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Full text of "New-York as it is, in [1833-1835] 1837; containing a general description of the city of New-York, list of officers, public institutions, and other useful information"

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IN 1837; 




Containiog, 

A GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE CITY OP NEW-YORK, I.TST OF 

OFFICERS, PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS, AND OTHER 

USEFUL INFORMATION. 

INCLUDING THE PUBLIC OFFICERS, &c. 



<g22^^ #2^ 5g^<S><S»2^2£»'^^a 



ACCOMPANIED BY A 



CORRECT MAP. 



FOURTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. 



DO/ 

NE-VV-YORK^Jj. _ 

•^ Of Ui/„^.,i^ortO 
PUBLISHED BY J. Dl S TU R NE»|^^ '^^ 

M DCCC XXXVIL 



iV INTRODUCTION. 



or avarice, they by their sordid conduct, cause distress of 
hoth mind and body to thousands of their fellow beings. 

The sad reverse which the City of New-York, and the 
country at large has recently experienced, owing to the 
derangement of our currency, and a too anxious desire 
to accumulate wealth, ought to teach us a lesson of mo- 
deration, and cause us, as a people, to avoid a repetition 
of such evils. Too long has the unfeeling usurer, the 
greedy speculator, and the selfish politician had the ascen- 
dancy. Let the poor and the middling classes of society, 
return to industrious and frugal habits, and learn wisdom 
from sad experience. 

"With these remarks, the Publisher respectfully sub- 
mits this volume to the public, hoping it will be found 
useful, and meet with approbation. 

New-York, May, 1837. 



Index, • .^ * . . . . 3 

General Description of the City, 9 

Recent Improvements, ...«.......<;.. ^ ....«••**•• • 20 

Officers of the Common Council, 28 

County Officers, 30 

Officers appointed by the Common Council, .... 30 

City of Brooklyn, * • * • • • 35 

Courts, <■ i . . 37 

Criminal Calendar, * . . . . 40 

Courts— Brooklyn, ' • • 42 

Register's Office, * • « 43 

Naturalization Offices, * • • 43 

Prisons, &c 44 

Alms House, * .....* 45 

Fire Department, 46 

Board of Health, 47 

Military, 47 

Colleges, Academies and Schools, ,...».... 49 

Medical Institutions, * .... * 58 

Institutions of the Fine Arts, 65 

Literary and Scientific Institutions, 67 

ReligiouSj Benevolent, and Moral Institutions, 75 

Miscellaneous Institutions, 108 

Churches, .......*. 114 

Churches — Brooklyn, * . 120 

Banks, 122 

Banks in Brooklyn, ; 135 

Fire Insurance Companies, 136 

Brooklyn Fire Insurance Companies, 144 

Marine Insurance Companies, 145 

Life Insurance and Trust Companies, 149 

Rail- road Companies, 151 

Miscellaneous Companies, 155 

Custom House, 157 

Post Office, 165 

Lines of Packets, 169 

Steamboats, < 177 

Rail Roads, 184 

Stages, 185 

Hotels and Public Houses, 186 

1 



CONTENTS. 



Periodicals, 188 

Newspapers, 18^ 

Circulating Libraries, 192 

Reading Rooms, 192 

Consuls, 193 

Wardens of the Port, 194 

Harbour Masters, 194 

Ballast Master, 194 

Rates of Pilotage, 195 

Measurers, Inspectors, &c., 195 

Weights and Measures, 197 

Damages on Bills of Exchange, 198 

Wharfage and Commissions, 198 

Commissioners of Insolvency, • 199 

Rates of Storage, 200 

duantities of goods that equal a ton, 201 

Tares allowed by Custom, &c., 202 

Auctioneers, 204 

Licenses, 204 

Coaches and Carriages, 205 

City Stages, 208 

Cartmen's Fees, &c., 208 

Porters' Fees, &c., 210 

Distances from the City Hall, 211 

Chimney Sweepers' Fees, 211 

Census, 212 

Bill of Mortality, 213 

Markets, 215 

Finances, 216 

Amusements, Theatres, &c., 223 

Baths, 226 

Fashionable Resorts, 227 

Favourite Excursions, 229 

Ferries, 233 

Distances to various Places in the United States, 233 

Fire Limits, 237 

Wards, 237 

Alphabetical List of Streets, 239 

Wards and Streets in Brooklyn, 246 

Distances from Brooklyn, 249 

List of Piers, 250 

Key to the Map, 251 



INDEX. 



A 

Page. 

Acaelemies and Schools, 49 

Albany and Troy Steamboatg, 177 

Albion Club, 106 

Aldei-midn, N Y., 28 

Brooklyn, 35 

Alms House, 13,45 

Alphabetical List of Streets, 

New-York, 239 

Brooklyn, 246 

American Academy of the Fine 

Arts, 65 

Anti-Slavery Society, . . 99 
and Foreign Bible Soci- 
ety, 86 

Bible Society, 75 

Board of Commissioners 
for Foreign Missions, 78 

Fur Company, 156 

Historical Society, 74 

Home Missionary Soc . 79 

Institute, 109 

Lyceum, 69 

Museum, 225 

Seamen's Friend Soc.,. 88 
Society for the Promo- 
tion of Ed. in Africa,. 81 
Sunday School Union, . 80 

Theatre, 224 

Tract Society, 76 

Amusements, 223 

Apprentices' Library, 71 

Arrivals at the Port of N. Y. , . 163 

Assessments, 222 

A ssessors, 29 

Association for the Relief of 

Aged Females, 102 

Asylum, Lunatic, 60 

for Lying-in Women, 103 

Orphan, 91 

Rom. Cath. Orphan,. 92 

Athenaeum, 68 

Apalachicola Packets, 175 

Auctioneers, 204 



B 

Page 

Ballast Master, 194 

Banks, Rules, &c., 122 

Rates of Coins at 123 

United States Agency, 132 

City, 123 

Savings, 132 

Brooklyn, 135 

Baptist Home Mission Society, 87 

Battery, 227 

Bath, 231 

Baths, 226 

Bellevue Hospital, ...46,62 

Benevolent Institutions, 7S 

Bible Societies, 75,86 

and Common Prayer- 

Book Society, . 82 

Bill of Mortality, 213 

Bloomingdale, 229 

Boarding Houses, 187 

B®ard of Health, 47 

of Missions of the Pro- 
testant Episc. Church, 81 
of Stock and Exchange 

Brokers, Ill 

of Trade, Ill 

Boats, Steam, 177 

Freight, 179 

Bost. and Prov. Steamboats,.. 182 

BridewoU, 45 

Brooklyn, 35, 230 

Charter Officers, .... 35 

City Hall, 27 

Mayors of the City of 35 
Officers appointed by 
Common Council, 36 

Lyceum, 72 

Collegiate Institute,. 54 

Banks, 135 

Churches, 120 

Fire Ins. Companies, 144 
Buildings erected in 1835-6, ... 20 

Bull's Ferry, 230 

Burnt District, 21 



INDEX. 



Page. 
C 

Carthagenian Packets, 172 

Cartmen, 208 

Castle Garden, 228 

Cemeteries, 18 

Census, 212 

Brooklyn, 213 

Chamber of Ct«nmerce, 108 

Chancery, Court of, 37 

Charter Officers, 28 

Charleston Packets, 173 

Charleston Steam Packets. . . . 173 

Chimney Sweepers 211 

Churches 114 

in Brooklyn 120 

CiHcinnati, Society of 108 

Circulating Libraries 192 

Cilj of Brooklyn 35, 230 

Aldermen .... 35 
Assessors .... 36 
Collectors .... 36 

Supervisors 35 

City of New- York, Descrip- 
tion of 9 

City Hall , Description of 11 

Prison 45 

Stages 208 

Finances 216 

Licenses 204 

Surveyors 34 

Clerks of Markets 34 

Clinton Hall Association 70 

Clothing Society 95 

Coaches and Carriages 205 

Collectors 29 

Colleges, Columbia 49 

University 61 

Physicians and Sur- 
geons 58 

Pharmacy 65 

Comm'rs of Insolvency 199 

of the School Fund . . 34 

Commerce 162 

Colonization Society 96 

Commissions, Bates of 193 

Common Council, N. Y 28 

Brooklyn 35 

Constablei 30 

.CorbuIb 193 

Coney Island 231 

Coroners' Inquest 42 

Cou»ty Officers 30 



Page. 

Court, U. S. Diet, and Circuit . 37 

Errors 37 

Chancery 37 

Supreme 38 

Circuit and Oyer and 

Terminer 38 

Superior 38 

Common Pleas 39 

Surrogates 39 

General and Special 

Sessions 39 

Marine 41 

Justices' or Ward 41 

Police 41 

Sheriffs' Jury 42 

Brooklyn 42 

King's County 43 

Municipal 43 

Criminal Calendar 40 

Custom House 23, 157 

£> 

Daily Newspapers 189 

Damages on Bills of Exchange 19S 

Darien Packets 175 

Deaf and Dumb Institution ... 89 
Deaths by some of the princi- 
pal Diseases 214 

Description of the City 9 

Dispensary, Eastern 64 

New- York 63 

Northern 63 

Distances, from Brooklyn 249 

from the City Hall. 211 
from New-York to 

Albany 235 

from New- York to 

Washington 236 

of the ^principal 

Cities 233 

Domestic Servants, Society for 

the Encouragement of lOO 

Dorcas Society 94 



Eastern Dispensary 64 

Eastern Packets 176 

Education and Miss. Society. 84 
Society of the Be- 
lormed Dutch Ch. 86 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Episcopal Societies, &c 81 

Estate, Ileal and Personal. . . . 222 

Exchange, Merchants' 22 

Exchange Reading Room 192 

Expenditures, City 219 

Eye Infirmary 59 

F 

Fashionable Resorts 227 

Favourite Excursions 229 

Fees of City Guagers 203 

Female Assistance Society ... 93 
Benevolent Society. ... 93 

Bible Society 86 

Ferries 233 

Finances of the City 216 

Fire Department, Brooklyn . . 47 

Fund 96 

New York . . 46 

Fire Districts 237 

Insurance Companies. ... 136 

Limits 237 

Flatbush 231 

Foreign Board of Missions. . .81 86 

Moneys 164 

Fort Hamilton 231 

Fortifications 10 

Franklin Theatre 224 

French Benevolent Society. ... 106 

G 

Gardens 229 

Gas Light Company 13, 155 

German Society 107 

Goods that equal a Ton 201 

Grand Lodge 113 

Groceries, &c., Licensed 204 

H 

Hackney Coaches 205 

Coaeh Stands 208 

Halls of Justice and House of 

Detention 24 

Hamilton Literary Association 74 

Harbour 10 

Masters 194 

Harlsam 229 

Rad-road 14, 184 

Hartford Steamboats 183 

Havre Packets 171 



Page, 

Health Commissioners 47 

Health Wardens 34 

Historical Society 68 

Hoboken 230 

Horticultural Society 113 

Hospitals, New-York 59 

Bellevue 62 

Quarantine 62 

Hotels and Public Houses .... 186 

Heuse of Refuge 45 

Hudson River Steamboats . . . 177 
Canal and Lake 
Transportation 

Line 183 

Humane Societies 107 



Infant School Society 57 

Inspectors 195 

Institute, American 109 

Mechanics' 110 

Stuyvesant 69 

Institution lor the Deaf and 

Dumb 89 

Institutien for the Blind 105 

Institutions of the Fine Arts . . 65 

Medical 68 

Literary and Scien- 
tific 67 

Religious, Benevo- 
lent, &c 75 

Miscellaneous .... 103 
Insurance Companies, Fire... 136 

Marine 145 

Brooklyn, Fire 144 

Life and Trust. 149 
Islands contiguous to New- 
York 229 



Jamaica 232 

Jersey City 224 

Junk Shops 205 

Juvenile Delinquents, Society 
for the Reformation of. 101 



K 

Key to the Map 251 

Kings County Officers 36 

Kingston (Jam. Packets) 172 



1* 



JNDEX, 



Page. 

Ladies' Depository 95 

Law Association 72 

Institute 71 

Libraries, Circulating 192 

Librjiry, Apprentices' 71 

Mercantile 7C 

New- York Society.,, 68 

Lines of Packets 169 

Literary and Scientific Insti- 
tutions 67 

Brooklyn 72 

Philosaphical 67 

Liverpool Packets 170 

Lombard Association 155 

London Packets 169 

Lunatic Asylum 60 

Lyceum of Natural History . . 69 

Brooklyn 72 

United States Naval 73 



M 

Mails 167 

Manumission Society 105 

Manhattan Company 16 

Manhattanville 229 

Manufactures 19 

Marine Court 36 

Bible Societies 86 

Society 107 

Insurance Companies.. 148 
Mariners' and Merchants' As- 

sociatioQ 112 

Markats 215 

Marshals 32 

May Day 19 

Mayors 28 

Measurers, Inspectors, and 

Guagera 195 

Mechanics' School 54 

Institute 110 

and Tradesmen's 

Society 107 

Medical Institutions 58 

Society 59 

Mercantile Library Association 70 

Merchants' Exchange 22 

Company 155 

Methodist Book Concern 87 

Military 47 



Pass. 
Miscellaneous Institutions. . . . 108 

Companies 155 

Missionary Society of the Re- 
formed Dutch Church 86 
of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church 87 

Mobile Packets 175 

Monuments 18 

Mortality, Bill of 213 

Museums 225 



National Academy of Design 68 

Theatre 224 

Naturalization Offices 4.3 

New-England Society 100 

New-Brighton Association .,, 156 

New-Haven Steamboats 183 

New-London and Norwich 

Steamboats 182 

New-Orleans Packets 174 

Nevniort and Providence 

Steamboats 182 

Newspapers 189 

Brooklyn 192 

New-York City Finances 216 

City Tract Society , 75 
Church Building So- 
ciety 85 

Description of 9 

Dispensary 63 

State Society of the 

Cincinnati 108 

Sund. School Union 80 
Theolog. Seminary 53 

University 21, 51 

Niblo's Garden 229 

Norwalk, Bridgeport, &c. 

Steamboats 182 

Northern Dispensary 63 

North American Lumber Com- 
pany 186 

O 

Orphan Asylum 91 

Do. Protestant 92 

Do. Roman Catholic. 92 

Society, Jewish 102 

Officers of the City appointed 
by the Conunon Coimcil .... 80 



INDEX. 



Pasre. 
P 

Park Theatre 223 

Peru Iron Company 166 

Packets, Lines of 1 69 

Pawnbrokers 204 

Peale's Museum 226 

Periodicals ISS 

Penitentiary 13, 44 

Philadelphia Packets 176 

Steamboats 181 

Piers, List of 250 

Police Offices 41 

Population 1 1 

Porters' Fees 210 

Postage, Rates of 167 

Post Office 165 

Presbyterian Education Society 87 

Prisons 44 

Protestant Episcopal City Mis- 
sion Society 8-3 

Church Music Soc. 83 
Corporation for the 
Relief ofWidows, 

&c 85 

Press 82 

Public School 85 

Society for promo- 
ting: Religion, &c. 84 
Sunday School Soc. 83 
Theolog. Seminary 52 

Tract Society 82 

Public Buildings 11 

Gardens 229 

School Society 55 

Schools 56 

Stores 162 

Quarantine Hospital 62 

R 

Rates of Commissions 193 

of Cartage 209 

of Pilotage 195 

of Postage 167 

of Storage 200 

of Wharfage 198 

Rail Roads 184 

Companies 151 

Reading Rooms 192 

Real Estate owned by the Cor- 
poration 221 



Page 
Recent Improvements. ...... . 20 

Reformed Dutch Church So. 86 

Sunday School Union 86 

Religious Institutions. ........ 75 

Reservoir 16 

Register Office 43 

Richmond Hill Theatre 224 

Rockaway 232 

Roman Cath. Free School. . .. 57 
Benevolent Soc. 102 



S 

Sacred Music Society 72 

Sailors' Snug Harbour .... 87 

Savannah Packets 173 

Savings Bank 132 136 

Seamen's Retreat 112 

Schools J Mechanics' ......... 54 

Pubhc 56 

Free and Infant .... 57 

Sunday 80 

Sheriffs' Jury 42 

Situation and Extent of the City 9 

Society Library 68 

Society for the Encouragement 
of Faithful Domestic 

Servants 100 

for the Promotion of 
Knowledge and In- 
dustry 100 

for the Relief of poor Wi- 
dows with small Chil- 
dren 102 

for the Reformation of 

Juvenile Dehnquents.. 101 

Southern Packets 173 

St. Nicholas' Society 105 

St. George's Do 106 

St. Andrew's Do 1 06 

St. Patrick's Do 106 

Steamboats 177 

Streets 20 

Street Inspectors 32 

Streets, List of. 239 

Brooklyn 246 

Stages 185 

City 206 

Staten Island 232 

Stuy vesant Institute 69 

Supply of Water 14 

Surgeon Dentists 64 



INDEX. 



Paee. 
T 

Tares allowed by Custom 202 

allowed by Law 203 

Temperance Society 104 

Tract Society 76 

and Sunday School 

Union S7 

Telegraph 11 

Theatres 223 

Theological Sem'y. ofthe Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church . . 52 
New York . 53 

Tontine Coffee House 112 

Towboats on the Hudson River 179 

Trades Union 113 

Typographical Society 108 

Association lOS 



U 

Unfinished Edifices 22 

University ef the City of New- 
York 2!, 51 



Pa^e 

United States Branch Bank ... ~94 

Naval Lyceum. . 73 

Nav^r Yard 230 

V 

Vauxhall Garden 226 

W 

Wards 237 

Brooklyn 246 

Wardens of tlie Port 194 

Watch 43 

Water Commi.ssiwners 197 

Water from the Croton Kiver 17 

Waterworks je 

Weights and Measures 197 

Williamsburgh 231 

Y 

Yorkville 229 

Young Men's Auxiliary Edu- 
cation and Missionary Soc 85 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

OF THE 
CITY AND HARBOUR OP KE^^-YORK. 



SITUATION AND EXTENT, 

The City of New- York, the commercial emporium of 
the United States, is situated on New- York Island, for- 
merly called Manhattan Island, (at the confluence of the 
Hudson or North River, with the strait called the East 
River, which connects Long Island Sound with the At- 
lantic Ocean. It is about equi-distant (or less than twenty 
miles) from the western extremity of Long Island Sound 
on the north-east, and the Atlantic Ocean on the south. 
The City Hall is in latitude 40 deg. 42 min. 40 sec. north, 
and longitude 74 deg. I min. 8 sec; west, from Greenwich. 
The City and country are of the same limits, comprising 
the whole island, which extends from the Battery on 
the south, to Kingsbridge on the north, 13 » miles, or 
71,700 feet. The average breadth is 1 mile and 3,220 
feet, or 8,500 feet. The greatest breadth is on the line of 
88th-street, and is 12,200 feet, or about 2j miles. The 
area of the island is about 14,000 acres. 

On the north and east it is separated from Westchester 
County by Harlsem River, over which are three bridges, 
namely Harlaem, Macomb's, and King's bridges. The 
tide flows through this river or strait ; the western termi- 
nation of which, where it connects with the Hudson, is 
called Spuyten DuyveVs Creek. The strait called the 
East River separates the island from Long Island on the 
east. On the south is the bay or harbour; and on the 
west is the North, or Hudson River ; with the state of 
New- Jersey on the opposite shore. The few small islands 
in the harbour are also attached to the City ; the principal 
of which are Governor's, Ellis', and Bedlow's Islands; 
also, Blackwell's Island, in the East River, occupied by 
the City Penitentiary establishment, and Great Barn 
Island, near Hell Gate, 



10 DESCRIPTION OF THE CITY AND HARBOUR. 



HARBOUR, &C. 

The harbour of New- York is safe and commodious, its 
circumference being about 25 miles, and the largest ves- 
sels may come up to the wharves at the City. On the 
bar, at Sandy Hook, the depth of water, at high tide, is 
27 feet, and at low water 21 feet ; from thence to the City 
the channel is from 35 to 50 feet. The Light House at 
Sandy Hook on the New- Jersey shore, is distant 18 miles 
from the City ; and vessels frequently anchor in the outer 
harbour, or Raritan Bay. The entrance to New- York 
harbour is called " The Narrows," between Staten 
Island on the west, and Long Island on the east, 8 miles 
from the City. Sands' Point Light House, on Long 
Island, is situated near the western extremity of Long 
Island Sound, 20 miles N.E. ofthe City. The harbour is 
but seldom obstructed with ice. The difference between 
high and low tides, at the wharves, averages about seven 
feet ; and for the convenience of commerce several 
steamboats are employed in towing ships to and from sea. 
The principal commercial business is transacted on the 
east side of the City ; the East River being the most con- 
venient and safe part of the harbour. The width of the 
East River is from one third to one half of a mile to the 
opposite shore of Brooklyn, Long Island. The Hudson, 
or North River, is one niile in width to Jersey City, and 
a mile and a half to Hoboken, (New Jersey.) 

FORTIFICATIONS. 

The principal fortifications for the defence ofthe har- 
bour are at the Narrows, about 8 miles from the City, 
On the eastern, or Long Island shore, are forts Hamilton 
and La Fayette, the latter of which, (^formerly called Fort 
Diamond,) isbuilt on a reef of rocks, two hundred yards 
from the shore, where the former is situated, and has 
three tiers of guns. The strait, or Narrows, is here about 
one third of a mile in width, and on the Staten Island, or 
western shore, opposite the two fortresses just named, 
are fort Tompkins and fort Richmond. The United 
States Government have expended large sums of money 
on these different fortifications, particularly since the last 
war with Great Britain, and they are now considered 
amply sufficient for the defence of this passage to the 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 11 



harbour. The principal fortifications on the East River 
are at Throg's Point, where is situated Fort Schuyler. 

There are batteries on Bedlow's and Ellis' islands, on 
the western side of the harbour; and on Governor's 
Island, (which is distant 3.200 feet from the City at the 
Battery, and contains 70 acres,) are Fort Columbus and 
Castle Williams. The former is a strong work in the 
shape of a star, on the south side of the Island. The 
latter is on the north-west point of the island, built of 
stone, in a circular form, 600 feet in circumference, and 
60 feet in height, with three tiers of guns. There is also 
a battery on the south-west side, commanding the entrance 
through Buttermilk Channel. There are barracks on 
the island for the accommodation of a considerable num- 
ber of soldiers. 

TELEGRAPH. 

A Telegraph is established on the heights of Staten 
Island, communicating by signals with one in the Citv on 
Holt's Hotel. 

DIVISIONS AND GOVERNMENT. 

The City is divided into 17 wards, which are particu- 
larly defined in another part of this volume. Each ward 
elects annually an Alderman and an Assistant Alderman, 
who are formed into a Common Council of two boards. 
The Mayor is elected annually, in April, (agreeably to 
an amendment of the constitution,) by the people. 

POPULATION OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK, AT DIFFERENT PERIODS 
DURING THE LAST 100 YEARS. 

In 1731 . . . . 8,628 In 1810 .... 96,373 

123,706 
166,086 
202,589 
270,089 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

In enumerating the public buildings which are not de- 
scribed under their appropriate heads, we shall first 
name. 

THE CITY HALL, 

Situated in the Park, about half a mile from the Bat- 
tery, and eqi-distant from the East and North Rivers. 
It is 216 feet in length, by 105 in breadth ; the front and 



1731 . . 


. . 8,628 


In 1810 . . . 


1750 . . 


. . 10,381 


1820 . . . 


1773 . . 


. . 21,876 


1825 . . . 


1790 . . 


. . 33,131 


1830 . . . 


1800 . . 


. . 60,489 


1835 . . . 



12 



PUBLIC fiUILDlNGS, 



ends built of white marble, and the rear of free stone, and 
is considered one of the most beautiful edifices in the 
United States. It consists of a centre building and two 
wings, principally of the Ionic and Corinthian orders. 
This edifice was commenced in 1803, and finished 
in 1812, at the cost of ^538,734, and is occupied as 
follows : 



CITY Hall 
Basement. 

1. Cit}' Inspector's Office. 

2. Collectors of Arrears of 

Assessments. 

16. Sheriffs' Jury Room. 

18, Mechanics' institute. 

First Floor. 

4. Recorder's Office. 

5. Ma)^or's Office. 

6. Circuit Judge. 

7. Clerk of the Board of 
Assistants. 

8. Clerk of the Board of 
Aldermen. 

9. Keeper's Room. 

17. First Judge's Office. 

19. Clerk Supreme Court. 



, proper. 

20. Clerk City and County. 

21. Sheriff's Office. 

22. Law Institute. 
Chamber Judges Supe- 
rior Court. 
Court of Chancery. 

Second Floor. 
Governor's Room. 
Com. Council Chamber. 
Superior Court. 
15. Superior Court Clerk's 

Office. 

Court Common Pleas. 
Circuit Court. 
Chamber of Board of 

Assistants. 

Vice Chan. Office, 



23. 

24. 

11. 
13. 
14. 



25. 

26. 
27. 



28. 



NEW CITY HALL, or City Hall^ No. 2. 
-' In the rear of the City Hall is an extensive brick build 
ing, formerly the Alms House, which is now occupied as 
follows : 



West End. 
Basement, Watch House. 

First Floor. 
Marine Court. 
Police Office. 

Second Floor. 
Office of the Clerk of the 

Court of Sessions. 
District Attorney's Office. 
Sessions Court Room. 
Grand Jury Room. 
Witnesses' Rooms and Petit 

Jurv Rooms. 
Water Com'rs' Office. 



Centre Door. 
Office of Commissioners of 

the Alms Houses. 
Rooms for lost Children iff 
Basement under do. 
East End. 
United States Court Rooms, 
United States Clerks' 

Office. 
Marshal's Office. 
Judges' Chamber. 

Third Floor. 
Keepers' Room. 



GAS WORKS. 13 



Ball of records, or C'dy Hall, No, 3. 



F'irst Floor. 
Register's Office. 
Surrogate's Office. 



Second Floor. 
Street Com'rs' Office. 
Comptroller's Office. 



THE ROTUNDA, 

Situated in the Park, facing Chambers-street, is now 
used as the City Post Office. 

THE CITY PRISON, 

Formerly the Bridewell, is situated west of the City 
Hall, near Broadway ; the above constitutes all the public 
buildings in the Park. 

PENITENTIARY, 

Situated on Blackwell's Island, is an immense stone 
edifice, erected a few years since. The main building is 
four stories high, surmounted by a square tower ; two 
wings, each extending upwards of 200 feet from the 
centre building, are also four stories high. The interior 
is fitted up with rooms for the accommodation of the 
keepers, workshops in which the prisoners are obliged 
to labour, and numerous cells; the whole being con- 
structed in the most substantial and secure manner. 

ALMS HOUSE. 

The new Alms House is situated at Bellevue, on the 
East River, two and a half miles from the City Hall, and 
is a spacious edifice of stone, with numerous buildings as 
appendages. The location is remarkably salubrious and 
pleasant. There are several farms on Long Island, at- 
tached to the Alms House establishment. 

(For other picblic Buildings, see Index.) 

GAS WORKS. 

THE NEW-YORK GAS-LIGHT COMPANY 

Have their works located at the corner of Canal and 
Centre streets, and have at present laid down, in the prin- 
cipal streets, 26 miles of iron pipes. The public build- 
ings and stores which are supplied with gas by this Com- 
pany, pay for the same atthe rate of 70 cents per 100 cubic 
feet consumed. The expense of gas for a store, with four 
lights, is about $60 per year. (For capital, &c. see 
page 155.) 

2 



14 NEU'-YORK AND IIARLiEM HAIL-ROAD. 

THE MANHATTAN GAS LIGHT COMPANY WORKS 

Are located on the North River at tlie fool of Eighteenth- 
street. This Company have laid their main pipes through 
Eighteenth-street, Ninth-avenue, Hudson, Bleccker-street, 
Sixth-avenue, Waverly-place, Broadway, Bowery, 
Broome, Centre, and Grand-streets ; and are now laying 
them through other important streets. (For capital, &c. 
see page 155.) 

NEW-YORK AND HARLEM RAILROAD COMPANY. 

This Company was incorporated in 1831, andhas since 
been so amended that its capital, originally $350,000, is- 
now SI, 150,000. 

The route selected for its road is from Prince-street, in 
the Bowery, through the 4th Avenue, to Hartem River, 
with a branch through One hundred and Twenty-fifth- 
street to Ninth Avenue, and thence to the Hudson River 
at Manhattan ville landing. 

The first running of the cars upon this road was in^ 
November, 1832, and they travelled no further than 
Fourteenth-street. In June, 1833, their route was ex- 
tended to Murray Hill. In May, 1834, the route was 
further extended to Yorkville, w^here it has continued 
ever since. The number of passengers in the cars down 
to that date was about 125,000. From May to November, , 
1834, the number of passengers was 176,000, and the re- 
ceipts from fare, $16,000. From 1st November, 1834, to' 
1st November, 1835, the number of passengers was about 
400,000, and receipts from fare, $37,000. From the 1st 
November, 1835, to 1st November, 1836, the number of 
passengers was about 600,000, and the receipts of fare' 
something above $52,000. In the year ending the 1st 
January, 1837, the amount of fare w^as $54,000. 

When the route shall be extended through the tunnel' 
over the beautiful embankment and bridge constructed tO' 
Harlaem, the number of passengers will, probably, greatly 
increase. 

The tunnel commences at the southerly side of Ninety- 
first-sireet, and terminates at the northerly side of Ninety- 
fourth-street, and will be, when completed, 844 feet in 
length, 24 feet wide, and 21 feet high in the centre. Each 
end of the tunnel will be finished with a handsome stone 
facing, so as to give it a conspicuous and pleasing appear- 



SUPPLY OF WATER, 15 



ance. The embankment commences at One hundredth- 
street, and extends to One hundred and sixth-street. 
This will be a most substantial work, as the whole will be 
supported by slope walls of dry masonry. At the crossing 
of the streets there are handsome arched carriage-ways, 
supported by stone pillars. At the northern termination 
of the embankment, the bridge commences, extending 
from One hundred and sixth-street to One hundred and 
eighth-street. 

This tunnel is said to be as spacious as any other exca- 
vation of solid rock made in modern times, not excepting 
the excavation of the Simplon, made under the Emperor 
Napoleon ; and the approach to it at both ends through a 
rock, 52 feet in depth, is an object not less interesting 
than the tunnel itself. 

There is scarcely to be found a more beautiful and 
picturesque scenery in any part of the world, than the 
view Hell Gate and its neighbourhood presents, in riding 
over the bridge and embankment north of the tunnel, at an 
elevation of thirty feet above the level of the avenue. 

It is expected that this road will be travelled by the cars 
to Harlsem sometime in the month of July, 1837. 

Passengers' Ticket Offices, at No. 241, Bowery; and at 
the corner of Eighty-sixth-street and Fourth Avenue. 

SUPPLY OF WATER. 

The City is destitute of a supply of good and whole- 
some water, and various plans have been proposed, at 
different times, for obtaining an adequate quantity of an 
element so essential to the health, convenience, and com- 
fort of the citizens. The Bronx and Croton rivers have 
been suggested as sources of supply ; also the Passaic, at 
Paterson, New Jersey. The quantity of water required 
for the supply of the City, is estimated at over four mil- 
lions of gallons per day, or 20 gallons for each person, in- 
cluding manufactories, stables, &c. At an early period 
of the history of the City, it was found that the well water 
was deteriorating in goodness. The fact is noticed in an 
able report made by Mr. Weston in 1799. There are nu- 
merous wells, with pumps in all parts of the City ; but the 
pump water is generally considered bad and deleterious in 
its character, south of a line from the Hudson River 
through Spring-street, to the Bowery and Third Avenue, 



16 ST-prLV UK WATER. 



and thence to Thirteenth-street and the East River. In 
the remaining parts of the City, it is generally indif- 
ferently good ; but it is also annually losing its purity. 

For washing, rain water is generally used by the citi- 
zens, most of the houses being provided with good cis- 
terns. Many parts of the City are now supplied with 
water, for the table, brought from the upper wards in 
casks. On the East and North Rivers, in some instances, 
it is pure, and in others its goodness is but little better than, 
the present well water. The tables of the wealthy are 
supplied from this source, while the poorer classes have 
to resort to such wells and pumps as are in their neigh- 
bourhood. It has bsen ascertained that there are now 
brought to the City daily Ijy drays or water carts, 600 
hogsheads, for which there is paid one dollar and twenty- 
iive cents for each hogshead, (or about one cent per 
gallon, amounting to S750 per day, or $273,750 per annum, 
for water from that source. The sum paid for water is 
annually increasing, owing to wells and springs con- 
stantly losing their purity. Many of the large hotels pay 
from S200 to 450, annually, for water, and the smaller 
classes of boarding and private houses pay from S 15 to 
$50, annually, for the same. 

The shipping in the port are principally supplied with 
water from Brooklyn, Long Island, and a small quantity 
from New-Jersey and Staten Island. The supply re- 
quired for the shipping is estimated, from careful in- 
quiries, to amount to 415 hogsheads per day, or 129,850 
hhds. per year, (8,183,895 gallons,) which at 31 and 50 
cents per hogsheads, is S160 per day, or ^50,080 paid per 
year. 

MANHATTAN WATER WORKS. 

In 1790 the Manhattan Company was incorporated, 
with a view to supply the City with pure and wholesome 
water. The charter is perpetual, and the capital over 
two millions of dollars, (see page 98,) the surplus funds 
being employed in banking. 

CITY RESERVOIR. 

The Corporation of the City, in order to provide a 
supply of water for a part of the City, for the extinguish- 
ment of fires, have recently caused the construction of an 



supr-iiY or WATER. r 



extensive reservoir, Avhich is situated in Thirteenth- 
street, near the Bowery. 

The diameter of the well, from which the water is pro- 
cured, is 16 feet, its depth is 112 feet, 97 of which are 
excavated in solid rock ; its bottom is 62 feet below com- 
mon high tide. On the east side, and within 12 feet of 
the bottom of the well, there is a horizontal passage, 4 
feet by 6, extending into the rock T5 feet ; and on the west 
side, a similar passage, 75 feet long, with a branch 25 
feet. The object of these excavations is to increase the 
<|uantity of water, which rises in the well to within 12 
foot of the surface of the ground, and the whole contains 
175,170 gallons. 

From the well, the water is raised by a steam engine 
of 12 horse power, into an iron tank in a building of an 
octagonal form. The bottom of the tank is 83i feet 
■above tide. It is 44 feet in diameter, 20^ feet high, and 
will contain 233,169 gallons. From the tank the water is 
conducted into the mains by curved pipes, of 20 inches 
diameter. The total cost of the works, exclusive of 
pipes, was $^42,238 ; and the annual expense is $3,165. 
From the reservoir, iron pipes, from 6 to 12 inches in 
■diameter, have been laid down through many of the 
principal streets, to the extent of over 9 miles, or 47,066 
feet, at an average expense of about two dollars per foot. 
(The cost of one mile mile of pipe, of 12 inches diameter, 
is SI 1,245.) 

By an experiment which has been made, it is ascer- 
tained that water from the City Reservoir can be thrown 
from the fire plugs over the houses in any of the lower 
.parts of the City, or south of the reservoir, or in its vi- 
cinity. 

PROPOSED SUPPLY OF WATER FROM THE CROTON RIVER. 

Surveys of routes and estimates of the expense of 
bringing water to the City from the Croton River has 
been made by order of the Corporation, An Act passed 
the Legislature of the State, May 2, 1834, " to provide for 
supplying the City of New- York with pure and whole- 
some water," by which the Governor and Senate were 
authorized to appoint five citizens, to be called " Water 
Commissioners," who were to examine and consider all 
matters relating to the subject, causing surveys to be 

• 2* 



18 CEMETERIES AND MONUMENTS, 



made, and adopting such plans as they might deem most 
advantageous. The said Commissioners have reported 
in favour of obtaining water from the Croton River, 
which has been approved of by the Common Council, 
and submitted to the voters of the City at the Charter 
election in 1835 ; 17,330 voted " yes," and 5,963 '= no," 
leaving a majority of 11,307 in favour of supplying the 
City, as proposed, with '' pure and wholesome water." 

The stream which can be brought to the City in an 
aqeduct is estimated to aftbrd a daily supply of 32 millions 
of gallons. The present demand of the City is probably 
not^more than ten millions. The total length of the 
aqueduct, which it is proposed to construct of mason work, 
will be about 45 miles, and the estimated expense (ex- 
clusive of pipes in the City) is about live millions of 
dollars. 

CEMETERIES AND MONUMENTS. 

In 1823, a law was passed to prevent interments south 
of Grand-street, and a penalty of ^250 fixed for each vio- 
lation of the same. 

Many of the churches have burying grounds and vaults 
in the upper part of the City, belonging to congregations 
of different denominations. An extensive cemetery has 
been laid out on the Fifth Avenue, near the three mile 
stone, containing ten acres of ground. Occasional inter- 
ments take place in the vaults belonging to families at- 
tached to churches in the lower part of the City, the 
friends of the deceased paying the penalty of S25fl. 

Among the numerous monuments in churches and 
churchyards, we may name the following: The monu- 
ment to Bishop Hobart, in Trinity Church ; to Thomas 
Addis Emmet, (an obelisk 30 feet high) in St. Paul's 
Churchyard, where are also the monuments to Major 
General Montgomery, and George Frederick Cooke, the 
celebrated tragedian. In Trinity Churchyard is the 
monument to Captain James Lawrence, who fell in the 
contest between the U. S. frigate Chesapeake and the 
British frigate Shannon, during the last war. 



Manufacturers. 19 



MAY DAY, &C. 

The usual time for moving established by general 
custom in the City of New- York, is on the first of May. 
Tenants who intend vacating their premises are required 
to give the landlords notice the preceding quarter day, 
the first of February ; then houses are engaged for the 
ensuing year, to be taken possession of the first of May ; 
rent generally payable quarterly. To such an extent 
does this custom extend as to be a great evil, May- 
Day being proverbial for confusion, amounting to partial 
suspension of business. If tenants would insist upon 
leases for a number of years, the evil, in a measure, 
would be remedied. 

Housekeepers are required by the laws of the Corpo- 
ration to abate all nuisances about their premises ; coal, 
ashes, and dirt of every description is required to be 
given to cartmen employed by the City authorities ; 
chimneys are required to be swept every month, or else 
subject the occupant to fine in case of their taking fire ; 
side-walks must be kept clean and unobstructed. Sca- 
vengers and chimney-sweepers are all licensed by the 
Corporation, and have regular rates of charging esta- 
blished by law. 

MANUFACTURES, 

IN THE CITY OF NEW-YORK, ACCORBING TO THE CENSUS OF 1835- 

Raw Materials. Manufact. Articles. 

10 Breweries, 152,475 326,505 

5 Cotton Factories,.. 202,800 271,600 
9 Distilleries, 532,527 659,067 

4 Glass Factories,... 32,000 146,100 
2 Grist Mills, 108,000 130,000 

14 Iron Works, 316,250 722,050 

1 Paper Mill, 8,000 16,000 

10 Rope Walks, 58,845 99,555 

6 Saw Mills, 311,860 418,210 

5 Tanneries, 23,855 55,260 

1 Trip Hammer,.... 17,000 21,000 

1 Woollen Factory,. 15,000 23,000 



20 RECENT IMPIIOVEMENTS. 



RECENT I.-VSPaOVEMENTS. 

The number oibuildinsfs of all descriptions erected in 
the Cily of New-York, durin;^ the year 1835, was twelve 
hundred and fifty-nine ; of which 100 were in the first 
ward; G8 in the second; 55 in the third; 18 in the 
fourth; 12 in the fifth; 10 in the sixth; 80 in the 
seventh; 38 in the eighth; 105 in the ninth; 2^ in the 
tenth; 249 in the eleventh ; 274 in the twelfth ; 44 in the 
thirteenth ; 35 in the fourteenth ; 137 in the fifteenth. 
Total 1259. 

The number erected in 183G was sixteen hundred and 
twenty-one, of which 609 were in the first ward; 102 in 
the second ; 22 in the third ; 24 in the fourth ; 25 in the 
fifth ; 9 in the sixth ; 81 in the seventh ; 26 in the eighth ; 
85 in the ninth ; 44 in the tenth ; 150 in the eleventh ; 
110 in the twelfth; 43 in the thirleenth ; 34 in the four- 
teenth; 140 in the fifteenth; 116 in the sixteenth. 
Total 1,621. 

Of which 114 of the above buildings are two story brick 
dwellings ; 349 three-story do. ; 34 four-story do. ; 27 
brick and wood two-story do. ; 115 wood two-story do.; 
26 two-story brick stores ; 75 three-story do. ; 470 four 
story do.; 132 five-story do.; 11 six-story do.; 4 stone 
churches, and five brick churches. The remaining 
buildings of difierent descriptions. 

The above does not include many buildings now in 
progress, embracing only those which were c ^mmenced 
previous to the 12th September, 1836. 

STREETS. 

Several streets have been widened and materially im- 
proved in appearance during the past year. Beaver- 
street has been extended through the Burnt Distrid,, in- 
tersecting Pearl at the corner of Wall-street ; Mill-street 
has been connected with William-street in the same 
neighbourhood, and it is proposed to change the name of 
Mill to South WlUiavi. Platt-street has been extended 
from Gold-street to William. Fulton-street has been 
widened on the south side between Broadway and Gold- 
street. Gold-street has been widened between Fulton 
and Frankfort streets. Spruce-street has been widened 
from Gold-street to Nassau. Chapel-street has been 
widened between Murray and Franklin streets, and it is 
proposed to change its name to Went Brfladvay. 



RECENT I^IPROVEMENTS. 



NEW-YORK UNIVERSITY, 

Situatedbetween Washington Place andWaverly Place, 
fronts Washington Square towards the west, forming a 
noble ornament to the city, being built of marble, and 
exhibits a specimen of the English collegiate style of ar- 
chitecture. (^See Frontispiece.): 

This building has just been completed, after a labor of 
several years; it is one hundred feet wide, and one hun- 
dred and eighty feet long. In front this oblong is di- 
vided into five parts — a central building, with wings 
flanked by towers, one rising on each of the four corners 
of the edifice. This central building or Chapel is supe- 
rior to the rest in breadth, height, and character ; and 
is somewhat similar to that of King's College, Cam;- 
bridge, England ; a masterpiece of pointed architecture, 
and the model for succeeding ages. It is fifty-five feet 
broad, and eighty-five feet deep,, including the octangular 
turrets, one of which rises at each of the four corners. 
The two ends are gabled, and are, as well as the sides, 
crowned with an embattled parapet. The Chapel will 
receive its principal light from a window in the western 
end. This window is twenty-four feet wide, and fifty 
high. It has eight lights and two embattled transoms. 
The heads of the lights are cinque-foiled in a plain arch, 
and the divisions above are quatre-foiled. Over the 
head of the window is a drip-stone, with plain returns. 
From the central building, or Chapel, wings project right 
and left, and are four stories in height, flanked by towers 
of five, supported by angular buttresses of two stages, 
running above an embattled parapet, and are at the top 
themselves embattled. The windows in the wings have 
square heads, with two lights, a plain transom, and the 
upper division tre-foiled. The heads of the windows 
are labelled, and have plain returns. The lower range 
of windows is set on a tablet, which serves as a base, and 
the two ranges above are set on strings, which return 
around the turrets, and stop against the buttresses. The 
.principal entrance is under the great western window, 
through a richly moulded and deeply recessed portal, 
.flanked by butresses of two stages, the upper stage set di- 
agonally, and rising above an embattled parapet. The 
doors are of oak, richly panneled, and filled with tracery 
of openwork, closely studded with bronze. 



23 RECENT IMPROVEMENTS. 



THE BURNT DISTRICT. 

In the First Ward, bounded by Wall-street, the East 
River, Coenties-slip, and thence in an irregular line to 
the corner of William and Wall streets, embraces all the 
ground burnt over during the great conflagration of 
Dec. IG and 17, 1835, when about five hundred stores and 
dwelling-houses were dcstroved, many of them of the first 
class of buildings. Tlie public buildings destroyed 
were the Merchants' Exchange and the South Dutch 
Church ; the other buildings consumed were principally 
wholesale stores, which contained an immense amount 
of merchandise, most of which was burnt, amounting in 
all, including the buildings, to about eighteen millions 
of dollars. 

This ground is now nearly all rebuilt on, most of the 
stores being occupied, many of wliich are entirely fire- 
.proof, constructed in the most durable manner, princi- 
pally of brick. 

UNFINISHED EDIFICES, 



w erecting in part on the site of the Exchange 
ling, which was destroyed by fire Dec. 17, 1835, 



THE MERCH.\NTS' EXCHANGE, 

Now 
Buildi ^, . , 

embraces all the ground between Wall, William, Ex- 
change-place, and Hanover-streets, covering the entire 
block. 

The building, when finished, will be of the Grecian 
Ionic style of architecture, the exterior of which will be 
constructed of blue Gluincy granite, in the most chaste 
and durable manner, three stories high, besides the base- 
ment. In front, on Wall-street, will be a recessed por- 
tico, with 18 massive columns, 38 feet in height. 

The interior will be fitted up for a public Exchange 
Room, which will be 80 feet in diameter, having four 
recesses, making an extent of 100 feet in depth and 
breadth ; the room is to be 80 feet in height, surmounted 
by a dome resting, in part, on eight Corinthian columns 
of white marble, 41 feet high, and lighted by a skylight 
25 feet in diameter. There will also be rooms for the 
accommodation of public and private offices; the whole 
to be constructed so as to be entirely fire-proof, under the 
superintendence of Mr. Isaiah Rogers, the architect of 
the building. 



RECENT IMPROVEMENTS. 23 



CUSTOM HOUSE, 

A new Custom House is now erecting on the site of the 
old one, at the corner of Wall and Nassau streets, ex- 
tending to Pine-street. The following is a description of 
the contemplated building. 

The building is to be 177 feet long, and 89 feet wide; 
and the form and order of the building to be similar to 
that of the Parthenon at Athens. It is to stand on a base- 
ment story, ascended by nineteen steps from Wall -street, 
and six steps on Pine-street. There are to be eight Gre- 
cian doric columns at each front, and fifteen columns and 
antffi on each side attached to the walls. There is also 
to be a second row of six smaller columns back of and 
parallel with those of the main front, leaving a space of 
ten feet between the two rows, and nine feet between the 
inner row and the front wall of the building. Back of 
the two extreme columns of the inner row there are to be 
two antes, and six antge attached to the walls of the rear 
front, leaving a space of eight feet and a half between the 
columns and antse. There will thus be twenty-four out- 
side columns, five feet eight inches diameter at the bottom, 
and thirty-two feet high, including the capital, and eigh- 
teen antge on the two sides of the same height, five feet 
wide, and three feet nine inches projection from the walls. 
The six inner columns of the main front will be four feet 
-eight inches diameter at bottom, and the antae to corres- 
pond. The building is to be two stories high, except the 
great business hall, part of which is to be vaulted as high 
as the roof will permit, and its centre finished with a 
dome sixty-two feet in diameter. This hall will occupy 
the centre of the building, and will be one hundred and 
fifteen feet long, leaving a small vestibule at each end to 
enter from. It is to be seventy-seven feet wide in the 
centre part, which is a circle of seventy feet in diameter, 
with the length and breadth of the room extending be- 
yond its circumference to these dimensions ; and the four 
parts so extended beyond the circle are thirty-three and a 
half feet wide, leaving six rooms and three circular stair- 
cases in the four corners, the two largest rooms to be 
twenty-four by twenty-one feet each, besides a square 



04 nrxEXT improvements. 



staircase in the rear, and three vaults for papers at the j 
two ends of each vestibule. The same division of the 
room is made in the second story. Nearly the same num- 
ber, shape, and sizes of rooms are had in the basement, 
as above in the other stories, leaving all the area of the 
same shape and size as the great hafl immediately about 
it ; with the addition of sixteen tinted doric columns to 
support the vaulting and the pavement under the dome of 
the great hall. 

HALLS OF JUSTICE. 

This edifice is now in progress of erection, and nearly 
completed, on an extensive scale, occupying the whole 
of the block bounded by Leonard, Elm, Franklin, and 
Centre streets, (formerly the Corporation Yard,) and is 
253 feet 3 inches in length, by 200 feet 5 inches in width. 

The interior combines accommodations for the Courts 
of Sessions, Police, Grand Jury, House of Detention, Re- 
cords, City Watch, District Attorney, Sheriff, Clerk of 
the Court, and other officers belonging to the different 
branches of the Institution, together with the necessary 
offices for cooking, washing, watering, warming, &c. 
The whole designed by Mr. John Haviland. 

The four Facades, as well as the entrance hall, are 
executed in the Egyptian stjie of architecture, with Hal- 
lowell granite. 

The principal front has a distyle portico of four co- 
lumns, with palm-leaved capitals. Above the capitals 
are square dies, upon which rests the architrave, orna- 
mented with a large winged globe encircled by serpents. 
The architrave is surmounted by a cornice, composed of 
a bold Scotia, enriched with reeded Triglyphs and a 
banded Torus ; and which, being of the same height 
with that of the similarly embellished wings, forms with 
them one continued line. Moreover, the banded mould- 
ing of the cornice descends in the form of a roller on all 
the external angles of the edifice. Both the wings are 
perforated with five lofty windows, extending the height 
of two stories, and finished with diminished pilasters, 
which support a cornice over each, composed simply of 
a bold Scotia, enriched with a winged globe and serpents. 
The lateral fronts on Leonard and Franklin streets 
have each two projecting Pylones or Porches, with two 



RBCENT IMPROVEMENTS^ 25 

columns : the one on Leonard-street adjoining the prin- 
cipal front, is the entrance to the Debtors' ward, and the 
opposite one on Franklin-street is the entrance to the 
Police ward 5 the other two corresponding porches next 
to Elm-street, form the carriage entrances to the House of 
Detention. These porches are 54 feet wide, and their 
columns and entablatures correspond with those of the 
principal front, but the caps and shafts of the columns are 
less enriched. The recess in both these lateral fronts is 
six feet, and is relieved by five windows corresponding 
in character with those of the principal front, but of less 
proportion and enrichment, the Scotia being finished with 
reeded Triglyphs only, instead of (he winged globe and 
serpents. The approach to the windows on these fronts 
is guarded against by a neat railing in keeping with the 
architecture. The rear or front on Elm-street having no 
entrance or windows, is simply relieved by seven narrow 
recesses in imitation of embrasures, and a railing in the 
same style as those on the lateral fronts. 

A terrace surrounds the whole inclosure, raised ten 
feet above the level of Centre-street, from which you 
ascend eight steps of a truncated and pyramidal form, to 
the platform of the portico, from which you ascend also 
twelve steps, between the intercolumniation of the rear 
columns to the entrance hall. This hall is 50 feet square 
and 25 feet high) supported by eight columns, ranged be- 
tween two rows with their antae placed on the opposite 
walls. These columns bear the character or an order 
taken from the colonnade of the temple of Medynet 
Abou. Attached to the antes opposite these columns, 
the architect originally designed to place the Egyptian 
caviatides, so highly spoken of by the French artists in 
Napoleon's great work on Egypt, published by Pauc- 
konche ; and he feels assured that the Board will yet be 
of his opinion, and finally adopt these splendid and im- 
posing figures in this entrance hall, as nothing else will 
be wanting to perfect the edifice ; their capitals are orna- 
mented with the leaves and flowers of the Lotus. The 
floors are arched and laid in mosaic of an Egyptian 
character, governed in form by the compartments in the 
ceiling to which each belongs. 

The principal courts, jury, witness, and Other business 
rooms, are connected with, and leading into the entrance 

3 



26 RKCENT IMPROVEMENTS. 

hall. On the left side are doors and passages commu- 
nicating with the grand jury room, offices lor register, 
clerk of the court, district attorney, and sheriff, debtors' 
ward and witness rooms ; and on the right side are dis- 
posed the magistrates' offices, court, and witness rooms, 
watchmen's dormitories, police court, officers' rooms, 
and cells for nightly commitments. The centre leads to 
the court of sessions, (including two jury rooms, and se- 
parate gallery capable of containing an audience ol 300 
persons;) the whole well ventilated and lighted, and in a 
situation the least liable to be disturbed by the noise of 
the adjoining sti-eets. 

The Court of Sessions is connected with the House of 
Detention, and has external galleries of communication 
with every part of the building, independent of the public 
thoroughfares. 

The House of Detention is a distinct and isolated build- 
ing, 142 feet in length by 45 in width. It contains 148 
cells, divided into four distinct classes for prisoners, in- 
cluding baths, and rooms for male and female, white and 
black, vagrants. The lower cells are 6 feet 9 inches 
wide, 11 feet high, and 15 feet long, diminishing 18 
inches in length in each story ; they are provided with 
cast iron water closets, hydrant, water cock, ventilators, 
and are warmed by Perkins' hot water pipes, (introduced 
and now in successful operation in the new Peniten- 
tiaries at Philadelphia and Trenton, by J. Haviland, ar- 
chitect.) The floors, and ceilings, and galleries are 
formed of slabs from the North River flagging ; the doors 
and window jambs of iron ; and the entire cells are other- 
wise finished on the most approved plan for security, se- 
clusion, ventilation, economy of supervision and watch- 
ing. The corridors are ten feet wide below, and widen 
at each story to 19 feet at the summit, affording a free 
ventilation and uninterrupted view of every cell door, 
from the observatory. A bridge leads across from the 
House of Detention to the prisoners' seat in the court- 
house. By reference to the specifications and drawings, 
it will be seen that every part of the building is calcu- 
lated to be executed in the most substantial and approved 
manner, with the best materials of their kind ; and that 
no pains or expense is spared to effect all the desired ob- 



RECENT IMPROVEMENTS. 27 



jects of the Instiiudon, with the aid, experience, and best 
talent that the country affords. 

The building is generally fire proof by ceilings and 
floors of arched masonry. 

The site on which the building is erecting, is formed 
of made ground, every precaution having been used to 
render the foundation secure by the introduction of iron 
ties, inverted arches, and heavy timbering. The whole 
area was excavated several feet below the water level, 
large timbers were placed together, and range timbers at 
right angles with these.laid several feet wider than the 
respective walls. 

Lastly, the whole superstructure to the roof has been 
erected during the past season, affording it sufficient 
time to come to its proper bearing. The several stories 
of the House of Detention with -their weighty stone 
floors, have been completed some time, without showing 
any appearance of cracks or partial settlement. 

BROOKLYN CITY-HALL, 

Now erecting, is situated at the intersection of Fulton, 
Court, and Joralemon streets, occupying an entire block, 
forming a scalene triangle of 269 feet on Fulton-street, 
250 on Court-street, and 222 on Joralemon-street. The 
exterior of the building is to be constructed of marble, 
and to have porticoes on the three fronts, with columns 
3G feet 6 inches high, ornamented with capitals of the 
Grecian order, from the design of the Toiver of the Winds, 
resting on a pedestal base, 17 feet high, which when 
finished, will be 62 feet from the ground to the top of the 
cornice. The angles are to be surmounted by domes, 
and rising from the centre of the building, will be a 
tower 125 feet high, which will be enriched with a cor- 
nice and entablature, supported with coryatides standing 
on pedestals. The whole will have a most splendid and 
imposing appearance, when finished. 

The interior will be finished in the most chaste and 
durable style of architecture, calculated to accommodate 
the different public offices, courts, &c., attached to the 
City of Brooklyn. The whole arrangement is under the 
direction and superintendence of Mr. C. Pollard, the 
architect of the building. 



08 



CITY OFFICERS. 



MAYORS OP THE CITY OP NEAV-YORK. 

The first Mayor of the City was Thomas Willett, who 
was chosen in the year 1665, and continued until the 
year 1674. His successors were chosen as follows : 



1674. Nicholas De Myer, 

1675. William Duval, 

1677. S. Van Cortlandt, 

1678. Thomas Delaval, 

1679. Francis Romcolt, 

1680. William Beekman, 
1682. Stenwick, 

1687. Nicholas Bayard, 

1688. S. Van Cortlandt, 

1689. P. D. Leroy, 

1691. John Lawrence, 

1692. Abraham Depeyster, 
1694. Charles Lodwick, 

1699. David Provost, 

1700. Isaac D. Dromer, 

1701. Thomas Hood, 

1702. Philip French, 

1703. William Basbroo, 
1707. Ebenezer Wilson, 
1710. Jac. Van Cortlandt, 
1720. Robert Walton, 

1724. Francis Harrison, 

1725. Johannes Jansen, 

1726. Robert Lorting, 
1735. Paul Richards. 
1737. Daniel Horsmanden, 



1739. John Cruger, 
1744. Stephen Bayard, 
1747. Edward Holland, 
1756. John Cruger, 
1766. Whitehead Hicks, 
1777. David Mathews, 
1784. James Duane, 
1789. Richard Varick, 
1801. Edward Livingston, 
1803. De Witt Clinton, 

1807. Marinus Willett, 

1808. De Witt Clinton, 

1810. Jacob Radcliflf, 

1811. De Witt Clinton, 
1815. Jacob Radcliff, 

1817. John Ferguson, 

1818. Cadw'd. D. Colden, 
1821. Stephen Allen, 
1824. William Paulding, 

1826. Philip Hone, 

1827. William Paulding, 
1829. Walter Bowne, 

1833. Gideon Lee, 

1834. C. W. Lawrence. 
1837. Aaron Clark. 



CHARTER OFFICERS. 
Aaron Clark, Mayor . . . Salary, $3,000. 
Richard Riker, Recorder . . Fees. 

Common Council. 



Wards. Board of Aldermen. 

1. Matthew C. Paterson, 

2. Edward Taylor, 

3. Egbert Benson, 

4. David Randell, 



Board of Assistants. 
Calvin Balis, 
Caleb C. Woodhull, 
Ellis Potter, 
William Hall, 



CITY OFFICERS, 



29 



5. 

G. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 



Robert Smith, 
Thomas S. Brady, 
Joseph Hoxie, 
Charles Deforest, 
John V. Greenfield, 
Richard J. Smith, 
Nehemiah Waterbury, 
Daniel P. Ingraham, 
Isaac B. Merritt, 
Isaac P. Whitehead, 
George W. Bruen. 
Isaac L. Varian, 
Jacob Acker, 



Murray Hoffman, 
John Foote, 
Morris Framklin, 
Joseph N. Barnes, 
Jacob Westervelt, 
Philip Snedecor, 
John Miller, 
A. V. Williams, 
Abraham Tappan, 
Joseph R. Taylor, 
William F. Hyde, 
William W. Holley, 
Orville I. Nash. 



Assessors. 



John Simonson, 
Elam Williams, 
Abraham Beecker, 
Ralph Hall, 
Richard TenEyck, 
Shivers Parker, 
Thomas Truslow, 
Smith Bloomfield, 
Anthony A, Jacobus. 
Andrew Birdsall, 
Edward Penny, jr. 
William Burnham. 
Obadiah Newcomb, jr. 
Jesse Oakley, 
Benjamin Harker, 
Benjamin Petit, 
John B. Hawkins, 



William H. Walsh, 
Samuel Gilford; jun. 
Philip Pietch, 
William A. Mercein, j 
James A. Rich, 
Robert Grimes, 
James Brooks, 
Sylvanus Gedney, 
Orsen H. Sims, 
John Remick, 
Charles Overton, 
Isaac Piatt. 
Eleazor L. Cook, 
William M. Mailler, 
Thomas H. Merry, 
John Steuart, 
Isaac Walton. 



1. Oliver Cobb, 

2. Edward T. Backhouse, 

3. Gerret Forbes, 

4. Harman King, 

5. Elijah F. Horton, 

6. Martin Waters, 

7. William A. Haggerty, 

8. Bart'w. W. Thatcher, 

9. Edward N. Mundy, 



Collectors. 
10. 



11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 



Richard T. Bush, 
John Bennett, 
John G. Kip, 
John F. Russell, 
Charles Osborn, 
Joseph Britton, 
Samuel Beilby, 
C.Van Benschoten, 



30 CITY OPriCBRS. 



Constables.. 

1. Jeffrey Reeve, Jacob Dreisback, 

2. James A. Pearsall, John Wintringham, 

3. Cornelius Allison, Tobias Boudinot, 

4. Charles W. Riddell, Alexander Jackson, 

5. Samuel Westcott, Theodore Mercer, 

6. Philander Fisk, Francis E. Powers, 

7. Christopher Merkle, Henry H. Burgess, 

8. Jesse Gaunt, Solomon Rice, 

9. James W. Allen, Benjamin D. Wisner, 

10. Matthew Rice, John C. Cunningham, 

11. Abraham Hyatt, William Ivans, 
13. Isaac W. Hadley, James Somerdyke, 

13. Beach Curtis, Henry B. Shaphoff, 

14. Leonard Curtis, William Angus, 

15. Geo. H. Willers, James Horton, jun. 

16. Trueman B. Hebbard, William C. Johnson, 
11. Francis Thomas, William P. Slasson. 

COUNTY OFFICERS. 

James Hillyer, Sheriff. Office, No. 21 City Hall. 
James M. Lownds, Under Sheriffs do. do. 
James G. Gulick, Register^ Nos. 1 and 2 Hall of 
Records. 
Thomas Jeremiah, Clerk, No. 20 City Hall. 
Andrew Warner, Deputy Clerk, do. do. 
Jefferson Brown, Coroner, Lower Police. 

OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE COMMON 
COUNCIL. 

Salary. 

Thomas Bolton, Clerk of Common Council S2,00O 

David T. Valentine, Assistant Clerk of C, C 1,800 

Jacob Hays, Sergeant at Arms 500 

John Newhouse, Clerk of Board of Assistants. .... 1,400 
M. M. Davidson, Assist. Clerk of Board of Assistants 200 

John W. Van Nuyse, Sergeant at Arms 800 

John Ahem, Mayor's Clerk 1 ,500 

D. D. Williamson, Comptroller 2,500 

William Thompson, Deputy Comptroller 1,500 

Chamberlain 500 



CITV' OFnCERS, SI 



John Caldwell, Collector of Arrears of Taxes, 

15 per cent. Commission. 

Nathaniel B. Blunt, Corporation Attorney fees. 

Robert Emmet, Counsel fees. 

Harris Scovill, Public Adviinistrator 1,250 

John Ewen, jun,. Street Commissioner 3,000 

Jacob S. Warner, Assistant Street Commissioner . . 1,500 

M. L. Gaines, \st Clerk to Street Commissioner 1,000 

John Secor, '2d Clerk to Street Commissioner 750 

Jefferson Berrian, Superintemient of Streets 1,500 

James Barr, jun,, Superintendent of Wharves 1,000 

John Butler, Inspector of Stages 750 

T. J, Hall, Superintendent of Hackney Coaches .... 800 

Henry G. Dunnel, City Inspector 1,000 

Georg>g Lyde, and Samuel A. Vanderlip, Assist- 
ant City Inspectors 1 ,000 

Benjamin G. Wells, Superintendent of Buildings, . 1,200 

Alexander Edgar, Collector of City Revenue . . 1,500 

Cornelius V. Anderson, Chief Engineer 1,000 

William G, Henshaw, Water Purveyor 1,000 

James H. Kipp, Ballast Master fees, 

B. Davidson, Regulator of Public Clocks 200 

Amos Belden, Sealer of Weights and Measures. ... fees. 

James Duff, Do. Do fees. 

Lloyd Bryant, Register of Dogs fees. 

"Cornelius Schuyler, Keeper of Potter's Field 821 

Abraham B. Martling, Keeper of City Hall 400 

George W. Skellorn, Deputy of Do 1 ,000 

John P, Whitman, Keeper of the Park per day SI 50c 

John W. Whitney, Keeper of the Battery. . . .do.. . 1 50c 

Benjamin Ogden, M.D., Resident Physician 1,500 

Linus W, Stevens, Superintendent of the Alms 

House 1^600 

Philip W. Engs, Peter Palmer, Zebedee Ring, Wm. 
A. Tomlinson, and James H. Braine, Commis- 
sioners of the Alms House. 

Henry B. Bolster, Superintendent of Paving 1,250 

Sydenham T. Smith, Clerk of Corporation Yard. . '500 

Caleb M. Angevine, Assistant Inspector of Stages. . 500 

David Falconer, Superintendent of Lam,ps and Gas 1,500 

John L. Earle, Inspector of Weights and Measures, fees. 

Francis D. Esquiroll, Do. Do. ... fees. 



32 CITY 0FPICRR3. 



Joseph Smith, William R. Lowery, and Cornelius 

S. Van Winkle, Collectors of Assessments fees. 

L. B. Chapin, Clerk to Superintendent of Streets. . . 500 

Samuel D. Jackson, Clerk in Comptroller's Office. . 1,000 

James Cog^eshell, Keeper of Bridewell 1,000 

Jeremiah Vanderbilt, Keeper of BlackwelVs Island 1,000 

William Palmer, Clerk at Bellevue 750 

C. R. Gillman, M.D., Physician to City Prison 400 

Ezekiel Maynard, Superintendent of Roads 1,000 

W. B. Townsend, Printer to the Board of Aldermen. 

STREET INSPECTORS. 
(Salary, $2 50 each per day.) 



Wards. 

10. Charles Hunter, 

11. Arch. M' Donald, 

12. Richard Crawford, 

13. Abraham Pierce, 

14. John Colvin, 

15. Philip Becannan, 

16. Cornelius R. Hebbard, 

17. Benjamin Hicks. 



Wards. 

1. James H. Kellum, 

2. John Hill, 

3. Barnard A, Mayavean, 

4. Minard S. Thresher, 

5. Charles M. Holmes, 

6. Daniel M'Grath, 

7. John J. Williamson, 

8. Andrew Blakely, 

9. J. Traphagen, 

OFFICERS ASSIGNED BY THE MAYOR TO ATTEND AT THE POLICE 
OFFICE, AND EXECUTE THE ORDERS OF THE RUGISTRATES, viZ. 

Jacob Hays, High Constable, S500. 

Zebulon Homan, Benjamin I. Hays, William F. Ste- 
venson, William H. Sparks, Henry W. Merritt, Ben- 
jamin F. Tompkins, John Dunshee, Percival Place, 
John S. Hardenbrook, Alexander M. C. Smith, Robert 
W. Bowyer, James H. Welch. David Waldron, Gilbert 
F. Hays, Jonathan Knapp, Ebenezer M. Peck. 

Upper Police.— T>im\e\ Rikcr, Thomas M. Tompkins, 
James King, Nathaniel Hepburn. 

MARSHALS. 

John Mount, First Marshal, $900. 

Criminal Process. 

Bllery A. Arnold, Robert W. Bowyer, Abial Surges, 

James R. Carter, Josiah L. Day, Thomas Doremus, 

Stephen W. Dusenbury, John Dunshee, James B. Ebbetts, 



CITY OFFICERS, 33 



Ezra Frost, George Goodwin, Benjamin J. Hays, Gilbert 
F. Hays, John C. Hill, Zebulon Homan, John L. Hyer, 
Nathaniel Hepburn, John S. Hardenbrook, Leonard 
Hoffman, Samuel Ingersol, Amos Janes, James H. 
Kellum, Jonathan Knapp, James King, John Lyon, 
Thomas M. Lyon, Henry W. Merritt, Percival Place, 
Ebenezer M. Peck, William Purdy, Daniel Riker, James 
Rile, Isaac A. Rose, William H. Sparks, William F, 
Stevenson, A. M. C. Smith, James S. Smith, Joseph G. 
Stanton, Francis F. Smith, Benjamin F. Tompkins, T. 
M. Tompkins, Francis Tillou, Evert S. Voorheis, A. M. 
Walsh, Samuel B. Warner, David Waldron, James 
H. Welch. 

Civil Process. 

George Anderson, David W. Anderson, Abraham 
Bensel, Ransom Beach, William Chapman, Paul M. 
Crandall, Nathan Dusenbury, Richard Ellis, Benjamin 
Ferris, James G, Finn, Ezra Frost, Azel Freeman, Henry 
Getchell, Jacob Hadley, John Hill, John S. Jenkins, 
Elisha Kingsland, James H. Kellum, Stephen M'Cormick, 
Thomas M'Cready, Abraham Maddan, Charles Missing, 
William R, Newton, Elisha Norcross, James Palmer, 
Thomas Pinder, John Rizley, James Rider, Abner San- 
ford, Philip M. Sairs, Henry Sickels, Joseph S. Simson, 
Solomon Seixas, Richard D. Simonson, Samuel Steven- 
son, George Scarff, James Shaw, George L Trask, 
Samuel Trenchard, M. S. Thresher, John W. Timson, 
Benjamin Vandervoorst, Michael R, Walsh, J. H. 
Welch, John Whitaker, James Woodruff. 

SHERIFFS. 

John Hillyer, Sheriff. 

James M. Lowndes, Under Sheriff. 

DEPUTY SHERIFFS. 



Isaac Kip, 

John J. V. Westervelt, 

William M. Summers/ 



Henry Ramsay, 
James Q.uackenbush, jr. 
Abraham T. Hillyer. 



Anthony B. Fountain, Jailer. 



34 



CrrV. OFFICERS. 



CITY" SURVEYORS. 

Joseph F. Bridges, E. W. Bridges, Edward Doughty, 
William B. Doughty, John Ewen, Daniel Ewen, Ros- 
well Graves, jun., A. M. Hoffman, Isaac T. Ludlam, 
Thomas R. Lndlam, Silas Ludlam, George B. Smith, 
Edwin Smith, Reuben Spencer, Wm. H. Sidell, Gardner 
A. Sage, George C. Schaeffer, William Dewey, F. P, 
Vidal, Samuel S, Doughty, John Serrell. 

COMMISSIONERS OF THE SCHOOL FUxVD. 



Wards. 

1. Cornelius Heeney, 

2. Samuel Gilford, jun. 

3. William A. Seeley, 

4. Samuel N. Dodge, 

5. Matthias B. Edgar, 

6. John Gray, 

7. Joseph Piggott, 

8. Cornelius Harsen, 



Wards. 
9. Levi Kidder, 
10. Peter S. Titus, 
IL William Thompson, 

12. A. Wagstaff, 

13. E. D. Comstock, 

14. Charles S. Du.senberry, 

15. W. P. Hallett. 



DEPUTY CLERKS OF MARKETS. 

Thomas J. Veldran, Washington Market. 

Samuel W. Anthony, Catharine Market. 

Daniel Baker, Fulton Market. 

John Fush, Centre Market. 

Lawrence Wiseburne, Clinton Market, 

Matthew Vogal, Gouverneur Market. 

George W. Peck, Franklin Market. 

William H. Simmons, Tompkins Market. 

John M. Sims, Greenwich Market. 

John Flume, Es^sex Market. 

James D, Champlin, Jefferson Market. 



HEALTH WARDENS. 



Georee Wetsel, 



Thomas Dilk.s, 
Hezekiah Williams, 
Henry R. Shanklin, 

6. John Mansfield, 

7. Ebenezer A. Parrott, 

8. Benjamin Stickney, 

9. Alexander M'Donald, 



10. Thomas Cooper, 

11. Obadiah Palmer, 

12. William Chapman, 

13. David Suffren, 

14. George J. Trass, 

15. Wm.^B. Walsh, 

16. Daniel B. Townsend, 

17. Luther A. Underwood. 



BROOKLYN CtTY OFFICERS. 35 



CITY OF BUOOIiLiYN. 

The City of Brooklyn is situated on the East River 
(736 yards wide,) directly opposite New-York, in King's 
County, on the extreme west end of Long Island ; and is 
the third place, in point of population in the State. 

The City is bounded north by the City and County of 
New-York ; east by the township of Bushwick ; south 
by the townships ofFlatbush and New Utrecht; and west 
by New- York Bay. 

The City is divided into nine wards, each ward elect- 
ing two Aldermen, besides Supervisors, Assessors, Col- 
lectors, Constables, and Overseers of the Poor. 

The election for Charter Officers is on the second 
Monday of April of every year. The Mayor is chosen 
by the Aldermen elect on the first Monday of Mav 
ensuing, for the term of one year. 

MAYORS OP THE CITY OF BROOKLYN. 

1834. George Hall. 

1835. Jonathan Trotter. 
1837. Jeremiah Johnson, 

CHARTER OFFICERS. 

Jeremiah Johnson, Mayor Salary SI, 000. 

Common Council. 

Samuel Smith, President of the Board. 

Aldermen. 
Wards. 

1. John Wright, jun. Fisher How, 

2. Richard V. W. Thorne, Jonathan Rogers, 

3. Charles E. Bulk ley, George Hall, 

4. Henry Russell, Moses Reeve, 

5. Ethan Estabrook, Joshua Rogers, 

6. Samuel Smith, James E. Underbill, 

7. Samuel Bouton, Jeremiah V. Spader, 

8. Martenus Bergen, Teunis S. Barkaloo, 

9. Moses Smith, Moses Suydam. 

Supervisors. 



Jeremiah Johnson, 
Peter Conover, 
William M. Udall, 



William H. Hale, 
John U. Manley, 
Martenus Bergen. 



36 



BROOKLYN CITT OmCERS/ 



Assessors^ 



Jeremiah Wells, 
Sylvanus White, 
John Dimon, 



Nathan Young, 
Theodoras Polhamiw 



Collectors. 



Samuel Doxsey, Gilbert C- BayKs, John Swertcope. 

Constables. 

6. Lodowick Welles, 

7. John Storms, 

8. Rillef Bennett, 

9. John Sxfrertcope. 



1. Piatt Powell. 

2. Gilbert C. Baylis, 

3. Sandford Allen, 

4. William Bennett, 

5. Charles W. Pitman, 



Overseers of the Poor. 
Andrew Demarest, Moses Smith, Daniel Wrigfet, 

OFnCERS APPOINTED BY THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Alfred G. Stevens, Clerk of Common Council, 

Henrj' C. Murphy, Attorney and Counsellor. 

John S. Doughty, Treasurer. 

Jacob Lozier, Street Commissioner. 

Smith Haynes, City Inspector. 

Samuel Vunck, City Collector. 

Dr. U. A. Garrison, Health Physician. 

John G. Pray, Inspector of Pavement. 

John F. L. Duflon, Chief Engineer. 

John Douglass, Printer to Common Council, 

Stephen J. Hendrickson, Inspector of Carts. 

John H. Jackson, Keeper of City Prison.. 



Marshals. 



S. Doxsey, First Marshal, 
Samuel Vunck, 
Ryke Reid, 
Peter V. Spader, 



Nicholas Cornelf^ 
Sandford Allen, 
Moses Montgomery. 



KING'S COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Nathan B. Morse, First Judge. 
John Van Dyne, Sheriff. 
Abraliam Vandeveer, Clerk. 
William Rockwell, District Attorney. 
William Jenkins, Coroner. 



COURTS. 37 

■^' 

COURTS. 

UNITED STATES DISTRICT AND CIRCUIT 

COURTS, FOR THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF THE STATE 
OF NEW-YORK. 

Smith Thompson, Circuit Judge, Office, City Hall.* 

Samuel R. Betts, District Judge, do. do. 

Frederick J. Betts, Clerk, do. do. 

William C. H. Waddell, Marshal, . . do. do. 

William M. Price, District Attorney, do. do. 

The Courts are held at the City Hall, in the City of 
New- York, as follows— 

Circuit Court. — Judges Thompson, (of the United 
States Supreme Court,) and Betts. Equity and Criminal 
Terms.— hast Monday in February and July. General 
Terms.— First Monday in April, and last Monday in Oc- 
tober. 

District Court.— Judge Betts. First Tuesday in every 
month. 

11:1= United States Commissioner's Office, to take affi- 
davits, bail, &c New City Hall. 

THE COURT OF ERRORS of the state of new-york. 

Composed of the Senate, the Chancellor, and Judges 
of the Supreme Court of the State, is held, generally, at 
Albany ; but sometimes, by adjournment, at the City 
Hall in this City, 

THE COURT OF CHANCERY,' 

Is held by the Chancellor, (Hon. R. H. Walworth, 
who resides at Saratoga,) as appointed by him, two 
stated terms in each year, at Albany ; and the same on 
the fourth Monday in May, and fourth Monday in Octo- 
ber, in this City, at the City Hal], Motion Days. — First 
and third Tuesdays of every month during the vacations, 
at the Capitol, in the City of Albany. 
John Walworth, Assistant Register, (in Chancery,) 

Office, No. 28 City Hall. 
Hiram V/alworth, Deputy do. do, do. do. 

* In the buil.ling commonly known n.s the New City Hall, formerly 
the Alms House. All the buildings in the Park, u&ecl lot the purpoot; oY 
Couiid, are, in law, designated " City Hall." 

4 



38 COURTS, 



■""^•w 



illiam T, M'Coun, Vice Chancellor for the First 

Circuit. 
John Walworth, Clerk. 
Charles Edwards, Reporter. 

Stated Terms. — First Mondays in January, April, July 
and October, at the City Hall. Motion Daijs. — Each 
Monday in Term, and the second and fourth Tuesdays, 
at the City Hall, in the City of New- York, after the ad- 
journment of the term. 

SUPREME COURT. 

Samuel Nelson, Chief Justice. Residence, Cooperstown. 
Greene C. Bronson, Justice. . . do. Albany. 
Esek Cowan, do. ... do. Saratoga. 

Wm. P. Hallett, Clerk for New- York, Office, City Hall. 
John Fairlie, Deputy Clerk. 

This Court sits alternately at Albany, New- York, and 
Utica. The May term is held at the City Hall, in New 
York, October and January terms at Albany. July 
term, Utica. 

CIRCUIT COURT. 

Ogden Edwards, Judge of the First Circuit. 

Terms. — Third Monday in March, fourth Monday in 
May, first Monday in July, first Monday in October, se- 
cond Monday in November, fourth Monday in January, 
at the City Hall, 

COURT OP OYER AND TERMINER, 

In the City and County of New- York, is held by one 
or more Justices of the Supreme Court, or of the Circuit 
Judges, or by the First Judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas of the County, together with the Mayor, Recorder, 
and Aldermen, or any two of them. 

Henry Meigs, Clerk. 

Henry Vandervoort. Deputy Clerk, 

SUPERIOR COURT, 

Samuel Jones, Chief Justice. 
Thomas J. Oakley, Justice. 
Daniel B. Tallmadge, do. 
David P. Hall, Reporter. 
Charles A. Clinton, Clerk. 
Michael Weyant, Deputy Clerk. 



COURTS. 



39 



The regular terms of this Court are the first Monday 
of each month. January, March, May, July, September, 
and November, are law terms ; February, April, June, 
August, October, and December, are terms for the trial 
of causes by Jury. Inquests are taken in the second week 
of each law term. 

COURT OP COMMON PLEAS, FOR THE CITY AND COUNTY OP 
NEW-YORK. 

John T. Irving, First Judge. 
Michael Ulshoetfer, Assistant Judge. 
Mayor, Recorder, and Aldermen of the city, 

Ex officiis, Judges. 
Thomas Jeremiah, Clerk. 
Andrew Warner, Deputy Clerk. 

The Court sits, for the trial of issues, on the third 
Monday in every month, (except August, when no Jury 
is summoned.) Terms continue one month. 

surrogate's COURT. 

James Campbell, Surrogate. 

Open every day for the proving of wills, granting ad- 
ministrations, appointment of guardians, &C.5 No. 3 Hall 
of Record. 

COURT OP GENERAL SESSIONS 

Meets on the first Monday in every month, and con- 
tinues until Saturday of the third week tnereafter. 
Held by the Recorder and two Aldermen. 

THE SPECIAL SESSIONS 

Are held the first Friday after the adjournment of the 
General Sessions, and the Tuesdays and Fridays there- 
after, until the next meeting of the General Sessions, by 
the Recorder and two Aldermen. 

Henry Meigs, Clerk of the General and Special Ses- 
sions, 

Henry Vandervoort, Deputy Clerk, 

1:^ The Court of Sessions is held in the new City 
JHall, second story, west end. 

Thomas Phoenix, District Attorney, 



40 COURTS. 



CRIMINAL CALENDAR. 

Convictions and Acquittals in the Courts of Oyer and 
Terminer, General and Special Sessions of the Peace, 
for the year 1836. 

OYER AND TERMINER. 

Convicted. — Murder 1 — Manslaughter in the first de- 
gree 1 — do. in the second degree 1 — Conspiracy 20. Ac- 
quitted.— Mmdei a— Arson 1— Total 26. 

GENERAL SESSIONS. 

Convicted. — Assault and Battery with intent to kill 6 — 
Burglary, first degree 5 — do. second degree 7 — do. third 
degree 11 — Attempt to commit Burglary, second degree 
2 — Attempt to commit Burglary, 3d degree, 2 — Forgery, 
in the second degree, 1 — Forgery, in the third degree, 5 
— Robbery in the first degree 6 — Grand Larceny 103 — At- 
tempt to commit Grand Larceny 1 — Petit Larceny, sec- 
ond ofl!encel — Petit Larceny 55 — Receiving Stolen Goods 
1 — Obtaining Goods by false pretences 1 — Riot and As- 
sault and Battery 12— Keeping Disorderly Houses 2 — 
Selling Liquor by retail without license 2 — Assault and 
Battery 75--Cruelty to a Horse 1 — Misdemeanors 2. Ac- 
quitted during the year 51. Discharged by Proclamation 
144. Total 496. 

SPECIAL SESSIONS. 

Convicted. — Petit Larceny 341 — Assault and Battery 189. 
Acquitted. — Petit Larceny 69 — Assault and Battery 18. 
Discharged by Proclamation, either at request of com- 
plainants, or no witnesses appearing against them, 448. 
Total 10(35. 
Whole number convicted in the three Courts,. . . . 854 

" " Acquitted, 141 

" " Discharged by Proclamation,. ... 592 

Total, 1587 

Of the number convicted, there have been sentenced 
to Death, Men, 1— State Prison, (Men 131, women 14) 145 
— one man for life. Penitentiar}', (Men 318, Women 53) 
371. City Prison, (Men 2, Women 2) 4. House of Re- 
fuge, (Boys 18, Girls 6) 24. 



COURTS. 41 



MARINE COURT. 

This Court is held daily, (except Sundays,) in the 
New City Hall, (west end,) for the trial of causes be- 
tween S'25 and $100, and for controversies between Ship- 
masters, Shipowners, and Seamen, to any amount. 

Judah Hammond, John B. Scott, and Effingham Schief- 
felin. Justices. 

John Barberie, Clerk. 

justices', or ward courts. 

First District, for 1st, 2d, and 3d Wards. Office, rear 
144 Fulton-street.— Ambrose Kirtland, Justice.— Clai- 
borne Ferris, Clerk. 

Second District, for 4th and 6th Wards. Office, 245 
William, near Duane-street. — Nicholas C. Everett, Jus- 
tice. — Abraham Tucker, Clerk. 

Third District, for 5th, 8th, and 14th Wards. Office, 
47 Howard-street, near Broadway. — William Wiley, 
Justice. — Peter See, Clerk. 

Fourth District, for 7th and 10th Wards. Office, Divi- 
sion, opposite Norfolk-street.— Levi H. Clarke, Justice, 
Isaac Labagh, jr., Clerk. 

Fifth District, for9th,llth,15th, and 17th Wards. Office, 
corner Bowery and Third-street. — Anthony Woodward, 
Justice, Robert L. Jaques, Clerk. 

Sixth District, for Tith and IGth Wards. Office, corner 
Nineteenth-street and Third Avenue. — James Flanagan 
Justice. Office, at Harlsem. — John Doughty, Justice. 

POLICE OFFICES. 



In the New City Hall. 
James Hopson, 

Oliver M. Lownds, ^ Special Justices. 
John M. Blood2:ood, 



_ yd,) 

Jacob L. Dickinson, ) p, i 
William Callender, S ^^^^^^^ 
Corner of the Bowery and Third-street, 
James Palmer, ) o • i t .• 
John W. Wvman, \ ^P^^^^ Justices. 
Daniel M. Frye, ) ^, , 
Herman Ruggles, J ^'e^*^^. 
Jacob Hays, High Constable. 
4* 



43 COURTS. 



SIIEniFF S JURY. 

John Hillyer, Sheriff. 

The Sheriff will execute Writs of Inquiry, for the 
year 1837, at the Sheriff's Office, City Hall of the City 
of New-York, at the following times: 



Friday, January 6 

Monday, January 9 

Friday, January 13 

Saturday, Jaiiuary 21 

Friday, February 10 

Saturday, February 25 

Friday, March 10 

Saturday, March 25 



Friday, July 7 

Monday, July 10 

Friday, July 14 

Saturday, July 22 

Friday, August 11 

Saturday, August 26 

Friday, September 8 

Saturday, September 23 



Friday, April 7 Friday, ..October 6 

Saturday, April 22 Friday, October 20 

Friday May 5 Saturday, October 21 

Monday May 8 Monday, October 23 

Friday, May 12 Friday, November 10 

Saturday, May 20 i Saturday, November 25 

Friday, June 9 Friday, December 8 

Saturday June 24 | Saturday, December 23 

The First Panel will attend during the months of Ja- 
nuary, March, May, July, September, November. 

The Second Panel will attend during the months of 
February, April, June, August, October and December. 

The hour of meeting will be 5 o'clock, P. M. in the 
months of .January, February, November and December ; 
6 o'clock, P, M. in the months of March, April and Oc- 
tob3r ; and 7 o'clock, P. M, in the months of May, June, 
July, August and September. 

On other days, inquests will be taken at 11 o'clock, 
A. M. precisely. 

coroner's mauESTs. 

Jefferson Brown, Coroner. 

Inquests are held, on notice being given to the Coro- 
ner, of the sudden decease of any person, where any 
doubt remains as to their dying a natural death. Coro- 
ner's Office, Lower Police, New City Hall. 

COURTS— BROOKLYN. 

CIRCUIT COURT, AND OYER AND TERMINER. 

Ogden Edwards, Circuit Judge. 

Terms. — First Wednesday in March, the third Mon- 
day in September, and second Monday in December, in 
the City of Brooklvn. Held at the City Building, cor- 
ner of Henry and Cranberry streets. 



WATCH. 43 

king's county courts. 

Nathan B. Morse, First Judge. 

Joseph Conselyea,! 

Samuel Smith, > Associate Judges. 

John S. Bergen, ) 

Mayor of Brooklyn, ex officio, Judge. 

Abraham Vanderveer, Clerk. 

William Rockwell, District Attorney. 

John Van Duyne, Sheriff. 
The Court of Common Pleas is held at the City Build- 
ings, corner of Henry and Cranberry streets, Brooklyn, on 
the third Tuesday of January, April, July and October. 

municipal court. — BROOKLYN. 

Joseph Dean, 1 

John G. Murphy, > Justices. 
John Lott, jun., ) 
Asbury W. Kirk, Clerk. 
Sit at the City Buildings, every day for the trial of 
causes. 



REGISTER'S OFFICE. 

James Gulick, Register. 

Office, Nos. 1 and 2 Hall of Records ; open daily from 
9 A. M. to 4 P. M., for the registering of deeds, mort- 
eaofes and leases. 



NATURALIZATION OFFICES. 

District Court of the United States, New City Hall. 

Supreme Court, City Hall. 

Superior Court, City Hall. 

Court of Common Pleas, City Hall. 

Marine Court, New City Hall, west end. 



WATCH. 



The present number of Watchmen is about seven hun- 
dred; one-half of whom are on duty each night, com- 
mencing at 7 o'clock, P. M., in winter, and at 9 P. M., 
in summer. The annual expense to the City for wages, 
&c., of the Watch, is about S140,000. 



44 PRISONS. 

The Watch Houses are located as follows — 
First. — In the basement of the New City Hall. 
Second. — No. '22 Eldridgc, near Walker-street. 
Third. — Wooster, corner of Prince-street. 
Fourth. — Attorney, corner of Delancey-street. 
/^(/■^A.— Jefferson Market, Sixth Avenue. 

PRISONS. 

There are two Penitentiaries for the confinement of 
prisoners after conviction, under the control of the city 
authorities. The principal building, situated on Black- 
well's Island, about four miles north-east of the City 
Hall, is a large and substantial stone edifice, recently 
erected, partly by the male convicts; where are con- 
fined male and female prisoners. The other building is 
situated at Bellevue on the East River, near Twenty- 
eighth-street, being exclusively used for the confinement 
of female prisoners, including a few State prison female 
convicts, being all under the same regulations. 

PENITENTIARY. 

According to the weekly report of the Penitentiary^ 
ending March 10, 1837, there were confined — 
On Blackwell's Island, 

Male prisoners, 377 

Female do 153 

At Bellevue. 

Female Penitentiary prisoners, 149 

" State Prison convicts, 30 

Total, 709 

Who are employed as follows : — 

Gluarrying stone, men, 130 

General work, " 198 

Sick in Hospital, " 49 

Picking wool, women, 10*2 

Sewing and Spinning, " 51 

Washing and in kitchen, " 35 

Tailoring, &c " 30 

Sick in Hospital, " 114 

John Philips, Keeper of Penitentiary. 

William M. Howell, Assistant, .do. 

Daniel Kearney, do do. 



ALMS HOUSE, 45 



BRIDEWELL, 

Situated at Bellevue, is a part of the building now 
used as the Female Penitentiary. Criminals convicted 
of petit larceny, &c., are confined here; also, prisoners 
before trial, amounting in all, March 10th, 1837, to 
one hundred and forty-four. 

CITY PRISON, 

Situated in the Park, near the City Hall, (formerly 
the Bridewell,) is now used as a temporary place of con- 
finement, for prisoners of different grades, before convic- 
tion, and such debtors as are liable to confinement under 
the existing laws. 

Daniel Lyon, Keeper. 

Dr. Edmund Stewart, Physician. 

A. B. Fountain, Jailer. 

HOUSE OF REFUGE, 

Situated about two and a half miles north of the City 
Hall, is under the cont?ol of the Society for the Refor- 
mation of Juvenile Delinquents, incorporated in 1825, 
and has been attended with very salutary effects; one 
thousand six hundred and nine children having been re- 
ceived since its commencement. [See Beiievolent Insti- 
iutio7is.] 

Nathaniel C. Hart, Superintendent. David Terry, 
Assistant Superintendent. Susan C. Taylor, Matron, 
Ann Carter, Assistant Matron. G. B. Hart, Teacher. 
» John C. Cheesman, M. D., Galen Carter, M. D., .Visit- 
ing Physicians. 

James B. Nelson, M. D., Resident Physician. 

Rev. Thomas S. Barrett, Chaplain. 



ALMS HOUSE. 



Situated at Bellevue, contained, in connexion with the 
number on the Long Island Farms, and in the Bellevue 
Hospital, according to the weekly report, ending March 
10th, 1837,— 

Men 792 I Boys' 546 

Women 803 Girls 300 

Total.... 2441. 
Of whom 1156 were natives, and 1285 foreigners. 



46 FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Of the above number, 538, principally children, are 
on the Long Island Farms, attending school, and in the 
nurseries. In addition to the above, not included among 
the inmates of the Alms house, there are 181 infants, 
provided for by the Department, under the charge of 
proper nurses. 

John Targee, George Lovett, Thomas T. Woodruff, 
J. H. Hart, Jacob Brush, Commissioners. 

Thoinas J. Stevens, Superintendent. 

Henry Van Hovenberg, Resident Physician. 

John H. Giiion, Clerk, Bellevue. 

Josiah Mann, Clerk, New City Hall. 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL, 

(Connected with the Ahns House.) 

The number in this establishment, according to the 
report of March 10th, 1837, was as follows, viz. 

Men in Hospital, 74 Women, 61 

" Maniac Department, 51 " ' 61 

Total, 278. 

Of whom 82 were natives, and 196 foreigners. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



There are in the City forty-nine Fire Engines, most 
of which are in complete order ; and attached to them 
are upwards of twenty thousand feet of hose, and about 
thirteen hundred Firemen, twenty-six men being consi- 
dered a complement to each Engine. There are also 
six Hook and Ladder Companies, with a complement of 
one hundred and thirty-six men, and twelve Hose Carts, 
with tMclve men each, and twelve hundred feet of Hose 
each ; also a Company to take charge of the Hydrants 
in time of Fire, with twent}' men, making in all, when 
the vacancies are filled, upwards of sixteen hundred 
Firemen. 

ENGINEERS. 



John Ryker, jr.. Chief. 
Edward Blanchard, 
Allen R. Jollie, 
Panicl Coger, 



A. B. Purdv, 
Elijah T. Lewis, 
Edward Hoffmire, 



MILITARY, 47 



FIRE DEPARTMENT.— BROOKLYN. 

John F. L. Diiflon, Chief Engineer. 

Richard Van Voorhis, ") 

Burdett Stryker, ' Assistar.t Fno-i-nf^Pr^ 

William A. Thompson, ^ Assistant l?.ngineers. 

William Bennett, j 

There are in the City of Brooklyn eleven Fire En- 
gines, all of which are in complete order; one hook and 
ladder company, and one hose company ; in all with a 
compliment of about five hundred men. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

The Board of Health consists of the Mayor, Recorder, 
and Aldermen of the City, any seven of whom constitute 
a quorum for the transaction of business. The officers 
are, 

His Honour, the Mayor, President, 

, Secretary. 

D. D, Williamson, Treasurer. 

HEALTH COMMISSIONERS, 
(Office, No. 5 City Hall.) 
Dr. William Rockwell, Health Officer. 
Dr. James R. Manley, Resident Physician. 
Dr. Smith Cutter, Health Commissioner. 
James H. Ward, Agent. 



MII.ITARY. 

THE FIRST DIVISION OF NEW-YORK STATE ARTILLERY, 

Composed of uniform troops, commanded by Majo/ 
General , consists of— 

The First Brigade of Horse Artillery, commanded by 
Brig. Gen. Henry Arcularius, of about five hundred men. 

The First Brigade of Field Artillery, commanded by 
Brig. Gen. Samuel I. Hunt, of about fifteen hundred men. 

The Sixth Brigade of Field Artillery, commanded by 
Brig. Gen. Charles W, Sandford, of about eighteen hun- 
dred men. 

Total, First Division of Artillery, 3,800 men. 



48 MILITARY. 



THE SECOND DIVISION OF INFANTRY, 

Commanded by Major General B. M. Van Buren, con- 
sists of — 

The Third Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. John 
Lloyd, of about three thousand men, including the uni- 
formed regimentof Washington Guards. The remain- 
der of this division extends through the counties of 
Kings and Richmond, embracing Staten Island, and a 
part of Long Island. 

THE THIRD DIVISION OF INFANTRY, 

Commanded by Major General James J. Jones, con- 
sists of — 

The Fifty-ninth Brigade, commanded by Gen. Lee, of 
about one thousand men. 

The Sixty-third Brigade, commanded by Gen. Kier- 
sted, of about one thousand men. 

Total 2,000 men. 

THE TWENTY-EIGHTH DIVISION OF INFANTRY, 

Commanded by Major Gen. G. H. Striker, consists of— 

The Forty-fifth Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. 
Wm, L. Morris, of about twelve hundred men. 

The Fifty-eighth Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. 
R. L. Schieffelin, of about thirteen hundred men. 

Total 2500 men. 

THE THIRTY-FIRST DIVISION OF INFANTRY, 

Commanded by Major General G. S. Doughty, con- 
sists of — 

The Tenth Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. Pentz, 
of about eight hundred men. 

The Sixty-second Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. 
Keeler, of about eight hundred men. — Total, 1600 men. 

Making, 9,110 Infantry. 

Grand total, twelve thousand nine hundred; which is 
the probable amount of effective men that might be 
raised in the City; (the wliole number enrolled is about 
twenty-three thousand men.) 



COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AND SCHOOLS. 49 



COIiLE^aES, ACADEIMISS, AND SCHOOLS. 

COLUMBIA COLLEGE, 
(Formerly King's College,) 

Is situated on a beautiful square, between Murray, 
Barclay, Church, and Chapel streets, in the City of New 
York. It was established under a royal charter, in the 
year 1754, which has been confirmed by various acts of 
the Legislature since the Revolution, the principal of 
which is that of 13th April, 1787. Its Faculty of Arts 
consists of — 

William A. Duer, LL. D., President. 

Rev. John M'Vickar, S. T. D., Professor of Moral 
and Intellectual Philosophy, Rhetoric, Belles Lettres, 
and Political Economy. 

Charles Anthon, LL. D., Jay Professor of Greek and 
Latin Languages, and Rector of the Grammar School. 

James Renwick, LL. D., Professor of Natural and 
Experimental Philosophy and Chemistry. 

James Kent, LL. D., Professor of Law. 

Henry James Anderson, M. D., Professor of Mathe- 
matics, Analytical Mechanics, and Physical Astronomy. 

Lorenzo Da Ponte, Professor of the Italian Language 
and Literature. 

Rev. Antoine Verren, Professor of the French Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

Mariano Velazquez de la Cadena, Professor of the 
Spanish Language and Literature. 

Rev. Samuel H. Turner, D. D., Professor of the He- 
brew Language and Literature. 

Robert G. Vermilye, A. M., Classical Instructor of the 
Freshmen Class, Librarian and Secretary to the Board. 

The number of Graduates since the establishment of 
the College, to and including the year 1836, is about 
1,600. There are now in College about 110. 

The Trustees are 24, (when vacancies are filled.) 
The names of the present are — 

Peter A. Jay, LL. D., Chairman. 



Clement C. Moore, Clerk, 
Rt. Rev. Benjamin T. On- 

derdonk, D. D., 
David B. Ogden, 
William Johnson, LL. D., 



Philip Hone, 

Charles King, 

Rev. Gardiner Spring, D,D. 

Rev. Wra. Berrian, D. D., 

Ogden Hoffman, 



iJO c'6Ll1;gk3, academics, and sciiO(3ts. 



Ed*.'ard W. Laij^ht, 
Beverley Robinson, 
Thomas L. 0;^'cten, 
John T. Irvinj=:, 
T)avid S. Jones, 
Rev.Wm. Creij^hton, D. D. 
Edward R. Jones, 



James Campbell, 
V/illiam A. Duer, LL. D., 
John L. Lawrence, 
Samuel Wprd, 
Samuel B. Ruggles, 
Rev. John Knox, D. D., 
Thomas L. Wells. 



Commencement th^ day follOAVins: the first Mondaj'' in 
October. Vacatio'ri, iioVi August 1, to the first Monday 
in October. 

There are two literary societies connected with the 
College, composed of students and graduates, viz. — the 
Pti&t,oli)gldii and the Pliilolcxian. Societies. 

There is also connected with the College a Grammar 
School, subject to the control of the Trustees, and under 
*the direction of Professor Anthon, as Rector. The 
school is composed of upwards of two hundred scholars, 
ct'iid instruction is given in all branches necessary for ad- 
mission into any College, or for the Counting House, 

Eight instructors are constantly employed, besides one 
teacher in French, one in Spanish, and one in "German 
and Italian. There is also a primary school attached 
■^•o this institution, in which boys from 5 to lO'yearS are 
prepared for the more advanced classes. 

fiy a statrue of Columlfia Colllege, the'Coxp6ration of 
the City of New- York, the Trustees of the NeAV-York 
*t'ufclic School Sotiety, the Trustees or Directors of the 
Clinton Hall Association, of the Mercantile Library 
dissociation, and of the Mechanic and Scientific Institu- 
tions; the General Society of Mechanics and Trades- 
*nen, and such other Societies as the Board of Trustees 
may from tiriie to time designate, are each entitled to 
have always two students educated in the College free 
of all charges of tuition. Every religiotis denomination 
in the City is also entitled to have one student, who may 
be designed*for the ministry, educated i'ree of all charges. 
And every school, from Avhich there shall be admitted in 
any one yeaY into the College four sKidents, have the 
privilege of sending one scholar, to be educated gratui- 
tously. In order to give effect to the privilege in regard 
to the common schools in the cily, twdve scholars at one 
tim^ receive gratuitotls instruction in the Grammar 
School prepaffetcr^"^ to their entering the College. 



COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AN-D SCHOOLS. 5'S 



UNIVERSITV OF THE CITY OF NEW-VORK 

Was cliartered in 1S31, and opened for the reception. 
of students in October, 1832. The buildings for this in- 
slilution are now erected, and are situated on the east 
side of Washington Square. The stj'le of the architec- 
ture is Collegiate Gothic, the edifice forms one of the 
iprfjst splendid ornaments of our city. The number of 
students the present year is three hundred and sixty-four.. 

COUNCIL. 

James Tallmadge, President. 

Rev. James Milnor, D. D., Vice President. 

Rev; Archibald Maclay, Secretary, 

O. Holmes, Esq., Treasurer. 

The Mayor of the City, (ex officio.) 
Rev. Spencer H. Cone, John S. Crarv, Walter Bowne,, 
E: D. Conistock, J. M. Mathews, D.'D., William W. 
Chester, V/illiam B. Crosby, Dr. Edward Delalield, Ga- 
briel P. Dissosway, George Griswold, Moses Allen, J. 
Prescoil Hall, Cornelius Baker, PJchard T. Haines, 
CHiarles BuUer, Waldron B. Post, Charles Starr, Mynderl 
Van Schaick, Stephen AVhitney, William W. Woolsey, 
J. Lorimer Graham, John Johnston, Robert Kellv, Rev. 
Absalom Peters, D. D., Frederick A. Tracy, S. Van 
Rensselaer, B.. L. Woolev. Of the Cih/ Corporation. — 
J.V. Greenfield, F.A.Talmadge, G.W. Bruen, H-Erben. 

OFFICERS. 

Rev. James M. Mathews, D. D. Chancelloi:. 

Rev. Henry P. Tappan, Professor of Moral and Fntel- 
lectual Philosophy and Belles Lettres. 

D. B. Douglas, Professor of Architecture and Civil 
Engineering. 

Hod. B. F. Butler, Professor of Law, and Principal of 
tlve Law Faculty. 

Samuel F.B.' Morse, Professor of the Literature oij 
the Arts of Design. 

Re\'. John Proudfit, Professor of the Latin Language- 
and Literature. 

Robert B. Patton, Professor of the Greek Language 
and Literature. 

Rev. George Bush, Piofessor of the Hebrew Language- 
ami Literatuie. 

Charles W. Hacklev. Professor of Mailiematics.. 



52 COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AND SCHOOLS. 

William A. Norton, Professor of Natural Philosophy 
and Astronomy. 

Lewis C. Beck, M. D., Professor of Chemistry and 
Botany- 
Miguel Cabrera De Navares, Professor of the Spanish 
Language and Literature. 

Charles Rabadan, Associate Professor of the Spanish 
Language and Literature. 

Isaac Nordheimer, Acting Professor of the German 
Language and Literature, Arabic, Syriac, Persian, and 
Ethiopic. 

Lorenzo L. Da Pontc, Professor of the Italian Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

Charles K Parmantier, A.M., Professor of the French 
Language and Literature. 

L. D. Gale, M. D., Professor of Geology and Miner- 
alogy. 

Rev. Cyrus Mason, Professor of the Evidences of Re- 
vealed Religion. 

GENERAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF THE PROTESTANT EPIS- 
COPAL CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES. 
(Corner of Ninth Avenue, and Twenty-first-street.) 
TRUSTEES. 

The Board of Trustees consists of all the Bishops of 
the Church, ex officio^ — one Trustee from each diocese, 
and one additional for every eight Clergymen in the 
same ; one more additional for every tvo thousand dol- 
lars of money contributed, until the same amounts to ten 
thousand^ and then an additional Trustee for every ten 
thousand dollars. 

STANDING COMMITTEE. 

The Bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the United States, and the following Clergymen and 
Laymen. 

Rev. Dr. Lyell, 

Rev. Dr. Berrian, 

Rev. Dr. Milnor, 

Rev. Dr. McVickar 

Rev. Dr. Hawks, 

Rev. Mr. Taylor, 



Thomas L. Ogden, 
David S. Jones, 
Isaac LaAvrence, 
Peter A. Jay, 
Jacob Lorillard, 
Floyd Smith, 



Together with Edward R. Jones, Treasurer, and Rev. 
Dr. Anthon, Secretary. 



CULI.KGE'S-, ACADEMxEPj AUB SC'HOOLg. &^ 



PROFESSORS!. 

Right Rev. Benjamin T. Onderdonk, D. D., Professor 
of the Natnre, Ministry, and Polity of the Church; and, 
c'x officio, Chairman of the Facnliv. 

Rev. Samuel H. Turner, D. D"., Professor of Biblical- 
Learning-, and the Interpretation of Scripture. 

Rev. Bird Wilson, D. D., Professor of Systematic Di- 
vinit)'. 

Clement C. Moo^.-e„LL,.D., Professoi' of Oriental and 
Gdee-k Literature. 

Rev. William R. Whitttngham, A.M., St. Mark's 
Church, in the Bowery, Professor of Ecclesiastical His- 
tory, Dean* of the Faculty, and Librarian. 

Rev. Samuel Seabury, A. M., Lecturing on the Evi- 
dences of Christianity, and on Moral Science as connect- 
ed with Theology. 

Rev. Hughi Smith, A. M., having charge of the De- 
partment of Pastoral Theology and Pulpit Eloquence. 

STUDENTS. 

Senior Class' 27— Mfddle Class 31— Junior Class 28.— 
Total 8(5. 

Annual Commencement, Friday next following the 
last Tuesday in June. Commenced operations, 1819. 

Number of studeMs who have been edticaled since fjt- 
stituted, about three hUisdrsd. 

Library, 4000 volumes. 

NEW-YORK THEOLOGilC.^L SEMINARY ,- 
(Wooster-street, above Waverly Place. Organized Dec. 1336.) 

The' Board of Directors consists of fourteen clergy- 
men and fourteen laymen of the Presbyterian Church, 
residing in the Cities- of Nelv-York and Brooklyn, and 
vicinity. The offices of instruction are. 

Rev. Thomas M'Aulev, D. D, LL. D., President, and 
Professor of Pastoral Ttieology and Church History. 

Rev. Henry White, Professor of Theology, 

Rev. Edward Robinsofi,. D. D.,. Pro&ssor of Biblical 
Literature, 

Rev. Thomas H. Skinner, Professor of Sacred Rhet- 
oric. 

Rev.Ichabod S. Spencer, Professor ofEitlical History. 

* A yearly office, held bv the resideiH Professors in rotation. 
5* 



54 COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AND SCHOOLS. 

f~ — ' 

Rev. Erskine Mason, Professor of Church History. 

This Institution went into operation on the 5th of De- 
cember, 1836, and now has twenty students in the junior 
class. 

The buildings for the accommodation of the Seminary 
are now in progress, and will be completed during the 
present year. 

BROOKLYN COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. 
(For young ladies. No. 125 Hicks-street, Brooklyn.) 

This Institution was incorporated, April 23, 1829, with 
a capital of 30,000 dollars; being under the control of 
ten Trustees. The building is constructed of brick, 75 
feet in length, and four stories high ; containing forty 
rooms. 

Mrs. A. E. Bazeley, Principal. 

Charles Chazotte, Professor of French. 

Don Ramon Garbayo, Professor of Spanish. 

B. J. Carbonaj, Professor of Italian. 

J. W. Martins, Professor of Drawing and Perspective. 
Signor Bertie, and Mrs. M. M. Bickerstaff, Professors, 
of the Piano, and Vocal Music. 

Thomas Williams, Professor of the Harp and Guitar. 

C. Berault, Professor of Dancing. 

The Institute enjoys the advantage of a most healthy, 
pleasant, and eligible situation, on the heights of Brook- 
lyn, opposite to the city of New- York; commanding an 
extensive view of the harbour, and the adjacent country, 
for many miles. The building is sufficiently spacious 
for the accommodation of seventy boarders; the rooms, 
for study, recitation, and recreation are commodious 
and pleasant, and the dormitories airy. 
mechanics' school. 
(Crosby-street.) 
This School was established, in 1820, by the General 
Society of Mechanics' and Tradesmen, for the purpose 
of affording the facilities of education to the children of 
deceased or unfortunate members, who might need the 
aid of the society. Pay scholars are also admitted; the 
children of members always having the preference. 

Care has been taken to procure teachers of the high- 
est respectability, both in the male and female depart- 
ments, and the branches taught, embrace a complete En- 



COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AND SCHOOLfl^ 55 

glish education, including, in the Male Department, 
architecture, drawing, designing, and civil engineering; 
and in the Female Department, Painting and drawing. 
The school is under the immediate supervision of a 
committee of twelve members, appointed annually by the 
society. 

COMMITTEE. 

Thomas Bussing, Adoniram Chandler, Thomas C. 
Chardovoyne, Edwin B. Clayton, Eleazer S. Lazarus, 
George Mather, John P. Moore, Samuel M'Cully, Wm. 
A. Mercien, Shivers Parkers, John Remick, Linus W. 
Stevens. 

Thomas Bussing, Chairman. 
Thomas C. Chardavoyne, Treasurer. 
John P. Moore, Secretary. 
Male Department. Will accommodate three hundred. 
John F. Jenkins, A. M., Principal. 
Ralph Hoyt, Assistant Principal. 
John C. Gaze, Azor Hoyt, J. Reeve, Charles J. Con- 
way, Assistants, 

Edward Purcell, Drawing Master. 
Female Department. Will accommodate two hundred 
and sixty. 

Miss Arabella Clark, Principal. 
Miss Frances M. Hart, Assistant Principal. 
Miss Messerve, Miss Chalmers, Miss Cathell, and 
Miss Clark, Assistants, 

PUBLIC BCHOOL SOCIETY OP NEW-YORK. 
(Incorporated, April, 1805.) 
Now under the direction of sixty-six Trustees, of 
whom — 

Peter A. Jay is President. 
Robert C. Cornell, Vice President. 
Samuel F. Mott, Treasurer, 
Lindley Murray, Secretary. 
There are at present in this city," fifteen school houses, 
in which are permanently engaged fifteen male, and fif- 
teen female teachers, as principals, besides general mo- 
nitors and monitors. 

Number of pupils taught in 1836, 12,128, of which 
1,171 were coloured children. 



5"ft' CtitLKCBS, ACADEM1K>J. AND SCHOOLS. 

TIIK PLBLfC SCHOOLS ARE LOCATED AS FOLLOWS.- 

No. 1. Chniham-strcet, corner Trvon-row. 

No.. 2, 100 Honry-sireet, near Pike. 

No. 3. Corner oi" Hudson and Grove streets. 

No. 4. 20.) Rivin^non-street, near Pitt. 

No. 5. ll).-^ Moit-sireet, near yprinj^. 

No. G. Lon- Island Farms, opposite Black-well's Islanil 

No. /..(jO Ciir;,\stie-street.. 

No. 8. 05 Grand-street.- 

No. 0. Bloomins^dale, near Eighty-secoutl-street 

No. 10. 1-25 Duane-street, near C'him-.h. 

No. 11. 150 Wooster-.street, near Bleeckcr. 

No. 12. Seventeenth-street, near Eij^hlh Avenue. 

No. 13. 237 Madison-street, near Scanimel. 

No. 14. 238 Houston-street, -near Norfolk. 

No. -15.. Twenty-seventh-street, near Third Avenue. - 

PUBLIC PRLMARY SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. 85 Orchard-.street. 

No, 2. '14 Orange-street. 

No. 3. 333 Third-street, near Avenue D. 

No. 4. Chrystie-street, corner of Delancev 

No. 5. OOOj Water-street, or 490 Cheny. ' 

No. 6. Broome-street, corner of Norfolk 

at"' I Ji^ Delancey-street, corner of Attorney. 

No. 8. King-street, near McDougal. 

N-o. 9: Bleecker-street, corner of Aino.'^ 

No. 10. 154 Amos-street. 

No. 11. 39 City Hall Place. 

No. 12. 138 Broome-street. 

No. 13.- 44 Orans^e-street. 

No. 14. Near House of Refuge. 

No. 15. 31 Stanton-sireet, near Forsyth. 

No. 16. Fourth-street,- ii^ar Aveiuie D. 

No, 17. 408 Broome-street. - 

No. 18. 496 Grand-street. 

No. 19. 275 Spring-stKeet. 

No. 20. 250 Henry-street, confer of-Scammei. 

No. 21. Eighth Avenue,:near Forty-second-street 

No. 22. Second Avenue, near Second-street 

Np.-23. 203 RivingtoiT-streetv 

No. 24. Bleecker-sti^eet, corner of Do^vam<r 

N0.-25. f)l Thompson-street. "* 

No,-26i 61 Thompson-street. 



COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AND SCHOOLS. 57 



AFRICAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. 137 Mulberry-Street. 
No. 2. 51 Laurens-street. 

PRIMARY AFRICAN SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. ^ 

L°' o* )> Temporarily discontinued. 

No^4' J 

No. 5. IGl Duane-street, near Hudson. 
No. 6. Second-street, near Avenue D. 
Total Scholars under the care of the Piihlic School Society. 

Public Schools 9,182 

Primary Schools 2,946 

Public Schools for coloured children 325 

Primary Schools for coloured children 84G 

Total, 13,299 

ROMAN CATHOLIC FREE SCHOOLS. 

St Patrick's Cathedral, about 300 

St. Peter's Church, about 300 

St. Mary's Church, about 600 

Total,.. 1200 

INFANT SCHOOL SOCIETY. 
(Instituted ?tlay, 1827, under the patronage of the late Gov. Clinton.) 
Mrs. Bethune, First Directress. 
Mrs. Striker, Second Directress. 
Miss Mary Smith, Treasurer. 
Miss Byron, Corresponding Secretary. 
Miss Bleecker, Recording Secretary. 
Miss Harriet M. Magee, First Teacher. 
Miss Agnes H. Stuart, Second Teacher. 
The society opened its first school, July 16, 1827, which 
serves as a model school and seminary, where teachers 
are trained and qualified for superintending otherschools. 
Situated in the basementof the Bowery Church; entrance 
in Elizabeth-street. 

Annual subscription $'1. Life subscription $15. 
Besides the above Public Schools, there are a great 
number of private male and female academies, schools, 



5.>. ME©jCAL INSW'ITUTIONS., 

jiMcl seminaries, in ditlerejit parts of the fit}' ; mjinyoC 
ihcm aiibrding leainini^ in llui hiijher branches of ecl'v 
nation. 



MESJICAI. l?JSTiTUTIOXS. 

COLT^EuK OF PJIVSICVIXS WD SIROEOXS IN THE CITY OF 
NKW-VOIIIC. 
(Crosby Street, near Spri:i;r.) 
This insti!utit)n was f Jinided in the 3'car 1807, bv at'^ 
act of the lei^islaturc of ]Xew-York, at the rccomnieiida- 
lion of the Rcii^ents of the University, by whose imme- 
diate sjovernment it is cuiitrolled. 

J..Auu:ustine Smith, M. D., President. 
Thomas (Jock, M. i)., Vice-President. 
Nicoll H. Derino;, M. D., Rej^ister. 
Fannini^ C. Tuckei-, Esq., Treasurer. 

PnOFFISSORS. 

John A. Smith, Professorof Physiology. 

Alexander H. Stevens, M. D., Principles and Practiiip 
of Surgery. 

Valentine Mott, M. D., Surgical Anatomy and Opcr<v 
live Surgery. 

Joseph M. Smith, M. D., Professor of the Theory anc'l 
Pi-actice of Physic. 

Edward Delafield, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics an;^ 
the IMseases of Women and Children. 

John B. Beck, M, D., Professor of Materia Mcdica 
and Medical Jurisprudence.. 

John Torrey, M. D., Professor of Cijcmistry and Bo- 
tany. 

Jolin R. Rhinelander, Professor of Anatomy. 

Lectures commence on the first Monday of xs'ovcmbci* 
annually, and continue four )nonths. Degrees confer- 
I'ed by the Regents of the University, at the recommen-- 
dation of the Board of Trustees. 

Tins institution has for several years been in a ver\- 
tl-j-urishing condition. ISumbcr of students for session,. 
lH3()-7, 10(». The whole expense f)r all. the courses^ 
aliout oue hi^.udrcd dollars.. 



'IvlEDlCAL INSTiTUTlOXS, 59 



NKW-YORK EYE INFIRMARY. 
(Foimtlod 1S:J0.) 

■Henry I. W.vckott; President. 

• -, Fir:^t Vice President, 

G. Hoyl, Second Vice President. 
James E. Cornell, M. D.,' Secretary. 
J. Delafield, Treasurer. 
Sur^c'07is. — Drs. J. Kearney Rosters, Edward Delafield, 
James E. Cornell, and George Wilkes. 

It appears from the report of the Directors of the New 
York Eye Infirmary; thatAvithin the last year 1,097 per- 
sons were under the care of the"5\trgeons of the institu- 
tion for a longer or shorter periodj^ making an aggre- 
gate, since its foundation in 1820. Oi clearly 17,000. 

Income for 183G, derived from appropriations. ,snb- 
r.criptions, &c., ^•1,46'i CO. Expenditures, ^1,400 10. 

MEDICAL .SOCIETY OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF NEW-YORK. 

James R. Man ley, M. D... President. 
"Francis U. Johnston, M. D., Vice-President. 
Slichard K. Huflman, IvL D., Corresponding Secre- 
tary. 
johu R. Hardenbrook, iv^.^x)., Recording Secretary 
'A. J. Berry, Treasurer. 

CENSOR.S. 

l)octors Jared Lindsey, B. R. Robson, C. R. Gilman, 
Alexander E. Hosack, N. H. Dering, 

Members, about 500. 

Graduates 209 ; Licentiates ^3. Total, 302. 

The number of ph3'sicians and surgeons in the city, 
rvho are not members of the medical society, is about 
one hundred and fifty. 

NEW-YORK HOSPITAL. 
(Broadway, between Diiane and Anthony streets.) 
George Newbold, President. 
Najah Taylor, Vice President. 
John Adams, Treasurer. 
Robert I. Murray, Secretary, 
Noah Wetmore, Superintendent. 
E. L. Schieffelin, Assistant. 
Rev. Le't;is't*ea.sej Chaplain. 



60 MEDICAL INSTlTUTIONa, 

John Watson, M. D., Librarian. 
Thomas W. Ustick, Apothecary. 
William H. Wakeman, Clerk. 

Consulting Physician. — Thomas Cock, M. D. 

Attending Physicians. — Francis U. Johnston, M. D., 
Joseph M. Smith, M. D., John B. Beck, M. D., Edward 
Delafield, M. D. 

Consulting Surgeon. — Valentine Mott, M. D. 

Attending Surgeons. — Alexander H. Stevens, M. D., 
John C. Cheesman, M. D., J. Kearney Rogers, M. D., 
Alfred C. Post, M. D., Richard K. Hofiinan, M. D., 
John G. Adams, M. D. 

Resident Physician. — James M'Donald, M. D. 

House Physicians. — Nelson Shook, M. D., Chauncey 
L. Mitchell, M. D. 

House Surgeons. — P. L. Jones, M. D., David L. Eigen- 
brodt, M. D., William A. Mathews, M. D., George 
Adam, M. D. 

By the last report it appears that during the year 1836, 
there have been 1987 patients admitted into the hospital 
in the city of New- York, who with the 189 remaining 
there on the last day of the year, 1835, make 2176 per- 
sons who have received the benefits of the Institution 
during the year last past; a larger number than usual, 
being 175 more than in the year preceding, and261morei 
than in the year 1834. 

Out of this number of 2176 patients, there have been 
cured 1503; relieved 122; discharged at their own re-« 
request 101 ; and as improper objects for the Hospital 
15; there have eloped or have been discharged as dis- 
orderly 25; died 197; and there remained 213 patients 
in the Hospital at the end of the last year. 

Receipts, ^36,782 38. Expenditures, 836,700 II. 

LUNATIC ASYLUM. 
(Connected with the New-York Hospital.) 
TheBloomingdale Asylum forthe Insane is pleasantly 
situated near the banks of the Hudson River, distant 
seven miles from the city, and has attached to it forty 
acres of land, laid out in gardens, pleasure grounds, gra- 
vel walks, and farm lots, well adapted to the unfortunate 
inmates. 

The building is erected on one of the most elevated 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 61 

and healthy sites on the Island, and sufficiently retired 
for the comfort and convenience of the patients. 

These are under the immediate superintendence of a 
skilful physician, who has devoted a number of years to 
this particular branch of medical science, and has visit- 
ed the various lunatic establishments inEngland, France 
and Italy; examining the condition of the patients, and 
inquiring minutely into the mode of treatment pursued 
therein. 

The ordinary affairs of the house are managed by a 
warden and matron, and a sufficient number of kind and 
careful nurses, are always ready to attend to the wants 
and comforts of the patients. 

The whole establishment is under the general direc- 
tion of a Committee taken from and appointed by the 
Board of Governors of the New- York Hospital. They, 
for the information of those who may be desirous of en- 
trusting to the charge of this institution such of their 
friends as they think may be benefitted thereby, embrace 
this opportunity of stating, that, in all cases, before a pa- 
tient can be received into the house, an order for admis- 
sion must be obtained from two magistrates, who require 
for this purpose, the testimony of two credible witnesses, 
that the insane person is not fit to go at large. 

This order must be presented to one of the undersign- 
ed, who will arrange for the board of the patient, the 
price of which varies according to circumstances; and 
will then give directions for his or her reception. 

It is particularly requested that those who apply may, 
if practicable, come possessed with a history of the pa- 
tient, and the immediate cause of the disease. 

The ground on which the buildings are located, is 
elevated one hundred and fifty feet above the Hudson 
River, and from the cupola is a fine prospect of the 
Island, the North and East Rivers, and the adjacent 
country for fifty miles. The principal edifice is of 
stone, three storses high, 210 feet long, and 60 feet wide. 
The cost of the whole was over ^200,000. 

The numbers in the hospital report, given above, are 
exclusive of the maniac patients, of whom 121 have been 
admitted into the Bloomingdale Asylum, and, with 144 
remaining on the 31st December, 1835, make 265 who 

6 



(W MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 



have received the benefit of the Asylum during the past 
year. 

Out of the patients above enumerated, 66 have been 
cured, 26 have been discharged improved, 16 others at 
the request of their friends ; 14 have died; one eloped, 
and 142 remained in the Asylum at the close of the year. 

Two hundred persons can be accommodated at the 
Asylum. The charges are from S2 to SIO per week, for 
board, &c. No free patients are admitted. Applica- 
tion for admission of lunatics must be made at the New- 
York Hospital, Broadway, where information can also 
be obtained, respecting the proper time and days, for 
visiting this interesting Institution. 

James M'Donald, Resident Physician. 

Application for admission of patients must be made to 
.<?ome one of the committee. 

ASYLUM COMMITTEE. 

Najah Taylor, 10 Cortlandt Street. 
James Lovett, 73 Eldridge-street. 
Stephen Allen, 1 Washington Square. 
Robert C. Cornell, 119 Hudson-street. 
Thomas R. Smith, 35 Market-street. 
Henry I. WyckofT, 6 Broadway. 
Receipts, in 1836, $40,847 17. Expenditures, S33,034 76. 

NEW-YORK QUARANTINE HOSPITAL. 

(Staten-Island.) 

Established by State Act of April 14, 1820. 
William Rockwell, Health Officer. 
James R. Manley, Resident Physician. 
Smith Cutter, Health Commissioner. 
James H. Ward, Agent. 
The last officer takes charge of the receipts and exs 
pcnses. 

HOSPITAL AT BELLEVUE. 
(For the sick and insane poor.) 
Established, November, 1826. 

Henry Van Hovenberg, Resident Physician, 
This establishment is a branch of the city Alms 
House, and its expenses are included in those of that 
establishment. 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 63 

1 ■ . I ' ' ' ■ . • - ■ " , . ■ I 17 

NEW-YORK DISPENSARY, 
(White, corner of Centre-street.) 
Established in the year 1790, " for the purpose of re- 
lieving such sick, poor, and indigent persons, as are 
unable to procure medical aid." 
Supported by annual subscriptions, donations, &c. 
Edward W. Laight, President. 
Lindley Murray, Treasurer. 
James F. De Peyster, Secretary. 
Attending Physicians. — J. Jaffray Brownlee, M. D., H. 
D. Bulkley, M. D.,B.W. M'Cready, M. D., Gurdon Buck, 
M. D., Michael P. Moore, M. D., J. L. Vandevoort, 
M. D., H. A. Dubois, M. D., Charles A. Porter, M. D., 
A. Bloodgood, M. D., W. P. Turpin, M. D. 
Vacci7ie Physician. — S. A. Purdy, M. D. 
Assistant Physician. — Nathan Adams, M. D. 
Consulting Physicians and Surgeons. — Francis U. John- 
ston, M. D., Samuel W. Moore, M. D., John C. Chees- 
man, M. D., John Augustine Smith, M. D., A. L. An- 
derson, M. D,, Richard Hoffman, M. D. 
Apothecary. — Charles E. Fennell. 

EXTRACT FROM REPORT, JANUARY 1837. 

There have been prescribed for during the past year — 

At the Dispensary 10,931 

At their own houses 2,861 

Vaccinated during the past year — 

At the Dispensary 1,008 

At their own houses 750 

Making a total of 15,550 

Expenses S2,394 51. 

NORTHERN DISPENSARY. 
(Ib Christopher-Street, corner of Waverly Place. Founded in 1827.) 
Robert Halliday, President. 
Otis Loomer, ) ,^. „ .j . 

Benjamin B. Howell, ] ^^^^ Presidents. 
William T. Whittemore, Secretary. 
George Barrell, Treasurer. 
Attending Physicians.—:}. B. Samo, M. D., R.W. Cairns, 
M. D., J. W. G. Clements, M. D., E. Earle, M, D., Ho« 
ratio Stone, M. D., J. C. Fisher, M. D. 



64 MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 

Consulting Physicians. — John Neilson, M. D., James 
Stewart, M. D., C. A. Lee, M. D., John Stearns, M. D. 

Consv.lting Surgeons. — A. H. Stevens, M. D., S. C. 
Roe, M. D/ 

Apothecary. — Wm. L. De Bow. 

Number of patients during the past year, 4580. 

Receipts, in 1836, $1414 AG 

Expenditures, 1)1385 53 

EASTERN DISPENSARY. 
(27-5 Division-Street. Commenced June. 1834.) 
Samuel Akerly, M. D., President. 
E. D. Comstock, Vice President. 
Walter Underhill, Treasurer. 
E. D. Brown, Secretary. 
Consulting Physicians. — Benjamin R. Robson, M. D., 
Anthony L. Anderson, M. D. 

Consulting Surgeons. — John Augustine Smith, M. D., 
James Cockcroft, M. D. 

Attending Physicians.—^. E. Stilwell, M. D., T. Mar- 
selis, M. D., D.'D. Marvin, M. D., J. P. Garrish. M. D., 
A. L. White, M. D. 

Eye and Ear Department. — John E. Stilwell, M. D., T. 
C. Chalmers, M. D. 

Vaccine Department. — Stephen Wood, M. D. 
Apothecary. — Rowland H. Bourne. 
Number of patients, 1836, was 6,614. 
Expenses, $1,374 75. 

THE SOCIETY OF SURGEON DENTISTS OF THE CITY AND STATE OP 
NEW-YORK. 

The objects of this society are to advance the honour 
of the profession, and to preserve good feeling and har- 
mony among its members. A course of lectures is an- 
nually delivered. 

Elisha Baker, President. 

John B. Stout, Vice President. 

Solomon Brown, Recording Secretary. 

John W. Crane, M. D., Corresponding Secretary. 

Jahial Parmly, Treasurer. 

John Burdell, Librarian. 

Eleazar Parmly, ^ 

Elisha Baker, ' > Investigating Committee. 

Vernon Ciiyler, ) 



INSTITUTIONS OF THE FINE ARTS. 65 

"I ■ . • ' ^::3 

COLLEGE OP PHARMACY OF THE CITY OP NEW-YORK. 

This institution is composed of Druggists and Apothe- 
caries, and was chartered in 1831. It now consists of 
about eighty members. Two courses of Lectures are 
annually delivered by the professors attached to the In- 
stitution. 

The present officers are — 

Constantine Adamson, President. 

John Milhau, ) 

Oliver Hull, > Vice Presidents. 

James H. Hart, ) 

Charles L. White, Treasurer, 

Allen C. Hallock, Secretary. 

Dr. Rogers, Professor of Materia Medica. 

John H. Griscom, Professor of Chemistry. 
This Association has for its object the improvement 
of the sciences of Chemistry, Pharmacy, and Materia 
Medica ; and to furnish a school where those designing 
to follow the business of Apothecaries may acquire the 
necessary instruction. 



INSTITUTIONS OP THE FINE ARTS. 

AMERICAN ACADEMY OP THE PINE ARTS.* 
(No. 8| Barclay-street, near Broadway.) 
Rembrandt Peale, President. 
Ithiel Town, Vice President. 
Alexander J. Davis, Secretary, 
Pierre Flandin, Treasurer. 



DIRECTORS 

James Herring, 
John C. Chapman, 
Alexander Hosack, M.D 
Frederick R. Spencer, 



Jacob C. Ward, 

Jer. Van Rensselaer, M.D,, 

William Page, 

John F. E. Prudhomme, 



This Institution was founded in 1802, for the improve- 
ment and encouragement of the Fine Arts ; and incor- 
porated in 1808, Mr. Vanderlyn was sent to France 



* This building was in part destroyed by fire, March 23, 1837. Several 
valuable paintings and books were consumed, and others more or less 
injured. The collection of Statuary, however, belonging to the Academy 
Mnere but slightly injured. 

6* 



66 INSTITUTIONS OF THE FINE ARTS. 

and Italy, in 1803, for the purpose of copying for the 
Academy the finest pictures by the great masters; and 
to collect casts from antique statues, and other pieces of 
sculpture; which, with the additions since made, form 
the most valuable collection of sculpture in the United 
States. Napoleon, while First Consul, presented Mr. 
Livingston, our ambassador to France, with a precious 
collection of casts, engravings, &c., for this Institution, 
which may be seen by the public during the season ot 
exhibition. The annual exhibition opens in May, for 
three months; at other times, the rooms of the Academy 
are generally open for the exhibition of paintings of a 
high order of merit. 

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF DESIGN, 
(In Clinton Hall.) 

Instituted in 1826, by artists professing the four arts of 
design, viz. — Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, and En- 
graving. This Academy is the only Academy of De- 
sign in the United States, being founded on the same ge- 
neral principles as Academies of Design throughout the 
civilized world. 

The Academic body consists of twenty-six Academi- 
cians, who are professional artists, and who may in- 
crease their numbers to fifty, chosen from a body of 
Associates. A body of Honorary Members, to whom 
are granted liberal privileges, are attached to the Insti- 
tution. 

Schools are established, and in progress of establish- 
ment, similar to those in Europe, where are taught 
drawing from the antique, and from the living model. 
A school of ornament is about to be commenced. Pre- 
miums are given annually to the successful candidates 
among the students. A fine collection of casts from the 
antique statues belongs to the Academy; among which 
are the Farnese Hercules, and the Antinous of the Bra- 
schi palace, both of colossal size, the only casts of these 
celebrated antiques in the western world. 

Lectures are annually delivered by professors of paint- 
ing, of sculpture, of anatomy, of perspective, of mytho- 
logy, of historical composition, of miniature painting, 
of history, of wood engraving. 

The annual Exhibition occurs in May, and consists of 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTION.^. 67 



works by living artists only, and such as have never be- 
fore been exhibited by the Academy. • ' 

The government is vested in a President, Vice' Presi- 
dent, Secretary, Treasurer, and two members, constitu- 
ting a Council, who are chosen at the annual election in 
May, 

COUNCIL. 

Samuel F. B, Morse, President. 

William Dunlap, Vice President. 

Asher B. Durand, Secretary. 

John L. Morton, Corresponding Secretary. 

Thomas S. Cummings, Treasurer. 

Charles Ingham. 

Thomas Cole. 

PROFESSORS. 

Samuel F. B. Morse, of Painting. 

Horatio Greenough, of Sculpture. 

Hamilton Morton, M. D., of Anatomy. 

William C. Bryant, of Mythology. 

Robert W. Weir, of Perspective. 

William Dunlap, of Historical Composition. 

Thomas S. Cummings, of Miniature Painting. 

Gulian C. Verplanck, of History. 

J. J. Mapes, of the Chemistry of Colours. 

A. J. Mason, of Wood Engraving. 



lilTERARY ATiffD SCIENTIFIC I]?fSTITUTI01VS. 

NEW-YORK LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL BOCIETT. 

William A. Duer, LL, D., President. 

Hon. Albert Gallatin, 1 

James Renwick, LL. D., > Vice Presidents. 

Rev. John M'Vickar, D. D., ) 

Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, M. D., ) Corresponding 

John W. Francis, M. D., ^ Secretaries. 

DaSefS'lieid, | ^^-ording Secretaries, 

Rev. J. F. Schroeder, ) nintnrs 
James E.Dekay,M.D., J '-^^rator^. 



68 LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS, 



COUNSELLORS. 



Valentine Mott, M. D., 
Alex. L. Hosack, M. D., 
William B. Lawrence, 
Jacob Harvey, 
Samuel F. B. Morse, 



Wm. J. M'Neven, M. D., 
Col. John Trumbull, 
William Emerson, 
Philip Hone, 
John Stearns, M. D. 



John L. Morton, Treasurer. 

NEW-YORK SOCIETY LIBRARY. 
(No. 12 Chambers-Street, near Chatham. Established 1754.) 
Open every day, except Sundays and holidays, from 
9 A. M., till sunset. Volumes, 30,000. Price of shares, 
$25. Annual dues, S4. 

John I. Morgan, ^ 

J. A. Smith, 

Gulian C. Verplanck, I Library 

Edward W. Laight, [ Committee. 

Evert Bancker, 

Enos T. Throop, 

Philip J. Forbes, Librarian. 

THE NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 
(E8tablishedl809.) 

Possesses a library of about 10,000 volumes, with a 
valuable collection of coins and medals. They now oc- 
cupy spacious rooms in the building lately erected by 
the Stuyvesant Institute in Broadway, opposite Bond-street. 

Peter G. Stuyvesant, President. 

Philip Hone, First Vice President. 

William B. Lawrence, Second Vice President. 

H. W. Field, Treasurer. 

Frederic De Peyster, Secretary. 

Joseph Blunt, Librarian. 

THE NEW-YORK ATHEN^UM. 
(Corner of Broadway and Chambers-street. Established, 1824.) 

For the promotion of science and literature. This 
Institution contains a well selected library of 1600 vols., 
together with all the most popular Foreign and Ameri- 
can periodicals and newspapers. Yearly subscription, 
$5. Subscribers privileged to introduce strangers, gratis. 

Rev. J. M'Vickar, President. 

John Delafield, Treasurer. 

S. C. Williams, Recording Secretary. 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 69 

THE LYCEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
(563 Broadway, near Prince-street. Incorporated, 1818.) 
This Institution possesses a valuable Library, and a 
museum of natural history, and have recently erected a 
fine and substantial building for their accommodation, 
where public lectures are frequently given. 
Joseph Delafield, President. 
John Torrey, First Vice President. 
William Cooper, Second Vice President. 
Samuel Thomas Carey, Corresponding Secretary. 
J. H. Redfield, Recording Secretary. 
John C. Jay, Treasurer. 
Robert H. Brownne, Librarian. 



Joseph Delafield, i 
Abraham Halsey, ] 
James E. Dekay, [► Curators. 
J. C. Jay, 
E. L. Beadle, 






THE AMERICAN LYCEUM 

Was founded in 1831, for the promotion of education, 
particularly bythe means of common schoels, embracing 
the whole Union, founding Lyceums, &c. 
William A. Duer, LL. D., President, 
Alexander Proudfit, D. D.,'] 
Edward Everett, ! Vice 

Philip Lindsley, j Presidents. 

Peter W. Radcliff, J 

William B. Kinney, Recording Secretary. 
Theodore Dwight, jr., First Corresponding Secre- 
tary. 
William Forrest, Treasurer. 
A large Executive Committee, and a number of Cor- 
responding Secretaries, in difierent states. 

STUYVESANT INSTITUTE. 
(In Broadway, opposite Bond-street.) 
This institution was organized in 1834, for the diffu- 
sion of knowledge, by means of popular lectures, and to 
establish a reading room, library, cabinet of natural his- 
tory, &c., in the building recently erected by the Asso- 
ciation, which is built of granite in the most substantial 
style, being 75 feet front on Broadway. 



W LITBRIRT AND KCIENTTFIC INSTITUTIONS. 

« «' ' ■ ■ ■ ■ — - 

Samuel Ward, President. 
Stephen Allen, Vice President. 
Robert G. Rankin, Secretary. 
Russell H. Nevins, Treasurer. 

DIRECTORS. 

Samuel Ward, Samuel B. Ruggles, P. H. Woodruff, 
William Turell, Stephen Allen, J. G. Pearson, John 
R. Townsend, William Kent, John W. Francis, Wm. 
B. Lawrence, John C. Brant, Saul Alley, John I. Bailey, 
Peter G. Stuyvesant, R, H. Nevins, Verdine Ellsworth^ 
Robert G. Rankin. 

CLINTON HALL ASSOCIATION. 
(Established, 1830.) 

For the cultivation and promotion of Literature, Sci- 
ence, and the Arts. 

Philip Hone, President. 
R. B. Brown, Secretary. 

MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 
(Clinton Hall. Instituted, 1821.) 

Objects. — The encouragement of moral and intellec- 
tual improvement, by the dissemination of knowledge, 
particularly amongst merchants' clerks. 

With this view the society have procured a large 
number of standard and periodical works, for a library 
and reading room. 

The library is composed of between 1300 and 14(X) vo- 
lumes. In the reading rooms may be found the princi- 
pal periodical publications of the United States, Great 
Britain, and France. The rooms are open from 10, 
A. M., to 10, P. M. Under the patronage of the direc- 
tors, annual courses of lectures are delivered. 

Terms. — The payment of one dollar initiation fee, one 
dollar for the first six months, and fifty cents thereafter, 
quarterly in advance, entitles merchants' clerks to regu- 
lar membership, which enables them to procure books 
from the library, to the use of the reading room, and to 
advantages incidental to attendance at lectures. 

The privileges of honorary membership are confer- 
red on merchants and others, who contribute five dollars 
Annually in advance, Honorary members are admitted 
to all the rights of regular membership, except that of 
*!oting. Number of members, (Feb- 1837,) 2736, 



LITERARY AMD SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. *?! 

-* — -^ - ' " ' "^ 

The receipts, during the past year, obtained from ini- 
liation fees, quarterly dues, &c., amounted to S5,222 96. 
The expenditures for books, &c., amounted to $5,079 61. 
Charles Rolfe, President. 
Alexander Nesbit, Vice President. 
William H. Fleming, Secretary. 
E. A. Lewis, Treasurer. 
Directors. — Edmund Coffin, Albert G. Lee, Reuben M. 
Hobinson, J. S. Shultz, E. B. Pease, John J. Herrick, J. 
H. Beekman, and H. R. Prall. 
apprentices' library of the general society op mechanic* 

AND tradesmen. 
(Crosby-Street. Established, 1820.) 
This Library contains between 12,000 and 13,000 vols., 
and supplies annually about 1700 readers. Commodious 
reading rooms are connected with the establishment, for 
the accommodation of the members of the society, and 
for apprentices. Open from 6 to 9 o'clock, in the evening. 
William Harsall, Chairman. 
C. C. Jacobus, Treasurer. 
John A. Smith, Secretary. 
J. I. Stephens, Librarian. 

NEW-YORK LAW INSTITUTE. 
(No. 22 City Hall. Established, 1830.) 

Samuel Jones, President. 

Peter A. Jay, ^ 

Beverly Roljinson, > Vice Presidents. 

David B. Ogden, S 

John Lorimer Graham, Treasurer. 

Jonathan P. Hall, Librarian. 

Benjamin W. Bonney, Secretary. 
The New- York Law Institute keep their library in 
the City Hall, of the City of New- York. This society 
was formed in 1828, by a number of gentlemen, for the 
purpose of professional improvement. In 1830, the bet- 
ter to attain their objects, they procured an act of incor- 
poration, but from the commencement of their associa- 
tion they have actively and diligently prosecuted thfiir 
intejoiion of forming a useful and complete law library. 
The library already contains more than 2500 volumes 
of select law books, and nearly the whole series of Eng- 
lish and American reports. 



79 LITERARY AND SaENTlFlC INSTITUTIONS. 

«' f ... 

Members of the bar from abroad, while in the city, 
and judges of the different courts, are, by the rules of 
the Institute, entitled to the use of the library, 

LAW ASSOCIATION OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 
(Organized, March, 18.^.) 
The principal objects embraced in its design are a 
library and reading room, Moot Courts and Law Lec- 
tures, which are provided for in its constitution, and in- 
tended for the benefit and improvement of the law stu- 
dents and junior members of the bar. 
Henry Mott, President. 
George Bowman, Vice President. 
C. W. Van Voorhies, Secretary. 

NEW-YORK SACRED MUSIC SOCIETY, 
(Established, 1823. Incorporated, 1829.) 

Meet at their Hall, Chatham-street Chapel, Qate 
Chatham Theatre,) every Monday evening. 

Nathaniel T. Hubbard, President. 

Aaron Clark, First Vice President. 

William Hall, Second Vice President. 

James Dunn, Secretary. 

, Treasurer. 

Richard M. Pell, Librarian. 

George Whitlock, Assistant Librarian. 

William H. Sage, Conductor. 
Directors. — David R. Harrison, Luther B. Wyman, 
Nicholas Berrj', James P. Gifhng, Richard Lanckenau. 

BROOKLYN LYCEUM. 

(Corner of Washington and Concord streets, Brooklyn.) 

This Institution was organized in October, 1833. Its 
objects are intellectual and moral improvement, by 
means of certain specified committees, and by public lec- 
tures. A course of lectures upon miscellaneous sub- 
jects, by gentlemen of the City of Brooklyn, was com- 
menced on the 7th of November, 1833, to be conti- 
nued at stated intervals. This has been varied occa- 
sionally by essays, generally from the pens of ladies. 
The institution is in a highly prosperous state. It is 
proposed to connect with it a library, philosophical ap- 
paratus, &c., and ground has been purchased, and an 



LITERARY AND SCIEN'nFIC INSTITUTIONS. 73 

elegant building erected. The officers are elected an- 
nually, on the first Wednesday of October. The follow- 
ing officers constitute the present Board. 

Gen. Jeremiah Johnson, President. 

Theodore Eames, ) y. pj-^sidents 

Evan M. Johnson, S ^r^sments. 

Theodore Dwight, jr., Corresponding Secretary. 

Alexander Hadden, Recording Secretary. 

Josiah Dow, Treasurer. 

An Executive Committee of eight. 

UNITED STATES NAVAL LYCEUM. 

(Established at the Navy-Yard, Brooklyn.) 

This Institution was organized by the officers of the 

Navy and Marine Corps, in order to promote the difiu- 

sion of useful knowledge, to foster a spirit of harmony, 

and a community of interest in the service. 

Com. Charles G. Ridgely, President. 

M. C. Perry, Captain, First Vice President. 

Wm. L. Hudson, Lieutenant, 2d Vice President. 

Charles O. Handy, Purser, Corresponding Secretary. 

Henry J. Willet, > Recording Secretaries 
A. D. Ostrander, \ recording becretaries. 

George W. Lee, Treasurer. 

Dr. John Hasleti, 'j 

M. C. Perry, Captain, | 

Dr. M. G. Delaney, }> Curators. 

S. B. Wilson, Lieutenant, | 

J. W. Turk, Lieutenant, j 

Professor E. C. Ward, Librarian. 

George A. Farley, Assistant Librarian. 

Committee of Correspondence. 
William L. Hudson, Lieutenant, Chairman. 
Stephen B. Wilson, Lieutenant. 
Joshua R. Sands, Lieutenant. 
Henry W. Ogden, Lieutenant Com'dt. 
Dr. W. Turk. 

Committee of Nomination. 
Commander Ralph Voorhees, Chairman. 
Samuel Hart, Naval Constructor, 
Dr. M. G. Delaney. 
W. W. Bleecker, Passed Midshipman. 
Joseph Lanman, Lieutenant. 
7 



74 LITERARY AND SCTENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 



Committee of Finance. 
C. O. Handv, Purser, Chairman. 
Dr. John Haslett, 
Colonel T. Craven. 

Library Committee. 
Dr. W. Turk, Chairman. 
Dr. A. G. Gambrill. 
Dr. Lewis B. Hunter. 
Rev. Charles S. Stewart. 
J. J. Almy, Passed Midshipman. 
Draughtsman — Samuel M. Pook. 

AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF >ULITARY AND NAVAL EVENTS, 
(Established, December 19th, 1834.) 
To collect and rescue from oblivion every unrecorded 
action and incident of the revolutionary and late wars. 

General Morgan Lewis, President. 
^ Gen. Winfield Scott, ^ 

Washington Irving, | 

SJ.-S^twJst'^ebb, [Vice Presidents. 

Gen. Anthony Lamb, 

Col. Thomas Morris, J 

Philip E. Milledoler, ) Recording Secretaries 
James F. Brady, ] ^^^°^^^^° oecreiaries. 

Hamilton Fish, > Corresponding 

Horatio Gates Stevens, \ Secretaries. 
Abraham Le Foy, Treasurer. 

CORRESPONDING COMMITTEE. 

Ely Moore, 



Capt. George Mills, 
Capt. M. C.Perry, U.S. N 
Col. Samuel L. Knapp, 
Mordecaf M. Noah , 
Li. A. Slidell, U. S. N., 
Dr. John Wolcott, 



Charles A. Clinton, 
William W. Campbell, 
Henry C. Sperry, 
Darius Darling, 
Charles F. Hoffman. 



HAMILTON LITERARY ASSOCIATION — BROOKLYN. 

This Association has been in existence about seven 
years. It is composed of young men who engage in the 
exercise of debate and literary composition. Its meet- 
ings are held once a week, from October to June, in 
every year. 



RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 



75 



OFFICERS. 

Charles R. Marvin, President. 

M'Lean, Secretary. 

Henry Hadden, Treasurer. 



REI.IGIOUS, BENEVOIiENT, AND MORAL 

INSTITUTIONS. 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY. 

Hon. John Cotton Smith, President. 

Rev. John C. Brigham, Corresponding Secretary. 

John Nitchie Treasurer. 

Joseph Hyde, General Agent. 

Rev, George Bush, Editor and Librarian. 



MANAGERS. 



John Aspinwall, 
Leonard Bleecker, 
James Boorman, 
Samuel Boyd, 
William N. Chadwick, 
Isaac Carow, 
Charles Chauncey, 
Thomas Cock, M. D., 
George Colgate, 
William Colgate, 
William B. Crosby, 
George Douglas, 
James W. Dominick, 
Thomas Darling, 
William Forrest, 
Timothy R. Green, 
Timothy Hedges, 



Francis Hall, 
Horace Holden, 
Zechariah Lewis, 
Eleazer Lord, 
D. W. C. Olyphant, 
Pelatiah Perit, 
James L. Phelps, M. D^ 
John Sargeant, 
Peter G. Stuyvesant, 
George Suckley, 
Benjamin L. Swan, 
Najah Taylor, 
Samuel Ward, 
B. L. Woolley, 
Marinus Willet, M. D., 
S. V. S. Wilder, 
William Winterton. 



Cornelius Heyer, 

The American Bible Society was formed in 1816, for 
the sole object of increasing the circulation of the Holy 
Scriptures, without note or comment. Its seat of opera- 
tion is at No. 115 Nassau-street, New- York, where Bi- 
bles and Testaments are printed, bound, and issued. 
More than two million of copies have been issued in 
tvxnty years. The Society is under the direction of a 
board of thirty-six Lay Managers, (Baptists, Episcopa- 
lians, Presbyterians, Episcopal Methodists, Reformed 



76 RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 



Dutch, and Society of Friends,) who meet once a month, 
withfl-ut pay, and inspect and give directions in relation 
to all the affairs of the Institution. They publish a 
monthly account of all moneys received, and once a year 
give, in a printed report, a full history of all their pro- 
ceedings. 

The Society has now nearly one thousand Auxiliary 
Societies, scattered through ever}' State and Territory in 
the Union. The Auxiliaries receive books at the very 
lowest rates at which they can be made, and when una- 
ble to buy are furnished with them gratuitously. 

Any person becomes an annual member, and has a 
right to buy books at cost, by paying S3. A member for 
life pays S30, and a director for life S150. 

The Society's houses, built by funds given for this ob- 
ject, cover one hundred feet square of ground. They 
contain the offices of the Secretaiy and the General 
Agent, the Managers' Hall, a large depository for books, 
a printing office with seventeen steam power presses, 
and an extensive bindery. If necessary, 1000 Bibles per 
day can easily be made. The Society keeps no perma- 
nent funds, but expends all contributed in circulating the 
Scriptures at home or abroad. 

AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY. 
(Formed, May, 1825.) 
House comer of Nassau and Spruce streets, erected 
by the liberality of individuals in the City of New- York. 
Receipts, the vear ending April 15, 1836 — 

For publications sold, $47,573 37 

Donations, 56,638 04 

Total, S104,211 41 

The Society has stereotyped more than 500 duodecimo 
Tracts, in English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, 
German, Danish, and AVelsh ; nearly 200 Children's 
Tracts, Broadsheets, and Handbills : with numerous oc- 
casional volumes, including the Rise and Progress, Pil- 
grim's Progress, Saint's Rest, Call to the Unconverted, 
Edwards on the Affections, Life of Brainerd, Essays to 
do Good, Biographies, Pocket Manuals, &c. &c., making 
a total of nearly 800 publications. Agents are employed 
in different parts of the country to awaken an interest in 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 77 

: ' * . . ^=3 

circulating these publications. In May, 1836, 43,647,590 
Tracts, and other publications, embracing 711,853,750 
pages, had been printed ; and 39,042,676 publications, 
embracing 614,790,076 pages, had been circulated ; of 
which 43,084,983 pages were grants. The Society also 
aids in circulating Tracts in foreign and pagan lands, 
especially where American Missionaries are labouring, 
having appropriated for that object, in the year ending 
April, 1835, S30,000 ; 1836, $35,000. The Society has 
evidences of good accomplished in the reformation of 
the immoral, and the apparent conversion of many, both 
in our own country, and in foreign lands. 

S. V. S. Wilder, Esq., President, 

Rev. A. Proudfit, and others. Vice Presidents. 

Moses Allen, Treasurer. 

William A. Hallock, Corresponding Secretary. 

Rev. Oman Eastman, Vis. and Fin. Secretary. 

Rev. A. Maclay, Recording Secretary. 

R. Kingsbury, Assistant Secretary. 

Rev. William A. Hallock, General Agent. 

John A. Ackley, Depositary. 
Thirty-six Directors, besides an extensive distributing 
and finance committee. 

NEW-YORK CITY TRACT SOCIETY. 
(Instituted, February 19, 1827.) 
This Society, which is auxiliary to the " American 
Tract Society," was formed to promote the circulation 
of religious tracts within the bounds of the city, and to 
extend the operations of the parent institution. 
Zechariah Lewis, Esq., President. 
Rev. Thomas M' Auley, and others, Vice Presidents. 
James F. Robinson, Corresponding Secretary. 
Jesse Talbot, Recording Secretary. 
Alfred Edwards, Treasurer. 

FEMALE BRANCH SOCIETY. 

This Societ}', denominated " The Female Branch of 
the New-York City Tract Society," is to further promote 
the same objects, in connexion with the above insti- 
tutions. 

7* 



78 RELIGIOUS. BENEVOLENT, AND 

Mrs. (Rev. Dr.) De Witt, First Directress. 
Mrs. William W. Chester. Second Directress. 
Mrs. John L. Mason, Treasurer. 
Mrs. William A. Hallock, Secretary. 
Mrs. J. E. Caldwell, and others. Managers. 

AMERICAN BOARD OF C0M>USSI0NERS FOR FOREIGN ADSSIONS. 

(Instituted, 1810. Agency in the Brick Church Chapel.) 

The object of the Board is to propagate the Gospel 

among iinevangelized nations and communities, by 

means of preachers, catechists, schoolmasters, and the 

press. 

The Board has under its care thirty-two missions and 
seventy-eight stations; connected with which are one 
hundred and four ordained missionaries, (seven of whom 
are regularly educated physicians, and six others have 
prosecuted medical studies to such an extent as to render 
them highly useful in that capacity.) nine physicians not 
ordained, eight printers, thirty teachers, catechists, far- 
mers and mechanics, and one hundred and fifty-seven 
married and unmarried female assistants; making a to- 
tal of three hundred and eight missionaries and assistant 
missionaries sent forth from this country. Four native 
preachers and fifty-one other native assistants, employed 
principally as teachers, are also laboring at the several 
missions. The number cf converts received to the forty- 
one churches under the care of the missionaries of the 
Board among the heathen, since their organization, is 
about two thousand and four hundred, and the present 
number is about two thousand and forty-seven. At the 
schools established among the heathen, through the 
agency of persons sent forth by the Board, and taught by 
them, or by persons to a greater or less extent under 
their superintendence and direction, not less than eighty- 
thousand pupils have been instructed since their com- 
mencement, and about twenty-one thousand are now in 
a course of instruction. Connected with the missions 
are eight printing establishments, including fifteen 
presses, at which and at other presses employed by the 
Board, not less than ninety millions of pages have been 
printed, in sixteen different languages, exclusive of the 
English. The languages are the following: — Italian, 
Greek, Armeno-Turkish, Arabic, Mahratta, Tamul, 



^Prudential Committee. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 79 

Chinese, Hawaiian, Cherokee, ChoctaAv, Seneca, Aber- 
naquis, Ojibwa, Ottawa, Creek, and Osage ; seven of 
which were first reduced to a written form by missiona- 
ries of the Board. 

John Cotton Smith, LL. D., President. 

Stephen Van Rensselaer, LL. D., Vice President. 

Calvin Chapin, D. D., Recording Secretar)'. 

Charles Stoddard, Assistant Recording Secretary. 

Samuel Hubbard, LL. D., ^ 

Warren Fay, D. D., 

Hon. Samuel T. Armstrong 

Charles Stoddard, Esq., 

John Tappan, Esq., 

Daniel Noyes, Esq.., 

Rev. Rufus Anderson, D. D.', ) secretaries for 

Rev. David Green, V Correspondence. 

Rev. William J. Armstrong, } ^ 

Henry Hill, Esq., Boston, Treasurer. 

William Hubbard Esq., ) Auditors. 

■Charles Scudder, Esq., ) 

Jesse Talbot, Agent, New- York. 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

A voluntary, unincorporated association, formed by 
persons of the Presbyterian, Congregational, Associate 
Reformed, and Reformed Dutch Churches., in May, 1826. 
The object is " to assist congregations that are unable to 
support the Gospel Ministry, and to send the Gospel to 
the destitute within the United States." During the tenth 
year of its operations it sustained in twenty-seven states 
and territories, 755 missionaries, labouring in more than 
1000 congregations, or missionary districts. Expendi- 
tures, S92,108 94. It has state auxiliaries in Massachu- 
setts, Connecticut, Vermont, Rhode-Island, Maine, New- 
Hampshire, Indiana, Illinois, and smaller auxiliaries 
and Boards of Agency in other states, through which it 
conducts its operations. Thirty dollars constitutes a life 
member, and one hundred dollars a life director. Office^ 
150 Nassau-street, 2d floor. 

Hon. Stephen Van Rensselaer, President. 

Several Vice Presidents. 

Fifty Directors. 

Knowles Taylor, Treasurer, 150 Nassau-street. 



RELIGIOUS, BENE70LEXT, ANP 



Rev. Absalom Peters, Corresponding Secretary. 
Rev. M. Badger, Associate Secretary and Gen. Agent. 
Rev. Charles Hall, Assistant Secretary. 
William M. Halsted, Recording Secretary'. 

AMERICAN SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION. — BRANCH DEPOSITORY, 
NEW-YORK. 

The Depository of Sunday School Books is kept at 
No. 152 Nassau-street. Was established by the American 
Sunday School Union, (which has its principal seat of 
operation in Philadelphia,) in 1827 ; and is still under 
their control. 

All the variety of the publications of the Parent So- 
ciety, are constantly kept for sale at this Depositor^', upon 
the same terms at w^hich they are sold in Philadelphia, 
Constitutional measures are taken to prevent these publi- 
cations from being sectarian or impure. 

The " Sunday School Journal" is issued semi-monthly 
from this office, at one dollar per annum in advance. 

Connected with this Depositor}*-, there is a Board of 
Agency to co-operate with the Parent Society, consisting 
of 21 members, of whom — 

William Winterton, President. 
M. O. Halsted, } ^.. ^ . , , 
F.A.Tracy, '| Vice Presidents. 

F. S. Winston, Corresponding Secretary, 

R. W. Martin, Recording Secretarv. 

Rev. R. B. Campfield, Gen. Agent for New- York. 

THE NEW-YORK SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION. 
(Instituted, in 1816.) 
It embraces at this time eighty-one schools, most of 
w^hich have a male and female department. Seventy- 
seven of these schools report 2119 teachers and conduct- 
ors, 13,352 children, with libraries containing more than 
23,871 volumes of books. 

Eleazer Lord, Esq., President. 
Thomas Purser, and others, Vice Presidents, 
M. O. Halsted, Treasurer. 
H. Holden, Corresponding Secretary. 
Samuel Richards, Recording Secretary. 
John R. Hurd, and others, Managers. 
A Committee of Visiters hold a meeting for business. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 81 

every Saturday evening, corner of White and Centre 
streets. An Association of Teachers meet on the third 
Monday evening in every month, in the basement of the 
Bowery Church. This Union supplies the Schools in 
its connexion with Hymn Books, Testaments, Question 
Books, Class Books, and other requisites, gratuitously. 
The Depository of their books is kept in connexion with 
the one noticed above, and the operations of the Society 
are characterized in like manner, by excluding sectari- 
anism and impurity. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF EDUCATION IN 
AFRICA. 
(No- lis Nassau-Street.) 
William H. Crosby, President. 
Reuben D. Turner, Corresponding and General Agent. 

BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN 
THE UNITED STATES. 

It consists of all the Bishops of said Church, and of 
thirty Clergymen and Laymen, chosen by the General 
Convention; and has two Committees located in this 
City, viz. 

Comviittee for Domestic Missions. 

(Office, No. 115 Franklin street.) 

Right Rev. Benjamin T. Onderdonk, D. D., Chairman. 



Rev. Lot Jones, 
Rev.Wm. R. Whittingham, 
Rev. John M'Vickar, D. D., 
Rev. William Richmond, 



Murray Hoffman, 
Brittain L. Woolley, 
George C. Morgan, 
Don Alonzo Cushman, 



Rev. Benjamin Dorr, Secretary and General Agent. 
Rev. James D. Carder, Local Secretary. 
James Swords, (8 Wall-street,) Treasurer. 
Cominitiee for Foreign Missions. 
(Otfice, No. 114 White-street.) 
Right Rev. Benjamin T. Onderdonk, D. D., Chairman. 



Rev.MantonEastburn,D.D. 
Rev. William Jackson, 
Rev. Benj. C. Cutler, D. D., 
Rev. James Milnor, D. D., 



Lewis Curtis, 
James F. De Peyster, 
John P. Stagg, 
Frederick S. Winston. 



Rev. John A. Vaughan, Secretary and Gen. Agent. 
Henry Carey, (Phenix Bank,) Treasurer. 
Charles J. Aldis, (Bank of America,) acting do. 



83 



RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 



NEW-YORK PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL TRACT SOCIETY. 

Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D.D., cx-officio, Pres't. 
Rev. Lewis P. Bayard, First Vice President. 
Mr. Lewis Curtis, Second Vice President. 
Mr. Thomas C. Butler, Third Vice President. 
Mr. Anthony Ten Broeck, Corresponding Secretary. 
Mr. Pierre E. F. M'Donald, Recording Secretary. 
Mr. Thomas M. Browning, Treasurer. 
Mr. Benjamin M. Yarrington, Agent. 



TRUSTEE.S. 



William E. Dunscomb, 
William H. Hobart, M.D., 
William B. Ballow, 
J. D. L. Walton, jun., 
Thomas M. Beare, 
William H. Bell, 
Charles W. Carmer, 
James D. Fitch, M. D., 
J. B. M'Ewen, M. D., 



William H. Townsend, 

John Atwill, 

N. Radnor Smith, 

John O. Dixey, 

Elijah Guion, jun., 

Theron Wilber, 

L. M. H. Butler, 

J. Remsen Onderdonk, 

Robert Gracie. 



AUXILIARY NEW-YORK BIBLE AND COMMON PRAYER-BOOK 
SOCIETY. 

William E. Dunscorabe, President. 

Henry Cotheal, First Vice President. 

Charles Keeler, Second Vice President. 

John Alstyne, Third Vice President. 

Charles N. S. Rowland, Corresponding Secretary. 

Henry I. Seaman, Recording Secretary. 

Thomas BroAvning, Treasurer. 

Floyd Smith, Agent. 

NEW-YORK PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL PRESS. 
(No. 28 Ann-street.) 
The object of this Society, (founded in 1829,) is the 
diffusion, through the medium of the press, of the bless- 
ings of the Gospel, as it is exhibited in the doctrines, the 
worship, and the discipline of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, in the United States of America. 
Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D. D., ex officio, Pres't. 
Rev. William Berrian, D. D., First Vice President. 
Mr. Charles Keeler, Second Vice President. 
Mr. Henry CvUheal, Treasurer. 
Mr. Louis Shcrm:in, Secretary. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 83 



NEW-YORK PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CITY MISSION SOCIETY. 
(Established in 1831.) 

The object of the Society is to provide Clergymen of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church, to act as missionaries 
in the City of New- York. 

Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D. D., ex officio, Pres't. 
Rev. T. Lyell, D. D., ^ 

Rev. J. M'Vickar, D. D., ] 
Rev. M. Eastburn, D. D., ! ,;.. „ ., , 
Hon. GulianC. VerplaAck, ^^^^^ Presidents. 
William Bard, 
Henry Cary, 

William R. Wadsworth, Secretary. 
Elijah Guion, jun., Assistant Secretary. 
Lewis Phillips, Treasurer. 

NEW- YORK PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL SUNDAY SCHOOL SOCIETY. 
(Instituted in 1817.) 

BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D. D., ex officio^ Pres't. 
Rev. JohnF. Schroeder, D. D.,"] 
Rev. Lot Jones, | 

Rev. Aldert Smedes, jun., \ -^r- -n -j . 

Elijah Guion, J> Vice Presidents. 

Thomas C. Butler, 
William R. Wadsworth, 
T. Wilber, Secretary. 

, Treasurer. 

The schools in union with this society contain rising 
7200 scholars. 

NEW-YORK PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH MUSIC SOCIETY. 
OFFICERS. 

Charles H. Roach, President. 

A. B. Rumsey, Vice President. 
Norwood Bowne, Secretary. 
Charles A. Focke, Treasurer. 
R. L. Williams, Organist. 

W. J. Edson, Conductor. 

J. E. Challis, Assistant Conductor. 

B. Dikeman, Librarian. 

John J. Kearsing, Assistant Librarian. 



J 



84 RELiaions, benevolent, and 

Music Cojnmittce. — W. J. Edson, J. E. Challis, R. L< 
Williams, A. H. Bartlett, W. F. Berry, J. B. auick, N. 
Bowne, ex officio. 

Board of Trustees. — C. H. Roach, Chairman, ez officiOf 
Rev. F. L.'Hawks, D. D., Rev. Henrv Amhon, D. D.,'Rev. 
JohnF. Schroeder, D. D., Benjamin M. Brown, J. E. Chal- 
lis, Joseph T. Harris, Norwood Bowne,. ex officio, Charles 
A. Focke, ex officio. 

EDUCATION AND MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE PROTESTANT EPIS- 
COPAL CHURCH IN THE STATE OF NEW-YORK. 
(Instituted in 1S32.) 
Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D. D., ex officio, Pres'L 
Rev. David Butler, D. D., First Vice President. 
Rev. Thomas Lyell, D. D., Second Vice President. 
Rev. John Reed, D. D., Third Vice President. 
Rev. James Milnor, D. D., Fourth Vice President. 
Rev. John M'Vickar, D. D., Fifth Vice President. 
Rev. John C Rudd, D. D., Sixth Vice President. 
Thomas L. Ogden, Seventh Vice President. 
Peter A. Jay, Eighth Vice President. 
William A.'Duer, D. D., Ninth Vice President, 
David Hudson, Tenth Vice President. 
Benjamin M. Brown, Eleventh Vice President, 
William Johnson, Twelfth Vice President. 
Rev. Henry Anthon, D. D., Corresponding Secretary. 
G. G. Van Wagenen, Recording Secretary. 
Benjamin M. Brown, Treasurer. 

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING RELIGION AK1> 
LEARNING IN THE STATE OF NEW-YORK. 
(Instituted in 1802.) 
Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D. D., ez, officio, Pres't, 
William H. Harrison, Secretary. 
William Johnson, Treasurer. 

OTHER TRUSTEES. 



Rev. Thomas Lyell, D. D., 

Rev. Wm. Berrian, D. D., 

Thomas L. Ogden, 

James Swords, 

Floyd Smith, 

Rev, Thomas Breintnall, 



Richard I. Tucker, 
Hubert Van Wagenen, 
Joseph Ketchum, 
James F. De Peyster, 
William Bard, 
John P. Stagg, 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 85 



Rev. W. Creighton, D. D., 
Rev. Henrv Anthon, D. D., 
Rev. F.L. Hawks, D. D., 



Charles Keeler, 
R,ey. Hugh Smith. 



NEW-YORK CHURCH BUILDING SOCIETY FOR THE WEST. 

Samuel Ward, President. 

James Swords, Vice President. 

Evert Wenman, Secretary. 

Morris Robinson, Treasurer. 
_ This society proposes to raise a capital of S25,000, to 
aid, by loans, in the erection of churches in Illinois, In- 
diana, Tennessee, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, and 
Michigan. 

NEW-YORK PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL PUBLIC SCHOOL. 

Right Rev. Benjamin T. Onderdonk, D. D.^ President. 

Rev. Thomas Lyell, D.D., Vice President. 

Rev. John F. Schroeder, D. D., Secretary. 

Benjamin M. Brown, Treasurer. 

And eighteen other Trustees. 

Rev. John F. Schroeder, D. D., Visiter. 

This institution is richly endowed, has spacious build- 
ings, and gives gratuitous instruction to about three hun- 
dred and fifty scholars. 

CORPORATION FOR THE RELIEF OF WIDOWS AND CHILDREN OF 

CLERGYMEN OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN 

THE STATE OF NEW-YORK. 

Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D. D., ex officio, Pres't. 
Rev. Samuel Seabury, Secretary. 
P. A. Jay, Treasurer. 

YOUNG men's AUXILIARY EDUCATION AND MISSIONARY SOCIETY OP 
THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN THE CITY OF 
NEW-YORK. 
(Instituted in 1834) 
Rev. John F. Schroeder, D. D., President. 
Rev. Aldert Smedes, First Vice President. 
William H. Hobart, M. D., Second Vice President. 
Pierre E. F. M'Donald, Third Vice President. 
Anthony Ten Broeck, Corresponding Secretary. 
Charles W. Carmer, Recording Secretary. 
William H. Townsend, Treasurer. 
8 



8G RKI-IGIOUS, BENEVOf.F.NT. AND 

^^SSIONARY SOCIETY OP THE REFORMED DUTCH CHURCH IN 
NORTH AMERICA. 

Rev. John Knox, D. D., President. 

Daniel D. Williamson, Clerk. 

Peter Van Zandt, M. D., Corresponding Secretary. 

L. V. De Forrest, Treasurer. 

FOREIGN BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE REFORMED DUTCH CHURCH. 

Peter D. Vroom, President. 

Rev. Thomas De Witt, D. D., Corresponding Secretary. 

William R. Thompson, Treasurer. 

synod's board of aussions. 

Peter D. Vroom, President. 

Rev. J. Broadhead, Secretary. 

Thomas C. Doremus, Treasurer. 

EDUCATION SOCIETY OF THE REFORMED DUTCH CHURCH, 

S. Van Rensselaer, President. 

Rev. George Dubois, D. D., Secretary. 

John D. Keese, Treasurer. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION OF THE REFORMED DUTCH CHURCH. 

Hon. S. Van Rensselaer, President. 

B. Lane, Secretary. 

M. W. Brett, Treasurer. 

V. Vandewater, Agent. 

NEW-YORK MARINE BIBLE SOCIETY. 

Noah Wetmore, President. 
John Cleaveland, Secretary. 
Najah Taylor, Treasurer. 

NEW-YORK FEMALE BIBLE SOCIETY. 

Mrs. J. E. Caldwell, President. 
Mrs. David Codwise, Secretary. 
— , Treasurer, 

AMERICAN AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY. 
(Formed May 12, 1836.) 
Rev. Spencer H. Cone, President. 
Rev. C. G. Somers, Cor. Secretary, 83 Madison-street. 
John West, Recording Secretar)\ 
William Colgate, Esq., Treasurer, 6 Dutch-street. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS, 87 

AMERICAN BAPTIST HOME MISSION SOCIETY. 

The object of this society is to promote the preaching of 
the Gospel in North America, through its own exertions, 
and the aid of auxiliary societies of the Baptist denomi- 
nation, 

Hon. Heman Lincoln, of Massachusetts, President. 

^e;: Lufher C?aw"Srd, \ Corresponding Secretaries. 
Rev, John C. Murphy, Recording Secretary. 
Runyon W. Martin, 57 Wall-street, Treasurer. 

TRACT AND SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH. 

Rev. Robert R. Roberts, President. 
David L, Reese, M, D., Secretary. 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 

Rev, Robert R. Roberts, President. 

Rev. Nathan Bangs, D. D., Resident Secretary. 

METHODIST BOOK CONCERN, 

Established for the purpose of distributing Books and 
Tracts throughout the United States ; the income of 
which, after deducting expenses, is appropriated to bene- 
volent purposes. Near 200 persons are employed in the 
various branches of printing and binding, 

T, Mason and George Lane, Agents, 

Rev. Samuel Luckey, D. D., General Editor, 

Rev. J, E. Collins, Assistant Editor. 

PRESBYTERIAN EDUCATION SOCIETY. 

Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen, President. 
William Patton, Secretary and Agent. 
O. Willcox, Treasurer. 

sailors' snug harbor. 
(Now located on Staten Island, near New Brighton.) 
Founded in 1801, by Capt. Robert R. Randall, who de- 
vised his real estate and Mansion House, at the Sand 
Hill, Broadway, (now Eighth and Ninth streets,) to sup- 
port an Asylum for aged and infirm seamen. 

The Trustees named by him are the Mayor and Re- 
corder of New-York, the Presidents of the Chamber of 
Ck)mmerce, and of the Marine Society, the senior myjis- 



88 RlLIjrlGUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 



ter of the Episcopal Church, and of the Presbyterian 
Church in Wall-street. The Trustees applied for an act 
of incorporation, which was granted in 1606 ; but the in- 
tentions of the donor were not carried into effect till a few 
3'ears since, when inquiries were instituted by the Legis- 
lature. In 1830 and 1831, the whole of the Sailor's Snug 
Harbour estate, from Broadway to the Fifth Avenue, and 
"Washington Square, was leased out in house lots for 
twenty-one years. With the income of these rents, the 
Trustees have purchased a farm of nearly one hundred 
and fifty acres of fine land, on the north side of Staten 
Island, "half a mile west of New-Brighton ; they have 
erected a large and convenient building, G5 feet by 100, 
where fifty or sixtv disabled seamen find a snug harbor 
for life, with every vrant supplied, and laboring only 
enough for their health and comfort. The building com- 
mands a fine view of the Bay of New-York, the Hudson 
River, and Newark Bay, and the Philadelphia stesmboats 
pass it daily. The whole of the Sailor's Snug Harbor 
propertv is now supposed to bs worth a million of dollars. 
The Trustees of this Initiiuion report to the Legisla- 
ture that their receipts during the year 1836 amounted to 
S5-2,702 58, and their expenditures to 850,766 19. Their 
income from rents for 1837 they estimate at 5^33,265. 

AMERICAN seamen's FRIEND SOCIETY. 
(Formed, January, 1S26.') 

Commenced the Sailor's Magazine, and other steady 
operations, in the fall of 1828. 
Adrian Van Sinderen, Brooklyn, President. 
Hon. Levi Woodbury and others. Vice Presidents. 
Rev. Jonathan Greenleaf, Corresponding Secretary. 
Elisha D. Hurlburt, Recording Secretary. 
Charles N. Talbot, 6G South-street, New-York, Tresurer- 
Samuel Brown, General Agent. 

Office of the Society, 82 Nassau-street. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



x\drian Van Sinderen, 
Rev. John C. Brigham, 
John Wheelwright, 
Charles N. Talbot, 
E. D. Hurlburt, 



Jonathan Greenleaf, 
Thomas De Witt, 
EdM^Trd Richardson, 
William L. Hudson. 



MORAI, INSTITUTION;'. 85) 



Annual Mcetino: — Monday previous to the second 
Thursday in May. 

NEW-YORK INSTITUTION FOR THE INSTRUCTION OF THE DEAF 

AND DUMB. 

(Incorporated, April, 1817.) 

This institution commenced operations under its char- 
ter, by opening a school for the reception of pupils on the 
12th day of May,1818. Until the spring of 1829, the school 
was held in the building now called the New City Hall. 
At that time the pupils were transferred to a large building 
erected for the purposes of the institution, on Fiftieth- 
street and the Fourth Avenue, three and a half miles from 
the City Hall. Communication between the Institution 
and the city is rendered very easy, by the cars which pass 
on the Harlaem Rail Road, (Fourth Avenue,) every fifteen 
or twenty minutes in both directions. 

The principal building occupied for the purposes of the 
Institution, is one hundred and ten feet jjy sixty, in the 
dimensions of its plan, and five stories in height", includ- 
ing the basement. It accommodates, with some inconve- 
nience, the number of pupils (about one hundred and 
sixty) which the Institution embraces at present : with the 
teachers, the family of the Principal, and such other per- 
sons as are needed to assist in conducting the affairs of 
the establishment. 

The original charter of the Institution being about to 
expire by limitation on the first day of April, 1837, it was 
extended by the Legislature, in the spring of 183G, for a 
period of twenty-five years. 

The number of pupils who were members of the Insti- 
tution in 1836, was one hundred and ninety-seven; the ac- 
tual number present on the first day of January, 1837, Avas 
one hundred and sixty. One hundred and twenty of these 
are supported at the expense of the State of New- York, 
seven at the expense of the State of New- Jersey ; four by 
the city authorities, one by the Supervisors of the county 
of Dutchess, five by the fmids of the Institution, and the 
rest by their parents or friends. 

8* 



)0 RELIGIOUS, BENKVOLENT, AND 



OFFICERS. 

Rev. James Milnor, D. D.. President. 

Peter Sharpe, First Vice President. 

Myndert Van Schaick. Second Vice President. 

Robert D. Weeks, Treasurer. 

Harvey -P. Peet, Secretary 



Lcv/is Seymour, 

Timothy Hedges, 

Rev. J. F. Schroeder, D.D., 

James Lovett, 

Robert C. Cornell, 

B. L. Woollev, 

Henrv I. Wvckoff, 

Joim'R. Willis, 

Charles L. Livingston, 

William L. Stone, 



Shepherd Knapp, 
Samuel Downer, jun., 
Jacob Drake, 
William B. BoUes, 
Henry S. Richards, 
William Kelly, 
George S. Ro'bbins, 
David Thompson, 
Augustin Averill, 
Edward Curtis. 



Harvey P. Peet, A. M., Principal of the Institution, 

FROFESSORS- 

David Elv Bartlett, A. M., Frederick A. P. Barnard, 
A. M., Josiah Addison Gary, A. M., Barnabas Maynard 
Fay, A. M., Amos Boardman Lambert, A. B., Ransom 
Taylor, A. B., Joseph Haven, A. B., Oran W. Morris. 
Samuel Sargent, M. D., Physician. 
Miss Martha Dudley, Matron. 
Mrs. Harriette St oner, Assistant Matron 
Patience Baker, Seamstress. 
Edmund B. Peet, Steward. 
R. J. Tucker, Cabinet-maker. 
Samuel B. Wyckoi!", Tailor. 
John Hackett, Shoemaker. 
J. C. Miller, Book-binder. 
Garrett Mead, Gardener. 
The total number of admissions into the Institution to 
January 1, 1837, was 488. In May, 183G, the Central Asy- 
lum for the Deaf and Dumt at Canajoharie was closed, 
and the pupils transferred to the New- York Institute. 
The total number of admissions at Canajoharie, was 149. 
Total of both Institutions 637. Of these, 117 have been 
members of both schools, or more than once admitted to 
the same. Whence the number of deaf-mutes who have 
been under instruction in the State, to January 1, 1837, 
-was 520. Of these, 283 were males, and 238 females: 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 91 



193 were born deaf; 201 became deaf by disease, or acci- 
dent early in life ; of 117 the causes of their deafness are 
unknown ; and 9 were both deaf from birth, and incapable 
of intellectual improvement. 

There are at present one hundred and forty schools for 
the deaf and dumb in the world. There are five in Ame- 
rica, viz. one in Hartford, Conn. ; one in Philadelphia, 
Penn. ; one in Columbus, Ohio; one in Danville, Ky. ; 
and the New- York Institution, New-York city. Of these 
the New- York Institution is considerably the largest. 
There are two larger institutions only of the kind in Eu- 
rope, viz. the Insticuiion of London, containing 230 pupils, 
and the Royal Institution of Paris, containing 175. The 
National Institution at Groningen, Holland, contains the 
same number as that in New- York, viz. 160. 

According to the census of 1835, the number of per- 
sons deaf and dumb in the State of New- York, was 1070, or 
one to every 2029 individuals. There is great reason, 
from various facts in possession of the Institution, to sus- 
pect the accuracy of the returns. A more just estimate 
of the deaf mute population of the State would be, at the 
smallest computation, 1200, probably 1300. The least 
number named would give one deaf mute to 1800 persons. 
The proportion in Europe is about one to 1550 ; through' 
out the world one to 1500. 

ORPHAN ASYLUM. 
(Situated at Bloomingdale. Founded in 1807.) 
Thirty years have elapsed since this charitable institu- 
tion commenced its labours ; and during that period of 
time there have been admitted 931 children; of whom 
411 boys have been apprenticed to mechanics and farm- 
ers, 273 girls to trades, and as servants in private families, 
and 81 have died. Thirty is about the average number 
yearly bound out, and about the same number is yearly 
received. Present number of children in the Asylum is 173. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Mrs. Gen. Hamilton, First Directress, 
Mrs. Bethune, Second Directress. 
Mrs. Walsh, Treasurer. 
Mrs. Maria Montgomery, Secretary, 



0-2 



nriLrciou.^, DKV):vut,K.vp, and 



Miss Bleecker, 
Mrs. Maria Remsen, 
Mrs. John Aspinwall, 
Miss Parker, 
Mrs. Richmond, 



TRUSTEES. 

Mrs. Perrit, 
Mrs. J. P. Van Home, 
Miss Donaldson, 
Mrs. Satterlhwaite, 
Mrs. Bailev, 



PROTESTANT HALF ORPHAN SOCIETY. 

(Twelfth-street. Established in 1835.) 

OFFICERS. 

Mrs. William A. Tomlinson, First Directress. 
Mrs. James Boorman, Second Directress. 
Mrs. J. W. Wheeler, Secretary. 
Mrs. N. Littlefield, Treasurer. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Mrs. William A. Tomlinson, 37 Great Jones-street. 
Mrs. E. Wainwright, 59 Bleecker-street. 
Mr. James Boorman, 13 Washiniifton Square. 
Mrs. John W. Wheeler, 76 Franklin-street. 
Mrs. Levi Coit. Eighth-street. 



MANAGERS. 



Mrs. William W. Chester, 

D. F. Manice, 

J. Boorman, 

Eli Wainwright, 

Levi Coit, 
Miss Rhoades, 

Kelso, 

Sidell, 

A. L. Smith, 
Mrs. John W. Wheeler, 

Samuel Neilson, 

George R. Ives, 
Miss Elizabeth Riggs, 



Mrs. 

Miss 
Mrs. 

Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 



G. C. Goddard, 
John Noble, 
King, 

S. P. Staples, 
G. S. Robbins, 
M. Skimer, 
Charles March, 
Matilda Bleecker, 
Charles Talbot, 

Clark, 
Asa Smith, 
Norton. 



ROMAN CATHOLIC ORPHAN ASYLUM. 
(Prince-street, corner of Mott.) 
Right Rev. John'Dubois, President. 
P. M'Kenna, Secretary. 
John B. Lasala, Treasurer. 
Sister Elizabeth Boyle, Principal. 
Total number of orphans, male and female, aboRit 2O0. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 



93 



FEMALE BENEVOLENT SOCIETY. 
(Female Asylum, Yorkville.) 
Mrs. G. Lathrop, First Directress. 
Mrs. A. Warner, Second Directress. 
Mrs. Dr. Mead, Treasurer. 

Mrs. Charles C. Darling, Corresponding Secretary. 
Mrs. S. Cobb, Recording Secretary. 

NEW-YORK FEMALE ASSISTANCE SOCIETY. 
(For the Relief and Religious Instruction ol'tlie Sick Soor.) 

The object of this society is the relief and instruction 
of the side poor ; the beneficiaries are chiefly " the father- 
less and the widow," who are visited by one or more of 
the Managers, and supplied with the necessaries of life, 
including fuel, food, clothing, and bedding. 

The Twenty-third Annual Report of this Institution is 
published, to which is added a list of the subscribers, and 
of donations made to the Society from November, 1835, to 
November, 1836. By this report, it appears that S5,313 
has been distributed in the purchasing of wood, food, &c., 
and given to diiferent persons deserving of charitable as- 
sistance. 

DIRECTRESSES. 

Mrs. Francis Hall, 152 Hudson-street. 

Mrs. William Galatian, 72 Amity-street. 

Mrs. Thomas Scott, 49 White-street. 

Mrs. Joseph Trulock, 202 Bleecker-street. 

Mrs. Henry W. Olcott, 114 Chambers-street, Treasurer. 

Miss Post, 9 Carroll Place, ) Secretaries 

Miss Mercein, 5Laight-street, J 

MANAGERS. 

Mrs. Samuel G. Smith, 100 Cliff-street. 

Mrs. Ezra Dennison, 197 William-street. 

Mrs. Dr. Reese, 525 Broadway. 

Mrs. Jacob P. Bunting, 51 Crosby-street. 

Mrs. Benjamin Farrington, 122 Sullivan-street. 

Mrs. Silas Brown, 46 Cliff-street. 

Mrs. Felix A. Huntingdon, 44 Franklin-street. 

Mrs. Thomas Lankford, 54 Rivington-street. 

Mrs. Ellis Potter, 143 Chambers-street. 

Mrs. Joseph Varick, 83 Amity-street. 



04 RKU(1I0U^?, BENEVOLENT, AND 



Mrs. Fullerton, 17 Clinton Place. 
Mrs. A. T. Anderson, 137 Hudson-street. 
Mrs. T. R. Green, 2 Albion Place. 
Miss Elizabeth Green, 27 St. Mark's Place. 
Miss Eliza Brower, 74 Hester-street. 
Miss Mary Brasher, 83 Franklin-street. 
Tke following ladies are appointed to the different Wards. 

First Ward — Mrs. Denison. 

Second Ward— Mrs. S. Brown. 

Third Ward— Mrs. Potter. 

Fourth Ward— Mrs. Smith. 

Fifth Ward — Mrs. Scott, Miss Brasher, Mrs. Ander- 
son, Mrs. Hall. 

Sixth Ward — Mrs. Huntington. 

Seventh Ward — Mrs. Purdy, G7 Clinton-street, Mrs. 
Gray, 481 Greenwich-street. Above Clinton-street, Mrs. 
Murphy, li)5 Henry-street. 

Eighth Ward — Mrs. Reese, Mrs. Farrington. 

Ninth Ward— Mrs. Galatian, Mrs. Varick, Mrs. Tru- 
lock, Mrs. Fullerton. 

Tenth Ward — Miss Brower, Mrs. Morrison. 

Eleventh Ward— Mrs. Green, Mrs. T. R. Green, Mrs. 
Cushman,411 Houston-street, Mrs. Wakely, 67 Delancy- 
street. 

Thirteenth Ward — Mrs. Lankford. 

Fourteenth Ward— Mrs. Bunting, Mrs. R. Mead, 252 
Fourth-street, 

Fifteenth Ward — Mrs. Galatian, Mrs. Varick, Mrs. 
Trulock, Mrs, Fullerton. 

NEW- YORK DORCAS SOCIETY. 
(Auxiliary to the Female Assistance Society.) 
More than four years has elapsed since this Society was 
established ; the object of which is to procure and make up 
clothing for the poor of our city, and the Assistance So- 
ciety is the channel through which they receive them. 
Mrs. J, Patten, John-street, First Directress. 
Mrs. O. Cole, Broadway, Second Directress. 
Miss M. Boyd, 15 Warren-street, Treasurer. 
Miss J. Scott, 49 White-streetj Secretary. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 



95 



MANAGERS. 



Mrs. W. W. Phillips, 
Oliver, 
Wheeler, 
Brewer, 
Nelson, 
Spelman, 
Gould, 



Miss Maitland, 
Jackson, 
Rankin, 
Simmons, 
Brown, 
Nixon. 



ladies' depository. 
(435 Broadway.) 
This institution is intended to give employment to La- 
dies, who, by a reverse of fortune, are forced to depend 
on their own exertions for support. 

Mrs. David Codwise, 8 St. Mark's Place, First Directress. 
Mrs. Dr. Lyell, 77 Anthony-street, Second Directress. 
Miss Donaldson, 15 State-street, Treasurer. 
Mrs. Dr. Van Rensselaer, 638 Broadway, Cor. Secretary. 
Miss King, 170 Bleecker-street, Recording Secretary. 

NEW-YORK CLOTmNG SOCIETY. 

Mrs. Bowles Colgate, No. 7 Dutch-street, First Directress. 
Mrs. J. B. Oakley, 347 Greenwich-street, 2d Directress. 
Mrs. Ellis Potter, 142 Chambers-street, Third Directress. 
Mrs. James Beatty, 320 Washington-street, Treasurer. 
Mrs. Alexander Cushman, 411 Houston-street, Secretary. 



MANAGERS. 



Mrs. A. Knapp, 

** Dr. Hebbard, 

" D. Turner, 

" D. Day, 

" D. Sutton, 

«' G. Hall, 

" J. Gatfield, 

" J. Burdett, 

" William Higgins, 

" P. Hilton, 

" C. R. Disosway, 

" Rev. Carpenter, 

" Shoults, 

" William Colgate, 

*' Dr. Newcomb, 



Mrs. J. B. Dodd, 

" H. Merritt, 

" H. Sickles, 

" J. Ertzberger, 

" J. Raymond, 

" R. Meade, 

" Rev. Seney, 

" Dr. Stephenson, 

" Rev. Nichols, 

" Rev. Devinne, 

Miss M. Oakley, 

" Fowler, 

" E. Raymond, 

" E. Akin, 

" M. C. Akin. 



9G 



RELIGIor?, EE.VEVOLExVT, AND 



NEW-YORK FIRE DEPARTMENT FUND. 

The object of this Institution is to relieve the widows 
and orphans of deceased firemen, and to assist sick or dis- 
abled members and their families. Upwards of seven 
thousand dollars were expended in deeds of charity un- 
der the direction of the Trustees, during the past year, 
and the claims on the fund are daily increasing. 

The officers of the department are elected annually by 
the representatives of the fire engine, hook and ladderand 
hose companies, and fire wardens. The Board of Trus- 
tees of the Fire Department Fund consists of nine mem- 
bers, three being elected annually by the representatives. 

OFFICERS. 

Elias G. Drake,* President. 
Nathaniel G. Bradford, Vice President. 
Henry B. Cook, Treasurer. 
William G. Henshaw, Collector. 
Edward Tunis, Secretary. 



TRUSTEES. 



Nathaniel G. Bradford, 
Peter Goelet, 
James B. Townsend, 
Benjamin G. Rushton, Sec 



Robert M. Stratton,* Pres't., 
Enoch Dean, 
John Ryker, jr., 
Edward M. Hoffmire, 
Isaac P. Whitehead, 

COLONIZATION SOCIETY OF THE CITi' OF NEW- YORK. 
(Founded in 1931.) 

Auxiliary to the American Colonization Society, in con- 
veying 10 Africa, with their own consent, the free colour- 
ed persons of the United States. 

There are now established along the western coast of 
Africa, by American philanthropists, four distinct Colo- 
nies, supposed to contain nearly ten thousand inhabitants. 
In these are included the villages of Monrovia, Caldwell, 
Millsburgh, Marshall, and New-Georgia, which are im- 
mediately under the supervision of the Parent Society at 
Washington. The next settlement in order along the 
coast is Edina, situated near to the River St. John's, and 
probably about sixty miles south of Monrovia, This co- 



* Ex officio, Directors of the Firemen's Insurance Company. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 97 

lony was founded by the Parent Society several years 
since, and has been subject to their jurisdiction until De- 
cember last, when it was ceded, with the consent of the 
inhabitants, to the associated Colonization Society of New 
York and Pennsylvania. The colony at Bassa Cove is 
situated within a few miles south of Edina, and was 
planted in October, 1824, under the united patronage of 
the Societies of Pennsylvania and New- York, and is re- 
inforced by expeditions sent alternately each year by these 
institutions. The location at Bassa Cove, whether we 
regard fertility of soil, or salubrity of climate, or the com- 
modiousness of its harbour, is not perhaps inferior to any 
other on the coast of Africa ; and it is expected that the 
contemplated college or high school will be erected in that 
vicinity. CapePalnlos lies on the margin of the ocean, in 
a southern direction, about two hundred and twenty miles 
from Monrovia. The colony at this Cape was founded 
by the Colonization Society of the State of Maryland, and 
they mention in their last annual report that " three years 
since this spot was a wilderness, with untutored savages 
for its inhabitants, and that it is now the boast of the 
western coast." The Colonization Society of Missouri 
have recently purchased an intermediate territory be- 
tween Bassa Cove and Cape Palmas, at the River Sinon, 
and expect to send out their first expedition early in 
April ; the Society of the State of Louisiana is making 
similar arrangements, and each Association has resolved 
to appropriate twenty thousand dollars a year, for five 
years, in sustaining their respective settlements ; and the 
Colonization Society of Virginia, at their anniversary in 
January last, adopted a resolution to establish, " as soon 
as suitable funds can be obtained," a colony of their own, 
to be called New- Virginia. 

In these various establishments there are now about 
twenty missionaries, either coloured or white, Methodists, 
Baptists, Episcopalians, and Presbyterians. There are 
also schools established in every settlement for the educa- 
tion of the children, both of the colonies and natives, and 
various printing presses. The inhabitants at the different 
stations are now turning their attention to the cultivation 
of the soil, and are represented in general as temperate, 
industrious, orderly, and rapidly advancing in improve- 
ment, intellectual and moral. At the various settlement* 

9 



98 



RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 



a large proportion of the colonists are professors of reli- 
gion, connected with different denominations of Chris- 
tians, and are members of the Temperance Society, on 
the principle of entire abstinence. A -weekly mail was 
established during the last autumn to run between Bassa 
Cove and Monrovia. 

William A. Duer, President. 

Gardiner Spring, D. D.," 

Nathan Bangs, D. D., 



•Vice Presidents. 



John W. Hinlon, 

Abraham Van Nest, 

Hugh Maxwell, 

James Milnor, D. D., 

Rev. Alexander Proudfit, D. D., Cor. Secretary. 

Ira B. Underbill, Recording Secretary. 

Moses Allen, Treasurer. 



MANAGERS. 



Anson G. Phelps, 
Israel Corse, 
James Donaldson, 
Rev. John P. Durbin, 
Francis L. Hawks, D. D./ 
David M. Reese, M. D., 
Samuel A. Foot, 
Samuel Akerly, M. D,, 
Rev. William Jackson, 
William L. Stone, 
James Monroe, 
Silas Brown, 
Anson Blake, 
Francis Hall, 



Gabriel P. Disosway, 
Henry V. Garritson, 
John W. Mulligan, 
John R. Davison, 
Henry S. Richards, 
James M. Go old, 
Daniel Lord, jr. 
Josiah L. Hale, 
Thomas De Witt, D. D,, 
William W. Campbell, 
John Woodbridge, D. D,, 
Aaron Clark, 
Thomas G. Fletcher, 
Thomas C. Doremus, 



Office, 118 Nassau-street. 

There are also branches in several of the religious con- 
gregations, auxiliaiy to the foregoing, viz. — 

In the Brick Church, William L. Stone, President. In 
the Cedar-street Church, Francis Markoe, President, In 
the Broome-street Church, William W. Chester, President. 
In the Middle Dutch Church, Abraham Bloodgcod, Pres't. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 99 

AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY. 
(Founded in 1833.) 

Arthur Tappan, President, 

Vice Presidents. 

Samuel Fessenden, of Maine. 

George Storrs, New-Hampshire. 

Rowland T. Robinson, Vermont. 

Charles Follen, Massachusetts, 

John Blain, Rhode-Island. 

Eli Ives, George Benson, Connecticut, 

Beriah Green, Gerrit Smith, New-York. 

William R. Weeks, New- Jersey. 

Abraham L. Pennock, Pennsylvania. 

William Gibbons, Delaware. 

John Needles, Maryland. 

Joseph Janney, District of Columbia, 

Samuel Crothers, James G. Birney, Ohio. 

Professor James M. Buchanan, Kentucky. 

Nathaniel Field, Indiana. 

David Nelson, Missouri, 

William Jay, Secretary for Foreign Correspondence. 

Elizur Wright, jr., Sec'y. for Domestic Correspondence. 

Amos A. Phelps, Recording Secretary. 

John Rankin, Treasurer, 

According to its constitution, " the object of this Socie- 
ty is the entire abolition of slavery in the United States. 
While it admits that each state, in which slavery exists, 
has, by the Constitution of the United States, the exclu- 
sive right to legislate in regard to its abolition in said state, 
it shall aim to convince all our fellow-citizens, by argu- 
ments addressed to their understandings and consciences, 
that slave-holding is a heinous crime in the sight of God, 
and that the duty, safety, and best interests of all con- 
cerned, require its immediate abandonment, without expa- 
triation. The Society will also endeavor, in a constitu- 
tional way, to influence Congress to put an end to the 
domestic slave-trade, and to abolish slavery in all those 
portions of our common country, which come under its 
control, especially in the District of Columbia, and like- 
wise to prevent the extension of it to any state that may be 
hereafter admitted to the Union," 

It has nine state^ and about one thousand minor auxiK- 



100 RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 

aries. The business of the Society is conducted by an 
Executive Committee located in New- York. Its periodi- 
cal publications are the Emancipator, issued weekly, the 
Human Rights and Anti-Slavery Record, monthly, and 
the Anti-Slavery Magazine, quarterlv. Publishing Agent, 
R. G. Williams. Office, 143 Nassau-street. 

THE SOCIETY FOR THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF FAITHFUL DOMESTIC 
• SERVANTS. 
(Instituted in 1325.) 
Their office, for the gratuitous registry of servants, is 
kept at 106 Chambers-street. 

Subscribers only are supplied, who pay five dollars per 
annum. No servant is sent, without a satisfactory written 
recommendation. The object of this Institution is the 
promotion of good feelings between employers and ser- 
vants, and to induce the latter to remain as long as possi- 
ble in their places. After March, 1828, every servant for 
wliom five dollars has been paid, will receive as follows — 
In one year after the registry of such servant's 
name, a Bible, or, (having one,) in lieu thereof, S2 00 

At the end of two vears, 3 00 

three " 5 00 

" four " 7 00 

" five " (and a certificate of their 
good services for that period,) 10 00 

S-27 00 
And on the completion of every year thereafter, 10 00 
Levi Coit, President. 
R. Jaffray, Vice President. 
Jonathan D. Steele, Treasurer. 
Theodore Dwight, jr. Secretaiy. 

MANAGERS. 



John W. Leavitt, 
C. O. Halsted, 
Wm. L. Stone, 



Moses Allen, 
Jonathan D. Steele, 
M. B. Edgar. 



Mr. and Mrs. E. Norcross, Agents. 

GENERAL I.VTELLIGENCE OFFICE OF THE SOCIETY FOR THE PRO- 
MOTION OF KNOWLEDGE AND INDUSTRY. 
(4TS Broadway.) 
This Society was formed in 1834. Its object is to be- 
nefit the poor through their own labor, and with this view 



MORAL INSTITUTIONa, 101 



this intelligence office was established to direct to employ- 
ment and to affijrd every possible facility to the industri- 
ous. Upwards of twenty thousand individuals have been 
gratuitously furnished with employment during the short 
period which has elapsed since the office was first opened. 
It is supported by voluntary contribution, and is justly con- 
sidered one of the best of charities, as it has an undoubted 
tendency to elevate the characters of all who use its good 
offices. The following is a list of the names of the Com- 
mittee for its management. 

Dr. William James Macneven, Chairman. 

COMMITTEE. 



Rev. Dr. Strobel, 
Rev. Mr. Arnold, 
Joseph Hoxie, 



Redwood Fisher, 
Joseph Curtis, 
Wm. F. Piatt, M, D. 



A. Vedder, General Agent 

SOCIETY FOR THE REFORMATION OF JUVENILE DELINQUENTS. 
(Uader the control of which is the House of Refuge. Instituted in 1824.) 

By the Twelfth Annual Report of this Institution, it 
appears that there have been received into the House of 
Refuge, during the last year, 

11.5 Boys, 69 Girls— Total 214 

Boys in the House at the date of the last Annual Re- 
port, 179 

Girls in the House at the date of the last Annual Re- 
port, 64 



Total number of all the children under the care of 

the Society during the past year, 457 

Of the above number have been indentured during 

the past year, Boys, 155 

Girls, 61 

Returned to friends, 15 

Escaped, 6 

Of age, 3 

Sent to the Alms House, 6 

Deceased during the past year, 2 

Now remaining in the House, Boys, 149, Girls, 60,. . 209 

457 
9* 



102 RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 



OFFICERS. 

Stephen Allen, President. 

William W. Fox. ^ 

Robsrt C. Cornell, \ 

Henry I. Wyckofi; ' y.^^ Presidents. 

James Lovelt, j 

Peter Sharpe, 1 

Hugh Maxwell, J 

Cornelius DubDis, Treasurer, 

John R. Townsend, Secretary. 

Indenturing Committee. 
Benjamin S. Collins, Silas Brown, Jacob Drake. 

Acting Committee. 
William W. Fox, B. L.Woolley, James Lovett, Robert 
D. Weeks, Robert C. Cornell, Aiigustin Averill, William 
Mandeville. 

ROMAN C-VTKOLIC BENEVOLENT SOCIETY. 

Right Rev. John Dubois, President. 
Peter M'Laughlin, Secretary. 
John B. Lasala, Treasurer. 

SOCIETY FOR THE EDUCATION OF ORPHaN CHILDREN OP THE 

JEWISH PERSUASION. 

S. L. Joseph, President. 
M. Cordoza, Secretary. 
M. L. Moses, Treasurer. 

SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF OF POOR WIDOWS WITH SMALL 

CHILDREN. 

(Instituterl in 1837.) 

Mrs. L. Coit, First Directress. 

, Secretary. 

Miss Murray, Treasurer. 

ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF OF RESPECTABLE AGED INMfSENT 

FEMALES. 

(Instituted, 1814 ) 

Mrs. S. Cowdrey, President. 

Mrs. N. Littlefield, Secretary." 

Mrs. J, W. Dominick, Treasurer. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 103 

NEW-YORK ASYLUM FOR LYING-IN WOMEN. 
(Founded in 1823. Orange-street, above Prince.) 
The object of this Society is to furnish comfortable ac- 
commodations, and skilful medical attendance to repu- 
table females, who desire an asylum during the period 
of their confinement. The affairs of the Society are 
conducted by a Board of Managers, consisting of thirty- 
three females. 

OFFICERS. 

Mrs. Isaballa Scott, First Directress, 49 White-street. 
Mrs. Dr. Gilbert Smith. 2d Directress, 48 Bleecker-street. 
Mrs. David Baker, Third Directress, 51 East Broadway. 
Mrs. Collin Reed, Fourth Directress, 298 Broadway. 
Mrs. Sam'l F. Mott, Fifch Directress, 262 East Broadway. 
Mrs. Thos. M'Cready, Sixth Directress, 459 Houston-st. 
Mrs. Thomas Darling, Treasurer, 35 Courtland-street. 
Mrs. Henry Ccit, Secretary, 76 White-street. 

MANAGERS. 



Mrs. David Austin^ 

' ' Rev. Jacob Broadhead 

" Silas Brown, 

" Robert Buloid, 

" James Boyd, jr., 

" Thomas L. Chester, 

" Robert C. Cornell, 

" Nathan Cobb, 

" James N. Cobb. 

" Dr. T. Cock, 

" Rev. B. Cutter, 

" Herman Hughes, 

" William M. Halsted, 

Atteyiding Physicians. — James A. Washington, M. D., 
J. H. Borrowe, M. D., G. Wilkes, M. D. 

Consulting Physicians. — Gilbert Smith, M. D„ Thomas 
Cock, M. D., Ansel W. Ives, M. D., Francis U. John- 
ston, M. D., John C. Cheesman, M. D., John Kearney 
Rogers, M. D. 

Resident Physician. — P. Turpin, M. D. 

District Phijsicians.— Dr. G. Buck, Dr. O. White, Dr. 
Van Kleeck, Dr. G. H. Hodgson, Dr. Shook, Dr. T. C. 
Chalmers, Dr. M'Cready, Dr. J. C. Halsey, Dr. John 
Adams. 



Mrs. James Hoyt, 

" Jacob Isaacs, 

'•' Thomas Lavender, 

" Rev. Thomas Mason, 

" Daniel Oakley, 

" Rev. W.W. Phillips, 

" J. Ruthven, Brooklyn, 

" Rev. J. F. Schroeder, 

" William L. Stone, 

" J. W. Schmidt, 

" J. Stoutenburgh, 

" M. Van Schaick. 



104 RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 



NEW-YORK INSTITUTION FOR THE BLIND. 
(Eighth Avenue between Thirty-third and Thirty-fourth streets.) 
This Institution contains fifty blind pupils ; (males 32, 
females 18,) who, in addition to the school exercises, are 
employed in making baskets, mats, rugs, carpeting, and 
in braiding, palm-leaf hats. They are also taught vocal 
and instrumental music. In 1836 there were made at the 
institution articles of the value of S18'2*2 dollars, of which 
sales were effected to the amount of Sl,295. The insti- 
tution is in a prosperous condition, and the pupils are im- 
proving in their studies, in music and mechanical em- 
ployments, under the direction of Mr. Silas Jones, the 
present intelligent and efficient superintendent. 
Samuel Akerly, M.D., President, 183, Broadway. 
Anson G. Phelps, 400, Fourth-street, Vice President. 
Silas Brown, Treasurer, 218, Pearl-street. 
Theodore Dwight, Jr., Cor. Secretary, Brooklyn. 
George F. Allen, Rec. Secretary, 19, Platt-street. 

MANAGERS. 



Dr. Isaac Wood, 
Edward Roome, 
Charles Hoyt, Brooklyn, 
Dr. W. N. Blakeman, 
Joseph Trulock, 
Wm. Mandeville, 
Don Alonzo Cushman. 



Joseph C. Hart, 

Hiram Ketchum, 

John R. Stuyvesant, Pough- 

keepsie, 
Curtis Holmes, 
John W. Walker, 
Morris Ketchum, 
Thomas Price, 

Mr. Silas Jones,' Superintendent. 
Dr. Wm. N. Blakeman, Physician, 187, Bleecker-street. 

NEW-YORK CITY TEMPERANCE SOCIETy. 
(OfBce, Chnton Hall, No. 137, Nassau-street.) 
This Association was formed March 9, 1829. Its sole 
object is the promotion of sobriet)', by dissuading from 
the use of intoxicating liquors as a beverage. Since its 
organization, the names of rising of 80,000 persons have 
been recorded as members. 

OFFICERS. 

Samuel Ward, President. 

Ansel W. Ives, ) ^. presidents. 

John Dela field, ) 

Robt. M. Hartley. Corresponding Secretary. 

Thomas Denny, Recording Secretary. 



Charles A. Lee, 
Luther Jackson, 
Nathaniel Weed, 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 105 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 

John W. Leavitt, Chairman. 



Edward S. Gould, 
Morris Ketchum, 
Alexis Baker. 



NEW-YORK MANUMISSION SOCIETY. 

Peter A. Jay, President. 

George Newbold, First Vice President. 

Wm. L. Stone, Second Vice President, 

Robert C. Cornell, Treasurer, 

Richard Field, Secretary. 

Henry Wood, Assistant Secretary, 

ST. NICHOLAS SOCIETY. 

Under this name, a Society has recently been organ- 
ized in this city, composed of native New-Yorkers, and 
of the descendants of the old burghers. Its objects are, 
the promotion of good fellowship and social intercourse 
between old citizens, and charity towards those of them 
who may have fallen into decay. 
Gulian C. Verplanck, President. 
Washington Irving, First Vice President, 
Peter Schermerhorn, Second Vice President, 
Cornelius Heyer, Third Vice President, 
Egbert Benson, Fourth Vice President. 
John Oothout, Treasurer, 
Hamilton Fish, Secretary. 
William A. Lawrence, Assistant Secretary, 

MANAGERS. 

Robert Benson, I Jeromus Johnson, 

Thomas R. Mercein, Daniel E. Tylee. 

Abraham Asten, Charles Graham, 

John Leveridge, 
Abel T. Anderson, 
George B. Rapelye. 
Rt. Rev. B, T. Onderdonk,' D. D., ) ^, , . 
Rev. Robert M'Carfee, D. D., I ^iiapiains. 



John W. Mulligan, 
James L. Brinckerhoff, 
James R. Manley, M. D., 



William H. Hobart, M, D., > t,, " 
Edward G. Ludlow, M. D., \ Physicians, 
Hugh M'Lean, M. D., ) ^ ,,, r., . . 
John W. Francis, M. D., ] C^nsqltrng Physicians. 



106 BEUGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 

r , . , Ml 

NEW-ENGLAND SOCIETY. 

Henry R, Storrs, President. 
Samuel A, Foot, Vice President. 
Alfred A. Weeks, Secretary. 
Robert Buloid, Treasurer. 

ST. George's society. 
Anthony Barclay, President, 
?h''a",!slSk,'^-°iviee Presidents. 
James Chesterman, Treasurer. 
James B. Elliman, ) Serrptaries 
Edward W, Canning, \ Secretaries. 

ALBION CLUB. 
(Corner of Park Place and Broadway ) 
Thomas Dixon, Chairman, "| 
Charles Edwards, | 

Samuel T. Carey, }» Managers. 

J. C. Beales, M. D., 
J. B. Elliman, Hon'y.Sec'y, 
Joseph Fowler, Treasurer. 

ST. Andrew's society. 
Hugh Maxwell, President. 
Richard Irvin, First "Vice President. 
William H. Maxwell, Second Vice President. 
John J. Palmer, Treasurer. 
John Campbell, Secretary. 
Robert Gillespie, Assistant Secretary. 

ST. Patrick's society. 

Campbell P. White, President. 

£EcS™'|v-P-'<'e„.s. 

R. I. Dillon, Secretary. 
Samuel Osborne, Treasurer. 
John Tait, jr., Almoner. 

FRENCH benevolent SOCIETY. 

Marinus Panon, President. 
Charles Benard, Secretary, 
Elias Ponvert, Treasurer. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS, 107 



GERMAN SOCIETY, 

John Jacob Astor, President, 

C. W, Faber, Vice President. 

D, H. Sand, Secretary. 

L. H. Von Post, Treasurer. 

HUMANE SOCIETY OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK, 
(Instituted in 1787.) 
John Adams, President, 
Anthony J, Bleecker, Secretary. 
Cornelius Dubois, Treasurer, 

MARINE SOCIETY OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 
(Instituted in 1770,) 
Capt. John Whetten, President, 
Capt, James Lovett, First Vice President, 
Capt, John Webb, Second Vice President. 
Capt, William M'Intire, Treasurer. 
Capt, John Webb, Secretary, 
Daniel Lord, jun,, Esq., Attorney. 
Capt. James Copland, Collector, 

STANDING COMMITTEE, 

Captain James Lovett, Chairman 



Capt. Humphrey Ricketson, 
Capt. Thos. H. Merry, 
Capt, George Alcock, 
Capt. Thomas Cottrell, 
Capt. John Webb, 
Capt. Josiah Ingersoll, 



Capt. Peter Murphy, 
Capt. James Copland, 
Capt, Charles H, Barnard, 
Capt. Joshua Geer, 
Capt, Jabesh Lovett, 
Capt, Thomas Lavender, 



GENERAL SOCIETY OP MECHANICS AND TRADESMEN OF THE 
CITY OF NEW-YORK, 
(Instituted in 1780.) 
Shepherd Knapp, President*. 
Anson Baker, First Vice-President. 
Cornelius C. Jacobus, Second Vice President. 
Adoniram Chandler, Treasurer. 
James Van Norden, Secretary, 
Robert Provost, Collector and Doorkeeper. 

* Tlie President of this Society is, ex officio, a Director of the Me- 
chanics' Bank, 



108 MISCELLANEOUS INSTITUTIONS. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE. 



E. D. Comstock, 
Thomas T. Woodruff, 



Samuel Roome, 
Joseph Depew. 



ALMONERS. 



Brigham Howe, 
John Sutphen. 



Thomas R. Mercein, 
George Conklin, 

NEW-YORK TYPOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. 

Hugh Pattinson, President. 
David H. Reins, Vice President. 
George S. Wharam, Secretary. 
George Mather, Treasurer. 
John G. Clayton, Librarian 
Thomas Crocker, Curator. 

NEW-YORK TYPOGRAPHICAL ASSOCIATION- 

Hiram Tupper, President. 
Charles A. Davis, Vice President. 

Treasurer. 

A. H. Krauth, Secretary. 
J. Oglesby, Librarian. 
John Murphy, Janitor. 



MISCEIiLiANEOUS INSTITUTIONS. 

NEW-YORK STATE SOCIETY OF THE CINCINNATL 

Morgan Lewis, President. 
John Trumbull, Vice President. 
Theodosius Fowler, Treasurer. 
Anthony Lamb, Assistant Treasurer. 
Charles Graham, Secretary. 
Anniversary, 4th of July. 

NEW-YORK CHAMBER OP COMMERCE. 

Robert Lenox, President. 

William W. Woolsey, J ^.^^ Presidents. 

Isaac Carow, 5 

Henry I. Wyckoff, Treasurer. 

Jacob Harvey, Secretary. 

STANDING COMmrrEE, 

Isaac Carow, John R. Hurd, James G. King, John A 
Stevens, Peter I Nevius. 



MISCELLANEOUS INSTITUTIONS; lO^ 
• ■ .- 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR THE CITY OP NEW-YORK^ 
(87 Broadway. Organized Jan., 1823. Incorporated May 2, 18290 
" For the purpose of encouraging- and promoting do- 
mestic industry in this State and the United States, in 
agriculture, commerce, manufactures, and the arts, and 
any improvements made therein, by bestowing rewards 
and other benefits on those who shall make any such im- 
provements, or excel in any of the said branches." 

TRUSTEES; 

James Tallmadge, President; 
Clarkson Crolius, ) 

Martin E. Thompson, > Vice Fresideiitg< 
Jonathan Amory, } 

George Bacon, Treasurer; 
Edwin Williams, Recording Secretary; 
T. B. Wakeman, Corresponding Secretaryi 
Annual election, second Thursday in May; 
Stated meetings, second Thursday in each month. 
The Institute is composed of four departments, viz. : 
Agriculture, Manufactures, Commerce, and the Arts. 

The first Manufacturers* Fair, held under the auspices 
of the Institute, was in October, 1828, at the Masonic 
Hall, since which eight other annual fairs have been 
held, and eleven addresses delivered. 

ADDRESSES BEFORE THE INSTITUTE. 

July 4, 1828, By Henry M. V/estem. 

July 4, 1829, By Ralph Lockwoody 

October 19, 1829, .By James Lynch. 

July 4, 1830, By Levi H. Clarke. 

October 14, 1830, By Tristram Burges, of R. I. 

October 14, 1831,. . . . . .By Edward Everett, of Mass. 

October 11,1832, By Lyman Beecher, D.D; 

October 15, 1833, By John P. Kennedy, Esq 

October 9, 1834, By Henry Baldwin, Esq. 

October 22, 1835, By Chas. J. Ingersoll, Esq 

October 20, 1836, By Caleb Ctishitig, ^q. 

The Institute has published at difl!ereht times^ reports 
on the following subjects: cotton goods, glass, silk, in- 
digo, cash duties and auctions, ship building, and toA" 
nage duties, and reports on the annual fairs. 

10 



110 MISCELLANEOUS INSTITUTIONS. 

To encourage the culture of silk in the United States, 
the Institute, in lb'29, imported a quantity of mulberry 
seed from France, which was distributed gratuitously to 
agriculturists. 

A list of patents from the United States Patent O "'", 
may be seen at this Institution. A list of new patents 
received every month. To the American Institute, also, 
belongs a well-selected Library of above 5,000 volumes ; 
and a Repository, consisting of a great variety of ma- 
chines, models, and specimens of manufactures, and the 
arts. Open to strangers and visiters, free of any 
charge. Library and Repository, 187 Broadway, up 
stairs. 

There is also published under the patronage of the 
above Institution, the Journal of the American Institute, 
a monthly publication, devoted to the interests of agri- 
culture, commerce, manufactures, and the arts, accom- 
panied with public documents, sketches of natural his- 
tory, and occasionally philosophical and literary essays. 

MECH.\NICS' INSTITUTE OF THE CITY OF NEV.-YORK. 

(founded \n 183!, and Incorporated in 1S33.) 

This Institution has for its object the instruction of 
mechanics and such others as desire to avail themselves 
of its privileges. It holds monthly meetings the first Tues- 
day in each month for transacting its ordinary business ; 
every other Tuesday evening in the year is devoted to 
scientific purposes, and lectures are given, or other 
scientific exercises held at the lecture-room of the Insti- 
tute. It also holds an annual fair, for the exhibition of 
manufactures during the year; and during the winter 
months popular lectures, twice a week, are delivered 
before the society. The Institute has a library of be- 
tween 1,100 and 1,200 volumes, besides the large and 
splendid work on Egypt, consisting of tAventy-three vo- 
lumes, of which ten are quarto text, and thirteen are plates 
embracing about 1,400 copper-plate engravings of im- 
mense size. The reading-room is regularly supplied 
with the newspapers of the day, and an excellent selec- 
tion of scientific journals and literary magazines and 
reviews, amounting to between thirty and forty. Its 
rooms, situated in the basement story of the City Hall, 



MISCELLANEOUS INSTITUTIONS. Ill 



are gratuitously furnished by the Common Council, and 
are kept open daily from 9 A. M. to 10 P. M. 
The f)l lowing is a list of ofRcers for 1837 : 

George bruce, President. 

John M. Dodd, First Vice President. 

Henry Cunningham, Second Vice President, 

George L. Spencer, Recording Secretary. 

Leonard D. Gale, Corresponding Secretary. 

William Everdell, Treasurer. 

NEW-YORK BOARD OF TRADE, 

Nathaniel Weed, President. 
John W, Leavitt, First Vice President. 
Silas Brown, Second Vice President. 
Gabriel P. Disosway, Third Vice President. 
Marcus Wilbur, Fourth Vice President. 
Revo C. Hance, Treasurer. 
John Ely, Recording Secretary. 
Thomas Denny, Corresponding Secretary. 
ComvilUee of Refeience. 



Meigs D. Beniamin, 
Christopher Wolfe 



D. A. Cushman, 
Robert L. Smith. 



Richard B. Brown, 
John Lloyd, 



Committee of Inquiry. 



Paul Babcock, 
Frederick S. Winstoii. 



BOARD OF STOCK AND EXCHANGE BROKERS, 

(22; Wall-Street.) 

D. Clarkson, President. 

D. Nevins, Vice President. 

J. W. Bleecker, 42 Wall-street, Treasurer. 

B. Hart, 23^ Vv^all-street, Secretary. 

MEMBERS. 

Sands & Atherton, Moses Anstice, S. & M. Allen, 
Dvkers & Alstyne, John Aspinwall, Wm. G. Bucknor, 
W. H. Brown, Leonard Lee, S. J. Bebee, Berney & Hoyt, 
Jas. W. Bleecker, William Borrowe, Carpenter & Ver- 
milye, Clarkson & Co., Cammann & Whitehouse, R. 
Curtis, Levi Coit, James B. Cochrane, William Cairns, 
jr., George Carpenter, F. W. Cammann, Dav & Forman, 
A. N. Gifibrd, Gallatin Brothers. J. Gourlie^ J. M. Hen- 



IIQ AHSCEIvLANEOUS INSTITUTION'S. 

riques, B, Hart, J. L. &. S. Joseph & Co. ; E. M. Morgan, 
& Co,, Ketchum, Durkee, & Co. ; Jacob Little & Co., Le 
Roy & Co., G. L. Lewis, William Lawton, Nathan & 
Co,, J. Neilson, jr., R. L. Nevins & Co., J. G. Og- 
den, Le Roy & Perry, Prime & Co., N. Piatt, Paipe & 
Spaulding, Nevins & Townsend, W. H. Robinson, W. 
J. Robinson, Graham, Rollins, & Graham; Stebbins, 
Brothers, E. Sprague, St. John & Co., Tracy & Gould, 
John Ward & Co., Weeks & Co., John Warren, D. H. 
Wickham, R. H. Winslow, Wood & Bogerts, St. John 
Chapman, J. C. Parker, Rawdon, Kellogg & Co., Tailer 
& White, George Henriques. 

TONTINE COFFEE-HOUSE. 

(Instituted in 1794.) 

Originally 203 Nominees, now (1837,) 101 Nominees 
living ; 103 shares outstanding. 

F. De Peyster, Chairman. 

COMMITTEE, 

Frederic De Peyster, Richard M. Lawrence, William 
Bard, Gulian C. Verplanck. 

mariners' and merchants' association. 

(No. 71 Wall-Street.) 

For the registering of unemployed Officers and Seamen. 

Benjamin Strong, President. 

Reuben Brumley, Vice President. 

Augustus Averiil, Secretary. 

peamen's retreat, 
(71 Wall-street.) 

Hospital on Staten Island, opened Oct. 1, 1831. Au- 
thorized by act of Legislature, April 23, 1831. Election 
in May. 

Samuel Swartwout, President. 
James Morgan, Secretary. 
J. R. Westervelt, Physician. 
Oliver Obear, Superintendent, Staten Island. 
The society recommend that seamen, when paid off 
from their vessels, take a receipt from the captains for 



MISCELLANEOUS INSTITUTIONS. 1.15 



the atnoimt of hospital money, which is to be exhibited 
as proof to the trustees of the institution. 

THE GRAND LODGE OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK, 

Meet quarterly, on the first Wednesdays in June, Sep- 
tember, December, and March, at the Howard House., 
Broadway. 

OFFICERS. 

M. W. Morgan Lewis, Grand Master. 

Rt. W. James Van Benschoten, Deputy G. M. 

Rt. W. Joseph Cuyler, Sen. G. Warden. 

Rt. W. John D. Willard, Jim. G. Warden. 

Rt. W. James Herring, Secretary, 

Rt. W. Richard Ellis, G. Treasurer. 

Rt. W. and Rev. Evan M. Johnson, G. Chaplain. 

Rt. W. Joseph Sprague, G. Marshall. 

Rt. W. Daniel Orpes, Standard Bearer. 

Rt. W. John Coffin, G. Sword Bearer. 

W. Gerrit Lansing, G. Pursuivant. 

W. Robert Young, G. Tyler. 

NEW-YORK HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

John Torrey, M.D., President. 

John J. Palmer, 

Jas. K. Hamilton, 

Benjamin M'Vickar, )>Vice Presidents, 

Hic'ksonW. Field, f 

Ephraim Hoibrook, J 

Wm. R. Cooke, Corresponding Secretary. 

Jas. Hogg, Rec. Secretary and Librarian. 
Meet in the Library-room of the New-York Lyceum 
of Natural History, No. 581 Broadway, on the last 
Tuesday evening of each month. The Inspecting Com- 
mittee meet in the same place every Tuesday evening, 
from the 1st of March to the 1st of December. 

GENERAL TRADEs' UNION. 

Hiram Tupper, President. 
B. S. Gillespie, Vice President. 
Enoch Bogart, Recording Secretary. 
Levi D. Slamm, Corresponding Secretary. 
John Parks, Financial Secretary, 
James M'Beath, Treasurer. 
10* 



114 CHURCHES. 



CHURCHES. 

PRESBYTERIAN. 

First Presbyterian Church, Wall-Street, near Broad- 
way, Rev. W. W. Phillips, D.D. 

Brick Church, Beekman, n. Park, Rev. Gardiner 
Spring, D.D. 

Rulgers-street Church, Rutgers, corner of Henry, 
Rev. John M. Krebs. 

Duane-street Church, c. of Church, Rev. Geo. Potts. 

Canal-street Church, c. Greene, Rev. Mr. Anderson. 

Laight-street Church, c. Varick, Rev. F. S. Mines. 

Seventh Church, Broome, c. Ridge, Rev. E.F.Hatfield. 

Eighth Church, Christopher, c. Bleecker, Rev. Edwd. 
D. Smith. 

Allen-street Church, n. Grand. 

Central Pres. Church, Broome, n. Elm, Rev. Wm. 
Adams. 

Spring-street Church, n. Varick, Rev. H. G. Ludlow. 

Bleecker-street Church, Bleecker, n. Broadway, Rev. 
Erskine Mason. 

Bowery Church, 66 Bowery, Rev. Richard W. 
Dickinson. 

1st Free Pres, Church, Dey, c. Washington. 

3d Free Pres. Church, Thompson, c. Houston, Rev. 
N. E. Johnson. 

4th Free Pres. Church, Madison, c. Catharine, Rev. 
Joel Mann. 

Scotch Church, Grand, c. Crosby,Rev. J. M'Elroy, D.D. 

Scotch Church, 550, Pearl, Rev. H. A. Rowland. 

Murray-street Church, 45 Murray, Rev. Thomas 
M'Auley, D.D., LL.D. 

Associate Pres. Church, Grand, c. Mercer, Rev. 
Andrew Stark. 

Second Avenue Church, Second Avenue, n. Third, 
Rev. C. S. Porter. 

West Church, Carmine, n. Varick, Rev. David R. 
Downer. 

Associate Pres. Church, Prince, c. Thompson, Rev. 
Mr. Irving. 

Reformed, Prince, c. Orange, Rev. Mr. M'Leod. 

Reformed, Sixth, n. Christopher, Rev. Mr. Kipp. 

Fourteenth, Franklin, n. Chapel. 

Coloured Pres. Church, Frankfort, c. William, Rev. 
Theodore S. Wright. 



CHURCHES. 115 



Village Church, Eighth Avenue, Rev. D. Clark, Jr. 

Brainerd Church, 91 Rivington, Rev. Asa D. Smith. 

Eighth Avenue Church, Eighth Avenue, Rev.E. Riley. 

Madison-street Church, Madison, c. Gouverneur, Rev. 
J. W. M'Lane. 

Manhattan Island Church, Fourth, n. Av. D., Rev. J. 
Gray. 

Mercer-street Church, n. Eighth, Rev. Thomas H. 
Skinner, D.D. 

Welsh Pres. Church, (preach in Welsh,) Broome, n. 
Mott, Rev, J. J. Jones. 

Burial grounds, Sixth n. Wooster. 

Do. do. Twenty-fifth, n. Eighth Avenue. 

CONGREGATIONALISTS. 

Tabernacle, Broadway, n. Anthony. 
Chatham-street Chapel, 88 Chatham, Rev. J. Martyn. 
7th Free Church, Thalian Hall, Grand, n. Sheriff. 
Providence Chapel, 46 Thompson, Rev. T. Harrison. 

DUTCH REFORMED. 

The Consistory Rooms of the Collegiate Reformed 
Dutch Churches, c. Nassau and Ann. 

South Church, (destroyed by fire Dec. 17, 1835,) part 
of the congregation worship at the University, Wooster- 
street. Rev, Dr. Mathews, and the Rev. Mr. S. Hutton. 

The other part of the congregation worship in Mur- 
ray-street, where they intend erecting a new church. 

Middle Church, Li-"] 
berty, c. Nassau, t tt v ■n n 

..North Church. Wil- ^^ ^ Brownlee, D.D, 
ham, c. Fulton, |rT.i, r\ ixrv* Tk t-» 

New Church, c. La- Thomas De Witt, D.D. 

fayette Place and 4th, J 

Northwest Church, Franklin, n. Church, Rev. George 
Dubois. 

Northeast Church, Market, c. Henry, Rev. Isaac 
Ferris, D.D. 

Church, Broome, c. Greene, Rev. J. Broadhead, D. D. 

Church, Greene, c. Houston, Rev. Eli Baldwin, D.D. 

Church, Bleecker, c. Am®s, Rev. N. J. Marselus. 

Church, Ninth, near Broadway. 

Church, Harlaem, Rev. Cornelius Vermeule. 



lis 



CHURCHES. 



Mission Church, Houston, c. ForsA'th, Rev. George 
Bourne. 

Young Men's Mission Church, Third, n. East River, 
Rev. Frederick F. Cornell. 

Church, Blooming-dale. Rev. E. Van Aken. 

True Reformed D. C, King,n. M'Dougal, Rev. C. T. 
Demarest. 

German Reformed, 121 Allen, Rev. John Rudy. 

General burial ground, Houston, c. Forsyth and 
Eldridge. 

EPISCOPALIANS. 

Rt. Rev. Benjamin T. Onderdonk, D.D., Bishop of 
the Diocess. 

Trinity Church, Broad-"] 
way, opposite Wall, t, ,,^ -n • t\ t\ 

St Paul's Chapel Broad- •' ^^^'- ^^"•^^^™f' ^i^^ 
wav c.Vesev, ,1^^^^ • Jf • ^f^^eder D.D. 

St. John's Chapel, Varick, ^^^- Edward ^ . Higbee. 



op. St. John's Park, 

St. George's Church, ) Rev. James Milnor, D. D., 
Beekman, c. Cliff", ) Rev. James W. Cooke. 

French du St. Esprit, (preach in French.) Franklin, c. 
Church, Rev. A. Verren. 

Christ Church, 81 Anthony, Rev. Thomas Lyell, D. D. 

Grace Church, Broadwav, c. Rector, Rev. Thomas H. 
Taylor. 

St. Mark's Church, Stuyvesant, c. Second Avenue, Rev. 
Henry Anthon, D. D. 

Zion Church, Mott, c. Cross, Rev, Thomas Breintnall. 

St. Stephen's Church, Christie, c. Broome, Rev. Win. 
Jackson. 

St. Thomas' Church, Broadway, c. Houston, Rev. F. 
L. Hawks, D. D. 

St. Luke's Church, Hudson, op. Grove, Rev. John M. 
Forbes. 

Church of the Ascension, Canal, n. Broadway, Rev, 
Manton Easiburn, D. D. 

All Saints' Church, Henry, c. Scammel, Rev. Benja- 
min I. Haight. 

St. Clement's Church, Amity, n. M'Dougal, Rev. L. P. 
Bayard. 

IVIissi on Church of the Holy Evangelists, Vandewater, 
Rev. Alexander Frazer. 



CHURCHES. ir 



Mission Church of the Epiphany, Stanton, n. Norfolk, 
Rev. Lott Jones. 

St. Peter's Church, Twentieth, n. Ninth Avenue, Rev. 
Hugh Smith, 

St. Philip's Church, (coloured,) 33 Centre, Rev. Peter 
Williams. 

St. Michael's Church, "i 



Bloomingdale, 

St. James' Church, Ha- 
milton Square, 



Rev. William Richmond. 



St.Mary'sChurch,Man- j Rev. James C. Richmond, 
hattanville, | 

St. Ann's Church, Fort | 
Washington, j 

Church of the Nativity, Avenue D, (burnt down.) 

St. Bartholomew's Church, Lafayette Place, c. Great 
Jones, Rev, Charles V, Kelly. 

Third City Mission Station, Rev. Ezra B. Kellogg. 

Calvary Church, Fotirth Avenue, near Thirtieth, Rev. 
Francis H, Cuming. 

St, Andrew's Church, Harlaem, Rev. Abram B. Hart. 

Trinity Church Vestry Office, Fulton, c. Church, W. 
Johnson, Compt. 

Burial ground, Hudson, c. Clarkson. 

BAPTISTS. 

First Baptist Church, 33 Gold, Rev, Wm. Parkinson. 

Oliver-street Church, 6 Oliver, Rev. Spencer H. Cone. 

Mulberry-street Church, Mulberry, n. Chatham, Rev, 
Archibald Maclay. 

Bethel Church, Military Hall, Bowery, op. Spring, 
Rev. W. G. Miller. 

Beriah Church, M'Dougal, op.Vandam, Rev. Duncan 
Dunbar, 

Union Church, Stanton, Rev. George Benedict. 

North Church, Bedford, c. Christopher, Rev. Jacob 
H. Brouner. 

East Church, Grand, n. Pitt, Rev. John Middleton. 

Ebenezer Church, North, c. Suffolk, Rev. L. G. Marsh. 

South Church, 84 Nassau, Rev. C, G. Sommers. 

Broome-street Church, Broome, n. Cannon, Rev, John 
Blain, 

Abyssinian Church, (coloured,) 44 Anthony, Rev. W. 
I, Loomis. 



1 18 CHURCHES, 

Sixteenth Baptist Church, Eighteenth, Rev. D. Ber- 
nard. 

Central Baptist Church, Fourth, n. A v. C. Rev. Wm. 
Card. 

Welsh Baptist Church, (preach in Welsh,) c. King 
and Hudson, Rev. W. Harris. 

Zion Baptist Church, (African.) Duane, Rev. J. S. 
Raymond. 

Amity-street Church, Amity, n. Greene, Rev. W. R. 
Williams. 

General Baptist Church, Laurens, Rev. Mr. Barker. 

West Church, Masonic Hall, Rev. John Dowling. 

Oiftce of the American Baptist Home Mission So- 
ciety, and of the American Baptist, Clinton Hall, corner 
of Beekman and Nassau. 

Burial grounds, North, n. First Avenue, and c. Amity 
and Wooster. 

METHODIST EPISCOPALI.iXS. 

First Methodist Church, 32 John, Rev. E. E. Griswold. 

Second Methodist Church, 8 Forsyth, Rev. D. Smith. 

Third Methodist Church, 180 Duane, Rev. Jarvis Z. 
Nichols. 

Fourth Methodist Church, 130 Allen, Rev. John Ken- 
nadav. 

Fifth Methodist Church, Willet, n. Broome, Rev. S.. 
Remington. 

Sixth MethodistChurch, Bedford, c. Morton, Rev. Lu- 
ther Mead. 

Seventh Methodist Church, Seventh, n. Third Avenue, 
Rev. Samuel Me r win. 

Eighth Methodist Churcli, Second, n. Avenue D, Rev. 
H. Brown. 

Ninth Methodist Church, (51 Greene, Rev. Charles W. 
Carpenter. 

Tench Methodist Church, Twentieth, n. Eighth Ave- 
nue, Rev. J. Cjvel. 

Eleventh Methodist Church, Vestry, n. Hudson, Rev. 
F. Hodi^son. 

Twelfth Methodist Church, Mulberry, n. Bleecker, 
Rev. R. Seney. 

INDKPENDEN'T METHODISTS. 

Independent Church, 56 Chrysiie, Rev. Wm. Stilwell. 



cmmcHEs. 119 



ProtestantlChurch, 61 Attorney, ) Rev. Thomas Harries, 
Protestant Church, Sullivan, ) Rev. Mr. Piercey. 
Primitive Church, 43 Elizabeth. 
Primitive Church, Dominick, n. Varick. 
Primitive Church, Pitt, n. Houston. 
Asbury Methodist, (coloured,) 55 Elizabeth, Rev. Ja- 
cob Mathews. 

Zion Church, (coloured,) 156 Church, Peter Van Has. 
Burial grounds. First, n. Second Avenue. 

ROMAN CATHOLIC. 

'Rt. Rev. John Dubois, D. D. 

CathedralofSt. Patrick's, J g^^^-J^^^^ ^n'n'^"^'n'^' 
Mott, c. Prince, ] ^^^'- i^'}]'' ^ Donnell, 

' ' Rev. William Starrs, 

[Rev. John Conroy. 
St. Peter's Church, Bar- ) Very Rev. John Power, D.D, 
clay, c. Church, \ Rev. James Neill. 

Qt TK/i „ ! r*u , \ n 1 ) Rev, William Gluarter, 
St. Mary s Church, Grand, / ^^^^ p^^^,.^^^ Danaher, 

■^^^°^' ) Rev. Joseph Teixcheira. 

St. Joseph's Church, ) Rev. Charles C. Pise, D. D., 
Sixth Av. c. Barrow, \ Rev. James Q.uinn, 

Transfiguration Church, Cham-) Rev. Felix Varela. 
bers, \ Rev. John Frates. 

German Catholic Church, Second, Rev. Mr, Raffiner. 

) Rev. Wm. Burns, 

St. James' Church, James, n. Oak, > Rev.Mr. Maginniss, 

) Rev. Mr. Maguire. 

Burial grounds at Cathedral, also on First Avenue, 
between Eleventh and Twelfth streets, and also, near 
Deaf and Dumb Asylum. 

FRIENDS. 

Meeting House, Rose, n. Pearl, 
Meeting House, Hester, c. Elizabeth. 
Meeting House, Downing, n. Bleecker. 
Meeting House, 38 Henry, (Orthodox.) 

LUTHERAN. 

St. James', Orange, Rev. William D. Strobel. 
St. Matthew's, Walker, n. Broadway, Rev. F.W. Geis- 
senhainer, D. D., and Rev, F. W. Geissenhainer, jr. 



120 



CHURCHES — BROOKLYN. 



UNIVERSALISTS. 

First Society of Universalists, Orchard, n. Broome, 
Rev. T. J. Sawyer. 
Society of United Friends, Duane, c. City Hall Place. 
Third Society of Universalists, Bleecker, c. Downing. 

UNITARIANS. 

Unitarian Church, 109 Chambers, Rev. Wm. "Ware. 
Unitarian Church, Mercer, c. Prince, Rev. Orville 
Dewey. 

JEWS. 

Synagogue of Portuguese Jews, 15 Crosby, Isaac 
Seixas. 

Synagogue of German Jews, Elm, n. Grand, Alexan- 
der Hart, 

Synagogue, Grand, Eliazer Metz. 

MORAVIAN. 

United Brethren, 104 Fulton, Rev. Mr, Kluge, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Mariners' Church, Roosevelt. Rev. Henry Chase. 

New Jerusalem Church, 406 Pearl, Rev.C. I. Doughty/ 

Christian Church, Broome, Rev. Isaac N. Walters. 

Enon Church, Chrystie,n. Hester, Rev, Mr. Pitcher. 

Salem Church, King, n. Hudson. 

Floating Bethel, Rev. Wm. Scott. 

Primitive Christians, 183 Canal, Mr. Buchanan. 

TOTAL NUMBER OF CHURCHES IN THE CITY, 



Presbyterian, 34 

Congregationalist, 4 

Dutch Reformed, 16 

Episcopalian, 28 

Baptist, 19 

Methodist, ... 20 

Roman Catholic, 7 

Friends 4 



Lutheran, 2i 

Universalist, 3 

Unitarian, 2 

Jew^s, 3 

Moravian, I 

Miscellaneous,... 7 

Grand Total, 150 



CHURCHES— BROOKLYN. 

PRESBYTERIAN. 

First Presbyterian Church, Cranberry, n. Hicks, Rev. 
D. L. Carroll. 



CHURCHES BROOKLYN. 121 

Second Presbyterian Church, c. of Clinton, n. Fulton, 
Rev. J. S. Spencer. 

DUTCH REFORMED. 

First Reformed Dutch Church, Joralemon, n. Fulton, 
Rev. M. W. Dwight. 

Second Reformed Dutch Church, worship at the Lyce- 
um, c. Washington and Concord, Rev. John Garretson. 

EPJSCOPALIAN. 

St. Ann's Church, Washington, c- Sands, Rev. B. C. 
Cutler, D. D. 

St. John's Church, Washington, c. Johnson, Rev. Evan 
M. Johnson. 

Trinity Church, Clinton Avenue, Rev. Daniel V. M. 
Johnson. 

St. Paul's Church, Pearl, Rev. T. S, Brittan, Rev. John 
F. Messenger. 

St. Peter's Church, (African,) Staunton-street. 

BAPTIST. 

First Baptist Church, Nassau, c. Liberty, Rev. Silas 
Ilsley. 

Second Baptist Church, Tillary, c. Barbarine, Rev. 
Oclavius Winslow. 

METHODIST, 

First Methodist Church, Sands, n. Fulton, Rev. B. 
Creagh. 

Second Methodist Church, York, c. Gold, Rev. R. Gil- 
bert. 

Third Methodist Church, Washington, n. Tillary, Rev, 
J. B. Stratton. 

African Methodist Church, High, n. Bridge, Rev. Mr. 
Samuel Todd. 

ROMAN CATHOLIC. 

St. James' Church, Jay, c. Chapel, Rev. John Walsh, 
and Rev. P. Dougherty. 

Independent Roman Catholic Church, York, c. Jay, 
Rev. John Farnam. 

UNITARIAN, 

Unitarian, Washington, near Concord, Rev. David H. 
Barlow. 

11 



122 



BAKKS. 



SUMMARY OF CHURCHES IN BROOKLYN. 



Presby'crian 2 

Du.ch Reformed ... '2 

Episcopalian 5 

Bjp-ist 2 

McJiodist, 4 



Ronicn Catholic. .. . 3 
Uniiaiion 1 

Teal 1 J 



BA^I£S. 

There are now in the city of New York twenty-three 
incorporated B.nks, with fcn oggreg^tc c^piti.] of 
^•'20,361,200. There are also incorpor<Jod in the State 
of New York .seventy-iIre other B_nks, with ?.n .''ggre- 
gate capital of 816,740,200, m king in all ninery-eight 
Banks, with a total capital of S37.K)l,iG8. All biit eight 
of the ahjve Bi-nks are sub eci to the S fciy Fund Act ; 
the exceptions are the Manhattan, Dry Dock, Fulton, 
North River and Chemical B.jnks, in the city of NcW 
York; the Long Island Bjnk, Brooklyn ; Commerciul , 
Bank, Alb ;ny ; and B. nk cf Roches.er, in the citv of j 
Rochester. The S. fety Fund now r mounts to ^SOOjOOO, 
which is the maximum provided by law. This fund 
was created by an annujl t=ix upon the Safety Fund 
Banks, and in case of the failure of any one or more of 
them, it is liable to be drawn on for the deficit. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS OK THE BANKS IN THE CITY. 

The Banks are open everyday in the year, from 10 
A. M. to 3 P. M., except Sundays, Christmas Diy, New 
Year's day, the Fourth of July, and general holidays ap- 
pointed by legal authority, and the Bank of New- York 
on Good Fridays. 

The rate of discount is 6 per cent, per annum, (calcu- 
lating 360 days to the year,) excepting: when notes have 
over GO days to run. Three days' grace are alloAvcd on 
all notes, and the discount ta]:en for the same. When 
notes have over GO days to run, the Banks have the pri- 
vilege of charging 7 per cent. 

Bills or notes offered for discount must be enclosed in 
a letter directed to the cashier the day belore discount 
day, advisin;^ the name of the person upon whose ac- 
count it is offered, &c. 



BANKS. 123 

Bills or notes lodged for collection, arc collected free 
of chirge to the holders, except when at a distance. 
Wiien protested, the person lodging" the same pays the 
clnrge of protest. 

Deposits and notes for collection, must be entered in 
the dealer's bjok at the time when deposi ea. No inter- 
est allowed on deposits. 

RATES AT WHICH FOREIGN' COINS ARE RECEIVED AT THE 
BANKS. 

Silver Coins. Gold Coins. 

Crowns, 109 cents. French, 87 1-4 c. p. dwt. 

Dollars, 100 " English, 88 S-9 " 

Five Francs, 93 3-10 Spanish, 81 
Pistareens, 16 

BANK OF AMERICA. 
(30 Wnll-strect.) 

Chartered 1S13, for 20 vears ; renewed till 1852. Ca- 
pital 2,001,200 doihirs. Election, 1st Monday in May. 
100 dollars each share. Discount days, Tuesdays and 
Fridays. Dividends, January and July. 
George Newbold, President. 
D. Thompson, Cashier. 
Thomas G. Buckley, George Grisv.^old, Stephen Whit- 
ney, Jona. Gjodhne, Benjamin L. Swon, John Johnston, 
Peter Crary, J. H. Howland, Fred. Sheldon, John B. 
Lawrence, 'John Yf . Leavitt, David Lee, Samuel M. Fox^ 
Charles Dickinson, Jeromus Johnson,'^ John Targee* — 
Directors. 

S. C. ■\Villiams, Notary. 

BANK OF' NEW-YORK. 
(32 Wall-street.) 
Incorporated March, 1791, to endure until the second 
Tuesxhiy in M^y, 1811. Charter was renewed until the 
second Tuesday in May. 183-3. Renewed in 1831 to 1st 
January, 1853. * Capital 1,000,000 dollars. Election, se- 
cond Tuesday in Mar. 500 dollars each shire. Dis- 
count diys, Tue-;da.ys „nd Thursday. Dividends, 1st 
May and November."" 



* State Dirertors. 



124 BANKS, 

Cornelius Heyer, President, 
Anthony P. Halsev, Cashier. 
J. Waddington," G. G. Rowland, P. Schermerhom, 
Charles M'Evers, John Oothout, Robert Maitland, Henry 
Beekman, Gurdon Buck, Edward R. Jones, George S. 
Robbins, John A. Hicks, Robert Benson — Directors. 
W. D. Waddington, Notary. 

BANE OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK. 
(15 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated May 18, 183G, for thirty years. Capital 
2,000,000 dollars. Shares, 100 dollars. Election, second 
Tuesday in June, Discount days, Tuesdays and Fri- 
days, 

Cornelius W. Lawrence, President. 
Reuben Withers, Cashier. 
J. Anthony, Assistant Cashier, 
Isaac Townsend, John Stewart, Charles A. Davis, 
Reuben Withers, Morgan L. Smith, John Bolton, 
Henry W. Hicks, James N. Tuttle, Charles Denison, 
Joseph Lawrence, Jonas Conkling, Ferdinand Suydam — 
Directors. 

John L. Graham, Notary and Attorney. 

butchers' and drovers' bank, 
(22S, Bowery, near Grand-street.) 
Incorporated April 28, 1830, till January 1, 1853. Ca- 
pital 500,000 dollars. Shares 25 dollars each. Election, 
2d Tuesday in July. Discount days, Wednesdays and 
Saturdays. Notes offered the day previous. 
Benjamin M. Brown, President. 
D. W. Townsend, Cashier. 
Jacob Aims, John Perrin, David Cotheal, Caleb Bart- 
lett, Arnest Fink, J. P. Bunting, Wm. E. Craft, John 
Wood, Geo. B. Smith, Jabesh Lovett, Gideon Ostrandei, 
Jos. R. Taylor — Directors. 

Notary. 

chemical Bank. 

(216 Broadway, opposite St. Paul's Chureh.) 

Incorporated April 1, 1824, for twenty-one years. 
Capital, 500,000 dollars. Shares, 25 dollars. Election, 



BANKS. 



125 



first Monday in April. Discounts daily. Dividends, 
Isl cf February and August. 

Jjhn M.ison. President. 
Archibald Crdg, C-shier. 
Gdeon Tucker, I>aac Jjnes, Geo. B. Gllbsrt, Thomas 
W. Thornc — Directors. 

J ,mc? Ken', Counsellor. 

George B. G:!b2r\ Factory Agent. 

Samuel A. Porter, Notary and Attorney. 

CITV BANK. 

(08 Wall-Street.) 

Incorporated ISH, for twenty ye-rs. Extended in 
1831, fjr twenty years. Capital 720,000 dollars. 45 dol- 
lars each share. Officers elected first Tuesd.'ty in June. 
Discount days Mondays and Thursdays. Dividends, 
lit of May and 1st of Noveinb -r. 

Thomss Bloodgool, President. 

G. A. Worth, Cashier. 
Jord?n Wright, C. R. Snyd>m, Richard M. Lawrence, 
Benjimin Coilies, H. V n W.irenen, Joseph Foulke, 
R. J. Walker, Wm. W. Fox, Daniel Parish, Abraham 
Bell, Henry Del field, John P. Stagg, Oliver Corwin, 
Gabriel Wisner — Diiectors. 

Richard I. Welh, Notary. 

Benjamin Clark, Attorney. 

comme:icial bank. 

(Cfirner of Chathnin and Chambers streets.) 

Chartered April 28, 1834, un il Jan. 1, 1865. Capi- 
tal 500,000 dollars, in shires cf 50 dollars each. Elec- 
tion second Tuesday in June. Discount days, Mondays, 
and Thursdays. 

George D. S'.rong, President. 
Hiram Curtiss, Cashier. 
Henrv Laverty, John Field, Wells Phillips, William 
Wyckoff, R. C. Townsend, James L. Graham, J^hn 
Lovett, H. J. Gluackenbjss, Daniel E. Tylee, F. In- 
goldsby, Jas. B. Douglass — Directors. 

E. T. Throop Martin, Notary. 
Richard 1. Wells, Attorney. 
11* 



r26 BANKS. 

DELAWARE AND HUDSON CANAL COMPANY. 
(53 William-street.) 

Chartered in 182.5, for the purpose of making a canal 
from the Hudson River to Honesdale, in Pennsylvania, 
with hanking privileges. Capital, 1,500,000 dollars. 
500,000 may be employed in banking. Shares 100 
dollars. Election, first Tuesday in March. Discount 
days, Wednesdays and Saturdays. Dividends, June and 
December. 

John Wurts, President. 
John H. Williams, Treasurer. 
Philip Hone, Robert Dyson, Wm. Worrell, Samuel 
Reynolds, William M. Halsted, Allison Post, Isaac L. 
Piatt, John Ferguson, Don Alonzo Cushman, Joseph 
Otis, Wm. E. Lee, Edward Coleman — Directors. 
Russel F. Lord, Chief Engineer. 
Wm. E. Dunscomb, Notary. 

FULTON BANK. 
(Corner Fulton and Pearl streets.) 

Incorporated April 1st, 1824, to continue twenty years. 
Capital 600,000 dollars. Shares, 30 dollars each. 
Election, last Tuesday in March. Discount days, Wed- 
nesdays and Saturdays. Dividends, 1st May' and No- 
vember. 

John Adams, President. 
William J Lane, Cashier. 
Benjamin Deforest, Amos Palmer, Samuel T. Tis- 
dale, Edwin Clark, David Trimble, Anson G. Phelps, 
C. O. Halsted, Jos. Kernochan, Valentine G. Hall, O. 
Mauran, John R. Willis, Robert B. Minturn — Directors.. 
Charles A. Clinton, Notary. 

GREENWICH BANK. 
(308 Hudson-Street.) 

Incorporated 17th April, 1830, for twentj-^-five years.. 
Capital 200,000 dollars. Shares 25 dollars each. Divi- 
dends, 1st of August and February. Discount notes 
must be offered the days previous to Tuesdays and Fri- 
days. Election, first Monday in June. 

John R. Satterlee, President. 
Edward R. Weston, Cashier. 
James N. Wells, Robert Halliday, Mordecai Myers, 
Jos. W. Beadel, Nathaniel Jarvis, Thomas Cumniing, 



BANKS. 127. 

Timothy Whittemore, Clinton Gilbert, Lewis Webb, 
Isaac L. Varian, George Coggill, Peter Stuyvesant, 
Henry Dudle)^ — Directors. 

Wm. L. Morris, Director, Att. and Coun. 

Wm. B. Aitkin, Notary. 

LEATHER MANUPACTURERs' BANK. 
(45 William -street.) 

Incorporated April 23, 1832. Expires 1st June, 186-2, 
Capital 600,000 dollars. 50 dollars per share. Election, 
first Monday in June. Discount days, Tuesdays and 
Fridays. 

Fanning C. Tucker, President. 
Francis W. Edmonds, Cashier. 
Austin Melvin, Ogden E. Edwards, James Meinell, 
Gideon Lee, Paul SpotFord, Joseph N. Lord, E. K. 
Prichett, W. W. De Forest, Isaac J. Bicknell, Jehiel 
Jagger — Directors. 

Morris Franklin, Notary. 
Thomas R. Lee, Attorney, 

MANHATTAN COMPANY. 
(23 Wall-street.) 
Incorporated in 1799. Charter unlimited. Capital, 
1,050,000 dollars. Election, first Tuesday in December. 
50 dollars each share. Discount days, Mondays and 
Thursdays. Dividends, July and January. 
Maltby Gelston, President. 
Robert White, Cashier. 
J. G. Coster, Jona. Thompson, James M'Bride, Wm. 
W. Todd, David S. Kennedy, Wm. B. Crosby, Camp- 
bell P. White, Wm. Paulding, Thomas Suffern, S. D. 
Beekman, James Brown, and Richard Riker, City Re- 
corder, ex officio — Directors. 

John R. Livingston, jr.. Notary. 

LA FAYETTE BANK. 
(425 Broadway, near Canal-street.) 
Incorporated April 29, 1834, to continue until January 
1, 1865. Capital 500,000 dollars, in shares of 100 dol- 
lars each. Election second Tuesday of June. Discount 
Monday and Thursday nights. 

Richard M'Carty, President. 
Alfred Colvill, Cashier. 



128 EAN'KS. 

Bcnjimin D. Brush, D. B. Tallmidge, Jacob Wcs'er- 
velt, Jj7iiei! Hirriot, A. Lockwood, C. Duienb-Try, 
Niclulis Lull '.fn, F rnii m HA], T. G. T. Imcre, Birr 
WLk3in>.n, Willi .m M. Ciarkj, John H. Coinell — 
Directors. 

Philip S. CroDke. Notary. 

D. B. Tjllmidg3, A;i'y ..nd Counsellor. 

mechanics' Bank*. 
(I'J Wall-street.^ 
Incorporated 23i of M^rch, 1810, -with a cipital of 
1,500,000 dollars. In ISU, increased the capital to 
2,000,000 doll irs. To endure until the second Tuesday 
in A,>ril, H3]. Rjaswjd in ISJl, till 1835. Elecaon, 
first 'Tuesday in April. 25 dolljrs e?.ch share. Dis- 
count d:iy>, \Vednt;sdiys and Saturdays. Dividends, Ist 
of Febru.iry and 1 st of August. 

Jjhn Flemin<^, President. 
Hirniin B Idwin, Cashier. 
Jacob Lorilljrl, G b-iel Farm:\n, Fr-ncis Cooper, 
Snnuel Hxks, H. C. Dv? Rhim, Jjhn M'Comb, Peter 
Sharpe, Giorge lr;?ljnd, R.b^rt Speir, John Leonard, 
George Arcul irius, Abriliam Warner, John Fleming, 
and Shepa'd Kmpp, (President of the G2ner.1l Society 
of MecLanxsand Trcdesinen, ex o.-^^c/o)— Directors. 
H. Westervelt, Isotary. 

mechanics' and rr^APERs' bank. 
(C )rn it o!" X nf )lk a i 1 Gr i id s reels.) 
Incorporated April 13, 1830, till Jan. 1, 1957. Ca- 
pital, 200,000 dollars, in share? of 23 dollars each. E'ec- 
tion, second Tuesday in July. Discount days, Tuesdays 
and Fridays. 

John Clapp, President. 
E. D. Brown, Cashier. 
Fred. A. Tracv, Zeb. Ring, John Rogers, Thomas H. 
Mills, Wm. E. Dodare, Thomson Price, Jeremiah Clark, 
Stephen Lyon, Abijah Fisher, Walter R. Jones, Rus.sell 
Dart, Josiah L. Hale, W. B. Boll es— Directors. 
John Leveridge, Attorney and Notary. 

♦ The Pension Office of the United States is kept at the Mechanics' 
Bank. John FJeming, Pension Ayent. Sylvester Sper.cer, Chief Clerk. 



BANKS. 129 

merchants' bank. 
(25 Wall-Street.) 

Incorporated in 1805, to endure until the first Tues- 
day in June, 1832. Renewed in 1831, till 1857. Capital, 
1.490,000 dollars. Election, first Tuesday in June. 50 
dollars each share. Discount days. Wednesdays and 
Fridays. Dividends, 1st of June, and 1st of December. 
John J. Palmer, President. 
Walter Mead. Cashier. 
H. I. WyckofF, James Heard, David Lydig, William 
S. Herriman, R. T. Haines, Peter I. Nevius, Benjamin 
Aymar, Harvey Weed, John Crumby, John D. Wolfe, 
Treasurer of State, ex-officio — Directors. 
J. D. Campbell, Notary. 

merchants' exchange bank. 

(Corner of Greenwich and Dey streets.) 

Incorporated April 29th, 1829, for twenty years. Ca- 
pital, 750,000 dollars. Shares, 50 dollars each. Elec- 
tion, first Monday in June. Discount days, Wednesdays 
and Saturdays. 

Peter Stagg, President. 
W. M. Vermilye, Cashier. 
Henry Wyckoff", H. F. Tallmadge, W. F. Have- 
meyer, J. V. Nostrand, Chester Clark, Eli Hart, Goold 
Hoyt, Henry Rankin, R. M'Curdy, Jos. B. Varnum, 
James Brooks, Samuel Thomson — Directors. 

John L. Graham, Notary and Counsellor. 

NATIONAL BANK. 
(19 Wall-street.) 

Chartered 30th April, 1829, for 28 years, with a capital 
of 1,000,000 dollars. In 1830, capital reduced to 750,000 
dollars. Shares, .50 dollars each^ Commenced opera- 
tions 17th May, 1831. Election, second Tuesday in 
July. Discount days, Tuesdays and Fridays. Divi- 
dends, 1st of April and 1st of October. 
Albert Gallatin, President. 
Samuel Flewwelling, Cashier. 

William James, jr., William B. Astor, Eli Benedict, 
Henry Andrew, Seth Grosvenor, Daniel Jackson, John 



130 



BAMKSw 



Wilson, Dudley Selden, Abraham Bloodgood, Elisha 

Riggs, Joseph Bouchand, I'heodure Meyei — Directors. 

Thomas W. Chrisiie, iN'otaiy. 

MORRIS CANAL AND BANKING COMPANY. 
(Jersey City, and 4) William-street ) 
Incorporated in 1824, for loO vcnrs, with bimkinir pri- 
vileges 31 ye^irs. Capital, 4,100,000 dollars. 1,000,000 
dollars employed in btnking. Shares, 100 dollars. 
Eleation, first Monday in March. Select meeting of the 
Board every Thursday. 

Louis M'L'.me, President. 
Thos. A. Alexander, Cashier. 
Henry Yates, E. R. Biddle, George Griswold, Thomas 
C. Cadwalladcr. Joseph L. Joseph, Washington Irving, 
Daniel Jackson, Jonathan Goodhue, Henry W. Hick*^, S. 
R. Brooks, Stephen Whitney, Edwin Lord, John Moss, 
Peter M. Rverson, Simeon Draper, jun., W. Jackson, 
Jas. B. Murray, I. H. Williamson, C. B. Zubriskie, 
Garret D. Wall, John Travers — Directors. 

Roswell B. Mason, Chief Eiigix^.eer. 

NEW-YORK DRY DOCK COMPANY. 
(Bank, corner Avenue D, and Tentii-street. Office 27 Wail-street.) 
Incorporated 12 h April, 18-25, perpetually. Capital 
420,000 dollars ; wi.h b mking privileges. Shares 30 dol- 
lars. Discount days, Tuesd.;}^^ and Fridays. Election, 
2d Monday in January. Dividends, January and July. 
Benjamn Strong, President. 
Wm. W. Dibblee, < /ashier. 
E. D. Comstock, Lewis Lyman, George W. Bruer, H. 
Denning, Obidiah Holme's, Russell Stebbins, John B. 
Lasala, William Paxson H illetr — Directors. 
James W. M'Keon, Noiary. 
Crist and Wheeler, Attorneys. 

NORTH RIVER BANK. 
(Corner of Greenwi,;!) an i Dey streets.) 

Incorporated February 16. h, 1821. < barter to continue 
21 years. Elecjion, 1st Monday in June. Dividend^^, 
January and July. Capital r>00,00:) dollars. Shares 50 
dollars each. Discounts by the Board, Tuesday and Fri- 
day, Ditto by Committee, every day. 



Banks. 131 

Leonarrl Kip, President. 

A. B. Haj's, Cashier. 
Thomas Brooks, Chailes Trinder, Peter A. Jpy, 
Ch;-rles Town, Thomrs DorL'n;', J. mcs Benedict, Na- 
thr.niel Weed, Jf:mes Swords, Aaron Clark, S. D. Ro- 
gers, S. W. Anderson — Directors. 

G. D. Coo{-er, NoIar3^ 

Peter A. Jc y, Counseilor. 

PHENIX BANK. 

(24 Wall-sirect.) 

Charter dated June 15:h, 1812, for 20 years. Continued 
to 1854. Capital 1,500,000 dollars. Officers elected 1st 
Tuesday in July. '-i5 dollars each share. Discount days, 
Wednesdrys iind Saturdays. Dividends, 1st of January 
and 1st of ^uly. 

Henry Cary, President. 

John "Del. field. Cashier. 

N. G. Ogden, Assistf nt Cashier. 
James Don Idson, B. Curtis, D-ivid Bryson, Henry 
Cary, obn Rub'ns, Henry Parish, G. Sharp, Jimes W, 
Otis, G. Siorm, M. H. Grirjiell, ohn Gray, James Camp- 
bell, (Slate.) Robert Rav — Directors. 

V/illiam Van Hook, Notary. 

SEVENTH WARD EANK. 
(-5.3 Kast Bn'adway ) 

Incorporated April 20rh, 1833, for 30 years. Capital 
500,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. Election, 2d 
Tuesday of June. Discounts on Monday and Thursday 
evenings. Notes offered same d-^y. 

Walter Bowne, President. 

Alfred S. Fraser, Cashier. 

Abraham Dally, Vv^illiam S. Coe, Henry Erben, James 

R. Whiting, J. V. Greenfield, Henry Ogden, David 

Brown, Philip Harmon, Gilbert Hopkins, Samuel N. 

Dodge, Aug. Cornwall, Abm. C. Hoagland— Directors. 

James R. Whiting, Notary and Counsellor. 

tradesmen's bank, 
(177 Chatham street.) 

Incorporated in 1823, for 10 years. Renewed in 1831, 
for 24 years. Capital 400,000 dollars. Shares 40 dol- 



13*2 BANKS. 

lars each. Election, 1st Monda}' of July. Discount days 
Tuesdays and Fridays. Dividends, 1st July and January. 
Preserved Fish, President. 
W. H. Falls, Cashier. 
James Hall, Shivers Parker, Eldad Holmes, Isaac Frost, 
Ebenezer Cauldwell, Henry W.Bool, William S. Smith, 
David Lyon, Cyrus Hitchcock, Nicholas Gibert, Josiah 
Macy, S. W. Lowerre, Gilbert Coutant, Richard Law- 
rence, T. J. Townsend, Oliver Slate, jun., Lewis Sey- 
mour, Samuel J. Himt, (one vacancy) — Directors. 
Samuel F. Cowdrey, Notary. 

UNION BANK. 
(17 Wall-sireet.) 

Incorporated March, 1811. To endure until 1831. Re- 
newed in 1831, till 1853. Capital 1,000,000 dollars. Elec- 
tion, 1st Monday in March. 50 dollars each share. Dis- 
count days, Mondays and Thursdays. Dividends, 1st of 
May and Isl November. 

A. G. Thompson, President. 
Daniel Ebbets, jun.. Cashier. 
William Howard, A. G. Thompson, Knowles Taylor, 
Samuel S. Howland, Morris Ketchum, Edwin U. Berry- 
man, Edward Kellogg, Mortimer Livingston, Lewis Cur- 
tis, Wm. A. White, James Chesierman — Directors. 
Howard H. White, Notary. 

AGENCY OF THE BANK OF THE UNITED 

STATES. 

(Philadelphia. Office, 25 Wall-street.) 

Morris Robinson, Agent. 

SAVINGS BANKS. 

NEW-YOnK BANK FOR SAVINGS. 
(Office, No. 43 Chambers-Street. Chartered, 1819.) 
Office open every afternoon from 4 to 6. Friday after- 
noons exclusively for females. Dividends, 3d Monday in 
January and July. 

John Pintard, President. 

Peter A. Jay, First Vice President. 

Philip Hone, Second Vice President. 

Thomas Buckley, Third Vice President. 

John Oothout, Treasurer. 

R. C. Cornell, Secretary. 

D. E. Tylee , Accountant. 



BANKS. 133 

Benjamin Clark, Francis Cooper, Cornelius Du Bois, 
Gabriel Furnam, Jonathan Goodhue, John E. Hyde, C. 
W. Lawrence, R. M. Lawrence, Samuel F. Molt, Tho- 
mas L. Servoss, Silas Wood, Zechariah Lewis, James 
Lox'ett, Cornelius R. Suydam, Lindley Murray, James 
Palmer, Nathaniel Richards, Benjamin Strong, Benja- 
min L. Swan, Najah Taylor, H. Van Wagenen, James 
F. De Peyster — Trustees. 

It appears by the Report of the above Institution, for 
the last year, that ^1,519,468 12 has been received, and 
SI, 751, 761 33 paid out; the heaviest deposits were made 
in the months of June, July, and December, The great- 
est of all in the month of June last. 

The largest amounts of money were drawn for in 
April and July. 

Among the depositors, the most numerous class are 
domestic servants, 891 in number — the next common 
labourers, 846 — the next carpenters, 335 — the next tailors, 
270 — the next seamstresses, 245. 

The most provident of the depositors appear to be the 
single women, 1070 in number — the widows, 467 — and 
coloured people 186, out of 5378 persons doing business 
with the bank. 
The New- York Bank for Savings has 

been in operation, seventeen and a half 

years, and received altogether from 

55,132 depositories, $13,059,695 40 

To which add interest to 1st Jan. 1837,. . . 1,339,173 95 

$14,398,869 35 
Closed and paid out 28,705 accounts, 10,865,152 47 

Leaving 26,427 accounts, entitled to S3, 533, 716 88 

BOWERY SAVINGS BANK. 
(Office, 128 Bowery, above Grand-street.) 
Incorporated May 1, 1834. Bank open for the recep- 
tion of deposits Mondays and Saturdays, from 5 to 8 
o'clock, P. M. Dividends third Monday of January and 
July. David Cotheal, President. 

Thomas Jeremiah, ) -.r. „ t3^„o,-j^„*.. 
r, 1 • 1 T> T f Vice Presidents, 
Frederick R. Lee, y 

G. H. Coggeshall, Secretary. 

13 



134 BANKS, 

Benjamin M. Brown, E. H. Warner, E. D. Comstock, 
Anson G. Phelps, AVilliam Hibbard, Jacob Aims, James 
Mills, A. C. Wheeler, William E. Craft, John Wood, 
Charles Dusenberry, G. Ostrander, Peter Coutant, Caleb 
Bartlett, Joseph R.' Ta3ior, Isaac L. Varian, Jacob P. 
Bunting, William C. Wales, R. M. Hartley, William 
Lee, N. Schureman, Lambert Suydam, Samuel J. Willis, 
Peter Gassner, Peter Pinckney, Jabez Lovett, Samuel 
Andreas, John O'Neal, David Seabury, Peter Palmer, 
EdwinTownsend, John Gray. John I. Marshall, B. Rhine- 
lander, George B. Smith, Jared L. Moore, Isaac Ward, 
Smith Ovutt, W. P. Woodcock— Trustees. 

The amount of deposits made in this bank during the 
last year, was 3286,093 01. Amount drawn out during 
the same period, S213,918. Number of depositors, 5,265. 

GREENWICH SAVINGS BANK. 
(No. 10 Carmine-Street. Incorporated 1833.) 
Open for the transaction of business every Monday and 
Friday, 

George Sucklev, President. 
Charles Oakley, ) ^. presidents 
James N. Wells, ( ^^^^ i:'r...ments. 

B. B. Howell, }^ ,,,. 
W. W. Rodman, \ secretaries. 

John R. Satterlee, Treasurer. 
Stuart F. Randolph, William L. Morris, James B, 
Murray, John Delamater, Robert Halliday, John Gro- 
shon, Timothy Whittemore, Silas M. Stilwell, Isaac L, 
Varian, Joseph Tucker, Thomas Cuminings, Joseph W. 
Beadel, Nathaniel Jarvis, John Bolton, DavidVandervoort,, 
George Riblet, Abraham Nan Nest, William C. Rhine- 
lander, Thomas S. Stevens, Peter Stuyvesant, William 
Mandeville, B. B. Howell, Benjamin Ellis, Clinton Gil- 
bert, Farnham Hall — Trustees. 

seamen's bank for savings, 
(71 Wall-street. Chartered, 1829.) 

Benjamin Strong, President. 
Benjamin Clark, ) „. p„„„,-^„„tj. 
Pelatiah Perit, J Vice Presidents. 

Caleb Barstow, Secretary. 
Gurdon Buck, Treasurer. 



BANKS — BROOKLYN. 135 

Najah Taylor, Henry Coit, Aiigustin Averill, Simeon 
Baldwin, Riifus Davenport, Edward Richardson, Moses 
H. Grinnell, Silas Holmes, John R. Hurd, William 
'Whillock, Joshua Geer, Gabriel Havens, C. W. Law- 
rence, Thomas Masters, Christopher R. Robert, John 
Pintard, George T. Elliott, Anson G. Phelps, James 
Brown, B. L. Wooley — Trustees. 

Bank open daily, (Sundays excepted,) from 12 to 2 
o'clock. 

BANKS IN BROOKLYN. 

BROOKLYN BANK. 
(No. 5 Front-Street.) 

Incorporated Feb. 21, 1832, until 18G0. Capital 200,000 
dollars each. Election second Tuesday in June. Divi- 
dends August and February. 

Robert T. Hicks, President. 
Robert I. Crommelin, Cashier. 
R. V. W. Thorne, C'onklin Brush, Joseph Sprague,R. 
E. De Russy, Joseph Moser, Coe S. Downing, .lames Fos- 
ter, J.G. Murphy, John Thorne, Henry P. Waring, Ti- 
mothy T. Kissam — Directors. 

Nathaniel F. Waring, Attorney and Counsellor. 
R, D. Covert, Notary. 

LONG ISLAND BANK. 
(No. 7 Front-Street.) 
Incorporated April 1, 1824. Capital 300,000 dollars. 
Shares 50 dollars each. Discounts Wednesdays and Sa- 
turdays. Election in June. Dividends 1st of August and 
1st of February. 

Leffert Lefferts, President. 
Daniel Embur}', Cashier. 
Robert Bache, Nehem. Denton, Joseph Kissam, Silas 
Butler, John Schenck, James S. Clark, S. D. Wilkins, 
Robert Carter, Egbert Benson, Whitehead I. Cornell, 
David Johnson — Directors. 

ATLANTIC BANK, BROOKLYN. 
(55 Fulton-street.) 
Incorporated May 10, 1836, to continue until January 1, 
1806. Capital 500,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. 
Discount days, Tuesdays and Saturdays, 



136 FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

Jonathan TroUer, President. 
J. S. Doii<?hiy, Cashier. 
John Lawrence, John T. Bergen. Edwin Hicks, Wm. 
Rockwell, Henry C. Murphy, Rohert F. Manley, E. D. 
Hurlbut, William M. Udall," William Hunter, jun., Ste- 
phen Haynes, Samuel Smith, Richard Corn well — Di- 
rectors. 

SAVINGS BANK— BROOKLYN. 

(OlTice, 43 High-street.) 
Open for business, every Tuesday afternoon. 
A. Van Sinderen, President. 
H. B. Pierponi, Vice President. 
Abraham Vanderveer, Treasurer. 
Adrian Heofeman, Accountant. 



FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

JBTNA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
CoO Wall-street.) 
Passed March 31, 1823, for 21 years. Capital 200,000 
dollars. Shares 50 dollars. Dividends, May and No- 
vember. Election, first Monday in June. 
Charles Town, President. 
Henry Lott, Secretary. 
Charles Town, JFrederick Pentz, John Allan, Chester 
Clark, Wm. A. F. Pentz, RusseJ Stebbins, L. M. Hoff- 
man, John Wright, jun., M. L. Marsh, R. Pegg, George 
Pomeroy, J. R. St. John, Aaron Clark, D. E. Delavan, 
Timothy Southmayd, P. L. Foulke, D. A. Cushman,C. 
S. WoodhuU, Obidiah Holmes, S. J. Mumford, G. F. 
Darbv, .Tohn S. Smith, jun., William H. Thorn, D. L. 
Grav^ Walter M. Smith, William C. Boardman, Simeon 
Draper, Silas Wood, Stewart C. Marsh, Edwin B. Clay- 
ton — Directors. 

Richard P. Dunn, Surveyor. 

AMERICAN FIRE I.VSURANCE COMPANY, 
(Receiver's Oilice, Wall-street.) 

BOWERY FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(124 Bowery, corner ofGrand-street.) 
Incorporated April 24th, 183.'^, for 30 years. Cnpitnl 
300,000 dollars. Shares 25 dollars each". Election. 2d 
Wednesday in February. 



FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 137 



Benjamin M. Brown, President, 
Peter Pinckney, Secretary. 
Benjamin T. Brown, Effingham H. Warner, Anson G. 
Phelps, Frederick R. Lee, Joseph R. Taylor, John Per- 
rin, William R. Cooke, David Cotheal, William Hib- 
bard, M. D., Hamilton Fish, James Mills, Peter Gassner, 
Gideon Ostrander, E. R. Diipignac, George Haws, jun., 
Jabesh Lovett, James C. Stoneall, Jacob P. Bunting, Ber- 
nard Rhinelander, Joseph S, Brainerd, Edward Doughty 
— Directors. 

Hamilton Fish, Counsellor and Attorney. 
William Lee, Surveyor. 

CITY FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(No, 44 Wall-street.) 
Incorporated in 1833, for thirty years. Capital 300,000 
dollars. Election, second Wednesday in February. 
John Barrow, President. 
R. A. Reading, Secretary. 
Cornelius W. Lawrence, Josiah Macy, Robert Hicks, 
Robert I. Walker, William H. Falls, Joseph W. Corlies, 
Isaac Frost, John Barrow, John D. Wright, Cyrus Hitch- 
cock, Benjamin Clark, Amos Willets, David S. Brown, 
William C. White, Abraham Bell, Thomas J. Townsend, 
Peter S. Titus, Daniel Trimble, Thomas Carpenter, 
Henry A. Nelson, Thomas C. Chardavoyne — Directors. 

CLINTON FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(Not yet in operation.) 

Capital, 300,000 dollars. Shares, 50 dollars. 

EAGLE FIRE COMPANY. 
(59 Wall-street.) 
Incorporated 1806, charter perpetual. Capital 500,000 
dollars. Shares, 100 dollars each. Officers elected se- 
cond Tuesday in January. Dividends, April and Oc- 
tober. 

Edward W. Laight, President, 
Thomas Glover, Secretary. 
David Lydig, Philip Hone,Wm. H. Aspinwall, Thomas 
W, Ludlow, Garrit Storm, Maltby Gelston, Henry 
Laight, James I. Jones, George S. Robbins, Thomas L. 
Wells, Robert Ray, James Strong— Directors. 

12* 



138 FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

EAST RIVER FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(44 Williani-slreet, one door South of Wall) 
Incorporated April 24, 1833. Capital, 250,000 dollars- 
Shares, 25 dollars each. Election, second Monday in 
May. 

William Mandeville, President. 
Gold S. Silliman, Secretary. 
John Morehead, James M'Bride, Thomas Suffern, C. 
P. White, John Wilson, Joseph Kernochan, Robert 
Dyson, Abner Weyman, James Bowen, Henry W. Hills, 
John J. Bailey, Robert I. Dillon, John R. Peters, John 
Brower, E. L. Williams, Charles Oakley, R. H. Os- 
good, Geore^e Coggeshall, Hamilton Murray, Thomas 
Nesmith — Directors. 

Robert J. Dillon, Counsel and Attorney. 

EQUITABLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 
(46 Wall-street.) 
Chartered April 20, 1823, for twenty-one years. To 
insure against loss by fire, as well as loss or injury bv 
robbery committed on furniture or personal property in 
house or stores, while the proprietors are absent from 
the city. Capital, 300,000 dollars. Election, first Mon- 
day in June. Shares, 50 dollars. Dividends, May and 
November. 

Thomas R. Mercein, President. 
Joseph Strong, Secretary. 
William Burgoyne, Harvey Weed, Shepherd Knapp, 
Lambert Suydam, Samuel B. Ruggles, Amasa Wright, 
George Rapelye, Joseph W. Duryee, Samuel Bell, W. 
B. Lawrence, A. G. Thompson, Henry Yates, William 
Kent, J. G. Pierson, Louis Decasse, Frederick Deming, 
Charles Hoyt, L. Bradley — Directors, 

Daniel Stansbury, Surve5'or. 

firemen's INSURANCE COMPANY'. 
(46 Wall -street.) 

Incorporated April 19, 1825. Capital, 300,000 dollars. 
Shares, 25 dollars. Election, second Monday in No- 
vember, Dividends, September and March. 
John Leonard, President. 
Niel Gray, Secretarv. 
Jacob Drake, Stephen Allen, John Sutphen, S. W. 



FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES, 139 

— •» 

Anderson, O. T. Hewlett, Samuel Demilt, John Wilson, 
C. W. Lawrence, F. C. Havemeyer, F. T. Luqueer, 
Peter Sharpe, Edward G. Faile, Gabriel Havens, S. M. 
Thompson, John R. Townsend, H. C. De Rham, EfF. 
Townsend, William Adee, William Agnew, Jacob 
Lorillard, R. P. Carman, S. T. Skidmore, Charles A. 
Jackson — Directors. 

President of Fire Department, ex-officin. 

President of Trustees of Fire Department Fund, ex- 
officio — Directors. 

EIGHTH WARD MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(46i) Broadway-) 

Incorporated April 30, 1836, to continue 20 years. 
Election in April. 

Moses Jacques, President. 
James C. Hallock, Secretary. 

FRANKLIN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(Receiver's Office at the Office of the New Jersey Railroad and Trans- 
portation Co., No. 2 Hanover-street.) 

FULTON INSURANCE COMPANY. 
{Receiver's Office, Beaver-street, near Broad.) 

GLOBE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
{Receiver's Office, 58 Williara-street, comer of Pine.) 

GUARDIAN INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(51, Wall-Street, closing their business.) 
Incorporated April 24, 1833. Capital, 300,000 dollars. 
Shares, 50 dollars. Election, second Monday in May. 
George Johnston, President. 
Joseph Greenleaf, Secretary. 
Robert Lenox, Robert Maitland, John Johnston, John 
S. Crary, D. J. Kennedy, J. Rathbone, jun., G. G. Hoav- 
land, Charles March, William Colgate, H. L. Williams, 
James Campbell, Thomas Barron — Directors. 

HOWARD INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(54 Wall-Street.) 
Incorporated March 9, 1825, for Iwenty-one years. 
Capital, 300,000 dollars. Shares, 50 dollars. Election, first 
Monday in December. Dividends, January and July. 
R. Havens, President. 
Lewis Phillips, Secretary. 



140 FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

Najah Taylor, C. W. Lawrence, John Rankin,, J. P. 
Phenix, J. D. Wolfe, John Morrison, David Lee, Joseph 
Otis, Fanninsf C.Tucker, J. V. Varnum, Wm. Ccu:h,C. 
O. Halsted,^B. L. Woolley, Micah Bal hvin, Jehiel 
Jaggar, Wm. W. Todd, Daniel Oakley, Moses Allen — 
Directors. 

GREENWICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(306 Hudson-Street.) 
Incorporated May G, 1834. Capital, 200,000 dollars. 
Shares, 25 dollars each. Election, first Monday in June. 
Timothy Whittemore, President. 
Joseph Torrey, Secretary. 
Abm. Van Nest, George Suckley. Isaac L. Varian, 
James N. Wells, Robert Halliday, 'William L. Morris, . 
W. C. Rhinelander, John Delamater, A. A. Jacobus, 
Jacob Brush, J. W. Beadel, Nathaniel Jarvis, J. R. Sat- 
terlee, Ed. D. West, Asher Martin, Clinton Gilbert, 
Samuel Kip, jun., William F. Havemeyer, Henry I. 
Seaman — Directors. 

JEFFERSON INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(26, Wall-street.) 
Passed March 4, 1824, for twenty-one years. Shares, 
30 dollars each. Insures against loss or damage by fire, 
and also inland navigation. Election, first Monday in 
February. Dividends, 15th July and 15th February. 
Thomas W. Thorne, President. 
George T. Hope, Secretary. 
Thomas W. Thorne, Dr. David Rogers, John R. 
Davison, Thomas T. Woodruff', Samuel Webb, David 
Jacol, Stephen Lyon, Thomas Price, Alexander Master- 
ton, Jonathan H. Ransom, John Morss, Dr. Benjamin R. 
Robson, John C. Merritt, Francis P. Sage, Peter Em- 
bury, jun,, Caleb C. Tunis, John H. Lee, Moses Tucker, 
Anson Baker, Samuel Underbill — Directors. 

MANHATTAN INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(34 Wall-street.) 

Chartered March, 1821, for thirty years. Shares, 50 
dollars. Election, last Monday in March. Dividends, 
December and June. 



FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



141 



Harmon Hendricks, President. 

Thomas Bull, jun., Secretary. 
Henry Thomas, Eleazer Lord, H. Hendricks, Peter 
H. Schenck, William Wallace, William P. Mott, David 
L. Haight, John Rathbone, jun., E. J. Anderson, J. E. 
Haight, Elisha Riggs, R. L. Lord, S. F. Mott, John 
Ward, David N. Lord, Thomas Barron, John Delafield, 
Russell H- Nevins, Samuel Osborne, Daniel Jackson, 
Henry L- Pierson — Directors. 

George Sutton, Surveyor. 

merchants' insurance company. 
(55 Wall-Street.) 
Chartered in April, 1818. Capital 500,000 dollars. 
Election, last Monday in January. Shares, 100 dollars 
each, Dividends, 15th January and July. 
Jonathan Lawrence, President. 
Nathaniel W. Strong, Secretary. 
Jonathan Lawrence, Henry Kneeland, Thomas 
Bloodgood, John A. Stevens, Robert Chesebrough, Fran- 
cis H. Nicoll, Thomas Lawrence, James Boyd, jun., 
William W. Fox, George Barclay, Jeromus Johnson, 
Jacob P. Giraud, David M. Prall, Ephraim Holbrook, 
Henry K. Bogert, Anthony C. Rossire, Moses Taylor, 
Oliver Corwin, J. L. Lawrence, Charles Sagory, Chas. 
N. Talbot, James G. Stacey, Asaph Stone, Joseph 
Hudson, Andrew Foster, jun. — Directors. 

MUTUAL insurance COMPANY. 

(52 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated in 1798 — renewed in 1809, and stands un- 
til revoked by the Legislature. Renewed capital, 350,000 
dollars. Shares 50 dollars. Election, 1st Tuesday in 
April. Dividends, June and December. 

George Ireland, President. 

Anthony Bleecker M' Donald, Secretary. 
Gabriel Furman, William Wilson, Joshua Waddington, 
Jacob Lorillard, John Oothout, George Ireland, George 
Arcularius, Robert Benson, John Campbell, George Conk- 
lin, Joseph Tucker, Joshua Brush, Robert L. Stuart, 
John Fleming, John Gray, Boltis Moore, George C. Sat- 
terlee, Robert C. Wetmore, Edward Cook, James Lefferts, 
Anthony Lamb, Adam Norris, Harman Westervelt— 
Directors. 



142 



FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



NEW-YORK CONTRIBUTIONSHIP. 
(57 Wall-street.) 
Chartered April 5th, IS'24, to continue 30 years. Capi- 
tal 300,000 dollars, in shares of 50 dollars each. Elec- 
tion, 3d Monday in January. Dividends, June and De- 
cember. 

Abraham Bloodgood, President. 
R. W. Martin, Secretary. 
Abraham Bloodgood, James McBride, John Adams, 
John Haggerty, James Campbell, GulianC. Verplanck, 
John Johnston, Thomas Suffern, Joseph Kernochan, 
James Bryar, John J. Palmer, John Wilson, Peter Lo- 
rillard, jr., Stephen Whitney, James M'Call, Thomas Ir- 
vin, Robert M'Coskry, Henry Parish, Campbell P.White, 
Reuben Withers, William Scott, Ferdinand Suydam, Pe- 
ter I. Nevius — Directors, 

NEW-YORK FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(192 Chatham-Street.) 

Incorporated April 18th, 1832, to continue 30 years. 

Capital -200,000 dollars. Shares 100 dollars. Election, 

2d Wednesday in February, Dividends, 1st of February 

and August. 

William B. Bolles, President. 
A. M. Merchant, Secretary. 
William B. Bolles, Samuel Akerly, William H. Falls, 
John Anderson, George Lovett, John G. Coster, William 
N. Chadwick, Richard J. Hutchinson, Cornelius Vander- 
bilt, Caleb Bartlett, Ebenezer Piatt, jun., Lewis Seymour, 
Zebedee Ring, James W. Dominick, Isaac K. Jessup, 
Oliver H. Jones, Jeremiah Clark, Walter R. Jones, Jere- 
miah Vanderbilt, Ephraim D. Brown, Thomas H. Mills, 
John Sampson, Augustus Greele, William Sherwood, 
Thomas Truslow — Directors. 

NORTH AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(18 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated January 1, 1836. Capital 250,000 dollars. 
Shares 50 dollars eacli. Election last Monday in May. 
Dividends May and November. 

Robert Ainslie, President, 
John M'Brair, Secretary. 



FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 143 

Daniel Jackson, Henry Wyckoff, Henry H. Leeds, H. 
H. Elliott, George D. Strong, Thomas Sargeant, John L. 
Graham, Edgar Jenkins, Stephen Storm, Courtlandt Pal- 
mer, Louis De Casse, David Cod wise, C.V. B. Hasbrook, 
Thomas Bolton, Thomas Tileston, Charles O. Handy, 
William P. Hallett, Samuel T. Tisdale, Nathaniel Weed, 
D, A. Comstock — Directors. 

NORTH RIVER INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(192 Greenwich-street.) 
Incorporrted February, 1822, for 15 years. Renewed 
for 15 years. Capital 350,000 dollars. Dividends, March 
and September. Shares 25 dollars. Election, last Mon- 
day in March. 

Richard Whiley, President. 
P. R. Warner, Secretary. 
Richard Whiley, David Rogers, Benjamin Stephens, 
Thomas Brooks, William C. Rhinelander, Charles Gra- 
ham, David Johnson, Stephen Storm, Benjamin Strong, 
Stuart F. Randolph, George Vaughn, Louis De Casse, 
Samuel Verplanck, George P. Rogers, Obadiah Holmes, 
Thomas Swords, Samuel Reynolds, Edward A. NicoU, 
John B. Martin, Michael Allison, Silas B. Hamilton, 
William Bleakley, John B. Schmelzel, George Arcula- 
rius, John Le Maire, Eli White, Stephen Mayers, George 
Schmelzel, John L Lagrave — Directors. 

traders' INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(Receiver's Office, Cliatham-square. ) 

UNITED states' FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(2S2 Pearl-street, corner of Beekman.) 
Passed April 1, 1824, for 21 years. Capital, 250.000 
dollars, with liberty to increase to 500,000. Shares, 25 
dollars each. Election, first Monday in June. Divi- 
dends, June and December. 

John L. Bowne, President. 
James Wilkie, Secretary. 
John R. Willis, Silas Hicks, Robert C. Cornell, James 
Barker, Benjamin Corlies, Lindley Murray, H. H. 
Lawrence, Step. Van Wyck, Isaac Frost, Robert D. 
Weeks, John Wood, Thomas W. Jenkins, Benjamin 
Strong, George Hussey, U. F. Carpenter, James H. 
Titus, Eben. Cauldwell, Joshua S. Underbill, C. T. 



144 BROOKLYN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



Croimvell, C. W. Lawrence, Nathaniel Lord, Morris J 
Ketchum. Charles Kneeland, Ed. A. Wrij^ht, Benjamin i! 
Clark, Robert B. Minlurn, James Lovett, William Brad- 
ford, George Ehninger, Thomas W. Pearsall, Silas 
Wood, George D. Post, Benjamin A. Mott, Jos. L. 
Frame — Directors. 

WASHINGTON INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(Receiver's Olfice, 8 Wall street, third story.) 

BROOKLYN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

BROOKLYN INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(31 Fulton-street.) 
Passed April 3, 1824, to continue twenty-one years. 
Capital 10-2,()00 dollars. Shares, 17 dollars. Election,' 
first Monday in June. Dividends, May and November. 
Abraham Vanderveer, President. 
William Ellsworth, Secretary. 
James B. Clark, William Philip, Robert Bach, Hora- 
tio G. Onderdonk, Abraham Vanderveer, Joshua Tol- 
ford, Josiah Dow, Silas Butler, Obadiah Holmes, 
Amasa Wright, James Forbes, Samuel Smith, Joseph 
Moser, Losee Van Nostrand, Abraham Sutton, Nathan 
Young, James E. Underbill, Edward G. Miller, Jer. 
H. Taylor — Directors. 

LONG ISLAND INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(3 Front street.) 
Incorporated in 1833. Capital, 200,000 dollars. Shares, 
50 dollars. Election, second Tuesday in May. Divi- 
dends, May and November. 

Henry Waring, President, 
Joseph Sprague, Vice-President. 
S. Alpheus Smith, Secretary. 
David Anderson, Conklin Brush, James C. Church, 
Elias Hubbard, jun., Robt. T. Hicks, Obadiah Jackson,' 
John Lawrence, Freeman Rawdon, Geo. L. Thatcher' 
Jonathan Trotter, Richard V. W. Thorne, H. Waring' 
Samuel A. W^illoughby, Charles E. Bill, Charles Christ- 
mas, James M. Duffield, George B. Fisk, Alexander 
Hamilton, Stephen Haynes, David Kinderley, John A. 
Lott, Jeremiah Lambertson, Charles I. Henshaw, John 
H. Smith, Joseph Sprague — Directors. 



MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 145 



MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

AMERICAN INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(51 Wall-Street.) 
Incorporated March 1, 1815. Capital, 500,000 dollars. 
£0 dollars each share. Election, second Tuesday in May. 
Dividends, second Tuesday in May and November. 
Wm. Neilson, President. 
BacheM'Evers, Assistant President. 
Philip Hayt, Secretary. 
H. C. De Rham, Wm. Wilson, Peter Remson, Edm. 
Morewood, James M'Bride, F. Cottenet, Robert Gracie, 
John Graham, John A. Stevens, John Ferguson, Felix 
Columb, P. L. Foulke, Wm. H. Aspinwall— Directors. 

ATLANTIC INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(57 Wall-Street.) 
Charter dated Feb. 27, 1824, and tQ continue until 
1845. Capital, 350,000 dollars. Shares, 50 dollars each. 
Election, second Monday in January. Dividends, Jan- 
uary and July. 

Josiah L. Hale, President. 
Walter R. Jones, Vice President, 
f Jacob R. Pentz, Secretary. 

Josiah L. Hale, Walter R. Jones, Georg-e GriswoM, 
Jonathan Goodhue, Peter Crary, Thomas Tileston, 
Goold Hoyt, Henry Parish, Caleb Barstow, Henry 
Coit, Frederick A. Tracy, Geo. Hussey, EMsha Riggs, 
George T. Elliot, William W. De Forest, Lewis Curtis, 
Charles H. Russell, S. V. S. Wilder, John Crumby, Eli 
Wainwright, Daniel Low, John C. Halsey, E. D. Hurl- 
but, George Gordon, James Hagarty— Directors. 
John Earl and Samuel A. Waring, Inspectors. 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(44 Wall-Street.) 

Incorporated in April, 1832, to continue twenty-one 
years. Capital, 300,000 dollars. Shares, 100 dollars. 
iElection, fourth Monday in May. Dividends, first Mon- 
day in January and July. 

Edward A. Russell, President. 
Paul Spofford, Vice President... 
Ebenezer Hale, Secretary. 
13 



146 MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

E. A. Russell, Paul Spofford, John A. Haven, Wm. F. 

Cary, Geo. W. Gra}^, Henry W. Hills, Samuel Downer, 

jun., DavJd Lane, N. Liitletield, S. Draper, A. .i. Stout, 

Geo. Higgintion, Robert Kelly, C. L. Roberts — Directors. 

james Morgan, Inspector. 

JACKSON INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(53 Wa])-&tre^t.) 
Incorporated in 1831, till 1852. Capital, 400,0C0 dollars. 
Shares, 50 dollars. Election, second Monday in January. 
Dividends, first Monday in July and January. 
Anthony B. Neilson, President. 
Fyler Eiibblee, Vice President. 
Lewis Gregory, Secretary. 
Robert White, Wm'. W. Todd, Moses Taylor, Jos, 
Foulke, jun., Nathaniel Lord, R. H. M'Curdy, "^Knowles 
Taylor, Russel Stebblns, Samuel Painter, Wm. A. 
Wnite, J. Grosvenor, A. G. Phelps, Charles Brugiere, 
jun., John S. Smith, jun., George R. Ives— Directors. 
Hiram Ketchum, Counsellor and Ati'y. 
A. J. Skiddy, Inspector. 

NEPTUNE INSURANCE COMPANT. 
(60 Wall-street.) 
Incorporated April 1, 1625, to endure till 1846. Capi- 
tal, 250,000 dollars. Shares, 50 dollars each. Election, 
second Monday in January. Dividends, first Monday in 
July and January. 

John R. Hurd, President. 
Thomas H. Merry, Assistant President. 
Charles J. Johnson, Secretary. 
Abm. Bell, Chas. A. Davis, Arthur Tappan, Joseph 
D. Beers, Samuel Thompson, H. Auchincloss, Henry 
K. Bogert, James Wilson, jun., Henry Grinnell, Simeon 
Baldwin, Henry Burgy, Robert I. Walker, Wm. Shaw, 
Jonathan Little, Andrew P. Pillot, John Q,. Jones, C. L. 
Roberts, George B. Dorr, Robert L. Taylor — Directors. 
George Dupleix, Inspector. 

merchants' marine INSURANCE COMPANT. 
(44 Wall-Street.) 
Incorporated in 1836, to endure until 1857. Capital, 
400,000 dollars. Shares, 100 dollars each, Election in 
February. 



Marine insurance companies. 147 

Thomas Hale, President. 

Bnijamin R. Winthrop, Vice President. 

John D.Jones, Secretary, 
Joseph Kernochan, Wm. H. Russell, D. W. C. Oly- 
phant, A. Foster, jun., Thomas Lord, Riifus Leavitt, C, 
Durand, A. Bigelow, jun., L. Lorut, J. Heydecker, Asa 
Whitney, M. Purton, William Scott, Ramsay Crooks, 
John Bcirstow, Roscow Cole, D. F. Manice, A. Averill, 
Benjamin Salter, S. H. Foster, jun., Hamilton Murray, 
Wm, Redmond, John M. Catlin — Directors. 
Alexander J. Cartvvright, Inspector. 

NEW-YORK INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(34 Wall-st:e3t.) 

Incorporated April 2, 1798, till 1840. Capital, 500,000 
dollars. Shares, 50 dollars each. Election, second Mon- 
day in January, Dividends, lirst Monday in January 
and July, 

Charles M'Evers, President. 

Adam Tredwell, Assistant. 

T. B. Satterthwaite, Secretary. 
Wm. Banks, Joseph Sands, George T. Trimble, Ed- 
ward R. Jones, Stewart Brown, Theodore Meyer, L. C. 
Ilamersley, G. C. Verplanck, Jacob Harrey, Henry W. 
Hicks, R. B. Minturn, Matthew Maury, Robert Kermit, 
Caspar Meier, C. W. Lawrence, Stephen Higginson, 
William Moore — Directors. 

NEW-YORK STATE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(55 Wall-Street.) 

Incorporated in 1825. Revived in 1831, for twenty-one 
years. Capital, 300,000 dollars. Shares, 50 dollars each. 
Election, first Monday in May, Dividends, first Monday 
in January and July. 

John C. Delprat, President. 
Charles C. Walden, Vice President. 
Henry Bulling. Secretary. 
Henry Cotheal, C. W. Faber, Joseph Kernochan, 
Thomas Sutfern, Charles Sagory, Edward Stainer, A. R. 
Thompson, A. Le Barbier, W. H. Thorne, T. C. Dore- 
mus, Benjamin Clapp, Daniel Parish, John I. Bailey, 
David C. Porter, Robert L. Cutting, A. Lemoyne, James 
D. P. Ogden, Samuel Lunel, M. Livingston — Directors. 
William Neweomb, Inspector. 



148 MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

OCEAN INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(21 Wall-Street.) 
Incorporated March 20th, 1810, with a capital of 
340,000 dollars. Shares, 35 dollars each. Eleciion, se- 
cond Monday in January. Dividends, first Monday in 
January and July. 

Abraham Ogden, President. 
N. G. Rutgers, Assistant. 
James S. Schermerhorn, Secretary. 
James Brown, William Earnewall, John S. Crar)% 
Samuel M. Fox, Moses H. Grinnell, Samuel S. Howiand, 
Samuel Hicks, Peter Harmony, ('harles A. Hecksdier, 
Isaac Jones, Anthony Lutilhon, Thomas Masters, Abra- 
ham Ogden, Jas. De Peyster Ogden, Thaddeus Phelps, 
Nicholas G. Rutgers, Frederick Sheldon, James P. Van 
Home, Campbell P. White, Henry I. Wyckoff— Di- 
rectors. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(Marine and Life. 48 Wall-street.) 
Incorporated 1818, to endure till 1838, with the privi- 
lege of insuring on lives, for which a part of its capital 
was set apart, and made perpetual. Directors electecl 
second Monday in January. Capital, 500,000 dollars, of 
which 100,000 dollars is secured on bond and mortgage, 
and made liable for the business of the Life Department 
only. Shares, 50 dollars each. Dividends, January 
and July. 

Jeremiah P. Tappan, President. 
Daniel Cotheal, Assistant President. 
Wm. J. Van Wagenen, Secretary. 
Thomas March, Adam Norrie, Robert Maitland, 
James Boyd, jun., D. S. Kennedy, Andrew Foster, Chas. 
N. Talbot, John Brouwer, Pelatiah Perit, Joseph Bou- 
chaud, James Strong, N. D. C. Moller, John De Ruyter, 
James G. Stacey, Lambert Suydam, James Boorman, 
George Gordon, E. A. B. Graves, Archibald Gracie, J. 
Green Pierson — Directors. 

Jabesh Lovett, Inspector. 

THK SEA INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(65 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated May 15, 1834, for thirty years. Capital, 
2^50,000 dollars. Shares, 50 tlollars. Election, 1st January. 



Lira INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANIES. 149 

Isaac Bell, President. 

Samuel Rogers, Secretary. 
Peter Stuyvesant, John J. Bailey, Henry Dudley, 
James Hagarty, Russell Glover, E. N. Rogers, Benjamin 
F. Lee, Robert Steele, William Burns, Benjamin Curtis, 
O. E. Edwards, J. D. Beers, J. R. St. John, Isaac A. 
Storm — Directors. 

Timothy Edwards, Inspector. 

WASHINGTON MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(54 Wall-Street.) 

Incorporated April 27, 1834, to continue thirty years. 
Capital, 300,000 dollars. Shares, 50 d liars each. Elec- 
tion, first Tuesday in January. Dividend days, first Tues- 
days of January and July. 

Gilbert Allen, President. 

James Lawson, Vice President, 
Robert Dyson, T. T. Kissam, John Thorne, John 
Wilson, Alex. Hamilton, E. Richardson, Joseph Howard, 
R. C.Wetmore, W. C. Boardman, A. B. Morrell, William 
E. Dodge, R. R. Minturn, Lewis De Casse, Oliver Hull, 
Albert Woodhull, P. V. HoflTman, Jed. Frye, James S. 
Brander, Bradford Lincoln, Charles H. Marshall, A. G. 
Stout, Geo. Ehninger, William F. Hamilton — Directors. 

Joseph B. Nones, Secretary. 

Wm. Thomson, Inspector. 

John A. Sidell, Attorney, 



lilFE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANIES. 

NEW-YORK LIFE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY. 
(33 Wall-street.) 
Passed March 9th, 1830. Unlimited. Capital, 1,000,000 
dollars. Shares, 100 dollars each. Dividends, 10th 
January and July. 

William Bard, President. 
E. A. Nicoll, Secretary. 
Chas. C. Palmer, Assist. Sec'y. 
New York Directors — John Mason, Samuel Thompson, 
William Bard, Isaac Bronson,?J. J. Astor, James M'Bride, 
John Duer, Thos. W. Ludlow, Stephen Whitney, James 
• 13* 



160 LIFE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANIES. 

Kjent, Wm. B. Lawrence, Thos. J. Oakley, G. C. Ver- 
plaHck, Nathaniel Prime, Jonathan Goodhue, John Rath- 
bone, inn., Thomas Sutiern, Peter Harmony, John G. 
XDoster, P. G. Stuyvesant, H. C. De Rham, Jacob Loril- 
lard, Henry Brevoort, jun., Benjamin L. Swan, C. W. 
Lawrence. Albany Directors — S. Van Rensselaer, Benj, 
Knower. Utica — Nicholas Devereux. Troy — Stephen 
"Warren. 

Persons may effect insurances with this company on 
their own-lives, or l-he lives of others, and either for the 
iwhole duration of life^ or for a limited period. The 
payments of premium may be either made annually or 
in a gross sum. 

Money will be received in deposit by the Company, 
;and held in trust, upon which interest will be allowed as 
tfoUows .: 
Upon sums over SI 00, irjedeemable for 1 year, 4^ pr cent. 

Do. do, 100, do. 5mos. 4 " 

J)o. do. 100, do. 2 " 3 " 

FARMERS^ LOAN AND TRUST COMPANY. 

<34 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated Feb. 28, 1822, under th« name of the 
Farmers' Fire Insurance and Loan Company. Title 
altered and Directors classified April 8, 1836. Capital, 
•2,000,000 dollars. Shares, 50 dollars each. Election, 
.'Second Tuesday in June. Dividends, January and July, 
Henry Seymour, President. 
David Codwise, Vice President. 
Rufus K. DeiajSeld, Secretary. 
Fred. A. Tracy, George Griswold, Lewis Curtis, John 
S. Crary, James Tallmad^€, Henry Parish, K H. Elv, 
Charles Dickinson, Thomas Tiieston, Eli Hart, Daniel 
Jackson, George NeWbold, Henry Wyckofi', Mor. L. 
Smith, John L. Graham, Isaac Townsend, Enos T. 
Throop, John Delafield, John Fleming. State Direc- 
tors—John De Mott, James Seymour, €yrus Curtiss, Lot 
<^.lark, Henry Vail, Jeremiah Johnson — Directors. 
John L. Graham, Counsellor. 
Dr. James A. Washington, Physician. 
This Company insures lives, grants, annuities, and 
executes trusts. 



RAIL-ROAD COMPANIKS. 151 



AMERICAN LIFE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY. 
(Baltimore. Agency, 55 Wall-street.) 

Chartered in 1833. Charter perpetual. Shares, 50 
dollars. Election, first Monday in June, Dividends 
May and November. ' 

P. K. Macaulay, President, Baltimore. 
Morris Robinson, Vice President, New York. 

James Boorman, Charles A. Davis, William E. 
Mayhew, Fred. W. Brune, Joseph L. Joseph, Samuel 
Wetmore, Matthew L. Bevan, James Cox, Samuel Hoff- 
man, Fielding Lucas, jun., Isaac Lawrence, Jas. Swan, 
Joseph Cushing, Henry Kneeland, George S. Robbins, 
Peter I. Nevius, Benjamin M'Vickar, Bev. Robinson, 
Roswell L. Colt, John Moss, William Piatt, Samuel F. 
.Mott — Directors. 

Richard Wilson, Secretary, Baltimore. 

Nathaniel Thurston, Assist. Secretary, New- York. 
^ ^Chas. F. Maver and J. H. B. Latrobe, Coun., Baltimore, 



RAIL-ROAD COMPANIES. 

J!JE^V-Y0RK AND HARLEM RAIL-ROAD COMPANY. 
(18 Wall-street. Ticket Office, 241 Bowery.): 
Incorporated April 25th, 1831, for twenty-one years. 
Capital, 1,150,000 dollars. Shares, 50 dollars each, 
i^lection, first Tuesday in July. 

Abraham R. Lawrence, Esq., President. 
John Lozier, Esq., Vice President. 
Samuel Swa rtwout, John Mason, Henry Ogden, S. J, 
Joseph, Thomas Addis Emmet, Isaac Adriance, Thos! 
E. Davis, Joseph Wallis, Henry Wilkes, Wm. Dumont— 
Directors. 

C. A. C. Rainetaux, Secretary. 
John Ewen, jr.. Engineer. 

NEW-YORK AND ERIE RAIL-ROAD COMPANY. 
(46 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated in April, 1832. Capital, 10,000,000 dol- 
lars. Shares, 100 dollars each. 



15'3 RAIL-ROAD COMPANIES. 



James G. King, President. 

P. G. Stuyvesant, Vice President. 

Talman J. Waters, Secretary. 
John G. Costar, James Boorman, Samuel B. Ruggles, 
Stephen AVhitnev, J. Rnthbone, jr., J. Green Pierson, 
Jer. H. Pierson, G. D. Wickham, C. W. Lawrence, W. 
B. Lawr.mce, George Griswold, William E. Dodge, 
Geo. S. Robbins, J. W. Leavilt, J. A. Stevens— Directors. 

LONG ISLAND RAIL-ROAD COMPANY. 
(45 William-Street ) 

Incorporated 24th April, 1834. Capital, 1,150,000 dol- 
lars. Shares, 50 dollars. Election, 1st Monday in June. 
Knowles Taylor, President. 
Wm. F. Blydenburgh, Vice President. 
Clarence D. Sickett, Secretary. 
John Delafield, Treasurer. 
John L. Graham. Henry Wvckoff, Benjamin Curtis, 
Valentine Hicks, George D. "Strong, Joshua Fanning,. 
William S. Smith, John H. Hicks, H. F. Tallmadge— 
Directors. 

BROOKLYN AND JAMAICA RAIL-ROAD COMPANT. 

(2 Hanover-Street.) 

Incorporated 25th April , 1832, for fifty years. Capit ^1, 
300,000 dollars. Shares, 50 dollars each. Election, 9th. 
July. Dividends, December and June. 

John A. King, President. 

Elihu Townsend, Treasurer. 

Robert Schuyler, Secretary. 
Nathan Shelton, Tames Foster, Samuel Smith, A. Chi- 
chester, Van W. Wickes, James Herriman, Charles 
Hoyt, .loseph W. Allen, Robert Ray, G. R.I. Bowdoin .— 
Directors. 

SARATOGA AND SCHKNECTADY RAnL,-ROA* COMPANT. 

(27 Wall-street.) 

R. H. Lawrence, President. 

John Clarke, Vice-President. 

Wm. W. Dibblee, Secretary ajid Register. 



RAIL-ROAD COMPANIES. 153 

BOSTON AND NEW-YORK TRANSPORTATION COMPANY. 
(2 Hanover-Street.) 

Robert Schuyler, President. 

Aug. Fleming, Treasurer and Secretary, 
Wm. W. Woolsey, James G. King, Elihu Townsend, 
Charles H. Russell, New- York. Moses B. Ives, Provi- 
dence — Directors. 

NEW JERSEY RAIL-ROAD AND TRANSPORTATION COMPANY. 
(2 Hanover-Street. Ticket Office foot of Courtlandt.) 
Incorporated 2d March, 1832. Capital, 1,500,000 dol- 
lars. Shares, 50 dollars. Dividends, Jan. and July. 
Election, 4th day of June. 

John S. Darcy, President, Newark. 
J. Worthington, Treasurer, New- York. 
J. P. Jackson, Secretary, Newark. 
W. W. Woolsev, Elihu Townsend, R. L. Colt, A. Dey, 
G. L. Schuyler, New- York. A. Lee, Rahway. G. P. 
Molleson, New Brunswick— Directors, 

JERSEY CITY FERRY, 
(2 Hanover-Street.) 
William W. Woolsey, President. 
Robert Schuyler, Superintendent. 
R. H. Nevins, James G. King, Daniel Jackson, Isaac 
H. Williamson, George Griswold, Louis Atterbury, 
Acquila Stout, Peter W. Radcliff— Directors. 

BOSTON AND PROVIDENCE RAIL-ROAD CORPORATION. 
(51 Wall-street.) 

Chartered in Massachusetts. Capital, 1,650,000 dol- 
lars. Shares, 100 dollars each. 

Wm. W. Woolsey, President in New York. 

BOSTON AND WORCESTER RAIL-ROAD COMPANY. 

(Boston. Office, 21 Wall-street.) 

Chartered in Massachusetts. Capital, 1,500,000 dol- 
lars. Shares, 100 dollars each. Dividends, January and 
July. 

Nathan Hale, President. 

Lewis Forman, Transfer Agent, New York. 



154 RAIL-ROAD COMPANIES. 



MOHAWK AND HUDSON RAIL-ROAD COMPANY. 

(Transfer Office, 27 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated in 1826. Capital, 1,000,000 dollars. Shares, 
100 dollars each. 

Samuel Glover, President. 
James Vanderpool, Vice President. 
J. M. Catlin, Secretary. 
William C. Redfield, John Laurie, Isaac Newton, J. 
V. L. Pruyn, Watts Sherman, Rufus H. King— Directors, 

NEW-YORK, PROVIDENCE, AND BOSTON RAIL-ROAD COMPANY, 

(45 William-street.) 

Incorporated by the States of Connec*^"cu.t and Rhode 
Island, 183-2. Capital, 1,300,000 dollars. Shares, 100 
dollars each. 

John S. Crary, President. 
Samuel Cox, Clerk. 

PATTERSON AND HUDSON RAIL-ROAD COMPANY. 
(Office, 59 Wall. Ticket Office, 75 Courtlandt-street ) 

James L. Morris, President. 
Elias B. D. Ogden, Secretary. 

CAMDEN AND AMBOY RAIL-ROAD COMPANY. 

(Office, 12 Washington-street.) 

Ira Bliss, Agent. 

STEAM NAVIGATION COMPANY. 
(32 Courtlaiidt-street ) 
Richard Hubbard, President. 
Wm. C. Redhcld, Secretary. 

DELAWARE AND RARITON CANAL COMPANY. 

(Office, 12 Washington-street.) 

Ira Bliss, Agent. 

NEW BRUNSWICK STEAM-BOAT AND CANAL TRANSPORTATION 
COMPANY, 

(Office, 12 Washington-stiPet.) 
Henry R. Swan, Agent. 



MISCELLANEOUS COMPANIES. 155 



MISCEIiliAKEOUS COMPANIES. 

merchants' exchange company. 
(Office, Merchants' Exchange.) 
Incorporated in 1824, perpetually. Capital 1,000,000 
dollars. Shares 100 dollars. Election, 2d Monday in 
January. 

John A. Stevens, President. 
Richard C. M'Cormick, Secretary. 
Wm. W. Woolsey, James G. King, Henry I. WyckofF, 
Henry Brevoort, jun., Henry Beekman, George Gris- 
wold, Stephen Whitney, John I. Palmer, John Suydam, 
Isaac Carow, John A. Stevens, I. Green Pearson, Goold 
Hoyt, Andrew Foster, Jonathan Goodhue, Russell H. Ne- 
vins, Moses H. Grinnell, John G. Coster — Directors. 

NEW-YORK GAS LIGHT COMPANY. 
(Corner of Centra and Hester streets.) 
Incorporated in 1823. Capital 1,000,000 dollars. Shares 
50 dollars each. Election, 2d Monday in January. Divi- 
dends, May and November. 

William W. Fox, President. 
E. E. Weed, Secretary. 
J. Mowton, Manager. 
Joseph Walker, H. I. Wyckoif, Thomas W. Pearsall, 
John Worthington, John I. Palmer, Charles Dickinson, 
Joseph Kernochan, David Hadden, Najah Taylor, John 
Suydam, Elisha Riggs — Directors. 

MANHATTAN GAS LIGHT COMPANY. 
(Office, No. 170 Elm-street. Works 18th street, N. River.) 
Incorporated February 26th, 1830, unlimited. Capital 
500,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars. Election, 2d Mon- 
day in January. 

David E. Colden, President, 
Lambert Suydam, Richard M. Lawrence, Charles Gra- 
ham,William J. MacNiven, William L. Morris, William 
B. Lawrence, George Rapalye, John Fleming, Thomas 
T. Woodruff, Noah Jarvis, John C. Cheesman, Gouver- 
neur M. Wilkins, Charles J. Smith, Joseph Bouchard- 
Directors. 

NEW-TORK LOMBARD ASSOCIATION. 

(Cornw of Tryon-row and City-Hall Place, closing their bmsinwM.) 



156 RUSCELLANEOUS COMPANIES. 



NEW-BRIGHTON ASSOCIATION. 
(Omce, No. 8 Wall-street.) 

This is a company of gentlemen who have associated 
for the purpose of laying out and building a village, in 
Richmond county, Staten Island, at the junction of the 
Kills with New- York Bay, fronting the city, at the dis- 
tance of five miles, which is overcome by excellent steam 
boats in the short space of from twenty to twenty-five 
minutes. 

Walter Patterson, President. 
Carroll Livingston, Secretary. 
John L. Mason, Counsel. 
Thomas A. Power, Superintendant. 
Samuel R. Brooks, James B. Murray, Thomas E. Da- 
vis, John S. Crary, John N. Gossler, Henry Dudley, Jas. 
L. Curtis, Solomon I. Joseph, Peter Stuyvesant, Waller 
Patterson — Directors. 

NORTH AMERICAN LUMBER COMPANY. 
(Office, No. 60 Wall-Street.) 
Capital 2,000,000 dollars. Shares 100 dollars. 
Seth Geer, President. 
William L. Haskins, Secretary. 
Robert M. N. Smyth, General Agent. 
Thomas J. Oakley, Frederick Bronson, Stephen A, 
Halsey — Trustees. 

Seth Geer, Samuel Stocking, S. D. Dakin, Willis Hall, 
Charles A. Clinton, D. Evans, John George M'Kean, Pe- 
ter B. Manchester, Benjamin Fenner, Pliny Freeman, 
Truman Roberts, J. Dimon, R. M. N. Smyth— Directors. 

PERU IRON COMPANY. 
(32 South -Street.) 

Incorporated Nov. 11th, 1824. Capital 130,000 dollars- 
Shares 100 dollars each. Election in April. 
Francis Saltus, President. 
A. T. Van Boskerck, Secretary. 
Goold Hoyt, A. V. Winans, T. T. Payne, Jeromus 
Johnson — Directors. 



AMERICAN FUR COMPANY. 
(Office, rear 39 Ann-sueet.) 

Ramsay Crooks, President. 
John B. Whetien, Secretary. 



CUSTOM HOUSE. 157 



CUSTOM HOUSE. 

(From Pine to Cedar-street, near Nassau-street.) 
A new and spacious Custom House is now erecting on 
the site of the old one, at the corner of Wall and Nassau 
streets, extending to Pine-street. When completed, it 
will, no doubt, be the most splendid and durable public 
building in the Union. 

collector's office. 

Business hours from 10 A. M. to 3 P. M. Entries must 
be made before 2 o'clock. 

S. Swartwout, Collector. 
D. S. Lyon, ) 

M. S. Swartwout, > Deputy Collectors. 
James Campbell, } 
Henry Ogden, Cashier. 
Joshua Phillips, Assistant Cashier. 
John A. Fleming, Auditor. 
A. Martine, Assistant Auditor. 
The Desks in the Collector's Office are arranged in 
the following order. 

A. B. C. Deputy Collectors. D. S. Lyon, M. S. Swart- 
wout, and James Campbell. 

No. I. Export Bond Clerk. Charles A. Gardner, 
Nos. 2, 3, and 5. Export Clerks. R. M. Mitchill, T.V- 
Mumford, and Ebenezer Piatt. 
No. 4. Debenture Calculator. Daniel Bonirett. 
No. 6. Debenture Clerk. W. J. M'Master. 
Nos. 7 and 8. Liquidating Clerks. Cornelius Duryee 
and R. C. Overton. 

Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13. Entry Clerks. W. Wyer, 
A. Phillips, A. Campbell, W. A. Spies, D. B. Ogden, J. 
Gutman, and O. M. M' Daniel. 

No. 14. Check, Permit, and Receipt Clerks. J. B. 
Thurston and William C. Dayton. 
No. 15. Enrolment and License Clerk. J. Leonard. 
No. 16. Assistant Enrolment and License Clerk, J. A. 
Bogert. 
No. 17. Assistant Register Clerk. Wm, Cannon. 
No. 18. Invoice Clerk. J. C. Niebuhr. 
No. 19. Protection Clerk. C. Oakley. 
No. 20. Register Clerk. John H. Ball. 
14 



158 CUSTOM HOUSE. 



No. 21. Clearance Clerk, and Entry of Vessels Coast- 
wise. Jacob R. Wood. 

No. 22. Bond Clerks. W. B. Byrara and J. Bluxome. 
Assistant Bond Clerk. R. B. Adams. 

In the Auditor's department there are thirty-two clerks, 
who are engaged in making up the quarterly accounts 
of the Customs for the Treasury department. 

NAVAL OFFICE. 

Enos T. Throop, Naval Officer. 

John T. Ferguson, Deputy Naval Officer. 

EliasB. Dayton, Chief Clerk. 

W. T. Vreedenburgh, Abstract Clerk and Private Sec. 

P. E. F. M'Donald, ) ^ ^, . 

Samuel H. Moore, \ ^^^> ^lerifs. 

John Cockle, Debenture Clerk. 

otrPiir'' ^^^''^'' I ^'^"'''' ^^'^^ Calculators. 

Charles Holt, Entrance, Clearance and Tonnage Clerk. 

Marinus H. Van Dyke, ) 

Wade Houge, > Impost Clerks. 

A. Ingraham, ) 

S. M. Isaacks, General Clerk. 

I. M. Summers, ) 

William R. Muir, > Liquidating Clerks. 

Joshua S, Bowne, ) 

Wimlmrlros,. I Endorsing Clerks. 

George Bailey, Porter. 

surveyor's office. 
Hector Craig, Surveyor. 
A. B. Vanderpool, Deputy Surveyor. 
Andrew A. Jones, Chief Clerk. 
Sturges Brewster, Second Clerk. 
Edward G. Corlies, Third Clerk. 
Jonas B. Phillips, Fourth Clerk. 
James W, Carpenter, Fifth Clerk. 
John Magarth, Messenger. 

INSPECTORS. 

Rowland P. Allen, Abraham Ackerman, Henry Abel, 
Robert Adams, William Beebe, David Brooks, John By- 
ers, John R. Downe, George L. Birch, Abraham Bokee, 



CUSTOM HOUSE. 159 



William L. Boyle, William Bruce, G. V. V. Breese, 
Charles W. Baker, J. R. Bartine, William J. Brown, Pas- 
chall Bertine, Jacob Burdett, John Bleecker, Amos Coles, 
Samuel W. Coe,William W. Chardowoyne, L. H. Camp- 
bell, Barnet Cole, John Colvill, Frederick A. Cameron, 
Timothy Cook, Henry Cheavers, John Decamp, Abra- 
ham Davids, Denyse Denyse, George Davis, David J. 
Demerest, Bertrand Dupoy, Joseph Dryfous, Charles De- 
nike, MoranDugan, John .). Earle. John Egbert, Richard 
John Everitt, Francis B. Fitch, John Fream, JobFurman, 
Henry Fanning, Charles D. Field, Richard Finning, S. 
B. Flemming, Peter Field, David Fieks, Joseph Gideon, 
William H. P. Graham, Thomas W. Garness, Peter Gor- 
don, Charles Gill, Munson Gray, T. H. Gahagan, Frede- 
rick Groshon, Charles Green, C. H. Graham, Elias Hicks, 
George Hodgson, X L. Hoyt, Ward B, Howard, Joseph 
Hopkins, Edward Hitchcock, Archibald Hays, Benjamin 
F. Hart, J. A. Holly, Thomas Howard, D. R. Hitchcock, 
Andrew Hutton, Benjamin Hilton, Andrew Jackson, 
Thomas Jenkins, Isaac Isaacs, Henry Keyser, E. Kings- 
bury, Robert O. Kelly, Timothy Knowell, Amos Leeds, 
William Lee, John H. Leggett, Gerard Lathrop,William 
Lupton, Samuel Lloyd, James Ladd, John M. Lester, 
Washington Lyon, John Little,Thomas H. Lyell, Richard 
Lewis, Philip R. Livingston, William Lyon, Joseph Ly- 
on, George Messerve, Samuel Marvin, Abraham Messe- 
role, Alexander Ming, jr., John Morris, jr., Daniel Mor- 
gan, Charles Mills, John Morris, Donald M'Lean, Mont- 
gomery Moses, John Marston, Alexander Ming, John 
M'Gloin, James Montcrief, James M'Millen, John Mar- 
schalk, John I. Manning, George W. M'Pherson, Patrick 
M'Cafferty, Donald M'Donald, Robert C. Morris, John 
W. Oakley, James M. Oakley, Gideon Ostrander, Alex- 
ander Pfister, Napthali Phillips, Robert Phillips, Drake 
B. Palmer, James G. Reynolds, Barnet Roman, George 
Ricard, Charles Radcliif, William Randal, W. E. Robert- 
son, Elnathan Sears, Peter R. Sprainger, Dennis Striker, 
William Smith, Stephen Stillwell, William Shute, Elijah 
Secor, Charles Stuart, Henry Sands, George Sibell, John 
Sing, Peter Taylor, Peter Tappen, Samuel Terry, Tho- 
mas Tripler, Griffin Tompkins, Stephen Titus, William 
Thorn, James Thorne, Thomas Trenor, J, T. Thompson, 
John Townsend, Oliver H.Tompkins, Edward R.Thomp- 



160 CUSTOM HOLSE. 



son, Samuel Utter, Samuel Udell, JohnL. Van Boskirck, 
John Van Dyke, Jacob Van Winkle, Cornelius Van Ant- 
werp, Thomas B. Verniilye, Francis Vo-burgh, James 
R. Waldron, William Welling, Henry Willett, Everar- 
dus Warner, Daniel Wisharl, Henry Whiting, Thomas 
Wiswall, William W. Wells, John W. Wheeler, George 
West, George W. "VVaite, William L. Youngs, James D. 
Bisset, William Cairnes, George F. Hopkin^, Dayid I. 
Henderson, Humphrey Ricketson, Sylyester Robinson, 
David Gardner, William Honey, George Inness, Horatio 
Lewis, Andrew Tombs, George A. Wasson, Sidney 
Whetmore, Beekman M. Van Buren, Benjamin Wood. 

DKPUTY INSPECTORS. 

J. J. Cohen, James I. Craig, G. H. Richards, Peter 
Smith. 

WEIGHERS. 

J. Brower, A. Bleecker, E. Cooper, A. S. De Peyster, 
E. H. De Camp, J. Franklin, T. Hazard, S. B. Hoffman, 
T. Kirk, L. Loutrell, D. Poor, J. Stephens, J. Tallman, 
J. M. Patterson, John Anderson, jr., James Westervelt, 
Robert Dumont. 

GUAGERS. 

A. Baudoine, J. J. S. Hasler, T. Morris, E. Nixen, W. 
R. Thompson, H. Tallman, J. Tuomv, Ed w. R. Painter, 
J. A. Walker, A. O. Houghton, Benj." Field. 

MEASURERS. 

E. Belknap, D. Dodge, W. Durell, O. Dunning, J. W. 
Forbes, W. M. HitcTicock, H. Leveley, A. Seymour, P. 
Sebring, H. A.Vedder, J .T. Boyd Edmond Fitch, J. M. 
Vreel.iud, J. D. V.inderpoel, L. Pittman. 

BOARDING OFFICERS. 

G. Siball. Assistants— P. Gordon, J. M. Oakley, H. 
Keyser. 

STORE-KEEPERS. 

J. D. BisseU, W. Cairnes, Geo. F. Hopkins, G. Innes, 
S. Whitmore, G. A. Wasson, D. Gardner. Collectors — 
H. Ricketson, S. Robertson. C. Mills, G. Davis, H. 
Whiting, D. S. Henderson, H. Lewis, P. R. Livingston, 
W. Lupton, W. Honey. A. Tombs, Brooklyn. T. B. 
Vermilye, Staten Island. Assistant— D. R. Hitchcock. 



CUSTOM-HOUSE, 161 



FEES OP OFFICE. ' 

To the Collector and Naval Officer. — Entry of a vessel 
of 100 tons or upwards, two dollars and fifty cents. 
Clearance of a vessel of 100 tons or upwards, two dol- 
lars and fifty cents. Entry of a vessel under 100 tons, 
one dollar and fifty cents. Clearance of a vessel under 
100 tons, one dollar and fifty cents. Every Post Entry, 
two dollars. Permit to land goods, twenty cents. Every 
Bond taken officially, forty cents. Permit to load goods 
for the exportation, for drawback, thirty cents. De- 
"benture, or other official certificate, twenty cents. Bill of 
Health, twenty cents. Official document (register ex- 
cepted) required by any person, twenty cents. 

To the Surveyor. — Admeasuring and certifying the 
same, of every ship or vessel of 100 tons and under, per 
ton, one cent. Admeasurement of every ship or vessel 
above 100 tons, end not exceeding 200 tons, one dollar 
and fifty cents. Above 200 tons, two dollars. For all 
other services on board any ship or vessel of 100 tons 
and upwards, having on board goods, wares, or merchan- 
dise, subject to duty, three dollars. For like services on 
board any ship or vessel of less than 100 tons, one dollar 
and fifty cents. On all vessels not having on board 
goods, wares, or merchandise, subject to duty, sixty-si\ 
and two-third cents. Certificate of registry of vessel, 
two dollars. Endorsement on registry or record, one 
dollar. Every bond required by this act, twenty-five 
cents. Every bond for a Mediterranean passport, forty 
cents. Every Seaman's Protection, twenty-five cents. 

Under the Coasting Act. — Admeasuring every vessel, 
in order to the Registering, Enrolment, Licensing, or Re- 
cording the same, of 5 tons or upwards, and less than 20, 
fifty cents. — 20, and not exceeding 70, seventy-five cents. 
— 70, one dollar. — Above 100, one dollar and fifty cents. 
For every Certificate or Enrolment, fifty cents. Every 
Endorsement of do., twenty cents. Every License, in- 
cluding the Bond, not exceeding 20 tons, twenty-five 
cents. Above 20 tons, and not more than 100, fifty cents. 
More than 100, one dollar. Recording Certificate, Mani- 
fest, and granting Permit, of less than 20 tons, twenty- 
five cents. Above 50 tons, fifty cents. For certifying a 
Manifest, and granting Permit for Registered vessels, 
one dollar and fifty cents. For receiving certified Mani- 

14* 



162 CUSTOM-HOUSE. 



fest, and g^ranting Permit for Registered vessels, one 
dollar and tit'iy cenis. Granting Permit lor a vessel, not 
belonging to a citizen, on arrival to proceed from district 
to district, and receiving a Manifest, two dollars. Re- 
ceiving Manifest, and granting Permit to unload, as 
above, two dollars. Granting Permit for a vessel to 
carry on fisliery in a foreign port, twenty-five cents. For 
Report and Entry of any foreign goods imported in such 
last mentioned vessel, twenty-five cents. 

PUBLIC STORES. 

Nos. 259 and 274 Front, 15 and 17 Nassau, 153 
and 109 Washington, and 153 Greenwich streets. 

UNITED STATES APPRAISER'S OFFICE. 

No. 17 Nassau-street. 

storekeeper'.^ office. 
No. 66 Cedar-street. 

commerce. 
Imports and Exports of foreign merchandise, to and 
from the District of New- York, during the years 1835 
and 1836 : 

Value of Value of 

Imports. Exports. 

1st quarter of 1835 Slfi,404,141 .... S'6,298,103 

2d do. do 22,453,541 .... 8,(590,678 

3d do. do 33,491,833 .... 7,840,626 

4th do. do 16,954,593 . . . 6,206,348 

S89,304,108 829,035,855 

Duties in 1835 ^$14,468,116 

1st quarter of 1836 S26,756,312 .... 4,712,682 

2d do. do 37,937,582 .... 9,168,572 

3d do. do 36,052,430 .... 7.01 1,269 

4th do. do 18,139,870 .... 6,562,700 

SI 18,886,194 S27,455,223 

Duties in 1836 $17,114,305 



CUSTOM-HOUSE. 



163 



ARRIVALS AT THE PORT OF NEW-YORK, 1836. 



American 
Austrian . 
British . . . 
Bremen . . 
Brazilian 
Colombian 
Du.cii .. 
Danisii . 
French . 
Geraiin . 
Greek. . . 
Hamburg 
Hanoverian 
Hay tie n . 
Lubec . . 
Mexican 
MeckieLbur 
Norwegian 
Portuguese 
Prussian . . 
Russian . . . 
Swedish .. . 
Spanish , . . 
Sicilian. . . 
Sardinian . 



2 
33 
11 



"oral 
c' '^-' j 



Ul 



527 841 701 209 



9 



1 

1 

11 

2 



Armed vessels 



59919 



2 
1 

18 



4 14 
46| 150137 
16 29 

4 

5 
32 
28 
18 

1 

1 
10 

1 

3 

1 

2 

1 

3 

3 
12 

4 
37 

5 

6 

1 



1073 412 



m 

■§! 



2 1583 

29 

366 

56 

6 
3- 
34 

2(.; 

2 

1 

25 
3 
4 
1 
4 
1 
3 
3 

15 
6 

66 

15 
7 
1 



Number of 
Passensfers. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

.Tune, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



1,014 
535 
726 

3,353 

14,968 
9,494 
5,595 
8,702 
6,600 
4,846 
3,686 
1,022 



52285 



60,541 

Passengers 

in 1835, 35,303 

1834, ^48,111 

1833, 41,752 

1832, 48,589 

Vessels arr. from 

foreign ports in 

1835, 2,043 

1834, 1,933 

1833, 1,924 

1832, 1,819 



2,293 



Total 

The increase of arrivals, as compared with the re- 
turns for 1835, is 250; increase of passengers, 25,254. 
The increase of American vessels is only 18; of foreign 
vessels 224. Of the foreign increase, 79 are British ; 
Dutch, Hamburgh, and Bremen, 58; Swedish, 20; 
Danish, 20; Austrian, 10; Prussian, 10. Of the British 



1G4 CTJSTOM-IIOUSE. 



vessels arrived, 150 were brigs, and 137 schooners. 
These, we take it, were chielly from Nova Scotia and 
New Brunswick. The number of American ships ar- 
rived in 1836, is greater by 7 than the whole number of 
the same class of vessels which arrived in 1835, both 
American and foreign. 

FOREIGN MONEYS, AS TAKEN AT THE CUSTOM-HOUSE IN NEW-YORK. 

Antwerp, Amsterdam, Rollerdam, and all the 
Netherlands, florins or guilders, (thus fixed by 

law,) 5?0 40 

Augsburg florins 48 

Batavia rix dollar 75 

Brazil guilder 40 

Banco marks ^ 33j 

Barcelona and Catalonia livres ^53] 

Brabant florin 34 

Bremen dollar 75 

Bengal sicca rupee, (fixed by law,) 50 

Bombay sicca rupee 50 

Calcutta rupee (thus fixed by law,) 50 

China tale, (thus fixed by law,) 1 48 

Cayenne livres, 7 to a dollar 

Cre veld florins 37] 

Crowns of Tuscany 1 05 

Current marks 28 

Denmark rix dollar (thus fixed by law,) 1 00 

Ducat of Naples 80| 

England, pound sterling, (thus fixed by law,) 4 80 

France — franc 18j 

Do. livre, (thus fixed by law, ) 18^ 

Florence livre, 6] to a dollar, 

Halifax pound 4 00 

Hamburg rix dollar 1 00 

India pagoda, (thus fixed by law,) 1 84 

Ireland, pou nd,(thus fixed by law,) 4 80 

Jamaica currency, 3 dollars to the pound. 

Leghorn dollar 90| 

Leghorn livre, Gj to the dollar. 

Louis d'or, or rix dollar of Bremen 75 

Ounce of Sicily 2 46 

Portugal mil reas, (thus fixed by law,) 1 24 



POST-OFFICE. 165 



Russia rouble* $0 10 J 

Spain, real of plate, (thus fixed by law,). , . 10 

Spain, real of vellon, (thus fixed by law,) 05 

St. Gaul guilders - 40* 

Sweden, rix dollar 1 GO 

Saxon dollar 69 

Swiss livre 27 

Scudes of Malta 40 

Turkish Piaster, value to be ascertained accord- 
ing to the exchange en London. 

Prussian rix dollar 68^ 

Prussian florin 23 

Leipsic florin 48 



NEW YORK POST OFFICE. 

The Post Oflice is situated in the Rotunda, fronting on 
Chambers street and City Hall Place. 

Access to the Merchants' boxes is from City Hall Place, 
fronting Tryon Row, by a large door immediately in the 
rear of the newspaper delivery. 

Newspaper oflice and delivery is in the East wing of 
the building, and fronts the entrance to the Merchants' 
boxes. 

Mails and ship letters are received at the large door 
fronting City Hall Place ; — newspapers at the door front- 
ing Chambers street. 

The Carriers' delivery is at the large circular window 
next to the general delivery, and fronts City Hall Place. 

Editors are accommodated with boxes placed under the 
window of the newspaper delivery. 

The general delivery, or that for alphabetical and ad- 
vertised letters and the Ladies' window^, are situaiedat the 
S. E. corner of the new building, lately erected in the 
rear of the Rotunda. 



* Subject lo the rate ol" exchange on London. 

t This is 10 15-32 pence, not cents, as 10 pence sterling is taken at the 
Custom-liouse for 20 cents. 

NOTE. — All currencies not fixed by law, will be taken according to 
the American Consul's certificate of their intrinsic value, compared with 
the American dollar, which must accompany the invoice. 



IGO POST-OFFICE. 



The office is open every day, (except Sundays,) from 
8 A. M. to 7 P. M., and on Sundays from 9 to 10 A. M. 
and from 12» to li P. M. 

The business of the office is so arranged as to define the 
duties of each employed in it. There are four general 
divisions, viz : City delivery, Forwarding department, 
Newspaper distribution and deliveiy,and Letter Carriers' 
department. 

The City delivery is under the superintendance of 
Courier Goodwin, the senior Clerk, (who has the general 
charge of the office during the absence of the Post Master) 
and is assisted by several Clerks ; he has charge of all 
letters received for assortment and delivery to the mer- 
chants and others who have boxes, for the Carriers' and 
general delivery. 

The Forwarding department is under the direction of 
Joseph Benedict, who superintends the general distribution 
of all mails and letters to be forwarded to various parts 
of the Union ; he is assisted also by several Clerks, whose 
duty is to rate, stamp, and make up all the mails. 

The Newspaper distribution is carried on by several 
Clerks, each of whom is assigned a particular branch of 
the distribution of all newspapers by mails, comprising 
the Northern and Western, Eastern and Southern dis- 
tricts. They also put up and despatch all the Letter and 
Newspaper mails. 

The distribution and delivery of newspapers for the 
city, that is, for the Merchants' boxes, Carriers, Citizens 
and strangers, is conducted by David Brown, and an as- 
sistant. 

The Carriers' department is placed under the direction 
of Elias Lynch, who regulates the accounts of all the car- 
riers, and superintends their general operations. 

LOWER OR BRANCH OFFICE. 

This establishment has been in operation since the first 
day of January, and is superintended by Jamison Cox ; 
he is assisted by several Clerks, who receive from the 
upper or main office, such letters and newspapers as are 
to be delivered from the Merchants' boxes and the al- 
phabet. 

It is situate at the N. W. c. of William st. and Exchange 
Place, and is opened and closed at the same hours as the 



POST-OFFICE. 167 



main office, and receives such letters as may be deposited 
there for transmission by the various mails. 

Jonathan J, Coddington, Post Master. 

MAILS. 

The Great Northern Mail, by Steamboat, on the Hud- 
son river, closes at 3i P. M. daily. 

During Steamboat navigation, Extra Mails for the prin- 
cipal offices on the Hudson river, close at 5 1 o'clock A. M. ; 
also, mails for Schenectady, Utica, Rochester and Buifalo, 
close at the same time. 

The Steamboat Mails for Newport, Providence, Boston, 
&c. close daily, (Sundays excepted,) at 3i P. M. 

The Great Southern Mail, via South Amboy, closes 
daily at 3i P. M. 

The Express Mail closes daily at 4 P. M. 

All the above mails close at the Lower Office at the 
same hour, except the Express, which closes there at 10 
minutes before 4 P. M. 

The New Jersey Way Mails on the direct route to Phila- 
delphia, via Newark, Rahway, New Brunswick and Tren- 
ton, closes twice each day, viz. at A. M. and 2 P. M., 
including a mail for Philadelphia, vv^hich closes at G A. M. 
daily. 

The Western Mails by Steamboat to Newburgh, via 
Monticello, Binghampton, &c., and the mails for Ithaca, 
Owego, &c. are closed at 3 P. M. daily at both offices (ex- 
cept Sundays.) 

The Eastern Mails, via New Haven, Hartford, Boston, 
Portsmouth, Portland, &c., close daily at 5i A. M. 

The Eastern Land Mail, via Stamford and Bridgeport, 
closes daily at the same hour. 

RATES OF POSTAGE. 

Single Letters. — Any distance not exceeding 30 miles, 
six cents. Over 30, and not exceeding 80 miles, ten cents. 
Over 80, and not exceeding 150 miles, twelve and a half 
cents. Over 150, and not exceeding 400 miles, eighteen 
and three quarter cents. Over 400 miles, twenty-five 
cents. Double Letters, or those composed of two pieces of 
paper, are charged with double these rates. Triple and 
Quadruple Letters, are charged accordingly. Packets or 
Letters composed of one or more pieces of paper, or one 



108 POST-OFFICE. 



or more other articles, and weighing one ounce avoirdu- 
pois, quadruple those rates, and in thai proportion tor all 
greater weight. Ship Letters, not carried by mail, six 
cents. Each Ncuspaper, carried not over 100 miles, one 
cent. Over 100 miles, one and a half cents. But if car- 
ried to any Post Office in the state in which it is printed, 
whatever may be the distance, one cent. Periodical or 
regular Pamp/ilets, not over 100 miles, one and a half cents. 
Over 100 miles, two and a half cents Not Periodical, not 
over 100 miles, per sheet, four cents. Over 100 miles, six 
cents. 

f::^ Letters going out of the United States, must be paid 
for when lodged in the Post Office, except for Upper and 
Lower Canada, which are forwarded to the Lines with- 
out being paid for. 

Every printed pamphlet or magazine, which contains 
more than 24 pages on a royal sheet, or any sheet of less 
dimensions, shall be charged by the sheet, and small 
pamphlets, printed on a half or quarter sheet of royal or 
less size, shall be charged with half the amount of post- 
age charged on a full sheet; and there shall be printed 
or written on one of the outer pages of all pamphlets and 
magazines to be sent by mail tlie number of sheets they 
contain ; and if such number shall not be truly stated, 
double postage shall be charged. 

Letters and Newspapers are delivered out of the Office 
every day, (except Sunday,) at all hours, from 8 o'clock 
A. M. to 7 P. M., and on Sunday, from 9 to 10, and from 
12^ to U P. M. 

Nevspapers, to be forwarded by mail, should be en- 
closed in a cover, and left open at one end, and the num- 
ber of free papers, and those for subscribers respectively 
endorsed on each packet ; and all newspapers, for each 
Post Office, should be enclosed in one package, provided 
they do not exceed twenty in number. If a letter, or 
memorandum in writing, is contained in any newspaper, 
the person who deposites the same forfeits five dollars, 
and the package becomes liable to letter postage. 

Letters to be sent by mail, should be addressed to the 
places of their destination in the clearest manner ; they 
should always be directed to the nearest Post Office, if the 
person to whom addressed does not reside where there is 
an office, and the name of the state ought not to be omit- 



LINES OF PACKETS, l^g 



ted. Letters are often missent, from their ambiguous 
direction. A punctual attention to this rule may prevent 
delays and miscarriages. 

If an abatement of letter postage be claimed, the letter 
must be opened in the presence of the Post Master or 
one of his assistants ; and if such letter should, instead of 
bemg overcharged, happen to be undercharged, the defi- 
ciency must be made up by the applicant. 

All letters which are lodged to go by the British Pac- 
kets, should be distinguished by writing, per packet, for 
there are places of the same name in the United States, 
similar to those in Europe. 

l:^ Persons calling for letters that are advertised, are 
requested to ask for advertised letters. 



lilNES OF PACKETS. 

LONDON PACKETS, 



This Line of Packets sail punctually from New York 
and Portsmouth on the 1st, 10th, and 20th, and Irom 
London on the 7th, 17th, and 27th of every month through- 
out the year, viz. : 

Ship St. James, Sebor, master, sails from New- York 
January 1, May 1, September 1, From London, Feb. n' 
June 17, October 17. 

Ship Montreal, Griffing, master, sails from New- York 
January 10, May 10, September 10, From London 
February 27, June 27, October 27. ' 

Ship Gladiator, Britton, master, sails from New- York 
January 20, May 20, September 20. From London 
March 7, July 7, Nov. 7. 

Ship Mediator, Champlin, master, sails from New- 
York February 1, June 1, October 1, From London, 
March 17, July 17, Nov. 17. 

Ship Uuebec, Heberd, master, sails from New- York 
February 10, June 10, October 10, From London, March 
27, July 27, April 27. 

Ship Wellington, Chadwick, master, sails from New- 
T^'^i^.' J^P^^^^y 20, June 20, October 20, From London, 
Apr]17, Aug. 7, Dec. 7. 

Ship Philadelphia, Morgan, master, sails from New- 
15 



170 LINES OF PACKE'rS. 



York, March 1, July 1, November 1. From London, 
April 17, Aug. 17, Dee. 17. 

Ship Samson, Sturges, master, sails from' New-York, 
March 10, July 10, Novembsr 10. From London, April 
27, August 27, December 27. 

Ship President, Chadwick, master, sails from New- 
York, March 20, J uly 20, Nov. 20. From London, May 7, 
September 7, Jan. 7. 

Ship Ontario, Huttleson, master, sails from New- York, 
April 1, August 1, December 1. From London, May 17, 
September 17, January 17. 

Ship Toronto, Griswold, master, sails from New- York, 
April 10, August 10, December 10. Froili London, 
May 27, September 27, January 27. 

Ship Westminster, Moore, master, sails from New- 
York, April 20, August 20, December 20. From New- 
York, June 7, October 7, February 7.j 

The price of cabin passage is now fixed at S140, out- 
ward, for each adult, which includes wines and liquors. 

Agents in New- York— J. Griswold, 70 South-street ; 
Grinnell, Minturn & Co.. 134 Front-street. 

Agents in London— G. Wildes & Co., 19 Coleman-street. 

LIVERPOOL PACKETS. 

(Old Line.) 

Ships. Masters. \ Ships. Masters. 



Columbus Depeyster 

Hibernia Wilson 

South America . . Barstow 
England Waite 



Orpheus Bursley 

Oxford Rathbone 

North America Hoxie 
Europe Marshall 



Sail from New- York and Liverpool on the 1st and 
16th of each month. 

Agents in Liverpool— Baring, Brothers & Co. 

Agents in New- York— Goodhue & Co. ; C. H. Mar- 
shall, 64 South-street. 

(Second Line.) 

Ships. Masters. Ships. Masters. 

Roscoe Delano Washington Holdridge 

Independence Nye Pennsylvania . . . Smith 

Sail from New-York on the 8th, and Liverpool on the 
24th of each month. 

Agents in Liverpool— Crary, Fletcher, & Co. 



LINES OP PACKETS. 



171 



Agents in New-York— Grinnell, Minturn, & Co., 134 
Front-street. 

(Third Lin^.) 
Ships. Masters. ( Ships. _ Masters 



United States. .Holdridge 
St. Andrew. . . . Thompson 



Virginian Harris 

Sheffield Allen 



Sail from New-York on the •24th, and Liverpool on the 
8th of each month. 

Agents in Liverpool — Sands, Hodgson, & Co. 

Agent in New- York— R. Kermit, 74 South-street. 

Usual passage to Liverpool S140, and from Liverpool, 
thirt3^-five guineas, including wines and stores of every 
description. 

(New Line.) 
Ships. blasters, j Ships Masters. 

Shakspeare Collins Sheridan Russell. 

Siddons | Garrick Robinson. 

Agent in New-York— K K. Collins, 55 South-street. 

Agents in Liverpool — W. & J. Brown & Co. 

Passage to Liverpool $^150. From Liverpool, ihirty- 
five guineas. Stores of every description found. 

NEW-YORK AND HAVRE PACKETS. 

From New-York on the 8th, 16th, and 24th, and from 
Havre on the 1st, 8th, and 16th of each month, in the 
following order, viz. 

Ship Louis Philippe, CasttofF, master, sails from New- 
York, May 8, August 24, December 16. From Havre, 
June 16, Octobers, February 1. 

Ship Sully, Lines, master, sails from New-York, May 
16, September 8, December 24. From Havre, July 1, 
October 16, February 8. 

Ship Burgundy, Rockett, master, sails from New- 
York, May 24, "September 16, Jan. 8. From Havre, 
July 8, November I, February 16. 

Ship Rhone, Skiddy, master, sails from New- York, 
June 8, September 24, January 16. From Havre, July 
16, November 8, March 1. 

Ship Charlemagne, Richardson, master, sails from 
New- York, June 16, October 8, January 24. From 
Havre, August 1, November 16, M?rch 8. 

Ship Ville de Lyon, Stoddard, master, sails from New- 



172 LINES OP PACKETS. 



York, June 24, October 16, February 8. From Havre, 
August 8, December 1, March 16. 

Ship Francois I., Pell, master, sails from New-York, 
July 8, October 21, February 16. From Havre, August 
16, December 8, April 1. 

Ship Formosa, Orne, master, sails from New- York, 
July 16, November 8, February 24. From Havre, Sep- 
tember 1, December 16, April 8. 

Ship Silvia de Grasse, Weiderholdt, master, sails 
from New- York, July 24, November 16, March 8. From 
Havre, September 8, Jan. 1, April 16. 

Ship Poland, Anthony, master, sails from New-York, 
Ausfust 8, November 24, March 16. From Havre, Sep- 
tember 16, January 8, May 1. 

Ship Albany, Johnson, master, sails from New- York, 
August 16, December 8, March 24. From Havre, Oc- 
tober 1, January 16, May 8. 

These vessels are ',ali ot the first class, and ably com- 
manded, with elegant accommodations for passengers, 
comprising all that may be required for comfort and 
convenience, including wines and stores of every de- 
scription. Goods sent to either of the subscribers at 
New-York, will be forwarded by these packets, free of 
all charges, except those actually incurred. 

Agents in New- York — C. Bolton, Fox, & Livingson, 
22 Broad-street ; W. Whitelock, jun., 46 South-street; 
John I. Boyd, broker, 1) Tontine Coffee House. 

Agents in Havre — Pitray, Viel, & Co. ; Welles & 
Green; Clucsnel, Freres, & Co. 

Agent in Paris— S. B. Denison, me Cle'y, No. 10. 

KINGSTON, JAMAICA (WEST INDIES) PACKETS. 

Ship Orbit Mead, master. 

Ship John W. Cater Crane, do. 

Sail from New-York the 10th, and from Kingston the 
15th of every month. 

Aijents— Aymar & Co., 34 South-street; C. Morgan, 
65 Washington-street. 

NEW-YORK AND CARTIIAGENA PACKETS. 

Brig Marcelino Chapman, master. 

Brig Nue va Grenada Beekman , do. 



LINES OF PACKETS. 



ns 



Sail from New-York the 1st, and Carthagena the 10th 
of every month. 

Agents and owners — Everett & Battelle, 76 South- 
street. 

PRINCIPAL LINES OF P/ CKETS BETWEEN 
NEW-YORK AND SOUTHERN PORTS. 

CHARLESTON STEAM PACKETS. 

Steamboat Columbia Wright, 

" New- York . , Spinney. 

Leave New-York (from Pier No. 3, North River,) 
and Charleston, every Saturday, at 4 o'clock P.M. 

Agent at New-York — Charles Morgan, 65 Washing- 
ton-street. 

Agent at Charleston — William Patten, 8 Fitzoms' 
Wharf. 

NEW-YORK AND CHARLESTON PACKETS, 



Ships. Masters. 

Anson Sinclair 

H. Allen Wilson 

Calhoun O'Neal 

Lafayette Blair 

Agent — George Sutton, 88 
slip. 



Ships. Masters. 

Niagara . . ; . . . . Besher 

Sutton Berryl 

Saluda = . . . Hamilton 

South, corner of Burling- 



CHARLESTON BRIG LINE. 



Brigs. Masters. 

Sun G. Brown 

Moses D. Brown 

George B. PIull 

Planter J. Sturges 



Brigs. Masters, 

Lawrence. . .J. Hull 

Jones T. H. Herbert 

Camilla F. Nichols 

Courier G. Smith 



Sail every fourth day, (Sundays excepted,) from the 
east side of Burling-slip. 
Agent — George Buckley, 88 South-street. 



SAVANNAH PACKETS. 



Ships. Master. 

Louisa, Truman 

Ocmulgee, Leavitt 

Oconee, Wilson 

Macon Osborn 



Ships. Master. 

Angelique, Nichols 

Celia, Miner 

La Grange, Doane 

New Ship, 

15* 



174 



LINES OF PACKETS. 



Sail from New York and Savannah once a week. 
Agents in New York, Scott & Morrel, 72 South st. 
Agents in Savannah, Ladd, Tupper & Sistare. 



SAVANNAH PACKETS. 
(Old Line.) 



Masters. 
Thos. Dunham 
D. L. Porter 



Ships. Masters. Ships. 

Republican, . . R. W. Foster Newark, . . 

Trenton, J. S. Bennett New Ship,. 

Milledgeville, . N. P. Durfey 

Sail from each port once a week — Johnson & Lowden, 
8G Wall St., Agents, New York. 

Stone, Washburn & Co. Agents, Savannah. 

(Schooner or Brig line.) 



Schooners. Masters. 
Exact, Hubbard 



Brigs, Masters. 

Madison, Buckley 

Tybee, Lyons 

Georgia, Sherwood 

William Taylor . Hoey 

Sail once a week from foot of Maiden Lane, N. York. 

Sturges & Clearman, Agents, 92 Wall st. New York. 

Cyrus B, Costar, Agent, Savannah. 

NEW LINE NEW-ORLEANS PACKETS. 



Ships. Ma.sters. 

Saratoga,.. .W. Hathaway 
Arkansas,. . .E. S. Dennis 
T^ashville, . . .D, Jackson 



Ships. Masters. 

Kentuck)^, — John Bunker 

Orleans, S. Sears 

Alabama, C. C. Berry 



To sail punctually from New York and New Orleans, 
every second Monday during the season. 

They have handsome furnished accommodations, and 
the cabin passage is SBO, without wine or liquor, but all 
other stores of the best description will be provided. 

Agent — Silas Holmes, 62 South street. 



(Louisiana Line.) 



Ships. 

Huntsville, 
Vicksburg, , 



Masters. 
• Eldridge 
. Woodhouse 



Ships. Masters. 

Mississippi, Hall 

Yazoo, Trask 

Louisville, Palmer 

Sail From New York anid from New Orleans, every 
other Monday. 

Agent— Edward K. Collins, 56 South street. 



LINK OP PACKETS, 



176 



NEW YORK AND MOBILE PACKETS. 



Ships. Masters. 

Alabamian, .... Lane 

Lorena, Urquhart 

Russell Baldwin, Magna 

Tuskina, Post 

Matilda, Ashbey 

Agents— E. D. Hurlbut & Co., 84 South street. 



Ships. Masters. 

Junior, Williams 

St. John, Hitchcock 

Elisha Denison, West 
Hector, Post 



(New Line.) 



Ships. Masters. 

Rob Roy, Arnold 

Thames, Snow 



Ships. Masters 

Waverley, Philips 

Warsaw, Rosseter 

Cahawba, Smith 

Agents in New York — Center & Co., 94 Pine street. 

Agents in Mobile— E. C. Center & Co 

APALACmCOLA PACKETS. 



Ships. Masters. 
Indiana, Doane 



Ships. Masters. 

Wash'ton Irving, . . Latham 
Agents E, D. Hurlbut & Co., 84 South street. 
4 Brigs also sail regularly — Sturges & Clearman, 
Agents, 92 Wall street. 

DARIEN, (gEO.) line OF PACKETS 



Schooners. Masters. 
D.B.Crane, Studley 



Brigs, Masters 

Macon, Bibbins 

Darien, Buckley 

New Jersey, Matthews 

Amelia Strong, . . . Brown 

Premium, Coburn 

Agent at New York— R. M. Demill, 180 Front street 
Agents at Darien, (Geo.) Hawes, Mitchel & Collins. 



RICHMOND PACKETS. 
(Old Line.) 

Schooners. Masters^ 

Tuscarora, J. Bell 

Weymouth^ H. Coucb 

Hornet, J. Pitts 



Schooners. Masters. 

Richmond,. ... .J. Gould 

Leontin, Dearbon 

Nassau, S.Chester 

Allen & Paxson, Agents, No. 92 Wall street. 

NORFOLK AND PORTSMOUTH, (VA.) PACKETS. 

5 Schooners sail every Saturday, from foot of Wall st. 
Sturges & Clearman, Agents, 92 Wall street, N. York. 
Wm. Rowland, Agent, Norfolk. 



176 LINl or PACKKTS. 



PETERSBURG PACKETS. 
(Old Line.) 

6 Schooners saiLfrom each port once a week. 

Agents — Johnson &. Lowden, 86 Wall street, N. York. 

P. Ryen — Petersburg, Va. 

BALTIMORE PACKETS. 
(Old Line.) 
6 Schooners sail from each port once each week. 
Agents — Johnson & Lowden, 8G Wall street, N. York. 
Josiah Mankin, Agent, Baltimore. 

BALTIMORE DESPATCH LINE. 

5 Schooners sail from foot of Wall street. 

Agents — Sturges & Clearman, 92 Wall st. New York. 

Thomas Whitredge, 13 Bowlay's Wharf, Baltimore, 

Wilmington, (N. C.) Old Line, 5 vessels. 
Agent — John Ogden, 88 AVall-street, 

Wilmington, New Line, 6 vessels. 

Agents — Halleti & Brown, 180 South-street, 

Wilmington Union Line, 5 vessels. 
Agent— G. O. Van Amringe, 80 Wall-street. 
Packets for district of Columbia, 5 schooners, sail once 
a week from foot of Wall-street. 
Agents — Sturges & Clearman, 92 Wall-streei, 

PHILADELPHIA. 

1st. Union Line, sail every Wednesday and Saturday. 

2d. Despatch Line, sail every Wednesday and Sa- 
turday. 

3d. New Line, sail every Wednesday and Saturday. 

4th. Philadelphia Line, sail every Wednesday and 
Saturday. 

5th. Van Amringe's Line. Office, 80 Wall-street. 

Agents for Union Line, J. & N, Briggs, 36 Old-slip. 

Agents for 2d Line, Miller & Bancker, 32 Front-street. 

Agents for 3d Line, H. B. Cooley, 19 Coenties-slip. 

Agent for 4th Line, William J. M'Kee, Coenties-slip, 

LINE OF PACKETS EAST. 

1st. Boston Despatch Line, (6 schooners,) twice a 
week. . 



STEAMBOATS. 177 



2d. Second Line, (6 schooners,) twice a week. 

3d. Commercial Line, (6 schooners,) twice a week. 

4th. Tremont Line, (fi schooners,) twice a week. 

Agents for 1st Line — E. & J. Herrick, 23 South-street; 
and Howes, Godfrey, & Robinson, 26 South-street. 

Agents for 2d Line — Ezra Lewis, 26 Coenties-slip. 

Agents for 3d, Commercial Line — S. H. Herrick, 5 
Coenties-slip. 

Agents for 4th Line — Sturges and Clearman, 92 Wall- 
street. 

Salem, Union Line, 4 vessels. 

Agents — P. J. Farnum &Co., 112 South-street. 

Portsmouth, 2 vessels, sail once a fortnight. 
Agent — Ezra Lewis, 26 Coenties-slip. 

Providence three Lines, sail several limes a week, 
from foot of Maiden-lane. 

New-Haven, Hartford, Middletown, New London, 
and Norwich, sail several times a week. Sail from 
Burling and Peck slips. 



STEAMBOATS. 

HUDSON RIVER STEAMBOATS. 

NEW-YORK, ALBANY AND TROY LINE. 

Morning Line from foot of Barclay-street^ daily ^ at 1 A.M.. 
Steamboat Champlain, Captain A. Gorham. 
" Erie, " James Benson. 

" Albany, " 

Night Line, from foot of Courtlandt- street, daily, at 5 P. M . 

Steamboat North America, Captain G. Lathrop. 
" De Witt Clinton, '« S. R. Roe. 

" Swallow, " A. McLean. 

" Ohio, " M.Bartholomew. 

" Robert L. Stevens, " J. P. Dean. 

Berths can be secured in either of the above Boats, by 
applying at the office, foot of Courtlandt-street, or to the 
Captains on board the Boats. 



178 



STEAMBOATS. 



people's line for ALBANY. 

Leave foot of Courtlandt-street, daily, (Sundays ex- 
cepted,) at 5 o'clock, P. M. 

Steamboat Rochester, Captain St. John. 
" Uiica, " Wells. 

For berths or passage, apply to the Captains on board, 
or Crooke & FoAvks, West-street, corner of Liberty, 

FOR NEWBLRGH. 

(Passage and Freight Boats.) 
Steamboat Highlander, Captain R. Wardrop, 
Leaves from foot of Warren-street, Monday and Thurs- 
day, at 5 o'clock, P. M. For freight or passage, apply to 
the Captain on board, or T. Powell & Co. Newburgh. 
Steamboat Superior, Captain James H. Leeds, 
Leave from foot of Warren-street, Wednesday and Sa- 
turday, at .5 o'clock, P. M. For freight or passage, apply 
to the captain on board, or Oakley & Davis, Newburgh, 
Steamboat James Madison, Captain E. Perry, 
Leave from foot of Warren-street, Tuesday and Friday, 
at 5 o'clock, P. M. For freight or passage, apply to the 
captain on board, or B. Carpenter & Co., Newburgh. 
Steamboat Washington, Captain C. Johnston, 
Leaves from foot of Warren-street, Monday and Thurs- 
day, at 5 o'clock, P. M. For freight or passage, apply to 
the Captain on board, or D. Crawford & Co., Newburgh. 
FOR KINGSTON, (passoge onlj/.) 
Steamboat. Caroline, Captain Schultz, 
Leaves foot of Murray-street, every Tuesday, Thurs- 
day, and Saturday, at 5 o'clock, P. M. Leaves Kingston, 
every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, at 6 P. M. For 
passage, apply on board, or to 

Norton & Smith, 7 West-street. 

FOR PEJJKSKILL, VERPLANCK, GRASSY POINT, SING-SING, TARRY- 
TOWN, dobb's ferry, and YONKERS. 

Steamboat Union, Captain H. Tuthill, 
From the foot of Chambers-street, every morning, (Fri- 
days excepted,) at 7 o'clock. 

FORT LEE. 

Steamboat Bergen, Captain Scott, 
Leaves foot of Canal-street, twice a day, for Bull's 
Ferry and Fort Lee. 



STEAMBOATS. 179 



Albany and New- York Line, Steam Tow Boats. 

The steamboats Swiftsure, Commerce, Oliver Ellsworth, 
New-London, United States, Henry Eckford, James Fair- 
lie, and a new boat, run in connection on the above line; 
towing thirteen barges. Two steamboats leave daily, from 
the foot of Broad-street, at 5 o'clock, P. M. 

Isaac Newton, Agent, 15 South, corner Broad-street. 

Troy Line Tow Boats. 

The above steamboats also run in connection with the 
Troy Line, towing fourteen Barges ; one leaving Coen- 
ties Slip daily, (Sundays excepted,) at 5 o'clock, P. M. 
Pope Catlin, Agent, 33 Coenties Slip. 

Swiftsure Line. 

Steamboats towing fourteen barges, one of which leaves 
New- York from the foot of Courtlandt-street, daily, (Sun- 
days excepted,) at 5 o'clock, P. M. 

A. Van Santvoord, Agent, 82 Courtland-st., up-stairs. 

Aliany and CanMl Line. 
The Steamboat.-^ Constitution and Mount Pleasant, tow 
nine barges ; leaving New- York from the foot of Broad- 
street, daily, at 5 P. M. 

A. Jermain, Agent, 16 South-street. 

Eagle Line Tow Boats for Albany. 

Steamboat John Jay, Captain W. T. Schultz. 
" Sandusky, " H. H. Buckbee. 

Towing Canal boats only ; leave foot of Liberty-street, 
every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Saturday, at 
5 o'clock, P. M. For freight or passage, apply on board, 
or to Norton & Smith, 7 West-street. 

Hudson Tow Boat Company. 
Leave every day, (Sundays excepted,) from the foot of 
Liberty-street, at 5 o'clock, JP. M. 

Steamboat General Jackson, Captain I. T. Haviland. 
" Legislator, " T. P. Newbury. 

Three Tow boats. For freight or passage, apply to 
the Captains on board, cr to 

Crooke & Fowks, West-street, comer Liberty. 



180 STEAMBOATS. 



Westchester Tmo Boat Line — For Hudson. 

Steamboat "Westchester, Captain M'Dougal, 
Leave foot of Liberty-street, for Hudson, every Wed- 
nesday and Saturday, at 5 o'clock, P. M. For freight or 
passage, apply on board, or to 

Crooke & Fowks, West-street, corner Liberty. 

Calskill Tow Boat Company. 
Steamboat Frank, Captain J. B. Coffin, 
Leave foot of Liberty-street, every Monday, Wednes- 
day and Friday, at 5 o'clock, P, M. For freight or pas- 
sage, apply on board, or to 

Crooke & Fowks, West-street, comer Liberty. 

For Kingston. 
Steamboat Hudson, Captain L. D. Woolsey, 
Leave every Wednesday and Saturday, from the foot 
of Murray-street, at 5 P. M. For freight or passage, ap- 
ply to the Captain, or 

Crooke & Fowks, West-street, corner Liberty. 

For Poughkeepsie. 

Steamboat Emerald, Captain G. Wilkinson, 
Leave foot of Murray-street, every Monday, Thurs- 
day, and Saturday, at 5 o'clock, P. "M. For freight or 
passage, apply on board, or to 

Crooke & Fowks, West-street, corner Liberty. 

Coxsackie and Stuyvesant Tow Boat Company. 
Steamboat New-Castle, Captain S, Brooks, 
Leave foot of Dey-street, every Wednesday and Satur- 
day, at 5 P. M. For freight or passage, apply on board, 
or'to Crooke & Fowks, West-street, corner Liberty. 
Hyde Park and Kingston. 

Steamboat Providence, Captain M. Sleight, 
Leave every Tuesday and Friday afternoon, from foot 
of Murray-street, at 5 o'clock, P. M. For freight or pas- 
sage, apply on board, or to 

Crooke & Fowks, West-street, corner Liberty. 
For Fishkill, Low Point. * 
Steamboat William Young, Captain V. B. Budd, 
Leave foot of Murray-street, every Tuesday and Friday, 
at 5 o'clock, P. M. For freight or passage, apply on 
board, or to 

Crooke & Fowks, West-street, corner Liberty. 



STEAMBOATS. 



181 



NEW-YORK BAY AND STATEN ISLAND SOUND 
STEAM-BOATS. 

FOR PHILADELPHIA. 

Camden and Aviboy Rail-road Line. 

Steamboat Independence, Captain A. H. Schultz. 
" Swan, " C. Seymour. 

Leaves Pier No. 1 North River, three times a day, at 
6 and 10 A. M., and in the afternoon, carrying the United 
States Mail. 

Cars leave Amboy on the rail-road immediately after 
the arrival of the steamboats. 

For passage apply at the office, 12 VsTashington-street. 

N. B. Passengers by this line are also carried to Free- 
hold Princeton, and Trenton, N. J., by the 6 o'clock boat 
in summer, and 7 o'clock boat in winter. 

NEWARK. 

Steamboat Passaic, Captain B. Tate, 
Leaves foot of Barclay-street twice a day, at 10 o'clock, 
A.M., and 3 o'clock, P. M. 
For freight or passage apply to the Captain on board. 

NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Steamboat Napoleon, Captain Fisher, 
Leaves New- York from Pier No. 2 North River, at 
2 o'clock. P. M. Leaves passengers at the usual landings. 

NEW BRIGHTON AND ELIZABETHPORT. 

Steamboat Cinderella, Captain De Grove. 
Water Witch " Van Pelt, 
Leave Pier No. 1 Battery-place, North River, four 
times a day. 

NEW BRIGHTON. 

Steamboat New Brighton, Captain J. Waterbury, 
Leaves Pier No. 4 North River, five times a day. 

MIDDLETOWN POINT. 

Steamboat Monmouth, Captain Greene, 
Leaves foot of Barclay-street every day. 

STATEN ISLAND. 

Steamboat Bolivar, Captain Braistead, 
Leaves New-York from the foot of Whitehall-street, 
several times during the day for Staten Island. 

16 



182 STEAMBOATBT. 



QUARANTINE, &C. 

The steamboats Hercules and Rufus King are era- 
ployed in towing vessels from the Quarantine Ground,. 
Narrows, and other places. 

Union Transportation Lim. 
Steamboats in connexion with the above line leave 
Pier No. 1 North River, every da}', with freight for 
Philadelphia, per Camden and Amboy Rail-road. 
Office, 14 Washington-street. 

Merchants^ Transportation Line. 

Steamboat New-York, Captain E. Richards, 

Leaves Piers, No 5 and 6, North River, with freight 

barges in tow, for New Brunswick, and thence per canal 

to Philadelphia, This is the only Line on this route 

towed by steam. 

Agents — Miller & Bancker, 33 Front, and 73 Washing- 
ton-street. 

EAST RIVER AND LONG ISLAND SOUND 
STEAMBOATS. 

NEWPORT AND PROV!DEXCE, R. I, 

Boston and Providence Rail-road Line. 
Steamboat Massachusetts, Captain J. J. Comstock 
Rhode Island, " S. Thaver, 
" President, " G. Child. 

Leave New York from the foot of Pike-street, daily, 
("Sundays excepted,) at 5 o'clock, P. M. For passage or 
freight, apply to the Captains on board. Passengers 
for Boston will take the Rail-road cars immediately on 
their arrival at Providence. 

Steamboat Lexington, Captain J. Vanderbilt, 
Leaves New- York for Newport and Providence twice 
a week. 

NEW LONDO?^ AND NORWICH, CONN. 

Steamboat Norwich, Captain Coit, 
Leaves New-York from Catharine Market slip, 
every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, at 5 o'clock, 
P.M. 

NOR WALK, BRIDGEPORT, &C. 

Steamboat Nimrod, Captain 

" Fairfield, " 

Leave New- York every morning, (Sundays excepted), 
from east side Catharine Market slip, at 7 o'clock, A. M. 



STEAMBOATS. 



183 



jHartford, (conn.) 

Bunker Hill Captain Harrison 

Cleopatra " Reynolds, 

Leave Rariford, everyday at 2 P.M., (Sundays ei- 
-cepted.) Leave New- York, every day at 5 P, M., from 
foot of Beekman-street, East River. 

NEW HAVEN, (cONN.) 

New-York Captain Stone. 

New Haven " Stone, 

One Boat leaves New- York and New Haven, every 
aay, (Sundays excepted,) at 7 o'clock, A. M. Start from 
ibot of Beekman-street, East River. 

NEW ROCHELLE, GLEN GOVE, OYSTER BAY, AND COLD SPRING. 

American Eagle, Captain Peck, 
Leaves daily from East River, near foot of Beek- 
man-street. 

HALLETT's COVE AND FLUSHING, L. L 

Star, Captain Leonard, 
Leaves daily from East River^ near foot of Beekman- 
.street, 

WEST CHESTER, THROGG's NECK, WHITESTOWN, <JREAT NECK, 
AND ROBINA SAY. 

Sun, Captain Lane, 
Leaves daily from East River, n«ar foot of Beekman- 
street. 

HUDSON RIVER, CANAL AND LAKE TRANS- 
PORTATION LINES. 

From New YorK\ 

Clinton Line — J. Van Olinda & Co., and P. Grandin, 
Agents, 125 Broad street. 

Commercial Line — S. Card & Co., Proprietors, 123 
Broad street. 

Despatch Line— Wm. Brown, Proprietor, 100 Broad st. 

Erie Canal Line — W. C. Carter and Charles Cham- 
ijerlain, Agents, 21 Coenties slip. 

Erie and Ohio Line — E. D. Robinson, Ag't, 15 South st. 

Fulton Line — S. Bebee, jr., Agent, 109 Broad st. 



184 RAIL-ROADS 



Geneva and Penn Yan Line — John Rice and A. G. 
Jerome, Agenis, 22 South st. 

Lake and River Line — T. M Southwick, Agent. 119 
Broad st. 

New York, Utica, and Chenango Line — E. W. Hin- 
man, Agent, 101) Broad st. 

New York and Michigan Line — Allen Wheeler, Ag't. 
106 Broad st. 

New York and Ohio Line— A. B. Meech & Co., Ag'ts. 
corner Broad and Water streets. 

New^ York and Seneca Falls Line — M. L. Keith, 8 
South St., and Charles Chamberlain, 21 Coenties slip 
Agents. 

Oswego Line, (Lake boats.) — R.J. Vandewater, 100 
Broad st. 

Pilot and Traders' Line — D. P. Parker and Hiram 
M'Collum, Agents, 1 Coenties slip. 

Troy and Erie Line — R. Putnam, Agent, 33 Coenties 
slip. 

Troy and Michigan Line — L. Crocker, Agent, 106 
Broad st. 

Troy and Ohio Line— E. F. Norton and S. A. Watts, 
Agents, 33 Coenties slip. 

Troy and OsM'ego Line — James S. Wyckoff, Agent, 33 
Coenties slip. 

United States Line — D. Northrop, Agent, 22 1 South st. 

Utica Line— S. T. Hallock, Agent, 22 South st. 

Washington Line — T. P. Waters and S.Jones, Agents, 
125 Broad st. 

RAIL-ROADS. 

Harlccm Rail-road. 

Cars leave ever}^ 20 minutes, from the Bowery, oppo- 
site Prince street, for Harla?m, 7 miles. 

Ticket offices, 241 Bowery, and corner 86th street and 
Fourth Avenue, 

Long Island Rail-road. 

Cars leave Brooklin, from Atlantic street, near the 
South Ferry, three times a day, for Hicksville, 27 miles. 
Ticket office, Atlantic street, Brookl)'n, 



STAaES. 



18d 



Pater son Rail-road. 
Cars leave Jersey City, four times a day for Paterson, 
a distance of 17 miles. 
Ticket office, 75 Cortlandt street, New York. 

New Jersey Rail-road. 

Cars leave Jersey City, nine times a day for Newark, 
9 miles. Cars also leave Jersey City, three times a day; 
8^ o'clock, A. M.— 1 and b\ o'clock, for New Brunswick, 
33 miles. 

Ticket office, foot of Cortlandt street, New York. 



STAGES. 

FOR ALBANY. 

Stages leave New- York for Albany, running on the 
■east side of the Hudson, daily in winter. Office, York- 
House, No. 5 Cortlandt-street. 

NEWBURGH AND ALBANY. 

West side of the Hudson, daily in winter. Office, 
York House, No. 5 Cortlandt-street. 

OWEGO, ITHACA, AND GENEVA. 

Through :^ew Jersey, every day, (except Sunday,) at 
3 A. M. Office, No. 71 Cortlandt-street. Distance to 
Geneva, by this route, 251 miles. Distance to Buffalo, 
357 miles. 

PHILADELPHIA RAIL-ROAD LINE, 

Twice every day. United States Mail. Office, Whit- 
field's, No. 1 Cortlandt-street. 

EASTERN, (new-haven, BOSTON,) &C. 

Daily, United States Mail. Office, Whitfield's, No. 1 
Cortlandt-street. 

WESTCHESTER AND DANBURY. 

To Danbury, Conn., m miles. Leaves New- York, 
(corner of Bayard-street and the Bowery,) daily, at 9 
A. M. Returning, leaves Danbury, daily, at 4 P. M. 

FLUSHING, L. I. 

Stages leave several times a day from 328 Pearl- 
street, Franklin-square, for Flushing and other places 
on Long Island. 

16* 



186 PRINXIPAL HOTELS AND PUBLIC-HOUSES. 



LONG ISLAND. 

Stages leave Brooklyn, from near Fulton Ferry, se- 
veral times during the day for different places on the 
island. 

NEW-YORK ISLAND. 

Stages leave the Bowery from the corner of Bayard- 
street, several times a day, for Bloomingdale, Yorkville, 
Harloem, and Manhattanvillc. 



PRIIVCIPAL. HOTEIiS AND PUBIilC HOUSES. 

American Hotel, Edward Milford, 229 Broadway, 
corner of Barclay, 

Astor House, S. & F. Boyden, Broadway, between 
Vesey and Barclay streets. 

Athenaeum Hotel, Edward Windust, Broadway, corner 
of Leonard-street, 

Atlantic Hotel. William C. Anderson, 5 Broadway. 

Barclaj^-strect House, Andrew Harrison, Barclay, 
corner of West-street. 

Broad-street House, J. H. & A. Gardner, Broad, 
corner of Pearl-street. 

City Hotel, Robert Cruttenden, Broadway, between 
Cedar and Thames streets. 

Clinton Hotel, Mr. Hodges, Beekman, corner of Nas- 
sau-street. 

Congress Hall, Mrs. P. Sherman, 142 Broadway. 

Duchess and Orange County House, Smith Dunning, 
66 Cortlandt-street. 

Eastern Pearl-street House, A. S. and J. R. Foster, 
309 Pearl-street. 

Exchange Hotel, D. D. & J. P. Howard, 10 and 12 
Broad-street. 

Franklin House, Newton Hays, 195 and 197 Broadway. 

Globe Hotel, Francis Blancard, 61 Broadway. 
Holt's Hotel, Stephen B. & A. Holt, corner of Fulton 
and Pearl streets. 

Lovejoy's Hotel, Jonathan Lovejoy, corner of Beek- 
man-street and Park-row. 

Mansion House, (Bunker's,) William J. Bunker, 39 
Broadwav. ' 



PRINCIPAL PRIVATE BOARDING HOUSES, 187 

National Hotel, Horatio N. Carr, 112 Broadway. 
North American Hotel, James Bartlett, 30 Bower}'. 
Northern Hotel, James Harrison, 79 Cortlandt-street, 
Otsego House, Van Pelt, 31 Cortlandt-street. 
Pacific Hotel, Jessup & Nichols, 162 Greenwich-street, 
Pearl-street House, Flint and Whitall, 88 Pearl-street. 
Southern Hotel, E. Otley, 157 Broadway. 
Tammany Hall, Lovejoy and Howard, 166 Nassau, 
corner of Frankfort-street. 

Walton House, Mrs. Simeon Backus, 328 Pearl-street, 
Washington Hotel, James Ward, 282 Broadway. 
Waverley House, Blake & Reed, 352 Broadway. 
Western Hotel, David Brown, jun., 9 Cortlandt-street. 
York House, O. H. Williston, 5 Cortlandt-street, 



PRINCIPAL PRIVATE BOARDING HOUSES. 

FOR THE ACCOMMODATION OF TRANSIENT BOARDERS, 

Mrs. Pearcy, 32 and 34 Vese}^-street, 

Miss Boyd, 66 Broadway. 

Mrs. Street, 2 Bond-street. 

Mrs. Baker, 13 Broadway. 

Mrs. Hossack, 57 Broadway. 

Mrs, Helme, 21 Broadway. 

Mrs. Wade, 93 Liberty-street. 

Mrs. Manning, 139 Broadway. 

Mrs. Sistare, 170 Broadway 

Mrs. Waldron, 181 Broadway. 

Mrs. Mix & Miss Tripp, 161 Broadway. 

Mrs. Hubbard, 1 Bridge-street, 

Mrs. Howland, 1 Park-row, 

Mrs. Ballard, 75 Nassau-street. 

Mr. B. W.Bean, 110 Broadway. 

Mrs. J. Cowing, 5, 7, and 9 Murray-street. 

Mrs. Ludlow, 67 Greenwich-street. 

Mrs. Plinta, 15 Whitehall-street. 

Mrs. Burgess, 255 Pearl-street. 

Mrs. Mann, Broadway. 



188 PERIODICALS. 



In addition to the above, there are a great number of 
public and private houses, f^r the accommodation of 
strangers, and occasional residents in the city, affording 
the same comparative comfort as that enjoyed by the 
inhabitants themselves. The charges vary according to 
the style of the accommodation. The principal hotels 
and boarding houses possess every convenience that 
can be desired ; and an inmate may either reside in 
privacy or associate with the company, as inclination 
dictates. 

At the eating houses, meals can be procured at mo- 
derate charges, varying accordingto the articles ordered. 

Lodgings may be obtained by the day, week, or month, 
in many respectable houses, at a moderate price. 



PERIODICALS. 

QUARTERLY PUBLICATIONS. 



Literary and Theological Review, Ezra Collier, 148 
Nassau street. 

Naval Magazine, published every two months^ John S, 
Taylor, Brick Church Chapel. 

New York Review and Quarterly Church Journal, 
George W. Holley, No. 8 Astor's Building, Broadway.^ 

New York Quarterly Magazine, Howe & Bates, 76 
Chatham street, 

Quarterly Anti-Slavery Magazine, R, G. Williams, 
143 Nassau street. 

Quarterly Christian Spectator, John S. Taylor, Brick 
Church Chapel. 

Tailors' Magazine, D. Williams, 131 Nassau. 

United Brethren's Missionary Intelligencer, Rev. Mr, 
Cruger, 28 Ann st. 

MONTHLY PUBLICATIONS. 

American Monthly Magazine, G. Dearborn & Co. 38 
Gold street. 

Anti-Slavery Record, R. G Williams, 143 Nassau st. 
Children's Magazine, Rev. R. Whittingham,28 Annst. 
Family Magazine, 4 Spruce st. 



NEWSPAPERS. 



Home Missionary and Pastor's Journal, Absalom Pe- 
lers, 150 Nassau st. 

Human Rights, R. G. Williams, 143 Nassau st. 

Journal of the American Institute, T. B. Wakeman, 
187 Broadway. 

Knickerbocker Magazine, Clark & Edson, 161 Broad- 
way. 

Ladies' Companion, Wm. VnT. Snowden, 107 Fulton st. 

La Revue Francjais, (French). 

Mechanics' Magazine, D. K. Minor & G. C. Schaeffer, 
30 Wall St. 

Missionary Herald, John S. Taylor, Brick Church 
Chapel. 

Mother's Magazine, Rev. S Whittlesey, 150 Nassau st. 

National Preacher, John S. Taylor, Brick Church 
Chapel. 

New York Farmer and American Gardner's Magazme, 
D. K. Minor & G. C. Schaeffer, 30 Wall st. 

Parlev's Magazine, Charles S. Francis, 252 Broadway. 

Sailor's Magazine, S. Brown, Agent, 82 Nassau st. 

Sunday School Visiter, A. Ten Broeck, 28 Ann st. 

Tract Magazine, American Tract Society, 150 Nas- 
sau street. 

Youth's Friend, American Sunday School Union, 152 
Nassau st. 

NE^VSPAPERS. 
DAILY MORNING. 

Mercantile Advertiser andNew York Advocate, Amos 
Butler, 56 Wall st. 

Morning Courier and New York Enquirer, James 
"Watson Webb, Wall street. 

New York Daily Express, Townsend & Brooks, Ton- 
tine Building, corner Wall & Water. 

New York Gazette and General Advertiser, R, U. 
Lang and C. F. Daniels, 67 Wall st. 

New York Journal of Commerce, Hale & Hallock, 
Phoenix Buildings, corner Wall and Water. 

New York Times, Wm. Holland, Edw^ard Sanford 
and Edgar W. Davies, 10 Wall st. 

DAILY EVENING. 

Evening Post, Wm. C. Bryant & Co., 27 Pine st. 
Evening Star, Noah & Gill, 47 William st. 



190 NEWSPAPERS. 



New York American, Charles King, 74 Cedar st. 
New York Commercial Advertiser, Francis Hall & 
Co., corner of Pine and William streets. 

SMALL DAILY. 

Herald, James G. Bennett, 21 Ann st. 
New Era, Richard Adams Locke, 17 Ann st. ' 
New York Transcript, W. J. Stanley, 162 Nassau sL 
Sun, Benjamin H. Day, 158 Nassau st. 

SEMI-WEEKLY. 

Evening Post, Wm. C. Bryant & Co., 27 Pine st. 

Evening Star, for the country, Noah & Gill, 47 Wil- 
liam street. 

Le Courrier des Etats Unis, (French,) C. De Behr,94 
Broadway. 

New York Spectator, Francis Hall & Co., corner of 
Pine and William streets. 

New York Advertiser and Express, Townsend & 
Brooks, corner Wall and Water. 

New York American,* Charles King, 74 Cedar. 

New York Courier and Enquirer, James Watson 
Webb, Wall street. 

New York Journal of Commerce, Hale & Hallock, 
Phoenix Buildings, corner of Wall and Water streets. 

Shipping and Commercial List, and New York Price 
Current, W. Burritt & E. B. Clayton, 59 Wall. 

WEEKLY. 

Albion, John S. Bartlett, M. D., Barclay street, near 
Broadway. 

Allgemeine Zeitung, (German,) H. Ludwig, comer 
Vesey and Greenwich streets. 

American Baptist, Rev. Jonathan Going, D.D., corner 
Nassau and Beekman streets. 

American Rail-road Journal, D. K. Minor and G. C. 
Sehaefier, 30 Wall st. 

Christian Advocate and Journal, B. Waugh and T. 
Mason, 200 Mulberry. 
' Christian Intelligencer, V. Van Dewater, 104 Nassau. 

Churchman, Rev. Samuel Seabury, 28 Annst. 

Colored American, Rev. Mr. Cornish. 

Tha American is also published tri'WMklj. 



NEWSPaPERC. 



191 



El Noticioso de Ambos Mundos, (Spanish,) 49 Liberty. 

Emancipator, R. W. Williams, 113 Nassau st. 

Emigrant and Old Countryman, John S. Bartlett, M. D., 
Barclay st. near Broadway. 

European, John M. Moore, 29 Ann st. 

Examiner, Alfred Ludlow, cor. Fulton and Nassau sts. 

Green Banner, (Catholic,) Rev. H. Levins, 69 Centre si. 

Islander, John Jay Adams, 62 Wall st. 

Mercury, Hale & Hallock, 71 Wall street. 

New Era and American Courier, R. A. Locke, 17 
Ann street. 

New Yorker, Greeley, Fisher & Wilson, 127 Nassau st. 

New York Mirror, George P. Morris, Theodore S, 
Fay, and N. P. Willis, corner Ann and Nassau streets. 

New York Sunday Morning News, Samuel Jenks 
Smith, Iv Ann st. 

New York Observer, S. E. Morse & Co., 142 Nassau st. 

New York Weekly Messenger, William Scoit, 100 
Nassau st. 

New York Weekly Register and Catholic Diary, 10 
City Hall Place. 

Plaindealer, William Leggett, corner Pine street and 
Broadway. 

Protestant Vindicator, Reformation Society, 142 Nas- 
sau street. 

Spirit of the Times, Wm. T. Porter, 157 Broadway. 

Sylvester's Reporter, Coimterfeil Detector, and New 
York Price Current, S. J. Sylvester, 130 BroadAvav. 

Truth Teller, (Catholic,) William Denman, 108 Elm st. 

Universalist Union, P. Price & Co., 2 Chatham Square. 

Weekly Courier and New York Enquirer, James Wat- 
son Webb, Wall street. 

World, J. M. Church, 218 Broadway. 

SEMI-MONTHLY. 

Advocate of Moral Reform, 149 Nassau st. 

Day's New-York Bank Note List, &c., Mahlon Day, 

Downfall of IBabylon, S. B. Smith, 131 Nassau, st. 
Journal of Public Morals. 

La France Litteraire, C. De Behr, 94 Broadway. 
Petit Courrier Des Dames, C. De Behr, 94 Broadway. 
Sundav School Union, 152 Nassau st. 



192 



CmCULATING LIBRARIES. 



NEWSPAPERS— BROOKLYN. 

American Citizen, (daily,) F. G. Fish, 52 Fulton st. 

Long Island Star, (semi-weekly,) A. Spooner & Sons, 
10 Front-street. 

Brooklyn Advocate, (semi-weekly,) John Douglas, 14 
Fulton-street. 

CIRCUL.ATING LIBRARIES.* 



Names. 
Goodrich's, No. 
Minerva, 
Parthenon, 
Enterprise, 
Franklin, 
Bowery, 
Shaw's, 



Location. 
113 Fulton St. 

8 Astor House, 
252 Broadway, 
389 do. 
418 do. 
76 Bowery, 
134 Bowery, 



Proprietors. 
A. T. Goodrich. 
George W. Holley. 
C. S. Francis. 
James Herring. 
J. Stanley & Co. 
H. & S. Raynor. 
James G. Shaw. 



READING ROOMS. 

THE ATHEN.EUM. 

(Corner of Broadway and Chambers-street.) 
{See Literary Institutions.^ 

EXCHANGE READING ROOM. 
(Exchange -place, corner of New-street.) 

Strangers will here find files of American and foreign 
newspapers, and may be introduced to the .Reading Room 
by any citizen who is a subscriber. The terms of sub- 
scription are S7 per annum, or strangers SI per month. 
S. S. Gilpin, proprietor. 

Hudson's news room. 
Tontine Buildings, corner of Wall and Water streets. 
Wm. H. & R. E. Hudson, proprietors. 

THE PARTHENON READING ROOM. 

Is attached to the book store of Mr. Charles S. Francis, 
No. 252 Broadway. It is an agreeable lounge for the 
visiter or resident in the city. Here is to be found a col- 
lection, unequalled in the city, of Foreign and American 
periodicals. All the Literary, Philosophical, and Med- 
ical Journals published in Great Britain and the United 



* For Public Libraries, see Literary Institutions. 



eONSTTLS. 193 



States, of any nole, are regularly furnished and constantly 
kept for the use of subscribers, together with all the city 
newspapers, and many from other parts of the Union, 



CONSUIiS. 

Austrian — Lederer, 21 St. Mark's Place. 

Baden — Charles F. Hoyer, 393 Broadw^ay. 

Bavaria — George H. Siemon, 59 Maiden-lane. 

Belgium— Henry W. T. Mali, 62 William-street. 

Brazil — .(Vice,) Figueira, 57 Exchange-place. 

Bremen — L. H. Von Post, 42 Broad-street. 

City of Frankfort on the Maine — Frederick Wiss- 
mann, 46 Broad-street. 

Denmark— (Vice,) Benjamin Aymer, 34 Soath-street. 

France — Delaforest, Consul-General, 72 Greenwich-st. 
" Delaflechette, Chancellor of the French Con- 

sulate-General, 46 Pearl-street. 

Great Britain — J. Buchanan, Consul ; J. C. Buchanan, 
Vice do.; R. Steuart Buchanan, Assist, do., 61 Cedar-st. 

Hamburg — J. W. Schmidt, 12 Pine-street. 

Hanover — Theodore Me^^er, 9 Broad-street. 

Hesse — C. W. Faber, 44 Broad-street. 

Holland — J. C. Zimmerman, 44 Broad-street. 
Mecklenburg — Heckscher, 42 South-street. 
Mexico — Sebastian Mercado, 12 Pearl-street. 
Montevideo — John L. Darby, Consul ; John L. Francie, 
Vice do., 117, Front-street. 
Oldenburg — Otto H. Mieregaes, 29 Beaver-street. 
Portugal — Figaniere, 58 Exchange Place. 
Prussia — J. W. Schmidt, 12 Pine-street. 
Rome and Sicily— R. Martin, 32 Platt-street. 
Russia — A.. Eustaphieve, 505 Broome-sireet. 
Sardinia — Louis Mossi, 77 South-street. 
Saxe Weiman — A. W. Hupeden, 9 Broad-street. 
Saxony — Andreas Antoin Melly, 15 Maiden-lane. 
Spain — Don Francisco Stoughton, 7 Murray-street, 
Sweden and Norway — Zachrisson, 45 Broad-street. 
Switzerland — Henry C. De Rham, 44 Broad-street, 
Texas — John Woodward, 8, Wall-street. 
Tuscany — W. H. Aspinwall, 54 and 55 South-street, 
Veneraelian— Moller, 52 South-?!treet 
17 



194 



BALLAST MASTER. 



WARDENS OP THE PORT. 

(Office, 62 Wall-street.) 

Josiah Ingersoll, Master, 
Anthony Moffatt, Clerk. 

James Gillender, John iVIinuarh, William M'lntire, 
Reuben Hope, Charles H. Barnard. 

Vessels and goods arriving in a damaged state, and re- 
quired to be sold at auction, lor the benefit of under- 
writers out of the city of New- York, must be under the 
inspection of the wardens, who may be required to cer- 
tify the cause of the damage, and amount of sale and 
charges. Fees as follow : li per cent, on gross amount 
of sales; and for each survey on board of any vessel, at 
any store, or along the docks or wharves, S3.00 on da- 
maged goods; each survey on hull, spars, rigging, &c., 
5.00; each certificate 1.2,5; do. of distress of said vessel 
2.50. Same services for vessels pa3'ing foreign duties 
and tonnage, double. 



HARBOUR MASTERS. 

(Office, corner of Maiden-lane and Water-street.) 
Abraham Turnure, John Minugh, David MitchelL. 

Fees. — On vessels unloading li cts. per ton. Vessels 
paying foreign duties and tonnage, double; which must 
be paid witliin 48 hours after arrival. 

Schooners and sloops in the coasting trade, two 
dollars. 

For adjusting any difference respecting situation, $2- 



BAI^IjAST MASTER- 

John Baker. 
Fees. — For inspecting stone or shingle ballast, 8 cents 
per ton, 5 cents of which to be paid by the purchaser, 
and 3 cents by the seller. — Office, No. 28 Burling-slip. 



MEASURERS, INSPECTORS, AND GAUGERS. 



195 



RATES OP PIIiOTAGE. 

Ever>' Pilot, who shall take charge of any vessel to 
the eastward or southward of the White Buoy, on the 
Eastern Ridge, near the Bar, and conducts and moors 
safely such vessel to a proper whart ; or from the city 
to the southward or eastward of said buoy, is entitled by 
law, to the following rates, to wit :— For vessels of the 
United States, and those who are entitled by treaty to 
enter upon the same terms as American vessels, the sums 
which follow :^Every vessel drawing less than 14 feet, 
1.50 cents per foot. Do. drawing 14 feet, and less than 
18, 1.75 cents per foot. Do. drawing 18 feet or upwards, 
2.25 cents per foot. The same rates of pilotage to be 
allowed, for any vessel that may be piloted any where 
within the Hook, whose master or owner does not wish 
the same to be brought to the city wharves. Half 
pilotage only to be allowed to any pilot who shall take 
charge of a vessel to westward of the White Buoy. 
No pilotage whatsoever to be given to any pilot, unless 
he shall take charge of a vessel to the Sjouthward of the 
upper Middle Ground, nor unless such vessel shall be 
of 10 tons burthen, provided the usual signal be not 
given, in which case half pilotage is to be allowed. 
Between the first day of November and the first of April, 
inclusive, four dollars additional to be allowed, for ves- 
sels of ten feet water and upwards ; if less than ten feet, 
two dollars. One fourth additional to be given to the 
pilots, who shall take charge of vessels out of sight of 
the Light House. For every day any pilot shall be re- 
quired to remain on board, three dollars per day. Fo- 
reign vessels, not entitled by treaty to enter on the same 
terms as those of the United States, to pay one-fourth 
additional to the pilots, and also five dollars over and 
above the foregoing rates of pilotage. 



MEASURERS, INSPECTORS, AND GAUGERS. 

STATE AFPOINTMENTS, 

Christopher P. Tappen, Flour Inspector, 17 South-street, 
052 Front-street, and 80 Dey-street. 



196 VtEASLMlERS. INSPECTORS, AND OiUaSRS. 



Francis Peckwell, Inspector of staves, <S:c., 136 Souih- 
street. 
Robert C. Theall, Inspector of Oil, 145 Grand-street. 

INSPECTOR OF DOMESTrC SPIRITS. 

John Cooper, Inspector General of Domestic Spirits. 
Inspectors. — Thomas J. t-3hankland, Joseph Flynn, 
Joseph C. Cooper, George Nevin, G. J. Pesoa. 

MEASURERS or GRAIN. 

Samuel Satterlee, jr., Measurer General of Grain. 

Measurers. — John Wright, Samuel W. Disbrow, Isaac 
L. Tompkins, Oliver H. Tompkins, Cornelius Timpson, 
Samuel Clark, John Vredenburgh, .lohn G. Kecthum, 
Edward Webb, Lewis Smith, Jacob Brinckerhoff, Oliver 
Holden, Ebenezer Briggs, Joshua Carleton, Gilbert Jen- 
kins, Robert T. Clay, Tobias L. Stoughtenburgh, Thomas 
Frost, Isaac Sayrs, James Rogers. 

MEASURERS OF LIME. 

John R.OSS, Henry Ryer. 

TOBACCO INSPECTOR. 

J. D. Stevenson, 132 Cedar and 32 Pearl streets. 

INSPECTORS OF LEATHER. 

Daniel Gordon, Benjamin Cooper, Oliver Taylor, 
Howard A. Simons, John P. HafF, Isaac Sherwood, 
Evert Marsh. 

INSPKCTORS OF BEEF AND PORE. 

Thomas Gardner, Philo Lewis, Andrew Wilson, 
Robert Usher, James Lowerre. 

CULLERS OF STAVES AND HEADING. 

Thomas Candell, .Tachin Morris, John A. Weeks, 
James Kent, Henry Gordon, Francis H. Peckwell, John 
Hunt. 

INSPECTORS OF LUMBER. 

John J. Morris, Abraham A. Slover, Jacob Lockman, 
Peter Conrey, William ]M. Shepard, George W. Noble, 
Nathan Roberts, Alexander Dennistoun, William Green, 
James L. Wallace, Samuel Howell, James M. Nelson. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASmtES. 197 



INSPECTOR OF FLAX SEED. 

Richard B. Fosdick. 

INSPECTOR OF POT AND PEARL ASHES. 

William Dumont. 

INSPECTOR OF FISH. 

Hiram Scofield. 

INSPECTOR OF HOPS. 

Cornelius Higgins. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Stephen Allen, William W. Fox, Charles Dusenbury, 
Saul Alley, Thomas T. Woodruff. 

TIMBER MEASURERS. 

The Measurers appointed by the Common Council re- 
ceive the following fees : For measuring short ship 
timber, for every ton consisting of 40 cubic feet, 25 cents ; 
for every ton cubic measure of square timber, 14 cents ; 
for every thousand feet superficial measure of boards, 
plank, or scantling, 37^ cents; on all raft timber, 6 cents 
per ton, 

CITY MEASURERS. 

For measuring salt or grain, 75 cents for each hundred 
bushels ; for measuring lime, I2k cents for every load of 
sixteen bushels ; for measuring charcoal, one cent for 
each bushel; and for measuring sea coal, 25 cents for 
each chaldron ; and at and after the same rate for a 
greater or less quantity. Anthracite coal, 12^ cents 
per ton. 



"WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Sealers^ Fess.— Beams, yard and dry measures, 12* 
cents each. Liquid do. 3 cents. Weights 3 to 6 cents, 
with a reasonable compensation for adjusting. 

inspectors' FEES. 

Every wt. of 141bs. or upwards 3 cents 

" of smaller denomination 1(| " 

Every liquid measure 2 " 

Every yard and dry measure 3 " 

Every scale beam 3 " 

17* 



I'JS KAYtCS OP COMMISSIONS. 



DAMAGES ON BILLS OF EXCHAXGE. 

Three per cent, upon bills drawn upon persons in the 
Slates of iVIaine, New-Hampshire, Vermont, Massachu- 
setts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New-Jersey, Pennsyl- 
vania, Ohio, Delaware, Maryland, or in the District'of 
Columbia; 5 percent, in North Carolina, South Caro- 
lina, Georgia, Kentucky, or Tennessee. In the remain- 
ing States, and in the West Indies, Canadas, Europe, &c., 
10 per cent. 

KATES OP 1VHARPAGE. 

Vessels under 50 tons, 50 cents per day ; and for every 
50 tons more an addition of 12^ cents. 

RATES OF COMMISSIONS, 

Recommended for general adoption, and allowed by the 
New-York Charnber of Commerce, when no agree- 
vient subsists to the contrary. Established, March 2d, 
1819. 

ON FOREIGN BUSINESS. 

On the sale of merchandise, 5 per cent. Sale or pur- 
chase of Stocks, 1 per cent. Specie, | per cent. Pur- 
chase and shipment of merchandise, with funds in hand, 
on the aggregate amount of costs and charges, 2^ per 
cent. Drawing or endorsing Bills, in all cases, 2i per 
cent. Vessels, selling or purchasing, 2^ per cent. Pro- 
curing freight, 5 per cent. Collecting freight, on ge- 
neral average, 2A per cent. Outfits or disbursements, 
with funds in hand, 2^ per cent. Effecting Marine In- 
surance, in all cases, when the premium does not ex- 
ceed 10 per cent., on the amount insured, h per cent. 
When the premium exceeds ten per cent., on the amount 
of premium, 5 per cent. Collecting dividends on Stock, 
i per cent. Collecting delayed or litigated accounts, 5 
per cent. Adjusting and collecting Insurance losses, 2j 
per cent. Receiving and paying moneys, from which 
no other commission is derived, 1 per cent. Remittances 
in bills, in all cases, h per cent. Landing and re-ship- 
ping goods, from vessels in distress, on the value, 2j per 
cent. Receiving and forwarding goods, entered at the 
Custom House, on the value, 1 — and 2i per cent., on re- 
sponsibilities incurred. 



RATES OP COM^kn.^SIOXS. 199 



ON INLAND BUSINESS. 

On the sale of merchandise, 2h per cent. Purchase 
and shipment of merchandise, or accepting for purchases, 
without funds or property in hand, 2^ per cent. Sale or 
purchase of stocks, 1 per cent. Sale or purchase of spe- 
cie, ^ per cent. Sale of Bills of Exchange, with endorse- 
ment, ^ per cent. Sale of Bank notes or drafts, not cur- 
rent, ^ per cent. Selling or endorsing Bills of Exchange, 
2i per cent. Selling or purchasing vessels. 2^ per cent. 
Chartering, to proceed to other ports to load, 2;^ per 
cent. Procuring or collecting freight, 2k per cent. Out- 
fits or disbursements, 2k per cent. Collecting, general 
average, 2A per cent. Effecting Marine Insurance, in all 
cases, when the premium does not exceed ten per cent., 
on the amount insured, i per cent. When the premium 
exceeds ten per cent., on the amount of premium, 5 per 
cent. Adjusting and collecting insurance losses, 2A per 
cent. Collecting dividends on Stocks, J per cent. Col- 
lecting bills and paying over the amount, or receiving or 
paying moneys from which no other commission is de- 
rived, 1 per cent. Receiving and forwarding goods, on 
the value, k per cent. The same when entered for duty 
or debenture, 1 per cent. E-emittance in Bills in all 
cases, k per cent. 

The above commissions to be exclusive of the gua- 
ranty of debts for sales of credit, storage, brokerage, 
and every other charge actually incurred. The risk of 
loss by fire, unless insurance be ordered, and of robbery, 
theft, and other unavoidable occurrences, if the usual 
care be taken to secure the property, is in all cases to be 
borne by the proprietor of the goods. When bills are 
remitted for collection, and are returned under protest, 
for non-acceptance or non-payment, the same commis- 
sion to be charged as though they were duly honoured. 
On consignments of merchandise, withdrawn or re-ship- 
ped, full commission to be charged, to the extent of ad- 
vances or responsibilities incurred, and half commission 
on the residue of the value. 

COMMISSIONERS OF INSOLVENCY. 

Dominick T. Blake, Chairman; David Agrv, Elijah 
Yerks. Office, new City Hall. 



too 



RATEB OF BlMDRAOa. 



RATES OP STORAGE. 

Chargeable per Tnonlh, as established by the N. Y. C, of Commerce. 



Cents 

Almonds, in frails or pack. cwt. 6 
Alum, in casks or bags, p. ton 40 

Ashes, pot and pearl, bbl 8 

Beef, i)bl 6 

Boll ea qt ill mats,cr,or limp. gf. 8 
Hark, quercitron, in casks, ton. 60 
tagging cot. loose or in bales, p. c 3 
Butter, in firkins of 60 lbs. p. fir. 2 
Brandy, see Liquors. 
Candles, in boxes of 50 or 601bs. 

per box 2 

Chocolate, in bxs. of 50 lbs. box 2 

Cocoa, in bags, per cwt 2^ 

in casks, do 3 

Coffee, in casks, do 2k 

in bags, do 2 

Copperas, in casks, per ton . . .40 

Copper, in pigs, do 20 

in sheets or bolts, ton liO 

braziers bottoms, ton. .75 

Cordage, per ton. 50 

Cassia, in mats or bxs. per cwt. 10 
Cotton, American, in sq. bales, 



Ccjits. 

Iron in hoops,shts. or nar}nods,t. 30 
Liquors, in puns, of 120- gals. 

per pun 30 

— in quarter casks 6| 

in pipes or cks. I'iO g. . .30 

— bottled, in cks. or bxs. 

doz. b ii^. 

Leather, per side l 

Lard, in firkins of 601bs 2 

Lead, pig q| sheet, per ton 20 

— ■ — dry,6tgr. in oil, per ton.. 40 
Molasses, per hhd. of 110 gals. 

(other casks in proportion; . .30 

Nails, in casks, per cwt 2 

Oil, in hhds. or casks, 110 gals. 39 

— in chests, of 30 flasks p ch. 4 

— bot'd in boxs. or baskts, oz. Ij 
Paints, in casks or kegs, ton ... .40 

Pork, per bbl 6 

Porter, see Liquors. 

Pepper, in bags, per cwt 2 

Pimento, in casks or bags, cwt. 2 
Kice, in tierces, per tierce 12 



300 lbs 12i ! in half do., per half do. .. 8 

do. in round bales, do.. 16 , Rags, inhales, per cwt 6 



W.L in proportion to round. 
E I. in bales, per 300 lbs. 9 



Cheese, casks, bxs. or loose, cwt. 3 

Duck, heavy, per bolt 1^ ; Rum, see Liquors 



Raisins, Malaga, in casKs 3 

do in boxes 1 

• in other packag. per cwt. 2 



Ravens or Russia sheeting, 

per piece f 

Dry Goods, in boxes or bales, 

40 cubic feet 40 

Fish, pickled, per bbl 6 

dry, in casks or boxes, cwt. 4 

in bulk, per cwt 2i 

Figs, in fi-ails,bxs. ordrums,cwt. 2i 

Flax, per ton 60 

Flax seed, or other dry articles 

in tierces of 7 bushs. per tree. 10 
Flour, 01 other dry articles, in 

bhls 4 

Earthenw. in cratesof 25 to 30ft 15 

i,) hhds of4n'>i50ft. 30 

Grain, in bulk, per bushel 1 

Ginger, in bags, per cwt 2 

Glass, window, in boxes of 50ft. IJ 
Gin, see Liquors. 

Hemp, per ton ~5 

Hides, dried or salted, per hide 1^ 
Hardware, in casks of 40 cu. ft. 40 
Indigo, in seroons or bxs. p. cwt. 4 
Iron, in bars or boUs, per ton. .20 I 



Saltpetre, in bags, per cwt. .... 2 

. --m casks, per cwt.... 2J 

Salt, in bags or bulk, per bushel 1 

Shot, in casks, per ton 37 

Soap, in boxes of 50 to 60Ibs ... 2 
Steel, in bars or bundles, per ton 30 

in boxes or tubs, per ton. 40 

Sugar, raw,in bags or bxs. p cwt. 2 

do in casks, per cwt . . . 2^ 

refined, in csks. or pack. 3 



Tallow, in casks or seroons, cwt. 2 
Tea, bohea, in whole chests ... 15 

do. in hall chests 8 

green or black, in qr. chests 4J 

in bxs. in proportion to qr. ch. 

Tin, block, per ton 20 

in bxs of usual size, p. box I§ 

Tobacco, in hhds per hhd 37| 

— inbalesorserons.p.cwt. 4 

manuf in kegs of lOOlbs. 2 



Wines, see Liquois. 

WoodT3, for dying, under cover,t. 50 

do. in yards 25 

Whiting, in hhds. per tan 37^ 



QUANTITIES OF GOODS THAT KQUaL A TOi*. 1201 



On articles on which the rate is fixed by weight, it is. 
understood tob3 on the gross weight, and on liquors, oil, 
&c. on which the rate refers to gallons, it is understood 
to be on the whole capacity of the casks, whether full or 
not. The proprietor of goods to be at the expense of 
jjutting them in store, stowing away, and turning out of 
store. All goods taken on storage, to be subject to one 
month's storage ; if taken out within fifteen days after 
the expii'aticn of the month, to pay half a month's sto- 
rage : if after fifteen days, a whole month's storage. 



QUANTITIES OF GOODS THAT EQUAL A TON. 

(As established by the New-York Chamber of Commerce.) 

Resolved — That when vessels are freighted by the ton, 
and no special agreement is made between the owner of 
the vessel and freighter of the goods, respecting the pro- 
portion of tonnage which each particular article shall be 
computed at, the following regulations shall be the 
standard of computation : 

That the articles, the bulk of which shall compose a 
ton, to equal a ton of the heavy materials, shall be in 
weight as follows : 

1,568 lbs. of coffee in casks, 1,830 lbs. of coffee in bags. 

1,120 lbs. of cocoa in casks, 1,307 lbs. of cocoa in bags. 

952 lbs. pimenta in casks, 1,110 lbs. pimenta in bags. 

Eight barrels of flour, 1 cwt. 3 qr. each. 

Six barrels of beef, pork, tallow, pickled fish, pitch, 
tar, and turpentine. 

Twenty cwt. of pig and bar iron, pot ashes, sugar, 
logwood, fustic, Nicaragua wood, and all heavy dye 
woods, rice, honey, copper ore, and all other heav)' goods. 

Sixteen cwt. of coffee, cocoa, and dried cod fish in 
bulk, and 12 cwt. of dried cod fish in casks of any size. 

Six hundred weight of ship bread, in casks; seven 
cwt. of ship bread in bags, and ei^ht cwt. in bulk. 

Two hundred gallons (wine measure) reckoning the 
full contents of the cask, of oil, wine, brandy, or any 
kind of liquors. 

Twenty-two bushels of grain, peas, or beans, in casks ; 
S6 bushels of ditto in bulk. 



202 



TARES ALLOWED EY CUSTOM; 



Thirty-six bushels of European *; 't. 

Thirty-one bushels of salt from West Indies. 

Twenty-nine bushels of sea coal. 

Fort}- feet (cubic measure) of mahogany, square tim- 
ber, oakplank, pine, and otherboards, beaver, furs, peltry, 
bees-Avax, cotton, avooI, and bale goods, of all kinds. 

One hhd. tobacco, and 10 cwt. dried nides. 

Eight cwt. of China raw silk, ten cwt. net b hea tea, 
and eight cwt. green teas. 



TARES AliLOWED BY CUSTOM. 



Alum, in bags 5 lbs. 

in casks 10 p.c. 

Almonds, in cases ... 8 p.c. 

in bales 8 lbs. 

doublebales 16 lbs, 

in bags.... 4 

Cheese, in csks or tubs 15 

Cocoa, in seroons 8 

Copperas, in casks ... 10 
Cassia, in boxes . . actual 

in mats 6 

Cinnamon, in bxs. actiial 

in bales ... 6 

Cloves, in casks 12 

in bags 4 

Currants, in casks ... 12 

in boxes. ... 10 

Figs, in boxes 10 

in mats or frails 4 

in drums 8 

in casks 12 

Glue, in casks 20 

in boxes ,15 

Hemp, in bales 5 

Indigo, in cases 15 

Lead(whiteinoil)kegs 8 
Do. do. if the kegs are 

packed in hhds. 100 
lbs. extra is allowed 
, for the hogshead. 



Lead ,( white dry) in cks. 61bs . 

(red dry) in casks 5 

(red in oil) do. 10 

Lead in casks 3 

Nails, in bags 3 

Nutmegs, in casks ... 12 
Nutmegs, in bags. . . . 4p.c. 
Ochre,(in oil) in casks 12 

(dry) do.... 10 

Powder, Gun, in quar. 

casks 5 lbs. 

half cks. 9 

whole do. 23 

Plums, in boxes 8p.c; 

Prunes, in boxes .... 8 
Paris White, in casks 10 

Raisins, in jars 18 lbs. 

^ in boxes .... 15p.c. 

in casks . . . . 12 

in frails 4 

in drums .... 10 

Rice 10 

Snuff, in boxes- 15 

Sugar Candy, in tubs. 15 

Sugar in loaves l^lbs. 

Steel. .. .per bundle. . 3 
Sumac, no lart. : sometimes. 

1 lb. per bag is allowed. 
Sheet Iron, in casks. . 15p.c. 
Steelj in cases and cks. 8 



FEES OF THE CITY GUAGERS. 



203 



■Spikes, in casks 8p.c. 

in bags 3 

Tallow, in bales 8 

in casks 12 

in seroons ... 8 

' in tubs 15 



Twine, in boxes 15p.c. 

in casks 12 

in bales 3 

Tobacco, in boxes ... 15 

Wire, in casks 8 

Whiting, in casks .... 10 



Actual tare is allowed on fruit, if required. 



TARES ALiL-OWED BY E.AW. 



On'Candles, in boxes 8p.c. 
Cheese, in hampers or 

baskets 10 

Do. in boxes 20 

Chocolate, in boxes. . . 10 

Coffee, in bags 2 

in bales 2 

in casks IS. 

Cocoa, in bags 1 

in casks 4 

Cotton, in bales 1 



m-fieroons 



6 
10 

8 
3 



Indigo, in seroons. 
Nails, in casks . . . 
Pimento, in bags . 

Pepper, in bags 2 

Sugar, other than loaf 

sugar, in casks 12 

Sugar, in boxes 15 

The above to include ropes, canvass, and other cover- 
ings. On all other boxes of teas, according to the in- 
voice or actual weight thereof. 



Sugar, in matsorbags Sp.c^. 

Salts, Glauber 8 

Sugar Ca ndy, in boxes 10 

Soap, in boxes 10 

Shot, in casks 3 

Every whole chest of 

BoheaTea.,, 70 

half 36 

quarter 20 

Every chest of Hyson 

or other Green Tea, 

of 701bs. or upwards 20 
Every box of other Tea, 

between 50 & 70 lbs. .18 
Evervbox t)f other Tea, 

if 80 lbs 20 

Do. do. if from 80 lbs. 

and upwards. . * ... 22 



PEES OF THE CITY GUAGERS. 

For guaging and ullaging each standing cask. .50 cents. 

Ullaging : 12| 

Guaging each lying cask I2t 

Guaging each quarter cask 8 

Barrels or half barrels, each 8 

Ullaging barrels or half barrels, each 4 

One half to be paid by the buyer, and the other half by 
the seller ; employer first liable. 



2()t 



PAWNBROKERS. 



AUCTIONEERS. 

APPOINTED BY THE GOV^ERN'OR AND SENATE, 1837. 
NEW-YORK .\UCTIONEERS. 



David Austen, 
Lawrence Ackerman, 
Anthony W. Bleecker, 
James Bleecker, 
Thomas Bell, 
William J. Bartow, 
Edward L. Brinley, 
Joseph W. Corlies, 
Jesse Cadv, 
Jacob D. Clute, 
John P. Dieterich, 
Joseph Daymen, 
Isaac T. Doughty, 
Charles Del Vechio, 
William H. Hicks, 
Joseph W. Haven, 
William C. Haggert}', 

Richard C. Halsey, 

Sidney P. Ingraham, 

Ebenezer Irving, 

Edgar Jenkins, 

Aaron Levy, 

Richard Lawrence, 

Gilbert Lewis, 

Abraham Le Foy, 

Paul B. Lloyd, 

Edward H. Ludlow, 



Wm. W. M'Cartv, 
W. M'Laughlin,' 
George M Kay Morill, 
Samuel Maverick, 
Alb2rt Mann, 
Benjamin Mooney, 
Cornelius W. Oakley, 
Lawrence Power, 
Charles A. Palmer, 
Robert M. Penoyer, 
Miles Parker, 
Edmund J. Porter, 
John Rudderow, 
James C. Smith, 
Daniel Sparks, 
John Sniffer, 
Henry L. Shieffelin, 
Knowland H. Simpson, 
William Timpson, 
Henry A. Tallman, 
William Van Norden, 
Richard Van Dyck, jr, 
Charles Vicat, 
Moses Ward, 
John R. Wheeler, 
Charles N. Yeoman. 



GROCERIES AND TAVERNS. 

Two thousand eight hundred and sixty-two Grocery 
and Tavern Licenses were issued in 1836, who pay, 
when licensed, yearly, SIO. 



PAWNBROKERS. 

The principal Pawnbrokers are located in Chatham- 
street, and its vicinity. The number of licenses issued in. 
1836 was, 11 for Pawnbrokers, and 55 for dealers in »e- 



COACHES AMD CARR1A6ES. 605 

cond-hand articles. Pawnbrokers pay, when licensed, 
yearly, S'50, and dealers in second-hand articles pay, 
when licensed, yearly, ^25. 



JUKK SHOPS. 



There are 41 licensed Junk Shops, for the purchase of 
old rope, iron, &c., who pay annually, when licensed, 
$20 each. 



COACHES AND CARRIAGES. 

The number of Hackney Coach licenses in 1836, wa.s 
212, who pay $5,00, when licensed, yearly. Drivers SI, 
when licensed, yearly. 

RATES OF CHARGING. 

Title III. Sec. 1. The prices of rates of fare to be 
taken by or paid to the owners or drivers of hackney 
coaches or carriages, shall be as follows, to wit : 

1. For conveying a passenger any distance not ex- 
ceeding one mile, thirty-seven and a half cents ; and for 
every additional passenger, twenty-five cents. 

2. For conveying a passenger any distance exceeding 
a mile, and within two miles, fifty cents ; and for every 
additional passenger, twenty- five cents. 

3. For conveying a passenger to the New Alms 
House, and returning, seventy-five cents; and for every 
additional passenger, and returning, thirty-seven and a 
half cents. 

4. For conveying one passenger to Fortieth-street, 
and remaining half an hour, and returning, one dollar ; 
and for every additional passenger, twenty-five cents. 

5. For conveying one passenger to Sixty-first-street, 
and remaining three-quarters of an hour, and returning, 
one dollar and fifty cents ; and for every additional pas- 
senger, thirty-seven and a half cents. 

6. For conveying one passenger to Eighty-sixth-street, 
and remaining one hour, and returning two dollars ; and 
for every additional passenger, fifty cents. 



206 COACHES AND CARRIAGES. 

7. For conveying one or more passengers to Harlaem, 
and returning, with the privilege of remaining three hours, 
four dollars. 

8. For conveying one or more passengers to Kings- 
bridge, and returning, with the privilege of keeping the 
carriage all day, five dollars. 

9. For the use of a hackney coach or carriage by the 
day, with one or more passengers, five dollars. 

10. For the use of a hackney coach or carriage by the 
hour, with one or more passengers, with the privilege of 
going from place to place, and of stopping as often as 
may be required, as follows, viz. : for the first hour one 
dollar, for the second hour seventy-fi:ve cents, and for 
every succeeding hour fifty cents. 

11. In all cases v:here the hiring of a hackney coach or 
carriage is not at the time thereof specified to be by the day 
or hour, it shall be deemed to be by the mils. 

12. For children b3tween two and fourteen years of 
age, half-price is only to be charged; and for children 
under two years of age no charge is to be made. 

13. Whenever a hackney coach or carriage shall be 
detained, excepting as aforesaid, the owner or driver 
shall be allowed after the rate of seventy-five cents for an 
hour, thirty-seven and a half cents for each and every 
subsequent hour, and so in proportion for any part of the 
first and subsequent hour which the same may be sc 
detained. 

14. For attending a funeral within the lamp and watch 
district, two dollars; and to the Potter's Field, three dol- 
lars, which charges shall include for the necessary deten- 
tion and returning with passengers. 

Sec. 2 In case of disagreement as to distance or price, 
the same shall be determined by the Mayor or Superin- 
tendent of hackney coaches and carriages. 

Sec. 3. The owner of any hackney coach or carriage 
shall not demand or receive any pay for the conveyance 
of any passenger, unless the number of the carriage and 
the rates and prices of fare shall be fixed and placed in 
the manner hereinafter directed by section second of title' 
fourth of this Law, at the time such passenger may be 
conveyed in such carriage. 

Sec. 4. The owner or driver of any hackney coach or 
carriage shall not be entitled to recover or receive any 



COACHES AND CARRIAGES. 



207 



pay from any person, from whom he shall have de- 
manded any greater price or rates than he may be autho- 
rized to receive as£foresaid. 

Sec. 5 Upon the trial of any cause commenced for the 
recovery of any of the aforesaid prices or rates, it shall 
be incumbent upon the plaintiff or plaintiffs, in such 
action, to prove that the number and prices of rates were 
placed and fixed in pursuance of the provisions of this 
law, at the time the services were rendered for Avhich the 
suit may bs brought. 

Sec. 6. No owner or driver of any hackney coach or 
carriage in the city of New- York, shall ask, "demand, or 
receive any larger sum than he or they may be entitled to 
receive as aforesaid, under the penalty of ten dollars for 
jevery such offence. 

Title IV. Sec. 5. No owner or driver of any hack- 
ney coach or carriage, whilst waiting for employment at 
any place other than the house or stable of the owner 
thereof, shall refuse or neglect to convey any person or 
persons, to any place or places on the Island of New- 
York, upon being applied to for that purpose, and on being 
tendered the fare for the same, under a penalty often 
dollars for every such refusal or neglect. 

Title XIII. — Miscellaneous provisions of a general nature. 

Sec. 2. Every driver or owner of a hackney coach or 
carriage shall carry, transport, and convey in and upon 
his coach or carriage, in addition to the person or per- 
sons therein, one trunk, valise, saddlebag, or carpet bag, 
portmanteau, box, bundle, basket, or other articles used 
in travelling, if he be required so to do, without charge 
or compensation therefor; but for every trunk or other 
such article as above-named, more than one, he shall be 
entitled to demand and receive the sum of six cents, if 
conveyed within the distance of one mile, and if more 
than a mile, the sum of twelve and a half cents. 

Sec. 6. Every ov.'ner, driver or person, having charge of 
an)^ hackney coach, carriage, or accommodation coach, 
or stage, shall, upon being requested so to do, give to any 
person or persons the number of his coach or stage, the 
name of the owner thereof, and his place of abode, the 
Jianje of the driver thereof, and his place of abode ; and 



203 CITY STAUK3. 



ill default thereof, shall forfeit and pay the sum of ten 
dollars, to bs sued for and lecovered from the owner or 
driver of such coach or stage, severally and respectively. 

Passed by the Board of Assistants, June 3, 1833. 

Passed by the Board of Aldermen, June 10, 1833. 
HACKNEY COACH STANDS. 

1. On the South side of the Park. 

2. In Broadway, near Wall-street. 

3. In Broadway, around the Bowling-green. 

4. In Pearl-street, at Hanover-square. 

5. In Hudson-street, along St. John's Park. 

6. In Hudson-street, near Duane. 

7. In Chatham-square. 

8. On the North side of Canal-street, East of Broadway. 
Also, near the different Steamboat Landings, foot of 

Canal-street, Reade-street, Murray-street, Barclay-street, 
Cortlandt-street, Washington-street, near the Battery, 
Whitehall-street, Maiden-lane, Beekman-street, Catha- 
rine-street, and Grand-street, East River. 

CITY STAGES. 

The following Stages run constantly every day, (Sun- 
days excepted,) from Wall-street : 

36 Broadway Stages, to Bleeckerand 14th-streets. 

Thirty-two Greenwich Stages, to Fourteenth-street, 
near the North River. 

•24 Dry Dock Stages to the Dry Dock East River. 

Eighteen Bowery Stages, to Fourteenth-street. 

Fare, generally, 12i cents. 

Several, in addition to the above, run several times a 
day, each, from the corner of the Bowery and Bayard- 
street, for — 

Harlaem, seven and a half miles — Fare 25 cents. 

Manhattanvi He, eight miles '' 25 " 

Yorkville, five miles " 18J 

Total number of licensed Stages 108, which pay for a 
Stage drawn by four horses, $'20, and for two horses, SIO 
each, when licensed, annually. 

CAliTMEW. 

The number ofeartmen licensed in 183fi, was twenty- 
nine hundred, who pay ^'-,50 when licensed ; aad 50 
©eni« yearly, whea renewed. 



CARTAGE. 



zm 



RATES 

A Law passed in 1836, 
to the following rates : 

Ale or beer, per hogshead 

from 60 to 90 gallons,. . . . ^0 
Alum or copperas, per 

hhd. from 12 to 15 cwt.. . . 
or copperas, per hhd. 

over one ton weight, .... 
Bread, every 4 tierces,. . . . 

Bricks, per "load, 

, per load, handled and 

piled, 

Boards, plank and scantling 

or other timber, per load, 
Beef or pork, per 5 barrels, 
Cables, half shot, from 5 to 

7 inches in circunifer.,. . 
, whole shot, from 5 to 

7 inches in circumfer.,. . 
, half shot, from 7 to 10 

inches in circumference, 
,whote shot,from 7 to 10 

inches in circumference 1 
, v;hoIe shot, of 10, and 

not over 12 in. in cir. ... 1 
, whole shot, of 12, and 

not over 14 in. in cir 2 

• , half shot, of the 2 last 

preceding dimensions.. . 1 
, half shot, of 14, and 

not over 15 in. in cir.. . . 1 
, whole shot, of 14, and 

not over 1.5 in. in cir.,. . . 3 
, half shot, of above 15 

inches in circumference, 2 
, whole shot, of above 

15 in. in circumference,. 4 
Calves,sheep, lambs, per Id 
Cider,cheese, cocoa, per Id 
Clay or sand, per 12 bush., 
Coal, per i chald. or Mon,. 
Coffee, in bags or barrels, 
Coffee, per hogshead, over 

1000 weight 

Cordage, small, per load,. . 

Cotton, per 3 bales, 

Dye wood, per load, 

Eai'thenware, loose, per Id. 
European goods, per load, 

Firewood, per load, 

Fish, dried, loose, per load. 
Flaxseed, per 3 tierces, . . . 
Flour, per 7 bbls. or 12 bgs 



OF CARTAGE. 

allows one-quarter to be added 



Furniture, household, and 

25 liousing, per load, 75 

Gammons or haras, per Id. 25 
31 Hay, in bales, bundles, or 

trusses, per load, 31 

56 Hay, loose, per load. 75 

25 Heading or staves, per load 25 

25 Hemp, in bales or bundles, 31 

Hemp, loose, per 12 cwt. . . 50 

31 Hides, per £0, 31 

Hoops in bundles, per load, 25 

25 Hoop poles, per load, 31 

25 Iron, hollow ware, per load 31 

Iron, bar, per load, 31 

31 Molassfc s, per hhd., from 60 

to 90 gallons, 31 

62 Molasses, per hhd., from 90 

to 140 gallons, ..' 44 

75 O 1, per 3 barrels, 25 

Oysters, oy.ster-shells, or 

50 pantiles, per load. 31 

Paints or whiting, per hogs- 

75 head from 12 to 15 cwt. , . 31 

Paints or whiling,over 1 ton 56 
50 Paints.whiting, or pimento, 

per load, 25 

25 Plaster of Paris, per ton,.. 50 

Pot Ash, per 3 barrels,.. .. 25 

50 Rum, per hogshead, 37 

Salt, every 20 bushels, 25 

00 Shingles, in bundles, per Id 25 

,cypress,22in. per2000 37 

00 Stone, paving or building, 25 

, cut, per load, 31 

00 Sugar. Havana, per 3 boxes 31 

31 , perhhd. fr.9tol5cwt. 31 

25 , per hhd. over ton wt., 56 

25 Tar, pitch, or turpentine, 

31 per 5 barrels, 25 

25 Tea. per load, 31 

Tilesor slates, per load,... 31 

31 Tobacco, per hogshead,. . . 31 

25 , per hhd. over ton Avt., 56 

25 Wheat, or other grain, .. .. 25 

25 Wine, gin, or brandy, per 

31 pipe.over 100 gallons,.. . 37 

25 , per 4 quarter casks, . 37 

25 And for each load of goods, 
31 wares, merchandise, or 
25 other things, not above 

25 enumerated, 25 

18* 



tia PUBLIC PORTliRs' rBB3. 



Sect. 2. In all cases where the distance exceeds half a 
mile, and does not exceed two miles, the cartman shall be 
entitled to receive one-third more for every load of the 
same articles, for every additional half mile he shall cart 
or transport them. 

Sfxt. 3. If any cartman shall ask, demand, receive, 
take, exact, or extort, any greater rate or rates, price or 
prices, or compensation, for carting or transporting any 
goods, wares, merchandise, firewood, or other thing than 
is mentioned, expressed, and limited in the provisions of 
this title, he shall forfeit and pay the sum of five dollars 
for every such offence. 

Sect. 4. If any cartman shall ask or demand any greater 
rate or price than is above provided and allowed, for the 
transportation of any goods, wares, or merchandise, he 
shall not be entitled to receive any compensation for any 
such services. 

Sect. 5. No cartman shall neglect or refuse to cart, or 
employ his horse and cart, or sled, in the transportation of 
anv articles whatever, when required, unless he be then 
actually otherwise employed, or unless the distance he 
shall be required to go shall be more than four miles from 
the City Hall, under a penalty of five dollars for every 
such offence. 



PUBLIC PORTERS' FEES. 
ON A WHEEL-B-iRROW. 

Title II. Sec. 1. For any distance not exceeding half 
a mile, 12^ cents. Over half a mile, and not exceeding 
a mile, 25 cents, and in that proportion, for a greater 
distance. 

2. No public porter or hand cartman shall ask, demand, 
or receive any greater rate or price for transporting any 
article or articles than is herein allowed, under the pe- 
nalty of five dollars for every such olTence. 

ON A HAND-BARROW. 

Any distance not exceeding half a mile, 25 cents. 
Over half a mile, and not exceediniJ: a mile, 43i cents, and 
in that proportion for any greater distance. 



CHIMKBT-SWSKPKRS FKBS. 



211 



ON A HAND-CART. 

For any distance not exceeding half a mile. 18| cents. 
Over half a mile, and not exceeding a mile, 3l| cents, 
and in that proportion for any greater distance. 

TiTLK III. Sec. 1. No public porter shall neglect or 
refuse to transport any article, when required so to do, 
unless he shall then be actuallly otherwise employed, or 
unless the distance he shall be required to go shall be 
more than two miles, under the penalty of five dollars for 
each often ce. 

The number of porters licensed in 1835, was 160, who 
pay, when licensed, SI, when renewed, yearly, 121^ cents. 

Complaints for a violation of the above laws, are usually 
made at the Police Othce — New Citv Hall. 



DISTANCES FROM THE CITY HAIiL. 

TO DIFFERENT POINTS IN THE CITY, &C. 
Fr 



From the City Hall, ^iles. 

To the Battery, south end 1 

" north do. | 

TothefootofConlandt-st. i 

" Barclay-st. I 

" Chambers-st. a 

Canal-st. 1 

To the Old State Prison 

Dock U 

To Fort Gansevoort . 2 
To the Prot. Epis. Theolo. 

Sera 2i 

To the House of Refuge 2\ 
To Bellevue .... 2a 



To 
To 
To 
To 
To 



To 
To 
To 
To 



om the City Hall, 
the Dry Dock . . 
Corlear's Hook 
Catharine-st. Ferry 
Fulton-st. Ferry . 
Brooklyn, foot of 
Fulton-st. . . . 
foot of Atlantic-st 
City Hall . . . 
U. S. Navy Yard . 
Williamsburgh 
.Jersey City . . . 
Hoboken , . . 



Miles. 
, 2 



n 

s 
1 

2 
2 

2 



CHIMNEY-SV*'EEPERS' FEES. 

Every chimney, from the upper floor of any house, 
12^ cents. Next floor below, 15 cents. Next below, 18 
cents. Next beloAv, 21 cents. Next below, 28 cents. 
Next below, 37^ cents. Where a Franklin, Stove, Coal 
Grate, or Jack are used in any fire place, 12V cents extra. 

In 1836, forty Master Chimney SAveeps were licensed, 
with a average of two boys to each, besides one Gene- 
ral Patentee for Patent Sweepers, who pay $3 each, when 
licensed. 



213 



CENSUS. 



CENSUS. 
CITY OF NEW-YORK FOR 1835. 



Wards. 



First 

Second .. .. 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh. . . . 

Eighth 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh*. . 
Twelfth! . . . 
Thirteenth . 
Fourteenth. 
Fifieenih.. , 



Total. 



Males 


Female. 


5655 


4725 


4375 


3174 


542'2 


540i 


8071 


676S 


S403 


1009-- 


8230 


858.' 


10.080 


11,401 


12,968 


15,60-: 


i839 


10,72 


10,040 


lO.SSi 


12,8i35 


13.'JS( 


13,128 


11.30! 


8076 


905- 


3130 


9171 


5683 


751i 


131,624 


138,465 



Total. 



10.380 
7549 
10,8'^i 
15.439 
18.495 
16.827 
21,481 
23.570' 
■20,618' 
20,926 
•26.845 
24437 
17,1.30 
17.306 
13,202 



Subject) Enti- 



10 lUll. 

duty. 



15671 

o75j 
12941 
298(;i 
1379! 
17621 
1720; 
2386 

860' 
1839i 
2589 

861 
1689 
1-327, 

824 



;tledto 
vote. 

'2208 

1477 

2211 

3159 

2813 

2216 

3511 

4245 

3122 

3684 

4137, 

3288 

'2606 

2444' 

1970 1 



Male 
Alien. 

1263 
811 
1067 
2133 
2570 
2026 
2191 
1669 
1339 
1'246 
2585 
3713 
1921 
1469 
10G6 



270,089J 23,658 43,0911 14,977 

Of which there are in the city, — 

Unmarried Females imder the age of 16, . . 46,503 

Unmarried Females between the^ages of 16 and 45, 35!697 

Personsof colour entitled to vote, . . .68 

152 

14,972 

1799 

175 

105 

64 



Persons of colour taxed, 
Persons of colour not taxed, 
Paupers, .... 
Deaf and Dumb, 
Blind, .... 
Idiots and Lunatics, 
yumber of Inhabitants in the different Wards in 1830-5. 



Wards. 18.30 183-5. 

First, 11,331 10,380 

Second, ... 8,203 7.549 

Third, .... 9,599 10,884 

Fourth.... 12,705 15,439 

Fifth, 17,722 18,495 

Sixth, 13,570 16,827 

Seventh, .. 15,873 21,481 

Eighth,.... 20,729 28,570 Total,. 202,589 270,089 

Ninth, .... 22,810^ 20,618 

Mncluding the Seventeenth Ward, tincluding the Sixteenth Ward 
\ Including the Fifteenth Ward, formed in 1831. 
^ Including the Seventeenth Ward, formed in 1837. 
H Including the Sixteenth Ward, formed in 1836, 



Wards, 1830. 

Tenth, ,... 16,438 
Eleventh ,§ . 14,915 
Twelfth, II . 11,808 
Thirteenth, 12,598 
Fourteenth, 14,288 
Fifteenth, . . 



1S35. 

20,926 
26.045 
24/137 
17,130 
17,306 
13,202 



BILL OF MORTALITY. 



@13 



CENSUS— OF BROOKLYN LN 1830-35. 



Wards. 1S30. 1835. 

First, 145-2 1529 

Second, 2801 4614 

Third, 2191 2u60 

Fourth, .... 3557 5664 

Fifth, 2301 4510 



Wards. 
Sixth, ■^ . 
Seventh, ! • 
Eighth, f. 
Ninth, J . 



1830. 



2993 



Increase in 5 years, 9015. 



1835. 

2132 

2052 
493 
6^6 



15,295 24,310 



Bllili OF MOKTALiITY. 

We have been favoured with a sight of the City In- 
spector's report of deaths, &c. for the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1836, from which ^ve have made the following 
extracts. The total number of deaths is 8,009. 







G 


rd 


?4 


's-i 






>. 


3 


&i 


o o 








*-> 


fe 


S 


< 


S 


f3 




< 


m 


O 


^ 


Q 


Men . . . 




126 
124 


145 
110 


135 
117 


154 
116 


148 
109 


138 
115 


155 

106 


166 
118 


150 
132 


174 

150 


157 
141 


174 


Women 


^ , 


130 


Boys. . 




177 


161 


188 


182 


162 


182 


235 


313 


281 240 


206 


203 


Girls . 




150 


126 


152 


157j 


125 


144 


201 


297 


244 202 


151 


200 






577 


542 


592 


609 


544 


579 


697 


894 


807 766 


655 


707 


Ages 




— 







— 















— 





1 & under 


159 


186 


178 


150 


102 


165 


242 


325 


243 235 


160 


197 


1 " 


2 


61 


57 


59 


62 


85 


42 


92 


161 


161 88 


73 


73 


2 " 


5 


62 


52 


67 


71 


57 


65 


59 


79 


83 68 


90 


88 


5 " 


10 


24 


27 


22 


28 


27 


29 


27 


24 


21 34 


24 


28 


10 " 


20 


25 


24 


23 


21 


30 


26 


22 


17 


32 


33 


23 


25 


20 " 


30 


64 


70 


68 


92 


77 


72 


80 


87 


64 


82 


77 


94 


30 " 


40 


68 


77 


65 


78 69 


69 


86 


85 


86 


86 


91 


85 


40 '' 


50 


45 


33 


45 


39 


47 


47 


37 


43 


57 


60 


47 


51 


50 '= 


60 


1 24 


27 


29 


28 


21 


20 


119 


24 


25 


38 


30 


24 


60 " 


70| 25 


22 


13 


21 


14 


20 


66 


26 


17 


16 


19 


24 


70 " 


80 13 10 


15 


11 


11 


14 


9 


12 


13 


17 


10 


13 


80 " 


90 6 4 


7 


7 


4 


8 


8 


8 


3 


7 


8 


5 


90 " 


100 11 3 


-1 


1 




2 




1 


2 


2 


3 








57' 


'!54'; 


59-2 


609 


bii 


579 


697 


894 


807 


766 


655 


\l&l 



i>14 



BILL OF MOriTALITT. 



DisrcASES. — Abscesses, 13: apoplexv, 99; asthma, 11; 
bleeding frcm the lungs, 11: do. from the stomach, 4; 
do. nose, 1; burned, 40; cancer. 9 ; casualty, 14; cho- 
lera morbus, 24; do. int'anium, '298; conjestion of the 
brain, 1; childbed, 28; cholic, 3; consumption, 1,514; 
convulsions, 776; cramp in the stomach, 5; croup, 177; 
death sudden, 6: do. from poison. 3 ; debility, 98; deli- 
rium tremens, 67; diables, 1 ;j diarrhoea. 73V drinking 
cold water, 7; drops3% 154; do. of the head, 288; do. of 
the chest, 30; drowned, 90 : dysentery, 116; erysipelas, 
19 ; fever, 90; do. bilious, 56 ;" do. remittent, 26; do. in- 
flammatory, 5 ; do; puerperal, 45; do, scarlet, 202; do. 
typhus, 117; do. remittent, 23 ; fracture, 6; frozen, 2; 
gout, 6; gravel,!; hydrophobia, 3; indigestion, 8; in- 
flammation, 2; do. of the bladder, 2; do. of the brain, 
159; do. of the bowels, 263; do. of the chest, 331 ; do. of 
the heart, 20 ; do. of the kidneys, 1 ; do. of the liver, 82 ; 
do. of the lungs, 220; do. of the stom.ach, 13; do. of the 
throat, 21; insanity, 31; intemperance, 75 killed, 6; 
Iccked-jaw, 10; lues venerea, 33; malformation, 7; 
marasmus, 95; measles, 443; mortification, 23; old age, 
131 ; organic disease of the heart, 8 ; palsy, 45 ; rheu- 
matism, 8 ; rupture, 15; scrofula,' 19; small pox, 173; 
suicide, 33 ; still-born, 506 ; teething, 277 ; tumour, 2 ; 
unknown, 101; ulcer, 11 ; varioloid, 4; white swelling, 
3; whooping cough, 152; worms, 48; wounds, 1. — 
Total, 8,009, 

The following are the places of nativity : 

United States 5.721 | Canada 5 

Ireland , . . . 1,378 ; Sv/iizerland 6 

West Indies 11 

South America 2 

Holland 3 



England 313 

Germany . . . . , 213 

Scotland.., 99 

France 49 I Wales 7 

Sweden 17 Italv 2 

Norway 13 1 At S.-sa 3 



3pain ,... 13 

Unknown 148 

Africa , 1 



Nova Scotia 5 

Denmark 1 



i Total...... . •• 8,009 



Markets. 



ai5 



Interments Ironi public In.s'fiiutions 



Small Pix Hospital 26 

(Jity Prison 7 



Alms House 277 

Beilviie Hospital 443 

Citv Hospital 173 I 

Penilentiary, Black. Isl.. 75 \ Total : . . . ; 1,001 

I: v\'ill be seen by the above, that precisely one-ei^btb of 
the whole number of deaths were at the public institutions. 

The deaths of coloured persons amounted to 557j which 
is included in the 8^009. 

The total numberof deaths in 1836, was 8,009; in 1835 
7,082—927. 

In 1835 the deaths, according to the population, was 
one out of every thirty-eight, and in 1836, one out of 
every thirty-four. 

MARKETS. 



Name and Location. 



Valuation. 



Fulton Market, between Fulton 

and Beekman streets, East River 
Washihgion, bsiween Fulton and 

Vesey" streets. North River 

Catharine, Catharine-street, East 

River : . . 

Clinton , between Canal and Spring 

streets, North River I 

Greenwich, Christopher-street,! 

North River 1 

Centre, Grand, and Oransre-streetsj 
Franklin, Old Slip, Eist River - - j 
Essex, Grand, and Ludlow-streetsj 
Grand, Grand, and Mangin-si reels 
Gouverneur, Grand, and Gouver- 

neur streets • 

Tompkins, Boweiy, and Third 

Avenue 

Manhattan, between Rivington 

and Stanton streets. East River. 
Jefferson, junction Greenwich- 
Lane and Sixth Avenue 

Union, Second -street, Junction of 

Houston . . . i 



Revenue, 1836. 



$200,000 


S18,404 86 


130,C00 


11,189 83 


5,000 


3,433 58 


80,000 


3,003 94 


4,000 

10,000 

6,000 

75,000 

17,000 


340 40 
2,570 75 

276 1^ 
1,310 78 

m 47 


350 


176 55 


25,000 


320 aa 


30,000 


33 00 


38,000 


m 14 


3,000 


343 31 



seal .350 !S42,228 29 



216 NBw-roRK crry risxsczs. 



NEW^-YORK CITY FINANCES. 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

Balance in the Treasury on 1st Jan., 1836, S 192 93 

Receipts during the year, including the 
amount assumed in anticipation of taxes, 2,658,761 84 

Amount paid Mechanics'Bank, 
due 3Ist Dec, 1835, 139,978 53 

Warrants drawn on the Trea- 
sury, 2,518,087 76-2,658,066 29 



Balance in Treasury, 1st Jan., 1837, $ 888 48 

Commissioners of the Sinking Fund had to 
their credit, 1st January, 1836, 169,850 18 

Receipts in the Treasury, usual 
accounts, 78,605 57 

Receipts on account of Fire Loan, 13,755 29— 92,360 86 



262,211 04 

Commissioners of the Sinking 
Fund subscribed to the Fire 
Loan Stock, 160,742 38 

To the Building Loan Stock,. . . 15,000 00—175,742 38 



Balance in the Treasury, $86,468 66 

CITY DEBT. 

On five per cent stock of 1820, S200,000 00 

Less the amount held by the 
Commissioners of the Sink- 
ing Fund, 88,200 00—111,800 00 

On five per cent, stock of 1829, 300,000 00 

Less amount held by the Com- 
missioners of Sinking Fund, 3,000 00—297,000 00 

Due the City Aqueduct Account, 881,759 33 

Due Mechanics' Bank, 200,000 00 

On five per cent. Public Building Stock, 40,000 00 

Deduct therefrom the amount of 
funds in the Treasury, to the 
credit of the Commissioners 
of the Sinking Fund, 86,468 Q6 



NEW-YORK CITY FINANCES; 217 

Fire Loan Stock, subscribed by 

Commissioners, 146,987 09 

Building Loan Stock, 15,000 00—248,455 75 

^1 282 103 58 
Debt on 31st December, 1835, 902,534 63 

Balance, $379,568 96 

The sum due the Mechanics' Bank AVas 
loaned in anticipation of the taxes now 
due, and will be paid in the month of Feb- 
ruary, and is not therefore properly a 
city debt, 200,000 00 

Actual increase of debt, . $179,568 96 

The Water Loan is not taken into this account for these 

reasons : 

1st. The city is charged in the above ac- 
count with the sum due the City Aqueduct 
Account, $8Sifl5d 33 

2d. There is due the Water Loan, secured 
by stock, 150^000 00 



$1,031,759 33 
Making $31,759 33 more than th^ amount of the stock 
issued. 

Although the City Debt has increased forthe last year, 
it can be accounted for in a satisfactory manner. 

There has been paid for real estate, $6,847 70 

For building the House of Detention, 193,729 42 

For Lumber Dock, 51,000 00 

The two last sums were not provided for in the 
taxes of 1836, but were expended in antici- 
pation of the Building Loan, of which 
$40,000 was subscribed. 
*rhe account for opening and widening streets 

is in advance of the Treasury, S6,940 00 

The assessments, where time has been given 
to pay, and when the Treasury had to ad- 
vance to the contractors, 24,000 00 

$362,517 13 
19 



218 NEW-YORK CITY FINANCES, 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance in the Treasury, 1st Jan. 1836, .... $ 192 93 

Alms House, 27,075 95 

Bonds payable 200,000 00 

Building Loan, 40,0(X) 00 

Commutation of Alien Passengers, 37,338 25 

Courts, 3,332 49 

Cleaning Streets, • • 41,83b 68 

City Aqueduct, interest, 27,489 44 

County Contingencies, fire in Wall-street,. . 3,884 22 

Charges on arrears of assessments, 772 52 

Cleaning Docks and Slips, 929 15 

Docks and Slips, •• 788 27 

Fire Department, 2,834 75 

Fencing Lois, 58 54 

Interest 9,588 86 

Intestate Estates, 10,938 39 

Justices' Courts, 9,079 36 

Life and Trust Company, 387,550 00 

Liens on Lots, J ,183 63 

Mayoralty Fees, 3,030 12 

Police, . 7,102 66 

Penalties, 260 24 

Mechanics' Bank, 80,000 00 

Rents, Water Lot, S 4,229 60 

Ground, 26,624 56 

House, 3,«83 75 

Common Land, ^^97 50 

Ferry, 11,683 76 

Dock and Slips, 48,847 50 

96,166 67 

Essex Market, house rent, 455 00 

Salaries returned, 84 94 

Streets, opening, 645,273 02 

Streets, paving, 103,733 04 

Tompkin's Square, opening, 2,264 60 

Tavern and Excise Licenses, 29,579 00 

Taxes for 1835, $730,582 43 

1836, 76,000 00 

Interest, 2,740 15 

Arrears, 57,153 82 

Commutation , 125 11 

866,601" 51 



NEW-YORK CITY FINANCES. 219 

^ .. . . — » 

Vendue sales, 10,000 01 

Wells and Pumps, 3,490 55 

Error in return of Collector of City Reve- 
nue, over paid, 40 00 

$2,658,954 77 

EXPENDITURES. 

By Alms House, S205,506 88 

Board of Health, 9,099 65 

Building Loans, 63 00 

City Aqueduct, interest, 50,096 00 

County Contingencies, S36,748 10 

Census for 1835, 184 85 

Fire in Wall-street,. . . 5,273 36 

42,206 31 

Commutation of Alien Passengers, 685 00 

Courts, 34,738 92 

Coroner's Fees, 4,225 43 

Charities, 5,589 75 

Charges on arrears of Assessments, 457 98 

Cleaning Streets, 179,485 72 

Cleaning Docks and Slips, 12,273 61 

Docks and Slips, 103,605 18 

Lumber Dock, 39,010 00 

Elections, 7,400 19 

Fire Loan, 948 43 

Fire Department, 59,973 61 

Fencing Lots, 1,057 72 

Hall of Justice and House of Detention,... 154,645 50 

House of Detention, at Harlaem, 9,213 00 

House of Refuge, 4,000 00 

Interest, 28,004 05 

Intestate Estates, 1,863 14 

Iron Railing round Union Place, &c 19,054 18 

Iron Railing round City Hall, 2,372 47 

Justices' Courts, 14,625 44 

Lands and Places, 6,165 57 

Lamps, 88,276 02 

Mechanics' Bank, 139,978 53 

Markets, $47,921 71 

Essex Market, 1,850 00 

Centre Market, 22 00 

49,793 71 



220 NEW-YORK CITY FINANCES. 

Mayoralty Fees, 270 75 

Public Schools, 88,287 87 

Public Reservoir, 3.539 21 

Police, 25,606 99 

Penalties, 1,693 59 

Printing and Stationary, 22,743 98 

Roads, 39,927 30 

Repairs and Supplies, 18,521 71 

Real Estate, $3,874 70 

Lot on Third-street, 88 22 

Post Office, (addition,) . . 3,545 00 

7,507 92 

Salaries, 49,322 78 

Streets, opening, 682,859 18 

Streets, paving, 122,596 82 

Street expenses, 24,467 96 

Third Avenue, Macadamizing, 2,000 00 

Tenth Avenue, grading, &c., 4,990 86 

Tompkins' Square, filling, &c., 1,712 13 

Taxes repaid Collector, S 100 00 

Levying, 10,601 75 

Charges on arrears, 104 06 

Arrears, 23 81 

10,829 62 

Tavern and Excise Licenses, 1,204 75 

Water Commissioners, 42,773 36 

Water Pipes, 25,100 74 

Watch, : 158,988 53 

Wells and Pumps, 7,993 12 

Water lot property, viz. 

Pike to Rutgers-street, .. S22,123 46 

23d to 28th-street, 16,000 00 

Stanton to Rivington-st., . 2,588 72 

40,712 18 

Balance to 1st Jaftuary , 1837, 888 48 

S2,658,954 77 

REAL ESTATE OCCUPIED FOR PUBLIC PURPOSES. 

Bowling Green, situated at south end of Broadway. 
Valued at S25,000. 

The Park, situated at the junction of Broadway and 
Chatham-street. Valued at $122,000. 



NEW-YOKK CiTY FINANCES. 221 



A gore of land, situated in Chatham-street. Valued 
at S-20,000. 

The forty-six lots, situated in Broadway and Chambers 
street. Valued at S344,500. 

The City Hall, situated in the Park. Valued at 
S528,634 31. 

The Debtors' Jail, situated in the Park. Valued at 
$10,000. 

The building for Public Records, situated in the Park, 
Valued at S'25,000. 

The old Almshouse and stable, situated in Chambers- 
street. Valued at $25,000 dollars. 

The Rotunda, situated in Chambers-street. Valued at 
S6,000. 

The Almshouse, Bridewell, Penitentiary, &c., situated 
at Bellevue. Valued at $420,000. 

Twenty-eight acres, belonging to the same, situated at 
Bellevue. Valued at $56,000. 

The Fever Hospital and eleven lots, situated at Belle- 
vue. Valued at 52,610 55. 

Blackwell's Island and buildings, situated at Black- 
well's Island. Valued at $70,220 25. 

Farms on Long Island, situated at Long Island. Va- 
lued at $30,000. 

Piece of land, situated in Duane-street. Valued at 
^20 000 

Randall's Island. Valued at $60,000. 

House of Detention. Valued at $230,000. 

Total value of Real Estate, occupied for public pur- 
poses, $2,044,965 11. 

REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CORPORATION OP NEW-YORK. 

Property on Long Island, 

productive . . $118,650 00 
Property on Long Island, 

unproductive , . . 150 00 

— 118,800 00 

Property in New-York, as 
follows : 
City lots, and houses under 



lease 432.500 00 

19* 



2-22 



NEW-YORK CITY FINANCES. 



Ciiy lots and common lands, 
subject to quit rents, which 
will require lor their com- 
mutation a principal of . 8,207 40 

Common lands under lease . 90,100 00 

Wharves, piers, and slips 
underlease . , .1,004,675 00 

Wharves, piers, and slips 

under lease for ferries . 83,500 00 

Public markets and grounds 621,350 00 

Public purposes , . .2,044,965 11 

Unproductive . . . 45,000 00 



4,330,.397 51 



Grand Total S4,449,197 51 

ASSESSED VALUE OF REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE IN THE CFFY 
or NEW-YORK, FOR THE YEAR 1836, 

Return of the Board of Assessors of the value of the Real 
and Personal Estate of the City of New- York. 



Wards. 



First Ward 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

Eighth 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh.. . . 
Twelfth.... 
Thirteenth 
Fourteenth. 
Fifteenth. .. 
Sixteenth . . 



Real Estate. iPersonal Estate. 



S37,471.950 

19,752,350 

15,884,450 

10,007,250 

13,610,260 

10,211,760 

12,234,960 

13,385,300 

10,154,800 

7,613,700 

19,734,010 

10,375,591 

4,228,950 

7,886,750 

16,158,100 

22,588,485 



$•28,631,936 
2,490,386 
7.673,080 
2;365,628 
5,370,100 
4,080,617 
4,518,110 
2,251,855 
1,590,943 
0,877,250 
1,253,771 
2,565,865 
0,587,700 
2,338,930 
7,856,789 
0,532,666 



S231, 258.964 S74,787,589 

Increase of Real Estate since 1835 $90,009,878 

Increase of Personal Estate 767,339 



Total Increase S90,777,217 



AMUSEMENTS. 



S23 



COMPARATIVE VIBW OP VALUATIONS AND TAXES SINCE 1805. 



1805 
1806 
1807 
1808 
1809 
1810 
1811 
1812 
1813 
1814 
1815 
1816 
1817 
1818 
1819 
1820 



Valuation. 



City Taxes- 



S25,645,867 
26,529,630! 
24,959,955 
25,118,720 
24,782,267 
26,436,370 
26,045,730 
26,243,040 
27,640,230 
82,901,497 
81,636,042 
32,074,201 
78,895,725 
80,245,091 
70,113,061 
69,530,753 



127,946 
127,814 
119,155 
138,984 
139,027 
129,727 
176,978 
174,920 
174,726 
214,225 
197,913 
180,653 
216,720 
255,740 
250,140 
270,361 



87 
97 
09 
18 
39 
15 
25 
17 
94 
09 
33 
94 
44 
79 
21 
19 



1821 
1822 
lh23 
1824 
1S25 
1-26 
1827 
1823 
1-29 
1830 
1831 
1832 
1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 



Valuation, i City Taxes. 



$68,282,070 
71,289,144 
70,940,820 
33,075,676 
101,160,046 
107,477,781 
112,211,926 
114,019,533 
112,516,026 
125,288,518 
139,280,214 
146,302,518 
166,491,542 
186,548,511 
218,723,703 
309,500,920 



259,430 30 
302,105 61 
351,814 36 
353,328 20 
336,863 82 
583,758 89 
437,692 02 
485,751 73 
507,107 24 
509,178 44 
562,104 05 
665,385 74 
971,865 61 
835,605 49 
965,602 94 
1085,13044 



AMUSEMENTS. 

THEATRES. 

There are at present five Theatres in the City, as 
follows : 

PARK THEATRE, 

Situated in Park Row, was erected in 1798, and was 
burnt May 24, 1820, and, with the exception of the walls, 
which were left standing, was rebuilt and opened in 
August, 1821. The dimensions are as follows : Front, 
80 feet ; depth, 165 feet ; height, 55 feet to roof. The 
Green Room is in a wing in the rear, on Theatre Alley, 
The stage is 38 feet wide in front, and 70 feet deep ; and 
the height to the ceiling is 40 feet. The number of boxes 
is 42, namely, 14 in each tier. This Theatre is calcu- 
lated to contain 2,400 persons. 

The present prices of admission are, for the Boxes, 
$1 ; Pit, 50 cents; Gallery, 25 cents. 

Edmund Simpson, Manager. 



3'24 AMU8RMENTS. 



THE AMERICAN THEATQE. 
(Bowery, between Bayard and Walker streets.) 

Was erected in 1826, and opened October 16, 1826, 
within six months from the time the building was com- 
menced. It was burnt in May, 1828, and immediately 
afterwards rebuilt, and re-opened in August, 1828. 
Again burnt down Sept. 22, 1836 ; rebuilt and finished, 
January, 1837. The new building is one of the finest 
specimens of Doric architecture in the City ; the front 
being constructed after the model of the Temple of Mi- 
nerva at Athens. The interior is elegant, and fitted up 
in a superior style. The building is 75 feet front on the 
Bowery, and the depth to Elizabeth-street is 175 feet ; 
height of the building to the cornice, 58 feet. The Pit 
extends under the Boxes, and is capable of containing 
300 persons more than that of Drury Lane, London ; the 
dome and proscenium are all practicable, and can be 
lowered in half an hour ; the side proscenium, including 
the balcony boxes, are so constructed that, by a piece of 
ingenious machinery, they can in an instant be moved 
back so as to throw open the entire stage for pro- 
cessions, &c. 

Prices of admission — Boxes, 75 cents ; Pit, 37J cents ; 
Gallery, 25 cents. 

W. Dinneford, Manager. 

FRANKLIN THEATRE. 

(175 Chatham-street) 

This Theatre, recently erected, was first opened in 

1835. It is pleasantly situated in Chatham-square, near 

the corner of James-street, and is a popular and much 

frequented place of amusement. 

Pricesof admission — Boxes, 50 cents ; Pit, 25 cents. 

NATiONAL THEATRE. 
(Late Italian Opera House.) 
The building is on the N. W. corner of Church and 
Leonard-streets, and covers 99 feet front and rear, and 
150 feet in depth. The stage is 40 feet wide, and 70 feet 
deep. A portion of the house, 20 feet wide, and 150 feet 
long, on Leonard-street, is appropriated for a spacious 
saloon, coffee rooms, dressing rooms, and refectories. 



AMUSEMENTS, 225 



A part of the pit is set apart for balcony and orchestra 
seats, and the residue furnished with arm-chairs and 
settees. There are eight private boxes under the first 
tier, on the wings of the pit. All the seats in the house 
are unusually spacious and comfortable, and capable of 
fully accommodating 1,200 persons. 

Prices of admission — Boxes, $1; Pit, 50 cents; Gal- 
lery, 37^ cents, 

James H. Hackett, Manager, 

RICHMOND HILL THEATRE, 

Situated at the corner of 'Varick and Charlton streets, 
in the Eighth Ward, consisting in part of the former 
country seat of Colonel Aaron Burr, on Richmond Hill, 
now altered and enlarged into a Theatre. 

Prices of admission — Boxes, 50 cents , Pit, 25 cents. 

MUSEUMS. 

AMERICAN MUSEUM. 
(Opposite St. Paul's Church, Broadway.) 

This excellent institution was founded in 1810, by the 
late John Scudder, by whose arduous efforts, and the 

Eersevering exertions of its more recent proprietors, it 
as arose to its present high standing. It continues 
daily to improve in every department, by extensive and 
valuable additions of the works of Nature and artificial 
curiosities, from all parts of the world. Its immense col- 
lections are well arranged and beautifully displayed in 
four spacious Saloons, each one hundred feet in length ; 
in addition to which another apartment has recently 
been added of still larger dimensions. The Grand Cos- 
morama of this establishment is truly a most splendid 
affair, which for extent of glasses and magnificence of 
views, is not surpassed in this or any other country. 
The views embrace a great variety pf subjects, and were 
all executed expressly by Italian artists of eminence in 
their profession. No labour or expense has been spared 
to render this establishment well deserving a continuance 
of that liberal and distinguished patronage it has always 
received, The building is very high, and from its ob- 



226 BATHS. 

servatory may be enjoyed some of the finest views in the 
City, and of the beautiful bay and surrounding country. 
The halls are well warmed and ventilated, and at even- 
ing brilliantly lighted with gas, altogether forming a 
very inviting agreeable lounge, and at the same time, a 
place for serious contemplation and amusement, to those 
who delight in the study of the wonderful works of 
Nature. 
Admittance, 25 cents — children, half price. 

peale's museum axd gallery of fine arts. 
(Broadway, opposite the Paik.) 
This establishment was founded in the j'ear 1825, and 
has increased with astonishing rapidity. It contains four 
spacious apartments, which are arranged in the follow- 
ing order : The 1st contains specimens of Natural His- 
tory in all its branches, and for beauty of arrangement, 
and the exquisite style in which the articles are mounted, 
renders it one of the most interesting places of public 
amusement in the country. The 2d is a large and va- 
luable collection of Paintings, by eminent artists, amongst 
which may be particularly mentioned a Portrait of Na- 
poleon, by Le Fevre ; a Magdalen, by Le Bron, together 
with Portraits of at least 150 celebrated citzens and fo- 
reigners. The 3d contains a very superior Cosmorama, 
several Wax Figures of good worKmanship, Fossils, 
Shells, Minerals, and Miscellaneous Curiosities. It 
would be impossible to enumerate the principal articles of 
interest in the establishment, but it would be unjust to 
the enterprising proprietor, not to name the Eg}'pfian 
Mummv, the tatooed head of a New Zealand Chief, and 
the living Anaconda, all of which have been procured 
at a very great expense. The 4th is a Lecture Room, in 
which, during each evening throughout the year, a suc- 
cession of interesting amusements take place. 



BATHS. 

The principal Baths, for the accommodation of 
strangers and citizens, are the following : 
Arcade Bath, 39 Chambers-street. 
Washington Bath, 533 Pearl-street. 
Besides many others of less note. 



FASUIONAELK RESORTS, 227 



The sea water Baths are conveniently arranged, and 
are much frequented during warm weather. The prin- 
cipal Baths are at the Battery, and near Murray-street, 
on the North River. 



FASHIONABLE RESORTS. 

In the City, and its vicinity, are numerous places of 
resort, where the citizen and stranger may retire from 
the buslle of the City, and the fatigues of business. 

THE BATTERY. 

This beautiful promenade is situated at the south-west 
■end of the island, and junction of the North and East 
Rivers, and possesses attractions unsurpassed, perhaps, 
by any other similar place of resort in the world, justly 
commanding the admiration of every visiter. It is in full 
view ol the bay and surrounding scenery of Long Island, 
Staten Island, New Jersey, and the islands in the har- 
bour. From no one point can a better idea be formed of 
the magnitude of the commerce of the City. The nu- 
merous ships, steamboats, and small vessels, that are 
constantly entering and departing from the port, forming 
a scene of stirring interest. Of the bay itself, we deem it 
appropriate in this place to quote the language of a late 
English tourist. 

" I have never seen the bay of Naples, I can therefore 
make no comparison ; but my imagination is incapable 
of conceiving any thing more beautiful than the harbour 
of New-York. Various and lovely are the objects which 
meet the eye on every side ; but the naming them would 
only be to give a list of words, without conveying the 
faintest idea of the scene. I doubt if even the pencil of 
Turner could do it justice, bright and glorious as it rose 
upon us. We seemed to enter the harbour of New- 
York upon waves of liquid gold; and as we dashed past 
the green isles which rise from its bosom like guardian 
sentinels of the fair City, the setting sun stretched his 
horizontal beams further and further, at each moment, as 
if to point out to us some new glory in the landscape." 
The Battery extends somewhat in the form of a cres- 



228 rASHlONABLB RESORTS. 



cent, from the termination of Broadway, Greenwich, 
and "Washington streets^ on the north-west, to Whitehall- 
street, on the east, covering an area of nearly 11 acres, 
and laid out in grass-plots and gravel walks, shaded with 
trees. The exterior, fronting the harbour, is built up 
with hewn stone ; and on this side is a paved walk, with 
stone posts connected with a neat open railing. An ex- 
pensive iron railing, with gateways, extends along the 
interior front. 

This favourite promenade w^as originally a fortifica- 
tion, thrown up by the Dutch, and planted with cannon, 
from which circumstance it derives its name. Its bounds 
have been much enlarged by filling in, and for many 
years it has been used as a public walk, and constantly 
fanned as it is by the breezes of the ocean, no more 
agreeable and healthful retreat, from the heat of the City,- 
can be found during the summer months. 

CASTLE GARDEN. 

On a mole, connected with the Battery by a bridge, is 
situated Castle Garden, originally erected for a fortifica- 
tion, and used for that purpose until 1823, when it was 
ceded by the United States to the Corporation of this 
City, since which it has been leased for a place of pufelic 
amusement or recreation. On the top of the walls, a 
walk, covered by an awning, has been constructed, from 
whence a fine view of the harbour and adjacent scenery 
is obtained; Within the walls over ten thousand people 
may be accommodated, and concerts and fire works are 
occasionally given. 

vauxhall garden 
Is situated near the junction of the Bowery and Broad- 
way, fronting on the former, and was formerly a place of 
great resort in summer. On the evenings of public 
days, fire works and other entertainments were exhibit- 
ed ; but by the late improvements in that part of the city, 
particularly by the extension of Lafayette-Place through 
the Garden, its dimensions have been much lessened, 
and its attractions weakened. 



FAVOURITE EXCURSIONS. 229 

NIBLO's GARDEN, 
(Corner of Broadway and Priuce-sti-eet.) 
Is one of the most fashionable places of resort in the 
city, during the summer months. It has been laid out 
with great taste, and when open to the public, is hand- 
somely lighted, and decorated with paintings, mirrors, 
&c. The walks are bordered with shrubbery and flow- 
ers in great variety. Fire works are occasionally exhi- 
bited ; and in the saloon, which is a very tasteful and airy 
building, theatrical and musical entertainments are given. 

OTHER PUBLIC GARDENS. 

New-York Garden, Broadway, between Leonard and 
Franklin streets. 

Cold Spring Garden, between Greenwich and Wash- 
ington streets, corner of Le Roy-street. 

East River Garden, near Corlaer's Hook. 



FAVOURITE EXCURSIONS 

ON THE ISLAND OF NEW-YORK AND ITS VICINITY. 

Harl^m and Yorkville ; the conveyance to the above 
places on the island of New-York, are both frequent and 
reasonable, either by the Macadamized road on the Third 
Avenue, or on the Rail-road. The Harlgem Rail-road, 
commences in the Bowery, near Prince-street, and runs 
along the Fourth Avenue to Harlaem, a distance of 7| 
miles. Cars run on it constantly, stopping whenever 
any of the passengers wish to get out ; usual fare, 12i 
cents, 

Bloomingdale and Manhattanville, on the Island, are 
also places of great attraction ; the roads are good, and 
besides private conveyances, stages leave the Bowery, 
corner of Bayard -street, several times a day for both of 
the above places. 

Islands, contiguous to New-York, and under the juris- 
diction of the City authorities are Governor's, Bedlow's, 
and Ellis's Islands, in the Hudson River, included in the 
First Ward of the City, all of which belong to the United 
States' government, and are occupied for military pur- 
poses. Blackwell's, Great Barn, and Randell's Island, in 
the East River, forming part of the Twelfth Ward. 

20 



230 FAVOURITE EXCURSIONS. 

Blackwell's Island belongs to the city, on which is situ- 
ated the Penitentiary. 

HoBOKEN, New- Jersey, opposite New- York, where the 
North River is about a mile and a half wide, is a fa- 
vourite resort for the citizens during the summer. 
Steam ferry-boats run from Barclay-street and Canal- 
street, New-York, to this place, once in every twenty 
minutes or half hour, during the day; and the fare, in 
summer, is but 6^ cents. Near the ferry is a public 
house, in front of which is a fine lawn, where ?eats are 
provided for visiters to enjoy the cool breezes which 
prevail during the warmest weather, and the fine pros- 
pect which the place commands of the city and harbour 
— north of the house there is a circular railway, on 
which are carriages propelled by the passengers for ex- 
ercise and amusement. The grounds along the river, 
for more than a mile, are the property of the Messrs. 
Stevens, who permit a free public access to them. 
From the lawn a shaded gravel walk extends on the 
elevated and rocky bank of the river for about a mile, at 
the termination of which is a grove, called the £;///5m7j- 
JPiclds, where a handsome Pavilion has been erected, 
and from whence is a fine view of the North River and 
the opposite city. An excavation has recently been made 
in the solid rock under the blufl' about one mile north of 
Hoboken, near the river, which attracts considerable 
attention, it is appropriately named the ^'ybil's Cave. 

Bull's Ferry, 6h miles, and Fort Lee," 10 miles north 
of the Cit)', on the Jersey shore, are both much frequent- 
ed during the summer months ; Steamboats leave for the 
above places almost hourly, from the foot of Canal-street, 
affording a cheap and pleasant excursion. 

City of Brooklyn. From Brooklvn Heights, which 
overlooks the East River, and part of the City of New- 
York, is one of the most stirring views imaginab'e — the 
junction of the North and East Rivers, the fortified 
Islands in the vicinity, and the shipping in the harbour, 
are all in full view. 

The United States Navy Yard is on the east side of 
Brooklyn, on the Wallabnut Bay; where visitors can 
easily obtain admission. BrookljTi, although not pos- 
sessing many attractions to the stranger, is fast increas- 
ing in wealth and numbers j the increase in real estate 



FAVOURITE EXCURSIONS. 



231 



within the last iew years is unparalleled. The whole of 
the unsettled part of the city is about being surveyed and 
laid out into streets and avenues similar to the Island of 
New-York. The Long-Island Rail-road commences at 
Brooklyn, and, when tinished, will extend to Greenport, 
a distance of about 100 miles. 

The village of Williamsburgh, in the town of Bush- 
wick, Long Island, is situated on the East River, (950 
yards wide,) opposite Corlaer's Hook, and has intercourse 
with the city of New-York by ferries from the foot of 
Grand-street and Peck-slip. Ii is fast becoming a place of 
importance, being contiguous to New-York and Brooklyn. 
At present there are not many attractions for strangers or 
citizens as a place of resort, but it is susceptable of great 
improvements. Stages start twice a day for Newtown and 
Flushing, and the turnpike to Jamaica, leaves the village 
from North Second-street. 

Flatbush, five miles from New- York, is a delightful 
place of residence ; it is the seat of Erasmus Hall Acade- 
my, and was the scene of a sanguinary battle between 
the British and Americans in 1776. The spirit of im- 
provement has, in the rapid progress it is now making, 
reached this delightful spot — a softer landscape than it 
presents is rarely met with. Its surface is an inclined 
plane, fifty feet above the level of the ocean, to which it 
has a regular and gradual descent. The air about it is 
tempered by the sea breeze, and its salubrity is almost 
proverbial. 

Fort Hamilton, situated at the Narrows, is also a de- 
lightful place of residence ; being in sight of the ocean, it 
commands a view of all the shipping leaving and enter- 
ing the harbour of New-York. 

Bath, in the town of New-Utrecht, Long Island, nine 
miles south of BrookljTi, is a favourite place of resort 
for sea bathing. Here is a well kept public house, with 
a lawn fronting the bay, well shaded with trees, where 
the breezes of the ocean may be enjoyed during the heat 
of summer. This is the nearest watering place to Ncav 
York; new accommodations have recently been erected 
which are within a short distance of the beach, and com- 
mand a most beautiful prospect of the ocean. 

At Coney Island, which is three miles from Bath, and 
is joined to Long Island by a bridge across a narrow inlet, 



233 FAVOURITE EXCURSIONS. 



is a fine beach for bathing, with a public house, and other 
conveniences. A rail-road is attached to the establish- 
ment, with cars leaving the hotel for the beach, a dis- 
tance of eighty rods, every few minutes, during the sum- 
mer season. The bathing at this place is not surpassed 
by any in the United States. The beach is white and 
hard. 

Jamaica, on Long Island, is a beautiful and flourishing 
town ; having a village of the same name, eleven miles 
from Brooklyn, which is a place of importance, being 
the county town for Queen's Count)', and connected with 
Brooklyn by a rail-road, now in successful operation. 
The Long Island Rail Road, when completed, will make 
a continual road to Greenport, L. I., a distance of about 
one hundred miles. The tJnion Race Course is situated 
at the west end of Jamaica, about seven miles from Brook- 
lyn, between the turnpike and Rail-road, and is a place of 
great attraction during the spring and fall races. Eight 
miles from Jamaica is 

RocKAWAY, on the Atlantic Ocean, 20 miles from New- 
York. This is a favourite resort for sea bathing ; the 
fine beach affording great advantages for that purpose. 
A splendid hotel (the Marine Pavilion) has been recently 
erected at this place; it is 230 feet in front, 3 stories in 
height, with two wings, and two magnificent piazzas; the 
front one extending the whole length of the mansion, 20 
feet in width, ornamented with 28 Grecian columns. The 
rear piazza extends from one wing to the other, a distance 
of 150 feet. From the front is an unrivalled view of the 
Atlantic Ocean, and the numerous shipping passing 
Sandy Hook, to and from the Harbour of New- York. 

Statkn Island has long been a favourite place of re- 
sort. Steamboats leave several times during the day, 
from Whitehall-dock, and from piers No. 1 and 4, north 
side of the Battery, for the (Quarantine Ground, Tomp- 
kinsville. New Brighton, and other places on the island. 
For a further description of excursions to the different 
places of resort in the vicinity of the city of New-York, 
see ^^ Guide to Environs." 



DISTANCKS. 233 



FERRIES, 

Which are leased by the Corporation to different compa- 
nies and individuals, and from which a revenue is de- 
rived of about S10,000. 

From foot of Fulton-st. to Brooklyn, distance half a mile. 

From foot of Catherine-st. to do. do. half a mile. 

From foot of Walnut-st. to do. do. half a mile. 

From foot of Whitehall-st. to do. do. one mile. 

From foot of Grand-st., to Williamsburg, dist. ^ a mile. 

From foot of Peck-slip, to do. li miles. 

From foot of Cortlandt-st. to Jersey City, about a mile. 

From foot of Barclay-st., to Hoboken, about two miles. 

From foot of Canal-st., to do. do. It miles. 

From foot of Canal-st., to Bull's Ferry, about six miles, 
and Fort Lee, ten miles. 



DISTANCES 
OF THE PRINCIPAL CITIKS IN THE UNITED STATES, FROM THE 
CITV OF NEW-YORK, BY THE NEAREST MAIL ROUTES, UNLESS 
OTHERWISE MENTIONED. 

Albanv, (bv water,) ■ 145 miles. 

Do. "(by.'land, east side of the river) 151 " 

Do. do. west do 157 " 

Augusta, Maine 370 " 

Augusta, Georgia 777 " 

Annapolis, Maryland 217 " 

Baltimore, do 187 " 

Boston, Mass 207 " 

Do. (by water, via Providence) 229 *' 

Bufialo, via New Jersey 357 " 

Do. (by river and canal) 508 " 

Do. via Albany 435 " 

Burlington, Vt 486 " 

Charleston, South Carolina 769 " 

Columbia do. do : 725 " 

Cincinnati, Ohio, (by mail route) 722 " 

Do, do. (by land and water, via Pitts- 
burgh 856 " 

Columbus, Ohio 551 " 

Concord, New Hampshire 249 " 

Detroit, Michigan 675 " 

Dover, Delaware 165 " 

20* 



234 DISTANCES. 



Frankfort, Kentucky 736 miles. 

Harrisburgh, Pennsylvania 182 " 

Hartford, Connecticut 110 " 

Hudson 116 " 

Indianapolis, Indiana 752 " 

Jackson, Mississippi 1260 " 

Jefferson City, Missouri 1180 " 

Little Rock, Arkansas 1293 " 

Louisville, Ken. (by land and water) 99-1 " 

Middletown, Coniiecticut 100 " 

Milledgeville, Georgia 8G7 '* 

Mobile, Al. 1275 " 

Montpelier, Vermont 299 " 

Montreal, Canada 370 " 

Nashville, Tennessee 939 " 

Natchez, Miss, (by land and water) 2067 " 

New-Haven, Connecticut 75 " 

New-London, do 125 " 

New-Orleans, Louisiana 1428 " 

New-Orleans, (by land and water, via Pitts- 
burg) 2364 " 

Norfolk, Virginia 437 " 

Norwich, Connecticut 130 " 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 387 " 

Philadelphia, do. via Bordentown 89 " 

Do. do. via Trenton 87 " 

Portsmouth, New'-Hampshire 263 " 

Portland, Maine 317 '• 

Providence, Rhode Island 169 " 

Do. do. (by water) 190 " 

Cluebec, Canada 540 " 

Raleigh, North Carolina 51 1 " 

Richmond, Virginia 347 " 

Rochester, via Albany 356 " 

Savannah, Georgia 884 " 

St. Louis, Missouri. . . * 1046 " 

Tallahassee, Florida 1121 " 

Trenton, New Jersey 59 " 

Troy 151 " 

Tuscaloosa, Alabama 1083 " 

Utica, via Albany 241 " 

Vandalia, Illinois 971 " 

Washington, District of Columbia 225 " 

Wilmington, Delaware 118 " 



DISTANCES FROM NEW-YORK TO ALBANY. 



23!! 



DISTANCES 

FROM NEW-YORK TO ALBANY, &C. BY WATER AND 
LAND. 



New- York to Albany, Troy f 

and Waterford, by water. 

Manhattanvllle, 8 

Fort Lee, 2 10 

Harl8einRiver,orSpuy- 

ten Duyvel's Creek, 3 13 

Yonkers, 4 17 

Dobb's Ferry, 5 '^ 

Tarry town, .5 27 

Sing-sinir, 6 .33 

Stoney-point, 7 40 

CaldwilPs Landing,. 5 45 

West Point, 8 .53 

Cold Sprinji, 3 56 

New- Windsor, 4 60 

Newburgh, 2 62 

New-Hamburgh, 6 68 

Hampton, 1 99 

Milton, 3 72) 

Poughkeepsie, 3 75 ! 

Hyde Park, 5 80: 

Pelham, 4 84' 

Kingston Landing, .. 6 90 
Redhook, loioer land- 
ing, 7 97 

Redhook, upper land- 
ing, 3 100 

Clermont, 2 102 

'Caiskill, 9 111 

Hudson, 5 116 

iGoxsackie, 8 124 

Kinderhnok, Landing, 2 126 

New-Baltimore, 3 129 

K3oeymans, 2 131 

Schodack Landing,... 3 134 

Castleton, 2 136 

Overslaugh, 6 142 

Albany, 3 145 

Troy, 6 151 

Lansingburgh, 3 154 

Waterford, 1 155 



New- York to Albany ; east 
side of Hudson River. 

Kingsbridge, 13 

Yonkers, 3 16 

Dobb's Ferry, 5 21 

Sing-Sing, 10 31 

Peekskill, 12 43 

Fishkill, 20 63 

Poughkee])sie, 13 76 

Hyde Park, 7 83 

Staatsburgh, 5 88 

Rhinebeck, 6 94 

Red Hook 6 100 

Clermont,'. 8 108 

Livingston, 5 113 

Hudson, 9 122 

Columbiaville, 5 127 

Kinderhook, 7 1.34 

Schodack Centre, 10 144 

Greeenbush, 6 150 

Albany, 1 151 

New- York to Albany ; west 
side of the river. 

Hoboken, N. J., 2 

Hackensack, 11 13 

New-Prospect, 11 24 

Ramapo, N. Y 10 34 

Monroe Works, 9 43 

Galloway, 4 47 

Newburgh, 17 64 

New-Paltz, 16 80 

Rondout, 17 97 

Kingston, 3 100 

Saugertiei=, 12 112 

Maiden, 2 114 

Catskill, 10 124 

Athens, 5 129 

Coxsackie, 6 135 

New-Baltimore, 7 142 

Coeymans, 3 145 

Albany, 12 157 



236 DISTANCES FROM NEW-YuUK TO WASHINOTOM. 



DISTANCES 

FROM NEW YORK TO WASHINGTON. 



By Steamboat ^ Railroad, j By Railroad and Stages. 



To Bedlow's Island, by 

Steamboat 2 

Kills 4 6 

Newark Bay 4 10 

Elizabethpon 2 12 | 

Rahwav river 4 16 | 

Penh Ainboy 8 24 j 

South Ainboy 1 25 | 

Spntswood, by railroad 9 34 i 

West's 4 38 

Hightstown 7 45 

Centreville 4 49 

Sand Hills 5 54 

Bordcntotcn' 4 58 

Cralt's Creek 4 62 

Burlington 7 69 

Rankocus river 6 75 

^.amden 12 87 

Philadelphia... 1 88 

Fort Mitflin, by S. boat 9 97 

Chester 9 106 

Marcus Hook 4 110 

Christiana creek 8 118 

New Castle, Del 5 123 

Glagow, by railroad . . 12 135 

Frenchtoicn 4 139 

Mouth of Elk river^ by 
Steamboat ...... ...13 152 

Grove Point 6 158 

Pool's Island 16 174 

North Point 16 100 

Fort McHcnry 10 200 

Baltimore 3 203 

Elkridge, by railroad 10 213 

VansviUe 17 230 

Bladensburg 7 2:37 

Washington 6 243 



To Jersey City 1 

Hackensack river, by 

railroad 4 5 

Neicar/,- 4 9 

Elizabechtown 6 15 

Railway 5 20 

New Brunswick 13 33 

Kingston, by stage.. . .13 46 

Princeton 3 49 

Trenton' 10 59 

Morris^ville, Ponn 1 60 

Tyburn, by railroad ..3 63 

Tullylown 3 6G 

Bristol 4 70 

Uunksville 4 74 

Frankford 9 83 

Philadelphia 4 87 

Darby, by .s-tage 7 94 

Chester 8 102 

Marcus Hook 5 107 

Wilmington, Del 8 115 

Newport 5 120 

Christiana 5 125 

Newark 5 130 

Elkton, Md 5 135 

North East 6 141 

Charleston 3 144 

Havre de Grace 7 151 

Hall's X Roads 5 156 

Harford 6 162 

Little Gun Powder 7 169 

Baltimore 16 185 

Elkridge, by railroad 10 195 

Patuxcnt river 12 207 

Vansville 5 212 

Bladensburg 7 219 

Washington 6 225 

*To Philadelphia by steam- 
boat, 36 miles. 



'To Philadelphia by steam- 
boat, 29 miles. 

In addition to the above routes, there is an inland water 
■communicalion, via. the Delaware and Raritan, and Chesa- 
peake and Delaware Canals. Vessels ofalarce burthen can 
pass through these Canals, which atTord a safe conveyance 
between New-York, and the different places on the Chesa- 
peake bay. 



WARDS, 237 



FIRE LIMITS. 

By a recent act of the Legislature, the fire limits of this city 
are extended so as to include a large section before exempted 
from tiieir operation. Under the new law, they will extend 
from the East River, near Rivington-street, in an irrrcgular 
line, northwesterly, to between Twenty-first and Twenty-se- 
cond street on the Second Avenue ; thence west to the Sixth 
Avenue, and then continue in an ii"regular line south-easterly, 
to the Hudson River, near Hamersley-street. 

FIRE DISTRICTS. 

The city is divided into five Fire Districts, which are indica- 
ted by the striking of the City Hall bell as follows : 

1st District — One stroke of the bell. 

2d District — Two do do. 

3d District— Three do do. 

4thDistrict — Four do do. 

SthDistrict — A continual ringing. 

The first District is comprehended by a line from the foot 
of Murray street to the City Hall, and in a line parallel with the 
North River to 21st street. 

The second District is bounded by the latter line, and a 
straight line from the Hall to the 3d Avenue at 21st street. 

The third District is bounded by the latter and a line from 
the City Hall to the East River above the Dry Dock. 

The fourth District is bounded by the latter and compre- 
hends all the space between that and the East River as far 
down as Frankfort street. 

The fifth District is all that part of the city below Frankfort 
and Murray streets. 



WARDS. 

The City is divided into 17 Wards ; each Ward 
electing one Alderman, one Assistant Alderman, 
two Assessors, one Collector, and two Constables. 
1st Ward, extends from Liberty-street, and the east 
end of Maiden-lane, south to the extrem- 
ity of the Island, including Governor's, 
Bedlow's, and Ellis's, Islands. 
2d Ward, from Liberty-street, and the east end of 
Maiden-lane, n.-east, to Spruce and Ferry 
streets, and Peck-slip, bounded on the 
north-west by Broadway and Park Row, 
and on the south-east by the East River. 
3d Ward, from Liberty-street, north, to Reade-street, 
bounded on the east by Broodway,wcst, 
by the North River. 



238 WARD3. 

4th Ward, from Spruce and Ferrv streets, and Peck- 
slip, east, to Catharine-street, bounded 
on the north by Chatham-street, south by 
the East River. 
5th Ward, from Reade-street, north, to Canal-street, 
bounded on the east by Broadway, west 
by the North River. 
6th Ward, from the junction of Broadway and Park- 
row, north, to Canal and Walker-streets, 
bounded on the west by Broadway, soutii- 
ea.st by Chatham-street and the Bowery. 
7th Ward, from Catharine-st. east, to Corlaer's-hook, 
bounded on the north by Division and 
Grand-streets, south by the East River, 
8th Ward, from Canal-st. north^ to Hamersley and 
Houstoun-streets, bounded on the east by 
Broadway, w^est % the North River. 
9th Ward, from Hamersley-st. N. to Fourteenth-st., 
bounded on the E. by the Sixth Avenue 
and Hancock-st. west, by the North River. 
10th Ward, from Division-street, north, to Riving- 
ton-street, bounded on the west by the 
Bowery, east, by Norfolk-street. 
11th Ward, from Rivington-st. N. to Fourteenth-st. 
bounded on the W. by Clinton-street and 
AvTuue B, east by East River. 
12th Ward, from Fortieth-st. N. to Harlaem River, 
which separates N. York Island from 
Westchester county, including Black- 
well's and other Islands in the E. River. 
13th Ward, from Division and Grand streets, north, 
to Rivinglon-street, bounded on the west 
by Norfolk-street, east by the East Riv^er. 
14th Ward, from Canal and Walker streets, north, 
to Houstoun-street, bounded on the west 
by Broadway, east, by the Bowery. 
15th Ward, from Houstoun-.st., north to Fourteenth 
St., bounded on the west by the Sixth Av. 
and Hancock-st., east, by the Bowery. 
16th Ward, from Fourteenth-st., north, to Fortieth- 
street, bounded on the west by the North 
river and on the east by East River. 



alphabbttcal Li3r or streets. 



239 



17th Ward, from Rivinglon-street, north to Four- 
teenth-street, bounded on the west by the 
Bowery, E. by Clinton-st. and Avenue B. 



ALPHABETICAL. L.IST OF STREETS. 
Albany-street, runs from Greenwich-street, west, 

to the North Riv^er. 
Allen, Div.sion-st., north, to Houstoun-st. 

Amity, Broadway, west, to Sixth Avenue. 

Amos, Siith Avenue, west, to N. River. 

Ann, Broadway, east, to Gold-street. 

Anthony, Huison-st,, east, to Orange-street. 

Art, Broadway, east, to Bowery. 

Attorney, Di\ision-st., north, to Houstoun-st. 

Avenue, A., Hoistoun-st., north, to East River. 
Avenue, B., Hovstoun-st., north, to East River. 
Avenue, C, Hoistoun-st., north, to East River. 
Avenue, D., Hjijstoun-st., north, to East River. 
Avenue, First, Hoistoan-st., north, to Harlaem R. 
Avenue, SecondHoTstoun-st., north, to Harlaem R. 
Avenue, Third, Bovery, north, to Harlaem R. 

Avenue, Fourth, ter^roadway, north, to Harlaem R. 

Avenue, Fifth, Wa'^erly-place, north, to HarlaemR. 

Avenue Sixth, Camine-st., north, to Harlaem R. 

Avenue, SeventhGrenwich-lane, N., to Harlaem R. 

Avenue, Eighth. Huson-st., north, to Harlaem R, 

Avenue, Ninth, Gret Kiln-road, N., to Harlaem R. 

Avenue, Tenth, ter. Vest-st., N., to Harlaem R. 

Bank, Gredwich-lane, west, to North R. 

Barclay, Broaway, west, to North River. 

Barrow, Wasington-sq., west, to North R. 

Batavia, Roosv^elt-st., east, to James-street. 

Batter)--place, Broaway, west, to North River. 

Bayard, Divion-st., west, to Orange-st. 

Beach, Cha»l-st., west, to North River. 

Beaver, Broaway, east, to Pearl-street. 

Bedford, Hanirsley-st. north, to Amos-st. 

Beekman, Park-ow, south-east, to East R. 

Benson, Leonrd-st., north, to Franklin-st. 

Bethune, Greewich-st., west, to North R. 

Birmingham, Henr^st., south, to Madison-st. 

Bleecker, BowAr, W. then N. to Eighth Av. 

Bloomingdale R.Unio4)lace, N. to Manhattan ville. 



240 



ALPHABBTIGAL LIST OP STREETS. 



Broadway, east, to Boweiy. 

Chatham-sq., north, to Fourth Av. 

Siate-st., east, tc Broad-street. 

Wall-st. south, to East River. 

Battery-place, north, to Fourth Av. 

East River, west, to Hudson-st. 

Pearl-st. south, to East River. 

Bleeeker-st. west, to Epis. cemetery, 

Walker-st., west, to North River. 

Grand-st.. N. t( Houstoun-street. 

Greenwich-st. vest, to North River, 

Sixth Avenue west, to Varick-st. 

Duane-st., norh, to Jay-street. 

Division-st., souh, to Cherry-st. 
Catharine-lane, Broadway, ea&, to Elm-street. 
Catharine-slip, Cherry-st., soith, to East River. 



Bond, 

Bowery, 

Bridge, 

Broad, 

Broadway, 

Broome, 

Burling-slip, 

Burton, 

Canal, 

Cannon, 

Carlisle, 

Carmine, 

Caroline, 

Catharine, 



Cedar, Pearl-st., west to North River. 

Centre, Pearl-st., norti, to Brcome-street. 

Chambers, Chatham-st.,vest, to North River, 

Chapel, Murray-si., n»rtfl, to Canal-street. 

Charles, Greenwich-laie, west, to N. River, 

Charlton, M'Dougal-st..west, to N. River. 

Chatham, Frankforl-st. ;ast, to Bowery. 

Cherry, Pearl-st, east to East River. 

Chesnut, Oak-st., norll to Madison-street. 

Christopher, Sixth Avenu, west, to N. River. 

Chrystie, Division-st., orth, to Houstoun-st, 

Church, Fulton-st., ncth, to Canal-street. 
CityHall-place,Tryon-row, orth, to Pearl-street. 

Clarke, Broome-st., orth, to Spring-street, 

Clarkson, Varick-st., Aest, to North River. 

Cliff, John-st., nojh-east, to Hague-st. 

Clinton, Houstoun-s, south, to East River. 

Coenties-slip, Pearl-st., scth, to East River. 

College-place, Barclay-st.,iorth, to Murray-st. 

Collister, Beach-st., nrth, to Laight-street. 

Columbia, Grand-st., prth, to Houstoun-st. 

Commerce, Bleecker-st west, to Barrow-st. 

Corlaers, Grand-st., nith, to East River. 

Cornelia, Asylum-st.west, to Bleecker-st. 

Cortlandt, B roadway .vvest, to North River. 
Cortlandt-alley, Franklin-s, north, to Canal-street 



ALPHABETICAL LIST or STREETS. 



211 



Howard-st, north, to Bleecker-st. 

Chambers-st., east, to Mott-street. 

Water-st., south, to East River. 

BoM^ery, east, to East River. 

Water-st., south, to East River. 

Hudson-st., west, to North River. 

Broadway, west, to North River. 

Bowery, east, to Grand-street. 

Clarke-st., west, to Hudson-street. 

Pearl-st., south, to East River. 

Bleecker-st., west, to Varick-street. 

Bowery, north, to'Pell-street. 

Rose-st., west, to North River. 

John-st., north, to Fulton-street. 
East Broadway, Chatham-sq. east, to Grand-street. 
Eden's-alley, Gold-st., east, to Ryder's Alley. 

Sixth Avenue, east, to East River, 

North River, east, to East River. 

Division-st., north, to Houstoun-st. 

Seventh Avenue, east, to East R.v 

Bayard-st., north, to Bleecker-st. 

Reade-st., north, to Spring-street. 

Division-st., north, to Houstoun-st. 



Crosby, 

Cross, 

Cuyler's-alley, 

Delancy, 

Depeyster, 

Desbrosses, 

Dey, 

Division, 

Dominick, 

Dover, 

Downing, 

Doyer, 

Duane, 

Dutch, 



Eighth, 

Eighteenth, 

Eldridge, 

Eleventh, 

Elizabeth, 

Elm, 

Essex, 



Exchange-placeHanover-st. west, to Broadway. 

Factory, Christopher-st., north, to Jane-st. 

Ferry, Gold-st., south-east, to Pearl-street. 

Fifteenth, North River, east, to East River, 

Fifth, Bowery, east, to East River. 

First, Bowery, east, to Houstoun-street. 

Fletcher, Pearl-st., south to East River. 

Forsyth, Bayard-st., north, to Houstoun-st. 

Fourteenth, North River, east, to East River. 

Fourth, Thirteenth-st., east, to East River. 

Frankfort, Chatham-st,, east, to Pearl-street. 

Franklin-sq., Cherry-st., north, to Pearl-street. 

Franklin, Chapel-st., east, to East River. 

Front, Whitehall-st., east, to East River. 

Fulton, East River, west, to North River. 

Gay, Waverly-p., N. to Christopher-st. 

Goerck, Grand-st., north. 

Gold, Maiden-lane, N.E.,toFrankfort-st. 

Gouverneur, Division-st., south, to East River. 
21 



242 



ALPHABETItf.M, LIS5T OF Sl'REETS. 



Gouvemeur-ai. Water-st., south, to East River. 

Grand, Vaiick-st. east, to East River. 

Great Jones, Broadway, east, to Bowery. 
Great Kiln road, Thirteenth-st., west, to N. River. 

Greene, Canal-st., north, to Eighth-street. 

Green, Liberty-st., north, to Maiden-lane. 

Greenwich, Battery-p. north, to Great Kiln road. 
Greenwich-lane Sixth Av., north, to Thirteenth-st. 

Grove, Hudson-st.,east, to Waverh'-place.^ 

Hague, Pearl-st. north, to Cliff-street. 

Hamersley, M'Dougal-st. west, to North River. 

Hamilton, Catherine-st. east, to Market-street. 

Hammond, Greenwich-lane, west, to N, River. 

Hancock, Houstoun-st., north, toBleecker-st. 

Hanover, Pearl-st., north, to Wall-street. 

Harrison, Hudson-st., west, to North River. 

Henry, 01iver-st.,east,to Grand-street. 

Hester, Clinton-st., west, to Centre-street. 

Hoboken, Washington-st.,west, toN. River 

Horatio, Greenwich-lane, west, to N. River. 

Houstoun, East River, west, to M'Dougal-st. 

Howard, Centre-st., west,to Mercer-street. 

Hubert, Hudson-st., west, to North River. 

Hudson, Chambers-st, north, to Ninth-Av. 

Irving-place, Fourteenth-st., N.toTwentieth-st. 
Jackson-avenue, Waverly-place, north, to Union-pl 

Jacob, Ferry-st., east to Frankfort-street. 

James, Chatham-st., south, to Cherry-st. 

James-slip, Cherrj'-st., south, to East River. 

Jane, Greenwich-lane, west, to N. River. 

Jay, Hudson-st., west, to North River. 

Jefferson, Division-st., south, to East River. 

Jersey, Crosby-st.,east, to Mulberrj'-street. 

John, Broadway, east, to Pearl-street. 

Jones, Asylum-st., west, to Bleecker-st. 

Jones-lane, Front-st., south, to East River. 

King, M'Dougal-st., west, to North River 
Lafayette-place, Great Jones-st., north, toEighth-st. 

Laight, Canal-st., west, to North River. 

Laurens, Canal-st., north, to Amity-street. 

Leonard, Hudson-st., east, to Orange-street. 

Le Roy, Hudson-st., west, to North River. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF STREETS. 



243 



Little Water, Cross-st., north, to Anthony-street, 

L.ewiSj Grand-st., north, to East River. 

Liberty, Maiden-lane, west, to North River. 

Lispenard, Chapel-st., east, to Broadway. 

Ludlow, Walker-st., north, to Houstoun-st, 

Lumber, Liberty-st., south, to Greenwich-st. 

M'Dougal, Spring-st., north, to Eighth-street. 

Madison, Pearl-st., east, to Grand-street. 

Maiden-lane, Broadway, south-east, to East River. 

Mangin, Grand-st, north, to East River. 

Manhattan, Second-st., west, to North River. 

Market, Division-st., south, to East River. 

Marketfield, Broad-st., west, to Whitehall-street. 
Mechanic-alley, Monroe-st,, south, to Cherry-street. 

Mercer, Canal-st., north, to Eighth-street. 

Mill, Broad-st., east, to William-street. 

Minetto, Bleecker-st., east, to M'Dougal-st. 

Monroe, Catharine-st., east, to East River. 

Montgomery, Division-st. south, to East River. 

More, Pearl-st., south, to East River. 

Morris, Broadway, west, to North River. 

Morton, Bleecker-st., west, to North River. 

Mott, Chatham-st., north, to|Bleecker-st, 

Mulberry, Chatham-st. north, to Bleecker-st. 

Murray, Broadway, west, to North River. 

Nassau, Wall-st., north, to Chatham-street. 

New, Wall-sL, south, to Beaver-street. 

Nineteenth, North River, east,'toEast River. 

Ninth, Greenwich-lane, east, to East River. 

Norfolk, Division-st., north, to Houstoun-st. 

North Moore, Chapel-st,, west, to North River. 

Oak, Pearl-st., east, to Catharine-street. 

Old-slip, Stone-street, south, to East River. 

Oliver, East Broadway, south, to E. River. 

Orange, Chatham-st., north, to Prince-st. 

Orchard, Division-st., north, to Houstoun-st. 

Park-row, Broadway, east, to Beekman-st. 

Park-place, Broadway, west, to Church-street. 

Pearl, State-st, E. then N, to Broadway. 

Peck-slip. Pearl-st., south, to East River. 

Pelham, Monroe-st., south, to Cherry-street. 

Pell, Bowery, west, to Mott-street. 

Perry, Greenwich-lane, west, to N. River. 



244 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF STREET*. 



Pike, Division-st., south to East River. 

Pine, Broadway, east, to East River. 

Pitt, Grand-st., north, to Houstoun-st. 

Piatt, Pearl-st., north, to William-street. 

Prince, Bowery, west, to M'Dougal-street, 

Rector, Broadway, west, to North River. 

Reade, Cross-st., west, to North River. 

Renwick, Canal-st., north, to Spring-street. 

Republican-al. Reade-st., , to Elm-street. 

Ridge, Division-st., north, to Houstoun-st. 

Rivington, Bowery, east, to East River. 

Robinson, College-place, west, to N. River. 

Roosevelt, Chatham-st., south, to East River. 

Rose, Frankfort-st. N. E. to Pearl-street. 

Rutgers, Division-st., south, to East River. 

Ryder's-alley, Fulton-st., south, to Eden's-alley, 

Scammel, Grand-st., south, to East River. 

Second, Bowery, east, to East River. 

Seventh, Bowery, east, to East River. 

Seventeenth, North River, east, to East River. 

Sheriff, Grand-st. north, to North River. 

Sixteenth, North River, east, to East River. 

Sixth, Bowery, east, to East River. 

Smith, Hamersley-st., south, to King-st. 

South, Whitehali-st., east, Corlaers-hook. 

Spring, Bowery, west, to North River. 

Spruce, Nassau-st. south-east, to Gold-street. 

Stanton, Bowery, east, lo East River. 

Staple, Duane-st., north, to Harrison-sreet. 

State, Whitehall-st.,E.thenN.to B'dway. 
St. John's -lane, Beach-st., north, to Laight-street. 

Stone, Whitehall-st., east, to William-st. 

Stuyvesant, Bowery, east, to Second Avenue. 

Suffolk, Division-st., north, to Houstoun-st. 

Sullivan, Canal-st., north, to Amity-street. 

Temple, Liberty-st., south, to Thames-street. 

Tenth, GreeuAvich-lane, east, to East River. 

Thames, Broadway, west, to Greenwich-st. 
Theatre-alley, Ann-st., north, to Beekman-street. 

Third, BoAvery, east, to East River. 

Thirteenth, North River, ea.st, toEa.st River. 



ALPHABETICAL UST 6F STREETS. 



245 



Thomas, 

Thompson, 

Tompkins, 

Torbert, 

Try on-row, 

Twelfth, 

Twentieth, 

Twenty-first, 

Twenty-second, 

Twenty-third, 

Twenty-fourth, 

Twenty-fifth, 

Twenty-sixth, 

Twenty-seventh 

Twenty-eighth, 

Troy, 

Van dam, 

Vande water, 

Varick, 

Vesey, 

Vestry, 

Walker, 

Wall, 

Walnut, 

Warren, 

Washington, 

Washington-pl, 

Water, 

Watts, 

Waverly-place, 

West, 

White, 

Whitehall, 

WiUet, 

William, 

Wooster, 

York, 

Total number 



Church-st. west, to Hudson-street, 
Canal-st., north, to Fourth-street. 
Grand-st., north, to East River. 
Henry-st., south, to Madison-street. 
Chatham-st., west, to City Hall-pl. 
Greenwich-lane, east, to E. River. 
North River, east, to East River. 
North River, east, to East River. 
North River, east, to East River. 
North River, east, to East River. 
North River, east, to First Avenue. 
North River, east, to East River. 
North River, east, to Second Av. 
North River, east, to Second Av. 
North River, east, to East River. 
Greenwich-lane, west, to N. River. 
M'Dougal-st., W. to Greenwich-st. 
Frankfort-st. east, to Pearl-street. 
Franklin-st., north, to Clarkson-st. 
Broadway, west, to North River. 
Canal-st., west, to North River. 
Chapel-st., east, to Division-street. 
Broadway, east, to East River. 
Henry-st., south, to East River. 
Broadway, west, to North River. 
Battery-place, north to Twelfth-st. 
Broadway, west, to Wooster-street. 
Whitehail-st., east, to East River. 
Sullivan-st., west, to North River, 
Christopher-st., east, to Broadway. 
Battery-place, north, to Tenth-st. 
Chapel-st., east to Orange-street. 
Marketfield-st. south, to East River 
Grand-st., north, to Houstoun-st. 
Stone-st., north-east, to Pearl-street. 
Canal-st., north, to Fourteenth-st. 
St. John's-lane, east, to Chapel-st. 
of streets, 277. 
21* 



246 STREETS — BROOKLYN, 

WARDS AND STREETS IN BROOKLYN. 

WARDS. 

The City of Brooklyn is divided into nine Wards, 
as follows, viz. 

1st Ward, is between Hicks-street and the East 

River, and between Fuhon and At- 
lantic streets. 
2d Ward, is between Sands-street, and the East 

River, and between Fulton and 

Bridge streets. 
3d Ward, is between Fulton and Atlantic sts., 

and between Hicks-street and Red 

Hook-lane. 
4th Ward, is between Fulton and Bridge streets, 

and between Sands-street, and a line 

running from Red Hook-lane to the 

Wallabout Bridge. 
5th Ward, is between Bridge-street and the Wal- 
labout bay and the East River, and the 

above line. 
6th Ward, is between Atlantic-street and Red 

Hook. 
7th Ward, is between the Wallabout bay and 

the village of Williamsburgh, in the 

town of Bush wick. 
8th Ward, is between Red Hook, and the south 

bounds of the city. 
9th Ward, is between the south bounds of the 

7th Ward, and the town of Flatbush. 

LIST OF STREETS IN THE CITY OP BROOKLYN. 

Adams-street, from East River, southerly, to Ful- 
ton-street. 
Amity, East River, east, to Red Hoolc road. 

Atlantic, East River, east, to Fulton-street. 

Baltic, East River, east, to Gowanus road. 

Bedford, Raymond-street, east, to Division-st. 

Bergen, East River, east, to Gowanus road. 

Boerum, Fulton-street, south, to Bergen-st. 

Bolivar, Raymond-street, west, to Jackson-st. 

Bond, Fulton-street, south, to Degraw-st. 



STREETS! — BROOKLYN. 



247 



Bridge, 

Butler, 

Carll, 

Carroll, 

Chapel, 

Charles, 

Clarke, 

Clinton, 



Columbia, 

Concord, 

Constable, 

Court, 

Cranberry, 

Crown, 

Dean, 

Degraw, 

Division, 

Dock, 

Doughty, 

Douglas, 

Duffield, 

Elizabeth, 

Fisher, 

Fleet, 

Front, 

Fulton, 

Furnam, 

Gold, 

Green-lane 



Henry, 

Hicks, 

High, 

Hoyt, 

Jackson, 

James, 

Jay, 

John, 



East River, south, to Fulton-street. 

East River, east, to Gowanus road. 

Tillar}'^-street, south, to Fleet-street. 

East River, east, to Court-street. 

Jay-street, east, to Bridge-street. 

Front-street, south, to Sands-street. 

Fulton-street, west, to East River. 

Fulton-street, south, to Gowanus bay. 
Clinton Avenue, Newtown road, south, to Jamaica 
road. 

Poplar-street, south, to Gowanus bay. 

Fulton-street, east, to Navy-street. 

Clinton-street, west, to East River. 

Fulton-street, south, to Gowanus bay, 

Fulton-street, west, to Columbia-st, 

East River, east, to Court-street. 

East River, east, to Gowanus road. 

Gowanus road, Avest, to East River. 

Raymond-street, north, to Newtown 
road. 

Front-street, to East River. 

Hicks-street, west, to East River. 

Court-street, east, to Gowanus road. 

Fulton-street, north, to Tillary-st. 

Fulton-street, south, to Doughty-st. 

Water-street, north, to East River. 

Fulton-street, east, to Jackson-street. 

Fulton-street, east, to Jackson-street. 

East River, south-east, to Flatbush 
turnpike. 

Fulton-street, south, to Dean-street, 

East River, south, to Fulton-street. 

Front-street, south, to Sands-street. 
Hamilton Avenue, East River, south, to Gowanus 
bay. 

Fulton-street,south, to Gowanus bay, 

Fulton-street,south, to Gowanus bay. 

Fulton-street, east, to Navy-street. 

Fulton-slreet, south, to Degraw-st. 

East River, south. 

Front-street, south-east, to Main-st. 

East River, south, to Fulton-street. 

Bridge-street, east, to Navy Yard. 



248 



STREETS — BR KL YN . 



Johnson, Fulton-street, east, to Carll-street. 

Joralemon, Fulton-street, west, to East River. 
Lafayette, Raymond- street, west, to Fleet-st. 
Lawrence, Tillary-street, south, to Fulton-st. 
Liberty, Nassau-street, south, to Concord-st. 

Livingston, Clinton-street, east, to Fulton-street. 
Main, Fnlton-street, north, to East River. 

Marshall, Bridge-street, east, to Navy Yard. 
Mercein, James-sireet, east, to Garrison-street. 
Middagh, Fulton-street, west, toColumbia-st. 
Montgomery, East River, East, to Court-street. 
Monroe-place,Ciark-street, south, to Pierpont-st. 
Moser, Joralemon-street, north to Pierpont- 

street. 
Myrtle, Fulton-street, east, to Washington 

Avenue. 
Nassau, Fulton-street, east, to Navy Yard. 

Navy, York-street, south, to LafnyeUe-st. 

Nevius, Fulton-street, south, to Degraw-st. 

Orange, Fulton-street, west, to Columbia-st. 

Pacific, Gowanus road, west, to East River. 

Pearl, F'ulton-street, north, to East River. 

Pierpont, Fulton-street, west, to East River. 

Pineapple, Fulton-street, west, to Columbia-st. 
Plymouth, Adams-street, east, to Navy Yard. 
Poplar, Henry-street, west, to Columbia-st. 

Powers, Fuhon-street, south, to Degraw-st. 

President, East River, east, to Court-street. 
Prince, Tillary-street, south, to Fleet-street. 

Prospect, Fulton-street, east, to Navy-street. 
Raymond, Tillary-street, south, to Lafavette-st. 
Red Hood road,Fulton-street, to Red Hook Point. 
Remsen, Clinton-street, west, to East River. 

Sackett, East River, east, to Court-street. 

Sands, Fulton-street, east, to Navy-street. 

SchermerhornClinton-street, east, to Fulton-street. 
Sidney-place, Joralemon-street, south, to State-st. 
Smith, Fulton-street,south, to Gowanus bay. 

State, Fulton-street, west, to East River. 

Steward's-alley Water-street, south, to Prospect-st. 
Sycamore, Raymond-street, east, to Division-st. 
Talman, Jay -street, east, to Charles-st. 

Tillary, Fulton-street, ->ast, to Division-st. 



DISTANCES. 249 

Tompkins, Cornell's lane, south, to Degraw-st. 

Union, East River, east, to Court-street. 

Village, Fleet-street, south, to Fulton-streel. 

Warren, East River, east, to Gowanus road. 
Washington, East River, south, to Fulton-street. 

Washington Avenue, Bedford road, south, to Ja- 
maica road. 

Water, Fulton-street, east, to Navy Yard. 

William, Fulton-street, south, to Degraw-st. 

Willow, Poplar-street, south, to Pierpont, st. 

Willoughby, Fulton-street, east to Clinton Ave. 

Wyckoff, East River, east, to Gowanus road. 

York, James-street, east, to Navy Yard. 



DISTANCES, 

PROM BROOKLYN TO SUNDRY PLACES ON LONG ISLAND, 

By land. 

To Williamsburgh, 2 miles. 

To Flatbush, 4 

To Union Race Course, 7 

To Newtown, 7 

To Bath, 9 

To Gravesend 10 

To Flushing, .' 10 

To Coney Island, 12 

To Jamaica, 11 

To Marine Pavilion, Rockaway, ... 19 

To Hempstead, 20 

To Jerusalem, 26 

To Hicksville, {by Railroad,) 27 

To Jericho, 29 

To Glen Cove, 25 

To Oyster Bay, 30 



250 



LIST or PIERS. 



lilST OF PIERS. 

Numbers eommencing at the Battery— Including all the 
New Piers. 



NORTH RIVER. 

1, Foot of Battery Place. 

2, 3, Between Battery Place 

and Morris street. 
4, 5, 6, 7, Between Morris & 
Rector street. 

8, Rector street. 

9, Between Rector and Car- 

lisle street. 

10, Carlisle street. 

11, Albany street. 

12, Between Albany and Ce- 
dar street. 

13, Cedar street. 

14, 1.3, Liberty street. 
16, 17, Courtlandt street. 

18, Between Courtlandt and 
Dey street. 

19, Dey street. 

20, Fulton street. 

21, Wasliington Market. 

22, Vesey street. 

2J, Between Vesey and Bar- 
clay street. 

24, Barclay street. 

25, Robinson street. 

26, Murray street. 

27, Warren street. 

28, Chambers street. 

29, Reade street. 

30, Duane street. 

31, Jay street. 

32, Harrison street. 
3.3, Franklin street. 

34, North Moore street. 

35, Beach street. 

36, Hubert street. 

37, Vestry street. 

38, Desbrosses street. 

39, Watts street. 

40, Hoboken street. 

41, Canal street. [ 



'. 42, Spring street. 
' 43, Charlton street. 

44, King street. 

4.5, Clarkson street. 

46, Christopher street. 

47, Amos street. 

48, Charles street. 

49, Hammond street. 

EAST RIVER. 

1, Foot of the Battery. 

2, Whitehall street. 

3, Moore street. 

4, 5, Broad street. 

6, 7, 8, Coenties slip. 
9, 10, Cuyler's alley. 
11, 12, Old slip. 

13, Governeur's lane. 

14, 15, Coffee House slip. 

16, Pine street. 

17, 18, Maiden Lane. 
19, 20, Burling slip. 

21, Fulton street. 

22, Fulton Market. 

23, Beekman street. 

24, 25, Peck slip. 
26, 27, Dover street. 
28, 29, Rosevelt street. 
30, 31, .James slip. 

32, Oliver street. 

33, 34, Catherine slip. 
35, 36, Market street. 
37, 38, Screw Dock. 
39, 40, Pike slip. 

41, 42, Between Pike and 

Rutger's slip. 
43, 44, Rutger's slip. 

45, Jefferson street. 

46, Clinton street. 

Dry Docks, near Avenue 
D. between Ninth and Elev- 
enth streets. 



In addition to the above Piers, it is proposed to erect a 
Great Pier in the Hudson River, to extend from the Battery, 
northerly, as far as the interests of the city shall require. It 
is also proposed to construct a stone pier and breakwater in 
the East River, above Corlaer's Hook. 



K3E2Y. 



PUBLIC BinLUlNGS. 
A City Hall, in the Park. 
B Records OtMce, do. 
C City Prison, do. 
Cc House of Detention, Elm-st. 
D Merchants' Exchange, Wall-st. 
E Custom House, 
r New York Hospital, Broadway. i 

G State Arsenal, Elm o. Franklin. | 

H Columbia College, Park-place. 
Hh University, opposite Wash. Square. 
I Amer. Acad. Fine Arts, Barclay-st. 
I i National Academy, 9 Beekman-st. 
J Masonic Hall, Broadway. 
K Clinton Hall, Beekman-st. 
li Gas Works, Canal c. Centre. 
M Park Theatre, 21 Park Row. 
N American Theatre, 46 Bowery. 
Nn Franklin Theatre, 175 Chatham-st. 

Richmond Hill Theatre, Varick-st. 
P National Theatre, Church-st. 

Q, American Museum, 'i'H Broadway. 

R Peale's Museum, ^52 Broadway. 

S Niblo's Garden, Broadway. 

T Fulton Market, Fulton-st. 

U Washington do. Washington-st. 

V Clinton do. Canal c. Washington. 
W Franklin do. Old Slip. 

X Catharine do. Catharme-st. 

Y Essex do. Grand c. Ludlow. 

Z Gouverneur do. Gouverneur-st. 

AA Monroe do. Grand-st. 

BB Centre do. Grande. Centre. 

CC Greenwich do. Christopher-Bt. 

DD Manhattan do. Mangin-st. 

EE Tompkins do. Bowery. 

FF Jefferson do. Sixth Avenue. 

GG Union do. Second -St., n. Houston. 

HH Lyceum Nat. Hist., 563 Broadway 

1 I Zoological Institute. 37 Bowery. 
JJ Post Office, Chamher*-st. 

KK Exchange Post Office, William-si. 

PRINCIPAL HOTELS, &c. 
a Astor House, Broadway, 
b .American Hotel, i29 Broadway. 
e Atlantic Hotel, -5 Broadway, 
d Barclay-street House, Barclay-st. 
e Broad-street House, Broad-st. 
f City Hotel, Broadway. 

Clinton Hotel, Beekman-st. 

Congrees Hall, 142 Broadway. 



i Eastern Pearl-street House. Pearl-st. 
i Exehange Hotel, 10 and 12 Broad-st. 
k Franklin House, 197 Broadway. 
1 Holt's Hotel, Fulton-st. 
m Lnvejoy's Hotel, 34 Park Row. 
n Globe Hotel, 01 Broadway, 
o Mansion House, 39 Broadway, 
p Pacilic Hotel, 162 Greenwich-sU 
q National Hotel, 112 Broadway, 
r North American Hotel, 30 Bowery, 
s Northern Hotel, 79 Courtlandt-st. 
t Orange County HoH.^e, Co/irtlandt-st. 
u Pearl-street House and Ohio Hotel, 

38 Pearl-st. 
V Tammany Hall. 166 Nassau-sl. 
w Tontine Coffee-House, Wall-sl. 
X Otsego House, 31 Courtlandt-st. 
y Walton House, 328 Pearl-st. 
z Washington Hotel, Broadway, 
aa Western Hotel, 9 Courtlandt-st. 
bb York House, 5 Counlaadt-st. 

CHURCHES. 
Presbyterian. 

1 First church, Wall-st. 

2 Brick ch. Beekman-st. n. Park. 

3 Rutgers-st. cli. Kutger's c. Henry. 

4 Duane-st. ch. Duanec. Churi-.h. 

5 Canal-st. ch. Canal c. Green. 

6 Laight-st. ch. Laight c. Vari'.k. 

7 Seventh ch. Broome c. Ridge. 

8 Plighth ch. Christopher -St. 

9 AUen-st. ch. n. Grand-st. 

10 Central ch. Broome n. Elm. 
U Spring-st. ch. n. Varick-st. 

12 Bleecker-st. ch. n. Broadway. 

13 Bowery ch. 66 Bowery. 

14 Union ch. Prince c. Orange. 

15 North ch. Sixth Avenue. 

16 Free Presbyterian ch. Dey-si. 

17 Do. do. do. 84 Chatham. 

18 Scotch do. do. Cedar-st. 

19 Do. do. do. Pearl-Bt. 

20 Murray-sU ch. 45 Murray-st. 

21 .Second Avenue ch. n. Third-st. 

22 West ch. Carmine op. Varick. 

23 Associate ch. Grand c. Mercer. 

24 Do. do. Prince-st. 

25 Reformed ch- 47 Channb*r-st. 

26 Do. do. Srxth-st. 

27 Fourteenth ch. Franklin-st. 

28 Coloured ch. Frankfort-st. 



Dutch Rearmed. 

fc9 South ch. Exchange-place. 

30 Middle ch. Liberty c. Naasau. 

31 North ch. W'iUiam c. Fulloii. 
S2 Northwest ch. Franklin-st. 

33 Northeast ch. Market c. (leiiry. 
"H Church, Broome c. Greene. 
36 Do. Greene c. Houston. 

36 Do. Bleecker c. Amos. 

37 Do. North c. Eldridge. 

38 Miision House. Ninlh-st. 

39 True Reformed ch. King-jt. 

40 Gertnan do. do. 21 Forsyth-et. 

Episcopcd. 

41 Trinity ch. Broadway. 

42 St. Paul's chapel, Broadway. 

43 St. John's chapel. Vnrick-st. 

44 St. George's ch. Beckman-st. 

45 French ch. du Esprit, Franklin-st. 

46 Christ ch. 81 Anthony-st. 

47 Grace ch. Bron^iway c. Rector. 

48 St. Mark's ch. Stuy vesant-st. 

49 Zion ch. Molt c. Cross. 

50 St. Stephen's ch. Chrystie-st. 

51 St. Thomas' ch. Broadway. 

52 St. Luke's ch. Hudson-su 

53 Ascension ch. Canal-bU 

I 54 All S;tints' ch. Heury-st- 

55 St. Clement's ch. Amity-st. 

56 Mission ch. Vandewater-at. 

57 St. Peter's ch. Twentieth-tt. 

58 St. Pliilip's, (col'd) 33Centre-«t. 

59 Mission, (col'd) Ridge-su 

Baplisl. 

60 First ch. 33 Gold-st. 

61 Church, 6 Oliver-st. 

62 Do Mulberry n. Chatham. 

63 Bethel ch. Delancy c. Chryutie. 

64 Beriah ch. M'Dongal-«t. 

65 Union ch. North c. Forsyth. 

66 Noiih ch. Bedrord-st. 

67 East ch. Pitt c. Delancy. 

68 Church, Mott n. Spring. 

69 Elienezer ch. North c. Suffolk. 

70 South ch. 84 Nassau. 

71 Mission ch. Brpoine c. Cannon. 

72 Amity-sl. ch. Amity n. Greene. 

73 Abyssinian ch. 44 Anthony-Bt. 

74 General ch. 13S Laurens st. 

75 Particular ch. rear 63 Chrystic-sL 

Methodist Efnscopal. 

76 First ch. 31 John-st. 

77 Second ch. 8 Forsyth-st. 

78 Third ch. 108 Duane-st. 

79 Fourth ch. 138 Allen-st. 

80 Filth ch. Willet n. Bioonie. 



81 Sixth ah. Be^ltord e. Morton. 
S2 Seventh ch. Seventh-tt. 
tH Eighth ch. Second-lit. 

84 Ninth ch. 61 Greene-it. 

85 Tenth ch. Twenty-first-^t. 

Independent Melhodixt 

86 Independent ch. 56 ChrysUe-it. 

87 Protestant ch. 61 Attorney-st. 

88 Do. do. Sullivan-bt. 

89 Do. do. 859 Broome-el. 

90 Primitive ch. 43 Elizabetli-»u 

91 Do. do. Doiiiinick-st. 

92 Do. do. Pitt n. North. 

93 Mariners' ch. Roosevelt-sl. 

94 Asbury, (col'd) 55 Elizaleili-ft. 

95 Zion, do. 156 ChurcU-»l. 

Roman Catholic. 

96 Si. Peter's ch. Barclay-sl. 

97 Christ ch. Ann n. Williani-st. 

98 St. Patrick's cathedral, Prinoe-sL 

99 St. Mary's ch. Grand c. Ridge. 

Friends. 

1(10 Meeting House, Rose n. Pearl. 
101 Do. do. Hester-M. 
10-: Do. do. 38 Heniy-i-u 
103 DiJ. do. DownirifbU 

hutJierati, 

101 St. James' ch. Orange-st. 

105 St. Matthew's ch. WaJkei-st. 

Univeisaliits, 

106 First Society, Orchard-st. 

107 Society United Friends, Duane-&1. 

Urdtarian. 

108 Cliurch, 109Chambers-st. 

109 Do Mercer c. Prince. 

Independent. 

110 Providence chapel, Thonipsou-«t. 

111 Welch chapel, 137 Mulberry-isU 



112 Synagogue, Portuguese, Mill-«t. 
U3 Do. German, Elni-*t. 

114 Do. Dutch, Grand-«t. 

MisceUancous. 

115 Uniteil Brrthren ch. Fnlton-.-it. 

116 New Jerusalem chapel, Pearl-sl. 

117 Clirigt:»^ ch. Broonie-st. 

* , ' New Churches marked thus f 



THE 

CLASSIFIED 

MERCANTILE DIRECTORY, 



FOR 



NEW-YORK AND BROOKLYN. 

CONTAINING, 

rHE NAMES, OCCUPATION AND PLACE OF BUSINESS OF ALL 

THE PRINCIPAL FIRMS ANB INDIVIDUALS, TRANSACTING 

MERCANTILE, PROFESSIONAL OR MANUFACTURING 

PURSUITS, IN NEW- YORK AND BROOKLYN ; 

UNDER THEIR RESPECTIVE KINDS OF BUSINESS. 
EMBRACING A 

LIST OF PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS, &c. 



PUBLISHED BY J. DISTURNELL. 

[ 1837. 



EXPLANATION. 



In searching for the name of an individual, or a firm, 
in the Classified Mercantile Directory, reference 
must be had to the business in which they are engaged, 
whether a Bookseller, Importer, &c. Many occupations are 
also divided under two or more heads, viz, — Merchant 
Tailors, and Tailors. First, find the occupation of a per- 
son, and then look for the name, all of which are arranged 
alphabetically. 

As the publisher only feels bound to insert subscribers' 
names, and the principal concerns in New-York and Brook- 
lyn, information in regard to whose business is of pubhc 
utility to the stranger and citizen ; some omissions, how- 
ever, may have occurred, — if so, their names will be in- 
serted in future editions, if desired. 

Nem York, Mat/, 1837. 



CONTENTS. 



A Page 
Agents, ]3 

Agricultural Implements, 

Cdealers in^ 15 

Apothecaries, (See Druggists.) 

Architects, J5 

Artists, 16 

Artists' Colourmen, 16 

Arts, f dealers in Works of) .. 16 

Attorneys, Ifi 

Auctioneers, J9 



B 

Bakers, 

Bankers, 

Bandbox Makers, 

Barometer and Thermometer 
Makers, 

Basket and Woodenware Deal- 



ers, 



Bathing Houses (Proprietors ofj 

Bedstead Mrirul;.cturers, 

Billiard Table Manii!;icturer,.. 

Blacking Maimfactuiers, 

Blacksmiths, 

Block and Tump Manufactu- 
rers, 

Boarding Ilotise Keepers, 

Boat Builders, 

Bookbinders,.. ■ 

Bookbinders' Tools, ('dealers 
in; 

Booksellers, 

Boot and Shoe Dealers, 

Boot and Shoe Manufacturers' 
Articles, fdealers in^ 

Booiree and Last Makers, 

Brass Founders, 

Brewers, 

Britannia, Block Tin and Pew- 
ter Ware Manufacturers, .. 

Brokers 

Brooms, Cdealers in j 

Bfush Makers,...,.... 



Page 

Builders, 31 

Butter Dealers, 31 



Cabinet Makers, 32 

Calico Engravers, 32 

Cap Manufacturers, 33 

Card Manufacturers, 33 

Card, CVisiting and Pla3ing,; 

Manufacturers, 33 

Carpenters, 33 

Carpet Dealers, 33 

Carriage and Coach Makers,.. 34 

Carvers, 34 

Chair Makers, 34 

Charts and Nautical Instru- 
ments, (dealers in; 35 

Chemists, 35 

Chimney Top Maker, 35 

China, Glass and Earthenware 

Dealers, 35 

Cider and Vinegar Dealers, .... 35 

Clergymen, 36 

Clothiers, 41 

Cloths, ^dealers in; 43 

Coal Dealers 43 

Coffee and Spice Manufactu- 
rer, 44 

Comb Dealers 44 

Commission Alerchants, 45 

Confectioners, 48 

Coopers, 48 

Copperplate Printers, 48 

Coppersmiths, 49 

Cork Manufacturer, 49 

Corset Dealers, 49 

Crockery Dealers, (See China, 
Glass and Earthenware Deal. 
ers.) 
Cutlers 49 



Dentists, 



D 



49 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
Dentists* Foil, Cdealer in^ — 50 

Die yinkers, 50 

Distillers, 50 

DressmaKera, 50 

I>ruggists, 50 

Dry Goods, Cdealersin^ ...... 5'2 

Dyers, 59 

Dye Stuffs, Cdealors in; 59 



Page 
India l^ubber, Cdealers in; ... 79 
Intelligence I Offices, Ckeepers 

of; 79 

Iron Chest Manufacturers 79 

Iron Founders, 79 

Iron Mongers 79 

Iron Railing Manufacturers,... 79 

JeweHase Makers, 79 

Jewellers, 80 



Embroiderer, 59 

Engineer, ^9 

Engravers, 59 



Fancy Goods, ^dealers in; .... 

Fancy Hardware Dealers, 

Fariiers, 

Featiier Bed and Matrass Deal' 

trs, 

Feailier Dresser, 

Fire Engine Builders, 

Flour l>ealers, 

Forwarding Merchants, 

Fringe and Trinunings, Cdeal 

ers in; 

Fruiterers, 

Furnishing Warn Dealers, .... 

Furiuture Dealers, 

Furrieis, 



60 
(U 
62 

6-2 
62 
62 
62 
62 

62 
63 
63 
63 
63 



Gangers, 64 

Glass Cutters, 64 

Glovers, 64 

Gold Leaf Manufacturers, .... M 

Granite Dealer, 64 

Grate and Fender Makers, .... 64 

Grocers, 65 

Gunsmiths, 68 

U 

Hair Dressers, 68 

Hardware Dealers, 69 

Halters, 71 

Hay Healers, 72 

Hosiery and Glove Healers, ... 72 
Hotel and Tavern Keepers, ... 72 



Importers, 



Lace Dealers, 81 

Lamps, (dealers in; 81 

Land Agents, 81 

Lend Points, &c. (dealers in) 81 

Leather Dealers, 81 

Lime Dealers, 82 

Liquors, (dealers in) 82 

Lithographers, 83 

Livery St.ibles, (proprietors of) 83 

Locksmiths, 83 

Looking Glass and Frame 

Makers 83 

Looking Glass Makers and Gild- 
ers, 84 

Lumber Dealers, 84 

M 

Machinists, 84 

Mahogany Dealers, 85 

Manifold Writers, (dealers in) 85 

Map Dealers, 85 

Marble Dealers, fc5 

Marine Kailways, (proprietors 

of; 85 

Masons, 86 

Mathematical Instrument 

Makers, 86 

I Matrasses and Beding, ideal- 

1 ers in 1 86 

Medicine, (dealers in) h6 

Merchants, (general) 86 

Merchant Tailors, 87 

Military Goods, (dealers in) ... 89 

Milliners, 89 

Mills, (proprietors of) 89 

Milistone Maker, 89 

Miniature Painters, 89 

Miscellaneous Subscribers' 
Names; also. New Firms, 
Removals and Omissions, 9 to 12 

Morocco (^ase Makers, 89 

Morocco Dressers, ^9 



CONTENTS. 



Vll 



m • T^ Page 
iUusic Dealers, 90 

Music Printer and Engraver,. . 90 

Mustard Manufacturers, 90 

O 

Oculist ...90 

Oil Cioth Manufacturer, ...... 90 

Oil Dealers, 90 

Optician 90 

P 
"ainters, 91 

Paints, (dealers in) '.'. 92 

Pantaloon Strap Manufacturer, 92 

Paper Box Makers, .92 

Paper Dealers, V.... 92 

Paper Hangers, 92 

Pawn Brokers, go 

Penci I Case Makers, ...'.'..'.... 92 

Perfumers ,, 93 

PJjrenologist, .....'.'!!!! 93 

P|i}'sicians, [[ 93 

Pianoforte Makers, ...... \l' 93 

Plane Maker, 94 

Plumbers, "\ 94 

Pocketbook ManulacturersV .'. 94 

Portrait Painters 94 

Printers, ]/'' (^4 

Printers' MateriaYs", (dealers *iA) 95 

Prolessors, 95 

Publishers, ............. 9G 

Q 
Gluill Manufacturers, 97 

R 

Kail Road Car Builders, 98 

Reading Rooms,(proprietorsoO 98 
Ready Made Linen, (dealers in) 98 
Ivetectories and Coftee Houses, 

(keepersof) _' 93 

Kiggers, gg 

Rope and Cord Manufacturers, 99 
Rule iMakers, 99 



Faddlers, gg 

Pail Duck, (dealers in)*" * 99 

Sail Makers, , gg 

Bash and Window ij'liiid Maiiul 

facturers, gg 

Pal t, (dealers in) ..'...,'" 99 

Scalebeam Manufacturer, '..'. JOO 



Scavenger, , . , j^q 

Sculptors, .. ..',,[' 1 100 

Seedsmen and Florist's,! .* .' ." ! ! 100 

Segar Dealers, !*..*.'*. 100 

Shells, (dealer in)...'!.*! 101 

Ship Ctiandlers, . !..'!!!!! !lOl 

Ship Joiners, !!!!!!!lOl 

Shipwrights, !*.!!!!* 101 

Shipping Merchants, !!!!!lOl 

Shoe Dealers, 102 

Shoemakers, .'!!!!l02 

Shot Manufacturers, ! ! 103 

Shower Bath Manufacturer, .!l03 

Silks, (dealers in) i03 

Silversmiths, !i04 

Siiverplaters, '.!l04 

Silverwarr- Dealers, .!!!!!l04 

Soap and Candle Dealers, !.'!!l04 
Sofa and Mahogany Chair Ma- 
nufacturer, 104 

Spar Maker, ',l\\ !!l04 

Spirit Gas Dealer, ! !.','.' !l04 

Stage Proprietor, '. . 104 

Stationers, 105 

Steam Engine Makers,. ! .'.!!!. 105 
Stock and Ready Made Linen 

Dealers, i05 

Stone Cutters, !!.'.!! 106 

Storage Warehouses, (propriV- 

torsoO 106 

Straw Hat Manufacturers 106 

Stove Dealers and Manufacfcu- 

^rers, 106 

Sugar Refiners, 107 

Surgical Instruments, (dealers 

^ in) 107 

Surveyor, 197 

Suspenders, (dealers in) . '. '. '. '. '. '. 107 

T 

Tailors, ]07 

Tanners and Curriers, .!!!!!!! 108 

Tavern Keepers, !i08 

Tea Dealers, ! ! ! 109 

Teachers, ! ! . ! ! 109 

Thimble Manufacturers, ! ! 109 

Thread and Needle Dealers, !!lO<j 

Tinsmiths, ' u'q 

Tobacconists, !..*!!ll0 

Trunk Makers, .'!'.!! 110 

Turners, .'...'.110 

Turpentine Manufacturer,* ! ! ! ! m 
Type and Stereotype Foun- 
ders Ill 



CONTENTS. 



U 

Page 

Umbrplla Dealers, HI 

Undertakers, HI 

Upholsterers, 112 

V 

Vault Light Manufacturers, .. 112 

W 

Watch and Clock Makers, 112 

Watch Case Makers 113 

Watch Dial Makers, 113 

Water Filn-rer, 113 

^Vheel Wrights, 113 

AVhip Makers, 114 



rage 
White Lead Manufacturers, ..114 

White Washer 114 

Whiting and I'aris White Ma- 
nufacturers 114 

Wig Makers 114 

Wine Dealers, 114 

Wire Cloth and Sieve Manu- 
facturers 11^ 

Woodenware Dealers, 115 

Wool Dealers, H-^ 

Woolen Draper, 11^ 

Writing Masters, 1 1-^ 

Z 

Zinc Ilollow-ware Manufac- 
turers, 11"^ 



PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS, &c. 



Page 
Academies, Colleges, «fcc. 116 

Banks, ^^^ 

Benevolent and Religious Institutions, 118 

Public Buildings, Offices, &c. 120 

Packets, Schooners, Sloops and Steamboats, 123 



ilHSCEI.I.A]\EOUS SUBSCRIBERS) NAMES; 

>Also, New Firms, Removals and Omissions, information of 
which was received too late for insertion in their respec- 
tive places in the Classified Directory. 

Adams & Co. Levi, coach makers, Third Avenue, Harlaem. 

Amslie Robert, President North American Fire Insurance 
Company, 18 Wall. 

Alexander Thomas A. Cashier Morris Canal and Banking 
Company, 45 William. 

Aspinwall William H. Consul for Tuscany, 54 South. 

Barnard John T. copperplate printer, 130 Fulton. 

Barton & Heming, xylographic engravers and printers, 9 
Wall. ^ 

Bradford N. G. Commercial Bank, Chatham. 
Brown Jefferson, Coroner, office Lower Police, New City 
Hall. ^ 

Case Robert L. merchant, 135 Front. 
Clark Aaron, Mayor of the City of New- York, No. 5 City 
Hall and 102 Liberty. 

Coddington Jonathan L Postmaster, office, Chambers corner 
City Hall Place. 

Crommelin Robert L Cashier Brooklyn Bank, 5 Front, 
Brooklyn, 

Cornell Robert C. 119 Hudson. 

Cumberson E. black and white smith, plain and ornamental 
iron work, 123 Prince. 

Dando Stephen, bookseller, removed to 18 Cherry. 

Delafield R. H. Secretary Farmers' Loan and Trust Com- 
pany, 31 Wall. 

Dey Anthony, Attorney and Counsellor, 63 Cedar. 

Dibblee William W. Cashier Dry Dock Bank, 27 Wall. 

Doughty J. S. Cashier Atlantic Bank, 55 Fulton, Brooklyn. 



\Q MISCELLANEOUS SUBSCRIBERS' NAMES. 



Duer William L. President Columbia College, No. 1 Col- 
lege Green opposite Park Place. 

Duflon John F. L. Chief Engineer, 333 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Edmonds Francis W. Cashier Leather Manufacturers' Bank, 
4.5 William. 

Flewwelling Samuel, Cashier National Bank, 19 Wall. 

Fulton Iron Foundry Company, manufactory 98 Sullivan. 

Gould & Newman, booksellers, corner Fulton and Nassau. 

Gulick James, Register, Nos. 1 and 2 Hall of Records. 

Hale Josiah L. President Atlantic Insurance Company, 57 
Wall. 

Harris William D. commission merchant, 82 Pine. 

Havens R. President Howard Insurance Company, 54 Wall. 

Hayes Henry H. book-binder, 50 Fulton. 

Haynes Smith, City Inspector, 123 High, Brooklyn, 

Hendricks Harman, President Manhattan Fire Insurance 
Company, 34 Wall. 

Hurd John R. President Neptune Insurance Company, 60 
Wall. 

Johnston & Rogers, corn, and grain dealers, 198 Hudson. 

Lander & Co. William P. gold and silver refiners and smelt 
ers, lith street near Seventh Avenue. 

Latham James, ornamental and writing engraver, 160 Green- 
wich. 
Lawrence A. R. President New York and Harlaem Railroad 

Company, 241 Bowery. 

Lawrence Jonathan, President Merchants' Insurance Com- 
pany, 55 Wall, 

Lenox Robert, President of the Chamber of Commerce, 59 
Broadway. 

Lorillard Jacob, President Mechanics' Bank, 10^ Wall. 

Lozier John, Superinlendant Manhattan Water Works, 7 
Reade. 



MISCELLANEOUS SUBSCRIBERS' NAMES, 11 

Martin C F. guitar manufacturer and importer of musical 

instruments, 196 Hudson. 
Mathews, d.d. Rev. James M. Chancellor of the University 

of the city of New- York, 2 Washington Place. 
Melly Andreas Anton, Consul for Saxony, 15 Maiden Lane. 
Miesegaes Otto II. Consul for Oldenburg, 29 Beaver. 
Miles William B. & A. brewers, 59 Christie. 
Moffat James G. brass founder, 121 Prince. 
Murphy James, composition ornament manufacturer, 165 

Prince. 
Nicoll E. A. Secretary New York Life and Trust Company, 

38 Wall. 
Oakley W. Merchants' Exchange Bank, Greenwich corner 

Dey. 
Onderdonk, d.d. Right Rev. Benjamin T. Bishop of the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church in the State of New York. 
Palmer John J. President Merchants' Bank, 25 Wall. 
Patterson Walter, President New Brighton Association, 8 

Wall. 
Pollard Calvin, architect and builder, 28 Thompson. 
Pratt William W. Florida Packet Office, corner Old Slip 

and South. 
Riker Richard, Recorder, No. 4 City Hall. 
Robinson Morris, Agent United States Bank, 25 WalK 
Satterlee John R. President Greenwich Bank, 308 Greee- 

wich. 
Spencer Sylvester, Chief Clerk U. S. Pension Office, 16 

Wall. 
Stiles, Sherman & Smith, engravers, 89 Nassau c, Fulton. 
Stone James, engineer, 390 Broadway. 
Swartwout Samuel, Collector, Custom House. 
Tar gee John, 27 Frankfort. 
Thompson A. G. President Union Bank, 17 Wall. 



12 MISCELLANEOUS SUBSCRIBERS' NAMES. 

Trevall, Slodart & Co. Commission and Auction Store, 14 
Courtlandt. 

Trotter Jonathan, Hicks corner Joralemon, .Brooi7?/n. 

Van Buren S. B. builder, 46 Howard near Broadway. 

Vermilye W. M. Cashier Merchants' Exchange Bank, 
Greenwich corner Dey. 

Wakeman Thaddeus B. Secretary and Agent American In- 
stitute, 187 Broadway. 

Waters Talman J. Secretary New York and Erie Railroad 
Company, 46 Wall. 

Weed E. E. Secretary New York Gas Light Company, 102 
Centre. 

Whitteniore Timothy, President Greenwich Insurance Com-' 
pany, 306 Greenwich. 

Wilson, Hawksworth & Moss, merchants, 9 Piatt. 



CLASSIFIED 
MERCANTILE DIRECTORY. 



AGENTS. 

Allen & Paxson, agents Old Line Richmond Packets, 92 Wall. 
Armitage Benjamin, agent North American Coal Company, 

8 Wall. 
Beadleston Ebenezer, agent for the sale of Nash <fe Son's 

Troy Cream Ale, 180 Washington, corner of Dey. 
Beebe, jr. S. agent Fulton Line Canal Boats, 109 Broad. 
Bliss Ira, agent Delaware and Raritan Canal, and Camden 

and Amboy Railroad Company, 12 Washington. 
Boyd John J. agent Havre Line of Packets, 9 Tontine 

Buildings Wall. 
Briggs J. & N. agents Philadelphia and Baltimore Packets, 

36 Old Slip. 
Brown Wm. agent Despatch Line Canal Boats, 100 Broad. 
Buckley George, agent for the Charleston Brig Line, 88 

South, corner Burling Slip. 
Card & Co. agents Commercial Line Erie Canal Boats, 123 

Bread. 
Carter W. C. agent Erie Canal Line, 21 Coenties Slip. 
Callin Pope, agent Troy Line Steam Tow Boats, 33 Coen'- 

ties Slip. 
Chamberlain Charles, agent Seneca Falls Line Lake Boats, 

21 Coenties Slip. [South. 

Collins E. K. agent Liverpool and New Orleans Packets, 56 
Corlies E. A. &, G. W. agents for the Hartford and Norwich 

Steamboat Companies, 283 Pearl. 
Crocker Leonard, agent Troy and Michigan Line Canal 

Boats, lOG Broad. 
Crooke &Fowks, agents Hudson River Steamboats, West, 

corner Liberty. 
Degrauw John W. agent for Cromeliu & Co.'s Mustard and 

Chocolale, 22 Coenties Slip. 
Degrauw & Wright, agents for Dunlap's Albany Ale, 22 Co- 
enties SHp. 

A 



14 AGENTS. 

Demill R. IM. agent Darien Line of Packets, 180 Front. 
Fonda A. P. agent for Hudson River Steamboat Associa- 
tion. 51 Courtlandt. 
Grisvvold John, agent London Line of Packet.*:, 70 South. 
Hallnck S. T. agent Utina Line Canal Boats, 22 South. 
Herrick S. H. ageni Boston Packets, 5 Coenlies Slip. 
Hinman E. W. agent New York, Utica, and Chenango- 

Line Canal Boats, 109 Broad. 
Hurlbnrt & Co. E. D. agent Mobile Packets, 84 South. 
Jerraain A. agent Albany and Canal Line Steam Tow Boata^ 

16 South. 
Johnson & Lowden, agents Savannah Packets, &c. 86 Wall. 
Keith, M. L. agent J\ew York and Seneca Falls Line Canal 

Boats, 8 South. 
Kermit Robert, agent Liverpool Line of Packets, 74 South. 
Knight F. agent Granite and Railroad Company, 7 Broad. 
Leverett John, agent for the sale of Collins &, Co.'s axes^ 

246 Pearl. 
M'Kee Wm. J. agent Philadelphia Line of Packets, 7 Coen- 

tics Slip. 
Meech & Co. A. B. agents New York and Ohio Line Canal 

Boats, corner Broad and Water. 
Miller &- Bancker, agent Philadelphia Line of Packets, 32 

Front and 73 Washington. [ington. 

Morgan Charles, agent Charleston Steam Packets, 65 Wash- 
Myers M. North American Land Agency, 18 Wall. 
Northrup D. agent United States Line Canal Boats, 22J 

South. 
Norton & Smith, agent=! Hudson River Steamboats, 7 West, 

between Courtlandt and Liberty. 
Norton E. F. agent Troy and Ohio Line Canal Boats, 33 

Coenties Slip. 
Pratt Wm. W. agent Florida Packets, 19 Coenties Slip. 
Putnam R. agent Troy and Erie Line Canal Boats, 33 Co- 
enties Slip. 
Rice John, agent Geneva and Penn Yan Line Canal Boats, 

22 South. 
Ring & Co. Z. agents for Screw Dock Company, 442 Water. 
Robinson &, Co. E. D. agent Erie and Ohio Line Canal 

Boats, 15 South. [Wall, 

Scott &- Morrell, agents Savannah Packets, 72 South. 
Shaw S. agent for Munn and Illiiioig Land Company, 44 



ARCHITECTS. IS 



Southwick T. M. agent Lake and River Line CanaJ Boats, 

119 Broad. 
Stiirges & Clearman, agents Savannah and other Hnes of 

packets, 92 Wall 
Sutton George, agent for Charleston Packets, 88 South, cor- 
ner Burling Slip. 
Swan Henry R. agent for New Brunswick Steamboat and 

Canal Transportation Company, 12 Washington. 
Van Dewater R. J» agent Oswego Line Canal boats, 100 

Broad. 
Van Olinda &. Co. L agents Clinton Line Canal Boats, 125 

Broad. 
Van Santvoord A. agent Swiftsure Line Steam Tow Boats, 

82 Courtlandt. 
Warrin John, sole agent for C. Atwood & Co.'s Steel Pens, 

72 Maiden Lane. [Broad. 

Waters T. P. agent Washington Line Canal Boats, 125 
Watson George, agent for the Knower japanned and enam- 
elled leather manufacturing company. Boot, shoe, and 

leather warehouse, 161 Water. 
Wheeler Allen, agent New York and Michigan Line Canal 

Boats, 106 Broad. 
Whitlock, jr. Wm. agent Havre Packets, 46 South. 
Wilkie Frederick, forwarding agent, 9 Coenties Slip. 
Worthington J. agent and treasurer. New Jersey Railroad 

Company, 1 Hanover. 
Wyckoff James S. agent Troy and Oswego Line Canal 

Boats, 33 Coenties Slip. [ton. 

Yates Richard, agent steamboat New Brighton, 51 Washing- 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, Cdealers in) 

Dunn & Co. S. agriculture and machine warehouse, 193 

Water. 
Freeborn & Hitchcock, 183 Front. [Bowery, 

Mayher John, agriculture and plough manufactory, 73 

APOTHECARIES, (See Druggists.) 

ARCHITECTS. 

Dakin James H. 729 Greenwich. [ington Place. 

Davis Alexander J. University, Wooster, corner of Wash- 
Krarap William C. 45 William. 
Town Ithiel, 14 Wall. 

A2 



16 ATTORNIES. 



Webb Edward J. ornamental, plain, and perspective draughts- 
man, corner of Cedar and Nassau — up stairs. 

ARTISTS. 

Adams J. A. engraver on wood, 38 John. 

Brown George L. landscape painter, 5 Dey. 

Chambers Thomas, marine painter, 213 Greene. 

Chapman John G. landscape and historical painter 62 White. 

Cole Thomas, landscape and historical painter, Catskill. 

Cnmmings Thomas S. miniature painter, 38 Reade. 

Dunlap WilUam, v.p.n.a. historical painter, 16 Green- 
wich Lane. [Duane. 

Durand Asher B. historical engraver and portrait painter, 82 

Fisher Alvin, portrait painter, 41 James, Brooklyn. 

Herring James, portrait painter, 389 Broadway. 

Hughes Robert Ball, sculptor, 36 Hudson. 

Ingham Charles, portrait painter, 61 Franklin. 

Inman Henry, portrait painter, 18 Walker. 

Marsiglia Gerlando, 333 Broadway. 

Morse Samuel F. B. p. n. a. historical and portrait painter, 
New York University, Wooster. [8A Barclay. 

Peale Rembrandt, p. a. a. f. a, historical and portrait painter, 

Rogers N. miniature painter, 1 Cortlandt, corner Broadway. 

Smillie James, landscape engraver, Kingston, N. Y. 

Trumbull John, (late p. a. a. f. a.) historical painter, 20 
Broadway. 

Wier Robert W. landscape painter, West Point. 

ARTISTS' COLORMEN. 
Rover H. 300 Broadway. 
Smith's artists' Repository, 359 Broadway. 

ARTS, (dealers in works ofJ 

Beaumont John P. 11 John. 
Cohnan William A. 205 Broadway. 
Decheux Edward, 325 Broadway. 
Flandin Pierre, importer of fine paintings, 2 Murray. 
Hayward Wm. publisher and importer of English engra- 
vings ; dealer in paintings, &c. 20 Courtlandt — up stairs. 
Paff Michael, 9 Barclay. 

ATTORNIES. 
Anderson & Raymond, counsellors, 5 Broad. 
Bell John, attorney, 42 Wall. 



ATTORNIES. 17 



Betts Frederick J. clerk U. S. Court. New City Hall. 

Blatchford Richard M. counsellor, 1 Hanover. 

Blatchford Edgecomb H. 1 Hanover. 

Bogardus Robert, counsellor, 12 City Hall Place. 

Brady James T. 27 Beekman. 

Bronson Frederick, counsellor, 34 Wall. 

Browning C. S. 21 Wall. 

Burger Timothy P. counsellor, solicitor in chancery and 
commissioner of deeds, 121 Cherry. 

Burrill Alexander M. counsellor, 44 Wall. 

Campbell William W. counsellor, 44 Wall. 

Cassedy Samuel, counsellor, 23 Grand, Jersey City. 

Clark Gerardns, counsellor, 136 Water. 

Cleaveland John, counsellor, 44 Wall. 

Clinton Charles A. clerk Superior Court, 15 City Hall. 

Coit Joshua, counsellor at law, 60 Wall. 

Cook John, counsellor, &c. 46 John. 

Cutting Francis B. counsellor, &c. 69 Cedar. 

Davies iSl, Foot, counsellors, 1 Hanover. 

De Peyster Frederic, master in chancery, 73 Nassau. 

Dikeman & Reid, counsellors, 97 Cranberry, Brooklyn. 

Dixon George C. master in chancery, 10 Front, Brooklyn. 

Dner John, counsellor, 42 Wall. 

Edwards & M'Coun, counsellors, .53 Wall. 

Fish Hamilton, counsellor, 21 Wall. 

Folsom George, counsellor and commissioner for Massa- 
chusetts, 49 William, near Wall. [berry, Brooklyn. 

Furman &. Fames, counsellors, corner of Fulton and Cran- 

Glover Samuel, 21 Wall. 

Green I. R. counsellor, &c. 63i Cedar. [Liberty. 

Hall David P. counsellor, solicitor, and conveyancer, 83 

Hall Willis, counsellor, 8 Wall. 

Hallett William P. clerk Supreme Court, 19 City Hall. 

Hanford Frederick A. counsellor, 38 Wall. 

James Thomas W. notary, Grand, Jersey City. 

Johnson Isaac A. 20 Nassau. 

Kimball Elijah H. 12 Wall. [man. 

Knapp Samuel L. counsellor, corner of Nassau and Beek- 

Kursheedt Alexander, 18 Wall. 

Leonard William H. notary, 8 Wall. 

LesterA.21 Wall. 

Leveridge John, counsellor, 145 Cherry. 

A3 



18 ATTORNIES. 



Leveridge John W. C. 145 Cherry. 

M'Coiin GilbertJ. 40 Wall. 

M'Elrath Thomas, commissioner for Pennsylvania, no* 
tary, &c. Pine, c. "Wall. 

March Joshua S. 3 Jones' Lane. 

Maxwell Wm. H. commissioner for the states of Connec- 
ticut, Georgia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, &e. 3 Nassau. 

Maxwell & Magher, counsellors, &c. 3 Nassau. 

Millard A O. 3 Peck Slip. 

Mitchell J. W. counsellor, &c. 631 Cedar. 

Morris Wm. L. 2 Purk Place, and Grove, corner Bleecker. 

Oakley Jesse, counsellor, 11 Pine. 

Ogden David B. counsellor, 20 Nassau. 

Paine Elijah, 40 Wall. 

Prall Horatio G. commissioner for the stale of New Jersey, 
2 Park Place, and Grove, c. Bleecker. 

Proudfit James, counsellor, 3 Peck Slip. 

Rankin Robert G. counsellor and commissioner for Con- 
necticut, <fcc. 44 Wall. 

Reading Richard A. commissioner of deeds, 44 Wall. 

Robinson Beverly, counsellor, 42 Wall. 

Robinson, jr. Beverly, 42 Wall. 

Rockwell & Greene, counsellors, 136 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Schieirelin counsellor, 20 Chambers. 

Schuyler Robert, 1 Hanover. 

Shaw Henry, attorney. 44 Wall. 

Slosson & Schell, 27 Wall. 

Smally John, commissioner and notary, 10 Front, Brooklyn. 

Smally & Dixon, counsellors, 10 Front, Brooklyn. 

Smith Joseph W. 54 Wall. 

Ten Broeck Rensselaer, attorney and commissioner of 
deeds, 1 Courtlandt, corner of Broadway. 

Tillou Francis R. counsellor, &c. 69 Cedar. 

Van Cntt & Duryea, counsellors, 10 Front, Brooklyn. 

Van Rensselaer Jacob R. counsellor, 21 Wall. 

Van Voorhis C. W. solicitor in chancery, 40 John. 

Van Wasenen William W. 42 Wall. 

Walker Charles, 27 Wall. 

Ward & Ullmann, counsellors, 21 Wall. 

Waring <fc Covert, counsellors, 3 Front, Brooklyn. 

Wheeler & Curtis. 21 Wall. 

Woodruff Lewis B. 118 Broadway. 



AUCTIONEERS. 19 



AUCTIONEERS. 

Adee & Timpson, 37 William. 

Austen, VVilnierding & Co. corner William and Exchange. 

Beams &- Co. Frederick J. Pearl, corner of Wall. 

Bell Thomas, 34 Ann. 

Bleecker &. Sons James, commission merchants and agents 

for the purchase and sale of real estate, 13 Broad. 
Cady Jesse, 117 and 119 Water. 
Carter & Co. 208 Pearl. 

Cooley & Bangs, books, &c. 196 Broadway. _ 

Corlies, Haydock & Co. 35 William. 
Crandell & Fields, 178 Pearl. 
Daymon Joseph. 191 Chatham. 
Del Vechio Charles, 44 Chatham. 
Doughty Isaac T. 29 Fulton. 
Dunn, Colton & Co. 197 Chatham. 
Edwards A. books, &c. 27 Chatham. 
Franklin & Jenkins, general agents for the purchase and 

sale of real estate, 15 Broad. 
Gautier Benjamin F. J. 32 Ann. 
Gerard W. & R. I. 76 Wall. 

Gowans William, New York Long Room, 1G9 Broadway. 
Haggerty &, Sons John, 1G9 Pearl, and 77 Pine. 
Hicks, Lawrence tt Co. 22 Exchange Place. 
Hoffman & Co. L. M. 85 Wall. 
Ludlow & Co. Edward H. 11 Broad. 
]\rCartee Wm. D. 87 Wall. 
M'Cormick William, 8 Courtlandt. 
Mann Albert, 76 Wall. 
Maverick Samuel, 85 Liberty. 
Milderberger C. 35 Ann. 
Miller, Pine, & Miller, 30 Broad. 
Milliken & Co. A. 132 Water. 
Milis & Co. 61 Wall, corner of Pearl. 
Minturn &, Co. R. R. 89 Wall. 
Mooney Benjamin, 206 Pearl. 
Pells & Co. 87 Wall. 
Seixas, 160 Broadwav. 
Shirley W. W. 421 Broadway. 
Sill &. Aaron, 194 Pearl. 
Sims Thomas S. 78 Wall. 
Sparks Daniel, 123 Water. 



20 BAROMETER AND THERMOMETER MAKERS. 



Sturtevant J. H. 72 Wall. 

Timpson & Co. R. H. 36 Ann. 

Van Antwerp & Van Dyke, 18 Broad. 

Van Norden William, 32 Ann. 

Whitelaw James H. 194 Pearl. 

Woolsey Charles, 1 Ann, near Broadway. 

BAKERS. 

Arcularius William G. 30 Courtlandt. 

Divin John, Third Avenue, corner of Twenty-eighth. 

Eudine A. & J. 49 Beekman. 

Gibbs Alexander, Houston, opposite Orchard. 

Jamieson & Sanford, biscuit and cracker bakers, on an im- 
proved plan, 154 South. 

Limberger J. 41 Vesey. 

Luke Andrew, ship bread, biscuit and crackers, 10b and 
348 Broadway, and 42 Bowery. 

Miller George W. tea cake bakery, 40 Lispenard. 

Nevins & Somers, ship bread and patent crackers, 97 
Washington, corner of Rector. 

Philip William, 105 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Pitcher Edward, corner of Washington and Liberty. 

Roe Benjamin G. tea cake and bread bakery, 26 John. 

Treadwell Ephraim, cracker bakery, 275 Washmgton, 
corner of Warren. 

Treadwell Francis C. biscuit and cracker baker, 114 and 
116 Beekuian. 

Wallace Michael, 2S0 Bowery. 

Ward U. P. 179 Greenwich. 

Welsh G. & R. 125 Greenwich. 

Young W. L. District street, Brooklyn. 

BANDBOX MAKER. 

Barbier Alphonse, fancy paper boxes, 51 John. 

BANKERS. 

Pickersgill William C. 44 Wall. 
Prime, Ward, & King, 42 Wall. 

BAROMETER AND THERMOMETER MAKERS. 

Pike &. Son Benjamin, 166 Broadway. 
Pool Thomas, 174 Broadway. 



BLACKSMITHS. SI 



BASKET AND WOODENWARE DEALERS. 

Bessonett J. P. birds and woodenware, 60 Nassau. 

Jackson J. H. 122 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Jameson Robert, 253 Greenwich. 

Kelly John R. 145 Elizabeth. 

Meeker Wi.liam E. 395 Washington. 

Ottignon C. 225 Greenwich. 

Smith Silas E. 19 Fulton. 

Weatherhead & King, 304 Broadway, corner of Duane. 

Windle B. 118 Maiden Lane. 

Woolley & LafFerty, 171 William. 

BATHING HOUSES, (proprietors of) 
Carroll J. P. medicated vapor and sulphur bath, 25 John. 
Stoppani Charles G. arcade bath, 39 Chamber. 
Thorp William M. Greenwich bath, 337 Hudson. 
Timolat L. Washington bath, 533 Pearl. 

BEDSTEAD MANUFACTURERS. 

Hewitt Francis, patent and premium bedsteads and cabinet 
ware, matrasses, paliasters, &c. 114 Bleecker. 
N.B, — Hewitt's patent and premium bedsteads, are only 
manufactured and for sale at 20 Hudson and 114, Bleecker. 

Woolley W. patent sofa bedstead; 422 Broadway. 

BILLIARD TABLE MANUFACTURER. 

Bassford Abram, billiard table manufactory and iron found- 
ery, 165 Fourth, wareroom, 218 Broadway. 

BLACKING MANUFACTURERS. 

Chapel John, 70 Fulton. 

Gosling &. Co. L. 2 Franklin Square. 

Lee »fc Thompson, 265 Broadway. 

BLACKSMITHS. 

Allen David, horse shoer, rear 44 Main, Brooklyn. 
Atkinson R. white and blacksmiUi, 20 Rector. 
Coger, jr. John, 466 Water. [den Lane. 

Duncan & West, black and whitesmith, 2 Green near Mai- 
Mulligan James, horse shoer, 119 Grand. 
Murphy Thomas. South Ferrv Brooklm. 
Place Robert S. 486 Water. ' 



3*2 BOAROINO-HOUSE EE£P£RS. 



Silk Thomas, horse shoer, rear 44 Main, Brooklyn. 

Trickey Samuel, 460 Water. 

Youngs T. C. Pearl, between Front and Water, Brooklyn. 

BLOCK AND PUMP MANUFACTURERS. 

Ileadley George K. blocks anrl pumps, 506 Water. 

Miirdock James, corner of Pearl and Water, Brooklyn. 

Rogers Leonard H. block and pump manufacuturer, 482 
Water. 

Shonnard, jr. Frederic, Main-street, Brooklyn. 

Winooski patent block manufacturing company (Burling- 
ton and New York.) 40 and 42 Fletcher. 

BOARDING-HOUSE KEEPERS. 

Baker Mrs. M. 10 and 12 Broadway. 
Ball Mary, 122 Nassau. 
Ballard Rebecca, 75 Nassau. 
Barker Harriet, 13 Broadway. 
Bean Benjamin W. 110 Broadway. 
Burgiss Mrs. W. 255 Pearl. 
Cornell Maria, 32 Front, Brooklyn. 
Cowing Jane, 5, 7, and 9 Murray. 
Falkinburg Hays B. 40 Front, Brooklyn. 
Fish Mary, 16 Munroe. 
Graham Hester, 61 Fulton. 
Harteau Nancy A. 93 Main, Brooklyn. 
Helme Mrs. A. 21 Broadway. 
Hossack Mrs. 27 Broadway. 
Howland Mrs. 1 Park Row. 
Hubbard Mrs. 1 Bridge. 
Knox Hugh, 22 Vesey. 
Lee Mrs. M. 68 John. 
Leigh Mrs. 39 Maiden-lane. 
Lockwood Mrs. Mary B. 106 Greenwich. 
Ludlow Ezra, 67 Greenwich. 
M'C^ormick James, 19 East Broadway. 
Manning Mrs. S. 139 Broadway. 
Mix & Tripp Mrs. 161 Broadway. 
Pearcy Mrs. J. 32 and 34 Vesey. 
Plinta Charles, 15 Whitehall. 
Sistare Mrs. N. 170 Broadway. 
Street Mrs. C,2 Bond. 



BOOKSELLERS. 33 



Wade Mrs. 93 Liberty. 
Waldron Mrs. ISl Broadway. 
Waterbury Mrs. E. 153 Broadway. 
Wilde James, 16G Prince. 
Willis Mrs. 245 Greenwich. 

BOAT BUILDERS. 

Crolius W. & J. premium boat builders; race and club boats 

of every description built to order, 400 Water. 
Degrove Quincy C. 25 Washington. 
De La Montagnie W. & E. 438 Water 
Fox Joseph, 482 Water. 

^Te!l96 mte^'r"'''"'^''"^ '^P'"'' '' the shortest no- 

w^uT* "^r,^?''"^"' ^"^* ^"'^^^>*' "^9 Washington. 

Q> ^v ?!'''^^^^°"' shipwrights, spar makers, and caulkers 
v4 Washington. ' 

BOOKBINDERS. 

Adriance Henry, account book ruler, ]98 Fulton. 

Ballou & Freeman, 48 Fulton. 

Camp O. 29 Fulton. 

Clussman Joseph A. 21 Madison. 

Colton & Jenkins, 144 Nassau. 

Crygier John, 74 Fulton, corner Gold. 

Fenwick & Fiora, 38 Gold. 

Focke C. A. 216 William. 

Linen & Horn, 80 Vesey. 

Miller & Strong, libraries &c. rebound, 71 John 

Penoyer, Cooledge & Co. 6 Green, near Maiden Lane. 

Sackmann J. H. & E. plain and fancy bookbinders, import- 

ters of German books, 63 Vesey— up stairs. 
Shaw Samuel, GO Ftiltou. 
States J. D. 74 Fulton. 
Walker Edward ; books bound for libraries, societies, &c on 

advantageous terms, 75 Barclav. 

r -^ BOOKBINDERS' TOOLS, (dealers in) 

Nassau ''''' ^'*'' ^°''^^"^'^^^«' ^^ock and tools, US 
BOOKSELLERS. 

Appleton &Co. D. importers and publishers, 200 Broadway. 

Ash & Co. Ihomag T. publishers and importers of foreign 
stationery and fancy articles, 12 Decatur, PhUaddphia 



24 BOOKSELLF.RS. 



Bancroft Herman, 389 Broadway. [Broadway. 

Behr Cliarles de, importer and dealer in foreign books, 94 

Berard (fe Mondon, importers of French, Spanish, and Ita- 
lian books ; a large supply of school books, 36 Courtlandt. 

Betts James E. books, stationery, engravings, and travellers' 
maps of every variety, 214 Broadway. 

Bleakley James T. JM. libarian and binder, 242 Hudson. 

Burnton J. T. stationery and fancy articles, 189^ Hudson. 

Callender J. P. 141 Nassau. 

Carter Robert, 112 Canal. 

Carvill & Co. G. & C. publishers and agents for all the 
principal Reviews, Magazines, &c. 106 Broadway. 

Clark Z. Water-street, Trotj, N. Y. 

Collins, Keese, Sl Co. 230 Pearl. 

Collier Ezra, ^Theological bookseller and publisher, 148 
Nassau. 

Colman William A. 205 Broadway. [Fulton. 

Colman Samuel, publisher and wholesale bookseller, 114 

Cooledge D. & Q. F. 322 Pearl. 

Cotrel Thomas, books and stationery, 96 Fnlton. 

Dando Stephen, agent for christian Advocate and Journal, 
methodist books, &c. 29 Spruce. 

Davenport & Wood, stationers and publishers of law blanks, 
155 Broadway. 

Day Mahlon. 374 Pearl. 

Dearborn & Co. George, 38 Gold. [stairs. 

Dirfturnell John, book and map publisher. 20 Courtlandt — up 

Doolittle & Vermilye, successors to N. B. Holmes, 262 
Greenwich. 

Doyle John, 294 Pearl. 

Folsom Charles J. stationery, &c, manifold letter writers, 
portable desks, maps, &c. 40 Fulton, 1 door above Pearl. 

Francis Charles S. Parthenon circulating library and read- 
ing room, 252 Broadway. 

French & Adlard, importers of English books, stationery, 
and engravings, 46 Broadway. 

Gates Elias, Water-street, Troij, N. Y. 

Goodrich, A. T. 113 Fulton. [144 Nassau. 

Gould & Banks, law booksellers, bookbinders, and printers, 

Greene Henderson, 435 Broadway. [Cedar. 

Halstead tXr Voorhies, law booksellers, corner Nussau and 

Harper &. Brothers, publishers, 82 Cl'^' 



BOOKSELLERS. U5 



Hegeman Joseph, stationer &c. 69 Wall. 

Hegeraan & Son, Adrian, 60 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Holley George \V. publisher and dealer in books, stationery, 

paintings, engravings, fancy articles, &c. No. 6 Astor 

House, Broadway. 
Howe & Bates, publishers, &c. 76 Chatham. 
Hunt Freeman, publisher, &c. 141 Nassau. 
Huntington & Co. F. J. publishers and stationers, 174 Pearl. 
Jackson WiHiam, importer and publisher, 53 Cedar. 
Jarvis Samuel, 13G Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Kavanagh P. bookseller and stationer, 390 Grand. 
Leavitt, Lord, & Co. 180 Broadway. 
Little Weare C. 67 State-street, Albany. 
Lockwood Roe, school book depository, 411 Broadway. 
Long George, 269^ Pearl. 
Martin & Co. R. importers of English books of engravings. 

views in Switzerland, Scotland, &c. &c. 42 Whitehall. 

N.B — ^Early in May will be received. Part I, of American 

Scenery, from sketches taken on the spot by W. H. Bart- 

lett, Esq. with letterpress description by N. P. Willis, Esq. 
Mats-11 G. W. &■ A. J. 479 Pearl. 
Maze Abraham, 237 Bleecker. 
Moffat John. 3S0 Bowery. 

Phelan Owen, dramatic repository, 36 Chatham. 
Post L«<rael, bookseller and stationer, and agent for reviews, 

magazines, &c. 88 Bowery. 
Potter & Wilson, Poughkcepsie, N. Y. 
Radde William, importer of German, French, and Spanish 

books, wholesale and retail, 471 Pearl. 
Ray nor, H. &, S. Bowery circulating library, 76 B owery. 
Riker John C. 15 Ann. 
Robinson Pratt & Co. 63 Wall. 

Scofield & Voorhies, booksellers and publishers, 118 Nassau, 
Shaw James G. circnlating library, &c. 104 Bowery. 
Shepard Chauncey, 262 Broadway; 
Skinner E. W. & C. State-street, Albany. 
Small Charles, 298 Pearl. 
Smith Daniel D. 190 Greenwich. 
Stanley & Co. J. 418 Broadway, corner Canal. 
Steele Oliver, South Market-street, Albany. 
Stewart William, books and stationery, 188 Nassau. 
Swords, Stanford & Co. publishers and imp. 152 Broadway» 



26 BOOT AND SHOE DEALERS. 



Taylor John S. Brick Church Chapel, Park-row, opposite 

City Hall. 
Van Nostrand & Dwight, 146 Nassau. 
Wiley & Putnam, publishers, importers, and wholesale and 

retail dealers in Foreign and American books and station- 
ery, 161 Broadway. 
Wood Samuel S. & William, 261 Pearl. 

BOOT AND SHOE DEALERS. 
Backmann George, 14 Dey. 
Barker Stephen VV. 114 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Bartlett, Davis, & Co. 129 Water. 
Brooks L. 24 John. 
Coles C. &T. 355 Pearl. 

Coles & Howe, manufacturers and wholesale dealers in 
boots, shoes, and leather, hats, caps, bonnets, &c. 59 Lib- 
Combs S. B. 196 William. [erty. 
Corning & Son, 148 Water. 
Darlington John J. 82 Broadway. 
Fishermann W. 36 Fulton. 
Fuller & Annin, 325 Pearl. 
Granniss & Co. C. B. 127 Maiden Lane. 
Inslee Samuel, 36 Hicks, Brooklyn. 
Johnson John, 183 Greenwich. 

Kimball W. manufacturer and wholesale dealer, 124 Pearl. 
ftl'Arthur, 20 Wall. 
Mercerat P. L. 109 Nassau. 

Moody John, 132 Fulton, Brooklyn. [John. 

O'Grady J. D. cork, double sole, pump, and boot ranker, 58 
Rogers *N. A. 409 Broadway. 
Ryder Henry B. 110 William. 

Searles H. 357 Broadway. 

Secor Samuel P. 564 Pearl. 

Sexton James N. 178 Broadway. 

Sym> John, 51 Chatham. 

Tilton Silas, 2-59 Greenwich. 

Tucker J. A. 67 Nassau. 

Uhler Martin, 102 Nassau. 

Underbill C. 361 Pearl. 

Vose Reuben, 131 Water. 

Waterbury Stephen, 158 William. 

Weed & Gillespie, 302 Pearl. 

Witherby J. & J. B. 15 Chatham. 



BROKERS. 27 



BOOT-TREE AND LAST-MAKER. 
Dare C. W. F. 393 Pearl. 

BOOT AND SHOE MANUFACTURERS' ARTI- 
CLES, (dealers in) 

Field & Kellogg, 23 Jacob. 

BRASS FOUNDERS. 

Callen William, 189 Reade. 

Force & Co. Cornelius B. 265 Water. [ter. 

Thompson John H. coppersmith and brassfounder, 247 Wa- 

BREWERS. 

Armstrong Sterling, agents for the sale of John Taylor's 
imperial cream ale, 140 Cedar. 

Beveridge & Co. J. pale and amber ale office, 203 Cham- 
bers and 195 Reade. 

Howard Robert, brewer and agent for Albany Ale, corner 
of Cedar and Washington. 

Nash & Son A. Troy, N. F.— E.Beadleston, agent, 180 Wash- 
ington, corner of Dey. 

Read & Son Thomas, 174 Washington. 

Vassar & Co. M. 135 Cedar. 

BRITANNIA, BLOCK-TIN, AND PEWTER WARE 
MANUFACTURERS. 

Boardman & Hart, 6 Burling Slip, betw. Pearl and Water^ 
BROKERS. 

Adams James, produce, 85 Wall. 

Allen & Co. S. and M. stock and exchange, 26 Wall. 

Anstice JMoses, stock and exchange, 25 Wall. 

Aspinwall John, stock and exchange, 48 Wall. 

Austin William, sugar, and foreign produce. 

Backhouse F. exchange, 63 Wall. 

Baker John, exchange, 50 Wall. 

Baker Moses, exchange, 321J Broadway. 

Barrell George, produce, 85 Wall. 

Barnard Thomas, 64 Wall. 

Bates W. C. produce, 80 Wall. 

Beach H. A. exchange, 214^ Broadway. 

Bebee S. J. stock and exchange, 22 Wall. 



28 BROKERS. 



Beekman, Richards, & Luke, exchange, 40 Wall. 

Beers & Co. J. D. exchange, 20 Wall. 

Belden G. <fc G. exchange. 50 Wall. 

Beuners J. E. exchange, 55 Wall. 

Bergen James, broker and notary, 80 Wall. 

Berney Hoyt, stock and exchange, 46 Wall. 

Bignall D. exchange and commission, 146 Broadway. 

Bleecker James W. stock and exchange, 42 Wall. 

Borrowe William, stock and exchange, 50 Wall. 

Braisted J. W. and F. H. 190 Chatham. 

Braisted John W. 51 Bowery. 

Brees li. G. exchange, 1 Park Row. 

B"ck Charles, exchange, 21 Wall. 

Burr Horace, exchafcge, 50 Wall. 

Cahoon & Kinney, cotton, 63 Wall. 

Cairns, jr. William, exchange, 25 Wall. 

Cairns, jr. AVilliam, stock and exchange, 25 Wall. 

Cammann &- Whitehouse, stock and exchange, 12 Wall. 

Gammann, F. W. stock and exchange, 53 Wall. 

Cammann O. J. exchange, 22 Wall. 

Campbell T. N. Custom House, 23 Pine. 

Carpenter & Thurston, exchange, 52 Wall. 

Carpenter & Vermilye, stock and exchange, 42 Wall. 

Christmas, Livingston, Prime, & Coster, 42 Wall. 

Clare Joseph, exchange, 34 Wall. 

Clarkson & Co. stock and exchange, 44 Wall. 

Coit Levi, stock and exchange, 50 Wall. 

Cotte John B. 133 Bowery. 

Cuming R. S. exchange, 8 Wall. 

Cnrrie AVilliam & James, 34 Wall. 

Curtis R. stock and exchange, 55 Wall. 

Day & Forman, stock and exchange, 21 Wall. 

Dykers & Alstyne, stock and exchange, 20 Wall. 

Edy Henry, merchandise, 36 Wall. 

Farror Jolin, 164 Nassau. 

Fitzgerald Edward B. land broker, 6^ Wall, 

Forsyth Douglas, exchange, 26 Wall. 

Fox & Kemp, produce, 79 Wall. [Wall. 

Franklin Sc Co. David, foreign and domestic exchange, 14 

Gallatin, Brothers., stock and exchange, 51 Wall. 

Gassner & Co. 137 Chatham. 

Gay G. W. & E. H. 75 Wall. 



BROKERS. 29 

Gibson & Wright, 1 Hanover. 

GifTord A. N. stock and exchange, 44 Wall. 

Gitibrd James, merchandise, 79 Wall 

Goodman &. Co. John K. exchange, 34 Wall. 

Gourlie John H. stock and exchange, 50 Wail. 

Graham Rollins, & Graham, stock and exchange, 21 Wall 

Hardie Allen W. 11 Wall. ^ ' [vVall 

Hart & Henriques, stock and exchange, Jones' Buildings' 

Hart 13. stock and exchange, 22h Wall. 

Hart Joseph, 31 Chatham. 

Herrick Josiah, 12 Wall. 

Hicks William H. exchange, 12 Wall. 

Horbeck Henry, exchange, 48 Wall. 

Houghton Royal, exchange, 50 Wall. 

How & Son David, stock and exchange, 27 Wall. 

Hunter & Sons, cotton, 2 Hanover. 

Hutton J. Francis, exchange, 27 Wall. 

Ingraham Francis, 106 Broadway, 

Joseph & Co. J. L. & S. stock and exchange 57 Wall 

Jndah Alfred N. stock, exchange, and land, 309 Broadway. 

Ketchum, Durkee, & Co. stock and exchange, 36 Wall 

Kimball Alba, real estate, 12 Wall. 

Lawrence Jonathan H. insurance, 34 Wall. 

Lawton William, stock and exchange. 46 Wall. 

Lewis G. L. stock and exchange, 34 Wall. 

Le Roy and Perry, stock and exchange, 1 Hanover. 

Little & Co. Jacob, stock and exchange, 48 Wall. 

Lynch Henry, exchange, 14 Wall. 

Mackay William, 155 Fulton. 

M'Kee& Co. Wm. H. real estate and exchange, 51 Wm 

Mathews J. merchandise, 73 Wall. 

Mendell H. exchange, 182 Broadway. 

Morgan & Co. E. M. stock and exchange, 40 Wall 

Morgan H. T. 40 Wall. ^ 

Moses M. L. & D. produce, 52 Wall. 

Nathan & Co. stock and exchange, 53 Wall. 

Nevins & Co. R L. stock and exchange, 30 Wall. 

Nevins, Townsend, &, Co. stock and exchange, 42 Wall 

Oakes Samuel, 167 Broadway. 

Ogden Isaac, stock and exchange, 48 Wall. 

Ogden Samuel G. exchange, 48 Wall 

Osborne & Co. O. C. 13 Wall. 



^ BROKERS. 



Otis P. Jewitt, land and stock, 51 William. 

Paine J. exchange, 63 Wall. 

Paine & Spaulding, stock and exchange, 30 Wall. 

Papoon F. H. exchange, 26 Wall. 

Parshall Charles, exchange, 22 Wall. 

Perrin R. P. 2d door in Grand, from Bowery. 

Porter Edmund J. exchange, 21 Wall. 

Prime, Ward & King, stock and exchange, 42 Wall. 

Ravvdon, Kellogg, & Co. stock and exchange, 12 Wall. 

Redmond & Reynolds, exchange, 2b Wall. 

Robison John M. real estate 11 Broad. 

Robinsoa Frederick D. stock and exchange, 34 Wall. 

Robinson W. J. stock and exchange, 34 Wall. 

Rogers, Ketchum, & Grosvenor, 00 Wall. 

Seixas, exchange broker, 77 Cedar. 

Seymour C. H. drugs, 48 Wall. 

Shotwell, jr. William, exchange, 50 Wall. 

Skiddy Francis, produce, 77 W all. 

Smith' Albert, 168 Broadway. 

Smith Henry M. exchange, 34 wail. 

Smith John, stock and exchange, 2oVya 1. 

Sprague E. stock and exchange, 2.^ Wall. 

Stanton George H. produce, 65 Wall. 

Starkweather Henry, exchange, 50 Wall. 

Stewart J. I. exchange, 15 Dey. 

Stebbins, Brothers, stock and exchange, 1 H^IJ^^^r. 

St. John & Co. J. R. stock and exchange 20 WaJl 

St John & Chapman, exchange, ol Wall. LBroad 

Sylvester S. J. stock, exchange, and commission broker, 130 

Tailer & White, stock and exchange, 42 Wall 

Talcott & Son Noah, cotton and exchange, 29 Broad. 

Taylor & Dunham, exchange, 53 Wall. 

Thompson John, 69 Wall. 

Tillon George W. exchange I2h VVa". 

Townsend J. & C. flour and gram, 53 Wall 

Tracy & Gould, stock and exchange, 27 Wall. 

Van Buskirk Charles A. 132 Broadway. 

Vandenberg J. G. 55 Chatham. Lw^^n. 

Van Duzer & Co. stock and exchange brokers, 177 Green. 

Vernon William T. exchange 34 Wall. 

Waite James C exchange broker, lr2 Broadway. 

Ward & Co. John, stock and exchange, 42 Wall, 



way. 



BUTTER DEALERS. 31 



Warren John, stock and exchange, 46 Wall. [Front 

Webb Charles H. wine and general merchandise broker, 119 
Weeks & Co. stock and exchange, 12 Wall 
Whitaker Thomas S. 39 Pine. 
Whitman M. W. exchange 12 Wall. 
Wickham D. H. stock and exchange, 42 Wall. 
Winslovv R. H. slock and exchange, 54 Wall. 
Wood &, Bogart, stock and exchange, 28 Wall. 

BROOMS, (dealbrs in) 
Hopping & Allen, 188 Washington. 
Hopping & Co. A. D. wholesale dealers in brooms, wood, 

and willow ware, mats, &,c. 189 Washington. 
Meeker William E. wholesale and retail dealer in brooms, 

cedar, and willow ware, mat:!, &c. 195 Washington. 

BRUSH MAKERS. 

Berrien & Co. D. brush & bellows manufacturers, 357 Pearl. 
Chubb William, 554 Pearl. 

Mount R. E. brush and bellows manufacturer, 359 Pearl 
Smith W. & H. 203 Greenwich. 

Smith Edmund L. manufactures all kinds of brushes. Ma- 
chine brushes made to order, 156 Water. 
Sznith Robert C. 163 Water. 
West J. & T. S. 49 Fulton. 

BUILDERS. 

Berrian & Mulford, builders, &c. 36 Eighteenth 

Coit WiHiam A. 89 Elizabeth. 

Hallsted & Board. 64 Cliff. 

Harper Benjamin. 262 Wooster. 

Lawall Jacob, 66 North More. 

Looker Joseph, near the Railroad House, Yorkville. 

M'Clellan R. & W. carpenters and builders, 25 Washington. 

Patterson John, Third Avenue, corner Eightieth street. 

Rogers Jonathan, Jay street, Brooklyn. 

Titus Henry W. 113 Greenwich. 

Vandervoort David, 41 Renwick. 

Webb George, builder and architect, 184 Wooster. 

BUTTER DEALERS. 

Boyce & Adams, wholesale dealers, 244 Fulton. 
Van Auken Jesse, butter, lard, and cheese, 186 Washington. 

B 



32 CAMCO ENGRAVERS. 



CABINET MAKERS. 

Allison IMichael, cabinet furniture and upholstering ware- 
house, 46 and 43 V^esey. 

Avery Charles, So Barclay. 

Baird David, 120 Bond. 

Baudoine CharJes A. mahogany chair and sofa maker. 
N. B. — All orders for shipping promptly attended to, oC>8 
Pearl. 

Bishop & Breekels, manufacturers of Bi^eckels' patent pre- 
mium sofa bedsteads, 450 Broadway. 

Blechet F. L. (from Paris,) upholsterer and n)anufacturer 
of furniture, 52 Warren. 1.445 Broadway. 

Bosch B. rosewood, zebra, and mahogany made to order, 

Boyd John &. George, corner of Duane and Washington. 

Coad James, 79^ Bowery. 

Cook H. B. it W. 414 Broadway. 

Elleau G. &- A. 526 Broadway. 

Frost William, 59o Broadway. 

Garretson James B. 46 Beekman. 

Gsell & Truschel, 165 Bowery. 

Haverstock & Wooliey, 112 Fulton. [Broad. 

Holmes Edward, cabinet, chair, and sofa warerooms, 58 

Howell & Dawson, 68 Beekman. 

Jordan Lawrence P. 11 Bowery. 

M'Beath Thomas 298 Adanrs, Brooklyn. [35C Bowery, 

IMaggs Jpseph. Furniture bougiit, sold, -and exchanged, 

MeeksJohn & Joseph, 14 Vesey. [Broadway. 

Miller & Campbell, cabinet, chair, and sofa warehouse, 441 

Needham Thomas & Jolm, 327 Bowery. 

Phyfe «fe Sons, D. cabinet warehouse, 194 Fulton. 

Sacket & Branch, 332 Broadway. 

Shipman William B. 340 Broadway. 

Stratton Eliphalet, 326 Bowery. 

Walsh William H. 48 Broad. 

Waterbery Samuel, 60 Beekman. 

Wenzel Henry, 60 Cliff. 

Williams Elam, 167 WiUiam. 

Wood, Bogert & Major, 455 Broadway. 

CALICO ENGRAVERS. 

Andrews Alexajider J. 136 Fulton — up stairs. 
North & Gallagher, engravers to calico printers, and to em- 
bossers of silks. &c. 29 Gold. 



CAF.PET DEALERS. 33 



CAP MANUFACTURERS. 

Chapman John, 79 Clmtham. 

Davies & Co. John M. (successors to Luke Davies <fc Sou,) 
United States cap, stock, linen, collar, bosom, and oil silk 
manufactory, wholesale and retail, 102 William. 

Harding Theodore L. 120 and 180 Chatham. 

Johnson William, 80 Bowery. 

Lyon William P. 80 William. 

Raymond Asaliel, 55 Chatham. 

CARD MANUFACTURERS. 

Whittemore & Co. G. & H. cettoii and wool card mana- 

facturers, 15 Piatt. 
Whittemore John, 66 Frankfort. 

CARD, (visiting and playing,) MANUFACTURERS. 
Cohen Lewis L importer of stationery, Slc 122 William. 
Russell Henry, manufacturer of enamel and snow-flake 
cards for copperplate and letterpress printing, 131 Allen. 
Sawzade Robert, 208 William. 

CARPENTERS. 

Bird George, 160 Madison. 

Bloomer Thomas, box maker and carjpenter, 40 Gdld= 

Brown J. & C. 10 Dutch. 

Connolly Mathew, 80 Nassau- 

Cooley M. 78 Naissau. 

Cropsey William, Washington-street, Brooklyn. 

Dominick James, 94 Chff. 

Hallsted & Board, 64 Cliff. 

Hoe William, 10 Green, near Maiden Lane. 

Lister John, box maker and carpenter, 30 Gold. 

MoletJ. ifc P. 78 Fulton. 

Stanley J. C. 48 Gold. 

Thompson J. C. Pearl street, Brooklyn. 

Winant &c Degraw, 98 Cliff. 

CARPET DEALERS. 
Albro, Hoyt & Co. 105 Bowery. 
Andrew Henry, 193 Broadway. 
Cljester J. L. importer, &c. 203 Broadway. 
Chester & Co. W. W. importers of French and English 
carpetings, floor cloths, jugs, &c. 191 Broadway. 



34 CHAIR MAKERS. 



Hawkesworth C Lownsberry, 387 Bowery. 

Miller H. & F. A. 447 Broadway. 

Prouty VVilliatn C. ]63 and 165 Chatham. 

i^ackett J. & J. H. importers and dealers of carpeting, 

floor cloths, <fec. 76 East Broadway, extending through 

to 71 Division. 
Pmith, jr. Reuben, 157 and 159 Chatham. 
Webb & Tinson, 177 Broadway, 
Woodford O. W. 141 Chatham. 

CARRIAGE AND COACH MAKERS. 

Bishop L. L. & S. 11 Canal. 

Brower Abraham, 661 Broadway. [Brooklyji. 

Cleaveland Charles J. corner of Prospect and Adams, 
Cooke & Co. Thomas, carriage repository, 38 Canal. 
Flynn Daniel, Third Avenue, corner of 79th street. 
Guillard & Donnell, jobbing done with neatness and de- 
spatch, 234 Washington. 
JLawreuce & CoUis, 12 Vesey, and 6 Barclay. 
M'Chesney Nathaniel. 440 Broadway. 
Mather Alexander, 1 Canal. 
Mix & Sons, Isaac, 32, 34, and 36 Canal. 
Parker Charles, 85th-street, Yorktille. 
Piatt Richard, Fulton-street, Brooklyn. 
Reed & Williams, 25 and 27 Canal. 

Ryker, jr. John, carriage repository, 83 Anthony. \_Brookhjn. 
gcudder David, carriage repository, Myrtle corner Fulton, 
Shephard Thomas, 353 Bowery, 

Walters & Duryea, Henry, corner of Poplar, Brooklyn. 
Watson John W, carriage repository, 446 Broadway. 
Weir J. 552 Broadway. 

CARVERS. 

Campbell <fe Greig, 146 Fulton. 

Millard Thomas, ship and house carver, 191 Cherry, 

CHAIR MAKERS. 

Arcularins P. S. 11 High street, Brooklyn. 

Blauvelt Ricliard D. 87 Bowery. 

Pucan David C. 304 Greenwich. 

Brown A: Ash, easy chair makers, 191 Bowery. 

Durbrow Joseph, 17 Bowery. 

Hendrickson Garrett,223i Bowery. 



CIDER AND VINEGAR DEALERS, 



Miller John, 21 Beaver. 

Plumb Isaac, 59 Bowery. 

Sarnmis & Breinner, 15 Bowery. 

Slater A. wholesale and retail, 5.55 Broadway. 

Tredwell Edward L. 166 Fulton. 

CHARTS AND NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS, 

(dealers in) 

Blunt E. & G. W. 133 Maiden Lane, corner of Water. 

Frye & Shaw, importers nautical instruments, &c. 222 Wa- 
ter and 76 Fulton. 

CHEMISTS. 

Chilton James R. chemist and philosophical instrument 
maker, 263 Broadway. 

Cotton E. L. chemist and apothecary, 263 Bleecker. 

Feuchtwanger Lewis, 2 Courtlandt. 

Fortenback W. 14 Hudson. 

Paulus Gustavus, 48 Beekman. 

CHIMNEY TOP MAKER. 
Roberts J. B. 452 Broadway. 
CHINA, GLASS, AND EARTHEN WARE, (dealers in) 

Barrow & Co. Thomas J. 35 Nassati. 

Booth Elizabeth, 73 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Callamore P2benezer, 151 Broadway. 

Cook Thomas, 176 Broadway. 

Dewey & Everett, 197 Water. 

Drummond J. P. importer ifcc, 47 3IaidenLane. 

Frame John, 373 Bowery. [landt. 

Gill T. A. agent for the Jersey City Glass Works, 5G Court- 
Graham & Son, 180 Washington. 

Gulick Aaron, 86 Canal. 

Hadley Frederick, importer &c. 209 Greenwich. 

Haviland &. Co. Edmund, importers &c. 78 Maiden Lane, 

Humbert & Lent, 226 Greenwich. 

Kissman Thomas, 65 Cliff. 

Raymond ifc Taylor, wholesale, 68 Water. 

Riou & Boell, importers of French china, clocks and faacj 
goods, 53 Maiden Lane. 

CIDER AND VINEGAR DEALERS. 

Jackson N. v^^holesale vinegar dealer, Third Avenue, cor- 
ner of Fourteenth street. 

Roberts S. & S. Newark eider and vinegar dealers, 7 South. 

B 2 



36 



CLERGYMEK. 



CLERGYMEN 

Adams William, Presbyterian church ^^'^l^^'^^f^^^;,, 

Anderson. Presbyterian church Canal, c. Ureen.. 

A l.n n n Henrv Episcopal church, Stuyvesant. 
^l^er'M.'eJre'ar^'a^d agJnt American Home Missionary 

B 'S'^rSu^^hR.church, Greene, c^Honston^ 
Bang!,"'. D Nathan, secretary Missionary fcociety of the 

M'ethodist church. r -p^rnao 

Barrett Thomas S. chaplain. House of Refuge. 

Bernard D. Baptist church, Eighteenth. 

Brown H. Methodist church, Second. 
^ own John W. Episcopal church 81 Anthony 
Burns William. Roman Catholic cauch Ja e.. 
Bush George. Professor, New \ oik UnuorMi) 
CamnfieldR B agent sunday school union, lo. [Nassau. 
C^Zvllliain, Baptist church. Fourih, near A -mie C 

Carder James, sec. Epis. ^«"^,^^'^,^^'^"';V Greene 
Carpenter Charles W. methodist church 61 Greene. 
Chase Henry, Mariners' church, Kosevet 
Clark, jr. D. Presbvtenan ^I'^^c^.E^hth Avenue. 

Cooke James W. Ep>--copai ciiiu , r^u- a near E. R. 
Cornell F.-ederick F '^'■''^'L«;;,,«,Ju ch Th.rd n ar^L^^^^^_ 

Ji;^w?onir:^:^";XAtericauBaptis,HomoMUs■o.. 
Society, CUnton Hall. 



CLERGYMEN, 37 



Creagh B. Methodist church, Sand-street, Brooklyn. 
Cunning Francis H. Episcopal church, Fourth Avenue. 
Cutler, D.D. B. C. Epis. church, Washington-st. Brooklyn. 
Donaher Patrick, Roman C. church. Grand, corner Ridge. 
Dewey Orville, Unitarian church, Mercer, corner of Prince. 
Demarcst C. T. Dutch Reformed church, King. 
De Witt, D.u. Thomas, D. R. churches, Nassau and Fulton. 
Dickinson R. W. Presbyterian church, 66 Bowery. 
Dorr Benjamin, sec. Episc. Domes. Missions, 115 Franklin. 
Doughty C. I. New Jerusalem church, 406 Pearl. 
Dowling Jolin, Baptist, Masonic Hall, Broadway. 
Downer David R. Presbyterian church. Carmine. 
Dougherty P. Catholic church. Jay, c. Chapel, Brooklyn. 
Dubois George, Dutch Reformed church, Franklin. 
Dubois, D.D. John, Roman Catholic'church, Mott, e. Prince. 
Dunbar Duncan, Baptist church, 3rD()Ugal, op. Vandam. 
Dwight M. W. Dutch R. church, Joraleman-st. Brooklyn. 
Eastburn, d.d. Manton, Episcopal church. Canal. 
Eastman Orman, secretary Amer. Tract Soc. 150 Nassau. 
Farnam John, Catholic church, York, corner Jay, Brooklyn. 
Ferris d.d. Isaac, Dutch Reformed church. Market, c. Henry. 
Forbes John M. Episcopal church, Hudson, opposite Grove. 
Frates John, Roman Catholic church, 45 Chambers. 
Frazer Alexander, Episcopal church, Vandewater. 
Garretson John, Dutch R. church, Washington, Brooklyn. 
Geissenhainer, d.d, F. W. Lutheran church. Walker. 
Geissenhainer jr. F. W. Lutheran church, Walker. 
Gernmn Reuben, Episcopal church, Henry, cor. Scamniel. 
Gilbert R. Methodist church, York, corner Gold, Brooklyn. 
Going, d.d. Jonathan, secretary American Baptist Home 

Mission Society, Clinton Hall. 
Goodwin F. J. Professor New York University. 
Gray J. Presbyterian church, Fourth, near Avenue D. 
Griswold E. E. Metliodist church, 32 John. 
Greenleaf Jonathan, secretary of the American Seaman's 

Friend Society, 82 Nassau. 
Hall Charles, sec. Amer. Home Missionary Soc. 150 Nassau. 
Haight Benjamin I. Episcopal church, Henry, c. Scammel. 
Hallock William A. agent Amer. Tract Society, 150 Nassau. 
Harries jr. Thomas, In. Methodist church, 61 Attorney. 
Harris W. Baptist church, Hudson, corner King. 
Harrison L Congregational church, 46 Thompson. 



38 CLERGYMEN, 



Hart Alexander, Jewish church, Ehn, near Grand. 
Hart Abram B. Episcopal church, Harlaem. 
Hatfield E. F. Presbyterian church, Broome, corner Ridge. 
HuttonM. S., D.R. church New York University, Woosler. 
Hawks, D.D. Francis L. Epis. church, Broadway, c. Houston. 
Higbee Edward Y. Episc. churches, Broadway and Varick. 
Hodgson F. Methodist church, Vestry, near iludson. 
Huddart R. Townsend, Academy, Bluomingdalc. 

Irving Presbyterian church. Prince, corner Thompson. 

Ilsley Silas, Baptist church, Nassau, c. Liberty, Brooklyn. 
Jackson William. Episcopal church, Christie, c. Broome. 
Johnson Evan, Epis. church, Washington, c. Sands, Brooklyn. 
Johnson Daniel V. M. Episc. church, Clinton Av. Brooklyn. 
Johnson N. E. Presbyterian church, Thompson c. Houston. 
Jones Lot, P^piscopal church, Stanton, near Norfolk. 
Jones J. J. Welsh Presbyteriau church, Broome, n. Mott. 
Kellogg EzraB. Episcopal Mission church. 
Kennadav John, Methodist church, ]oO Allen. 
Kelly Charles V. Episcopal church. La Fayette Place. 
Kip Francis M. Presbyterian church, Sixth. 
Knox, D.D. J. Dutch Reformed churches, Nassau and Fulton. 
Krebs JohnJL Presbyterian church, Rutgers, corner Henry. 

Kluge Moravian church, 104 Fulton. 

Loomis W. S. Baptist church, 44 Anthony. 
Luckey, d.d. Samuel, editor Methodist Book concern. 
Ludlow H. G. Presbyterian church. Spring street. 
Lyell, D.D. Thomas, Episcopal church, 81 Anthony. 
M'Auley, d.d. l.l.d. Thomas, Presbyterian church, Murray. 
M'Elroy, d.d. J. Presbyterian church, Grand, c. Crosby. 
M'Lane J. W. Presbyterian church, Madison. 
M'Leod John N. Presbyteri;m church, Prince, c. Orange. 
M'Vicker, d.d. John, Professor Columbia College. 
Maclay, d.d. Archibald, Baptist church. Mulberry. 
Maginniss. Roman Catholic church, James, near Oak. 
Maguire, Roman Catholic church, James, near Oak. 
Mann Joel. Presbyterian church, Madison, c. Catharine. 
Marselus N. J. Dutch Reformed church, Bleecker.c. Amos. 
Marsh L. G. Baptist church. Houston, corner of Suffolk. 
MartynJ. S. Congregational church, 88 Chatham. 
Mason Erskine, Presbyterian church, Bleecker. 
Mason Cyrus, Professor New York University. 
Matheus Jacob, jr. Methodist church, 55 Elizabeth. 



CLERGYMEN. 39 



Mathews, d.d. James M. Dutch Reformed church, New- 
York University, Wooster. 

Mead Lather. Methodist church, Bedford, corner of Morton. 

IMesfsenger John F. Episcopal churcli, Pearl-st. Brooklyn. 

Metz Eliazer, Jewish church, Grand. 

Middleton John, Baptist church, Grand, near Pitt. 

Miller W. G. Baptist church, Bowery, opposite Spring. 

3Iilnor, d.d. James, Episcopal church, Beekman, c. Cliff. 

Mines F, S. Presbyterian church. Lai^ht. 

Merwin Samuel, Methodist church. Seventh street. 

Nichols Jarvis Z. Methodist church, lf;0 Duane. 

Niles William W. Episcopal JMission church. 

Neiil James, Roman Catholic church, Barclay. 

O'Donnell James. Roman Catholic church, Mott, c. Prince. 

Onderdonk, d.d. Right Rev. Benjamin T. Bishop Episcopal 
churches. 

Patton, D.D. Wm. sec. Presb. Education Soc. 116 Nassau. 

Parkinson William, Baptist church, 33 Gold. 

Peters, d.d. Absalom, correspondino^ secretary of the Ame- 
rican Home Missionary Society, 150 Nassau. 

Pitcher Enon, church Christie, near Hester, 

Phillips, D.D. Wm. W. Presbyterian church, Wall street. 

Piercey, jr. Alfred J. Methodist church, Sullivan. 

Pise, D.D. Charles C. Roman Catholic church, Sixth Ave- 
nue, corner of Barrow. 

Porter C. S. Presbyterian church, Second Avenue. 

Potts George, Presbyterian church, Duane, corner Church. 

Power, D.D. John, Roman Catholic church, Barclay. 

Proudfit, D.D. Alexander, sec. Col. Society, 118 Nassau. 

Proudfit John, Professor of New York University. 

Quarter William, Roman Catholic church. Grand, c. Ridge. 

Quinn, James, R. Catholic church. Sixth Av. c. Barrow. 

Raymond J. S. Baptist church, Duane. 

Remington S. Methodist church, Willet, near Broome, 

RatBner, Roman Catholic church, Second-st. [hattanville. 

Richmond James, Epis. churches, Bloomingdale and Man- 
Richmond William, Episcopal churches, do. 

Riley E. Presbyterian church. Eighth Avenue. 

Roberts Robert R. President of the Missionary Society of 
the Methodist church. 

Robinson, d.d. Edward, Profe.ssor of the New York Theo- 
logical Semijtjiary, Wooster. 



40 CLERGYMEN. 



Rowland H. A. Preshyteriari church, 550 Pearl, 
liiidy John, Dutch Reformed church, 121 Allen. 
Sawyer T. J. Universalist church, Orchard, near Broome. 
Schroeder, d.d. John F. Epis. churches. Broadway &. Varick. 
Scott Williau), Floating Bethel. 
Seixas Isaac, Jewish cliurch, 15 Crosby. 
Seabiiry Samuel, Epis. Theol. Seni. Twentieth street. 
Seney R. Methodist church, Mulberry, near Bleocker. 
Skinner, d.d. Thomas II. Presbyterian church, Mercer. 
Smith Asa, D. Presbyterian church, 91 Rivington. 
Smith D. Methodist churcli, 8 Forsyth. 
Smith Edward D. Presbyteriau church, Christopher. 
Smith Hugh, Epis. church, Twentieth, near Ninth Avenue. 
Sommers C. G. Baptist church, 84 Nassau. 
Spencer I. S. Presbyterian church, Clinton-st. Brooklyn. 
Spring, D.D. Gardiner, Presbyterian church, Beekman. 
Stark Andrew, Presbyterian church. Grand, corner Mercer. 
Staunton Wm. agent of the Episcopal Sunday School Union. 
Starrs William, Roman Catholic church, Mott, c. Prince. 
Stilwell Williain, Methodist church, 56 Chrystie. 
Strohel William I). Lutheran church, Orange. 
Stratton J. B. Methodist church, Washington-st. Brooklyn. 
Taylor ThonKxs II. Episcopal church, Broadway c. Rector. 
Tappan Henry P. Professor of the New York University. 
Tiexcheira Joseph, Roman Catliolic church, Grand c. Ridge. 
Todd Samuel, Methodist church, High-st. Brooklyn. 
Turner, d.d. Samuel H. Epis. Theol. Sem. Twentieth-st. 
Uguhart John D. Roman Catholic church, Mott, c. Prince. 
Van Aken E. Dutch Reformed church, Bloomingdale. 
Van Has Peter, Independent Methodist church, 156 Church. 
Varela Felix, Roman Catholic church, 45 Chambers. 
Vaughan John A. Secretary Foreign Missions, 114 White. 
Vermeule Cornelius, Dutch Reformed church, Harlaem. 
Vorren Antoine, Episcopal church, Franklin, c. Church. 
Walsh John, Roman Catholic ch. Jay,c. Chapel-st. Brooklyn. 
Wallers Isaac N. Christian church, Broome. 
Ware Wm. Unitarian church, 109 Chambers. 
White Henry, Professor New York Theol. Sem. Wooster. 
Whittingham Wm. R. Epis. Tiieol. Sem. Twentieth-st. 
Williams Peter, Episcopal church, ')3 Centre. 
Williams W. R. Baptist church. Amity, near Greene. 
Wilson, D D. Bird, Epis. Theol. Sem. Twentieth-street. 



CLOTHIERS. 41 



Winslovv Octavius, Baptist church, Tillary street, Brooklyn. 
Wright Theodore S. Presbyterian church, Frankfort corner 

of WilUani. 

CLOTHIERS. 
Anderson John, 188 Chatham. [Chatham, 

liach Jacob, cheap new and second hand clothing store, 52 
Baker, Johnson &. Co. 50 William. 
Baker & Co. Cornehus. 73 Cedar. 
Bellamy &. Son, *J5 and 97 Chatham. 
Berrian William, 69 Chatham. 
Blaekwell, iM'Grath & Co. 85 Chatham. 
Bogart Jacob, 219 Greenwich. 
Brewster & Co. Soloman, 37 Nassau. 
Brooks & Co. H. «fc D. II. wholesale and retail clothing 

store, 193 Washington. 
Brown L. B. 16G Pearl. 
Brown, Stiles & Howe, 204 Chatham. 
Brown &. Son, John, 32 Bowery. 
Chichester Aaron, 86j Bowery. 
Chichester & Ilebbard, 80.^ Bowery. 
Chichester James H. 78 Bowery. 
Child & Fox, 155 Chatham. 
Clussman G. il. 182 Chatham. 
Clute & Meade, wholesale dealers and importers of cloths, 

cassimeres, vestings. trimmings, &c. 25 William. 
Cochran & Philips, 132 Pearl. 
Cogswell Henry, 127 Chatham. 
Cogswell Jacob, 131 Chatham. 
Cohen Joseph, 58 Chatham. 
Conant &l Co. Frederick J. 126 Pearl. 
Coon &. Higgins, 18 Bowery. 
Davis & Hart, 115 Chatham. 
Dickinson & Jennings, wholesale and retail clothiers, 380 

Water corner Oliver. 
Durando S. P & P. M P. 60 Chatham. 
Forest Benjamin, 85 Chatham. 
Francis D. & W. 401 Broadway. 
Garritts Leonard, 96^ Chatham. 
Gilpin John L. 200 Chatham. 
Green & Conklin, 4 Bowery. 
Gurnee & Conant, 90 Williani. 
Haight Elisha, 58 Bowery. 



42 CLOTHIERS. 



Haight Jonathan, 52^ Bowery. 
Hart Henry, 33 Chatham. 
Harris Edward, 54 Chatham. 
Hadden & Howes, 235 Bowery. 
Hines John C. 237 Greenwich. 
Hoyt & Co. George A. 14 Bowery. 
Hulse Amos, 86 Bowery. 

Husted, Mott & Adriance, 15 Fulton corner of Front. 
Husted L. V. 217 Greenwich. 

Jacobs Miss, infant's and children's clothing, 457 Broadway.- 
Jennings Thomas L. 35 Chatham. 
Johnson William D. 94 Barclay. 

Knapp William H, draper and tailor, has and will constantly 
keep on hand a general assortment of clothing, 128 Beek- 
man. 
Knight & Keeler, 225 Washington. 
KufFman L. M. 1G5 Chatham. 

Law George, 41 Chatham. 

Lecerf Joseph L. 80 Chatham. 

Levy M. 82* Chatham. 

Levy Lewis, 101 Chatham. I 

Lightenstain Barnet, 113 Chatham. 

Lissak Adolphus H. 77 Chatham. 

Lumley & Co. M. 65 and 109 Chatham. 

Maby Jacob, cheap clothing store, 18 Division. 

M'Multy, Mills & Meritt, wholesale dealers in ready made : 
clothing, 58 Liberty— up stairs. 

M'Kinley & Ware, iGi and 28 Bow^ery. 

Miller, Gould & Co. wholesale and retail, 11 Catherine 
Slip, corner Water. 

Mix & Co. Mrs. E. infants clothing, &g. 189^ Broadway. 

Moore & Co. S. W. 362 Water. 

Morrison &. Levy, 37 and 75 Chatham. 

Mortimer James, 82 Fulton, BrookUjn. 

Muir & Hope, 127 Chatham. 

Newmark Joseph, 94 Chatham. 

Olsen Edward J. 74 Bowery. 

Pierson & Co. J. S. 13 Cedar. 

Rae & Scofield, 100 Cherry. 

Richardson Jeremiah, 71 Chatham. 

Roberts & Wormwood, 272 Water. 

Robinson & Doane, 60 Maiden Lane. 



COAL DEALERS. 



43 



Rose W. A. 47 Chatham. 

Simpson John, 23* Chatham. 

Simpson Thomas, 39 Chatham. 

Simpson Wilham, 21 Chatham. 

Smith & Estes, John, manufacturers of every description of 
gentlemen's wearing apparel at wholesale only, ]68 Pearl 
— up stairs. ^' ' 

Smith & Co. D. 40 Broadway. 
Smith & Sniffen, 95 Ciiatham. 
Sperling & Alhertson, 2a Bowery 
Street, Mitchell & Gilbert, 117 Mai.len Lane 
Stringer, William & Thomas, 341 Bowery 

Itl I'l-'r '' '^'^^'f ^'' ^"^ '"'-"^ fashionable clothing 
store, iJ4,j Ureeuwich. ® 

Townsend J. & E. IIG Bowery 

Trask, Baldwin & Lombard, 123 Maiden Lane. 

Tyson Wilham, 128 Chatham. 

Vernol Joseph E. & Lewis, 91 Chatham. 

VVanzer & Harrison, 51 Cedar. 

Wont Catharine, 83 Chatham. 

White & Curtis. 229 Water 

White Levy, 49 Chatham. 

Williams John. 212 Broadway. 

Woodham, 3 Chambers. 

CLOTHS, (dealers in,) 
Bailey & Dixon, 82 Maiden Lane 
Bates Henry W. 72 Maiden Lane, and 7 Liberty. 
Blatchford Samuel M. importer, &c. C6 Maiden Lane. 
Bowen ^ Co. J. importers &c. 104 Maiden Lane. 
Ue Forest Marcus, 113 Fulton. 
Hook & Townsend, importers &c. 79 Maiden Lane. 
Lewis jr. Isaac, 62 Maiden Lane. 
Rushforth & Andrews, manufacturers and printers of fancy 

Offi 'on^r^'""^,''''', '^'- ^^^""^^^t^''^' ^«^^' New Jersey. 
Uthee 20 Courtlandt. ^ 

Smith & Co. D. 40 Broadway 

Van Pelt & Briggs, 90 William. 

COAL DEALERS^ 

Anderson & Ward,'general assortment of coals, 403 Wash 
ington, and corner of Hamersley and Bedford 
C 



44 COMB DEALERS. 



Brooklyn coal yard, corner of Pearl and Plymouth, Brooh- 

hjn. 
Eddy Thomas, 156 Monroe. 
Hophani it Hill, corner Fourth and Broadway. 
Jones, Son, & Co. Wm. G. Chambers, corner Washington. 
Langdon G. C. 21 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Langdon John, 73 Front, corner Washington, Brookhjn. 
Laing & Randolph, all kinds ©f anthracite and bituminous 

coals, 250 Washington, and corner of Le Roy and Green.- 

wich, and East Broadway and (ioverneur. 
Lowther & Son, Peach orchard coal from Spohn's mrne^ 

402 Washington. 
Nassau coal yard, Adams street, Brooklyn. 
Nova Scotia coal yard, foot of Adams, Brooklyn. 
Reeve & Co. Samuel B. venders of Peach orchard coal ^rom 

Spohn's mine, corner of Murray and Washington, and 

Canal and Elm. 
Skidmore R. &, B dealers in every description of anthra- 
cite and bituminous coals, 350 Washington. 
Stokes & Co. Henry, wholesale and retail dealers in coals of 

various kinds, 38 Wa.shington. 
Tuthill & Griffiths, 499 Water. 
Walton & Soiithart, 263 Washington. 

Williams & Ferguson, 28 Oak and c. Madison & Jefferson. 
West N. W. Sole agent of the Lehigh coal and navigation 

company, corner of Albany and Washington, and corner 

of Rutger's Slip and Cherry. 

COFFEE AND SPICE MANUFACTURER. 

Walker Silas, 27 Bayard. 

COMB DEALERS. 

Bourdett D. S. 112 Fulton, Brookhjn, 

Carter & Co. L. C. 83 Pine. 

Cary &- Co. importers and manufacturers of combs, &c- 

194 Pearl. 
Eraser B. manufacturer of shell and horn combs, 206 Pesirl. 
Jones William, 70 Bowery. 
Ledwith Richard F. 1 Cedar. 
Maguire Margaret, 293 Broadway. 
Taylor &- Co. P. G. 11 Cedar. 
White George, comb manufacturer, 2 Piatt. 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 



VVhitaker J. 60^ Bowery. 

Wilcox sen. John, tortoise shell, ivory and horn comb man- 
uiacturer, 91 Bowery. 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Alexander & Mullen, tobacco, 129 Front. 
Arnold, Lawrence &Co. grocers, 59 Water. 
Atwater& Porneroy, American hardware &c. 115 Maiden 
Lane. 

Auchincloss & Sons, dry goods, 17 William. 
Balch JohnT. 25 South. 

Baldwin Charles, foreign fruits tSse. 117 Front 
Barstow & Co. C. and J. commission and shipping mer- 
chants, 73 South. ® 
Bayaud & Deloynes, 74 Wall. 
Beach Lewis, dry goods 14 Cedar. 
Benson A. G. & A. M. 30 South. 
Boardman William C. 71 and 73 Front. 

^^'^'^"'if.u'^' "^ Livingston, C. Havre Packet office, 22 Broad. 

Bt)nd, Whilwell &.Co. 64 Pine. 

Boorman, Johnston & Co. 119 Greenwich 

Bradley & Parker, dealers in hats, caps, furs, &c. 62 

Liberty — up stairs. 
Bradley James, 33 Exchange Place. 
Brett & Vose, 28 South. 
Brooks, Brothers & Co. 51 William. 
Bryan & Co. John S. 20 Tontine Buildings 
Bulkley R. 85 Washington. 
Bull & Co. William G. 74 Wall. 
Burgoyne William M. Old Slip. 
Burral F. A. 28 South. 
Cebra &. Gumming, 106 Peai'l. 
Chostelain &, Ponvert, .36 South. 
Clibborn John A. 41 William. 
Congdon, Binns & Co. dry goods, 28 Pine 
Connally C. M. 11 Coenties Slip. 
Cooke i&. Co. William, 142 Water. 
IJavenport Wilham H. produce, 107 Broad. 
Dawson & Brothers, 9 Nassau. 
Dean, Hyslop & Dean, 75 Wall. 
D.nsmore, Barrett & Co. 42 Exchange Place. 
Donaldson James, 29 Broadway. 



40 COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Dow & Co. Josiah, dry goods, ]57 Pearl. 

Dows &- Cary, 72 Courtlandt. 

Eaton Winthrop, shoes, paper, cards. &c. ]G4 Water. 

Edwards William, oil and sperm candles, 146 Front. 

ElvvellJohn, 86 Wall. 

Emanuel, Sou & Co. wholesale grocers, 146 Front. 

Fenner & (^o. B. grocers, 45 Water. 

Fisher Jonah, 9 IS'assau. 

Foote John, 204 Front. 

Gibson Charles, dry goods, 70 Pine. 

Gihon & Co. John, dry goods, 64 Pine. 

(jloodvvin, Fisher & Spencer, 46 Exchange Place. [Lane. 

GofF Charles, Boston crown window glass, 164 Maiden 

Criffen &. Edy, 73 Water. 

Grinnell, Minturn &. Co. Liverpool and London Packet 

office, 134 Front. 
Harmony Peter, 63i Broadway. 
Hart & Merritts. ship chandlers, &c. 58 South. 
Hartman & Birdsall, brokers, &c. 50 and 52 Water. 
Hasbrook &- Seaman, grocers, 47 Water. 
Haviland Henry, 98 Wall. 

Hart &u Co- Eli, flour dealers, 175 Washington. 
Herdman & Keenan, ship brokers, *&:c. 106 and 75 South. 
Herrick S. H. 5 Coenties Shp. 
Hir:»t Arthur, 92 Wall. 
Hotf Benjamin C. groceries, 153 Front. 
Holbrook, Nelson, &. Co. American dry goods, 53 Pine. 
Hoyt & Bogart, dry goods, 49 Pine. 
Howes Godfrey & Robinson, 26 South. 
Hyde William F. 20 Nassau. 
Jeanvenaud & Beguin, 38 Exchange Place. 
Kirk tV: Johnston, groceries, 137 Front. 
Kitching John B. 44 Wall. 

Lawrence, Jagger & Variek, wholesale grocers, 150 Front. 
Lawrence kt Lingham, general commission merchants, 71 

Broad. 
Lawrence & Trimble, American goods, 51 Pine. 
Lee, Dater & Miller, groceries, 161 Front. 
Leverett & Thomas, foreign and domestic goods, 13 Broad. 
Lewis S. W. 26 Coenties Slip. 
Lewis Ezra, 2(5 Coenties Slip. 
M'Ardle & Bradiee, groceries, 61 South. 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 47 

M'Lellen & Richardson, 31 South. 

Martin E. F. 50 Water. 

Mauran &Bullus, 68 South. [Maiden Lane. 

Messenger T, &. H. tobacco dealers and manufacturers, 161 

Mitchell & Co. Andrew, drv goods, 61 Stone. 

Mettler S. & W. grain, 1 West.; 

Mulligan jr. John^W. 82 PearJ. ' 

Manning & Hoftraan, 9 Coenties Slip. 

Mott, Wood & Merritt, 44 Exchange Place. 

Nesmith & Leeds, 27 South. 

Norton & Smith, general agents, forwarding, &c. 7 West. 

Noyes S. H. dry goods, 70i Pine. 

Ogden John, 88 Wall. 

Ogden, Waddington & Co. 27 Beaver. 

Patrullo Andrew, 10 Gold. [Liberty. 

Pftltibone & Long, domestic and foreign hardware, 4 

Pigot »& Richards, dry goods, 34 Pine. 

Putnam & Co. T. American manufactures, 58 Pine. 

Richardson & M'Cobb, 27 South. 

Schenck «fcCo. Peter H. American dry goods, 25 Pine. 

Seager & Co. D. W. 78 Water. 

Seaman & Morton, dry goods, 124 Pearl. 

Snelling & Co. William, 44 Exchange Place. [Pine. 

Smith, Wheeler & Fairbanks, American manufacturers, 56 

Smith, Mills & Co. groceries, cor. Front and Maiden Lane. 

Stalker Thomas, 84 Front. 

Stainer, Dutilh & Co. 91 Wall. 

Steele, Wolcott & Co. dry goods, 62 Pine. 

Stanton & Cross, 119 Front. 

St. John & Witherell, nails, &c. 2 Liberty. 

Stone, Swan &l Co. 48 Exchange Place. 

Summer George W. drugs, &c. 149 Maiden Lane. 

Suydam & Reed, commission merchants and wholesale 

grocers, 102 Broad. 
Thompson E. C. forwarding, &c. 68 Broad. 
Titus &, Hubbard, 40 Exchange Place. 
Tomlison, Booth & Edgar, 124 Front. 
Torey, Goodwin & Co. 48 Pine. 
Van Voorhis, oil, 148 Front. 
Wainwright Ely, 52 Wall. 
Warner William H. dealer in Havana tobacco and segars, 

147 Maiden Lane. 

C 2 



48 COPPERPLATE PRINTERS. 

Wells & Spring, drv goods, 52 Pine. 

Wheelwright G. OS Wall. 

Wheelwright & Atterbury, 52 Exchange Place. 

Willard & West, dry goods, 54 Pine. 

Wilson & Co. G. R. C9 Wall. 

Wolcott & Goodwin, woollen goods, 29 Pine. 

CONFECTIONERS. 

Baner E. F. 17 Chatham. 

Beecher Nelson. 146 Eighth Avenue. 

Bradish Petor, 106 Bowery. 

Caraccioli Cipriano, 220J Broadway. 

Clapp Oliver, 184 Chatham. 

Hodgkins T. G. wholesale confectioner and manufacturer 
ofWrups, &c. 49 Courtlandt. 

Lecomte Vincent, wholesale and retail confectioner, ^90 
Greenwich, between Chambers and Reade. 

Marshall R. ornamental confectioner, C51 Broadway. 

Morand Augustus, 166 Wil iam. 

Painter George. 409 Broadway. 

Peers Thomas,. F. 148 William. 

Reid William, 78 Hudson. 

Stuart R. L. & A. manufacturers of candy and sugar re- 
finers, 285 Greenwich, corner Chambers. 

Sweeny Terence, 88 Bowery. 

Thompson James, 171, 192 and 579 Broadway. 

Wager Silas, 118 Broadway. 

Weller J. cook and confectioner, 204Broadway. 

COOPERS. 

Aikman Hugh, 89 Pine. 

Callender William. 17 Burhng Slip. 

Hutchings John, 26 Peck Slip. 

M' Donald William, 27 Water, Brooklyn. 

Paterson John, 30 Old Slip. 

Pell Edward, 23 James, Brooklyn. 

Talraon & Co. Charles. 18 Fletcher. 

Young Adam W. 614 Water. 

COPPERPLATE PRINTERS. 

Clark's printing and engraving establishment, 17J Tontioe 
Buildings, Wall corner Water. 



DENT1ST3. 49 

King Aaron, rear 29 Ana, 

Neale John, 6 John. 

Phelps William, 1 Wall— up stairs. 

COPPERSMITHS. 

Benson John, 70 Water, Brooklyn. 

Benclon John 81 Water. [facturers, 5G Vesey. 

Chailock T. (few. copper, tin, sheet iron, and stove man'u. 
Cunningham Kobert, 195 Greenwich. 

Hendricks & Brothers, proprietors of the Belleville copper 
^^°_^J^^' ^"d "manufacturers of bolt and sheet copper, 245 

Mills A. 52 Avenue D. 

Morrison William, 54 Bowery. 

Moore John A. dealer in copper and iron, 83 Water 

Ihompson, brass founder, &c. 249 Water. 

CORK MANUFACTURER. 

King Stephen, 192 Water. 

CORSET DEALERS. 

Parkel' ^^^r''^^' Broadway. [Broadway. 

WdHn.tfnrrn m"''^'""'"' ^^'««^Je and retail, 299 

Broadway '' P'^"'""" ^'^"^'^ ^"^''^^ "^^keri, 329 

CUTLERS. 

Rouse Peter, surgical instruments, ifec. 130 William 

ChXm.""'^"' '""'' '°^ '"'^^'"^ instrument maker, 63 

DENTISTS. 
Allen J. A. 117 Bowery. 

Arnold & Falkiner, members of the Royal Colleffe of Snr 
geons in London, 28 Warren v^oiiege ol feur- 

Bryan & Stout, 1J5 Chambers. 
Burk jr M.D. Gurdon, 76 Chambers. 
Birdell John corner Broadway and Chambers. 
Castle, M.D. Alexander C. 3 Murray 



50 DRUGGISTS. 



Clark Allen, 180 Hudson. 

Clay George, 130 Franklin. 

Dell John, 158 Broadway. 

Dodge J. Smith, 49 Bowery. 

Forbes Isaiah, 115 Bowery. 

Greenwood Isaac .1. 71 Warren. 

Hawes & Allen, 8 Park Place. 

Kimball, m.d. Horace, dentist, 3 Park Place. 

Lacey Zenas, 15 Murray. 

Lawyer, m.d. Augustus F. 25 Murray. 

Parmly E. & J. 11 Park Place. 

Spooner T. 79 Cedar. 

DENTISTS' FOIL, (dealer is) 
Kearsing George, manufacturer of dentists' foil, gold and 
platina ware, 88 Reade. 

DIE SINKER. 
Hoole & Key, 177 William. 

DISTILLERS. 

Bach Robert, Filrman street, Brooklyn. 

Birdsall, Schenck & Sneaden, distillers and rectifiers, foot 

of Joralemon street, Brooklyn. 
Cornell William, Water, between Washington and Main 

street, Brooklyn. 
Cram J. 114 Front. 

Ely Nathan C. 194 Front and 237 Orange. 
Hood Andrew, agent, the most approved brands of foreign 

wines and liquors, 149 Bowery. 
Manly & Clark, corner Tillary and Gold, Brooklyn. 
Putnam, Knapp & Co. cordial distillers and grocers, agents 

for Albany ale, 256 Washington. 
Redding & Co. Thomas H. 74 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 
Waterberry & Co. J. M. distillers and rectifiers, 323 and 

325 Front. 

DRESS MAKERS. 

Cook Mrs. corner Smith and Schermerhorn, Brooklyn. 
Thome Mrs. L. 56 John. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Adamson & Olliff, 6 Bowery and 099 Broadway. 
Badeau M. W. 260 Bowery. 



DRUGGISTS. 51 



Slagrove & Powers, chemists, &c. corner of Fulton and 

Sands, Brooklyn. 
Bradhiirst W. W. 70 Wall and 36G Broadway. 
Burger Wra. drugs, medicine, paints, fullers' and hatters' 

articles, wliolesale and retail, 50 Courtlandt, 
Burrell M. H. 210 Chatham. 
Bush & Hillyer, wholesale dealer in drugs, medicines, 

paints, oils, and dye stuffs, 184 Greenwich. 
Colby G. chemist, &c. 351 Pearl. 
Colvill, jr. John, 438 Broadway. 
Cougnacg Charles F. 39 Chatham. 
Crumble James, 361 Bowery. 
Cutler &. Hurd, wholesale and retail druggists, and dealers 

in French and English perfumery and chemicals, 72 Dey. 
Degen C. R. drug broker, 142 Maiden lane, up stairs. 
Dirkie Patrick, chemist and apothecary, 413 Broadway. 
Downer George, 118 Cherry. 
Duryee Joseph W. 139 Maiden Lane. 
Graham Nathan B. Nassau corner Fulton. 
Green Thomas T. 399 Broadway. 
Guion Clement, 2C6 Greenwich. 
Guion Edward M. 127 Bowery and Grand. 
Hart James H. 278 Broadway. 
Haviland, Keese & Co. wholesale dealers in drugs, medi 

cines, paiuts, &c. 80 Maiden Lane. 
Haydock, Corlies &, Co. dealers in dye woods, dye stuffs, 

paints, oils, glass, &c. 127 Water. 
Hoadley, Phelps & Co. wholesale druggists, dye stuffs, 

paints, oil, &c. 142 Water. 
Hopper Josiah, drug and chemical store, 364 Broadway. 
Howard John G. chemist, &c. corner Fulton and Hicks. 

Brooklyn. 
Hull &. Bowne, 128 Maiden Lane. 
Keersted H. T. 529 Broadway. 
Kennedy James, 319 Greenwich. 
L'Amoureux & Co. 377 Broadway. 
Langstaff William, 360 Broadway. 
Lawrence, Keese & Co. drugs and medicines, wholesale 

and retail, 121 Maiden Lane. 
Leeds G. & S. dealers in drugs, chemicals, varnishes, oils 

and perfumery, 155 Front. 
Leo-Wolf Joseph, commission dealer in drugs, chemicals 

and dye stuffs, 115 Fulton. 



52 DRY GOODS, (dealers IN) 

M'Clean Edward A. agent for the Putnam congress water. 
Prescriptions accurately prepared, 208 Greenwich. 

Merlin Achilles, 80 Chatham. 

Milhau John, importer of French and other drugs and che- 
micals, 185 Broadway. 

Minor Isreal, 214 Fulton. 

Milche!! T. 35 Fulton. 

Morrison & Son, John C. 186 and 168 Greenwich. 

Munsel Jonathan, ]]2 Cherry. 

Murray &- Lannian, 69 Water. 

Olcott, M'Kesson & Co. wholesale druggists and import- 
ers, 145 Maiden Lane. 

Osborne Samuel J. 286 Bowery. 

Penfold J. & W. 43 Fulton. 

Perkius David, 125 Maiden Lane. 

Posts & Main, 44 Cedar. [cines, 10 Gold. 

Pon &. Co. P. importers and exporters of drugs and medi- 

Rushton & Aspinwall, wholesale and retail druggists, 86 
William, 110 Broadway, and No. 10 Astor House, corner 
Barclay. 

Sands A. B. «& D. wholesale and retail druggists and apo- 
thecaries, 100 Fulton. 

Schieflelin J. L. drugs, medicines, patent medicines, per- 
fumery, &c. 114 Canul, corner Laurens. 

Simonson Wm. (i5 Fulten. 

Slocum INIarshall C. 303 Broadway. 

Smith James W. chemist, wholesale and retail dealer in 
drugs, medicines, &.c. Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

Souillard & Delluc, 2 Park Row, and 581 Broadway. 

Taylor <t Moore, wholesale venders of drugs, chemicals 
and perfumery, 170 Liberty. 

Thayer Frederick A. 375 Bowery. 

Townsend J. &. W. corner Beekman and Water. 

Tyler Wm. A. 83 Barclay. 

Underbill A. 38 Beekman. 

Vanzandt P. 225 Fulton. 

Vermeule R. 43 Bowery. 

White C. L. apothecary, &c. 405 Pearl. 

DRY GOODS, (dealers in) 

Angler, Barry & Co. 67 Pine. 
Andrews 6l Finn, 64 Liberty. 
Armstrong George, 3d Avenue, corner 33d street. 



DUY GOODS, (dealers In) 



Arnold, Ilearii & Co. 52 Canal and 51 Howard 

Ayniar John J. Broadway, corner Chambers 

Baldwin, Hawkins & Ripley, 101 Pearl and 64 Stone. 

Baldwin <fe Van Embaro:h, 205 Greenwich 

Barnes & Roberts, 19G Chatham. 

Barker & Co. R. & G. wholesale, 75 William 

Bayer & 3Ioritz, L. 63 Liberty. 

Beach J. Stirling, 231 Greenwich. 

Bennett & Rhodes, 112 Bowery. 

Besly & Fitch, wholesale dealers, 47 Liberty' 

Birdsall, W. B. & L. K. 266 Bowery 

Biglow & Bagley, 139 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Bigelow & Clough, importers and wholesalo dealers in Bri^ 

tish and American dry goods, 73 Cedar. 
Blake 'fc JJr^t, Tuscan and straw bonnets, palm leaf hats, 

&;c. dlz Pearl. 
Bliss, Walker cfe Oakley, 56 Cedar 
Bradley & Taylor, 272 Pearl. 
Boynton & Hyde, 51 Cedar. 
Bostwick & Taylor, 115 Pearl. 

Bostwick & Welles, European and domestic, 171 Pearl. 
Boyle G. B. 256 Broadway. 
Brown & Dimock, 23 Cedar. 
Brown, Mulligan & Bradford, 82 Pearl. 
Browning & Co. 13 Cedar. 
Bruce, J. A. 42 Pine. 

Buckingham & Huntington, 40 Broadway. 
Budd William, Third Avenue C. 84th street. 
Burtis James W. 330 Fulton. Brooklyn. 
Bussing & Co. E. K. 157 William. 
Canfield D. W. ]74 Chatham. 
Carrington & Lee. wholesale, 26 Exchange Place 
Carroll, Booth & Co. 13 William. 
Carpenter, Griffen & Co. wholesale, 73 William 
Carter & Sperry, buttons, fancy articles, &c. 83 Pine. 
Cavau William, staple & fancy, 226 Bowery 
Chase Samuel, 33 Fulton. 
Churchill, Southmayd & Co. 120 Pearl 
C lark J. M. 89 Catharine. 
Clarke, Myers & Gidney, 243 Broadway 
Clarke H. E. wholesale. 71 William 
Clark Richard W. 114 Bowery. 



54 DRY GOODS, (dealers IN) 

Clark William G. 72^ Bowery. 

Conklin Jonas, 81 Pearl. 

Combs Lelitia, 403 Broadway. 

Comstock & Andrews, 55 Liberty. 

Creed &: Primrose, 20 Liberty. 

Crosby, Candee & Scribner, 110 Peail. 

Croskey N. dr< Maiden Lane. 

C ashman Alexander, 269 Broadway. 

Davison & Van Pelt, 45 Cedar. 

Dayton, Jennings & Fenton, jobbers, ]9 William. 

Dodge, Smith & Co. wholesale dealers in silks, merino 

shawls, fancy and staple dry goods, 46 Maiden Lane. 
Doughty. Diblee «fc Co. 90 Pearl. 
Doremns, Snydams & Nixon, importers and jobbers of fancy 

and staple dry goods, 37 Nassiui, corner Liberty. 
Downer &, Co. wholesale, 134 Pearl. 
Drummond & Smith, staple and fancy dry goods, 371 

Broadway. 
Dunn B. cotton yarn, wicks, batts, 6cc. 210 Pearl. 
Eno & Phelps, 115 Maiden Lane. 
Farmer Peter, 106 William. 
Faulkner R. S. 145 Chatham. 
Faulkner and Darrow, wholesale, 129 Chatham, 
Ferguson, Collins & Co. 11 William. 
Ferris, Smith & Co. jobbers, 43 William. 
Field Thompson & Co. 55 Cedar. 
Fleet Jesse S. importer and dealer in foreign and domestic 

dry goods, 10 Maiden Lane. 
Foster & Easton, silks. &c. 146 Pearl. 
Fountain J. S. wholesale and retail dealer in dry goods, 

silks, satins, iaces, linens. &g. 29 Maiden Lane. 
Freeland, Hoftraan & Co. 5 and 7 William. 
Freeman & Co. P. 3 William. 
Frost & Dickezsen, wholesale, 140 Pearl. 
Garesche Alfonse P. 311 Broadway. 
Gates John, 125 Chatham. 
Garrett & Co. John, wholesale dealer in English, French 

and American dry goods, 20 Cedar, 
Gedney Elijah L. 239 Greenwich. 
Gold, Draper & Anderson, 1 Hanover Square. 
Graham & Son, James, 93 and 95 William. 
Granger, Birch & Co. importers and jobber?, 160 Pearl. 



DRY GORDS, (dealers IN) 55 



Grant & Barton, 118 Pearl. 

Gray, Sherwood & Co. wholesale dealers in British and 
American dry goods, 20 Courtlandt. 

Greenvvay & Co. Henry, 109 Pearl. [hats, 214 Pearl. 

Ha 1 & Co. SD. Tuscan, straw, Leghorn, and palm leaf 

Halsted S. 280 Pearl. 

Halsted & Co. Caleb O. 23 William. 

Haines Wm. 249 Greenwich. 

Planna John, 34 Maiden Lane. 

Heath John, 162 Chatham. 

Hardings & Co. wholesale dealers, 68 Liberty. 

Hart Henry, 72 Bowery. 

Hart James, 438 Pearl, 

Hilyer, Bush & Co. 117 Pearl, 

Hasbrouck, Eaman & Co. wholesale dealers in foriegn and 
domestic, fancy and staple dry goods, 21 Cortlandt. 

Hoag & Co. J. D. 213 Greenwich. 

Huntington & Campbell, importers and jobbers, 26 Liberty, 

Hunt Wilson G. cloths, vestings, trimmings, &c. 464 Pearl 

Homer, Havens & Davis, 121 Pearl. 

Holmes S. & L. 10 Cedar. 
Horton O. 149 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Imlay Joseph M. fancy and staple, 462 Pearl. 
Jackson & Duel, 79 Pearl and 46 Stone. 
Jagger, Skidmore & Co. 49 Cedar. 
Jenkins & Skeel. 25 and 27 Cedar. 
Jennings, Woodward & Co. wholesale, 78 William. 
Judson & Co. M. wholesale, 77 William. 
Kane & Co. William, silks, &c. 144 Pearl. 
Kellogg & Ce. Edward, ]39 Pearl. 
Kelly Samuel, 160 William. 
Kelly & Co. J. & W. wholesale, 142 Pearl. 
Ketchum &. Simonson, Fulton corner High, Brooklyn. 
Ketchum, Ferris & Woodward, wholesale, 71 William 
Kingsland E. & P. 38 Maiden Lane. 
Kingsland & Rowland, 26 Maiden Lane. 
Kirby & Co. L. & V. 47 Cedar. 
Lane R. & A. 11 Maiden Lane. 
Laing & Co. Hugh, 250 Pearl. 
Lathrop & Phelps, jobbers, 62 William. 
Laverty, Cutter & Co. 67 Cedar. 
Law & Todd, 60 Maiden Lane & 21 Liberty, 

D 



56 DRY Goobs, (dealers in) 

Lawrence & Beardsley, silks, &.c. 128 Pearl. 

Leonard A. S. & A. A. fancy French goods, 3 Morton's 

Building, Piatt street. 
Leavitt J. W. &. R. ]G6 Pearl. John W. Leavitt, Rufus 

Leavitt and Eli Mygatt, jr. 
Lent A. 577 Broadway. 
Levings & Johnson, 62^ Bowery. 
Lewis ct Carter, 30 Cedar. 
Lewis E. 150 Fnlton street, Brooklyn. 
Little, Shaw & Co. wholesale, 132 Pearl. 
Livingston & Co. P. F. 12 Cedar. 
Loder Benjamin, 26 Cedar. 
Lloyd & Co. John, wholesale, 130 Pearl, 
Lummis S: Co. B. R. wholesale dealers, 100 Pearl. 
Lynes S. C. & S. fancy and staple dry goods, 226 Pearl. 
Maltby &. Bolles, fancy and staple dry goods, 8 Pine. 
M'Donald Samuel, 369 Bowery. 
iVLDougall J. F. importer and dealer in fancy and staple 

dry goods, 16 Courtlandt. 
M'Gregor &- Beekman, dealers in fancy and staple dry goods, 

merino shawls, cloths, <fcc. 48 Maiden Lane. 
Mayer, Hathaway &. Wilcox, 67 Liberty. 
Marsh & Drinker, 22 Cedar. 
Marsh & Co. Jam€s, foreign and domestic dry goods, 252 

Pearl. 
Mead Rufus, 5 Cedar. 
Mead Rufus, wholesale, 78 William. 
Merrell & West, 30 Maiden Lane. 
Merrell Daniel A. (one price store,) wholesale and retail 

dealers in foreign, domestic, fancy and staple dry goods, 

209 Greenwich. 
Merwin & Carpenter. 145 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 
Miller & Smith, 158 William. 
Miller Justus D. 151 Chatham. 
Moore & Co. Joseph L. wholesale, 17 William. 
Moore & Jackson, 172 Pearl. 
Morgan F. & H. foreign and domestic, 67 Liberty. 
Morgan & Co. Wm. A. Ill Fulton street, Brooklyn. 
Morgan Thomas, 125^ Chatham. 
Nichols *?t. Meeker, 151 Fulton street, Brooklyn, 
North, Manning & Hoyt, 8 Pine. 
Norwood, Macy & Hall, 55 Cedar. 



DRY GOODS, (dealers IN) 57 

OdellT. B. & J. 201 Pearl. 

Pattison Thomas, 1 Bowery. 

Parish & Co. importers and jobbers, 162 Pearl. 

Parks EHzabeth, 158 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

Peck S. & E. wholesale and retail dealers in staple and 
fancy dry goods, merino shawls, &e. 27 Maiden Lane, 

Perkins, Hopkins & White, jobbers, 62 William. 

Perry A. B. 152 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

Prince, Condit & Farmer, 17 Cedar. 

Petiit W. W. 132i Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

Pinkney James H. 143 Chatham. 

Phillips Henr}', 92 Bovveiy. 

Phelps, Crane & Hodges, 112 Pearl. 

Phillips A. IGG and 168 Chatham. 

Pomeroy, Wilson & Butler, jobbers. 25 William. 

PoiUon C. & G. C. 33 Catharine. 

Ramsdell, Brown & Co. wholesale, 63 William. 

Raymond & Dexter, 99 Pearl. 

Kathbone M. 605 Broadway. 

Revis John W. 123 Chatliam. [liam. 

Richards, Bassett & Aborn, importers and jobbers, 72 Wi!- 

Robertson & Eaton, 89 Pearl and 56 Stone. 

Robinson Sarah, 147 Fulton street, Broo/dyn. 

Rogers P. & H. Y. 571 Broadway. 

Robbins, Painter & Co. wholesale, 148 Pearl. 

Rushmore William, 148 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

Rutherford R. 81 Pine. 

Satterlee, Masters & Beebee, William street. 

Seaman & Ward, 78 Cedar, and 122 and 124 Broadway. 

Schell Richard, fancy and staple dry goods, 242 Pearl. 

Scott, Hutton & Atwell, wholesale and retail dealers in 
fancy and staple dry goods, 72 and J 02 Hudson. 

Sharp, Tuttle & Co. importers, &c. 186 Pearl. 

Shephard & Farquhar, 10 Pine. 

Sherman James D. 1 W^illiam. 

Sheppard George G. staple and fancy dry goods, embroide- 
ries, hosiery, &c. 607 I3roadway. 

Sheldon & Co. Henry, 93 Pearl and 58 Stone. 

Simmons Henry, 84 Hudson, corner Franklin. 

Smith & Co. Truman, 8 Cedar. 

Skidmore & Wilkins. wholesale, 131 Pearl. 

Smith & Co. C. 2 Maiden Lane. 



Jl8 DRY GOODS, (dealers 1N) 

Smith & M^.rritt, 42 Cedar. 

Smith & Co. Ira, 104 Pearl and 7 Old Slip. 

Smith George W. 38 Exchange Place. 

Snow L. & G. W. staple and fancy, 155 Pearl. 

Staples, Clark & Paige, jobbers, 27 WiUiam. 

Starr & Smith, wholesale, 54 William. 

Stebbins, Lockwood & Co. 

Stewart Alexander T. 257 Broadway. 

Steward, jr. 6l Co. John. 87 Pearl and 54 stoue. 

Stone, Wood & Starr, 11 Cedar. 

Stryker & Loofborrow, linens, sheetings, diapers, satins, 

mousseUn de lain, challys, cloths, cassimeres, &.c. 9 Maidea 

Lane. 
Stryker & Smith, 42 Maiden Lane. 
Sutton Abraham, 93 Fulton street, Brooldyn. 
Sutton & Kingsland, 653 Broadway. 
Suydam & Boyd, 153 Pearl. 

Tallman & Gaston, staple and fancy dry goods, 204 Pearl. 
Tappan & Co. Arthur, jobbers, 122 Pearl. 
Taylor James, importer, &c. 33 Cedar. 
Taylor & Thomas, wholesale, 76 William. 
Thomas, Son & Adams, 22 Broad. 
Timpson James, 37 Cedar. 
Titus Wm. 99 William. 
Townsend & Bates, 33 Nassaii. 
Trowbridge & NicoU. 22 Cedar. 
Turner D. S. 54 Maiden Lane. 
Underbill &. Waring, 3 Cedar. 
Van Allen James J. 158 Pearl. 

Van Arsdale & Co. wholesale, 142 Pearl and 103 Water. 
Van Benthuysen & Co. 30 Broadway, [goods, 74 William. 
Van Dusen, Dibble & Bergen, wholesale dealers in dry 
Van Pelt & Briggs, cloths. &c. 90 William. 
Venables Richard, shawl warehouse and fancy dry goods, 

254 Broadway. [dry goods, 61 Liberty. 

Van Schaick & Noyes, wholesale dealers in staple and fancy 
Walker & M'Kenzie, 35 Cedar. 
Walters & Co. Felix M. jobbers, 15 William. 
Ward, Crane & Co. wholesale, 24 Exchange Place. 
Warbury iS: Co. J. R. importers, &c. 25 Cedar. 
W*arner, Cune & Edwards, 63 Stone and 3 South William. 
Warriner, Carter & Putnam, 40 Cedar. 



ZNSRAVERS, 59 



Warriner & Birch, wholesale, 128 Pearl 

Washburn & Co. H. B. 119 Pearl 

Weed & Little, 63 Liberty. 

Weed James, 62 Bowery. 

Wells A. L. 159 William. 

Wells, Vandervoort & Co. 25 and 27 South William 

Wells & Patterson, 277 Broadway. 

Welling, Whittemore & Ladd, wholesale, 59 William 

West & Oliver, wholesale, 136 Pearl. 

Wilbur M. 9 Cedar. 

w-1!?^ '^r^^l' ^- t {• ^^holesale and retail, 207 Greenwich. 
Wddey G. & C. 7 Cedar. 

Williams & Book-over, one price store, whole.: le ^nd retail 
dealers in loreign and domestic dry goods, 203 Greenwich. 
VVood Mary, 247 Greenwich. 
Wright. Winston & Stebbins, 53 Liberty. 
Youngs Henry, 261 Broadway. 
Youngs Oliver, flincy and staple dry gods, 23 Maiden Lane. 

DYERS. 

New York dying and printing establishment, 41 John. 

JM Coy John, 275 Greenwich. 

Wolters Henry, 80 Grand and 40 Beekman. 

DYE STUFFS, (dealers in) 
Colgate, Pollen & Colgate, 177 Water 
Partridge AVilliam, 34 Cliif. 
Pentz & Co. 55 Water. 

EMBROIDERER. 
Smith M. M. Paris embroidery, &c. 4 Maiden Lane. 

ENGINEER. 

Rutter ^ contractor for the Harlaem Railroad, Third 

Avenue, Yorkvillc. 

ENGRAVERS. 
Bale & Smith, 68 Nassau. 

Brown Thomas, stone steel engraver, 202 Broadway. 
Burton, Gurley it Edmonds, bank note engravers, 26 Wall 
Cushman Thomas H. Albany, New York. [stairs' 

^^""^A ^\^}?y''^^^ ^°^ landscape engraver, 66 Fulton— up 
Everdell William, 135 William "^ 

D 2 



CO FANCY GOOD.S, (DEALERS IJj) 



Folger William B. 391 Pearl. 
Gimber Stephen H. historical engraver, 70 Fulton. 
Harrison David R. map and card engraver, corner of Li- 
berty and Broadway. 
Harris James. 58 Nassau. [254 Bleeeker. 

Hinshelwood Robert, historical and landscape engraver, 
Holyland C. J. engraver and printer, 48 Vesey. 
Lansing G. vsrood engraver, 20 Nassau. 
Lewis Joseph L. 104 Broadway. 
Lowe Robert, card engraver, 4G Broadway. 
Marsh William R. engraver of cards, seals, jewelry, silver 

ware, &c. 1 Courllandt. 
Maverick Samuel, engraver and printer, 85 Liberty. 
Mason Alexander J. engraver on wood, 144 Canal. 
Murray T. every description of ornamental writing and 

engraving carefully executed, 60 Fulton. 
Perkins Joseph, card engraver, 4 John. 
Prudhomme John F. E. 31 Reade. [corner of William. 
Rawdon, Wright & Hatch, bank note engravers, 30 Wall, 
Scoles John, 3S2 Broadway. [printer, 174 Broadway. 

Smith William D. engraver, seal cutter and copperplate 
Stout George H. card and seal engraver. Plated and brass 
door plates and knockers of every description, Maiden 
Lane, corner Broadway. _ 

Tompson Wm. engraver and draftsman, and importer ot 
English refined steel plates, copper, &c. for engravers, 
167 William. [^4 Wall. 

Underwood, Bald, Spencer & Hufty, bank note engravers 
Winslow Henry J. engraver and copper-plate printer, 10 

Maiden Lane. 
Wright & Prentiss, C C copper-plate and xylographic en- 
gravers and printers, 45 Maiden Lane. 

FANCY GOODS, (dealers lx) 

Achrenfeldt Charles, importer, &c. 46 Maiden Lane. 
Bailly, Ward & Co. importers, &c. 41 Maiden Lane. 
Bourdett D. S. 112 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 
Bussing & Co. dressing cases, travelling writing desks, 

ladies' work boxes. &c. 80 William. 
Cannon Anne C. No. 3 Astor House, Broadway. 
Deraismes & Bcizard, importers French fancy goods, »b 

William. 



FANCY HARDWARE DEALERS. 61 



Dikeman & Mills, importers, &c. 84 Maiden Lane. 

Fellows, Wadsworth & Co. importers, &c. 17 Maiden Lane. 

Hart Henry C. " Bazaar," 173 Broadway. 

Harvey Thomas, G3 and 154^ Fulton street, BrooMvn. 

Jones G. W. 168 William. 

Lohse F. A. importer of French and German goods, watches, 
precious stones, &c. 65 Liberty. 

Lilliendahl C. D. W. importer, &c. 34 Maiden Lane. 

M'Donald M. A. Ill William. 

M'Quaid J. & P. 96 Catharine. 

Pa»e & Son, Lewis, 60 Maiden Lane, 

Schroder A. importer, &c. 149 Fulton. 

Schulz & Bleidorn, 91^ Bowery. 

Taylor John R. ladies' work boxes, card cases, gloves, per- 
fumery, jewelry, artificial, &c. 135 William. 

Tracy William, 194 Chatham. 

Werckmeister M. importer, &c, 150 Broadway. 

Whittingham A. M. 387 Broadway. fway 

Woodworth S. H. S. & F. A. (late Bonfanti's) 279 Broad- 
" For things of use, and things of sport, 
The gay and curious, here resort." 

FANCY HARDWARE DEALERS. 

Clark &. Coit, importers and dealers in lamps of everv des- 
cription, silver and plated ware, cutlery, japannery, man- 
tle clocks, vases bronze ornaments, and fancy hardware 
generally, 9 Maiden Lane. 

Conroy J. fishing ana fowling tackling, 52 Fulton. 

Delavan Charles H. importer &c. 36 Maiden Lane. 

I'euchtwanger & Co. Lewis, manufacturers and dealers in 
German silver ware, 2 Courtlandt. 

Gilbert, Bailey & Draper, importers and dealers in watches, 
cutlery and fancy goods, 8 Maiden Lane. 

Grove George, importer of buttons, japannery, and fancy 
hardware generally. 114 Fulton and 6 Gold 

Ogsbury Addington, 102 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

^iatt &i, Brothers, importers, &c. 12 Maiden Lane. 

Rowntree Henry, agent for W. Stanton & Sons, manufac- 
turers of cutlery, &c. Sheffield, 72 Maiden Lane. 

Tomes, Miller & Co. importers, &c. 6 Maiden Lane. 

ynn'n% 1^ ^!"^' ^^^ Broadway, corner of Duane. 
i:oung, Smith & Co. importers &€, 4 Maiden Lane. 



62 FRINGE AND TRIMMINGS, (DEALERS 1K) 

FARRIERS. 
Cooper John H. veterinary surgeon, from London, corner 

of Ninth street and Third Avenue, 
Drysdale A. farrier and veticary shoer, 158 Liberty. 

FEATHER BED AND MATRAS DEALERS. 

Hall & Mellen, corner Chatham and Mott. 
Parker Samuel S. 170 Greenwich. 
Parker, jr. S. 153 Chatham. 
Willard Martin, 150 Chatham. 

FEATHER DRESSER. 
Paradise Thomas, 78 Main, Brooklyn. 

FIRE ENGINE BUILDERS. 
Ludlum Henry M. machinist and fire engine builder, 9 

Sullivan. re t?i , 

Smith James, fire engine builder and hose maker, ot> r.im. 

FLOUR DEALERS. 

Allen & Whittlesey, 25 South. . ^ , .«« r-.^or 

Brett Theodonis. flour and commission dealers 1^^ l.eaar. 
Carll Selah B. corner of Main and Front, Brooklyn. 
Carpenter J. G. & J. W. 246 Fulton. 
Herrick E. & J. 23 South, corner of Coenties^felip. 
Hinsdale Henry, flour and commission store, 75 Vesey. 
Palmer & Co. Peter, dealer in wheat and rye flour, Indian 

meal, hay, oats, shorts, ship stuffs, &c. 329 Bowery. 
Underbill & Sons, Joshua, 250 Front. 
Westervelt & Bogert, 83 Dey. 
White George F. 103 West. 

FORWARDING MERCH.\NTS. 

Redfield John H. 82 Couvtlandt. 

Redfield W. C. 82 Courtlandt. 

Van Santvoord A. 82 Courtlandt— up stairs. 

Van Santvoord A. H. 82 Courtlandt. 

Wilkie Frederick, 9 Coenties Slip. 

WiUiams Joseph, 82 Courtlandt. 

FRINGE AND TRIMMINGS, (dealers in) 

Booth D. A. 100 William. 
FlachatC. 120Wmiam. 



FDRRiERg. g3 



re. 



FRUITERERS. 
Ashley & Ross, 200 Front, 
Bennett George L. 140 Front. 
Corrigan Luke, 21 Fulton. 
Hudson L. 31 Fulton. 
Niles John, fruit and produce dealer, 212 Washington. 

FURNISHING WARE, (dealers in) 
Jamison Robert, 253 Greenwich. 
Weatherhead & King, 304 Broadway 
Windle N. B. 56 and 120 Maiden Lane. 

FURNITURE DEALERS. 
Allen Russell W. 53 Bowery. 
Cooke James H. 100 Broadway. 
Devoe Thomas F. 106 Bowery 
Heymer Sarah, 199 Chatham. 
Hewitt John, 20 Hudson. 

Kearley Jarnes, dealer in new and second hand furniture. 
Household furniture, beds and bedding of every descriu- 

j^t^Ta ^""^'u'- ^^ ^^^'^ Broadway, corner of Reade. 

Madden William, 19 East Broadway. 

Reed John, furnishing warehouse, 257 and 259 Hudson 

Schwarzwalder C. 23 East Broadway. 

Silvey Joseph, 193 and 195 Chatham. 

^TA^'^J'Yl.a■^ ^' «^^^«^acturers of patent windlas* 
bedsteads, 196 Broadway. 

Sackett &, Branch, 332 Broadway. 

Spinnings Daniel, 113 Bowery. 

Whitmore, Livermore & Co. chairs, tables, workstands, 
cradles, sinks, «&c. 213 Duane. 

FURRIERS. 
American Fur Company, 39 Ann. 
Barron & Co. Joseph, 185 Water. 
Biglow & Co. Levi, 139 Fulton street, Brooklyn, 
Center & Son, Asa H. 187 Water 
Cerf John L. 138 William. 
Cleland & Co. G. 141 Water 
Deuel Alvah B. 172 Broadwav— up stairs. 
Frantzker F. W. 40 Maiden Lane. 
Gunthera C. G. wholesale and retail, 46 Maiden Lane, 



64 GRATE AND FENDER MAKERS. 

Halsey& Co. 189 Water. 

Jacobs Abraham, 252 Grand. 

King & Brothers J. 183 Water. [capes, &c. 1C8 Pearl. 

La Tonrrette, wholesale manufacturer of furs, caps, stocks, 

Pfefferle F. J. 22 Maiden Lane. 

Phillips A. 54 Maiden Lane. 

Raymond E. drest and undrest furs, 172 Water. 

Root & Leonard, wholesale dealers in furs and deer skins, 

105 Liberty. 
Searls Isaac, furblower, Doughty street, Brooklyn. 
Shannon J. manufacturer and importer. The highest price 

given for all kinds of shipping furs, 32 Maiden Lane. 
Taylor C J. between Hicks and Willis streets, Brooklyn. 
Van Winkle & Randall, hatters' furs, 169 Water. 
Wendel John, 9A Gold. 
White William A. fur and wool, 172 Water. 

GAUGER. 

Libbey James, city ganger, 20 Fulton street, Brookltjn. 

GLASS CUTTERS. 

Raymond & Co. J. <fc S. 68 Water. 
Stouvenel & Co. Joseph, 296 Water. 
Zeiss James, 29 and 31 Gold. 

GLOVERS. 
Hawkins & Pullmon, leather and gloves, 361 Pear!. 
MuUins D. 327^ Pearl. 
Peacock Allen, 2S6 Pearl. 
ShardlQw William L. 279 Broadway. 

GOLD LEAF MANUFACTURERS. 

Cook J. 20 Cherry. 

Ruggles R. B. No. 3 Astor House, Barclay street. 

GRANITE DEALER. 

Butler Thomas, 511 Water. 

GRATE AND FENDER MAKERS. 
Ayers &, Combes, grate and fender warerooms, 358 Pearl. 
Clayton H. I. 139 Bowery. 

Gilhooly & Son, A. manufacturers of Savages' patent 
kitdien ranges, and Russia iron grates, 78 Nassau. 



GROCERS. 65 

Goadby J. & S. patent reflecting, and other fashionable 

gTsites, 57 Canal, west of Broadway. 
Harapton' Adam, Russia iron, mantel and German silver 

reflecting grates, 87 Fulton. 
Lamb O. 103 Nassau. 
Smylie E. 68 Nassau and 73 Henry. 
Thomas T. <fc L. VV. 65 Nassau. 

GROCERS. 

Abbot & Fletcher, family grocers, 370 Broome. 

Alcoek George, corner of Washington and Courtlandt. 

Arcularius & Co. P. G. wholesale, Courtlandt corner West. 

Arcularius & Bayard, Greenwich, corner of Cedar. 

Attwater & Co. E. M . wholesale, 35 Barling Slip. 

Ballagh William & Robert, 64 Chatham. 

Bergh & Arcularius, wholesale, 62 Water. 

Bergen John, 61 Tillary street, Brooklyn. 

Birch & Nichols, wholesale grocers, 3 West. 

Bonghton & Bagley, 143 Cedar, corner of West. 

Bodine & Benjamin, 242 Fulton. 

Bourne S. corner of Tillary and Adams, Brooklyn. 

Brooks & Potter, 16 Fulton. 

Brown & Co. Joseph, L. 43 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

Buloid Robert W. wine and tea dealer, 199 Broadway, 

Bunker & Co. dealers in wines and groceries, 13 Maideil 
Lane. 

Byard John, family grocer, 161 Twentieth. 

Carman & Valentine, 29 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

Caswell Solomon T. 33 Murray. . 

Castree John, temperance family grocer, 320 Washington. 

Conover & Barkeloo, 187 Fulton street, Brooklyn^ 

Crooke & Fowkes, dealers in foreign fruit, flour, fish, pro- 
visions, Rhode Island lime, &c. corner West and Liberty. 

Cornwell & Powell, 39 Hicks street, Brooklyn. 

Crooke &l Suydam, wholesale, corner of West and Liberty. 

Craig & Dellickef, wholesale, 42 Front. 

Chichester Melick, wholesale and retail grocer, 293 Spring. 

Craikshank J. & E. 40 Greenwich. 

Cotton, jr. Samuel, 96 Bowery. 

Curtis & Co. E. 389 Bowery. 

Davis Benjamin W. 56 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

Davis Charles, 200 WiUiam. 



06 GROCERS, 

Degraw & Randolph, 24 Coenties Slip. 

Demaray David, 80 West, near Barclay. [Slip.- 

De Wald Henry D. grocer and dealer in fruit, 19 Coenties 

Doly Lewis, 347 Bowery. 

Dunham F. family grocer, 180 Spring. 

Dunning Clark S. 70 Fulton. 

Earl & Co. Justus, 42 and 43 West. 

Emery D. E. keeps a select assortment of wines, leas, coffee 
fruits, &c. 142 Greenwich. 

Fenner & Co. B. wholesale, 45 Water. 

Foster & Nickerson, wholesale, 28 South. 

Foote Philo P. family grocer, 129 Spring, 

Fieken Martin, 247 Bowery. 

Fleming, jr. Thomas, 86 Cedar. 

Furman & Webb, 333 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

Furman & Co. G. & G. C wholesale, 220 Front, 

Gaffuey James, cheap family grocer, 205 Hester. 

Gerald Thomas J. 20 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Greenwood & Wright, wholesale 01 Couitlandt. 

Fisher Richard, 351 Bowery. 

Grigg James W. 325 Bowery. 

Harvey R. S. ship stores, 74 South. 

Hicks jr. Daniel, 302 Bowery. ,oV^,^/^u' 

Hoft'man A. N. office of the steamboat Swallow, 163 VVash- 

Hoppock & Apgar. wholesale grocers and commission mer- 
chants, 230 Fulton. 

Hubbard & Co. A. 37 Peck Slip. 

Hunt Wilson J. 44 West. 

Hutchings R. family grocer, 755 Broadway. 

Jarvis Jay, family grocer, 19 Bowery. 

Johnson & Co. Hiram, wholesale, 12 Coenties Slip. 

Kerr Henry A. family grocer, 74G Broadway. 

Ketchum JohnT. B. wholesale, 17 Coenties Slip. 

Kipp Samuel, 487 Broadway. -,,1 r^ j 

Lockman Jacob, grocer and lumber inspector, 141 Cedar, 
M'Whorter Alexander, family grocer, 61 AVarren. [thony. 
Mahaffy Francis, family grocer, 238 Hudson and 14b An- 
Martin Hugh, 1 Hudson. 

Mead & Co. Ralph, wholesale, 13 Coenties Slip. 
Mills 6c Archer, groceries and provisions, 106 West. 
Montgomery jr. James, wine and lea dealer, 71 Vesey. 
Moreau John B. 2S Bowery. 



GROCERS. g7 

Neill John, corner West and Diiane. 
Newman Amasa, 250 (jireenwich. 
Oakford & Whitcomb, wholesale, GO Water. 
Olvvell, James »t. IMathevv, wholesale, (31 Catharine 
Perkins Jacob, only 7 articles viz.— sugar, tea, coffee, choco- 
late, molasses, nee and spices, 141 Bowery. 
Phoenix & Co. wholesale, ()5 and 67 Water. 
Pomeroy & Ball, wholesale, 63 Water, 
Potter Joseph, family grocer, 48 Hammond. 
Potter Joseph, 2A Hicks, Brooklyn. 

Kaynor John, family grocer. Third Av. corner 121st. street 
Kichardson William, b9 Main, Biooldyn. 
Richmond Warren, 6o Sands, Brooklyn. 
Ridden Bernard, corner Main and Water, Brooklm. 
Rollins William, 68 Chapel. 
Russell & Copland, ship stores, 88 Wall. 
Schenck William 1. :53 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Sherwood F. cSb J. 328 Bowery. 
Smith Crawford C. 135 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Smith Joshua R. wholesale and retail dealers in groceries 
^ wooden ware, Ac. 208 Washington. [ Vesey 

Smith, Howe &. Palmer, 210 Washington, 2 doors above 
Snedikor Sc Thurston, 30 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Spencer <t Sharp, 4 Fulton. 
Stagg & Co. Benjamin, 185 and 187 Washington. 
Story & Hawxhurst, 118 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Sutton & Young, 71 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Siorm & Co. I. T. wholesale, 15 Coenties Slip. 
Sullivan Michael,27 Catharine. 
Sutton & Farrar, 248 Fulton. 
Taylor Benjamin, tea dealer & grocer, SO Vesey. 
Tucker & Morrill, groceries and provisions, 96 West, 
Tyler & Brewer wholesale, 16 Coenties Slip. 
Van Benschoten & Co. James, 379 Broadway- 
Van Pelt & Fowler, wholesale, 4S Water. 
Vanbrunt & West, 10 Fulton. 
Van NordenThoroas L. 50 West. 
Van Nostrand J. & J, 32 West. 
Voorhees John, 153 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Vanvhet & Hart, 34 West. 
Van Schaick B. corner of West and Dey. 
Volckmer Henry, 163 Bowery. 

E 



68 HAIR DRESSERS. 

WilliamsWilliam, groceries in general, 378 Washington. 

Williams Hezekiah, family grocer, 365 Pearl. 

Williams & Co. Richard, 1 Fulton. 

Wood Ebenezer, corner of Tillary and Stanton, Brooklyn. 

Woodhull W. <!L S. 12 Fulton. 

AVilson Sc Cobb, wholesale, G3 Water. 

Wray Stephen, wholesale grocer, 100 West. 

"Wright G. family groceries, 42 Greenwich. 

Wyckotf William, 37 West. 

Wyckoff &■ Co. Henry, wholesale, 68 and 70 Courtlandt. 

WyckofF & Loveland, 92 South. [Fulton. 

Yvelin n. wholesale and retail grocer, and fruit dealer, 231 

GUNSMITHS. 
Barr William, gun and locksmith, 106 Beekman. 
Coles John K. 8U Fulton, 

Cooper Joseph, sporting and military store, 202 Broadway. 
Hinton William, 194 Broadway, opposite Dey. 
Jenner <fe Whitney, American rifle manufacturer, 69 Fulton, 

Brooklyn. 
Lewis Joseph, 13 Pearl. 

M'Larty William, gun and pistol manufacturer, 103 Cherry. 
Moore d; Baker, gun makers &c. 206 Broadway. 
Mullin John, ]97^ Greenwich. 
Reed Robert A. 23 Chatham. 

HAIR DRESSERS. 

Bardotte & Carter, gentlemen's hair cutters, 146 Broadway, 

Barrabino N. 38 Fulton. 

Behean Henry, 325 Broadway. 

Boyd John, 90 Barclay, 

Boyle T. G. Park Dressing Room, hair cutter, &c. 2 Beekman 

Bourdett D. S. wholesale and retail manufacturer of ladies 

ornamental hair work, 112 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Carauna A. 82 Broadway. 

Chapman Samuel, 84 Chatham. [Nassau. 

Chatters George, gentlemen's hair cutter and perfumer, 96 
Clirehugh Vair, ladies and gentlemen's wig maker and hair 

dresser, 158 Fulton. 
Colwell George, 199 Bowery. [American Hotel, 

Giffin James, hair cutter and dresser, 2 Barclay under 
Hazard Eli, hair cutting and dressing room, perfumer, &c. 

428 Broadway. 



HARDWARE DEALERS. QQ 



Kotblack Maria, 281 Broadway. 

Lewis, hair cutting dressing room and fancy store, under 

Waverly House, 352 Broadway 
M'Gregor Robert, 32 Park Row. 
Marteile & Holderman, ornamental hair manufacturers of 

wigs toupees, scalps and curls, wholesale and retail, 36 

iVlaiden Lane — up stairs. 
Martin Henry, 283^ Broadway. 
Manior: John, 162 Broadway. 
May Thomas M. ladies' and gentlemen's wig maker, whole- 

^ sale and retail, 98 Chatham. 
N^aly William, wig manufacturer, hair cutter and dealer in 

fancy articles, 1 Courtlandt. 
Palmieri Joseph, 6 Astor House, Broadway 
Parker Thomas, 120 Beekman. 

Pastor Antoni, 165 Greenwich. [Park Row. 

Pusseddu P. hair dresser, wig and toupee manufacturer, 17 
isaunders George, razor strop manufacturer, 157 Broadway 

— up stairs. •' ' 

Simms John, 5 Frankfort. 
Stokes James, 32 Main, Brooklyn. 

HARDWARE DEALERS. 

Arsborn & Littel, 33 Fulton. 

AylifFe Richard, 86 Chatham. 

Baylis & Co. A. B. 144 Fulton, Brooklyn 

Berrian J. & C. 601 Broadway. 

Blackett J. & W. 364 Bowery. rpiatt 

Butcher W. & S. manufacturers of Sheffield hardware 2 

Conover Stephen, 327 Broadway. ' 

Delavan & Brother, E. 4^9 Broadway 

Duryea John C. 81 Fulton, Brooklyn. [Maiden Lane. 

t.Ihot & Allen, importers of hardware, cutlery, guns, &c 85 

Fairbanks Henry F. 14 Piatt. 

Foster & Nitchie, 37 Cedar. 

Hill John, 397 Broadway. 

Hinchman B. & W. 74 Pearl. 

Hobson Francis, cutlers, (Sheffield, England,) 14 Piatt 

Hunt Samuel I. 201 Greenwich. 

Jenkins J. W. & G. W. importers of hardware, cutlery, guns, 
&c. also, dealers in jewellers and engravers Turkey oil 
stone, 210 Greenwich. i*^ j uu 



70 HARDWARE DEALERS. 

Lagrave John J. denier in foreign and domestic hardware, 

190 Greenwich. 
Lee Frederick A. 24.5 Bowery. 
Luqueer &. Son, F. T. 105 Pearl. 
M'Intosh Robert, manufacturer of copper, brass, tin, sheet 

iron and stoves, 99 Main, Brooklyn. 
Olmsted S. B. importer, &c. 290 Pearl. 
Peck iSi Son E. wire and sheet iron, 21 Cliff. 
Pierce M. A. 70 Fulton Brooklyn. 
Reed jr. John, 12 Old Slip. 

Reraleflerts, corner of Fulton and Johnson, Brooklyn. 
Richards, Kingsland & Co. importers of hardware, cutlery, 

guns, etc. 89 Maiden Lane. 
Robbins & Martin, (Birmingham, England,) 14 Piatt, 
Rowntree H. 72 Maiden Lane. 
Schuyler & Swords, 142 Broadway. 
Sheldon & Phelps, G2 Cedar. 
Stenton & Sou W. cutlers, &c. (SJieffield, England.) 72 

Maiden Lane. 
Taylor Joseph R. 284 Bowery. 
Thomas & Son, T. have for sale all kind;? of planished tin 

ware, wholesale, 65 Nassau, 
Thorp A. & H. S. cabinet hardware, 300 Pearl. 
Trask & Onderdonk, wholesale, 83 Water. 
Tysen & Co. George W. 150 Pearl. 
Tucker Moses, 111 Chatham. 
Underbill &. Tompkins, 58^ Bowery. 
Van Nest Abraham, sadlery, &c. 114 Pearl. 
Van Wagenen «t Tucker, importers of hardware and cutlery, 

172 Greenwich, corner of Dey. 
Weatherhead & King, importers and dealers in furnishing 

and fancy hardware, 304 Broadway. 
Wenman & Wyckotf, 147 Broadway. 
Wetmore & Co. importers an<l dealers in every description 

of hardware, bar iron and steel, nails, hollow ware, &c. 

corner of Washington and Vesey. 
Whitney Samuel, receives orders for Richardson & Son's fine 

table ; cutlery domestic hardware sold on commission, 258 

Greenwich. 
Wood John, lin, sheet iron and stove factory, 200 Green- 
wich. 



HATTERS. 71 

HATTER^. 

Alvord & Co. 12 Bowery. 

Archer Isaac H. 260 Greenwich. [157 Water. 

Bage & Co. Robert, wholesale and retail, 154 Broadway, and 
Bancker & Co. 22^ Bowery. 
Baker, Sproulls & Co. 117 Maiden Lane. 
Baldwin E. 26 Chatham. 
Bloomer Elisha, 160 Broadway. 
Bond Leonard, 8 Bowery. 
Boughton Edward C. 78 Water. 
Brewster J. & L. 166 Water. 

Brewster Joseph B. 68 Bowery and 307 Broadway. 
Brown & Co. 178 Chatham. 

Bunce H. fur and satin beaver, 333 Pearl. [Cedar. 

Champlin & Co. hat &, cap warehouse, 120 Broadway corner 
Clark Theodore, 463 Pearl corner of Chatham. 
Coupland Richard, importer and dealer in hat plush, trim- 
mings, &c. 14 Courtlandt. 
Debraine Victor, 7 Wail. 
Field Edward, 10 Bowery. 
Fish Orlando, 196 Chatham. 
Force James H. 510 Grand. 
Force William, 84 Bowery. 
Green M. D. 33 Chatham. 
Haight Samuel L. 186 Chatham. 
Hatch Robert H.fur store, 178 Water. 
Hazlett William R. 272 Broadway. 

Higgs William, 63 Cedar. [Broadway. 

Howe James L. wholesnle and retail hat warehouse, 404 
Hughes, Brothers & Co. 299 Greenwich. 
Hunt & Co. John, 181 Water. 
Hunt & Son, 138 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Leary & Co. 4 Astor House, Broadway, and 3 Broad. 
Macking J. 31 Fulton. 
Maltby & Starr, 147 Water. 
Peck R. W. 98 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Peck W. H. 114 Fulton, Brookhjn. 
Pollock & M'Manus, 7 Bowery. 
Price L 190 Broadway. 
Ryder A. M. & E. T. 236 Water. 

Sanderson & Co. 34 Fulton, [wholesale and retail, 61 Canal. 
Siming& Co. Thomas, satin beaver and fur hat manufacturers, 

E 2 



72 HOTEL AND TaVERNT KEEPERS. 

Spencer Joseph P. 4 Wall. 

Smith Charles, 150 Water. 

St. John Charles, 118 Broadway. 

Tombs & Co. John, hat manufacturers and ladies premium 

beaver bonnets. West Broadway. 
Tuttle S. 208 Chatham. 
Watson & Vanduzer, 154 Chatham, 

HAY DEALER 

Penfield Joseph, 3 West. 

HOSIERY AND GLOVE DEALERS. 

Chapraafi Horace H. 1 Maiden Lane. 

Clark. <fe Saxton, 175 Broadway. 

Haynes T. 397i Pearl. 

Houghton, ready made linen, stocks, gloves, hosiery, &c, 

whole.sale and retail, li Maiden Lane. 
Lane & Co. C. wholesale, 54 Beaver. 
Lane & Van Zandt, 14 Maiden Lane. 
Mahoney J. gentlemen's furnishing store, 451 Broadway. 
MichoU Morland, 291 Broadway. [Greenwich. 

O'Meara J. glove, liosiery, thread and needle store, 198 
Petrie William W. 92 Bowery. 
Pinkney Joshua G. 367 Pearl. 
Rankin Alexander, 98^ Bowery. 

Scho George, 133^ Chatham. [way. 

Walli & Patterson, gentlemen's furnishing store, 277 Broad- 

HOTEL AND TAVERN KEEPERS. 

Adams John, Sock and Buskin Hotel, 19 Park Row. 
Allaire Thomas H. Bleecker Street House, 273 Bleecker 
Anderson William C. Atlantic Hotel, 5 Broadway. 
Backus Mrs. S. Walton House, 328 Pearl. 
Bartlett James, North American Hotel, 30 Bowery. 
Blake & Reed, Waverly Hotel, 352 Broadway. 
Blancard Francis, Globe Hotel, 61 Broadway. 
Blin Sebastian, French Coffee House, 7 Warren. 
Boyden S. & F. Astor House, Broadway. 
Brovrn jr. David, Western Hotel, 9 Courtlandt. 
Brown George W. Auction Hotel, 129 Water- 
Brown Wm. H. Greyhound Hotel, Harlaem. 
Browning Archibald, 241 Washington. 



HOTEL AND TAVERN KEEPERS!. 



Banker William J. Mansion House, 39 Broadwav 
Byington Francis, Washington Hall J Intel, 1GJ (/liorrv 
Carman Samuel Long Island Hotel, 27 F.iltonst. nroohlvn 
Carr Horatio N. National Hotel, 1]2 JJroadwav ^ 

andS-ty^ ^'"'' ^' ^''''^ Hotel, comer' Washington 
Conklin J D Fulton Ferry, Water street, Broohhm. 
Cornell Charles, Four Mile House, Tliird Avmue 
^^'""1 P^ter, United States and European Collee House, 

lob Uuane. ' 

Cruttenden Robert G. City Hotel, Broadway 
Davis W.ll.am Repuhhean House, 107 Fnrn.an st. Brooklyn, 
Delmonico & Brother, corner William and Beaver 
JJrew Gershora, Second Ward Hotel, 87 Nassau. * 

qTn .^"'?'' ^^'P^' ^""'" "^^*^' Third Avenue, corner 
^4th street. 

Duflon John F L Military Garden, Fulton st. Brooklyn. 

Dunn J. C. Caledonian Hotel, 5 Gold 

Dunning Smith Dutchess and Orange County House, cor^ 

ner Courtland and Washington 
Elsey Richard, Twelfth Ward House, 3d Av. c. 40th street. 

t 'f.^-'^irT^l^^r* li^'^^^"^ Stage House, Yorkville. 

Flint &. Whitehall, Pearl Street House. 88 Pearl 

foot Ehsha, Montgomery Hall, 31 Park Row 

Foster A S. & J. K. Eastern Pearl Street H^use, 309 Pearl 

1 rost John, Willow Grove Hotel, 3d Av. corner 32d street 

Gardner I. H. & A. Broad Street Hotel, c. Pearl and Broad." 

Hardmg John, Rising States, South Ferry, Brooklyn. 

Harrison James, Northern Hotel, c. Courtlandt and West 

Harrison Andrew, Barclay Street House, west c. Barclay ' 

Hayes Newton, Franklin House, 197 Broadway 

Hickok Norman, Five Mile House, Third Avenue. 

Hi aire Pelerin, Bowling Green Hotel, IC Broadway 

Hil man Reuben, United States Pavilion, 53 Cherry 

Holt Stephen, B. & A. Holt's Hotel, 200 Water c. Fulton. 

Home, jr James, Custom House Hotel. IG Nassau c. Pine. 

Howard D^ D & J. P. Exchange Hotel, 8, 10 and 12 Broad. 

Hudson Charles, City Hotel, 163 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Jackson John Edystone Light House, 139 Washington. 

Jesup & Nichols. Pacific Hotel, 1C2 Greenwich 

Jones E. I) M. Washington Hall, Third Avenue, Harlaem. 

Johnson William, Railroad House, Yorkville. 



IMPORTERS. 



Lovejoy Jonathan, Park Row, corner Beekman. 

Lovejoj & Howard, Tammany Hall, 3G6 Nassau corner 

Frankfort. 
Lovejoy & Libby, York Hotel, 94 Barclay. 
M'Dermott Robert, Second Ward House, corner York and 

Pearl, Brooklyn. 
M'Kenzie Allen, Waverly Grove and RhodericDhu House, 

Bloomingdale Road, [Barclay. 

Milford Edward, American Hotel, 229 Broadway corner of 
Murray P. Long Island Railroad Hotel, South Ferry, 

Brooklyn. 
Nowlan James, Prospect House, near the Harlaem Rail 

Road Tunnel, Yorkcillr. 
Ottey E. Southern Hotel, 157 Broadway. 
Patten John, 73 Courtlandt. [Battery Place. 

Pettit Charles, Philadelphia Hotel, Washington, corner of 
Quevedo F. Sixth Ward House, corner Smith and Scher- 

merhorn, Brooklyn. 
Reynolds R. Western Pearl Street House, 307 Pearl. 
Roosevelt James V. Union House, Broadway corner 21st. 
Ryder Luke C. Washington Hotel, corner Adams and Til- 

lary, Brooklyn. [Brooklyn. 

Shearman Darius, Firemens' Hall Hotel, 41 James street, 
Sherman Mrs. P. Congress Hall, 142 Broadway. 
Simmons Alpheus, Yorkville Hotel, 4th Av. c. 85th street. 
Stone W^illiam M. Howard House, 429 Broadway. 
Underwood M. North American and Pennsylvania Cofiee 

House, 157 Washington. [lyn. 

Van Orden, jr. Andrew, Atlantic Hotel, Main street, Brook- 
Van Pelt, Otsego House, 31 Courtlandt. 
Vie John P. Village Hotel, 265 Bleecker. 
Ward James, Yv^'ashington Hotel, 282 Broadway. 
Webster & Ludlow, Main street, Brooklyn. 
Williston O. H. York House, 5 Courtlandt. [Leonard. 

Windust Edward, Athenaeum Hotel, Broadway, corner 
Wood J. B. Mechanics' Hotel, 24 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

IMPORTERS. 

Alexander William S. drilled and silver eyed needles, fish 
hooks and fishing tackle, agent for Windle's warranted 
steel pens, 85 Maiden Lane. 

Babcock & Suydam, French goods, 128 Pearl. 



IMPORTERS. 75 



Bai ey & Dixon, importers of cloths, buttons, &e. 4 Gold 

tiailey, Keeler& KeniKen, dry goods, 42 Broadvvav 

Berteaii Felix G. 83 William. ^' 

Berry man & Ebbets, French goods, ]18 Pearl. 

Bacli & Bradish, 43 Fulton. 

Bate T. &. J. importers and mannflicturers of genuine drill- 

ed eyed needles and fish hooks. 70 Afaiden Lane 
Benedict, Benedict & Co. watches, 30 Wall 
Benjamin W. M. & J. importers and jobbers of cloths cas- 

suneres, vestings, &c. 81 Maiden Lane 
Bend, W. B. dry goods, 45 Cedar. 
Bell Robert H. crockery, 59 Pearl. 
Billing & Mahler, French goods, 17 Broad 
Blackett J. &W. importers of hard ware and brush mann- 

facturers, .304 Bowery and 642 Broadway. 
Booth, Tomlinson & Booth, dry goods, 158 Pearl. 
Borrowe Charles E. wines, 44 Broadway. 
Bottomley jr. Jan:es, 97 Pearl. 

Boyd, Heard & Bryan, staple and fancy drv goods, 157 Pearl. 
Brett Panl J. o2 Beaver. ^ - «= 

Billiet Lander .\s Fils, (A Lachaise & V. Fauche,) 39 Beaver, 
isrornberg & Co. S. pianos, musical goods, &c. 112 Fulton, 
liuchanan J. C. wines, 61 Cedar. 
Burnham& Smith, British goods, 74 William. 
Calemard & Co. Chas. French goods, 120 Pearl, fup stairs. 
Carpenter & \ilade, importers of French hair,5SNassau— 
Caselh A. straw goods, silks, &c. 54 Exchange Place 
Chevrolat, Freres & Co. French goods, J 14 Pearl. 
Chuard & Boell, French goods, 130 Pearl. 
Cochran Samuel, laces, &c. 148 Pearl. 
Cox J. & I. importers and dealers in lamps of every descrip- 
tion, lustres, candelabres and guandolcs, 15 Maiden Lane. 
Cutter, Bulkley, Hunt Sc Co. drv goods, 60 Cedar. 
Chagot T. nrtilicial flowers. &c. 24 Maiden Lane. 
Chappell Salvador, importer of Havana segars of all brands, 

llii lieekman. 
Chazournes & Paillet, French goods, 116 Pearl 
Clark & Hunt, dry goods, 127 Pearl. 
Clark & Co. Samuel, British lace, etc. 70 Maiden Lane 
Crocker & Bill, British and French goods, 36 Ex. Place. 
D.ayton Charles W. 128 Broadway. 
Delano & Langdon, dry goods, if William. 
D Ivernois Bourry, Swiss muslins, 186 I'earl. 



76 IMPORTERS. 



Decasse, Miege &. Co. 131 Pearl. 

Denisoii & York, dry goods, 17 Broad. 

Deraisines & Boizard, fancy goods, 88 William. 

Dixon & Sons, James, importers of Sheffield plate and Bri- 
tania ware, &c. 14 Gold, up stairs. 

Dodge, Phelps &- Co. tin, ♦fcc. corner Cliff and Fulton. 

Dorr S. & F. English and French dry goods, 182 Pearl. 

Downer & Rogers, French and English goods, 134 Pearl. 

Draz &. Kummell, fancy goods, 111 Fulton. 

Duffield, Swift & Raymond, dry goods, 140 Pearl. 

Embury it Co. P. 73 Wall. 

Engler &c Foley, French, Swiss, and German goods, 18 Cedar. 

Fellows, Cargill & Co. importers of watches, jewelry, and 
fancy goods, 21 Maiden Lane. 

Fe.lovvs, Wadsworth & Co. importers of watches, jewelry, 
and fancy articles, 17 Maiden Lane. 

Fiedler & Co. Ernest, importers of French and German 
goods, drugs, chemicals, &c. 65 Cedar. 

Frye & Shaw, nautical, mathematical and optical instru- 
ments, 222 Water and 7(5 Fulton. 

Foot, Sterling & Co. drv goods, 171 Pearl. 

Gaillard Joseph, 73 Wall. 

Gillet Horatio, buttons, &c. 4 Liberty. 

Gerding & Siemon, importers of cut, plain and fancy glass 
ware; German hardware and goods generally. Also, mu- 
sical instruments, fancy goods, clocks, toys by the case, 
&c. 59 Maiden Lane. 

Godfrey, Pattison & Co, dry goods, 6 Fletcher. 

Graveley & Wreaks, importers and dealers in every descrip- 
tion of cutlery. No. 9 Astor House, Broadway. 

Griffen William F. watches and clocks, 240 Peari, 

Greenfield & Co. John V. earthenware, 77 Pearl. 

Hall &, Belknap, dry goods, 24 Exchange Place. 

Harden Geo.jje, linen, 43 William. 

Hardy Edward, hosiery, &c. 110 Pearl— up stairs. 

Harris &. Chauncey, china and earthernware, 81 Water. 

Harvier C. French goods, 112 Pearl. 

Hennequin <fcCo. H. dry goods, 15 Broad. 

Hoguet & Son, French goods, 76 William. 

Hourdequin F. 15 Broad. 

Hoyer G. F. music. 393 Broadway. [Place. 

JIunt& Brooks, French and English goods, 40 Exchange 



IMPORTERS. 77 

Kl^n'/ '''^•'/''^ ^{ ^"^^^'^^' ^^^"^h' -^ SwiL ward's' 
Kleudgen & Levenhager, 38 Exchange Place ^^^^'^^s, 

l^abron and Ives, importers of British dry goods, 35 Pine 
Lane, Lamson & Co. French goods, 133 Pearl 
Lansing, Munro & King, Gl Water 
Lawrence J. & A. 17 Cedar. 

Lee & Co. Benj F. British and French goods, 54 William 
Lee James chemicals and dry goods, 38 Broad 
Leggett, Wooster & Frame, dry goods, 57 Pine 
rT'f if f'""'^ett, fancy goods, 13 William. 
Littlefield & Shaw, Irish and British goods, 54 Pine 
Loeschigk William, silk goods, 12 Old Slip 
\^Za t r'* ?; ^' ^^^g^^ds, 50 Exchange' Place. 
Lord & Co. Thomas, dry goods, 42 Exchange Place 

LoXt A''73"^a^r"' '''''''' '' ^^^^ ^ane. ' 
Lowe Joseph, carpets, 3.33 Broadway. 
Magnin & Co. John, watches, 9 Wall 
Man.ce, Gould & Co. dry goods, 23 William. 
Manzanedo Jose, Havana Segars, 103 Fulton, 
iviartin L. t. musical instruments. 212 Fulton. 
McNutty & Chapman, dry goods, 52 Cedar. 
McCurdy, Aldrich & Co. dry goods, 172 Pearl. 

llf^ n'?^^'"' ^^ ^^^^^^" Lane-up stairs. 
Mitchell &, Co. Andrew, 6J and 63 Stone. 

Mver°' t R^;!^- ^^^"^^.-goods, 115 Pearl. []76 Washington. 

Niederer&Knnzler, French and Swiss good's lo^Te'ari 
Norwood, Carlisle & Co. 42 Wall. 
Oakeys & Robinson, dry goods, 8 Fletcher. 

P."i"^rp'^'''^P''' importer of French baskets, 109 William. 

Fares & Faye, paper hangings, 377 Pearl, 

Paton &: Stewart. 20 Cedar 

Peck & Co. H. N. 130 Front. 

Patten & Co. 92 William. 

Peck Theophilus, dry goods, 7 Cedar. 

X>%^J^^^^^' ^^^-^ and hosiery, 155 Pearl. 

PfeifFer C. F. watches and clocks, ISi Maiden Lane, 

riatt Isaac L. lookmg glass plates, 178 Broadway. 



78 IMPORTERS. 



Piatt 5o\m, cloths, C Gold. [11 Cedar. 

Plunkett & Leberthon, French, Eni^lish, and Gerinau goods, 
Porter, Denny & Co. French and English goods, 57 Beaver. 
Rhodes & Co. Francis B. French, English, and German 

goods, 29 Pine. 
Riirgs, Taylor, & Co. British goods, 109 Pearl. 
Robbins & Co. E. & C. hardware, 134 Pearl and 100 Water. 
Sargeant Thomas, 71 Water. [52 Stone. 

Schrage A: Koop, German and French goods, 85 Pearl and 
Snelling, Strong & Co. dry goods, 44 Exchange Place. 
Spehnan t-V- Frazer, combs and fancy goods, loG Pearl. 
Spies Adain W. hardware, 192 Pearl. 
St. Felix **i:, Co. John R. fancy goods, 57 Beaver. [Lane. 
Stout, Ingoldsby cSs Co. hardware and cutlery, 119 Maiden 
Strasser J^. French atid German dry goods, 52 Broad. 
Swords, Ilalsted <Sc Corning, (50 Stone. 
Taylor, Little & Co. dry goods, 210 Pearl. 
Taylor, Wyvill & Co. importers and manufacturers of lace 

goods, hosiery, gloves, <^g. 178 Pearl. 
Thompson, Austen kt Co. French goods, 15 William. 
Thompson, Pinneo &. Co. French, Lidia, Italian and Swiss 

goods, and all articles in the millinery line, 212 Pearl. 
Townsend George E. hardware, 138 Pearl. 
Tucker, Dorr & Co. importers of dry goods and commission 

merchants, 33 Pine. 
Tobias S. I. watches, 22 Wall. 
Umber & llambniauM, F. French goods, 54 Beaver. 
Underbill v^ Seymour, china, glass and earthenware, 88 

Pearl and 50 Stone. 
Underwood, Tetend &- Blain, 119 Pearl. [Pearl. 

Van Amburgh & Maghee, English and French goods. 111 
Vepault & Floyd, dry goods, 72 William. 
Victor &. Duckworth. German &. Swiss goods, 93 Pearl. 
Vaisin »So Co. J. A. French goods, 27 William. 
Walker Thomas, worsted goods, 31 Pine. 
Ward, Sill ♦&- Roberts, French importers, 84 William. 
Wetmore & Co. R. C. china and earthenware, 85 Water. 
Wetzlar & Co. Gustavus, French and German dry goods, 

5 and 7 William. 
Whitney &. Foster, importers of silks, &c. 26h Broadway. 
Wolfe, "Bishop & Co. importers of line and heavy hardware, 

guns, <Sir.. S7 Maiden Lane. 
WoUe & Clarks, 193 Pearl. 



Ji;W£L CASE AlAKBRS. 79 

Wood Samuel R. woollens, 30 Cedar 
Wood Thomas, woollens, 30 Cedar. 
Wright jr. & Co. John, crockery, 43 Water 
INDIA RUBBER, (dealers in) 
4T W '"^"'"^^'^'^^^'^ ^°"^i'^">'' J- L- Warner,agent, 

INTELLIGENCE OFFICES, (keepers oe) 
Gregory Holly, 70 Chambers. 
Hiitson William, 73 Chambers. 
Norcross E. agent, ]()G Chambers. 
Vedder Albert, agent, 478 Broadway. 

IRON CHEST MANUFACTURERS 

Froehc Lewis, 132 William. 
Gayler Charles J. 102 Water. 
Heberd Andrew, Water street, Brooklyn. 
IRON FOUNDERS. 
Atwater & Co. Plymouth street, Brooklm. 
Birekbeck Alexander, Water street, Bxooklun. 
Brownmg William, North Moore near We.st street. 
New lork iron manufacturing and furnishing company 
manufacture You e's and Packard's and StarbuS "a' 

.'rread"ic"^tiiT-"'i"^'""^^^"^'^s ^^^^' ^-'-«^« 

VVrter of castings done to order, 264 

Z^lf^ ^f- ?\^'^»J^' l^etween Washington and West 
Sabbaton Paul A. R.vington corner Cannon. 
Trimble Thomas, 502 Water. 

IRONMONGERS. 

oSi' arrii v^zf' ^"^ "« "'-T-fi- , 

vvunereii, Ames & Co. manufacturers' agents, g Liberty. 

IRON RAILING MANUFACTURERS 
Seely Joh„, 43 Cranberry street, BrookUm. 
Stilwell George W. Hicks street, Brooklyn. 

JEWEL CASE MAKERS. 

Lea & Coles, 1G4 Broadway. 

F 



80 JKWELLERS. 



JEWELLERS 

AcUerman Abraham, inanufucturer of fine filigree jewelry, 
144 Reade. 

Andrews & Grierson, 14 John. 

Arthur & Kunirill, d9 Reade. 

Bassford William B. mausifacturing jeweller, 106 Reade. 

Canfield, Palmer A:. Bliss,, manufacturing jewellers and ena- 
mellers, 6 Coiirtlandt. 

Clapp Benjamin W. 4 Giaen. 

Dimond Isaac M. 4 Green near Maiden Lane. 

Dominge F. 20 John. 

Downing »S:. Baldwin, 145 Reade. 

Downing & Co. G. R. pe rl and jet work, 57 Reade. 

Ellis Richmond, manufaciuring jeweller, 1.54 Reade. 

Fellows, Wadsworth & Co. importers, Sec. 17 Maiden Lane. 

Gelston Geo. S. importer and manufacturerof fine watches, 
jewelry, silver ware .nd fancy goods, 1 Astor House, 
Broadway. 

Greene it. Brothers Will am, manufacturers and wholesale 
dealers, 44 Maiden Lai \ and 4 North Fifth, Philadelphia. 

Marquand &, Co. importi rs, wholesale and retail dealers in 
diamond and other pre lous stones, silver and plated ware, 
watches, jewelry and r ch fancy goods, Ibl Broadway. 

Melville David, raanufac irer and wholesale dealer in Ame- 
rican and importer of ■ English jewelry, watches, &c. 16 
Courtlandt — up stairs. 

Melville Henry B. 4 Gr€ -n, up stairs. 

Miller William, 6 Green near Maiden Lane. 

Mott W. & J. C. 4 Green, up stairs. 

Murray Peter, importer aid dealer in jewelry, fancy gooda, 
and manufacturer of b ?ad necklaces, &c. 74^ Chatham. 

Peckham & Grinnell, manufacturers, 1*3 John in rear build- 
ing. 

Reed Stephen, watches and clocks, 179 Broadway. 

Richards Joseph, spectacles, tfcc. 175 Broadway. 

Riley &- Brainard, wholesale jewellers and gold enamellers, 

94 Reade. 
Rockwell E. & S. S. watches, jewelry, sdver ware and dia- 
mond work of the most fashionable patterns, 102Broad'y. 
Sackett, Willard & Sewall, wholesale dealers, 58 Nassau. 
Salisbury Henry, 171 Broadway. 

Stebbins & Co. E. importers, manufacturers and dealers m 
watches, jewelry, silver ware, &c. 207 Broadway. 



LEATflEIi DEALERS. 81 



Tenney William I. importer, manufacturer and dealer in 
watches, rich jewelry, &c. 251 Broadway. 

LACE DEALERS. 

Green R. S. 91 William. 

Philips M. & M. 105 William. [n^ent., 90 Fulton. 

Smi^b r Too%?/m-''"'^ ^"d military orna- 

femith .1. 12.-, William. •' 

Thompson James, fancy lace and cap store, 133 William. 

LAMPS, (dealers in) 
Cox J. & S. importers, &c. 15 Maiden Lane. 
Kurtz John, coach and gig lamp manufacturer and silver 

plater, 91 Fulton. 
Stoutenburgh & Morgan, 19 Fulton. 
Wilbor J. B. 263 Pearl. 
Wilbor William H. 5 Bowery. 

LAND AGENTS. 
Beach H- C. 7 Broad, over the Mechanics' Exchange. 

McJimsey Joseph M. 30 Wall 
Itadclitt &. Adams, 7 Broad. 

LEAD POINTS AND PENCILS, (dealer m) 
^den Lan^" "'^""^^'^^"^^*" °^ ^^ad points of all sizes, 5 Mai- 

LEATHER DEALERS. 

Andrews &. Wilson, 47 Ferry. 
Bowden & Kissam, 66 Vesey.' 
Braine Daniel, 18 Jacob. 

Brooks & Co. James and George, Gold opposite Ferry. 

crown &. Burke, 7 Ferry. 

Bullard & Mattison, 14 Ferry. 

Burtis & Co. William A. 10 Ferry 

Griffiji Charles PI. 21 Jacob. 

<TreenT.&I. 3 Jacob. 

Hopkins Gerard, 27 Ferrv 

Hull H. D. 30 Ferry. 

Johnson William P. 64 Frankfort. 



32 LiQUORP, (dealers in) 

Kemp William, boot, shoe and leather dealer, 52 Ferry. 

Knmbel Williym, ?j?, Ferry. 

Labaw Jonathan, 1 Jacob. 

Lee S: Co. Gideon, 20 Ferry. 

Looniis Lewis E. 49 Ferry. 

JMarsh B. hide, oil and leather store, c. Ferry and Jacob. 

JMarsh Evert, corner of" Frankfort and Jacob. 

Meineli &- Co. James, 2:^ Ferry. 

Mills Nathaniel, 40 Fnlton, Brooklyn. [site Ferry. 

Miller William P. hide and leatliermerchant. 85 Gold opi)o- 

Melvin tSL Co. A. leather and hide dealers, 5 Ferry. 

Penny v!C Smitli, 12 Jacob, 

Prickett lAhvard K. 4G Ferry. 

Purdy & Parker, 15^ Bowery. 

Quackenboss &. Co. Of) Ferry. [oil, 17 Ferry. 

Ring ifc Ely, commission merchants and dealers in hides and 

Scott Thomas, 23 Ferry. 

Smith, Schult/ & Co. 37 Ferry. 

Stout T. & R. 51 Ferry. 

Trotter Jonathan, 29 Ferry. 

Van Nostrand & Hoople, 38 Ferry. 

Watts George, 26 Ferry. 

LIME DEALERS. 

Frost J. S. dealer in lime and building materials. South 

Ferry, Brooklyn. 
Keeler & Ostran, foot of Jay, Brooldyn. 
Raymond & Co. South Ferry, Brooklyn. 

LIQUORS, (dealers in) 
Barnctt S. importer of foreign wines and liquors, 145 Liberty. 
Carroll Anthony B. 236 Grand corner Christie. 
Cope & Co. John, 133 Canal. 
Davies Rouland, 16 Spruce. 
Durand tV Co. John, importers of brandy, French wines, 

olive oil, fruits, &c. 97 Cedar. 
Eden Mathew, best of ales, wines, liquors, &c. 9 Frankfort. 
Farrington James A. Third Avenue corner 131st street. 
Fletcher C. has constantly on hand a choice assortment of 

cordials, &c. 254 Greenwich. 
GrilHn &, Co. C. G. wines, spirits, cordials, &c. wholesale 

and retail, 271 Hudson. 
HofTraan A. W. 183 Washington. 



LOOKING GLASS AND FRAME MAKERS. 83 

Ide Willard, 195 South. 

Lawson John, 15 Burling Slip. 

Miller John H. 8 Frankfort. 

Miller Henry W. 22 Fletcher. [176 Washington. 

Myers &, Brother, importers of foreign wines and hquors, 

Fierson Joseph, 102 Frankfort corner Gold. 

Ryan Thomas, 13 Bridge. 

Sayre John, 23 Whitehall. [quors, 85 Division. 

Simpson Lissack H. importer ^nd dealer in wines and li- 

Smith James, Third Avenue corner 129th street. 

Thorp David B. 29 Peck Slip. 

Vreeland R. C. 24 South. 

LITHOGRAPHERS. 

Bufford J. H. 136 Nassau corner Beekman. 

Endicott George, 359 Broadway and 22 Nassau. 

Graham & Price, 42 Nassau. 

Green & M'Gowran, 30 Wall. 

Hayward & Pillou, 48 Nassau. 

Miller & Co, 15 Broad. [landt. 

Robinson Henry R. publisher and caricaturist, 52 Court- 

LIVERY STABLES, (proprietors or) 

Brower Abraham, 661 Broadway. 
Campbell Alexander, 163 and 165 Washington. 
Cox Daniel T. 70 Prince corner Crosby. 
Disbrow William D. 386 Bowery. 
Gores Nathaniel, 26 Henry, Brooklyn. 
Rooney Patrick, 355 Bowery. [Broome and Canal. 

Stimpson &. Cowan, New York Baazar.'Sl Crosby, between 
Wortendyke R. exchange, commission and livery stable, 
20th street near Broadway. 

LOCKSMITHS. 

Andrews Solomon, patent combination locks, office 174 

Broadway. 
Day, Newell & Day, 589 Broadway. 

LOOKING GLASS AND FRAME MAKERS. 

Gaily Andrew, bird cage, looking glass and frame maker; 

267 Bowery. 
Eamseyer C. 141 Leonard. 

F 2 



84 MACHINISTS. 



LOOKING GLASS MAKERS AND GILDERS. 

Cammey(^r Auaustns F. 453 Broadway. 

Clover Lewis P. 294 Broadway. 

Del Vecchio J. J. 44 Chatham. 

Dugliss Hosea, 11 Park Row. 

Heins John J. 60 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

McDonald Jolin, carver and gilder and looking glass and 

picture frame manufacturer, loUi Bowery. 
Marshall Matthew, 180 Fulton. 
Williams &. Co. John, wholesale and retail, 315 Pearl. 

LUMBER DEALERS. 

Bliven Charles D. corner West and Hobokcn. 

Bool Henry W. 247 Water and 2H7 Cherry. 

Brush J. & B. D. corner West and Franklin. 

Cantine John M. commission lumber merchant, West be- 
tween Canal and AVatts. 

Carnley Thomas, dealer in locust timber, tree nails, lumber, 
&c. 3Iunroe street near AVilliamsburg Ferry. 

Clark & Mann, lumber and stave dealers, 551 Water. 

Conklin Ilenrv N. Water-street, Brooklyn. 

Colborn Elias," corner North Moore and AVest. IBrookhjn. 

Dannat William II. 258 (Cherry. 

Loveland Horace, Marshall-street near Jackson street Ferry, 

Lyon Thomas, 194 Cherry. [between Canal and Watts. 

Mankin George I. hardware and pine lumber yard, West 

IVIiller S. & D. South Ferry, Brooklyn. 

Moore John, Water street, Brooklyn. 

Morse Martin, 147 West corner Franklin. 

Raymond &. Co. South Ferrv, Brooklyn. 

Sherwood Oran, 324 Cherry and 532 Water. 

Titus «fc Son M. M. 202 Cherry. 

Vandecar John, Water street near Fulton Ferry, Brooklyn. 

Wallace James, 13 Eighth Avenue. 

MACHINISTS. 

Burdon William, 144 Front, Brooklyn. 

Dimpsel ( leorge L. 23 Canal. [North Moore near West. 

Dunham A: Co. Henry R. steam engine and machine sJiop, 

Frasse H. F. 5)5 Fulton. 

Hoe & Co. R. 29 it 31 Gold and corner Broome «fc Sheriff. 



MARINE Railways, (proprietors of) 85 



Maxwell James, 259 Bowery. 
Suydam, H. M. 9 Snllivan. 

MAHOGANY DEALERS. 

Cadle jr. Cornelius, 43 and 45 Harrison. 
Copcutt J. & F. rose, maplo, zebra, satin and walnut ve- 
neers, corner Washington and Franklin. 
Merry & Brouer, 18S Chambers. 

NevvhouseB. keeps constnutly for sale elsgant veneers, ta- 
ble vyood, plank, <icc. 408 Washington. 

Peck & Kidner, mahogany yard and steam saw mill, corners 
VVashington, West ajid Laiglit. 

Tm-nl.iill John, keeps a general assortment ofstock suitable 
jor cabinet and piano forte makers, and joiners, corner 
VVashington and Harrison. 

MANIFOLD WRITERS, (deat.krs in) 
Dakm C. P. mnnrifactnrer of the improved manifold writer 

and lead points, 5 Maiden Lane. 
Oilchrist J. 202 Broadway. 

^ ^ ^ ^^ MAP DEALERS. 

Colton J. H. Fulton corner Nassau. 

Disturnell John, jniblisher and dealer in maps wholesale and 

retail, 20 Courtlandt— up stairs. 
Hinman & Dutton, pubhshers, (5 North Fifth, Philadelphia. 
rhelps cV fequires, n Bowery, up stairs. 
Wilson Richard J. publisher and dealer, Maps printed and 

mounted to order, 8 Burling Slip, c. Water— up stairs. 
MARBLE DEALERS. 
Browne Robert L. 360 Greenwich. 

Clark James Water street, near Fulton Ferry, Brookhm. 
Johnson & Wilson, marble mantle manufacturers, Fulton 

near Smith, Brookhjn. 
Kain Francis & James, 359 Greenwich. 
Little Hamilton & Co. Lafayette marble works, c. Chamber 

and VVashington. 
Mclntire George, Myrtle corner Wasiiington, Brooklyn 
Oatwell Joseph. marb;e works, G and 8 Sullivan 
UiiderhiU & Ferris, mantles, statuary, monuments, &c. 

Greenwich corner Beach. 

MARINE RAILWAYS, (proprietors of) 
Mercareau & Breath, marine railway, Jay st. Brooklyn. 



86 MERCHANTS, (gENERAL) 



Secor Francis, marine railway, Washington-street, between 
Rector and Carlisle. 

MASONS. 

Ennis Michael, mason and builder. Third Avenue corner 18th 

street. 
Poullalier G. mason and builder, cor. Fulton and William. 

MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENT MAKERS. 

Brown E. mathematical instruments, 27 Fulton. 

Frye & Shaw, mathematical instrument makers, 222 Water 
and 72 Fulton. 

Kutz Erasmus A. 180 Water. 

Pike & Son Benjamin, 166 Broadway. 

Roach & Warner, manufacturers of optical, mathematical 
and philosophical instruments, 293 Broadway. 

MATRESSES AND BEDDING, (dealer in) 

Ahrenfeildt Henry, 208 Fulton. 

MEDICINE, (dealers in) 

Brandreth m.d. Benjamin, 1 Spruce, 287 Hudson, 276 Bow- 
ery and 268 Grand. 

Brett Thomas P. corner Hicks and Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Glover, m.d.R. manufacturer of trusses, suspensary bandages, 
Russia belts, &c. 2 Ann. 

Hart Robert D. general agent for the sale of popular medi- 
cines, 437 Broadway above Howard. 

Harper Abigail, manufacturer of Harper's relief for coughs 
and asthmas, 31 Rose and Sixth Avenue corner Amos. 

Mead John, druggist and apothecary, 522 Pearl. 

Ralph, M.D. Joseph, 38 Courtlandt. [ih Ann. 

Sears William, American hygiene vegetable renovating pills, 

Sharpe W. J. Swains' Panacea, 82 William. 

Stanley & Co. Joseph, 4]8 Broadwhy, comer Canal. 

Turner & Hughes, Henry D. agents for the sale of Beck- 

j^ with's anti-dyspeptic pills, 180 Broadway. 
MERCHANTS, (general) 

Andrews & Co. H. M. 30 Wall. 
Boisgerard Edward, 54 Wall. 
Brown, Brothers & Co. 46 Wall. 
Darby George F. .54 Wall. 
Gordon George, 34 Wall. ^ 



MERCHANT TAILORS. 87 



Gossler John N. 40 Wail. 

Gracie & Sargent, 2 Hanover. 

Greenzebach George E. 80 Wall. 

Heydecker I. 54 Wall. 

King Beri, 272 Pearl. 

Lowery & Co. J. <fc A. 84 Wall corner Front. 

M'Grath George, 52 Wall. 

Macrae & Hall, 29 South. 

MoUer & Oppenheimer, 52 Sonth. 

Ogden & Co. James D. P. 53 Wall. 

Pearson J. Green, 34 Wall. 

Pitkin John R. 18 Wall. 

Thrall Geprge W. 18 Wall. 

Wheelwright John, 71 Wall. 

Wilson William D. 20 South. 

Wright Albert H. 76 Wall. 

MERCHANT TAILORS. 

Andrews, Swain & Lamphier, tailors and woollen drapers, 
north corner of Courtlandt and Greenwich. 

Arnoux A. & G. A. 145 Fulton. 

Avis William T. 410 Broadway. 

Benschoten J. V. draper and tailor, 3 Astor House, Vesey. 

Braker C. 356 Pearl. 

Eriggs J. 48 Courtlandt. 

Brundage & Co. James H. 1-57 Broadway. 

Bnrtis Oliver D. 57 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Cooper A. W. 227 Greenwich. 

Corlies, jr. Benjamin, 380 Pearl. 

Cox &. Knock, 5 Astor House, Broadway. 

Culbert John, 340 Water. 

Darley John, draper and tailor, 143 Fulton. 

Davenport & Prindle, 46 Fulton. 

Demarest David N. 89 Fulton. 

Derby & Farnham, 187 Broadway. 

Doremus & Seaman, 169 Broadway. 

Dubois & Lockwood. 169 Broadway. [way. 

Dolson & Reeve, cloths, cassimeres and vestings, .567 Broad- 

Dunkin John, 152 Front. 

Dougherty &. Watson, 174 Broadway. 

Edgerton *fc Washburn, 48 Fulton. 

Elmendorfs &. Lord, arni}^ and navy uniforms made to order, 
2 Astor House, Vesey. 



88 MERCHANT TAILORS. 



Emmeiis John P. 85 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Fowler S. L. draper and tailor. 70 Liberty. 

Freeland L. & J. 311 Broadway. 

Garnsey Albert, 16 Maiden Lane. 

Goodwin & Robinson, 84 Broadway. 

Grubb George, mercer and tailor, 6 Courtlandt. 

Harriot Smith, 301 Broadway. 

Hart L. 251 Greenwich. 

Hatfield Sc Pearson, 176 Broadway. 

Hewlett H. L. has on hand all kinds of ready made clothing, 
also makes to order, 187 Greenwich. 

Hewlett Isaac, 86 Vesey. 

Howard, Keeler & Scofield, 68 Broadway. 

Hoyt Henry N. 393 Pearl. 

Hoyt & Hanabergh, 62 Fulton, Brooklyn- 

.Tarvis, Samuel & Nelson, woollen drapers and tailors, 142 
Broadway. 

Livingston VV. draper and tailor, 103 Fulton. 

Lynde &. Jennings, 116 Broadway. 

Malcolm, & Tombs, 7 Astor House, Broadway. 

Manchester & Smith, 2 Astor House, Broadway. 

Pegg & Co. R. 125 William. 

Post Stephen, draper and tailor, 269 Greenwich, 

Poulson & Jennings, 4 Franklin Square. 

Price & Mallery, 20 Courtlandt— up stairs ; and in Savan- 
nah and Augusta, Geo. 

Sayre, Morris & Co. drapers and tailors, dealers in stocks 
and ready made linen,. &c. 125 Fulton. 

Sharp & Sturges, corner of Fulton and Main, Brooklyn. 

Sherman Edward, draper and tailor, 5 Nassau. 

Stilwell S. B. 39 Fulton, Brookhjn. 

Stinemets Wm. H. draper and tailor, 2 Nassau. 

St. John. Raymond & Co. 84 Broadway. 

St. John & Tousey, 86 Broadway. 

Thome & Jarvis, 406 and 408 Broadway. 

Turner A. R. 56 Fulton Brookhjn. 

Underbill, Silleck & Co. drapers and tailors, 68 Fulton. 

Van Amburgh VVm. R. 255 Greenwich. 

Van Boskirk Abraham, 296 Broadway. 

Waldron c^ Ackerman, 139 Broadway. 

White James M. draper and tailor, 50 Fulton. [Pearl. 

Whiting Charles, stocks, gloves, and ready made linen, 320 



MOROCCO DRESSERS. 89 

MILITARY GOODS, (dealers jn) 

Bell Joseph T. military caps, belts, &c. 186 Fulton. 
Cotfiii John, equipment maker, 3 Jacob. 
Dingee Robert, 16 Jacob. 
Gratacap H. D. 392 Broadway. 

Hinton William, importer and manufacturer of rifles, mili- 
tary caps, <ic., fowling and fishing tackle, 194 Broadway. 

MILLINERS. 
Ambler Mrs. M. 120 Bowery. 

Bennett Thomas, 297 Broadway. 

Brien Jane, 415 Pearl. 

Bunford Catharine, 120 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

Leggett Mary M. millinery and I'ancy dry goods, 401 Pearl. 

Smith Mrs. J. N. 19 John. 

Whitney 31. L. 403 Pearh 

MILLS, (proprietors of) 
Hurst Benjamin F. ground rice flour, superfine, fine, mid- 

dlings and Graham wheat, &c. All kinds of grain ground 

to order, corner of Jefterson and South. 
Thatcher &, Bergen, George L. planeing mill, Front street, 

Brooklyn. 
Van Amaringe, George O. steam saw mill, 587 Water. 

MILLSTONE MAKER. 
Tyark William, 240 Washington. 

MINIATURE PAINTERS. 

Burhng R. 205 Hudson. 
Folsom Mrs. 66 Beekman. 

MOROCCO CASE MAKERS. 
Hartnett & Co. C. corner Maiden Lane and Broadway. 

MOROCCO DRESSERS. 
Brown & Filmore, 9 Ferry. 
Griffin Philip, 9 Jacob. 
Kerrigan James, 1 Ferry corner Gold. 
Rutherford & Sons, C. morocco manufacturers, Gold near 

Tillary, Brooklyn. 
Trotter John, 5] Stanton, Brooklyn. 



90 OIL DEALEKS. 



MUSIC DEALERS. 

Atvvill Joseph F. piano forte and music saloon, 201 Broad- 
way. 
Dubois & Bacon, 167 Broadway. 

Endicott Geor^'e, music publislier and dealer, 359 Broad'y. 
Geib &. Walker, 2o 3Iuideu Lane. 

Godone G. 412 Broadway. [House, 239 Broadway. 

Hewitt & Co. J. L. j)iano forte and music store, Park Place 
Kersing Sc Sons, 259 Broadway. [son and 212 Fulton. 

Martin C. F. manufacturer of guitars, violins, &c. 19G Hud- 
Millet William C. music saloon, 375 Broadway. 
Riley & Co. E. 29 Chatham. 
Torp Otto, 465 Broadway. 

MUSIC PRINTER AND ENGRAVER. 

Ackerman Samuel, corner Greenwich and Barclay. 

MUSTARD MANUFACTURERS. 

Hill Seth, 52 Spring. 

Van Dyke, jr. James, plot 78 Clinton Avenue, Brooklyn. 

OCULIST. 

Elliott, Dr. professor of the anatomy and diseases of the hu- 
man eye, 303 Broadway. 

OIL CLOTH MANUFACTURER. 

Manley John, corner of Livingston and Smith, Brooklyn. 

OIL DEALERS. 

Clark S. S. oils, groceries, &.c. 229 Fulton. 
Collin & Fowler, dealers in sperm oil and candles, 73 Vesey. 
Constant Silas, 54 Water. 
Earle &- Brady, oil merchant, 40 West. 
Elsworth Henry, dealer in oils, paints, glass, iScc. 88 Dey. 
Fowler Charles C. corner Bridge and John st. Brooklyn. 
Frost & Co. John, dealers in sperm oil and candles, 40 Wa- 
ter street, Brooklyn. 
Judd Samuel, oil and candles, 59 Fulton. [Broad. 

Kingsland J). & A. yperm oil and candle maiujfacturers, 49 
Mott Isaac, fine sperm oil, candles, «5Lc. 125 Fulton. 
Ostrander C. V. B. 233 Fulton. 
Seely & Co. WiUiam H. 04 Dey. 



PAINTERS. 



91 



Seely & Storms, 179 Washington and 38 Water 
Swain W. A. & C. 189 Greenwich. 
Van Wyck Isaac C. 3 Coenties Slip. 
Woodvyard Thomas, 41 Front. 

OPTICIAN. 

^^WM,^"^" Cf. manufactures all kinds of optical glasses. 268 

PAINTERS. 

Afllick Thomas, 81 Bowery. 

Ayres & Berrien, 12G Spring. 

Carnian&KiHg ship, house and sign painting, graining 

marbling, guilding, &c. 220 Washington. ^ 

drill Anthony, painter and glazier and dealer in paints, oils, 

cVc. ()0o Broadway. 

Dov^ I'n ^- ^\ ^""^"7: tington and Duane. 

IJon .i^ Beesley, house, ship and sign painters, cor. Wash- 
Dugdale Arthur, 15 York, Brooklyn. [wich 

Gardiner John, house and ornamental painter, 770 Green- 
Lribbs John, sign and ornamental painter, 153 Front 
Gibson W. & I. plain and decorative painters, glaziers and 

glass stainers, 376J Bowery. 
Grirten John L. 234 Bowery. 
Harris & Co. Edward, 98 Cranberry, Brooklun. 
S'iTn ' ^'i ^? Beekman. i;742 Broadway. 

Hi Uavid, glazing and transparent window blind painting. 
Hill Jameg, i)amt store, 211 Greenwich, 
llndgekin John, house and sign, 378 Broome. 
M'Fayden Archibald, house and ornamental painter. Third 

Avenue, corner 26th street. 
Meree Peter, house and sign, 484 Pearl. 
Moore James T. house, ship, sign and ornamental painter in 
all its branches, 145 Washington. [and Pearl 

Moores Edward H. sign painter and gilder, corner Beekmar; 
Kamsbottoni E. sign painter and premium imitator of wood 

and marble, 175 Broadway. 
Renoud David, 297 Bowery. 
Torboss Luke, 92 Liberty. 
Watson & IMuckel house, sign and ornamental painters in 

all ita branches, 73 Fulton. 
West Daniel, house & sign painter and glazier, 233 William. 

G 



92 PENCIL CASE MAKERS. 



PAINTS, (dealers in) 

Bunker B. F. 100 Barclay. 

Dodge Samuel N. paint store, 189 Chatham Square. 

Gibson William & I. plain and decorative painters and glass 

stainers, 376^ Bowery. 
Hill James, 211 Greenwich. 
Ripley & Falconer, dealers in paints, oils, glass, varnish, dye 

stuffs, &,c. 149 Maiden Lane. 
Robertson H. P. 227 Bowery. 
Whitney Daniel, ]36 Chambers. 
Woddle Allen, 307 Bowery. 

PANTALOON STRAP MANUFACTURER. 

Moss Henry, 152 Cherry. 

PAPER BOX MAKERS. 

Barbier A. fancy paper boxes, 51 John. 
Peuscher Georjje, 121 Fulton. 

PAPER DEALERS. 

Bartlett C. & Ely S. 71 Fulton. 

Bartow George & Edgar, 7 Burling Slip. 

Butler Asa, paper manufacturer, 203 Cherry. 

Campbell «& Persse, 112 Nassau. 

Cross J. R. Ill Beekman. 

Elliot D. 5 Burling Slip. 

M'Dermott Robert, 4 Burling Slip. 

Poillon, jr. Peter, paper warehouse, 271 Pearl. 

Sheffield Jos. B. commission paper warehouse, 47 Liberty, 

Seymour & Son, Jonathan, 33 John 

PAWN BROKERS. 

Davies John M. 7 Chatham. 

Levy Lewis, Si Chatham. 

Simpson J. & J. B. & J. 25 Chatham. 

PAPER HANGER. 
Mott Thomas W. 373 Pearl. 

PENCIL CASE MAKERS. 

Thomas Augustus, G2 Nassau. 

Wickham Daniel H. manufacturer of gold and silver over 

pointed ])encils, 106 Reade. 
Withers Henry, gold and silver pencil case maker, 157 

Broadway. 



PIANO FORTE MAKERS. 93 



PERFUMERS. 

Hart Henry, dealer in fine perfumery, ladies' and gentle- 
men's dressing cases and portable desks, instructive games 
and plays for children, Rodger's cutlery and fancy goods, 
189 Broadway, opposite John street. 

Johnson & Co. wholesale dealers, manufacturers and im- 
porters of perfumery, fancy soaps, brushes, and Itincy ar- 
ticles, 3G and 38 Cedar. [Maiden Lane. 

Prentiss N. Smith, manufacturer and wholesale dealer, 45 

PHRENOLOGISTS. 

Fowler O. S. & S. iN. practical phrenologists, give a full and 
accurate description of character, talents, &c. from the 
size and shape of the head, 135 Nassau and 7 Beekman, 

PHYSICIANS. 

Akerly Samuel, 183 East Broadway. 

Beck John B. 14 Le Roy Place, near Broadway, 

Bronson Oliver, ()8 Greenwich. 

Buel William P. 74 Nassau. 

Clarke J. H. S3 Liberty. 

Delafield Edward, 9 Warren. 

Evans William, medical office 100 Chatham, where his ad. 

vice and medicines can be obtained. 
Francis John W. G62 Broadway, 
Glover Rudulphus, 2 Ann. 
Lasher John J. 172 William. 
M'Comb J. R. 273 Greenwich. 
M'Knight John M. S. 04 Greenwich, 
Manley James R. J 9 White. 
Peters Jos. P. 129 Liberty, 
Pratt P. 83 Cedar. 
Ralph Joseph, 38 Courtlandt. 
Randolph Israel, 86 Liberty. 
Smith J. Augustine, 47 East Broadway. 
Tonelier John S. 154 Greenwich. 

PIANO FORTE MAKERS. 

Bridgland & Jardine, 459 Broadway. 

Brumley &, Smyth, (laie Nunn's & Brumley,) grand action 

piano forte warehouse, 411 Broadway. 
P.ubois, Bacon & Chambers, 167 Broadway and 13 Crosby, 



94 PRINTERS. 



Gibson Thomas, Gl Barclay. ' 

Jollie Allen R. ^S5 Broadway. 

Neilson J. 1 Astnr House, Vesey-street. 

Nunns, Clark Sc Co. 137 Broadway. 

Pease William, first preniiiim grand action piano fortes, ninl 

music publisher, 329 Broadway. 
Provoost Peter, 32 Vestry, near Hudson. 
Stodard, Worcester & Dunham, 375 Broadway. 
Tallman John, 35 Barclay. 
Torp & Love, 465 Broadway. 

PLANE MAKER. 
Davis J. 92 Chatham. 

PLUMBERS. 
Chardavoyno Wm. & T. C. 134 Cherry. 
Duff & Ivers, house and ship plumbers, lead pipe and water 

closet manufiicturers, 230 Water. 
Ilillsburgh Charles, plumber and pewterer, 342 Water. 
Laae & Byrd, house and ship plumbers, 336 Water, and 72 

Water street. BrooJdijn. 
Pitt Charles, 376 Bowery. 
Ridgway A, Son, 162 William. 
Stone James, 390 Broadway. 
Walter James R. 455 Broadway. 

POCKET BOOK MANUFACTURERS. 

Bussing & Co. manufacturers of fine pocket l)()()ks. portable 
writing desks, dressing cases in Itjatljer and roso wood^^O 
William corner of Liberty. 

Chapman Levi, 88 William. 

Lemaa Morris M. 204 Fulton. 

PORTRAIT PAINTERS. 
Burlin R. portrait and landscape painter, 205 Hudson. 
Waldo & Jewett, 1 Courtlandt. 
Wallace A. H. 61 Fulton street, BrooLhjn. 

PRLNTERS. 

Bell Jarod W. book and job printer, ]7 Ann — up stairs. 
I'ooth S: Son, J. book and job printer, 1 17 Fulton. 
Bowne and Wisner,22 William. 
Buckingham Joseph L. 18 New. 



PROFESSORS, 95 



Colyer William H. book and job printer, 104 Beekman. 

Craighead & Allen, 112 Fulton. 

Elliot J. M. 4 Green near Maiden L ne. 

Dorr W. S. bonk, job and fancy printing office, 123 Fulton. 

Handford A. 6 Green, near Maiden Lane. 

House John C. 88 Barclay, corner Washington. 

Lawrence Peter, mercantile job printing office, for bill-heads, 

cards, circulars and receipts, ]3G Water. 
Lambert & Co. M. C Green, near Maiden Lane. [Canal. 
Liddle J. B. printer and publisher of juvenile books, &C.85 
Lovett & Co. E. S. xylographic engravers and printers, 108 

Nassau. [Vesey. 

Ludwig Henry, corner Greenwich and Vesey, entrance in 
Mercein & Post, 133 Water. 
Narine James, book and job printer, 11 Wall. 
Osborne William, 88 William. 
Price George B. job printer, 71 Hudson. 
Sandford W. book and job printer, 29 Ann. 
Scott ife Co. George P. 71 John. 

Sylvester & Owens, printers and booksellers, 42 Division. 
Tupper Hiram, corner Fulton and Nassau. [to, 15 Ann. 
Vale G. book and job printer, all orders punctually attended 
Van Norden James, book and job printer, 27 Pine. 
Wright J. P. 74 Cedar. 

PRINTERS' MATERIALS, (dealers in) 
Hoe & Co. R. printers warehouse, and machinists in gen- 
eral, also saw manufacturers, 29 ajid 31 Gold. 
Prout Moses P. manufacturer of printers' ink, 63 Spring. 

PROFESSORS. 

Anderson Henry J. M.D.mathematiGS,&c. Columbia College. 
Anthon Charles, ll.d. Greek and Latin languages, Colum- 
bia College. [versity. 
Beck Lewis C. m.d. Chemistry and Botany, New York Uni- 
Berault C dancing, Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn. 
Bertie Signor, piano and vocal music, Collegiate Institute, 
Brooklyn. [Institute, Brooklyn. 
Bickenstaff Mrs. M. M. piano and vocal music. Collegiate 
Carbonaj B. J. Italian language, Collegiate Institute, Brook- 
lyn. [University. 
Cabrera de Navares, Miguel, Spanish language. New York 
Chazotte Charles, French language, Collegiate Institute, 
Brooklyn. G 2 



96 PUBLISHERS. 



Da Ponte Lorenzo, Italian language, Coltimbia College and 
New York Universit)'. [University. 

Douglas D. B. architecture and engineering, New York 

Finn Mathew, professor and lecturer on book-keei)ing, 174 
Broadway. [versity. 

Gale L. D. m.d. geology and mineralogy, New York Uui- 

Garbayo Don Ramon, Spanish language, Collegiate Insti- 
tute, Brooklyn. 

Ilackley Charles W. mathematics. New York University. 

Martins J. W. drawing and perspective. Collegiate Institute, 
Brooklyn. [testant Episcopal Theological Seminary. 

Moore Clement C. ll.d. Oriental and (ueek language, Pro- 

Manesca John, French language, 20 lleade. 

Norton William A. natural philosophy, New York University. 

Nordheimer Isaac, German language. New York University. 

Parmantier Chas. L. French language, N.York University. 

Pattou Robert B. Greek language. New York University. 

Rabadan Charles, Spanish language, N. York University. 

Renwick James, ll.d. philosophy and chemistry, Columbia 
College. [lumliia College. 

Velazquez de la Cadena, Mariano, Spanish language, Co- 
Williams Thomas, harp and guitar, Collegiate Institute, 
Brooklyn. 

PUBLISHERS. 

Adams John Jay, Islander & Fireman's Journal, 107 Fulton. 

Bartlett John S. Albion, Barclay near Broadway. 

Benedict &. Co. Seth W. New York Evangelist, 162^Nassau. 

Bennett James Gordon, The Herald, 21 Ann. 

Bryant <Sc Co. William C. livening Post 27 Pine. 

Burritt &- Clayton, Shipping and Commercial List, 59 Wall. 

Butler Amos, Mercantile Advertiser, 56 Wall. 

Church Joseph M. publishes '' The World" weekly at ^3 
per annum, 218 13roadway. 

Clark & Edson, Knickerbocker Magazine, 161 Broadway. 

Day Benjamin H. The Sun, corner "of Nassau and Spruce. 

Dearborn George, publisher and bookseller, 38 Gold. 

Douglas John, Advocate, 14 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Fish F. G. American Citizen, 52 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

Foster Theodore, publisher of the Quarterly, Edinburgh^ 
Foreign and London and W^estmiuster Reviews, Black_ 
wood's New Monthly and Metropolitan Magazines, cor 
ner Pine and Broadway. 



QUILL filAKUFACTURERS. 97 



Going Jona. The American Baptist, c. Nassau & Beekman. 

Grnnja John, editor of the Spanish newspaper, "Noricioso 
de Ambos Mnndos," 49 Liberty. 

G'reeley, Fisher S: Wilson, The New Yorker, 127 Nassau. 

Hale & ilallock, Journal of Commerce, c. Wall and Water. 

Hall & Co. Francis, Commercial Advertiser, corner Pine 
and William. 

Harper & Brothers, 82 Cliff. 

Holland, Sanford &, Davies, Times, 10 Wall. 

King Charles, American, 74 Cedar. 

Lang &. Daniels, New York Gazette, 67 Wall, 

Leggett William, Plaindeaier, corner Pine and Broadway. 

Locke Richard Adams, New Era, 17 Ann. 

Minor D. K. & Schaeffer George C. publishers of the Ame- 
rican Railroad Journal and Advocate of Internal Improve- 
ments; New York Farmer and Gardeners' Magazine; 
and Mechanics' Magazine, 30 Wall. 

Morris George P. New York Mirror, c. Ann and Nassau. 

Morse & Co. Sidney E. New York Observer, 143 Nassau 

Noah & Gill, Evening Star, 47 William. 

Porter William T, Spirit of the Times, 157 Broadway. 

Saunders & Otley, 45 Ann. 

Scott William, New York Weekly Messenger, 100 Nassau. 

Smith Samuel B. Downfall of Babylon, 131 Nassau. 

Smith Samuel Jenks, New York Sunday Morning News, 
lA Ann. 

Spooner & Sons A. Long Island Star, 10 Front, Brookhjn. 

Stanley & Prall, Nqw York Transcript, c. Ann and Nassau. 

Snowden William W. Ladies' Companion, 107 Fulton. 

Townsend & Brooks, Daily Express, c. Wall and Water. 

Webb James Watson, Courier & Enquirer, Wall. 

Wells Charles, 56 Gold. 

Whittlesey S. Mother's Magazine, 150 Nassau. 

Williams Thomas P. Magazine and Quarterly Report of 
Fashions, 131 Nassau. 

aUILL MANUFACTURERS. 

Byrne Mrs. P. importer and manufacturer of quills and wa- 
fers, 60 William. 
Lawson William, 15 Burling Slip. 
Mitchell & Co. J. D. R. wholesale and retail, 329 Pearl. 
Noah's quill factory, 12 Green, near Maiden Lane. 



9S RIGGERS. 

RAILROAD CAR BUILDER. 

Dreyer P. H. corner of Atlantic and Court, Brooklyn. 

READING ROOMS, (proprietors of) 

Francis Charles S. Parthenon, 252 Broadway. 

Gilpin S. S. Merchants' Exchange, Exchange Place, corner 

New-street. 
Hudrou's News Room, Tontine Building, Wall c. Water. 

READY MADE LINEN, (dealers in) 
Broadbrook G. A, 353 Pearl. [sale and retail, 162 Canal. 
Denaux E. stocks, hosiery, gloves and haberdasher, whole- 
Drig?s Mary W. 164 Broadway. 
Hill & Co. 1. 84 Chatham. 
Panell James C. 267 Broadway. 
Perego Ira, 74 Maiden Lane. 
Raworth Morris, 90 Chatliam. 
Reynolds Frederick, 153 Broadway. 
Richardson jMiss, 382 Pearl. 
Smith Charles D. 333 Pearl. 
Thompson James B. 170 Broadway. 

REFECTORIES AND COFFEE HOUSES, 

(keepers of) 
Adams Charles, auction coffee house, 50 Broad. 
Babcock Thomas, 75 Cedar. 

Brown John P. Franklin coffee house, 86 Maiden Lane. 
Butler John, 80 Fulton street, Brooklyn, 
Burgalew Richard, 56 Wall and 45 Beaver. 
Cex (ieorge, 1 Houston corner Hancock. 
Dillon John C. 6^ Wall. 
Downing Thomas, Nos. 3, 5 and 7 Broad. 
Earle <fe Fossett, bank coffee house, 39 Pine. 
Knowlton P. American House, 114 Spring. 
Pattinson Hugh, Temperance House, c. Ann and Nassau. 
Roache Antoitie, 307 Broadway. 
Stuart Edward, 197 Chatham. 

Santine John, (late Palmo's,) Broadway corner Reade. 
Tyson Stephen, 263 Hudssn. 

Welsh Alexander, Terrapin Lunch, 222 Broadway c. Ann. 
Warren Thomas, 34 Reade. 

RIGGEllS. 
Weaver & Gaunt, 157 South. 
"VVhalley A. B. master rigger, 6 Gouverneur. 



SASH AI^D WmooW BLIND MANUFACTCHERS. 99 

ROPE AND CORD MANUFACTURERS. 

Dobbins James, Fulton near Smith, Brooklyn 
Marshall .t Sweeney, Concord-street, Broohhjn 
Miavv J. & R. Adains street, Brookhpi. 
Smith Henry, Tillary street, Brooklyn. 
Wall & Richardson, Bushvvick, Brooklyn. 

RULE MAKERS. 
Belcher, Brothers, 101 John. 

SADDLERS. 

Anderson James, 126 Water. 

Bell Joseph T. manufacturer of military caps and belts, sad- 

die cloths, holsters, bridles, &c. 186 Fulton 
Carter John B. 143 Bowery. 
Cox Robert F. 360 Broadway 
Field & Mead, 237 Bowery. 
Francis Charles, 46 Fulton street, Brookh/n 
Harrison Richard, harness and trunk maker, 90 Broadway 
Levendge ifc Welsh, 9 Front street, Brooklyn. 
M'Donald Charles, 560 Broadway corzier Prince 
Ryer J. B. 612 Broadway. ^Brooklyn. 

Story Robert R. engine hose made to order, 25 Fulton* 
feummers & Co. Jno. S. importer of sadlery, hardware, coach 

furniture, &c. 130 Water. 
Turney & Co. G. W. 55 Gold. 
Underbill E. H. 32 Bowery. 
Wilson John, saddler and trunk maker, 341 Pearl 
Woolsey Aaron, 59^ Bowery. 

SAIL DUCK, (dealers in) 
Bakewell & Cole, 138 Front. 

SAILMAKERS. 

Bakewell J. 140 Cedar. 
Thorp Samuel S. 18 Fulton. 

SASH AND WINDOW BLIND MANUFACTURERS. 

Gillmer, Bausher & Co. manufacture sashes, window blinds, 
store doors and doors for dwellings of every deserip- 
Hon ; also Am sashes of any pattern. J J7 Beekman. 

^jowdey & Colwell, 348 Broadway. 



100 SEGAR DEALERS. 



Little C. H. 309 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

McLean Cornelius, sash maker, 422^ Broadway. 

Plum Nathaniel D. 168 Church. 

Roome »So Jacobus, sash makers, 71 Laurens. 

SxA.LT, (dealers in) 
Stajsrg & Co. Benjamin, 185 and 187 Washington. 
Todd & Co. William W. corner Old Slip and Front. 

SCALE BEAM MANUFACTURERS. 

Jones & McDojiald, 83 Fulton. 

SCAVENGERS. 
Zeider Jacob, 86 Pitt. Orders left at the City Inspector's 
Otiice, No. 1 City Hall, will he promptly attended to. 

SCULPTORS. 
Frazee & Launitz, 591 Broadway. 

SEEDSMEN & FLORISTS. 

Bergh Teunis, 74 Courtlandt. 

Bridgeman T. Bloomingdale road, near 18th street. 

Buel, Wilson & Co. Fourth Avenue, near 26th street. 

Garretson G. R. Ill Fulton. 

Hogg Thomas & James, nurserymen, seedsmen and florists, 

Broadway, near 23d street. Seed store, 365 Bowery. 
Noe & Boll, Bloomingdale road, near 42d street. 
Prince & Sons Wm. Flushing, L. L; letter box, 152 Broad'y. 
Reid William, nursery, &c. Fourth Avenue, n. 32d street. 
Smith Alexander, 388 Broadway. 
Thornton George C. 11 John. 

SEGAR DEALERS. 

Benedict Simon, 98^ Chathau). 

Lessman Henry, commission manufacturer, importer and 

dealer in Havana Segars, 138 Maiden Lane— up stairs. 
Munois Peter L. 352 Bowery. 
Parmele Edwin, 340 Pearl. 

Scott & Deforest, segar and liquor dealers, 4 Park Row, 
Seixas B. M. importer. &.c. 77 Cedar. 
Smith Samuel P. 212 Broadway. 
Speaight Charles, 73 Bowery. 
Wayne Thomas I. 19i Chatham- 



SHIPPING MERCHANTS. 101 



SHELLS, (dealer in) 
Trappan C. shells for shell work, 74 Chambers. 

SHIP CHANDLERS. 

Bagley & Co. John S. 37 South. 
Beare & Hurry, 30 South. 

Burdett & Tolerton, ship chandlers and ropemakers; deal- 
ers in paints, oils, glass, bagging and duck, 41 West. 

Dayton Edward, 1C2 South, 

Galloway & Co. James, hemp and chain cables, anchors and 
cordage, paints, duck, &c. 104 West. 

Hicks & Co. Robert T. 106 South. 

Jenkins William B. ship chandler and rope maker, paints, 
oil, glass, &c. 53 West. 

Lush William H. 156 and 164 South. 

Martin M. M. & D. K. ship chandlers and grocers, 114 and 
115 West. 

Mitchell W. L. G. & patent rope makers, dealers in hemp, 
anchors, chains, &c. 169 South. 

Ormond & Co. John, 14 Coenties Slip. 

Park M. & P. 88 South. 

Roberts & Stiles, hardware dealers, &c. 36 West. 

Schermerhorn George S. 93 Washington. 

Schermerhorn, Banker & Co. 243 Water, 

Sherman & Nye, 98 Wall. 

Thompson & Collin, 167 South. 

Udall Wm. M. 15 Water, Brooklyn. 

Ward E. & J. O. 27 South. t^8 South. 

Whitlock Augustus, cordage, oils, paints, naval stores, &c. 

SHIP JOINERS. 

Gilbert John O. 116 Washington. 
Stebbins. Woods & Co. 137 Avenue D. 
Wynkoop, 100 Sands, Brooklyn. 

SHIPWRIGHTS. 

Webb & Robertson, shipwrights, spar makers and caulkers, 
92 Washington. 

SHIPPING MERCHANTS. 

Allen and Paxson, Richmond Packet Office, 92 Wall. 
Ayraar & Co. 34 South= 



102 SHOEMAKERS. 



Bolton, Fox & Livingston, C. Havre Packet Office,22 Broad. 

Bruen G. W. IGG South. 

Center & Co. Mobile Pucket OlKce, 94 Pine. 

Douglass, Robinson ti Co. o34 Pearl. South. 

Collins E. K. Liverpool and New Orleans Packet Office, 50 

Everett ».^:- Batelle, Carthagena Packet Office, 7G South. 

llallett iSc Brown, 180 South. 

Holmes Silas, New Orleans Packet Office, 02 South. 

Hovvland & Aspinwall, 54 and 55 South. 

Herrick E ».t J. 23 South. 

Johnson tfc Lowdeu, Savannah Packet Office, 80 Wall. 

Marshall Charles H. Liverpool Packet Office, 04 South. 

Pratt Wm. W. 19 Coenties Slip. 

Scot &. Morrell, Savanah Packet Office, 72 South. 

Schermerhorn, Willis tt Co. 53 South. 

Smith & Son, Thomas H. 100 South. 

Sturges &- Clearman, Savanah, &c. Packet Office, 92 Wall. 

Van Amringe George O. SO Wall. 

Wetherbee John, 77 South. 

Goodhue <:t Co. 04 South. 

Graves & Co. B. 90 Wall. 

Hargous Peter A. 9 Old Slip. 

Hart, Walsh & Co. 51 South. 

SHOE DEALERS. 

Anderson Henry, 158 Chatham. 
Bertine Robert, 174 Bowery. 
Brewer James, 270 Broadway. 
DevauP. B. & S. 150 Chatham. 

Howes R. W. 1 Chatham. [80 Pearl- 

Ransom Jonathan H. wholesale shoe, hat and cap warehouse, 
Reed Addington, 10 Bowery. 
Tilison William T. wholesale, 128 Broadway. 
Upham <fc Lay, 2 Bowery. 
Wood N. E. 172 Chatham. 

SHOEMAKERS. 
Austin Robert, 305 Broadway. 
Baglcy John, 372 Hudson. 
Bennett & Sons, 95 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Connolly C. boot and shoe maker, 100 Cedar. ' 
Denning Wm. boot manufacturer, 2^ Courtlandt. 



SILKS, (dealers in) 16& 

Goldey Henry, 92 Main, Brooklyn. 
Gray & Gallagher, 75 and 99 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Green Jonas C. 41G Broadway. 
Johnson John, boot and shoe store, 183 Greenwich. 
Lane William H. 1 Murray. 
Lockwood Monson, 391 Broadway, 
Middleton Charles, 295 Broadway. 
Negus Thomas, 171 Greenwich. 
Nunns Henry, IGO Fulton. 
Philhps D. B. 107 Chatham. 
Raymond & Merritt, 304 Bowery. 
Remick John 85J Bowery. 
Smith Stephen C. India rubbers, C6 Chatham. 
Sutton James, 280 Broadway. [Broadway, 

Taylor Wra. wholesale and retail French shoemaker, 451 
Thomas Elias, 436 Broadway. 
Tilyou John V. 59 Chatham. 

Whitney J. first premium French shoemaker ; ladies boots 
and shoes, wholesale and retail, 467 Broadway. 

SHOT MANUFACTURERS. 

Halsey & McCullough, dealers in lead, &c. 246 Water. 

SHOWER BATH MANUFACTURER, 
Baltzer F. A. cabinet maker, &c. 167 Bleecker. 

SIGN MANUFACTURER. 

Roach James J. manufacturer of the patent metalic and wood 
block letter signs, 76 Cedar. 

SILKS, (dealers in) 
Booraem & Co. wholesale dealers, 164 Pearl. 
Burnham & Dow, 180 Pearl and 67 Water, Boston. 
Bull W. A. & J. 76 Maiden Lane. * 

Chilton <fe Barnura, wholesale and retail dealers in rich silks, 

embroideries, shawls, laces, hosiery, gloves, &c. 15 Maiden 

Lane. 
Clark, Smith & Co. 57 Liberty. 
Low & Scudder, 58 Maiden Lane. 
Ramsdell, Brown «fe Co. 63 William. 
Smith & Co. Robert L. importers and wholesale dealers in 

French silk goods, laces, leghorn, tuscau and fancy straw 

H 



104 STAGE PROPRIETORS. 



bonnets ; men's and women's cloaks, merino shawls, &c. 

176 Pearl. 
Stewart Seneca, 71 Cedar. 

Taylor & Thomas, wholesale dealers, 76 William. 
Terry & Burroughs, 12U Chatham, 

SILVERSMITHS. 

Beebe J. W. & L. D. silver spoon and fork manufaclHrers. 

101 Reade. 
Coles Albert, 6 Green, near Maiden Lane. 
Gurnee Benjamin, manufacturer of silver spoons, forks, &c. 

21 Thomas. 
Morrison D. 164 Chatham. 
Roberts Robert, 61 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

SILVERWARE DEALERS. 
Brower & Rusher, 149 Broadway. 

SILVERPLATERS. 

Smith & Lyon, 6 Green, near Maiden Lane. 

SOAP AND CANDLE DEALERS. 

Buchanan John, 213 William. 

Colgate & Co. William, 6 Dutch. 

Colgate G. & J. 252 Greenwich, second door above Murra^^ 

Hamilton & Alsop, 109 Greene. 

Hull& SonW. 112Clitf. 

Morgan Enoch, 202 Greenwich. 

SOFA & MAHOGANY CHAIR MANUFACTURER 
Hutchings E. W. 43 Sullivan. 

• SPIRIT GAS DEALER. 

Baker Henry, camphorated spirit gas, 186 Canal. 

SPARMAKERS. 
Denike &, King, 705 Water. 

STAGE PROPRIETORS. 
Stuart James, corner Broadway and Art. 
Whitfield Thomas, Old No. 1 Caurtlandt. 



STOCK AND READY MADE LINEN DEALERS. 105 

STATIONERS. 

Anstice Henry, 24 Nassau, corner Cedar. 

Ash &. Co. Thomas T. wholesale stationers and importers 
of English, French and German fancy articles, 12 Decatur 
street, Pliiladelphia. [Wall street. 

Bowne & Co. account books, &c. No. 5 Tontine Buildings, 

Burtis James A. 19 Peck Slip. 

Burtsell John L. corner Wall and Broad. 

Clayton E. B. printer, stationer and blank book manufac- 
turer, 59 Wall, one door above Pearl. 

Cohen Lewis I. importer &,c. 122 William. 

Coolidge &. Lambert, 57 Wall. 

De Camp & Co. A. blank book manufacturers, 34 Wall. 

Felt & Co. D. Stationers' Hall, 245 Pearl. 

Hopkins & Son George, 98 Nassau. 

Jansen J. B. books, &c. 158 Nassau. 

Longworth Octavius, general stationer and manufacturer of 
ink, sealing wax, indelible ink, &c. 301 Pearl. 

Mesier Edward L. 57 William. 

Rich & Loutrel, account book manufacturers, French Eng- 
lish and American stationery of the best quality at whole- 
sale and retail, 61 William. [Broad. 

Riley Horace, stationer and blank book manufacturer, 87 

Sibell John F. 56 Wall. 

Williamson John A. 11 Old Slip. 

Wood T. & C. stationers, printers, lithographers and blank 
book manufacturers ; also, keep a general assortment of 
law, custom house and mercantile blanks ; pocket maps of 
the United States and every State in the Union ; writing 
desks and travelling cases ; pocket books, wallets, pencil 
cases, penknives, quills, steel pens, &c. 18 Wall. 

STEAM ENGINE MAKERS. 

Allaire James P. 464 Cherry and 238 Water. 
Birbeck Alexander, Water, Brooklyn. 
Sabbaton Paul A. Riviugton coiaer Cannon. 

STOCK AND READY MADE LINEN DEALERS. 

Birt William, wholesale and retail, 94 Nassau. 
Cotrell & Cranston, 109 William. 
Fanshaw Charles, 136 William. 
Hatch C. B. 115 William. 



106 STOVE DEALERS AND MANUFACTURERS. 

Ogden, 100 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Smith William, 202 Chatham. 

StHrges S. B. 72j Chatham. 

Tamblingson, 237 Broadway. 

Tracy C. M. wholesale dealer and manufacturer, 18 Liberty. 

STONE CUTTERS. 
Anderson & Murray, Plymouth, Brooklyn. [Slip- 

Butler Thomas, granite dealer, 511 Water, near Rutgers 
Cocks & Co. Tiiomas, corner West and Watts. 
Emmerson, Milne & Co. corner John and Charles, Brooklyn. 
Fisher & Bird, 287 Bowery. 

Wilson, Gridley &, Co. blue flag yard, corner Mercer and 
Greene, Jersey City. 

STORAGE WAREHOUSES, (proprietors of) 
Hobby Amos R. 125, 127 and 129 Washington, between 

Albany and Carlisle. 
Wyckoff Richard L. naval storage, Firman street, Brooklyn. 

STRAW HAT MANUFACTURERS. 

Bennett Thomas, 297 Broadway. 
Blum Abraham, 117 William. 
Chapin Benjamin, 195 Bowery. 
Edip.ondson Elizabeth, 121 Bowery. 
Hall & Co. S. D. Ill WilHam. 

King Carl, tuscau and straw hat manufacturer, 2G5^ Broad- 
way and 17 Division. 
Wells &, Miles, bonnet and palm leaf, 146 Water. 

STOVE DEALERS AND MANUFACTURERS. 

Cort & Co. Nicholas, 41 Bowery and 358 Water. 

Frazier Thomas, 206 Water. 

Gold Job S. 84 Nassau. 

Lock wood David, manufacturer of Pierce's patent kitchen 
ranges and air heaters, 364 Broadway. 

Mann <^' Loomis, 235 Water. 

Moore Si, Co. William K. 185 Bowery. 

Mott J. L. patent coal stoves for halls, parlours, stores, steam- 
boats, &c. 233 Water. 

Pattinon Thomas, patent stove rnanulacturer, 269 Water. 

Peirce Samuel, patentee of ranges and air heaters, 364 Broad 
way. 



TAILORS. 107 

Smith & Sherman, proprietors of Olmsteds patent stoves, 
and dealer in sheet iron, tin plate, copper, &c. 210 Water. 

Somerville A. & M. 260 Water and 106 Cherry. 

Stanley & Co. M. N. Stanley's patent rotary cooking stoves, 
&c. 244 and 246 Water. 

Sweet Ezra B. stov^, tin, sheet iron and kitchen furniture 
warehouse, 200 Canal. 

Thorp Gould, patent stove manufacturer, 254 Water. 
These stoves are so constructed as to convey the steam 
arising from the boilers and the smoke from the griddle, 
directly into the pipe ; which renders them as pleasant as 
an open fire-place, and are calculated to burn wood or 
coal. 

SUGAR REFINERS. 
Stuart R. L. & A. 2S5 Greenwich corner Chambers. 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, (dealer in) 
Liese Frederick, manufacturer and dealer in instruments, 
utensils and other apparatus employed in surgery, phar- 
; macy, the dispensing of medicine, &c. 7 Liberty, 

SURVEYOR, 

Graves jr. R, 10 Front, Brooklyn. 

SUSPENDERS, (dealer in) 
Burnham Oliver R. 104 William. 

TAILORS, 
Beers James H. 176 Chatham. 
Benson & Rogers, 51 Fulton. 
Burnham & Jennings, 206 Chatham. 
Chambers Miles, 373 Pearl. 
Chase Jarvis, 85 Nassau. 
Church C. M. 267 William. 
Cochrane Wm. J. 190 Broadway. 

Cortelyou & Jaques, John, drapers and tailors, 54 Courtlandt 
Clarke E. & G. B. drapers and tailors, 86 Nassau. 
Daily James, merchant tailor, 260 Broadway 
Daul & Schurck, 129 Nassau. 
Freeland L. & J. 311 Broadway. 
Goodman John K, 110 William. 

H 2 



108 TAVERN AND COFFEE HOUSE KEEPERS. 

Gray & Bouton. merchant tailors, 24 Bowery, 

Hart John, 5(3 Chatham. 

Hascy A. 5 John, near Broadway. 

Hume Walter, Coiirtlandt corner Greenwich. 

Jacobi W. J. 40 Fuhon. 

Kerrigan James, 53 Chatham. 

Levy Esther, 78 Chatham. 

I^evy Louis, 101 Chatham. 

Lyon A. & W. 366 Pearl. 

M'Kinley John, 54i Bowery. 

Morrison James D. 10 Hamilton. 

Paret & Co. John, 221 Greenwich. 

Peck K. & B. 74 Chatham. 

Perry John, tailor and scourer. 111 Bowery. 

Pietch & Co. Abraham, 18 Chatham, 

lloach A. draper and tailor, 106 Nassau. 

Rogers C. B. 219 Greenwich. 

Rogers Charles H. draper and tailor, 60 Gold. 

Roberts John, draper &c. 3 John. 

Ryer Benjamin F. 393 Broadway. 

Scofield S. W. merchant tailor, 26 Bowery, 

Skidmore Stephen H. 137 Spring. 

Talman Abram, 283 Greenwich. 

Thompson Andrew, 334 Bowery. 

Thompson R. H. 2.35 Greenwich. 

Van Boskerk Abraham, merchant tailor, 296 Broadway. 

TANNERS AND CURRIERS. 

Thompson & Son, Alexander, leather dealers, &c. 31 Ferry. 
Van Nostrand & Son, 30 Water, Brooklyn. 

TAVERN AND COFFEE HOUSE KEEPERS. 

Aubery's House, 13 Park Row, 

Burns' House, 19 Warren. 

('ostello &. Flowers, 164 Nassau. 

Cotte Peter, 168 Duane, 

Cronly Michael, 5 Chatham. 

Dunlap Nathaniel, Union Hotel, 150 Church. 

Fink Alexander, 149 Bowery, 

Gager Daniel, .57 Bowery. 

Gilbert Thomas, 348 Bowery. 

Lewis William B. 288 and 290 Broadway. 

M'Grath William, 5 Chatham Square. 



THREAD AND NEEDLE DEALERS. 109 

Merritt Philip, 305 Bowery. 

IVIooney Felix, 34 Jay. 

Murphy Thomas, 23 Chatham Square. 

Nicholson John, 19 Warren. 

Odell John, 215 Bowery. 

Santine John, late Palmo's, 289 Broadway. 

Schwartz Louis, 38 Chatham. 

Smith Randelt 31 Park Row. 

Street William. 96 Chatham. 

Warden Philander, 188 Chatham. 

Wiikins James, 44 Bowery. 

Williams Sandford S. 167 Chatham. 

Wilhs B. H. 20 Bowery. 

Yates Alexander, 323 Bowery. 

TEA DEALERS. 

Goodbarne John, New York Tea Company, office 274 Green- 
wich. 
M'Brair Robert, dealer in tea and coffee, 91 Main, Brookhjn. 

TEACHERS. 

Duff William, 271 Greenwich. 

Gowaid Isaac, professor and teacher of music, drawing and 

penmanship, &c. 408 Broadway. 
Manesca John, teacher of the French language, 20 Reade. 
Moir John, 132 Liberty. 

Nettleton Lydice, corner of Tillary and Barbarine, Brooklyn. 
Oakley John, 269 Bowery. 

O'Connor Henry, professor of bookkeeping, 175 Broadway. 
Rabadan Carlos, Spanish, 61 Fulton. 

TPHMBLE MANUFACTURERS. 

Roshore & Prime, 6 Green, near Maiden Lane. 

THREAD AND NEEDLE DEALERS. 

Barnett T. importer *fec. 118 Cedar. 

Clark Hosea F. 171 Greenwich. 

Johnson J. B.281 Greenwich. 

Mahoney James, ready made linen, &c. 451 Broadway. 

Morrison John, 135 Chatham. [way 

Morrison & Cos. W. & J. 20 Maiden Lane and 281 i Broad 

Sanderson Esther, 373 Bowery. 



no TURNERS. 

Taylor J. R. thread and needle Bazaar, combs, gloves, sus- 
penders, &c. 135 William. 
Wright Andrew, 305 Broadway. 

TINSMITHS. 

Cargill Abraham, 232 Water. 

Doughty Albert H. 61 Bowery, 

Frazier John, corner of Fulton and Middagh, Brooklyn. 

Frazier & Vining, 59 Fullon, Brooklyn. 

Gassner J. &, M. keeps constantly on hand a general assort- 
ment of tin, copper and sheet iron ware, 227 Fulton. 

Godfrey John C. 339 Bowery. 

Laurence Samuel C. general assortment ofstoves and kitchen 
furniture, 125 Bowery 

Locke & Carter, plain and japanned, 241 Water. 

Morgan David, 319 Bowery. 

Powell Robert T. 140 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Slade J. coppersmith &tin plate worker, 47 James, Brooklyn. 

Thorp & Harris Robert, Third Avenue, near 14th street. 

TOBACCONISTS. 

Beekman G. 102 Barclay. 
Deen John, 123 Greenwich. 
Inness John W. 199 Chambers or 191 Reade. 
Lilienthal Lear, 219 Washington. 
Lorrilard jr. Peter, 42 Chatham. 
Martin & Co. Thomas, 80 Broadway. 
Miller & Co. Mrs. G. B. 110 Water. 
Schott George, 177 Washington. 

TRUNK MAKERS. 

Macdonald John H. 603 Broadway. 
Page Charles R. 104 Bowery. 
Steiner M. 173 and 187 Broadway. 

TURNERS. 

Aikman &, Son, Robert, 173 William. 
Betjeman H. turner in general. 26 Sullivan. 
Coats John R. brass turner, rear 237 Bowery. 
Cowenhoven Nicholas, William corner Spruce. 
Phyfe John, ivory turner, 19 Murray. 



UNDERTAKERS. Ill 



TURPENTINE MANUFACTURER. 

West Frederick, corner of Plymouth and Jay, Brooklyn. 

TYPE AND STEREOTYPE FOUNDERS. 

Bruce & Co. George, 13 Chambers. 

Connor &. Cooke, type and stereotype founders and pubUsh- 
ers, corner of Ann and Nassau. 

Dill & Perocheau, stereotype founders, 208 William. 

Nippen G. B. 81 Clift'. 

Riggs Abraham, type founder, 74 Fulton. 

Ripley Francis F. stereotype founder, corner Ann and Nas- 
sau — up stairs. 

Turney jr. James, stereotyper, 55 Gold. 

Wells & Co. D. wood type cutters and job letter founders, 
74 Fulton. 

White & Hagar, type founders, 45 Gold. 

UMBRELLA DEALERS. 

Ames & Co. J. P. umbrella manufacturers, 26 Maiden Lane. 

Caulkins & Darrow, 28 Maiden Lane. 

Cook Norman, 108| Bowery. 

Grossman Henry, 92i Chatham. 

Gardner Henry, .56 Bowery. 

Garner jr. Thomas, 119 Chatham. 

Gilmour J. A. & J. manufacturers wholesale and retail, 20G 

Greenwich and 402 Broadway. 
Harriot & Co. David, wholesale snd retail umbrella and 

parasol manufactory, 70 Maiden Lane. 
Losher W. cheap umbrella manufacturer, 347 Hudson. 
Macdonald & Vansant, umbrella and parasol manufacturers, 

wholesale and retail dealers, 278 Pearl. 
Piatt & Co. S. H. 270 Pearl. ■ 
Smith Charles E. 316 Pearl. 
Smith Joseph, 362 Pearl. 
Smith John L 93 Chatham. 

UNDERTAKERS. 

Dugan Caleb, sexton of St, Luke's Church, and undertaker 

in general, 378 Hudson. 
Gillespie T. D. sexton and undertaker, 140 Church. 
Hull James S. general furnishing undertaker, 568 Pearl. 
M'Graw Nicholas, general furnishing undertaker, 478 Pearl. 



112 WATCH AND CLOCK MAKERS. 

Mace John, 014 Broadway. 
Raisbeck James, 315 Hudson. 

UPHOLSTERERS. 

Ackernian jr. Lawrence, 44 I^Iaiden Lane. 

Brown & Ash, improved patent self-acting recumbent chair 

and sofa manufacturers, lUl Bowery. 
Curtis W. & G. upholstery and paper hanging warehouse, 

52 Maiden Lane. [way. 

Davis Horatio, fashionable upholstery warerooms, 286 Broad- 
Gratacap's upholstery and bedding mart, 82 Maiden Lane. 
Hall M. C. 159 Chatham. 
Lebailly A. 550 Broadway. 
Phyfe & Brothers, 43 Maiden Lane. 
Prince R. 44 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Riley Joseph A. 42 BeeUraan. 
Spiro Philip J. 31 Bowery. 
Voorhis Abraham, 50 Maiden Lane. 

VAULT LIGHT MANUFACTURER. 

Rockwell's patent vault lights. 192 Broadway. Tiie great 
usefulness ofthe above lights, not only for vaults intended 
for safety of goods in case of fire, and for the deposit of 
coal, &c., but by giving so much light, and at the same 
time excluding all wet, dust and frost, they make an under- 
ground apartment (when judiciously constructed and 
made white) a valuable place for business. Persons 
wishing to introduce them in other cities would do well 
to apply as above. 

WATCH AND CLOCK MAKERS. 

Baur John N. 140 William. 
Benedict Andrew C. 28 Bowery. 
Benedict Martin, 276 Bowery, 
Blackford Edward, 409 Pearl. 
Bliss &Creighton, 42 Fulton. 
Brook John, 72 Chatham. 
Cheeseman James L. 78 Bowery. 

Conklin Sc Co. E. dealers in watches, clock.*?, jewelry, sil- 
verware, &.C. 25 Maiden Lane. 
GritFen William F. importer, &c. 240 Pearl. 
Hervey C. P. ^4 Bowery. 



WHEELWRIGHTS. 113 



Hinsdale & Atkin, 172 Broadway coiner Maiden Lane. 

Hoyt Henry E. 104 Cherry. 

Imbery J. & A. 38 Chatham, 

Jacobs Angel, 34^, Bowery. 

Ketcham James, 373 Pearl. 

Labagh John, 283 Broadway. 

Lawrence M. M. 359 Pearl. 

Lockwood Frederick, 39 J i Broad v/ay. 

Lockwood & Jennings, 94^7 Fulton. 

Martin Peter, jeweller &c. 89 Chatham. 

Mathey & Co. A. importers ofwatches, &c. 61 Chatham. 

Piggot Samuel, clock and watch maker, jeweller and silver- 
ware manufacturer, 215i Hudson. 

Piaget H. F. manufacturer, importer and repairer of duplex, 
levers, anchors, lapine independent, seconds, and verticle 
watches, 96 Fulton. 

PostelP. G. 4 Courtlandt. 

Pringie John, 50 Nassau. 

Ritterband Henry M. 185 Reade. 

Kodgers James, 410^ Broadway. 

Rogers George, 14 Carmine. 

Scudder Egbert, 85 Broadway. 

Sinclair William, 80 Chatham. 

Stoddard Noah, jeweller, &c. 13 Chatham. 

Taylor & Co. P. L. 97 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

White J. 66 Fulfon. 

White William W. 70i Bowery. 

WATCH CASE MAKERS. 

Barnes Charles L. 6 Green, near Maiden Lane, 
Bebee S. 53 John. 

Ebbitt William, watch case and dial maker, gold and silver 
essayer, 13 John in rear building. 

WATCH DIAL MAKER. 
Mullen Wm. J. 175 Broadway— up stairs. 

WATER FILTERER. 
Parkes J. 1 Wall corner Broadway. 

WHEELWRIGHTS. 

Cleaveland Charles J. corner of Prospect and Adams, Brook, 



114 WINE DEALERS. 



Pettigrew R. wheelwright and blacksmith, Bloomingdale 

road near 23d street. 
Piatt Richard, Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

WHIP MAKERS. 

Alexander William, 88 Nassau. 

Back Augustus, 143 Fulton. 

Bailej & Co. J. manufacturers, &c. 85 Maiden Lane. 

Ros.s William, 167| Bowery. 

Sharpe & Sutphen, 67 Fulton. 

WHITE LEAD MANUFACTURERS. 

Brooklyn White Lead Company Works, 85 Front, Brook- 
lyn. Office 160 Front, New York. 

Union White Lead Company Works, Front cor. of Bridge, 
Brooklyn. Office 175 Front, New York. 

WHITE WASHER. 

Brush Samuel, 109 Reade or 217 Bleecker. 

WHITING AND PARIS WHITE MANUFAC- 
TURERS. 
Baxter & Co. T. Water street, Brooklyn. Office 8 Fultoi), 

New York. 
Culver Wm. H. Henry st. below South Ferry, Brooklyn. 

WIG MAKERS. 

Cristadord Joseph, 218 Broadway. 

Grandjean A. author of an invaluable composition for the 
cure of dandruff and restoration of the hair. No. 1 Astor 
House, Barclay street. 

Jacklard Sebastian, wig, toupee and ornamental hair manu- 
facturer, wholesale and retail, 163 Broadway. 

WINE DEALERS. 
Bininger »t Co. A. 141 Broadway. 
Boker John G. & E. 24 Pine. 

Duncan John, pure wines and family groceries, 407 Broad'y- 
Engs & Son P. W. 120 Front. 
Honey Robert, importer and dealer in wines, liquors, &c, 

407 Broadway. 
Kelso James, 154 Ma^-den Lane. 



ZINC HOLLOW-WARE MANUFACTURERS. 115 

Paulding Nathaniel, 35 Vesey. 

Roberts William, corner Wall and Broadway. 

Vibert L. 235 Fulton. 

Williamson <fe Co. Richard, keeps a large and constant sup- 
ply of French, German, Spanish and Portuguese wines ; 
also an extensive supply of superior quality groceries, 19 
Maiden Lane. 

Wolfe U. wholesale wine and liquor dealer, 406 Broome. 

WIRE CLOTH AND SIEVE MANUFACTURERS. 

McChesney & Moore, brass and copper wire cloth, iron 
wire, web sieves, safes, coal sifters, &c. 108 Beekmau. 

WOODENWARE DEALERS. 

Weatherhead & King, 304 Broadway corner Duane. 

WOOLLEN DRAPER. 

Blatchford Samuel M. importer, &c. 6G Maiden Lane. 

WOOL DEALERS. 

Johnson William, 97 Beekmau. 
Tonnele & Hall, 45 Fulton. 
Trotter Jonathan, 29 Ferry. 

WRITING MASTERS. 

Wheeler A. H. book-keeping and writing master, 251 
Broadway. 
ZINC HOLLOW-WARE MANUFACTURERS, 

Zinc Hollow-ware Company, manufactory, 117 Sullivan. 



iPUBLIC INSTITUTIONS, &c. 



ACA]>EI?IIE!^» COIiliSQES) &c. 

Americaa Academy of the Fine Arts, 83 Barclay. 

American Institute and Library, 187 Broadway. 

Apprentices' Library, 32 Crosby. 

Brooklyn Collegiate Institute, 125 Hicks, Brooklyn. 

Brooklyn Lyceum, Washington c. Concord, Brooklyn. 

College of Physicians and Surgeons, Crosby n. Spring; 

Columbia College, Church street, opposite Park Place. 

Erasmus Hall, Flathush, L. I. 

Flushing Institute, Flushing, L. I. 

Lyceum of Natural History, 563 Broadway n. Prince. 

Mechanics' Institute, No. 18 City Hall, basement. 

Mechanics' School, Crosby, between Grand & Broome. 

Medical Society of the city of New-York, Grand Jury 
Room, New City Hall. 

Mercantile Library, Clinton Hall, Beekmanc. Nassau. 

National Academy of Design, Clinton Hall, Beekman 
corner Nassau. 

New York AlheUftura, 74 Chambers cor. Broadway. 

New York Historical Society, at the Stuyvesant In- 
stitute, Broadway. 

New York Society Library, 12 Chambers. 

New York Theological Seminary, Wooster street, near 
Waverly Place. 

New York Law Institute, No. 22 City Hall. 

Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary, corner of 

Ninth Avenue and 21si street. 
Stuyvesant Institute, Broadway opposite Bond street. 
United States Naval Lyceum, Navy Yard, Brooklyn- 
University of the city of New York, Wooster street, 
fronting Washington Square. 



BANKS. Jj'y 



BANKS. 

Atlantic Bank, 55 Fulton, Brooklyn. 

Bank of America, 29 Wall corner William. 

Bank of the State of New York, Wall. 

Bowery Saving-s Bank, 128 Bowery near Grand. 

Brooklyn Bank, 5 Front, Brooklyn. 

Brooklyn Savings Bank, 43 High, Brooklyn. 

Butchers' and Drovers' Bank, Bowery corn.r Grand. 

Chemical Bank, 216 Broadway. 

City Bank, 36 Wall. 

Commercial Bank, 62 Chatham corner Chambers. 

i)e aware and Hudson Canal Bank, 53 ^Villiam. 

b ulton Bank, 37 Fulton corner Pearl. 

Greenwich Bank, 308 Hudson corner Clarksoa. 

Greenwich Savings Bank, 12 Carmine. 

La Fayette Bank, 425 Broadway near Canal. 

Leather Manufacturers' Bank, 45 William. 

Long Island Bank, 7 Front, Brooklyn. 

Manhattan Bank, 23 Wall. 

Mechanics' Bank, 16 Wall. 

Mechanics' and Traders' Bank, 370 Grand. 

Merchants' Bank, 25 Wail. 

Merchants' Exchange Bank, 173 Greenwich o. Dey. 

Morris Canal Banking Company, 45 William. 

National Bank, 39 Wall. 

New York Bank, 32 Wall corner William. 

New York Dry Dock Bank, 27 Wall. 

New York Bank for Savings, 43 Chambers. 

North River Bank, 175 Greenwich corner Dev. 

Phenix Bank, 24 Wall. 

Seaman's Savings Bank, 71 Wall. 

Seventh W^ard Bank, 52 East Broadway. 

Tradesmens' Bank, 177 Chatham. 

Union Bank, 17 Wall. 

United States Bank Agency, 25 Wall. 



318 BENEVOLENT AND REL1CI0U3 INSTITUTIONS. 



IJENEVOr.EIVT ArVI> RKI.IGI01JS 
INSTITUTIONS. 

African Society for Mutual Relief, 44 Orange. 

American Anti-Slavery Society, 143 Nassau. 

American Baptist Home Mission Society, Clinton Hall. 

American Bible Society House, 115 Nassau. 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Mis- 
sions, Agency, corner Spruce and Park Row. 

American Colonization Society, 118 Nassau. 

American Home Missionary Society, 150 Nassau. 

American Seamens' Friend Society, 82 Nassau. 

American Society for the Promotion of Education m 
Africa, 118 Nassau, 

American Sunday School Union, 152 Nassau. 

American Tract Society, 150 Nassau. ^ 

Blind Institution, Bih Avenue, between 33d and o4tli 
streets. [Chapel. 

Board of Education, (Presbyterian,) brick church, 

Board of Foreign Missions, (Western,) brick church, 

Chapel. , , [P^^- 

Board of Missions, (Presbyterian,) brick church. Cha- 
Brooklyn Sabbath School Depository, 52 Fulton, 

Brooklyn. 
Eastern Dispensary, 275 Division. 
Female Benevolent Society, Asylum, lorkviUe. 
Half Orphan Asylum, Twelfth near Broadway. 
Infant School Society, basement Bowery Church. 
Kinepock Institution, Dispensary, White cor. Centre. 
Ladies' Depository, 435 Broadway. 
Lunatic Asylum, near Hudson River, seven miles 

north City Hall. 
Lying-in Asylum, Orange above Prince. 
Methodist Book Concern, 200 Mulberry. 
New York Asylum for Lying-in Women, Orange near 
Prince. 



BENEVOLENT AND RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS. 119 

New York Dispensary, 118 White corner Centre. 

New York Eye Infirmary, 96 Elm. 

New York Hospital, 317 and 319 Broadway. 

New York Institution for the Blind, 8th Avenue near 

33d street. 
New York Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf 

and Dumb, 4ih Avenue corner 50th street. 
Northern Dispensary, Waverley Place c. Christopher. 
Orphan Asylum, Blooming dale, five miles from Citv 

Hall. 
Orphan Asylum, (Roman Catholic,) Prince c, Mott. 
Protestant Episcopal Bible and Common Prayer Book 

Society, 28 Ann near Nassau. 
Protestant Episcopal Board of Missions — Domestic 

Committee, 115 Franklin ; Foreign Committee, 

White corner Centre. 
Protestant Episcopal Press, 28 Ann. 
Protestant Episcopal Public School, Varick c. Canal, 
Protestant Episcopal Sunday School Union, 28 Ann, 
Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary, 20ih st. 

between 9th and 10th Avenue. 
Protestant E piscopal Tract Society, Depository, 28Ann. 
Protestant Half Orphan Asylum, 12th street. 
Reformed Dutch Church Charity School, cor. Broome 

and Greene. 
Reformed Dutch Church Collegiate Consistory Rooms, 

Nassau corner Ann. 
Reformed Dutch Church Societies, Nassau cor. Ann. 
Sailors' Snug Harbor, Staten Island n. New Brighton. 
Seamens' Retreat, 71 Wall. 
Society for the Encouragement of Faithful Domestic 

Servants, 106 Chambers. 
Society for the Promotion of Knowledge and Industry, 

478 Broadway. 
Sunday School Union Depository, 152 Nassau. 

I 2 



120 PUBLIC BUILDINGS, OFFICES, ETC. 

PUBliIC BUIIiDIIVOS, OFFICES, &c. 

Adjutant General, (U. S.) Eastern Department, Scott, 

90 Franklin. 
Albion Club, corner Broadway and Park Place. 
Almshouse, Bellevue, office, New City Hall, Park. 
Arsenal, (State,) Elm corner Franklin. 
American Fur Company, rear 39 Ann. 
American Museum, Broadway corner Ann. 
American Theatre, 46 Bowery. 
Bellevue, 1st Avenue opposite 26ih street. 
Boston and New York Transportation Company, 2 

Hanover. 
Broadway Hall, 440 Broadway near Howard. 
Brooklyn City Buildings, Henry corner Cranberry. 
Brooklyn City Hall, (building,) Fulton c. Joralemon. 
Brooklyn JMarine Railway, foot of Jay street. 
Brooklyn Mechanics' Exchange, 10 Front. 
Brooklyn Military Garden, Fulton near Joralemon. 
Brooklyn Municipal Court and other Courts, City 

Buildings, Henry corner Cranberry. 
Brooklyn (U. S.) Navy Yard, JVallabout Baif. 
Brooklyn White Lead Works, Front corner Adams. 
Camden and Amboy Railroad Line, 12 Washington. 
Charleston Steam Packet Office, 65 Washington. 
Chief Engineer's Office, foot of Rivingion. 
City Comptroller's Office, 5 Hall of Records. 
City Hall, in the Park. 

do. do. New, in the Park near Chambers. 
City Inspector's Office, No. 1 basement City Hall. 
City Workshop, Goerck corner Stanton. 
Clerk Board of Aldermen, No. 8 City Hall. 
Clerk Board of Assistant Aldermen, No. 6 City Hall. 
Clerk City and County of New-York, office, 20 City 

Hall. 
Clerk City of Brooklyn, office Henry cor. Cranberry. 
Clinton Hall, Beekman corner Nassau. [City Hall. 
Collector's Office of arrearages of taxes, No.2 basement 
Collector's Office of assessments, 7 Hall of Records. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS, OFFICES, ETC. 121 

Commissary General, (N. Y. State,) Arcularius, 30 
iranklin. ' 

Commissioners of Insolvency for the U. States, office 

I\ew City Hall. 
Common Council Room, 13 and 27 City Hall 
Concert Hall, 406 Broadway. 
Coroner's Office, Lower Police, New City Hall 
Corporation Attornies' Office, 4 Spruce. 
Corporation Public Yard, Goerck corner Stanton 
Corporation Water Works for Fire Department, 'l3th 

street near Bowery. 
Counsellor to the Corporation, office 76 Cedar 
Courts, in City Hall and New City Hall. 
Custom House, between Pine and Cedar, n. Nassau 
Debtors Prison, in the Park. 
District Attornies office, west end New City Hall 
District Court of the United States, New City Hall 
Dry Docks, foot of 10th street near Avenue D. 
Euterpian Hall, 410 Broadway. 
ExchanD:e Telegraph, in Holt's Hotel. 
Hall of Records, in the Park. 

Hallof Justice and House of Detention, Centre be- 
tween Leonard and Franklin. 
Harbor Masters, 133 Maiden Lane corner Water 
Health Officer, New Citv Hall. 

Hell Gate Pilot Office, 454 Water «fc 24 Coenties Slip. 
House of Refuge, Bloomin.irdale road near 24th street. 
Hudson River Steamboat Association, 51 Courtlandt. 
Long Island Railroad Company, 45 William. 
Lost or Stray Children, (deposite,) New City Hall. 
Manhattan Gas Light Company, foot of 18th street; 

office 170 Elm. 
Manhattan Water Works, 7 Reade. 
Blarine Court, west end New City Hall. 
Masonic Hall, 314 and 316 Broadway. 
Mayor's Office, No. 5 City Hall. [Cranberry. 

Mayor's Office, (Brooklyn,) City Buildings, Henry c. 



122 PUBLIC BUILDINGS, OFFICES, ETC. 

Measurer General of Grain, office 120 Greenwich. 

Mechanics' Exchange, 7 Broad. 

Merchants' Exchange, 6S Exchange Place cor. fsew. 

National Theatre, Church corner Leonard. 

New York City Hall, in the Park. 

New York Gas Light Company, 102 Centre. 

New York and Erie Railroad Company, 46 Wall. 

New York and Harlaera Railroad Company, 14 Wall 

and 241 Bowery. 
Park Theatre, 21 Park Row. 
Police Olftce, lower. New City Hall. 
Police Office, upper, 341 Bowery corner Third. 
Post Office, Chambers in the Rotunda. 
Post Office, branch, William corner Excnange Place. 
Peale's Museum, 252 Broadway. 
Portwarden's office, 62 Wall. 
Public Administrator's Office, 43 Liberty. 
Quartermaster United States Army, 61 Washington. 
Recorder's Office, No. 4 City Hall. 
Resident Physician's Office, 150 Hester. 
Richmond Hill Theatre, 170 Varick corner Charlton, 
Sheriff's Office, No. 21 City Hall. 
Ship Letter Office, 68 Exchange Place. 
Stock Exchange, 22^ Wall. ^ „ „ ^^ , 
Street Commissioners' Office, 4 Ha of Records. 
Street Commissioners' Office, (Brooklyn,) City Build. 

ings, Henry corner Cranberry. 
Superintendan. of Streets, City Hall Place n. Chatham 
Surrogate's Office, 3 Hall of Records 
Tammany Hall, 166 Nassau corner I ra^kfort 
Union Line Transportation Company, 14 Washington. 
Unhed States Court, New City Hall. 
United States Navy Yard, Brooklyn. 
Watch Houses, New City Hall, 22 E dridge, Woosfer 
corner Prince, Attorney corner Delancey and Jef-^ 
ferson Market. j 

Water Commissioners' Office, New City Hall. 
Zoological Institute, 37 Bowery. 



PACKET&j SCHOONERS, SLOOPS AND STEAMBOATS, 123 

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PACKETS, SCHOON- 
ERS, SLOOPS AND STEAMBOATS. 

Albany Steamboats, Barclay and Courtlandt streets. 

Albany Sloops, Lent's Basin, E. R. 

Albany and Troy Tow-boats and Barges, Broad and Court- 
landt streets. 

Alexandria Packets, foot of Wall street. 

Appalachicola Packets, Burling Slip, west pier. 

Boston Packets, foot of Maiden Lane and Coenties Slip , 

Bridgeport Steamboats, foot of Catharine street. 

Baltimore Packets, foot of Wall street and Coenties Slip. 

Carthagena Packets, foot of Maiden Lane. 

Calskill Steamboat, foot of Liberty street. 

Charleston Packets, (ship line,) Burling Slip, E. R. 
do. do. (brig line,) do. do. 

Charleston Steam Packets, foot of Morris street. 

Darien Packets, foot of Beeknian street. 

Elizabethport Steamboat, foot of Battery Place. 

Fishkill Tow-boats, foot of Liberty street. 

Fort Lee Steamboats, foot of Canal street. 

Flushing Steamboats, foot of Fulton street, E. R. 

Georgetown Packets, foot of Wall street. 

Glen Cove Steamboats, foot of Fulton. 

Hartford Steamboats, Beekman street, E. R. 

Hartford Packets, Peck Slip and Burling Slip, E. R. 

Havre Packets, foot of Rector street, N. R. and Pier No. 
14. E. R. 

Hyde Park Packets, foot of Liberty street. 

Hoboken Steamboats, foot of Barclay and Canal streets. 

Hudson Steamboats, foot of Liberty street. 

Huntington Steamboats, foot of Fulton street, E. R. 

Kingston (Jamaica) Packets, near foot of Morris street. 

Kingston Steamboat, foot of Liberty street. 

Liverpool Packets, (old line,) foot of Beekman street. 
do. do. (new line.) foot of Wall street, 

do. do. (Grinnell, Minturn & Co.) footM. Lane. 

do. do. (R. Kermit,) foot of Fletcher street. 

London Packets, foot of Pine strpetajic^ Maiden Lane. 

MiddJetown Point Steamboat, foot of Bterclay ii-eet; N. R. 

Magnolia Packets, foot of Coenties Slip. ^ ^X 



124 PACKETS, SCHOONERS, SLOOPS, AND STEAMBOATS, 

Norfolk Packetg, foot of Wall street. 
Newport Steamboats, foot of Pike street, E R. 
Norwalk Steamboats, foot of Catharine street. 
Nevvbern Packets, foot of Roosevelt street. 
New Haven Steamboats, Beekman street. 
Nevv-Rochelle Steamboats, foot of Fulton street, E. R. 
New Haven Packets, Peck Slip and Burling Slip, E. R. 
New London Packets, do. do. 

New London Steamboats, foot of Beekman street. 
Norwich do. do. do. 

New Brunswick Steamboats, foot of Battery Place 
New Brighton Steamboats, foot of Battery Place. 
New Orleans Packets, foot of Wall street. 
Newark Steamboat, foot of Barclay street. 
Newburgh Steamboats, foot of Warren street. 
Peekskiil Steamboat, foot of Chambers street. 
Petersburgh Packets, foot of Wall street. 
Philadelphia Packets, foot of Old Slip. 
Philadelphia Steamboats, Pier No. 2, N. R. 
Poughkeepsie Steamboats, foot of Murray street. 
Portland, Me. Packets, foot of Coenties Slip. 
Portsmouth, N. H. Packets, do. 

Providence Packets, foot of Maiden Lane. 
Providence Steamboats, foot of Pike street, E. R 
Red Bank Steamboats, foot of Chambers street. 
Richmond Packets, foot of Wall street. 
Salem Packets, Coenties Slip. 
Savannah Packets, (ship line,) foot of Pine street. 

do. do. (schooner line,) foot of Maiden Lane 

Shrewsbury Steamboats, foot of Chambers street. 
Staten Island Steamboats, Whitehall. 
St. Augustine Packets, Coenties Slip. 
St. Mark's Packets, do. 

Troy Sloops, Coenties Slip and North River. 
Washington City Packets, foot of VV^all street. 
Wilmington, N. C Packets, foot of Rosevelt street 
Washington, N. C. Packets, do. do. 

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