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Full text of "News notes of California libraries"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant 



http://www.archive.org/details/newsnotesofcalif6971cali 



California State Library 
California History Section 




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NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 




I 



Ethel S. Crockett, 
State Librarian 

Nancy W. Percy, 
Executive Assistant 

Cy H. Silver, 
Cliief of Library 
Consultant Services 

Alfred J. Maupin, 

Chief of State Library 
Services 

Gerald D. Newton, 
Chief of Technical 
Services 

Muriel Hoppes, 
Law Librarian 

Richard H. Dillon, 
Sutro Librarian 



EDITOR: John W. Cully 

California State Library 
P.O. Box 2037 
Sacramento 95809 

Issued quarterly in the interest of the 
libraries of the State by the California 
State Library. 

Entered as second class matter Decem- 
ber 1913 of the post office at Sacra- 
mento, California, under the act of 
August 24, 1912. 

Accepted for mailing at the special rote 
of postage provided for in Section 
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, auth. 
August 27, 1918. 



Indexed in: Library & Information 
Science Abstracts, Library Literature. 



news notes 
of 

California 
libraries 



OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE 
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 

Statistics and Directory Issue 

CONTENTS 

Page 

California State Library Report 3 

California Libraries Annual Statistics 14 

California Library Systems 21 

Population, Income and Expenditures 26 

Collections, Hours of Service, Non-Resident Use .. 36 

Circulation 46 

Personnel and Working Conditions 56 

California State Library Pay Ranges 77 

California Public Library Salaries 78 

Bookmobile Service 87 

Films, Filmstrips, Slides and Microtext 90 

Sound Recordings 94 

County Low Libraries 98 

Friends of the Library Organizations 103 

Directory of California Libraries by Cities 109 

Index to Headquarters, Branches and Stations 211 

Index to Names of Libraries 218 

Directory of California Public Libraries and Library 

Systems 225 



Photoelectronic composition by 

CAUFORNIA OmCE OF STATE PMNTINC 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 3 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY REPORT, 1972-73 
ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY 

July 1, 1972-June 30, 1973 

Materials Added to Collection 

*Books and bound periodicals — volumes added 12,420 

Magazines — new titles (includes Blind materials) 161 

Newspapers — new titles 

Government publications 64,557 

Maps 4,196 

Books for the Blind and Physically Handicapped 3,655 

Microfilms — reels 1,922 

Union Catalog — new titles and editions 55,286 

Use of Materials 

Circulation of all materials except Blind material 218,201 

Circulation of materials for blind and physically 

handicapped 284,355 

Reference and reading aid transactions 360,115 

Bibliographies compiled and revised 390 

Photocopies made 127,602 

Photographs made 2,896 

Consultant Services 

Libraries visited by Library Consultant staff 107 

Total Library Consultant visits 484 

Visits of librarians, officials, etc., to LCS 47 

Law Library 

Law libraries visited by Law Librarian 14 

Total Resources, July 1, 1973 

Books and bound periodicals 839,765 

Magazines — current subscriptions (includes Blind 

material) 3,649 

Newspapers — current subscriptions 206 

Government publications 2,263,271 

Maps 77,655 

Books for the Blind and Physically Handicapped 98,601 

Films and filmstrips — titles 77 

Microfilms — reels 41,887 

* Includes all collections except Books for the Blind and Physically Handicapped and Government 
Publications. 



4 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

STATE LIBRARY SERVICES 

Administrative-Legislative Reference Section 

Workload: In 1972-73 there was an increase of 24% in requests from 
administrative agencies over the previous year, resulting in a change in 
the proportion of agency requests to legislative requests from 37% to 
over 50% of the total. 

Responsibility for interlibrary borrowing for state employees was 
transferred from the Reference Section and was assumed by the Li- 
brary Technical Assistant of ALR. A program of staff visits to depart- 
mental and special libraries resulted in increased mutual interlibrary 
cooperation. 

Most all of the professional and clerical positions were filled for the 
year. The addition of a temporary clerk to the staff and the discontinu- 
ance of the daily messenger service to the Capitol resulted in progress 
toward reducing backlogs which had occurred due to staff shortages. 

A new program for vertical file maintenance was instituted, enabling 
the staff to clear up the backlog and keep the file current. 

Publications: The Management Development Institute took over the 
reproduction of the ALR "What's New" series and the Cultural Differ- 
ences Bibliography from the Training Division of the State Personnel 
Board. 

Presentations: The Supervising Librarian participated in the Bay 
Area Reference Center Workshop on Politics and Government and the 
Symposium on Government Information Sources given for the Metro- 
politan Cooperative Library System in Glendale. Orientation and a tour 
of the State Library was conducted for the Assembly Interns. 

Books for the Blind and Physically Handicapped Section 

Legislation was the major interest of the year with the introduction 
of SB 281 by Senator Grunsky. This bill authorized a $238,000 appropria- 
tion to maintain an adequate staff and expand facilities for the Books 
for the Blind and Physically Handicapped Section. It was signed into 
law after the end of the fiscal year. 

The number of individual and institutional accounts reached 9,421, an 
increase of 19 percent for the year. Circulation of materials also in- 
creased, but because of the rapid increase of borrowers with no increase 
in staff, the number of books per borrower decreased to 2.5 per month. 
Personnel handling the shipment of containers were transferred from 
the Property and Shipping Section to BBPH. 

The collection increased by a net gain of 3,000 volumes and contain- 
ers after the annual weeding of the collection. Surplus copies of older 
materials were offered to the National Collections at the Library of 
Congress and to the other 50 regional libraries. Additions to the Braille 
collection included handcopied short stories from the Braille class spon- 
sored by the Sacramento Braille Transcribers. A collection of Braille 
piano music was donated to the library. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 5 

Training activities and opportunities for public relations and current 
awareness of progress and research in the field were provided by a class 
in Braille and attendance at conferences of the National Federation of 
the Blind, National Braille Association — CTEVH, American Association 
of Workers for the Blind, and special study institutes at the American 
Institute of Research, Lawrence Hall of Science, and California State 
University, San Francisco. The Supervising Librarian participated in a 
panel at a workshop at the California Library Association Conference 
in Anaheim, and spoke to the Associated Blind of California semi-annual 
conference, a Sacramento Braille Transcribers meeting, and a class at 
American River College. 

Visitors included Robert Bray, Chief of the Division for the Blind and 
Physically Handicapped, Library of Congress; James Hahn, Assistant 
Chief of Reader Services; and Ed Lewis, Assistant Chief of Field Serv- 
ices. 

The Supervising Librarian also attended the annual Western Re- 
gional Librarians Conference at the Utah Commission for the Blind, 
Salt Lake City, and visited the regional library at the Iowa Commission 
for the Blind in Des Moines, Iowa. 

California Section 

Workload: During 1972/73 the number of reference and information 
requests remained at the same level as the previous year, while requests 
for photoservice increased from 8,104 to 11,258. The increase in work- 
load was also reflected in clerical paging and shelving statistics. 

CoJJection: Major acquisitions of the year were speeches, a scrapbook, 
and other memorabilia of Will C. Wood, State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction from 1919 to 1926, and the papers of J. A. Mclntire (1844?- 
1931) relating to his efforts to reactivate and consolidate mining inter- 
ests in the Mother Lode. 

Proce55i>2^; Approximately 1,500 glass negatives, ca. 1880-1910, by San 
Francisco, Sacramento, Santa Cruz, and Monterey photographers were 
processed for the picture collection. 

Among the manuscript collections prepared for research use during 
the year were the Joseph B. Chaffee, DeWitt C. Thompson, George 
Kingsley, and George McKinstry papers from the Sutter's Fort Pioneer 
Collection. The processing librarian also completed the organization of 
the Annie E.K. (Mrs. John) Bidwell papers, 1842-1917, containing 
unusual material on the history of Rancho Chico, the temperance 
movement (including John Bidwell's candidacy for President on the 
Prohibition ticket), Indian education, and women suffrage. 

Meetings: Staff represented the Library at meetings of the California 
Heritage and Historical Convention, Santa Cruz; Special Libraries As- 
sociation, San Francisco; Western Association of Map Libraries, Sacra- 
mento; Conference of California Historical Societies, Northern 
Symposium, Bishop; Society of California Archivists, Bakersfield; South- 
ern California Symposium, Pasadena; California Historical Society, Sac- 
ramento; Society of California Archivists, Sacramento; San Diego 



6 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Congress of History; California History Foundations, Stockton; Baja Cal- 
ifornia Symposium, Corona del Mar; Conference of California Historical 
Societies, Sacramento. 

Staff attended the dedication and opening of the Federal Archives 
and Records Center, San Bruno; the Historic Preservation Conference, 
Davis; and the BARC workshop. Libraries as the Community Switch- 
board. 

Staff members spoke on the resources of the section at Santa Cruz 
and in Sacramento. 

The Supervising Librarian attended meetings of the California Herit- 
age Preservation Commission as the State Library's representative. 

Circulation Section 

The Circulation Section took an active part in gathering data used in 
a study conducted by a team from the Department of Finance, Audits 
Division. The study was a review of the Library's procedures and opera- 
tions. 

After many years, the pages of the Section enjoyed cool air in the 
stacks after the installation of air-conditioning units. 

The function of paging, shelving, and discharging films was trans- 
ferred from the Circulation Section to the Department of Health. 

Marlene E. Gaston was appointed Head of the Section. It was also a 
busy year in training of new staff, especially in the paging area. 

Government Publications Section 

Acquisitions: Preliminary screening was completed of three State 
departmental libraries containing large numbers of government publi- 
cations — the Department of Social Welfare Library, the State Personnel 
Board Library, and the State Office of Planning and Research Library. 
A program was begun to replace back files of periodicals with microfilm 
to save space. 

Reference: Local reference inquiries declined because of changes in 
service policies and the practice of making more referrals to the public 
library as appropriate. Use of technical reports on microfiche increased 
as more state agencies and libraries became aware of the collection. 

Library Distribution Act Program: In preparation for the implemen- 
tation of changes in LDA procedures recommended as the result of a 
study by the Department of General Services, five meetings were held 
for agency publications representatives. Several applications from pub- 
lic libraries for depository status were reviewed and approved. 

U.S. Regional Depository Program: The principal activities of the 
Section as a U.S. regional depository were providing information and 
interlibrary loan service and assisting other depositories to dispose of 
their no-longer-wanted U.S. government publications. 

Training: Members of the staff attended courses on supervision and 
workshops on politics and legislation, the U.S. Census, alternative forms 
of communication, the library as a community resource center, and law 
for laymen. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 7 

Reference Section 

The Public Health and Mental Hygiene film collections were trans- 
ferred to the new California State Department of Health. Reference 
Section retains films on libraries and library use. 

The Section sent out new instructions for libraries on how to submit 
interlibrary loan requests. These helped standardize the requests and 
the faster handling — with additional staff — brought author-title loan 
service to current standing. 

Reference Section took over the operation of the Periodicals Reading 
Room and the collection of newspapers on microfilm. 

Subject requests increased by 20%. 

CSLSI (California State Library Service to Industry) 

Incoming author-title and subject requests received continued to 
increase in number. Special libraries made a greater use of this service 
to industry. 

CSLSI is cooperating with the U.S. Forest Service Library at Berke- 
ley, and with city and county public libraries in the counties with forest 
product industries, on a new project (Calfornet) to provide specialized 
information and materials to people in these industries. 

Staff members attended various workshops sponsored by the Special 
Libraries Association, the Library Institute Planning Committee, and 
BARC, on census materials, government documents, acquisition of spe- 
cial materials such as films, and on law reference. 

Sutro Library 

Interesting readers, researchers and loans continued to have their 
place at the Sutro Branch of the State Library during 1972-73, but 
another activity grew markedly in strength. This was in the area of 
exhibits. Sutro Library has always placed a high value on displays as an 
educational or cultural device, and during the year it added more dis- 
play cases in order to carry on a better program. It also set up insurance 
protection, for the first time, in order to encourage visiting or "guest" 
shows which could alternate with exhibits of our own material. 

Since Sutro Library is the host institution in San Francisco for two of 
the country's major touring exhibits of fine printing and design, it dis- 
played the Southern Books and Western Books shows during the year. 
The Branch also continued a long-standing policy of lending rare 
material (under proper precautions) to other institutions; in this case, 
some Aldines were sent to an Aldus Manutius show at Stanford Univer- 
sity Library in March, 1973. 

But the heart of the exhibit program for the year was a series of four 
major displays. The first was a showing of old and rare law books from 
Sutro's stacks for the annual American Bar Association meeting in San 
Francisco in August, 1972. At the turn of the year, the Peter Pauper 
Press exhibit attracted national attention. We displayed the collection 
of Joan Bennett Shaw of Santa Fe (the best in private hands), then 
acquired it by purchase and made it into what is probably the best 



8 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

collection in the country when Edna Beilenson, Peter Pauper Press 
publisher, presented us with the volumes we lacked in order to make 
it near-perfect. 

March saw an interesting display of color enlargements by photogra- 
pher Larry Bishop, of the University of San Francisco School of Educa- 
tion, titled "Vagabond Camera." It won very good public relations and 
press coverage. 

The major exhibit of the year was a one-man show, of sorts, a look at 
the late Maynard Dixon's work. The great Western artist's sketches, 
paintings, mural cartoons, poems, letters, artifacts, etc., made a splendid 
display which attracted much praise. The greater part of the exhibit was 
the loan by artist Edith Hamlin, Dixon's widow, of her own collection 
of Dixoniana. 

TECHNICAL SERVICES BUREAU 

In order to provide a more effective organizational structure, the 
Bureau was reorganized into five sections. The span of control was 
diminished by transferring several units to the newly appointed Execu- 
tive Assistant to the State Librarian. The reorganized table of organiza- 
tion for the Bureau became: (1) Union Catalog; (2) Automation 
Project; (3) Processing Center; (4) State Library Acquisitions Section; 
and (5) State Library Cataloging Section. 

Union Catalog 

It was determined in December, 1973, that conversion to a machine- 
readable data base was one of the State Library's highest priorities. The 
staff prepared a request for bid proposal for an implementation plan. 
The plan is to be completed, and implementation started, in 1974. The 
result of this project will be an automated union catalog. 

In addition, the manual filing operation was greatly accelerated. The 
section received 350,250 cards including 65,758 withdrawals from its 82 
member libraries. During the fiscal year the section filed 706,487 cards 
(an increase of 294,625) , and pulled 68,888 withdrawals (an increase of 
30,998) . A total of 55,286 new titles or editions were added to the main 
file. The total count of entries in the Union Catalog is 2,142,710. 

Automation Project 

The following two projects were initiated: (1) Union List of Periodi- 
cals, (2) Union Catalog of Books. 

The Union List of Periodicals Project was begun in January, 1973. The 
first edition of the list will be produced in 1974, and it will contain the 
holdings of approximately 200 libraries. 

The staff participated in the Implementation Plan RFP noted above. 

For testing and training purposes, the Project staff installed computer 
software to create and maintain a data base for monographs. From this 
system was produced a book catalog of the recent works in science and 
technology in the State Library's collection. This catalog was distribut- 
ed to all Library Distribution Act libraries. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 9 

Processing Center 

Several improvements to the Center were made this year. The physi- 
cal plant was reorganized to facilitate production flow; the evening shift 
was expanded to full-time; the processing sequence and procedures 
were improved to provide faster and higher quality processing. The 
cumbersome Library of Congress proof slip files were replaced by a 
microfiche data service, releasing one FTE from the job of sorting and 
filing proof slips and adding this support to improve the searching 
operation. Two microfiche readers and two reader-printers were added 
to support the microfiche data service. Prices were increased to place 
the Center on a more sound fiscal basis. 

The Processing Center processed and shipped 102,797 volumes for 51 
member libraries during the fiscal year 1972/73. The Center also repro- 
duced and finished 97,093 card sets for Sacramento City-County Library 
and 345 card sets for Lassen County Library. 

State Library Acquisitions Section 

The staff continued to assist the Automation Project staff in data 
collection for the Union List of Periodicals. Assistance was also provided 
to the Cataloging Section's "Fastcat" project to brieflist all backlogged 
materials. 

As part of reorganization throughout the entire Library, the Periodi- 
cals Reading Room unit was transferred to the Reference Section. 

The collection development policy underwent an important change. 
Emphasis was shifted from "backup to all public libraries" to specializa- 
tion in those materials needed by legislative offices and state agencies. 

A total of 8,600 monographs was acquired by gift and purchase. This 
was an increase of 100 items over the previous year. 

A major review of the periodicals collection was made by the profes- 
sional staff of the Reader Services Bureau. As a result of this activity, 239 
subscriptions were discontinued. One hundred sixty-six new periodical 
titles were added to the collection, and 80 continuations were acquired. 

State Library Cataloging Section 

In order to improve filing operations, a File Maintenance Unit was 
established. A Fastcat (brieflisting) program was established in order 
to make all backlogged materials available for public use. 

A systems analysis of the operation was begun. It is estimated that this 
study will be completed in the 1973/74 fiscal year. From this, several 
improvements are anticipated. 

During the fiscal year the Section processed 6,628 new titles (an 
increase of 1,000 over last year) . Titles recataloged amounted to 314. 
Added volumes /copies amounted to 1,296. Withdrawals amounted to 
93. 

The Section reproduced 15,869 card sets including titles cataloged or 
analyzed by the Cataloging Section, California Section, Government 
Publications Section, and Administrative-Legislative Reference Sec- 
tion. The Section filed 111,088 cards into several files. 



10 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

LAW LIBRARY 

The legal community continued to make heavy use of the Law Li- 
brary's unique collection of statutes, codes and court reports from Cali- 
fornia, other states, and many foreign countries. Among other activities 
the professional staff handled 14,276 book requests, 4,583 verbal inqui- 
ries, and 3,784 telephone inquiries. 

An annotated bibliography, "Why aren't there more law books in 
your library?", was issued as part of a program of helping public librar- 
ies improve their own legal reference service. "Specialization and the 
legal paraprofessional" and "Condominiums: financial and legal as- 
pects" are the titles of two additional bibliographies issued. The latter 
has proved extremely popular and is in its third printing. Research in 
legislative intent was aided by publication of a union list of California 
legislative hearing transcripts held in California law libraries. 

The Law Librarian surveyed the Butte County Law Library and 
prepared a plan for arranging it in its new quarters. He gave a legal 
reference demonstration-lecture at the Serra System annual meeting in 
San Diego, held workshops for Department of Corrections librarians 
and for researchers from the Democratic Caucus, and paid consultant 
visits to ten law libraries. 

The principal area of change was in service to prisons when the 
Department of Corrections installed law libraries in its prisons. The 
State Law Library helped in this in two ways. One was to provide 
training for the library personnel from the prison libraries. The other 
was to enter into a contract with the Department of Corrections to 
provide required backup service. 

The collection now stands at 153,493 volumes. 

LIBRARY CONSULTANT SERVICES 

The improvement of the quality of local library service continued to 
be the Consultants' chief goal. They concentrated on helping individual 
libraries achieve professional standards through strengthening adminis- 
trative structure, developing collections, improving physical facilities, 
expanding the knowledge and skills of staff members, trustees and 
Friends, and better informing the public and governing officials at all 
levels on the role and importance of good library services. 

Consultants reviewed and evaluated grant project requests, made 
field visits for meetings and individual conferences and for direct obser- 
vation of individual libraries and systems. Much activity continued to 
relate to federal and State aid programs to libraries involved in coopera- 
tive systems, reference centers, information and interlibrary lending 
networks, and outreach or enrichment projects of many types. 

Librarians throughout the state were saddened by the death on 
March 7, 1973, of Margaret J. Ward of the Consultant staff. 

Ruby O. Woods left Consultant Services to take a position outside the 
state, and in the last month of the fiscal year Collin Clark was trans- 
ferred from the Lake County Demonstration Project back to consultant 
work in Sacramento. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 11 

Statistically, the Consultants made 484 visits to 107 public, special and 
state institutional libraries. One special study was completed during the 
year: Solano County Library Task Force Report, February 1973, M. 
Virginia Hughes, Chairman. There were 47 visits made to LCS offices 
by librarians, library governing officials, and others. 

Federal and State Programs 

Federal: This ninth year of the Library Services and Construction Act 
was one of uncertainty about continued funding and the impoundment 
of funds already appropriated. California's total allotment after im- 
poundment was reduced to $2,081,346 for LSCA Title I and $99,034 for 
Title III. Title II for library construction was not funded at all this year. 

Available Title I funds were granted to those demonstration pro- 
grams contributing to total library service and public library develop- 
ment. Reference services continued to have high priority under the 
State Plan, and reference grants were made to 18 systems. Also under 
the State Plan, funding was continued for 23 ongoing projects; no new 
outreach proposals were approved because of the reduction in funds. 
Five state institutional service programs were continued and three 
grants were made to public library systems for projects serving the 
physically handicapped. 

Funds for the State Library's demonstration library projects were 
continued, and Title I funds were also utilized by the State Library for 
its automation project and for acquisition of research materials. The 
State Library offered a minority recruitment training program to li- 
brary systems formed under the Public Library Services Act. Grants 
were made available to systems to assist minority students in either a 
graduate library degree program or a library technical assistant pro- 
gram. Individual graduate library study grants were also made. 

LSCA Title III funds for interlibrary cooperation were increased 
slightly in 1973 over 1972. Five continuing projects of public libraries 
working cooperatively with school, college and special libraries were 
funded, and four new grants were made. 

State: State Public Library Services Act assistance was continued at 
$800,000 for the year, aiding 138 public libraries within 21 library sys- 
tems. System membership continued to grow with the addition of Inyo 
County Library to the Inland System; El Segundo Public Library to the 
Metropolitan System; Nevada County Library to the Mountain- Valley 
System; and Anaheim Public Library and Orange Public Library to the 
Santiago System. Grants were also made for consolidation of Riverside 
City and County Library with Coachella Public Library; Nevada 
County Library with Grass Valley Public Library and Nevada City 
Public Library; Yuba County Library with Marysville Public Library; 
Butte County Library with Oroville Public Library; and Humboldt 
County Library with Eureka Public Library. 

State appropriations for PLSA programs have not grown in propor- 
tion to the number of libraries joining systems, or the increased popula- 
tion to be served in many areas. It has been necessary, therefore, for 



12 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

some systems to curtail services to the public. The Governor's budget 
for 1973-74 increases PLSA support to $1,000,000. It also directs the State 
Librarian to develop a new formula for funding for subsequent years. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 13 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 
ANNUAL STATISTICS 



14 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES ANNUAL STATISTICS 

California library law specifies that the State Librarian shall "collect 
and preserve statistics and other information pertaining to libraries, 
which shall be available to other libraries within the State applying for 
the information." 

Such statistics are supplied, in tabular form, in the pages immediately 
following. Permanent files of the annual reports from which the statis- 
tics are compiled are maintained in the State Library's Consultant Serv- 
ices Bureau. 

Definitions 

A single library system includes the central library and other outlets of 
one jurisdiction, together with all its affiliated libraries and their outlets, 
and any library service points operated by the jurisdiction, by contract, 
to serve another jurisdiction or jurisdictions. Other definitions o{ library 
system, as they legally apply to the implementation of the Public Li- 
brary Services Act of 1963, are given in Education Code Division 20, 
Chapter 1.5, Article 5, Section 27125. 

The term public library includes city, county, and district libraries 
which have been legally established by public officials, are supported 
by income from taxation or other public funds, and have their own 
trustee or other civil governing body. 

An outlet is any service point, such as a central library, affiliated 
library, branch, station, or bookmobile station that, as an integral part 
of the public library system, distributes books or otherwise renders 
library service to the public. 

An affiliated public library is a regularly established city or district 
library which has joined the county library for supplementary service. 
The city or district library retains its own trustees or other governing 
body, and the city makes an appropriation for this local public library 
in addition to paying the county library tax. 

A branch (according to California Public Library Service Standards) 
is a basic library unit operating as part of a library system and with its 
services available to the public some part of five days a week. It is 
located in quarters with floor area of not less than 1,400 square feet, 
housing a general collection of at least 7,000 volumes. It has a staff 
equivalent to at least one professional and one non-professional em- 
ployee on duty during time the branch is open to the public. 

A station is a library unit smaller than a branch and operating as part 
of a library system. A branch housed in a school but giving service to 
the whole community is counted as a community agency; a school 
agency affiliated for school service, as a school agency. 

Circulation represents statistics kept of actual count according to an 
established system. Total circulation of book materials is the count of 
one for each bound volume, pamphlet, or periodical lent for home use, 
from the central library and its agencies, and the count of each renewal. 
A county library also includes the circulation of county library books 
from all its agencies, including affiliated libraries, which do not include 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 15 

such count in their own annual report totals. 

The collection and circulation of nonbook materials is counted sepa- 
rately from that of book materials. The unit count of all types of sound 
recording is by album, of films, by title. Circulation of all such miscella- 
neous materials is one for each unit lent. For example, the count of 
recordings is by album, regardless of record speed or numbers of titles 
on a recording. The count of films is by title, and circulation is equiva- 
lent to the number of times a film title is in use for showings, regardless 
of the number of persons in the audience for such showing. 

Interlibrary loans axe loans between libraries which do not form part 
of a system. (Such intrasystem loans are included under Shipments.) 
Circulation by the borrowing library of a book borrowed on interlibrary 
loan is included in circulation; the interlibrary loan itself is not. 

A shipment from the central library is a group of items sent to one 
outlet at one time. 

The count of employees is by FTE and by total number. Professional 
employees are defined as those who are college or university and li- 
brary school graduates, and those who attained professional status 
through library experience and /or examination. They perform work of 
professional grade which requires training and skill in the theoretical 
or scientific parts of library work (as distinguished from its merely 
mechanical parts) . If paid from the library budget, janitors and building 
force are included in the total count of employees. 

Operating expenses axe divided into three major categories: Salaries, 
library materials, service and supplies. The last contains a sub-category, 
payment of funds for contract services and system membership. 

Capital expenses include only such major outlay items as buildings, 
sites, additions, remodeling and major repairs, and new furniture and 
equipment purchased for new or enlarged buildings. Expenditures for 
replacement furniture and equipment, and for mobile equipment, are 
listed under operating expenses, as are also books and other library 
materials. 



16 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

NUMBER OF LIBRARIES BY TYPE 

1,120 California libraries are listed in the directory for the year 1972- 
73, as follows: 

Public Jibrahe»— 185 (with 3,563 outlets) 
1 state library 
52 county libraries f 
8 library district libraries (Altadena, Beaumont, Buena Park, i 
Palos Verdes, Palo Verde Valley, Placentia, Upper Lake, Yorba Linda) 
5 union high school district libraries (Banning, Coalinga, Dixon, 
Santa Paula, Vacaville) 

119 municipal libraries 
Law libraries — 106 

58 county law libraries 
48 institutional and academic law libraries 
University, College, and Other Institutions of Higher Education 
Libraries — 203 

203 university, two- and four-year college, technological, theologi- 
cal and professional school libraries, including 9 campuses of the Uni- 
versity of California and 19 State University and State College libraries 
Special Libraries — 625 

574 institution, association, and business libraries 
51 armed forces installation libraries 



t All counties received library service, 1972-73. Not included in the above count are San Francisco 
County, coterminous with San Francisco City and served by the San Francisco Public Library, and 
Santa Barbara County, in which library service is given by the Santa Barbara Public Library to 
Supervisorial Districts 1-3; by the Lompoc Public Library to S.D. 4; and by the Santa Maria Public 
Library to S.D. 5. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 17 

CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES STATISTICAL SUMMARY, 1972-73 



Item 



Public 
libraries 



State 
library 



Total 



Per capita ° 



Number of libraries reporting 

Outlets (central library, branches and sta- 
tions) 

Total volumes 

Circulation — book materials 

Circulation — nonbook materials 

Total income (excluding subventions)" 

Total operating expenditures (excluding sub- 
ventions) 

Spent for salaries 

Spent for library materials'* 

Capital outlay 



182 

3,563 

37,881,256 

106,949,895 

3,744,380 

3124,945,946 

8121,867,407 

278,077,087 

gl7,664,743 

39,082,162 



1 

2 

839,865 

hl98,078 

284,355 

31,976,774 

3445,441 

31,306,603 

3224,730 



183 

3,565 

38,721,121 

107,147,973 

4,028,735 

3126,922,720 

3122,312,848 

379,383,690 

317,889,473 

39,082,162 



1.88 

5.22 

0.19 

36.18 

35.95 
33.86 
30.87 
30.44 



* Per capita figures are based on California State Department of Finance, Population Research Unit estimate 
of total state population, 20,524,000 on July 1, 1972, the beginning of the 1972-73 fiscal year. 

b Includes all collections except Books for the Blind and Physically Handicapped and Government Publications. 

" Breakdown of income from taxation is no longer separately tabulated. Taxation income is the primary source 
of total income. 

^ Includes books, periodicals, and audiovisual materials. 

FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDS SUMMARY, 1972-73 



Federal funds total e 32,180,380 

State (subvention) funds f 3800,000 

Federal funds for construction 30.00 

" Federal funds granted to public libraries, and to State Library for administration. Total includes Title I, 

32,081,346; Title II, 30.00; Title III, 399,034. 
' State funds granted to public libraries. 
K Federal funds granted to public libraries. Total is included in total federal funds, above, 36,779,978. 



2—85403 



18 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES ARRANGED BY COUNTY 
Based on 1 972-73 Annual Reports 



County 


Independent municipal or 

library district libraries 

(115) 


Municipal or district 

libraries contracting 

with county libraries 

(19) 


Counties contracting with other counties for 
library service: 






Lake (Napa) (LSCA Title I demonstration 


Lakeport 

Upper Lake Lib. Dist. 





















Counties contracting with cities for county 
library service: 

Del Norte (Crescent City) 




(Municipal or district library 
providimg library service to 
county by contract) 

Crescent City 

Orland 


Glenn (Orland, Willows) - 






Banning USD Lib. Dist. 

Beaumont Lib. Dist. 

Corona 

Hemet 

Palm Springs 

Palo Verde Valley Lib. Dist. 


Willows 








Lodi 
Watsonville 




Santa Barbara (Supervisorial Dist. 4 served 
by Lompoc; S.D. 1, 2, 3 served by Santa 
Barbara City; S.D. 5 served by Santa 
Maria) 

Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz City) 


Lompoc 
Santa Barbara 
Santa Maria 

Santa Cruz 


Counties maintaining county library service: 


Alameda 

Berkeley 

Hayward 

Livermore 

Oakland 

San Leandro 


(Municipal or district library 
contracting with county 
library fo- additional serv- 
ice) 






Butte . . 


Chico 
















Richmond 




El Dorado 






Coalinga USD Lib. Dist. 

Eureka 

Brawley 
El Centro 














Imperial 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 19 

CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES ARRANGED BY COUNTY— Continued 
Based on 1972-1973 Annual Reports 







Municipal or district 




Independent municipal or 


libraries contracting 


County 


library district libraries 


with county libraries 




(115) 


(19) 


Inyo -- 






Kern 






Kings ^ 


Hanford 




Lassen - 






Los Angeles .. .. 


Alhambra 






Altadena Lib. Dist. 






Arcadia 






Azusa 






Beverly Hills 






Burbank 






Cornmerce 






Covina 






Downey 






El Segundo 






Glendale 






Glendora 






Industry 






Inglewood 






Irwindale 






Long Beach 






Los Angeles 






Monrovia 






Monterey Park 






Palos Verdes Lib. Dist. 






Pasadena 






Pomona 






Redondo Beach 






San Marino 






Santa Fe Springs 






Santa Monica 






Sierra Madre 






Signal Hill 






South Pasadena 






Torrance 






Vernon 






Whittier 




Madera 






Marin - 


Larkspur 






Alill Valley 






San Anselmo 






San Rafael 






Sausalito 




Mendocino . 


WiUits 




Merced 




Modoc 






Mono 






Monterey 


Monterey 


Carmel 




Pacific Grove 


King City 




Salinas 




Napa (City-County) 


Calistoga 






St. Helena 




Nevada 






Orange 


Anaheim 






Buena Park Lib. Dist. 






FuUerton 






Huntington Beach 






Newport Beach 






Orange 






Placentia Lib. Dist. 






Santa Ana 






Yorba Linda Lib. Dist. 





20 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES ARRANGED BY COUNTY— Continued 
Based on 1972-1973 Annual Reports 



County 


Independent municipal or 

library district libraries 

(US) 


Municipal or district 

libraries contracting 

with county libraries 

(19) 




Lincoln 
Roseville 












San Juan Bautista 
Colton 




Ontario 

Redlands 

San Bernardino 

Upland 

Carlsbad 
Chula Vista 
Coronado 
Escondido 
National City 
Oceanside 
San Diego 

San Francisco 

Paso Robles 

Burlingame 
Daly City 
Menlo Park 
Redwood City 
San Bruno 
San Mateo 
South San Francisco 

Los Gatos 
Mountain View 
Palo Alto 
San Jose 
Santa Clara 
Sunnyvale 


































Benicia 

Dixon USD Lib. Dist. 

Vacaville USD Lib. Dist. 

Vallejo 

Healdsburg 
Petaluma 












Sutter - 










Corning 








Tulare - 


Porterville 
Tulare 

Visalia 










Oxnard 

Santa Paula UHS Lib. Dist. 

Woodland 




Yolo -_ 


















Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



21 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY SYSTEMS ESTABLISHED UNDER 
THE PUBLIC LIBRARY SERVICES ACT* 



Name of System 


Date of 
Establish- 
ment 


Total 
Popula- 
tion 
Served 
7/1/72 


PLSA 
Grants, 
1972-73 


Total 
Volumes, 
1972-73 


New- 
Titles 

Added 
in 

1972-73 


Number 
of 

Per. 

Subs. 
1972-73 


BERKELEY-OAKLAND 
SERVICE SYSTEM 


1/14/69 


478,277 


515,948 


1,086,500 


23,499 


1,150 


BLACK GOLD COOPERATIVE 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


7/ 1/64 


670,118 


19,683 


1,011,888 


14,570 


700 


CAAIINO REAL 

LIBRARY SYSTEM 


1/11/65 


629,026 


18,889 


940,610 


28,558 


1,457 


EAST BAY COOPERATIVE 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


1964 


937,655 


26,393 


1,600,688 


11,258 


1,974 


49-99 COOPERATIVE 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


3/15/67 


533,154 


16,684 


1,197,866 


31,374 


1,011 


INLAND 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


12/29/66 


1,073,011 


71,880 


2,096,812 


15,000 


702 


KERN COUNTY 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


12/29/65 


330,234 


11,240 


566,691 


8,309 


711 


LONG BEACH PUBLIC 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


12/27/65 


358,882 


10,681 


591,143 


8,036 


914 


LOS ANGELES COUNTY 
PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM 


1964/65 


2,413,010 


91,438 


3,613,872 


16,009 


1,838 


LOS ANGELES PUBLIC 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


1963/64 


2,809,813 


91,997 


4,106,297 


33,417 


6,583 


METROPOLITAN COOPERATIVE 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


6/66 


1,243,845 


59,101 


3,327,850 


132,859 


8,933 


MONTEREY BAY AREA 
COOPERATIVE LIBRARY 

SYSTEM 


1/14/69 


344,938 


11,004 


754,791 


19,609 


726 


MOUNTAIN-VALLEY 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


1/14/69 


960,944 


96,047 


1,437,799 


10,401 


1,291 


NORTH BAY COOPERATIVE 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


5/13/64 


648,889 


32,095 


1,292,657 


14,052 


3,825 


NORTH STATE COOPERATIVE 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


1/14/69 


401,150 


52,652 


1,043,393 


42,207 


522 


PENINSULA 

LIBRARY SYSTEM 


2/13/70 


474,376 


11,888 


1,186,561 


39,146 


2,802 


SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


1964/65 


715,674 


18,272 


1,397,763 


17,236 


6,694 


SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


7/64 


669,803 


27,276 


1,268,873 


14,464 


865 


SANTA CLARA VALLEY 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


7/64 


358,336 


10,181 


966,183 


12,797 


784 


SANTIAGO 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


12/29/66 


1,356,933 


57,544 


2,077,676 


20,803 


915 


SERRA 
LIBRARY SYSTEM 


2/ 5/64 


1,404,591 


49,107 


2,318,098 


16,034 


2,212 



* Data for fiscal year ending June 30, 1973. 



22 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEMS GROUPED BY 
POPULATION OF AREA TAXED AND SERVED 

Grouping of public libraries on the basis of population served follows 
to some extent the classification of libraries employed in the Public 
Library Inquiry and specifications in the Public Library Service Stand- 
ards for California. 

This listing of all public libraries runs together county, district, and 
municipal Ubraries within the five groups of population they serve. 

It should be noted, therefore, that the statistics for an individual 
hbrary affiliated with a larger Hbrary will appear only under the larger 
population group of the entire library system (i.e., the total population 
served by all affiHated municipal or district libraries, or such as two 
county libraries) . 

Since population figures are for area taxed and served, the population 
listed for a county library does not include population of cities or dis- 
tricts (in that county) operating independent and unaffliated public 
libraries. Population figures of affiliated libraries are, therefore, listed 
in parentheses to indicate that they have been included in the popula- 
tion figure for the larger service unit or library system. 

The basic population figure, that for the fiscal year of report, for each 
Hbrary jurisdiction is based on the 1970 U.S. Census, a special census 
taken by the U.S. Department of Commerce, or an estimate prepared 
by the Department of Finance of the State of California, whichever was 
most recent at the close of the preceding fiscal year. 

The grouping of libraries on the basis of population served and the 
treatment of populations served by libraries affiliated with county li- 
braries does not apply to cooperative library systems estabHshed under 
the California Public Library Services Act of 1963 and to the member 
libraries of those systems. For present reporting purposes, public librar- 
ies which are now members of cooperative Hbrary systems are stiU 
grouped as they have been in past years, on the basis of the population 
served within the local taxing area. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



23 



DISTRIBUTION OF CALIFORNIA MUNICIPAL AND DISTRICT LIBRARIES 
BY POPULATION, 1972-73 



10,000 or less 


10,001 to 25,000 


25,001 to 50,000 


50,001 to 100,000 


Over 100,000 


(24) 


(36) 


(26) 


(29) 


(18) 


Benicia 


Banning USD 


Altadena Lib. Dist. 


-Alameda 


Anaheim 


Calistoga 


Beaumont Lib. 


Arcadia 


Alhambra 


Berkeley 


Carmel* 


Dist. 


Azusa 


Buena Park Lib. 


Glendale 


Corning* 


Brawley 


Beverly Hills 


Dist. 


Huntington Beach 


Dixon USD 


Calexico* 


Burlingame 


Burbank 


Long Beach 


Etna* 


Carlsbad 


Corona 


Chula Vista 


Los Angeles 


Ferndale* 


Chico 


Covin a 


Daly City 


Oakland 


Healdsburg 


Coalinga UHSD 


Escondido 


Downey 


Pasadena 


Imperial* 


Colton* 


Glendora 


Fullerton 


Riverside* 


Industry 


Commerce 


Livermore 


Hayward 


Sacramento 


Irwindale 


Coronado 


Lodi 


Inglewood 


San Bernardino 


King City* 


Crescent City 


Lompoc 


Mountain View 


San Diego 


Lakeport 


El Centro 


Menlo Park 


Ontario 


San Francisco 


Lincoln 


El Segundo 


Monrovia 


Orange 


San Jose 


Orland* 


Hanford 


Monterey 


Oxnard 


Santa Ana 


Paso Robles 


Hemet 


Monterey Park 


Palo Alto 


Santa Barbaia 


St. Helena 


Larkspur 


National City 


Palos \'eides Lib. 


Stockton* 


San Juan Bautista* 


Los Gates 


Newport Beach 


Dist. 


Torrance 


Sausalito 


Mill Valley 


Oceanside 


Pomona 




Signal Hill 


Pacific Grove 


Redlands 


Redondo Beach 




Upper Lake Lib. 


Palm Springs 


San Bruno 


Redwood City 




Dist. 


Palo Verde Valley 


San Rafael 


Richmond 




Vernon 


Dist. 


Santa Cruz* 


Salinas 




Willits 


Petaluma 


South San Fran- 


San Leandro 




Willows* 


Placentia Lib. 


cisco 


San Mateo 






Dist. 


Upland 


Santa Clara 






Porterville 


Visalia 


Santa Maria 






Roseville 




Santa Monica 






San Anselmo 




Sunnyvale 






San Marino 




Vallejo 






Santa Fe Springs 




Whittier 






Santa Paula USD 










Sierra Madre 










South Pasadena 










Tulare 




, 






VacaviUe USD 










Watsonville 










Woodland 










Yorba Linda Lib. 










Dist. 









* Affiliated with county library. 



CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEMS CLASSIFIED 

BY POPULATION SERVED 

Summary of Tabulations, 1972-73 





Population group 


Total 
library 
systems 


Type of independent 
public library 


Type of affiliated 
public library 


Total 
public 
libraries 


Munici- 
pal 


County 


District 


Munici- 
pal 


County 


District 


43 
38 
41 
45 
18 


Serving over 100,000 

Serving 50,001 to 100,000... 

Serving 25,001 to 50,000 

Serving 10,001 to 25,000 

Serving under 10,000 


36 
37 
35 
42 
19 


18 
26 
25 
27 
13 


18 
9 
9 
8 
4 


1 
7 
2 


3 
3 
2 
1 
2 


4 

"i 


-- 


185 




169 


109 


48 


12 


11 


5 






The above chart is based on statistical tables I-A through V-C and differs from the arrangement of libraries on 
the chart, California Public Libraries Arranged by County. 

The count of 169 systems equals the count of independent libraries (through which 16 other libraries are served, 
through affiliation). The count of 185 public libraries equals 169 independent libraries plus 16 affiliated 
libraries. For purposes of the chart above, the two counties served by contract with other counties are counted 
as affiliated county libraries (Mariposa and Sierra), as are similarly three of the counties served by contract 
by city libraries (Riverside, San Joaquin, and Santa Cruz). The county and city libraries giving service 
(Merced and Plumas Counties; Riverside, Stockton, and Santa Cruz cities) are included above as independent 
libraries. 

The three city libraries which give service to Santa Barbara County are treated as independent libraries and 
included above in the population groups (including county area served) in which they are listed on the sta- 
tistical charts. 

Changes in library organization subsequent to the close of fiscal year 1972-73 are not shown in the above chart. 



24 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES CLASSIFIED BY NUMBER 
OF VOLUMES— 1972-73 



Total volumes 


Number of libraries reporting 


1,000,000-4,161,905 . . . 


4 


600,000-999,999 


10 


300,000-599,999 


13 




Total 27 or IS .6% 


100,000-299,999 


55 




Total 55 or 31.8% 


50,000-99,999 


48 




Total 48 or 27.7% 


30,000-49,999. 


24 


20,000-29,999... 


5 




Total 29 or 16.8% 


10,000-19,999 


11 




Total ....: 11 or 6.4% 


5,000-9,999 


1 


975-4,999 


2 




Total 3 or 1.7% 




173 







CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES CLASSIFIED BY OPERATING 
EXPENDITURES— 1 972-73 



Expenditures 
(Exclusive of capital outlay) 


Number of libraries reporting 


Over 52,000,000.... 


14 


31,000,000-1,999,999 


12 




Total 26orl4.7% 


3500,000-999,999 


23 


300,000-499,999 


23 


200,000-299,999 


• 25 


100,000-199,999 . 


28 




Total 99 or 56.3% 


375,000-99,999 


13 


50,000-74,999 


12 




Total 25 or 14.2% 


340,000-49,999 


8 


30,000-39,999 


3 


20,000-29,999 


6 


10,000-19,999 


5 




Total 22 or 12.5% 


35,000-9,999 


1 


1,000-4,999 


3 




Total 4 or 2.3% 




176 







I 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



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26 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



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29 



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35 



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Ferndale (see Table Il-lOa) 

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9 MODOC CO 

10 MONO CO 

Orland (see Table IV-14a) 

11 PASO ROBLES-.. 

12 SAINT HELENA. 

San Juan Bautista 

(see Table IV-31a) 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



45 



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Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 75 

CLASS TITLES 

In the attempt to use a fairly uniform terminology for professional 
library classes, we define class titles in common use in terms of the 
following general duty statements that suggest the various levels of 
personnel classification: 

Professional Employee — An employee in a position which requires col- 
lege or university education and library school graduation, and per- 
formance of work of a grade which necessitates training and skill in 
the theoretical or scientific parts of library work (as distinguished 
from its mechanical parts) . Applies to all classes in this list. 

Assistant Librarian — ^Professional employee who coordinates the work 
of section supervisors or principal librarians, assuming a major por- 
tion of planning and policy-making for the library as a whole. 

Branch Librarian — ^Professional employee in charge of an auxiliary li- 
brary agency which has separate quarters, a permanent staff, a regu- 
lar schedule and a permanent basic collection of Ubrary materials. 

Chief Librarian — ^Librari^n who assumes responsibility for operation of 
the entire library, integrating its work with that of other city or 
county departments, university or college departments, or other ma- 
jor parts of the larger organization; makes final decisions on policies, 
plans and programs. 

Department Head — ^Professional employee who plans, organizes and 
directs the work of the staff of a major section or department of the 
library, reviews work and passes on difficult problems, and does high- 
ly skilled professional work. 

Junior Librarian (Librarian I) — ^Beginning professional position, re- 
quiring a college or university education, plus a degree from an 
accredited library school. This is the trainee grade, for which no 
professional experience is required. 

Principal Librarian — Professional employee who plans, organizes and 
directs the work of several sections or departments or a particular 
kind of work (e.g. children's work) in the library system; makes 
recommendations on policy organization and procedures; develops 
programs of service. 

Senior Librarian (Librarian II) — ^Professional employee doing varied 
and difficult professional Ubrary work under general supervision; 
may also be responsible for a subordinate function, and exercise su- 
pervisory responsibility over a small staff" or act as assistant supervisor 
of a large staff. 

i Nonprofessional Employee — ^Employee in a position the duties of 
which are of a mechanical and /or routine nature, not requiring pro- 
fessional library education. 



76 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

INDEX TO COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL LIBRARY SALARY TABLES 



Library- 



Table 



Library 



A. K. Smiley (Redlands) 

Alameda 

Alameda County 

Alhambra 

Alpine County 

Altadena 

Amador County 

Anaheim 

Arradia . 

Auburn-Placer County 

Azusa 

Banning 

Beaumont 

Benicia 

Berkeley 

Beverly Hills.. 

Brawley 

Bruggemeyer Memorial (Monterey Park) 

Buena Park 

Burbank 

Burlingame 

Butte County 

Calaveras County 

Calexico 

Calistoga 

Carlsbad - 

Carmel (Harrison Memorial) 

Chico 

Chula Vista 

Coalinga 

Col to n 

Colusa County 

Commerce 

Contra Costa County 

Corning 

Corona 

Coronado 

Covina 

Crescent City 

Daly City - 

Dixon 

Downey 

El Centre 

El Dorado County - 

El Segundo -- 

Escondido 

Etna 

Eureka-Humboldt County — 

Ferndale 

Fresno County 

Fullerton 

Glendale 

Glendora 

Glenn County (see Orland, Willows) 

Hanford 

Harrison Memorial (Carmel) 

Hayward 

Healdsburg 

Hemet 

Huntington Beach 

Imperial 

Imperial County 

Industry 

Inglewood 

Inyo County 

Irwindale 

Kern County 

King City 

Kings County 

Lakeport 

Larkspur * 

Lassen County 

Lincoln 

Livermore 

Lodi.. 

Lompoc 



IV 

III 

II 

III 

VI 

IV 

V 

II 

IV 

III 

IV 
V 
V 
VI 

11 

V 
IV 

III 
III 

IV 

III 

V 
VI 
V 
VI 
V 

III 

V 

V 
V 
V 

II 

* 

IV 
IV 
IV 

III 

VI 

III 

V 
IV 

V 
IV 

* 

III 

* 

II 

III 

II 

IV 

V 
VI 

in 

VI 
V 

« 

VI 
IV 

III 

V 
VI 

II 

* 

IV 
VI 
V 

V 

IV 
IV 
IV 



Long Beach 

LosAngeles 

Los Angeles County 

LosGatos 

Madera County 

Marin County 

Mariposa County (incl. in Merced County) 

Marysville-Yuba County 

Mendocino County 

Menlo Park 

Merced County 

Mill Valley .-. 

Modoc County 

Mono County 

Monrovia 

Monterey 

Monterey Cou nty 

Monterey Park (Bruggemeyer Memorial) 

Mountain View 

Napa City-County 

National City 

Nevada County 

Newport Beach 

Oakland 

Oceanside 

Ontario , 

Orange 

Orange County 

Orland 

Oxnard 

Pacific Grove 

Palm Springs 

Palo Alto... 

Palo Verde Valley 

Palos Verdes 

Pasadena 

Paso Robles 

Petaluma 

Placentia 

Plumas County 

Pomona 

Porterville 

Redlands (A. K. Smiley) 

Redondo Beach 

Redwood City 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Roseville . 

Sacramento City-County 

St. Helena 

Salinas 

San Anselmo 

San Benito County 

San Bernardino 

San Bernardino County 

San Bruno 

San Diego 

San Diego County 

SanFrancisco . _ 

San Joaquin County (incl. in Stockton- 
San Joaquin County) 

San Jose 

San Juan Bautista 

San Leandro 

San Luis Obispo County 

San Marino 

San Mateo 

San Mateo County 

San Rafael 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Clara 

Santa Clara County 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Fe Springs 

Santa Maiia 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



77 



INDEX TO COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL LIBRARY 
SALARY TABLES— Continued 



Library 



Table 



Library 



Table 



Santa Monica 

Santa Paula 

Santa Rosa-Sonoma County 

Sausalito 

Shasta County 

Sierra County (incl. in Plumas County) 

Sierra Madre 

Signal Hill. 

Siskiyou County 

Solano County 

South Pasadena 

South San Francisco 

Stanislaus County 

Stockton-San Joaquin County 

Sunnyvale 

Sutter County 

Tehama County 

Torrance 



III 
V 
II 
VI 

III 

V 
V 

« 

IV 

III 

V 
IV 

II 
II 
III 

IV 
IV 

II 



Trinity County 

Tulare . 

Tulare County 

Tuolumne County 

Upland 

Upper Lake 

Vacaville 

Vallejo 

Ventura County and City 

Vernon 

Visalia 

Watsonville 

Whittier 

WiUits 

Willows 

Woodland 

Yolo County 

Yorba Linda 



V 

II 

V 

IV 

VI 

V 

III 



IV 
V 

III 



V 

III 

V 



' Indicates no report, or report lacking salary range data. 



I. CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY PAY RANGES, 1973 



Professional Librarian Classes 




Number 
of jobs 



Civil Service-exempt: 
State Librarian 

Executive Assistant to the State Librarian 

Civil Service Ratings: 

Chief of Library Services (CEA) 

Principal Librarian 

Supervising Librarian 

Senior Librarian 

Librarian 



$2,379 
1,611 



1,390-1,460-1,533-1,611-1,690 
1,260-1,324-1,390-1,460-1,533 
1,036-1,089-1,144-1,202-1,260 
897-942-988-1,03 6-1 ,089 
814-853-897-942-988 



The salary raise for Librarian is granted after completion of the six-month probationary period, and the next 
raise one year later. 



78 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



II. SALARIES IN COUNTY, MUNICIPAL AND DISTRICT LIBRARIES- 
POPULATION OVER 100,000 

Figures reported are established salary range 

(e.g., $1,252-1,522). The number of jobs at each pay range is indicated 

in parentheses preceding it, if reported. 

Professional Positions — August 31, 1973 



City or County 



Chief 
librarian 



Assistant librarian; 

professional 

administrative 

assistant 



Principal 

librarians; 

division chiefs 



Alameda County 

Anaheim 

Berkeley 

Contra Costa County 

Fresno County 

Glendale 

Kern County* 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles 

Los Angeles County 

Marin County 

Merced County 

Monterey County 

Oakland 

Orange County 

Pasadena 

Riverside 

Sacramento City' 

Sacramento County' 

San Bernardino 

San Bernardino County 

San Diego 

San Diego County 

San Francisco 

San Jose 

San Mateo County 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Clara County 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Rosa- Sonoma County.. 

Stanislaus County 

Stockton-San Joaquin County 

Torrance 

Tulare County 

Ventura County and City' 



?l,646-2,002 

1.789-2,174 
1,600-2,22S* 

1,866-2,268 

1,653-2,010 

l,916.66t* 

1,513-1,839* 

1,688-2,083 

40,632t 

2,424t 



l,686t 

1,155-1,405* 
1,352-1,682 
l,890t* 

1,803-2,226 



21,600t 

2,012-2,515 
901.60-1,095.20 



1.399-1,673 
1.555-1,891 



1,674-2,035 

2,236-2,717* 

1,898-2,306 



1.572-1,965* 
1,684-2,048* 
1,437-1,746 
1,702-2,068 
1,244-1,496 
1,520-1,848* 
1,306-1,588 
1,749-2,173 
1,834-2,021* 
1,243-1,512 
871.75t 



(1)?1,252-1,522 

(1) 1,335-1,622 

'(1) 1,284-1,562* 

,(1) 850-1,032* 

(1) 1,573-1,912 

fl) 1,263-1,535 

(1) 1,327-1,613 

,(1) 1,014-1,233 

(1) 1,216-1,506 

(3TT,20(>-1,481 

(1) 2,140-2,660* 

^(1) 1.719-2,142 

t(2) 1,540-1,919 

(1) l,208t 



(1) l,630t* 
(3) 1,241-1,370 



(1) 1 8,866 1 
(1) 1,439-1,750 



(1) 1,160-1,410 

(1) 1,588-1,931* 

(1) 1,523-1,852 

,(1) 1,297-1,576 

(1) 1,259-1,573* 

(fri",197-l,4S5 
(1) 1,332-1,621 

(lTY,345-l,636* 
(1) 1,184-1.440 
(1) 1,325-1,643 

(lTT,023-l,243 
(1) 570.93-693.57 



[(2)31.103-1,341 
(3) 1,050-1,277 
(3) 952-1,158 

(2) 1,151-1.399 

(3) 1,056-1.284* 



/(2) 1 

1(3) 1 

(4) 1 

(6) 1, 

(2) 1 

(2) 1 



,294-1,573 
146-1,393 
,065-1,295 

036-1,284 
,075-1.307* 
,108-1,369 



(3) 1,627-2,027* 



(1) 1 
,(10)1 

(5) 
(2) 



,306-1.627 
,170-1.458 

914-1.111 
842-1.023* 



(2) 1,211-1,336 



(2) 1. 
.(1) 1, 



,451-1.799 
,232-1.531 



/(6) 17.185 1 

1(1) 16,412t 

(2) 1.243-1,511 
/(I) 540.80-657.60 \ 
1(4) 497.60-604.80 / 

(3')" "889-1,066 

/(I) 1,160-1.410 

1(3) 1,052-1,279 

(3) 1,222-1.478 

(2) 1,022-1.218 

(5) 1.159-1,406* 

(4) 1,088-1.322 



(4) 1,007-1.259 

(2) 1,096-1,332* 

(1) 1,046-1,274 
(4) 1,096-1,332 

(2) 926-1,114 
(4) 1.025-1.250* 

(3) 998-1.213 

(4) 1,076-1,307 
(4) 1,237-1,362* 

(3) " 469.39-570.98 



* Raise after 12 months (otherwise, raises are after 6 months, if reported), 
t Flat rate. 

1 Includes 1 FT. 
> Includes 4 PT. 

* Includes 2 half-time. 



i 


Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 


79 


II. SALARIES IN COUNTY, MUNICIPAL AND DISTRICT LIBRARIES- 


POPULATION OVER 100,000— Continued 




Figures reported are established salary range 




(e.g., $1,252-1,522). The number of jobs at each pay range is indicated 


in parentheses preceding it, if reported. 




Professional Positions — August 31, 1973 




Supervising 










librarians; 


Regional 


Branch 


Senior 


Junior 


department heads 


librarians 


librarians 


librarians 


librarians 






1(2) ?l,05O-l,277 \ 
1(10) 952-1,158 / 


(16) $907-1.0501 


(7) 2808-9342 
















(1) 995-1,180 


(3) 858-1,043 


d)"' ?9S9-1,166* 





(4)'" 959-1,166* 


(7) 872-1,048* 


(4) 848-974' 


(2) 1.146-1.393 


(3) gl.146-1.393 


(2) 1,014-1,233 
(11) 920-1,118 


(10) 925-1,125 


(28) 819-996 


(3) 943-1,146 


(7) 943-1.146 


(1) 943-1,146 
(8) 834-1,014 


(7) 834-1.014 


(8) 757-920 


(1) 936-1.160 





(11) 888-1,100 




(10) 796-986 


(4) 975-1,186* 




(5) 843-1,024* 


(3) 843-1,024* 


(16) 764-929*5 


(3) 1,024-1,265 


(2)"" 923-1.138 


(I) 875-1,079 

(II) 971-1,200 


(20) 875-1,079 


(14) 830-1,024 


(16) 1.202-1.498 


(8) 1,202-1,498 


(63) 1,020-1,270 


(30) 1,020-1,270 
(5) 966-1,202 


(244) 865-1,077 





(9) 1,170-1,458 


(23) 984-1,221 
(49) 932-1,038 


(34) 984-1,221 


(109) 932-1,038 
(6) 42.88/day 
(6) 735/mo. 





(3) 1,008-1,225 





(1) 914-1,1116 


(2) 829-1,0086 









(1) 764-928* 


(1) 644-782*7 


(1)' ' 863-1.065 




(1)"" 738-909 


(3) 738-909 




K13) 1.044-1.152 


(28)"' 958-1,058 


(11) 890-983 




aj" 836-924* 


i(l) 1.130t* 










(2) 1.047-1.302 


(2) 1,168-1,451 


(1) 1.047-1,302 

(5) 995-1,232 
(10) 945-1,168 

(6) 723-896 


(9) 945-1,168 
(3) 896-1,106 
(12) 851-1,047' 


(20) 827-9956 


(7) 11.254-13.718 





(7) 12.755-15,556 





(21) 10,294-12,549 


(2) 5.39-6.57/hr. 










!(11) 1,023-1.243 


(UK) 763-1,023 









J (10) 462.40-561.60 








(14')" 431.20-499.20 


(37" 376.80-416 




(2) 512-622.40* 


(2) 464-564* 


(8) 420.8O-i87.20* 


(1) 372.80-410* 


(3'k)" 889-1.066 





(1) 889-1,066 





(3K) 834-979 


(4) 931-1.132 






(12) 845-1.027 


(9) 767-931 


(7) 1,060-1.281 


(2)"'l,060-l,281 


(17')" 920-1,111 
(8) 800-964 


(9) 920-1,111 


(47) 800-964 


(8) 931-1.132 


(4) 931-1,132 


(2) 931-1,132 


(4) 845-1,027 


(5) 767-931 


1(25) 1,024-1,244* 







(48) 927-1,129* 


(66) 804-975* 


;(11) 987-1,200 


...- 


(2)' " 987-1,200' 
(8) 895-1,0889 
(1) 4.73-S.75/hr.» 


(8) 895-1,088 


(7) 4.73-S.75/hr. 
(12) 812-987 


(2) 924-1.155 





(4) 924-1,155 


(6) 854-1.067* 


(25) 762-952* 


(5) 947-1,151* 










(4) 814-990* 


(3) 949-1.153 






(7)"' 860-1.046 


(2) 782-949 





(1)"' 1.044-1.269 


(6)" 946-1.151 


(17) 901-1.096 


(21K) 818-994 


(4) 791-947 









(8) 721-865 








(3)- — 


(8) 885-1.075* 


(3) 842-1,025* 


;(5) 905-1,100 





(1) 821-998 


(8) 821-998 


(6) 745-905 


S(7) 975-1.185 







(6) 864-1,050 


(3) 765-929 


(1) 1.017-1.122* 





(ST" 1.017-1,122* 




(9) 922-1,017* 







(5) 764-928 




'(5)"" 426.42-517.51 





— - 


(9) 386.73^69.68 


(12)" 359.76-437.11 


. * All steps increased by ?40 on 9/1/73. 






' ' Includes 2 PT. 






; ' Includes 1 half-time. 






I ' Libn. I in lieu of Libn. II. 






i ' Biweekly payments. 






" » 5% differential for 


all librarians supervisin 


g a branch. 







80 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



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85 












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86 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



VI. SALARIES IN COUNTY, MUNICIPAL AND DISTRICT LIBRARIES- 
LESS THAN 10,000 POPULATION 

Figures reported are established salary range. 
The number of jobs at each pay range is indicated in parentheses preceding it, if reported. 

Professional Positions — August 31, 1973 



Chief librarian t 



Other librarians t 



Alpine County 

Benicia 

Calistoga 

Carmel 

Dixon U.S.D.. 
Healdsburg 

Imperial 

Irwindale 

I^akeport 

Paso Robles.. 

Saint Helena.. 

Sausalito 

Signal Hill.... 
Upper Lake 



?666.S0t* 

17St> 
1,206-1,466* 

693-1,095* 
S30ti 



S7S2 

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564 
770-972 



514-625 
987-1,200 
748t 
170ti 



(1) 2425t' 
(1) 433t* 

■(lT"804-978* 
,(2) 747-907* 

(fr"300t> 
(1) 21St' 
(1) 400t' 



(1) 407 

(1) 508-642 

(1) 452-571 

(1) 2.61-3.29/hr. 

(1) 478-581 

(1) 766-930 

(1) 2.98/hr. 



t Some positions filled by nonprofessionals; some have short schedules of working hours per week. 
• Raise after 12 months (otherwise, raises are after 6 months, if reported). 
t Flat rate. 
■ Part-time. 
' Third step. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



87 



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89 



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93 





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94 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SOUND RECORDINGS IN CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES, 1972-73 
Unit Count Is by Album — All Types and Speeds of Recordings 



City or County Library 



Total 
Record- 
ings 



Number 
Added 
During 
Year 



Number 
With- 
drawn 
During 
Year 



Total 
Circu- 
lation 



Equipment Owned 



Record 
Player 



Alameda 

Alameda County 

Alhambra 

Alpine County 

Altadena L.D 

Amador County 

Anaheim 

Arcadia 

Auburn-Placer County 

Azusa 

Banning U.S.D 

Beaumont D.L 

Berkeley 

Beverly Hills 

Brawley 

Buena Park L.D 

Burbank 

Burlingame 

Butte County 

Calaveras County 

Calexico 

Calistoga 

Carlsbad — 

Carmel (Harrison Memorial) 

Chico 

Chula Vista 

Coalinga U.H.S.D 

Colton 

Colusa County 

Commerce 

Contra Costa County 

Corona 

Coronado 

Covina 

Daly City 

Dixon U.S.D.— 

Downey 

El Centro - 

El Dorado County 

El Segundo 

Escondido 

Eureka-Humboldt County.. 

Fresno County 

FuUerton 

Glendale 

Glendora 

Hanford 

Hay ward 

Healdsburg... 

Hemet 

Huntington Beach 

Imperial 

Inglewood 

Inyo County.. 

Irwindale 

Kern County 

Kings County — 

Lakeport 

Lassen County 

Livermore 

Lodi 

Lompoc 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles 

Los Angeles County 

Los Gatos 

Madera County 

Marin County 

Marysville-Yuba County 

Mendocino County 

Menlo Park 

Merced County 

Mill Valley 

Modoc County 

Mono County 



6,722 
6,680 
6,530 
369 
5,069 
1,603 
3,818 
4,552 

2,488 

652 

426 

10,196 

1,850 

112 

4,907 

8,392 

4,224 

3,830 

2,243 

743 

325 

461 
1,292 
4,894 
3,628 
4,928 

3,468 
1,369 

314 
2,068 
3,515 
5,085 

323 
1,890 
1,532 

648 
1,712 

610 

2,596 

13,106 

5,299 

18,067 

3,324 

3,184 

253 

4,241 

168 

9,233 

247 
6,819 
1,171 

466 

1,909 

2,255 

3,439 

1,215 

18,409 

36,778 

49,594 

2,952 

563 

759 
1,761 
3,246 
2,503 
10,817 
4,862 
1,490 

203 



204 
4,927 
1,325 

34 

570 

1 

495 

369 

12 

40 

2,546 

500 

299 
1,125 
667 
442 
156 
82 

805 
78 
180 
2,418 
428 
168 

353 
1,453 

ISO 
1,104 
835 
123 
221 

104 
165 

649 
1,672 

948 
1,586 

598 

463 



393 
67 
355 

23 

1,772 

322 

127 

185 

191 

152 

380 

1,371 

6,411 

8,072 

231 

42 

134 

280 

61 

479 

506 

118 

2 



125 

45 

1,142 

1 

17 



620 

lis 

1 

79 

1,966 

150 

1 

218 

310 

214 

106 

9 



211 
42 

334 

381 

27 

645 

84 

"4 
160 



SO 

52 

58 

"2 

1,573 

633 

307 

267 

237 



63 

8 

445 

"l 

651 

4 

"9 

40 

36 

61 

1,368 

2 

575 

46 

29 

119 
50 

165 
46 
40 

115 



21,090 

738 

27,022 

2,286 

«2,8i2 

b8,580 

112 

2,070 

171,115 

2,500 

158 

15,899 

59,529 

8,966 

11,051 

2,127 

2,298 

578 

3,610 
3,880 

7,913 
6,726 



2,076 
19,291 



=872 
23,400 



4,561 
10,402 



74,538 

18,099 

7,913 

12,839 

750 

1,125 

29,293 

401 

41,066 

451 

87 

5,994 
1,318 
7,897 



48,381 

94,531 

d3 89,698 

20,008 

1,666 
=2,300 

2,603 

17,072 
7,083 
6,980 
9,809 



7 
1 

"i 

2 
1 
2 
20 
15 
45 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



95 



SOUND RECORDINGS IN CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES, 

1972-73 — Continued 
Unit Count Is by Album — All Types and Speeds of Recordings 



City or County Library 



Total 
Record- 
ings 



Number 

Added 

During 

Year 



Number 
With- 
drawn 
During 
Year 



Total 
Circu- 
lation 



Equipment Owned 



Record 
Player 



Monrovia 

Monterey 

Monterey County 

Monterey Park (Bruggemeyer 

Memorial) 

Mountain View 

Napa City-County 

National City 

Newport Beach 

Oakland 

Oceanside 

Ontario 

Orange 

Orange County 

Orland 

Oxnard 

Pacific Grove 

Palm Springs 

Palo Alto -. 

Palos Verdes L.D 

Palo Verde Valley Dist 

Pasadena 

Petaluma 

Placentia L.D 

Plumas County 

Pomona 

Porterville 

Redlands (A.K. Smiley) 

Redondo Beach 

Redwood City 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Roseville 

Sacramento City-County 

St. Helena 

Salinas 

San Benito County 

San Bernardino 

San Bernardino County 

San Bruno 

San Diego 

San Diego County 

San Francisco 

San Jose 

San Leandro 

San Luis Obispo City-County. 

San Marino 

San Mateo 

San Mateo County 

San Rafael 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Clara 

Santa Clara County 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Fe Springs 

Santa Maria 

Santa Monica 

Santa Paula U.S.D 

Santa Rosa-Sonoma County.- 

Sausalito 

Shasta County 

Sierra Madre 

Siskiyou County 

Solano County 

South Pasadena 

South San Francisco 

Stanislaus County 

Stockton-San Joaquin County 

Sunnyvale 

Sutter County 

Tehama County 



;,719 
300 

,857 
,493 
998 
,353 
,850 
,370 
,423 
,692 

,857 
,194 
,352 
820 



522 
,554 

,913 
,178 
,759 



,263 
,959 
,064 
,913 
,336 
,115 
371 
941 

,755 
,390 

,379 
979 
,769 
,615 
,437 
,267 
,690 
,555 
,131 
,377 
,271 
,936 
,113 
,754 
,600 

,546 
,136 

1,995 

506 
,659 

836 
,078 

887 
1,475 
1,300 
),386 
1,159 
,095 

785 
,658 



97 

287 

590 

282 

891 

1,768 

1,743 

60 

1,102 

193 
332 
154 

328 

46 



253 
187 
716 

543 
314 
692 
712 

1,604 
185 

3,427 
105 
112 

97 
751 

2,145 
454 

3,126 

2,596 

353 

67 

109 

738 

1,338 
381 

1,254 
864 
772 

1,663 
200 
170 
407 
334 



154 
63 
88 
139 
215 
152 

2,476 
884 
340 
305 
121 



459 



52 
177 

28 
405 

20 
1,112 

799 
415 

32 
27 
74 

127 



56 

333 

7 

600 

589 

22 

103 

615 

389 

21 

726 

12 

99 

368 
708 

725 

85 

10 

1,628 

83 

42 

5 

110 

144 

299 

361 

529 

71 

745 

13 
144 
264 

389 
4 
1 

122 

124 
20 

105 

264 
540 

35 
39 



24,316 

* 

38 
16,298 

3,353 

17,068 
54,229 

13,087 

37,618 

175,516 

8,930 

11,999 



99,532 
442 

33,859 
3,092 
9,975 

32,103 

8,136 

19,082 

11,670 

33,630 

4,837 

962 

* 

358 
18,634 
38,074 

5,571 
61,669 

8,794 

66,005 

3,787 

32,238 

10,125 



29,491 
110,248 



2,370 



679 

4,441 
898 

3,220 
11,751 
21,864 

21,255 



96 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SOUND RECORDINGS IN CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES, 

1972-73— Continued 
Unit Count Is by Album — All Types and Speeds of Recordings 





Total 
Record- 
ings 


Number 

Added 

During 

Year 


Number 
With- 
drawn 
During 
Year 


Total 
Circu- 
lation 


Equipment Owned 


City or County Library 


Record 
Player 


Tape 
Recorder 


Torrance 

TrinityCounty 


5,526 

1,228 

2,706 

1,911 

1,916 

47 

3,557 

1,300 

844 

3,624 

3,185 

1,174 

443 

161 


2,110 

l56 

430 

79 

179 

18 

1,289 

1,300 

294 
162 

3 
15 


"4 

9 

65 

27 

2,190 

65 

383 

'6 


55,545 
1,926 
1,246 
4,510 

5,278 

420 

17,683 

5,957 
7,792 
17,019 
2,155 
1,982 

5,890 


13 

"l 

1 
1 
3 

ii 

10 
2 
1 

3 
2 

1 
1 
2 


7 










Upland 

Vacaville U.S.D 


-- 


Vallejo . 


5 
7 




2 




8 


Whittier 

Willows . . . . ... 


"i 




1 




2 


Yorba Linda L.D 


12 










* Included in total circulation; see Tables I-C-V-C. 
^ Tapes only; discs included in total circulation, 
b Discs only; tapes included in total circulation. 
<' Tapes only; discs not circulated, 
d Discs only; tapes not circulated. 
= Estimated. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



97 



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Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



99 



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101 





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Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 103 

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY ORGANIZATIONS 
OF CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES* 

Albany (Alameda Co.). Albany Friends of the Library. » 

Altadena. Friends of the Altadena Library. 

Anaheim. Friends of the Anaheim Public Library. 

Arcadia. Friends of the Arcadia Public Library. 

Atherton (San Mateo Co.). Friends of the Atherton Community Library. 

Auburn (Auburn-Placer Co.). Friends of the Library. 

Azusa. Book Buddies. 

Bakersfield. Friends of Kern County Library. 

Bakersfield (Kern Co.). South Bakersfield Friends of the Library. 

Baldwin Park (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the Baldwin Park Library. 

Bell (Los Angeles Co.) . Friends of the Bell Library. 

Bellflower (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the Bellflower Library. 

Bell Gardens (Los Angeles Co.) . Bell Gardens Friends of the Library. 

Belvedere-Tiburon (Marin Co.) . Friends of the Marin Co. Library. 

Berkeley. Friends of the Berkeley Public Library. 

Beverly HUls. Friends of the Beverly Hills Public Library. 

Brentwood (Contra Costa Co.). Brentwood Women's Club. 

Brentwood. Friends of the Library (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Burlingame. Friends of the Burlingame Library. 

Byron (Contra Costa Co.). Byron Library Club. 

Canoga Park. Friends of the Library (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Carlsbad. Carlsbad Friends of the Library. 

Carson (Los Angeles Co.). City of Carson Friends of the Library. 

Carmel (Monterey Co.). Friends of the Harrison Memorial Library. 

Chatsworth. Chatsworth Friends (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Chula Vista. Friends of the Library. 

Claremont (Los Angeles Co.) . Friends of the Claremont Library. 

Clarksburg (Yolo Co.). Friends of the Clarksburg Public Library. 

Concord (Contra Costa Co.). Concord Library League, Inc. 

Corcoran (Kings Co.). Friends of the Library of Corcoran. 

Coming. Friends of the Library. 

Corona. Friends of the Corona Public Library. 

Coronado. Friends of the Coronado Public Library. 

Costa Mesa (Orange Co.). Friends of the Costa Mesa Library. 

Covina. Friends of the Covina Public Library. 

Cupertino (Santa Clara Co.). Friends of the Cupertino Library. 

Daly City. Friends of the Daly City Library. 

Davis (Yolo Co.). Friends of the Davis Public Library. 

Delano (Kern Co.) . Delano Friends of the Library. 

Downey. Friends of the Downey City Library. 

Duarte (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the Duarte Library. 

Dublin (Alameda Co.). Dublin Friends of the Library. 

El Cajon (San Diego Co.) . Friends of the El Cajon Library. 

El Monte (Los Angeles Co.). El Monte Friends of the Library. 

Encino-Tarzana. Friends of the Library (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Escondido. Friends of the Escondido Public Library. 

Eureka. Friends of the Redwood Libraries. 

Fairfield (Solano Co.). Friends of the Fairfield-Suisun Branch Library. 

Fallbrook (San Diego Co.) . Friends of the Fallbrook Library. 

Fountain Valley (Orange Co.). Friends of Fountain VaUey Library. 

Fremont (Alameda Co.). Fremont Friends of the Library. 

Fullerton. FuUerton Friends of the Library. 

Gardena (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the Holly Park Library. 

Gardena (Los Angeles Co.). Gardena Valley Friends of the Library. 

Garden Grove (Orange Co.). Friends of the Garden Grove Libraries. 

Glendale. Associates of Brand Library and Art Center. 

Glendora. Friends of the Glendora Library. 

Granada Hills. Friends of the Library (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Grass Valley (Nevada Co.). Friends of the Nevada Co. Libraries. 

Hacienda Heights (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the Hacienda Heights Libraries. 

Half Moon Bay (San Mateo Co.) . South Coast Friends of the Library. 

* County name in parentheses indicates coimty library branch or station with its own "Friends" group. 



104 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Hemet. Friends of the Hemet Public Library. 

Hermosa Beach (Los Angeles Co.). Hermosa Beach Friends of the Library. 

Huntington Beach. Friends of the Huntington Beach Public Library. 

Huntington Park (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the San Antonio Library. 

Inip)erial. Junior Women's Club. 

Inglewood. Friends of the Inglewood Public Library. 

Kensington (Contra Costa Co.). Friends of the Kensington Library. 

Lafayette (Contra Costa Co.) . Lafayette Library Association. 

Laguna Beach (Orange Co.). Friends of the Laguna Libraries. 

Lakeside (San Diego Co.). Friends of the Lakeside Library. 

Lakewood (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the Lakewood Library. 

La Mesa (San Diego Co.) . Friends of the La Mesa Library. 

La Mirada (Los Angeles Co.) . La Mirada Friends of the Library. 

La Palma (Orange Co.). Friends of La Palma Library. 

Larkspur. Friends of the Larkspur Library. 

Lomita (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the Lomita Library. 

Lompoc. Friends of the Library. 

Long Beach. Friends of the Library. 

Los Alamitos (Orange Co.) . Friends of the Los Alamitos-Rossmoor Library. 

Los Altos (Santa Clara Co.). Friends of the Los Altos Library. 

Los Angeles. Fairfax Friends (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Los Angeles. J.C. Fremont Friends (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Los Angeles. Friends of Memorial Library (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Los Angeles. Granada Hills Friends (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Los Angeles. Los Angeles Library Association (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Los Angeles. Los Feliz Branch Friends (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Los Angeles. Loyola- Westchester Friends (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Los Angeles. Northridge Friends (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Los Angeles. San Pedro Friends (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Manhattan Beach (Los Angeles Co.). Manhattan Beach Friends of the Library. 

Markleeville. Alpine County Friends of the Library. 

Martinez (Contra Costa Co.). Friends of the Martinez Library. 

Marysville. Yuba-Sutter Friends of the Library. 

Mendocino (Mendocino Co.). Friends of the Mendocino County Library. 

Menlo Park. Friends of the Menlo Park Library. 

Merced. Friends of the Merced County Library. 

Mill Valley. Mill Valley Library Association. 

Milpitas (Santa Clara Co.). Milpitas Friends of the Library. 

Mission Viejo (Orange Co.). Friends of Mission Viejo Library. 

Monrovia. Friends of the Monrovia Library. 

Montebello (Los Angeles Co.). Montebello Friends of the Library. 

Monterey. Friends of the Library. 

Monterey Park. Friends of the Library of Monterey Park. 

Moraga (Contra Costa Co.). Friends of the Moraga Library. 

Mountain View. Friends of the Mountain View Pubhc Library. 

Napa. Friends of the Napa City-County Library. 

Newark (Alameda Co.). Newark Friends of the Library. 

Newp>ort Beach. Friends of the Newport Beach Pubhc Library. 

Northridge. Northridge Friends (Los Angeles P.L.) . 

Novate (Marin Co.) . Novato Friends of the Library. 

Oakdale (Stanislaus Co.). Oakdale Friends of the Library. 

Oakland. Friends of the Oakland PubUc Library. 

Oakley (Contra Costa Co.). Friends of Oakley Library. 

Oceanside. Friends of the Oceanside Public Library. 

Ontario. Friends of the Ontario City Library. 

Orange. Friends of the Orange PubUc Library. 

Orinda (Contra Costa Co.). Friends of Orinda Library. 

Orland. Orland Women's Improvement Club. 

Oxnard. Oxnard Friends of the Library. 

Pacific Palisades. Palisades Friends (Los Angeles P.L.). 

Palm Springs. Friends of the Palm Springs Library. 

Palo Alto. Friends of the Palo Alto City Library. 

Palos Verdes Peninsula. Peninsula Friends of the Library. 

Pasadena (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the La Canada Library. 

Pinole (Contra Costa Co.). Greater Pinole Library League. 

Pittsburg (Contra Costa Co.). Friends of the Pittsburg Library. 

Placentia. Friends of the Placentia Library, Inc. 



' 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 105 

Placerville (El Dorado Co.) . Friends of the El Dorado County Library. 
Pleasant Hill (Contra Costa Co.). Friends of Pleasant Hill Library. 
Pleasanton (Alameda Co.). Pleasanton Friends of the Library. 
Pomona. Pomona Friends of the Library. 
Porterville. Friends of the Library. 

Portola Valley (San Mateo Co.). Friends of the Portola VaUey Library. 
Quincy. Friends of the Plumas County Library. 
Rancho Santa Fe (San Diego Co.). Rancho Santa Fe Library Guild. 
Red Bluff (Tehama Co.). Friends of the Library. 
Redding (Shasta Co.). Library Boosters. 
Redlands. Friends of A. K. Smiley Public Library. 

Redondo Beach (Los Angeles Co.). Manhattan Beach Friends of the Library. 
Redwood City. Friends of Redwood City Public Library. 
Riverside (Riverside Co.). Friends of the Library. 
Rosemead (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the Rosemead Library. 
Roseville. Friends of the Roseville Public Library. 
Sacramento. Friends of the Sacramento City-County Library. 
St. Helena. Friends of St. Helena Library. 
Salinas. Friends of the Library. 

San Bernardino. Friends of the San Bernardino County Library. 
San Clemente (Orange Co.) . Friends of Capistrano Bay Area. 
San Diego. Special Gifts Committee (San Diego P.L.). 
San Dimas (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the San Dimas Library. 
San Francisco. Friends of the San Francisco PubHc Library. 
San Gabriel (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the San Gabriel Library. 
San Jose. Friends of the San Jose Public Library. 
San Juan Bautista. San Juan Bautista Historical Society. 
San Marino. Friends of San Marino Public Library. 
San Mateo. Friends of the San Mateo Library. 
San Pablo (Contra Costa Co.). Friends of the San Pablo Library. 
San Rafael. San Rafael Library Association. 

San Ramon Valley (Contra Costa Co.) . Friends of the San Ramon Valley Library. 
Santa Ana. Friends of the Santa Ana Public Library. 
Santa Barbara. Friends of the Santa Barbara PubUc Library. 
Santa Clara. Friends of the Santa Clara Pubhc Library 
Santa Fe Springs. Friends of the Library. 
' Santa Monica. Friends of the Santa Monica PubUc Library. 
i Santa Paula. Friends of Blanchard Community Library. 
J Santa Rosa. Friends of the Santa Rosa-Sonoma County Public Library. 
I Saratoga (Santa Clara Co.). Friends of the Saratoga Libraries. 
jSausalito. Friends of the Sausalito Public Library. 
iSeal Beach (Orange Co.). Friends of the Leisure World Library. 
jSebastopol (Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co.). Friends of the Sebastopol Public Library. 
i Sierra Madre. Friends of the Sierra Madre PubUc Library. 
ISimi Valley (Ventura Co.). Simi Valley Friends of the Library. 
South Gate (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the Leland R. Weaver Library. 
South Pasadena. Friends of the South Pasadena PubUc Library. 
Stockton. Friends of the Stockton PubUc Library, 
j Sunnyvale. Friends of the Sunnyvale PubUc Library. 
jTemple City (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the Temple City Library. 
:|Thousand Oaks (Ventura Co.). Conejo VaUey Friends of the Library. 
iTorrance. Friends of the Torrance Library. 

'Truckee (Nevada Co.). Friends of the Truckee Community Library. 
Tustin (Orange Co.) . Friends of Tustin Library. 
iVentura (Ventura Co.). San Buenventura Friends of the Library. 
(VisaUa. Friends of the VisaUa PubUc Library. 

iUkiah (Mendocino Co.). Friends of the Mendocino County Library. 
Upland. Friends of the Upland PubUc Library. 
VaUejo. Friends of the VaUejo PubUc Library. 
Walnut (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the Walnut Library. 

■Walnut Creek (Contra Costa Co.). Friends of the Tice Valley-Saranap-Rossmoor Library. 
Walnut Creek (Contra Costa Co.). Friends of Walnut Creek Library. 
(Waterford (Stanislaus Co.). Friends of the Nora Ballard Library. 
iWatsonville. Friends of the WatsonviUe PubUc Library. 
(West Covina (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the West Covina Library. 
•Westminster (Orange Co.). Friends of Westminster Library. 
West Sacramento (Yolo Co.). East Yolo Friends of the Library. 



106 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Whittier (Los Angeles Co.). Friends of the Los Nietos Library. 

Whittier. Friends of the Whittier Public Library. 

Whittier. Friends of the Whittwood Branch of the Whittier Pubhc Library. 

Willows. Friends of the Willows Public Library. 

Woodside (San Mateo Co.). Friends of the Woodside Library. 

Ygnacio Valley (Contra Costa Co.). Friends of the Ygnacio Valley Library. 

Yorba Linda. Friends of the Yorba Linda District Library. 

Yreka (Siskiyou Co.). Friends of Libraries. 



108 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Outline Map 




OUTLINE MAP OF THE 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

SHOWING COUNTIES 



MARIN 

SAN FRANCISCO 
SAN MATEO 

SANTA CRUZ 



kMONO 



FRESNO 



KINGS 



INYO 



TULARE 



SANTA 
BARBARA 



KERN 



LOS 



>r\ ANGELES 



SAN BERNARDINO 



RIVERSIDE 



SAN 0IE6O 



IMPERiAl 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 109 

DIRECTORY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES BY CITIES 

The information and statistics given in the following directory are based on fiscal year 1972-73 reports, 

except that listings for public libraries have been revised to incorporate more recent changes, 

when known, through February, 1974. 
Full statistics for public libraries (including county law libraries) are included in the preceding tables. 

These libraries have directory listing, only, here. 
Each public library which is a member of a cooperative library system established under the provisions 

of the Public Library Services Act of 1963 has been so identified in the Directory. Statistics of 

hbrary systems are given in the table on page 21 and a directory of systems appears on pages 

232-233. 
An "Index to Headquarters, Branches and Stations of County Libraries Arranged by Place" and an 

"Index to Names of Libraries" follow the Directory, on pages 211 and 218 respectively. 

CALIFORNIA 

Area: 156,537 sq. mi. 

Population: 20,524,000* 

ALAMEDA (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

ALAMEDA FREE LIBRARY. 2264 Santa Clara Ave. (mailing: 1433 Oak St.) (94501). 
522-5413. Carl W. Hamilton, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Oakland. Outlets: 7 (1 branch, 5 stations). Copying service for patrons. 

Dewey decimal classification. 
Special collections: Naval-maritime, aviation-space, local history. 
Trustees: Joseph F. Durein, Donald E. Bruzzone, Mrs. Claribel E. Kaleva, Dr. Neylan A. Vedros, Mrs. 

Lois R. Hanna. 
Member, East Bay Cooperative Library System. 

COLLEGE OF ALAMEDA LIBRARY. 555 Atlantic Ave. (94501). 522-7221. M-F, 7:45- 
4:30. Robert A. Maynard, Libn. 

Vols: 23,000. Bd per: 500. Micro hldgs: 3,000 reels. Per subs: 400. 

Inc: $100,000. Exp: Sal: $75,000. Bks: $20,000. Per: $6,000. AV: $6,500. Bd: $1,000. 

Special subjects: Afro-American history, sociology. 

NAVAL AIR STATION LIBRARY. Bldg. 2, Wing 3 (94501). 869-2519. 

M-F, 10-9, S, Sun, 1-9. Mrs. Carmelita P. Barrett, Libn. 
Staff: 1 libn, 6 others. Vols: 24,000. Per subs: 141. Pams: 1,000. 
Special subjects: Naval history and aviation. 

ALBANY (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

U.S. DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE, AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, WEST- 
ERN REGIONAL RESEARCH LABORATORY LIBRARY. 800 Buchanan St. (mailing: 
Berkeley 94710). 525-2244, ext. 201. M-F, 8^:30. Rena Schonbrun, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn, 2-4 others. Vols: 15,200. Per subs: 600. 

Special collections: Fruits, vegetables, textile chemistry and technology (wool and mohair) , poultry, 
cereals, field crops, pharmacology, food technology. 

ALHAMBRA (Lot Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

ALHAMBRA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 100 N. Garfield Ave. (91801). 289-4216. Mrs. Lois K. 
Songer, Libn. 

Contracts with: Los Angeles County Library System. Reciprocal agreements with: Los Angeles, Mon- 
terey Park, South Pasadena. Outlets: 2 (1 branch). Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal 
classification. 

Trustees: Wilson Rutherford, James Fosselman, Boyd Kern, Will Forbes, William Lieberg. 

C.F. BRAUN & COMPANY REFERENCE LIBRARY. 1,000 South Fremont (91802). 
570-2234. M-F, 8-5. Duane M. Helgeson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 9,000. Tech reports: 5,000. Per subs: 375. 
Micro hldgs: 300. 



* California State Department of Finance, Budget Division, Population Research Unit, provisional 
estimate for July 1, 1972. (Provisional estimate, July 1, 1973: 20,741,000.) U.S. Bureau of the Census, 
U.S. Census of PopulaHon, 1970, California, was 19,953,134. 



110 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

ALHAMBRA — Continued 

Special subjects: Chemical engineering, design and construction. 

ALTADENA (Lo* Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

ALTADENA LIBRARY DISTRICT UBRARY. 600 E. Mariposa St. (91001). 798-0833. 
William J. Tema, Libn. 

Outlets: 2 (1 station) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collection: Califomiana. 

Trustees: Mrs. Richard Brill, Robert E. Bowdoin, Sam Soghomonian, Nicholas E. Devereux, Mrs. Roger 

C. Rumsay. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

LA VINA HOSPITAL FOR RESPIRATORY DISEASES, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 3900 
North Lincoln (91001) . 791-1241, ext. 219. M-F, 1^. Mrs. Grace Waser, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vok: 1,000. Per subs: 47. Special subject: Respiratory diseases. 

ALTA LOMA (Son Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 

CHAFFEY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 5885 Haven Ave. (91701) . 987-1737. M-Th, 7:45-9; F, 
7:45-1:30. Mrs. Miriam H. Bov^^ers, Libn. 

Vols: 55,972. Bd per: 3,435. Micro hldgs: 2,765 fiche, 5,291 films. Per subs: 560. 

Inc: $126,131. Exp: Sal: $95,000. Bks: $16,000. Per: $6,000. AV: $250. Bd: $1,198. Microforms: $2,163. 

ALTURAS (Modoc Co.) Area Code 916 

MODOC COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (96101). 233-2615. Rae E. Gloster, 
Secretary. 

MODOC COUNTY UBRARY. 212 W. 3rd St. (mailing: P.O. Box 771) (96101) . 233-2719. 
Mrs. Betty L. Chism, Libn. 

Serves: Entire coimty. Contracts with: Portion of Siskiyou County. Outlets: 7. 

Stations: Adin, Canby, Cedarville, Davis Creek, Lookout, Willow Ranch. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collection: Modoc County. 

Member, North State Cooperative Library System. 

ANAHEIM (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

ANAHEIM MEMORIAL HOSPITAL UBRARY. 1111 West Lapalma Ave. (92801). 
774-1450, ext. 619. 8-5. Phyllis Kennedy, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 150. Per subs: 39. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

ANAHEIM PUBLIC LIBRARY. 500 W. Broadway (92805). 533-5221. William J. Grif- 
fith, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Buena Park Library District. Outlets: 35 (1 branch, 1 station, 32 commu- 
nity bookmobile stops) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Local history (Anaheim and Orange County) , Walt Disney. 

Trustees: Mrs. Elizabeth Schultz, Earl E. Dahl, Glenn P. Fry, Reuben Paul Hughes, Mrs. Jeanne 
Stanton. 

Member, Santiago Library System. 

INTERSTATE ELECTRONICS CORPORATION LIBRARY. 707 East Vermont Ave. 
(92803). 772-2811, ext. 1284. 8-^. Mrs. Frances Zuehlsdorf, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 1,500. Tech reports: 1,200. Per subs: 220. PB docs; 4,000 ASTIA or NTIS docs. 
Special subjects: Electronics, oceanography, IEEE Transactions and Proceedings. 

MARTIN LUTHER HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 1825 West Romneya (92801) 
(P.O. Box 3304, 92803). 772-1200, ext. 259. M-Th, 7-12:30. Mrs. Jerry Lund, Libn. 

Vols: 358 (incl bd per) . Per subs: 22. 

NORTHROP CORPORATION, ELECTRO-MECHANICAL DIVISION, TECHNI- 
CAL INFORMATION CENTER. 500 East Orangethorpe Ave. (92801). 871-5000, ext.i 
467. M-F, 8-4:45. Janice D. Chang, Libn. 

Staff: 3. Vok: 4,500. Tech reports: 23,000. Per subs: 200. Micro hldgs: 1,500. 
Special subject: Engineering. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 111 

ORANGE COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT LIBRARY. 1011 East St. (mailing: 
P.O. Box 355, Santa Ana 92702) . 776-5551, ext. 393. M-F, 8-5. 

Staff: 3. Vols: 2,000. Per subs: 40. 

ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL, ELECTRONICS GROUP, TECHNICAL INFOR- 
MATION CENTER. 3370 Miraloma Ave. (P.O. Box 3105) (92803) . 632-3621. M-F, 8-5. 
Victor J. Michel, Mgr. 

Staff: 8 libns, 22 others. Vols: 69,500. Tech reports: 125,000. Per subs: 490. Micro hldgs: 100,000 fiche. 
Special subjects: Management development, electronics, physics, solid-state physics, chemistry. 

U.S. BORAX RESEARCH LIBRARY. 412 Crescent Way (92803) . 774-2670, exts. 64, 65. 
M-F, 8-4:45. Betty J. Robson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3 others. Vols: 12,000. Tech reports: 2,500. Per subs: 200. Micro hldgs: 20. 
Special subjects: Chemistry, agriculture. 

ANGWIN (Napa Co.) Area Code 707 

PACIFIC UNION COLLEGE LIBRARY. (94508). 965-6241. M-Th, 7:30-10; F, 7:30-1; 
Sun, 9-10. Clarence R. Sletwick, Libn. 

Vols: 88,417. Bd per: 12,429. Micro hldgs: 5,038. 

Inc: $172,517. Ejqi: Sal: $99,101. Bks: $43,295. Per: $14,701. Bd: $4,057. Other: $4,057. 

Special subject: Seventh-Day Adventist. Special collection: Japanese War Crimes Trials (transcripts) . 

APTOS (Santa Cruz Co.) Area Code 408 

CABRILLO COLLEGE LIBRARY. 6500 Soquel Dr. (95003). 475-6000. M-Th, 6:45-9:45; 
F, 6:45-5; S, Sun, 1-5. Fred Osborne, Libn. 

Vols: 41,470. Bd per: 1,851. Micro hldgs: 1,968 fihn, 122 cards, 100 fiche. Per subs: 430. 

Inc: $133,398. Ej^: Sal: $106,828. Bks: $15,991. Per: $5,653. AV: $1,672. Bd: $827. Other: $900. 

ARCADIA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

ARCADIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 20 W. Duarte Rd. (91006). 446-7111. Richard E. Miller, 
Libn. 

Outlets: 5 (4 stations) . Dewey Decimal, ANSCR classifications. 
Special collections: Antiques, Christmas, local history. 

Trustees: Mrs. Donald Camphouse, Richard E. Miller, Dr. Robert Puckett, Mrs. Earl McNall, Mrs. 
Bartling Anderegg, Dr. James Hagelganz. 

METHODIST HOSPITAL OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, MEDICAL STAFF LI- 
BRARY. 300 West Huntington Drive (91006). 681-5256, ext. 211. Mrs. Eugenia Elliott, in 
charge. 

Staff: 1. Vols: 1,300 (incl bd per). Per subs: 47. 

ARCATA (Humboldt Co.) Area Code 707 
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, HUMBOLDT, LIBRARY. (95521). 826-3441. 

ATASCADERO (San Luis Obispo Co.) Area Code 805 

IaTASCADERO state hospital, PATIENTS' LIBRARY. Drawer A (93422). 466- 
I 2200, ext. 26. M-T, 9-11:30, 1^, 6-8; W-Th, 9-11:30, 1^; F, 9-11:30, 1-4, 6-8; S, Sun, 9-11:30, 
!j 1-4. Marie V. Logan, Libn. 
j Staff: % libn, 1 other. Vols: 18,250. Per subs: 45. 

ATASCADERO STATE HOSPITAL, PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY. Drawer A (93422). 
i 466-2200, ext. 26. M-T, 8:30-4, 6-8; W-F, 8:30-4; S, Sun, 2:30-4. Marie V. Logan, Libn. 

I Staff: Vj libn, 1 other. Vols: 6,850. Tech reports: 35. Per subs: 160. 
' Special subjects: Sex psychopathy, forensic psychiatry. 

AUBURN (Placer Co.) Area Code 916 

j AUBURN-PLACER COUNTY LIBRARY. 350 Nevada St. (95603). 823-4391. Mrs. Do- 
' rothy C. Sanborn, Libn. 

I Serves: Entire county except Lincoln, Roseville. Outlets: 46. 
I Contracts with: Alpine County. 

I Stations: Applegate, Colfax, Dutch Flat, Foresthill, Kings Beach, Loomis, Penryn, Rocklin, Tahoe City. 
Bookmobile stops: 36 (30 community, 6 school) . 



112 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

AUBURN— Continued 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Member, Mountain- Valley Library System. 

PLACER COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (95603). 

AZUSA (Lot Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

AZUSA PACIFIC COLLEGE, MARSHBURN MEMORIAL LIBRARY. Highway 66 at 
Citrus (91702). 

AZUSA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 729 N. Dalton Ave. (91702). 334-0338. Jay Ector, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Los Angeles County. Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classifi- 
cation. 

Trustees: Mrs. Lydia M. Wheelehan, Mrs. Louese G. Davies, Robert S. Manning, Mrs. Caroline Cruz, 
Kenneth J. Aldn. 

Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

CITRUS COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 18824 E. Foothill Blvd. (91702). 335- 
0521, ext. 290, 292. M-Th, 7:30-10; F, 7:30-5; S, 10-2; Sun, 1:30-^5:30. Mrs. Aline Crowley 
Wisdom, Libn. 

Vols: 55,926 Bd per: 5,600. Micro hldgs: 265. Per subs: 510. Inc: $230,356. Exp: Sal: $145,455. Bks: $30,070. 

Per: $7,704. AV: $13,329. Bd: $842. Other: $32,956. 
Special subjects: Art, music, literary criticism. Special collections: Personal library of operator of a 

planetarium; personal library of founder of Citrus College. 

BAKERSFIELD (Kern Co.) Area Code 805 

BAKERSFIELD COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1801 Panorama Drive (93305). 

CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE, BAKERSFIELD, LIBRARY. 5912 Stockdale Hwy. 
(93309). 833-2185. Dr. Benton F. Scheide, Libn. 

Vols: 112,729. Bd per: 11,558. Micro hldgs: 82,220. Per subs: 1,916. 

Inc: $485,978. Exp: Sal: $257,638. Bks: $138,253. Per: $36,703. AV: $14,051. Bd: $175. Supplies and services: 
$39,158. 

Special coUections: U.S. Government documents, California State documents, Carban Collection (mu- 
sic). 

KERN COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT, DR. MYRNIE A. GIFFORD PUBLIC 
HEALTH LIBRARY. P.O. Box 997 (93302). 861-3631. M-F, 8-5. Karen Groves, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 1,000. Per subs: 50. 

KERN COUNTY LAW UBRARY. Civic Center, 1415 Truxtun Ave. (93301). 861-2379. 
Eleanor M. Hauser, Libn. 

KERN COUNTY LIBRARY. 1315 Truxtun Ave. (93301). 861-2135. Mrs. Lois C. Magee, 
Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Outlets: 75. 

Branches: Baker Street, Delano, McFarland, Oildale, Shafter, South, Taft, Wasco. 

Stations: Arvin, Belridge, Boron, Buttonwillow, Caliente, California City, CaUfomia Corr. Inst., Camp i 
Owens, Christian Towers, Edwards, Fairfax, Fellows, Fire Dept. No. 1, Fire Dept. No. 2, Fire Dept. i 
No. 3, Fire Dept. No. 4, Fire Dept. No. 5, Fire Dept. No. 6, Fire Dept. No. 7, Fire Dept. No. 8, 
Glennville, Greenfield, Inyokem, Isabella, Juvenile Hall, KCSO Lerdo, Kern General Hospital, : 
Kemville, Lamont, Lost Hills, McKittrick, Maple, Maricopa, Mojave, North Edwards, Panama, i 
Randsburg, Ridgecrest, Rio Bravo, Rosamond, Tehachapi, Tupman, Twin Oaks, Weldon, Wofford, 
Woody. 

Bookmobile stops: 20 (19 community, 1 school). 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Kern County historical collection (includes Kern County, California and Western i 
Americana), geology, mining, petroleum collection. 

KERN GENERAL HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 1830 Flower St. (93305) . 323-7651, j 
ext. 257. M-F, 8-4:30. Mrs. Janette V. Miller, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, V2 other. Vols: 6,000. Per subs: 152. AV: 1,500. 

Special subjects: Professional, clinical and laboratory medicine, radiology, technology, psychiatry, 

nursing and hospital administration. Complete hospital staff pubUcations file. 
Member, PSRMLS. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 113 

BANNING (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 

BANNING UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT LIBRARY DISTRICT LIBRARY. 21 W. 

Nicolet St. (92220). 849-3192. Mrs. Dolores Smithpeter, Libn. 

Outlets: 2 ( 1 station) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal, Library of Congress classifications. 
Special collections: Western Americana, Negro history, Mexican-American, American Indian. 
Trustees: Robert Peterson, Mrs. Maxine Smith, Lewis Robertson, Maurice Calderon, Mark Pickett. 

SAN GORGONIO PASS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 600 Highland 
Springs Ave. (92220). 845-1121, ext. 225. M-F, 9-1. Helen Statira Clapp, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 79L 

BARSTOW (San Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 

BARSTOW COLLEGE LIBRARY. 2700 Barstow Rd. (92311). 252-2411. M-F, *-5. 
Thomas M. Kimball, Libn. 

Vols: 22,500. Bd per: 247. Micro hldgs: 400. Per subs: 194. 

Inc: $58,563. Exp: Sal: $34,865. Bks: $13,200. Per: $3,169. AV: $3,853. Other: $3,476. 

BARSTOW COMMUNITY HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 550 South Seventh St. (92331) . Daily, 
7-4:30. Jimmie L. Jarman, Libn. 

MARINE CORPS SUPPLY CENTER LIBRARY. (92311). 577-6395. Daily, 10-7. Eli- 
zabeth M. Andreen, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 4 others. Vols: 21,500. Per subs: 157. 

Special subjects: Military, fiction, juvenile, California desert, automotive. 

BEAUMONT (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 

BEAUMONT DISTRICT LIBRARY. 125 E. 8th St. (92223) . 845-1357. Mrs. Gwen Bron- 
son, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: California collection, art, pictures. Black American contributions, large print edi- 
tions, large print Reader's Digest, law books and reference law books, music, antiques, drug abuse, 
gardening, agriculture, nostalgia, history. 

Trustees: Jerome B. Weaver, James E. Miller, Charles H. Daum, Fred A. Hicks, Donald B. Houston. 

BELLFLOWER (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

CALIFORNIA MISSIONARY BAPTIST INSTITUTE AND SEMINARY LIBRARY. 9246 
Rosser (90706) (P.O. Box 848). 925-4082. 8-12:30. Carl Dow, Libn. 

Vols: 3,000. Per subs: 20. 
Special subject: Theology. 

KAISER FOUNDATION HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 9400 East Rosecrans Ave. 
(90706). 920-4247, -4248. M-F, 8-5. Geraldine N. Graves, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 6,000. Tech reports: 250. Per subs: 213. Audio Digest: 4,500. 
Special subjects: Orthopedics, Ophthalmology, surgery, ENT, radiology, nuclear medicine. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

BELMONT (San Mateo Co.) Area Code 415 

; SAN MATEO COUNTY LIBRARY. 25 Tower Rd. (94002) . 573-2056. James W. Buckley, 

I Libn. 

i Serves: Entire county except Burlingame, Daly City, Hillsborough, Menlo Park, Redwood City, San 
Bruno, San Mateo, South San Francisco. Contracts with: Menlo Park, Redwood City, San Bruno, 
San Mateo, Sonoma State College, San Mateo County Health and Welfare Dept. Outlets: 63. 
Branches: Atherton, Belmont, Foster City, Francisquito (East Palo Alto), Half Moon Bay, Millbrae, 
Pacifica, San Carlos, Woodside. 

i Stations: Brisbane, El Granada, Pescadero, Portola Valley, Sanchez. 

j Bookmobile stops: 48 (43 community, 5 school) . 

I Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

I Special collections: Californiana, newspaper file, government documents, library science, art and large 

) type books. 

' Member, Peninsula Library System. 



5— S5403 



114 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

BENICIA (Solano Co.) Area Code 707 

BENICIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 144 East G St. (94510) . 745-2265. Mrs. Lillian Alves, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: California collection, American and foreign literature, antiques, art, crafts. 

Trustees: Alfred Johnson, Weston Lockry, Patricia Leary, Frieda Lundin, ZHnda Lopes. 

BERKELEY (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

ARMSTRONG COLLEGE LIBRARY. 2222 Harold Wy. (94707). 848-2500. M-F, 7:45- 
4:45. Mrs. Eileen Joan Brunswick, Libn. 

Vols; 1,500. Bd per: 30. 

Exp: Sal: $2,150. Bks: $3,700. Per: $3,500. AV: $200. Supplies: $500. 

Special subjects: Accounting, business, administration, finance, personnel management, secretarial 
administration. Special collection: Biography. 

ALTA BATES COMMUNITY HOSPITAL LIBRARY. Webster and Regent Sts. (94705). 

BERKELEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 2090 Kittredge St. (90704). 644-6100. Jack M. Tyler, 
Libn. 

Outlets: 65 (4 branches, 38 community, 22 school bookmobile stops) . 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Foreign language books, civil rights and protest movements, history and culture 

of Black Africa. 
Trustees: Mrs. Amanda WiUiams, Alfred Baxter, Henry Ramsey, Thomas Shaw. 
Member, Berkeley-Oakland Service System. 

WILLIAM M. BROBECK & ASSOCIATES LIBRARY. 950 Gilman St. (94710). 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND LIBRARY. 3001 Derby St. (94705). 

CENl ER FOR TRAINING IN COMMUNITY PSYCHIATRY 

AND MENTAL HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, LIBRARY. 2045 Dwight Way (94704). 

Open by special arrangement only. Mrs. Lois King Danton, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn (part-time). Vols: 1,565. Per subs: 30. 

Special subjects: Community mental health, mental health administration, mental retardation. 

CUTTER LABORATORIES LIBRARY. Fourth and Parker Sts. (94710). 841-0123, ext. 
268. M-F, 7:45-4:30, Mrs. Hwei Wen Ng, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 15,000. Per subs: 648. 

Special subjects: Biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences. 

GRADUATE THEOLOGICAL UNION LIBRARY. 2451 Ridge Rd. (94709). 

HERRICK MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, PSYCHIATRIC LIBRARY. 2001 Dwight Way 
(94704) . 845-0130, ext. 491. M-F, 8-12. Mrs. Lois King Danton, Libn. 

Staff: Vi libn. Vols: 3,700. Per subs: 73. 

JUDAH L. MAGNES MEMORIAL MUSEUM, MORRIS GOLDSTEIN LIBRARY. 2911 
Russell St. (94705). 849-2710. Sun-F, 10-4. Vivian Kleiman, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 6,000. 

Special subjects: Religious thought, ethics, philosophy, mysticism, history; general Judaica. 
Special collections: Manuscripts and rare printings; collections from world Jewish communities (Mo- 
rocco, Egypt, Czechoslovakia, India) ; Belkin Collection; Lowdermilk papers; Rathenau collection. 

MEIKLEJOHN CIVIL LIBERTIES LIBRARY. 1715 Francisco St. (94703). 848-0599. 
M-F, 8-5. 

Staff: 1 libn (part-time) , 3 others. 
8,000+ legal cases; extensive micro hldgs. 

Special subjects: Draft and military holdings; Angela Davis case materials; Daniel Ellsberg/Russo case 
materials; legal source materials on human rights law. 

PACIFIC SCHOOL OF RELIGION, CHARLES HOLBROOK LIBRARY. 1798 Scenic 
Ave. (94709) . 848-0528. M-Th, 8:30-6, 7-10; F, 8:30-6; S, 9-noon. Oscar Burdick, Libn. 

Vols: 96,194. Micro hldgs: 989 reels, 47,374 cards. Per subs: 473. 

Inc: $66,469. Exp: Sal: $30,927. Bks: $18,378. Per: $4,681. Bd: $2,980. Other: $9,503. 

Special subjects: Religion, including Bible, theology, church history. Some California church records 

and archives related thereto. 
Branches: Palestine Institute Library (biblical archaeology) , Woodrow Wilson collection. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 115 

U.S. FOREST SERVICE, PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST AND RANGE EXPERI- 
MENT STATION, SCIENCE LITERATURE SERVICES. 1960 Addison St. (P.O. Box 
245) (94701). 841-5121, ext. 413. M-F, 7:45-4:15. Theodor B. Yerke, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 6 others. Vols: 10^92. Per subs: 522. 

Special collections: Scientific bibliographies in forest disease control, economic entomology, insect 
metabolism, remote sensing of the environment, management planning, timber and watershed 
resource development, insecticide evaluation, fire prevention, sediment and erosion, mistletoe 
infestation, biometrics, wildlife management. U.S. Forest Service research publications since 1960. 

Member, CALIFORNET. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, GENERAL LIBRARY. (94720) . 642-3773. Main Li- 
brary: M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-5; S, Sun, 1-5. Moffitt Undergraduate Library: M-Th, 8-12m; F, 
8-6; S, 12-5; Sun, 10-12. Richard M. Dougherty, University Libn. 

Special materials: Gov't docs, U.S., Calif. State deposit, maps, mss, recordings, microforms, technical 
reports, prints. 

Special services: Microfilm facilities, photocopy, microfilm, -card, -print readers, complete photo- 
graphic services. 

Library of Congress classification. 

Collections open to: Students and faculty of other institutions for inlibrary use with personal identifica- 
tion, borrowing on payment of fee; secondary school students for inlibrary use only, with identifica- 
tion (must reside in direct borrowing area) ; members of public for inlibrary use, borrowing on 
payment of fee (only if holder of BA degree or over 21, and residing in direct borrowing area). 

Interlibrary loan: To aU libraries except those in direct borrowing area. 

Restrictions: Periodicals, theses and dissertations (except second copies) , publications of the current 
and preceding year not lent. Intention to honor faculty and post-BA requests only. Photocopy 
always available. 

Branches: Agriculture, Anthropology, Astronomy-Mathematics /Statistics-Computer Science, Bio- 
chemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, East Asiatic, Education /Psychology, Engineering, 
Entomology, Environmental Design, Forest Products, Forestry, Graduate Social Sciences, Library 
School, Music, Optometry, Physics, Public Health, Social Welfare. 

BANCROFT LIBRARY. 642-6481. M-F, 8-5; S, 1-5. James David Hart, 

Libn. 

Staff: 18 libns, 12 others. Vols: 243, 112. Per subs: 1,452. Micro hldgs: 32,011 reels. Mss: 12,059,172. Maps: 

14,262. Pams: 63,257. Pictures: 80,040. Fihns: 292 reels. 
Special collections: Bancroft Collection (history of western North America) ; Rare Books Collection 

(incunabula and early printing; history of printing; pamphlets on English history; literature and 

printing of the Italian Renaissance; modem poetry; history of science) ; Mark Twain Collection 

(mss and printed editions of Mark Twain). 

CENTER FOR CHINESE STUDIES LIBRARY. 12 Barrows Hall (94720) . 

642-6510. M-F, 8:30-5. Chi-ping Chen, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 24,000. Per Subs: 120. Micro hldgs: 3,500 reels. 
Special subject: China since 1949. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION OF THE BAR LIBRARY. 2150 Shattuck Ave. 

(94704). 642-5343. Virginia Polak, Ubn. 

Staff: 4 (half-time). Vols: 11,000. Vols added: 500. Per subs: 200. Los Angeles County Law Library 
classification. 

COWELL MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, GEORGE REINHARDT STAFF LI- 
BRARY. 848-3072, ext. 217. Open to physicians and staff only. 

Vols: 500. Per subs: 30. 

GIANNINI FOUNDATION OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS LI- 
BRARY. 248 Giannini Hall (94720) . 642-7172. M-F, 8-12, 1-5. Mrs. Virginia A. Fox, Libn. 

Staff: 2 FTE Ubns, 3Vi FTE others. Vols: 15,000. Tech reports: 90,000. Per subs: 2,500. Micro hldgs: 2,400 

reels. 
Special subjects: Agricultural economics, resource development, development of underdeveloped 

countries, water economics, federal-state market news reports (all major U.S. cities) . 

INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENTAL STUDIES. 109 Moses Hall (94720). 

642-1472. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-5; S, 9-5. Jack Leister, Libn. 

Staff: 4Vi Ubns, dVi others. Vols: 340,450. Micro hldgs: 750. 



116 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

BERKELEY— Continued 

INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS LIBRARY. 2521 Channing 

Way, Rm. 110 (94720). 642-4441. M-F, 8-5. Gwendolyn Lloyd, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1.35 FTE others. Vols: 10,629. Serials reed: 953. 

Special subjects: labor, industrial relations, organizational behavior and related topics. 

. INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES LIBRARY. 2538 Channing 

Way (94720) . 642-3633. M-F, 8-5. Colette Myles, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 9,820. Pams, tech reports, etc: 12,500. Per subs: 130. 

Special subjects: International poUtics and area studies, international organizations, methodology of 
social sciences, technology and politics. 

INSTITUTE OF LIBRARY RESEARCH LIBRARY. (94520). 

INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC ENGINEERING. 

412 McLaughlin Hall (94720) . 642-3604. M-F, 10-5. Beverly Hiekok, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, IVi LA, 2-4 part-time others. Vols: 16,538. Tech reports: 27,104. Per subs: 661. Annuals: 

1,018. Micro Hldgs: 71. Pams: 11,188. Reprints: 14,902. Docs: 575. 
Special collections: Regional transportation studies, newspaper cUppings, detailed subject catalog incl. 

magazine article analytics. 
Special subjects: Highway transportation, taffic engineering, traffic accidents, urban transportation, 

mass transit, civil aviation, aiport engineering, city and urban planning, San Francisco Bay Area 

information. 

LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY LIBRARY. Cyclotron Road, 

Bldg. 50, Rm. 134 (94720). 843-2740, ext. 5621. M-F, 8-5. Roy J. Nielsen, Libn. 

Staff: 7 libns, S'/j others. Per subs: 570. 
Special subject: High-energy physics. 

. SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY. Boalt Hall (94720). 642-4044. Vaclav Mos- 

tecky, Libn. 

Staff: 27. Vols: 297,000. Vols added: 14,860. Per subs: 3,750. Library of Congress, Los Angeles County 
Law Library classifications. 

WATER RESOURCES CENTER ARCHIVES. Rm. 40, North Gate Hall 

(94720). 642-2666. M-F, 8-5. Gerald J. Giefer, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 2% others. Vols: 32,000. Per subs: 1,000. Mss: 3,800. Maps: 3,800. Pams: 30,000. 

Special subjects: Water resoures planning and management, water economics, water pollution and 
control of pollution, water law and legislation, hydraulic engineering, shoreline processes, water 
supply, social and envirormiental aspects of water (primary emphasis is on Cahfomia and western 

states) . 

WESTERN JEWISH HISTORY CENTER OF THE JUDAH L. MAGNES MEMORIAL 
MUSEUM. 2911 Russell St. (94705). 849-2710. Sun-F, 10-4. Ruth Rafael, Libn-Archivist. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 450. Per subs: 32. Micro hldgs: 40 reels, manuscripts: approx. 145 collections. 
Special subjects: American Western Jewry; Judah L. Magnes; Commission for the Preservation of 

Jewish Cemeteries and Landmarks. 
Special collections: Oral history project; Latin-American Collection; Jewish periodicals. Publicationj 

Program: Bibliographies in Western Jewish Americana Series. 

WOMEN'S HISTORY RESEARCH CENTER, INC., WOMEN'S HISTORY LIBRARY. 

2325 Oaks St. (94708). 524-7772. Not open to public. Ms. Laura X (Laura Murra), Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 9 others. Vols: 2,225. Pams & bulletins: 150. Per subs: 375. Also over 2,000 topical research I 
files of newspaper clippings from mass, alternative and women's presses, as well as term papers,] 
speeches, and early (1969) women's Uberation movement position papers. 

Microfilm of women's periodical collection available; specific subject areas of Topical Research Files^ 
also to be microfilmed. 

BEVERLY HILLS (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

AMERICAN FILM INSTITUTE, CENTER FOR ADVANCED FILM STUDIES, 
CHARLES K. FELDMAN LIBRARY. 501 Doheny Road (90210) . 278-8777. M-F, 9-5:30. 
Ms. Anne G. Schlosser, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 4y2 FTE others. Vols: 2,800. Per subs: 152. Micro hldgs: 49. Clipping files: 3,500. 
Special subject: Motion pictures and television. 

Special collections: Buster Keaton Scrapbook, Rowland V. Lee Collection, George Chandler Collec- 
tion, Mitchell Leisen Collection. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 117 

BEVERLY HILLS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 444 N. Rexford Dr. (90210) .274-7044. Marvin E. 
Smith, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Art, especially 19th and 20th centuries. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

LOS ANGELES PSYCHOANALYTIC SOCIETY AND INSTITUTE, SIMMEL- 
FENICHEL LIBRARY. 344 North Bedford Drive (90210) . 272-1434. M, Th, alternate F, 
11-7. Peter A. Tararin, Libn. 

Stafi^: 1 libn. Vols: 3,700. Per subs: 25. Cassettes/ tapes: 120. 
Special subjects: Freudiana; psychoanalysis and psychiatry. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PSYCHOANALYTIC INSTITUTE, FRANZ ALEXAN- 
DER LIBRARY. 9024 Olympic Blvd. (90211). 276-2455. Mrs. Lena M. Pincus, Libn. 

Stafi^: 1 libn (part time) . Vols: 2,300 (incl bd per) . Per subs: 28. Non-journal serials: 13. Also large reprint 

collection. 
Special subjects: Psychoanalysis and psychiatry. 

BISHOP (Inyo Co.) Area Code 714 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DISTRICT 09 LIBRARY. 500 S. Main St. (P.O. Box 847) (93514). 

BLYTHE (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 

PALO VERDE COLLEGE LIBRARY. 811 W. Chanslorway (92225) . 922-6168. M-F, 8-4, 
6:30-9:30. Margaret Ann Heater, Libn. 

Vols: 13,000. Bd per: 525. Micro hldgs: 661. Per subs: 145. 

Exp: Sal: $13,690. Bks: $5,080. Per: $1,909. AV: $4,183. Others: $1,602. 

PALO VERDE VALLEY DISTRICT LIBRARY. 125 W. Chanslorway. (92225) . 922-5371. 
Alice M. Rosenberger, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Howard A. Coulson, Jr., Margaret Ann Heater, R. Dale Braman. 

BRAWLEY (imperial Co.) Area Code 714 

BRAWLEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 400 Main St. (92227) . 344-1891. Mrs. Grace Washington, 
Libn. 

Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: History, especially early Americana, railroad, southern, ranch Ufe. 

Trustees: Mrs. John E. Stiteler, Mrs. Grace Hull, Chester Thompson, Mrs. Barbara Meyer, Sherman 

Smith. 
Member, Serra Library System. 

BREA (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

AMERON, CORROSION CONTROL DIVISION LIBRARY. 201 North Berry St. 
(92621). 529-1951, ext. 341. M-Th, 10:30-4:30. Catherine Scheile, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 1,600. Tech reports: 200. Per subs: 150. Also specs, standards, patents. 
Special subjects: Chemistry, coatings for corrosion control, corrosion-resistant materials. 

UNION OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA, UNION RESEARCH CENTER, TECH- 
NICAL INFORMATION CENTER. Imperial Highway and Valencia (92621) (P.O. Box 
76). 528-7201, ext. 462. M-F, 8-4:40. Barbara Orosz, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 4 others. Vols: 25,000. Tech reports: 8,000. Per subs: 650. Micro hldgs: 6,200. 
Special subjects: Petroleum technology, chemistry, geology. 

BRIDGEPORT (Mono Co.) Area Code 714 

MONO COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. Courthouse Annex, School St. (mailing: P.O. Box 
398) (93517). 932-7311. Mrs. Arlene H. Reveal, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Outlets: 90. 

Stations: Benton, June Lake, Mammoth Lakes. 

Bookmobile stops: 80 (73 community, 7 school) . 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Mono County and High Sierra history, biology, geology, geography. 



118 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

BRIDGEPORT — Continued 

MONO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. (Courthouse) (93517). 

BUENA PARK (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

BUENA PARK LIBRARY DISTRICT LIBRARY. 7150 La Palma Ave. (mailing: P.O. Box 
6270) (90620) . 826-4100. Murray K. Holmes, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Anaheim. Outlets: 18 (1 station, 14 community, 2 school bookmobile 

stops) . Copying service for patrons. Library of Congress classification. 
Special collections: Fine arts ( A-V) , literature, history, foreign languages, biography, American Indian 

culture, western Americana. 
Trustees: Kenneth B. Jones, Mrs. Walter P. Tedrahn, Dr. Paul S. Tucker, Mrs. Emily Levine, Mrs. Ethel 

M. Gowa. 

KNOTT'S BERRY FARM, INDEPENDENCE HALL COMPLEX, COLONIAL RE- 
SEARCH LIBRARY. 8039 Beach Blvd. (90620). 827-1776, ext. 376-7-8-9. M, W, F, 10-12, 
1-5; T, Th, 1-5. Rev. Claude Bunzel, Curator. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 4,000. Per subs: 2. 

Special subjects: Early American history (esp. 1600-1800) ; Declaration of Independence, Constitution, 
Supreme Court decisions, Bill of Rights. 

BURBANK (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

BURBANK PUBLIC LIBRARY. 110 N. Glenoaks Blvd. (91503). 846-1020. L. Kemieth 
Wilson, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Los Angeles Public Library. Outlets: 4 (2 branches, 1 station) . Copying 

service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Western history and Califomiana, D. H. Lawrence, H. L. Mencken. 
Trustees: Mrs. Carolyn Bentz, Mrs. Mary Kelsey, Rollin Bigbee, Mrs. Loris Warner, Mrs. Jean Smith? 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

CRANE COMPANY, HYDRO-AIRE DIVISION, LIBRARY. 3000 Winona Ave. 
(91504) . 842-6121, ext. 393. M-F, 8-5. Lois Underwood, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 100. Tech reports: 5,000. Per subs: 35. 

WALT DISNEY PRODUCTIONS UBRARY. 500 S. Buena Vista (91505). 

LOCKHEED-CALIFORNIA COMPANY, TECHNICAL INFORMATION CENTER 
(CENTRAL LIBRARY) . P.O. Box 551 (91520) . 847-2444. M-F, 7:30^:15. K. B. Andrews, 
Libn. 

Staff: 6 libns, 7 others. Vols: 37,841. Tech reports: 298,000. Per subs: 400. Micro hldgs: 360,000 fiche. 
Special subjects: Aerospace and technology, ASW and ocean systems, management. 
Member, INFO. 

ST. JOSEPH MEDICAL CENTER, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 501 South Buena Vista 
(91505) . 843-5111, ext. 2522. M-F, 8-5. Darthea W. Eisaman, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 3,000. Per subs: 130. 

WARNER BROTHERS, INC., LIBRARY. 4000 Warner Blvd. (91522) . Carl Milliken, Jr., 
Libn. 

Staff: 5 libns. Vols: 20,900. Per subs: 85. 

Special subjects: production of films for theatrical and television use; research background materials 
for other industries or arts. 

BURLINGAME (San Mateo Co.) Area Code 415 

BURLINGAME PUBLIC LIBRARY. 480 Primrose Rd. (94010) . 344-1164. George Paul 
Lechich, Libn. 

Outlets: 2 (1 branch). Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Russia and satellite countries, Califomiana, natural history, biography, fiction, 

belles lettres, poetry in English (including translations from foreign languages) . 
Trustees: James DeMartini, Lloyd Lynes, Mrs. Edith Cohendet, Ben L. Hechinger, Mrs. Genevieve 

Phelan. 
Member, Peninsula Library System. 

PENINSULA MEDICAL CENTER, CARL HOAG LIBRARY. 1783 El Camino Real 
(94010). 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 119 

CALEXICO (Imperial Co.) Area Code 714 

CALEXICO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 420 Heber Ave. (92231). 357-2605. Mrs. Eunice Kirk- 
land, Libn. 

Contracts with: C.E.T.Y.S. College, Mexicali, B.C., Mexico. 

Reciprocal agreements with: San Diego State Library, Imperial Valley College Library. Affiliated with: 
Imperial County. Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Historical books on the Imperial VaUey, Spanish books (fiction, non-fiction, refer- 
ence) , music and language recordings in Spanish, language recordings in German, Italian, French, 
English. 

Member, Serra Library System. 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SAN DIEGO, IMPERIAL VALLEY CAMPUS 
LIBRARY. 720 Heber Ave. (92231). 

CALISTOGA (Napa Co.) Area Code 707 

CALISTOGA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 1108 Myrtle St. (94515). 942-4833. Mrs. Katherine 
Boyadjieff, Libn. 

Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Dr. John Wilkinson, Mrs. Marian Bounsall, Mrs. Felix Grauss, Gordon Elrick, Mrs. James Zink, 

Warren Butler. 
Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

CAMARILLO (Ventura Co.) Area Code 805 

CAMARILLO STATE HOSPITAL, PATIENTS' LIBRARY. Box A (93010) . 482-4671, ext. 
2335. M-F, 9-11:30, 1-4. Ms. Erma D. McLemore, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 7 others. Vols: 8,131. Per subs: 15. 
Special collections: Pamphlets, recordings. 

CAMARILLO STATE HOSPITAL, PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY. (93010) . 482-4671, ext. 
2446. M-W, 8-12:30, 1:30-5, 6-10; Th-F, 8-12:30, 1:30-5. Melvin C. Oathout, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, '/z other. Vols: 9,000. Bd per: 900. Tech reports: 15 linear feet. Per subs: 160. 
Special subjects: Psychiatry, psychology, medicine, social service, nursing, adjunctive therapies. 

ST. JOHN'S SEMINARY, EDWARD L. DOHENY MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 5012 E. 
Seminary Rd. (93010) . 482-2755. M-F, 8:30-12, 1-5, 7-10:30. Rev. Newman C. Eberhardt, 
CM., Libn. 

Vols: 50,000. Bd per: 6,000. Micro hldgs: 6,000. Per subs: 200. 

Special subjects: Theology — fundamental, dogmatic, moral, ascetical, mystical and pastoral; Christian 

literature; church history; canon law; sacred Scripture; liturgy. Special collection: Carrie Estelle 

Doheny Collection of rare books and manuscripts. 

CAMP PENDLETON (San Diego Co.) Area Code 714 
MARINE CORPS BASE LIBRARY SYSTEM. (92055). 

CANOGA PARK (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

HUGHES AIRCRAFT COMPANY, CANOGA PARK BRANCH LIBRARY. Bldg. 265/ 
P-10 (91304). 883-2400, ext. 1115. M-F, 8:15-5:15. Mrs. Clara Ann Miles, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 7,000. Tech reports: 20,000. Per subs: 125. Micro hidgs: 20,000 fiche. 
Special subject: Guided missile sciences. 

ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL, ROCKETDYNE DIVISION, TECHNICAL INFOR- 
MATION CENTER. 6633 Canoga Avenue (91304). 884-2575. M-F, 8-4:42. Laura J. 
Rainey, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 3 others. Vols: 18,000. Tech reports: 200,000. Per subs: 432. Micro hldgs: 150,000 fiche. 
Special subjects: Aerodynamics, chemistry, fluid dynamics, energy conversion, materials, metallurgy, 

rocket engines, rocket propulsion systems, structural mechanics, physical properties, mechanical 

properties, pollution. 

CARLSBAD (San Diego Co.) Area Code 714 

CARLSBAD CITY LIBRARY. 1250 Elm Ave. (92008) . 729-7933. Mrs. Georgina D. Cole, 
Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collection: Southwest collection, including much Indian material. 



120 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

CARLSBAD — Continued 

Trustees: Ray F. Brookhart, Mrs. Mary Casler, Rev. William A. Driver, Mrs. Caroline Schindler, Marvin 

Kratter. 
Member, Serra Library System. 

CARMEL (Monterey Co.) Area Code 408 

COMMUNITY HOSPITAL OF THE MONTEREY PENINSULA, MEDICAL STAFF 
UBRARY. Box HH (93921) . 624-5311, ext. 350. Open 24 hours daily. Mrs. Marjorie 
Thorpe, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others (part-time) . Vols: 3,000 (incl bd per) . Per subs: 70. Tapes and Audio Digest: 1,000. 
Member, MEDLARS. 

HARRISON MEMORIAL UBRARY. Oceanside and Lincoln Sts. (mailing: Box 800) 
(93921) . Mrs. Vicki Anderson Jones, Libn. 

Contracts with: Unincorporated Carmel. Affiliated with: Monterey County. Outlets: 2 (1 station). 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Fine arts, Carmeliana, Robinson Jeffers, Japanese prints, Edward Weston prints, 

Robert and Elizabeth Browning. 
Triistees: Mrs. Richard Sippel, Peter R. Dyer, Herbert R. Blanks, Mrs. Elizabeth Nowell, Mrs. Matthew 

Beaton. 
Member, Monterey Bay Area Cooperative Library System. 

CARMICHAEL (Sacramento Co.) Area Code 916 

ESKATON AMERICAN RIVER HEALTHCARE CENTER, ERLE M. BLUNDEN 

MEMORIAL UBRARY. 4747 Engle Road (95608) . 486-2128. M-F, 1-5. Frances Heim, 

Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 500. 

CARSON (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

PUREX CORPORATION, LTD., TECHNICAL UBRARY. 24000 South Main St. 
(90745). 775-2111, ext. 595. M-F, 8-^:30. Louise Y. Sakamoto, Libn. 

Staff: 1. Vols: 4,000. Per subs: 150. 

Special subjects: Chemistry, chemical technology, 

CASTLE AIR FORCE BASE (Merced Co.) Area Code 209 

CASTLE AIR FORCE BASE, BAKER UBRARY. FL 4672 (95342) . 726-2630. M-Th, 11-9; 
F, S, 11-5; Sun, 1-5. Enid L. Wilford, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 4 others. Vols: 26,917. Per subs: 201. Records & tapes: 1,278. 

Special subjects: Drug abuse education, black studies and ethnic minorities, education course supple- 
mentary reading. 

CASTRO VALLEY (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

LAUREL GROVE HOSPITAL, MEDICAL AND DENTAL STAFF UBRARY. 19933 
Lake Chabot Road (94546) . 538-6464, ext. 32. Open daily, 24 hours. 

Vols: 60. Per subs: 12. 

Special subjects: Medicine, dentistry. 

CERRITOS (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

CITY OF CERRITOS PUBUC LIBRARY. 183rd and Bloomfield Sts. (90701). 924-5775. 
Mrs. Margaret N. Sloane, Libn. 

(Opened to public in September, 1973.) 

CHICO (Butte Co.) Area Code 916 

CAUFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, CHICO, LIBRARY. First and Hazel Sts. (95926). 
345-6212. M-Th, 8-11; F, 8-5; S, 9-5; Sun, 1-11. Phyllis I. Bush, Libn. 

Vols: 380, 207. Bd per: 60,598. Micro hldgs: 23,442 reels, 262,112 other. Per subs: 3,697. 

Exp: Sal: $696,598. Bks: $401,579. Per: $100,175. Bd: $34,588. 

Special subjects: Liberal arts, professional (computer science, engineering, social welfare /correc- 
tions) , agriculture, education (curriculum) . Special collections: Northeastern California collection. 
Eagle Lake collection, archives, rare books. 

Branches: Division of Nursing, Extended Campus at Travis Air Force Base, Fairfield, California; 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 121 

Curriculum Materials Department, A.J. Hamilton Building on campus (temporary) . 

CHICO COMMUNITY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL STAFF LIBRARY. 560 Cohasset Road 
(95926) . Open daily, 24 hours. Dawn H. Brennan, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 219. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

CHICO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 141 Salem St. (95926). 343-4401, ext. 256. Mrs. Dorothy D. 
Ingalls, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: David H. Rush, James Foreman, Mrs. George Longazo, Mrs. C. S. McCulloch, George H. 

Roseman. 
Member, North State Cooperative Library System. 

N.T. ENLOE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL STAFF LIBRARY. West 5th Ave. & Esplanade 
(95926) . Open daily, 24 hours. Dawn H. Brennan, Libn. 

Staff: 1. Vols: 181. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

CHINA LAKE (Kern Co.) Area Code 714 
NAVAL WEAPONS CENTER LIBRARY (93555). 

CHINO (Son Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTION FOR MEN, PROGRAM "A" LIBRARY. P.O. Box 128 
(91710) . Abe Oppenheim, Libn. 

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTION FOR MEN, PROGRAM "D" LIBRARY. Central Avenue 
(91710). (P.O. Box 368). 597-1821. M, W, F, 8:30-^; T, Th, 8:30-4, 6:30-8:30; S, Sun, 1-4. 
McKinley Quates, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 4 others. Vols: 18,000. Tech reports: 45. Per subs: 7. 
Special subject: minor vocational trades. 

CHULA VISTA (San Diego Co.) Area Code 714 

CHULA VISTA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 276 Fourth Ave. (92010). 427-4234. Mrs. Bluma 
Levine, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Harry LaBore, Angela Villagomez, Mrs. Harold Foster, Mrs. Joan Roseman, John A. Sinatra, 

Herb C. Lathan. 
Member, Serra Library System. 

ROHR INDUSTRIES, INC., CORPORATE LIBRARY. Box 1516 (92012). 426-7111, ext. 
2150. M-F, 8-1:30. Joseph H. Simpson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3 others. Vols: 4,000. Tech reports: 19,000. Per subs: 406. Micro hldgs: 50,000. Spdcs & 

standards: 20,000. 
Special subjects: Aeronautics, transportation, metallurgy. 

SOUTHWESTERN COLLEGE LIBRARY. 900 Otay Lakes Rd. (92010). 

CLAREMONT (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 714 

FRANCIS BACON FOUNDATION, INC., FRANCIS BACON LIBRARY. 655 North 
Dartmouth Ave. (91711). 624-6305. M-F. 9-4:30. Mrs. Elizabeth S. Wrigley, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 2 others. Vols: 9,500. Per subs: 39. Micro hldgs: 25. Mss, photos, clippings. 

Special subjects: Francis Bacon; cryptography, 16th century to present; emblem books, 16th and 17th 
centuries; Rosicrucian, 17th century to present; anti-Shakespeareana; Dante; 18th century Ameri- 
can political theory. 

CENTER FOR CALIFORNIA PUBLIC AFFAIRS LIBRARY. 226 West Foothill Blvd. 
(P.O. Box 30) (91711). 624-5212. M-F, 10-6. 

Staff: 2. Vols: 750. Tech reports: in thousands. Per subs: 135. 

Special collections: Public and private organizations in California (fugitive material: 65 file boxes) ; 
California legislative docs, complete service, current session only; public and private organizations 
in the U.S. and abroad concerned with environmental and consumer protection (fugitive material: 
125 fUe boxes, 6 file drawers); environmental issues (subject file, ephemera: 135 file boxes); 
California cities and counties (geographic file: 50 file boxes.) . 



122 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

CLAREMONT— Continued 

COLLEGE STUDENT PERSONNEL ABSTRACTS, JOSEPH G. PROSSER LIBRARY. 

165 E. 10th St. (91711). 

THE HONNOLD LIBRARY FOR THE CLAREMONT COLLEGES. Dartmouth at 
Ninth (91711). 626-8511. M-F, 8-10; S, 9-5; Sun, 1:30-10. Patrick Barkey, Director of 
Libraries. 

NOTE: The Claremont Colleges (Pomona, Scripps, Claremont Men's, Harvey Mudd, Pitzer, and 
Claremont Graduate School) are served by a central system of libraries with headquarters in the 
Honnold Library. In addition to the Honnold Library, the system includes the Seeley W. Mudd 
Library, the Ella Strong Denison Library on the campus of Scripps CoUege, the Norman F. 
Sprague Library on the campus of Harvey Mudd CoUege, and the six science libraries at Pomona 
CoUege. 

RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN LIBRARY. 1500 North College Ave. 
(91711). 626-3922. M-F, 8-12, 1-5. Mrs. Beatrice M. Beck, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn, 1 other. Vols: 25,000. Per subs: 430. Micro hldgs: 128. 

Special subjects: Botany, floras of the world, native California materials, evolutionary biology. 

SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CLAREMONT, THEOLOGY LIBRARY. 1325 College 
Ave. (91711). 

COALINGA (Fresno Co.) Area Code 209 

COALINGA UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT LIBRARY DISTRICT LIBRARY. 305 N. 

4th St. (93210). 935-1676. Mrs. Ina-Mae Com, Libn. 

Outlets: 4 (1 branch, 2 stations). Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special coUection: Art, genealogy, geology, Spanish language. 

Trustees: Ralph C. Neate, Keith Howe, Cornelius O'NeU, Ronald S. AUen, Marcia Chertok. 
Member, San Joaquin VaUey Library System. 

WEST HILLS COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 300 Cherry Lane (93210) . 935-0801. 
M-Th, 8-5, 6:30-9; F, 8-5. Lois Judd, Libn. 

Vols: 2,200. Bd Per: 50. Micro hldgs: 833 reels. Per subs: 360. 

Inc: $52,568. Exp: Sal: $29,079. Bks: $5,800. Per: $2,500. AV: $4,200. Bd: $200. Equipment repair: $5,000. 

COLTON (San Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 
COLTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 380 N. La Cadena Dr. (92324). 825-1585. 

Martine A. Homburg, Libn. 

Affiliated with: San Bernardino County. Outlets: 2 (1 station). Copying service for patrons. Dewey 

Decimal classification. 
Special coUections: Spanish language. 

Trustees: Dr. J. J. H. Smith, Mrs. Sara Ceizler, Donald Mcintosh, Mrs. Hilda Garcia, Dr. R. J. AneUe. 
Member, Inland Library System. 

COLUMBIA (Tuolumne Co.) Area Code 209 

COLUMBIA JUNIOR COLLEGE LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1849 (95310). 532-3141. M-Th, 
8-9; F, 8-4:30. Dean Finney, Libn. 

Vols: 26,000. Bd per: 777. Micro hldgs: 2,275 reels (periodicals). Per subs: 537. 

Inc: $42,591 (includes $5,358 HEA grant) . Exp: Sal: $48,151. Bks: $22,467. Per: $5,217. AV: $547 (musical 
recordings only) . Bd: $2,705. Microfilm: $1,815. State and Federal Documents: $684. 

COLUSA (Colusa Co.) Area Code 916 

COLUSA COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 738 Market St. (95932) . 458-4161. Mrs. Gail Conley, 
Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Outlets: 8 

Stations: Arbuckle, Grimes, Lodoga, Maxwell, Princeton, Stonyford, Williams. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collection: Californiana. 

Member, North State Cooperative Library System. 

COLUSA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, 547 Market St. (95932). 458-4091. El- 
wood M. Moran, Libn. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 123 

ESKATON COLUSA HEALTHCARE CENTER, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 199 East Web- 
ster St. (P.O. Box 331) (95932). 458-5821, ext. 259. M-F, 7-5. Wanda E. Summerbell, 
Medical Records Adm. 

Staff: 3. Vols: 200. Per subs: 45. 

COMMERCE (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

CITY OF COMMERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 5655 Jillson St. (90040). 722-6660. Lois E. 
McClish, Libn. 

Outlets: 4 (3 stations) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: paint and varnish (coating technology) , basic California and U.S. law collection, 

commercial directories, business management. 
Trustees: Mrs. Florence Brown, Mrs. Alice Brasket, Mrs. Delia Mackey, Alexander Ortiz, Mrs. Dorothe 

Yantis. 

COMPTON (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 
COMPTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1111 E. Artesia Blvd. (90221). 

CONCORD (Contra Costa Co.) Area Code 415 

MT. DIABLO HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 2540 East St. (94520) . 682-8200. Open 
daily, 24 hours. Mrs. Linda Faye Odom, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 597 Per subs: 16 

CORNING (Tehama Co.) Area Code 916 

CARNEGIE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF CORNING. 618 4th St. (96021). 824-3290. 
Operated under contract with Tehama County Library. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Trustees: Richard Collins, Lillian E. Hagen, Dennis Moore, A. R. Kirkpatrick, Orville Jolly, Vem 
Freitas. 

CORONA (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 

CALIFORNIA REHABILITATION CENTER LIBRARY. P.O. Box 841 (91720). Gerald 
Nelson, Libn. 

CORONA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 650 S. Main St. (91720). 736-2381. Lyle F. Perusse, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Local history, microfilm archive of Corona newspapers. 

Trustees: Gerald E. Stewart, Harriet Joseph, Jesse R. Garcia, Suzanne Hess, William Vasels. 

Member, Inland Library System. 

CORONA DEL MAR (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

SHERMAN FOUNDATION LIBRARY. 614 Dahlia Ave. (92625). 673-1880. M-F, 9-5. 
Edwin W. Tomlinson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, Vj other. Vols: 5,500. Per subs: 30. Mss, business records & ephemera: 350,000-400,000. Los 

Angeles Times, 1881 to date. Calexico Chronicle, 1904-1906. 
Special subjects: History of the Pacific Southwest (Southern California, Arizona, Baja California 

(state) , Sonora (state) , parts of New Mexico and Nevada) in last 100 years. Land and water 

development; local history. 

CORONADO (Son Diego Co.) Area Code 714 

CORONADO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 640 Orange Ave. (92118). 435-4187. Mema J. Cox, 
Libn. - 

Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Mrs. Rhae Gray, William B. Rohan, William J. Davis, Mrs. Midge Peltier, Mrs. Jane Winn. 

Member, Serra Library System. 

COSTA MESA (Orange Co,) Area Code 714 

HYLAND LABORATORIES LIBRARY. 3300 Hyland Ave. (P.O. Box 2214) (92626). 

ORANGE COAST COLLEGE LIBRARY. 2701 Fairview Rd. (92626). 556-5885. M-F, 
7:30-10; S, Sun, 12-^. Mary Lou Wilhelm, Libn. 

Vols: 78,077. Bd per: 311. Micro hldgs: 3,116. Per subs: 776. 

Inc: $317,412. ¥xp: Sal: $230,429. Bks: $54,266. Per: $8,827. AV: $1,417. Bd: $1,514. 



124 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

COSTA MESA — Continued 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA COLLEGE, O. COPE BUDGE LIBRARY. 2525 Newport 

Blvd. (92626). 

COVINA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

AMERICAN BAPTIST SEMINARY OF THE WEST LIBRARY. Seminary Knolls 
(91724). 332-4034. M-Th, 7:30-10:30; F, 7:30-9:30; S, 7:30-5. Genevieve Kelly, Libn. 

Vols: 72,908. Micro hldgs: 579. Per subs: 504. 

Exp: Sal: $40,500. Bks: $15,500. Per: $3,000. AV: $500. Other: $7,000. 

Special subjects: Theology and supporting fields, Baptistica. 

COVINA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 234 N. Second Ave. (91723) . 967-3935. Mrs. Dorothy Weed- 
ing, Libn. 

Contracts with: Part of Los Angeles County. Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classifica- 
tion. 
Special collections: Egyptology, art and architecture, early Covina history and photographs. 
Trustees: Clyde P. Price, Wesley G. Berry, William R. Bonhall, Charles G. Colver, Clinton H. Webb. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

CRESCENT CITY (Del Norte Co.) Area Code 707 

CRESCENT CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 850 H St. (95531) . 464-5478. Mrs. Edna R. Cadra, 

Libn. 

Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Nina Bryne, Ella Treheame, Elizabeth Griffin, Ernestine Buzzine, Maude Ellis. 

DEL NORTE COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (95531). 464-4521. Marie Davis, 
Libn. 

CULVER CITY (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

HUGHES AIRCRAFT COMPANY, CULVER CITY LIBRARY. Centinela and Teale Sts. 
(90230). 391-0711, ext. 2615. M-F, 8-5. Masse Bloomfield, Libn. 

Staff: 5 libns, 6 others. Vols: 51,000. Per subs: 700. Micro hldgs: 7,500 fiche. 
Special subjects: Electronics, physics, mathematics. 

HUGHES AIRCRAFT COMPANY, TECHNICAL DOCUMENT CENTER. Centinela 
and Teale Sts. (90230). 391-0711, ext. 6543. M-F, 8-12, 1-5. B. W. Campbell, Libn. 

Staff: 6 libns, 13 others. Tech reports: 90,000. Micro hldgs: 180,000. 

HUGHES HELICOPTERS (DIV. OF SUMMA CORPORATION) LIBRARY. Centinela 
and Teale Sts. (90230). 870-3361, ext, 3723. M-F, 8-4:45. Dorothy K. Goss, Libn. 

Staff: 1. Vols: 2,700. Tech reports: 13,000. Per subs: 110. 

Special subjects: Aeronautical engineering, mechanical engineering, materials technology. 

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER, INC., RESEARCH DEPARTMENT LIBRARY. 10202 
Washington Blvd. (90230) . 

WEST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE LIBRARY. 4800 Freshman Dr. (90230). 836-7110. 
M-Th, 7:30-10; F, 7:30-4. Frances G. Vella, Libn. 

Vols: 36,000. Micro hldgs: 1,146 reels, 9,056 sheets. Per subs: 437. 
Exp: Sal: $82,000. Bks: $35,000. Per: $12,000. 

CUPERTINO (Santo Clara Co.) Area Code 408 

DE ANZA COLLEGE LEARNING CENTER. 21250 Stevens Creek Blvd. (95014). 257- 
5550, ext. 456. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-4:30; Sun, 1^. Gary T. Peterson, Assoc. Dean of Instruc- 
tion. 

Vols: 50,099. Bd per: 2,603. Micro hldgs: 4,951 (fikn and fiche). Per subs: 419. 

Inc: $382,892. Exp: Sal: $265,399. Bks: $43,762. Per: $6,805. AV: $18,481 (excludes film rental of $4,043 
charged to divisions). Bd: $611. Other: $47,834. 

HEWLETT-PACKARD, CUPERTINO LIBRARY. 11000 Wolfe Road (95014) . 257-7000, 
ext. 2465. M-F, 8-4:30. Julianne Jedeka, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 1,500 (titles) . Per subs: 150. 
Special subjects: Computer technology, programming. 
Member, GIN. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 125 

CYPRESS (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

CYPRESS COLLEGE LIBRARY. 9200 Valley View (90630) . 826-2220, ext. 282. M-Th, 
8-9:30; F, 8-1:30; S, 11-3. Chester A. Dalton, Libn. 

Vols: 41,903. Bd per: 1,121. Micro hldgs: 2,646. Per subs: 513. 

Inc: $192,157. Exp: Sal: $137,490. Bks: $37,178. Per: $13,026. Bd: $421. Records: $497. 

DALY CITY (San Mateo Co.) Area Code 415 

DALY CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 275 Southgate Ave. (94015). 992-2414. Samuel C. 
Chandler, Libn. 

Contracts with: Cokna, unincorporated Cokna, Broadmoor. Outlets: 3 (1 branch, 1 station). Copying 

service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Trustees: Richard Silver, Mrs. V. R. Kendree, Mrs. Sarah Kelecheva, Mrs. Anna Maria Horta. 
Member, Peninsula Library System. 

MARY'S HELP HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 1900 Sullivan Ave. (94015). 992-4000, ext. 145. 
M-F, 7:45— i: 15. Marie G. Abbruzzese, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 4,000. Per subs: 125. Med cassettes: 600. 

Special subjects: clinical medicine (patient care) , nursing, hospital. 

DAVIS (Yolo Co.) Area Code 916 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS, LIBRARY. (95616) . 752-2110. M-Th, ^12; F, 
8-11; S, ^5; Sun, 12-12. J. Richard Blanchard, Libn. 

Vols: 1,077,805. Micro hldgs: 877,340. Per subs: 30,534. 

Inc: $3,866,096. Exp: Sal: $2,183,787. Bks: $768,855. Per: $482,169. AV: $12,388. Bd: $183,215. Other: 
$235,682. 

Special subjects: Agricultural, biological and medical sciences, engineering, law, history, areas in social 
sciences and humanities. Special collection: F. H. Higgins Library of Agricultural Technology. 

Branches: Agricultural Economics, Food Protection and Toxicology Center, Health Sciences, Institute 
of Governmental Affairs, Law, National Center for Primate Biology, Packing Reference, Sacra- 
mento Medical Center. 

INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS LIBRARY. 752-2045. S-5. Ned- 

jelko D. Suljak, Libn. 

Staff: 2 Ubns, 1 other. Vols: 60,000. Per subs: 500. 

Special subjects: Public administration, budgets, planning (city, regional, state) , community develop- 
ment, crime, juvenile delinquency, education, elections, employment, finance, government (fed- 
eral, state, local), health, housing, intergovernmental relations, law enforcement, police, 
personnel, population, poverty, schools, social problems, taxation, Tahoe studies, traffic, urban 
renewal, violence, waste management, water supply, zoning, ecology. 

LAW LIBRARY. (95616) . 752-3322. Mortimer D. Schwartz, Libn. 

Staff: 20. Inc: $424,480. Vols: 117,919. Vols added: 6,804. Per subs: 956. Library of Congress classification. 

NATIONAL CENTER FOR PRIMATE BIOLOGY, REFERENCE LIBRARY 

SERVICES. (Hutchison and Pedricks Rd.) (95616). 

DEEP SPRINGS (Inyo Co.) Area Code 714 
DEEP SPRINGS COLLEGE LIBRARY. Deep Springs (Via Dyer, Nevada, 89010). 

DILLON BEACH (Marin Co.) Area Code 707 
PACIFIC MARINE STATION, UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC, LIBRARY. (94929) . 

DIXON (Solano Co.) Area Code 916 

DIXON UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT LIBRARY DISTRICT LIBRARY. 135 E. B St. 

(95620). 678-5447. Ms. Sandra Stocking, Libn. 

Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees (school board) : Jack Phillips, Audrey Slater, Donald Erickson, James Cooley, Barbara Hays. 

DOMINGUEZ HILLS (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE, DOMINGUEZ HILLS, LIBRARY. 1000 E. Victoria 
St. (90747). 532-4300, ext. 201. M-Th, 7:45-9; F, 7:45-5; S, 9-5. Phillip Wesley, Libn. 

Vols: 132,563. Bd per: 10,085. Micro hldgs: 6,301 microfilm reels, 106,718 microfiche titles. Per subs: 
1,461. 



126 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

DOMINGUEZ HILLS— Continued 

Exp: Sal: $296,551. Bks: $182,779. Per: $39,000. Bd: $12,645. 

DOWNEY (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

AEROJET ORDNANCE AND MANUFACTURING COMPANY, TECHNICAL LI- 
BRARY. 9236 East Hall Road (90241) 923-7511, ext. 247. M-F, 8-4:30. Dicksie C. Black- 
stock, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 7,000 (incl bd per) . Tech reports: 30,000. Per subs: 100. Micro hldgs: 100,000. 
Special subjects: Ordnance, weapon systems. 

DOWNEY CITY LIBRARY. 8490 E. Third St. (90241). 923-3256. Mrs. Ruth C. Miller, 
Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Santa Fe Springs, Downey Unified School District. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Large print books, Califomiana. 

Trustees: Charles V. Jones, Mrs. James Copeland, Caesar Mattel, Mrs. Jack Farmer, Mrs. Warren Heer. 

Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

RANCHO LOS AMIGOS HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 7601 East Imperial High- 
way (90242) . 773-4331, ext. 2196. M-F, 8-9; S, 8-4. Sharon Pruhs, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3 others. Vols: 6,000. Per subs: 549. Bd per: 10,000. 
Member, MEDLINE. 

ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION, SPACE DIVISION, LIBRARY. 
12214 Lakewood Blvd (Attn: TIC D/41-092 AJOl) (90241). 922-1641. M-F, 10-^:30. Bar- 
bara E. White, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 7 others. Vols: 49,000. Tech reports: 78,000. Per subs: 600. Micro hldgs: 500,000. 
Special subjects: Aerospace technology, astronautics, mathematics and engineering, information sys- 
tems. 

DOWNIEVILLE (Sierra Co.) Area Code 916 
SIERRA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (95936). 

DUARTE (Lot Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

SANTA TERESITA HOSPITAL, HEALTH SCIENCE LIBRARY. 1210 Royal Oaks Drive 
(91010). 359-3243, ext. 375. M-F, 9^. 

Vols: 300. Per subs: 20. Cassettes. 

DUBLIN (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

FOREMOST FOODS COMPANY LIBRARY. 6363 Clark Ave. (P.O. Box 2277) (94566). 
828-1440, ext. 34, 35. M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. Joan M. LaManna, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 6,100 (incl bd per) . Tech reports: 750. Per subs: 200. 
Special subjects: Dairy and food technology. 

DURHAM (BuHe Co.) Area Code 916 

BUTTE COLLEGE LIBRARY. 2239 Midway (95938). 345-2481. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-5. 
Donald L. Johanns, Libn. 

Vols: 30,860. Bd per: 588. Micro hldgs: 2,726. Per subs: 430. 
Exp: Sal: $66,134. Bks: $20,000. Per: $5,500. AV: $21,461. 
Special subject: Liberal arts. 

EDWARDS (Kern Co.) Area Code 805 

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION, FLIGHT RE- 
SEARCH CENTER LIBRARY. P.O. Box 273 (93523) . 258-3311, ext. 334, 335. M-F, 7:30^. 

Staff: 3 libns. Titles: 5,000. Per subs: 230. Micro hldgs: 390,000. Cassettes. 

Special subjects: Flight research, aircraft and flight equipment, aircraft research and development. 

Member, SCAN. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 127 

EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE (Kern Co.) Area Code 805 
AIR FORCE BASE LIBRARY. Popson Ave. (93523). 
AIR FORCE FLIGHT TEST CENTER, TECHNICAL LIBRARY. (93523) 

EL CAJON (Son Diego Co.) Area Code 714 

GROSSMONT COLLEGE, LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER. 8800 Grossmont Col- 
lege Dr. (92020). 465-7100. M-Th, 7:30-10; F, 9-^; S, 12:30-4:30; Sun, 12:30-5:30. T. A. 
Hepp, Libn. 

Vols: 56,110. Bd per: 50. Micro hldgs: 2,698 reels. Per subs: 756. 
Inc: $569,718. Exp: Sal: $271,690. Bks: $74,072. Per: $15,185. AV: $64,000. Bd: $1,500. 
Special collctions: Art reproductions, sculpture, phonograph records, vocational materials, college 
catalogs, filmstrips, video tapes. 

EL CAMINO COLLEGE (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

EL CAMINO COLLEGE LIBRARY. El Camino College (via Torrance) (90506). 532- 
3670, ext. 250. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-4:30 Helen E. Rodgers, Libn. 

Vols: 80,710. Bd. per: 1,866. Micro holdgs: 2,206 reels. Per subs: 912. 
Inc: $76,024. Exp: Bks: $50,000. Per: $10,500. Bd: $3,000. Other: $12,524. 

EL CENTRO (Imperial Co.) Area Code 714 

EL CENTRO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 539 State St. (92243). 352-0751. Mrs. Romaine R. 
Magee, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey DecimEil classification. 

Trustees: Roy Womack, Mrs. Reginald Knox, William J. Ewing, Raymond Reeder, James Fisher. 

Member, Serra Library System. 

IMPERIAL COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, 939 Main St. (92243) . 352-3610. 
Loretta DouU, Libn. 

ELDRIDGE (Sonoma Co.) Area Code 707 

SONOMA STATE HOSPITAL, PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1400 (95431). 
996-1011, ext. 244. M-F, 8-4:30. Mrs. Thella Winters, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn, 'A other. Vols: 7,861. Tech reports: 557. Per subs: 225. 

Special subjects: Mental retardation, psychiatry, psychology, genetics, pediatrics. 

Member, PSRMLS. 

EL MONTE (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

HOFFMAN ELECTRONICS LIBRARY, 4323 North Arden Drive (91734). 442-0123, ext. 
300. M-F, 8-5. Roberta Kunze, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 2,500. Tech reports: 600. Per subs: 98. 
Special subjects: Electronics, navigation. 

EL SEGUNDO (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

AEROSPACE CORPORATION, CHARLES C. LAURITSEN LIBRARY. 2350 E. El 
Segundo Blvd. (90245) . 

COMPUTER SCIENCES CORPORATION. 650 North Sepulveda Blvd. (90245). 678- 
0311, ext. 1078. M-F, 8:3(^5:30. Joann M. Tommela, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 2,500. Tech reports: 12,000. Per subs: 230. Micro hldgs: 300 
Special subjects: Computer sciences, data processing, data communications, business, management, 
mathematics, operations research. 

EL SEGUNDO PUBLIC LIBRARY. Ill W. Mariposa (90245). 322-4121. Dorothea 
Fitzgerald, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Inglewood PubUc Library. Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal 

classification. 
Trustees: Elmer L. Balmer, Jane Hough, Gordon Stephens, Richard Nagel, Herman McGiU, James C. 

Morgan. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 



128 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

EL SEGUNDO— Continued 

HUGHES AIRCRAFT COMPANY, SPACE AND COMMUNICATIONS BRANCH LI- 
BRARY. 1950 East Imperial Highway (90009) (Bldg. 366/171, P.O. Box 92919, Los Ange- 
les 90009) . 648-4668, ext. 84668. M-F, 8-5. Vicky S. Huang, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 9,000. Tech reports: 58,000. Per subs: 125. Micro hldgs: 58,000 fiche. 
Special subject: Space science. 

XEROX CORPORATION, DATA SYSTEMS DIVISION, TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 

701 South Aviation Blvd. (90245). 679-4511, ext. 2221. M-F, 9-5:15. Carole Westberg, 
Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 3,500. Tech reports: 1,600. Per subs: 350. Bd per: 1,100 vols. 
Special subjects: Computers, xerography, management, electronics. 

EMERYVILLE (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

TECNA CORPORATION LIBRARY. 4204 HoUis St. (94608). 658-7787. M-F, 8:30-5:30. 
D.L. Hunt, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Per subs: 43. 

Special subjects: Biomedical research and engineering. 

ESCONDIDO (San Diego Co.) Area Code 714 

ESCONDIDO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 239 S. Kalmia St. (92025) . 745-2217. Graham H. Hum- 
phrey, Jr., Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Art slides and film collection, musical scores, Califomiana. 

Trustees: Charles H. Daniels, Mrs. Coral R. Bergman, Mrs. Josephine Chamberlain, Wesley R. Thorn- 
ton, Mrs. Mildred Thien. 
Member, Serra Library System. 

PALOMAR MEMORIAL HOSPITAL MEDICAL STAFF LIBRARY. 550 E. Grand Ave. 
(92025) 

ETNA (Siskiyou Co.) Area Code 916 

ETNA FREE LIBRARY. Main St. (96027). Mrs. Doris Jackson, Libn. 

Affiliated with: Siskiyou County. 

EUREKA (Humboldt Co.) Area Code 707 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DISTRICT 01 LIBRARY. 1656 Union St. (95501). 

COLLEGE OF THE REDWOODS LIBRARY. (95501) . 443-8411. M-Th, 7:30-10; F, 7:30- 
5. Gerald E. Brogan, Libn. 

Vols: 35,143. Bd per: 900. Micro hldgs: 3,093 reels, 126 fiche. Per subs: 358. 
Exp: Sal: $105,560. Bks: $32,500. Per: $4,600. AV: $1,900. Bd: $175. 

EUREKA-HUMBOLDT COUNTY LIBRARY. 421 1 St., Courthouse (mailing: 636 F St.) 
(95501). 455-7513. Ms. Evanne Wheeler, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Affiliated with: Femdale. Outlets: 76. 

Branches: Garberville, Willow Creek (Klamath-Trinity Branch) . 

Stations: Alderpoint, Areata, Blocksburg, Blue Lake, Fortima, Hoopa, Jail, Juvenile Hall, McKinleyville, 

Miranda, Orleans, Rio Del, Trinidad, Whitethorn. 
Bookmobile stops: 58 (51 community, 7 school) . 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collection: Humboldt and Del Norte county history. 
Member, North State Cooperative Library System. 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, 825 Fifth St. (95501). 

FAIRFIELD (Solano Co.) Area Code 707 

SOLANO COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. Texas St. at Union Ave. (94533) . 422-2010, ext. 257. 
Mrs. Josephine M. Becker, Acting Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Benicia, Vallejo, Dixon U.S.D. Library District, Vacaville U.S.D. Library 

District. Outlets: 57. 
Branches: Fairfield-Suisun, Rio Vista. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 129 

Bookmobile stops: 54 (46 community, 8 school) . 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Solano County history, discontinued periodicals. 
Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

SOLANO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Hall of Justice, 600 Union Ave. (94533) . 425-8922. 

FERNDALE (Humboldt Co.) Area Code 707 

FERNDALE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 807 Main St. (P.O. Box 397) (95536). Mrs. Frances M. 
Haywood, Libn. 

Affiliated with: Humboldt County. 

FONTANA (Son Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 

KAISER FOUNDATION HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 9961 Sierra Ave. (92335). 
822-3371, ext. 470. M-F, 8-^:30. Mrs. Sue D. Layvas, Libn. 

Stafi^: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 3,000. Per subs: 140. Texts: 3,000. 

Special subjects: Medicine, orthopedics, surgery ob.-gyn., dermatology, pediatrics. 

FORT ORD (Monterey Co.) Area Code 408 

ARMY COMBAT DEVELOPMENTS EXPERIMENTATION COMMAND, TECHNI- 
CAL LIBRARY. Bldg. 2925 (Box 22) (93941). 242-3757, -2971. M-F, 7:15-^. Ava Dell 
Headley, Libn. 

Staff^: 2 libns, 3 others. Vols: 30,000. Tech reports: 20,000. Per subs: 350. Pams: 10,000. 

Special subjects: Military art and science (combat fire team, small arms, tank duels, air defense, aircraft 

survivability); behavioral sciences; operations research; simulation; instrumentation; Dept. of 

Army official publications. 

FORT ORD LIBRARY SYSTEM. (93941). 

FORTUNA (Humboldt Co.) Area Code 707 

REDWOOD MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. Renner Drive (95540) . 
725-3361. Open daily, 24 hours. 

Vols: 100. Tech reports: 25-50. Per subs: 18. 

FREMONT (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

OHLONE COLLEGE LIBRARY. 650 Washington Blvd. (94538) . 627-2100. M-Th, 7:45- 
9; F, 7:45-4:45; S, noon to 4; Sun, 1-5. Hans L. Larsen, Libn. 

Vols: 32,000, Bd per: 100. Micro hldgs: 1,760. Per subs: 449. 

Exp: Sal: $104,000. Bks. $42,000. Per: $5,554. AV: $19,000. Bd: $700. 

WASHINGTON HOSPITAL, GRIMMER MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 2000 Mowry Ave. 
(94538) . Open to public by arrangement. John W. Patton, Library Consultant. 

Vols: 400. Per subs: 50. 

FRENCH CAMP (Son Joaquin Co.) Area Code 209 
SAN JOAQUIN GENERAL HOSPITAL MEDICAL UBRARY. (95231) . 

FRESNO (Fresno Co.) Area Code 209 

CALIFORNIA STATE COURT OF APPEAL, FIFTH APPELLATE DISTRICT, LAW 
LIBRARY. 2550 Mariposa St. (93721). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME, REGION IV, LI- 
BRARY. 1234 E. Shaw Ave. (93726). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBUC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DISTRICT 06 LIBRARY. 1352 W. Olive Ave. (93728) . 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES, SAN JOAQUIN 
DISTRICT LIBRARY. 3374 E. Shields Ave. (P.O. Box 2385) (93723). 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FRESNO, UBRARY. (93740) . 487-2596. M-Th, 
7:30-10; F, 7:30-5; S, 8-5; Sun, 2-10. Henry Miller Madden, Libn. 

Vols: 426,491. Bd per: 66,164. Micro hldgs: 219,376. Per subs: 4,603. 

Inc: $1,557,387. Exp: Sal: $865,265. Bks: $477,541. Per: $86,943. AV: $15,911. Bd: $53,679. Operating 
expenditures: $58,048. 



130 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

FRESNO — Continued 

Special collections: History of the San Joaquin Valley and Sierra Nevada, wines and grapes, William 
Saroyan, international exhibitions. University Archives, fine presses, ichthyology. 

FRESNO CITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1101 University Ave. (93741) . 264-4721. M-Th, 
8-9; F, 8-^; J. C. Carty, Libn., Alfred Herrera, Chief A.V. 

Vols: 45,127. Bd per: 2,665. Micro hldgs: 2,161. Per subs: 440. 

Inc: $216,957. Exp: Sal: $178,797. Bks: $10,760. Per: $6,760. AV: $17,300. Bd: $1,000. Microfilm: $3,000. 
Supplies: $2,500. 

FRESNO COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 2420 Mariposa St. (92721) . 488-3191. Mrs. Alice 
F. Reilly, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except CoaUnga Unified School District. Outlets: 53. 

Branches: Clovis, Fig Garden, Gillis, North Fresno, Reedley, Sanger, Selma, Suimyside, West Fresno. 

Stations: Auberry, Big Creek, Big Creek #2, Caruthers, Easton, Firebaugh, Fowler, Giant Club, 

Kerman, Kingsburg, Laton, Mendota, Miramonte, Navelencia, Orange Cove, Parlier, Pinedale. 
Bookmobile stops: 21. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: William Saroyan collection, Califomiana, with special emphasis on San Joaquin 

VaUey. 
Member, San Joaquin Valley Library System. 

FRESNO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, Rm. 600, 1100 Van Ness Ave. (93721) . 
237-2227. Mrs. Dorothy G. Morris, Libn. 

PACIFIC COLLEGE, HIEBERT LIBRARY. 1717 S. Chestnut (93702). 251-7194, ext. 
51. M-Th, 8-5:30, 6:30-10:30; F, 8-5, 9-12; S, 1-4. Adonijah Pauls, Libn. 

Vols: 53,862. Micro hldgs: 800 reels. Per subs: 534. 

Inc: $43,483. Exp: Sal: $27,931. Bks: $13,710. Bd: $243. Other: $1,597. 

Special subject: Mennonite Brethren history. Special collections: Mennonite Library and archives. 

SAINT AGNES HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 530 West Floradora Ave. (93728). 
266-9551, ext. 265. Open daily, 24 hours. Mrs. Mary Lou Kearney, Med. Staff Secretary. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 748. Per subs: 27. 

Special subjects: Medical Letter (drugs and therapeutics) ; modem concepts of cardiovascular diseases; 

tumors (oral tissues; thymus thyroid teratomas; pancreas, kidney and ureter; bone and cartilege; 

stomach soft tissues). 
Member, PSRMLS. 

VALLEY CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 3151 North MiUbrook 
Ave. (93703). 227-2961, ext. 253. Open daily, 24 hours. Rosanne Fakunding, R.R.R., Med. 
Record Administrator. 

Vols: 250. Per subs: 19. Cassettes. 
Special subject: Pediatrics. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

VALLEY MEDICAL CENTER OF FRESNO, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 445 South Cedar 
Ave. (93702). 251-4833, ext. 2409. M-F, 7:30-4:30. Mrs. Vicky Christianson, Libn. 

Staff: I'/j libns. Vols: 5,500. Per subs: 170. Audio Digest. 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 2615 Clinton Ave. (93703). 

FRONTERA (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTION FOR WOMEN LIBRARY. (91720). Ralph M. Sheets, 
Acting Libn. 

FULLERTON (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

BECKMAN INSTRUMENTS, INC., RESEARCH LIBRARY. 2500 Harbor Blvd. (92634) . 
871-4848, ext. 359. M-F, 8-4:42. Jean Miller, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3 others. Vols: 23,000 (incl bd per) . Tech reports: 20,000 Per subs: 457. Micro hldgs: 200 
cartridges, 2,000 fiche. 

Special subjects: Optics, spectroscopy, chromatography, analytical chemistry, physical chemistry, in- 
strumentation, cUnical chemistry. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 131 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSIY, FULLERTON, LIBRARY. Box 4150 (92634). 870- 
2714. M-Th, 7:45-10; F, 7:45-5; S, 9-5. Ernest W. Toy, Jr., Libn. 

Vols: 325,310. Bd per: 21,989. Microfilm: 47,525 reels; other microform: 71,923 equiv. vols. Per subs: 
4,289. 

Inc: $1,445,592. Exp: Sal: $848,995. Bks: $343,135. Per: $102,000. Bd: $22,000. Microforms: $30,363; 
Records and tapes: $3,900; Services and bib. tools: $18,500; Special library materials: $16,800; Sup- 
plies and services: $56,647; Equipment: $3,255. 

Special subjects: Califomiana, World War, 1939-49 (including oral interviews re the Japanese-Ameri- 
can relocation centers), Labor papers collection, mathematics, oral history. United States dis- 
plomatic history, higher education. Orange County history, liberal arts. Special collections: Press 
books and fine printing of the 20th century; local history ephemera; history of cartography; science 
fiction; Freedom Center of Political Ephemera (political controversy) ; ichthyology; angling and 
fishing. 

FULLERTON COLLEGE LIBRARY. 321 E. Chapman Ave. (92634). 879-2560. M-Th, 
7:30-10; F, 7:30-4; S, noon to 4. Mrs. Shirley E. Bosen, Libn. 

Vols: 78,971. Bd per: 2,482. Micro hldgs: 92,375. Per subs: 636. 

Inc: $421,330. Exp: Sal: $330,545. Bks: $35,656. Per: $8,937. AV: $11,092. Bd: $797. Other: $35,303. 

Special subjects: Pohce science, California law, oceanographic technology, mathematics (audio tutori- 
al) , photography. Special collections: U.S.G.S. Quadrangle maps of California, Presidential Doll 
Collection, ERIC, doctoral dissertations on microfilm (literary topics). New York Times on mi- 
crofihn 1920-date. 

FULLERTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 353 W. Commonwealth Ave. (92632) . 871-9440. Mrs. 
Jean Nelson, libn. 

Outlets: 14 (1 branch, 12 community bookmobile stops) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal 

classification. 
Special collection: Fine arts books. 

Trustees: Mrs. Herbert G. Osborne, Mrs. Miles Engle, Vem P. Maple, Carl Kalbfleisch, Ralph Mclean. 
Member, Santiago Library System. 

HUGHES AIRCRAFT COMPANY, GROUND SYSTEMS DIVISION, TECHNICAL 
LIBRARY. 800 West Malvern (P.O. Box 3310) (92634). 871-3232, ext, 3506. M-F, 8-^. 
Stanley B. Demes, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 5 others. 

Vols: 10,500. Tech reports: 30,000. Per subs: 225. Micro hldgs: 15,000. Newspapers: 10. 

Special subjects: Electronics, electrical engineering. 

PACIFIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE, HURST MEMORIAL UBRARY. 2500 E. Nutwood 
(92631). 879-3901. M-Th, 7:30-10:30; F, 7:30-5; S, 12:30-^:30. Kenneth C. Hanson, Libn. 

Vols: 25,500. Bd per: 156. Micro hldgs: 100 reels. Per subs: 257. 

Inc: $28,000. Exp: Sal: $16,000. Bks $7,500. Per: $1,500. AV: $900. Bd: $600. Other: $1,500. 

Special subjects: Religion, Bible, church history, Christian education, early childhood education. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF OPTOMETRY UBRARY. 2001 Associate 
Rd. (92632). 

GARDENA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

HITCO CORPORATION LIBRARY. 1600 West 135th (90249). 329-4908. M-F, 8-3:30. 
Sherril Hisaw, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 6,125. Tech reports: 14,000. Per subs: 125. 

Special subjects: Graphite and carbon/carbon composites, plastics technology. 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL OF GARDENA, MEDICAL STAFF UBRARY. 1145 Redondo 
Beach Blvd. (90247). 532-4200, ext. 229. M-S, 7-5. 
Vols: 102. Per subs: 28. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

GARDEN GROVE (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 
LIBRARY OF VEHICLES. 12172 Sheridan Lane (92640). 



132 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

GEORGE AIR FORCE BASE (San Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 

AIR FORCE BASE LIBRARY (92392) . 269-3456. M-Th, 9-9; S, 1-5, Sun, 2-6. Mrs. Frances 
Haysley, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 4 others, vols; 31,000. Per subs: 180. Micro hldgs: 100+ . Art reproductions: 59. 
Special subjects: Education and counselling, business administration and management, Air Force and 
rmlitary history. 

OILMAN HOT SPRINGS (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 
MT. SAN JACINTO JUNIOR COLLEGE LIBRARY. P.O. Box 248 (92340). 

GILROY (Santa Clara Co.) Area Code 408 
GAVILAN COLLEGE LIBRARY. 5055 Santa Teresa Blvd. (95020). 

GLENDALE (Lot Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

BEHRENS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 446 Piedmont Ave. (91206). 

GLENDALE ADVENTIST HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 1509 Wilson Terrace (91206) (Box 
871, 91209). 244-4684, ext. 356. Sun-Th, 9-9; F, 9-3. Gertrude Huygens, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 3 others. Vols: 14,769. Per subs: 345. 

Special subject: Nursing (library is depository for all material indexed in Cumulative Index to Nursing 
Literature ) . 

GLENDALE COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1500 N. Verdugo Rd. (91208). 240- 
1000. M-Th, 7:30-10; F, 7:30-5; Sun, 1-5. William J. Strange, Libn, 

Vols: 42,000. Bd per: 33 titles. Micro hldgs: 82 titles. Per subs: 434 titles. 

Inc: $142,914. ¥xp: Sal: $110,215. Bks: $27,458. Per: $4,400. AV: $12,495. Bd: $3,017. Student Salaries: 
$6,664. 

GLENDALE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 222 E. Harvard St. (91205). 956-2030. Jack Ramsey, 
Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: City of Los Angeles, County of Los Angeles. 

Outlets: 21 (6 branches, 14 community bookmobile stops) . 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Sp>ecial collections: Glendale history (central and Brand libraries), art and music (Brand library), 

genealogy and history of felines (central library) . 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

LOS ANGELES COLLEGE OF CHIROPRACTIC LIBRARY. 920 E. Broadway (91205) . 
245-1251, 244-3154. M-F, 9:30-9. Loretta E. Heacock, Libn. 

Vols: 7,520. Bd per: 840. Per subs: 203. 

Inc: $1,944. Exp: Sal: $6,555. Bks: $318. Per: $846. Bd: $200. Other: $401. 

Sjjecial subjects: Chiropractic technic (spine and related subjects); biological sciences; human spine. 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL OF GLENDALE, MEDICAL STAFF LIBRARY. 1420 South 
Central Ave. (91204). 246-6711, ext. 377. Mrs. Olga Martin, Libn. 

Private library. 

SINGER LIBRASCOPE TECHNICAL INFORMATION CENTER. 833 Sonora Ave. 
(91201) . 245-8711, ext. 1751. M-F, 8-4:30. Nathan J. Sands, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 15,000. Tech reports: 10,000. Per subs: 250. Micro hldgs: 20,000. VSMF 

Microfilm System of Documentation. 
Special subjects: Computers, antisubmarine warfare. Navy fire control systems, display systems. 

VERDUGO HILLS HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 1812 Verdugo Blvd. (91208). 790-7100, ext. 
575. M-F, 8-5. William Stewart, Med. Records Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 400. Tech reports: 3. Per subs: 15. 

WED ENTERPRISES RESEARCH LIBRARY. 1401 Flower St. (91201) . 245-8951, ext. 247. 
M-F, 8:30-12, 1-5:30. Jean Kenney, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 7,800. Tech reports: 375. Per subs: 235. Picture file. 
Special subjects: Architecture, art, engineering. 



! 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 133 

GLENDORA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

GLENDORA LIBRARY AND CULTURAL CENTER. 140 S. Glendora Ave. (91740). 
936-4168. John Jolly, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Los Angeles County Public Library. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Mrs. Aline Crowley Wisdom, Mrs. Joseph B. Fracasse, Mrs. Robert L. Tschamer, Raymond 

Gelgur, William D. Dyer. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

GOLETA (Santo Barbara Co.) Area Code 805 

BURROUGHS CORPORATION LIBRARY. 6300 HoUister Ave. (93017) 964-6881, ext. 
222. M-F, 8-4:30. Mrs. Claudia H. Scott, Libn. 

Vols: 700. Tech reports: 75. Per subs: 125. 
Special subjects: Computers and electronics. 
Member, Total InterHbrary Exchange (TIE) . 

HUMAN FACTORS RESEARCH, INC., TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 6780 Cortona Drive 
(93017). 968-1071, ext. 40. M-F, 8-5. Ms. Vema Starks, Libn. 

Staff": 1 libn. Vols: 1,185. Tech reports: 9,023. Per subs: 160. Micro hldgs: 103. 

Special subjects: Psychiatry, psychology, transportation, human factors, biology, education, engineer- 
ing. 

RAYTHEON COMPANY, ELECTROMAGNETIC SYSTEMS DIVISION, ENGINEER- 
ING LIBRARY. 6380 Hollister Ave. (P.O. Box 1542) (93017). 967-5511, ext. 237. M-F, 
7:30-^:15. Arthur J. Bossd", Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 3,500. Per subs: 100. Micro hldgs: 2,500. VSMF— Design and Mil Spec. 
Special subjects: Computer sciences, electronic engineering, general drafting, mathematics, mechani- 
cal engineering, microwave technology, radar. 
Member, TIE (Total Interlibrary Exchange) . 

GRANADA HILLS (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

GRANADA HILLS COMMUNITY HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 10445 Balboa Blvd. (91344). 
360-1021. M-F, 8-5. 
Vols: 200. Per subs: 20. 

GRASS VALLEY (Nevada Co.) Area Code 916 

NEVADA COUNTY LIBRARY. 207 MUl St. (95959). 273-6829. Mrs. Judith Schugren, 
Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Outlets: 44. 

Stations: Nevada City, Truckee, Grass Valley. 

Bookmobile stops: 41 (35 community, 6 school) . 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal, Sears classifications. 

Special collections: County history, mining. 

Member, Mountain- Valley Library System. 

HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE (Marin Co.) Area Code 415 
HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE LIBRARY, FL 2541. (94934). 

HANFORD (Kings Co.) Area Code 209 

HANFORD COMMUNITY HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 450 North Greenfield (93230). 582- 
4361. Open daily, 24 hours. 

Vols: 300. Per subs: 24. Pat Chester, Med. Records Libn. 

HANFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY. 401 N. Douty St. (93230) . 582r0261. Mrs Louise HoUey, 
Acting Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Kings County. Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Fine arts, Califomiana. 

Trustees: Mrs. WUma Humason, Louise Holley, Rev. James Tubbs, James H. Leonard, Mrs. Clarence 

Wilson, Derral Hawkins. 
Member, San Joaquin Valley Library System. 



134 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

HANFORD — Continued 

KINGS COUNTY LAW UBRARY. Courthouse, Box C (93230). 584-6143. M-F, 8-5. 

KINGS COUNTY LIBRARY. 401 N. Douty St. (93230). 582-9096. Mrs. Jean Schafer, 
Acting Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Hanford. Contracts with: Hanford. Outlets: 12 

Branches: Armona, Avenal, Corcoran, HPL Children's Room. 

Stations: Clarks Fork, Grangeville, Kettleman City, Kings River, Stratford. 

Bookmobile stops: 4. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Member, San Joaquin Valley Library System. 

HAWTHORNE (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

NORTHROP CORPORATION, AIRCRAFT DIVISION, UBRARY SERVICES. 3901 
West Broadway (90250). 675-4611, ext. 1034. M-F, 8-^:42. H. W. (Bill) Jones, Mgr. 

Staff: 3 libns. 6 other. Vols: 13,500. Tech reports: 50,000. Per subs: 475. Micro hldgs: 200,000. Military 

specs, standards, handbooks, manuals, etc.: 25,000. 
Special subjects: Aerodynamics, aeronautical engineering. 
Special collections: USAF Technical Orders, NASA publications, Northrop Reports. 

NORTHROP CORPORATION, RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER LI- 
BRARY. 3401 West Broadway (90250). 675-4611, ext. 2711. M-F, 8:15-5. Esther Demoss, 
Libn. 

Staff: 3. Vols: 17,608. Tech reports: 27,000. Per subs: 284. Micro hldgs: 29,300. 

HAYWARD (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

ALAMEDA COUNTY FREE UBRARY. 224 W. Winton Ave., Rm. 108 (94544) . 783-5800, 
ext. 337. Barbara Gray Boyd, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Alameda, Berkeley, EmeryviUe, Hayward, Livermore, Oakland, Pied- 
mont, San Leandro. Outlets: 73 

Branches: Business /Gov't. Center, Castro Valley, Fremont Main (Fremont), San Lorenzo. 

Stations: Albany, Centerville (Fremont), Dublin, Irvington (Fremont), Newark, Niles (Fremont), 
Pleasanton, Union City. 

Bookmobile stops: 5 (37 community, 16 school). 

Copying service for patrons. 

Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Business, local government, history of southern Alameda Coimty, Spanish collec- 
tion. 

Member, East Bay Cooperative Library System. 

BUSINESS AND GOVERNMENT UBRARY. 224 West Winton Ave., Room 

188 (94544). 537-6800. M-F, 10-6. Mrs. Ann M. Stevens, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 3 others. Vols: 10,000. Per subs: 500. 

Special subjects: Business and government. Elmphasis on management, personnel, marketing, adver- 
tising, investments, administration, real estate, insurance, materials by and for local city /county 
governments including planning, operations, administration, finances. 

Member, BARC; East Bay Cooperative Library System. 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, HAYWARD, LIBRARY. 25800 Hillary St. (94542) . 
884-3664. M-Th, 8-9; F, 8-5; S, 9-5; Sun, 1-9. Floyd R. Erickson, Libn. 

Vols: 370, 029. Bd per: 53,393. Micro hldgs: 59,377. Per subs: 2,923. 

Inc: $1,207,033. Exp: Sal: $719,226. Bks: $290,377. Per: $76,000. Bd: $25,050. Other: $96,380. 

CHABOT COLLEGE LIBRARY. 25555 Hesperian Blvd. (94545). 

HAYWARD PUBLIC UBRARY. 22734 Mission Blvd. (94541) . 581-2545. William G. Web- 
ster, Libn. 

Outlets 2 (1 branch). 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Mrs. Ruth McGuire, Mrs. Norma McKamey, Earl S. Kenyon, Ernest Pimental, Mrs. Shiela 
Martinsen. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 135 

KAISER FOUNDATION HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 27400 Hesperian Blvd. 

(94545). 

HEALDSBURG (Sonoma Co.) Area Code 707 

HEALDSBURG PUBLIC LIBRARY. 221 Matheson St. (95448) . 433-3772. Mrs. Elinor B. 
Seng, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: James Mazzoni, Ms. Fay Seghesio, Garrett Rosenberg, Kenneth Hampton, Ms. Margerie 

Neal. 
Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

HEMET (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 

HEMET PUBLIC LIBRARY. 510 E. Florida Ave. (92343). 658-5183. James P. Boulton, 
Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: CaUfomiana, with special emphasis on southern CaUfomia. 
Trustees: Carl Gregory, Mrs. L. H. Tucker, Mrs. Eldert Staargaard, Roland Mann, Fred R. Moya, 
Frances G. Tracy. 

HOLLISTER (San Benito Co.) Area Code 408 

SAN BENITO COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 470 Fifth St. (95023) . 637-2013. Kathryn Dool- 
ing, Libn. 

Serves: Entire County. Affiliated with: San Juan Bautista City Library. 

Outlets: 3. 

Station: Panoche. 

Special collection: Memorial art collection. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (95023). 

HOLLYWOOD (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

MAX FACTOR & COMPANY, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY 
LIBRARY. 1655 North McCadden Place (90028) . 462-6131, ext. 334. M-F, 8:15-5. Mrs. 
Dawn A. Wingate, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 2,500. Per subs: 100. 

Special subjects: Cosmetics; bacteriology, chemistry, dermatology, geriatrics, metallurgy, mycology, 
pharmacology, as apphcable to cosmetics. 

METROMEDIA PRODUCERS CORPORATION, RESEARCH DEPARTMENT LI- 
BRARY. 8544 Sunset Blvd. (90069) . 652-7075, ext. 334, 335. M-F, 9-«. Gary Pflaum, Re- 
search Dept. Head. 

Staff: L Vols: 2,000. Tech reports: several hundred. Per subs: 10. 

HUNTINGTON BEACH (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

GOLDEN WEST COLLEGE LIBRARY. 15744 Golden West St. (92647) . 892-7711. M-Th, 
7:30-10; F, 7:30-5; Sun, 1-5. Beatrice N. Kell, Libn. 

Vols: 58,677. Micro hldgs: 948 reels, 104 tides. Per subs: 698. 
Inc: $247,548. Exp: Sal: $175,130. Bks: $37,243. Per: $9,000. 

HUNTINGTON BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY. 525 Main St. (92648). 536-5481. Walter 
Johnson, Libn. 

Outlets: 74 (2 stations, 53 community, 18 school bookmobile stops). Copying service for patrons. 
Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Large print and French language books, Microbook library of American civiliza- 
tion (microfiche) , book discussion sets. 

Trustees: David Wickersham, Charlene Bauer, Gertrude Murphy, Richard Altimari, George Wdliams. 

Member, Santiago Library System. 

HUNTINGTON PARK (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

MISSION HOSPITAL OF HUNTINGTON PARK, LIBRARY. 3111 East Florence Ave. 
(90255). 582-8261, ext. 54. M-F, 8:30-5. Mildred E. Wade, R.R.A., Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 50-70. Per subs: 14. 



136 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

IMOLA (Napa Co.) Area Code 707 

NAPA STATE HOSPITAL, WRENSHALL A. OLIVER PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY. 
Box A (94558). Mrs. Alberta C. Titus, Libn. 

IMPERIAL (Imperial Co.) Area Code 714 

IMPERIAL COUNTY FREE UBRARY. 247 S. Imperial Ave. (92251). 355-2260. Mrs. 
Kathryn M. Staab, Acting Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Brawley, El Centre. Affiliated with: Calexico, Imperial. Outlets: 14. 
Stations: Calipatria, Heber, Holtville, Magnolia, Niland, Ocotillo, Plaster City, Salton City, Seeley, 

Westmorland, Winterhaven. 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: California history. Imperial County history. 
Member: Serra Library System. 

IMPERIAL PUBUC UBRARY. 200 W. 9th St. (mailing: Box 38) (92251). 355-1332. 
Helen W. Prescott, Libn. 

Affiliated with: Imperial County. Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Trustees: Robert G. Holt, Mrs. Lois Patterson, George Riley, Evans T. McCauley, Mrs. William Lee. 
Member, Serra Library System. 

IMPERIAL VALLEY COLLEGE LIBRARY. P.O. Box 158 (92251). 352-8320. M-Th, 
8-9; F, 8-5. Stanley E. Alberda, Libn. 

Vols: 29,566. Bd per: 500. Micro hldgs: 1,437 reels, 2,477 volumes. Per subs: 350. 
Exp: Sal: $62,522. Bks: $20,000. Per: $4,000. AV: $1,800. 
Special collection: Imperial Valley. 

INDEPENDENCE (Inyo Co.) Area Code 714 

INYO COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. Courthouse (mailing: Drawer K) (93526) . 878-2411, 
ext. 269. Jeannette E. Glynn, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Outlets: 7. 

Stations: Big Pine, Bishop, Furnace Creek, Lone Pine, Rovana, Shoshone. 

Special collections: Local history, Mary Austin. 

Member, Inland Library System. 

INYO COUNTY LAW UBRARY. Courthouse (93526). 

INDIO (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 

INDIO COMMUNITY HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 47-111 Monroe St. (P.O. 
Drawer LLLL) (92201) . 347-6191, ext. 241. Open daily, 24 hours. Joan A. Wyman, A.R.T., 
Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. (part-time). Vols: 81. Per subs: 15. Audiotapes: 150. 

INDUSTRY (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

CITY OF INDUSTRY PUBLIC UBRARY. 100 Hacienda Blvd (P.O. Box 3366) (91744) . 
Mrs. Elvira Ward, Libn. 

SPECTROL ELECTRONICS CORPORATION LIBRARY. 17020 E. Gale (91745). 

INGLEWOOD (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

DANIEL FREEMAN HOSPITAL, VICTOR J. WACHA MEDICAL LIBRARY. 333 
North Prairie Ave. (90301) . 672-0112, ext. 230. M-F, 8 a.m.-midnight. Mrs. Helen Klensch, 
Libn. 

Vols: 2,050. Per subs: 73. Audio-Digest cassettes: 462. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

INGLEWOOD PUBLIC LIBRARY. 101 W. Manchester Blvd. (90301). 674-7111, ext. 
397. John W. Perkins, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles County Public Library System, 
El Segundo Public Library, Torrance Public Library. Outlets: 3 (2 branches) . Copying service for 
patrons. Library of Congress classification. 

Trustees: Margaret Grodrian, Fran Smith, W. E. Jones, Bernard Lauhoff, Thomas Ellerbe. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 137 

NORTHROP INSTrrUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, ALUMNI LIBRARY. 1155 West Ar- 
bor Vitae (90306) . 776-5466. M-Th, 7:30 a.m.-lO p.m.; F, 7:30 a.m.-7 p.m.; S, 8-^; Sun, 1-5. 
Mrs. Nan McCandless, Libn. 

Staff: 4 libns, 3 others. Vols: 47;263. Tech reports: 63,000. Per subs: 200. Micro hldgs: 28,570. 
Special subjects: Engineering, management, law, aviation history (journals, books, manuals; 175,000 
negatives, 50,000 photos) . 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PERMANENTE MEDICAL GROUP, MEDICAL U- 
BRARY. 3425 W. Manchester Blvd. (90305). 

WESTERN STATES COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING LIBRARY. 970 W. Manchester 
Ave. (90301). 

IRVINE (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

ALLERGAN PHARMACEUTICALS, ALLERGAN UBRARY. 2525 DuPont Drive 
(92664). 833-8880, ext. 271. M-F, 8:15-^. Mrs. Shirley Harrison, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 2,500. Per subs: 325. Audio-Digest: 165 tapes. 
Special subjects: Ophthalmology, dermatology. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE, UBRARY. (92664). 833-5212. M-Th, 8- 
midnight; F, 8-6; S, 1-5; Sun, 2-10. John E. Smith, Libn. 

Vols: 420,466. Bd per: 155,219. Micro hldgs: 225,626. Per subs: 10,123. 

Inc: $2,243,187. Exp: Sal: $1,216,499. Bks: $499,215. Per: $297,674. Bd: $91,297. Other: $138,502. 
Special collections: British naval history, I8th century literature, costume, dance, American radical 
pamphlets. Orange County history. 

IRWINDALE (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

IRWINDALE PUBUC LIBRARY. 5050 N. Irwindale Ave. (mailing: P.O. Box 2224) 
(91706). 962-5255, 962-3381, ext. 38. Mrs. Mary Mountjoy, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Los Angeles County Public Libraries. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collection: City history. 

JACKSON (Amador Co.) Area Code 209 
AMADOR COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 108 Court St. (95642). 

AMADOR COUNTY UBRARY. 530 Sutter St. (95642) . 223-0543. Mrs. Sylvia Neal, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Outlets: 5. 

Stations: Amador City, lone. Pine Grove, Plymouth. 

Copying service for patrons. 

Special collections: Mining, large print, foreign language. 

Member, 49-99 Cooperative Library System. 

JAMESTOWN (Tuolumne Co.) Area Code 209 

SIERRA CONSERVATION CENTER, INMATE LIBRARY. P.O. Box 497 (95327). 
Bruce McCloud, Libn. 

KENTFIELD (Marin Co.) Area Code 415 

COLLEGE OF MAPQN UBRARY. (94904) . 454-3962, ext. 274. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-5; Sun, 
1^. Cal Kurzman, Libn. 

Vols: 50,000. Bd per: 5,000. Micro hldgs: 1,225. Per subs: 500. 

Inc: $203,000. Esq): Sal: $154,000. Bks: $34,000. Per: $9,000. Bd: $1,500. 

Branch: Marine Technology Library, Bolinas Marine Station. 

KING CITY (Monterey Co.) Area Code 408 

KING CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 212 S. Vanderhurst Ave. (93930). 385-3677. Mrs. Vir- 
ginia L. Glosson, Libn. 

Affiliated with: Monterey County. Copying service for patrons. 
Special collection: Oral history tapes. 

Trustees: Mrs. Jane Nash, Mrs. Mary Hutton, Mrs. Diane Frudden, Mrs. Socorro Ramirez, Mrs. Helen 
Slagle. 



138 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

LA JOLLA (San Diego Co.) Area Code 714 (see also, San Diego) 

CONTROL DATA CORPORATION, TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 4455 Eastgate Mall 
(92037). 453-2500, ext. 229. M-F, 9-5:30. Mrs. Patricia A. Shephard, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 400. Tech reports: 500. Per subs: 50. 

GULF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS LIBRARY. 10955 John Jay 
Hopkins Drive (92037) (P.O. Box 81608, San Diego 92138) . 453-1000, ext. 3322. M-F, 8-5. 
Richard J. Tommey, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 4 others. Vols: 32,000. Tech reports: 150,000-175,000. Per subs: 1,000. 
Special collection: USAEC R fit D Reports. 

LA JOLLA MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LIBRARY. 700 Prospect St. 
(92037). 454-0183. T, Th, F, 10-5; W, 10-5, 7-10; S, Sun, 12-5 (by appointment). Gail 
Richardson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 1,450. Per subs: 45. Slides: 4,800. 33 file boxes artist monographs; 9 vertical file drawers 

art clippings. 
Special subject: Contemporary art. 

LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF LA JOLLA, ATHENAEUM MUSIC AND ARTS LI- 
BRARY. 1008 Wall St. (92037). 454-5872. T-S, 10-5:30. Evelyn R. Neumann, Library 
Administrator. 

Staff: 3. Vols: 6,300. Per subs: 41. Records: 2,800. Cassettes: 136. 
Special collection: Bachgesellschaft ed. of Bach's works (47 v.). 

NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, SOUTHWEST FISHERIES CENTER, 
UBRARY. 8604 La Jolla Shores Drive (P.O. Box 271) (92037) . 453-2820, ext. 243. M-F, 
8-1:30. Dan Gittings, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 9,000. Tech reports: 1,500. Per subs: 300. 

Special subjects: Fisheries literature (including Japanese journals) , marine biology and oceanography. 

SALK INSTITUTE FOR BIOLOGICAL STUDIES LIBRARY. 10010 North Torrey Pines 
Road (P.O. Box 1809, San Diego 92112) . 453-4100, ext. 235. Open daily, 24 hours. Mrs. 
Pauline K. Whalen, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3 others. Vols: 9,804. Per subs: 225. 

SCRIPPS CLINIC AND RESEARCH FOUNDATION MEDICAL LIBRARY. 476 Pros- 
pect St. (92037) . 459-2390, ext. 421. M-F, 8-8; S, 8-5. Jesse G. Neely, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 18,932. Per subs: 379. 

SCRIPPS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, KINYON MEDICAL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 28 

(92037). 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO, LIBRARY. P.O. Box 2367 (92037). 453- 
2000, ext. 1963. M-F, 8-10; S, 9-5; Sun, 1-10. Melvin J. Voigt, Libn. 

Vols: 977,573. Micro hldgs: 302,739 microfiche and microcards; 7,302 microfilm reels. Per subs: 21,587. 

Inc.: $3,481,520. Exp: Sal: $1,871,235. Bks: $961,345. Bd: $137,627. Other: $225,854. 

Special subjects: Art, Black literature, business, economics, education, humanities, medicine, music, 
natural science, para-medical, science-technology, social and behavioral sciences. Special collec- 
tions: Renaissance, Spanish Civil War, theosophy, Baja California, Pacific voyages, oceanography, 
marine biology, medicine. 

Branches: Biomedical Library, Science and Engineering Library, Scripps Institution of Oceanography 
Library, Cluster Undergraduate Library. 

WESTERN BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES INSTITUTE LIBRARY. 1150 Silverado St. 
(92037). 459-3811, ext. 239. M-F. Jessie R. Rohrbough, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 2,500. Per subs: 72. 
Special subjects: Behavioral sciences, social change. 

LAKEPORT (Lake Co.) Area Code 707 

LAKE COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (P.O. Box 276) (95453). 

LAKE COUNTY LIBRARY PROJECT. 200 Park St. (95453). 263-6927. Gail McGovem, 
Director. 

LAKEPORT CARNEGIE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 200 Park St. (95453). 263-5325. Mrs. A. 
Leslie Mullen, Libn. 

Copying services for patrons. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 139 

Special collection: Lake County history (Henry K. Mauldin). 

Trustees: V. A. "Kip" Neasham, Mrs. Marie Blanche, Mrs. Florence King, Mrs. Jean Thompson, Mrs. 

Beverly Butcher. 
Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

LA MESA (San Diego Co.) Area Code 714 

KAISER FOUNDATION HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 8010 Parkway Drive 
(92041). 465-8440, ext. 468. M-F, ^-5. Sheila Latus, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 3,800. Per subs: 180. Cassettes. 
Special subjects: Clinical medicine, nursing. 

LA MIRADA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 714 

BIOLA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 13800 Biola Ave. (90639). 941-3224. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-6; S, 
1-8. Gerald L. Gooden, Libn. 

Vols: 102,000. Bd per: 12,000. Micro hldgs: 3,003. Per subs: T78. 

Inc: $139,603. Exp: Sal: $72,000. Bks: $50,233. Per: $11,472. Bd: $5,203. 

Special subjects: Bible, theology. Civil War, missions (Christian) . 

LANCASTER (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 805 
ANTELOPE VALLEY COLLEGE, ROY A. KNAPP LIBRARY. 3041 W. Ave. K. (93534) . 

LARKSPUR (Marin Co.) Area Code 415 

LARKSPUR PUBUC LIBRARY. 400 Magnolia Ave. (94939). 924-3165. Richard A. Kil- 
boume, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Marin County Free Library. Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal 

classification. 
Trustees: George B. Frease, Mrs. Johaima Lewis, Mrs. Helen Brenlin, John K. De Bonis, Philip A. Terry. 

LATHROP (San Joaquin Co.) Area Code 209 
SHARPE ARMY DEPOT, FIELD ANNEX, SPECIAL SERVICES LIBRARY. (95330). 

LA VERNE (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 714 
LA VERNE COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1950 3rd St. (91750). 

LAWNDALE (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, WESTERN LIBRARY AWE 63A. 15000 
Aviation Drive (90261) (P.O. Box 92007, World Way Postal Center, Los Angeles 90009). 
M-F, 7:30-3:50. Mrs. Frances Taylor, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 3,000. Tech reports: 3,000. Per subs: 200. 
Special subjects: Aeronautics, aircraft, air transportation. 

TRW SEMICONDUCTOR DIVISION LIBRARY. 14520 Aviation Blvd. (90260). 

LINCOLN (Placer Co.) Area Code 916 

LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY. 590 5th St. (95648) . 645-8744. Ms. Norma Duggan, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. 

Trustees: Mrs. Elizabeth Dubin, Mrs. Ruth Elkus, Mrs. Virginia Garrett, Philip Alosi, Arlan Welch. 

Member, Mountain- Valley Library System. 

LIVERMORE (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

LIVERMORE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 1000 S. Livermore Ave. (94550). 447-2376. Donald 
Nolte, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Wine and winemaldng. 

Trustees: Art Henry, Ms. Kay Honodel, Cliff Marcussen, James Dimmick, Ms. Wesley Ludermann. 

SANDIA LABORATORIES TECHNICAL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 969 (94550). 455-2951. 
M-F, 7:30-4:15. Mr. Lurl S. Ostrander, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 9 others. Vols: 18,000. Tech reports: 50,000. Per subs: 240. Micro hldgs: 2,000 16 mm 
cartridges. 



140 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

LIVERMORE— Continued 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LABORATORY, 
TECHNICAL INFORMATION DEPARTMENT UBRARY. 7000 East Ave. (P.O. Box 
808) (94550) . 447-1100, ext. 8401. M-F, 8-5:30. Scott J. Buginas, Libn. 

Staff: 15 libns, 20 others. Vols: 37,497. Tech reports: 75,500. Per subs: 2,141. Micro hldgs: 283,000 fiche. 
Special subject: Nuclear science. 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY AND PA- 
TIENTS' LIBRARY. (94550). 447-2560, ext. 325. M-F, 8-^:30. Jane S. Halliday, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 1,500. Per subs: 155. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

LODI (San Joaquin Co.) Area Code 209 

LODI PUBLIC LIBRARY. 305 W. Pine St. (95240). 369-6823. Leonard L. Laehendro, 
Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classiBcation. 

Special collections: Califomiana, local history. 

Trustees: Lewis P. Singer, L. W. Verne Howen, Frank V. Johnson, Jr., W. J. Coffield, C. M. Sullivan, 

Jr. 
Member, 49-99 Cooperative Library System. 

LOMA LINDA (San Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 

LOMA LINDA UNIVERSITY, VERNIER RADCLIFFE MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 

(92354). 796-7311. M-Th, 7:30 to midnight; F, 7:30-3; Sun, 8 to midnight. George V. 
Summers, Libn. 

Vols: 103,207. Bd per: 60,462. Micro hldgs: 84,157. Per subs: 2,513. 

Inc: $415,870. Exp: Sal: $200,000. Bks: $22,800. Per: $54,570. AV: $350. Bd: $13,150. Other: $125,000. 
Special subjects: Medicine and allied professions. 

Special collections: Remondino Collection in History of Medicine, C. Burton Clark Collection in 
history of Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

LOMPOC (Santa Barbara Co.) Area Code 805 

LOMPOC PUBLIC LIBRARY. 501 E. North Ave. (93436) . 736-3477. Paul F. Thompson, 
Libn. 

Contracts with: Santa Barbara County Library Zone II, including city of Lompoc. Outlets: 2 ( 1 station) . 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Electronics, space science and technology, electrical engineering. 
Trustees: Lawrence Grossman, Domenico Signorelli, Ronald Saladino, Mrs. Grace Bell, Richard Jaco- 

by. 
Member, Black Gold Cooperative Library System. 

LONG BEACH (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME, MARINE RE- 
SOURCES REGION, MARINE TECHNICAL INFORMATION CENTER. 350 
Golden Shore (90802) . 

CAUFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH, LIBRARY. 6101 E. 7th St. 
(90840). 498-4047. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-5; S, 11-5; Sun, 1-5. Charles J. Boorkman, Libn. 

Vok: 599,322. Bd per: 73,481. Micro hldgs: 23,603 reels of microfilm, 125,382 microfiche cards, 128,228 

opaque cards. Per subs: 4,210. 
Exp: Sal: $1,222,780. Bks: $483,528. Per: $118,605. AV: $17,000. Bd: $37,027. Supplies and services: 

$142,450. Equipment: $12,160. 
Special subjects: United States history, English history, art, English and American literature, theatre 

arts, music, business administration. 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF LAKEWOOD LIBRARY. 5336 Arbor Rd. (90808). 
LONG BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 4901 E. Carson St. (90808) . 420- 
4231. M-Th, 7-10; F, 7-4; S, 10-4; Sun, 12:30-4:30. John E. Geyer, Libn. 

Vols: 103,131. Bd per: 5,820. Micro hldgs: 5,873 (369 16 mm fihns) . Per subs: 600. 
Inc: $360,775. Exp: Sal: $148,128. Bks: $76,739. Per: $11,700. AV: $34,464. Bd: $2,500. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 141 

LONG BEACH INDEPENDENT-PRESS TELEGRAM LIBRARY. 604 Pine Ave. 
(90801). 435-1161, ext. 356. M-F, 9-^:30; S, 9-12. Eugenia Macdonald, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. 

Special collections: News clips and pictures. 

LONG BEACH MUSEUM OF ART LIBRARY. 2300 East Ocean Blvd. (90803). 439- 
2119. W-Sun, 12-5. Mrs. Wahneta T. Robinson, Curator. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 1,723. Per subs: 6. 

Special collections: History of art (all periods) , exhibition catalogues, bulletins, pamphlets, yearly 
reports. 

LONG BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY. Ocean and Pacific Ave. (90802) . 597-334L Mrs. 
Frances Henselman, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: City of Los Angeles. Outlets: 34 (12 branches, 1 station, 19 community, 
1 school bookmobile stop) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classiBcation. 

Special collections: Foreign language books, petroleum collection. Long Beach history collection, 
Bertrand L. Smith, Sr. rare book collection, Rancho Los Cerritos California collection (Rancho 
period), large print books. 

Trustees: Harold Seal, Mrs. Robert Campbell, Mrs. L. L. Wiltse. 

McDonnell douglas corporation, douglas aircraft company, 

TECHNICAL LIBRARY Cl-290 MC 36-84. 3855 Lakewood Blvd. (90808). 593-6536. 
M-F, 8:30-4:42. Mrs. M. H. Swanigan, Libn. 

Staff: 6 libns, 8 others. Vols: 3,000. Tech reports: 215,420. Per subs: 763. Micro hldgs: 542,000 reports. 
Special subjects: Astronautics, aeronautics, human engineering, electronics, mechanics, power plants, 
management. 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER LIBRARY. 2801 Atlantic Ave. (90801) . 
595-2216. M-Th, 8-9; F, 8-6; S, 8-4:30. Frances Aiko Ishii, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 24,639. Per subs: 800. 

PACIFIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE, HURST MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 4835 E. Ana- 
heim St. (90804) . 

PACIFIC HOSPITAL OF LONG BEACH, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 2776 Pacific Ave. 
(P.O. Box 1268) (90801). 595-1911, ext. 291. M-F, 8:30-5. Lois Harris, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 5,000. Per subs: 275. Cassettes: 450. Member, PSRMLS 

ST. MARY'S HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 509 East 10th St. (90801 ) . 435-4441, ext. 
350. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-6; S, Sun, 9-1. Mrs. Pauline Kelvin, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 20,000. Per subs: 700. 

Special subjects: Medicine, nursing, history of medicine. Member, MLGSC. 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 5901 East 7th 
St. (90801). 498-1313, ext. 2417. M-F, 8-^:30. Frances Freleaux, Libn. 

Staff: 5 libns, 1 other. Vols: 6,000. Per subs: 325. Audio cassettes: 600. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

WOODRUFF COMMUNITY HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 3800 Woodruff Ave. (90808). 
421-8241, ext. 317, 301. Open daily, 24 hours. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 85. Per subs: 6. 

LOS ALTOS HILLS (Santa Clara Co.) Area Code 415 

CONGREGATION BETH AM LIBRARY. 26790 Arastradero Road (94022) . Sun, 9-1. 
Elise Zentner, Libn. 

Staff: 12 volunteers. Vols: 2,000. Per subs: 15. 

Special subjects: Jewish studies, incl. Biblical literature, history, cultural and juvenile materials. 

FOOTHILL COLLEGE, HUBERT H. SEMANS LIBRARY. 12345 El Monte (94022). 
948-8590. M-Th, 7:45 to midnight; F, 7:45-4:30; Sun, 1-5. Mrs. Dolly Prchal, Assoc. Dean 
of Instruction. 

Vols: 75,000. Bd per: 5,245. Micro hldgs: 3,475 reels. Per subs: 320. 

Inc: $290,549. Exp: Sal: $227,403. Bks: $25,960. Per: $4,968. AV: $12,025. Bd: $1,005. Other: $36,012. 

Special collections: Californiana (including first 10 yrs. of Palo Alto Times on microfilm) , ethnic studies 

with emphasis on Mexican-American and Black, women's studies. 
Individual Study Center (120 stations) to be opened in Fall, 1973. 



142 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

LOS ANGELES (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE ARTS & SCIENCES, MARGARET HERRICK 
UBRARY. 9038Melrose Ave. (90069). 278-8990. M-F, 9-5. Mildred Simpson, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 4 others. Vols: 7,200. Per subs: 92. 

Special collections: Richard Barthelmess, Thomas Ince, Jean Hersholt, Louella Parsons, Hedda Hop- 
per, Irene, Henry Grace scrapbooks. Lux Radio Theatre scripts. William Selig, Mack Sennett 
collections. Other collections within field of motion pictures, past and present. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY RELATIONS, ROSWELL H. JOHNSON 
MEMORIAL UBRARY. 5287 Sunset Blvd. (90027). 465-5131. M-S, 9-5. Mrs. Bella 
Goldstein, Libn. 

Vols: 7,500. Tech reports: 500. Per subs: 125. 
Special subjects: Marriage and fanuly life. 

ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN LIBRARY. 5353 West Third St. (90020) . 938- 
5166. M-Th, 8:30-8:30; F, 8:30-4:30. Anne Festen, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 3 others. Vols: 12,500. Per subs: 160. Newspapers: 3. 

ATLANTIC RICHFIELD COMPANY, HEADQUARTERS LIBRARY. 515 South 
Flower St. (90071) (Box 2679, Terminal Armex, 90051) . 486-2400. M-F, 8-4:30. William O. 
Baum, Libn. 

Staff: 5 libns, 4 others. Vols: 15,000. Per subs: 800. Micro hldgs: 358. Newspapers: 30. VF drawers: 80. 
Special subjects: Petroleum industry, petroleum refining, economics. 

BARLOW HOSPITAL, ELKS LIBRARY. 2000 Stadium Way (90026) . 628-4165, ext. 26. 
M-F, 8-^:30. Mrs. Lendon O'Neill, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 3,000. Med reprints: 12,000. Per subs: 70. Audio tape: 100 reels. Filmstrip teaching 

units: 2,000. 
Special subject: Respiratory diseases. 

BLUE CROSS OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, LIBRARY. 4777 Sunset Blvd. (90027) . 
666-3473. M-F, 8-^:30. Frances Linke, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 8,000. Tech reports: 120. Per subs: 120. Micro hldgs: 130. 

Special collections: Government publications in fields of health care. Medicare, Medicaid, and/or 

MediCal. Blue Cross Association publications. Blue Cross of Southern California publications. 

Legislation in the field of health care and insurance. 

BRAILLE INSTITUTE OF AMERICA LIBRARY. 741 North Vermont Ave. (mailing: 
4205 Melrose Ave.) (90029). 660-3880. M-F, 8:30-5. Phyllis Cairns, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 20 others. 

Braille books: 21,814 vols. Talking books: 60,818 containers. Tapes: 16,547 reels. Cassettes: 4,201 contain- 
ers. 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION, DIVISION OF MINES 
AND GEOLOGY LIBRARY. 107 S. Broadway (90012). 

CALIFORNIA STATE COURT OF APPEAL, SECOND APPELLATE DISTRICT, 
LAW LIBRARY. 217 W. First St. (90012). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OF- 
FICE UBRARY. 217 W. First St., Rm. 600 (90012). Mrs. Maud Hoff, Libn. 

CAUFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBUC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DISTRICT 07 UBRARY. 120 S. Spring St. (90012) . 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES, SOUTHERN DIS- 
TRICT, ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH LIBRARY. 849 S. Broadway (P.O. Box 6598) 
(90055). 

CAUFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LOS ANGELES, JOHN F. KENNEDY 
MEMORIAL UBRARY. 5151 State University Dr. (90032). 224-2201. M-Th, 7:15 to 
midnight; F, 7:15-5; S, 9-5; Sun, noon to 9. Morris Polan, Libn. 

Vols: 513,402. Bd per: 82,178. Micro hldgs: 186,821. Per subs: 5,514. 

Inc: $1,896,240. Exp: Sal: $1,197,506 (est.). Bks: $410,320. Per: $161,000. AV: $2,163. Bd: $46,983. Other: 
$78,268. 

Special subjects: Art, business, economics, education, humanities, paramedical, science and technol- 
ogy, social and behavioral sciences. Special collections: Printing and engraving (Long) . 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 143 

CEDARS-SINAI MEDICAL CENTER, CEDARS OF LEBANON HOSPITAL, MEDI- 
CAL LIBRARY. 4833 Fountain Ave. (90029) . 662-9111, ext. 104. M-F, 7:30-9; S, 9-1. Mrs. 
Lois Ann Colaianni, Director of Libraries. 

Staff: 3 librarians, 1 other. Vols: 7,500. Per subs: 533. Micro hldgs: 50 reels. Audio cassettes: 20 subscrip- 
tions. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

CEDARS-SINAI MEDICAL CENTER, MT. SINAI HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 

8720 Beverly Blvd. (90048) . 652-5000, ext. 315. M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. Lois Ann Colaianni, 
Director. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 1,500. Per subs: 155. Audio cassette services: 4. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL OF LOS ANGELES, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 4650 Sunset 
Blvd. (90027). 

CITIZENS SAVINGS ATHLETIC FOUNDATION. 9800 South Sepulveda Blvd. 
(90045) . 670-7550. M-F, 9-5; S, 9-3 by appointment. W.R. Bill Schroeder, Libn. 

Staff: 2 Ubns. Vols: 7,500. Per subs: 32. 

Special subject: Sports. Special collections: Sports photos, Olympic Games, athletic guides, baseball, 
football. 

COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. See University of 
California, Irvine, Medical Sciences Library. 

COLORADO RIVER BOARD OF CALIFORNIA. 302 California State Bldg., 217 W. 
First St. (90012). 

COOPERS & LYBRAND LIBRARY. 555 South Flower St. (90071). 680-2500, ext. 208, 
209. M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. Francia Baily, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 5,000. Tech reports: 3,000+. Per subs: 100+ . 
Member, INFO. 

DANIEL, MANN, JOHNSON & MENDENHALL CORPORATE LIBRARY. 3250 Wil- 
shire Blvd. (90010) . 381-3663, ext. 126. M-F, 8:15-5. Carol Ann Bakeman, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 7,000. Per subs: 700. Micro hldgs: 60 fiche. 800 maps, 3,000 slides. 
Special subjects: Area statistics and information; architecture, transportation, planning, recreation, 
environment, water resources, engineering (civil, electrical, mechanical, structural) . 

DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH ASSOCIATES LIBRARY. 731 South Flower St. 
(90043). 626-2342, ext. 28. M, W, 12-6; Th, 8:30-5. Mrs. Suzanne Johnson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 4,300. Tech reports: 1,600. Per subs: 150. 

Special subjects: Urban problems and renewal, leisure time, community real estate, housing, transpor- 
tation, recreation and tourism. 

ECONOMICS RESEARCH ASSOCIATES LIBRARY. 1100 Glendon Ave. (90024) . 477- 
9585, ext. 521, 525. M-F, 8:30-5:30. Heather Kitchen, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 500. Tech reports: 3,500. Per subs: 125. 

CLINTON E. FRANK/ WEST COAST RESEARCH LIBRARY. 3550 Wilshire Blvd. 
(90010). 

GETTY OIL COMPANY, CORPORATE LIBRARY. 3810 Wilshire Blvd. (90010). 

GIBSON, DUNN & CRUTCHER LAW LIBRARY. 515 S. Flower St. (90071). 

HEBREW UNION COLLEGE, FRANCES-HENRY LIBRARY. 3077 University Mall 
(90007) . 749-3424. M, W, Th, 8:45-5; T, 8:45-10; F, 8:45-4; Sun, 1-5. Harvey P. Horowitz, 
Libn. 

Vols: 48,000. Bd per: 2,500. Micro hldgs: 840. Per subs: 170. 

Bks: $8,000. Per: $1,500. Bd: $1,200. Other: $4,500. 

Special subjects: Bible (O.T.) , Talmud, Midrash, Rabbinic literature, Jewish history, Jewish philosophy, 

art, Jewish education, Jewish Communal Service, Zionism, modem Israel. 
Branch: Joseph H. Rosenberg American Jewish Archives. 

HOLLYWOOD PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER, HEALTH SCIENCE LI- 
BRARY. 1300 North Vermont Ave. (90027). 660-3530, ext. 200. M-F, 8-4:30. Erika M. 
Hansen, Libn. 
Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 6,200. Pams: 1,000. Per subs: 167. 



144 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

LOS ANGELES— Continued 

Special collection: audio-visual (235 films, filmstrips, videotapes, etc.) 

Member, PSRMLS. 

HOMOSEXUAL INFORMATION CENTER LIBRARY. 3473% Cahuenga Blvd. 
(90068). 

HOSPITAL OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN MEDICAL LIBRARY. 1212 Shatto St. 
(90017). 482-8111, ext. 259. M-F, 8-^:30. Veryl E. Aumack, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 5,658. Tech reports: 150. Per subs: 137. Audio-Tapes. 
Si>ecial subjects: Medicine, nursing, hospital administration. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

IMMACULATE HEART COLLEGE LIBRARY. 2021 North Western Ave. (90027). 

THE INFORMATION SOURCE. 1709 West Eighth St. (90017) . 484-1464. M-F, 9-5:30. 
Les Estrin, Libn. 

Staff: 4 libns, 8 others. Vols: 1,000. Micro holdings: 250,000. Approx. 20 million pages of data (reports, 

papers, etc.) . 
Special subjects: Marketing and advertising data and supporting business subjects. 
(NOTE: Formerly, Advertising and Marketing Research Library.) 

INNER CITY CULTURAL CENTER, LANGSTON HUGHES MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 

1308 South New Hampshire Ave. (90006) . 387-1161. M-F, 10-6. Nancy Nix, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 3,000. Per subs: 10. 

Sp>ecial subjects: Minority groups (Blacks, Asians, Spanish-surname, American Indians) in the arts; 
performing and visual arts. 

INTERNATIONAL SENIOR CITIZENS ASSOCIATION, INC. UBRARY. 11753 Wil- 
shire Blvd. (90025) . 275-3430. Open by appointment. Eleonora Crowder, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 50. Per subs: 100. 

Special collection: Depository of world publications relating to senior citizens. 

JEWISH FEDERATION COUNCIL OF GREATER LOS ANGELES, JEWISH COM- 
MUNITY UBRARY. 590 North Vermont Ave. (90004) . 663-8484, ext. 340, 341. M-F, 9-5. 
Mrs. Hava Ben-Zvi, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 60,000. Per subs: 130. Micro Hldgs: 68 reels. 

Special subjects: Jewish community in Los Angeles and vicinity; Jewish life and thought; Yiddish and 

Hebrew literature. Includes documents, newspapers, correspondence, scrapbooks, pictures, oral 

history, etc. 

KAISER FOUNDATION HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 4867 Sunset Blvd. 
(90027). 667-4616. M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. Judith Dowd, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 6,000. Per subs: 279. 
Special subject: Clinical medicine. 

KINDEL & ANDERSON LAW LIBRARY. 555 S. Flower St., 26th floor (90071). 680- 
2222. Mrs. Marie G. Wallace, Libn. 

Staff: 3. Vols: 16,500. 

LOCKHEED AIRCRAFT INTERNATIONAL, INC. LIBRARY. 510 West Sixth St. 
(90014) . 623-7252, ext. 320. M-F, 8-4:45. Betty Scanlon, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. 

Sp>ecial subject: Aircraft industry. 

LOEB AND LOEB LAW LIBRARY. One Wilshire Bldg., Wilshire Blvd. at Grand Ave. 

(90017). 

LOS ANGELES AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, MANAGEMENT PLANNING 
AND RESEARCH DEPARTMENT, UBRARY. 404 South Bixel St. (P.O. Box 3696 
Terminal Annex) (90051). 482-4010, ext. 253. 8:45-5. James H. Levtas, Libn. 

Vols: 200. 

Special subject: Business and economics, Los Angeles area. 

LOS ANGELES CITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 855 N. Vermont Ave. (90029). 663-9141. 
M-Th, 7:45-10; F, 7:45-^; S, 9-1. Hal C. Stone, Libn. 

Vols: 132,000. Bd per: 5,329. Micro hldgs: 2,255 reels. Per subs: 824. 

Inc: $459,946. Exp: Sal: $342,430. Bks: $100,516. Per: $17,000. 

Special collections: History of the book; college archives; ethnic, multi-cultural collection. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 145 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY AIR POLLUTION CONTROL DISTRICT, TECHNICAL 
LIBRARY. 434 South San Pedro St. (90031). 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY ART INSTITUTE LIBRARY. 2401 Wilshire Blvd. (90057). 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES, 
JOHN L. POMEROY MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 313 North Figueroa St. (90012). 974- 
7780. M-F, 8-5. Agnes Imbrie, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 6,074. Per subs: 165. 

Special subjects: Preventive medicine, sanitation, dentistry, nursing. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES, MENTAL 
HEALTH SERVICES LIBRARY. 1106 South Crenshaw Blvd. (90019). 937-2380, ext. 
270. M-F, 9-4. Edward E. Asawa, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 2,000. Per subs: 70. 
Special subject: Community mental health. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL, LIBRARY. 222 North 
Grand Ave., Room 546. (90012) . 974-2500. M-F, 8-4:30. Charlotte Foumier, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other . Vols: 6,500. Tech reports: 500. Per subs: 95. 

Special collections: Los Angeles County materials; California college and university catalogs; occupa- 
tional profiles; audiovisual materials; personnel bibliographies; best research and development; 
programmed materials. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 301 W. First St. (90012) . 629-3531. 8:30-10. 
Forrest S. Drummond, Libn. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION LIBRARY. 634 South Westlake 
Ave. (90057). 483-4555. M-F, 8:30-5. John M. Connor, Libn. 

Staff: 6 libns, 11 others. Vols: 115,129. Per subs: 1,452. Micro hldgs: 300-400. Audio-Digest cassettes: 

300-400. 
Member: MEDLINE; PSRMLS. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART, ART RESEARCH LIBRARY. 5905 
Wilshire Blvd. (90036). 937-4250, ext. 219. T-F, 10-4:30. Mrs. Eleanor C. Hartman, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 5 others. Vols: 57,000. Per subs: 216. 

Branches: Textile and Costume Center; Prints and Drawings. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY LIBRARY. 900 Expo- 
sition Blvd. (90007) . 746-0410, ext. 210. T-F, 10-5. Betty Begun, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 43,089. Per subs: 780. Micro hldgs: 516 reels. 

Special collections: Southern California newspapers to 1900; theater programs; Califomiana; western 
history; industrial technology; natural history. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT, JOHN L. POMEROY 
MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 313 N. Figueroa St. (90012). 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM. 320 W. Temple st. (90012) 
(mailing: P.O. Box 111) (90053). 974-6501. Mrs. Carol E. Moss, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except AUiambra, Arcadia, Azusa, Beverly Hills, Burbank, Cerritos, Commerce, 
Covina, Downey, El Segundo, Glendale, Glendora, Industry, Inglewood, Irwindale, Long Beach, 
Los Angeles, Monrovia, Monterey Park, Pasadena, Pomona, Redondo Beach, San Marino, Santa Fe 
Springs, Santa Monica, Sierra Madre, Signal Hill, South Pasadena, Torrance, Vernon, Whittier, 
Altadena Library District and Palos Verdes Library District (including the cities of Palos Verdes 
Estates, Rolling HiUs, and Rolling Hills Estates) . 

Reciprocal agreements with: Alhambra, Azusa, Covina, Glendale, Glendora, Inglewood, Irwindale, 
Los Angeles, Monrovia, Pasadena, Pomona, Torrance, Whittier. 

Outlets: 219. 

Branches: Region I: Canyon Country, Lancaster, Newhall, Palmdale, San Fernando, Valencia; Region 
II: Culver City, Hawthorne, Holly Park, Las Virgenes, Malibu, San Vicente, Wisebum, Woodcrest; 
Region III: Carson, Gardena, Hermosa Beach, Lawndale, Lomita, Manhattan Beach, Manhattan 
Heights, Villa Carson, West Gardena; Region IV: Bell, Compton, East Compton, Enterprise, Gra- 
ham, HoUydale, Huntington Park, Leland B. Weaver, Lynwood, WiUowbrook; Region V: Alondra, 
Angelo M. lacoboni, Artesia, BeUflower, George Nye, Jr., La Mirada, NorwaUc, Paramount; Region 
VI: Chet Holiiield, East Los Angeles, Montebello, Pico Rivera; Region VII: El Monte, La Canada, 
La Crescenta, Rosemead, San Gabriel, Temple City; Region VIII: Baldwin Park, Claremont, 
Duarte, Hacienda Heights, La Puente, Rowland Heights, San Dimas, Sunkist, West Covina; Institu- 
tion Libraries — IX: Juvenile Hall, Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Wayside Honor Rancho — Min. 

6—85403 



146 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

LOS ANGELES— Continued 

Stations: Region I: Littlerock, Quartz Hill, Roosevelt; Region II: El Marino, Lennox, View Park; Region 
III: Dominguez, Victoria Park; Region IV: Cudahy, Florence, Maywood, North Enterprise; Region 
V: Avalon, Bloomiield, South Whittier; Region VI: Bell Gardens, Belvedere, City Terrace, Los 
Nietos, Rivera, Sorensen, Stephenson; Region VII: Del Mar, Live Oak, Mountain View, Norwood, 
South El Monte, Sunnyslope; Region VIII: Charter Oak, Diamond Bar, Edgewood, La Verne, Vine 
Avenue, Walnut; Institution Stations — IX: Acton Rehabilitation Center, Central Jail, Lake Hughes 
Rehabilitation, Long Beach General Hospital, Mira Loma Facility, Sheriffs Academy, Sybil Brand 
Academy, Warm Springs Rehabilitation Center, Wayside Honor Rancho — Max. 

Bookmobile stops: 112 (86 community, 18 school, 8 institutions). 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Granger, Califomiana, John F. Kennedy Memorial, World War I and II. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY— UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MEDICAL 
CENTER, MEDICAL LIBRARIES. 1200 North State St. (90033). 225-3115, ext. 7-1853. 
M-F, 9-9; S, 9-5:30. Nelson J. Gilman, Libn. 

Staff: 5 libns, g'/j others. Vols: 53,226. Per subs: 1,825. Audio-Digest tapes /cassettes: 6,410. 
Special collections: Books for the visually handicapped; Braille books; Audio-Digest tapes and cassettes; 
pamphlets; audio-visual software and hardware. Member, PSRMLS. 

LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND POWER— CITY ATTORNEY'S 
OFFICE, LEGAL LIBRARY. Ill N. Hope St., Rm. 1526 (90012) . 481-3264. Francine A. 
Wren. Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. 

LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 630 W. 5th St. (90017) . 626-7555 (Administration) , 
626-7461 (PubHc Service) . Wyman H. Jones, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreements with: Alhambra, Burbank, Glendale, Inglewood, Long Beach, Los Angeles 

County, South Pasadena, Torrance. 
Outlets: 133 (61 branches, 4 Mimicipal Reference Units, 27 community, 40 school bookmobile stops) . 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Accounting, American Indians, Califomiana, Czechoslovakia, foreign language 

dictionaries, genealogy, Mexico, orchestral scores, telephone directories, theatrical performances 

in Los Angeles, World War II. 
Trustees: Ann Lane, Susie D. Frierson, Rosemary HoUoman, Muriel Pfaelzer Bodek, Betty Reddin, 

William Robertson. 

MUNICIPAL REFERENCE DEPARTMENT LIBRARY. City Hall East, 

Room 530 (90012) . 485-3791. M-F, 8-5. Wilma J. Dewey, Libn. 

Staff: 3'/2 libns, &Vi others. Vols: 38,000. Per subs: 500. 

MUNICIPAL REFERENCE DEPARTMENT, CITY PLANNING DIVI- 
SION LIBRARY. City Hall, Room 618 (90012) . 485-5077. M-F, 7:30-^:30. Sally Wolf, Libn. 

Staff: Vi libn, 1 other. Vols: 3,629. Tech reports: 152. Per subs: 201. 
Special subject: City planning. 

MUNICIPAL REFERENCE DEPARTMENT, POLICE DIVISION LI- 
BRARY. 150 North Los Angeles St., Room 503 (P.O. Box 30158, 90030) . 485-3288. M-F, 8-5. 
Mrs. Gay F. Boughourian, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, Wi others. Vols: 11,029. Per subs: 219. 
Special subjects: All police-related subjects. 

MUNICIPAL REFERENCE DEPARTMENT, WATER AND POWER DI- 
VISION LIBRARY. Ill North Hope St., Room 518 GOB (90012) (P.O. Box 111, 90051) . 
481-4610. M-F, 7:30-4:15. Donald F. Hinrichs, Libn. 

Staff: 4 libns, eVi others. Vols: 19,565. Per subs: 600. 
Special subjects: Electric and water utility related subjects. 

LOS ANGELES SOUTHWEST COLLEGE UBRARY. 11514 South Western Ave. 
(90047) . 757-9251. M-Th, 7:45-10; F, 7:45-4:30; S, 9-2. Rayma Greenberg, Libn. 

Vols: 42,095. Micro hldgs: 2,104. Per subs: 584. 
Special subjects: Black history and literature. 

LOS ANGELES TEMPLE GENEALOGICAL LIBRARY. 10741 Santa Monica Blvd. 
(90025) . 474-9900. M. 9-5; T-F, 9-9; S, 9-5. E. Garrett Barlovi', Libn. 

Staff: 4. Vols. 5,903. Per subs: 35. Micro hldgs: 12,174. 

Special collections: U.S. Census, 1790-1880; military index from National Archives (all wars to 1893) ; 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 147 

National Archives indexes to passenger lists (all ports); Somerset House Index (birth, marriage, 
death records, 1837-1847) ; Barbour Collection of early California mission records; other genealogi- 
cal coUections. 

LOS ANGELES TRADE-TECHNICAL COLLEGE LIBRARY. 400 W. Washington 
Blvd. (90015). 746-0800. M-F, 7-9:30; S, 10-2. Henry Lash, Libn. 
Vols: 60,000. Bd per: 100. Micro hldgs: 1,062. Per subs: 1,414. 

Inc: $206,105. Exp: Sal: $122,995. Bks: $35,000. Per: $19,000. AV: $22,500. Bd: $150. Other: $6,000. 
Special subjects: Trade aeas: aircraft, building, cosmetology, apparel, business, art, automotive, culi- 
nary arts, nursing, drafting, electrical and electronics. 
Special collections: Black America and Chicano studies. 
Branch: Aircraft Branch. 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY OF LOS ANGELES LIBRARY. 7101 W. 80th St. (90045). 

, SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY. 1440 W. 9th St. (90015). 776-4870, ext. 49. 

Richard Rank, Libn. 

Staff 15. Vols: 156,551. Vols added: 11,181. Per subs: 1,122. Rank classification. 

LYBRAND ROSS BROTHERS & MONTGOMERY LIBRARY. 555 S. Flower St. 
(90071). 

MASONIC LIBRARY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LIBRARY. 706 West Pico Blvd. 
(90015). 

MITCHELL, SILBERBERG & KNUPP LAW LIBRARY. 1800 Century Park E. 
(90067) . 553-5000, ext. 333. Mrs. Mary Anne Donaldson, Libn. 

Staff: 3. Vols: 21,000. Vols added: 3,000. Los Angeles County Law Library classification. 

MOUNT SAINT MARY'S COLLEGE, CHARLES WILLARD COE MEMORIAL LI- 
BRARY. 12001 Chalon Rd. (90049) . 272-8791. M-Th, 8-5, 6-9; F, 8-5; S, 9^; Sun, 11:30- 
4:30, 6-9. Mrs. Deirdre D. Ford, Acting Director. 

Vols: 109,158. Bd per: 2,845. Micro hldgs: 1,670 microcards, 15 microfiche, 1,120 reels of microfilm. Per 
subs: 643. 

Inc: $111,238. Exp: Sal: $37,946 (staff). Bks: $18,379. Per: $10,938. AV: $1,381. Bd: $639. Other: $12,584. 

Special subjects: Music, theology. Western history, special education. 

Special collections: Music Library, Newman Collection, Mayer Foundation Library in Special Educa- 
tion. 

Branch: Doheny Campus Library. 

NEUROPSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE, UCLA CENTER FOR THE HEALTH 
SCIENCES, PROFESSIONAL STAFF AND PATIENTS' LIBRARIES. 760 Westwood 
Plaza (90024) . 825-0597. Sherry Terzian, Libn. 

NOSSAMAN, WATERS, SCOTT, KRUEGER & RIORDAN LAW LIBRARY. 445 S. 

Figueroa St., 30th floor (90017). 628-5221. Sylvia Hoffman, Libn. 

Staff: 2. Vols: 15,000. Vols added: 300. Per subs: 300. Circ: 40. 

OCCIDENTAL COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1600 Campus Rd. (90041) . 255-5151. M-F, 8:45 
to midnight; S, 9-5; Sun, 1 to midnight. Tyrus G. Harmsen, Libn. 

Vols: 266,345. Micro hldgs: 27,300. Per subs: 1,631. 

OCCIDENTAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA LAW LIBRARY. 
1149 S. Hill St. (90015). 748-8111. Nedra C. Thompson, Libn. 

Staff: 5. Vols: 9,000. Vols added: 250. Per subs: 10. 

O'MELVENY & MYERS LAW LIBRARY. 611 W. 6th St., suite 3800 (90017) . 620-1120. 
Stanley K. Pearce, Libn. 

Staff: 11. Vols: 32,000. Vols added: 1,000. Per subs: 300. Own classificaHon. 

ONE, INC., BAKER MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 2256 Venice Blvd. (90006). 

ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL, LT. ROBERT J. RUBEL MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 2400 
South Flower St. (90007) . 747-4481, ext. 228, 384. M-F, 9-5. Mrs. Barbara Sherry, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 3,940. Per subs: 280. Audio tapes: 60. 
Special subjects: Orthopaedics; the hand. 
Member, PSRMLS. 



148 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

LOS ANGELES— Continued 

PACIFIC BIO-MARINE SUPPLY COMPANY LIBRARY. 13000 Washington Blvd. 

(90066) (P.O. Box 536, Venice 90291) . 397-7281; 397-9702. Open daily, 8-5. Mike Fishman, 

Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 1,500. Tech reports: 250. Per subs: 21. 

Special subject: Marine biology of southern California and environmental topics. 

RALPH M. PARSONS COMPANY, TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 617 West Seventh St. 
(90017). 629-2484, ext. 1548, 1577. M-F, 8-5. Cordell Summers, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 9,000. Tech reports: 500. Per subs: 350. Micro hldgs: 40. 
Special subjects: Engineerings, power, mining, transportation. 

PEAT, MARWICK, MITCHELL & COMPANY, CENTRAL LIBRARY. 555 South 
Flower St. (90071). M-F, 8:30-5:30. Mrs. Lois Steinmann, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 2,585. Per subs: 160. Annual company reports: 7,000. 
Special subjects: Accounting, auditing, business, management, taxes. 

POLISH AMERICAN CONGRESS, DIVISION FOR CALIFORNIA AND ARIZONA, 
POLAND'S MILLENIUM LIBRARY. 1312 W. 3rd St. (90017). 

PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE COMPANY, BUSINESS LIBRARY. 5757 Wilshire Blvd. 
(90035). 933-6141, ext. 380. M-F, 8-4. Pam Silvers, Libn. 

Staff: 1. Vols: 3,000. Per subs: 350. 

REISS-DAVIS CHILD STUDY CENTER, ANNA FREUD RESEARCH LIBRARY. 

9760 West Pico Blvd. (90035). 277-1113, ext. 301. M-F, 9-5. Mrs. Ethelyn Rafish, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 11,000. Per subs: 375. Fihns: 25. Audiotapes: 500. 

Special subjects: Child psychiatry, clinical child psychology, psychiatric social work with children and 

their farmlies, child development, special education and educational psychology, Freud, children's 

literature. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL, B-1 DIVISION, TECHNICAL INFORMATION 
CENTER (BA08) . Los Angeles International Airport (90009) . 670-9151, ext. 2961. M-F, 
7:30-4:12. T. B. Yates, Supervisor. 

Staff: 11. Vols: 9,950 books, 1,900 pers. Tech reports: 115,000. Per subs: 320. Micro holdings: 95,000. Specs 
and standards: 9,500. 

Special subjects: Aeronautics, information sciences, human factors, computer sciences, systems engi- 
neering, weapon systems, transportation, operations research, management, electronics. 

SECURITY PACIFIC NATIONAL BANK, CORPORATE LIBRARY. 411 South Main 
St. (90013) (P.O. Box 2097, Terminal Annex, 90051) . 620-8623. M-F, 8-^:30. Sharon Bailey, 
Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 2 others. Vols: 1,000. Tech reports: 4,000. Per subs: 350. 

Special subjects: Business and economics, California history, agriculture, building and real estate. 

SHELL OIL COMPANY LIBRARY. 1008 West Sixth St. (90054) (P.O. Box 3397, Termi- 
nal Annex, 90051) . 482-3131, ext. 1560. Alberta Tatum, Libn. (Library being transferred to 
Shell head office, Houston, Texas) 

SONS OF THE REVOLUTION LIBRARY. 672 S. LaFayette Park Place (90057). 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LIBRARY FOR SOCIAL STUDIES AND RESEARCH. 

6120 South Vermont Ave. (90044) . 759-6063. M-F, 1-5; or by appointment. Jon Greene, 
Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 5 others. Vols: 20,000. Per subs: 100 + . Recordings: 1,800. News clippings: 150,000. 
Special collections: Films of the early 1930's on labor actions; strikes, demonstrations. 15,000 pamphlets 
on black and brown liberation movements, socialist and communist movements since 1900. 

SOUTHWEST MUSEUM RESEARCH LIBRARY. 235 Museum Drive (90042). 

TEMPLE HOSPITAL MEDICAL STAFF LIBRARY. 235 North Hoover St. (90004). 
382-7252, Ext. 210. M-F, 9-5. Mrs. B. R. Barba, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 75. Per subs: 8. 

TWENTIETH CENTURY-FOX FILM CORPORATION, RESEARCH LIBRARY. 
10201 West Pico Blvd. (90213) (P.O. Box 900, Beverly Hills 90213) . 277-2211, ext. 2782. 
M-F, 9-6. Kenneth Kenyon, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Hbn. Vols: 50,000. Per subs: 12. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 149 

Special collections: U.S. license plates (1928-1972) ; World War II combat photos; telephone directories; 
pictures and clipping files (180 VF drawers); U.S. Army pamphlets, World War II. 

UNITED CALIFORNIA BANK LIBRARY. 707 Wilshire Blvd. (90017) (P.O. Box 3666, 
Terminal Annex 90051) . 624-0111, ext. 1497, 1498. M-F, 8:15-4:45. Mrs. Arline Lloyd Jones, 
Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 8,150. Per subs: 387. Newspapers: 18. 
Special subjects: Banking and finance, business and industry. 

UNITED WAY, INC., LIBRARY. 621 South Virgil (90005). 380-1450, ext. 356. M-F, 
8:30-5. Nancy A. Busacca, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, Vi other, vols: 2,000. Tech reports: 1,000. Per subs: 85. Newsletters: 80. 
Special subjects: Social services, management. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES, LIBRARY. 405 Hilgard Ave. 
(90024). Adm. Office: 825-1201; Genl. Info.: 825-1323. University Research Library, M-Th, 
7:45-11; F, 7:45-6; S, 9-5; Sun, 1-10. Page Ackerman, Univ. Libn. 

Special materials: Foreign gov't pubs., U.N., U.S., Calif. State deposit, maps, mss, films, recordings. 

Special services: Complete photographic facilities and services, quick copying facilities at library 
service points, microform reading facilities. 

Collections open to: Students and faculty of other institutions of higher education with the following 
provisions: Faculty of accredited institutions of higher education in CaUfomia and graduate stu- 
dents of Irvine, Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara campuses of U.C. may obtain direct 
borrowing privileges without fee; other students of accredited institutions of higher education 
residing in Los Angeles metropolitan area (Los Angeles, Ventura, and Orange Counties) may 
obtain direct borrowing privileges on payment of a fee; to adult public, "reference" privileges are 
available without fee; for residents of Los Angeles metropolitan area (Los Angeles, Ventura, and 
Orange Counties) home use privileges are granted on payment of a fee. College library (for 
undergraduates) open to secondary school students for in-Hbrary use, with signed recommenda- 
tion from school librarian required for issuance of "reference" card. Participates in Cooperative 
Academic Library Study Project, of UCLA, USC, and Cal Tech. 

InterUbrary loan: Will lend to academic, public institutional, and government libraries. 

Restrictions: Periodicals not lent; photocopies of periodical articles available to above libraries on order 
through interlibrary loan services; to all others through Library Photographic Department. 

Special collections: The Sadleir collection of nineteenth century English fiction. Children's Book 
Collection, Spinoza, CaUfomiana, Western Americana, Southern California imprints, manuscripts 
of California authors, Theodore E. Cummings Collection of Hebraica and Judaica, John R. and 
Dora Haynes Collection of local government materials, Arthur B. Spingam Collection on the 
Negro, Theater Arts collection, Albert Boni collection on Photography, Francis Farquhar and 
Horace Albright collections on mountaineering, English and American popular literature of the 
19th and 20th centuries, materials in support of Asian-American studies. Black studies, and Near 
Eastern Studies. 

Branches: Architecture and urban planning, art (includes Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana) , biomedical 
(includes Brain Information Service, MEDLINE Service, Pacific Southwest Regional Medical 
Library Service, John A. Benjamin Collection of Medical History), chemistry, education and 
psychology, engineering and mathematical sciences (includes Technical Reports Center) , English 
reading room, geology-geophysics, law, management (includes Robert E. Gross Collection on the 
History of Business and Economics), map, music, oriental, physics. University Elementary School; 
William Andrews Clark Memorial Library (see also separate entry) . 

WILLIAM ANDREWS CLARK MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 2520 Cimarron St. 

(90018). 731-8529. M-S, 8-5. Wm. E. Conway, Libn. 

Vols; 71,190. Micro hldgs: 1,736 (7,006 manuscripts) . Per subs: 53. Special subjects: English civilization, 
1641-1750; John Dryden and contemporaries; Oscar WUde and the Nineties; Montana history to 
1900; modem graphic arts; Eric GiU. 

CENTER FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES, BIOMEDICAL LIBRARY. 405 

Hilgard Ave. (90024) . 825-4055. M-Th, 7:45-midnight; F, 7:45-10; S, 9-5; Sun, 1-midnight. 
Louise Darling, Libn. 

Staff: 26 libns, 40 others. Vols: 288,742. Tech reports: 3,000. Per. subs: 7,088. Micro hldgs: 690. 

Special collections: Classics in ornithology and mammalogy (Donald R. Dickey); S. Weir Mitchell 
Collection; classics in opthalmology (Dr. M. N. Beigeknan) ; Florence Nightingale Collection; John 
A. Benjamin collection of medical books and manuscripts; Richard Rudolph collection of Japanese 
medical books and prints (17th-19th centuries). 

Headquarters, Pacific Southwest Regional Medical Library Service. 



150 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

LOS ANGELES— Continued 

LAW LIBRARY. 405 Hilgard Ave. (90024). 

WATER RESOURCES CENTER ARCHIVES. 2081 Engineering I (90024). 

825-7734. M-F, 8-5. Beth WiUard, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, IVi others. 

Special collections: Engineering, economic, social and legal aspects of water; water as a natural 
resource and its utilization; municipal and industrial water uses and problems; flood control, 
irrigation and reclamation, waste disposal, water law, saline water conversion, soil conservation, 
envirormiental problems, water resources development and management. 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LIBRARY. University Park (90007). 746- 
2543. M-Th 8 to midnight; F, 8-5; S, 9-5; Sun, 1 to midnight. Roy L. Kidman, Libn. 

Special materials: Gov't docs, U.S., Calif. State deposit, maps, mss, recordings. Special services: Mi- 
crofilm facilities, photocopy, microfilm, -card, -print readers. 

Library of Congress, Dewey Decimal classifications. 

Collections open to: Students and faculty of other institutions for inlibrary use, borrowing privileges 
extended to faculty of other institutions that hold PhD; secondary school students for inlibrary use 
with referral letter ft-om school librarian; members of public for inlibrary use, if engaged in serious 
study or research. 

Interlibrary loan: To all libraries. 

Branches: Architecture and Fine Arts, College Library, Dentistry, Education, Business Administra- 
tion, Gerontology, Hancock (marine biology and oceanography). Law, Library School, Medicine, 
Music, Philosophy, Science and Engineering, Social Work, World Affairs. 

Special collections: American literature after 1850, cinema, international relations, human relations 
area files. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, WESTERN RE- 
SEARCH APPLICATION CENTER. 823 West 34th St. (90007). 746-6231. M-F, 8:30-5. 
David T. Komoto, Libn. 

Staff; 7 libns. Vols: 4,000. Tech reports: 15. Per subs: 4. Micro hldgs: 300,000. 
Special collections: U.S. Government technical reports (NASA-related) . 

LAW CENTER LIBRARY. University Park (90007). 746-6487. Francis Gates, 

Libn. 

Staff: 14 (full-time), 11 (part-time). Vols: 124,526. Per subs: 1,795. Circ: 36,536. Ubrary of Congress 
classification. 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY LIBRARY. 925 West 34th St. (90007). 746-2884. 

M-Th, 8:30-10; F, 8:30-5; S, 10-3; Sun, 1-5. Frank O. Mason, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2Vi others. Vols: 26,677. Per subs: 304. 
Special subjects: Dentistry and aUied sciences. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, NORRIS MEDICAL LIBRARY. 2025 Zonal Ave. 

(90033) . 225-1511, ext. 344. M-Th. 7:45-midnight; F, 7:45-€; S, »-5; Sun, 1-10. Nelson J. 
Gilman, Libn. 

Staff: 9.1 libns, 20.9 others. Vols: 75,000. Per subs: 1,607. Micro hldgs: 4,000. Slides: 423. Audiotapes: 40. 

Motion picture cartridges: 9. Biographical items: 490. Medals: 22. 
Special subjects: Medicine, biomedically oriented research, pharmacy. 
Special collections: history of medicine: ethnopharmacology of natural products used by Southwest 

American Indians. 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL, MEDICAL RESEARCH LIBRARY. 

Wilshire and Sawtelle Blvds., Bldg. 114, Room 130 (90073) . 478-3711, ext. 2166. 8-4:30. Mrs. 
Frieda Dreyer Oxman, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 7 others. Vols: 5,919. Per subs: 100. 
Special subjects: Biological and medical sciences. 

WEST COAST UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 440 Shatto Place (90020). 

WESTSIDE HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 910 South Fairfax Ave. (90036) . 938-3431. 
Open daily, 24 hours. Mrs. Hattie Foster, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 250. Per subs: 10. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 151 

WHITE MEMORIAL MEDICAL CE^^^ER, COURVILLE-ABBOTT MEMORIAL LI- 
BRARY. 1720 Brooklyn Ave. (90033) . 269-9131, ext. 215. M-Th, 9-9; F, 9-3; Sun, 9-5. Joyce 
Marson, Libn. 

Staff: I'/j libns, P/m others. Vols: 44,000. Per subs: 460. 
Special subjects: Medicine, nursing and paramedical subjects. 

Special collections: Abbott Neurological Collection, Magan History Collection, Hara History of Medi- 
cine Collection. 

WILSHIRE BOULEVARD TEMPLE, SIGMUND HECHT LIBRARY. 3663 Wilshire 
Blvd. (90010). 

HARVEY G. WOLFE LIBRARY. 848 Kodak Drive (90026) . 664-7658. M-F, 10-5. Douglas 
L. Evans, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 5,975. Per subs: 20. 

Special subjects: espionage, clandestine operations, sabotage, military, diplomatic and strategic intelli- 
gence. Secret Service. 

WOODBURY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1027 Wilshire Blvd. (90017). 

LOS GATOS (Santa Clara Co.) Area Code 408 

IBM SDD LIBRARY. 6450 Guadalupe Mines Road (P.O. Box 66) (95030) . 227-7100, ext. 
5491. M-F, 8-4:45. Marjorie Griffin, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 3 others. Vols: 22,500. Tech reports: 4,000. Per subs: 500. Micro hldgs: 2,000. Newspapers: 

12. 
Special subjects: Computers: Computer systems, technology and applications. 

LOS GATOS MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 110 E. Main St. (95030). 356-6891. John Schmuck, 
Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Mrs. Mary Ellen Heising, Mrs. Jearmette Small, William Balch, Mrs. Ethel Kretsinger, John 
Smart, Gerald Rafferty. 

LYNWOOD (Los Angelec Co.) Area Code 213 

ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL OF LYNWOOD, HEALTH SCIENCE LIBRARY. 3630 Impe- 
rial Highway (90262). 639-5111, ext. 413. M-F, 7-4. Mrs. Eva Kratz, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 4,000. Per subs: 162. Audiotapes: 1,000. 
Special subjects: Medicine, nursing, health sciences. 

McCLELLAN AIR FORCE BASE (Sacramento Co.) Area Code 916 
McCLELLAN AIR FORCE BASE LIBRARY. (95652). 

MADERA (Madera Co.) Area Code 209 

MADERA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. County Government Center, 209 W. Yosemite 
Ave. (93637). 

MADERA COUNTY LIBRARY. 121 N. G St. (93637). 674-4641, ext. 261. 

Mrs. Doris Newman, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Outlets: 9. 

Branch: Chowchilla. 

Stations: Central Camp, Madera Convalescent Hospital, Madera County Mental Health Clinic (Day 

Care Center), North Fork Library, Oakhurst Library, Raymond, Skylake. 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collection: California history. 
Member, San Joaquin Valley Library System. 

MALIBU (Lot Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

MEDICAL PLANNING ASSOCIATES, LIBRARY. 1601 Rambla Pacifico (90265). 456- 
2084. M-F, 7:45-5:30. Eva V. CouviUon, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 102. Tech reports: 1,246. Per subs: 48. 120 bd pers; 27 in. VF. 
Special subjects: Hospital design, medical office building design, automated area programming of 
hospitals. 



152 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

MALIBU — Continued 

PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 24255 Pacific Coast Hwy. (90265). 456-4243, 

456-4244. M-Th, 8-9; F, 8-5; S, 10-5; Sun, 2-9. Mrs. Dorothy W. Moore, Libn. 

Vols: 152,000. Bd per: 12,512. Micro hidgs: 34,507. Per subs: 976. 

Inc: $323,077. Exp: Sal: $157,283. Bks: $81,899. Per: $12,327. AV: $9,026. Bd: $4,459. Other: $34,963. 

Special subjects: Education, humanities, religion, social, behavorial and natural sciences, business 

management. Special collections: Asian art, education, religion. 
Branches: Malibu Library, Los Angeles Library, Law School. 

MANTECA (San Joaquin Co.) Area Code 209 

MANTECA HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 300 Cottage Ave. (95336). M-F, 8-^:30. 
Mary Jo Sachs, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 100. Per subs: 5. 

MARCH AIR FORCE BASE (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 

FL 4664 BASE LIBRARY (92508). 714-655, ext. 2203. M-Th, 11-9; F, S, 11-^5; S, 1-9. Ms. 
Thelma R. Hall, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 3 others. Vols: 18,392. Per subs: 218. Micro hldgs: 43. Audio: 1,761. 
Special collections: Califomiana, international relations, aerospace management. 

MARIPOSA (Mariposa Co.) Area Code 209 
MARIPOSA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (95338). 

MARKLEEVILLE (Alpine Co.) Area Code 916 

ALPINE COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (96120). 694-2237. Barbara J. Ryan, 
Chief Deputy Clerk. 

ALPINE COUNTY LIBRARY. Montgomery St. (mailing: P.O. Box 296) (96120). 694- 
2989. Mrs. Dorothy C. Sanborn, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. 

Outlets: 4. 

Contracts with: Auburn-Placer County. 

Bookmobile stops: 3 

Dewey Decimal classification. 

Member, Mountain- Valley Library System. 

MARTINEZ (Contra Costa Co.) Area Code 415 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 2500 Alhambra Ave. 
(94553) . Open daily, 24 hours. 

Per subs: 176. 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (94553). 228-3000, ext. 2783. 
Jean Steffensen, Libn. 

JOHN F. KENNEDY UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 1124 Ferry St. (94553) . 228-6700. M-Th, 
9-10; F, S, 9-5. Mrs. Mary S. Burton, Libn. 

Vols: 13,500. Per subs: 75. 

Inc: $5,203. Exp: Sal: $14,355. Bks: $3,926. Per: $926. Other: $375. 

Special subjects: Law, psychology, business administration. 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 150 Muir Road (94553). 228- 
6800, ext. 298. M-F, 8-6; S, Sun, 1-5. Dorothea E. Bennett, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 5,755. Per subs: 249. Audiotapes. Member, PSRMLS. 

MARYSVILLE (Yuba Co.) Area Code 916 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DISTRICT 03 LIBRARY. 703 B St. (P.O. Box 911) (95901). 

MARYSVILLE- YUBA COUNTY LIBRARY. 301 4th St. (mailing; P.O. Box 991) (95901). 
743-7196. Ivan K. Edelman, Libn. 

Serves: entire county. Outlets: 26. Bookmobile stops: 25. 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: California history and art books. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 153 

Member, Mountain- Valley Library System. 

YUBA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 2088 N. Beale Rd. (95901). 742-7351, ext. 255. M-Th, 8-10; 
F, 8-5. Robert H. Staehlin, Libn. 

Vols: 43,189. Micro hldgs: 1,969. Per subs: 527. 
Inc: $68,785. Bks: $15,000. 

YUBA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, 215 Fifth St. (95901). 

MATHER AIR FORCE BASE (Sacramento Co.) Area Code 916 

AIR FORCE HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY (95655). 364-2115. M-F, 8-5. Marie 
Thore, Library Clerk. 

Staff: 1. Vols: 760. Per subs: 83. 

MENLO PARK (San Mateo Co.) Area Code 415 

MENLO PARK PUBLIC LIBRARY. Civic Center (Alma & Ravenswood). (94025). 325- 
7894. Kathleen Vaudagna, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Armstrong collection on dyslexia, horticulture, business and finance. 
Trustees: Dr. S. Wing Chan, Mrs. Joseph Scaroni, Marvin Siegel, Mrs. Norma Pollock, Mrs. Joanne 
Grant. 

MENLO SCHOOL AND COLLEGE LIBRARY. (94025). 323-6171. M-Th, 7:45-5, 6:30- 
11; F, 7:45-5; S, 9-12, 1-5 Sun, 1-5, 6:30-11. Donald V. Drury, Libn. vols: 41,350. Bd per: 
63. Per subs: 350. 

Inc: $52,000. Exp: Sal: $$33,500. Bks: $12,400. Per: $3,400. Bd: $700. Other: $2,000. 

Special subjects: Business, economics. 

Branch: Elkus Memorial Library (Faculty Science Library). 

ST. PATRICK'S SEMINARY, McKEON MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 320 Middlefield Rd. 
(94025). 322-2224. M-F, 8-5. Mrs. Ruth I. Poehlmann, Libn. Vols: 51,000. Bd per: 3,100. 
Per subs: 162. 

Inc: $37,228. Exp: Sal: $17,688. Bks: $4,744. Per: $1,450. Bd: $208. Other: $522. 

Special subject: Theology. Special collection: Bibliotheca Sancti Francisci Archdiocesos. 

STANFORD RESEARCH INSTITUTE LIBRARY. 333 Ravenswood Ave. (94025). V. 
Lorraine Pratt, Libn. 

Staff: 8 libns, 15 others, vols: 42,000. Tech reports: 40,000. Per subs: 1,600. Micro hldgs: 1,050 reels. 
Armual reports: 14,600. Government pubs: 71,000. Pams: 5,100. 

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY LIBRARY. 345 Middlefield Road (94025). 323-8111, ext. 
2208. M-F, 7:45-4:15. Eleanore E. Wilkins, Libn. 

Staff: 4 libns, 10 others. Vols: 190,000. Per subs: 1,000. Micro hldgs: 2,000. Maps: 40,722. 
Special subject: Earth sciences. 

MERCED (Merced co.) Area Code 209 

MARIPOSA COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 2125 M. St. (95340). 722-7411, ext. 214. Doris E. 
Cochran, Libn. 

Distributing outlets listed under Merced County Free Library. 
Contracts with: Merced County. 

MERCED COLLEGE LIBRARY. 3600 M. St. (95340) . 723-4321, ext. 71. M-Th, 7:30-9; F, 
7:30-n5. Mary Dolven, Libn. 

Vols: 26,000. Micro hldgs: 1,252 reels, 1,137 fiche. Per subs: 305. 
Exp: Sal: $18,319. Bd: $100. 

MERCED COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 2125 M St. (95340) . 722-7411, ext. 214, 215. Doris 
E. Cochran, Libn. 

Serves: Entire coimty. Contracts with: Mariposa County. Outlets: 25. 

Stations: Amsterdam, Atwater, BaUico, Bear Valley, Cressey, Delhi, Dos Palos, El Nido, El Portal, Wm. 

J. George, Gustine, Irwin-Hilmar, Le Grand, Livingston, Los Banos, Mariposa, Planada, Red Cloud, 

Snelling, South Dos Palos, Stevinson, Winton, Woodland, Yosemite. 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 



154 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



MERCED — Continued 

MERCED COUNTY LAW UBRARY. County Courts Bldg. (95340). 

MERCED GENERAL HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 290 E. 15th St. (95340). 

MILL VALLEY (Marin Co.) Area Code 415 

GOLDEN GATE BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY LIBRARY. Seminary Drive 
(94941). 

MILL VALLEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 375 Throckmorton (94941 ) . 388-4245. Mrs. Thelma 
W. Percy, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Mill Valley history (both written material and taped oral interviews, as well as old 

maps, photos, etc.). 
Trustees: Mrs. Carol Asch, Mrs. Jean Downs, William Ramsey, Mrs. Elizabeth Wallace, James T. Rubey. 
Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

MISSION SAN JOSE (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

HOLY FAMILY COLLEGE LIBRARY. P.O. Box 3248 (94538) . M-F, 9-10 (Public by 
arrangement) . Sr. M. Jeanette, SHE, Libn. 

Vols: 15,000. Per subs: 60. 

Special subjects: Religion, sociology, early childhood education. Special coUections: Mentally retarded, 
religious education. 

MISSION VIEJO (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 
SADDLEBACK COLLEGE LIBRARY. 28000 Marguerite Parkway (92675). 

MODESTO (Stanislaus Co.) Area Code 209 

E. & J. GALLO WINERY LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1130 (95353). 521-3230. M-F, 8:30-^5. 
Nancy Dedini, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 4,000. Per subs: 217. 
Special subjects: Viticulture and viniculture. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

MODESTO BRANCH GENEALOGICAL LIBRARY. 731 El Vista Ave. (95350). 

MODESTO JUNIOR COLLEGE LIBRARY. (95350) . 

SCENIC GENERAL HOSPITAL, STANISLAUS COUNTY MEDICAL LIBRARY. 830 
Scenic Drive (95350) . 526-5250, ext. 671. M-F, 8-4:30. Mrs. Betty Dause, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 2,669. Per subs: 113. 

SHELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES RESEARCH CEN- 
TER LIBRARY. P.O. Box 4248 (95352) . 545-0761, ext. 340. M-F, 8-4:30 Mrs. Rosemarie 
Fortner, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 6 others. Vols: 9,000. Tech reports: 7,800. Per subs: 730. Micro hldgs: 397 reels. 
Special subjects: Chemistry, biological sciences. 

STANISLAUS COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 1500 I St. (95354) . 526-6821, 526-6822. Oscar 
W. J. Smaalders, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Outlets: 78. 

Branch: Turlock. 

Stations: Broughton, Ceres, Denair, Ellias, Empire, Hughson, Keyes, Newman, Oakdale, Patterson, 

Provines, Riverbank, SaHda, SUverthom, Valley Home, Waterford, Wright. 
Bookmobile stops: 59 (50 community, 9 school) . 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collection: Stanislaus County history. 
Member, 49-99 Cooperative Library System. 

STANISLAUS COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, Rm. 224 (95354) . 526-6302. Mrs. 
Dana Winter, Libn. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 155 

MOFFETT FIELD (Santa Clara Co.) Area Code 415 

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS & SPACE ADMINISTRATION, AMES RESEARCH 
CENTER, LIBRARY N202-3 (94035). 965-5157 (main library); 965-5387 (Life Science 
branch). M-F, 8-^:30. Ralph W. Lewis, Libn. 

Staff: 7 libns, 6 others. Vols: 45,000. Per subs: 1,600. Micro hldgs: 500 reels. 

Special collections: NACA and NASA Formal Series with indexes. 

Special subjects: Basic and appUed research in space environment physics, incl. aircraft simulation 
techniques; gas dynamics research at extreme speeds; configuration, stability, guidance and con- 
trol of aeronautical and space vehicles; biomedical and biophysics research; aeronautics, aerody- 
namics, space biology and medicine; fluid mechanics; geophysical fluid dynamics and computer 
sciences. 

NAVAL AIR STATION LIBRARY. Bldg. 25 (94035) . 966-5455. M-F, 9-9; S, Sun, 12-4. Mrs. 
Arline L. Hayden, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 4 others. Vols: 16,000. Per subs: 79. Newspapers: 5. 
Special subjects: Naval aviation, naval and military subjects. 

MONROVIA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

ACTRON INDUSTRIES, INC., TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 700 Royal Oaks Drive (91016) . 
359-8216, ext. 257, 258. M-F, 8-5. Stella A. Medigovich, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, I'/j others. Vols: 5,500. Tech reports: 1,000. Per subs: 350. 
Special collections: Military specs and standards. 

MONROVIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 321 S. Myrtle Ave. (91016). 358-0174. John Lustig, 
Libn. 

Contracts with: Los Angeles County area adjacent to Monrovia. Copying service for patrons. 
Trustees: Patricia Yates, Geraldene Pefferle, Ruth Barks, Warren McNemey, Wilham Faith, Harvey 

Brubaker. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

MONTEBELLO (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

ST. VINCENT'S SEMINARY LIBRARY. 1105 Bluff Rd. (90640). 723-7343. M-F, 8-11. 

Vols: 7,500. Bd per: 500. Per subs: 65. 

Bks: $1,900. Per: $800. AV: $700. Bd: $300. Other: $950. 

MONTEREY (Monterey Co.) Area Code 408 

CALIFORNIA TEST BUREAU /McGRAW-HILL LIBRARY. Del Monte Research Park 
(93940). 

DEFENSE LANGUAGE INSTITUTE, WEST COAST BRANCH (DLIWC) , ACADEM- 
IC LIBRARY. (93940). 242-8255. M-F, 7:45-^:45. S. Eleftheriades, Libn. 

Vols: 21,000. Bd per: 300. Per subs: 700. 
Special subjects: Foreign languages, linguistics. 

HUMAN RESOURCES RESEARCH ORGANIZATION, HumRRO DIVISION NO. 3, 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 5787 (93940) . M-F, 8-11:30, 12:30-4:30. Mrs. Gloria E. Henderson, 
Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 2,200. Tech reports: 28,500. Per subs: 135. Micro hldgs: 350 fiche, 30 microfihn. 
Special subjects: Psychology, sociology, education, military behavioral research. 

ALLEN KNIGHT MARITIME MUSEUM LIBRARY. 550 Calle Principal (P.O. Box 805) 
(93940). 375-2553. Prof. G. R. Giet, in charge. 

Vols: 1,000-1-. 

Special subjects: Sailing and ships. Special collections: Ship models, prints, paintings, and pictures of 
ships, maritime artifacts and reUcs. 

MONTEREY HISTORY AND ART ASSOCIATION, MAYO HAYES O'DONNELL LI- 
BRARY. 155 Van Buren St. (Box 805) (93940). 

MONTEREY INSTITUTE OF FOREIGN STUDIES LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1978 (93940). 
373-4779. M-Th, 8:30-9; F, 8:30-7; S, 9-2. Dr. Eva I. A. Schroeder, Libn. 

Vols: 31,155. Micro hldgs: 52. Per subs: 331. 

Inc: $64,574. Exp: Sal: $44,375. Bks: $8,165. Per: $4,793. AV: $523. Bd: $258. 

Special subjects: Languages and civilizations of China, Europe, Japan, Latin America; area studies: 
Asia, Latin America, Near East, Soviet Union, West Europe; history; poUtical science; international 



156 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

MONTEREY— Continued 

economics and management; translation and interpretation; education. 

MONTEREY PENINSULA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 980 Fremont (93940). 375-9821. M- 
Th, 8-10; F, 8-4:30. Ms. Jeanne Inwood, Libn. 

Vols: 49,517. Micro hldgs: 761. Per subs: 241. 

Exp: Sal: $74,776. Bks: $18,813. Per: $3,630. Other: $4,312. 

MONTEREY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 625 Pacific St. (93940) . 372-7391. Ms. Davis C. McDan- 
iel, Libn. 

Outlets: 35 (34 community bookmobile stops). 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Califomiana (local history collection weighted toward local history and local 
authors); Raiquel, Elkins, Adler collection on architecture (emphasis on 17th-19th century, Eng- 
lish, Italian, French). 

Trustees: George R. Luckett, Mrs. Jack Craft, Mrs. Hal Hallett, George Schroeder, John Mahoney. 

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL, DUDLEY KNOX LIBRARY. (93940). 646-2341. 
M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-6; S, noon to 4; Sun, 1:30-10. George R. Luckett, Libn. 

Vols: 253,000. Bd per: 41,000. Micro hldgs: 63,000 bibliographic vols, (microfihn annd microfiche). Per 

subs: 1,224. 
Inc: $522,951. Exp: Sal: $372,826. Bks: $54,601. Per: $67,606. AV: $1,134. Bd: $8,926. Other: $17,858. 
Special subjects: Engineering, physical sciences, operations analysis, administrative sciences, naval 

sciences, government and humanities. 
Special collections: The Christopher Buckley, Jr., Library (naval history and the sea) . 

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL, ENVIRONMENTAL PREDICTION RE- 
SEARCH FACILITY, TECHNICAL LIBRARY (93940). 646-2813. M-F, 8-4:30. W. F. 
Rettenmaier, Jr., Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 10,000. Tech reports: 10,000. Per subs: 270. Micro hldgs: 1,000 fiche. 
Special subjects: Meteorology, oceanography. 

MONTEREY PARK (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

BRUGGEMEYER MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 318 S. Ramona Ave. (91754) . 573-1411. Co- 
lin R. Lucas, Libn. 

Copying Service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: E. P. Oppenheim, U.S. and international telephone directories. North American 

Indians, Califomiana, railroadiana. World War II, miniature book collection. 
Trustees: Mrs. Chet Meske, Mrs. M. Alva Zook, Mrs. Sidney Johnson, Norma Jaffe, Mrs. Bobbie Miyano. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

MOORPARK (Ventura Co.) Area Code 805 

MOORPARK COLLEGE LIBRARY. 7075 Campus Rd. (93021). 529-2321. M-Th, 8-5, 
6-9; F, 8-4:30. Michael M. Slama, Libn. 

Vols: 41,194. Bd per: 1,210. Micro hldgs: 2,001. Per subs: 339. 

Inc: $108,851. Exp: Sal: $69,830. Bks: $22,946. Per: $4,801. Bd: $320. Other: $10,954. 

MORAGA (Contra Costa Co.) Area Code 415 

SAINT MARY'S COLLEGE LIBRARY. (94575) . 376-4411. M-Th, ^-ll; F, 8-5; S, 9-5; 
Sun, 10-4, 7-11. Brother L. Dennis, F. S. C, Libn. 

Vols: 108,208. Bd per: 346. Micro hldgs: 163. Per subs: 462. 

Exp: Sal: $45,847. Bks: $12,876. Per: $7,900. AV: $4,000. Bd: $4,000. Other: $18,500. 

Branches: Science (physics and chemistry) , Moraga Historical Society Archives. 

MOSS LANDING (Monterey Co.) Area Code 408 

MOSS LANDING MARINE LABORATORIES OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNI- 
VERSITY AND COLLEGES, LIBRARY. P.O. Box 223 (95039) . 633-3304. M-F, 8:30-5. 
Mrs. Doris Baron, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 3,363. Tech reports: 700. Per subs: 50. Micro hldgs: 18 reels, 643 microcards, 320 fiche. 
Special subject: Marine science. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 157 

MOUNTAIN VIEW (Santa Clara Co.) Area Code 415 

ACUREX CORPORATION, AEROTHERM DIVISION, LIBRARY. 485 Clyde Ave. 
(94042). 964-3200, ext. 282, 274, M-F, 8-5. Violet I. Nicholson, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns. Vols: 50. Tech reports: 5,000. Per subs: 250. Micro hldgs: 2,000. 

MOUNTAIN VIEW PUBLIC LIBRARY. 585 Franklin St. (94040) . 968-6595. Mrs. Ruth 
Lawson, Libn. 

Outlets: 51 (48 community, 2 school bookmobile stops) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal 

classification. 
Trustees: Mrs. Judith Leeper, Mrs. Josephine Jackson, Edward N. Smith, Stewart E. Clegg, Mrs. Sumi 

Uyeda. 
Member, Santa Clara Valley Library System. ■ 

NAPA (Napa Co.) Area Code 707 

NAPA CITY-COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 1201 Franklin St. (945'8). 255-2091. Mrs. 
Winifred F. Munger, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Calistoga, St. Helena. Contracts with: Lake County. Outlets: 28. 

Stations: Napa Junction, Yountville. Bookmobile stops: 24. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Mrs. William H. Simms, Ed Henderson, Mrs. John Hawkley, Mrs. Edward Penland, Arthur 

Youngberg. 
Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

NAPA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 2277 Napa-Vallejo Highway (94558). 255-2100. M-Th, 
7:45-^:30, 6:30-10; F, 7:45-^:30. Virginia Borges, Libn. 

Vols: 32,199. Bd per: 2,510. Micro hldgs: 2,998. Per subs: 326. 

Inc: $76,748. Exp: Sal: $55,377. Bks: $10,014. Per: $3,380. AV: $3,926. Bd: $571. Other: $1,656. 

NAPA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (94558) . 226-6653, -5965. M-F, 8-5. Maxine 
Oellien, Secretary. 

NATIONAL CITY (San Diego Co.) Area Code 714 

NATIONAL CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 200 E. 12th St. (92050). 477-3335. 

Joel R. Siegfried, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Mrs. Thelma Hollingsworth, Mrs. Alfred Hlawatsch, Mrs. Thomas Baker, George James, Milo 

Wood. 
Member, Serra Library System. 

NEVADA CITY (Nevada Co.) Area Code 916 
NEVADA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse Annex, Rm. 201 (95959). 
SEARLS HISTORICAL LIBRARY. Church St. (95959). 

NEWBURY PARK (Ventura Co.) Area Code 805 

NORTHROP CORPORATION, VENTURA DIVISION, TECHNICAL INFORMA- 
TION CENTER. 1515 Rancho Conejo Blvd. (91320) . 498-3131, ext. 1050. M-F, 8-^:45. Ms. 
Adrienne Morse, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. 

Vols: 6,000. 

Tech reports: 90,000 

Per subs: 200 

Special subjects: Aerodynamics, paradynamics, NACA and NASA publications and specs. 

NEWHALL (Lot Angeles Co.) Area Code 805 

LOS ANGELES BAPTIST COLLEGE LIBRARY. 21726 W. Placenta Canyon Rd. 
(91321). 

NEWPORT BEACH (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

COLLINS RADIO COMPANY, TECHNICAL INFORMATION CENTER. 19700 Jam- 
boree Rd. (92663). 



158 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

NEWPORT BEACH— Continued 

HUGHES AIRCRAFT COMPANY, NEWPORT BEACH DIVISION LIBRARY. 500 Su- 
perior Ave. (92663). 

NEWPORT BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY. 2005 Dover Dr. (92660). 642-8650. Mrs. Doro- 
thea Sheely, Libn. 

Outlets: 5 (2 branches, 2 stations) . Copying ser\'ice for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Boats, boating, Newport Beach history, personalities. 

Trustees: James Robert Gage, Mrs. Peter Vogel, Mrs. Stanley LeLievre, Mrs. Bertrum C. Coffey, Dr. 

Thomas A. Blakely. 
Member, Santiago Library System. 

PHILCO-FORD CORPORATION, AERONEUTRONIC DIVISION, TECHNICAL IN- 
FORMATION SERVICES. Ford Road (92663). 640-1500, ext. 1301. M-F, ^5. Dr. L. H. 
Under, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 19,000. Tech reports: 387,000 (incl. 348,000 fiche) . Per subs: 245. Maps: 1,900. 
Special subjects: Mathematics, astronomy, physics, meteorology, metallurgy, chemistry, biology, engi- 
neering and management. 

NORTH HIGHLANDS (Sacramento Co.) Area Code 916 

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH LIBRARY. 3644 Bolivar Ave. (95660). 332-4001. Open 
Sunday mornings or by request. Carol Price, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn. Vols: 460. 

Special collection: Luther's works. 

NORTHRIDGE (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, NORTHRIDGE, LIBRARY. 18111 Nordhoff St. 
(91324). 885-2271. M-Th, 7-11; F, 7-5; S, 9-5; Sun, 1-10. Norman E. Tanis, Libn. 

Vols: 502,422. Bd per: 73,949. Micro hldgs: 28,969 reels, 1,047,532 microtext material. Per subs: 3,974. 

Inc: $1,868,174. Exp: Sal: $992,642. Bks: $551,979. Per: $248,436. Bd: $38,360. Other: $1,639. 

Special subjects: Black studies, religious studies. History — Europe 1870-1940, Cahfomia and Southwest 

history. Special collections: Edwin Booth Theatre Collection; early nineteenth century British 

plays, Mormonism. 
Branch: Map Library. 

RIKER LABORATORIES, INC. (SUBSIDY OF 3M COMPANY) LIBRARY. 19901 Nord- 
hoff St. (91324) . 341-1300, ext. 445. M-F, 8-4:30. Edwin A. Staggs, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other Vok: 5,900 (incl bd per) . Per subs: 325. 

Special subjects: Medicine, chemistry, pharmaceutical chemistry, medicinal plants, drug directories. 

NORWALK (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

CERRTTOS COLLEGE LEARNING MATERIALS CENTER. 11110 E. Alondra Blvd. 
(90650) . 860-2451. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-^:30. C. E. Roberts, Coordinator of Library Servces, 
Lyman Miles, Coordinator of Instructional Media Services. 

Vols: 51,347. Bd per: 3,257. 

Micro hldgs: 2,544. Per subs: 404. 

Exp: Sal: $240,766. Bks: $26,483. 

Per: $6,562. AV: $23,492. Bd: $676. Other: $3,764. 

METROPOLITAN STATE HOSPITAL, PATIENTS' UBRARY. 11400 South Norwalk 
Blvd. (90650) . M-F, 9-12. G. Calvin Tooker, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, '/a other (FTE) . Vols: 10,060. Per subs: 16. 

METROPOLITAN STATE HOSPITAL, PROFESSIONAL STAFF LIBRARY. 11400 
South Norwalk Blvd. (90650) . 863-7011, ext. 295. M-F, 1-4:30. G. Calvin Tooker, Libn. 

Staff: '/j libn. Vols: 7,307. Per subs: 97. 

Special subjects: Psychiatry, psychology, psychiatric social service, psychiatric nursing; hospital admin- 
istration, rehabilitation for psychiatric patients, pharmacology and general medicine. 

NOVATO (Marin Co.) Area Code 415 

INDIAN VALLEY COLLEGES LIBRARY. 720 Ignacio Blvd. (94947). 883-5921. M, W, 
F, 8-10. Mrs. Ann Coder, Libn. 

Vols: 5,000. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 159 

OAKLAND (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

ALAMEDA CONTRA COSTA MEDICAL ASSOCIATION LIBRARY. 2850 Vallecito 
Place (94606) . 534-8055, ext. 257. M-F, 8-9; S, 9-4. Lisi Melkus, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 4 others. Vols: 27,752. Per subs: 325. Audio-Digest: 757 cassettes, 768 reels. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, Rm. 200, 1225 Fallon St. (94612). 
832-8667. John D. White, Libn. 

CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 51st and Grove 
Sts. (94609) . 654-5600, ext. 210. Open daily, 24 hours. Mrs. Barbara Davenport, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 2,749 bd journals, 1,811 texts. Per subs: 135. Tapes: 134. Cassettes: 176. 
Special subjects: Pediatrics, neonatology, pediatric hematology. 

GROVE STREET COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 5714 Grove St. (94609). 

HOLY NAMES COLLEGE LIBRARY. 3500 Mountain Blvd. (94619). 436-0111. M-Th, 
8-10; F, 8-5; S, 9-4; Sun, 1-10. Mrs. Beth R. Granicher, Libn. 

Vols: 73,000. Micro hldgs: 4,000. Per subs: 610. 

Inc: $55,239. Exp. Sal: $35,789. Bks: $12,100. Per: $6,000. Bd: $600. Other:$750. 

Branches: Music Library, Curriculum Library, Rascob Library. 

HOLY REDEEMER COLLEGE LIBRARY. Box 5007 (94605). 569-2851. 

KAISER ENGINEERS, ENGINEERING LIBRARY. 300 Lakeside Drive (94604). 271- 
4334. M-F, 8:15-5. Wanda Ingmire, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 5,000. Tech reports: 2,000. Per subs: 300. Micro hldgs: 25,000 fiche. 
Special subjects: Engineering (all phases) , conunercial nuclear power plants. 

KAISER FOUNDATION SCHOOL OF NURSING LIBRARY. 3451 Piedmont Ave. 
(94611) . 645-6485. M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. Meredyth Young, Ysabel Bertolucci, Libns. 

Staff: 2 libns, 2 others. Vols: 5,200. Per subs: 72. 
Special subject: Nursing. 

KAISER-PERMANENTE HEALTH EDUCATION CENTER, LIBRARY. 3779 Pied- 
mont Ave. (94661) . 645-6552. M-T, 9-5; W, 9-8:30; Th, F, 9^. Ms. Karen Quay, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 235. 253 nonprint media programs. 

Special subjects: Prenatal care, dental care, child care; medical problems (arthritis, diabetes, heart 

diseases, etc.) 
Member, PSRMLS. 

LANEY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 900 Fallon St. (94607). 834-5740. M-Th, 8-9; F, 8-4. Dr. 
William A. Pettas, Libn. 

Vols: 55,941. Bd per: 2,530. Micro hldgs: 3,207. Per subs: 500. 

Inc: $230,557. Exp: Sal: $158,735. Bks: $38,207. Per: $4,906. AV: $8,787. Bd: $2,290. Other: $6,640. 
Special subjects: General vocational areas: machine shop, dry cleaning, construction, welding, voca- 
tional nursing, cosmetology, electronics, shoe rebuilding. Special collections: Ethnic materials. 

MERRTTT COLLEGE LIBRARY. 12500 Campus Dr. (94619). 531-4911. M-F, 7:45-4. 
Irwin Mayers, Libn. 

Vols: 20,000. Micro hldgs: 600 reels. Per subs: 365. 

Inc: $49,529. Exp: Sal: $116,000. Bks: $20,000. Per: $6,000. Bd: $2,000. 

Special subjects: Ethnic minorities, radical movements in U.S. and world. 

SAMUEL MERRTTT HOSPTTAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. Hawthorne and Webster Sts. 
(94609). 655-4000. M-F, 8-10:30; Sun, 4-10. Lucy Chang Meng, Ubn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 3,500. Micro hldgs: 150. 
Special subjects: Medicine, nursing. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

MILLS COLLEGE LIBRARY. (94613) . 632-2700. M-F, 8-10; S, &-5; Sun, 1-4, 6-10. Flora 
Elizabeth Reynolds, Libn. 

Vols: 166,114. Bd pr: 24,010. Micro hldgs: 4,738 reels. Per subs: 466. 

Bks: $33,738. Per: $14,432. Bd: $4,039. 

Special subjects: Literature, art, music, history, dance. Special collections: Early printed books, dance, 

Dante, U.N. documents, press books, Americana, book binding. 
Branch: Margaret Prall Music Library (scores and recordings). 



160 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

OAKLAND — Continued 

NAVAL BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY LIBRARY. Naval Supply Center, 

Bldg. 844 (94625) . 832-5217, ext. 58. M-F, 10-2. Mrs. Theresa Dundon, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 2^10. Per subs: 100. 

Special subjects: Aerobiology, medical microbiology, environmental microbiology. 

Member, PSRMLS. 

NAVAL REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER, MEDICAL LIBRARY. (94627). 639-2070, 
-2031. M-F, 8^:30. Mrs. Jane C. O'SuUivan, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 2 others. Vols: 13,140. Per subs: 350. 

Branch collections: Preventive medicine and public health; physical and occupational therapy. 

Member, PSRMLS. 

NAVAL SUPPLY CENTER, TECHNICAL LIBRARY. Seventh and Maritime Sts. 
(94625). 466-6628. M-F, 7:30-4. Frances V. Miller, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 1,000,000. 

Special subjects: All Navy material. Also listings, catalogs, part/stock numbers, specs, standards. 

NORTH PERALTA COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 5714 Grove St. (94609). 
655-6110. M-F, 8-4. Margaret Traylor, Libn. 

Vols: 50,000. Bd per: 600. Micro hldgs: 480. Per subs: 288. 

Inc: $76,413. Exp: Sal: $46,000. Bks: $4,000. Per: $3,000. AV: $2,000. Bd: $500. 

Special subjects: African, Afro-American art. 

OAKLAND ARMY BASE, COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION, SPECIAL SERVICES 
BRANCH, POST LIBRARY (94626). 466-2906. M-F, 9-7; S, 10-6. Wilma A. Williams, 
Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 2 others. Vols: 26,000. Per subs: 47. Recordings: 2,000. 
Special subjects: Military science, recreational reading. 

OAKLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, CITY DIRECTORY LIBRARY. 1320 Web- 
ster St. (94612). 451-7800, ext. 1. M-F, 9-5. J. W. Cowart, Director. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other, vols: 200. 

OAKLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY. 125 14th St. (94612) . 273-3282. William H. Brett, Libn. 

Contracts with: Piedmont. Reciprocal agreement with: Alameda. Outlets: 125 (19 branches, 16 stations, 
40 conununity, 49 school bookmobile stops) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classifi- 
cation. 

Special collections: Art, California and local history, city planning and urban renewal, documents (U.S. 
and California) , Jack London collection, maps, marine science and technology, music (especially 
choral music). 

Trustees: James D. Saddler, Leo S. Fancey, Mrs. Ruth Caldwell, John W. Cova, Paul F. Faberman, 
Aramis Fouche, Ms. Pat Treece. 

Member, Berkeley-Oakland Service System. 

LATIN AMERICAN LIBRARY. 1449 Miller Ave. (94601) . 532-7882. M-Th, 

10-9; F, S, 10-5:30. Keith Revelle, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 11 others. Vols: 26,000. Per subs: 149. 

Special collections: Printed and audio-visual materials on the Chicano (about half of total collection 

is in Spanish) . Special programs: fikn and sUde programs, story hours, English, Spanish, etc. classes. 

Programs and materials in Spanish and English, bilingual staff. Librarians available for consultation 

on materials and programs for Chicanos. Have own bookmobile. 

OAKLAND TRIBUNE LIBRARY. 13th and Franklin Sts. (P.O. Box 509) (94604) . M-F, 
6-5. Arthur A. Hakel, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 1 other. Vols: 4,600. Est. 12 million clippings, 1 million photos. 

RUCKER CONTROL SYSTEMS LIBRARY. 4700 San Pablo Ave. (94608) . 653-5221, ext. 
292. M-F, 8-12, 1-^. Helen Kemp, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 350. Tech reports: 800. Per subs: 40. Micro hldgs: 375 reels. 

Special collections: Military specifications, engineering specifications, manufacturers' catalogs. 

SAFEWAY STORES LIBRARY. Fourth and Jackson Sts. (94660). 444-4711, ext. 247. 
M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. Elizabeth D. Williams, Libn. 

Staff: 2 hbns, 2 others. Vols: 22,000. Per subs: 500. 

Special subjects: All phases of retail food industry, business, finance. 

Special collections: Corporate annual reports, telephone directories. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 161 

OCEANSIDE (San Diego Co.) Area Code 714 

MIRACOSTA COLLEGE LIBRARY. Barnard Dr. (92054) . 757-2121. M-Th, 7:3(M; 6- 
10; F, 7:30-4. Leland E. Russell, Libn. 

Vols: 19,500. Bd per: 136. Micro hldgs: 390. Per subs: 310. 

Exp: Sal: $45,812. Bks: $10,637. Per: $3,674. AV: $10,677. Bd: $50. Other: $10,728. 

OCEANSIDE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 615 Fourth St. (92054) . 722-2101. Helen M. Nelson, 
Libn. 

Outlets: 10 (9 community bookmobile stops). Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classifica- 
tion. 

Trustees: Gen. Russell Jordahl, Mrs. Peter Magana, Dr. A. Beckers, Mrs. Robert Carson, Mrs. Randall 
Mitchell. 

Member, Serra Library System. 

TRI-CITY HOSPITAL MEDICAL STAFF LIBRARY. 4002 Vista Way (92054). 724- 
8411, ext. 250. Open daily, 24 hours. Mrs. Virginia E. Ray, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 800. Per subs: 35. 

OJAI (Ventura Co.) Area Code 805 

KROTONA INSTITUTE OF THEOSOPHY, KROTONA LIBRARY. Rt. 2, Box 3 

(93023). 

THEOSOPHICAL BOOK ASSOCIATION FOR THE BUND, INC. Route 2, Krotona 
54 (93023). 646-2121. 8:30-12. Marjorie S. Dawn, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 6 others. Vols: 1,200. Tapes /cassettes: 600. 

Special subjects: Theosophy, philosophy, comparative religion, healing, meditation. 

ONTARIO (Son Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 

ONTARIO CITY LIBRARY. 215 E. C St. (91764). 984-2758. James R. Housel, Libn. 

Outlets: 5 (4 stations) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collection: Local history. 

Trustees: Dr. W. J. Kelber, Harold J. Martin, Carl J. Hase, Jr., John L. Lopes, Gordon C. Beisel. 

Member, Inland Library System. 

ORANGE (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

CHAPMAN COLLEGE, THURMOND CLARKE MEMORIAL UBRARY. 333 N. 
Glassell (92666) . 633-8821. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-5; S, 11-3; Sun, 1-9. Alice F. Flint, Libn. 

Vols: 116,739. Micro hldgs: 3,929. Per subs: 822. 

Inc: $213,463. Exp: Sal: $141,894. Bks: $47,779. Per: $17,022. AV: $992. Bd: $2,579. Other: $13,197. 

Special subjects: Education, humanities, geology, religion, economics. 

Branch; World Campus Afloat Library. 

CHAPMAN GENERAL HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 2601 East Chapman Ave. 
(92669) . 633-0011, ext. 321. M-F, 7-10; S, 7-2. Thelma E. MuUane, Dir. of Medical Records 
Dept. 

Stafi^: 1 libn. Vols: 67. Per subs: 9. 

ORANGE COUNTY MEDICAL CENTER, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 101 City Drive 
South (92668) . 633-9393, ext. 407. M-Th, 8-9; F, 8-7; S, 9-6; Sun, 1-6. Lesley Rahm, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 3 others. Vols: 9,800. Per subs: 550. Also videotapes, slides, fihnstrips, cassettes. 
Special subjects: Medicine, surgery, psychiatry, nursing. 

ORANGE COUNTY PUBUC LIBRARY. 431 City Dr., South (92668) . 532-7841. Harry 
M. Rowe, Jr., Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Anaheim, Buena Park Library District, Fullerton, Huntington Beach, 
Newport Beach, Orange, Placentia Library District, Santa Ana, Yorba Linda Library District. 
Outlets: 62. 

Branches: Bolsa, Brea, Chapman, Costa Mesa, Cypress, Dana Point, Fountain Valley, Garden Grove, 
Laguna Beach, La Habra, La Palma, Leisure World, Los Alamitos-Rossmoor, Mesa Verde, Mission 
Viejo, San Clemente, Seal Beach, Stanton, Tustin, West Garden Grove, Westminster. 

Stations: San Juan Capistrano, Silverado, South Laguna, Villa Park. 

Bookmobile stops: 28. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Califomiana, topographic maps of southern California area, telephone directories. 



162 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

ORANGE — Continued 

art and music books, art prints, foreign languages (Danish, Icelandic, Italian, Norwegian, Swedish) . 
Member, Santiago Library System. 

ORANGE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 101 N. Center St. (92666). 532-0391. Martin Erlich, Libn. 

Outlets: 2 (1 branch). Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Biography. 

Tmstees: Edmund H. Salter, Mrs. James Tavis, Mrs. Louis McClure, Mrs. Madeline English, Harold 

S. Forsythe. 
Member, Santiago Library System. 

ST. JOSEPH & CHILDRENS HOSPITAL OF ORANGE COUNTY, BURLEW MEDI- 
CAL UBRARY. 1100 Stewart Drive (92668). 633-9111, ext. 291. M-F, 8-9; S, 9-2. Helen 
R. Asher, Libn. 

Staff: 3. Vols: 10,000+. Per subs: 450. Cassettes: 348. 

Special subjects: Pediatrics, cardiology, ophthalmology, surgery. 

ORLAND (Glenn Co.) Area Code 916 

ORLAND FREE LIBRARY. 333 Mill St. (95963). 865-3465. Mrs. Wilma Ferry, Libn. 

Contracts with: Glenn County, to give service to northern part. 

Outlets: 3 (2 stations) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Keith Rucker, Mrs. Neil Haley, Hearder Taylor, Mrs. Fred Ely, Mrs. Jo Hoppe, C. K. Price. 

Member, North State Cooperative Library System. 

OROVILLE (Butte Co.) Area Code 916 

BUTTE COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (95965). 

BUTTE COUNTY LIBRARY. 278 Nelson Ave. (95965) . 534-4525. Mrs. Josephine R. Terry, 
Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Chico. Outlets: 50. 

Branch: Paradise. 

Stations: Biggs, Chico, Clipper Mills, Durham, Feather Falls, Forbestown, Forest Ranch, Gridley, 

Oroville Branch, Richvale, Stirling City. 
Bookmobile stops: 37. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classifiction. 
Special collection: Spanish rotating book collection. 
Member, North State Cooperative Library System. 

MEDICAL CENTER HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 2767 Olive Highway (95965) . 533-8500, ext. 
25. Open daily, 24 hours. Diane Piskulic, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 290. Per subs: 15. 

OXNARD (Ventura Co.) Area Code 805 

OXNARD PUBLIC UBRARY. 214 S. C St. (93030). 487-3981. Edwin J. Hughes, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Ventura County. Outlets: 14 (13 bookmobile stops). Copying service for 

patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collection: Sheet music. 
Trustees: Mrs. A. Gwen Hill, Mrs. Jo Leish, Carlos Levy, Frank Diaz, Mrs. John Ramirez. 

ST. JOHN'S HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 333 North F St. (93030). 483-1141, ext. 

287. M-Th, 8-12. 

Staff: 1. Vols: 375. Per subs: 50. Audio-Digest: 20. 

Member, PSRMLS. 

PACIFIC GROVE (Monterey Co.) Area Code 408 

HOPKINS MARINE STATION LIBRARY (93950). 373-0464, ext. 51. M-F, 8-^5. Alan 
Baldridge, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, % other. Vols: 17,078. Per subs: 544. Micro hldgs: 98. Uncataloged materials organized for 

use: 1,406. Maps: 120. Photos, pictures, prints: 58. Tapes: 167. 
Special collections: Opisthobranchiate Molluscan Library of Frank Mace MacFarland; G. M. Smith 

Algae Reprint Collection. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 163 

PACIFIC GROVE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Central and Fountain Ave. (93950). 373-2822. 
Mrs. Margaret G. McBride, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classiBcation. 

Special collection: South seas (Seale collection) . 

Trustees: Mrs. Lilyan Eldred, Mrs. Reuben Klemin, Dr. Troy Bramlett, Darlene Lunden, Shirley 

Stoddard. 
Member, Monterey Bay Area Cooperative Library System. 

PALM DESERT (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 

COLLEGE OF THE DESERT LIBRARY. 43-500 Monterey Ave. (92260). 346-804L M- 
Th, 7:45-10; F, 7:45-5. Everett L. Moore, Libn. 

Vols: 36,150. Bd per: 1,050. Micro hldgs: 4,200 reels. Per subs: 400. 

Inc: $114,510. Exp: Sal: $84,672. Bks: $16,436. Per: $2,537. AV: $1,801. Bd: $483. Other: $8,581. 

Special subject: The desert. 

PALM SPRINGS (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 

PALM SPRINGS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 100 S. Palm Canyon Dr. (92262). 325-5153. Mrs. 
Billie Lu Floan, Libn. 

Outlets: 3 (2 branches) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Western Americana, Rothman collection, Robinson Jeffers collection. 
Trustees: Francis Crocker, Robert A. Schlesinger, Mrs. Jacques B. Crommelin, Mrs. Thomas Kieley, 

William Hesson. 
Member, Inland Library System. 

PALO ALTO (Santa Clara Co.) Area Code 415 

ALZA CORPORATION, RESEARCH LIBRARY. 950 Page Mill Road (94304) . 493-3200, 
ext. 268, 271. M-F, 8:30-5:15. Johanna H. van der Talc, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 4,850. Per subs: 445. Microfilms: 1,300 reels. Fiche: 50. 

Special subjects: Pharmacology, biochemistry, medicine, organic chemistry, physiology, polymer 

science, analytical chemistry, chemical engineering. 
Member, Cooperative Information Network (CIN) . 

AMERICAN INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH IN THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES LI- 
BRARY. 1791 Arastradero Road (P.O. Box 1113) (94302). 493-3550, ext. 62. M-F, 8:30-5. 
Ms. Roberta Steiner, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 2,200 books, 2,500 journals. Tech reports: 5,500. Per subs: 375. 

Special subjects: Educational psychology, educational research. American Institutes for Research 

technical reports, 1947 to date. 
Member, Cooperative Information Network (CIN). 

BECKMAN INSTRUMENTS, INC. SPINCO DIVISION, TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 1117 
California Ave. (94304). 326-1970, ext. 377. M-F, 8-^:45. Phyllis Browning, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 4,000. Tech reports: 300. Per subs: 170. 

Special subjects: Biochemistry (esp. ultracentrifugation) , column chromatography, protein and pep- 
tide structure and synthesis. 

CONGREGATION KOL EMETH LIBRARY. 4175 Manuela St. (94306). 

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH LIBRARY. 1985 Louis Road (94303). 326-3116. 
Daily, 9-5. Jane Neff, Libn. 

Staff: 3. Vols: 1,500. Per subs: 2. 
Special subject: Christian doctrine. 

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH LIBRARY. 625 Hamilton Ave. (94301). 323- 
6167. Open daily. Virginia T. Williams, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 5,500. Per subs: 6. Micro hldgs: 145. Recordings: 120. 
Special subjects: Religion, Bible, theology, biography, child study, education, travel, geography, art, 
music, hobbies. 

HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY, INC., CORPORATE LIBRARY. 1501 Page Mill 
Road (94304). 493-1501, Ext. 309. M-F, 7:30-5. Mark H. Baer, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 4 others. Vols: 24,050. Tech reports: 2,600. Per subs: 750. Micro hldgs: 500 fiche. VF 

drawers: 52. 
Special subjects: Electronics, physics, chemistry, soUd state physics, business, finance. 



164 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

PALO ALTO — Continued 

Member, Cooperative Information Network (CIN). 

LOCKHEED MISSILES AND SPACE COMPANY, INC., TECHNICAL INFORMA- 
TION CENTER. 3251 Hanover Street (94304) . 493-4411, ext. 45041 (manager) , ext. 45893 
(ILL) . M-F, 7:30-5:15. George R. Evans, Manager. 

Staff: 8 libns, 9 scientists /engineers, 6 others. Vols: 60,000. Tech reports: 630,000. Per subs: 1,100. Micro 
hldgs: 330,000. Technical data items: 155,000. 

Special subjects: Aerospace sciences, mathematics, electronics, computer sciences, materials and struc- 
tures. 

Member, Cooperative Information Network (CIN). 

PALO ALTO CITY UBRARY. 1213 Newell Rd. (94303) (mailing: 250 Hamilton Ave.) 
(94301) . 329-2516. Mrs. Marjorie Kohn, Acting Libn. 

Outlets: 5 (4 branches) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

PALO ALTO MEDICAL CLINIC AND RESEARCH FOUNDATION, BARNETT- 
HALL MEDICAL UBRARY. 860 Bryant St. (94301). 321-4121, ext. 350. M-F, &-5. Mrs. 
Beatrice Grady, Libn. 

Staff: 4 libns (half-time) . Vols: 11,396. Per subs: 267. 
Special subjects: Medicine, dentistry, biological sciences. 
Member, Cooperative Information Network (CIN) . 

PHILCO-FORD CORPORATION, WESTERN DEVELOPMENT LABORATORIES 
UBRARY. 3939 Fabian Way (94303) . 326-4350, ext. 4811. M-F, 10:30-12:30, 2-4. Mrs. Carol 
R. Hurley, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 10,000. Tech reports: 10,000. Per subs: 270. Micro hldgs: 10,000. 
Special subjects: Engineering, astronomy, physics, chemistry, mathematics, management. 

SCM RESEARCH AND ENGINEERING LABORATORY, TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 
3210 Porter Drive (94304) . 493-1700, ext. 232. Daily, 8-3. Mrs. Sophie Rentz, Libn. 

Vols: 2,000. Per subs: 177. Catalogs: 100. 

Special subjects: Electronis, computer science, physics, chemistry, business management. 

Member, Cooperative Information Network (CIN) . 

SYNTEX CORPORATION UBRARY. 3401 HiUview Ave. (94304). 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL LIBRARIES. 3801 Miranda Ave. (94303) . 
493-5000, ext. 5447. M-F, 8-4:30. Charls R. Gallimore, Libn. 

Staff: 4 libns, 6 othrs. Vols: 22,125. Tech reports: 56. Per subs: 362. Micro hldgs: 12. Newspapers: 6. 
Special subjects: Behavioral sciences, general medicine, surgery. 

W. A. WAHLER AND ASSOCIATES LIBRARY. 1023 Corporation Way (94303). 

XEROX PALO ALTO RESEARCH CENTER, RESEARCH LIBRARY. 3180 Porter 
Drive (94304). 493-1600, ext. 231. M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. Palma Marton, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 2,816. Tech reports: 168. Per. subs: 436. 

Sp>ecial subjects: Acousto-optics, photo elasticity, lasers, computers, medical diagnosis, operation re- 
search, crystals, graphic arts, holography, human engineering, physics, education, optics, chemis- 
try, electronics. 

ZOECON CORPORATION UBRARY. 975 California Ave. (94304) . 855-6375. M-F, 8-5. 
Mrs. Carolyn Betz, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 1,500 books, 700 bd journals. Per subs: 175. Micro hldgs: 650 cartridges. 
Special subjects: Entomology, organic chemistry, pesticides. 
Member, Cooperative Information Network (CIN) . 

PALO VERDES PENINSULA (Lot Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

MARYMOUNT PALOS VERDES COLLEGE UBRARY. 6717 Palos Verdes Dr. S. 
(90274) , 377-5501. M-Th, 8-5, 7-9:30; F, 8-4:30; Sun, 1-4:30. Sister Eileen Tuohy, R.S.H.M., 
Libn. 

Vols: 45,000. Bd per: 7,900. Micro hldgs: 650. Per subs: 180. Inc: $18,000. Exp: Sal: $10,820. Bks: $3,490. 

Per: $1,880. AV: $146. Bd: $569. 
Special coUection: Newman Collection. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 165 

PALOS VERDES LIBRARY DISTRICT LIBRARY. 650 Deep Valley Dr. (90274). 377- 
9584. William L. Emerson, Libn. 

Outlets: 3 (2 branches) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Dr. George Cleghorn, Ms. Mary S. Beeks, Ms. Myma Shiras, Edward E. Nelson, Ms. Patricia 

Marchbanks. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

PANORAMA CITY (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

KAISER FOUNDATION HOSPITAL, STAFF LIBRARY. 13652 Cantara St., (91402). 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL OF PANORAMA CITY, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 14850 Roscoe 
Blvd. (91402) . 787-2222. M-F, 8:30-5. E. Gilmore, Med. Record Libn. 

Vols: 300. Per subs: 5. 

PASADENA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

AMBASSADOR COLLEGE LIBRARY. 300 W. Green St. (91123) . 577-5541. Open: 6 days, 
80 hours. Dr. R. E. Walther, Libn. 

Vols: 44,388. Bd per: 5,797. Micro hldgs: 180,000. Per subs: 765. 

Inc.: $500,841. Exp: Sal: $225,386. Bks: $25,000. Per: $15,000. AV: $3,000. Bd: $3,300. Other: $229,255. 

Special collection: Hastings Collections. 

Branch: Fine Arts Library. 

AVERY PRODUCTS CORPORATION LIBRARY. 325 North Altadena Drive (91107) 
795-7201. M-F. 8:30-5. Louanne A. Kalvinskas, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 800. Per subs: 70. Patents: 2,000. 
Special subject: pressure-sensitive adhesive technology. 

BELL & HOWELL RESEARCH LABORATORIES, RESEARCH LIBRARY. 360 Sierra 
Madre Villa (91109). 795-8601, ext. 222. M-F, 8-5. Tom Gess, Libn. 

Staff: I libn, 1 other. Vols: 8,000. Tech reports: 2,000. Per subs: 250. 

Special subjects: Magnetic materials, magnetic recording, specs and standards. 

BURROUGHS CORPORATION, WESTERN REGION CENTRAL TECHNICAL LI- 
BRARY. 460 Sierra Madre Villa (91107). 

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, ROBERT ANDREWS MILLIKAN 
MEMORIAL LIBRARY. (91109). 795-6811. School year, M-F, 8-5. Johanna E. Tallman, 
Libn. 

Special materials: Gov't docs, U. S., deposits, maps, mss, films, recordings. 

Special services: Microfilm facilities, photocopy, microfilm readers. 

Collections open to: Students and faculty of other institutions, members of public for inlibrary use only. 

Interlibrary loan: to all libraries; $4.00 fee per item charge to industrial libraries. 

Restrictions: Periodicals, rarities not lent. 

Branches: Geology, aeronautics, industrial relations, astrophysics. 

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS LIBRARY. (91109). 

JET PROPULSION LABORATORY LIBRARY. 4800 Oak Grove Drive 

(91103). 354-4200. M-F, 7:30-^:30. Rocco Crachi, Libn. 

Staff: 16 libns., 28 others. Vols.: 90,000 books, 24,000 bd. per. Tech. reports: 190,000. Per subs.: 1,950. 

Micro, hldgs.: 545,000; fiche, 2,200 fihn. 

Special subjects: Unmarmed space exploration, astronomy, electronics, communications, physics. 

FULLER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, McALISTER LIBRARY. 135 N. Oakland 
(91101). 449-1745. M-S, 8-10. C. Schoonhoven, Libn. 

Vols.: 86,000. Micro, hldgs.: 1,000. Per subs.: 563. 

Inc.: $97,600. Exp.: Sal.: $54,290. Bks.: $35,050. Bd.: $3,000. Supplies, equipment, etc.: $5,100. 

Special subjects: Theology, missions, psychology. 

HALE OBSERVATORIES, CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON, LI- 
BRARY. 813 Santa Barbara St. (91101). 

HUNTINGTON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, HEALTH SCIENCE LIBRARY. 100 Con- 
gress St. (91105). 796-0371, ext. 555, 556. M-F, 7-5. June J. Engstrom, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn., 2 others. Vols.: 10,000. Per subs.: 249. 
Special subjects: Medical, nursing, other paramedical. 



166 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

PASADENA — Continued 

NAVAL UNDERSEA RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER, TECHNICAL 

LIBRARY. 3202 E. Foothill Blvd. (91107). 

PACIFIC OAKS COLLEGE LIBRARY. 714 West California Blvd. (91105). 795-9161. 
M-Th., 8:30-9; F, 8:30-4:30. Cyril C. Treister, Libn. 

Vok.: 19,805. Bd. per: 218. Micro, hldgs.: 1,284 ERIC microfiche. Per subs.: 175. 
Inc.: $26,060. Exp.: Sal.: $30,350. Bks.: $1,250. Per: $800. AY: $100. Bd.: $60. Supplies: $200. 
Special subjects: Preschool education, early elementary education. Special collections: Society of 
Friends; children's books. 

PASADENA CITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1570 E. Colorado Blvd. (91106). 578-7221. 
M-Th, 7:30-9:45; F, 7:30-4:45; S, noon to 4. William K. Grainger, Libn. 

Vols.: 103,646. Bd. per: 4,112. Micro, hldgs.: 2,670 reels. Per subs.: 582. 

Inc.: $293,825. Exp.: Sal.: $220,566. Bks.: $42,421. Per: $7,237. AV: $2,775. Bd.: $1,118. Other: $14,359. 

PASADENA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1539 E. Howard St. (91104). 

PASADENA JEWISH TEMPLE AND CENTER, SARAH CELIA KRAKOWSKI 
MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 1434 North Altadena Drive (91107) . Sun, 9:30-12:30. Mrs. Kate 
Shapiro, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols.: 3,000. 

Special subjects: Jewish interest, incl. philosophy, religion, history, customs and ceremonies, literature. 

PASADENA PUBUC LIBRARY. 285 E. Walnut St. (91101). 577-4066. Robert W. 
Conover, Jr., Libn. 

Contracts with: Los Angeles County. Outlets: 9 (8 branches) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey 

Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Art, music, Califomiana, business directories, Pasadena history, biography and 

architecture. 
Trustees: Mrs. Stanley E. Kyle, Henry H. Clifford, Lyle Nash, James W. Price, Dr. Catherine J. Bobbins, 

Mrs. Alan R. Sweezy. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

ST. LUKE HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 2632 East Washington Blvd. (91107). 797- 
1141, ext. 252. Open daily, 24 hours. Mrs. Jacquelin Erwin, Libn. 

Vols.: 230 books, 700 bd. journals. Per subs.: 60. 

XEROX CORPORATION, ELECTRO-OPTICAL SYSTEMS, LIBRARY. 300 North Hal- 
stead St. (91107) . 351-2411. M-F, 8:30-5;30. Mrs. Elizabeth P. Neeri, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols.: 12,000. Tech. reports: 5,000. Per subs.: 150. 

PASO ROBLES (San Lui> Obispo Co.) Area Code 805 

PASO ROBLES PUBUC UBRARY. 800 12th St. (93446) . 238-0315. Mrs. Gertrude Ches- 
more, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal, Library of Congress classifications. 
Trustees: Mrs. Jane Belmont, Martha Swanson, Mrs. Myrtle De Chaine, Jay Ferrin, Mrs. Emelie 
Lochhead. 

PATTON (San Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 

PATTON STATE HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. Drawer B, Box 209 (92369). 862- 
8121, ext. 484. M-F, 8-^:30. Alva S. Klotter, Libn. 

Vols.: 7.500. Per subs.: 50. 

Special subjects: Psychiatry, psychology, nursing, deviant behavior, mental retardation, medicine, 
administration. 

PATTON STATE HOSPITAL, PATIENT'S UBRARY. Drawer B, Box 209 (92369) . 862- 
8121, ext. 484. M-F, 8-11, 1-3. 

Vols.: 8,000. Per subs.: 35. 

PETALUMA (Sonoma Co.) Area Code 707 

PETALUMA FREE PUBUC UBRARY. 20 Fourth St. (94952) . 762-8075. Alice M. Han- 
na, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Kenneth M. Wightman, Mrs. Dorothy Bertucci, Dr. Harold A. Brown, Duncan Olmstead, 
Robert Brunner. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 167 

Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

PLACENTIA (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

PLACENTIA LIBRARY DISTRICT LIBRARY. 143 S. Bradford Ave. (92670). 528-1906. 
David E. Snow, Library Director. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collection: Califomiana. 

Trustees: Virginia C. Fanner, Victor J. Michel, Kathryn A. McKnight, Irene Czaplinski, Alft-ed V. 

Aguirre. 
Member, Santiago Library System. 

PLACERVILLE (El Dorado Co.) Area Code 916 

EL DORADO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 495 Main St. (95667) . 626-2431. Billie Mitch- 
ell, Libn. 

EL DORADO COUNTY LIBRARY. 549 Main St. (95667) . 626-2340. Alice L. Stjemquist, 
Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Outlets: 32. 

Stations: El Dorado Hills, Georgetown, Lake Valley, Pollock Pines, Shingle Springs. 

Bookmobile stops: 26 (24 community, 2 school) . 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Member, Mountain-Valley Library System. 

MARSHALL HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. Marshall Way (95667) . 622-1441, ext. 5. 
M-F, 8-4. Mrs. Evangeline R. Niles, Libn. 

Vols.: 405. Per subs.: 6. Audio-tapes: 90. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

PLEASANT HILL (Contra Costa Co.) Area Code 415 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY LIBRARY. 1750 Oak Park Blvd. (94523) . 937-4100. Clarence 
R. Walters, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Richmond. Contracts with: Alameda County, Richmond. 

Outlets: 66. 

Branches: Antioch, Concord, El Cerrito, EH Sobrante, Kensington, Lafayette, Martinez, Moraga, Orin- 

da, Pittsburg, San Pablo, San Ramon, Walnut Creek. 
Stations: Brentwood, Byron, County Hospital, Crockett, Oakley, Pacheco, Pinole, Rodeo, Rossmoor. 
Bookmobile stops: 43. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Business, local history, documents, newspapers, food technology, automotive and 

motorcycle repair manuals, periodicals, Spanish and bilingual materials, military and naval history. 
Member, East Bay Cooperative Library System. 

DIABLO VALLEY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 321 Golf Club Rd. (94523). 685-1230. M-Th, 
7:45-9:30; F, 7:45-5; Sun, 1-6. Thomas B. Murray, Libn. 

Vols: 55,000. Bd per: 2,708. Micro hldgs: 1,477. Per subs: 454. 

Exp: Sal: $233,845. Bks: $39,591. Per: $6,404. Bd: $2,520. Supplies: $6,361. 

Special subject: Black studies. 

Special collection: Topographic maps. 

LOS MEDANOS COLLEGE LIBRARY 321 Golf Club Rd. (94523) . 685-1230. M-F, 8-5. 
A. "Don" Donatelli, Libn. 

PLEASANTON (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

KAISER ALUMINUM AND CHEMICAL CORPORATION, CENTER FOR TECH- 
NOLOGY, TECHNICAL INFORMATION CENTER, LIBRARY. 6177 Sunol Blvd. 
(94526). 462-1122, ext. 239. M-F, 8-4:30. Fred Farhat, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 4 others. Vols: 18,000. Tech reports: 14,000. Per subs: 500. Micro hldgs: 2,000. Reports/ 

reprints: 28,000. Patents: 5,000 
Special subjects: Aluminum, refractories, chemistry, metallurgy, nickel, extractive metallurgy, alumi- 



168 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

POINT MUGU (Ventura Co.) Area Code 805 

NAVAL MISSILE CENTER, TECHNICAL LIBRARY (CODE 5632) . (93042) . 982-8156. 
M-F, 8-1:30. Mrs. Isabelle K. Burtnett, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 7 others. Titles: 36,000. Tech reports: 25,000 hard copy; 15,000 fiche. Per subs: 500 titles. 

Micro hldgs: 5,000 periodical vols. 
Special subjects: Guided missiles, space research and technology, guidance systems, engineering, 

physics, radar, electronics, human factors. 

POMONA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 714 

CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 3801 West Temple 
Ave. (91768) . 598-4671. M-Th, 7:45-10; F, 7:45-5; S, 1-5; Sun, 6-10. Harold F. Wells, Libn. 

Vols: 205,782. Bd per: 41,117. Micro hldgs: 299,244. Per subs: 2,162. 

Inc: $1,059,791. Exp: Sal: $579,000. Bks: $304,309. Per: $50,283. Bd: $18,430. Other: $107,769. 

Special subjects: Engineering, agriculture, environmental design. 

Sp>ecial collections: Arabian horse, environment, fungi. 

PACIFIC STATE HOSPITAL, RESIDENTS' LIBRARY. 3530 West Pomona Blvd. (Box 
100) (91768). 595-1221, ext. 462. M-F, 1-1. Mrs. Eleanor Wash, Libn. 

Staff: Vi libn, 2 others (half-time). Vols: 850. Per subs: 15. 

Special collections: Children's collections, picture file, records, tapes. 

PACIFIC STATE HOSPITAL, STAFF LIBRARY. 3530 West Pomona Blvd. (Box 100) 
(91768). 595-1221, ext. 277. M-F, 8-4:30. Mrs. Eleanor Wash, Libn. 

Staff: I'/a libns, 1 other. Vols: 9,500. Per subs: 350. 

Special subjects: Mental retardation, psychology, psychiatry, nursing, medicine. 

POMONA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 625 S. Carey Ave. (mailing: P.O. Box 2271) (91766). 
620-2033. Bradley A. Simon, Libn. 

Contracts with: Los Angeles County Public Library. 

Outlets: 12 (11 bookmobile stops). 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Willis Kerr Philatelic Library, Califomiana, Sarah M. Jacobus memorial collection, 
local history, sight saving, genealogy, local authors, college catalogs, telephone books. Citrus Pack- 
ing House Company collection. Water Company collection, Frasher Photograph coUection, World 
Affairs Periodical Alcove, postcard coUection, Loyd C. Cooper Photograph collection, historical 
theses. 

Trustees: Rev. Vernon Trahms, Mrs. Ernest Shaffer, Mrs. Maurice Williams, Ralph E. Bayer, Raymond 
Wentworth. 

Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

POMONA VALLEY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL, MEDICAL STAFF LIBRARY. 1798 
North Carey Ave. (91767) . 623-2411, ext. 251. M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. Helen Boughton, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 455. Per subs: 33. Audio-Digest tapes. 

PORTERVILLE (Tulare Co.) Area Code 209 

PORTERVILLE COLLEGE LIBRARY. 900 S. Main St. (93257). 

PORTERVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 41 W. Thurman Ave. (93257) . 784-0177. Dennis R. 
Masiello, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collection: Califomiana. 

Trustees: Mrs. Patricia McLaughlin, Donald B. Thompson, Gary Garlund, Graham Dean, Mrs. Grace 
Scanlon. 

PORTERVILLE STATE HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 2000 (93257). 
784-2000, ext. 254. M, 8-10, 12-^:30; T-F, 8-10, 3-4:30. Mrs. Mary Jane Berry, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 6,900. Per subs: 126 
Special subject: Mental retardation. 

PORTERVILLE STATE HOSPITAL, RESIDENTS' LIBRARY. P.O. Box 2000 (93257). 
784-2000, ext. 203. M, 10:45-11:30; T-F, 10:15-3. Mrs. Mary Jane Berry, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 4,000. Per subs: 3. 
Special collection: Easy reading. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 169 

PORT HUENEME (Ventura Co.) Area Code 805 

NAVAL CIVIL ENGINEERING LABORATORY, TECHNICAL LIBRARY (CODE 
L31). (93043). 982-4252, -4788. M-F, 8-4:30. Frances J. Rugen, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 3 others. Vols: 10,500. Tech reports: 28,000. Per subs: 403. Maps: 1,000. 

Special subjects: Ocean engineering, concrete construction, corrosion of materials, polar operations 

and construction, environmental protection. 
Member, TIE. 

NAVAL SCHOOL, CIVIL ENGINEER CORPS OFFICERS, MOREELL LIBRARY. 
Bldg. 41 (93043). 982-5655, ext. 65. M-F, 8-4:30. Mrs. Barbara J. Horn, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 3,750. Tech reports: 4,900. Per subs: 185. Micro hldgs: 75. 

Special subjects: Management (engineering) , construction and protective shelters, oceanography and 
ocean engineering, economic analysis, nuclear defense engineering, PERT and CPM, Commu- 
nism and counterinsurgency, construction management. 

Member, TIE. 

QUINCY (Plumas Co.) Area Code 916 

FEATHER RIVER COLLEGE LIBRARY. P. O. Box 1110 (95971). 

PLUMAS COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Box 686, Courthouse (95971). 283-2365. 8:30-5. 
Morris Durrant, Libn. 

PLUMAS COUNTY LIBRARY. 445 W. Jackson St. (mailing: P.O. Box 270) (95971). 
Jonathan J. Little, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Contracts with: Sierra County. Outlets: 17. 

Stations: Beckwourth, Belden, Chester, Chilcoot, GreenviUe, La Porte, Portola, Storrie, Taylorsville, 

Vinton. 
Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Local history, mining, state documents. 
Member, North State Cooperative Library System. 

SIERRA COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. Plumas County Free Library (P.O. Box 270) 
(95971). 283-0780. Jonathan J. Little, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Contracts with: Plumas County. Outlets: 6. 
Stations: Alleghany, Calpine, Downieville, Loyalton, Sierra City, Sierraville. 

RED BLUFF (Tehama Co.) Area Code 916 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES, NORTHERN DIS- 
TRICT LIBRARY. 2440 Main St. (P.O. Box 607) (96080). 

TEHAMA COUNTY I^AW LIBRARY. Courthouse, Rm. 24 (96080). 527-5605. Mavis Y. 
Manwell, Libn. 

TEHAMA COUNTY LIBRARY. 909 Jefferson St. (96080) . 527-0604. Mrs. Alice Mathisen, 
Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Contracts with: Coming. Affiliated with: Coming. Outlets: 13. 

Stations: Brentwood, Ecology Center, Gerber, Los Molinos, Los Robles, Manton, Mineral, Olive, Senior 

Citizens, Tehama, Vina. 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collection: Local history. 
Member, North State Cooperative Library System. 

REDDING (Shasta Co.) Area Code 916 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DISTRICT 02 LIBRARY. 1657 Riverside Dr. (96001). 

SHASTA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1065 N. Old Oregon Trail (96001). 

SHASTA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (96001). 

SHASTA COUNTY LIBRARY. 1855 Shasta St. (96001). 246-5756. Mrs. Grace A. Gilman, 
Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Outlets: 18. 

Stations: Anderson, Bumey, Castella, Central Valley, Cottonwood, Enterprise, Fall River Mills, French 

Gulch, Lakehead, Montgomery Creek, Oak Run, Ono, Palo Cedro, Pit #5, Platina, Shingletown, 

Whitmore. 



170 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

REDDING — Continued 

Copying service for patrons. 

Special collections: Business collection, Califomiana and local history. 

Member, North State Cooperative Library System. 

REDLANDS (San Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 
LOCKHEED PROPULSION COMPANY, SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 111 (92373) . 794-5467. M-F, 8-4:45. Belle D. Berlad, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, IVi others. Vols: 6,000. Tech reports: 35,000. Per subs: 250. Micro hldgs: 250. 

A. K. SMILEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 125 W. Vine (mailing: P.O. Box 751) (92373). 793- 

2201. Phyllis Irshay, Libn. 

Outlets: 2 (1 station). Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Redlandsiana, Califomiana, Smiley archives, Gideon Wells letters, Lincolniana, 

fine arts (painting and sculpture) , framed art prints. 
Trustees: William G. Moore, James A. Fallows, L. P. Scherer, Franklin D. Postle, Dr. Eugene Dawson. 

UNTVERSITY OF REDLANDS, ARMACOST LIBRARY. (92373) . 793-2121. M-Th, 8-11; 
F, 8-5; S, 10-5. Bernard E. Richardson, Libn. 

Vols: 186,300. Bd per: 40,840. Micro hldgs: 2,150. Per subs: 1,591. 
Inc: $320,499. Exp: Sal: $159,823. Bks: $80,366. Per: $36,147. Bd: $5,833. Other $38,330. 
Special subjects: Art; English literature and comparative literature. Special collections: MacNair Far 
Eastern Collection; Irvine Map Library. 

REDONDO BEACH (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 
REDONDO BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY. 309 Esplanade (90277) . 376-8723. William R. 
Poole, Libn. 

Outlets: 20 (1 branch, 18 school bookmobile stops). Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal 

classification. 
Special collections: Fiction. 
Trustees: Mrs. Kay Horrell, Mrs. Dorothy Carter, Mrs. Gay E. Jett, Mrs. Emma R. Gomez, Mrs. Lucille 

HoUand. 
Member, MetropoUtan Cooperative Library System. 

REDWOOD CITY (Son Mateo Co.) Area Code 415 
AMPEX CORPORATION TECHNICAL LIBRARY (Mail Stop 3-10) . 401 Broadway 
(94063) . 367-3368. M-F, &-5. B. M. Burriss, Jr., Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 3 others. Vols: 15,000. Per subs: 350. Micro hldgs: 2,500. Special subject: magnetic recording 

technology. 
CANADA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 4200 Farm Hill Blvd. (94061) . 364-1212. M, Th, 8-9; T, 
W, F, 8-4:30. Amerigo T. Ciani, Libn. 

Vols: 30,500. Bd per: 1,145. Micro hldgs: 1,983 rolls of microfihn. Per subs. 550. 
Inc: $218,518. Exp: Sal: $110,116. Bks: $46,503. Per: $4,780. AV: $36,518. Bd: $492. 

KAISER FOUNDATION HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 1150 Veterans Blvd. 
(94063). 365-4321, ext. 210.M-F, 9-5:30. Rose Marie DeBella, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 904. Per subs: 76. Audio tapes: 438. 

REDWOOD CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 881 Jefferson Ave. (94063). 369-3737. Karl A. 
VoUmayer, Libn. 

Contracts with: San Mateo County, for service to three unincorporated county areas. 
Outlets: 2 (1 branch). Copying service to patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Braille, marine biology, large type books (including children's) . 
Triistees: Allison M. Rouse, Lucille Johnson, W. Earl Whitaker, Lawrence G. Brian, Leonard Green- 
wold. 
Member, Peninsula Library System. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Hall of Justice and Records (94063) . 364-5600, 
ext. 2480. Peter S. Nycum, Libn. 

SEQUOIA HOSPITAL MEDICAL STAFF LIBRARY. Whipple and Alameda (94062). 
369-5811, ext. 554. Open daily, 24 hours. Mrs. Virginia Beaumont, Libn. 
Staff: 3. Vols: 2,000. Per subs: 70. Tapes; Audio-Digest. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 171 

REEDLEY (Fresno Co.) Area Code 209 
REEDLEY COLLEGE LIBRARY. Reed and Manning Aves. (93654). 638-3641. M-Th, 
7:45-5, 7-9:30; F, 7:45-5. Lloyd C. Dry, Libn. 

Vols: 21,000. Bd per: 1,302. Micro hldgs: 1,241 Microfilm, 5,000 microfiche. Per subs: 229. 
Inc: $83,456. Exp: Sal: $55,649. Bks: $10,000. Per: $2,400. AV: $2,800. Bd: $700. 

REPRESA (Sacramento Co.) Area Code 916 

FOLSOM STATE PRISON LIBRARY. (95671). Dean W. Gregory, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 8 others. Vols: 20,000. 

RICHMOND (Contra Costa Co.) Area Code 415 

CHEVRON RESEARCH COMPANY, RICHMOND LABORATORY LIBRARY. 576 
Standard Ave. (P.O. Box 1627) (94802) . 237-4411, ext. 2105. M-F, 8-4:45. H. D. Gholston, 
Libn. 

Staff: 4 libns, 7 others. Vols: 25,000. Tech reports: 1,500. Per subs: 900. Micro hldgs: 4,000 reels. Record- 
ings: 25 albums, 100 cartridges. 

RICHMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY. Civic Center and MacDonald Ave. (94804) . 234-6632. 
Theodora L. Johnson, Libn. 

Outlets: 27 (4 stations, 14 community, 8 school bookmobile stops) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey 

Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Walter T. Helms (California history), Richmond collection (local history). 
Trustees: Mrs. Ethel Grimason, Mrs. Jo Nell Bamett, Edwin R. Brooks, Mrs. Rosemary Corbin, Mrs. 

Dorothy Vincent. 
Member, East Bay Cooperative Library System. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING RESEARCH 
CENTER LIBRARY. 1301 South 46th St. (94804). 235-6000, ext. 288. M-F, 8-12, 1-5. 
WiUiam C. Berges, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 388 monographs, 205 bd pers. Tech reports: 2,500. Per subs: 25. Micro hldgs: 

25. Maps: 110. Unbound pers: 1,500. 
Special subjects: Structural engineering, earthquake damage, seismic design of structures, dynamic 

structural analysis. 

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY, FOREST PRODUCTS LIBRARY. 1301 South 46th 

St. (94804). 235-6000, ext. 271. M-F, 8-12, 1-5. WilHam C. Berges, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 5,100. Tech reports: 2,000. Per subs: 600. Micro hldgs: 50 reels. 
Special subjects: Wood science and technology, wood chemistry, wood physics, wood machining, 
preservation, wood deterioration, pulp and paper, adhesives and adhesion. 

RIDGECREST (Kern Co.) Area Code 805 

CERRO COSO COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. College Heights Drive (93555). 
375-1548. Frank L. Selvera, Libn. 

Vols: 3,500. Bd per: 500. Per subs: 75. 
Special subject: Desert ecology. 

RIVERSIDE (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 

CALIFORNIA BAPTIST COLLEGE LIBRARY. 8432 Magnolia Ave. (92504). 689-5771. 
M, T, Th, 8-9:30; W, F, 8-5:30; S, 10-4. Mrs. Janette B. Cutsinger, Acting Libn. 

Vols: 90,000. Bd per: 11,244. Micro hldgs: 5,000. Per subs: 600. 

Inc: $3,102. Exp: Sal: $46,191. Bks: $3,617. Per: $7,588. Other: $6,579. 

Special collection: D. E. Wallace Evangelism Collection. 

KNOLLWOOD COMMUNITY HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 5900 Brockton Ave. 
(92506) . 686-3344, ext. 24. M-F, 7-9:30. Mrs. JoAnn Taylor, Libn. 

Staff: 1 (part-time). Vols: 389. Per subs: 23. 

LOMA LINDA UNIVERSITY, LA SIERRA CAMPUS, LIBRARY. (92505). 785-2044. 
M-Th, 7:30-10; F, 7:30-2:30; Sun, lO-lO. George V. Summers, Libn. 

Vols: 87,479. Bd per: 13,109. Micro hldgs: 18,408. Per subs: 768. 

Inc: $218,635. Exp: Sal: $143,000. Bks: $43,600. Per: $10,400. AV: $235. Bd: $6,400. Other: $15,000. 

Special collection: Seventh-Day Adventist history. 



172 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

RIVERSIDE— Continued 

PRESS-ENTERPRISE EDITORIAL LIBRARY. 3512 14th St. (P.O. Box 792) (92502). 

684-1200, ext. 301. Joan Minesinger, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. 

RIVERSIDE CITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 4800 Magnolia Ave. (92506). 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 3535 Tenth St., Suite 100 (92501). 

RIVERSIDE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 3581 Seventh St. (mailing: P.O. Box 468) (92502). 
787-7211. Albert Charles Lake, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Banning Unified School District Library, Beaumont Library District, 
Corona, Hemet, Indian Weils, Palm Springs, Palo Verde Valley Library District. 

Contracts with: Coachella, Desert Hot Springs, Elsinore, Indio, Norco, Perris, San Jacinto, and unincor- 
porated area of Riverside County. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Banning, Beaumont, Hemet, Palm Springs, Palo Verde Valley. 

Outlets: 54. 

Branches: Arlington, Desert Hot Springs, Elsinore, Indio, Lake Tamarisk, La Sierra, Marcy, Norco, 
Palm Desert, Robidoux, San Jacinto, Sun City, Sunnymead. 

Stations: Coachella, Casa Blanca, Cathedral City, Glen Avon, Highgrove, Idyllwild, Mecca-North 
Shore, Nuview, Palm Desert Country Club, Perris, Valle Vista, Rancho California. 

Bookmobile stops: 27 (26 community, 1 school) . 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classiBcation. 

Member, Inland Library System. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE, LIBRARY. P. O. Box 5900. (92507). 
787-3221. M-Th, 8 to midnight; F, 8-^; S, 10-5; Sun, 2 to midnight. Donald G. Wilson, Libn. 

Vols: 736,136. Micro hldgs: 23,805 Microfihn reels, 217,802 microfiches, 248,960 microcards and print. 

Per subs: 11,297. 
Inc: $1,909,000. Exp: Sal: $885,588. Bks: $267,885. Per: $279,387. AV: $12,543. Bd: $78,240. Other: $70,905. 
Special subjects: Citrus and avocado, especially pathology; entomology, plant pathology, biological 

control. Special collections: Ezra Pound, Sadakichi Hartmann, Niels Cade, fantasy and Utopian 

literature, Diaz-Perez-Godoi papers, Christopher Morley. 
Branches: Bio-Agricultural, Physical Sciences, Music (departmental library) . 

BIO-AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY. (92502). 787-3701. M-Th, 8 a.m.-midnight; 

F, 8-8; S, 10-^; Sun, 2-midnight. Richard W. Vierich, Head, Science Libraries. 

Staff: 3 libns, 12 others. Vols: 82,000. Per subs: 2,800. 

Special subjects: Avocados, citrus, other subtropical horticulture; biology and agriculture; arid lands 

research. 
Member, Inland Empire Academic Libraries Cooperative. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCES LIBRARY. (92502). 787-3227 (information), 787-3701 

(ILL). M-Th, 8 a.m.-midnight; F, 8-8; S, 10-5; Sun, 2-midnight. Richard Vierich, Head, 
Science Libraries. 

Staff: 1 libn, 4 others. Vols: 54,326. Per subs: 2,100. 

Special subjects: Chemistry, physics, geology and related fields. 

Member, Inland Empire Academic Libraries cooperative. 

ROCKLIN (Sacramento Co.) Area Code 916 

SIERRA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 5000 Rocklin Rd. (95677). 624-3333. M-Th, 7:30-9:30; F, 
7:30-5. William R. Pierce, Libn. 

Vols: 51,000. Bd per: 2,666. Micro hldgs: 1,200 reels. Per subs: 367. 

Inc: $123,988. Exp: Sal: $74,919. Bks: $18,500. Per: $4,256. AV: $4,530. Bd: $200. Other: $21,583. 

ROHNERT PARK (Sonoma Co.) Area Code 707 

CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE, SONOMA, LIBRARY. 1801 E. Cotati Ave. (94928). 
795-2397. M-Th, 7:45-11; F, 7:45-5; S, 9-5. A. S. Pickett, Libn. 

Vols: 166,403. Bd per: 26,323. Micro hldgs: 283,198. Per subs: 3,030. Exp: Sal: $514,950. Bks: $211,992. Per: 

$62,500. Bd: $25,740. Other: $54,313. 
Special collection: Lyman Collection (Celtic). 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 173 

ROSEMEAD (Los Angele* Co.) Area Code 213 

DON BOSCO TECHNICAL INSTITUTE LIBRARY. 1151 San Gabriel Blvd. (91770). 
280-0451. Sister M. Jean Ellen Shields, BVM, Libn. 

Vols: 12,000. Per subs: 120. Inc: $11,000. Exp: Sal: $5,000. Bks: $4,500. Per: $500. Other: $1,000. 

ROSEMEAD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY LIBRARY. 1409 N. Walnut 
Grove Ave. (91770). 

ROSEVILLE (Placer Co.) Area Code 916 

ROSEVILLE COMMUNITY HOSPITAL, ROBERT G. ADLER, M. D., MEMORIAL 
LIBRARY. 333 Sunrise Ave. (95678). 783-9111. M-F, 8-5. Mildred Tindall, Libn. 

Staff: Vi libn, Vi other. 

Vols: 350. Tech reports: 60. Per subs: 20. Tapes: 300. 

Special subjects: Medicine, nursing. 

Member, PSRMLS. 

ROSEVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 557 Lincoln St. (95678) . 783-7158. Ms. Helen G. O'Con- 
nor, Libn. 

Outlets: 15 (1 station, 13 community bookmobile stops) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal 

classilication. 
Special collections: Railroad collection, old Roseville pictures. 

Trustees: James GiU, William BirdsaU, June Wanish, Ted Husldnson, Walter Knudsen. 
Member, Mountain- Valley Library System. 

SACRAMENTO (Sacramento Co.) Area Code 916 

AMERICAN RIVER COLLEGE LIBRARY. 4700 College Oak Dr. (95841). 484-8293. 
M-Th, 7:30-9:30; F, 7:30-5; S, 9:30-2:30. James F. Carison, Libn. 

Vols: 60,000. Bd per: 3,915. Micro hldgs: 3,916 reels, 612 cards. Per subs: 500. Bks: $56,450. Per: $6,000. 

AV: $5,000 (Micro). Bd: $900. Other: $10,100. 
Special collections: California collection; vocational collection. 
Branch: Placerville Branch. 

CALIFORNIA AUDITOR GENERAL, LIBRARY. 1100 K St., Rm. 400 (95814). 

CALIFORNIA SECRETARY OF STATE, STATE ARCHIVES. 1020 O St. 445-4293. Dr 
W. N. Davis, Jr., Chief Archivist. 

CALIFORNIA STATE ADVISORY COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN, 
LIBRARY. 1025 P St., Rm. 340 (95814). 

CALIFORNIA STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION, LAW LIBRARY. 1020 N St., Rm. 

276 (95814). 

CALIFORNIA STATE BOARD OF NURSING EDUCATION AND NURSE REGIS- 
TRATION, LIBRARY. 1020 N St., Rm. 448 (95814). 

CALIFORNIA STATE COURT OF APPEAL, THIRD APPELLATE DISTRICT, LAW 
LIBRARY. 119 Library and Courts Bldg. (95814). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, CHEMISTRY LABORA- 
TORY SERVICE LIBRARY. 1220 N St., Rm. A-307 (95814). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, PLANT INDUSTRY 
REFERENCE ROOM. 1220 N St., Rm. 351 (95814). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, LEGAL OFFICE 
LIBRARY. 1020 N St., Rm. 509 (95814). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, AUDITS DIVISION LIBRARY. 
1025 P St., Rm. 535 (95814) 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, BUDGET DIVISION U- 
BRARY. 1025 P St., Rm. 472 (95814). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES, MANAGEMENT 
ASSISTANCE DIVISION LIBRARY. Office Bldg. #1 (95814). 



174 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SACRAMENTO— Continued 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAY PATROL, TRAINING SERV- 
ICES SECTION, LIBRARY SERVICES UNIT. 2611 26th St., Rm. 123 (95818). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVEL- 
OPMENT, LIBRARY. 1121 O St., Rm. 3344 (95814). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OF- 
FICE LIBRARY. 1500 5th St., Rm. 443 (95814). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, COMMISSION ON PEACE OF- 
FICER STANDARDS AND TRAINING, UBRARY. 7100 Bowling Drive, Suite 240 

(95823). 

CAUFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES, RESEARCH AND 
STATISTICS LIBRARY. 2570 24th St. (P.O. Box 1828) (95809). 445-2100. M-F, 8-^:45. 

Vols: 75. Tech reports: 850. Per subs: 36. 

CAUFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBUC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, BRIDGE LIBRARY. 1120 N St., Rm. 3340 (95814). 

CAUFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, LEGAL LIBRARY. 1120 N St., Rm. 1315 (95814). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, MATERIALS AND RESEARCH UBRARY. 5900 Folsom Blvd. (95819). 

CAUFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, TRANSPORTATION UBRARY. 1120 N St. (P.O. Box 1499) (95807). 445-3230. 
M-F, 7:30^:30. Phyllis Newton, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 4 others. Vols: 400. Tech reports: 39,000. Per subs: 176. Micro hldgs: 50. 
Special subjects: Technical and planning data on aU modes of transportation. 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE LIBRARY. 744 P St. 

(95814). 445-5868. M-F, 8-12:30, 1^:30. Jane Person, in charge. 

Staff: 1. Vols: 1,200. Per subs: 180. 

CAUFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES LAW LIBRARY. 

1416 9th St., Rm. 1118-13 (95814) (mailing: P.O. Box 388) (95802). 445-2839. Marybelle 
Archibald, Libn. 

Staff: 2. Vols: 13,750. Vols added: 500. Per subs: 30. Los Angeles County Law Library classification. 

CAUFORNIA STATE EMPLOYMENT DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, EM- 
PLOYMENT DATA AND RESEARCH LIBRARY. 800 Capitol Mall, Rm. 6099 (95814). 

CAUFORNIA STATE EMPLOYMENT DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, PERSON- 
NEL MANAGEMENT AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT SECTION LIBRARY. 800 Capi- 
tol Mall, Rm. 6132 (95814) . 

CAUFORNIA STATE FRANCHISE TAX BOARD, LEGAL DIVISION LIBRARY. 

Aerojet Facility (95857). 

CALIFORNIA STATE FRANCHISE TAX BOARD, PERSONNEL AND TRAINING 
LIBRARY. Aerojet Facihty (95857). 

CAUFORNIA STATE FRANCHISE TAX BOARD, RESEARCH AND STATISTICS 
SECTION LIBRARY. Aerojet Facility (95857). 

CALIFORNIA STATE HEALTH AND WELFARE AGENCY, INTERDEPARTMEN- 
TAL LIBRARY. 714 P St., Room 1800 (95814). 445-8975. M-F, 8-^:45. Thomas Dickson, 
Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 10,000. Per subs: 400. 

CAUFORNIA STATE LEGISLATIVE BUDGET COMMITTEE, LEGISLATI 
ANALYST'S OFFICE UBRARY. State Capitol (95814). 

CAUFORNIA STATE LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL LIBRARY. 3021 State Capito| 
(95814). 445-2609. Janet Kiniry, Libn. 

Staff: 2. Vols: 23,000. Vols added: 350. Per subs: 18. Los Angeles County Law Library classification. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 175 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. Library and Courts Bldg. (P.O. Box 2037) (95809). 
445-4374. M-F, 8-5. Ethel S. Crockett, State Librarian. For annual statistical summary, see 
p. 3; Sutro Library, see San Francisco. 

CAUFORNIA STATE OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES, LIBRARY. 2800 Mea- 
dowviewRoad. (95832). 

CALIFORNIA STATE RESOURCES AGENCY UBRARY. 1416 9th St., Room 117 
(95814). 445-7752. M-F, 7:45-5. Miriam S. Nylin, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 5 others. Vols: 8,000. Tech reports: 50,000. Per subs: 850. Micro hldgs: 100. 
Special subjects: natural resources, conservation. 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SACRAMENTO, UBRARY. 6000 Jay St. (95819) . 
M-Th, 8-11; F, 8-5; S, Sun, 1-9. Gordon P. Martin, Libn. 

Vols: 443,000. Bd per: 74,200. Micro hldgs: 542,000. Per subs: 3,972. Exp: Sal: $883,520. Bks: $512,439. Per: 

$80,003. AV: $2,970. Bd: $55,525. 
Special collections; Fine printing, art slides, curriculum. 

CALIFORNIA TAXPAYERS' ASSOCIATION LIBRARY. 900 11th and L Bldg. (95814) . 
441-0490. M-F, 8:30-5. Arlen K. Bean, Libn. 

Staff: 2. Vols: 1,000. Tech. reports: 5,000. Per sub^: 50. 

COSUMNES RIVER COLLEGE LIBRARY. 8401 Center Parkway (95823) . Terry Kastan- 
is, Libn. 

SACRAMENTO BEE LIBRARY. 21st and Q Sts. (95814). 

SACRAMENTO CITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 3835 Freeport Blvd. (95822). Marvin Ho- 
well, Library Director. 

SACRAMENTO CITY-COUNTY LIBRARY. 1930 T St. (95814). 449-5651. Harold D. 
Martelle, Jr., Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Outlets: 62. 

Branches: Arcade, Arden, Carmichael, Citrus Heights, Courtland, Elk Grove, Fair Oaks, Florin, Fol- 
som. Foothill, Gait, Isleton, North Highlands, Orangevale, Rancho Cordova, Rio Linda, Southgate, 
Walnut Grove, Cooledge, Del Paso, Gillis, Hagginwood, King, McClatchy, McKinley, North Sacra- 
mento, Oak Park. 

Stations: Fniitridge, Wilton. 

Bookmobile stops: 32 (7 community, 25 school) . 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Sacramento (current and historical) , art, Cahfomia collection. 

Member, Mountain- Valley Library System. 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 720 9th St. (95814) . 444-5910, -5911. Allan J. 
Andrews, Libn. 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY, PAUL H. GUTTMAN UBRARY. 

5380 Elvas Ave. (95819). 452-2671, ext. 7. M-F, 9-5. Michael Wayne Bennett, Ubn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 7,000. Tech reports: 50. Per subs: 115. 
Special collection: Sacramento medical archives. 

SACRAMENTO MEDICAL CENTER, MEDICAL UBRARY. 2233 Stockton Blvd. 
(95817). 454-5749. M-F, 8-8; Sat, 9-1. Ms. Molly Reeves, Libn. 

Staff: V/i. Vols: 7,329. Per subs: 305. 
Special subject: Clinical medicine. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

SACRAMENTO UNION LIBRARY. 301 Capitol Mall (95812). 

U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LIBRARY. 2800 Cottage Way (95825). 484-4491. 
M-F, 7:45-4:30. Sophie Hirtz, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 49,574. Tech reports: 46,000. Per subs: 196. 

UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC, McGEORGE SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY. 3282 
Fifth Ave. (95817). 452-6167. Mrs. Alice J. Murray, Libn. 

Staff: 5. Vols: 57,790. Vols added: 5,549. Per subs: 300. Library of Congress classification. 



176 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

ST. HELENA (Napa Co.) Area Code 707 

ST. HELENA PUBLIC UBRARY. 1360 Oak St. (94574). 963-3431. Mrs. Elisabeth M. 
Reed, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Wine library, Robert Louis Stevenson books, cookbooks. 

Trustees: Dr. Robert Darter, Mrs. James Beard, Michael Golick, Ellen K. Shaffer, Marshal Higley. 

Member, North Bay Cooperative Library Association. 

THE SILVERADO MUSEUM. 1347 Railroad Ave. (P.O. Box 409) (94574). 963-3757. 
T-Sun, 12^. Ellen Shaffer, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Books, mss, letters, paintings, etc.: approx. 3,000. 
Special subject: Life and works of Robert Louis Stevenson. 

SALINAS (Monterey Co.) Area Code 408 

GENERAL HOSPITAL OF MONTEREY COUNTY, LIBRARY. 1330 Natividad Rd. 
(P.O. Box 1611) (93901). 424-2541, ext. 225. 

Vols: 900. Per subs: 45. 

HARTNELL COLLEGE LIBRARY. 156 Homestead Ave. (93901) . 422-9606. M-Th, 7:45- 
10; F, 7:45-5. Ms. Luella Wiens, Libn. 

Vols: 53,829. Bd per: 5,325. Micro hldgs: 986. 

Inc: $126,417. Exp: Sal: $82,307. Bks: $22,171. Per: $4,458. AV: $11,268. Bd: $560. Other: $3,374. 

Special project: Multi-media individualized instruction learning laboratory. 

Special collection: O. P. Silliman Memorial Library of Natural History and Ornithology. 

MONTEREY COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (93901) . 424-8611, ext. 227. Alan J. 
Bollman, Libn. 

MONTEREY COUNTY LIBRARY. 26 Central Ave. (93901). 424-8611, ext. 395, 396. Bar- 
bara Wynn, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Monterey, Pacific Grove, Salinas. 

Contracts with: Salinas, Pacific Grove. Affiliated with: Carmel Public Library, King City Public Li- 
brary. 

Outlets: 44. 

Branch: Emerson. 

Stations: Aromas, Big Sur, Bradley, Carmel Valley, Castroville, Chualar, Gonzales, Greenfield, James- 
burg, Marina, Pajaro, Parkfield, Pnmedale, San Ardo, San Lucas, Soledad, Spreckels. 

Bookmobile stops: 23. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Sf>ecial collections: Art, large print editions, Monterey County vertical file collection, Libros En 
Espanol (books in Spanish), Califomiana. Member, Monterey Bay Area Cooperative Library 
System. 

SALINAS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 110 W. San Luis St. (93901). 758-7311. John Gross, Libn. 

Contracts with: Monterey County. 

Outlets: 3 (1 branch, 1 station). Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. , 

Special collection: Steinbeck collection. 

Trustees: Mrs. Raymond Gutierrez, Jerome Kasavan, Peter Hoss, Rev. Arnold Nelson, Mrs. Johnny 

O'Grady. 
Member, Monterey Bay Area Cooperative Library System. 

SAN ANDREAS (Calaveras Co.) Area Code 209 

CALAVERAS COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Government Center (95249). 754-4252. Jeri 
Morse, Libn. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY LIBRARY. 46 Main St. (mailing: P.O. Box 338) (95249). 754- 
4266. Frances Hunt, Libn. 

Serves; Entire county. 

Outlets: 8. Stations: Angels Camp, Arnold, Mokelumne Hill, Railroad Flat, Sheepranch, Valley Springs, 

West Point. Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Member, 49-99 Cooperative Library System. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 177 

SAN ANSELMO (Marin Co.) Area Code 415 

SAN ANSELMO PUBLIC LIBRARY. IIO Tunstead Ave. (94960). 456-4419. Mrs. Lucy 
Palo, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Library of Congress, Dewey Decimal classifications. 

Special collections: CANHC Resource library (books on handicapped children, special education, 

teaching and behavior), arts and crafts, Calif orniana. 
Trustees: Harry Belgrade, Rosemary Gicker, Louis Yates, Roy W. Fairchild, Jo Feldman. 
Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

SAN BERNARDINO (San Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 

CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE, SAN BERNARDINO, LIBRARY. 5500 State College 
Parkway (92407). 688-4917. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-5; S, 9-1; Sun, 1-5. Arthur Nelson, Libn. 

Vols: 153,061. Bd per: 29,472. Per subs: 1,416. 

Exp: Sal: $264,633. Bks: $169,516. Per: $41,522. AV: $1,850. Bd: $15,430. Other: $13,589. 

Special subjects: Russian fiction in translation; social sciences. 

Special collections: Curriculum, simulation kits and games, careers collection. 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DISTRICT 08 LIBRARY. 247 W. Third St. (P.O. Box 231) (92402). 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY GENERAL HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 780 E. 
Gilbert St. (92404) . 383-3228. M-F, ^-4:30. Rebecca Engels, Libn. 

Vols: 2,000. Per subs: 150. Audio-Digest: 7 categories. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse Annex, 351 N. Arrow- 
head Ave. (92402) . 383-2701. Beulah M. Brown, Libn. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY LIBRARY. 194 W. Fourth St. (92401). 383-1734. Do- 
rothy Traver, Libn. 

Entire county except Ontario, Redlands, San Bernardino, Upland. Affiliated with: Colton. Outlets: 144. 

Branches: Barstow, Big Bear Lake, Chino, East Base Line, Fontana, Rialto, Twentynine Palms, Victor- 
viUe. 

Stations: Adelanto, Apple Valley, Bloomington, County Juvenile Hall, Crestline, Cucamonga-Alta 
Loma, Hesperia, Joshua Tree, Lake Arrowhead, Loma Linda, Lucerne Valley, Mentone, Montclair, 
Morongo Valley, Muscoy, Needles, Running Springs, Trona, Yucaipa, Yucca Valley. 

Bookmobile stops: 114 (84 community, 30 school). 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Local history (including a number of manuscripts) , the desert, mining. 

Member, Inland Library System. 

SAN BERNARDINO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 401 N. Arrowhead Ave. (92401). 889-0264. 
Ms. Gertrude D. Odell, Libn. 

Outlets: 6 (5 branches). Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Californiana. 

Trustees: J. David Wood, Larry B. Harvey, Edgar C. Keller, Leno F. Diaz, Jewell Shelton. 
Member, Inland Library System. 

SAN BERNARDINO VALLEY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 701 S. Mt. Vernon Ave. (92403) . 
885-0231. M-Th, 7:55-9:45; F, 7:55-4:15; Sun, 2-9:45. Elton E. Shell, Libn. 

Vols: 81,145. Bd per: 10,975. Micro hldgs: 736 reels of microfihn. Per subs: 800. 

Inc: $214,337. Exp: Sal: $151,748. Bks: $40,727. Per: $11,264. Bd: $4,612. Other: $5,986. 

SAN BRUNO (San Mateo Co.) Area Code 415 

SAN BRUNO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 701 W. Angus Ave. (94066). 588-7726. Ms. Beth 
Chiles, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Member, Peninsula Library System. 

SKYLINE COLLEGE LIBRARY. 3300 College Dr. (94066) . 355-7000. M-T, 8-9; W-F, 
8-5. William P. Stanley, Libn. 

Vols: 25,000. Bd per: 500. Micro hldgs: 1,600 reels. Per subs: 300. 

Inc: $200,000. Exp: Sal: $100,000. Bks: $44,000. Per: $4,000. AV: $8,400. Bd: $200. Equipment: $37,000. 

Special subject: Instructional technology. Special collection: Materials in audiovisual media. 

7— S5403 



178 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SAN BRUNO— Continued 

U.S. FEDERAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS CENTER, ARCHIVES BRANCH. 1000 

Commodore Drive (94066). 556-8452. M-F, 7:45-4:15. Ann M. Campbell, Chief. 

Staff: 2 archivists, 2 others. Micro holdings: 10,000 rolls. 

Special collections: Holdings of National Archives in Washington on microfilm; 6,000 cubic ft. of 
original records of U.S. Goverrunent's involvement in the West. 

SAN CARLOS (San Mateo Co.) Area Code 415 

GTE LENKURT INC., TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 1105 County Road (94070) . 591-8461, 
ext. 293. M-F, 8-^:30. Mary Lewis Waller, Libn. 

Staff: 2 Ubns. Vols: 5,032. Per subs: 400. 

Special collections: Patents, electronic communications. 

SAN CLEMENTE (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

SAN CLEMENTE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, SUTHERLAND MEMORI- 
AL LIBRARY. 119 Estrella (92672). 492-6158. M-F, 9-^; Sun, 8-12. 

Staff: 3. Vols: 1,500. Per subs: 12. Cassettes: 150. 
Special subjects: Bible, Christian living. 

SAN DIEGO (San Diego Co.) Area Code 714 (see alto, La Jolla) 

ASSOCIATED SCIENCE LIBRARIES OF SAN DIEGO. 

A voluntary interlibrary cooperative which includes the libraries of the following organizations: 
Fishery-Oceanography Center, General Dynamics /Convair, Gulf Energy & Environmental Sys- 
tems Inc., Natural History Museum, Naval Electronics Laboratory Center, Rohr Corporation, 
Teledyne Ryan Aeronautical Company, SaUc Institute for Biological Sciences, San Diego Gas and 
EUectric Company, San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego Public Library, San Diego State CoUege, 
Sar. Diego Zoo, Scripps CHnic and Research Foundation, Smyth Research Associates, Stromberg- 
DatagraphiX, U.S. Naval Hospital, U.S. International University (CaUfomia Western Campus), 
University of California, San Diego, Whittaker Corporation Research and Development. 

CALIFORNIA STATE COURT OF APPEAL, FOURTH APPELLATE DISTRICT, 
LAW LIBRARY. 1350 Front St. (92101). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DISTRICT 11 LIBRARY. 4075 Taylor St. (P.O. Box 390) (92112). 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SAN DIEGO, MALCOLM A. LOVE LIBRARY. 

(92115) . 286-6014. M-Th, 8-11; F, 8-5; S, 9-5; Sun, noon to 10. Louis A. Kenney, Libn. 

Vols: 584,240. Bd per: 112,336. Micro hldgs: 542,385 micro-opaque; 25,118 reels of microfilm; 277,642 
microfiche. Per subs: 7,377. 

Exp: Sal: $1,151,499. Bks: $348,507. Per: $161,680. AV: $22,954. Bd: $75,360. 

Special subjects: Liberal arts, chemistry, aeronautics, anthropology, art, astronomy, biochemistry, 
biology, business administration, city planning, the Civil War, ecology, education, electronics, 
engineering, genetics, geography, geology, history, Latin American studies, linguistics, mathemat- 
ics, mechanics, microbiology, music, nuclear physics, philosophy, physics, psychology, public ad- 
ministration, social welfare, space sciences, Baja California, telecommunications and film, 
orchidology. Special collections: Economic and political integration of Europe, Developmental 
Biology, Geological History of Pacific Ocean Invertebrate Faunas, Astronomy and the History of 
Science (Ziimer Collection) , the Harrington Collection on North, South, and Central American 
Indian languages, German language and literature, German dialects, San Diego area history and 
Asian Collection. 

Branch: Off-Campus Center, Calexico, Cahfomia. 

CALIFORNIA WESTERN SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY. 3902 Lomaland Dr. (92106). 
224-3211. John M. Lindsey, Libn. 

Staff: 2.5. Vols: 43,750. Vols added: 1,200. 

CUBIC CORPORATION, TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 9233 Balboa Ave. (Box 80787) 
(92138). 277-6780, ext. 392. M-F, 8-5. Ms. Bonnie J. Brovm, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 2,300. Tech reports: 14,000. Per subs: 95. Micro hldgs: 3,000. 
Special subjects: Electrical and electronics manufacturing. 

FINE ARTS GALLERY OF SAN DIEGO. Balboa Park (P.O. Box 2107) (92112) . 232-7931, 
ext. 28. T-S, 10-12, 1-5. Nancy J. Andrevi^s, Libn. 

Vols: 8,300. Per subs: 35. 35mm slides: 7,500. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 179 

Special collections: Renaissance, Spanish, Asian arts; artists, esp. contemporary; exhibition catalogs; 
sales catalogs. 

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH LIBRARY. 320 Date St. (92101). 232-7513, ext. 34. 
M-F, 8:30-4; Sun, 9-12. Mrs. Madeline Parrish, Libn. 

Vols: 3,000. Tech reports: 100. Per subs: 50. 

FLEET COMBAT DIRECTION SYSTEMS SUPPORT ACTIVITY, SAN DIEGO, 
TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 200 Catalina Blvd. (92147) . 225-7604. M-F, 7:45-4:30. Mrs. Lois 
Whitledge, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 800. Tech reports: 8,000. Per subs: 58. 
Special subjects: Data processing, computers, tactical data systems. 

GENERAL DYNAMICS, CONVAIR AEROSPACE DIVISION, RESEARCH LIBRARY. 
P.O. Box 80986 (92138). 277-8900, ext. 1073/1347. 8-4:45. Urban J. Sweeney, Libn. 

Staff: 4 libns, 5 others. Vols: 81,000. Tech reports: 203,000. Per subs: 507. Micro hldgs: 800,000. 
Special subjects: Aerospace, electronics, life science, general science technology. 

JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER, SAMUEL AND REBECCA ASTOR JUDAICA LI- 
BRARY. 4079 54th St. (92105). 583-3300. M, 10:30-4:30, 7:30-10; T-F, 10:30-4:30. MoUie S. 
Harris, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 4,200. Per subs: 33. 
Special subject: Judaica. 

MARINE CORPS RECRUIT DEPOT LIBRARY. Bldg. #7, MCRD (92140). 

MIRAMAR COLLEGE LIBRARY. 10440 Black Mountain Rd. (92126). 271-7300. M-Th, 
8-10. Robert D. Henderson, Libn. 

Vols: 2,000. 
Bks: $1,500. 

NATIONAL STEEL AND SHIPBUILDING COMPANY, ENGINEERING LIBRARY. 
28th and Harbor Drive (92112). 232-4011, ext. 304. M-F, 7:30-4:15. Alta M. Sadler, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 1,000. Tech reports: 500. Per subs: 60. 

NAVAL AIR STATION, MIRAMAR, LIBRARY. (92145). 271-3557. M-F, 10-9; S, Sun, 
12-8. Dorothy Caudill, Libn. 

Staff. 1 libn, 5 others. Vols: 14,000. Per subs: 120 

NAVAL AIR STATION, NORTH ISLAND, STATION LIBRARY. Bldg. 91 (92135). 437- 
7041. M-F, 9-5. Louise Bidwell, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3 others. Vols: 23,000. Per subs: 115. 

NAVAL AMPHIBIOUS BASE, CORONADO, LIBRARY. (92155) . 437-2473. M-F, 11:30- 
7:30; S, Sun, 3-7:30. Mrs. May Gady, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3 others. Vols: 16,000. Tech reports: 100. Per subs: 129. Recordings: 700. 
Special subject: U.S. Navy — amphibious. 

NAVAL AMPHIBIOUS SCHOOL, LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER. Naval Am- 
phibious Base, Bldg. 401 (92155) . 437-2295, -2923. M-Th, 7:30-5:30; F, 7:30-4. Dr. Audrey 
Yoder Fleak, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 4-12 others. Vols: 14,000. Tech reports: 2,000. Per subs: 200. Micro hldgs: 2,000. Classified 

holdings: 10,000 docs, 5,000 micro. 
Special subjects: Amphibious warfare, military intelligence, coimterinsurgency, human resources 

training and development. 

NAVAL ELECTRONICS LABORATORY CENTER RESEARCH LIBRARY. 271 Catali- 
na Blvd. (92152) . 225-6621. M-F, 7:30-4. William E. Jorgensen, Libn. 

Staff: 7 libns, 12 others. Vols: books: 38,846; bd. per: 26,615. Tech reports: 97,447. Per subs: 1,208 titles. 
Micro hldgs: 40,000 fiche. Maps & charts: 3,000. 

Special subjects: Electronics, physics, mathematics, engineering, instrumentation, marine engineer- 
ing. 

NAVAL HOSPITAL, SAN DIEGO, STATION LIBRARY. Bldg. 7-B. M-F, 8-9; S, 8-12. 
Hattie M. DeGraff, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn, 1 other. Vols: 29,613. Per subs: 63. 
Special subject: Naval history. 



180 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SAN DIEGO — Continued 

NAVAL HOSPITAL, THOMPSON MEDICAL LIBRARY (92134) . 233-2367. M-S, 8-10; 

Sun, 12-10. Mrs. Michele Winters, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 17,436. Per subs: 367. 

Special subjects: Medicine, dentistry, nursing, hospital administration. Member, PSRMLS. 

NAVAL STATION UBRARY. Box 15 (92136). 235-1403. M-F, 11-8; S, Sun, 11:30-7:30. 
Mrs. Marjorie Homeyard, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 19,000. Per subs: 95. 

NAVAL TRAINING CENTER LIBRARY. Bldg. 177 (92133) . 225-5470. M-F, 10-9; S, Sun, 
1-9. Audrey M. Savell, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 6 others. Vols: 30,669. Per subs: 109. 

NAVAL UNDERSEA CENTER, TECHNICAL UBRARY, CODE 6565 (92132). 225- 
6171. M-F, 8-4:30. Thor H. Jensen, Libn. 

Staff: 4 libns, 4 others. Vols: 35,000. Tech reports: 30,000. Per subs: 450. 

Special subjects: Underwater acoustics, underwater ordnance, marine biology, oceanography, marine 
engineering. 

NAVY PERSONNEL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER, TECHNICAL 
LIBRARY. Catalina Blvd. (92152) . 225-7971. M-F, 7:30-4. Adolph A. Koran, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 2,475. Tech reports: 16,750. Per subs: 162. Micro hldgs: 102. 

Special subjects: Psychology (social and industrial) ; applied psychology in personnel selection, classifi- 
cation, motivation and performance measurement; human factors in engineering; personnel sys- 
tems and management; occupational analysis; training methods and training research; statistics 
and applied mathematics; computer technology and computer-assisted instruction. 

OCEANIC LIBRARY AND INFORMATION CENTER, DIVISION OF POLLUTION 
ABSTRACTS INC. 7611 Convoy Ct. #15 (92037). 

REES-STEALY MEDICAL CLINIC UBRARY. 2001 Fourth Ave. (92101) . 234-6261, ext. 
398. M, T, Th, F, 8:30-5:30; W, S, 8:30-5:30. Mrs. Margaret O'Rourke, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 6,300. Per subs: 92 Tapes: 120. 
Special subjects: Medicine and biochemistry. 

SAN DIEGO CITY COLLEGE UBRARY. 1425 Russ Blvd. (92115). 234-8451, ext. 296. 
M-Th, 7:30-10; F, 7:30-4:30. James E. Newbold, Libn. 

Vols: 45,550. Bd per: 4,737. Micro hldgs: 2,632. Per subs: 473. 

Inc: $46,329. Exp: Sal: $161,046. Bks: $23,965. Per: $6,144. AV: $10,846. Bd: $1,956. Other: $4,379. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 1105 Front St. (92101). 236-2231. O. James 
Werner, Libn. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY LIBRARY. 5555 Overland Ave. (92123). 565-5100. Arthur B. 
Murray, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Carlsbad, Chula Vista, Coronado, Escondido, National City, Oceanside, 

San Diego City. Outlets: 52. 
Branches: Casa de Oro, Del Mar, El Cajon, Encinitas, Fallbrook, Fletcher Hills, Imperial Beach, 

Lakeside, La Mesa, Lemon Grove, Rancho Santa Fe, San Marcos, Solana Beach, Spring Valley, 

Valley Center, Vista. 
Stations: Alpine, Banner Queen, Borrego Springs, Campo, Cardiff, Castle Park, Descanso, Dulzura, 

Jacumba, Julian, Lincoln Acres, Palomar Mountain, Poway, Ramona, Santee, Suncrest, Woodlawn. 
Bookmobile stops: 18 (16 community, 2 school). 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Southwest history, Spanish books. 
Member, Serra Library System. 

SAN DIEGO GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY UBRARY. 101 Ash St. (92101) (P. O. 
Box 1831) (92112) . 232-4252, ext. 1446. M-F, 8-5. Mrs. A. Pfaff, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 5,000. Tech reports: 20 file cabinets. Per subs: 500. 

Special subjects: Specs and standards regarding utilities; public utilities reports; opinions and orders 
of PUC (California); financial, management, economic material. 

SAN DIEGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, SERRA MUSEUM RESEARCH LIBRARY. Pre- 
sidio Park (P. O. Box 81825) (92138). 297-3258. T-F, 10-5; S, Sun, 12-5. Sylvia Arden, 
Research Libn. 

Staff: 4 (part-time). Per subs: 7. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 181 

Special subjects: History of San Diego County and surrounding areas; Califomiana and Southwest. 

SAN DIEGO MESA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 7250 Artillery Dr. (92111). 

SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF MAN, SCIENTIFIC LIBRARY. 1350 El Prado, Balboa Park 
(92101). 239-2001, ext. 23. M-F, 8:30-12:30. H. Beatrice Ingham, Libn. 

Staff: 3 (part-time). Vols: 11,670. Per subs: 300 Archival mss: 72. 

Special collections: U. S. Bureau of American Ethnology publications; Smithsonian Institution publica- 
tions; Mexico INAH and UNAM series; Mexican codices. 

SAN DIEGO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 820 E St. (92101). 236-5800. Marco G. Thome, Libn. 

Outlets: 50 (21 branches, 1 Governmental Reference Library, 3 stations, 21 community, 3 school 

bookmobile stops). 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Califomiana, chess, genealogy, history of the book, historical aviation, historical 

children's books, rare books ( Wangenheim Room collection) . 
Trustees: Dr. Malcolm Love, Mrs. Barbara D. Anderson, Mrs. Elliott Cushman, Harold A. Fletcher, 

Richard F. Pourade, Thomas A. Shannon, Lester E. Tokars. 
Member, Serra Library System. 

GOVERNMENTAL REFERENCE LIBRARY. County Administration Center, 

1600 Pacific Highway (92101). 236-6305, -2760. M-F, 8-5. Mildred E. Pickle, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 2 others. Vols: 8,794. Pams & docs: 22,521. Per subs: 402. 

Special collections: San Diego City and County documents, specs, surveys and studies related to San 
Diego City and County government; annual departmental reports from selected municipalities; 
public administration, public works, law enforcement, plaiuiing, public finance, health and wel- 
fare, transportation. 

(Library is jointly supported by City and County of San Diego, and operated by San Diego Public 
Library) 

SAN DIEGO SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY LIBRARY. P. O. Box 1390 (92112). 
232-9146. M-F, 10-4:30. Azalea P. Gorby, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 80,000. Per subs: 93. 

Special collections: General A. W. Vogdes Library of Geology and Paleontology; Klauber Library 

(herpetology) ; Plant Life Society (botany and horticulture); original watercolors of California 

wildflowers by Valentein. 

SAN DIEGO ZOOLOGICAL GARDEN LIBRARY. P. O. Box 551 (92112). 234-5151, ext. 
55. M-F, 8:30-5. Marjorie Betts Shaw, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn. Vols: 3,000 Per subs: 253. 

Special subjects: Zoology, biology, taxonomy, ethology, veterinary science, natural history. 

DONALD N. SHARP MEMORIAL COMMUNITY HOSPITAL, HEALTH SCIENCE 
LIBRARY. 7901 Frost St. (92123). 277-6121, ext. 538-539. M-F, 8-4:30. Nadine Babcock, 
RRA. 

Staff: 1 libn. (part-time), 1 other. Vols: 490. Per subs: 63. 

SUPERVISOR OF SHIPBUILDING CONVERSION AND REPAIR, IITH NAVAL 
DISTRICT, TECHNICAL LIBRARY. Naval StaHon, 32nd St. and Harbor Dr. (92136). 
235-2455. M-F, 7:30-4. N. G. Henthom, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 20,000. Tech reports: 5,000. Per subs: 8. Micro hldgs: 324 reels. 

TELEDYNE RYAN AERONAUTICAL, TECHNICAL INORMATION SERVICES. 

2701 Harbor Dr. (92101) (P. O. Box 311) (92112). 291-7311, ext. 1067. 8-4:30. William E. 
Ebner, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 5 others. Vols: 3,600. Tech reports: 110,000. Per subs: 200. Micro hldgs: 50,000 fiche reports. 
Special subjects: avionics, aeronautical engineering, materials and electronic engineering. 

UNION-TRIBUNE PUBLISHING COMPANY LIBRARY. Camino de la Reina (92112). 
234-7111, ext. 353. Daily, 7-9. Olga Webber, Libn. 

Staff: 4 libns, 6 others. Vols: 2,000. Per subs: 17. Micro hldgs: 4,000 rolls. 

Special subjects: Armed forces, San Diego port and tuna industry, electronics and aerospace, Latin 
America. 

UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO LIBRARY. Alcala Park (92110). 291-6480. M-Th, 8-10; 
F, 8-5; S, 9-5; Sun, 1-10. Mrs. W. Roy HoUeman, University Libn. 

Vols: 150,000. Bd per: 30,000. Micro hldgs: 500. Per subs: 6,000. 

Inc: $190,820. Exp: Sal: $128,000. Bks: $32,000. Per: $14,000. Bd: $5,000. 



182 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SAN DIEGO — Continued 
Other: $11,820. 

Special subjects: Liberal arts, business, education. 

Special collections: Book plate collection, history of the book (examples of illuminated mss, in- 
cunabula, 16th-20th century books) . 

SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY. Alcala Park (92110) . 291-6480, ext. 369. Joseph 

S. Ciesielski, Libn. 

Staff: 9. Vols: 61,000. Vols added: 4,682. Per subs: 873. Circ: 20,000. Library of Congress classification. 

SAN FRANCISCO (San Francisco Co.) Area Code 415 

ALLIANCE FRANCAISE LIBRARY. 414 Mason St. (94102) . 781-8755. 10-6. Mrs. Suzanne 
Wilson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 20,000. Per subs: 5. 

AMERICAN EXPRESS INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT COMPANY, INFORMA- 
TION CENTER. P.O. Box 7650 (94120). 563-7900. 

AMERICAN RUSSIAN INSTITUTE LIBRARY. 90 McAllister St. (94102) . 831-3813. M-T, 
10-3:30; W, Th, 10-5; F, S, 10-3:30. Zoia Martinoff, Dr. Holland Roberts, Libns. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols.: 5,000. Per subs.: 25. Also photos, slides, posters, art objects. 
Special subject: Soviet materials. 

ASIA FOUNDATION LIBRARY. 550 Kearny St. (94108) (P.O. Box 3223) (94119). 982- 
4640, ext. 215. 8:30-5. Marilyn Grimstad, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols.: 3,850. Per subs.: 205. 
Special subject: Current Asian affairs. 

BANCROFT, AVERY & McALISTER LAW LIBRARY. 240 Stockton St. (94108). 756- 
5192. Anita K. Head, Libn. 

Staff: 5. Vols.: 17,000. Vols, added: 1,500. Per subs.: 320. Library of Congress classification. 

BANCROFT- WHITNEY COMPANY, EDITORIAL LIBRARY. 301 Brannan St. (94107) . 
986-4410. M-F, 8:30-^:30. Mrs. Keltah T. Narbut, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn., 7 others. Vols.: 60,000. Per. subs.: 600. 
Special subjects: Law, sociology. 

BANK OF AMERICA LAW LIBRARY. P.O. Box 37000 (94137). 622-6040. Esther G. 
Thai, Libn. 

Staff: 1. Vols.: 15,000. Vols, added: 500. Per. subs.; 75. 

BANK OF AMERICA REFERENCE LIBRARY. 555 California St. (P.O. Box 37000) 
(94137). 622-2068. M-F, 8:15-5. Teresa Hickey, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn., 3 others. Vols.: 21,000. Per. subs.: 295. 

Special subjects: Agriculture, banking, economics, foreign trade, international business. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY. 400 California St. (P.O. Box 45000) (94145). 765- 
2116. 9:30-5. Barbara Barton, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols.: 2,000. Tech. reports: 700. Per. subs.: 35. 

Special subjects: Business, banking, accounting, management, personnel, finance. 

BAY AREA AIR POLLUTION CONTROL DISTRICT LIBRARY. 939 Ellis St. (94109). 

BUILDING SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT, INC., LIBRARY. 120 Broadway (94111). 434- 
3830, ext. 22. Not open to public. Dr. Alina Wierzbianska, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols.: 2,000. Tech. reports: 150. Per. subs.: 120. Pams.: 1,000. Slides: 2,000. 
Special subject: Building systems. 

BUREAU OF JEWISH EDUCATION, JEWISH COMMUNITY LIBRARY. 639 14th 
Ave. (94118). 

CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, J. W. MAILLIARD, JR. LIBRARY. Golden 
Gate Park (94118). 221-5100, ext. 75. M-F, 8-12, 1-5. Ray Brian, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns., 2.2 others (plus 2.5 FTE work-study and volunteers) . Vols.: 75,000. Per. subs.: 2,198. 

Special subjects: Transactions and proceedings of learned societies; botany, entomology, geology, 
geography, herpetology, ichthyology, invertebrate zoology, mammalogy, marine biology, ornithol- 
ogy, paleontology, diatoms, conservation, ecology, Baja California, Academy archives. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 183 

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF PODIATRIC MEDICINE LIBRARY. P.O. Box 7855, 
Rincon Annex (94120). 922-2775, ext. 247. M-F, 7:30-6. Leonard P. Shapiro, Libn. 

Vols.: 3,000. Bd. per.: 2,200. Per. subs.: 164. 

Inc.: $36,850. Exp.: Sal.: $18,600. Bks.: $7,000. Per.: $5,000. Bd.: $2,600. Other: $3,500. 
Special subjects: Podiatry, orthopedics, dermatology, neurology, basic sciences. 
Special collection: Reprint file: 800 articles on basic and clinical sciences. 

CALIFORNIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY LIBRARY. 2099 Pacific Ave. (94109) . 567-1848. 
T-S, 10-4. Peter A. Evans, Libn. 

Staff: 4Vi libns., 1 other. Vols.: 35,000. Per. subs.: 2. Micro, hldgs.: 1,114. Photos: 120,000. Maps: 4,500. 
Special collections: Kemble Collections of Printing and Publishing (emphasis on the West) ; library of 

the California Genealogical Society; Mss.; trade catalogs, trade cards and other ephemera; records 

of the Historic American Buildings Survey for the Western states. 

CALIFORNIA LABOR FEDERATION, AFL-CIO LIBRARY. 995 Market St., Suite 310 
(94103). 

CALIFORNIA MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, SOCIO-ECONOMIC LIBRARY. 693 Sutter 
St. (94102). 776-9400, ext. 181. M-F, 9-5. Regina E. Chadwick, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn., 1 other. Vols.: 4,000. Per. subs.: 303. 

Special subjects: Prepaid medical care (health insurance); government sponsored medical care and 

financing (Medicare, MediCAL) ; medical sociology; medical economics; medical care for special 

groups (aged, migrants, poor, etc.). 

CALIFORNIA STATE AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION REFERENCE LIBRARY. 150 
Van Ness Ave. (94101). 565-2297. M-F, 8-5. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols.: 100. Tech. reports: 1,000. Per. subs.: 100. 

CALIFORNIA STATE COURT OF APPEAL, FIRST APPELLATE DISTRICT, LAW 
LIBRARY. 350 McAllister St. (94102). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF BANKING, RESEARCH LIBRARY. 235 
Montgomery St., Suite 750 (94104) . 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION, DIVISION OF MINES 
AND GEOLOGY LIBRARY. Ferry Bldg, Room 2022 (94111) . 557-0308. M-F, 8-5; 1st Sat 
of month, 10-12. Mary R. Weinstein, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 28,500. Per subs: 230. Mss: 475. Maps: 2,000. 

Special collections: Theses in California geology; publications of USGS and USBM; state and foreign 
government publications on mining and geology; history of mining in CaUfomia. 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, DIVISION 
OF INDUSTRIAL SAFETY LIBRARY. 455 Golden Gate Ave., Rm. 7240 (P.O. Box 603) 
(94102). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, DIVISION 
OF LABOR STATISTICS AND RESEARCH LIBRARY. 455 Golden Gate Ave., Rm. 3163 
(P.O. Box 603) (94102). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OF- 
FICE LIBRARY. 350 McAllister St., Rm. 6000 (94102). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DISTRICT 04 LIBRARY. 150 Oak St. (94102). 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DIVISION OF BAY TOLL CROSSINGS LIBRARY. 151 Fremont St. (94105). 

CALIFORNIA STATE SUPREME COURT LAW LIBRARY. State Bldg. Annex, 445 
Golden Gate Ave. (94102). 

CENTER OF ASIAN ART AND CULTURE, AVERY BRUNDAGE COLLECTION 
LIBRARY. Golden Gate Park (94118). 558-2993. M-F, 1-5. Fred A. Cline, Jr., Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn, 'A other Vols: 9,000. Per subs: 79. 
Special subject: Oriental art. 

CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL OF SAN FRANCISCO, EMGE MEDICAL LIBRARY. 3700 
California St. (94118) (P.O. Box 3806) (94119). 387-8700, ext. 534. M-F, 8-9:30; S, 9-1. 
Brigitta M. Schneider, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 4 others (inc. 3 part-time) . Vols: 12,500. Per subs: 350. AV tapes: 580. 



184 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SAN FRANCISCO— Continued 
Member, PSRMLS; MEDLINE. 

CITY ATTORNEY'S OFFICE LIBRARY. 206 City Hall (94102). 558-4993. Helen T. 
Mootz, Libn. 

Vols: 8,000. Per subs: 12. 

CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO LIBRARY. 50 Phelan Ave. (94112). 587-7272, 
ext. 227. M-Th, 8-9; F, 8-4;S, 9-1; Sun, 1-5. Mrs. lole Matteucig, Acting Director. 

Vols: 57,566. Micro hldgs: 3,627 reels. Per subs: 630. 

Inc: $312,604. Exp: Sal: $232,316. Bks: $44,061. Per: $10,058. AV: $8,603. Bd: $1,090. Other: $14,730. 

Special collections: Listening Center (cassette tapes, film loops, filmstrips and slides (with and without 

accompanying tapes). Language Master cards). 
Branch: the Alice Statler Library (hotel-restaurant collection) . 

. AUCE STATLER LIBRARY. 50 Phelan Ave. (94112). 587-7272, ext. 460. 

M-F, 8-^. Winthrop W. Williams, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others (part-time). Vols: 5,400. Pams: 6,600. Per subs: 116. Menus: 1,200. Bd per: 690. 
Special subject: Public Hospitality Industries (hotels, motels, resorts, restaurants, clubs, bars, institu- 
tions, etc.). Special collection: Hotel and restaurant periodicals firom 19th century. 

COGSWELL POLYTECHNICAL COLLEGE LIBRARY. 3000 Folsom St. (94110). 647- 
1473. M-F, 8-3:30. Herbert E. Childs, Libn. 

Vols: 7,000. Bd per: 500. Per subs: 60. 
Exp: Sal: $8,400. Bks: $1,100. Per: $200. Bd: $28. 

Special subjects: Structural, mechanical and electronic engineering technology. Special coUection: 
Early electrical science publications. 

COMMONWEALTH CLUB OF CALIFORNIA UBRARY. 681 Market St. (94105) . 362- 
4903. M-F, 8:30-5. Durward S. Riggs, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 14,126. Per subs: 33. 

CROWN ZELLERBACH CORPORATE UBRARY. 1 Bush St. (94119). 823-5403. M-F, 
8:30-5. Gloria Capel, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 3,500. Tech reports: 500. Per subs: 250. 
Special subjects: Business, marketing, paper industry. 

FAR WEST LABORATORY FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOP- 
MENT, UBRARY. 1855 Folsom St. (94103). 565-3210. M-F, 8:30-12, 1-5. 

Staff: 3. Vols: 7,700. Tech reports: 2,000. Per subs: 300. Micro hldgs: 74,000. Tests: 1,500. 
Special materials: ERIC system (RIE, C^fE, complete ERIC microfiche) . 

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, RESEARCH LIBRARY. 400 San- 
some St. (P.O. Box 7702) (94120) . 397-1137, ext. 403. M-F, 8hI:30. Mrs. Phyllis A. Waggon- 
er, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 6 others. 

Special subjects: Economics, finance, banking, central banking, economic conditions in Western U.S. 

FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISCO LIBRARY. Golden Gate Park (94118). 
558-2887. Open by appointment. Jane Nelson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 20,000. Per subs: 50. 

Special subjects: General history of art; American art, French art: art of Africa, Oceania, and the 

Americas. 
(Formerly California Palace of the Legion of Honor and M. H. de Young Memorial Museum libraries) 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE UBRARY. P.O. Box 3395 (94120). 

GOETHE INSTITUTE, GERMAN CULTURAL CENTER, LIBRARY. 432 Clay St. 
(94111). 391-0370. M-F, 8:30-4. Mrs. Gisela Schwabe, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 5,500. Per subs: 50. 

Si>ecial subjects: German literature, classics, politics. 

GOLDEN GATE UNIVERSITY UBRARY. 536 Mission St. (94105). 391-7800, ext. 275. 
M-F, 8:30-10; S, Sun, 10-^. Harold Korf, Libn. 

Vols: 42,239. Bd per: 5,012. Micro hldgs: 8,164 reels, sheets and sets; 2,574 misc. collections. Per subs: 

540. 
Inc: $120,780. Exp: Sal: $76,245. Bks: $20,137. Per: $6,557. AV: $12,345. Bd: $500. Microforms: $6,000. 
Special subjects: Economics, public administration, management, accounting. Special collections: An- 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 185 

nual reports, tax law, accounting systems. 
Branch: Golden Gate University School of Law Library. 

LAW LIBRARY. 526 Mission St. (94105) . 391-7800, ext. 367. M-F, 8-10; S, 10^; 

Sun, 12-7. Gerard Magavero, Libn. 

Inc: $138,130. Vols: 64,380. Per subs: 471. 

GRAHAM & JAMES, ATTYS., LAW LIBRARY. 310 Sansome St. (94104). 986-2171, ext. 
37. Susan L. Stromme, Libn. 

Staff: 2. Vob: 8,000. Vols added: 1,500. Per subs: 87. 

ARTHUR E. GUEDEL MEMORIAL ANESTHESIA CENTER LIBRARY. 2395 Sacra- 
mento St. (94115). T, 1-5. Mrs. Esther P. Garden, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 1,000. Per subs: 30. Films, Audio Digest tapes. 
Special subject: Anesthesia. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

HEALD COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE LIBRARY. 1215 Van 
Ness Ave, (94044) . 771-9192. M, W, 8-6; T, Th, 8-8; F, 8 to noon. Catherine Bernard, Libn. 

Vols: 2,477. Per subs: 47. Inc: $6,004. Exp: Sal: $4,704. Bks: $1,200. Per: $100. 
Special subjects: Civil, electrical, electronic engineering; architecture. 

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY OF PACIFIC MEDICAL CENTER AND THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF THE PACIFIC SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY. 2395 Sacramento St. (P.O. Box 
7999) (94120) . 563-4321, ext. 2751. M-F, 8-10; S, 8-5; Sun, 1-5. Ms. Joan Dexter Saunders, 
Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3 others. Vols: 58,000. Per subs: 800. 
Special subjects: Medicine, dentistry, history of dentistry. 

(Library formed in 1973 as merger of Presbyterian Hospital Medical Staff Library and University of 
the Pacific School of Dentistry Library) 

HELLER, EHRMAN, WHITE & McAULIFFE LAW UBRARY. 44 Montgomery St., 
30th floor (94104). 

HURDMAN AND CRANSTOUN LIBRARY. 650 California St. (94108) . 981-7720, ext. 31. 
M-F, 8:30-5. Linda Marion Feingold, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 1,900. Per subs: 90. 

Special subjects: Accounting, auditing, management services, taxes. 

INDUSTRIAL INDEMNITY COMPANY LIBRARY. 255 California St. (P.O. Box 3660) 
(94120). 968-3535, ext. 2235. 8:15-4:30. Christine S. Petty, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vok: 9,000. Per subs: 150. 
Special subjects: California history, firemarks. 

INTERNATIONAL LONGSHOREMEN'S AND WAREHOUSEMEN'S UNION, ANNE 
RAND RESEARCH LIBRARY. 150 Golden Gate Ave. (94102) . 775-0533. M-F, 9-5. Marg- 
ery Canright, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 3,000. Per subs: 100. 

Special subjects: Longshore industry, shipping industry, U.S. and international trade union move- 
ments, economic materials. 

KAISER-PERMANENTE MEDICAL CENTER, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 2425 Geary 
Blvd. (94115). 929-4100. M-F, 12-7. Vincent Lagano, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn, 1 other. Vols: 9,700. Per subs: 200. 
Special subjects: Clinical medicine, surgery. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

LANGLEY PORTER NEUROPSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE LIBRARY. University of 
California (94143). 681-8080, ext. 329. M-F, 8:30-5. Edwarda Adams, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, IVi others. Vols: 14,668. Serials: 248. 

Special subjects: Psychiatry, psychoanalysis, clinical psychology and allied fields. 

LATINO LOCAL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LIBRARY. 2595 Mission St., Suite 303 
(94110). 824-2000. M-F, 9-12. Alison P. Seidel, Libn. 

Staff: Ys Ubn, (FTE). 

Vols: 400. Per subs: 68. Pams, clippings, etc.: 5 file drawers. 

Special subjects: Small business, economic development, Hispanic studies. 



186 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SAN FRANCISCO— Continued 

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY. 281 Masonic Ave. (94118). 

221-1212. Glenn Hughes, Libn. 

LONE MOUNTAIN COLLEGE, MONSIGNOR J. M. GLEASON LIBRARY. 2800 Turk 
Blvd. (94118) . 752-7000. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-5:30; S, 1-5. Ms. Clare Mashbum, Libn. 

Vols: 143,000. Bd per: 13,300. Micro hldgs: 160. Per subs: 375. 

FTTZ HUGH LUDLOW MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 1445 Stockton St., Suite 209 (94133). 
362-1353. Open by appointment. Barbara M. Bibel, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 10,000. Also recordings, artifacts, posters, pamphlets, clippings. 
Special subjects: Drugs, drug cultures, drug abuse: historical, scientific, literary works, artifacts (most 
rare, o.p.). 

McCUTCHEON, DOYLE, BROWN & ENERSEN LAW LIBRARY. 601 California St. 
(94108). 

MANALYTICS INC. LIBRARY. 625 Third St. (94107) . 788-4143, ext. 41. M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. 
Jacqueline J. Desoer, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn. Tech reports, books: 3,000. Per subs: 110. Micro hldgs: 400. Trade data tapes. 
Special subjects: All modes of transportation (air, land, sea) , emphasizing movement of freight rather 
than people; distribution, shipbuilding, containerization, port development. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE LIBRARY. 57 Post St. (94104). 

METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY UBRARY. P.O. Box 7750 (94120). 
546-3423. M-F, 8:30-5. Josephine Calloway, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 5,564. Per subs: 87. 
Special subjects: Life and health insurance. 

MORRISON, FOERSTER, HOLLOWAY, CLINTON & CLARK LAW LIBRARY. 

Crocker Plaza (94104) . 986-1310. Sue Benson, Libn. 

Staff: 2. Vols: 35,000. Own classification. 

MT. ZION HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTER, SINAI MEMORIAL UBRARY. 

1600 Divisadero (P.O. Box 7921) (94120). 567-6600, ext. 339. M-F, 8:30-9; S, 8:30-5. Mrs. 
Kathryn Kammerer, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn, 3 others. Vols: 30,000. Per subs: 285. 
Special subject: History of Medicine. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

MUSIC AND ARTS INSTITUTE OF SAN FRANCISCO, COLLEGE OF MUSIC, 
DRAMA, OPERA, LIBRARY. 2622 Jackson St. (94115). 567-1445. 10-6. R. McKee, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Books, scores, recordings: 11,000. Per subs: 12. Also musical instruments and equipment, 
art collection, scrolls, tapestries, sculpture. 

PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY LAW LIBRARY. 77 Beale St. (94106). 
781-4211, ext. 1944. Noel M. Weaver, Libn. 

Staff: 1.5. Vols: 18,040. Vols added: 440. Per subs: 59. 

PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY LIBRARY. 77 Beale St. (94106) . 781-4211, 
ext. 2573. M-F, 8-5. Anne Bumette, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 2 others. Vols: 5,900. Per subs: 350. Micro hldgs: 34. 

Special subjects: Public utilities economics; electric, gas, hydro, civU, mechanical engineering. 

PACIFIC TELEPHONE COMPANY LIBRARY. 140 New Montgomery St., Room 2620 
(94105). 542-3453. M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. Ruth F. Trawin, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 7,500. Per subs: 80. Also Bell Laboratories Record, Bell System Technical 

Record. 
Special subjects: Telephone technology, personnel management. 

PACIFIC-UNION CLUB LIBRARY. 1000 California St. (94108). 775-1234. Not open to 
public. Ruth B. Miller, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn. 

PAULIST LIBRARY (OLD ST. MARY'S CHURCH). 614 Grant Ave. (94108). 



I 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 187 

PEAT, MARWICK, MITCHELL & CO. San Francisco International Airport (P.O. Box 
8007) (94128) . M-F, 8:30-5 (not open to public) . Olga Kaczorowski, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 500. Tech reports: 5,000+. Per subs: 60. Also docs, trade association publica- 
tions. 
Special subjects: Airport planning, environmental planning, transportation planning (general). 
Available to staff only. 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL OF PACIFIC MEDICAL CENTER, MEDICAL STAFF 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 7999 (94120). 

SAINT FRANCIS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, WALTER F. SCHALLER MEDICAL LI- 
BRARY. 909 Hyde St. (94109) . 775-4321, ext. 226. 9-5:30. Eleanor Worley, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 6,089. Tech reports: 100. Per subs: 90. Audio-Digest tapes. 

ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 355 Buena Vista Ave. East (94117). 
431-3900, ext. 205. M-F, 7:30-4. Eleanor Benelisha, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 3,954. Per subs: 63. Tapes: 64. 
Special collection: Orthopedics. 

SAINT LUKE'S HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING LIBRARY. 555 San Jose Ave. 
(94110). 647-8600, ext. 295. M-F, 9-5:30. Corazon O'S. Ismarin, Libn. 

Vols: 3,063. Per subs: 17. 
Special subject: Nursing. 

ST. MARY'S HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTER LIBRARY. 2200 Hayes St. (94117). 
752-4000, ext. 319. M-F, 8-10:30; S, Sun, 8-10. Sr. M. Joan, Director; Mrs. C. Bolompo, Libn. 

Staff: 5 libns, 5 others (3 part-time) . Vols: 23,076. Per subs: 250. Micro hldgs: 50. 
Special collections: Medicine, nursing, CaUfomiana, fiction & nonficHon, biography, literature, reli- 
gion. 

SALVATION ARMY SCHOOL FOR OFFICERS, TRAINING LIBRARY. 1450 Laguna 
St. (94115). 346-2232. M-F, 8:30-4:30. Lavonne D. Robertson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 15,500. Per subs: 103. 
Special collection: Salvation Army publications. 

SAN FRANCISCO ACADEMY OF COMIC ART. 2850 Ulloa St. (94116) . 681-1737. Open 
by appointment. Bill Blackbeard, Libn. 

Staff: 6 libns. Vols: 50,000. Per subs: 50. 

Special subjects and collections: Dime novels, pulp magazines, comic magazines, comic strips, bound 
newspapers, science fiction, crime fiction, western fiction, adventure fiction, motion pictures, 
children's books, popular art and literature, graphic, dramatic, and humorous art. 

SAN FRANCISCO ART INSTITUTE, ANNE BREMER MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 800 
Chestnut St. (94133) . 771-7020, ext. 57. M-Th, 9-9; F, 9-5. Elisabeth C. Cunkle, Libn. Vols: 
21,434. Bd per: 589. Per subs: 93. 

Inc: $20,816. Exp: Sal: $17,094. Bks: $9,865. Per: $1,005. AV: $1,498. Bd: $965. Other: $5,636. 
Special subjects: Fine arts, photography and filmmaking. Special collection: 14,500 slides. 

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE PUBLISHING COMPANY LIBRARY. 905 Mission St. 
(94119). 421-1111, ext. 273. Sun-Fri, 9 a.m.-midnight. Not open to public; phone calls 
accepted M-F, 2-5. Suzanne Caster, Libn. 

Staff: 10. 

SAN FRANCISCO COLLEGE OF MORTUARY SCIENCE LIBRARY. 1450 Post St. 
(94109). 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC LIBRARY. 1201 Ortega St. (94122). 
564-8086. M-Th, 9-9; F, 9-5; S, 9-3. Mrs. Viola L. Hagopian, Libn. 

Vols: 10,200 (books and music) . Bd per: 10. Micro hldgs: 3,050. Per subs: 35. 
Inc: $32,000. Exp: Sal: $27,000. Bks: $3,150. Per: $750. AV: $600. Bd: $500. 

Special subject: Music. Special collections: Manuscripts and first editions of American composers, 
particularly Califomian; materials pertaining to Ernest Bloch; ethnomusicology. 

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER LIBRARY. 110 Fifth St. (P.O. Box 3100, Rincon Annex) 
(94119). Not open to public. Larry Lieurance, Libn. 

Staff: 6 libns, 5 others. 



188 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SAN FRANCISCO— Continued 

SAN FRANCISCO GENERAL HOSPITAL, BARNETT-BRIGGS LIBRARY. 1001 Po- 
trero Ave. (94110) . 648-8200, ext. 200. M-F, 8-10; S, 9-5; Sun, 1-9. Mrs. Dorothy B. Drago- 
nette, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 5 others (3 part-time) . Vols: 17,127. Per subs: 623. 
Special subject: Medicine. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

REGIONAL MEDICAL PROGRAMS AREA 1/ CORONARY CARE LI- 
BRARY. Ward 35 Solarium, 22nd and Potrero Sts. (94110). 

SAN FRANCISCO LAW LIBRARY. 436 City Hall (94102). 558-4869. Harold E. Rowe, 
Libn. 

SAN FRANCISCO LAW SCHOOL LIBRARY. 20 Haight St. (94102). 626-5550. 
Staff: 1 Ubn. Vols: 20,000. Per subs: 10. 

SAN FRANCISCO LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE BLIND, EDUCATION-DEVELOP- 
MENT CENTER BRAILLE LIBRARY. 745 Buchanan St. (94102). 

SAN FRANCISCO MARITIME MUSEUM, J. PORTER SHAW LIBRARY. Foot of Polk 
St. (94109). 776-1175. M-F, 10-5. David Hull, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 8,000. Photos: 100,000. 

Special collections: Documents, ships' logs, ships' plans, recordings, charts, photos, shipping records 
(1884-1941). 

SAN FRANCISCO PSYCHOANALYTIC INSTITUTE LIBRARY. 2420 Sutter St. (94115) . 
931-4205, M-F, 9-5. 

Vols: 3,000. Per subs: 30. 

Special subject: psychoanalytic literature. 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY. Civic Center (94102). 588-4235. Dr. Kevin O. 
Starr, Acting Libn. 

Outlets: 41 (25 branches, 2 stations, 13 community bookmobile stops) . Copying service for patrons. 
Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Califomiana (with particular emphasis on San Francisco); Max J. Kuhl Collection 
of fine printing and typography; Phelan Collection of California authors; Schmulowitz CoUection 
of Wit and Humor; Richard Harrison Collection of Calligraphy and Letering; Grabhom Collection 
on the History of Printing and Development of the Book; chilren's literature collections; genealogy 
and heraldry; Robert Frost Collection; picture file of illustrations from 18th and 19th century books 
and periodicals; Scowrers Sherlockiana Collection; morgues of San Francisco News, the Call- 
Bulletin, and the News Call-Bulletin; bookplates; Eric Hoffer manuscripts; McComas Collection 
of Science Fiction and Fantasy; Foundation Center, Western Region; Business Library. 

Trustees: Edward F. Callanan, Jr., Mrs. Carl W. Stem, Wm. M. Malone, Mrs. Curtis Day, Mrs. Elsie 
Lisle, Rev. Timothy L. McDonnell, Mrs. George Toumahu. 

SAN FRANCISCO LODGE, THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETT LIBRARY. 414 Mason St. 

(94102). 

SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 1630 HoUoway Ave. (94132). 469- 
1681. M-F, 8-11; S, 8:30-5; Sun, 1-11. Dr. Frank A. Schneider, Libn. 

Vols: 421,222. Bd per: 66,901. Micro hldgs: 199,017. Per subs: 3,344. Inc.: $1,429,094. Exp: Sal: $909,226. 

Bks: $355,189. Per: $70,000. Bd: $40,565. Other: $54,114. 
Branch: Frank V. de Bellis Collection. 

SIERRA CLUB, WILLIAM E. COLBY MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 220 Bush St. (94104). 

SIMPSON COLLEGE LIBRARY. 801 Silver Ave. (94134). 334-7400, ext. 17. M-F, 7:45- 
9:45; S, 8:30-4:30. Miles S. Compton, Libn. 

Vols: 38,785. Per subs: 282. 

Special collection: History of Christian and Missionary Alliance denomination. 

SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA PIONEERS LIBRARY. 456 McAllister St. (94102) 861-5278. 
M-F, 10-12, 1-4. Mrs. Irene Lichens, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. 

Vols: 3,900. 

Special collection: Charles B. Turrill Collection of photographs of California subjects. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 189 

SOCIETY OF MAYFLOWER DESCENDANTS IN THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 
LIBRARY. 681 Market St., Room 670 (94105). Open by appointment. Mrs. Dwight L. 
Wilbur, Libn. 

Vols: 1,460. Per subs: 1. 

Special collections: Genealogy, esp. of those descended from passengers on the ship Mayflower; vital 
records of places in New Ejigland, esp. Massachusetts; pedigree papers. 

STONE, MARRACCINI & PATTERSON, PROGRAMMING AND RESEARCH LI- 
BRARY. 455 Beach St. (94133) . 775-7300, ext. 63. M-F, 8:15-11:45, 12:45-5:15. Carl Pearcy, 
Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 1,700. Tech reports: 500. Per subs: 97. 
Special subjects: Medical, hospital architecture. 

STRYBING ARBORETUM SOCIETY, HELEN CROCKER RUSSELL LIBRARY. 9th 
Ave. and Lincoln Way, Golden Gate Park (94122). 661-0822. M-F, 10-4. Barbara Ingle, 
Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 3,000. Per subs: 20. Slides: 200. 

Special collection: History of Golden Gate Park; archives of William Hammond Hall; horticulture, 
botany, natural history, forestry, plant-hunting. 

SUPREME COURT OF CALIFORNIA LAW LIBRARY. State Bldg. Annex, 955 Golden 
Gate Ave. (94102). 557-1922. John A. Sigel, Libn. 

Staff: 2. Vols: 55,000. Per subs: 104. 

SUTRO LIBRARY, CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. Golden Gate Ave. at Temescal 
(mailing: 2130 Fulton St.) (94117) . 557-0374. M-F, 10-5 (closed on State holidays) . Ethel 
S. Crockett, State Libn.; Richard H. Dillon, Sutro Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 3 others. Vols: 100,000. Per subs: 101. 

Special subjects: English history, U. S. history and genealogy, voyages and travels, early science, rare 

books, Mexican history. Special collections: Sir Joseph Banks mss; English and Mexican pamphlets; 

genealogy reference; Renaissance and Reformation books in Latin and German; Hebrew mss, first 

editions. 

UNITED AIR LINES, ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, LIBRARY. San Francisco In- 
ternational Airport (94128). 876-3730. M-F, 8-^:30. Josephine J. Whitney, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 8,000. Tech reports: 5,000. Per subs: 240. Micro hldgs: 190 fiche; also fflm. 
Special subjects: Electronics, metals, welding, aeronautics, F.A.A. materials. 

Special collections: U. S. Government standards and specs. Society of Automotive Engineers standards, 
aircraft company standards and specs. 

U.S. ARMY LETTERMAN ARMY MEDICAL CENTER, MEDICAL LIBRARY. Pre- 
sidio of San Francisco, Bldg. 1100, Room 338 (94129) . 561-2465, -3124. M-F, 8-6. Mary-Elsie 
Caruso, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 2 others. Vols: 24,000. Per subs: 625. 

Special subjects: Medicine and allied sciences, military medicine. 

Member, PSRMLS, MEDLINE. 

U.S. ARMY MEDICAL LABORATORY LIBRARY. Fort Baker (94965. 561-7212. M-F, 
7:30-4:15. Capt. Alan R. Gillogly, Libn. 

Staff: 2 (part-time) . Vols: 5,000. Per subs: 98. 

Special subjects: Clinical chemistry, microbiology, veterinary medicine, environmental health, ento- 
mology, pathology. 

U.S. ARMY, POST LIBRARY SYSTEM. Presidio of San Francisco, Bldg. 386 (94129). 
561-3448. T-Sun, 12-9. Ms. Juanita W. Taylor, Libn. 

Staff: 2.5 libns, 7 others. Vols: 35,000. Per subs: 264. Newspapers: 26. Special subjects: Military science 
and history. 

U.S. ARMY, SIXTH U.S. ARMY REFERENCE UBRARY. Presidio of San Francisco, 
Bldg. M 13-14 (94129). 561-3115, -3760. Mrs. Juanita Taylor, Libn. 

Staff: 2.5 libns, 2 others. Vols: 48,000. Tech reports: 62,000. Per subs: 273. Micro hldgs: 438. 
Special subjects: Military science and history, international affairs and area studies, management. 

U.S. COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE NINTH CIRCUIT LIBRARY. P. O. Box 5731 
(94101). 556-6129. Edward Chichura, Libn. 

Staff: 4. Vols: 31,180. Vols added: 1,408. Per subs: 282. Los Angeles County Law Library classification. 



190 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SAN FRANCISCO— Continued 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, SAN FRANCISCO REGIONAL OFFICE OF 
FIELD OPERATIONS, LIBRARY. 450 Golden Gate Ave. (P.O. Box 36013) (94102). 
556-5862. M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. L. Faye McBride, Libn. 

Staff: 2. Vols & pams: 4,000. Per subs: 15. Other: 60. 

Special collections: Bureau of Census data (business, population, manufactures, agriculture, govern- 
ments, housing, minerals); trade directories (domestic and foreign); government yearbooks and 
publications; foreign trade statistics, information and aids; business and marketing data; technical 
reports data. 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, REGION IX 
LIBRARY. 450 Golden Gate Ave. (94102). 

U.S. DISTRICT COURT, LOUIS E. GOODMAN MEMORIAL LAW LIBRARY. 450 
Golden Gate Ave. (P.O. Box 36060) (94102). 556-7979. Cherilyn Gilboy, Libn. 

Staff: 2. Vols: 14,000. Vols added: 750. Library of Congress classification. 

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY, REGION IX LIBRARY. 100 Cali- 
fornia St. (94111). 556-1840. M-F, 8-^:30. Jean Circiello, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3 others. Vols: 3,000. Tech reports: 15,000. Per subs: 300. Micro hldgs: 3,000 fiche, 20 rolls. 

Special subjects: Environmental pollution, incl. air pollution, water pollution, pesticides, solid waste 

and radiation, esp. in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Hawaii; land use and enviroimiental policy. 

U.S. NAVY EDUCATION AND TRAINING SUPPORT DETACHMENT, NAVAL RE- 
GIONAL LIBRARIAN. Treasure Island, Bldg. 62 (94130) . 765-6300. M-F, 7:30-4. Bonnie 
J. Snovi^, Libn. Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 10,000. 

U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 15th Ave. and 
Lake St. (94118). 752-1400, ext. 308. M-F, 8-4:30. Marie A. Wegman, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 5,000. Per subs: 200. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, HASTINGS COLLEGE OF THE LAW LIBRARY. 

198 McAllister St. (94102). 557-1354. Dan F. Henke, Libn. 

Staff: 16. Vols: 104,523. Vols added: 6,293. Per subs: 1,255. Library of Congress classification. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO, LIBRARY. Parnassus Ave. 
(94143) . 666-2334. M-Th, 8-9:50; F, 8-6:50, S, 8-4:50; Sun, 12-5:50. Mrs. Jeanette G. Yeazell, 
Libn. 

Staff: 18 libns, 66 others. Vols: 383,450. Per subs: 4,111. Micro hldgs: 14,406. 

Special collections: History of the health sciences: Oriental medicine; California medicine; homeopa- 
thy. 

UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO, GLEESON LIBRARY. Golden Gate and Parker 
(94117). 666-6686. M-Th, 7:30-10:30; F, 7:30-6:30; S, 9:30-5; Sun, 1-10:30. Dr. Robert L. 
Gitler, Libn. 

Vols: 276,611. Bd per: 50,420. Micro hldgs: 6,147 microfilm; 8,032 microfiche sheets; 42,796 microprint 
slides. Per subs: 3,200. 

Inc: $775,900. Exp: Sal: $405,742. Bks: $166,282. Per: $82,000. AV: $1,000. Bd: $42,220. Other: $55,689. 

Special subjects: Theology, history, belles-lettres, nursing, chemistry. Special collections: St. Thomas 
More (including recusant writers) ; Eric Gill; Robert Graves; A. E. and Laurence Housman; Rich- 
ard LeGallienne; Christmas writings; Grabhom Press; Book Club of California (books and ephem- 
era) . 

Branch: Chemistry Library (in Harney Science Center) . 

. SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY. Kendrick Hall (94117). 666-6679. Elizabeth 

Anne Quigley, Libn. 

Staff: 10. Vols: 75,154. Vols added: 4,687. Per subs: 435. Library of Congress classification. 

UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC, SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY LIBRARY. 2155 Webster 
St. (94115). 

UTAH INTERNATIONAL, INC., LIBRARY. 550 California St. (94104). 981-1515, ext. 
437, 444. M-F, 8:30-5. Kathleen T. Pabst, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, IVi others. Vols: 5,000. Per subs: 100. 
Special subjects: Mining, minerals. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 191 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL, GENERAL LIBRARY. 4150 Clement St. 
(94121) . 221-4810, ext. 230, 313. Mary Lee Gosney, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 2 others. Vols: 4,998. Per subs: 25. 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 4150 Clement St. 
(94121) . 221-4810, ext. 230, 313. M-Th, 8-9; F, 8-5:30; S, Sun, 1-3. Mary Lee Gosney, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 2 others. Vols: 10,138. Per subs: 220. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

WELLS FARGO BANK HISTORY ROOM. 420 Montgomery St. (94104) . 396-2648. M-F, 
10-3. Merrilee A. Gwerder, Libn. 

Staff: 4. Vols: 1,200. Per subs: 6. 

Special collection: 8,000 prints on staging. Pony Express, San Francisco, Wells Fargo agents and 
agencies. 

WELLS FARGO BANK LIBRARY. 475 Sansome St. (P.O. Box 44000) (94144) . 396-3744. 
M-F, 8:15-4:45. Alice Hunsucker, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3 others. Vols: 6,000. Per subs: 600. 
Special subjects: Banking, finance, economics. 

WINE INSTITUTE LIBRARY. 717 Market St. (94103). 986-0878. M-F, 9-12. 1-5 (by 
appointment only). Joan V. Ingalls, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 2,000. Per subs: 100. 

Special subjects: Winemaking, wine industry and viticulture. 

WORLD TRADE LIBRARIES. 1 Embarcadero Center (94111) . 421-7777. M-F, 8:30-5:30. 
Mrs. Jeanne Nichols, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3y2 others. Vols: 18,000+. Per subs: 672. 

SAN JACINTO (Riverside Co.) Area Code 714 

MT. SAN JACINTO COLLEGE LIBRARY. 21400 Highway 79 (92383) . 654-7321. M-Th, 
8-10; F, 8-5. Louis Canter, Libn. 

Vols: 21,500. Micro hldgs: 755 reels. Per subs: 208. 

Inc: $35,500. Exp: Sal: $25,500. Bks: $8,000. Per: $2,000. AV: $500. Other: $500. 

Special subjects: Art, Black literature, business, economics, humanities, music, natural sciences, para- 
medical, sci-tech, social and behavioral sciences, vocational (auto mechanics, photography, print- 
ing, etc.). Special collections: Academic and vocational multi-media materials for individual stu- 
dent use. 

SAN JOSE (Santa Clara Co.) Area Code 408 

AGNEWS STATE HOSPITAL, READING AND LISTENING CENTER. (95114). 262- 
2100, ext. 2367. M-F, 10-12, 1-4. Mrs. Lucille Leuschner, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn. Vols: 1,000. Also talking books, recordings. 

AGNEWS STATE HOSPITAL, STAFF LIBRARY. (95114) . 262-2100, ext. 2367. M, T, Th, 
F, 12-5; W, 9-5. Mrs. Lucille Leuschner, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 7,000. Per subs: 125. Tapes: 125. 

Special subjects: Mental retardation, psychiatry, neurology, clinical psychology, psychiatric nursing, 

social service, rehabilitation literature, learning disorders, bibhotherapy. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SAN JOSE, LIBRARY. 250 S. Fourth St. (95192). 
277-3377. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-5; S, 9-^; Sun, 1-5. Donald R. Hunt, Libn. 

Vols: 614,016. Micro hldgs: 378,823 physical units. Per subs: 5,304. 

Inc: $1,833,307. Exp: Sal: $1,072,049. Bks: $394,612. Per: $128,000. AV: $15,020. Bd: $50,800. Other: 

$172,826. 
Special subjects: Military history, art history, curriculum materials, music scores. 

FMC CORPORATION, ORDNANCE ENGINEERING LIBRARY. 1105 Coleman Ave. 
(P.O. Box 1201) (95108) . 289-2852. M-F, 7:30^:30. Martin J. McKeown, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 4 others. Vols: 3,000. Tech reports: 30,000+. Per subs: 200 +. 

Special subjects: Vehicles, tracked and wheeled, including military, cargo, harvesting, mining, trans- 
port and recreational. 



192 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SAN JOSE — Continued 

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, NUCLEAR ENERGY DIVISION, LIBRARY. 175 

Curtner Ave. (95114). 297-3000, ext. 3522. M-F, 7:45-4:30. AUeen Thompson, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 6 others. Per subs: 500. 

ROSICRUCIAN RESEARCH LIBRARY. Rosicrucian Park (95191) . 295-0323, ext. 220. T, 
Th, 2-5; F, 2-5, 7-9; S, 2-5. Ruth Phelps, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. Vols: 137,500. Per subs: 25. 

Special subjects: Egyptology, Rosicrucianism, parapsychology, mysticism, Baconiana. 

SAN JOSE CITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 2100 Moorpark Ave. (95114) . 298-2181, ext. 282. 
M-Th, 7:30-10; F, 7:30-4:30; Sun, 1-5. Russell G. Fischer, Libn. 

Vols: 59,000. Bd per: 3,520. Micro hldgs: 3,293. Per subs: 625. 

Inc: $356,059. Exp: Sal: $212,802. Bks: $40,000. Per: $14,330. AV: $35,044. Bd: $504. Other: $53,379. 

SAN JOSE HOSPITALS AND HEALTH CENTER, HEALTH SCIENCE LIBRARY. 675 

E. Santa Clara (95114) . 998-3212, ext. 375. Mrs. Barbara A. Wilson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, Mi other. Vols: 2,000. Per .^ubs: 100. 
Special subject: Nursing. 

SAN JOSE MEDICAL CLINIC LIBRARY. 45 S. 17th St. (95112). 998-5551, ext. 300. 
Jeanne Hunter, Records Libn. 

Vols: 630. Per subs: 100. Taped series: 6. 

SAN JOSE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 180 W San Carlos St. (95113) . 287-2788. Homer L. Hetch- 
er, Libn. 

Oudets: 87 (11 branches, 1 station, 72 community, 2 school bookmobile stops). Copying service for 

patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Califomiana (emphasis on Santa Clara County), children's research collection. 
Trustees: Dr.Stuart BaiUie, Dr. AUan Kahn, Dr. Robert R. Neiman, Mrs. Margaret Kraynick, David E. 

McDaniel. 
Member, Camino Real Library System. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY FREE UBRARY. 1095 N. 7th St. (95112). 293-2326. Barbara 
J. Campbell, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Los Gatos, Mountain View, Palo Alto, San Jose, Santa Clara, Suimyvale. 
Oudets: 105. 

Branches: Alum Rock, Campbell, Cupertino (includes research center), GUroy, Los Altos (includes 
Los Altos Hills) , Milpitas-Calaveras, Morgan Hill, Saratoga-Quito, Saratoga- Village. 

Stations: MUpitas-Community Center, MUpitas-SunnyhiUs, Stanford-Escondido. 

Bookmobile stops: 80 (73 community, 7 school) . 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Califomiana, Western Americana, art, genealogy, Spanish, Italian, French, Ger- 
man, and Portuguese languages, periodicals on microlilm. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT LIBRARY. 2220 Moorpark 
(95128) . 297-1636, ext. 221. M-F, 8-5. Elizabeth Walters, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3y2 others. Vols: 5,000. Per subs: 300. Micro hldgs: 65 fiche. Fihns and videotapes: 200. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 191 N. First St. (95113). 299-3567. John W. 
Heckel, Libn. 

SANTA CLARA VALLEY MEDICAL CENTER, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 751 S. Bascom 
Ave. (95128) . 293-0262, ext. 404, M-F, 8-8; S, 10-2. Edna N. Graun, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 12,647. Per subs: 320. Micro hldgs: 12. Audiotapes: 435. 
Special subjects: clinical medicine, clinical nursing, pathology. 

SAN JUAN BAUTISTA (San Benito Co.) Area Code 408 

SAN JUAN BAUTISTA CITY LIBRARY. 411 2nd St. (mailing: P. O. Box 427) (95045). 
623-4687. Mrs. Yvonne Manitto, Libn. Affiliated vidth: San Benito County. 

SAN LEANDRO (Alameda Co.) Area Code 415 

J. A. FREITAS LIBRARY. U.P.E.C. Cultural Center Bldg., 1120-24 E. 14th St. (94577). 
483-7676. M-F, 9-5. Carlos Almeida, Libn. 

Staff: 1 hbn, 1 other. Vols: 3,900. Per subs: 3. 

Special subjects: Portugal and the Portuguese. Special collections: Newspapers published by the 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 193 

Portuguese in California from 1885; books on the Azores. 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, MEDICAL STAFF LIBRARY. 2838 Bartlett St. (94577) . 357- 
8300, ext. 245. 8-5. Catherine E. Lee, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 437. Per subs: 8. 

Audio Digest tapes: Internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, anesthsiology, obstetrics /gynecology, fam- 
ily practice. 

SAN LEANDRO COMMUNITY LIBRARY. 300 Estudillo Ave. (94577). 483-1511. Ste- 
phen D. Ewing, Libn. 

Outlets: 6 (5 stations). Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: CaHfomiana, with emphasis on San Leandro, centennial picture collection, slides 

and pictures by Cahfomia artists (with accompanying descriptive cassette tapes) . 
Trustees: Mrs. Durlynn Anema, Mrs. Faith Frazier, Carlos A. Almeida, Vernon P. Larson, C. H. 

Lubker, Jas. P. Riley, Joseph W. Smith. 

SINGER BUSINESS MACHINES, R AND E LIBRARY. 2350 Washington Ave. 
(94577) .357-6800, ext. 2575. M-F, 8-4:30. Mrs. Susanna C. Crymes, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 2,000. Tech reports: 50. Per subs: 121. 

Special subjects: electronic and electrical engineering, computer science, materials engineering. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO (San Luis Obispo Co.) Area Code 805 

CALIFORNIA MEN'S COLONY LIBRARY. P. O. Box A-E (93401). Frank Capadona, 
Libn. 

CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. (93407). 546-2345. 
M-Th, 7:45-10; F, 7:45-5; S, 8-5; Sun, 1-10. L. Harry Strauss, Library Director. 

Vols: 398,083. Bd per: 37,053. Micro hldgs: 412,387. Per subs: 3,704. Inc: $1,317,691. Exp: Sal: $705,176. 

Bks: $407,230. Per: $101,226. AV: $19,064. Bd: $41,467. Other: $43,528. 
Special subjects: Science and technology, agriculture, architecture, engineering, business, social 

sciences, English. Special collections: Archives, curriculum materials, school textbooks, children's 

books, ERIC, Library of American Civilization, Human Relations Area Files, News Bank Urban 

Affairs Library. 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DISTRICT 05 LIBRARY. 50 Higuera St. (P. O. Box L) (93401). 

CUESTA COLLEGE LIBRARY. P. O. Box J (93401). 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CITY-COUNTY LIBRARY. 1354 Bishop (maiHng: P. O. Box X) 
(93401). 543-1730. Dale W. Perkins, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Paso Robles. Outlets: 141. 

Branches: Arroyo Grande, Atascadero, Grover City, Morro Bay. 

Stations: Avila Beach, Cambria, Cayucos, Creston, Halcyon, Nipomo, Oceano, Pismo Beach, Pozo, San 

Miguel, Santa Margarita, Shandon, Shell Beach, Simmler, South Bay, Templeton. 
Bookmobile stops: 120 (119 community, 1 school). 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Member, Black Gold Cooperative Library System. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, Rm. 309 (93401) . 543-1550, 
ext. 326. Mary E. Gaydosh, Libn. 

SAN MARCOS (San Diego Co.) Area Code 714 

PALOMAR COLLEGE, PHIL H. PUTNAM MEMORIAL LIBRARY. (92069) . 744-1150. 
M-Th, 7:30-9:45; F, 7:30-4; S, 9-2. Mrs. Esther W. Nesbin, Dean of Instruction Library 
Services. 

Vols: 90,000. Per subs: 563. 

Inc: $257,442. Bks: $30,500. Per: $14,000. AV: $12,000. Bd: $300. 

Special subjects: Art and music; Iceland. Special collection: Oological collection (birds' nests and eggs 

of birds which nest in California) . 
Branch: Art and Music Library. 

SAN MARINO (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

HUNTINGTON LIBRARY, ART GALLERY AND BOTANICAL GARDENS. 1151 Ox- 
ford Rd. (91108) . 792-6141, ext. 57. M-S, 8:30-5. Daniel Holt Woodward, Libn. 

Staff: 193/5 libns, 3iy5 others. Mss: 5,000,000. Rare books: 300,000. 



194 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SAN MARINO— Continued 

Reference: 200,000. Per subs: 600. Micro hldgs: 1,776 titles on microfilm. 

Special subjects: American history and literature; Western Americana and CaUfomiana; British history 
and literature; incunabula, printing and book illustration. 

SAN MARINO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 1890 Huntington Dr. (91108). 282-8484. E. Caswell 
Perry, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Califomiana and Western Americana. 

Trustees: Nick Ugrin, Mrs. Thomas Batson, Adam Bennion, Mrs. Millard McLain, Claude Quillin. 

Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

SAN MATEO (San Mateo Co.) Area Code 415 

COLLEGE OF SAN MATEO LIBRARY. 1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd. (94402). 574-6100. 
M-Th. 7:30-10; F, 7:30^:30; Sun, 1-5. John B. Dooley, Libn. 

Vols: 95,000. Bd per: 4,500. Micro hldgs: 3,573 reels ultra-microfiche; 12,000 cards. Per subs: 741. 
Inc: $391,359. Exp: Sal: $284,036. Bks: $27,194. Per: $8,604. AV: $58,511. Bd: $400. 
Special subjects: Library of American Civilization (by Americans or about American "civilization" 
from beginnings to 1915); nursing, aeronautics, art, crafts, real estate. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE LIBRARY. 
225 37th Ave. (94403). 573-2520. T-F, 12-5. Nancy Crabbe, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 4,000. Per subs: 214. Pams and uncataloged material: 12,000 items. 
Special subjects: Psychiatry, psychology, social work (incl. staff development and training) , public 

health. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION AND MUSEUM LIBRARY. 
1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd. (94402) . 574-6441. M-F, 9:30-4:30; S, 10:30-^:30. Mrs. Betty Hoag, 
Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 500. Also mss, docs, photos, maps. 

Special subjects: San Francisco International Airport, San Mateo County history. 

SAN MATEO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 55 W. Third Ave. (94402). 574-6950. Alfred R. Kraig, 
Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Burlingame. Outlets: 4 (2 branches, 1 station) . Copying service for pa- 
trons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Califomiana, music, business reference, zoology (minor specialization) . 

Trustees: Mrs. Gordon L. Ridgeway, Howard T. East, Jr., William J. Gyorgy, E. Lesley Kelley, Frank 
A. Douglas. 

Member, Peninsula Library System. 

SAN PABLO (Contra Cofta Co.) Area Code 415 

BROOKSIDE HOSPITAL, MEDICAL STAFF LIBRARY. 2000 Vale Rd. (94806). 235- 
7000, ext. 291. M-F, 8-5. Anelle Kloski, Ubn. 

Staff: Vi libn (FTE). Vols: 425. Pers, Bd & unbd: 700. Per subs: 59. 

CONTRA COSTA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 2600 Mission Bell Dr. (94806) . 235-7800. M-Th, 
8-10; F, 8-5. John W. Homer, Libn. 

Vols: 46,626. Bd per: 1,273. Micro hldgs: 518 microfilms; 4,515 microfiche. Per subs: 476. 
Inc: $143,500. Exp: Sal: $110,000. Bks: $24,500. Per: $7,200. Supplies: $1,800. 

SAN PEDRO (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

FORT MacARTHUR POST LIBRARY. Bldg. 310 (90731). 831-7179. M-F, 12-9; S, 12-6. 
Helen E. Burgess, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, IVi others. Vols: 17,927. Paperbounds: 3,840. Pams, maps, pictures: 5,480. Per subs: 104. 

Newspapers: 16. Recordings: 2,721. 
Special subject: Mihtary affairs. 

SAN PEDRO AND PENINSULA HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 1300 W. 7th St. 
(90732). 832-3311, ext. 391. M-F, 8-^:30. James H. Harlan, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 1,650. Per subs: 49. Cassettes: 203. 
Special subjects: Medicine, tumor registry. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 195 

SAN QUENTIN (Marin Co.) Area Code 415 

CALIFORNIA STATE PRISON INMATE LIBRARY. (94964). 454-1460, ext. 489. M-F, 
7:30-^:15; S, Sun, 8-4. James McHenry, Mrs. Patricia Caldwell, Libns. 

SAN RAFAEL (Marin Co.) Area Code 415 

DOMINICAN COLLEGE, ARCHBISHOP ALEMANY LIBRARY. 1520 Grand Ave. 
(94901). 454-5782. M-Th, 8-5:30, 7-11; F, 8-5; S, 9-12, 1-5; Sun, 10-5, 7-10. Sister Mary 
Marguerite, O. P., Libn. 

Vols: 70,595. Micro hldgs: 1,135 reels mirofiliii. Per subs: 396. 
Exp: Sal: $52,000. Bks: $12,500. Per: $6,000. Bd: $775. Other: $1,000. 
Special subjects: Humanities, art, music. 

MARIN COUNTY LAW UBRARY. Hall of Justice C-33 (94903). 479-1100, ext. 2078. 
Meyer W. Halpem, Libn. 

MARIN COUNTY LIBRARY. Civic Center Administration Bldg. (94903) . 479-1100, ext. 
2577. Bruce D. Bajema, Libn. 

Serves: Elntire county except Larkspur, Mill Valley, San Anselmo, San Rafael, SausaUto. Contracts with: 
Mill Valley Public Library. Reciprocal agreement with: Larkspur, San Rafael. 

Outlets: 35. 

Branches: Corte Madera, Novato. 

Stations: Belvedere-Tiburon, Bolinas, Fairfax, Forest Knolls, Inverness, Marin City, Point Reyes, Stin- 
son Beach, Woodacre. 

Bookmobile stops: 23 (16 community, 7 school). 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Clem Miller (civil liberties), art, Califomiana, Indians. 

Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

SAN RAFAEL PUBLIC LIBRARY. 1100 E St. (94901) . 453-3282. Mrs. Vivian R. Smith, 
Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Marin County Free Library. Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal 
classification. 

Trustees: James Mayer, Mrs. Homer Dalbey, Mrs. Edwin Miimeman, Richard Bradshaw, Bryce Ander- 
son. 

SANTA ANA (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

CHARLES W. BOWERS MEMORIAL MUSEUM. 2002 N. Main St. (92706) . 834-4024. 
T-S, 10:30-4:30. 

Vols: 1,450. Tech reports: 70. Per subs: 10. 

HURTY-PECK LIBRARY OF BEVERAGE UTERATURE. 16950 Armstrong Ave. 
(P.O. Box 15103) (92705). Mr. W. A. Noling, Libn. 

ORANGE COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 515 N. Flower St. (92703) . 834-3397. Bethany J. 
Ochal, Libn. 

SANTA ANA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 17th and Bristol (92706). 835-3000. M-Th, 7:30- 
10:30; F, 7:30-^. Rolland E. Boepple, Libn. 

Vols: 52,620. Micro hldgs: 1,077 reels. Per subs: 691. 

Inc: $120,000. Exp: Sal: $65,717. Bks: $42,313. Per: $8,080. AV: $81,346. Bd: $453. 

SANTA ANA COMMUNITY HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 600 E. Washington 
Ave. (92701). 542-6744, ext. 342. M-F, 8:30-5. Evelyn Simpson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 10 others. Vols: 3,000. Per subs: 44. Audio Digest tapes. 

SANTA ANA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 26 Civic Center Plaza (92701) . 834-4013. Howard K. 
Samuelson, Libn. 

Outlets: 24 (1 branch, 18 community, 4 school bookmobile stops) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey 

Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Business, Califomiana, foreign language, Santa Ana and Orange County history. 
Trustees: John W. "Bill" Hill, Harold Jenldns, Jack E. Larson, Robert Kohl, Ginger Yates. 
Member, Santiago Library System. 



196 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SANTA ANA — Continued 

TRINITY UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH LIBRARY. 17th St. and Prospect Ave. 

(92705). M-F, 9-5; Sun, 9-12. Kathryn Lindskoog, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 2,000. Per subs: 20. Recordings: 130. Cassettes: 200. 
Special subjects: Christian education, social concern, church history, philosophy. 

SANTA BARBARA (Santa Barbara Co.) Area Code 805 

ABC-CLIO INC., INGE BOEHM LIBRARY. 2040 Alameda Padre Serra (93103). 

BROOKS INSTITUTE, SCHOOL OF PHOTOGRAPHY LIBRARY. 2030 Alameda 
Padre Serra (93103). 963-8651, ext. 57. M-F, 8:30-i:30. James Maher, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 1,700. Tech reports: 300. Per subs: 113. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY— TEMPO, TECHNICAL INFORMATION CEN- 
TER. 816 State St. (P.O. Drawer QQ) (93102) . 965-0551, ext. 252. M-F, 8-5. Kenneth W. 
Lauderdale, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 2 others. Vols: 16,000. Tech reports: 30,000. Per subs: 415. 

GENERAL RESEARCH CORPORATION LIBRARY. 5383 HoUister Ave. (93111) 
(P.O. Box 3597) (93105). 964-7724, ext. 238. M-F, 8:30-5. Shirley Clow, Libn. 

Vols: 5,000. Tech reports: 4,200. Per subs: 5. 

GOLETA VALLEY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 351 S. Patterson St. (93017) . 

OUR LADY OF LIGHT CATHOLIC CENTER AND LIBRARY. 19 W. Victoria 
(93103). 

SANTA BARBARA CITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 721 Cliff Drive (93109). 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (93101) . 966-1611, ext. 309. 
Evalyn M. Casey, Libn. 

SANTA BARBARA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 40 E. Anapamu St. (mailing: P.O. Box 1019) 
(93102). 962-7653). Robert A. Hart, Libn. 

Outlets: 9 (5 branches, 3 stations) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Trustees: Christopher Nicholas, Rev. Karl W. Tuttle, Mrs. William Bryant, Jr., Mrs Homer E. Gililland, 

Mrs. Romain Young. 
Member, Black Gold Cooperative Library System. 

TRINITY CHURCH LIBRARY. 1500 State St. (93101). 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA, LIBRARY. (93106) . Donald C. 
Davidson, Libn. 

WESTMONT COLLEGE, ROGER J. VOSKUYL LIBRARY. 955 La Paz Rd. (93108). 
969-5051. M-Th, 8-11; F, 8-10; S, 9:30-10; Sun, 1:30-5:30. J. E. Divelbiss, Acting Director. 

Vols: 100,914. Bd per: 24,462. Micro hldgs: 2,500. Per subs: 442. 

Inc: $111,935. Exp: Sal: $68,700. Bks: $38,265. Per: $16,220. Bd: $1,729. Other: $6,100. 

Special subjects: Biblical studies; Christian theology. Special collections: Christ and culture. 

SANTA CLARA (Santo Cloro Co.) Area Code 408 

FMC CORPORATION, CENTRAL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES LIBRARY. 
1185 Coleman Ave. (95052). 

SANTA CLARA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 2635 Homestead Rd. (95051) . 243-0560. Donald F. 
Fuller, Libn. 

Contracts with: City of Sunnyvale. Outlets: 90 (1 branch, 71 community, 17 school bookmobile stops). 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Genealogical collection, rural and urban research library, U.S. geological survey 

topographical map depository, Cabral collection of local memorabilia, Sports Expert, Inc. library. 
Trustees: Mrs. Virginia Hooper, John Roberts, W. Larry Ferguson, Mrs. Elizabeth Gill, Mrs. Dolores 

Wriglesworth. 
Member, Camino Real Library System. 

UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA, ORRADRE LIBRARY. (95053) . 984-4404. M-F, 8 to 
midnight; 8, S9-5; Sun, 1 to midnight. Dr. Victor Novak, Libn. 

Vols: 202,134. Bd per: 51,932. Micro hldgs: 170,188. Per subs: 2,524. 

Inc: $571,990. Exp: Sal: $330,200. Bks: $129,752. Per: $77,000. AV: $32,000 (includes salaries) . Bd: $19,725. 
Other: $42,038. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 197 

Special subjects: Business, humanities, sciences, engineering, law. Special collections: Califomiana, 

rare books, Santa Clarana, archives. 
Branch: Science Library. 

LAW LIBRARY. (95053). 

SANTA CRUZ (Santa Cruz Co.) Area Code 408 

FOREST HISTORY SOCIETY, INC., LIBRARY. 733 River St. (95060). 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY HEALTH SERVICE AGENCY, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 1060 
Emeline Ave. (P.O. Box 962) (95060). 425-2022. M-F, 8-^5. 
Vols: 100. Per subs: 50. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courts Bldg., 701 Ocean St. (95060). 425- 
2211. Lynne M. Hays, Libn. 

SANTA CRUZ GENERAL HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 1080 Emeline Ave. 
(95060). 

SANTA CRUZ PUBLIC LIBRARY— CITY AND COUNTY. 224 Church St. (95060). 
423-6210. Charles K. Atkins, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Santa Cruz, Watsonville. Contracts with: Watsonville. Outlets: 42. 

Branch: Branciforte. 

Stations: Alba, Aptos, Ben Lomond, Bonny Doon, Boulder Creek, Capitola, Felton, Freedom, Garfield, 

La Selva Beach, Scotts Valley, Soquel, Twin Lakes. 
Bookmobile stops: 27 (24 community, 3 school). 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Monterey Bay Area Cooperative Library System. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFONRIA, SANTA CRUZ, LIBRARY. (95064). 429-2076. M-Th, 
8-11; F, 8-6; S, 9-5; Sun, 2-11. David W. Heron, Libn. 

Vols: 390,688. Micro hldgs: 8,472 reels; 76,043 other. 

Inc: $1,509,676. Exp: Sal: $651,390. Bks: $500,868. Bd: $72,033. Other: $285,385. 

Special Subjects: South Pacific, astronomy (Lick Collection). Special collections: Thomas Carlyle 

Collection, T. S. EUot, Ezra Pound. 
Branch: Science Library. 

SANTA FE SPRINGS (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

SANTA FE SPRINGS CITY LIBRARY. 11700 Telegraph Rd. (90670) . 868-7738. Joseph 
Da Rold, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Member, Metropohtan Cooperative Library System. 

SANTA MARIA (Santa Barbara Co.) Area Code 805 

TED BUSHMAN LAW LIBRARY. Bushman bldg. (93454). 

SANTA MARIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 420 S. Broadway (93454). 925-0994. James A. 
Petrella, Libn. 

Outlets: 5 (4 stations) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Dr. Harold T. Case, James A Petrella, Jack H. Glines, Chester M. Langenbeck, Mrs. A. 

Emerson Stoskopf, Elizabeth H. Scott. 
Member, Black Gold Cooperative Library System. 

SANTA MONICA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

R&D ASSOCIATES LIBRARY. 525 Wilshire Blvd. (90403) . 451-5838, ext. 220. Celine 
F. Walker, Libn. 

Staff: IVi libns, 4 others. Vols: 6,000. Tech reports: 10,000. Per subs: 150. 
Special subjects: Physics, defense systems, systems engineering. 

RAND CORPORATION LIBRARY. 1700 Main St. (90406). 393-0411, ext. 287, 7544. 
M-F, 8-5. Helen J. Waldron, Libn. 

Staff: 7 libns, 20 others. Vols: 62,000. Docs: 275,000. Per subs: 1,720. Micro hldgs: 12,000. Newspapers: 

70. 
Special subjects: Military history; Russian-language collection in economics and political science; 

aerospace materials. 



198 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SANTA MONICA— Continued 

ST. JOHN'S HOSPITAL, KYSER MEDICAL UBRARY. 1328 22nd St. (90404). 829- 

5511, ext. 1197. M-F, 8-5. Mrs. Janet C. White, Libn. 

Special collection: Kennedy Child Study Center. 

SANTA MONICA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1815 Pearl St. (90405) . 392-4911. M-Th, 7:45- 
10; F, 7:45-4; S, 9 to noon. Norma Nyquist, Libn. 

Vols: 77,000. Bd per: 3,723. Micro hldgs: 1,400. Per subs: 650. 

Inc: $190,891. Exp: Sal: $131,202. Bks. $34,300. Per: $5,000. AV: $2,450 (microfilm). Bd: $1,500. Supplies 
and equipment: $14,389. 

SANTA MONICA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 1343 Sixth St. (maiHng: P.O. Box 1610) (90401) . 
451-5751. Mrs. Patricia Terrill Brownell, Libn. 

Outlets: 4 (2 branches, 1 station) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Fine arts, Califomiana. 

Trustees: Donald Mclsaac, Mrs Margaret Leighton, Janice Bambrick, Ralph H. Bowen, Nancy Braun. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, TECHNICAL INFORMATION CEN- 
TER—LIBRARY. 2500 Colorado Ave. (90406) . 393-9411, ext. 7232. Not open to public. 
Mrs. Ellen Sol, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 4 others. Vols: 12,000. Tech reports: 50,000. Per subs: 250. 

Special subjects: Computers, data processing, programming, education, military, systems analysis, 

management. 
Member, INFO. 

SANTA PAULA (Ventura Co.) Area Code 805 

BLANCHARD COMMUNITY LIBRARY (SANTA PAULA UHS PUBLIC LIBRARY 
DISTRICT LIBRARY) . 119 N. 8th St. (93060) . 525-3615. Mrs. Elisabeth S. Blake, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreement with: Oxnard. Outlets: 14 (11 community, 2 school bookmobile stops) . Copying 

service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Genealogy, local history, Mexican-American experience, literature and old fiction. 
Trustees: Dr. Gilbert S. Jackson, Charles E. Harbison, George J. Castenada, Dr. Alan J. Peterson, John 

A. Melton. 
Member, Black Gold Cooperative Library System. 

SANTA ROSA (Sonoma Co.) Area Code 707 

COMMUNITY HOSPITAL OF SONOMA COUNTY, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 3325 
Chanate Rd. (95402). 544-3340, ext. 247. M-F, 8-^:30. Joan Chilton, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 1,400 bd pers, 600 books. Per subs: 90. Audio-Digest tapes. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

SANTA ROSA JUNIOR COLLEGE LIBRARY. (95401). 

SANTA ROSA-SONOMA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY. Third and E Sts. (95404) . 545- 
0831. David Sabsay, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Healdsburg, Petaluma. Reciprocal agreements with: Healdsburg, Peta- 

luma. Outlets: 42. 
Branches: Cloverdale, Northwest Regional Branch, Rohnert Park, Sebastopol, Sonoma. 
Stations: Boyes, Forestville, Geyserville, Glen Ellen, Graton, Guemeville, Monte Rio, Occidental. 
Bookmobile stops: 27. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collection: Local history. 

Trustees: Mrs. George A. Butler, Walter C. Hansel, John J. Healy, Everett H. Shapiro, Kirk H. Veale. 
Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

SONOMA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Hall of Justice (95401) . 527-2668. Frances Kers- 
tens, Libn. 

SARATOGA (Santa Clara Co.) Area Code 415 
WEST VALLEY COLLEGE, LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER. 14000 Fruitvale 
Ave. (95070). 867-2200. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-^; Sun, 1-5. Dr. Mary E. Jensen, Director, 
Learning Resources. 

Vols: 47,000. Micro hldgs: 8,200. Per subs: 900. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 199 

Exp: Sal: $216,057. Bks: $55,000. Per: $15,000. AV: $40,100. Bd: $1,500. 

SAUSALITO (Marin Co.) Area Code 415 

SAUSALITO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 733 Bridgeway (94965). 332-2325. Ms. Patricia She- 
pard, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: sailing, Marin history, Sausalito history. 
Trustees: William Berkman, Mrs. Ben Famham, L.W. Thomas May, Mrs. Susan Hock, Mrs. Jacques 

Newville. 
Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

SEPULVEDA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL, LIBRARY SERVICE. 16111 Plummer 
St. (91343). 894-8271, ext. 371, 418. M-F, 8-4:30. Martha W. Stovall, Libn. 

Staff: 3 libns, 1 other. Vols: Patients, 11,000; Medical, 3,800. Per subs: 375 
Special subjects: Psychiatry, psychology, nursing, internal medicine, surgery. 
Member, MEDLINE. 

SIERRA MADRE (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

SIERRA MADRE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 440 W. Sierra Madre Blvd. (91024). 355-7186. 
Robert C. Ragsdale, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Earl C. Morris, Ms. Ann Valois, Arthur L. Benedict, Ms. Edith Dane, Richard L. Johnson. 

Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

SIGNAL HILL (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

SIGNAL HILL PUBLIC LIBRARY. 2175 Cherry Ave. (90806) . 426-7333, 424-5383. Mrs. 
Kathleen M. Brady, Libn. 

Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collection: Joint Committee on Atomic Energy hearings. 

SIMI (Ventura Co.) Area Code 805 

SIMI VALLEY ADVENTIST HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 2975 N. Sycamore Dr. (93065). 
Open 24 hours daily. Mrs. Eileen Gillespie, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: Vols: 191. Per subs: 23. 

SOLEDAD (Monterey Co.) Area Code 408 

CORRECTIONAL TRAINING FACILITY, CENTRAL LIBRARY. (P.O. Box 686) 
(93960). M-Th, 8-4, 6:3(^:30; F-Sun, 8-4. John Raffile, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 9 others. Vols: 21,000. Per subs: 20. 
Special collection: Legal library. 

CORRECTIONAL TRAINING FACILITY, NORTH, LIBRARY. P.O. Box 2530 
(93960) . W, F, S, 8-4; T, Th, 12:30-8:30. Eugene Littleton, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 8 others. Vols: 15,900. 
Special collection: Legal library. 

SONORA (Tuolumne Co.) Area Code 209 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 465 S. Washington (95370). 532-7842. Mrs. 
Ethel T. Kary, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Outlets: 8. 

Stations: Groveland, Jamestown, Long Bam, Mi-Wuk ViUage, Pinecrest, Tuolunme City, Twain Harte. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Member, 49-99 Cooperative Library System. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, Rm. 301. (95370) . Elberta Dun- 
lap, Secretary. 

TUOLUMNE GENERAL HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 101 E. Hospital Rd. 
(95370). 532-3401, ext. 35. M-F, 8-6. Eldora Shuford, Med. Rec. Supvr. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 200. Per subs: 10. 
Member, PSRMLS. 



200 NEWS NOTES OF CAUFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SOUTH PASADENA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

SOUTH PASADENA PUBLIC UBRARY. 1115 El Centre (91030) . 799-9108. Mrs. Mary 
Helen Wayne, Libn. 

Reciprocal agreements with: Alhambra, Los Angeles. 

Copying service for patrons. 

Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collection: Local history. 

Trustees: Mrs. Thelma Clark, Mrs. Doris Gertmenian, Robert Coleman, Mrs. Helen Spencer, James 

Van Patten. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO (Son Mateo Co.) Area Code 415 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO PUBUC LIBRARY. 840 W. Orange Ave. (94080) . 871-6585. 
Dr. Robert S. Alvarez, Libn. 

Outlets: 2 (1 branch). Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Business, local history. 

Trustees: Frank A. Frank, Mrs. Ruth Boyd, Mrs. Charlotte Dillon, Mrs. Edna deLarios, Jack A. Ferre. 

STANFORD (Santo Clara Co.) Area Code 415 

CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES LIBRARY. 
202 Junipero Serra Blvd. (94305). 321-2052. M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. Elizabeth W, Calloway, 
Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1% others. Vols: 4,500. Per subs: 250. Newspapers: 14. 

Special subjects: AnthroE>ology, economics, history, philosophy, political science, psychiatry, psycholo- 
gy, sociology. 

STANFORD UNIVERSITY UBRARIES. (94305). 327-8094. M-F, 8-10; S, 9^; Sun, 
1-10. David C. Weber, Director of University Libraries. 

Collections open to: Faculty of other institutions in the Bay Area for interlibrary use and, with fee, 
for borrowing; students in Bay Area may have Umited inlibrary use privileges upon request of 
school librarian; other members of public for inlibrary use and, with fee, for borrowing. Fee for 
alunmi use is $12.50 annually, for general public $25. 

Interlibrary loan: Standard policies, although industrial and business firms through Technical Informa- 
tion Service on subscription. 

Restrictions: Films, most serials, rare books, microtext, phonorecords not lent. 

J. Henry Meyer Memorial Library (undergraduate collections, incl. the Audio Library and Language 
Laboratories) . 

Library units in Main Library: General Reference rooms. Central Circulation Department, Central 
Map Collection, Ejigineering Library, Government Documents Department, Interlibrary Loan 
Services, Microtext and Newspaper Reading Room, Photocopy Services, Special Collections De- 
partment (see detail under Special Collections below). University Archives and Stanford Collec- 
tion. 

Special Libraries in the humanities and social sciences: Art and Architecture, Classics, Communica- 
tions, Cubberley Library of Education, German Studies, Music (incl. Archive of Recorded Soimd, 
Harry R. Lange Collection of Historical Musical Instruments and Books), Physical Education for 
Women, Psychology, Tanner Memorial Library of Philosophy, Victor J. West Memorial (Political 
Science) . 

Special Libraries in the sciences: Branner Earth Sciences, Computer Science, Ejigineering (incl. 
Electrical Engineering-Solid State, Guggenheim Space Sciences) , Falconer Biology (incl. Sys- 
tematic Biology), Hopkins Marine Station (Pacific Grove, California), Mathematical Sciences, 
Physics Library (incl. Hansen Microwave, High Ejiergy, Plasma, Astro-physics) , Swain Library of 
Chemistry (incl. Chemical Engineering) , Timoshenko Collection (history of mechanics and struc- 
tural engineering) . 

Special collections: Antoine Borel Collection (mss, material on California political history) , Frederick 
E. Brasch collection on Sir Isaac Newton and the History of Scientific Thought, Bernard De Voto 
papers, Charlotte Ashley Felton Library (British and American literature of the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries) , Hopkins Transportation Library, Elmer E. Robinson Collection on American 
History, Aline D. and Morgan A. Gunst Memorial Library, Memorial Library of Music, Early 
American Imprints and Early Printed Books from the European Continent prior to 1600, Ernesto 
Galarza papers on California farm labor, Frances B. Loomis papers, Edward L. Plumb papers, and 
Civil War General Frederick Steel papers. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 201 

FOOD RESEARCH INSTITUTE LIBRARY. (94305). 321-2300, ext. 2012. 

M-F, 8-5. Charles C. Milford, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2.36 others. Vols: 10,489. Per subs: 580. Pams: 25,000. 

Special subject: Agricultural change and economic development in less-developed countries. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, J. HUGH JACKSON LIBRARY. 

(94305). 321-2300, ext. 2161. M-Th, 7:50-11; F, 7:50-10; S, 8-^; Sun, 1-10. Mrs. Marion M. 
Smith, Libn. 

Staff: 8.8 libns, 19.6 others. Vols: 174,796. Pams & docs: 7,692. Per subs: 4,927. Micro hldgs: 151,932. 
Special collections: Favre Collection of Economic History of the Pacific Northwest; historical archives 
of several industries. 

HOOVER INSTITUTION ON WAR, REVOLUTION AND PEACE LI- 



BRARY. (94305). 

LAW LIBRARY. (94305). 321-2300, ext. 2477. J. Myron Jacobstein, Libn. 

Staff: 21. Vols: 210,000. Vols added: 8,500. Per subs: 2,020. Own classification. 

MEDICAL CENTER, LANE MEDICAL LIBRARY. (94305). 

STOCKTON (San Joaquin Co.) Area Code 209 

CALIFORNIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, DIVISION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DISTRICT 10 LIBRARY. 1976 E. Charter Way (95206). 

DAMERON HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 525 W. Acacia St. (95207). 466-2611, ext. 118. 

Open 24 hours daily. 
Vols: 300. Per subs: 20. 

HUMPHREYS COLLEGE LIBRARY. 6650 Inglewood Ave. (95207). 

ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL, DOCTORS LIBRARY AND MEDICAL STAFF LIBRARY. 

1800 N. California St. (95204). 466-4811. Open daily, 24 hours. 

Vols: 300. Per subs: 20. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, R. 300 (95202). 944-2208. Irene 
A. McCall, Libn. 

SAN JOAQUIN DELTA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 3301 Kensington Way (95204) 466-2631, 
ext. 268. M-Th, 8-9:30; F, 8-5. Allan R. Laursen, Libn. 

Vols: 50,086. Micro hldgs: 6,525 reels. Per subs: 595. 

Inc: $180,992. Exp: Sal: $142,336. Bks: $22,064. Per: $6,491. AV: $543. Bd: $827. Other: $8,728. 

SAN JOAQUIN PIONEER AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, ALMEDA MAY CASTLE 
PETZINGER LIBRARY. 1201 N. Pershing Ave. (95203). T-S, 8-^5 (by appointment). 
David J. Hampton, Libn. 

Staff: 2 Ubns, 2 others. Vols: 5,400. Per subs: 52. 

Special subjects and collections: Farm machinery manufacture in Stockton; V.Covert Martin Photo 
Collection; Caterpillar Track-Type Tractor; Bert Whitman editorial cartoons; Stockton, California 
and Western history; local biography; agricultural technology of the San Joaquin Valley; Stockton 
business and industry; Ralph Yardley drawings of early Stockton history. 

STOCKTON RECORD LIBRARY. 530 E. Market (P.O. Box 900) (95201) . 466-2652, ext. 
296. M-F, 7:30-5; S, 7-3. Dorothy M. Frankhouse, Libn. 

Staff: 3 Ubns. Vols: 250. 

STOCKTON-SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY LIBRARY. 605 N. El Dorado St. (95202). 944- 
8415. Ursula Meyer, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Lodi, Stockton. Contracts with: Amador County, Calaveras County. 

Outlets: 123. 
Branches: Fair Oaks, Manteca, Southeast, Tracy. 
Stations: Central Fire Station, County Jail — Men, Covmty Jail — ^Women, Escalon, Honor Farm, Larch 

Clover Neighborhood, Linden, Mary Graham Hall, Peterson Hall, Project Identity, Rest Homes 

(6) , Ripon, Senior Citizens (3) , Summer Camps (3) , Thornton. 
Bookmobile stops: 94 (62 community, 32 school) . 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Religion, history, recordings. 
Member, 49-99 Cooperative Library System. 



202 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

STOCKTON— Continued 

STOCKTON STATE HOSPITAL, PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY. 510 E. Magnolia 

(95202). 948-7181. M-F, 8-4:30. Mrs. Elizabeth B. Huxtable, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 7,200 (incl bd. journals) . Per subs: 204. Micro hldgs: 151. Audio tapes: 125. 
Special subjects: Psychiatry, community mental health, mental retardation. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

STOCKTON STATE HOSPITAL, RESIDENTS' LIBRARY. 510 E. Magnolia (95202) . M, 
W, F, 9:30-11:30, 1:30-^:30; T, Th, 1^:30. Mrs. Yvonne L. Erb. Libn. 

Staff: 1. Vols: 6,000. Per subs: 50. Recordings: 1,800. 

UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC LIBRARY. (95204). 946-2431. M-Th, 8-11; F, 8-5; S, 
9-5; Sun, 1-11. James A. Riddles, Libn. 

Vols: 278,300. Micro hldgs: 115,200. Per subs: 4,100. 

Inc: $512,483. Exp: Sal: $291,790. Bks: $125,000. Per: $45,000. AV: $6,710. Bd: $12,500. Other: $12,500. 

Special subjects: India, pharmacy, Latin America. Special collections: Western Americana, John Muir, 

Shutes Lincoln Collection, Spanish language library. 
Branches: Music, Education, Law, Medicine. 

SUISUN CITY (Solano Co.) Area Code 707 

SOLANO COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. P.O. Box 246 (94585) . 422-4750. M-Th, 
7:30-9:30; F, 7:30-4:30. John Jackson, Libn. 

Vols: 21,000. Bd per: 2,000. Micro hldgs: 300 reels. Per subs: 300. 
Exp: Sal: $50,000. Bks: $38,407. Per: $4,000. Bd: $650. 

SUNNYVALE (Santa Clara Co.) Area Code 408 

ADVANCED MICRO DEVICES, INC., LIBRARY. 901 Thompson Place (94086). 732- 
2400, ext. 339. M-F, 8-5. Gerda Westendorf, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 3 others. Vols: 300. Tech reports: 250. Per subs: 150. 
Special subject: Semiconductor technology. 

BARNES-HIND PHARMACEUTICALS, INC., TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 895 Kifer Rd. 
(94086) . 736-5462, ext. 255. M-F, 8:30-5. Mrs. Dellene A. Mercer, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 7,000. Tech reports: 3,000. Per subs: 350. 
Special subjects: Ophthalmology, dermatology. 

CONTROL DATA CORPORATION LIBRARY. 215 Moffett Park Dr. (94086). ESL 
INC., RESEARCH LIBRARY. 495 Java Dr. (94086). 734-2244, ext. 295. M-F, 8-12, 1-5. 
Vema Van Velzer, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 3,500. Tech reports: 4,000. Per subs: 250. Micro hldgs: 50. 

Special subjects: Electronics, environmental controls, computers, geophysics, telecommunications. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, BREEDER REACTOR DEPT., TECHNICAL LI- 
BRARY. 310 DeGuigne Dr. (94086). 297-3000, ext. 393. Joellen Lashbrook, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 775. Tech reports: 15,000. Per subs: 90. Micro hldgs: 12,000. 
Special subjects: Sodium technology, liquid metal fast breeder reactors. 

PROBE SYSTEMS INC. LIBRARY. 655 N. Pastoria Ave. (94086) . 732-6550, ext. 26. M-F, 
8:30-5. Mrs. Patricia L. Horn, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 700. Tech reports and reprints: 700. Per subs: 12. 

STAUFFER CHEMICAL COMPANY, AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER LI- 
BRARY. 1195 W. Fremont Ave. (94087) (P.O. Box 760, Mountain View 94042). 739-0551, 
ext. 36. M-F, 8-12, 12:30-4:30. Mrs. Adrienne Louise Lohr, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 3,500. Tech reports: 200. Per subs: 180. Micro hldgs: 180 reels. 

Special subjects: Chemistry (analytical, biological, organic); entomology (incl. insect pest control); 
botany (plant pathology, plant physiology); agriculture (incl. agricultural chemicals); horticul- 
ture; weed control; enviromnent (ecology, pollution, pesticides and public health) . 

SUNNYVALE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 665 W. Olive Ave. (94086). 245-9171. Philip G. 
Morales, Libn. 

Outlets: 40 (39 community bookmobile stops) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classifica- 
tion. 

Special collections: Patent library. Philatelic Library, Califomiana, art collection, business and technol- 
ogy collection, large print books. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 203 

Trustees: Mrs. Winifred Therien, Frank M. Holly, Mrs. Madeline Morgin, Mrs. Jacqueline Frewin, 

Jerrold Oldani. 
Member, Camino Real Library System. 

UNITED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION— UNITED TECHNOLOGY CENTER DIVI- 
SION, LIBRARY SERVICES. 1050 E. Arques Ave. (P.O. Box 358) (94088) . 739-4880, ext. 
2563. M-F, 8-4:45. Harold E. Wilcox, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 7,000. Tech reports: 15,000. Per subs: 290. Special subjects: Chemical 
propulsion, solid rocket motors. 

SUSAN VILLE (Lassen Co.) Area Code 916 

CALIFORNIA CONSERVATION CENTER LIBRARY. P.O. Box 790 (96130) . 257-2183, 
ext. 357. M, Th, F, 12:30-9. S, Sun, 8-^:30. John Martinez, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 5 others. Vols: 7,000. Per subs: 50. 

LASSEN COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. P.O. Box 3000 (96130). 257-4101. M-F, 
8-9. W. Russell Rose, Jr., Libn. 

Vols: 11,000. Bd per: 75. Micro hldgs: 105. Per subs: 105. 

Exp: Sal: $17,000. Bks: $8,000. Per: $1,700. AV: $1,000. Equipment: $20,000. 

LASSEN COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. Courthouse Annex (96130). 257-5547. Mrs. EK- 
zabeth Ann Hallum, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Contracts with: Herlong Sierra Ordnance Depot. Outlets: 11. 

Stations: Bieber (Big Valley), Doyle, Herlong, Janesville, Madeline, Milford, Ravendale, Standish, 

Wendel, Westwood. 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

LASSEN COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, Lassen St. (96130) . 257-3426. Helen E. 
Smith, Libn. 

TAFT (Kern Co.) Area Code 805 
TAFT COLLEGE LIBRARY. 29 Emmons Park Dr. (93268). 

TEHACHAPI (Kern Co.) Area Code 805 

CALIFORNIA CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION. P.O. Box 1031 (93561) . 822-4402, ext. 
420. M-F, 9-11, 1-3:30; S, Sun, 9-11:30. Ron Tuculet, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 15 others. Vols: 21,730. Per subs: 25. 

TERRA LINDA (Marin Co.) Area Code 415 

LESTER GORSLINE ASSOCIATES LIBRARY. 1050 Northgate (P.O. Box 6276) (94903) . 
472-3213, ext. 46. M-F, 8:30-5:30. Peggy Johnson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 1,500. Tech reports: 200. Per subs: 100. Special subjects: Plaiming, health 
plaiming, architecture, higher education. 

THOUSAND OAKS (Ventura Co.) Area Code 805 

CALIFORNIA LUTHERAN COLLEGE LIBRARY. (91360). 

LOS ROBLES HOSPITAL, MEDICAL STAFF UBRARY. 215 W. Janss Rd. (91360). 
497-2727, ext. 553. M-F, 8-5. Antoinette Pepitone, Medical Staff Secretary. 

Vols: 480. Per subs: 34. Audio Digest tapes: 125. 

ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER LIBRARY. 1049 Camino Dos 
Rios (P.O. Box 1085) (91360) . 498-4545, ext. 285. M-F, 8:30-5. Margaret R. Anderson, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, IVi others. Vols: 16,900. Tech reports: 4,000. Per subs: 331. 

Special subjects: Air poUution monitoring and chemistry; structural materials; physics; chemistry; solid 

state electronics. 
Member, TIE. 

TORRANCE (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

GARRETT CORPORATION, AIRSEARCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY, TECH- 
NICAL LIBRARY. 2525 W. 190th St. (90509). 323-9500, ext. 2255. M-F, 8-4:30 (not open 
to public) . Mrs. Yvonne Millar, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 1 other. 

Vols: 12,000. Tech reports: 100,000 paper, 25,000 fiche. Per subs: 475. 



204 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

TORRANCE— Continued 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY HARBOR GENERAL HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 
1000 W. Carson St. (90509). 328-2380, ext. 1505. M-F, 8-10; S, 10-3; Sun, 1-5. Mrs. E. 
Goodchild, Libn. 

Staff: IVa libns, 5 others. Vols: 17,000. Per subs: 600. Micro hldgs: 498. Tapes & cassettes: 950. 

MAGNA VOX RESEARCH LABORATORIES LIBRARY. 2829 Maricopa St. (90503). 
328-0770, ext. 293. M-F, 8-12, 1-5. Cecilia Fontana, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 1,300. Tech reports: 4,500. Per subs: 105. 

SHELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, ELASTOMERS TECHNICAL CENTER, LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 211 (90509). 323-3030, ext. 361. M-F, 8:30-4:30. Jean Richards, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 3,000+. Tech reports: 2,000+. Per subs: 150+ . 
Special subject: Polymers, esp. elastomers. 

TORRANCE PUBLIC UBRARY. 3301 Torrance Blvd. (90503). 328-2251. Russell J. 

West, Libn. 

Contracts with: Los Angeles County. Reciprocal agreement with: City of Los Angeles Public Library, 

Inglewood Public Library. Outlets: 7 (6 branches) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal 

classtBcation. 
Trustees: John Lankford, Mrs. Claire Crain, John Mosley, James Pierson, James Rea, Mrs. Barbara 

Werre, Mrs. Teresa Covey. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

TRACY (San Joaquin Co.) Area Code 209 

DEUEL VOCATIONAL INSTITUTION LIBRARY. P.O. Box 400 (95376). Calvin 
Tomlinson, Libn. 

TRAVIS AIR FORCE BASE (Solano Co.) Area Code 707 

BASE UBRARY, FL 4427, 60 ABGP/SSL/96. (94535) . 438-3347. M-F, 10-9; S, 12-8; Sun, 
1-6. Hollis M. Edwards, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 6 others. Vols: 39,691. Per subs: 280. 
Special subjects: Military; Black literature. 

DAVID GRANT USAF MEDICAL CENTER, MEDICAL LIBRARY. (94535). M-F, 
8-^. Ann Robertson, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 7,000. Per subs: 217. 
Member, PSRMLS. 

TULARE (Tulare Co.) Area Code 209 

TULARE PUBLIC UBRARY. 113 N. F St. (93274). 686-0083. Mrs. Louise Longan, 
Library Director. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Genealogical and local history collection, Bancroft works. 

Trustees: Ned Kehrli, Mrs. Harry Richmond, Mrs. H. C. Schumacher, Bill Silveira, Jr., Mrs. Chloe 

Winston. 
Member, San Joaquin Valley Library System. 

TURLOCK (Stanislaus Co.) Area Code 209 

CAUFORNIA STATE COLLEGE, STANISLAUS, LIBRARY. 800 Monte Vista Ave. 
(95380). 634-9101. M-Th, 7:30-10; F, 7:30-5; S, 9-5; Sun, 1-9. R. Dean Galloway, Libn. 

vols: 127,044. Bd per: 5,921. Micro hldgs: 3,743 reels newspapers; 4,846 reels periodicals; 137,355 fiche 

or cards. Per subs: 1,666. 
Inc: $469,175. Exp: Sal: $261,000. Bks: $172,000. Per: $33,800. Bd: $1,500. 
Special collections: Syriac Collection, local history (limited to Merced, Mariposa, Stanislaus, Tuolumne, 

San Joaquin, Calaveras Counties) . 

TWENTYNINE PALMS (San Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 

MARINE CORPS BASE LIBRARY. Bldg. 1528 (92278) . 367-9111, ext. 6875. M, W-Sun, 
11-10. 

Staff: 4. Vols: 17,500. Per subs: 63. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 205 

UKIAH (Mendocino Co.) Area Code 707 

MENDOCINO COLLEGE LIBRARY. P.O. Box 3000 (95482) . 462-0571. M-F, 8-^. Mrs. 
Lelia Cassidy, Libn. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, Rm. 206 (95482). 462-2258. 
Myma L. Oglesby, Libn. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY LIBRARY. 105 N. Main (95482). 462-1984. Norman E. Hal- 
lam, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Willits. Outlets: 33. 

Branch: Fort Bragg. 

Station: Mendocino Study Club Library. 

Bookmobile stops: 30 (26 community, 4 school) . 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Forestry, life sciences. 

Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

UNIVERSAL CITY (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

UNIVERSAL CITY STUDIOS, RESEARCH DEFT. LIBRARY. 100 Universal City Plaza 
(91608). 985-4321, ext. 2493. M-F, 8:30-6. R. Andrew Lee, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn., 3 others. Vols.: 12,000. Per. subs.: 72. Pictorial clippings: 3,500 VF. 
Special subjects: American West, art and architecture, Americana, history, costume, biography, wars, 
literature, film history, reference. 

UPLAND (San Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 

UPLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY. 450 N. Euclid Ave. (91786). 982-1561. Kathy Bemath, 
Acting Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Mrs. Edward W. NoveU, Ray Simpson, John McCarthy, Mrs. Thomas Lucero, Richard Riley. 

Member, Inland Library System. 

UPPER LAKE (Lake Co.) Area Code 707 

UPPER LAKE LIBRARY DISTRICT LIBRARY. Second and Main Sts. (mailing: P.O. 
Box 486) (95485). 275-2049. Mrs. Betty E. Lowe, Library Clerk. 

Trustees: Emma Starmer, Geneva Neil, George Jorgensen, Warren D. Abels, L. T. Doney. 

VACAVILLE (Solano Co.) Area Code 707 
CALIFORNIA MEDICAL FACILITY LIBRARY. (95688) . Andrew H. Dykstra, Libn. 

VACAVILLE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT LIBRARY DISTRICT LIBRARY. 680 

Merchant St. (95688). 448-2093. M. Grady Zimmerman, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Harrie Griffin, Jr., Carleton Johnson, Ernest Burton, Dolores Skinner, Keimeth Hales. 

Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

VALENCIA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 805 

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF THE ARTS LIBRARY. 24700 McBean Parkway (91355). 
255-1050. M-Th, 11-9; F, 11-5; Sun, noon to 6. Elizabeth Armstrong, Libn. 

Vols: 49,324. Bd per: 3,020. Micro hldgs: 4,442. Per subs: 627. 

Inc: $289,335. Exp: Sal: $166,684. Bks: $49,062. Per: $8,720. AV: $11,626. Bd: $4,190. Supplies and services: 

$49,058. 
Special subjects: Art, dance, design, film, music, theatre. Special collection: Women artists. 

COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS, INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCE CENTER. 25000 W. 
Valencia Blvd. (91355). 259-7800. M-Th, 8-9; F, 8-1:30. D. Joleen Bock, Libn. 

Vols: 21,567. Micro hldgs: 26,458. Per subs: 277. 

Inc: $126,539. Exp: Sal: $68,720. Bks: $28,500. Per: $3,500. AV: $3,800. Bd: $1,500. Other: $13,319. 

VALLEJO (Solano Co.) Area Code 707 

BROADWAY HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 525 Oregon St. (94590) . 643-8626, ext. 
261. 7 a.m.-midnight. Peggy Jane Meeker, R.R.A. 

Vols: 250. Per subs: 16. 



206 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

VALLEJO — Continued 
Member, PSRMLS. 

CALIFORNIA MARITIME ACADEMY LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1392 (94590) . 642-4404, ext. 
71. M-Th, 10-9:30; F, 10-6. Paul W. O'Bannon, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn., 5 others. Vols.: 14,000. Tech. reports: 200. Per. subs.: 150. Micro, hldgs.: 200. 
Special subjects: Ships and shipping, marine engineering, navigation, naval architecture, maritime 
history. 

MARE ISLAND NAVAL SHIPYARD, TECHNICAL LIBRARY. Code 202.3, Stop T-71 
(94592). 646-4306. M-F, 7:30-^. Mary T. Handley, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols.: 10,000. Tech. reports: 10,000. Per. subs.: 350. Micro, hldgsr.: 5,000. 
Special subjects: Chemistry; electrical, mechanical and nuclear engineering; naval architecture; ma- 
rine engineering. 

NAVAL SUPPORT ACTIVITY, RODMAN UBRARY, CODE 41B P-46. (94592). 646- 
3338. M-Th, 10-9; F, 10-5; Sun, 1-9. Mrs. Otome I. Andrews, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn., 4 others. Vols.: 18,500. Per. subs.: 92. 
Special subject: Naval history. 

VALLEJO PUBUC UBRARY. 505 Santa Clara St. (mailing: P.O. Box 272) (94590). 
691-1010. Mrs. Josephine M. Becker, Libn. 

Outlets: 42 (1 branch, 40 community bookmobile stops) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal 

classification. 
Special collections: Fine printing, fishing, local history, Vallejo and Solano County memorabilia. 
Trustees: Richard Wanger, Kenneth H. Macdonald, Rev. V. J. Lawhom, Mrs. Herbert L. Joseph, 

Robert E. Whyte. 
Member, North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE (Santa Barbara Co.) Area Code 805 

HEADQUARTERS SPACE AND MISSILE TEST CENTER, TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 
(93437). 866-5519. M-F, 7:45-^:45. Claudia Jakobeit, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns. Vols: 6,412. Tech reports: 4,213. Per subs: 140. 

U.S. AIR FORCE HOSPITAL, VANDENBERG, MEDICAL UBRARY. (93437). 866- 

4376. M-F, 8-5. 

Vols: 1,325. Per subs: 125. 

Special subject: Medicine. 

Member, PSRMLS. 

VAN NUYS (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

BIO SCIENCE LABORATORY LIBRARY. 7600 Tyrone Ave. (91405) . 989-2520, ext. 271. 
M-F, 8:30-5:30. Dr. I. OUtzky, Library Administrator; Mary F. Judy, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 1 other. Vols: 5,000. Per subs, 169. 

Special subjects: Clinical chemistry, clinical microbiology, clinical endrocrinology, clinical pathology; 
business management. 

CARNATION COMPANY RESEARCH LABORATORIES LIBRARY. 8015 Van Nuys 
Blvd. (91412). 787-7820, ext. 253. M-F, 8-4:45. Mrs. Helen V. Hall, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn, 2 others. Vols: 5,044. Per subs: 200. 

Special subjects: Agriculture and dairy, biochemistry, biological science, chemistry and chemical 
engineering, foods and nutrition. 

LOS ANGELES VALLEY COLLEGE UBRARY. 5800 Fulton Ave. (91401). 781-1200. 
M-Th, 7:45-10; F, 7:45-^; S, 10-4; Sun, 3-9. Marjorie F. Knapp, Libn. 

Vols: 99,160. Bd per: 230. Micro hldgs: 2,364 reels. Per subs: 809. 

Inc: $4455, 691. Esp: Sal: $312,617. Bks: $74,909. Per: $23,440. AV: $16,221. Bd: $3,118. Other $22,278. 
Special subjects: Mexican American studies, Jewish studies, Afro- American studies, anthropology, art, 
psychology, nursing. 

VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL, LIBRARY FOR MEDICAL AND HEALTH 
SCIENCES. 15107 Vanowen St. (91405) . 782-6600, ext. 216. M-F, 8:15-4:45. Olga T. Kallos, 
Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols: 3,000. Per subs: 180. 






Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 207 

VENTURA (Ventura Co.) Area Code 805 

VENTURA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 4667 Telegraph Rd. (93003). 

VENTURA COUNTY AND CITY LIBRARY. 651 E. Main St. (93001). 648-6131. Mrs. 
Catherine S. Chadwick, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Oxnard, Santa Paula School District (includes the city of Santa Paula) . 

Reciprocal agreement with: Oxnard. Affiliated with: E. P. Foster, H. P. Wright Libraries. 
Outlets: 46. Branches: Camarillo, Conejo, Oak View, Ojai, Port Hueneme, Simi Valley. 
Stations: Avenue, El Rio, Fillmore, Moorpark, Meiners Oaks, Saticoy, Somis. 
Bookmobile stops: 30. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Local California history, books in Braille, large print books. 
Member, Black Gold Cooperative Library System. 

VENTURA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY, INC., VENTURA COUNTY PIONEER 
MUSEUM LIBRARY. 77 N. California St. (93001). 

VENTURA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 522 E. Main St. (93001). 648-6131, ext. 2695. 
Naydean L. Baker, Libn. 

VERNON (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

VERNON CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 4305 Santa Fe Ave. (90058) . 583-1666. Mrs. Rita M. 
Luich, Libn. 

Trustees: R. J. Furlong, Mrs. G. H. Anderson, T. A. Ybarra, L. C. Malburg, Mrs. Martha Tavemelli. 

VICTORVILLE (San Bernardino Co.) Area Code 714 

VICTOR VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 18422 Bear Valley Rd. 
(92392). 245-4271. M-Th, 8:30-9:30; F, 8:30-5. Geraldine Bergan, Libn. 

Vols: 23,871. Bd per: 2,317. Micro hldgs: 69. Per subs: 494. 

Exp: Sal: $39,088. Bks: $7,363. Per: $6,248. AV: $9,111. Bd: $1,771. Other: $1,351. 

VISAUA (Tulare Co.) Area Code 209 

COLLEGE OF THE SEQUOIAS LIBRARY. 915 S. Mooney Blvd. (93277) . 732-4711, ext. 
75. M-Th, 7:45-9:15; F, 7:45-4:15; S, 10-3. Lewis J. Walker, Libn. 

Vols: 57,151. Bd per: 4,025. Micro hldgs: 859. Per subs: 560. 

Inc: $123,167. Exp: Sal: $56,730. Bks: $24,384. Per: $6,136. Bd: $623. Other: $32,598. 

TULARE COUNTY FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Rm. 10, Courthouse (93277). 732-5511. 
Mrs. Oloanne Dykeman Palen, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Porterville, Tulare, Visalia. 

Outlets: 64 

Stations: Alpaugh, Dinuba, Ducor, Earlimart, Exeter, Farmersville, Goshen, Grant Grove, Ivanhoe, 
Johnsondale, Lindsay, Lodgepole, Mt. Home, Orosi, Panorama Heights, Pixley, Poplar, Springville, 
Strathmore, Terra Bella, Three Rivers, Tipton, Woodlake, Woodville, Woodville F.W.C. 

Bookmobile stops: 38 (19 community, 19 school. Total increases to 61 in summer). 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collection: Tulare County Historical Society collection. 

Member, San Joaquin Valley Library System. 

TULARE COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, Rm. 305 (93277). 

VISALIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 200 W. Oak (93277) . 734-2011, ext. 388. Arthur J. Stobbe, 
Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal, Library of Congress classifications. 

Special collections: Tulareana, CaMomiana, cook books, science fiction, flowers and horticulture, city 

directories. 
Trustees: Richard Clore, Arthur J. Stobbe, Gareth W. Houk, Jr., Carl W. Walters, Patricia Clevenger, 

Nat O. Bradley. 
Member, San Joaquin Valley Library System. 



208 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

WALNUT (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

MT. SAN ANTONIO COLLEGE, EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES LIBRARY CENTER. 
1100 N. Grand Ave. (91789). 595-2211, 339-7331. M-Th, 7:30-10; F, 7:30-5. Harriett Ge- 
nung, Dean. 

Vols: 95,755. Bd per: 10,350. Micro hldgs: 4,156. Per subs: 897. 

Inc: $622,884. Exp: Sal: $438,485. Bks: $52,829. Per: $15,130. AV: $71,497. Bd: $710. Other: $44,232. 

WALNUT CREEK (Contra Costa Co.) Area Code 415 

DEL MONTE CORPORATION RESEARCH CENTER, TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 205 
N. Wiget Lane (94598). 933-8000, ext. 235. M-F, 8:30-4:30. Mrs. Kay Leddon, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols.: 3,950. Tech. reports: 7,400. Per. subs.: 120. 

Special subjects: Food science, packaging, nutrition, chemistry, microbiology. 

DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY LIBRARY. 2800 Mitchell Dr. (94598) . 933-3100, ext. 260. 
M-F, 7:30-4. Marian Wickline, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns., 2 others. Vols.: 20,500. Per. subs.: 425. 

WATSONVILLE (Santo Cruz Co.) Area Code 408 

WATSONVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 310 Union St. (95076). 724-4438. Mrs. Seely 
Sumpf, Libn. 

Contracts with: Santa Cruz County. Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Aviation, Spanish language. 

Trustees: Mrs. Philip T. Boyle, Mrs. Ivan T. Christie, Martin J. Franich, C. James Mehl, Mrs. J. Arthur 

Rodger s. ^ 

Member, Monterey Bay Area Cooperative Library System. 

WEAVERVILLE (Trinity Co.) Area Code 916 

TRINITY COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. Main St. (mailing: P.O. Drawer AB) (96093). 
623-6182. Mrs. Doris A. Clement, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Reciprocal agreement with: Lewiston School District, Mad River Joint School 

District, Trinity County Joint Union High School District. Outlets: 10. 
Stations: Denny, Hayfork, Hyampom, Lewiston, Ruth, Trinity Center, Trinity County Convalescent 

Hospital, Van Duzen, Zenia. 
Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collection: Trinity County history. 
Member, North State Cooperative Library System. 

TRINITY COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Drawer "R" (96093). 623-2451. 

WEED (Siskiyou Co.) Area Code 916 

COLLEGE OF THE SISKIYOUS LIBRARY. 800 College Ave. (96094) . 938-4463. M-Th, 
8-i:30, 6:30-10; F, 8-4:30. Huldah C. Seed, Libn. 

Vols.: 20,500. Bd. per.: 700. Micro, hldgs.: 200. Per. subs.: 200. 

Inc.: $16,000. Exp.: Sal.: $27,000. Bks.: $15,000. Per.: $2,500. AV: $900. Bd.: $600. Other: $1,792. 

WEST COVINA (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

HONEYWELL, INC. MARINE SYSTEMS DIVISION, CALIFORNIA CENTER, 
TECHNICAL UBRARY. 1200 E. San Bernardino Rd. (91790). 331-0011, ext. 296. M-F, 
7:45-4:30. Linda McLaughlin, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols.: 2,100. Tech. reports: 5,000. Per. subs.: 165. Micro, hldgs.: 200 fiche, 125 rolls film. 
Special subjects: Acoustics, electrical engineering, oceanology, sonar, underwater warfare. 

WESTMINSTER (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 
WESTMINSTER COMMUNITY HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 200 Hospital Cir- 
cle (92683). 

WHITTIER (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 
PRESBYTERIAN INTERCOMMUNITY HOSPITAL, ANNA SIEGRIST MEDICAL 
STAFF LIBRARY. 12401 E. Washington Blvd. (90602). 698-0811, ext. 414. M-F, 8-5. 
Gregory B. Shapton, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn. Vols.: 600. Per. subs.: 23. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 209 

RIO HONDO COLLEGE LIBRARY. 3600 Workman Mill Rd. (90608) . 692-0921, ext. 277. 
M-Th, 8-9; F, 8-4:30. Mickey M. Sparkman, Libn. 

Vols.: 49,200. Bd. per.: 194. Micro, hldgs.: 18,621 microfiche; 320 microform. Per. subs.: 570. 
Exp.: Sal.: $176,005. Bks.: $47,872. Per.: $5,835. Bd.: $250. 

WHITTIER COLLEGE, WARDMAN LIBRARY. (90608) . 693-0771, ext. 223. M-Th, 8-11; 
F, 8-7; S, 9-5; Sun, 1-10. Philip M. O'Brien, Libn. 

Vols: 108,905. Bd per: 21,182. Micro hldgs: 7,329. Per subs: 800. 

Inc: $192,611. Exp: Sal.: $75,932. Bks: $69,054. Per: $23,398. Bd: $6,297. Microprint: $1,555. 

Special collections: YMCA, Society of Friends (Quakers), John Greenleaf Whittier, Jessamyn West 

(manuscripts) . 
Branch: Science Library. 

WHITTIER PUBLIC LIBRARY. 7344 Washington Ave. (90602) . 698-8181. June E. Bay- 
less, Libn. 

Contracts with: Los Angeles County. Outlets: 2 (1 branch). Copying service for patrons. Dewey 

Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Whittier and California history, large print books. 
Trustees: Mrs. Vernon Hodge, Mrs. Paul A. Duich, Robert G. Chapman, Harry H. Green, Mrs. Harry 

D. Krummel. 
Member, Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. 

WILLITS (Mendocino Co.) Area Code 707 

WILLITS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 85 E. Commercial St. (mailing: P.O. Box 909) (95490). 
459-5908. Mrs. Lucille L. Elliott, Libn. 

Contracts with: Little Lake Valley, LaytonviUe, Covelo. Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal 

classification. 
Special collection: Northern California books. 
Trustees: Leonard Strathman, Nora Hope, Cynthia Frey, Edward Mills, Jane Gibson. 

WILLOWS (Glenn Co.) Area Code 916 

GLENN COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 526 W. Sycamore St. (95988) . M-F, 8-5. George W. 
Otterson, Libn. 

WILLOWS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 201 N. Lassen (95988). 934-5156. Mrs. Bonnie M. Ar- 
bogast, Libn. 

Contracts with: Glenn County, to give service to southern part. 

Outlets: 4 (3 stations) . Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Joseph W. Sites, Mrs. W. H. Sexsmith, John F. Wallin, Mrs. Jack Ewing, Mrs. Clark Knowles. 

Member, North State Cooperative Library System. 

WILMINGTON (Los Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

LOS ANGELES HARBOR COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1111 Figureroa Place (90744). 835- 
0161. M-Th, 7:30-9:30; F, 7:30-^:30. Camille L. Baxter, Libn. 

Vols.: 56,500. Bd. per.: 1,758. Micro, hldgs.: 1,575. Per. subs.: 638. 

Inc.: $195,625. Exp.: Sal.: $120,873. Bks.: $33,000. Per.: $9,367. AV: $10,501. Bd.: $1,327. Other: $725. 

Special subject: Local history. 

WOODLAND (Yolo Co.) Area Code 916 

WOODLAND CLINIC MEDICAL GROUP, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 1207 Fairchild Ct. 
(95695). 

WOODLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY. 250 First St. (95695) . 662-6616. Brandon McClintock, 
Acting Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Trustees: Mrs. Martha Hoppin, Kenneth E. Brown, Mrs. Ethel Bums, Harold Douglass, M. O. Santoni. 

Member, Mountain- Valley Library System. 

YOLO COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 535 Court St. (95695) . 666-8329. Ms. Mary L. Ste- 
phens, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county except Woodland. Outlets: 25. 
Branches: Davis, West Sacramento. 

Stations: Clarksburg, Elkhom Village, Esparto, Knights Landing, Winters, Yolo. 
I Bookmobile stops: 16 (10 community, 6 school. Total increases to 19 in summer). 

8 — 85403 



210 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

WOODLAND— Continued 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Adult and juvenile Spanish books, California history, Henry James. 

Member, Mountain- Valley Library System. 

YOLO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (95695). 666-8357. M-F, 8-6. Carol J. 
Hoffman, Secretary. 

WOODLAND HILLS (Lot Angeles Co.) Area Code 213 

LOS ANGELES PIERCE COLLEGE LIBRARY. 6201 Winnetka Ave. (91364) . 347-0551. 
M-Th, 7:45-10; F, 7:45^; S, 9-1. William R. Madden, Libn. 

Per.: 78,438. Bd. per.: 200. Micro, hldgs.: 3,580 microfihn; 1,260 fiche. Per. subs.: 866. 
Exp.: Sal.: $190,000. Bks.: $47,000. Per.: $11,000. AV: $15,000. 
Special subjects: Humanities, computer science, agricultural science, nursing. 
Special collections: Califomia and local history, agriculture. 

LOS ANGELES UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT, WEST VALLEY OCCUPATIONAL 
CENTER LIBRARY. 6200 Winnetka Ave. (91364) . 346-3540, ext. 22. M-Th, 8-10; F, 8-4. 
Iris Hoblit, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn, 1 other. Vols: 7,200. Per subs: 193. Also films, filmstrips, audiotapes, transparencies, slides. 
Special subjects: Occupations, technology. 

MOTION PICTURE AND TELEVISION HOSPITAL, JUDY GARLAND LIBRARY. 

23388 MulhoUand Dr. (91464) . 347-1591. M-F, 8-4:30. Mrs. Carolyn Leo, Libn. 

Staff: 1 Ubn, 1 other. Vols: 316. Per subs: 45. Audio digest cassettes. Member, PSRMLS. 

YORBA LINDA (Orange Co.) Area Code 714 

YORBA LINDA LIBRARY DISTRICT LIBRARY. 18262 Lemon Dr. (92686). 528-7039. 
Mrs. Katherine T. Citizen, Libn. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 
Special collections: Local history, Orange County history, Cahfomiana. 
Trustees: Mrs. Ralph Shook, John Carson, John Hyma, Harold Van Patten. 
Member, Santiago Library System. 

YOUNTVILLE (Napa Co.) Area Code 707 

VETERANS HOME OF CALIFORNIA, LINCOLN MEMORIAL LIBRARY. (94599). 
944-2422, ext. 279. Daily, 9-9. June A. Clunie, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns, 10 others. Vols: 22,197. Per subs: 122. Large print bks: 660. 

YREKA (Siskiyou Co.) Area Code 916 

SISKIYOU COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse, 311 Fourth St. (96097) . 842-3531, ext. 
60. Mrs. Patricia A. Howard, Libn. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 719 Fourth St. (96097). 842-3531, ext. 20, 21; 
842-5256. Mrs. Thora Leoni, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. Contracts with: Portion of Modoc County. Alfilitated with: Etna. 

Oudets: 24. 

Stations: CecilviUe, Convalescent Hospital, Copco, Dorris, Dunsmuir, Edgewood, Forks of Salmon, 
Fort Jones, Happy Camp, Hilt, Hombrook, McCloud, Montague, Mt. Hebron-Macdoel, Mt. Shasta, 
Mt. Shasta Hospital, Sawyers Bar, Scott Bar, Somes Bar, Tulelake, Walker, Weed. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Special collections: Local history, religious and metaphysical books. 

Member, North State Cooperative Library System. 

YUBA CITY (Sutter Co.) Area Code 916 

SUTTER COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. Courthouse (95991) . 673-6544. Lillian R. Boss, Libn. 

SUTTER COUNTY LIBRARY. 750 Forbes Ave. (95991). 673-5773, 673-5774. Mrs. Sara 
Carter Swanney, Libn. 

Serves: Entire county. 

Outlets: 21. Stations: Barber, Browns, Meridian, Nicolaus, Pleasant Grove, Bobbins, Sutter. 

Bookmobile stops: 13. 

Copying service for patrons. Dewey Decimal classification. 

Member, Mountain-Valley Library System. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



211 



INDEX TO HEADQUARTERS, BRANCHES AND 
STATIONS OF COUNTY LIBRARIES 
ARRANGED BY PLACE 
The abbreviations indicate the nature of the county public library 
outlet. They are: Hq. — Headquarters; Br. — Branch; St. — Station. 

Not included are outlets with generic names (Fire Station, Juvenile 
Hall, etc.); these are, however, included in the county library listings 
in the Directory of California Libraries by Cities. 

Acton Rehab. Center, Los Angeles Co. St. 



Adelanto, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Adin, Modoc Co. St. 

Alba, Santa Cruz Co. St. 

Albany, Alameda Co. St. 

Alderpoint, Humboldt Co. St. 

Alleghany, Sierra Co. St 

Alondra, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Alpaugh, Tulare Co. St. 

Alpine, San Diego Co. St. 

Alturas, Modoc Co. Hq. 

Alum Rock, Santa Clara Co. Br. 

Amador City, Amador Co. St. 

An^sterdam, Merced Co. St. 

Anderson, Shasta Co. St 

Angelo M. lacoboni, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Angels Camp, Calaveras Co. St. 

Antioch, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Applegate, Aubum-Placer Co. St 

Apple Valley, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Aptos, Santa Cruz Co. St 

Arbuckle, Colusa Co. St 

Arcade, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Areata, Humboldt Co. St. 

Arden, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Arlington, Riverside Co. Br. 

Armona, Kings Co. Br. 

Arnold, Calaveras Co., St 

Aromas, Monterey Co. St 

Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo Co. Br. 

Artesia, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Arvin, Kern Co. St 

Atascadero, San Luis Obispo Co. Br. 

Atherton, San Mateo Co. Br. 

Atwater, Merced Co. St 

Auberry, Fresno Co. St 

Auburn, Aubum-Placer Co. Hq. 

Avalon, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Avenal, Kings Co. Br. 

Avenue, Ventura Co. St. 

Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo Co. St 

Bakersfield, Kern Co. Hq. 

Baker Street, Kern Co. Br 

Baldwin Park, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Ballico, Merced Co. St 

Banner Queen, San Diego Co. St 

Barber, Sutter Co. St 

Barstow, San Bernardino Co. Br. 

Bayliss, Glenn Co. St 

Bear Valley, Merced Co. St 

Beckwourth, Plumas Co. St. 

Belden, Plumas Co. St 

Bell, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Bellflower, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Bell Gardens, Los Angeles Co. St 



Belmont, San Mateo Co. Br. 

Belmont, San Mateo Co. Hq. 

Belridge, Kern Co. St. 

Belvedere, Los Angeles Co. St 

Belvedere-Tiburon, Marin Co. St 

Ben Lomond, Santa Cruz Co. St. 

Benton, Mono Co. St 

Bieber, Lassen Co. St 

Big Bear Lake, San Bernardino Co. Br. 

Big Creek, Fresno Co. St 

Big Creek #2, Fresno Co. St 

Biggs, Butte Co. St 

Big Pine, Inyo Co. St 

Big Sur, Monterey Co. St. 

Bishop, Inyo Co. St 

Blocksburg, Humboldt Co. St 

Bloomfield, Los Angeles Co, St 

Bloomington, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Blue Lake, Humboldt Co. St 

Bolinas, Marin Co. St. 

Bolsa, Orange Co. Br. 

Bonny Doon, Santa Cruz Co. St. 

Boron, Kern Co. St. 

Borrego Springs, San Diego Co. St. 

Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz Co. St 

Boyes, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. St. 

Bradley, Monterey Co. St 

Branciforte, Santa Cruz Co. Br. 

Brea, Orange Co. Br. 

Brentwood, Contra Costa Co. St 

Brentwood, Tehama Co. St 

Bridgeport, Mono Co. Hq. 

Brisbane, San Mateo Co. St. 

Broughton, Stanislaus Co. St. 

Browns, Sutter Co. St 

Bumey, Shasta Co. St 

Butte City, Glenn Co. St 

ButtonwUlow, Kern Co. St 

Byron, Contra Costa Co. St. 

Caliente, Kern Co. St 

California City, Kern Co. St. 

Calipatria, Imperial Co. St. 

Calpine, Sierra Co. St 

CamariUo, Ventura Co. Br. 

Cambria, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

Campbell, Santa Clara Co. Br. 

Campo, San Diego Co. St. 

Camp Owens, Kern Co. St 

Canby, Modoc Co. St. 

Canyon Country, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Capay, Glenn Co. St 

Capitola, Santa Cruz Co. St. 

Cardiff, San Diego Co. St 

Carmel Valley, Monterey Co. St. 

Carmichael, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Carpinteria, Santa Barbara Co. Br. 



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Carson, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Caruthers, Fresno Co. St. 

Casa Blanca, Riverside Co. St 

Casa de Oro, San Diego Co. Br. 

Castella, Shasta Co. St 

Castle Park, San Diego Co. St 

Castro Valley, Alameda Co. Br. 

Castroville, Monterey Co. St. 

Cathedral City, Riverside Co. St 

Cayucos, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

Cecilville, Siskiyou Co. Br. 

Cedarville, Modoc Co. St. 

Centerville, Alameda Co. St. 

Central Camp, Madera Co. St. 

Central Valley, Shasta Co. St 

Ceres, Stanislaus Co. St 

Chapman, Orange Co. Br. 

Charter Oak, Los Angeles Co. St 

Chester, Plumas Co. St. 

Chet Holilield, Los Angeles Co. St 

Chico, Butte Co. St 

Chilcoot, Plumas Co. St 

Chino, San Bernardino Co. Br. 

Chowchilla, Madera Co. Br. 

Christian Towers, Kern Co. St. 

Chualar, Monterey Co. St 

Citrus Heights, Sacramento Co. Br. 

City Terrace, Los Angeles Co. St 

Claremont, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Clarksburg, Yolo Co. St 

Clarks Fork, Kings Co. St 

Clipper Mills, Butte Co. St 

Cloverdale, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. Br. 

Clovis, Fresno Co. Br. 

Coachella, Riverside Co. St 

Colfax, Auburn-Placer Co. St 

Colusa, Colusa Co. Hq. 

Compton, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Concord, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Conejo, Ventura Co. Br. 

Cooledge, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Copco, Siskiyou Co. Br. 

Corcoran, Kings Co. Br. 

Corte Madera, Marin Co. Br. 

Costa Mesa, Orange Co. Br. 

Cottonwood, Shasta Co. St 

Courtland, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Cressey, Merced Co. St. 

Crestline, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Creston, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

Crockett, Contra Costa Co. St 

Cucamonga-Alta Loma, San Bernardino Co. St 

Cudahy, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Culver City, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Cupertino, Santa Clara Co. Br. 

Cypress, Orange Co. Br. 

Dana Point, Orange Co. Br. 

Davis, Yolo Co. Br. 

Davis Creek, Modoc Co. St 

Delano, Kern Co. Br. 

Delhi, Merced Co. St 

Del Mar, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Del Mar, San Diego Co. Br. 

Del Paso, Sacramento Co. Br. 



Denair, Stanislaus Co. St 

Denny, Trinity Co. St 

Descanso, San Diego Co. St 

Desert Hot Springs, Riverside Co. Br. 

Diamond Bar, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Dinuba, Tulare Co. St 

Dominguez, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Dorris, Siskiyou Co. Br. 

Dos Palos, Merced Co. St 

Downieville, Sierra Co. St. 

Doyle, Lassen Co. St 

Duarte, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Dublin, Alameda Co. St 

Ducor, Tulare Co. St 

Dulzura, San Diego Co. St 

Dunsmuir, Siskiyou Co. Br. 

Durham, Butte Co. St 

Dutch Flat, Auburn-Placer Co. St 

E^limart, Tulare Co. St 

E^t Base Line, San Bernardino Co. Br. 

East Compton, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

East Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Elaston, Fresno Co. St. 

Eastside, Santa Barbara Co. Br. 

Edgewood, Los Angeles Co. St 

Edgewood, Siskiyou Co. Br. 

Edwards, Kem Co. St 

El Cajon, San Diego Co. Br. 

El Cerrito, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

El Cerrito Hosp., Los Angeles Co. St 

El Dorado Hills, El Dorado Co. St 

El Granada, San Mateo Co. St 

Elias, Stanislaus Co. St 

Elk Creek, Glenn Co. St 

Elk Grove, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Elkhom Village, Yolo Co. St 

E3 Marino, Los Angeles Co. St. 

El Monte, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

El Nido, Merced Co. St 

El Portal, Merced Co. St 

El Rio, Ventura Co. St 

Elsinore, Riverside Co. Br. 

El Sobrante, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Emerson, Monterey Co. Br. 

Empire, Stanislaus Co. St 

Encinitas, San Diego Co. Br. 

Eiiterprise, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Enterprise, Shasta Co. St. 

Escalon, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. St. 

Esparto, Yolo Co. St 

Eureka, Eureka-Humboldt Co. Hq. 

Exeter, Tulare Co. St 

Fairfax, Kem Co. St 

Fairfax, Marin Co. St 

Fairfield, Solano Co. Hq. 

Fairfield-Suisim, Solano Co. Br. 

Fair Oaks, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Fair Oaks, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. Br. 

FaUbrook, San Diego Co. Br. 

Fall River Mills, Shasta Co. St 

Farmersville, Tulare Co. St. 

Feather Falls, Butte Co. St 

Fellows, Kem Co. St 

Felton, Santa Cruz Co. St 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



213 



Fig Gardens, Fresno Co. Br. 
Fillmore, Ventura Co. St. 
Firebaugh, Fresno Co. St. 
Fletcher Hills, San Diego Co. Br. 
Florence, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Florin, Sacramento Co. Br. 
Folsom, Sacramento Co. Br. 
Fontana, San Bernardino Co. Br. 
Foothill, Sacramento Co. Br. 
Forbestown, Butte Co. St 
Foresthill, Auburn-Placer Co. St. 
Forest Knolls, Marin Co. St 
Forest Ranch, Butte Co. St 
Forestville, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. St 
Forks of Salmon, Siskiyou Co. Br. 
Fort Bragg, Mendocino Co. Br. 
Fort Jones, Siskiyou Co. Br. 
Fortima, Humboldt Co. St. 
Foster City, San Mateo Co. Br 
Fountain Valley, Orange Co. Br. 
Fowler, Fresno Co. St 
Francisquito, San Mateo Co. Br. 
Freedom, Santa Cruz Co. St. 
Fremont, Alameda Co. Br. 
French Gulch, Shasta Co. St 
Fresno, Fresno Co. Hq. 
Fruitridge, Sacramento Co. St 
Furnace Creek, Inyo Co. St 
Gait, Sacramento Co. Br. 
Garberville, Humboldt Co. Br. 
Gardena, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Garden Grove, Orange Co. Br. 
Garfield, Santa Cruz Co. St 
George Nye, Jr., Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Georgetown, El Dorado Co. St 
Gerber, Tehama Co. St. 
Geyserville, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. St 
Giant Club, Fresno Co. St 
Gillis, Fresno Co. Br. 
GiUis, Sacramento Co. Br. 
Gilroy, Santa Clara Co. Br. 
Glen Avon, Riverside Co. St. 
Glen Ellen, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. St. 
Glennville, Kem Co. St 
Goleta, Santa Barbara Co. Br. 
Gonzales, Monterey Co. St. 
Goshen, Tulare Co. St 
Graham, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Grangeville, Kings Co. St 
Grant Grove, Tulare Co. St 
Grass Valley, Nevada Co. Hq. 
Grass Valley, Nevada Co. St. 
Graton, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. St. 
Greenfield, Kem Co. St 
Greenfield, Monterey Co. St 
Greenville, Plumas Co. St 
Gridley, Butte Co. St 
Grimes, Colusa Co. St 
Groveland, Tuolumne Co. St. 
Grover City, San Luis Obispo Co. Br. 
Guemeville, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. St 
Gustine, Merced Co. St 
Hacienda Heights, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Hagginwood, Sacramento Co. Br. 



Halcyon, San Luis Obispo Co. St 

Half Moon Bay, San Mateo Co. Br. 

Hamilton City, Glenn Co. St. 

Hanford, Kings Co. Hq. 

Happy Camp, Siskiyou Co. Br. 

Hawthorne, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Hayfork, Trinity Co. St 

Hayward, Alameda Co. Hq. 

Heber, Imperial Co. St. 

Herlong, Lassen Co. St 

Hermosa Beach, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Hesperia, San Bernardino Co. St 

Highgrove, Riverside Co. St 

Hilt, Siskiyou Co. St 

HoUister, San Benito Co. Hq. 

HoUydale, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Holly Park, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

HoltviUe, Imperial Co. St. 

Hoopa, Humboldt Co. St 

Hombrook, Siskiyou Co. St. 

Hughson, Stanislaus Co. St. 

Huntington Park, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Hyampom, Trinity Co. St 

IdyUwild, Riverside Co. St. 

Imperial, Imperial Co. Hq. 

Imperial Beach, San Diego Co. Br. 

Independence, Inyo Co. Hq. 

Indio, Riverside Co. Br. 

Inverness, Marin Co. St 

Inyokem, Kem Co. St 

lone, Amador Co. St. 

Irvington, Alameda Co. St 

Irwin-Hilmar, Merced Co. St. 

Isabella, Kem Co. St 

Isleton, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Ivanhoe, Tulare Co. St. 

Jackson, Amador Co. Hq. 

Jacumba, San Diego Co. St. 

Jamesburg, Monterey Co. St. 

Jamestown, Tuolunme Co. St. 

Janesville, Lassen Co. St 

Johnsondale, Tulare Co. St 

Joshua Tree, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Julian, San Diego Co. St 

June Lake, Mono Co. St. 

K.C.S.O. Lerdo, Kem Co., St 

Kensington, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Kerman, Fresno Co. St. 

Kem General Hosp., Kem Co. St. 

Kemville, Kem Co. St 

Kettleman City, Kings Co. St 

Keyes, Stanislaus Co. St. 

King, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Kings Beach, Auburn-Placer Co. St. 

Kingsburg, Fresno Co. St. 

Kings River, Kings Co. St 

Knights Landing, Yolo Co. St 

La Canada, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

La Crescenta, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Ladoga, Colusa Co. St 

Lafayette, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Laguna Beach, Orange Co. Br. 

La Habra, Orange Co. Br. 

Lake Arrowhead, San Bernardino Co. St. 



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Lakehead, Shasta Co. St. 

Lake Hughes Rehabilitation, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Lakeside, San Diego Co. Br. 

Lake Tamarisk, Riverside Co. Br. 

Lake Valley, EH Dorado Co. St 

La Mesa, San Diego Co. Br. 

La Mirada, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Lamont, Kem Co. St 

Lancaster, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

La Palma, Orange Co. Br. 

La Porte, Plumas Co. St 

La Puente, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

I .arch Clover, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. St. 

La Selva Beach, Santa Cruz Co. St. 

La Sierra, Riverside Co. Br. 

Las Virgenes, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Laton, Fresno Co. St. 

La Verne, Los Angeles Co. St 

Lawndale, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Le Grand, Merced Co. St. 

Leisure World, Orange Co. Br. 

Leland R. Weaver, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Lemon Grove, San Diego Co. Br. 

Lemoore, Kings Co. Br. 

Lennox, Los Angeles Co. St 

Lewiston, Trinity Co. St 

Lincoln Acres, San Diego Co. St 

Linden, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. St 

Lindsay, Tulare Co. St 

Littlerock, Los Angeles Co. St 

Live Oak, Los Angeles Co. St 

Livingston, Merced Co. St. 

Lodgepole, Tulare Co. St 

Loma Linda, San Bernardino Co. St 

Lomita, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Lone Pine, Inyo Co. St 

Long Bam, Tuolumne Co. St. 

Long Beach General Hosp., Los Angeles Co. St 

Lookout, Modoc Co. St 

Loomis, Auburn-Placer Co. St 

Los Alamitos-Rossmoor, Orange Co. Br. 

Los Altos, Santa Clara Co. Br. 

Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co. Hq. 

Los Bancs, Merced Co. St 

Los Mohnos, Tehama Co. St 

Los Nietos, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Los Olivos, Santa Barbara Co. St 

Los Robles, Tehama Co. St 

Lost Hills, Kem Co. St 

Loyalton, Sierra Co. St. 

Luceme Valley, San Bernardino Co. St 

Lynwood, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

McClatchy, Sacramento Co. Br. 

McCloud, Siskiyou Co. St 

McFarland, Kem Co. Br. 

McKinley, Sacramento Co. Br. 

McKinleyville, Humboldt Co. St 

McKittrick, Kem Co. St 

Madeline, Lassen Co. St. 

Madera, Madera Co. Hq. 

Madera Convalescent Hospital, Madera Co. St 

Madera Co. Mental Health Clinic, Madera Co. St. 

Magnolia School, Imperial Co. St 

Malibu, Los Angeles Co. Br. 



Mammoth Lakes, Mono Co. St. 

Manhattan Beach, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Manhattan Heights, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Manteca, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. Br. 

Manton, Tehama Co. St 

Maple, Kem Co. St 

Marcy, Riverside Co. Br. 

Maricopa, Kem Co. St 

Marina, Monterey Co. St. 

Marin City, Marin Co. St. 

Mariposa, Merced Co. St. 

Markleeville, Alpine Co. Hq. 

Martinez, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Mary Graham Hall, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. St. 

Marysville, Marysville-Yuba Co. Hq. 

Maxwell, Colusa Co. St. 

Maywood, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Mecca-North Shore, Riverside Co. Sit 

Meiners Oaks, Ventura Co. St. 

Mendocino Study Club, Mendocino Co. St 

Mendota, Fresno Co. St 

Mentone, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Merced, Merced Co. Hq. 

Meridian, Sutter Co. St 

Mesa Verde, Orange Co. Br. 

Milford, Lassen Co. 5^ 

Millbrae, San Mateo Co. Br. 

Milpitas-Calaveras, Santa Clara Co. Br. 

Milpitas-Community Center, Santa Clara Co. St. 

Milpitas-SunnyhiUs, Santa Clara Co. Br. 

Mineral, Tehama Co. St 

Mira Loma Facility, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Miramonte, Fresno Co. St 

Miranda, Humboldt Co. St 

Mission Viejo, Orange Co. Br. 

Mi-Wuk Village, Tuolumne Co. St 

Modesto, Stanislaus Co. Hq. 

Mojave, Kem Co. St 

Mokelunme HiU, Calaveras Co. St. 

Montague, Siskiyou Co. St. 

Montclair, San Bernardino Co. St 

Montebello, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Montecito, Santa Barbara Co. Br. 

Monte Rio, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. St 

Montgomery Creek, Shasta Co. St 

Moorpark, Ventura Co. St 

Moraga, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Morgan Hill, Santa Clara Co. Br. 

Morongo Valley, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Morro Bay, San Luis Obispo Co. Br. 

Mountain Home, Tulare Co. St 

Mountain View, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Mt. Hebron-McDoel, Siskiyou Co. St. 

Mt. Shasta, Siskiyou Co. St 

Mt. Shasta Hospital, Siskiyou Co. St 

Muscoy, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Napa, Napa City-Co. Hq. 

Napa Junction, Napa City-Co. St 

Navelencia, Fresno Co. St. 

Needles, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Nevada City, Nevada Co. St 

Newark, Alameda Co. St 

NewhaU, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Newman, Stanislaus Co. St. 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



215 



Nicolaus, Sutter Co. St. 

Niland, Imperial Co. St. 

Niles, Alameda Co. St. 

Nipomo, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

Norco, Riverside Co. Br. 

North Edwards, Kern Co. St. 

North Enterprise, Los Angeles Co. St 

North Fork, Madera Co. St 

North Fresno, Fresno Co. Br. 

North Highlands, Sacramento Co. Br. 

North Sacramento, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Northwest Regional, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. Br. 

Norwalk, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Norwood, Los Angeles Co. 5^ 

Novato, Marin Co. Br. 

Nuview, Riverside Co. St 

Oakdale, Stanislaus Co. St 

Oakhurst, Madera Co. St 

Oakley, Contra Costa Co. St 

Oak Park, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Oak Run, Shasta Co. St 

Oak View, Ventura Co. Br. 

Occidental, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. St 

Oceano, San Luis Obispo Co. St 

OcotiUo, Imperial Co. St 

Oildale, Kern Co. Br. 

Ojai, Ventura Co. Br. 

Olive, Tehama Co. St 

Ono, Shasta Co. St 

Orange, Orange Co. Hq. 

Orange Cove, Fresno Co. St 

Orangevale, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Orinda, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Orleans, Humboldt Co. St 

Orosi, Tulare Co. St 

Oroville, Butte Co. Br. 

Oroville, Butte Co. Hg. 

Pacheco, Contra Costa Co. St 

Pacifica, San Mateo Co. Br. 

Pajaro, Monterey Co. St 

Palmdale, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Palm Desert, Riverside Co. Br. 

Palm Desert Country Club, Riverside Co. St 

Palo Cedro, Shasta Co. St 

Palomar Mt., San Diego Co. St 

Panama, Kern Co. St 

Panoche, San Benito Co. St 

Panorama Heights, Tulare Co. St 

Paradise, Butte Co. Br 

Paramount, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Parkfield, Monterey Co. St 

Parlier, Fresno Co. St 

Patterson, Stanislaus Co. St 

Penryn, Auburn-Placer Co. St 

Perris, Riverside Co. St 

Pescadero, San Mateo Co. St 

Peterson Hall, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. St 

Pico Rivera, Los Angeles Co., Br. 

Pinecrest, Tuolumne Co. St 

Pinedale, Fresno Co. St 

Pine Grove, Amador Co. St 

Pinole, Contra Costa Co. St 

Pismo Beach, San Luis Obispo St 

Pit #5, Shasta Co. St 



Pittsburg, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Pixley, Tulare Co. St 

Placerville, El Dorado Co. Hq. 

Planada, Merced Co. St 

Plaster City, Imperial Co. St 

Platina, Shasta Co. St 

Pleasant Grove, Sutter Co. St 

Pleasant Hill, Contra Costa Co. Hq. 

Pleasanton, Alameda Co. St 

Plymouth, Amador Co. St 

Pt. Reyes Station, Marin Co. St 

Pollock Pines, El Dorado Co. St 

Poplar, Tulare Co. St 

Port Hueneme, Ventura Co. Br. 

Portola, Plumas Co. St 

Portola Valley, San Mateo Co. St 

Poway, San Diego Co. St 

Pozo, San Luis Obispo Co. St 

Princeton, Colusa Co. St 

Project Indentity, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. St 

Provines, Stanislaus Co. St 

Prunedale, Monterey Co. St 

Quartz Hill, Los Angeles Co. St 

Quincy, Plumas Co. Hq. 

Quincy, Sierra Co. Hq. 

Railroad Flat, Calaveras Co. St 

Raisin City, Fresno Co. St 

Ramona, San Diego Co. St 

Rancho California, Riverside Co. St 

Rancho Cordova, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Rancho Santa Fe, San Diego Co. Br. 

Randsburg, Kern Co. St 

Ravendale, Lassen Co. St 

Raymond, Madera Co. St 

Red Bluff, Tehama Co. Hq. 

Red Cloud, Merced Co. St 

Redding, Shasta Co. Hq. 

Reedley, Fresno Co. Br. 

Rialto, San Bernardino Co. Br. 

Richvale, Butte Co. St 

Ridgecrest, Kern Co. St 

Rio Bravo, Kern Co. St 

Rio Dell, Humboldt Co. St 

Rio Linda, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Rio Vista, Solano Co. Br. 

Ripon, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. St 

Rivera, Los Angeles Co. St 

Riverbank, Stanislaus Co. St 

Riverdale, Fresno Co. St 

Riverside, Riverside Co. Hq. 

Bobbins, Sutter Co. St 

Robidoux, Riverside Co. St 

Rocklin, Auburn-Placer Co. St 

Rodeo, Contra Costa Co. St 

Rohnert Park, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. Br. 

Roosevelt, Los Angeles Co. St 

Rosemond, Kern Co. St 

Rosemead, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Rossmoor, Contra Costa Co. St 

Rovana, Inyo Co. St 

Rowland Heights, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Ruiming Springs, San Bernardino Co. St 

Ruth, Trinity Co. St 



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Sacramento, Sacramento Co. Hq. 

Salida, Stanislaus Co. St. 

Salinas, Monterey Co. Hq. 

Salton City, Imperial Co. St. 

San Andreas, Calaveras Co. Hq. 

San Ardo, Monterey Co. St. 

San Bernardino, San Bernardino Co. Hq. 

San Carlos, San Mateo Co. Br. 

Sanchez, San Mateo Co. St. 

San Clemente, Orange Co. Br. 

San Diego, San Diego Co. Hq. 

San Dimas, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

San Fernando, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

San Gabriel, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Sanger, Fresno Co. Br. 

San Jacinto, Riverside Co. Br. 

San Joaquin, Fresno Co. St 

San Jose, Santa Clara Co. Hq. 

San Juan Capistrano, Orange Co. 5^ 

San Lorenzo, Alameda Co. Br. 

San Lucas, Monterey Co. St 

San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo Co. Hq. 

San Marcos, San Diego Co. Br. 

San Miguel, San Luis Obispo Co. St 

San Pablo, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

San Rafael, Marin Co. Hq. 

San Ramon, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Co. Hq. 

Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Co. Hq 

Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo Co. St 

Santa Rosa, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. Hq. 

Santa Ynez, Santa Barbara Co. St. 

Santee, San Diego Co. St 

San Vicente, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Saratoga-Quito, Santa Clara Co. Br. 

Saratoga-Village, Santa Clara Co. Br. 

Saticoy, Ventura Co. St 

Sawyers Bar, Siskiyou Co. St. 

Scott Bar, Siskiyou Co. St 

Scotts Valley, Santa Cruz Co. St. 

Seal Beach, Orange Co. Br. 

Sebastopol, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. Br. 

Seeley, Imperial Co. St 

Sehna, Fresno Co. Br. 

Shafter, Kern Co. Br. 

Shandon, San Luis Obispo Co. St 

Sheepranch, Calaveras Co. St. 

Shell Beach, San Luis Obispo Co. St 

Sheriffs Academy, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Shingle Springs, El Dorado Co. St. 

Shingletown, Shasta Co. St 

Shoshone, Inyo Co. St 

Sierra City, Sierra Co. St. 

Sierraville, Sierra Co. St. 

Silverado, Orange Co. St. 

Silverthom, Stanislaus Co. St. 

Simi Valley, Ventura Co. Br. 

Sinunler, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

Skylake, Madera Co. St 

Snelling, Merced Co. St. 

Solana Beach, San Diego Co. Br. 

Soledad, Monterey Co. St 

Solvang, Santa Barbara Co. Br. 

Somes Bar, Siskiyou Co. St. 



Somis, Ventura Co. St 

Sonoma, Santa Rosa-Sonoma Co. Br. 

Sonora, Tuolumne Co. Hq. 

Soquel, Santa Cruz Co. St. 

Sorensen, Los Angeles Co. St. 

South, Kern Co. Br 

South Bay, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

South Dos Palos, Merced Co. St. 

Southeast, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. Br. 

South El Monte, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Southgate, Sacramento Co. Br. 

South Laguna, Orange Co. St. 

South Whittier, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Spreckels, Monterey Co. St. 

Spring Valley, San Diego Co. Br. 

Springville, Tulare Co. St 

Standish, Lassen Co. St 

Stanford-Escondido, Santa Clara Co. St. 

Stanton, Orange Co. Br. 

Stephenson, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Stevinson, Merced Co. St 

Stinson Beach, Marin Co. St. 

Stirling City, Butte Co. St 

Stockton, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. Hq. 

Stonyford, Colusa Co. St 

Storrie, Plumas Co. St. 

Stratford, Kings Co. St 

Strathmore, Tulare Co. St 

Summerland, Santa Barbara Co. St. 

Sun City, Riverside Co. Br. 

Suncrest, San Diego Co. St 

Sunldst, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Sunnymead, Riverside Co. Br. 

Suimyside, Fresno Co. Br. 

Sunnyslope, Los Angeles Co. St. 

SusanviUe, Lassen Co. Hq. 

Sutter, Sutter Co. St 

Sybil Brand Academy, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Taft, Kern Co. Br 

Tahoe City, Auburn-Placer Co. St. 

Taylorsville, Plumas Co. St 

Tehachapi, Kem Co. St 

Tehama, Tehama Co. St 

Temple City, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Templeton, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

Terra Bella, Tulare Co. St 

Thornton, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. St 

Three Rivers, Tulare Co. St 

Tipton, Tulare Co. St. 

Tracy, Stockton-San Joaquin Co. Br. 

Tranquillity, Fresno Co. St 

Trinidad, Humboldt Co. St 

Trinity Center, Trinity Co. St 

Trinity County Convalescent Hospital, Trinity Co. St. 

Trona, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Truckee, Nevada Co. St. 

Tulelake, Siskiyou Co. St. 

Tuolumne, Tuolumne Co. St. 

Tupman, Kem Co. St 

Turlock, Stanislaus Co. Br. 

Tustin, Orange Co. Br. 

Twain Harte, Tuolumne Co. St. 

Twentynine Palms, San Bernardino Co. Br. 

Twin Lakes, Santa Cruz Co. St 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



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Twin Oaks, Kern Co. St. 

Uldah, Mendocino Co. Hq. 

Union City, Alameda Co. St. 

Valencia, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Valle Vista, Riverside Co. St 

Valley Center, San Diego Co. Br. 

Valley Home, Stanislaus Co. St 

Valley Springs, Calaveras Co. St 

Van Duzen, Trinity Co. St 

Ventura, Ventura Co. Hg. 

Victoria Park, Los Angeles Co. St 

Victorville, San Bernardino Co. Br. 

View Park, Los Angeles Co. St 

Villa Carson, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Villa Park, Orange Co. St 

Vina, Tehama Co. St 

Vine Avenue, Los Angeles Co. St 

Vinton, Plumas Co. St 

Visalia, Tulare Co. Hg. 

Vista, San Diego Co. Br. 

Walker, Siskiyou Co. St 

Walnut, Los Angeles Co. St 

Walnut Creek, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Walnut Grove, Sacramento Co. Br. 

Warm Springs Rehabilitation Center, Los Angeles Co. St 

Wasco, Kem Co. Br. 

Waterford, Stanislaus Co. St 

Wayside Honor Rancho-Maximum, Los Angeles Co. St 

Wayside Honor Rancho-Minimum, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Weaverville, Trinity Co. Hg. 

Weed, Siskiyou Co. St 

Weldon, Kem Co. St 

Wendel, Lassen Co. St 

West Covina, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

West Fresno, Fresno Co. Br. 

West Gardena, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

West Garden Grove, Orange Co. Br. 

Westminster, Orange Co. Br. 



Westmorland, Imperial Co. St 
West Point, Calaveras Co. St 
West Sacramento, Yolo Co. Br. 
Westwood, Lassen Co. St 
Whitethorn, Humboldt Co. St 
Whitmore, Shasta Co. St 
Wm. J. George, Merced Co. St 
Williams, Colusa Co. St 
Willowbrook, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Willow Creek, Humboldt Co. Br 
Willow Ranch, Modoc Co. St 
Willows, Glenn Co. Hg. 
Wilton, Sacramento Co. St 
Winterhaven, Imperial Co. St 
Winters, Yolo Co. St 
Winton, Merced Co. St 
Wisebum, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
WofFord, Kem Co. St 
Woodacre, Marin Co. St 
Woodcrest, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Woodlake, Tulare Co. St 
Woodland, Merced Co. St 
Woodland, Yolo Co. Hg. 
Woodlawn, San Diego Co. St 
Woodside, San Mateo Co. Br. 
Woodville, Tulare Co. St 
Woodville FWC, Tulare Co. St 
Woody, Kem Co. St 
Wright, Stanislaus Co. St 
Yolo, Yolo Co. St 
Yosemite, Merced Co. St 
Yountville, Napa City-Co. St 
Yreka, Siskiyou Co. Hg. 
Yuba City, Sutter Co.Hg. 
Yucaipa, San Bernardino Co. St 
Yucca Valley, San Bernardino Co. St 
Zenia, Trinity Co. St 



218 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



INDEX TO NAMES OF LIBRARIES 

The Index to Names of Libraries has been prepared to guide users to 
the place of entry in the main directory of special, university, college, 
law and public libraries not otherwise easily located. In general, each 
library which bears a name not easily identified with the community in 
which it is located is entered here under the first word of the name, or 
under one or more key words in the name. 

All municipal libraries with memorial names have been indexed. For 
quick reference, all county libraries and county law libraries have been 
indexed, unless the county seat and county have the same name. 

A few libraries with geographical names, which are actually located 
in and entered in the directory under a different place, are indexed 
(e.g., Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, Glendale ) . 



ABC-Clio, Inc., Santa Barbara 

AFL-CIO Library, see California Labor Federation, San 
Francisco 

Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Los Ange- 
les 

Actron Industries Inc., Monrovia 

Acurex Corporation, Aerotherm Division, Mountain 
View 

Advanced Micro Devices Inc., Sunnyvale 

Aerojet Ordnance and Manufacturing Company, Dow- 
ney 

Aerojet Solid Propulsion Company, Sacramento 

Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo 

Aerotherm Division of Acurex Corporation, Mountain 
View 

Agnews State Hospital, San Jose 

Airesearch Manufacturing Company, see Garrett Corpo- 
ration, Torrance 

Alameda Contra Costa Medical Association, Oakland 

Alameda County Free Library, Hayward 

Alameda County Law Library, Oakland 

Allan Hancock College, Santa Maria 

Allen Knight Maritime Museum, Monterey 

Allergan Pharmaceuticals, Irvine 

Alliance Francaise, San Francisco 

Alpine County Law Library, Markleeville 

Alpine County Library, Markleeville 

Alza Corporation, Palo Alto 

Amador County Law Library, Jackson 

Amador County Library, Jackson 

Ambassador College, Pasadena 

American Baptist Seminary of the West, Covina 

American Express Investment Management Company, 
San Francisco 

American Film Institute Center for Advanced Film Stud- 
ies, Beverly Hills 

American Institute of Family Relations, Los Angeles 

American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral 
Sciences, Palo Alto 

American River College, Sacramento 

American Russian Institute, San Francisco 

Ameron, Corrosion Control Division, Brea 

Ames Research Center, see National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration, Moffett Field 

Ampex Corporation, Redwood City 

Anna Freud Research Library, see Reiss-Davis Child 
Study Center, Los Angeles 

Antelope Valley College, Lancaster 



Armstrong College, Berkeley 

Art Center College of Design, Los Angeles 

Asia Foundation, San Francisco 

Associated Science Libraries, San Diego 

Atlantic Richfield Company, Los Angeles 

Avery Products Corporation, Pasadena 

Bacon, Francis, Library, Claremont 

Bancroft, Avery & McAlister, San Francisco 

Bancroft Library, see University of California, Berkeley 

Bancroft- Whitney, San Francisco 

Bank of America, San Francisco 

Bank of California, San Francisco 

Barlow Hospital, Los Angeles 

Barnes-Hind Pharmaceuticals, Sunnyvale 

Bates, Alta, Community Hospital, Berkeley 

Bay Area Air Pollution Control District, San Francisco 

Beckman Instruments Inc., Fullerton, Palo Alto 

Behrens Memorial Hospital, Glendale 

Bell & Howell Research Laboratories, Pasadena 

Biola College, La Mirada 

Bio Science Laboratory, Van Nuys 

Blanchard Community Library, Santa Paula 

Blue Cross of Southern California, Los Angeles 

Bowers, Charles W., Memorial Museum, Santa Ana 

Braille Institute of America, Los Angeles 

Braun, C. F. & Company, Alhambra 

Broadway Hospital, Vallejo 

Brobeck, William M., & Associates, Berkeley 

Brookside Hospital, San Pablo 

Brooks Institute, Santa Barbara 

Bruggemeyer Memorial Library, Monterey Park 

Brundage Collection, see Center of Asian Art and Cul- 
ture, San Francisco 

Buildiiig Systems Development, San Francisco 

Bureau of Jewish Education, San Francisco 

Burroughs Corporation, Goleta, Pasadena 

Bushman, Ted, Law Library, Santa Maria 

Butte College, Durham 

Butte County Law Library, Oroville 

Butte County Library, Oroville 

Cabrillo College, Aptos 

Calaveras County Law Library, San Andreas 

Calaveras County Library, San Andreas 

California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco 

California Attorney General, Los Angeles, Sacramento, 
San Francisco 

California Auditor General, Sacramento 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



219 



California Baptist College, Riverside 
California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland 
California College of Podiatric Medicine, San Francisco 
California Conservation Center, Susan vilJe 
California Correctional Institution, Tehachapi 
California Genealogical Society, see California Historical 

Society, San Francisco 
California Historical Society, San Francisco 
California Institute of Technology, Pasadena 
California Institute of the Arts, Valencia 
California Institution for Men, Chino 
California Institution for Women, Frontera 
California Labor Federation, AFL-CIO, San Francisco 
California Lutheran College, Thousand Oaks 
California Maritime Academy, Vallejo 
California Medical Association, San Francisco 
California Medical Facility, Vacaville 
California Men's Colony, San Luis Obispo 
California Missionary Baptist Institution and Seminary, 

BelWower 
California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo 
California Rehabilitation Center, Corona 
California School for the Blind, Berkeley 
California Secretary of State, State Archives, Sacramento 
California State Advisory Commission on the Status of 

Women, Sacramento 
California State Archives, Sacramento 
California State Automobile Association, San Francisco 
California State Board of Equalization, Sacramento 
California State Board of Nursing Education and Nurse 

Registration, Sacramento 
California State College, Sonoma, Rohnert Park 
California State College, Stanislaus, Turlock 
California State Colleges, Bakersfield, Dominguez Hills, 

Rohnert Park, San Bernardino, Turlock 
California State Court of Appeal, Fresno, Los Angeles, 

Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco 
California State Department of Agriculture, Sacramento 
California State Department of Banking, San Francisco 
California State Department of Conservation, Division of 
Mines and Geology, Los Angeles, San Francisco 
California State Department of Consumer Affairs, Sacra- 
mento 
California State Department of Finance, Sacramento 
California State Department of Fish and Game, Long 

Beach, Fresno 
California State Department of General Services, Sacra- 
mento 
California State Department of Highway Patrol, Sacra- 
mento 
California State Department of Housing and Community 

Development, Sacramento 
California State Department of Industrial Relations, San 

Francisco 
Cahfomia State Department of Justice, Los Angeles, Sac- 
ramento, San Francisco 
California State Department of Motor Vehicles, Sacra- 
mento 
California State Department of Public Works, Division of 
Highways, Bishop, Eureka, Fresno, Los Angeles, 
Marysville, Redding, Sacramento, San Bernar- 
dino, San Diego, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, 
Stockton 
California State Department of Social Welfare, Sacra- 
mento 
California State Department of Water Resources, Fresno. 
Los Angeles, Red Bluff, Sacramento 



California State Division of Mines and Geology, see Cali- 
fornia State Department of Conservation, Los 
Angeles, San Francisco 

California State Employment Development Depart- 
ment, Sacramento 

California State Franchise Tax Board, Sacramento 

CaUfomia State Health and Welfare Agency, Sacramento 

California State Legislative Budget Committee, Sacra- 
mento 

California State Legislative Counsel, Sacramento 

California State Library, Sacramento 

California State Office of Emergency Services, Sacra- 
mento 

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona 

California State Prisons, Represa, San Quentin 

California State Resources Agency, Sacramento 

California State Supreme Court, San Francisco 

California State Universities, Areata, Chico, Fresno, Ful- 
lerton, Hayward, Long Beach, Los Angeles, 
Northridge, Pomona, Sacramento, San Diego, 
San Francisco, San Jose, San Luis Obispo 

California State University, San Diego, Imperial Valley 
Campus, Calexico 

California Taxpayers' Association, Sacramento 

California Test Bureau /McGraw-Hill, Monterey 

California Western School of law, San Diego 

Caiiada College, Redwood City 

Canyons, College of the, Valencia 

Carnation Company Research Laboratories, Van Nuys 

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles 

Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, 
Stanford 

Center for California Public Affairs, Claremont 

Center for Chinese Studies, see University of California, 
Berkeley 

Center for Training in Community Psychiatry and Men- 
tal Health Administration, Berkeley 

Center of Asian Art and Culture, San Francisco 

Cerritos College, Norwalk 

Cerro Coso Community College, Ridgecrest 

Chabot College, Hayward 

Chaffey College, Alta Loma 

Chapman College, Orange 

Chapman General Hospital, Orange 

Chevron Research Company, Richmond 

Children's Hospital, Los Angeles 

Children's Hospital Medical Center, Oakland 

Citizens Savings Athletic Foundation, Los Angeles 

Citrus Conununity College, Azusa 

Clark Memorial Library, see University of California, Los 
Angeles 

Cogswell Polytechnic College, San Francisco 

College of Marin, KentHeld 

College of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons, see Uni- 
versity of CaUfomia, Irvine 

College of the Canyons, Valencia 

College of the Desert, Palm Desert 

College of the Redwoods, Eureka 

College of the Sequoias, Visalia 

College of the Sisldyous, Weed 

College Student Personnel Abstracts, Claremont 

Collins Radio Company, Newport Beach 

Colonial Research Library, see Knott's Berry Farm, 
Buena Park 

Colorado River Board of CaUfomia, Los Angeles 

Commonwealth Club of California, San Francisco 



220 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



Community Hospital of Sonoma County, Santa Bosa 

Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula, CarmeJ 

Computer Sciences Corporation, El Segundo 

Congregation Beth Am, Los Altos Hills 

Congregation Kol EJneth, Palo Alto 

Continuing Education of the Bar, see University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley 

Contra Costa College, San Pablo 

Contra Costa County Hospital, Martinez 

Contra Costa County Law Library, Martinez 

Contra Costa County Library, Pleasant Hill 

Control Data Corporation, LaJoUa, Sunnyvale 

Convair Aerospace Division, see General Dynamics, San 
Diego 

Coopers & Lybrand, Los Angeles 

Cosumnes River College, Sacramento 

Cowell Memorial Hospital, see University of California, 
Berkeley 

Crane Company, Hydro-Aire Division, Burbank 

Crown Zellerbach Corporation, San Francisco 

Cubic Corporation, San Diego 

Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo 

Cutter Laboratories, Berkeley 

Dameron Hospital, Stockton 

Daniel, Mann, Johnson & MendenhaU, Los Angeles 

De Anza College, Cupertino 

Defense Language Institute, Monterey 

Del Monte Corporation, Walnut Creek 

Del Norte County Law Library, Crescent City 

Desert, College of the. Palm Desert 

Deuel Vocational Institution, Tracy 

Development Research Associates, Los Angeles 

Diablo Valley College, Pleasant Hill 

Disney, Walt, Productions, Burbank 

Disney, Walt E., Enterprises, Glendale 

Dominican College, San Bafael 

Don Bosco Technical Institute, Bosemead 

Douglas Aircraft Company, See McDonnell Douglas Cor- 
poration, Long Beach 

Dow Chemical Company, Walnut Creek 

ESL Inc., Sunnyvale 

Earthquake Engineering Research Center, see Univer- 
sity of California, Bichmond 

Economics Research Associates, Loa Angeles 

El Dorado County Law Library, Placerville 

EU Dorado County Library, Placerville 

Enloe, N. T., Memorial Hospital, Chico 

E^katon American River Healthcare Center, Carmichael 

E^katon Colusa Healthcare Center, Colusa 

FMC Corporation, San Jose, Santa Clara 

Factor, Max, & Company, Hollywood 

Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and De- 
velopment, San Francisco 

Feather River College, Quincy 

Federal Aviation Administration, Lawndale 

Federal Reserve Bank, San Francisco 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company, San Francisco 

First Baptist Church of Lakewood, Long Beach 

First Congregational Church, Palo Alto 

First Presbyterian Church, San Diego 

First United Methodist Church. Palo Alto 

Folsom State Prison, Bepresa 

Food Research Institute, see Stanford University Librar- 
ies, Stanford 

Foothill College, Los Altos Hills 



Foremost Foods Company, Dublin 

Forest History Society, Santa Cruz 

Forest Products Library, see University of California, 
Bichmond 

Francis Bacon Library, Qaremont 

Frank, Clinton E. Los Angeles 

Freeman, Daniel, Hospital, Inglewood 

Freitas, J. A., Library, San Leandro 

Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena 

GTE Lenkurt Inc., San Carlos 

Gallo Winery, Modesto 

Garrett Corporation, Airesearch Manu&cturing Com- 
pany, Torrance 

Gavilan College, Gilroy 

General Dynamics, San Diego 

General Electric Company, San Jose, Santa Barbara, Sun- 
nyvale 

General Hospital of Monterey County, Salinas 

General Research Corporation, Santa Barbara 

Getty Oil Company, Los Angeles 

Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, see Uni- 
versity of California, Berkeley 

Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, Los Angeles 

Gifford Public Health Library, see Kern County Health 
Department, BakersHeld 

Gleim County Free Library, Orland/ Willows 

Glenn County Law Library, Willows 

Goethe Institute, San Francisco 

Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary, Mill Valley 

Golden Gate University, San Francisco 

Golden West College, Huntington Beach 

Goleta Valley Community Hospital, Santa Barbara 

Gorsline, Lester, Associates, Terra Linda 

Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley 

Graham & James, San Francisco 

Grant, David, USAF Medical Center, Travis AFB 

Grossmont College, EU Cajon 

Grove Street Community College, Oakland 

Guedel, Arthur E., Memorial Anesthesia Center, San 
Francisco 

Gulf Energy and Ejivironmental Systems, La Jolla 

Hale Observatories, Carnegie Institute of Technology, 
Pasadena 

Harrison Memorial Library, Carmel 

Hartnell College, Salinas 

Hastings College of Law, see University of California, San 
Francisco 

Heald College of Engineering and Architecture, San 
Francisco 

Hebrew Union College, Los Angeles 

Heller, Ehrman, White & McAulifFe, San Francisco 

Herrick Memorial Hospital, Berkeley 

Hewlett-Packard Company, Cupertino, Palo Alto 

Hitco Corporation, Gardena 

Hofirnan Electronics Corporation, El Monte 

Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center, Los Angeles 

Holy Family College, Mission San Jose 

Holy Names College, Oakland 

Holy Redeemer College, Oakland 

Homosexual Information Center, Los Angeles 

Honeywell Incorporated, West Covina 

Honnold Library, Claremont 

Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace, see 
Stanford University, Stanford 

Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



221 



Hospital of the Good Samaritan, Los Angeles 

Hughes Aircraft Company, Canoga Park, Culver City, El 
Segundo, Fullerton, Newport Beach 

Hughes Helicopters, Culver City 

Human Factors Research, Goleta 

Human Resources Research Organization, Monterey 

Humboldt County Law Library, Eureka 

Humboldt County Library, see Eureka-Humboldt 
County Library, Eureka 

Humphreys College, Stockton 

Himtington Library, San Marino 

Huntington Memorial Hospital, Pasadena 

Hurdman and Cranstoun, San Francisco 

Hurty-Peck Library of Beverage Literature, Santa Ana 

Hydro-Aire Division, see Crane Company, Burbank 

Hyland Laboratories, Costa Mesa 

IBM SDD Library, Los Gatos 

Inmiaculate Heart College, Los Angeles 

Imperial County Law Library, El Centra 

Imperial Valley College, Imperial 

Indian Valley Colleges, Novato 

Industrial Indemnity Company, San Francisco 

Information Source, Los Angeles 

Inner City Cultural Center, Los Angeles 

Institute of Govermnental Affairs, see University of CaH- 
fomia, Davis 

Institute of Governmental Studies, see University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley 

Institute of Industrial Relations, see University of Califor- 
nia, Berkeley 

Institute of International Studies, see University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley 

Institute of Library Research, see University of Califor- 
nia, Berkeley 

Institute of Transportation and Traffic Ejigineering, see 
University of California, Berkeley 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Un- 
ion, San Francisco 

International Senior Citizens Association, Los Angeles 

Interstate Electronics Corporation, Anaheim 

Inyo County Free Library, Independence 

Inyo County Law Library, Independence 

Jewish Community Center, San Diego 

Jewish Federation Council, Los Angeles 

John F. Kennedy University, Martinez 

Judy Garland Library, see Motion Picture and Television 
Hospital, Woodland Hills 

Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation, Pleasanton 

Kaiser Engineers, Oakland 

Kaiser Foundation Hospitals, Bell/lower, Fontana, Hay- 
ward, La Mesa, Los Angeles, Panorama City, 
Redwood City, San Francisco 

Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing, Oakland 

Kaiser-Permanente Health Education Center, Oakland 

Kennedy, John F., University, Martinez 

Kem County Health Department, Bakersfield 

Kem County Law Library, Bakersfield 

Kem County Library, Bakersfield 

Kem General Hospital, Bakersfield 

Kindel & Anderson, Los Angeles 

Kings County Law Library, Hanford 

Kings County Library, Hanford 

Knight, Allen, Maritime Museum, Monterey 

KnoUwood Community Hospital, Riverside 

Knott's Berry Farm, Colonial Research Library, Buena 
Park 



Krotona Institute of Theosophy, Ojai 

Lake County Law Library, Lakeport 

Lake County Library Project, Lakeport 

Laney College, Oakland 

Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric Institute, San Francisco 

Langston Hughes Memorial Library, see Inner City Cul- 
tural Center, Los Angeles 

Lassen College, Susanville 

Lassen County Free Library, Susanville 

Lassen County Law Library, Susanville 

Latin American Library, see Oakland Public Library, 
Oakland 

Latino Local Development Company, San Francisco 

Laurel Grove Hospital, Castro Valley 

La Vina Hospital, Altadena 

Lawrence Berkeley Radiation Laboratory, see University 
of California, Berkeley 

Letterman Army Medical Center, see U.S. Army, San 
Francisco 

Library of Vehicles, Garden Grove 

Lincoln University, San Francisco 

Lockheed Aircraft International, Los Angeles 

Lockheed-California Company, Burbank 

Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Palo Alto 

Lockheed Propulsion Company, Bedlands 

Loeb & Loeb, Los Angeles 

Loma Linda University, La Sierra Campus, Riverside 

Lone Mountain College, San Francisco 

Los Angeles Baptist College, Newhall 

Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, Glendale 

Los Angeles County Harbor General Hospital, Torrance 

Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, Los Angeles 

Los Angeles Harbor College, Wilmington 

Los Angeles Pierce College, Woodland Hills 

Los Angeles Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, Bev- 
erly Hills 

Los Angeles Valley College, Van Nuys 

Los Medanos College, Pleasant Hill 

Los Robles Hospital, Thousand Oaks 

Loyola University, Los Angeles 

Ludlow, Fitz Hugh, Memorial Library, San Francisco 

Luther, Martin, Hospital, Anaheim 

Lybrand Ross Brothers & Montgomery, Los Angeles 

McCutcheon, Doyle, Brown & Enersen, San Francisco 

McDonnell Douglas Corj)oration, Douglas Aircraft Com- 
pany, Long Beach 

McGeorge School of Law, see University of the Pacific, 
Sacramento 

Magnavox Research Laboratories, Torrance 

Magnes, Judah L., Memorial Museum, Berkeley 

Manalytics Inc., San Francisco 

Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo 

Marin, College of, Kentfield 

Marin County Law Library, San Rafael 

Marin County Library, San Rafael 

Mariposa Coianty Free Library, Merced 

Marshall Hospital, Placerville 

Marymount College, Palos Verdes Peninsula 

Mary's Help Hospital, Daly City 

Masonic Library of Southern California, Los Angeles 

Max Factor & Company, Hollywood 

Mechanics' Institute, San Francisco 

Medical Planning Associates, Malibu 

Meiklejohn Civil Liberties Library, Berkeley 

Mendocino College, Ukiah 



222 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



Mendocino County Law Library, Uh'aJi 

Mendocino County Library, Uldah 

Menlo School and College, Menlo Park 

Merritt College, Oakland 

Merritt, Samuel, Hospital, Oakland 

Methodist Hospital of Southern California, Arcadia 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Research Department, Culver 
City 

Metromedia Producers Corporation, Hollywood 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, San Francisco 

Metropolitan State Hospital, Norwalk 

Millikan Memorial Library, see Cahfomia Institute of 
Technology, Pasadena 

Mills College, Oakland 

Mira Costa College, Oceanside 

Miramar College, San Diego 

Mitchell, Silberberg & Knupp, Los Angeles 

Modoc County Law Library, Alturas 

Modoc County Library, Alturas 

Mono County Free Library, Bridgeport 

Mono County Law Library, Bridgeport 

Monterey County Law Library, Salinas 

Monterey County Library, Salinas 

Morrison, Foerster, Holloway, Clinton & Clark, San Fran- 
cisco 

Motion Picture and Television Hospital, Woodland Hills 

Mt. Diablo Hospital, Concord 

Mount St. Mary's College, Los Angeles 

Mount San Antonio College, Walnut 

Mt. San Jacinto College, San Jacinto 

Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, San Francisco 

Napa State Hospital, Imola 

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Edwards 

National Center for Primate Biology, see University of 
California, Davis 

National Marine Fisheries Service, La folia 

National Steel and Shipbuilding Company, San Diego 

Neuropsychiatric Institute, Los Angeles 

Nevada County Law Library, Nevada City 

Nevada County Library, Grass Valley 

Norris Medical Library, see University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, Los Angeles 

North Peralta Community College, Oakland 

Northrop Corporation, Anaheim, Hawthorne, Newbury 
Park 

Northrop Institute of Technology, Inglewood 

Nossaman, Waters, Scott, Krueger & Riordan, Los Ange- 
les 

Occidental College, Los Angeles 

Occidental Life Insurance Company of California, Los 
Angeles 

Ohlone College, Fremont 

O'Melveny & Myers, Los Angeles 

One, Inc., Los Angeles 

Orange Coast College, Costa Mesa 

Orange County Health Department, Anaheim 

Orange County Law Library, Santa Ana 

Orange County Medical Center, Orange 

Orange County Public Library, Orange 

Orthopaedic Hospital, Los Angeles 

Our Lady of Light Catholic Center, Santa Barbara 

Pacific Bio-Marine Supply Company, Los Angeles 

Pacific Christian College, Fullerton 

Pacific College, Fresno 

Pacific Gas and Hectric Company, San Francisco 



Pacific Marine Station, see University of the Pacific, Dil- 
lon Beach 

Pacific Oaks College, Pasadena 

Pacific School of Religion, Berkeley 

Pacific State Hospital, Pomona 

Pacific Telephone Company, San Francisco 

Pacific-Union Club, San Francisco 

Pacific Union College, Angwin 

Pacific, University of the, Dillon Beach, Sacramento, San 
Francisco, Stockton 

Palomar College, San Marcos 

Palomar Memorial Hospital, E^condido 

Palo Verde College, Blythe 

Palo Verde Valley Library District, Blythe 

Parsons, Ralph M., Company, Los Angeles 

PauUst Library, San Francisco 

Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Company, Los Angeles, San 
Francisco 

Peninsula Medical Center, Burlingame 

Pepperdine University, Malibu 

Philco-Ford Corporation, Newport Beach, Palo Alto 

Placer County Law Library, Auburn 

Placer County Library, see Auburn-Placer County Li- 
brary, Auburn 

Plumas County Law Library, Quincy 

Plumas County Library, Quincy 

Polish American Congress, Los Angeles 

Presbyterian Hospital, San Francisco 

Presbyterian Intercorrmiunity Hospital, Whittier 

Press-Enterprise Company, Riverside 

Probe Systems Incorporated, Sunnyvale 

Prudential Insurance Company, Los Angeles 

Purex Corporation, Carson 

R&D Associates, Santa Monica 

Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey 

Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, Claremont 

Rand Corporation, Santa Monica 

Raytheon Company, Goleta ' 

Redwood Memorial Hospital, Fortuna 

Redwoods, College of the, Eureka 

Rees-Stealy Medical Clinic, San Diego 

Reiss-Davis Child Study Center, Los Angeles 

Riker Laboratories, Northridge 

Rio Hondo College, Whittier 

Rockwell International, Anaheim, CanogaPark, Downey, 
Los Angeles, Thousand Oaks 

Rohr Industries, Chula Vista 

Rosicrucian Research Library, San Jose 

Rucker Control Systems, Oakland 

SCM Research and Engineering Laboratory, Palo Alto 

Saddleback College, Mission Viejo 

Safeway Stores, Oakland 

Saint Agnes Hospital, Fresno 

St. Francis Memorial Hospital, San Francisco 

St. John's Hospital, Oxnard, Santa Monica 

St. John's Seminary, Camarillo 

St. Joseph & Children's Hospital, Orange 

Saint Joseph Medical Center, Burbank 

St. Joseph's Hospital, San Francisco, Stockton 

Saint Luke Hospital, Pasadena 

Saint Luke's Hospital, 5^ Francisco 

Saint Mary's College, Moraga 

St. Mary's Hospital, Long Beach 

St. Mary's Hospital and Medical Center, San Francisco 

St. Patrick's Seminary, Menlo Park 



Volume 69, No. 1, Winter, 1974 



223 



St. Vincent's Seminary, Montebello 

Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Lajolla 

Salvation Army School for Officers, San Francisco 

San Benito County Free Library, HoUister 

San Benito County Law Library, HoUister 

Sandia Laboratories, Livermore 

San Gorgonio Pass Memorial Hospital, Banning 

San Joaquin County Law Library, Stockton 

San Joaquin County Library, see Stockton-San Joaquin 
County Library, Stockton 

San Joaquin Delta College, Stockton 

San Joaquin General Hospital, French Camp 

San Joaquin Pioneer and Historical Society, Stockton 

San Mateo County Law Library, Bedwood City 

San Mateo County Library, Belmont 

Santa Clara County Free Library, San Jose 

Santa Clara County Health Department, San Jose 

Santa Clara County Law Library, San Jose 

Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose 

Santa Teresita Hospital, Duarte 

Scenic General Hospital, Modesto 

Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, Lajolla 

Scripps Memorial Hospital, Lajolla 

Searls Historical Library, Nevada City 

Security Pacific National Bank, Los Angeles 

Sequoia Hospital, Bedwood City 

Sequoias, College of the, Visalia 

Serra Museum Research Library, see San Diego Histori- 
cal Society, San Diego 

Sharp, Donald N., Memorial Community Hospital, San 
Diego 

Sharpe Army Depot, Lathrop 

Shasta College, Bedding 

Shasta County Law Library, Bedding 

Shasta County Library, Bedding 

Shell Development Company, Modesto, Torrance 

Shell Oil Company, Los Angeles 

Sherman Foundation, Corona Del Mar 

Sierra Club, San Francisco 

Sierra College, Bocklin 

Sierra Conservation Center, Jamestown 

Sierra County Free Library, Quincy 

Sierra County Law Library, Downieville 

Silverado Museum, St Helena 

Simpson College, San Francisco 

Singer Business Machines, San Leandro 

Singer Librascope, Glendale 

Siskiyou County Law Library, Yreka 

Siskiyou County Public Library, Yreka 

Siskiyous, College of the, Weed , 

Skyline College, San Bruno 

Smiley, A.K., Public Library, Bedlands 

Society of California Pioneers, San Francisco 

Society of Mayflower Descendants, San Francisco 

Solano Community College, Suisun City 

Solano County Free Library, FairBeld 

Solano County Law Library, FairBeld 

Sonoma County Law Library, Santa Bosa 

Sonoma County Library, see Santa Rosa-Sonoma County 
Library, Santa Bosa 

Sonoma State Hospital, Eldridge 

Sons of the Revolution, Los Angeles 

Southern California College, Costa Mesa 

Southern California College of Optometry, Fullerton 

Southern California Library for Social Studies and Re- 
search, Los Angeles 



Southern CaMomia Permanente Medical Group, Ingle- 
wood 

Southern California Psychoanalytic Institute, Beverly 
Hills 

Southwestern College, Chula Vista 

Southwest Museum, Los Angeles 

Spectrol Electronics Corporation, Industry 

Stanford Research Institute, Menlo Park 

Stanislaus County Free Library, Modesto 

Stanislaus County Law Library, Modesto 

Statler, Alice, Library, see City College of San Francisco, 
San Francisco 

Stauffer Chemical Company, Sunnyvale 

Stone, Marraccini & Patterson, San Francisco 

Strybing Arboretum, San Francisco 

Sutro Library, San Francisco 

Sutter County Law Library, Yuba City 

Sutter County Library, Yuba City 

Syntex Corporation, Palo Alto 

System Development Corporation, Santa Monica 

TRW Semiconductor Division, Lawndale 

Tecna Corporation, Emeryvi'Je 

Tehama County Law Library, Bed Bluff 

Tehama County Library, Bed Bluff 

Teledyne Ryan Aeronautical Company, San Diego 

Temple Hospital, Los Angeles 

Theosophical Book Association for the Blind, OJai 

Tri-City Hospital, Oceanside 

Trinity Church, Santa Barbara 

Trinity County Free Library, Weaverville 

Trinity County Law Library, WeaverviUe 

Trinity United Presbyterian Church, Santa Ana 

Tulare County Free Library, Visalia 

Tulare County Law Library, Visalia 

Tuolumne County Free Library, Sonora 

Tuolumne County Law Library, Sonora 

Tuolumne General Hospital, Sonora 

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, Los Angeles 

Union Oil Company of California, Union Research Cen- 
ter, Brea 

Union-Tribune Pubhshing Company, San Diego 

United Aircraft Corporation, Surmyvale 

United Air Lines, San Francisco 

United California Bank, Los Angeles 

U.S. Air Force, Castle AFB, Edwards AFB, George AFB, 
Hamilton AFB, McClellan AFB, March AFB, 
Mather AFB, Travis AFB, Vandenberg AFB 

U.S. Army, Fort Ord, Lathrop, Monterey, Oakland, San 
Francisco, San Pedro 

U.S. Borax, Anaheim 

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Sacramento 

U.S. ._-ourt of Appeals, San Francisco 

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Albany 

U.S. Department of Commerce, San Francisco 

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 
San Francisco 

U.S. District Court, San Francisco 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, San Francisco 

U.S. Federal Archives and Records Service, San Bruno 

U.S. Forest Service, Berkeley 

U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park 

U.S. Marine Corps, Barstow, Camp Pendleton, San Diego, 
Twentynine Palms 

U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
Ames Research Center, Moffett Field 



224 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

U.S. Navy, Alameda, China Lake, MofFett Field, Monte- 
rey, Oakland, Pasadena, Point Mugu, Port Hue- 
neme, San Diego, San Francisco, Vallejo 

U.S. Public Health Service, San Francisco 

United Way, Los Angeles 

University of California, Berkeley, Davis, Irvine, Lajolla, 
Livermore, Los Angeles, Richmond, Riverside, 
San Francisco, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz 

University of Southern California, Los Angeles 

University of the Pacific, Dillon Beach, Sacramento, San 
Francisco, Stockton 

Utah International, San Francisco 

Valley Children's Hospital, Fresno 

Valley Medical Center, Fresno 

Valley Presbyterian Hospital, Van Nuys 

Verdugo Hills Hospital, Glendale 

Veterans Administration Hospitals, Fresno, Livermore, 
Long Beach, Los Angeles, Martinez, Palo Alto, 
San Francisco, Sepulveda 

Veterans Home of California, Yountville 

Victor Valley Community College, Victorville 

Wahler, W.A., and Associates, Palo Alto 

Walt Disney Productions, Burbank 

Warner Brothers, Inc., Burbank 

Washington Hospital, Fremont 

Water Resources Center Archives, 5ee University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley, Los Angeles 

Wells Fargo Bank, San Francisco 

West Coast University, Los Angeles 

Western Behavioral Sciences Institute, Lajolla 

Western Jewish History Center, Berkeley 

Western States College of Engineering, Inglewood 

West Hills College, Coalinga 

West Los Angeles College, Culver City 

Westmont College, Santa Barbara 

Westside Hospital, Los Angeles 

West Valley College, Saratoga 

West Valley Occupational Center, Woodland Hills 

White Memorial Medical Center, Los Angeles 

Wilshire Boulevard Temple, Los Angeles 

Wine Institute, San Francisco 

Wolfe, Harvey C, Library, Los Angeles 

Women's History Research Center, Berkeley 

Woodbury College, Los Angeles 

Woodruff Community Hospital, Long Beach 

World Trade Center Libraries, San Francisco 

Xerox Corporation, El Segundo, Pasadena 

Xerox Research Center, Palo Alto 

Yolo County Free Library, Woodland 

Yolo County Law Library, Woodland 

Yuba College, Marysville 

Yuba County Law Library, Marysville 

Yuba County Library, see MarysviUe-Yuba County Li- 
brary, Marysville 

Zion Lutheran Church, North Highlands 

Zoecon Corporation, Palo Alto 



DIRECTORY OF CALIFORNIA 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES 
AND LIBRARY SYSTEMS 



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V. 69, no. 2-3-4, 1974 



alifomia Lioranes 



Official Journal of the California State Library 



News Notes of 



California Libraries 



V. 69, no. 2-3-4, 1974 



237 BBPH— Past, Present and Future— Daphne Kester 
243 Public Patent Libraries in California — Kay Idso Donahue 
247 California's Ex-Officio State Librarians, 1850-1861— Peter Thomas 
Conmy 

257 State Library Agency Appropriations, 1975 

NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

261 News Notes 1974 

262 Sheila Thornton 

263 50 Years Ago in California Libraries 

264 Books Received 

265 California State Library's Annual Program, Library Services and 

Construction Act 

271 California Basic State Plan, Library Services and Construction Act 

272 Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of Educa- 

tion, Basic State Plan Amendment 

273 Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of Educa- 

tion, Maintenance of Effort Certification — FY 1975 

274 Certification of the Establishment of the California State Library 

Advisory Council on Libraries 



236 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

ISSN 0028-9248 

News Notes of California Libraries 

Official Journal of the California State Library 

Mrs. Ethel S. Crockett, State Librarian 

California State Library 
Library and Courts Building 
Sacramento, California 
Mailing address: P. O. Box 2037 
Sacramento CA 95809 

Edited by Collin Clark, Public Information Office 
Four numbers per volume year. 

Indexed in: Library & Information Science Abstracts; Library Litera- 
ture. 
Second class postage paid at Sacramento, California. 

Photoelectronic composition by California Office of State Printing. 



ON THE COVER: Patrons learn about equipment and services at the Open House for 
the Books for the Blind and Physically Handicapped Section, California State Library, 
Sept. 29, 1974. Photo by Bill Stabler. 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 237 

BBPH — Past, Present and Future 

by Daphne Kester 



The years 1973-1974 will be remembered as red letter years for the 
Books for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (BBPH) section of the 
California State Library, for it was in February, 1973, that State Senator 
Donald L. Grunsky introduced Senate Bill 281 which appropriated 
funds for an adequate staff and facilities for this unit. 

A year later, on March 7, 1974, BBPH moved into fine new facilities 
at 600 Broadway, Sacramento, which were dedicated at a gala Open 
House ceremony, September 29, 1974. 

The unit had its origin in a small Braille collection established at the 
State Library in 1905 under the supervision of Mabel Gillis. In the 1930's 
with passage of the Pratt-Smoot Bill the Library of Congress established 
eighteen regional libraries for the blind, and our Books for the Blind 
Section became one of them. 

Talking books and players were added to the collection, and later 
both open reel magnetic tape recordings and cassettes were included. 

On July 19, 1966, Public Law 89-522 expanded service not only to the 
blind but to all individuals who were unable to read conventional print 
due to a visual or physical handicap. At this time the unit became 
known as the Books for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, or BBPH 
for short. The staff consisted of 13.5 positions serving 4,200 borrowers 
with a circulation average of 4.33 books per month per borrower. 

The statistics for the following seven years show a rapid increase in 
borrowers to 9,400 in 1973 with no increase in staff positions, no increase 



"A rapid increase in borrowers with no increase in 
staff positions, no increase in work and storage 
area" 



in work and storage area, a slight increase in total circulation but a 
decrease in books per borrower from 4.33 to 2.5 per month. 

Due to these conditions the National Federation of the Blind of Cali- 
fornia asked Senator Grunsky to introduce SB 281 to appropriate $238,- 
000 to improve staffing and facilities for the BBPH. The intent was to 
return the level of service to what it was in 1966, before the physically 



Mrs. Daphne Kester, formerly Supervising Librarian, Books for the Blind and Physically 
Handicapped section, California State Library, has recently resigned to accompany her 
husband on a sabbatical in Israel and Europe. Mrs. Marion Bourke is now in charge of the 
section. 



238 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

handicapped were added to the program, and to provide each borrow- 
er with an average of 5 books per month. 

The bill was passed by the Legislature and signed by Governor Rea- 
gan on September 14, 1973. 

The present year finds BBPH in a new, 20,000 square foot leased 
facility at 600 Broadway, Sacramento. Ample parking is available in 
front for staff, visitors and patrons. All architectural barriers have been 
eliminated: all doors can accommodate wheel chairs; there are no steps 
to climb; low drinking fountains and adequate restroom facilities for the 
handicapped have been installed. 

The interior of the building features blue and green walls and carpet- 
ing. Light oak panelled walls and furniture are used throughout. A 
large, comfortable reading room for the blind or handicapped patron 
has been provided so that he may use this library just as a sighted person 
uses his library reading room. Talking machines, cassette players and 
Braille books are available at each reading table. Also in the reading 
room are a page-turner, magnifying lamp, cataract readers, and a Vi- 



"He may use this library just as a sighted person 
uses his library reading room" 



sualtek low vision aid. A collection of large print books are shelved here. 

In the work areas Telex duplicating equipment has been installed 
with the capability of copying both open reel and cassette tapes. The 
latter will soon be duplicated at both 1% ips and ^Vie ips, on both two 
and four track tapes, as the Library of Congress tape program will soon 
be recording at this slower speed. Soon to be installed is a Braille ther- 
moform machine and a soundproof recording booth. 

The remaining half of the building houses the storage stacks and 
shipping area. This area is designed so that there is easy access to the 
shipping dock for loading and unloading daily postal trucks. New post- 
age metering equipment plus Braille book containers have been ob- 
tained. 

The above has outlined both the space and equipment in BBPH's new 
facility. However, SB 281 also provided funds for increased staffing. The 
staff now consists of 21.5 positions. Two of these were added in August, 
1973, as a result of a budget augmentation. In January, 1974, six more 
positions were added. One of these is a professional librarian whose 
principal duty is to act in a reader's advisory capacity. 

On September 29, 1974, the California State Library held an Open 
House for all borrowers, interested librarians and friends at the new 
BBPH facility. Staff of the State Library worked especially hard prepar- 
ing decorations, serving refreshments and conducting tours of the 
building for some 400 guests. 

For the Open House program Alfred J. Maupin, Chief of State Library 
Services, acted as Master of Ceremonies. The Invocation was given by 












Reading materials are available in 
many forms through BBPH 



A reminder of the BBPH Open House, Sept. 29, 
1974, in photos by Bill Stabler. 



240 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 




Mrs. Crockett welcomes visitors at the 
BBPH Open House 



Porter Hatten and Mrs. Janie Ford 
hear remarks by Gerald Buttars 





Daphne Kester introduces speakers to 
400 Open House guests 



Visitors inspect reading aids for the 
visually handicapped 



4 






A high speed duplicator makes talking 
book tapes readily available 

Porter Hatten, Vice President, Yolo County Chapter, National Federa- 
tion of the Blind of California, and the Pledge to the Flag by Mrs. Janie 
Ford, President, Sacramento County Club, Associated Blind of Califor- 
nia. Following introductions, there were remarks by Mrs. Melba Gallo- 
way representing the National Federation of the Blind of California, 
Gerald Buttars, Regional Librarian, Utah State Library Commission, 
and Mrs. Ethel S. Crockett, California State Librarian. The day was a 



"A particularly fine opportunity for library staff 
and library users to meet and come to know one 
another" 



particularly fine opportunity for library staff and library users to meet 
and come to know one another, and all of us will long remember it. 
This brings us to the future — a future in which we hope to see an 
expanded program for the blind and physically handicapped of Califor- 
nia. This program can only be expanded through both our own staff 
efforts to provide readers' advisory service and increased circulation of 
materials, plus You: 

• You the Volunteer to help with recording tapes. 

• You the Transcriber to assist with hand-copied Braille. 

• You the Librarian to help the blind or handicapped patron through 
your demonstration or deposit collection, your reference department, 
your outreach program, and your referral to the State Library Books for 
the Blind and Physically Handicapped. 

Each of you is invited to visit our new quarters and learn how you can 
help us better serve the blind and physically handicapped residents of 
your community. 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 243 

Public Patent Libraries in California 

By Kay Idso Donahue 



Two public patent libraries exist in California, in the Los Angeles 
Public Library and in the Sunnyvale Public Library. 

The term "patent library" is used to define libraries which include 
U.S. patent specifications and drawings, and search tools for patent 
research, and have staff to assist inventors, attorneys, and others to use 
the collections. The staff, of course, does not interpret patent law or 
express opinions as to the patentability of an invention. 

In this respect, the two public patent libraries are alike. They differ, 
however, in that the Los Angeles collection includes patents from the 
beginning of the patent system while Sunnyvale's dates only from Janu- 
ary, 1962. Also, while Los Angeles' patents are in strict numerical order, 
those in Sunnyvale have all been sorted into the 300-odd main classes 
of the U. S. patent system. 

Both libraries receive the full output of newly-issued U. S. patents, 
replete with errata which will be remedied with seemingly endless 
corrections — the burden of all patent archivists. 

They both have full sets of the U. S. Patent Office Official Gazette. 
At Sunnyvale the Gazettes are used to search patents earlier than Janu- 
ary, 1962, as this weekly announcement bulletin includes an abstract 
and drawing of each patent. Trademarks are also announced in the 
Gazettes, and the libraries have indexes for search of registered trade- 
marks. 

Besides helping inventors, attorneys, and industry, the libraries assist 
plant propagation experts (with plant patents), writers, students, art- 
ists, and engineers. 

Los Angeles previously received hard copy patents and bound them. 
All earlier years are in this form. Presently they subscribe to mi- 
crofilmed patents, commencing with January, 1973. 

At Los Angeles the Patents Room is part of the Science and Technol- 
ogy Department. The collection starts with Patent No. 1, issued on July 
13, 1836. In addition to the search media for patents and trademarks, 
Los Angeles has the complete Catalog of Copyright Entries, and publi- 



Kay Idso Donahue is Reference Librarian at the Sunnyvale Public Library, holders of a 
unique patent library arranged by main class. Her article has been prepared with the help 
of Mrs. Virginia Taneja, Los Angeles Public Library, for the information of librarians and 
patent users at both libraries. 



244 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

cations on copyright procedures and laws. Sunnyvale does not have the 
Copyright Entries or bulletins. 

Also at Los Angeles but not at Sunnyvale are foreign patent abstracts: 
Canadian Patent Office Record 1890 to date; Cuba, Boletin Oficial de 
la Propiedad Industrial, 1915 to 1971; Germany, Auszuge aus Patents- 
chriften, 1880-1940; German Patent Abstracts (cgmprehensive English 
edition) , 1962 to date; Great Britain, Abridgements of Specifications, 
1855-1939 and 1947 to date; Great Britain, Official Journal, 1889 to date; 



"The Los Angeles collection includes patents from 
the beginning of the patent system while Sunny- 
vale's dates from January, 1962." 



U.S.S.R. Soviet Inventions Illustrated (comprehensive English edition) , 
1962 to date. Please note that these are all abstracts. 

The Los Angeles Public Library (like its counterpart) will copy pat- 
ents for patrons. The rules at L.A.P.L. for companies are: orders on 
company letterhead will be mailed to the firm with a bill. For individual 
orders not on a company letterhead, Los Angeles first sends a photo- 
quote to notify the patron of the cost. (Charge for hard copy from film 
is 25<zf per page. But for mailed copies from bound hard-copy volumes, 
rates are prorated and patrons will be advised in their photoquote.) 
Checks should not be sent to Los Angeles with the original request. 
Telephone orders are not accepted. Their address: 630 West Fifth St., 
Los Angeles 90071. A self-operated coin copy machine (10<zf per copy) 
is available in the Patents Room for copies from patents earlier than 
January, 1973. Copying from microfilm is the same charge whether 
on-site or mailed: 2^<^. 



The Science and Technology Department of L.A.P.L. furnishes this 
information on open hours: 

Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. 

Friday and Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

Phone No (213) 626-7461 



Since Sunnyvale's collection of whole patents starts with Number 
3,015,103, our patrons have become familiar with their choices for ob- | 
taining earlier patents. In fact, we print the information about Los 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 245 

Angeles' rules in our brochure. The second choice for obtaining whole 
patents is the Commissioner of Patents & Trademarks, Washington, 
D.C. 20231, Attn: Patent Copy Sales Branch. There are two ways to 
order from the Patent OfBce: (1) at 50^ per patent, with about 6 weeks 
delivery time, or (2) at $1.00 per patent, marked "special handling" 
with about 14 days delivery time. 

Here at Sunnyvale we have developed a simplified system for compa- 
nies to order patents copied. A deposit account is established with the 
city, and firms (as well as government agencies, etc.) simply draw 
against the account, so that we do not send monthly bills. Staff copying 
has a per-page charge plus postage. 

Each firm writes a letter of authorization, specifying names of per- 
sons eligible to place orders. Most orders come in by phone; we ask that 
the patent number and class number both be furnished when possible. 
If only the patent number is given, it is necessary for someone here to 
look up the patent as listed in the Gazette, because all patents here are 
out of their original numerical order, and stacked in bundles (unbound) 
with their main class number on the cover. (They are numerical within 
their class.) 

This system of sorting patents on arrival into main classes is unique 
among libraries. Only the Patent Office has a complete collection of 
sorted patents. However, theirs are sorted in sub-classes, which are a 
finer breakdown. Some classes have hundreds of subclasses, so that 
thousands of subclasses exist. 

Sunnyvale is not a depository and buys all materials; the acquisition 
processes are not without travail. 



LOCATION MEZZANINE OF MAIN SUNNYVALE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

665 W. Olive Avenue 
Sunnyvale, California 94086 

HOURS Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Sunday I p.m. to 5 p.m. 

TELEPHONE NO 736-0795 (Direct Line), 

or 245-9171— Ext. 42 



How did a modest-sized public library happen to become host to a 
patent library? A local patent attorney. Jack L. Bohan, now with United 
Technology Center division of United Aircraft Corp., initiated and in- 
spired the entire project. At one point, his garage was the site where 
Boy Scouts sorted great boxes of patents. 



246 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Originally the patent library was housed in an abandoned Sunnyvale 
fire house a mile from the city library. Now it is on the mezzanine of 
the expanded main library. 

Mrs. Margaret Sielschott, previously in Federal civil service, became 
the mainstay of the patent library on its opening in 1965. She established 
the precedent for her successors of the high level, paraprofessional 
patent specialist to whom great numbers of independent inventors 
acknowledge a great debt. Currently in charge is Mrs. Margreta Nis- 
bett. 

Sunnyvale's patent library is now operated by IV2 library assistants, 
1 office clerk, page time, and some aid by reference librarians from the 
adult services staff. Those of us who welcome this opportunity assist 



'Boy Scouts sorted great boxes of patents. 



with the 69 weekly open hours by taking an evening, a Saturday, and 
occasional dinner hours. There is a special satisfaction in helping floun- 
dering inventors take initial steps on the long road to a patent applica- 
tion, and when a patent is awarded, all share the joy. 

An ideal public patent facility would include at least: 

1. Patents easily accessible by subclass including all patents ever 
granted, plus another set of patents in chronological order, on 
microfilm if possible. 

2. Up-to-date, cumulative, improved indexes, including microfilm 
lists of patent numbers and an expanded Index to Classification 
with many more "see references" for the novice searcher. 

3. Improved text material on how the individual inventor may pur- 
sue his own search and application. 

4. U. S. Patent Office pamphlets for handout or loan. 

5. Several reliable, inexpensive, rapid, self-operated photo copiers. 



Demands upon the patent libraries have doubled and redoubled. 
Copying has become a tremendous quantity operation far beyond the 
scale of typical library duplicating. Independent inventors are increas- 
ingly discovering us, and in teaching them how to do a patent search, 
we believe our primary purpose is happily served. 

For decades, proposals have been made for the Federal government 
to improve access to public records of technology. No conceivable 
means could serve this goal as well as enhancing the resources of public 
patent libraries. 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 247 

California's Ex-Officio State 
Librarians, 1850-1861 

by Peter Thomas Conmy 



California State Library dates from January 24, 1850, the day upon 
which Governor Peter H. Burnett signed into law a bill creating the 
institution. This action, like most others, had its prelude. 

When the first legislature of the western state, not yet admitted to the 
Union, convened in December 1849, among the standing committees 
appointed was one on the State Library. In anticipation of legislation 
creating such an institution Colonel Jonathan D. Stevenson gave Cali- 
fornia a set of New York reports and a natural history of the New York 
region. A few days later Senator Thomas J. Green of Sacramento pre- 
sented as a gift several books, which were given into the charge and 
custody of the Secretary of the Senate. Within a month or on January 
19, 1850 to be exact, John C. Fremont donated one hundred volumes, 
primarily government publications, law books and accounts of explora- 
tions. When five days later the state library was created these gifts 
became the nucleus of its collection. 

The legislation of January 24, 1850 placed the California State Library 
under the control and management of the Secretary of State. ^ This 
officer, under the Constitution, was not an elected official as in most 
states. He was appointed by the Governor for a term of three years, 
subject to confirmation by the Senate.^ By virtue of the library law he 
was commissioned (1) to procure a suitable place for the state library 
and (2) take charge and operate it "in a manner best calculated to serve 
the objects of said state library". Of course the law was silent on what 
the objects of the library might be but this was obviated several weeks 
later by a new enactment approved by the Governor on April 9th. 
Under this law (1) use of the library was restricted to members of the 
Legislature during sessions, and at all times to the Governor, the state 
officers required to live in the capital city, the justices of the Supreme 
Court and the Attorney General; (2) withdrawal of more than two 
items at any time was prohibited; (3) the librarian was instructed to 
maintain a record of books borrowed and returned; (4) period of loans 
was limited to two weeks, except for members of the Legislature during 
sessions; (5) for books lost or otherwise not returned a charge of three 
times the value of the book was imposed; (6) the Comptroller was 
instructed to withhold the final payment for session attendance of all 
members of the Legislature until it was ascertained that their accounts 



Dr. Peter T. Conmy, City Historian of Oakland and Librarian Emeritus of the Oakland 
Public Library, has written extensively on the history of libraries and librarians. This is 
one of a series of articles by him on early State Librarians. 



248 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

with the library were clear; and (7) the librarian was given authority 
to maintain civil actions to recover against individuals who were delin- 
quent in their accounts with the state library.^ 

Although the language of the statute summarized above constitutes 
procedural directives rather than a substantive philosophy, it does set 
forth in effect the objective of the institution as a library for the officials 
of the State of California. As such, therefore, its policy of selection of 
materials was oriented toward filling the needs of its users, especially 
the Supreme Court. In its early years, therefore, it was largely, although 
not entirely, a law library. John D. Henderson writing in 1939 summa- 
rized the early period of the state library in these words. 

The California State Library started as a legal collection in 1850 
and, as with many another state library of that period, its function for 
many years was limited to a rather passive service for state officers 
and members of the legislature. Although through gifts and purchases 
books of general interest were added, including valuable source 
material on California history, this limited activity continued until 
1899 when James L. Gillis became State Librarian. Mr. Gillis' vision 
of an extended and comprehensive state library service resulted in 
his establishing in one institution fundamental state-wide activities.^ 

Notwithstanding the "passive" existence of the State Library, as Mr. 
Henderson defines it, much good was accomplished in those early years. 
For one thing a priceless collection of materials was built up, and al- 
though not properly arranged, was discovered enthusiastically by Gillis, 
and, under his supervision made readily available. Both the several 
Governors and their Secretaries of State persuaded the Legislative to 
appropriate as generously as possible for the institution. In 1855 the sum 
of $17,250.00 was paid in purchase of the law library of William C. Olds, 



"In the other States of the Confederacy, the 
officers of State are provided with substan- 
tial brick or stone buildings." 



a pioneer attorney of San Francisco.^ This strengthened greatly the 
library's resources held for the Supreme Court. In 1860 an appropria- 
tion of $2,500.00 was made for the acquisition of files of California's first 
newspapers, the California and the California Star respectively, and 
many of the back issues of the Alta California, an early San Francisco 
daily. The statutes of 1860 indicate appropriations of $1,000 for rent, 
$300 for shelving and furniture, $600 salary for a porter, and $300 for 
contingent purposes.^ At that same session also William C. Stratton was 
authorized under the Secretary of State to prepare "a descriptive and 
classified catalog". This included authority to superintend the printing 
of the catalog by the State Printer, to number all books in the library 
and to stamp on the back of each "California State Library". The sum 




William Van Vorhies, served 1849-1853 



of $1,000 was allowed for this, and the legislation provided also the 
keeping of what today would be called accession records^ On January 
4, 1854 Governor Bigler in his annual message submitted this recom- 
mendation to the Legislature, 

Although deeply impressed with the importance as well as the 
necessity, of economizing in every department of the State govern- 
ment, I feel it incumbent upon me to direct your attention to the 
insecure position of the public archives. The entire public records, as 
well as the State Library, now numbering about four thousand 
volumes, are kept in fragile frame buildings, without fire proof vaults 
or safes. The public records are now invaluable, and if destroyed, 
could not be replaced, and their loss would involve the State and 
individuals in serious difficulties. In other States of the Confederacy, 
the officers of State are provided with substantial brick or stone 
buildings, and the public records rendered entirely secure by being 
deposited in fire-proof vaults, or safes, provided for that purpose. In 
this truly important matter we are admonished of the necessity of 
increased safeguards by the many and terrible conflagrations which 
have occurred during the past year. I trust, therefore, that you will, 
without delay, adopt such measures as you may deem necessary to 
render entirely secure the public archives in the several offices, and 
also the State Library.® 

No action appears to have been taken on this portion of Governor 
Bigler's message and the library was not moved into a stone edifice until 
the state capitol building was opened in 1867. Here it remained until 



250 - NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

1928 when it was placed in its present location, the Library and Courts 
Building, also of monumental construction. Notwithstanding its poor 
and hazardous quarters, the State Library continued to add to its collec- 
tion many important and valuable items. 

THE EX-OFFICIO STATE LIBRARIANS 

In 1937 Mrs. Faith Holmes Hyers of Los Angeles Public Library pub- 
lished an article, "Library History Told Through Librarians' Personali- 
ties".^ Although her treatment is limited to leaders of her own 
institution it does lend emphasis to the fact that human personality is 
a factor in the success of any project. Judged by this standard it will be 
seen that the six men who headed California State Library during its 
first eleven years were outstanding citizens in all respects. It tends to 
prove also the theory put forth by political scientists that in public 
offices requiring specialization appointment rather than popular elec- 
tion produces the better quality. In addition to this the appointed offi- 
cial is responsible to his appointing power and his own efficiency or lack 
of it contributes greatly to the success or failure of the higher official's 
administration. Short biographical summaries of California's first six 
Secretaries of State will show this to be true. It will evidence also the 
high quality of man in the early years of California's statehood. ^° 

William Van Voorhies 1849-53. The first Secretary of State was 
named by Governor Burnett on December 2, 1849. He had been elected 
previously a state senator from San Francisco but resigned this post on 
December 21st, upon being confirmed in the appointed office. Born in 
Tennessee in 1823, Van Voorhies by profession was a lawyer and had 
located in Washington, D. C. He arrived in California on February 28, 
1849 having been appointed an Assistant Postmaster General with in- 
structions to establish post offices in California. Upon the expiration of 
his three year term as Secretary of State by Governor Bigler he was 
reappointed on January 9, 1852 but resigned on February 19, 1853 to 

"His appointment as Secretary of State fol- 
lowed upon his twenty-second birthday by 
just five weeks." 

accept appointment as Surveyor of the Port of San Francisco. Taking 
up his residence in Oakland, he both practiced law and wrote for news- 
papers. At one time he published the Alameda Gazette and later the 
Alameda Democrat. Upon his leaving for California, the Masonic Grand 
Lodge of the District of Columbia entrusted to him a charter for a lodge 
to be established in California and to bear the title, California Lodge No. 
13. He did help to form the lodge in San Francisco and was one of its 
first officers. It became known, however, as California Lodge No. 1." 
Van Voorhies was a native of Tennessee, born in 1823. On January 26, 
1854 in San Francisco he married Miss Di McDougal, niece of Califor- 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 251 

nia's second Governor, John McDougal. In 1878 by the voters of Ala- 
meda County he was elected a delegate to California's Constitutional 
Convention. He was then fifty-eight years of age. In August 1884 he 
went to Eureka to do some special newspaper work for the Humboldt 
Standard. It was there that he died suddenly on September 26th. He was 
a highly competent man and as equally respected.*^ 

James W. Denver 1853-1855. California's second ex-officio State Li- 
brarian was appointed by Governor Bigler, February 19, 1853 and reap- 
pointed January 9, 1854, holding the office until he resigned November 
1, 1855. His vacation of the office was due to the fact that he had been 
elected to the House of Representatives in which he served for two 
years. Previously he had been a senator in the California Legislature 
representing Klamath and Trinity counties in the third and fourth ses- 
sions. ^^ Following his term in Congress by President Buchanan he was 
named Commissioner of Indian Affairs and or shortly after this by the 
same president appointed Governor of the Territory of Kansas, which 
then included Colorado. There were many problems on this frontier 
and the Governor proved himself a man of rare administrative ability. 
The city of Denver is named after him. 

Born in Virginia in 1817, James W. Denver had been taken as a child 
to Ohio where he received most of his education and where he gradu- 
ated from Cincinnati Law School. He had served with distinction in the 
Mexican War, and offering his services in 1861 was commissioned a 
Brigadier General in the Union Army. He participated in some of the 
important campaigns and battles of the war. After discharge he settled 
in Washington, D. C. where he practiced law until his death which 
occurred on August 9, 1892.^^ 

Charles H. Hempstead 1855-1857. Governor Bigler selected as suc- 
cessor to Denver, Charles H. Hempstead, a native of Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania, born September 29, 1832. Of his early years little is known but 
eventually he did read law in an office in St. Louis. In 1852 he moved 
to California, but not yet having attained his majority was ineligible for 
public office. He did become personal secretary to the Governor, and 
his appointment as Secretary of State, effective November 5, 1855 fol- 
lowed upon his twenty-second birthday by just five weeks. Two years 
later he was named Superintendent of the United States Mint in San 
Francisco. His tenure ended in 1861 when the Buchanan administration 
went out of office. Hempstead then moved to Utah where he joined the 
Union forces under General Connor. His entire military service was in 
that state. He left the army at the close of the war having attained the 
rank of captain. For a short time thereafter he engaged in the newspa- 
per business and then pursued the practice of the law. During the Grant 
administration he was United States Attorney for Utah Territory. He 
died in Salt Lake City, September 28, 1879, aged fifty-seven.^^ 

David F. Douglass 1856-58. This ex-officio State Librarian was ap- 
pointed by Governor J. Neeley Johnson on January 10, 1856. He was 
born in Sumner County, Tennessee, January 8, 1821. At age fifteen he 
moved to Arkansas. There on March 17, 1839 he got into a fight with 



252 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



a Dr. William Howell and this resulted in the physician's death. Dou- 
glass served fourteen months in prison for the offense. In the winter of 
1845-46 he went to Texas, and, the war with Mexico having broken out, 
he enlisted in the Texas volunteers and was in the regiment command- 
ed by Colonel John C. Hays. He was assigned as a wagoner and came 
into California and stayed in the Golden State for the remainder of his 
years, settling in San Joaquin County, where Douglass Township bears 
his name. 

Elected a state senator, Douglass represented the San Joaquin Dis- 
trict in the first session. In 1850 also he was elected by the Legislature 
a Brigadier General of the California militia. In 1851 by President Fill- 
more he was appointed United States Marshal for California; later dur- 
ing the sixth session of the Legislature he sat as an Assemblyman, 
representing San Joaquin County. A prosperous farmer and highly re- 
spected citizen he died in his home on June 16, 1872; his age at the time 
was fifty-four. ^^ 




Charles H. Hempstead, served 1855-1857 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 



253 



Ferris Forman 1858-1860. On January 9, 1858 Governor Weller ap- 
pointed as Secretary of State, an attorney, Ferris Forman, who already 
had enjoyed a very distinguished career. During the administration of 
President Franklin Pierce he had served as postmaster of Sacramento. 
Prior to that he had been Judge of California's Sixth Judicial District, to 
which position he was elected in 1850. He was born in New York, August 
25, 1807 and had graduated from Union College in Schenectady and was 
a trained lawyer. Early in his career he moved to Illinois, where by 
President Van Buren, a personal friend of his family, he was appointed 
United States Attorney. Later in that state also he was elected a state 
senator. Upon the outbreak of the Mexican War he raised a regiment 
of Illinois volunteers and was commissioned its colonel. He saw gallant 
service in Mexico, notably at Cerro Gordo. In 1849 he came to California 
and settled in Sacramento. In 1861 when the Civil War broke out his 
commission was reactivated but when he learned that he would not be 
sent into battle he resigned in disgust. In 1866 he returned to Illinois and 




James W. Denver, served 1853-1855 



254 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

resumed legal practice. Twenty years later he moved back to California 
and lived in retirement with his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. D. Peters. In his ninety-fourth year he died in their home on February 
11, 1901.'^ 

Johnson Price 1860-62. The last Secretary of State to have charge of 
the State Library was Johnson Price, who was appointed to the office 
by Governor Latham, January 10, 1860. He served until replaced by 
Governor Stanford's naming of William H. Weeks on January 11, 1862. 
In politics Johnson Price was a Lecompton Democrat, although for a 
time had belonged to the shortlived American Party and was a delegate 
to its national convention in 1856. Born in Kentucky he became a Doc- 
tor of Medicine and was a Surgeon in the Kentucky Volunteers during 
the Mexican War. In his native state also he had been elected a delegate 
to a constitutional convention organized for the purpose of proposing 
revisions of the organic document. 

In 1849 Dr. Johnson Price came to California and for a number of 
years followed his profession in Sacramento. On November 6, 1858 he 



"Although the first decade of statehood was 
one characterized by sordid politics, the 
state library seemed to have been kept free 
from evil influences." 



was elected a State Senator for the unexpired term of W. I. Ferguson, 
deceased, and served during the tenth session in 1859. There were 
twenty-eight Lecompton Democrats in the senate at that time and they 
selected one of their number. Dr. Samuel Merritt of Oakland, also a 
physician, as president pro tem. This session closed on April 19th and 
ten days later or on the 28th Dr. Price in San Francisco was married to 
Miss Annie N. C. Jones by Rev. F. C. Ewer of the Episcopal Church. 
Following his service as Secretary of State Price took up residence in 
San Francisco where he was a stockbroker. He died there on April 8, 
1868, at the age of forty-five. Cause of death was tuberculosis. Upon 
receiving word of his passing the stock exchange immediately closed for 
the day in his memory. ^^ 

A day following his appointment of Price as Secretary of State, Gover- 
nor Latham resigned to become a United States Senator and Lieutenant 
Governor James G. Downey succeeded to the governorship. He was a 
strong executive and succeeded, as did his successor, Leland Stanford, 
in keeping California in the Union during the difficult period of the 
Civil War. It was in this biennial also that the State Library was re- 
organized both by the Governor and the ex-officio State Librarian. In 
1861 the Legislature followed a gubernatorial recommendation and 
placed the institution under an appointed Board of State Library Trust- 
ees, vested with the power, among others, to appoint the State Librar- 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 255 

ian for a period of four years. ^^ The first one named was William C. 
Stratton, a Union Democrat and he served until 1870. He had been a 
member of the New Jersey legislature before coming to California in 
1853 and in this state he had represented Placer County in the Assembly 
during the 9th and 10th sessions. In fact he had been Speaker during 
the time that Johnson Price sat in the Senate. And, as noted earlier, in 
1860, he had been hired by the Legislature to prepare a descriptive 
catalog for the library. Thus he had had experience under Price and 
proved a most worthy successor. 

CONCLUSION 



Notwithstanding the fact that during the first eleven years of its 
existence (1850-1861) the California State Library did not become what 
might be called a great library, it was operated under competent men 
of ability and integrity. Its retarded growth in that period was most 
probably due to its restricted use to state officials rather than to intrinsic 
defect in its management. The fact of the matter is that it grew rich in 
resources that awaited the leadership that came at the close of the 
century in the person of James L. Gillis. But his progressive activity was 
aided by popular interest and scholarship, an educational growth in the 
first half century of California's statehood. It should be observed, also, 
that although the first decade of that statehood was one characterized 
by sordid politics, the state library seemed to have been kept free from 
evil influences, and developed along such professional lines as was possi- 
ble in that period. That this freedom from corruption characterized 
public libraries of the era generally is evidenced by the following quota- 
tion from Joeckel who reviews the political past in these words, 

Nor must it be forgotten that this period was one of such wide- 
spread corruption, graft and inefficiency that it caused Lord Bryce to 
characterize our local government as a "conspicuous failure". In this 
respect the record of the public library appears to be almost absolute- 
ly clean, as far as evidence is now available. In a day when the spoils 
system ruled, and the vicious system of rotation in office was com- 
mon, the personnel of libraries seems to have been little affected. The 
leading librarians of the early days were often recruited from aca- 
demic positions or from the social libraries. The reputations of such 
early library leaders as Jewett, Winsor, Poole, Crunden and others are 
outstanding in comparison with the rather common averages of me- 
diocrity, and sheer inefficiency in municipal service. Possibly the 
librarians were financially too poor and their salaries too low to at- 
tract the interest of the spoilsmen, but at any rate they escaped his 
touch. The librarian's characteristic fear of politics, born in this unsa- 
vory period of municipal history, has been a powerful influence in 
determining his point of view regarding the governmental organiza- 
tion of the public library.^" 

It may be well to close this discussion by quoting the last paragraph 
of a monumental article on California State Library written by Mabel 
W. Gillis. This in turn quotes an appraisal of the library in 1863 and 



256 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

would indicate that under the six ex-officio librarians the institution 
fared well. 

An editor of the Daily Alta California on December 28, 1863, after 
describing some of the treasures of the State Library, closed with this 
warm admonition to his readers: "Let the citizens of our State fre- 
quent this institution, become better acquainted with its utility, and 
lend their aid to its further advancement and prosperity".^ ^ 



FOOTNOTES 

1. California Statutes 1850, p. 162. 

2. Constitution (1849) Article V, Sec. 19. 

3. California Statutes 1850, p. 173. This was amended eight years later to provide that 
the library be open daily except Sundays and holidays from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. 
and during legislative sessions in the evening from 7:00 P.M. to 10:00 P.M. Act 
approved March 20, 1858. California Statutes 1858, p. 79. 

4. John D. Henderson "The California State Library" The Library Journal S4:\2 (June 
15, 1939) p. 481. 

5. California Statutes 1855, p. 267. Act approved May 5, 1855. At that same session $2,500 
had been allowed the library for contingent expenses. Statutes 1855, p. 147. In 1856 
for contingent expenses $1,000 was allowed. Statutes 1856 p. 46. Several appropriations 
are noted in 1857, Statutes 1857, p. 87, 351, 354. In 1859 for rent $1,200 was allowed, 
$1,000 for shelving and furniture, $300 contingent, and $300 for salary for a porter 
Statutes 1859 p. 277. 

6. California Statutes 1860, p. 404. 

7. California Statutes 1860, pp. 167-68. 

8. The Governor's Annual Message 1854 is reproduced in California Blue Book and State 
Boster, 1899, compiled by Charles Forrest Curry, Secretary of State (Sacramento: 
State Printing Office, 1899), p. 279. 

9. Faith Holmes Hyers, "Library History told through Librarian's Personalities", Pacific 
Bindery Talk 91 (March 1937). pp. 115-18. 

10. Many have the impression that governmental affairs on early California followed the 
"wild and wooley" western trend. To some extent, of course, this was true, but in 
many instances the bizarre side of life has been over emphasized. Wrote Frankhn 
Tuthill in 1866 regarding California's first legislation session, "The Legislature 
continued in session four months. The wits of the day called it, "The Legislature of 
a Thousand Drinks". The appellation may have been fairly won. Members whose 
families were the width of a continent away found it a thirstier land than it has ever 
been since. But if they drank well, they worked well, too. They enacted one hundred 
and forty laws most of which were of a general and important character, though some 
were pretty nearly transcripts of the laws of other states' (Franklin Tuthill, The 
History of California, pp. 285-86). (San Francisco: H. H. Bancroft and Co., 1866). 

11. John Whicher, Masonic Beginnings in California and Hawaii (San Francisco: Grand 
Lodge, F. and A. M., 1931) pp. 28-35. 

12. For data on life of William Van Voorhies see Quarterly of The Society of California 
Pioneers 2:1 (March 1925), pp. 5-18; San Francisco ^//a January 27, 1854, 2-^: Daily 
Humboldt Standard, September 6, 1884. 

13. Klamath County is no longer in existence. Located in the northwestern portion of the 
state it was created on April 25, 1851. Territory was taken from it and given to Siskiyou 
in 1852, to Trinity in 1855, and to Del Norte in 1857. The county was disbanded in 
1874-75 and its territory divided between Humboldt and Del Norte. 

14. Data on Denver's life may be found in abbreviated form in The Washington Post, 
August 10, 1892; Appleton's Cyclopaeda of American Biography 2:144; Oscar T. Shuck, 
History of the Bench and Bar of California, p. 227. 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 257 

15. Much biographical data about Charles H. Hempstead may be found in a memorial 
address before the Salt Lake City Bar Association delivered by a Judge Tilford and 
reproduced in Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 30, 1879. See also Irma W. House 
and Irene Warr, comp., Johnston, Connor and the Mormons: an Outline of Military 
History in Northern Utah (Salt Lake City: Authors, 1962), pp. 31-34. 

16. For biographical data on Douglass see Stockton Herald, June 18, 1872, 3-1; also for June 
17, 1872, 3-1. See also F. T. Gilbert, History of San Joaquin County, California 
(Oakland: Thompson and West, 1879), p. 109. 

17. Stockton Evening Mail, February 11, 1901; Sacramento Bee, February 11, 1901, 1-1; 
San Francisco Examiner, February 12, 1901, 7-4. 

18. Data on Johnson Price is sparse. See Sacramento Union, February 10, 1868, 2-2; 
Sacramento Union, October 1, 1879, 2-4, and Daily Alta California, February 4, 1868, 
1-1. 

19. Act approved March 8, 1861. The Governor and Chief Justice were ex officio members 
of the board; the other three were elected by the Legislature for terms of four years. 
The first board was composed of John R. McConnell, Joseph W. Winans, Solomon 
Heydenfeldt, Chief Justice Stephen J. Field and Governor Downey. The act of March 
8, 1861 established the State Librarian's salary at $2,500. 

20. Carlton Bruns Joeckel, The Government of The American Public Library (Chicago: 
University of Chicago Press, 1939) p. 23. 

21. Mabel R. Gillis, "Cahfornia State Library, Its Hundred Years," California Library 
Bulletin 11:2 (December 1949) p. 77. That California State Library was developing 
well in this period is evidenced by the fact that a Sacramento City Directory for 1859 
indicates that at that time it had a collection of 10,000 volumes. 



State Library Agency Appropriations, 1975 

Again this year we print the data on State Library Agency appropria- 
tions gathered by Joseph F. Shubert, Ohio State Librarian. In addition 
to columns giving the amount of state funds budgeted for state aid to 
libraries, and state funds for operation of the state agency, there are 
columns for LSCA funds for FY 1975 and estimated LSCA for FY 1976. 
Once again, our thanks to Mr. Shubert and The State Library of Ohio 
for this data.— CC 



258 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



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260 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



STATE LIBRARY AGENCIES— ESTIMATES OF LSCA FUNDS 

November 1, 1974 



State 


LSCA-FY 1976 


LSCA— FY 1977 


Annual Budget 


Biennial Budget 






2100,000 

378,500 

612,000 

1,592,248 





256,000 

1,328,176 

259,970 



238,400 



1,227,987 

553,087 
422,800 

270,000 
900,000 

"o 

800,000 



655,940 

500,000 

355,629 

348,468 

401,000 



1,769,795 





557,000 



950,000 





2,178,172 

400,265 

622,845 



'5 
417,000 
231,450 
720,000 


968,633 
200,000 


No 

Sioo.ooo 

No 

681,000 
No 

No 
No 
No 
No 
No 


No 
No 

No 
No 
No 
270,000 



No 



No 
No 
No 
No 

401,000 





No 
No 



950,000 




No 


No 



o" 



No 
No 

968,663 




X 
X 

"x 

X 
X 
X 

X 

X 
X 

X 

X 

X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 

X 

X 
X 
X 

X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 

X 


X 












X 


















Florida 






X 




X 


Idaho --- 










X 




X 








X 








X 




















X 












X 








X 




X 










New York 






X 




X 


Ohio 


X 








X 




.. 


Rhode Island 


.. 




.^ 












X 


Utah - 










X 




X 




.. 




X 




X 







Compiled by: The State Library of Ohio 
65 South Front Street 
Columbus, Ohio 43215 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 261 

NEWS NOTES 1974 



With this issue. News Notes of California Libraries (NNCL) speaks 
again, after about a year's silence. This is the single, catch-up issue for 
1974, marked no. 2-3-4, completing the v. 69 publication year. The other 
issue this year was the "winter" statistics and directory, v. 69 no. 1. 

John Cully, Editorial Librarian for the California State Library since 
1968, accepted a new assignment as Assistant Supervisor of the Govern- 
ment Publications Section in the spring of 1974. The editorial functions 
were then incorporated into the newly organized Public Information 
Office of the State Library. The several responsibilities of this office 
have made it impossible to get out another issue of NNCL until now, 
though our good friends, the serial librarians of institutions around the 
world, have written regularly to ask where it was. 

NNCL was founded in 1906. In its early years it was a publication for 
"news notes". Libraries submitted quarterly reports on their activities, 
and these were published as a running account of library events. A 
reminder of those years is given in the new feature beginning with this 
issue, "50 Years Ago in California Libraries", which will reprint news 
items from NNCL of a half century ago. 

By the 1950s, NNCL had evolved into approximately its present form, 
a quarterly periodical carrying articles and features of the nature of a 
permanent contribution to the literature of librarianship. It is also an 
official source for documents of the California State Library. The need 
for publication of news items is filled by our duplicated memoranda and 
newsletters, chief of which is Mrs. Crockett's From the State Librarian 's 
Desk. 

Publication of the California Library Laws was split off from NNCL 
in 1974, where it had regularly been the "fall" issue. This will continue 
as a special publication, though it will not be annual. 

In 1975, the "winter" issue of NNCL, traditionally the statistics issue, 
will also be spun off as a separate publication, California Library Statis- 
tics and Directory. This will appear annually. For the first time library 
data is this year being assembled in a computer database, which will 
allow printing of additional tables, an index of subject collections, and 
more sophisticated manipulation of the data than could be done by 
hand. Ultimately, though not next year, computerization should also 
allow us to get the annual statistics and salary survey information out 
sooner after receipt of the report forms than was ever possible with us 
in the manual mode. 

These changes will leave News Notes itself as a library periodical. It 
will approximate quarterly publication, though it will probably take us 
a year to get into the rhythm of that. Traditional volume numbering 
will be continued. The editor herewith issues a call for manuscripts on 
any phase of library service, but particularly with a California emphasis. 



262 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

for publication in NNCL. Standard editorial practices should be fol- 
lowed (typed, double-spaced, single side of page for text), and photo- 
graphs or line artwork can be used. Payment cannot be made, but the 
periodical is seen throughout the world and is indexed in Library &: 
Information Science Abstracts and in Library Literature. 

This brings us to the present issue. A major State Library event this 
year was Senator Grunsky's bill 281 which allowed much needed expan- 
sion and new quarters for the Books for the Blind and Physically Hand- 
icapped service. The story of this is told by Daphne Kester with photos 
by Bill Stabler. Dr. Peter Conmy continues his historical series on early 
California State Librarians, covering the first holders of the office, the 
Secretaries of State. Kay Idso Donahue has contributed a story on a 
subject about which librarians should know more, patent libraries. She 
informatively describes the services of the two such facilities in Califor- 
nia, the Los Angeles and the Sunnyvale patent libraries. 

Other "news note" features for 1974 follow this editorial. Comments 
and suggestions for our readers are welcome. 

— CC 



SHEILA THORNTON 

Sheila F. Thornton became Chief of State Library Services, Novem- 
ber 18, 1974. 

Active in special library affairs, Ms. Thornton was employed by Sys- 
tem Development Corp. and by the Rand Corp. before joining the 



Sheila F. Thornton, Chief of State Library 
Services, California State Library. 




Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 263 

California State Library in 1973. She worked first as a Library Consult- 
ant and then as Deputy Chief of Technical Services before accepting 
her present position. 

Ms. Thornton's first association with libraries, other than as reader, 
came as student page at Santa Monica Public Library. She graduated in 
English from Mount St. Mary's College, Los Angeles, in 1957, and after 
some work experience returned to school at UCLA, receiving her MLS 
in 1965. 

The Chief of State Library Services of the California State Library 
heads the Bureau providing public services to state government and 
municipal and county libraries. She supervises the Law Library, Books 
for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, California Section, Govern- 
ment Publications Section, Reference Section, and Sutro Library. 

50 YEARS AGO IN CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Fresno County Free Library, Miss Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. The 
County Librarians of the Fourth District, with the Librarian of the 
Coalinga Library and the heads of departments of the Fresno County 
Free Library, have formed a luncheon club which meets every two 
months in Fresno, as the most central location. The first luncheon was 
held in January. It is proving a very pleasant way of getting together 
and talking over the work, each librarian telling of the new things she 
is doing and all taking part in the discussion of problems. — April, 1924. 

Merced County Free Library, Miss Essae M. Culver, Lib'n. The foot 
and mouth disease has descended upon the county with very disastrous 
effects and strict quarantine is now being enforced. This means that no 
visits can be made by the librarian to branches or by custodians to the 
main office without violating the spirit of the quarantine. Some branch 
librarians report their circulation is seriously affected because people 
cannot get to the library and others that people have more time to read 
and are therefore using the library more than ever and that the guards 
on duty are asking for many books. — April, 1924. 

A joint meeting of the First and Second Districts of the California 
Library Association was held in San Francisco in the Concert Room of 
the Palace Hotel, March 1, 1924. Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
spoke briefly of the change in the location of the Sutro Branch of the 
State Library from the Lane Medical Library Building to its present 
quarters in the San Francisco Public Library, Civic Center. Charles S. 
Greene was elected nominator for the First District, with Miss Edith 
Coulter, as alternate. Luncheon was served to about one hundred and 
twenty guests. Miss Carol Donnan favored the assembly with two violin 
solos and Miss Melva Far well with two flute solos. Miss Edith Hibberd 
of the Oakland Public Library sang two groups of songs in her very 
delightful way. — April, 1924. 

From the twenty-ninth annual meeting of the California Library 
Association held at the Hotel Huntington, Pasadena, April 28-30, 1924: 



264 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Miss Althea Warren of the San Diego Public Library gave an interesting 
talk on entertainment material. Patrons crowd to the library to know 
how to celebrate some holiday fittingly and the librarian is often puz- 
zled to make her material go around. Miss Warren gave sources for 
plays, games, recitations, etc. "In this branch of library work," she said, 
"it is sometimes necessary to lower our standards somewhat, for when 
a patron wants The face on the bar-room floor,' that's what he wants, 
not some classical poem." — July, 1924. 

Los Angeles Public Library, Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. On April 23 Mr. 
Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue, Architect of the Central Library build- 
ing, died suddenly in New York City of heart failure. His death was a 
severe loss to the architectural profession in general and was a grievous 
shock to his friends in Los Angeles and to the members of the Library 
Board. Fortunately plans for the Central Library building were practi- 
cally completed, which simplified the situation arising after his death. 
Early in June the contract for the rough grading of the Central Library 
site and excavation for foundations was completed, about 75,000 cubic 
yards having been removed at a cost of approximately $56,000. — July, 
1924. 

BOOKS RECEIVED 

Davies, D. W. Public libraries as culture and social centers: the origin 
of the concept. Scarecrow Press, 1974. $6.00. 174pp. LC: 74-8420. ISBN 
0-8108-0738-6. 

A scholarly and largely historical work tracing the origins of the idea 
that public libraries ought to be social service and entertainment cen- 
ters. 

Glover, Janice. Lighter side of the library. William S. Sullwold, 18 
Pearl St., Taunton MA 02780, 1974. $4.75. 128pp. LC: 74-75520. ISBN 
0-88492-003-8. 

Anecdotes about public library patrons, books, staff and services col- 
lected from public librarians, many from California. 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 265 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY'S ANNUAL PROGRAM 
LIBRARY SERVICES AND CONSTRUCTION ACT 

California's Annual Program for fiscal year 1975 will consist of projects and project 
descriptions which will be "action steps" in the implementation of programs that will lead 
to fulfillment of (1) general objectives of total statewide library development of Califor- 
nia; and (2) objectives specific to the use of funds from the Library Services and Construc- 
tion Act. 

Priorities to be emphasized will be: (1) those of extending public library services to 
geographical areas and groups of persons without such services; improving such services 
in such areas and for such groups as may have inadequate public library services; and 
establishing, expanding and operating progams and projects to provide state institutional 
library services, library services to the physically handicapped, library services for the 
economically disadvantaged in urban and rural areas, strengthening metropolitan public 
libraries which serve as national or regional resource centers, and strengthening the 
California State Library; (2) those of public library construction projects which will result 
in a usable public library building; (3) those of interlibrary cooperation; and (4) providing 
library service for the elderly. 

I. Title I. Budgeted funds throughout specific areas of projects show Federal share 
only except where otherwise noted: 

Federal Source: $3,097,202 

(1972/73 Supplemental— Impound) 

Federal Source: 3,492,820 

State Source: 3,467,248 

Local Source: $120,000,000 

A. The general objectives of total statewide library development in California relating 
to the extension of public library services will be to promote the further extension 
of public library services to areas which are without such services or with inade- 
quate services; to make library services more accessible to persons who, by reason 
of distance, residence or physical handicap, or other disadvantage, are unable to 
receive the benefits of public library services regularly made available to the public; 
to strengthen metropolitan public libraries which serve as national or regional 
resource centers; and to improve and strengthen the California State Library. 

B. Specific activities to be carried out by California in the fiscal year 1975 with its 
allotment of funds for library services under Title I will be the following activities: 

(1) Projects to strengthen public library reference networks designed to serve the 
total population of California by reason of intertype library cooperation includ- 
ing video resources via cable TV. 

(a) Project to strengthen Public Library Systems. Grants will be continued to 
Library Systems established under the Public Library Services Act so that 
area libraries, acting as resource centers, may provide the more extensive 
reference and bibliographic services demanded in such subjects as busi- 
ness, education, and technology. ($3,383,791) 

(b) Project to strengthen two metropolitan libraries which serve as national 
resource centers, Los Angeles Public Library and San Francisco Public 
Library. (See attached Statement of Criteria.) ($525,228) 

(c) Project to strengthen the California State Library in its role as a research 
and resource library in the statewide reference network. (See I.B. (6) ) 

(d) Projects to demonstrate countywide library service in Del Norte and Trin- 
ity Counties and improved countywide library service in Marysville City- 
Yuba County and Imperial County. ($462,000) 

(2) Project Outreach: extending library services to those previously unserved or 
inadequately served and to the economically disadvantaged in urban and rural 
areas with high concentrations of low-income families. (Criteria used are those 
set forth in California's Basic State Plan) 

^ (a) Projects to the economically disadvantaged urban areas will include, but 

■ not be limited to: 



266 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

(1) Berkeley-Oakland's Library Service System's project Outreach, pro- 
viding vans that are mobile information centers to people who ordi- 
narily do not come to public libraries. ($36,000) 

(2) Camino Real and Santa Clara Valley's joint Library System project 
providing special Outreach services to senior adults, shut-ins and the 
handicapped (continuing with carryover funds) . 

(3) Inland Library System's ORIFLAMME (Older Residents Involved 
From Library Activity in Mass Media Experiment). Introduction of 
older citizens not now served through direct service to the home- 
bound or institutionalized by mail. Involve both homebound and ac- 
tive older citizens in library programs, planning, and direction of 
service to older people by effecting the library's position by communi- 
cation links to the older resident by interaction with other agencies 
serving the aged. ($38,660) 

(4) Kern County Library's Public Access Center using video program- 
ming to bring library service into people's homes, also through books 
by mail. People will be able to exhibit their skills and express their 
needs and experiences by producing their own taped programs. Those 
confined to their homes, institutionalized because of age or infirmity, 
and those with physical or geographical handicaps are among the 
target groups for this service. ($59,352) 

(5) Napa City-County Library's Local History Index. Information gather- 
ing project conceived to deal with the lack of effectively serving the 
community regarding its local history. To involve all cooperating li- 
braries and institutions by providing an index to a union list of local 
history holdings and making materials accessible to the public via 
services of computer generated index. ($4,904) 

(6) Peninsula Library System's service to the unserved and inadequately 
served Spanish-speaking peoples through Spanish materials and a bi- 
Hngual staff. ($35,855) 

(7) Peninsula Library System's Outreach Project LOVE & Bookpower 
Bus. Through Library Outreach Volunteers, Etc. . . . library opera- 
tion became involved with volunteer groups who took the services to 
the institutions. The Bookpower Bus provides inexpensive service to 
non-library patrons of the System libraries through paperback book 
collections and community aides. Concentration is on the target areas 
where the black neighborhoods among the five cities of the System 
are located. (Carry-over funds) 

(8) Peninsula Library System's Outreach Computerized Community In- 
formation Project. The project will create a comprehensive and easy- 
to-use and maintain file of community information for all local resi- 
dents and staff of government and social agencies who assist the pub- 
lic. The information to be on-line and retrievable through the 
teletypewriter network which already links the libraries, these in turn 
connected to the Stanford Computation Center via phone lines. 
($83,656) 

(9) San Joaquin Valley Library System's Extension of Service to Urban 
Bilingual, Bicultural Disadvantaged. The San Joaquin Valley Library 
System through the support of LSC A funds, previously awarded, oper- 
ates a Spanish language Bookmobile, the Biblioteca Ambulante, in the 
four-county area and at a headquarters office. The past emphasis in 
service has been to serve the rural disadvantaged. It will now change 
in emphasis to serve the urban bilingual and bicultural disadvantaged. 
($20,000) 

(b) Projects to the economically disadvantaged rural areas will include, but not 
be limited to: 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 267 

(1) Mendocino County Health Service library program with the Mendo- 
cino County Public Library has broadened its project into an Ameri- 
can Indian Community Information Center under the direction of the 
Mendocino County Indian Health Bureau. (Carry-over funds) 

(2) North State Library System's Outreach Listen-In project to the sparse- 
ly populated and largely unserved regions through provision of cas- 
sette tapes, ($35,000). 

(c) Projects to those previously unserved and to the economically disadvan- 
taged in urban and rural areas throughout the state not reached in (a) and 
(b). 

(d) Project to strengthen the California State Library in its role as a research 
and resource library in the statewide network of library systems. (See I.B. 
(6)) 

(3) Project for national educational priorities: 

(a) Projects for the "right to read" will include, but not be limited to: 

(1) Camino Real and Santa Clara Valley Library Systems' Joint Library 
System READ Project providing Reading for Everyone to Achieve 
and Develop by making library materials available through public 
outlets, a mobile unit, and community centers. ($61,940) 

(2) Long Beach Public Library's Signal Hill Intercity Cooperation Project. 
The target population of the Intercity is 60,000. 70% of Long Beach's 
minority population reside in this area. Median family income is $6,- 
534. 20% of the population of this area are below the poverty cutoff 
level and only 65% of the population have attained a 12th grade 
education or less. A little over 10% of the population are 65 years of 
age or older. A right to read will be brought about through LSCA 
funds to provide information the patrons require, necessary duplica- 
tion of needed how-to books. Civil Service manuals; adequate staffing 
to fill service requests from convalescent homes, headstart classes, 
senior citizen groups and other organizations whose members cannot 
come to the library. ($65,170) 

(b) Project for Early Childhood Education will include, but not be limited to: 

(1) 49-99 Cooperative Library System's Interagency Outreach Library 
Project to Children. The project will develop guidelines of library 
services to children giving user needs and reading development pre- 
eminence. Emphasis will be on those institutions and children who are 
not traditionally library users. ($155,816) 

(2) San Francisco Pubhc Library's Early Childhood Education Project. 
($25,000) 

(4) Project of service to the Physically Handicapped: 

(a) Projects to the physically handicapped will include, but not be limited to: 

(1) Long Beach Public Library's project furnishing special equipment 
and materials to the visual and physically handicapped. ($17,450) 

(2) San Joaquin Valley Library System's program providing extension of 
the full range of services to the largely unserved physically hand- 
icapped, shut-ins, and aging, involving the institutions and agencies 
serving these groups and working with individuals and groups. ($30,- 
000) 

(b) Projects to the visually handicapped will include, but not be limited to: 

(1) Many of the outreach projects in Section I. B. (2) provide services to 
the blind as well. The Long Beach Public Library's project listed 
under physically handicapped in Section I. B. (4) is especially oriented 
toward providing services for the visually handicapped. 

(c) Project to strengthen the California State Library in its role as a research 
and resource library in the statewide network of Library Systems. ($100,- 
000) 



268 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

(5) Project for state institutional library services: 

(a) Projects to correctional institutions will include, but not be limited to: 

(1) California Conservation Center at Susan ville Library Project will pro- 
vide library materials to up-date their collection with college level 
material, audio, and audiovisual aids. This will provide a useful tool for 
a skill center concept now being developed at the institution. 
Strengthening of the trade and technical section will also take place. 
($2,400) 

(2) California Men's Colony, East Facility at San Luis Obispo is being 
funded for a survey and study of the advantages and /or disadvantages 
for a Department of Corrections library system. Conclusions of the 
survey will serve as a guideline for future departmental planning for 
institutional libraries. ($2,200) 

(3) Correctional Training Facility, Soledad, will upgrade fiction collection 
with paperback books. It will provide these for three facilities in Mon- 
terey County. ($3,600) 

(4) Folsom State Prison's project is designed to furnish recreational read- 
ing materials in paperback form to its inmates. They will be selected 
by the librarian of the institution assisted by an advisory panel of 
inmates, with circulation informally organized by a swap, one for 
one. ($2,600) 

(5) Fred C. Nelles School, California Youth Authority, continuing their 
independent study center project. Added funds will provide more 
carrels, books, and media materials of all kinds. Since the federal 
assistance the need for vocational education, started by this library 
project has taken on increasing importance for other Youth Authority 
institutions. ($2,500) 

(6) Fred C. Nelles School, California Youth Authority, (REVIVE) Read- 
ing Easily- Viewed in Vivid Environment. The project is to provide 
enrichment to the collection through paperback books, equipment, 
furniture, carpeting. Creating a comfortable, relaxed setting and at- 
mosphere for the inmates. ($25,700) 

(7) Karl Holton School, California Youth Authority, Statewide Planning 
Conference & Implementation of Interlibrary Cooperation. This con- 
ference will assess the current and future needs and logical develop- 
ment of libraries in the CYA institutions, based upon input from the 
participants, guidance from California State Library, and direction 
from California Youth Authority. ($16,000) 

(b) Projects to mental health institutions will include, but not be limited to: 

( 1 ) Agnews State Hospital's Expansion of Library Services to the Mentally 
Retarded. Agnews made the transition from a treatment center for 
the mentally ill to a residential faciUty for the mentally retarded in 
1972. The library will combine the roles that a school instructional 
materials center and public library together perform. ($45,200) 

(2) Pacific State Hospital Library's listening center for the mentally re- 
tarded, ($10,000). 

(c) Project to strengthen the California State Library in its role as a research 
and resource library to all the libraries in the state. (See I. B. (6) ) 

(6) Project for strengthening the capacity of the California State Library: 
(a) Projects of administration will include, but not be limited to: 

(1) Administration of the State Plan including obtaining the services of 
library consultants; 

(2) Statewide planning for and the evaluation of library services; 

(3) Dissemination of information concerning library services; 

(4) Activities of the California State Library Advisory Council on Librar- 
ies; 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 269 

(5) Activities of such other advisory groups and panels as may be neces- 
sary to assist the California State Library in carrying out its functions; 

(6) Training of librarians and library personnel engaged in activities un- 
der Library Services and Construction Act; 

(7) Comprehensive study of Public Library Systems in California. 

(b) A project that otherwise will strengthen the California State Library for 
meeting the needs of the people of California in carrying out the purposes 
of the Library Services and Construction Act, and the demonstration and 
exploration of new patterns of service through enrichment of its programs 
including data processing studies and implementation. ($1,000,000) 

(1) Further provision made to fill the State Library's function of a re- 
search center to the California network of libraries, ($200,000). 

(2) To furnish supplementary resources to all libraries and library sys- 
tems. (Including a Minority Recruitment Program) ($140,000) 

II. Title II. (Federal funds: -0-; Local funds: $8,157,256) 

A. The general objectives under Title II will be to construct public library facilities to 
serve areas which are without library facilities necessary to develop library services. 

B. Specific objectives will be to determine those public library construction projects 
which will result in usable public library buildings pursuant to California's Basic 
State Plan. 

C. The California State Library will be strengthened in order to continue its leader- 
ship providing the facilities that can furnish adequate total library services to all 
California residents. 

III. Title III. (Federal funds: $547,577) 

A. The general objectives of interlibrary cooperation in California will be (1) planning 
for, and taking other steps leading to the development of, intertype library net- 
works; and (2) establishing, expanding, and operating local, regional and System- 
wide, and interstate cooperative networks of libraries, which provide for the sys- 
tematic and effective coordination of the resources of school, public, academic, 
institutional, and special libraries and information centers for improved services. 

B. Specific activities to be carried out by California in the fiscal year 1975 with its 
allotment of funds under Title III will be the following: 

(1) Projects will be toward a planned statewide network of all types of libraries to 
include, but not be limited to: 

(a) Camino Real, Monterey Bay Area Cooperative, Peninsula Library, and 
Santa Clara Valley System's Cooperative Information Network (CIN) be- 
tween all types of libraries. ($62,000) 

(b) Lassen County Pubhc Library's California-Nevada Interstate Communica- 
tions Network. A rapid network service for information delivery from best 
available source, wherever located, to all of Lassen County through partici- 
pation in the Communications Network now under organization in the 
State of Nevada. Access to Nevada information sources in libraries of all 
types as the closest available resource, and when necessary to California 
sources as the most complete backup resource for the area. Library cooper- 
ation with Washoe County has been functioning for five years and this 
began as an aftermath of an LSCA project of interstate cooperation funded 
initially in 1967. ($40,000) 

(c) Monterey Bay Area Cooperative Library System's Interlibrary Coopera- 
tion Project, (continuing with carry-over funds). 

(d) Stanford University, Demonstration of Multi-Library Services through the 
BALLOTS II-Network. The project moves to a comprehensive set of auto- 
mated services to link and provide for support for all publicly and privately 
financed libraries in California, to demonstrate joint BibCenter-BALLOTS 
services: on-line searching, Se-Lin spine labels as well as complete techni- 
cal processing and acquisitions all completed by computers. ($150,877) 



270 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

(2) Project to strengthen the California State Library's personnel and inter-type 
library communications in both its Automation Project and in its role as a 
research center for the statewide library network. ($294,700) 

IV. Title IV. (Federal funds unspecified at this writing) 

A. The general objectives of Older Readers Services in California will be: 

(1) the training of librarians to work with the elderly; 

(2) the conduct of special library programs for the elderly; 

(3) the purchase of special library materials for use by the elderly; 

(4) the payment of salaries for elderly persons who wish to work in libraries as 
assistants on programs for the elderly; 

(5) the provision of in-home visits by librarians and other library personnel to the 
elderly; 

(6) the establishment of outreach programs to notify the elderly of library services 
available to them; and 

(7) the furnishing of transportation to enable the elderly to have access to library 
services. 

B. Specific activities to be carried out by California in the fiscal year 1975 with its 
allotment of funds under Title IV will encompass some area of objectives appearing 
in A above. 

ATTACHMENT: Statement of Criteria for Regional or National Resource Centers. 
(Note: Federal funds budgeted in the above document are those received by Califor- 
nia for Fiscal Year 1974 and 1972/73 Supplementary, impounded funds, under the 
LSCA) 

The Long Range Program, Library Services and Construction Act, California State 
Library, Fiscal 1975-79, Revised June 74 is published and available upon request to the 
California State Library. 
Statement of Criteria: Los Angeles and San Francisco Public Libraries as regional or 
national resource centers: 

1. Two largest Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas for population count and density 
per square mile. San Francisco for Northern California and Los Angeles for Southern 
California, geographically situated. 

Northern California 

2. San Francisco-Oakland Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area: 

Population 

a. San Francisco 714,300 
Oakland 361,561 
High density pop. area 1,075,861 

b. San Francisco-Oakland SMSA 3,285,700 
High density pop. area 1,075,861 
Fringe area 2,209,839 

(San Francisco-Oakland SMSA includes counties of: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San 
Francisco, San Mateo, and Solano) 

Southern California 

3. Los Angeles-Long Beach Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area: 

Population Square m Pop. Density 

a. Los Angeles City 2,816,061 463.68 6,073 
Long Beach 358,633 48.74 7,358 
High density pop. area 3,174,694 512.42 6,195 

b. Los Angeles-Long Beach SMSA 7,034,300 4,068.60 1,728 
High density pop. area 3,174,694 512.42 6,195 
Fringe area 3,859,606 4,581.02 842 

In the above tables, the population count for the high density population areas in each 
of the two largest SMSA areas was subtracted from that for the whole area, in this way 
giving the fringe area population, square miles, and population density. The fringe area 



Square m 


Pop. Density 


45.40 


15,733 


63.00 


5,739 


108.40 


9,924 


3,303.80 


994 


108.40 


9,924 


3,195.40 


691 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 271 

population density of each is larger than the whole area density for any of the other 
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas in California. 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census-United States Census of Population, 1970, California: 
Number of Inhabitants. April, 1970. 



CALIFORNIA BASIC STATE PLAN, LIBRARY SERVICES AND 
CONSTRUCTION ACT 

(Note: The California State Library developed its first Basic State Plan under the provi- 
sions of the Library Services and Construction Act in the spring of 1971. This plan, as 
approved by the U. S. Commissioner of Education and effective as of July 1, 1971, was 
published in NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES in the Fall, 1971 issue.) 

Under the Library Services and Construction Act Amendments of 
1970 (Public Law 91-600) , the California State Library, which is the 
legally authorized administrative agency for the program in California, 
must provide the Commissioner of Education, U. S. Office of Education, 
with this document each year. The California State Library's Basic State 
Plan remains the same as that previously published, except that dates 
have been updated to the applicable year. Should there be exceptions, 
the parts of the Basic State Plan being amended or changed are submit- 
ted to the Commissioner of Education. For Fiscal Year 1975 the follow- 
ing document provided the exceptions: 



272 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

OFFICE OF EDUCATION 

BASIC STATE PLAN AMENDMENT 

(State-Federal Agreement) 

LIBRARY SERVICES AND CONSTRUCTION ACT, 
AS AMENDED BY P.L. 91-600 

California State Library, Division of Libraries, The Department of 
Education (Officially Designated State Library Administrative Agency) 
of the State of California, hereby agrees and assures that the Basic State 
Plan which serves as an agreement between State and Federal Govern- 
ments under the Library Services and Construction Act, as amended, 
for which Federal funds are being requested for fiscal year ending June 
30, 1975, continues to be in effect as signed by the U. S. Commissioner 
of Education on July 1, 1971 (13 August 1971), except as otherwise 
indicated in documents listed below, copies of which are attached: 

^ Maintenance of Effort Statement 

^ Advisory Council 

□ Criteria 

D Other (identify) 

California State Library 
Division of Libraries 
Department of Education 

State Library Administrative Agency 

Library-Courts Building 
Post Office Box 2037 
Address Sacramento, California 95809 

ETHEL S. CROCKETT 
Signature of Authorized State Agency 

Ethel S. Crockett 
State Librarian 
Title 



Volume 69, No. 2-3-4, 1974 273 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 
FY 1975 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 
OFFICE OF EDUCATION 



MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION— FY 1975 

LIBRARY SERVICES AND CONSTRUCTION ACT, 
AS AMENDED BY P.L. 91-600 

California State Library, Division of Libraries, The Department of 
Education (Officially Designated State Library Administrative Agency): 

I. assures that it has available for expenditure under Title I of the 
Act in this fiscal year (FY 1975) . 

A. From State and local sources: 

1. Sums sufficient to earn its basic minimum allotment. 

2. Not less than the total amount actually expended, in areas 
covered by the programs for such year, for the purposes of 
such programs from such sources in the second preceding 
fiscal year (FY 1973) 

B. From State Sources: 

1. Not less than the total State amount actually expended for 
such purposes from such sources in the second preceding 
fiscal year (FY 1973) 

II. assures that it will expend in this fiscal year (FY 1975) from Fed- 
eral, State, and local sources, an amount not less than the amount 
expended by the State from such sources for State institutional 

' library services, and library services and to the physically hand- 
icapped during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1971. 



ETHEL S. CROCKETT 

Signature of Authorized State Library 
Administrative Agency Official 



Ethel S. Crockett 
State Librarian 



274 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



LSCA 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA 



CERTIFICATION OF THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY ADVISORY 

COUNCIL ON LIBRARIES 

I hereby certify that, pursuant to and as required by the provisions of Section 3 (8) , 
Library Services and Construction Act, and 130.8 (a) of the Regulations, the California 
State Library Advisory Council on Libraries is established and the names of the members 
of the Council, followed by a statement of identification to show their representation, are: 
Dr. Jack H. Aldridge -User 

San Francisco, California 



Clinton R. Burt, Head PubUc Services 

California State University 

Bakersfield, California 
E. V. Griffith, Federal Programs Administrator -User 

County of Humboldt 

Eureka, California 



-Academic libraries 
(Higher Education) 



Samuel Leask, III 

Santa Cruz, Cahfornia 
Mrs. Ann R. Lane, President 

Board of Library Commissioners 

Los Angeles Public Library 

Los Angeles, California 
Dr. Curtis May, Library Coordinator 

Education Resource Center 

San Mateo County Board of Education 

Redwood City, California 
Elton Shell, Librarian 

San Bernardino Valley College 

San Bernardino, California 
Mrs. Virginia Simms, Supervisor 

Napa County Board of Supervisors 
Fred Sinclair, Consultant in Charge 

Special Education of the Visually 
Handicapped 

Clearinghouse Depository for the Visually 

Handicapped 

Sacramento, California 
Mrs. Phyllis A. Waggoner, Chief Librarian 

Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 
Mrs. Eleanor Wash, Librarian 

Pacific State Hospital 

Pomona, California 
Dr. LeRoy Gloria 

Rancho Santiago Community College District 

Santa Ana, California 



-User 

-Public Libraries 

-School libraries 



-Academic libraries 
(Community Colleges) 

-User 

-Representative of the 
visually and physically 
handicapped person 



-Special libraries 
-Institutional libraries 



-Representative of the 
disadvantaged person 



Ethels. Crockett 
Ethel S. Crockett 
California State Librarian 
Date: December 23, 1974 



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News Notes of 



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V. 70, no. 1-4, 1975 



California Libraries 



Official Journal of the California State Library 



News Notes of 



California Libraries 



V. 70, no. 1-4, 1975 



ARTICLES 

3 Resource Sharing Prospects, by David C. Weber 
13 The Federal R.E.A.D. Project, by Brenda Gray 
19 ORIFLAMME: The Inland Library System's Outreach Service to 

the Elderly, by Marsha Neuber 
24 Medical Reference Works for the Public Library, by William Maina 

and Beverlee French 



NEWS NOTES 

33 What Happens When the Earth Shakes 

34 A Landmark Year 

35 50 Years Ago in California Libraries 

37 California State Library's Annual Program, Library Services and 
Construction Act 

49 California Basic State Plan, Library Services and Construction Act 

50 Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of Educa- 

tion, Basic State Plan Amendment 

51 Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of Educa- 

tion, Maintenance of Effort Certification — FY 1976 

52 Certification of the Establishment of the California State Library 

Advisory Council on Libraries 



2 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

ISSN 0028-9248 

News Notes of California Libraries 

Official Journal of the California State Library 

Mrs. Ethel S. Crockett, State Librarian 

California State Library 
Library and Courts Building 
Sacramento, California 
Mailing address: P. O. Box 2037 
Sacramento CA 95809 

Edited by Collin Clark, Public Information Office 

Four numbers per volume year. 

Indexed in: Library 6c Information Science Abstracts; Library Litera- 
ture. 

News Notes of California Libraries is available on microfilm from Xerox 
University Microfilms. 

Second class postage paid at Sacramento, California. 

Photoelectronic composition by California Office of State Printing. 



ON THE COVER: Butte County Librarian Jo Terry surveys book spillage following the 
Oroville earthquakes in August. Story and additional photos on pages 33-34. Cover 
photo courtesy the Oroville Mercury Register. 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 

Resource Sharing Prospects 

by David C. Weber 



One may ponder how any state or region may use the developing 
technical capabilities, standards, and new operational styles to benefit 
our own institutions. Not only in California are library budgets exceed- 
ingly tight in public libraries, academic libraries, school and special 
libraries. We all seem to be in similar circumstances. When library 
budgets are indeed tight and getting tighter, when there is talk about 
"zero budget" growth or the "steady state" of support from our institu- 
tions, when some federal funds seem to have dried up, and when many 
legislators and other governmental officials turn support to other inter- 
ests and more popular projects, it creates a formidable problem for us 
in this profession. No library contains all its users need. We must share. 
Since 1905, when the first ALA interlibrary loan code was adopted, 
borrowing and lending between libraries has had official sanction. 

There has been considerable evidence ever since the 1970 Confer- 
ence on Interlibrary Communication and Information Networks that 
the sharing of resources and the reliance on networks to facilitate this 
sharing are the best way politically, fiscally and perhaps operationally 
to make a successful effort to continue, or indeed improve, our services 
and to receive support from our superior officials. That 1970 conference 
was in fact conceived in the state of Maine, a small state that also shares 
these concerns with large ones such as yours in the Mountain Plains 
area. In 1970 it seemed clear that there were legal, procedural, jurisdic- 
tional, and psychological roadblocks to improved sharing of resources. 
There was very considerable evidence that the technical problems 
could be solved during the 1970's if those other aspects could be re- 
solved. How then have we proceeded with this effort in recent years — 
to clear the legal, procedural, jurisdictional and psychological hurdles? 
How does the picture look at the present time? 

In addressing this matter of current prospects for resource sharing, 
let me present the picture from the local scene as I view it in California, 
and the state scene also as experienced in this westerly state in which 
I work. 

As an example of the local California scene, I select the Cooperative 
Information Network (CIN). This is an LSCA Title Ill-funded project 
chosen for support by the California State Library. It was initiated in 



David C. Weber is Director of the Stanford 
University Libraries. This paper was pre- 
pared for a meeting of the Mountain Plains 
Library Association, October 19, 1975. 



4 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

the fall of 1971 as a program of the Library Cooperative of Santa Clara 
County. The Cooperative's application for funds early in 1972 was 
granted so that in the County of Santa Clara, in which rests Stanford 
University and another ninety libraries of different types, there was an 
organization designed to provide reference assistance through a struc- 
tured network. It relied on a unified subject directory, workshops on 
networking, TWX machines to supplement telephone service, tele- 
phone assistance outside the local message unit, and later on a research 
librarian in a headquarters location to provide special reference service 
as a last resort. After the first year CIN was enlarged by the addition 
of San Mateo County, which is between Santa Clara County and San 
Francisco, resulting in another sixty libraries of varying types joining 
this Cooperative Information Network. The third year of operation saw 
the Counties of Santa Cruz and Monterey join. At the present time 
membership is some 250 libraries and, indeed, I am aware of only three 
libraries (two special libraries and a business library of a major univer- 
sity) which have felt they could not or should not share in this way and 
therefore have not participated in the network. The formation of this 
kind of network is, of course, not unique. Other projects in California 
or elsewhere in the nation have chosen to enhance interlibrary loan or 
develop messenger services and joint union lists of serials. And these 
operations also have been studied and some support given them in this 
cooperative. 

With that four year experience, let me draw some conclusions which 
conceivably could be applicable in other parts of the country. First of 
all it seems evident that it has been exceedingly difficult to achieve 
effective discussions among librarians from different types of institu- 
tions. Before this project there were a few acquaintances between types 
of libraries but no effort to formulate an effective procedural inter- 
change of a new and more complex nature. No individuals of two or 
more types of libraries had gotten together every month to spend two 
or three hours formulating common goals, setting priorities, trying to 
develop an organizational structure with elected board members and 
certain management staff, and creating a new service. Even the varia- 
tions in terminology, urgency, the meaning of funding, laws unique to 
each city, and unfamiliarity with state and federal procedures for ap- 
plications, justification, auditing, etc., were obstacles for many par- 
ticipating in this effort. Although the legal and jurisdictional hurdles 
were cleared, progress with CIN has been frustratingly slow, and multi- 
type-of-library cooperation at that local level seems indeed laborious 
and only moderately effective. 

Very modest progress has been made over these years in the proce- 
dural and psychological or attitudinal aspects. There still is inadequate 
attendance at Board meetings, partly because very busy administrators 
in different types of libraries have many meetings regularly scheduled 
which almost preclude finding a free time for 20 CIN Board members 
to meet. Some are present but do not contribute. Much of the back- 
ground research, working papers, preparation of agenda, and other 
businesslike methods of conducting business in large and complex orga- 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 5 

nizations are relatively unused processes to many librarians. It there- 
fore is an educational experience at the very least. It takes a 
super-abundance of patience, tact and renewing of effort to make mod- 
est progress. 

These four counties that form the Cooperative Information Network 
have, in the judgment of the State Library staff and many others in 
California, been in fact successful. Nevertheless those who have worked 
within this organization and seen its operational Manual grow, the 
procedures change, witnessed some of the fundamental processes 
evolving, and several times considered reorganizational plans, can all 
attest to the effort required to move into this new dimension of shared 



"It takes a super-abundance of patience, tact and 
renewing of effort to make modest progress." 



resources. The developmental nature and timing of organizational 
change and the great importance of effective management structure, 
which has been discussed every single year that CIN has existed, may 
be telling lessons to those in other states. 

In some ways the CIN Board of Directors has found the most frustrat- 
ing aspect to be the lethargy of professional staff at the circulation or 
reference desks of our libraries, whether they be large or small. The 
public do not always seem to be the group which needs to be convinced 
of resource sharing; the librarian and senior clerical or technical staff 
who conduct our front desk operations seem the weak link. Some of 
them are of course superb. Nevertheless it has been appalling how 
much evidence accumulates that when a request is made for informa- 
tion, the answer is often "this is all we have" or "you would have to try 
some other library" or "we do not have that current information but 
these three items from our collections may provide you with some 
help." True it is that the staff is often very hard pressed. All of us feel 
short of staff, and we are spread over very long hours. However, if we 
are to use shared resources the service staff must take that extra step 
to tell the patron "but in 24 hours I can have it from a special library 
in this area," "may I obtain it in photocopy from the Leo Library in 
Louisiana" or "if you can give us a week, we can borrow that particular 
edition from one of these three libraries and it will be here next Thurs- 
day between 4 and 5 o'clock." 

Resource sharing requires an aggressive attitude, and it involves a 
lateral thinking process. A good deal of effort by the CIN staff has gone 
into spreading the message to service librarians of what resources there 



6 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

are right around the corner, how the CIN network can be made to help 
them meet the needs of their patrons. Circulation and reference librari- 
ans may be very good in a traditional process but on the whole they do 
not do well when measured against the demands of operating in a fully 
effective sharing network. Here seems to be an area where library 
schools need to teach a different operational attitude than may have 
been previously adequate. Continuing education programs for staff 
development of those who interface with these cooperatives seem an 
urgent need. 

Another lesson from CIN can be cited, one which may be typical of 
library cooperative programs of the past decade. To move beyond the 
historic pattern of reciprocal informal programs of sharing to the formal 
programs of larger scale has required staff that is hired by and for the 
program. CIN has three full time professionals. No longer can we rely 
on family-style relations. If we are to move from the recent plateau of 
interlibrary programs to far more ambitious and effective ones, the next 
plateau requires special staff providing centralized professional man- 
agement. This is a significant difference. It requires a whole new set of 

"The next plateau requires special staff providing 
centralized professional management." 



legal, procedural and fiscal arrangements. We cannot offer the new 
second plateau service if we try to operate it informally with contribut- 
ed staff on the payroll of one library. 

I hope that we in California are not much less adept than librarians , 
elsewhere at designing improved means of sharing. If our achievements ! 
are of use to you, I am sure the Coordinator of the Cooperative Informa- 
tion Network in California will be pleased to show the CIN documents 
and explain the procedures and problems to those of any other state or | 
region faced with similar efforts. Let me not leave CIN without empha- j 
sizing my personal conviction it is successful, is worth the effort, and is ', 
making constant progress. t 

To turn now to the state level in California, I shall refer to two major i 
developments, each one of which is regrettably in an embryonic state, ji 
The effort has nevertheless been great; and there also there may be j 
some lessons for those in other states. 1 

One of these is a new organization just now being formed under the 
name of CLASS, standing for California Library Authority for Systems 
and Services. CLASS developed from discussions in the State Depart- 
ment of Education, the CaHfornia State Library, the President's Office 
of the University of California, and the Chancellor's Office of the Cali- 
fornia State University and College System. There was considerable 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 7 

budget pressure about two years ago. A group was formed to discuss the 
common problems among those major segments. The Intersegmental 
Task Force, as it was first called, met every month or two to explore 
what each of the segments was doing with respect to automation and 
cooperative programs. Particular attention was given to the computer- 
based plans of each of these. In due course the privately supported 
institutions were added as another segment represented by the Chair 
of the Library Committee of the Association of Independent California 
Colleges and Universities. In the course of last year, as the program 
design became more specific, there were additional representatives 
from special libraries and public libraries. 

This Intersegmental Task Force grappled with the question of 
whether a separate organization might manage a computer system and 
offer its services to all libraries in the state, thereby enabling it to meet 
the specified needs of California libraries in all segments. The Task 
Force was chaired by the California State Librarian, a most capable and 
tactful individual who should allay in California the all too common 
distrust of State Librarians. A prime desideratum was a commonly 
developed on-line union catalog, available to all, the computer system 
for which could provide full support as well as location information. 
This led to discussions of a non-profit corporation and a legislated 
agency as two structures for pursuing these goals. However, since the 
State Library and state funded libraries could not be participants in a 
non-profit corporation and the legislative approach takes too long, a 
Joint Exercise of Powers agreement was chosen as the initial model 
upon recommendation of the State Attorney General's Office. A com- 
mittee of the Intersegmental Task Force grappled with that gover- 
nance issue and came up last spring with a proposal for CLASS. After 
several draft documents and a great deal of discussion, the CLASS 
organization and the document designed to form that organization 
were approved last July 9th. It is now undergoing review by each of the 
segments and particularly the libraries that will sign the agreement as 
founding members, the hope being that by this spring it will exist 
legally. 

The stated purpose of CLASS is to "develop and implement a system 
for library programs development and resource sharing including: (1) 
to provide for the cooperative development and maintenance of com- 
mon bibliographic and holdings data bases; (2) to provide for develop- 
ment and implementation of an interlibrary loan and delivery system; 
(3) to provide for development and operation of systems for coopera- 
tive use of cataloging data, cooperative acquisitions, and other forms of 
resource sharing; and (4) to provide for the development and im- 
plementation of library systems for information exchange." The CLASS 
organization will have a Congress made up of all libraries that use its 
services, an Advisory Committee of twenty-one members which will 
meet frequently, and a legal Board of eight members. The Advisory 
Council serves as the probouleutic body for setting goals, selecting 
services to be provided and standards to be followed, and determining 
the operational form of management and pricing policy for services. 



8 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Some services which have in the past been discussed as potential 
CLASS services are the following: 

Shared use of resources. 

Bibliographic access to materials from a common data 
base of holdings. 

Computerized catalog production. 

Improved communications. 

Acquisitions processing and control. 

Automated interlibrary loan message processing. 

Joint facility for lesser-used materials. 

and Preservation program for deteriorating materials 
The Board of Directors, made up of the six librarians from the found- 
ing organizations plus two non-voting members, is the legal entity that 
will need to ratify all proposals from the Advisory Council, will finally 
set policies, establish pricing, and take all legal actions for the organiza- 
tion. 

A lesson that can certainly be drawn from this effort is that the 
structure for management is of central importance, just as it was for the 
CIN organization. The jurisdictional and legal issues that were of con- 
cern in the 1970 conference are every bit as important today. There also 
is especial need for careful advance planning when setting out to obtain 
a system to support a unified, structured, on-line union catalog. It is not 
like buying telephone service. Although it may be opportunistic to buy 
whatever is currently available and be able to tell one's university 
president or city council that you are "modern", are using computers, 
and are going to share collections with libraries in the region, it will in 
fact be much sounder to develop a solid theoretical plan for state-wide 
or regional files and services, and create an organization which will 
support that even though it may take two to four years to get it under- 
way. The end result will be far better for our libraries, our institutions 
and our successors. Libraries must be learning this lesson because they 
are beginning to be far more cautious in entering service agreements — 
wanting to assure coordinated file structures, control of the data base, 
participation in system management, and its future. The lesson is finally 
being learned. 

Now we turn to the second example at the state level. When I moved 
to California in 1961, I thought it had an exceptional reputation for a 
pattern of public libraries blanketing the state. It did. However, I quick- 
ly found out that full library cooperation hardly existed at all. The 
librarians of the University of California spoke among themselves. Since j 
the nine campuses are so large — with a total budget this year of about { 
$1.9 billion — they have more book collections and more staff than many j 
an entire state or state library association. In turn, the California State j 
University and College System is also a giant (19 campuses and a quar- ' 
ter million FTE students) and has its own meetings. The California 
State Library and the numerous public and county libraries are coor- ' 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 9 

dinated. But there was in fact no state network for sharing which in- 
volved all types of libraries. Despite all of the considerable library 
resources in the state they were fragmented among many jurisdictions, 
with no program or structure to make available to persons in the state 
all of the resources that in fact existed in the state. After many surveys 
and a lot of effort by public librarians, a bill was fashioned and intro- 
duced into the State Legislature by Senator Collier which was at long 
last to form such a California library network. It passed the legislature 
but was vetoed in December 1973 by Governor Reagan. The climate 
worsened for receiving gubernatorial support. Upon the advice of the 
state administration and the legislative analyst, the California State 
Librarian contracted with the firm of Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. to 
undertake an extensive survey of public library programs and design a 
new state-wide program for public library service that would include 
the involvement of other types of libraries. The PMM report was issued 
early last June. A Library Planning Institute of 100 invited participants 
evaluated the report, attendees added further information, and came 
up with a set of recommendations which are now being turned into a 
new legislative program. A new bill is being drafted for laying before 
the State Legislature. 

The PMM report and California librarians agreed there was preva- 
lent substandard reference performance, that the present per capita 
funding formula was inappropriate, that it should be based on need for 
interlibrary resource sharing, and that equal access to public libraries 
was reaffirmed. The PMM report also proposed two organizational 
models. One would develop major public libraries as regional designat- 
ed intermediate libraries to which all public library "systems" would 
turn. The second model was to augment the public library "systems". 
In either case there would be a "top level consortium" made up of 
major research libraries which would be reimbursed to function as a last 
resort for loans or reference information for the public libraries. Insti- 
tute participants chose the second model using the library "systems" 
and the multi-type-of-library cooperatives, such as CIN, because they 
were already administratively proven, operational, and politically suc- 
cessful. This choice was made despite the fact that there would in 
theory be greater economy in the more vertical structure of so-called 
intermediate libraries rather than to use the twenty "systems". It is too 
early to know what the outcome will be of this current effort. The state 
obviously needs a state-wide library program. The State Library is pro- 
viding the leadership that is needed to create a valid structure, yet the 
budgetary circumstances are not the most propitious. 

Lessons that can be drawn from this are much the same as in discus- 
sions of CIN and CLASS. It has seemed especially desirable to involve 
lay representatives in shaping and promoting these organizations. State 
legislatures need to be briefed and convinced that it is in the interest 
of their constituencies and of the state as a whole to create the organiza- 
tion and assure its funding. There also is a clear lesson that librarians 
need to become far more astute in the political process; we need to 
solve the problems of working among different types of libraries in 



10 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



I 



creating a common system. And then — with no ego problems — we mus 
speak effectively with one voice in convincing legislators and othe: 
governmental officials that there is improved service and long-term 
economy in what is being proposed. Funds must be available to under- 
take that promotional effort. Time is required of librarians, particularly 
the chief librarians who need to provide their leadership and experi- 
ence. Library boards need to understand and speak out in order to 
fashion a true grassroots support and thereby convince the legislators 
and governor that it is in the best interests and is a high priority of the 
state. 

Another lesson is, of course, that California has not yet pulled this off 
to a point of operational effectiveness and stability! CIN exists albeit in 
an adolescent phase, and has not yet been extended as a pattern to 
blanket the state. CLASS is in a formative phase, not to be underway 
until at least this coming winter. The earlier State Library network 
design failed of funding so that the effort is being mounted again. 
Though one could be discouraged, nothing major of great and lasting 
importance was ever achieved overnight. We are still trying. 

Timing is often the essence. At the national scene, the timing of a new 
program is as important as it is at the state or local level. Although the 
Association of Research Libraries has proposed a computer-based sys- 
tem for supporting interlibrary borrowing and lending, it may fail of 
funding for being a few months too late. The National Commission on 
Libraries and Information Science has now published its final statement 
of program after a few years of study, drafting, and submitting drafts 
to public review. There are myriad reasons for the delays in state and 
federal progress. There are governmental checks and balances. There 
is the philosophic war waged between centralized federal programs 
and decentralized state or local programs. Further, all are affected by 
practical and human concerns at the local operating level. 

"If there are incentives to cooperation," writes ARL Executive Direc- 
tor John P. McDonald, "there are also many problems and difficulties 
that limit or frustrate our best efforts at collective action. There is, for 



"There is a persistent attitude that insists that coop- 
eration be undertaken as a part-time extra duty." 



example, a persistent attitude that assigns cooperative activities low 
priority and low or no budget. This viewpoint insists that cooperation 
be undertaken as a part-time extra duty and then only after more 
important work has been accomplished. There are other attitudes that 
have proved difficult to overcome. It is asserted that cooperation causes 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 11 

delay and inconvenience resulting in a general deterioration in service. 
Other complaints are that cooperation is expensive, that it involves high 
effort for low return, that there are inequities in contributions and 
benefits, and that cooperation is often ill defined or redunant." ("Inter- 
library Cooperation in the United States," in Issues in Library Adminis- 
tration, edited by Tsuneishi, Buckman and Suzuki. Columbia U.P., 1974, 
p. 131). 

Let us not lose sight of our mission or the worldly conditions within 
which we provide our service to society. The Carnegie Commission on 
Higher Education has issued a report which describes the mission in the 
current context. 

"Existing libraries and information centers have played a vital role 
in the formal and informal education of the American people. Until 
recently, our pattern of independent library establishment serving 
neighborhoods, communities, schools, colleges, and special interests 
of various kinds has appeared adequate to the nation's needs, but now 
the situation has changed. The information revolution has completely 
overwhelmed some of the smaller and medium-sized library estab- 
lishments and they have abandoned all hopes of keeping up with it. 
Moreover, the new technologies for communication and information 
storage and retrieval involve heavy expenses that many individual 
libraries cannot afford. . . 

"In several locations across the country, public and academic li- 
braries are forming regional library networks in response to such 
problems. . . To the degree that these networks become effective, 
they make the information resources of large libraries available to 
small colleges with limited budgets. They also give colleges and uni- 
versities a stronger united voice in claims for rights of access to com- 
munications media controlled by government, and more financial 
capability to adopt advanced information and communications tech- 
nologies. 

"As long as the organizational framework of such networks pro- 
vides those individual institutions with superior collections with ade- 
quate compensation for the use of their holdings (possibly by users' 
fees) , we believe that information and communications networks are 
a logical answer to many of the problems now facing college and 
universities libraries. Moreover, we regard such networks to be, po- 
tentially the hubs of instructional networks in higher education that 
should soon be organized on a regional level." ( The Fourth Revolu- 
tion — Technology in Higher Education. 1972, pp. 34-35.) 

Have circumstances now become politically auspicious? One might 
hope that the common financial problems combined with what appears 
to be a universal appreciation for much improved sharing of resources 
has created the right time for major cooperative library programs at all 



12 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

levels. If that assessment is correct, one may then hope there is a fairly 
good prospect in the next five years for legislative programs and gov- 
ernmental support to facilitate and finance incremental programs con- 
stituting a new environment for sharing our resources. 

Let none of us believe that the road will be easy. The experience in 
each of these Californian and national examples demonstrates the dif- 
ficulty. The fact that OCLC has a few things operating widely, that New 
York State and New Jersey and Illinois have created operational state- 
wide networks — none of these make much easier the path in our own 
state. Each of us is faced with local problems, new faces, a different 
history and starting point. 

Nevertheless our problems are not unique. The approach, proce- 
dures and models of others can be profitably studied. Computer proc- 



"One may hope there is a fairly good prospect in 
the next five years for a new environment for shar- 
ing our resources." 



essing and shared data banks are creating a revolution in libraries over 
the course of this decade. Yet true resource sharing will be achieved in 
my state and in yours only when we tackle the legal, jurisdictional, 
fiscal, procedural and psychological roadblocks — and resolve them each 
and every one within the specific context of our state. I wish you good 
fortune. 



Dorothy Muktarian works with a dyslexic 
teenager, composing a story with flash 
cards. Photo by Brad Martin, Mountain 
View. 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 13 

The Federal R.E.A.D. Project 

by Brenda Gray 



Every week over fifty people with reading problems are receiving 
free tutoring in a library lab, twenty reluctant readers are involved in 
enrichment activities for children aged seven to twelve, and twenty- 
five pre-schoolers attend classes in reading readiness. In addition teach- 
ers, librarians and parents can attend workshops on learning disabilities 
and use a special resource collection of books, magazines, pamphlets 
and clippings. 

Where is this happening? At the Mountain View Public Library, 
where the Federal R.E.A.D. Project is operating a literacy program 
funded by the Library Services and Construction Act, Title I. Located 
on the second floor of the library, the project occupies a spacious, 
well-equipped lab overlooking an attractive city park. 

R.E.A.D. is an acronym for "Reading for Everyone — To Achieve and 
Develop". The purpose of the grant is to use trained library employees 
to attack illiteracy in a specific target area. A joint Systems grant of the 

Brenda Gray is project director of the Fed- 
eral R.E.A.D. Project, an LSCA-financed 
demonstration project of the South Bay 
Cooperative Library System. 





14 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Camino Real and Santa Clara Valley Library Systems, R.E.A.D. began 
July, 1972 with a target area of east San Jose, which included the Hill- 
view Branch of San Jose Public Library and the Alum Rock Branch of 
Santa Clara County Library. The staff was headed by librarian Brenda 
Gray until July, 1974 when the project was refunded and expanded to 
include Mountain View Public Library and a target area of Mountain 
View-Sunnyvale. R.E.A.D. was then supervised for a year by Jan Gal- 
limore, who left July, 1975 to become a branch librarian in San Jose. In 
July, 1975 R.E.A.D. was refunded on a limited basis, and Ms. Gray 



"The purpose is to use trained library employees to 
attack illiteracy in a specific target area." 



returned as project director. The project no longer serves the east San 
Jose area, but concentrates on the Mountain View-Sunnyvale target 
area. 

The present staff consists of a project director, one librarian, a typist- 
clerk, and two part-time tutors. Maurice Stevenson, librarian, is a gradu- 
ate of San Jose State University with a B.A. in political science and a 
secondary teaching credential. This winter he will complete his studies 
for an M.A. in librarianship and a media credential. Mr. Stevenson has 
several years' experience as a library clerk with the San Jose Public 
Library. He tutors, supervises volunteers, develops reading games and 
is presently compiling a directory-manual of the project's learning 
materials. 

Dorothy Muktarian, typist-clerk, is a graduate of Wittenberg Univer- 
sity, Springfield, Ohio with a B.A. in elementary education. Before 
moving to California, she taught second grade in Ohio and did substi- 
tute teaching in New York. The project receives the service of half-time 
clerk Antoinette Barrientos through CETA (Comprehensive Employ- 
ment & Training Act) . Ms. Barrientos is a graduate of the University of 
California at Berkeley with a B.A. in Speech. She has taught and per- 
formed modern dance. 

The newest member of the staff, who was hired September, 1975, is 
reading specialist Ronda Goldstein, who has a B.A. in English from 
Queens College, New York and an M.A. in reading and English from 
Boston University. Her experience includes teaching in Boston public 
schools and tutoring learning-disabled students privately. 

Project Director Brenda Gray received a B.A. in English and humani- 
ties from San Jose State University. Her graduate studies include 
courses in English, librarianship and education. A librarian since 1961, 
Ms. Gray has been employed by both the Mountain View Public Library 
and San Jose Public Library. Her library experience includes supervi- 
sion of a branch and work with children's, young adults', adults' and 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 15 

outreach services. Besides tutoring, Ms. Gray supervises the staff, han- 
dles publicity, does public speaking engagements and programming. 

Throughout the three years of the project, both directors have main- 
tained close communication with Leslie Janke, head of San Jose State 
University's Librarianship Department. A number of Mr. Janke's gradu- 
ate students have received class credit by volunteering for R.E.A.D. 
One semester R.E.A.D. had seven graduate students assisting the staff. 

Presently, one librarianship student and two other adults are serving 
as regular volunteers. One person specializes in tutoring children with 
dyslexia, and the other is a senior citizen who prefers to perform clerical 
tasks. This year the Voluntary Action Bureau of Sunnyvale has sent 
R.E.A.D. short-term volunteers, who have been referred by the Sunny- 
vale Municipal Court. These people have been guilty of minor viola- 
tions of the law and have the option of doing community service instead 
of paying a fine. Such volunteers can be used for clerical tasks, freeing 
regular R.E.A.D. staff for tutoring. 

More than fifty students are being tutored on a regular basis every 
week. Students range in age from nine to seventy-five, with the major- 
ity being adults in their twenties. A number of adults have been re- 
ferred to R.E.A.D. by Mountain View's Adult Education program or the 
local Operation SER. Most of these adults are interested in improving 
their reading and study skills so that they can pass their G.E.D. test or 
become United States citizens. The younger students have been re- 
ferred by their schools or have been brought in by their parents. 

Tutoring sessions usually last one hour, and most students are tutored 
two or three times a week, depending on need and motivation. Stu- 
dents are tested with the Wide Range Achievement Test and the 
Spache Reading Test. The Spache is very useful, because it indicates 
problem areas like weaknesses in sight word vocabulary, silent and oral 
reading and phonics. Students receive completely individualized tutor- 
ing tailored to their particular needs. A variety of materials, reading 
machines, games, visual aids, puzzles and even puppets are used to 
make the teaching of reading an enjoyable experience for both student 
and teacher. 

Staff meetings are held once a week to evaluate the progress of every 
student and discuss any problems encountered in tutoring sessions. 
Communication is maintained with Adult Education, Operation SER, 
and private and public schools to discuss students who might have 
special needs. 

Most R.E.A.D. students are highly motivated individuals who sincere- 
ly wish to overcome their reading disabilities. A thirty-year-old twin 
who suffers from severe dyslexia and has a speech defect has done 
extensive research on his own handicaps and brought in a notebook 
crammed with clippings from newspapers and scholarly journals to 
share with his tutor. This young man is very anxious to discuss his 
problems with the R.E.A.D. staff. 

More reluctant at first was a middle-aged woman from Germany. 
"Educated" in Nazi schools, she was beaten every time she made a 



16 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

reading error. So traumatic were her experiences, that she was afraid 
to seek help for her poor reading until the 1950's, when she enrolled in 
an American adult education class. She felt that her fellow students and 
teacher ridiculed her German accent, and she dropped the class. In 
July, 1975 her husband convinced her to sign up for the R.E.A.D. pro- 



"He literally dragged his wife into the R.E.A.D. lab 
and on the first day did all the talking for her." 



gram. He literally dragged his wife into the R.E.A.D. lab and on the first 
day did all the talking for her. Overcoming this student's fears has taken 
patience and understanding, but now she is convinced that she can 
learn to read. In July she knew the letters of the alphabet but did not 
know her letter sounds, nor the difference between a vowel and a 
consonant. Today she knows her sounds and has progressed enough to 
read primers and Dr. Seuss books. By using the Bell and Howell Lan- 
guage Master she is improving her pronunciation. 

A set of hyperactive, emotionally disturbed twins; a Vietnamese fam- 
ily recently arrived from Vietnam; a native of Portugal whose goal is to 
pass his citizenship test; a dyslexic young woman who has "turned on" 
to books and in the last few weeks has read Aiken's Night Fall, Kellogg's 
Tell me that you love me, Junie Moon, Neufeld's Lisa, Bright and Dark 
and Christie's Surprise! Surprise!; several educationally handicapped 
young adults who love Radlauer's books on dune buggies and motor- 
cyles; a hyperactive nine-year-old girl who will read if she can use 
puppets (this keeps her so occupied that she does not have time to 
fidget). . . these are some of the "typical" students in the R.E.A.D. 
tutoring program. 

Another service offered by R.E.A.D. is a community referral file on 
3" X 5" cards emphasizing agencies for the educationally, physically and 
emotionally handicapped. Testing, diagnostic, counseling and tutoring 
services and special schools in Santa Clara County are listed. The pur- 
pose of this file is to help the R.E.A.D. staff direct individuals to the 
proper agency for help. 

In August R.E.A.D. held an Open House program to make the com- 
munity more aware of the services the project offers. "Your Child and 
School Success", a workshop for parents was given in September. Par- 
ents saw a demonstration on how to make inexpensive reading and 
math games, discussed the underachieving child, were given bibliogra- 
phies of suggested reading and heard Shirley Hunter, a kindergarten 
teacher from San Jose, talk about the needs of pre-school children. A 
workshop for librarians and teachers on reaching the reluctant reader 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 17 

will be given in February, 1976. The project director is secretary of the 
Mountain View-Await High School District Advisory Committee on 
Special Education and recognizes the need for more information about 
learning disabilities and will give a program on this for parents later this 
year. 

To reach the reluctant reader Ms. Gray organized the READrunner 
Club for children 7-12. The READrunners meet every Friday afternoon 
for enrichment activities like puppetry, creative dramatics, writing and 
crafts. The group hopes to publish their first newspaper soon. Children 
who usually are not interested in books are being tempted to read about 
their hobbies or special collections. They have shared such "valuables" 
as rocks, shells, dolls, and even ajar of tomato worms with their friends 
in the club! The children are encouraged to talk about the good or 
"awful" books they have read. 

Pre-schoolers are involved in reading readiness classes taught by 
Brenda Gray on Tuesday and Wednesday mornings. The children par- 
ticipate in activities to develop gross and fine motor skills, play with 
puppets, watch short films, and learn about spatial, number and letter 
concepts. Ms. Gray feels that more libraries should offer this type of 
program, and that it is as necessary as the regular pre-school story hour. 

The project has been well-publicized by the Bay Area media. An- 
nouncements have been broadcast by television and radio stations, and 
all the local newspapers have printed articles about R.E.A.D. The direc- 
tor sent letters describing the project to all schools and service agencies 
in Mountain View and Sunnyvale. The public has responded to this 
publicity, and there is a waiting list of prospective students for tutoring 
and for the reading readiness classes. 

Funding for R.E.A.D. ends June 30, 1976. The staff wonders what will 
happen to the large collection of materials and equipment after that, 
and more importantly, whether the services R.E.A.D. incorporated will 



"With a properly trained, enthusiastic and sympa- 
thetic staff, a library lab can be a conducive setting 
for learning." 



be continued in some way. They are unanimous in their feeling that 
R.E.A.D. has been successful in reaching poor readers who cannot func- 
tion in a school situation. With a properly trained, enthusiastic and 
sympathetic staff, a library lab can be a conducive setting for learning. 
The librarian who can bring a love of books to her teaching can success- 
fully turn on the student to the pleasures of reading. 








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Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 19 

ORIFLAMME: The Inland Library System's 
Outreach Service to the Elderly 

by Marsha Neuber 



ORIFLAMME (Dlder R_esidents Jnvolved From Library .Activity in 
Mass Media Experiment) was an Inland Library System outreach serv- 
ice to the elderly operating from August 1, 1973 through July 31, 1975. 
The project was funded for its first year by Title III of the Older Ameri- 
cans Act as administered by the California Office on Aging. The project 
was picked up for its second year by the California State Library and 
was funded with money from the Library Services and Construction 
Act. Although ORIFLAMME had originally been conceived as a three 
year project, the Inland Library System was not able to obtain funding 
for the proposed third year. 

The libraries of the Inland System absorbed ORIFLAMME's services 
as of August 1, 1975. The library staffs were prepared to do this by a 
series of workshops given by the ORIFLAMME staff. In May and June 



Senior citizens at Mt. Rubidoux Rehabilita- 
tion Hospital, Riverside, enjoy recordings, 
films and large print books provided 
through ORIFLAMME. Photos by Ed- 
mond Contrell, San Bernardino. 



of 1975, six small workshops were held to train and prepare the Inland 
System librarians to absorb ORIFLAMME's services into their regularly 
budgeted library programs. Although ORIFLAMME will no longer op- 
erate as a separate entity, the Inland Library System is continuing the 
services which it began. 

The project staff began work in September, 1973. Some of the equip- 
ment, such as projectors, screens, carts and cassette players, were pur- 
chased before the staff was hired. However, much of the material was 
ordered after the project had begun and the staff was able to ascertain 
what would be most valuable to the project. These materials included 
cassette tapes, records and films. This method worked well because it 
made the large equipment available early in the project and yet later 
supplied the materials which the patrons were demanding. 



Marsha Neuber, former coordinator of 
ORIFLAMME, is now working as refer- 
ence and young adult librarian in the Riv- 
erside City and County Public Library. 



20 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

In a project such as ORIFLAMME, the equipment and materials 
undergo heavy use by many people. For example, the projectors were 
lent to the public as well as used by the staff. This made it essential to 
train everyone in the use of projectors so that they were taken care of 
properly. Loaning the projectors to the public worked very well and 
made it possible to serve many more people than the ORIFLAMME 
staff alone could reach. 

The first, and perhaps largest, problem faced was to identify specific 
individuals within Riverside, San Bernardino and Inyo counties who 
were senior citizens and were not being served by their local public 
libraries. So the staff organized a publicity campaign to search out and 
identify these people. However, this group is an extremely difficult one 



"The first, and perhaps largest, problem was to 
identify specific individuals who were senior citi- 
zens and were not being served by their local pub- 
lic libraries." 



to reach. This is caused by many factors, including limited mobility, a 
limited economic base and declining health. 

Many means of reaching these people were utilized with varying 
degrees of response. Radio and newspapers were used with limited 
response. However, ORIFLAMME did have a 15-minute interview 
show on radio station KWOW which was very successful. Contacts were 
made with many agencies serving the aged such as churches, mobile 
home parks. Visiting Nurse Associations, Meals-on-Wheels, county 
health, welfare, civic organizations, senior citizens clubs, and many 
more. Some of these agencies were helpful and did what they could to 
help publicize ORIFLAMME, while others did nothing. It was neces- 
sary to continually renew these contacts as staff turnovers were con- 
stantly bringing in new people. Cooperation was best from 
book-oriented individuals within agencies. It seemd that if the repre- 
sentative of the agency was a reader, he was more likely to tell the 
senior citizens he contacted about ORIFLAMME. 

In addition to using agencies to disperse information about ORI- 
FLAMME, the staff was able to reciprocate by passing on information 
about the agencies to the many people they contacted. Thus ORI- 
FLAMME, and the Inland Library System, was able to be a viable 
communication link between different agencies and between agencies 
and individuals. 

The staff found out early in the project that the best way of identify- 
ing potential senior patrons was through the libraries of the Inland 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 21 

System. The staff working in these libraries received information about 
the project and they in turn passed on word of ORIFLAMME to their 
patrons. Flyers and The Banner, ORIFLAMME's newsletter, were dis- 
tributed to libraries and to the many agencies working with the elderly. 
The yellow Books-by-Mail flyer (the second flyer designed by the 
project staff) was particularly effective in recruiting patrons. It includ- 
ed a tear-off registration form for applying for ORIFLAMME service. 

Word of mouth was another excellent way of involving new people 
in the services. This seemed to work in two ways. Shut-ins who knew 
of other shut-ins told them of the Books-by-Mail service. And people 
who were attending the film and slide shows brought friends and neigh- 
bors with them to the programs. 

Since the area of the Inland Library System is so large, it would have 
been impossible to cover the entire area. Hence four target areas were 
designated, with headquarters at the Louis Robidoux Branch Library in 
Riverside county and offices in Inyo county and the desert communities 
of Palm Springs and Victorville. Although programming was concen- 
trated in these areas, the Books-by-Mail service was available to anypne 
in the three counties. These target areas proved to be very effective and 
made it possible to deal with the large geographic area of the Inland 
Library System. 

Although the project staff concentrated on making the residents of 
the three counties aware of ORIFLAMME's services, they also took 
every opportunity to promote libraries in general. For example, this 
occurred when the staff gave talks on ORIFLAMME and then went on 
to discuss the services available through the local library. 

One of the major concerns of the project, and a source of much of the 
publicity, was the Books-by-Mail service. Books-by-Mail was a totally 
free mail service of books (regular and large print as well as in Spanish) , 
cassette tapes and small framed art prints. Materials were loaned for a 
month with renewals upon request. They were sent in jiffy bags, which 
contained instructions for returning and included a return mailing label 
with postage attached. 

The Books-by-Mail service operated out of the headquarters office 
with books selected from the collections of Riverside City and County 
Public Library. The Inyo county target area developed a book catalog 
for residents of that county but the Books-by-Mail service from River- 
side relied on miscellaneous subject book lists. The Inyo county book 
catalog was not written into the original grant proposal but was con- 
ceived during the first year of the project as a means of demonstrating 
the usefulness of a book catalog in conjunction with Books-by-Mail 
service. Then it was discovered that due to postal regulations covering 
that large and sparsely populated county, Books-by-Mail service was 
virtually impossible. (Postal regulations should be checked with each 
local post office which will be involved.) However, the book catalog is 
proving very useful for the shut-in and institutionalized as an aid in 
selecting books to be delivered by ORIFLAMME clerks and future 
volunteers. All of the selection and most work on the catalog was an 



22 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

in-kind contribution of the Inyo County Librarian and her staff with 
ORIFLAMME contributing some financial support. This, of course, re- 
quired some readjustment of the project budget running into the sec- 
ond year due to late billing by the printer of the catalog, which indicates 
the perils of adding projects to a grant proposal. Nevertheless, the 



"Phone calls and written notes to the patrons were 
the methods utilized to keep the service personal 
and responsive." 



ORIFLAMME staff and the Inyo county staff feel that the book catalog 
project was an invaluable demonstration in the feasibility and useful- 
ness of producing a book catalog for a large but sparsely populated 
county. 

The quality of the Books-by-Mail service was very high. It is easy to 
fall into the role of becoming a shipping house of materials; however, 
ORIFLAMME's Books-by-Mail service has always been responsive to 
the needs of the patrons. This was accomplished because the staff cared 
about the individual patrons and took time to select the right materials 
for each reader. Phone calls and written notes to the patrons were the 
methods utilized to keep the service personal and responsive. 

In addition to Books-by-Mail, the target areas and many of the librar- 
ies operated their own shut-in services with volunteers. Now that the 
libraries have absorbed Books-by-Mail, they will be able to offer a choice 
to patrons of either mail or delivery-by-volunteer service. 

ORIFLAMME also offered programs of various kinds, including dis- 
cussion groups, guest speakers, slide and film shows. Films were the 
most popular. The types of films which drew the largest audiences were 
travel and nature films. The film programs took place both inside and 
outside of libraries. Outside of libraries, films were shown at convales- 
cent hospitals and nursing homes, retirement centers, nutrition pro- 
grams and drop-in centers. Early in the project, letters explaining 
ORIFLAMME's services were sent to 355 extended-care facilities in 
Riverside and San Bernardino counties. The response was poor with 
only six answers. However, over the remaining two years of the project, 
the staff was able to establish relationships with many more facilities. 

Volunteers were an important part of ORIFLAMME. They per- 
formed many tasks, including working with the Books-by-Mail service, 
showing films and slides, conducting a book discussion group, and doing 
original taping. However, because of the large geographic area of the 
project, it was difficult to work with volunteers. It takes time to effec- 
tively use volunteers and someone must be responsible to supervise 
them. Since it was not possible for the staff to cover all three counties. 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 



23 



volunteers were only used in designated areas. Where it was feasible to 
use them, the volunteers proved to be invaluable. 

ORIFLAMME operated under an Advisory Council. This Council 
was composed of representatives for each of the 10 member libraries 
and a member-at-large. The Council served in an advisory capacity and 
was very helpful to the staff in giving support and advice, as well as in 
working with the staff in setting policy. 

ORIFLAMME was a demonstration project. It set out to prove that 
the elderly need special library services and that these services can be 
provided without too much difficulty. Although ORIFLAMME was fed- 
erally funded, most of its services have been absorbed by the Inland 
Library System. The staff of ORIFLAMME was able to build up exper- 
tise in library service to the elderly and to serve as a resource for the 
Inland Library System staff. And perhaps, most important of all, the 
System has developed a commitment to provide good library service to 
the aging. ORIFLAMME was a success. 




24 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Medical Reference Works 
For The Public Library 

by William Maina and Beverlee French 



The demand by the public for medical information seems to be sky- 
rocketing almost as rapidly as malpractice insurance rates. Further- 
more, today's public library patron with a medical question is often 
fairly knowledgeable; he or she frequently wants sophisticated discus- 
sions of medical topics, rather than simplified summaries. 

Since lay persons seeking all types of medical information turn to the 
public library, and since medical libraries are not oriented toward serv- 
ing the general public in large numbers, it is clearly advantageous for 
the public library to build a medical collection that can meet the needs 
of users with varying levels of sophistication. The suggestion has even 
been made that libraries should begin to function as "community health 
information centers." ^ A first step in the answering of medical queries 
is the building of a comprehensive ready-reference collection in medi- 



"It is clearly advantageous for the public library to 
build a medical collection that can meet the needs 
of users with varying levels of sophistication." 



cine. Preferably, this would be supplemented by a good selection of 
non-reference monographs, such as those suggested by Beatty and 
Beatty.2 

Unfortunately, many medical reference works designed for use by 
the lay public contain outdated information, incomplete and simplistic 
discussions, poor illustrations, and a patronizing attitude toward the 
reader. This fact, plus the growing sophistication of the library users, are 
two reasons why public libraries may want to acquire reference works 
aimed at health professionals. 

This article is designed to aid public librarians who wish to know 
more about professionally-oriented medical reference works — the kind 



William Maina and Beverlee French are 
reference librarians at the Biomedical Li- 
brary, University of California, San Diego, 
at La Jolla. Their bibliography is revised 
from one prepared earlier for a workshop 
of the Serra Regional Library System. 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 25 

typically found in a medical library — that would be suitable for a public 
library. We hope that this overview of thirty-two monographs will make 
it easier to select appropriate items for purchase. Almost all of the works 
listed are designed for the health professional, but we have also includ- 
ed in the list a very few high-quality items aimed at the general public. 
Although many professionally-oriented medical reference works are 
written in somewhat technical language, virtually all are understanda- 
ble by the informed layman, especially if he or she has access to a good 
medical dictionary. 

We have arranged the items in a somewhat unusual way: they are 
listed in suggested order of purchase. The order of purchase has been 
determined by consideration of both cost and usage factors. Items of 



"The items are listed in suggested order of pur- 
chase, determined by consideration of both cost 
and usage factors." 



relatively low cost that are likely to be heavily used are listed first; items 
of relatively high cost that may not be heavily used are listed later. More 
weight has been given to usage than to cost. Thus, some rather expen- 
sive, but very useful, items are of first priority. 

It should be stressed that this list reflects our personal opinions. Two 
other medical librarians would certainly have compiled a somewhat 
different list with a somewhat different suggested order of purchase. 
We believe that all the items are in print. The subjects of dentistry and 
nursing are not covered; for books on such specialties within the health 
care field, the bibliography compiled by Brandon may be consulted.^ 

The Book of Health: A Medical Encyclopedia for Everyone. Clark, Randolph Lee and 
Russell W. Cumley, compilers and eds. 3d ed. New York, Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1973. 
975 p. Illustrated. $29.95. 

An excellent medical encyclopedia designed for the layman, but with 
few of the usual flaws of such works. Medical and scientific jargon are 
avoided, yet the information given is accurate and up-to-date. The 
endpapers contain information on methods of emergency medical 
treatment. Chapters cover various bodily systems, birth and childhood, 
disease-producing organisms, first aid information, history of medicine, 
nutrition and other topics. It is profusely illustrated with frank photo- 
graphs and drawings. If a public library's medical reference collection 
had to be limited to one book, this one would be a good choice. 

Miller, Benjamin F. and Claire B. Keane. Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine and 
Nursing. Philadelphia, Saunders, 1972. 1089 p. Illustrated. $10.95. 

A very useful "first" medical dictionary for the public library. Al- 
though less comprehensive than Dorland's or Stedman's (discussed 
below) , it is written in simpler language. Nurses and paraprofessionals 



26 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

in medicine are the audience for which it is designed. Because it is a 
dictionary /encyclopedia, rather than just a dictionary, many of its defi- 
nitions are minor treatises as long as one-and-a-half pages. 

Current Medical Diagnosis and Treatment. Krupp, Marcus A., et al. Los Altos, Calif., 
Lange Medical Publications, 1975. (annual) 1044 p. S13.50. (soft cover). 

An extremely useful tool at a reasonable price. It gives the essentials 
of diagnosis, general considerations, clinical findings, complications, 
prevention, treatment and prognosis for twenty-four different catego- 
ries of diseases. Relatively simple terminology is used, and bibliograph- 
ical references are given for each condition discussed. 

Physicians' Desk Reference. 29th ed. Oradell, N.J., Medical Economics Co., 1975. (Annu- 
al) 2040 p. Illustrated. S13.50. 

The PDR, as it is commonly called, is available free to physicians 
through pharmaceutical companies. The information included in the 
text is provided by the pharmaceutical companies and is the same 
information as found on the drug labels required by the Food and Drug 
Administration. Of special interest is the information given on adverse 
reactions or complications of drugs. The work provides several access 
points: an alphabetical list of drug manufacturers, lists of all drugs 
manufactured by each company (alphabetically by company), an al- 
phabetical index by drug brand name, a drug classification index, and 
a generic and chemical name index. A unique feature of this publication 
is the section which contains colored illustrations of pills; this section 
can be used to identify pills which are in hand, but the identity of which 
is not known. Supplements are sent to each purchaser between new 
editions. 

Handbook of Non-Prescription Drugs. Griffenhagen, George B. Washington, D.C., 
American Pharmaceutical Association, 1973. 232 p. Illustrated. $7.50. 

This easily-understandable work contains descriptions of most popu- 
lar over-the-counter remedies. Included are explanations of the drug 
actions, and many tables showing products, manufacturers, ingredients, 
and forms of application. Each section has a few references guiding the 
user to scientific or medical articles. 

Dreisbach, Robert H. Handbook of Poisoning. 8th ed. Los Altos, Calif. Lange Medical 
Publications, 1974. 517 p. $6.50. 

This handy, pocket-sized book is often used in hospital emergency 
rooms. Although written for physicians and hospital staff, it can be used 
by the general public. For each type of poisoning, the work presents 
clinical findings, prevention, treatment, and prognosis. Substances dis- 
cussed include agricultural poisons, industrial hazards, household haz- 
ards, medicinal poisons, and animal and plant hazards. The chapter on 
"Emergency Management of Poisoning" is likely to be of wide interest. 
Prevention of poisoning is emphasized throughout the book. One prob- 
lem with this book is that it may disappear from the shelves because of 
its small size. 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 27 

United States. National Center for Health Statistics. Facts of Life and Death. Rockville, 
Md., 1974. 46 p. DHEW publication no. (HRA) 74-1222. (Price unknown; may be free) 
(soft cover) . 

A gold mine of basic United States statistical data on health-related 
topics. Statistics are given on: population, births, life expectancy, mar- 
riage and divorce, health characteristics, physical measurements, 
health resources, and mortality. 

Allied Medical Education Directory, 1974. 5th ed. Chicago, American Medical Associa- 
tion, 1974. 441 p. $2.25 (soft cover). 

This work could be considered for inclusion in an education refer- 
ence collection as well as a medical reference collection. With the 
growing interest in paramedical careers, this tool is likely to be heavily 
used. The major portion of the book is devoted to descriptions of allied 
medical occupations, the education required for them, and schools that 
offer the necessary educational programs. 

Medical School Admission Requirements 1976-77, U.S.A. and Canada. 26th ed. Washing- 
ton, D.C., Association of American Medical Colleges, 1975. (Annual) 351 p. $5.00. (soft 
cover). 

This item also could be considered for an education reference collec- 
tion. In addition to a two-page description of the curriculum, admission 
requirements, and selection factors of every medical school in the U.S. 
and Canada, this work contains a wealth of other information of interest 
to students considering medical school. Topics covered include 
premedical planning, financial information, the nature of medical edu- 
cation, and information for rejected applicants. 

Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. Wintrobe, Maxwell M. et al., eds. 7th ed. New 

York, McGraw-Hill, 1974. 2120 p. Illustrated. $29.50. 
Textbook of Medicine. Beeson, Paul B. and Walsh McDermott, eds. 14th ed. Philadelphia, 

Saunders, 1975. 1968 p. Illustrated. $34.50. 

Harrison 's Principles of Internal Medicine and the Textbook of Medi- 
cine are the two standard, comprehensive textbooks of medicine. One 
or both should be in all but the smallest medical reference collection, 
although the lay reader is likely to find the physician-oriented language 
of both somewhat challenging. Medical reference collections which will 
remain small and are severely limited in size by shortage of funds may 
wish to buy The Book of Health rather than one of these. Although 
Harrison 's and the Textbook of Medicine contain much the same infor- 
mation, Harrison 's has one useful feature that the Textbook does not: 
a section of 323 pages that discusses symptoms, and the disorders that 
various symptoms may indicate. For example, it is possible to consult a 
chapter discussing all the possible causes of vertigo. 

Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Saunders, 1974. 1748 p. 
Illustrated. $21.50. 

Stedman's Medical Dictionary. 22d ed. Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, 1972. 1532 p. 
Illustrated. $18.50. 

norland's send Stedman's dixe the two standard, authoritative Ameri- 
can medical dictionaries, and they are similar in many ways. Both are 



28 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

designed for use by physicians and others thoroughly familiar with 
medical terminology. Both contain sections on medical etymology. 
Both have many plates and many illustrations in the text. Both regularly 
appear in new, revised editions. Stedman 's also contains eleven appen- 
dices covering such topics as blood groups, medical symbols, etc. 

While any but the smallest medical reference collection should have 
one or the other of these dictionaries, it probably is not necessary to 
have both unless the collection grows to twenty or more titles. Because 
the two works are so similar, one might wish to look at factors such as 
price, date of the latest editions, and special tables or illustrations when 
deciding which to purchase. 

Burton, Benjamin T. The Heinz Handbook of Nutrition. 2d ed. New York, published for 
the H. J. Heinz Co. by McGraw-Hill, 1965. 462 p. $n.50. 

Contains a large body of nutrition information in a concise format. 
The scope of this work embraces the following: basic physiology and 
biochemistry of the human body as it relates to food intake and utiliza- 
tion; various nutrients — their sources, metabolism, physiology; human 
nutritional requirements and nutrition under varying conditions of 
health and in periods of stress; nutrition in disease; nutrition in relation 
to emergencies; food sanitation and food technology; community 
health. A very useful section of the work is the food composition tables 
which provide nutritive values of a number of foods. A third edition is 
scheduled for publication soon. 

National Research Council. Food and Nutrition Board. Recommended Dietary Allow- 
ances. 8th ed. Washington, D.C., National Academy of Sciences, 1974. 128 p. $2.50. (soft 
cover). 

The library which does not want to purchase the Heinz Handbook 
(see above) until the new edition is available may wish to purchase this 
inexpensive but less comprehensive work for the interim. A general 
discussion of the concept of recommended dietary allowances and their 
uses is presented, as well as information on the nutritional aspects of 
water, protein, vitamins, and minerals. A twenty-five page bibliogra- 
phy, arranged by topic, accompanies the text. 

Church, Charles Frederick and Helen Nichols Church. Food Values of Portions Common- 
ly Used. 12th ed. Philadelphia, Lippincott, 1975. 197 p. $6.90. 

This extensive list of nutrient values for all categories of food is likely 
to be a popular item. A brief introduction discusses types of nutrients 
and provides tables of the revised (1974) Recommended Daily Dietary 
Allowances. Food substances are arranged alphabetically within food 
category (ie., appetizers, cereals, vegetables, etc.) and such values as 
calories, proteins, fiber content, fat, minerals and vitamins, are given for 
a precisely designated portion of each substance. There is also a section 
discussing the function, food uses, and level of use of non-nutritive 
ingredients (food additives). In addition, charts are provided on such 
topics as family food planning, gluten-free foods, cholesterol, adequate 
diet and desirable weight. The work includes a bibliography and an 
index of all the food substances, many of which appear in more than one 
category. 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 29 

Greisheimer, Esther M. and Mary P. Wiedeman. Physiology and Anatomy. 9th ed. Phila- 
delphia, Lippincott, 1972. 678 p. Illustrated. $13.50. 

This work is introduced by a section on the body as an integrated 
whole and then is organized by body system. In each section anatomy 
is conveniently presented first, followed by physiology. Although there 
are many physiology texts available, this is one of the better ones. It is 
not aimed at the layman, but rather the student of physiology. Because 
this text includes anatomical as well as physiological information, the 
library buying this work may wish to omit Gray's Anatomy (discussed 
below) . 

Schmidt, Jacob E. Paramedical Dictionary: A Practical Dictionary for the Semi-Medical 
and Ancillary Medical Professions. Springfield, 111., Thomas, 1973. 423 p. $7.95. 

As the subtitle indicates, this medical dictionary is designed for non- 
physicians. The average person will find the definitions quite under- 
standable. It contains an appendix which lists communicable diseases, 
medical abbreviations, tables of equivalent measures, and other infor- 
mation. Although this is not a tool of primary importance, adding it to 
a public library medical reference collection will broaden the range of 
readers able to use the collection. 

Directory of Medical Specialists. 16th ed. Chicago, Marquis, Who's Who, 1974. 2v. $49.50. 

This directory lists those physicians who are members of American 
Specialty Boards: about 140,000 persons. They are listed geographically 
by state, then city, within each specialty. The following information is 
given for each individual: specialty in which certified, date of certifica- 
tion, date and place of birth, school attended, degree received and year, 
career record (e.g., hospitals affiliated with, teaching positions held), 
professional society membership, current address and phone number. 
Information is also included on the Boards that together make up the 
American Board of Medical Specialties. Although relatively expensive, 
it is likely to be heavily used. 

Magalini, Sergio. Dictionary of Medical Syndromes. Philadelphia, Lippincott, 1971. 591 p. 
$18.00. 

A syndrome is a group of symptoms that occur together and usually 
indicate a specific disease. A syndrome is often named after the individ- 
ual who first described if (e.g., Parkinson's Syndrome, Down's Syn- 
drome); syndromes named after individuals are called "eponymic" 
syndromes. Because syndromes are groups of symptoms, and because 
they are often named after individuals, it is sometimes confusing to look 
them up in standard medical reference tools. In such cases, a syndrome 
dictionary is an ideal source to consult. The following information is 
provided for each syndrome listed: synonyms, symptoms and signs, 
etiology, pathology, diagnosis, therapy, prognosis, and a brief list of 
articles dealing with the syndrome. 

Current Therapy, 1975: Latest Approved Methods of Treatment for the Practicing Physi- 
cian. Conn, Howard F., ed. Philadelphia, Saunders, 1975. (Annual) 877 p. $21.00. 

An excellent source of therapeutic miorrsi2ition on relatively common 
diseases. Patrons wanting a general discussion of diseases will not be 



30 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

satisfied with this work, since it primarily discusses therapies and possi- 
ble complications of therapies. Despite the fact that it is aimed at the 
physician, much of it should be understandable to the informed layman. 

Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry. Freedman, Alfred M., et al., eds. 2d ed. Bal- 
timore, Williams & Wilkins, 1975. 2 v. Illustrated. $65.00. 

Excellent and up-to-date coverage of all types of psychiatric disor- 
ders. Although quite expensive, it is the most authoritative and compre- 
hensive work in its field. Besides giving thorough descriptions of all 
aspects of psychiatric conditions, it contains chapters on biology, neurol- 
ogy, and sociology of human behavior. Separate chapters are also devot- 
ed to various theories of personality and to various types of therapies 
(i.e., psychotherapy, drug therapy, milieu therapy) . 

American Medical Directory. 26th ed. Chicago, American Medical Association, 1974. 4 v. 
$125.00. 

This work lists physicians (Doctors of Medicine and Doctors of Oste- 
opathy) who are located in the United States, Canal Zone, Puerto Rico, 
Virgin Islands, certain Pacific Islands, or are temporarily located in 
foreign countries. All AMA members are listed as well as Doctors of 
Medicine who are not AMA members. Basic biographical information 
is given: address, birth date, school from which M.D. degree was re- 
ceived, year of M.D. degree, year of license, specialties, type of practice, 
and American Specialty Board Membership. It is unfortunately both 
costly and dated, but its information is nevertheless likely to be in great 
demand. 

Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics. Goodman, Louis A., et al., eds. New York, MacMil- 
lan, 1975. 1704 p. Illustrated. $30.00. 

This work contains much valuable information that is difficult to find 
in other sources. Commonly known as "Goodman and Gilman," it is a 
classic textbook of pharmacology, toxicology, and therapeutics designed 
for physicians and pharmacologists. Drugs are discussed both according 
to the bodily system upon which they act, and according to use (e.g., 
local anesthetics) . This format is in contrast to the Physicians' Desk 
Reference (see above) in which drugs are arranged by manufacturer 
and within manufacturer by trade name, rather than by generic type. 

Modern Drug Encyclopedia and Therapeutic Index. Arthur J. Lewis, ed. 13th ed. New 
York, Yorke Medical Books, 1975. 922 p. $29.00. 

The Modern Drug Encyclopedia (MDE) contains information simi- 
lar to that in the Physicians' Desk Reference (see above) . Although the 
MDE is, not as comprehensive and detailed as PDR, it is much easier to 
use, since drugs are simply listed in alphabetical order by generic or 
trade name. Three indexes are included: the therapeutic, manufactur- 
ers' and general. Features found in this work but not in PDR are a 
glossary of pharmaceutical trade-name dosage forms and a table of drug 
and chemical blood level data. The work is supplemented by Modern 
Drugs, which is issued periodically and lists new drugs available since 
publication. 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 31 

American Hospital Association. Guide to the Health Care Field. Chicago, The Association, 
1975. (annual) 604 p. $20.00. 

This tool lists by location all U. S. hospitals registered with the Ameri- 
can Hospital Association. The work lists osteopathic hospitals and in- 
cludes a roster of accredited long term care facilities as well. The 
following information is given for each hospital: name, address, phone 
number, information on facilities, and brief data on the number of 
patients served. A good deal of other information on the health care 
field is also presented in this work (e.g., health organizations, agencies, 
and education programs are listed; hospital equipment manufacturers 
are listed) . 

Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy. Holvey, David N., et al., eds. 12th ed. Rahway, 
N. J., Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, 1972. 1964 p. $8.00. 

Gives brief descriptions of various disorders, listing signs and symp- 
toms, diagnosis, and treatment. The work is arranged by bodily system. 
It includes chapters on poisoning and on clinical procedures and rou- 
tines. Although this book is ever-present in hospitals and doctors' offices 
(perhaps because of its low cost and small, convenient size) , it probably 
should not be a first choice for the small medical reference collection. 
The Book of Health, Current Medical Diagnosis and Treatment, Harri- 
son 's Principles of Internal Medicine and /or the Textbook of Medicine 
should all be added before this item. 

Arena, Jay M. Poisoning: Toxicology, Symptoms, Treatments. Springfield, 111., Thomas, 
1974. 804 p. $43.50. 

This comprehensive text is one of the best on the subject of poisoning, 
although it is relatively expensive. Of particular interest is the chapter 
entitled "Public Safety Education" which contains discussions of first 
aid in poisoning, carbon monoxide poisoning, solvent hazards, toxic 
Christmas decorations and firework hazards. Other sections of the text 
deal with insecticides, fumigants, industrial hazards, halogenated hy- 
drocarbons and metals, occupational hazards, cosmetics and toilet arti- 
cles, poisonous plants, reptiles and insects. A major emphasis of the 
author throughout the book is the prevention of accidental child poison- 
ings. Most of the information is written in a manner which can easily 
be understood by the general public. 

Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease: Dietotherapy. Goodhart, Robert S., ed. 5th ed. 
Philadelphia, Lea & Febiger, 1973. 1153 p. Illustrated. $35.00. 

This is a very good, basic textbook of nutrition. As stated in the 
preface, it is intended for students and practitioners in nutrition, medi- 
cine, and public health. The book is divided into six parts: foundations 
of nutrition; safety and adequacy of the food supply; interrelations of 
nutrients and metabolism; malnutrition; nutrition during physiologic 
stress; and nutrition in the prevention and treatment of disease. Biblio- 
graphies accompany each chapter. This work is somewhat more com- 
prehensive, but also much more expensive than the Heinz Handbook 
(see above). 



32 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Clinical Toxicology of Commercial Products. Gleason, Marian N., et al. 3d ed. Baltimore, 
Williams & Wilkins, 1969. Paging by section. $27.00. 

An excellent source of information on toxic household products. It is 
divided into seven sections: first aid and emergency treatment; ingredi- 
ents index; therapeutic index; supportive treatment; trade name index; 
general formulations; manufacturers' names and addresses. A unique 
feature is a table listing household commercial products by brand name 
with corresponding ingredients and their proportions. Although it is an 
authoritative publication, this work may not be as useful to the general 
public as the Physicians' Desk Reference, the Modern Drug Ency- 
clopedia, or Goodman and Oilman's Pharmacological Basis of Thera- 
peutics (discussed above). Each drug listed in the therapeutic index 
section has a fairly comprehensive bibliography, and the explanations 
of the drug actions are quite concise. 

Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body. Goss, Charles Mayo, ed. 29th ed. Philadelphia, Lea 
& Febiger, 1973. 1465 p. Illustrated. $28.50. 

The authoritative textbook of anatomy. 

Merck Index: An Encyclopedia of Chemicals and Drugs. Stecher, Paul, ed. 8th ed. Rah- 
way, N.J., Merck and Co., 1968. 1713 p. Illustrated. $15.00 (soft cover). 

This work is useful for chemical as well as medical reference. It is in 
dictionary form by chemical name and gives the chemical structure and 
general information for each drug or compound. Medicinal and veteri- 
nary uses are stated and some key references are given. Most of the 
information is fairly sophisticated for the general public, but this is the 
best of the chemical dictionaries. A new edition is supposedly planned 
for 1976 or 1977. 



REFERENCES 

' Librarians as "Gatekeepers" of Medical Info. Library Journal, 100(20):2094, Nov. 15, 
1975. 

^ Beatty, William K. and Virginia L. Beatty. A Medical Collection. American Libraries, 

5(5):250-253, May 1974. 
^ Brandon, Alfred N. Selected List of Books and Journals for the Small Medical Library. 

Bulletin of The Medical Library Association, 63 (2): 149-172, April 1975. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The authors wish to thank both Sandra K. Smith, Reference Coordinator of the Serra 
Regional Library System (San Diego) and Marilyn Petersen of the Thompson Medical 
Library, Naval Regional Medical Center (San Diego) for their advice and 
encouragement. 



Volume 70, No. 1-4. 1975 



33 



NEWS NOTES 




He may have swallowed the canary, but 
this young patron is not really responsible 
for the Oroville earthquakes. Photo from 
the Butte County Library. 



WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE EARTH SHAKES 

The photo on the cover this month, taken by the Oroville Mercury 
Register, shows what happens to libraries when the earth shakes in 
California. Oroville, county seat of Butte County north of Sacramento, 
experienced a series of moderate earthquakes beginning August 1, 1975. 
The strongest of these registered 6.1 on the Richter scale. 

The Butte County Library suffered no serious structural damage, and 
neither staff nor patrons were injured. Books fell on the floor, but 
shelving which was cross-braced withstood the shaking. Heavier books 
stayed on shelf better than light ones, and most of those that fell, 
(around 4,000 out of 100,000 in the building) , were on the wall bracket 
areas rather than the free-standing ranges. 

The library did not lose any glass, but gaskets were loosened on plate 
glass windows over the doors and had to be replaced. One light fixture 



34 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



fell in the main public reading room. Light-weight acoustic ceiling tile 
buckled and fell in some areas, a source of some potential danger to 
personnel. Boxes toppled in shipping and work areas. 

As often happens in small communities during times of crisis, every- 
one turned to to help. Library pages and staff, GET A manpower pro- 
gram personnel, staff husbands and library friends cleaned up and 
reshelved the library in record time. Patrons braved danger signs and 
barricaded areas to return their books to the bookdrop. County Librar- 
ian Jo Terry had had the foresight to order a brand new bookmobile, 
and it was officially turned over to the county the Monday following the 
quake. Within one hour it was set up for service outside the building 
and continued as a temporary headquarters until Wednesday, when the 
county library re-opened for service. 




Falling acoustic tile can be a library hazard 
in earthquake country. Photo from the 
Butte County Library. 



A LANDMARK YEAR 

Nineteen seventy-five will stand as a landmark year in library devel- 
opment in California, with completion of the first major, independent' 
study of the state's Public Library Systems and the subsequent week- 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 35 

long planning meeting called to formulate recommendations for the 
future. 

The report of Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. recommended new 
cooperative arrangements among libraries and a new, more responsible 
funding structure based upon reimbursement for costs of resource shar- 
ing. The report, California Public Library Systems, a Comprehensive 
Review with Guidelines for the Next Decade, was distributed by the 
State Library to public and academic libraries in California and to state 
libraries and library schools throughout the country. Copies of the re- 
port are now exhausted. 

The State Library sponsored the Library Planning Institute in San 
Francisco, June 23-27, 1975, to bring together over 100 trustees, Friends 
and librarians from every type of library to consider the Systems study 
report. Participants accepted much of the Peat, Marwick, Mitchell data 
but put together their own set of recommendations on structure and 
funding. Immediately upon conclusion of the Institute, State Librarian 
Ethel Crockett appointed a Legislative Task Force to draft the text of 
a new legislative program for consideration by the California library 
community and submission to the Legislature in 1976. 

Proceedings of the Library Planning Institute were published in a 
222-page volume in early December, 1975. This publication also was 
widely distributed. A limited number of copies are still available, with- 
out charge, from the State Library Public Information Office. 



50 YEARS AGO IN CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Los Angeles County Library, Miss Helen E. Vogleson, Lib'n. Other 
libraries may like to know about the addressograph, added to the equip- 
ment of the Catalog Department in April 1924. This machine has fur- 
nished us with an economical and satisfactory means of duplicating 
book pockets, book plates, book cards, branch shelf list cards, and 
charge cards. The addressograph plates are made by the local addresso- 
graph office at a cost of 5% to 5% cents a plate, and are delivered to us 
within three days. Each plate is embossed with author's name, initials, 
title and class number of the book we are duplicating. From this plate 
the desired number of cards is quickly run off at the rate of 100 impres- 
sions in five minutes — ten times faster than the typewriter. No skill is 
required to operate the machine and all revision of the cards is eliminat- 
ed. After the necessary records are made, the main shelf list card is 
stamped with the word "Addressograph" and the plate is filed al- 
phabetically in a special filing cabinet ready for use whenever more 
copies of the book are added to the collection. — January, 1925. 

Huntington Beach Public Library, Mrs. Bertha Proctor Reynolds, 
Lib'n. Armistice Day we had a county celebration here at Huntington 
Beach. Over a hundred floats representing different scenes of history 



36 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

were in the parade. The Une of march was down the New State High- 
way on Ocean Avenue, a very wide street where the parade could be 
seen twice going and coming. The history of the Huntington Beach 
Library was represented by a miniature Carnegie Library and grounds 
on a large oil truck. The truck was decorated in bunting and red, white 
and blue streamers. At the prow of the float was a large American eagle 
with a flag in its mouth and two large silken flags crossed at its feet. On 
top of the cab of the truck was a miniature library of the olden days of 
Huntington Beach. — January, 1925. 

Escondido Public Library, Miss Mary Adams, Lib'n. The Escondido 
Public Library has been primarily a reading room for the mature and 
older citizens. We are at this time seeking to build up the Junior Depart- 
ment of the Library, having just purchased 180 volumes of the old 
standard books for the youth. These are being listed in grades, when we 
hope to show the junior how completely he has read and how much is 
before him, that he may be properly graded. The grade pupils have 
been brought to the Library for training in "How to use the Library." 
A Children's Hour has been inaugurated, and plans are unfolding for 
guidance and stimulus of their summer reading. The work is refreshing 
and promising to us. — April, 1925. 

Banning Union High School Dist. Library and Branch, Riverside Co. 
Free Library, Frieda J. Iselin, Acting Lib'n. The Banning Union District 
Library welcomes patrons from Banning, Cabazon, Whitewater, and 
the well-known winter resort. Palm Springs. Its small, yet varied and 
good, selection of 1800 books does excellent service to the invalids of the 
sanitariums and to the many sick folks. Many ex-servicemen and others 
are recuperating in the neighborhood. All books used by these patrons 
are thoroughly fumigated upon being returned. The extremely satisfac- 
tory service of the Riverside County Library, which sends us books 
upon request (and we seem to request many), greatly increases our 
opportunity to give the people the books they want and need. An 
interest on books dealing with the will, the subconscious mind, and 
mind development is interesting and noticeable. — April, 1925. 

Tuolumne County Free Library, Sonora, Miss Martha J. Coleman, 
Lib'n. We really feel that spring is with us in Tuolumne County for 
Sonora is full of lumberjacks on their way up to the logging camps. We 
will soon be opening our summer branches in the mountains. In fact we 
already have one request from a new camp, called Camp Crandall. 
According to the storekeeper up there, "The boys would sure appreci- 
ate a box of about 25 books," especially since they are all laid off on 
account of an unexpected snow storm. — April, 1925. 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 37 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY'S ANNUAL PROGRAM 
LIBRARY SERVICES AND CONSTRUCTION ACT 

California's Annual Program for fiscal year 1976 will consist of projects and project 
descriptions which will be "action steps" in the implementation of programs that will lead 
to fulfillment of (1) general objectives of total statewide library development of Califor- 
nia; and (2) objectives specific to the use of funds from the Library Services and Construc- 
tion Act. 

Priorities to be emphasized will be: (1) those of extending public library services to 
geographical areas and groups of persons without such services; improving such services 
in such areas and for such groups as may have inadequate public library services; and 
establishing, expanding and operating programs and projects to provide State institution- 
al library services, library services to the physically handicapped, library services for the 
economically disadvantaged in urban and rural areas, library services to persons of lim- 
ited English-speaking ability, strengthening metropolitan public libraries which serve as 
national or regional resource centers, and strengthening the California State Library; (2) 
those of public library construction projects which will result in a usable public library 
building; (3) those of interlibrary cooperation; and (4) providing library service for the 
elderly. 

I. Title I. Budgeted funds throughout specific areas of projects show Federal share 
only except where otherwise noted: 

Federal Source: $3,945,238 

State Source: 4,279,454 

Local Source: 125,000,000 

A. The general objectives of total statewide library development in California relating 
to the extension of public library services will be to promote the further extension 
of public library services to areas which are without such services or with inade- 
quate services; to make library services more accessible to persons who, by reason 
of distance, residence or physical handicap, or other disadvantage, are unable to 
receive the benefits of public library services regularly made available to the public; 
to strengthen metropolitan public libraries which serve as national or regional 
resource centers; and to improve and strengthen the California State Library. 

B. Specific activities to be carried out by California in the fiscal year 1976 with its 
allotment of funds for library services under Title I will be the following activities: 

(1) Projects to strengthen public library reference networks designed to serve the 
total population of California by reason of inter-type library cooperation. 

(a) Project to strengthen Public Library Systems. Grants will be continued to 
Library Systems established under the Public Library Services Act so that 
area libraries, acting as resource centers, may provide the more extensive 
reference and bibliographic services demanded in such subjects as busi- 
ness, education, technology, and includes advanced interlibrary loan dem- 
onstration networks between libraries of all types. ($600,000) 

(b) Project to strengthen two metropolitan libraries which serve as national 
resource centers, Los Angeles Public Library and San Francisco Public 
Library. (See attached Statement of Criteria.) ($433,140) 

(c) Project to strengthen the California State Library in its role as a research 
and resource library in the statewide reference network. (See LB. (6) ) 

(d) Projects to demonstrate countywide library service in Del Norte, Lake and 
Trinity Counties and improved countywide library service in Imperial 
County. ($1,500 for planning) 

(2) Project Outreach: extending library services to groups previously unserved or 
inadequately served, to the economically disadvantaged populations in urban 
and rural areas with high concentrations of low-income families, and to persons 
of limited English-speaking ability. (Criteria used are those set forth in Califor- 
nia's Basic State Plan) 

(a) Projects to the economically disadvantaged urban areas will include, but 
not be limited to: 



38 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

(1) Kern County Library's Public Access Center using video program- 
ming to bring library service into people's homes, also through books 
by mail. People will be able to exhibit their skills and express their 
needs and experiences by producing their own taped programs. Main 
thrust to be toward those confined to their homes, institutionalized 
because of age or infirmity, and those with physical or geographical 
handicaps, are among the target group for this service. ($65,701) 

(2) Los Angeles County Public Library's Audio Visual Services to resi- 
dents, patients, and inmates of County Institutions served by the Los 
Angeles County Public Library. This represents a new service pro- 
gram to institutions and enrichment of an existing and well-estab- 
lished library service. It is proposed to fully fund the project with 
LSCA monies for one year, after which the program will be continued 
on a maintenance basis. ($68,840) 

(3) Los Angeles County's Learning Centers for the Bilingual, Bicultural. 
Bilingual, bicultural residents of the cities of Compton, Gardena, La 
Puente, Montebello, Norwalk, and San Fernando are targeted. Black, 
Spanish American, American Indian, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Fili- 
pino, and Hawaiian. Six learning centers, phased over a two-year peri- 
od with three each year, will concentrate on the improvement of 
reading and language skills on an individual basis, and will provide a 
plan of reading skill development ranging from the beginning to the 
college level. Services of the learning centers will be available to any 
resident regardless of age, sex, race, or library jurisdiction. ($267,- 
838) 

(4) Los Angeles Public Library's Multi-Cultural, Multi-Lingual and Audio- 
Visual Project. Will enhance the cultural and educational opportuni- 
ties for Los Angeles' minority population (particularly thoSe with Hm- 
ited English-speaking ability) by providing cultural and foreign 
language Audio-Visual materials. The materials will be purchased 
with an emphasis on providing useful information for daily living 
(consumer education, etc.) ($159,358) 

(5) Metropolitan Cooperative Library System's project; Service to the 
Deaf and Hearing Impaired. This project will serve the deaf and 
hearing impaired throughout the greater Los Angeles Area. The Li- 
brary will be developed to be responsive to their special needs. 
($137,610) 

(6) Napa City-County Library's Local History Index. Information gather- 
ing project conceived to deal with the lack of effectively serving the 
community regarding its local history. To involve all cooperating li- 
braries and institutions by providing an index to a union list of local 
history holdings and making materials accessible to the public via 
services of computer generated index. ($3,806) 

(7) Oakland Public Library's Asian Community Library Project. This 
project is to provide bilingual library service to the 25,000 Chinese, 
Japanese, Filipinos, and Koreans in this community. The library cen- 
ter with a bilingual staff and materials collection will serve as a bridge 
between two worlds, making the literature and cultural heritage of 
both Asian and English-speaking worlds accessible and meaningful to 
each other. This project will be a cooperative venture with public 
schools, university, community college, and community agencies. 
($290,287) 

(8) Peninsula Library System's Outreach Project LOVE & Bookpower 
Bus. Through j^ibrary Outreach Volunteers, Etc. . . . library opera- 
tion became involved with volunteer groups who took the services to 
the institutions. The Bookpower Bus provides inexpensive service to 
non-library patrons of the system libraries through paperback book 
collections and community aides. Concentration is on the target areas 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 39 

where the black neighborhoods among the 5 cities of the system are 
located, (carryover funds) 

(9) Peninsula Library System's services to the unserved and inadequately 
served Spanish-speaking peoples through Spanish materials and a bi- 
lingual staff. ($40,000) 

(10) San Joaquin Valley Library System's Extension of Service to Urban 
Bilingual, Bicultural Disadvantaged. The San Joaquin Valley Library 
System through the support of LSCA funds, previously awarded, 
operates a Spanish language Bookmobile, the Biblioteca Ambulante 
in the four-county area and at a headquarters office. The past empha- 
sis in service has been to serve the rural disadvantaged. It will now 
change in emphasis to serve the urban bilingual and bicultural disad- 
vantaged. ($60,000) 

(11) San Jose Public Library's Bilingual and Bicultural Materials Acquisi- 
tion project. The project will provide quantities of bicultural, bilin- 
gual, and Chicano materials to satisfy long neglected needs of Spanish 
monolinguals and bilinguals who comprise a fifth or more of San 
Jose's population. Provide language qualified librarians to facilitate 
and encourage use of the materials which will be added, and to lay 
a solid base for long range development of this material at outlets 
which are accessible and attractive to target groups. ($127,537) 

(12) Ventura County Library Services Agency and the Santa Paula Dis- 
trict Public Library wish to bring Spanish-speaking populations into 
the mainstream of library service. The libraries will pool resources 
and outfit a bookmobile with ephemeral materials, go out into com- 
munities with Spanish-speaking library personnel and contact these 
patrons, alert them person-to-person to the resources of the libraries. 
($102,114) 

(13) Ventura County Library Services Agency project to Create Youth 
Awareness of Library Services. Cooperative program between the 
public library and the CYA institution, Ventura School. ($31,168) 

(b) Projects to the economically disadvantaged rural areas will include, but not 
be limited to: 

(1) Mendocino County Health Service Library program with the Mendo- 
cino County Public Library has broadened its project into an Ameri- 
can Indian Community Information Center under the direction of the 
Mendocino County Indian Health Bureau, (carryover funds) 

(2) North State Library System's Outreach Listen-In project for non read- 
ers in sparsely populated and largely unserved regions through provi- 
sion of cassette tapes. ($5,000) 

(3) San Joaquin Valley Library System's Library Services to Correctional 
Institutions. This project will be to make the library resources of the 
San Joaquin Valley Library System available to the 1,400 inmates of the 
correctional institutions in the area who presently lack any library 
service whatsoever. ($37,000) 

(c) Projects to those previously unserved and to the economically disadvan- 
taged in urban and rural areas throughout the state not reached in (a) and 
(b). 

(d) Special projects involving new areas of public service for disseminating 
information and exploring potential informational, cultural, educational, 
and governmental program formats: 

(1) South Bay's Cable T.V. Outreach Project to encourage library partici- 
pation in developing potential uses of cable television as a medium for 
public service to residents of Santa Clara County. ($81,138) 

(2) Peninsula Library System's Outreach Computerized Community In- 
formation Project. The project will create a comprehensive and easy- 
to-use and maintain file of community information for all local resi- 



40 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

dents and staff of government and social agencies who assist the pub- 
lic. The information to be on-line and retrievable through the tele- 
typewriter network which already links the libraries, these in turn 
connected to the Stanford Computation Center via phone lines. 
($83,656) 

(3) California Video Resources Project of the San Francisco Public Li- 
brary. Demonstration to ascertain the effectiveness of variable use of 
videotape and cable television programming for library services. De- 
signed to meet the current need for sophisticated information on the 
economic, technical and political developments of telecommunica- 
tions. To provide a clearinghouse of information on statewide resource 
materials for individual library involvement. ($64,461) 

(4) Santiago Library System's Regional Media Resource Center. The utili- 
zation of non-print materials to augment library traditional services 
has expanded at a rapid pace. This project will attempt to organize the 
heretofore produced materials. The center will create and reproduce 
materials for distribution throughout the system. The system has been 
enlarged to include all types of libraries. ($43,000) 

(e) Aging: 

(1) Inland Library System's ORIFLAMME (Older Residents Involved 
From Library Activity in Mass Media Experiment). Introduction of 
older citizens not now served through direct service to the home- 
bound or institutionalized by mail. Involves both homebound and 
active older citizens in library programs, planning, and direction of 
service to older people by effecting the library's position by communi- 
cation links to the older resident by interaction with other agencies 
who service the aged. ($38,660) 

(2) Los Angeles County Library System's Mobile/ Mail /Teletronix Service 
to Senior Citizens project. Target group for this proposal consists of 
again (60 years plus) residents of the Antelope Valley area of Los 
Angeles County. Area residents must travel to stationary library facili- 
ties for library materials, information and programming. The project 
will initiate and maintain a professionally staffed mobile information 
referral unit to bring regular, personalized service to non-mobile sen- 
ior citizens and a materials circulation by mail program to supplement 
the mobile service along with Telephone Information Service. 
($137,703) 

(f) Project to strengthen the CaHfornia State Library in its role as a research 
and resource library in the statewide network of library systems. (See I.B. 
(6) ) 

(3) Project for national educational priorities: 

(a) Projects for the "right to read" will include, but not be limited to: 

( 1 ) Long Beach PubHc Library's Signal Hill Intercity Cooperation Project. 
The target population of the Intercity is 60,000. 70% of Long Beach's 
minority population reside in this area. Median family income is $6,- 
534. 20% of the population of this area are below the poverty cutoff 
level and only 65% of the population have attained a 12th grade 
education or less. A little over 10% of the population are 65 years of 
age or older. A right to read will be brought about through LSCA 
funds to provide information the patrons require; necessary duplica- 
tion of needed how-to books. Civil Service manuals; adequate staffing 
to fill service requests from convalescent homes, headstart classes, 
senior citizen groups and other organizations whose members cannot 
come to the library. ($61,830) 

(2) Los Angeles Public Library Audio- Visual Centers in Exposition Park, 
Benjamin Franklin, and Vernon Branches. These communities are 
characterized by a relatively low level of reading ability. Improved 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 41 

library services will be demonstrated by establishing audio-visual cen- 
ters at the branches. ($53,498) 

(3) Nevada County Library's project, The Library and Early Childhood 
Education. A series of workshops for parents and teachers designed to 
demonstrate the importance of the library in the early development 
of the child. ($23,950) 

(4) South Bay Cooperative Library Systems' joint library System READ 
Project providing Reading for Everyone to Achieve and Develop by 
making library materials available through public outlets, a mobile 
unit, and community centers. ($61,940) 

(b) Project for Early Childhood Education will include, but not be limited to: 

(1) 49-99 Cooperative Library System's Interagency Outreach Library 
Project to Children. The project will develop guidelines of Hbrary 
services to children giving user needs and reading development pre- 
eminence. Emphasis will be on those institutions and children who are 
not traditionally library users. ($155,816) 

(2) San Francisco Public Library's Early Childhood Education Project. 
(Carryover funding) 

(4) Project of service to the Physically Handicapped: 

(a) Projects to the physically handicapped will include, but not be limited to: 

(1) Long Beach Public Library's project furnishing special equipment 
and materials to the physically handicapped. ($47,450) 

(b) Projects to the visually handicapped will include, but not be limited to: 

(1) Many of the Outreach Projects in Section I. B. (2) provide services to 
the blind as well. The Long Beach Public Library's project listed 
under physically handicapped in Section I. B. (4) is especially oriented 
toward providing services for the visually handicapped. 

(c) Project to strengthen the California State Library in its role as a research 
and resource library in the statewide network of library systems. The Blind 
& Physically Handicapped Section of the State Library serves the state. 
($22,210) 

(5) Project for state institutional library services: 

(a) Projects to correctional and other institutions will include, but not be lim- 
ited to: 

( 1 ) Agnews State Hospital's Expansion of Library Services to the Mentally 
Retarded. Agnews made the transition from a treatment center for 
the mentally ill to a residential facility for the mentally retarded in 
1972. The library will combine the roles that a school Instructional 
Materials Center and a public library together perform. ($45,200) 

(2) Ben Lomond Youth Conservation Camp Library Demonstration 
project. The project will provide a large paperback library that would 
include books of high interest, emphasizing ethnic, minority youth 
culture subjects on all levels of reading ability. These paperback books 
would also be used by minority and disadvantaged community youth 
groups via the Bookmobile provided by the Santa Cruz Public Li- 
brary. ($9,900) 

(3) California Conservation Center at Susan ville Library Project will pro- 
vide library materials to up date their collection with college level 
material, audio, and audiovisual aids. This will provide a useful tool for 
a skill center concept now being developed at the institution. 
Strengthening of the trade and technical section will also take place. 
($5,000) 

(4) California Institution for Men Project. Establish a music appreciation 
library center in the institution. ($6,000) 

(5) California Men's Colony, East Facility at San Luis Obispo is being 
funded for a survey and study of the advantages and /or disadvantages 



42 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

for a Department of Corrections library system. Conclusions of the 
survey will serve as a guideline for future departmental planning for 
institutional libraries. ($2,200) 

(6) California State Prison, San Quentin Mobile Library Services Project. 
This project at the San Quentin Inmate Library will include oppor- 
tunities for utilization for library services by the lock-up population 
housed in Management Control Units. A mobile library will provide 
extension services to an estimated population of twelve hundred in- 
mates within the target group. ($9,500) 

(7) Correctional Training Facility, Soledad, will upgrade fiction collection 
with paperback books. It will provide these for three facilities in Mon- 
terey County. ($3,600) 

(8) El Paso de Robles library project. Due to the fact the state is reopening 
a school which had been closed for a number of years and, at its time 
of closing, was literally decimated, all equipment, furniture, materials, 
books and even one building were distributed throughout the CYA 
System. We are therefore talking about a new program starting with 
virtually nothing. ($26,000) 

(9) Folsom State Prison's project is designed to furnish recreational read- 
ing materials in paperback form to its inmates. They will be selected 
by the Librarian of the Institution assisted by an advisory panel of 
inmates with a circulation, informally organized by a swap, one for 
one. ($5,603) 

(10) Fred C. Nelles School, California Youth Authority, (REVIVE) Read- 
ing Easily-viewed in Vivid Environment. The project is to provide 
enrichment to the collection through paperback books, equipment, 
furniture, carpeting creating a comfortable, relaxed setting and at- 
mosphere for the inmates. ($25,700) 

(11) Karl Holton School Library Project. Changing population from teen- 
age to young adult makes it necessary to provide college students at 
the institution with access to research materials. The collection will 
be developed in the direction of multi-media learning. ($21,891) 

(12) Mt. Bullion Youth Conservation Camp of the California Youth Au- 
thority library project. This project calls for adding sufficient voca- 
tional-education books and materials to enable wards within the 
camp to research and prepare for those occupations in which they 
are interested. ($2,500) 

(13) Pacific State Hospital Library's listening center for the mentally re- 
tarded, (carryover funds) 

(14) Napa State Hospital Patient's Library. Inasmuch as patients at the 
Napa State Hospital are geographically and physically circumvented 
from using public library services, we propose to develop a suitable 
library within the institution. Cooperation will be provided from the 
regional public libraries and system. ($24,222) 

(15) O. H. Close School project for the Expansion of Library Service. 
Within this project is a library staff training package, we want the 
teacher /librarian and his student assistants to visit public libraries 
and multi-media centers to broaden their perspective and eventually 
improve offerings to students. Library materials and operating ex- 
penses are to be provided. Motivation of students to use the library 
more as a recreational outlet and multi-media service center is an- 
ticipated. ($18,800) 

(16) Oak Glen Youth Conservation Camp. Funds from LSCA will be used 
to buy magazines, paperback books, an encyclopedia, reading pro- 
grams and vocational guidance material. ($500) 

(17) Patton State Hospital Educational and Recreational Center. The Pat- 
ton Center (PERC) will provide basic multi-media center materials. 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 43 

recreational reading, hometown newspapers, popular magazines, 
current paperbacks, and books with large print, for use in the Library 
and in the units. Reference collection, membership in the San Ber- 
nardino, Inyo, Riverside United Library Service (SIRCULS). Inland 
Library System's Project funded under Title I of LSCA. ($12,000) 

(18) Pine Grove Conservation Camp at the present time, has very few 
library materials; most of the collection has been donated and are not 
interesting or outdated, or are owned by the present teacher. There- 
fore, funds would be used to buy books, periodicals, tapes, and other 
materials which reflect the ward's interests and backgrounds. ($3,- 
000) 

(19) Sonoma State Hospital project to establish a resident library, branch, 
and mobile library unit. The van of the mobile unit would also be 
used in a materials exchange with Napa State Hospital's Library for 
the developmentally disabled. ($77,111) 

(20) Washington Ridge Youth Conservation Camp. This project will pro- 
vide for a small, well rounded collection of paperbacks which would 
be extremely active. The collection will also include current maga- 
zines and newspapers. The Nevada County Bookmobile, a successful- 
ly demonstrated LSCA project and now locally supported, is liaison 
between the school library and the public and state library system. 
($800) 

(21) Youth Training School Library Revitalization project. The project 
will expand library operation hours, add staff member, and provide 
audio visual media for the non and low level reading students. 
($39,500) 

(b) Project to strengthen the California State Library in its role as a research 
and resource Ulbrary to all the libraries in the state. (See I. B. (6) ) 
(6) Project for strengthening the capacity of the California State Library: 

(a) Projects of administration will include, but not be limited to: 

(1) Administration of the State Plan including obtaining the services of 
library consultants. 

(2) Statewide planning for and the evaluation of library services. 

(3) Dissemination of information concerning library services. 

(4) Activities of the California State Library Advisory Council on Librar- 
ies. 

(5) Activities of such other advisory groups and panels as may be neces- 
sary to assist the California State Library in carrying out its functions. 

(6) Training of librarians and library personnel engaged in activities un- 
der Library Services and Construction Act. 

(7) Study of overlap book holdings including University of California 
northern campuses, Berkeley, Davis, San Francisco and Santa Cruz; 
the State Colleges at Sonoma and Sacramento; Stanford University; 
San Francisco Public Library; and the State Library. ($8,000) 

(b) A project that otherwise will strengthen the California State Library for 
meeting the needs of the people of CaHfornia in carrying out the purposes 
of the Library Services and Construction Act, and the demonstration and 
exploration of new patterns of service through enrichment of its programs 
including data processing studies and implementation. ($200,000) 

(1) Further provision made to fill the State Library's function of a re- 
search center to the California network of Hbraries. ($60,000) 

(2) To furnish supplementary resources to all libraries and library sys- 
tems. (Including a Minority Recruitment Program) ($32,000) 

II. Title II. (Federal funds: -0-; Local funds: $8,157,256) 

A. The general objectives under Title II will be to construct public library facilities to 



44 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

serve areas which are without library facilities necessary to develop library services. 

B. Specific objectives will be to determine those public library construction projects 
which will result in usable public library buildings pursuant to California's Long 
Range Program. 

C. The California State Library will be strengthened in order to continue its leader- 
ship providing the facilities that can furnish adequate total library services to all 
California residents. 

III. Title III. (Federal funds: $85,997) 

A. Thegeneralobjectivesofinterlibrary cooperation in California will be (1) planning 
for, and taking other steps leading to the development of, intertype library net- 
works; and (2) for establishing, expanding, and operating local, regional and sys- 
tem-wide, and interstate cooperative networks of libraries, which provide for the 
systematic and effective coordination of the resources of school, public, academic, 
institutional, and special libraries and information centers for improved supple- 
mentary services. 

B. Specific activities to be carried out by California in the fiscal year 1976 with its 
allotment of funds under Title III will be the following: 

(1) Projects will be toward a planned statewide network of all types of libraries to 
include, but not be limited to: 

(a) Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAC) The Regional Clearing- 
house for Library Automation project. The project is to provide coopera- 
tive information exchange on library automation and technology for 
participating libraries; and, building on this clearinghouse structure, devel- 
opment of a planning model that would incorporate library planning con- 
cerns into the on-going comprehensive regional planning process. 
($74,693) 

(b) Lassen County Public Library's California-Nevada Interstate Communica- 
tions Network. A rapid network service for information delivery from best 
available source, wherever located, to all of Lassen County through partici- 
pation in the Communications Network now under organization in the 
State of Nevada. Access to Nevada information sources in libraries of all 
types as the closest available resource, and when necessary move on to 
California sources as the most complete backup resource for the area. 
Library cooperation with Washoe County has been functioning for 5 years 
and this began as an aftermath of an LSCA project of Interstate Coopera- 
tion funded initially in 1967. ($40,000) 

(c) Monterey Bay Area Cooperative, Peninsula Library, and South Bay Coop- 
erative Library System's Cooperative Information Network (CIN) 
between all types of libraries. ($117,316) 

(d) Stanford University, Demonstration of Multi-Library Services Through the 
BALLOTS II-Network. The project moves to a comprehensive set of auto- 
mated services to link and provide for support for all publicly and privately 
financed libraries in California, to demonstrate joint BibCenter-B ALLOTS 
services: on-line searching, Se-Lin spine labels as well as complete techni- 
cal processing and acquisitions all completed by computers. ($150,958) 

(2) Project to strengthen the California State Library's personnel and inter-type 
library communications in both its Automation Project and in its role as a 
research center for the statewide library network. ($294,700) 

IV. Title IV. (Federal funds never appropriated as yet) Programs that would be fund- 

ed from this title if funds were made available are now funded under 
Title I. 
A. The general objectives of Older Readers Services in California will be: 

( 1 ) the training of librarians to work with the elderly; 

(2) the conduct of special library programs for the elderly; 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 45 

(3) the purchase of special library materials for use by the elderly; 

(4) the payment of salaries for elderly persons who wish to work in libraries as 
assistants on programs for the elderly; 

(5) the provision of in-home visits by librarians and other library personnel to the 
elderly; 

(6) the establishment of outreach programs to notify the elderly of library services 
available to them; and 

(7) the furnishing of transportation to enable the elderly to have access to library 
services. 

B. Specific activities to be carried out by California in the fiscal year 1976 with its 
allotment of funds under Title IV will encompass some area of objectives appearing 
in A above. 
(Note: Federal funds budgeted in the above document are those received by Califor- 
nia for Fiscal Year 1975, under the LSCA.) 

The Long Range Program, Library Services and Construction Act, California State 
Library, Fiscal 1976-80, is published and available upon request to the California State 
Library. 

ATTACHMENTS: 
Statement of Criteria: Los Angeles and San Francisco Public Libraries as regional or 
national resource centers: 

1. Two largest Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas for population count and density 
per square mile, San Francisco for Northern California and Los Angeles for Southern 
California, geographically situated. 

Northern California 

2. San Francisco-Oakland Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area: 

Population 

a. San Francisco 714,300 
Oakland 361,561 
High density pop. area 1,075,861 

b. San Francisco-Oakland SMSA 3,285,700 
High density pop. area 1,075,861 
Fringe area 2,209,839 

(San Francisco-Oakland SMSA includes counties of: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San 
Francisco, San Mateo, and Solano) 

Southern California 

3. Los Angeles-Long Beach Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area: 

Population 

a. Los Angeles City 2,816,061 
Long Beach 358,633 
High density pop. area 3,174,694 

b. Los Angeles-Long Beach SMSA 7,034,300 
High density pop. area 3,174,694 
Fringe area 3,859,606 

In the above tables, the population count for the high density population areas in each 
of the two largest SMSA areas was subtracted from that for the whole area, in this way 
giving the fringe area population, square miles, and population density. The fringe area 
population density of each is larger than the whole area density for any of the other 
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas in California. 



Square m 


Pop. Density 


45.40 


15,733 


63.00 


5,739 


108.40 


9,924 


3,303.80 


994 


108.40 


9,924 


3,195.40 


691 



Square m 


Pop. Density 


463.68 


6,073 


48.74 


7,358 


512.42 


6,195 


4,068.60 


1,728 


512.42 


6,195 


4,581.02 


842 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census-United States Census of Population, 1970, California: 
Number of Inhabitants. April, 1970. 



46 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Statement of Criteria 

1. The State Agency's criteria for determining the adequacy of pubHc library service to 
geographical areas and for groups of persons in the state are: 

A. Adequacy of library service: 

a. Do all people living in a given area have public library services easily accessible? 

One county has no countywide library service; a city library in this county 
serves its own residents but gives only limited service to county residents who 
seek help. Many cities have grown far beyond the periphery of the service areas 
of existing central libraries and branches. In metropolitan areas, fringe cities 
outside the boundaries of the central cities have not been able to furnish library 
service outlets in proportion to population growth. 

b. Where there is a library system established, does this library system have suffi- 
cient budget, facilities, materials, and staff to provide total geographic coverage; 
has the service of this library system kept pace with population growth? 

Many areas with a library service are virtually "unserved" because the libraries 
have not been able to fulfill these requirements. 
The criteria used in determining which geographic areas are "inadequately served" are: 

c. Does the public library service to which the people have access provide mini- 
mum service when checked against the Public Library Service Standards for 
California, Public Library Service Equal to the Challenge of California, the 
American Library Association's Minimum Standards for Public Library Systems, 
1966, A Master Plan for the Development of Public Library Service in the State 
of California, the Master Plan for Total Library Services, and guidelines set forth 
in Library Service to the Unserved? ' 

For example, (1) does the library system provide Ve volume per capita per year 
in areas with less than 500,000 population, or % volume per capita in areas of more 
than 500,000 population; (2) does the library system have one current periodical 
title for each 250 people in the service area and are 50% of these retained in back 
files; (3) does the library system provide librarians with professional training and 
specialized experience in administration, technical processes, adult reference 
and readers advisory work, children's reference and readers advisory work, and 
library extension? 

Do the residents of this area have access to library services beyond the limits 
of the local library? Do they have access to a collection of 100,000 books? ( 1 ) Do 
they have the benefit of specialized professional reference staff to help them use 
these books? (2) Do they have indexes which help them locate these materials 
both in the local library and in other libraries, and the benefit of rapid communi- 
cation and delivery service for bringing the materials to them? 

When annual reports submitted to the State Agency were checked against 
these standards, no library was found to meet all of them. Libraries inadequate 
in any respect will be considered eligible to be served under the Plan. A program 
demonstrating library service meeting standards might most easily be given 
through a library or system which is now approaching standards. 

2. Priority within the geographical areas will be given to: 

A. Persons residing in sparsely settled areas of California which are distant from 
adequate public library facilities based upon the number of persons per square mile 
in a given geographic area as determined from a current official census and as 



' Public Library Service Standards for California, adopted by the membership of the California Li- 
brary Association on November 14, 1953, amended by action of the Board of Directors at their 
meeting held on November 1, 1958. Sacramento: California State Library. Public Library Service 
Equal to the Challenge of California, by Lowell A. Martin and Roberta Bowler. Sacramento, 
California State Library, 1965. Minimum Standards for Public Library Systems, 1966. Chicago: 
American Library Association, 1967. A Master Plan for the Development of Public Library Service 
in the State of California. Berkeley: California Library Association, 1967. Master Plan for Total 
Library Services, adopted by the California Library Association, December 13, 1969. Sacramento: 
California Library Association, 1969. Library Services to the Unserved; papers presented at a 
library conference . . . New York: R. R. Bowker, 1970. 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 47 

defined in the Public Library Services Act (Education Code Sections 27111-27146; 
State of California) . Section 27145.5 of the Public Library Services Act defines 
"sparsely populated areas" as ". . . all library areas wherein the population per 
square mile is 100 or less; . . ." 

B. Economically disadvantaged persons residing in areas with high concentrations of 
low-income families as determined in 3 below. 

C. Persons of limited English-speaking ability (See 4 below) 

D. Physically handicapped persons including the blind or other visually handicapped 
(See 6 below). 

E. Inmates, patients, or residents of penal institutions, reformatories, residential train- 
ing schools, orphanages, residential schools for handicapped persons, and other 
general or special institutions or hospitals operated or substantially supported by 
the state (See 5 below) . 

3. A. The criteria used in the determination of an economically disadvantaged area, both 
urban and rural, as having a high concentration of low-income families are: 

(1) The annual family income is less than six thousand dollars ($6,000). 

(2) Twenty per cent (20%) of the families in the designated areas report annual 
income less than six thousand dollars ($6,000) according to the most recent 
federal census for which statistics are available. 

(3) An urban economically disadvantaged area shall have a population of not less 
than 25,000. 

a. The State Library Agency has determined that the following urban areas of 
the state shall be designated as urban economically disadvantaged areas: 
Alameda County 

Bakersfield in Kern County 

Fresno in Fresno County 

Long Beach in Los Angeles County 

Los Angeles in Los Angeles County 

Pasadena in Los Angeles County 

Richmond in Contra Costa County 

Sacramento in Sacramento County 

San Bernardino in San Bernardino and Riverside Counties 

San Diego in San Diego County 

San Francisco in San Francisco County 

San Jose in Santa Clara County 

Santa Ana in Orange County 

Stockton in San Joaquin County 

Vallejo in Solano County 

Venice-LaPlaya in Los Angeles County 

b. The State Library Agency defines, as rural areas, those areas of the State 
lying outside the urban area defined in criterion A (3) above and meeting 
the following: 

1. Criteria A (1) and (2) above. 

2. A rural area shall be that area or areas composed of incorporated and 
unincorporated places lying within county lines and outside an urban 
area. 

B. The sources of information on which the above criteria are based are: 

Human Resources Development Act of 1968; State of California Statutes, Chapter 
1460 (Chapter 1. General Provisions and Definitions. Article 2. Definitions, 
Section 9111). 

State of California, Department of Human Resources Development, Human Rela- 
tions Agency Report: Characteristics of the Population of the Economically Disad- 
vantaged Areas in California. 



48 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

The frequency with which the information is updated: 

Section 9111 of the Human Resources Development Act of 1968, State of Cali- 
fornia, states: ". . . shall be reviewed periodically, and the director shall recom- 
mend necessary changes to the Legislature and the Governor." 

4. The criteria used in designating areas with high concentrations of persons of limited 
English-speaking ability are either (a) or (b) following. 

(a) Statements from local school administrators, social agency directors, library ad- 
ministrators, or other head of community service agencies, which affirm that there 
is a significant population in their community which possesses one of the following 
characteristics: 

(1) individuals who were not born in the United States or whose native language 
is a language other than English. 

(2) individuals who come from environments where a language other than English 
is dominant, and by reason thereof, have difficulty speaking and understanding 
the English language. 

(b) Individual school statistics indicative of a population as in (a) above. 

For both (a) or (b), identification of the language other than English, and additional 
information to verify the scope of the population, must be submitted. 

5. The criteria used in designating those inmates, patients, or residents of penal institu- 
tions, reformatories, residential training schools, orphanages, residential schools for 
handicapped persons, and other general or special institutions or hospitals operated or 
substantially supported by the state are: 

(a) All requests for grants for projects or programs will include a description of the 
present services of the library; a description of the enriched services which would 
result from the project or program (not only to the individual library but to other 
institutional libraries) , and such statistics as are necessary to show that services at 
present are non-existent or inadequate and that the proposed service will contrib- 
ute to meeting standards established by the American Library Association or other 
similar professional organization. 

(b) American Library Association Standards as adopted by the various types of librar- 
ies and divisions shall be used as criteria for all institutional libraries. This includes 
present standards and any which might be established and adopted in the future. 
Some of these are: American Library Association's Standards for Library Func- 
tions at the State Level; Standards for School Library Programs; and Hospital 
Libraries; American Correctional Association's Manual of Correctional Standards; 
United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare's Institutions Serv- 
ing Delinquent Children; Guides and Coals. 

(c) Value of the project or program within this Plan to establish a statewide network 
of libraries. 

6. The criteria used in designating those physically handicapped persons including the 
blind or other visually handicapped shall include, but not be limited to: 

(a) Standards shall be those developed and adopted by the American Library Associa- 
tion and its affiliates and shall include standards developed by other agencies and 
groups working with the physically and visually handicapped. Some of the sources 
for these are as follows: American Library Association's Minimum Standards for 
Public Library Systems, 1966; American Association of State Libraries' Standards 
for Library Functions at the State Level; American Library Association's Round 
Table on Library Service, in cooperation with the Division of the Blind of the 
Library of Congress' Standards for Regional Libraries for the Blind; American 
Standards Association's American Standard Specifications for Making Buildings 
and Facilities Accessible to and Usable by the Physically Handicapped; Commis- 
sion on Standards and Accreditation of Services for the Blind's Comstac Report: 
Standards for Strengthened Services. 

(b) A project or program should include all kinds of library services to the physically 
and visually handicapped and not be restricted to one type of handicapped. 

(c) A project or program should include all applicable existing service programs for 



i 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 49 

providing materials for those eligible. The work being done by non-profit organi- 
zations, institutions, schools, hospitals, foundations, service organizations and oth- 
ers should be coordinated so that cooperation can make possible good library 
service. 
(d) A project or program will be flexible to insure maximum advantage to the physi- 
cally and visually handicapped, including the work with the blind. The project or 
program shall be designed to strengthen, enrich, and extend any existing pro- 
grams, and not to replace such programs. 



ETHEL S. CROCKETT 
Ethel S. Crockett, 

California State Librarian 



CALIFORNIA BASIC STATE PLAN, LIBRARY SERVICES AND 
CONSTRUCTION ACT 

(Note: The California State Library developed its first Basic State Plan under the provi- 
sions of the Library Services and Construction Act in the spring of 197 L This plan, as 
approved by the U. S. Commissioner of Education and effective as of July I, 197L was 
published in NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES in the Fall, 1971 issue.) 

Under the Library Services and Construction Act Amendments of 
1970 (Public Law 91-600), the California State Library, which is the 
legally authorized administrative agency for the program in California, 
must provide the Commissioner of Education, U. S. Office of Education, 
with this document each year. The California State Library's Basic State 
Plan remains the same as that previously published, except that dates 
have been updated to the applicable year. Should there be exceptions, 
the parts of the Basic State Plan being amended or changed are submit- 
ted to the Commissioner of Education. For Fiscal Year 1976 the follow- 
ing document provided the exceptions: 



50 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

OFFICE OF EDUCATION 

BASIC STATE PLAN AMENDMENT 

(State-Federal Agreement) 

LIBRARY SERVICES AND CONSTRUCTION ACT, AS AMENDED 
BY PUBLIC LAWS 91-600; 93-29; 93-133; 93-380 

California State Library, Division of Libraries, the Department of 
Education (Officially Designated State Library Administrative 
Agency) of the State of California, hereby agrees and assures that the 
Basic State Plan which serves as an agreement between State and Fed- 
eral Governments under the Library Services and Construction Act, as 
amended, for which Federal funds are being requested for fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1976, continues to be in effect as signed by the U. S. 
Commissioner of Education on July 1, 1971 (13 August 1971), except as 
otherwise indicated in documents listed below, copies of which are 
attached: 

^ Maintenance of Effort Statement 

^ Advisory Council 

^ Criteria 

□ Other (identify) 

California State Library 
Division of Libraries 
Department of Education 

State Library Administrative Agency 

Library-Courts Building 
Post Office Box 2037 

Address Sacramento, California 95809 

ETHEL S. CROCKETT 

Signature of Authorized State Agency 

Ethel S. Crockett 
State Librarian 
Title 



Volume 70, No. 1-4, 1975 51 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

FY 1976 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 
OFFICE OF EDUCATION 



MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION— FY 1976 

LIBRARY SERVICES AND CONSTRUCTION ACT, 
P.L. 91-600, AS AMENDED 
California State Library, Division of Libraries, The Department of 
Education (Officially Designated State Library Administrative 
Agency) : 

I. assures that it has available for expenditure under Title I of the 
Act in this fiscal year (FY 1976). 

A. From State and local sources: 

1. Sums sufficient to earn its basic minimum allotment. 

2. Not less than the total amount actually expended, in areas 
covered by the programs for such year, for the purposes of 
such programs from such sources in the second preceding 
fiscal year (FY 1974) 

B. From State Sources: 

1. Not less than the total State amount actually expended for 
such purposes from such sources in the second preceding 
fiscal year (FY 1974) 

II. assures that it will expend in this fiscal year (FY 1976) from Fed- 
eral, State, and local sources, an amount not less than the amount 
expended by the State from such sources for State institutional 
library services, and library services and to the physically hand- 
icapped during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1971. 

ETHEL S. CROCKETT 
Signature of Authorized State Library 
Administrative Agency Official 

Ethel S. Crockett 
State Librarian 



52 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



LSCA 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA 



CERTIFICATION OF THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY ADVISORY 

COUNCIL ON LIBRARIES 

I hereby certify that, pursuant to and as required by the provisions of Section 3 (8) , 
Library Services and Construction Act, and 130.8 (a) of the Regulations, the California 
State Library Advisory Council on Libraries is established and the names of the members 
of the Council, followed by a statement of identification to show their representation, are: 
Dr. Jack H. Aldridge -User 

San Francisco, California 



Clinton R. Burt, Head Public Services 

California State University 

Bakersfield, California 
E. V. Griffith, Federal Programs Administrator 

County of Humboldt 

Eureka, California 
Samuel Leask, III 

Santa Cruz, California 
Mrs. Ann R. Lane, President 

Board of Library Commissioners 

Los Angeles Public Library 

Los .\ngeles, California 
Dr. Curtis May, Library Coordinator 

Education Resource Center 

San Mateo County Board of Education 

Redwood City, California 
Elton Shell, Librarian 

San Bernardino Valley College 

San Bernardino, California 
Mrs. Virginia Simms, Supervisor 

Napa County Board of Supervisors 
Fred Sinclair, Consultant in Charge 

Special Education of the Visually 
Handicapped 

Clearinghouse Depository for the Visually 

Handicapped 

Sacramento, California 
Mrs. Phyllis A. Waggoner, Chief Librarian 

Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 
Mrs. Eleanor Wash, Librarian 

Pacific State Hospital 

Pomona, California 
Dr. LeRoy Gloria 

Rancho Santiago Community College District 

Santa Ana, California 



-Academic libraries 
(Higher Education) 

-User 



-User 

-Public Libraries 

-School libraries 



-Academic libraries 
(Community Colleges) 

-User 

-Representative of the 
visually and physically 
handicapped person 



-Special libraries 
-Institutional libraries 



-Representative of the 
disadvantaged person 



Ethel S. Crockett 
Ethel S. Crockett 
California State Librarian 
Date: December 23, 1974 



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V. 71, no. 1, 1976 



alifomia Libraries 

Official Journal of the California State Library 
Ethel S. Crockett, State Librarian 



i 



News Notes of 



California Libraries 



V. 71, no. 1, 1976 



ARTICLES 
3 California Library Trustees and Commissioners Conference 
10 How Important is the State Legislature to Library Trustees? 

by Agnes Booe 
15 Service to the Deaf, by Joe DaRold and Betty Bray 
21 Working With The Establishment, by Rod Diridon 
25 A Multiplicity of Sources, by Justice Allison M. Rouse 
30 A Trustee Activist Speaks, by Florence McMullin 
37 A Bicentennial Building, by Herb Lathan 
40 Employment Issues, by Nancy Percy 

NEWS NOTES 

45 California has CLASS 

46 State Library Publications 

46 50 Years Ago in California Libraries 



2 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

ISSN 0028-9248 

News Notes of California Libraries 

Official Journal of the California State Library 

California State Library 
Library and Courts Building 
P. O. Box 2037 
Sacramento, CA 95809 

Mrs. Ethel S. Crockett, State Librarian 

Edited by Collin Clark, Information Manager 
Library Development Services Bureau 

Indexed in: Library & Information Science Abstracts; 

Library Literature. 
News Notes of California Libraries is available on microfilm from Xerox 

University Microfilms. 
Second class postage paid at Sacramento, California. 



Price $2.50 

Available at single copy price of $2.50, or on annual subscription of one 

volume year, three issues, with California Library Statistics and 

Directory, for $14.00. 
Make remittance payable to California State Department of Education. 

California residents add 6 percent sales tax. 

Order from: California State Department of Education 
Publications Sales 
P. O. Box 271 
Sacramento, CA 95802 



ON THE COVER: The first CLASS Board of Directors sits for its portrait in Los Angeles, 
June 17, 1976. Left to right: Dr. David Saxon, President, University of California; Mayor 
Tom Bradley, City of Los Angeles; Ethel S. Crockett, California State Librarian; Dr. 
Robert Burnham, Superintendent, Grossmont Community College District, San Diego; 
Supervisor Rod Diridon, County of Santa Clara. Photo by Collin Clark. Story and 
additional photos on pages 44-46. 




mum 






California Library Trustees and 
Commissioners Conference 



Over 100 of California's library trustees and commissioners, and the 
heads of their public libraries, met in Sacramento, June 4 and 5, for the 
California Library Trustees and Commissioners Conference. The meet- 
ing was co-sponsored by the California State Library and the California 
Library Association. The theme of the two-day conference was explor- 
ing ways in which trustees and commissioners can strengthen their own 
libraries as well as influence California library programs and funding. 




especially in these "Catch 22" days of reduced library resources and 
expanding community needs. 

The event began on the afternoon of June 4, when an optional tour 
was offered of the California State Library and its Books for the Blind 
and Physically Handicapped Service, the new Arthur F. Turner branch 
of the Yolo County Library in West Sacramento, and colorful Old Sacra- 
mento. 

Assembling for a reception and first dinner meeting, conferees were 
welcomed by Gil McNamee, President of the California Library As- 
sociation (CLA) . Gil introduced guests and staff for the conference and 
traced the stream of recent library planning events from the Library 
Planning Institute of 1975, through the formation of CLASS, (California 
Library Authority for Systems and Services) , to CLA's new legislative 
proposal. 

CLA Executive Director Stefan Moses was in fine form recounting 
anecdotes from his experience with trustees as a library consultant in 
New York state. 

"Picture a small town library in 1965, population of 7,000. The trustees 
decided they would go to ALA, which was in New York, but the librar- 
ian wasn't asked to go because the library needs to remain open, after 
all. The trustees went to the exhibits, and one of these fellows got hold 
of them and sold them a book-drop box. If there was anything in the 
world that library didn't need it was a book-drop box, because there 
weren't that many books to drop. 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 5 

"The trustees came home and said nary a word to the librarian, and 
one day this thing appeared, unassembled. The librarian said, 'What is 
this?' The trustees said, Tt is a book-drop box. You put it in front of the 
library and people put the books in the box. You get them out of the 
box. That is modern library service that a salesman told us about.' So the 
trustees went home, and the librarian went to her back room and made 
a sign, which I treasure as an artifact: 

'NOTICE. Do not put library books in this box. Bring 
them when library is open. You make me extra work.' 
Then, since librarians all keep records, it says as though an afterthought: 
'A record will be kept if you disobey.' 

"We have here an example of why we must keep good communica- 
tions with our librarians ... 

"I think your best role, your best job, is to continually ask questions. 
Librarians no longer need advice on how to run a charging system or 
how to play library roles that trustees used to like to get into, nor does 
anyone have the time or the money or the patience for ego trips, 
whether they be by head librarians or trustees or political ofBcials. I 
think that in your role of asking questions you will observe, you will 
learn and you will force the librarian to really think twice about every- 
thing that is done and decided." 

Stefan concluded by describing the structure and programs of the 
California Library Association, and what it offers to the trustee or com- 
missioner. 



/ J 







6 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

State Librarian Ethel Crockett reported that attending the confer- 
ence were representatives of some 56 library districts, stretching from 
Humboldt to San Diego counties. City, county and district public librar- 
ies were represented. 

Referring to the CLA legislative program she said, "As members of 
the library community we are all concerned about the needs of our 
California public libraries. It is because we are in such dire need of state 
funding for public libraries that legislation is being introduced. The 
program under development right now will need the concerted effort 
of the entire library community to pass this legislation." 

Mrs. Crockett then introduced the conference keynote speaker, Mrs. 
Agnes Booe, editor and publisher of the Sacramento Newsletter. Mrs. 
Booe's talk, "How Important is the State Legislature to Library Trust- 
ees?", is published in this issue. 

Ethel Crockett opened the full second day session with a statement 
on conference goals. She stressed particularly the need for communica- 
tion: 

"Trustees are important and essential to good library service. Trust- 
ees are the liaison between the library and government. They can do 
a great deal to interpret library needs and in many cases guide and assist 




Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 




librarians in their daily work. A conference like this is a time that 
trustees can put their heads together, compare notes, find new ways, 
and learn new ideas fi-om one another, in the informal setting as well 
as in the formal one. In a sense I'm telling you that I think the cofi^ee 
breaks are just as important as the sessions." 

Gil McNamee next moderated a panel presentation, "California Li- 
brary Scene: 1976", in which three programs for innovative services, 
funded through the federal Library Services and Construction Act 
(LSCA) , were described. 

Jane Irby, Project Director, Peninsula Library System, spoke on the 
computerized community information project in operation in San 
Mateo county. A description of this project was published in California 
Librarian, official periodical of the California Library Association, for 
July, 1976. 

Joe DaRold, Santa Fe Springs City Librarian, spoke on the project, 
"Service to the Deaf', while Betty Bray, Project Director, Metropolitan 



8 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Cooperative Library System, interpreted his words simultaneously in 
sign language. Their talk is published in this issue. 

Brenda Gray, Operation READ Project Director, South Bay Coopera- 
tive Library System, concluded with a description of the Reading for 
Everyone to Achieve and Develop (READ) project in Santa Clara 
county. An article by Brenda on this project, "The Federal R.E.A.D. 
Project", was published in News Notes of California Libraries, v. 70, no. 
1-4, 1975. 

The funding section of the conference followed. Titled "The 'Catch 
22' Library Budget — How Do You Get it Funded?", it featured two 
prominent trustees and a university librarian. 

Rod Diridon, Santa Clara County Supervisor, District 4, spoke on 
"Working with the Establishment." His talk is published in this issue. 

Justice Allison M. Rouse, Redwood City Library Trustee, followed 
with a talk titled, "A Multiplicity of Sources", which is also published 
in this issue. 

Finally, Morris Polan, University Librarian of the California State 
University, Los Angeles, under the title of "State and Federal Funding 
— What's Next in California?", outlined provisions of the draft CLA 
legislation for a new California Library Services Act. This draft has since 
been published in the CLA Newsletter for July- August, 1976, and has 
been amended as result of several forum meetings throughout the state 
and of CLA Council action. It is under consideration by the CLA mem- 
bership now. 

Mrs. Florence McMuUin, Trustee of the King County Library, Wash- 
ington, and active in the Washington Library Association and the 
American Library Association, was luncheon speaker opening the final 
afternoon program. Her talk, "A Trustee Activist Speaks", is published 
in this issue. 

Part two of "California Library Scene: 1976" began with an audiovis- 
ual presentation on the new Chula Vista Public Library, a bicentennial 
building. Herb Lathan, Chula Vista Library Board trustee, spoke on the 
trustees' role in obtaining the building, and Library Consultant Ray 
Holt, chairman of the ALA /LAD Buildings and Equipment Section, 
showed slides of the new library and its furnishings. Mr. Lathan's talk 
is published in this issue. 

Nancy Percy, Assistant State Librarian, brought out important facts 
about Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and Affirmative Action under the 
title, "Employment Issues." Her talk is published in this issue. 

A time for questions and answers among the conference attendees 
and speakers was followed by a summary and closing comments from 
Gil McNamee and Ethel Crockett. A hope was voiced to preserve the 
spirit of exchange and enthusiasm developed during the conference, 
either through active trustee participation in the California Institute of 
Libraries section of CLA, or through the formation of a new CLA 
Trustees Chapter, or several regional chapters. (^ 





s^♦♦♦•€ 





How Important is the State Legislature 
to Library Trustees? 



by Agnes Booe 



I'm a legislative and political reporter. I was pleased to be asked to 
be the speaker for this important assemblage because I've long been 
addicted to books and appreciative of the services performed by librar- 
ies. Since the time I was a youngster, when I found the library a cure 
for the orphan blues, you have greatly expanded your services: films, 
special materials for the blind, research facilities, library systems to 
permit even greater service, and even lending etchers for valuables to 
help thwart thieves. 

As years have rushed by I seem to have grown busier and the borrow- 
ing and buying of books have sifted down largely to non-fiction, histori- 
cal and political volumes, books on economics and books on wildlife. 

Mrs. Booe is Editor and Publisher of the 
Sacramento Newsletter. 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 11 

Recently I dropped into a bookstore where I am well-known, but a new 
girl stepped up to wait on me. From the back of the room my usual clerk 
informed the new girl, "Mrs. Booe just buys books about politicians and 
wild animals". The new girl said "Is there a difference?" 

During my long years of observing and reporting on legislative poli- 
tics I've developed a few basic convictions. First, no one has the right 
to be indifferent about our governmental and political system's well- 
being. No one is obligated to play bridge, join the dancing class or play 
golf, but it is the obligation of every good citizen to vote, and vote as 
intelligently as possible. No one can know all about the candidates and 
ballot propositions and must ask advice. But when seeking information, 
my advice is that you seek it as you would buy furs and diamonds, from 
an unimpeachable source. Further, I am convinced the two party sys- 
tem is the best machinery by which our government is run. Also, our 
constitution is indeed one of the greatest documents ever struck by the 
hands of man; let's change it only after the greatest consideration. 

I'm here under the assumption that I am at liberty to speak my mind. 
During the past few years, I've developed an awareness that priorities 



'You can tell a man by how he spends his money." 



in the expenditure of public funds are a necessity. Also, I agree with a 
prominent citizen who once said to me, "You can tell a man by how he 
spends his money." 

It has been my personal stance that libraries and facilities should have 
considerable priorities in expenditure of public funds because they are 
facilities that can be enjoyed for an entire lifetime and by everyone who 
choses to do so. Regular use of libraries by youth can curtail delin- 
quency. Libraries can be a source of information and enjoyment by 
those in middle years, and a God-send to the elderly and alone, particu- 
larly for those with limited funds for there they can live again through 
pages of books. They can climb the highest mountains without leaving 
their chairs. 

I have scanned your file of legislation which you support, oppose and 
on which you have taken no position. I can concur that professionally 
trained librarians are to be desired and that many libraries need new 
buildings to enhance their services to the public, as well as expanded 
resources of instructional and special materials. Some of your legislation 
affects personnel, organizational and policy matters, which with per- 
missive legislation can be solved by library trustees and commissioners 
with the aid of librarians. 

Library trustees and commissioners are in the best position to influ- 
ence legislation, pro and con. Since they are responsible for budgets, 
they need to know library laws in order to become successful lobbyists 
for libraries. This is a responsibility they asked for when they were 



12 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

appointed or elected to whatever board administers library business. 
There are close to 900 trustees or commissioners in California and that 
can make a very strong lobbying force. 

I'd like to pass on to you a little know-how told to me by some of the 
great lobbyists around the Capitol as well as by Democratic and Repub- 
lican office holders, state officials, congressmen and legislators. They 
are pros in their fields, as you are in yours. 

Know your legislator, by first name if possible. Call on him and invite 
him to events before you need to ask a favor. Also, try to say something 
about the good he has done before you criticize things that you don't 
agree with. Donate to his or her campaign — a few dollars can be effec- 
tive. Make it your business to know how he stands on major issues, not 
just on your own cause. Know his habits, hobbies, affiliations, political 



"Be sure you are united. Nothing gives the Legisla- 
ture a better excuse to back away quicker than a 
divided house." 



and otherwise, his religion and creed. Being informed requires effort, 
and is not cheap, but it pays off. 

If you are working in an organization such as yours be sure you are 
united. Nothing gives the Legislature a better excuse to back away 
quicker than a divided house. Your legislative chairman can tell you all 
about the mechanics which a bill must go through from introduction to 
pass or to defeat. 

When your particular bill is set for hearing, write a card or note to 
members of the appropriate committee. This information is easily ob- 
tained. Let them know what you are for or against, not just the bill 
number. 

Bills are often amended out of shape. You might be for it today, but 
amended it might be totally unacceptable. Our joke around the Capitol 
is, he just wants a small amendment changing "yes" to "no". 

Many public officials have told me cards and letters count. They have 
seismograph minds, able to sense quakes in public thinking, and don't 
you forget it. 



"Many pubhc officials have seismograph minds, 
able to sense quakes in public thinking." 



A top lobbyist knowing I was here making a speech said, tell them 
this — ^really know your facts. When making a presentation before a 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 



13 



committee or the public, make it brief, precise, and simple. Remember, 
every business and profession has its own vocabulary not understood by 
others. 

Lastly, make it your business to call on legislators before the bill 
comes up and ask them if they have any questions. Answer them then; 
don't wait until the question comes up in committee or before the 
Legislature, which can result in controversy which can leave your bill 
with the committee or still on file, or result in outright defeat. This takes 
time but can prevent derailing your cause. 

Lobbyists are paid handsome salaries for following these procedures. 
I recommend them to you. These, plus ads and TV and radio appear- 
ances, all of which can be acquired if the media is properly approached, 
will help influence legislation and the public. 

I've seen many great battles in the Legislature. Maybe some of these 
issues were larger, but not necessarily more important than yours. But 
the method of influencing the legislators and others is the same. 

There was one classic battle in Sacramento in which women manned 
the front line trenches. That bill was to permit white oleomargarine to 
be commercially colored to resemble butter. Housewives swarmed Sac- 
ramento to support the bill, and the wife of a senator told me that 
legislators would as soon face a nest of angry hornets as women when 
they really get riled. Women got plenty of support from the cotton oil 
interests and as much opposition from the dairy industry, but the bill 




*''^.-, 



14 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

passed and the women went home happy. Many legislators were both 
happy and relieved at their departure, but women knew their subjects. 
They had gotten that sticky yellow coloring over their hands and uten- 
sils and they were united. Two basic requirements for success. 

Another great and continuing battle in California has evolved around 
water, a more vital resource than gold or oil in this state of vast desert 
and arid regions. Dams, ditches, canals and reservoirs were discussed in 
our home as TV, sports and comic strips might be in some households. 
Floyd Booe was involved in water development for decades. He was 
among the sponsors of the Central Valley Project and was present in 
Denver when the big six signed the contract to build Boulder Dam. 
When he died nearly 14 years ago the then Secretary of the Interior 
wrote to me to say that California owed Floyd Booe a debt of gratitude 
about which few knew. He said after his own father had practically gone 
broke crusading for the Central Valley Project it was Floyd Booe who 
raised the final $10,000 which put over the campaign. Nobody from 
Southern California can miss the importance of the Central Valley 
Project that takes that water across the Tehachapis. 

Now back to libraries a moment. I'm well aware of your antipathy to 
censorship. I share it. However, no library can stock all the books that 
are published, any more than the New York Times can print "all the 
news that's fit to print." Selectivity is a continual process in all phases 
of our life, the clothes we wear, the friends we choose, the food we eat. 



"Selectivity is a continual process in all phases of 
our life, the clothes we wear, the friends we choose, 
and the books we read." 



the candidates we support, the charities to which we donate and the 
books we read. A library is known by how it spends its money, under 
the policy guidance of trustees and librarians. 

Children's books should be the best obtainable; sex books should be 
scientific; history editions should be authentic; mysteries and adven- 
tures should be well-written; and political works should be accurate and 
valid. Books carry a great force that is powerful, either a beneficent 
influence for a lifetime or a destructive one, mentally and emotionally. 
Quality is important. 

For these reasons I would support sufficient funds to buy the best 
books available in all categories and to hire trained librarians with 
knowledge and good taste, and urge the selection of trustees and com- 
missioners who care enough to help supply the best, the most entertain- 
ing, the most informative and the most helpful. (^ 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 15 



Service to the Deaf 

by Joe DaRold and Betty Bray 



What you are going to hear about this morning is probably one of the 
most exciting programs going on, not only in the state but in the coun- 
try, in terms of answering people's human needs. Betty Bray is our 
Project Director, and a professional interpreter; she will sign while I'm 
speaking. Ours is a demonstration project that has no equal anywhere 
in the country simply because of its scope. I want to say at the outset 
that this project would not have been possible without the help of the 
State Library through its Library Consultants. The project has a two 
year federal grant for $170,000 and it includes our 24 member libraries 
in the Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. We are the largest 
multijurisdictional system in the state. 

The program is set up in four parts. First off, we have set up a teletype 
reference center. This is probably the most important, because this is 
how the deaf community is going to get access to us. And I should say 
that we have found — we are in the process of finding — the invisible 
minority. We could not answer the State Library's questions as to how 
many deaf people there are, where they are, or how many of them are 
library users. We didn't know; we still don't know, but we are finding 
out. 



"There are estimates that 5.5% of the population is 
profoundly deaf, 20% is hearing impaired." 



The National Association for the Deaf in their recent report estimates 
that 5.5% of the population is profoundly deaf. A larger percentage, 
about 20% of the population, is hearing impaired. This is quite extraor- 
dinary. 

One of the things we found out is that the deaf and hearing impaired, 
but mainly the profoundly deaf, go where they can communicate. They 
live in areas with each other, usually around learning centers. In South- 
ern California this occurs in the San Fernando Valley near the Califor- 
nia State University at Northridge, because they have not only an 
undergraduate program but a master's program for leadership in the 
deaf. In Orange County there is Golden West College which serves the 
deaf. So there is a definable deaf population. In the southeastern area 
of Los Angeles where we are located — Santa Fe Springs, Downey and 

Joe DaRold is Santa Fe Springs City Librar- 
ian. Betty Bray is Project Director for Serv- 
ice to the Deaf. 



16 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



Whittier — there is an offshoot of the John Tracy clinic. There is the 
Southeast Los Angeles County High School serving deaf students, and 
there are elementary students from the Whittier comprehensive sys- 
tem. There is a sizable deaf population there. 

As we identify the deaf community, we have to tell them what ques- 
tions to ask us. They have not been library users. Some of them who 
have been have not been identified as deaf patrons. There are a couple 
of reasons for this. Many times they will walk in a library and they will 
write their question. They cannot use the telephone. If they do attempt 
speech — the deaf community now is into what they call "total com- 




munication", using their oral skills as well as their manual skills — in 
many cases their oral communication is guttural. They are mistaken for 
retarded people, or they may be thought of as deaf-mutes, but most of 
the deaf population is not mute. Many have lost their hearing at early 
ages, but have heard sound. Some are recently deaf, in their twenties 
and their adulthood. Mostly, deafness occurs in early childhood so they 
have some remembrance of sound and verbalization. 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 



17 



The deaf cannot communicate by telephone, even though according 
to legend Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone for his wife 
who was deaf. It has not turned out to be an instrument that the deaf 
can use. The deaf use a teletypewriter, which is abbreviated to TTY. 
There are different types of TTY's. The deaf have been saddled with 
the most outmoded. I consider it the dinosaur of teletypewriters and 
totally unsuitable for today's technology. But that is all they have to 
communicate with. 

What we have set up, unlike other areas in the country, is a 24-hour 
toll-free network. In Prince George's County, Maryland, they have put 




TTY's in some of the local regional libraries. This may work in a central- 
ized area on the east coast where things aren't so spread out. In Los 
Angeles it just wouldn't work. We investigated a WATS line, a Southern 
California 800 line, which is what we now have. This means that any of 
the deaf who have access to a TTY in the 714, 213, or 805 calling areas 
may use our service for free. This is very important because the charge 
is on-line, just as you would be charged on the telephone, but bear in 



18 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

mind that the deaf are typing their messages to each other, and many 
are not skillful typists. We felt it was important to break down the 
barriers so they could communicate to us, and if they wanted to there 
would be no cost factor to impede their communication. 

What we found out by looking at the map is that the 714 and 805 areas, 
(Los Angeles county includes these plus 213), go all the way up to 
Bakersfield, out to Riverside, and down to San Diego. What started out 



"Any of the deaf who have access to a teletypewrit- 
er may use our service for free." 



as a Los Angeles County area project is having much larger ramifica- 
tions. In fact, our whole project is being looked at nation-wide, and it 
seems like every week we have another inquiry. The State of Washing- 
ton has been in touch about our project hoping to duplicate our pro- 
gram and we are not even a year through the project! We are still 
stumbling and making errors, but there seems to have been enough 
validity in the research findings of our grant proposal that it is being 
recognized as a valuable document for the other states. 

What do the people use the TTY for? Two things: for book delivery 
and for reference questions. We've recently had a performer for the 
National Theatre for the Deaf, who resides in the San Fernando Valley, 
call us up for a list of community theaters and to find out who has the 
rights for a certain novel that she wishes to dramatize. These are valid 
reference questions, yet she cannot go into her local library and get 
them answered. She is a professor, an intelligent person who ordinarily 
could communicate skillfully. 

The book delivery system is exciting too because it extends over the 
Metropolitan Cooperative Library System's boundaries. We are 24 in- 
dependent libraries in Southern California. We share Los Angeles 
County with the County system, Los Angeles Public Library and Long 
Beach. The book delivery system is designed in cooperation with these 
other three systems. There is no charge to any of the deaf patrons. 

We can mail a book out to the deaf patron's local library. We felt this 
was very important when we broke ground, because the main focus was 
to bring the deaf and hearing impaired into the mainstream of library 
service, and this meant bringing them in touch with their local libraries. 
Whether it was a library in our system or not, we didn't care. We want 
them to be aware of total library services. 

Santa Fe Springs is where we are building the resource center — the 
second section of our program — where the TTY and where Betty Bray 
are located. This is a demonstration resource center of books, pamphlets 
and journals on deafness and deaf awareness. We will be going into 










video later, and are already acquiring films, even records, anything that 
would be of interest to the deaf person wishing information or to a 
student who is seeking information on the problem of deafness. Some 
of the university libraries have collections on deafness, but we are 
slanting ours more for the general patron rather than the scholar. 

The third large area of the grant involves the teaching of manual 
communications skills. Since Betty is a professional interpreter, she is 
going around to the libraries in the six areas of the system teaching the 
sign language classes. To date, Betty has taught close to 90 staff mem- 
bers who have attended these classes with the blessings of their ad- 
ministrators on library time. I think it is a very exciting example of 
in-house training, of continuing education, which librarians always 



"Betty has taught sign language to 90 staff mem- 
bers from 24 libraries." 



complain that they don't get enough of. Ninety staff members from the 
24 libraries is quite an impressive display of support from the adminis- 
trators. It attests to the interest and participation we have from all of 
our member libraries. 

The fourth area is Betty herself. We spoke to the other library systems 
throughout the country where we had heard of deaf programs: Deaf 
Awareness Month in Washington, D.C.; teletypewriter service in Mary- 
land; small programs here and there. The main problem all of them had 
was that there was no follow through. We felt, especially after talking 
with the leaders of the deaf community, that we had to have the con- 
tacts. If we did not have the support and the continuing contact and 



20 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

communication with the deaf community, there would be no purpose 
or success to the grant and we might as well not do it. 

Betty was hired for two years, not only to teach classes but to maintain 
these contacts. She is out every other night at a deaf community meet- 
ing, and we have been going around speaking to other library groups 
(which we do gratefully) because we hope that other libraries will pick 
up from this demonstration grant something applicable to their own 
library system. 

What do we do when the grant runs out? This is spoken to in the 
grant, and I think it is very beautiful because we are not asking for any 
funds upon termination of the grant. The Project Director will go look- 
ing for another job, but we feel that the programs will have been set 

"We are not asking for any funds upon termination 
of the grant." 



up, that the staff members and the libraries will have been trained to 
the point where they can continue the library programs and the con- 
tacts with the people in the community. 

The TTY service will continue. The TTY and the answering system 
have been purchased. It may have to be modified. We don't know 
whether we can continue funding the WATS line, which is extremely 
expensive, but we feel that if part of the project proves itself the deaf 
community will perhaps join with our libraries in maintaining the fund- 
ing. If that is impossible there is no reason why we cannot fund a local 
number, and the deaf community would simply TTY us on a regular 
local line. That would really entail very little expense. Of course, the 
demonstration resource center of materials will remain intact and will 
be added to through our regular library budgets. 

Our project is generating so much enthusiasm and so much commit- 
ment that it is really very exciting, very heartwarming. There has been 
so much done for the blind throughout the country; they have been a 
very organized minority. There has been a great deal done for the 
physically handicapped. It is only now that things are really starting to 
sky-rocket for the deaf community. 

In Los Angeles County the sheriffs ofBce has a TTY. One of the 
medical buildings in Glendale, a private clinic, has a TTY for the deaf 
community to call in. Throughout the country private markets and 
large department stores are installing TTY's so that orders can be typed 
in. Post offices in some areas have TTY's. 

We have borrowed from almost every project in existence to put our 
own together and when the project is ended of course there will be 
mistakes that we will have to report, things that could have gone a little 
bit better, but we feel that we will have put two years of good, solid 
effort into it, and it is something that the library community as a whole 
will be very pleased with and be able to make use of. [^ 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 21 



Working With the Establishment 

by Rod Diridon 



What I would like to offer you is a perspective from the outside, from 
the way that government funders, the elected officials, have to look at 
you. Particularly, I would like to lay on the line, tactfully but as bluntly 
as possible, what we have to see in the macro-sense, in terms of all the 
competing demands for funds. And, in a micro-view, a few things I 
personally think you can do to increase the marketability of your prod- 
uct in terms of getting it to your users and getting your program funded 
by those who must make the decisions. 

The macro-view really begins with the realization that we in local 
government are now in the throes of a grass roots property taxpayer 
revolt. Any legislator who is unaware of the fact that homeowner as- 
sociations are organizing to assault city hall or their county board of 
supervisors at budget time is hopelessly naive and probably won't serve 
very long. Most other officials are aware that a taxpayers' revolt is at 
their doorstep and that it is a new type of revolt. Taxpayers are remind- 
ed annually when their assessments come out and the tax bill arrives 
that if the increases continue for more than a year or two, they will be 
unable to afford their homes. This is no longer a "maybe" situation; it 
is a matter of fact. 

The situation in Santa Clara County provides a good example of the 
conditions that produced this taxpayers revolt. Santa Clara County has 
a very large population of senior citizens, most of whom are living on 
fixed incomes — probably about 14 percent of the population. We have 
a crisis there because those people are losing their homes. They are not 
"about to lose them", they are losing them. At the same time, we have 
10 percent unemployment, one of the highest rates in the state, some- 
thing which we are not very proud of but with which we have to live. 
Of course, the unemployed are unable to maintain payments of any 
kind. Therefore, one-quarter of the population is totally unable to with- 
stand increased property taxation and additional government spend- 
ing. They, and others, are also ready to come after us unless we talk 
seriously about significantly reducing spending. A 5 percent reduction 
is not enough. They want 25 percent, a significant reduction, because 
in many cases that equals the increase in their property assessments. 

Responsive legislators on the local government level are attempting 
to confront this new situation by first determining that only programs 

Rod Diridon is Supervisor for District 4, 
Santa Clara County, and Chairman of the 
Board of Directors of CLASS (California 
Library Authority for Systems and Serv- 
ices) . 






j^fat^ 



V 





"We are in the process now in local government of 
an unadulterated property tax payer revolt." 



of very high priority are funded; and secondly, by making sure tax rates 
can in fact be cut. This means that your programs are going to have to 
be very attractive in order to warrant the continued support of your 
local legislators. 

We are in a time of high unemployment and, in many parts of Califor- 
nia, that unemployment is going to continue for a long time to come. 
You are going to have to do a difficult job in order to compete with 
social programs for funding, particularly in county systems, at least until 
the unemployment crisis is relieved and the fiscal situation improves for 
local government. 

At this point, I would like to discuss some of the techniques you can 
use in competing for those very limited government resources. You can 
compete not only by touting the good things you have to offer, but also 
by assisting us in those budget reduction processes. Why, in a big 
county, or even a small county, do you need more than one chief 
librarian? Why can't you have one chief librarian for a metropolitan 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 23 

area instead of half a dozen, one serving each city? And one in each 
school district? I have heard the traditional answers, and they are not 
going to be good enough any more. You are going to have to examine 
closely various kinds of consolidation efforts. 

While I am aware of some of the things you are exploring in terms 
of centralization of purchasing and coding, you are going to have to 
move beyond just looking at those ideas. You have to push ahead and 
make them happen, not just say "we are studying it", when it comes to 
budget time. You will have to begin showing proof of the fact that you 
are attaining reductions in cost that centralized purchasing, centralized 
coding and book processing can offer. 

In many areas of California, during the 1950's and 60's, there were 
many so-called "annexation wars", where one would find the fingers of 
a municipality creeping out into what was formerly a rural community 
in a kind of ink-blot spread or, as we now call it, urban sprawl. This kind 
of process certainly never encouraged logical service delivery areas. 
Yet, and I recall this as a former Saratoga City Councilman of a few 
years ago, we tend to hang onto our prerogatives even though the 
boundary line is clearly illogical in terms of service delivery. We tend 
to hang onto that narrow finger of population which is difficult or 
impossible to service properly, and immediately establish a fire house, 
a library, and a school to prove to everyone that that is our piece of land 
out there in the boondocks. A county library may be sitting across the 
street, although possibly not as expensive as the library system of the 
adjacent city. But that county library may already have adequate 
capacity for serving the area. Although local government cannot now, 
and really never could, afford those redundant services, all of us still 
tend to hang onto our prerogatives, especially those illogical boundary 
lines. 

You, as a group of forward-looking leaders in the community, cannot 
afford to go to budget hearings this year, or at any time in the future, 
and not be able to say that you are leading in forcing economies in your 
programs. I certainly don't believe you want to be in a position of 
having the chairman of your board of supervisors or mayor tell you to 
come up with some economies, or to "please cooperate" in a study 
committee which is going to be created to study your program for 
consolidation potential. 

Instead, you should get together now, go to your board of supervisors 
or your mayor at budget time and say, "We have created a consolidation 
commission to pursue cost-saving objectives. These are our results and 
on that basis we've saved this much money for you over last year's 
approved budget. Therefore, instead of asking for an increase, we'd like 
to have the same amount we had last year." Even that amount will be 
difficult for you to get, but that changed attitude holds a much greater 
probability of success than requesting an increase. Your chances of 
success in withstanding heavy cuts multiply, of course, if you are well 
prepared to demonstrate an attempt at voluntarily cutting costs. 



24 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



Two final points: first, work on increasing the visibility of your pro- 
grams. Oftentimes, libraries are taken for granted, and shouldn't be. 
The free public lending library is an American invention, providing 
access to knowledge integral to the exercise of our First Amendment 
rights. Libraries provide one of the most basic services to a community, 
the transmission of knowledge essential to an informed electorate, the 
key ingredient of a healthy democratic process. 

"Come at budget time and say, 'We've saved this 
much money already and we are not going to ask 
for an increase'." 



Libraries are regarded by many as a "resource" for a community, 
which implies passivity. You need, however, to become an active force 
in your communities. Think about things like public information pro- 
grams and coordinated community involvement, to bring the commu- 
nity, the homeowners, into your programs. And do this not only on a 
formal basis but in special programs utilizing your physical facilities. 

The second suggestion is to convert those revolutionary homeowners 
to support of your programs. Bring them in and have a meeting in your 
community room, and get to know them well. Let them use that com- 
munity room, and when it conflicts with your library commission, en- 
courage the library commission to step aside and find another room or 
to meet with the homeowners. It is now the homeowners association 
that really runs things when it comes down to the basic, final vote at 
the ballot box. If you can adopt that philosophy, reach out and bring the 
people in, let them make a real impact on your planning processes, they 
may be down there arguing for you instead of against you when it comes 
to budget time. That would be a nice, new, unique experience. [^ 




Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 25 



A Multiplicity of Sources 

by Justice Allison M. Rouse 



One wonders how a member of the judicial branch of government 
ever becomes involved with library trusteeship, but I think if you ana- 
lyze it our respective functions are not that incompatible. As an appel- 
late judge, I spend a substantial portion of my daily time reading, and 
the balance of the time writing, which makes me an author. As a matter 
of fact, I'm a published author. We have a very captive audience for our 
writings. All the lawyers are practically required to become thoroughly 
familiar with our work product. I haven't yet written any best sellers. 
As a matter of fact I haven't even received honorable mention, but I'm 
dedicated to the idea that some day a judge certainly ought to be able 
to write a best seller. 

I will try to review some of the sources we have become involved 
with in our own Redwood City Library. We are told that, as trustees, 
we have an obligation to acquire additional funds and to be sure of an 
adequate budget. I think that probably is one of the most important 
functions of a trustee. Our own library in Redwood City, a community 
of approximately 55,000 people, has participated in many of the tradi- 
tionally recognized sources of funding. Some of them are not so tradi- 
tional, and we'll try to discuss those here. 

One program that really has not been income-producing was the 
DIALOG program. We had been a participant for two years in an 
experiment funded by the National Science Foundation whose purpose 
was to determine whether or not an on-line information retrieval serv- 
ice is a feasible program to provide for a public library. The experiment 
has also been carried on by three other libraries in the Bay Area. The 
technical input and instruction, including the hardware, were supplied 
by Lockheed and the libraries involved provided the manpower and 
necessary telephone lines linked to the computer located in Palo Alto. 

The patron received the service for the first year without charge, 
paid one-half the commercial rate for the terminal connection time 
during the second year, and only during the third year, which began 
last Tuesday, (and we are no longer participants), was the patron re- 
quired to pay the full commercial rate. We had to drop out of the 
program very reluctantly for two reasons: one, lack of funding for the 
operating personnel, because it does take a great deal of their time and 
certainly a great deal of skill on the part of those involved; and secondly, 
what I thought was very interesting, the high rate of use by non-resi- 
dents. This was sort of sad, because we would like to have thought that 



Allison M. Rouse is a Justice of the State 
Court of Appeal and a member of the Red- 
wood City Library Board of Trustees. 



26 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

the program was of interest to our local citizens. The cost became such 
that it just was not economically feasible for us to pursue the experi- 
ment. 

Another area, which I personally have always thought a good source 
of inexpensive revenue, was volunteer manpower, that is, volunteered 
in the library service. We utilize a number of types of volunteer work. 
Some of the sources are the Friends of the Library, retired senior 
volunteer programs, the Volunteer Bureau, and one that is particularly 
familiar to me, the County Probation Office and the County Welfare 
Department. 

When I was on the trial bench in San Mateo County my last term 
there was served as a juvenile court judge. I was tremendously im- 



"I was tremendously impressed with the opportu- 
nity made available to the juvenile court by the 
volunteer work program." 



pressed with the opportunity made available to the juvenile court by 
the volunter work program. You know, more often than not the type 
of youngster that became involved with the juvenile court process was 
usually not charged with a serious offense. He was a child, or young lady 
as the case may be, who perhaps had the typical amount of teen-age 
energy, and perhaps the home situation wasn't ideal. They were looking 
for things to do. They were a little too intelligent, perhaps, and they just 
needed some sort of a challenge. They needed identification. This is 
something I think we overlook sometimes, the need to be recognized. 

We had, at that time, a volunteer supervisor who maintained liaison 
with various agencies throughout the county, and who could use assist- 
ance in a variety of capacities. We would try to relate the particular 
agency or activity with the type of offense the youngster had become 
involved in. If there had been a confrontation with the police, for 
example, I was not loath to require that youngster to spend maybe 25 
hours, or a reasonable time, as a condition of probation working with 
the police department, riding patrol cars, (if the parents consented, of 
course) , and seeing what some of the problems were. 

In that connection, when I was on the library board I suggested that 
perhaps this source of assistance might be available. I still think it is a 
pretty good source, but I must tell you that the library did avail itself 
of this type of help and had some trouble. One of the Friends of the 
Library found her purse missing, and of course this was the end of the 
game. It can happen and does happen, so you just have to be careful 
with the type of person you make available for this kind of work. I do 
think that you find a lot of enthusiasm among these youngsters, and 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 27 

perhaps you just might aim them in the right direction where they 
develop an interest in a career that they can follow up by an education. 

Of course, as well as job-hunting librarians, who ask if they may 
volunteer for work in the library, to be used for a reference purpose in 
obtaining employment, there are always other interested civic-minded 
citizens who are available. The Friends of the Library in our commu- 
nity have an extensive program whereby they visit the homebound 
with library materials and services. In addition to this pure library 
service they also deliver and assist recipients to operate talking book 
machines for the blind or partially sighted. This federal program is 
designed to work without the blind person needing any outside help. 
The Friends have discovered that it all works smoother if they go out 
and help the patron get started. They also hold an annual book sale with 
the proceeds going to the library. Each of these programs has an im- 
mense amount of volunteer assistance. 

Within the library the volunteers are placed by the above-mentioned 
outside agencies. We use them for programs and activities which we 
have no funds for and which we could not do without volunteer help. 
We are very careful not to use them for anything that we would pay our 
own employees to do. Examples of some of the tasks performed are 
special indexing projects that are not essential, sign making projects, 
newspaper clippings, picture mounting for the vertical file or straight- 
ening of shelves in our storage warehouse. Librarians get professional 
experience by working on special bibliographies and sometimes work- 
ing on the vertical file. 

Many of the local service clubs would welcome an opportunity to 
become involved in a project or projects which involved your library. 
An excellent example is the Lions Club white cane project which pro- 
vides large print books and other materials for libraries. Other clubs 
might do things if they were asked, and we should ask, for most of them 



"Local service clubs might do things if they were 
asked, and we should ask, for most of them have 
money and talent to contribute." 



have money and talent to contribute. Don't forget the women's service 
clubs. They are also very numerous and very enthusiastic, and I'd like 
to cite an example of that. 

We have a local club, the Peninsula Hills Junior Women's Club. I 
don't know how long they've been in existence, but a very short period 
of time and they are very enthusiastic and very capable. They put 
together a bicentennial calendar which they sold. It consists of some 
beautiful art work and this was accomplished by conducting a competi- 



28 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



tion among the school children. The results of their exhibits were select- 
ed from among the competitors and published. This little item sold for 
$2.00 with the proceeds going to the library, and we were just recently 
presented with a check for $2,000. They are eager to assist in other ways, 
and I'm sure they are going to assist in the future. 

The Comprehensive Employment and Training Act provides the 
CETA employees. They have been utilized by our library for typing, 
publicity and general page work, and very successfully. To qualify for 
the appointment you must be out of work for 30 days and live in the 
jurisdiction administering the program. A variety of skills can be avail- 
able to the employer. We have a young man working for us with pho- 
tography skills and some journalism background. He is helping with 
publicity. Another, a woman teacher, is helping bilingual students in 
the library. These are both programs of the library which we could not 
otherwise afford in our library budget. 

The Neighborhood Youth Corps are students, disadvantaged princi- 
pally, who need basic instruction on how to hold jobs, so the training, 
of course, is very fundamental. We concentrate in the beginning on real 














Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 29 

rudiments of employment: how to phone in if you're sick, how you must 
show up to work on time, how you answer the phone in a business-like 
fashion, and so forth. I suppose our work there is more of a contribution 
to the student than his is a contribution to us, but it pays off in the long 
run, and they do — if they are enthusiastic — make a contribution. 

Another area that I do want to comment on very briefly is fines for 
overdue books. This is a mixed blessing indeed. Most libraries feel that 
fines are necessary to insure the prompt return of materials. There are 
some libraries who feel that this isn't a good idea. We think it is a good 
idea because we think it is only fair to the vast bulk of the users who 
are complying with the rules and who return the books promptly, and 
to whom we have some obligation to make other books available. We 
feel that there has to be some sort of a sanction, some sort of penalty 
involved in late return. It can be minimal. It is not necessarily revenue- 
producing, but it does help keep the tax rate down in our own experi- 
ence. 

As a former lawyer, and a judge, I must commend to your attention 
the idea of memorials. As you know, most universities have professional 
staff that go out and contact alumni and talk of the old school tie. This 



"Memorials are a very productive source of reve- 
nue, and this may be an area that we have over- 
looked." 



is a very productive source of revenue, and this may be an area that we 
have overlooked. Memorials can take the forms of money, books, build- 
ings and other things. You must be careful, however, that there are not 
too many restrictions or strings attached, because this may pose some 
real problems. 

One of our libraries, in the city of San Mateo, has a rental collection, 
believe it or not. Through their Friends of Libraries they have estab- 
lished a system whereby with the purchase of some of the best sellers 
and the more desired books the patron can avoid taking his place on the 
waiting list and go down and rent the best seller. 

One other area in which we are now doing a great deal of research 
and effort is foundation grants. It is hot proper for a judge to express 
his bias and prejudices but I'm going to do it anyway and tell you that 
I think we have the best librarian and the worst library in the State of 
California. We are trying to do something about the library and we are 
studying the foundation grant extensively. 

I've told you about my feelings as a trustee. I've thoroughly enjoyed 
my work with our librarian and with the other trustees. It has been a 
great and a very rewarding experience. [^ 



30 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

A Trustee Activitist Speaks 

by Florence McMullin 



Appointment to a library board constitutes a public trust. A trustee 
is a policy maker, cultural consultant, controller of finance, employer 
of personnel, and most important a library link to the public. I feel that 
is the chief responsibility of the trustee, representing the public interest 
in libraries and seeing to it that the public library effectively serves the 
community that supports it. One of the ways to do this is to first deter- 
mine library objectives appropriate to the needs and the desires of the 
community and re-examine them periodically. You know, nothing is set 
in concrete so it really follows that trustees have to closely be involved 
in their community. 

I think that it is very necessary to maintain a continuing dialogue with 
individuals in your community, with business men, with service organi- 
zations, with the schools, and find out what these people expect from 
libraries. Find out what kind of programs they want, what materials 
they want to find in their library, and at the same time tell them about 
the services that are available now in libraries. I think very few people 
are aware of the extensive services that libraries ofi^er. Programs and 
good service cost money, so trustees, together with the assistance of 
their library director, must secure adequate funds to make these objec- 
tives a reality. 

We are all facing a slightly different version of the financial crunch 
and of course we must be especially responsible in our budget planning. 
Accountability is the key word in government today. However, I inter- 
pret responsibility as meeting the growing library needs of your com- 
munity and maintaining optimum library standards and not just 
knuckling under to the politicians in city hall by drastically cutting 
library programs. I think that is the responsibility of the trustee, to fight 
for the financial requirements of the library and to be able to give 
reasons for these requirements, and to be able to perhaps organize 
community support from Friends of the Library or library users. This 
is very effective with your government officials. Of course, your library 
director is going to be there defending the budget also and answering 
questions concerning the administration and financial detail. So you are 
in this together, and if you pass that budget you have to lobby. 

Librarians and trustees and interested citizens working together can 
effectively influence the decision makers. I think that trustees and 

Mrs. Florence McMullin is a trustee of the 
King County Library, Washington, Presi- 
dent of the Washington State Library 
Trustee Association, and active in the 
American Library Association. 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 31 

Friends and users of libraries make the best possible lobbyists because 
in the eyes of the legislators they have no vested interest. They are not 
employed by the library, they do not receive any compensation for the 
services that they give to the library, and they have no personal gains 
from any legislation or the budget that is passed for the library. They 
are simply concerned citizens trying to plead the case of libraries and 
to improve conditions in their own community. I think legislators are 
impressed with this kind of dedication, frankly. Lobbying for libraries 
is a continuing, year-round job. It means getting acquainted with your 



"I interpret responsibility as meeting the growing 
library needs of your community, not just knuck- 
ling under to the politicians in city hall." 



legislators and telling them what you want, why you want it and why 
they should help you attain it. 

If you intend to lobby the state legislature you must inform yourself 
about your own legislature. Now most people know where their legisla- 
ture meets, and many people know when the legislature meets, but far 
fewer people are aware of the ins and outs of the committee structure 
of their legislatures. This is a very important thing. The committees are 
where the decisions are made. In the committee they can make or 
break your particular legislation. In Washington State we have an open 
meeting law, and I would imagine that here in California you do, also, 
since it is called the "sunshine law". This is a slang term applied to open 
meeting laws, because you have to let the sunshine in on everything 
that is going on. 

You also have to know who has the power, who are the legislative 
leaders. The very most effective lobbyists are legislators. You want to 
know and influence the influencial legislators, because they in turn will 
espouse your cause and they will lobby the other legislators. You also, 
of course, must know which political party has the majority. Although 



"The very most effective lobbyists are legislators." 



we always say that library bills are non-partisan, somehow they can 
become partisan. This happens in the legislature. It is not something 
that we do. 

You want to know the party so you can count your votes. You want 
to have friends in the political caucus so you know the real, hard deci- 
sions that are being made. We are trying to get open caucuses. I don't 



32 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

think we will be successful. I think the legislators would fight that till 
their dying breath, really, but it would be really interesting. 

You must know your own legislators and you must know what kind 
of people they are. I say that legislators reflect the population at large. 
Some are intelligent and conscientious, and some are not; some have 
strong views on all subjects, and some do not. Some are well-informed 
and some are not, and most are honest but some are not. Many legisla- 
tors have their own philosophy or approaches to social problems, and 
whatever positions that they take on legislation will reflect those 
philosophies, so it is very important to learn as much as possible about 
your legislator's personal, political philosophy. This will help you to 
persuade him or her. There are other ways, of course, that you can get 
acquainted or learn about your legislator. 

Observe him in his home district. Attend meetings where he or she 
is going to be speaking, or where they will be in attendance, and take 
the opportunity to go up after the meeting and talk to them. Tell them 
about your interest in libraries and try to get them to commit them- 
selves to supporting libraries. If they do this in only a general way, 
pursue it at another meeting, at another time. Call them, write them, 
and have a foot in the door; follow through. 

Now that election time is coming up, there will be opportunities to 
attend coffee hours for candidates and incumbents, or you can yourself 
give coffee hours. We have candidate meetings in our community li- 
brary for each legislative district, and these are very well attended. This 
is in addition to the kind of large candidate meetings that the League 
of Women Voters put on. At that time, again question the candidate 
about his interest in libraries. Listen very closely to the answers, and if 
you agree on enough issues with this candidate get involved in the 
campaign. Lick envelopes, make phone calls, ring door bells, and put 
your money where your mouth is, because election campaigns are very 
expensive and if the candidate is willing to support libraries he deserves 
our support. 

You have to remember basically that those in power want to remain 
in power and those out of power want to gain it. Election time is the 
prime time to be informing the candidates that you are very interested 
in his or her position on libraries, and you are interested as a voter. If 
enough citizens were to communicate their feelings to legislators, I 
really think that we would receive our fair share of both state and 

"Whenever the occasion arises publicly thank a 
legislator. A public thank you goes a very long 
way." 

federal funds. We have the power, we have enough numbers, and 
legislators play the numbers game, certainly. But we simply do not use i 
it. 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 33 

The last thing that we do after we have received support from the 
legislator, if he has acted in our behalf to further our legislation or 
perhaps to kill some legislation, is remember to say thank you. In addi- 
tion to personal thank you's, whenever the occasion arises publicly 
thank a legislator. A public thank you goes a very long way. 

Lobby the news makers, because the media people can really make 
or break us. Lobby the influential, the people who know and move 
other people, though seldom politicians themselves. Lobby your neigh- 
bors, lobby your friends, your dentists, your doctors, your beauty opera- 
tors. Just lobby everybody. You know, this is part of your PR job as a 
trustee. Lobby other lobbyists. This means to talk to them about your 
particular issue, selling them on your library legislation or your library 
budget. This could be your state library budget where you want help. 
I find that being friendly with other lobbyists I just learn all kinds of 
interesting things about what is happening in those marble halls. 

I think it is essential to the competent performance and the growth 
of trustees that they be a member of their local, their state and national 
trustees association. They should be members of these associations, and 
they should whenever possible attend the annual conference. It is most 
legitimate for the budget to include dues and travel expenses for trust- 
ees to attend the conference. 

I attended my first ALA meeting in Atlantic City in 1969, and I have 
to say that for me it was a very positive experience. I got really turned 
on. I think that the contact that I made was just so valuable and the 
communication with trustees and libraries from all over the country 
was very exciting: the exchanging of ideas and experience, the discuss- 
ing and sharing of mutual problems, and maybe even a couple of solu- 
tions here or there or a step in the right direction. Sometimes it is nice 
to know that you are not the only one out there with these same 
problems. As a result of that very positive ALA experience, I went back 
to Washington State and got involved with my state association. Usually 
it is the other way around, I know, but I guess I'm a backward trustee. 

I got involved immediately with committee work, and now I'm the 
president of the trustee section of the Washington Library Association. 
As the elected president, I sit on the executive board but we also have 
a second trustee who is elected from the membership who also sits on 
the executive board. This year we have decided that a trustee must be 
a member of the conference planning committee. That won't be me or 
the other member of the executive board. This will be some trustee at 
large who perhaps has not attended very many state conferences. This 
way there will be trustee input for program planning, and I think that 
the programs will probably be more meaningful for trustees because of 
this. 

Our state association conference in Washington includes a trustees 
awards luncheon. At this luncheon we recognize the outstanding serv- 
ice of an individual trustee, a board of trustees, and just recently we've 
added the Friends of the Libraries group award. This is for outstanding 
service for the preceding year. We also have honorable mention for 



34 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

many individual trustees and Friends whose names have been submit- 
ted with criteria saying that they should receive the award. We have 
a well-known speaker at that luncheon who will in some way direct his 
or her speech particularly to trustees. All of the conference attendees 
are present at this luncheon so it is a very good time for librarians and 
trustees to be listening to the same thing and be talking about the same 



"You are going to have to be a little pushy and get 
involved in the decision-making of your state as- 
sociation." 



thing. Also, I find that the librarians enjoy sharing the recognition that 
the trustees and boards that receive awards get at the luncheon. 

I believe that trustees have a responsibility to belong to and be active 
in their state association, and maybe you are going to have to be a little 
pushy about this. You should get involved in the decision-making of the 
association, and I think that it is the responsibility of the state association 
in turn to recognize the special needs of trustees and to go out of their 
way to meet these needs in program planning and in whatever way that 
they can, perhaps by the scheduling of the conference itself. 

I think that trustees should encourage seminars and workshops for a 
fuller utilization of trustee talent and experience. There is a lot of this 
just sitting around, going to waste. In our own library system we have 
an annual, one-day workshop for trustees, advisory boards and Friends 
of the Library, or Guilds as we sometimes call them, from about 43 
community libraries. 

We try to focus on a different area of interest every year, and this year 
we concentrated on legislation because we had a Washington State 
Library network that was ready to go into the hopper the following 
month and we just felt that this was a really good way to inform a 
number of trustees throughout King County. Since we passed the legis- 
lation, and since many of these trustees and Friends were down there 
in Olympia and were writing letters to their legislators, I think it was 
a successful approach and I will continue to use it. But you can't focus 
on legislation every year. I think trustees are going to get pretty tired 
of that being their only responsibility, the only reason the libraries want 
them. I happen to like lobbying, I think it is neat, but some people want 
to do other things, and they should. 

One area of trustees' responsibility that is seldom discussed is the 
responsibility of the trustee to protect the community from individual 
and group censorship. I would like to read something from the Library 
Bill of Rights. Article II says, "Libraries should provide books and other 
materials presenting all points of view concerning the problems and 
issues of our times; no library materials should be proscribed or 
removed from libraries because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval." 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 35 

Now I think that it would be a very wise move, and perhaps I'll go 
further and say a necessary move, for boards to adopt the Library Bill 
of Rights, and to adopt a good materials selection policy. I think that 
when we have written policies they help to avoid misunderstanding 
and they provide guidance for both the trustees and the library staff. 
When you do receive complaints, and you will, your house will be in 
order and you will be better equipped to deal with these complaints. 

Last night Mrs. Booe made several comments about intellectual free- 
dom and I'd like to respond to them, if I may. She talked about good 
literature and purchasing the best books. She used terms, "good taste", 
and she referred to "trash" readings and obviously didn't care much for 
paperbacks. Well, I don't think you should make those kinds of value 
judgements, not as trustees nor librarians. I think that if you are serving 
the public that is what you better do. If they want paperbacks, if they 
want "trash", supply it. If the kids want to read the Hardy Boys or the 
Nancy Drew books, (which we did not purchase at King County a 
number of years ago) , for goodness sake buy them. If you get kids into 
the library and meet their immediate request, they are going to start 
reading other books, too. I think it is very important that you are not 
to make moral judgements or value judgements for the community. 

The most controversial article of the Library Bill of Rights is Article 
V. "The rights of an individual to the use of a library should not be 
denied or abridged because of his age, race, religion, national origins or 
social or political views." Of course, age is the kicker in that article. 
People just get all bent out of shape about kids having the right to read 
anything that they wish to, and I think that we just vastly underestimate 
the sophistication of today's youngster. 

Frank Herbert, the author of Soul-Catcher and Dune, put it very 
nicely when he spoke at our WLA Conference. He said that if a young 



"If you are serving the public that is what you bet- 
ter do. If they want *trash', supply it." 



person goes into a library and borrows Fanny Hill, for instance, and 
understands this book, then the damage was done before they ever got 
near the library. If they don't understand the book, no damage is being 
done. I think that is a very practical approach to kids and books, frankly. 
Although a trustee on a personal level may prefer not to read or to 
view some particular piece of material, they must not assume the role 
of a censor. It is very easy to fall into that role. We all have our limits, 
we all have our hangups, and you've got to fight them. Defend the 
principle, not the title; teU yourself that, over and over again. Remem- 
ber, this is your personal preference. You have the choice to read or not 
to read that book, to view or not to view that movie. Nobody is twisting 



36 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



your arm, and that is what intellectual freedom is all about: the individ- 
ual's right to make choices. Don't make the other individual's choices 
for him. 

Although each area of trusteeship deals with policy making in one 
way or another, I really haven't talked about specifics of this policy 
making process, and I will just briefly. We all know, of course, that a 
primary function of a board of trustees is to establish policies for the 
operation of the library and to govern the library program. The board 
of trustees establishes policies and the librarian administers the library 
under these policies. The trustee does not go into the library and run 
the library, per se. In the decision making process, policies should be 
cooperatively studied by the board of trustees and by the librarian. The 
librarian should be free to make any kind of recommendation on these 
policies and should be willing to provide any kind of information to the 
board and in general help them to make these decisions, but in the final 
determination the responsibility lies with the trustee. 

I read a folksy little admonition in the Ohio trustee handbook, and it 
goes this way. Trustees should not run their libraries, but see that they 
are properly run; not manage them, but get them managed. I think that 
is sound advice from Ohio, but somehow it had a Pennsylvania Dutch 
flavor to me. Perhaps I can best sum this up by saying that your effec- 
tiveness as a library trustee can be directly measured by the kind of 
service that your community receives, r^ 




Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 37 



A Bicentennial Building 

by Herb Lathan 



I have no expertise in building or operating libraries. As far as I'm 
concerned, that is a job for the professionals and I want to make this 
very clear. In my business I always go to professionals if I have a prob- 
lem, and I think that we as trustees should do the same thing. I do have 
enthusiasm and dedication and I feel an obligation to my community. 
This is a philosophy that is shared by my other trustees and also, fortu- 
nately, by our city council and this is why we do have a beautiful, new 
bicentennial library in Chula Vista. 

It was over 10 years ago that we started on this library and, boy, did 
we get it shot down a number of times! I was trying to remember last 
night and I think that I attended some 14,000 council meetings, about 
9,689 adjourned conferences, and probably 4,000 or 5,000 hours on my 
knees begging and pleading. I finally started carrying an onion in my 
pocket so I could produce large, obvious tears on cue. 

Although the library was included in the master plan for the City of 
Chula Vista, I knew we were going to be shot down when the motion 
was made several years back that the library would not go on bonds by 
itself. The entire Civic Center complex would be included. This was a 
very logical thing to be done. I can understand the feeling of the coun- 
cil, but when they came up with a total amount for that I knew that 
people were not going to vote for it because they thought all of that 
money was going into the library, and it was not. It was said that people 
voted the bonds down for a library in Chula Vista, but they did not. 
They voted down the completion of the Civic Center complex. I've 
been unable to convince a lot of people of that. 

Then the reassuring rumbles of the possibility of getting federal reve- 
nue sharing money was being heard, and funds could be used for 
projects such as a library. So with my trusty onion and with my knee 
pads I went off to Washington not once but five times and contacted 
several congressmen and senators about revenue sharing. I'm sure that 
I had very little effect on the outcome but I can assure you that when 
we received our first allocation, some $625,000, I felt that I had had a 
baby. 

Our next step was to convince the city and our council that this 
manna from Washington was the answer to our prayers. A couple of our 
councilmen felt that perhaps only 50% of this money should be used for 

Herb Lathan is a trustee of the Chula Vista 
Public Library and member of the State 
Advisory Council on Libraries. 



38 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

the library and the other 50% for other things. By diligent pleading, 
veiled threats and appeal to their common sense, we finally convinced 
them that they should use at least 90% , and that is what they did. Money 
went into the bank and was designated for the library. As a result, we 
do have a new library. It is paid for by no increase in taxes, no bonds 
to be paid off, and no dipping into the general fund. Very basically this 
is how we got the bicentennial library in Chula Vista. 

I would like to say a word about my personal conception of what a 
trustee's function is. I think that we are the liaison between the library 
and the community, city council and the staff. I don't know how to 
check out a book from the other side of the counter, and I don't want 
to. I think that is up to the librarian. I have the utmost faith in the 
librarian. I admire everyone of you and I think you are doing an out- 
standing job. 

I think it is very important that we do establish a close rapport with 
our legislators, and I mean all the way from a councilman to our state 
legislators and our congressman. Get to know them on a first name 
basis. 

I wonder how many of you people are from the Los Angeles area. 
How many of you went in to see Tom Bradley or spoke to him. I did. 
I live in San Diego, but within a week after he was elected I went up 
to see him, just to see how he felt about things I was interested in. I've 
done the same thing in other places because I'm involved in other 
groups where we have to work with these people and I think it is 
important to get to know them. 

Yesterday I took some flowers to an administrative assistant to one of 
the assemblymen. It was her birthday. I keep lists of all these things. 
These are the people who can help us. I don't forget their birthdays, or 
anything. Remember those people; this is what you should do. 

It is important that we should participate actively. Attend the CLA 
meetings even if you have to pay your own expenses. I think most of 
the trustees are able to come to meetings and things, even if they have 
to pay for it themselves when the community doesn't do it. You know, 
a new Cadillac or a trip to Europe or something like this is a very 
fleeting thing, but there is nothing like that warm, inner feeling of 
satisfaction that you feel as you go down by our new library. I know that 
I had a small part in building that library, and that it is going to be there 
for many, many years. 

To me a library still is a book. I'll accept all of these other things, I 
think they are fine, but the only thing that I wanted in the library in 
Chula Vista was a nice easy chair over by the fireplace where I could 
sit down and read a book and enjoy it. I think that the people who do 
not enjoy reading books are missing an awful lot. 

There is just one thing that I want to say to you as librarians. Many 
librarians feel that we as trustees are trying to usurp your power. We 
are not. We want to cooperate with you. We want to help in every way 
that we can, and I think that we can help. When things have come up 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 




"There is nothing like that warm, inner feeling of 
satisfaction knowing that I had a small part in build- 
ing that library." 



before the council about the Ubrary and as an employee the librarian 
has not been able to go to them, I can go because in my business I've 
had to support their campaigns. I don't have to worry about my job, 
where you do. 
So librarians, all we want to do is help, l^ 




Employment Issues 



by Nancy Percy 



We are here because of a common interest in the support and im- 
provement of library programs. I know that each of your groups differs 
from one another in its authority and in the kinds of activity that it 
conducts in the local community. You have different legal relationships 
with your council and with your librarians, so I'm not going to try to deal 
in specifics. I'm sure many of you know more than I about employment 
issues, where you deal with them on a day-to-day basis, and others of 
you are not interested in specifics. 

There are two employment areas in particular where the greatest 
amount of change and the most significant kinds of change are taking 
place. The first is an Affirmative Action and in Title VII j the second is 
in employment relations. These two areas are not unrelated to one 
another. 

Title VII has become a shorthand way of referring to a whole host of 
laws, decisions, executive orders, hearing agency rulings and published 
guidelines, which require equal employment opportunity ^ased on 

Nancy Percy is Assistant State Librarian, 
California State Library. 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 41 

qualifications for the job. Specifically, it refers to Title VII of the 1964 
Civil Rights Act, as amended, which in its most substantive provision 
declares, "it shall be an unlawful practice for an employer to fail or 
refuse to hire or to discharge any individual or otherwise to discrimi- 
nate against any individual with respect to his compensation, terms, 
conditions or privileges of appointment because of such individual's 
race, color, religion, sex or national origin." These groups are referred 
to as "protected classes". 

You all remember the social struggles which accompanied the 1964 
Civil Rights Act, but public employers were not affected at that time. 
In fact, public agencies were specifically exempted from its provisions. 
In 1972, however, the Equal Employment Opportunity Act amended 
the Civil Rights Act and it now includes public employers. 

In public employment practices, it was sufficient defense against 
charges of discrimination for years that testing was objective. That is, 
if you gave everyone the same test it was objective and not discrimina- 
tory. It was a practice to assign numbers and avoid names, and that was 
another way of being objective. Court decisions growing out of these 
new laws have made it clear that if there is any adverse effect on any 
of those protected classes, any test or requirement for hiring, promotion 
or transfer must be proven by the employer to be related to the actual 
job: in specific, not in the abstract. The landmark U.S. Supreme Court 
decision on this is Griggs vs. the Duke Power Company of 1971, which 
established these principles. 

1. Discrimination is an employment practice which operates to 
exclude a protected class or group and which cannot be shown to be 
related to job performance. 

2. The intent to discriminate need not be proven, if in fact the 
employment practices exclude a protected group. 

3. Explicit measures of ability, not abstractions like diplomas or 
degrees, are preferred as screening devices. 

4. Preferential treatment for protected classes is disallowed. 
You will see now the connection between Affirmative Action and 

Title VII. Affirmative Action is the principle that employers should take 
active steps to improve the employment opportunities for members of 
the protected classes. Title VII says preferential treatment for protect- 
ed classes is disallowed. Title VII says that whenever employment crite- 
ria are used they must be job-related with no preferential treatment. 
Moreover, the courts are seeming to be reaching the conclusion that in 
fact all individuals and groups are protected by the law, as indeed 
everyone has race, color, religion, sex or national origin. 

In other words, if tests or requirements for employment can be prov- 
en to be job-related, discrimination does not exist even if there is ad- 
verse effect on a particular protected class. What this means, of course, 

I is that employment practices are coming under increasing scrutiny. 

) Selection criteria must be validated as job-related and these are subject 

I to intensive review by the court. You wouldn't believe how deeply into 

I testing and test validation the courts are getting. 



42 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

While all of this is in the developing stage, other social changes are 
occurring which impact upon the total public employment picture as 
well. A major development here is the increasing unionization of the 
public employee work force. 

For some years now, local public agency employer /employee rela- 
tions have been governed under the terms of what we refer to as the 
Meyers-Milias-Brown Act which establishes procedures for the recogni- 



"You wouldn't believe how deeply into testing and 
test validation the courts are getting." 



tion of bargaining units and requires the employer to meet and confer 
in good faith with the union or association elected by each bargaining 
unit to be its representative. They must agree to terms of employment, 
basically relating to wages, hours and working conditions. They do this 
by means of a memo of understanding. 

The Meyers-Milias-Brown Act does not cover the state itself as an 
employer, nor does it cover school districts, and its requirements fall far 
short of what a true collective bargaining law would require. But the 
case law, the local employer /employee ordinances, the conciliation and 
arbitration practices and the threat of strikes, and strikes, have tended 
to tighten up the employer /employee relationship in actuality. Last 
year the Legislature passed a collective bargaining bill for teachers, the 
Rodda Act, and very nearly passed a collective bargaining bill to cover 
all public employees including state employees, which in most of its 
various forms would have been a true collective bargaining bill. 

So in effect, there is a trend toward regularizing the setting of the 
terms of public employment by negotiation or bargaining between the 
public employer and the public employee. I don't intend to discuss the 
philosophical aspects of this trend. They are many and fascinating, but 



**^Employees are going to be increasingly aware of 
the restrictions on employers from Title VII and 
provisions of other laws now in effect." 



let me leave with you some issues which I see arising in public employ- 
ment as a result of these developments. 

Employees are going to be increasingly aware of the restrictions on 
employers from Title VII and provisions of other laws now in effect. In 
fact, in many situations it is a union or an association which files a class 
action suit under Title VII on behalf of its members or refers an em- ! 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 43 

ployee to the appropriate federal or state compliance agency. In other 
words, the unions are acting as employee educators on their rights and 
privileges under the law. Of course, unions are also covered by the law 
when their activities affect hiring or promotion. 

Some traditional employment practices will be in conflict with new 
employment standards. For example, lay-offs on the basis of seniority 
may have an adverse effect on an ethnic minority group. "Last hired, 
first fired." Not long ago a member of the Board of Trustees of the State 
University and Colleges system proposed that any faculty lay-offs be on 
the basis of merit rather than seniority, which strikes at the very heart 
of the tenure system. That resolution was withdrawn but it is still being 
discussed. 

Some traditional management prerogatives will be questioned. One 
California city gave an extra percentage wage increase to employees 
who were not in an organized bargaining unit. The courts ruled that 
this violates the Meyers-Milias-Brown Act, which allows employees to 
organize and be represented. 

It will be increasingly difficult for employers to withdraw what are 
seen by employees as traditional or long-term benefits. For example, a 
tradition of four hours of unofficial time off over the holidays is likely 
to be written into the first memorandum of understanding as a no-cost 
item and existing privilege. 

Finally, while it is true that most library boards and commissions in 
California are not hiring authorities and do not have active roles to play 
in employment activities, it is important for you to be aware that this 
is a rapidly changing field and to make sure that the library director 
stays abreast of these developments. There also may be some tides 
which you wish to ride. 

For example, if in your city or county your library assistants, (mostly 
female), have a substantially lower salary than driver clerks, (mostly 
male) , this may be the time to see that that inequity, if it is an inequity, 
be corrected. It is a perfect time for that. There are great opportunities 
from these confluences of events. 

I think you can see that federal and state laws, not just laws which 
provide money for us, can have great impact on local government 
activities. Your city officials and your county officials are probably ac- 
tive in the League of California Cities and in the County Supervisors 
Association, and these organizations spend great amounts of time and 
money trying to influence the Legislature and the Executive on legisla- 
tion on all kinds of endeavors: retirement systems, public employment, 
land use, the whole range of things. They know that employment issues 
at the state level are every bit as important to them as employment 
issues at the local level. 

Trustees and commissioners might have the same kind of interest in 
state legislation and state activity relating to employment practices as 
other local officials do. We've talked a great deal about lobbying for 
money, but here is another area where you might have a need to 
express your interest and concern. \^ 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 45 

NEWS NOTES 



CALIFORNIA HAS CLASS 



The California Library Authority for Systems and Services (CLASS) 
became a reality when a joint powers agreement was signed at a 
ceremony, June 17, in Los Angeles, the result of two years' planning by 
the state's top library representatives. 

Spearheaded by State Librarian Ethel Crockett, CLASS has been 
designed as a service organization for libraries of all types — academic, 
public, business and institutional — enabling them to locate library 
materials and reduce duplication of technical preparation work 
throughout the state so all library users will be able to take advantage 
of the great library resources of California. 

CLASS is the first of its kind in the country, a public agency with 
powers to provide needed special services to libraries of all types, under 
contract. It is expected that one of the first activities of CLASS will be 
to establish a computerized listing of books in libraries throughout the 
state, for cataloging and interlibrary loan use. Other services CLASS 
may ofi^er include a facility for storing httle used and last copy books, 
the cooperative acquisition of library materials, and delivery systems for 
statewide interlibrary loan. 

Signing the joint powers agreement to form the California Library 
Authority for Systems and Services were Dr. David Saxon, President of 
the University of California; Mayor Tom Bradley for the City of Los 
Angeles; Supervisor Rodney Diridon for the County of Santa Clara; and 
Dr. Robert Burnham, Superintendent, Grossmont Community College 
District, San Diego. The State Department of Education is the fifth 
signatory member of CLASS. Dr. Wilson Riles, Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Instruction, also signed the agreement but was unable to attend the 
ceremony. 

"We are all here celebrating this morning," said Mayor Bradley, "but 
the people who should really celebrate are the users. Library users 
throughout California are the real beneficiaries of this joint powers 
agreement." 

The new CLASS Board of Directors, who held their first meeting 
following the signing ceremony, June 17, are Supervisor Rodney Diri- 
don of Santa Clara County, chairman; Erv Metzgar, President of Gross- 
mont Community College, vice-chairman; Dr. Stephen Salmon, 
University of California, secretary. Other Board members are Los An- 
geles Deputy Mayor Grace Montaiiez Davis and State Librarian Ethel 
Crockett. 

At their meeting the CLASS Board adopted rules for operating the 
new agency, named an interim planning committee, and settled on 



46 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Santa Clara County as the location for an ofBce for CLASS. Until an 
executive director and staff can be hired, the Santa Clara County Li- 
brary will serve as a contact point for CLASS business. Services of the 
Santa Clara County Treasurer and Comptroller will be utilized under 
contract. [^ 



STATE LIBRARY PUBLICATIONS 



The latest statistical data and directory information on 1,037 Califor- 
nia libraries has now been published by the California State Library. 
California Library Statistics and Directory 1976 contdtxns information for 
fiscal year 1974-75 compiled from annual reports of public, academic, 
special, state agency and county law libraries. Included is a complete 
directory of all California libraries reporting, an address list of Public 
Library Systems, networks and reference centers, a subject index to 
library special collections and a library name index. 

The 1976 Directory has been sent to all California libraries complet- 
ing the report forms, and to Library Depository Act and exchange 
agreement libraries. The Directory is also available for sale through the 
California State Department of Education. 

California Library Statistics and Directory replaces the former "win- 
ter" issue of News Notes of California Libraries, official journal of the 
State Library. News Notes will now appear three times per year. Annual 
subscriptions are available either separately, (three issues) , or in combi- 
nation with the Directory, (four publications) . For order information, 
please see the verso of the title page of this issue. 

For 1975, only one publication was issued, News Notes, v. 70, no. 1-4; 
no "winter" issue or Directory was published. This issue of News Notes 
is the first published for 1976, v. 71, no. 1, with two more to follow to 
complete the volume year. [^ 



50 YEARS AGO IN CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



Long Beach Public Library, Mrs. Theodora R. Brewitt, Lib'n. The 
library is cooperating with a local book store in giving radio book re- 
views each week. The store pays for the broadcasting as advertising and 
the book reviews are prepared by the library staff. One period a month 
will be designated as "library night" for any special library notices or 
for the reviewing of books which may not be in the book store. — 
January, 1926. 



Volume 71, No. 1, 1976 47 

Los Angeles Public Library, Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. With the new 
Central Library Building scheduled to open July first there is much to 
be done to forward the great change to a permanent home. The re- 
moval fi-om the last of the rented quarters of the Los Angeles Public 
Library will begin June fifteenth. With the exception of the junior 
members of the Registration and Loan Department it is expected that 
the efforts of the entire staff will be required to "settle" in the beautiful 
new building, to shift records, catalogs, files, etc., to the new furniture. 
The opening will be celebrated with appropriate dedicatory exercises 
and visitors will be shown through the building during the first week. 

The landscape contract has been awarded to the Beverly Hills Nurs- 
ery Company; the lighting contract given to Thomas Day Company; the 
sculpturing and interior decorating are progressing. The figures of 
Herodotus, Virgil, St. John and David are coming to life under the hands 
of the carvers and the Lee Lawrie sculptures promise great beauty. Mr. 
Julian Garnsey's colorful designs for the ceilings are taking shape, and 
have been approved by the Art Commission and the Library Board. His 
plan for the children's room includes a pictorial representation of 
scenes from Ivanhoe for the murals. It is hoped to have murals or 
tapestries later for the walls of the rotunda. — April, 1926. 

Pomona Public Library. Miss Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. With the first 
of the year the library has been trying out a slightly diff^erent publicity 
plan. Persons eligible to library membership but not now members are 
sent postcards which inform them that such-and-such a book has been 
received at the library, and that in the hope that it would interest the 
addressee the book is held for him till a given date. Of the persons so 
notified, ten percent have taken out memberships and drawn the books 
offered. 

The books selected for experiment have been fairly evenly divided 
among popular fiction, travel, and miscellaneous. Only one response 
has been received to an offer of fiction. 

The chief labor is in getting the names of prospects. The telephone 
directory has been used as a working list, as by the library rules, any 
telephone subscriber is entitled to library membership. There would 
thus be no chance that the prospect would be refused a card, when he 
came for the book. We realize that this trial is too short to be conclusive 
evidence for this form of publicity, but from the proportion responding 
to circulars in other fields, we know that a ten per cent response war- 
rants at least a further trial of the plan. — April, 1926. 

San Jose Free Public Library. Mrs. Edith Daley, Lib'n. Since the last 
issue of News Notes of California Libraries the San Jose Free Public 
Library has had added to its patronage, by the city's annexation of 
territory, about 10,000 persons. To date, in this addition, more than 400 



48 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

library applications have been made — the first one that of a 12-year-old 
boy, who said he was "glad to belong to the library!" 

Also, the library has instituted a "service with a heart." This service, 
to "Shut-ins," has the fine cooperation of the Board of Trustees, and is 
a direct from-library-to-home service of books and magazines for those 
who, by reason of age or infirmity, are unable to visit the library, and 
who have no one to send. There are now being served each Thursday 
more than fifty persons, and new names are on the list for investigation. 
The board has also started hospital service to the San Jose hospital, the 
only one within the city limits. This has been started with delivering to 
the hospital 100 volumes of books, including some juvenile, the hospital 
made responsible. These books are to be used as long as they will serve, 
then to be exchanged for others. It is hoped that this service will eventu- 
ally develop into one-day-a-week service with a library assistant in 
charge of a book wagon. The main thing was to make a beginning — and 
that has been done to the joy of the patients within the big hospital. 

January, 1926, has the record of the largest circulation in the history 
of the library — 17,804, an increase over January, 1925, of 2,086. — April, 
1926. 

Ukiah Free Public Library. Mrs. Mary L. Burrey, Lib'n. This year 
our library held another Wild Flower Show from the 29th to 31st of 
March. During the three days of the exhibit, over a thousand people 
attended and it was generally stated that the flowers were in greater 
abundance and of more beauty than in past years. In all, there were 
about two hundred varieties of flowers and plants shown. Each exhibit 
arranged its flowers to its own liking and this plan brought out many 
novel and beautiful arrangements. 

One of the largest exhibits was that of the Ukiah High School, ar- 
ranged by the teacher of Botany. The entire table was covered with 
sand, and, planted in this were the flowers with a cottage and garden 
in the foreground, the orchard, the fields of grain, and in the back- 
ground were the hills. In this display there were ninety-nine varieties 
of flowers and shrubs. 

The Boy Scout table was a collection of miniature camps in a Red- 
wood grove. This, together with a large variety of pressed leaves of 
every kind of tree obtainable in this section of the country, made a very 
impressive showing. — April, 1926. \^ 



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BIBLIOTECA 
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fJews Notes of 



V. 71, no. 2, 1976 



California Libraries 

i Official Journal of the California State Library 
i Ethel S. Crockett, State Librarian 



News Notes of 



California Libraries 



V. 71, no. 2, 1976 



2 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

ISSN 0028-9248 

News Notes of California Libraries 

Official Journal of the California State Library 

California State Library ^ 

Library and Courts Building 
P. O. Box 2037 
Sacramento, CA 95809 

Mrs. Ethel S. Crockett, State Librarian 

Edited by Collin Clark, Information Manager 
Library Development Services Bureau 

Indexed in: Library & Information Science Abstracts; 

Library Literature. 
News Notes of California Libraries is available on microfilm from Xerox 

University Microfilms. 
Second class postage paid at Sacramento, California. 



Price $2.50 

Available at single copy price of $2.50, or on annual subscription of one 

volume year, three issues, with California Library Statistics and 

Directory, for $14.00. 
Make remittance payable to California State Department of Education. 

California residents add 6 percent sales tax. 

Order from: California State Department of Education 
Publications Sales 
P. O. Box 271 
Sacramento, CA 95802 



ON THE COVER: A collage of logos and mastheads from California's 
Public Library Systems and LSCA projects. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 



SPECIAL ISSUE: LSCA in California 

9 Foreword, by Ethel S. Crockett 
10 Introduction, by Ruth Kierstead 
13 LSCA Projects, 1957-1976 

1. Butte County Library Project 

2. Amador County and Stockton-San Joaquin County Library 
Project. 

3. Lassen and Plumas — Sierra County Libraries Project. 

4. Central Processing Center at State Library. 

5. Santa Barbara County Project. 

6. San Diego County Project. 

7. North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

8. San Joaquin Valley Reference Project, (name changed to San 
Joaquin Valley Information Service in 1961). 

9. Scholarship Grants and Graduate Study Grants. 

10. Mendocino County Library Project. 

11. Calaveras County Library Project. 

12. Tuolumne County Library Project. 

13. Northern California Survey, Public Library Services in Northern 
California by Public Administration Service. 

14. Oakland Public Library's Latin American Library. 

15. Statewide Survey, Public Library Service Equal to the Challenge 
of California by Lowell A. Martin and Roberta Bowler. 

16. Los Angeles Public Library, Demonstration of Library Service to 
Shut-Ins. 

17. Los Angeles Public Library, Demonstration of Library Service to 
the Culturally Deprived. 

18. Monterey Bay Area Information Service. 

19. San Mateo County Library Demonstration of Service to Young 
Adults. 

20. Multi-Library Cooperative Systems Demonstration. 

21. Stockton Public Library Book Grant. 

22. Summer Internship Program. 

23. State Library Survey, Study of the Evaluation of the Feasibility of 
Mechanization in the California State Library, by Robert M. 
Hayes. 

24. Scholarships for American Library Association Library, USA — 
Information Center, U.S. Pavilion at the New York World's Fair, 
1965. 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

25. North Sacramento Valley Cooperative Library System Planning. 

26. Alpine County Library Bookmobile Demonstration with County 
of El Dorado. 

27. Implementation of the Study and Evaluation of the Feasibility of 
Mechanization in the State Library. 

28. Black Gold Cooperative Library System, Reference Service 
Project. 

29. East Bay Cooperative Library System, Enrichment of Existing 
Services in Special Collections and Foreign Language Collections. 

30. 49-99 Cooperative Library System, Library Recordings Project. 

31. Inland Library System, Reference and Audio- Visual Center 
Project. 

32. San Gabriel Valley Library System, (name changed to Metropoli- 
tan Cooperative Library System in 1968) . Local and Subject Cen- 
ter Project. 

33. Mother Lode Library System, Centralized Reference Service 
Project, (now the Mountain Valley Library System) . 

34. North Bay Cooperative Library System, Reference Service 
Project, (coordinated joint program with San Francisco Public 
Library) . 

35. North Bay Cooperative Library System, Young Adult Service for 
Small Town and Rural Youth. 

36. San Francisco Public Library, Bay Area Reference Referral Serv- 
ices Project (BARC), originally submitted as a joint project with 
North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

37. San Joaquin Valley Library System, Service to the Rural Disadvan- 
taged, (Biblioteca Ambulante). 

38. Santa Clara Valley Library System and San Jose / Santa Clara / Sun- 
nyvale Cooperative Library System, Cooperative Young Adult 
Services Project (YAP). 

39. California Library Association, Library Careers Project. 

40. 49-99 Cooperative Library System, Demonstration of Foreign 
Language Books. 

41. Lassen County — Washoe County, Nevada, Interstate Coopera- 
tion. 

42. Los Angeles County Library, Way Out Project. 

43. North Sacramento Valley Cooperative Library System, (now the 
North State Cooperative Library System) . 

44. Richmond Public Library, Service Center Project. 

45. Sacramento City-County Library System and Mother Lode Li- 
brary System, Information and Communications Project. 

46. San Mateo County Library System, Library Service to East Palo 
Alto. 

47. Serra Library System, Enrichment of Existing Program and Dem- 
onstration of New Systemwide Program. 

48. Metropolitan Cooperative Library System, Total Community Li- 
brary Service, including Planning Survey (Serving the Economic 
Community) . 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 5 

Fresno County Library, Extension of Service to Business and In- 
dustry. 

Auburn-Placer County Library, Nevada County Library Demon- 
stration. 

California Rehabilitation Center, Corona, Expansion of Library 
Services — Music Appreciation Center. 

California Men's Colony, East and West Facilities, Department of 
Corrections, Inmate Library Developmental Program for Recrea- 
tional Reading. 

Correctional Training Facilities, Central and North at Soledad, 
Upgrading Quantity and Quality of Available Recreational Li- 
brary Material. 

Metropolitan State Hospital, Norwalk, Patients' Library In-depth 
Collection. 

Agnews State Hospital, Bibliotherapy Program. 
Santa Rosa-Sonoma County Library and Los Guilucos School 
Bookmobile Service Leading to Establishment of Permanent Li- 
brary. 

California Conservation Center Library — Department of Correc- 
tions, Expanded Library Service to Conservation Camps (Susan- 
ville) . 

Atascadero State Hospital Library, Reciprocal Cooperative Pro- 
gram. 

49-99 Cooperative Library System, Library Services to the Blind 
and Physically Handicapped, Large Print Library Materials. 
Black Gold Cooperative Library System, Reference Center Serv- 
ices (TIE). 

Los Angeles Public Library, Southern California Extended Refer- 
ence Project (SCAN). 

Mountain Valley Library System, Information and Communica- 
tions Network. 

Serra Library System, Systemwide Reference Center Services. 
Eureka Public Library, North Coast Libraries Project. 
49-99 Cooperative Library System, Network of Periodicals. 
San Francisco Public Library, South of Market Area Library Serv- 
ices Demonstration. 
Lake County Demonstration Project. 
49-99 Cooperative Library System, Project Outreach. 
Graduate Library Education Grant. 

Long Beach Public Library, Enrichment Program — Service to 
Disadvantaged. 

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) 
and California State Library Service to Industry (CSLSI) Intern 
Study Grant. 

California Men's Colony, East Facility, Department of Correc- 
tions, Attaining Standards Recommended by Library Manual, De- 
partment of Corrections. 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

73. California Rehabilitation Center, Corona, Department of Correc- 
tions, Program for Vocational Information and Motivation Serv- 
ices. 

74. Berkeley-Oakland Service System (BOSS) , Strengthening the Re- 
gional Reference Network. 

75. Black Gold Cooperative Library System, Outreach Project. 

76. 49-99 Cooperative Library System, Central Association of Librar- 
ies Network (CAL) . 

77. Los Angeles Public Library, Service to the "Unserved" (Out- 
reach). 

78. North State Cooperative Library System, Interlibrary Coopera- 
tion. 

79. Peninsula Library System, Services to Institutions and Individuals 
Confined in Private Homes and Book-Power Bus. 

80. San Luis Obispo County Library, Service to the Rural Economi- 
cally Disadvantaged Mexican-American in San Luis Obispo 
County. 

81. Santa Barbara Public Library, Service to the Handicapped Chil- 
dren. 

82. Santiago Library System, Outreach Program. 

83. Serra Cooperative Library System, California-Arizona Interstate 
Cooperation. 

84. Serra Cooperative Library System, "Que Sera" Project. 

85. Berkeley-Oakland Service System (BOSS) Operation Outreach. 

86. Camino Real and Santa Clara Valley Library Systems, Service to 
Senior Adults, Shut-Ins and the Handicapped (SOS) . 

87. Pacific State Hospital, Patients' Library, Listening Center for the 
Mentally Retarded. 

88. Camino Real Library System and Santa Clara Valley Library Sys- 
tem, (now South Bay Cooperative Library System), South Bay 
Area Reference Network (SBARN) . 

89. East Bay Cooperative Library System and Oakland Public Li- 
brary, East Bay Information Service (EBIS). 

90. 49-99 Cooperative Library System, Reference Resources Net- 
work, (now called Interlibrary Cooperation Reference Network) . 

91. Inland Library System, Reference Project and SIRCULS Inter- 
type Library Network. 

92. North State Cooperative Library System, Reference Network Ex- 
tension Services. 

93. Peninsula Library System, Reference Project. 

94. San Joaquin Valley Library System /Area Wide Library Network 
(AWLNET) Demonstration Project. 

95. Santiago Library System, Libraries of Orange County Network 
(LOCNET) Reference Network. 

96. California Rehabilitation Center, Corona, Women's Unit, Audio 
Media Center. 

97. California Men's Colony Inmate Library, East and West Facilities 
(San Luis Obispo) Cultural Enrichment Program. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 7 

98. Santa Clara County Library, Bibliotherapy Project. 

99. Correctional Training Facilities, Central and North At Soledad, 
Recreational Reading. 

LOO. Metropolitan State Hospital, Norwalk, Department of Mental Hy- 
giene, Special Interests of the Mentally 111. 

LOl. Monterey Bay Area Cooperative Library System, Outreach Pro- 
gram. 

L02. Santiago Library System, Service to Physically Handicapped. 

103. East Bay Cooperative Library System, Outreach, Union City Li- 
brary Branch of Alameda County. 

L04. Metropolitan Cooperative Library System, Cooperative Acquisi- 
tions and Retention — an Intertype Library Project. 

105. Metropolitan Cooperative Library System, Service to the 
Economically Disadvantaged. 

L06. Richmond Public Library, Mobile Outreach Project (MOP) . 

L07. Deuel Vocational Institution Central Library, Department of Cor- 
rections, Sub-Library Educational Service. 

108. Mendocino State Hospital, Department of Mental Hygiene, 
American Indian Alcoholism and Drug Addiction Information 
Center. 

L09. North State Cooperative Library System, Project LISTEN-IN 
Outreach. 

110. San Francisco Public Library, Early Childhood Education. 

111. San Joaquin Valley Library System, Services to Handicapped, 
Shut-Ins and Aging (Extra Hands). 

112. Yuba County Library Demonstration, (Bi-County Bookmobile 
Project) . 

113. Camino Real and Santa Clara Valley Library System, (Later the 
South Bay Cooperative Library System), Cooperative Informa- 
tion Network (CIN). 

L14. Camino Real and Santa Clara Valley Library Systems, (later the 
South Bay Cooperative Library System) , Reading for Everyone — 
to Achieve and Develop (READ). 

L15. Monterey Bay Area Cooperative Library System, Reference 
Project. 

116. Peninsula Library System, Library Services to the Spanish-Speak- 
ing. 

117. Fred C. Nelles School for Boys, California Youth Authority, Inde- 
pendent Study Center. 

118. Mountain Valley Library System, Interlibrary Cooperation. 

1 19. San Joaquin Valley Library System, Union Serials List. 

120. Serra Library System, Communication among All Types of Librar- 
ies. 

121. Monterey Bay Area Cooperative Library System, Interlibrary Co- 
operative Project. 

122. Inland Library System, ORIFLAMME (Older Residents Involved 
from Library Activity in Mass Media Experiment) . 

123. Santiago Library System, Libraries of Orange County Network 
(LOCNET). 



8 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

124. California Men's Colony, Department of Corrections, San Luis 
Obispo, System Possibilities for CDC Libraries. 

125. Correctional Training Facility, Soledad, Library Committee Ex- 
pansion Program. 

126. Karl Holton School, California Youth Authority, Stockton, State- 
wide Planning Conference and Implementation of Inter-library 
Cooperation. 

127. Kern County Library, Public Access Center. 

128. Los Angeles Public Library, SCILL (Southern California Inter- 
library Loan). 

129. Napa City-County Public Library, Napa County Local History 
Index. 

130. San Joaquin Valley Library System, Service to Urban Bilingual, 
Bicultural Disadvantaged. 

131. Agnews State Hospital, Expansion of Library Services to the Men- 
tally Retarded. 

132. California Conservation Center, Department of Corrections, Su- 
sanville. Library Project. 

133. California Institution for Men, Department of Corrections, Pro- 
gram A and RC-West (Reception Center) Music Appreciation 
Center, Chino. 

134. Karl Holton School, California Youth Authority, Stockton, Library 
Project. 

135. Oak Glen Youth Conservation Camp, California Youth Authority, 
Yucaipa. 

136. Patton State Hospital, Department of Health, Patton Educational 
and Recreational Center. 

137. Ventura County Library — Ventura School, California Youth Au- 
thority, Create Youth Awareness of Library Services. 

138. Los Angeles County Library, Audio-visual Services to Institutional 
Libraries. 

139. Minority Recruitment Training Program. 

140. California Public Library Systems, A Comprehensive Review with 
Guidelines for the Next Decade, by Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. 

89 Examplary Projects 

105 Reference and Networking, by Cy Silver 

110 LSCA Title I Funds, 1976 

112 State Library Appropriations, 1977 

114 Index to Project Numbers 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 



Foreword 

by Ethel S. Crockett, California State Librarian 

The Library Services and Construction Act has encouraged the develop- 
ment of numerous library programs in California. With its support, librari- 
ans have tested a variety of imaginative concepts and have demonstrated 
the merits of worthy but untried plans of service. Many good projects 
which began with the help of the Library Services and Construction Act 
continued to flourish with local support, thus attesting to the value of 
experimentation. A few have fallen by the wayside. The State Library staff 
and I share the belief with many citizens and librarians that the experi- 
ences gained in California should be recounted for all. 

Ruth Kierstead has prepared this history of the Library Services and 
Construction Act in California. Project plans and strategies are described 
for the guidance of all who continue to plan projects f6r ever better library 
service. She was assisted by consultants from the Library Development 
Services Bureau of the State Library and by librarians whose projects are 
reported. The result is a synthesis which reflects the "State Library" view 
of what has happened. 

I hope that everyone seeking to develop new programs will find the 
experiences described in this publication enlightening. |^ 



10 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Introduction 

by Ruth Kierstead, State Library Consultant 



This report is to provide to California a summary of California's learning 
experience with the Library Services and Construction Act, since its be- 
ginning as the Library Services Act in 1956, and its continuation as the 
Library Services and Construction Act. Since the purpose of the report is 
to offer useful guidance for future planning and activities, it includes both 
a comprehensive summary catalog of all projects funded through June 
1976, and a selective critical discussion of projects of various types. 

Development of LSCA 

The development of the Acts in California has been described in News 
Notes of California Libraries, and this section summarizes those important 
facts. Starting with the end of World War II, ten years of national effort 
on the part of librarians, trustees and interested citizens went into the 
promotion of federal legislation that would make possible demonstrations 
of good library service. Congress passed the Library Services Act in 1956, 
providing federal grants to aid states in serving the estimated twenty- 
seven (27) million rural residents without access to local library services, 
and the five and a half {^Vi) million others to whom services were inade- 
quate. The Act authorized $7,500,000 annually for five years. All federal 
funds were to be matched by the states on a sliding scale according to the 
state's economic ability to pay. The Act was intended to stimulate both 
state and local governments to provide adequate library service. In Cali- 
fornia, the California State Department of Education was designated as 
the state agency to accept, receive and administer the funds, with adminis- 
tration and supervision of the state plan designated to the California State 
Library. 

The State Librarian, and staff, and a representative committee of librari- 
ans met to develop a set of principles, and they discussed methods for the 
development and operation of demonstrations. Guidelines and standards 
were suggested by the committee, with a first priority to establish service 
where none existed. Six counties out of California's 58 lacked a county 
library. The goal was to make sure that no citizen living anywhere in 
California would be without access to a county library. Localities were 
invited to submit proposals to the State Library for local demonstrations. 
The total planning framework covered the five years of the Library Serv- 
ices Act demonstration period. Areas would be selected for demonstra- 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 11 

tions that showed the greatest official and citizen interest, offering assur- 
ance of wiUingness to assume local financial support when the funding 
ended. 

In October 1956 Congress allocated $40,000, not the expected $240,000, 
to each state. After proposals for bookmobile service, childrens' librarians 
and a central processing center for the state had poured in, the State 
Library concluded that a plan providing for a variety of types of demon- 
strations would be preferable to one providing for a single type. The 
Cahfornia State Library submitted its plan to Washington in March 1957, 
and it was approved. The plan included a statement that certain parts of 
California's program would be carried out by county libraries, since they 
were under the general supervision of the State Librarian. The plan de- 
scribed four types of activities and services: extension of service through 
bookmobiles; establishment of a service center for technical processing; 
enrichment of existing services; and encouragement of establishment of 
libraries in unserved areas. The plan concluded with the statement that 
the entire rural area of California was inadequately served, according to 
the State's criteria. 



California's use of LSA/LSCA funds 

California's first Library Services Act project was a successful bookmo- 
bile demonstration in Butte County. This was followed by planning for and 
execution of many project types including: contracts between counties for 
improved services; a processing center at the State Library; reference 
demonstrations; countywide demonstrations; and a multi-county system 
demonstration. 

As the Library Services Act was expanded into the Library Services and 
Construction Act in 1964, California continued its past programs for rural 
areas and introduced a variety of additional programs to benefit both rural 
and urban areas. Metropolitan areas, which had not been able to partici- 
pate in the LSA program, which was restricted to rural populations under 
10,000, could now participate in local projects. Of particular significance 
in 1964 was the LSCA-funded Statewide Survey, under the direction of Dr. 
Lowell A. Martin. Its major topics were an appraisal of the adequacy and 
problems of public library services; the role of the State Library in the total 
provision of good library service statewide; and relations of public libraries 
to schools, colleges, and research library facilities. The report was pub- 
lished in the fall of 1965, and it assisted in guiding the use of state and 
federal funds. 

California's use of federal funds under the Act is expressed in its Basic 
State Plan, Long Range Program and Annual Program. These documents 
assure that grants for demonstration projects will be made to California's 
public library systems, local public libraries, state-supported institutions, 
all libraries serving the physically handicapped, and the State Library for 
statewide programs. Projects have been funded to demonstrate the feasi- 
bility of: building on cooperative library systems to include networks; 



12 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

standard library services; and special kinds of library services. Particular 
pride is taken in that, as a result of LSCA funds, all counties in California 
now have some form of countywide library service. 

This report 

California has had over 140 LSCA projects, of several types. This report 
will list all of them in chronological order, with a brief summary of each. 
For an example or two of each type, an evaluative summary is provided 
in greater detail. For the latter group the choices are selective, and not 
surprisingly they reinforce the key factors for success in any project: com- 
munity involvement from the beginning of planning onwards; public rela- 
tions; and quality project staffing. These are indexed by subject and by 
grantee. Some documentation for the demonstrations described is in Cali- 
fornia State Library files, such as manuals, procedures and planning docu- 
ments, contracts and publicity, and is available. 

Appreciation is expressed for the invaluable assistance and cooperation 
of State Library staff, and especially those of the Federal and State Pro- 
grams Office and the Library Development Services Bureau, in preparing 
this report. The encouragement of the State Advisory Council on Libraries 
must also be acknowledged. All grantees have had an opportunity to 
comment on how successful they believe the particular project or projects 
granted to their library or system have been. Although their views have 
been incorporated throughout, this report is, of course, the responsibility 
of the State Library. 

In the last analysis it is not our effort but that of the dedicated citizens 
and librarians throughout California which is described here. {^ 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 13 

LSCA Projects, 1957-1976 
1. Butte County Library Project. 

TYPE Bookmobile demonstration. 

DATES 1957-59. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $89,717. 

SUMMARY Quality service was brought to unserved residents in a rural 
area through use of a well-stocked bookmobile staffed with a professional 
librarian. The demonstration was approved by the Supervisors after only 
six months, and funding for continuation of the service was included in the 
county library budget. The demonstration enabled the Butte County Li- 
brary to phase out expensive library stations in very small communities 
which were inadequately staffed. From 1958 to 1975, when the bookmo- 
bile was finally replaced, the bookmobile's average circulation was 50,000 
per year. Many non-readers became library patrons through the bookmo- 
bile and continued on as library users of the county library branches. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



2. Amador County and Stockton-San Joaquin 
County Library Project. 

TYPE Contract with neighboring county library for improved services. 

DATES 1957-59. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $20,000. 

SUMMARY A study-demonstration to revitalize library service in a 
mountain county with low tax and population base, through contract with 
a valley county library, resulted in proposal adoption by the Supervisors, 
appointment of the project librarian as Amador County Librarian, and 
continuation of the contract with the Stockton-San Joaquin County Li- 
brary for reciprocal and improved services. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



14 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

3. Lassen and Plumas — Sierra County Libraries 
Project. 

TYPE Contract with professional librarian to serve two rural counties. 

DATES 1957-59. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $15,001. 

SUMMARY Library materials, a station wagon and cataloging personnel 
were obtained to give improved cooperative library service under the 
direction of a professional librarian. At the end of the demonstration 
period a cooperative library program was assumed by the local jurisdic- 
tions. 

The Demonstration WORKED and the project was ADOPTED, but it did 
not really succeed for many years because of differences, including those 
of tax base and population in Lassen and Plumas Counties. In the 1960's 
the Lassen County Librarian determined that those people in Plumas 
County living in Chester, Lake Almanor and Canyon Dam, could have full 
privileges and hold cards in Lassen County. This decision resulted in many 
patrons from those areas using the Lassen County Library. 



4. Central Processing Center at State Library. 

TYPE Processing Center demonstration. 

DATES 1957-61. YEARS 4. AMOUNT $219,408 

SUMMARY Ordering, cataloging and processing books /library materi- 
als was begun for member libraries and continued as a partially self- 
supporting unit. The resultant freeing of staff time in member libraries 
contributed to their ability to enrich readers' services. 

It WORKED, and contracted on a partially self-supporting basis until 1974, 
at which time computerized commercial vendors became able to provide 
more cost-effective service. 



5. Santa Barbara County Project 

TYPE Reference demonstration. 

DATES 1957-59. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $39,989. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 15 

SUMMARY Strengthened reference services were provided to residents 
of Santa Barbara County through a contract with the Santa Barbara City 
Library, and a pilot regional center was developed in Lompoc to serve the 
area. Although there was a moderate circulation in reference materials, 
the center itself was impractical because the small service population did 
not offer economies of scale. However, the experience led to the concept 
of the Black Gold Information Center, which successfully served all librar- 
ies in the area (see #28 below). 

It WORKED in that it was a successful part of evolution toward sophisti- 
cated network operation existent today, (see TIE, Total Information Net- 
work, #60 below). The network accesses and services public libraries in 
a five-county area and almost 100 non-public library system affiliates. 



6. San Diego County Project. 

TYPE Bookmobile demonstration. 

DATES 1959-61. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $99,802. 

SUMMARY Modern regional library service was brought to an explod- 
ing population north county area, largely unserved, through a quality 
bookmobile demonstration. Supervisors voted to continue the program, 
and transfer of bookmobile and library materials was made to the County. 
The bookmobile was later replaced, and service has continued to this area. 
A number of locations once served by this bookmobile are now served by 
branch Hbraries. The project was successful in reaching an unserved area. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



7. North Bay Cooperative Library System. 

TYPE Multi-jurisdictional system demonstration. 

DATES 1959-67. YEARS 8. AMOUNT $525,581. 

SUMMARY Interlibrary cooperation for programs and services was suc- 
cessfully demonstrated in a five-county area, and the system continued to 
demonstrate methods of cooperation among a group of independent li- 



16 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

braries working together. It served as a model for the later development 
of other multi-jurisdictional cooperative library systems. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



8. San Joaquin Valley Reference Project, (name 
changed to San Joaquin Valley Information Service 
in 1961). 

TYPE Reference demonstration. 

DATES 1959-63. YEARS 4. AMOUNT $144,999. 

SUMMARY Headquartered in the Fresno County Library, enriched ref- 
erence service was established with close and rapid communication 
throughout San Joaquin Valley counties, with in-service training, addition- 
al reference materials and a broad public relations program. The informa- 
tion service and an exemplary reference coorrespondence course have 
continued, sustained by local membership fees. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



9. Scholarship Grants and Graduate Study Grants. 

TYPE Recruitment. 

DATES 1959-62, 1964-66. YEARS 5. AMOUNT $43,500. 

SUMMARY The Scholarship program awarded thirteen scholarships in 
the fiscal years of 1959 through 1962. Five award winners went into rural 
library work, three in supervisory positions: one became a Branch Librar- 
ian in the Santa Clara County Library; one a Branch Librarian in the 
Contra Costa County Library; and the third a Bookmobile Librarian in the 
Fresno County Library. Of the other two, one was in the Childrens' Serv- 
ices in the San Bernardino County Library, and the other was in the 
Reference Division of the Orange County Library. Four of the remaining 
eight did not complete their contracts: two dropped out of school; and two 
completed school but left California. Each of these students received 
$2,000. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 17 

The Graduate Study program in 1964 through 1966 awarded $2,500 to 
seven students, and six of these worked in California public libraries. It was 
decided to consider an internship program in the future, whose objective 
would be to give young people first-hand experience with library work, 
(see #22 below). 

The project was about 50% successful. 



10. Mendocino County Library Project. 

TYPE Establishment of county library service. 

DATES 1962-65. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $235,000. 

SUMMARY The demonstration verified the need for and value of 
county library service where none existed in a depressed county of 51,000 
population and 3,500 square miles. Two bookmobiles, professional staff, 
intense public relations, a large collection of the best in library materials 
and grass root involvement in addition to county election results con- 
vinced the County Board of Supervisors to establish a county library in 
1964. Membership in North Bay Cooperative Library System brought 
additional services. (See also detailed summary of this project, page 90). 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



11. Calaveras County Library Project. 

TYPE Contract with neighboring county library for improved services. 

DATES 1964-66. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $30,000. 

SUMMARY Enriched services for a small rural county were obtained 
through a contract with Stockton-San Joaquin County Library, making 
available Stockton's entire resources. The contractual arrangement con- 
tinued after project completion. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



18 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

12. Tuolumne County Library Project. 

TYPE Contract with neighboring county library for improved services. 
DATES 1964-66. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $30,000. 
SUMMARY Same as Calaveras County Library, above. 
It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



13. Northern California Survey, Public Library Serv- 
ices in Northern California by Public Administration 
Service. 

DATES 1964-66. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $50,000. 

SUMMARY Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Modoc, Plumas, Shasta, Siskiyou, Sut- 
ter, Tehama, Trinity Counties and the City of Marysville were surveyed 
to determine the extent of library services and available resources. Ways 
to improve services in the area and Sierra County were recommended. 
The Survey was the deciding factor in obtaining the necessary agreements 
for establishing the North State Cooperative Library System, (see #25 
below) . Additionally the Survey proved to be a useful source of informa- 
tion during system formation. Modoc County joined the North State Sys- 
tem and felt that its services had improved. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 

COMMENT: The survey contained invaluable material instrumental in 
obtaining Siskiyou County's new library building and in the formation of 
the library system. 



14. Oakland Public Library's Latin American Li- 
brary. 

TYPE Outreach to ethnic minorities. 

DATES 1965-74. YEARS 9. AMOUNT $721,080. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 19 

SUMMARY This demonstrated what a pubhc hbrary could do for its 
Chicano community through techniques such as involvement of citizen 
advisory committees, community aides and a bilingual staff which par- 
ticipated in community organizations. This demonstration of service to 
this Mexican-American community together with an extensive bilingual 
collection of books, periodicals, films, records and a bookmobile which 
extends service to Spanish-speaking neighborhoods, classes and groups, 
became nationally known for its pioneering programs in this area. In 
addition, scholarship funds were provided for two bilingual, bicultural 
students to earn MLS degrees. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 

COMMENT: The Latin American Library is now located in an attract- 
ive, multi-agency building which was constructed by the Spanish Speaking 
Unity Council to serve the Fruitvale Community and the Spanish-speak- 
ing. It was built with Ford Foundation and EDA funds. Business is flourish- 
ing; circulation has doubled since this move to a convenient and accessible 
branch. 



15. Statewide Survey, Public Library Service Equal 
to the Challenge of California by Lowell A. Martin 
and Roberta Bowler. 

DATES 1964-65. YEARS 1. AMOUNT $16,700. 

SUMMARY The purpose of the Survey was to devise a program for 
library service built upon the existing libraries in California, leading to a 
coordinated statewide program, and to study the role of the State Library 
in the provision of good library service statewide, and relations of public 
libraries to schools, colleges and research libraries' facilities. Results were 
the establishment of patterns for the growth and development of Califor- 
nia's cooperative public library programs and of goals for higher levels of 
library service among all types of libraries, in order to create a statewide 
library network. Discussion workshops on the Survey were widely held for 
librarians, trustees, officials and Friends. The Survey's impact was critical 
in providing guidance for implementing the Public Library Services Act 
of 1963. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



20 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

16. Los Angeles Public Library, Demonstration of 
Library Service to Shut-Ins. 

TYPE Outreach to shut-ins, aging and physically handicapped. 

DATES 1964-74. YEARS 10. AMOUNT $984,620. 

SUMMARY A program designed to reach those physically unable to use 
the services of the library and concentrating on those children and adults 
confined to their living quarters was put into operation. Despite contacts 
with local organizations, problems were encountered in locating those 
who could be served. The program limped along until 1969 with mediocre 
results. For fiscal purposes it was then combined with the Library's Dem- 
onstration of Library Service to the Culturally Deprived, (see #17 below) . 
In 1969, under supervision of a Coordinator, the Shut-In program finally 
succeeded in reaching those in homes and institutions through contact by 
community aides and trained volunteers, who used a one-to-one approach. 
The service has been continued as a volunteer program, directed by a 
Senior Librarian on the staff. Stafi^ members serving the culturally de- 
prived and shut-ins have continued the nontraditional planning and in- 
novative projects successfully. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



17. Los Angeles Public Library, Demonstration of 
Library Service to the Culturally Deprived. 

TYPE Outreach to ethnic minorities (Lincoln Heights, Venice and 

Watts) . 

DATES 1964-68. YEARS 4. AMOUNT $888,836. 

SUMMARY Good library service was demonstrated in three areas of Los 
Angeles which are culturally and economically deprived, and populated 
largely by blacks and Mexican-Americans, mostly non-library users. Dy- 
namic programs of community involvement and cultural activities, in 
addition to bilingual staffs and community aides, resulted in active partici- 
pation by the residents. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 21 

18. Monterey Bay Area Information Service. 

TYPE Reference demonstration. 

DATES 1964-68. YEARS 4. AMOUNT $94,302. 

SUMMARY Dissatisfaction with limited available reference service led 
to a demonstration to enrich reference facilities and services in Monterey 
County and the cities of Carmel, Monterey, Pacific Grove and Salinas, in 
the project known as SEARCH (Service for Everyone in an Areawide 
Reference Center designed to Help you find information) . With no coor- 
dinated planning or programming and no in-service training for reference 
staffs, the demonstration ended with little but augmented reference col- 
lections in the individual libraries. 

It did NOT work. 



19. San Mateo County Library Demonstration of 
Service to Young Adults. 

TYPE Outreach to young adults. 

DATES 1964-67. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $62,303. 

SUMMARY The value of a library program designated for the young 
adult population in a large part of San Mateo County was demonstrated 
by providing a professional librarian, with special training in working with 
young adults, who arranged programs, activities and meetings, and organ- 
ized the selection of materials. San Mateo County Library assumed financ- 
ing for the program as part of its regular services, and the library 
continued a formal Young Adult Department from 1968-1971. The Young 
Adult Coordinator did book selection, programming, training, worked in 
branches, made booklists and bibliographies. From 1971 on, the Coordina- 
tor gradually assumed other duties and, today, there is no formal Young 
Adult Department. Services designed to appeal to young adults are con- 
tinuing; these include paperback racks; displays; small, changing book 
collections; popular record collections, and film programming. 

It WORKED moderately well and was ADOPTED. 



22 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

20. Multi-Library Cooperative Systems Demonstra- 
tion. 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1964-66. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $589,632. 

SUMMARY The then seven multi-library cooperative systems, formed 
since 1963 under the Public Library Services Act, demonstrated improved 
library services. These were: Black Gold Cooperative Library System; East 
Bay Cooperative Library System; North Bay Cooperative Library System; 
San Joaquin Valley Library System; San Jose-Santa Clara-Sunnyvale Coop- 
erative Library System; Santa Clara Valley Library System and Serra Li- 
brary System. Attention was focused on centralization of acquisitions and 
cataloging, transportation and communication. Coordinated projects sup- 
plied additional services. Political barriers to library service were eliminat- 
ed. 

It WORKED and was continued. 



21. Stockton Public Library Book Grant. 

TYPE Book grant. 

DATES 1964-65. YEARS 1. AMOUNT $10,000. 

SUMMARY The adult and reference book collections in the Stockton- 
San Joaquin County Library were strengthened, thus offering improved 
library service to Calaveras and Tuolumne Counties through existing con- 
tracts. Approximately 2,500 books were added. 

It WORKED. 



22. Summer Internship Program. 

TYPE Recruitment. 

DATES 1964-72. YEARS 8. AMOUNT $29,940. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 23 

SUMMARY More than 100 college undergraduates, potential recruits to 
the library profession, participated in the program whose purpose was to 
give supervised work experience on a pre-professional level. Systems and 
member libraries introduced the interns to the whole range of library 
activities, employing them for two summer months. Half salaries were 
paid by the system and half by LSCA funds. This was a popular program 
and resulted in many interns confirming their interest in library work, as 
expressed in their written evaluations. Participating libraries accom- 
plished delayed projects, and many supervisors were enthusiastic about 
the intelligent, eager prospective librarians temporarily on their staffs. Of 
these 100 plus interns, 17 expressed an intention of becoming librarians, 
27 stated they would consider, and the remainder were uncertain. The 
combination of new recruits to librarianship and the completion of many 
local library programs made this a fairly successful project. A Minority 
Recruitment program replaced this project in 1973, (see #139 below). 

It WORKED, and it is known that approximately 20 did continue their 
education and received M.L.S. degrees, returning to work in California 
public libraries sometime from the end of this project in 1972 to the 
present. 



23. State Library Survey, Study of the Evaluation of 
the Feasibility of Mechanization in the California 
State Library, by Robert M. Hayes 

DATES 1965-66. YEARS 1. AMOUNT $52,000. 

SUMMARY Automation and mechanization as related to all appropriate 
State Library processes were studied in order to determine the feasibility 
of mechanization.The Study demonstrated that a computer-assisted sys- 
tem was feasible for aspects of the Processing Center at the California 
State Library, (see #27 below). 

It was helpful principally in providing analysis which was used to develop 
the set of programs currently producing the California Union List of 
Periodicals. 



24 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

24. Scholarships for American Library Association 
Library, USA — Information Center, U.S. Pavilion at 
the New York World's Fair, 1965. 

TYPE Scholarships. 

DATES 1965-66. YEARS 1. AMOUNT $2,000. 

SUMMARY Two scholarships were awarded to two professional librari- 
ans employed in California public libraries to receive training and work 
experience in the computer-equipped reference library, sponsored by the 
American Library Association, the Special Libraries Association and the 
American Documentation Institute. The librarians had a unique experi- 
ence, that of working in a program demonstrating superior library service 
to visitors at the Fair. 

It WORKED. 



25. North Sacramento Valley Cooperative Library 
System Planning. 

TYPE Multi-county system demonstration. 

DATES 1966-68. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $37,150. 

SUMMARY Recommendations of the survey, Public Library Services in 
Northern California, (see #13 above) , were implemented through devel- 
opment of a plan of service for the establishment of a library system, now 
known as the North State Cooperative Library System. The participating 
libraries cooperated in book selection and specialization and compilation 
of union lists of periodicals and newspapers. Governmental bodies of the 
various jurisdictions discussed and agreed to system formation under the 
Public Library Services Act. Modoc County purchased some greatly need- 
ed reference titles and used the union lists frequently in their interlibrary 
loan procedures. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 

COMMENT: Although Siskiyou County was not a member at this time, 
North Sacramento Valley Cooperative Library System did result in the 
present system which is of extreme importance to this area. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 25 

26. Alpine County Library Bookmobile Demonstra- 
tion with County of El Dorado. 

TYPE Establishment of county library service. 

DATES 1966-73. YEARS 7. AMOUNT $53,940. 

SUMMARY Countywide library service in California's smallest county, 
mountainous and sparsely settled, demonstrated through a contractual 
agreement with its neighbor. El Dorado County, to provide materials, 
bookmobile and mail-order service, and a community library operating in 
Markleeville, Alpine County seat. The Supervisors established the Alpine 
County Library in 1970, membership was continued in the Mountain Val- 
ley Cooperative Library System, and supervision was given by the El 
Dorado County Librarian (later the Auburn-Placer County Librarian) , for 
advisory services. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 

COMMENTS: The Alpine County Library continues with three of the 
original five members of the Library Commission continuing to guide its 
progress. The first full-time professional librarian-in-charge was hired in 
1975. A station has been established in the elementary school in Bear 
Valley. The Alpine County demonstration was a great success. Today 
Alpine County has a library supported by the community and county 
government. The project introduced the county to library services, and it 
established a core around which the collection has developed. The library 
is a service and cultural center fully integrated into the community. 



27. Implementation of the Study and Evaluation of 
the Feasibility of Mechanization in the State Library. 

DATES 1966-^9. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $96,940. 

SUMMARY The Study had recommended that an automated center for 
cooperative cataloging and serials control be established at the California 
State Library. Although not directly implemented, the Study guided the 
State Library into automation efforts, including creation of the California 
Union List of Periodicals (CULP). (See #23 above.) 

It was helpful in providing background analysis and programming im- 
plementation activities. 



26 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

28. Black Gold Cooperative Library System, Refer- 
ence Service Project. 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1966-69. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $236,050. 

SUMMARY Based at the Santa Barbara Public Library, improved and 
enriched reference services were demonstrated for system members, in- 
cluding rapid communication, strengthened book collections, increased 
interlibrary loans, rapid delivery and reference referral. Cooperation with 
the Los Angeles Public Library in providing a higher level of reference 
service, (Southern California Answering Network, SCAN, see #61 be- 
low) , was an important part of the program, and the cooperation demon- 
strated the value of referral services beyond those resources immediately 
available to the individual library members. 

It WORKED and was CONTINUED. 



29. East Bay Cooperative Library System, Enrich- 
ment of Existing Services in Special Collections and 
Foreign Language Collections. 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1966-69. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $337,550. 

SUMMARY Resources of member libraries were strengthened and co- 
operative techniques developed, including rapid communication to make 
the augmented resources available throughout the system area. Libraries 
acquired foreign language materials to serve the many non-English-speak- 
ing persons in the communities. 

It WORKED. 

COMMENT: A collection to serve the special interests of people in busi- 
ness, industry and government was purchased with $70,000 of this grant. 
Alamenda County Library supplied the professional and support staff and 
services. The Business and Government Library opened in 1969, has been 
continually expanded and supported by Alameda County and is an estab- 
lished success. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 27 

30. 49-99 Cooperative Library System, Library Re- 
cordings Project. 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1966-69. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $88,200 

SUMMARY Phonograph recordings were selected under professional 
guidance and provided to member libraries, benefiting especially two 
sparsely populated mountain counties. A broad range of selections includ- 
ed music, drama, poetry, speeches and folk music. A reference collection 
of some 3,500 recordings was added to the Stockton-San Joaquin Library, 
and approximately 1,500 to each community library. These were received 
with expressed pleasure by patrons throughout the 49-99 service area. 

It WORKED. 



31. Inland Library System, Reference and Audio- Vis- 
ual Center Project. 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1966-69. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $137,500. 

SUMMARY Sparsely populated areas as well as the more heavily popu- 
lated areas in the system benefited from the Audio- Visual Center estab- 
lished and staffed professionally in the San Bernardino Public Library. The 
demonstration improved system reference service through rapid com- 
munication and delivery, and improved materials collections and profes- 
sional personnel. 

It WORKED. 



32. San Gabriel Valley Library System, (name 
changed to Metropolitan Cooperative Library Sys- 
tem in 1968) . Local and Subject Center Project. 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1966-76. YEARS 10. AMOUNT $898,300. 



28 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SUMMARY Improved and enriched reference services were demon- 
strated by providing stronger reference service at the local and reader 
subject center levels, for independent public libraries, in the urban area 
of Los Angeles County. The project has been enlarged to include service 
from an LSCA project, SCAN (Southern California Answering Network, 
see #61 below), for higher level reference service and participation in 
SCILL (Southern California Interlibrary Loan, see #128 below). The 
demonstration has resulted in larger materials collections, provision of 
system staff and development of rapid communication and delivery pat- 
terns. 

It WORKED and is CONTINUING. 

COMMENT: Successful exploration of on-line bibliographic searching 
has been possible the last year and a half through BALLOTS. Much of the 
service provide under the Cooperative Acquisition and Retention project, 
(see #104 below), is being continued with the aid of this project. 



33. Mother Lode Library System, Centralized Refer- 
ence Service Project, (now the Mountain Valley Li- 
brary System) . 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1966-69. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $41,275. 

SUMMARY To demonstrate a centralized reference service for libraries 
in two mountain counties and two independent city libraries, a Reference 
Center was established in the Placer County Library. Reference collec- 
tions in member libraries were strengthened and rapid communication 
and delivery established. A professional librarian served as consultant for 
the system area. The Reference Center retained its responsibility when 
Placer County consolidated with Auburn Public Library, and the Mother 
Lode System joined Mountain Valley Library System, (see #62 below). 

It WORKED and was CONTINUED. 

COMMENT: All Mother Lode System members continue as members of 
Mountain Valley. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 29 

34. North Bay Cooperative Library System, Refer- 
ence Service Project, (coordinated joint program 
with San Francisco Public Library) . 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1966-76. YEARS 10. AMOUNT $820,700. 

SUMMARY Improved and enriched reference service is demonstrated 
by reference referral from small member libraries to system headquarters 
and then to San Francisco Public Library as a higher level reference 
service (BARC). Libraries are linked by teletype and/or facsimile trans- 
mission. Professional personnel, in-service training, additional materials 
and rapid communication and delivery are provided. (See #36 below.) 

It WORKED and is CONTINUING. 

COMMENTS: North Bay is only one system who sends questions to 
BARC; there are ten other systems. The referral pattern was from smaller 
libraries through type B centers, then to area libraries, then to San Fran- 
cisco (BARC) . Telefacsimile proved to be too expensive and not an effec- 
tive tool. 



35. North Bay Cooperative Library System, Young 
Adult Service for Small Town and Rural Youth. 

TYPE Outreach to young adults. 

DATES 1966-69. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $35,000. 

SUMMARY Under the guidance of a Young Adult Coordinator, a pro- 
gram of library service to small towns and rural young adults in the area 
was demonstrated. In-service training to non-professional personnel be- 
gan, with participation by member libraries. Book reviews were given by 
the Coordinator and paperback collections were housed in the libraries' 
adult rooms, as near as possible to the reference collections, and clearly 
separated from the children's collections. 

It WORKED fairly well but was not continued as a separate system pro- 
gram. 

COMMENT: A group called the Bay Area Young Adult Reviewers, 
whose formation predated this project, has continued. 



30 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

36. San Francisco Public Library, Bay Area Refer- 
ence Referral Services Project (BARC), originally 
submitted as a joint project with North Bay Coopera- 
tive Library System. 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1966-76. YEARS 10. AMOUNT $1,979,205. 

SUMMARY Enriched and improved reference services were demon- 
strated by reference referral from NBC system member libraries to the 
system headquarters, and on to the B ARC staff at the San Francisco Public 
Library, as a higher level reference service. Libraries were linked by 
teletype and /or facsimile transmission. Professional personnel, in-service 
training, additional resources and rapid communication and delivery were 
provided. There were difficulties at first due to insufficient in-service 
training for reference personnel in member libraries, and there were 
frequent problems with the transmission equipment. Continuous LSCA 
funding gradually brought about improvement in all services. From 1969 
on, BARC has not been funded jointly with the North Bay Cooperative 
Library System. (See #34 above.) 

It WORKED and BARC is CONTINUING. 

COMMENTS: During the first two years NBC system member libraries 
made reference referrals to system headquarters and the headquarters 
referred unanswerable questions on to the staff of BARC at the San Fran- 
cisco Public Library. Libraries in this initial project were linked by the 
teletype and /or facsimile transmission. In-service training workshops, ref- 
erence materials, and professional personnel were provided for the par- 
ticipant libraries. Much more time went into training personnel in the 
member libraries than was anticipated. Frequent problems with telefac- 
simile equipment led BARC to abandon this experimental portion of the 
project. With continuous LSCA funding the project has been expanded to 
include 11 systems and all aspects of the program have been strengthened 
to improve services to member libraries. Since 1969 BARC has been con- 
tinuously funded by LSCA as an individual project. 

1) We are now able to answer reference requests from both main and 
branch patrons which entail extensive searching or cannot be an- 
swered using our own resources by referring the question to BARC. 

2) Funds for materials have been used to strengthen the reference collec- 
tions of the Main Library. 

3) All of our professional staff has had the opportunity to develop through 
the specialized workshops offered by BARC over the ten year period. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 31 

4) Indexes, newsletters, bibliographies, and booklists compiled by BARC 
have been used as the basis for book selection lists and as informational 
resources throughout the system. 

5) The BARC staff has been instrumental in identifying resources which 
fill in gaps in the library's book collections and has developed an infor- 
mation file which is consulted by all staff members. 

6) The potential for cooperation between the San Francisco Public Li- 
brary, the special libraries of San Francisco, and the member libraries, 
(including UC Berkeley) , has been enhanced by the mutual respect 
developed by participating libraries for each other. 



37. San Joaquin Valley Library System, Service to 
the Rural Disadvantaged, (Biblioteea Ambulante). 

TYPE Outreach to ethnic minorities. 

DATES 1967-74. YEARS 7. AMOUNT $265,400. 

SUMMARY A bookmobile equipped with audio-visual materials and 
manned by Spanish-speaking personnel brought library service to migrant 
workers, labor camps and depressed rural communities, all previously 
unserved groups in the area. Problems of interacting with the migrant 
workers and their families were solved by putting a Mexican- American 
director in charge. Success was moderately substantial as measured by the 
number of stops made and the individuals served, until the migrants 
moved into the city in large numbers. A limited mobile service was main- 
tained and financed locally, to continue serving those few left in rural 
areas. 

It WORKED and was succeeded by the system's Service to Urban Bilin- 
gual, Bieultural Disadvantaged Project, (see #130 below). 



38. Santa Clara Valley Library System and San Jose/ 
Santa Clara /Sunnyvale Cooperative Library System, 
Cooperative Young Adult Services Project (YAP) . 

TYPE Outreach to young adults. 

DATES 1966-69. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $231,000. 



32 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SUMMARY A young adult librarian developed small library centers in 
places where young people congregated, and after a slow start the centers 
attracted more numbers through programs of particular appeal. A young 
adult bookmobile was also utilized. Problems arose because of noise and 
general distraction in some local neighborhood young adult centers, but 
a staff that could relate to the young adults was fairly successful in serving 
some non-library users, such as the school dropout and the culturally 
deprived. The centers themselves and the YAP mobile were not retained, 
but participating libraries followed the program with appealing commu- 
nity programs and updated services to the young adults, which continue 
currently. 

It WORKED in a different manner than expected. 

COMMENT: The project gave impetus to libraries in developing aware- 
ness of and concern for service to young adults. Although most libraries 
had some service prior to 1966, project staffs zeal and enthusiasm, as well 
as tangible results, encouraged others to find practical applications in their 
own libraries. Further, some former project staff members are still living 
and working in the area, and occasionally participate in workshops on 
young adult service. A slide-tape documentary on YAP was used as recent- 
ly as one year ago at the San Jose Public Library in a Young Adult Work- 
shop. Since the project ended, both San Jose Public and Santa Clara 
County libraries have fulltime Young Adult Coordinators on staff. Al- 
though a direct connection between YAP perhaps cannot be shown, we 
can be reasonably certain that the atmosphere generated by the project 
led to establishment of goals by both libraries to better serve young adult 
citizens. Finally, YAP was the first LSCA project administered jointly by 
the San Jose/Santa Clara /Sunnyvale Cooperative System, (later Camino 
Real Library System), and the Santa Clara Valley Library System. This 
created a sense of unity which led to implementation and finally to the 
merger of the two cooperative systems. In these two ways, YAP was a 
significant program with substantial long-term results. 



39. California Library Association, Library Careers 
Project. 

TYPE Recruitment. 

DATES 1967-February 1970. YEARS "2}^. AMOUNT $27,250. 

SUMMARY The centralized recruitment program of the California Li- 
brary Association identified persons who would be valuable additions to 
the public library profession and encouraged them to enter a recognized 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 33 

library school. A Career Consultant, a professional librarian, visited col- 
leges and universities in western states, primarily California. Due to a 
shortage of federal funds and the low priority in contrast to those projects 
of high priority which were oriented to minority groups, the recruitment 
program was terminated after two and a half years. During that time the 
Career Consultant visited many campuses, discouraging some poor candi- 
dates and encouraging many outstanding young people to pursue actively 
a library career. The California Library Association received an H. W. 
Wilson award at ALA in 1969 in national recognition of its recruitment 
efforts. The exact number of those recruited is unknown. 

It was moderately successful. 



40. 49-99 Cooperative Library System, Demonstra- 
tion of Foreign Language Books. 

TYPE Service Enrichment. 

DATES 1967-70. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $42,600. 

SUMMARY A collection of books in five languages, Spanish, French, 
German, Italian and Portuguese, was provided to the residents of the 
system area, through rotating deposit collections and a central collection 
in Stockton. Approximately 7,000 vinabound paperbacks were purchased 
including recreational reading, American bestsellers, literary master- 
pieces and some instructional materials. Although the resources of the 
area were increased, there was little impact on service. Comments were 
that how-to-do-its were more in demand than the classics, and easy-to- 
read, picture-book types of hardbounds in paperbacks, in greatest de- 
mand. There was no community input into the selection of materials. The 
selection was made by a foreign language expert on the staff of the Stock- 
ton/San Joaquin County Public Library who was assigned to this project. 

It WORKED moderately well. Member libraries continue the develop- 
ment of their collections through local funds, but not as a cooperative 
project. 

41. Lassen County — Washoe County, Nevada, Inter- 
state Cooperation. 

TYPE Across state borders. 

DATES 1967-70. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $21,500. 



34 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SUMMARY All residents of a sparsely populated, remote mountain 
county have been provided reference service backed up with direct access 
to its next-door neighbor, the Washoe County Library, Reno, Nevada. 
Shopping and traffic patterns which existed between the two counties 
made it feasible for the Washoe County Library to develop a staff training 
program for Lassen residents and to add a reference librarian to the 
Washoe County Library staff to handle Lassen's requests. Lassen County 
Library materially improved its reference collection and reference tech- 
niques, and both county libraries established new interlibrary loan proce- 
dures. Lassen County Supervisors have contracted with Washoe County 
Library for reference service that continues today, and the Supervisors 
have supported the library program with local funding. A rapid network 
service for information delivery from the best available source has devel- 
oped, despite barriers of separate political jurisdictions. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 

COMMENT: The project is indeed healthy and operating at this time. 
Not only do we use Washoe County, and through them all types of library 
service in Nevada, but we have become members of the Nevada Library 
Media Cooperative through which we share and use constantly a fine film 
collection held by the cooperative, plus all Washoe County film holdings. 
This program was certainly the finest opportunity that a county could 
have to learn library cooperation on a one-to-one basis with a county 
whose generosity and all-round kindness cannot be equaled in any cooper- 
ative I have ever heard discussed. Learning how to work together was 
undoubtedly one of the most valuable results, and I believe that it is born 
out by the development in Nevada of three state-wide networks similar 
to our cooperation which have certainly gained from our initial program. 
We are still learning. 



42. Los Angeles County Library? Way Out Project. 

TYPE Outreach to ethnic minorities. 

DATES 1967-70. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $512,712. 

SUMMARY The target was a large number of minority races in the 
lower socio-economic classes in east and south Los Angeles County. Plans 
were to simplify library procedures, break with conventional methods and 
materials, and make pertinent materials readily and freely available 
through fixed locations and bookmobiles. The project did reach some 
Mexican-American and black children and elderly, and a Chicano re- 
search collection was established in the County Library. Branch library 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 35 

staffs penetrated the communities, often on a door-to-door basis, suffi- 
ciently to learn what the people's service needs really were for day-by-day 
information to live by, as well as basic survival skills. There was no involve- 
ment by community groups in either planning or execution of the project. 

It WORKED moderately well. 

COMMENT: While this project was not publicized widely in the county 
nor in the library world, it did accomplish some successes: 

1. Local sources discovered for ethnic materials continue to be used by 
the system for regular collection development. 

2. It showed the value of bookmobile service when used to compliment, 
extend and enhance what library facilities are doing. Without the use of 
mass media, this vehicle and its service became known and the library 
began to be visible in the communities served by this project. 

3. Although there were no formal advisory boards, project staff participat- 
ed in community groups such as Regional Advisory Councils; NAPP advi- 
sory boards; Los Angeles County Parks and Recreation projects; Model 
Neighborhoods and Model Cities programs; Parent-teacher groups, and 
others. 

4. Audio-visual service was established in all libraries served by the 
project. 

5. An extensive African and Chicano literature /history /culture collection 
was built at the Compton and East Los Angeles Libraries and the refer- 
ence collections at all the facilities were up-graded to meet minimum 
standards in addition to adding black and Chicano reference materials. 

6. Civil Service exam books and how-to-do-it/ consumer information areas 
were extensively developed and used. 

What remains of the demonstration today are the Chicano materials which 
are being expanded by a current LSCA grant; the audio-visual collections 
which are now being maintained, developed and expanded by the System; 
some of the equipment and materials, although these have been utilized 
and not consistently monitored for replacement nor expansion. 



43. North Sacramento Valley Cooperative Library 
System, (now the North State Cooperative Library 
System) . 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1967-69. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $23,150. 



36 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SUMMARY Six county libraries and four city libraries in the northern 
Sacramento Valley had formed a library system as a result of the Public 
Administration Service's study, Public Library Services in Northern Cali- 
fornia, (see #13 and 25 above) . Butte County Library and Shasta County 
Library were designated as reference centers, coordinated book selection 
policies were established and reference services coordinated. Results were 
increased library service to an area of some 28,000 square miles and 
aroused public interest, convincing governing officials of the value, of 
cooperative library service. 

It WORKED and was CONTINUED. 

COMMENT: Modoc County uses Shasta Reference Center's interlibrary 
loan and interlibrary reference services heavily, and this in turn has in- 
creased and bettered our library service to remote areas in our county. 



44. Richmond Public Library, Service Center 
Project. 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1967-69. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $45,680. 

SUMMARY The attractive, small service Center Library was located in 
the lobby of the state's service center in Richmond. The State Service 
Center housed offices for many government services, i.e. Social Security, 
Employment, Rehabilitation, Health, etc. Having the library located in 
the large reception area meant that a person waiting to see a social worker 
or a public health nurse was waiting in the library. This offered an excel- 
lent opportunity for the library to introduce its services and to gain new 
patrons. The book collection focused upon Afro-American and Mexican- 
American materials, along with employment "how tos" and popular read- 
ing material. Adjoining the library, there was a small-child care room to 
be used when parents had to bring small children along. Often impromptu 
story-hours were given. Library staff concentrated on efforts to change the 
library's stereotyped image, simplifying borrowing and registration rou- 
tines. In addition to serving the Service Center clientele, the library also 
served the agency staff by providing material for their professional needs. 
The project successfully demonstrated meaningful library service, offer- 
ing patrons non-conventional and conventional materials to improve their 
economic condition. At the end of two years the Service Center was forced 
out of the building by space needs, (see #106 below). 

It WORKED but was not continued locally. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 37 

45. Sacramento City-County Library System and 
Mother Lode Library System, Information and Com- 
munications Project. 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1967-70. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $300,286. 

SUMMARY A metropolitan library and a cooperative system jointly 
demonstrated improved library services through reference referral, rapid 
communications and delivery, in-service staff training, professional per- 
sonnel and a coordination of programs. The basic reference collections in 
all libraries were strengthened and a reference and research center estab- 
lished in Sacramento. The Mountain Valley Library System resulted. 

It WORKED and was CONTINUED. 



46. San Mateo County Library System, Library Serv- 
ice to East Palo Alto. 

TYPE Outreach to ethnic minorities. 

DATES 1968-74. YEARS 6. AMOUNT $275,809. 

SUMMARY A predominantly black area in a portion of unincorporated 
San Mateo County and an eastern section of Menlo Park, isolated by 
freeways and the Bay, were the targets. Skilled staff, black history titles, 
audio- visual materials, and service to persons in prisons and juvenile facili- 
ties, plus general community programming, resulted in large increases in 
library use. Today, service to the black community is given through San 
Mateo County Library's East Palo Alto Branch, opened in June, 1975. 

It WORKED moderately well and was ADOPTED. 



47. Serra Library System, Enrichment of Existing 
Program and Demonstration of New Systemwide 
Program. 



38 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1967-70. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $405,022. 

SUMMARY Value of networking by libraries in the greater San Diego 
County area was demonstrated, including many in rural and sparsely 
populated areas. A strong reference center, in-service training, rapid com- 
munications and delivery were part of the plan. Elimination of political 
barriers to service and hiring of a Coordinator resulted in a services en- 
richment in the system. Federal funds were used to coordinate projects 
for additional system-wide services. 

It WORKED and was CONTINUED. 



48. Metropolitan Cooperative Library System, Total 
Community Library Service, including Planning Sur- 
vey (Serving the Economic Community) . 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1968-70. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $215,300. 

SUMMARY The first phase was a planning survey. The Library and the 
Economic Community, Information Needs of Business and Industry in 
Pasadena and Pomona, California, by Robert S. Meyer with Dr. Gerhard 
N. Rostvold, 1969. The study outlined a pilot program to provide an exam- 
ple of total community library service in Pomona and Pasadena, cities with 
numerous industries and businesses. The project demonstrated how the 
libraries could provide service focused on these businesses and industries 
most effectively. A summary to the above study was published in 1970, 
Information for Business Decision Making, the Public Library and the 
Economic Community. A special service was established, and it continues 
in both libraries. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 

COMMENT: In Pomona the service level remains fairly constant. In 
Pasadena, a special "Business and Industry" Department was developed. 
Its size, scope, and use volume have greatly increased each year, and it has 
become one of the busiest and most innovative departments in the Pasa- 
dena Library. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 39 

49. Fresno County Library, Extension of Service to 
Business and Industry. 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1968-70. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $38,106. 

SUMMARY This provided improved reference services to the business 
and industrial communities of Fresno County and San Joaquin Valley 
Library System members. Enriched service was provided through added 
professional and clerical staff in the Reference and Extension Depart- 
ments of the Fresno County Library, and through extensive use of rapid 
telecommunications. Their experience was shared by workshops given in 
Fresno, Altadena, Palos Verdes Estates and Sacramento, which gave excel- 
lent in-service training to librarians around the state. A business librarian 
was added to the Fresno staff, contributing to the project's successful 
impact. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 

COMMENT: Local radio and TV publicity was used extensively to in- 
form the business and industrial communities of the service. It might also 
be important to note that the project would not have been successful 
without the additional support staff in the State Library and on the cam- 
pus of UCLA. Their support of the project and the resources available 
through them added significantly to the success of the service. 



50. Auburn-Placer County Library, Nevada County 
Library Demonstration. 

TYPE Establishment of county library service. 

DATES 1968-72. YEARS 4. AMOUNT $320,869. 

SUMMARY The establishment of a county library, utilizing modern 
bookmobile service and a contract for professional direction from the 
Auburn-Placer County Librarian, resulted also in strengthening the Grass 
Valley and Nevada City libraries, and establishing the Truckee Commu- 
nity Library, all of which became part of the new county library. At the 
urging of local community library supporters, officials in Nevada County 
established the county library in 1971, and decided to provide full local 
administration with a county librarian and a bookmobile librarian. LSCA 
funds further demonstrated for one year the services of a professional 
children's librarian. 



40 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED except for the children's librarian. 

COMMENT: A new era in library service was made possible by this 
funding. From this base has developed yearly a higher and higher level 
of service and greater and greater circulation. The community has evi- 
denced its growing respect for its County Library service by its usage of 
it and its attendance at programs, story-hours, etc. County government 
officials have evidenced growing support by increasing budgets yearly and 
by voting to provide revenue sharing funds to build the new Truckee 
library — its first library building — and first library building constructed in 
Nevada County since 1916! 



51. California Rehabilitation Center, Corona, Ex- 
pansion of Library Service — Music Appreciation 
Center. 

TYPE Institutions. 

DATES 1968-69. YEARS 1. AMOUNT $2,295. 

SUMMARY Men and women residents of the institution were provided 
an opportunity to develop appreciation of music and the spoken word 
through use of phonograph recordings. A music center was established in 
the resident library, and the center was used by approximately 72% of the 
residents. The program was planned to assist in the rehabilitation of the 
inmates. An audio media center was later established in the resident 
women's unit library, (1972). 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



52. California Men's Colony, East and West Facili- 
ties, Department of Corrections, Inmate Library De- 
velopmental Program for Recreational Reading. 

TYPE Institutions. 

DATES 1968-70. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $2,200. 

SUMMARY Library materials were provided to the many non-English 
speaking inmates in the institution; one-third of the materials were pur- 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 41 

chased in the Spanish language. These met with wide use but were insuffi- 
cient to meet all the inmates' demands, due to limited funds. 

It did NOT work well. 



53. Correctional Training Facilities, Central and 
North At Soledad, Upgrading Quantity and Quality 
of Available Recreational Library Material. 

TYPE Institutions. 

DATES 1968-71. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $8,400 

SUMMARY Inmates in both facilities were provided with recreational 
reading materials and an opportunity to develop skills in the use of avail- 
able materials. Reading as a satisfying leisure time activity was en- 
couraged, and there was a continuous demand for additional current 
fiction. The two facilities regularly exchanged books to provide wider 
choices, but the problems remained of insufficient materials and lack of 
project direction, (see #100 below). 

It did NOT work well. 



54. Metropolitan State Hospital, Norwalk, Patients' 
Library In-depth Collection. 

TYPE Institutions. 

DATES 1968-70. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $2,000. 

SUMMARY The project was intended to strengthen the library's serv- 
ices so that specific needs of the mental patients could be met as they 
participated in rehabilitation programs. Staff planned to use the library 
materials in their "remotivation groups" while assisting the patients in 
returning them to productive lives. Project staff shortage and insufficient 
materials led to poor results, (see #101 below). 

It did NOT work well. 



42 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

55. Agnews State Hospital, Bibliotherapy Program. 

TYPE InstituHons 

DATES 1968-73. YEARS 5. AMOUNT $55,769. 

SUMMARY The Agnews Patients' Library demonstrated that biblio- 
therapy could serve as a valuable resocialization and rehabilitation tech- 
nique when done in cooperation with skilled library and treatment staff. 
The successful project received national attention. Project administration 
was transferred to the Santa Clara County Library when Agnews began 
phasing out its program in 1972, and the bibliotherapy program was later 
modified to meet changing conditions and clientele, (see #98 below and 
also detailed summary of this project, page 101). 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



56. Santa Rosa-Sonoma County Library and Los 
Cuilucos School Bookmobile Service Leading to Es- 
tablishment of Permanent Library. 

TYPE InstituHons. 

DATES 1968-73. YEARS 5. AMOUNT $35,700. 

SUMMARY The Los Cuilucos School, part of the California Youth Au- 
thority, received a demonstration from the Santa Rosa-Sonoma County 
Library to extend public library services to the school's institutionalized 
wards and staff. Carried out in two phases, first a bookmobile service and 
second the establishment of a branch library in the school operated as part 
of the county library system, the project was successful until the school was 
closed, and it strongly influenced the library development in other Cali- 
fornia Youth Authority schools, (see also detailed summary of this project, 
page 102). 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



57. California Conservation Center Library — De- 
partment of Corrections, Expanded Library Service 
to Conservation Camps ( Susan ville). 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 43 

TYPE Institutions. 

DATES 1968-70. YEARS 2. AMOUNT $2,000. 

SUMMARY Library materials were provided to the institution and 18 
camps in an isolated area in northern California. Each camp maintained 
a program of vocational education, and the project assisted the inmates in 
their rehabilitation, self-improvement and general welfare. A cooperative 
relationship was developed between the Center and the Lassen County 
Library which led to another LSCA demonstration project in 1974, (see 
#132 below). 

It WORKED moderately well. 



58. Atascadero State Hospital Library, Reciprocal 
Cooperative Program. 

TYPE Institutions. 

DATES 1968-74. YEARS 6. AMOUNT $31,740. 

SUMMARY The project was developed for the promotion of services 
between the hospital libraries and community public libraries. A contract 
with the San Luis Obispo County Library provided rotating collections of 
current titles and interlibrary loan privileges for hospital patients. A coop- 
erative agreement was made with the Black Gold Cooperative Library 
System, resulting in interlibrary loan and the use of system films in the 
hospital auditorium, hospital wards and clubrooms. The Librarian joined 
Black Gold's TIE (Total Interlibrary Exchange) network and the expan- 
sion of services and materials to and from the hospital library program 
became firmly established and continues to be an important parf of hospi- 
tal library services. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



59. 49-99 Cooperative Library System, Library Serv- 
ices to the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Large 
Print Library Materials. 

TYPE Outreach to shut-ins, aging and physically handicapped. 



44 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

DATES 1968-71. YEARS 3. AMOUNT $46,535. 

SUMMARY Large print books, newspapers and magazines were pro- 
vided to residents of the system area. Special publicity and programs 
informed residents of the materials available to them in each library, 
consisting of both stationary and rotating collections. Three large print 
book catalogs were produced and distributed to local agencies and librar- 
ies throughout the system. A total of 3,656 books was provided with steady 
use and circulation. The project, which was well publicized, succeeded in 
increasing the use by patrons. Member libraries continue to develop their 
collections through local funds. The rotating collection continues. 

It WORKED and was ADOPTED. 



60. Black Gold Cooperative Library System, Refer- 
ence Center Services (TIE). 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1968-76. YEARS 8. AMOUNT $783,754. 

SUMMARY This cooperative program, which utilizes the Black Gold 
Reference Center at Santa Barbara Public Library, includes all types of 
libraries in Kern, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, 
(plus a section of northwestern Los Angeles County). Reference and 
interlibrary loan services are being provided. In-service staff training and 
workshops have facilitated a knowledgeable handling of reference quer- 
ies. 

It WORKED and is CONTINUING. 



61. Los Angeles Public Library, Southern California 
Extended Reference Project, (SCAN) . 

TYPE Service enrichment. 

DATES 1968-76. YEARS 8. AMOUNT $1,427,299. 



Volume 71, No. 2, 1976 45 

SUMMARY SCAN (Southern California Answering Network) is a Re- 
gional Resource Center in the Los Angeles Public Library. It performs 
high level reference service primarily to the southern California area, 
concentrating to a great degree on use of the vast holdings of the Los 
Angeles Public Library, and the expertise of a staff of subject specialists. 
INFO (Information Center for Southern California Libraries) has been 
absorbed into