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Full text of "News Releases 1946 - 1947"

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AERONAUTICAL LIBRARY 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 
Balboa Park Online Collaborative 



http://www.archive.org/details/newsreleases194600will 







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HGH Field • San Diego 1, California 

Twenty-two years ago when young, butch-born Harm Jan van der Linde, walked 
out to the airport at uutch flats to ask for a job, neither he nor the equally 
youthful proprietor., T. Claude Ryan., had any conception of what the future had 
in store for them. 

But today on the anniversary of "John van der Linde's association with the 
Ryan organization, he and the company's executive head took a half hour off to 
spend to get he r^>n reminiscence.. And when he left the boss's office John was 
wearing a new diamond studded service pin. 

These two pioneers of aviation manufacturing in San biego had a lot in com- 
mon for it is van der Linde who has supervised assembly of Ryen's latest product 

— the morc-than-400 mile-an-hour jet-pushed, propeller-pulled Fireball fightar 

— nnd every other airplane the coi^pany has manufactured since the days of the 
slow Ryan-Standard biplane of post World War I. 

One of Ryan's first employees, andthe oldest still with the company, "John" 
came to work at the old Hyan field, opposite the Marine Base, only two years after 
he left the Dutch East Indies as a boy of 19. The senior vtn der Lindc wes a 
doctor for the butch colonial government and, John says, decided to move the 
fami ly to Cal ifornia when he was^ready to retire because "Sen biego hss the best 
-cl imate i n the world," .^ 

John van der Linde wasn^t satisfied to merely build airplsnes. He hcd 
learned to fly in San biego soon after coming here from the Indies, and so al- 
ternated his supervision of aircraft manufacture with flyine. In the early days 
of air trcinsportation in this country, John frequently flew cs co-pilot with 
Claude Kyan, then doing much of the piloting himself on America's first yeer 



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'round regularly scheduled airline, between San Liego and Los Angeles. 

Probably no airplanes Hyan - and van der Ljnoe - ever built gave the rangy 
fabrication superintendent more satisfaction than the military landplane end 
seaplane trainers which the company built and shipped to his native Netherlands 
East Indies to train colonial pilots when w.ir with Japan was on the horizon. 

van der Linde has been in charge pf Ryan's final assembly line for the' long 
series of planes which have come off the local production line - Standard bi- 
planes; the M-l mail planes which pioneered airmail service on the coast; the 
Brougham, prototype of Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis; the S-T series of I ow- 
wing trainers in which tens of thousands of American war pilots first learned 
to fly; the YJ-51 steep-landing, short-take-off observation pUne; the S-C 
pri vate-owner cabi n plane; and most recently the Fireball fighter, first air- 
craft in the world to combine jet propulsion with a conventional engine and pro- 
peller for maximum performance. 

John's long service with Ryan was interrupted only when CUude Kyan went 
to Europe in 1927 for an extended study of commercial aviation, out even then 
van der Linde stayed in aviation work right here in San i/iego until rejoining 
the company. 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



Two of San i^ie^'s pioneer airmen took time off for half an hour yesterday to 
tillscuss "the good old Hsfs" of flying as it was 20 years ago. The occasion was the 
presentation by T. Claude Ryan of a dl s^nd studded service pin to the cot-apany's 
veteran superintendent of fabrication. Harm Jan "John** van der Linde, who 22 years 
before had asked Sa> UieQ0*s pioneer aircraft manufacturer for a Job "helping out." 

£te)iy 21 at the time, van der Linde had arrived only two years before fron tht 
Netherlands East Indies with his parents. John's fatl^r, a doctor for the i/utch 
colonial t^vernoent, had just been retired ^d s»ved the family to CaMfornia because 
"Sw» Olego has the best cl inate in the world," 

In his 22 years in aviation here, van der Linde has supervised the assembly of 
every Ryan model frora the more>than-400 ^He-an-hour Jct-pushed, propeller-pulled 
Fireball fighter of today back to the slow biplane types of post feorld aar I — ^d 
a lot of models io between. 

John van der Linde wasn't satisfied to »^«ly build airplanes. He had learned 
to fly In San Diego soon after coming here fro® the Indies, and so alternated his 
supervision of aircraft sanufacture with flying. In the early days of air trans- 
portation in this country, John freijuentty flew as co-pllot with Claude Hyan, then 
doing rauch of the piloting himself on America's first year 'round regularly schcdu'ed 
airline, between San Qiego and Los Angeles. 

Probably no airplanes Ryan - and van der Linde - ever built gave the rangy 
fabrication superintendent mw satisfaction than the asilitary landplanc and sea- 
plane trainers which the company built and shipped to his native Netherlands Last 



RTAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

-2- 

rndies to train colonial pilots when war with Japan was an the horizon. 

van d«r Linde has been in charge of Ryan's final assembly tine for the long 
series of planes which have coAe off the local production line > Standard biplanes; 
the M-l mail planes which pioneered airmail service on the coast; the brougham, 
prototype of Lindbergh's Spirit of St. ijiuis; the S-T series of low.wing trainers 
In which tens of thousands of Asierican war pilots first learned to f|y$ the Ya-51 
steep-landing, short- take-off observation plane; the S-C private-owner cabin plane; 
and most recently the Fireball fighter, first aircraft in the world to combine $et 
propulsion with a conventional engine and propeller for maximm perfor^iance. 

John's long service with %an was interrupted only when Cl^de %an went to 
Europe in 1927 for an extended study of coomercial aviation, but even then van dcr 
LInde stayed in 3vi»tion work right here in San i^iego untii rejaining the CQf^m\f, 




RGH Field • San Diego 1. California 



FIREBALL IN FLOVCRS V.INS 
ROSE TOURNAMENT AWARL 



This flower-bedecked Ryan Fireball Navy fighter, vnth jet exhaust 
streaming from its tail, propeller spinning, and the entire plane grace- 
fully dipping and turning, was the official entry of San Liego City and 
County |n Pasadena's famous i-iew Year's Lay Tournament of Roses Parade, 
capturing second prize in Class A. 

Under regulations governing the Rose Parade every portion of the 
float which can be seen by spectators must be completely covered with 
flowers. The half-scale Fireball modal was built by the mock-up section 
of Ryan's experimental departaent. The night before the parade it was 
mounted onto the lower section of the float, built in Pasadena; then 
completely covered with chrysanthemum buds laid over hot glue. The in- 
signia design, propeller tips and other details were workec out in blue 
de Iphini um. 

(Photo; Please credit ■^- San Liego Journal), 



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Wagner-Ryan 

S. L. Chamber of CornmercG 

Rose Parade Ti e- i n 



WORKthS COMF'LlTl lXACT MGbtL JF RYAN FIRtBALL 
JlT FIGHTtlK FOR SAiJ L\EGO kGSE PARAuL FLJaT 

The half-scale ifiodel of the Ryan jet-pushed, prope I I er-pul I ea Fire- 
ball fighter, which will surmount San D iego ' s f I oat in the Tournament of 
Roses Parade, attracted so much attention at the aircraft plant that five 
pretty Ryan secretaries, without too much urging, found themselves in 
front of the camera in various poses when the photographer showed up to 
take pictures before the wooden modsl was shipped off to Pasadena. . 

Ryan workers who built th>3 plane, which wi II be completely covered 
with flowers, have dubbed the half-scale model of the Navy FR-I fighter 
the"TR-|" for "Tournament of Roses, Model I." Construction of the model 
was co(np|eted this week and it is now in Pasadena where the balance of 
t he floatjsbeing built. 

Built so that it will turn and dip, the Fireball model plane will be 
mounted above and behind the sloping bed of red, white and blue flowers 
forming a Stars and Stripes pat-tern in front of which will ride aviation 
heroes of the Army, Navy and r-larine Corps. The flower-covered propeller 
will turn, and from tht: tail will come the tell -tele smoke of the parent 
Firebcl I 's jet engi ne , 

Named "Winged Victory" the float is sponsored jointly by San Uiego 
City and County, the San Ui ego-Cal i forn i a Club and the Junior Chamber of 
Commerce. It is expected thrt most of the flowers for the flo&t will be 
obtained from florists and nurserymen in the C?r I sbsd-Enci ni t;:S arce. 



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Dacomber 13s 1945 










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statement by Earl L. Prudden, vice-president 
of the Kyan Aeronautical Company, to Cali- 
fornia newspaper writers at NAM luncheon, 
Lee ember |3tl-i. 



RGH Field • san Diego 1. California 



Studies are being conducted of the conmercial aftd private airplane 
markets with a view to reentering this maniifacturing fields However, due to 
the fact that Ryan was one of the few warplane production units in the 
country which continued on an acceleratijig manufaetm'ing scale right up to 
V-J Day, the transition to peace-time production in this field will be some- 
what slower than in the case of some other companies a 

Ryan has already readjusted its total personnel and production to the 
realistic demands of peace-time requirements, but now has 1700 employees, 
irtiich is a very substantial employment level compered with post-war years, 
and represents about the working staff the company feels can be maintained in 
the immediate future „ 

With the nation fully aware cf the tremendous contribution of air power 
to the winning of the war and the maintenance of peace j and the need for con- 
tinuing an aggressive research and engineering program, the Ryan management 
feels confident of maintaining an important position in military aircraft 
development and production, 

Ryan went through a very progressive development during the war, having 
gone from building small numbers of relatively simple primary training planes 



- 2 - 



tc design, engineering and volume ]3roduetion of Navy Fii'eball jet- pushed, 
propeller- pvilled fighters of extreiaely' advanced design. With this experience 
at hand, and with the necessary key persoonel rotained 5.n the Ryan organiza- 
tion, the company expects to continue to serve the coimtry's bast interests 
through deve3.opnent of new military aircraft iypes. This is evidenced by 
the high e!np]oyment in the engineesring departiaent where much in new and 
advanced development vx>rk is being carried on„ Importance of its activities 
in new design is illustrated by the naturs of work that is being eceoaplished 
in the field of advanced applicatj.ons of jet propulsion^ super sonic speeds 
and electronics. 



Viagnar-Kyan 

S. u. Chanber of Commerce 

Rose Parade Tie-in 



VvOt^KEHS CJMPLtTE EXACT MOL/LL OF RYAN FIREBALL 
JET FliiHTER FOR SAN blEGO ROLE PARAbE FLOAT 

It took just a mite of a "glamor girl," 5-year old Suzanne Reamo, 
to christen the tial f-scal e model of the Ryan Fireball jet-pushed, propeller- 
pulled Navy fighter vi/hich, covered wi th flowers, will be the center of at- 
traction of San Diego's float in the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena 
n N e w Y e ar ' s L ay . *■ H b ' " 

On hand to represent the fvlavy at the christening was Lieut. Comdr. 
R. 0, Dcitzer, Bureau of Aeronautics Representative at the Ryan Aeronautical 
Company plant. Ryan workers who built the float have dubbed the half- 
scale model of the Navy FR-1 fighter, the "TH-I" for "Tournament of Roses, 
Model I." Construction of the model was completed this week and it is now 
in Pasadena where the balance of the f I oat is being bui lt» 

Built so that it will turn and dip, the Fireball model plane will 
be mounted above and behind the sloping bed of red, white and blue flowers 
forming .1 Stars and Stripes pattern in front of which will ride aviation 
heroes of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps. The flower-covered propeller 
wi II turn,, and from the tai I will come the tel l-tale smoke of the pcrent 
Fi reb'::i| I 's jc t engi ne, ; 

NfjTicd "Winged Victory" the float is sponsored jointly by San Diego 
City and County, the Sah Diego-California Club and the Junior Chamber of 
Commerce. It is expected that most of the flowers for the float will be 
obtained from florists and nurserymen in the Car Isbad-Enci ni tas area. 



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RYAN^ AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO I. CALIFORNIA 




RYAN FIKEBALL REAUY FOR CARRIER 
LANDING FLYING ON JET ALONE 

News services have just carried stories from V»ashington that the Navy has 
reported that the first successful, although unpremeditated, landing by a jet- 
powered Navy fighter plane on an aircraft carrier was made last fall by the Ryan 
FR-I Firebal I. T|g? 

The landing was made November 6th aboard the escort carrier "Vvake Island" 
off San Liego by Ensign Jake C. \/est of Air Group 4! who made his unintentional 
pioneer jet landing when his plane experienced an almost complete power failure 
in the conventional engine as he was making his landing approach.- Uuickly 
starting his jet engine, he continu^jd his approach ana landed safely. The Fire- 
ball is powered by both turbo-jet and a reciprocating engine and is the first 
plane in the world so equipped. 

The Navy reported the landing was the first on record and confirmed its 

long held belief that such a feat could be accomplished successfully. 

Ryan engineers who were on the four-day qujil i f icat i on trip last fsll reported 
that the landing was m.ide under extremely adverse operating conditions. A heavy 
sea gave the carrier a pitch of 40 feet from low to high which, with occasional 

rolls, gave the carrier peculiar oscillations mak ing it very difficult for the 
landing signal officer and pilot to judge the position of the deck at the time 
of the landing. In spite of the severe sea, eighty-nine landings were accom- 
plished and 14 pilots were qualified to fly the Navy's first jet airplane, . 

The British are reported to have also operated a jet plane but from the 
deck of a large carrier, whereas the Fireball was landed on the much smaller 



escort type. 



(OFFICIAL U. S. NAVY PHOTOGRAPH) 







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ERGH Field • San Diego l. California 



PETER NAMED TO HEAD RYAN 
PLANT PROTECTION SERVICES 



Promotion of M. J, Peter to Chief of Plant Protection of the Ryan 
Aeronautical Company was announced today by Earl U, Prudden, vice president, 

Peter, who has been captain of plant guards for the past six years, 
succeeds A! Gee as head of Ryan*s protection services which include the 
fire department as well as plant security. Before his affiliation with 
the local aircraft company, Peter was with the National Park Service 
stationed at General Grant Parit In Central California, Prior to that, he 
worltcd with several San Diego general contractors after his World Vnar I 
service. 

Al Gee, one of San Diet's best i^nown horsemen, is retiring as head 
of Ryan plant protection to devote hjs full time to loca| equestrian activities 
and will become co-publisher of The Horse Bulletin, covering San Diego County's 
growing Interest in horses. Gee originated and for four years staged the suc- 
cessful Ryan Annual Horse Shows in Mission Valley, 







RGH Field • San Diego l. California 



7^ 



RYAN FORMS NEW DIVISION TO 
BUILD STAINLESS STEEL ITEMS 



Creation o-f the Stainless Steel Manufacturing Division of the 
Ryan Aeronautical Company announced today by T. CI suae Kyan, presi- 
dent., is indicative of the company's plans for expansion of peace- 
time production. 

Formerly known as the exhcust systems division,, the Stain- 
less Steel Manufacturing Division will operate under this new and 
more appropriate title, due to the broadening of its line of 
products, in addition to aircraft exhaust systems, parts for jet 
propulsion engines and allied accessories, which have long been in 
production, a number of non-aeronautical products of stainless 
steel which fit the facilities and technique of this division 
have been developed and are planned for early production. 



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HGH Field • San Diego l. California 



RYAN APPOINTS SMALL ASST. SALES 
MGR. OF EXHAUST MANIFOLD DEPT. 



Promotion of Joseph A. Small to the position of Assistant Sales 
Manager of the Ryan Aeronautical Company's exhaust manifold department 
was announced today by T, Claude Ryan, president. 

In his new position, Small wi I | assist Sam C. Breder, Ryan's veteran 
sales manager, In further development of new business for the company's 
large-scale exhaust systems production activities which are continuing in 
heavy volume into peacetime. At the same time, the new appointment will 
relieve Breder of routine activities so that he may give more attention 
to the expansion of peacetime markets for other stainless steel products. 

With the Ryan company for more than two years, Small came to the 
organization with e)<tensive sales promotion experience, having repre- 
sented the Ford Motor Company In Chicago and been in charge of that firm's 
large exhibit at the Chicago Fair, Prior to that he was for many years a 
publishers representative. Before his association with Ryan, Small was 
Southern California Manager of the Research Institute of America, 



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iGH Field • San Diego 1. California 



Here's a five-photo sequence we thought would be of interest 
to aviation and technical editors because it gives an unusually clear 
picture of the unique feature of the Kyan Fireball jet-pushed, pro- 
peller-pulled fighter which permits this outstanding Navy combat 
plane to be split in half for serviciiig the jet engine, or to re- 
place the entire tail unit in case of damage. 

In reverse sequence, of course, it shows the method of in- 
stallation of the jet engine on the procuction line. 



P. S. Also enclosed is a new Official U. S. Navy Photo of five 
Ryan Fireball Navy fighters, flying on their jet engines alone, 
and with propellers feathered, strafing the Naval-Air Station at 
North Island, San uiego, in a recent demonstration.. 




RYAN^ AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO I, CALIFORNIA 




I. 

VTith a fuselage which can be split into two sections just aft of the wing, 
the Ryan FK-I Fireball jet-pushed, propel I er-pul I ed fighter provides a 
welcome innovation for maintenance crev»s. Lesigned to provide an important 
advantage during combat operations, the separation makes possible the quick 
replacement of the plane's powerful jet *ingine or the whole tail assembly. 
The individually-stressed sections of the fuselage are held together by 
four tension bolts and conical-seat type bushings. All of the engine con- 
trols end fuel lines have quick-disconnect fittings perinitting a separetion 
in thirty minutes. Here maintenance men at Kyan are placing hydrsulic jacks 
under the Fireball preparatory to splitting the plane's sUek fuselage. 



SpB' n: 



2. 

by means of a dolly clFimptid tu the aft section of the fuselage, the circular 
tail structure is pulled away froin the forward part of the plene. This 
operation is easily performed fay the deck crews of Navy carriers for which 
the Fireball is designed; The unique separation feature permits the fighter 
to. be hoisted and stored in two sections to conserve space eboercj ship. 



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3. 

With tail section remavtid, the ruse of the General Electric T-16 ges turbine 
engini2 can be seen fr<=.inccl in the circul'ir opening of the eft fuselage. A 
specially designed monorail track and trolley is provided in the top of the 
fuselage to allowthe jet engine to be rolled out o-f the plcne. 



— "T" 



4. 

The jet engine of the Fireball is rolled out far enough for the hook of a 
conveyor or crane to be attached and the unit is lifted out. The completely 
hidden location of the aft engine gives the Fireball the deceptive appearance 
of a sine I e-engi ne fighter. The plane maintains this distinct aerodynamic 
and psychological advantage while packing the combat superiority of two 
power p I ants. 



5. 
The compact, I i ght-wai gtit jet engine of the Ryan Fireball is shown here 
after it has been taken from the fuselage. Both engines of the plane are 
self-contained "eggs". Tricycle landing gear makes it possible to instcll 
fuel system and hydraulic equipment accessories in the front wheel well 
where they are more accessible to ground crews without the need for open- 
i ng access panel s. 




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JERGH Field • San Diego 1. California 



VJe have just received permission from the Navy to release 
for publication all drawings and specifications of the Ryan FH-I 
Fireball jet-pushed, propeller-pulled fighter contained in our 
Illustrated Parts Catalog. A typical page from the catalog (showing 
the wing leading edge ducts for the jet engine) is attached. 

V^ith the release of this information, the way is now clear for 
editors to prepare detailed design analyses of the Fireball.. The 
writer will be pleased to worl< closely with you in coordinating 
your requirements with our engineering department so that whatever 
will be most helpful to you can be supplied prompt! y enc complete! y.. 
Let me hear from you. 




Also enclosed is a new Official U,. S. Navy Photo of four Ryan Fireball 
fighters of Air Group 41 flying in formation over San Diego,. 




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RGH Field • San Diego t. California 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL CO. REVEALS 
PLANS FOR NEW PRObUCTS IN 

SPECIAL ST OCKHGLbERS REPORT 

First indication that Ryan Aeronautical Company is planning to reenter 
the commercial and private airplane manufacturing field was given today in an 
informal jetter sent to stockhofders by T, Claude Ryan, president, as a means 
of familiarizing them with the company's position and prospects in the trans- 
ition period from war production to peacetime operations. 

"Studies of new designs, production and markets for private and commercial 
planes have been under way since the war's end," Ryan explained. "However, 
we feel that it is not a sound policy to fully reveal our plans in the com- 
petitive commercial field at this time." 

That Ryan is continuing actively in the development of advanced military 
aircraft types was also revealed, "This is evidenced," the company president 
said, "by the high employment in the engineering, laboratory and experimental 
departments where much In new and advanced development work Is being carried 
on. Importance of the activities in new design is illustrated by the nature 
of the work being done in advanced applications of jet propulsion, sxiper-son ic 
speeds end electronics. ' 

"Your company went through a very orogtessive development during the war,' 
having advanced from building training and private owner type planes to the de- 
sign, engineering and volume production of Navy Fireball jet-pushed, propeller- 



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pulled fighters. With this experience aa'ti the necessary key personnel retained 
in the Ryan organization, the company expects to continue to serve the country's 
best interests through development and manufacture of new combat aircraft types." 

"Of long-range Importance to the company's future operations is the fact 
that although production of the FR-I model Fireball was stopped after war's end,^ 
engineering and development work on new projects was continued. Authorization has 
since been given by the Navy for the design, development and building of an ex- 
perimental quantity of a completely new but still more advanced model of the basic 
Fireball type fighter. Following its development, this model is planned for pro- 
duction to meet the Navy's peacG-time rcauirements for the most modern, high per- 
formance aircraft." 

A bright future is seen by President Ryan for the company's Stainless Steel 
Manufacturing Division which produces a variety of products, principally of stain- 
less steel, Including the production of jet and gas turbine engine parts, in ad- 
dition to a complete line of aircraft engine exhaust systems and allied acces- 
sories. The jet propulsion and turbine engine parts manufacturing activity is a 
new and expanding field which the company expects to represent an Important share 

of future business. 

Ryan also disclosed that several purely peace-time products which fit the 
facilities end technlnues of this manufacturing division have been developed end 
arc planned for early production. 

Because final settlement of government terminated contracts ccnnot be made in 
time to permit accurate financial statements for the complete 1945 fiscal year to 
be rerdy for distribution In February, as In the psst, the Board of Lirectors de- 
c-ided to postpone the Issuance of the annual report, and the stockholders meeting 
normally held In March, for approximately 90 days. Instead the company issued the 
1-nformal interim report covering the nine months ended July 31, 1945, for which 
period a net profit of $244,895 was earned after all charges. It was pointed out 
that the figures were taken from the books of the company end did not represent 
independently audited statements. 




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3ERGH Field • san Diego 1, CALiFORNrA 



GA5 TURBINE ANL FUEL REFINEMENTS SEEN 
AS KEY TO FUTURE AIRCRAFT DEVELOPMENT 



Ryan Engineer Stresses Faith in Superiority 
of Propeller and Jet Propulsion Combination 



Further refinement of the gas turbine engine and development of new super-fuels 
of high chemical energy in relation to weight are the two most important factors 
which will extend the economical advantage of the airplane, Ben T. Salmon, chief 
engineer of the Ryan Aeronautical Company, told members of the San Diego section of 
the Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences at their dinner meeting March 1st. 

"The two principal possibilities open to science to improve airplanes beyond 
what they are today from an economic standpoint are reduction of the installed 
power plant weight and reduction of fuel reouirements in pounds," Salmon explained. 
"The lighter power plent weight is with us now in the form of the gas turbine, both 
in its jet propulsion and propeller-drive forms. Because this type of power plant 
is still in the development stags, its present disadvantage of poorer thermal ef- 
ficiency and higher fuel reouirements will be overcome in the near future, 

"Perhaps of even greater importance is the fact that the gas turbine will oper- 
ate an almost any substance as a fuel which can be blown through a nozzle and which 
will burn in air. Let us take the word of petroleum engineers that as yet we know 
virtually nothing of the secrets which lie locked up within crude petroleum. Given 
a liquid fuel of high energy content, turbine designers will transform that chemical 
energy into mechanical motion which the aeronautical engineer will convert into more 
efficient and economical air transportation than any we have yet envisioned. 

"Analyze, for example, what the effect would be upon the economics of some 
present day airplane if a fuel releasing twice as much heat-energy per pound as 
present fuel was aueilabJe. Consider the passJbUfties on the bssis of a given 






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range, and determine the increase in ton-miles which could be hauled, or on the 
basis of a given payload, imagine the advantage .in terms of increased range." 

Salmon cited the Ryan fireball Navy fighter as the first plane in the world to 
combine propel J er and jet propulsion, and said, "there exists no doubt in my mind 
thct given a set of reauircments for s new airplane, so long as they include a rc- 
puirement for high cruising or top speed, that one which Is designed around a com- 
posite power plant (jet and propeller) will exceT in overall performance," 

"The all-jet airplane, while capable of very high speeds, has very little thrust 
horsepower at low speeds, and must carry a very heavy fuel Joad to get any rceson- 
ab ' e range ••'t all, making it deficient in take-off performance. Since it must -y- r 
iTiaintcin high speeds to maintain its power, it is deficient in tight turn maneuvers 
bQCd-'.ss it must slow down In order to avoid excessive structural loads. In slow 
speed climbs necessary in combat to avoid losing contact with an adversary, it is 
also at a disadvantage because of its low thrust horsepower. 

"For these reasons we find need for a composite powered airplane, combining 
propeller and jet propulsion, which is indicated in those cases where more high speed 
performance is required than is obtainable from a propelier-dri ven power plant alone, 
but where range, take-off performance, climb and maneuverability cannot be com- 
promised, as is ttiecasevviththe^ll-jetairp I an e. 

"As in the Ryan Fireball, we combine all of thi good characteristics of both 
the propeller drive power plant and of the turbo-jet and find that each compliments 
the other so as to very largely overcome the inherent operating deficiencies of both. 
I know that some of my listeners drs raising their eyebrows at this statement; but 
from such differences of opinion as this stems the scientific progress by which we 
as a nation grow great." 



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RYAN NAMES MANKEY AS 
ASSISTANT TO PRESIDENT 



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3EHGH FrELD • SAN DiEGO 1. CALIFORNIA 



Appointment of W, Art Mankey, well-known aircraft engineer, as Assistant to 
the President was announced today by T. Claude Ryan, President of the Ryan Aero- 
naut ical Company. 

Mankey 's special assignment at Ryan will be as coordinator of the aircraft en- 
gineering and experimental manufacturing departments, master scheduling and schedule 
follow-up on aircraft including new combat plane projects now in progress for the 
U. S. Navy. 

After an absence of almost 20 years, Mankey has rejoined Ryan. In 1926, he 
served as engineering consultant to Claude Ryan in the days of the Ryan M-l mail 
planes and 8-1 Brougham cabin planes, which were near to being the first of the 
long line of Ryan planes that have been produced over the past two decades, buring 
those early days Mankey was Chief Engineer of the Louglas company in Santa Monica 
and through an arrangement made by Ryan with Donald Douglas, Mankey worked for Ryan 
part-time, 

Mankey's aircraft engineering experience goes back 30 years to before the days 
of World War I when he served as a civilian engineer with the Navy in the section 
which later became the Bureau of Aeronautics, After his service with the Douglas 
and Ryan companies from 1922 to 1927, Mankey was chief engineer of Detroit Aircraft 
Corp., where he designed the first fighter airplane to have retractable landing 
gear. 

In 1933 Mankey joined Northrop Aircraft, in charge of engineering, and fol- 
lowed that with wartime assignments as chief of production design for the Glenn L, 
Martin Co., and engineering manager of Bell Aircraft Company, 




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W4 



RETURNED VETERANS CREDITED FOR ARMY AND 
NAVY SERVICE GET RYAN 5-YEAR SERVICE PINS 



RGH Field • San Diego l. California 



Time served with the Army, Navy and Marine Corps by Ryan Aeronautical 
Company employees who have now returned to their peacetime Jobs has been 
credited to their accumulation of seniority toward coveted service pins, 
eleven veterans discovered yesterday when receiving their 5-year diamond- 
studded Ryan awards. 

The four years John F. Connors, manifold worker, spent as an aviation 
machinists mate In the Navy was considered as the equivalent of service with 
the company, and added to his 14 months previous employment at Ryan, won him 
a 5-year pin, presented by Earl D. Prudden, vice-president. 

After the presentation ceremony, Prudden ran a hurried check of company 
seniority records which disclosed that 487, or more than a third of the Ryan 
plant's total personnel, have been with the company over five years. Leading 
the entire list, of course, is president T. Claude Ryan with 24 years service 
as of last month; Earl D. Prudden, vice-president, over 17 years; and H. J, 
van der Linde, assistant production superintendent, with 15 years service. 
Ten other employees have ten years or more of service. 

Among the other veterans receiving 5-year service awards yesterday 
were Noel Coath, 39 months in the Navy; Raymond Schneider, 35 months, Air 
Forces; William Smith, Navy, 38months; Walter Shields, Navy, 37 months; 
George WIdmaler, 18 months. Army; and M. w. Wilder, Louis Schaffer, Claude 
Routh, Robert Booth and Alvin Bennett, all with Navy Service. 







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RgTURNED VETERANS CREDITED FOR AHMY *^ND 
NAVY SERVICfc 6£T RYAN 5-Y£Aft S£ftVIC£ Pir«5 



ERGH Field 



San Diego 1, California 



With the return during ractnt months of many war v«ttrens to their 
former jobs at the Ryan Acroaauttcni Company, a chscK of records yesterday dis- 
closed that 437, more than a third of ail personnel at San Liego's oldest 
aircraft plant, hdve been with the carpany over five years, 

Occasion for the check-up was the presentation of five-year service 
pin awards by £ar| D. Prudden, vice-president, to eleven recently returned 
veterans who were ylven credit on the Htyan seniority list for the time they 
served with the Ar»y, Navy and f^arine Corps during the war. 

Senior man «M>fly the group of returned veterans vat Jithn F. Connors, 
aanlfoid worker, four of whose five years of Hyan seniority were earned 
white serving as an aviation machinists mate in the Navy. Noel Caath was 
credited with 39 months service, also in the Havy, and Raymond bchn«ider, of 
the Air Farces, with 35 months Army service, toward their Ryan five-year dia- 
mond service pins. 

Leading the entire list of Ryan personnel in point of service is, of 
course, president T. Claude Ry«n who founded the company 24 years a^. Carl 
C. Prudden, vice-presic'ent has been with the organization continuously for .-aore 
than 17 years, while h. j, vanderLinoe has fifteen years service. Ten other 
employees have ten years or more of service. 

Among the other veterans receiviny ^year service awards yesterday were 
William Smith, Navy, 38 months; vaiter Shields, Navy, 37 months; ueorge widmaier. 
Army, 18 months; and M, w, wiloer, Louis Schaffer, Claude Houth, Robert Saoth 
and Aivin i»ennett, all with Navy service. 






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RYAN CLOSES NEW CONTRACTS 
FOR $2,500,000 MANIFOLDS 



*** 



ERGH Field • San Dieoo 1. California 



Contracts totaling more than $2,500,000 in new exhaust manifold busi- 
ness for the Ryan Aeronautical Company's stainless steel manufacturing di- 
vision have been signed in the last 60 days, it was announced today by T. 
Claude Ryan, president, 

"A large share of this post-war business is for installation of Ryan 
manifolds on the country's newest and largest four-engined long-range pas- 
senger and cargo transport airliners," Ryan said. The company executive ex- 
plained the new orders would also assure future business since transport 
planes have a five to ten year period of service use, during which the ex- 
haust systems must be periodically replaced because of the gradual deteriora- 
tion of even the finest heat-resistant alloys from continuous exposure to 
the extreme temperature which the manifolds are required to handle on engines 
of two and three thousand horsepower. 

Under the contracts just signed, Ryan manifolds will be standard equip- 
ment on the giant Boeing C-97 Stratocrui sers, one of which recently set a 
new cross-country transport specd^ record, and on the Gouglas Aircraft's DC-6 
airliners which will make their appearance later this year on the country's 
commercial skyways. 

Another importint contract just obtained is that with General Electric, 
leading producer of jet and gas turbine engines, for parts for that company's 
new "prop-jet" power plant which turns a propeller by means of a qls tur- 
bine and at the same time provides jet propulsive thrust from the engine's 
exhaust. Manufacture of jet prjpulsion engine assemblies represents a new 



-2- 
and expanding field which the company expects to represent an important share 
of future business of the Stainless Steel division. 

In addition to their installation on Boeing and Louglas commercial air- 
liners, Ryan manifolds will also be furnished under the new contracts for the 
b-50 superbomber, new version of the earlier b-29 Superfortress. In the 
mi I i tary f i el d, the company also has new orders from Lockheed for exhaust 
collectors for the P2V2 mul t i-engi ned patrol and search bomber; from North- 
rop for the radical four-sngined B-35 flying vying bomber; from Louglas for 
th2 C-54 Skymaster and C-74 Globsmaster military transports, largest now 
flying; and from Martin for the Mauler, the Navy's newest carrier-borne dive 
and torpedo bomber. 

Ryan also has new replacement orders on all of Louglas Aircraft Com- 
pany's earlier transports including the four-sngined CiC-4 passenger liners, 
end the twin-engined LC-3, C-47 and C-53 transports. 

■'Present production of Rysn manifolds is at a gratifyingly high per- 
centage of the wartime level," according to Sam C. Breder, sales manager, 
"and new business is being booked in continually increasing volume." 




vt^^^"-' 






)ERGH Field • San Dieoo 1. California 



STILLWAGEN NAfCD COtvlTROLLER 
OF RYAN AERONAUHCAL COMPANY 



Promotion of C. A. Stillwagen, 38, to the position of ControUcr of 
the Ryan Aeronautical Company, effective today, has just been announced by 
the Board of Directors, 

A veteran of six and a half years service in the Ryan organization's 
financial departments, Stillwagen will retain his position as corporate 
Secretary, to which he was named by the board a year ago. He is also Sec- 
retary, Controller and a member of the board of directors of the subsidiary 
Ryan School of Aeronautics, 

During the war, Stillwagen was responsible for the business management 
and much of the organizational work in setting up Ryan Schooi*s huge Army 
pilot training centers, first at San Diego and later at Hemet, California, 
and Tucson, Arizona. 

Coincident with the assumption of his new duties, Stillwagen announced 
the promotion of Dale H. Ockerman, general supervisor of the company'-s ac- 
counting department, to the position of Assistant to the Contro Ner. Ockerman 
has been with Ryan for the past five years, much of that time as office mana- 
ger of the Ryan School of Aeronautics, of which he retains the position of 
Assistant Secretary. 



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ERGH Field • San Diego 1. California 



QLU TIH&RS RUOIN RYAN 
EHSINfetRIMQ 0£PT. IM M£w 
DRIVE FUR Ma«£ WORKERS 

The old timer acronautlcdi engineers are coming back to work in aviation 
in San Ciego. At Ryan Aeronautical Company, where the shortage of highly 
trained engineer* is acute, 'lllijaa F, Schult has rejoined the engineering 
department after an absence of eighteen years. 

When he left the ftyan San Diego plant in 1928 there i«er« only four other 
engineers in the entire department. Today there are 225 and tTte company is 
seeking to eflH)ioy 75 «^% experienced engineers now critically needed to com- 



plete work en projects being undertaken far the Araity and Navy. 

Two former students of the ^an School of Aeronautics, who graduated In 
Aeronautical Engineering in 1940, have also returned t« the cotapany engineering 
department. Douglas McArthur returned today after his wartime assignment as 
the British Air Coioalss ion's resident representative at Oouglas aircraft. 
McArthur came to the <<yan School ss a Canadian student in 1936. James M. 
Smith, Jr., for th« pdst five years in the Douglas co«t^any*s engineering de- 
partr>ent, has also rejoined Ryan. 

Schult's former boss, <«. Art Hmkey, chief engineer in 1928 of the old 
Ryan company, returned to the organization after an extended absence the first 
of this year, as assistant to the orssident in charge of enyineering-praducticn 
coordination on military aircraft projects. 




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!H Field • San Diego l. California 



Sent to: 

Aviation Magazines - Red. 
Financial - Red & Yej low 
San Diego - Red 



For Rei case 
Friday, May 10th 



■/4 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY GOES ON 



/ 



REGULAR QUARTERLY DIVIDEND BASIS 



Adoption by the Board of Directors of the Ryan Aeronautical Com- 
pany of a policy of declaring dividend payments on a regular quarterly 
basis was announced 4e4-ay by T, Claude Ryan, president. At the same 
time, an initial quarterly dividend of 10 cents per share, payable 
June 10 to stockholders of record May 25, was declared by the Board. 

In addition. Directors declared a special dividend of 15 cents 
per share, also payable June 10 to stockholders of record May 25, 

"The Board of Directors," Ryan explained, "deemed the adoption of 
this policy of regular quarterly dividend payments justified by informa- 
tior/now available as to results of operations for the ,1945 fiscal year 
and the prospects of continuing profitable operations," 




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RGH Field • San Diego 1. CALfFORNiA 






RYAN GETS MILLION DOLLAR 
ORDER FOR EXHAUST SYSTEMS 



One million dollars in new orders for exhaust manifold systems de- 
signed and manufactured by the Stainless Steel Products Division of the 
Ryan Aeronautical Company, have been received since the first of April, 
T. Claude Ryan, president announced today. 

The contracts just received are in addition to $2,500,000 In new 
orders which Ryan announced late in March had been placed with the com- 
pany in the previous 60 days. 

Ryan exhaust manifold systems for latest models of the Douglas, 
North American, Lockheed, Fairchild and Northrop aircraft companies are 
to be supplied under the new contracts. 

Production in Ryan's exhaust manifold department can be maintained 
at a high level, with the present employees already assigned. Little 
change in total employment will result since the new work will be replacing 
that which is now being delivered in heavy volume to Ryan's many manifold 
customers. While more employees arc not now required in production de- 
partments, Ryan has openings for approximately a hundred additional 
trained engineers in its airplane engineering department. 

The Stainless Steel Products Division is also going ahead with 
work on a number of non-aeronautical items which will soon be ready for 
volume production. 



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RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



'45 PROFITS REPORTED GOOD - 



'^Indications are that the Ryan Aeronautical Company's annual report for its 
fiscal year of 1945 which ended October 31, last, will show substantial earnings, 
even though contract cut-backs and cancellations occurred throughout the year, and 
had a major effect on the years operations. ^ 

The issuance of the company's annual report was postponed, as previously an- 
nounced, until more accurate information as to contract settlements was available. 
Although settlement of these contracts is still not complete, they are now so far 
iimijh along, and the results sufficiently clear, that Ryan's annual report will 
be ready for issuance soon. 

It is understood that results of the first five months of the present fiscal 
year are also substantially in the black. In common with other companies, Ryan did 
an abnormally high volume of business during the war years and has had to readjust 
operations sharply downwaij/, but fupt i u i P i unij for the first five months would In- 
dicate that the company has accomplished effective adjustments to the present changed? 
conditions without a period of operation at a loss. 

Principal current activities of the Ryan Aeronautical Company include major 
development work and manufacture of experimental quantities of advanced type com- 

ba^ planes for the Navy, and a substantial production volume of stainless steel 
items in its well established Metal Products Division. The latter includes 
aircraft engine exhaust systems, heat exchange equipment, jet propulsion engine 
parts and accessories, and certain non-aeronautical products which fit the company's 
facilities and manufacturing techniques. Details of the non-aeronautical products 
have not yet been released for public announcement, though it is understood^ they 
involve substantial orders. "^ 





\^\v.* 



0^ . \** 



ERGH FrELD < SAN DlEGO 1. CALIFORNIA 



Sent to: May 28, 1946 

Aviation Red 
Financial Red 
Technical Red 
San Diego 



RYAiNl A'wARLEO $200,000 CONTRACT TO 
6UILD CJNVAIR 240 AIRLINER EXHAUSTS 



Collector rings and allied exhaust system accessories for Consoljdated- 
Vultee's twin-engine 240 airliners will be provided by the iletal Products 
Division of the Ryan Aeronautical Company, it was announced today by T. 
Claude Ryan, president. 

The initial order !s for approximately $200,000 and is based on re- 
ouirements for the "more than 100" airliners which have been contracted for 
by A,nerican Airlines and VJestern Air Lines. In aircraft industry circles, 
it is reported that other airlines 'will soon order 240s from Convair, in- 
creasing the initial order considerably. 

Ryan's iletal Products Division has long been providing exhaust systems 
for America's leading transports including the tv/in and four-engine Douglas 
bC-3 and uC-4 airliners, no'v so widely used on the country's airways. Ryan 
manifolds have also been selected as standard equipment on the newer trans- 
port aircraft just now getting into production, including, in addition to 
Convair'S tw i n-enq i ne 240 , the four-engine Boeing Stratocru i ser and the 
giant Douglas' DC-o and DC-7 transports, along with a number of other new 
mode Is, 







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ERGH Field • San Dieqo I, California 



May 20, 1946 

Sent to: 

San Di ego - Red 
Technical - Red 
Av iation Mags. - Red 
Financial - Red 



RYAN ESTABLISHES EASTERN OFFICE 
FDR ITS NETAL PRiDDUCTS DIVISION 
WITH PETERS Olvl AS SALES ENGINEER 



Establishment In Washington, D. C. of eastern headquarters of Ryan Metal 
Products Division of the Ryan Aeronautical Company to handle sales and service of 
its exhaust manifold systems and new non-aeronautical products, was announced to-u 
B«^ at San Diego by T. Claude Ryan, president. 

The Metal Products Division will occupy space in the company's established 
offices at 516 Bond Building. Richard D. Peterson, who recently joined the Ryan 
organization, has been appointed Sales Engineer for the eastern territory, with 
headquarters at Washington. James Stalner, exhaust systems engineer from the 
San Diego plant, has also been assigned to the eastern area as Engineering Repre- 
sentative, 

E. R, Scroggie is the Ryan Aeronautical Company's Washington aircraft repre- 
sentative, handling matters relating to the company's aircraft manufacturing con- 
tracts with government agencies, 

Peterson, who prior to joining Ryan was for seven years with Solar Aircraft 
Company, most recently as assistant sales manager, will serve as sales and en- 
gineering consultant on exhaust manifold projects and will work with eastern air- 
craft manufacturers to whom Ryan supplies exhaust systems, jet engine parts and al- 
lied accessories. He received his technical tr^iining in mechanical engineering at 
Vclparalso University, Indiana, and after four years service with the Navy served 
on the production planning staff of the General Electric Plant at Ft, Vi/ayne, 



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RYAN^AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FfELD • SAN DIEQO I, CALrFORMIA 




FlKEdALLS IN "Or'ENL.G FLOyVcK" KOLL-UUT 



One of the most beautiful demonstrations of precision 
group flying is the "Opening Flower" maneuver of VF-41, 
first Navy squadron to be equipped u\Xh jet planes - the 
Ryan FR-| prop and jet coniposi te-engined Fireballs. 

At a recent Los Angeles air show, the squaoron of six- 
teen Ryan jet fighters streaked low across the field in a 
single column, breaking off to port and starboard alternately 
to perform a column roll-out, or as the pilots of VF-4i prefer 
to call it, an "opening Flower." In the photo above the 
squadron leader, flying the first Fireball, is rolling out to 
port to be followed by number two plane (tolling to starboard. 




Wcdheidfltv , Twin ** 3 , 
S« vt to ' 



ERGH Field • San Diego 1. California 



RYAN EMPLOYMENT TO REACH 2000 
• AS 100 NEW. WORKERS ADDED MONTHLY 

Employment at the Ryan Aeronautical Company will approach the 2000 mark by 
late fall, it was disclosed today by T. Claude Ryan, president, who stated that 
loo additional production workers and technicians will be added each month for 
the next four or five months. 

Since March, employment has been stabilized at about 1425, but during the 
past two weeks 25 aircraft engineers and 50 production workers In the airplane 
experimental development department have been added bringing the personnel of San 
Diego's pioneer aircraft plant up to Its present 1500 workers. 

The increase of |00 employees per month will be required for execution of 
Ryan's military airplane development contracts, for production of co-nventi onal- 
engjne exhaust manifold systems and jet engine parts and accessories of the com- 
pany's design, and for manufacture of certain new, but as yet undisclosed stain- 
less steel products for which the company has received volume orders. 

With emphasis upon new military aircraft and aerial weapon designs and upon 
advanced flight research projects, Ryan has strengthened its position by expand- 
ing its airplane engineering personnel by one-third in the past six months. In 
addition to engineering and manufacturing work under way on an advanced model of . 
the jet-plus-propeller type of Navy fighter, similar in general type to the Fire- 
ball. Ryan also has several new confidential projects for the military services 
in the design stage. 



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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 



Sent to: Journal 

RYAN WORKERS TO GET FOUR- {"J^r/if!, ^""" 

1 1 bone-Sun 

DAY FOURTH OF JULY HOLIDAY 'S;;3.p,„, e/26/46 



Ryan Aeronautical Company workers will enjoy a four-day 
holiday over the Fourth of July week-end, it was announced today 
by company officials. 

Decision was reached by production executives at Ryan today 
to close the plant on Friday, July 5th in order to make the long 
week-end possible. Thursday, the Fourth, is a holiday, and on 
its present 40-hour week, the plant does not operate Saturday and 
Sunday. 

(We understand no uniform plan for Fourth of July week-end 
operation has been adopted by San Diego aircraft plants). 



ficifJu 




BERGH Field • San Oieso 1. California 



For Release 
Wednesday, July I 
Sent Tei 

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Ret> 



METAL PRODUCTS DIVISION OF RYAN 

AERONAUTICAL ADDS CASKET SHELLS AS 
NEW PRODUCT: 1000 PER MO. SCHEDULED 



Entry of the Ryan Aeronautical Company Into another field of stainless steel 
products, through its Metal Products Division, was disclosed today with announce- 
ment by T. Claude Ryan, president, that the company has begun manufacture of high 
quality durable alloy metal casket shells to be supplied to casket manufacturers 
and finishers throughout the nation. 

First showing of the Ryan casket shells, featuring entirely new and distinc- 
tive styling made possible by the company's extensive experience in metal design 
and fabrication, has just been completed at Kansas City to casket Industry repre- 
sentatives assembled from all parts of the country. The one-week showing, ar- 
ranged through Earl T. NSAivcomer, recently appointed national distributor for Ryan, 
resulted In firm orders for 20 carloads of casket shells with a value in excess 
of $350,000. These represent the highest volume orders for a new casket design 
ever placed in a like period of time in the Industry, ant* Indicate the wide ac- 
ceptance which the new Ryan product has immediately received. 

The enthusiastic reception the Ryan casket shells have received and the targe 
Initial orders just placed have resulted in a large-scale manufacturing program 
being scheduled. The plant Is now being tooled up for volume production, A 
schedule has been set calling for a delivery rate of 1000 casket shells per month 
to be reached by early fall. 



:l!^ 



■31532- 



-2- 

Precision steel dies, which assure great accuracy and ease of manufacture 
on a production line basis, are now being machined in Ryan's tooling department 
and v; 1 1 1 56oh be ready for the expanded production sfchedules. 

Lesign and engineering work on the casket shells wcis started early this year. 
After preliminary showings, Newcomer found interest so high in the new precision- 
built chrome nickel alloy casket shells that production plans were immediately 
revised upward. Vvhjie the first production orders are for chrome nickel alloy 
casket shells, other high quality durable alloys, principally copper and bronze, 
wi I I be used on subsequent runs. 

Since formation of its Metal Products division, Ryan has analyzed a wide 
variety of products which could be built with present facilities and utilizing its 
established manufacturing technioues. "All of these studies," says T. Claude Ryan, 
"have been based on the theory that any products we add to our line must be 
basically sound and demonstrated as capable of competing [n the established market 
so that they will become a permanent part of our operations and not just a tem- 
porary activity. 

"We have been approached by scores of concerns asking us to manufacture 
various kinds of metal products but have felt that extraordinary care is called 
for in investigating and judging the long-range prospects of each separate item. 
Volume orders can be obtained for an almost unlimited number of metal products at 
this time due to present shortage of consumer goods. Many companies, however, will 
find little advantage in producing goods which are not economically sound for pro- 
duction in their type of organization, facilities or location, and will be unable 
to compete in the open market when the present abnormal demand is satisfied. 

"For these reasons, we have proceeded most cautiously and have rejected many 
manufacturing opportunities which we feel do not offer the long-range possibilities 
we believe are necessary to justify development costs." 



-3- 

The Ryan Metal Products uivision was organized earlier this year to further 
develop, in both the aircraft and non-aeronautical fields, the company's es- 
tablished business as one of the country's leading designers and fabricators of 
stainless steel and other high nuality metal alloy products. Principal aircraft 
items are exhaust manifold systems and associated accessories, in which the com- 
pany has long been one of the country's largest suppliers, and the newer field of 
high temperature alloy parts for jet propulsion and gas turbine engines. 

Entrance of the Ryan Aeronautical Company, through its I'^ietal Products Di- 
vision, into manufacture of non-aeronautical products should not be interpreted 
as any lessening of the organization's interest and activities in the strictly 
aircraft field, Ryan was careful to point out. Rather, he said, it supplements 
and supports its airplane development and production worl< by providing fuller 
utilization of the company's war-expanded manufacturing facilities, and assures 
a more stable flow of production and stability of employment. 

Through its airplane division, Ryan is currently developing an entirely new 
and advanced-type fighter airplane for the Navy, and working on a number of Im- 
portant military engineering and research projects for both the Army and islavy. 
The new Navy fighter will be a composite-engine plane using both propeller and 
jet propulsion as in the Ryan Fireball design .which was produced during the war. 
Further description of the new Ryan fighter has not yet been permitted. 



.su*..^ 7- ;?;?_•<; 






CAPT. g£HRgS ^\\X DESCRIBE CA^^RICR 
flUKSlHa FOR KYAN FaR£MiuN*S CUA 

Tkt ktnblng and ntroic savins of th« aircraft carrier Franklin will 
be dtscriiitd by Cs^t. L«siit C. Qehrts, cacfimanding officer of the Haval 
Air Station, Horth Uland, for mmbtrs of tfic Forenen*$ Club of the Rywi 
Aeronautical CoflNiany tonight (Thursday) at seven o'clock In tne Sun Room 
of San Olego Hotel. Official Navy motion picture* of the bombinii will be 
shown In connection with Capt. Gehres* talk 

Capt. Strhrcs was in coaamand of the Franklin in March last year «hcn 
the carrier, operating (>Q raiies off the Japanese cuast, was sertausly 
crippled by enemy bombs. 

Al^ough wracked by terrific internal explosions and fires, the ship 
was saved by the valiant efforts of her crew, and she limped bock into port 
a stirriny reminder of arte of the greatest heroic feats in neval annals. 

M, w, Keiley, president of the Kyan Farefti«n»8 Club, will preside. 




*^*!V 



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RGH Field • San Diego 1, California 



^or Rcltast 
Tuttday, July 30 



Sent to: 
San D j ego 
Financ jal 



flYAN ACftQNAUTICAL TO PAT 
RE6ULAR aUART£m.T DIVtDO« 



Dirtctors of tt)« Ryan Aeronautical Coi^any havt di-> 
ciarad a rtgular Quarttrfy dividtnd of 10 ctntt par ahart, 
payable Saptambar lOtb to ttecktioldars of racord August 23rd. 













»* 



Sent to: 
San Diego Red 
Technical Red 
Financial Red 
Avi at ion Mags Red 
July 26, 1946 



DBERGH Field • san Diego 1. California 



MARKET FOR RYAN METAL PRODUCTS 
WIDENED BY NLW MANIFOLD ORDERS 

Widening of the market for exhaust systems and other items designed and manu- 
factured by Ryan Aeronautical Company's Metal Products Division was indicated to- 
day in an announcement by T. Claude Ryan, president, that orders have been re- 
ceived from a number of new firms the company has not previously served. 

Most important among the new orders is that from Fairchild Aircraft for the 
exhaust manifold equipment for the Army's new C-82 twin-engine "Packet" cargo 
■plane. 

For Menasco Manufacturing Company of Los Angeles, Ryan has just signed a 
contract to provide jet engine equipment for a new secret development that company 
is undertaking for the Army Air Forces. AiResearch Manufacturing Company, also 
of Los Angeles, has given Ryan orders for special aircraft air conditioning units, 
a new field of production for the company's Metal Products Division. 

The Allison Division of General Motors, scheduled to become the Army's lar- 
gest supplier of conventional and jet engines, has also placed substantial orders 
within the past two weeks for Ryan exhaust manifold equipment. 

Additional orders from Boeing Aircraft Company, an old Ryan customer, have 
been placed for exhaust systems for the new four-engined B-50 Superfortress bombers 
and for C-97 Stratocrui sers. 




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SENT TO: 

San Oi ego 
Red List - JU 
July 29, 1946 



RFC OFFERS NON-PHI OR I TY SURPLUS 
SALE OF SHOP EQUIPMEKT AT RYAN 



Disposal of $14,000 worth of non>priority, R.F.C.-owned^ shop 
equipment will be made by the Ryan Aeronautical Company this week fron 
9 A.M. until 5 P.M. daily at the west end of the factory grounds on Lind- 
bergh Field. 

The inventory includes electric drill motors, small grinders, steel 
work benches, stools, vises, cabinets, radio, laboratory and test equip- 
went, cafeteria equipment md other miscellaneous manufacturing aids and 
equipment. 

Since no priority is required to purchase the offered items, the salt 
provides non-priority buyers the opportunity of obtaining hitherto unobtain- 
able equipment. The sale is limited, however, to purchases not to exceed 
$500.00 per customer and goods are not to be purchased for resale. All 
transactions arc on a fixed price, "as is, where is" basis. 




<i^ ***^ !^^^* 



Sent to; 
Technical Red 
Financial Red 

Aviation Mags Red. 
San D i ego Red 

July 31, 1946 



BERGH Field • san Diego 1, California 






RYAN AWARUEU NAVY CONTRACT 
FOR METALLURlilCAL RESEARCH 

A contract for a metallurgical research program in connection with develop- 
ment of new types of materials suitable for jet power plant and exhaust systems 
equipment has been placed with the Metal Products Division of the Ryan Aero- 
nautical Company by the Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics, T. Claude Ryan, president, 
reveal ed today. 

Details of the project have not been disclosed except for the basic announce- 
ment that the company in cooperation with the Navy would conduct research work on 
new high heat-resistant alloys and on products fabricated from these new materials. 
In this connection, Ralph Haver, chief engineer of Ryan's Metal Products Division, 
points out that the biggest problem facing aircraft and engine designers is the 
development of metals capable of withstanding the elevated temperatures, exceeding 
1600 degrees Fahrenheit, now encountered in both jet and the new, high-powered 
conventional engines. 

The importance of proper design of exhaust systems for conventional engines 
was recently stressed by Douglas Aircraft Company in revealing that speed of their 
new DC-6 airliner has been increased approximately 25 miles an hour by use of Ryan 
"ejector" exhaust stacks which provide a supplementary jet thrust, similar to that 
of a jet engine. This particular design was developed as a result of close en- 
gineering cooperation between Douglas and Ryan technical staffs. 

Replacing less modern equipment, Ryan exhaust systems for Army airplanes have 
just been ordered in substantial volume by the Air Materiel Command at Wright • = 
Field, the company announcement also stated. 



a^ 







Sent to: 
S. D. Red 

Technical Red 
Aviation Mags (Red) 
July 29, 1946 



V?<>-*^ 



lERGH Field • san Diego 1. Californ 



TWENTY OFFICERS OF U. S. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE 
SCHOOL TO RECEIVE SPECIAL TRAINING AT RYAN 

Twenty pilot-officers from the Postgraduate School of the United States 
Naval Academy will visit the Ryan Aeronautical Company this fall for two days 
of concentrated practical instruction in aeronautical engineering and advanced 
design problems, according to arrangements just completed by Capt, H, A, Spanagcl, 
Head of the Postgraduate School at Annapolis. 

All of the officers are naval aviators, most of them with combat experience. 
To supplement their classroom education in aeronautical engineering, Ben T. Salmon, 
Ryan's chief engineer, at the Navy's request, has arranged for a series of nine 
lectures by ranking authorities of the company's various technical divisions. 
This type of practical instruction in the field has been a feature of Naval 
Academy postgraduate training for some years, according to Capt. Spanagel, and 
is considered extremely valuable in preparing officers for technical assignments 
within the Naval organization. 

Because of Ryan's pioneering work in developing the FR-I Fireball fighter, 
first plane in the world to combine jet propulsion with thrust from a propeller, 
much of the lecture and discussion time will be concentrated on the engineering 
problems encountered in the design, development and manufacture of this unique 
combat Navy plane and its logical successors. 

The opening lecture on "The Trend of Aircraft Research and Development" will 
be given by Mr. Salmon. Other papers will be presented by C. R. Tuttle, Senior 



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Design Specialist; W. T. Immenschuh, Project Engineer on the Fireball; A. W. Con- 
over, Flight Research Manager and Chief Test Pilot; Larry Martin, Experimental 
Department Manager; R. B. Johnston, Chief Aerodynamiclst; Joel Whitney, Thermo- 
dynamicist; Harold Hasenbeck, Laboratory Supervisor; and H. R. Foottit, Chief of 
Structures. Each of the talks will be followed by a discussion and question period. 

The visiting officers will also tour manufacturing and experimental depart- 
ments as part of their two-day practical instruction. T. Claude Ryan, company 
president, will be host to the Naval Academy group at a dinner the last night of 
the ir visit. 

All of the officers who will visit Ryan have completed two years of post- 
graduate instruction in aeronautical engineering, and after their field trip this 
fall will register at M. I.T. or Caltech for another year of training. 







H Field • san Dcego 1, Calii 



Release Tuesday, August 13, |946 
to: 

San Oiego 
Technical 
Financi a! 
Aviation Mags 



RYAN INSTALLS NEW TEST CELL 
FOR JET PROPULSION RESEARCH 



A concrete cell, steel reinforced, designed by the Ryan Aeronautical Com- 
pany especially for testing the largest available jet propulsion and gas tur- 
bine engines, and allied equipment the company engineers and builds, has just 
been completed at Ryan's Lindbergh Field plant. 

The new test house has been equipped with all Instrumentation necessary to 
measure jet engine performance, thrust and fuel consumption, and will make it 
possible for the company to run complete ground tests of jet power plants. 

Designed for maximum protection of Ryan research personnel assigned to jet 
engine studies, the test house is built somewhat along the lines of the Army's 
equipment at Its Muroc Lake operational base, but has been modified to make It 
more flexible so as to accommodate different types of test units. 

The jet equipment to be tested Is placed in a test stand between concrete 
walls. Controls, instruments and personnel are located beyond the wal I on one 
side, while the fuel is stored beyond the other wall to eliminate fire hazard. 
At the location where the turbine and compressor of the jet engine are sometimes 
spinning at the terrific speed of over 17,000 r,p,m. during test runs, operators 
are protected by one inch of steel armor plate and 18 Inches of reinforced con- 
crete, while heavy plate glass and small protecting steel grills give access 
for visual observation of the engine. 



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Ryan Metal Products Division Is playing an Important role in both engineer- 
ing and manufacturing in the revolutionary new field of jet power. Already a 
leader in the design and production of exhaust systems for conventional recip- 
rocating aircraft engines, Ryan now also supplies important equipment and does 
engineering design and development work for the newer jet propulsion and gas 
turbine engines now coming into wide use. 



*— f 




RYAN^AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO I. CALIFORNIA 




RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY REVEALS 
HELICOPTER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 



FOR RELESSE 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, A.M. 

San Diego ^^ / 

Technical 4 1> 

Financi al 

Aviation Magazines 



First confirmation of a report tliat has been current for some time 
that Ryan Aeronautical Company was interested in helicopter development 
worl< came from T. Claude Ryan, president, today, 

"We have had an active interest In the helicopter type of aircraft 
far a number of years," Ryan said, "and a considerable amount of engineering 
and experimental v/ork on rotors and mechanisms has been carried on In re- 
cent months. Same extremely interesting and worthwhile development work 
has been accomplished, 

"This type of aircraft has great possibilities, but a considerable 
amount of improvement and refinement of present type helicopters is neces- 
sary before they reach the stage of substantial practical utility, although 
that point may not be far away. Wc arc planning to actively continue our 
present program of helicopter research and development," 



w.w. 

Given to TRIBUNE-SUN, UNION, JOURNAL 

and INDUSTRIAL TIMES at E.D.P. suggestion. 

Mght make good newsletter item* 

9-6-46 

W.P.B. 



Arthur S. Silllngst, Chief Inspector of the Ryan Aeronautical Company, 
till leave Monday morning for the annual convention of the National Association 
of Foremen which is to be held Septeniber I?, 13 and 14 in St. Louis, Mo. 
Billings will be an official deieyate from the Ryan Foreman's Club in which 
he is Vict President. This local organization is une of iiiore than 12^ Foremen 
and management clubs throughout the nation which are affiliated with the 
Notional Association of Foremen. This group is an educational organization 
dedicated to the worli of raising the standards of foremanship as a profession 
and creating greater unity among ai I members of (vianagement. 

Billings will report back to the Kyan Foreman's Ciub upon the many valu- 
able contributions to better management which will be presented to the 10,000 
members attending the convention. Highlighting these events will be an address 
by Charles F. Kettering, Vice (^'resident of General Hotors Corporation and 
Director of the Research Laboratory, who will speai^ on "America, what Do we 
Owe You?" Harry Woodhead, President of Consaiidated-Vultee Aircraft corpora- 
tion, and Charles R. Hoolc, President of the American Rolling Hilt Company will 
also speai( to the assemblage on phases of management. 

AiBong the events scheduled fur this *'Heport To The Nation** convention, 
is a conducted tour through bO St. Louis industries and a huge display of 
national exhibits to be shown at Kiel Auditorium. 




Tot Tribime-Sun, Union, Journal and Industrial Times* 
For: Septefflber 11, p.m. release 






OFFICHcS fBXM U.S. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 
TO RECEIVE SPECIAL TRAINING AT RIAN 



BERGH Field • San Diego 1. California 



Twenty pllot-offiosrs from the postgraduate school of the United States 
HsYal AcadMsy vdll visit the Ryan Aeronautical Conpany on Septanber 13 and 14 for 
concentrated practical instruction in aeronautical engineering and advanced design 
probleias, according to arrangements ocniploted by Captain H. A. Spanagel, Head of 
the Postgraduate School at Anapolis. 

All of the officers are naval aviators, most of them with coodaat experience. 
Included in the 07oup aret Lt. Condr. Donald J. 0*Meara, Lt. Comdr. Clyde C* 
Andrews, Lt. Coodr. (SLmn W. Burger, Lt. Comdr. Jerry F. Daniels, Jr., Lt. Cootdr. 
Joseph B. Deodati, Lt. Coiulr. Charles W. Griff ing, Lt. Comdr • Edward B. Mcsiteath, 
Lt. Comdr. Leo W. Ifiillane, Lt. Comdr. Albert D. Pollock, Jr., Lt. Comdr. Orlan A. 
Soli, Lt. Comdr. Russell L. Reiserer, Lt. K^ineth P. Harden, Lt. James M. Bowie, 
Lt. William £• Ditch, Lt. Paul C. Durup, Lt. Gerald S. Huestis, Lt. Floyd F. Beck, 
Lt. Joseph 0. Weisenberg, Lt. Ifllliam C. WUbum and Lt. (jg.) Jack U, Miller. 

Ben T* Salmon, Ryan*s Chief E^ineer has arranged a series of nine lectures 
by ranking authorities of the company's various technical divisions to be presented 
to the visiting officers on Friday and Saturday. This type of instruction in the 
field has been a feature of Naval Academy postgraduate training for years, according 
to Captain Spanagel, and is considered valuable in preparing officers for technical 
assignncnts within the Naval organization. 

Because of Ryan's pioneering work in developing the FRi»l Fireball Navy Filter, 
first plane in the world to combine Jet propulsion with propeller thrust, much of 



:^^ 





>*^^v 






iDBERGH Field • san Diego I. California 

pag« 2 

the dlsoussicm vill bo dwoteci to engineering problems encountered In the design^ 
deTelopoient and oanufaoture of this unique combat Navy plane and its logical 
successors • A special flight demonstration of the Fireball will be presented to 
the visitors on Friday by A* W. Conover, Kyan's Chief Test Pilot. 

Aaong the mgineering papers vMch idll be presented end discussed by Ryan 
engineers will be a lecture On «Tr«id of Aircraft Research end Developnent'* by 
Ben T* SalJ&on, Chief Bigineer and other contributions by C* R« Tut tie. Senior 
Design Specialist} II. T. Xoimenschuh, Project Engineer on the Fireball j A. W. 
Conover^ Flight Research JSanager and Chief Test Pilot; Larxy Sfartin, Iljqjerimental 
Departisent Manager; R. B* Johnston, Chief Aerodynajsicist; Joel YMtney, Thex^ody- 
namicist; Harold Easenback, Laboratory Supez'visor) H. E. Footitt, Chief of Structures 
and Roy Cunninghsfii, £9q;>erlfiiental Coordlivator* 

T« Claude Ryan, cooipany President, idll b e host to the group on Friday evening 
at a dinner arranged in the Cuyamaca Club. Attending this function with Uxe visit- 
ing officers will be re^esentatives from the Havy Bureau of Aeronautics office at 

U. Alex Uihalko, 
Eyani Lt. Cosidr. R. 0« Deitser, Lt. Coiadr. Carl B. Noeeker, , Frsjnk Pellegrinoj 

coapany officials Farl D. Prudden, Vice-President, George C. Wood&rd, Viee-Presidentf 
C* A* Stillwagen, Corporate Seoretaiy and Bribers of the Engineering Departm«it« 

All the officers visiting Ryan have coopleted two years of postgraduate 
instruoticm in aeronautical engineering. After their plant visit, which includes 
a tour of the manufacturing and experimental departments, they will register at 
MaT.I. or Caltech colleges for another year of training. 




^^'i^-:;: 






(DBERGH Field • san Diego 1. California 



An aviation pioneer oif 24 years' experience, the Ryan Aeronautical Company 
Is currently engaged In three major fleltfs of manufacturing: aircraft, aviation 
exhaust equipment and commercial metal products* A new version of the famous 
FR-I Fireball Navy jet fighter, world's first composi te-engined airplane, Is the 
company's most important aircraft project. Only major aircraft factory with an 
Important manufacturing division devoted to mass production of exhaust systems, 
Ryan Is building the exhaust equipment for most of the natlon^s finest airliners. 
In the non-aeronautical field, the concern has announced sizable orders for its 
new stainless steel casl<et shell. 

During each year of the war, Ryan made a greater percentage of vital s%- 
haust equipment which served the heavy fighters, giant transports and super- 
bombers of the battle skies. Now, well into its peacetime program, the company 
has emerged as the largest producer of this type of aircraft components for com- 
mercial aviation also. Among the prominent new transports which fly with Ryan' 
manifolds are the Douglas DC-7, .DC-6, DC-4 and DC-3 airliners; C-54 Skymaster; 
C-74 Globemaster? Boeing C-97 Stratocru iser ; B-50 Superbomb^r; Northrop B-35 
Flying Wing; Consol i date-Vul tec Model 240 transport and Fairchlld C-82 "Packet" 
transport. 

As a by-product of exhaust system production Ryan has become the nation's 
largest user of stainless steel for aviation purposes. Miles of the bright sheets 
flow through the 43-acre factory at San Diego each month*. Staggering quantities 
of oxygen, acetylene, hydrogen and elcctr i.ci.ty are used to "stitch" the white 



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mani fold metal together. For these mass production needs, Ryan has developed 
faster, better manufacturing techniques; 

Undoubtedly, no task which stainless steel Is called upon to perform Is as 
tortuous as the job it does in an aircraft engine exhaust system. The exhaust mani- 
fold on an aircraft engine serves the same purpose as the exhaust system on an auto- 
mobile except that Instead of removing the hot gases generated by about 100 horse- 
power, it must serve the terrific combustion of several thousand horsepower, it 
must be as light in weight as possible and yet withstand the effects of corrosion 
and vibration while being subjected to frigid external temperatures and fiery in- 
ternal blasts. 

The sheer power which has been compressed into the small size of a 3500 horse- 
power radial aircraft engine is a titanic force to contemplate. One of these new 
engines packs almost twice the power of the average passenger train locomotive, yet 
could neatly be placed In the cab. Like rows of rapidly firing cannon barrels, the 
28 cylinders of these mammoth engines each fire 21 explosions of air and gasoline a 
second. To support this combustion they consume air like a raging forest fire, So 
much air, that special air gumps called superchargers, must be used to force enormous 
quantities down the engine^s windpipe, like some giant "iron lung," 

Every molecule of air and gasoline which is rammed down the engine's cylinders 
must be forced out and returned to the atmosphere — none of it is destroyed. It is, 
however, greatly transformed from the cool air which entered the intake ducts to 
a fiery blast of 1700 degrees temperature rushing from the exhaust ports. This 
volcanic gas could easily melt the aluminum structure of the airplane and must be 
carefully channeled back to the atmosphere. Stainless steel has earned a shining 
reputation as the outstanding metal used in the performance of this vital job. 

The tremendousfy rapid advance In the power developed by both conventional 



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pIston-typG engines and jet power plants has placed a great responsi bi 11 ty upon 
metallurgists. Strides made in this direction have outdistanced the laboratory's 
efforts to find new materials which can witstand the terrific temperatures genera- 
te.d. The Ryan Laboratory is maintaining a full program of research in the field 
of high temperature metallurgy which Is adding to the fund of l^nowledge at in- 
dustry's disposal. In conjunction with the steel producers, Ryan has determined 
the most desirable stainless steel formulae and finish for the specialized worl< 
of exhaust host disposal. 

Using the latest scientific machines, Ryan research technicians "torture" 
stainless steel molecules to force them to give up their secrets. They are 
"electrocuted" In the Spectrograph, photographed through the microscopic "eye" 
of the Metal lograph and pinched in the jaws of the Hardness Tester, other samples 
arc yanked apart with a 200-ton tug, cooked in molten salt and vaporized in the tiny 
oven of the Two-Mlnute-Carbcn-Determinator, Each clue to the behavior of the 
steel at elevated temperatures is pursued with the scientific tenacity of a modern 
Sherlock Holmes. 

The result of much of this research has been to give added usefulness to the 
huge amounts of exhaust heat energy which were formerly wasted. |n addition to 
their primary function of carrying away volcanic engine gases, Ryan exhaust equip- 
ment has been devised to do many vital jobs in the airplane. The rushing exhaust 
gas is harnessed to spin the air compressor of turbosuperchargcrs, provide ef- 
ficient anti-Icing heat for wings and control surfaces and warm cabins, carburetors 
and gun installations. By utilfziing the "kick", or jet propulsive thrust, of ex- 
haust gases speeding through ingeniously designed tubes Ryan has added as much 
as 28 miles per hour to plane speeds. 

Using the mlJIIons of BTUs of exhaust heat which would otherwise be wasted 
to the atmosphere each hour, saves the weight of extra heaters and fuel needed 



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to perform these tasks. This elimination of weight adds speed and carrying 
capacity to the airplane. Thus Ryan engineering is reversing the proverbial 
adage and making it read "V/aste Makes Haste,"' 

The birth of the sensational gas turbine jet engine has placed new em- 
phasis on heat resistant metals. It is a heat engine of the hottest kind — a 
windmill run by a hurricane of hot air. Early turbines were unsuccessful because 
the blades could not stand the heat. Only after heat resistant metals, which 
could take cherry-red temperatures without elongation, were discovered could the 
gas turbine become useful. Today, the big problem is to find alloys which will 
withstand even higher temperatures for long periods of service, |n this Interest- 
ing work, Ryan's long experience in handling tough temperature jobs Is a marked 
advantage. The company Is putting its unexcelled knowledge to work on a metal- 
lurgical research program which is closely coordinated with the military services 
and the steel producing companies, 

Ryan is more than a pioneer manufacturer, |t is a research and engineering 
oirganlzation for aviation's needs which Includes a tcp-notch laboratory and a full 
flight test program. It is a skilled Industrial plant with modern facilities 
and mass production "know how«" And finaliy/it Is widespread service organization 
immediately available for technical counsel on service problems or new design 
questions to all other manufacturers* 



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September 26, 1946 

Sent to: 

San Diego ) 

Miscellaneous Aviation Mags.) 



lERGH Field • San Diego 1, California 



NAVY'S AERONAUTICS CHIEF 

VISITS RYAN AIRCRAFT PROJECTS 



In one of his first post-war inspections of military aircraft and 
engine production facilities, Rear Admiral Harold B. Sallada, chief of 
the Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics, in company with T, Claude Ryan, presi- 
dent of the Ryan Aeronautical Company, last week surveyed the company's 
factory and the current assignments Ryan has under way for the Navy. 

Accompanying Admiral Sallada were Capt. C. A. Nicholson, head of 
the Navy's piloted aircraft division, Lt. Comdr. R. 0. uetizer. Bureau 
of Aeronautics Representative at Ryan, and Lieut. J, J. Pace of the pro- 
curement division. Included in the projects surveyed by the Navy's top 
aircraft officers were Ryan's entirely new larger and faster, jet-plus- 
propeljer Fireball-type fighter and jet engine developments incorporat- 
ing Ryan's techniques in fabricating stainless steel. 



Left to right: 



4 



.. * , ■: 










September 26, 1946 
Sent to: 
San Diego ) 
Aviation Mags) Red 
Financial ) 



BERGH Field • San Diego 1. California 



EFFECTIVE CONVERSION TO PEACETIME OPERATION 
REPORTED BY RYAN TO STOCKHOLDERS: OFFICERS 
AND DIRECTORS REELECTED AT ANNUAL MEETING 



Successful adjustment of the Ryan Aeronautical Company from war to peacetime 
operation in the year since V-J Day and the favorable financial position of the 
company were reported to shareholders at the special annual stockholders meet- 
ing by T. Claude Ryan, President, and by other officers and directors. 

"The company," Ryan reported, "has been fortunate in accomplishing adjust- 
ment to peacetime operation combining design and manufacture of aircraft v^ith 
volume production of aeronautical accessories and commercial metal products 
adapted to good dollar volume and which can be conducted economically with company- 
owned facilities. Present business is proving profitable, and the company is now 
studying additional products which might add further to the volume of business." 

Stockholders were advised that "Research work for the government in super- 
sonic planes and pilotless aircraft is being actively carried on but military air- 
planes are not at this time being purchased from airplane manufacturers in ouantity 
but only primarily as development projects. Present military requirements are in- 
dicated by comparison of the 100,000 planes manufactured by the industry in this 
country during the war with the approximately 700 being produced this year." 

"Increasing peacetime orders for Ryan exhaust systems, jet engine components, 
other aircraft accessories and commercial stainless steel items in the company's 
Metal Products Division, as well as rapidly progressing work on the entirely new. 



i 



-2- 



larqer and faster j et-p I us-propel I er Fireball-type Navy fighter, have resulted 
in an increased hiring program which will bring the company's personnel to 2000 
employees by the year end," 

Stockholders reelected the Board of uirectors which has served during the 
past year. This board includes T. Claude Ryan, President; Earl U. Prudden, Vice 
President; George C. Woodard, Vice President Treasurer; C. Arnholt Smith, Chairman 
of the Board of the United States National Bank and President of National iron 
Works, San Diego; and Frank iM. Phillips, President of the Washburn Wire Company 
and director of many eastern business enterprises, of Providence, R. I. 

Following the stockholders meeting^ the Board of Directors met to select of- 
ficers of the corporation for the coming year at which time T. Claude Ryan was re- 
elected president to head the Ryan organization for the 25th consecutive year. 
Other officers re-elected in addition to Ryan, Woodard and Prudden, were Colin A. 
Stillwagen, Secretary-Controller; and John 0. Hill, Assistant Secretary. 



/i 



tfi 



•1 












FOR A.M. RELEASE 
OCTOBER I, 1946 

Sent to: San Diego 

Aviation Mags. ) 
Technical Mags.) Red 
Financial Mags.) 



>BERGH Field • san Diego 1. California 



SUTTON NAMED ENGINEERING ADVISOR 
AND ASSISTANT TO RYAN PRESIDENT 

Appointment of Harry A. Sutton, nationally recognized aeronautical engineer, 
to the position of Assistant to the President and Engineering Advisor to the Ryan 
Aeronautical Company, was announced today by T. Claude Ryan, president. 

Sutton is best known in the industry through his long connection with Consoli- 
dated-Vultee Aircraft Corporation where he was Director of Engineering for that 
company's twelve divisions. 

At Ryan, Sutton will serve as engineering consultant to the management. His 
responsibilities will include liaison with the Army and Navy on current aircraft 
contracts and on development work the company will shortly undertake for the mili- 
tary services. He is now in Washington with Ben T. Salmon, Ryan's chief engineer, 
in connection with projects for the Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics. Before their re- 
turn to San Diego, the Ryan engineers will also visit the Air Materiel Command at 
Wright Field for conferences with Army Air Forces experts. 

Sutton brings to the Ryan company thirty years experience in aviation beginning 
with his World Vlar I training as an Army pilot at Rockwell Field, North Island. He 
entered the Army following engineering training at Oregon State College. After com- 
pleting flight training here, Sutton was assigned to Kelly Field, Texas, as a pri- 
mary instructor. He was selected, along with other promising young Army officers, 
for postgraduate aeronautical engineering training at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. He was then assigned to McCook (now Wright) Field, Dayton, the 



(, 



-2- 

Army's aviation research center, where for ten years he played an important part 
in aeronautical engineering projects. 

Sutton received the distinguished Flying Cross and the Mackay Trophy for his 
pioneering work in solving baffling problems in connection with airplane spins. 
In addition to serving as project officer on this program, he also was test pilot 
in the first extensive actual flight research of spins. During this period of 
Army service, Sutton was again selected for advanced aeronautical engineering 
studi es at M. I.T. 

Leaving the Army for an industrial position, Sutton joined the Aviation Cor- 
poration as head of its engineering department, and after two years there went 
to Curtiss-Wright, Buffalo, as Chief Test Pilot and head of aerodynamics. When 
Consolidated, also then of Buffalo, moved to San Uiego in 1935, he joined that 
company as assistant chief engineer, advancing from that position to Director of 
Engineering for Convair's far-flung aircraft activities. 



d 



Sent to: 

San Diego - Red 

Miscel I aneous 

Aviation Mags, Financial 



From: Aircraft Industries Association 
7046 Hollywood Blvd. 
Los Angeles 2S, Calif. 



For Release 
Wednesday, October 2nd 



RYAI^' ELECTED HEAD OF VffiSTERN 
AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURERS COUNCIL 



Election of T. Claude Ryan, president of the Ryan Aeronautical Com- 
pany, San Diego, as Chairman of the ?festern Region Executive Comrnittee 
of the Aircraft Industries Association, v/as announced today by Los 
Angeles headquarters of the trade organization. 

At the same time William M. Allen of Boeing Aircraft, Seattle, 
was named Vice Chairman. Ryan, formerly vice chairman, vd-ll serve 
as head of the aircraft manufacturers council for one year. Retiring 
as chairman is Lalviotte T. Cohu of Northrop Aircr^af t . 

Other members of the executive committee of the industry's west 
coast organization are Donald Douglas of Douglas Aircraft, Harry Wood- 
head of Consolidated-Vultee, Robert E. Gross of Lockheed and J. H. 
Kindelberger of North American. 



X 










v->^ 



.<^^^^*^ 



^^ 



>* 



RGH Field • San Diego 1. California 



Date- 



/c^ 



_, 1946 



"Technical Story - Long Version" 
Sent with pixs to: 
Aviation Mags Red and Yellow 
Technical Mags Red and Yellow 



EXHAUST SYSTEM TO MUFFLE LIGHTPLANE 
ENGINE NOISE DEVELOPED BY RYAN AERO 



Development by the Metal Products Division of the Ryan Aeronautical Company 
of a light-weight stainless steel muffler for 65-85 horsepower lightplane aircraft 
engines, which effectively eliminates objectionable engine exhaust noise, and plans 
for its immediate volume production were announced today by T. Claude Ryan, presi- 
dent. 

The new Ryan muffler incorporates in its unique design four essential 
functions: (l) a complete exhaust system, (2) a muffler which eliminates 90 per- 
cent of the engine noise, (3) provision for heating the carburetor air, and, 
(4) provision for delivering heat to the cabin for passenger comfort. 

First public showing of the new Ryan lightplane exhaust system will be at the 
National Aircraft Show, Cleveland, November 15-24, where it will be prominently 
featured by Air Associates^ Inc., leading aircraft accessory supply house, which 
has been appointed by Ryan as exclusive national retail outlet for the muffler. 
Sales of mufflers to lightplane manufacturers for installation on new planes com'ng 
from their assembly lines will be handled directly by the Ryan company's Metal 
Products Di vi sion. ^ 

The Ryan muffler is the first C.A.A, approved lightplane exhaust to be manu- 
factured of non-corrosive material, being fabricated of stainless steel. This is 
the same high heat-resistant steel alloy developed by Ryan metallurgists for use 
in the large, high-horsepower engines for military and commercial transport planes 



-2- 
and provides an added advantage to liqhtplanes since it assures long, trouble-free 
muff I er serv ice li f e. 

While the Ryan muffler eliminates 90 percent of the engine noise, the problem 
of completely satisfying the increasing complaint of lightplane noise, cannot be 
solved until propeller noise is similarly reduced. 

The present production models of the muffler are available for four cylinder 
"flat" engines from 65 to 85 horsepower, but development work is already under way 
to provide similar mufflers for the higher horsepower engines used in some of the 
newer private and light commercial planes. 

Mufflers allow the airplane engine exhaust gases to cool momentarily and dis- 
sipate in an expansion chamber before they are released to the outside air. This 
reduction in velocity decreases the loudness of their "pop" as they expand into 
the air. Frenuently, however, this causes a back pressure which produces toss of 
power, but in the Ryan muffler engine power is maintained since the power loss is 
I ess than 2 percent. 

Exhaust systems currently in use in lightplanes are short exhaust stacks or 
semi-collectors fabricated of mild steel, and do not incorporate muffling, or in 
many cases adequate cabin and carburetor heating features, which are separate in- 
stallations. Although the new Ryan muffler provides for these additional functions, 
the complete unit, with cabin and carburetor heat muffs (shrouds), weighs only 
eight pounds. 

In its C.A.A. approval tests, the Ryan muffler demonstrated carburetor heat- 
rise characteristics far in excess of government speci if icat ions which require a 
90°F. rise with 30°F. outside air temperature at 75 percent engine power. 

The Ryan muffler is designed for quick, easy installation and inspection. 
It can be installed without the necessity of removing the propeller or engine acces- 



,3- 
sories. VJith exhausts currently in use, it is generally necessary to remove the 
engine cowling, propeller, engine, engine oil tank and cylinder cooling baffles 
in order to remove the factory-provided exhaust system. To install the Ryan muf- 
fler it is necessary only to open the cowling, loosen the cylinder baffles and bolt 
the assembly in place. 

Into the design and manufacture of this new product has gone the vast ex- 
perience and skill which Ryan has accumulated as the nation's leading builder of 
exhaust systems and jet engine components. For many years the company has en- 
gineered and built aircraft engine manifolds for the country's outstanding aircraft, 
and now, for the first time, makes available its knowledge of exhaust systems 
problems to lightplane manufacturers and owners. 



(Details of functioning of the muffler are shown in the 
accompanying illustrations). 




Date; /^ - 2 



1946 



OBEHGH FiELD • SAN DIEQO 1. CALIFORNIA 



Short Versi on 

Sent to: 

San Diego - Red 

Foreign - Red (with pix) 

Financial - Red 

Wire Services - Red 



EXHAUST SYSTEM TO MUFFLE LIGHTPLANE 
ENGINE NOISE DEVELOPED BY RYAN AERO 



Development by the Metal Products Division of the Ryan Aeronautical Company 
of a light-weight stainless steel muffler for 65-85 horsepower lightplane aircraft 
engines, which effectively eliminates objectionable engine exhaust noise, and plans 
for its immediate volume production were announced today by T. Claude Ryan, presi- 
dent. 

The new Ryan muffler incorporates in its unique design four essential 
functions: (l) a complete exhaust system, (2) a muffler which eliminates 90 per- 
cent of the engine noise, (3) provision for heating the carburetor air, and, 
(4) provision for delivering heat to the cabin for passenger comfort. 

First public showing of the new Ryan lightplane exhaust system will be at the 
National Aircraft Show, Cleveland, November 15-24, where it will be prominently 
featured by Air Associates, Inc., leading aircraft accessory supply house, which 
has been appointed by Ryan as exclusive national retail outlet for the muffler. 
Sales of mufflers to lightplane manufacturers for installation on new planes coming 
from their assembly lines will be handled dir^jctly by the Ryan company's Metal 

Products Di vi si on, 

> 

The Ryan muffler is the first C.A.A. approved lightplane exhaust to be manu- 
factured of non-corrosive mater i a! , 'bei ng fabricated of stainless steel. This is 
the same high heat-resistant steel alloy developed by Ryan metallurgists for use 
in the large, high-horsepower engines for military and commercial transport planes 



_2- 
and provides an added advantage to lightplanes since it assures long, trouble-free 
muf f I er service I i fe. 

While the Ryan muffler eliminates 90 percent of the engine noise, the problem 
of completely satisfying the increasing complaint of iightplane noise cannot be 
solved until propeller noise is similarly reduced. 

The present production models of the muffler are available for four cylinder 
"flat" engines from 65 to 85 horsepower, but development work is already under way 
to provide similar mufflers for the higher horsepower engines used in some of the 
newer private and light commercial planes. 

Mufflers allow the airplane engine exhaust gases to cool momentarily and dis- 
sipate in an expansion chamber before they are released to the outside air. This 
reduction in velocity decreases the loudness of their "pop" as they expand into 
the air. Frequently, however, this causes a back pressure which produces loss of 
power, but in the Ryan muffler engine power is maintained since the power loss is 
I ess than 2 percent. 




Long Version - General 
Story 



For Release Friday, October 4, 
Sent to: Aviation Mags Red 

Aviation Mags Ye Now 

Technical Red 
Technical Ye I low 









^^ 



>* 



RGH Field • San Diego 1, California 



PLANE NOISE GET ON YJUR NERVES? 

Ryan Aeronautical Company i^evelops New Lightplane 

Muffler Which Eliminates 90fo of Engine Noise 

If the engine noise from lightplanes has been getting on your nerves (John Q. 
Public has doubled his complaints about airplane noise since the first of the 
year), you and the personal-plane owner, too, are in for a bit of relief thanl<s to 
the development by Ryan Aeronautical Company, leading aircraft exhaust system 
builder, of a new private-plane muffler which eliminates 90 percent of noise from 
the engine exhaust. 

The Ryan muffler works on the basic principle of slowing the velocity of the 
hot escaping gases by channeling them into an expansion chamber before their re- 
lease into the open air. 

"At the urging of the Civil Aeronautics Authority, which has long recognized 
noise as one of the greatest deterrents to wider use and public acceptance of pri- 
vate flying, we began a research program early this year looking toward the elimina- 
tion of this objectionable feature," says T. Claude Ryan, president. 

Not only has Ryan pretty well licked the engine noise problem, but at the same 
time engineers of its Metal Products Division developed in one package a complete 
exhaust system including provision for heating carburetor air, and a cabin heating 
system to assure room-temperature comfort for pilot and passengers, as well as the 
muf f I ing feature. 

The public has not merely been irritated by airplane noise. Its complaint, in 



-2- 

fact, has become so loud that it has endangered the seven-year airport-airpark pro- 
gram approved by the last Congress, Already, in many parts of the country, irate 
citizens in residential sections near airports or proposed flying field locations 
have been so vociferous that their protests to city councils and planning commis- 
sions have closed airports or stopped development work on many new projects. The 
pilot, too, has been concerned since it is recognized that the pleasure of private 
flying would be increased more by a reduction in noise than by aJmost any other im- 
provement. 

"The noise problem is a direct challenge to the aircraft industry," say Ryan 
executives "and like other companies we have put our best engineering brains to 
work on it. We feel we have now cone far toward elimination of engine noise. But, 
there is still much work to be done, largely by the propeller people since the 
'prop' contributes a great deal to the overall noise level." 

The noise level of a lightplane flying at allowable height over a residential 
area is less than that of a passing trolley or truck and about the same as a pas- 
senger automobile. But it is an overhead noise, standing out distinctly in the 
sky, rather than one merging into the general noise of street traffic. 

The three chief sources of airplane noise are the propeller, engine exhaust 
and engine clatter. Authorities vary in their opinions, but it is generally es- 
timated that an open-exhaust engine creates about the same noise as the propeller 
at cruising speeds. Engine clatter accounts for only a neglible percentage. 

If a noise comes from several sources, as in the airplane, and one of these 
is predominantly louder, that noise will drown out the others. Two noises of 
about equal intensity, as with the engine and propeller of a lightplane, will when 
combined raise the total sound level only about 3 decibels higher than either alone. 
For example, if a propeller is kicking up 90 decibels, and the engine is also 
registering 90, then the combined noise will be approximately 93, and not 180. 



-3- 

(roughly speaking, a decibel is the slightest change in noise intensity 
detectable to the average ear. Speech runs between 40 and 60 decibels, 
inside a subway train you get 80 and an airplane engine and propeller 
produce about 110 at 18 feet from the propeller with l.oOO r.p.m. At 
120 decibels, sound can be physically felt as well as heard — at 130, 
noi se causes pain.) 

Because of the "merging effect" of different noises of nearly equal sound 
level, developments in the reduction of engine exhaust noise will not appreciably 
reduce the overall noise of the airplane until propeller manufacturers lick the 
noise problem caused by the propeller. 

The reduction in velocity of exhaust gases in the muffler's expansion cham- 
ber decreases the loudness of their "popV as they expand into the air. Frequently, 
however, this causes a back pressure which produces loss of power and engine over- 
heating. In the Ryan muffler, however, engine power is maintained since there is 
less than a two percent power loss from back pressure. 

Until now little has been done to eliminate noise for the private plane pi- 
lot and passenger and for the home-owner near airports because only recently 
has there been concerted demand for such action and knowledge as to how best to 
tackle the problem. But unless lightplane noise is auieted in the near future 
by wide use of exhaust mufflers and effective reduction of propeller noise, the 
development of private flying will be retarded by property owners who resist the 
establishment of airports. 




I Field • San Diego I. California 



PLANE NOISE GET ON YOUR NERVES? 



Released Fri., October 4, 1946 
Short Version Gcnraj Story 
Sent to: S. 0. Red 

Newspapers Red & Yel 
Foreign Red 
Army & Navy Red & Yel 
Midc. Red and Yel 
Financial Red and Yel 
Wire Services Red & Y 
Mags Red and Yel low 
(Pix inci) Photo Syndicates Red 
Radio Yel low 
Chief Editorial 
Writers of 238 



newspapers. 



Ryan Aeronautical Company l^evelops New Lightplane 
Muffler Which Eliminates 90% of Engine Noise 



If the engine noise from lightplanes has been getting on your nerves (John Q, 
Public has doubled his complaints about airplane noise since the first of the 
year), you and the personal-plane owner, too, are in for a bit of relief thanks to 
the development by Ryan Aeronautical Company, leading aircraft exhaust system 
builder, of a new private-plane muffler which eliminates 90 percent of noise from 
the engine exhaust. 

The Ryan muffler works on the basic principle of slowing the velocity of the 
hot escaping gases by channeling them into an expansion chamber before their re- 
lease into the open air. 

"At the urging of the Civil Aeronautics Authority, which has long recognized 
noise as one of the greatest deterrents to wider use and public acceptance of pri- 
vate flying, we began a research program early this year looking toward the elimina- 
tion of this objectionable feature," says T. Claude Ryan, president. 

Not only has Ryan pretty well licked the engine noise problem, but at the same 
time engineers of its Metal Products Division developed in one package a complete 
exhaust system including provision for heating carburetor air, and a cabin heating 
system to assure room-temperature comfort for pilot and passengers, as well as the 
muf f ling feature. 

The public has not merely been irritated by airplane noise. Its complaint, in 



-2- 
fact, has become so loud that it has endangered the seven-year airport-airpark 
program approved by the last Congress. Already, in many parts of the country, 
irate citizens in residential sections near airports or proposed flying field 
locations have been so vociferous that their protests to city councils and plan- 
ning commissions have closed airports or stopped development work on many new pro- 
jects. The pilot, too, has been concerned since it is recognized that the pleasure 
of private flying would be increased more by a reduction in noise than by almost 
any other improvement. 

"The noise problem is a direct challenge to the aircraft industry," say Ryan 
executives, "and like other companies we have put our best engineering brains to 
work on it. V/e feel we have now gone far toward elimination of engine noise. But, 
there is still much work to be done, largely by the propeller people since the 
'prop' contributes a great deal to the overall noise level," 



;^'- 



13' -Ss 





< 






UJ 



UJ 



Edi torial Wr i ters - 

Here is something new and encouraging on 
the airplane noise problem , which in recent 
months has been receiving ever- increasing news 
and editorial page mention. There is hardly a 
city in the country where airplane noise and air- 
port locations are not matters of great civic 
interest and concern. 



1}: ^' 




«.„, . ' __ ;__ j 



^i-'. ,1 .-! 



■'if .V-- :,-,,. 



^'H.- .>^ion .,;>..! :■•; , _ ,. „ 



3 ! .- i J * ■ 



: If. . i ; -. 



; . .• ! 5 r /; J 







^?^> 






Field • San Diego 1. California 



PLANE NOISE GET ON YOUR NERVES? 

Ryan Aeronautical Company develops i>lew Lightplane 

Muffler Which Eliminates 90fo of Engine Noise 

If the engine noise from lightplanes has been getting on your nerves (John Q. 
Public has doubled his complaints about airplane noise since the first of the 
year), you and the personal-plane owner, too, arc in for a bit of relief thanks to 
the development by Ryan Aeronautical Company, leading aircraft exhaust system 
builder, of a new private-plane muffler which eliminates 90 percent of noise from 
the engine exhaust. 

The Ryian muffler works on the basic principle of slowing the velocity of the 
hot escaping gases by channeling them into an expansion chamber before their re- 
lease into the open air. 

"At the urging of the Civil Aeronautics Authority, which has long recognized 
noise as one of the greatest deterrents to wider use and public acceptance of pri- 
vate flying, we began a research program early this year looking toward the elimina- 
tion of this objectionable feature," says T. Claude Ryan, president. 

Not only has Ryan pretty well licked the engine noise problem, but at the same 
time engineers of its Metal Products Division developed in one package a complete 
exhaust system including provision for heating carburetor air, and a cabin heating 
system to assure room-temperature comfort for pilot and passengers, as well as the 
muff I ing feature. 

The public has not merely been irritated by airplane noise. Its complaint, in 



-2- 
fact, has become so loud that it has endangered the seven-year airport-airpark 
program approved by the last Congress. Already, in many parts of the country, 
irate citizens in residential sections near airports or proposed flying field 
locations have been so vociferous that their protests to city councils and plan- 
ning commissions have closed airports or stopped development work on many new pro- 
jects. The pilot, too, has been concerned since it is recognized that the pleasure 
of private flying would be Increased more by a reduction in noise than by almost 
any other improvement. 

"The noise problem is a direct challenge to the aircraft industry," say Ryan 
executives, "and like other companies we have put our best engineering brains to 
work on it. V/e feel we have now gone far toward elimination of engine noise. But, 
there is still much work to be done, largely by the propeller people since the 
'prop' contributes a great deal to the overall noise level." 




.A'^ %.»*' Ix^* 

JERGH Field • San Diego 1. California 



October 4, 1946 
Sent to: 

San Diego Red 
Financial Red 
Aviation News 
American Aviation 



RYAN EMPLOYMENT UP 
200 (N SEPTEMBER 



In its biggest peacetime employment spurt, Ryan Aeronautical Company 
today reported a net gain of 200 workers added during the month of Septem- 
ber, Starting the month with personnel totaling 1725^ employment now 
stands at 1925 and will soon reach the 2000 year-end goal the company an- 
nounced this summer, according to T. Claude Ryan, President. 

Practically all of the employment gain was in production depart- 
ments, with major demand for additional workers in the airplane experi- 
mental and casket divisions. Further employment In both these groups 
is expected. 

Ryan's experimental department has under development for the Navy 
an entirely new, larger and faster, jet-pl us-propel fer Fireball-type 
fighter. 4n the casket division, volume manufacture of metal casket 
shells is now well under way using precision steel dies and tools on 
which production is scheduled to be stepped up to a rate of 1000 units 
per month* 



■•> w *' 




'f ^ •: ; 



: (G;'ii)i; }c ?tj;. 



• ■'■>. « 




RYAN^AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO I. CALIFORNIA 




October 7, 1946 
Sent to; 

Financial Mags - Red 
Aviation Mags - Red 



RYAN AT WORK ON $200,000 NAVY CONTRACT 

FUR MODIFICATION OF FIREBALL JLT FIGHTERS 



The huge final assembly builaing at Ryan Aeronautical Company, little 
used for manufacturing operations since Navy contracts for volume pro- 
duction of warplanes were cancelled after V-J bay, was humming today with 
the clatter of rivet guns. 

Under a $200,000 contract Ryan has just signed with the Bureau of 
Aeronautics, a modernization program involving new type armament in- 
stallations and other modification of the Ryan Fireball fighters is 
being carried on preliminary to assignment of the Navy's first jet- 
propeller planes to extensive sea duty aboard aircraft carriers. 

Using facilities provided in the final assembly building, Ryan 
production men are carrying on the service work and incorporation of 
armament eouipment, including the extensive changes necessary for in- 
stallation of aircraft rocket launchers, on a product i on- I i ne basis. 




RYAN^ AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO t. CALIFORN.IA 




HARVEY APPOINTED EASTERN 
SALES ENGINEER BY RYAN 



Oct. 16, 1946 

Sent to: 
San Ujego Red 
Avi ation Mags Red 
Technical Red 



Appointment of Leighton M. Harvey as Sales Engineer for the 
Metal Products Division of the Ryan Aeronautical Company was announced 
today by Sam C. Breder, Sales Manager. 

Harvey will represent Ryan in a liaison engineering capacity in 
its contacts with aircraft and engine companies throughout the east. 
He will make his headquarters at the company's eastern office in 
Washington, L. C. 

His assignments will include not only exhaust manifold system 
engineering, but also consultation on jet engine components and on 
commercial stainless steel products. 

An engineering graduate of the University of Kansas, Harvey 
spent seven years with Wright Aeronautical Corp. in various en- 
gineering capacities, including assignments in their test laboratory, 
research development section, and field and liaison engineering. His 
principal work was in turbosupercharger research, cooling, airflow 
studies and combustion dynamics. 



Fr« Bill WagoT (Ryan) t,l°'\'' ?' • I'tL R.d 



First mteting of the rectntly famieei San Uicgo Manag«nent Club, af- 
filiated with tht National Association of Foremen, will be held Tuesday 
niQht at 7:00 p.m. in the Sold Hoom of the U. S. Srant Hotel. The new 
group will meet Jointly with the Convair Foremen's Ciub. 

Principal speatcer will be Arthur Horrocks, Industrial relations con- 
sultant to the Goodyear Tire and Hubber Coapany and former president of the 
National Association of Foreiuen. 

Officers of the San ijiego Hanagement Club will formally be Installed 
on this occasion. Included In the group arc L. D. Pratt, president, pro- 
duction manager of the Keico Coopany; £• £. Binger, first vice-president, 
of Solar; J. L. Hobel, second vice-president, of Hohr Aircraft; and H. B, 
Roundtree, secretary- treasurer, of S. &. Gas and £tectric Coo^aiy, 

Under leadership of Lerl 0. Prudden, vice president of the Ryan 
Aeronautical Company, and one of the sponsors of the Ryan Fore>.^n*s Club, 
aanagement representatives of local industry »et recently to for^j the San 
Olcgo Management Club. Hore than 20 industrial finas are already represented, 
and aeabcrship is expected to be doublid in the next few laonths. 




RYAN^ AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 1. CALIFORN.IA 




October 21, 1946 
Sent to: 

WARTIME RYAN PLANES TURN UP IN CHINA '^^!^J!'??„^^^^ ^^'^ 

and ■ e 1 1 ow 

AS PAN AMERICAN AIRLINE PILOT TRAINERS^* ^' 



Wartime military training planes built by Ryan Aeronautical Company - 
were on a new peacetime assignment today in China where Pan American Air- 
ways' asiatic affiliate is using them to train Chinese as airline transport 
pilots for China National Aviation Corp, 

First hint of the new job for the trainers came months ago when Pan 
American ordered six engines and engine accessories as replacements for 
Army PT-22 planes. Ryan officials were frankly puzzled by the orders to 
send the equipment to San Francisco for trans-sh fpment across the Pacific 
since Pan American to their knowledge had none of the trainers. 

The assumption was that China National Aviation Corp., jointly operated 
by PAA and the Chinese government, must have acquired from the Chinese Air 
Force lend-lease Ryan PT-22s flown into China "over the hump" from India 
during the war. This was confirmed last week when T. Claude Ryan, company 
president, received a letter from a friend in Shanghai enclosing a photo 
showing a PT-22 with the Chinese airline insignia painted on the fuselage 
and giving the information that six of the planes are being utilized for 
the training of C.N.A.C. airline pilots. 




RYArsr AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 1. CALIFORNIA 




RYAN BOOKS $500,000 

IN NEW MANIFOLD ORDERS 



October 22, 1946 
Sent to: 

Aviation Mags Red 
Financial Red 
San Diego - Red 



Continued expansion of exhaust manifold manufacturing accjvitler. a': R\ an 
Aeronautical Company through its Metal Products Division was reporter +.oda> by 
T. Claude Ryan, president, with the announcement that $500,000 in new business 
had been contracted for in the past 30 days. 

Although current orders are being filled at a substantia' rate„ new business 
is being booked in considerably heavier volume than deliveries are being inada tj 
customers. As a result Ryan's backlog of orders for exhaust systems now stanos 
at a peacetime record of $2,750,000. This is, o.f course, exclusive of the com- 
pany's substantial unfilled orders for Navy airplanes and aircraft engineering, 
and for commercial metal products. The new manifold contracts represent a net 
gain of $450,000 in unfilled orders over the $2,300,000 backlog reported in mid- 
August. 

Douglas, Boeing, Consol i dated-Vu I tee and Lockheed, leading manufacturers of 
the new twin and four-engined commercial airliners, placed the bulk of the half 
million dollars in new manifold orders. 

Lockheed Aircraft, under contracts just announced, has selected Ryan to under- 
take development of an entirely new exhaust system for the famous Constellation 
transport. Latest order from Boeing is for the exhaust manifold requirements for 
the 417 "regional" twin-engine high-wing transport being developed for feeder-line 
operation. 



-2- 

iJouglas has contracted for over $200,000 worth of additional manifolds for 
the C-54 Skymaster transport, and Convair has substantial ly increased its order 
for Ryan exhaust manifolds for the new twin-engine 240 airliner, soon to have its 
first fl iqht. 










GH Field • San Dieoo 1. California 



October 22, 1946 

Sent to: 

San Di ego Red 

Aviation News - L.A. 

American Aviation - L.A. 

Wal I St. Journal - L.A, 



RYAN aECUTIVCS 'OFf fOfi «CW 



Th« thlrt«entb firing of e c»ptur€d tSerman V-2 rocket at "hite Sands, Uw 
H«xlco, scheduld for Thursday (October 24th), wiii b« wltnMsad by Ryan Aero- 
nautical Company executives Including T. Claude ftyetn, presidents Harry Sutton, 
recently a^ipoloted a9»l5tant to the president and englneerins advlserj mn T, 
Salmon, chief crujlneerj and will Vandermeer, design specialist, wha left for 
the Isolat d desert proving ground yesterday. 

T>ie Ryan represents^tlves ere a«Bong those of industrial orydnlzations coiw 
cerncd with research and development of guided missiles for the ftrmy. Their 
attendance at test firings will enable them to obtain knQwled<je of pre-fMijht 
inspection, loading, launching, tracking m4 Instrumentation, 

The current firings are In the series of tests started In May to evaluate 
performance of the 3fe*:K) ml le-an-hour V*t, to develop trxkling and telemetering 
techniques, to obtain date on physics of the opjper atmpiphere and to train 
personnel In launching large rockets. The instruments necessary to obtain the 
technical data are contained in the inert wariieads of the V-.2S. 

The 14-ton projectile to toe fired Thursday will contain instruments pro- 
vided by the applied physics laboratory of Johns Hopkins University to record 
cosmic ray data and other scientific information. 




>^;vnv 



RGH Field • San Diego 1. California 



October 28, 1946 
Sent to: S. U. Red 

Financial Red 



RYAN TO PAY REGULAR ID 
CENT QUARTERLY DIVIDEND 



Directors of the Ryan Aeronautical Company 
have declared a regular quarterly dividend of 
10 cents per share, payable December lOth to 
stockholders of record November 2?, T. Claude 
Ryan, president, announced today. 







.^->^ 



GH Field • san dieoo 1, CALiFORNrA 



November 18, 1946 
Sent to: 

Aviation Mags. (Red) select 

I ist 
San Di ego Red 



EX-AIR FORCES OFFICER NEW HEAD 

OF ENGINEERING LABORATORY AT RYAN 



Expansion of Ryan Aeronautical Company's already extensive research 
program was revealed today with announcement of the appointment of Lieut. 
Colonel Lloyd F. Ryan, former Air Forces research physicist, as Super- 
visor of Engineering Laboratories. 

Colonel Ryan has recently been released from the Army after five 
and a half years of service including four years as a research physicist 
at the Air Materiel Command, Wright Field, and one and one-half years 
in Europe as an Intelligence Officer under personal orders of General 
Arnold on special investigations of enemy technical developments. 

Much of the advancement in gun sight and fire control computation 
made both before and during the war was accomplished by the Armament 
Laboratories at V/right Field under Colonel Ryan's direction. 

At the S3i(ie time, Harold W. Hasenbeck, former Ryan laboratory 
chief, was named to head an entirely new and significant project as 
Supervisor of Electronics and Control Systems research and head of 
the special military projects laboratory. 




vo 

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RGH Field • San Diego 1. California 



GERMAN ROTARY WING SUBMARINE 
KITE TO BE TESTED AT RYAN 



Date 



.. 1946 



Sent to: 

Aviation Mags Red & Yel. 
Technical Red 
Financial Red 
San Diego Red 



A skeleton-like combination autogiro and kite, towed behind a surfaced sub- 
marine to give German undersea crews an elevated observation post, has arrived 
in San Diego for study and testing by Ryan Aeronautical Company technicians, it 
was revealed today. 

On loan from the technical intelligence branch of the Army Air Forces' 
materiel command at Wright Field, the motorless submarine rotor-kite has been re- 
assembled at the local factory where it is to be used for evaluation studies. The 
project is one of many being carried out under coordinated programs between mili- 
tary and industrial organizations in evaluating captured technical equipment de- 
veloped by enemy countries during the war. 

Known officially as the Focke Achgells FA-330, the autog iro-k i te depends on 
the forward speed of the ship or other vehicle from which it is towed on the end 
of a cable, to turn the 25-foot rotor blades and provide lifting power to carry 
the observer eloft, A forward speed of 17 miles an hour Is required to keep the 
kite and pilot aloft. (Both the autogiro and helicopter are rotary-wing aircraft 
differing solely in the absence of a power source to drive the rotors in the case 
of the autogiro). 

This small, 180-pound, craft has a simple, collapsible, steel-tubing frame- 
work, and a three-bladed rotor. The pilot is entirely in the open, his cockpit 




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consisting only of a pilot seat. A telephone from the observer aloft carries 
messages to the submarine. Aboard German submarines, the kites were stored in 
watertight tubes. 

The conning tower, on which a small spring-supported platform was built, 
served as the landing and take-off area. An electric or compressed air winch 
operated the reel that contained the 500-foot towing cable. Two crew members 
generally assisted at take-off and landing in mooring the unpowered rotor-kite. 
With the submarine under way, a slight breeze or push with the hand was sufficient 
to start the rotor turning. When sufficient rotor speed was reached, the craft 
rose slowly, making its take-off with a slight backward tilt. 

Easily "knocked down" for quick erection and storage in a small area, the 
kite consists of a pilot seat, Controls, a pylon in back of the pilot, a con- 
ventional rotor head, the three-bladed rotors, and a horizontal tube extending 
aft to support the tail surfaces. The lending gear consists merely of skids which 
can be folded together. 

By use of a quick-release mechanism the pilot can, in an emergency, separate 
the rotor, thereby automatically releasing the parachute stored behind the seat 
and permitting the pilot to land safely. 

Will Vandermeer, who has been on Ryan's engineering staff for the past 14 
years, heads up the company's rotary wing research program. 



'^(- 




U. S. Navy Approved 



FOR RELEASF. 

hONDAY 
JANUARY 20 



RYAN^ AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO I. CALIFORN.IA 



Sent to: Complete mailing 
I i st_lT8-4» - 




RYAN DEVELOPS XF2R-I ALL-JET FIGHTER AS 
NAVY'S FIRST COMBAT PLANE TO USE PROP-JET 

A new shark-nosed Ryan all-jet fighter plane, far more formidable than the 
FR-I Fireball, with much greater speed and climb, has been developed for the U. S. 
Navy and has been flying for ttie past two months at the government's Muroc Lake 
desert test base and at the company's factory, both In California, the Ryan Aero- 
nautical Company announced today, 

' Actual performance figures of the new bullet-like Ryan XF2R-I are restricted 
by security regulations, but bas.:!d on published reports of the earlier FR-I model, 
the new Navy jet fighter is probably In the ^OO-nvi I e-an-hour class. Details of 
the plane's armament have not been released. 

The "dark shark" Fireball, as it is known at Muroc, is the first Navy combat 
plane, and the second of any type in this country, to be powered by a gas turbine 
engine turning a propeller. 

Pioneering the "prop-jet" engine field for the Bureau of Aeronautics, the 
XF2R-i is serving as a flying laboratory to obtain operational experience with 
this new type power plant, its propeller and other engine accessories. The new 
Ryan became the first plane in this country powered by a "prop-jet" engine to make 
a cross-country flight when it recently flew from Muroc to the factory at San Diego, 
where it is now based for further tests. 

Like the basic FR-I Firebcll Navy fighter, the new Ryan XF2R-I uses a two- 
engine power plant combination, with the front engine turning 3 propeller. The 
XF2R-I, however, is an all-jet airplane in that power for the propeller Is supplied 



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by a General Electric TG-IOO gas turbine "prop-jet" engine, in the original FR-I 
design, the propeller was driven by a conventional reciprocating engine. 

As in the FR-I model, the XF2R-I has a separate thermal jet engine installed 
in the aft fuselage section to supplement power of the propeller in giving peak 
performance for terrific bursts of speed and phenomenal climb. 

The new shark-lil<e Fireball has an extended forward fuselage section to house 
the "prop-jet" engine. This long, pointed nose has increased the plane's overall 
length to 36 feet, almost 4 feet longer than the FR-I model, and gives the plane 
its sleek, bullet shape. The extended length also has the effect of placing the 
wing relatively farther to the rear. To take care of the greatly increased torque, 
both from the propeller and the spinning turbine wheel, a larger dorsal fin-section 
has been added to the standard FR-I fuselage-tail structure. 

The propel I er-p I us-j et engine combination, as first used in the Ryan FR-i 
Fireball, has been demonstrated as highly effective in giving peak performance 
over a wide range of speeds and altitudes. Although all-jet planes lack flexibili- 
ty at low speeds, particularly during take-off because of the slow acceleration, 
this is overcome by the propeller-pulled, jet-pushed combination power arrange- 
ment of both Ryan models. The short toke-off characteristic is particularly im- 
portant, of course, in aircraft carrier operation. 

This type of composite power has resulted in an excellent combination of de- 
sirable fighter plane characteristics, including high speed over a wide range of 
altitudes, making both Fireballs "all-altitude", rather than just "critical alti- 
tude" high speed craft. In addition, the Ryan composite-powered planes have an ex- 
tremely high sustained rate of climb at all altitude, short take-off, extreme 
maneuverability, slow landinij speed, good combat radius and heavy firepower — 
each with its relative degree of importance to the others. 

The forward engine in the "dark shark" Fireball research plane is a General 



-3- 
Electric TG-IOO "prop-jet" which provides a two-way harnessing of gas turbine 
power to drive a propeller and at the same time boost with jet thrust. About 
three-fourths of the available power is absorbed by the propeller, the remaining 
one-fourth being supplied by thrust of the jet exhaust stream which nozzles into 
troughs on either side of the fuselage, just below the cockpit. 

Mounted at the nose of the plane around a streamlined spinner is the huge 
four-bladed Hamilton Standard square-tipped, super hydromatic propeller. 

The engine in the aft fuselage of the XF2R-I is a General Electric 1-16, and 
is the same thermal jet unit as installed in the earlier FR-I model. Total pow-^r 
of the two jet engines of the XF2R-I is considerably in excess of that of the con- 
ventional and jet engine combination of the FR-I. This increase in available power 
is obtained with a proportionately small increase in gross weight. 



Sent to: 1/30/47 

San Diego Newspapers 





RYAN^ AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO I. CALIFORNIA 



*iAVY ft£r»m:sfcNT/TivE AT mm 

A top ex|t«rt in opttrietion of plarics from strcraft cdrrUrs tuok over today 
•S th« Navy's representativs «t the Ry«n A«ronsutica! Company 't^fien Comdr, holdnd 
L, i^lllttt replaced Lieut. Comdr. R, 0, 8eitz«r, who is retiring After 30 years 
service in Naval aviation including 3^ years assipvaent at Ryan, 

CoMdr, tiiilctt, whs win supervise Jet plane end other projects at ^an for 
the Sureau of Aeronautics, cc^mes to his am berth from almost a year's service 
with the i9th f'lett at Tacoma, Vsashln^ton, where he »as chief inspector In charge 
of inactivating several dozen CVti escort carriers, aotJ "puttln<j theisi away in raoth- 
balls.*' 

Uurtng the late stages of tne msr m the Pacific, Comdr. -illett was coiamand> 
Inq officer of the CV£ "Tskanls fisay," which operated, much of the time out of ian 
Oiego under fleet Air .est Coast, as a training snip for iostructli>n of pilots in 
aircraft carrier operatlun. During 17 mooths on this esslynMsnt, the '*Tdkanis Say" 
est£sblishe(} the remarkable record of only one fatality on siwse 20,200 landings. 

Corner. Vtiiutt's coa»l3at experience was principally with the CVi^. "Segue" as 
assistant air officer on Morth Atlantic aoti-suosaarine patrol and canvoy escort. 
Though the actual figur«?5 have never bepn released, the "tiosue'* balked more aersan 
subs than any other tarrivr. 

One of the faost colorful careers in Havsl aviation Is belny left behind by 
Coffldr, D(>itzer as he retires today to spend ejuch of his time at his appropriately 
named Cescanso mountain horn*', "«etiro dun Crizin,'* (Hetlre, done cruising). Ten 



-2- 

days bttttrif oirpj ar I, he started his career witn th€ f4a»jr b leafttlo^i ta fly 
at Ptns0cal«i, Ft<Dri€s. Aft«r 4}ssi(^{»m«nt ds fH^nt dfficcr abaar«2 tri« ^ianeer 
dircrsft carrier Lansley, vf«itz<r saw (Jwtjr a» »BP«r I BteaiS«nt at shops at l*wth 

tsMnd^ mii uttr »t l^«n«%«, witii furttt€r »ef«ic« a&ourd tJi« Ssr«ti»|)a aa4 dtlt«r 
C4rrl«r», H« #<js first assl§««itf td th« Ltxln^tmi kn BJS, ani^ e*c«j3t far a t»o 
year ptriod «t f-€a$scals rig*^iii«<J aboard the ♦*L€«'* as fllgnt sJecK <ilficifr m%H 

^« w«int dow« In t«« eattl« of tht taral S«a is J«*42, . 




VITJUOdnVO •! 053la NVS • aT3IJ HSUBSaNn 

ANVdWOO nVOIXnVNOM3V-.NVAa 




^/ 



for PM Rel ease 
Thursday, Feb. 6 



RYAN^AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO t. CALIFORNIA 




RYAN SIGNS NEW $700,000 PLANE 
CONTRACT WITH ARMY AIR FORCES 



Receipt by the Ryan Aeronautical Company of a $700,000 increase in a con- 
iratt with the Army Air Forces for development of a new, highly advanced-type air- 
craft of the company's own design was disclosed today. 

Officials of the San Diego aircraft firm declined detailed comment on the 
project. However, they did state that the contract is an extension of an order, 
never previously revealed, which they received some months ago from the Air 
Materiel Command, V/right Field. 

With tht; exception of occasional announcements regarding its continuing de- 
velopment of various jet-p I us-propel I er type combat planes for the Navy's Bureau 
of Aeronautics, Ryan officials have been uncommunicative regarding other military 
programs on which they are working. They have, however, indicated general in- 
terest in the entire field of sonic and supersonic aircraft, both piloted and 
pilotlGss, including research into guided missiles, jet propulsion and rockets, 
but have issued no specific information on current projects. 

Though no connection with the new aircraft development order has been an- 
nounced, recent personnel appointments at Ryan may be indicative of the signifi- 
cance of the new program. In November when announcing the appointment of Lieut. 
Colonel Lloyd F. Ryan, former Air Forces research physicist, as supervisor of en- 
gineering laboratories, the company stated that its already extensive research 
program was being expanded. At the same time, Harold W. Hasenbeck was named to 
head an entirely new project under Colonel Ryan as head of the special military 
projects laboratory. 

Before joining the Ryan technical staff, Colonel Ryan spent IB months in 
Europe as an intelligence officer under personiJi orders of General Arnold on 
special investigations of enemy tt;chnica| developments. Prior to that he was a 
research physicist at Wright Field. 




Feb. 19, 1947 
Sent to; ^■..^, . S. D. Red 




RYAN^ AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 1. CALIFORNIA 

NAVY PILOTS TAKE AlHMAN'S 
HOLIDAY TO VISIT RYAN i^LMT 

One hundred twenty-five officers and men of Carrier Air Group 21, many of 
them combat veterans, took an "airman's holiday^* yesterday and crossed San Diego 
Bay from North island to Lindbergh Field to learn a bit more abaut aviation on their 
"day off." 

Led by their ccfimanding officer, C<9M»ana«r John &. Barlcon, Jr., the pilots 
and ground crews visited the Ryan Aeronautical Co^any where Commander Roland 
Wlllett, newly appointed bureau of Aeronautics representative, and company officials 
acted as hosts. 

After a series of short technical lectures on aircraft design and construction, 
principles of Jet propulsion and the technique of piloting Jet aircraft by J. W. 
Borden, Will lam P. Hrotherton and A] Conover, the visiting alnaen were conducted on 
a guided tour of the Ryan plant where they inspected Navy planes, exhaust systems 
and Jet cc»)ponents under construction. Final event, and high point of the trip, 
was a visit to the steel-reinforced concrete test ceil Ml^ere Air Sroup 21 witnessed 
8 new type jet engine being "run In." 

Air Group 21 is a special training unit under Fleet Air, west Coast, which gives 
pilots the final phase instruction in operatlne from aircraft carriers, and sends re- 
placement airmen to the fleet, its instructors are combat veterans with two or 
three tours of duty, specially selected for their ability to pass on to new pilots 
their combat know-how. 

The Ryan plant visit, <icc>rding to Comdr. Bar! eon, is the first of a series of 
tours of aircraft companies designed to fa<ni Marine personnel of the air group with 



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d«Sign, manufacturing, testing snri service problems of Navy combat aircraft. The 
educational program will be further cxpandcO riurlnq coming months to give the Nevy 
airmen an insight into ail phases of Navy operation throughout the Southwest and 
will include such divergent activities as f«ni I iarization with submdrincs and lighter- 
than-air "blimp" patrol. 



Sent to: Aviation l^ags Red 
& Ye I low 




For A. M, Release 
Tuesday, February 25 



RYAN" AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO t. CALIFORNIA 




Financial Red & Ycl 
Technical Red 
Newspapers Red. 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL REPORTS $300,320 
NET PROFIT FOR 1946 FISCAL YEAR 

Net profit of $300,320 was reported today by the Ryan Aeronautical Company 
in its annual report to stockholders for the 12 months of the fiscal year ended 
October 31, 1946, This Is equivalent to 68 cents per share on the 439,193 
shares outstanding or 74 cents per share if the 34,500 shares held by the Ryan 
School of Aeronautics, a wholly-owned subsidiary, are excluded. 

Gross revenues for the period were $11,973,353 and, while including some 
clean-up of war contracts, consisted largely of peacetime business. Provision 
for federal taxes on income totaled $199,533, 

The net book value has continued to increase and stood at $4,128,697 at 
the end of the period. This is equivalent to $10.20 per share, an advance of 
33 cents from the $9,87 per share reported at the end of the prior fiscal year. 

The Ryan report reflects operations during the period of readjustment from 
the last wartime year with the largest dollar volume of production in the com- 
pany's history to more nearly normal peacetime conditions. "This conversion has 
been successfully accompi ished," reported T. Claude Ryan, president, "in spite 
of the many problems which h?d to be surmounted, and has resulted in a sub- 
stantial net profit for such a period," 

Dividends paid during the fiscal year totaled 45 cents per share; and the 
regular quarterly dividend of 10 cents per share has been declared for the first 
quarter of ^947 payable March 10, 1947. Stockholders were advised that the poli- 



€V'M?9^8. of .1 



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T 



.8,?$ S 



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cy of regular quarterly dividend payments has been continued as justified by the 
current rate of profit. 

Orders at hand on January 31 aggregated $5,588,455, consisting of $2,564,787 
for aircraft and engineering and $3,023,668 for exhaust systems, jet engine parts, 
casket shells and other Metal Products Division items. 

Charts which accompanied the letter to stockholders show that Ryan's net 
pr jfit on gross sales was 2,48?^, a marked increase from the wartime low, for the 
1945 fiscal year, when profit was 6/IOths of a cent on every dollar of sales. 
The profit percentage on gross sales for 1944 was 1.75^ and 2,36^ for 1943. 

Wages and salaries took 42g% of the company's Income for fiscal 1946, and 
materials and supplies 45?o. Miscellaneous expenses totaled 6, 205'° of income, 
and taxes were 3.825^ of the gross revenue. 

Present employment at Ryan is 1800, or about 205& more than a year ago. This 
increase resulted from a larger scale of airplane construction and development 
work and the recent increase in metal products mf.nufactur ing, reflecting the ef- 
fect of new products. 

Although appropriations for military aircraft procurement have been slashed, 
the Ryan report states that the "company continues to play an important part in 
the design and developmental manufacture of aircraft and aeronautical equipment 
of the most advanced scientific design." 

Many of the company's engineering and experimental manufacturing activities 
are veiled by military security requirements, but the Ryan letter to stockholders 
states in general terms that the company is "presently interested in the whole 
field of sub-sonic and super-sonic aircraft, both piloted and pilotless, includ- 
ing research and development on guided missiles, jet propulsion and rockets. 
Significant work In this field is being carried on currently, while future plans 
call for continual emphasis upon the most advanced scientific approaches to the 



(V i'; 



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problems of high speed flight." 

In its Metal Products Division, the company reports that although production 
of exhaust systems is not comparable to the wartime peak, current production is 
believed to exceed that of any other company. As one of the largest fabricators 
of stainless steel, Ryan's production of metal products, both aeronautical and 
commercial, has been on a volume basis, with sales in this division accounting 
for approximately 405^0 of gross revenues, 

"Because it now appears," the letter says, "that all high speed and super- 
sonic planes and guided missiles will use engines requiring stainless steel or 
eauivalent heat-resisting parts for their jet or rocket engine combustion cham- 
bers, exhaust systems and other vital parts, the future possibilities in this 
field for this company are believed very worthwhile, 

"As the only manufacturer of jet and gas turbine components which also de- 
signs, builds and flies jet aircraft, the company through first-hand flight re- 
search has a unique and advantageous position in the development of this expand- 
ing new market," 

Fixed assets increased from $278,132 at the end of the 1945 fiscal year to 
$590,789 on October 31, 1946, This was occasioned by the purchase for $417,727 
of needed and carefully selected machinery, equipment and office furniture from 
surplus government property, the original cost of which as installed and in use 
on company property was $799,175. Such purchases are considered advantageous 
transactions for the company, and negotiations are being completed for the ac- 
ouJs»tio/i of additional needed items on similarly favorable terms. 



■' ''. 



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■ ! :r.-. 



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•■■■*'' »*•! 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



from Bill Wagner 




^f aP6fe-57-^ ^9g? 



Ryan Aeronautical Company late yesterday announced it had just received 
word from the Bvireau of Aeronautics that one of its contracts involving a Navy 
combat plane was being cancelled inanediately, though no faxilt of the company, 
due to unavailability of the ipowei? plant around vjhich the aircraft was designed. 

The Navy contract involved employment of approximately 275 people, and its 
cancellation will require the immediate termination, at least temporarily, of 
this number of employees. Those involved in the layoff are sheet metal workers, 
flight mechanics and engineers y.*-all M the comparer's experimental department. 

Other Array and Navy contracts under which I^an is doing advanced 
development woric on high-speed aircraft and jet engine accessories remain in 
force and are unaffected by the one contract "Wfttefe^e being terminated. 

The extensive work in Ryan's Metal products Division where exhaust 
manifold systems, jet engine components and commercial items, principally 
stainless steel casket shells, are being manufactured in volume, is likewise not 
affected. This division, which specializes in design and production of high- 



^ -f-i.' ■ 



'\ 



of the company's 



quality heat-resistant metal products, accounts for 

Ryan employment has ce s Bcntly boon, otaislTfesg l aroimd 1800 and will be 
reduced to approximately I5OO workers by yesterday's contract Ccincellation, 




jBonsJc 



»^-^- •t^^ )"*-■:. f - 



j-'-r .,r> 




For Release, Monday 
March 17 
Sent to: S. D. Red 



RYAN CASKET SHELL MANUFACTURE 
REACHES VOLUME PRODUCT UN STAGE 



H Field • San Diego 1. California 



With its mechanized production line now in full operation after 
months of planning, Ryan Aeronautical Company has reached volume manu- 
facture of its stainless steel casket shells. Company officials an- 
nounced today that shipments during trie first two weeks of March ex- 
ceeded deliveries made in the entire 30-day period of any previous 
month. 

Ryan manufactures the casket shells and ships them to regional 
manufacturers all over the United States who put In the interior finish 
and market the completed caskets to tho funeral service Industry in 
their trade territory. 

The streamlined design and modern production methods used at 
Ryan ere entirely naw to the metclllc casket industry. They have at- 
tracted so much attention among funeral directors that an increasing 
number of regional manufacturers have been coming to the San Diego 
plant to gain first-hand knowledge of aircraft methods, as applied 
to their business. 

Only recently have the I ight-wciyht, corrosion-resistant metals 

used in aircraft manufacturing been made available for the metal It^ 

> 
casket market, and as a result an entirely new industry is raBidly tak- 
ing shape in this city. 



"^ 




Field • San dieqo I. California 



Sent "to Financial Red List; 

Aviation Mgs. Red List 

Mar. 18, 1947 



RYAN CASKET SHELL MANUFACTURE 
REACHES VOLUME PRODUCTION STAGE 



With its mechanized production line now in full operation after 
months of planning, Ryan Aeronautical Company has reached volume manu- 
facture of its stainless steel casket shells. Company officials an- 
nounced today that shipments during the first two weeks of March ex- 
ceeded deliveries made In the entire 30-day period of any previous 
month, 

Ryan manufactures the casket shells and ships them to regional 
manufacturers all over the United States who put in the interior 
finish and market the completed caskets to the funeral service in- 
dustry in their trade territory. 

The streamlined design and modern production methods used at 
Ryan are entirely new to the metallic casket industry. They have at- 
tracted so much attention among funeral directors that an increasing 
number of regional manufacturers have been coming to the San Diego 
plant to gain first-hand knowledge of aircraft methods, as applied 
to their business. 

Only recently have the light-weight corrosion-resistant metals 
used in aircraft manufacturing been made available for the metallic 
casket market, and as a resuK an entirely new Industry is rapidiy 
tortiag 3^lv.pe Ifi San X^i^QO, 



-'I»^, 



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Sent to Financial Red & Itel low 
list 

Aviation Mags. Red. 
March 20, 1947 




EXPANSION OF RYAN CASKET PRODUCTION 
DISCLOSED AT STOCKHOLDERS MEETING 



Plans for an Immediate Increase In production schedules of the Metal 
Products Division of the Ryan Aeronautical Company by adding a second shift 
to double the production rate of casket shells were announced to stockholders 
yesterday by T, Claude Ryan, President, at the corporation's annual meeting 
here. 

Ryan explained that the present volume of casket production is approach- 
ing the capacity of manufacturing equipment available when utilized on the 
one-shift basis currently In effect. 

Such comparatively high utilization of plant facilities in the post-war 
readjustment period makes possible overhead costs that are not excessive, he 
said. The addition of a full second shift will have the favorable effect of 
lowering overhead rates and increasing efficiency still further. Production 
of metallic caskets begun last year has met with such success that the planned 
increase In output is advisable. 

Casket production, which is now on a profitable basis, is especially well 
adapted to the company's facilities and experience, and the future prospects 
appear very worth-while, the president said. 

Ryan warned stockholders that extreme caution has been and must continue 
to be exercised by the management in the selection of any new products. For 
the immediate future, he reported, the full development of the fields in which 
the company is already engaged is a sounder course than going Into other new 
products. 



- >l i 



-2- 



At yesterday's stockholders meeting, all directors and officers were re- 
elected. Officers, who arc also directors, include T. Claude Ryan, President; 
G, C. Woodard, Vice President and Treasurer and Earl D. Prudden, Vice President. 
C. A, Stillwagan was renamed Controller and Secretary and John 0, Hill, As- 
sistant Secretary. C, Arnholt Smith, President of the National Iron Works of 
San Dicqo, and Frank N. Phillips, President of the Washburn VJire Company of 
Providence, Rhode Island, were re-elected to the board. 

This will be the 25th consecutive year since the founding of Ryan aero- 
nautical activities in San Diego thst T. Claude Ryan has headed the organization. 
The actual quarter-century anniversary wj I I be observed this fall. 

In the airplane division, Ryan reported that the company is working in 
the genercil field of high-speed flight, including both piloted aircraft and 
guidec^ missiles. Contracts are under way for engineering work, experimental 
construction and flight testing, but details cannot be given because of mili- 
tary security regulations, he explained. 

The company continues to play a dominant part In the fabrication of stain- 
less steel for use in the aircraft industry. It produces such items as ex- 
haust systems and allied accessories for conventional aircraft engines, and 
tail pipes, combustion chambers and other components for jet propulsion and 
gas turbine engines. Work is also in progress on ram jet engines and an im- 
portant jet engine accessory of the company's design which is classed as a 
jet thrust augmentation device. 



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Sent: April 6, 1947 
Avi ation Mags - Red. 
Financial Red 
Technical Red 



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RYAN APPOINTS STALNAKER AS SALES 



ENGINEER IN CHAr^GE OF EASTERN OFFICE 



Appointment of James Stalnaker as Sales Engineer in charge of 
the eastern office of Ryan Aeronautical Company's metal products 
division, being established at Roosevelt Field, Garden City, L. I., 
was announced today by Sam C. Breder, Sales Manager. 

Stalnaker, who has been with Ryan for five years as a metal 
products engineer, will serve as sales and technical consultant on 
exhaust manifold systems and jet engine components. He will work 
directly with the engineering departments of eastern aircraft manu- 
facturers for v/hom Ryan builds engine accessories of heat- and cor- 
rosion-resistant stainless steels. 

With five years of engineering experience in this specialized 
field, Stalnaker supplemented his technical knowledge of exhaust 
systems and jet components with several months of production familiar- 
ization at the Ryan factory before taking the new assignment as the 
cofiipany's eastern representative. 




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FIRST FLIGHT QEMONSTfRAT I ON 
10 AM Wednesday, April 9th 
RYAN XF2R>I "Uark Shark" NAVY JET FIGHTER 

The Ryan XF2R-I jet fighter is the Navy's first combat plane to be powered 
by a gas turbine engine turning a propeller , and is the first plane so powered 
to make a cross-country flight. 

Known as a "turbo-prop" or "prop-jet" engine, the General Electric TG-IOO 
gas turbine in the nose of the "Park Shark" both drives the propeller and boosts 
with jet propulsion . 

In addition, the Ryan "Uark Shark" has a separate jet propulsion engine in 
the fuselage to supplement power of the "prop-jet" engine in giving speed in the 
500-mi le-an-houf class, and climbing ability even mofe phenomenal than that of 
the FR-I Fireball. For peak performance both engines are used, though the plane 
is capable of flying on either engine alone. 

While the XF2R-I "Uark Shark" was announced by the Navy two months ago, 
Wednesday's flight v/ill be the first demonstration for the press of the plane's 
outstanding performance. A| Conover, Ryan's chief test pilot and flight re- 
search manager, will fly the "uark Shark." 

The bullet-like XF2R-I gets its "Uark Shark" name from the long, pointed 
nose section which houses the gas turbine engine. Pioneering the "prop-jet" en- 
gine field for the Navy Bureau of Aeronautics, the new fighter was developed by 



-2- 

Ryan Aeronautical Company as a flying laboratory to obtain operational experience 
with this new type power plant, its propeller and engine accessories. 

The propell er-plus-jet engine combination is highly effective in giving peak 
performance over a wide range of speeds and altitudes. Although planes using 
straight jet propulsign lack flexibility at low speeds, particularly during take- 
off because of the slow acceleration, this is overcome by the propeller-pulled, 
jet-pushed combination power arrangement of the Ryan fighters. The short take-off 
characteristic is particularly important for the Navy's aircraft carrier operations. 

The "Dark Shark" is an "all-altitude", rather than just "critical altitude" 
high speed craft, with extremely high sustained rate of climb at all altitudes. 
In addition, it has excellent maneuverability, and is capable of short take-offs 
and slow landings. 



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RYAN CITES HISH PERCENTAGE OF WAR 

VETERANS EMPLOYED; 209 EX-RYAN WORKERS 
AND 525 OTHER VETS HIRED IN PAST 16 MOS. 



The percentage of war veterans employed today at the Ryan Aeronautical Company 
is higher than the proportion of employees who left the company during wartime for 
military service. Earl D. Prudden, vice president, revealed today in discussing 
the company's administration of the veteran rc-enf»ployment act. 

Today one Ryan employee in every seven is a war veteran, while during the 
war only one employee in every eight volunteered for military service or was 
drafted, Prudden stated. 

Since January 1st, 1946, the company has re-employed 209 former Ryan employees 
with military service and in addition has hired 525 other war veterans. So far 
this year 48 Ryan veterans have been re-employed, and 69 other veterans have been 
hired, 

"Since the end of the war the Ryan company has applied a liberal Interpretation 
of the veterans re-employment act," Prudden said. "While our obligation is only to 
re-employ permanent Ryan workers, we have given all veterans, whether Ryan employees 
or not, preference in hiring. This is evidenced by the 525 veterans not previously 
employed who have been hired during the past 16 months, 

"The case of William L. Dickey Is the exception; not the rule. It is such 
exceptions, rather than the excellent record the company has established, which 
attract public attention," 




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Scnt May 29, 1947 

Financ i al Red List 
San Diego Red List 
Aviation Mag Red List 

RELEASE JUNE 3, A.M. 



RYAN GETS $-300,000 IN NEW 

ORDERS FOR EXHAUST SYSTEMS 

Contracts exceeding $300,000 for exhaust manifold systems 
have been signed by Ryan Aeronautical Company during the past 
month with Douglas Aircraft Company, it was announced today. 

The exhaust systems, to be produced by Ryan's Metal Products 
Division, are about equally divided in dollar value between 
manifold equipment for the Douglas UC-6 and C-54 airliners. 

The DC-6 Is Douglas' newest, largest, fastest transport. 
Ryan ejector-type exhaust stacks, standard on the DC-6, give 
the plane a more than 20 mjle-an-hour boost by the jet propul- 
sive thrust of the gases nozzled out the exhaust system. 



o-CP***' '*tr<^<""'°''reo' ■ Aviation R8d Mags (17) 







POWERED BY TUReO-FROr AND STRAIGHT JET, 
NAVY'S RYAN XF2R-! "DAK'; SHARK" TAKES OFF 

Pulled by its four-bladed propeller and pushed by the thrust of its 
jet engine, the Ryan XF2R-I "Dark Shark" Navy fighter is capable of short, 
steep take-offs, a high, sustained rate of climb and speed in the 500- 
mi le-an-*hour class. 

The front engine of the Ryan "Dark Shark" is a General Electric tur- 
bine which both pulls and pushes the plane. The shaft of the spinning tur- 
bine wheel drives the propeller, which absorbs approximately 75 percent of 
the total power output, while the balance of the power of the front engine 
is provided by the jet propulsive thrust of the exhaust gases which are 
nozzles out under high speed from short pipes alongside the pilot's cock- 
pit. 

First Navy plane to use a "turbo-prop" engine, the XF2R-I is serving 
as a flying laboratory to test propeller-driving gas turbines. 



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Wednesday June 4, 1947 
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NEW RYAN "AFTER BURNER," FIRST FOR ACTUAL 
FLIGHT, SPEEDS BLAST OF EXHAUST GASES TO 
GIVE TREMENDOUS BOOST IN JET ENGINE THRUST 



At the flick of a control, pilots flying combat planes equipped with the 
newly developed Ryan "After Burner" will soon be able to add tremendous supple- 
mentary speed and power to the already cyclonic force of the searing gases blast- 
ing from the tailpipe nozzle of jet propulsion engines. 

This was revealed today with the announcement that the Ryan thrust-augmenta- 
tion device is the first specifically designed for regular use in flight. It has 
been developed by the Ryan Aeronautical Company of San Diego for the Navy's Bureau 
of Aeronautics, 

With jet planes already flying at more than 600 miles an hour, the added 
thrust of Ryan After Burners will be invaluable In breathing through the compres- 
sibility barrier as planes approach the speed of sound. In addition, after burner 
thrust-augmentation will be used to give added power for tal<e-off, during combat 
conditions and on all occasions where extra thrust and speed are required. 

In ground tests, the stainless steel pipe of the unit becomes a roaring, thun- 
dering blast furnace which can be heard blocl<s away and from which the colorless, 
searing jet stream, revealed only by heat waves, spurts at over 1,000 miles an 
hour. 

In basic conception the Ryan After Burner Is a ram-jet engine installed down- 
stream from the turbine of a conventional jet engine to add more than one-third to 



-2- 

the power plant's normal propulsive thrust. This Is accomplished by spraying fuel 
into the tailpipe where its burning adds mass and velocity to the speeding gases 
of the jet stream. The problem of burning the fuel and maintaining combustion with- 
in the after burner's short length is a critical one, for it is like trying to 
build a bonfire in a whirlwind. 

Special techninues Ryan has developed for the use and fabrication of heat- and 
corrosion-resistant stainless steels, such as are used in the after burner tailpipe, 
have played an important part in the success of the new thrust-augmentation device. 

As the world's largest user of stainless steels for aircraft, Ryan has had 
the valuable background of producing over a hundred thousand exhaust systems to 
carry away the volcanic heat and gases of the huge reciprocating engines which 
power America's most formidable bombers and transports. In addition, in develop- 
ment of the after burner, engineers have been able to draw upon the company's ex- 
tensive research work in operation of the jet engines and gasoline turbines which 
power the Ryan Fireball series of Navy fighter planes. 

All tests of after burners to date have been made in fixed engine stands on 
the ground, and under these static conditions have shown substantial power gains. 
However, engineers point out that in actual flight, as speeds rise, the power boost 
from the Ryan After Burner will show still greater increases over the normal jet 
engine thrust output. 

ADDITIONAL TECHNICAL DETAILS 

In developing the after burner, Ryan has in effect attached a ram-jet engine 
to a turbo-jet. The after burner application is simpler than the ram-jet, however, 
because the inlet velocities, pressures and temperatures are higher. Since the 
ram-jet depends solely on its speed to compress the air rushing in its nose, it has 
to be launched by rockets to attain the initial 500 mile-an-hour speed required for 
it to operate effectively. But with the after burner, the speed of the air stream 






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In the tailpipe is well above that needed to make the ram-jet operate, so that the 
use of the basic ram-jet configuration as a thrust-augmentation device is logical 
and easily accomplished. 

Amazing results in thrust and efficiency are possible in building an after 
burner for static tests on the ground, but in designing the Ryan unit engineers 
attained high performance even though restricted to the weight and space limita- 
tions imposed by the flight conditions which have to be met. Because it has been 
developed from the outset as a practical flight power booster, the Ryan After Burner 
will undoubtedly be the first American unit to be flight tested. 

Fuel consumption of the after burner at low speeds is high compared to the jet 
engine, but at very high speeds, it is more economical of fuel than the turbo-jet. 

All of the experience gained during the past year from Ryan's research on the 
after burner is applicable to the ram-jet when that engine becomes a major power 
plant for supersonic speeds, company officials pointed out. 

One of the unique advantages of the use of an after burner with a turbo-jet 
engine Is the fact that this method of augmenting thrust does not affect the opera- 
tion of the turbo-jet by imposing additional stresses upon it. Since turbo-jet 
power plants are operating near the critical stress limits of the turbine compo- 
nents, the after burner Is an especially desirable method for increasing thrust. 
This is not the case where water injection, and most other methods, 
are employed to attain thrust augmentation. 

A turbo-jet with an after burner has performance characteristics which fall 
between those of the turbo-jet alone and a rocket. While the rocket is valuable 
for obtaining short periods of thrust augmentation, such as is required for take- 
off (Jato), it actually requires more pounds of fuel per pound of thrust than the 
after burner. Therefore, when sustained thrust augmentation over moderate periods 
is desired, the after burner becomes the most efficient method for the job. 



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Because the after burner does not increase the frontal dimensions of the power 
plant, has good weight characteristics and causes only a negligible Increase in 
the drag of the airplane, its use is indicated in place of a larger turbo-jet en- 
gine. 

(This same basic idea of having a source of great reserve power to supplement 
a medium-powered engine having good cruising characteristics and fuel economy, was 
first used in the Ryan FR-I Fireball composite-engined Navy fighter. In this pio- 
neer jet-plus-propeller plane, the 1300 horsepower Cyclone engine gave the plane 
long range for cruising, but for combat the jet engine was blended in to give tre- 
mendous power for high top speed, for outstandingly high and sustained rate of 
climb and for maneuverability). 

With gasoline used as a fuel in an internal combustion engine, a fuel-air- 
mixture ratio of I to 16 is necessary to obtain complete combustion of the oxygen 
in the air which is sucked into the cylinders. In contrast, the turbo-jet engine 
operates at a fuel-air ratio of I to 50, and as a consequence there is a great deal 
of unburned oxygen in the jet stream. The quantity of this unburned oxygen, then, 
Is the limiting factor In the amount of thrust augmentation which it is possible 
to attain. 

Unlike the turbo-jet, which is limited by the stresses imposed in the rotating 
turbine blades and temperature considerations, the after burner is a completely 
static mechanism and can be cooled below critical temperatures. 

Essentially, the use of the after burner permits raising the fuel-air ratio 
of the combustible mixture to the limit of the chemistry of combustion, whereas 
the turbo-jet alone is limited by the physical requirements of the turbine blading. 

Some of the basic problems which have been encountered in the design and opera- 
tion of the after burner are; 
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homogcneous mixture of air and fuel in the correct proportions, depending upon tem- 
perature and pressure. When you realize that the length of the after burner must 
be quite limited because of practical airplane design considerations, this mixing 
process becomes difficult. Only that combustion and resultant velocity increase 
which occurs within the short length of the after burner itself contributes any 
positive effect to thrust. 

2. Maintaining combustion t The fuel sprayed into the after burner will burn just 
so fast; yet it must be properly mixed and burned with the air in a stream of gas 
which has momentarily been slowed down from its full hurricane force, 

3. Cooling the after burner components ; Without rotating parts, the after burner 
is not bothered with the same stresses as are involved in the turbine blades of 
the turbo-jet. 

4. Control of fuel rate to after burner ; It is very important that the fuel rate 
to the after burner be controlled because excessive combustion of fuel will impose 

a choking at the nozzle which affects the operation of the turbine of the turbo-jet. 
A proper fuel rate is achieved automatically in such a way that the ultimate per- 
formance of the engine-after burner combination is maintained without exceeding 
established engine operating limits. The amount of fuel that can actually be 
burned in the after burner Is limited only by the size of the nozzle and by the re- 
sistance of the metals in the after burner to high temperatures. 

5. Starting ; Starting an after burner has been a problem because the conditions 
are more critical than those experienced after the flame has been started and the 
after burner is in operation. Starting is accomplished by ignition from a spark 

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Sent to Complete Mailing list; 

For Release Saturday P.m. 
June 7, 1947 

In connection with Aviation 
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RYAN ANNOUiNiCES XFR-4 EXPERIMENTAL NAVY 
FIGHTER; TESTS FLUSH ENTRY AIR DUCTING 



A new experimental Navy interceptor fighter, the Ryan XFR-4, which uses a 
jet-plus-propeller power combination to give it sensational climbing ability and 
speed in the 500 mi I e-an-hour class, has been developed by Ryan Aeronautical Com- 
pany, San Uiego, for the Bureau of Aeronautics. 

The new Ryan fighter has an extremely high and sustained rate of climb. Planes 
using jet only, though turning out great power at high speed, must make' a rela- 
tively long take-off while most conventionally powered planes, though capable of 
quick steep take-offs, because of the efficiency of their propellers, lack the ex- 
tra punch which the Ryan fighter has in its jet engine. The good qualities of 
each power source, however, are blended together in the XFR-4 to produce remarkable 
cl imb inc abi I i ty. 

The added performance of the Ryan XFR-4, compared with the production model 
FR-I Fireball, is attained by installation of a new jet engine in the aft fuselage 
section. This new turbo-jet engine is a V^esti nghouse 24-C axial flow design and 
developes far more power than the 1-16 model used in the standard FR-I model. The 
front engine, a conventional propeller-driving Wright Cyclone, has not been changed. 
While actual performance figures have not been released for either plane, the XFR-4 
is superior in both high speed and rate of climb as compared with the recently an- 
nounced XF2R- I "bark Shark" Fireball. The latter is the Navy's first airplane to 
use a gas turbine driving a propeller. 



-2- 

Air ducts for the XFR-4's jet engine are of the flush-entry type, providing 
a smooth contour, without external scoops, on both sides of thp lower forward 
section of the fuselage. This is a marked change from x\,q. FR- I Firebai:. In that 
model, the ducts are located in extended air-foil sections of the leading edge of 
the wing adjacent to the fuselage, 

iii,f? of the principal purposes of the XFR-4 flying laboratory project is a 
study of flush-entry ducting under actual flight conditions. Preliminary to de- 
velopment of this research plane, a conventional Fireball carrier-based fighter 
was converted at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory to test the first flush entry 
duct in a full-scale airplane in the NACA's wind tunnel. 

With its jet-plus-reciprocating engine power arrangement, the XFR-4 is pro- 
vided with electrically operated duct doors which are closed while the plane is 
flying on the front engine only, so as to eliminate the drag of air windmilling 
through the aft jet engine. The electric motor is tied into the starting switch 
for the jet engine so that the duct entry doors open automatically before the rear 
engine can be started. Each flush entry has streamlined "eyebrows" to distribute 
the boundary layer air and a "lip" to collect the air for the duct system. 

The distinctive plan form of the FR-I Fireball wing, which was due to the ex- 
tended leading edge, is not retained in the XFR-4. With use of the flush entry air 
ducts, the wing leading edge is now straight for its entire length. The tail pipe 
diameter and exhaust nozzle opening at the aft end of the fuselage have been en- 
larged to accommodate the larger Westinghouse jet engine. 

Except for the vastly improved performance, and these minor changes in ex- 
terior design, there is little to visually distinguish the XFR-4 from the standard 
FR-I type operated by a Navy fighter squadron. 

The flight test program for the XFR-4 has been conducted under direction of A| 
Conover, Ryan's flight research head and chief test pilot, as part of a long-range 



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rtisearch project. The data being compiled from XFR-4 flights has been correlated 

with results of wind tunnel research at NACA's Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. These 

wind-tunnel tests, particularly as they relate to flush entry ducting, have been 

under way since 1944 and are scheduled for continuing study. 

In addition, flight tests with the full-scale XFR-4 airplane are providing 

linnal experience and data which will be applicable to new combat planes under 

V I j,;mGnt for the Navy, 

Below are listed the various models of the general Fireball jet-plus-propeller 

type, showing Navy designation, company model, and engine installation: 

Hodel FR-I (Ryan Model 28 ) 

Front Engine (Driving Propeller): Wright Cyclone R-1820 (1300 horsepower) 
Rear Engine (Thermal Jet): General Electric l-lb (1600 lbs. thrust) 

Model XF2R-I (Ryan Model 29 ) 

Front Engine (Driving Propeller): General Electric TG-100 "prop-jet" 

(Rating restricted) 
Rear Engine (Thermal Jet): General Electric 1-16 (1600 lbs, thrust) 

Model XFR-4 (Ryan Model 28-5 ) 

Front Engine (Driving Propeller): Wright Cyclone R-1820 (|300 horsepower) 
Rear Engine (Thermal Jet): Westinghouse (model & power rating re- 

stricted) 



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American leadership in the air is in serious jeopardy. Cut back 
95 percent since the war, the aviation manufacturing industry shows 
signs today of progressive disintegration. ULj i n t ! i iM ^ m .^government 
purchases of military planes have dropped far below the safety limits 
recommended by the Army and Navy and Coordinating Coinmittee. 

These circumstances are handicapping the industry in its efforts to 
keep pace with the revolutionary advances in aeronautical science. In 
1946, eight of the twelve largest aircraft companies lost money. It 
has long been an accepted fact that private plane manufacturers cannot 
possibly finance the development cost of new military types which became 
the forerunners of commercial planes. 

To preserve our leadership among nations and ^naintain our national 
security, we must have a sensible long-range progran of research and 
production which will support the minimum recommendations of the Army 
and Navy. 






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Sent to: Aviation 
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SPECIAL: RELEASE TO AVjA MEMBERS 

Neither a conventional airplane nor a jet job looks silly breezing 
along in the Southern California sky but to have a gang of propeller- 
powered fighters come buzzing by at 300 miles an hour with their pro- 
pellers stopped and feathered Is enough to make even members of the 
Aviation Writers Association pause and look twicel 

That's what a lot of members told us after the Navy (with a little 
prompting from Ryan and Navy PROs) sent out a squadron of Ryan jet-plus- 
propeller Fireballs to escort the NATS AWA convention flight into Bur- 
bank after the San Francisco take-off. 

If you were on the plane you'll perhaps enjoy having this picture, 
and if you weren't, here's evidence of the show you missed. And, of 
course, there's no objection to having your engraver make a cut for use 
in the next issue of the publication you representl 



(OFFICIAL U. S. NAVY PHOTOGRAPH) 



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PROPS STOPPED AND FEATHERED, RYAN 
FIREBALLS FLY FORMATION ON JET ONLY 



Neither a conventional airplane nor a jet job looks the least bit un- 
usual breezing along in the Southern California sky but to have a squadron 
of propeller-powered fighters come buzzing by at 300 miles an hour with 
their propellers stopped and feathered is enough to make even the most 
seasoned air traveler pause and look twicei 

The passengers in this case were members of the Aviation Writers 
Association flying in a Naval Air Transport Service plane, and the demon- 
stration of the unique jet-plus-propeller powered Ryan Fireball fighters 
was staged especially for them by a Navy squadron from San Diego. 

Using the two-engine composite power arrangement consisting of a 
conventional engine in the nose and a jet engine in the aft section of 
the fuselage, the Fireball pilot is able to stop and feather his propeller, 
yet cruise along at a 300 mile-an-hour clip using the jet engine as the 
only power source. 

(Official U. S. Navy Photograph) 



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RYAiM TURBO-PROP POWERED NAVY FIGHTER 
TOPS 39,000 FEET IN 23 MINUTE CLIMB 

V/hat is believed to be the highest altitude reached by a turbo-prop 
powered airplane has been attained by the Ryan Aeronautical Company's 
XF2R-I "Dark Shark" Navy fighter which, with A| Conover, the contractor's 
test pilot at the controls, has topped 39,000 feet. 

The maximum altitude of 39,160 feet was reached in less than 23 minutes 
during a routine test flight while determining performance and climb charac- 
teristics of the new jct-p jus-propel I er fighter. Both the turbo-prop and 
the straight jet engines were used continuously during the climb to ser- 
vice ceiling. The XF2R-I's demonstrated service ceiling of around 4-0,000 
feet is well above that of many current fighters. 

The extremely high sustained rate of climb of the XF2R-I was demon- 
strated throughout the entire flight. The "Dark Shark" made exceptional 
time to 20,000 feet and to 30,000 feet, but actual t ime-of-c I imb to these 
altitudes has not been released by the Navy, No attempt was made to es- 
tablish records for timer,of-c I imb during the routine test, but on other 
occasions Conover has flown the XF2R-I to 10,000 feet in approximately 
2 minutes, thus closely approximating the record for climb to that al- 
titude. 

The excellent performance of the Ryan flying laboratory plane high- 
lights the early experimental and developmental stage of the turbo-prop 



-2- 

type of power plant, upon which Navy bureau of Aeronautics engineers are 
pinning high hopes for future applications in transport and carrier types. 

The XF2R-I represents the first Navy application of the turbo-prop en- 
gine, which is a gas turbine performing the dual function of spinning the 
propeller and boosting with jet propulsive thrust. It is the TG-IOO modef, 
developed by the General Electric Company. Like its predecessor, the "uark 
Shark" also has a pure jet engine installed in the tail to give added power 
for peak performance, during take-off and in combat maneuvers where maximum 
speed and climb are essential. 



From Bi I | Wagner 

Ryan Aeronautical Company 

Lindbergh Field 

San Oiego 12, Cai ifornia 



July 10, 1947 Sent to: 



i^ote "to Editors: 



Aviation Red & Yellow 
Financial Red, Foreign 
Miscellaneous, Red 
Technical Red & Eellow 

Tills is tiie first 
release by Ryan 
concerning the 
Navion program. 



NAViON NEWS RELEASE 



RYAN SETTING UP FOR IMMEDIATE 
PRODUCTION OF NAVION PLANES 



Delivery of Navion four-place personal and executive planes from the pro- 
duction lines at the Ryan Aeronautical Company are scheduled to begin within 60 to 
90 days, T, Claude Ryan, president, announced today. Until then, deliveries will 
be made from finished planes in stock at North American. Spare parts orders, how- 
ever, will be handled by Ryan beginning July 15th. 

Formal contracts covering the detailed terms under which Ryan acquires from 
North American Aviation, Inc., all design and manufacturing rights, production tool- 
ing, work-in-process, and spare parts for the Navion were signed over the week-end. 

"In acquiring the Navion," Ryan said, "we have a plane we feel is the finest 
design, and most satisfactory airplane operationally, of any in its field. It 
represents the best balance of desirable qualities including extreme ruggedness of 
construction, slow landing, quick take-off, high cruising speed, safe handling 
characteristics and comfortable stability under all conditions." 

Work is already in full tempo at Ryan in setting up production facilities with 
a manufacturing capacity of up to 10 Navions per day. Production executives of 
the Ryan and North American plants have been working together for the past several 
weeks. Carefully worked out plans are being carried out for the orderly transfer 
of all tooling, material and parts to the San Diego plant. "North American," Ryan 
said, "has done the finest and most complete job of production tooling ever made 
available for the manufacture of a personal type aircraft." 



-2- 



One of Southern California's biggest trucking jobs, since the war, started 
last week as transfer. of materials and tools to the Ryan factory got under way. 
Some idea of the magnitude of the equipment and materials involved is Ryan's esti- 
mate that the move will require around 500 twelve-ton truck loads, and will not be 
completed until September. 

"Since the end of the war," Ryan added, "our company has been continuously an- 
alyzing the personal plane field, looking to re-entry into commercial manufacture 
at the 'right' time after the temporary pent-up demand had ended and a more ac- 
curate estimate of the true market volume could be determined. 

"Coupling the Ryan company's 25 years experience in the aircraft business, 
most of which has been related to the manufacture and sales of personal and com- 
mercial airplanes, with the outstanding quality of the Navion plane, present and 
future owners of Navions can be assured of the plane's continued leadership. 

"Private and commercial pilots have long expressed their preference for a four- 
place airplane of metal construction. More than any other plane, the Navion meets 
the requirements of today's and tomorrow's market. Its highly satisfactory all- 
purpose performance together with its carefully thought out practical features as- 
sures an airplane of maximum utility to both private owners and business firms. 

"Uistr ibution plans for the Ryan-built Navion anticipate continuing the basic 
dealer organization established by North American. However, plans are being studied 
for strengthening and expanding distribution, and extensive surveys of airplane 
merchandising are being made." 

Studies at this time of contemplated production and sales costs indicate Ryan 
will maintain the $7750 f.a.f. price. The Navion name will be retained since it 
is now a well-established and highly regarded trade name, but in future advertising 
and promotion marketing will be done under the name "Ryan Navion." 



i' . 



1.-.(, -^ 



-3- 

Continuing, Ryan added, "Vvs are completely convinced of the plane's inherently 
superior safety characteristics, a point which has been stressed over and over again 
by all owners and operators with whom we have talked, Ryan pilots and engineers 
have made a thorough study of the Navion and on the basis of their recommendations 
no changes in the basic airplane structure are contemplated in the foreseeable 
future. Some design refinements may be expected from time to time as customer 
preference in minor features is definitely established, but we feel the basic de- 
sign is so advanced that it will be modern for an extended period of time and that 
production of this model will reach very substantial proportions." 

The advertising agency which has been handling the l^orth American account since 
the inception of the Navion program is expected to be retained. BBDO has the ac- 
count, and Robert Schmelzcr is the account executive. The recent program of stres- 
sing business use of the Navion will be continued, and the slogan "Navion - The 
Airplane That Means Businessl" will be used in the initial phases of Ryan's adver- 
tising program. 

Ryan's record as a leading manufacturer of private-owner airplanes before the 
war converted the San Diego company into a volume producer of Ryan military train- 
ing planes and carrier-based jet fighters, is well known. Familiar models include 
the Ryan S-T sport trainers and S-C metal cabin planes, both pioneers in their 
field, which won wide popularity throughout the world. 



From Bill V/agner 

Ryan Aeronautical Company 

Lindbergh Field 

San Diego 12, Cal ifornia 



July 10, 1947 

Sent to: Picked list of 

Aviation Red, Financial 
(25) 



NAVION NEV^S RELEASE 



TRANSFER OF NAVIOiM TO RYAN PLANT 
UNDER WAY IN HUGE TRUCKING JOB 



Picture a line of 12-ton trucl<s spaced 1000 feet apart and stretching from 
Los Angeles to San Diego. 

That's a graphic description of the size of the moving job which got under 
way yesterday at Ryan Aeronautical Company as the first of 500 trucks began trans- 
fer of the Navion four-place personal and executive plane project to the San Diego 
factory. 

Biggest moving job in Southern California since the war, the trucking began 
with shipment of Navion fuselages which are now being set up on a new assembly 
line in Ryan's war-time final assembly building where Fireball jet fighters were 
built for the Navy. The trucking job will be carried on over a period of several 
months and is not expected to be completed until September. 

Under terms of the contract, Ryan acquires the entire Navion program, with 
the San Diego company immediately taking over all production tooling, spare parts, 
work-in-process, design and engineering data and manufacturing rights. Spare 
parts for the Navion will be available from Ryan beginning July 15th, but complete 
planes will probably not be coming off the Ryan assembly line until fall. 

Production equipment, sub-assemblies, spare parts and work- in-procdss will be 
flowing into the Ryan plant in heavy volume every work day for the next few weeks. 
Complete plans for the efficient layout of production, assembly and storage areas 
were worked out in advance with North American production technicians, so that all 
arriving trucks are unloaded quickly and equipment systematically placed where it 
wi I I be used. 



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Sent to: July 23, 1947 

San Diego Red 

Picked Aviation Mags Red 






p,e^^*^'. s^'* 



V^^^.eoo 



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,r*o6' 



NAVION DISTRIBUTOR FROM MEXICO CITY VISITS SAN DIEGO 



Howard F. Klein, prominent i^exico City businessman, flew into San Diego 
yesterday to confer with Ryan Aeronautical Compeny officials on sales policies 
for the new Ryan Navion personal plane. Klein is one of the owners and General 
Manager of MACSA (Maquinaria, Accesorios Y Controles, S.A.) and has been dis- 
tributing Navions in Mexico and six Central American countries for seven months. 

During the past ten years, he has engaged in aircraft manufacturing, air- 
line operation and distribution of aircraft and aviation products. 

Stepping from his Navion at Lindbergh Field, Klein spoke enthusiastically 
about the sales possibilities for the Ryan Navion, "Ryan is particularly for- 
tunate to acquire the manufacture of this plane because I believe that it is 
the outstanding personal and business plane of today," he said. "In Mexico, 
the Navion is receiving wide acceptance for personal use and as a means of fast 
transportation for businessmen who must visit branch offices, warehouse and 
customers in various points throughout the country. Seven of my own salesmen 
use planes for their business calls and I have sold three Navions to State 
Governors who use them for official trips," 

Klein stated that the Navion was unsurpassed in performance in the high, 
thin air of Mexico City. "Our capital is situated at 7,500 feet altitude," he 
explained. "This means that every take-off and landing is made at higher speeds 
and that power is reduced by about 25 percent because of altitude. We do most 



-2- 



of our flying at about 12,500 feet. Many planes which are good performers at 
sea-levet are under-powered or unstable at our altitudes. That is why we like 
the Navion. It is very stable at high altitudes and has enough extra power to 
insure good performance in the difficult atmosphere of Mexico City." 

"Another feature of the Navion which makes it ideal for the small landing 
strips which dot the coffee-growing and mining countries of Central America, 
is its tricycle landing gear. This type of gear is excellent for operations from 
uneven, small fields because it permits quicker stopping and is more stable under 
adverse conditions of cross-winds." 

Klein reported a definite trend toward four-place personal planes and away 
from two-place jobs. He attributed this to the fact that many Mexicans who 
bought smaller planes in order to learn to fly, now wanted four-place models in 
order to get more utility from their flights. 

Klein took off late in the afternoon on his flight back to Mexico City, 
stopping at Mexicali enroute. He plans to return to San Diego every month to 
pick up Navions and confer with Ryan sales and service executives. 



August 12, 1947 
Sent to: 

From ' William Wagner • Keith Monroe Aviation MagS Red 

RYMN AERONAUTICAL CO. Financial Red 

RYMN SCHOOL OF MERONJiUTICS San Dieoo Red 

RYMN AEROSAUTICAL INSTITUTE 
Lindbergh Field, San Diego, California 



RYAN'S METAL PRODUCTS U IV IS I ON 
BOOKS $200,000 IN NEW BUSINESS 

New orders totaling $200,000 have just been placed with the Ryan 
Aeronautical Company for items to be manufactured in the firm's Metal 
Products Division, T. Claude Ryan, president, announced today. 

The majority of the new contracts are for exhaust manifold systems 
for multi-engine transport plane and bomber types produced by Boeing, 
Convair, Douglas, North American and Northrop. Other items including 
aircraft heating systems, collector rings for helicopters and various 
components for jet engines. 

The new business reported by Ryan covers only their Hetal Products 
Division. The plant recently purchased all rights to the four-place all- 
metal Navion personal-business plane, and production lines are now being 
set up as the huge job of transferring manufacturing equipment and parts 
nears completion. Actual deliveries are not expected to begin until late 
fall. 

In addition to work on its new commercial airplane project, Ryan 
has recently received additional contracts covering military aircraft 
developments, but details have not yet been released. 



TOP WEST CQ\ST AMATEUR 
GOLFER ARRIVES THIS WEEK 



August 13, 1947 
Sent to Dayton News 

Dayton Journal 
Dayton Uerald 
(Sports Editors) 



Dayton golfers can look forward to some stiff new competition 
on local fairways when Dick Li I lard, one of Southern California's 
top amateur golfers, arrives this week to take up a post here as 
sales engineer for the Ryan Aeronautical Company, of San Diego. 

A consistent "par" tournament golfer, Li I lard plays in the 
low seventies, and has been doing so for years. Before he moved 
to the coast to join the Ryan organization two years ago, he was 
well known around Wichita, Kansas, as a hard man to beat. 

Li I lard has been selected by his firm to serve in an engineer- 
ing liaison capacity between Ryan and the Army's Air Materiel Command 
here. He is a specialist in exhaust system and jet engine components 
engineering. Li I lard and his family are expected to locate here per- 
manently. 



August 13, 1947 

Sent to: Dayton Herald, Journal 

and News, 

Pi eked Av i ati on Mans 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY • LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA ^^^ ^_.^\ 



'm f.o. <ySM ^^ifTWL 



San j ego Red 



RYAN APPOINTS LILLARD AS SALES 
ENGINEER HEAuQUARTEREL AT DAYTON 

Appointment of Richard H. Li I lard as sales engineer of the Ryan 
Aeronautical Company's metal products division, with headquarters at 
Uayton, was announced today by Sam C. Breder, sales manager. 

Li I lard will serve in an engineering liaison capacity between Ryan 
and the Army's Air Materiel Command, and in addition will be the company's 
mId-west representative serving the Allison and Continental engine com- 
panies, McDonnell Aircraft Company at St. Louis and the aircraft companies 
at V7lchita and Ft. Worth. 

A specialist in exhaust system and jet engine components engineer- 
ing, Li I lard has been with Ryan in a similar capacity at its San Ciego 
plant for the past two years. Prior to that, he was in the power plant 
section of Boeing Aircraft at its Wichita factory. 

Li I lard, a top tournament golfer as well as a highly regarded en- 
gineer, is moving to Uayton with his family this week, v/hen business 
permits, he is expected to spend plenty of time on Dayton fairways and 
offer top golfers there stiff competition. 



N 
E 
S 

• EXHAUST SYSTEMS • JET ENGINE COMPONENTS • JET AFTER BURNERS • METAL PRODUCTS 



Wagncr-JOiNT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR W£ON£SOAY P.M. 

for Ryan Aeronaut icat Coopany RCLEiASC 

and United Aircraft Welders 

Sept. 10, 1947 
SAN t/IEGO RED LIST 



Representatives of Ryan Aeronautical Company and the United 
Aircraft Welders of America, Local 52, have reached an agreement 
covering wages and working conditions, J. w. Bunnell, personnel 
manager, and Jack King, union negotiating committee chairman, an- 
nounced today. 

The new agreement extends for one year the present contract 
which cavers Ryan welders, most of whom are employed in the company** 
ioetal products division. Principal contract change is a provision 
to increase to SO percent the ratio of journeyman welders to be em- 
ployed. 

Without the charges and counter-charges which so frequently 
mark labor negotiations, United Aircraft Welders and Ryan repre- 
sentatives have l)een meeting quietly together during recent months. 
San Oiego management and labor have again demonstrated their ability 
to reach agreement when both sides lay their problems on the table 
and restrict their debate to the negotiating committees. 






t /lliSI-. -I. 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 






RYAM GRECIAN URN CASKETS 

Boycrtown Qurisi Cask«t Coopony b«8 ptircDascd ail (}tsi$n», copyright*, 
(»«t«Rts and produetioo tQulpment for ai«nuf«eturc of f}y»n Grecian Urn c«skcts, as 
««ll •» th« (rntlr* stock of cemplctvtf ca«k«t$, from th« Ryan Aeronautical Company, 
San Olago, it wa& r«v«aitttf to<)ay in a joint annaunceieent i»«ue«l by tn« companies, 

Kiprcscntativea of eoycrtoim have tieen in Swt Oiego for the pa»t few days 
arranging ail details ef the huge transfer of tools and production nechinery from 
the California aircraft plant to goyertown's factory at Bayertown, Pennsylvania, 

The graceful, stainless steel anii bronze Orecian Urn caskets «ttre intro- 
iuccd to the funeral service industry mare than a year ayo fallowing their Oevelop- 
(Hcnt by Ryan as a post«>war coM»iierciai product. 

Secause of the co^^any's skill in faiiricatiflg stainless steel, and with ait 
necessary lemufaeturinii equip<»ent already In its airersft plant, Ryan technicians 
were a&tt to set new hlQh standards of excellence in the design and production of 
the Grecian Urn. Tims, Soyertown is acqufrins one of the most advanced and t)est 
engineered metal casket desifns, togetner with all the facilities necessary for 
its continued precision minufactt^re. 

TN i^an Aeronautical Company is wlthdrBifrin9 from the casket fi«|d because af 
its expand ins aircraft production progrem and the necessity of using all of Its 
faeittties in this field. Recently %an ac(}uired all design and manufacturing 
rights to the Mavion four.placc al|..^etal personal and business plane. 

Complete production lines naw being set up far the Byan Havion production 
have necessitated the discontinuance of casket manufacture and concentration i^n 
coaitmercial plane production, officials said. 



0^^