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RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY • LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



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FOR L^iEDIATE: RELEASE! 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 
TO PAY 10 CENT DIVIDEND 

A dividend of 10 cents per share on common stock of the 
Ryan Aeronautical Company, payable March 10 to stockholders of 
record February 20, was declared at today's meeting (Friday) 
of the Board of Directors, 
p The dividend declaration at this time is in accordance 

with Ryan's established policy of considering dividends at or 

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- near the close of each fiscal year. (The company's fiscal year 

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. ended October 3|st, and the annual report to stockholders will 



be issued the latter part of February). 



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• EXHAUST SYSTEMS • JET ENGINE COMPONENTS • JET AFTER BURNERS • METAL PRODUCTS 







RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY • LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



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from \JJaJcC' ^i/f\/<!in^\JUl. For A.M. release 

Friday, Feb. 20. 



$1,000,000 IN ORDERS IN THREE DAYS SETS 
SALES RECORD AT RYAN AERONAUTICAL CO. 

One million dollars in new contracts in the past three days 
is the unusual sales record just chalked up by the Metal Products 
Division of the Ryan Aeronautical Company. 

Among orders included in the $1,000,000 in new business are 
those for exhaust systems for new type Fairchild C-119 Packet cargo 

p planes and for Boeing's new B-50 Superfortress bombers. Jet engine 

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f^ accessories for McDonnell Banshee Navy jet fighters, and additional 

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O Ryan exhaust systems for Douglas Aircraft Company and for the 

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f^ U.S. Navy Bureau of Aeronautics are also among the new contracts. 

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As with other specialized aircraft engine accessories cur- 
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N rently being manufactured by Ryan, the exhaust manifolds and jet 
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engine components are fabricated of stainless steel, a field in 
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X which the company has long been a leader, 

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RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY • LINDBERSH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



from 



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For Ifrmediate Release 



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RYAN AERONAUTICAL CO. REPORTS 
NET LOSS OF $127,660 FOR YEAR 

Financial operations of the Ryan Aeronautical Company for the 1947 fiscal 
year, ended October 31, resulted in a net loss of $127,660 on gross revenues of 
$8,015,766 after giving effect to a tax carry-back credit of $423,497, T. Claude 
Ryan, president, reported today in the Annual Report to Stockholders. 

For the prior fiscal year, ended October 31, 1946, Ryan reported a net 
profit of $300,320 on gross revenues of $11,973,352. 

The company's 1947 operating loss before tax carry-back credit was $551,157. 
Ryan aircraft and aircraft accessories divisions were on a profitable basis, but 
the stainless steel casket shell manufacturing operations, and the sale of this 
project during the year, represented a loss of $660,774, Ryan reported. 

"One of the most important developments during the year," Ryan told stock- 
holders, "was the purchase of the four-place personal-business airplane program 
from North American Aviation, Inc., which had invested over eight million dollars 
in engineering, development, tooling and inventories. This project, including 
exclusive manufacturing rights, was purchased by Ryan on a very advantageous 
basis, and an aggressive production and marketing program is now well under way, 

"Ryan has been able to re-enter the personal airplane field without making 
the extremely large investment that would normally be required to design, develop, 
tool and put into production a new model beginning from the drawing board. 

"Military aircraft manufacturing during the year consisted principally of 




By Rvnn 

• EXHAUST SYSTEMS • JET ENGINE COMPONENTS • JET AFTER BURNERS • METAL PRODUCTS 



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pilotless aircraft or guided missiles on a developmental basis. The program 
in this important field has met with a good degree of success to date, the con- 
tract with the United States Air Force having been increased recently for the 
third time. The missile program, even though on a developmental basis, involves 
a considerable amount of manufacturing volume. This class of work is very ad- 
vantageous in that it has interesting future possibilities. It is indicative of 
the scientific standing maintained by the company's engineering and other techni- 
cal departments. , 

"An engineering design contract with the United States Navy for an airplane 
project of very advanced nature has been under way for some time, A flight test 
research project on the XF2R-I airplane manufactured by this company for the 
United States Navy and incorporating a gas turbine engine plus a jet engine was 
completed during the year." 

The company continued its leading position in the field of aircraft metal 
products during l<#47, with the substantial sales and production volume consisting 
principally of stainless steel exhaust systems, jet engine parts and accessories 
and allied aeronautical products. Ryan exhaust systems are standard equipment on 
a large share of the commercial and military airplanes being produced. 

Development work on an "afterburner" thrust augmentation device for jet en- 
gines, designed by the Ryan company, continued throughout the year on contract 
with the United States Navy. Work in this field and its practical application is 
now also being done directly for other airplane manufacturers. Manufacturing on 
a moderate scale in the field of rocket power plants is also being carried on by 
the company in collaboration with organizations specializing in this field. 



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sent: May 5, 1948 
San Diego Red 
Financia I Red 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY • LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



from ^^^JuJ^ ^f\^pWL 



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RYAN GETS $1,325,000 ORDER 
FOR BOEING FUSELAGES 

Production in San Dieqo of fuselage sections for huge commercial 
airline and military cargo planes to be assembled in Seattle was 
begun this week by Ryan Aeronautical Company under a new $1,325,000 
contract, T. Claude Ryan, president, announced today. 

The order, placed by Boeing Aircraft Company, is for fabri- 
cation by Ryan of the 14-foot-diametGr riidir sections of fuselages 
for the Stratocruiscr passenger airliner and the Air Force's C-97 
Stratofreighter. Ryan officials declined to disclose how many 
uni ts were to be bu i 1 1. 

To provide adeguate facilities and personnel for the large 
new Boeing fuselage contract, Ryan has recently expedited de- 
livery schedules for other work currently in production at the 
company's San Ciego plant. Employment at Ryan is now at 1400 
compared with a post-war low of slightly over 850 last October. 




By Rvnn 

EXHAUST SYSTEMS • JET ENGINE COMPONENTS • JET AFTER BURNERS • METAL PRODUCTS 



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RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY • LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 

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JAMES Lo KELLEY NAMED 
WORKS MANAGES BY RYAN 

Appointment of James L^ Kelleyj, veterarn aircraft manufacturing execu- 
tflvfig to the newSy created position of Works Manager of the Ryan Aeronauti- 
cal! Companyj, San DSegOj, was announced today by T^, Claude Ryanj, presidento 

Prior to his new connection with Ryanj, KelJey was for nearly twenty 
years one of the key production officials of Consolidated Vultee Aircraft 
Corpo He was San Diego division manager for Convair during its period of 
major expansion for the vast war production programo More recently Kelley 
had served on Convair's management staff as a consuJtanto 

in his new position, Keltey will apply his years of production knowi~ 
edge to the rapidly expanding aircraft and metal products manufacturing 
program at Ryan„ As the company's manufacturing head^ he will work direct- 
ly with G« Co Woodardj, vice president under whom the production departments 
operateo Under Kclley^s direction will be the manufactur jng^ production 
engineertngj standards and estimating^ production control and plant engineer- 
ing departmentSo 

When Consolidated moved to San Diego from Buffalo in I935j, Kelley was 

named factory manager and held that position until he became division head 

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£ iin 194-2, He was a civilian manufacturing representative for the Air Corps 

p from 1917 until he joined the Consolidated staff at Buffalo in !929o 

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• EXHAUST SYSTEMS • JET ENGINE COMPONENTS • JET AFTER BURNERS • METAL PRODUCTS 




11/27/48 
Sent to: 
S. Q. Red 
Av. Mags Red 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY • LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA Regional Red 

Newspapers Red 

horn \y^Xjct^ ^Vfi't^^/WL Financial Red 

^ FOR RELEASE .^jre Ses. Red 

MONL.AY, UECEMBER lst,^jsc.|. Red 

Gen. Mags. Red 
Av. Mags. Yel. 

RYAN AWARUED MILLION DOLLAR INCREmSE 
IN AIR FORCE GUIUEb MISjILE PROGRAM 

Emergence of the Ryah AeronautrCal Company as a leader in the new 
field of guided missile research was indicated with today's announcement 
by T. Claude Ryan, president, that the U. S. Air Force has just increased 
by $1,070,000 its already substantial commitments with the company for 
development and manufacture of a new type controlled weapon it has de- 
signed. 

Since starting its research program on guided missiles and pilotlcss 
aircraft more than a year ago, Ryan has concentrated on development work 
In a specialized field in which it has now become a recognized authority. 
As a result the Air Force has three times increased its contract, each 
time authorizing additional and more extensive work. 

Though details of the guided missile are not releaseable as to its 
design or specific military mission, Ryan engineers have described it as 
one of the most compact weapons of its type ever designed and with a 
"built-in brain capable of doing its own thinking" once it has been 
launched. 

While the missiles are being developed at Ryan's research labora- 
tory and fabricated in its San Diego plant, actual flight testing is 
being done at the Alamogordo Air Base in New Mexico, center of Air Force 

'- guided missile testing, 

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RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY • LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 
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REVERSING PROPELLER ON RYAN "DARK SHARK" 

FIGHTER BREAKS AIR SPEED & SHORTENS LANDIi^ 

A new system of "braking" the speed of a plane in the air by flattening the 
pitch of the propeller during the final landing approach, so that the increased 
drag gives a steeper gliding angle and markedly reduces the landing roll, has 
been successfully demonstrated on the Ryan Aeronautical Company's XF2R-I "uark 
Shark" Navy fighter. 

A strictly experimental plane, the Dark Shark recently completed its test 
program for the Navy and some of the results are now being announced after evalua- 
tion by company engineers and the Bureau of Aeronautics. 

This uniaue air braking system, made possible by the huge four-biaded Hamilton 
Standard square-tipped, Super-Hydromat ic propeller, can be used dyring landings 
to supplement the drag created by the plane's wing flaps So effective was the 
drag-creating feature of the reversing propeller that Ryan test pilot Al Conover 
expressed the belief that normal runway landings could be made in a distance no 
greater than the length of large aircraft carriers of the Midway class. 

Jet-powered aircraft due to their clean aerodynamic design have an extremely 
high landing speed and require long runways for the landing roll. The XF2R-I, 
however, even though using only jet-turbine engines, could make very short land- 
ings, and had greatly improved handling qualities on the ground, because the 
turbo-prop engine was equipped with the Super-Hydromat ic propeller. Previously 
this type of propeller had been used only on mul ti-engined transport planes. 

The constant speed, full feathering and reversing propeller has an automatic 
adjustment coordinated with the throttle to change the blade angle from normal 

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operating pitch, when the power is reduced for landing, to the flatter pitch 
position which converts it into an effective bral<e in the air to reduce speed. 

The propeller arrangement also incorporated a tie-in circuit to the landing 
gear so the prop could immediately be changed to an even flatter angle when con- 
tact with the runway is made, thus reducing the landing roll to an absolute mini- 
mum. Due to the great inertia of the spinning turbine wheel, which turns for a 
long time at high r.p.m. even after the engine is shut down, the propeller, with- 
out the flat pitch feature, would pull the plane far down the runway even against 
the holding power of the landing gear wheel brakes. 

Diameter of the propeller, which has a greatly increased blade area compared 
with previous Fireball designs, is II feet as contrasted to the 9g feet of the 
three-bladed propeller of the FR-I model. 

The Super-Hydromat ic propeller used on the Ryan experimental Navy fighter has 
an extremely fast rate of pitch change. Full feathering of the propeller, or 
reversing it to a zero blade angle, is accomplished in a matter of seconds. The 
zero blade angle creates the reverse thrust which permits deceleration of the 
plane in landing. 

The XF2R-I, like previous Fireball models, was capable of flying on its rear 
jet engine alone, and in such flights the propeller was "feathered" by changing 
the blade angles so that their chord lies in the direction of flight. In this 
position, they acted as brakes to stop rotation of the propeller and turbine 
wheel, and at the same time offer the least possible drag on the plane. 

One of the additional advantages the "Dark Shark" has over the FR-I model, the 
propeller of which is turned by a reciprocating engine, was the faster accelera- 
tion and deceleration possible. This was due to the fact that power changes in 
the newer model were made entirely by adjustment of the propeller control. 



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Mai ling out: 

PRESS RELEASE 



January II, \94) 
San r I pQo ^eti 
Aviation '^ans ?g! 
F iranc iai ^p6 



FROM BILL WASNER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIE60 12, CALIFORNIA 



RYAN RECEIVES $1,500,000 INCREASE IN ORDER 
FROM BOEING FOR STRATOFRE I GHTER ASSEMBLIES 



A $1,500,000 increase in Ryan Apronautical Company's current order from 
Boeing Aircraft Company for C-97 Strato fre ighter assemblies has just been 
received, T. Claude Ryan, president, announced today., The new order, which 
practically doubles Ryan's original contract, stems from an Air Force decision 
to increase by 23 the number of Boeing Stratofre i ghters which can be used on 
the Berl in Air Li ft. 

Authority to proceed with the increased number of C-97's was signed late 
last week at Seattle by Major General K. B. Wolfe, Director of Procurement and 
Industrial Planning of the Air Materiel Command. Announcement of authorization 
by President Truman of funds for the purchase was announced earlier by the 
Air Force in Washington. 

Ryan will build the 14— foot-di ameter rear fuselage sections and all floor 
beams for the additional Stratofre i ghters under an accelerated schedule which 
calls for completion of the entire project in approximately the same time as 
planned for the original order^ To ensure rapid progress on the new Boeing 
contract Ryan has expedited delivery programs for other work currently in pro- 
duction at the company's 43-acre San Diego plant. 

Employment at Ryan has reached 2,500 compared with a post-war low total 
of about 850 in October, 1947. Additional personnel will be added gradually 
as the Dace of production increases, most of the increment slated for the final 
assembly department. The number of large special fuselage Jigs required for 
the Boeing sections will be doubled and other equipment added as needed. 



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The "authority to proceed" order delivered to Boeing brings to 119 the 
inclusive number of double-deck Stratocru i ser=Strato fre ighter type transports 
already built or on order. Ten Stratofre iqhters already are in service with 
the UoSo Air Force, and deliveries are about to begin on 55 Stratocru i scrs 
to six foreign and domestic airlines. Ryan is buildino fuselage components 
for both Strato fre i ghters and Stratocru i sers, and also makes exhaust systems : 
for these two transports as well as for the Boeing B-50 Superfortress bombero 

Need for the big, fast-cruising air transports was indicated in a recent 
statement attri bated by press services to Air Secretary Stuart Symington that 
airnlanes having a capacity more than double that of the C-54's now in use are 
being considered for the Berlin Air Liftc The planes were identified as C-97'So 
Sixty Strato fre i ghters now built or on order would, it was claimed by W. E. Beall, -, 
Boeing Vice-president at Seattle, be equivalent to 210 C-54's if assigned to the 
Air Li fto 1 



1st group out: V/ednesdey, l-IZ-49 

San Ci '-go Red 
Financi al Red 
Avia. Mags Red 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY • LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



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For PoMa Release 
Friday, January 14 



RYAN GETS MULTI-M i LLION COLLAR ORDER 
FOR GENERAL ELECTRIC JET ENGINE PARTS 



A mu 1 1 i— mi I I ion dollar volume production order for exhaust cones, burner 
assemblieSj combustion chambers and other specialized jet engine parts has Just 
been received by the Metal Products Division of the Ryan Aeronautical Companyo 

The Ryan-built jet engine components have been ordered by General Electric 
Company for their J-47 (TGr-190) model, which is going into mass production be- 
cause of the important role this power plant will play in the expanding Air Force 
programo 

Preliminary work on the huge new order was started at Ryan several months 
ago 5 and a major re-arrangement of olant facilities is nearing completion in 
order to provide necessary manufacturing and assembly areas for the J=47 jet 
engine componentSo A sizeable investment has been made in new equipment for the 
General Electric order, including a new hydro-press, spot welders, vertical turret 
lathes and other machine tools which are now being insta! led at the Ryan planto 

As the Ryan Vetal Products Division swings into line nroduction, the delivery 
schedule will be stepped up to match the expanding requirement for the J-47 jet 
engineso The present program calls for a several-years uninterrupted production 
schedu I So 

Negotiations with General Electric and the Air Force for Ryan to undertake 
much of the stainless steel parts manufacture for the J-47 were begun many months 

agoo Since that time the total production scheduled has been increased several 

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Ryan officials declined to name the exact dollar value of the contract or 
reveal detailed production schedules, but have stated that the program will be 
a major factor in the v.ork of their Metal Products Division for several yearso 
Several hundred additional employees have already been hired for the program, 
and more may be required later in I950„ 

The J-47 jet engine is used on such advanced types as the North American 
F-86 fightero The engine was developed and has been in production on a"pilot" 
basis at General Electrics Lynn, Massachusetts, plant, but will be assembled 
under the expanded program at the Lockland, Ohio, planto 

As an advance step in getting started on the npw program, Ryan some months 
ago placed advance orders for materials, especially critical items which are now 
in short supplyo Under present schedules it is anticipated that first deliveries 
from Ryan will be made early in 1949, 



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RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY • LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 

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L RYAN AERONAUTICAL REPORTS 

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$356,603 EARNINGS FOR 1948 



Sent with Annual Report on 
2-21-4-9 

Avia. Mags I 
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Finaneial Red 
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Earnings of the Ryan Aeronautical Company for the 1948 fiscal year, ended 
October 31, were $356,603 after provision for federal taxes on income, T. Claude 
Ryan, president, reported today in his Annual Report to Stockholders. 

The 1948 profit was equal to approximately 90 cents per share, and compares 
with a net loss of $127,659 the prior year, which was approximately 31 cents loss 
per share. 

Sales volume for the 12 months ended October 31, 1948, was $7,948,41! and 
resulted in a gross profit of $588,603 before allowance of $232,000 for federal 
income taxes. For the prior fiscal year, sales totaled $8,015,766. 

Reporting on the past year's activities in the company's Airplane Division, 
Ryan disclosed that some 500 commercial Ryan Navion planes had been sold, and 
that work was in progress at the year end on an order for 163 military Navions, 
plus the equivalent of 60 additional planes in spare parts. 

"The company's guided missile program for the U. S. Air Force has been on 
an increascdscal e of activity and substantial progress was made during the year," 
Ryan said, "justifying considerable confidence in its future prospects. 

"A design developed by the company during the year for a high-speed, jet- 
propelled, pilotless target plane for the U. s. Air Force won a competition In a 
field of 16 entries by the country's principal aircraft manufacturers. The con- 
tract for engineering, development and manufacture of an initial quantity was in 
its early phase of work during the latter part of the year. It is believed to have 
very good prospects for the future. 




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"The enginef?ring and study contract with the U, S, Navy for work on an 
advanced-type airplane design, which was in effect the prior year, was continued 
and increased in scope," 

Ryan also reported excellent progress on the company's large subcontracts 
with Boeinq Airolane Company for fuselage sections for Stratocru i scr passenger 
transports and Strato fre iqhter cargo planeSo 

In the Metal Products Division, business has been increasing in scale all 
along the line, with important new orders booked for jet engine components, for 
conventional exhaust systems and for rocket power plant parts. Of major im- 
portance was the contract recently received from General Electric Company for 
volume production of stainless steel assemblies for the J-47, most powerful and 
modern jet engine now being built for the military services^ 

Net worth of the company increased from $3,874,820 on October 31, 1947 
to $4,152,428 at the end of the 1948 fiscal year, and book value per share was 
up from $9.64 to $IOc50o 

The increased volume of manufacturing operations during the latter part of 
the year was reflected in inventories of raw material and work-in-proccsSo At 
the start of the fiscal year they were $1,819,352, increasing to $4,182,594 at 
October 31st, and stood at slightly in excess of $5,100,000 on December 3|sto 

For the three years since the end of the war, total net profit after taxes 
was renorted by Ryan as $529,263, while dividends since the war "nd, including 
the one to be paid March 10, have amounted to $329,395^ During the same period, 
equipment assets have been increased $759,072, which is $229,808 more than the 
net profit for the three years„ 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY • LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



Mai I ing Out: 3-8-49 
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OS^ HA/Ct^rm^ San Dipgo Red 

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Financial Red 
Avia. Maps. I 



NEW METAL PRODUCTS SALES 
BOOST RYAN ORDER BACKLOG 

New order for stainless steel metal products totalling more 
than $750,000 were added to Ryan Aeronautical Comoany's backlog 
recently, Sam ?>r^<i^r , Sales Manager, disclosed upon return from a 
business trip to New York, Wasiiington and other eastern cities. 

Prominent in the new business columns was an award from 
Continental Motors Company for manifolds for their automotive 
engines. Continental's 810 h.p, 12-cyl inder model engine was de- 
veloped for the Army's new General Patton tanks, which develop up 
to 5C^ more speed than the General Sherman tanks of World War II, 

Lockheed Aircraft Corporation put in an order for exhaust 
manifolds for the Navy's record-setting long-range patrol plane, the 
P2V-3 Neptune, the second large order from this company this year. 
From the Glenn L, Martin Company came an order for exhaust systems for 
the new carrier-borne torpedo-bomber plane, the Martin Mauler AM-I, 
already dubbed "Able Mable" by Navy aviation personnel. The Mauler 
carries a greater load of explosives aloft than any other sing le-engi ned 
carrier plane, with improved speed and range to match its terrific fire- 
power, 

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5-21-49 Aviation Mags I 

PRESS RELEASE 

FROM BILL WA6NER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY « LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 

LARGEST JET ENGINE TAIL- 
PIPE DISCLOSED BY RYAN 



Believed to be the largest jet engine tailpipe ever built is the huge 
stainless steel exhaust system Ryan Aeronautical Company built for the 
Wright T-35 Typhoon turbo-prop engine. Pictures of the tailpipe assembly 
have just been released for publication by the National Mi 11 tary Estab I i sh- 
mento 

Several years ago Wright Aeronautical Corp. began work on an experimental 
gas turbine-propeller engine, reported to be one of the largest in the world, 
with a thrust said to be in excess of 5000 pounds. They called on Ryan 
engineers and workmen to turn out the largest tailpipe assembly ever constructed 
to carry off the fiery exhaust gases and provide jet thrust for the engine. The 
T-35 Typhoon was built as a research and development project, and the experi- 
mental installation was mounted in the nose of a Boeing B-17 for flight testing. 

One of the design problems Ryan engineers had to conquer was the forward, 
aft, and side motion of the tailpipe as well as the up and down motion while 
in flight. One portion of the tailpipe was attached to the airplane structure 
and one portion to the engine, Ted Hacker, Ryan Manifold Design Engineer, 
solved this thorny problem of transverse motion by devising transversal seal 
rings which fitted between the engine and the plane's structure. 

Because of careful planning this largest of all jet exhaust systems re- 
quired no reworking or design changes after operational tests, but there were 
tremendous problems involved in the construction of the assembly. 

Of the fourteen large, stainless steel sections which made up the final 
installation, some were as much as six feet in diameter. Biggest headache was 
holding these huge sheet metal parts to fine tolerances during welding, heat- 
treating and assembling. 



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Aiinust 12, 1949 
AVIATION MAGS 
FmJSiNCIAL RED 

PRESS RELEASE 



FROM >IU WAGNGR 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBEReH FIELD * SAN DIE60 12, CALIFORNIA 



MILITARY COMPLETES INSPECTION 
OF RYAN XQ-2 TARGET PLANE 

Forty officers and technicians of the Air Force, Navy 
and Army Field Forces, from Wright Field and other aviation 
development centers have just completed a three-day preliminary 
inspection of the Ryan XQ-2 jet-propelled pilotless target 
plane at the Ryan Aeronautical Company plant. 

The group was headed by Col, H. J. Sands, Jr., Chief of 
the Guided Missiles Section of the Air Materiel Commando 

Ryan has had the XQ-2 robot plane under development for 
the past year and a half, having been awarded the contract 
after a major competition. The project is a joint effort of 
the Air Force and Navy, 

The Ryan XQ-2 is a high-speed radio-controlled pilotless 
drone, less than half the size of a standard fighter plane. It 
will be used as a target plane for interception problems as well 
as for anti-aircraft and combat plane gunnery training. 

Technical details of the XQ-2, quantity of units being pro- 
duced by Ryan and amount of the contracts involved have not yet 
been announced^ 




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PRESS RELEASE 



FROM BILL WASNER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 

For AM Release 
Tuesday, August 30 

Mailed 8-25 - 8-29 

San Diego Red 
Avija. Mags 1-2-3 

RYAN AWARDED MILLION DOLLAR Newspapers - Red 

Techn ical - Red 

INCREASE IN JET TARGET PLANES Financial - Red 

Fore ign - Red 
Wires - Red & Ywl low 
Army & Navy Red 

A new million dollar Air Force contract has been awarded Misc. Red 

Free Lance Red 

Ryan Aeronautical Company to continue the development and fabri- 
cation of an additional quantity of Ryan XQ-2 remotely controlled 
jet-powered aerial target planes. 

The original contract for the Ryan robot planes, signed more 
than a year ago, was for approximately two million dollars. 

The design and fabrication of the first experimental quantity 
has progressed satisfactorily, and delivery schedules have been 
established to permit flight testing and evaluation by the Air 
Force. The Air Force is charged with the technical responsibility 
for the development of the XQ-2. 

The high speed, radio-controlled target craft will be used 
for combat plane interception problems and for antiaircraft and 
aerial gunnery training by the Air Force, Navy and Army. 

The first production units are noxv being assembled at Ryan' s 
San Diego plant and work on a second group of the pilotless air- 
craft is being started immediately, company officials said. The 



-2- 



first preliminary evaluation of the XQ-2 was completed just two 
weeks ago by a joint Air Force-Navy-Armj'- technical board headed 
by Col. H. J. Sands, Jr., Chief of the .guided missiles section 
of the Air Materiel Command, 

No information is available as to the number of robot planes 
scheduled to be built, nor have other than very general technical 
details of the XQ-2 been released. 

Since the XQ-2 is to be used in target work with latest combat 
planes, it is reported to be capable of performance approximating 
that of modern jet fighter aircraft. Powered by a jet engine, 
the robot aerial target is designed for high speeds and remote 
control operation. It is less than one-half the size of a standard 
jet fighter plane. 

The original development contract for the XQ-2 was awarded 
the Ryan Aeronautical Company as a result of a design competition 
with other aircraft manufacturers. 



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PRESS RELEASE 



FROM BILL WASNER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD » SAN DIESO 12, CALIFORNIA 



For Re lease 

Monday, November 14^ 



AIR FORCE REVEALS RYAN "FIREBIRD" 

AS FIRST AIR-TO-AIR GUIDED MISSILE 



The rocke-t-propel led "Firebird" guided missile, virtually a fragmentation 
shell with human intelligence, which is extremely small, fast and difficult to 
track even on radar scopes, has been developed by Ryan Aeronautical Company 
engineers. The Air Force's first air-to-air missile, the "Firebird", is designed 
to be as effective for night or inclement weather interception as in clear skies 
since visual sighting is not reguiredo 

Designated the XAAM-A-I (experimental, air-to-air missile, Air Force, first 
model), the Ryan "Firebird" is extremely compact for the complete radar naviga- 
tional system and large explosive charge it carries. Launched from a "mother" 
jet fighter plane, it is capable of heading off and destroying its objective in 
a matter of seconds, it has all the speed first generated by the parent fighter, 
plus the added power of its own booster rocket and finally its flight rockets. 

Because it is a pilotless projectile, it is capable of maneuvers beyond 
human endurance, making it extremely effective against piloted aircraft. Little 
more than half a foot in diameter, it is about 10 feet in length and 7-1/2 feet 
long after dropping its booster rocket. 

The "intelligence" of the Ryan "Firebird" is its complicated radar naviga- 
tional and electronic system, making this missile one of the most compact flying 
weapons ever devised. 

The missile's mother niane is the first to detect the target, and directs 
the launching of the missileo Thereafter, the "Firebird" is designed to "home" 
on the enemy target. At night or in inclement weather the launch plane must 



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-2- 



have a saarch/trsck inn rar'ar cacsbla of soottino the anemy aircraft. The host 
fighter plane can carry one or more missiles on external launching racks which 
fit stanr'ari^ bomb insta I I at ionso The "Firebird" missiles can be fired in single 
or mu 1 1 in I e I aunch ings„ 

In actual flinht tests, four cf the "Firebird" air-to-air missiles v.ere 
slunn beneath the wings of a North American F-82 "Twin Mustang" fighter — two 
beneath each winn. During other tests, a Douglas B-26 twin-engine attack bomber 
served as the launch plane. 

The v.'inns and tail of the missile are in the form of a double cruciform, 
the wings having anj><^att i tude and the fins a-j— attitude when in level flight. 
The four vane-like wings are located about midway on the rocket portion of the 
projectile. Two feet behind the v\inas are the four tail vanes. Both wings and 
tail surfaces serve to control the flinht of the missile. 

Of about 3-foot snan, the winns have an aeroriynami ca I I y smooth surface not 
enualled by the usual sheet metal construction, Exceot for the plastic radome 
and winns, the basic missile structure is conventional aluminum-alloy sheet. 

After the missile is launched from the oarent plane, a booster rocket takes 
over. Then, when the "Firebird" reaches maximum speed, the spent booster is 
jettisoned by an exolosive charge. Thereafter, during the latter phase of inter- 
cention, power is supplied by flight rockets. The warhead is designed to explode 
when it is close enough to an enemy aircraft to insure destruction. Should the 
missile miss its target, the warhead is automatically detonated in the airo 

Development of the missile has been under way for more than two years by 
the r?yan Aeronautical Company. The "birds" have been manufactured by the com- 
pany's San Diego plant, and under joint Air Force-Ryan technical supervision 
actual firings have been made at Holloman Air Force Base, Alamogordo, New l^exico. 



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-3- 



In the interests of economy, the missiles were launched from aircraft in 
flight without the guiding mechanism installed, and the data resulting from the 
flight tests served to determine the effectiveness of the propulsion system 
and the general aerodynamic conf i gurat ion„ The guiding mechanism has been sub- 
jected to extensive ground testing and found satisfactory. 

The project is still in the experimental phase. Although it is not planned 
to out the "Firebird" into production, the research and development work has 
provided Air Force and industry techniciams with valuable engineering data which 
is being used in designing improved air-to-air missiles. Cost of the develop- 
ment project was approximately $2,000,000o 

The "Firebird" name derives from the "Fire" series of combat aircraft 
designed and built by Ryan, the first of which was the "Fireball" jet-plus- 
pro oe ller f ighter. 

At the oresent time Ryan Aeronautical Company is also working on the XQ-2, 
a jet-propelled, high-speed, radio-controlled pilotless aircraft less than half 
the size of a combat fighter, to be used as an aerial target for interception 
and gunnery trainingo 



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Out: 12-23-49 
Stockho I ders 
Selected San Dieno Red 
Financial Red 

RYAN AERONAUTICAL C O M p"^^^'^ ''''' 

LINDBERGH FIELD, SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA, U.S.A. 

CABLE; RYANCD, SAN OIEDO 



NEWS LETTER 

TO THE SHAREHOLDERS OF 
THE RYAN AERONAUTICAL CO.: 

The year 1949 was the 17th profitable year for The Ryan Aeronautical Co. since 
its incorporation in 1931. Near the end of February you will receive the regular Annual 
Report to Stockholders containing complete financial information. It was felt that you 
would like to have this preliminary report at this time, outlining some of the main 
points of 1949 operations. 

SALES for the year were $15,268,087.00,; the largest volume of any post-war year. 

NET PROFIT after taxes was $346,674 00 - roughly 90 cents per outstanding share. 
This is approximately the same as for 1948. 

BOOK VALUE per share at the year end was $11.20, compared to $10.53 per share as 
of the start of the year and $9.64 at the close of the 1947 fiscal year. 

WORKING CAPITAL. At the year end the ratio of current assets to current liabilities 
was slightly under 2 to 1. The slight decline in this ratio during the year was due to 
the larger volume of sales which necessitated larger bank loans and larger inventories. 
The bank loans which stood at $3^000,000.00 at October 31, will have been reduced to 
$2,000,000.00 by December 31, increasing the current ratio to approximately 2% to 1. 
Net working capital as of the year end was $3,186,945.00 or over $8.00 per outstanding 
share. 

Respectfully submitted. 




^n^ 



T. Claude Ryan, President 
December 23, 1949 




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Mai I ing Out: 2-10-50 

3 S.D. Newspapers ) 
Aviation Mags i ) pix 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY • LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA Tech. Red) 



fron 



<JSMH/>^^r^ 



RYAN BUILDING COMPONENTS FOR 
AERO BEE HIGH ALTITUDE ROCKET 



Aviation Mags 2 
Financial Red 
Fore i gn Red 
Wire Services 
A.P.) S.D. 
U.P.) 



Latest name to be added to the list of those associated with manufacture 
of the 3000 m.p.h. Aerobee high altitude sounding rockets is that of Ryan 
Aeronautical Company, San Diego. Recognized as leading fabricators of stain- 
less steel components for high temperature aircraft uses, Ryan for some time 
has been building most of the assemblies for the pencil-thin rocket, except 
the propulsion unit and fuel tank. The Aerobee is the most widely used American- 
built sounding rocket. 

The latest research project with Aerobee rockets got under way in mid- 
September at Holloman Air Force Base at Alamogordo, New Mexico. There the 
Air Force will use the latest Ryan-built Aerobees for a two-year high-altitude 
study of cosmic rays, meteorology, radio characteristics and other unknown facts 
about the thin, upper atmosphere. Scientific assistance and instruments are 
being supplied by some 15 colleges and research institutions which will help 
Air Force technicians in evaluating the information. 

Experience with the 60 rockets to be fired at Alamogordo is expected to 
not only furnish new information about conditions 75 miles above the earth, but 
will also supply technical data on which further guided missile development will 
be based. The new project is an exoansion of similar tests- the Army has been 
conducting with German V-2 rockets at the White Sands, New Mexico, proving ground. 
The Aerobee rockets are smaller, simpler and cheaper missiles than the huge, com- 
pl icated V-2's. 




By Rvnn 

• EXHAUST SYSTEMS • JET ENGINE COMPONENTS • JET AFTER BURNERS • METAL PRODUCTS 



-2- 



Since the launching of the first Aerobee rocket in March, 1948, at White 
Sands, the missiles have twice hit the headljneSc First was the fall of that 
year when automatic cameras mounted in one of the rockets took 200 pictures at 
\\ second intervals from up to 70 miles high, showing curvature of the earth 
and land areas of the western United States 1400 miles in length from upper 
Wyoming on the north to deep into Mexico on the south„ 

Then, in March of this year, two Aerobee rockets were fired from the deck 
of the UoSoSo Norton Sound, a Navy seaplane tender fitted especially for launch- 
inq guided missiles at seao Principal data gained at the time of these firings, 
to an altitude of 65 miles at a location 700 miles in the Pacific off the west 
coast of South America, concerned cosmic ray intensityo 

The Aerobee was developed originally for the Navy Bureau of Ordnance by ■ 
the Aerojet Engineering Corpo of Azusa, California;, a subsidiary of The General 
Tire & Rubber COo, Akron, Ohio, from which Ryan Aeronautical Company has received 
its contracts for the missile's needle-like nose section, the tail cone, booster 
and main rocket body fins, shrouds, fairings and other componentSo 

A portion of the components of the first 20 Aerobees was sub-contracted by 
Aerojet to Douolas Aircraft Company, Santa Monica^, This project has been under 
the technical supervision of the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins 
University« The design was influenced to some extent by previous development 
sponsored by the Ordnance Department of the Army,, 

The Aerobee is a I igu i d-fue I ed rocket, 20 feet long and pencil thino Ft has 
two-stage propulsion; that is a solid fuel booster rocket first brings its velo- 
city up to 670 moPoh, and then drops off,, After that the sustain ingi|4qu ifl=fue led 
rocket motor speeds it up to 3000 miles an hour and altitudes of 75 mileSo It 



*3'* 



is desianec* to carry a 150- to 200-pound pay load of scientific instruments which 
are blown from the nose of missile at the top of the trajectory and lowered liy 
ribbon parachute,, The rocket also carries teiemeterino equipment which auti*- 
matically transmits data by radio to ground ■ stat ions., 

Simple in desian and comparatively inexpensive to build, the Aerobee is 
fired from a launching tower by a small technical crew using a minimum of costly 
installation and firing facilities,, 



'4 




Ma i I inq Out : 2-21-50 
PRESS RELEASE San Oieqo Red 

Aviation Maos I & 2 
FROM BILL WAGNER Financial Red 

RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



NEW FIELD ENTERED BY RYAN AERO IN 
STARTING $750,000 WING TANK ORDER 



A new field of airframe components manufacture has been entered 
by Ryan Aeronautical Company with the closing of contracts for the 
design and volume production of external wing tanks for military 
p lanes. 

Preliminary work on the three-quarters of a million dollar 
contract has been under way for some time in the Engineering Depart- 
ment, Research Laboratory and Experimental Department at Ryan„ Due 
to security restrictions Ryan is not yet at liberty to disclose 
details of the new order, nor the military airplane for which the 
tanks are to be manufactured. 

Requirements for the external wing tanks were outlined by the 
prime manufacturer, but Ryan will do the actual design and engineer- 
ing. Possibly the largest wing tanks ever designed, some idea of their 
size may be gained by the fact they will be larger than the fuselage of 
Ryan's popular four-place Navion personal-business plane. 

Production on the tanks, on the basis of present schedules, will 
continue we I I into 1951 . 




PRESS RELEASE 



For Re lease 
Tuesday, 
February 28 



FROM BILL WASNER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIESO 12, CALIFORNIA 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 
1949 EARNINGS $358,052 



San Diego Red (5) 

Aviation Mags I 

Financial Red 

PAC Publ ic Relations 

AIA Personnel (3-2-50) 

(Littrell, Geuting, 

. Webb, Goss) 

Ryan Aeronautical Company earned $358j052 for the 1949 fiscal year, 

ended October 31 last. To Claude Ryan, president, disclosed today in the 

company's annual report to stockho I derSo This was equivalent to 91 cents 

per share on the net outstanding shares, and compares with $356,603, or 

90 cents per share, for the 1948 fiscal year. 

Book value at the close of the fiscal year was $4,415,608, or $n<,2l 
per net outstanding share, compared with $4,152,428 or $IOo54 per share 
for 1948 and $3,874,822 or $9,65 per share for l947o 

During the year, $406,054 additional was invested in new equipmento 
The $210,160 by which this exceeded depreciation charges for 1949 came from 
earni ngso 

Net working capital stood at $3,404,397 or approximately $8o64 per net 
outstanding share, as of the end of the fiscal year, compared with $3j,229,773 
or $8o20 as of the year before. 

Of I949's gross revenue of $15,014,564, the Airplane Division accounted 
for $8,736,821 and the Metal Products Division for $6,277,743, Operations 
of both divisions were profitable, Ryan reported. Gross revenue for 1948 
was $7,948,41 I. 

Work of the Airplane Division falls into three classes (I) Ryan Navion 
personal-business planes, (2) manufacture of major airframe components, and 
(3) military aircraft development contracts. 



.2- 



Principal activity of the Metal Products Division is the design and 
manufacture of products fabricated from heat- and corrosion-resistant 
stainless steels^ This work falls into two basic groups: (I) Exhaust 
systems and similar accessories for conventional piston-type engines; 
and (2) Components for turbo-jet and gas turbine engineso Ryan's jet 
engine business represented a larger proportion of the total volume than 
in the prior year and this trend is expected to continues, Ryan saidp as 
increasing emphasis is given this type of power planto 

In the field of airframe components manufacture^ Ryan has just com= 
pleted a contract for 50 huge fuselage sections for Boeing commercial and 
military transport planeSo Negotiations for an additional quantity have 
been completed, calling for deliveries during the latter half of 1950o 

Three new Ryan Navion planes will make up the company's 1950 line of 
personal-business aircraft, compared to the one model previously offered, 
Ryan stated. These are the Utility 205 at $9485, the DeLuxe 205 at $10,985 
and the Super 260 at $I3,985„ The Super 260 represents the greatest im- 
provement in performance since Ryan began Navion production in l947o it's 
increased cruising speed of 170 mopdio, exceptionally high rate of climb, 
and other outstanding performance characteristics are reported to be 
superior to any other airplane in its classo 

In the field of military aircraft, the company is proceeding with 
development and manufacture of the Ryan XQ^2 jet propelled pilotless target 
planeo During 1949 the program was increased by over $|,000,000o It "holds 
excellent future possibilities," Ryan reported to stockho 1 derSo 

An engineering design and research project for the Navy Bureau of 
Aeronautics has been further extended, but security regulations do not per- 
mit identifying ito 



-3- 



In addition to worl< on accessories for both conventional piston-type 
and jet engines, the company's specialized knowledge has led it into newer 
items, including rocket engine parts and rocket bodies, which are expected 
to add further to production activity in this growing fieldo 

Total dividends paid to stockholders in the past 14 years is $9585386, 
Ryan saidj which is more than the capital provided by shareholders through 
the purchase of capital stocko 



^ 



^ 




PRESSRELEASE Mailing out: 3-1 



San D i eqo Red 
FROM BILL WAGNER AvidtJonMaos I 

RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY ♦ LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIESC) 'iJ^.tWlPoRNlX'^ 



-50 
2 



HALF MILLION DOLLARS IN METAL 

PRODUCTS BOOKED BY RYAN AERO 



New Metal Products business totaling $500,000 for 
Ryan manifolds and jet engine parts has been contracted 
for in the past few weeks, Sam C, Breder, sales manager 
of Ryan Aeronautical Company, announced today. 

Approximately a quarter of a million dollars of new 
business has been placed by General Electric Co. for 
additional jet engine components, supplementing the large 
volume of exhaust cones, combustion chambers and trans- 
ition liners now in production. 

New exhaust manifold system business, also amounting 
to about $250,000, has been received from the U. s. Air 
Force for a number of mu I t i-eng ined bomber and cargo planes. 




Ma i I i no Out : 3-7-50 

PRESS RELEASE ''" ^'''° °^^ 



FROM BILL WAGNER 



Aviat ion Mans I & 2 
Financial Red 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBER6H FIELD « SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



RYAN GETS $750,000 ORDER 

FOR MORE BOEING FUSELAGES 



With delivery this month of the 50th aft fuselage 
section built by Ryan Aeronautical Company for Boeing 
C-97 Stratofre ighters and 377 Stratocru I sers, receipt 
of a re-order for additional units has been disclosed, 
assuring re-activation of this assembly line at the 
San Diego plant. 

The new contract with Boeing is for approximately 
three-quarters of a million dollars and calls not only 
for the 30-foot long C-97A aft fuselage sections but 
also for cargo doors and for all the floor beams for 
the additional number of Boeing military cargo planes 
to be built. Production will get under way first on 
floor beams as these must be supplied to Boeing for 
assembly with the other sections of the fuselage which 
are built at the Seattle plant. 




PRESS RELEASE 1°' ^'''"' 

Wednesday, 

FROM BILL WA6NER MarCfl 22 

RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY ♦ LINDBERGH FIELD ♦ SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 

RYAN AERONAUTICAL OFFICERS RE-ELECTED 

FOLLOWING ANNUAL STOCKHOLDERS MEETING 

All officers of the Ryan Aeronautical Company, headed by To Claude Ryan, 
President, were yesterday renamed by the Board of Directors for the ensuing 
year = 

The Board action followed the annual meeting of shareholders at which 
four directors were re-elected and a new Director, Melvin Ho Lockctt, selec- 
ted to servco Lockett, a nominee of the Ryan management, is a partner in the 
firm of Mattison, Thomas & Lockett, certified public accountants of Los Angeles 
and a Director of Oceanic Oil Company, 

The new director takes the place on the Board held since 1943 by Mro Frank 
N, Phillips, who passed away last December, The remaining portion of Mr„ Phillips' 
lasttermwas served by Mr, H, G, Sloane, who has been the legal counsel of the 
company for many years. 

Directors re-elected were T, Claude Ryan, President; G, C, Woodard, Execu- 
tive Vice President and Treasurer; Earl D, Prudden, Vice President; and Co 
Arnholt Smith, Chairman of the Board of United States National Bank and of the 
National Steel and Shipbuilding Corporation of San Diego, 

Last year's operations and business developments since the close of the 
fiscal year were reviewed and discussed during the question and answer period, 
Ryan reports new orders of $1,000,000 in value received during the current month 
to date, and substantially increasing volume of additional business under nego- 
tiation and in prospect. 

Besides Ryan, Woodard and Prudden, other Ryan company officers renamed by 
the Board include C, A, Stillwagen, Secretary; L, L, Underwood, Assistant 
Treasurer; and D, H, Ockerman, Assistant Secretary, 




PRESS RELEASE 



Mai led 3-28-50 

San Di eqo 5 
Aviat ion Red 



FROM BILL WAGNER financial Red 

RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



RYAN GETS $1,000,000 INCREASE 

IN GENERAL ELECTRIC JET PARTS 

A $1,000,000 extension of its contracts with General Electric 
Company for additional quantities of the jet engine parts Ryan 
Aeronautical CoTiGany has been manufacturing for the past two years 
was received yesterday, Sam C, Breder, Ryan sales manager, announced. 

On the basis of the new orders, Ryan production of oarts for 
the General Electric J-47 jet engine is assured until August, 1951. 
The stainless steel exhaust cones and other Ryan-built parts are 
shipped to Lockland, Ohio, for final assembly at the factory GoEo 
has taken over there especially for J-4-7 production,. Exact quanti- 
ties to be built cannot be released but Ryan indicated they run into 
thousands of units. 



For Re lease 
Wednesdays, 
March 29 




ilai I inq Out: 0-12-50 
F i nanc i a I Red 
PRESS RELEASE For Release S.D. 4 

Tuesday, 
FROM BILL wASNER June 13 

RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL REPORTS 
$225. 878 NET FOR HALF YEAR 



The Ryan Aeronautical Company yesterday released to stockholders 
the following financial information for the six months ended April 30, 1950, 
showing net income of $225, 878, 



Total Current Assets $ 5, 673, 562 

Total Liabilities 2, 110, 795 

Net Current Assets ■= (Working Capital) $ 3, 562, 767 

Fixed Assets - Less Depreciation 1,022,831 

Other Assets ■ 18,829 



Net Worth (Capital Stock & Surplus) $ 4, 604,427 



Net Sales $ 5, 565, 668 

Cost of Sales & Other Expenses 5, 189, 356 

Income Before Taxes $ 376, 312 

Provision for Federal Income & State Franchise Taxes 150,434 

Net Income for First Half 1950 Fiscal Year $ 225, 878 



Net profit for the full 1949 fiscal year, ended October 31, 1949, was 
$358,052. 

In his letter to stockholders. To Claude Ryan, president, pointed out 

that "the stage of completion and of deliveries under major contracts usually 

has an important effect on the income reflected m any one period. Therefore, 

these earning figures should not be considered as a gauge of the rate of 

profit that may be shown for the full year, " 




Ma i I ing Out: 8-4-50 

PRESS RELEASE 

FROM BILL WA6NER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERSH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 

For ponfic Release 
Monday, August 7 

Di str i bu t ion: 

San D iego Red 
Avia. Mags I & 2 

$10,000,000 IN NEW ORDERS w! re'serv i ces Red 

Misc. Red 
FOR RYAN AERONAUTICAL CO. 



The largest single order since World War II has just been received by 
Ryan Aeronautical Company, T. Claude Ryan, president, disclosed today in 
announcing the first details of a production expansion program the company 
has already begun. This order brings to over $10,000,000 new contracts 
received in the past 30 days. 

Under the new contract with Boeing Airplane Company of Seattle, Ryan 
will greatly increase its production of the huge aft fuselage sections for 
the Air Force's giant C-97 Stratocru i ser military transports. 

For the past 18 months Ryan has been building C-97 fuselage sections and 
other components for Boeing. Now the schedule will be built up rapidly to a 
peak monthly production rate which will then be continued far into the future. 

Under new military security regulations neither the number of units to be 
built or dollar value of individual contracts can be revealed. 

In addition to this order from Boeing, production planning is under way 
for other contract increases scheduled but not yet firmed by formal orders, 
the company president said. Ryan is already producing most of the important 
products on which increased volume is planned, Ryan stated, pointing out that 
the necessary production machines, tooling and key personnel are already 
available. Placing orders with firms already producing important assemblies 
for military planes permits the fastest possible acceleration in American air 
power, he said. 



^i 



Volume military work Ryan is presently doing includes production of 
stainless steel components for jet and gas turbine engines, fuel tanks 
which are reportedly the largest ever built, and exhaust systems for trans- 
port and bomber planes, all reported scheduled for accelerated productioHo 
The company has been requested by interested engine manufacturers to furnish 
full details of jet engine production capacity on a multi-shift basis and 
definite confirmation of orders is expected soono 

During the past three months Ryan has added 425 new employees, more 
than half of them in the last 30 daysc Current level is approximately 1800 
workers which may be built up over a period of months to around 4000o About 
a thousand new workers will be required in the next 90 days as the plant 
swings into the increased production rate on the Boeing fuselages and other 
accelerated schedules„ 

In anticipation of the expansion program Ryan began stepping up produc- 
tion and delivery of all orders on hand immediately after the outbreak of 
hostilities in Korea. This advance planning is permitting Ryan to "clear 
the decks" for the influx of additional contracts now being receivedo 

The Ryan plant has been operating two shifts for many months, with the 
second shift employing only a few hundred workerso The second shift is now 
being built up, and a third shift added last week will be increased as rapidly 
as the work load builds upo 

Besides its sub-contract work, Ryan also holds prime contracts with both 
the Air Force and Navy Bureau of Aeronautics, for jet-propelled target planes, 
guided missile research, new applications of jet propulsion and exhaust sys- 
tems, and other such advanced worko Just how these might be affected by the 
increased aircraft procurement program, Ryan said he could not discuss,, In 



=■2- 



addition, the company is producing Ryan Navion executive business planes at a 
two-a-day production rate. Several iiundred military versions of the Navion, 
l<nown as the L-17, have been built for the Army Field Forces and National 
Guard for use as liaison planes and for personnel transportat ion^ 



-3- 




Mai I inq Out: lO-l 1-50 

PRESS RELEASE ^^" °'^"° ^"^ 

San Dieao Ya i lo 

FROM BILL WASNER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



SMITH AND IMMENSCHUH APPOINTED 
TO TOP ENGINEERING POSTS AT RYAN 

Appointment, of Bruce Smith to the position of Director of Engineering of the 
Ryan Aeronautical Company, San Diego, was annotinced today by T. Ciaade Ryan, 
president. For Smith, the appointment is an advancement to the company"? top 
engineering post from his former position as Chief Engineer of Ryan's Aj rpJane 
Division. 

Smith is a veteran of 20 years aircraft engineering activity. Prior to his 
association with Ryan in 1949, he served nine years as Chief Design Engineer 
for Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corp„ Before that he was Chief Engineer for 
the Travelair Aircraft Corp. 

Announced concurrently with Smith's appointment was the promotion of 
W. T. Immenschuh to Executive Engineer, principal aid to the Director of 
Engineering. Immenschuh* s appointment is an interesting development m a 
"local boy makes good" career that began here when he joined the Ryan engineer- 
ing department after graduation from local schools and the engineering division 
of the Ryan School of Aeronautics. 

Ten years m design work for Ryan military contracts, including experience 
as project engineer on important war and postwar developments., preceded his 
present promotion to the Executive Engineer position with responsibility for 
proper functioning of all engineering operations. 



t 




-,_._-.-. p»i-i r-Ai-i- l^ailinqOut: 10-11-50 

rKbbb KbLbASE Aviation Mans I & 

Tech. Red & Ye I low 

FROM BILL WA6NER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



BRUCE SMITH NAMED 
RYAN DIRECTOR OF ENGINEERING 

Appointment of Bruce Smith to the position of Direr tor of Er.gmeering 
of the Ryan Aeronautical Company, San Diego, was announced lodoy by 
T. Claude Ryan, president. For Smith, the appointment ts ??n advancement 
to the company's top engineering post from his former posiiion as Chief 
Engineer of Ryan's Airplane Division. 

Smith IS a veteran of 20 years aircraft engineering artivity. Prior +o 
his association with Ryan m 1949, he served nine years as Chief Design 
E-ngrneer for Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corp, Before 1ha+ he was 
Chief Engineer for the Travelair Aircraft Corp. 

Announced concurrently with Smith's appointment was +he promo+ion of 
W. T. Immenschuh to Executive Engineer, principal aid ^o ^he Direrilo' 
of Engineering. Ten years m design work for Ryan military contracts, 
including experience as project engineer on important war and postwar 
developments, preceded Ihe appointment to his new posilion wilh responsibi]i^y 
for proper functioning of all engineering operations- 




Ma i I inn Out : I l-l-T 
PRESS RELEASE ^an Cieno Re, 

r inane ia I Ret 

FROM BILL WASNER Avia. Ma^S I 

& J 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



RYAN ADVANCES TWO TO 
NEW FINANCE POSTS 

Advancement of two key executives of the Ryan Aeronautical Company 
to new finance posts was announced following yesterday's meeting of the 
Board of Directors of the San Diego aircraft firm. 

L. Li. Underwood, who became Assistant Treasurer last year after 
eight years' service with the company, was named Controller. He joined 
the Ryan School of Aeronautics of Arizona, at the company's wartime pilot 
training center at Tucson. After the war he transferred to the parent 
company's accounting staff. 

Dale H. Ockerman, Assistant Secretary of the corporation, was 
elected to serve also as Assistant Treasurer. Ockerman is a ten-year 
veteran with Ryan, having served in many accounting capacities. Just 
last w^eek he was presented the Merit Award of the National Office Management 
Association. 




Ma i I inq Out: I 1-9-50 

PRESS RELEASE ',f 'r^° "l"' 

'S litow 
Avi at ion Mars I 



FROM BILL WAGNER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 

2000 RYAN WORKERS GO 
ON SIX-DAY WORK WEEK 

Two thousand production worl<ers at Ryan Aeronautical Company will go on a six- 
day 48-hour week starting today to speed work on an increasing volume of military 
aircraft contracts, company officials have announced. 

Office and engineering employees will continue to work a 40-hour week, except 
for those whose duties require close coordination with manufacturing departments. 
Hourly employees working 48 hours will receive pay for 52 hours since time-and-a- 
half is paid for all hours over 40 in a work week. This will increase take-home 
pay of hourly-paid Ryan workers on the six-day work week by 30 percent. Two shifts 
are being worked, with approximately 500 currently on the second shift. 

"The change from a 40-hour to 48-hour work week in production departments will, 
in effect, be the equivalent of adding 250 skilled workers to our present payroll, 
but this will not solve the problem of bringing the necessary number of additional 
skilled workers into aircraft production in our factory," said T. Claude Ryan, • 
president. 

Ryan products include important items for the military services on which in- 
creased production rates are now required. Several of these contracts provide 
for heavy manufacturing schedules for at least the next two years. Included in 
current contracts are Ryan jet-propelled pilotless aircraft, huge fuselage as- 
semblies for military transport planes, special type fuel tanks, numerous aircraft 
parts and assemblies, jet engine components and stainless steel exhaust systems, 
heat exchangers and allied products for nearly every major American aircraft company. 



11-8-50 



3CrV.: 



■J r".'! 




PRESS RELEASE 



FROM BILL WA6NER 



Mai I ing Out: I l-l3-5( 
San Dieqo Red (5) 
Aviation Hans I 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERSH FIELD ♦ SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 

JOHN ATHA NAMED RYAN 
DAYTON REPRESENTATIVE 

Appointment of John Atha as Midwest Representative of the Ryan Aeronautical 
Company's Mete! ^^roducts Division with headquarters at Dayton, Ohio, has just been 
announced by Sam C. Breder, Customer Service head. 

Atha has joined the Ryan organization following many years' service with the 
Curt i 5S-V/r iqht Airplane Division where his most recent assignment was as that 
company's representative at Dayton. 

Ryan's new representative relieves Charles Kinney who has recently served 
on temporary assignment, providing liaison with the Air Mcteriel Command at 
V/r i ght-Pstterson Field and with Ryan's midwest exhaust systems and jet engine 
components customers. Kinney returns to the company's San Diego headquarters 
where he will be associated with C. L. Foushee, Jr., Service Manager, in providing 
close coordination with customers of the company's Metal Products Division. 

Atha is well known at Dayton having been with the Air Materiel Command in a 
wartime civilian capacity for five years. Following that he joined Curt i ss-Wr ight 
at their Columbus, Ohio, plant where he was chief contract administrator prior to 
assignment as Dayton representative of the Airplane Division. 



I I - 1 3-50 




For Release 
PRESS RELEASE Thursday 

November 23 

FROM BILL WAGNER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERSH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



Mai I inq Out: I 1-22 
San Dieao Red 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL CO. Aviation Maqs I 

Financial Red 

CHANGES DIVIDEND POLICY " Yellow 

DECLARES 10 CENT PAYMENT 



Directors of the Ryan Aeronautical Company have 
declared a cash dividend of 10 cents per share, payable 
December 27 to stocl<ha I ders of record December 12. 

With declaration of the dividend, Ryan directors 
announced that it is now the intention of the Board that 
the payment of dividends be considered quarterly. 

For the past several years it has been the policy of 
the directors to consider the matter of dividend payments 
annually after the close of the fiscal year. Since 1947 
these annual dividend payments have been made in March of 
each year. 



I 1-22-50 




Mailed to Aviation List I and 5. D, 
____-, -*--■ — A^r- For Release 

PRESS RELEASE Thursday, 

December 21 

FROM BILL WA6NER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



RYM jffiRONAUTICAL COlffANY 
BACKLOG TOPS 1^25,000,000 

Unfilled orders of the Ryan Aeronautical Company now exceed |25,000,000, 
T, Claude Ryan, president, stated today. During the past thirty days new contracts 
totaling more than 4^4*000, 000 have been closed. 

Included in these latest orders are contracts from General Electric for con- 
tinued volume production of important components for the latest types of jet engine 
power plants. Other important orders just received are those from Pratt and Miit- 
ney and Douglas Aircraft Company for Ryan-developed stainless steel exhaust systems. 

Employment at Ryan near the year-end has increased 6? percent since June to over 
2500 workers. An intensive hiring program is now under way to provide the necessary 
work force for the rapidly expanding military aircraft program. By July, I95I, Ryan 
employment is scheduled to reach l+OOO. 

In recent months additional large orders have been placed with Ryan for both 
airframe and engine components. Further increases in production rates are being 
asked on many of these contracts — ■ several of which call for accelerated manufactur- 
ing schedules for at least the next two years, 

Ryan is now building jet-propelled pilotless aircraft, huge fuselage assemblies 
for military transport planes, special type fuel tanks and numerous other aeronauti- 
cal products, Navion executive liaison planes, jet engine components and exhaust 
systems and allied stainless steel products for nearly every major American aircraft 
company. 



12-21-50 




Mailing Out: I-29-5I 

PRESS RELEASE ^'^ancial red 



FROM BILL WASNER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL CO. TO 
PAY IO9S QUARTERLY DIVIDEND 

a quarterly dividend of 10^ per share has 
been declared by the board of directors of the 
Ryan Aeronautical Company, payable March 12, 1951> 
to stockholders of record as of february 21, 1951- 



1-29-51 



To Local Press 
2-2-51 



w 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL CO/f VINSTALLS 
LARGEST MACHINE TOOL OF KIND ON PACIFIC COAST 

1 The largest machine tool of its kind in the west 
as in operation today at Ryan Aeronautical Cqfilto^step up production of jet 
-as ocyib l y parts. 

'WThe installation, a 4-0-ton, 13-foot high vertical turret I at he /y"*'''''^ 
^— -— dismantled ' 

is so bulky that a portion of the main factory building's wall had to be 'mmMM'"" 
while it was moved into place after its arrival on a special flat car from the 
factory in Bridgeport, Conn. 

Ryan production engineers said MMV this lathe has the 
hiphest boring mill with raised bed ever installed on the Pacific Coast. ItswiislK* 
f turning table will accommodate metal sections ranoing from one halrfinch to just 
urjder 7 feet in height. 

6 ProductionV^ch items as Mm huge 48-inch aluminum rings for external 
fuel tanks will be increased 25 percent over previous methods, &3fr* Darwin iiiWi 
Whetstine, foreman of Ryan jet assembly departments, stated. Similar increased 

production rates are anticipated on cones, aftf frames and other jet engine assemblies. 

[The lathe Is so simple to operate that one man can run it safely, 
maniouiatihg the gear control arm to set off electrical solenoids. These, \r\$ turn, 
hydrau I ical I y actuate gear changes to produce desired rotating <^ speeds up to 160 
rpm on the fast-whirling table. 

### 



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tsbfm 




PRESS RELEASE 



Aviation Mags 1 
2-7-51 



FROM BILL WA6NER 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY . LINDBERGH FIELD . SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



KEEN JOINS PUBLIC RELATIONS 
STAFF OF RYAN AERONAUTICAL 

Harold Keen, aviation writer and general assignment 

REPORTER FOR THE SaN DiEGO EVENING TRIBUNE FOR 11 YEARS, 
HAS JOINED THE PUBLIC RELATIONS STAFF OF RYAN AERONAUTICAL 

Company as an assistant to William Wagner, public relations 
manager. 

Keen has been a San Diego newspaperman for I5 years, 
including h years on the now defunct Sun, A member of the 
Aviation Writers Association, he is San Diego correspondent 
for Time and Life Magazines, and the Los Angeles Times, Keen 

also CONDUCTS DAILY RADIO NEWSCASTS AND TELEVISION NEWS INTER- 
VIEW PROGRAMS, WHICH HE WILL CONTINUE IN HIS PRESENT CAPACITY 

AT Ryan. 



2-6-51W 




Mail iNG Out: 2-13-^1 
Aviation Mags 1 & 2 

PRESS RELEASE financial red 

For Release 
from bill wasner february ]k 

ryan aeronautical company . lindbereh field . san diego 12, california 

VAN DER LINDE NAMED PRODUCTION 
MANAGER OF RYAN AERONAUTICAL CO. 



H. J. VAN DER LiNDE, 48, WHO JOINED THE RyAN ORGANIZATION 28 YEARS AGO, 
HAS BEEN ADVANCED TO THE POSITION OF PRODUCTION MANAGER OF THE RyAN AERONAUTICAL 

Company, T. Claude Ryan, president, announced yesterday. 

Starting as a flight mechanic and co-pilot on the Los Angeles-San Diego 
run of Ryan Airlines, Inc., in 1923^ van der Linde has held many key posts 
WITH Ryan, his most recent having been Airplane Production Superintendent, 

R. L. Clark, former assistant director of Ryan's customer service depart- 
ment, has been appointed Assistant Production Manager under van der Linde, and 
J. C. Zippwald was advanced from field service representative to Clark's pre- 
vious position in customer service. 

In a realignment of factory service functions, the production engineering 
division under H. p. Rasp has been enlarged in scope to include production 
control and methods engineering, and will be known as the Factory Service 
Division, with Rasp as manager. 

Van der Linde, who came to San Diego at the age of I9 from his native 
Netherlands East Indies with his parents, has supervised the assembly of every 
Ryan model from the hi gh-performancEjet-pushed, propeller-pulled Fireball Navy 
fighter and the sleek, four-place Navion executive-liaison plane to the slow 

BIPLANE types OF POST-WORLD WaR I AND THE RyAN M-1 WHICH PIONEERED AIRMAIL SER- 
VICE ON THE West Coast. 

Other aircraft were the Brougham, prototype of Lindbergh's Spirit of 
St. Louis; the S-T series of low-wing trainers in which tens of thousands of 
Air Force pilots learned to fly; the S-C private owner cabin plane series; and 
the YO-51 "Dragonfly", a steep-landing, short takeoff observation plane for the 
Air Force. 



k^Hl;, 



>3Hi J° 



Van der Linde is married and has two sons, Henry, i8, enrolled in San Diego 
Junior College, and John, ^k , a student at Woodrow Wilson Junior High School. 
The family resides at ^55^ Fifty-Sixth Sto 



2-I3-5IK 



San Diego Union, Feb. i8 



Aircraft workers are the homing pigeons of industry. 

Between wars or national emergencies, they scatter to far-flung places and 

VARIED occupations. 

Whenever the full-throated roar of America's aerial might swells in ■*!«: volume 



J 



»-Tft B BIP- » -»->f6 -T0 T Mt CT T eMV , THE WORKERS FLOCK BACK TO THEIR OLD JOB 



stations. 

They drop their peacetime activities and return to the rivet gun, the drop- 
hammer, THE punch press, THE DRILL, THi LATHE AMD THE COUNTLESS TOOLS THAT FORGE 

America's unbeatable industrial might. 

"It gets under your skin, and always stays a part of you, I guess," a grizzled 




D 



n 



MACHINIST AT RyAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY REMARKED. 

"For me, it was like coming back home," 

At Ryan and other aircraft plants in this area, personnel managers harassed bi^Tvi 

THE SHORTAGE OF SKILLED MANPOBER ARE THANKFUL FOR THESE "HOMING PIGEONS." ThEY CO H 
prise a quickly TAPPED POOL OF SAVVY LABOR WHICH IMMEDIATELY SWINGS INTO THE TEMPOV^ 
OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION. 

There's little or the lost time of in-plant training required of the raw new-' 

COMERS ON WHICH INCREASING RELIANCE MUST BE PLACED IN THE INDUSTRY'S MUSHROOM EXPAMSI 
A REPETITION OF THE EARLY DAYS OF WORLD WaR 1). 

"It's THOUGH THEY HAD NEVER LEFT," SAYS JaMES W. BUNNELL, RyaN PERSONNEL CHIEF. 

"Many pick up their tools and go to work as if they were just returning from a week- 
end," 

Employment managers say they "see halos over the heads" of the "old-timers" 
when they ap«»ear for rehiring, "We're tickled pink to have them back," am executive 



(IN, 



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Wh£n World War II cnocd and aircraft ordlrs wcrc cancellco, numcrous workers 

RETURNED TO THEIR rORMER HOMES ALt OVER THE COUNTRY AND TOOK lOBS THERE. THE YEARN- 
ING FOR San Diego was never quelled in many hearts, and in recent months the influx 

TO THEIR "adopted" HOME HAS RESUMED. 

"We're qcginning to get letters of inquiry from World War II workers, asking 
IF there are jobs for them should they come back to San Diego," Bunnell declared. 
"Since the last war, they've been working on farms or in small businesses in all 
PARTS of the United States, and now they're anxious to return to the aircraft in- 
dustry." 

For example, Kenneth Matthews, a manifold assemble-r who was terminated at 
war's end, went sack to Lake City, Iowa where he worked in a welding shop and 
drilled wells until he heard that aircraft jobs again were available here. 

"i always wanted to come back," he explained. "i never found a better place 

TO WORK." 

Lloyd Doerge, a welder, spent the years since World War II in and around 
La Crosse, Wisconsin on various welding jobs. He returned to San Diego recently. 

H's SIMPLE explanation; "I ENJOYED WORKING HERE BEFORE, SO I CAMl BACK." 

Many experienced the tribulations of being "one's own boss" after World War II. 
They went into business for themselves, now are satisfied with holding down jobs 
helpful to the defense effort. 

Still others took prolonged vacations after the long pf.riod of intensive work 
under pressure. 

Cecil R. Hamlet and his wife travelled for almost k years. He has started in 

the AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY HERE IN 1936, CLIMBING TO FOREMAN OF SHEET METAL FABRICATION 
TEN YEARS LATER, 

"My wife and I wanted to see how other people lived," Hamlet explained. "We 

LEARNED A LOT, AND DISCOVERED THAT SaN DiEGO IS THE BEST PLACE TO LIVE AND WORK." 



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Today HfMtET is handling pressure tests on the Boeing fuselage sections being 
BUILT BY Ryan. He had to start out as an hourly paid worker, but "I'm sure battling 
TO become a foreman again." 

Those who left the industry of their own volition for "greener" fields often 
regret they lost their continuity of employment. "i wished i never had left," 
SAID W. A, "Bud" Meixner, an assistant foreman at Ryan, "I might be better off 

TODAY." 

The new emergency has also brought many old-timers out of the "mothballs" of 
retirement. 

Observe, for instance, John J. "Red" Harrigan, one of San Diego's most colorful 

PIONEER aviators. 

"Red" entered naval aviation in I916, flew for 9 years before returning to 
civilian life as a flight instructor and test pilot for Ryan. The depression of 

THE EARLY THIRTIES SEPARATED HIM FROM HIS JOB, ALSO. "GOLD FEVEr" SENT HIM ON A 
none-too-profitable flying expedition TO THE YuKON TERRITORY. LaTER HE SERVED AS 
PRIVATE PILOT FOR A MILLIONAIRE IN CHICAGO, FOR THREE YEARS HE WAS LINDBERGH FlELO 
MANAGER FOR THE SaN Oie:GO HARBOR DEPARTMENT, UNTIL THE NAVY CALLED HIM BACK TO ACTIVE 

duty in the last war. 

After thi war, he relaxed in kis home in Harbison Canyon for several years. 

"But I GOT tired of tVlfSG around doing nothing, and there was JUST ONE PLACE 
for ME to do any GOOD WHEN THIS NEW EMERGENCY CAME UP," ME SAID. "ThAT WAS IN THE 

aircraft industry." 

Today, at 63, "Red" Harrigan happily drives 60 miles each day to and from work 

AS AN INSPECTOR AT RyAN. 

Or, take THE CASE OF FrED MaGULA, who has SPENT MOST OF HIS ADULT LIFETIME IN 
THE AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY, EXCEPT FOR THE 8ETWEEN-WARS VAGARIES OF EMPLOYMENT. 






•€* 



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Fred was one of the: small gang or enthusiastic Ryan workers who laborcd day 

AND NIGHT TO FINISH LINDBERGH's "SPIRIT OF 5t. LOUIS." LaTER HE WENT TO St . LoU I S 
TO WORK FOR LiNDBERGh's BACKERS. EVENTUALLY HE. WOUND UP IN DETROIT, OUT OF A JOB 
WHEN THE DEPRESSION HIT IN 1932. He RETURNED TO C LIFORNIA, ENTERED THE BAKING 
BUSINESS WITH HIS BROTHER IN FrESNO. 

But THE "homing pigeon" instinct asserted itself in 1935> *ND WH£N BUSINESS 

PICKED UP at Ryan, he returned, became sheet metal foreman. For ten uninterrupted 
YEARS, Fred remained in the aircraft industry, until the postwar production cut- 
backs which displaced tens of thousands of workers. 

During the years of uneasy peace, he operated a service station in Chula Vista. 
When the Korean war ended th£ aircraft industry's starvation diet, he made a bee-line 
FOR his old haunts. Today Fred Magula is happily pounding away as a mechanic on the 
giant fuselage sections produced sy Ryan por the C-97 Boeing transport. 

Throughout San Diego's aircraft industry, reunions are taking place daily, 
"You're back tooI" is the cry being heard as the "homing pigeons" come home 

TO ROOST. 

# # # # 



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To LcAL Papers 2-26-51 

^ t- 



One family today will provide the entire semi-monthly San Diego quota or 

RECRUITMENT FOR THE WAFS (V/OMEN IN THE A|R FORCe), 

Claudette Louise Beem, 20, A^4D her sister. Donna Marie, I9, both of 
^5^1 Adair St., will leave this afternoon (Tuesday, February 27) for training 
AT Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. 

When they enlisted, thc problem of miletinq the WAF quota for the second 
HALF of February was solved for Pfc Betty Powell, in charge of recruiting 

FOR WACS AND WAFS AT THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BUILDING, ^135 WEST BROADWAY. 

The WAF quota for San Direo is four a month, in two "installments." 
Their enlistment means that exactly half of Othello Beem's large family 
will be engaged in the defense effort, 

BEEM himself is a DEFENSE WORKER— AS A SPOT WELDER AT RyAN AERONAUTICAL 

Company, Before leaving for their Air Force training, Claudette and Donna 

EXPRESSED a DESIRE TO SEE THEIR DAD AT WORK, AND TitEY WERE ACCOMPANIED TO THE 
PLANT YESTERDAY BY PFC POWELL. 

The oldest of Beem's children, Milton, 26, of Hartford, Connecticut, is 
AN Air Force veteran now employed in an aircraft engine factory. It was his 

SERVICE IM the A|R FoRCE THAT GAVE ClAUOETTE AND OONNA THE IDEA THEY'D LIKE TO 

be in that branch of the armed forces, they said yesterday. 

Their older sister, Mrs. Betty Lou Stairs, Z^, of Lowell, Massachusetts, 

IS MARRICD AND HAS 5 CHILDREN. ThE OTHER TWO CHILDREN ARE TOO YOUNG TO HELP 

Uncle Sam. They're Carole, 1*+, and Ronald, 11, 

"That makls it four out of eight in our family doing some kind or defense 

WORK," REMARKS BecM, WHO BROUGHT HIS FAMILY HERE LAST JULY FROM MaRS HILL, Ma I NE , 
IN THE NORTHEASTERNMOST SECTION OF THE UNITED STATES, THREE MILES FROM THE 



-2- 



Canadian border. Soon after arrival, he became: a spot welder or j6:t engine 
asscmdlies at rvan, i 

Claudette hopes to do secretarial work in the Air Force, while Donna is 

AIMING at duties A5 A MEDICAL TECHNICIAN, BOTH HAVE BEEN OFFICE WORKERS IN 

San Diego in recent months. 



^ 



a 




Out: 2-ZJ-^\ Aviation Week 

Time Western Flying 

News-Week Fortnight 
Littrell Fortune 

U.S. Nr_ws 

NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY Ts..lnTLs... 

BILL WAGNER BUSINESSWEEK 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 

Factory MANAGEMEh 

AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY'S "HOMING PIGEONS" RETURN FOR ANOTHER DEFENSE EMERGENCY 
^Aircraft workers are the homing pigeons of industry. 

Between wars or national emergencies, they scatter to far = £lung places and 
varied occupations. 

Whenever the full-throated roar of America's aerial might swells in volume, 
the workers flock back to their old job stations. 

They drop their peacetime activities and return to the rivet gun, the drop- 
hammer, the punch press, the drill, the lathe and the countless tools that forge 
America's unbeatable industrial might. 

"It gets under your skin, and always stays a part of you, I guess, " a grizzled 
machinist at Ryan Aeronautical Company remarked. 

"For me, it was like coming back home. " 

At Ryan and other aircraft plants in this area, personnel managers harassed by 
the shortage of skilled manpower are thankful for these "homing pigeons". They com- 
prise a quickly tapped pool of savvy labor which immediately swings into the tempo 
of defense production. 

There's little of the lost time of in-plant training required of the raw new- 
comers on which increasing reliance must be placed in the industry's mushroom 
expansion, a repetition of the early days of World War II, 

"It's though they had never left, " says James W. Bunnell, Ryan Personnel 
Chief. "Many pick up their tools and go to work as if they were just returning from 
a w^eekend. " 



Employment managers say they "see halos over the heads" of the "old-timers" 
when they appear for rehiring. "We're tickled pink to have them back, " an executive 
remarked. 

When World War II ended and aircraft orders were cancelled, numerous 
workers returned to their former homes all over the country and took jobs there. 
The yearning for San Diego was never quelled in many hearts, and in recent months 
the influx to their "adopted" home has resumed. 

"We're beginning to get letters of inquiry from World War II workers, asking 
if there are jobs for them should they come back to San Diego, " Bunnell declared. 
"Since the last war, they've been working on farms or in small businesses in all 
parts of the United States, and now they're anxious to return to the aircraft industry. " 

For example, Kenneth Matthews, a manifold assembler who was terminated at 
war's end, went back to Lake City, Iowa, where he worked in a welding shop and 
drilled wells until he heard that aircraft jobs again were available here. 

"I always wanted to come back, " he explained. "I never found a better place 
to work. " 

Lloyd Doerge, a. welder, spent the years since World War II in and around 
La Crosse, Wisconsin on various welding jobs. He returned to San.-Diego recently. 
His simple explanation: "I enjoyed working here before, so I came back. " 

Many experienced the tribulations of being "one's own boss" after World War II. 
They went into business for themselves, now are satisfied with holding down jobs 
helpful to the defense effort. 

|i 

Still others took prolonged vacations after the long period of intensive work 
under pressure. 



= 3 - 
' Cecil R. Hamlet and his wife travelled for almost 4 years. He had started in 

the aircraft industry here in 1936, climbing to foreman of sheet metal fabrication ten 
years later. 

"My wife and I wanted to see how other people lived, " Hamlet explained. "We 
learned a lot, and discovered that San Diego is the best place to live and work. " 

Today Hamlet is handling pressure tests on the Boeing Fuselage sections being 
built by Ryan. He had to start out as an hourly paid worker, but "I'm sure battling 
to become a foreman again. " 

Those who left the industry of their own volition for"greener" fields often 
regret they lost their continuity of employment. "I wished I never had left, " said 
W. A. "Bud" Meixner, an assistant foreman at Ryan. "I might be better off today. " 
^ The new emergency has also brought many old-timers out of the "mothballs" 

of retirement. 

Observe, for instance, John J. "Red" Harrigan, one of San Diego's most 
colorful pioneer aviators. 

"Red" entered naval aviation in 1916, flew for 9 years before returning to 
civilian life as a flight instructor and test pilot for Ryan. The depression of the 
early thirties separated him from his job, also. "Gold fever" sent him on a none- 
too -profitable flying expedition to the Yukon territory. Later he served as private 
pilot for a millionaire in Chicago. For three years he was Lindbergh Field Manager 
for the San Diego Harbor Department, until the Navy called him back to active duty 
in the last war. 
1 After the war, he relaxed in his home in Harbison Canyon for several years. 

"But I got tired of lying around doing nothing, and there was just one place 



_ 4 - 

► for me to do any good when this new emergency came up. " he said. "That was in the 

aircraft industry. " 

Today, at 63, "Red" Harrigan happily drives 60 miles each day to and from 

work as an inspector at Ryan. 

Or, take the case of Fred Magula, who has spent most of his adult lifetime in 

the aircraft industry, except for the between-wars vagaries of employment. Fred was 

one of the small gang of enthusiastic Ryan workers who labored day and night to finish 

Lindbergh's "Spirit of St. Louis". Later he went to St. Louis to work for Lindbergh's 

backers. Eventually he wound up m Detroit, out of a job when the depression hit in 

1932. He returned to California, entered the baking business with his brother in 

Fresno. 

^ But the "homing pigeon" instinct asserted itself m 1935, and when business 

picked up at Ryan, he returned, became sheet metal foreman. For ten uninterrupted 

years, Fred remained in the aircraft industry, until the postwar pr^sduction cut= 

backs which displaced tens of thousands of workers. 

During the years of uneasy peace, he operated a service station in Chula Vista. 

When the Korean War ended the aircraft industry's starvation diet, he made a bee-line 

for his old haunts. Today Fred Magula is happily pounding away as a mechanic on the 

giant fuselage sections produced by Ryan for the C-97 Boeing transpoxt. 
< 

Throughout San Diego's aircraft industry, reunions are taking place daily. 
"You're back too!" is the cry being heard as the "homing pigeons" come home 
to roost. 




To Local Papers Z-Z'J-'j] 



^ 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



BILL WAGNER 
BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN 




Fift^ ofiUcajrs of the Air Force, Uie Ars^, tiie ««a,»^, 

the Hoyol Air Farce mid the Kosral Cssiadiasi ilir Force kill ^^i^^o to school" 
all day Fi'Magr at H^'an Aororiautical G«sjj:®ay, 

Tli® of fioere, etudorits in tii© Anaed SisfrviGSB Guided 
Missiles J>chool at Ft. Slise, Teac.j are attending claer.es at various air» 
Grsdtt plants a© the tixial phase of eavejial laotith©* irweti'ucticsn oa goideci 
Edssiles* resssarch asKi developa»ant, 

Thirteai ^a« ^if^aers ^11 con-iuct the ai®-<la7 course 
here, outliMnii^ findings in tti® ©®veml years » guided missiles work psi^- 
fsmaed bj- the caap3Q^« Jaaes S, Gline©, special projects mginser, and 
R« VI4 Shaver, project engineer, will coordjxiat® Fridasi'*® prograra, %'hich 
will include a plant toor, inspcciicn and limited deaaistratiosi© of sec- 
ret j^ojects, aad aotioi picturee. 

lA,t Col, Jos© !• Olivarss, an artiilerjr oStteer , is 
the senior otricer ol" the vi£siti>irj (jroup* 



3-/ -s-f 



There's at lcast one phase m the booming aircraft inoustry in which a 

HANDICAP IS A SLESSING* 

ST£P into THC room WHCRC planishing machines are QOINQ full 8LAST, AND 

you'll learn why. 

Of all factory sounds, those EMANATINQ F«0M the planishing OEPARTMtNT 

are amonq the most jarring and penetratino* a planishing machine is really a 
small pneumatic air hammer, you know the earth-shaking noise from a jackhammer 
drilling holes in pavement, consider, then, several miniature jackhammers, each 
beating thousands of strokes a minute on pieces of stainless steei.. no amount 
of sound control, through use of acoustic materials, can absorb this piercing 
industrial clamor, 

Recruiting of planishing machine operators proved a difficult task until 
someone got the bright idea; 

"Why NOT HIRE DEAF MUTES FOR THIS JOB?*' 

AT Ryan Aeronautical Company, the experiment has become established practice. 
Employment turnover has diminished almost to the vanishing point. Both the company 
and the deaf mutes are happy, as a handicap has become not only an advantage but 
a virtual requirement for a specialized task. 

Thus, in San Dicqo's defense effort, with manpower at a premium, deaf mutes 
release persons with normal hearing and speaking ability for other jobs to which 

THEY ARE SETTER SUITgOt 



.<< 



> V A 



«2. 



Planishing is an essential operation to rcmove minute "wrinkles" that may 

REMAIN IN PARTS FORMCO OY THE DROP-HAMMEf! METHOD. IN AN EXHAUST MANtTOLD SYSTEM 
THROUGH WHICH PASS EXTREMELY HOT GASeS| OF TEMPERATURES AS HIGH AS 1900'*f., A 
SMALL "wrinkle" CAN RESULT IN A "mOT SPOT". INTERRUPTION Of THE SMOOTH FLOW OF 
THE GAS WILL WEAR OUT THE EXHAUST SECTION AT THAT SPOT AT A FASTER THAN NORMAL 
RATE, 

APPROXIMATELY 3O TO 35 PERCENT OF THE KXHAUST SYSTEM PARTS NEED PLANISHING, 
AND THE HAMMERING IS INCESSANT IN BE "OUMP SHED", THE AIRCRAFT COLLOQUIALISM FOR 
THAT NOISY PORTION OF THE PLANT. It'S A SKILLED JOB »N WHICH AtR PRESSURE MUST 
S£ CAREFULLY OBSERVED AT ALL TIMES, AND THE OPERATOR MUST DECIDE ON THE CORRECT 
"dolly" TO PLACE INTO THc HAMMER, OEPEMOING ON THE PART'S CURVATURE, 

One Of THE OLDEST FACTORY WORKERS IN San OieGO IS A DEAF MUTE, HE IS 
S, M. BREESE, 69, WHO HAS SEEN IN THE RyAN PLANISHING DEPARTMENT FOR 9 VCARS, 
A DEAF MUTE SINCE BIRTH, HE HAS SEEN IN INDUSTRIAL WORK MOST OF HV-i LIFE. FOR 
37 YEARS ME WAS EMPLOYED AT THE AUTOMATIC ELFCTRIC COMPANY PLANT IN CHICAGO, 

Illinois. 

When me retired in 1939* he came to San OicGO and the weather and scenery 

CONVINCED him ME OUGHT TO SETTLE DOWN HCRE, 

"I WAS RESTLESS," BREESE WRITES, "aNO FIRST I WENT TO WORK AS A DISHWASHER 

IN A HOTEL. Then I «ot this jos at Ryan, and I learned fast. } like it and I 

WANT TO STICK TO IT AS LONG AS I LIVE. EVERYBODY IS FRIENDLY ANO UNDERSTAND I MS. 
I AM PROUD OF MY STEADY POSITION," 

Mas, Pauline Sticht, 62, is another "old-timer" deaf mute at Ryan. She has 

BECN A planish OPERATOR SINCE 19^3» AND TREASURES HER RECORD OF DOING ESSENTIAL 
TASKS IN BOTH WORLD WARS 1 ANO H, In THE FIRST CONFLICT, SHE WAS EMPLOYED IN A 
LOCAL BLUEPRINT CONCERN DOING WORK FOR THE NaVY, 



? 1 I- l>- i^MTfilM^' 



•3" 



"I WOftKEO !0 M0UB8 A 0A¥, f OAVS A WCtK,"* SMC USCAdtS. "TmEHK WERE MO 
tNCOH£ T,AXCi»y AND HQ ftATIOMIN® IM TM08C OAVS«" 

HiR &CHOOCIMO WAS CXCCtteNT, SmC ATTCNOCO a CATNOtlC CONVCMT IN CHICAaO, 
AND jAmS MiLbiKIK UNIVeKSITY IN DCCATURj^ ttLINOiS, WHC»C SI4€ TOOK A FIME ARTS 
COURSE A»0 MAMAQCO TO WIN A fCWCIM® CMAMPfONSHtP* "I mVt« ATTE«£>r0 A SCHOOL FOR 
THC OSIAr," SMC STATES Id PCWrCCT PEMMAMSHIP. 

All UMUSOAL COUf^LC ARC F, t» PUCKETT, 5I, AMD HIS WIFE, tlOSIE, 26, BOTH 

OEAr MOTES, They a«£ ewriorsB on cirrcReMT swirts to cmv^mmr 'tm mcb© or 

HIRINO A 8A8Y SITTER, TmEIR 15-»e«TM OtO 0AU0«T£R MAS NORMAL M£ARIM« AHO yOtCC, 
WteS, POCKCTT, <m T«£ DAT SHirf, t<mt$ HOME IM Tl«£ TO R£l,ft:ve HER HUSBAWO Of t« 
CHORCS or CARI»6 rOR THE YOUNSSTER, AMD HE FROCEEBS TO THE f»t,ANT fOR fHt NiaWT 
SHIFT, 

fORCMen AH© ASSISTAfcJT FOSEMES VHO SUPERWISii TME OEAf MafEt' WORK HAV£ SeCOMC 
QUITE ADEPT AT THE SI6« UABtQUAaCS NCCOEO fOR COMMUftlCAT «0» ASOOt TMCIR TASKS, 

**W4- OOM'T have TO WRITE OOWS OUR IM9TRUCTIOMS V£Rr OTTCN AWV MORE," SATS 
A00l.S>H @OtO£R» rORMIMS A«0 PROCCS$l»G ro»E«AW AT f^YAW, '*Tl«€©& OEAf MWtfcS ARE 
OU|T£ ALERT AHD CATCH 0» QUICKLY, AS«0 THEV DOM*T WAMT S^SC I At FAVORS SCCAUSE Or 
TMCIR HANOI CAS»,^ 

Sof«£Tmes A ocAr mute smows asihties ih other types or work, a c'ase i« poiwt 

IS THAT or J, B, LlOVO, A 9*TSA«t VtTSRAN Of RyAM*S PLAMtSMtMa OEIPARTMEMT, WtJO HAS 
eeCM TRANSrCRRgO TO TME Lf St NOISY JOB OT 9AH0SAW OPERATOR, 

To A PSRSON WITH MORMAL MCARIHOy SOCH A HOVE MtOMT ®t COKSIOeRfO WELCOMC mm 
TME STAKePOTWT Or tCSS WEAR AMb ?£A8 0« TME eAfieR«'M3, 

9UT l« THE (JUIET WOtLO Or DSAf-WuTe tLOYCtj THE CMAW6I. WSAHT QtfT Ol»£ THING, A 
HAM0ICAPP£O PCRSOH HAO SCEM AeCePTS© ON MI9 OW«t MERITS ASO etVEN OReATEffi nCSPOHSI- 
BILITY |{« A NATIONAL OErswsE INDUSTRY, 




For A.m. Release 
Friday, March 2, I95I 

NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 

Mailed with Report: 3"1-51 

Local Papers 
Avi AT ION Mags 1 & 2 
PROFITS OF RYAN AERONAUTICAL Financial R^d & Yellow 

Newspapers Red Misc. Red 
INCREASE TO $635,165 IN I950 Wire Services (Report 

Free Lance Red only to 

\AUi/UUU\- PUB.REL.) 

Earnings of $635,165, representing an increase of 77 percent over the $358,052 
net profit for 19^9, were reported today by Ryan Aeronautical Company's president, 
T. Claude Ryan, in his annual report to stockholders covering the 12 months ended 
October 3I , I95O. 

Per share earnings were $1.6l in 1950 compared with 9I cents for fiscal 19^9. 

"The overall accomplishments and results for the year mark it as a successful 
ONE," Ryan said. "Net worth of the company passed the $5,000,000 mark and, as of 

THE close of the FISCAL YEAR, THE BOOK VALUE STOOD AT AN ALL-TIME HIGH OF $12-72 

per net outstanding share." 

Gross revenue for 1950 was $12,512,851. The sales of the company's two opera- 
ting DIVISIONS AND comparisons WITH 1 9^^9 ^^^ SHOWN BELOW: 

1950 19^19 

Metal Products Division $ 6,863,962 $ 6,277,7^3 
Airplane Division 5,6'48,889 8,736,821 

Total Sales $12,512,851 $15,01^,564 
As OF January 3I , the backlog of business booked ahead exceeded $29,000,000, | 
reflecting the effect of the new defense program. "Exhaust systems business," Ryan 
said, "though regularly representing a sizeable portion of business done, consistent- 
ly represents only a small portion of backlog figures, since orders are normally 
received only a few months in advance of deliveries. 



I .■ I -. - I 



« 



AIRPLANE DIVISION 

"A NEW MILITARY MODEL OF THE RyAN NaVION FOUR-PLACE PLANE HAS BEEN DEMON- 
STRATED TO THE Air Force, Army and Navy. A proposal and bid for a quantity order 

HAS recently been MADE TO THE U. S. AlR FORCE IN CONNECTION WITH A COMPETITION 
HELD BY IT BUT RESULTS OF THAT EVALUATION ARE NOT YET KNOWN," PRODUCTION OF COM- 
MERCIAL NaVION MODELS IS BEING LIMITED IN 1951 TO GIVE PRIORITY TO IMPORTANT 

military contracts. 

In the company's airplane division, a major project is the manufacture of 

LARGE fuselage SECTIONS FOR BOEING C-97 StrATOFRE I GHTER MILITARY TRANSPORTS. ThE 

program is on an accelerated production basis which is planned to continue into 
1952. Cargo floors and floor beams for the C-97 are also in production and, in 
addition, the company has new contracts for other components for this same trans- 
port plane. 

A NEW Ryan product developed during the year and now in volume production 
IS A huge external fuel tank for military planes. This is a new field for the 
company and one which Ryan reported as having interesting possibilities for future 
development, a number of other types of airframe components have recently been 
contracted for, and the company is negotiating with manufacturers on still other 
items. 

In the aircraft research and development field, Ryan is continuing manufacture 
of its XQ-2 jet propelled pilotless target plane under joint Air Force-Navy sponsor- 
ship. "The company is performing the important electronics phase of this project 
as well as the basic airplane design," Ryan said. "It is anticipated that production 
contracts will result for this advanced type airplane. Other important design and 
development projects, which cannot be identified and described due to military se- 
curity regulations, are on contract and in progress with the Air Force and Navy. 



-3- 



METAL PRODUCTS DIVISION 
"The company's metal products division was responsible for an important 

PROPORTION OF THE YEAR'S TOTAL SALES VOLUME AND EARNINGS. I TS ACTIVITIES IN 

1950 still more firmly established the company as a leader in the field of 
aeronautical products constructed of the high heat-resistant alloys commonly 
referred to as stainless steels, 

"These company products fall into two general classifications; (1) Exhaust 
systems for conventional piston type aircraft engines, with their allied items 
such as heat exchangers and thermal anti-icing equipment; and (2) major turbo- 
jet engine components and accessories." 

The annual report disclosed that Ryan is now building exhaust systems of 

MILITARY combat TANK ENGINES AS WELL AS FOR USE ON AIRPLANES, IT WAS ALSO STATED 
THAT THE LEADING ENGINE MANUFACTURERS AS WELL AS AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURERS ARE NOW 
CUSTOMERS FOR THE COMPANY'S EXHAUST SYSTEMS, 

In DISCUSSING JET ENGINE BUSINESS, RYAN NOTED THAT "tHE VOLUME OF THIS TYPE 
WORK NOW SCHEDULED IS SUBSTANTIALLY LARGER THAN IN THE RECENT PAST. RoCKET TYPE 
POWER UNITS AND GUIDED MISSILE COMPONENTS WERE ALSO AMONG THE COMPANY'S PRODUCTS 
DURING THE YEAR AND ARE CONTINUING IN PRODUCTION," 



For A.m. Release 
fkWMy March 2, 1951 



PROFITS OF RYAN AERONAUTICAL 
INCREASE TO $635,165 IN I95O 

Earnings of $635,165, representing an increase of 77 percent ovek the 

$35^^052 net profit for 19^9^ WERE REPORTED TODAY BY RyaN AERONAUTICAL COMPaNY'S 

PRESIDENT, T. Claude Ryan, in his annual report to stockholders covering the 12 

MONTHS ENDED OCTOBER 3I , 1950* 

Per share earnings were $1.61 in I95O compared with 9I cents for fiscal 

19^9. 

"The overall accomplishments and results for the year mark it as a success- 
ful ONE," Ryan said. "Net v/orth of the company passed the $5>000,000 mark and, 
as of the close of the fiscal year, the book value stood at an all-time high 
OF $12.72 per net outstanding share." 

Gross revenue for 1950 was $12,512,851. The sales of the company's two 
operating division and comparisons with 19^9 '^^'^ shown below: 

1 950 1 9^9 

Metal Products Division $ 6,863,962 $ 6,277,7^3 
- Airplane Division 5,6^18,889 8,736,821 

Total Sales $12,512,851 $15,01^1, 56H 
As of January 31 > the backlog of business booked ahead exceeded $29,000,000, 
reflecting the effect of the new defense program. "Exhaust systems business," 
Ryan said, "though regularly representing a sizeable portion of business done, 
consistently represents only a small portion of backlog figures, since orders 

ARE normally received ONLY A FEW MONTHS IN ADVANCE OF DELIVERIES. 






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-2- 



AIRPLANE DIVISION 

"A NEW MILITARY MODEL OF THE RYAN NAV!0N FOUR-PLACE PLANE HAS BEEN DEMONSTRATED 

TO THE Air Force, Army and Navy. A proposal and bio ^or a quantity order has 

RECENTLY BEEN MADE TO THE U.S. AjR FORCE IN CONNECTION WITH A COMPETITION HELD BY 
IT BUT RESULTS OF THAT EVALUATION ARE NOT YET KNOWN." PRODUCTION OF COMMERCIAL 
NaVJON MODELS IS BEING LIMITED IN 1951 TO GIVE PRIORtTY TO IMPORTANT MILITARY CON- 
TRACTS, 

In the company's airplane division, a major project is THE MANUFACTURE OF 
LARGE FUSELAGE SECTIONS FOR BOE I NG C-97 STRATOFRE I GHTER MILITARY TRANSPORTS. ThE 
PROGRAM IS ON AN ACCELERATED PRODUCTION BASIS WHICH IS PLANNED TO CONTINUE INTO 

1952, Cargo floors and floor beams for the C-97 ARf^ also in production and, in 

ADDITION, THE COMPANY HAS NEW CONTRACTS FOR OTHER COMPONENTS FOR THIS SAME TRANS- 
PORT PLANE. 

A NEW Ryan product developed during the year and now in volume production is 

A HUGE EXTERNAL FUEL TANK FOR MILITARY PLANES. TK I S IS A NEW FIELD FOR THE 
COMPANY AND ONE WHICH RyAN REPORTED AS HAVING INTERESTING POSSIBILITIES FOR FUTURE 
DEVELOPMENT. A NUMBER OF OTHER TYPES OF AIRFRAME COMPONENTS HAVE RECENTLY BEEN 
CONTRACTED FOR, AND THE COMPANY IS NEGOTIATING WITH QHHKt MANUFACTURERS ON STILL 
OTHER ITEMS, 

In THE AIRCRAFT RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FIELD, RyAN IS CONTINUING MANUFACTURE 
OF ITS XQ-2 JET PROPELLED PILOTLESS TARGET PLANE UNDER JOINT AlR FORCE-NaVY 
SPONSORSHIP. "The company is performing the important -ELECTRONICS PHASE OF THIS 
PROJCCT AS WELL AS THE BASIC AIRPLANE DESIG«," RyAN SAID. "It IS ANTICIPATED 

that piroduction contracts will result for this advanced type airplane. other 
important design and development projects, which cannot be identified and described 
due to military security regulations, a'^e 3n contract and in progress with the 
Air Force and Navy, 



-li- 



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-3- 

METAL PRODUCTS DIVISION 
"The company's Metal Products Division was responsible for an important 

PROPORTION OF THE YEAR'S TOTAL SALES VOLUME AND EARNINGS. ItS ACTIVITIES IN 

1950 still more firmly established the company as a leader in the field of 
aeronautical products constructed of the high heat-resistant alloys commonly 
referred to as stainless steels, 

"These company products fall into two general classifications: (1) Exhaust 
systems for conventional piston type aircraft engines, with their allied items 
such as heat exchangers and thermal anti-icing equipment; and (2) major turbo- 
jet engine components and accessories." 

The ANNUAL REPORT DISCLOSED THAT RYAN IS NOW BUILDING EXHAUST SYSTEMS FOR 
MILITARY COMBAT TANK ENGINES AS WELL AS FOR USE ON AIRPLANES. |T WAS ALSO STATED 
THAT THE LEADING ENGINE MANUFACTURERS AS WELL AS AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURERS ARE NOW 
CUSTOMERS FOR THE COMPANY'S EXHAUST SYSTEMS, 

In DISCUSSING JET ENGINE BUSINESS, RyAN NOTED THAT "tHE VOLUME OF THIS 
TYPE WORK NOW SCHEDULED IS SUBSTANTIALLY LARGER THAN IN THE RECENT PAST, ROCKET 
TYPE POWER UNITS AND GUIDED MISSILE COMPONENTS WERE ALSO AMONG THE COMPANY'S 
PRODUCTS DURING THE YEAR AND ARE CONTINUING IN PRODUCTION," 



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Mailing Out: 3-6-'51 
Selected 

Aviation Mags 1 &. 2 

Technical Red 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



PHOTO USED TO HIGHLIGHT 
RYAN CUSTOMER SERVICE 

To graphically show the service Ryan Aetronaut j cal Company places at the 

DISPOSAL OF CUSTOMERS, ITS METAL PRODUCTS DIVISION RECENTLY ARRANGED THE 
attached SPECIALLY POSED PICTURE OF KEY PERSONNEL AND THE PRODUCTS CURRENTLY 
SEI NG BU I LTo 

However dramatic in concept, this photo fails to convey the total impact 
that experienced sub-contractors like Ryan can bring to bear on the problems 
which arise from day to day in connection with work being done for prime con- 
tractors, 

Ryan's customer service division provides liaison before, during and 
after production of components for other manufacturers. It is headed by 
Sam Co Breder who appears in the foreground of this human "organization chart," 

In the row behind Breder are Field Representatives, at left, with offices 
!N Dayton, New York and Seattle, who privide sales engineering consultation 
before production; and rovjng Service Representatives, at right, who see that 
customers receive follow-through service after production. The four Coordinators 
in the center row look after the stacks of paper work which keep the jobs running 
smoothly during production, 

The group of seven men at the left in the fourth row are the company's top 
manufacturing engineers, production managers and chief inspector who are avail- 
able to prime contractors at either the customers' plants or the Ryan factory 
for the exchange of know-how; to assure precision workmanship and quality at 

EVERY step; to BREAK BOTTLENECKS AND, IN GENERAL, GET THE JOB DONE, 



( 



.2- 



Tackling the complex problems of the scientific laboratory, and working 

IN CLOSE harmony WITH THE TECHNICAL EXPERTS OF ITS CUSTOMERS, ARE KEY MEMBERS 

OF Ryan's laboratory staff (right, fourth row) which includes metallurgists, 

CHEMISTS, welding TECHNICIANS AND OTHER SPECIALISTS WHO CAN UNRAVEL THE MYSTER- 
ies of present-day industrial science. 

In the field of engineering, the company provides liaison engineers (back 
row) on customer projects with long background AND special knowledge of jet 
engines, airframe components and exhaust systems. 

This group of 26 key men is posed against a background of the products 
Ryan's metal products division now manufactures for other companies. Jet engine 
parts, far left, include tail cones for General Electric engines and tail pipes 

FOR JET pods for B-^7 '^^^ B-36 BOMBERSo TyPSCAL AIRFRAME COMPONENTS, CENTER, 
ARE AFT FUSELAGE SECTIONS OF BOE i NG C-97 STRATOFRE I GHTERS , WING FLAPS FOR B-36 
BOMBERS AND HUGE EXTERNAL FUEL TANKS TO BE MOUNTED ON THE WINGS OF MILITARY 
PLANES, At RIGHT ARE VARiOUS ASSEMBLIES FOR THE EXHAUST SYSTEMS RYAN BUILDS 
FOR COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT AND MILITARY PLANES. 

!n ADDITION TO METAL PRODUCTS BUILT ON SUB-CONTRACT, THE COMPANY IS ALSO 
A PRIME AIRFRAME MANUFACTURER DOING WORK FOR THE MILITARY SERVICES ON RyAN PILOT- 
LESS JET PROPELLED PLANES, GUIDED MISSILES AND IMPORTANT RESEARCH IN RELATED 
Fl ELDSo 



3-2-5IW 




This is an unusuac "mumam orsanizatiov chart'" of just one of the many 

ACTIVITIES OF A CO¥H*LtX INDUSTRY $UCH AS AN AIRC^tAFT PtANT* It IS A GRAPHIC 

IttUSTRATION or TM£ CUSTOMER SeRVICK l.lAtSO«i| «T RVAN ACRONAUT ICAI. COMPANY 

WITH OTMCR titANUrACTiJitCRS VOH WHOM THC SaN DICQO flRH PRODUCED MAJOR COMS^ONCNTS. 

Such ciaison must o£ i»ROvit>KO Btront, ourimo aho after moouctiom, 

BCKINO TMCSe 26 KEY MEN ARE THE VARIOUS ITEMS RyAN'S METAl. PSOO'JCTS DIVISION 
MANUFACTURES FOR OTHER eOM»»ANieS» AT FAR tfFT AR£ JET KNSINC PARTS, JMCtUDjNO 
TAIL CON&S FOR GENERAL EtCCTRK CNOIMES AN© TAIL Pl»»CS FOR J&T POOS FOR BOEIMG 

B-kf ANO CoNVAiR Q-36 Bowaeitts, In center arc aft rusELAfiC secTiONS for Boeing 
c-97 stratofrtlqmters, wing flaps for 8*36 bomscrs, and mu«£ external fuci tanks 
to be mounted oh th£ winos of military plancs. at right arc various axmaust 
manifold asscmstl s for commf.rcial transport and military planss, 

This represents only part of the work at Ryan, where pilotless ^et propelled 
planus^ 0uioeo missiles and research activities are also under wav* 

T«E CUSTOMER SERVICE DIVISION IS HEADED ©Y SaM C# BrEDER, IN FORCeROUNO, 

Seven men in row semind him are field representatives with ofpices in Dayton, 

New York and Seattle, who provide sales enoi meek ins consultation before prod ct ion j 

and roving service representatives, who make sure f0llow<-throuqh service is given 

after production. 

Four men in center row are coordinators who keep the jobs ri;nhing smoothly 

DURING PROCUCTION. SevEN M£H AT FAR LEFT BEHIND THEM ARE THE TOP MAWUFACTUR INS 
EMGINECRS, PRODUCTION MANAGERS AND CHIEF INSPECTOR. FOUR MEN AT RISMT IN FOURTH 



i 



«»2« 



ROW ARC LA90RAT0RY TECHNICIANS WHO OEAt WITH SUCH PROOLCMS AS MCTALLURSY, CHCMISTRY 

AMD wcuoiNG. Three men in rear row are uiaison enoinccrs with special knowledgc of 

JST CMCINES, airframe COHfHJNENT AND EXHAUST SYSTEMS. 



i 



■5-^*3 t 



^->^/. (^^s- / 



This is an unusual "human organization chart" of just onc of the many 
activities of a complex industry such as am aircraft plant, u is a graphic 
illustration of the customer service liaison at rvan aeronautical company 

WITH OTHER MANUFACTURERS FOR WHOM THr SaN DICSO FIRM PRODUCES MAJOR COMPONENTS. 

Such liaison must be provided seforc, during and after production* 

BCHIND THESE 26 KEY MEN ARE THE VARIOUS ITEMS Ryam's METAL PRODUCTS DIVISION 
MANUFACTURES FOR OTHER COMPANIES. AT FAR LEFT ARE JET ENGINE PARTS, INCLUDING 
TAIL CONES FOR GENERAL ELECTRIC CWSINES AND TAIL PIPES FOR JET POOS FOR BOE H«G 
B-^7 ^I^O CONVAIR B-36 BOMBERS. In CENTER ARE AFT FUSELAGE SECTIONS FOR BOEINQ 
C>97 STRATOFREIGHTERS; wing FLAPS FOR S-36 BOMSERS^ AND HUGE EXTERNAL FUEL TANKS 
TO BE MOUNTED ON THE WINGS OF MILITARY PLANES. AT RIGHT ARE VARIOUS EXHAUST 
MANIFOLD ASSEMBLIES FOR COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT AND MILITARY PLANES, 

This represents only part or the work at Ryan, where pilotless jet propelled 

PLANES, GUIDED MISSILES AND RESEARCH ACTIVITIES ARE ALSO UNDER WAY. 

The CUSTOMER service division IS HEADED BY SaM C, BREDER, in FOREGROUND, 

Seven men in row behind him are field representatives with offices in Dayton, 

New York and Seattle, who provide sales engineering consultation before prooi ctionj 

and roving service representatives, who make sure fo:.low-through service is given 

AFTER production. 

Four men in center row are coordinators who keep the jobs running smoothly 
during production. seven men at far left behind them are the top manufacturing 
engineers, production managers and chief inspector. four men at right in fourth 



}i> nj- 



m^m 



ROW ARC LABORATORY T£CHNIC|ANS WHO DEAL WITH SUCH PROQLCHS AS METALLURGY, CHEMISTRY 
AND WCLDING. ThRCC MEN IN REAR ROW ARC LIAISON CNQINCERS WITH SPECIAL KNOWLCOQC OP 
JET ENGINES, AIRFRAME COMPONENT AND EXHAUST SYSTEMS. 



:•! 



i 




McSuRELY - Aviation Week 
Stockwell - Aviation Age 
Hamlin - Aero Digest 
Parrish - American Aviation 
Rhodes - Western Flying 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



Mailing Out: 3-7-5^ 
"POSITION IS EVERYTHING, . ," (with pi x) 



The observation that "position is everything in life" applies particularly 
TO job efficiency in industry., Workers who must twist themselves into uncomfort- 
able POSITIONS TO get A TASK DONE AREN'T LIKELY TO TURN OUT THE BEST POSSIBLE 
PRODUCT. 

This has been recognized at Ryan Aeronautical Company, where increasing 
quantities of positioning equipment have been installed to conserve manpower and 
improve output of arc welders, 

In THE FIRST PHASES OF THIS PROGRAM, AS APPLIED TO MANUFACTURE OF RyAN 
EXHAUST SYSTEMS, WORK POSITIONING TABLES HAVE (l) PROVIDED CLOSER TOLERANCES IN 
THE FINISHED PRODUCT; (2) ENABLED A CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS ON ONE TABLE, THUS 
SAVING TIME, ENERGY AND FACTORY SPACE; AND (3) IMPROVED THE QUALITY OF THE WELD 
BECAUSE THE OPERATOR IS CONSTANTLY WORKING IN AN ADVANTAGEOUS POSITION, 

A WELDER WORKING IN A "dOWN-HAND" POSITION CAN USE A MUCH HEAVIER ROD, 

control the flow of metal to a greater degree, and can complete with one "pass" 
what would require two or three in positions at awkward angles, 

Utilization of the Standard Ransome Welding Positioner has "streamlined" the 
method of assembling and welding, such fittings as beaded slip joint flanges, 

hanger BRACKETS, FIRE-SEAL COLLARS, ETC, ON LARGE MANIFOLD SECTIONS CAN NOW BE 

welded in the correct dimensional position, 

a standat^ jlg table top, with legs removed, is mounted on the positioner, 
With some modification of present tooling, fittings can now be installed on a 

SUB-ASSEMBLY TO EXACT PRINT TOLERANCES, ThE COMPLETE JOB OF WELDING CAN BE 



^ 



< 



« 



J 



-2- 



performed by tilting the table to various angles for the most advantageous po- 
sitions, thus providing true jig locations and assemblies which are not warped 
out of shape from welding. 

Under the old method, considerable handwork was needed to restore fittings 

TO PRINT dimensions BECAUSE OF WARPAGE IN THE WELDING OPERATION. ThE NEW SYSTEM 
has REDUCED HANDWORKING TO THE ABSOLUTE MINIMUM. 

"Two IMPORTANT ITEMS ARE ELIMINATED," RaY OrTIZ, SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
MANIFOLD AND FABRICATION D I V 1 S I ON S, PO I NTS OUT. "OnE IS HANDWORK. WE AVOID THE 
WARPAGE RISKED WHEN WELDING IS DONE OUTSIDE A JIG, ThE OTHER ITEM IS A HIGHER 
STANDARD OF QUALITY, ENABLING THE FINISHED ARTICLE TO PASS INSPECTION MORE READILY." 

Two TYPES OF POSITIONERS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED IN THE RyaN PLANT. ThE LARGER 
TABLES HAVE A CAPACITY OF 2500 POUNDS, WHILE THE SMALLER POSITIONERS, USED FOR 
SUCH PARTS AS PORT NIPPLES AND SHAFTS, HANDLE UP TO 100 POUNDS. ThE TABLES CAN 

rotate 360 degrees and can be tilted 9o degrees in any direction. 

"This is the type of equipment that pays for itself in a short time, through 

AN improved product AND BETTER WORKING CONDITIONS FOR WELDERS," OrTIZ REMARKS. 



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Western Flying 

Fortune Fortnight 
Modern Industry /\|a 
Aviation Week Pathfinder 



Mailing Out: 3-12-51 (pix) 

Western Industry 

W STERN Machinery & Steel World 

U.S. News 

Aviation AGe 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



BILL WAGNER 
BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



DEAF MUTES IN DEFENSE WORK 
RELEASE NEEDED MANPOWER 



There's at least one phase of the booming aircraft industry in which a 
handicap is A blessing. 

Step into the room where planishing machines are going full blast, and 
you'll learn why. 

Of all factory sounds, those emanating from the planishing department are 
among the most jarring and penetrating, a planishing machine is really a small 
pneumatic air hammer. You know the earth-shaking noise from a jackhammer dril- 
ling HOLES in pavement. CONSIDER, THEN, SEVERAL MINIATURE JACKHAMMERS, EACH 
beating THOUSANDS OF STROKES A MINUTE ON PIECES OF STAINLESS STEEL. No AMOUNT 

of sound control, through use of acoustic materials, can absorb this piercing 
industrial clamor, 

Recruiting of planishing machine operators proved a difficult task until 
someone got the bright idea: 

"Why NOT HIRE DEAF MUTES FOR THIS JOB?" 

At Ryan Aeronautical Company, the experiment has become established practice, 
Employment turnover has diminished almost to the vanishing point. Both the 
company and the deaf mutes are happy, as a handicap has become not only an ad- 
vantage BUT A virtual REQUIREMENT FOR A SPECIALIZED TASK, 

Thus, in San Diego's defense effort, with manpower at a premium, deaf mutes 

RELEASE persons WITH NORMAL HEARING AND SPEAKING ABILITY FOR OTHER j'OBS TO WHICH 
THEY ARE BETTER SUITED. 



-2- 



Planishing is an essential operation to remove minute "wrinkles" that may 

REMAIN IN parts FORMED BY THE DROP-HAMMER METHOD. In AN EXHAUST SYSTEM THROUGH 
WHICH PASS EXTREMELY HOT GASES, OF TEMPERATURES AS HIGH AS 1 900 F., A SMALL 

"wrinkle" can result IN A "hot spot". Interruption of the smooth flow of the 
gas will wear out the exhaust section at that spot at a faster than normal rate, 
Approximately 30 to 35 percent of the exhaust system parts need planishing, 

AND the hammering IS INCESSANT IN THE "bUMP SHED", THE AIRCRAFT COLLOQUIALISM 
FOR THAT NOISY PORTION OF THE PLANT. It's A SKILLED JOB IN WHICH AIR PRESSURE 
MUST BE CAREFULLY OBSERVED AT ALL TIMES, AND THE OPERATOR MUST DECIDE ON THE 
CORRECT "dolly" TO PLACE INTO THE HAMMER, DEPENDING ON THE PART'S CURVATURE. 

One of the oldest factory workers in San Diego is a deaf mute. He is 
S, M. Breese, 69, who has been in the Ryan planishing department for 9 years. 
A deaf mute since birth, he has been in industrial work most of his life. For 
37 years he was employed at the automatic electric company plant in chicago, 
Illinois. 

When he retired in 1939^ he came to San Diego and the weather and scenery 
convinced him he ought to settle down here. 

"I WAS RESTLESS," BrEESE WRITES, "aND FIRST I WENT TO WORK AS A DISHWASHER 

IN A HOTEL, Then I got this job at Ryan, and I learned fast. I like it and I 

WANT TO STICK TO IT AS LONG AS I LIVE, EVERYBODY IS FRIENDLY AND UNDERSTANDING. 
I AM PROUD OF MY STEADY POSITION," 

Mrs, Pauline Sticht, 62, is another "old-timer" deaf mute at Ryan. She has 
been a planish operator since 19^3, and treasures her record of doing essential 
tasks in both World Wars T and M. In the first conflict, she was employed in a 

LOCAL blueprint CONCERN DOING WORK FOR THE NAVY. 



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"I WORKED 10 HOURS A DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK," SHE RECALLS. "ThERE WERE NO 
INCOME TAXES, AND NO RATIONING IN THOSE DAYS." 

Her sct+GOLiNe was excellent. She attended a Catholic convent in Chicago, 
AND James Millikin University in Decatur, Illinois, where she took a fine arts 

COURSE AND MANAGED TO WIN A FENCING CHAMPIONSHIP. "I NEVER ATTENDED A SCHOOL 
FOR THE DEAF," S++E STATES IN PERFECT PENMANSHIP. 

AN-WNUSUAL couple ARE F. L. PUCKETT, 5I, AND HIS WIFE, JOSIE, 26, BOTH 
DEAF MUTES. THEY ARE EMPLOYED ON DIFFERENT SHIFTS TO CIRCUMVENT THE NEED OF 
WIRING A BABY SITTER, THEIR I5-MONTH OLD DAUGHTER HAS NORMAL HEARING AND 
VOICE. Mrs. PuCKETT, on the day shift, comes home in time to relieve HEf? HUSBAND 

of the chores of caring for the youngster, and he proceeds to the plant for the 
night shift. 

Foremen and assistant foremen who supervise the deaf mutes' work have be- 
come QUITE adept at THE SIGN LANGUAGES NEEDED FOR COMMUNICATION ABOUT THEIR TASKS. 

"We don't HAVE TO WRITE DOWN OUR INSTRUCTIONS VERY OFTEN ANY MORE," SAYS 
ADOLPH BoLGER, forming and PROCESSING FOREMAN AT RYAN. "ThESE DEAF MUTES ARE 
QUITE ALERT AND CATCH ON QUICKLY. AnD THEY DON'T WANT SPECIAL FAVORS BECAUSE OF 
THEIR HANDICAP." 

Sometimes a deaf mute shows abilities in other types of work. A case in 

POINT IS THAT OF J, B, LlOYD, A 9-YEAR VETERAN OF RyAN's PLANISHING DEPARTMENT, 

who has been transferred to the less noisy job of bandsaw operator. 

to a person with normal hearing, such a move might be considered welcome 
from the standpoint of less wear and tear on the eardrums, 

But in the quiet world of Deaf-Mute Lloyd, the change meant but one thing. 

A handicapped PERSON HAS BEEN ACCEPTED ON HIS OWN MERITS AND GIVEN GREATER 
RESPONSIBILITY IN A NATIONAL DEFENSE INDUSTRY. 



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From: William Wagner 
Ryan Aeronautical Company 
Lindbergh Field, 5an Diego 



OFFICERS STUDY RYAN XQ-2 
PILOTLESS JET TARGET PLANE 

Dwarfed by the structure of Ryan Aeronautical Company's huge final assembly 
building, a group of guided missile experts of the military services study the 
Ryan XQ-2 jet propelled pilotless target plane as they listen to a technician 
discuss design details. (The low-angle shot was necessary to obscure the XQ-2 

PLANE WHICH HAS NOT YET BEEN CLEARED FOR RELEASE.) 

As part OF THE FINAL PHASE OF SEVERAL MONTHS' INSTRUCTION ON GUIDED MISSILE 
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, 5O OFFICERS OF THE AjR FORCE, ArmY, NaVY, ROYAL AIR 

Force and Canadian Air Force recently visited the Ryan plant. 

The OFFICERS, students in the Armed Services Guided Missiles School at 
Fort Bliss, Texas, were in San Diego on a practical experience schooling which 

HAS taken them INTO MANY OF THE AIRCRAFT FACTORIES WORKING ON GUIDED MISSILES AND 
IN ALLIED FIELDS. 

At Ryan, the all-day session directed by I3 Ryan engineers included labora- 
tory VISITS and inspection of production departments. There were limited demon- 
stration and motion pictures of several secret projects and others of a classified 
nature on which Ryan is currently working. Work in the fields of electronics, 

GUIDANCE systems, JET PROPULSION AND EXHAUST SYSTEMS RESEARCH WAS STUDIED. RyAN's 
XQ-2 JET PROPELLED PILOTLESS TARGET PLANE WAS INCLUDED IN THE LABORATORY AND PRO- 
DUCTION INSPECTIONS, AND MOTION PICTURES INCLUDED THOSE SHOWING THE RYAN "FiREBIRD" 
AIR-TO-AIR GUIDED MISSILE. 



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NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



OFFICERS STUDY RYAN XQ-2 
PILOTLESS JET TARGET PLANE 

Dwarfed by the structure of Ryan Aeronautical Company's huge final assembly 
building, a group of guided missile experts of th£ military services study the 
Ryan XQ-2 jet propelled pilotless target plane as they listen to a technician 

DISCUSS DESJGN DETAILS. (ThE LOW-ANGLE SHOT WAS NECESSARY TO OBSCURE THE XQ-2 
plane which HAS NOT YET BEEN CLEARED FOR RELEASE.) 

As PART OF THE FINAL PHASE OF SEVERAL MONTHS* INSTRUCTION ON GUIDED MISSILE 
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, 5O OFFICERS OF THE AlR FORCE, ARMY, NAVY, ROYAL AiR 

Force and Royal Canadian Air Force recently visited the Ryan plant. 

The officers, students in the Armed Services Guided Missiles School at 
Fort Bliss, Texas, were in San Diego on a practical experience schooling which 
has taken them into many of the aircraft factories working on guided missiles and 
IN allied fields. 

At Ryan, the all-day session directed by I3 Ryan engineers included labora- 
tory visits and inspection of production departments. There were limited demon- 
stration and motion pictures of several secret projects and others of a classified 

NATURE on which RyAN IS CURRENTLY WORKING. WORK IN THE FIELDS OF ELECTRONICS, 
GUIDANCE SYSTEMS, JET PROPULSION AND EXHAUST SYSTEMS RESEARCH WAS STUDIED. RYAN'S 
XQ-2 JET PROPELLED PILOTLESS TARGET PLANE WAS INCLUDED IN THE LABORATORY AND PRO- 
DUCTION INSPECTIONS, AND MOTION PICTURES INCLUDED THOSE SHOWING THE RyaN "F I REB I Rd" 

air-to-air guided missile. 

Lt. Col. Jose E. Olivares, an artillery officer, was the senior officer of 

THE visiting GROUP. 




1 



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K&r^% 



Sent 3-I3-5I 
Aviation Mags 1 

(PIX TO SELECT GROUp) 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



BILL WAGNER 
BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN NAMES ZIPPWALD ASSISTANT 
DIRECTOR OF CUSTOMER SERVICE 

A PERSONABLE YOUNG MAN WHO DESCRIBES HIMSELF AS "jUST A FARM BOy" HAS JUST 
BEEN PROMOTED TO THE POST OF ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF CUSTOMER SERVICE AT RyAN 

Aeronautical Company, San Diego. Fifteen years ago he was a ^tO-cENT an hour 

AIRCRAFT worker. 

He is Jack C. Zippwald, 35> w"° ^as spotted in I938 by Sam C. Breder, 
director of customer service, as promising executive material when he had risen 
TO the post of assistant foreman in the exhaust manifold assembly department. 

That was the year in which Ryan was making long strides toward its present 
position of leadership in the production of stainless steel exhaust systems for 

AIRCRAFT. As the VOLUME OF MANIFOLDS IN SERVICE INCREASED METEOR I CALL Y , IT 
became NECESSARY TO HAVE A FIELD SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE. BREDER CHOSE ZiPPWALD 

as the first such representative to help customers with their engineering and 
service problems on manifolds. 

Zippwald travelled throughout the United States and into Canada. After 
World War 11, he was named field representative for the Southern California area, 

WHERE some of RYAN'S LARGEST CUSTOMERS ARE LOCATED. 

Zippwald achieved his "farm boy" appellation honestly. Although a native of 
Chicago, he came to California with his family at the age of k and settled on a 
citrus ranch in Lemon Grove, a San Diego suburb. Today, he has a 24-acre ranch 
of his own in Lemon Grove. To help pay for the land, Zippwald often spent week- 
ends operating his own tractor for other farmers on a for-hire basis. 



Breder pointed out that the advance of Zippwald is typical of Ryan's policy 
of grooming executives from the ranks of its own employees. 



2-IO-5IK 



1 



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Mailing Out: 3-I6-5I 
35 Selected AM-1 Mags 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



SELF- INSURANCE OF WORKMEN'S 
COMPENSATION PAYS OFF AT RYAN 

When premiums for workmen's accident compensation insurance soar, the time 
has come for the consideration of a se lf- i nsurance plan and a more rigid exami- 
NATION OF INDUSTRIAL HAZARDS. ThE EXPERIENCE OF THE RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 
HAS RECENTLY SPOTLIGHTED THE ADVANTAGES OF SUCH A COURSE. 

For YEARS, THIS San Diego aircraft manufacturer, which is also one of the 

world's LEADING PRODUCERS OF STAINLESS STEEL AIRCRAFT PARTS (eXHAUST SYSTEMS, 

jet engine components), had been covered by private insurance carriers, 

Confronted with rising insurance costs, Ryan's self-examination of plant 

METHODS and WORKER INDOCTRINATION LED TO THIS CONCLUSIONS CLOSER CONTROL OF 

accident prevention under self- i nsurance would save money and reduce lost time. 

Self-interest would be the spur toward better control, for in California 
A plant's accident experience is the basis for computing the premiums, on an 
actuarial scale. The company decided to underwrite its own workmen's accident 
compensation insurance, a protection required by the State of California, 

Management put teeth into its self-insurance safety engineering program. 
Foremen whose departments showed any negligence in safety procedures were called 
to account before the production manager, "citations" for unsafe conditions 

showed on THEIR RECORDS, 

Foremen learned quickly to team up with safety engineers on the never- 
ending task of impressing on workers the right way to do a job, and to establish 
"good housekeeping" practices. The number of "citations" dwindled to the vanish- 
ing point. 



Today, Ryan points to better than a 50 percent decline in costs in the 21 

MONTHS OF SELF-INSURANCEo 

Ryan's desire to improve employer-employee relations by furnishing a safer 

PLACE to work, and THE COMPANY'S FULL ASSUMPTION OF THE RISKS OR LOSSES HAVE 
provided THE INCENTIVE TOWARD PLACING SAFETY FIRST, 

"We are IMPRESSING ON EVERYONE THAT SAFETY IS A STATE OF MIND," M. M, CLANCY, 

Supervisor of Safety and Welfare at Ryan, explains, "Most accidents are caused 

BY carelessness OR INATTENTION, BUT WHERE SAFETY ENGINEERING HAS DETERMINED 

that hazards exist due to work procedures or machinery arrangement, these have 
been changed," 

Safety Engineer, H, E, Rawlings, tours the plant daily on sharp lookout for 

UNSAFE HABITS OR SITUATIONS, He CONSTANTLY CONFERS WITH FOREMEN OVER SAFETY METHODS, 

Safety has become an integral element in the supervisorial attitude. 

Two safety committees function constantly. One is composed of Rawlings and 
four shop workers chosen by their unions (u, a, w, -c „ i , 0, and united aircraft 
Welders), Each Friday this group tours the plant to spot hazardous conditions. 
If their recommendations to management require action, prompt corrections are made. 

The other committee, comprising foremen, assistant foremen and superintendents, 
meets monthly with Ted Smith, noted Los Angeles consulting safety engineer. The 

month's accident experience is thoroughly reviewed and the shortcomings are TACKLED 

immediately. Smith also meets with the shop workmen's safety committee monthly. 
The State of California does an important "back-up" job. The plant, like all 

OTHERS, is under RIGID, PERIODIC STATE INSPECTION TO ASSURE CONFORMITY WITH THE StATE 

Safety Code, 

Every new employee goes through an induction process in which he studies a 

SAFETY MANUAL PREPARED BY THE COMPANY, Th I S MANUAL SHOWS THE RIGHT WAY OF DOING 
EVERY TYPE JOB IN WHICH TOOLS ARE EMPLOYED, ThE INDUCTION CLASS IS FOLLOWED UP BY 
SPECIFIC ON-THE-JOB SAFETY INSTRUCTION OF THE FOREMAN, 



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"Safety is a state of mind" has become a Ryan slogan. Stressed is that vir- 
tually EVERY accident IS DUE TO FAILURE OF THE WORKER TO HAVE SAFETY CONSTANTLY ON 
HIS MIND. 

"For INSTANCE, A WORKER HAS A SMALL JOB TO DO ON A GRINDER," CLANCY EXPLAINS, 
"He SAYS TO HIMSELF, 'IT'LL JUST TAKE A FEW SECONDS. I WON'T BOTHER TO GET MY 
GOGGLESo ' That's when the accident happens — when an eye is likely to be put OUT BY 

A flying particle," 

For an injury or industrial illness, medical and hospital bills, regardless 

OF THE amount, ARE PAID, IN ADDITION TO $3^ * WEEK STARTING ON THE EIGHTH DAY OF 
disability. To insure payment, the state REQUIRES DEPOSIT WITH IT OF A $50,000 

bond, exclusive of the amount in the company's own insurance reserve fund, 

Self-insurance of this type is a privilege which must be approved by the 

STATE after AN INVESTIGATION OF THE COMPANY'S INTEGRITY AND DEMONSTRATED ABILITY 
TO RESPOND IN EVENT OF DAMAGES, ADMINISTRATION OF RyAN'S FUND IS PERFORMED BY A 

Los Angeles firm of self-insurance consultants and administrators, Mund, McLaurin 
AND Cornell. 

Most common of the expensive injuries are strained backs, caused by improper 
lifting methods. Finger and hand injuries occur with greatest frequency. 

But all types of accidents have been drastically reduced by the hawk-eyed 

CONTROL WHICH WAS IMPOSED WHEN INSURANCE BECAME RyAN'S BUSINESS, 

During the first year of self-insurance, Ryan saved 50 percent of the premium 

IT WOULD have had TO PAY TO THE PRIVATE CARRIER, Th I S YEAR, THE SAVING IS EXPECTED 
TO BE EVEN GREATER, ACCORDING TO CLANCY, 

In some plants, the loss ratio runs as high as 100 PERCENT--THAT IS, THE AMOUNT 
PAID OUT BY THE PRIVATE INSURANCE CARRIER FOR MEDICAL AND HOSPITAL BILLS AND COM- 
PENSATION EQUALS THE PREMIUM, WHICH IS BASED ON THE PREVIOUS FIVE YEARS' ACCIDENT 
EXPERIENCE AVERAGE. 



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USING ARBITRARY FIGURES, UNDER SUCH A LOSS RATIO, $50*00^ WOULD BE PAID BY THE 
COMPANY IN PREMIUMS TO COMPENSATE THE INSURANCE COMPANY FOR THE EMPLOYEE CLAIMS IT 
WOULD HAVE TO PAY, A PLANT SWITCHING TO SELF- 1 NSURANCE , IF IT ENJOYED RyAN ' S IM- 
proved safety record, would have to pay out only $25,000 in claims the first year, 
compared with a premium which probably would have exceeded $50,000, 

There is the dollars-and-cents incentive for management to impose the rigid 
controls that make a plant a safer place in which to work, 



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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Mailed: 31-19-51 

San Diego Union (Orig) 

TR I BUNE 

^ NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



A 12-WEE:k course in the basic Pf?|NCIPLES OF FREIGHT TRANS- 
PORTATION AND PREPARATION OF SHIPPING DOCUMENTS WILL BE GIVEN BY 

THE San Diego Vocational School starting Monday night (March 26) at 

7. 

The class, of interest to shipping and receiving clerks, office 
employees, custom brokers and all persons who handle freight documents, 

WILL BE CONDUCTED BY TaFT KaLLOF, TRAFFIC MANAGER OF RyaN AERONAUTICAL 

Company. It will convene every Monday for 12 weeks from 7 to 9 p.m. 
JN Room 20^ of the Vocational School, 835 Twelfth Avenue. 

# # ## 
3-20-51 K 



For: RYAN REPORTER 



Vlhen C. L. Foushee, Jr., became a field service representative for Hyan Aeronauti- 
cal Company's Metal Products Division specializing in exhaust systems, he didn't 
realize he'd be going into the publishing business. 

Today, with eight "book" to his credit, Foushee can be considered an "author" 
as well as a technical authority. His books haven't become best-sellers, but to 
their group of readers, they're all-important. The "books" are the service iuanuals 
which provide detailed inforaaticai needed by users of I^an exhaust equipsaent for 
their proper naintenance. 

Foushee 's first crsative effort in the publishing field was tiie service aanual 
on the Douglas DC-6 exhaust system. Since then, the demand has been steady. He has 
turned out manuals on the manifolds for the Convair 240 and T-29j Boeing 377 Strato- 
cruiser, C-97 Stratofreighter and B-50 bociberj Fairchild C-119 Packet and Douglas 
G-124 Globemaster, 

Not-/ he's gathering the material for two more manuals, caa the Piasecki iiHP-2 and 
HUP-1 helicopters, 

like an editor who coordinates theflow of infoiraation fraa numerous news sources, 
Foushee gathers his data fraa various channels and organises it into a neat package of 
information. 

His "news sources" are not cnly Hyan's ovm engineers, welding technicians and 
metallurgical laboratory personnel, but the prime contractors' service and engineering 
groups, the coramercial airlines and the lailitaiy, 

A manual is published only after a prototype of the exhaust system is bxiilt and 
enough have gone into service to provide the ansv/ers of viiat to expect under actual 
operating conditions. Once published, the manual doesn't reuiain a fixed, arbitraiy 
compendium of facts. Like a history book or encyclopedia Wiich must be changed j^ff in 
new editions to reflect new conditions, the manual is constantly revised to keep up 



-2- 



with changes made by engineers as x-esult of service experience. 

Let's take a look at a tvpical service inanual. Like any book, it has an intro- 
duction and several chapters. The introduction is a general description of the main 
items in the exhaust system. The chapters deal udth the principal features of in- 
stallation, maintenance, repair and inspection. 

Chapter I is likely to be a reference parts list# giving the installation numbers 
and the sub-assemblies required for complete installation, including all bolts, nuts 
vrashers and cotters. This data is obtained by Foushee from a parts catalogue projnred 
by the engineering department. 

In Chapter 2, an installation instruction sheet is included. This is first checked 
with the Ryan engineering department and vdth the operator in the field, Foushee points 
out that under operating conditions, techniques of installation may be developed that 
may prove superior to the ccsacept in the factory. The installation instructions are 
cOTiprehensive, ranging from removing the protective covers after the engines are taken 
from their shipping crates, to the proper fit of bolts and how to check the exiiaust 
system during the initial engine run. 

Chapter 3 deals with the inspection procedure — what sections should be observed 
periodically \irfiile the exhaust system is in operation in the aircraft, 

Ryan's vast store of exhaust systems expr rience is draxisi upon for recoramendations 

in Chapter 4> dealing with maintenance and repair. Included is information on the mini- 

to which 
mum limits/parts can be checked — such as flange and material thickness vdth regard to 

wear. You'll find rainute instructions, as, for example, "Check clamps for cracks around 

belt lugs," Definite limits of thiclcness are set, and the part is to be discarded if 

wear has caaeed it to beccxne thinner than a certain dimension. 

Chapter 5 is the story of proper alignment — the use by operators of their ovai 

fixtures for checking parts at overhaul periods, Ryan supplies the operators with 



,^ 



-3- 

draidJigs of fixtures to assist them in producing aligrunent jigs. 

The sizing of parts is told in Chapter 6, Vvlien a part leaves the Hyan plant, it 
has a definite close tolerance dimension. If it is re-sized to that dimension in the 
overhaul period, the amount of leakage and wear and general installation probleros are held 
to a minimum. Ideal dimensions are contained in tiiis chapter, 

Recofianended and accepted welding practices for repairs by the operator are out- 
lined in detail in Chapter ?• 

If a new material is used, a separate chapter id.ll acquaint the operator with its 
characteristics. For instance, on the Boeing 377» a new high heat resistant steel al- 
loy, 19-9DL, was used for the first time in a l^an exhaust ostein. In the service manu- 
al for this system, considerable attention is given to tensile strength, percentage of 
elongation, scaling temperature, stress rupture properties, etc, 

Infonnaticai also is given en the different techniques required in welding and the 
type of rod to be used on the new alloy, 

Foushee's service manuals aren't all words. There are also usually either a series 
of photographs sho^-dng the entire assembly and parts list, or a detailed blueprint. 

Biggest circulation attained by Foushee's "books" was that for the DC-6 exhaust 
system, on w'nich 250 copies v/ere distributed. On a commercial plane order, the prime 
contractor requisitions a certain number of copies, or supplies i^an vdth a list of 
users of the aircraft and the number to be sent each. 

On military planes, a specified number is sent to the prime contractor, who dis- 
tributes them to the personnel in his avsn factory requiring this information, and to 
field service representatives. The military itself digests the manual and places the 
essential inforuiation into the bulky AN Handbook, vdiich covers every item in the com- 
plex mechanism of a modem plane. 

Copies of the manual are also supplied Ryan's own service and sales representa- 
tives for reference in meeting problems that may arise in the field. Other manual 






6 






-4- 

users are the Air Materiel Cornraand at Wright Field and the Civil Aeronautics Authority, 

Manuals are usually revised and brought up to date about every six months, "We 
may have to replace 1 page or 20 pages," Foushee points out. 

Like all authors or editors, he occasionally has last-minute headaches just be- 
fore publication is scheduled — or even after it is pr.TJited, 

Saaetimes the manual is completed and ready for distribution v;hen engineering 
changes suddenly aidse, Foushee then must disassemble the aianual and make the neces- 
sary revisions before any copies get out. 

It's a job where speed and accuracy are factors as essential as in any well-run 
publishing business. 



(! 



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JnQ^^ 



oMailed 3-'<d1-'pl 
Aviation Mags 1 
Financial Red &. Yellow 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS OF RYAN 
AERONAUTICAL COMPANY RE-ELECTED 

T. Claude Ryan, founder of the Ryan Aeronautical Company, has been re- 
elected President by the Board of Directors and has entered his 29th year as active 
head of the organization he established in 1922 in San Diego. 

Other officers re-named by the Board were G. C. Woodard, executive vice 
president and treasurer; Earl D. Prudden, vice president; C. A. Stillwagen, 
secretary; L. L. Underwood, controller, and D. H. Ockerman, assistant secretary 
and assistant treasurer. 

Re-election of the officers followed the annual meeting of stockholders at 
which all the former board members were re-elected for the ensuing year. They 
include, in addition to Ryan, Woodard and Prudden, C. Arnholt Smith, chairman 
of the board of the United States National Bank, San Diego; and Melvm H. Lockett, 
partner, Mattison, Thomas and Lockett, certified public accountants of Los Angeles. 

"The company's airplane and metal products divisions are now devoted 
exclusively to production of military aircraft and military aircraft components, " 
Ryan told stockholders in a discussion period during the annual meeting. 

"Our $30, 000, 000 backlog of business on hand carries with it the responsibility 
for the company to gear its operations to the military needs in the way it can best 
serve, and to further substantially increase its production volume and engineering 
accompli shnnents . 



a 



- 2 - 

"While the increased demand for military aircraft since the start of the 
Korean War was not reflected in 1950's business results, deliveries are now 
starting at aji accelerated rate on products we have previously been maniofacturing. 
Important among these are jet engine components, exhaust manifold systems and 
fuselage sections for military transport planes. In addition, volume production is 
getting under way on huge external fuel tanks for combat aircraft, and new work is 
being started on other airframe components. All of these projects are scheduled for 
continued acceleration of deliveries. " 

Discussing the future of the company's guided missile and pilotless aircraft 
programs, Ryan reported continued progress on the Ryan XQ-2 jet-propelled 
plane under joint Army-Navy sponsorship and revealed that "The company is making 
substantial contributions to the country's overall guided missile program. We are 
actively engaged in the electronic phases of guided missile research as well as 
production of rocket bodies and rocket engine parts for missiles. 

"The future possibilities for Ryan in this field are very great. The aircraft 
companies, rather than electronics and armament manufacturers, are emerging 
as the prime developers and builders of guided missiles largely because of the 
aerodynamic and control problems which must be met and with which they are most 
familiar. 

"Ryan also has the knowledge and experience to maintain a top position in the 
manufacture of stainless steel components for jet engines. This field is one of 
increasing importance to the company's program since this type power plant is 
becoming predominant for military planes. 



i 



"Constant changes in the rapidly developing art of aircraft design require 
flexibility in our manxofacturing operations. The Ryan plant must be adapted to a 
wide variety of products requiring constant rearrangement of facilities, purchase 
of new machine tools and equipment, and the expansion of manufacturing space. 
In many ways, the period of semi-mobilization in which we now find ourselves 
offers more problems for management than the total mobilization we had in 
World War 11. " 



c 



< 




Mailing out: 3-22-51 

(with pix) 
Selected AM-1 & Technical 

) NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



MAKERS OF JET PARTS 

STUDY CUT-AWAY ENGINE 

Ryan Aeronautical Company employees recently viewed for the first time 

THE powerful GENERAL ElECTRIC J-^Y TURBO-JET ENGINE FOR WHICH THEY ARE BUILD- 
ING NUMEROUS COMPONENT PARTS, INCLUDING COMBUSTION CHAMBERS, EXHAUST CONES 
AND TRANSITION LINERS. 

A "cUT-AWAY" of the J-kf TO EXPOSE ITS INNER WORKINGS WAS DISPLAYED IN 

the outdoor cafeteria plaza during rest and lunch periods. employees were 
able to manipulate a lever which caused the mechanism to revolve slowly. 

Accompanied by Daniel W. Stowell, foreman for General Electric's air- 
craft GAS TURBINE DIVISION IN LyNN, MASSACHUSETTS, THE "cUT-AWAy" ENGINE IS 
ON A NATIONWIDE TOUR OF FACTORIES PROVIDING PARTS. "WE WANT WORKERS TO SEE 
THE END PRODUCT TO WHICH THEY'RE CONTRIBUTING," STOWELL EXPLAINED. 

The J-h'J IS THE MOST POWERFUL TURBO-JET IN FULL-SCALE PRODUCTION IN THE 

United States. !t is used in the North American F-86 Sabre fighter, holder 

OF THE official WORLD'S SPEED RECORD OF Sf 1 MILES AN HOUR; THE BOE I NG B-^7 
StRATOJET, world's FASTEST BOMBERj CONVA I R B-^6D , REPUBLIC XF-91 INTERCEPTOR; 

North American B-^5 Tornado; North American F-95 Interceptor; and Martin XB-51 
ground support bomber. 

Forward thrust is given planes by expanding gases as they are expelled 
at the rear of the j-^7 eng'ne at about 1200 miles per hour. alr enters an 
inlet at the front of the engine at the rate of nearly three tons per minute. 
Temperatures as high as 2000° F. are generated inside the engine, and at high 

SPEED THE THRUST IS EQUIVALENT TO ABOUT 10,000 H.P. 
3-li|-51K 



c 



To: Local Papers 
3-1^-51 



Ryan Aeronautical Company employees yesterday (Weonesoay) viewed tor the 

FIRST TIME TME POWERFUL GENERAL ELECTRIC J-^7 TURSO-JET ENGINE FOR WHICH THEY 
AR£ auttOING NUMEROUS COMPONENT PARTS; INCLUDING COMauSTION CHAMBERS, EXHAUST 
C0NC3 AND TRANSITION LINERS. 

A "cutaway" OF THE J-k"^ TO EXPOSE ITS INNER WORKINGS WAS DISPLAYED IN THE 
OUTDOOR CAFETERIA PLAZA DURING BEST AMD tONCM PERIODS. EMPLOYEES WERE ABLE TO 
MANIPULATE A LEVER WHICH CAUSED THE MECHANISM TO REVOLVE SLOWLY* 

ACCOMPANIED BY OaNIEL W. STOWELL, FOREMAN FOR GENERAL ElECTRIC's AIRCRAFT 
GAS TURBINE DIVISION IN UYNN, MaSS., THE "CUTAWAY" ENGINE IS ON A NATIONWIDE 
TOUR OF FACTORIES PROVIDING PARTS. "W WANT WORKERS TO SEE THE END PRODUCT 
TO WHICH they're CONTRISUTINO," STOWELU eXPLAINES* 

The J-^7 's the most powerful turbo-jet in full-scale production in the 
United States, It is used in the North American F-86 Sabre fighter, holder of 

the official world's speed record of 671 MILES AM HOURJ THE BOE I NQ B-^7 StRATO- 
JET, world's fastest BOMBER} CONVAIR B-36O, RCPUSLSC XF-91 IHTERCEPTORJ NORTH 

American B^k^ Tornado; North American F-95 Interceptori and Martin XB-5^ ground 
support bomber, 

Forward thrust is given planes by expanding gases as they are expelled at 
the rear of the j'k'j engine at about 1200 miles per hour* , alr enters an inlet 
at the front of the engtne at the hate of nearly three tons per minute, temper- 
atures as high as 2000 f. are generated inside the engine, and at high speed the 
thrust is equivalent to about 10,000 h.p, 






4 j^«: 



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iri 




Mailing Out: 3-28-5I (with pix) 
Selected Aviation Mags 1 
& Technical Red 

^ NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



BRITISH HERE TO STUDY 
RYAN JET TARGET PLANE 

Great Britain's interest in a San Diego aircraft project of advanced design 
WAS disclosed this week. 

Four aircraft engineers holding key posts in the Ministry of Supply, London, 
AND the Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough, inspected the Ryan XQ-2, pilot- 
less JET plane under DEVELOPMENT AT RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY FOR THE U.S. AlR 

Force and Navy. 

The XQ-2 target plane is designed for training in high speed interception 
and anti-aircraft gunnery. It is •■■w-controlled, approximately half the size 

OF A JET fighter PLANE AND HAS COMPARABLE PERFORMANCE. MANEUVERS OF JET FIGHTERS 
CAN B£ simulated BY THIS PILOTLESS "DRONE" PLANE. 

Here from the Ministry of Supply to view and obtain information about the 
XQ-2 WERE J. W. Truran and C. A. Jarman. E, D. Whitehead and W. 0. Broughton 
represented the Royal Aircraft Establishment, the British development center for 

experimental PROJECTS. THEY CONFERRED WITH BRUCE SmITH, DIRECTOR OF ENGINEERING, 

AND Forrest Warren, Jr., project engineer, of Ryan. 

The engineers were accompanied to San Diego by Squadron Leader J. L. Tempest 
of THE British Joint Services Mission, Washington; and Col. Otto Haney, head of 
the guided missiles section of the alr force materiel command at wright fleld, 
Ohio. 

Tempest holds the British Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism during 
World War II, when he flew more than 30 missions over enemy territory in long 
range Halifax bombers. 

3-22-5IK 



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NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



BRITISH HcIK: to STUDY 

RYAH JET TAnecr Pim. 

QfttTAT Britain's iMTeftcst in a San &ie«^ AineitArT inhojcct <Mr advancco 

OCSICMI WAS OISCLOSCO TOOAV. 

Foul} AldCAATT CHOtHeCRS (i9t0t»G K€V I^STS tN THC MiMISTRY Or $Ul»f'tVy 

L,«w»0»9 AMI TNC RoTAt At««»ArT !:s7A8iisiMear« rAmnacMtouoMf tits#»eeTce thc 
RvAN X0«>2, Pitork£;s9 jct f»LAMt: otiMit ef:v«:i.<JWH£i»t at fttum AtitOttAUTieAk CwrAtiv 

r<M THC U*S« Air Foi^e a»o tiAvv. 

Im. Jta-S TAftOKT miAtts; is ecst^ee f«m viuktmtm m tt««M «i»e£D f«iTc«reE;^Tt<m 

AMO AMTI*AlilCRArT aiMMCAV* It IS R«1$ni<-C<»NtR0U.£0f^ Af>f»»OK«*«ATi!;tV HAtF THC SUE 

or A JET f ic^iTEtt ii%mt ANO HAS coM(»Ai»Am.c spttOm $<lft«(euveits (M^ ^it riOHTCItS 

CAN 8E; StMULATCO 8Y THIS rtkOTtCSS ""IHIO^e" «>t,AI(ie. 

HCftC PROM rm. MtttlSTRV or Sm»l»t¥ to view Af«l OOTAIIt iNfOWMATtOM A80UT 
TIME XC-S WtllC J* y. TauSAlt AMO €• nm JStmtAH, t« D* V,t4lT£HCAt> AfiO W. 0. BftOUOHTON 

iic«»fte8CMTeo TMc Royal AtftcitArf CsTAOt^ismKHT^ the ^itish dcvclopmsnt ecNTcn 
FOR ea^cftittcNTAi. iHio^£CTs« Tnev ^oarmmti wtnt ilfti^£ Smitn^ Dircctoiy op 
£M«twtcRm&y mo Fonn&sT WAiweNj Jfi,, paoj€«T CN6ittCE(i« «r Rya)<. 

The fcHomecfis \ftnt AeeoM^ANiEO to %m Dt^eo ev S<hmoroim Uaoer J. L* 

TCM^eST OP THw ^tTISH JOIUT Si.fiVteCS MlifOtONf WASHIttaTOM; AND Cot.« Otto HANCVt 

HeAi> Of THE siitOEO Misstucs oecTiON OT ttm Aio FoRce: MATsaiet. C<»ima!«o at Wrioht 

Ft£iO.« C^iO. 

TcwHisT iMR^s rm. S^tTisH DisTi«ieiirigH£0 Flyihc C»os» ro« kc«o»©« {MjHIIio 
W(Kn.o VAs ||« imeii h€ fk£w MMie tmam p missiohs ov£fi zmmr TeimtTORv tu touo 

RANOC HaLIPAK MMISOO* 

3-NEK-5flt 




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aQPs" 



Originals mailed 3-12-51 

To: R.E. Stockwell Av-At^-C 

Alex McSurely Ai/. li/czA\ — 
Fred Hamlin Acvt^Oi^'^ 
Raymond Kay ik'-r^n A^-S- -^ 



Mailing Out: 3-28-5I (with fix) 
THE GLASS INDUSTRY CERAMIC AGE 
THE ENAMEL! ST BETTER ENAMEL- 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY ^°e"rican°cJ* 



BILL WAGNER 
BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN 



p\t\J)St~l SOCIETY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



CERAMICS FOR THE HOT SPOTS 



Ceramics, an art thousands of years old, associated with the aesthetic 
expressions of countless civilizations, is beginning to play a vital, industrial 
role in modern high-performance aircraft. 

During World War 11, when metallurgists were confronted with the need for 
saving such strategic materials as high-grade, heat-resistant alloy steels, 
ceramic coatings were applied to increase thermal efficiency while using low 
carbon steels. 

At Ryan Aeronautical Company, pioneering work in the ceramics field was 
performed when portions of more than 500 complete exhaust systems for the Douglas 
A-20 attack bomber were given thick porcelain enamel coatings. These were applied 
on SAE 1020, A LOW carbon steel used in manifolds because of a critical shortage 
OF stainless steel. 

Today the use of ceramics has taken long strides as Ryan metallurgists, de- 
signers AND service engineers CONTINUE THEIR DEVELOPMENT STUDIES. STRESSES HAVE 
GAINED IN MAGNITUDE AND OPERATING TEMPERATURES OF PISTON-ENGINE EXHAUST SYSTEMS 
HAVE INCREASED CONSIDERABLY SINCE WORLD WaR II. ENGINES GENERATING 3OOO H.P. 
AND MORE, NEARLY TWICE THAT OF THE BIGGEST POWER PLANTS IN REGULAR USE IN THE 
LAST CONFLICT, ARE NOT UNCOMMON. ThE NEED FOR IMPROVING HEAT RESISTANCE AND CHECK- 
ing corrosion from the exhaust gases has increased sharply. 

For several months, tests of "header" sections of Ryan exhaust systems with 

THIN ceramic coatings OF .001" TO .OO3" HAVE BEEN CONDUCTED UNDER REGULAR SERVICE 

conditions in a Pan American World Airways' Boeing 377 Stratocrui ser operating 
on transpacific runs. 






mUQiAU 



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■2- 



These tests have been the subject of innumerable conferences in Seattle 
AND San Francisco between C. L, Foushee, JRo, Ryan service manager; T. C. Hacker, 

MANIFOLD project ENGINEER, AND BOE I NG AND PaN-AMERICAN TECHNICIANS. 

After 65O hours service, close examination was made in Ryan's engineering 

LABORATORY OF THE COMPARATIVE EFFECTS OF HIGH TEMPERATURE ON HEADERS CERAMIC 
coated INSIDE AND OUT, HEADERS COATED ONLY ON THE INSIDE, HEADERS WITH NO COATING, 
AND HEADERS FABRICATED OF OTHER HEAT- AND CORROSION-RESISTANT ALLOYS. 

The results have been considered encouraging enough to merit production OF 

"B" AND "C" ROW CYLINDER HEADER ASSEMBLIES WITH CERAMIC COATING FOR THE BOE I NG 

377's» Meanwhile, service tests are continuing, and inspection is under way on 

CERAMIC-COATED HEADERS AND NON-COATED CONTROL HEADERS WHICH HAVE BEEN IN USE MORE 
than 1200 HOURS ON THE SAME PLANE. 

The HEADER WITH CERAMIC COATING INSIDE AND OUTSIDE, AFTER 123^ HOURS, WAS 
REVEALED TO BE ESSENTIALLY THE SAME AS WHEN EXAMINED AT 65O HOURS. It WAS DE- 
termined by thickness measurements and spectrograph i c analysis that the ceramic 
coating still is in evidence on both the inner and outer surfaces. this indicates 
that the ceramic has offered complete protection for that period of time. 

Additional tests are being conducted on an American Airlines Convair 2^0, in 

WHICH THE entire EXHAUST SYSTEMS OF BOTH ENGINES HAVE CERAMIC COATINGS, AND ON A 

Pan American World Airways Boeing JJ^ , in which one engine has the collector ring, 
AS well as the header assemblies, ceramic coated. 

The PROBLEM OF HEAT RESISTANCE IS GREATEST IN THE HEADERS, WHICH COMPRISE 
those PORTIONS OF THE MANIFOLD BOLTING DIRECTLY TO THE CYLINDER HEADS OF THE ENGINE. 

Gases are introduced first into the headers before they pass into the collector 
RINGS. Exhaust gas temperatures are most intense in the headers, cooling somewhat 

when they FLOW INTO THE COLLECTOR RINGS. 



JDeiDMAHi MAC 0«.4 

JOT I MAW 

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In today's powerful engines, temperature of gases in the headers is above 
1900°F., compared with temperatures ranging from 1200° to 16oO° F. in World 
War IL Greater horsepower and higher back pressures through the use of turbo- 
superchargers are among the factors responsible for producing temperatures 
exceeding the heat resistance of some of the most expensive alloys. 

Under such circumstances, there is need for a high heat resistant but 

NON-STRATEGIC ALLOY TO START WITH. ThE CERAMIC COATED HEADERS USED IN THE 

Boeing 377 aRe: built by Ryan of 19-9DL steel, an alloy containing nickel, 

CHROMIUM, tantalum, TITANIUM, TUNGSTEN, COLUMBIUM AND MOLYBDENUM, A SUBSTANTIAL 
IMPROVEMENT OVER THE THICK CERAMIC COATED LOW CARBON STEEL SAE 1020 USED IN 

World War I I . 

The ENAMEL USED ON THIS ALLOY IS BASED ON NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS 
CERAMIC COATING A417^ DESIGNED FOR JET ENGINE, GAS TURBINE AND OTHER HIGH 
TEMPERATURE APPLICATIONS. SPECIFIC PURPOSES OF THE ENAMEL, TO PREVENT OXIDATION, 
CARBON ABSORPTION AND CORROSION ATTACK HAVE BEEN BORNE OUT IN THE 65O-HOUR AND 
1200-HOUR TESTS UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE OPERATING CONDITIONS. 

At THE CONSIDERABLY HIGHER OPERATING TEMPERATURES OF PRESENT EXHAUT SYSTEMS, 

much of the rapid deterioration of unprotected headers has been due to high rates 
of carbon absorption with resulting surface embr i ttlement . enameling prevented 
this carbon absorption, thus greatly increasing the life of the headers. 

There was no reduction in gauge thickness (.o45") on the header coated on 

BOTH sides, indicating THAT THE CERAMIC COATING RETARDED CORROSION 100 PERCENT, 
AT LEAST OVER A 123^-HOUR PERIOD, AFTER 65O HOURS, ONLY A SLIGHT REDUCTION (tO 
.0^2"), DUE TO SCALING ON THE OUTSIDE, WAS NOTED ON THE HEADER WHICH WAS COATED 
ONLY ON THE INSIDE, NON-COATED HEADERS SHOWED SOME LOSS IN DIMENSIONAL THICKNESS 
WHEN USED 650 HOURS, 



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After fabrication and inspection by Ryan, headers now in production for the 
Boeing 377 aR^ shipped to the California Metal Enameling Co,, Los Angeles, for 

THE ceramic coating PROCESS. AlL PARTS ARE SANDBLASTED TO PROVIDE A UNIFORM 

finish. Care is taken to assure that the surfaces are free of all contamination 
SO that the ceramic coating will have a maximum bond with the metal. 

Slip joints between the header sections are made of alloys with an extremely 

HIGH oxidation RESISTANCE. ThEY MUST BE KEPT FREE FROM CERAMIC COATING WHERE THE 
PARTS ARE SLIPPED TOGETHER. A CLAY SOLUTION IS APPLIED BY BRUSH TO MASK THESE 

PORTIONS. Having no bond with the steel during the firing process, the clay con- 
veniently SHATTERS ITSELF OFF WHEN THE PARTS COOL, THE AREAS COATED BEFORE 
dipping are left free FOR JOINING PURPOSES. 

After any necessary masking, the headers are hung on a conveyor which takes 
them to the dipper who dips the parts in a special ceramic coating fii.k]~[ "slip" 
which, in texture, is similar to thin wet clay. 

In MAKING THE SLIP, CALIFORNIA ENAMELING USES A SPECIAL "fR I T 33^"? BASED ON 

A Bureau of Standards formula. A "frit" is the gravel-like material that results 

FROM MELTING RAW MATERIALS TO FORM A TYPE OF GLASS, AND POURING THE MOLTEN GLASS 
INTO COLD WATER TO SHATTER IT, THEN THE "fRIT" AND OTHER MILL MATERIALS ARE GROUND 

to a powder-like consistency and water is added to hold the materials in suspension. 

After the dipping process, the "slip" is drained from the headers, leaving an 
extremely thin coating, of approximately ,0015" thickness on both interior and 

EXTERIOR, The PARTS THEN ARE BEADED TO REMOVE ANY BUILD-UP OF CERAMIC COATING 

along the downward edge. 

Another conveyor carries the headers to firing in a special hi gh-temperature, 

V-BOTTOM furnace, 12 FEET LONG, 5 FEET WIDE AND k FEET HIGH. ThE PARTS ARE HUNG 
FROM HEAVY InCONEL HOOKS AND FRAMES, AND FIRED FOR APPROXIMATELY 12 MINUTES AT 
1850° F, ACCURATELY CONTROLLED AS TO HEAT AND TIME. 



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When the parts are removed from the furnace and allowed to cool at room 



TEMPERATURE^ THE CLAY MASKING SHATTERS FROM THE COATED SLIP JOINT AND FLANGE 
SURFACES, The other portions have a SMOOTH, GREEN ENAMELED SURFACE. 

The NOMINALLY HIGHER COST OF CERAMIC COATED HEADERS WILL BE MORE THAN 

absorbed by extending the life of the exhaust system, it is reasonable to 
believe from the results of the tests to date, 

Much research is being conducted by industry, technical schools and by 
THE Air Force on use of ceramic materials for various applications. In addition 
TO exhaust systems, these include combustion chamber liners, rotor buckets and 
stator blades for gas turbines; rocket motor components; walls of ramjet and 

PULSE-JET engines, HEAT EXCHANGERS, AND COATINGS FOR SKINS OF SUPERSONIC VEHICLES. 

At Ryan, the key men in Operation Ceramics, are Foushee; Hacker; Wilson G. 
Hubbell, chief metallurgist; and Ralph Haver, manifold design specialist. 

Additional study is inevitable before even tie partial potentialities of 
ceramic materials are realized. Meantime, th is centuries-old art is being put 
TO practical use on such projects as Ryan's exhaust collector systems for the 
Boeing 377 Stratocru iser, and on future exhaust systems for Boeing B-50 bombers 
and C-97 military transports. 



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Mailing Out: ^-26-51 
Selec. AM-1 and Tech. Red, 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LiNDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



TIME-SAVING SAND 

The sand which filters down the hourglass of production is buying more 
TIME AT Ryan Aeronautical Company today. 

Sand is a time factor in an aircraft plant, and at Ryan, time is being 
saved since a switch was made in the type of sand used in sandblasting opera- 

T ions. 

For years, a white silica sand was utilized in the high pressure blast- 
ing that cleanses metal parts. These sand particles deteriorated rapidly, 
and a fine dust, of no further use in the sandblasting, was created. 

It was discovered that a reddish garnet sand quarried from a mountainside 
AT Fernwood, Idaho, had 50 percent better "staying" powers than the silica sand. 
Ryan was one of the first aircraft plants in the west to experiment, success- 
fully, WITH THIS material ON A LARGE SCALE. TONS ARE USED ANNUALLY, 

The garnet mineral base provides a much more abrasive material than the 

SILICA, according TO RAY OrTIZ, MANIFOLD AND FABRICATION SUPERINTENDENT AT RyAN. 

"It takes ONLY HALF AS LONG TO SANDBLAST A PART, AND WITH LESS AIR PRESSURE," 
HE SAYS. "The particles don't pulverize AS EASILY, AND WE'RE NOT BOTHERED WITH 
THE POWDER CREATED BY SILICA SAND, INTERFERING WITH VISIBILITY," 

An EXAMINATION OF GARNET SAND CRYSTALS AFTER SOME USE SHOWS THAT WHEN THEY 
DO BREAK DOWN THEY RETAIN THEIR SHARP FEATURES AND THE CUTTING QUALITIES SO 
NECESSARY IN SANDBLASTING. IN CONTRAST, THE SILICA SAND DISINTEGRATES INTO 
"round" CRYSTALS OF NO FURTHER VALUE IN CUTTING ACTION, 



-2- 



Thus, although garnet sand is more expensive than silica sand, it lasts much 
longer and does the job faster. a considerable saving is effected. 

On TWO eight-hour swifts, the sandblasting machines HAD TO BE LOADED AT LEAST 

six times with silica sand. now, the machines need be filled only twice, once for 
each shift. 

Less residue also means less of a problem in the trucking away of waste 
■material. 

And in rainy weather, garnet sand, which is more moisture-resistant than 

SILICA sand, won't CLOG UP AS EASILY IN THE MOIST ATMOSPHERE. ITS FLOW INTO THE 
sandblasting machines IS UNINTERRUPTED, 

Sandblasting is performed at Ryan to clean stainless steel exhaust system 

PARTS and permit THOROUGH INSPECTION. BY USE OF A NEW INUSTRIAL ABRASIVE, RYAN 
is proving THAT SAND CAN BUY VALUABLE PRODUCTION TIME. 



3-12-51K 



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MAILING OUT; ^-30-51 
Aviation Mags 1 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



BILL WAGNER 
BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



SIX-DAY WEEK SCHEDULED 
FOR RYAN AIRCRAFT WORKERS 

All Ryan Aeronautical Company workers will go on a six-day 48-hour 

WEEK starting MONDAY (ApRIL 3O) TO SPEED WORK ON AN INCREASING VOLUME OF 
MILITARY AIRCRAFT CONTRACTS, COMPANY OFFICIALS HAVE ANNOUNCED. NEARLY 
3000 ARE NOW EMPLOYED AT RyAK )N THE AIRPLANE AND METAL PRODUCTS DIVISIONS. 

Some of Ryan's production departments have been working a six-day 

WEEK since last NOVEMBER, BUT NOW THE ENTIRE PLANT GOES ON A i|8~H0UR WEEK. 

Though the additional 8 hours in the work week will., in effect, add several 

HUNDRED experienced WORKERS TO THE PRESENT PAYROLL, THIS WILL ONLY PARTIALLY 
SOLVE THE PROBLEM OF BR!NG!NG THE NECESSARY ADDITIONAL WORKERS INTO PRODUCTION 
DEPARTMENTS AT RyAN. 

Skilled workers of almost all classes are particularly needed at this 
TIME, J. W, Bunnell, personnel manager, said. Despite the increased man- 
hours resulting from the longer work WEEK Ryan is scheduled to add at least 
300 additional workers in the next three months, 

Ryan products (nclude smportant items for the military services on 
which constantly increasing production rates are being REQUiRED. Several 
OF the largest contracts require heavy manufacturing schedules already running 

MORE THAN TWO YEARS INTO THE FUTURE. INCLUDED IN CURRENT CONTRACTS ARE RYAN 
jet-propelled P:L0TLESS aircraft, huge FUSELAGE ASSEMBLIES FOR MILITARY TRANS- 
PORT PLANESj SPECIAL TYPE FUEL TANKS, NUMEROUS AIRCRAFT PARTS AND ASSEMBLIES, 
JET ENGINE COMPONENTS AND STAINLESS STEEL EXHAUST SYSTEMS, HEAT EXCHANGERS 
AND ALLIED PRODUCTS FOR NEARLY EVERY MAJOR AMERICAN AIRCRAFT COMPANY. 



i|-27-5iw 



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TO: LOCAL PAPERS ^-27-51 



SIX-DAY WEEK SCHEDULED 
FOR RYAN AIRCRArr VCRKERS 

All Ryan Aeronautical Company workers will eo on a six-oav HS-hour 

WEEK STARTINC MONOAY (APRIL 3D) TO SPEED WORK ON AN INCREASING VOLUME 

or MILITARY AlRCRAfT CONTRACTS, C(MIPANY OfrtCIALS HAVE AHNOUNCCO. KEARLY 

3000 ARC NOW EMPLOYEO AT RyAN IN THE AIRPLANE ANO (iftTAL PROOuCTS DIVISIONS. 

Some or Ryan's production departments have acEN working a six->oay 

WCtK since last MOVEMSCRf »UT NOW THE ENTIRE PLANT 80£S ON A ^B-MOUR WEEK. 

Though the additional 6 momrs in the work week will» in Errccr, add several 

NUNOREO EXPERIENCEO WORKERS TO TNE PRESENT PAYROLL* THIS WILL ONLY PARTIALLY 
SOLVE THE PROBLEM Or SRINOING THE NECESSARY ADDITIONAL WORK£RS INTO PRODUCTION 
DEPARTMENTS AT RVAN* 

Skilled workers or almost all classes are particularly Nt^E&co at this 

TIME4 J« W* SUNNELLf PERSONNEL MANAOER, SAID. DESPITE THE INCREASED MAN- 
HOURS RESULTING rROM THE LONOER WORK WE£K RyAN IS SCHEDULED TO ADO AT LEAST 
300 ADDITIONAL WORKERS IN THE NEXT THREE MONTHS. 

Ryan products include important items fon TaE military services or which 

CONSTANTLY INCREASINS PRODUCTION RATES ARE SS^tNG REQUIRES. SEVERAL Of THE 
LARGEST CONTRACTS REQUIRE HEAVY MANUPaC TUR i NO SCHEDULES ALREADY RUNNING liWRE 
THAN TWO YEARS INTO THE PUTURE. INCLUDED IN CURRENT CONTRACTS ARE RyAN JET- 
PROPELLED PIL0TLE8S AIRCRA«-T, KUOE PUSELAQE ASSCMBLISS rOR MILITARY TRANSPORT 
PLANES* SPECIAL TYPE FUEL TANKS, NUMEROUS AIRCRAFT PRRTS AND ASSEMBLIES, JET 
ENGINE COMPONENTS AND STAINLESS STEEL EXHAUST SYSTEMS, HEAT EXCHANGERS AND 
ALLIED PRODUCTS FOR NEARLY EVERY MAJOR AMERICAN AIRCRAFT COMPANY. 

11-27-51W 



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MAILING out: 5-2-51 

L06AL Papers & 
Financial Red 

NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL CO. TO 
PAY lO^f QUARTERLY DIVIDEND 

A QUARTERLY DIVIDEND OF 10^ PER SHARE HAS BEEN 
DECLARED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE RYAN 
AERONAUTICAL COMPANY, PAYABLE JuNE 12, 1951, TO 
STOCKHOLDERS OF RECORD AS OF MaY 22, 1951. 



5-I-5IW 






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Mailing Out: 5"^^~51 
Aviation Mags ^, 2, 3 
Technical Red &. Yellow 
Financial Red & Yellow 



Wire Services Red & Yellow 
Army - Navy Red 
Miscellaneous Red 

(PiX TO SELEC. GROUP^ 



For Release 
Monday, May 7 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



BILL WAGNER 
BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN TO BUILD NEW FACTORY 
BLDG. FOR JET PARTS MFGR. 



Ryan Aeronautical Company, San Diego, this week started construction 

OF A 75,000 SQ. ft. addition TO ITS MANUFACTURING FACILITIES, T. ClAUDE RyAN, 

president, announced today. The factory building is being erected adjacent 

TO THE company's LARGE FiNAL AND SuB-ASSEMBLY BUILDINGS ON LINDBERGH FlELD. 

The new $300,000 building will provide needed production space for 

FURTHER EXPANSION OF RYAN'S ALREADY LARGE JET ENGINE COMPONENTS MANUFACTURING 
PROGRAM, 

With the completion of its new jet engine parts factory building, Ryan 
plant space will be increased to approximately three-quarters of a million 

SQUARE FEET. ThE NEW BUILDING, OF STEEL AND STUCCO CONSTRUCTION, WILL BE 
25O-BY-3OO FEET, It WILL BE LOCATED AT THE WEST END OF THE COMPANY'S ^0-ACRE 

plant site. 

Present plans call for the new factory to be used exclusively for the 
manufacture of combustion chambers, exhaust cones, tailpipes, exhaust nozzles, 

afterburners AND OTHER PRECISION-BUILT STAINLESS STEEL COMPONENTS FOR JET ENGINES. 

While the largest current production is for the General Electric jet engines, 
Ryan also manufactures jet engine parts for Pratt &. Whitney, V/est inghouse, 
Allison, Wright Aeronautical and others. 

More than $2,000,000 worth of new production machinery and other equipment, 

EXCLUSIVE of special TOOLING AND F I XTURES, W I LL BE INSTALLED !N THE NEW BUILDING, 



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Additional precision machining equipment, heavy presses, extensive welding equip- 
ment, ANNEALING OVENS AND OTHER FACILITIES FOR STAINLESS STEEL FABRICATION ARE 

i ncluded. 

In addition to the new jet parts factory building, Ryan also has under 
construction a l4,000 sq. ft. hangar-warehouse to provide needed facilities 
FOR Ryan Navion executive-liaison plane service and spare parts departments. 
The new structures are being built by Trepte Construction Company with structural 
steel furnished by the National Steel and Shipbuilding Company. Both are San Diego 

F IRMS. 

The Navion hangar-warehouse is due for completion the end of May, while the 

JET parts factory BUILDING IS SCHEDULED TO BE READY FOR USE LATE THIS SUMMER. 



5-4-51W 



To LOCAL PAPERS 5~''5~51 



Overtime Saturday work at Ryan Aeronautical Company, where the 

ENTIRE plant HAS RECENTLY BEEN WORKING A SIXTH DAY, WILL BE REDUCED 
THIS WEEK, COMPANY OFFICIALS SAID TODAY. HOWEVER, NEARLY HALF OF 
THE PRODUCTION WORKERS WILL CONTINUE ON A 48-HOUR WORK WEEK. 

In ANNOUNCING THE RESCHEDULING OF OVERTIME WORK, IT WAS POINTED 
OUT THAT REQUIRED APPROVALS OF THE AGENCIES CONCERNED FOR A SIX-DAY 
WORK WEEK FOR THE ENTIRE PLANT WERE NOT RECEIVED. 



5-I5-5IW 



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Mailing Out: 5-1^-51 
Avi AT ION Mags 1 &. 2 
Financial Red 
Technical Red 

tut ..**. C^'*iL«JL»'-«*~-- (il-W/^- 



FoR Immediate 
Release 



»l,.v»~»a. « -/) 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



BILL WAGNER 
BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN METAL PRODUCTS ORDERS 
BOOSTED BY $3,500,000 

New orders of more than $3,500*^00 ^o" ^e:t engine components and exhaust 

SYSTEMS HAVE BEEN RECEIVED BY RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY IN RECENT WEEKS. THIS 
WAS REPORTED BY T. ClAUDE RyaN, PRESIDENT, JUST PRIOR TO HIS DEPARTURE OVER 

the week-end to attend meetings of the board of governors of the aircraft 
Industries Assn. in Washington and to confer with military officials. 

The entry of automobile manufacturers into production of aircraft engines 

for the EXPANDED NATIONAL MILITARY REQUIREMENTS WAS REFLECTED IN AN ORDER RYAN 

has received from Ford Motor Company for exhaust systems for Wasp Major engines. 
Ford will build the "^+360" four-row 28-cylinder piston engine under license 
FROM Pratt & Whitney. 

Other engine companies placing additional jet engine and exhaust system 

ORDERS with RyAN INCLUDED GENERAL ElECTRIC, CONTINENTAL, WESTINGHOUSE AND 

Pratt &. Whitney. The exhaust systems being built for Continental are for use 
IN M-^6 Patton combat tanks. 

New orders for transport plane exhaust equipment came from the Douglas, 
Boeing and Fairchild aircraft companies. 

The additional jet engine business is being received by Ryan as work gets 

UNDER way on THE COMPANY'S NEW 75>000 SQ. FT. JET ENGINE PARTS FACTORY BUILDING 

adjoining THE FINAL AND SUB-ASSEMBLY BUILDINGS. D. H. PaLMER, PLANT ENGINEER, 

REPORTS THAT SEWER AND UTILITIES LINES ARE BEING COMPLETED AND FOOTINGS POURED 

THIS WEEK, BUT THAT NOT MUCH STRUCTURE ABOVE GROUND WILL BEGIN GOING UP UNTIL 
LATER THIS MONTH. 



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ThE $3,500,000 IN NEW CONTRACTS RECEIVED BY RyaN IS EXCLUSIVE OF INCREASES 
IN ORDERS CONSTANTLY BEING RECEIVED FOR AIRFRAME COMPONENTS. AFT FUSELAGE 
SECTIONS FOR MILITARY TRANSPORT PLANES, HUGE EXTERNAL FUEL TANKS FOR LONG-RANGE 
BOMBERS, CARGO DOORS, FLOOR BEAMS AND OTHER COMPONENTS ARE NOW BEING DELIVERED 
IN STEADY VOLUME FROM RYAN ASSEMBLY LINES. 



5-I7-5IW 




Mailing Out: 5-18-51 
Aviation Magazines 1 & 2 
Financial Red 
Local Papers: 5-2I-5I 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



BILL WAGNER 
BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN EXPANDS DAYTON OFFICE 
TO SERVE MIDWEST CUSTOMERS 

Opening of an office in the Third National Building, Dayton, Ohio, to 
serve the Middle West territory is announced by Ryan Aeronautical Company, 
San Diego. 

A full-fledged office is needed to accommodate Ryan's rapidly expanding 
business, particularly in the metal products field, for component parts of 
jet and piston engines, Sam C. Breder, customer service director, explained, 

John Atha, who has been Ryan's Middle West field representative during 

THE last year, V/ILL BE IN CHARGE OF THE DaYTON OFFICE, ASSISTED BY RiCHARO J, 
OFFENBERG, WHO HAS JUST JOINED THE RyAN ORGANIZATION AFTER 9 YEARS WITH 

Curtiss-Wright Corp. and North American Aviation, Inc. in Columbus, Ohio. 
Offenberg, 3^1, A graduate of Ohio State University with a Bachelor of Science 

DEGREE, WAS SUPERVISOR OF ESTIMATING FOR CURTISS WrIGHT's AIRPLANE DIVISION 

AND WITH North American when the latter took over the Columbus plant last 
November. 

The Dayton office will service the area extending as far west as St. Louis 

AND AS FAR EAST AS BUFFALO, NEW YORK. IT WILL INCLUDE THE DETROIT REGION, AGAIN 
BECOMING INCREASINGLY IMPORTANT TO AIRCRAFT PRODUCTION, RyAN'S CLOSE LIAISON 

WITH Air Force Materiel Command headquarters at V/right Field, Dayton, on prime 

AIRPLANE contracts AS WELL AS METAL PRODUCTS WORK, WILL BE CONTINUED THROUGH 
THE NEW OFFICE. 



5-I8-5IK 



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Mailing Out: b-O-'pl 

Aviation Mags 1 &. 2 

Technical Red 

Financial Red (pix to For Release 

Local Papers selec.) Sunday, June 10 

NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 




BILL WAGNER 
BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN GETS MULTI-MI LLION DOLLAR 

ORDER FOR PODS FOR KC-97 TANKERS 

A mult I -M I ll ion dollar contract for refueling pods for Boeing l'C-97 flying 

TANKERS HAS SEEN RECEIVCD BY RYAN AERONAUTICAL COIiPANY, T. CLA'JDE RyAN, PkESIDENT., 

revealed today. The Ryam announcement was issued comcurrent with a statement 3Y 
Boeing Airplane Cohpamy that additional STRATorRe ighters yov; being i'uilt for the 
THE U. S. AlP. Force will be quickly convertible for service either as transports 
or aerial tankers. 

"Deliveries of refueling pods have already begun," Ryan said, "and are 
scheduled to continue through 1952' fof several years RYAii Aeronautical Cc;4paiJY 

HAS been building THE AFT FUSELAGE SECTION AND CARGO DOORS FOR THE C~97^ SiNCE 

the pods in the flying tanker version are designed to replace the cargo doors, 
Ryan was the logical source to also supply this equipment. Production of the 

PODS has been GREATLY SPEEDED BECAUSE OF THE CLOSE TOOLING COORDINATION WHICH 
has been POSSIBLE." 

The BOOM-OPERATOR 's POD IS DESIGNED TO. FIT EXACTLY INTO THE OPENING MADE BY 
REMOVAL OF THE TRANSPORT'S REAR CLAMSHELL CARGO DOORS. It REQUIRES ONLY SIX HOURS 
TO CHANGE THE DOUBLE-DECK MILITARY TRANSPORT FROM ITS MORE-NORMAL ROLE AS TROOP 
OR CARGO CARRIER TO A FlYING BOOM TANKER. PRODUCTION MODELS OF THE DUAL-PURPOSE 
C-97'S WILL LEAVE THE BOE I NG SEATTLE PLANT AS TANKERS 3UT WILL CARRY COMPLETE 
TRANSPORT CONVERSION KITS INCLUDING THEIR RyAN-BUILT CARGO DOORS, SEATS AND OTHER 
EQU I PMENT. 



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VlTH ONE AIRPLANE ABLE TO SERVE THE TWO FUNCTIONS OF TRANSPORT AND TANKER, 

THE Air Force will be able to do both jobs with fewer planes, saving on initial 

COST, UPKEEP AND MANPOWER. 

The SELF-CONTAINED ELECTRIC MONORAIL HOIST OF THE C-97 IS USED TO RAISE AND 
LOWER THE INTERCHANGEABLE POD AND CARGO DOOR UNITS, PERMITTING CHANGEOVERS TO BE 
MADE VIRTUALLY ANYWHERE UNDER FIELD SERVICE OPERATING CONDITIONS. 

6-7-5IW 



§ 



\ 




iviAiLLu u-^c-ji Aviation Mags 1 & 2 

For R^fe^s^e'^^ ^^^^ ^ ^^^^°^ 
Tuesday, June 26 

NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL BUILDING 
COMPLETE ROCKET MOTORS 



Expanding the scope of its operations in the manufacture 
of rocket engine components, Ryan Aeronautical Company has 
recently been awarded a contract by Douglas Aircraft Company 
to produce a small number of complete rocket motors for a 
surface-to-surface missile under developnent. 

According to Ryan production experts, long experienced 
in building the "hot end" of jet and piston engiaes, the 
rocket motor for the surface-to-surface missile presents 
new problems in forming and welding heavy gauge materials. 

The outer shell and other sheet metal portions are drop- 
hammer stamped to very close tolerance. Both arc and electric 
resistance welding processes are used, and furnace brazing is 
also employed. Certain of the major components of the motor 
are precision machined from solid stainless steel billets. 

The missile is a project of the Army Ordnance Corps and 
its development is under the direction of the Jet Propulsion 
Laboratory of Caltech. 



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MAILING UUT: l-\0-yi 

Local Papers, AP & UP 

Aviation Mags 1 & 2 For Release 

Tech. Red, Finan. Red Thursday 

July 12th 

NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



$8,000,000 IN JET ORDERS BOOST 
RYAN BACKLOG TO FORTY MILLION 

New orders totaling $8,000,000 for jet engine components were received 
BY Ryan Aeronautical Company during the first week of July, T. Claude Ryan, 
president announced today. 

The new business, which brings the company's backlog of unfilled orders 
to over ^0 million dollars, was placed by General Electric Company and the 
Wright Aeronautical Corp. 

Already in large scale production of many components for the "hot end" 
of General Electric J-^iy jet engines, Ryan will further increase its delivery 
of exhaust cones, combustion chambers, exhaust nozzles, transition liners, 
aft frames and other parts for latest models of the j-^7 engine. 

For Wright Aeronautical Corp., Ryan is scheduled to go into volume pro- 
duction OF EXHAUST CONES FOR THE 7200-POUND-THRUST J-65, AMERICANIZED VERSION 

of the famous armstrong siddeley sapphire jet engine, originally developed in 
England. 

Wright Aeronautical, newest p iston-engi ne manufacturer to enter the jet 

FIELD, IS undertaking ONE OF THE GREATEST SUB-CONTRACTING PROGRAMS IN THE 
COUNTRY TODAY TO PUT THE POWERFUL J-65 INTO MASS PRODUCTION. SOME OF Ryan'S 
TOP TECHNICAL PEOPLE AND CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES HAVE BEEN WORKING 
CLOSELY WITH WRIGHT AT ITS WOOD-RlDGE, N. J. PLANT IN CONNECTION WITH THE CON- 
VERSION OF THE English Sapphire engine to American production standards. 






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TO SPEED PRODUCTION OF THE NEW GENERAL ELECTRIC ORDERS AND OTHER JET PARTS 
CONTRACT WORK, RYAN IS RUSHING TO EARLY FALL COMPLETION A NEW 75^000 SQUARE FOOT 

manufacturing structure located at the west end of the final assembly building. 
Costing in excess of $300,000, the new jet parts factory will be equipped with 
SOME $2,000,000 OF specialized production machinery. 



7-10-51W 



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Mailing Out: 7-I7-5I 
Aviation Mags 1 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY GETS 
CONTRACT FOR CONSULTING SERVICE 

to help speed production of urgently needed external fuel tanks of 
Ryan Aeronautical Company's own design, the company has begun entering 

INTO assistance CONTRACTS WITH OTHER MANUFACTURERS WHICH WILL SERVE AS 
ALTERNATE SOURCES. FiRST SUCH CONTRACT IS WITH AMERICAN StOVE COMPANY 
WHICH WILL SOON BEGIN PRODUCTION OF THE HUGE FUEL TANKS AT ITS St , LOUIS, 

Missouri, plant. 

So that INCREASING MILITARY REQUIREMENTS FOR THE RyAN EXTERNAL TANKS, 
LARGEST KNOWN TO BE IN PRODUCTION, MAY BE MET, IT HAS BECOME NECESSARY FOR 
THE PRIME AIRFRAME MANUFACTURER TO ESTABLISH SEVERAL SOURCES OF SUPPLY, AS 
AN AID TO THE EXPANDED PROGRAM, RYAN HAS OFFERED TO EDUCATE THE ALTERNATE 

manufacturers in the advanced production methods the company has developed. 
Such extensive use is being made of resistance welding in building the 

TANKS THAT RyaN IS NOW ONE OF THE BEST EQUIPPED PLANTS IN THE WORLD FOR THIS 
SPECIALIZED WORKo MANY OTHER WELDING MACHINES ARE ON ORDER, 

As PART OF THE ASSISTANCE CONTRACT, AMERICAN STOVE RECENTLY SENT VICTOR 

Frank, fuel tank project engineer, and Raymond Johnson, tooling engineer, to 
THE Ryan plant for an extended study of manufacturing techniques. 



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Mai I ing Out: 8-3-51 
Avi at ion Mags I 
Fin. Red & Ye I low 
San Dieqo 

^ NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 

For Release 
Saturday, August 4. 

RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY ASKS 

APPROVAL TO INCREASE CAPITAL STOCK 

A proposal for an increase in the authorized capital stock of Ryan Aeronautical 
Company from 500, 000 shares of $1. 00 per value to 1, 000, 000 shares is being 
submitted for approval of stockholders by the Board of Directors. 

Discussing the proposed increase in authorized capital stock, T. Claude Ryan, 
president, said that rapidly expanding production and the large backlog of orders makes 
it important that the corporation be in a position to do appropriate financing through 
issuance of some form of its own securities if and when advantageous to the company. 

The Ryan Management indicated that at this time it had not reached any conclusion 
as to any specific plan or type of security that might be issued. Any issuance, if and 
when made, might take the form of a general offering for sale to the public or granting 
of rights to stockholders; or the reservation for conversion of long-term debentures 
which could be issued with provision for convertibility into common stock, company 
officials said. 

The only class of Ryan stock is common capital stock, of which 439, 193 shares 
are outstanding. Of these, 45, 350 are held by the wholly owned subsidiary, Ryan 
School of Aeronautics. The amount of stock authorized in the Articles of Incorporation 
, has not been changed since 1939. The solicitation of consent is being sent to stock= 
holders of record July 20th. 

8-3-51W 



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Mail ing Out 8-1-51 ^^^' 8-8-51 
Avia-tion Mais I Technical Red 
Financial RED 

San Diero FOR IMMEDIATE 

REI^EASE 

NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN ANNOUNCES FIRST PRODUCTION 
ORDERS FOR CERAMIC COATED PARTS 

Ryan Aeronautical Company today announced the nation's first volume 
production contracts for adaptation of an ancient art to modern aircraft == ceramic 
coating of exhaust systems to conserve growingly scarce strategic alloys. 

Approximately 600 sets for Pratt & Whitney engines, including spares, for 
the Convair Model 240 and Model 340 transports will be ceramic-coatedj Sam C. Breder, 
Ryan Customer Service Director^ reported. 

In addition, Boeing Airplane Company, Seattle, has ordered ceramic- coated 
Ryan exhaust assemblies for all its B-50 bombers and C = 97 Stratofreighters under 
production for the Air Force. 

In the jet engine field. General Electric has given Ryan experimental orders 
for ceramic coating of the transition liners and inner combustion chambers Ryan 
manufactures for the J-47 engine. G. E. has launched a program of using non- 
strategic materials on its famed J=47 engine, which will require ceramic coating for 
protection. 

Experimental work also is being conducted with Douglas Aiycraft Company 
and United Air Lines on ceramic coating of DC-6 transport exhaust stack assemblies, 
through service tests on actual scheduled runs. 

And on the ground, Continental Motors Corporation's 825 h.p. engine for the 
General Patton tank, will have ceramic = coated sections on the new manifolds due to 
get into production soon at Ryan. 



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' Ryan is the only aircraft company in the country providing ceramic coated 

parts for piston engines on a production basis, Breder pointed out. 

Its pioneering work in this field dates to World War 11, when portions 
of more than 500 complete exhaust systems for the Douglas A=ZO attack bomber were 
given thick porcelain enamel coatings. A low carbon steel was used then because of 
a critical shortage of stainless steel. 

Today's ceramic coating, applied to the "hot spots" of the engine -- the 
exhaust system =- to increase its life by enhancing its resistance to heat and gas 
erosion, is only one thousandth to three thousandths of an inch thick and adds little 
to the weight, a vital factor in aircraft, Breder said. 

Importance of this technique has increased since World War 11, with engines 
V) generating temperatures of 2000 degrees and more, at the same time the Air Force 
is asking manufacturers to use high heat= resistant strategic alloys as little as 
possible. 

The first service tests of ceramic coatings since World War 11 were 
conducted in a Pan American World Airways' giant Boeing 377 Stratocruiser on the 
transpacific run. 

After more than 1800 hours service, examination showed that the Ryan 
ceramic coated exhaust systems had so resisted heat and erosion that Boeing 
decided to equip its entire fleet of Stratocruisers with ceramic = coated exhaust parts 
as replacements are made. These transports are flying for Northwest Airlines, 
British Overseas Airways Corp. , United Air Lines and the Military Air Transport 
j^ Service, as well as Pan-American. 

On the Convair Model 240, the ceramic coated exhaust systems will 



- 3 = 
i replace the non-coated parts of planes in service for American Airlines, Pan 

American World Airways, Western Air Lines, Continental Airlines, Midcontinent 
Airlines and Northeast Airlines. The ceramic-coated exhausts will go into the 
new Model 340 Convair Liners as they are built in San Diego. 

8-3-51K 




i 



Ma iLiNG Out: 8-10-51 
Local Papers 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



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C.L.SfcFoushee Jr., Ryan Aeronautical Company service 
representative, today is en route to England to train personnel of the British Overseas 
Ajrways Corp. in maintenance of exhaust sytems. 

He will be stationed at the B.O.A.C. MWpaewi service 
hangars in Filton, England for two weeks. Ryan supplies the exhaust systems for the Wasp 
Major engines of the Boeing Stratocru isers used by B.u.a.C. 

This is Foushee's second service trip to Europe in 3 years. 
Turing tlie Berlin airlift, he flew to Germany to help meet service problems 
on exhaust systems of the Ajr Force's C-54 transports which broke the Russian blockade of 
Berlin. 






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To: Av I AT ION Mags 1 &. 2 
Financial Red 
Mags. Gen. 

Wl RE SeRV I CES 

S.D. (5) 



Mailing Out: 9-12-51 

For Release 

Thursday, September I3 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



BILL WAGNER 
BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN TO DEVELOP ELECTRONIC 
EQUIPMENT FOR NAVY BUAER 

Broadening its activities in the electronics field, Ryan 
Aeronautical Company will develop a new type of equipment of 
an undisclosed nature for the U.S. Navy Bureau of Aeronautics, 
T. Claude Ryan, president, revealed today in announcing receipt 
of a contract for the project. 

While detailed information on the new project is still 
Classified, Bruce Smith, Ryan Director of Engineering, stated 
that it places the company in a new field of work with broad 
possibilities for further application. 

The development program is under the direction of Owen S. 
Olds, electronics project engineer. 



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Ma I L iNG Out: 9.25-51 
San Diego Union 
Toledo Times 

NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



Once again oldsters arc coming out op RCTtRCMeNT to spcce warplane production 
IN San Oieqo. 

Many have held highly responsible positions either in private industry or 
community welfare work. Today, in order to help the defense effort, they're 

content to labor in the obscurity of RANK-AND-r I LE JOBS IN AIRCRAFT PLANTS. 

Typical are John 0, Dun, 59, former editor of the Toledo, 0. Times, and 
Carle B. Moore« 62, who has retired effective Sept, ^, after 11 years as 
Executive of the Sam Diego Area Council, Boy Scouts of America. 

Both have just started punching clocks at Ryan Aeronautical Company, where 

TMEY are employed AS STOCK CLERKS AND ARE HAPPY IN THE ANONYMITY OF THEIR NEW 
EXISTENCE. Both say IT*S a pleasant contrast with THEIR FORMER WHJTE-COLLAR 
ROUTINE. 

•VlTH NO MORE PUBLIC APPEARANCES TO MAKE OR CONFERENCES TO ATTEND, THE 
REGULAR HOURS OF A FACTORY JOB ARE ACTUALLY IMPROVING MY HEALTH," REMARKS MOORE, 
A VETERAN OF 33 YEARS* SERVICE AS A 8OY ScOUT EXECUTIVE IW VARIOUS PARTS OF THE 
COUNTRY^ BEFORE COMING TO Sam DIEGO tN 19^50, HE HEADED ScOUT ORGA;\'l ZAT lOMS IN 

Colorado Springs, Colo.; Dusuque, Ia.| Greeley, Colo,, and was a deputy regional 

EXECUTIVE with JURISDICTION OVER SIX MIDWESTERN STATES. 

"At k P.M., I CAN LEAVE MY JOB BEHIND ME," MOORE EXPLAINS. "NO LONGER DOES 
MY WORK FOLLOW ME HOME. AnO DURING THE WORKING DAY, I AM PEEASEO THAT AT THE AGE 
OF 62, I AM ABLE TO PERFORM USEFULLY.** 









HTIM2 aOfi 




^ NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 

—- 

Dun was editor of the Toledo Times from 191^^ to I939, when he retired 

AND moved to a RANCH AT TuCSON, ARIZ, OuRING WORLO WaR My BECAUSE HE WAS TOO 
OLD TO ae ACCEPTED BY THE ArmV, HE JOINED THE AMERICAN FlELO SERVICE AS AN 
AMBULANCE DRIVER ATTACHED TO THE FRENCH FOREIGN LEGION PURSUING ROMMEL'S GERMANS 

IN North Africa. 

For RESCUING wounded men under the fire of enemy GUNS^ HE WAS AWARDED NOT 

ONLY THE French Croix oe Guerre, but also the Medaille Militairc, which in 
France corresponds to the Congressional ^teOAL or Honor, America's highest 
military award. 
* Sent home ill. Dun recovered, and though past 50, he joined the American 
Military Government, serving in France and England until 19^15, On his return, 
a national syndicate made a sunday "strip" in color of his north african adventures* 
Last year, Dun and his wife moved to La Jolla. After rcmooelling their home, 

HE "got TIRED OF DOING NOTHING**, LEARNED THAT HE COULD ASSIST IN THE DEFENSE 
EFFORT, AND WENT TO WORK IN AN AIRCRAFT PLANT. 

### 



9-2^-51 K 



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Mailing Out: 10-1 5-5I 
Aviation Mags 1 &. 2 
Technical Red &. Yellow 

FiNANC I AL Red & Yellow 



Newspapers Red 
Mags Gen. Red 



For RhLEASE 
Tuesday. October i6 



NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



BILL WAGNER 
BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL TO EXPAND 
ROCKET MOTOR WORK TENFOLD 

A ten-fold sncrease in production of complete rocket motors for surface- 
to-surface missiles will be undertaken by Rvan Aeronautical Company as a result 
OF orders just received, To Claude Ryan, president, announced today„ 

Latest contract for missile rocket- motors is from Firestone TiRE and Rubber 
Company of Los AngeleSo Previously Ryan has built rocket motors under contract 
WITH Douglas Aircraft Company for an Armv Ordnance Corps missile which has been 
developed under the direction of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of CaltecHo 

to confine the tremendous but short-lived thrust of the powerful rocket 
engines, extremely heavy gauge materials are used in the manufacturing proces- 
ses, which require new techniques jn forming and weldlngo the engine consumes 
vast quantjt^es of fuel and oxidizer, creating terrific internal pressureso 

DrOF-HAMMER FORMING TO VERY CLOSE TOLERANCE IS USED BY RYAN Jm FABRICATING 

the outer shell and other sheet metal portionso both electric resistance awo 
arc welding processes are used, as is furnance brazing, in joining the various 
componentso certain of the major assemblies of the motor are frecision machined 
from stainless steel billetso 

Long experienced in building the "hot end" of jet and piston engineSj Ryan 

IS FURTHER expanding THE SCOPE OF ITS INTEREST IN THE ROCKET MOTOR FIELD AS THE 
RESULT OF THE NEW FIRESTONE CONTRACTo 



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Annuai^ Report &. 

NEWS BUREAU Loc.L b.nks 

.& Investment 

Pub. Rel. & AIA 



Bill WAGNER 

Bill BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailed: 2-27-52 - 2-28-52 

Fin. Daily Press (With Annual Report R attach ) 

Fin. Mags S^V/riters " " *' ^ " • For Release 

Friday.. February 29 
TMENT List, SS). Repb^te^^ist (brown tabs) 



AviA. Mags 1 &. 2 

CH. TO 




LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL 'I95I SALES TOP 
$22,000,000; NET PROFIT ^k02,6ok 

Gross revenue of the Ryan Aeronautical Company for the 195"! fiscal year ended 
October 31, last, was $22,277,175, an increase of 78^ over the $12,512,851 for the 
comparable period of 1950^ '^ ' Claude Ryan, president, reported today in his 21st 

ANNUAL report TO STOCKHOLDERS. 

Earnings for the 12 months were $827,60^ before taxes, and net income after 
taxes was $1402, 604, equal to $1.02 per share on the 393^3^3 ^^"^ outstanding shares. 

Net PROFIT IN FISCAL 1950 WAS $635,165, OR $l,6l PER SHARE, 

"Despite rising production costs and a profit margin lower than in the corre- 
sponding PERIOD OF 1950," Ryan said, "the net worth reached an all-time high of 

$5,217,072 AT the fiscal year END, ThE BOOK VALUE PER NET OUTSTANDING SHARE STOOD 
AT $13,25, COMPARED WITH $12.72 AT THE START OF THE PERIOD, 

"The LOWER earn INGS-TO-SALES ratio in I95I was due PRINCIPALLY TO THE ABNOR- 
MALLY HIGH COSTS INCIDENT TO THE RAPID PRODUCTION BUILD-UP ON NEW PRODUCTS, MUCH 
OF THE HIGH STARTING LOAD AND TOOLING COSTS INCURRED IN BUILDING UP TO INCREASED 
VOLUME ARE NOW ABSORBED AND AS HIGHER OUTPUT IS REACHED, AN IMPROVED EARNING RATIO 
IS NOW BEING REFLECTED," j 

AT THE START OF THE I95I FISCAL YEAR, THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS PLACED THE COMPA- 
NY'S STOCK ON A REGULAR QUARTERLY DIVIDEND BASIS, SiNCE THAT TIME FIVE CONSECUTIVE 
DIVIDENDS OF 10 CENTS EACH HAVE BEEN PAID, AND A SIXTH DIVIDEND OF THE SAME AMOUNT 

WILL BE PAID March 12 to stockholders of record February 20. 

To HANDLE THE INCREASED VOLUME OF BUSINESS IN CONNECTION WITH THE DEFENSE PRO- 
GRAM, Ryan added 90>000 sq, ft. of new factory area, including a building exclusively 



' r a - :/ .-VI i 



FOR JET ENGINE PARTS PRODUCTION, DURING THE YEAR, BRINGING TOTAL BUILDING AREA TO 

730;iOOO SQ. FT. Besides these factory additions, costing some $^130, 000, Ryan in- 
vested $825,000 in new manufacturing equipment which includes some of the largest 
precision machine tools and electric resistance welders used anywhere in the air- 
craft INDUSTRY. 

From a backlog of $21,4i4,220 at the start of the 1951 fiscal year, the total 

OF undelivered contracts INCREASED TO $41,542,204 BY THE CLOSE OF THE PERIOD AND 
have since risen an ADDITIONAL FOUR MILLION DOLLARS. 

Ryan revealed that the company is working on a number of prime research and 

DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTS FROM THE AlR FORCE AND NAVY BUT THAT SECURITY RESTRICTIONS 
prevent other THAN VERY GENERAL IDENTIFICATION OF THE PROJECTSo MENTIONED IN THE 
ANNUAL REPORT ARE A JET PROPULSION RESEARCH PROGRAM FOR THE NaVY, RyAN XQ-2 JET- 
propelled pilotless target planes, and electronics development work for both the 
Air Force and Navy, 

"While these projects did not contribute heavily to total revenues, they are 
considered important to the company's future since research and development work is 

THE FORERUNNER OF NEW PRODUCTS AND PRODUCTION PROGRAMS," RyAN SAID. 

Other current work in the Airplane Division includes manufacture of aft fuselage 
sections, refueling pods, cargo doors and floor beams for boe ! ng military transport 

planes, and VOLUME PRODUCTION OF THE LARGEST EXTERNAL FUEL TANKS KNOWN TO BE IN PRO- 
DUCTION. 

In THE Metal Products Division, the volume of jet engine components work is ex- 
panding RAPIDLY BUT THE EFFECT OF THE LARGE BACKLOG OF ORDERS WILL NOT BE FULLY FELT 
UNTIL SOMETIME NEXT YEAR. 

The ANNUAL REPORT DISCLOSED THAT RYAN IS EXPANDING ITS WORK IN THE ROCKET POWER 
PLANT FIELD AND IS NOW MANUFACTURING COMPLETE ROCKET MOTORS OF A TYPE DEVELOPED BY 

THE Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, Exhaust 

SYSTEMS FOR PISTON ENGINES, HOWEVER, ACCOUNTED FOR THE LARGEST DOLLAR VOLUME OF METAL 

PRODUCTS WORK LAST YEAR. THE COMPANY NOW BUILDS EXHAUST SYSTEMS FOR COMBAT TANKS AS 

WELL AS FOR AIRPLANES, RyaN REVEALED. 

2-26-52W 




NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAONER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailing Out: 3~7"52 
Aviation Mags 1 
Fin. Mags &. ViR iters 
Fin. Daily Press 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN AERO FIRST QUARTER 
SALES TOP $6,000,000^ 

Gross revenue or The Ryan Aeronautical Co, for 

THE first quarter OF THE 1952 FISCAL YEAR WAS $6,013,4lO, 

the company has reported to the securities and exchange 
commi ss i on. 

Sales volume showed a 61 percent increase over the 
$3,750,013 for the three months period ended january 3i , 

1951 o 



3-7-52W 



a 



I 




NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL APPOINTS N. Y. 
TRANSFER AGENT AND REGISTRAR 

To EXPEDITE THE HANDLING OF STOCK TRANSFERS IN EASTERN FINANCIAL 

CENTERS, Th; Ryan Aeronautical Co. has appointed Manufacturers Trust 
Company of New York City as transfer agent and Chemical Bank & Trust 
Company, also of New York City, as registrar. 

At the same time, G. C. V/oodard, executive vice-president and 
treasurer, announced discontinuance of the stock transfer fee formerly 
made for issuance of new certificates. 

Stock of The Ryai-i Aeronautical Co. is listed on the New York Curb 
Exchange as well as on the Los Angeles and San Francisco Stock Exchanges. 

The eastern trust companies will serve as co-transfer agents and 
co-registrars with The Ryan Aeronautical Co. and Union Title and Trust 
Company, of San Diego, respectively. 



3-7-52W 



i 




NEWS BUREAU 

BILl WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Ma I L I NG Out : 
S.D. Red 
Av I AT I ON Mags 2 
Newspapers Red 
WiiffE Servi^ces Red 
Army - Nav 



3_ici_52 - 3-19-52 

Misc. Red 

Free Lance Red 

Magazines General ^°^ Release 

Financial Daily Press Friday, March 21 



vJUfeo ^^ _ "TK _ Financial W»6azin^ ^9 

LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL, CALIFORNIA METAL ENAMELING 
COMPANIES MERGE CERAMIC COATING ACTIVITIES 



Climaxing two years of coordinated production and testing of ceramic coated 
parts for high-temperature aircraft applications, Ryan Aeronautical Company and 
California Metal Enameling Company today announced they have combined their 
activities in this field. 

Both firms contribute specialized knowledge which will further the develop- 
ment OF STILL BETTER CERAMIC COATINGS AND SPEED PRODUCTION OF CRITICAL PARTS FOR 
JET, PISTON AND ROCKET ENGINES. ThE NEW ARRANGEMENT COMBINES RYAN LEADERSHIP IN 
MAKING HEAT- AND CORROSION-RESISTANT SHEET METAL PARTS WITH CAMEO'S HALF-CENTURY 
CERAMICS PRODUCTION EXPERIENCE AND EXTENSIVE FACILITIES. 

In ANNOUNCING THE MERGER OF THEIR CERAMICS PROGRAMS, THE TWO FIRMS ALSO DIS- 
CLOSED THAT AN IMPROVED CERAMIC, A-418-RY ANCO-C , HAS BEEN DEVELOPED AS A RESULT 

of laboratory and service tests, and has been used for some time in production of 
aircraft engine components. 

Special significance is attached to the Ryan-Cameo arrangement because of the 
importance of ceramic coatings to the government's program of conservation of 
critical materials. 

The development program the companies have carried out since early I95O has 

VERIFIED THE BENEFITS OF SPECIAL CERAMIC COATINGS WHEN USED WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE 
components FOR AIRCRAFT POWER PLANTS, NOT ONLY DO THE CERAMIC APPLICATIONS EXTEND 
THE SERVICE LIFE OF ALLOYS SPECIFIED FOR JET AND INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE COM- 
PONENTS, BUT THEY ALSO MAKE IT POSSIBLE TO USE LOWER GRADE ALLOYS BY GIVING THEM 
THE RUGGED STAMINA REQUIRED FOR THESE APPLICATIONS. 



fS H:;»Mi ^Y/ 



Many vital high temperature components for jet engines, which are now made of 

InCONEL, may be fabricated from type 321 STAINLESS STEEL AND ADAPTED TO THE SAME 
APPLICATIONS WITH CERAMIC COATlNGSo SiNCE INCONEL CONTAINS A MINIMUM OF 7O PERCENT 
NICKEL AND TYPE 3^1 CONTAINS ONLY BETWEEN 8 AND 11 PERCENT OF THE PRECIOUS METAL, A 
SUBSTANTIAL SAVING OF THIS SCARCE MATERIAL CAN THUS BE EFFECTED. SIMILARLY, OTHER 
CRITICALLY SHORT ELEMENTS SUCH AS COLUMBIUM^ COBALT AND TUNGSTEN, MAY BE CONSERVED 
BY SUBSTITUTING LOWER GRADE ALLOYS, COATED WITH THIS CERAMIC, FOR THE RICHER "LUXURY 
class" METALSo 

The new agreement between Ryan and California Metal Enameling provides that 
the companies will jointly finance a continuing program of research in the improve- 
ment of high temperature ceramic coatings and their methods of application- 

In FILLING THE SUBSTANTIAL ORDERS WHICH HAVE RESULTED FROM THE DEVELOPMENT WORK 
OF THE PAST TWO YEARS, RYAN AND CALIFORNIA MeTAL ENAMELING HAVE BECOME THE FIRST 
COMPANIES TO PRODUCE CERAMIC COATED PARTS IN LARGE VOLUME FOR AIRCRAFT ENGINE APPLI- 
CAT lONSo 

The ENTIRE FLEETS OF BOE I NG STRATOCRU I SE R AND CONVAIR 2^10 P I STON-ENG I NED AIR- 
LINERS ARE BEING EQUIPPED WITH RyAN-CamEO CERAMIC COATED EXHAUST SYSTEM PARTS. EX- 
PERIMENTALLY, COMBUSTION CHAMBERS AND TRANSITION LINERS FOR JET ENGINES HAVE BEEN 
COATED AND PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF TEST RESULTS HAVE BEEN VERY ENCOURAGING. OTHER 
TEST ORDERS HAVE BEEN FABRICATED FOR PraTT & WHITNEY AIRCRAFT FOR THE POWERFUL 

3500 H.p. Wasp Major engine, and for Douglas Aircraft Company's DC-6 airliners 
operated by united alr lines. 

For ground vehicles, Ryan and Cameo are building thousands of ceramic coated 

SECTIONS for the MANIFOLDS USED ON THE CONTINENTAL 825 H.P. ENGINES WHICH POWER 
M-46 AND M-^Y COMBAT TANKS. 

# # # 



3-I2-52W 



i 



a3Vfl3c 




NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



CERAMIC ENGINEER JOINS RYAN 
AERONAUTICAL TECHNICAL STAFF 

In an expansion of its technical research program which points up the 

GROWING importance OF CERAMICS IN THE AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY, RYAN AERONAUTICAL 

Company has appointed Alexander Pechman, ceramic engineer, to the staff of 

ITS development LABORATORIESo 

A graduate of North Carolina State College, one of the few colleges 
equipped to grant Bachelor of Science degrees in ceramic engineering, Pechman 

HAS BEEN trained IN HIGH TEMPERATURE APPL I C AT I ONS o 

His specialized experience will be devoted to Ryan's program of testing, 
improving and developing ceramic coatings for jet, rocket and internal com- 
BUSTION ENGINES, His SERVICES WILL ALSO BE AVAILABLE TO RyAN CUSTOMERS FOR 

technical counsel on new ceramic appl i cat i ons o 

Pechman comes to Ryan from the Cook Ceramic Manufacturing Company of 
Trenton, New Jersey where he played a prominent part in the development of 
ceramic insulating bodies for electrical APPL icat ionSo These components were 
required to have high electrical insulating characteristics, low coefficients 
of expansion and good resistance to elevated temper atures <, 

Prior to his work with Cook, Pechman was associated with the National 
Bureau of Standards in Washington, D.Co where he performed laboratory research 
ON government projects. He took part in the testing of special silicone paints 
and the enameling of components for a new bomb sighTo He is a member of the 
American Ceramic Socsety and Keramos - the national ceramic honor society. 



3-12-52B 




NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAONER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailing Out: 3-2O-52 

Aviation Magazines 1 
Technical Red 

Technical Yellov/ 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYM AERONAUTICAL, CALIFORNIA ^4ETAL ENAMELING 
COMPANIES MERGE CERAMIC COATING ACTIVITIES 



Climaxing two years of coordinated production and testing of ceramic coated 
parts for high- temperature aircraft applications, Ryan Aeronautical Compemy and 
California Metal Enameling Company have announced they have combined their 
activities in this fieldo 

Both firms contribute specialized knowledge which will further the develop- 
ment of still better ceramic coatings ajid speed production of critical parts for 
jet, piston and rocket engines. The new arrangement combines Ryaji leadership 
in making heat - and corrosion-resistant sheet metal parts with Cameo's half- 
century ceramics production experience and extensive facilities. 

In announcing the merger of their ceramics programs, the two fiirms also 
disclosed that an improved ceramic, A-4l8-Ryanco-C, has been developed as a 
result of laboratory and service tests, and has been used for some time in 
production of aircraft engine components. 

The "Ryanco-C" ceramic process involves not only improved A-4l8 ceramic 
materials but also new methods and thicknesses of application. Extensive gauge 
studies with the new ceramic discloses that some applications give better results 
with fairly thick coatings, while others are better when applied extremely thin. 

Special significance is attached to the Ryan-Cameo arrangement because of 
the importance of ceramic coatings to the government's program of conservation 
of critical materials. The development program the compajiies have carried out 
since early 1950 has verified the benefits of special ceramic coatings when used 
with high temperature components for aircraft power plants. Not only do the 



-2- 

ceramic applications extend the service life of alloys specified for jet and 

internal combustion engine components, but they also make it possible to use 

lower grade alloys by giving them the rugged stamina required for these applications. 

Many vital high temperature components for jet engines, which are now made 
of Inconel, may be fabricated from type 321 stainless steel and adapted to the 
same applications with ceramic coatings » Since Inconel contains a minimum of 70 
percent nickel and type 321 contains only between 8 and 11 percent of the precious 
metal, a substantial saving of this scarce material can thus be effected. Similarly, 
other critically short elements such as colimibium, cobalt and tungsten, may be con- 
served by subs+ituting lower grade alloys, coated with this ceramic, for the richer 
"luxury class" metals. 

The new agreement between Ryan and California Metal Enameling provides that 
the companies will jointly finance a continuing program of research in the im- 
provement of high temperature ceramic coatings and their methods of application. 
This work, carried on by the two laboratories, will continue the mutual development 
program which has been in progress since the beginning of the first experiments 
two years ago. 

The first ceramic material used in this work was A-kYJ which was developed 
by the National Bureau of Standards after six years of intensive effort. Although 
very successful, it was improved hy MBS and A-4l8 was created. From the evalua- 
.tions made of these ceramics by Ryan-Cameo in the laboratory and in the field, the 
improved A-i^-lB-Ryanco-C has been developed, and a number of innovations perfected 
in preparing, applying and firing the coatings which gives it maximum toughness 
and adherence. 

This latest product is designed to perform under continuous temperature of 

o 
iBOO F, and remains unaffected by thermal shocks enco\intered in exhaust systems 

between -TO°Fo and 1700°F, In addition, the thin ceramic coatings will sustain 

a s\arprising amount of mechanical impact without damage. 



vd By- 



'+ bc.a 



Founded in 1922, Ryan Aeronautical Company for the past 15 years has held 
a leading position in the design and production of heat - and corrosion-resistant 
equipment for the "hot end" of piston aircraft engines „ With the advent of jet 
and rocket engines, and their greater use of high temperature sheet metal components, 
Ryan has "built a similar reputation in these fields „ 

California Metal Enameling Company has grown since I905 to he the largest 
metal enameling firm in the west. Its key personnel, including President Joseph 
To Penton, have a half -century of experience in highly specialized ceramic and 
porcelain enameling worko For many years, Cameo made approximately ten percent 
of all enamel signs in the United States, 

Most important investigation carried out since the Ryan-Cameo relationship 
began in 1950 is a flight test program arranged with Pan American World Airways. 
Ryan fabricated exhaust components, using a variety of alloys, and had them 
ceramic coated by California Metal Enameling,, These assemblies were placed on 
the powerful 3500 Ho Po engines of Stratocruiser aircraft used in trans-pacific 
flights and are now approaching 2000 hours of service test vmder actual flight 
conditions o 

Periodic examinations of these test units in the development laboratories 
verified the life-extending benefits of the new technique and established Ryan 
and Cameo as the leading authorities in its application to the aircraft industry. 
In filling the substantial orders which resulted from the development work, the 
two companies have become the first to produce ceramic coated parts in large 
volume o 

Experimentally, combustion chambers and transition liners for the General 
Ele;:fcric J-k"] jet engine have been ceramic coated and preliminary analysis of 
test resxilts are very encouraging. Production orders for piston engine exhaust 
systems are being fabricated for the entire fleet of Boeing Stratocruisers in 
the services of Pan American, Northwest Airlines, British Overseas Airways Corp,, 



I 



■k- 



United Air Lines and the Military Air Transport Service, 

Ceramic coated exhaust system components are also being "built for fleets 
of Convair 2^4^03 operated by American Airlines, Pan American, Western Air Lines, 
Continental Air Lines, Northeast Airlines and Mid-Continent Airlines, 

Experimental orders have been received from Pratt & Whitney for complete 
ceramic coated exhaust manifolds for the R-4360 engine which is used on Boeing 
C-97 and B-50 aircraft and Convair B-36 bomber „ Experimental work is being 
conducted with the Douglas Aircraft Company and United Air Lines on ceramic 
coatings for DC -6 exhaust systems. 

On ground equipment, Rysm and Cameo are fabricating thousands of ceramic 
coated sections for the Ryan manifolds which serve the Continental 825 H, P. 
engines in General Patton U-kS and M-k"] medium tanks. 

The introduction of ceramics, an art known to the ancients, to the field of 
modern aviation power plants is the most promising metallurgical development 
in many years o Having led the aircraft industry in the verification of this 
new technique, Ryan and California Metal Enameling are merging their knowledge 
and facilities to meet the demands of rapidly expanding production. 



3=13=52 




NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



CERAMIC ENGINEER JOINS RYAN 
AERONAUTICAL TECHNICAL STAFF 

In an expansion of its technical research program which P0INTS UP THE 
GROWING IMPORTANCE OF CERAMICS IN THE AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY, RYAN AERONAUTICAL 

Company has appointed Alexander Pechman, ceramic engineer, to the staff of 

ITS development LABORATOR IESo 

A graduate of North Carolina State College, one of the few colleges 
equipped to grant Bachelor of Science degrees in ceramic engineering, Pechman 

HAS BEEN trained IN HIGH TEMPERATURE A PPL I C AT I ONS » 

His SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE WILL BE DEVOTED TO RyAN's PROGRAM OF TESTING, 
IMPROVING AND DE VE LOP I NG CER AM i C COATINGS FOR JET, ROCKET AND INTERNAL COM- 
BUSTION ENGINES. His SERVICES WILL ALSO BE AVAILABLE TO RyAN CUSTOMERS FOR 

technical counsel on new ceramic applications. 

Pechman comes to Ryan from the Cook Ceramic Manufacturing Company of 
Trenton, New Jersey where he played a prominent part in the development of 
ceramic insulating bodies for electrical applications. These components were 
required to have high electrical insulating characteristics, low coefficients 
of expansion and good resistance to elevated temperatures. 

Prior to his work with Cook, Pechman was associated with the National 
Bureau of Standards in Washington, D.C. where he performed laboratory research 
ON government projects. He took part in the testing of special silicone paints 
and the enameling of components for a new bomb sight. He is a member of the 
American Ceramic Society and Keramos - the national ceramic honor society. 



3-12-52B 




NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailed to Stockholders 
BY Trudy approx. k-2-^2 




LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



$25 MILLION RYAN AERO ORDERS 
BOOST BACKLOG TO $70 MILLION 

Closing of new production orders for more than $25,000,000 worth of its 
aeronautical products, including the largest single contract of the past seven 

YEARS, HAS BEEN ANNOUNCED BY T. CLAUDE RYAN, PRESIDENT OF THE RyAN AERONAUTICAL 

Company. 

as a result of the added contracts, obtained in recent weeks, the company's 
backlog has deen increased more than 5^ percent to over $70j000,000. orders on 
hand a year ago amounted to $3^ million and two years ago were $6 million. em- 
PLOYMENT, NOW 3650 ^T Ryan's San Diego factory, is planned to rise to approxi- 
mately 5000 BY THE YEAR-END, THE COMPANY EXECUTIVE SAID. 

Largest single order in the new group of contracts is from Boeing Airplane 
Company of Seattle. It calls for Ryan to substantially increase its output of 

HUGE aft fuselage SECTIONS, REFUELING PODS, CARGO DOORS AND FLOOR BEAMS FOR THE 

Air Force's versatile Boeing C-97 Stratofre i ghter, a combination cargo plane and 
flying tanker. 

The Boeing order is the largest contract Ryan has ever received for airframe 
components, and was exceeded in size only by the company's wartime orders for Ryan 
"Fireball" jet fighters for the Navy. 

Ryan said the company has been building the Boeing C-97 ^'''^ fuselage sections 

FOR the past three YEARS AND THAT THE NEW ORDER SUBSTANTIALLY INCREASES THE TOTAL 
NUMBER SCHEDULED FOR PRODUCTION. LAST YEAR WHEN THE AlR FORCE ANNOUNCED THE KC-97 
FLYING TANKER MODEL I NC ORPO K' AT I NG BOEING'S "FlYING BOOm" FOR AERIAL REFUELING, 

Ryan began production of the refueling pods which are interchangeable with the 



2 - 



Ryan-built cargo doors and are the principal item needed to make the huge four- 
engine TRANSPORTS CONVERTIBLE FROM CARGO; TROOP, AMBULANCE OR PASSENGER TRANSPORT 

planes to flying tankers in a few hours. 

Other important contracts just received, which go to make up the $25,000,000 

ADDITION IN NEW ORDERS, INCLUDE THOSE FOR RYAN'S McTAL PRODUCTS DIVISION FROM 

Continental Motors Corp., Douglas Aircraft Company, Pratt &V/hitney, Kaiser Manu- 
facturing Company and the U S. Air Force. These orders are for exhaust systems 

AND other high-temperature COMPONENTS FOR JET AND PISTON ENGINES. 



# # # 



4-3-52 




NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Ma I L I NG Out: 3-I9-52 
Aviation Mags 1 
FiNANC lAL Da ily Press 
Financial Mags & V/riters 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN EARNS $l61|,000 IN 1ST QUARTER,' 
BOARD AND OFFICERS RE-ELECTED 

Since the close of Ryan Aeronautical Company's I95I fiscal year, the in- 
creased PROFIT ratio forecast IN THE ANNUAL REPORT IS BEING SHOWN, To ClAUDE 

Ryan, president, reported to stockholders yesterday (Tuesday) at the corpo- 
ration's annual meeting. 

Net earnings of $16^1, ^46 for the first quarter of 1952, ended January 3I , 
were reported in a summarized, unaudited statement made to stockholders. These 
earnings were equivalent to approximately 42 CENTS per share on the net outstand- 
ing shares, and compare with $402,6o4, or $1o02 per share for the full 1951 FISCAL 
YEAR. 

Net worth of the stockholders' equity increased to $5,337>599 equal to $13.55 
per share compared with $13.25 ON October 3I , 1951° 

Gross income for the first quarter was $6,039^^33^ compared with $3^750^013 
for the corresponding period of the prior year. Net income, before federal taxes, 
for the three months was $^00,795 ^N'^ provision for federal income and excess 
profits taxes was $236,349. 

"Production volume is at the highest rate in seven years," Ryan told stock- 
holders, "and is scheduled to continue to increase in spite of the government's 
recent 'stretch-out' in the military aircraft program. It will be 18 to 24 months 
before the full benefit of Ryan's increased production capacity is realized. New 
tools and equipment which have long been on order are constantly being installed 

AND OUR new jet ENGINE PARTS BUILDING IS NOW PARTIALLY EQUIPPED AND AVAILABLE FOR 



USE, 



- 2 - 



Ryan is now well started, the company executive reported, on production of 
a rocket motor which previously had been built only in experimental quantities. 
The rocket motor itself is not a Ryan development, but the company has been re- 
sponsible FOR developing THE TECHNIQUES NECESSARY TO MANUFACTURE IT IN PRODUCTION 

quantities. 

Stockholders were a'lso informed that the company is in the early stages of 
volume manufacture of two different jet engine afterburner designs, and that 
this work is scheduled for continued expansion, Ryan reported that afterburner 
manufacture will be an important part of the company's jet engine activities in 
the future since the principle of augmenting jet engine thrust is now becoming a 
standard practice in military aircraft, 

The present board of directors, consisting of T, Claude Ryan, president; 
G. C, Woodard, executive vice-president and treasurer; Earl D, Prudden, vice- 
president; Co Arnholt Smith, San Diego banker and industrialist; and Melvin H. 

LOCKETT, partner IN AN ACCOUNTING FIRM, WERE RE-ELECTED, 

Following the annual meeting of stockholders, the board of directors met 

AND RE-NAMED THE OFFICERS OF THE COMPANY, IN ADDITION TO RYAN, WOODARD AND 

Prudden, the board appointed C, A, Stillwagen, secretary; L, L, Underwood, con- 
troller; AND Do H, Ockerman, assistant secretary and assistant treasurer. 



# # # 



3-19-52W 



I'HT am/ 



OW* OH. 




"^cTis' 



NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAONiR 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



San Die.go 1 Technical Red 

Aviation Mags 1 &. 2 Newspapers Red 
Fin. Mags &. Daily Press Wire Services 



For Release 
Thursday 



Security List 



Magazines General April 3 



LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



$25 MILLION RYAN AERO ORDERS 
BOOST BACKLOG TO $70 MILLION 



Closing of new production orders for more than $25^000,000 worth of its 
aeronautical products, including the largest single contract of the past seven 
years, was announced today by T. Claude Ryan, president of 'the Ryan AE,R0NAuf ical 



Company. 



~X, 



>> 



As A RESULT OF THE ADDED CONTRACTS, OBTAINED IN THE PAST TWO WEEKS, THE % 
company's backlog HAS SEEN INCREASED MORE THAN 56 PERCENT TO OVER $70,000,000. 

Orders on hand a year ago amounted to $30 million and two years ago were $6 
MILLION, Employment, now 365O at Ryan's San Diego factory, is planned to rise 
to approximately 5000 by the year-end, the company executive said. 

Largest single order in the new group of contracts is from Boeing Airplane 
Company of Seattle, It calls for Ryan to substantially increase its output of 
huge aft fuselage sections, refueling pods, cargo doors and floor beams for the 
Air Force's versatile Boeing C-97 Stratofre ighter, a combination cargo plane and 
flying tanker. 

The Boeing order is the biggest contract Ryan has ever received for airframe 
components, and was exceeded in size only by the company's wartime orders for 
Ryan "Fireball" jet fighters for the Navy. 

Ryan said the company has been building the Boeing C-97 ai^t fuselage sections 

FOR the past three YEARS AND THAT THE NEW ORDER GREATLY INCREASES THE TOTAL NUMBER 
scheduled FOR PRODUCTION. LaST YEAR WHEN THE AlR FORCE ANNOUNCED THE KC-97 FLYING 
TANKER MODEL INCORPORATING BOEING's "FlY I NG BOOm" FOR AERIAL REFUELING, RyAN BEGAN 




PRODUCTION OF THE REFUELING PODS WHICH ARE INTERCHANGEABLE WITH THE RyAN-BUILT 

cargo doors and are the principal item needed to convert the huge four-engine 
transports from cargo planes to flying tankers in a few hours. 

Other important contracts just received, which go to make up the $25,000,000 

ADDITION IN NEW ORDERS, INCLUDE THOSE FOR RYAN's METAL PRODUCTS DIVISION FROM 

Continental Motors Corp., Douglas Aircraft Company, Pratt &. Whitney, Kaiser 
Manufacturing Company and the U. S. Air Force. These orders are for exhaust 
systems and other high-temperature components for piston and jet engines. 



# # # 



i+-1-52W 



<! 



FROM: NEV/S BUREAU 

RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 
SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL APPOINTS 



LIMBACH AS WORKS MANAGER 



Mailing Out: k-k-'^2 

To: San Diego (Keen dist.) 
Aviation Mags 1 and 2 
Technical Red 

FiNANC I AL Da I LY PRESS 



Pi X to: Av I at ion Week 

Amer. Aviation 
West. Aviation 
Aero Digest 
Aviation Age 
Iron Age 



Lawrence Mo Limbach, k] , formerly Manager of Operations, Steel and Tubes 
Division, Republic Steel Corp», Cleveland, has been appointed Works Manager of 
THE Ryan Aeronautical Company, it was announced today by Go C. Woodard, Executive 
Vice-President. 

The position of Works Manager has been reactivated due to Ryan's increased 
volume of production. Division Managers of the activities which will report 
to the Works Manager have, in the immediate past, been directly under Executive 
Vice-President Woodard, to whom Limbach as Works Manager now reports. These 
INCLUDE the Production Division and the Factory Services Division with their 

MAIN direct supporting DEPARTMENTS. MANAGERS OF THE PRODUCTION AND FACTORY 

Services Divisions are H. J. van derLinde amd H. P. Rasp, respectively. 

A native of Massillon, Ohio, Limbach is a graduate of the Staunton Military 
Academy, and of the Case Institute of Technology, in Metallurgical Engineering. 
He started with Republic in 1933 ^^ '^'^ apprentice in the same division he headed 

WHEN, LAST MONTH, HE LEFT THAT FIRm's EMPLOY AFTER 19 YEARS. HE SERVED SUCCES- 
SIVELY AS Assistant Ch'EF Metallurgist, Assistant Manager of the division's 
Elyria, Ohio plant. Assistant Manager and Manager of the Cleveland plant. The 

DIVISION, producing TUBULAR PRODUCTS, COMPRISES FOUR PLANTS WITH 2000 EMPLOYEES, 

AT Cleveland, Elyria, Detroit and Brooklyn, New York 



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NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAONER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Ma I LING Out: ij--22-52 
Av I ATioN Mags 1 
Technical Red 

FiNANC I AL Da I LY &. MagS 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN AWARDED CONTRACT FOR 
EXHAUST GAS CONVERTERS 



A contract for development and testing of an exhaust gas converter has been 

RECEIVED FROM THE LU S <, AlR FORCE BY RyaN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY, SPECIALISTS IN THE 
FIELD OF HIGH TEMPERATURE EXHAUST SYSTEM ENGINEERING;, T, ClAUDE RYAN^ PRESIDENT, 

announced today. 

Known as a "de-corroder •" model 57 j> "''"^ Ri'an device is designed to remove 

FROM exhaust GASES THE CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS WHICH ATTACK AIRCRAFT STRUCTURAL 

materials, 

Utilization of the vast amounts of heat energy contained in the gases gener- 
ated BY aircraft power PLANTS^ FOR CABIN HEATING,. WING ANTi-IClNG AND SIMILAR 
APPLICATIONS, HAS BEEN HAMPERED BY THE HIGHLY CORROSIVE EFFECT WHICH THESE GASES 
HAVE UPON AIRCRAFT METALS SUCH AS ALUMINUM AND MAGNESIUM ALLOYS. In RELATIVELY 

few hours of exposure the chemicals !n the gases will penetrate these alloys to 
an alarming degree by corrosive attack, 

The Ryan "de-corroder" has successfully demonstrated its effectiveness in 

REMOVING contaminants SO THAT THE EXHAUST GASES MAY SAFELY BE BROUGHT INTO CONTACT 
WITH AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES^ Th I S DEVELOPMENT HAS IMPORTANT SIGNIFICANCE TO THE HAR- 
NESSING OF EXHAUST GAS ENERGY BY MAKING POSSIBLE THE DESIGN AND USE OF LIGHTWEIGHT 
ALUMINUM ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGERS, DUCTS AND PIPING. AT PRESENT, MANY OF THESE COM- 
PONENTS HAVE TO BE FABRICATED FROM STAINLESS STEELS WHICH RESULTS IN SUBSTANTIALLY 
MORE WEIGHT THAN OTHERWISE REQUIRED, 



Original research on the decontaminating unit was accomplished v/ith extensive 

WORK WHICH THE RyAN ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT CONDUCTED UNDER PREVIOUS U. S. AlR FORCE 
EXPERIMENTAL CONTRACTS, ThE NEW CONTRACT WILL PROVIDE FOR FURTHER IMPROVEMENT OF 
THE DEVICE AND ITS DEVELOPMENT FOR USE WITH BOTH JET AND INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES. 

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Mailing Out: 4-29-52 
San Diego Red (Kenn) 
Aviation Mags 1 
Financial Daily Press 

NEWS BUREAU • RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

BILL WAGNER 

BOB SMITH HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN DECLARES QUARTERLY DIVIDEND 

A REGULAR QUARTERLY DIVIDEND OF 10 CENTS PER SHARE 
ON THE COMMON CAPITAL STOCK OF THE RyAN AERONAUTICAL CO. 
HAS BEEN DECLARED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AT A REGULAR 

MEETING. This cash dividend is payable June 12, 1952 

TO STOCKHOLDERS OF RECORD MAY 22, 1952* 



IJ-29-52W 



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news'bureau 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



ma il i ng uut : 5/1 - 5-5 

Aviation Mags 1 Financial Daily 

Newspapers Red Financial Mags ^°^ Release Sunday, 

Tech. Red * Photo Synd. Red) May H, I952 

Wire Services Red Picture Mags ) pix 



••p I X 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN BUILDING WORLD'S LARGEST EXTERNAL 
FUEL TANKS FOR BOEING B-^tyB STRATOJET 

The world's fastest known bomber, the new Boeing B-^JB, has increased its 

COMBAT RANGE CONSIDERABLY THROUGH INSTALLATION OF RYAN EXTERNAL FUEL TANKS, THE 
LARGEST EVER MOUNTED ON AN AIRPLANE, IT HAS NOW BEEN OFFICIALLY REVEALED FOR THE 
F IRST TIME. 

The HUGE STREAMLINED TANKS, CAPACITY OF WHICH REMAINS SECRET, ARE UNDER CON- 
STRUCTION IN MASS QUANTITIES AT RyAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY, WHICH HAS SHIPPED HUN- 
DREDS TO Boeing's Wichita, Kan. plant, where the "bomber with fighter speed" is in 
large scale production. 

Suspended one under each wing, between the tip and inboard jet engine pods, 

the tanks WILL enable THE B-^+YB'S TO COMPLETE LONG-RANGE MISSIONS, CARRYING MORE 
THAN 20,000 POUNDS OF BOMBS. 

ANOTHER StRATOJET FEATURE EXTENDING ITS FLIGHT RANGE IS THE MID-AIR REFUELING 
SYSTEM, IN WHICH RYAN ALSO PLAYS A MAJOR ROLE. BEING BUILT BY RyaN ARE AFT FUSELAGE 
SECTIONS AND REFUELING PODS FOR THE BOEING KC-97 STRATO-TANKER . AN OPERATOR STA- 
TIONED IN THE POD CONTROLS A "fLY I NG BOOm" THROUGH WHICH FUEL FLOWS IN MID-AIR FROM 

the strato-tanker to the b-^j^ bomber. 

Still another Ryan contribution to the effectiveness of the B-^YB are many 
high-temperature components for the new series general electric j-^y engines, which 
develop more than 5^00 pounds of thrust each, compared with 5200 pounds of thrust 

FOR ENGINES USED ON THE EARLIER B-^7 MODELS. Ta I L PIPES WHICH CARRY THE SEARING 
JET GASES FROM THE ENGINE TO THE ATMOSPHERE ALSO ARE BEING BUILT ON RYAN PRODUCTION 
LINES. 



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With the largest number of electric resistance welding machines in the industry, 
Ryan uses this equipment for joining the aluminum alloy sheets in the lightweight, 
torpedo-shaped design. 

More than 30,000 electric spot welds are employed in each tank. All circum- 
ferential joints are closed with two rows of spot welds and one row of seam welding 

TO ATTAIN A GAS-TIGHT SEAM, ThE SINGLE LONGITUDINAL SEAM, WHICH RUNS THROUGH THE 
INDIVIDUAL TANK SECTIONS, IS FUSION-WELDED ON AUTOMATIC HELIARC WELDING MACHINES. 

This provides a strong, flat seam no thicker than the metal itself and does not re- 
quire SPLICE PLATES. 

The giant spot welding machines can squeeze aluminum alloy sheets together with 
10,000 pounds pressure, and can produce more than 200 spot welds per minute, cramming 

NINE of them into A RUNNING INCH, 

Because of the difficulty of cleaning the metal, an alloy of aluminum without 
CLADDING, Ryan had to develop a new cleaning agent, RACO 3^, WHICH removes all oxides 
with smooth uniformity. 

Deliveries of the new B-^YB Stratojets are being made in increasing numbers to 
THE Air Force's Strategic Air Command. They are the first large planes to utilize 

SHARPLY SWEPT BACK WINGS AND TAIL SURFACES. BESIDES THE SIX TURBOJET ENGINES, l8 
integral ROCKET-ASSIST UNITS ARE MOUNTED IN THE REAR FUSELAGE, PROVIDING AN ADDITIONAL 
20,000 POUNDS OF THRUST. 

Only three men are needed to operate the B-klB, which weighs almost 93 tons when 

FULLY LOADED FOR COMBAT. An EXPERIMENTAL XB-^Y, WITH LESS POWERFUL J-35 ENGINES, 
STILL HOLDS THE TRANSCONTINENTAL SPEED RECORD, SET IN 19^9, WHEN IT FLEW FROM MOSES 

Lake, Wash, to Washington, D. C, 2,289 miles non-stop in 3 hours, k6 minutes, an 

AVERAGE SPEED OF 6O7 MILES AN HOUR, 



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Mailing Out: 5-23-52 

S.D. Red - Tab Tech. Red - Tab 

A.M. (1) - All Fin. Mags- " 

A.M. (2) -tflB " Daily " 

A.M. 



For Release 

Tuesday, May 27 



NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



1 31 - TA^? For. Red - " 



Wire Serv i ces - Tab 
News Red 
Mags Gen. 
Org. 



LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN GETS NEW AEROJET CONTRACT 
FOR MISSILE MOTOR COMPONENTS 

A contract for production of missile motor components of a type recently 
developed by Aerojet Engineering Corp., has been awarded by Aerojet to Ryan 
Aeronautical Company, specialists in the fabrication of high-temperature metals, 
T. Claude Ryan, president of the latter firm, announced today. 

Following other orders for missile motors, this latest contract estab- 
lishes Ryan's position in the rocket engine field on a firm basis comparable 
TO that it has already established in the jet engine and piston engine fields 

FOR production OF HEAT-RESISTANT COMPONENTS. 

This is the second Aerojet rocket project for which Ryan has been selected 

AS A production SOURCE. PREVIOUSLY RyAN BUILT MAJOR COMPONENTS OF THE AEROBEE 

high-altitude sounding rocket. 

Currently, Ryan is also building complete rocket motors for surface-to- 
surface MISSILES under a PRODUCTION CONTRACT FROM FIRESTONE TiRE AND RUBBER CO. 

Ryan also supplied this same rocket motor under previous experimental contracts 
TO Douglas Aircraft Company, The motor was developed by the Jet Propulsion 
Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology. 

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Mailing Out; 5-26-52 Fin. Mags & Writers - All 
San Diego Red - Tab " Daily Press - " 
Aviation Mags - (1) - Tab For Release 

Aviation Mags - (2) - " ,,__ ^_ ^ _ Thursday, May 29 



Technical Red - Tab 



Wire Serv.-Tab 



NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



CUSTOMERS PLACE ORDERS FOR %\ 
MILLION RYAN EXHAUST SYSTEMS 

New orders for exhaust systems, totaling in excess of $4,000,000, 

HAVE BEEN RECEIVED BY RyAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY DURING THE PAST MONTH, 

To Claude Ryan, president, announced today, 

A MAJOR PORTION OF THE NEW BUSINESS CALLS FOR LARGE SCALE PRO- 
DUCTION OF Ryan exhaust systems for Douglas Aircraft Company's <i-\?)\ 
Globemaster, the Air Force's huge cargo transport. 

• Other principal contracts of the past 30 days are with Consolidated 
Vultee for ceramic coated collectors and other exhaust equipment for the 

CONVAIR 2^0 AND '^Q COMMERCIAL A I RL I NERSj ? i ASEC K I HELICOPTER CORP, FOR 
EXHAUST COLLECTOR FOR HUP AND H-21 TRANSPORT -RESCUE HELICOPTERS, AND 

WITH THE Air Force for equipment for B-25s and a number of other military 

PLANES. 

Douglas Aircraft also placed additional orders for Ryan exhaust systems 
FOR their expanding DC-6 commercial transport production program. 

Deliveries of the Ryan Aeronautical Company are currently running in 

EXCESS of two-and-a-half MILLION DOLLARS MONTHLY, RyAN SAID, 

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5-28-52W 



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NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailing Out: 5-28-52 

AM-1 - All Tech. Red - Tab Newspapers Red - Ta! 

AM-2 - Tab Fin. Daily Press - Tab 

AM-3 - Tab Foreign Red - Tab 

—^ V/iRE Services - Tbb^ ^y 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



Disclosure of a revolutionary new development in the air transport field -- 
use of externally mounted tanks for the entire fuel supply -- followed the recent 
first test flights of the Fairchild C-119H at Hagerstown, Maryland. 

Suspended pod-like beneath the wing of the new, enlarged long-range 
C-119H "Flying Boxcar" are two streamlined tanks, built by Ryan Aeronautical 
Company. They are the largest fuel carriers of their kind in the world. 

The tanks are similar to the hundreds which have been built by Ryan for 
the Boeing B-47B Stratojet bomber. However, in the B-47s the tanks supplement 
the internal fuel capacity of the plane and can be dropped when the gasoline is 
expended. In the Fairchild C-119H, the tanks are permanently secured to the 
wing by means of struts and are the only source of fuel. 

Often advocated for transport planes by safety engineers, these Ryan tanks 
of the new Fairchild replace the 22 internal wing fuel cells of other C-119 models 
and provide several advantages. 

Complexity of wing construction to accommodate internal fuel cells is 
reduced, A 600-pound weight saving is accomplished by eliminating or reducing 
fittings, connections, access doors, etc. Maintenance is simplified and fire 
hazard is cut down. Vulnerability from gunfire is less because under the old 
system, virtually the entire wing is the "inflammable" area. For combat protec- 
tion„ a self- sealing "blanket" which fits over the external tanks can be quickly 
installed at the front. 

5-28-52K 




NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailing Out: 6-3-52 Tech. Red - Tab 
San Diego Red i Tab Fin. Mags - All 
Aviation Mags 1 - All " Daily- " For Release 

Aviation Mags 2 - Tab wire Services - Tab Wednesday, June 4 

AviatiQD_^ags 3 - Tfli_ Newspapers R^d 





Camp€inif 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN AERONAUTICAL REPORTS 



$347, 675 SIX MONTHS PROFIT 



A net profit of $347, 675 for the first half of the 1952 fiscal year of 
the Ryan Aeronautical Company was reported today by T. Claude Ryan, 
president, in an unaudited interim statement to stockholders. Earnings for 
the six months period ending April 30 were equivalent to 88 cents per share 
on the net outstanding s^iares. 

Ryan's earnings for the full 1951 fiscal year were $402, 604, equal to 
$1. 02 per share. A half-year report was not issued in 1951. 

Gross income for the six months just ended was $13, 747, 077, against 
$8,422,281 for the comparable period of the prior year. First quarter 1952 
sales were $6,039,633, while second quarter gross revenue was $7,707,444. 

"Of the 88 cents net profit for 1952's first half, 42 cents was earned in 
the first quarter and 46 cents in the second quarter, " Ryan said. 

On April 30, the company's net book value stood at an all-time high of 
$5,476,908. This was e.quivalent to $13. 91 per net outstanding share, 
compared with $13. 55 at the end of the first quarter, and $13. 25 at the close 
of the 1951 fiscal year. 

Of its $12 million bank credit, Ryan Aeronautical Company was using 
$11 million on April 30. "To finance the still larger scale of business 
scheduled, " Ryan told stockholders, "it may be necessary to apply for a further 
increase in the loan commitment. " 



< 



"Good progress continues to be made in equipping the new $300, 000 
compajiy-owned jet engine parts building for accelerated production. Many 
of the most advanced type machine tools for the quantity production of specied 
jet and rocket engine components are rapidly being installed in this building. 
Its 75, 000 square feet of floor space will shelter approximately $2 million 
worth of new machinery, principally for working high -temperature, precision 
items of special alloys." 

Ryan also reported that within the past fortnight the company had been 
permitted to disclose that the huge Ryan-designed external fuel tanks it has 
been building for the past two years are for use on one of America's most 
important warplanes, the 600 mph Boeing B-47B Stratojet bomber. 



i 



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Mailing Out: 6-26- -52 

AM-1 - Tab . News. Red - Tab 

AM-2 - " Mags. Gen. - 

^!^^ Wire Services " Army /Navy - " 



Ji^fO^TUa^mauXicaL Camfuuuf 



NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 

HAROLD KEEN 



YOUNG RYAN FOLLOWS 
FATHER'S FOOTSTEPS 

History is repeating itself in the Ryan family. 

At about the same age T. Claude Ryan was vhen he received his Army Air Corps 
pursuit pilot's rating, back in 1921, his son, David, nov 22 years old, has just 
won his Air Force commission as a jet fighter pilot. At ceremonies at Williams 
Air Force Base, Arizona, Dave had his wings pinned on by his father, who founded 
Ryan Aeronautical Company 30 years ago and is still its president. 

Second Lieut, David Ryan has bridged the gap of three decades between the 
Liberty-powered De Havillands his dad used on peacetime missions of forest fire 
patrol, to the F-86 Sabrejets he will soon fly in combat In Korea. 

Dave began his military career when he volunteered as an Air Force private 
and went through basic training at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Later he was 
accepted for aviation cadet training and received pilot instruction at Bartow, 
Florida for more than half a year. At his last assignment, Vllliams Air Force 
Base, he trained for six months In T-33 two-place jet trainers and In F-80 
Shooting Stars. 

With 200 hours of flight training behind him, 2nd Lieut. Ryan has reported 
to NeUls Air Force Base, Las Vegas for ten weeks' gunnery training In F-60's and 
F-86' 8. This will be followed by brief processing at Camp Stoneman, California en 
route to Korea. 

On hand to see Dave's father pin on his wings was the newly commissioned 
officer's mother and two brothers, Jerome and Stephen. Jerry, the older of the 
two, has been in the Air Force R.O.T.C. at Stanford University. 



6-25-52 



i 




'"icT^'^ 

NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailing Out: 7-2^^-52 Financial Daily Press - All 

Aviation Mags 1 (All) Wire Servicesp^^Tab. „,^ 
Technical Red (Tab) ^°^ Release 

Financial Mags (All) Friday, July 25 

LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



$7 MILLION IH NEW CONTRACTS 
SIGNED BY RYAN AERONAUTICAL 

New orders totaling $7^000^000 for airframe parts and aircraft engine com- 
ponents have been received by Ryan Aeronautical Company in the past month. To 
Claude Ryan, president, disclosed today„ 

With deliveries currently runnitjg at approximately $3,000,000 per month, 
the new business resulted in a net gain of $i<-,000,000 in the backlog of unfilled 
orders on hand, which now stand at more than $70^000, 000 a 

Largest of the contracts closed in June was with General Electric for ad- 
ditional quantities of aft frames, transition liners and inner combustion chambers 
for J-47 jet engines „ 

From Boeing Airplane Company substantial orders were received for C-97 
fuselage parts | eadiaust systems for B-50 bombers and C-9T cargo planes; and jet 
engine tail pipes and external fuel tanks for the B-^7 Stratojet„ 

Other major contracts are with Continental Motors Corp. for exhaust manifolds 
for M-^8 tanks, latest versions of the famed General Patton modelj and with 
Douglas Aircraft Company and Consolidated Vultee for e3chaust systems for com- 
mercial and military transports » 

Completing the $7,000,000 new order list were contracts from Canadair and 
Aeronca for exhaust systems for Beech's new twin-engine T-36 trainer and from 
Piasecki for exhaust systems for helicopters „ 

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7-23 -52W 



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-'^cT^' 



NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailing Out: 7-25 --52 
Aviation Mags 1 (Tab) 
Fin. Mags (All) 
Fin. Daily (All) 

Services -(TaTp) 



i > 



TjV 



f> 



For Release 

Saturday, July 26 

LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 




QUARTERLY DIVIDEKD DECLARED 

BY RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

A regular quarterly dividend of 10 cents per share 
on common capital stock was declared yesterday (Friday) 
by the board of directors of the Ryan Aeronautical Company. 
The 10-cent cash dividend is payable September 12 to stock- 
holders of record August 22. 

This will be Ryan's eighth consecutive quarterly 
dividend, and the 23rd dividend payment since incorporation. 



T-23-52W 



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NEWSBUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailing Out: 8-5-52 
S. D. Red - Tab 
Avia. Mags 1 - Tab 
Avia. Mags 2 - lab 



Fin. Mags - All 
Fin. Dailies - All 
Wire Services - Tab 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



STILLWAGEN NAMED TREASURER 

OF RYAK AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

C. A. Stillwagen has been named to the office of Treasurer of 
the Ryan Aeronautical Company by the Board of Directors, His new 
assignment is in addition to his post as Secretary of the corporation. 

The Finance and Accounting Division, headed by L. L. Underwood 
as Controller, will report to G. C. Woodard, Executive Vice-President, 
through Stillwagen instead of direct as in the past. Woodard formerly 
held the position of Treasurer in addition to his other executive 
management assignments. 

Stillwagen at one time was Controller, first of the subsidiary 
Ryan School of Aeronautics and later of the Company. Active in civic 
and business organizations, he is president of the San Diego chapter 
of the National Association of Cost Accountants. 

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8-U-52tf 



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Mailing Out: 5-22-52 
.ypf San Diego Red - Tab 

Aviation Mags 1 - All 



news'bureau 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Avition Mags (2) - Tab 
Aviation Mags (3) - Tab 
Technical Red - All 
Fin. Mags & v/riters - Tab 
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—' Foreign Red - Tab i U 

Wire Services - Tab 
LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



FIRE-SUITRESSION BY FUEL TAKK 
PURGING REVEALED BY RYAN AERO 



Elimination of the ever-present threat of fire in aircraft fuel tanks 
during flight is the goal of research that has been conducted by the Ryan 
Aeronautical Company, San Diego, California, for the Air Force, it has just 
been revealed. 

Kept under wraps for more than a year, some details of the project are 
disclosed in the current issue of the plant publication, "Ryan Reporter." 

Ryan's studies were aimed at minimizing the in-flight danger of ex- 
plosions due to combustible mixtures of fuel-air vapors in fuel tanks, as 
well as in the surrounding areas and in engine nacelles. This can be per- 
formed through a process of "purging" the dangerous gases. 

Need for such a system was pointed up in World War 11^ when numerous 
aircraft were destroyed by fuel tank fires and explosions. Research was 
undertaken in the United States at the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory and 
has been furthered by Ryan and other industrial firms. 

It was realized that the danger of explosion or fire is comparatively 
small when fuel tanks are full. But as the fuel is used, it is replaced by 
air which absorbs gasoline vapors and forms a combustible air -fuel mixture. 
How to remove this potential explosive has been the objective of Ryan re- 
seeirchers . 

They decided that if an inert gas containing little or no oxygen could 
be introduced in the fuel tank areas at the same rate as the fuel is withdrawn 



the oxygen content of the air would he maintained below the combustible point. 
The difficulty has been devising an economical, light weight method of funnel- 
ing such an inert gas into the critical areas. 

One system studied involves carrying non-combustible carbon dioxide or 
nitrogen under pressure in metal cylinders. Another calls for a small in- 
dependent engine designed to generate inert gases, A third system suggests 
the use of exhaust gases from the aircraft's engines. 

Although the "Ryan Reporter" article did not specify which of these purging 
methods was developed by Ryan, the illustrations accompanying the story, and the 
company's leadership in making exhaust systems, indicated that the company's 
engineers have been favoring the exhaust gas system, 

"The use of exhaust gas for purging," states the article, "has definite 
advantages at least insofar as logistical simplicity is concerned, for it 
automatically provides a continuous source of inert gas," 

Disclosure of the purging experiments was recently approved by the Depart- 
ment of Defense security review branch, not long after another development in 
an allied field was reported. Because of Ryan's experience in "purging" and 
in high temperature exhaust system engineering generally, the Air Force recently 
awarded the company a contract for creation and testing of an exhaust gas con- 
verter, or "de-corroder," 

Already the Ryan "de-corroder" has successfully demonstrated its effective- 
ness in removing corrosive chemicals from gases generated by aircraft power 
plants, which can be used for cabin heating, wing anti -icing, purging and 
similar applications. In the past, these chemicals have caused extensive 
damage to aircraft metals. Use of a "de-corroder" Will make possible harness- 
ing of exhaust gas energy and at the same time using lighter weight materials. 
The "de-corroder" can be used with both jet and internal combustion engines, 

8-20-52K 



jit.Jn 



ban 



sat., ari 




NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailing Out: 8-22-52 
Aviation Mags(l) - All 
Aviation Mags (2) - Tab 
Financial Daily Press - Tab 
Financial Mags & Writers - Tab 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN NAMES RICHARD WHITE 

WASHINGTON REPRESENTATIVE 

Capto Richard Eo White, USNR, former chief project engineer in 
the production division of Ryan Aeronautical Company has been appointed 
the company's Washington, Do Co, representative for contract admin- 
istration, effective September lo 

Co Ao Stillwagen, secretary-treasurer at Ryan, said the company 
needs a resident representative with engineering background at the nation's 
capital because of a growing number of military contracts » 

White will maintain close contact with high level officers, it was 
explained , 

The aeronautical firm at present has four prime contracts on advanced- 
type projects. Two others are being negotiated„ Still more are in prospect, 
officials saido 



# # # 



8-20-52K 



I 



Mailing Out: 8-27/26/-52 wire services - Aii 

-VtT To: San Diego Red - All Newspapers Red - Tab 

A.M. 1 - All Tech. Red - Tab For Release Friday 

_,^__^ A.M. 2 - Tab Fin. Mags - all 29 August 1952 

5^|P A^ 3 - Tab Fin . Daily- all 

NEWS BUREAU Tiua^ /U/ianutOicai. Canuutnu 

BILL WAONER ' HF 

BILL BROTHERTON i .».,*«^.»^. . _ 

HAROLD KEEN LINDBERGH FIELD ©SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 




RYAN AERONAUTICAL PROFIT 

$1.55 FOR FIRST NINE MONOHS 

Net profit of the Ryan Aeronautical Company for the nine months ended July 31 
was $609,669, or $1.55 per net outstanding share, G. C„ Woodard, executive vice- 
president, reported to stockholders today in an unaudited statement. 

For the full 12 months of the I951 fiscal year, ended October 31, net income 
was $U02,604, equal to $1.02 per share » 

The gross business volume for the nine-month period just closed was $22,219,829, 
compared with $22,277,175 for the full I951 fiscal year. 

"The working capital position," Woodard said, "shows marked improvement and is 
now at the highest figure in the company's history. On July 3I, working capital 
stood at $4,037,123, an increase of $712,515 compared with $3,32U,6o8 on October 31, 
1951. 

"Net worth of the company also is at an all-time high of $5,69^,982. This is 
equal to $lU.U6 per share on the net outstanding shares, and represents an increase 
of $1.21 per share since the close of the I951 fiscal year, when per share book 
value stood at $13o25o 

"Your management feels that excellent progress has been made during the current 
fiscal year in improving the company's overall operations. The extensive plant and 
equipment expansion program, principally for increased jet engine production, has 
now largely been completed. This fact is reflected in the larger volume and improved 
operational results. 



1 



"During the past nine months, three quarterly dividend payments of 10 cents 
per share each have been declared, totaling $131,758o Included is a 10 cent cash 
dividend which will be paid September 12 to stockholders of record August 22 » 

"As forecast in the last interim report to stockholders, the $12 million bank 
credit has been increased in order to handle the growing volume of business., We 
now have a commitment for $13^5 million, of which $12^5 million is being used as 
of this dateo 

"The major projects of the Airplane Division and Metal Products Division have 
continued to show increases in volume over last year, and a projection for the 
period ahead indicates further growth in 1953= These programs include the manu- 
facture of large airframe components and production of high-temperature parts for 
jet, piston and rocket engines » The backlog of unfilled orders remains at $70 
million, new business being booked at approximately the same rate as current de- 
liveries » 

"In the field of prime contracts for airplanes, and for research and develop- 
ment work, activity is increasing steadily„ The Ryan XQ-2 jet propelled pilotless 
target plane program is attracting much interest, and other classified projects 
are gaining recognition from the military services^ Security regulations, however, 
permit only a brief mention of this increasingly important phase of the company's 
worko" 

# # # 



8-2T-52W 




HOLD FOR RELEASE 



For A.M. Release 

NEWSBUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

'*'haro?J"keVn°'^ LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



I Mon ^9 Sept. 19^2 | 



FIRST ARTIST'S CONCEPTION OF RYAN 
Q-2 JET TARGET DRONE RELEASED 

Shaxply swept wings and tail surfaces appear to be the outstanding 
design features of the Ryan Q-2 pilotless target plane on the "basis of 
an artist's conception of the high-speed jet-propelled drone. 

The silhouette drawings, released today with Department of Defense 
approval in the 30th Anniversary Issue of Ryan Aeronautical Company's 
magazine, are obviously intended to reveal a minimum of design, dimensional 
and performance information, 

"High above the desert sands of New Mexico," says the Ryan Reporter 
article, in the only reference to Q-2's current flight program, "a small 
pilotless jet airplane streaks across the sky at near sonic speed, guided 
only by the hand of a grounded 'pilot' at a remote control panel. 

"it is Ryan's new target drone, designed for anti-aircraft and aerial 
gunnery training and for use in combat plane interception problems by 
Army, Navy and Air Force units. 

"Little has been written or can now be revealed of its design details 
beyond the bare description that it is less than half the size of modern 
American jet fighters, but with comparable performance." 

The original development contract was awarded the Ryan Aeronautical 
Company as a result of a design competition with li^ other aircraft manu- 
facturerso The Q-2 is a joint project of the Air Force, Army and Navy with 
the Air Force having technical responsibility for its development. 



i 



-2- 



This is Ryan's second announced project in the field of pilotless air- 
craft. Its experimental, rocket-powered Ryan XAAM-A-1 "FireTaird" vas the 
first air-to-air guided missile to be disclosed hy the Air Force. Work is 
continuing under Air Force contract on some phases of the "Firebird" de- 
velopment program. 

No information has been released on the quantity of Q-2s manufactured 
or in operation, or the present status of the program, though Ryan announced 
in its first reference to the target plane that the contract was for a "ser- 
vice test" quantity. A year later the company disclosed a further contract 
to "continue the development and fabrication of an additional quantity of 
the jet-powered aerial targets." 



# # # 



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Mailing Out: 10-9-52 Technical Red - All Army /Wavy -Tab 

San Diego Red - Tab Fin. Mags - All 

Aviation Mags (l) - All Fin. Dailies - Tab 

Aviation Mags (2) - Tab Wire Services - All 

^^^5?* i^j^i^sion MagsCi^ - Tab Wewspapeji^ R^^Tab 

NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

*'haro?J"keVn°^ LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DiEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAK AERONAUTICAL COMPAOT AWARDED AIR 
FORCE CONTRACT FOR TITANIUM RESEARCH 

Ryan Aeronautical Company's venture across a new frontier in aircraft 
metallurgy — the use of the temperamental metal titanium — has resulted 
in a contract for research and development awarded by the Air Force, To Claude 
Ryan, president, announced today. 

The work for the Air Force is to determine the best methods of processing 
titanium for use in conjunction with eadiaust systems, a field in which Ryan 
has long specialized. 

Announcement of the contract award came only a few days after Brigo Geno 
Kern Metzger, director of the Aircraft Production Resources Agency, told 150 
members of the San Diego chapter. Institute of Aeronautical Sciences: 

"In the battle to keep down weight, titanium is our newest ally. The 
Navy also looks to titanium as the answer to many problems with salt water 
spray and salt air corrosion for both aircraft and sea-going vessels » 

"By utilizing titanium, it is possible to design and produce aircraft 
to operate at speeds which involve temperatures in excess of those permissible 
by today's conventional materials „" 

The Air Force, Metzger said, has drafted a program to stimulate production 
by private industry, and has set aside $5,000,000 to explore the vital material.. 

Because of its peculiar characteristics, titanium requires special handling, 
in the forming, cleaning and welding processes o But the military services are 
interested in its use because of its great strength-weight ratio and the pos- 
sibility that it might be able to replace stainless steel in certain applications 
at great reductions in weight. 



% 



1 



2 - 



Ryan began research on titanium at its own expense in August, 1951, and was 
one of the first companies in America to form this metal successfully "by the drop- 
hammer process. Sections of complex shape were fabricated for exhaust system 
shrouds for Piasecki HUP-1 helicopters. One of these exhaust system sections has 
undergone tests of several hundred hours and the titanium is being analyzed to 
determine the effect of high temperatures. 

Known as the "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" metal, titanium is a paradox of 
nature, exhibiting strangely contradictory characteristics. 

It has an extremely high melting point for its weight --higher than steel-- 
but it will not withstand continued use at temperatures above 1,000 degrees F. 
Titanium falls between the aluminum and steel alloys in both strength and re- 
sistance to temperature. It therefore has qualities of great interest to air- 
craft engineers, who have been forced to use the heavier stainless steel in 
designing structures which required more strength than aluminum alloys could 
provide at high temperatures. 

While aluminum alloys lose strength rapidly when temperatures exceed 300 
degrees P., titanium can retain its unusual strength up to temperatures of ap- 
proximately 800 degrees F, Yet it weighs only 56 percent as much as steel, and 
compares favorably with steel in tensile strength (as high as 200,000 pounds per 
square inch) . 

Titanium has a lower linear coefficient of expansion and thermal conductivity 
than either aluminum or steel alloys. It also is the only metal known to have an 
endurance strength consistently in excess of 50 percentof its tensile strength. 

Titanium is not a new discovery, but its use in the aircraft industry is new. 
Its presence has been known since 1791, but it was not produced commercially 
until 19^> when the U. S. Bureau of Mines developed a process for separating it 
from its ore. Although titanium is plentiful in the earth's crust, production 
costs are tremendous due to its affinity for the ore. The refined metal costs 
$10 to $20 a pound, compared with the two cents a pound market price for the ore. 
In 1950 only 60 tons of the metal were refined. 



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- 3 



^ One of the research avenues explored "by Ryan is the experimental use of 

ceramic coatings on titanium to determiTie vhether these may provide protection 
against oxidation and ahsorptiono Ryan vas an industry pioneer in demonstrating 
the success of such coatings when used with stainless steel alloys in the hottest 
spots of aircraft engines o 

### 



9-26-52K 



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)IS^-dS-Q 



Mailed with "Facts About Ceramic Coating" ^w^^ 

"booklet to: «B^^ ^'^^' ^^^'^7 Press -(Tab) 

Aviation Mags (1) - All , MSMPI Wire Services - Tab 

(2) - Tab ^saaai Wa&— J 

Technical Red - All ^^^^^j^^^"^^ 
Fin. Mags _ Tab 

R Y A 1v AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



LINDBERGH FIELD, SAN DIEGO 12, CALIFORNIA, U.S.A. 

CABLE: RYANCD, SAN OtECO 



To Aviation; Financial and Technical Editors: 

One of the major limitations in this "high temperature 
age" on the performance of aircraft and missiles is the 
ability of metals to withstand the searing heat generated 
by jet, piston and rocket engines. 

A promising solution to many of the problems is the use 
of ceramics to coat metal parts. Two advantages are ob- 
vious: (1) the service life of the components when ceramic 
coated is greated extended, and (2) less critical metals 
which are ceramic coated can often replace the strategic 
metals which are in short supply. 

Because of the widespread interest in this new field, Ryan 
Aeronautical Company and California Metal Enameling Company, 
largest producers of ceramics for aircraft, have prepared 
the attached bulletin summajrizing developments in ceramic 
coating. We believe editors will find it of interest. 



Public Relations Department 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



WW:ah 
Attach . 



-J" 



« 




NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailing t: 10-25-52 
Aviation Mags 1 (Tab) 
Financial Mags (All) 
Financial Dailies (All) 
Wire Services (Tat) 



For Release 
Monday, October 27 



Leal P 



LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



EXOEA DIVIDEiro DECLARED 
BY RYAH AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 

A regular quarterly dividend of 10 cents per share 
plus an extra dividend of 10 cents per share on common 
capital stock vas declared yesterday (Friday) by the board 
of directors of the Ryan Aeronautical Cotirpanyo The 20-cent 
cash dividend is payable December 12 to stockholders of 
record November 21, 1952 o 

This -will be Ryan's ninth consecutive quarterly dividend, 
and the 2^Va. dividend payment since incorporation. 



10-25-52 



i 



I 



1 
] 




Ma I L I NG Out; 1 1 -5-5^ 

San Diego Red - Tab 

Av I AT I ON Mags h) - Tab 

Aviation Mags (2) - Tab 



-"VcT"?' 



Technical Red - (Tab) 
Financial Mags - (Tab) 
Financial Daily (Tab) 



NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



TWO ENGINEERS APPOINTED 
TO KEY POSTS AT RYAN AERO 



Pix SENT TO following: 

Aviaton Week (Bob Wood) 
Amer. Avia. (Wayne Parrish) 
Aero. Eng. Review (Shrader) 
Western Aviation (Rhodes) 
Southern Flight (Haddaway) 
Aero Digest (Fred Hamlin) 

Two top civilian experts from the Navy Bureau of Aeronautics and the 
Uo S. Air Force have joined the Ryan Aeronautical Company engineering depart- 
ment in key posts. 

They are G. C. "Gabe" Danch, for seven years wjth the Fighter Branch, 
Bureau of Aeronautics, and Al Deyarmond, former chief of the special studies 
office, Air Technical Intelligence Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, 
Dayton, Ohio. 

For one year as an officer and the last six years as a civilian, Danch 
WAS associated with the development of the Navy's most advanced fighter planes. 
By coincidence, one of the first planes on which he worked was Ryan's famed 
"Fireball", the first combination jet and reciprocating engine plane in the 
WORLD, Danch will serve as executive assistant to Bruce Smith, Ryan director 
OF engineering, and will perform special assignments. 

Deyarmond actually is returning to Ryan, where he was chief of structures 
from December, 19lt6 to April, 19^8, when he went to the Air Materiel Command's 
intelligence section on a civil service appointment. His duties have encompassed 

THE study of performance CHARACTERISTICS OF FOREIGN AERONAUTICAL EQUIPMENT. 

Deyarmond will again fill the reactivated post of chief of structures at Ryan 

AND in addition WILL ALSO BE CHIEF OF AERODYNAMICS, 



11-3-52W 



# # # 




yY Mailed 11-2^1-52 to: 
San Diego Red - Tab 

Aviation Mags (1) - All For release: Virednesday,26 November 
Aviation Mags (2) - All Technical Red - Tab 

AviTiON Mgs )[3) - Tab Fin. Mags - ai^l W ire Services - Tab 



NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 




"Tim Fin. Da i ufc,- Ali^ewj^^pers Red - Tab 

LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN BOOKS $6 MILLION IN NEW ORDERS 
AS DELIVERY RATE DOUBLES YEAR AGO 

Current deliveries of Ryan Aeronautical Company's aircraft and 
aeronautical products are double the rate of a year ago and :it the 
highest level since peak production rates of World War II, T. Claude 
Ryan, president, revealed today „ 

At the same time Ryan announced the closing of $6,000,000 in 
new orders for jet engine components, exhaust systems and airframe 
parts during the past thirty dayso 

Contracts from General Electric for parts for the J-A7 jet 
engine totaled in excess of $2,000,000 for the period, while Douglas 
Aircraft Company and the Ford Motor Company placed new orders of 
more than $1,000,000 each, with smaller but substantial new business 
also coming from Continental Motors Corp„, Fairchild Aircraft 
Company, Boeing Airplane Company and other long-time Ryan customers « 

lilftiile monthly delivery figures were not released, Ryan stated 
that gross business for the last quarter of the 1952 fiscal year, 
ended October 31 last, was well in excess of $10, 000,000o 

Employment which was 3400 at the start of the 1952 fiscal year 
increased 15 percent to 3900 on October 31 and is planned to reach 
A200 early in 1953 » 

11-20-52W 




-"vcT^i 



NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailed: 11-2^-52 
San Diego Red - Tab- 
Aviation Mags (1) - All 
" " (2) - " 

(3) - Tab 



Technical Red - All 

Fin. Mags - " 

" Dailies - " 

Fore ign Red - Tab 






LINDBERGH FIELD* SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



EYAN ASHO AWARDED SECOND 
TITANIUM RESEARCH CONTRACT 



A second iinportant contract in research and development of titanium for 
application to aircraft production has been awarded Ryan Aeronautical Companyo 

Recognizing Ryan's pioneering experience in this fields the Navy Bureau 
of Aeronautics has ordered the manufacture and testing of a large number of 
specimens typical of airframe constructiono 

Award of this contract follows closely an earlier iiir Force order aimed 
at determining the best methods of processing titanium for use in conjunction 
•with exhaust systems^ one of Ryan's longtime specialties „ 

The Bureau of Aeronautics contract will provide information much needed 
by the aircraft industry regarding optimum application to aircraft structures 
of titanium and titanium alloys as compared with aluminum alloys and stainless 
Steele 

Titanium is a temperamental "mystery" metal with many advantageous 
qualities as far as strength, weight-saving and heat=resistance factors are 
concerned But it requires special handling, due to its peculiar characler= 
istics, and the aircraft industry, with Ryan as one of the leaders, is experi= 
menting to decide how it might, for instance, be able to replace stainless 
steel in some applications „ 



4 



4 



-2= 



Ryan was one of the first companies in America to form titanium suc- 
cessfully by the drophanuner process „ Research at its own expense was 
started in August^ 1951o 

Ex-tremely expensive because of high costs of refining from the orej 
titanium now costs as high as $25 a pound » The first shipment of titanium 
sheets for the Air Force and Navy cont^jracts is due at the Ryan plant in 
about two months o The work^ on a lohg=term basis ^ will be performed under 
supervision of the engineering department in the development laboratories » 



#### 



11-20-52W 



4 




_3h» M AILED \d-\\-ycl WITH INTERIM KEPORT: 

San Diego Red - All Tech. Red - All 

—^ Aviation Mags (1) - All Fin. Mags - All ^ 

r^ Aviation Mags 2 - All Fin. Writers - All '^°'' 

Aviation Mags (3) - j^g v/ire Services - All '^'"Day, 



NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Magaz I NEs Gen. - Tab 

For Release 

December 12 



Newspapers - Red a. All 



^^^ .__ |\|EWSPAPERS - KED 5- '^^Ui* 



LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



RYAN PROFIT OF $878,359 MORE 
THAN DOUBLES I95I EARNINGS 

Net profit of The Ryan Aeronautical Co. for the 12 months ended October 3I , 

LAST, WAS $878,359, more THAN DOUBLE THAT FOR 1951, To ClAUDE RyAN, PRESIDENT, 
reported yesterday in a PRELIMINARY UNAUDITED STATEMENT TO STOCKHOLDERS. 

The IMPROVED earnings as CONTRASTED WITH 1951's NET PROFIT OF $H02,6oH, 
AND THE SHARP INCREASE IN BUSINESS VOLUME, WERE THE SIGNIFICANT DEVELOPMENTS 
OF THE FOURTH QUARTER OF THE COMPANY'S 1952 FISCAL YEAR, RyAN SAIDo 

The 1952 EARNINGS WERE EQUAL TO $2<,23 PER NET OUTSTANDING SHARE, AGAINST 
$1o02 FOR THE 12 MONTHS ENDED OCTOBER 3I , I95I0 

Net SALES for the fiscal year just closed were $35,068,250, AN INCREASE 
OF 57 PER CENT OVER THE $22,277,175 FOR I95I0 

In HIS REPORT TO SHAREOWNERS RyAN DIRECTED SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE FACT 
THAT WHILE FEDERAL TAXES TOOK 52 PERCENT OF THE I95I NET INCOME DOLLAR, THIS 
YEAR 70 PERCENT OF NET INCOME WENT FOR FEDERAL TAXESo 

Net BOOK value of the company was at an all-time high of $5,898,510 ON 
October 3I, last. This was equal to $1^.98 per share, an increase of $1.73 
during the past twelve monthso 

Working capital also showed a marked increase, standing at $4,238, 52^, up 
$913,916 compared with $3,324,608 a year previously. 

The complete annual report to stockholders of The Ryan Aeronautical Co. 
with audited financial statements is now in preparation. 

# # # 



12-11-52W 




NEWS BUREAU 

BILL WAGNER 

BILL BROTHERTON 

HAROLD KEEN 



Mailing Out: 12-2^1-52 
Aviation Mags (1 ) - All 
II II (2) - " 

" (3) - Tab 



Tech. Red - All 

Fin. Mags - All 

F_i_N. Da iLY - All 

Wire Services - All 



News. Red 



- Tab 



LINDBERGH FIELD • SAN DIEGO 12, CALIF. 



YEAR END ROUND-UP 
RYAN AERONAUTICAL COMPANY 



The year I952 was the brightest, from a financial standpoint, in the 
history of Ryan Aeronautical Company, whose president, T. Claude Ryan, one 
OF San Diego's aviation pioneers, celebrated his 30th anniversary in the 
industry. 

Net income for the I952 fiscal year, a preliminary financial statement 
showed, was at an all-time high of $878,359, more than twice the preceding 
YEAR. Sales volume, over $35,000,000, was up 50 percent over the previous 
year, and net worth of the company at the close of 1952 is at a record peak. 
The current backlog of approximately $70,000,000 is the highest since the 
PEAK OF World War II production. 

The year I952 might well be described as the "harvest year" of the ex- 
tensive tooling preparation in 1951. With the "make-ready" period passed and 
improvements in general efficiency reflected in rapidly accelerating production, 
1953 's forecast to surpass even the outstanding 1952 record. 

Taking on increased importance is Ryan's research and development in both 
piloted and pilotless jet planes of very advanced types. 

Noted in the industry as the company that made the "Fireball," first Navy 

JET fighter and THE WORLD'S FIRST JET-PLUS-PROPELLER AIRPLANE, RYAN HAS DESIGNED 
NEW TYPES OF AIRCRAFT IN WHICH THE AlR FORCE, NaVY AND ARMY HAVE SHOWN GREAT 
INTEREST. Only one of these projects can be IDENTIFIED — THE Q-2, A JET- 
PROPELLED, PILOTLESS DRONE PLANE NOW FLYING AT THE HOLLOMAN AlR DEVELOPMENT 

Center, Alamogordo, N.M. 



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Increased funds during the past year were allotted Ryan by the Air Force 
AND THE Navy for its electronic research and development projects, also of 

CONFIDENTIAL NATURE, AND FOR PIONEERING WORK WITH TITANIUM, A TEMPERAMENTAL 
METAL NEW TO THE AIRCRAFT INDUSTRYo In THE FIELD OF METALLURGY, RyaN FURTHER 

advanced its leadership in the application of ceramics to stainless steel 
used in the hottest portions of exhaust systems and jet engine components, a 
Ryan specialty for many years. 

The greatest increase in business during 195^^ volume-wise, was in jet 
engine components for General Electric and in huge fuselage sections for the 
Boeing C-97 transport planes. Expansion of production of external fuel tanks — 
the largest of their kind ever made — ALSO occurred during the last year. 
After successful pilot line manufacture of rocket engines in I95I, Ryan launched 

QUANTITY PRODUCTION IN ^95^' 

A TREMENDOUS ARRAY OF GIANT NEW MACHINE TOOLS STREAMED INTO THE PLANT 
DURING 1952^ AND IN ONE PARTICULAR PHASE OF PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES, ELECTRIC 
RESISTANCE WELDING ON BOTH ALUMINUM AND STAINLESS STEEL, RYAN IS BELIEVED TO 

have the most elaborate equipment in the world. 

An amazing variety of component parts and aeronautical equipment will 

CONTINUE TO BE PRODUCED BY RyAN DURING 1953 ^^^ SUCH MAJOR CUSTOMERS AS BOE I NG, 

General Electric, Douglas, Pratt &. Whitney, Ford, Continental Motors, Convair, 
Westinghouse, Fairchild, Firestone, Piasecki and a host of other airframe and 
engine manufacturers. At the same time Ryan will be negotiating for additional 
production of piloted and pilotless planes of its own design. 



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12-24-52K