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Full text of "[News releases]"

Illinois Institute 

of Technology 

LIbnuries 



FOR USE IN LIBRARY ONLY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/newsreleases1950illi 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 
PAUL V, GALVIN LIBRARY 
35 WEST 33RD STREET 
Cnr A'-^O \ 60616 



X ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

ifl 3300 South Federal Street 
/ Chicago 16, Illinois 

CALUMET 5-9600 



James W. Armsey, Director 



/ 



Mailed: 

Ifey 1, 135 rt 
FOR RELEASE: ^ 



Hot e t_q Lditoi-s: 

The attached stateraent by Dpc Henry T„ Healds president 
of Illinois Institute of Technology, was presented this after- 
noon (May l) to the Chicago Housing Authority by Raymond Jv 
Spaeth, executive secretary and treasurer of the Institute, in 
Drc Heald*3 absence from the city,- 



-- Jim Armssy 



statement to the Chicago Housing Authority 

by 

Henry T, He aid 
President of Illinois Institute ol" Technology 
May 1,1950 

Y/hen Illinois Institute of Technology v^as formed 10 years ago thjrough a 
consolidation of Arm.our Institute of Technology and Levels Institute^ a major 
initial problem revolved around the location of the new institution. 

Armour Institute was located on Chicago's central south side, once one of 
the city's proudest residential districts. Years of neglect and the shifting 
social and economic tides had blighted the area and reduced it to slioms,. 

But there were advantages : 

luost important^ it was centrally located, within easy reach of both day and 
evening students. It could not be isolated geographically from these for v.'hom its 
educational progra:n was intended. 

It had a m.uch-needed, though inadequate ^ rhysical plant, v/hich could serve 
as a core around which to build an outstanding educational institutiono 



Page two - Chicago Housing Authority 

Its location in the heart of one of the nation's largest slum areas pre- 
sented a challenge for urban reclamation that sparked the imagination of its 
trustees and staff. 

They had faith in the future of Chicago, and they saw a chance to contribute 
something tangible, 

£o Illinois Tech decided to stay on the south side, and it made its deci- 
sion deliberately. 

immediately it began to rebuild. In a decade Illinois Tech has built 11 
educational^ research, and housing structures. It serves 8,000 day and evening 
students. It employs a staff of 2,000 persons <, It has expanded its campus from 
7 to 8^ acre So 

It has becomiO one of the nation's leading centers of technological education 
and research, and it has done so without public funds, subsidies, or financial as- 
sistance from city agencies <- 

As it has acquired land, cleared slums, and progressed on the job of re- 
building its campus, it ha,s stimulated, encouraged, and cooperated with others in 
remaking the south side of Chicago. 

Illinois Tech has been in the forefront of the city-s slum clearance and 
development program. Its record of accomplishiient speaks for itself. It believes 
that the rebuilding of Chicago is necessary; that the south side area, and, indeed, 
the city as a whole, are in jeopardy financially and socially if minimum decent 
conditions for v.'-orking and living are not provided. 

This job can be done only by a com.bination of private individuals ai^id firms 
and public agencies vforlcing together to achieve a sound long-term pattern of land 
use and redevelopment. 

Moreover, rehabilitation of slums must follov; an orderly pattern all over 
the city, v.-herever they m^ay be, and public housing sliould also be built in an 



Page three - Chicago Housing Authority 

orderly manner, dispersed so that each part of the city and all of the people may 
benefits 

S>:cessive concentration of public housing in a single area defies sound 
neighborhood planning practices and principles. It establishes economic ghettos 
and it deters private developmento Concentration of the kind proposed creates a 
city within a city in v.'hich a large number of people are forced to depend upon 
the largesse of the r/hole city, T;ith no opportunity for association vrith persons 
in higher income categories and consequent discrimination on an eccnor.ic basis o 

Considered as a group, the four proposed sites along the Rock Island rail- 
road tracks on the south side, are unacceptable because they v.'ould result in an ex- 
cessi'/e concentration of public housing in a single area and discourage rather 
than stimulate further private development. 

As a vfhole, the current proposals for location of public housing sites are 
unsatisfactory because too fev: units are located on vacant land and too many are 
located in a limited area of the city. 

The selection of these locations is another example of an attempt to solve 
a difficult problem by the methods of expediencye It completely ignores the sound 
principles of city planning and urban redevelopment. 

Unless the officials of Chicago are willing to base their decisions and ac- 
tions on facts furnished by the professional persons Tfhose help they have r.nlisted, 
there is little hope that the city's housing problem.s v.'ill be solved. 

-end- 



^M^ from... 

g^X ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

\mfj 3300 South Federal Street 
pi^ Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
James W. Armsey, Director 



•^'"'^^ mv 2. 1930 
FOR RELEASE 



Photo Ueao 



jUj a proluae to Illinais l?eoh*s annual Qpen ajuso-Junioar Wedc, 
Mny 4t 5t And £« an electronic lioaii* designed and op©ratdd \xf Illinoia 
T«o*ii dtudeotSf will parade the loop area from 10t30 to 11 jp.cu Wedaaaday 
e^daldg (ISay 3)* 

The eight-foot robot is equipped vith braiii-iiaTa tranffiiiittar and 
a JOfOCK? high Toltai^ apparatus whioh furslahea eleotrioal power for a 
halo« fire»flpittin(S mouth, aod an onnind-off spark noae. He is alao 
d«^«d with neoa ttibaa* asitohes* reeaption aatanoa* and other dleotrioal 

Be,'9t piotux^ possibilities are at lOtJO p«is» at the northeast 
eomffiT of State oM. Randolph atreets. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



James W. Armsey, Director 



^ ..] 3300 South Federal Street 
5/ Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Mailed: ^^Y 2. 195^ 
FOR RELEASE: Advance 



ADVANCE FOR RELEASE AFTER 1 P..M, THURSDAY, tlAY 4, 195 



CHICAGO -- I^iiss Patricia Nash and James Fitzpatrick, seniors at Illinois 
Institute of Technology, today were crowned Illinois Tech's "Llan and T/oimn of the 
Year*" 

Both students were selected by popular vote of the 3i5^^ undergraduate day 
students attending the Institute. 

Coronation ceremonies, which launched the Institute's three-day Open House- 
Junior ".7eek activities., were held in the auditorium of the North Student Union 
building, 33rd and Federal streets. 

Miss Nash, 20, daughter of lilrs. Mena Stanton of I619 Highland avenue, is 
majoring in home economics. 

She is president of the Home Economics club, secretary of the Illinois 
Tech Student Association, second vice president of Sigma Kappa social sorority^ 
and former secretary of her sophomore class,. She graduated from Senn high school 
in June of 1947. 

Fitzpatrick, 22, son of Ifir. and Mrs. Jam.es V. Fitzpatrick of 3421 South 
Parnell avenue, is majoring in electrical engineering. He has served as vice 
president of his junior class, social chairm.an of his sophom^ore class, pledge 
master for Alpha Sigma Phi social fraternity, and secretary of Alpha Phi Omega, 

national service fraternity. 

He is also a member of the college dramatic club, Newman club. Eta Kappa 
Nu, national honorary electrical engineering society, and Honor I, honorary 
athletic society. 

Fitzpatrick graduated from Tilden Technical high school in June of 1946. 

-mtw- 
END ADVANCE FOR RELEASE AFTIR 1 P,M. , THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1950 



(4, from... 

>^ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



3300 South Federal Street 



Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



fublic Kelations Uepartment 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: ^a^ 2, 1950 



FOR RELEASE: 



Inirnediate 



CIIICLiG-0 -- Illinois Institute of Technology will open its doors to the 
public on T.'Iay I4., j, and 6 during its raanirr.oth Open Hcuse-JuJiior V/eek activities. 

Students, eager to show-off their scientific knowledge, have spent the 
past month in laboratories and class rooms planning exhibits that \vill appeal to 
the non-scientific visitor as well as to the engineer* 

This year's exhibits, v/hich include more than 200 special student projects, 
are designed to shov; the accomplishments of the engineer and the methods by which 
he is constantly -.i-orking to improve the comfort, luxury, and safety of the public-, 

They range from a kiss-o-meter, which gauges the potency of a kiss,, to an: 
electronic nan, complete with neon lights, dials, and electric brain-v/ave transmitter. 

Among some of the other unique exhibits are an electric train, controlled 
by voice rather than by conventional sv.dtches and control panel; a strength meter, 
operated by crank; and a recording of your radio voice , which will be played back 
in natuj-al, base, and soprano tones. 

And this year's displays have not slighted the housewife, so frequently 
ignored in the shuffle of science. The wonan who pays the bills v/ill learn the 
hourly cost of using any of 10 electrical household appliances. She will also 
observe how an electric iron and toaster interfere with television reception and 
how a hot do^' is electronically cookedo 

The housewife v;ill be equally interested in the dramatization of common 
fire and electrical hazards, applications of mathematics to fields completely 



open house- junior v/eek — Illinois Tech, page two 

divorced fron matlieraatics, an ant colony portraying comparisons to human society, 
quicksand demonstrations,, and model table s ,.t tings „ 

Other exhibits include aerial gunnery training v;ith visitor participation, 
demonstration shov/ing ho\/ each automxObile carves a specific impression upon the 
bridge it passes, models of sewage treatment p^^ants, tensile testing machines; 
and electrolytic polishing •-- v/ith etched stainless steel bracelets given as 
souvenirs o. 

Rumiing concurrently with Open House is the forty-fourth annual Junior 
T/eek, a colorful progx-am of student theatricals, sings, concerts, dances, sporting 
events, and contests which will be clim-axed by the Junior '.Veek prom Saturday 
evening (May 6) at the Sheraton hotelo 

Other features of the three-day program are the dedication of Gunsaulus 
Hall, new ten-story apartment building for married students and staff members at 
3140 ocuth Michigan avenue; dedication of nev/ carrillon chimes; crowning of 
Illinois Tech's "Man and Vloiisn of the Year" as selected by popular student vote; 
baby contest for children of students and f-:iculty; and the annual Alumni Reunion 
dinner at which Lt, Gen. Leslie R.. Groves, U.S^A, Ret,, will be principal speaker. 

Besides viewing exhibits and special events, visitors v.'ill have a first 
hand opportunity to see what has been done in Illinois Tech's program of slum 
clearance and redevelopment.-, In addition to the apartment building, other new 
buildings including two dormitories, a heating plant-, and fo-ur classroomi and 
laboratory buildings will be open for inspection, as well as the recently completed 
Association of American Railroads central research laboratory^ 

Illinois Institute of Technology was formed ten years ago through the 
merger of Lewis Institute and Armour Institute of Technology^ In that period it 
has recorded a phenomenal growth. Open House is designed to shov/ that development. 



-mtw— 



<: 



^ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

^/ :! 3300 South Federal Street 
SiS^ Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE 



May 3, 1950 

Memo 



^Q^Si I2. suitors; 

Lt-, Geiio Leslie R. Groves, Rot»: wartime head of the atomi'", 
bor.ib project and presently vice president of Remingtcr. Rand, Incr., 
wi:,l be the main speaker- at Illinois Tech's annual Aramni Reunion 
Dinner at 8530 p»m;, SYiday, May 5t in the college gymnasium at 32ncl. 
and Dearborn streetSo 

I have neither a text nor abstract availableo- He will talk 
from notes or completely off-the-cuff,,. I have no subject title.. 

If you'd like to send a reporter or photographer, I'll be 
glad to assist in any way I can* - 

The dinner begins at 6130 pvmc , and if your representative 
would like to attend, let me know and I'll have a ticket for him; 
Just call CAlumet 5-9600, Ext. 317.. 



— Jim Armsey 



Ifd from... 

^\ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



>/':'! 3300 South Federal Street 
iy Chicago 16, Illinois 

CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department ■, 
James W. Armsey, Director 



May 3, 1950 
M^'^^^- Photo Memo 

FOR RELEASE: 



Memo to Photo Editors and Gity Editors : 

Illinois Tech's annual Open House-Junior Week will officially- 
open at 1 p,.ra. Thursday, Wky 4f with the crowning of the Institute's 
outstanding students of 1950, "The llan and V/oraan of the Year," 
Ceremonies will be held in the North Student Union auditorium, 32^'^ 
and Federal streets,. 

Other pictui^e possibilities such as a kiss-o-meter, turtle race, 
strength meter, and electronic man, have been listed in a previous merao* 

If you care to send a photographer, we shall be happy to assist 
him. Our office is located in room 224 of the Metallurgical and Chemical 
Engineering building, northv/est corner of 33'^^ si^d State streets. 



•- Jim Armsey 



^ from.,. 

s ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

:! 3300 South Federal S+reef 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: Maj 3, 19$0 

FOR RELEASE: linmeliate 



CHICAGO — ^IVilliam John Card, Jr,, 29, director of buildings and gi'ounds at 
Washington and Jefferson college j V<'ashington, Pa,, has been named manager of 
housing at Illinois Institute of Technology, it mrs announced today by C A^ Force, 
business manager. 

Card succeeds Re A, Madery, who has resigned to accept a position as hotel 
r^anager in Indiana, 

Gard v/as graduated magna cvjn laude from Washington and Jefferson in 19U?o 
He T.^as elected to Phi Beta Kappa, national scholastic society, as an undergr arcuate. 

Since his graduation, he has been employed on the staff at Washington and 
Jefferson as assistant to the president, instructor in political sciencsj manager 
of the bock store and dining room., and assistant to the dean of the college,, 

He has been in charge of buildings and grounds since 19U3. 

At Illinois Tech, ho will supervise men's residence halls and the new stu- 
dent-staff apartment building, all of which are recent additions in tha Institute -s 
building program. 



-jwa- 



(<^ from... 

^\ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

)J'p. 3300 South Federal Street 
P Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: May 3, 19^0 
FOR RELEASE: Inimediate 



CHICAGO — James L. Knight, assistant business manager at Armour Research 
Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology, has been named business manager, 
it v;as announced today by Dr. Haldon A, Leedy, director of the Foundation. 

Knight succeeds Lawrence 0. Paul, who recentl;^^ was named assistant director 
in charge of program development at the Foundation. 

Prior to his joining the Foundation in 19U8 Knight was vice-president of 
George B. Hurd, Inc., New York City. A supply officer in the Navy during the 
war, he is a graduate of Amherst College and has done graduate work at the 
Harvard Business School, 

l/jT, and Mrs, Knight, vd.th tivo daughters, Judith, h, and Robin, 1, live at 
1091 Sheridan Road, Winnetka, Illinois. He is 30. 



i- from... 

^ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Arnnsey, Director 



'/ 



3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Mailed: ^"^Y 4f 1950 

FOR RELEASE: ^™ediate 



CHICAGO -" The second annual auction of student and faculty art 
work sponsored by the students of the Institute of Design of Illinois 
Institute of Technology will be held at 7 Pa-nu I.lay 13o 

The paintings, sculpture and prints to be auctioned are currently 
beini2 exhibited at Riccardo's Studio Restaurant, 437 North Rush street 
and the schools- The auction v/ill be held in the Institute auditorium 
at 632 riorth Dearborn streeto 

Among the 100 pieces are works donated by the faculty> V/ell-known 
'artists represented are Serge Chernayeffo Richard Koppe, Richard Filipowski, 
John ./alley, and Hugo V7eber« 

Prominent among the students are John Sutherland and Leslie Laskey,^ 
both of whom have recently exliibited at the 'Vell-of-the-Sea gallery in 
the Shei-nan hotel. 

Proceeds of the sale will go to the Iifeholy-Nagy scholarship fund. 
In the past year four semester scholarships were given from the proceeds 
of the first auctionr- 



-J eg- 



'Xf4- from... 

^ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

^ J 3300 South Federal Street 
,^ Chicago 16, Illinois 

CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmeni 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: "^"^7 4, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: i™^ediate 

CHICAGO — For the first time in the history of Illinois Institute of 
Technology a v;oman student will be awarded a membership badge to Tau Beta Pi, 
highest engineering honorary society. 

She is Miss Lois Bey, of 1351 '.Vest liidy street, one of four Illinois Tech 
students who will receive special awards at 1 p.m.. Monday (l.Iay 8) during the 
Institute's all-school honor assembly.. 

Miss Bey, a senior majoring in chemical engineering, will also celebrate 
her tvrenty-first birthday on that date. 

Other engineering students who will receive avrards for exceptional 
scholarship during their freshman and sophomore years are: 

Howard Anderle, 19, 14^0 Scoville avenue, Berv.'yn — Chi Epsilon chemical 
engineering honorary society av/ard; James Gewartov.^ski, 19, 26Z).2 North Lawndale 
avenue — Eta Kappa Nu electrical engineering honorary av;ard; Warren Henderson, 
21, 922 North President street, 7i[heaton — Phi Lambda Upsilon chemistry and 
chemical engineering honorary society award. 

Following the presentation of awards, Dr. Louis L, Mann, Rabbi, Sinai 
Temple, will speak on "Honor — and Human Relations," 

The assembly will be held in the auditorium of the North Student Union 
building, 33^^ ^nd Federal streets. 



-mtw- 



j 3300 South Federal Street 
ijk^ Chicago 16, lllinoit 
CAiUMei 5-9600 



rubU^Relatlon^eparTmen? 
Jemei W, Armiey, Director 



/ 



Mailed; Ivlay 4. 1950 

FOR RELEASE: Paoto Memo 



Hote to Fioto Editors and City Editors ; 

Illinois In.3titute of Technology will dedicate (Junsaulus Hall, 
first of three proposed lO-story apartnsnt buildings for married students 
and staff ner.bers, at 3 ?•-"!• 5^iday (T.'Iay5)» ■'- "■- " ^'-' "-^ 

The ll6-unit residence, constructed at a cost Of $1,200,000, is 
XJart of Illinois Tech's lon^;- range derelopraent progra.m wliich will cover 
110 acres on Chicago's near south side. ' '-■' -' -■;:■•, - ■ • 

Persons Mio might be included in a photograph are: 

Newton 0, Farr, Chicago realtor, chairman of the board of trustees' 
cormnittee on housing, and principal speaker; Henry T» Heald, president 
of Illinois Tech; two young residents of G-unsaulus Hall \*io will unveil 
the dedication plaque; and possibly Mayor lifevtin H. Kennelly. 

Grunsaulus Hall is located at 3I4O South Michigan avenue. If you 
care to send' a photographer, I will be happy to assist him. 

Dedication ceremonies are one of the featvires of the Institute's 
triree-daj' Open House-Junior Week. 



— Jim Artasey 



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f^ from... 

X ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

if.! 3300 South Federal Street 

JJ 

y Chicago 16, Illinois 

CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations DepartmenI 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: Ifey 5, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: Advance 



ADVMCE FOR RELEASE AFTER 9 P.M., (CDT), TUESDAY, tlAY 9, 195 
Note to Editors ; 

An address entitled "Technical Knowledge is not Enough" by James 
D. Cunningham, president of Republic Flov/ Meters Co., chairman of the 
board of trustees of Illinois Institute of Technology, and president of 
the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, is attached* 

He ;?ill deliver the address Tuesday night, May 9f 195^1 at the 
Furniture Club, 66? McClurg Court, following receipt of the 1950 Merit 
Award of the Chicago Technical Societies Council.. 

The award will be presented by Dr. Gustav Egloff , director of 
research of the Universal Oil Products Co., past president of CT3C, and 
chairman of the award committee this year. 

The citation for the aivard reads: 

"For Outstanding Achievements as an Engineer, Industrialist, 
Administrator, Civic Leader, and Educator,." 



— Jim Armsey 



'mcmiCAL . jg^J f^jD^ JS. NOT ENOUGH 

BY 

JALES DALTON GUmTj^GIIAM 

President 9 Republic Flow Meters Co. 
rh«?^^:«®SSv^^^°f^ Society of Mechanical Engineers 
Chairman of the Boards Illinois Institute of itchnology 

Address In Accepting 

The Chicago Technical Societies Council 

1950 tlERIT A\JMm 

For Outstanding Engineering, 

. Administrative and Civic Service 



Presentation by 
_. Dr. Gustav Egloff 

Director of Research, Universal Oil Products Co^ 
Past President of the Chicago Techrical 
Societies Council 

Ifey 9 » 7:00 PoMn at 

The Furniture club of America 

667 N. MoGlurg Court 

Chicago, Illinois 



ci^'.xstxi'&s hy RoL-ert H, Baooii, President 
■.J^;icago, TechtticaJ. SocietJles Coa.i\oil 



By Ju.'Uf^s ^« Cunninpiham 



In nuny v/ays, the ^roup that ia neetijig here tonif-ht 
mi^ilit be rti-^jardwd us ths itioat fortunate group In the 
v./orlci's hlf tory. \t'e are tho technical leaderB of a great 
tachnloal center in a nutioii which has v^on its way to world 
supremacy by technical mastery of its natural resources. 
The power over natural v/ealth and huaan destiny that is 
represented in this room would have been tho anvy of the 
kinfs and eriperors of a fev/ hundred years agOc iiven iU.exander, 
who conquerad and ruled the greater part of the civilized 
Vi/orld of ids timej, v/ould .have stood in awe of the forces that 
you and I release a dozen tiiaea a day us v/e make mere routine 
decisions. Surely at this pinnacle of technical pov/er in 
a mechanized civilization, we nust be the hapj^iest men and 
women the v/orld has ever seen! 

1 

The fixct iflg of coursej, tliat v/e are nothing of the i' 

kindo Instead of thatj, v/e are confused and ap})rehen3iV0c 
Many of us look backv/ard v/ith lon^in^, to a time v;hen v/e were -■ 

much less pov/erful but much nore serenej, and wish we could !: 

turn the clock back to that aiffipler, happier dayo Most of i 

us look forward fearfully to a future that is dark with be- '[ 

v/ildermentj doubt and possibilities for catastrophCo The f: 

fev; of us v/ho do see, or think v^e see, a way out of our pre= l 

sent difficulties know in our hearts that there is little 
likelihood of our \/ay out being follov>?edo I was araused a 
fev; days ago, in looking over a calendar of special days and 
v/eeks issued by the Uo Tj. Department of C^^mmorce to note a 
juxtaposition of events thet seenod to mo to sum up our sit- 
uation with a sort of desperate humor o The calendar shows 
/inerican m-mea. Fore us Day coining right in the middle of 
National Pickle l/oekJ It couldn't be said quicker J 



AS v/e contemplate the vast social and political com- 
plexity of the \/orld today j it has become commonplace for 
us to say "Isn't it a trap^ody - that we have concentrated 
our talents on technical problems to the neglect of human 
problems. But for most of us this is just an expression, 
not a real belief c Me donH really think it is a tragedy 
at all, because we keep right on concentrating on techni- 
cal problems and neglecting human problems « in our in= 
dividual lives, in our businesses and professions, and in 
our communities o We may brood about politics and public 
problems but we don't do anything about themo Mostly, we 
see them us a somber backdrop for our own individual 



'2^ 



triumphwS of tKohnique. "'e thiril' if only everybody else 
v;ere as brilliant and onereetic as we are, the problems 
v/ould be solved o 

Perhaps this is a natin'al attitude for us to takso 
To each of us his ov/n work,, his own interest,, is the most 
important thing in the world. Aa technical people,, we are 
bound to look upon technical progress as an important end 
or objective of human activityo But eventually v/e come to 
the questionK that many of us keep asking ourselves more 
and more frequently these days - the questions I'd like to 
discuss with you here tonit^ht; Is technical progress enough? 
Does it justify our activity? If notg v;hat are the other 
ends or objectives we should seek? 

Of coursej, those are not new questions o Since the be- 
ginning of our civilisation man have asked themselves these 
very sarae (questions. The French philosopher » RoussoaUg for 
example, put the question in a different ^ and challengingj 
foriic He asked? iifia the progress of science done man any 
real good? Obviously;, we think the answer is "Yes'" and 
yet it may be worth while for us to examine the answer that 
Rousseau himself came tOo He v/as skeptical. In his Dis- 
coui'se on the Arts and iJclenceSj Rousseau recalled the words 
of Socrates; "Because the most skillful of men excel others 
in their particular jobSj they think Uieiaselves wiser than 
all the rest of mankind; this arrogance spoiled all their 
skill in my eyos^" In Rousseau ''s Judgment^ the moral effects 
of science may have been so bad as to offset its physical 
advantages c 

These are hcirsh words p and I doubt that many of us Vi/ould 
acknov.'ledgt that they are true., But certainly it is a fact 
that skilliul men are likely to become self<=c entered j, and 
certainly this fact has something to do with the political 
and social difficulties in v/hich we find ourselves todayo 

But tliere is another ^ and more important ^ respect in 
v/hich our technical and moial interests are in conf.licto I 
think it is fair to say that a large part of the technical 
mastory that v/e have achieved in this country has been the 
direct result of competition. It is their efforts to excel 
one another and so achieve recognition and rewards that take 
men to the top within a profession or business, and it is the 
effort to excel ojid profit that takes a company ahead within 
an industry, and an industry ahead in society o Our customs 
and lav/3 recognize the value of competition and seek to pre- 
serve it, Tet the emphasis on competition in our economic 
lives is in some conflict with the moral rules by v;hich our 
personal lives are governed o 



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Pluin.lys the pressures of technical progress have 
forced us to abandon many raoral doctrines which we prog- 
ress to believso Is this the inevitable scoui'ge of our 
efforts to conquer our environment ^ as Rousseau believed? 
Or is it rather the result of a coffipetitive, technical 
interest that has becoine so intense that we have lost 
sight of other values? And can we noWj, hy educating our- 
selves and our children^, achieve the kind of balance of 
technical and spiritual forces that is essential to our 
happiness J, if not to our survival? 

I think it is encouraging that we have recognized the 
need and are making the effort <, Let me present some of 
the evidences Our engineering and technical faculties are 
awakening nore and more to the need for humanizing the 
technical curriculum,, andj what may be more significant^ 
students themselves j in contrast to the attitude of ;5^st 
a few years ago, are Virelccming and even denanding courses 
outside their chosen technical fields, Herej, for exaraplej, 
is a recent statement by Dean Paul Herake of Rensseleajf 
Polytechnic Institute; "The engineer and scientist as a 
professional man deals with people as much as he deals with 
things o Because of his profession ^ he has additional re^ 
sponsibilities as a citiaeno The broader and more under= 
standing his outlook upon the v^orld- the better able he is 
to perform his duties as a citizenj,, and the fuller and more 
complete will be his life as a human beings" 

Dean Ileinke's viev/s are echoed in technical and pro= 
fessional schools throughout the country,, In a recent sur^ 
veyg the ecucatlon editor of the New York Times found only 
an occasional engineering student who felt he was wasting 
time on language, history and literatiu-e courses o By and 
large J, the Tiiaes foun.dj, science and engineering students 
want the broadest possible nontechnical educatiouo They are 
trying to squeeze into their already crov^ded schedules as 
many liberal arts courses as they are permitted tOo At 
Georgia Tech this year, for example ^ mors than 10 per cent 
of the entire student body has voluntarily scheduled modern 
language courses as electives^ Many liberal arts classes 
for juniors and seniors have no room for all the students 
who wish to take them! 

Here is a confirmirig report — from Dro Weller Embler 
of Cooper Unions "It has boen our experience/' he saidj, 
"that technical students are not only willing but very often 
eager to read, think and talk about humanities ■= especially 
ideals and problemiSo If there remains any displeasure on 
their part at being required to take humanities courses j, the 
displeasure stems largely from the fact that they are too 
busy with technical studies to give proper time and thought 



to the humanities coia.;.':o'' Contrast thut vlth your ov.n 
experience as a teelinio;>l stuclont? 

The reasciiing behind these chejages reflects the chy.xig- 
ing emphasis in our te)ca.'jioal society «» the tiwakening 
realizatiou that techniciil KEOv/»how is not enough,, The dean 
of engineering at Yale University^ Dro Vf alter Woh.lGnbergp 
suiKEied it up recently in these words s "The Liberal arts 
are a pert of the cultural and educational background of 
the human racej, as much as engineering and science areo The 
problems of modern society stem from the whole of h\iman ex- 
perience j to urxderatand and help in their solution requires 
a broad educational backgrovjid„" 

Perhaps^ the students of this changing emphasis in tech- 
nical education are likely to be less keen as technical 
specialists than their predecessors have been but maybe ovir 
hope for tiie future is based on the expectation that they 
may be mora keen as citizens and as human beingSo As special- 
ists ^ many of you may resent the implication here that you 
have been less than you might have been as citizens and human 
beings o Look v;hat you have contributed to human comfort and 
wall-being through your techiiical accomplishments? Look at 
the number of people you employ ^^ and the taxes you pay^ and 
the civic contributions you make J What is expected of a 
citizen fn-5. a human being that you haven't given? You may 
well asl-jj and it is a fair question.. 

As I see itj, the axisv/er to yoiu' question is related to 
the ansvior that I think v;e must givg to Rousseau's question j, 
"Has the pi\ogrsss of science done man any real good?'* If 
science has simply made man more comfortable ^ If it has made 
him stronger and sleeker^ and evon health?. or g it has not im- 
proved him intrinsically at allj and we have done all that 
could be expected of us as hutian beings o But if science has 
released iirsi from the demands of animal existence so that he 
may turn his energies toward moral and spiritual improvement, 
then the possibilities are as great as the accomplishments 
to date are small ^ and many of us have failed in our chief 
re3pon3ibi3.ity as citizens and human beings » 

Is this just so much Sunday School talk, v/ithout any 
real meaning in a world of H-bosbSj, public debts and ward 
commltteGmen? 

I don't believe it is. In fact, I think it can be shown 
that ovir failure to recognize and respond to our broad re- 
sponsibilities as citizens and human beings , our failure to 
understand that technical progress is not enough, is the key 
to many of our greatest difficulties in America today. The 
political structure in v^|i:.ch vie take so much pride j, our great 
United States Constitution, was formulated, in its own 
language, "to establish justiccj, insure domestic tranquillity 



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and promote the general V;?s If ere o' Is it reasonable to think 
that these ends can bs achieved tlirough words alone ^ Vi?ithout 
continuing f re-inforcing action by every citizen of the 
nation? Does o\ir conduct as individuals and technicians always 
bear close examination as a ccntribution to justice and tran- 
quillity and the general welfare? If v^'e had devoted as much 
of our individual effort to the achievement of Justice and 
tranquillity and the general welfare as we have to technical 
progress y is it unlikely that we v/ould be faced now with the 
many conflicts and problems arising from the fact that we have 
relinquished to the Styte many functions and responsibilities 
that we should have kept as our own? 

You and I hear and take part today in a lot of conver- 
sation about hov/ ve can stop the trend toward socialism in 
Americao If I am sure of anything^ I am sure that we can'^t 
stop the trend toward socialism by talking about itj or by 
talking about all the evils it has led to elsewhere and may 
lead to here* Nor is it certain that we can atop it alto- 
gether by replacing one riet of elected government officials 
with another J hov/evcr desirable that may be for ®ther reasons, 
because essentially the trend arises not alone from the will 
of our elected and appointed officials but, from the will of 
a people seeking justice ^ tranquillity and the general wel- 
fare j, and not knav'inii hov- to find these dasired ends,-. 

Actually, of Gours"?^ these ends cannot be achieved 
through socialisrag any nore than they can be achieved through 
any other mere doctrine o If they can be achieved at all it 
must be done instead through effoxto It must be everybody's 
effort J, of courses but tl:e technical leaders of a technical 
society cannot escape their rssponsibility for leadership. 
Until our acts reveal dsvetion to these great causes they 
can never be realised in any true measure^, and this means 
that we must turn some of our attention away from technical 
progress to insure the survival of our economic society as we 
know ito 

There are a few hopeful signs that this is being donoo 
Increasingly we find the leaders of cur technical society j, 
people like yourselves j, turning away from their professional 
and business lives and accepting responsibilities in the 
education and welfare activities of the communityo Increas- 
inglyg tooy v/e see technical leaders assuning political re- 
sponsibilities — and it is in this area., I thinks that our 
failure as citizens has been most shameful. Too many of us j, 
I am afraidj have failed to accept even the very minimum of 
political responsibility^ that of informing ourselves on the 
issue and the candidates and voting, TJhtil v/e have done this 
and much mor©^ hoxt can we expect a political system based on 
the sovereignty of the people to work? The fact is that it 
can't possibly work very well until people like yourselves^ 



technical lead.ors^ are \/illiiig to accept the high responsi= 
bilitiea of office-holding and Ifc.w-iaekingo The system de» 
pends on yoiir active participation but you have been too busy 
with technical progress to talce part. There is still timej. 
if you have the vision and the resolution to change your 
habits o 

Our greatest hope for the future^ however^ lies in the 
evidence of still another awakaning interest in our technical 
society — an interest in spiritual and moral as well as tech- 
nical values o Church memberships ara growing as people reach 
out for sonething they are aware is missing in their lives,, 
Books whose message is a spiritual message are on best=seller 
lists for the first time in our history^ andj, this is especially 
important I think ^ these books are in greatest demand on our 
college and university campuseso Here again^, hov.'evers it is 
our technical leaders on vjhom we must depend to give the move- 
ment toward spirituality the strength and vigor and endurance 
that will make it m.eaningfulo Can you turn aside from tech- 
nical progress to contemplate the greatest and most neglected 
admonition that has ever been given to man; ''Love thy neighbor 
as thyself?" If you oai\, we will find our way out of the dif- 
ficulties Vie are in and any others that may come to uSo If 
you cannot p surely we are doomedo 

What each of us needs most,, I am convinced ^ is something 
that I cannot describe but can illustrate o It is the g)irit 
of the nursing Sister about whom this story came back from tte 
^Nationalist v^'or front in China o In a mission hospital^ the 
Sister was tenderly caring for a dirty Chinese soldier whose 
ugly J, festering wounds v;8re an offense to the senses,, A war 
correspondent in the ».'ard looked on for a momenta and said;^ 
"Sister 5, I \70uldn''t do your work for a million dollars S" The 
Sister looked up and amiledj, then replied cuietlyi "Neither 
would II" 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 



Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relatfons Departmeni 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: May S, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: photo meymo 



Hote to City Sdlfcors and Photo MitovB t 



Illinois Institute of T0ehnolos7* s annual Gpsn House- Junior 
Week offer* th® following piotur® suggestions on its closing aay, 
Saturday, May 6: 

1) E p.m., baby contest at whiob 50 children of Illinois 
Tech students will ccripeta. There will bQ three ag© divisions, 
ranging from six months to four years, viitb. a trophy awarded to 
the winner of each division, 

S) 2:30 p. a., final fudging of sal® staff and student 
baking contest. 

If you car© to sand a photographer, we shall be happy 
to assist hiau Our office is located in room 2PA of the Metallupgioal 
and Chsfiiical JSngineering building, northwest oornar of 33rd and 
State streets. 

— Jia Armsey 






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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: May 5, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: i,,„^iate 



CHIG/lCJO -- Dr. Louis L. ferm. Rabbi, Sinai Ten5)le, 
will speak at 1 p*ni» ('May 8) at Illinois Institute of 
Technology's all'-school assembly. 

The talk, "Ifonor — ard liunKin. Relations," will be 
presented in the auditorium of the North Student lifeiion 
building, 33rd and Federal streets. 



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d' from... 

^ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

,'.■; 3300 South Federal Street 
' Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmeni 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: J/ay 8, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: iTimediate 



CHICAGO — A program of courses in clinical psychology will be 
offered this summer at Illinois Institute of Technology* 

The summer session begins June 19 and closes August 18. 

A clinic for children will be arranged and members of the 
teaching and administrative staff will be given an opportunity to bring 
their children for testing* 

In addition, Illinois Tech will offer morning and evening classes 
in industrial psychology, Dr, David F. Boder, professor of psychology,, 
will be in charge of the clinical courses* 



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!• from... 

5, ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Mailed: ''^y 9. 195^ 

FOR RELEASE: ^^^^^ediate 



CHICAGO — Illinois Institute of Technology will begin a series of five™ 
week courses in civilian defense against atomic effects,, it vias anno'onced today 
by Dro James S„ Thompson, cnairman of the physics department.- 

A one-year contract has be-i-i signed with the Atomic Energy Coramlssicn to 
provide study in five subjects;; 

lo Fundamental physics of radioactivityo 

2» Biological effects of radiation* 

3o Detection and measurement of radioactivity in all types of substances.; 

l^^ Disaster phenomenao 

53- Civilian defense against radioactivity.. 

In additions the course vtill include an intensive survey of the ' ' ■■■■ 
fundamentals of nuclear physics and properties of radio-active substances,. 

Each class will consist of a maximum of 25 persons selected by state 
governors and approved by the AEC^ These persons will head state and local 
agencies in civilian defense . 

The course is tentatively scheduled to begin July 10^ 



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4' from... 

>, ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



Public Relations Depar+meni 
James W. Armsey, Director 



3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Mailed: ^'^^ 9. 1^0 

FOR RELEASE: i^'^^^ediate 



CHICAGO -- The Institute of Design of Illinois Institute of 
Technology will sponsor its second annual auction of student-faculty 
art work at 7 Pc-mo Saturday (llay 13)0 

Proceeds from the sale will be used for the Ivfeholy-Nagy scholar- 
ship fund which furnished four one-semester scholarships from the profit 
of last year's auctiono. 

The paintings, sculpture* and prints^ now on display at Riccardo's 
Studio restaurant, will be auctioned in the auditorium of the Institute 
of Design at 632 North Dearborn streets 

Included in the 100 pieces, are ??orh3 donated by faculty artists 
Serge Cherraayeff, Richard Koppe, Richard Filipov/ski, John Tfalleys and 
Hugo .Jeber„ 

Proiainent among student paintings, are vvorks by John Sutherland 
and Leslie Laskey, both of whom recently exhibited at the Well-of-the- 
Sea gallery in the Serman hotelo 



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^ from.,. 

^ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

'.') 3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmeni 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: I'^Y 9. 19^0 

FOR RELEASE: L^ediate 



CHICAGO — Bert Jack Toppel, 645 South 20th avenue; Ulayviood.:- 
instructor of physics at Illinois Institute of Technology, has been 
awarded a pre-doctoral fellowship in physical sciences by th-^ Atomic 
Energy Con'imissionr 

Toppel, a 1943 graduate of Proviso Toi/mship high school, will 
do work in nuclear physics in the Institute's Van de Graaff laboratoryo 
He received his bachelor of science degree in 1948 ai^<i his master's 
degree in January, 1950 1, both at Illinois Techo 

He T/as appointed instructor in physics in February after 
previous experience as a graduate assistant and research assistants 
He is a member of the American Physical Sccietyc 



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W from... 

;^^ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



:y 



Public Relations Department '^ 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 



J^y 9. 1950 
FOR RELEASE: feuoiiate 



GliK-^0 — Dr. John T. Eettaliata, dean of engineering at Illizioia 
loatltute of Tdchnology* Chioago, will address the Cleveland alunmi of 
Uliiiois ?ech follOKio^ a 6 p.m. dinner S^iday (S&y 12) at the ibtel 

Thirty high school prinoipsils ua& eounaelors frrai the Olereland 
wea sill also attend. "' ' ' • *"■ ^^ - 

Dr» a«t*;aliata« one of the youngest deans of engineering in the 
aation» ia a letadint; laocbaaical en^irseer and a noted expert on Jet 
propulsion aiii stoRiS una s^ ttarbirjss, Ik. will diBcvjas Illinois Tech's 
educatloial prosreuiu 

Iferry Jislicr, Jr., i£tBtnset«p at Case loAjtitute of Techrsology, 
"ia ]^sldont of the club aai la ohar^ of dinner aji-rangeaienta. Ife will 
be asslstoa by Hsirold H. Niasley, 3514 .^dcliffe road, aecratary-traasurer. 



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LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

[/,'.') 3300 South Federal Street 
/ Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmen 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 



I:Iay 10, 195 



FOR RELEASE: 



Inroediate 



CHICAGO — Elementary school methods of teaching are responsible for faulty 
practices in reading, according to ¥nrs, Elizabeth Simpson of Illinois Institute 
of Technology, 

In an article in Education magazine, Kts. Simpson, director of the adult 
reading service of Illinois Tech's Institute for Psychological Services, blajned 
oral reading lessons for slov/noss and poor comprehension* 

"A child cannot read faster than he can tal]\, I.lrs. Simpson explained, "and 
relatively few pupils are schooled in the transfer from this oral training to 
silent reading,. 

"The eye is capable of extremely rapid perception and recognition, but it 
must automatically adjust to keep pace with the much slower rate of speech* 

"This type of training also leads to 'vocalizing' which, in its most 
obvious form, can be seen in lip readinge In a less serve, but still improper, 
manner, it results in the reader's hearing in his mind the written words as they 
would be spoken^ " 

Another handicap to faster reading is the belief that the slow reader is 
the one vvho gets the most out of what he reads,, Tests liave proven that the slow 
person tends to lose the meaning, but many teachers persist in the erroneous belief-^ 

"The slow reader must continually be binding together the meanings to each 

individual \7ord into phrases, each phrase into sentenceSc- Because of this he may 

often for<y,et or feel unsure of what he has just road and read it again^ 

"Good silent readings" I.Irs, Simpson concluded, ''should be carried on at a 
rate at least twice as fast as oral readingg." 

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^ from... 

\ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmeni 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Ivfey 10, 1950 
Mailed: Irariiudiate 

FOR RELEASE: 



CHIGaGO -- Three-hundred high school seniors and graduates will 
compete for 39 freshman scholarships in liberal studieso sciences^, and 
engineering Saturday (May I3) at Illinois Institute of Technologyo 

Of the total number of scholarshipSj. I8 cover full tuition for 
four years v/hile the remainder are one-year awardSc 

Winners will be selected on the basis of competitive examinations,, 
high school scholastic records, extra-curricular activities, and personal 
interviev?s.. 

Written examinations will be given at 8:30 a..m. in the North 
Student Union building^ 33rd and Federal streets. 



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h 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmer- 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 

I&y 10, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: 

Irmiediate 



CHICAGO — Modern art enthusiasts will have a field day Saturday 
evening (ivfey I3) at the Institute of Design of Illinois Institute of 
Technology when Institute students viill sponsor an auction of paintings, 
sculpture, and other art v?orks of both students and facultyc 

Bargain prices are expected to prevail as the works -■- many of 
them by well known artists — go under the hammer wielded by Peter 
Pollack, publicity director of the Art Institute, and Brandt Kingsleyf 
a senior student » 

All proceeds of the sale will go to the Institute's student 
scholarship fund;. 

The vrorks are currently being exhibited at the Institute and 
Riccardo's Studio Restaurantc- 

The auction will begin at 7 p.ni.> in the Institute auditorium; 
632 North Dearborn streeto It is free and open to the publicc 



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tj- from... 

5^ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

'J) 3300 South Federal Street 
^ Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 



tlay 11, 1950 



FOR RELEASE: 



Iirmedlate 



CHICAGO — John Pe Makielski, assistant to the dean of engineering 
and swiimning coach at Illinois Institute of Technology, has been appointed regis- 
trar. President Henry T, Heald, announced today,. 

The 25-year-old Iilakielski, with a staff of eleven, is believed to be tha 
youngest registrar in any of the country's major educational institutions^. 

xVs a Navy V-12 student at Illinois Tech, he earned a bachelor's degree in 
mechanical engineering in January 1947 and a bachelor's degree in industrial engineer- 
ing the following June, At present, he is completing v/ork toward a master's degree 
in business administration at the University of Chicago* 

While an undergraduate, Makielski was president of the Illinois Tech student 
association, captain of the varsity swimjning team, secretary and treasurer of 
Honor I (athletic honorary society), chairman of the Interhonorary Council^ and 
president of Tau Beta Pi, highest engineering honorary societyj. 

Before returning to Illinois Tech in September I9489 he worked in the 
engineering department of Singer Manufacturing company, South Bend, Indiana, and 
was then plant layout engineer for Dodge fenufacturing corporation, Mishawaka, 
Indiana,. 

In 1943 during his senior at Central high school, South Bend, he was 
president of the student association, captain of the swimming team, class president^ 
valedictorian, and Indiana All-State high school diving championo 

Ho is the .gon of Mco and IfrSo Joseph J^ Makielski, Edwardsburg, Michigani 



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'■d from... 

%. ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



May 12, 195 

Immediate 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: 



CHICAGO — Sigfried Giedion, one of the leading figures in the 
promotion of modern art and architecture and visiting professor at 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will talk May 18 at the Institute 
of Design of Illinois Institute of Technology, 

He will speak on "Arts A Fundamental Experience." 

Giedion, who has been conducting a series of seminars on "Civic 
Centers and Social Life" at M, I,T», is a native of Switzerland. He was 
educated in Germany and Italy, and is the former secretary-general of 
the International Congress of Modern Architecture, 

Author of numerous books, Giedion's best-known works are "Space, 
TiriB and Architecture" and "Mechanization Takes ComnHnd, " 

The talk will be given in the Institute auditorium, 632 North 
Dearborn street. It will begin at 8 p,m. and is free and open to the 
public. 



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t^ from... 

X ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

i'.'! 3300 South Federal Street 
/ Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department ! 
James W. Armsey, Director ij 



ray 17 » 195 i 
Mailed: Immediate 

FOR RELEASE: 



CHICAGO — Leslie Co Hardison, 21, senior student at Illinois 
Institute of Technology, has been awarded second prize in the midwesterm 
student paper contest sponsored by the undergraduate section of the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 

Hardison, a 194^ graduate of Tilden Technical high school; is 
the son of Ivir. and L1rs„ ./illiam Li, Hardison, 6020 South Normal boulevards 

In competition with college students tliroughout the raidwestern 
area, Hardison received the honor for his paper on "Short Term Wear 
Testing of Diesel Engines,." 

He is president of Illinois Tech's chapters of Tau Beta Pi, 
highest engineering honorary society, and Alpha Sigma Phi, social 
fraternity!. 



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|ld from.,. 

^ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

/'.'! 3300 South Federal Street 
^ Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent I' 
James W. Arnnsey, Director 



Mailed: Ifey l8, \%Q 

FOR RELEASE: ^mediate 



CHICAGO -- Top prizes in a nation-T;ide poster competition 
sponsored by the Society of Tjrpographic Arts v;ere avrarded to two students 
of the Institute of Design of Illinois Institute of Technology,. 

First prize of $500 vjas won by Louis Dvorak, 29 » of 3421 Oak 
F&rk avenue, Berwyn, 111, The $250 second place award was won by R» 
ThoiK's Shorer, 21, Newtons Mass,> 

Both students are in their sixth semester, najoring in visual 
design, Dvorak v;as a prize v/inner in the 1947 Chicago Tribune "Better 
Rooms for Better Living" contesto- 

The poster competition vras held for the National Graphic Arts 
Expositions, Inc., sponsors of the sixth educational graphic arts 
exposition to be held September 11-23 at the International Amphitheatre 
in Chi cage ,■> 



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«f, fr 



>^ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Ijl 3300 South Federal Street 
'' Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
JameiS W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: May 18, I95O 

FOR RELEASE: Iminediite 



CHICAGO — Alunmi of Illinois Institute of Technology have contributed 
$55 1 000 to the Institute during the first quarter of their 195^ alumni fund drive, 
it was announced today by Earl C, Kubicekj director of alunmi relations. 

This figure, Kubicek stated, represents an increase of $9,000 over the 
record total given during the first quarter of last year. 

Duxing the past eight years, alumni have contributed $1,000,000 toward the 
Institute's long-range building program which will cover an area of 110 acres on 
Chicago's near south side.. To date, eight classroom and laboratory buildings and 
three housing structures have been completed. 

Eighty south side alunmi are among the 615 who have asisted with the 

personal solicitation phase during the first quarter of this year's drive» They 
are: 

Francisco A. Alayu, Sl'^k Wferyland avenue; Samuel J. Aurelius, 7648 Kingston 
avenue; IJicolai E,. Beclcmann, 7^30 Vernon avenue; Lewis J,, Bergman, III8 E, h,oV(x 
street; Harry L. Boren, 6304 S, Crandon avenue; J, F, Borrowdale, 7242 S. Crandon 
avenue ► 

Dudley Vf.. Budlong, Jr.,, 7I36 A Columbia avenue, Hammond, Indiana; George 
A,. Buettner, 7215 S,. Ptairie avenuej Earl Jo Oalhoun, 6449 Vernon avenuej Norman 
W,. Carey, 3140 S,. Michigan avenue; Edward R. Carmody, 46IO Oakwood avenue. Downers 
Grove; Donald C. Colby, 6529 Kenwood avenue? John R, Coley, 7238 A Columbia avenuej. 
Hammond, Indiana^ 



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1950 alumni fund workers— Illinois Tech, page two,, south met. section 

Abraham Gorman, 31IO Kenwood avenue; Lewis E, Dillon, 7229 Indiana avenue; 
Rueben V,. Eck, 8139 Drexel avenue; lawrance L. Edlund, 8220 Langley avenue; Donald 
Er Ennis, 8233 Kenwood avenue;; Oscar R, Erickson, 7409 Evans avenue; James De Ferris, 
3140 3, lilichigan avenue, 

Robert B. Fridstein, 2226 E. 70th place; Charles K, Goldberg, IOIO7 Paxton 
avenue; Herbert J.. Goldsmith, 1122 E. 46th street; James L. Haakett, II63 E» 52nd 
street;, Ii'Iiss Genevieve R, Hcaly, 816 E. k3^d street;; Donald K. Hedeen, I84 E, l4th 
street, Chicago Heights, 

Casriel Halperin, 7025 3, Merrill avenue; Henry Re- Heintz, 8422 S, Iiachigan 
avenue; L, G, Herdeg, 9^44 Avalon avenue; Charles H. Herman, 7020 Jeffery avenue; 
Vferren Ee. Hill, 9228 Luella avenue; Eugene F, Hiller, 5321 Vfoodlawn avenue; John 
E, Hines,. 6024 Indiana avenue, 

Millard H, Hunt, IIO56 Avenue J; Horace F, Johnson, 48o6 Evans avenue; 
C. Sidney Jones, 7639 3, Luella avenue; Clifton E. Jones, 45^6 Ellis avenue; Leonard 
Ho Kaplan, 8200 3, Merrill avenue; Lowell E. Kent, 834I Cregier avenue; Mrs, 0, E, 
Kerr, 4627 3, '.Tabash avenue; Ivlathias C, Kill, 7530 Rhodes avenue, 

William C„. Krone, I248 E, 79th street; Francis B. Kruchten, 9^33 Dobson:: 
avenue; Russell L, lawson, IOI35 Avenue L; Edward P, Levirin, 652I 3. Greenwood 
avenue; Raymond E.. Lind, I532 E. 65th place; James W, Lucus, 6210 Rhodes avenue;, 
Ishamel Iifedison, 642I Langley;, John P, Ivfekielski, 33OO 3, Michigan avenue, , 

David Ifershall, 8221 Ridgeland avenue;; Ivlrs, Lucretia E. F^irshall, 4738 Evans 
avenue; George H,v Martin, Jr., 7242 Yates avenue; Donald Y, Milne, 15529 Marshfield 
avenue; Miss Dolores F, Moore^ 5406 3, Michigan avenue; Raymond E, Moseley, 1545 
E.. 60th street; John F.. Muram, 8142 Dorchester avenue, 

l'!rs,. llaurice G, Mcintosh, 6234 Indiana avenue; Harry 3, Nachraan, 7846 3. 
Bennett avenue;. Glenn G, Pangborn, 8428 3. Vernon avenue; 3, L. Ray, 5454 Ellis 
avenue;. Philip A.. Reif, I502 Euclid street, Chica-o Heights, 

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i »'• 



from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



rUDlic rveidTioni i_ic|jai i nicn i 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: lv«ay 13, I95O 

FOR RELEASE: tnmediate 



CHICAGO — Alumni of Illinois Institute of Technology have contributed 
$55 1 000 to the Institute during the first quarter of their 1950 aluinni fund drive, 
it was announced today by Earl Cc Kubiccko director of alumni relations. 

This fi^ure^ Kubicek stated, represents an increase of $9^000 over the 
record total given during the first quarter of last yearo 

During the past eight years alumni have contributed $1,000,000 toward the 
Institute's long-range building program which will cover an area of 110 acres 
on Chicago's near south sideo To datej eight classroom and laboratory buildings 
and tliree housing structures have been completed* 

Eighty-eight southv/est side alumni are among the 615 T;ho have assisted 
with the personal solicitation phase during the first quarter of this year's drive. 
They are: 

Robert H„ Anderson, SOllj. 3, ¥By street;; Robert V« Bairdj II410 Eggleston 
avenue; George J, Beerasterboer j 11517 Parnell avenue; Leonard Bloomy 211|2 So 
Fulaski road;. George L* Bonvallet, llll|.9 Kkplev?ood avenue; Raymond Jo Bosnak, 2342 
Wo 6/j.th street;, Clarence H. Brauer, I700 W^ 105th streets 

John Butkus, 3253 S, Halsted street;; Robert J* Byerwalter, 853/; Tluroop 
street; iTalter J. Clark, 3825 ^o- Morgan street; Edward P, Ka Clarke^ 2312 "J^ 36th 
street; Kenneth He. Cora jod, . 68/|0 3,, Bishop street; Mto and Mrso ".William F, Cramer, 
Jr., 3450 Vi[, 66th street; Donald He Cravener, 2653 i}„ 107th streets Lawrence A^ 
Cullen,. 6237 S. Troy street; Peter J. J. Duerinck, 15I E, 112th street^ 



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1930 alumni fund vorkers — Illinois Tech, page two, south\7e3t met. section 

Jar.ies Dunne, 9813 Not tincham avenue, Oak Lav.-n; Erank S. Egloff, Jr, , 
4121 V.'olf road, ■.Teatcrn Springs;. Max Ephraira, Jr., 7607 S. Seeley avenue; John 
A.. Fleck, 7230 S. Bell avenue;; Edward A, '.7, Ganzer, I2924 3, Division street. 
Blue Island; Henry IL Garvey, 5437 3« Racine avenuoo 

Theodore C. Gault, 75k^ S. Eggleston avenue; Fred C. Gehle, 6222 S, 
Richmond street; Homer H, Geymer, 9939 So Campbell avenue;; Earl 3. Goldberger, 
4306 W, 21st street;, Irwin E» Gostlin, 8508 Sc Bishop street; Edward "h Gross, 
10600 Si- Prospect avenue;^ Edmund J, Grydyk, 6124 3, Francisco avenueo 

Robert A.. Harschnek, 7723 So Ikulina street; Christopher J,, Heaneyj, 
10412 So Park avenue; Edwin Jo Hemzacekj 3908 ",l„ 6lst place; Blake Ha Hoopers 
10626 Vfelden Rirkfj-ay; Philip L^ Huguelet, 6840 So Yale avenue; Eugene Er, Johnson^ 
8922 So Elizabeth street;; Swan Mo Johnson, IO84I Prairie avenue,:, 

Henry C Kaecker, 5440 S„. Loomis street; Charles A* Kaiser, 5^47 S» 
Christiana avenue; Thomas J, Kenny, 8423 3. JJhj street; Richard Ms, Keyes, 11207 
S, Central Park avenue; Francis 3, Kosco, II916 Princeton avenue; J= Russell Kotal, 
5724 S.. Spaulding avenue;; "/alter 3, Kozinski, I2405 3. Ada streeto 

Robert Ao Kraus, 8543 3. Elizabeth street; Otto R. Krause, 11020 Emerald 
avenue; Anthony Kxiz- 67I3 3, laflin street; Casimir A,. Krol, 8749 S, Morgan street; 
John A. larson, 10 N, Stryker avenue, Joliet; Vernon W^ Lester, 10224 3, Aberdeen 
street; Robert Mc Lundbergp 1255 Douglas, Flossmoorc 

Carl 3, lyklmfeldtj I353 W. Marquette road? Roman T. Mankus, 2605 Vfn 6oth 
street; .^'illiam E^ Manstrom^. 6508 Lowe avenue; Richard E, Meagher t, 9700 3, Prospect 
avenue; Erwin F, Mezera, 9824 3, Hamlin avenue,. Evergreen Park; Edward To Miniekaj 
3303 S. Lowe avenue; George A„ Morgan, 9372 Longwood driven 

Joseph F. Oles, 2622 Stark street; Carl A„ Olson, 964I Oakley avenue;, 
Edv^ard E, Pfeschke, 8606 3., \Yolcott avenue;, Milton F* Pleva, 6022 So Artesian 
avenue;, Adolph P. Pocius, 7128 So, Troy avenue* 



1950 alumni fund \7orker3 — Illinois Tech, page tlxree, southv/ost met, section 

Elmer Pn. Renstrom, Jro , IIO39 S, P&rnell avenue; Carl J. Reutter, 99Q9 
So Bell avenue; Ktrs. Dorothy Eo Reynolds, 7106 Stewart avenue; Daniel Roesch, 
2136 Vif, 103th place;, Paul J, Rupprecht, 9342 S, Elzabeth street; Charles J, Ryant, 
Jrc , 716 W« 82nd street; Herbert W. Sauorman, 2032/.7c 103rd street. 

Wo. Otto Sauermann, 2032 ",!« 103rd street; John. J^ Schilf, 8045 S, Emerald 
avenue; EdsTard Wa.ter Schmidt, 6949 T/entworth avenue; Charles K Schroeder, 1536 
T/,. 70th street; Ebrl G<, Shaver, IO946 S„ Normal avenue; Vincent Smatlik, 6908 
S.,. '.fent'.vorth avenue; L. H. Streb, 9^34 Vandcrpoel avenuco 

Chessman M« Summers, 2051 IK- 119th place, Blue Island; Carl A. Sv/anson, 
6549 S. Seeley avenue; './alter C- Thatcher, 2127 VJ, 114th place; Charles D, Thomsen, 
1722 .;.. 104th street; John Po Vaikutis, 4233 S„ Mozart street; Eugene P„ Virtue, 
533 '-'^^ 65th place; Richard J,. ".Tagner, 8329 S, Bishop streeto 

John F,. "Jardell, 9023 S, T;ky street; k„ L.. Winlcler, 5730 S. Hermitage 
avenue; James N„ \7ognura, 10157 Lovre avenue; Richard '■! > Regensburger , 849 J^rk drives 
Flossmoor; Raymond J. Spaeth, IO825 3, Jkirfield avenue; Earl C, Kubicek, 8852 
So ftirnell avenue; Hernnn Ao Seemann, 17922 3, Sacramento avenue, Homewood, 

E, Ls Singlerj 18539 Dundee road^. HoraeT7ood-> 



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-i... ; ; i .; 



■...-, r- / 'l-V 



', from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

! 3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmenl 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: May l3, I950 

FOR RELEASE: Inmediatc 



CHICAGO — Alir^_^,i of Illinois Institute of Technology have contributed 
$55 » 000 to the Institute during the first quarter of their 1950 alumni fund drivcj 
it was announced today by likrl C. Kubicek, director of alumni relations,. 

This figure, Kubicek stated, represents an increase of $9,000 over the 
record total fjiven during the first quarter of last year,, 

During the past eight years, alumni have contributed $1,000,000 toward the 
Institute's long-range building program which will cover an area of 110 acres on 
Chicago's near south side. To date, eight classroom and laboratory buildings and 
three housing structures have been completed* 

One hundred and fifteen north side alumni are among the 615 v/ho have assisted 

with the personal solicitation phase during the first quarter of this year's driveo 

They are: 

Robert Ja Afton, 8037 N, Kenton, Skokie; 

Magnus J, Ahlstromer, Jro , I625 Grace street; George J. Andrews, 1506 

Rosemont avenue; Joseph A,, Bacci, 683I N, Hamilton avenue;,; Robert D. Barrett, 1354 

v/, Estes avenue;, Roy E. Baur, I469 Pensacola avenue; Herbert E, Bay, 6459 Glenvrood 

avenue;, Ernest S, Beaumont j 6236 N,,. V/hipple avenue,, 

Abraham So Benjamin, 5220 N, Kenmore avenue;, Monroe B, Bowman, I525 Estes 
avenue; Thomr.s \l. Boyle, II41 North Shore avenue; TJilliam Bradley, 4225 No Broadway; 
Lavnrence P,. Brown, 994 Spruce street, Winnetka;- A. Co- Buckettp 1010 I»]ain street, 
Evanston; Howard A. Carter, 1174 Cherry street, 'Tinnetka, 

Julian C. Chaderton,. 47OO N. 'Winchester avenue; Thomas G<, Cleaver, 63OO 
N.. Talra:\n avenue; Theodore H, Cole, 144 Callan avenue, Evanstono 



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1950 alunmi fund -.Tork^rs — Illinois Tech, page tv;o, north met. section 

James A. Davidson, 1206 Simpson, Evanston; Lewis Davidson, 643O N, Glenv/ood 

avonu>-,; John 3, Delraan, 425 Roscoe street; Albert Jo DeLong,. I814 Lincoln Park V/estg 

Curtis W. Diemecke, 1424 Kirk street, Evanston; John Lo Donoghue, 2200 Sherman 

avenue, Evanston; Edward D, Duke, 2030 Bradley place, 

Ezra v;. Eriksen, 4701 Beacon street;, Raymond Co Fasick, 1739 Devon avenuej; 
George E,. EroSt, 209 S. LaSalle' street; 
Iv!artin Pulirer, 242 'ialden drive, Glencoe; Fdss Edna Le Gaul, 5410 N, './ayne avenue; 

Herman L, Golan, Zt44 "■'• Belmont avenue; Myron Goldsmithj 1619 Morse avenue; Paul 

Goldsmith, 4236 N.. Kenraore avenue; w'illiam Graf , Jr., I702 liJanchoster road, '..'heatono 

Chedo P» Graham, 525 '■^' Arlington place;, V/illiam Co Graves, 6245 N. Oakley 
avenue;, Carl A, Gustafson, 443 ElraiTood avenue, Evanston;- James ".7, Hammond, 1217 
Asbury avenue, "./innetka; Frank T,. Ifenneraan, 142I Sherwin avenue; B, Emmet Hartnett, 
700 ./, Irving I&rk road; Ray "i» Kaxvkins, 2835 Lunt avenue© 

Henry ./. Herbst, 2144 Beechwood avenue, '.Jilmetten Richard Jt Herst, 5^39 
Nj Talman avenue; Arthur Henry Jens, 1638 Juneway terrace; Thore A„ Johnson, 2224 
Ridgelee road, Highland park; Burton M, Joseph, 6317 N^ Sheridan road; Nathaniel 
Koenigsberg, I528 Morese avenue; Alfred Re. Kubitz, 506 Ashland avenue, River Foresto 

F«. Hovfard Lane, 3I E. Elm street; './illiam ./• Lange, 6728 N, Campbell avenue; 
Elv.'ood Oo Langill, 416 V/, Surf street;, Stanley P. lapin, l623 Columbia avenue; 
Fred L. Leason, Jr.., 615I N, "Jinthrop avenue; David Jo Leraieux, 1658 Bryn Ivdawr 
avenue;, Norimn Lettvin, 1143 •^=> North Shore avenue* 

Israel S, Loe\7enberg, 2842 Sheridan road, Myron E» Lukcy, 23IO Thayer avenue,. 
Evanston; Donald J, Maihock, 3720-2- North Pinegrove avenue; Edv/ard V, Mnlela, 919 
Eighth street, ..'aukegan; Peter Jo Klarschall, 2009 Greenwood avenue, './ilmette; 
Sherwood E» Mee, 2245 Morse avenue; Jacque L, Meister, 4439 N, ",/olcott avenue^ 

David L. Messer, 1558 './, Juneway terrace; Martin Meyer, 6117 N, Richmond 
street; Odd Meyer, 13OO Hood avenue; Emil J. Minx, 7008 N, RockvTell street; Robert 
R. Mix, 100 No I^alle street;, Frank P» Mueller, 2022 Arthur avenueo 



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1950 alujnni fund workers— Illinois Tech, page three, north met. section 

Robert ..",. Mueller, 4826 Parker avenue; J. Warren McCaffrey, 1200 Greenvraod 

avenue, './ilmette; Robert F. Negele, 2125 Belmont avenue; Harold E, Nelson, 55^7 

N. Glon7;ood avenue; Thorvald M. Nelson, 524 Belden avenue; J, Stanley Ness, 

Rto §1, Box 133, Wiieaton; Robert B. NevTmani 6412 N. Talman §venuej, Delbert P, Noren, 
1427 Berwyn avenue. 



Edward i. Nudelrnan, 6014 No Francisco avenue; Robert A, Oldenburg, 

N,. ./olcott street;: Karl H. Otte, I32O Rosedale avenue; Kent H= Parker, ll3l Oakley 

avenue, ./innotka; Harry N, Ikrsons, 63OI LalOTOod avenue; /illiam Eo Penfold, 7^9 

Windsor road,, Glenview; Pfeiul E, Pfeifer, 1967 Balmoral avenue;. Oscar Mo. Pinsof, 234 
Dennis lane, Glencoe» 

Irwin P. Pochterp 1451 '^o- Catalpa avenue; './illiam Ho Poplctt, 61I Thatcher 
avenue. River Forest:. Minor C, Pricej 835 No Summit street, Wheaton; Hubert Fo. 
Rehfeldt, 2255 Giddings street;. Charles H, Riesz, 1241 N. State street j A, S., 
Hitter, 2608 N.. Ivlagnolia avenue; L, P» Rcrpeko 243^ N,, lawndale avenue, 

Anthony B, Ross, 3748 N, Inkewood avenue; Max M. Salzman,. 87I Burrf Winnetkaj 

Ogden W, Sandborg, 3442 N, Greenview avenue; Seymour Saperstein, 2716 N, Hampden 

court; Harold 'i. Scholin, 506O2- Winchester avenue;, Seymour K, Shapiro, 2503 W^ 

Leland avenue; Arthur Jo Slingerland, 83O Elmwood avenue, Evanston* 

Harold Eo Smith, 69 Akenside road. Riverside;, Monroe A* Smith, 107 East 
Jefferson avenue, Wheaton; David M, Sniader, 7027 N,. Glenwood avenue; Frank 'iio 
Spaulding, Jr,., 909 'Washington street; John H, Stern, 8I7 W, Altgeld street,*; 
Frederic Po. Strauch, 
1519 Central avenue, './ilmette; E^ W» Stroctor, 6432 N« Trumbull avenue. Lincolnwood; 

W, Lindsay Suter, 329 Locust road, Winnetkaj Benjamin Ro Sutton, 93^ W, Cuyler avenue 

Hcnry A. Thorsen, 1229 Maple, Wilmette; Harry G, Todman, 2340 Commonwealth 

avenue; Alex Toth, 723I Nc Kilpatrick avenue,, Lincolnv/ood; George H. Von GehTs 

2707 Euclid Park place, Evanston; Paul P. Werlein, 3713 N. Virginia avenue: 

Harrison D.. Wilson, Jrc , 1223 W, Jarvis avenuej; Edwin A, Wojcik, 2938 N, Sprinfield 

avenue o 

Howard Ao. Wolfberg, 7606 N^ Bosworth avenue; Herbert A, Wolffj 7353 N» 

Damen avenue;, Ivfeiximilian Ao Zink, 2140 Foster avc.nue. 



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1950 alumni fund workers — Illinois Toch, page four, north nict» section 

Norman D„ Buchling, 19/{.l Sunset Ridge road, Glunview; Victor R. Clark, 
1544 .;» Pratt blvd.; A.. J. R„ Curtis, 934 Bonnie Brae, River Forest;, './illiam N, 
Erickson, I605 Ridge avenue, Evanston; liirold ■.7, Munday, J^6 Oakdalo avenue; 
Vernon A. Peterson, lii-4 Sunset road,. Highland Park; Jolin P, Sanger, 2714 Grant 
street, Evanston» 

JohnJc. Schoramer, 421 "-K Melrose street; Louis C, Thoclocko, I504 Central 
avenue, "./ilmette*. 

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t from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

) 3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmeni 
Janaes W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: ^-^Y iQ, 195^ 

FOR RELEASE: inmoiiato 



CIiICAGO -- Alumni of Illinoia Institute of Technology have contributed 
$55»000 to the Institute during the first quarter of their 195^ alurnni fund drive, 
it v/as announced today by Earl C, Kubicek, director of alumni relations^ 

This figure, Kubicek stated, represents an increase of $9^000 over the 
record total given during the first quarter of last yearo 

Diuring the past eight years, alumni have contributed $1, 000, 000 tov/ard 
the Institute's long-range building program which v;ill cover an area of 110 acres 
cm Chicago's near south side.. To date, eight classroom and laboratory buildings 
and three housing structures have been completedo. 

One hundred and three northvrest side alurnni are among the 615 v/ho have 
assisted \."ith the personal solictation phase during the first quarter of this year's 
drive » They are: 

EdT/ard Go A.very, Tower lakes, 
Barrington;, Melvin H, Balikov, 4137 N, Kimball avenue; Curtis Ro Beeler, lakoview 
Villa, Wauconda; Charles .K Behrens, 3813 N,. Avers avenue; Charles F, BesSg 4545 
N,. Lawndale avenue; Lucian C^ Bielicki, 50OI './rightvrood avenuGo 

Elmer J,,. Bievcr, 97Q' Jeannette avenue, DesPlaincs; V/illiam 3. Bodinus, 
6608 No. Keating avunue; Roland Be Boertitz, 5712 N<,. 'Jashtenaw avenuoj Robert E,, 
Boyar,. 5548 No Iifeingo avenue; Melvin F. Brennwald, 5906 VJ. Newport avenue; Jerome 
C. Brichta, Jr».,, 4953 Concord place;, Ifrs,. Robert T^ Clark, 1024 N^ Central avenue. 

James D. Cole, 125 Prairie avenue, I^rk Ridge; Patrick Jo. Colombo, 2807 
1/0. Shakespeare avenue; John A. Cramer, 4530 N, Kimball avenuGo 



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1950 aluivmi fund vrorkcrs — Illinois Tech, page two, northr/ost rrict. section 

James F, Cubbidge, 4729 '.J, Deming place;; George E. Cuonzo, 2946 N, Nordica 
avenue; Robert S. Czeropski, 3542 ./, Beach avenue; Edv/ard R. Darmstadt, 5237 •'« 
Melrose street; Miss T.ladeline Dent, 3117 •!» Fullerton avenue;; Bernardo Ro Diangson, 
4846 N, .v'ashtenaw avenue;, Thonas M. Dressier,. 734^ N, Bell avenue* 

Jacob D, Dumelle, 743^ '■'• Gregory street; Thomas Jo Dunsheath, 4319 N» 
Saviryer avenue; Earry M. EssingtOHj 114 S, Elmhurst avenue. Mount Prospect; James 
E„. Fairbanks, 5349 Potomac avenue; Norton Ferber, 4^45 Nt. LaPorte avenue; Roland 
G„ Fischer, Grand avenue, Rt. 1, Bensenvillco 

Charles J„ Foxgrover, Jr, , 149 B^. Hemlock street. Park Forest j Mr. and Vsrs-y 
Francis Frost, Jr.., 3655 '■!»■ Belleplaine avenue; Robert F^ Grunwald, 655I N, Os'ikosh 
avenue; ■ Conrad Co. Hogue, 919 

Augusta, Oak Park; Eugene M, Imbur, 6616 Melrose avenue; Miss Hope Pc Iversen, 
7157 Oriole avenue. 

Joseph Jc Janicek, 8014 3, Sangamon street;, Frank Jo- Jencius, 4937 -^^ 
George street; Harold C, Johnson, 6029 N. IJarlem avenue; V/alter A. Jordt, 1741 78th 
avenue; Elra^vood Park;, U Mitchel Josephs, 30OI N» Grcsham avenue; Viggo i.T. Kalhauge, 
7815 Balmoral road; Ralph Keenan, 601 Sc iostern avenue. Park RidgCo 

Seymour Kessler, 3053 Argyle street; ./illiam M. Kiefor, 3851 N, Kildare 
avenue; Edward I. Knorring, II5 N, Greenwood avenue, Palatine; Carl E» Kreibich, 
5526 Agatite avenue; H» F* Krusej 2540 '.1, Leland avenue; Joseph A, Kubik, 41IO No 
Pittsburgh avenue; Jilton F, Kuffel, RoR. §1, Box 295, Dundee, 

Arnold B. Larsen, I40I N,. Ivhyfield avenue; Garfield P, Lennartz, 2741 
Fullerton avenue; './illiam Lc Long, 7329 Cortland street, Elmfv^ood Rirk,* Emil 0<, 
Mandler, 3284 './rightwood avenue; Christian W. MarkSj II5 y/ilma place, Iferk Ridge;. 
I^ul Miller Martin, 6548 N, Richmond street, 

Thaddeus R,. Ifoslanka, 5439 ''L George street; Lcander './., Matsch, 224 
Belleplaine avenue, Park Ridge;; John A, I.litchell, 2633 N. Central Park avenue. 



1950 alumni fund workers — Illinois Tech, page three, northwest met. section 

Glenn M, ]\fontgomGry, 5748 Nc Campbell avenue; Henry G, Mueller, k3k7 No 
■.i/olcott avenue; Hans P^ Nelson, I51O Belle Plaine avenue, Park Ridge; D» J» 
Niotis, 3920 Potomac avenue; Richard F, Odenv;aldt, 6269 Nc Knox avenue; Carl W, 
Ohgrvjn, A954 N, Kilpatrick avenue; Stanley Go Oskandy, 6061 N^, Newburg stre^to 

Stanley M,- Osri, 4100 No Kenneth avenue; Harry A^ Palm, 525O N., Spaulding 
avenue; Stanley A» Parke, 4821 N, Keeler avenue; Donald V/o Parker, Jr, , 4904 Nr, 
Monitor avenue; James Mc. Parker, 20l6 N„^ Humboldt blvdo; Anthony F- Phso'u'icz, 
5736 No I&rmora avenue; '.Jilliam A» Pauke, 6342 N». Nokorais avenue* 

Robert E, Pearson, 4324 Crystal street; Nando J= PetterinOj 4320 ",/% Kamerling 
avenue; David B, Pivanj 3820 N,. Kedsie avenue; John L„ Ploss, Jr, , 4427 ..'rightwood 
avenue; Theodore 3. Pryst, 5485 No. Marmora avenue; Lester Rowen, 4017 N, Central 
Park avenue; Huntington R. Schlagel, 1435 Jefferson street, DesPlaineSo 

./illiam Fo Schlax, 5209 Cullom avenue; Albert C. Schmitt,. I438 N, Hamlin 
avenue; Harry F, Seeberger, 3950 Pine Grove avenue; Mto I&irion E. Shaxv, 839 3o 
Prospect avunue, Park Ridge;, Richard A. Simonsen, 2633 No 74th court, Elmwood Park; 
Ole lo Stancelandj 3729 N, Newcastle avenue; Donald G, Storey, 5621 N. Rock^jell street 

John E„ Tater, 573O Roscoe street; H« "./ray Thoss, 3917 Nc Paris avenue^ 
George Jo Trinkaus, 3817 No. Newcastle avenue; IVhrtin^H,. Vandervelde, 7229 Lunt 
avenue; Francis Go Varenhorst, 214 S, Merrill avenue. Park Ridge; Carl E, './eber, 
1246 No. Parkside avenue; Arthur H. './elsch, 5326 N, Nashville avenue* 

Eberhard Ec iettley, 7058 No teison avenue; Guy F. \/etzel, 1010 ./. Crescent 
avenue. Park Ridge;, Ro J. \Iick, 3742 N^. Monticello avenue; Harvey A. V/illiams, 
1446 No. Lockwood avenue; Charles V. Zalcski, 6573 Ebinger drive, Niles; "./illiam: 
Fo Schroeder, 4.323 Balmoral avenue; './illiam ':K Zechel,. 227 3= Oak street, Palatine* 
llxo Marvin A. Kagan, 3733 Ihstwood avenue. 



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J. from.,. 

X ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmeni 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 



Ifey 13, 1950 



FOR RELEASE: 



Immediate 



CPilCxlGO — Alumni of Illinois Institute of Technology have contributed 
$55«000 to the Institute during the first quarter of their 195^ alumni fund drive, 
it vns announced today by Ehrl C. Kubicek, director of alumni relations. 

This figure, Kubicek stated, represents an i-icrease of $9^000 over the 
record total given during the first quarter of last year. 

During the past eight years^ alumni have contributed $1,000,000 toward the 
Institute's long-range building program which will cover an area of 110 acres on 
Chicago's near south side» To date, eight classroom and laboratory buildings and 
three housing structures have been completed* 

One hundred and thirty-seven v:e3t side alumni are among the 615 who have 
assisted with the personal solicitation phase during the first quarter of this 
year's drive^ They are: 

Edw-rd Armstrong, 201 FairviuW, EliTihurst; Francis M. Baldwin, 722 N. Grove 

avenue, Oak Park; Frank G, Barclay, 58I8 ./. Superior street; Norman D, Barficld, 

112 No. Lincoln street, Hinsdale; Stephen J<, Bartha, III6 N„ Christiana avenue; 

Lo Robert Beardsley, 326 4th street, Downers Grove; Henry F. Becker, 352 E, Hickory 

street, Lombard; Ivliss Gertrude Behrens, 10 19 Wisconsin, Oak Park; Otto A, Bischmann, 

48 N, Brain^red avenue, LaGrange^ Arnold V/o Blackshaw, 387 Arlington avenue, 
Elmhursto 

Harold H, Boesenberg, 50I Hannah avenue. Forest Park; Edward M, Bosanac, 

1813 3. 51st av>-nue, Cicero; George '//, Boylan, 4914 ■'» Rice street; Vfarren G» 

Brockmeier, 305 Forest avenue. Oak Park; Mack G., Burkey, 5908 './. Ohio street; 

Edward J. Burris, 5157 ./, './ashington blvd..; "./endall Burris, './. Emerson avenue, 
Glen Ellyn* 

-more- 



1950 alumni fund workers — Illinois Tech, page tuo, v;cst mot. section 

MiGS Florence M. Butler, 5^49 ''■^* '-''ashington blvd. ; Jilliam G, Carnecie,. Jr., 
1006 Douglas, Flossmoor; Gilbert S. Chubinski, 23Z|i|. Buckingham avenue, iostchostur; 
Miss Grace E. Clement, 40 N» Parkside avenue; Miss Lillian V. Clement, 40 N. 
Parksido avenue; ..'alt>^r T, Collins, 710 Clarence avenue. Oak Park, 

Robert F. Dalton, 5909 7. Ohio street; ./illiard './. Dickur, 714 N, Elmvraod 
avenue, Oak Park; Ellis H, Doane, Jr., ^^S S. Lincoln avenue, Aurora; Carl F, 
Doerr, 701 Konilv;orth avenue, Glen Ellyn; Hirvey H, Dozois, 411 N, Ridgeland 
avenue, Oak P^.rk; Howard A. Dvorak, 3539 iirden, Brookf ield. 

Henry Eickelberg, 3l8 Forest avenue. Oak Park; lo Robert Elcstrom, 443 
'iashington street, Elmhurstj Byron Ellis, Jr., 924 N, Harvey avenue, Oak Park; 
Donald Ho. Fleig, 483 3.. Alfred street, Elgin; Charles Frankel, 3505 "./, Adams street; 
Robert V. Goldsborough, 110 Geneva avenue, Elraliurst; ialter M. Greaves, 4442 ./est 
End a venue a- 

John i. Griffith, 2123 Jarren blvd.; Frank G. Grothman, 3002 Montrose 

avenue; Harry S. Fnrned, 235 S., Marion street, Oak Park; George S. Hoff, 3836 ".J. 
Adams street; Herbert C, Hoff, 419 N. Ashland avenue; 

John Horamos, 305 N, York, Elmhurst; Oscar R. Huster, 919 Circle 

avenue. Forest Park; George M. Ives, Jr., 4221 Arthur avenue, Brookf ioldo 

J, Janak, 314 Ruby street, Clarendon Hills; E,, A. Janssen, 1000 N. Humplirey 

avenue. Oak Ihrk; William A,. Janssen, 435 3. Taylor avenue, Oak Park; Robert Jensen, 

49 N^ Plum Grove avenue. Palatine; Halvard T, Johnson, 206 E, Hickory street, 

Lombard; John B, Johnson, 820 N, Ridgeland avenue. Oak Park. 

Arthur M. Kaindl, 260O ■./. Chicago avenuej: Paul Kane, 123 N, ,7aller avenue; 

Robert Karbeling, 3337 ./, 19th street;; Mrs, Laura 3. Kennedy, 4000 'Washington blvd,.f 

David ./. Kettlc:strings, 835 N. Grove, Oak Ihrk; Robert C. Kidd, 356 Myrtle, 

Elmhurst; Peter J, Klaphaak, 7121 Stanley, Bcr\7yno 

Budd J„ Kubicka, 3II6 Clarence avenue, Bcrvryn; Alfred R. Kubitz, 506 

Ashland avenue. River Forest^. ' • • 



-more- 



1950 alujimi fund workers — Illinois Tech, page three, west mete: section 

Huco n. Kuehn, 59l6 Tif, Superior street; V'illiani '.Ts Laeraraer, 3OO N* Larch 
avenue, Elraliurst; Arthur Ro. Lake, 60O Euclid avenue, Glen Ellyn: Herbert E<, Lense, 
3506 3, Gunderson avenue, 3erwyn; Stanley M, Lind, 259 Churchill place, Clarendon 
Hills, 

Edmund Pe Lomasney, 579 Kearsage, Elrahurst; Robert Co. Longwell( /4.61 Parkview 
avenue^ Elmhurst; V,. E, Lowden, 729 S, Lincoln street, Hinsdale j Charles Go ^.(ackie, 
/j.730 V/est End avenue; Harry D. Magnuson^ Box 405o Glen Ellyn; Damon Martin, Jro , 
i|l|12 Blanchan avenue, Brookfield; Robert E^ Maxant, 723 Arlington road. Riversides 

Miss Alice M. Moffett, 8OO Y/ashington blvd,., Maywood; JVkx "-<<, Horowitz, 
3920 Wo. Jackson blvd,; Gerald E, Myers^ 324 Sg Loomis street, Naperville; Thomas 
E, McDowell, 1010 N„ Grove avenue, Oak Park; Forrest C„ Neil, 225 N, Austin blvdoj 
Bert So Nelson, Box 3h7t Westmont; John J. Noble, 2440 S, Euclid avenue, Bervfyno 

Raymond Fc Novy, 417 Jerrick road, Riverside;., Robert Cs. Osborne, 322 
Washington^ Oak Phrk; Milton Fo Page, lhk5 Norfolk, '.'festchester; 

Edward F. Pohlmann, 258 N. Monterey avenue, Elrahurst; 
Clarence if. Price, 159 S. Stewart street, Lombard. 

Richard Jo Rasmussen, 204 Sim avenue, Elrahurst; Edvrard F-^ Reardon, 817 So 
Highland avenue, Oak Park; Albert A, Rootberg, 5557 'ih Jackson blvd,; r&ul A,. Roys, 
709 S» Gunderson, Oak Park; "-'/alter P. Rusanowski, 245 Sc 13th avenue, Maywood; 
Sherwin Schaffer, 3925 \h Gladys avenue; Robert J, Schneller, 4106 W, Cerraak road,. 

Paul J, Schrader, 358 E. Ravine road, Hinsdale^ Julius Simon, 33l6 W. 
Lexington street; William E, Sirvatka, 284I Sc Maple avenue, Berwyn; Eric E, Smith, 
1927 S. 25th avenue, Maywood; Frederick L, Smith, I619 S<. 15th avenue, Maywood; 
Newton Wo Snashall, 698 Duane, Glen Ellyn; David M. Sniader, 7027 N. Glenwood; 

Anton A. Sobolik, 200 Geneva avenue, Elmhurst; Alvin C, Sod er holm, 306 
l-.laple avenue, ELmliurst;; Richard H, Stevenson, 221 Washington blvdo , Oak Park; 
George B. Strand, 1127 Edmer avenue. Oak Ifeirk, 



1950 alumni fund vorkers — Illinois Tech, page four, T;est raeto section 

Joseph E, Sullivan, 421 3. Taylor, Oak Park; L, Loren S\7artZg 4110 Linden 
avenue. Western Springs; John H, Sweeney, 321 N, Ridgeland avenue, Oak Park: 
John P. Tansey, 127 N, Lavergne avenue; Harvey 0, Tenner, 1119 Augusta, Oak Park}; 
Mr„ and Mrs,. Robert A, Tetik, 521 S, Spring avenue, LaGrange^ 

.Ulliam L. Thompson, 437 Sherwood road, LaGrange Park; George Eo Tinteraj 
l3Zj.6 S, Wenonah avenue, Berwyn; Ray E, Tubergen, 796 Hillside avenue, Elmhurstj 
Frank R. Valvoda, 2837 Wenonah avenue, Ber\7yn; Richard N. Vandekieft, 347 "''• 
St» Cliarles road, Villa I^rk; Nicholas Virgilio, 90I S. Loomis streets 

Norbert Cr. Vojtaj I25 Hianatha, Clarendon Hills; Iferold Ac 'J'ahlstrand. 
5233 "I.. Crystal street; John D, "(Yarhus, 223 '■''f'' Sth street, Hinsdale; Sidney 3, 
"'.Yestby, 4'32 Pfeirkside avenue, Elmhurst; Lawrence E. "Whitehead, 820 S„ Charlotte, 
Lombard; Vfesley S„ Wieting, 600 Lyman avenue, Oak Parko 

Robert A. ".Tight, 120 N. '.Vashington, Hinsdale; Ivliss Ida ■7„ ".Tright, 2315 S, 
Clinton avenue, Berwynj; John S, "Jysocke, 2248 S« Highland avenue, BervTyn; Edr/ard 
Yuknis, 4159 '"^« Adams street; Clifford Zitek, 3602 Scoville avenue, Berwyn; Walter 
Painter, 211 N„ Grove avenue. Oak Park* 

F. Gale V/alker, 826 N. Kenilworth, Oak Pa-k; Otto Kuehn, 563 S^ l/ain streets 
Lombard; Ralph 1.5. Faust, I327 Heidorn avenue, V/estchester; Fted Taylor, Box 303, 
Winfield; Harold F. Carey, 2826 Fulton street; FirSo Talmage C. Henderson, 2249 
Ifeypole avenue; Harry Steinberg, 2203 ''^" Chicago avenue. 



-mtw- 



i 



■ from.,. 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

! 3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmeni 
Jannes W. Arnnsey, Director 



Mailed: K'ay l3, 19^0 

FOR RELEASE: Imniediate 



CHICAGO — Alumni of Illinois Institute of Technology have contributed 
$55 f 000 to the Institute during the first quarter of their 1950 alumni fund drive, 
it was announced today by Ikrl C, Kubicek, director of alumni relationso 

This fi^'ire, Kubicek stated, represents an increase of $9,000 over the 
record total r;iven during the first quarter of last year. 

During the past eight years, alumni have contributed $1,000,000 tov/ard the 
Institute's long-range building program which will cover an area of 110 acres on 
Chicago's near south side. To date, eight classroom and laboratory buildings and 
three housing structures have been completed. 

Eighty-eight out-of-town alumni are among the 615 who have assisted v/ith 
the personal solicitation phase during the first quarter of this year's drive* 
They are: 

Rudolph '^h Bartsch, 3615 Rose Mear avenue, Hollyrrood; Thomas '>'?» Bohmker, 
905 So Oakr/ood, Geneseo; Merle '.•1', Dargelj 205 Carrie, Peoriaj Fred H, Druminond, Jr^ > 
510 Vu Jackson street, ■•foodstock; Arthur Moeller, II35O Chenault street, Los Angeles ^ 
California; Tho^nas M. Mooreo 304 Beacon place, Munster, Indianae 

Russell H. Perkis, 1949 Benedict circle, Sto. Albans, V/est Virginia; '.'/, Ho 
Pittelko, 1341 Hull avenue, 'Jestchester;; R,. Charles Ronk, 601 I-Iamilton blvd., 
Peoria;, George L.. I^rkhurst, IO75 V/insor avenue. Piedmont, California; Clinton E. 
Stryker, 740 N. Planl<:inton avenue, Milwaukee, VJisconsin, 

Frank J. './ise, 200 N. Lansdowne avenue, Lansdovme, Pennsylvania; Robert 
lo. Wishnick, 214 Trenor drive, New Rochette, New York, 



1950 alumni fund -ivorkera— Illinois Tech, page two, out-of-town section 

Harold S, Ellington, 937 Tronibley road, Grosse Point, Michiganj Harry P. 
Eichin, 710 Skyline drive,. Park Hill, North Little Rock, Arkansas; Anton J. Groh, 
Route 1, Box 55I1 IVesno, Californiaj Milton J. Adamson, 195^ Thayer avenue, Los 
Angeles, California;. Miss Jane G, Goelet, 440 S, Bonnie Brae, Los Angeles, California, 

Grant L.. Ifensen, 7935 Chase avenue, Los Angeles, California; Lavjrence Nadel, 
1546 S, Shenandian street, Los Angeles, California; Albert Ao 3chv;artz, 8227 
KirkvvTood drive, Los Angeles, California; Lcroy Simpson, 319 Delaware avenue. 
Redwood City, California; Harold B, Nicholas, 4027 Randolph street, San Diego, Califs 

Charles Fo Rowbotham,. 3IOI Divisadero street, San Francisco, California; 
V/illiani F,. Thornton, 33 Eo Empire street, San Jose, California; Thoinas H» Hart,. 
773 Mornings ide drive, N^.E,. „ Atlanta, Georgia; James Go Cooney, 3202 i7, IvCain street, 
Belleville; Charles G, McHugh, Box 307, Astoria; './alter Jo. Zwieraycki, 7904 Elm. 
avenue p Rockford> 

Frederick D, Payne, IO3O Fayette avenue, Springfield; Ray Parker, R.Ro #2, 
Godfrey; Louis P. Allaire, 2201 Shernan blvd, , Fort \feyne,. Indiana; B, H, Peterson, 
5121 Rosslyn avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana;, Richard A, Huster, 120 '.7, 8th street, 
Mishav/aka, Indiana; Robert F, Tosky, 8939 E. Deleware parkivay, Munster; Indianao 

Robert L, Fawcett, IO53 5'th avenue, S.E. , Cedar Rapids, lov/aj Jo M, D» 
Sheehan, 917 './arren, Topeka, Kansas; Milton F» Veck, 820 N, Pfeirkivood lane, '.Tichita^ 
Kansas; Kenneth Ao Rees, 2202 Government street, Baton Rouge, Louisiana; ReVo John. 
L, liiapp, 212 Division street, Marshall,, Michigan, 

Reynold Steinert, 27450 Goldengate drive, Birmingham, Michigan; Earl H. 
Smith, 2161 "Jest Lincoln road, Birmingham, Michigan; Carl Lc Shermer, 626 Cherry 
lane, Ikst Lansing, Michigan;, M. C. Larkin, 353 Fuller, S,E, ,, Grand Rapids, 
Michigan; Robert A. Rehwaldt, II07 Clinton road, Jackson, Michigan, 

Mrso. Jeannette B, Liefbroer, 989 Mount Olivet road, Kalamazoo, Michigan; 
Fred '.K DeMoney, 1024 23th avenues SoE,, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 



1930 aluinni fund workers — Illinois Tech, page three, out-of-tov/n section 

llrst. James C, Logan, 1600 Independence street, Cape Girardeau, Missouri; 
Hubert M. Henry, 2114 Fayette street, North Kansas City, Missouri;. Robert H, Coyle, 
7346 Burrwood drive, Nornandy, Missouri; Garrett B« James, Jr.,, 45^2 N, Kings highvray, 
St.. Louis, Missouri; Landrith B, P&rker, 329 Selma avenue, '.febster Groves, Missourio 

Leonard K, Dicke, 1145 Princeton avenue, Billings, Montana; Frank T, Ksiazek, 
3021 Benson street, Camden, Ne\7 Jersey; Harold E, Rose, 15 Washington Park, 
Maplewood, Nev; Jersey; Joseph Abrams, 30 Sandford avenue, Plainfield, New Jersey;, 
John M. Birdsong, 523 ColejiBn place, "■.Testf ield, Neiv Jersey. 

Arthur D, Taylor, 3306 43rd place, Sandia Base, Albuquerque, New Mexicoj 
Race N.. V.'ilt, 318 3» Oak street, Alburquorque, Ne./ Mexico; Miss Hattie C, Lewis, 
266 Decatur street, Brooklyn, New York; Salter R, Ruegnitz, I7O" Ashland avenucj 
Buffalo, New York; Michael V/. Larinoff, 149 E, 36th street. New York, New York, 

Iferper Moulton, Box 772, Norwalk, Connecticut; I.iiss Genevieve Smithy. 22 
Ee. 93rd street, New York, New York; Armand J. Ifehn, 234 E. Iikin street, Webster, 
New York; './♦ David Allen, 20434 Alraar drive, Shaker Heights, Ohio; iilliam J, Berk, 
3873- Lechner avenue, Columbus, Ohio, 

Stuart N,. Miller, 1922 Stanford road, Columbus, Ohio;; Kirs. Mildred 3,. 
Carman, I837 Duane street, Astoria, Oregon; Lawrence E. Burke, 223 Gypsy lane, 
Wynnov,'ood, Pennsylvania; Eldon A, Johnson, 1 Plymouth road, Springfield, Pennsylvania 
Carl G, Miller, II6 Rose avenue, Knoxville, Tennessee^ 

Mrs, Alvin L, Kornman, Ellendale drive, Nashville, Tennessee; Marshall T, 
Polk, Jr. .J 3827 >/est End avenue, Nashville, Tennessee; ".i'illiam S.. Hornbaker, P, Oo 
Box #73, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Henry Co Grant, 3220 Holraan, Houston, Texas; 
Gordon S, Johnson, 7104 Village "-^ay, Houston, Texas, 

Edward B, Davis, 8I GiLiier court, Orange, Texas;, Ike Marblestone, 5I 
Cromwell drive, San Antonio, Texas; G. './, Barlow, 224 S. 13th Ikst street. Salt 
Lake City, Utah, 



-more- 



1950 alumni fund workers-r-Illinois Tech, page four, out-of-tovm section 

Donald E^ Young,, 32^ East Lane, American Fork, Utah; C. H, Cuthbert, 139 
Monroe street, Petersburg, Virginia; Frank J, "./oodsraall, 3937 First street, S,.l»,. 
Washington, D.C,.; Spencer N, Havlick, 1434 S, Jackson street, Green Bay, '.Visconsin; 
Kenneth V, Knudsen, 314 3. 64th street, Milwaukee, './isconsin. 

George R, Mahn, R, 3 Box 5'^3t ".feukesha, 'Jisconsin; Leonard K. 3airs, 5016 
N, j'oodburn street, Milv/aukce, ./isconsin; Grover Keeth, 1111 - 10th street, Jausau, 
..'isconsin* 



-mtw— 



i, from... 

N ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



Public Relations Department jjj 
Jannes W. Arnnsey, Director 



3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Mailed: Iv^^y 23, I95O 
FOR RELEASE: Inmediate 



CHIGAG-0 — Illinois Institute of Technology has completed 
arrangements with the second of two liberal arts colleges to enable 
students to receive both A.B,. and B,3, degrees after five years, the 
last two of wliich are spent at Illinois Tech. 

Dr. John T« Rettaliata, dean of engineering, announced that 
students who complete three years at Westminster college, Fulton, Mo,, 
may transfer to Illinois Tech for two additional years in one of four 
engineering fieldso 

Upon completion of the fiftn year, the graduate receives a 
bachelor of arts degree from Westminster and a bachelor of science degree 
from Illinois Tech* 

Engineering fields in which the program applies are civil, 
electrical, mechanical, and chemical, 

A similar coordinated program is in effect with Vfeshington and 
Jefferson college, ITashington, Pa, 



-jwa- 



i from... 

, ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



^^"^^- Fay 2k, 1?50 

FOR RELEASE 



linnediate 



oKKAGO -- Civil encineering studerxts at Illinois Inotitute ai-e 
readying for the rugr;ed life.-,. 

They are preparing for five weeks of "roughing it" at the Instioute^' 
Camp Ar:-nour at Trout lake in northern 'iisconsinj 40C miles north of 
Chicago^ 

In 1903; Armour Institute (forerunner of Illinois Tech) 
established one of the first summer camps for field practice in surveying, 
a rec^uired course for all civil engineering students. Since then^ 
hundreds of yoiui':; men have cade the annual treki 

The summer camp has been divided into two five- week sessions 
to accomj:iodate the 80 students who must attends The first group will 
go from June 9 to July li|j The second session will be held from July 
14 to August 20c 

Besides the 0-hour, 5a' ^'^Y work week at the camp, there's time 
for swi:7]i.iing, boating, fishing, volley balls horse shoes^ and other 
summer outdoor s ports o 

Director of the camp this summer vfill be Edward J» Kimnick; an 
a.^sistant professor of civil engineering^. 



•jee- 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



/ 



Mailed: llay 24, I95O 
FOR RELEASE: Memo 



Note to Editors : 

The new $1,0003 000 Central Research Laboratory of the Association 
of American Railroads on the campus of Illinois Institute of Technology 
will be dedicated at 2 po,m» (CDT) Friday, IJhy 26, I95O0. 

You are invited to send a photographer and reporter if you vaah- 
The building is located at 32nd and Federal streets, and I can be contacted 
there* 

Material based on the renarks of Dr. Henry To Heald, president 
of Illinois Tech, is attached,. A story including material on the remarks 
of Williain T» Faricy, president of AAR, will be sent to you be the AAR 
public relations department in VJashington, DaCo 



— Jim Armsey 



i- from... " 

X "ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

1 3300 South Federal Street 



Public Relations Departmenl 
James W. Armsey, Director 



■J 



Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



irecTory 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: Advance 



ADVANCE FOR RELEASE AFTER 2PM (CDT), FRmAY, MAY 26, 19^0 

Construction of a research building for the Association of American Railroads 

on the campus of Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago illustrates the mutual 

benaiit inherent in industry-education cooperation, Dr. Henry T, Heald, president 

of Illinois Tech, said today, 

Dro Heald and Vlilliam T, Faricy, president of the AAR, vrere the main speakers 

#// 0CO,OOa 
at the dedication of the Association's nev.'- -SsJ^OOj-GSf) Central Research Laboratory, 

one of 11 new structures built on the Institute campus since 19^3- 

Dr, Heald said the laboratorj^ is tangible evidence of the recognition of 
"the important role scientific and engineering research plays in the progress of 
American industry." 

"Here is proof," he said, "that the vital segment of American industry repre- 
sented by the railroad industry is alive tc the continued necessity of progress 
through research to provide better service to the American public." 

"The alliance of the Institute and the railroad industry in a joint effort to 
further the progress of one of the nation's great enterprises demonstrates the 
soundness of a closer association between industry and higher education," Dr, 
Heald saido 



page two - MR dedication 

"No two groups in the American political, social^ and economic system are 
more closely allied or more dependent upon each ether than education and industryo 

'■From the institutions of higher education come the industrial leaders of 
tomorrov;, and out of the laboratories come the discoveries which Y/ill enable in- 
dustry to produce more and better goods and services for an increasingly higher 
standard of living, 

"Closer cooperation between industry and education ivill help close the 
imaginary ,gulf which som.etimes separates the two and build better understanding 
and a better life for all of the people," Dr„ Heald said. 

The railr-cad research building is one of the campus structures — ^including 
educational, research, and housing units — designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. one 
of the foremost living architects and head of the Illinois Tech department of 
architecture c 

It is located along the Ne.v York Central-Reck Island right-of-way, at the 
norbhivest corner of Illinois Tech's projected 110-acre campus on the central south 
side of Chicago. 

EhT) ADVANCE FOR RELEASE AFTER 2 PlI (CDT), FRIDAY, MY 26, 19^0 



from. .. 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmeni 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: May 2l|, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: Imraediate 



Note to Financial Editors ; 

A copy of a release from the Structural Clay Products 
Institute in 'i^ashington, D, C» , is inclosed for your infornBtiom 
on the assumption that it ir^y not otherwise have come to your 
attention* 



— Jim Arinsey 



STRUCTURAL CIAY PRODUCTS 1N3TITOTE 

The National Authority on SCPI Brick and Tile Construction 

1520 l8th STREET N. Yf»i HUDSON 4200; VJASHINGTON 6, DoC^ 



S'ffiUOTm.W. CIAY EiODUCTS RESEARCH. FOUNDATION 

FOR RELEASE: Thursday. I\fev 2 ^ 

The Armour Research Foundation of the Illinois Institute of Technology^ 
Chicago^, Illinois, has been selected as the technical Research Center of the StruO" 
tural Clay Products Research Foundation, it was announced today by the latter 'a 
Director of Researchj Robert B, Tayloro Here the initial phases of the industrji ^s 
long-range $ls,250y000 Research Program will get underwayo 

"The Research Program to be conducted at Armour will be devoted prinarily 
to end-use research in brick, tile and other structural clay productSj* I/Ira Taylor 
declared, "Lov/er in-the-wall itasonry costs will be the main objective. Studies 
will be made of the effect of unit size, weight, assembly techniques^ etc», to 
determine combinations that will allow walls to be built most economicallyo 

"New clay products, of a non-wall type, will also be evaluated to determine 
their practicality and marketability, so that additj.onal sales potentials for clay 
can bo developedc. 

"Armour Research Foundation was selected after a detailed survey of a group- 
of nationally known universities and industrial research organizations* Armour 
has had considerable successful experience in the fields of building, and building 
material research. In addition. Armour can assign trained men from its present 
staff to the Structural Clay Products Program immediately, thus reducing the 



- 2 



'start-up timfr* of getting the program into operationj It is well supplied with 
research and testing equipments and sufficient space is available for present or 
contemplated needs," 

!.&"» Taylor also revealed that the Structural Clay Products Research 
Foundation will conduct research on efflorescence, insulation and condensation- 
along with fundamental clay research. The final decision as to where these studies 
should be carried on V7ill be made short lye 

The Research Director v/ill establish an office in Chicago to devote the 
major portion of his time to personal direction of the researche He plans to 
continue his personal survey and study of the brick and tile industry and its users,-, 
in order to keep research needs evaluated arji up-to-dateo 

Utr. Taylor, who was formerly Assistant Dir^jctor of Research for the Owens™ 
Corning Fiberglas Corp*, Newarko Ohiot took over his nev; post with the Structural 
Clay Products Research Foundation in January of this year^ after the nation's 
brick and tile manufacturers had subscribed to a five-year, long~x'ange research 
effort. 



PR 5/22/50 



from.,. 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 



May 25, 1950 



FOR RELEASE 



Snmediate 



'i'hr^ l:vfyi^<^ ;n-a^j3': 



CmCiao-nilnoi. lech rtU wlM „p con^tition In three sporta this 
.eetend. The ..aaeball te^ ,ni conclude thai, season ^th the aica^o 0,1- 
legiate elimination tournament May 29-31. ., , . .. . . ^ .i... -..■,, j : , 

^e baseball tea-. „Wrs of eight of an e^n do.en ga.es, ,111 ,a» 
up for the elimination tou^ey at Stagg Field with a game at Concordia. 

Coach Roy Mauley.s trac. s<^ad will .,eet »avy Pier SatuMay aftenioon 

at Ogden Field at 33rd & Federal street., 'Pv.^ + , 

rt^aerax streets, ihe trackmen have won three of four 

dual meets in the outdoor season. ... ....^jied a- ^a..'i y doctor f 

^e tennis sc^ad will be after their seventh wi. i. ten matches this 
season ^en the. take on Navy Pier at East End Park, 53rd st. at the lal.. m 
a previous meeting, the Techairks won 8-1. 

Illino: s Tech can-t lose .hen the golf s,uad, with a record of si. wins 
^ three losses, .e, ts the al™ni Saturta, at Silver lalce golf course. 



-jeg- 



0Z9L ,^S ^£6S ■■^^^'"•^ 
:3eA3J3^ HOT 



..^conco *. --3 ^ H.1. M^, .^.3 ^^ X--.0. ho«BnMU. s<« .o. ,. 
.oc^-U ^... «- ^- -- "- -- "'-^ ^'^'"''"'' "' '°^°° ,^ ,, 

^ . 9 +«^ +fi i9X*I yvbH no 9^c^ ^rf- -'^s^^ no8? -^ 
,1-8 now a>f^rfo9T erf^ »8«^*-«" ^^°^'''' 



-30c- 



from. .. 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



llhy 25, 1930 
'^■slled: Immediate 

FOR RELEASE: 



CHICAGO ■ — The largest graduating class in the history of 
Illinois Institute of Technology will be avrarded 622 advanced and 
undergraduate degrees at 8 piin. Rriday, June 9» in the Civic Opera 
House, 

Of the total number of candidates, 59 will receive advanced 
degrees v;hile the remainder will take bachelor's degreeso 

Dr. Edwin G, Nourse, former chairman of President Truman's 
Council of Economic Advisors, will deliver the commencement address 
on "Technology and Public Serviceo" 

Following the talk, he will be awarded an honorary doctor of 
laws degree by Dr. Henry T, Heald, president of Illinois Tech,, who wi 11 
also confer degrees on graduates 3 



-mtw— 



i from.,. 

, ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Arnnsey, Director 



3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Mailed: ^^^Y 26, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: Irr^odiate 



CHICAGO- — One hundred and fifty south side students are among the 622 
who will recieve degrees at 8 p^m^ Friday (June 9) during Illinoi3 Institute of 
Technology's commencement ceremonies in the Civic C,pera Housej 

Graduates of this year's classj the largi' st in the history of the Institute, 
will be avvarded 59 advanced degrees and 5^3 bachelors' degrees* 

Dr. Edwin G» Nourse, former chairman of President Truman's Council of 
Economic Advisors, will deliver the commencement address on "Technology and 
Public oervicee" 

Following the talk, he will be awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree 
by Dr. Henry T, Heald^ president of Illinois Tech, who v/ill also conf-er degrees 
on graduates* 

Those who will receive the degree of doctor of philosophy are: 

Don Scott, 4510 3,. Woodlawn avenue, bacteriology; K, Nagaraja Rao, Ik^k 
Ea 59th street, chemical engineering:, Bernet 3, Swansonj Jre , I910 V;f» 58th street^ 
chemiical engineering; Charles Dc McKinney, Jr,, 5235 University avenuOf chemi! s^ryj 
Joseph V/, Harney; 6708 3, Constance avenue, psychologyo 

Those who will receive the degree of raastev of science are: 

Yaye Purutani, I4l4 E, 59th street, bacteriology; Yohan 3.^ Lewis, 1414 ^» 
59th street, bacteriology; Albert Weinstock, 8209 3, Michigan avenue, biochemisitryi; 
Edward R, Moore, 635 Ee 4lst street, business and economics;, William L» Lennemainnj, 
3200 3, Michigan avenue^ chemical engineerings 



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iS£^ ^. 



graduates June 1950 — Illinois Tech, page two, south met, section 

R» Prabhakar, 1414 Ea 59'th street, chemical engineering;, Charles Jc 'i.'olfs 
1324 '»^o- 121st street, V/hiting, Indiana, chemical engineering^ William M» Boyer, 
5526 Blackstone avenue, chemistry; Fred Mp Gruenj 451^ S, Greenwood avenue, 
chemistry; I.(!arianne S, Schlochauer, 1414 E, 59th street, cheriiistry« 

Gerd Albers, 1414 J^" 59'th street, city planning;, Robert E. Ricketts. 5532 
Kenwood avenue, city planning; Stanley W,. Anderson, 1043 Eo Ii'hrquette road, 
electrical engineering;. Gail T» Flesher, 57^1 3, Blackstone avenue, electrical 
engineering; Willark Skolnik 2836 E* 77th place, electrical engineeringo 

Keith H, Sueker, 3140 3, Michigan avenue, electrical engineering; Ming-Chen 
Huang, 3140 3, Michigan avenue « mechanical engineering;; Chester A, Peyronninj Jrcn 
3140 Sc Michigan avenue, mechanical engineering; Chih VJen Chen, 32OO 3o Michiga::^ 
avenue, metallurgical engineering; Shao-Chi Huang, 3^40 3, Michigan avenue, 
mefcallurgical engineering,; 

Chung-yao 3zu, 3^40 So Michigan avenue, metallurgical engineering; Watts 
S* Humphrey, Jr,.,. 5737 University avenue, physics. 

Those who will receive the degree of bachelor of science are: 

Leonard E, Adams, 4722 So Drexel, mechanical engineering;, Harold Ro AmeSn 
3200 3, Michigan avenue, architecture;; Bertram L, Amstadter, 54^5 Ingleside 
avenue, industrial engineering;. Oliver 0, Amundsen, 10229 Calumet avenue, mechanica: 
engineering; John L, Anderson, 320O 3, Michigan avenue, mechanical engineeringo 

Roy L...AX, 3210 S. Michigan avenue, industrial engineering; Richard H, 
Baldwin, 3220 S» Michigan avenue, chemical engineering; Thomas Bar lam, 3200 3, 
Michigan avenue, electrical engineering; William C, Barrows, 3140 3, Michigan 
avenue, electrical engineering;,. RajTuond K, Bender, 12258 S, Michigan avenue, 
mechanical engineering, 

I^ul J, Bingen, 6932 Wabash avenue, electrical engineering; Frederick P. 
Boulais, 5656 Dorchester avenue, industrial engineering, 

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graduates June 1950 — 'Illinois Techj page three,, south mete section 

John Ro Brown, 31^0 3. Michigan avenue, mechanical engineering: Ivlarshall 
R» Brownell, 3012 S» Cottage Grove avenue, mechanical engineering; James A, Bulger^ 
4909 Dorchester avenue, civil engineering; Edmund U, Burke, 6l|3 ^o 90th street, 
architecture. 

Raymond \7. Casati, 32OO S,. Michigan avenue, architecturej Salvador Nc 
Ceja, /|011 Ellis avenue, electrical engineering;; Ralph Churchill,, 928 E, 6l3t 
street, mechanical engineering; Donald D« Craycraft, 3^22 3, Michigan avenue, 
chemistry; Leonard E, Dale, 31^0 So Michigan avenue, industrial engineeringo 

Leonard A, Delanga 31^0 Sa Michigan avenue, fire protection and safety 
engineering;^ fted 3. Delia-Rose, II260 Vernon avenue, metallurgical engineering! 
Joseph H» Enenbach, 3200 S, Ellis avenue,, electrical engineering; Norman Ettens'oir. 
7920 Champlain avenue, civil engineering* 

James V, Fitzpatricko 3154 So Michigan avenue electrical engineering; 
Eugene Foxman, k35^ Berkeley avenue, electrical engineering; Melvin I./^ Friedlander^ 
1969 E.. 73rd place, mechanical engineering; Charles Vo Frisbie, 3240 S, Michigan 
avenue,, fire protection and safety engineeringo 

Edward Bo. Frysinger, 5216 Blackstone avenue, electrical engineering;; 
Richard J, Fulirer, 53'^5 Greenwood avenue, mechanical engineering;, Yoneo Fukuda, 
4537 Ellis avenue, electrical engineering; Kurt Puld, 5311 Ellis avenue, electrical 
engineering; John J. Garnier, 10.8 'k7» l^th avenue, Gary,, Indiana, mechanical 
engineering* 

Joseph Mo- Goeb, 3224 S«. Ingleside avenue, civil engineering,* Peter Eo 
Srafton, 3214 S, Michigan avenue^ civil engineering; Gordon^ T» Granertj. 1516 Eo 
39th street, electrical engineering;; Robert L, Grines, 3214 3» Michigan avenue, 
3ivil engineering; Ilarold J. Guldberg, 8223 So Clyde avenue, electrical engineeringo 

Joseph A., Gump, Jr., 1502 Ekst 713* placej chemical engineerings George 
*/[. Harris, I512 E. 85th street, chemical engineering, 

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graduates June 1950--Illinois Tech, page four, south raetr> section 

Albert K,. Hiwkes, 928 E, 62nd street, electrical engineering; Donald Po 
Hayden, ^610 Lferyland avenue,, business and economicsj. Robert E, Heisler, I516 
E^ ^^th street, electrical engineering;; Benjamin Helfner, 4510 So Woodlawn 
avenue, industrial engineering© 

Harold Ho- Hellman,. 3200 3,. Ivlichigan avenue, architecturej Claude C^, Horrickj 
3154 S, Michigan avenue» cheniistryi; William To Hickman;, 6040 3, Stony Island avenue, 
industrial engineering;; Ev/ing W» Hix, 3^40 So Michigan avenue, electrical 
engineering;, Tom To. Horita, 6148 Kimbark avenue, electrical engineering, 

Joe Iv/aoka, 43^4 S, Lake I^rk avenue, mechanical engineering; John F<, 
Jacobs, 3140 S, Michigan avenue, electrical engineering; Joseph P, Jallits, 872b 
Sc, Harper avenue, electrical engineering;; Edgerton Ro Jennings, 2i|.31 Ikxton averuec 
mechanical engineering; Richard A, Johnson, 7343 Luella avenue, civil engineering- 
Robert E.. Jonelis, 3154 So Michigan avenue, mechanical engineering; 
Throb jorn Karlsson, 3318 Blackstone avenue, meclianical engineering; Belle KeriaarTv 
4935 Sc- Drexel avenue, arcliitecture; Joseph U, Kilcourse, 7321 Wabash avenue j, 
electrical engineering; Robert F, Kill, 7334 Prairie avenue, architecture* 

Allen T, Kirk, 5717 Dorchester avenue, architecture;; Ronald G.-. Klein^ 
822 E. 49th street, industrial engineering;; Michael C. Kopchak, 3252 E. 91st stree-j,, 
metallurgical engineering; Reginald 0, Kramer, 3154 St Ivlichigan avenue, 
metallurgical engineering; John "(Tc- Langrehr, 3140 Michigan avenue, industrial- 
engineering» 

Robert W., Larson, 7210 Vernon? avenue, electrical engineering? Gerald Lev^s 
4527 Drexel blvd,>, electrical engineering;; Lawrence L, Listens 32OO So Michigan 
avenue, architecture; Robert La Logelin, 5426 University avenue, mechanical 
engineering; Ben H, Loper, 220 E, Ridge street, Gary^ Indiana, chemical engineeringo 

Samuel C„ Lucia, 3236 3» Michigan avenue, civil engineering;, Albert J» 
Majetich, 945^ Commercial avenue, electrical engineering. 



graduates June 195^ — Illinois Tech, page five., south met, section 

Frima Re Margolin, I3UO E, 6lst street ^ Undesig; Donald E. I.lartint. 3140 
Si Michigan avenue, mechanical engineering; John V/^, Matushek, 8017 Euclid avenue, 
mechanical engineering; William McKeown, I8II E, 72nd street, chemical engineering;', 
Donald J, Mcl/knamey, 7749 Wabash avenue, chemical engineeringo 

Hobert C, Meckstroth, 3222 S, Michigan avenue, electrical engineering;; 
Floyd K, Meller, 3214 S- Michigan avenue, chemical engineering; George Lo Mild, 
4510 3, Woodlawn avenue, industrial engineering^ DaVid Miller, 3^54 3» Michigan 
avenue, chemical engineering} Gerald M. Mokate, 3140 Sc Michigan avenue, electrical 
engineering, 

Hiroshi H,. Nakamura, 1375 ^O' 57th street, chemical engineerings James 
M,. Nickerson, 10229 Bensley avenue, mechanical engineering) Roger K, Oberg, 
10541 Avenue "N", metallurgical engineering; Roy T, Paluska, -3300 3„ Michigan 
avenue^ meclianical engineering; Coda Pan, I523 E, 66th place, mechanical 
engineering. 

Hari Iv» Pknde, 32OO S^ Michigan avenue, mechanical engineering; Robert Ej 
I^rsons, 3236 S, Michigan avenue, fire protection and safety engineering;, Morton. 
Peltzman, 3254 S, Michigan avenue, industrial engineering;; Sidney G^ Porter^ 
3210 S, Michigan avenue, industrial engineering* 

Jack K, Raney, 675I 3^ Chappel avenue, physics; Iferold L.. Rechter, 5219 
Ingleside avenue, chemical engineering; Ilee 3, Reed, 6415 Evans avenue, politica.l 
and social science; Donald E, Reiff, 6812 Dorchester avenue, mechanical 
engineering; Louis Ross, 1401 Eo 5l3t street, industrial engineering, 

Carl 0» Schelin, 32OO S, Michigan avenue, mechanical engineering; John J» 
Scott, 2249 E, 75th street, civil engineering; John E. Sherman, 1517 E, 54th 
place, mechanical engineering; Satoru Shikasho, 3200 3, Michigan avenue, mechanical 
engineering; Lloyd S, Shook, 3214 3, Michigan avenue.^ fire protection and safety 
engineering. 



gracfuates June 1950 — Illinois Tech, page six^ south meto section 

Robert W, Shuldes, 3^5k S« Michigan avenue, civil engineering; Janes N» 
Siltanen, 6853 East End avenue, metallurgical engineering!: Ermon \^, Smith, 315^ 
So- Michigan avenue, fire protection and safety engineering;, Laurence E, SnodgrasEj 
1438 E. 67th place, industrial engineeringo 

Joseph Pe Sterrettt 6203 S» Ellis avenue, electrical engineering; Gregory 
Tfo- Streb, 752i| Ridgeland avenue, mechanical engineering; Kfershall SuloT/ay, 7121 
Merrill avenue, civil engineering; Robert T„ Summers* 5h3k Woodlawn avenue, 
electrical engineering; Theodore F, Surig,. 6232 Jackson avenue, Harainondt Indianaa 
electrical engineerings 

James A^ Swan.i, 5215 Blackstone avenue, architecture; Rajnnond L» Sv/artwout , 
2670 E, 78th street, electrical engineering;, Walter A, Trela, 620 '*?. 151st strjetj 
East Chicago, Indiana, chemistry; Robert J. Vandewalker, 4953 Blackstone avenue^, 
electrical engineeringo 

Yerrara Venkatesham, 1/|-14 Eo- 59th street, chemical engineering; George C. 
Wait, 3200 Sj. Michigan avenue, electrical engineering; Jerry F, Vleiss, 5^19 2» 
Drexel avenue, architecture; Norm.an T. Vv'ollscheid, 31^0 So Michigan avenue, 
electrical engineering;, Shao-Yuen Yuan, 6343 ^»- Inpleside avenue, chemical 
engineering* 

Thaddeus T, Zagula, ^200 S,. Michigan avenue, architecture; Harold Ro 
Zeitlin, 7718 S, Essex avenue, chemical engineering; Carl H, Zieger, 5130 S, 
Kenwood avenue, electrical engineering; Edmond N^. Zisook, 57^9 So Kenwood avemr.es, 
architectureo 



-mtw- 



% from... 

, ILLINOIS INSTITUTt Jr TECn OLOGY 



3300 South Federal Stre^ 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
Jannes W. Arnnsey, Director 



Mailed: 



ray 26, 1950 



FOR RELEASE: 



Iitinediate 



CHICAGO — One hundred and seventeen southwest side students are among 
the 622 who will receive degrees at 8 p.-m, Priday (June 9) dioring Illinois 
Institute of Technology's commencement ceremonies in the Civic Opera House, 

Graduates of this year's class, the largest in the history of the Institute; 
will be av.'arded 59 advanced degrees and ^G"^ bachelors' degrees. 

Dr. Edwin G, Nourse, former chairman of President Truman's Council of 
Economic Advisors, will deliver the commencement address on "Technology and Public 
Service, " 

Following the talk, he will be awai'ded an honorary doctor of laws decree 
by Dr. Her.ry T, Heald, president of Illinois Tech, who will also confer degrees 
on graduates,. 

Stank A, Crossley, 5^ "*^» 59th street, will receive the degree of doctor 
of philosophy in metallurgical engineering. 

Those virho will receive the degree of master of science are: 

Robert Jo Freund, 1759 Garfield avenue, business and engineering administra- 
tion}; Harold E, Whiteley, 893O S» Union avenue, civil engineering; Edward F, Koncel, 
Jr,, 5005 S, Damen avenue, electrical engineering; Robert E, Swartwout, 7^33 ^» 
Stewart avenue, electrical engineering. 

Ray IvI, Kolb, II404 So Lowe avenue, mechanical engineering; Richard J, 
Dunworth, 9305 S, Clifton Iferk, metallurgical engineering. 

Those who will receive the degree of bachelor of science are: 

Robert J, Akin, IIOI8 S, Green street,, mechanical engineering; 

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graduates June 1950--Illinois Tech, page two,, southwest meto section 

John A, Alexander, 6450 S.. Normal blvdo,. electrical engineering; John Re Amato, 
6548 3, Justin avenue, electrical engineering}; Donald J«. Bailey, 6719 S, Oakley- 
avenue, psychology; Gustav S, Barnes, 11412 Watkins avenue, undesigj Eugene A, 
Bartkus, 1354 '^"^o- 47th street, civil engineeringo 

Thonas L, Batina, 36 E,. 117th place, metallurgical engineering}; Myron- 
Becker, 2537 Orchard, Blue Island, electrical engineering; Stanley L, Becker; 
8615 Sc Throop street, metallurgical engineering^ William Benac, 1439 Komensky 
avenue, industrial engineering; Nicholas A„ Bilandic, 2820 Sb Wells street, civil 
engineer ing, 

Richard Jo Bonk,. 90I ^^o 513^ place, elecLrical engineering; Charles Fr- 
Bremigan, I7846 Howe avenuej Homevrood, mechanical engineering; John Ec Bye; 515'^ 
S». Wells street, electrical engineering; Harry M, Carlsen, 3II4 So Normal avenue j, 
electrical engineeringo 

George A, Cebula, 4025 W,, Fifth avenue, industrial engineering; Donald 
Chiz,. 14930 Se. Ivostner avenue, Midlothian, chemical engineering; John Fo Christxari,, 
260 W.. 65th street, fire protection and safety engineering;; John Chronos, 457 ^» 
79th street, electrical engineering,, 

Stanley I,. Cohn, 5525 S« Marshfield avenues electrical engineer ing j 
Gordon Ec Cole, 11126 S, Vernon avenue, mechanical engineering;. Hiram E, Cotton, 
15023 Main street, Harvey, metallurgical engineering; Joseph F, Culverwell, IO51 
ViFa. 99th street f chemical engineeringo 

Howard S* Dahl, 7OIO Normal blvdo, mechanical engineering; Leonard He Dehnj ■ 
^533 S» Whipple street, industrial engineering?; Roger W, Dekker, 449 '^o 117th street' 
electrical engineering; Robert F,. Domagala, 3^^\- S<> Menard avenue, metallurgical 
engineering; Robert Er. Dukes 6925 S, Emerald avenue^ fire protection and safety 
engineering. 



graduates june 1950— Illinois Tech, page three, southwest met. section 

I.'Iark Fakkeroa, IOII9 LalJlayette avenue, industrial engineering; Henry R» 
ibllerius, 9205 S,. Elisabeth street, industrial engineering;, Herbert Feitler, 7743 
Haskins avenue, chemical engineering;, Frank M, Fisher, 9^12 S, Leavitt street, 
mechanical engineering. 

Leonard E^ Fron, 23i|.0 S, Troy street, chemical engineering; Janes J? 
Gaffney, 6^50 S,. California avenue, mechanical engineering; Richard T, Gaffney, 
6615 S. Racine avenue, civil engineering;; Bruno P, Glab, 6l20 S» Koeler avenue,, 
mechanical engineering* 

IVIax B,. Goldberg, 3255 S,. Halsted street, electrical engineering; Stanl.ey 
J«. Goslovich, 3426 Wfi 60th street, electrical engineering; John Ao Gradle, 2605 
S3. Green street, electrical engineering;, Ira E,> Grahamj 6415 S, California avenuej 
fire protection and safety engineering, 

William Hanzel, 5701 3»- Christiana avenue,, chemical engineering; Leslie 
Hardison, 6020 So. Norraal avenue, mechanical engineering; Ervin Jo Hawrylewics , 
3353 ''T* 6lst street, biology; Kenneth H,. Hohhof, IIOI6 S, Artesian avenue, 
industrial engineer ingo. 

vTalter H,. Holle, IO828 So Prospect avenue,, mechanical engineering; Thomas 
R, Hughes, 8414 S,, Aberdeen street, chemistry; Lawrence A, Istel, 2263 Collins 
street. Blue Island, mechanical engineering^ William Jakubchik, 4935 So Keeler 
avenue, mechanical engineering* 

Kay Ray Janush, 7838 3, Green street, industrial engineering; David K^ 
Johnson, 69O-8 S, Wentworth avenue 3 mechanical enj^ineering; Edwin A, Kariba, 
2432 V^,. 57th street, mechanical engineering; William M, Koier^ 340 Noriml Parkway, 
mechanical engineeringo 

Rudolph A, Konater, 3254 S, Karlov avenue, metallurgical engineering; 
Robert A, Kresse, II312 Church street, industrial engineering; George F. Krtous, 
2547 S» Harding avenue, mechanical engineering* 

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i 



graduates June 1950 — Illinois Tech, page four;;, southwest met, section 

Adolph Aa, Kudzia, 2937 ^^ Keeley street, mechanical engineering; Bernard 
P» Kunka, 2964 S, Loomis street, mechanical engineering; Harry W» Lamberty, 6942 
S, Ada street, electrical engineering;, George E„ lane, 11255 S, Park avenue, civil 
engineering; Robert W, Lindgren, 6140 S,. Richmond .. treet, mechanical engineoringo 

Henry W» Longfield, II303 S, Church street, business and economics; TJalter 
G» Lormer, 7515 Yale avenue, architecture; Raymond Lyons, 9435 Elizabeth street, 
chemistry; Jted I'kmett,. 3250 '^h Ogden avenue, electrical engineering; John G, 
McCoy, 14330 S» Kecler avenue, Midlothian, electrical engineering, 

Leslie A, McKano, 6l47 So Campbell avenue, mechanical engineering; Keith 
E3. McKee, IO424 S, Caluiaet avenue, civil engineering}; Lav^rence Fe McNamara, IO806 
Forest avcnuoj mechanical engineering;; '>7alter F, Metz, 2004 '^'^» 102nd street, 
chemical engineering;; Robert £«. Mitchcllj 5728 So Sangamon street, electrical 
engineeringo 

Gerald Cc. Nalon, 742 W, ll6th place, metallurgical engineering; Leroy 'i-- 
Nero,, 6803 S, Ashland avenue, electrical engineering; VJilliam J, Nicholson, 8948 
So. Wallace street, mechanical engineerir^; Herbert N». Nordlander, 7602 S, Peoria 
street, architecture; Charles C» Oldenburg, 1652 W., 105th placet chemical 
engineering* 

Melvin L, Orloff, 7047 S, \7olcott avenue, industrial engineering;; Robert 
Ao. Paluchowski, 3335 ''■'^' 62nd place, civil engineering; Leonard F, P&sikowski, 
5542 S, "Jashtenaw avenue, chemical engineering;, Harry G, Ikzucha, 145 Eo 111th 
street, civil engineeringo 

Carl Petersen, 5^k^ Emerald avenue, chemical engineering; Joseph Fo 
Petrosius, 6616 S. Troy street, mechanical engineering; Joseph A, Radich, 6140 
S, Hermitage avenue, mechanical engineering;; Roman Na Radziwon, 4530 So Fairfield 
avenue, mechanical engineering; Gerald E^ Ragan, 8816 S„ Bishop street, civil 
engineering; Raymond G.. Reiff, 1423 ¥, 71st place, metal. lurgical engineering,, 

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graduates June 1950 — Illinois Tech, page fivei southwest mot, section 

Donald W,, Richards, 910? 3,, Aberdeen street, metallurgical engineering;, 
Robert W. Richter, 355^ '^'^» 65th place, civil engineering;; Walter M, Rother, 2952 
Se- Wallace street, civil engineering;. Frank R» Roubik, 9726 Tully avenue. Oak 
La;"m, electrical engineering* 

Charles D, Rutledge, 8543 ^e- Vincennes avenue, chemical engineering; 
George V/,. Scalamera, 6007 S,. Uood street „ mechanical engineering; John A, Schonerran,. 
8553 3.. Elizabeth street, fire protection and safety engineering; Gorhnrd L, 
Schultz, 6434 S3 Riclimond street, mechanical engineering, 

Ivlilton Seidel, 4421 So Shields avenue,, mechanical engineering;; Raymond Mo 
Senkowski, 6449 3» 'Knox avenue, mechanical engineering; Aaron D« Shanlcman, 8G9 
S,. Spaulding avenue, metallurgical engineering;; William P, Shefcik, 7718 Se "vVocd 
street, chemical enfineeringo 

I^ul SireviciuSj Box 227, '>^illow Springs, mechanical engineering; David 
Skein, 1502 S, Avers avenue- business and economics; Edvrard J. Skrzypek. 2655 S. 
Troy street, mechanical engineering; Raymond Lo Sosnov/ski, 4340 S, Spaulding avenu" 
chemical engineerings 

Robert Ft. Spreenberg, 7745 S*. Wood street, mechanical engineering;, James 
Eo. Stack, 1104 W,. 104th place, electrical engineering,*; Richard G=. Stack, 5^29 S. 
Winchester avenue, fire protection and safety engineering; Ralph A, Stasclike, 
5007 S, I^arlov avenue, electrical engineering, 

John W,. Sugden, 205O W, 103rd street, architecture; Charles J, Super, 313^ 
Se llhy street, chemical engineering," Francis D^ Supple, I326 Wc 98th street; fire 
protection and safety engineering? Charles W, Tarrcan, 7145 So Green street, civil 
engineering; Raymond E, Thompson, 7239 Sa Yale avenue, electrical engineerings, 

Frederick W, Tukovits^ 8848 3, Lowe avenue, business and economicsj James 
Eo Turnbull,, 4628 Lake I^rk avenue, business and economics;, Albert V, Ulis, 3007 
S,. Emerald avenue, electrical engineering. 



graduates June 1950— -Illinois Tech, page six, southvresi; mot. section 

Robort J„. Vitt, 5732 3. Troy street, mechanical engineering; Hovrard R« 
Verduin, IO739 Se State street, mechanical engineering; Thaddeus J.. Walocha, 
2957 '^^ 39'th place, chemical engineering; lawrence Ro Wattors, 5119 S,, Union 
avenue, industrial engineering* 

Vj'illiam W. Widule, IO605 S,. Leavitt street, physics; Milton C, Zilis, 
429 '*'^. 102nd place, mechanical engineering. 



-mt\"/- 



l fror 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 

CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmeni 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed 

FOR RELEASE 



IMy 26, 1950 

In:Bnediate 



CESAGO — One hundred and two north side students are among the 622 v/ho 
will receive dc^rrees at 8 pr..m> Friday (Juno 9) during Illinois Institute of 
Technology's coimencement ceremonies in the Civic Opera Housco 

Graduates of this jrear^s class, the largest in the history of the Insi;itute,- 
will be av/arded 59 advanced degrees and 3^3 bachelors' degrees,, 

Dro Edwin Go Nourse,. former chairimn of President Trurran's Council of 
Economic Advisors, will delvier the commencement address on "Technology and Public 
Serviceo" 

Following the tall<:, he will be awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree 
by Dro Henry T, Healdj president of Illinois Tech, v/ho v;ill also confer degrees 
on graduatesc 

Bennett Taylor Andres, of 3^24 Pine Grove, avenue» will receive a master 
of arts degree from the Institute of Design which last December became a degree- 
granting department of Illinois Toch» 

Those who will receive the degree of naster of science are; 

IJorri Sirri, 4400 Nc- I'.^Ialden street., electrical engineering; Boris Evenstein^ 
6931 N,- Lakewood avenue, industrial engineeringj Theodore W. Franks, 424 Oakdale 
avenue, industrial engineering; Arnold Goldberg, 708 Grace- street, mechanical 
engineering; Donald L„ Arenson, 61I6 No ^i^intlirop avenue, undesignated^ 

Those VYho will receive the degree of bachelor of science are; 

Tom To Araij 4060 N, Sheridan road, mathematics; James V,> Baptista, 



graduates June 1950 — Illinois Tech, page twoj north met, section 

303 Sunnyside avenue, Wheaton, mechanical engineering; Albert Bauer, 2724 N, 
Mildred avenue, electrical engineering; William H, Bauragartner, 1421 Suramerdale 
avenue, mechanical eiigineering; Lawrence Berlov?, 7711 No Ashland avenueg 
architecture; Miss Lois Ac Beyj. I851 sV, Eddy streetj, chemical engineeringo 

Henry VJ,. Bierimn, I918 W, Grace street, mechanical engineering; Halsy H, 
Bilter, 1713 Dempster, Evanston, mechanical engineering; Robert S, Blumenthalj 
6638 N, Nev/gard avenue, mechanical engineering; Robert J. Bokosky^ 1^22 Northshore 
avenue, industrial engineeringo 

Stephen Ho Boll, 2721 Devon avenue electrical engineering; Gladwyn L» 
BoToe, 1117 Fullerton avenue 5 industrial engineering; Robert 0, Brovm, 5321 Nj 
Ashland avenue, electrical engineerings Gordon H» Carlson, k^l^h N„ Hermitaga 
avenue, business and economics; Jack S, Castiglia, 1531 '»'/. George street, fira 
protection and safety engineering* 

Rajrmond Go. Chelton9 1972 T/inona street, chemical engineering; Marvin 
Cohn, 3512 N,. Pine Grove avenue, electrical engineering; Richard P. Colbert, 1739 
W^ Wallen avenue, electrical engineering;, Stanley J, Dalley, 2916 w', Arthur 
avenue, electrical engineeringo- 

Merritt J. Davoust, 7113 No Ridge avenue, business and economics; Theodore 
Dolan, 906 Belle Plaine^ mechanical engineering; James Ao Donohue, 44 Burton 
avenue, Waukegan, mechanical engineering; Sidney lo. Doppelt, 4875 N, Magnolia 
avenue, mechanical engineeringo 

Richard E, Durand, 4153 N» Ashland blvdo, physics; Roy U, Edstedt, 7331 
No. Honore street, electrical engineering; "'.'alia La Ferris^ I360 11. State street, 
mechanical engineerings Leonard N- Foster, 379 Jefferson avenue, Glencoe,. 
psychology; John A, Fo\j3hi.j 1139 Grant avenue, Chicago Heights;, mechanical 
engineering; Byron L. Garoufalisg 1331 Foster avenue, mathematicso 



I 



graduates June 1950 — Illinois Tech, page three, north met, section 

Dale W, Gierke, 11^0 No- LaSalle street, mechanical engineering; Michael 
Giordano, 5928 N, Kenmore avenue, mechanical engineering; Charles Gramlich, l|li|.0 
N» Leavitt street, chemistry; Robert Jo Grassl, /j.821 No Seeley avenue, psychology; 
George Ao liallinan, 63^3 Wayne avenue, fire protection and safety engineerings 

James To Hauptli, 521 Brompton place, business and economics; Richard A, 
Hegberg, 6637 No Campbell avenue, mechanical engineering; Julius Heicliraan, 5^-^3'^ 
Nc. Konmore avenue, mechanical engineering; Ernst Ke Heimann, 6350 N, I/Iagnolia 
avenue, business and economics, 

Bernard L» Heinen, 818 Diversey Parlmay, industrial engineering; Carlos 
Hid-ilgOj 4940 No Winthrop avenue,, mechanical engineering; Paul V/c Higgins, 4237z 
N,, Hermitage avenue, electrical engineering; Albert A, Hoffraanj 6k3^ No I/aplcvood 
avenue, civil engineering; John Do Holland, 73 ^^ ^1™ street, architectureo 

Lawrence J« Horan, 818 James court, 'iTheatonj chemical engineering; George 
M-, Hottinger, 1326 Ridgeland avenue,, electrical engineering; Ken Ishikawa, 2222 
N, Scdgv/ick street, mechanical engineering; John V/c Jenkins, 3720 l^o Leavitt 
street, mechanical engineeringo 

Danial King, 757 Junior terrace, business and economics; Ralph Bo KraviSg 
1357i Touhy avenue, civil engineering; Howard Lavittp 6317 No Kenmore avsnue^ 
civil engineering; Ifershall Do Leibj 2620 W. Rosemont avenue, architecture j 
Harold C, Leler, 5k33 N. Kenmore avenue, English, 

Donald J, Leseth, 5648 N, Artesian avenue, fire protection and saf^cty 
engineering; Jack C. Leske, 1^228 N. Troy stree^^, chemistry; Vfarren H, Lieb,. .6l59 
No Wintljrop avenue, English; Miss I^Ty J/hrgolis, 5439 No VJintrhop avenue* ■ . 
home economics J 

William S, McDonald, 5864 Magnolia street, physics; Yoshio Migakig 95^ "i?o 
V/r ightwood avenue, mechanical engineering; Donald T* .I\Joeller, 5735 N, Maplevjood 
avenue, elecbrical engineering, ■ ' 



.. ; t..,.. 



graduates June 195^ -- Illinois Tech, page four, north met., section 

Lawrence C. Mohr, 3339 North Hoyne avenue, chemical engineering; Donald 
Lc Monchil, 1531 ""'/est George street, fire protection and safety engineering; 
Ilarry J. Morris, 333^ North Artesian avenue, mechanical engineering; Byran J. 
Murphy, 3237 V/est Diversey avenue, civil engineeringo 

Thomas J, Murphy, (^333 I-lagnolia avenue, electrical engineering; John F 
Nadon, 656 V/est Aldine avenue, industrial engineering; Miss Patricia Nash, 
1619 Ili^'hland avenue, home economics 5 Saul B, Needleraan, 3^12 North Fine Grove 
avenue, undesijnatedo 

Seymour S. Neems, 6l|01j. North Oakley avenue, chemical engineering; Morton 
Neri.'.roff, 24j5 North Ridgev/ay avenue, chemical engineering; Perry Fo Nichols ; 
332 North Genesee street, V/aukegan, mechanical engineering;, Ernest Vifo Nordquist; 
307 Nordica avenue, Glenview, civil engineering; V/illiam Wc Nu::-:ent, I23 De Windt 
Rd, , '//inet bka<, 

Vfalter A^ Oberheimt 2682 N,. Burling street^ physics;, Robert C, Ockerlundj 
6240 N„. IfepleiTOod, civil engineering; Walter A, Oweiss, 2215 Dell LanC; Highland 
Park, civil engineering; Paul A, Peterson, I309 Glcnlake avenues architecture; 
Eleanor Ro Pratscher, 1844 Dayton streetj home econcmicso 

John C. Reid, 67 E,. Oak street, business and economics; John ".T, Robinson,;, 
4859 "'^olcott avenue, mechanical engineering;, Frank F» Sauer, 817 ■/. George street- 
mechanical engineering;, Roy Shimaji, 7 "'^<; Pearson street, mechanical engineering; 
Roma.n '.7, Smook, I515 Estes avenue, biologye 

John T» Tyner, 1617 Greenwood lane, Glenview^ electrical engineering;, 
Eugene T«. Ulbert, I8l2 Hudson avenuej business and economics^ Fred K, Unick, 1610 
Granville avenue, electrical engineering; Ihrl Gu Van Boesschoten, 393^ No Pine 
Grove, industrial engineering: Robert Or Voigtmann; 434 Belden avenue, mechanical 
engineeringo 



-more- 



graduates June I95O-- Illinois Techj page five, north met, section 

William J, V/alters, 5722 N„ Richmond street, mechanical engineering}; 
Earold V,. V/atts, 300 S, Main street, VHieaton, physics; James Ao 'tTeinmano 5160 No 
Leavitt street, physics; Arthur C* Westromj 4734 N. Beacon street; electrical 
engineering; Bennett V, Uhiteson. 5432 No. Kenraore avenue, metallurgical enginecringr 

Shepart Hn iJhitiiBn, IOI9 Foster avenuor mechanical engineerings liarry L- 
V/icl:3troms 6506 N, Clareraont avenue, electrical engineering; Kenneth Jo Yahiroj 
1120 N, Clark street, electrical engineering; Robert Lo Zralekj 663O N« Talman 
avenue, business and economics 



-mtw- 



from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal S+reet 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: ^^Y 26, 19^0 

FOR RELEASE: ^^^diat. 



CHECAGO ~ One hundred and thirteen northwest side students are among 
the 622 who will receive degrees at 8 pt-m. Friday (June 9) during Illinois Institute 
of Technology's commencement ceremonies in the Civic Opera Houseo 

Graduates of this year's class, the largest in the history of the Institute^ 
will be a\7arded 59 advanced degrees and 563 bachelors' degrees* 

Dr. Edwin G, Nourso, former chairman of President Truman's Council of 
Economic Advisors, will deliver the commencement address on "Technology and 
Public Service," 

Following the talk, he will be awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree 
by Dr» Henry T, Heald, president of Illinois Tech, who will also confer degrees 
on graduates* 

Those who ¥>7ill receive the degree of master of science ares 

Roland L, Menzl, 2524 N» Harding avenue, chemical engineering} Jack M» 
Miller, 3012 vlilson avenue, mathenHtics; Bertrand R» Bertrando, k^30 W, Kamerling 
avenue, undesignated. 

Those T/ho will receive the degree of bachelor of science are: 

Gerald Ajemianj 2756 Pine Grove, industrial engineering; Wayne G» Andariese, 
4300 N,. Damen avenue, business and economics; Carl R,. Anderson, 4015 ■'^« Patterson 
avenue, electrical engineering; Donald N. Anderson, 6067 N, Neva avenue, 
architecture;; George A, Anderson, 2043 N, Newcastle avenue, mechanical engineering^ 
John L, Anderson, 6428 N». Nordica avenue, mechanical engineering. 



uates June 1950 — 'Illinois Tech, page two, northwest met^ section 

Richard L,, Anderson, 6654 Nc- Leoti, chemical engineering;; Theodore Ec, 
Bakal, 3733 Eastwood avenue, chemistry; Hans Behrraann, 1^910 "*''c. Diversey avenue, 
Harold A,. Bergen, 3743 ^^« "indsor, electrical engineering;, Richard F<, Bigott,- 
4228 N<. I.Ionitor avenue,, industrial engineering. 

V/illiam Fo Brauer^ 4315 ''Whipple street, electrical engineering; Theodore 
L. Brown, 1735 No. I.IcVicker avenue, chemistry; Robert Ac Cafarella, 5224 N, 
Monitor avenue, mechanical engineering; Edward J, Caliendo, 283I Nc Harlem avenue,, 
civil engineering; John Jc Chrystal, 3428 Hirsch street, industrial engineerlngo 

George Coanda, 4017 ^-^ Keeler avenue,, chemical engineer ingj"; Norman J., 
Collierr I640 N. Oakley avenuej industrial engineering; Charles E^ Conlon, 5559 
Mtgeld street, architecture; John M, Considine^ 1451 N.. Mason avenue^ architectii-re; 
Evelyn E» Czajka, W^ Potomac avenues prsychologyo- 

Lawrence F^. Daum,; 4448 No California avenue, physics; Arthur R.; Denz, 5213 
Cuyler avenue, electrical engineering;^ James ViT,. Dobe, 4229 N. Keystone avenue ^ 
mechanical engineering; Eugene J* Dymek, 206l No Kedzie avenue, fire protection 
and safety engineering. 

Raymond Wr Eckardt, 5^41 Schurbert avenue, electrical engineering; Glenm 
Elste, 4911 Byron street, chemical engineering; John J. Eslinger, 3^40 N,. Keating 
avenue, mechanical engineering; Harry Ho Fiedler, 4259 Leland avsnue, chemical 
engineering; Oscar J. Fisher.^ 5^47 Wolfram street, chemical en:iineering.> 

Ole F» Flaa; 3312 Dickens avenue, mechanical engineering; Floyd Me Gardners 
50/j5 N, Ridgeway avenue,, electrical engineering; Frederick A„ Gebauer^ 6092 No 
Navarre avenue, mechanical engineering; Robert A» Glamore, 525^ No Kamerling 
avenuej business and economicso 

Nathaniel Ro- Goodman, 1430 N, Hoyne avenue,, mathematics; Charles L« 
Gutberlet, 2817 N. Meade avenue, chemistry; Leonard Harwood, 2109 N„ Humboldt blvd,. 
electrical engineering; Eugene H^ Hasenberg, 3756 No Bernard street, mechanical 
engine eringc 



graduates June 195^ — Illinois Tech, page three, northwest section 

Robert R^. HoLnes, 3^3^^ N, Meade street, chemistry; Arthur II, Iluck, 2832 
No. Sawyer avenue, industrial engineering; Leo R, Idaszak, 2026 ''.U '-Tebster avenue, 
chenical engineering; Leonard J", Inc, 22h3 N.. Mango avenue, electrical engineering; 
Arthur 'K Jaeger, 2II3 N, 75'th avenue^ Elrawood Parkj electrical engineering, 

Justin J. Jankowskip 53^6 Melrose street- fire protection and safety 
engineering; Edwin Lc Jantho, 3911 Dakin street, civil engineering; Joseph Jo 
Jasinowski,. 2417 N, Central Park avenue, industrial engineering; Henry Jo. Job,,, 
2528 N,. Spaulding avenue, mechanical engineeringo 

Richard A, Jobus^ 1|256 Nc Bernard street; chemical engineering; Roy To 
Johnson, 3609 Thomas streets mechanical engineering; Tyrus T, Johnsont 2843 ^= 
Kenneth avenues chemical engineering; Marshall An Kaplan, S53h Nc Bernard street;, 
matherratics; Prank B,. Kelleher, 6501 Newcastle avenuej, electrical engineerings 

John Kc Kelly, 6302 Ilolbrook street 5 mechanical engineering; Ramon Ao 
Klitzke, 7333 ''^ " Summerdale avenue, fire protection and safety engineerina;; './alter 
Jo Kohler, 592^ Eddy street, industrial engineering; Thaddeus L^ Kolski, 6l21 W^ 
Barry avenue, chemistry;; '.ialter Jo Komiak, I03I N, Richmond street, mechanical 
engineeringo 

Joseph Co KoTfalski, 2135 N« feson avenue, mechanical engineering; 
Frederick Kremer, kkkl ".V, 7/rightwood avenue 3 business and economics; Samuel H^ 
Lane, '35'^5 Sunnyside avenuej electrical engineering; Paul E; Larsen, 2939 Newland 
avenue, electrical engineering; Kurt 77o Leibfritz, 3^51 N, Oakley avf^mue, 
mechanical engineerings 

Ray 0, Lever, 5512 ',t^ Eddy street, metallurgical engineering; Marvin B, 
Lewis, 4315 N. Kimball avenue, chemical engineering; John C, Liewehr, 61IO North 
avenue, electrical engineering; fervin Lissner, 2154 No Kedzie avenue, chemical 
engineering; Gerald Loebrnan, 2113 W, North avenue, industrial engineering; Stephen 
fezztoni, 952 N, Drake avenue; electrical engineering* 



graduates June 1950 — Illinois Tech, page fouTj northwest meto section 

Richard D,. McGinnis, 3S54 N.. Kedvale avenue 3 architecture; Theodore 
Mitchell, 3643 '■V. Shakespeare avenue,, physics; Benjamin Mittrran, 5^'^h No Avers 
avenue, nBthematics;; Norman Mittraano 502Z| N. Avers avenue, physics? Narciso G,^ 
Modesto, 921 Roclcroell street, architecturco 

Frank P.. Mortons 2^15 "'^o Medill avenue, industrial engineering; Lewis C-. 
Neumar, 3^75 Balmoral avenue, electrical engineering; Florian Re Nykiel, 59^6 
N, Melvina street, physics; Sveno G* Ohrvall, I5632 Lamon avenue. Oak Forest^ 
business and economics* 

Edward M,. Petrie, 2436 Oak streets Fi^anklin Parkj chemical engineering} 
Daniel S, Presorski, 7177 Grand avenueg chemical engineering: Adam W-, Przybysze¥i/ski, 
3658 N. St.. Louis avenue, electrical engineering; John G, Quist, 5353 Eddy stroet; 
civil engineering;, Heinz C, Recknagel, 3^33 No Ridgeway avenue, mechanical 
engineering, ' 

Donald F„. Rietz, 4O23 ''■h Gunnison streetj, civil engineering; Bruce A» 
Ritzenthaler, 5^5'^ '■'^•- Ohio street, physics; Morris Rosman. 460O Ng Drake avenue, 
metallurgical engineering; Martin L„ Rozenfeld, 5015 No Springfield avenu6f 
physics; Janes F, Schell, 1445 No Linder avenue^ mechanical engineeringa 

Miss Ifexine Lo S.chnieroWd 1433 Nn Lawler avenue, home economics; 'lalter 
F, Schroeder, 543^ No Western avenue, chemical engineering; Miss Shirley So 
SchultZj 3447 N,, Oak Park avenue; civil engineering; Raymond Fo Sell, 4444 "-h 
Wilson avenue, electrical engineeringo 

Eugene Do Shastal, 43^9 N, Kimball avenue; mechanical engineering; I/lartin 
Shatavskyp 4502 N,. Sawyer avenue, chemistry: Phillip M,, Siegelj 4604 N. Monticellc 
avenue, mechanical engineering; Miles Skrivanek, 2147 '^9 Evergreen avenue, 
electrical engineerings. Arthur C^ Slater, 6404 No Oakley avenue, electrical 
engineering; Edward L* Slepickat I46I No. Pulaski road, electrical engineering, 



graduates June 195C> — Illinois Tech, page five, northivest iret, section 

Herbert C. Snyder, 3k3^ Kamerling avenue;, mechanical engineering; Gilbert 
Ro Speich, 359 Hemlock street, Wooddale, metallurgical engineering; Ifershall L« 
Stein, 4603 N. Kimball avenue, electrical engineering; Boris A„ Stern, 1939 •'» 
Crystal street, chemistry, 

Prank J. Suszek, I316 '.h Huron street, mathematics; Paul Go Tietz, 3'^'^5 
Nj Rutherford avenue, mechanical engineering; Arthur Ao Turetzky, 4321 N, Avers 
avenue, mechanical engineering; Ifershall Turner, 2438 Nc Kedzie avenue, chemical 
engineering;, Howard B, Van Dagens, 4435 N, Melvina avenue, electrical engineeringc 

Robert A, Vandervestj 5^47 '''^»- Altgeld street, mechanical engineering; 
Edward V/, Veres, 4723 N, Keystone avenue, mechanical engineering; Donald R, 
Vomacka, 2313 Belmont avenue, mechanical engineering; Carl M, 'Jeinberg, 2021 Jarvis 
avenue, business and economics; Rex S, 'Jilk, 23OO Lincoln Parkway, civil ' "^ 
engineering. 

Morris VfilliamSj 2559 '^» Division street, electrical engineering; Edward 
Ao Vifimunc, 2325 ''h Haddon avenue, mechanical engineeringc 

-mtw- 



from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 

CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: ^'^^ ^6, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: i^^ediate 



CHICAGO — One hundred and seven west side students are ainong the 622 
who -.7ill receive degrees at 8 poni» Friday (June 9) during Illinois Institute of 
Teohnolo^y's coramenceinent ceremonies in the Civic Opera Housec. 

Graduates of this year's class, the largest in the history of the Institute, 
will be awarded 59 advanced degrees and ^(^3 bachelors' degreesc 

Dr. Edwin G* Nourse, foriner chairrsan of President Truman's Council of 
Economic Advisors, will deliver the commencement address on "Technology and Public 
Service^" 

Following the talk, he v/ill be awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree 
by Drr, Herjry T.. Keald, president of Illinois Tech, Vv'ho will also confer degrees 
on graduates* 

Those v;ho will receive the degree of master of science are: 

Leonard Klarich, 914 S, Ashland avenueg architecture; Edward Co Snyder f, 
3413 Home avenue, Bervjyn, bacteriology;; Oscar T, Bloomer, 165 N, Central avenue, 
chemical engineering; Charles G* Pollers 242 S, I.laple avenue. Oak Ikrkj civil 
engineering; Donald M, Friedlenj 50S College avenue, Aurora, mathematics* 

Clifton Ha- Hubbell, 543 No. County road, Hinsdale, mechanical engineering,*; 
Albert A,. Hess, 515 So. Cuyler, Oak Ifeirk, mechanics;, Robert E, Macherey. 737 ^> 
Cornell, Villa Park, metallurgical engineering; John R.-.- IVadigan, IO3O So J.5aplej 
Oak Park, physics;, I^ul A» Roys, 709 S,. Gunderson, Oak Park, physicsj Russell H. 
Levy^ 1116 S» Central Iferk avenue, psychology© 



graduates jime 1950--Illinois Tech, page twoj v^fest met, section 

Those who will receive the degree of bachelor of science are? 

Leo Alamprese, I3S E, Lake street, Elnihurst, mechanical engineering;, 
Arnold L, Albin, 1532 S» Honan avenue, electrical engineering;, Elmer L, Anderson, 
3209 Home avenue, Berwyn,. mechanical engineeringr Eugene La Arist, 7026 'Jo. 
Roosevelt road, Berwyn, electrical engineering, 

Ikul M, Aznavoorian, IO36 N, Hamlin avenue, business and economics; Dvfight 
L,. Barr, 126 N.-,. ITarwick, Westmont, meclianical engineerings, Michael Best, 7^7 So 
Lawndale avenue, mechanical engineering;: John 'vT, Beattie, 476 Longfellow avenue, 
Glen Ellyn, physics; Vfeyne Ea Bessette, III4 So Lombard avenue, Oak P&rkj business 
and economics, 

Kenneth F» Biddle, 87 Ohio street, Maywood, electrical engineering,' James 
Jo- Blastik, 3006 So- Kildare avenue,, mechanical engineering;, James E, Bobzin, 1528 
Kn. Laramie avenue, architecture;; John B* Booth, 9030 Sheridan avenuoc Brookfieldj 
electrical engineering, 

George E,. Chutka, 2815 S, Cuyler avenue, Berwyn, chemistry;^ Walter A» 
Conniff, II83 Wenonah avenue, Oak P&rk, business and economics; Idartin Cooper, 
3817 W,. Maypole avenue, electrical engineering;: William A^. Gooperj 342 Ng LaGrange 
road, LaGrange, mechanical engineering* 

Robert E, Davis, 3937 '^^e- Agusta blvdo, electrical engineering;; Phillip 
Po Dellegrazio, 604 N». IVky street, civil engineering; Charles A, Dolejs, 4009 ; '■■- ■ , 
Gladys avenue, civil engineering; Virginia Pc- Dorociak, 2045 ^^« Rice street, 
psychology;, Herbert R« Dressier, 229 S, Hudson street, "iTestmont, chemical 
engineering* 

William Po Drews, 9IO So 6th avenue, IVhyv/ood, chemical engineering; Reynir 
Einarson, 3824 W, Fulton street, civil engineering; Gildo Fato, 745 S* Kolmar 
avenue, chemical engineering;: Edward Rr,. Fencl, 2746 So- Lawndale avenue, mechanical 
engineering;, James J» Fratianni, 2417 So 6lst avenue, Cicero, electrical engineering* 



graduates June 1950 — Illinois Tech, page three, west met, section 

Julian L» JJtiedman, 315 S, Central Park blvd.,, mechanical engineering; 
Richard Co Genis, 1611 S« 2f9th court, Cicero, mechanical engineering,*; George A, 
Gibson, 217 S, ^rd avenue, liayv/ood, industrial engineering? Barbara Giles, 244 S3 
Western avenue, Bartlett, Englishj Edward 1%, Ginter^ 375^ ^^t 26th street, mechanical 
engineering, 

Edmund C- Golbeck, ^'^3 Ifedison avenue, Glencoe, electrical engineerings 
Ralph Pc Graziano, 523 N, Taylor avenue, Oak Park, industrial engineering; Robert 
Go- Greaves, 4442 West End avenue, industrial engineering; Leon Green, 1552 Se 
Kolin avenue, electrical engineerings 

Robert W» Gromer, 140I So 11th avenue, Iv!ayT;oodj industrial engineering; 
Glenn F, Grotz, 1714 3,. 9th avenue, Mayuood, electrical engineering; William A^ 
Hamilton,. 59^0 Race street, chemical engineering;; Wilbur Jo Hampel, 2525 Clinton 
avenue, Berwyn, electrical engineerings 

Alvin LL Handwerker, I807 So. Kedzie avenue, industrial engineering; ?/alter 
Je. Henderson, 28 E» Kenilv/orth avenue, Villa Park, physics; Paul Ro. Hirsch, 3^33 
W.2- Adams street, electrical engineering;; Erank Janik, l\.^Q No Forest avenue, Rt c Ij 
Melrose Pfe^.rk, mechanical engineering; Kenneth E» Kaysen, 608 Long avenue, 
rcathematicso. 

James N» Keith, I92 Pick avenue, Elrnhurst, chemistry; Robert J. Kenny, 
2246 S, Scoville, Berwyn, industrial engineering; Stanley Klocek, 2717 W, 15th 
street, industrial engineering; Frank Ao Kosik, 4104 '^^9 21st street, playsics; 
John- J f. Koza, 53^8 Chicago. avenue, civil engineering, 

Frank A, Krone, 205 3, Princeton, Villa Parkj chemical engineering;, 
Robert Go Krueger, II32 Edraer avenue. Oak Farkj industrial engineering; William 
H,. Kutm,. 4819 ^c- Monroe street, business and econom.ics; Edward M„ Lallyj, 7213 N. 
Wolcott avenueo n;iechanical engineering} Richard M,. Laiii), 2229 S, 6lst court, 
Cicero, psychology. 



graduates june I930 — Illinois Tech; page four, v/est met, section 

Bernard J,. Lainberty, 603 N,. Brainard, LaGrange, electrical engineering;; 
Donald E,. Laskowski, 316 S» Home avenue, Oak Park, chemistry?, Henry Jo I.(kjcher, 
2653 '■^' 22nd place, mechanical engineering; Francis J, Ivhney, 45 Irving avenue. 
Hillside, electrical engineering*) 

Paul Kn Margolis, 143 '^e- Central avenue; mechanical engineering; James 
A^ Mason, 1047 Ns Austin blvda, chemical engineering; Charles 'il^ llhyer-, I014 
Marenga, Forest Park, civil enginoeringj, Donald J,. McDowell, 819 'iVenonah streetg 
Oal-c I^rkj chemistry; Donald E^. Miller, 3^47 Elmv;ood avenue, Bervvyn, mechanical 
engineering* 

Ted Miller, 3446 W« 13th place, chemical engineering; Richard Oo Mitter^ 
209 Sa, Miciiigan avenue. Villa Bark, mechanical engineering; Charles E» (Cheun-Ying) 
Mok, 4330 "lY, Washington blvd»,. mechanical engineering; Robert F. Mulacek, 2234 
Sc. Sto Louis avenue, chemical engineering;^ 

Charles E,. Muris, 625 S.. Kedvale avenue,, civil engineering; '.Tilliam R» 
Murray, 520 N. Harvey, Oak Park, electrical engineering; Kenneth R» Nelson, 
5IIS Ohio street, architecture; Wilbur Nerenstein, 3636 Flournoy street^ mechanical 
engineering; Aleisander Fatsavas, 1820 S, Grove avenue, Bervyn, chemical 
engineering, 

Bernard Poller, 2636 3, Clarence avenue, Ben^yn, industrial engineering; 
Victor Peroutka, 6537 '^'^^ 27th place, Berwyn, industrial engineering;, JohnVc, 
Peterson, 2305 S» 17th avenue, Broadview, mechanical engineering; George Ls Picha,, 
2224 S, 6lst avenue, Cicero, physics;. Arthur Oo Rabinovitz, 3628 "vT, Lexington 
street, biology, 

Theodore Randich, 224 W„ Kenilworth; Villa Park, business and economics; 
Edwin. Jo. Rann, 2101 3, Harvey avenue, Berv/yn, industrial engineering; YJillian I. 
Ratcheson, 3437 ''•^■^ 13'tl'i place, civil engineering; Walter Ho Reedc 621 So 
Wisconsin avenue. Villa Park, architecture* 



graduates june 1950 — Illinois Tech, page five, v;est meto section 

Eugene J, Rezabeck, I837 S,. Home BervTyn, mechanical engineering;, Robert 
J.. Robertson, 2815 Ridgeland avenue, Berv/yn, industrial engineering; Edv/ard Go 
Rohn, 1032 Gunderson avenue t Oak I^rk, civil engineering;- William J» Rohn, 193^ 
S^ 51st avenue, Cicero, chemical engineering* 

Joseph Rokos, 1521 So Kildare avenue, mechanical engineering; Jack Do 
Root: 112 Galena street, West Chicago, electrical engineering;; Gerald S, Rose., 
3919 '^' 19th street, chemical engineering;; Arnold Rosenbloomo Rtc 1, Lombard, 
metallurgical engineering, 

Hov7ard Ross, 127 N,. Central avenue, raochanical engineering; Edward Co 
Rubin,, 5902 vJ, 26th street » Cicero, civil engineering; Lester M. Sachs, 3528 .v, 
Grenshaw street, physics; Jack L, Sciurba, 1916 i7o Erie street, electrical 
engineering; Herman E<: Shefte, 224? S,, Gunderson avenue, BerT7yn-, chemical 
engineeringo 

Robert E, Shuman,. 7203 T7. Adam^ street, Forest Rark, mechanical engineering; 
Robert D,. Skorheim, 526 No Humphrey avenue, Oak Park, electrical cngime'-ring; 
Norbert Jr Sladek,. 2346 S, Highland avenue, Berwyn, electrical engineering; 
Constantine Po Soxva, I529 S, 51st avenue, Cicero, electrical engineeringo 

George Po Stacy, 133^ 3* Lombard avenue, Berwyn, civil engineering;. Donald 
W„ Stcichen,, 117 No. Union street, Aurora, fire protection and safety eng^-neering; 
Irving Suson, I240 So Central P^rk avenue, electrical engineering; Robert oSo 
Taboloff, 857 3, Clinton, Oak Park, civil engineering* 

Leonard Mo Taussig, 2505 So 6lst court, Cicero, metallurgical enginoerff^S? 
Philip Aj. Turner, 11 N, 3rd avenue, Wkywoodt mechanical engineering; Kenneth No 
Unger, 2238 S, Drake avenue, mechanical engineering;; Richard Vj Vana, 2243 S, 
teller avenue, mechanical engineering; Eugene Mo. Voda, I84 Parkview avenue, 
tiverside, mechanical engineering,, 



graduates junc 1950 — Illinois Toch, page six, west meto section. 

Virlyn Ih Walter, I61O S» 58^11 avenue,. Cicero, electrical enginecringj, 
Donald Ho. Ward, 3^5 Rrairie avenucj Glen Ellyn, electrical engineering}, Willianii 
Dc- Warner, 33kk IVkple, Brookfieldj chemistryj, Joseph V/egwert, 305 So Cornell, Villa 
Iferkj electrical engineerings 

Frank J, Weingartner, 4301 W» Monroe street, electrical engineering^ 
Stanley Jo- Wilczcv;ski, 2303 Sa. Drake avenue, electrical engineering;: Robert Mp 
Yonko, 1520 S, 53th avenue, Cicero, chemistry^ Marvin He Zelibor, I904 S. 49th 
avenue, Cicero, mechanical engineeringo 

-mtW" 



from. .. 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 



Ifey 29, 1950 



FOR RELEASE: 



Immediate 



CHICAGO — Dr. Edwin G* Nourse, former chairman of President 
Truman's Council of Economic Advisors, will talk at 8 p,.m». Friday, 
June 9t before members of the largest graduating class in the history 
of Illinois Institute of Techno logyo 

The 622 graduates will hear Nourse discuss "Technology and Publics 
Service" at ceremonies in the Civic Opera House, 

Following the address, he will be awarded an honorary doctor of 
laws degree by Dro Henry To Healdj president of Illinois Tech'. 

Nourse has taught at Iowa State colleges Wharton School of 
Finance and Commerce, and the universities of South Dakota, Arkansas, 
and Pennsylvania o 



-intw« 



from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Armsev, Director . 



Mailed: I\fey 29, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: Imnediate 



CHICAdO --There will be a shortage of engineering gT^aduates in the United 
States before present high school seniors can coinplete four-year courses in any 
branch of engineering* 

This prediction was made today by Dro L^ Eo Grinter, professor of civil 
engineering and mechanics and former vice president of Illinois Institute of 
Technology, 

"High school graduates are completely mistaken in fearing that the 
temporary slight excess of engineering graduates will crowd the profession four 
years from now, " he said» 

Estimating the current (I930) engineering graduates at ii^s^OO} he forecast 
a sharp reduction next year and in 1952o 

"Because of the sm^ll birth rate in the early '30s, the present pool of 
high school students is rapidly becoming smaller than in pre-war yearso And a 
snaller percentage are choosing engineering as a career^" 

"It is clear," he said, "that the number of engineering graduates by 1954 
will be smaller than in 1940^. But the job opportunities for graduates in 1954 are 
expected to double those of 1940cf" 

This will produce an employment picture in which young men who enter 
college as engineering freshmen in 195^ and I951 can expect employers to seek 
them upon graduation^ 



-more- 



grinter-- Illinois Tech,, page two 

Dr.. Grintei' noted that one state university now has only 3OO freshmen 
in a total encineering eni^ollment of 2,200, and an even smaller freshman class 
is expected to enroll next fall,. 

"If this trend continues, the enrollment will be less than 900 engineering 
students by 195^5 and the number of graduates nay be expected to drop from 750 
this year to 2^0 in 1954," 

There is misunderstanding, too, he said, as to the purpose of engineering 
education, 

"It has a dual purpose^. It serves first as professional education for 
future engineers, but it also furnishes to large numbers of young men the best 
education available for living and earning in a technological vrorld* 

"Thousands of engineering student will becom.e industrial salesmen, 
supervisors, managers, and representatives of corporations, .for which their 
education as engineers is more valuable th.in education of a more general 
character," he pointed out,. 

"Not even one-third of all engineering graduates remain in professional 
engineering over an entire lifetime," Dr.. Grinter saidp. 



■ jwa- 



trom. 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South f*Bderjjl Street 
Chicago 16, llffnols 

CALUMET 5-9600 



iiif C 



■..c <i' ^ '>•■■•<-• n 'M^i- 



rublic Kelations Department 
Jamej W. Armsey, Director 



Milled! May 31, I95O 

FOR RELEASE Men» 



Note to Eaitors : 



ir; •■ : <: 



Here is a press book from RCA you might find valuable in 
connection with the forthcoming Symposium of Thin Films, sponsored 
by Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology 
on June 3, 9, and 10 at the Sheraton hotel. 



~ Jim Armsey 



! fi C 



.' the :•? '" A S c i c" n+ 1 f i ■:. 






ai &Io'st.-IfiV Mn Wsici i>c^ ^-0^ frrc-il aocd SBtsig a si 9ieH 



RCA Victor 

division of Kadio Corporation of America 



NEWS 




-HIS HASTER'S VOICr' 



FOR RELEASE: 
On Receipt 



PRESS DIVISION . CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY . WOodlawn 3-8000 



NEW RCA ELECTRON MICROSCOPE TO BE SHOWN 
AT ARMOUR RESEARCH FOUNDATION SYMPOSIUM 



Chicago, 111. -- The first Chicago area showing of RCA's new 
permanent-n agnet , table-nodel electron nicroscope will highlight 
an exhibit to be held by the RCA Scientific Instrument Section at 
the Sheraton Hotel here June 8-10 in connection with the Syiriposium 
on Thin Films, third of an annual series of synposia sponsored by 
the Armour Research Found at ionT*^of t^JT$ Illinois Institute of Tech- 
nology. 

More than 250 scientists from all parts of the United States 
and Canada are expected to attend the symposium, concerned with 
the formation, geometry, structure, properties , and applications of 
thin films. Dr. Robert G. "'icard, head of the RCA Scientific 
Instrument Engineering group, will be on the panel of scientists 
participating in the program. 

The new RCA electron microscope, employing for the first time 
permanent magnet lenses requiring no stabilization circuits and 
controls, will be demonstrated by RCA scientists in the company's 
booth at the Instrument Display in the hotel's Tropical Room. 
Micrographs and photographs pertinent to the syriposium will also 

be on view. 

If II II 
, , II II It 

5/22/50 



from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 

CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE 



my 31, 1930 

Immediate 



CHICAGO -- Two graduates of Illinois Institute of Technology 
have been awarded Sloan fellowships.^ each totaling $3^800, for a year's 
study in the executive development program at Ivkssachusetts Institute 
of Technology^ 

They are Edward Po Gruca. 3I, of IIOI3 Campbell avenue; and 
Ii'lartin J.. Kraegelj 3^. of 8336 Kraay avenue, Munster. Indiana,,. 

Awards, based on nation-wide competition, are effective 
beginning June 12 and consist of integrated courses in business 
administration and economics with opportunity for earning a master's 
degree in one of the two fields,. 

Gruca, who received a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering 
in 1942, has been employed in the research and development department 
of Pullman-Standard Car llanufacturing company; Hammonds Indiana,. 

Draegelj a 1942 mechanical engineering graudate, is a works 
engineer at American Steel Foundries, Hammond, Indiana*. 



-mtw- 



from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: ^^^^ 2, 1930 

FOR RELEASE: i^^ediate 



CHICAGO -~ The first formal summer session in the history of Illinois 
Institute of Technology will open June 19o Registration will be held June 1^ ^ 
A shorter six-week course at the Institute of Design of Illinois Institute of 
Tachnology will begin June 26o 

More than 135 undergraduate courses v/ill be offered in 1? fields of study 
in engineering, design, the natural sciences, and social sciences, Chester A^ 
Arents, assistant dean of engineering and director of the summer session^ said 
today. 

Thirty- two graduate courses in 12 fields will be offered for graduate 
students only. Special emphasis will be placed on engineering mechanics-. Among 
the instructors in this field will be Dr« A,„ Nadai, consulting miochanical 
engineer of Westinghouse corporation since 1929a and specialist in the behaTior 
of materials. 

Purpose of the session is to provide instruction for undergraduates who 
want extra credit or need to make up required courses, for instructors vrorking 
toward advanced degrees, for graduate students T/ho want to complete their 
studies, and for special students who want specific courses* 

Two ne?f courses for instructors are off erode Methods of teaching 
technical drawing is being given for high school and college drafting teachers, 



sunmer session — Illinois Techr, page two 

and modern developments in chemistry is offered as a refresher course for 
chemistry instructors* 

The Institute of Design will hold registration June 23- It will offer a 
teacher training seminar in technici.ues of instruction in applied arts^ Courses 
will be offered in basic workshop, visual fundamentals, and photographyo 

The summer session will run through August 18, 



-J eg- 



III 



from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: June 2, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — John Langrehr who never went to high school a day in his life 
will receive a college degree at 8 p^m* Friday (June 9) during Illinois Institute 
of Technology's spring commencement ceremonies in the Civic Opera House. 

The 3C-year-old graduate, who will receive a bachelor's degree in industrial 
engineering,, was forced to drop school 16 years ago following graduation from 
eighth grade. He and his wife and 5-yGar-old son, Richard, live at 31^0 South 
Michigan avenue, 

"As a child," Langrehr explained, "I was fortunate even to have finished 
eighth grade »" 

His father, Henry Langrehr, owner of a 360-acre farm near Parker, South 
Dakota, tried to keep John in school but the severe drought of the 30*3 made it 
impossible. Instead of attending the local public high school, John, ninth in 
a family of 10 children, helped on the farmo 

"I was never fond of farming," he admitted, "I always preferred puttering 
around nachines. So at I99 I left the farm and came east to see if I could find 
some way to study machinerv» 

"First, I went to Barrington, Illinois,, and worked two years on a fox and 
mink farm» Then, in 1938» I managed to get a job as an apprentice at the Barber- 
Coleman imchine tool manufacturing plant in Rockf ord» " 

While attending St.. Paul's Lutheran church in Rockford, he met the parson's 
daughter, MisS Dorothy Brunn, On J&irch 7, 1943, 'the bride's father, Dr. F.. A, Brunn, 



-more— 



langrehr, graduate — Illinois Tech, page two 

officiated at their wedding, 

A year after his narriage, John joined the navy and served as a motor 
machinist's mate aboard an 1ST in the Pacific theater. 

Upon returning to Rockford in January of 1946 » he learned of Illinois 
Tech's cooperative education program at Rockford college which enabled students 
in tlhat area to \vork alternating semesters in local industrial plants while 
studying for a degree. 

After two years at Rockford college, students then transfer to Chicago 
where they continue their five-year work-study program at Illinois Tech, 

Professor Harold L,, Ivlinkler, co-ordinator of the program, suggested John 
take an aptitude test to determine whether a high school education was necessary, 

"For years," Langrehr said, "I had been haunting libraries and studying 
by correspondence to compensate for my lack of formal education*" Thus, Langrehr 
not only passed the entrance examinations but ranked among the highest of those 
who took the testSc- 

A month after his navy discharge Langrehr vras attending classes at Rockford 
collegeo In accord with the program, he studied at Rockford four months and them 
spent the next four at Barber-Coleman company where he applied in fact what he had 
learned in class, 

MeanTifhile, through a GI loan he pruchased an $8,000 six-room home in 
suburban Loves Park and he and his wife spent evenings redecorating, landscaping, 
and gardening. However, before transferring to Illinois Tech in Septemier of 1948» 
they sold their home at a profit to help meet expenses, "Because," Langrehr 
explained^ "it was a pretty tight squeeze on $90 monthlyo" 

When the Langrehr family arrived in Chicago that fall, they buckcsd the 
housing shortage during their first year by Dorothy's v;orking as a maid while 
John- served as butler for a socially prominent north side family. In exchange 

-more- 



langrehr^ graduate — Illinois Tech, page three 

they received room and board which tided them over until Illinois Tech's ten-story 
apartment building for irarried students and staff members was completed. 

After moving into Illinois Tech's nev? apartment building, they both found 
work at the Institute, Mrs« Langrehr as a secretary, and John as a laboratory 
research assistant. 

Follov;ing graduation, the Langrehrs v;ill return to Rockford where Johm 
will resume v/ork at the Barber-Colerran company as an industrial engineer in the 
production, control, and methods department, 

Inspite of his heavy program of work and study, Langrehr has maintained 
a straight B average, but doesn't consider his efforts unusual, 

"It was well worth the struggle," he said; "it's taught me one thing» 
Our son will have a college education but he won't get one this way. Already 
he's filled three piggy banks labled 'for college only' and that," he said, 
"is just the beginning," 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: Jun© 2, 1950 

•FOR RELEASE: lJa«aediate 



CHICAao -« Donald 0. Craycaraft* 22, son of Uc» and Mrs. A. T, 
Oraycraft of 1205 Prospect roadt B^ia» will receive a bachelor 'a 
degree In chemistry f^iday evening (June 9) during Illinois Institute 
of Technology's coiBnenoement cereaionies in the Oivic Opera House* 

A 1942 graduate of Woodmff high school, Craycraft is a 
Bsaoaber of 'triangle* social fraternity. Alpha Fai Omega, national 
serrice fraternity, and the Illinois Tech glee club. 



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from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: June 2, 1550 

FOR RELEASE: Insoediate 



CSlOAao — > Robert £• Parsona, 21« son of Mr* and H&rs* Iiclw«rd 
K* Barsons of 44 Wood street, East l^lostine* Ohio* will receive a 
baetielor's de^ee in fire protection aixd safety engineering i!riday 
erening (June 9) during Illinois Institute of Technology** 
eomraeneement ceremonies in the Civic Opera Houae* 

Parsons graduated from Bast Palestine high school in Ifeiy 
of 1946. 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



ruDllc i\eiaTions meparimenT 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: June 2, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: I-nmediate 



0130/^30 — aiducy G« Portei', 32, son of ISca, Kellie M. Barter 
of lip-jr v^ost 3priQ£ street t liima. OhiOt will receiT& a bachelor's 
degree in industrial engineearing Eriday evening (June 9) dtyPing 
Illinois Institute of Tcdinology's eoramencanent ceremDnies in the ' • '^ 



Civic Opera House* 



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Poirtert who graduated from South high school in June of 1935 » 
is a mentoer of Tau 3eta H, highest e^ij^ineering honorary society, 
and Sigua L>ta Ejjsiltmt honorary industrial engineering aoeiety* 



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,^^i 1:0 scut irl Xeoiloa ifeixf dtsoe a%fi t^imb^m o^'* ^•kv*^'*' 



*»<3i;?- 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: June E, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: Immediate 



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CHICAGO — Carl 0. Sohelin, 31, of 1522 Meadow oourt, 
Rockford, will receive a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering 
Friday evening (June 9) during Illinois Institute of Technology's 
commencement ceremonies, 

Schelln, who graduated from Rockford high sohoo] in 
June of 1939, is a member of Pi Tau Sigma, national honorary 
mechanical engineering society. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



ruDlic Kelations Uepartment 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 



Juna 2, 1950 



FOR RELEASE: 



iMaedlatd 



Exclusive to North Riverside Star 

CHICAGO ^- laoyd H. Meller, 21, son of Mr, and J-lrs, 
Alvin S. Meller of South Main street, Dovmers Grove, will 
receive a bachelor's degree in ohamical engineering Friday 
evening (June 9) during Illinois Institute of Technology's 
oonraencement cereiaonies in the Civic Opera Eouse. 

A June 1946 graduate of River side-3rookfield high 
school, Meller served as vice president of the Institute's 
chapter of Theta Xi, social fraternity. He is also a raember 
of Alpha Chi SigEsa, national honorary chemistry and chemical 
engineering ■ how wi wwj / society. 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



ruDlic r^eiarions ueparimenT 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: ^^^ ^'» "^^^^ 

FOR RELEASE: I»»««iafc« 



Exoiuaif© to Dalttm Esral^ ., ^,. ,,, _ 

fHIS/.SO •• Bo\mTt 0, Meekstroth, 25, eon of Mr. anA 
Mrs* W^rry ;»• Msclcstjpoth of 901 Broad boulswdrd, Baj%iM, will 
ir»s«i7« a baelialor'a da^pr©^ fridBf evoElng {S\m& 9) la elsotrleal 
eogiEL&^rlng afe lilisola 2&s1»itQt@ of feeitsology*® ©aa®i©ne^ent 
e«rflaBocl®6 in tho Civic Opera Hous®, 

A ixm^ 1943 graduate of Ftaixmoat bigh seliool* Hs^toltroth 
is a ©d©i>«r of Triaagi® social fraternity, th@ 8oll<ags band, 
end th@ Institute of aMio ^iogintj^rs. 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



rUDllC i\eiaTioni i^epai ii'icin 
James W. Armsey, Director 



I\me 



1950 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE :^^?^^^^ 



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'siHi^' ■iill';^ ^;^l>:, i^t 430*1 Miy^tii '''{.. 



Eacolusive to l/ashington Tazawell Countjr Reporter 



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CEIC.iGO — Roy T. Paluska, son of i:!r. and Mrs, I'rank 
Paluska of 215 albert street, Washington, twIII receive a bachelor's 
degree in aechanioal engin ering Friday evening (June 9) during 
Illinois Institute of Technology's oofflmenoeraent ceremonies in 
the Civic Opera House, 

Paluska, who graduafesdfrom Roanoke high school in 
May of 1944, is a laember of Pi Tau Sigma, national honorary 
mechanical engineering society, and Tau Beta Pi, highest 
engineering honorary society. 



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r.l Bsincuxe-ieo v^..er.BOfleiumao a»xSOloiwioeT to Biuni^!ll Bloallll 

.sBuoH ATte^O olTlO ©li* 



— SaJui— 



from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



rUDIIC l\eiaTlons uayiai Mnx:ni 

James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: Juna 2, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: Immediate 



Sxoluslve to Jersey Co. Bemoorat-Nafws 

v^.5|,. GHICAGC — Donald 3. Martin, 25, of 806 North State 

street, Jerseyville, will receive a bachelor's degree in mechanical 
engineering Friday evening (June 9) during Illinois Institute 
of Technology' s conjmenoament cereaonies In the Civic Opera House. 

Martin graduated from Lincoln Ccsiimunity high school 
In June of 1943, 

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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departmenf 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: ^^^^ 2» i«50 

FOR RELEASE: Ii^©<^iata 



OBTa\^^<D •- Las8r®B©# !.« listos, £4, ass of ibt a©v, 
Asd Mrs. ^^lllisis ■■'« IJUfeoa of aoath Holland, will r@©al?® 
ft b3ehslot»*3dagr«ie la «refeit««tui"« friary ©Teslng (3'unt 9) 

9«r$s^ini«s in tkd Ci?le Cp@ra Houst, 

Listen sra4ui4t0(a from. Ftngsr tiigfe sehcci, Chieiifo» 
In 0un« of i945. 



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from, . 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department \ 
Janrtes W. Armsey, Director i 



Mailed: Jua« E, H 

FOR RELEASE: icgaMl^te 



^nitidlTo te Lowell :?rlbune 

-,;,/..-;■. .. smOi*^'^^ ♦« S^HOpt ?;# 7<»idlls, S5, «<m of Mr. aaft 

Mrs* ABitie&;f ;, JoaeXls of l.@w«lly laai^^sd, «1IX r#««iTe « 

eerdss^tui i» 6hd aivle Oj^^ft liaa@9* 

©f AlpJt^ aiieaa *%!, social trntts^&itft imfl ?i Tan .Siispa* a?sfelonal 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 


Public Relations Department \ 
James W. Armsey, Director i 


3300 South Federal Street 




Chicago 16, Illinois 




CALUMET 5-9600 




- 


Mailed: ^^^ 2. 1950 



FOR RELEASE: Immediate 



Sxolusiv© to Oshkosh Northwestern 

Caiia-GG — Heginald D, Eraser, 28, son of Mr, and 

Mrs. Regiaald Kramer of 52 AsfelaiK! aTonue, Oshkosh, ^11 

receive a bachelor* s degree in meehaBloal enginaaring B^rlday 

evening (June 9) during Illinois Institute of Technology's 

cc3©sene«Bent oer^aionies in the Civic Opera House. 

A June 1939 graaua':-e of Oshkosh hif?h school, Kraiaer 
is one of 622 Illinois Tech students who will receive advanoad 
or undergraduate degrees. 



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from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relationi Uepartmen^^pff 
Jamei W. Armiey, Director , ' 



Mailed: 5>J||e S, 1550 

FOR RELEASE: laawaiat* 



SHIO-'.^C •» jTo^ F* ^@i@ol>s« 27, u(m at Wt* aii4 Mrs* 
EftjLph ?• 3"aeofes ef Hasd«si« ^ortfe t5tlK>ta, sill y«e®l'r« a ^«h«lm**ij 

Illlxu>i8 Institute of T^s^^tuolo^f* is i^ri»g eo®isenwsiBast« 

is CJB© of 62E «fao will i*«s@i^e «i#TEs»e<^ DP URd€5»p»aa?ist« ■Sogrees 
aufing fehe Institute's p»a4tuatlea mm!'emrml&9 in ^© Clrie 



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I from... 

LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Publrc Relations Uepartmenl 
James W. Armsey, Directoi 



Mailed: 



June 2, 1S50 



FOR RELEASE 



IcamQdlate 



■vtf 



Exclusive to Atlantic News-Telegraph 

CHICAGO — Harold H, Eallman, 25, son of Mr, and Mrs, 
Peter Hellman of 901 Chestnut street, Atlantic, will recoive 
a bachelor's degree in architecture Friday evening (June 9) 
during Illinois Institute of Technology's ooranience/nent ceremonies 
in the Civic Opera House. r? *...^: 

Hellxaan graduated from Atlantic high school in June 
of 1943. -^^^ • 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 

CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department ^1] 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: ^WXB ^» 1$50 

FOR RELEASE.lQMdiate 



CEICAOO — INAmp !• ar?iftoa, BX , SOB cf Mr. and 
Urs, :i* C, (lraffco.fi of EOS Tssstip 8tz^tt» 'i^m;, will r^o©!-?© 

at IXllnoie Ia€ttit«t«j of t^eimaXogf^B sprite ec^rtaneasaenfe. 

Upcai graduatln45 froa Seoo ki^ ©eh.'-oi in .Tuno of 1S46, 
Os^ftoB waa awar«@d a four-ye^iP sahoIiirsJilp to Illlsiois T®0h 
by VmpBi Sola o«^ipfeay safi aurlng his mopbrnxorQ ye*.r in oollsga 
w^ namad ^utstendtlng studsnt lii his claaa* 

H« Ima also a«rY^ aa prssid^nt cf l*li« I»gitltu^*s 
ahaptar of Ght Spall oa, catioaal h-imm?fATt civil e^Liosyisg 
i^eiat^t Um»^ m^mgt^v of l^ata H, aoalal fi^tt«a»iit3r» anft 
voa aiaatod to Tau Bata Fi* hir^Boat aagiaaavlng ho&orarj aoalaty* 

OraftoB ia oa© of 6SS ^fa© id,Xl .rs^ei^e oit&ar adTaaoad 
or undf^gr&duata &ii^«»B at ear^^c^lits la tha OlTle Opara Hotaaa* 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: ^^« &$ X^O 

FOR RELEASE: Ifi»««lftt« 



daanoo -^ caarl©® ?• Frisbl®, ss, «©a of lir, aui 
WtB^ Ross S» Fri»bl# of 1040 Nortlli Park boulsva^d, IniSependesiea, 

will r««dl7@ Q teaoh#lor»s Ssgree Is fir® protsetlon aiicl esfsty 
«Bglr,«@ring Friday ®T©Eljsg i3^\in® §) dt^ng llllaols Insfcltute 

of ?#o!3aologT»« sprlB^ ee®iia«Qo^iimt» 

fWsfei®, wfe© gpadimtM fFi^, Iiidsp#n5an«@ high, sehool 
Im Kay of 194S, la or© of 622 who will r^aeire oi^hsr ady&BoM 
or undergraduate ^©gre^s at eoa^#ii©#©ent c©?€S!jsorI©s in th® 
Civle Opera Ho«4S©» 

Illl»ei8 Teeli i« tlM ©Biy ««ll#ge Sn %h& motion offering 
a full f©ur*j@«,r eoura© ia th« fiel4 in wMei; fj'isbi^ eimJoroS. 



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Director 



June 8, 1950 

ijQDi^iate 



^xolusire to Waupaca County Press 

CJSICAOO — Goorg© 0. Walt, 28, son of iir, and i^a, 
Lovi L» Walt of w'aupaoa, kifisooiisiii, will reoQiva a baoti9lor*a 
dsagree in «l«dCtrioal aaglaet^ririg J'rlday ©vening (June 9) during 
I'i4^japld Xii3titut>@ of Teohnology^s ooismenooment eereiaonies* 

Walt graduated frOK Grant Jaigh school, fox Leke, 
Illinois, in JuiiQ of 1940, 

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,«^^J xo^i ,Xoodoa daiil in^iO m-il Dsdr,i;foe^S *^«-« 

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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: Jun© S, 1930 

FOR RELEASE: Imodlat© 



l?xelusivo to Seirtoa fin^a -oi.o^- .^\\.\ ■^■■-' -\v- i::^.;- 

OHICAGO — Thaa>l«u8 T. Eagula, 5E, son of Mr. and 
Mr9» stsiaey iagula of £09 Ave I, Wslrton, wer^t Tipglnla, will 
receive a bachelor* s degree in ftrehit9etu3*9 Friday svenlng 
(June 9) during Illinois lasiituta of Technology's ooafi©nari«nt 
e«7«i&o&l@d« 

Zagul®, a Juae 1935 gpaduatt of "s/elr high soliool, 
is a mamber of Illiaois T©ch«8 Rawaen club (Oatholio organiaation), 
Pi Ru SpflllOR, national honorary music society, and H. Delta 
Hlpsilen, national honor--sry jourriallss society* 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
Jannes W. Arnnsey, Director 



'^^''^^^ June 5, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: 



Immediate 



CHICA.GO -- TV'o young women who defied precedent by invadi-ig fields of 
engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology will receive their bachelors' 
dcgiOes at 3 p.iiic. Friday (June 9) during the Institute's spring commencenent 
oeronionies in the Ci\'ic Opera Housec- 

The 21-year-old coeds who braved former exclusively irale engineering fields 
are Lliss Shirley SchultZj of 3447 I^orth Oak Pari: av&nueg. and I/Iiss Lois Bey,, of 
J.551 VJest Zddy streat. 

When l.liss Schultz receives a degree in civil engineering and Kiss Bey,, 
one in chemical engineering, they T/ill be the first women ever awarded degree? 
in -.hese fields by Illinois Tech or its predecessor institutions (Armour Institute 
of Tv:clinology and Lewis Institute)- 

Breaking a ^O-ye'^r-'Oldi tradition is no easy task, they both admit,. As 
lone women among men, they simply learned to push a slide rule as quickly as their 
fellow classmates, arrive at the same answers to calculus prcbleiiis, and, in 
general.; study long hours to keep pace with more mechanically-minded m.ale3.. 

At times it meant intrusion where Illinois Tech coeds liad ne'er before 
treado. 

For Miss Bey that was last month v.'hen, in tribute to her superior scholar- 
ship, she was awarded a woman's badge to Tau Beta Pi, highest engineering 
honorary society. It v/as the first such badge ever granted by Illinois Tech> 



-more— 



bey, schults, commencemsnt— Illinois Techj page two 

AnQ during the sunmer before Yiss Schultz's junior year (.August 1943). t 
she uroke the I.O-jear-old tradition of "men only" at the college's summer civil 
engineering camp in northern Wi3co:isin, At Camp Armour j, she and 36 Illinois Tech 
men completed the required fouiT-T'eek course in field Eiu:veying> 

Like the other engineering studentSj she wore dungarees ^■- and a crew 
baircuto The latter was administered by her classmates who thought Icng blonde 
tre"3es too feminine for the civil engineering profession, 

A graduate of Steirmietz high school in June of 1946s Miss Schulrz enrolled 
at Vllinois Tech in the fall of that yearo While at Illinois Tech, she was 
"lerted secretary of her freshjTian and senior classes and Sigma ICappa social 
aorority^. She also served on the staff of Tech News., student v;eekly nev/spapero 

Miss Eey, a graduate of lake View high school in June of !!946, attended 
■pri^_,ht Junior college for one year before entering Illinois Tech,, An honor 
stuaent throughout her three years at Illinois Tech» she is a meirber of the college 
chapters of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the American Chemical 
Socistyo 

Follov7ing graduation Miss Bey plans to work in the research and development 
phase of chemical engineering while continuing study tov/ard a master's degree im 
chemical engineering* 

Miss Schultz hopes to enter the sales division of a local civil engineering 
firmc 

-mtw— 



from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



ruDlic t\eiaTions L/eparrmenT 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE 



Zauttdlat* 



0H2a^^3O •• Rob«rt J. Areuitil* 2^* «l«etricbal ei^iit^eir at 
3«rift «ai oa^^»mjr« will rdo«lve a <ssast«a'*8 decree in busineaa aM 
«Eiglii«t^ing fl^bainistratiaQ J^lday «r(mi!)g (Jiixw 9) daring IXllaala 

i)Mtituli« of ?«ehtK>lii3g3r*s oaEs::6a«£«i»nt eer^Dniea. 

SpcnSO • •■ :r 

feextsdf who ^^rt^ a baohelc^r'a degree iB olootrioal 
mizirmcTia^ at IXllmis I<0Oh in Jsxssmry of I!}l^» was prcaident 9f 
tiie £%3titut«*9 studant asooeiatlcm. B» also oaptaioed th« oollasa 
vrastliJ^ taaaa* «aa a mt^st of Baaot I« hdsprarjr athletid aasooiatioo* 

and Mp^ Slgaa {%lt adoial ftratttmity* 

:--;;yti.>vJ '':ie'.iiw!.:-.' .- 
ii» Uvaa at 1759 ^ast Qarfleld bcMlavard* 



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from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



ruDlic KeiaTions ueparimenT 
James W. Armsey, Director 



June 5 

Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: Iinraediate 



CHICAGO — More than 200 scientists are expected to attend an internationa]. Sym- 
posium en Thin Films June 8, 9. and 10 at the Sheraton hotel, Microscopists^ chem- 
ists j physicists, and other technical experts will meet during the three days to 
discuss their laboratory problems with chemical films dcavn to millionths of an 
inch thick, 

I Sponsored by Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Teclinologyj 
the program vj-ill include four panel sessions led by outstanding authorities. The 
formation, geom.etry, structure, applications, and problems of thin films will be . 
discussed. 

Co-chairmen of the symposium are Charles F, Tufts, associate physicist at the 
Foundation, and Dr, Walter C, McCrone, supervisor of analytical chemistryc Prob- 
lems in such industries as paint, metals, plastics, and petroleum will be discussedc 
According to Tufts, thin film techniques are important in product control and in- 
provement since these films constitute the finish, of any product. 

A new Icvf-cost RCA electron microscope will be seen as part of an instrument 
display at the meeting. It will be the first Chicago area showing of the instrumento 



page two — thin films 

Note to Editors of Specialized P ublications ; 

Some of the outstanding scientists who i7ill attend the June 8, 9.o 10 Symposium 

on Thin Films at the Sheraton hotel are : 

Dr^ Ro D, Heidenreich, Bell Telephone Laboratories, Murray Hill^ N.Jo 
(Electron microscopy of metals — corrosion, etCo) 

Dro L, 0, Broclavay, University of Michigan, Ann Ar'^or, Mich^ 

(Electron diffraction of organic chemical substances— petroleum, etc„) 

Drc T, G, RochcxT, American Cyanamid Co., Stamford, Conn, 
(Kyion, cellophane, paint, adhesives) 

Dr, E. J. Ritchie, Eagle-Picher Co., Joplin, Mo, 
(Paint filr.s) 

Dro R. G, Picard, Radio Corporation of America, Camden, NoJ» 
(Electron optical instrumentation) 

Dr. Fi Ae Haram, General Aniline and Film Corp., Eastcn, Pa- 
(Pigments and dyee ) 

Dr, G, David Scott, University of Toronto, Canada 
(Thin metal films structure ) 

Dr^ Bruce Billings, Baird Associates, InCe, Cambridge, Mass. 
(Geometry of thin films) 

Dre Helen Jupnik, American Optical Co., Stamford, Conn. 
(Optical systems) 

Dr. Katharine Elodgett, General Electric Co., Schenectady, N.Y, 
(Measuring thickness of thin films) 

Dr, Henry Levinstein, Syracuse University, Syracuse, N,Y- 
(Geometry of thin films) 

Dr. A. Co Van Dorsten, Phillips Research Laboratories, Eindhoven, Netherlands 
(Electron optics) 



i 



Trom... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Kelations Department 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: June 5^, I95O 

FOR RELEASE: u^ediate 



CHICAGO — J'jhn M. Neff , supervisor of ceramics at Armour Research Foundation of 
Illinois Institute of Technology, has been named assistant chairman of the ceramics 
and minerals department at the Foundation, it was announced today by Dro £« P> 
Flint,, department chairman. 

Neff joined the Foundation in I9U6 and has been in charge of ceramics activi- 
ties since 19U8, He has been active in ceramic research and development for 2 2 
years . 

From 19hh to I9U6 Neff vj-as plant superintendent for Repca Corporation, Detroit, 
Mich, Previously he had worked in the U.S, Gypsum Company's laboratories, the 
Columbus Dental Manufacturing Company, and at the Bausch & Lomb Optical Corapanya 

Winner of the Orton ceramic fellowship at Ohio State University in 19hO, Neff 
earned a Master of Science degree there in 191^2, He received an honorary degree of 
professional ceramic engineer from the same university in I9I1O. He is a member of 
four honorary technical societies, 

Neff has done research on many types of ceramic materials, including dental 
porcelain, bricks, and jet alloys, 

MTo and Ifrs. Neff live at I4.3U Aldine, Chicago. He is k3« 



from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Kublic Kelations Uepartmeni 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: Jane 6, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO -- Prank Grossley, former part-time instructor at Illinois 
Institute of Technology, will receive the first doctor of philosophy degree inr 
metallurgical engineering ever awarded by the Instituteo 

The 23-year-old Cross ley is one of 622 who will receive either advanced 
or undergraduate degrees at 8 p^mo Friday (June 9) during Illinois Tech's spring 
commencement ceremonies in the Civic Opera House<> 

A 1942 graduate of DuSable high school, he is the son of litr, and Mrs, 
Joseph B, Crossley-, Sr. , of 51 '^^est 59'th street* 

Crossleyr v\fho received his bachelor's and master's degrees at Illinois 
Tech in June;, 1945c s^nd Junej 19478 respectively, will reimin in the academic 
field„. 

This September he will establish and direct a department of metallurgical 
engineering at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State collegeo 

"The first year," he said, "should prove a real challenge -» ordering 
equipment, setting up laboratories, scheduling courses, and, in general, putting 
a new department on its feet©" 

Crossley^ an honor student throughout his study at Illinois Tech, earned 
national scholastic recognition when, in I&irch of 1948, he took second place ini 
a nation-wide graduate student contest for a paper on "The Removal of Magnesium 
from Aluminum Alloy Scrap*" 



— more~- 



k ■'. • 15 



crossley, graduate — Illinois Tech, page two 

During the war Crossley served as an ensign on the Navy's troop transport, 
LBS Storm King* lie was commissioned in November, 1945» ^'^i'^ remained on active 
duty until August, 1946.- 

Prior to his commissions he was enrolled in the naval V-12 program at 
Illinois Techo 



-mtw- 



om 

IINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

ichnology Center 
hicago 16, Illinois 



Day Phones: 

Jllinois krstltute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400. Ext. S45 
Armour Research Foundat'hon 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-«00, Ext. 317 

Night Phona: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: J^^e 6, 19^0 

FOR RELEASE: ^&™ediate 



ADVANCE FOR RELEASE AFTER NINE (9) P.M., (CDT), FRIDAY, JUNE 9, 19^0 

Note to Editors ; 

A portion of the address on "Technology and Public Service," to be deli- 
vered Fridaj'" night, June 9^ 19^0, by Dr. Edivin G, Nourse, former chairman of the 
President's Council of Economic Advisers, to the graduating class of Illinois In- 
stitute of Technology, in the Civic Opera House, is reproduced belcw. 

Dr. Nourse virill receive an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Dr, Henry 
To Heald, president of Illinois Tech, who will also award degrees, both under- 
graduate and advanced, to 622 graduates, largest class in the history of the Insti- 
tute, 

The material belov; does not include Dr. Nourse 's preliminary remarks 
about his undergraduate days at Lewis Institute (predecessor of Illinois Tech) 
from which he received an associate in arts degree in 190U. 

It is likely you will find the most newsvrorthy statements in his final 
section on "Public Service and the Employment Act of 19U6," 



-Jim Armsey 



Edvin G. Ilourse - page iMo 

Tbs Tie Betaraen Engineering and Economics 

li ±3 frequently rsma-^ked in these dajs that our mastery of natural science 
h'T'.o far outstriy-ped car r.iasber/ of social science. It would be n^cre correct to say 
that the technology of inert or passive riaterials and unchanging natural forces is 
much, siiri^jler thaii the technology r-rhd-ch will organize and direct the not enslaved 
actions of infinitely dj_ff erentiated human oeings — aspiring and rebellioas^ competi- 
tive, and cooperative J to some extent conditioned but to a great extent A'nimsical., 
The aemano for individual education and for personal and group sej_f-dis-:ipline is 
something which has no counterpart in the v/orld of natural sciences, 

Tcday, our country stands at a crucial stage in its own history snd in the 
life of the world, Y/ith alraost fabulous resources in our hands, we are confronted 
by a fateful responsibility to employ those resources so as to enrich life, preserx-e 
liberty, and accelerate the pursuit of happiness not only ameng our own people but^ 
in reasonable measure, throughout the society of free nations. Many of those 
coiir.tries have been less favorably situated than we and some of them, have m»ade 
greater sacrifices in pioneering and in preserving h'oman liberties than we hax'e 
ever been called upon to make, 

A voice booms out from the grim towers of authoritarianism to say that free 
peoples will never discipline themselves and work to a common purpose in developing 
the strength that is potentially theirs « Thus far, we have not decisively refuted 
that challenge, l"e have not shown that we can use freedom to pursue our own 
economic interests as we see them without abusing that freedom so that individuals, 
companies, or groups overreach their proper place in a vrell balanced productive 
economy and thereby tlu-ow it into disorder and Imoair its prcductivityc 

-aore— 



EdiTin G, Nourse - page tliree 

The complex and delicate problem of economic adjustment in a free society 
makes high demands not merely on the intelligence but on the attitudes of those 
human beings v/ho are its directive agents. Some of these directive agents occupy 
exalted and strategic posts in the economy, Kany ai-e stationed at posts that are 
miinor, but these as a total are no less important. To be sound, the adjustments 
in the economic process made by all these people must be undertaken in the objective 
spirit of engineering or of underlying science. Ultimate trouble is invited -vhen 
action is that of the slick trader or bully "thi-oving his vreight around." All these 
business functionaries ^ corporation executives, officers of labor unions, farm 
leaders, and officials of government need to realize that it is a complex, inter- 
connected, and highly sensitive economic mechanism v;ith v.'hich they are dealing, 
Ihey must not think that they can build up group pov/er and use it to miake whatever 
adjustment seems at the moment desirable or profitable to themselves, without con- 
sidering the long-term effects and the v.'idespread repercussions of each particular 
action. 

The practicing engineer is quite aware of the importance of the human 
directive factor. He ]-mov.-s that, besides having a v/ell-designed plant and vrell- 
considered adjustm.ents of the several parts of this machine to each other, Y;e miust 
have Y/ell-trained and conscientious machine tenders, v.'ho know how to feed material 
in, how to manipulate the machine in its every operation, and what to do when 
trouble develops. The good machine tender is disciplined to the needs of his 
machine and cannot put his ov:n coimfort, convenience, or gain above its operational 
requirem.ents. 

This is just as true in the economic iTorld, Y/e have to learn in business 
that no party to the process can long be allovrad to put his own gain above the 
sm.ooth and productive operation of business as a lYhcle, This is not ethics: it is 



Edvfin G, Nourse - page four 

engineering experience and scientific logic. Failure to realize this fact, hoviever, 
or to accept this discipline lies at the heart of the kind of management-labor 
impasse that every now and then threatens successful operation and sustained pros- 
perity. 

As the industrial corporation developed in the United States and as 
engineering schools developed mere and more adequate training in mechanical, chemi- 
cal, and electric technologies, such of these young teclinicians as also had a flair 
for business organization and financial affairs moved rapidly to the head of our 
great producing and distributing com.panies. More and more they found that an un- 
derstanding of the technology of natural processes was not enough for themselx^es or 
for their understudies. More and more they felt the lack in their 0¥m college 
preparation of training in economic analysis, in labor relations, miarket relations, 
and public relations, and in an understanding of the broad economic and social 
forces which in the last analysis condition the economic v/orld within Vifhich the 
productive and distributive operations of the individual com.pany must be carried one 

The dictionary defines technology as "system.atic kncv: ledge of the industri- 
al arts" or as "applied science." The art of conducting modern industry success- 
fully requires the application of social science as well as natural science. The 
time has passed when schools of technology felt that proficiency in mathematics, 
physics, and chemistryj in drafting, computing, and vo-iting specifications is all 
that is required to prepare for industrial leadership. Y.'ith the growth of cur 
economic life, it has become painfully apparent that if science is to be applied 
most fruitfully to the advancement of the industrial arts, it must include not 
merely the physics and chemistry of natural processes but also the eccncmics, the 
political science, and the psychology by i^hose light human beings can be organized 



Edwin G, Nourse - page five 

and motivated to carry on a modern industrial society most effectively. 



Public Service and the Em.ployment Act of 19i|6 
As I enter the home stretch of this dissertation, I must of course mount 
my favorite hobby horse — the Emplojinent Act of 1946. This expcrim-cntal development 
within our frame of goverranent seems to me admirably to point a moral and adorn the 
tale I have been trying to unfold as to the relationship betv:een technology and 
public service. 

The essential feature of this important nev/ statute is that it enunciates 
a natiijnal policy of mobilizing all our organizational resources, public and private^ 
for a sustained high level of national prodaction and the correspondingly high level 
of national living. As a means of accom.plishing this great national purpose, it 
turns away from any trick device, panacea, or "money magic." With implicit recog- 
nition of the fact that this is the age of science in econom.ic and social relations 
not less than physical processes, the Act sets up a sort of scientific clearing 
house in the Executive Office (the Council of Economic Advisers) and a somev;hat 
comparable one in the Congress (the Joint Committee on the Econcm.ic Report of the 
President). Both bodies are designed to integrate analysis r.f the problems of all 
parts of the economy as a basis for f orm.ulating policies that Yiall advance the 
v:elfare of the economy as a v.diolej, 

In so far as the potentialities of this analytical or scientific approach 
arc appreciated by divisions of govermient and by the organizations of private 
business, it v/ould bo possible to obtain the goals of economic stabilizaticn and 
economic cxi:)ansion at a rate comjnensurate with the resources available and to avoid 
the severe interruptions which thus far have constituted a recurrent source of 
waste and frustration in modern industrial society. If such a purpose is to be 



Edwin G, Nourse - page si^: 

realised, technology as systematic kno\»fledge of the industrial arts must be geared 
to the public service, that is, to proinoting the total welfare rather than advancing 
the narrcvily conceived or short-range interests of any particular area, interest, 
group, or faction. 

It was my hope that each m.ember of the Council of Economic Advisers v;ould 
be equipped not merely v/ith high competence in the techniques of economic analysis 
but cndovred also yiith a broad and deep social philosophy. Both these qualifications 
would be needed if they were to weigh and scale the demands of the several parties 
to the economic process and display a calm judicial quality as the economic attor- 
ney for one or another special interest carie to argue the claim.s cf their respective 
clients for favored treatment. It was my hope also that, with that kind of staff 
assistance, the various members of the Executive family — Cabinet officers and agency 
heads — -viould be able to resist the political pressures brought upon them by busi- 
ness, labor, agricultural, and financial constituencies or by representatives of 
geographical sections. It was my hope that, thus staffed, successive Presidents in 
future might rise to higher planes of economic statesm.anship than ive have knavn 
in the past, and that the impressive character of the evidence brought to bear in 
support of policies calculated to advance the vrelfare of the whole country might 
vfxn the support of citizen voters, V'ith our constantly rising standard of general 
education, v:ith our better understanding of scientific principles and their applica- 
tion to the industrial arts both physical and social, such a substitution of power 
politics to economic statesmanship is the hope of our democracy in the future. 

As yet, how^ever, the promise of the Employment Act has not been fulfilled. 
There has not been a willingness to weigh the claims of all special interest groups 
as parts of a total productive program and to formula.te and follov/ those policies 
that "on balance" will do most to promo "to the smooth functioning of the economy as 



Edwin G. Nourse - page seven 

a whole. Ariiong our people the "ginime" spirit is rampant and the demand for personal 
security is put above the old spirit of personal creative achievement. Political 
agrarianism and political laborism have forged ahead of the political capitalism of 
the recent pa.st, and the merger of farmer and laborer into an unbeatable coalition 
seems to be the pattern to which we are being adoitly led today. 

It would be a sad commentary if, in this day when popular education has 
brought us such command of the technologies of material objects and natural forces, 
we should fail in our grasp of the technologies, that is the applied social science, 
of the human mind and spirit associated in business ventures and in free political 
lifco But such failure Vi^ill confront us unless, ere we face life and attack it, our 
educational institutions give to all of us the firm equipoise of an adequate phil- 
osophy of life. Not only those who go on to public position must have an ideal 
of public service. Every one v;ho labors at a private job must realize that ho has 
both an obligation and an opportunity of sound public service by making his best 
personal contribution to ma>:imumi production. For only by maximising the total 
product can the several shares be steadily enlarged. 



rom 



LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jamas W. Armsey 
Day Phonas: 

Jllinois knstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-»400. Ent. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet S-»600, Ext. 317 

Night Phona: 

Lombard IBIO-R 



Mailed: 



June 7 I 193= 



FOR RELEASE: 



Photo Memo 



Note to City Editors and Photo Editors ; 

Friday evening (June 9) Illinois Institute of Technology will graduate a 
class of 622 students, the largest in the college's history* Ceremonies in ths 
Civic Opera House offer the following picture possibilitieso 

1) John Langrehr, 30. 3140 South Michigan avenue, who never attended high school 
a day in his life but has managed a straight-B average throughout college, is 
receiving a bachelor's degree in industrial engineeringc 

2) Frank Orossley, 25, of 51 '''est 59th street- first Negro student ever 
awarded a doctor of philosophy degree at Illinois Tech, also earning first doctor "£ 
degree in his particular field, metallurgical engineering. After graduation he w.'j.l 
eetablish and direct a department of metallurgical engineering at Tennessee 
fiigricultural and Industrial State college-, 

3) John Robinson, 38, of 4859 North VJolcott avenue, who attended evenirs 
courses at Illinois Tech every semester for the past 14 years, setting a record for 
the longest consistent class attendance in the history of the Institute,) He is 

receiving a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineeringc. 

4,' Two 2i'-ye-.j."Cld coeds who have braved male fields to win the first such 
agrees at Illinois Techg Mss Shirley Schultz, of 3447 North Oak Park avenue> will 
arn a bachelor's degree in civil engineering and Miss Lois Bey, of I851 'West Eddy 
treeti: one in chemical engineering^ 

All persons mentioned in this memo will be available at 7»3^ Pom^ backstage ■ 
m -Che Civic Opera House* Miss Ivdiargaret Williams and I will be there to assist 
he photographer* 



— Jim Armsey 



rom 

LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
Ihicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jain«i W. Armuy 
Day Phonei: 

Jllrnois knstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9*00, Ext. S45 
Armour Research Foundation 
of lllmols institute of Technology — CAIumet S-UOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phona: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: June 8, 1953 

FOR RELEASE: Irnnediate 



CHICAGO — IDJ.inois Institute of Technology will offer 6C 
undergraduate courses in ll| fields in its evening division sunmer 
sessiono it was announced today by Stanton E, V/instcn, dsan of the 
evening divisicuo 

Registration for the s'j.iiimer term will be held June 12; fron 
6 to 8:30 p„mr in the North Student Union buildings 35rd and federal 
streetSc Classes will begin J'Jiie I9 and will run thi-'cugh August I80. 

Fields in which instruction will be offered ares 

Biolcgya business and economics, civil engineering; eloctrical 
engineering; ind'istrial engineering, language^ literature and philosophy,, 
mathenHtioSj mechanical engineerings mechanics, metallurgical engineerings 
physics J political and social sciences, psychology and education^ and 
technical drawings. 

A shorter six-week course at the Institute of Design of Illinois 
Institute of Technology will run frcm June 26 through August 4o 



■J eg- 



w^Bsmmmm 



-I"'. 



Tom 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

fechnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois knstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-5400, Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundat^on 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIunnet 5-»400, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



June 8, 1950 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: 



limited iate 



CHICAGO — Three faculty members at Illinois Institute of 
Technology have been elected to offices of the college chapter of Sigtna 
Xj.^ national honorary research organization;.. Dr- Et'ic To E.- Gross, 
6G44 Stony Islanci. avenue., professor cf electrical engineering; was named 
president for a one year ternin. 

Other officers elected werei 

Dr- Wilson P« Green< IO323 South See ley avenue, professor of 
mechanical engineering, vice-president^ and Dro Eugene Lieberc 5819 
Black3i.r,ne avenue^ associate professor of chemistry, secretary* Charles 
RiesZ; 1241 North State street^ senior chemical engineer of the Institute 
of Gas Technologyj treasurer,; was elected last year for two terms and 
continues in offioe. 

The Illinois Tech chapter of Sigma Xi was formed in 19^2 for the 
purpose of stimulating scientific research. ■, IVIajor activity of the 
organization is a series of lectures on modern scientific subjects which 
are free and open to the publico 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jamts W. Armjey 
Day Phonas: 

Jllinols Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9600, Bet. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?«00, Ext. 317 

Niqht Phona: 

Lombard IIIO-R 



Mailed: Ju^c 12, 193 

FOR RELEASE 



Immediate 



CHICAGO — College engineering teachers ought to be taught how to teach, 
a dean of engineering asserts^ 

New instructors must know their subject, but the colleges should tell 
them how to put it across^ according to Dro John To Rettaliata, dean of engin^eriiig 
at Illinois Institute of Technology,) 

Ke urged more adequate orientation programs for new instructors at a 
recent meeting of the Illinois-Indiana section of the American Society for 
Er^ineering Education at Purdue universityo 

Dean Rettaliata advised colleges to follow the lead of industry in this 
respecte 

"Progressive industrial concerns have formal orientation programs that 
properly acclimate and prepare the newcomer for the duties he is to perfcrm<, Such 
prn.grajES acquaint the employe with some of the specialization peculiar to the 
particular company i, " he saidr 

Dr, Rettaliata pointed out that the formal education nf the prospective 
sngineering teacher contains little to make him adept in future pedagogical 
pursuits, 

''In fact," he said, ''there are some who claim that emphasis upon research 
las an aggravating influence on the attainment of good teacherso" He noted that 



-more- 



rettaliata, asec— Illinoic Tsch, page two 

the most desirable qualification of a teacher is a thorough knowledge of subject 
matter, but too frequently,, the implication is that such knowledge guarantees a 
good teacher» 

"Mere possession of understanding is not autOTatically accompanied by the 
ability to impart it to others,. It is this transmission of the understanding of 
subject matter from teacher to point of reception by the student that must be 
accomplished," he believes.. 

The principal intent of an orientation program would be to develop the ' 
transmission factor in all its aspects and to acquaint the inexperienced teacher 
with the principles of effective teaching. 

The program should include: 

In iPreparatidn'of . departmentai.-curricula, courses o ■ course outlines., and 
individual lesson plans, emphasising the educal.ional objectives to be cbtaiued.> 

2„ Proper procedure for conducting class sessions, including presentat ..on^ 
integration into the complete program, and possible application of course material 
in future jobsr 

3o- Familiarity with the salient features of public speaking procedures,. 

4o Proper use of educational aidSc. 

5c Proper manner of measuring the progress of the studento" 

"Undoubtedly there is room for improvement in engineering teaching" s hs 
concluded, "and much progress can be accomplished through well-conducted orienta-f-ic 
programs o " 



-jeg- 



rom 



LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armiey 
Day Phones; 

Jllinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet ittOO. E«t. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?400, Ext. 317 

Night Phono: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: ^'^^^ 13, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: Immediate 



CHICAGO "~ With European recovery still a pressing world problem., 
a small but important Marshall Plan investment is being made in two young 
British scientists now studying at Illinois Institute of Technologyo 

The two men, Geoffrey Fear and Thomas Porter, are among 50 Britons 
now attending American universities or working in American industry to 
learn some of the American technical tricks in productiono 

Fear, 22(, who was awarded a bachelor of science degree at University 
College of 'Wales in Swanseac is studying metallurgy and metal production 
methodsa He was with the steel"making division of the British Iron and 
Steel Research Association in scientific liason,, He is the son of ¥ic« 
and Ivtrso Sidney Fear,, 65 Acland road^ Bridgend, South Waleso 

Porter^ 24^ a graduate of Q,ueen Mary College, London University, 
is studying industrial electronicsn At the time of his appointment he 
was working for Harris Rebus Ltd, t a furniture manufacturer in North London, 
doing research in high frequency heating for quick setting of glue in 
nass production of furnitureo He is the son of IVtr. and Mrsc Thomas Porter^ 
31 Cancell road, Brixtoii, L^ndono- 



'je^ 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois knstitute of Technology — CAiumet 5-?4O0, Ext. 545 

Armour Researcti Foundat'fon 

of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAiumet 5-9400, Eit. 317 
Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



June 14, 1950 

Iramediate 
Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: 



CHICAGO — Illinois Institute of Technology will be host to the 1st 
National Congress of Applied Mechanics June 11-16, 1951, in Chicago it was 
announced by Lloyd H. Donnell, general chairman^, 

Donnell, research professor of mechanics at Illinois Tech, said plans have 
been completed to hold National congresses every four years, between International 
congresses, which also aro held ever four years. 

The national meetings will be similar to the international and are planned 
to supplement them. No attempt will be made to attract participation outside the 
U»3, and Canada, although there will be no rule against such participation.. 

Papers for presentation at the congress must be submitted before April l/j-» 
1951 and should constitute original research in applied mechanics, which includes 
kineraaticsj dynamics, vibrations, waves, mechanical properties of materials and 
failure? stress analysis elasticity, plasticity; fluid raechanicsj thermodynamics* 

Papers should not be longer than5jOOO words. They will be grouped by 
subject and one half hour will be allotted for presentation and discussion of each 
paper. 

The congress is under the sponsorship of nine professional societies and 
four universities^ They Are: 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers, American Society of Civil 

Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, American IVIathenBtical Society, 
American Physical Society, Institute of Aeronautical Sciences, Society for 
Experimental Stress Analysis, U.S. National Committee on Theoretical and Applied 
Mechanics, Illinois Tech, Purdue University, Northwestern University, and 
University of Illinois,-, 

-jeg- 



rom 



LUNOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

'echnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois knstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9600. bit. 545 
Armour Research Foundathon 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-7400. Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



June 15, 1950 

Iromediate 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: 



CHICAGO — In a move aimed at consolidating its educational 
activities at one location, Illinois Institute of Technology will move 
its home economics department from its present location at 18 South 
Michigan avenue to the South Side campus at 33rd and Federal streets, 

The move will be made during the summer and first classes in 
the new location will begin in September, it was announced today by 
John Di, Larkin, dean of liberal studieso The department has been at 
the Michigan avenue location since moving from the Leviris Institute 
building at 1931 ''''est r.ladison street in 1945- Hovirever» students have 
had classes in biology, chemisi;ryj English, and economics on the campuso 

Space for the department offices and laboratories will be 
provided in a building at 34*1^ and Dearborn streets now used in part 
as a cafeteriao 

The only departments still remaining off-campus are the Institute 
of Design, 632 North Dearborn street, which became a degree- granting 
department of Illinois Tech last December, and the Institute for 
Psychological Services which reiuains at 18 South Michigan avenue^ 



-J^ 



rom 



LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



echnology Center 
Ihicago 16, Illinois 



Director o( Public Relations — James W, Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400. ht. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
o( Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIunnet 5-?400, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: 



June 16, 1950 

Irrmediate 



ADVANCE FOR RELEASE AFTER 12 NOON, THURSDAY, (GST) JUNE 22, 19^0 



CHICAGO — Automobile horns can be made less raucus and yet just as loud, an 
acoustics expert at Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute oi Technology 
said today. The formula; cut out some of the high notes. 

An automobile horn that could be heard asfar as the present variety but which 

would have a more pleasing sound is predicted by Daniel Callav^ray, associate physicist 

at the Foundation. He spoke at a national meeting of the Acoustical Society of 

America at State College, Pa. 

Calla'-vay described a two-month study of horns, sponsored by the Foundation as 
I 
part of a general survey of all city noises, which led to his assertion that the 

higher pitches of horn blasts ought to be removed. He said it could be done at lav 

cost, with the saving on nerves more than malcing up the difference. 

Three types of car horns were investigated: 

1, — electrically operated trumpet, made up in pairs and harmonically tuned. 
These are found on most new cars, 

2, — compressed air, the long, deluxe models sometimes custom installed on ex- 
pensive cars. 

3. — vibrating diaphragm, or "beep-beep" type, the least expensive. 

-more- 



page tvTo - horns 

Models of all three types got the same treatment and analysis, both in the 
laboratory and the field. Readings were made Y;ith standard acoustical instruments. 

The scientists first made hannonic analyses of the horns in a laboratory anecho~ 
ic chamber, a heavily insulated room virithout distracting sounds especially designed 
for sound measurements. They made recordings of various honks, and drevv graphs 
shovring the intensity and pitch of the blasts. 

Next they took outdoor measurements at distances from 10 to $00 feet, Simula ty- 
ing pedestrians at various distances. They also took instrument readings simulating 
the sound that would be heard by another driver in a closed car. 

The horns ranged from 100 to 115 decibels at 10 feet, Callaway reported, which 
is "very loud" since traffic measures from 70 to 90 decibels on the sound meter. 

But the high frequency, high pitched part of a horn's sound could well be elim- 
inated, Callai'j-ay asserted. He would cut cut all sound above 1200 cycles per second, 
leaving the lov:er frequencies as they are. He did this electronically on a record- 
ing of a horn blast and reported improvement. 

■"(Tork on a special horn using only the frequencies belov/ 1200 cycles per second 
is going on at the Foundation, he said. 

"The worst thing about automobile horns is hew people use them," admitted 
Callav/ay. "V,'e can't solve that in the laboratory." 

The general survey of noise in Chicago has included an extensive study of 
vehicular noise in traffic and noise in industrial and residential areas. The pur- 
pose of the year-long survey is to determine the sources of all types of city 
noise and to gather information useful to those who will write anti-noise . 
legislation. 

-^vas- 

im ADVAIICE FOR RELEASE AFTER 12 NOON, THURSDAY, ( CST ) JUNI. 22, 19^0 



om 



LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

chnology Center 
licago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Ptiones: 

Jllinois l/istitute ol Technology — CAIumet 5-»400, Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-»t00. Ext. 317 

Night Phone; 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: J^ne I9, I95O 

FOR RELEASE 



Advance 



ADVANCE FOR RELEASE AETER 4:00 P.M. (PSDT) THURSDAY, JUNE 22, I950 



SEATTLE ~- Today's industrial engineer is the link between the slide rule 
and the balance sheeto What's more, he's a rather rare bird, according to George 
So Speer, personnel counselor*, 

"The person who chooses industrial engineering has an interest in scientific 
study or mechanical analysis. However, his interest differs from that, for example; 
of the mechanical engineer in that he is less interested in the machine as a machine 
than in the use to which it can be puto 

"He's more interested in people than an engineer, and more interested in 
machines than a businessman," Speer saidj "a curious balance between the technology 
of industry and its business operationo" 

Speaking today before members of the American Society for Engineering 
Education here at their annual meeting, Speer, director of the Institute for 
Psychological Services of Illinois Institute of Technology, reported on results of 
interest preference tests. 

The interest preference tests include I68 questions in which the Individual 
was asked to indicate which of three subjects he prefers most and leasto Tests were 
measured in nine areas: mechanical, computational, persuasive, scientific, artistic, 
literary, musical, social service, and clerical. 

"Individual answers are of little importance, "Speer said, "but patterns 
based on the cumulative answers to all questions indicate interest preference. 

-more- 



apeer, aaee — Illinois Tech, page two 

"These tests showed the industrial engineer possesses, in common with other 
engineers, an interest in working with numbers and mechanical objects. In addition, 
he has a marked interest in activities which require direct and personal contact 
with people, 

"It is significant that in many traits the industrial engineer more nearly 
resembles the man in business and economics than he does many other engineering 
groupsn " 

The industrial engineering student, like the student of business and 
economics shows an interest in computational, persuasive, and literary activities, 
a mj Id interest in social organizations^ and a disregard toward artistic, musical, 
or clerical activitiesr 

"The basic difference betv/een the industrial engineer and the mechanical, 
civil, electrical, or chemical engineer" Speer concluded, "is his awareness of the 
individual or human problems related to his worko." 

-jeg- 
END ADVANCE FOR RELEASE AFTER 4; 00 P.M. (IDST) THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1950. 



om 



LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

chnology Center 
)icago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jamai W. Armi«v 
Day Phonal; 

Jllinois Ijistitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9W0, Ext. S45 
Armour Research Foundat'ron 
of lllcnois Institute of Technology — CAIumet S-MOO, E«t. 317 

Night Phona: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed 

FOR RELEASE 



June 2-^, 1950 

Immediate 



CHICAGO — Nicholas B. Tkachuk, 1?, son of Mr, and Mrs. Vifilliam 
Tkafthuk of 2431 West 47th placet has been awarded a four-year scholarship 
in fire protection and safety engineering to Illinois Institute of 
Technology, the only college in the nation offering a degree in this field.. 

Awarded annually by the James 3, Kemper foundation, the scholarship 
totals $2,400 and is effective beginning September I8 when classes resume 
for the fall semester, 

Tkachuk, a January 195^ graduate of Tilden high school, was 
selected on the basis of competitive examinations, high school records, 
and personal interviews. 



-mtw- 



om 



LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

chnology Center 
licago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones; 

Jllinois knstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?t00. ht, 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet S-HOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: June 20, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: Immediate 



CKICAGO .— Illinois Tech has awarded 38 niajor and 1? minor athletic awards 
t-o members of the varsity baseball; tracks tenniS; golf and rifle teams dur.ing the 
past years 

V^inners of major awards were presented grey sweaters with a scarlet and 
grey "I" by Bernard Weissman, athletic directoro Athletes who merited minor awards 
also received a sweater with a smaller letter^ 

Captains elected for the next season are; baseball. Bob Leiser, 2610 South 
NoniBlj track, Al Ashurst, jGq Blanchard, Fontana, California; tennis. Bill Matternr 
3822 North Hamlin avenue; golfr Dick Johnson, 7624 South Damen avenuef rife, Henry 
Kenriksen; 2104 North Keystone avenues. 

The list of award winners: 

Baseball, majors Bert Hoffman, 6438 North I^feiplewood; Dave Delazero, 1144 
East 93rd; Bob Leiser, 26IO South Normal; Bob Zevitz, 3II North 28th, Omaha, Nebr, ; 
Gordon Granertr, 1516 East 69tb; Jerry Maatman, II924 Yale; Joe Bass, 1618 South 
Ridgeway; Hank Lokay, 3743 South Wenonah, Berwyn? Fred .Casselj 7745 Burnham; Bob 
Sverak, 5^42 V*e3t 26th street ^ Cicero; Allen Hall, 2328 Pine Grovej Tom Connors, 
8213 Ingleside; Anson T/hitefie Id, Muskegon, Michcj Jim Bobzin (manager), 15 2 8 North 
Laramie, 



najor and minor athletic awards— Illinois Tech, page two 

Track, majors Don Anderaonc 6067 North Neva; Al Ashurst, 3^0 N, Blanchard, 
Fontana, Calif c ; Ken Yahiro, 1120 North Clark; Bill Bauragartiier, 11|.21 Summerdalej 
Ted Randich, 3426 Jackson; 7/alt Kohler, 5904 Eddy; Dick Durand, 4153 North Ashland; 
Dave Millerj 1323 South Kedvale; Harold Donko, 6106 Ellis; Steingrimur Hermannssonj 
Reykjavik, Iceland; Dean Levi, 134^6 Houston; Irv Gottesman, 133^9 S, Woodlawn, 
Cleveiand, Ohio; Clarence Langer, Cudahy, Wis,; George Zak (reanager)t 2839 South 
Millard, 

Track, minor; Keithe V/ingate, 2026 Washburn, Topeka, Kansas; Jerry Buglerj 
1827 Chase, 

PiflOj minors James R* Anderson, 7049 Clyde; Henry C. Borre, 193^^ North 
''3rd avenue, Elmwood Park; Don R. Crocker, 9426 South Racine; Leonard Druian, 4057 
V*est 16th street; Henry Henriksen, 2104 North Keystone^ 

Golf, majors Gus Blaha, 2339 Commonwealth; Dick Johnson, 7624 South Dameni 
Roman Radziwon, 4530 South Fairfield; Ernest Nordquist (manager), 307 Nordica, 
Glenviewe- 

G«lf, minor; Leo Walch, 43 West Elm, Roselle; Ed Jennings, 7431 Paxtom 

Tennis, majors Bob Zeitlin, 5123 South University? Norm Taxman, 6708 North 
Sheridan road; Dick Vana, 2248 South Keller; Jim Skipper, I615 Gurnee avenue,, 
Anniston, Ala.; Bill Mattern, 3822 North Hamlin; Bob Paluchowski, 3335 West 62nd 
places. 

Tennis, minor? Iferks Levy, 1415 Rosemont; Don Tekawa, 27 Bridge road, San 
Ifeteo, Calif..; Takis Vourvouliaa (manager), Apartado Aureo 800, Medellin, Columbia, 



-jeg- 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Arnnsey, Director 



Mailed: JujjQ 21, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: ir„„»diate 



CHICAGO -> George G. Spisak, 19, son of Mrs. Rosalie £« Spisak 
of 2426 North Glark street, was named winner of Illinois Institute of 
Technology's student technical drawing contest* 

Annotmcement was made today by H^iry C» Speneeri ehairoan of the 
department of technical drawing* 

In coiapetition with 300 Illinois Tech students, Spisak was awarded 
a $40 technical drawing set for an original casting and drawing of an 
automatic washing imchine coupling* 

Spisakf who has Just completed his freshman year in electrical 
engineering, has been attending Illinois Tech on a one-year scholarship 
awarded for high school excellence and based on natioiial oon3>etitlon« 
He graduated from Bloom Township high school in June of 1949«> 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

! 3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: j^^ 21, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: i„^cliate 



3HIG.4G0 •- Richard Swartz, 20, aon of He* and lira, Andrew Swarta 
of 4313 Veot Qladys avenue* has been aw-^rded .'^aoond prize in Illinois 
Institute of Technology's student tsehniail dmwing; contest* 

Announcement vas n&de taday by Henry 0. Spencer* chaimtan of the 
departiQsnt of tectmical drawing* 

In oonQietltion with 5^^ Illinois Tech students, SWarti was awarded 
a $25 slide rule for an orginal oai<ting and drawing of an autosaobile 
differential bousing. 

Swartz, a sophomore, graduated from Austin high school in 7une 
of 1948, 



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f; trom... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

) 3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: June 21, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: Immediate 



GHICAOO ~ Dennis A» Johnson* 18, eon of Ifip. and Mrs, Darid A. 
Johnson of I1.OO9 North Springfield avenue, has been awarded third prize 
in Illinois Institute of Technology's student technical drawing contest* 

Announcement was niade today by Henry C. Spencer, ohaimaQ of the 
department of technical drawing. 

In conq)etition with 500 Illinois Tech students, Jobnson was awarded 
an $18 drawing set for an original casting and drawing of ao oil pomp 
housing.* 

Johnson, a sophomore, graduated from Schurz high school in 

January of 1947* 

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from . . . 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 

CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



'^•"•«'' June 21, 1950 

FOR RELEASE 



Imaediate 



CHICAGO — Robert F. Borden, 26, aon of Mr. and tira* David F. 
Borden of 719 bbadyslde avenue* southwest* Canton* Ohio, baa been awarded 
fourth ixrize in a student technioal drawing contest at Illinois Institute 
of Technology* Chicago* 

Announcement was nade todaiy by Henry C* Spencer* obairraan of the 
departiaent of technical drawing* 

In coiBpetition with 5^0 Illinois Tech students* Borden was awarded 
a $13 slide rule for an original casting and drawing of a fuel puMp 
adapters 

Borden* a sophomore student majoring in aechanieal mgineering* 
graduated from McKiniey hi^ school in June of 194'^* 



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IINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

>chnology Center 
hicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinols k/istitute o( Technology —CAIumet 5-9M0, Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-WOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



^^'\^'i- June 22, 195^ 

FOR RELEASE: 



Imin3dia*,e 



CHICAGO — Winners of a drafting contest for students of Chicago public 
high schools, sponsored by Illinois Institute rf Technology: were announced toddy 
by Henry C, Spencer, chairriifln of the Illinois Tech technical drawing departmentc 

Competition was divided into three classes for first semester, second 
semester, and advanced drafting studentsa. More than 1,000 entries were submitted 
b;r students of 18 schoclso 

First prize in the advanced class, a one-year scholarship to Illinois Tech, 
was won by Russell O'Brien, I725 East 84th street, a student at Chicago Vocational 
high school. 

Eugene Begay, 4312 North Kedvale, a student at Lane Technical high school, 
was awarded top prize of a drafting machine and scales in the competition for 
second semester students. 

In the contest for students of Drafting 1, Arnold Cooperj 3710 South 
Dearborn street, won first prize of a portable television seto 

Four indentical third place prizes were awarded in each class.- Prizes 
were donated by Favor Ruhl & Coo, Illinois Tech, Gramercy Import Co=, Alvin Co., 
Keuffel & Esser Co», Charvaz-Roos Corpe , Allied Radio, Frederick Post Cc<. , and 
Eugene Dietzgen Co, 

Other prize winners, their addresses and schools are: 

Drafting Is second - Tibor Halasz, 9244 Cottage Grove avenue. Vocational; 



-more- 



public high schools drafting contest — Illinois Tech, page two 

third - Vytas Reklaitas, 3528 West Archer avenue, Tilden; Arthur Blonder, 3^47 
Pine Grove avenue, Lane; James Traub, 3^3^ Plainfield, I^ine; and Albert Stincic, 
9838 Avenue H, Vocational, 

Drafting II: second - Clyde Ancell, 1742 Tuohy avenue. Lane: third - 
Gerald Slawin, 2815 V^est Logan boulevard, Lane: Robert Guasta, 4739 West Parker 
avenue, Lane; J^hn Stein, 1927 Hudson avenue. Lane, and Charles Mittnan, 5^24 
North Avers avenue. Von Steuben.. 

Drafting III: second - William Huber, 11594 South State street, Fenger; 
third - Leo Tatosian, 804 Buckingham place. Lane; John Kuro, 2636 North Western 
avenue. Lane? Charles Nelson, 4535 'I'/oodlawn avenue, Vocational, and James 
Christenson, 455^ North Pulaski roado. 

-jeg- 



om 



LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

chnology Center 
licago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jamet W. Armjey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois knstltute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?400, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard lelO-R 



Mailed: ^'^ne 23, 19^0 

FOR RELEASE: Immediate 



CHICAGO — Research investments in sponsored projects at Armour Research 
Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology increased 11. U per cent during the 
first eight months of the l$h9-^0 fiscal year over the same period a year ago, Dr. 
Haldon A. Leedy, Foundation director, announced today. 

A gain of about $500,000 in total gross volume is estimated for the en- 
tire year ending Augijst 31, 1950, he reported. 

"Industry's increasing support of research is reflected in these rising 
figures," Dr. Leedy said, "An estimated $U, 625, 000 in total projected research 
volume for the year represents the amount of money invested by industry, government- 
al agencies, and industrial associations for the development of new products and 
processes and the discovery of new scientific facts." 

Sijcty-two per cent of the projects nov/ active are being done under con- 
tract for industrial firms, Dr. Leedy announced. Of the industrial sponsors, more 
than half have placed previous projects at the Foundation. 

A staff of 665 persons has vrorked on 212 research projects so far this 
year, according to Dr, Leedy. Technical personnel, who specialize in various fields 
of science, total U21, while the remainder of the staff includes some 75 expert 
craftsmen employed in Foundation shops. In addition to sponsored projects. 



Progress report - page tivo 

Armour pays for fundamental studies and public service activities out of its own 
funds. 

The acquisition of a neu-ly remodeled Physics Research building and other 
space will add more than IiO,000 square feet to the Foundation plant. Expansion 
in laboratory, shop, and office space during the year 19U9-50 v/ill bring plant total 
to "more than three and one-half acres under eleven roofs," Dr, Leedy asserted. 

Among public service projects sponsored by the Foundation are a survey 
of city noises, dust abatement program, a study of orthopedic equipment for 
crippled children, information services on rare chemicals and crj^'stallographic data, 
and work on the hemolysis of blood and trace elements in soils. 

Armour Research Foundation is a not-for-profit organization created in 
1936 to perform research and development primarily for industrial concerns. It has 
grown each year in size and volume of work and navi ranks second among independent 
research institutions. Fields of interest include physics, metals, chemistry 
and chemical engineering, applied mecharJLcs, electrical engineering, ceramics and 
minerals, magnetic recording, and international research. 






om 



LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



^chnology Center 
hicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

JMinois knstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?400, b(t. 545 
Armour Research FoundatJon 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-fiOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: jy^e 23, I95C 

FOR RELEASE: 



Advance 



ADVANCE FOR RELEASE AFTER 11:00 A.M. (E3T), IHURSDAY. JUNE 29, I93C 
Note to Editors; 



Attached is the text of a talk on "Business and Industry Relations" 
by James W. Armsey, director of public relations at Illinois Institute 
of Technology, 

The talk will be delivered at 11:00 a.m., Thursday, June 29, I930 
at one of the public relations seminars of the I950 national convention 
of the American Cniiege r\iblic Relations Association at the University 
of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich- 
It deals with the interlocking interests of industry and education 
and points out areas of current and future cooperation of benefit to both. 



American College Public Relations Association 

National Convention — 19^0 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 

Public Relations Session 

Seminar on Business and Industry Relations 

James Y! , Armsey, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago l6, Illinois 

No tv'TO groups in the American political, social, and economic system are 
more closely allied or more dependent upon each other than education and in- 
dustry;-);- for business supports our cducati-'inal institutions, either directly 
or indirectly, on the one hand, and education supplies in large measure the 
creative, dynamic, productive minds vhich shortly become the leaders of 
business enterprise. 

This interdependence, considered entirely proper principally because it 
is mutually beneficial, has been Viridely accepted as an inevitable part of the 
economic system -which has produced a higher standard of living in a shorter 
period of time than aijy other known to the virorld up to nov/. Almost everyone 
favors education: for example, our citizens will complain less about taxes 
for educational purposes than those used for any other purpose. Almost 
everyone favors our system of business enterprise: even those who espouse 
state socialism v;ould not abandon the fmits of the present system, 

-"-Throughout this discussion the term business is intended to mean 
business and industry. 



two 

Business and education, then^ are bedfellows because they v/ant and need 
each other, V/hat are some of the areas in v.^hich each performs services of 
benefit to the other? 



Education, of course, justifies its existence on the basis of learning 
and research. It molds the minds of the nation's young people during a per- 
iod vfhen these minds are most flexible, most receptive, and probably most 
eager. It instills an appreciation of the history and heritage of the nation, 
the potentialities and limitations of the system under vj-hich we live, and the 
hopes and aspirations of the people who are the nation's greatest resource. 

Education seeks to find the truth on the abstract level and to apply it 
on the practical level, whether such truth be buried in such widely separate 
fields as philosophy and engineering. It seeks to imp.art the truth to all 
who will seek it — at large numbers of educational centers, located in mai^ 
places, supported in diverse ways by diverse groups, and encouraged through 
various mechanisias such as summer sessions, evening classes, short courses, 
cooperative programs, in-plant training, conferences, seminars, and, of 
course, full-time day classes, all readily accessible to those whose needs 
they satisfy. 

Research contributes new knowledge by a constant assault on the barriers 
of the unknovm, whether they be social or scientific. New knowledge, once 
found, can be applied to the problcnB of living and m.aking a living, again 
whether they be in the field of human relations or in the coldly factual re- 
cesses of the frontiers of science. The scientific discoveries through v;hich 
processes are refined and new products developed have been dramatic] they 
have stimulated the economy and elevated the standard of living, and they 
have captured the iiTiagination of our people. But they are neither less 



three 

dramatic nor less iiaportant than social discoveries which may enable us to 
live together in peace and brotherhood. 

These arc some of the areas in which education serves business, Hov/ 
does business serve education? Except for the direct results of research and 
the immediate supply of employables v/hich education furnishes to business, 
the contributions of business to education are more direct. 



Probablj'' most important, of course, on both a short-term and a long- 
range basis, is the absorption into the business world of the main education- 
al product: its graduates. Next is the utilization of the research constant- 
ly underway in our colleges and universities. 

Narrower in individual scope but equally important in total are such 
contributions as; 

Encouraging employes to enroll in part-time study to increase their 
value to business. 

Participating in cooperative programs in which students spend alternate 
periods in the classroom and in the plant. 

Establishing scholarships for f i^st-rate young men and Tvomen, 

Employing students (both graduate and undergraduate) during prolonged 
vacation periods. 

Sponsoring formal in-plant educational programs. 

Establishing fellowships for graduate study. 

Sponsoring fundamental research programs. 

Contracting for applied research on specific problems. 

Endowing professorships in specific fields, contributing funds for ad- 
ditions to physical plant. 

Making unrestricted gifts v/hich enable educators to expand programs Im^ 
paired by limited tax funds or insufficient regular income, or to embark 



four 



upon nev; fields of education and research. 



Now, it is obvious that the fruits of a system in which education and 
business cooperate are greatest when the degree of cooperation is greatest. 
Although the degree has sonetimes been less than it should have been, it be- 
hooves each to support the other to the fullest possible extent. If they do 
notj the only result can be harm for both. How do they get together? 

By the nature of its methods and motives, business is not likely to make 
the first move. So education is wise if it takes the initiative. That it 
can succeed is evident from the soundness of its product: that is, the in- 
herent benefits of education which I have already noted. 

Here, then, are some of the things education can do and is doing: 

Educators should participate in civic and community affairs. They should 
serve on civic committees, they should lend personal, active support to com- 
munity projects (such as Comr.iunity Fund drives. Red Cross drives, etc.), they 
should speak to community clubs, social organizations, religious groups, and 
others. They should, if necessary, engage m political activity to further 
the ends of education. They should sell education day in and day out, tvrenty- 
four hours a day. 

Educators should seek out and encourage the top representatives of busi- 
ness to serve on boards of trustees, advisory committees, special councils, 
and other groups so that these business leaders will become acquainted with 
the philosophy, the needs, and the accompli slime nts of education. 

Educators should arrange open houses, conduct campus tours, sponsor 
conferences, meetings, and dinners at Virhich business leaders can become 
better informed about education. 



five 

Educational institutions should establish degree-granting programs, 
Y/hen consistent with educational philosophy and practice^ and sponsor short 
courses, seminars, and lectures to meet the specific needs of business. 

Educators should disseminate information through existing nev/s and in- 
formation r^edia — the daily press, wire services, business publications, semi- 
technical .journals, general magazines, radio, and television, and through 
appropriate direct m.ail devices to tell the story of education every day and 
in every way. 

Through all of these methods, educators should strive always to demon- 
strate the mutuality of interests as betv;een education and business and to 
narrow and eventually eliminate the imaginary gulf which etill exists to some 
degree between the two. Only by everlastingly i? or king at it can education 
prove that the search for truth and learning is not incompatible with the 
ways of business, that both are really trj^ing to make the v/orld a better 
place in which to live. 



), rrom... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 

June 23, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: ^ ^, , 
laoaediata 



CHIGAOO — Uiaa Tb-sula Uer, 21, sonior at Illinois 
Institute of Technology, will represent the Institute at the 
S07entj>fifth annual coisrention of Sigoa Rappa social sorority 
July 26 to 30 in 3naiiq;>800tt, Massachusetts* 

Miss Lier* a home eeonooiics major, is president of the 
XKititute's chapter of Sigisa Kappa and the Illinois Tech Wooen's 
aasooiatimu A June 1947 graduate of Austin high school, she 
is the dau^ter of I&>. and Ifrs. Carl ?• Ller of IO33 I^c^th 
MMierd arenue* 



•nftv* 



1 JDoiffcUn 



C'069-£ T3V 



ibsllfcM 

, , 3EA3J3;? 510^ 



Tj^lTDD'Sos I«.l;»cn eqqixK flKngi?; *!;o !;!©i;faa>r.f Cf.-.;>-r«$ fJ5'Xi'S«'^3ii&v»e 

tss-^iit&iiooaey '■■''■ --■^■■■■- ■: •"►; ■■■>■ ^s ^iTi»l 



om 



LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

chnology Center 
licago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jam«j W. Armwy 
Day Phonal: 

Jllinois knititute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9«)0, Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-7400. Ext. 317 

Night Phona: 

Lombard IBIO-R 



Mailed: J^"® 2?, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: ijnmediate 



CHICAGO — Dr, Rolston L. Bond, technical director of the butadiene divi- 
sion of Cities Service Refining Corporation, Lake Charles, La., has been named as- 
sistant chainaan of the chemistry and chemical engineering department at Armour 
Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology. 

Dr, Bond will be in charge of the Foundation's biochemistrj'' and organic 
chemistry research activities, it was announced today by Clark E. Thorp, department 
chairman. 

An expert in petroleum technology, Dr. Bond has been irlth Cities Service 
since 19^3* He was a research chemist for the Tidevj-ater Associated Oil Go, and 
the National Oil Products Co. from 193 8 to 19U3. 

Dr, Bond received his Ph.D. degree from Pennsylvania State College in 
I9U0, He is 36, 



rom 

LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Cen+er 
Ihicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jamsi W. Armtsy 
Day Phonas: 

Jllinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400. Eit. 54S 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-MOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phona: 

Lombard IBIO-R 



Mailed: J^^ne 2?, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — Two staff members and a department of Illinois Institute of 
Technology received highest awards in their respective divisions in the recent 
VII Fan-American Congress of Architects in Havana, Cuba, 

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, director of the Illinois Tech department of 
architecture, was awarded the Honor Medal for his design of classroom and 
laboratory buildings which have been built on the Institute campus, 

Konrad Vfachsmann, head of shelter design of the Institute of Design of 
Illinois Institute of Technology, was given the Honor Medal for a construction 
system developed with Walter Gropius, head of the architecture department of 
Harvard university. 

The Institute of Design was given the highest award, a Silver Medal, in 
college and university competition for its program of educational study. 

The Mies van der Rohe buildings are of functional design. Construction 
is of brick and steel with large window areas to permit a maximum of light. Seven 
such educational and research buildings have been completed. 

The industrialized building construction designed by Wachsmann and Gropius 
is a system of plywood joints and panels for factory production of building 
elements, and allowing the combination of these elements in an unlimited variety 
of one-story building types,. 



mies van der rohe, wachsmann— Illinois Tech, page two 

The Institute of Design exhibit contained 11 panels showing progression 
from the world-famous foundation course of free experimentation with media, 
mastery of tools and nBterials, and application of methods of problem analysis 
through the application to specified fields in shelter design, visual communication, 
or product design.. 

-jeg- 



rom 

LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsay 
Day Phonas; 

Jlllnols Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9M0. Ext. M5 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?t00, Ext. 317 

Night Phona: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: j^^e 29, 1930 

FOR RELEASE 



Immediate 



CHIGAGO — • Eight south side persons are among the 39 civil engineering 
students at Illinois Institute of Technology who are readying for the rugged lifeo- 

They are preparing for five weeks of "roughing it," July IZj. to August 20, 
at the Institute's summer camp at Trout Lake in northern Wisconsin, k.00 miles 
north of GhicagOo 

In 1908, Armour Institute (now Illinois Tech) established one of the first 
summer camps for field practice in surveying and since then hundreds of civil 
engineering students have iiade the annual trek,. 

Besides the 8-hour, 5i ^^y work week at the camp, there's time for swimming 
fishing, volley ball, horse shoes, and other summer outdoor sports. 

Director of the camp will be Edward Jo Kiramick, assistant professor of 
civil engineeringo 

South side students who will begin the course are: 

James Eo Anderson, 6637 S, Drexel avenuej Charles Jo Bartont 1542 E, 64th 
fltreetj Glenn Eo Drown, IO329 Eberhart avenuej Donald Feare 824 1 Wood lawn avenuaj 
Walter F, Kinnucan, Jr., 7629 Crandon avenuejTsun Yc Kwan, 1523 E, 66th place} 
Robert F. Mance, 1934 S. Ridgeland avenue; Emil Fa Nigro, 6952 S. Jeffery avenue^ 



-mtw- 



rom 



LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



echnology Center 
'hicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jamas W. Armtay 
Day Phonas: 

Jllinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?«)0, Ent. 545 
Armour Research Foundatfon 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?600, Ext. 317 

Night Phona: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



rune 29, 193'^ 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: 



Iranediate 



CHICAGO — Six southwest side persons are among the 39 civil engineering 
students at Illinois Institute of Technology who are readying for the rugged life.- 

They are preparing for five weeks of "roughing it," July 1/j. to August 20, 
at the Institute's summer camp at Trout Lake in northern Wisconsin, 400 miles 
north of Chicago, 

In 19'"'85 Armour Institute (now Illinois Tech) established one of the first 
summer camps for field practice in surveying and since then hundreds of civil 
engineering students have made the annual trek». 

Besides the 8-hour, 5'h day v/ork week at the camp, there's time for swimming, 
boating, fishing, volley ball, horse shoes, and other summer outdoor sports* 

Director of the camp will be Edward J» Kimmick, assistant professor of 
civil engineer ingo. 

Southwest side students who will begin the course are: 

Joseph Bo. Crow, Jr. , IO600 'rtalden parkwayj Joseph Po Egan, 7754 Sa Paulina 
street; Deward J. Fitzhugh, 5^17 S» Loomis street; Thomas J, Goralka, 5^^5 ^o 
Spaulding avenuej William Ho Stewart, Jr., 7316 S. Racine avenuej Ralph Ro Thonas, 
IC640 S, Drew street <>. 



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om 



.LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
hicago 16, Illinois 



director oT KuDiic KeiflTions — jamvs w. Arms»v 
Ddy Phonal: 

Jllinois knstitute of Technology — CAIumet S-f600. Eit. 545 

Armour Research Foundation 

of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-WOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phona: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: ^^^e 29, 1930 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — Ten west side persons are among the 39 civil engineering 
students at Illinois Institute of Technology who are readying for the rugged life* 

They are preparing for five weeks of "roughing it," July 14 to August 2O5 
at the Institute's summer camp at Trout Lake in northern Wisconsin, 400 miles 
north of Chicago, 

In 1908, Armour Institute (now Illinois Tech) established one of the first 
summer camps for field practice in surveying and since then hundreds of civil 
engineering students have imde the annual trek« 

Besides the 8-hour, 5i day work week at the camp, there's time for swimming, 
boating, fishing, volley ball, horse shoes, and other summer outdoor sportso 

Director of the camp will be Edward Jo Kimmick, assistant professor of 
civil engineering;, 

West side students who will begin the csurse are: 

James J. Banes, 25 19 So 57th court, Gicero; Niki Ma Hernandez, 3148 W. 
Roosevelt road; James Ro Kbehler, 205 N. Leamington avenue; Charles Po Linogren, 
48 No Lockv7ood avenue; Eugene F, Magdecki, 2330 W, Thomas streets 

Marvin E, Mellbom, k-Old Ellington avenues 'Western Springs; Frank L» Novak, 
1639 So 59th avenue, Cicero; Richard A, Pavia, 1345 S» Clinton avenue, Berwyn; 
Charles Fo Rubin, 5902 W, 26th street, Cicero; Arthur C, Rees, 1432 So Millard 
avenue. 

-mtw— 



rom 



LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
Ihicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllrnois knstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-MOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: June 29, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: linnediate 



CHICAGO — Six north side persons are among the 39 civil engineering 
students at Illinois Institute of Technology who are readying for the rugged life.: 

They are preparing for five weeks of "roughing it»" July IZj. to August 20, 
at the Institute's summer camp at Trout Lake in northern Wisconsinj I4.OO miles 
north of Chicago. 

In 1908, Armour Institute (now Illinois Tech) established one of the first 
summer camps for field practice in surveying and since then hundreds of civil 
engineering students have made the annual trek. 

Besides the 8-hour, 5'^ day work week at the camp, there's time for swimming, 
':oating, fishing, volley ball, horse shoes, and other outdoor sports. 

Director of the camp will be Edvvard J^ Kimmick, assistant professor of 
civil engineerings. 

North side students who will begin the course are: 

Roy Carlson, 690I Balmoral avenue; Lambert Jo Deegan, 4734 No- Keating 
avenue; Rudolph M. Jirgal, 4154 Nc Leavitt street; Fred E. Jochim, 6315 No 
Artesian avenue; Leonard Ma Kawell, 933 Marmora, Morton Grove; Donald Ao Walsh, 
8249 Newland street, Nilesc 



-mtw- 



rom 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



Fechnology Center 
Chicago 16, lllrnois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois Institute o( Technology — CAIumet 5-9600, Ext. 545 

Armour Research Foundation 

of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-WOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: June 29, I930 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO - Six northwest side persons are among the 39 civil engineering 
students at Illinois Institute of Technology wh^ are readying for the rugged life. 

They are preparing for five weeks of "roughing it," July I4 to August 20, 
at the Institute's suimer camp at Trout Lake in northern Wisconsin, 400 miles 
north of Chicago, 

In I908, Armour Institute (now Illinois Tech) established one of the first 
summer camps for field practice in surveying and since then hundreds of civil 
engineering students have made the annual trek. 

Besides the 8-hour.. 5^ day work week'at the camp, there's time for swimning, 
:)oating. fishing, volley ball, horse shoes, and other outdoor sports. 

Director of the camp will be Edward J. Kimmick, assistant professor of 
civil engineering,* 

Northwest side students who will begin the course are: 
Robert Eo Anderson, 4058 Patterson avenue^ Henry Ao Carlson, 5kk2 N. 
Neenah avenue; Charles E, Lukes, ^217 Melrose street; William So Powell, 3848 
N. ifemlin avenue; Alvin J. Robertson, 5942 W. Thorndale avenue; Russell V. Ziino, 
1604 S, Ridgeway avenue. 



-mtw- 



om 



.LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

;chnology Center 
hicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jamas W. Armsty 
Day Phonas: 

Jllinois knstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9600, Ext. 545 

Armour Research Foundation 

of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-MOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phona: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: June 29, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: Inmediate 



CHICAGO — Three out-of-town persona are among the 39 civil engineering 
students at Illinois Institute of Technology who are readying for the rugged life. 

They are prepared for five weeks of "roughing it," July 14 to August 20, 
at the Institute's summer camp at Trout Lake in northern Wisconaint 400 miles 
north of Chicago. 

In 1908, Armour Institute (now Illinois Tech) established one of the first 
summer camps for field practice in surveying and since then hundreds of civil 
engineering students have made the annual trek. 

Besides the 8-hour, 5i day work week at the camp, there's time for swimmingt 
boating, fishing, volley ball, horse shoes, and other summer outdoor sports. 

Director of the camp will be Edward J. Kimmick, assistant professor of 
civil engineering. 

Out-of-town students who will begin the course are; 

Arthur F, Burkhardt, I4II Struble avenue, N.E. , Canton, Ohio; Edwin 0. 
Hogan, R. #3 Orchard avenue, Rookfordj Jack Kuzia, I235 S. Maryland, Glendale, 
California, 



-mtw- 



rom 

.LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
hicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones; 

Jllinois krstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?M0, ht. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIunnet 5-MOO. Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



*^^"^*^= June 3::, 1050 

FOR RELEASE 



Iinm<?diate 



CHICAGO — ' Dr. Linton E, Grinteri 47i of 5749 Kenwoid avenue, research 
professor of civil engineering and mechanics at Illinois Institute of Technolcg^/j 
was elected vice-president of the American Society for Engineering Education at 
the annual meeting June 19-23 in Seattle, V/ashington* 

Dr. Grinter, who served as vice-president of Illinois Tech from 1937 to 
1946. is the authnr of five books on steel structures 5. and has written numerous 
papers and articles on steel contruction. During the war he served as advisor to 
the War Manpower Commission en use of technical personnel, and was coordinator of 
the Army's A3TP program in 26 midwestern colleges. 

The ASEE, with more than 6,300 merabersr was formed in I893 as an outgrowth 
of the World Engineering Congress at the Columbian Exposition, Until 194-6 it was 
kn-^wn as the Society for Promotion of Engineering Education. 

Grinter is a member of six professional societies. He received his 
bachelor's degree in civil engineering in I923 from the University of Kansas.. 
He was awarded his master's degree in I924 and his doctor's degree in I926, both 
at the University of Illinois^ He is a native of Kansas City, Missouri, 



■J eg- 



I 



from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 



July 3. 1950 



FOR RELEASE: 



Iiaaediate 



CHICAGO — Sari C. ^bioek, director of aluomi relation at 
niinoia Iziatitute of TeOhnology, Chicago* will apeak tonigh (July 6) 
at a 6130 diimor iaseti% of niinoia Tech*a Akron Aluiani Club* 

nie dinner will be held at the Miller Beataurant, 2035 Front 
atreett Cuyahoga Iblla* Ohio* 

Bubieek will diaouaa Illinoia Teoh*a 110-aere building program 
now underway on Chicago *a near aouth side* 



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•nfiite ii*«oe ifi«« e*'4:^,«oli1C' no v^tiwtsFmj tror^ 



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rom 



LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois knstltute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?400. txt. 545 

Armour Research Foundatfon 

of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, Ext. 317 
Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: July 3, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: j^,^,,,. 



CHICAGO — Dr. Jchn T. Rettaliata, 38, of 9712 South Winchester avenue, 
dean of engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology, has been named vice 
president of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

Dr, Rettaliata, a leading authority en turbine engines and jet propulsion, 
is the author cf numerous technical articles. He joined the Illinois Tech staff 
in 1945 as professor of mechanical engineering and director of the department* 
He was named dean in I9480 

A native of Baltimore, Maryland, Rettaliata received his bachelor's degret 
in mechanical engineering in 1932 at Johns Hopkins University and his doctor^s 
degree there in 1936.- From I936 to 1945 he was employed by Allis-Chalmers in 
Milwaukesa Since 1945 he has remained on the Allis-Chalmers staff as consultant. 

He is a member cf the "Western Society of Engineers, the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, American Society of Naval Engineers 
and eleven other professional sr honorary societieso 



-J eg- 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

fechnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jaitm W. Armi.y 
Day Phones; 

Jllinois Institute of Technology —CAIumet 5-fiOO, Ext. 54S 

Armour Research Foundation 

of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-f(00, Ext. 317 
Night Phona: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: July 5, I950 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO - Sixteen scholarships in fire protection and safety engineering 
to Illinois Institute of Technology ha.e been awarded by the Stock Fire Insurance 
companies through the Western Actuarial Bureau. 

Each award provides payment of tuition and other fees for the regular 
four-year course at Illinois Tech, the only college or university in the nation 
offering a degree in fire protection and safety engineering, 

Winners were selected by the scholarship committee of the Western Actuarial 
Bureau on the basis of competitive examination, high school record, and 
extra-curricular activities. 

During the shammer vacations, the Actuarial Bureau assigns each scholarship 
student to a position with one of the midwest inspection bureaus,. After graduation 
the student goes on the full-time payroll with the same firm. 
Those awarded scholarships are: 

Stuart H. Anderson, of IO827 Prairie avenue, Fenger high school, Orland 
E. Barbrey, 236 Parker avenue. West Chicago, Community high school, West ChicagOo 

Bernard H. Battaglin. 12247 Yale avenue, Fenger high school; Joseph R. 
Byerwalter, 8334 South Throop street, St, Leo high school; Richard F. Casey, I58 
South Humboldt street, Denver. Colorado. South Denver high school. 

John L. Crooks, 7701 South Union avenue. Calumet high school; Richard H. 
Erbe, 1320 Munroe avenue. Racine. Wisconsin, Washington Park high scSsool, Racine, 



-more- 



western actuarial scholarships— Illinois Tech, page two 

James Pc. Grannan, 466 Eastlawn avenue, Detroit, Michigan, De La Salle Collegiate 
high school, Detroito 

Carl Jo Granto Jr., 2330 East 12th street, Des Moines, Icwa, East high 
school, Des Moinesj Randall E. Harnish, 321 Oaklawn avenue, Elmhurst, York 
Community high school^; Ifett Merfeld, South Plum Grove, Palatine, Palatine Township 
high schoolo 

David Po Notley, 3624 Burr street, Gary, Horace Ifenn high school, Gary; 
Richard G. Perkuhn, 3340 Victor place, Wichita, Kansas, Wichita East high school, 

Robert lie Rahn, 76 19 South Carpenter street, Calumet high school; Charles 
Go Uram, 860 Burnham avenue, Calumet City, Thornton Ei-actional Township high school., 
Calumet Cityj Robert M, Zekes, 3025 LaFayette, Kansas City, Kansas, 'fjyandotte high 
school, Kansas City.- 



-mtw- 



i from,.. 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

I 3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jamei W, Armsey, Director 



Mailed! July 5, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO .— Stuart H» Anderson, of 1082? Prairie avenue, has 
been awarded a scholeurship in fire protection and safety engineering 
to Illinois Institute of Technology, the only college or university in 
the nation offering a full four-year course in that field. 

The award, one of l6, was granted by the Stock Fire Ins'oranoe 
companies through the Western Actuarial Bureau and covers tuition and 
other fees for the regular four-year course at Illinois Tech* 

Winners were selected by the scholarship conniittee of the 
Western Actuarial Bureau on the basis of competitive examination, high 
school record, and extra-curricular activities* 

Anderson is a June I950 graduate of Fenger high school where he 
was elected to the national honorary society and was a member of the 
school orchestra. 

He will begin study at Illinois Tech this September, 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



""'''''■ Julys. 1950 

FOR RELEASE: ^ ^. ^^ 



CHICAGO — Qrland £• Barbrey. of 236 Barker aTenue* West Ghioago. 
has been awarded a acholarship in fire protection and safety engineering 
to Illinois Institute of Technology, the only college or university in 
the nation offering a full four-year course in that field* 

The award* one of l6« was granted by the Stock Fire Insurance 
eoaqpanies through the Western Actuarial Bureau and covers tuition and 
other fees for the r^^lar fbur^year course at Illinois Tech* 

Winners were selected by the scholarship cmnmittee of the 
Western Actuarial Bureau on the basis of competitive examnation* high 
school record* and extra-curricular activities* 

Btirbrey graduated from C<xarQunity hi^ school in June of 1930* 
He will begin study at Illinois Tech this Septend^er. 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 5, I95O 

FOR RELEASE: Immediate 



CHICAGO ««• Joseph R, Byerwalter, of 8534 South Throop street, 
has been awarded a scholarship in fire pi^Jtection and safety engineering 
to Illinois Institute of Technology, the only college or university in 
the nation offering a full four-year course in that field* 

The award* one of l6, was granted by the Stock Fire Insurance 
companies through the Western Actuarial Bureau and covers tuition and 
other fees for the regular four-year course at Illinois Tech» 

Winners were selected by the scholarship coamittee of the Western 
Actuarial Bureau on the basis of competitive examination, high school 
record, and extra-*ourrioular activities*. 

Byerwalter graduated from St. Leo high school in June of 195^ 
and will begin study at Illinois Tech this September. 



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.-jsdr.s^qsS e.id;? iosT aloailXI *a y6«*8 niasd iXxw bne 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 

FOR RELE 



"^^: """ 



IcDDiediate 



CHICAGO — Richard F, Casey, of I58 South awtf)oldt street, 
Denrer* has been awarded a sdiolarship in fire protection and safety 
engineering to Illinois Institute of Technology* the only college or 
university in the nation offering a full four-year course in that field« 

The avardt one of I6, was granted by the Stock Fire Insurance 
companies through the Western Actuarial Bureau and covers tuition and 
other fees for the regular four-year course at Illinois Tech» 

Winners were selected by the scholarship coamittee of the 
Western Actuarial Bureau on the basis of corapetitive examination, high 
■ohool record, and extra-curricular activities* 

Casey graduated from South Denver high school in June of X930, 
Ha served as captain in the school's R.O.T.C. unit and was treasurer of 
the Junior Achievement group* 



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from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



PMblic Reldtiont Department 
Jannei W. Armiey, Director 



"^'"•^^ July 5. 1950 
FOR RELEASE 



jDaoediatd 



CHICAGO •• Joha La Crooks, of 7701 South T&iion aveaue* has been 
awarded a soholarahip in fire porotectlon and safety en^izieering to 
niiziois ifoatitute of Teohoology, the only college or university in the 
nation offering a full four-year eourse in that field* 

The award* one of 16* was granted by the Stock Fire Insuranoa 
companies through the Western Actuarial Bureau and oarers tuition and 
other feea for the regular four-year eourse at Illinois Tech* 

Winners were selected hy the scholarship oamalttBO of th» 
Western Actuarial Bureau on the basis of competitive examination* high 
s^ool record* and extra-curricular actirities* 

Grocdcs graduated from Calumet high 8<^ool this June* fis was a 
aaober of the National Honcnr Society* bowling team* and was a letter-man 
on the wrestling team* 

Be will begin study at Illinois Tech in Septttnbar* 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 5, 1950 

FOR RELEASE; Iimediata 



CHICAGO — Richard H. Erbe, of I320 Muni'oe avenue, Racine, 
Wisconsin, has been awarded & soholiu'ship in fire protection and. safety 
enginesring to Illinois Institute of Teehnologyt the only college or 
university in the nation offering a full four- year course in that field. 

The award, one of I6, was granted by the Stock Fire Insurance 
coopanies throu^ the Western Actuarial Bureau and covers tuition and 
other fees for the regular four^yeer course at Illinois Teeh, 

Winners were selected by the seholar&hip eoioaittee of the 
Western Actuarial bureau on the basis of competitive examioation, hig^ 
school record, and extra-curricular activities* 

£rbe graduated from Washington B:irk high school in June. lis 
was a ueriAer of the JiSat hematics, Gero»n» and Science dubs, and the 
football, basketball, and track teaias. He was also winner of the local 
history award given by the Daughters of the American Revolution* 

In Sept«i^er he will begin study at Illinoia Te^» 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 

CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 5, ly^O 

FOR RELEASE: jaaediat* 



CHICAGO — Jasaes F« Graanan* of 466 Eastlawn avenue* Oetroit* 
has bew& awarded e scholarship in fire protection and safety engineering 
to Illinois iJMtitute of Technology* the only college or university in 
the nation offering a fuU four*yeer eouree in that field* 

Th» award* one of l6* vas granted by the Stock Fire Iiusurance 
ooBQiaaies thr^u^h the Western Actuarial Bureau and coTers tuition and 
other fees for the regular four«year course at lllinoie Tech* 

Winners were selected by the scholarship coiBtaittee of the 
Weatern Actuarial Bureau on the basis of oompetitiTe exajoination* hieji 
sAool reoox'd* and extra-curricular activitiea* 

Grannan graduated from Oe La Sella Collegiate high schcwl in 
7une and will begin study at Illinois Tech this Septeaber* 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 



July 3. 1950 



FOR RELEASE: 



Insdiate 



CHIGAGO •• RaodaU £. Hamish, of 321 Oaklaim areime, Elahurat* 
baa been awarded a aeholarship in fire protection and aafetj engineering 
to Illinois Institute of Tet^nologj* the only college or uniTersity in 
tke nation offering a fall foiir*year course in that field* 

The amrdt one of 16. was granted by the Stodc Fire Insurance 
companies through the Western Actuarial Bureau and covers tuition and 
other fees for the r^iular four-year course at Illinois Te(di« 

Winners were selected by the scholarship ooeniittee of the 
Western Actuarial Bureau on the basis of con^etitiTe examinationt high 
school record* and extra*eurrieular activities* 

Hanxish* irtK> graduated from York C<»aunity high school in June* 
was president of the Draoatio dub and was a mffiaber of the track team 
and the Historical society* 

In Septendtiar he will b^n study at Illinois Tedi* 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Arnnsey, Director 



Mailed: July 5i 1950 

FOR RELEASE; limaBdlate 



CHICAOO — Carl J. Grant, Jr.. of 2330 East 12th street, Des Moines, 
has been awarded a scholarship in fire protection and safety engineering 
to Illinois Institute of Technology, the only college or uniTeraity in 
the nation offering a full four^year course in that field. 

The «mrd, one of I6, nas granted by the Stock Fire Insurance 
eoapanies through the Vest«m Actuarial Bureau and corers tuition and 
othw fees for the regular four-year course at Illinois Tech* 

Winners were selected by the scholarship eooBaittee of the 
Vestem Actuarial Bureau on the basis of coopetitive examination, hi^ 
school record, and extra-curricular act !▼! ties, 

Grant, who graduated from East high school in June, was an 
honor studmit throu^vnit his four y«trs there. He was also a mestbeat of 
the student council, the senior board, and the basketball and tennis 
teams. 

He will begin study at niinois Tech in September, 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 



Julyi, 1950 



FOR RELEASE: 



lanediattt 



CEICAOO — - Sfert Morfold, of Sotith Plum Qrare, Balatine, has been 
awarded a seholardiiip in f lr« proteotion and safety engineoring to 
niiaois Institute of Technology, the only college or university in the 
nation offering a full four*year course in that field* 

nie aeard, one of l6t was granted by the Stock Fire Insurance 
eoB^panies through the Westearn Actuarial Bureau and cover s tuition and 
other f e^ for the regular four-year course at Illinois Tech* 

Vianers w«re selected by the scholarship oonraittee of the 
Westnm Actuarial l^ireau on the basis of coapetltire eaaoination* hi|^ 
school record* and extra-curricular act ivi ties* 

Msrfeld* who graduated from Bslatine Township high school in 
June* aas an honor student through out his four years there* During 
his senior year, he was president of the student council and during 
his junior year* was president of his class* He aaa also a nenber of 
the baslcetball and track teams and the Dramatic club and Qlee cl\ib* 



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••te* 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 'uly 5, ISgO 

FOR RELEASE: lansdiate 



cmCAOO — Charles 0. Oram, of %0 Banimm STenue* Galunet City, 
haa been awarded a seholarahip in fira proteotion and safety engineariog 
to Illinois lAstitute of Taohnology, the only college or unireraity ia 
the nation offering a full four*year course in that field* 

The award* one of l6« was granted by the Stock Fire Insurance 
etMGpanies throu^ the Western Actuarial Bureau and code's tuition and 
other fees for the regular four-year course at Illioois Tedi* 

Winners were selected by the scholarship conenittee of the 
Western Actuarial Bureau on the basis of eooyietitiire ezaminatione hi^ 
school record, and extra-curricular actiTltles* 

TAram* a June 1950 £pc«duate of Thornton Fmctional high school, 
was an honor student thx^ughout hi^ school. He was also president of 
the Boys club and was a menber of the National Honor Society* Speech 
teaai* and the football* basketball, and track teauB* 

He vill begin study at Illinois Tec^ in Septeni>er« 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
Janries W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 3, I93O 

FOR RELEASE: j^^i^te 



CUICAOO •>* Robert M. Zekes, of 3025 Lal^ette* Katisas City, 
KiaAsas* has been avvarded a scholarship in fire protection and safety 
engineering to Illinois Institute of l^ohnology, the only college or 
unirersity in the nation offering a full four-year course in that field« 

The award* one of I6, was granted by the Stock Fire Insurance 
c<naip€mies through the Western Actuarial Bureau and coTers tuition and 
other fees for the regular four*year course at Illinois Tech* 

Winners were selected by the scholarship coisaittee of the 
Western Actuarial Bureau on the basis of competltiye exaoiination, hi^ 
sdiool reeordt and extra*eurrieular actiTities* 

Zielces graduated from Wyandotte high school in June and will 
b^n study at niinoia Tech in Septead»er» 



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.LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



schnology Center 
hicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armtey 
Day Phones: 

Illinois knstitute of Technology — CAIumet i-IUO, Ext. 545 
Armour Research FoundatJon 
of lllrnois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-MOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phone 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: ^^^V ^^ 1950 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — ■ Dr. David Pe Boder, professor of psychology at 
Illinois Institute of Technology, will talk at 9 P»ni. Sunday 
(July 9) before members of the Temple club at the Chicago Temple, 
First Methodist church. 

The talk is entitled "The Displaced People of Europe — A 
Psychological and Anthropological Analysis" and is based on Boder 's 
latest bookj "I Did Not Interview the Dead," 

This book, recently selected by the American Institute of 
Graphic Arts as one of the 50 best for 191|-9» is composed of verbatim 
accounts by displaced persons throughout Europeo It is believed to be 
the first book ever written from wire recordingSe 

The lecture is free and open to the public* 



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•om 



.LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

jchnology Center 
hicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jamas W. Armjay 
Day Phonas: 

Jllinois krstltute of Tedinology — CAIumet 5-?M0, Ext. 545 
Apmour Research Foundatfon 
of lilinols Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-MOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



July 6, 1950 

Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: In^ediate 



CHICAGO — Formation of a new industrial research institute in Mexico City 
by the Bank of Mexico marks another goal in an international development program 
which began six years ago, Dr. Haldon A. Leedy, director of Armour Research Founda- 
tion of Illinois Institute of Technology'-, said today, 

Dr, Milton E, Nelson, assistant director of the Foundation's international 
division, will be director of laboratories of the newly organized Institute Llexicano 
de Investigaciones Industriales, He will supervise the technical work of Mexican 
scientists who have been working with the Foundation staff in Mexico City, 

Establishment of the new institute gives Mexico its own industrial re- 
search organization, as outlined in a development program carried out by the Founda- 
tion and sponsored largely by the national Bank since 19hk, Di'. Leedy explained, 

Dr, Nelson also will take charge of the Foundation's international opera- 
tions, Dr, Leedy also announced, Dr, Francis W, Godwin, director of the inter- 
national division, has resigned but has been retained as consultant, he said. 

In addition to the program in Mexico, Armour's international group has 
done work for the United Nations, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and El Salvador, 



from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 6, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: liwediate 



CHIC&QO — Biehard &• Parkutm, of 3340 Victor place, lidiita, 
Sauotsast baa bean a«ard«d a soholarahip in fire ixroteetioa aodl safety 
engineeriog to Xllinoia Institute of rectmology. the only college or 
uniTersity in the nation offering a fall four-year course in that field* 

The a«ard« one of 1^« «as granted by the Stook Fire Insuranoe 
ooBipanies through the Western Actuarial Bureau and eovors tuition and 
other fees for the regular four-yisar course at Illinois Tech* 

Thinners were selected by the scholarship cooraittee of the 
Vest^'a Actuarial bureau on the basis of coa^etitive eaaiaination* hi^ 
school «*ecord« and extra-curricular actirities* 

Pe3±uhn« a June I930 ^aduate of ilichita East high school* 
eaptained the school's state chaiopiMishlp basketball team during 
1948-49* 3e was also a meoiber of the !iational Ibnor Society* Olee eluh* 
Msdri^l Silvers* Life Scouts* representatiTe of the school assei^lei 
fluid social ehairoan of Hi«Y* 

Perkuhn will begin study at Ulinois T^eh in Septeoher* 



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from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: j^^^ ^^ j^^^q 

FOR RELEASE 



loeaedlattt 



CHICAGO — Robert W, Raha, of 76 19 South Oarpentta: street, has 
bddn awarded a scholarship in fire protection and safety snginseriiu; to 
Illinois Institute of Tecanolog/f the only college or university in the 
nation offering a full four-year course in that f ield« 

The award* one of lS« naa granted by the Stock Fire lasurance 
companies through the Western Actuarial Bureau and covers tuition and 
other fees for the regular four-*year course at Illinois Tech« 

Winners were selected by the scholarship coomittee of the 
Western Actuarial Bureau on the basis of coa^etitire exaiaination, hig^ 
school reeordf and extra-curricular activities* 

Rahn« a June 1950 graduate of Calumet high school* was president 
of the school's National Honor Society and a member of the varsity 
swimniing team for four yeeurs* 

He will begin study at Illinois Tech in Septoaber* 



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from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 

CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 7t 1950 

FOR RELEASE: Ihmiediate 



CHICAGO -• 3«niard H. Battaglio, of 12247 Tale avenue* has been 
awarded a scholarship la fire protootioa and safety engineering to 
Illinois Inatitttte of Teehuology* the only college or unirersity in the 
nation offering a full four«year course in that field* 

Dm avard* one of l6« vas granted by the Stoek Tire Xosuranoe 
eaopaaies through the Western Actuarial Bureau and covers tuition and 
other fees for the regular four-year course at Illinois Teeh* 

Winners were selected by the scholarship ocnnsnittee of the 
Western Aotuarial Bureau on the basis of oc^petitive exaMnation* hi^ 
sdiool record* and extra*ourrioular actirities* 

Battaglin* a June 195^ graduate of Fengsr high school* ms a 
amber of the student ocuncil* the Hi*7 club* a delegate to Boys State* 
and participated in the intra*iaaral sports program* 

He will begin study at Illinois Teeh this September* 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Janaes W. Arnnsey, Director 



Mailed 

FOR RELEASE 



July 7. 1950 

Lamed iat9 



CHICAilO — DaTid P, Not ley » 3624 Burr street, Gary, has been 
awar-Jed a acholarshlp in fire protection and safety engineering to 
niinois Institute of Technology, the only csollege or univeraity in the 
aation offering a full four- year course in that field. 

The award, one of I6, was granted by the Stook Fire Ingurance 
ccMnpanies through the -^eateim Actuarial 3ureau and ooTers tuition and 
other fees for the regular four-year course at Illinois Tech, 

Winners ^were selected by the scholarship oonmittee of the 
T»estern Actuarial Bureau on the basis of eoTjpetitive examination, high 
school record, and extra-c»xrricular activities. 

Notley, a June 195^ graduate of Horace Ifean high school, was a 
meiriber of the adiool's Debating, Electron, and I^itin clubs. 

Be will begin study at Illinois Tech in Serateuber, 









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from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois knstilute of Teclinology — CAIumet 5-9600, Ext. 545 

Armour Research Foundat'fon 

of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9600, Ext. 317 
Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: July 11, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — Twenty Chicago area high school graduates have been awarded 
one-year scholarships to Illinois Institute of Technology, it was announced today 
t.y Fred R. Travis, director of admissionso. 

Awards were based en results of competitive examinations, high school 
records, and personal interviewsj They are effective beginning September 18 when 
classes resume for the fall semester. 

Viinners (listed with age, address, high school from which they graduated, 
and intended college major) are: 

Miss Beverly Asch, 17$ 3349 '>'est Division street, Roosevelt, home economics,;. 
Mss Charlotte Lo Bass, 1?, l6l8 South Ridgeway avenue, Marshall, psychology; 
Vincent Eo Beck, 18, 411 Springer avenue, Edwardsburg, Edwardsburg high school, 
electrical engineeringc- 

Frank R. Bielawa, 17, 3^13 West 62nd street, Lindblom, electrical engineer- 
ing; Ashley Bo Graig, Jr., 17, 4221 North Keeler avenue, Niles Township, civil 
engineering; Donald Dvorak, 18, Cary road, Fox River Grove, Crystal Lake Community 
high school, chemical engineerings 

Edward L, Flom, 17, 3^22 176th place, Lansir^, Thorton Fractional Township, 
Calumet City, chemical engineering; Ronald Ro Gabel, 18, 3518 South Albany avenueo 
Gage Park, biology; Burton Goldberg, 17, 1543 South Sti. Louis avenue, Marshall, 

physicso- 

-more- 



'S'-j^S ^^J 



freshman 3cholar3hips--Illinoi3 Tech, page two 

Ronald Ao Hemes, 18, 10lj.ll Avenue F, Bowen, business and economics; 
IVLLchael Jr Graft, l6, 305 V/est Kirchoff road, Arlington Heights^ Stc Mel, industrial 
engineering: John Fo. Krupka, 18, 8234 Keeler avenue, Niles Tovmship, mechanical 
engineering J. 

Roy T. Ogasawar, 1?, 14.3^3 South Lake Park avenue, Tilden, physics; Robert 
Ih- Postma, 17? 5552 West V/arwick avenue, Foreman, mechanical engineering; Miss 
laura L,. Rypstat, YJ, 7^7 West Thompson street, Harvard, Harvard Community high 
school, physicso 

Miss Fern Lo Schalund, 17, 431^ V/est 21st place, Farragut, home economics5 
Miss Nina Lee Schlafo 17- 4^17 Sunnyside avenue, Lyons Township, mathematics; 
Francis P. Tobolski, I7, 63IO South Claremont avenue, St. Rita, psychology and 
education. 

Miss Patricia Turner, 17, 2943 Belle Plains avenue, Amundsen, home economicsf 
William P». V/inkler, Jr,, I7, 7229 Sheridan road, Sullivan, biology^. 



-mtw- 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: _ , ,^ ,.^-/» 

July 12, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: 

lamediate 



CHICAGO — Uiaa Bererly Asch, 1?* daughter of Mrs. Jacob B. Aaeh 
of 3349 West DiTision street, has been awarded a one-year scholarship to 
Illinois Institute of Technology, it «as announced today by A:ed R* TraviSf 
director of adaissions* 

ICss Aach was one of 20 high sdiool graduates who earned scholarships 
through Illinois Tech's seiBi«>anntial freshman conpetitire examinations. 

The award was based on hi^ school records, and results of personal 
inteznriews, and competitive examinations* It covers tuition and other fees 
for the academic year beginning September 18* 

Ifiss Aach graduated from Roosevelt hig^ school in June of 1930* 
She was elected to the National Honor Society, and was secretary of the 
student council. At Illinois Tedi, she plans to major in homs economics* 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 12, I95O 

FOR RELEASE; immediate 



CHICAGO — Ashley B. Craig, Jr., 1?, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ashley 
B« Craig, Sr« , 4221 North Keeler avenue, has been awarded a one^year 
scholarship to Illinois Institute of Technology, it was announced today 
by Fred R. Travis, director of admissions* 

Craig was one of 20 high school graduates who earned scholarships 
through Illinois Tech's seioi-annual freshman competitive examinations. 

The award was based on high school records, and results of personal 
interviews, and con^jetitive examinations. It covers tuition and other fees 
for the academic year beginning September ld» 

3Ji June of 1950, Craig graduated from Niles Township high school 
where he was elected president of his sophomore class and was a member 
of the debating team* 

He plans to major in civil engineering* 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnr^ent 
Janfiei W. Armiey, Director 



Mailed: July 12» 1950 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CKLCkOO — John F. Krupka, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Rruplca 
of 8234 North Keeler avenue, has been awarded a one-year scholarship to 
Illinois Ijastitute of Technology, it was announced today by Fred R. Gi^aviSa 
director of admissions* 

Krupka was one of 20 high school graduates who earned scholarships 
through Illinois Tech's semi-annual freshman competitive examinations. 

The award was based on high school records, and results of personal 
interviews, and conQ)etitive examinations. It covers tuition and other 
fees for the academic year beginning September 18» 

A June graduate of Niles Township Community high school, Krupka 
was a meober of the National Honor Society, the bowling and tennis teams, 
and the Visual Aids Operator's club* 

He plans to major in mechanical engineering* 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 12, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: Imnediate 



CHICAGO — Robert W, Pbstiaa, 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. John PostuB 
o^ 3552 West Warwick avenue, has been awarded a one«year scholarship to 
Illinois Institute of Technology, it was announced today by Fred R» Travis* 
director of admissions* 

Postna was one of 20 high school graduates who earned scholarships 
through Illinois Tech's semi-annual freshman cong)etitive examinations. 

The award was based on high school records, and results of personal 
Interviews* and competitive examinations. It covers tuition and other fees 
for the academic year beginning September 18. 

Bostma, a June graduate of Forenan high school, was elected to the 
National Ibnor Society, and was a member of the ice skating team, and 
Biology club* 

Ife plans to major in mechanical engineering at Illinois Tech, 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



'^"""^^ July 12, 1950 
FOR RELEASE 



iHuadiate 



CHICAGO — Uiaa laura L. Rypatat» 1?, daoghter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward 9* I^atat of JCtf West Thaaspaoa streett I^ir7a.rd» has been awanded 
a one^year scholarship to Illinois Jjoatitute of Teehnology* it «ns 
announced today by Fred R« tvaria^ director of admissions* 

Miss I^stat was oz^ of 20 high school graduates who saxned 
acholarships through Illinois Tech's semi-annual freahioaa conpetiti-re 
entminations. 

Tte award was bftsed on high school records, a.iad results of personal 
interrrlews, and oonQ>etiti7e examinations* It cowers tuition and other foes 
for tile aoadamio year beginning Sept€rayt}ar 18* 

A June 1950 graduate of Iferrard GcBwimnity high school* Miss 
Rypetat serr^d as editor of the schrx>l naospapeiir, rice president of the 
Qirls* Athletic Association, and was a oeiBber of the band and a oappela 
choir* 

▲t Illinois Tech. she plans to najor ia plqrsica* 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 12, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: Inmediate 



OmCAOO ~ Miss Nina Lee Sehlaf , I7, daughter of Mrs. I!ranlc A. 
Sohlaf of 4217 Sunoyside areime, has been awarded a oneoyear scholarship 
to Illinois Institute of Teohnologyj it was announced today by Ared B. 
nraris, director of admissions* 

Miss Sehlaf was one of 20 high school graduates who earn^ 
scholarships through Illinois Tech's semi-annual freshoan conqpetitire 
exeuBinat ions* 

lbs award was based on high school records* and results of personal 
iaterriews* and co]^>etitiTe examinations. It corers tuition and other 
fees for the academic year beginning Septeaiber 18* ^^^ .<:aj^ ., 

Miss Sehlaf graduated from Lyons Township high school in June of 
1950* She plans to major in n^theaetics at Illinois ffeoh* 



— mtw- 









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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



""''''-■ July 12. 1950 
FOR RELEASE: 

JiOTBalafcc 



CHICAGO — Uisa Aitrioia Turner. 17. dau^ter of Kra. Mira B. 
TUrnsr of 29k3 Belle Plaine aresue* has been awarded a one-year soholarehip 
to Ulinola Inatitute of Taohnology. it was announced today by Fred R. 
Trarlst direotor of admiasiona* 

Mlaa Tnraer vaa one of 20 hi^ aehool graduates wbo earned aobolar- 
abijps through Illinois Tech'a semi-annual freshman ooaqKttitiTe exaadnations* 

Tlie aaard aaa based on high sdiool records, and results of personal 
interrievs. and ooiqpetitiTe enuaisetions* It covers tuition and other fees 
for the academic year beginning Septessber 18* 

Hiss Turner, a June graduate of Amndsen high school, was elected 
to the Ibtional Honor Society, and was a aesaber of the Girl's Athletic 
Association, and the Bowling league. At Illinois Tech. she plans to major 
itt hoam economics. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnrient 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 13, 1950 

FOR RELEASE; LuBdlate 



CiOJCAOO -. Ilias Cliarlotte L. Bass. !?• dau^ter of Mr. and ^i^s. 
Soary M. Bass of l6l6 South Ridgeway avenast has bean awardad a ona-year 
•oholarship to Illioola lastitute of l^aohnologyi it naa aaiK>uBeed today 
by Wred. R. Itavla* diraotor of admisaioos. 

lUas Bams was ona of 20 high aohool graduates who earnal scholar- 
ships throuj^ Illiooia 1?e^*8 semioannusLl freshioEin coiapetitiTe eXBuainations* 

Tha award was haaad on high school reoords. and results of personal 
interTiara» and conQiatitiTe axami nations. It covers tuition end other faas 
for the aeadamie year beginning Sept»aber Id* 

Miss Baas* a June graduate of Msurshell bi^ school, aerred as 
literary editor of Revieir* yearbook, and «&s adTez^tising editor and 
assistant advertising editor of News* the high sobooi i^evspH^per. At 
Illinois Teeh. she plans to aajor in psychology* 



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from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
Jannes W. Arnnsey, Director 



FOR RELEASE 



lanwdiate 



CHICAGO «- Viaoent E. Beck* 18, son of I9r» and Mrs. Cosisbs H. 
Beck of 41-1 Springer avenue* Sfhmrdarrille* has been anturded a one*year 
scholarship to Hiiro is lastitute of Techno l<^(gr« it was annoimQed today 
by Vt'ed R« T^ris* director of admissions* 

Beck was one of 20 high school graduates who earned scholarships 
throu^ Illinois Tech's aesii-attnual freshaaen oonQ>etitiTe examinations. 

The award was based on hig^ school records* and results of personal 
interrlevs* and eoiiQjetitive exasiinations* It corers tuition and other fees 
for the academic year beginning Septessber 18* .^ 

A June 1950 graduate of SdiRstrdsyille hlgli school* B»ck earned a 
letter for football* received the Aaxtrican Legion award* the ma^oa cun 
laude latin award* was co-editor of the high school annual* and junior 
elaas president* He nas also a rBmeber of the Afeth club and the wrestling 
and track teams* 

H» plans to laajor in electrical engineering* 



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from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: _ - ,_ «<v/\ 

July 13« V350 
FOR RELEASE: ,^^^ 



GHICAOO •• Burton Ck>ldberg» 17t son of Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Goldberg 
of 1343 South 3t« Louis arenust has bean awarded a one*year seholarahip 
to Illinois Institute of Technology* it ima announced today by ^ed R. 
Travis, director of admissions. 

Goldberg was one of 20 high sdtool graduates vho earned scholarships 
through Illinois Tech's semi-annual freshoan coapetitire esBaminations. 

"Rie award was based <m high school records, and results of 
personal intenriews. and ooiq^etitive ezaaiinations. It oavera tuition 
and other fees for the academic year beginning Septeaiser 13» 

A June graduate of Uarshall high school* Goldb^g was elected 
to the National Honor Society* and served as news editor of Marshall 
News* and treasurer of the Junior Honor Society* At Illinois TedtL, he 
will najor in physics. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 13, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — Michael J. Graft, l6, son of Mrs, Roy J. Graft of 
303 West Kirchoff road, iirlington Heights, has been awarded a one-year 
scholarship to Illinois Institute of Technology* it was announced today 
by Fred R. Travis, director of admissions. 

Graft was one of 20 high school graduates who earned scholarships 
through Illinois Tech's semi-annual freshman competitive examinations. 

The award was based on high school records, and results of 
personal interviews* and competitive examinations* It covers tuition 
and other fees for the academic year beginning September 18» 

Graft graduated from St. Mel high school in June* He was a 
member of the honor roll throughout his four years there and was also 
on the basketball, swimming, baseball, golf, and bowling teams. At 
Illinois Tech, he plans to major in industrial engineering* 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 



July 13, 1950 



FOR RELEASE: 



linoMdiat* 



CHICAOO •- liisa Fern L. Sdialuni* 17* daughtsr of lifr* and Mrs. 
Slasr C« SohalonA of 431^ ^9at 2l8t plaoe* has bean awarded a ona-year 
aeholarahip to Illlsols Inatitata of Taohnologjr* it «aa announoed today 
by F^red R. TraTia. dlraotor of admlssiona* 

Ifiaa Sobaluni was one of 20 high adiool ^raduatea who earned 
aeholarahipa throu|^ niinoia Teeh'a aanl*annttal frealaaan ooapetitiTa 
ezajBlnationa* 

The award waa baaed on hi^^ aOhool re«>rda» and reaulta of 
peraonal InterTiews* and caq;)etitire esEaminationa* It corera tuition 
and other feea for the aoadMde year beginning Septeidfter l8« 

A. June 1950 graduate of Ikrragut high school* Miaa Sohalund waa 
a neober of the Ibtional a>nor Society* the student council* and the 
band and oreheatra* She waa alao winner of the American L^on award. 

At niinoia !ra<^* she will aajor in hcxoa eoontxnica* 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CAiUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 13, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: Inmediate 



CHICAGO — William P. Winkler, Jr., 1?, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
William P, Winkler, Sr., of 7229 Sheridan road, has been awarded a 
one-year scholarship to Illinois Institute of Technology, it was 
announced today by Fred R» Travis, director of admissions. 

Winkler was one of 20 high school graduates who earned scholar- 
ships through Illinois Tech's semi-annual freshman competitive examinations* 

The award was based on high school records, and results of 
personal interviews, and competitive examinations* It covers tuitiom 
and other fees for the academic year beginning Sefktember 18« 

A. June 1930 graduate of Sullivan high schools Winkler was elected 
to the National Hanor Society, was a member of the varsity football team, 
and the wrestlings track and rifle teams» He was also on the staff of 
the school newspaper and conBoanding officer of the ROTO unit. Hs plans 
to major in biology* 



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LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jam«« W. Armj»y 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois loistltute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?M0. Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-«00. Ext. 317 

Night Phone 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: July 13, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — The tentative program for the sixth annual National Conference 
en Industrial Hydraulics October 18 and 19» 1930 at the Sherman hotel in Chicago 
was announced today by Frank W, Edwards, conferen:9 ascretaryo 

Professor Edwards is chairman of the civil engineering department at 
Illinois Institute of Technology. 

Sponsors of the non-profit, non-commercial technical conference are the 
Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology and the Graduate 
School of the InstitutSfi with the cooperation of seven technical societies; 

American Society of Civil Engineers, American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers, Society of Automotive Engineers, V/estern Society of Engineers, American 
Society of Lubricating Engineers, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and 
the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences* 

Edwards listed the tentative program as follows: 
W ednesday Moraingi Ootobgr 18, 1950 

Subject: GMERAL SESSION 

Hydraulic Control Problems in Automatic Transmissions, 
by Ro L. Smirl, Borg and Beck Division, Borg VJarner 
Corporation, Chicago, Illinoiso. 

Operation and Care of Pfydraulic Machinery, by 
Jo Cc Van Gundy, The Texas Company, 
New York, New York 



11". .''-,' :: ■■ 



hydraulics conference — Illinois Tech, page two 

Wednesday Afternoon. October 18, 1950 

Subjects AERONAUTICAL HYDRAULICS 



Aircraft Ifydraulic Equipment Problems, by 
Carl W; Chambers, Douglas Aircraft Companyi 
Santa Monica, California 

Cavitation in Piston and Gear Type Pumps, by 

Ro J. So Pigott, Gulf Research and Development Company - 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



Subjects CMTRITUGAL PUI^IPS 



Volute v3 Diffusion Casing for Centrifugal Pumps, by 
Ao J. Stepanoff, Ingersoll-Rand Comapny, 
Phillipsburgh, New Jersey 



Subject! SPECIAL FLUID PROBLEIVB 



Effect of Rate of Shear on Viscosity, by 
Sydney Jo. Needs, Kingsbury Jfe chine Works, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Fluidynamics of Rubble Trays, by Glen So Houghland 
and Warren Co- Schreinerj Mo "'>h- Kellogg Company-, 
New York, New York 



^hi xrsday Morning, October 19. 19S0 

Subject! HYDRAULIC PRESSES 

Accumulator versus Self-Contained Pumping Unite by 
J. Jo Littley, 
Chicago,- Illinois 

Large xlydraulic Presses in Germany before and during 
Tiforld War II, by A, Zeitlin, Hydropress, Incoj 
New York 5 New York 

Subjects CIVIL ENGINEERING HYDRAULICS 

Hydraulic Dredging, by 

Jc E© Yager, Bucyrus Erie Co., 

South Milwaukee, V/isconsin 

Large Sewage Pumps, by 

Ho. To Swardt Fairbanks Morse and Company, 

Peloit, Wisconsin 

Operating Experiences with High-Head Gates and Valves^ 
by "/» G, Weber, Bureau of Reclamation, 
Denver, Colorado 



-more— 



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hydraulics conference— Illinois Tech, page three 



Subject! HOSE AND FITTINGS 



Hose Assemblies and Related FittingSj by- 
Don Stranbergt Anchor Coupling Company, Inco , 
Libertyville, Illinois 

"0" and "T" Hings, by 

Jo Ho Swarta, Linear, Incorporated, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



Thursday Afternoon. October 19. 19S0 

Subject: AGRICULTURAL HYDRAULICS 



Utility of Hydraulic Power in Farming with "Wheel-Type 
Tractors, J» F. Ziskal, International Harvester Co;.. -, 
Chicago, Illinois 

Utility of Hydraulic Power in Farming with 
Track-Laying Type Tractors, F., Po Hanson, 
Caterpillar Tractor Company, Peoria, Illinois 



Subject! REFINERY HHDRAULICS 



New Developments in Reciprocating PUmps, by 

Eo Fo 'jilright, '^Vorthington Pump & Machinery Corp* 5 

Harrison, New Jersey 

Application "yf Centrifugal FUmpSj by 
Ao E, Harnsberger, Pure Oil Company j, 
Chicag'}, Illinois 



Subjects CONTROL OF SURGES 



The Desurger, by John Howard Dawson, 
Oklahoma Ao and Mc College, 
Stillwater, Oklahoma 

Mechanical- Pneumatic Shokstops - Their Place in 
Relief of Liquid Hammer,, by L;> H„ Kessler, 
Northwestern Technological InstitutS-p 
Evanstonc Illinois 



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.LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

»chnology Cen+er 
hicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jlllnols knstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9600. Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, Ext. 317 

Night Phone; 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: July ill, 15^0 

FOR RELEASEiInmiediate 



CHICAGO — Jack ViT. Garrison, physicist at Armour Research Foundation or 
Illinois Institute of Technology, will head a newly organized nucleonics section 
in the physics department of the Foundation, Dr. Christopher E, Barthel, Jr,,,. 
department chairman, announced today. 

The new section will apply radioactive tracer techniques to research 
problems. Dr. Barthel said. Activities of the group will in'^lude industrial 
process control studies, radiography, and nuclear instrumeni it-" .in, he explained 

Garriso;! joined the Foundation in 19US after a total of six years as re- 
search engineer for the U, S. Gypsum Company, From 19U2 to 19U5 he was a lieuten- 
ant in the U, S, Navy, He is a graduate of Butler university, 

Mr, and I.trs, Garrison live at 7215 South Yates avenue. He is Ul, 



from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July I4, I95O 

FOR RELEASE: linmediate 



CHICAGO — Prank R, Bielawa, 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. Prank J. 
Bielawa of 3^13 West 62nd street, has been awarded a one-year scholar- 
ship to Illinois Institute of Technology, it was announced today by 
Pred R. Travis, director of admissions, 

Bielawa was one of 20 high school graduates who earned scholar- 
ships through Illinois Tech's semi-annual freshman con^etitive examinations. 

The award was based on high school records, and results of 
personal interviews, and competitive examinations. It covers tuition 
and other fees- for the academic year beginning September 18, 

A June graduate of Lindblom high school, Bielawa plans to najor 
in electrical engineering. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jannei W. Armsey, Director 



July U. 1950 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: 



IinDmediat« 



CHIGAOO — Bamrd U Flom. 17. son of Mr* end Urs. Lamia 0» Horn, 
of 3622 176th plaoet Lansing* baa bsam aaardad a one-yoar acholarshlp to 
niinoia Institute of Tsehnoli^y, it tma announced today by Fred B« Traris* 
director of adoiaaions* , a_ „^.. ,,.... . 

Flon was one of 20 hi$^ school graduates who earned scholarships 
through Illinois Tech's semi-annual frestvoan competitive «Gamiaations. 

The award was based cm high school records, and results of 
personal interriews, and coaipetitiTe examinations* It covers tuition 
and othwr fees for the academic year beginning Septeober 18« 

A June graduate of Thortoa inractional hi^ school* Calumet City* 
Flom was ja>esident of the Debate club* and a meodser of the National 
Ebnor Society* and Boys* club board* kt Illinois Tech* he will major 
in chemical engineering* 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 14. 195° 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — Ronald H» Gab el, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter J, 
Gabeli 55^8 South Albany avenue, has been awarded a one-year scholar- 
ship to Illinois Institute of Technology, it was announced today by 
Fred R» Travisj director of admissions* 

Gabel was one of 20 high school graduates who earned scholar- 
ships through Illinois Tech's semi-annual freshman competitive examinations* 

Ifee award was baaed on high school records, and results of 
personal interviews, and competitive examinations^ It covers tuition 
and other fees for the academic year beginning September 18» 

A. June 1950 graduate of Gage Park high school, Gabel served as 
vice president of the school's Honor club, secretary of the student 
cotincil, co-litersu:y editor of the yearbook, and was a member of the 
Math team and the Quill and Scroll society. At Illinois Tech, he plans 
to major in biology. 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 14, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: Inmediate 



CHICAQO — Ronald A« Hemes, Id, son of Mr. and Uis. Joseph S. 
Hernss of I04II Avenue F, has been awarded a one-year soholeirship to 
Illinois Institute of Teohnoiogy, it was aimounced today by Fred R« 
Traris, director of adiLissionsa 

Bernsa was one of 20 high school graduates who earned scholarships 
through Illinois Tech's semi^aaaual freshman competitive exaaiiikitions. 

The award was based on high school records, and results of 
personal interviews, and competitive examinatioos. It covers tuition 
and other fees for the academic year beginning September 13» 

A June 1330 graduate of Bowen high school. Hemes served as 
p...*esident of the French club and advertising manager of the yearbook* 
He was also elected to tne Natio.ial Honor Society and was a member of 
the band and orchestra* 

At Illinois Tech. he will aaajor in business and economics. 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Sfreet 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Depar+nnent 
James W. Armsey, Director 



""'''''■ July 14. 1950 

FOR RELEASE. 

^OBBediate 



CHICAOO — Roy T. Ogasavara. 17» son of Ifr* and Mrs. John 
Ogasavara of 4333 South Lake Park avenue, haa been ai»rded a one-year 
aoholar^ip to Illinois Institute of Technology* it was announced 
today by TreA R« Travia* direotor of adaiisaiona* 

<^aaa«ara was one of 20 high school graduatea who earned soholar- 
ahlpa through Illinois T6oh*a smii*annual freaheaan ooiiQ>etitiTe examinations* 

The award was baaed on hi^ school records* and reaults of 
personal interriewa* and oompetitiTe esaminationa* It ooTsrs tuition 
and other fe^ for the academic year beginning Septeni)er l8« 

t^n graduating from Tilden high school in June of I95O9 
Ogasawara waa awarded a certificate for superior aoholarship* At Illinois 
Taoh* he plans to oajor in phyaies* 



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i from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

) 3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 14, I95O 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — » Pranois P. Tobolsk!, 17, son of Mrs* John Tobolsk! 
of 6310 South Olaremont avenue, has been awarded a one-year scholarship 
to Illinois Institute of Technology, it was announced today by Fred R. 
TraviSy director of admissions^ 

Tobolsk! was one of 20 high school graduates who earned scholsir- 
ships through Illinois Tech's semi-annual freshman competitive examinationso 

The award was based on high school records, and results of 
personal interviews, and competitive examinations. It cover^ tuition 
and other fees for the academic year beginning September 18« 

A Jxine 1950 graduate of St, Rita high school, Tobolsk! was a 
member of the National Honor Society and served as editor of the yearbook. 
He" plans to major in psychology and education. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Fechnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jamat W. Armsfly 
Day Phonfls: 

Jllinols knsfitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-»tOO, fxf. MS 
Armour Research Foundation 
of lllrnois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-MOO, E»t. 317 

Nighl Phone: 

Lombard IBIO-R 



Mailed: ^^^ ^^ > ^^^O 

FOR RELEASE: l™ediate 



CHICAGO — The nation's experts on noise will meet October 20, 1950, at 
Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology to discuss excess 
decibels and hew to get rid of them. 

About 300 persons are expected to attend a National Noise Abatement 
Symposium where they will hear talks on the effects, measurement, and control of 
many types of noise. Joint sponsors of the national meeting are the National 
Noise Abatement Council and Armour Research Foundation. 

The meeting will follow a two-day Shock and Vibration Symposium, 
scheduled for October 18 and 19 at the Foundation, where representatives of the 
arm.ed forces, universities, industrial laboratories, and common carrier organiza- 
tions will discuss various methods of measuring shock and vibration, 

Dr, Haldon A, Leedy, director of the Foundation, is chairman of the 
program committee for the noise abatement symposium. Other committee members are 
IVallace Waterfall, executive secretary and treasurer of the Acoustical Materials 
Association, and Walter A, Taylor, American Institute of Architects, 



LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
/hicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois krstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?400, bet. M5 

Armour Research Foundathon 

of Illinois institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-WOO, Ext. 317 
Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: July 1?, 195° 
FOR RELEASE: Inpediate 



CHICAGO — Three Chicago area high school graduates have been 
awarded f.: ur-year scholarships in chemical engineering to Illinois 
Institute of Technology,. 

The awards were granted by the Consolidated Natural Gas Systems 
Educational Foundation of Cleveland, Ohio, and cover full tuition, fees, 
and hor^ks. 

Winners, selected on the basis of high school records and results 
of competitive examinatit^ns, are: Halph G.. Zelmer, 17, k'^55 South 
California avenue, Tilden high school; Gerald Jc Robertson, 17» Lake 
Frrest, Lake Forest high school; Daziiel M» 0'R?urke, 1?, 41^9 '"'Vest 
Monroe street, 3t. Mel high school. 



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rom 



LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



DIreclor o( Public Relations — James W. Armiey 
Day Phones; 

Jllinois institute of Technology — CAIumef 5-9400, bit. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: ^uly 1?, 195^^ 

FOR RELEASE: iimediato 



CHICAGO — Despite pessimistic pre-graduat ion forecasts, more than 73 Per 
cent of the 471 June engineering graduates at Illinois Institute cf Technology hare 
already found employment, Harold L. Minkler, Institute placement director, reporter: 
today.;. 

"If job opportunities continue to come in for the next six weeks as they 
have for the p^i"^. six, the entire class will be employed by August 315" Minkler said-. 
"Also, this year, for the first time, the placement office is being asked tc 
arrange interviews during the summer for August graduates, indicating a sustained 
demand c " 

Placement of mechanicalt electrical, and civil engineers has been goodi, and 
practically all architecture and metallurgical engineering graduates have found 
jobso The demand for fire protection and safety engineering graduates and food 
technologists has far exceeded the number rf men availablec 

"Industrial engineers are finding many opportunities in the production 
field, but chemical engineers are having a somewhat more difficult timeg 
particularly in the Chicago area." 

Highest average starting wages cf $273 a^e being paid to civil engineering 
graduates. Average starting wage of all graduates is $_259« a slight increase ovei 
the $257»50 average a year ago, and more than double the 1940 starting figure of 
$119* 



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om 



LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

chnology Center 
licago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinols Ijistitute of Technology — CAIumet i-1U)0, 6xt, 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-MOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard lelO-R 



Mailed: July 18, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — Robert F. Betz, a 1948 graduate of Illinois Institute 
of Technology, has been appointed an instructor in biology at the 
Institute, it was announced today by John D« larkin, dean of liberal 
studies* 

Betz received a pre-medical deploma in 1944 from Reed College 
while serving in the Army, and attended the University of Basel, 
Switzerland, in 194^* He was graduated from De La Salle high school in 
Chicago in 1940* 

A native of Chicago, he is 27 years old and lives at 325^ South 
Lowe avenue. 



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om 



LINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

chnology Center 
licago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois Institute of Technology —CAIumet 5-9600, B<t. 545 
Armour Research Foundateon 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?t00, Ext. 317 

Night Phono: 

Lombard IBIO-R 



July 10, 1930 
Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: Inmediate 



CHICAGO — A new evening division course in basic science 
review for candidates for the Professional Engineers' Examination will 
be offered this fall at Illinois Institute of Technology, it was 
announced today by Staton E. VJinston, dean of the evening division. 

The course is a review of basic engineering subjects, including 
nBthercatics, physics, chemistry, mechanics, and strength of nBterials, 
to aid engineers in their preparation for the examinationo It is open 
to anyone who has a bachelor of science degree in engineering or the 
equivalent o 

The course will be offered 6:45 'to 9^30 P»ni, Tuesday evenings. 
Registration for the 17-week course will be held September 11 and 12r, 
Classes will begin Tuesday, September 19, 1950« 



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rom 



LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armiey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois lijistitute of Technology — CAIumet S-ltOO. hit. 545 
Armour Research Foundat■^on 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIunnet 5-9400, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard lelO-R 



July 19, 1950 
Mailed: Immediate 

FOR RELEASE: 



CHICAGO — Dr. G. Harvey Benham, 38, has been named supervisor of bio- 
chemistry at Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology, it 
Tvas announced today by Clark E. Thorp, chairman of the chemistry and chemical en- 
gineering department. 

Dr, Benham has been associate professor of biochemistry at Illinois 
Institute of Technology for the past five years « A native of Great Britain and a 
naturalized American citizen, he received his bachelor's degree in 1935 and his 
Ph.D. in 1938 in biochemistry at the University of London, England. 

From 1935 to 1938 he was an instructor in physiology and biochemistry at 
the University of London. For the following two years he v.^as at the University of 
Wisconsin under a Commora/ealth Fund fellowship, 

Dr, Benham was a research cheiriist for Ogilvie Flour Mills in Winnipeg 
and Montreal from I9U0 to 19U2, From that time until he came to Illinois Tech he 
was assistant professor of agricultural chemistry at Macdonald college of McGill 
university, Montreal, 

He is married and has three children, Barbara, 8, Ian, 5, and Craig, 3o 
The Benhams live at 8I452 South Bennett Ave., Chicago, 



-ces- 



from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July I9, I95O 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — Miss Dolores Bogacz, 24, of 13056 Escanaba avenue, 
former secretary- treasurer of the White Collar Girls' association at 
Illinois Institute of Technology, has bean elected president for 1950-31* 

As president of the organization* she will direct the social 
and ^uoatiooal activities for the Institute's 300 women employees. 

A graduate of Thornton Fractional high school, Calumet City, 
Miss Boga«z has been attending evening courses at Northwestern 
university* At Illinois Tech, she is employed as secretary to the 
chairmen of the department of language, literature and philosophy. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

1 3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: j^^y ^^^ ^g^Q 



FOR RELEASE. 



Immediate 



CHICAGO — Donald M. 0*Rourke. 17t son of £b>. and Mrs. Jaioes P. 
0*Rourke of 4149 Vest Monroe street, has been awarded a four-year 
scholarship in ohemical engineering to Illinois Institute of Technology* 

The seholarshipt effeotiTe this September* was one of three such 
awards granted by the Consolidated Gas Systems Educational Foandation« 
Cleveland, Ohio* It covers taition» fees, and books for the four year 
course, which consists of three year's study in the field of cheisical 
ei^ineering and the fourth, in gas engineering and technology at the 
Institute of Gas Technology on the Ulinois Tech campus* 

0*Rourke was awarded the scdiolarship on the basis of his high 
school records and results of a conpetitive examination* 

He graduated from St. Mel high school in Jtine of 1950* 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 



July 19, 1950 



FOR RELEASE: 



Iraoediate 



UiiliJrt-GrO — Gerald J« Hobertaon, 17» son of Mr, and Mra, John 
Robertson of Lake Forest, has been awarded a four-year scholarship in 
chemical eu^iueuriiig to iilinoia institute of Technology, 

The jsholiirshipj efreotive this September, was one of three such 
awax'ds gxcinoed by the Consolidated Graa :^stems Educational Fouudation» 
CleveliiDd, Ohio. It covers tuition, fees, ana books for the four year 
oourse, v/hioh oonaiata of three year's study in tni5 field of chemical 
engineering and the fourth, iu gas engineeriijg and technology at the 
Institute of Ges Technology on the Illinuis Tech campus* 

Robertson waa i^^wardeu nhe ^oiiolarship on the basis of his high 
school reuuirds and results of a competitive exarnxnation. 

lie graduated trom iake Forest high school in June of 1^3^" 



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from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relationi Department 
Jamei W. Armiey, Director 



Mailidi July I9, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: linmedlate 



CHICAGO — Ralph G, Zelmer, 1?, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gust Zelmer 
of 4155 Skjuth California avenue, has been awarded a four-year scholarship 
in chemioal engineering to Illinois Institute of Technology. 

The scholarship, effective this September, was one of three such 
awards granted by the Consolidated Gas Systems Educational Foundation, 
Cleveland, Ohio* It covers tuition, fees, and books for the four yeeir 
course, which consists of three year's study in the field of chemical 
engineering and the fourth, in gas engineering and technology at the 
Institute of Gas Technology on the Illinois Tech campus. 

Zelmer was awarded the scholarship on the basis of his high 
school records and results of a con5)etitive examination. 

A June 1950 graduate of Tilden Technical high school, he was 
editor of the school newspaper, senior class treasurer, and a member of 
the National Honor Society* 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: ^^^^ '^^' ^^50 

FOR RELEASE: ^^^^ediate 



CHICACK) •- Dooald C« Curaaing, 20« senior at Illinois Institute 
of Taehoology* has been appointed editor of the Integral* the Institute's 
annual yearbook* for V)50-5^» 

Cunming* a aeohanioal engineering major* is a laeiaber of Triangle 
social fraternity* Alpha Phi Omega, national service fraternity, and the 
American Society of Mechanical En^^ineers. 

Hb liTss on campus in the Triangle fraternity house* 3222 South 
Michigan avenue* 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Depar+nnent 
James W. Arnnsey, Director 



Mailed: July 20, 1950 

FOR RELEASE; immediate 



CHICAGO — Morris Franks, 20, senior at Illinoia Institute of 
Technology, has been appointed editor of the Institute's student 
directory for I950-3U --^ "■-■--''- • " 

Pranks, a mechanical engineering najor, is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs» Charles Flranks of 121 North Pine avenue. 

A June 1947 graduate of Austin high school, he is a member of 
the Institute's chapters of Alpha Phi Omega, national service fraternity, 
"Eau Epsilon Hii, social fraternity, and the Society for the Advancement 
of Management* . . 



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from... 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 20, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHJCAOO — Alan Plait, 24, senior at Illinois Institute of 
Technology, has been appointed editor of the Institute's handbook, 
Technette. Tfie 82-page booiclet will be published this fall. 

Plait, a Bjatberoatios niajor, is the son of Mr* and Mrs. Ionian 
Plait of 1315 South Kolin avenue* 

While at Illinois Tech, he has served as assignment editor of 
Tech News, student weekly newspaper, and co-editor of Zest, quarterly 
literary publication. He is also a member of Pi Delta Epsilon, national 
honorary journalism society, and Sigma Alpha Mu, social fraternity. 

Plait graduated from Tilden high school in January of 1941«> 



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from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 20, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: lamediate 



CHICAOO — John W. Soaimell* 23, senior at Illinois Institute 
of rechnologjr* has been appointed editor of the Institute's student 
weekly aesrspaper. Xech^'Mcnirai, for the year 195^3^* 

Soannell* a itiay 1943 gi^duate of £lgin high school* was iki.aed 
Illinois Teeh*s outstanding sophoiaore in electrical engineering, ds 
also served as 7ice president of his junior class and is a taataioer ot 
Pi i>elta Spsilont national honorary Journalisia society* and Phi Sta 
Signs* social fraternity* 

fie is the son of at, and Mrs. Antlu>ny 3. Scanoellof 4322 
Oreenriew avenue* 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

fechnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jamti W. Armtay 
Day Phones; 

Jllinols Ivistitute of Tecfinology — CAIumet 5-fUO, Ent. M5 
Armour Researcfi Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?»00, Ext. JI7 

Night Phont: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: 



July 21, 1950 



FOR RELEASE: 



Immediate 



CHICAGO — James J. Brophy, Jr., graduate assistant in physics 
at Illinois Institute of Technology, has been appointed instructor in 
physics at the Institute, it was announced today by Dr. James S, 
Thompson, chairman of the department. 

A native of Chicago, Brophy graduated from Steinmetz high 
school in 1944* He received his bachelor of science degree in electrical 
engineering at Illinois in 1947* and his nnster's degree in physics there 
in 1949. 

He is a member of the American Physical Society, and the American 
Society of Physics Teachers. 

Brophy, 24, is married and lives at 3140 South Michigan avenue. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Uirecfor ot Kublic Relations — James w. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jlllnois knstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-7400, Ext. M5 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-MOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phone; 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: July 2k, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: Inmediate 



CHICAGO — Dr. Gerald Berman, 25, of Toronto, Canada has been 
appointed instructor of mathematics at Illinois Institute of Technology, 
it was announced today by Dro Lester R. Ford, chairman of the department. 

Dr. Berman received his bachelor of arts degree at the University 
of Toronto in 1947f and his master's degree and doctor's degree there in 
1948 and 195^» He attended Harbord secondary school in Toronto. 

He was avrarded the Gordon Galloway medal in mathematics in 1943t 
and the Government of Ontario scholarships for general proficiency 1943-47" 
While studying for his doctor's degree he compiled the tables used by the 
City of Toronto to re-assess the city. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



uirecior or kudiic Kelatrons — Jam«« W, Arm«»y 
Day Phonal: 

Jllinols kpstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-7400. Ext. 545 

Armour Research Foundation 

of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-WOO, Ext. 317 
Night Phon*: 

Lombard laiO-R 



July 24, 1950 
Mailed: Imr^ediatG 

FOR RELEASE: 



CHICAGO — The sixth annual National Conference in Industrial Hydraulics, 
to be held October 18 and 19 at the Sherman Hotel in ChicagOj will be under the 
direction of Frank V, Edwards, director of civil engineering at Illinois Instiiuta 
of Technologyf 

The new conference secretary has been closely associated with the hydraulics 
field throughout his career since he received his nBster's degree in hydraulics 
in 1930 at the University of lowao 

From 1928 to 1932 he was employed by the Management and Engineering 
Corporation in Iowa in hydro-engineering and hydraulic research worko He spent 
the next year as research assistant in the U„S. bureau of agricultural engineering. 

From 1933 to 1946 Edwards occupied a variety of civilian positions with 
the Uo Se Army corps of engineers^ 

Among the projects on which he worked were chief of hydraulic structures 
design for flood controls Los Angeles (Sept. 1935 to I^ferch 1936)f and chief of the 
hydraulics section for Mississippi river flood control, New Orleans (Sept. 193^ 
to April 1939)0- 

Prom April I939 to IVkrch 1942, he was chief of hydraulics section of the 
third locks project in the Panama Canal Zone. He was senior engineer and chief 
of the military subdivision of the Wilmington district from May 1942 to Sept, 1943* 



-more- 



national conference on industrial hydraulics — Illinois Tech, page tvjo 

After teaching two years at Pennsylvania State College where he headed 
the hydraulics division, Edwards was principal engineer and chief of the design 
branch of the Missouri basin project from Itoy 1945 to Sept. 1946o 

In 1946 he accepted a position as professor of civil engineering at 
Carnegie Institute of Technology^ ISno years later he assumed his present duties 
as head of civil engineering at Illinois Techs 

The industrial hydraulics conference was formerly under the direction r.f 
Sidney F,. Musselman, assistant chaiman of applied mechanics research at Armour 
Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology. 

It is sponsored by the Foundation and the Graduate School of the Institute 
with the cooperation of eight technical societies: 

American Society of Civil Engineers, American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers, Society of Automotive Engineers, Western Society of Engineers, American 
Society of Lubricating Engineers, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, 
American" Society of Agricultural Engineers, and the Institute of Aeronautical 
Sciences. 



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LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

echnology Center 
/hicago 16, Illinois 



Uirector ot Kubdc Kelations — James W. Armwy 
Day Phones: 

Jllinols knstltute of Technology — CAIumet S-9600, Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-«00. Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: ^^^V 25. 1950 
FOR RELEASE: iTmediate 



CHICAGO — Harrison Da GoodnBn has been named instructor of 
mechanical engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology, it was 
announced today by Dr. Frank D» Garvin, director of the department » 

Goodman, a native of Dallas, Texas, graduated from high 
school in Long Beach, New York, He received his bachelor of arts 
degree at the University of Wisconsin in 1944o 

After service in the U^ S, Navy, he returned to Wisconsin 
where he received his bachelor of science degree in mechanical 
engineering in 1949<> He was awarded his master's degree in mechanical 
engineering in June of this year, after working a year as assistant to 
the supervisor of refrigeration of the United Fruit Company, New York, 

Goodjmn, 30, is single and lives at 729 Viest Grand avenune in 
Chicago. 



-J eg- 



Tom 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

fechnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jlllnols krstitute of Technology —CAIumet 5-9400, tut. 545 
Armour Research Foundat'fon 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE 



July 26, 1950 

Immediate 



CHIGAGO — 'iVilliam E» Thompson, 25, associate research mechanical 
engineer at the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory, Inc, Buffalo, No Y, , 
has been appointed instructor in mechanical engineering at Illinois 
Institute of Technology, it was announced today by Dro Frank D. Garvin, 
chairman of the department o 

A native of Pittsburgh, Pao , Thompson attended Perry high school 
there, and received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 
1947 at Carnegie Institute of Technologyo 

He was awarded his master's degree in 1949 at the University 
of Michigan? While working for the Cornell laboratory, he did further 
graduate work at the University of Buffalo,, 



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from.,. 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 26, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — Robert Bi B^rtoszewicz, son of Mr. and Mrs. B, 
Bartoszewicz, of 1 Gothic street, Rochester, New York* has been accepted 
for enrollment at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago. 

Axmouncement was made today by Fred R. Travis, director of 
admissions* 

Bartoszewicz, a June 195^ graduate of Aquinas Institute, served 
as president of the model airplane club and treaisurer of the Camera club« 
Be was also a msmber of the Class club. Camera aM Physios clubs, and 
the Junior Glee club* M Illinois Tech, he plans to major in chemical 
engineering* 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: 

FOR RELmf?' '»° 

Inmediata 



CHICAGO — Cbarles P. Anderson* 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jeima 
v. AadttTBon* 1323 Norwood avenaoe has been accepted for enrollment at 
Illinois Institute of Technology, it was announced today by fVed R« 
Travis t director of admissions* 

Anderson graduated from Lane high school in June of 1950* ^^ 
Illinois Tech, he plans to major in ciyil engineering. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 2?, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



OHICACrO — Edward (J. Anderson, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore 
S« Anderson of 453*^ North Kasaon street, has been accepted for enrollment 
at Illinois Institute of Technology, it was announced today by Fted R. 
Travis, director of admissions* 

A June 1950 graduate of Lane high school, Anderson was elected 
to the I^ational Honor Society and was a meiober of the Bowling and 
Agriculture clubs. 

He plans to major in fire protection and safety engineering. 
Illinois Tech is the only college or university in the nation offering 
a full four-year caurse in that field. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 2?, 1350 

FOR RELEASE: j^ediate 



CHICAGO ■— Donald E. Arther, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Artber of 4719 Natural Bridget St* Louis t Missouri, has besn accepted 
for enrollment at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, 

Announcement was made today by Bted R. Travis, director of 
admissions^ 

Arther graduated from Beaumont high school in June of 1950» At- 
Illinois Tech, he plans to major in electrical engineering. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: _ _ 

July 27. 1950 
FOR RELEASE: ^ ^, , 



CHICAGO — F&vLl 0, August ins, 13, son of Hr. and Mrs. Baul 
Augustine of iiV) South Center street* Gbrove City. Pennsylvania, has been 
aeespted for enroHjaent at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago* 

Announceraent was made today by A:ed R. iTiivis, director of 
adnissions* 

Augustine graduated from fisburne Military school, VDaynesbornt 
Virginia, in June of 1^3^» ^^ Illinois Tech* he plans to oajur in 
oeohanioal engineering. 



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. ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



I 3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
Jannes W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 28, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: liimediate 



CHICAGO — > Deuaiel Abrahatnson. tlS, son of Mr. smd Mrs. Daniel R» 
Abrahamson of 335^ Cuyler avenue, has enrolled as a freshman student at 
Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago* 

A June 1950 graduate of Lane high school, he served as president 
of the Lane Tech Cycle club, was elected to the National Honor Society, 
and was a member of the track team, college algebra club, and the tnodel 
railroad cluba 

At Illinois Tech, he will major in civil engineering* 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: July 28, 195© 

FOR RELEASE: Ihrnjediate 



CHiDSAGO ~ Denrid L. Abrams, 17 > son of Ifr. and Mrs. Haskel Abrams 
of 8348 Commercial avenue, has been accepted for enrollment at Illinois 
Institute of Technology, it was annoimoed today by Fred R» Travis, 
director of admissions* 

A Tune 193^ graduate of Bowen high school, Abrams served as 
treasurer of the school's Honor club, president of the Camera and 7i8ual 
Education club, and was a second lieutenant in the ROTC unit* He plans 
to BBjor in chemical engineering. 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed: j^^ gS, 1950 

FOR RELEASE 



lotaedlat* 



GHIG&OO — Richard J. Allea, 1?, son of Mr. and Afrs. Rioliard J. 
Allen of Nelaon street* Georgetown* liassaehusetta* has been accepted for 
enrollment at Illinois Institute of Technology* Chicago* it was announced 
today by Kred R. Travis* director of admissions* ,„,.^ „^ 

A June 1950 graduate of Perley high school* Allen served as 
treasurer of the Hi«Y club and was a snsnber of the soccer and baseball 
teams* He will begin freshman studies at Illinois Tech Septenber 18 
and plans to major in electrical engineering* 

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^ ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

l) 3300 South Federal Street 
y 

Chicago 16, Illinois 

CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Departnnent 
Jannes W. Arnrisey, Director 



''"'^^■- July 28. 1950 
FOR RELEASE: . ,, , 



CHICAao •- Donald C. Alger, 18, son of Mr. Earle Alger of 454^ 
Van Burea street. Qary* baa been aeoepted for enrollment at Illinois 
Institute of Iteehnologjr, it vas amaounoed today by Trei R. !Cravi8, 
director of admissions* 

A June 193^ graduate of Wallace high sdiool, (>ary, Alger serred 
as treasurer of the student council and the Chemistry club* He was also 
a menber of the trade and eolf teams* He plans to Goajor in metal lurgieal 
engineering* 



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ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Public Relations Department 
James W. Armsey, Director 



Mailed; 



July 28, 1950 



FOR RELEASE; 



lDxnediat;e 



CHICAGO — Howard T. Anderle, 19, son 5f L!r, and .'*s. Jeuioa T. 
Anderle of 1440 Sooville street, Bemyn, baa been aoaepted for enroUsiBnt 
at Illinois Inst it at 3 of Teohnology, it was announoed today by Fred R. 
Dt^yis, director of admissions, 

A June 1943 graduate of Iforton hi^ sobool, Cicero, Anderle plane 
to aajor in civil angineering. 



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from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jamej W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinoii kistitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400. Bl. 545 

Armour Research Foundation 

of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-7400. Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



July 31, 1950 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: 



Iranediate 



CHICAGO — Two representatives of Armour Research Foundation of Illinois 
Institute of Technology are enroute to Cuba to participate in a comprehensive 
siorvey of the Cuban economy to be sponsored by the International Bank for 
Reconstruction and Development. 

Walter J. Armstrong and Dr., Francis W, Godwin will act as advisers on 
industrial phases of the survey to be made by a 15-iiBn fact-finding group who will 
spend about three months in Cuba> 

The Foundation is cooperating with two other research organizations, 
Stanford Research Institute of California and Southwest Research Institute of Texas, 
in the study. Chief of the mission will be Francis Adams Truslow, president of 
the New York Curb ExchangSo 

The group will include representatives from the three research organizations 
and the International Banko 

Specific proposals on investment possibilities, methods of raising agri- 
cultural and industrial productions snd suggestions concerning economic and finan- 
cial policies will result from the surveyo 

Both Armstrong and Godwin have done research for Latin American countries 
as staff members of the International Division of Armour Research Foundationo 
.Armstrong was manager of Mexican operations and Godwin director of the division. 

Armstrong lives at 3IO So Stone-, LaGrange, Illinois, and Godwin lives in 
DesJfoines, lowaj 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — Jamej W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois knstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, Ext. 545 

Armour Research Foundat'fon 

of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, Ext. 31^ 

Night Phone: 

Lombard 1810-R 



7 



Mailed: ^^^^^^ ^' ^^^O 

FOR RELEASE: ^femediate 



CHICAGO — Industrial convprsion to vjar prcduction and the impending 
draft o.f manpower for military service have created a ne-.v demand fcr engineers, 
Harold L, Minkler, director of placement at Illinois Institute of Technology, said 
today, 

Minkler noted that several major companies are conducting summer 
intervie^/s on the campus for the first time in history. Students who will complete 
their academ.ic wcrk this summer but will not receive their degrees until January 
are much in demand. 

An unusual demand for engineers, particularly design engineers, is 
evident, Minkler said. Oil, chem.ical, aircraft, and motor car manufacturing com- 
panies have indicated the most pressing need for graduates, 

"A few months ago placement personnel in colleges were vitally concernea 
about the problem of placing 19^1 graduates," Minkler said. "Nov: it appears be- 
yond any doubt that no such problem will exist, if, in fact, it ever did." 

He explained that engineering graduates of the past year, despite 
pessimistic pre -graduation predictions, had been placed as quickly as those of any 
previous class and that starting salaries had slightly exceeded those of previous 
years. 

"Even without partial mobilization for war, there is every reason to be- 
lieve that the technological demands of our society will require an ever-increasing 
number of engineers in relation to the total v;orking force of the nation." 

This, he said, coupled r/ith decreased enrollment of freshmien in the en — 

gineering colleges in the last tv;o years, creates a real possibility of a shortage 

of engineering graduates by 19^2 or earlier, 

-jwa- 



Tom 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

fechnology Center 
i^hicago 16, Illinois 



Day Phones: 

Jllinols Institute of Technology — CAIumct 5-9600, Evt. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
o( Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, E«l. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: August 11, 19^0 

FOR RELEASE: 

Immediate 



CHICAGO— Donald E. Laskov^'ski, 23, of 3l6 South Home avenue. Oak Park, has 
been ai^farded an industrial research fellowship in the chemistry and chemical engin- 
eering department at Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology, 
it yfas announced today by W, A, Lewis, dean of the graduate school. 

Starting in September, Laskowski ^vill do graduate work at the Institute 
and industrial research at the Foundation, each on a half-time basis. Completion 
of the work will lead to a master of science degree in chemistry. 

Laskowski, who received his bachelor's degree in chemistry in June at 
Illinois Tech, is one of five students v/ho VTon fellov^ships at the Foundation, 
Fellowships were av^/arded on a competitive basis to graduates of accredited scien- 
tific schools or liberal arts colleges with a major in science, 

Laskowski is a member of Phi Lambda Upsilon, the American Chemical 
Society, and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and was on the Dean's 
List each semester. 

He was employed by Spencer, Kellog and Comparer as a chemical analyst, 
and by Communications Equipment and Engineering Comparry as an electronic technician. 

He is married and has one child. 



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rom 



LLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

'echnology Center 
i^hicago 16, Illinois 



Day Phones: 

Jllinois lr.5titute of Technologv — CAIumct 5-9400, ht. 545 
Armour Research Foundat'hon 
of Illinois Institute of Technoloqv — CAIumet 5-?400. E»t. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard ISIO-R 



Mailed: August 11, 19^0 

FOR RELEASE: Immediate 



CHICAGO— Five June, 1950 graduates have accepted industrial research 
fellowships starting in September, 1950 at Armour Research Foundation of Illinois 
Institute of Technology. 

Dean W, A, Lewis of the Illinois Tech graduate school announced the 
winners who will attend the Institute half -time and \vork in the Research Foundation 
half-time in a program leading to master's degrees. They are: 

Applied Mechanics: 

Boris Kaufman, 2U, of 108 Malvern Place, Cincinnati, Ohio, a married 
Army veteran, who received his bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering 
in June at the University of Cincinnati, 

Donald E, Miller, 25, of 31^7 Elrawood avenue, Berwyn, a veteran, v;ho re- 
ceived his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Illinois Tech and will 
work for his master's degree in mechanics, 

Henry Shucker, 33, of 76It6 East End avenue, Chicago, a married Navy 
veteran, who also received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering at 
Illinois Tech and vj-ill work for a master's degree in physics. 



Industrial Research Fellowships - page two 

Chemistry and chenical engineering! 

Donald E, Laskowski, 23, of 316 South Home avenue, Oak Park, a married 
veteran, who received his bachelor's degree in chemistry at Illinois Tech, 

Physics: 

Harold Vern Watts, 23, of 300 Main street, lATieaton, a Navy veteran, virho 
received his bachelor's degree in physics at Illinois Tech. 

In addition to tuition, fellows yiill receive $150 a month during the 
first academic year, $275 a month and two-weeks vacation during the summer, and 
$175 a month during the second academic year. They are employed full-time by the 
Foundation during the summer. 



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from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



uirecTor oT ruDiic KeiaTions — james w. Armiey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinols k/istitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-»600. bil. MS 
Armour Research F-oundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, Ext. 317 

NigM Phone: 

Lombard ISIO-R 



Mailed: August 11, 19^0 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO— Boris Kaufman, 21;, of 108 Malvern place, Cincinnati, Ohio, has 
been av/arded an industrial research fellowship in the applied mechanics department 
at Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology, YI, A. Lewis, dean 
of the Illinois Tech graduate school, announced today. 

Starting in September, Kaufman will do graduate work at the Institute and 
industrial research at the Foundation, each on a half-time basis. Completion of 
the work will lead to a master of science degree in mechanical engineering. 

Kaufman, who received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering 
in June at the University of Cincinnati, is one of five students who won fellowships 
at the Foundation. Fellowships were awarded on a competitive basis to graduates 
of accredited scientific schools or liberal arts colleges with a major in science, 

Ka-ufman attended Cornell University from September, I9U3 to February, 
19hh in the Array A-12 program, and then enrolled at the University of Cincinnati 
in September, I9U6. He is a member of Pi Tau Sigma honorary fraternity, and 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 

At Cincinnati he was a member of the cooperative student work program 
and was cnplpyod in various capacities by the George T. Stagg Distillery Company, 
Frankfort, Kentucky. He is married. 



-jeg- 



rom 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

rechnology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Day Phones: 

Jllinols Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-7400, ht. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-7400. Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: August 11, 19^0 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — ^Donald E, Miller, 25, of 3114-7 Elmvfood avenue, Bervvyn, has been 
av/arded an industrial research fellcwship in the applied mechanics department of 
Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology, W, A. Levi/is, dean of 
the graduate school, announced today. 

Starting in September Miller Virill do graduate work at the Institute and 
industrial research at the Foundation, each on a half-time basis. Completion of 
the vrork will lead to a master of science degree in mechanics. 

Miller, v/ho received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 
June at Illinois Tech, is one of five students who won fellowships at the Founda- 
tion, Fellowships were awarded on a competitive basis to graduates of accredited 
scientific schools or liberal arts colleges with a major in science. 

Miller is a member of Tau Beta Pi and Pi Tau Sigma, He attended Morton 
Junior College and Roosevelt college before enrolling at Illinois Tech. He is 
single and a war veteran. 



-jeg- 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



uirecror of Kublrc Kelations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?400, bit. S45 
Armour Research Foundat'fon 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-»600. Ext. 317 

Niqht Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: August 11, 193'0 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO—Harold V. Watts, 23, of 300 Main street, V/heaton, Illinois, has 
been av/arded an industrial research fellowship in the physics department of Armour 
Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology, ?/. A. Lewis, dean of the 
graduate school, announced today. 

Starting in September, Watts will do graduate work at the Institute and 
industrial research at the Foundation, each on a half-tjjne basis. Completion of 
the work will lead to a master of science degree in physics. 

Watts, who received his bachelor's degree in physics in June at Illinois 
Tech, is one of five students who won fellowships at the Foundation, Fellowships 
were av/arded on a competitive basis to graduates of accredited scientific schools 
or liberal arts colleges with a major in science. 

Watts enrolled at Illinois Tech in 19U7 after a year at IVheaton college. 
He is a member of Sigma Pi Sigma honorary fraternity. He is single and a Navy 
veteran. 



-jeg- 



^rom 



ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 



Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Day Phonei: 

Jllinols knstitule o( Technology — CAIumet 5-9400. Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, E«i. 317 

Night Phona: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: August 11, 19$0 

FOR RELEASE: j^^,.,,^ 



CHICAGO — Housewives and industries of twelve central Illinois counties are 
being assured cheaper and better electrical service in the next five, ten, and 
twenty years. 

Electrically speaking, the entire area served by the central division of the 
Illinois Paver Company has been set up in a single room at Illinois Institute of 
Technology here, and a team of engineers from Illinois Tech and Illinois Pov/er are 
busy analyzing problems of design and operation which will affect homeoiifners in the 
Bloomington, Decatur, Champaign, and Danville areas. 

The central division serves most or all of Champaign, DeWitt, Logan, Macon, 
McLean, Piatt, Taze^vell, and Vermilion counties, as well as the northeast section 
of Sangamon, southern part of IVoodford, and smaller sections of Livingston and 
Chjristian counties. 

The v^ork is being done on Illinois Tech's $100,000 A-C network calculator, 
an elaborate instriiment for simulating power system conditions. 

Local experts working on the project are: Emerson A, Shultz, RED 7, 
Decatur, chief system supervisor of Illinois Povrer; and Charles Krause, 6l6 West 
Macon street, Decatur, assistant relay engineer. 



Network Calculator - page tivo 

With the netv/ork calculator, any pCTver system can be exactly reproduced. 
Instead of time-cons\iming mathematics, an electrical engineer can set up, in 
niniatiire, a system representing lines extending for hundreds of miles and measure 
power and voltages at any point under any condition. 

Enough circuit elements are available to represent 12 generating stations, 
100 transmission lines or transformers, UO loads, and 18 variable ratio transform- 
ers. 

The miniature system can be adjusted to simulate any operating condition. 
From the readings, the engineers can immediately determine the effect of addition- 
al loads, methods by which they can be carried, system performance under normal or 
emergency conditions, and system changes that can, should, or must be made in the 
future. 

The engineers of the Illinois Paver company supply complete information on 
the local system and characteristics of all lines, generators, transformers, loads, 
and voltages are reduced to calculator values. 

The circuits on the calculator are then connected in the same manner as the 
real equipment and adjusted to have equivalent values. When all conditions are 
matched, the setup is an exact replica of the Illinois system. 

Changes can be made, new lines added, new loads served, new generators 
put into operation, etc,, and accurate inmiediate measurements can be made at all 
points to shovY the effects of such changes, 

Evrett B, Eggers, electrical engineer at Illinois Tech, is in charge of 
the calculator. 



-jeg- 



From 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Day Phonei: 

Jlllnols trstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?400, hi. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-WOO, E«t. 317 

Night Phont: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: August 11, 19^0 
FOR RELEASE: i^ediate 



CHICAGO— Henry Shucker, 33> of 76U6 East End avenue, Chicago, has been 
awarded an industrial research fellowship in the applied mechanics department of 
Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology, W. A, Lewis, dean 
of the graduate school, announced today. 

Starting in September, Shucker will do graduate work at the Institute and 
industrial research at the Foundation, each on a half -time basis. Completion of 
the work will lead to a master of science degree in physics, 

Shucker, virho received his bachelor's degree in physics in June at 
Illinois Tech, is one of five students who won fellowships at the Foundation, Fel- 
lowships T;ere awarded on a competitive basis to graduates of accredited scientific 
schools or liberal arts colleges v;ith a major in science. 

Shucker enrolled at Illinois Tech in I9U8 after two years at Drexel 
Institute of Technology, He is a member of Sigma Pi Sigma honorary fraternity. 
During the war, he supervised installation of radio equipment aboard snail ships 
at Peprl Harbor, After discharge from the service he v;as employed as production 
manager by the LaSalle Electrical Industries. 

He is married. 



-jeg- 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director o? Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Ptiones: 

Jilinols Institute of Technology — CAlumet 5-9400, Ent. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAlumet 5-MOO, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



August 111, 19$0 
^^'^ed: Immediate 

FOR RELEASE: 



» 



CHICAGO — The 19^0 Westinghouse f ellOTJ-ship in pwrer systems engineering 
at Illinois Institute of Technology has been awarded to William J, McNutt of 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, W, A, Lewis, dean of the graduate school, announced 
today. 

The fellowship, made possible through a grant to the Institute by the 
V/estinghouse Education Foundation, provides an aivard of $1,^00 and tuition for 
three semesters of intensive education leading to a master of science degree in 
electrical engineering, 

McNutt received his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering in June 
at Tufts college v/here he ranked first in his class throughout the eight semesters. 

He is a member of Tau Beta Pi, Engineer's Council, American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Institute of Radio 
Engineers, and Phi Delta social fraternity, and was a company commander in the 
Naval R.O.T.C. unit at Txofts. 

McNutt is 23, single, a Navy veteran, and lives at 3O8 East Highland 
avenue, Philadelphia, 

-jeg- 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Day Phones: 

Jllinois l/istitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, ht, 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9600. Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: August 1$, 19^0 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — The Chicagoland Paint Industries 19^0 fellowship in chemical 
engineering has been awarded to Howard F. Bauman of Chicagp, it was announced today 
by I'V, A. Lev;is, dean of the Institute graduate school. 

The fellowship, offered by the Chicago Paint, Varnish and Lacquer Asso- 
ciation and the Chicago Paint and Varnish Production Club, provides an avi-ard of 
$1,000 and tuition for two semesters leading to a master of science degree in 
chemical engineering, 

Bauman, a I9U8 chemical engineering graduate of Purdue University, v/ill 
conduct a research project selected by the paint groups and the Institute, 

He is a member of Phi Lambda Upsilon, Omega Chi Epsilon, and Alpha Tau 
Omega social fraternity, VHiile at Purdue he worked as assistant in the heat 
transfer laboratory, and since graduation he has been employed as a research as- 
sistant in the plastics section of the chemistry and chemical engineering depart- 
ment of Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology. 

Bauman, 2U, is married, a veteran, and lives at 7925 South LaSalle 
street in Chicago. 



-jeg- 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Day Phones; 

Jllinols liTstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundatton 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIunnet 5-WOO. Ext. 317 

NiqM Phone: 

Lombard IBIO-R 



Mailed: August l6, 1950 

FOR RELEASE: Immediate 



CHICAGO — TvYo graduate fellowships established by the Crane Company at 
Illinois Institute of Technology have been awarded to Vfilbert G. Kautz of Chicago 
and Earl A, Phillips of Riverside, Illinois. 

The aivards, leading to a master of science degree in mechanics, were an- 
nounced today by Vj', A, Lewis, dean of the Institute graduate school. 

Kautz, rho received his bachelor's degree in civil engineering in 19h9 at 
Illinois Tech, was given a grant of $2,000 and tuition for the first year, and 
$2,600 and tuition for the second. He v/ill do research in flow of fluids, 

Phillips attended Morton Junior College in Cicero for tv>ro years, and 
enrolled at Illinois Tech after service in the Army Air Forces, He was aivarded 
his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 19h8 at Illinois Tech. Under the 
fellowship he will receive .^2,200 and tuition for one year, and will do research in 
elasticity and experimental stress analysis. 

Kautz has been employed since 19U9 by the City of Chicago bureau of sevrers 
in hydraulics and hydrology. He is 31, single, a veteran, and a member of the Air 
Force Reserve, He lives at 2^21 Pensacola avenue in Chicago and is a member of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers, Sigma Xi, and Chi Epsilon fraternity. 

Phillips is 27, married, and lives at I93 Gage road. Riverside, He is a 
member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and Pi Sigma Tau honorary 
fraternity. 

-jeg- 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director ot Kubhc Kelotions — James w. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinols knstltute of Technology — CAIumet 5-7400, E»t, 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

LorT,bard 1810-R 



Mailed: August l6, 19^0 

FOR RELEASE: In^edip.te 



CHICAGO — Dr. Callavay Brown, 33, an authority on luminescent and 
electronic materials, has been named reseai'ch physical chemist at Armour Research 
Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology, it i:as announced today by Clark E. 
Thorp, chaii^man of the chemistry and chemical engineering department at the 
Foundation, 

From 1937 to 19hS} Dr. Brcwn was on the technical stftff cf Bell 
Telephone Laboratories, Ner York City. During this tim.e he ivorked on the govern- 
ment's radar program and on sub-c-ntract reseai^ch for the Manhattan Project, He has 
been a research associate for General Electric Co., Schenectady, M.Y., since 19U5e 

Dr. Brcvm received his bachelor's degree in 1933 from. Randolph-Macon 
College and his Ph.D. in 193° from the University of Virginia, 

He has published several papers and has a number of patents on work in 
fine particle technology. Dr. Brovm is a member of the jtaierican Association. for the 
Advancement of Science, the .taerican Chemical Society, Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, 
and alpha Chi Sigma, 

Dr. Brown is married and has three children, Am.anda, eight; Penelope, 
sixj and Cynthia, four. He and his family live at U531 South GreeniArood Ave,, 
Chicago, 

-cec- 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armscy 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois knstitute o( Technology — CAIumet 5-9600, Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?400, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: 



FOR RELEASE: 



August 16, 195:0 



Immediate 



CHICAGO—A fellowship in chemical engineering at Illinois Institute of 
Technology has been awarded to Irving R. Dunlap, Jr., of Glen Rock, Pennsylvania, 
by the Standard Oil Company of Indiana, W. A. Lei^is, dean of the Institute 
graduate school, announced today. 

The felloivship provides an award of $1,200 and tuition for two semesters 
and a summer session. Only stipulation is that the award winner conduct a program 
of research on a phase of chemical engineering of interest to the petroleum industry^ 

Dunlap received his master's degree in chemical engineering at Illinois 
Tech in 19h9 and was awarded his bachelor's degree in chemical engineering in 19U7 
at Drexel Institute of Technology, He first enrolled at Drexel in September, I9I4I 
and continued his education after 33 months' service in the Army Air Forces. 

He is a member of Tau Beta Pi, Pi Nu Epsilon, and Americcin Institute 
of Chemical Engineers. 



-jeg- 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jlljnois knstitute of Teclinology — CAIumet 5-9400. Ext. 545 
Armour Research FoundatJon 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-MOO, E»t. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard IBIO-R 



Mailed: August 17, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: ]jrmediate 



CHICAGO — ^The 19^0 M±xing Equipment Company fellowship in chemical engineer- 
ing at Illinois Institute of Technology has been awarded to John B, Sachs of 
Chicago, TiV, A, Lewis, dean of the Institute graduate school, announced today, 

Sachs, who received his bachelor's degree in I9U8 and his master's degree 
in June 1950 in chemical engineering both at Illinois Tech, will continue viork for 
his doctor's degree. The award provides a grant of ;pl,200 and tuition for two 
semesters and a summer session. 

Sachs was born in Dusseldorf , Germany. He is 2lt, married, a citizen, and 
an Army veteran. The Sachs have one child and live at 3^7 West 60th street in 
Chicago, 



-jeg- 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones; 

Jllinois Ijistitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400. Bt. 545 
Armour Research Foundatton 
of lllmols Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-WOO. E»t. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: August l8, 19^0 
FOR RELEASE: Immediate 



CHICAGO — Session chairmen for the sixth annual National Conference on 
Industrial Hydraulics to be held October 18 and 19 at the Sheman hotel in Chicago 
were announced today by Frank V/, Edveards, conference secretary and director of 
civil engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology. 

They are : 

General Session — H. E. Churchill, Studebaker Corporation, South Bend, Indiana 

Aeronautical Hydraulics — ^B, R. Teree, New York Air Brake Conpany, I'Vatertown, N.Y, 

Centrifugal Pumps — Dr, Victor L. Streeter, research professor of mechanics, 
Illinois Institute of Technology 

Chemical Engineering — Dr, J. Henry Rushton, director of chemical engineering, 
Illinois Institute of Technology 

Hydraulic Presses — Earl Cannon, Clearing Machine Corporation, Chicago 

Civil Engineering H^/draulics — To be announced 

Hose and Fittings — Carl E. Schmitz, director of engineering, Crane Packing Company, 
Chicago 

Agricultural Hydraulics — -17, H, V/orthington, Deere Manufacturing Company, Waterloo, 
lov/a 

Refinery Hydraulics — Dr, D, J. Bergman, chief engineer. Universal Oil Products 
Company, Chicago 

Control of Surges —Merrill B. Garnet, Northv?estern Technological Institute, 
Evanston, Illinois 

The conference is sponsored by Armour Research Foundation of Illinois 
Institute of Technology and the Graduate School of the Institute, with the coopera- 
tion of eight technical societies: 

American Society of Civil Engineers, American Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers, Society of Automotive Engineers, American Society of Lubricating Engineers, 
American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Vfestern Society of Engineers, Institute 
of Aeronautical Sciences, and American Society of Agricultural Engineers, 

. -jeg- 



!«• from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CAiUMET 5-9600 



Public Rtlafioni Daparlmtnt 
Jamci W. Armtey, Director 



Mailed: August 18, 19^0 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO—I llinois Institute of Technology in cooperation with the Chicago 
chapter of the societj'' of chartered property and casualty underwrite!^ will 
offer a complete educational program in property and casualty insurance this fall. 

The courses, designed to prepare qualified students for the Chartered 
Property and Casualty Underwriter (C.P.C.U.) examinations, are under the direction 
of Professor John J, Ahern, chairman of the fire T.rotectivon and safety engineering 
department at Illinois Tech. 

Courses are being offered in fundamentals of property and casualty insurance; 
advanced insurance principles and practices; economics, government, and social 
legislation; business and insurance lav.-; accounting and finance; fire protection 
engineering; and safety engineering. 

To attain a C^.CU, rating, a candidate must have a four-year accredited 
high school education, a rainimtun of three years experience in insurance, be 
at least 21 years of aje, and satisfactorily complete a written examination 
in insurance principles and practices, general education, laiv, and accounting 
and finance. 

Registration for the ly^.'eek: first semester will be held September 8 in 
the auditorium at 175 West Jackson boulevard. Classes will begin September 18, 
Further information may be obtained from the Registrar, Illinois Institute of 
Technology, Chicago 16, Illinois. 



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{rom... Public Relation! Depar+men 

Jarne* W. Arm»ey, Direct© 
^, ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

!;1 3300 South Federal Street 
P Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Mailed; 

FOR RB4i©«fSEi5, i?^o 

Irmeidl&te 

\PLClkL TO BIDSBUM OF SCIEHCE AND IHDUSTHT 

CHICAfJO— One of the most unusual and interesting aaWieoatics displays ever 
shown will soon become a persaanent exhibit at the K^seiya of Science and Industry, 

I'he MLhibit is a graphic fixpositi."*n of the scienc;' of geometry, "hfc subject 
fratt«r has been de;:igne(i tn shae not on}.y tlie useful aspects of geoi^try, but also 
its bcautifiil, clever, and amaaing features. 

It has been prepared urdor the direction of Dr, Karl Menger, astsociate pra- 
fessor 'jf -Eathematics at Illluoie Institute of Technologr, 

Design and construction of the unique prcsentatian Is the work of )tto Kolb, 
assistant profesBor of visual desisn at tiie Institute of Design of Illinois Tech, 

Dr, ?.%nser first conceived the ides, of an interesting geometry exhibit several 
years ago while viewing a conventional sathomatics display. To h ai, the exMbii seosed 
too coapllcated to arouse interest in the overat:e person and too basic and "old hat" 
to i,he expert. 

Dr, Mengcr, one o' the world's foreasOEt mathematicians, feels that aBt^Jen;atic8 
is a live, ov^r-changins field based on set aiKi ancient laws. In hia spare tliae he 
developed his own ideas of an interesting, informative, and mathejnatical ly sound exfiibit, 

iie suggested his project to IllinoiB Tech authorities, but funds were not 

irasedistely available. Fortunately, the Institute received a gift last s; rinf; opecifi- 

cally designated for an exhibit at the ^'useuE, The exVdbit was arranged after a 

irieetiag of !?aJor ienox lohr.. Dr. Uenger, and Dr, Henry T, Heald, president of Illinois Tech 

Kolb was called in, and with Eans Schleger, associate ^ rof esaor of visual 
design at the Institute of Design, a preliminary plan was adopted and a raodel constructed, 

iT-BDuel Husinoff, associate pi-ofessor of .'::.anufucturin;x procesees, weiit t<:» 
work <Mi the aechanical devices and FredericVr '.cet, physicist at Amour ?^search Foun- 
dation of Illinoia Institute of Technology, consulted on the electrical work. 

The exhibit is non under construction and will open in late fall. 



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oi^.^.ti.si:-- 






4 from... 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

f^l 3300 South Peder«l Street 
Chie<90 16, lllinoii 
CAlum^t J. 9600 



Public Rtlitleni Dtpirfmant 
Jtmei W, Armioy, Director 



Mdlledi 

FOR rA^I^e!- '!^^ 



iMaediate 



CHICAGO—Housewives and indv.strie.s of Indianapolis and V-arion county have 
be n aar-ured continued fine electrical service as a reeult of studies recentljr 
completed, 

i^lectrically speaking, the entire area se.-ved by Indianapolis Power and 
Ught CoEpacy was set up iri a single room at Illinois Institute of Technology here, 
and a isas of ea^;infcers frora Illinois Tech and Indianapolis Fower analyzed problems 
of design and operation which will affect hoaeowners of Sarion county. 

The work was done last week on Illinv->is Tech's .$ltX,0'0 A-C network 
calailator, an elaborate instrument for sismlatinfj {xmer conditions. 

Local ex]>erts who worked on the <,roject are: Jaiaes a. Jordan, ii230 l^inthrop 
aBenaej ^tichard K. Jordan, hhl North Bosart avenue; and A. A. Funktiouser, 8^8 Eastern 
avenue J all oS: the Operating Department, 

With the network calculator, any power sycterr. cati b exactly reproduced. 
Instead of trte-consuaaing natheffistics, an electrical engineer can set up, in miniature, 
a system representing lines extending for hundreds of ndles and measure power and 
voltages at any point under any condition. 

Enough circuit elements are avail ble to repreaent 12 -encrating stations, 
100 transEdssion lines or transformers, UO loads, and 18 variable ratio traraXorssers. 



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?Jetiiork Calculator - page tvo 

The rainiatuPB ^stem can be adjusted to simulate si^ operatin- condition. 
From the readings, the engineers can is&edi&tcj^' deteraine the effect of addition- 
al loads, isethods by which they can be carried, systen performance under nhmal or 
eseri-cncy condjtinne, an.^ system chans-^es that can, should, or aust be made in the 
future. 

The engineers of the- Indianapolis Power ■. Light coisany su: plied coEplete 
infonnatior. :.n the local syst€rc,and character is tics of all lines, generators, 
transformers, loads, and voltages were reduced to calculator values. 

The circuits on the calculator were then connected in the same aanner as the 
real equlpaent and a^l justed to have equivalent" values. «hen all conditions were 
jEStched, the setup becan:© an ex ct replica of the Indjanapolis system. 

Changes could be isade, new linr..-, adied, new lo^.ds served, new generators 
put into operation, etc., and accurate Immediate raeasurewente were t-aie at r11 
points to show the effects of such cJiangei., 

iivrett B, is^ers, electrical engineer at IllLnols Tech, is' in charge of 
the calculator. 



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from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Kelations — jamcs vy. «rrnicy 

Day Phones: 

Jllinols krstilute of Tecfiriologv - CAIumet 5.9M)0. ht. M5 
Armour Research Foundafion , .,„ c. in 

of Illinois institute of Technology - CAIumet S-«00. Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: August 21, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: immediite 



CHICAGO — Mervin E, Runner, a National Institute of Health 
fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, has been appointed an instructor 
in chemistry at Illinois Institute of Technology. 

The appointment, effective September 1, was announced today by 
Dr» Ivfertin Kilpatrick, department chairman* 

Runner, a native of Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania, graduated from 
high school there in 1934 £^nd received his bachelor of science degree 
in 1943 sit Albright college-. He waa awarded his master's degree in 1945 
at the University of Pennsylvania, and will complete work for his doctor's 
degree there in Septeniber, 

Since 1943 ^^ tias been an assistant instructor in general inorganic 
chemistry at Pernio He is a member of the American Chemical Society, 
Alpha Chi Sigma, and the Society of Sigma Xi» 

Runner is 33, married, and will live at 7236 North Oakley avenue 
in Chicago. 



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i from 
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones; 

Jllinois kPStitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, t»t. MS 
Armour Research Foundat^o^ 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIunnet 5-?*00, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard 1810-R 



August 22, 1950 
Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: I^ediate 



CHICAGO — Charles H. Parcells, who received his naster's degree 
in June at Illinois Institute of Technology, has been appointed an 
instructor in metallurgical engineering at the InatitutCo 

The appointment, effective September 1, was announced today by Dro 
Otto Zraeskal, director of metallurgical engineeringis 

Parcells, a native of Rochester, New York, received his bachelor 
of science degree in 1944 at Rensselaer Pclytes-hnic Institu-e* Troy, 
New Yorko After graduate work at Carnegie Institute of Technology, he 
transferred to Illinois Tech in 1947» 

He was an assistant instructor at Carnegie Tech from 1941 to 
1944« and has instructed in the evening division at Illinois Tech for 
the past yearo Parcells has also been a metallurgical assistant for 
the past two years at International Harvester company.) 

He is 32, single,, a Navy veteran and lives at 12041 Yale 
avenue in Chicago. 



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\ Illinois insmtute oi- technology 



Public Relations Departmen 
James W. Armsey, Dlrecto 



3300 South Federal Street 
Chicago 16, Illinois 
CALUMET 5-9600 



Ma lied August 22, 19^0 

FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CinCAGO — ^Homeoi'mers and industries of Cedar Rapids and 18 central and 
easte^Ti Iowa counties are being assured cheaper and better electrical service in the 
next five, ten and t?,'enty years. 

Electrically speaking, the entire area served by the lo' a Electric Light 
and Power Company has been set up in a single room at Illinois Institute of Technology 
here, and a teara of engineers from Illinois Tech and the lov/a company are busy analyzing 
problems of design and operation which will affect householders of the arua. 

The work is being done on Illinois Tech's ^100,000 A-C network calculator, 
an elaborate instrument for simulating power systea conditions. 

Cedar ftapids experts working on the project ares 

Harold H. Brown, 261)14 Country Club parki'.ay, system supervisor; Harvey D, 
Hunter, 111 27th street N,E., systems operation chief; and Charles R. Broym, 1037 
G avenue N.V.-. , and Roger Lane, 215 l8th stireet K,L., systems engineer. 

The Iowa Electric Light and Power Company serves all or most of Benton, 
Boone, Buchanan, Cedar, Clinton, Dela are, Dubuque, Greene, Guthrie, Iowa, Jackson, 
Johnson, Jones, Keokuk, Linn, Marshall, Story, and Tama counties. 

With the network calculator, any power system can be exactly reproduced. 
Instead of tiwe-consuming mathematics, an electrical engineer can set up, in 
miniature, a system representing lines exten .'inj for hundreds of miles and measure 
power and voltages at any point imderany condition, 

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Enough circuit elements ai-e available to represent 12 generating stations, 
100 transmission lines or transformers, UO loads, and 18 variable ratio transformers. 

The miniature system can be adjusted to simulate any operating condition. 
From the readings, the engineers can i,™ediately determine the effect of aciditional 
loads, metho.s by which they can be carried, system performance unaer normal or 
emer ency conditions, and qrstem changec that can, should, or must be made in the 
future. 

The engineers of the loua company suppljr complete inforraation on the local 
system and characteristics of all lines, generators, transformers, loads, and voltages 

are reduced to calcuQstor values, 

fit 

The circuits on the c^dculator are then connected in the same manner as 
the real equipment and adjusted to have equivalent values. When all conditions are 
matched, the setup is an exact replica of the lov.a system. 

Changes can be made, new lines ad ed, new loads ser-ved, new generators pit 
into operation, etc, and accurate imiiiediate measurements can be made at all points 
to show the effects of such changes, 

^ Evrett B, Eggers, electrical engineer at Illinois Tech, is in charge of 
the calculator, 

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from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 

Day Phones: 

Jlllnols k/istitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9M0. Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?400, Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard IBIO-R 



August 23, 1950 

Immediate 
Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: 



CHICAGO — Dr, William Rratoker, 26, of Toronto, Canada, a 
lecturer at the University of Birmingham, England, has been appointed 
an assistant professor of metallurgical engineering at Illinois Institute 
of Technology. 

The appointment, effective September 1, was announced today by 
Dr, Otto Zmeskal, director of the departmento 

Rostoker received both his bachelor and master of science degrees 
in metallurgical engineering at the University of Toronto, and was 
awarded his doctor's degree in 1948 at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, 
Pennsylvania. He was a research fellow at Birmingham in 1948 and 1949o 

Rostoker has specialized in physical metallurgy and is the author 
of three major works in this fieldo In 1945 he was awarded the Tc A, 
Russell fellowship at Tr^ronto, and, in 1946, the Roy R, Horner fellowship 
at Lehigho He is a member of Sigma Xio 



-jeg- 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director ot Kublic Kelations — james w. /^^msev 
Day Phones: 

Jllinols krstitute of Technology — CAIumet 5-7400, Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundatton 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-?400, Ext. 317 

Night Photie: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE 



August 24, 193 « 

Immediate 



CHICAGO — Robert C, Juvinall, former supervisor of the engineering 
staff of the Chrysler corporation research design department, has been 
named associate professor of mechanical engineering at Illinois Institute 
of Technology. 

The appointment, effective September 1, was announced today by 
Dr. Frank D^ Garvin, director of the departmento 

Juvinall received his bachelor's degree in 1939 at Case Institute 
of Technology, and did a advanced vrark in automotive engineering at 
Chrysler Institute if Engineering, Detroit. He will receive his master's 
degree this month at the University of Illinoiso 

From 1945 '^o 1948, Juvinall lectured on combustion at Chrysler 
Institute, and ta-^ght machine design in 1947 a-'^d 1948 in the Viiayne 
University evening school. While working for his degree at Illinois, 
he has been an assistant professor in machine designo 

He is a meiTiber of Tau Beta Pi, Pi Tau Sigma, the Society of 
Automotive Engineers, and American Society for Engineei'ing Education^ 

Juvinall is 33o married, the father of two children, and lives 
at 9^29 South Central Park avenue. Evergreen Park.- 



-jeg- 



s from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Day Phones; 

Jllinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9600, Ent. M5 
Armour Research Foundatfon 
of lllmols Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400. Ext. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: August 22^, 195 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — A special fellowship in physics has been awarded by 
Illinois Institute of Technology to Dr. Ramakrishna V. Rao, phyiics . 
lecturer at Andrha University, India. 

The award, which provides a grant to $1,3C0, will enable Dr. Rao 
to study in the Illinois Tech spectroscopy laboratory with Dr. Forrest 
F« Cleveland, world-famous head of the Institute department. 

Dr. Rao is a leading spectroscopist in his own right, having 
authored or co-authored l6 publications in this fields Since he already 
has his doctor's degree, he will not work for a degree at Illinois Tech. 

Rao received his bachelor of science degree with honors in 1943 
from Andrha University, his naster's degree there in 194^» and his 
doctor's degree in 1949o 

He is 28 and marriedo 



-jeg- 



s from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Day Phonei: 

Jllinois Institute o( Technology —CAIumet 5-9400. Ext. 545 
Armour Research Foundation 
of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400. Ext. 317 

Nighf Phone; 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: August 25, 1950 
FOR RELEASE: immediate 



CHICAGO — Enrico P. Mercanti has been appointed an instructor 
in mechanical engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology, Dr. Frank 
Do Carvin, department director announced today. 

Mercanti will complete work for his master's degree in September 
at Kansas State college and will join the Illinois Tech staff for the 
fall semestere 

A native of Mount Vernon, Be'i York, Mercanti attended Davis high 
school therea He received his bachelor's degree in 1949 at New York 
university, after service in World Vter II, 

At Kansas State he has been a research assistant while doing 
graduate worko He is a member of Tau Beta Pi, Pi Tau Sigma, and the 
American Society of Mechanical Sngineerso 



-jeg- 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Day Phones: 

Jllinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, ht. 545 

Armour Research Foundat'fon 

of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-«00. Ent. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: 

FOR RELEASE: 



August 23, 195 c 

Ircmediate 



CHICAGO — Jerome G. Morse has been awarded a special one-year 
fellowship by Illinois Institute of Technology. 

The $1,300 award, announced today by W, A, Lewis, dean of the 
Institute graduate school, will enable Morse to continue research in 
organic and physical chemistrye 

Morse received his bachelor of science degree in 1942 from the 
College of the City tl>f New York, and his master's degree in 1947 from 
the University of Pennsylvania. He has been working on his doctor's 
degree at Illinois Tech since 1947» 

While attending the University of Pennsylvania, he was an 
instructor in chemistry at Temple University; and has taught as a graduate 
assistant since coming to Illinois Techo. 

Morse is 28, married, an Army Air Force veteran, and lives at 
4510 South VVooilawn avenue in Chicago. 



-J eg- 



-^•VV :!>■■'• 



from 

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Technology Center 
Chicago 16, Illinois 



Director of Public Relations — James W. Armsey 
Ddy Ptiones: 

Jllinols Irstltote of Tectinology — CAIurret 5-9600, bit. M5 

Armour Research Foundation 

of Illinois Institute of Technology — CAIumet 5-9400, Ei<l. 317 

Night Phone: 

Lombard I8I0-R 



Mailed: August 31, 1930 
FOR RELEASE: Imnediate 



CHICAGO ~~ Richard M-, lOiapp, 23, of Harvey, has been awarded a 
full scholarship in the co-operative program of the mechanical engineering 
department at Illinois Institute of Technology, it was announced today 
by Fred R., Travis, director of admisaionss 

The awards effective this September, was granted by the "iVhiting 
corporation, Iferveyo- 

Illinois Tech's co-operative study program, covering five or 
more years instead of the usual four, requires that each student spend 
alternating semesters in the classroom and in industrial employments 

In general, degrees are awarded after five years, including 
summers and evening study, and the students benefit by close association 
with industrial methods and practiceso 

Knapp, a June 1945 graduate of Thornton Fractional Township 
high school, Harveyr w: i], v?ork alternating semesters at the Vihiting 
corporationc 

He lives with his parents, Mr. and Pfrs, LeRoy H» Knapp, of 15718 
Turlington avenue ^ Harvej'-o- 



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