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Full text of "New-York as it is, in [1833-1835] 1837; containing a general description of the city of New-York, list of officers, public institutions, and other useful information"

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NEW- YORK AS IT IS, 

III 1SS4; ' 
AND CITIZENS' 

ADVERTISING DIRECTORY. 



A GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE CITF AND ENVIRONS, 

EIST OF OFFICERS, PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS, AND 

OTHER USEFUL INFORMATION ; 

FOR THE CONVENIENCE OF CITIZENS, AS A BOOK OF 
REFERENCE, AND A GUIDE TO STRANGERS. 

WITH A CORRECT MAP OF THE CITY. 



EDITED BY EDWIN ^^ILLIAMS. 

Author of the N. V. Annual Register, &c. 



SECOND YEAR OF PUBLICATION. 



PUBLISHED BY J. DISTURNELL, 

No. 155 Broadway. 
Also for sale to the Trade, by John WiIeyy22Nas£au-st. 

1834. 




Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1834, by J. Disturnell, 
in the Clerk's Office of llie District Court of tbe Southern District of 
JvewYork. • 



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^■f!^ 



E. B. CLAVTCjM, printer, 

9 Tljanies-street. 



INTRODUC'riOlV. 



EivcouKAGED by the public favour bestowed on our 

first attempt to furnish a convenient manual for citizens 

and strangers, we offer the second annual volume of 

" Nvw-YoRK AS IT IS," with improvements and addi- 

i, which, we trust, will make it equally acceptable 

the one for 1833. Great care and labour have been 

(red to record the numerous changes and alterations 

n are constantly taking place hi the varied concerns 

; 's great metropolis; and the general correctness of 

' .anual may, it is believed, be relied on. Further 

ements and additions may be expected in future 

irs, should the patronage of the public be con- 

* h expense is necessarily incurred in the prepa^ 

of this little volume ; and to remunerate the 
,,^,^.xL=ner, a sale of the whole edition, (which is 
quite moderate,) is requisite. We, however, have so 
much confidence, that citizens as well as strangers will 
duly appreciate the convenience of this Panoramic and 
Statistical View of the City, that we anticipate an in- 
creased support to this volume. 

With these preliminary remarks, and with our thanks 
to friends and correspondents for their favours, we sub- 
niit to the public, " New-York as it is. in 1834.'" 



BANKS INCORPORAT£l> IN 1834. 



Commercial Bank; to be located in or near Cham- 
bers-street, in the Sixth Ward.— Capital $500,000. 

La Fayette Bank; to be located in the Eighth 

Ward, in or near Canal-street. — Capital $500,000. 

Phenix Bank. — Capital increased to $1,500,000. 

Bowery Savings Bank; Office in the Butchers' and 

Drovers' Bank, 128 Bowery. Deposit days, Mondays 

and Saturdays, from 5 to 8, P. M. 

Benjamin M. Brown, President. 
David Cotheal, Treastircr. 
Frederick K. Lee, Secretary. 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Introduction, 3 

Banks Incorporated in 1834, 4 

Contents, 5 

Index, 7 

General Description of the City, - 13 

Officers of the Common Council, 27 

Officers appointed by the Common Council, 29 

Courts, 33 

Watch, Prisons, &c., 37 

Alms House, , 38 

Fire Department, 39 

Board of Health,. 39 

Health Commissioners, 40 

Military, 40 

Colleges, Academies, and Schools, 41 

Medical Institutions, 48 

Literary and Scientific Institutions, 54 

Religious, Benevolent, and Moral Institutions, 60 

Miscellaneous Institutions, 83 

Churches, 86 

Banks, 93 

Insurance Companies, 105 

Miscellaneous Companies, 120 

Custom House, 123 

Arrivals in 1833, 130 

Merchants' Exchange, 1 30 

Post Office, 131 

Lines of Packets, 137 

Steamboats, 147 

Stages, 152 

Hotels and Public Houses, 153 

Periodicals, 155 

Newspapers, 156 



CONTENTS. 



Circulating Libraries, 159 

Reading Rooms, 159 

Consuls, 160 i 

Wardens of the Port, 161 

Harbour Masters, 161 

Ballast Master, 161 

Rates of Pilotage, 162 

Measurers, Inspectors, Slc, 163 

Damages on Bills of Exchange, 165 

Wharfage and Commissions, 166 < 

Commissioners of Insolvency, 168 

Auctioneers, 168 : 

Licenses, 169 ' 

Coaches and Carriages, 169 ' 

City Stages, 172: 

Cartraeu, and Porters' Fees, &c., 173 '■ 

Census, 174 

Bill of Mortality ] 75 

Election Returns, 176 '< 

Ferries, 177 

Finances, • 177 

Real and Personal Estate, 182 

Real Estate, (public) 183,184 

Fire Limits, 184 

Markets, 185 

Amusements, 186 

Bath s, 1 89 

Fashionable Resorts, 189 

Wards, 192 

Alphabetical List of Streets, 193 

Public Offices, Institutions, &c., 201 

Distances to various Places in the United States,... 202 

Chronology for 1833, 204 

Key to the Map, 205 

Environs, Brooklyn, Sic, 207 

Alphabetical List of Subscribers Names and Occu- 
pations, 225 



IIVDEX. 



Page 

A 

Academies and Schools, 45 

Academy of the Fine Arts, 54 
of Design, - - 54 
Additions and Corrections, 12 
Albany &. Troy Steamboats, 147 
Aldermen, N. Y., - - 27 
Aldermen, Brooklyn, - 208 
Alms House, - - - 38 
Alphabetical list of Streets, 

N. Y., - - 193 

Brooklyn, - - 216 

Subscribers, - 225 

American Bible Society, CO 

Tract Society, - C2 

Home Miss. Society, 63 

Sunday School Union, 63 

Seamen's Friend Soc, 70 

Theatre, - - 186 

Museum, - - 187 

Institute, - - 83 

Amusements, - - 186 

Apprentices' Library, - 59 

Arrivals at the Port of N. Y., 130 

Arts, - - . 54, 55 

Assessments, - - - 182 

Assessors, - - - 28 

Asylum, Lunatic, - 

Orphan, 

Rom. Catli. Orphan, 
Athenajum, - - - 
Apalachicola Packets, 
Auctioneers, 

B 



Ballast Master, 
Banks, Rules, tSrc. 



Pag« 

Banks, Rates of Coins at, 94 

United States, - 94 

City, - - - 95 

Savings, - - 103 

Brooklyn, - - 213 

Battery, - - - 189 

Bath, - - - - 219 

Baths, - - - - 189 

Belfast Packets, - - 139 

Bellevue Hospital, - 39 

Benevolent Institutions, - 60 

Bible Societies, - - 60 

and Common Prayer 

Book Society, - 65 

Bdl of Mortality, - - 175 

Boarding Houses, - - 154 

Board of Health, - - 39 

of Trade, - - 84 

Boats, Steam, - - 147 

Freight, - - 150 

Bost. & Prov. Steamboats, 149 

Bridewell, - - . 38 

Brooklyn, - - - 207 

Collegiate Institute, 208 

Banks, - - 213 

Churches, - - 211 

C 

Carthagenian Packets, - 141 

Cartraen, - - - 173 

Castle Garden, - - 190 

Cemeteries, - - - 26 

Census, ... 174 

Chamber of Commerce, 83 

Chancery, Court of, - 33 

161 Charitable Institutions, - 60 

93lCharter Officers, - - 97 



51 
73 

74 

57 

144 

168 



INDEX. 



Charleston Packets, - 142 
Steamboat, - - 150 
Chimney Sweepers, - 173 
Churches, - . - P6 
in Brooklyn, - 211 
Cincinnati, Socinty of, - 83 
Circulating Libraries, - 159 
City Hall, Description of, 19 
Stages, - - 172 
Finances, - - 177 
Licenses, - - 16^' 
Surveyors, - - 32 
Mission Socetty, - C6 
Climate, - - - 15 
Clinton Hall Association, 58 
Clothing Society, - - 75| 
Coaches and Carriages, - 169 
Cold Spring, - - - 221 
Collectors, - - - 28 
Colleges, Columbia, 41 
IJniversit}^, - - 43 
Piiysicians and Sur- 
geons, - • 48 
Pharmacy, - - 53 
Comm'rs of Insolvency, - 168 
of the School Fund, 32 
Commerce, . - - 129 
Colonization Society, - 76 
Commissions, Rates of, - 166 
Common Council, N. Y., 27 
Brooklyn, - - 208 
Constables, - - - 28 
Consuls, - - - 160 
Coney Island, - - 219 
County Officers, - - 29 
Court, U. S. Dist. and Cir., 33 
Errors, - - 33 
Chancery, - - 33 
Supreme, - - 34 
Circuit and Oyer and 

Terminer, - 34j 

Superior, - - 35 

Common Pleas, - 35l 



Page 
Court, General and Special 

Sessions, - - 35 
Marine, - - 36 
Justices or Ward, 36 
Police, - - 37 

Custom House, - - 123 

]> 

Daily Newspapers, - 156 

Darien Packets, - - 144 
Deaf and Dumb Institution, 70 
Deaths by some of the prin- 
cipal Diseases, - - 176 
Description nf the City, - 13 
Design, National Academy 

of, - - - - 55 
Dispensary, - - - 52 
Distances, - . - 202 
Damages on Bills of Ex- 
change, - - - 165 
Domestic Servants, Society 
for the Encouragement of, 77 

E 

East Chester, - - 221 

Eastern Packets, - - 146 

Education and Miss. Soc, 67 

Election, N. Y. City, - 176 

Elevations, - - - 15 

Elizabethtown, - - 223 

Episcopal Societies, <S:c., 65 

Estate, Real and Personal, 182 

Exchange, Merchants', - 130 

Exchange Reading Room> 159 

Expenditures, - - 180 

Eye Infirmary, - - 49 

F 
Fashionable Resorts, &c., 189 
Female Seminaries and 
Schools, - - - 46 
Assistance Society, 74 



INDEX. 



Page] 

Ferries, ... 177 

Finances of the City, - 177 

Fire Department, - - 39 

Limits, - - 184 

Flatbusb, - - - 219 

Flushing, - - - 220 

Fortifications, - - 14 

G 

Gardens, - - - 190 
Gas Light Company, 21, 121 

Geology, - - - 15 

Glen Cove, - - - 221 

Grand Lodge, - - 85 

Greenock Packets, - 139 

Groceries, &.C., Licensed, W9 



Page 
Institutions, Medical, - 48 
Literary and Scien- 
tific, - - - 54 
Religious, Benevo- 
lent, (fee, - - 60 
Miscellaneous, - 83 
Insurance Companies, Fire, 105 
Marine, - - 115 
Italian Opera House, - 187 
Introduction, - - 3 



Jamaica, ... 219 

Jersey City, - - - 224 
Junk Shops, - - - 169 
Juvenile Delinquents, Soc. 
for the Reformation of, 78 



Hackney Coaches, 
Harbour, ... 
Harbour Masters, - 
Harlrem Rail Road, 15, 
Hartford Steamboats, 
Havre Packets, 
Historical Society, 
Hoboken, ... 
Horticultural Society, - 
Hospitals, New-York, - 

Quarantine, 
Hotels and Public Houses, 
House of Refuge, - 
Hudson River Steamboats, 
Humane Societies, - 



K 



, pn Key to the Map, - 
?;^ I Kingston, (Jam.) Packets, 



205 
141 



161 

121 

149 

140 

56 

223 

86 

50 

52 

153 

38 

147 

79 



Infant School Society, - 48 

Inspectors, ... 163 

Institute, American, - 83 
Institution for the Deaf and 

Dumb, - - 70 

Description of, - 72 



Law Institute, - - 59 

Libraries, Circulating, - 159 

Library, Apprentices,' - 59 

Mercantile, - - 58 

New-York Society, 56 
Linnsean Botanic Garden, 

Flushing, - - - 220 
Lines of Packets, - - 137 
Literary and Scientific In- 
stitutions, - 54 
Brooklyn, - - 209 
Philosophical, - 57 
Liverpool Packets, - 137 
Lombard Association, - 120 
London Packets, - - 139 
Long Branch, - - 222 
Long Island, - - - 219 
Lunatic Asylum, - - 51 
Lyceum of Natural His- 
tory, ...-''- 



10 



INDEX. 



Mails, - - - - 133 

Manhattan Companv, - 24 

Marine Court, - - 36 
Mariners' and Merchants' 

Association, - - 85 

Markets, - . - 185 

Marshals, - - - 31 
Measurers, Inspectors, and 

Gaugers, - - - 163 

Mechanics' School, - 45 

Medical Institutions, - 48 

Society, - - 50 

Mercantile Library Associ- | 

ation, - ... 58 

Merchants' Exchange, - 130 

Companv, - - 120 

Methodist Book Concern, 69 

Mexican Packets, - - 142 

Militarj-, - _ . 40 

Miscellaneous Institutions, 83 

Companies, - - 120 

Missionary Societies, - 67 

Mobile Packets, - - 144 

Monuments, - - - 26 

Mortality, Bill of, - - 175 

Museums, ... 137 

National Acad, of Design, 55 

Newark, - - . 222 

New-Haven Steamboats, 149 
New-London and Norwich 

Steamboats, - - 150 

New-Orleans Packets, - 143 

New-Rochelle, - - 221 

Newspapers, - - . 156 

Brooklyn, - - 215 

Newtown, - . . 220 

New-York, Description of, 13 

Stat.' Society of the 

Cincinnati, - 83 



New- York City Finances, 

Niblo's Gai-den, 

Norwalk, Bridgeport, &c., 

Steamboato, 
Northern Dispensary, 

O 

Opera House, 

Orange Springs, - 

Orphan Asylum, - 

Roman Catholic, - 

Officers of the City, ap- 
pointed by the Com- 
mon Council, 

Oyster Bay, - . _ 



Park Theatre, 

Passaic Falls, 

Paterson, - . . 

Peru Iron Company, 

Packets, Lines of. 

Pawnbrokers, 

Perth Amboy, 

Peale's Museum, 

Periodicals, - - - 

Penitentiary, - 

Philadelphia Packets, - 
Steamboats, - 

Porters, - - - . 

Postaffe, Rates of, - 

Post Office, - 

Protestant Episcopal Theo- 
logical Seminary, 
Tract Society, 
Press, - - - 

Public Buildings, - 
Gardens, 
Schools, 



Page 
177 
191 



Quarantine Hospital, 



11 



R 

Rates of Commissions, - 166 

Rates of Pilotage, - - 162 

Rates of Postage, - - 135 

Rates of Wharfage, - 166 

Religious Institutions, - 60 

Reading Rooms, - - 159 
Real Estate owned by the 

Corporation, - - 184 

Rail Road, - - 21 

Reservoir, - - - 25 

Richmond Hill Theatre, 187 

Rockaway, - , - 219 

Roman Cath. Free School, 48 

Sacred Music Society, - 60 
Sailors' Snug Harbour, - 221 
Savannah Packets, - 142 
Savings Bank, - - 103 
Schools, Mechanics', - 45 
Public, . . 47 
Free and Infant, - 48 
Sunday, - - 63 
Schuylkill Coal Co., - 120 
Society Library, - - 56 
Society for the Encourage- 
ment of Faithful 
Domestic Servants, 77 
for the Reformation 
of Juvenile Delin- 
quents, - - 78 
Steamboats, - - - 147j 
Southern Packets, - - 142 
Street Inspectors, - - 30 
Streets, List of, - 193, 216 
Stages, - - - - 152 
City, - - - 172 
Staten Island, - - 221 



Page 
Sugar Refining Company, 122 
Supply of Water, - - 22 
Subscribers' Names and Oc- 
cupations, - - - 225 

T 

Tract Society, - - 62 

Telegraph, - - - 15 

Theatres, - - - 186 

Theological Seminary, - 44 

Tontine Coffee House, - 85 
Tow-boats on the Hudson 

River, - - - 150 

Typographical Society, - 82 

U 

University of the City of 

New-York, - - 43 

United States Branch Bank, 94 



Vauxhall Garden, - 191 

TV 

Wards, - - - - 192 

Wardens of the Port, - 161 

Watch, - - - . 37 

Water Commissioners, - 32 
Water Companies, not in 

operation, - - 25 

Waterworks, . . 24 

Wehawken Hill, - - 224 

Weights and Measures, - 165 

Westchester, - - 221 

Williamsburgh, - - 219 



Yorkville, 



22 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 



Page 35. — add Michael UlshoefFer, Associate Judge of the Court 
of Common Pleas. 

New- York HospitaL 
Page 50. — George Newbold, President. 
Najah Taylor, Vice-President. 
John Adams, Treasurer. 
Robert J. Murray, Secretary. 
Noah Wetmore, Superintendent. 
Henry N. Gamble, Apothecary. 
John W. Sterling, Clerk aud Librarian. 

Mercantile Library Association. 
Page 58.— R. R. Boyd, President. 

J. P. Benson, Vice President. 
A. E. Silliman, Secretary. 
C. W. Carmer, Treasurer. 

Directors. 
Charles J. Stedman, Isaac G. Graham, H. Blydenburgh, C. B. 
Collins, Simeon Hyde, jr., F. A. Cummings, John M. Potter, 
William Burke, James Horn. 

New- York Law Institute. 
Page 59. — For Samuel A. Foot, read John L. Graham, Treasurer. 

New- York Sacred Music Society. 
Page 60. — Oliver M. Lowndes, President. 

William Rockwell, First Vice-President. 

(vacant) Second Vice-President. 

James M. Lowndes, Secretary. 
H. B. Greenwood, Librarian. 
William Franklin, Assistant Librarian. 
U.C.Hill, Conductor. 

Comissioners of the Alms House. 
Page 38. — Wm. Mandeville, Joseph Hoxie, Philip W. Engs, 
George S. Doughty, and Samuel Stevens. 

Mechanics^ School. 
Page 45.— For William Halleck, read B. B. Hallock— for W. 
Wanlass, read G-^-^n Wanless. 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

OF THE 

CITY ANI> MAJRBOUB OF NEW-YOKJK. 



SITUATION AND EXTENT. 



The City of New-York, the commercial emporium of 
the United States, is situated on New-York Island, (for- 
merly called Manhattan Island,) at the confluence of the 
Hudson or North River, with the strait called the East 
River, which connects Long Island Sound with the At- 
lantic Ocean. It is ahout equi-distant (or less than 
twenty miles) from the western extremity of Long Island 
Sound on the north-east, and the Atlantic Ocean on the 
south. The City Hall is in Latitude 40", 42', 40", north, 
and longitude 74^, V, 8", west, from Greenwich. The 
City and County are of the same limits, comprising the 
whole island, which extends from the Battery on the 
south, to Kingsbridge on the north, 13^ miles, or 71,700 
feet. The average breadth is 1 mile and 3220 feet, or 
8500 feet. The greatest breadth is on the liije of 88th- 
street, and is 12,200 feet, or about 2^ miles. The area 
of the island is about 14,000 acres. 

On the north and east it is separated from West- 
chester County by Harlanii River, over which are three 
bridges, namely Harlaem, Macomb's, and King's bridges. 
The tide flows through this river or strait ; the western 
termination of which, where it connects with the Hudson, 
is called Spuyien DuyveVs Creek. The strait called the 
East River separates the island from Long Island on the 
east. On the south is the bay or harbour; and on the 
west is the North, or Hudson River ; witii the state of 



14 DESCRIPTION OF THE CITY AND HARBOUR. 

New-Jersey on tlie opposite shore. The few small 
islands in the harbour are also attached to the City ; the 
principal of which are Governor's, Ellis', and Bedlow's 
Islands ; also, Blackwell's Island, in the East River, 
occupied by the City Penitentiary establishment. 

HARBOUR, (Sec. 

The harbour of New-York is safe and commodious, its 
circumference being about 25 miles, and the largest 
vessels may come up to the wharves at the City. On 
the bar, at Sandy Hook, the dei)th of water, at high tide, 
is 27 feet, and at low water 21 feet : from thence to the 
City the channel is froui 35 to 50 feet. The Light 
House at Sandy Hook on the New-Jersey shore, is dis- 
tant 18 miles from the City ; and vessels frequently anchor 
in the outer harbour, or llaritan Bay. The entrance to 
New-York harbour is called "The Narrows," between 
Staten Island on the west, and Long Island on the east, 
8 miles from the city. Sands' Point Light House, on 
Long Island, is situated near the western extremity of 
Long li-land Sound, 20 miles N. E. of the City. The 
harbour is but seldom obstructed with ice. The differ- 
ence between high and low tides, at the wharves, 
averages about seven feet, and for the convenience of 
commerce several steamboats are employed in towing 
ships to and from sea. The principal commercial busi- 
ness is transacted on the east side of the City ; the East 
River being: the most convenient and safe part of the 
harbour. The width of the East River is from one third 
to onehalf of a mile to the opposite shore of Brooklyn, 
Long Island. The Hudson, or North River, is one mile 
in width to Jersey City, and a mile and a half to Hobo- 
ken, (New-Jersey.) 

FORTIFICATIONS. 

The principal fortifications for the defence of the har- 
bour are at the Narrows, about 8 miles from the City. 
On the eastern, or Long Island shore, are forts Hamilton 
and La Fayette, the latter of which, (tbrmerly called Fort 
Diamond,) is built on a reef of rocks, two hundred yards 



DESCRIPTION or THK CITY AND HARBOUR. 15 

from the shore, where the former is situated, and has 
three tiers of guns. The strait, or Narrows, is here about 
one third of a mile in width, and on the Staten Island, or 
western shore, opposite the two fortresses just named, 
are Fort Tompkins and Fort Richmond. 'J'lie United 
States e:overnment have expended large sums of money 
on these ditiferent fortifications, particularly since the last 
war with Great Britain, and they are now considered 
amply sufficient for the defence of this passage to the 
harbour. The fortifications on the East River are not, at 
present, of much importance. 

There are batteries on Bedlow's and Ellis' islands, 
on the western side of the harbour; and on Governor's 
Island, (which is distant 3200 feet from the City at the 
Battery, and contains 70 acres,) are Fort Columbus and 
Castle Williams. The former is a strong work in the 
shape of a star, on the south side of the Island. The 
latter is on the north-west point of the island, built of 
stone, in a circular form, 600 feet in circumference, and 
60 feet in height, with three tiers of guns. Theieisalso 
a battery on the south-west side, commanding the en- 
trance through Buttermilk Channel. There are barracks 
on the island for the accommodation of a considerable 
number of soldiers. 

TELEGRAPH. 

A Telegraph is established on the heights of Staten 
Island, communicating by signals with one in the City, 
on the Merchants' Exchange. 

GEOLOGY, ELEYATION, CLIMATE, &C.* 

The island of New-York is fonned on a bed of rocks, 
generally primitive granite, with some lime-stone in the 
northern section, where are quarries of white marble. 
The elevation is very considerable above tide water 



^ For a considerable portion of the informalion on these subjects, and on 
ibe supply of the City with water, we are iudebfed to the interesting Report 
-orCol. De Wilt Clinton, to the Common Council, Dec, 1832. 



16 DESCRIPTION OF THE CITY. 

throughont the whole extent. The outline of the island 
is not more irregular than its surface. The ground 
within two miles of Kingshridge, at Fort Washington, on 
the Hudson River, is su])posed to be the most elevated, 
and was ascertained by Capt. Partridge, to be 238 feet 
above tide water. Fort Washington and Fort Tryonare 
the remains of a fortilication used during the Revolu- 
tionary war. Fort Tryon is a short distance north of 
Fort Washington, and is 229 feet above tide. Other 
elevations in this part of the island, have not been ascer- 
tained. The greatest elevation of the f^ourth Avenue, 
(which is the line of the Harlaem Rail Road,) is 117 feet 
above tide. At the intersection of 23d-street, it is only 
14^ feet. The highest ground on the Sixth Avenue is 
111^ feet. The road, ^at Manhattanville, is 26 feet. 
The elevations of Broadway above tide, from the Battery 
to Canal-street, are as follows, (according to the surveys 
by the Street Commissioner,) namely at Battery-place, 
14 feet; at Wall-street, 34 feet; at Cortlandt-street, 31 
feet 6 inches; at Barclay-street, 35 feet 3 inches; City 
Hall, 38 feet ; at Chambers-street, 34 feet 7 inches ; at 
Duanc-street, 29 feet 6 inches; at Anthony-slreet, 35 feet 
4 inches; at Franklin-street, 28 feet 3 inches; at Canal- 
street, 10 feet 6 inches. 

The general slope of the island is from the west to the 
east ; and at points, it i? much broken by insulated and 
connected ridges and hills, with an elevated range of high 
ground running from west to east, which slopes towards 
the northern and southern parts of the island. This fact 
is considered invaluable, as it will enable reservoirs of 
water to be so located as to command, at an elevated 
head, the whole City. 

The general character of the soil of this island is open, 
through which the rains that fall freely percolate ; a 
small portion of its area consists of salt marsh and ex- 
posed rock. It is, however, commonly sand and gravel, 
intermixed with pebbles and loose rock, resting on a 
stratified mass of gneiss, which exists at various depths, 
and at places appears on the surface. The depth of the 
toil has no reirular uniformitv, as ascertained bvborin;:. 



DESCRIPTION OF THE CITY. 



At the well, on Thirteenth-street, it is 15 feet ; at Bleecker- 
street, it is 48 feet; at the Dry Dock, 100 feet; at Green- 
wich, 70 feet; at Washington ftlarket, 72 feet. The soil 
is greatly diversified in quality; but the best land is 
towards the north part of the island. The general aspect 
of the ground is forbidding for cultivation ; but, owing to 
the exertions and good taste of some of our citizens, there 
are many fields and gardens which afford good specimens 
of agriculture; and the horticulture is conducted in a 
style not surpassed in the United States. In 1825 the 
quantity of cultivated land on the island was 5785 acres. 
A considerable proportion of the ground which is laid 
out in gardens, is noted for its fertility, producing every 
variety of vegetables and fruits common to this climate. 
The situation of the city is considered very favourable 
to the health of the inhabitants, from tlie elevated charac- 
ter of the island, and the vicinity of the ocean. The 
climate, at most seasons, is mild and agrf eable. The 
winters are less severe than in the interior of the State, 
and the sea breezes render the heat of summer less op- 
pressive. An examination of the Bills of Mortality (see 
Index) will show the annual average of deaths in this 
City to be less in proportion to the population, than that 
of most other large Cities in the United States, lakino- 
into consideration that this port is the principal recepta^ 
cle of emigrants from Europe, the deaths among whom, 
unused to our climate, tend to swell the Bills of Mortality. 

DIVISIONS AND GOVERNMENT. 

The City is divided into 15 wards, which are particu- 
larly defined in another part of this volume. Each 
ward elects annually an Alderman and an Assistant 
Alderman, wlio are formed into a Comi:non Council of 
two boards. The mayor is elected annually, (agreeably 
to an amendment of the constitution,) by the people. 

GENERAL ASPECT. 

A panorama of this extensive City, presents the com- 
pact part occupying the south end of the island we have 
described, and stretching along each river about three 
2 



18 DESCRIPTION OF THE CITY. 



railes. The number of lots built upon in all the wards, 
except the twelfth, (which comprises all the island north 
of three miles,) in 1831, was 20,093, having a population 
of about 10 persons to each lot ; and the number of vacant 
lots, in the same wards, was 6352. The present number 
of buildings is about 30,000. 

The City is generally regularly built ; the principal 
streets running north and south, and being crossed by 
others, extendmg from the East to the North Rivers. 
Great improvements have been made within a few years, 
in the compact part of the City, by widening, opening, 
and straightening streets, to remedy, in some degree, the 
irregular and inconvenient manner in which the ancient 
part of the City was built. The dwellings and ware- 
houses of our Dutch ancestors have nearly all given place 
to the more tasteful and convenient buildings of modern 
times. Most of these buildings are of brick; and many 
of the warehouses of the merchants are not surpassed 
for beauty, spaciousness, and convenience, by those of 
any other City. The style of building, with granite and 
marble fronts to the basement, has been recently intro- 
duced, and is now almost uniformly adopted in the erec- 
tion of warehouses. The northern part of the City has 
been very handsomely laid out, with wide streets and 
avenues; and the style of building, for dweling houses, 
is neat, and frequently elegant. »Some of the rows of 
houses in La F.iyette-place, Bond-street, Bleecker-street, 
6lc., may vie, for beauty and taste, with those of the 
finest Cities of Europe. 

An alphabetical list of the streets of the City is given, 
at page 193. Broadway is the principal thoroughfare, 
and most fashionable promenade. It is 80 feet wide, and 
extends about three railes from north to south, termina- 
ting at the Battery. From this street there is a gentle 
slope, east ana west, to the rivers. Greenwich-street is 
wioe and elegant, and runs parallel with Broadway, be- 
tween that street and Washington-street, which last is a 
fine avenue, next to West-st., extending along the North 
E.iver. Pearl-street, between Broadway and the East 
River, is over a mile in length, and its course is nearly in 



DESCRIPTION OF THE CITY. 19 



the form of a crescent, containing numerous spacious 
wareliouses, and is the principal seat of the dry goods, 
and hardware business. Front and Water streets, be- 
tween Pearl-street and the East River, are occupied 
principally by the wholesale grocers, commission mer- 
chants, and mechanics connected with the shipping busi- 
ness. South-street, running along the East River, con- 
tains the warehouses and otifices of most of the principal 
shipping merchants. Wall-street runs from Broadway 
to the East River, and is occupied by the Banks, In- 
surance Companies, Merchants' Exchange, Newspapers, 
and Brokers offices, being the seat of heavier moneyed 
transactions than any other place in America. Canal- 
street, running across Broadway to the Hudson River, 
near the centre of the City, is a spacious street, princi- 
pally occupied by retail stores. The Bowery is a wide 
and extensive street, running directly north and south, 
east of Broadway. The Third Avenue, extending from 
the Bowery to Harlaem, is Macadamized, and is the 
principal avenue to the City from the east. Chatham- 
street, East Broadway, Nassau-street, Maiden-lane, 
Broad, Fulton, Cortlandl, William, Hudson, Division, 
Grand, and Broome streets, deserve particular notice, 
as amone: the principal streets and avenues. The streets 
are generally well paved, with stone or brick side walks, 
lighted at night with lamps, and some of them supplied 
with gas lights. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

In enumerating the public buildings which are not 
described under their appropriate heads, we shall first 
name 

THE CITY HALL, 

Situated in the Park, about half a mile from the 
Battery, and equi-distant from the East and North 
Rivers. It is 216 feet in length, by 105 in breadth ; the 
front and ends built of wlflte marble, and the rear of free 
stone, and is considered one of the most beautiful edifices 
in the United States. It consists of a centre building 
and two wings, principally of the Ionic and Corinthian 



20 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



orders. This edifice was commenced in 1803 and finish- 
ed in 1812, at the cost of $538,734, and is occupied as 



follows 



City Hall, proper. 



Basement. 
1. City Inspector's Office. 

18. Mechanics' Institute. 

First Floor. 

5. Mayor's Office. 

6. CleVk of the Board of 

Assistants. 

7. Circuit Judge. 

8. Clerk of the Board of 

Aldermen. 
4. Recorder's Office. 

9. Keeper's Room. 

17. First Judge's Office. 

19. Clerk Supreme Court. 

20. Clerk City and County. 

21. Sheriff's Office. 



23. Chamber Judges Supe- 

rior Court. 

24. Court of Chancery. 
22. Law Institute. 

Second Floor. 

13. Com'n Council Cham- 

ber. 
11. Governor's Room. 

Register in Chancery. 
27. Chamber of Board of 

Assistants. 
26. Circuit Court. 

25. Court Common Pleas. 

14. Superior Court- 

15. Superior Court Clerk's 

Office. 



NEW CITY HALL, 

In the rear of the City Hall, is an extensive brick 
building, formerly the Alms House, which, with the 
buildings formerly the Rotunda and Debtor's Prison, is 
now occupied as follows : 

City Hall, No. 2. 



West End. 
Basement, Watch House. 

First Floor. 
Police Office. 
Office of the Clerk of the 

Court of Sessions. 
District Attorney's Office. 

Second Floor. 
Sessions Court Room. 
Grand Jury Room. 
Witnesses' Room and Petit 
Jury Room. 



Centre Door. 
Office of Commissioners of 

the Alms House. 
Committee Room, &c. 

East End. 
U. S. Court Rooms. 
Clerk's Office. 
Marshall's Office. 
Judges' Chamber. 

Third Floor. 
Keeper's Room, 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS, GAS WORKS, Scc. 



21 



Hall of Records, (formerly 
Debtor^ s Prison.) 

First Floor. 
Register's Office. 
Collectors of Assessments. 
Surrogate's Office. 



Second Floor. 

Street Commissioner's Of- 
fice. 

Comptroller's Office. 

Water Commissioners' Of- 
fice. 

Rotunda. 
Marine Court. 



ALMS HOUSE. 

The new Alms House is situated at Bellevue, on the 
East River, two and a half miles from the City Hall, and 
is a spacious edifice of stone, with numerous huildings as 
appendages. The location is remarkably salubrious and 
pleasant. There are several farms on Long Island, at- 
tached to the Alms House establishment. 

(For other Public Buildings, see Index.) 

GAS WORKS. 

The New-York Gas Light Company have their works 
located at the corner of Canal and Centre streets, and 
have at present laid down, in the principal streets, about 
26 miles of iron pipes. The public buildings and stores 
which are supplied with gas by this Company, pay for 
the same at the rate of 70 cents per 100 cubic feet con- 
sumed. The expense of gas for a store, with four lights, 
is about $60 per year. (For capital, &c., see page ISK) 

THE MANHATTAN GAS LIGHT COMPANY WORKS 

Are located on the North River at the footof Eighteenth- 
st. This Company have laid their main pipes through 
Eighteenth-street, Ninth-avenue, Hudson, Bleecker-st. 
Sixth-avenue, Waverly-place, Broadway, Bowery, 
Broome, Centre, and Grand streets ; and are now laying 
them through other important streets. 

They expect to furnish the citizens in the upper 
parts of the City with a full supply of pure Gas within 
the current year. 

HARLEM RAIL ROAD. 

The New-York and Harlsem Rail Road Company was 
incorporated in 1831, with a capital of $350,000, for tlie 



22 HARLEM RAIL ROAD. 

purpose of constructing a Rail Road, from the central 
part of the. city to Harla?ni. The route selected extends 
from Prince-street, in the Bowery, along the line of the 
Fourth Avenue, 7| miles to Harleeni. The road is com- 
pleted from Prince-street to Yorkville, 5 miles ; a single 
track is laid on granite sleepers, in the best manner, 
from Prince-street to Union Place, when a double track 
commences, and which is laid on granite sleepers to 
Twenty-third-street, and on wood as far as Eighty- 
fourth-street, or Yorkville, (except a part of the distance, 
which as yet is only complete with one track.) 

The road was begun to be used as far as Murray Hill 
in June, 1833 ; and up to Feb., 1834, the total number of 
passengers carried, was 89,094. For several months 
cars drawn by horses have been in operation from 
Prince-street to Yorkville, and they now run as often as 
once in each half hour every day in the week. The fare 
for each passenger is 12^ cents, and the daily expenses of 
each car is computed at $2,75, exclusive of wear and 
tear. 

The excavations and deep cuttings, through the solid 
rock, and the extensive embankments over valleys, on 
the line of this Rail Road, are well worthy of observation. 
An excursion to Yorkville is at once pleasant and 
cheap. 

At Yorkville the company have erected a splendid 
Hotel, which at present is kept by George Nowlan. It 
is a spacious two story building, 80 feet in length by 30 
feet in width, having a piazza around both stories. The 
elevation is 125 feet above tide water, commanding a 
view of the surrounding country, Hell-gate, and the 
East River, that has no equal on the Island. 

SUPPLY OF WATER. 

The City is destitute of a supply of good and whole- 
some water, and various plans have been proposed, at 
different times, for obtaining an adequate quantity of an 
element so essential to the health, convenience, and 
comfort of the citizens. The Bronx and Croton rivers 
have been suggested as sources of supply ; also the Pas- 
saic, at Paterson, New-Jersey. The quantity of water 



SUPPLY OF WATER. 



23 



required for the supply of the City, is estimated at over 
four millions of gallons per day or 20 g:allons for each 
person, including manufactories, stables, &c. At an 
early period of the history of the City, it was found that 
the Well water was deteriorating in goodness. The fact 
is noticed in an able report made by Mr. Weston, in 
1799. There are numerous wells, with pumps in all 
parts of the City; but the pump water is generally con- 
sidered bad and deleterious in its character, south of a 
line from the Hudson River through Spring-street, 
to the Bowery and Third Avenue, and thence to 
Thirteenth-street and the East River. In the remaining 
parts of the City, it is generally indifferently good ; but 
it is also annually losing its purity. 

For washing, rain water is generally used by the citi- 
zens, most of the houses being provided with good cis- 
terns. Many parts of the City are now supplied with 
water, for the table, brought from the upper wards in 
casks. On the East and North Rivers, in some instances, 
it is pure, and in others, its goodness is but little better 
than the present well water. The tables of the wealthy 
are supplied from this source, while the poorer classes 
have to resort to such wells and pumps as are in their 
neighbourhood. It has been ascertained that there are 
now brought to the City daily by drays or water carts, 
600 hogsheads, for which there is paid one dollar and 
twenty-five cents for each hogshead, (or about one cent 
per gallon,) amounting to $750 per day, or $273,750 per 
annum, for water from that source. The sum paid for 
water is annually increasing, owing to wells and springs 
constantly losing their purity. Many of the large hotels 
pay from $200 to $450, annually, for water, and the 
smaller classes of boarding and private houses pay from 
$15 to $50, annually, for the same. 

The shipping in the port are principally supplied with 
water from Brooklyn, Long Island, and a small quantity 
from New-Jersey and Staten Island. The supply re- 
quired for the shipping, is estimated, from careful in- 
quiries, to amount to 415 hogsheads per day, or 129,895 
hhds. per year, (8,183,895 gallons,) which at 31 and 50 



24 



SUPPLY OF WATER. 



cents per hogshead, is $160 per day, or $50,080 paid per 
year. 

MANHATTAN WATER WORKS. 

In 1799 the Manhattan Company was incorporated, 
with a view to supply the City with pure and whole- 
some water. The charter is perj)etual, and the capital 
over two millions of tlollars, (see page 9o,) the surplus 
funds being emi)loyed in banking. 

Tlie Company have, by the charter, the control over 
the streams and springs on New-York Island, and the 
county of Westchester, for the above object. 

Their works are situated in Reed-street, a short dis- 
tance north of the City Hall. The water is raised by two 
steam engines, from a well in Cross-street, twenty-five 
feet in diameter, to a reservoir in Chambers-street, eleva- 
ted 15 feet above Broadway, from whence the water is 
distributed in iron and wooden pipes lO the lower parts of 
the City. In 1823, the slcam engines worked 16 hours 
per day, and raised in 24 hours, 691 ,200 gallons. 25 miles 
of pipes were then down, and 2000 houses, besides ma- 
nufactories, itc, were supplied by the Company, who 
had expended $400,000 in constructing the works. The 
well, from which the water is obtained, was the old Tea 
Water pump, and the water was formerly considered 
the best on the island. That it has greatly deteriorated 
in quality, appears from the following analysis, made in 
183J, of a gallon of the Manhattan water: 

Muriate of Soda, 45.20 

Muriate of Magnesia, 40.00 

Sulphate of Magnesia, 6.00 

Carbonate of Lime, with a little Carbo- 
nate of Magnesia, 12.80 

Sulphate of Lime, 4.00 

Extracti^ e matter, combined with water,. 17.80 

Mass in a gallon of water, 125.80 

The Manhattan Company, since 1823, have employed 
Mr. Disbrow to construct a well near the corner of 
Bleecker-street and Broadway. Its diameter is 8 inches, 
and its depth is 442 feet, containing 1154 gallons. 



WATER, CITY RESERVOIR. 



25 



WATEK COMPANIES NOT IN OPERATION. 

The following companies have been at different times 
incorporated by the Legislature of this State, for_ the 
purpose of supi)lying the City with water, but are neither 
of them in operation, nameh — The Sharon Canal Com- 
pany, incorporated in 18x;3; The New- York Water 
Works, incorporated in 1825; Harlccm Spring Water 
Company, incorporated in 1827. 

CITY RESERVOIR. 

The Corporation of the City, in order to provide a 
supply of water for a part of the City, for the extinguish- 
ment of fires, have recently caused the construction of an 
extensive reservoir, which is situated in Thirteenth- 
street, near the Bowery. 

The diameter of the well, from which the water is pro- 
cured, is 16 feet ; its depth is 112 feet, 97 of which are ex- 
cavated in solid rock ; its bottom is 62 feet below common 
high tide. On the east side, and within 12 feet of the 
bottom of the well, there is a horizontal passage, 4 feet 
by 6, extending into the rock 75 feet ; and on the west 
side, a similar passage, 75 feet long, with a branch 25 
feet. The object of these excavations, is to increase the 
quantity of water, which rises in the well to within 12 
feet of the surface of tlie ground, and the whole contains 
175,170 gallons. 

From the well, the water is raised by a steam engine 
of 12 horse power, into an iron tank in a building of an 
octagonal form. The bottom of the tank is 83^ feet above 
tide. It is 44 feet in diameter, 20^ feet high, and will 
contain 233,169 gallons. From the tank, the water is 
conducted into the mains by curved jiipes, of 20 inches 
diameter. The total cost of the works, exclusive of 
pipes, was $42,233 ; and the annual expense is $3,165. 
From the reservoir, iron pipes, from 6 to 12 inches in 
diameter, have been laid down through many of the 
principal streets, to the extent of over 9 miles, or 47,066 
feet, at an average expense of about two dollars i)er fool. 



26 SUPPLY OF WATER. 

(The cost of one mile of pipe, of 12 inches diameter, is 
$11,345.) 

By an experiment which has been made, it is ascer- 
tained that water from the City Reservoir can be thrown 
from the fire plugs over the houses in any of the lower 
parts of the City, or south of the reservoir, or in its vi- 
cinity. 

PROPOSED SUPPLY OF WATER FROM THE CROTON 
AND BRONX RIVERS. 

Surveys of routs and estimates of the expense of 
bringing water to the City from tlie Croton and Bronx 
Rivers, have been recently made by order of the Cor- 
poration. An Act passed the Legislature of the State, 
May 2, 1834, " to provide for supplying the City of New- 
York with pure and wholesome water," by which the 
Governor and Senate are authorized to appoint five citi- 
zens, to be called " Water Commissioners," who are to 
examine andconsider all matters relating to the subject, 
cause surveys to be made, and adopt such plans as they 
may deem most advantageous.* Said Commissioners 
are to report to the Common Council, who,if they approve 
thereof, are to cause the opinion of the electors of the 
city to be taken at the next charter election by ballots 
of "yes" and "no." If a majority of the electors are 
found to be in favour of the measure, the Common Council 
are authorized to raise by loan $2,500,000. 

The united streams which can be brought to, the City 
in an aqueduct are estimated to afford a daily supply 
of 32 millions of gallons. The present demand of 
the City is probably not more than 6 millions. The total 
length of the aqueduct, which it is proposed to construct 
of mason work, will be about 47 miles, and the estimated 
expense (exclusive of pipes in the City) is from five to 
six millions of dollars. 

CEMETERIES AND MONUMENTS. 

In 1823, a law was passed to prevent interments south 
of Grand-street, and a penalty of $250 fixed for each 
violation of the same. 

* For their names, see page 32. 



CEMETERIES AND MONUMENTS. 27 

Many of the churches have burying grounds and vaults 
in the upper part of the City, belonging to congregations 
of different denominations. An extensive cemetery has 
been laid out on the Fifth Avenue, near the three mile 
stone, containing 10 acres of ground. Occasional inter- 
ments take place in the vaults belonging to families at- 
tached to churches in the lower part of the City, the 
friends of the deceased paying the penalty of $250. An 
ordinance has been recently adopted, directing the ex- 
tension of Pine-street across Broadvi^ay, through Trinity 
churchyard, one of the most ancient cemeteries in the 
City. 

Among the numerous monuments in churches and 
churchyards, we may name the following. The monu- 
ment to Bishop Hobart, in Trinity Church; to Thomas 
Addis Emmet, (an obelisk 30 feet high) in St. Paul's 
churchyard, where are also the monuments to Major 
Gen. Montgomery, and George Frederick Cooke the 
celebrated tragedian. In Trinity churchyard is the 
monument to Capt. James Lawrence, who fell in the 
contest between the U. S. frigate Chesapeake and the 
British frigate Shannon, during the last war. 

CHARTER OFFICERS. 

Cornelius W. Lawrence, Mayor. — Salary, $3000. 
Richard Riker, Recorder, Fees. 

Common Council. 
Wards, board of aldermen, board of assistants. 

1 John L Labagh, John J. Boyd, 

2 Edward Taylor, Horace Holden, 

3 James Monroe, President, William S. Johnson, 

4 Hubert Van Wagenen, Samuel Sparks, 

5 Robert C. Cornell, Robert Smith, 

6 James Ferris, James Ballagh, 

7 Gilbert Hopkins, John W. Lamb, 

8 Joseph Tucker, Fred. A. Tallmadge, 

9 John Bolton, John Delamater, 
10 Gideon Ostrander, Samuel Purdy, 



28 



CITY OFFICERS. 



11 Francis Fickett, 

12 Isaac L. Varian, 

13 John Lovett, 

14 William C. Wales, 

15 Silas M. Stillwell, 

Wards. Assessors. 

1 John Simonson, 

2 Samuel Gilford, jr., 

3 Isaac Graham, 

4 Linus W. Stevens, 

5 Asher Martin, 

6 Clarkson Crolius, 

7 David Lyon, 

8 Wm. M'Lean,jr., 

9 Jacob Bogert, 

10 Pine Hopkins, 

11 William Gage, 

12 Stephen Mead, 

13 William Smith, 

14 Enoch Dean, 

15 John L. Ireland, 



Thomas H. White, 
Isaac Dyckman, 
Alexander Stewart, 
Lambert Suydam, 
George W. Bruen, Preset. 



William H. Walsh, 
Elam Williams, 
John W. Degrauw, 
Elijah W. Nichols, 
James W. Westervelt, 
George Mills, 
W. H. Barnes, 
Richard Wright, 
Nathaniel Jarvis, 
Wm. W. Wetmore, 
W^illiam Lee, 
Samuel Bailly, 
Geo. R. Hubbard, 
Eleazer S. Lazarus, 
Alba Kimball. 



Wards. 

1 Daniel I. Ebbets, 

2 Brigham Howe, 

3 Abraham King, 

4 William Benjamin, 

5 John Black, 

6 Martin Waters, 

7 Morris Oakley, 

8 Caleb Crane, 

Wards. 



Collectors. 



9 Abraham Miller, 

10 Stephen Wheaton, 

11 C. Van Benschoten, 

12 James Devoe, 

13 Thomas Sanford, 

14 Charles Osborne, 

15 J. B. Lester. 



Constables. 



1 Robert Graham, 

2 Alexander V^edder, 

3 Silas Morehouse, 

4 James W. Green, 

5 Henry R. Shanklin, 

6 J. W. Somerindyke, 

7 Leonard Dunkley, 



William Jessup, 
John Wintringham, 
Cornelius Allison, 
Andrew Farr, 
Thomas Jeffery, 
Wm. M'Donald, 
Ebenezer Sturgea, 



CITY OFFICERS. 29 



8 Abraham Franklin, Elisha Lippincolt, 

9 Josejih J. Blauvelt, James W. Allen, 

10 John Carpenter, Joseph Lockwood, 

11 Benjamin Robinson, William P. Slason, 

12 James Woodhull, Isaac VV. Hadley, 

13 Nehemiah Ludlam, John F. Russell, 

14 Sands Lane, James Edginton, 

15 Thomas G. Mantle, Philip Becannon. 

COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Jacob Westervelt, Sheriff. 
William H. Bunn, Register. 
Abraham Asten, Clerk. 
Andrew Warner, Deputy Clerk. 
John Colvill, Coroner. 

OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE COMMON 
COUNCIL. 

Salary. 

Jacob Morton, Clerk of Common Council^ $2000 

D. D. Williamson, Assistant Clerk of C. C 1250 

Jacob Hays, Sergeant at Arms, 250 

Redwood Fisher, Clerk of Board of Assistants,.. 1400 
George B. Butler, Assista7it Clerk oj Board of 

Assistants, 250 

David T. Valentine, Sergeant at Arms, 500 

John Ahern, Mayor's Clerk, 1000 

John Fleming, Chamberlain, 500 

Tallman J. Waters, Comptroller, 2500 

William Thompson, Deputy Comptroller, 1 500 

Abraham Miller, Collector of Arrears of Taxes, 

15 per cent. Commission. 

James Lynch, Corporation Attorney, fees 

Robert Emmet, Counsel, fees 

Alpheus Sherman, Public Administrator, 1250 

George B. Smith, Street Commissioner, 3000 

Edward Doughty, Assistant Street Commissioner, 2000 
Jacob Warner, 1st Clerk to Street Commissioner, 750 
James B. Glentworth, 2d Clerk to Street Com- 
missioner, ^0^ 



30 



CITY OFFICERS. 



Jefferson Berrian, Superintendent of Streets^ 1600 

Samuel Fickett, Superintendent oj Wharves,.... 800 

John Butler, Superintendent of Stages, 750 

Henry Storms, Superintendent of Hackney 

Coaches, 800 

Garrit Forbes, City Inspector, 1000 

John Williamson, Assistant City Inspector, 1000 

Benjamin G. Wells, Superintendent of Building,. 1200 

William S. Smith, Collector of City Revenue,... 1500 

James Gulick, Chief Engineer, 1000 

Uzziah Wenman, Water Purveyor, 750 

James H. Kipp, Ballast Master, fees 

David J. Burger, Regulator of Public Clocks,. .. 200 
Elias Hatfield, Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Benjamin Watson, Register of' Dogs, fees 

Cornelius Schuyler, Keeper of Patterns Field,... 821 

Abraham B. Martling, Keeper of City Hall, 400 

George W. Skellorn, Deputy of do 1000 

Hugh O'Hare, Keeper of the Park, 365 

John J. Shoemaker, Keeper of the Battery, 273 

Benjamin Ogden, M. D., Resident Physician,. . . . 1500 

Jameson Cox, Superintendent of the Alms House, 1600 

William Mandeville, Philip W. Engs, Joseph Hoxie, 
George S. Doughty, Samuel Stevens, Commissioners of 
the Alms House. 



STREET INSPECTORS. 

(Salaries $730 each.) 



Wards. 

1 William Lawson, 

2 John Hill, 

3 John C. Talman, 

4 Nicholas B. Lyon, 

5 Adrian B. Holmes, 

6 Daniel M'Grath, 

7 Daniel Devoe, 

8 Stillwell J. Douglass, 



Wards. 
9 J. Traphagen, 

10 John Stihvell, 

11 Abraham Hatfield, 

12 Cornelius Hibbard, 

13 Jonah Randell, 

14 Peter Field, 

15 Hiram Buchanan, 



CITY OFFICERS. 31 



OFFICERS ASSIGNED BY THE MAYOR TO ATTEND AT THE 
POLICE OFFICE, AND EXECUTE THE ORDERS OF THE 
MAGISTRATES, VIZ : — 

Jacob Hays, High Constable, $500. 
Benjamin I. Hays, William F. Stevenson, James 
Dewey, Joseph M. Thomas, Dennis Brink, Chester 
Huntmgton, William H. Sparks, Henry W. Merritt, 
Thomas Cornell, Francis Tiilou, John Dunshee, Zebulon 
Homan, Thomas L. Collins. 

MARSHALS. 

John Sidell, First Marshal, $900. 
Criminal Process. 
Nathaniel Asten, Denis Brink, Leonard Baum, Cyrus 
Bedell, Thomas M. Collins, James R. Carter, Thomas 
Cornell, Stephen W. Dusenbury, James Dewey, John 
Dunshee, James Ennis, James B. Ebbets, Benjamin I. 
Hays, Joseph L. Hays, Chester Huntington, John S. 
Hardenbrook, William A. Hardenbrook, James Healey, 
Leonard HotYiiian, Zebulon Homan, Isaac Haring, Wm. 
King, Daniel Lyon, Hart Levi, William Lawrence, Thos. 
M. Lyon, William Lawson, Henry W. Merritt, Anthony 
Morris, L-a Munson, John M'Gowan, Percival Place, 
John F. Purdy, Daniel Riker, Frederick Ryer, Samuel 
G. Reeder, William H. Sparks, William F. Stevenson, 
William Schureman, Cornelius Stagg, A. M. C. Smith, 
John Stewart, James S. Smith, Joseph G. Stanson, 
Benjamin F. Tompkins, Joseph M. Thomas, Francis 
Tiilou, Thomas M. Tompkins, James H. Welch. 

Civil Process. 
George Anderson, James Burgess, Jason M. Bass, 
John F. Bailey, Abraham Bensel, William Coghlan, 
Charles Denike, John M. Devoy, Nathan Dusenbury, 
Charles ]VL Day, Richard Ellis, Joseph W. Finch, Ben- 
jamin Ferris, Peter Field, Ezra Frost, Amos Gore, John 
S. Jenkins, Elisha Kingsland, Robert Lewis, Lawrence 
Lavin, Isaac Labagh, jr., Abraham Maddan, Stephen 
M'Cormick, Charles M'Dermot, Patrick Mangam, Daniel 



32 



CITY OFFICERS. 



M'Grath, Thomas 3rCreacly, John Nixon, William 
R. Newton, Elisha Norcror^s, James M. Oakley. David 
W. Ostrander, John Peck, William Primrose, John Ris- 
ley, John P. Raymond, George M. Seelye, Richard D. 
Simonsou, Philip Smith, Samuel Stevenson, Joseph S. 
Simson, George Simi;son, Henry Sickles, James M. 
Smith, Samuel Tyler, Samuel Trenchard, David P. 
Valentine, Michael" R. Walsh, John R. Wheeler. 

CITY SCRVEYORS. 

Joseph F. Bridges, E. V/. Bridges, Edward Doughty, 
William B. Doughty, John Ewen, Daniel Ewen,R()se\ve"ll 
Graves, jr., A. IVI. rloftman, Isaac T. Ludlam, Thomas 
R. Ludlam, Silas Ludlam, George B. Smith, Edwin. 
Smith, Reuben Spencer, Wni. H. Sidell. 

COJIMISSIONERS OF THE SCHOOL FUND. 

fVards. V/ards. 



9 Levi Kidder, 

10 Peter S. Titus, 

11 William Thompson, 
1-2 A. Wagstaff, 

13 E. D. Comstock, 

14 Charles S. Dusenberry, 

15 Michael Burnham. 



1 Cornelius Hceny, 

2 Samuel Gilford, jr., 

3 William A. See iy, 

4 Samuel N. Dodge, 

5 Lebbeus Chapman, 

6 John Gray, 

7 Joseph Piggotj 
'S Cornelius Harsen, 

DEPUTY CLERKS OF MARKETS. 

Leonard Baum, Washington Market. 
John Bremner, Catliariiic Market. 
George Duryea, Fidton Market. 
Thomas Cooper, Centre Market. 
James Gilbert, Clintou Market. 
Matthew \ ogal, Gotivemeur Market. 
James Seaman, Manhattan Market.. 
Jacob Manholt, Franklin Market. 
John Marline, Tompkins Market. 
Peter Valentine, Greenwich Market. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

(Appointed by the Governor and Senate. ^ 

Stephen Allen, Benjamin ]\r. Brown, Charles Dusen 
berry, Saul Alley, William W. Fox. 



33 



COURTS. 

UNITED STATES DISTRICT AND CIRCUIT 

COURTS, FOR THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF THE 
STATE OF NEW-YORK. 

Smith Thompson, Circuit Judge Office, City Hall.* 

Samuel R. Betts, District Judge do. do. 

Frederic J. Bells, Clerk do. do. 

William C. H.Waddell, Marshal.... do. do. 
, District Attorney . . do. do. 

The Courts are held at the City Hall, in the City of 
New-York, as follows — 

Circuit Court. — Judges Thompson, (of the United 
States Supreme Court,) and Belts. Equity and Crimi- 
nal Tcrm.s. — Last Monda}' in February and July. Ge- 
ncral Terms. — First Monday in April, and last Monday 
in October. 

District Court. — Judge Betts. First Tuesday in every 
month. 

[TF United States Commissioner's Office, to take affi- 
davits, bail, &c City Hall. 

COURTS OF THE STATE OF NEW- YORK. 

THE COURT OF ERRORS, 

Composed of the Senate, the Chancellor, and Judges 
of the Supreme Court of the State, is held, generally, at 
Albany ; but sometimes, by adjournment, at the City 
Hall, in this City. 

THE COURT OF CHANCERY 

Is held by the Chancellor, (Hon. R. H. Walworth, 
who resides at Albany,) as appointed by him, two stated 
terms in each year, at Albany, and the same oa thti 



* In the building commonly known as the new City Hall, formerly the 
Alms House. All the buildings in the Fark, used for the purpose of CourtSj 
are, in law, designated "City Kail." 



34 COURTS. 

fourth Monday in May, and fourth Monday m October, 
in this City, at the City Hall. Motion Days. — First and 
third Tuesdays of every month during the vacations, at 
the Capitol, in the City of Albany. 
John Walworth, Assistant Register, (in Chancery,) 

Office, No. 528 City Hall. 
Hiram Walworth, Deputy do. do. do. do. 
William T. M'Coun, Vice Chancellor for the First 

Circuit. 
John Walworth, Clerk. 
Charles Edwards, Reporter. 

Stated Terms. — First Mondays in January, April, 
July, and October, at the City Hall. Motion Days. — 
Second and fourth Tuesdays, at the City flail, iu tlie 
City of New-York, 

SUPREME COURT. 

John Savage, Chief Justice... .Residence, Albany. 
Jacob Sutherland, Justice. ... do. do. 

Samuel Nelson, do do. Cooperstown. 

Wra. P. Hallett, Clerk for New-York, Office, City Hall. 
John Fairlie, Deputy Clerk. 

This Court sits alternately at Albany, New-York, and 
Utica. The May term is held at the City Hall, in New- 
York. 

CIRCUIT COURT. 

Ogden Edwards, Judge of the First Circuit. 

Terms. — First Monday in March, first Monday in 
May, second Monday in September, third Monday in 
November, at the City Hall. 

COURT OF OYER AND TERMINER, 

In the City and County of New-York, is held by one 
or more Justices of the Supreme Court, or of the Circuit 
Judges, or by the First Judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas of the Counly, together with the Mayor, Recorder, 
and Aldermen, or any two of them. 

Henry Meigs, Clerk. 

Henry Vandervoort, Deputy Clerk. 



COURTS. 35 



SUPERIOR COURT. 

Samuel Jones, Chief Justice. 
Josiah O. Hofi'man, Justice. 
Thomas J. Oakley,. -do. 
David P. Hall, Reporter. 
Charles A. Clinton, Clerk. 
W. C. Baldwin, Deputy Clerk." 

The regular terms of this Court are the first Monday 
of each month. January, March, May, July, September, 
and November, are terms for the trial of causes by Jury. 
February, April, June, August, October, and December, 
are law terms. Inquests are taken in the second week 
of each law term. 

COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, FOR THE CITY AND COUNTY 
OF NEW-YORK. 

John T. Irving, First Judge. 

Mayor, Recorder, and Aldermen of the city. 

Ex officiis, Judges. 
Abraham Asten, Clerk. 
Andrew Warner, Deputy Clerk, 

The Court sits, for the trial of issues, on the third 
Monday in every month, (except August, when no Jury 
is summoned.) Terms continue a fortnight. 

surrogate's court. 
James Campbell, Surrogate. 

Open every day for the proving of wills, granting ad- 
ministrations, appointment of guardians, «Scc., No. 3 Hall 
of Record. 

COURT OF general SESSIONS 

Meets on the first Monday in every month, and con- 
tinues until Saturday of the third week thereafter. 
Held by the Recorder and two Aldermen. 

THE SPECIAL SESSIONS 

Are held the first Friday after the adjournment of the 
General Sessions, and the Tuesdays and Fridays there- 



36 COURTS. 

after, until the next meeting of the General Sessions, 
by the Recorder and two Aldennen. 
"Henry Meigs, Clerk of the General and Special 
Sessions. 

Henry Vandervoort, Deputy Clerk, 
(n? The Court of Sessions is held in the new City 
Hall. 

MARINE COURT. 

This Court is held daily, (except Sundays,) in the 
Rotunda, for the trial of causes between $25 and $100, 
and for controversies between Shipmasters, Shipowners, 
and Seamen to any amount. 

Judah Hammond, John B. Scott, and Effingham 
Schieffelin, Justices. 

John Barberie, Clerk. 

justices', or ward courts. 

First District, for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Wards. Office, rear 
144 Fulton-street. — Eber Wheaton, Justice. — Ambrose 
Kirtland, Clerk. 

Second District, for 4th and 6th Wards. Office, 9 
Duane, near William-street. — Elisha Morrill, Justice. — 
Abraham Tucker, Clerk. 

Third District, for 5th, 8th, and 14th Wards. Office, 
47 Howard-street, near Broadway. — William W. Cowan, 
Justice. — Peter See, Clerk. 

Fourth District, for 7th, and 10th Wards. Office, Divi- 
sion, opposite Norfolk-street. — Charles M'Evven, J ustice. 
— James Lozier, Clerk. 

Fifth District, for 9th, 11th, and 15th Wards. Office, 
corner Bowery and Third-street. — Anthony Woodward, 
Justice. — Robert L. Jaques, Clerk. 

12th Ward. Office, corner Nineteenth-street and 
Third Avenue. — James Flanagan, Justice. Office, at 
Harlaem. — John Doughty, Justice. 



PRISONS. 37 



POLICE OFFICES. 

In tlie new City Hall. 

John VV. Wyman, "i 

James Hopson, > Special Justices. 

Oliver M.LrOwnds, ) 

Resolvert Stephens, Clerk. 

Eiias Hicks, Assistant Clerk. 
Corner of the Bowery and Third-street. 

John M. Macdonald, Special Justice. 

Joshua L. Pell, Clerk. 

Jacob Hays, High Constable. 



The present number of Watchmen is about six hun- 
dred ; one half of whom are on duty each night, com- 
mencing at 7 o'clock, P. IM., in winter, and at 9, P. M., in 
summer. The annual expense to the City for wages, 
&c., of the Watch, is about $100,000. 

The Watch Houses are located as follows — 

First. — In the basement of the new City Hall. 

Second. — No. 22 Eldridge, near Walker-street. 

Third. — Wooster, corner of Prince-street. 



PRISONS. 

PENITENTIARY. 

One building, situated at Bellevue, two and a half 
miles north-east of the City Hall; another at Black- 
well's Island, in the East River, four miles from the 
City Hall, in the same direction. There were confined 
in the above Prisons, on the 25th January, 1834, five hun- 
dred and seventy-seven prisoners, viz. — three hundred 
and thirty-eight males, two hundred and thirty-nine fe- 
males, including twenty -eight female State prisoners; 
of whom two hundred and one were foreigners. 

John O. Woodrufl", Keeper of Penitentiary. 

Jacob Hardenbrook, Assistant . . do . . do. 

Joseph Tyson, do do. . do. 



38 ALMS HOUSE. 



BRIDEWELL, 

Situated at Bellevue, is a part of the building now 
used as the Female Penitentiary. Criminals convicted 
of petit larceny, &c., are confined here; also, prisonera 
before trial, amounting in all, January 25th, 1834, to 
seventy-two. 

CITY PRISON, 

Situated in the Park, near the City Hall, (formerly the 
Bridewell,) is now used as a temporary place of con- 
finement, for prisoners of different grades, before convic- 
tion, and such debtors as are liable to confinement under 
the existing laws. 

George B. Thorp, Keeper. 

Dr. William Rockwell, Physician. 

HOUSE OF REFUGE, 

Situated about two and a half miles north of the City 
Hall, is under the control of the Society for the Refor- 
mation of Juvenile Delinquents, incorporated in 1825, 
and has been attended with very salutary effects. [See 
Benevolent Institutions. '\ 

Nathaniel C. Hart, Superintendent. VV. Sampson, 
Assistant Superintendent. Rebecca Oram, Matron. 
Clarissa Nichols, Assistant Matron. Monmouth B. 
Hart, Teacher. 



AlilTIS HOUSE, 

Situated at Bellevue, contained, January 25th, 1834, 
two thousand and eleven inmates, viz. — seven hundred 
and sixteen men, six hundred and forty-six women, four 
hundred and seven boys, and two hundred and forty-two 
girls; of which number one thousand and fifty-one were 
natives, and nine hundred and sixty foreigners. Total 
increase, since January, 1833, one hundred and eighty- 
four. — John Targee, George Lovett, James J. Roosevelt, 
jr., Thomas T. Woodruff, Gideon Ostrander, Commis- 
sioners. J. Cox, Secretary. Dr. Benjamin Ogden, Phy- 
sician. Josiah Mann, Agent. William P. Elting, Clerk, 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 39 

new City Hall. E. M. Guion, do., Bellevue. William 
Schuremau, Out-door Visiter. Jameson Cox, Superin- 
tendent. 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL, 

(Connected with the Alms House.) 

The number in this establishment, on the 25th of Jan- 
uary, 1834, was two hundred and forty-four, viz. — Sixty 
nine male patients, fifty-seven female, do. — Fifty-three 
male maniacs, fifty-one female do., and twelve nurses; 
of which number, one hundred and seventy-four were 
foreiarners. 



FIRX: DEPARTMENT. 

There are in the City fifty-six Fire Engines, most of 
which are in complete order; and attached to them are 
upwards of twelve thousand feet of hose, and about thir- 
teen hundred Firemen, twenty-six men being considered 
a complement to each Engine. There are also six Hook 
and Ladder Companies, with a complement of one hun- 
dred and thirty-six men, and five Hose Carts, with ten 
men each, and six hundred feet of Hose each; also a 
Company to take charge of the Hydrants in time of Fire, 
with twenty men, making in all, when the vacancies are 
filled, upwards of fifteen hundred Firemen. 



ENGINEERS. 



James Gulick, Chief. 
John M. Sands, 
Thomas D. Howe, 
Drake B. Palmer, 



John Riker, jr. 
Jacob A. Roome, 
Edward Hoffmire, 
David T. Williams. 



BOAR© OF IIEA1.TH:. 

The Board of Health consists of the Mayor, Recorder, 
and Aldermen of the City, any five of whom constitute a 
quorum for the transaction of business. The officers are, 

His Honour, the Mayor, President. 

Jacob Morton, Secretary. 



40 MILITARY. 



HEALTH COMMISSIONERS. 
(Office, No. 5 City Hall.) 

Dr. John S. Westervelt, Health Officer. 
Dr. James R. Mauley, Resident Physician. 
Dr. Smith Cutter, Health Commissioner. 
James H. Ward, Agent. 



MI1.ITARY. 

THE FIRST DIVISION OF NEW-YORK STATE ARTILLERY, 

Composed of uniform troops, is commanded by Major 
Gen. Jacob Morton, and consists of — 

Tba First Brigade, doing duty with muskets, under the 
command of Brig. Gen. Moore, amounting to about 
sixteen hundred men. 

The Sixth Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. C, W. 
Sandford, of about one thousand men. 

A regiment doing duty with muskets, and two compa- 
nies of lancers, under the command of Col. Morris, of 
about six hundred men. 

A regiment of horse artillery, commanded by Brig. 
Gen. Arcularius, of one hundred and fifty men. 

Total Artillery, 3,350 men. 

THE SECOND DIVISION OF INFANTRY, 

Commanded by Major Gen. B. M. Van Buren, con- 
sists of — 

The Third Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. Mount, 
of about twenty ^five hundred men, including the uni- 
formed regiment of Washington Guards. The remain- 
der of this division extends through the counties of 
Kings and Richmond, embracing Staten Island and a 
part of Long Island. 

THE THIRD DIVISION OF INFANTRY, 

Commanded by Major Gen. Augustus Fleming, con- 
sists of — 

The Tenth Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. 
Doughty, of about two thousand men, including the 
uniformed battalion of President's Guards. 



COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AND SCHOOLS. 41 

The Fifty-ninth Brisfade, commanded by Brig. Gen. 
Jones, of about twenty-live liundred men. 
Total, 4,500 men. 

THE TWENTY-EIGHTH DIVISION OF INFANTRY, 

Commanded by Major Gen. William Paulding, con- 
sists of — 

The Forty-fifth Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. 
Irving, of about fifteen hundred men. 

The Fifty-eighth Brigade, commanded by Brig Gen. 
Striker, of about twelve hundred men. 

Total, 2,700 men. Making 9,700 Infantry. 

Grand Total, thirteen thousand and fifty; which is 
the probable amount of efiective men that might be 
raised in the City ; (the whole number enrolled is about 
twenty thousand men.) 



COI.I.ECtES, ACAWEMIES, AIVD 

COLUMBIA COLLEGE, 

(Formerly King's College,) 

Is situated on a beautiful square, between Murray, 
Barclay, Church, and Chapel streets, in the City of New- 
York. It was established under a royal charter, in the 
year 1754, which has been confirmed by various acts of 
the Legislature since the revolution, the principal of 
which is that of 13th April, 1787. Its Faculty of Arts 
consists of — 

William A. Duer, LL. D., President. 

Rev. .lohn M'Vickar, S. T. D. Professor of Moral and 
Intellectual Philosophy, Rhetoric, Belles Letires, and 
Political Economy. 

Nathaniel F. Moore, LL. D., Professor of the Greek 
and Latin Languages. 

Charles Anthon, LL.D.jJflj^ Professor of the Greek and 
Latin Languages, and Rector of the Grammar School. 

James Renwick, LL. D., Professor cf Natural and Ex- 
perimental Philosophy and Chemistry. 

James Kent, LL. D., Professor of Law. 



42 COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AND SCHOOLS. 



Henry James Anderson, M. D., Professor of Matht 
matics, Analytical Mechanics, and Physical Astronomy. 

Lorenzo Da Ponte, Professor of the Italian Language 
and Literature. 

Rev. Antoine Verren, Professor of the French Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

Mariano Velazquez de la Cadeno, Professor of the 
Spanish Language and Literature. 

Rev. Samuel H. Turner, D. D., Professor of the He- 
brew Language and Literature. 

The number of Graduates since the establishment of! 
the College, to and including the year 1833, is about 
1,500. There are now in College about 100. 

The Trustees are 24, (when vacancies are filled.) The 
names of the present are — 

Peter A. Jay, Chairman. 



Clement C. Moore, Clerk 
Rt. Rev. Benjamin T. On- 

derdonk, D. D., 
David B. Ogden, 
William Johnson, 
Edward W. Laight, 
John R. Murray, 
Beverley Robinson, 
Thomas L. Ogden, 
John T. Irving, 
David S. Jones, 
Rev. Wm. Creighton, D. D., 



Edward R. Jones, 
Philip Hone, 
Charles King, 
Samuel Boyd, 
Rev. Gardiner Spring, D.D., 
Rev.William Berrian, D.D., 
Ogden Hoffman, 
James Campbell, 
William A. Duer, LL. D., 
John L. Lawrence, 
Thomas W. Ludlow, 
Samuel Ward. 



Commencement, the day following the first Monday in 
October. Vacation, from August 1, to the first Monday 
in October. 

There are two literary societies connected with the 
College, composed of students and graduates, viz. — the 
Peithologian and the Philolexian Societies. 

There is also connected ^v'ith the College a Grammar 
School, subject to the control of the Trustees, and under 
the direction of Professor Anthon, as Rector. The 
school is composed of upwards of two hundred scholars, 
and instruction is given in all branches necessary for ad- 
mission into any College, or for the Counting House. 



COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AND SCHOOLS. 43 

Eight instructors are constantly employed, besides 
one teacher in French, one in Spanish, and one in Ger- 
man and Italian. There is also a primary school at- 
tached to this institution, in which boys from 5 to 10 
years are prepared for the more advanced classes. 

UNlVERSITy OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK 

Was chartered in 1831, and opened for the reception 
of students in October, 1832. The buildings for this in- 
stitution are now being erected, and are situated on the 
East side of Washington Square. The style of the 
architecture is Gothic, the edifice when completed ac- 
cording to the plan, will form one of the most splendid 
ornaments of our city. The number of students the 
present year is two hundred and twenty-six. 

COUNCIL. 

James Tallmadge, President. 

Rev. James Milnor, D. D., Vice President. 

Rev. Archibald Maclay, Secretary. 

Frederick A. Tracy, Treasurer. 

The Mayor of the City, (ex officio.) 
Hon. Samuel R. Betts, Rev. Spencer H. Cone, Rev. 
Samuel H. Cox, D. D., John S. Crary, Hon. Morgan 
Lewis, J. M. Mathews, D. D., William W. Chester, 
William B. Crosby, John Delafield, Dr. Edward Dela- 
field, Gabriel P. Dissosway, Robert Donaldson, George 
Griswold, Moses Allen, J. Prescott Hall, James Lenox, 
Cornelius Baker, Rev. James Milnor, D. D., Rev. Wil- 
liam M'Murray, D. D., Rev. Cyrus Mason, Dr. Valen- 
tine Mott, Waldron B. Post, Charles Starr, Martin E. 
Thompson, Myndert Van Schaick, Stephen Whitney, 
William W. Woolsey. Of the City Corporation — John 
Y. Cebra, John I. Labagh, William Van Wyck, James 
Munroe. 

OFFICERS. 

Rev J. M. Mathews, D. D., Chancellor. 
Rev. Henry P. Tappan, Professor of Moral and Intel- 
lectual Philosophy and Belles Lettres. 



44 COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AND SCHOOLS. 

1 . . .. . ■ I 

D. B. Douglas, Professor of Architecture and Civil I. 
Engineering. 

Rev. John Proudfit and R. B. Patten, Professors ofi 
the Latin and Creek Languages and Literature. 

Rev. George Bush, Professor of the Hebrew Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

Charles W. Hackley, Professor of Mathematics. 

William A. Norton, Professor of Natural Philosophy < 
and Astronomy. 

Lewis C. Beck, M. D., Professor of Chemistry and : 
Botany. 

Rev. William Ernenpeutsch, A. M., Professor of the 
German Language and Literature. 

Miguel Cabrera De Navares, Professor of the Spanish! 
Language and Literature. 

Lorenzo L. Da Ponte, Professor of the Italian Lan^^ ' 
guage and Literature. 

Charles L. Parmantier, A. M., Professor of the French' 
Language and Literature. 

GENERAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF THE PROTESTANT 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES. 

(Corner of Ninth Avenue, and Twenly-first-street) 

Right Rev. Benjamin T. Onderdonk, D. D., Professor 
of the Nature, Ministry, and Polity of the Church. 

OTHER PROFESSORS. 

Rev. Samuel H. Turner, D. D., Professor of Biblical 
Learning and Interpretation of the Scriptures. 

Rev. Bird Wilson, D. D., Professor of Systematic 
Divinity. 

C. C Moore, LL. D., Professor of Oriental and 
Greek Literature. 

Benjamin I. Haight, Librarian. 
Rev. Henry Anthon, D. I)., Secretary. 
Edward R. Jones, Treasurer. 
Annual Commencement, Friday next following the 
last Tuesday in June. 

Commenced operations, 1819. Number of students, 
about sixty. 



COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AND SCHOOLS. 45 

Number of students who have been educated since 
instituted, one hundred and forty-six. 
Library, 3638 volumes. 

mechanics' school. 

(Crosby street.) 

This School was established, in 1820, by the General 
Society of Mechanics' and Tradesmen, for the purpose of 
affording the facilities of education to the children of de- 
ceased or unfortunate members, who might need the aid 
of the society. Pay scholars are also admitted ; the chil- 
dren of members always having the preference. 

Care has been taken to procure teachers of the highest 
respectability, both in the male and female departments, 
and the branches taught, embrace a complete English 
education, including, in the Male Department, architec- 
ture, drawing, designing, and civil engineering ; and in the 
Female Department, painting and drawing. The school 
is under the immediate supervision of a committee of 12 
members, appointed annually by the society. 
Thomas Constantine, Chairman, 
Shivers Parker, Treasurer. 
Charles Starr, Secretary. 

Male Department. Will accommodate two hundred 
and sixty. 

Benjamin Galbraith, Principal. 

William Halleck, William Adams, J. Reeve, Charles 
J. Conway, and W. Wanlass, Assistants. 

Female Department. Will accommodate two hundred. 
Miss Arabella Clark, Principal. 

Miss Cook, Miss Messerve, Miss Chalmers, Miss Ca- 
thell, and Miss Smith, Assistants. 

PRINCIPAL MALE ACADEMIES AND SCHOOLS. 

Washington Institute. Rev. J. D. Wickham, Thir- 
teenth-street. 

La Fayette Institute. William A. Taylor, Ninth-st. 

C. D. Cleveland's Classical School, corner of Broome- 
street and Broadway. 

Forrest and 31 rJligan's Collegiate School, 45 Warren-st. 



46 COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AND SCHOOLS. 

Grammar School of Columbia College. Professor 
Charles Anthon, Rector. James Shea, Principal of tlie 
English Department. 

William J. Adams' Classical and Commercial School, 
72 Murray-street. 

Dr. Barry's Classical Academy, corner of Chambers 
and Church streets. 

William Sherwood's Select Classical School, 206 
Fourth-street. 

D. P. Bacon's Select School, 29 Dey-street. 
U. E. Wheeler, 11 Franklin-street. 
Shepherd Johnson, 554 Broadway. 

Episcopal Collegiate School, 76 Varick-street. Mr. 
Curtis, Principal. 
St.John'sAcademy, Hazleton&Merrill,172Chapel-st. 
Charles Sands, 3 North Moore-street. 
Charles Bishop, Consistory House, Franklin-street. 
Rev. Joseph Carter, 294 Hudson street. 
G. I. Hopper, 50 Spring-street. 
Willard Day, 393 Broome-street. 
J. D. Holbrook, 46 Lumber-street. 
N. Dunn, 144 Fulton-street. 

E. Mundv, 12 Stone-street. 

R. T. Huddart, 7 Beaver-street. 

J. M. Gahagen, Dey-street. 

Rev. Neherniah Brown, comer of Broadway and Reed- 
street. 

John Flint's Classical and English School, 107 Amos-st. 

Rufus Lockwood's Boarding and Day School, Hous- 
ton-street. 

John A. Nash's Classical and Mathematical School, 
110 Bleecker-street. 

Wyckoff and Rand, Houston-street, two doors east of 
Broadway. 

PRINCIPAL FEMALE SEMINARIES. 

Mrs. Okill, 43 and 45 Barclay-street. 
Mrs. E. Smith, 23 Varick-street. 
Madame Chegary, 50 Houston-street. 
Miss Jackson, 178 East Broadway. 



COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, AND SCHOOLS. 47 

Miss Roberts, 43 Walker-street. 

Miss Forbes, 31 North Moore-street. 

Miss Oram, 35 Dey-street. 

Miss M'Clenachan, 13 Carroll-place. 

Miss A. Gilbert, 113 Bleecker-street. 

Mrs. Morris, corner of Asylum and Jane streets. 

Miss Seguine, 50 Warren-street. 

Mrs. Delhoyo, East Broadway. 

Miss Goldsmith, 214 Cherry-street. 

Miss Thomas, 9 Fourth-street. 

Miss Hallet, 186 Fourth-street. 

Misses Coit, 115 Liberty-street. 

Mrs. Russel, 526 Broadway. 

Miss Keo^h, 3 Rivington-street. 

Madam Binsse, 40 Beach-street. 

Mrs. Saffery, 31 St. Mark's-place. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL SOCIETY OF NEW-YORK. 

(Incorporated, April, 1805.) 

Now under the direction of sixty-six trustees, of 
whom — 

Peter A. Jay is President. 
Robert C. Cornell, Vice President. 
Samuel F. Mott^ Treasurer. 
Lindley Murray, Secretary. 
There are at present in this city, fourteen school 
houses, in which are permanently engaged fourteen male, 
and fourteen female teachers, as principals, besides gene- 
ral monitors and monitors. 

Number of pupils taught, 1833, 6140 bovs. 

4320 girls. 



Total, 10,460 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS ARE LOCATED AS FOLLOWS. 

No. 1. Chatham-street, corner Try on-row. 

No. 2. 110 Henry-street, near Pike. 

No. 3. Comer of Hudson and Grove streets. 

No. 4. Rivington-sti-eet, near Pitt. 

No. 5. Mott-street, near Spring. 



48 MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 

— 1 

No. 6. Alms House, Bellevue. 

No. 7. 60 Chrystie-street. 

No. 8. 65 Grand -street. 

No. 9. Bloomingdale. 

No. 10. 125 Duane-street, near Church. 

No. 11. 180 Wooster-tftreet, near Blecckcr. 

No. 12. Seventeenth-street, near Eighth Avenue. 

No. 13. 327 Madison-street, near Scammel. 

No. 14. Corner of Essex and Houston streets. 

ROMAN CATHOLIC FREE SCHOOLS. 

St. Patrick's Cathedral,. . .. boys 120, girls 128 248 

St. Peter's Chun^h, boys 330, girls 300. . . .630 - 

Si. Mary's Church, boys 191, girls 187. . . .378 

Christ Church, boys 274, girls 321 595 

Total, 1851 

INFANT SCHOOL SOCIETY, 

(Inslilutcd Ma}', 1827, under tl;e patronage ol'lhe lale Gov. Clinlon.) 

Mrs. Bethune, First Directress. 

Mrs. Striker, Second Directress. 

Miss H. JNIurray, Treasurer, Laiaht-street. 

Miss Byron, Corresponding Secretary. 

Miss Bleecker, Recording Secretary. 
The society opened its first school, July 16, 1827, 
which serves as a model school and seminary, where 
teachers are trained and qualified for superintending other 
schools. Situated, corner of Canal and Mercer streets. 
Annual subscrijition $1. Life subscription $15. 



MEDICAL. IIVSTITUT50!<fS. 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS IN THE CITY 

OF NEW-YORK. 

(B<'rclay street, near Broadway.) 

This institution was founded in the year 1807, by an 

act o^the legislatur*^ of New-York, at the recommendation 
of the Regents of the University, by whose immediate 
government it is controlled. 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 49 



J. Augustine Smith, M. D., President. 
Thomas Cock, M. D., Vice President. 
Nicoll H. Dering, M. D., Register. 
John Jaques, M. D., Treasurer. 

PROFESSORS. 

John A. Smith, Professor of Anatomy and Physiology. 
Alexander H. Stevens, M. D., Principles and Practice 
of Surgery. 

Valentine Mott, M. D., Surgical Anatomy and Opera- 
tive Surgery. 

Joseph M. Smith, M. D., Professor of the Theory and 
Practice of Physic. 

Edward Delafield, M. D,, Professor of Obstetrics and 
the Diseases of Women and Children. 

John B. Beck, M. D., Professor of Materia Medicaand 
Medical Jurisprudence. 

John Torrey, M. D., Professor of Chemistry and 
Botany. -^ 

Lectures commence on the 1st Monday of November, 
annually, and continue four months. Degrees confer- 
red by the Regents of the University, at the recommen- 
dation of the Board of Trustees. 

This institution has for several years been in a very 
flourishing condition. Number of students for session, 
1833-4, 160. The whole expense for all the courses! 
one hundred dollars. 

NEW YORK EYE INFIRMARY. 

(Founded, 1820.) 

Henry I. Wyckoff, President. 

, 1st Vice President. 

G. Hoyt, 2d Vice President. 
Dr. J. Van Rensselaer, Secretary. 
J. Delafield, Treasurer. 
Surgeons for the Ei/e.—Drs. J. Kearney Rodgers, Ed- 
ward Delafield, James E. Cornell, and George Wilkes. 

Surgeons for the Ear.—Drs. Peter Forrester and Al- 
fred C. Post. 



50 MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 



MED1CA.L SOCIETY OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OP 
NEW-YORK. 

John B. Beck, M. D., President. 
Edward G. Ludlow, M. D., Vice President. 
Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, M. D., Corresponding ; 
Secretary. ' ; 

James T. Croniwell, M. D., Recording Secretary. 

CENSORS. 

Drs. John S. Bowron, William F. Piatt, Alfred C. 
Post, J. Kearney Rodgers, and Henry G. Dimnell. 

Members, four hundred and fifty-two. 

Graduates, 209 ; Licentiates, 93. Total, 302 

The number of physicians and surgeons in the city; 
who are not members of the medical society, is about 
one hundred and fifty. 

NEW-YORK HOSPITAL. 

(Broadway, between Duane and Anthony-streets.) 

Peter A. Jay, President. 
Thomas Buckley, Vice President. 
John Adams, Treasurer. 
Robert J. Murray, Secretary. 
Noah V^'^etmore, Superintendent. 
Thomas W. Ustick, Apothecary. 
John W. Sterling, Clerk and Librarian. 

William Hammersley, M. D., ? Consulting Physicians. 

David Hosack, M. D., ) 

John B. Beck, ai. D., ) . . 

Francis U. Johnson, M. D., > Attending Physicians. 

Joseph M. Smith, M. D., ) . 

James M'Donald, Resident Physician. 

Stephen Wood, M. D., House Physician. 

R. W. Carnes, M. D., Assistant. 

Lorenzo F. Warren, M. D., House Surgeon. 

Thomas Lea Smith, M. D., Assistant. 

Valentine Mott, M. D., ] 

John C. Cheesman, M. D^ I Attending Surgeons. 

J. Kearney Rodgers, M. D., f ^ ^ 

Austin L. S. Main, J 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 



51 



Receipts, $32,023 89. Expenditures, $2/ ,040 53. 

By the last report it appears that, diirme; the year 
1832, there have been 1764 patients admitted into the 
Hospital: who, with 219 patients remaining there on the 
31st December, 1831, make 1983 patients, who have re- 
ceived the benefit of the Institution durmg the year. 

LUNATIC ASYLUM, AT BLOOMINGDALE. 

(Connected with the New-York Hospital.) 

This establishment, (called also Retreat for the In- 
sane,) is situated on a beautiful eminence near Manhat- 
tanville, seven miles from the City hall, and is particu- 
larly worthy the attention of strangers. The ground on 
which the buildings are located, is elevated 150 feet above 
the Hudson River, and from the cupola is a fine prospect 
of the Island, the North and East Rivers, and the adjacent 
country for fifty miles. The principal edifice is of stone, 
three stories hiVh, 210 feet long and 60 feet wide._ About 
eighty acres of land are attached to the establishment, 
some" of which are handsomely laid out in gardens, &c. 
The cost of the whole was over $200,000. 

The numbers in the hospital report, given above, are 
exclusive of the maniac patients, of whom 118 have been 
admitted into the Bloomingdale Asylum, and, with 97 
remaining on the 31st December, 1831, make 215 who 
have received the benefit of the Asylum during the past 
year. Two hundred persons can be accommodated at 
the Asylum. The charges are from $2 to $10 per week, 
for board. Sec. No free patients are admitted. Applica- 
tion for admission of lunatics, must be made at the New- 
York hospital, Broadway, where information can also 
be obtained, respecting the proper time and days, for 
visiting this interesting Institution. 

James M'Donald, Resident Physician. _ 

Committee of six gentlemen. Application for admis- 
sion of patients must be made to some one of tlie com- 

Receipts, in 1832, $18,543 73. Expenditures, $18,650. 



52 MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 

NEW-YORK QUARANTINE HOSPITAL. 

(Slalcn Island.) 

Established by State Act of April 14, 1820. 
John S". Westervelt, Health Officer. 
James R. Manley, Resident Physician. 
Smith Cutter, Health Commissioner. 
James H. Ward, Agent. 
The last officer takes charge of the receipts and ex 
penses. 

, HOSPITAL AT BELLEVUE. 

(For the sick and insane poor.) 

Established, November, 1826. 

Dr. Ogden, Resident Physician. 

This establishment is a branch of the city Alms 
House, and its expenses are included in those of that 
establishment. 

NEW-YORK DISPENSARY. 

(White, corner of Centre-street.) 

Established in the year 1790, "for the purpose of re- 
lieving such sick, poor, and indigent persons, as are una- 
ble to procure medical aid." 

John AVatts, President. 
Lindley Murray, Treasurer. 
James F. De Peyster, Secretary. 

Attending Physicians. — Abraham Van Gelder, M. D., 
Mark Stephenson, M. D., Alfred S. Purdv, M. D., 
William A. Walters, M. D., J. Jaflfrav Brownlee, M. I)., 
John G. Adams, M. D., John R. Van Kleek, M. D., 
John A. Sweet,M.D., John Watson, M.D., H.D. Bulkley. 

Vaccine Physician. — David R. Hibbard. 

Assistant Physicians. — James D. Mead, M. D., Ezra 
Wood, M. D., John H. Griscom, M. D., James A. 
Washington, M. D. 

Consultinsr Physicians and Syrg-eans. — Gilbert Smith, 
M. D., Francis U. Johnston, M. D., Samuel W. Moore, 
M. D., Alexander H. Stevens, M. D., John C. Cheesman, 
M. D., John Augustine Smith, M. D. 

Apothecary.— WiWmm Walton Lake, jr. 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 53 

EXTRACT FROM REPORT, JANUARY, 1833. 

Number of patients attended by the physicians, and 
supplied with medicine from the dispensary, during the 
past year, 19,164. Of wliom were natives of — 

New-York State, 5329 

Other of the United States, 1080 

Ireland, 8070 

Other foreign countries, 1450 

Total, 15,829 

Expenses, $2287 62. 

NORTHERN DISPENSARY. 

(In Christopher-Street, coiner of Sixth. Founded iu 1827.) 

Attending Physicians. — George P. Cammann, M. D., 
William C. Wallace, M. D., Edward Vanderpool, M. D., 
William Steele, M. D., A. G. Greenly, M. D., Isaac B. 
Craft, M. D., Edward P. Marcellin, M. D., James i 
Sinclair, BI. D., Robert Les^gett, M. D., R. J. Woodruff, 
M. D., Oliver B. Baldwin, M. D. 

Constdtinsr Physicians. — James Stewart, M. D., 
Charles A. Lee, M. D. 

ConsuUing- Surgeons. — Valentine Mott, M. D., S. C' 
Roe, M. D. 

Apothecary. — William S. Elmer, M. D. 

Number of patients during the past vear, about 3800. 

Receipts, in 1832, ' $1165 30i 

Expenditures, 1190 lOi 

Balance due the Treasurer, $24 80 

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 

This Institution is composed of Druggists and Apo- 
thecaries, and was chartered in 1831. 
The present officers are — 

Lindley Murray, President. 

Constantine Adamson, "^ 

Oliver Hull, > Vice Presidents. 

Henry T. Kiersted, j 

William L. Rushton, Treasurer. 

James H. Hart, Secretary. 



54 LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 

This Association has for its object, the improvement 
of the sciences of Cliemistry, Pharmacy, and Materia 
Medica ; and to furnish a school where those designings 
to follow the business of Apothecaries may acquire the 
necessary insti'uction. 



IiIT£RARir AN1> SCIENTIFIC INSTITU- 
TIONS. 

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF THE FINE ARTS. 

(No. 8j Barclay-street, near Broadway.) 

Col. John Trumbull, President. 
Samuel L. Waldo, Vice President. 
James Herring, Secretary. 
Pierre Flandin, Treasurer. 

DIRECTORS. 

Robert Ball Hughes, Jer. Van Rensselaer, M.D., 

Ithiel Town, John Glover, 

Frederick R. Spencer, George Cook, 

Jacob C. Ward, Alexander J. Davis. 

David Hosack, M. D., 

This Institution was founded in 1802, for the improve- 
ment and encouragement of the Fine Arts; and incor- 
porated in 1808. Mr. Vanderlyn was sent to France 
and Italy, in 1803, for the purpose of copying for the 
Academy the finest pictures by the great masters ; and to 
collect casts from antique statues, and other pieces of 
sculpture; which, with the additions since made, form 
the most valuable collection of sculpture in the United 
States. Napoleon, while First Consul, presented Mr. 
Livingston, our ambassador to France, with a precious 
collection of casts, engravings, &lc., for this Institution, 
which may be seen by the public duririg the season of 
exhibition. The annual exhibition opens in May, for 
three months ; at other times, the rooms of the Academy 
are generally open for tlie exhibition of painting* of a 
high order of merit. 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 55 

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF DESIGN. 

(In Clinton Hall.) 

Instituted in 1826, by artists professi^ng the four arts of 
design, viz-Paintins, Sculpture, Architecture, and En- 
SnL: This Academy is the only Academy of Design 
fn'he United States, being founded on the same general 
principles as Academies of Design throughout the civi- 

TheTcademic body consists of twenty-six Academi- 
cians who are professional artists, and who may in- 
crease Their numbers to fifty, chosen from a body of 
Associate:. A body of Honorary Members to whom 
are granted liberal privileges, are attached to the Insti 

^"schools are established, and in progress of establish- 
ment similar to those in Europe, where are taught 
Tawing from the antique, and from the living model. 
A school of ornament is about to be commenced. Pre- 
miums are given annually to the successfu candidates 
m ion' he students. A fine collection oi casts from 
S^^^a^t que statues belongs to the Academy; among 
which a?e the Farnese Hercules, and the Antinous ot 
The Braschi palace, both of colossal size, the only casts 
of these celebrated antiques in the western woUd. _ 

Lectures a.eannuaUv\lelivcrecl by p^^^^^ 
ing, of sculpture, of anatomy, of perspective, of m tho- 
logylofhisiorical composition, of mimature pamtnig, of 
historv of wood engraving. . • » „r 

^"S'annual Exhibition^occurs in May, -^ consists of 
works by living artists only, and such as have never be 
fore been exhibited by the Academy. 

The government is vested in a I'^'esi'lent, \ ice Pies 
dent. Secretary, Treasurer, and two '^embers constitu 
ting a Council; who are chosen at the annual election in 
May. 



56 LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 

COUNCIL. 

Samuel F. B. 3Iorse, President. 

William Duiilap, Vice President. 

Asher B. Diirand, Secretary. 

John L. Morton, Corresponding Secretary. 

1 horaas S. Curamings, Treasurer. 

Charles Ingham. 

Robert W. Weir. 

PROFESSORS. 

Samuel F. B. Morse, of Painting. 

Horatio Greenough, of Sculpture. 

Hamilton Morton, M. D., of Anatomy. 

William C. Bryant, of Mytholop-y. 

Robert W. Weir, of Perspective" 

William Dunlap, of Historical Composition. 

Ihomas S. Cummings, of Miniature Painting. 

Ouhan C. Verplanck, of History. 

A. J. Mason, of Wood Engraving. 

THE NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

(Chambers-street, corner of Broadway. Established, 1809.) 

Possesses a library of about 10,000 volumes, with a 
valuable collection of coins and medals. Thev now oc- 
cupy spacious rooms in the buildinij latelv erected bv 
Peter Remsen, Esq., corner of Broadway and Chambers- 

BXTSQi, 

IMorgan Lewis, President. 
John Delafield, Treasurer. 
Frederick De Pevster, jr., Secretary. 
Samuel Ward, 3d, Librarian. 

NEW-YORK SOCIETY LIBRARY. 
(No. 33 Nassau-street. Established, 1754.) 

iiP?%'''''^7 ^^^i ^^''^P^ Sundays and holidays, from 
10 A. M., to 3 P. M. Volumes, 20,000. Price of sliarcs. 
f<». Annual dues, $4. 

John L Morgan, ^ 

^' "f." ^'ll'^h, V Library Committee. 

Gujian C. Veri-)lanck,) 

Philip J. Forbes, Librarian. 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 57 



THE NEW-YORK ATHENAEUM, 

(Corner of Broadway and Chambers-street. Established, 1824.) 

For the promotion of science and literature. This 
Institution contains a well selected Library of 1600 vols., 
together with all the most popular Foreign and Ameri- 
can periodicals and newspapers. Yearly subscription, 
$5. Subcribers privileged to introduce strangers, gratis. 

James Kent, President. 

John Delafield, Treasurer. 

S. C. Williams, Recording Secretary. 

THE LYCEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

(Centre, corner of White-street. Established, 1818.) 

Possesses a valuable Library, and a Museum of Natu- 
ral History. 
Major Joseph Delafield, President. 
Abraham Halsey, First Vice President. 
Dr. John Torrey, Second Vice President. 
Dr. Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Corresponding Sec'y. 
Dr. James E. Dekay, Recording Secretary. 
William Cooper, Treasurer. 

NEW-YORK LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY. 

William A. Duer, LL. D., President. 

Hon. Albert Gallatin, "> 

James Renwick, LL. D., > Vice Presidents. 

Rev. John M'Vickar, D. D.,> 

Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, M. D., ? Corresponding 

John W. Francis, M. D., ) Secretaries. 

F. De Pey^ter ? Recording Secretaries. 
Daniel D. Field, S 
Rev. J. F. Schroeder, ^ rm-nfnrc; 
James E. Dekay, M. D., ^ Cuiators. 

COUNSELLORS. 

Maj. Gen. J. Morton, Chairman. 



Valentine Mott M. D 
Alexander L. Hosack, M.D., 
William B. Lawrence, 
.Tacob Harvey, 
isamuel F. B. Morse, 



John L. Morton, Treasurer. 



William J. M'Neven, M.D,, 
Col. John Trumbull, 
William Emerson, 
Philip Hone, 
John Stearns, M. D. 



58 LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 



CLINTON HALL ASSOCIATION, 

(Established, 1830.) 

For the cultivation and promotion of Literature, Sci- 
ence, and tlie Arts. 

Philip Hone, President. 
R. B. Brown, Secretary. 

MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

(Clinton Hall. Instituted, 1821.) 

Objects. — The encouragement of moral and intellec- 
tual improvement, by tlie dissemination of knowledge, 
particulary amongst merchants' clerks. 

With tliis view the society have procured a large 
number of standard and periodical works, for a library 
and reading room. 

The library is composed of betwen 8 and 9,000 vols. 
In the reading rooms, may be found the principal period- 
ical publications of the United States, Great Britain, 
and France. The rooms are open from 10, A. M., to 10, 
P. M. Under the patronage of the directors, annual 
courses of lectures are delivered. 

Terms. — The payment of one dollar initiation fee, one 
dollar for the first six months, and fifty cents thereafter, 
quarterly in advance, entitles merchants' clerks to regu- 
lar membership, which enables them to procure books 
from the library, to the use of the reading room, and to 
advantages incidental to attendance at lectures. 

The privileges of honorary membership are conferred 
on merchants and others, who contribute five dolla's 
annually in advance. Honorary members are admitted 
to all the rights of regular membership, except that of 
voting. Number of members, (Feb. 1833,) 1.525. 
John W. Stebbins, President. 
James A. Smith, Vice President. 
J. M. Pease, Secretary. 
A. J. Bogart, Treasurer. 

Directors.— 3. D. Bradner, F. H. Babcock, J. A. 
Williams, J. W. H. Aymar, C. 1.. Rhoados, C. Carmer, 
J. P. Benson, and I. G. Williams. 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 59 

apprentices' LIBRARY OF THE GENERAL SOCIETY OF 
MECHANICS AND TRADESMEN. 

(Crosby street. Established, 1820.) 

This Library contains between 12,000 and 13,000 vols., 
and supplies annually about 1500 readers. Commodious 
reading rooms are connected with the establishment, for 
the accommodation of the members of the society, and for 
apprentices. Open from 6 to 9 o'clock, in the evening. 

Benjamin Demilt, Chairman. 

C. C. Jacobus, Treasurer. 

William Harsell, Secretary. 

J. I. Stephens, Librarian. 

NEW-YORK LAW INSTITUTE. 

(Established, 18:30.) 

Samuel Jones, President, 

Peter A. Jay, "> 

Beverly Robinson, > Vice Presidents. 

David B. Ogden, ) 

Samuel A. Foot, Treasurer. 

Elijah Paine, Librarian. 

Joshua Coit, Secretary. 
The New-York Law Institute keep their library in 
the City Hall, of the City of New-York. This society 
was formed in 1828, by a number of gentlemen, for the 
purpose of professional improvement. In 1830, the 
better to attain their objects, they procured an act of in- 
corporation, but from the commencement of their asso- 
ciation they have actively and diligently prosecuted their 
intention of forming a useful and complete law library. 
The library already contains more than 2000 volumes of 
select law books, and nearly the whole series of English 
and American reports. 

Members of the bar from abroad, while in the city, and 
judges of the different courts, are, by the rules of the In- 
stitute, entitled to the use of the libraiy. 



60 



RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 



NEW-YORK SACRED MUSIC SOCIETY, 

(Established, 1823.) 

Meet at their Hall, Chatham-street Chapel, (late 
Chatham Theatre,) every Monday evening. 
Oliver M. Lownds, President. 
William Rockwell, First Vice President. 
John A. Boocock, Second Vice President. 
James Dunn, Secretary. 
John A. Graft', Treasurer. 
William Wood, Librarian. 
James Tiebout, Assistant Librarian. 
U. C. Hill, Conductor. 



BEI^IOIOrS, BEIVEVOI.EIVT, AKO 
MOK.IX. INSTITUTIONS. 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY. 

Hon. John Cotton Smith, President. 

Rev. John C. Brigham, Corresponding Secretary. 

Hubert Van Wagenen, Treasurer. 

John Nitchie, General Agent and Ass't Treasurer. 

Robert F. Winslow, Recording Sec'y and Acc't. 



MANAGERS. 



John Aspinwall, 
Leonard Bleecker, 
Samuel Boyd, 
Isaac Carovv, 
Charles Chauncey, 
George Colgate, 
William Colgate, 
Benjamin Clark, 
William B. Crosby, 
George Douglass, 
James W. Dominick, 
Thomas Darling, 
Theodore Dwight, 
William Forrest, 



Francis Hall, 
Zechariah Lewis, 
Eleazar Lord, 
D. W. C. Olyphant, 
Pelatiah Perit, 
James L. Phelps, M. D., 
Henry Rogers, 
John Sargeant, 
Peter G. Stuyvesant, 
George Suckley, 
Benjamin L. Swan, 
Arthur Tappan, 
Najah Taylor, 
B. L. Wo'olley, 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 61 



Hubert Van VVasenen, 
Marinus Willet, M. D., 
S. V. S. Wilder, 
William Winterton. 



Timothy R. Green, 
John Griscom, 
Timothy Hedges, 
Cornelius Heyer, 

The American Bible Society was formed in 1816, for 
the sole object of increasing the circulation of the Holy 
Scriptures, without note or comment. Its seat of opera- 
tion is at No. 115 Nassau-street, New-York, where Bi- 
bles and Testaments are printed, bound, and issued. 
More than one million and a half copies have been 
issued in eighteen years. The Society is under the di- 
rection of a board of thirty-six Lay Managers, (Baptists, 
Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Episcopal Methodists, 
Reformed Dutch, and Society of Friends,) who meet 
once a month, without pay, and inspect and give direc- 
tions in relation to all the affairs of the Institution. 
They publish a monthly account of all moneys received, 
and once a year give, in a printed report, a full history of 
all their proceedings. 

The Society has now nearly one thousand Auxiliary 
Societies, scattered through every State and Territory in 
the Union. The Auxiliaries receive books at the very 
lowest rates at which they can be made, and when unable 
to buy, are furnished with them gratuitously. 

Any person becomes an annual member, and has a 
right to buy books at cost, bv paying $3. A member 
for life pays $30, and a director for life $150. 

The Society's houses, built by funds given for this 
object, cover one hundred feel square of ground. They 
contain the offices of the Secretary and the General 
Agent, the Managers' Hall, a large depository for books, 
a printing office with seventeen steam power presses, 
and an extensive bindery. If necessary 1,000 Bibles per 
day, can easily be made. The Society keeps no perma- 
nent funds, but expends all contributed, in circulathig 
the Scriptures at home or abroad. 



62 RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 

AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY. 

(Formed, May, 1825.) 

House corner of Nassau and Spruce streets, erected 
by the liberality of individuals in tlie City of New- York, 
Receipts, the year ending April 15, 1833 — 

Balance in the treasury, May 1, 1832,.. $96 67 

For publications sold, $31,117 58 

Donations, 31,229 25 

Total, $62,443 50 

The Society has stereotyped more than 450 duodeci- 
mo Tracts, in English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, 
Italian, German, and Welsh ; nearly 200 Children's 
Tracts, Broadsheets, and Handbills; with numerous oc- 
casional volumes, including the Rise and Progress, 
Pilgrim's Progress, Saint's Rest, Call to the Unconverted, 
Edwards on the Affections, Life of Brainerd, Essays to 
do Good, Biographies, Pocket Manuals, »fcc. &sc. making 
a total of nearly 800 publications. Agents are employed 
in different parts of the country to awaken an interest in 
circulating these publications. In May, 1833, 32,804,563 
Tracts, and other publications, embracing 503,371,790 
pages, had been printed; and 28,954,173 publications, 
embracing 433,238,327 pages, had been circulated, of 
which 21,700,957 pages were grants. The Society also 
aids in circulating Tracts in foreign and pagan lands, 
especially where American Missionaries are labouring, 
having appropriated for that object, in the year ending 
May, 1832, $5,000; and in the years ending April, 1833, 
$10,000 ; 1834, not far from $20,000. The Society has 
evidences of good accomplished in the reformation of the 
immoral, and the apparent conversion of many, both in 
our own country, and in foreign lands. 

S. V. S. Wilder, Esq., President. 

Moses Allen, Treasurer. 

William A. Hallock, Corresponding Sec. 

Rev. Oman Eastman, Vis. and Fin. Sec. 

Jesse Talbot, Assistant Secretary. 

Harlan Page, Depositary. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 63 



AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

A voluntary, unincorporated association, formed by 
persons of the Presbyterian, Congregational, Associate. 
Reformed, and Reformed Dutch Churches, in May, 1826. 
The object is "to assist congregations, that are vmable 
to support the Gospel Ministry, and to send the Gospel 
to the destitute within the United States." During the 
seventh year of its operations it sustained in twenty-three 
states and territories, 606 missionaries, laljouring in about 
900 congregations, or missionary districts. Expendi- 
tures $66,277 96. It has state auxiliaries in Massachu- 
setts, Connecticut, Vermont, Rhode Island, Maine, New- 
Hampshire, Indiana, Illinois, and smaller auxiliaries and 
Boards of Agency in other states, through which it con- 
ducts its operations. Thirty dollars constitutes a life 
member, and one hundred dollars a life director. Office, 
150 Nassau-street, 1st floor. 

Hon. Stephen Van Rensselaer, President. 

Several Vice Presidents. 

Fifty Directors. 

Knowles Taylor, Treasurer, 4 Fletcher-street. 

Rev. Absalom Peters, Corresponding Secretary. 

Rev. Charles Hall, Assistant Secretary. 

Mr. Silas H. Hodges. 

Abijah Fisher, Recording Secretary. 

AMERICAN SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION. — BRANCH DEPOSI- 
TORY, NEW-YORK. 

The Depository of Sundav School Books is kept at 
No, 205 Broadway. Was established by the American 
Sunday School Union, (which has its principal seat of 
operation in Philadelphia,) in 1827 ; and is still under 
their control. 

All the variety of the publications of the Parent So- 
ciety, are constantly kept for sale at this Depository, 
upon the same terms at which they are sold in Philadel- 
phia. Constitutional measures are taken to prevent 
these publications from being sectarian or impure. 



64 RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 

The " Sunday School Jounial," is issued weekly 
from this office, at two dollars per annum in advance. 
One copy of which is gratuitously given to such Sunday 
School superintendents, in this and adjoining states, as 
will engage to take it out of the Post Office, and use it 
in their respective Schools. 

A hook is kept, in which Sunday School Agents, 
Missionaries, and Clergymen, visiting the city, may re- 
cord their names, residence, place of stopping, &c. &c. 
Connected with this Depositor}^, there is a Board of 
Agency to co-operate with the Parent Society, consisting 
of 21 members, of whom — 
P. Perit, is President. 
William Winterton, ?yj pj-e.idents. 
Francis Hall, ) 

, Corresponding Secretary. 

R. W. Martin, Recording Secretary, 
M. O. Halsted, and others, members. 
The Board of Agency hold their stated meetings on 
the first Wednesday in each month. 

B. J. Sewardj Agent, house 58 Laight Street. 

THE NEW-yORK SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION. 

(Inslifuted in 1816.) 

It embraces at this time sixty-six schools, most of 
which have a male and female department. Fifty-nine 
of these Schools report 1805 teachers and conductors, 
11,500 children, with libraries containing more than 
15,000 volumes of books. 

Eleazar Lord, Esq., President. 
John I. Labagh, and others, Vice Presidents. 
Walter Bicker, Treasurer. 
H. Holden, Corresponding Secretary. 
Samuel Richards, Recording Secretary- 
James B. Brinsmade, and others, Managers. 
A Committee of Visiters hold a meeting for business, 
every Saturday evening, in the Depository, IVo. 205 Broad- 
way. An Association of Teachers meet on the third 
Monday evening in every month, in the basement of the 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 65 

Bowery Church. This Union supplies the Schools in 
its connexion with Hymn Books, Testaments, Question 
Books, Class Books, and other requisites, gratuitously. 
The Depository of their books is kept in connexion with 
the one noticed above, and the operations of the Society 
are characterized in like manner, by excluding secta- 
rianism and impurity. 

NEW-YORK PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL TRACT SOCIETY. 

Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D. D., ex officio, Pres't. 
Rev. William Berrian, D. D., First Vice President. 
Mr. Lewis Curtis, Second Vice President. 
Mr. Thomas C. Butler, Third Vice President. 
Rev. Benjamin I. Haight, Corresponding Secretary. 
Mr. Pierre E. F. M'Donald, Recording Secretary. 
Mr. Thomas Browning, Treasurer and Agent. 

TRUSTEES. 

William E. Dunscomb, John W. Smyth, 

Henry Cotheal, Nathaniel B. Holmes, 

James F. De Peyster, Charles W. Van Ness, 

William H. Hobart, M. D., Anthony Ten Broeck, 

William B. Ballow, Charles F. Harris, 

William H. Beare, F. R. Lee, 

Thomas Thompson, Benjamin Grut, 

William R. Wadsworth, J. D. L. Walton, jr. 
W. N. Chadwick, 

AUXILIARY NEW-YORK BIBLE AND COMMON PRAYER 
BOOK SOCIETY. 

Benjamin M. Brown, President. 

Henry Cotheal, First Vice President. 

Oliver M. Lownds, Second Vice President. 

John Alstyne, Third Vice President. 

Charles N. S. Rowland, Corresponding Secretary. 

Henry J. Seaman, Recording Secretary. 

Charles H. Roach, Treasurer. 

Thomas Browning, Agent. 



66 RELIGIOUS, BENErOLENT, AND 



NEW-YORK PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL PRESS. 

(No. 46 Lumber-street, rear ofTrinity Cliuixh.) 

The object of this Society, (founded in 1829,) is the 
diffusion, through the medium of the press, of the blessings 
of the Gospel, as it is exhibited in the doctrines, the wor- 
ship, and the discipline of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, in the United States of America. 
Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D. D., ex officio, Pres't. 

— — , First Vice Pres't. 

Mr. Charles Keeler, Second Vice President. 

Mr. Henry Cotheal, Treasurer. 

Rev. William R. \Miittingham, Secretary. 

NEW-YORK PROTESTAi\T EPISCOPAL CITY MlSSIO^i 
SOCIETY. 

(Established in 1831.) 

The object of the Society is to provide clergymen of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church, to act as missionaries 
in the City of New-York. 

Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D. D., ex officio, Pres't. 
Rev. T. Lyell, D. D., 1 

Rev. J. M'Vickar, D. D., | 

Rev. AVllliam Beman D. D., \^..^^^ presidents. 
Hon. Culian C V erplanck, J 
Samuel Ward, Esq., 
Hon. Gideon Lee, J 

William R. Wadsworth, Secretary. , 
Pierre E. F. M'Donald, Assistant Secretary. 
Lewis Phillips, Treasurer. 

NEW-YORK PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL SUNDAY SCHOOL 
SOCIETY. 

(Instituted in 1817.) 
BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D. D., ex officio, Pres't. 
Rev. Thomas Lyell, D. D., First Vice President. 
James Swords, Second Vice President. 
Elijah Guion, Third Vice President. 
Evert Wcnnian, Treasurer. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 67 

Charles H. Roach, Secretary. 

Twenty-eight schools are in union with this Society, 
containing rising 6500 scholars. 

EDUCATION AND MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE PROTES- 
TANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN THE STATE OF 
NEW-YORK. 

(Instituted in 1832.) 

Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D. D., ex officio, Pres't. 
Rev. David Butler, D. D., First Vice President. 
Rev. Thomas Lyell, D. D., Second Vice President. 
Rev. John Reed, D. D., Third Vice President. 
Rev. James Milnor, D. D., Fourth Vice President. 
Rev. John M'Vickar, D. D., Fifth Vice President. 
Rev. John C. Rudd, D. D., Sixth Vice President. 
Edward P. Livingston, Seventh Vice President. 
Thomas L. Ogden, Eighth Vice President. 
Nathan Williams, Ninth Vice President. 
Peter A. Jay, Tenth Vice President. 
Samuel Brown, Eleventh Vice President. 
William A. Duer, Twelfth Vice President. 
Rev. Henry Anthon, D. D., Corresponding Secretary. 
G. G. Van Wagenen, Recording Secretary. 
Benjamin M. Brown, Treasurer. 

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING RE- 
LIGION AND LEARNING IN THE STATE OF 
NEW-YORK. 

(Instituted in 1802.) 

Right Rev. Benj. T. Onderdonk, D. D., ex officio, Pres't. 
William H. Harison, Secretary. 
William Johnson, Treasurer. 

OTHER TRUSTEES. 



Rev. F. L. Hawks, D. D., 
Richard I. Tucker, 
Hubert Van Wagenen, 
Joseph Ketchum, 



Rev. Thomas Lyell, D. D., 

Rev. James Milnor, D. D., 

Rev. Wm. Berrian, D. D., 

Thomas L. Ogden, 

James Swords, j James F. De Peyster, 

Floyd Smith, William Bard, 

Rev. Thomas Breintnall, ! John P. Stagg, 

Rev. W. Creighton, D. D., ; Charles Keeler, 

Rev. Henry Anthon, D. D., ! Rev. Hugh Smitlu 



RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 



YOUNG men's auxiliary EDUCATION AND MISSIONARY 

SOCIETY OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 

IN THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 

(Instituted in 1824.) 

Rev. Benjamin I. Haight, President. 
Rev. Aldert Smedes, First Vice President. 
Charles H. Roach, Second Vice President. 
Pierre E. F. M'Donald, Third Vice President. 
William M. Benjamin, Corresponding Secretary. 
Charles W. Carmer, Recording Secretary. 
William H. Townsend. Treasurer. 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE REFORMED DUTCH 
CHURCH IN NORTH AMERICA. 

Hon. S. Van Rensselaer, President. 

V. Van Dewater, Clerk. 

L. V. De Foreest, Treasurer. 

FOREIGN BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE REFORMED 
DUTCH CHURCH. 

Peter D. Vroom, President. 

Rev. Thomas De Witt, D.D., Corresponding Secretary. 

William R. Thompson, Treasurer. 

synod's board OF MISSIONS. 

Peter D. Vroom, President. 
Rev. J. Brodhead, Secretary. 
Isaac Young, Treasurer. 

NEW-YORK MARINE BIBLE SOCIETY. 

Henry Smith, President. 
Charles Durfey, Secretary. 
D. Walter Smith, Treasurer. 

NEW-YORK FEMALE BIBLE SOCIETY. 

Mrs. J. E. Caldwell, President. 
Mrs. David Codwise, Secretary. 
Miss H. L. Murray, Treasurer. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 69 

jt^UXILIARY FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR NEW- 
YORK AND BROOKLYN. 

Zechariah Lewis, President. 
D. E. Wheeler, Secretary. 
William W. Chester, Treasurer. 

NEW-YORK CITY TRACT SOCIETY. 

Zechariah Lewis, President. 
Sidney E. Morse, Secretary. 
Alfred Edwards, Treasurer. 

NEW-YORK FEMALE TRACT SOCIETY. 

Mrs. J. E. Caldwell, President. 
Mrs. W. A. Hallock, Secretary. 
Mrs. Lethbridge, Treasurer. 

EDUCATION SOCIETY OF THE REFORMED DUTCH CHURCH. 

S. Van Rensselaer, President. 

Rev. William M'Murray, D. D., Secretary. 

John D. Keese, Treasurer. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION OF THE REFORMED DUTCH 
CHURCH. 

Richard Duryee, President. 
Dr. Philip Milledoler, Secretary. 
James Bogert, jr.. Treasurer. 

BIBLE, TRACT, AND SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION OF THE 
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

Rev. William M'Kendree, President. 

Rev. J. P. Durbin, Corresponding Secretary. 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH. 

Rev. William M'Kendree, President. 
Beverly Waugh, Corresponding Secretary. 

METHODIST BOOK CONCERN. 

(No. 200 Mulberry-street.) 

Established for the purpose of distributing Books and 
Tracts throughout the United States; the income of 



70 RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 

which, after deductmg expenses, is appropriated to be- 
nevolent purposes. Near 200 persons are employed in 
the various branches of printing and binding. 

B. Waugh and T. Mason, Agents. 

N. Bangs, General Editor. 

J. P. Durbin and T. Merritt, Editors of Sunday School 
Books and Tracts. 

PRESBYTERIAN EDUCATION SOCIETY. 

Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen, President. 
Rev. John J. Owen, Secretary and Agent. 
O. Willcox, Treasurer. 

AMERICAN seamen's FRIEND SOCIETY. ; 

(Formed, January, 1826.) 

Obtained as permanent agent, the Rev. Joshua Lea- 
vitt, and commenced the Sailor's Magazine, and otlier 
steady operations, in the fall of 1828. 
Adrian Van Sinderen, Brooklyn, President. 
Bishop M'llvaine, Brooklyn, Corresponding Secretary. 
Silas Holmes, 62 South-street, New-York, Treasurer. 
Samuel Brown, General Agent. 

Office of the Society, 82 Nassau-street. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Adrian Van Sinderen, I D. W. C. Olyphant, 

Rev. Charles P. M'llvaine, | John Wheelwright, 
Rev. John C. Brigham, j Philip Flagler, 
Rev. Joshua Leavitt, Jasper Corning, 

Silas Holmes, I Ephraiin Corning. 

Annual Meeting. — Monday previous to the second 
Thursday in May. 

NEW-YORK INSTITUTION FOR THE INSTRUCTION OF 
THE DEAF AND DUMB. 

(Incorporated in 1817.) 

Visiters admitted on Plonda^'s. 

The buildings occupied by this Institution were com- 
pleted in 1829, and are situated on an eminence on the 
Fifth Avenue, adjacent to the line of the Harlaem Rail 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 71 

Road, three and a half miles from the City Hall. The 
grounds occupied by the buildings, and adjacent to the 
extent of an acre, were granted by the City Corporation, 
and have been handsomely laid out, at the eastern ex- 
tremity, in a lawn, surrounded and intersected by walks, 
planted with trees, and at the western extremity in a flow- 
er garden. Nine acres, immediately adjoining, belonging 
to the City, are leased by the Institution, and are in part 
cultivated. 

The main building, constructed of brick, and stuccoed 
in imitation of marble, is 110 feet by 60, and four stories 
high. 

The number of pupils, on the 31st January, 1834, was 
134 — of whom 97 are supported by the State, and 11 by 
the City of New-York; others by their friends and cha- 
ritable institutions. 

The receipts, in 1833, amounted to $20,742 92. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

Rev. James Milnor, D. D., President. 
Peter Sharpe, First Vice President. 
Myndert Van Schaick, Second Vice President. 
Robert D. Weeks, Treasurer. 
Harvey P. Peet, Secretary. 



James Smith, 
Lewis Seymour, 
Daniel E. Tylee, 
William L. Stone, 
Timothy Hedges, 
Rev. J. F. Sohroeder, 
James Lovett, 
Robert C. Cornell, 
B. L.WooUey, 
William F. Mott, 
Shepherd Knapp, 



Robert D. Weeks, 
Peter S. Titus, 
Henry I. Wyckoff, 
Heman Averill, 
James A. Burtus, 
John R. Willis, 
John W. Leavitt, 
John Oothout, 
Charles L. Livingston, 
Rufus L. Lord, 
Samuel Downer, jr. 



PRINCIPAL OF THE INSTITUTION. 

Hai-vey P. Peet, A.M. 



RELIGIOUS, BENKVOLKNT, AND 



PROFESSORS. 

Leon Vaysse, 

David E. Bartlett, A. M. 

Frederick A. P. Barnard, A. M. 

Samuel R. Brown, A. B. 

J. Addison Gary, A. B. 

Barnabas M. Fay, A. B. 

George Edward Day, A. B. 

PHYSICIAN. 

Edward H. Dixon, M. D. 

Miss Martha Dudley, Matron. 

3frs. Mary Hale, Assistant, Matron. 

Mrs. Lncretia Sherwood, Seamstress. 

Giles Wright, Steward. 

Daniel E. Ruckel, Cabinetmaker. 

Samuel B. Wyckoff, Tailor. 

Robert Forest, Tailor. 

Edward Hackett, Shoemaker. 

Mervin Hale, Bookbinder. 
The following description of this interesting Institution 
was written by one of the pupils, a young man, 20 years 
of age, and is given as a specimen of the effects of in- 
struction upon the deaf and dumb : 

A DESCRIPTION OF THE INSTITUTION. 

This is a very large house, denominated the Institution 
for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb ; the Legislature 
of the State of New-York have granted funds to defray 
the expense of building it. It is situated on a piece of 
ground between the Third Avenue and the Middle Road, 
about three miles north of the City, about a mile and a 
half east of the Hudson River, about three quarters of a 
mile west of the East River, and about four miles south 
of the Harlcem Bridge. It was commenced in 1827, and 
completed in 1829. Men were employed in building it 
at the expense of $31,000. It has about 25 rooms, three 
of which are school rooms, for the instruction of the deaf 
and dumb; two of them are studying rooms for them; 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 73 

several are occupied by teachers and men, some fur- 
nished as parlours for visiters, and one as a library pre- 
sented by the benevolent. 

The lens^th of the building is 110 feet, and its width 60 
feet, and it has abasement, and three stories, and looks 
like a college. The basement contains a dining-roorn, a 
washing-room, a kitchen, and ironing-room. There is a 
partition between two yards, and sheds under which the 
males and females play. 

The Institution is provided with six well qualified and 
experienced teachers ; five of whom assist Mr. Peet in 
the duties of instructing the scholars in their five classes. 
The ])rincipal of the New-York Institution is Mr. Peet. 
And his duty is to take care of all the pupils, to make 
rules of conduct for them, and to have the superintend- 
ence and government. Pie was appointed a secretary 
of said Institution by the Board of Directors, in the place 
of Dr. Akerly, resigned. The Directors hold meetings 
monthly, to consult about the business of the Institution, 
and employ him in taking charge of all the pupils. 

There are ten acres of land belonging to the Institu- 
tion, which consist of meadows, a lawn, and two gardens. 
The meadows produce grass in abundance, which is 
converted into hay. The largest garden is planted with 
vegetables, and the other has various flowers for the 
female pupils. There is a shop built of wood, in which 
four competent and capable men have three trades to 
instruct the male pupils in the department of work and 
industry. And these trades consist of the cabinet-work, 
tailoring, and shoemaking. There is a stable standing 
opposite to the shop, in which horses, wagons, hay, and 
straw are kept. 

ORPHAN ASYLUM. 

(Situated in Greenwich Village, near Bank-st. Founded in 1807.) 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Mrs. Gen. Hamilton, First Directress. 
Mrs. Bethune, Second Directress. 
Mrs. Walsh, Treasurer. 
Mrs. Codwjse, Secretary. 



74 RELIGIOUS, BENErOLENT, AND 



TRUSTEES. 



Mrs. J. P. Van Home, 

Miss Donaldson, 
Mrs. Satterthwaite, 
Mrs. Bailey. 



Miss Bleecker, 

Mrs. Maria Remsen, 

Mrs. John Aspinwall, 

Miss Onderdonk, 

Mrs. Geo. Brinckerhoff, 
By the twenty-sixth Annual Report of this Institution, 
it appears that the present number of children in the 
Asylum is 115 — boys 72, and girls 43. 

ROMAN CATHOLIC ORPHAN ASYLUM. 

(Prince, corner of Mott-street.) 

Right Rev. John Dubois, President. 
John B. Lasala, Secretary. 
Peter M'Laughlin, Treasurtr. 
Sister Elizabeth Bovle, Principal. 
Males 72, Females 80. Total 152. 

THE NEW-YORK FEMALE ASSISTANCE SOCIETY. 

(For the Relief and Religious Instruction of the Sick Poor.) 

The nineteenth Annual Report of this Institution Is 
published, to which is added a list of the subscribers, 
and of donations made to the Society, from November, 
1831, to November, 1832. By this report, it appears, 
that $3650 has been distributed in the purchasing of 
wood, food, &c., and given to different persons deserving 
of charitable assistance. 

Mrs. Roger Strong, 56 Hammond-street, First Direc- 
tress. 

Mrs. Francis Hall, 41 John-street, Second Directress. 

Mrs. Thomas Scott, 49 White-street, Third Directress. 

Mrs. Joseph Trulock, corner of Bleecker and Han- 
cock streets, Fourth Directress. 

Mrs. James Harper, 76 Frankfort, corner of ClifT-st., 
Treasurer. 

Mrs. Dr. Mead, 48 Cliff-street, "> 

Miss H. E. Smith, corner of Green- > Secretaries, 
wich and Jay streets, j 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 75 



MANAGERS. 

Mrs. Jonathan Seymour, 104 Prince-street. 

Mrs. Charles Chipp, 104 Prince-street. 

Mrs. Dr. Tappan, 99 Houston-street. 

Mrs. Samuel G. Smith, 14 Fulton-street. 

Mrs. Ezra Dennison, cor. of Fourth and Mercer streets. 

Mrs. Dr. Reese, 525 Broadway. 

Mrs. James Bunting, 51 Crosby-street. 

Mrs. William Galatian, cor. of Broad and Beaver sts. 

Mrs. Farrington, corner of Broad and Beaver streets. 

Mrs. Silas Brown, 46 Cliff-street. 

Mrs. Felix A. Huntington, 64 Fulton-street. 

Mrs. Thomas Lankford, 135 Allen-street. 

Mrs. Potter, 143 Chambers street. 

Mrs. Gautier, 39 Dominick-street. 

Mrs. Henry W. Olcott, 39 Dey-street. 

Mrs. Leonard Corning, 40 Rose-street. 

Mrs. Gilbert Roe, 41 Liberty-street. 

Miss Eliza Brower, 55 Chrystie-street. 

Miss Mary Brasher, 83 Franklin-street. 

Miss Sarah 3Iortimer, 100 William-street. 

Miss Esther Turner, Fourth-street. 

NEW-TORK CLOTHING SOCIETY. 

(Auxiliary to the Female Assistance Society.) 

More than two years has elapsed since this Society 
was established ; the object of which is to procure and 
make up clothing for the poor of our city, and the Assist- 
ance Society is the channel through which they receive 
them. 

Mrs. J. Patten, First Directress. 

Mrs. Z. Griswold, Second Directress. 

Miss M. Maitland, Treasurer, 

Miss J. Scott, Secretary. 



RELIGIOns, BENEVOLENT, AND 





MANAGERS. 


Mrs. 


W. W. Phillips, 


Miss M'Farlan, 


Mrs. 


Gascoigne, 


Miss Thorburn, 


Mrs. 


Creagh, 


Miss Burr, 


Mrs. 


Haddock, 


Miss Dubois, 


Mrs. 


M'Lean, 


Miss Mavor, 


Mrs. 


Huntington, 


Miss Hughes, 


Mrs. 


Dubois, 


Miss Brazier, 


Mrs. 


Galatian, 


Miss Parr, 


Mrs. 


Farrington, 


Miss Brower, 


Mrs. 


Baldwin, 


Miss Dvvight, 


Mrs. 


Williamson, 


Miss Campbell, 


Mrs. 


Hyatt, 


Miss Mortimer. 


Mrs. 


J. B. Hall, 





COLONIZATION SOCIETY OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 

(Founded in 1831.) 

For the purpose of acting as auxiliary to the Ameri- 
can Colonization Society, in conveying to Africa, with 
their own consent, the free coloured persons of the 
United States. 

William A. Duer, President. 

Gardiner Spring, D. D., 

Nathan Bangs, D. D., 

John W. Hinton, 

Abraham Van Nest, 

Hugh Maxwell, I 

James Milnor, D. D., J 

John W. Mulligan, Corresponding Secretary, 

Iia B. Underbill, Recording Secretary. 

Moses Allen, Treasurer. 



Vice Presidents. 



MANAGERS. 



Anson G. Phelps, 
Israel Corse, 
James Donaldson, 
Rev. John P. Durbin, 
Hubert Van Wagenen, 
Francis L. Hawks, D. D. 
David M. Reese, M.D. 



Francis Hall, 
Gabriel P. Disosway, 
Henry V. Garretson, 
Thomas Bell, 
John R. Davison, 
Henry S. Richards, 
James M. Goold, 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 77 



Samuel A. Foot, 
Samuel Akerly, M. D. 
Rev. William Jackson, 



Daniel Lord, jr. 
Josiah L. Hale, 
Thomas De Witt, D. D. 



William L. Stone, ; William W. Campbell, 



Rev. Cyrus Mason, 
James Monroe, 
Silas Brown, 
Anson Blake, 



John Woodbridge, D. D. 
Aaron Clark, 
Thomas G. Fletcher, 
Thomas C. Doremus. 



Robert S. Finley, Agent. Office in the Chapel of the 
Brick Church in Beekman-street. 

There are also branches in several of the religious 
congregations, auxiliary to the foregoing, viz. — 

In the Brick Church, William L. Stone, President. 
In the Cedar-street, Church, Francis Markoe, President. 
In the Broome-street Church, William W. Chester, 
President. In the Middle Dutch Church, Abraham 
Bloodgood, President. Also, a Young Men's Coloniza- 
tion Society, w^hereof Gabriel P. Disosway is President. 

THE SOCIETY FOR THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF FAITHFUL 
DOMESTIC SERVANTS. 

(Instituted in 1825.) 

Their office, for the gratuitous registry of servants, is 
kept at 106 Chambers-street. 

Subscribers only are supplied, who pay five dollars 
per annum. No servant is sent without a satisfactory 
written recommendation. The object of this Institution 
is tlie promotion of good feelings between employers and 
servants, and to induce the latter to remain as long as 
possible in their places. After March, 1828, every ser- 
vant for whom five dollars has been paid, will receive 
as follows — 



78 RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 

In one year after the registry of such servant's 

name, a Bible, or, (having one,) in lieu thereof, $2 00 

At the end of two vears, 3 00 

" three " 5 00 

four " 7 00 

" five " (and a certificate of their 

good services for that period,) 10 GO 

$27 00 
And on the completion of every year thereafter, 10 00 
Levi Coit, President. 
John Johnston, Vice President. 



Levi Coit, 
Arthur Tappan, 
John W. Leavitt, 
Robert Jaffiay, 



MANAGERS. 

Moses Allen, 
Daniel Parish, 
Jonathan D. Steele, 
M. B. Edgar. 



AGENTS. 

David E. Paton, | Harriet C. Paton. 

SOCIETY FOR THE REFORMATION OF JUVENILE 
DELINQUENTS. 

(Under the control of which is the House of Refuge. Instituted in 18-24.) 

By the ninth Annual Report of this Institution, it 
appears that tliere have been received into the House of 
Refuge, during the last vear, 

153 Boys, 41 Girls— Total 194 

Boys in the House at the date of the last Annual 

Report 159 

Girls in the House at the date of the last Annual 

Report ^6 

Total number of all the children under the care of 
tlie Society during the past year 389 

Of the above number have been indentured during 

the past year. Boys 110 

Girls, 29 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 79 

Returned to friends • . • 15 

Escaped 3 

Of age 2 

Turned over to the Court of Sessions 1 

Now remaining in the House, Boys, 186, Girls, 43, 229 

389 

Stephen Allen, President. 

William W. Fox, " 

Robert C. Cornell, 

Henry I. Wyckoff, I vice Presidents. 

James Lovett, ' 

Peter Sharpe, 

Hugh Maxwell, 

Conielius Dubois, Treasurer. 

Ralph Olmsted, Secretary. 

John Stearns, M. D. ) ph^-gi^ians and Surgeons. 
Galen Carter, M. D. ) ' 

Indenturing Committee. 
Benjamin S. Collins, Silas Brown, Heman Averill. 

ROMAN CATHOLIC BENEVOLENT SOCIETY. 

Right Rev. John Dubois, President. 
John Costigan, Secretary. 
John B. Lasala, Treasurer. 

SOCIETY FOR THE EDUCATION OF ORPHAN CHILDREN 
OF THE JEWISH PERSUASION. 

J. Joseph, President. 
M. Cordoza, Secretary. 
M. L. Moses, Treasurer. 

SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF OF POOR WIDOWS WITH 
SMALL CHILDREN. 

(Instituted in 1807.) 

Mrs. L. Coit, First Directress. 
Miss H. L. Murray, Secretary. 
Miss Murray, Treasurer. 



80 RELIGIOUS, BENEVOLENT, AND 

ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF OF RESPECTABLE AGED 

INDIGENT FEMALES. 

(Instituted in 1814. No. 210 Fulton-street.) 

Mrs. S. Cowdrey, President. 

Mrs. Douglas, Secretary. 

Mrs. J. W. Dominick, Treasurer. 

NEW-YORK ASYLUM FOR LYING-IN WOMEN. 

(Instituted in 1823. Orange-street, above Prince.) 

Mrs. Isabella Scott, President. 
Mrs. Ruthven, Secretary. 
Mrs. T. Darling, Treasurer. 

MARINE SOCIETY OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 

(Instituted in 1770.) 

John Whetten, President. 
John Webb, Secretary. 
William M'Intire, Treasurer. 

NEW-ENGLAND SOCIETY. 

Henry R. Storrs, President. 
Samuel A. Foot, Vice President. 
Alfred A. Weeks, Secretary. 
Ezra Weeks, Treasurer. 

clerk's BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

(Instituted in 1833.) 

Isaac S. Hone, President. 
John H. Gourlie, First Vice President. 
Caleb F. Lindsley, Second Vice President. 
James F. Henry, Recording Secretary. 
William Poole, Corresponding Secretary. 
Robert Strong, Treasurer. 

directors. 

Augustus W. Vaupell, j Henry J. Buddington, 

George Timpson, Samuel Champlin, 

William B. Tavlor, Joseph Latourette, 

Warren Kimball, Edward H. Arthur. 

Charles C. Peck, William H. Scrymser. 

Benjamin M. Whitlock. i Ellis S. Potter. 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 81 

ST. George's society. 
Thomas Dixon, President. 
William Dawson, Secretary. 
James Chesterman, Treasurer. 

ST. Andrew's society. 
David Hadden, President. 
John Campbell, Secretary. 
John I. Palmer, Treasurer. 

ST. Patrick's society. 
John Chambers, President. 
Dudley Persse, Secretary. 
George S. Corbitt, Treasurer. 

FRENCH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY. 

Charles Sagory, President. 
Francis Depau, Secretar}'. 
J. Bouchaud, Ti-easurer. 

GERMAN SOCIETY. 

Philip Hone, President. 
Charles Graebe, Secretary. 
C. W. Faber, Treasurer. 

H0MANE SOCIETY OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 

(Instituted in 1787.) 

John Adams, President. 
Anthony J. Bleecker, Secretary. 
Cornelius Dubois, Treasurer. 

NEW-YORK CITY TEMPERANCE SOCIETY. 

Samuel Stevens, President. 
E. S. Goold, Secretary. 
Frederick A. Tracy, Treasurer. 

NEW-YORK MANUMISSION SOCIETY. 

Peter A. Jay, President. 
George Nevi'bold, First Vice President. 
Wm. L. Stone, Second Vice President. 
Robert C. Cornell, Treasurer. 
Richard Field, Secretary. 
6 



82 ' RELlGlOnS, BENEVOLENT, AND 

■ ■■ — , ' ^ 

Henry Wood, Assistant Secretary. 
Joshua S. Underbill, Register. 

NEW-YORK INSTITUTION FOR THE BLIND. 

Samuel Akerly, M. D., President. 
John D. Russ, M. D., Secretary. 
Curtis Bolton, Treasurer. 

GENERAL SOCIETY OF MECHANICS AND TRADESiMEN OF 
THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 

(Instituted in 1780.) 

Edwin B. Clayton, President.* 
James Hopson, First Vice President. 
Adoniram Chandler, Second Vice President. 
William Mandeville, Treasurer. 
James Van Norden, Secretary. 
Robert Provost, Collector. 
Reuben Odell, Doorkeeper and Messenger. 
* The President of this Society is, ex officio, a Direc- 
tor of the Mechanics' Bank. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

E. D. Comstock, I Jacob P. Bunting, 

Andrew Surre, I Thomas T. Woodruff. 

ALMONERS. 

Stephen Conover, j George Conklin, 

John I. Labagh, | Thomas R. Mercein. 

NEW-YORK TYPOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. 

Henry A. Brown, President. 
Hugh Pattinson, Vice President. 
Samuel Woodworth, Secretary. 
William Osborn, Treasurer. 
George S. Wharam, Librarian. 
Thomas Crooker, Curator. 

NEW-YORK TYPOGRAPHICAL ASSOCIATION. 

H. D. Bristol, President. 
A. H. Hays, Vice President. 
John Windt, Treasurer. 
A. H. Krauth, Secretary. 
J. D. Wilson, Librarian. 
H. J. Egan, Janitor. 



i 



MORAL INSTITUTIONS. 83 



KNICKERBOCKER SOCIETY. 

Dr. C. C. Yates, President. 

Col. Cornelius Harsen, First Vice President. 

Col. Charles W. Timpson, Second Vice President. 

Christopher Y. Wample, Treasurer. 

William L. Prall, Recording Secretary. 

John J. Westervelt, Corresponding Secretary. 

Albert Vedder, Messenger. 



I?IISC£IiIiAN£OUS IIVSTITUTIOIVS. 

NEW-YORK STATE SOCIETY OF THE CINCINNATI. 

Morgan Lewis, President. 
John Trumbull, Vice President. 
Theodosius Fowler, Treasurer. 
Anthony Lamb, Assistant Treasurer. 
Charles Graham, Secretary. 
Anniversary, 4th of July. 

NEW-YORK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. 

Robert Lenox, President. 

W^illiam W. Woolsey, ? ,- t> -j . 

Isaac Carow, ^ ^ Vice Presidents. 

Henry L Wyckoff, Treasurer. 
John R. Hurd, Secretary. 

STANDING COMMITTEE. 

Isaac Carow, George Griswold, Pelatiah Perit, Peter 
I. Nevius, James Heard. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 

(Organized, Jan., 1828. Incorporated, May 2, 1829.) 

" For the purpose of encouraging and promoting do- 
mestic industry in this State and the United States, in 
agriculture, commerce, manufactures, and the arts, and 
any improvements made therein, by bestowing rewards 
and other benefits on those who shall make any such im- 
provements, or excel in any of the said branches." 



84 M1SCELLAN£0L'S INSTITUTIONS. 



TRUSTKES. 

James Tallmadge, President. 
Clarkson Crolius, "^ 

Martin E. Thompson, > Vice Presidents. 
James Lynch, } 

John A. Sidell, Treasurer. 
Edwin Williams, Recording Secretary. 
T. B. Wakeman, Corresponding Secretary. 
Annual election, second Thursday in May. 
Stated meetings, second Thursday in each month. 
The Institute is composed of four departments, viz : 

Agriculture, , President. 

Manufactures, James Lynch, do. 

Commerce, Silas Brown, do. 

The Arts, Charles C. Wright, do. 

The first Manufacturers' Fair, held under the auspices 
of the Institute, was in October, 1828, at the Masonic Hall, 
since which five other annual fairs have been held. 

ADDRESSES BEFORE THE INSTITUTE. 

July 4, 1828, Bv Henry M. Western. 

July 4, 1829, By Ralph Lockwood. 

October 19, 1829, By James Lynch. 

July 4, 1830, Bv Levi H. Clarke. 

October 14, 1830, By Tristam Burges, ofR. I. 

October 14, 1831, By Edward Everett, of Mass 

October 11, 1832, By Lyman Beecher, D. D. 

r\ * I 1 c; 1 ooo S By Joh» P- Kennedy, Esq., 

October 15, 1833, . . . . ^ ^ ^^ Baltimore. 

The Institute has published at different times, reports 
on the following subjects : cotton goods, glass, silk, 
indigo, cash duties and auctions, ship building, and ton- 
nage duties, and reports on the annual fairs. 

To encourage the culture of silk in the United States, 
the Institute, in 1829, imported a quantity of mulberry 
seed from France, which was distributed gratuitously to 
agriculturists. 

NEW-TORX BOARD OF TRADE. 

Hugh Auchincloss, President. 
Nathaniel Weed, First Vice President. 



BIISCELLAXEOUS INSTITUTIONS. 85 

Silas TBrown, Second Vice President. 
H. Booraem, Third Vice President. 
John W. Leavitt, Fourth Vice President. 
G. P. Disosway, Corresponding Secretary. 
James L. Curtis, Recording Secretary. 
Revo C. Hance, Treasurer. 

Committee of Reference. 
Daniel Jackson, Chairman. I Charles Kelsey, 
John Ely, | D. A. Cushman. 

Committee of Inquiry. 
Ralph Olmsted, I M. D. Benjamin, 

R. H. M'Curdy, ( Thomas Denny. 

The Hon. Henry R. Storrs, Counsellor. 

TONTINE COFFEE-HOUSE. 

(Instituted in 1794.) 

Originally 203 Nominees, now (1834,) 109 surviving. 
F. De Peyster, jr.. Chairman. 

COMMITTEE. 

Robert Lenox, Richard M. Lawrence, Peter Remsen, 
Henry Laight. 

mariners' and merchants' ASSOCIATIOIf. 

(No. 49 W^all-street.) 

For the registering of unemployed Officers and Seamen. 
Benjamin Strong, President. 
Reuben Brumley, Vice President. 
Augustus Averill, Secretary. 

THE GRAND LODGE OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK, 

Meet quarterly, on the first Wednesdays in June, Sep- 
tember, December, and March, at the Masonic Hall. 

OFFICERS. 

M. W. Morgan Lewis, Grand Master. 

Rt. W. Mordecai Myers, Deputy G. M. 

Rt. W. John Van Beuren, Sen. G. Warden. 

Rt. W. Joseph Cuyler, Jun. G. Warden. 

Rt. W. James Herring, G. Secretary. 

Rt. W. James Van Benschoten, G. Treasurer. 



86 MISCELLANEOUS INSTITUTIONS. 

Rt. W. and Rev. Peter A. Overbagh, G. Chaplain. 

Rt. W. Joseph Sprague, G. Marshall. 

Rt. W. Edward Seaman, G. Standard Bearer. 

W. Gerrit Lansmg, G. Pursuivant. 

W. Robert Ycung, G. Tiler. 

NEW-YORK HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

Jacob Lorillard, President. 

Philip Hone, ^ 

William NeilsoB, I 

Gideon Lee, } Vice Presidents. 

John J. Palmer, j 

Charles Oakley, J 

Benjamin M'Vickar, Corresponding Secretary. 

Wm. R. Cooke, Recording Secretary. 

John Groshon, Treasurer. 

, Librarian. 



€HUR€IIE:S. 

presbyterian. 

First Presbyterian Church, Wall-street, near Broad- 
way, Rev. W. W. Phillips, D. D. 

Brick Church, Beekman, n. Park, Rev. Gardiner 
Spring, D. D. 

Rutgers-street Church, Rutgers, corner of Henry, 
Rev. John M. Krebs. 

Cedar street Church, 43 Cedar, Rev. Cyrus Mason. 

Canal-street Church, Canal, c. Green, Rev. Robert 
M'Cartee, D. D. 

Laight-street Church, Laight, c. Varick, Rev. Samuel 
H. Cox, D. D. 

Seventh Church, Broome, c Ridge, Rev. Elihu W. 
Baldwin. 

Eighth Church, Christopher, c. Bleecker, Henry 
Hunter. 

Allen-street Church, Allen, n. Grand, Henry White. 

Central Pres. Church, Broome, n. Elm, Rev. Williani 
Patton. 



CHURCHES. 87 



Spring-Street Church, Spring, n. Varick, Rev. Henry 
G. Ludlow. 

Bleecker-street Church, Bleecker, n. Broadway, Rev. 
Erskine Mason. 

Bowery Church, 66 Bowery, Rev. John Woodbridge, 

Union Church, Prince c. Orange, Rev. Herman Norton. 
1st Free Pres. Church, Dey, c. Washington, Rev. Hel- 
fenstein. 
2d Free Pres. Church, 84 Chatham, Rev. Mr. Ingersoll. 
3d Free Pres. Church, Thompson, c. Houston, Rev. D. 

C. Lansing D. D. 

4th Free Pres. Church, Bowery, Rev. Mr. Granger. 
Scotch Church, Cedar, n. Broadway, Rev. J. M'Elroy, 

D. D. 

Scotch Church, 550 Pearl, 

Murray-street Church, 45 Murray, Rev. Thomas 
M'Aulev, D. D., LL. D. 

Associate Pres. Church, Grand, c. Mercer, Rev. 
Andrew Stark. 

Second Avenue Church, Second Avenue, n. Third, 
Rev. Jno. A. Murray. 

West Church, Carmine, n. Varick, Rev. David R. 
Downer. 

Associate Pres. Church, Prince, c. Thompson, Mr. 
Irving. 

Reformed, 47 Chambers, Rev. Mr. M'Leod. 

Reformed, Sixth, n. Christopher, Rev. Mr. Kipp. 

Fourteentli, Franklin, u. Chapel, Rev. D. Caw, A. R. 

Coloured Pres. Church, Frankfort, c. William, Rev. 
Theodore S. Wright. 

North Church, Sixth Avenue, Vacant. 

Village Church, Eighth Avenue, Rev. BIr. Page. 

Brainerd Church, c. of Essex and Stanton, Rev. Mr. 
Deruelle. 

Eighth Avenue Church, Eighth Avenue, Rev. Mr. 
Edwards. 

Burial grounds, Sixth, n. Wooster. 
Do. do. Twenty-fifth, n. Eighth Avenue. 



83 



CHURCHES. 



DUTCH REFORMED. 

The Consistory Rooms of the Collegiate Reformed 
Dutch Chtirches, cor. Nassau and Ann. 

fc^outh Church, Exchange Place, n. Broad, Rev. James 
M. Mathews, D. D. 

Middle Church, Li-^ t tr r* rv 
berty, c. Nassau, I (v ^''l^ i' n n 

Nonh Church Wil- f y/ ^- ^^"Txrf; ^' ^^ 
liam, c. Fuiton, J Thomas De Witt, D. D. 

Northwest Church, Franklin, c. Church, Rev. George 
Dubois. 

Northeast Church, Market, c. Henry, Rev. William 
M'xMurray, D. D. 

Church, Broome, c. Greene, Rev. Jacob Brodhead, 
D. D. 

Church, Greene, c. Houston, Rev. Eli Baldwin, D. D. 

Church, Bleecker, c. Amos, Rev. N. J. Marselus. 

Church, Ninth, near Broadway, Rev. Francis M. Kip. 

Church, Harlfeni, Rev. Cornelius Vermeule. 

Mission Church, Houston, c. Forsyth, Rev. George 
Bourne. 

Young Men's Mission Church, Third, n. East River, 
Rev. Richard D. Van Kleek. 

Church, Bloominedale, Rev. J. AI Burtis. 

True Reformed D. C, King, n. M'Dougal, Rev. C. T. 
Demarest. 

German, 21 Forsyth. 

General burial ground, Houston, c. Forsyth and 
Eldridge. 

EPISCOPALIANS. 

Rt. Rev. Benjamin T. Onderdonk, D. D. Bishop of 
the Diocess. 

Trinitv Church, Broadway," 
opposite Wall Rev. Wm. Berrian, D.D. 

.Nt. Paul's Chapel, Broad- ^ Rev. John. F Schroeder, 



wav, c. Vesey, 

St. John's "Chapel, Varick, 
opp. St. John's Park, 



Rev.Henry Anthon,D.D. 



CHURCHES. 89 



St. George's Church, Beekman, c. Cliff, Rev. James 
mUnor, D. D. 

French du St. Esprit, Franklin, c. Church, Rev. A. 
V'erren. 

_,,._,, , ot A .1 ( Rev. Thomas Lyell,D.D. 

Christ Church, 81 Anthony, j p^^^^ ^^^g^t Smedes, jr 

Grace Church, Broadway, c. Rector, Rev. Thomas H. 
Taylor. 

St. Mark's Church, Stuyvesant, c. Second Avenue, 
Rev. Wm. Creighton, D. D. 

Zion Church, Mott, c. Cross, Rev. Thomas Breintnall. 

St. Stephen's Church, Chrystie, c. Broome, Rev.Wm. 
Jackson. 

St. Thomas' Church, Broadway, c. Houston, Rev. F. 
L. Hawks, D. D. 

St. Luke's Church, Hudson, op. Grove, Rev. W. R. 
Wliittingham. 

Church of the Ascension, Canal, n. Broadway, Rev. 
Manton Eastburn. 

All Saints Church, Henry, c. Scammel, Rev. Wm. A. 
Clark, D. D. 

St. Clement's Church, Amity, n. M'Dougal, Rev. L. 
P. Bavard. 

Mission Church of the Holy Evangelists, Vandewater, 
Rev. Hugh Smith. 

Mission Church of the Epiphany, Stanton, n. Norfolk, 
Rev. Lott Jones. 

St. Peter's Church, Twentieth, n. Ninth Avenue, Rev. 
Benjamin I. Haight. 

St. Philip's Church, (coloured,) 33 Centre, Rev. Peter 
Williams. 

St. Michael's Church, Bloom- 
ingdale, 

St. James' Church, Hamilton 

^Vy<^''^; , ^^ 1, Tvr u . ^ Rev. Wm. Richmond. 
St. Mary's Church, Manhat- '^ 

tanville, 

St. Ann's Church, Ft. Wash- 
ington. 



90 CHURCHES. 



St. Andrews' Church, Harlaem, Rev. Abram B. Hart. 
Trinity Church Vestry Office, Fulton, c. Church, W. 
Johnson, Compt. 
Burial ground, Hudson, c. Clarkson. 

BAPTISTS. 

First Baptist Church, 33 Gold, Rev. Wm, Parkinson. 

Oliver-street Church, 6 Oliver, Rev. Spencer H. Cone. 

Mulberry-street Church, Mulberry, n. Chatham, Rev. 
Archibald Maclay. 

Bethel Church, Delancy, c. Chrystie, Rev. W. G. 
Miller. 

Beriah Church, M'Dougal, op. Vandam, Rev. Duncan 
Dunbar. 

Union Church, Stanton, Rev. George Benedict. 

North Church, Bedford, c. Christopher, Rev. Jacob H. 
Brouner. 

East Church, Grand, n. Pitt, Rev. John Middleton. 

Ebenezer Church, North, c. Suffolk. 

South Church, 84 Nassau, Rev. C. G. Sommers. 

Broome-street Church, Broome, c. Cannon, Rev. John 
Mitchell. 

Abyssinian Church, (coloured,) 44 Anthony, Rev. Jas. 
Hayborn. 

Sixteenth Baptist Church, Eighteenth, Rev. D. Ber- 
nard. 

Central Baptist Church, Broadway Hall, Rev. O. 
Winslow. 

Welsh Baptist Church, c. King and Hudson, Rev. W. 
Jones. 

Zion Baptist Church, (African,) Duane, Rev. J. S. 
Raymond. 

Amity-street Church, Amity, n. Greene, Rev. W. R. 
Williams. 

General Baptist Church, Laurens. 

Office of the Am. Bapt. Home Missionary Society, and 
of the Baptist Repository, Clinton Hall, c. Beekman and 
Nassau. 

Burial ground, North, n. First Avenue. 



CHURCHES. 9^ 



METHODIST EPISCOPALIANS. 

First Methodist Church, 32 John, Rev. Fitch Reed. 
Second Methodist Church, 8 Forsyth, Rev. Daniel 

^Thhd' Methodist Church, 180 Duane, Rev. Charles 

^FouT Me'thodist Church, 130 Allen, Rev. Laban 

^ F^iftii Methodist Church, Willet, n. Broome, Rev. Benj. 

^ShTth Methodist Church, Bedford, c. Morton, Rev. 

-^"levernh'MeU^odist Church, Seventh, n. Third Ave- 

"lifhS MetSrt'chu^S. Second, n. Avenue D,Rev. 

"* NM; Kodist Church, 61 Greene, Rev. Peter P. 

^Tendf Methodist Church, Twentieth, n. Eighth Ave- 
nue, Rev. Josiah Bowen. 

INDEPENDENT METHODIST. 

Independent Church, 56 Chrystie, Rev. Wm. Stillwell. 

Protestant Church, 61 Anthony. 

Protestant Church, Sullivan, n. Sprmg, Rev. Mr. 

Thomas. , „^^ _ 

Protestant Church, 359 Broome. 
Primitive Church, 43 Elizabeth. . 
Primitive Church, Domimck, n. Vanck. 

'''zl'oTchurch, (coloured,) 156 Church, Peter Van Has. 
Burial grounds, First, n. Second Avenue. 

ROMAN CATHOLIC. 

S, Peter's Church, Barclay, | g-.Joto Power, 
"Chrisf Church, Ann, n.^Rev. F. Varella 



92 - CHURCHES. 



r John Kelly, 

St. Patrick's Cathedral, Mott, c. j Charles C. Vise, 
Prince, j T. C. Levins, 

[John Conroy. 

St. Mary'? Church, Grand, c. Ridge, Rev. W. Quarters. 

St. Joseph's Church, Rev. James Commesky. 

German Chapel, Sixth Avenue, Rev. Mr. RafFeiner. 

Burial grounds at Cathedral, also on First Avenue, be- 
tween Eleventh and Twelftli sts., and, also, near Deaf 
and Dumb Asylum. 

FRIENDS. 

Meeting House, Rose, n. Pearl. 
Meeting House, Hester, c. Elizabeth. 
Meeting House, 38 Henry. 
Meeting House, 9 Cannine. 

LUTHERAN. 

St. James', Oranere, Rev. William D. Strobel. 
St. Matthew's, Walker, n. Broadway, Rev. F. W. 
Geissenhainer, D. D., and Rev. F. W. Geissenhainer, jr. 

UNIVERSALTSTS. 

First Society of Universalists, Orchard, n. Broome, 
Rev. T. J. Sawyer. 

Society of United Friends, Duane, c. Augustus, Rev. 
E. Mitchell. 

Third Society of Universalists, Sixth Avenue, n. 
Amity. 

UNITARIANS. 

Unitarian Church, 109 Chambers, Rev. Wm. Ware. 
Unitarian Church, Mercer, c. Prince, Rev. Wm. P. 
Lunt. 

INDEPENDENTS OR CONGREGATrONALISTS. 

Providence Chapel, 46 Thompson, Rev. J. Harrison. 
Independent Welsh, 137 Mulberry, Rev. James Davies. 



CHURCHES. 93 



JEWS. 

Synagogue of Poi'tuguese Jews, 15 Crosby, Isaac 
Seixas. 

Synagogue of German Jews, Elm, n. Grand, Alexan- 
der Hart. 

Synagogue, Grand, Eliazer Metz. 

MORAVIAN. 

United Brethren, 104 Fulton. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Mariners' Church, Roosevelt, Rev. Henry Chase. 

New Jerusalem Church, 406 Pearl. 

Christian Church, Broome, Rev. Simon Clough. 

TOTAL NUMBER OF CHURCHES IN THE CITY. 



Presbyterian, 33 

Dutch Reformed, 15 

Episcopalian, 24 

Baptist, 18 

Methodist, 19 

Roman Catholic, 6 

Friends, 4 

Lutheran, 2 



Universalist, 3 

Unitarian, 2 

Independent, 2 

Jews, 3 

Moravian, 1 

Miscellaneous, 3 

Grand Total, 135 



BANKS. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE BANKS IN THE CITY. 

The Banks are open every day in the year, from 10, 
A. M., to 3, P. M., except Sundays, Christmas day, 
New-Year's day, the Fourth of July, and general Holi- 
days appointed by legal authority, and the Bank of New- 
York on Good Fridays. 

The rate of discount is six per cent, per annum, (cal- 
culating 360 days to the year,) excepting when notes 
have over 63 days to run, when the State incorporated 
Banks have the privilege of charging 7 per cent. 

Bills or notes offered for discount must be enclosed in 
a letter directed to the cashier the day before discount 



94 



BANKS. 



day, advising the name of the person upon whose ac- 
count It IS oflered, &c. 

Bills or notes lodged for collection, are collected free 
ot charge to the holders, except when at a distance. 
When protested, the person lodging the same pays the 
charge of protest. ' "^ 

Deposits and notes for collection, must be entered in 
the dealer s book at the time when deposited. No in- 
terest allowed on deposits. 

RATES AT WHICH FOREIGN COINS ARE RECEIVED 
AT THE BANKS. 

^ ^^^^^^ Coins. Gold Coins. 

Crowns, 109 cents French, 87 1-4 c. p. dwt. 

Dollars, 100 " English, 88 8-9 " 

Five Francs, 93 3-10 Spanish, 84 
Pistareens, 16 

BRANCH BANK OF THE UNITED STATES. 

(15 Wall-street.) 

Chartered 10th April, 1816, to endure 20 years. Capi- 
tal of the parent Bank 35,000,000 dollars"; New-York 
Branch employs 2,500,000 dollars. Shares 100 dollars 
each. United States holds 70,000 shares, being 7,000,000 
dollars, individual subscription 280,000 shares, equal 
to 28,000,000 dollars. The President of the Branch 
Bank is ex-officio Loan Officer of the United States for 
the State of New-York. First Clerk in the Loan Office 
is Henry A. Ovington. Discount days, Wednesdays and 
toaturdays. Dividends, 1st Monday in January and July. 
Election, last of November. 

Isaac Lawrence, President. 

Morris Robinson, Cashier. 
xj j/* ^^^^,^' Henry Kneeland, Charles Brugiere, David 
Hadden, John S. Crary, James Boyd, jr. Shepherd, 
Knapp Isaac S. Hone, P. I. Nevius, R. I. Cheesebrough, 
W. W. Woolsey— Directors. General Directors.— 
Robert Lenox, John Rathbone, jr. 

John L. Lawrence, Attorney. 

Henry Laight, Notary. 



BANKS. 95 



BANK OF AMERICA. 
(30 Wall-street.) 

Chartered 1812, for 20 years ; renewed till 1852. Ca- 
pital 2,000,000 dollars. Election, 1st Monday in May. 
100 dollars each share. Discount days, Tuesdays and 
Fridays. Dividends, January and July. 

George Newbould, President. 

D. Thompson, Cashier. 
Thomas Buckley, Geo. Griswold, Stephen Whitney, 
Jona. Goodhue, Benj. L. Swan, John Johnston, Peter 
Crary, jr., J. H. Rowland, Fred. Sheldon, Jno. B. Law- 
rence, John W. Leavitt, David Lee, Sam'l M. Fox, Chas. 
Dickinson, Jeromus Johnson,* John Targee*— Directors. 

S. C. Williams, Notary. 

BANK OF NEW-YORK. 

(32 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated March, 1791, to endure until the 2d 
Tuesday in May, 1811. Charter was renewed until the 
2d Tuesday in May, 1832. Renewed in 1831 to 1st Janu- 
ary, 1853. Capital 1,000,000 dollars. Election, 2d Tues- 
day in May. 500 dollars each share. Discount days, 
Tuesdays and Thursdays. Dividends, 1st May and No- 
vember. 

Cornelius Heyer, President. 
Anthony P. Halsey, Cashier, 
J. Waddington, G. G. Rowland, P. Schermerhorn, 
Charles M'Evers, John Oothout, Robert Maitland, Henry 
Beeckman, Gurdon Buck, Edward R. Jones, George S. 
Robbins, John H. Hicks, Robert Benson — Directors. 
H. & E. Wilkes, Notaries. 

butchers' and drovers' BANK. 

(128 Bowery, near Grand-street) 

Incorporated April 28, 1830, till January 1, 1853. Capi- 
tal 300,000 dollars. Shares 25 dollars each. Election, 



State Directors. 



96 



BANKS. 



2d Tuesday in July. Discount davs, Wednesdays and 
baturdays. Notes ofiered same days. 

Benjamin M. Brown, President. 
Clarence S. Bayley, Cashier. 
Jacob Aims, John Perrin, E. H. Warner, Caleb Bart- 
lett, Arnest Fink, John Campbell, Wm. E. Craft, John 
Wood, David Cotheal, James Lovett, G. Ostrander, J. P. 
Bunting— Directors. 

Henry J. Feltus, Notary. 

CHEMICAL BANK. 
(216 Broadway, opposite St. Paul's Cliurch.) 

^nn^noWn^'"'^ ^P'''^ ^' ^^24, for 21 years. Capital 
500,000 dollars. Shares 25 dollars. Election, 1st Mon- 
day m April. Discounts daily. Dividends, 1st of Feb- 
ruary and AuEfust. 

John Mason, President. 
Archibald Craiff, Cashier. 
Gideon Tucker, Thos T. Woodruff, Wra. T. M'Coun, 
John Q. Jones, George Jones, Gerard H. Coster- 
Directors. 

James Kent, Counsellor. 
John Q. Jones, Factory Agent. 
Samuel A. Porter, Notary and Attorney. 

CITY BANK. 

(38 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated 1812, for 20 years. Extended in 1831, 
for 20 years. Capital 720,000 dollars. 45 dollars each 
share. Officers elected 1st Tuesday in June. Discount 
days, Mondays and Thursdays. Dividends, first of May 
and first of November. 

Thos. Bloodgood President, 

G. A. Worth, Cashier. 
Jordan Wright, C. R. Suydam, Wm. F. Pell, Benj. 
Codies, H. Van Wagenen, Joseph Foulke, R. J. Walker, 
Wm. W. Fox, Thomas Tobias, Abm. Bell, Henry Dela- 
field, Jphn P. Stagg, Oliver Corwin— Directors. 

Richard I. Wells, Notary. 

Benjamin Clark, Attorney. 



BANKS. 97 

DELAWARE AND HUDSON CANAL COMPANY. 

(28 Wall-street.) 

Chart<M-e(l in 1825, for the ])urpof!e of tnaking a Canal 
from the Hudson River to iioncsdale, in Pennsylvania, 
with banking privileges. Capital 1,500,000 dollars. 
500,000 may be employed in banking. Shares 100 dollars. 
Election, 1st Tuesday in March. Discount days, Wed- 
nesdays and Satiu-days. Dividends, June and December. 

John Wurts, President. 

John H. Williams, Treasurer. 
Philip Hone, Joseph Bayley, Wm. Worrell, Samuel 
Reynolds, Wm. M. Halsted, Allison Post, Isaac S. Piatt, 
John Ferguson, Knowles Taylor, Joseph Sands, Wm. E. 
Lee, Edward Coleman — Directors. 

Russel F. Lord, Chief Engineer. 

Wm. E. Duscomb, Notary. 

FULTON BANK. 

(Coi-ner Fulton and Pearl streets.) 

Incorporated April 1st, lo-24, to continue 20 years. Ca- 
pital 600,000 dollars. Shares 30 dollars each. Election, 
last Tuesday in March. Discount days, Wednesdays 
and Saturdays. Dividends, 1st May and November. 

John Adams, President. 

William J. Lane, Cashier. 
Benj. Deforest, Amos Palmer, Robt. Carter, Reuben 
Withers, Jos. Lawrence, Anson G. Phelps, C. O. Halsted, 
Jos. Kernochan, Valentine G. Hall, O. Mauran, John 
R. Willis, Robt. B. Minturn— Directors. 

Charles A. Clinton, Notary. 

GREENWICH BANK. 

(394 Hudson-street.) 

Incorporated 17th April, 1830, for 25 years. Capital 
200,000 dollars. Shares 25 dollars each. Dividends, 1st 
of August and February- Discount Notes, must be of- 
fered the days previous to Tuesdays and Fridays. Elec- 
tion, 1st Monda}' in June. 



98 



BANKS. 



Samuel Whittemore, President. 
Jno. R. Satterlce, Cashier. 
Isaac L. Varian, James N. Wells, Robert Hallidav, 
Mordecai Myers, John Groshon, Chas. Oakley, Jos. W. 
Beadel, Thomas Camming, Nath'l Jarvis, Timothy 
VVhittemore, Robert Wiltse — Directors. 

Wm. L. Morris, Director, Att. &, Conn. 
John R. Satterlee, Notary. 

LEATHER MANUFACTURERS' BANK. 

(334 Pearl-street.) 

Incorporated April 23d, 1832. Expires ] st June, 18C^ 
Capital 600,000 dollars. 50 dollars per share. Election 
1st Monday in June. Discount days, Tuesdays and 
Iridays. "^ 

Gideon Lee, President. 
Francis W. Edmonds, Cashier. 
Austin Melvin, Ogden E. Edwards, James Meinell, 
Morgan L. femith, L. M. Hoffman, E. K. Prichett, Jona- 
than Trotter, VV. W. De Forest, Isaac J. Bicknell, Moses 
Allen, Jehiel Jagger, Elb't J. Anderson— Directors. 
Franklin S. Kinney, Attorney and Notary. 

MANHATTAN COMPANY. 

(23 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated in 1799. Charter uidimited. Capita 
2,050,000 dollars. Election, 1st Tuesday in December 
50 dollars each share. Discount days, Mondays am 
Thursdays. Dividends, July and January. 
Maltby Gelston, President. 
Robert White, Cashier. 

ix/'n?',9''^r^7' •^'^t''' Thompson, James M'Bride, Wm 
^-Jj^'^'^^J,^^^'Ji^^^^ersley, David S.Kennedy, Wn i 
Paulding, Thos. Suftern, W. B. Crosby, S. D Beekmau, 

•'^"?« ^i"«^"' '^"d Richard Riker, City Recorder, ex 
officio — Directors. 

Auijustus Floyd, Notary. 



BANKS. 99 

mechanics' bank. 

(16 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated 23d of March, 1810, with a capital of 
1,500,000 dollars. In 1811, increased the capital to 
2,000,000 dollars. To endure until 2d Tuesday in April, 
1832. Renewed in 1831, till 1855. Election, 1st Tues- 
day in April. 25 dollars each share. Discount days, 
Wednesdays and Saturdays. Dividends, 1st of Feb- 
ruary and 1st of August. 

John Fleming, President. 

Heman Baldwin, Cashier. 
Jacob Lorillard, Gabriel Furman, Francis Cooper, 
Samuel Hicks, H. C. De Rliani, John M'Conib, Peter 
Sharpe, George Ireland, Robert Speir, John Leonard, 
Geo. Arcularius, Tlios. A. Ronalds, John Fleming, and 
Edwin B. Clayton, (President of the General Society 
of Mechanics and Tradesmen, e^c-o^cio) — Directors. 
H. Westervelt, Notary. 

mechanics' and traders' bank. 

(Corner of Norfolk and Grand streets.) 

Incorporated April 15th, 1830, till Jan. 1st, 1857. Ca- 
pital 200,000 dollars, in shares of 25 dollars each. Elec- 
tion, 2d Tuesday in July. Discount days, Tuesdays 
and Fridays. 

Perez Jones, President. 
J E. D. Brown, Cashier. 

4 Fred. A. Tracy, Zeb. Ring, John Rogers, Thomas H. 
; Mills, John Clapp, John Leveridge, Francis Fickett, Wm. 
1 E. Dodge, S. G. Wheeler, Thompson Price, Jeremiah 
i Clark, Stephen Lyon, Abijah Fisher, Russel Dart. 
j John Leveridge, Attorney and Notary. 

merchants' BANK. 

(25 Wall-street.) 

Incorj)orated in 1805, to endure until 1st Tuesday in 
June, 1832. Renewed in 1831, till 1857. Capital 
1,490,000 dollars. Election, 1st Tuesday in June. 50 



100 BANES. 

dollars each share. Discount days, Wednesdays and 
Fridays. Dividends, 1st of June and 1st of December. 

John J. Pahner, President. 

Walter Mead, Cashier. 
Henry I. Wyckoff, James Heard, David Lydig, Wm. 
S. Herriman, John Spring, Benj. Aymar, Harvey Weed, 
John Crumby, John D. Wolfe, Treasurer of State, ex- 
offico — Directors. J. D. Campbell, Notary. 

merchants' exchange bank. 

(Corner of Greenwich and Dey streets.) 

Incorporated April 29th, 1829, for 20 years. Capital 
750,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. Election, 1st 
Monday in June. Discount days, Wednesdays and 
Saturdays. 

Peter Stagg, President. 
W. M. Vermilve, Cashier. 
Henry Wvckofi; H. F. Tallmadere, W. F. Havemeyer, 
J. V. Nostrand, Wm. W. Chester, Eli Hart, Goold Hoyt, 
Henry Rankin, R. M'Cnrdy, Jos. B. Varnum, Charles 
Denison, Sam'l Thomson — Directors. 

John L. Graham, Notary and Counsellor. 

national bank. 

(19 Wall-street.) 

Chartered 30th April, 1829, for 28 rears, with a capital 
of 1,000,000 dollars. In 1830, capital reduced to 750,000 
dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. Commenced opera- 
tions 17th May, 1831. Election, 2d Tuesday in July. 
Discount days,"Tuesdays and Fridays. Dividends, 1st 
of April and 1st of October. 

Albert Gallatin, President. 
Sam'l Flewwelling, Cashier. 
Wm. James, jr., James Magee, Henry Andrew, Seth 
Grosvenor, Daniel Jackson, John Wilson, Dudley 
Selden, Abm. Bloodgood, Elisha Riggs, Joseph Bou- 
chaud, John Chambers — Directors. 
Joseph Law, Notary. 



BANES. 101 

NEW-YORK DRY DOCK COMPANY. 
(Bank, cor. Avenue D. and Tenth-st. Office 333 Pearl-st., Franklin^sq.) 

Incorporated 12th April, 1825, perpetually. Capital 
420,000 dollars; with banking privileges. Shares 30 
dollars. Discount days, Tuesdays and Fridays. Elec- 
tion, 2d Monday in January. Dividends, January and 
July. 

Benj. Strong, President. 
Wm. Stebbins, Cashier. 
E. D. Comstock, Miles R. Burke, Geo. W Bruen, W. 
H. Denning, Obadiah Holmes, Russell Stebbins, John 
B. Lasala, William Paxson Hallett — Directors. 

Wm. Paxson Hallett, Attorney and Notary. 

NORTH RIVER BANK. 

(Corner of Greenwich and Dey streets.) 

Incorporated Febuary 16th, 1821. Charter to continue 
21 years. Election, 1st Monday in June. Dividends, Jan- 
uary and July. Capital 500,000 dollars. Shares 50 dol- 
lars each, THscounts by the Board, Tuesday and Friday. 
Ditto by Committee, every day. 

Leonard Kip, President. 
A. B. Hays, Cashier. 
Thomas Brooks, Charles Trinder, Edwin Clark, Pe- 
ter A. Jay, Charles Town, Thomas Darling, Jas. Bene- 
dict, Nath'l Weed, James Swords, Aaron Clark, S. D. 
Rogers, S. W. Anderson — Directors. 
G. D. Cooper, Notary. 
Peter A. Jay, Counselloi*. 

PHENIX BANK. 

(24 Wall-street.) 

Charter dated June 15th, 1812, for 20 years . Continued 
to 1854. Capital 500,000 dollars. Officers elected 1st 
Tuesday in July. 25 dollars each share. Discount 
days, Wednesdays and Saturdays. Dividends, 1st of 
January and 1st of July. 



102 BANKS. 



Henry Gary, President. 
John Delafield, Cashier. 
R. K. Delafield, Assistant Cashier. 
D. S. Jones, Abm. Valentine, David Bryson, Henry^ 
Cary, Benj. Smith, John Robbins, Henry Parish, G. 
Sharpe, (State,) C. V. S. Roosevelt, M.H. Grinnell, John 
Gray, C. H. Russell, Rob't Ray — Directors. 
William Van Hook, Notary. 

SEVENTH WARD BANK. 

(53 East Broadway.) 

Incorporated April 20th, 1833, for 30 years. Capital 
500,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. Election, 2d 
Tuesday of June. Discounts on Monday and Thursday 
evenings. Notes offered same day, 

Walter Bowne, President. 

Wm. O'Connor, Cashier. 

Abraham Dally, Henry Erben, Henry Ogden, Luther 

Halsey, Wm. S. Coe, Jas. R. Whiting, David Brown, 

Gilbert Hopkins, Wm. Scott-, J. V. Greenfield, Philip 

Harmon, Sam'l N. Dodge — Directors. 

James R. Whiting, Notary and Counsellor. 

tradesmen's BANK. 

(177 Chatbam-street.) 

Incorporated in 1823, for 10 years. Renewed in 1831, 
for 24 years. Capital 400,000 \lollars. Shares 40 dol- 
lars each. Election, 1st Monday of July. Discount 
days, Tuesdays and Fridays. Dividends, 1st of July and 
January. 

Preserved Fish, President. 

W. H. Falls, Cashier. 
James Hall, Shivers Parker, Joshua Hyatt, Eldad 
Holmes, Isaac Frost, Eben'r. Cauldwell, Thads. Seymour, 
Henry W. Bool, Wm. S. Smith, William Vail, David Ly- 
on, Nicholas Gibert, Elisha W. King, S. W. Lowerre, 
Gilbert Coutant, Cyrus Hitchcock, Richard Lawrences 
Josiah Mojcy, T. J. Townsend — Directors. 

Peter A. Cowdrey, Notai-y, 



BANKS. 103 

UNION BANK. 

(17 Wall street.) 

Incorporated March, 1811. To endure until 1831. Re- 
newed in 1831, till 1853. Capital 1,000,000 dollars. Elec- 
tion, 1st Monday in March. 50 dollars each share. Dis- 
count days, Mondays and Thursdays. Dividends, 1st of 
May and 1st of November. 

Wm. Howard, President. 
Daniel Ehbets, jr.. Cashier. 
Wm. Howard, Knowles Taylor, Sam'l S, Howland, 
Morris Ketchum, Edwin U. Berryman, Edward Kellogg, 
Mortimer Livingston, Rufus Prime, Wm. A. White, Jas. 
Chesterman — Directors. 

E. Jesup, jr., Notary. 

SAVINGS BANKS. 

NEW-YORK BANK FOR SAVINGS. 

(Office No. 43 Chambers-street.) 

Office open every afternoon from 4 to 6. Friday after- 
noons, exclusively for females. Dividends, 3d Monday 
in January and July. 

John Pintard, President. 
Peter A. Jay, First Vice President. 
Philip Hone, Second Vice President. 
Thomas Buckley, Third Vice President. 
Jno. Oothout, Treasurer. 
R. C. Cornell, Secretary. 
D. E. Tylee, Accountant. 
Benjamin Clark, Francis Cooper, Cornelius Du Bois, 
Gabriel Furman, Jona. Goodhue, John E. Hyde, John 
B. Lawrence, Zechariah Lewis, James Lovett, Denma 
M'Carthy, Cornelius R. Suvdam, Lindley Murray, 
James Palmer, Nathaniel Richards, Benj. Strong, Benj. 
L. Swan, Najah Taylor, H. Van Wagenen, M. Van 
Schaick, William Wilson, James F. De Peyster— Di- 
rectors. 



104 BANKS. 

It appears by the Report of the above Institution, for 
the last year, that the heaviest deposits were made in the 
months of May, June, July, and December. The great- 
est of all in the month of June last. 

The largest amounts of money were drawn for in 
April and July. 

Among the depositors, the most numerous class are 
domestic sei-vants, 8G0 in number — the next the common 
labourers, 589 — the next seamstresses, 331 — the next 
clerks, 150 — carpenters, 146 — tailors, 123. 

The most provident of the depositors appear to be the 
single women, 952 in number — the widows 434, and 
coloured people 198, out of about 5000 persons doing 
business with the bank. 

seamen's bank for savings. 

(49 Wall-street.) 

Najah Taylor, President. 

Benj. Strong, J vice Presidents. 
Benj. Clark, ) 
Caleb Barstow, Secretary. 
Gurdon Buck, Treasurer. 
Bank open daily, (Sundays excepted,) from 12 to 1 
o'clock. Chartered 1829. 

GREENWICH SAVINGS BANK. 

(No. 10 Carmine-street. Incorporated 18.33.) 

Open for the transaction of business every Monday 
and Friday. 

George Suckley, President. 

Charles Oaklev, ? ^.^^ Presidents. 

James N. \\ells, ) 

P-A.Cushman, ? Secretaries. 

W. W. Rodman, S 

John R. Satterlee, Treasurer. 
Stuart F. Randolph, William L. Morris, James B. 
Murray, Samuel Whittemore, Michael Van Beuren, John 
Delamater, Robert Halliday, John Groshon, Timothy 
Whittemore, Flovd Smith, Silas M. Stilwell, Isaac L. 
Vaxian, Francis Fickett, Joseph Tucker, Thomas Cum- 



IJTSURANCE COMP ANIES. 105 

minsfs, Joseph W. Beadcl, John Milderbere:er, Nathaniel 
Jarvis, John Bolton, David Vandervoort, John Rogers, 
Georsre Ribbet, Gideon Lee, Abraham Van Nest, George 
P. Rogers, Wm. C. Rhinelander, Thomas S. Stevens — 
Directors. 



INSURANCE COITIPANIES. 
FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

iETNA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(50 Wall-street.) 

Passed March 31st, 1823, for 21 years. Capital 400,000 
dollars. Shares 50 dollars. Dividends, May and No- 
vember. Election, 1st Monday in June. 
Charles Town, President. 
Henry Lott, Secretary. 

Jno. Wright, jr. Frederick Pentz, Gideon Ostrander, 
Luke Torboss, Egbert Ward, John Allen, L. 31. Hoffman, 
Chester Clark, P. S. Foulke, Henry Jackson, Richard 
Kidney, Joseph Sackett, J. G. Dyckman, Robert P. Bell, 
George D. Strong, Asa H. Center, T. Anthony, Nich's 
Gibert, John Low, jr., V. G. Hall, John Turner, Lewis 
Webb, J. Van Boskerck, R. Pegg, Charles Trinder, 
W. A. F. Pentz, Russell Stebbins, D. Jackson, J. L. 
Hart, M. L. Marsh, John D. Jaques, M. M. Noah, D. A. 
Cushman, George Pomeroy, Silas M. Stilwell, A. B. 
Hays, A. Cornwall, N. Berthoud, J. Grosvenor, J. R. 
Jobnson, J. R. St. John, G. S. Marschalk, Aaron Clark, 
Cephas Mills, John P. Stagg, H. Booraem, Timothy 
Southmayd, Peter Forrester, Joseph Otis — Directors. 
E. Williams, Surveyor. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(Basement room City Bank Building.) 

Incorporated April 20th, 1832, for 30 years. Capital 
200,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. Election, 2d 
Monday in December. 

David Aug. Clarkson, President. 

James M'Vickar, Secretary. 



1()6 INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

P. Perit, W. H. Aspinwall, Francis Olmsted, James 
Monroe, Joseph Henriques, Wni. Beach Lawrence, H. 
S. Leverich, J. I. Roosevelt, jr., Benj. M'Vickar, James 
W. Otis — Directors. 

CITY FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(169 Chatham-square, corner of James-slreet.) 

Incorporated in 1833, for 30 years. Capital 300,000 
dollars. Election, 2d Wednesday in February. 
John Barrow, President. 
R. A. Reading, Secretary. 

Preserved Fish, Cornelius "nV. Lawrence, Josiah Macy, 
Abraham Bell, Robert Hicks, Robert J. Walker, Tho- 
mas J. Townsend, William H. Falls, Peter S. Titus, 
John D. Wright, John Barrow, Joseph W. Corlies, Ben- 
jamin Clark, Isaac Frost, Edward A. Wright, Amos 
VVillets, William C. White, David S. Brown, Cyrus 
Hitchcock, Thomas Carpenter, Dan. Trimble — Direc- 
tors. 

CLINTON FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(Not yet in operation.) 

Capital 300,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars. 

EAGLE FIRE COMPANY. 

(59 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated 1806, charter perpetual. Capital 500,000 
dollars, with a privilege to increase to 1,000,000 dollars. 
Shares 100 dollars each. Officers elected 2d Tuseday 
in January. Dividends, January and July. 

Edward W. Laight, President. 

Thomas Glover, Secretary. 
David Lydig, Philip Hone, James Boggs, Thos. W. 
Ludlow, J. S. Schermerhorn, Maltby Gelston, Henry 
Laight, James I. Jones, Henry Rogers, Thos. L. Wells, 
Robert Ray, James Strong — Directors. 

EQUITABLE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(48 Wall-street.) 

Chartered April 20th, 1823, for 21 years. To insure 
against loss by fire as well as loss or injury by robbery 



INSURANCE COMPANIES. 107 

committed on furniture or personal property in houses 
or stores, while the proprietors are absent from the city. 
Capital 300,000 dollars. Election, 1st Monday in June. 
Shares 50 dollars. Dividends, 1st January and July. 

Thomas R. Mercein, President. 

Lebbeus Chapman, Secretary. 
William Burgoyne, Harvey Weed, Shepherd Knapp, 
Thos. Darling, David Kimberly, Lambert Suydam, A. C 
Thompson, David Hadden, Sam'l VVhittemore, L. Van 
Nostrand, Sam'l B. Ruggles, Sam'l Stilwell, Amasa 
Wright, Geo. Rapelye, Noah Jarvis, Wm. B. Lawrence, 
Joseph W. Duryee, Rich'd L Wells — Directors. 

farmers' fire insurance and loan company. 

(34 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated in 1822, till 1837, with the privilege of 
receiving trusts and acting as trustees. 10,000 shares of 
50 dollars each, is 500,000 dollars. Election, 1st Monday 
in June. Dividends, January and July. 
Elisha Tibbits, President. 
John King, Secretary. 

Fred. A. Tracy, Geo. Griswold, Lewis Curtis, Eli 
Hart, John S. Crarv, James Tallmadge, Saul Alley, 
Henry Parish, John Targee, E. H. Ely, George Newbold, 
Chas. Dickinson, Walter R. Jones, Thos. Tileston, 
Sam'l Downer, jr., Sam'l F. Dorr, Benj. L. Swan— Di- 
rectors. 

firemen's insurance company. 

(46 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated April 19th, 1825. Capital 300,000 dollars. 
Shares 25 dollars. Election, 2d Monday in November. 
Dividends, September and March. 

John Leonard, President. 
Niel Gray, Secretary. 

Jacob Drake, Stephen Allen, Henry C. De Rham, John 
Sutphen, S. W.Anderson, O.T. Hewlett, E. Townsend, 
A. M. Arcularius, Philip W. Engs, William Adee, Ab'm 
Van Nest, Samuel Demilt, John Wilson, C. W. Law- 
rence, F. C. Havemeyer, F. T. Luqueer, Peter Sharpe, 



108 INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



EdwM G. Faile, Gabriel Havens, Drake B. Palmer, S. 
M. Tliompsoii, John R. Townsend, L. V. De Forest,^ 
President of Fire Department, ex-officio, President of 
Trustees of Fire Department Fund, ex-officio — Di- 
rectors. 

FRANKLIN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(Merchants' Exchange.) 

Chartered March 1 3th, 1818, till 1836. Capital 250,000 
dollars. Election, 2d Monday in Jan. Dividends, 1st of 
January and July. Shares 25 dollars. 
J. Worthington, President. 
Washington Post, Secretary. 

Peter Harmony, Geo. Griswold, J. J." Palmer, Elisha 
Tibbits, S. Whitney, Gabriel Wisner, C. Dickinson, 
Thos. Bucklev, H. I. Wyckoft", Walter Bowne, Francis 
Griffin, Jos. Kernochan, Francis Olmsted, Robert Lenox, 
B. L. Swan — Directors. 

FULTON INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(33 Wall-street.) 

Passed April 2d, 1819, to endure 30 years. Capital 
500,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. Election, last 
Monday in January. Dividends, 15th July and 15th 
January. 

A. L. Underbill, President. 

Christian Zabriskie, Secretary. 
Stephen Allen, Rich'd I. Tucker, Corn's Du Bois, 
David Cargill, John Drake, Thos. R. Smith, John Lang, 
Ferd'd Suvdam, T. T. Woodruff, Geo. B. Thorp, Aug. 
Wynkoop." Peter Sharpe, David Austen, Rob't Buloid, 
Peter L Nevius, Wm. Howard, James N. Wells, John 
Ferguson, John 3Iason, M. H. Grinnell, A. L. Underbill^ 
Richard Lawrence. Wm. Aug. White— Directors. 

GLOBE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(27 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated 1814, perpetually. Capital 1,000,000 
dollars. Shares .50 dollars. Election, 1st IMonday in 
February. Dividends, 1st June and December. 



INSURANCE COMPANIES. 109 



Henry Rankin, President. 

Richard Dunn, Secretary. 
Nathaniel Prime, Peter Remsen, Garrit Storm, Jona. 
Goodhue, John Robins, Isaac Carow, John A. Haven, 
Gookl Hoyt, Henry Beekman, Edw. R. Jones, D. P. 
Campbell, Austin L. Sands, James Heard, Edm. &mith, 
John J. Astor, Henry Gary, Benj. L. Swan, Jer. F. Ran- 
dolph, S. S. Howland, Chas. H. Russell, John Glover, 
Peter Crary, A. Van Sinderen, Robert Gracie, Isaac S. 
Hone, Jacob R. Le Roy, John Suydam, Gurdon Buck, 
one vacancy — Directors. 

Joseph Ditto, Surveyor. 

GUARDIAN INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(29 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated 24th April, 1833. Capital 300,000 dollars. 
Shares 50 dollars. Election, 2d Monday m May. 
Geo. Johnston, President. 
Jos. Greenleaf, Secretary. 
Robert Lenox, Robert Maitland, Jas. Boorman, John 
S. Crarv, D. J. Kennedy, J. Rathbone, jr., G. G. How- 
land, Charles March, VVilliam Colgate, H. L. Williams, 
James Campbell, Thomas Barron— Directors. 

HOWARD INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(54 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated March 9th, 1825, for 21 years. Capital 
300,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars. Election, 1st Mon- 
day in December. Dividends, January and J uly. 

R. Havens, President. 

Lewis Phillips, Secretary. 
Najah Tavlor, C. W. Lawrence, Denis M'Carthy, J. 
P. Phenix, H. Van Wageuen, John Morrison, David 
Lee, Joseph Otis, Fanning C. Tucker, J. B. Varnum, 
Win. Couch, C. O. Halsted, B. L. Woolley, Micah 
Baldwin, Jehiel Jaggar, Wm. W. Todd, Daniel Oakley, 
Moses Allen — Directors. 



110 INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



JEFFERSON INSURANCE COMPANY. 
(Corner of Pearl and Chatham streets.) 

Passed March 4th, 1824, for 21 years. Shares 30 dol- 
lars eacli. Insures against loss or damage by fire, and 
also inland navigation. Election, 1st Monday in Feb- 
ruary. Dividends, 15th of August and 15th February. 
John Morss, President. 
Wm. S. Thorne, Secretary. 

John JMorss, Thomas W. Thome, Samuel Webb, 
William Bradford, John H. Lee, David Jacot, Caleb C. 
Tunis, Benjamin R. Robson, John Clapp, John C. Mer- 
ritt, Walter Peck, Stephen Lyon, Thompson Price, Alex. 
Masterton, Moses Tucker, Dr. David Rogers, Robert 
Buchan, Wm. H. Ireland, Joseph Evans, John R. Davi- 
son — Directors. 

MANHATTAN INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(26 Wall-street.) 

Chartered March, 1821, for 30 years. Shares 50 dol- 
lars. Election, last Monday in March. Dividends, De- 
cember and June. 

Henry Thomas, President. 

Thos. Bull, jr.. Secretary. 
Henry Thomas, Eleazar Lord, H. Hendricks, Peter H. 
Schenck, Wm. Wallace, Wm. F. Mott, David L. Haight, 
Isaac Lawrence, F. E. Berger, Jesse Schofield, John 
Ireland, Abm. Warner, John Rathbone, jr., E, J. Ander- 
son, J. E. Haight, Elisha Riggs, R. L. Lord, John E. 
Hyde, Albert R. Gallatin, S. F. Mott— Directors. 

George Sutton, Surveyor. 

merchants' INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(53 Wall-street.) 

Chartered in April, 1818. Capital 500,000 dollars. 
Election, lust 3Ionday in January. Shares 100 dollars 
each. Dividends, 15th January and July. 
Jonathan Lawrence, President. 
Nathaniel W. Strong, Secretary. 



INSURANCE COMPANIES. Ill 

James Lovett, Henry Kneeland, Moses Taylor, Wm. 
W. Fox, Thos. Bloodgood, Thomas Lawrence, Fran. H. 
INicoll, Geo. Barclay, Mich'l Biirnham, R. Chesebrough, 
Jas. Boyd, jr., John A. Stevens, Jeromus Johnson, James 
Strong, Jacob P. Giraud, Peter A. Jay, David M. Prall, 
O. Mauran, Ejihraim Holbrook, Augustus W. Hupeden, 
Wm. Whitlock, jr., Anthony C. Rossire, Henry K. Bo- 
gert, Daniel Low — Directors. 

C. C. Jacobus, Inspector. 

MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(o2 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated in 1798 — renewed in 1809, and stands 
until revoked by the Legislature. Capital 500,000 dol- 
lars. Shares 50 dollars. Election, 1st Tuesday in 
April. Dividends, June and December. 
George Ireland, President. 
Anthony Bleecker M'Donald, Secretary. 

George Arcularius, Robert Benson, Joseph Bouchaud, 
John Chambers, John Campbell, George Conklin, Theo- 
dosius Fowler, Gabriel Furman, Thomas Hammersley, 
George Ireland, John T. Irvhig, Isaac Jones, jr., Richard 
Leaycraft, Joshua Brush, Jacob Lorillard, John Oothout, 
John Pintard, Fred'k W. Rhinelander, H. G. Stevens, 
Joseph Tucker, James Van Antwerp, Joshua Waddington, 
William Wilson — Directors 

NEW-YORK CONTRIBUTIONSHIP. 

(44 Wall-street, up stairs.) 

Chartered April 5th, 1 824, to continue 30 years. Capital 
300,000 dollars, in shares of 50 dollars each. Election, 
3d Monday in January. Dividends, 11th May and No- 
vember. 

Abm. Bloodgood, President. 
R. W. Martin, Secretary. 

Robt. Lenox, John Adams, Robt. M'Coskry, Francis 
Depau, P. Lorillard, G. C. Verplanck, James Bryar, 
John Wilson, Jas. Magee, Jas, M'Bride, John Haggerty, 
J. Keruochan, James Campbell, John Johnston, John I. 



112 INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

Palmer, Thos. Suffem, David S. Kennedy, Stephen 
Whitney, James IM'Call, Robert M'Crea, Thomas Irvin, 
James 13rowu — Directors. 

NEW-YORK FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(192 Chatham-street.) 

Incorporated April 18th, 1832, to continue 30 years. 
Capital 200,000 dollars. Shares 100 dollars. Election, 
2d Wednesday in February. Dividends, 1st of February 
and August. 

Perez Jones, President. 
A. M. Merchant, Secretary. 

James \V. Dominick, Peter Neefus, VVilliam N. Chad- 
wick, Ephraim D. Brown, Eli Benedict, Lowell Holbrook, 
Samuel Akcrly, John Samson, Walter R. Jones, John G. 
Coster, Thomas H. Mills, John Anderson, Jeremiah 
Vanderbilt, Caleb Bartlett, William H. Falls, Richard 
J. Hutchinson, Isaac K. Jcssup, Samuel G. Wheeler, 
Zebedec Ring, Francis Fickett, Oliver H. Jones, Jere- 
miah Clark, G. Lovett, Cornelius Vanderbilt — Directors. 
Thomas Trusiow, Surveyor. 

NEW-YORK BOWERY FIRE INSURANCE C03IPANY. 

(lol Bowery, corner Broome-strect.) 

Incorporated April 24th, 1833, for 30 vears. Capital 
300,000 doll^irs. Shares 25 dollars each. Election, 2d 
Wednesday m February. 

Benjamin "M. Brown, President. 
Peter Pinckney, Secretary. 
E. H. Warner, Anson G. Phelps, "Frederick R. Lee, 
Jos. R. Tavlor, Benj. Birdsall, John Perrin, Wm. R. 
Cooke, David Cotheal, Jas. C. Stoneall, Wm. Hibbard, 
William Lee, Hamilton Fish, Geo. C. Thomas, James 
Mills, Peter Gassner, Gid'n Ostrander, E. R. Dupignac, 
Pliny Freeman, Geo. Haws, jr., Jabesh Lovett — Direc- 
tors. 

Hamilton Fish, Counsellor and Attorney. 
William Lee, Sur^-eyor. 



INSURANCE COMPANIES. 113 

NEW-YORK LIFE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY. 

, , (38 Wall-street.) 

Passed March 9lh, 1830. Unlimited. Capital 1,000,000 
dollars. Shanes 100 dollars each. Dividends, 1st 
Tuesday in January and July. 

William Bard, President. 

E. A. Nicoll, Secretary. 
New-York Directors. — John Mason, Samuel Thomp- 
son, Wm. Bard, Peter Remsen, Isaac Bronson, J. J. 
Astor, James M'Bride, John Duer, Thos. W. Ludlow, 
Stephen Whitney, James Kent, Wm. B. Lawrence, 
Thos. J. Oakley, G. C. Verplanck, Nathaniel Prime, 
Jonathan Goodhue, John Rathbone, jr., Thomas Suffern, 
Peter Harmony, John G. Coster, Erastus Corning, 
P. G. Stuyvesant, H. C. De Rham. Albany Directors — 
Isaiah Townsend, B. F. Butler, S. Van Rensselaer, Benj. 
Knower, E. C. Delavan. Utica — Nicholas Devereux. 

NORTH RIVER INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(192 Greenwich-street.). 

Incorporated Feb., 1822, for 15 years. Capital 350,000 
dollars. Dividends, March and September. Shares 25 
dollars. Election, last Monday in March. 
Richard Whiley, President. 
P. R. Warner, Secretary. 

Richard Whiley, David Rosters, Benj. Stephens, Thos. 
Brooks, Abm. Stagg, Isaac Jones, Wm. B. Astor, Wm. 
C. Rhinelandor, Chas. Graham, David Johnson, Stephen 
Storm, Benj. Strong, Stuart F. Randolph, Geo. Vaughan, 
Lewis Decasse, S^amuel Verplanck, Geo. P. Rogers, 
Joseph Bayley, Nich's J. Quackenbos, Samuel D. 
Rogers, Obadiah Holmes, Thomas Swords, Samuel 
Reynolds, Edward A. Nicoll, Richard Ray, John B. 
Martin, Michael Allison, Silas B. Hamilton, Wm. Bleak 
ley, Robert Buchan — Directors. 

PALLADIUM FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(Not yet in operation.) 



Hi INbt/RANCE tOMPANIF.?. 



PHEiNIX FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(i254 Broadway, up stairs.) 

Passed March 29th, 1823, to endure 21 years. Capital 
2-)0 01)0 dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. Election, last 
Moaday in Mav. Dividends, November and 5Iay. 
Thomas Bolton, President. 
Robert Ainslee, Secretary. 
John L. Graham, Amos Palmer, Abm. B. Mead, Reu- 
ben Withers, Daniel Jackson, Henry Laverty, Joseph 
B. Varnum, Wm. Paulding, Richard Riker, G. nV right, 
S Whittemoro, Thos. Herttell, Wdham l^-^^^^ord John 
Le Maire, George Lovett, R. iM. Lawrence, Joan \\ ebb 
— Directors. 

traders' insurance company. 

(44 Wall-street.) 

Incoroorated March 9th, 1825, for 21 years Capital 
250 000 dollars. Shares 25 dollars each. Election, 2ct 
Monday in May. Dividends, xMay and November. 
Wm. B. Bolles, President 
R. L. Reade, Secretary. 

Jacob Lorillard, G. G. Howland, Gideon Lee, Wm. 
Stevens, John C. Halsey, M. E. Thompson, L. C. 
Hamersley, Wm. Colgate, Sam 1 Campbell, U m- J;>«^;; 
well, E. W. Dunham, George Colgate, Mulfo'^vi '^'"' 
Russel Dart, R. E. Mount, Joseph Sands. David Clark- 
son, Eben. Cauldwell, John C. Merntt, C. N. R.ersted 
Gabriel Winter, John Brouwer, N. W. fetuyvesant, 
N. P. Hosack, Joseph Ketchum— Directors. 

UNITED states' FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(282 Pearl-street, corner of Beckraan.) 

Passed April 1st, 1824, for 21 years^^ Capital 250,000 
dollars, with liberty to increase to dOO,000. Shares 25 
dollars each. Election, 1st Monday in June. Dividends, 
June and December. , 

John L. Browne, President. 
Jos. F. Carroll, Secretary. 
John R. Willis, Silas Hicks, Robt. C. Cornell, James 
Barker, Said Alley, Benj. Corhes, Lindley Murray, 



INSURANCE COMPANIES. 115 

Charles Osborn, H. H. Lawrence, Stephen Van Wyck, 
Isaac Frost, Robt. D. Weeks, John Wood, Thos. H. 
Leggett, Thos. W. Jenkins, David Bryson, Benj. Strong, 
Geo. Schmelzel, Jacob T. Doty, George Hussey, John 
Corliss, U. F. Carpenter, James H. Titus, Eben. Cauld- 
well, Josh. S. Underbill, C. T. Cromwell, C. W. Law- 
rence, Nathaniel Lord, Morris Ketchum, Charles Knee- 
land, E. A. Wright, Peter S. Titus, Benjamin Clark 
— Directors. 

M(ASHINGTON INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(Corner of William and John streets.) 

Instituted June, 1801. Incorporated March, 1814, for 
an unlimited time. Capital 500,000 dollars. 50 dollars 
per share. Officers elected 1st Tuesda}' in April. Divi- 
dends, 1st of February and 1st of August. 

James Swords, President. 

John E. West, Secretary and Surveyor. 

George D. Post, Assistant Secretary. 
John Clark, jr., Leonard Kip, Joel Post, Gideon 
Tucker, John Graham, Jas. C. Roosevelt, James Dobbin, 
Jno^ B. Lawrence, Abm. Van Nest, Alfred Wagstaff, J. 
B. Schmelzel, James M'Brair, Elkanah Doolittle John 
D. _Wolfe, Seth Grosvenor, George S. Robbins, E. 
Schieffelin — Directors. 

MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

AMERICAN INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(51 Wall-street) 

Incorporated March 1st, 1815. Capital 500,000 dollars. 
50 dollars each share. Election, 2d Tuesdav in May. 
Dividends, 2d Tuesday in May and November." 

Wm. Neilson, President. 

John Palmer, Assistant President. 

Philip Hayt, Secretary. 
H. C. De Rham, Wm. Wilson, Peter Remsen, Edm. 
Morewood, James M'Bride, F. Cottenet, Robt. Gracie, 
John Graham, John A. Stevens, John Ferguson, Felix 
Columb, P. L. Foulke, Wm, H. A spinwall— Directors 



116 INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



ATLANTIC INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(47 Wall, corner of Hanover-street.) 

Charter dated Feb. 27th, 1824, and to continue until 
1845. Capital 350,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. 
Election, 2d Monday in January. Dividends, January 
and July. 

' Josiah L. Hale, President. 
Walter R. Jones, Vice President. 
Jacob R. Pentz, Secretary. 
O. Mauran, George Griswold, Jon. Goodhue, Peter 
Crary, Tho. Tileston, Goold Hoyt, Silas Hicks, Perez 
Jones, Fi-ed. A. Tracy, George Hussey, Silas Holmes, 
Henry Parish, Caleb Barstow, Henry Coit, Elisha 
Riggs, Geo. T. Elliott, W. W. De Forest, Jacob 
Brouwcr, Lewis Curtis, Chas. H. Russell, S. V. S. Wil- 
der, John Crumby, E. W. Wainvvright, Daniel Low — 
Directors. 

John Earl Inspector. 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(29 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated in April, 1822, to continue 21 years. 
Capital 300,000 dollars. Shares 100 dollars. Election, 
4th Monday in May. Dividends, 1st 3Ionday in January 
and July. 

Benj. Balch, President. 
Samuel Whetmore, Vice President. 
Ebenezer Hale, Secretary. 
Samuel Whetmore, Sidney Brooks, John A. Haven, 
E. A. Russell, Geo. W. Smith, Thos. Marean, Paul 
Spofford, Wm. F. Cary, Geo. W. Gra}', James Don- 
aldson, Walden Pell, Josiah Lane, B. Balch — Directors. 
Three vacancies to be filled in May, 1334. 
James Morgan, Inspector. 

GOOD-HOPE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW-YORK. 

(Not yet in operation.) 

Chartered April 25th 1832, for 21 years. Capital, 
300,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars. Election, 2d Mon- 
day in January. 



INSURANCE COMPANIES. 117 



JACKSON INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(49 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated in 1831, till 1852. Capital 400,000 dollars. 
Shares 50 dollars. Election, 2nd Monday in January. 
Dividends, 1st Monday in July and January. 
Fyler Dibblee, President. 
John R. Skiddy, Vice President. 
Lewis Gregory, Secretary. 
Robert White, Thos. Bloodgood, "Geo. Sutton, James 
Tallmadge, Moses Taylor, E. D. Hurlbut, Wni. W. 
Todd, David Leslie, John S. Smith, Mort. Livingston, 
Chas. Brugiere, John R. Marshall, Wm. R. Smith, J. 
Joseph, Edmund B. Bostwick — Directors. 

NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(49 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated April 14th, 1815, to May 1st, 1835. Capi- 
tal 250,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. Dividends, 
1st Monday in January and July. Election, 2nd Mon- 
day in January. 

Jas. K. Hamilton, President. 

Charles Rhind, Assistant. 

Townsend Jones, Secretary. 
Benj. L. Swan, Philip Hone, Thos. Lawrence, Isaac 
Lawrence, Horace W. Bulkley, Jacob P. Giraud, Lewis 
Fr. Varet, David Hadden, Cor. W. Lawrence, Wm. 
Whitlock, Wm. H. Fields, Chas. Kneeland, Edward A. 
Graves, Henry Delafield, Archibald Gracie, Robert L. 
Patterson, Verdyne Ellsworth — Directors. 

NEPTUNE BELL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(Not yet ill operation.) 

NEPTUNE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(25 E.xchange.) 

Incorporated April Ist, 1825, to endure till 1846. Capi- 
tal 250,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. Election, 
2d Monday in January. Dividends, let Monday io July 
and January. 



118 INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

John R. Hurd, President. 

Thomas H. Merry, Assistant President. 

A. Bleecker Neilson, Secretary. 
Abm. Bell, Chas. A. Davis, Wm. M'Leod, Arthur 
Tappan, Joseph D. Beers, Sam'l Thompson, H. Auchin- 
closs, Abm. 3Iason, Henry K. Bogert, James Wilson, jr., 
Henry Grinnell, A. Lentilhon, Simeon Baldwin, Rufus 
Prime, Wm. G. Bucknor, George W. Bruen, Henry 
Burgy, Knowles Taylor, Robert Walker — Directors. 

George Duplex, Inspector. 

NEW-YORK INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(34 Wall-street.) 

Incoi-porated April 2d, 1798, till 1840. Capital 500,000 
dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. Election, 2d Monday 
in January. Dividends, 1st Monday in January and 
July. 

Charles M'Evers, President. 

Adam Tredvvell, Assistant. 

T. B. Satterthwaite, Secretary. 
Wm. B. Astor, Henry Rogers, Rich'd I. Tucker, 
Edw'd R. Jones, Robt. Le Roy, Theodore Meyer, L. C. 
Hamersley, G. C. Verplanck, Jacob Harvev, Bache 
M'Evers, Miles R. Burke, Henry W. Hicks, R. B. Min- 
ium, Matthew JMaury, Robt. Kermit, Caspar Meier, C. 
W. Lawrence, Stephen Higginson, jr., William Moore 
— Directors. 

NEW-YORK STATE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(54 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated in 1825. Revived in 1331, for 21 years. 
Capital 300,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. Elec- 
tion, 1st Monday in May. Dividends, 1st Monday in 
January and July. 

John Bolton, President. 
Joseph Fowler, Vice President. 
Charles C. Walden, Secretary. 
John Bolton, Joseph Fowler, Henry Cotheal, Josiah 
Kernochan, C. W. Faber, Fanning C. Tucker, Isaac 



INSURANCE COIMPAJVIKS. 119 

Gibson, Wm. lilackay, Thos. Suflern, Joseph Sands, 
Charles Segory — Directors. 

Wm. Newcomb, Inspector. 

OCEAN INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(■15 Wall-streel.) 

Incorporated March 20th, 1810, with a capital of 
550,000 dollars. Shares 35 dollars each. Election, 2d 
Monday in January. Dividends, 1st Monday in January 
and July. 

Abm. Ogden, President. 
N. G. Rutaers, Assistant. 
James S. Schermerhorn, Secretary. 
Elisha Tibbits, Thos. Masters, S. S. Rowland, C. P. 
White, Jas. P. Van Home, Sam'l Hicks, Isaac Jones, 
jr., H, I. Wvckofl; Fred. Sheldon, James Brown, Francis 
Olmsted, P^ Harmony, John S. Crary, M. H. Grinnell, 
Francis Depau, Isaac Iselin, Thad. Phelps, Isaac S. 
Hone, C. A. Heckscher — Directors. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(Marine and Life. 21 Exchange.) 

Incorporated 1818, to endure till 1838, with the privi- 
lege of insuring on lives, for which a part of its capital 
was set apart, and made perpetual. Directors elected 2d 
Monday in January. Capital 500,000 dollars, of which 
100,000 dollars is secured on bond and mortgage, and 
made liable for the business of the Life Department onl}-. 
Shares 50 dollars each. Dividends, January and July. 

Jeremiah P. Tappan, President. 

Daniel Cotheal, Assistant President. 

Wm. J. Van Wagenen, Secretary. 
R'd M. Lawrence, Thomas March, Adam Norne, 
Benjamin Avmar, Robert Maitland, Rufus L. Lord, Da- 
niel W. Coit, Wm. G. Bucknor, James Boyd, jr., D. S. 
Kennedv, John Barstow, Asa Whitney, Andrew Foster, 
Corn. li. Suydam, Charles N. Talbot, John Brouwer 
Pelatiah Perit, Joseph Bouchaud, Geo. Higginson, 
George Jones, James Strong — Directors. 
Curtis Holmes, InRpcotor. 



120 MISCELLANEOUS COMPANIES. 

MISCEIiliANEOUS COMPANIES. 

NEW-YORK AND SCHUYLKILL COAL COMPANY. 

(48 Wall-street.) 

Incorporated April 18th, 1823, perpetually. Capital 
300,000 dollars, with a privilege to increase "to 500,000. 
Shares 50 dollars each. Election, 1st Monday in May. 
Dividends, .lanuary and July. 

John G. Coster, President. 
T. R. Mercein, Vice President. 

H. M. Van Solingen, James Votey, Lambert Suydam, 
Nath'l Weed, Timolhy Caldwell, Morgan Lewis, 'Peter 
Sharpe, John Cole, David Codwise, Sani'l C. Jaques, 
Thomas S. Townsend, Peter Embury, J. Lorillard, John 
F. Randolph, Jacob Harvey, George Arcularius, John 
Sutphen, Geo. B. Thorpe — Directors. 

NEW-YORK LOMBARD ASSOCIATION. 

(Corner of Tryon-row and Augustus-street) 

Passed April 8th, 1824. Charter to continue 30 years 
— to lend money on the pledge of e,oods, chattels, &c. 
Capital 200,000 dollars. Shares 100 dollars each. Divi- 
dends, 1st July and January. Election, 1st Monday in 
J une. 

Jasper F. Seaman, President. 
John B. Yates, Cashier. 

Arch. M'Intyre, Thomas Tobias, N. G. Kortright, 
Thos. F. Youngs, B. B. Seaman, Charles Yates, Edw. 
Kortright, The Mayor and the Recorder, ex-officio — 
Directors. 

merchants' exchange COMPANY. 

(Wall-street.) 

Incorporated in 1824, perpetually. Capital 230,000 

dollars. Shares 100 dollars. Dividends, 1st 31onday in 

February and August. Election, 2d Monday in Januaiy. 

W. W. Woolsey, President. 

John Suydam, Secretary. 

Elisha Tibbits, H. I. Wyckoff, John G. Coster, Jon. 

Goodhue, Peter Remsen, Goold Hoyt, Stephen Whitney, 



MISCELLANEOUS COMPANIES. 121 



Jeromus Johnson, Andrew Foster, James Heard, Isaac 
Carow, Benj. L. Swan, N. Prime, George Griswold, 
Henry Beeckman, John Suydam, John Johnson — Direc- 
tors. 

Richard M'Cormick, Accountant. 

NEW-YORK GAS LIGHT COMPANY. 

(Corner of Centre and Hester streets.) 

Incorporated in 1823. Capital 1,000,000 dollars. 
Shares 50 dollars each, Election, 2d Monday in January. 
Dividends, 3d Monday in March and September. 

Wm. W. Fox, President. 

E. E. Weed, Secretary. 

J. Mowton, Manager. 
Joseph Walker, H. I. Wyckofif, Peter Remsen, John 
Worthington, John I. Palmer, Chas. Dickinson, Jos. 
Kernochan, David Hadden, Peter S. Thus, Najah Tay- 
lor, John Suydam, Elisha Riggs — Directors. 

PERU IRON COMPANY. 

(32 South street.) 

Incorporated Nov. 11th, 1824. _ Capital 130,000 dollars. 
Shares 100 dollars each. Election in April, 
Francis Saltus, President. 
H. B. Llovd, Secretary. 
Goold Hoyt, A. V. Winans, T. T. Payne, Jeromus 
Johnson — Directors. 

NEW-YORK AND HARLjEM RAILROAD COMPANY. 

(41 Chambers-street.) 

Incorporated April 25th, 1831, for 21 years. Capital 
500,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars each. Election in 
August. 

John Mason, President. 

John Lozier, Vice President. 

A. C. Rainetaiix, Secretary. 
Sam'l Swartwout, Wm. G. Bucknor, Isaac Adriance, 
A. A. Cammann, Henry Ogden, S. B. Ruggles, C. H. 
Hall, Samuel Thompson, Alex'r Hosack, Joseph Wallis, 
T. Addis Emmet — Directors. 



122 MISCELLANEOUS COMPAMES. 



CONGRESS STEAM SUGAR REEIMNG COMPANY. 
(Works, Duaiie, near Chapel-street. Office, 91 AVasbingtnn-street.) 

Incorporated April 23cl, 1831, for 21 years. Capital 
100,000. Shares 150 dollars each. Election, 1st Mon- 
day iu May. 

J. W. Archibald, President. 

F. Bibby, Secretary. 

Jno. Delafield, Treasurer. 

William Kemble, Agent. 

MANHATTAN GAS LIGHT COMPANY. 

(Office, No. 48 Pine-street. Works IS'.h-street, N. River.) 

Incorporated February 26th, 1830, unlimited. Capital 
500,000 dollars. Shares 50 dollars. Election, 2d Mon- 
day in January. 

Lambert Suvdam, President. 

Wm. T. M'Coun, T. T. Woodrufi', Charles Graham, 
T. R. Mercein, Wm. J. Macneven, R. M. Lawrence, 
Nehemiah Brush, Noah Jarvis, James Shaw, M. Blyers, 
George Rapelye, Wm. L. fliorris, Wm. B. Lawrence, 
Chas. A. Davis — Directors. 

Timothy Dewey, Engineer. 

MOHAWK AND HUDSON RAIL-ROAD COMPANY. 

Ramsay Crooks, President. 
Erastus Corning, Vice President. 
Samuel Glover, Secretary. 
Josiah Townsend, James Porter, 'Aaron Thorp, Wm. 
C. Redfield, Seth Grosvenor, John Laurie — Directors. 

NEW-YORK, PROVIDENCE, AND BOSTON RAIL-ROAD 
COMPANY. 

(47 Merchants' Exchange.) 

Incorporated by the States of Connecticut and Rhode 
Island, 1832. Capital 1,300,000 dollars. Shares 100 dol- 
lars each. 

John S. Crary, President. 
S. D. Denison, Clerk. 



CUSTOM HOUSE. 123 



CUSTOM house:. 

(From Pine to Cedar-street, near Nassau-street.) 

A new Custom House is now erecting on the site of 
the old one, at the corner of Wall and Nassau streets, 
extending to Pine-street. The following is a description 
of the contemplated building. 

The building is to be 177 feet long, and S9 feet wide; 
and the form and order of the building to be similar to 
that of the Parthenon at Athens. It is to stand on a 
basement story, ascended by nineteen steps from Wall- 
street, and six steps on Pine-street. There are to be 
eight Grecian doric columns at each front, and fifteen co- 
lumns and anta3 on each side attached to the walls. — 
There is also to be a second row of six smaller columns 
back of and parallel with those of the main front, leaving 
a space of ten feet between the two rows; and nine feet 
between the inner row and the front wall of the building. 
Back of the two extreme columns of the inner row there 
are to be two antfe, and six antas attached to the walls of 
the rear front, leavina; a space of eight feet and a half 
between the columns and antfe. There will thus be 
twenty-four outside columns, five feet eight inches diame- 
ter at the bottom, and thirty two-feet hiffh, including the 
capital, and eighteen antaj on the two sides of the same 
height, five feet wide, and three feet nine inches projec- 
tion from the walls. The six inner columns of the main 
front will be four feet eight inches diameter at bottom, 
and the anta; to correspond. The building is to be two 
Btories high, except the great business hall, part of which 
is to be vaulted as high as the roof will permit, and its 
centre finished with a dome sixty-two feet in diameter. — 
This hall will occupy the centre of the building, and 
will be one hundred and fifteen feet long, leaving a small 
vestibule at each end to enter from. It is to be seventy- 
eeven feet wide in the centre part, which is a circle of 
Beventy feet diameter, with the length and breadth of the 
room extending beyond its circumference to these dimen- 
■ions ; aiid the four porta so extended beyond the circle 



124 CUST03I HOUSE. 



are thirty-three and a half feet wide, leaving six rooms 
and three circular staircases in the four corners, the two 
largest rooms to he twenty -four hy twenty-one feet each, 
besides a square staircase in the rear, and three vaults ' 
for papers at the two ends of each vestibule. The same 
division of the room is made in the second story. Nearly 
the same number, shape, and sizes of rooms are had iu 
the basement, as above in the other stories, leaving all 
the area of the same shape and size as the great hall 
immediately about it ; with the addition of sixteen fluted 
doric columns to support the vaulting and the pavement 
under the dome of the great hall. 

Business hours, from 10 to 3. Entries must be made 
before 2 o'clock. 



collector's office. 

S. Swartwout, Collector, 
D. S. Lyon, ^ 

M. S. Swartwout, > Deputy Collectors. 
D. Strobel, ) 

Henry Ogden, Cashier. 
Joshua Philips, Assistant Cashier. 
Geo. M. Troutman, Clerk to Cashier. 
Nathaniel Shultz, Auditor. 
The Desks in the Collector's Office are arranged in 
the following order — 

A. B. C. Deputy Collectors. D. S. Lyon, M. S. 
Swartwout, and D. Strobel. 
No. 1. Export Bond Clerk. Charles A. Gardner. 
Nos. 2, 3, and 5. Export Clerks. R. M. MitchUl, T. 
V. Mumford, and T. Olmstead. 
No. 4. Debenture Calculator. T. ]\L Rogers. 
No. 6. Debenture Clerk. W. J. M'xMaster. 
Nos. 7 and 8. Liquidating Clerks. Cornelius Duryeo 
and George L. Pride. 

Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13. Entry Clerks. D. Bonnett, 
W. Wyer, A. Philips, J. Campbell, A. Campbell, W. A. 
Spies, D. B. Ogden, and J. Gutman. 

No. 14. Check, Permit, and Receipt Clerk. J. B. 
Thurston. 



Cl?STOM HOUSE. 125 



No. 15. Enrolment and License Clerk. J. Leonard. 

No. 16* Assistant Enrolment and License Clerk. J. 
A. Bogert. 

No. 17. Assistant Register Clerk. Wm. Cannon. 

No. 18. Invoice Clerk. J. C. Niebuhr. 

No. 19. Protection Clerk. C. Oakley. 

No. 20. Register Clerk. John H. Ball. 

No. 21. Clearance Clerk and Entry of Vessels Coast- 
wise. Jacob R. Wood. 

No. 22. Bond Clerks. W. B. Byram and J. Bluxome. 
Assistant Bond Clerk. R. B. Adams. 

NAVAL OFFICE. 

Enos T. Throop, Naval Officer. 

John T. Ferguson, Deputy Naval Officer. 

Henry Reed, Clerk. 

Joseph R. Bleecker, Clerk. 

Lewis D'Oreville, Clerk. 

Gerard D. Smith, Clerk. 

Elias B. Dayton, Clerk. 

John Cockle, Clerk. 

Charles Holt, Clerk. 

Samuel Van Wyck, Clerk. 

Benjamin T. Ferguson, Clei'k. 

Duncan Ferguson, Clerk. 

Peiree E. F.^M'Donald, Clerk. 

W. T. Vredenburgh. 

surveyor's office. 
Hector Craig, Surveyor and Inspector. 
Anthony Haff, Deputy Surveyor and Inspector. 
Pierre A. Young, First Clerk. 
Andrew A Jones, Second Clerk 
Augustus Pitcher, Third Clerk. 
J. C. Delmar, Fourth Clerk. 
Jonas B. Philips, Fifth Clerk. 
J. W. Carpenter, Sixth Clerk. 
John Megrath, Measenger. 



126 CUSTOM HOUSE. 



INSPECTORS. (118.) 

Abraham Ackerinan, Henry Abel, Arnold, William 
Beebe, James Boardman, Davis Brooks, George B. Bur- 
rass, John Byers, Joseph Board, John R. Bowne, George 
L. Birch, Abraham Bokee, Elijah Briggs, William L. 
Boyles, William Bruce, G. V. Breese, Sturges Bruster, 
John L. Broome, Jacob Clinch, Alexander Coffin, John 
De Camp, Jacob L. Dickenson, Denyse Denyse, George 
Davis, David J. Demerest, Bertrand Dupoy, John Deane, 
Nathan Darling, John Fream, Benjamin Fuller, Job Fur- 
man, Donald Frazer, Henry Fanning, W. H. P. Gra- 
ham, Thonias W. Garniss, George Hodgson, Zadock 
Hedden, J. L. Hoyte, Warde B. Howard, Robert Hun- 
ter, Joseph Hopkins, Edward Hitchcock, Daniel Hazard, 
William Ironsides, Oliver Jaques, Andrew Jackson, 
Thomas Jenkins, Thomas Ketchum, Peter Kinnan, 
Henry Keyser, E. Kingsbury, Gerard Lathrop, William 
Lupton, Samuel Lloyd, James Ladd, John M. Lester, 
Samuel Marvin, Abraham Messerole, Alexander 
Ming, John iMorris, jr., Daniel Morgan, Charles Mills, 
John Morris, James Mitchel, Donald M'Lean, Montgo- 
mery Moses, Thomas Maiston, Richard Nixon, John W. 
Oakley, James Porter, Elijah Pinckney, John M. Pat- 
terson, William Phoenix, Samuel Pittman, Napthali 
Philips, Thomas Power, Edward R. Painter, Robert 
Philips, James G. Reynolds, Barnett Romer, Elnathan 
Sears, George Sibell, Joseph Schofield, Gold S. Silli- 
man, Peter R. Sprain^er, Sylvester Sullivan, Dennis 
Striker, William Smith, Jacob Stoutenburg, William 
Shute, Stephen Stiliwell, Peter Taylor, Peter Tappan, 
Samuel Terry, William W. Tompkins, Thomas Tripler 
Griffin Tompkins, Stephen Titus, William Thorne, 
Samuel Utter, Samuel Udell, John L. Vanbuskirck, 
Beekman M. Vanburen, Abraham B. Vanderpool, John 
Vandyke, Jacob Vauwinkle, Cornelius Vanantwerp, 
Thomas B. Vermilye, William Welling, Alexander 
Whaley, Henry Willett, Everardus Warner, James 
Westervelt, Daniel Wishart, Henry Whiting, Caleb T. 
Ward, Benjamin Wood, W. L. Young. * 



CUSTOM HOUsE. 127 



OFFICERS ATTACHED TO COLLECTOR'S STORES. 

Sidney Wetmore, General Store-keeper. 

STORE-KEEPERS. (18.) 

Henry Abel, William Cairns, James D. Bissett, Robert 
Dumont, David Gardner, jr., Jobn Gelston, George F. 
Hopkins, George Howard, William Honay, David Hen- 
derson, jr., George Innes, Horatio G. Lewis, Elijah F. 
Furdy, Humphrey Rioketson, Sylvester Robinson, An- 
drew Tombs, Philip Thomas, George A. Wasson. 

BOARDING OFFICERS. 

Joseph Schofield, New-York, Benjamin Wood,_ Qua- 
rantine. Assistants — Henry Keyser, John Morris, jr., 
Lemuel Pittman. 

DEPUTY INSPECTORS. 

Peter Smith, J. J. Cohen, G. H. Richards, E. Cole, 
James J. Craig. 

GAUGERS. 

W. R. Thompson, E. Nexsen, J. J. S. Hasler, A. Bau- 
doine, H. Tallman, J. Tuomy, Thomas Morris, A. So- 
merville. 

AVEIGHERS. 

J. Browere, L. Loutrell, J. Stephens, J. W. Hallet, D. 
Poor, J. Franklin, A. S. Dc Peyster, E. Cooper, A. 
Blcecker, T. Hazard, E. H. De Camp, S. B. Hoffman, 
J. Tallman, T. Kirk. 

MEASURERS. 

D. Dodge, E. Dodge, Oliver Dunning, H. A. Vedder, 
W.M.Hitchcock, PT Sebring, A. Seymour, J.Gould, 
W. Durell, J. W. Forbes, E. Belknap, J. J. Cluett, B. 
Rider, J. D. Philips, Henry Levely. 

Commander of the Revenue Cutter Rush, Captain 
Bicker. 

FEES OF OFFICE. 

To the Collector and Naval Officer.— Entry of a ves- 
sel of 100 tons or upwards, two dollars and fifty cents. 



128 CUSTOM HOUSE. 



Clearance of a vessel of 100 tons or upwards, two dol- 
lars and fifty cents. Entry of a vessel under 100 tons, 
one dollar and fifty cents. Clearance of a vessel under 
100 tons, one dollar and fifty cents. Every Post Entry, 
two dollars. Permit to land goods, twenty cents. 
Every Bond taken officially, forty cents. Permit to load 
goods for the exportation, for drawback, thirty cents. 
Debenture, or other official certificate, twenty cents. 
Bill of Health, twenty cents. Official document (regis- 
ter excepted) required by any person, twenty cents. 

To the Surveyor. — Admeasuring and certifying the 
same, of every ship or vessel of 100 tons and under, per 
ton, one cent. Admeasurement of every ship or vessel 
above 100 tons, and not exceeding 200 tons, one dollar 
and fifty cents. Above 200 tons, two dollars. For all 
other services on board any ship or vessel of 100 tons 
and upwards, having on board goods, wares, or merchan- 
dise, subject to duty, three dollars. For like services on 
board any ship or vessel of less than 100 tons, one dollar 
and filty cents. On all vessels not having on board, 
goods, wares, or merchandise, subject to duty, sixty-six 
and two-third cents. Certificate of registry of vessel, 
two dollars. Endorsement on registry or record, one 
dollar. Every bond required by this act, twenty-five 
cents. Every bond for a Mediterranean Passport, forty 
cents. Every Seaman's Protection, twenty-five cents. 

Under the Coasting ^c^.— Admeasuring every vessel, 
in order to the Registering, Enrolment, Licensing, or Re- 
cording the same,"of 5tons or upwards, and less than 20, 
fifty cents.— 20, and not exceeding 70, seventy-five cents. 
— 70, one dollar. — Above 100, one dollar and fifty cents. 
For every Certificate or Enrolment, fifty cents. Every 
Endorsement of do., twenty cents. Every License, in- 
cluding the Bond, not exceeding 20 tons, twenty-five 
cents. Above 20 tons, and not more than 100, fifty C3nts. 
More than 100, one dollar. Recording Certificate, Mani- 
fest, and granting Permit, of less than 20 tons, twenty- 
five cents. Above 50 tons, fifty cents. For certifying a 
Manifest, and granting Permit for Registered vessels, 



CUSTOM HOUSE. 129 



one dollar and fifty cents. For receiving certified Mani- 
fest, and granting Permit for Registered vessels, one 
dollar and fifty cents. Granting Permit for a vessel, not 
belonging to a citizen, on arrival to proceed from district 
to district, and receiving a Manifest, two dollars. Re- 
ceiving Manifest, and granting Permit to unload, as 
above, two dollars. Granting Permit for a vessel to 
carry on fishery in a foreign port, twenty-five cents. For 
Report and Entry of any foreign goods imported in such 
last mentioned vessel, twenty-five cents. 

PUBLIC STORES. 

Nos. 274 Front, 15 and 17 Nassau, 53 and 109 Wash- 
ington, 20 and 22 Albany, and 153 Greenwich streets. 

UNITED STATES APPRAISER'S OFFICE. 

No. 17 Nassau-street. 

STORE keeper's OFFICE, 

No. 66 Cedar-Street, 

COMMERCE. 

Imports and Exports of foreign merchandise to and 
from the District of New-York, during the year 1833. 
Value of Valne of 

Imports. Exports. 

1833, 1st quarter $12,333,948 $4,809,709 

" 2d " 16,297,190.... 6,284,453 

« 3d •' 21,079,873.... 6,708,810 

" 4th " 11,233,033.... 6,900,931 

$60,944,044. . . . $24,703,903 
The amount of duties which accrued during the same 
period, was $13,039,181 18. 

9 



130 



gustojm house. 



ARRIVALS AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK, 1833. 



NATIONS. 



American.. . 
English .... 

Frencli 

Spanish. . . . 
Dutch,Hamburg, 
and Bremen 

Swedish 

Danish 

Austrian 

Neai)olitan... , 

Mexican 

Haytien 

Russian 

Prussian 

Colonibiau... , 
Brazilian . . . . , 







-J. 


If. 


71 


H 

c 


• 


y. 


627 


300 


3 


1384 


406 


48 


28 


56 


181 


102 


4 


371 


12 


2 


13 


O 

M 




29 


2 




24 


9 




35 


15 


2 


13 


3 




33 


13 


5 


21 






41 


3 




13 
3 
1 


1 
1 




17 
3 
1 

1 






1 


2 




3 






1 






1 






3 






3 








1 




o 
1 


479 


113 


903 


423 


'i 


1925 



Number of 
passengers. 



Jan. 567 
Feb. 477 
.^larch, 738 
April, 3415 

May, 3869 
June, 8850 
July, 5406 
8728 
3161 
2488 
2394 
1659 



Aui£, 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 



41,752 

Total number of passengers arrived in the above ves- 
sels, 4J ,752. 



ITUERCHANTS> EXCHANGE. 

(Wall-street, below William.) 

Extends southward 150 feet to Exchange-street. \% \ 
has a front on Wall-street of 115 feet, and is three stories \ 
high, exclusive of the basement, wbich is considerably | 
elevated. Its southwest front in Exchange-street, is 114 li 
feet long, and three stories high, including the basement, \ 
which is only one step above tbe pavement. Tlie Wall- 
B tree t front is the principal one, and is built entirely of I 
white West Chester marble. I'he first and second sto 



merchants' exchange. 131 

ries are of the Ionic order, from the temj)le of Minerva 
Polias, at Priene, in Ionia. A recessed elliptical portico 
of about 40 feet wide has been introduced in Iront, with 
great convenience and beauty. A screen of four co- 
lumns and two antfe, each column being thirty feet high, 
and three feet four inches in diameter above the base, 
composed of a single block of marble, extends across the 
front of the portico, nearly in a line w ith the front of the 
building. The colunnis support an entablature of about 
six feet in height, upon which rests the third story, ma- 
king a heiglit of about 60 feet from the ground. On each 
side of the ])ortico is a passage through the basement 
story to the Post Office and Exchange-street. 

The principal entrance to the Exchange Room is by a 
flight of nine or ten marble steps, with a pedestal at each 
end. On ascending to the portico, three doors open to 
the vestibule in front, while one on either hand opens 
mto Insurance Offices, &c. The vestibule is of the 
Ionic order, from the little Ionic temple of Illyssus. 
The Exchange Room is 85 feet long, 55 wide, and 45 
high; adjacent to it ^re the offices of the Daily Adverti- 
ser and the Atlas; to which latter establishment is at- 
tached an extensive Reading Room of Newspapers. The 
Office of the Journal of Commerce is in the basement. 
In the rear of the Exchange Room is a place for auction 
sales, and in the second story are rooms for the Board of 
Brokers, and the Chamber of Commerce. The building 
was begun on the first of April, 1825, and completed in 
July, 1827. The plan was wholly that of M. E. Thomp- 
son, the architect of the edifice. 



NE^V-YOKK POST OFFICE. 

The Post Office, in the city of New-York, is situated in 
the basement of the Merchants' Exchange, fronting Ex- 
change-place and Hanover-street. Newspapers and ship 
letters are received at the large door in Hanover-street, 
and the Postmaster's private office is entered from Ex- 
change-place. The box, newspaper, and carriers' deli- 



132 POST OFFICE. 



veries are in the basement hall of the Exchange, which 
is entered from Wall-street and Exchange-place. The 
windows, fronting the hall of the basement, have between 
13 and 1400 boxes, numbered, and rented to mercantile 
houses at four dollars each per annum. The delivery of 
alphabetical and advertised letters, and the Ladies' win- 
dow, are in the portico on Hanover-street. The vast bu- 
siness of this office, since its recent organization, is con- 
ducted upon a regular system, which defines the duties 
and responsibilities of every' person employed in it. 
There are four general divisions of the office, denominated 
the City Delivery — Forwarding Department — Neics- 
paper Distribution and Delivery — Letter Carriers^ De- 
partment. The " City Delivery" is under the superin- 
tendence of William B. Taylor, who is assisted by six 
clerks ; he has charge of all the letters for the boxes, 
general delivery, and packets. Joseph W. Benedict is 
at the head of the " Forwarding Department," and has 
six clerks connected with him, whose duty it is to mark, 
stamp, distribute, and mail all letters for other offices. 
Simeon M. Tompkins has charge of the "Newspaper 
Distribution and Delivery," assisted by five clerks. The 
"Letter Carriers' Department" is under the direction of 
Elias Lynch, and has fifteen carriers connected with him, 
who deliver letters and papers to all persons whose resi- 
dences are known, (and have not boxes,) twice a day be- 
tween the months of March and September. Boxes are 
placed by the Carriers in the upper part of the city, 
where thev receive letters and deliver them every day 
(except Svindays) at one o'clock, to the Post Office, in 
time for the afternoon mails, for which they charge two 
cents each. Letters for the city, deposited in the Post 
Office before one o'clock, P. M., are delivered in the same 

day. 

Samuel L. Gouverneur, P. M. 
Barnabas Bates, Assistant P. M. 
Gouverneur S. Bibby, Cashier. 



POST OFFICE. 



133 



CLERKS. 



William B. Taylor, 
William S. Dunham, 
John R. Borley, 
Edward F. Hammekin, 
Joseph Dodd, 
George W. M'Phelan, 
Henry H. Vandolsom, 
Joseph Lyon, 
Simeon M. Tompkins, 
Abraham H. Pattison, 
Luther J. iAlills, 
Edward Phillips, 



Courier Goodwin, 
Joseph W. Benedict, 
John H. Gourlie, 
Isaac G. Bibby, 
Diederich H. Noelle, 
Thomas M. Gahagan, 
David Brown, 
L. B. Brown, 
Jared W. Martin, 
Francis H. Turk, 
John Van Orden. 



Elias Lynch, 
John H. Hallett, 
Charles Forrester, 
Isaac M. Tyson, 
John C. Shardlow, 
Samuel P. Hallett, 
John P. Haff, 
William M. Brown, 



LETTER CARRIERS. 

George Lvnch, 
Michael Noe, 
Joseph P. Smith, 
James E. Hyde, 
William Boyle, 
Isaac Hatch, 
John B. M'Pherson, 
R. Roberts. 



The Post Office is open for the delivery of Letters and 
Newspapers every day, (except Sunday,) from 8 o'clock, 
A. INL, uBtil 8, P. M.; on Sundays, from half past 9 to 
half past 10, A.M., and from half past 12, to half past 
1, P. M. 



GREAT MAILS. 



Close. 



Arrive. 



Northern— at half past 3, P.^ 

M., every day except Sun- | Northern-early every mor- 
days, when It closes at 8 > ^^. ^ steamboat. 
A. M,, (aurmg steamboat I *=' ■' 

navjs;ation.) J 

Northern— during the snsA Northern, by land, when 
pension of steamboat na- ( steamboat navigation is 
vigation, east side of the ( suspended, daily, at or 
Hudson, daily, at 6, A. M. J before 12, A. M. 



134 POST OFFICE. 



Northern — West side of the 
Hudson, daily, at 4, P. M. 

Eastern— at5 o'clock, A.M., '/ Eastern— daily at half past 
by land, every day. ) 3, P. M. 

Eastern — extra for Boston") 
and Providence, by Provi- 
dence steamboat, at 3, 
P. iVI. 

Southern — dailv, at2, P. M., ^ c? »i j -i .r a 

(on Sunday, 'at half past P^"^^^^™-^^^'^', at 6, A. 

1, P. M.) > ^"• 

Southern — extra for Phila- ^ 
delphia, daily, (except > 
Sunday,) at 5,'A. M. ) 

NORTHERN AND WESTERN MAILS. 

For all the towns on the east side of the Hudson Ri- 
ver, between New-York and Albany, mails are closed 
every day, (during the suspension of steamboat naviga- 
tion,) with the northern mail, at 6, A. M. 

N. B. The steamboats to Albany carry mails daily, 
(except Sunday,) for the following places, viz. — West 
Point, Newburgh, Fishkill Landing, Poughkeepsie, 
Kingston, Catskill, Redhook Landing, Hudson, Albany, 
Troy, Lansingburgh, Waterford, Coxsackie, Coldspring, 
Greenville, Athens, Fishkill, Goshen, Wappinger's 
Creek, Fish Lake, Rhinebeck, Lewiston, Oxford, Phi- 
lipsburgh, Hyde Park, Pleasant Valle}^ and Watervleit, 
New- York. Sharon and Salisbury, Connecticut. Up- 
per and Lower Canada. 

Western Mail, (via Newburgh.) — During steamboat 
navigation, is* despatched by steamboat, daily, (Sunday 
excepted,) at half past 3, P. M., (for parts of the coun- 
ties of Orange, Sullivan, Broome, Tioga, Tompkins, 
Seneca, &c.) 

Mails for Owego, Ithaca, and other places in that di- 
rection, including the counties of Tioga, Tompkins, 
Cortland, Steuben, Alleghany, Yates, Seneca, and Cayu- 
ga, (excepting towns on the route from Albany to Buf- 
falo,) are sent daily through tlie year ; in summer, via 



POST OFFICE 1^^ 



Newburgh, at half past 3, P. M., and in winter, via Mor- 
ristown,N. J., at4, P. M. 

OTHER MAILS. 

Sitaien Island Mail arrives and closes daily at 8, A. M. 
!"i«.^ M..7..-For Brooklyn amves and clo- 
ses every day, (Sunday excepted^ at 10, AM. J ma^ 

Z ?]?r/ciretf K;^' a"d\h;n^-ay, at 1 o'clock, 
V:^MmU Mail, thJugh SHHthtown Riverh-d 
&c., on Tuesday and Fm ay at 8 AM. lo.t^^;^eof 

t ^ Mol^l^ dnl^^di^^an^i^Sa^^ 8^. M. 
"^^r^S^fc ^//, through SpnngM.^.^^-: 
Jersey, to Pennsylvania, closes every Monday, Wednes 
dav, and Friday, at 8, A. M. Pnter'^on and Ac- 

Snndry A'^t*^'T^lf Tt l^"""! M For Bloon^field, 
quackanock, close dailv, at '^^ A. M. * ?J ^ a^^d 

Sf tl' ^'a ^M-' : rarr'rSday, Wed,fesday. 
^,T'Sa" Vm!^;Fo.- Belle^lle closes every day, 

^^™p"' ons callino- for Letters that are advertised 
on^e Lt "nd 15^ ofeach n.onth, are requested to ask 
for Advertised Letters. 

KATES OF POSTAGE. 

six ce^ts. Over 30, ="^.""' f;;"?*^^^,!™'!,^] a h 
F^cA-f/.s or /.f«ers composed of one or more Piec 



over 100 mii;s, one cen. Over ife''^'' '^""""^ ""^ 
cents. But if carried to anv Pol. n^'^'' ?"^ ^"^ ^ half 
which it is printed, whateve^ ma! h "^.f ^" '^^" ''^'^ ^^ 
cent. i'e.i.rf,:.a^VrS one 

n^> les. one and a half cenl" O^r ?00 f'n "°l ^^^^ l^^ 
naif cents. Ao/ P^,-^^,^; 7 ^"" ^^"es, two and a 

si,g,f„,,;cet3',^T:f4lS,sirc;„?,'' ■»"-• i>^^ 

and Lower CanaSwM.h o?^''^'^^^^Pt ^or Upper 
without being paid fo, '"'" forwarded to the Lines 

-o'?el-;rS"ptPeroS'a'i,*;;,7^ -^-^ -stains 

dimensions, shall be c Wed h '^ °' ^^'^^^ ^^^^^^^ «^le«« 
pamphlets, printed on a hflfn.^ '^' '^u""^' ^"^ small 
less size, shall be chTAd wiS' S^f/if ' '^"'^ "^^«^^«^ «r 
age charged on a fu 1 shppr f ^'^^he amount of post- 

orwritteLnoneS hec^rtVrnai''? ,f^"" ^' P""^^^ 
magazines to be sen bv mn^l T^"' "^Z^" pamphlets and 
contain; and if such mn^hi i! n"'"^^** «^ sheets they 
double postaVe shdfbrcharged''" "^^ '^ ''^'y ^'^'^^^ 

eve^rf SMelc'I^TSr ^'^ '^1^^^^ -^ «^the Office 
of the sun tifl S^o'cbck ^'^ M "" ^«•^^^fr«'« the risin| 
to 10, and from 1 to ? ' ^'' ^"'^ °" ^""^^a^' from 9 

cIoSl?:C:e:^ndtr'^' '^ "^^^'' ^^omd be en. 
ber of free paper,' and thL??" '' T ?."^' ^"^ ^^e num- 
endorsed oSeS'packet and'Jl '"^''"' respectively 
Post Offic., should Kej'Wd In ""^Wers, for each 
they do not exceed L'ntrn rm\?r"'lf'l' f^^^^'^^^ 
memorandum in writino- is cnnt.^S • ^ ^ ^*'"^'"' or 

*eper.„„.owho«addrcsseddoe"Ssi<ra°:'h2f'rhe™' 



POST OFFICE. 137 



is an office, and the name of the state ought not to be 
omitted. Letters are often missent, from their ambiguous 
direction. A punctual attention to this rule may prevent 
delays and miscarriages. 

If an abatement of letter postage be claimed, the letter 
must be opened in the presence of the Post Master, or 
one of his assistants; and if such letter should, instead 
of being overcharged, happen to be undercharged, the 
deficiency must be made up by the applicant. 

All letters which are lodged to go by the British Pac- 
kets, should be distinguished by writing, per packet, for 
there are ])Iaces of the same name in the United States, 
similar to those in Europe, 



lilNES OF PACKETS FROITI THE PORT 

OF IVE^V-YORK FOR FOREIGN 

PORTS. 

EUROPE. 

NEW-YORK AND LIVERPOOL PACKETS. 

1. Ship Caledonia, Graham, master, sails from New- 
York, Jan. 1, May 1, Sept. 1. From Liverpool, Feb. 16, 
June 16, Oct. 16. 

3. Ship Roscoe, Delano, master, sails from New-York, 
Jan. 8, May 8, Sept. 8. From Liverpool, Feb. 24, J une 24, 
Oct. 24. 

1. Ship Hibernia, Wilson, master, sails from New- 
York, Jan. 16, May 16, Sept. 16. From Liverpool, March 
l,July 1, Nov. 1. 

2. Ship Sheffield, Hackstaff, master, sails from New- 
York, Jan. 24, May 24, Sept. 24. From Liverpool, 
March 8, July 8, Nov. 8. 

1. Ship Columbus, Cobb, master, sails from New- York, 
Feb. 1, June 1, Oct. 1. From Liverpool, March 16, 
July 16, Nov. 16. 

3. Ship Geo. Washington, Holdredge, master, sails 
from New-York, Feb. 8, June 8, Oct. 8. From Liverpool, 
March 24, July 24, Nov. 24. 



138 LINES OF PACKETS. 

1. Ship Europe, J. Maxwell, master, sails from New- 
York, Feb. 16, June 16, Oct. 16. From Liverpool, April 
1, Aug. 1, Dec. 1. 

2. Ship United States, , master, sails from New- 
York, Feb. 24, June 24, Oct. 24. From Liverpool, April 
8, Aug. 8, Dec. 8. 

1. Ship South America, Waterman, master, sails from 
New-York, March 1, July 1, Nov. 1. From Liverpool, 
April 16, Aug. 16, Dec. ] 6. 

A. Ship Napoleon, Smith, master, sails from New-York, 
3Iarch 8, July 8, Nov. 8. From Liverpool, April 24, 
Aug. 24, Dec. 24. 

1. Ship Britannia, Sketchley, master, sails from New- 
York, March 16, July 16, Nov. 16. From Liveri>ool,May 
1, Sept. 1, Jan. 1. 

Ship , , master, sails from New-York, March 

24, July 24, Nov. 24. 

1. Ship Orpheus, Bursley, master, sails from New- 
York, April 1, Aug. 1, Dec. 1. From Liverpool, May 16, 
Sept. 16, Jan. 16. 

3. New Ship, Nye, master, sails from New-York, April 
8, Aug. 8, Dec. 8. From Liverpool, May 24, Sept. 24, 
Jan. 24. 

1. Ship North America, C. Dixey, master, sails from 
New- York, April 16, Aug. 16, Dec. 16. From Liverpool, 
June 1, Oct. 1, Feb. 1. 

2. Ship Virginian, Harris, master, sails from New- 
York, April 24, Aug. 24, Dec. 24. From Liverpool, June 
8, Oct. 8, Feb. 8. " ^ 

Passage to Liverpool, tliirty guineas — from Liverpool, 
thirty-tive guineas ; including beds, bedding, wines, and 
stores of every description. 

Agents in Liverpool — No. 1, Old Line, Baring, Bro- 
thers ik Co. — No. 2, Wni. and James Brown & Co. — No. 
3, Cearns, Crary & Co. 

Agents in New-York — No. 1, Jonathaii Goodhue <k 
Co., 64 South-street. — No. 2, Samuel Hicks »fe Sons, 80 
South-street; and Wood & / rimble, l.")7 Maid n-Jane. — 
No. 3, Grinnell, Mintiirn & Co., 134 Front-street. 



I 



LINES OF PACKETS. 139 

NEW-yORK AND LONDON PACKETS. 

Ship Samson, Chadwick, master, sails from New-York, 
Jan. 1, May 1, Sept. 1. From London, Feb. IG, June 16, 
Oct. 16. 

Ship President, 3Toore, master, sails from New-York, 
Jan. 16, May 16, Sept. ]6. From London, March 1, July 
1, Nov. 1. 

Ship Ontario, Sebor, master, sails from New- York, 
Feb. 1, June 1, Oct. 1. From London, March 16, July 
16, Nov. 16. 

Ship Montreal, Champlin, master, sails from New- 
York, Feb. 16, June 16, Oct. 16. From London, April 1, 
Aug. 1, Dec. 1. 

Ship Canada, Britton, master, sails from New- York, 
March 1, July 1, Nov. 1. From London, April 16, Aug. 
16, Dec. 16. 

Ship Sovereign, Griswold, master, sails from New- 
York, March 16, July 16, Nov. 16. From London, May 1, 
Sept, 1, Jan. 1. 

Ship Hannibal, Hebard, master, sails from New- York, 
April 1, Aug. 1 , Dec. 1. From London, May 16, Sept. 16, 
Jan. 16. 

Ship Philadelphia, Morgan, master, sails from New- 
York, April 16, Aug. 16, Dec. J 6. From London, June 
1, Oct. l,Feb. 1. 

These ships touch at Portsmouth (England) each 
way, which place they leave the 5th and i2Ulh of every 
month. 

Agents in London— George Wildes & Co., 19 Cole- 
man-street. 

Agents in New-York — Grinnell, Minturn & Co., 134 
Front-street; John Griswold, 69 South-street. 

NEW-YORK AND GREENOCK LINK OF PACKETS. 

Ship Glasgow, Robinson, Master. 

Ship Frances Joseph Grititiths, do. 

J^en^.— Norman Peck, 159 South-street. 

NEW-YORK AND BELFAST LINE OF PACKETS. 

Ship Sarah Sheafe, Merry, Master. 



140 LINES OF PACKETS. 

Ship Splendid, Proal, Master 

Agents, Abraham Bell & Co., 33 Pine-street. 

NEW-YORK AND HAVRE PACKETS. 

2. Ship Utica, Depeyster, master, sails from New- 
York, Jan. 1, May 1, Sept. 1. From Havre, Feb. 24, 
June 24, Oct. 24. 

1. Ship Formosa, Orne, master, sails from New-York, 
Jan. 8, May 8, Sept. 8. From Havre, March 1, July 1, 
Nov. 1. 

1. Ship Francois 1st, Burrows, master, sails from New- 
York, Jan. 16, May 16, Sept. 16. From Havre, March 
8, July 8, Nov. 8. 

1. Ship Normandy, Pell, master, sails from New-York, 
Jan. 24, May 24, Sept. 24. From Havre, March 16, 
July 16, Nov. 16. 

2. Ship Charles Carroll, Lee, master, sails from New- 
York, Feb. 1, June 1, Oct. 1. From Havre, March 24, 
July 24, Nov. 24. 

1. Ship Charlemagne, Pierce, master, sails from New- 
York, Feb. 8, June 8, Oct. 8. From Havre, April 1, Aug. 
1, Dec. 1. 

1. Ship Silvie de Grasse, Weiderholdt, master, sails 
from New-York, Feb. 16, June 16, Oct. 16. From Havre, 
April 8, Aug. 8, Dec. 8. 

1. Ship Poland, Anthonv, master, sails from New- 
York, Feb. 24, June 24, Oct^.24. From Havre, April 16, 
Aug. 16, Dec. 16. 

2. Ship Erie, J. Funk, master, sails from New-York, 
March 1, July 1, Nov. 1. From Havre, April 24, Aug. 24, 
Dec. 24. 

1. Ship Albany, Hawkins, master, sails from New- 
York, March 8, July 8, Nov. 8. From Havre, May 1, 
Sept. 1, Jan. 1. 

1. Ship Havre, Stoddart, master, sails from New-York, 
March 16, July 16, Nov. 16. From Havre, May 8, Sept. 
8, Jan. 8. 

1. Ship Henry IV, Castoff, master, sails from New- 
York, March 24, July 24, Nov. 24. From Havre, May 
16, Sept. 16, Jan. 16. 



LINES OF PACKETS. 141 

2. Ship France, E. Funk, master, sails from New-York, 
April 1, Aug. 1, Dec. 1. From Havre, May 24, Sept. 
24, Jan. 24. 

1. Ship Sully, Forbes, master, sails from New-\ ork, 
April 8, Aug. 8, Dec. 8. From Havre, June 1, Oct. 1, 
Feb. 1. 

1. Ship Francis Depau, Robinson, master, sails from 
New-York, April 16, Aug. 16, Dec. 16. From Havre, 
June 8, Oct. 8, Feb. 8. 

1. Ship Rhone, Rockett, master, sails from New-York, 
April 24, Aug. 24, Dec. 24. From Havre, June 16, Oct. 
16, Feb. 16. 

Passage in the cabin to or from Havre, one hundred 
and forty dollars, including beds, bedding, wines, and 
stores of every depcription. 

Agents— No. 1, Havre, Edward Quesnel; Pitray, Viel 
& Co., and Welles & Greene. 

No. 2, Bonafife, Boisgerard tfc Co. 

Agents— No. 1, New-York, C. Bolton, Fox & Liv- 
ingston, 29 Wall-street; and William Whitlock, jr. 46 
South-street. 

No. 2, John J. Boyd, 49 Wall-street. 

KINGSTON, JAMAICA (WEST INDIES) PACKETS. 

Ship Orbit, Moncrieff, master. 

Ship John W. Cater, Crane, do. 

Sail from New- York the 10th, and from Kingston the 
15th of every month. 

Agents— B. Aymar & Co., 34 South-street; C. Mor- 
gan, 31 South-street. 

NEW-YORK AND CARTHAGENA PACKETS. 

Brig Athenian, Chapman, master. 

Brig Montilla, Beekman, do. 

New Brig , , fio- ^, 

Sail from New-York the 1st, and Carthagena the 10th 
of every month. 

Agents and owners, Everett & Battelle, 76 South- 
street. 



142 



LINES OF PACKETS. 



NEW-YORK AND MEXICAN PACKETS. 

Ship Congress, , master, sails from New-York, 5th 

Feb., May, A us,., and Nov. From Vera Cruz, 1st April, 
July, Oct., and Jan. 

Ship Mexican, H. Davis, master, sails from New^-York, 
5th April, July, Oct., and Jan. From Vera Cruz, 1st 
June, Sept., Dec, and March. 

A vessel sailsi every month for Tampico. 

Agent — Edward K. Collins, 6o South-street. 

PRINCIPAL LINES OF PACKETS BETWEEN 
NEW-YORK AND SOUTHERN PORTS. 

NEW-YORK AND CHARLESTON PACKETS. 



Ships. Masters. 

Angelique Halsey 

Anson, Sinclair 

Allen, Wilson 

Calhoun, Sutton 



Ships. Masters. 

Lafayette, White 

Niagara, Besher 

Sutton, Berry 

Saluda, Jennings 



Agent — George Sutton, 80 South-street. 

NEW-YORK AND SAVANNAH PACKETS. 



Brit^s. Masters. 

Lela, Fisk 

Halcyon, M'Kinscry 



Ships. Masters. 

Macon, Porter 

New Ship. 

Fiorian,.. .Wm. Thompson 
Celia, Leavitr 

Sail from New- York and Savannah once a week. 

Aeents in New- York — Scott, Shapter «fc Morrell, 72 
South-street. 

Agents in Savannah — Hall, Shapter &l Tupper. 

(Schooner Line.) 

Briifs. Masters. Schooners. 

Madison, Bulkley Exact,. . . . 

Wm. Taylor,. . . . Bartram Excel,. . . . 

Louisa, D. Wood 

Georgia, Sherwood 

Sail from New-York ouce a week. 



Masters. 
. . .Nichols 
, . . .Hilliker 



LINES OF PACKETS. 



143 



Ag?nts in New-York — Augustus Cornwall, 13() Front- 
street; Doane, Sturges Sc Co., 9i Coffee House-slip. 
Agei-ts in Savannah — Co wen &. Miller. 

NEW-YORK AND NEW-ORLEANS PACKETS. 
(Old Line.) 



iS/iips. Masters. 

New-Orleans, Sears 

Tennessee, Holmes 



Shij^s. 31as1ers. 

Arkansas, Dennis 

Kentucky, Eunker 

Alabama, Handy 

Sail from New-York 1st and 15th, and from New-Or 
leans the 10th and 25th of each month, Sundays ex' 
cepted. 

Agents, Silas Holmes & Co., 62 South-street. 

(Second Line.) 



Ships. Masters. 

Saratoga, Marshall 

New Ship, 



Ships. blasters. 

New-Jersey, Wibray 

John Linton, Mansiield 

Cincinnati, Barstow 

Sail from New-York 5th and 20th, and from New-Or 
leans 1st and 15th of each month. 

Agents in New-York — C. &. J. Barstow, 73 South 
street. 

Agents in New-Orleans — Adams &, Andrews. 

(Louisiana Line.) 



Ships. Masters. 

Nashville, Rathbone 

Huntsville, Palmer 



Ships. blasters. 

Mississippi, flJiner 

Yazoo, Packard 

Louisville, Price I 

Sail from New- York and from New-Orleans the 10th 
and 25th of every month. 

Agent — Edward K. Collins, 68 South-street. 

(Third Line.) 



Ships. Masters. 

Oceana, Leslie 

St. Louis, .Story 



Ships. Masters. 

Hudson, Tracy 

Florence, Smith 



Agents in New- York — Scott «fc Laidlaw, 79 South-st. 
Agent in New-Orleans — Peter Laidlaw, Camp-street. 



144 



LINES OF PACKETS. 



NEW-YORK AND MOBILE PACKETS. 



Ships. Masters. 

Alabamian, Doane 

Lorena, Urquhart 

Russell Baldwin,. West 
Tuskina, Post 



Ships. Masters. 

Junior, Parker 

St. John, Spencer 

Elisha Denison,.. .Lane 
Hector,. 



Agents— E. D. Hurlburt & Co., 84 South-street 
(New Line.) 



Ships. Masters. 

Rob Roy, Arnold 

Robert Wilson, Smith 



Ships. Masters. 

Waverley, Philips 

Warsaw, Thatcher 

Cahawba, Smith 

Agents in New-York— Center & Co., 94 Pine-street. 

Agent in Mobile — Robert E. Center. 

APALACHICOLA PACKETS. 



Ships. Masters. 

Matilda, Ellison 

Indiana, Churchill 

Wash'ton Irving, .Latham 

Agents— E. D. Hurlburt & Co 



Ships. Masters. 

American, Mathews 

Brig Columbus, . . .Knowles 



84 South-street. 



DARIEN PACKETS. 



Brigs. Masters. 
Amelia Strong,.. .Chase 
Premium, Sherman 



Brigs. Masters. 

Coral,.. Buckley 

Sch. David B.Crane,Bibbins 



Agents— R. M. Demill, 174 Front-street ; and Benja- 
min Strong & Son, 176 Front-street. 
Agent in Darien — John T. Rowland. 

OTHER LINES FROM NEW-YORK TO THE SOUTH. 

Charleston, Union Line, sail every 4th day, Sunday 
excepted. 

Charleston, Union Line, sail every Tuesday and Fri- 
day. 

Agent — Joseph Munro, 39 Burling-slip. 

Savannah, Schooner Line, sail every week. 

Agents— A. Cornwall, 131 Front-street, and Doane & 
Sturges, 91 Coffee House-slip. 



LINES OF PACKETS. 145 

Savannah, Old Line, 5 ships. 

Agent — C. Seguine, 86 Coflee House-slip. 

Wilmington, (N. C.) Old Line, 5 vessels. 

Agent— John Ogden, 168 South-street. 

Wilmington, New-Line, 6 vessels. 

Agents — Hallett & Brown, 31 Burling-slip. 

Washington, (N. C.) New Line, 3 vessels. 

Agents— Hallett & Brown, 31 Burling-slip. 

Norfolk, (Va.) 4 schooners. 

Agents in New-York— W. A. L'Hommedieu, 88 Coffee 
House-slip. 

Agent at Norfolk — John Hipkins. 

Norfolk, Old Line, 5 schooners. 

Agents in New-York — Doane, Sturges & Co., 91 Cof- 
fee House-slip. 

Agent in Norfolk — William Rowland. 

Petersburgh, (Va.) 20 vessels, sail every day. 

Agent — James Hunter, 58 South-street. 

Petersburgh, Old Line, sail every Saturday. 

Agent — C. Seguine, 86 Coffee House-slip. 

Richmond, (Va.) 7 schooners, sail 1st, 5th, 10th, 15th, 
20th, 25th, and 30th, of each month. 

Agents— Allen & Paxson, 92 Coffee House-slip, and 
James Hunter, 58 South-street. 

Baltimore, 1, Todd's Line, sail every Saturday. 

2, Old Line, sail once a week. 

3, Despatch Line, sail every Saturday. 

Agents for the 1st line, W. W. Todd, corner of Old- 
slip and Front-street. 

Agent for the 2d line, C. Seguine, 86 Coffee House- 
slip. 

Agent for the 3d line, J. F. Trumbull, 119 Front- 
street. 

Alexandria, Georgetown, and Washington packets 
sail every day. 

Agents— Doane, Sturges & Co., 91 Coffee House- 
slip. 

10 



146 LINES OF PACKETS. 



PHILADELPHIA. 

1st. Regular Liiie, sail every Wednesday and Satur- 
day. 

'^d. Despatch Line, sail every Wednesday and Satur- 
day. 

3d. New Line, sail every Wednesday and Saturday. 

4th. Philadelphia Line, sail every Wednesday and 
Saturday. 

Agents for 1st line, Baldwin &. Co., 9-3 Coffee House- 
slip. 

Agents for 2d line, Miller &. Bancker, 19 Coenties- 

slip. 

Agents for 3d line, Howes, Godfrey & Robinson, 26 
South-street. 

Agent for 4th line, William J. M'Kee, 34 Old-slip. 

LINES OF PACKETS EAST. 

1st, Boston Despatch Line, (6 schooners,) twice a 
week. 

2d, Second Line, (6 schooners,) twice a week. 

3d, Commercial Line, (6 schooners,) twice a week. 

Agents for 1st line, E. J. Herrick, 23 South-street ; 
and Howes, Godfrey «fc Robinson, 26 South-street. 

Agents for 2d line, Rider & Lewis, 26 Coenties-slip. 

Agents for 3d, Commercial Line, G. Herrick & Son, 
10 South-street. 

Salem, 2 vessels. 

Agents— Rider & Lewis, 26 Coenties-slip. 

Salem, Union Line, 4 vessels. 

Agents — Farnham & Co., 29 South-street. 

Portsmouth, 2 vessels, sail once a fortnight. 

Agents — Rider & Lewis, 26 Coenties-slip. 

Providence, several times a week. Sail from foot of 
Maiden-lane. 

New-Havea, Hartford, Middletown, New-London, and 
Norwich, sail several times a week. Sail from eait side 
of Burling-slip. 



STEAMBOATS. 147 



STEAMBOATS. 

HUDSON RIVER LINE. 

Morning Boats for Albany and Troy. 

Steamboat North America, Ca])tain Criittcndeii. 

" " Albany, " Jenkins. 

" " Erie, " Benson. 

" " Champlain, " Gorham. 

One of the above Boats leave every day, at 7 o'clock, 

A. M., from the foot of Barclay-street. 

Afternoon Boats for Albany and Troy. 
Steamboat Ohio, Captain Bartholomew. 

" " Dewitt Clinton, " Seymour. 

" " Constellation, " Brown. 

" " Constitution, " Hoyt. 

One of the above Boats leave every day, at 5 o'clock, 
P. M., from the foot ot Cortlandt-street. 

Berths can be secured in either of the above lines, by 
applying at the offices, at the foot of Barclay and Cort- 
landt-streets, or to the Captains on board the Boats. 

OTHER BOATS FROM NEW-YORK TO ALBANY. 

Westchester, St. John — leaves New-York, Tuesday, 
Thursday, and Saturday; leaves Albany, Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday. 

Sandusky, De Groot — leaves New-York, Tuesday, 
Thursday, and Saturday ; leaves Albany, Wednesday, 
Friday, and Sunday— foot of Cortlandt-street, North 
River. 

PEEKSKILL. 

Union, Hayward— leaves New-York every day at 7 
o'clock, A. M., and Peekskill at 12 o'clock, M.— foot of 
Murray-street, North River. 

NEWBURGH. 

Washington, Wardrop— leaves New-York, Monday 
and Thursday, at 5 o'clock, P. M. ; leaves Newburgh, 
Wednesday and Saturday. 

Baltimore, Clark— leaves New-York, Tuesday and 
Saturday, at 5 o'clock, P. M.; leaves Newburgh, Thurs- 
day and Monday. 



148 STEAMBOATS. 



Providence, Logau — leaves New-York, Monday and 
Thursday, at 6 o'clock, P. M.; leaves Newburgh, Wed- 
nesday and Saturday. 

William Young, Halstead — leaves Nevi^-York, Tues- 
day and Friday ; leaves Newburgh, Wednesday and 
Saturday — foot of Murray-street, North River. 

NEW'-WINDSOR. 

Norfolk, Wandell — leaves New- York, Monday and 
Thursday; leaves New-Windsor, Tuesday and Friday. 

Experiment, Griswold — leaves New-York, Tuesday 
and Friday ; leaves Cornwall, near New-Windsor, Wed- 
nesday and Saturday. 

FORT LEE. 

John Jay, , leaves New-York twice a day — foot 

of Canal-street, North River. 

STATEN ISLAND. 

Bolivar, Braisted— leaves New-York at 7, 9^, 1^, and 5 
o'clock; leaves Staten Island at 8, 11, 3, and 6 o'clock — 
office, foot of Whitehall-street. 

FLUSHING, (l. I.) 

Flushing, Lane— leaves New-York at 4 o'clock, P. M. ; 
leaves Flushing at 7 o'clock, A. M.— office, foot of Ful- 
ton-street, East River. 

NEW-ROCHELLE. 

American Eagle, Peck— leaves New-York atl2 o'clock, 
M. ; leaves New-Rochelle at 8 o'clock, A. M.— office, 
foot of Fulton-street, East River. 

AMBOY, 

(Belonging to the Camden and Amhoy Rail-Road Line.) 
Swan, Seymour— leaves New- York at 10 o'clock, A. 

M. ; leaves !Amboy at 4 P. M. 
Independence, Diehl— leaves New-York at 6 o'clock, 

A. M. ; leaves Amboy from 12 to 1, P. M. 
Thistle, Degraw— (carries the mail,) leaves New- York 

at 4 o'clock, P. M.- leaves Amboy at 3 and 4, A. M.— 

office, foot of Washmgton-street, near th"? Battery. 



STEAMBOATS. 149 



NEW-BRUNSWICK. 

( PeopW s Line for Phila delphia . ) 
New-York, Van Pelt— leaves New-York at 7 o'clock, 
A. M. ; leaves New-Brunswick at 2 and 3, P. M. — office, 
pier No. 2, Washington-street, near the Battery. 

NEW-BRUNSWICK. 

( Transportation Line.) 

Napoleon, Fisher — leaves New-York at 2 o'clock, P. 
M. ; leaves New-Brunswick at 7, A. M. 

Agents for transportation. Hill, Fish & Abbe — office, 
12 Washington-street, near the Battery. 

NEWPORT AND PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

[New- York and Boston Line.) 

President, Bunker. 

Benjamin Franklin, Coleman. 

Leave Nev/-York, from the foot of Cortlandt-street, 
every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, at 5 o'clock, P. 
M. Providence same days at 12. 

(Second Line.) 

Boston, Comstock — leaves New- York, Tuesday and 
Saturday — leaves Providence, Monday and Friday. 

Providence, Thayer — leaves New-York, Monday and 
Thursday — leaves Providence, Tuesday and Saturday — 
foot of Fulton-street, East River. 

HARTFORD, (cONN.) 

Water Witch, Vanderbilt. 

Chief Justice Marshall, Howes. 

New-England, . 

Leave New-York, every day at 5, P. M.— leave Hart- 
ford, every day at 2, P. M., (Sundays excepted) — foot of 
Beekman-street, East River. 

NEW-HAVEN, (conn.) 

Superior, .Stone. 

Splendid, R. Stone. 

One Boat leaves New York and New Haven, every day 



150 STEAMBOATS, 



(Sundays excepted) at 7, A. M. — foot of Beekman-street, 
East River. 

NORWICH, (conn.) 
General Jackson, Coit — leaves New- York, Tuesday 
and Friday — leaves Norwich, Monday and Thursday — 
wharf, above the foot of Beekman-street, East-River. 

BRIDGEPORT, (CONN.) 

Nimrod, Brooks — loaves New-York, Tuesday, Thurs- 
day, and Saturday — leaves Bridgeport, Monday, Wed- 
nesday, and Friday — foot of Catharine-street, East 
River. 

NORWALK, (conn.) 

Fairfield, Peck— leaves New-York, Tuesday, Thurs- 
day, and Saturday — leaves Norwalk, Monday, Wednes- 
day, and Friday — foot of Catharine-street, East River. 
NEWARK, (n. j.) 

Newark, Tate— leaves New-York at 10 o'clock, each 
morning, and 4, P. M.; leaves Newark at 7 o'clock, A. 
M., and half past 1, P. M. — office, foot of Barclay-street, 
North River. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, (N. J.) 

Cinderella, Vanderbilt — leaves New-York at half past 
10 o'clock, A. M., and 3, P. M.; leaves Elizabethtown at 
8 o'clock, A. M., and 12, M.— office, foot of Washington- 
street, near the Battery. 

CHARLESTON, (s. C.) 

David Brown, James Coffee. 

William Gibbons, James Pennoyer. 

Leave New-York and Charleston every Saturday, at 4, 
P. M. 
Agent in New-York — Charles Morgan, 31 South-street. 

tow-boat LINES ON THE HUDSON RIVER. 

iyirif'tsure Line for Albany. 
Swiftsure, Winray — Commerce, Fitch — Oliver Ells- 
worth, House — Henry Eckford, Minuse — James Fairlie, 
Hitchcock. 



6TEAMB0ATS. 151 



One Boat of this line leaves the foot of Broad-street, 
New- York, and Albany, every day. 
Troy Line. 

Twelve Boats, towed by the steamboats New-London, 
Commerce, Oliver Elsworth, and James Fairlie — leaves 
New-York, daily, from west side Coenties-slip. 

Agent, Philip Hart, 22 South-street. 
Kingston. 

Delaware and Victory. 

These boats have no regular day of sailing, they are 
employed in towing coal barges. 

Quarantine^ SfC. 

Fanny, Benson — Hercules, Vanderbilt — and Rufus 
King, . 

These Boats are emj'.loyed in towing vessels from the 
Quarantine ground, and other places, into harbour. 

FREIGHT AND PASSAGE BOATS. 

Kinderhook. 
United States, Blayhew — leaves New- York, Wednes- 
day and Saturday ; leaves Kinderhook, Tuesday and 
Friday — foot of Dey-street, North River. 

Hudson. 
Legislature, Havalln— leaves New- York, Wednesday 
and Saturday; leaves Hudson, Tuesday and Friday — 
foot of Liberty-street, North River. 

Kingston. 

Hudson, Dean — leaves New-York, Wednesday and 
Saturday ; leaves Kingston, Tuesday and Friday. 

Congress, Ketchum — leaves New-York, Monday and 
Thursday ; leaves Kingston, Wednesday and Saturday — 
foot of Dey-street, North River. 

Nyack. 
Rockland, , leaves New-York, Tuesday, Thurs- 
day, and Saturday; leaves Nyack, Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday — foot of Robinson-street, North River. 



152 STAGES. 



STAGES. 

ALBANY. 

East side of the Hudson, daily in winter. Office, 
York House, No. 5 Gortlandt-street. 

NEVVBURGH AND ALBANY. 

West side of the Hudson, daily in winter. Office, 
York House, No. 5 Cortlandt-street. 

OWEGO, ITHACA, AND GENEVA. 

Through New-Jersey, every day, (except Sunday,) at 
3, A. M. Office, No. 71 Cortlandt-street. Distance to 
Geneva, by this route, 251 miles. Distance to Buffalo, 
357 miles. 

PHILADELPHIA RAIL ROAD LINE. 

Daily, United States Mail. Office, Whitfield's, No. 1 
Cortlandt-street. 

EASTERN, (new-haven, BOSTON,) &C. 

Daily, United States Mail. Office, Whitfield's, No. 1 
Cortlandt-street. 

v^testchester and danbury. 
To Danbury, Conn., 66 miles. Leaves New- York, 
(corner of Bayard-street and the Bowery,) daily, at 9, 
A. M. Returning, leaves Danbury, daily, at 4, P. M. 

NEWARK. 

f Leaves foot of Cortlandt, and Barclay-streets, hourly, 
from 10, A. M., till 4, P. M. 

PATTERSON STAGES AND RAIL ROAD LINE 

Leaves three times a day from the foot of Cortlandt- 
street. 

LONG ISLAND. 

Stages leave Brooklyn Ferry every hour, for different 



places on the Island. 



PRINCIPAL HOTELS AND PUBLIC HOUSES. 153 

PRINCIPAIi HOTE1.S AN» PUBIilC 
HOUSES. 

Albany Hotel, 31 Cortlandt-street, P. B. Walker & 
G. C. Watson. 

American Hotel, 229 Broadway, Edward Milford. 

Atlantic Hotel, 5 Broadway, M'Neil Seymour. 

Barclay-street House, Barclay, corner of West-slreet, 
Harrison & Benson. 

Broad-street House, Broad, corner of Pearl-street, 
James Kinney. 

City Hotel, Broadway, between Cedar and Thames 
streets, Chester Jennings. 

Clinton Hotel, Beekman, corner of Nassau-street, 
Mr. Hodges. 

Congress Hall, (Webb's,) 142 Broadway, Charles H. 
Webb. 

Eastern Pearl-street House, 309 Pearl-street. 

Exchange Hotel, 10 and 12 Broad-street, Daniel D. 
Howard. 

Franklin House, 197 Broadway, Newton Hays. 

Holt's Hotel, corner of Fulton and Pearl-streets, Ste- 
phen Holt. 

Lovejo>'s Hotel, corner of Beekman-street and Park 
Row. 

Mrs. Mann's, 61 Broadway. 

Mansion House, (Bunker's,) 39 Broadway, William 
J. Bunker. 

Merchant's Hotel, 108 Broad-street, Henry Thurston. 

Nihlo's Hotel, 112 Broadway, John Niblo. 

North American Hotel, 30 Bowery, Mr. Montague. 

Northern Hotel, 79 Cortlandt-street, James Harrison. 

Orange County House, 66 Cortlandt-street, Smith 
Dunning. 

Pearl-street House and Ohio Hotel, 88 Pearl-street 
Mahon & Peck. 

Tammany Hall, 166 Nassau, corner of Frankfort- 
street, Lovejov & Co. 

Tontine Coffee House, Wall, corner of Water-street, 
T.ovejoy & Co. 



54 PRINCIPAL HOTELS AND PUBLIC HOUSES. 



United States Hotel, 178 and 180 Pearl-street. 
Walton House, 328 Pearl-.street, Simeon Backus. 
Washington Hotel, 282 Broadway, James Ward. 
Western Hotel, 9 Cortlandt-street, William Faulkner. 
York House, 5 Cortlandt-street, O. H. Williston. 



PRIIYCIPAJL PRIVATE BOARI>INO 

HOLIES, 
FOR THE ACCOMMODATION OF TRANSIENT BOARDERS. 

Mrs. Southart, 65 Broadwaj'. 

Mrs. Pearcy, 56 Broadway. 

Miss Boyd, 66 Broadway. 

Mrs. Wood, 21 Broadway. 

Mrs. Street, 36 Broadway. 

Mrs. White, 37 Broadway. 

Mrs. Manwaring-, 24 Broadway. 

Mrs. Durfey, 40 Broadway. 

Mrs. Baker, 10 and 12 Broadway. 

Mrs. Hosack, 57 Broadway. 

3Irs. Helme, 59. Broadway". 

Mrs. Wade, 110 Broadway. 

Mrs. Manning, 13«^ Broadway. 

Mrs. Sistare, 170 Broadway. 

Mrs. Waldron, 181 Broadway. 

Mrs. Belden, 38 Beach, opposite St. John's Park. 

Mrs. Mix and Mrs. Tripp, 75 Nassau-street. 

IMrs. Huhbard, 1 Bridere-street. 

Miss Shackerly, 15 Whitehall-street. 

Miss White, 8 State-street. 

Mrs. Howland, 1 Park-row. 

Mrs. Ballard, 251 Pearl-street. 

In addition to the above, there are a great number of 
public and private houses, for the acx;ommodation of 
strangers, and occasional residents in the citv, affording 
the same comparative comfort as that enjoyed bv the 
inhabitants themselves. The charges vary according 
to the style of the accommodation. The principal hotels 



PRINCIPAL PRIVATE BOARDING HOUSES. 155 



and boarding houses possess every convenience that 
can be desired; and an inmate may either reside in 
privacy or associate with the company, as inchnation 
dictates. , 

At the eating houses, meals can be procured at mo- 
derate charges, varying according to the articles ordered. 

Lodgings may be obtained by the day, week, or month, 
in many respectable houses, at a moderate price. 

PE KIOUIC A1.S. 

MONTHLY. 

The Knickerbocker, Clark & Edson, 155 Broadway. 

American IMonthly Magazine, Jonathan Greenleaf. 

American Mechanic's Magazine, D. K. Minor, 35 
Wall. 

The Booksellers' Advertiser, West &. Trow, 144 Ful- 
ton. . ^ 1 , 1,T 

New-York Farmer and American Gardner s Magazine, 
D. K. Minor. Samuel Fleet, Editor, 35 Wall. 
Journal of Public Morals, Hines & Dennison, 126 

Nassau. 

The Sailors' Magazine, 82 Nassau. 

The Familv Magazine, O. Bachelor & J. S. Redfield. 

The Anti-Slaverv Reporter, Anti-Slavery Society. 

The Father's Mafi:azine, John Wiley, 22 Nassau. 

The Mother's Magazine, Rev. S.Whittlesey, 22 Nassau. 

Abbot's Reli2:iou3 Magazine, John Wiley, 22 Nassau. 

Emigrants' Magazine, 22 Nassau. 

La Revue Francais (French,) Snowden & Hoskms, 58 

Wall. 

Protestant Magazine, L. D. Dewey, Clinton Hall.^ 

Home Missionary and Pastor's Journal, Absalom Pe- 
ters, 150 Nassau. . . ,. T^ . u o 

Reformed Dutch Magazine, Association of Dutch Ke- 
formed Clergy, corner Ann and Nassau-street. 

M'Dowali's Journal, J. M'Dowall, 150 Nassau. 

Children's Magazine, Rev. Wm. R. Whittingham, 46 

Lumber. •„ ^ , , 

New-York Sporting Magazine, C. R. Colden. 



156 NEWSPAPERS. 



NETTSPAPERS. 

DAILY MORNING. 

New-York Gazette and General Advertiser, John Lang 
& Co., 3 Old-slip, (Hanover-square.) 

Mercantile Advertiser and New-York Advocate, Amos 
Butler &L Co., 56 Wall-street. 

New- York Daily Advertiser, Dwight, Townsend & 
Co., 22 Merchants'" Exchange. 

Morning Courier and New-York Enquirer, James 
Watson Webb, 58 Wall-street. 

The New-York Journal of Commerce, Hale & Hal- 
lock, 2 Merchant's Exchange. 

The Democratic Chronicle, W^illiam D. Hart, comer 
Beekman-street and Park Row. 

New-York Times, Wm. Holland, Edward Sanford, 
and John J. Bedient. 

DAILY EVENING. 

New- York Commercial Advertiser, Francis Hall & 
Co., corner of Pine and William streets. 

The Evening Post, Bryant, Leecgett & Co., 49 Wil- 
liam-street. 

New- York American, Charles King, 35 Wall-street. 

The Evening Star, Noah & Gill, 47 William-street. 

There are several small daily papers published in the 
city, which are sold by carriers, to citizens and strangers, 
at one cent each, such as The Sun, The Bee, The Tran- 
script, The Man, The Morning Star. 

SEMI-WEEKLY. 

New-York Spectator, Francis Hall & Co., comer of 
Pine and William streets. 

The Evening Post, Bryant, Leggett & Co., 49 William- 
street. 

New-York Advertiser, Dwight, Townsend & Co., 22 
Merchants' Exchange. 

New-York American,* Charles King, 35 Wall-street. 



* The American is also published tri-weekly. 



NEWSPAPERS, 



157 



New- York Courier and Enquirer, James Watson 
Webb, 58 Wall-street. c u ,, i o 

New-York Journal of Commerce, Hale & HallocR, Z 
Merchants' Exchange. , „ , j t^- i c;r 

New- York Advocate and Journal, Redwood 1* islier, Db 

Wall-street. . , ^^ ^r i t> • 

Shipping and Commercial List, and New- York Fnce 

Current, W. Burritt & E. B. Clayton, 17 Hanover-street. 
Le Courrier des Etats Unis, (French,) Felix Lacoste, 

7 Broad-street. 

WEEKLY. 

New- York Mirror, George P. Morris, Theodore S. 
Fay, and N. P. Willis, corner of Ann and Nassau 
streets. 

The Albion, John S. Bartlett, M. D.,76 Cedar-street. 

The Emigrant, do. do. 

The Atlas, Swinborne, Rogers & Co., 175 Broadway. 

The Constellation, do. do. 

Merchants' Intelligencer, Eustis Prescott. do. 

The Mercury, Hale & Hallock, 2 Merchants Ex- 
change. , ^ . T 

Weekly Courier and New-1 ork Enquirer, James 
Watson Webb, 58 Wall-street. 

New- York Whig, L. D. Dewey, 129 Nassau-street. 

American Rail Road Journal, D. K. Minor, 35 Wall- 

The Traveller, Times, and Journal, Fisher & Inman, 

189 Broadway. _. , . c-r r. ^ 

The Old Countryman, Davis & Pickering, 57 h rank- 

iort-strGGt» 
Working Man's Advocate, George H. Evans, 6 Thames- 

Str6Gt» 

Sylvester's Reporter, Counterfeit Detector, and New- 
York Price Current, S. J. Sylvester, 130 Broadway. 

New-Yorker. . 

Truth Teller, (Catholic,) William Denman, corner ot 
Anthony-street and Broadway. 

New-Yorker, H. Greeley & Co., 20 Nassau. 



158 NEWSPAPERS. 



The Emancipator, S. W. Benedict & Co., 166 Nassau. 

Citizen of the World, G. Vail, Roosevelt-street. 

New-York Weekly Register, and Catholic Diary. 

New- York Observer, S. E. Morse & Co. 

New-York Evangelist, Rev. Joshua Leavitt, 162 Nas- 
sau-street. 

The Protestant, Reformation Society, ] 06 Nassau- 
street. 

The Churchman, Rev. Samuel Seabury, 46 Lumber- 
street. 

Christian Advocate and Journal and Zion's Herald, B. 
Waugh & T. Mason. 

Christian Intelligencer, C. D. Westbrook, D. D., 104 
Nassau-street. 

Baptist Repository, C. C. P. Crosby, comer of Nassau 
and Beekman streets. 

Examiner, 1 Mott-street. 

Free Enquirer, 222 William-street. 

Youth's Companion, James Van Valkenburgh, 17 Ann- 
street. 

The Comet, H. D. Duhecquet. 

Children's Magazine, 46 Lumber-street. 

Christian Messenger, P. Price. 

New-York Weekly IMesseuger and Young Men's Ad- 
vocate, Burnett «fc Smith, 17 Ann-street. 

The Free Press, Wm. Hagadorn. 

SEMI-MONTHLY. 

Day's New-York Bank Note List, (Sec, Mahlon Day, 
376 Pearl-street. 

Journal of Women, Fulton-street. 

La France Litteraire, C. De Behr, Broadway. 

Atlas Magazine, Swiuborne, Rogers &i, Co. 



CIRCULATING LIBRARIES. 



159 



CIK€Ui,ATI]V«i I.BUIIAIS1ES.* 


Names. 






Location. 


Proprietors. 


Goodrich's, 


No 


124 Broadway, 


A. T. Goodrich. 


Minerva, 




94 


do. 


Peter Hill. 


Parthenon, 




252 


do. 


C. S. Francis. 


Broadway, 




155 


do. 


J. Disturnell. 


Enterprise, 




389 


do. 


M. Bancroft. 


Franklin, 




413 


do. 


J. Stanley &Co. 


liowerv. 




76 Bowery, 


Bartlett &.Kaynor. 


Green's, 




1 Beekman, 


A. Green. 



KEA1>I^G ISOOMS. 

THE ATHENiEUJI. 

(Corner of Broadway and Chambers-street.) 

(Sec Literary Institutions.) 

EXCHANGE READING ROOM. 

(Rear room of Merchants' Exchange.) 

Strangers will here find files of American and foreign 
newspapers, and may be introduced to the Reading Room 
by any citizen who is a subscriber. The terms of 
subscription are $7 per annum, or strangers 75 cents per 
month. 

THE PARTHENON READING ROOM. 

Is attached to the book-store of Mr. Charles S. Francis, 
]No. 252 Broadway. It is an agreeable lounge for the 
visiter or resident in the city. Here is to be found a 
collection, unequalled in the city, of Foreign and Ameri- 
can periodicals. All the Literary, Philosophical, and 
Medical Journals published in Great Britain and the 
United States, of any note, are regularly furnished and 
constantly kept lor the use of subscribers, together with 
all the city newspapers, and many from other parts of the 
Union. 



For Public Libraries, see Literary Institutions. 



160 READING ROOMS. 



FRANKLIN READING ROOM. 

(418 Broadway, corner Canal-street.) 

Is kept by J. Stanley «feCo. The rooms are furnished 
with most of the English and American periodicals, and 
newspapers, including those from every part of Great 
Britam. 



Austria — (Vice) Jos. A. Gordon, 38 South-street. 

Baden — C. F. Hoyer, corner William and Beekman. 

Belgium — Henry W. T. Mali, 16 Cedar-street. 

Brazil — Herman Brueu, 166 South-street. 

Bremen — Caspar Meier, 42 Broad-street. 

Denmark — (Vice) Benj. Aymar, 43 South-street. 

France — Adel Charles Lacathou de la Forest, Consul 
General, 21 Pearl-street. 

Great Britain — James Buchanan, Consul. J. C. Bu- 
chanan, Vice-Cousul, 33 Nassau-street. 

Hanover — (Vice) A. W. Hupeden, 28 Broad-street. 

Hesse— C. W. Faber, 30 Broad-street. 

Holland — J. C. Zimmerman. 44 Broad-street. 

Mexico — (Vice) James Treat, 41 Cedar-street. 

New-Grenada— Xavier De Medina, 4 Wall-street. 

Oldenburg — Otto H. Miesegaes. 

Prussia, and Vice-Consul for Hamburg — J. W. 
Schmidt, 69 Pine-street. 

Portugal— James B. Murray, 5 Exchange-place. 

Rome and Sicily— Martin Mantin, 7^ Old-slip. 

Russia— A. Eustaphieve, 426 Broome-street. 

Sardinia— S. V. Bouland,130 Pearl-street. 

Saxony— Charles Augustus Davis, Consul General, 21 
Broad-street. Andreas Anton Melly, Consul. 

Spain — Don Francisco Stoughton, 76 Leonard- 
street. 

Sweden and Norway — Henry Gahn, Consul. John 
James Boyd, Vice-Consul, 49 Wall-street. 

Switzerland— H. C. De Rham, 44 Broad street. 

Tuscany— Jos. A. Gordon, 38 South-street. 



WARDENS OF THE PORT. 161 



IVARDENS OF THE PORT. 

(Office, 55 Wall-street.) 

Josial) Ing^ersoll, Master. 
Anthony Mofi'att, Clerk. 

John White, John Minugh, Wm. M'Intire Reuben 
Hope, Charles H. Barnard. 

Vessels and goods arriving in a damaged state, andrer 
quired to he sold at auction, for the benefit of under- 
writers out of the city of New-York, must be under the 
inspection of the wardens, who may be required to certify 
the cause of the damage, and amount of sale and charges. 
Fees as follows: 1| per cent, on gross amount of sales; 
and for each sui-vey on board of any vessel, at any store, 
or along the docks or whaiTes, 3.00 on damaged goods; 
each survey on hull, spars, rigging, &c., 5.00 ; each certi- 
ficate 1.25 ; do. of distress of said vessel 2.50. Same 
services for vessels paying foreign duties and tonnage, 
double. 



HARBOUR MASTERS, 

(Office, corner of Maiden-lane and Water-street.) 

John Webb, Sam'l Wiswall, David Mitchell. 
Fees. — On vessels unloading 1^ cts. per ton. Vessels 

paying foreign duties and tonnage, double ; which must 

be paid within 48 hours after arrival. 

Schrs. and sloops in the coasting trade, 2 dollars, 
For adjusting any difference respecting situation, $2. 



BAI^IiAST MASTEK. 

John Baker. 
Fees. — For inspecting stone or shingle ballast, 8 cents 
per ton, 5 cents of which to be paid by the purchaser, 
and 3 cents by the seller.— Office, No. 28 Burling-elip. 
11 



162 RATES OF PILOTAGE. 



RATES OF PII^OTACJE. 

Every Pilot, who shall take charge of any vessel to 
the eastward or southward of the \\hite Buoy, on the 
Eastern Ridge, near the Bar, and conducts and moors 
safely such vessel to a proper wharf; or from the city 
to the southward or eastward of said buoy, is entitled by 
law, to the following rates, to wit : — For vessels of the 
U. States, and those who are entitled by treaty to enter 
upon the same terms as American vessels, the sums 
which follow : — Every vessel drawing less than 14 feet, 
1.50 cents per foot. Do. drawing 14 feet, and less than 
18, 1.75 cents per foot. Do. drawing 18 feel or upwards, 
2.25 cents per foot. The same rates of pilotage to be 
allowed, for any vessel that may be piloted any where 
within the Hook, whose master or owner does not wish 
the same to be brought to the city wharves. Half 
pilotage only to be allowed to any pilot who shall take 
charge of a vessel to westward of the White Buoy. No 
pilotage whatsoever to be given to any pilot, unless he 
shall take charge of a vessel to the southward of the 
upper Middle Ground, nor unless such vessel shall be 
of 70 tons burthen, provided the usual signal be not 
given, in which case half pilotage is to be allowed. 
Between the first day of November and the first of April, 
inclusive, four dollars additional to be allowed, for vessels 
often feet water and upwards; if less than ten feet, 
two dollars. One fourth additional to be given to the 
pilots, wlio shall take charge of vessels out of sight of 
the Light House. For every day any pilot shall be re- 
quired to remain on board, three dollars per day. Fo- 
reign vessels, not entitled by treaty to enter on the same 
terras as those of the United States, to pay one-fourth 
additional to the pilots, and also five dollars over and 
above the foregoing rates of j)ilotage. 



MEASURERS, INSPECTORS, AND GAUGERS. 163 



MEASUBEKS, IIVSPECTOKS, AND 
CAUGEKS. 

Richard M'Carty, Flour Inspector, 17 South-street, 
252 Front-street, and 80 Dey -street. 

Francis Peckwell, Inspector of Staves, &c., 162 South- 
street. 

Robert C. Theall, Inspector of Oil, 136 Grand-street. 

INSPECTORS OF DOMESTIC SPIRITS. 

Abraham Dally, Inspector General of Domestic Spirits, 
90 Front-street. 

Inspectom. — Thomas J. Shankland, Hugh Flynn, 
Joseph C. Cooper, George Nevin, G. J. Pesoa. 

MEASURERS OF GRAIN. 

Samuel Satterlee, jr., Measurer General of Grain, 15 
Hanover-street. 

Measurers. — John Wright, Samuel V. Disbrow, Isaac 
L. Tompkins, Oliver H. Tompkins, Cornelius Timpson, 
Samuel Clark, John Vredenburgh, John G. Ketchum, 
Edward Webb, Lewis Smith, Jacob Brinckerhoft', Oliver 
Holden, Ebenezer Briggs, Joseph Earle, Gilbert Jenkins, 
Robert T. Clark, Tobias L. Stoughtenburgh, Thomas 
Frost, Isaac Sayrs, James Rogers. 

MEASURERS OF LIME. 

John Ross, Henry Ryer. 

TOBACCO INSPECTOR. 

J. D. Stevenson, 132 Cedar and 32 Pearl streets. 

MEASURERS OF COAL. 

William Guest, Alexander Frasier, Abraham Cole, 
Abraham Guest. 

INSPECTORS AND WEIGHERS OF ANTHRACITE COAL. 

Caleb Crane, John I. Gantz, Sam'l D. Throop, Wm. 
'R. Lowery, Philip Power, John S. Gantz, John Cowdry, 
John Bowen, John Martin, Timothy Youle, John Van 
Bussom, James Delamatcr. 



l&l MEASURERS, INSPECTORS, AND GAUGERS. 

MEASURERS OF CHARCOAL. 

William Cox, James Greig, George Greig, Eben. D. 
Cobb, R. W. Moore, A. Hardenbrook, Wm. C. Brooks, 
John Culver, Barnes Underbill, J. W. Wheeler, John 
Hogencamp, Elliot Walker, Amos Leeds, James Scott, 
James Emmens, Thos- Wiggins, John S. Skinner, Thos. 
Connor, Job Haskell, Wm. T. Slosson, I. M'Sweggin. 

TIMBER MEASURERS. 

The Measurers appointed by the Common Council 
receive the following fees : For measuring short ship 
timber, for every ton consisting of 40 cubic feet, 25 cents ; 
for every ton cubic measure of square timber, 14 cents ; for 
every tliousand feet superficial measure of boards, plank, 
or scantling, 37^ cents; on all raft timber, 6 cents per ton. 

CITY MEASURERS. 

For measuring salt or grain, 75 cents for each hundred 
bushels ; for measuring lime, 12^ cents for every load of 
sixteen bushels ; for measuring charcoal, one cent for 
each bushel ; and for measuring sea coal, 25 cents for each 
chaldron ; and at and after the same rate for a greater 
or less quantity. Anthracite coal, 12^ cents per ton. 

INSPECTORS OF LUMBER. 

Peter Tice, Dudley Sheffield, Jonathan Hall, John 
Boyd, James L. Wallace, James Hallett, John Sher- 
wood, Thomas Brown, Samuel Howell, I. H. Robb, 
Simon Ackerman, James Weed. 

WOOD INSPECTORS. 

A. G. Brinckerhoff, Pearson Halsted, John Van 
Osdall, Thos. Jeroleman, John Covert, John Ewen, Isaac 
Paul, William Evans, D. Clark, David Clark, Toms 
Kuvpers. John Crouter, Henry Osborn, Joseph Tunis, 
William D. Sloan, John T. Blauvelt, Corns. Chatterton, 
William Beach, John Graffit. Isaac B. Torboss, Amout 
Brown, J. L. Van Kleek, Wm. Van Wart, Gerardus 
Riker, Abraham Acker, Moses Brush, John Mount, Jacob 
Van Orden, Daniel Morgan, Fr. Marschalk, Richard 
Grant, John Legget, Robert Morris, Wm. G. Babb. 



MEASURERS, INSPECTORS, AND GAUGERS. 155 



GAUGERS. 

C. C. Williams, Peter Demil, James D. Oram, Ricft'd 
Ellison, Benj. H. Roach, D. Waldron,jr., Benj. C. Bnr- 
dett, Wm. Wasson, Horace Bates, Abra. Dally,jr., Israel 
Dean. 

CITY WEIGHERS. 

Lewis A. Berte, W. A. Depeyster, James Welling, 
Daniel Johnson, D. D. Crane, John Moore, Isaac B. 
Strong, Ezra Collins, Archibald Gourley, Andrew Bachte, 
Wm. Vandervoort, C. F. Bunner, Stephen S. Clay, 
Daniel Strang, James Barton, Albert Cocks, Reuben 
Bunker, J. A. Davenport, Benj. B. Gallagher, Joseph 
Wood, C. W. Davenport, Isaac Wilkins, jr., John M. 
Ryer, Wm. D. Coit, John Marschalk, Isaac Auld, Joseph 
Leggett, James Archer, S. D. Southmayd, Sam'l R. 
Ryer, William Russell, Samuel H. Rogers, Wm. J. 
Wiswall, Wm. H. Dodge, Abraham Bogert, Samuel 
Neilson, John A. Holly, Stephen B. Rich, Willet Sea- 
man, Corns. Van Cleef, Sam'l M. Holland, Daniel E. 
Glover. 



IVEIGHTS AND mEASURES. 

Sealers' Fees. — Beams, yard and dry measures, 12^ 
cts. each. Liquid do. 3 cts. Weights 3 to 6 cts., with a 
reasonable compensation for adjusting. 

inspectors' fees. 

Every wt. of 141bs. or upwards, 3 cents 

" of smaller denomination, 1 ^ " 

Every liquid measure, 2 " 

Every yard and dry measure, 3 " 

Every scale beam, 3 " 



DAMAOES ON BlliliS OF EXCHANGE. 

Three per cent, upon bills drawn upon persons in the 
states of Maine, New-Hampshire, Vermont, Massacbu- 



1G6 DAMAGES ON BILLS OF EXCHANGE. 

setts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New-Jersey, Pennsyl- 
vania, Ohio, Delaware, Maryland, or in the District of 
Columbia ; 5 per cent, in North Carolina, South Carolina, 
Georgia, Kentucky, or Tennessee. In the remaining 
states, and in the West Indies, Canadas, Eurojie, &c., 10 
per cent. 



RATES OF 11^H[AKFA€;E. 

Vessels under 50 tons 50 cents per day; and for every 
50 tons more an addition of 12^ cents. 



RATES OTP COMMISSIONS, 

Recommended for general adoption, and alloived hy the 
NeiD-York Chamber of Commerce, when no agree- 
ment subsists to the contrary. Established, March 
2d, 1819. 

ON FOREIGN BUSINESS. 

On the sale of Merchandise, 5 per cent. Sale or pur- 
chase of Stocks, 1 per cent. Specie, ^ per cent. Pur- 
chase and shipment of Merchandise, with funds in hand, 
on the aggregate amount of costs and charges, 2^ per 
cent. Drawing or endorsing Bills, in all cases, 2| per 
cent. Vessels, selling or purchasing, 2^ per cent. Pro- 
curing Freight, 5 per cent. Collecting Freight, on ge- 
neral average, 2| per cent. Outfits or Disbursements, 
with funds in hand, 2J per cent. Effecting Marine In- 
surance, in all cases, when the premium does not ex- 
ceed 10 per cent., on the amount insured, ^ per cent. 
When the premium exceeds ten per cent., on tlie amount 
of premium, 5 per cent. Collecting dividends on Stock, 
^ per cent. Collecting delayed or litigated Accounts, 5 
per cent. Adjusting and collecting Insurance Losses, 2^ 
per cent. Receiving and paying Moneys, from which no 
other commission is derived, 1 per cent. Remittances 
in Bills, in all cases, ^ per cent. Landing and re-ship- 
ping Goods, from vessels in distress, on the value, 2^ per 



RATES OF COMMISSIONS. 1G7 



cent. Receiving and forwarding Goods, entered at 
the Custom House, on the value, 1 — and 2^ per cent., on 
responsibilities incurred. 

ON INLAND BUSINESS. 

On the sale of Merchandise, 2| per cent. Purchase 
and shipment of Merchandise, or accepting for purcha- 
ses, without funds or property in hand, 2^ per cent. 
Sale or purchase of Stocks, 1 per cent. Sale or pur- 
chase of Specie, ^ per cent. Sale of Bills of Exchange, 
with endorsement, ^ per cent. Sale of Bank Notes or 
Drafts, not current, ^ per cent. Selling or endorsing 
Bills of Exchange, 2^ per cent. Selling or purchasing 
Vessels, 2g per cent. Chartering, to proceed to other 
ports to load, 2^ per cent. Procuring or collecting 
Freight, 2^ per cent. Outfits or Disbursements, 2^ per 
cent. Collecting, general average, 2^ per cent. Effect- 
ing Marine Insurance, in all cases, when the preinium 
does not exceed ten per cent., on the amount insured, ^ 
per cent. When the premium exceeds ten per cent., on 
the amount of premium, 5 percent. Adjusting and col- 
lecting Insurance Losses, 2^ per cent. Collecting divi- 
dends on Stocks, ^ per cent. Collecting Bills and pay- 
ing over the amount, or receiving or paying Moneys 
from which no other commission is derived, 1 per cent. 
Receiving and forwarding Goods, on the value, ^ per 
cent. The same when entered for duty or debenture, 1 
per cent. Remittances in Bills in all cases, ^ per cent. 

The above Commissions to be exclusive of the gua- 
ranty of debts for sales of Credit, Storage, Brokerage, 
and every other charge actually incurred. The risk of 
loss by fire, unless Insurance be ordered, and of robbery, 
theft, and other unavoidable occurrences, if the usual 
care be taken to secure the property, is in all cases to be 
borne by the proprietor of the goods. When bills are 
remitted for collection, and are returned under protest, 
for non-accejitance or non-payment, the same commis- 
sion to be charged as though they were duly honoured. 
On consignments of Merchandise, withdrawn or re-shi})- 
ped, fullCommission to be charged, to the extent of ad- 



168 



RATES OF COMMISSIONS. 



COMMISSIONERS OF INSOLVENCY. 

T i?''" ^^/ Mulligan, Dominick T. Blake, Thomas 
Jefferson Smith. Office, new City Hall. -^"omas 



AUCTlO]VEERS. 

APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR AND SENATE, 

(February 2oth, isai.) 
NEW-YORK AUCTIONEERS. 



David Austen, 
William G. Bull, 
Thomas P. Bowne, 
John J. Bedient, 
Anthony W. Bleecker, 
Jacob Burdett, 
Wm. J. Brown, 
Thomas Bell, 
Joseph W. Corlies, 
Richard Crawford, 
John P. Dieterich, 
Joseph Day m on, 
Isaac T. Doughty, 
Wm. H. Franklin, 
James Gourlay, 
William Gerard, 
James N. Giffing, 
Lindley M. Hoffman, 
Peter M. Halstead, 
John Herriman, 
George Innis, 
Sidney P. Ingraham, 
Sampson M. Isaacs, 
Elisha Kingsland, 
Aaron Levy, 
Richard Lawrence, 



John Langdon, 
Gilbert Lewis, 
Wm. M'Laughlin, 
Wm. M'Donnell, 
Wm. W. M'Carty, 
Rowland R. Minturn, 
James M. Miller, 
Robt. Charles Morris, 
Geo. M'Kav Morrill, 
Geo. S. Munn, 
Aaron B. Nones, 
Samuel Philips, 
John Pearson, 
Thomas W. Pearsall, 
Lawrence Power, 
Henry L. Patterson, 
James C. Smith, 
Solomon Seixas, 
Daniel Sparks, 
Charles B. Spicer, 
William Timpson, 
Edward G. Thompson, 
Abraham Waterhouse, 
Jacob Van Winkle, 
N. Yeoman. 



GROCERIES AND TAVERNS. 169 

oro€£:ri£S ani> taverns. 

Three thousand Grocery and Tavern Licenses were 
issued in 1833, who pay, when licensed, yearly, $10. 



PAlVNBROKJERSi 

The principal Pawnbrokers are located in Chatham- 
street, and its vicinity. The number of licenses issued 
in 1833 was, 8 for Pawnbrokers, and 22 for Dealers in 
second-hand articles. Pawnbrokers pay, when licensed, 
yearly, $50, and Dealers in second-hand articles pay, 
when licensed, yearly, $25. 



JUNK SHOPS. 

There are 18 licensed Junk Shops, for the purchase of 
old rope, iron, &c., who pay annually, when licensed, 
$20 each. 

COACHES ANi> CARRIAGES. 

The number of Hackney Coach licenses in 1833, was 
212, who pay $12,50, when licensed, yearly. Drivers 
$1, when licensed, yearly. 

RATES OF CHARGING, &C. 

Title III. Seel. The prices of rates of fare to be 
taken by or paid to the owners or drivers of hackney 
coaches or carriages shall be as follows, to wit : 

1. For conveying a passenger any distance not ex- 
ceeding one mile, twenty-five cents ; and for every addi- 
tional passenger, twenty-five cents. 

2. For conveying a passenger any distance exceeding 
a mile, and within two miles, fifty cents ; and for every 
additional passenger, twenty-five cents. 

3. For conveying a passenger to the New Alms 
House, and returning, seventy-five cents; and for every 
additional passenger, and returning, thirty-seven and a 
half cents. 



170 COACHES AND CARRIAGES. 

4. For conveying one passenger to Fortieth-street, 
and remaining half an hour, and returning, one dollar; 
and for every additional passenger, twenty-five cents. 

.5. For conveying one passenger to Sixty -first-street, 
and remaining three quarters of an hour, and returning, 
one dollar and fifty cents ; and for every additional pas- 
senger, thirty-seven and a half cents. 

6. For conveying one passenger to Eighty-sixth-street, 
and remaining one hour, and returning, two dollars ; and 
for every additional passenger, fifty cents. 

7. For conveying one or more passengers to Harlsem, 
and returning, with the privilege of remaining three hours, 
four dollars. 

8. For conveying one or more passengers to Kings- 
bridge, and returning, with the privilege of keeping the 
carriage all day, five dollars. 

9. For the use of a hackney coach or carriage by the 
day, with one or more passengers, five dollars. 

iO. For the use of a hackney coach or carriage by the 
hour, with one or more passengers, with the privilesre of 
going from place to place, and of stopping as often as 
may be required, as follows, viz: for the first hour one 
dollar, for the second hour seventy-five cents, and for 
every succeeding hour fifty cents. 

11. In all cases where the fm-ing of a hackney coach 
or carriage is not at the time thereof specified to be by 
the day or hour, it shall be deemed to be by the mile. 

12. For children between two and fourteen years of 
age, half price is only to be charged; and for children 
under two years of age no charge is to be made. 

13. Whenever a hackney coach or carriage shall be 
detained, excepting as aforesaid, the owner or driver 
shall be allowed after the rate of seventy-five cents for an 
hour, thirty-seven and a half cents for each and every 
subsequent hour, and so in proportion for any pnrt of the 
first and subsequent hour which the same may be so 
detained. 

14. For attending a funeral within the lamp and watch 
district, two dollars; and to the Potter's Field, three del- 



COACHES AND CARRIAGES. 171 



lars, which'charges shairincliide for the necessary deten- 
tion and returning with passengers. 

Sec. 2. In case of disagreement as to distance or price, 
the same shall be determined by the Mayor, or Superin- 
tendent of hackney coaches and carriages. 

Sec. 3. The owner of any hackney coach or carriage 
shall not demand or receive any pay for the conveyance 
of any passenger, unless the number of the carriage and 
the rates and prices of fare shall be fixed and placed in 
the manner hereinafter directed by section second of title 
fourth of this Law, at the time such passenger may be 
conveyed in such carriage. 

Sec. 4. The owner or driver of any hackney coach or 
carriage shall not be entitled to recover or receive any 
pay from any person, from whom he shall have demand- 
ed any greater price or rates than he may be authorized 
to receive as aforesaid. 

Sec. 5. Upon the trial of any cause commenced for the 
recovery of any of the aforesaid prices or rates, it shall be 
incumbent upon the plaintiff or plaintiffs, in such action, 
to prove that the number and prices of rates were placed 
and fixed in pursuance of the provisions of this law, at 
the time the services were rendered for which the suit 
may be brought. 

Sec. 6. No owner or driver of any hackney coach or 
carriage in the city of New- York, shall ask, demand, ar 
receive any larger sum than he or they may be entitled 
to receive as aforesaid, under the penalty of ten dollars 
for every such offence. 

Title XIII. — Miscellaneous provisions of a general 
nature. 
Sec. 2. Every driver or owner of a hackney coach or 
carriage shall carry, transport, and convey in and upon 
his coach or carriage, in addition to the person or per- 
sons therein, one trunk, valise, saddlebag, or carpet bag, 
portmanteau, box, bundle, basket, or other articles used 
in travelling, if he be required so to do, without charge 
or compensation therefor ; but for every trunk or other 
such article as above named, more than one, he shall be 



172 COACHES AND CARRIAGES. 

entitled to demand and receive tlie sum of six cents, 
if conveyed within the distance of one mile, and if more 
than a mile, the sum of twelve and a half cents. 

Sec. 6. Every owner, driver, or person, having charge of 
any hackney coach, carriage, or accommodation coach, 
or stage, shall, upon being requested so to do, give to any 
person or persons the number of his coach or stage, the 
name of the owner thereof, and his place of abode, the 
name of the driver thereof, and his place of abode ; and 
in default thereof, shall forfeit and pay the sum of ten 
dollars, to be sued for and recovered from the owner or 
driver of such coach or stage, severally and respectively. 

Passed by the Board of Assistants, June 3, 1833. 

Passed by the Board of Aldermen, June 10, 1833. 

Approved by the Mayor, June 17, 1833. 

J. MORTON, Clerk. 



CITY STAOES. 

The following Stages run constantly every day, (Sun- 
days excepted,) from Wall-street. 

Thirty-two IBroadway Stages, to Bleecker and Four- 
teenth streets. 

Thirty Greenwich Stages, to Fourteenth-street, near 
the North River. 

Eighteen Dry Dock Stages, to the Dry Docks, East 
River. 

Seventeen Bowery Stages, to Fourteenth-street. 

Fare, generally, 12| cents. 

Several, in addition to the above, run several times a i 
day, each, from the corner of the Bowery and Bayard- 
street, for — 

Harlsem, seven and a half miles,. Fare 25 cents. 

Manhattanville, eight miles, " 25 " 

Yorkville, five miles, " 18f " 

Total number of licensed Stages, 97, which pay for a i 
Stage drawn by four horses, $20, and for two horses, $10, 
each, when licensed, annually. 



CARTMEN. 



173 



CARTMEN. 

Rates of Cartage.— For any distance not exceeding 
half a mile, for all ordinary loads, 25 cents; for hides, 
cut stone, coal, hollow-ware, oysters, &c., 3U cents per 
load • for pipes, and hogsheads, 100 gallons and over, and 
heavy loads, 37^ cents ; for household furniture, and 
housing, 50 cents per load ; for cables, an extra charge, 
according to the dimensions. , , ir -i^ 

In all cases where the distance exceeds half a mile, 
and not two miles, half in addition to be allowed. 

The number of Cartmen licensed m 1833, was twenty- 
five hundred, who pay $2, when licensed; and 122 cents, 
yearly, when renewed. 

PUBr.IC PORTERS' FEES. 

ON A WHEEL-BARROW. 

For any distance not exceeding half a mile, 121 cents. 
Over halt a mile, and not exceeding a mile, 25 cents, and 
in that proportion for any greater distance. 

ON A HAND-BARROW. 

Anv distance not exceeding half a mile, 25 cents. 
Over half a mile, and not exceeding a mile, 43f cents, and 
in that proportion for any greater distance. 

ON A HAND-CART. 

For anv distance not exceeding half a mile, 18^ cents. 
Over half a mile, and not exceeding a mile, 31, cents, and 
in that proportion for any greater distance. 

The number of Porters licensed m 1833, was 160, who 
pay, when licensed, $1,371, and when renewed, yearly, 
12^ cents. 

CHIMNEY SWEEPERS' FEES. 

Every Chimney, from tlie upper floor of any house 
m cents. Next floor below, 15 cents. Next below, lb 



174 



CHIMNEY sweepers' FEES. 



cents Next below, 21 cents. Next below, 28 cents. 
Next below 37^ cents. Where a Franklin, Stove, Coal 
Urate, or Jack are used in any lire place, 12^ cents 
extra. 

In 1833, 40 Master Chimney Sweeps were licensed, 
with an average of two boys to each, besides one Gene- 
ral Patentee lor Patent Sweepers, who pay S3 each, 
when licensed. i j -t^ > 



CENSUS OF 1S30. 
Taken from the Marshal's Returns. 



Whites. 



Males. 



Under 5 years 


5 to 


10 


10 to 


15 


15 to 


20 


20 to 


30 


30 to 


40 


40 to 


50 


50 to 


60 


60 to 


70 


70 to 


SO 


80 to 


90 



90 to 100 



13,644 

10,357 

8,6.56 

9,918 

21,409 

13,659 

6,625 

3,207 

1,468 

449 

80 

14 



100 and upwards, 
Total 89,523 



Coloured. 



Wales, 



Under 10 years 
10 to 20 
20 to 36 
36 to 45 
55 to 100 



100 and upwards, 



1,261 
1,358 
1,774 
1,269 
371 



Total. 



6,038 



Females. 

"l3,26y 
10,665 
9,802 
11,5.56 
22,556 
12,916 
6,694 
.3,702 
1,793 
666 
178 
31 



93,826 



Females. 



1,431 
2,135 

2,495 

1,530 

449 



8,045 



CENSUS OF 1830. 



175 



197,432 
5,525 



Total persons classed 

Persons returned not classed . . 

Grand Total "'-f'n 

Number of Inhabitants in the different Wards, IMU. 



First, 11,331 

Second,.. . 8,203 

Third 9,599 

Fourth, .. .12,705 
Fiftli, 17,722 



Eleventh,... 14,91 D 
Twelfth,... 11,808 
Thirteenth,. 12,598 
Fourteenth, 14,288 



Sixth,.... 13,570 
Seventh,.. 15,873 
Eighth,... 20,729 
Ninth,*... 22,810 

Tenth,... 16,438 „no -q(» 

Total,' (as corrected at Washington) 202,oby 

POPULATION OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK, 

At diliereut periods during the last 100 years. 



Inl731 8,628 

1756 10,381 

1773 21,876 

1790 33,131 

1800 60,489 



In 1810 96,373 

1820 123,706 

1825 166,086 

1830 202,589 



BII.I. OF inORTAI^ITY FOiaiS32&1833. 



Months. 

Jan... . 
Feb.... 
March. 



Deaths. 
1832. 1833. 



Ages. 



564 
735 
545 
478 
515 
410 
2,467 



April. . 
May... 
June . . 
July... 

Aug 2,206 

Sept 1,064 

Oct 586 

Nov 400 

Dec 389 



503 
415 
420 
405 
441 
330 
647 
556 
536 
535 
447 
509 



Under 1 
] 

2 to 
5 to 
10 to 
20 to 
30 to 
40 to 
50 to 
60 to 
70 to 
80 to 



year 

to 2 
5 
10 
20 
30 
40 
50 
60 
70 
80 
90 
90 to 100 



1,922 

830 

965 

450 

433 

1,397 

1,617 

1,142 

705 

489 

273 

109 

25 



1833. 

'i;724 
552 
468 
232 
262 
701 
691 
448 
258 
211 
118 
61 
15 



Total.... 10,359 5,746 



100 Sc upw's 2 



Total 10,359 5,746 



Includins 15th Ward. 



170 



BILL OF MORTALITY. 



DEATHS BY SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL DISEASES FOR THE 
LAST FIVE YEARS. 



Diseases. 



Apoplexy 

Cholera 

Consumption 

Convulsions 

Dropsy 

Dropsy in the head . . , 
Dropsy in the chest. . . 

Dysentery 

Fever, scarlet 

Fever, typhus 

Inflam. of the bowels.. 
Inflam. of the brain . . . 
Inflam. of the chest. . . 
Inflam. of the liver.... .. 

Old age 181 

Smallpox I 16 



1830. f 1831. 1832. f 1833. 



98 

880 
342 
138 
258 

49 
126 
188 

5.5 
152 
109 
251 

68 



90 



121 



974 


1013 


434 


422 


111 


132 


289 


319 


65 


45 


128 


133 


246 


258 


53 


54 


192 


195 


71 


71 


171 


114 


107 


60 


106 


135 


176 


224 



81 

3513 

1415 

501 

130 

344 

43 
130 
221 

84 
196 

99 

11 

44 
154 

89 



100 

10 

1251 

510 

121 

305 

35 i 

87 
179 

55 
204 
101 

74 

36 
107 

25 



IVEW-YORK CITY EliECTIOXj 

APRIL, 1834. 



Wards. 

1st 

2d 

3d 

4th 

5th 

6th 

7th 

8th 

9th 

10th 

11th 

12ih 

13th 



No. 
Voles. 

2104 
1678 
1911 
2413 
2483 
1898 
3023 
3630 
2725 
2850 
3091 
1475 
2240 



FOR MAYOR. 

Majority for 
Verplanck. Lawrence. Verplanc^. 



1516 

1134 

1224 

1317 

1303 

790 

1418 

1841 

1201 

1244 

1128 

506 

885 



588 

531 

684 

1093 

1175 

1100 

1600 

1769 

1453 

1588 

1952 

959 

1346 



928 
603 
540 
224 
128 



Majority for 
Lawrence. 



313! 
182 

252 
344 
824 
453 
461 



NEW-YORK CITY ELECTION. I77 



14th 2095 973 1120 .. 147 

15th 1531 914 614 300 .. 

Tot. 35 147 17,394 17,575 2^95 2"!976 

Majority for Lawrence 181 

Scattering votes 21 



FERRIES. 

Which are leased by the Corporation to different com- 
panies and individuals, and from which a revenue is 
derived of about $10,000. 

From foot of Fulton-st., to Brooklyn, distance half a mile. 

FromfootofCatharine-st.,to do. do. half a mile. 

FromtootofWalniit-st.,to do. do. half a mile. 

From foot of Grand-st., to Williamsburg, dist. half a mile. 

From foot of Cortkndt-st., to Jersey City, about a mile. 

* rom foot of Barclay-st., to Hoboken, about two miles. 

From foot of Cana -st., to do. do. 1| miles. 

From foot of Canal-st., to Bull's Ferry, about six miles. 

NEW- YORK CITY FIIVAIVCES. 

CITY DEBT. 

On 5 per cent, stock of 1820, . . $200,000 
Less the amount held by the 

Commissioners of the Sinking 

Fund, 81,500 

or; , ^,0^^ ■ 118,500 00 

On 5 per cent, stock of 1829,. . . 300,000 00 

r^ K J . 1 . X , $418,500 00 

On bond to the estate of John 

^Mijls,. 25,000 

On bond to the Mechanics' 

Bank, 517,500 

■ 542,500 00 

Making a total of $961,000 00 

12 



178 NEW-YORK CIT¥ FINANCES. 

Deducting therefrom the amount 
of funds in the Treasury, at the 
credit of the Commissioners of 
the Sinking Fund, 124,655 47 

Leaves a net total of. ...%.. . $836,344 53 

The total of debt on the 31st of 

Dec, 1832, was 394,809 66 

The total of debt on the 31st of 

Dec, 1833, was 836,344 53 

Decrease of debt, $58,465 13 

SINKING FUND. 

Account of the Commissioners, for the year 1833. 

Balance in the Treasury, Jan. 1, 
1833, '. $317,090 34 

RECEIPTS DURING THE YEAR. 

For Commutation of water lot 

rents...... 9,494 80 

Hark Licenses 3,616 00 

Intelligence Office Licenses, 50 00 

Interest on debts, bonds, 

stock, &c., 22,028 19 

Licenses of Pawnbrokers, 

&c., 1,400 00 

Market Fees, 19,484 17 

3Iarket Rents, il,U75 93 

G0,560 10 

Real Estate, sales,., v ..... . 4,740 00 

Stage Licenses, 903 00 

Street Vaults 3,634 44 

Water lot quit rents, s:rant3 

prior to Jan. 1, 1804,. .... 1,138 60 

Making a total of. $424,655 47 



NEW-YORK CITY FINANCES. 179 



Deduct — amount of bond, dated 
]9tli Julv, 1828, paid per reso- 
lution 27th March, 1833, $100,000 

Do. do. dated 1st Jan., 
1829, paid per resolution as 

above, 200,000 

300,000 00 

In the Treasury, at the credit of 
the Commissioners of the Sink- 
ing Fund, Dec. 31, 1833, $124,655 47 

RECEIPTS. 

Frovi the Comptroller'' s Report, for 1833. 

Balance in the Treasury, 1st January, 1833, $20,119 53 

Bonds payable, (loans of Mechanics' Bank,) 226,500 00 

Commutation of alien passengers, 31,617 00 

Cleaning streets, sales of manure, 30,279 50 

Courts, 3,559 02 

Charges on arrears of taxes and assessments, 764 05 

Docksand slips, 1,890 00 

Fencing lots, 1,385 26 

Fire department, 831 17 

Interest, 12,458 22 

Justices' courts, 10,608 71 

Intestate estates, ^ 1,595 51 

Liens on lots, 3,234 80 

Lottery office licenses, 2,625 00 

Lamps, 677 53 

^lavoralty fees, 1,473 99 

P. lice, 5,811 46 

Penalties, 710 22 

Kents, viz* docks and slips,... $54,023 34 

Ground 23,219 71 

Water lot, 11,760 17 

Ferry, 14,214 65 

House and com- 
mon land, 4,417 09 

^^ 107,634 96 



180 NEW-YORK CITY FINANCES. 

Repairs and supplies, 128 32 

Streets, collected for assessments, 309,780 06 

Street expenses, 101 71 

Taxes, arrears of former years, $5,670 04 
of 1831, 1,447 36 

1832, 539,100 36 

1833, 94,156 85 

640,374 51 

Tavern and excise licenses, 31,406 00 

Vendue sales, 5,000 00 

Water pipes, 487 24 

Wells andpimips, 1,997 31 

$1,453,051 08 

PAYMENTS. 

Sundries per statement (see page 182,) 933,829 76 

Special appropriations for building on Black- 
well's Island, 12,000 00 

Do. do. building on farms on Long 

Island, 8,218 86 

Bonds payable, 177,400 00 

Streets and street expenses, 297,514 62 

Sundries, 16,035 33 

$1,444,998 62 

Balance in the Treasury, Dec. 31, 1833,. . . 8,052 46 

$1,453,051 08 

EXPENDITURES. 

Statement of the actual net Payments, for the year 1833. 

Almshouse, Bridewell, and Penitentiary,... $124,852 96 

Board of Health, 26,355 91 

Cleaning streets, (balance after sales of ma- 

nure,) 45,845 09 

Courts, 29,467 48 

County contingencies, 21,927 95 



NEW-YORK CITY FINANCES. 181 



Charities, 4,500 00 

Coroner's fees, 2,955 83 

Charges on arrears of taxes and assessments, 805 50 

Commutation of aUen passengers, 100 00 

Docks and slips, 75,080 99 

Elections, 3,746 23 

Fire department, 12,554 62 

Fencing lots, 472 96 

Ferry house at Hell Gate, (L.I.) 210 00 

Ground rent, 440 00 

House of refuge, 4,000 00 

House of detention, 696 73 

Interest, 48,948 62 

Justices' courts, 13,090 14 

Intestate estates, 1,308 22 

Iron railing on Chatham-street, 4 00 

Lamps anci gas, 72,408 05 

Levying tax, 7,346 00 

Lands and places, 5,105 15 

Lottery office licenses, 2,000 00 

Liens on lots, 1,535 68 

Markets, 10,630 37 

Mayoralty fees, 112 00 

Old almshouse, 758 91 

Public schools, 86,954 69 

Public reservoir, 3,808 55 

Police, 17,669 07 

Printing and stationery, 5,1 40 56 

Penalties, 192 50 

Roads generally, 55,197 45 

Repairs and supplies, 17,921 68 

Recordhall, 13,284 17 

Real estate, 1,500 00 

Salaries, 41,839 88 

Street expenses, 29,028 29 

Tavern and excise licenses, 1,810 00 

Taxes — errors and delinquencies,. 30 45 

Watch, 105,602 36 

Water pipes, 44,008 95 



182 



NEW-YORK CITY FINANCES. 



Water commissioners, 3,500 00 

Wells and pumps, 4,225 94 

Total expenses of the city, 1833, $933,829 76 

ASSESSED VALUE OF REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE IN 
THE CITY OF NEW-YORK, FOR THE YEAR 1833. 



Assessment of 1833. 



War-ds. 



\Real Estate.] Personal. 



First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

Eighth 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh 

Twelfth (S.*). 
Twelfth (N.t). 
Thirteenth . . . 
Fourteenth. . . 
Fifteenth 



$22,531,600 
10,956,120 
10,173,050 
6,851,550 
8,690,000 
5,613,250 
6,489,080 
6,918,676 
4,762,200 
4,047,300 
5,497,200 
2,713,100 
4,912,705 
2,351,300 
4,452,400 
7,165,035 



$23,969,815 

2,865,704 

6,348.272 

2,567,253 

3,727,172 

2,911,876 

1,950,430 

1,387,300 

553,700 

673,500 

509,700 

7,500 

481,400 

345,150 

1,986,504 

2,081,700 



j $114,124,566! $52,366,976 

Increase of Real Estate since 1832, $10,082,161 

Increase of Personal Estate do. do., 10,106,763 

Total Increase, $20,188,924 



* South of the Lamp aud Watch District (Fourteentli-street.) 
t North of do. do. do. 



NEW-YORK CITY FINANCES. 188 



REAL ESTATE OCCUPIED FOR PUBLIC PURPOSES. 

Bowlius: Green, situated at south end of Broadwav. 
Valued at $'25,000. 

The Park, situated at the junction of Broadway and 
Chatham-street. Valued at $122,000. 

A gore of land, situated in Chatham-slreet. Valued at 
$20,000, 

The fortv-six lots, situated in Broadway and Cham- 
bers-street". Valued at $344,500. 

The Citv Hall, situated in the Park. Valued at 
$528,634 3f. 

Tlie Debtors' Jail, situated in the Park. Valued at 
$10,000. 

The buildins: for public records, situated in the Park. 
Valued nt $25,000, 

The old Ahushouse and stable, situated in Chambers- 
street. Valued at $25,000. 

The Rotunda, situated in Chambers-street. Valued at 
$6,000. 

The Almshouse, Bridewell, Penitentiary, &c., situated 
at Bellevue. Valued at $420,000. 

Twenty-eight acres, bcloneing to the same, situated at 
Bellevue. Valued at $56,000. 

The Fever Hospital and 11 lots, situated at Bellevue, 
Valued at $52,610 55. 

Blackwell's Island, and buildings, situated at Black- 
well's Island. Valued at $70,220^25, 

Farms on Long Island, situated at Long Island. Va- 
lued at $30,000. 

Piece of land, situated in Duane-street. Valued at 
$20,000. 

Total value of Real Estate occupied for public pur- 
poses, $1,754,965 11. 



184 NEW-YORK CITY FINANCES. 



REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CORPORATION OF NEW- 
YORK. 

Property on Long Island, 

productive $118,650 00 

Property on Long Island, 

unproductive 150 00 

118,800 00 

Property in New-York, as 
follows, viz : 
City lots, and houses under 

lease 432,500 00 

City lots and common lands, 
subject to quit rents, which 
will require for their com- 
mutation a principal of. . . 8,207 40 
Common lands under lease. 90,100 00 
Wharves, piers, and slips 

underlease 1,004,675 00 

Wharves, piers, and slips 

under lease for ferries. . . . 83,500 00 
Public markets and grounds 532,850 00 

Public purposes 1,945,415 11 

Unproductive 45,000 00 

4,142,247 51 



,261,047 51 



FIRE IiI]VIITS. 



By an act of the Legislature, the fire limits of this city 
will be extended, on the 1st of August, so as to include 
a large section of territory before exempted from their 
operation. Under the new law, they will extend from 
the East River, near Rivington-street, in an irregular 
line, northwesterly, to between Twenty -first and Twenty- 
second streets on the Second Avenue ; thence west, to 
the Sixth Avenue, and then continue in an irregular 
line, southeasterly, to the Hudson River, near Hammers- 
ley-street. 



MARKETS. 



185 



MARKETS. 



Name and location. 



Revenue, 1833. 



Fulton Market, between Fulton 
and Beekman streets, East 
River 

Washington, between Fulton and 
Vesey streets, North River.... 

Catharine, Catharine-street, East 
River 

Clinton, between Canal and 
Spring streets. North River.. . 

Greenwich, Christopher-street, 
North River 

Centre, Grand and Orange streets 

Franklin, Old-slip, East River, 

Essex, Grand and Ludlow-streets 

Grand, Grand and Mangin-streets 

Gouverneur, Grand and Gouver- 
neur streets 

Tompkins, Bowery and Third 
Avenue 

Manhattan, between Rivington 
and Stanton streets, E. River., 

Jefilerson, junction Greenwich 
Lane and Sixth Avenue 

Weehawken, West and Christo- 
pher streets, North River 



Premium on butcher stands. 



^20,408 95 

13,478 37 

4,282 85 

3,487 28 

330 49 
3,477 12 
1,087 74 
1,198 21 

485 42 

317 05 
564 74 
218 25 
366 35 



$49,702 82 
10,857 28 



$60,560 10 



186 



AMUSKMENTS. 



AITIUSEITIEIVTS. 
THEATRES. 

There are at present three Theatres in the Citv, and 
an Opera House, as follows : 

PARK THEATRE, 

Situated in Park Row, was erected in 1793, and was 
burnt May 24, 1820, and with the exception of the walls, 
which were left standing, was rebuilt and opened in 
August, 1821. The dimensions are as follows: Front, 
80 feet; depth, 165 feet; height, 55 feet to roof. The 
Green Room is in a wing in the rear, on Theatre Allev. 
The stage is 38 feet wide in front, and 70 feet deep; and 
the height to the ceiling is 40 feet. The number of boxes 
is 42, namely, 14 in each tier. This Theatre is calcu- 
lated to contain 2,400 persons. 

The present prices of admission are, for the Coxes, 
$1 ; Pit, 50 cents; Gallery, 25 cents. 

Edmund Simpson, Alanager. 

THE AMERICAN THEATRE. 
(Bowery, between Bayard and Walker streets.) 

Was erected in 1826, and opened Octotober 16, 1826, 
within six months from the time the buildinsf was com- 
menced. It was burnt in May, 1828, and immediately 
afterwards rebuilt, and re-opened in Ausr., 1828. The 
present building is one of the finest specimens of Doric 
architecture in the City ; the front being constructed after 
the model of the Temple of 3Iinerva, at Athens. The 
interior is elegant, and fitted up in a su]ierior stvle. The 
width of the front, on the Bowery, is 75 feet ; and the 
deplh, to Elizabeth-street, is 175 feet. The height of 
the building to the cornice being 50 feet. 

Prices of admission— Boxes, 75 cents; Pit, 37| cents; 
Gallery, 25 cents. 

Thomas S. Hamblin, Manager. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



18 



RICHMOND HILL THEATRE. 

Situated at the corner of Varick and Charlton streets, 
in the Eighth Ward, consisting in part of the former 
country seat of Col. Aaron Burr, on Richmond HiU, now 
altered and enlarged into a Theatre. 

Prices of admission— Boxes, 50 cents ; Pit, 2j cents. 

THE ITALIAN OPERA HOUSE, 

Erected hv an association of 16 proprietors, each sub- 
scribing $6,000, and each possessing a private box, with 
six free seats, in the second tier. The building is on the 
N. W. corner of Church and Leonard streets, and covers 
99 feet front and rear, and 150 feet in depth. The stage is 
40 ieet wide, and 70 feet deep. A portion of the house, 
20 feet wide, and 150 feet long, on Leonard-street, is ap- 
propriated for a spacious saloon, coffee rooms, dressing 
rooms, and refectories. A part of the pit is set apart for 
balcony and orchestra seats, and the residue furnisiied 
with arm-chairs, and settees. The-e are eight pnvate 
boxes under the first tier, on the wings of the pit. Ail 
the seats in the house are unusually spacious and com- 
fortable, and capable of full v accommodating 1200 persons, 
exclusive of the proprietors' boxes m the second tier, 
which will, if necessary, contain 300 seats. 

MUSEUMS. 

AMERICAN MUSEUM. 

(Opposite St. Paul's Church, Broadway.) 

This excellent institution was founded in 1810, by the 
late John Scudder, bv whose arduous efforts, and the 
persevering exertions of its more recent proprietors, it 
has arose to its present high standing. It continues daily 
to improve in every department, by extensive and valua- 
ble additions of the works of Nature and artificial curio- 
sities, from all parts of the world. Its iminense collec- 
tions are well arranged and beautifully displayed in tour 
spacious Saloons, each one hundred feet in length, which 
have now become so well filled, that another apartment 



188 AMUSEMENTS. 



(now in a state of preparation) of still larger dimensions 
is necessary for its accommodation. The Grand Cos- 
morama of this establishment is truly a most splendid 
affair, which for extent of glasses and magnificence of 
views, is not surpassed in this or any other country. 
The views embrace a great variety of subjects, and were 
all executed expressly by Italian Artists of eminence in 
their profession. No labour or expense has been spared 
to render this establishment well deserving a continu- 
ance of that liberal and distinguished patronage it has 
always received. The building is very high, and from 
its observatory may be enjoyed some of the finest views 
in the City, and of the beautiful bay and surrounding 
country. The halls are well warmed and ventilated, and 
at evening brilliantly lighted with gas, altogether forming 
a very inviting agreeable lounge, and at the same time, a 
place for serious contemplation and amusement, to those 
who delight in the study of the wonderful works of Na- 
ture. 
Admittance, 25 cents — children, half price. 

PEALE's MUSE0M AND GALLERY OF THE FINE ARTS. 

(Broadway, opposite the Park.) 

This establishment was founded in the year 1825, and 
has increased with astonishing rapidity. It contains four 
spacious apartments, which are arranged in the follow- 
ing order. — The 1st contains specimens of Natural His- 
tory in all its branches, and for beauty of arrangement, 
and the exquisite style in which the articles are mounted, 
renders it one of the most interesting places of public 
amusement in the country. The 2d is a large and va- 
luable collection of Paintings, by eminent artists, amongst 
vv^hich may be particularly mentioned, a Portrait of Na- 
poleon, by Lc Fevre ; a Magdalen, by Le Bron, togetlier 
with Portraits of at least 150 celebrated citizens and fo- 
reigners. The 3d contains a very superior Cosmorama, 
several Wax Figures of good workmanship. Fossils, 
Shells, Minerals, and Miscellaneous Curiosities. It 
would be impossible to enumerate the principal articles of 



AMUSEMENTS. 189 



interest in the establishment, but it would be unjust to the 
enterprising Proprietor, not to name the Egyptian Mum- 
my, the tattooed head of a New-Zealand Chief, and the 
living Anaconda, all of which have been procured at a 
very great expense. The 4th is a Lecture Room, in 
which, during each evening throughout the year, a suc- 
cession of interesting amusements take place. 



BATHS. 

The principal Baths, for the accommodation of strangers 
and citizens, are the following : 

Arcade Bath, 39 Chambers-street. 

Washington Bath, 533 Pearl-street. 

Mansion House Bath, 39 Broadway. 

Besides many others of less note. 

The sea water Baths are conveniently arranged, and 
are much frequented during warm weather. The princi- 
pal Baths are at the Battery, and near Murray-street, 
on the North River. 



FASHIOlVABIiE RI^I^OBTS. 

In the City, and its vicinity, are numerous places of 
resort, where the citizen and stranger may retire from 
the bustle of the City, and the fatigues of business. 

THE BATTERY. 

This beautiful promenade is situated at the south-west 
end of the island, and junction of the North and East 
Rivers, and possesses attractions unsurpassed, perhaps, 
by any other similar place of resort in the world, justly 
commanding the admiration of every visiter. It is in full 
view of the bay and surrounding scenery of Long Island, 
Staten Island, New-Jersey, and the islands in the har- 
bour. From no one point can a better idea be formed of 
the magnitude of the commerce of the City. The nu- 
merous ships, steam-boats, and small vessels, that are 



190 FASHIONABLE RESORTS. 

constantly entering and departing from the port, forming 
a scene of stirring interest. Of the bay itself, we deem it 
appropriate in this place to quote the language of a late 
English tourist. 

"1 have never seen the bay of Naples, I can therefore 
make no comparison ; but my imagination is incapable 
of conceiving any thing more beautiful than the harbour 
of New-York. Various and lovely are the objects which 
meet the eye on every side ; but the naming them would 
only be to give a list of words, without conveying the 
faintest idea of the scene. I doubt if even the pencil 
of Turner could do it justice, bright and glorious as it 
rose upon us. We seemed to enter the harbour of New- 
York upon waves of liquid gold ; and as we dashed past 
the green isles which rise from its bosom like guardian 
sentinels of the fair City, the setting sun stretched his 
horizontal beams further and further, at each moment, as 
if to point out to us some new glory in the landscape." 

The Battery extends somewhat in the form of a cres- 
cent, from the termination of Broadway, Greenwich, and 
Washington streets, on the north-west, to Whitehall- 
street, on the east, covering an area of nearly 11 acres, 
and laid out in grass-plots and gravel walks, shaded with 
trees. The exterior, fronting the harbour, is built up 
with hewn stone ; and on this side is a paved walk, with 
stone posts connected with a neat open railing. An ex- 
pensive iron railing, with gateways, extends along the 
interior front. 

This favourite promenade was originally a fortifica- 
tion, thrown up by the Dutch, and planted with cannon, 
from which circumstance it derives its name. Its bounds 
have been much enlarged by tilling in, and for many 
years it has been used as a public walk, and, constantly 
fanned as it is by the breezes of the ocean, no more 
agreeable and healthful retreat, from the heat of the City, 
can be found during the summer months. 

CASTLE GARDEN. 

On a mole, connected with the Battery by a bridge, is 
situated Castle Garden, originally erected for a fortifica- 



FASHIONABLE RESORTS. 191 

tion, and used for that purpose until 1823, when it was 
ceded by the United States to the Corporation of this 
City, since wliich it has been leased for a place of public 
amusement or recreation. On the top of the walls a 
walk, covered by an awning, has been constructed, from 
whence a line view of the harbour and adjacent scenery 
is obtained. Within the walls over ten thousand people 
may be accommodated, and concerts and tire works are 
occasionally given. 

VAUXHALL GARDEN, 

Is situated near the junction of the Bowery and Broad- 
way, fronting on the former, and was formerly a place 
of great resort in summer. On the evenings of public 
days, fire works and other entertainments were exhibited ; 
but by tlie late improvements in that part of the City, 
particularly l)y the extension of Lafayette-place through 
the Gaj'deu, its dimensions have been much lessened, and 
its attractions weakened. 

NIBLO's GARDEN. 

(Corner of Broadway and Prince-street.) 

[s one of the most fashionable places of resort in the 
City, during the summer months. It has been laid out 
with great taste, and when open to the public, is hand- 
somely lighted, and decorated with paintings, mirrors, 
<fcc. The walks are bordered with shrubbery and 
flowers in great variety. Fire works are occasionally 
exhibited; and in the Saloon, which is a very tasteful 
and air}' Ijuilding, theatrical and musical entertainments 
are given. 

OTHER PUBLIC GARDENS. 

Palmo's Garden, Broadway, between Duane and An- 
thony streets. 

New -York Garden, Broadway, between Leonard and 
Franklin streets. 

Cold Spring Garden, between Greenwich and Wash- 
ington streets, corner of Le Roy-street. 

East River Garden, ne^r Corlaers Hook. 



192 FASHIONABLE RESORTS. 



OTHER PLACES OF RESORT. 

On the North and East Rivers, in addition to those we 
have named above, there are, on this island, many fa- 
vourite places of resort for rides and excursions. Burn- 
ham's, Cato's, Rogers', and Rose Hill Taverns, may be 
named as among the most frequented by equestrians. — 
(For places of resort and excursions out of the city, See 
Environs.) 



WARDS. 

The City is divided into 15 Wards, each Ward elect- 
ing one Alderman, one Assistant Alderman, two Asses- 
sors, one Collector, and two Constables. 

1st Ward, extends from Liberty -street, and the east 
end of Maiden-lane, south, to the extremity 
of the island, including Governor's, Bed- 
low's, and Ellis's Islands. 

2d Ward, from Liberty-street, and the east end of 
Maiden-lane, north-east, to Spruce and Ferry 
streets, and Peck-slip, bounded on the north- 
west by Broadway and Park Row, and on 
the south-east by the East River. 

3d Ward, from Liberty-street, north, to Reade-street, 
bounded on the east by Broadway, west, 
by the North River. 

4th Ward, from Spruce and Ferry streets, and Peck- 
slip, east, to Catharine-street, bounded on 
the north by Chatham-street, soutli, by the 
East River. 

5th Ward, from Reade-street, north, to Canal-street, 
bounded on the east by Broadway, west, by 
the North River. 

6th Ward, from the junction of Broadway and Park 
Row, north, to Canal and Walker streets, 
bounded on the west by Broadway, south- 
east, by Chatham-street and the Bowery. 

7th Ward, from Catharine-street, east, to Corlaers 
Hook, bounded on the north by Division 
and Grand streets, south, by the East 
River. 



193 



ytli Ward, from Canal-street, north, to Hamersley and 
lloustoun streets, bounded on the east by 
Broadway, west, by the North River. 
9th Ward, lioni liumersley-street, north, to Four- 
teenth-street, bounded on the east by the 
Sixth Avenue and Hancock-street, west, by 
the North River. 

10th Ward, from Division-street, north, to Rivington- 
strcct, bounded on the west by the Boweiy, 
east, by Norfolk-street. 

llth Ward, irom Rivington-street, nortli, to Fourteenth- 
street, bounded on the west by the Bowery, 
cast,b3'- the East River. 

12th Ward, from Fourteenth-street, north, to Harlsein 
River, which separates New-York Island 
from Westchester county, including Black- 
well's and other islands in the East River. 

13th Ward, from Division and Grand streets, north, to 
Rivinglon-street, bounded on the west by 
Norfolk-street, cast, by the East River. 

llth Ward, from Canal and Walker streets, north, to 
Iloiistoun-street, bounded on the west by 
Broadway, east, by the Bowery. 

15jh W^ard, from Houstoun-strect, north, to Fourteenth- 
stro.ct, bounded on the west by the Sixth 
Avenue and Hancock-street, east, by the 
Bowery. 



AI.rMABETI€AIi lilST OIF STREETS. 

Albany-street, runs from Greenwich-street, west, to 

the North River. 
Allen, Division-street, north, to Houstoun-st. 

Amity, Broadway, west, to Sixth Avenue. 

Amos, Greenwich-lane, west, to North River. 

Ann, Broadway, east, to Gold-street. 

Anthony, Hudson-street, east, to Orange-street. 

Art, Broadway, east, to Bowery. 

Attorney, Division -street, north, to Houstoun-st. 

13 



194 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF STREETS. 



Avenue, First, Iloustoun-st., north, to Harljem River. 
Avenue, Second, Houstoun-st., north, to Harlaem River. 
Avenue, Third, Bowery, north, to Harh-em River. 
Avenue, Fourth, ter. Broadway, north, to Harlaem River. 
Avenue, Fifth, Waverley-place, north, to Harlaem 

River. 
Avenue Sixth, Carmine-street, north, to Harlaem River. 
Avenue, Seventh, Greenwich-lane, N., to Harlrem River. 
Avenue, Eighth, Hudson-street, north to Harlagni River. 
Avenue, Ninth, Great Kiln road, north, to Harhem River. 

ter. West-street, north, to Harlaem River. 

Houstoun-street, north, to East River. 

Houstoun-street, north, to East River. 

Houstoun-street, north, to East River. 

Houstoun-street, north, to East River. 

Greenwich-lane, west, to North River. 

Broadway, west, to North River. 

Washington-squ., west, to North River. 

Roosevelt-street, east, to James-street. 

Broadway, west, to North River. 

Division-street, west, to Orange-street. 

Chapel-street, west, to North River. 

Broadway, east, to William-street. 

Hamersley-street, north, to Amos-street. 

Park-row, south-cast, to East River. 

Leonard-street, north, to Franklin-st. 

Greenwich-street, west, to North River. 

Henry-street, south, to Madison-street. 

Bowery, west, then north, to Eighth Av. 

Broadway, east, to Bowery. 

Chatham-squ., north, to Fourth Avenue. 

State street, east, to Broad-street. 

Wall street, south, to East River. 

Battery -place, north, to Fourth Avenue. 

East River, west, to Hudson-street. 

Pearl-street, south, to East River. 

Bleecker-st., west, to Epis. cemetery. 

Walker-street, west, to North River. 

Grand-street, north, to Houstoun-street. 

Greenwich-street, west, to North River. 



Avenue, Tenth, 

Avenue A., 

Avenue B., 

Avenue C, 

Avenue D., 

Bank, 

Barclay, 

Barrow, 

Batavia, 

Battery.place, 

Bayard, 

Beach, 

Beaver, 

Bedford, 

Beekman, 

Benson, 

Bethune, 

Birmingham, 

Bleecker, 

Bond, 

Bowery, 

Bridge, 

Broad, 

Broadway, 

Broome, 

Burlingrslip, 

Burton, 

Canal, 

Cannon, 

Carlisle, 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF STREETS. 



195 



Carmine, Sixth Avenue, west, to Varick-street. 

Caroline, Duane-slreet, north, to Jay-street. 

Catharine, Division-street, south, to Cherry-street. 

Catharine-lane, Broadv^'ay, east, to Elm-street. 

Catharine-slip, Cherry-street, south, to East River. 

Cedar, Pearl-street, west, to North River. 

Centre, Pearl-street, north, to .Broome-sti"eet. 

Chambers, Chatham-street, west, to North River. 

Chapel, Barclay-street, north, to Canal-street. 

Charles, Greenwich-lane, west, to North River. 

Charlton, M'Dougal-street, west, to North River. 

Chatham, Frankfort-street, east, to Bowery. 

Cherry, Pearl-street, east, to East River. 

Chestnut, Oak-street, north, to Madison-street. 

Christopher, Sixth Avenue, west, to North River. 

Chrystie, Division-street, north, to Houstoun-st. 

Church, Fulton-street, north, to Canal-street. 

City Hall-place, Tryon-row, north, to Pearl- street. 

Clarke, Broome-street, north, to Spring-street. 

Clarkson, Varick-street, west, to North River. 

Cliff, John-street, north-east, to Hague-street. 

Clinton, Houstoun-street, south, to East River. 

Coenties^slip, Pearl-street, south, to East River. 

College-place, Barclay-street, north, to Murray-street. 

Collister, Beach-street, north, to Laight-street. 

Columbia, Grand-street, north, to Houstoun-street. 

Commerce, Bleecker-street, west, to Barrow-street. 

Corlaers, Grand-street, south, to East River. 

Cornelia, Asylum-street, west, to Bleecker-street. 

Cortlandt, Broadway, west, to North River. 

Cortlandt-alley, Franklin-street, north, to Canal-street. 

Crosby, Howard-street, north, to Bleecker-st. 

Cross, Chambers-street, east, to Mott- street. 

Cuyler's-alley, Water-street, south, to East River. 

Delancey, Bowery, east, to East River. 

Depeyster, Water-street, south, to East River. 

Desbrosses, Hudson-street, west, to North River. 

Dey, Broadway, west, to North River. 

Division, Bowery, east, to Grand-street. 

Dominick, Clarke-street, west to Hudson-street. 



196 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF STREETS. 



Dover, Pearl-street, south, to East River. 

Downing, Bleecker-street, w^est, to Varick-street. 

Doyer, Bowery, north, to Pell-strcet. 

Duane, Rose-street, west, to North River. 

Dutch, John-street, north, to Fulton-street. 
East Broadway, Chatham-square, east, to Grand-street. 

Eden's-alley, Gold-street, east, to Ryder's Alley. 

Eighth, Sixth Avenue, east, to East River. 

Eighteenth, North River, east, to East River. 

Eldridge, Division-street, north, to Houstoun-st. 

Eleventh, Seventh Avenue, east, to East River. 

Elizabeth, Bayard-street, north, to Bleecker-street. . 

Elm, Reade-street, north, to Spring-street. 

Essex, Division-street, north, to Houstoun-st. 

Exchange, William-street, east, to Pearl-street. 
Exchange-place, Hanover-street, west, to Broadway. 

Factory, Christopher-street, north, to Jane-street. . 

Ferry, Gold-street, south-east, to Pearl-street. 

Fifteenth, North River, east, to East River. 

Fifth, Bowery, east, to East River. 

First, Bowery, east, to Houstoun-street. 

Fletcher, Peai-1-street, south, to East River. 

Forsyth, Bayard-street, north, to Houstoun-st. 

Fourteenth, North River, east, to East River. 

Fourth, Thirteenth-street, east, to East River. 

Frankfort, Chatham-street, east, to Pearl-street. 
Franklin-square, Cherry-street, north, to Pearl-street. 

Franklin, Chapel-street, east, to East River. 

Front, Whitehall-street, east, to East River. 

Fulton, East River, west, to North River. 

Gay, Waverley-place, north, to Christopher- 
street. 

Goerck, Grand-street, north. 

Gold, Maiden-lane, north-east, to Frankfort-st. 

Gouverneur, Division-street, south, to East River. 
Gouverneur-alley, Water-street, south, to East River. 

Grand, Varick-street, east, to East River. 

Great Jones, Broadway, east, to Bowery. 

Great Kiln road, Thirteenth-street, west, to North River. 

Green, Liberty-street, nortli, to Maiden-lane. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF STREETS. 



197 



Greene, Canal-street, north, to Eighth-street. 

Greenwich, Battery -place, north, to Great Kiln road. 
Greenwich-lane, Sixth Avenue, north, to Thirteenth-st. 

Grove, Hudson-street, east, to Waverley-place. 

Hague, Pearl-street, north, to Clifi-street. 

Hamersley, M'Dougal-street, west, to North River. 

Hamilton, Catharine-street, east, to Market-street. 

Hammond, Greenwich-lane, west, to North River. 

Hancock, Houstoun-street, north, to Bleecker-st. 

Hanover, Pearl-street, north, to Wall-street. 

Harison, Hudson-street, west, to North River. 

Henry, Oliver-street, east to Grand-street. 

Hester, Clinton-street, west, to Centre-street. 

Hoboken, Washington-street,west, to North River. 

Horatio, Greenwich-lane, west, to North River. 

Houstoun, East River, west to M'Dougal-street. 

Howard, Centre-street, west, to Mercer-street. 

Hubert, Hudson-street, west, to North River. 

Hudson, Chambers-street, north, to Ninth Av. 

Irving -place, Fourteenth-street, north, to Twentietlt- 

street. 
Jackson-avenue, Waverley-place, north, to Union-place. 

Jacob, Ferry-street, east, to Frankfort-street. 

James, Chatham-street, south, to Cherry-street. 

James-slip, Cherry-street, south, to East River. 

Jane, Greenwich-lane, west, to North River. 

Jay, Hudson-street, west, to North River. 

Jefferson, Division-street, south, to East River. 

Jersey, Crosby-street, east, to Mulberry-street. 

Jolin, Broadway, east, to Pearl-street. 

Jones, Asylum-street, west, to Bleecker-street. 

Jones-lane, Front-street, south, to East River. 

King, M'Dougal-street, west, to North River. 
Lafayette-place, Great Jones-street, north, to Eighth-st. 

Laight, Canal-street, west, to North River. 

Laurens, Canal-street, north, to Amity-street. 

Leonard, Hudson-street, east, to Orange-street. 

Le Roy, Hudson-street, west, to North River. 

Little Water, Cross-street, north, to Anthony-street, 

Lewis, Grand-street, north, to East River. 



198 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF STREETS. 



Liberty, Maiden-lane, west, to North River. 

Lispenard, Chapel-street, east, to Broadway. 

Ludlow, Walker-street, north, to North-street* 

Lumber, Liberty-street, south, to Greenwich-st. 

M'Dougal, Spring-street, north, to Eighth-street. 

Madison, Pearl-street, east, to Grand-street. 

Maiden-lane, Broadway, south-east, to East River. 

Mangin, Grand-street, north, to East River. 

Manhattan, Second-street, west, to North River. 

Market, Division-street, south, to East Riven 

Marketfield, Broad-street, west, to Whitehall-street. 
Mechanic-alle}', Monroe-street, south, to Cherry-street. 

Mercer, Canal-street, north, to Eighth-street. 

Mill, Broad-street, east, to Stone-street. 

Minetto, Bleecker-street, east, to M'Dougal-st. 

Monroe, Catharine-street, east, to East River. 

Montgomery, Division-street, south, to East River. 

More, Pearl-street, south, to East River. 

Morris, Broadway, west, to North River. 

Morton, Bleecker-street, west, to North River. 

Mott, Chatham-street, north, to Bleecker-st. 

Mulberry, Chatham-street, north, to Bleecker-st. 

Murray, Broadway, west, to North River. 

Nassau, Wall-street, north, to Chatham-street. 

New, Wall-street, south, to Beaver-street. 

Nineteenth, Houstoun-street, east, to East River. 

Ninth, Greenwich-lane, east, to East River. 

Norfolk, Division-street, north, to Houstoun-st. 

North Moore, Chapel-street, west, to North River. 

Oak, Pearl-street, east, to Catharine-street. 

Old-slip, Stone-street, south, to East River. 

Oliver, East Broadway, south, to East River. 

Orange, Chatham-street, north, to Prince-street. 

Orchard, Division-street, north, to Houstoun-st. 

Park-row, Broadway, east, to Beekman-street. 

Park-place, Broadway, west, to Church-street. 

Pearl, State-st., east, then north, to Broadway. 

Peck-slip, Pearl-street, south, to East River. 

Pelhani, Monroe-street, south, to Cherry-street. 

Pell, Bowery, west, to Mott-street. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BTHEETS. 



199 



Perry, Greenwich-lane, west, to North River. 

Pike, Division-street, south, to East River. 

Pine, Greenwich-street, east, to East River. 

Pitt, Grand-street, north, to Houstoun-street. 

Piatt, Pearl-street, north, to Gold-street. 

Prince, Bowery, west, to M'Dougal-street. 

Rector, Broadway, west, to North River. 

Reade, Cross-street, west, to North River. 

Renvvick, Canal-street, north, to Spring-street. 

Rep ubUcan- alley, Reade-street, , to Elm-street. 

Ridge, Division-street, north, to Houstoun-st. 

Rivington, Bowery, east, to East River. 

Robinson, Chapel-street, west, to North River. 

Roosevelt, Chatham-street, south, to East River. 

Rose, Frankfort-street, north-east, to Pearl-st. 

Rutgers, Division-street, south, to East River. 
Ryder's alley, Fulton-street, south, to Eden's-alley. 

Scammel, Grand-street, south, to East River. 

Second, Bowery, east, to East River. 

Seventh, Bowery, east, to East River. 

Seventeenth, North River, east, to East River. 

Sheriff, Grand-street, north, to North River. 

Sixteenth, North River, east, to East River. 

Sixth, Bowery, east, to East River. _ 

Smith, Hamersley-street, south, to King-street. 

South, Whitehall-st., east, to Corlaers-hook. 

Spring, Bowery, west, to North River. 

Spruce, Nassau- street, south-east, to Gold-st. 

Stanton, Bowery, east, to East River. 

Staple, Duane-street, north, to Harison-street. 

State, Whitehall-st., E., then N., to Broadway. 
St. John's-lane, Beach-street, north, to Laight-street. 

Stone, Whitehall-street, east, to William-st. 

Stuvvesant, Bowery, east, to Second Avenue. 

Suffolk, Division-street, north, to Houstoun-st. 

Sullivan, Canal-street, north, to Amity-street. 

Temple, Liberty-street, south, to Thames-street. 

Tenth, Greenwich-lane, east, to East River. 

Thames, Broadway, west, to Greenwich-street. 
Theatre-alley, Ann-street, north, to Beekmau-street. 



8Q0 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF STREETS. 



Third, Bowery, east, to East River. 

Thirteenth, North River, east, to East River. 

Thomas, Church-street, west, to Hudson-street. 

Thompson, Canal-street, north, to Fourth-street. 

Tompkins, Grand-street, north, to East River. 

Torbert, Henry-street, south, to Madison-street. 

Tryon-row, Chatham-st., west, to City Hall-place. 

Twelfth, Greenwich-lane, east, to East River. 

Twentieth, North River, east, to East River. 

Twenty-first, North River, east, to East Rivei*. 

Troy, Greenwich-lane, west, to North River. 

Vandam, M'Dougal-street,west, to Greenwich-st. 

Vandewater, Frankfort-street, east, to Pearl-street. 

Varick, Provost-street, north, to Clarkson-st. 

Vesey, Broadway, west, to North River. 

Vestry, Canal-street, west, to North River. 

Walker, Chapel-street, east, to Division-street. 

Wall, Broadway, east, to East River. 

Walnut, Henry-street, south, to East River. 

Warren, Broadway, west, to North River. 

Washington, Battery-place, north, to Twelfth-street. 
Washington-place, Broadway, west, to Wooster-street. 

Water, Whitehall-street, east, to East River. 

Watts, Sullivan-street, west, to Nortli River. 
Waverley-place, Christopher-street, east, to Broadway. 

West, Battery-place, north, to Tenth-street. 

White, Chapel-street, east, to Orange-street. 

Whitehall, Marketfield-street, south, to East River. 

Willett, Grand-street, north, to Houstoun-street. 

William, Stone-street, north-east, to Pearl-street. 

Wooster, Canal-street, north, to Seventeenth-st. 

York, St. John's-lane, east, to Chapel-street. 
Total number of streets, 277. 



PUBLIC OFFICES, INSTITUTIONS, &C. 201 



PUBT.IC OFFICES, INSTITUTIONS, &c.* 

Adjutant General of Eastern Department, 45 Lispenard. 

African Society for Mutual Relief, rear 44 Orange. 

American Institute, office and library, 41 Cortlandt. 

Apparatus for the recovery of drowned persons, at the Dispen- 
sary, White C.Centre. 

Arsenal, State, Elm c. Franklin. 

Assistant Register in Chancery, (Walworth,) 28 City Hall. 

Ballast Master, (John Baker,) 29 Burling-slip. 

Camden and Amboy Rail Road Line, 12Washinfrton. 

Chief Engineer's Office, (James Gulick,) Elm c. Franklin. 

City Comptroller, (T. J. Waters,) 5 Hall of Records. 

City Gaugers, 174 Front. 

City Inspector's Office, 2 City Hall. 

City Workshops, Elm c. Franklin. 

Clerk of the Sessions, and Oyer and Terminer, (H. Meigs,) 
Old Alms House, west end. 

Clerk, Citv and County, (Abraham Asten,) 20 City Hall. 

Clerk of Board of Aldermen, (J. Morton,) 8 City Hall. 

Collector's Office of arrears taxes and assessments, 1 Hall of 
Records. 

Columbian Transportation Line, 31 Washington. 

Commissary General, N. Y. State, (Arcularius,) 30 Franklin. 

Common Council Rooms, 13 and 27 City Hall. 

Coroner's Office, (Colvill,) 145 Greenwich c. Liberty. 

Corporation Public Yard, (J. P. Roome, Sup.,) Franklin c. Elm. 

Corporation Water Works for Fire Dep't, Thirteenth n. Bowery. 

Counsel to the Corporation. (Robert Emmet,) lih Pine. 

Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, 28 Wall. 

District Attorney, (Ogdeu Hoffman,) 11 Pine, Office, Old Alms 
House, west end. 

Exchange Telegraph, 39 Merchants' Exchange. 

Free Emigrant Office, Waverley n. Avenue Six. 

First Judge's Office, 23 City Hall. 

Hall of Record, in the Park op. Frankfort. 

Health Commissioner, (Smith Cutter,) 193 Greenwich. 

Hellgate Pilot's Office, 454 Water, and 4 Coenties-slip. 

Kine Pock Institution, City Dispensary, White c. Centre. 

Loan Office for the U. S., at the Branch Bank, 15 Wall. 

Lost or stray children deposite. New City Hall, Chambers, also 
at the Alms House, Bellevue. 



For other Institutions, see Index. 



202 PUBLIC OFFICES, INSTITUTIONS, &C. 

Manhattan Gas Light Company, 48 Pine. 

Manhattan Water Works, 7 Reade. 

Masonic Hall, 314 and 316 Broadway. 

Mayor's Office, 5 City Hall, S. W. corner first floor. 

Mechanics' Institute, City Hall. 

Naturalization Office, City Hall Rotunda. 

New-York and Liverpool Emigrant Society, 89 Waaler. 

New-York Society Intelligence Office, 106 Chambers. 

Public Administrator, (Alpheus Sherman,) 41 Cedar. 

Recorder's Office, (Richard Riker,) 4 Citv Hall. 

Register's Office, (W. H. Bunn,) 2 Hall of Records. 

Resident Physician, (James R. Manley,) 19 White. 

Revenue Barge Office, (Joseph Scofield,) Whitehall-dock. 

Sailor's Snug Harbour Office, Jones' Building, Wall. 

Seaman's Register Office, and Office of Seaman's Retreat, 49 

Wall. 
Sheriff's Office, (Jacob Westervelt,) 21 City Hall. 
Ship Letter Office, 16 Merchants' Exchange. 
Society for the Promotion of Industry, 40 Avenue Six. 
Soup House of Humane Society, 4 Trj'on-row. 
Street Commissioner's Office, (G. B. Smith,) 4 Hall of Record. 
Superintendent of Streets, Leonard c. Elm. 
Tammany Hall, 166 Nassau c. Frankfort. 
Union Line Transportation, 14 Washington. 



DISTANCES 

OF THE PRINCIPAL CITIES IN THE UNITED STATES, 
FROM THE CITY OF NEW-YORK, BY THE NEAREST 
MAIL ROUTES, UNLESS OTHERWISE MENTIONED. 

Albany, (by water,) 145 miles. 

Do. (by land, west side of the river,) 151 " 

Do. do. east do 160 " 

Atigusta, Maine, 370 " 

Augusta, Georgia, 777 " 

Annapolis, Maryland, 217 " 

Baltimore, do 187 " 

Boston, Mass., 207 " 

Do. (by water, via Providence,) 232 " 

Buflfalo, via New-Jersey, 357 " 

Do. via Albany, 435 " 

Do. (by river and canal,) 508 " 

Charleston, South Carolina, 769 " 

Columbia, do. do 725 " 



DISTANCES. 205 



Cincinnati, Ohio, (by land and water via Pitts- 

burgh,) 856 miles* 

Do. do. (by mail route,) 722 " 

Columbus, Ohio, 551 " 

Concord, New-Hampshire, 249 " 

Detroit, Michigan, 675 " 

Dover, Delaware, 165 '* 

Frankfort, Kentucky, , ... 736 " 

Harrisburgh, Pennsylvania, 89 " 

Hartford, Connecticut, 110 " 

Indianapolis, Indiana, 752 " 

Jackson, Mississippi, 1260 '* 

Jefferson City, Missouri, 1180 " 

Little Rock, Arkansas, 1293 " 

Middletown, Connecticut, 100 " 

Milledgeville, Georgia, 867 " 

Montpelier, Vermont, 299 " 

Montreal, Canada, 370 " 

Nashville, Tennessee, 939 " 

New-Haven, Connecticut, 75 " 

New-London, do 125 " 

New-Orleans, Louisiana, 1428 " 

Norfolk, Virginia, 437 " 

Norwich, Connecticut, 130 " 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 390 " 

Philadelphia, do. via Bordentown, ... 89 " 

Do. do. via Trenton, 98 " 

Portsmouth, New-Hampshire, 263 " 

Portland, Maine, , ».. 317 " 

Providence, Rhode Island, 169 "■ 

Do. do. (by water,) 190 " 

Quebec, Canada, 540 " 

Raleigh, North Carolina, 511 " 

Richmond, Virginia, 347 " 

Savannah, Georgia, 887 " 

St. Louis, Missouri, 1046 '* 

Tallahassee, Florida, 1121 « 

Trenton, New-Jersey, 59 " 

Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 1083 " 

Vandalia, Illinois, 971 « 

Washington, District of Columbia, 225 '* 



204 



NEW-YORK CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE. 



N£\V-¥ORK CHRONOIiOOICAl. TABIiE, 

FOR 1833. 

January 2. Hon. Gideon Lee installed Mayor. 

January 12. Navigationclosedbctweeu New-York and Albany. 

February. Uncommonly mild for the season. 

March 23. North River opens to Albany. 

April 9. Charter Election. 

April 25. City Hotel took fire, destroying the upper and 

attic stories. 

April 30. Destructive fire in tlie 9th Ward, between Hud- 

son and Washing-ton streets, about 160 houses 
comprising nearly fonr blocks were destroyed, 
and forty horses i3urnt to death. 

May 6. Anniversary of the Religious and Benevolent So- 

cieties comnience. 

May 14. New Common Council sworn into ofiice, and take 

their seats. 

June 12. The President of the United States, arrives in the 

City. 

June 14. Mr. Durant makes his sixth ascent in a balloon 

from Castle Garden ; Black Hawk and suite 
arrive the same day. 

July 3. The President unexpectedly passed by the 

City, on his return to Washington. 

July 4. Fifty-seventh Anniversary of American Inde- 

pendence. 

August 14. The United States ship Delaware, Capt. Ballard, 
sailed for the Mediterranean, to touch at Cher- 
bourg, with the Hon. Edward Livingston, Mi- 
nister to France, on board. 

September 27. Large fire in the 11th Ward, between Sheriff and 
Columbia streets, destroying 16 buildings. 

October 9. Dreadful accident on board the steamboat New- 

England, which left New-York the preceding 
evening, for Hartford, Conn., at 3 o'clock, A. M., 
when in the Connecticut river, off Essex, both 
boilers simultaneously burst, with a tremen- 
dous explosion, killing 15 persons, besides a 
number severely wounded. 

October 15. The Hon. Henry Clay arrives in the City. 

November 25. Fiftieth Anniversary of the Evacuation of the 
City, by the British troops. 

Nov. 4, 5, & 6. General State and County Election. 

Decembers. Thanksgiving Day. 

December 13. Navigation closes between New-York and Albany. 



KEY TO THE MAP. 



205 



KSir TO THE MAP. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

A City Hall, in the Park. 

B Records OtEce, do. 

C City Prison, do. 

D Merchants' Exchange, Wall. 

E Custom House. 

F NewVork Hospital, Broadway. 

G State Arsenal, Elm c. Franklin. 

H Columbia College, Park-place. 

Hh University, op. Wash. Square. 

I Amer. Acad. Fine Arts, Barclay. 

J Masonic Hall, Broadway. 

K Clinton Hall, Beekman. 

L Gas Works, Canal c. Centre. 

M Park Theatre, 21 Park Row. 

N American Theatre, 4t> Bowerv. 

O Richmond Hill Theatre, Varick. 

P Opera House, Church. 

Q, Amer. Museum, 222 Broadway. 

R Peale's Museum, 252 Broadway. 

S Niblo's Garden, Broadway. 

T Fulton Market, Fulton. 

U Washington do., Washington. 

V Clinton do.. Canal c. Washington. 
AV Frankliu do., Old-slip. 

X Catharine do., Catharine. 

Y Essex do., Grand c. Ludlow. 
Z Gouverneur do., Gouverneur. 
AA Corlaers do.. Grand. 

BB Centre do., Grand c. Centre. 
CC Greenwich do., Christopher. 
DD Manhattan do., Mangin. 
EE Tompkins do.. Bowery. 
FF JetTerson do., Sixth Avenue. 

PRINCIPAL HOTELS, &c. 

a Aster's new Hotel, Broadway. 
b American Hotel, 229 Broadway. 
c Atlantic Hotel, 5 Broadway. 
d Barclay-street House, Barclay, 
e Broad-street House, Broad, 
f City Hotel, Broadway, 
g Clinton Hotel, Beekman. 
h Congress Hall, 142 Broadway. 
i Eastern Pearl-street House, Pearl, 
j Exchange Hotel, 10 and 12 Broad, 
k Franklin House, 197 Broadway. 
1 Holt's Hotel, Fulton, 
m Mrs. Mann's 01 Broadway, 
n Mansion House, .39 Broadwaj'. 
o iMerchants' Hotel, 108 Broad. 



p New-Vork Hotel, 162 Greenwich. 

<1 Niblo's Hotel, 112 Broadway. 

r North American Hotel, 30 Bowery. 

s Northern Hotel, 79 Cortlandt. 

t Orange Co. House, Cortlandt. 

u Pearl-street House and Ohio Hotel, 

88 Pearl. 
V Tammany Hall, 166 Nassau, 
w Tontine ColTee-House, Wall, 
x U. S. Hotel, 178 and 180 Pearl. 
y Walton House, 328 Pearl, 
z Washington Hotel, Broadway, 
aa Western Hotel, 9 Cortlandt. 
bb York House, 5 Cortlandt. 

CHURCHES. 

Presbyterian. 

1 First church, Wall. 

2 Brick church, Beekman n. Park. 

3 Rutgers-street church, c. Henry. 

4 Church, Duane c. Church. 

.5 Canal-st. church, Canal c. Green. 

6 Laight-st. church, c. Varick. 

7 Seventh church, Broome c. Ridge. 

8 Eighth church, Christopher. 

9 AUen-st. church, n. Grand. 

10 Central church, Broome n. Elm. 

11 Spring-st. church, n. Varick. 

12 Bleecker-st. church, n. Broadway. 

13 Bowery church, tK Bowery. 

14 Union church. Prince c. Orange. 

15 North church, Si.xth Avenue 

16 Free Presbyterian church, Dey. 

17 Do. do. do. 84 Chatham. 

18 Scotch do. do. Cedar. 

19 Do. do. do. Pearl. 

20 Murray-st. church, 45 Murray, 

21 Second Avenue church, n. Third. 

22 West church. Carmine op. Varick. 

23 Associate ch. Grand c. Mercer. 

24 Do. do. Prince. 

25 Reformed church, 47 Chambers. 

26 Do. do. Sixth. 

27 Fourteenth church, Franklin. 

28 Coloured church, Frankfort. 

Dutch Reformed. 

29 South church. Exchange-place. 

30 Middle church. Liberty c. Nassau. 

31 North church, William c. Fultou. 



206 



KEY TO THE MAP. 



32 Northwest church, Franklin. 

33 Northeast ch., Market c. Henry. 

34 Church, Broome c. Greene. 

35 Do. Green c. Houstoun. 

36 Do. Bleecker c. Amos. 

37 Do. North c. Eldridge. 

38 Mission House, Ninth. 

39 True Reformed church, King. 

40 German do. do. 21 Forsyth. 

Episcopal. 

41 Trinity church, Broadway. 

42 St. Paul's chapel, Broadway. 

43 St. John's chapel, Varick. 

44 St. George's church, Beekman. 

45 French ch. du Esprit, Franklin. 

46 Christ church, 81 Anthony. 

47 Grace ch., Broadway c. Rector. 

48 St. Mark's church, Stuyvesaiit 

49 Zion church, Mott c. Cross. 
60 St. Stephen's church, Chrystie. 
SI St. Thomas' church, Broadway. 

62 St. Luke's church, Hudson. 

63 Ascension church. Canal. 
54 All Saints' church, Henry. 

65 St. Clement's church. Amity. 

66 Mission church, Vandewater. 

57 St. Peter's church. Twentieth. 

58 St. Philip's, (col'd) 33 Centre. 

59 Mission, (col'd) Ridge. 

Baptist. 

60 First church, 33 Gold. 

61 Church, 6 Oliver. 

62 Do. Mulberry n. Chatham. 

63 Bethel ch., Delancey c. Chiystie. 

64 Beriah church, M'Dougal. 

65 Union ch., Houstoun c. Forsyth. 

66 North church, Bedford. 

67 East church, Pitt c. Delancey. 

68 Church, Mott n. Spring. 

69 Ebenezer ch., Houstoun c. Suflblk. 

70 South church, 84 Nassau. 

71 Mission ch., Broome c. Cannon. 

72 Amity-street church, n. Greene. 

73 Abyssinian church, 44 Anthony. 

74 General church, 1.38 Laurens. 

75 Particular ch., rear 63 Chrystie. 

Methodist Episcopal. 

76 First church, 31 John. 

77 Second church, 8 Forsyth. 

78 Third church, 108 Duane. 

79 Fourth church, 130 Allen. 

80 Fifth church, Willetn. Broome. 



81 Sixth church, Bedford c. Morton. 

82 Seventh church, Seventh. 

83 Eighth church, Second. 

84 Ninth church, 61 Green. 

85 Tenth church, Twenty-first. 

Independent Methodist. 

86 Independent church, 56 Chrystie. 

87 Protestant church, 61 Attornej-. 

88 Do. do. Sullivan. 

89 Do. do. 859 Broome. 

90 Primitive church, 43 Elizabeth. 

91 Do. do. Domiuick. 

92 Do. do. Pitt n. Houstoun. 

93 Mariners' church, Roosevelt. 

94 Asbury, (col'd) 55 Elizabeth. 

95 Zion, do. 156 Church. 

Roman Catholic. 

96 St. Peter's church, Barclay. 

97 Christ church, Ann n. William. 

98 St. Patrick's cath. Prince. 

90 St. Mary's ch., Grand c. Kidge. 

Fr-iends. 

100 Meeting House, Rose n. Pearl. 

101 Do. do. Hester. 

102 Do. do. 38 Henry. 

103 Do. do. Downing. 



Lutheran. 



I 



104 St. James' church. Orange. 

105 St. Matthew's church, Walker. 

Universalist. 

106 First Society, Orchard. 

107 Society United Friends, Duane. 

Vnitai'ian. 

108 Church, 109 Chambers. 

109 Do. Mercer c. Prince. 

Independent. 

110 Providence chapel, Thompson. 

111 Welch chapel, 137 Mulberry. 

Jetos. 

112 Synagogue, Portuguese, Mill. 

113 Do. German, Elm. 

114 Do. Dutch, Grand. 

Miscellaneous. 
\lb United Brethren church, Fulton. 

116 New Jerusalem chapel. Pearl. 

117 Christian church, Broome. 



ENVIRONS 

OF THE 

CFY OF NEW-YORK. 



BROOKLYN. 

By a recat act of the Legislature, Brooklyn has be- 
come an inorporated City. The following are the out- 
lines of thenew charter. 

1 . The at lakes effect from the passage thereof, and is 
now a law. 

2. Title.-'' The Mayor and Common Council of the 
City of Broklvn." ^^ , 

3. Bouncs.—T\\e whole of the present town of Brook- 
lyn. 

4. Annuk election on the first Monday in May, in eve- 
ry year. 

5. Preseit Trustees hold their offices to the third Mon- 
day of May 1835. , ^^, 

6. Electi.n for Aldermen for the 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th 
wards, twojn each ward,on the first Monday in May, 1834 . 

7. Electim same day for six Supei-visors, two Over- 
seers of the Poor, one Constable for each ward, one Col- 
lector for tlie first seven wards, and one Collector for 
the 8th and 9th wards. 

8. Mayor to be chosen by the Aldermen on the third 
Monday of May, for one year. 

9. City Clerk chosen by the Board. 
The City of Brooklyn is situated on the East river, 

(736 yards wide,) directly opposite New-York, in King s 
County, on the extreme west end of Long Island ; and is 
the third place, in point of population, in the State. 

The City is bounded north by the city and county ot 
New-York ; east bv the township of Bushwick ; south by 
The townships of Flatbush and New-Utrecht; and west 
by New-York bay. 



208 



ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-YCtK. 



The communication between Brooklyn ancN'ew-York 
is by three steam terries, where boats crot the East 
River at intervals of about ten minutes, viz one from 
the foot of Fulton-street, New -York, to the fouif Fulton- 
street, Brooklyn ; one from the foot of Catli iue-street, 
New-York, to Main street, Brooklyn ; anc one from 
Walnut-street, New-York, to Jackson-strectfBrooklyn. 

It is also contemplated to establish anothelferry from 
near the foot of Joralemon-street, Brooklyn, o Old-slip, 
New- York. 

Brooklyn contains a population of about 5,000 inha- 
►bitants; aiyiisthe favourite residence of mny doinj? 
business in P«ew-York ; its growth has beenery rapid 
since 1815, and it contains a number of extensive 
manufactoi-ies of various kinds. The United Sates Navy 
Yard is situated in the northeast part of the (|ty. 

COMMON COUNCIL. I 
The following Aldermen, elected as Trulees in the 
first five Wards and Aldermen in the four ojicrs, took 
their seats on Tuesday 20th May, 1834. The^hold their 
seats till May, 1835." The Mayor was eleited by the 
Aldermen at their first meeting. 

George Hall, Mayor. 
Wards. Wards. 



1 Gabriel Furman, 
Conklin Brush, 

2 Geo. D. Cunningham, 
John M. Hicks, 

3 James Walters, 
Joseph Moses, 

4 Jonathan Trotter, 
Adrian Hegeman, 

5 Benjamin R. Prince, 



Wm. 31. Utldl, 

6 Samuel Sn)fh, 
Wm. Foweif, 

7 Clarence D.Backett, 
Stephen HiCtnes, 

8 Robert Wilson, 
Moses Smitli, 

9 John S. Bergen, 
Theodorus Polhemus. 



Cyrus P. Smith, Clerk and Attorney. 
ACADEMIES AND SCHOOLS. 

BROOKLYN COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. 

(For Young Ladies.) 

C. W. Bazeley, Principal. 

Assisted in the duties of the Seminary by Mrs. A. E. 



ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 209 

Bazeley, and five Ladfes, and C. L. Pannentier, Profes- 
sor of French, and of the University of New-York. 

iVIiguel Cabrera de Nevarcs, Professor of Spanish, (of 
the same.) 

B. J. Carbonaj, Professor of Italian. 

B. Bakewell, Professor of Drawing and Perspective. 
M. M. Bickerstaff, Professor of tlie Piano, and Vocal 

Music. 

H. J. Trust, Professor of the Harp and Guitar. 

C. Berault, Professor of Dancing. 

This Institute enjoys tlie advantage of a most healthy, 
pleasant, and eligible situation, on the heights of Brook- 
lyn, opposite to the city of New-York ; commanding an 
extensive view of the harbour, and the adjacent country 
for many miles. The building is sufficiently spacious 
for the accommodation of seventy boarders ; the rooms, 
for study, recitation, and recreation, are commodious and 
pleasant, and the dormitories airy. 

OTHER PRINCIPAL SEMINARIES IN BROOKLYN. 

Eames 6z, Putnam's English and Classical Hall, 
Washington, near Concord-street. 

Brooklyn Academy, corner of Henry and Pine^-apple 
streets. Seymour «fc Mervin, Principals. 

E. Kingsley's School, 241 Washington-street. 

A. Hegeman's Select School, Adams-street. 

LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 

BROOKLYN LYCE0M. 

This Institution was organized in October, 1833. 
Its objects are intellectual and moral improvement, by 
means of certain specified committees, and by public 
lectures. A course of lectures upon miscellaneous sub- 
jects, by gentlemen of the village of Brooklyn, was com- 
menced on the 7th November, 1833, to be continued 
weekly until May, 1834. This has been varied occa- 
sionally by essays, generally from the pens of ladies. 
The institution is in a highly prosperous state. It is 
proposed to connect with it a library, philosophical ap- 
paratus, &:c. ; and ground has already been secured for 
14 



210 ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 



an elegant building, which it is designed to erect as soon 
as possible. The officers are elected annually, on the 
first Wednesday of October. The following officers con- 
stitute the present Board. 

Peter \V. Radcliff, President. 

Gen. Jeremiah Johnson, ) y. p_„- ,„„._ 

Theodore Eames, S *^resulents. 

Gabriel Furman, Corresponding Secretary. 
Alden J. Spooner, Recording Secretary. 
Josiah Dow, Treasurer. 
An Executive Committee of eight. 

UNITED STATES NAVAL LYCEUM. 

(Established at the Navy Yard.) 

This Institution was organized by the officers of the 
Navy and Marine Corps, in order to promote the diffu- 
sion of useful knowledge, to foster a spirit of harmony, 
and a community of interest in the service. 

OFFICERS. 

Com. Charles G. Ridgely, President. 

M. C. Perry, Master Com'dt, First Vice President. 

Tunis Craven, Esq., Second Vice President. 

Lieut. Henry Pinkney, Corresponding Secretary. 

Henry Willet, } r, j- c< * • 
A r> T?!!- > Recordmg Secretaries. 
A. B. Ellison, ) ^ 

George W. Lee, Treasurer. 

M. C. Perry, Master Com'dt, 

Wm. Swift, Surgeon, 

James Glynn, Lieutenant, } Curators. 

D. S. Edwards, Surgeon, I 

G. Gansevoort, P. Midshi])man, J 

T. L. Smith, Assistant Surgeon, Librarian. 

John Bellingham, Assistant Librarian. 

Committee of Correspondence. 

M. D. Mix, Master Com'dt, Chairman. 

Joshua Sands, Lieutenant. 

Wm. L. Hudson, Lieutenant. 

Henry Eagle, Lieutenant. 

K. R. Thompson, Past Midshipman. 



ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 



211 



Committee of Nomination. 

F. H. Gregory, Master Com'dt, Chairman. 
John S. Nicholas, Lieutenant. 
Samuel, Hart, Constructor. 

John Robinson, Sailing Master. 

G. W. Robbins, Lieutenant of Marines. 

Committee of Finance. 
C. O. Handy, Purser, Chairman. 
J. M. Halsey, Purser. 
S. Butler, Purser. 

Library Committee. 
Wm. W. Dulany, Captahi Marines, Chairman. 
A. A. Nicholson, Lieutenant Marines. 
S. Sharp, Assistant Surgeon. 
George A. Prentiss, Acting Sailing Master. 
Charles Heywood, Past Midshipman. 
Braug-Jitsman — Samuel M. Pook. 

HAMILTON LITERARY ASSOCIATION. 

This Association has been in existence about four 
years. It is composed of young men who engage in the 
exercises of debate and literary composition. Its meet- 
ings are held once a week, from October to June, m every 
year. 

OFFICERS. 

Charles R. Marvin, President. 

Howard, Secretary. 

Alexander Hadden, Treasurer. 

CHURCHES. 

PRESBYTERIAN. 

First Presbyterian Church, Cranberry, n. Hicks, Rev. 
D. L. Carroll. 

Second Presbyterian Church, c. of Clinton, n. Fulton, 
Rev. J. S. Spencer. 

DUTCH REFORMED. 

Reformed Dutch Church, Joralemon, n. Fulton, Rev. 
M. D wight. 



212 ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 



EPISCOPALIAN. 

St. Ann's Church, Washington, c. Sands, Rev. B. C. 
Cutler. 

St. John's Church, Washington, c. Johnson, Rev. E. 
M. Johnson. 

Navy Yard Chapel, Navy Yard, Rev. Addison Searle. 

BAPTIST. 

First Baptist Church, Pearl, n. Concord, Rev. Mr. 
Howard. 

■ Second Baptist Church, Washington, n. Concord, Rev. 
Mr. Frey. 

METHODIST. 

First Methodist Church, Sands, n. Fulton, Rev. Mr. 
Birch. 

Second Methodist Church, York, c. Gold, Rev. Mr. 
Kennedy. 

Third Methodist Church, Washington, n. Tillary, Rev. 
Mr. Sucky. 

African Methodist Church, High, n. Bridge, Rev. J. L. 
Todd. "^ 

Episcopal Mission Church, Rev. Mr. Thomas, A. M. 

ROMAN CATHOLIC. 

Church, Jay, c. Chapel, Rev. John Walsh. 
Independent R. C. Church, York, c. Jay, Rev. John 
Farnam. 

UNITARIAN. 

Unitarian, Washington, rear Concord, Rev. Mr. 
Barlow. 

SUMMARY OF CHURCHES IN BROOKLYN. 



Presbyterian, 2 

Dutch Reformed. . . , . . .1 

Episcopalian 3 

Baptist 2 

Methodist 4 



Roman Catholic 2 

Unitarian 1 

Total 15 



ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-YOBK. 213 

BANKS. 

LONG ISLAND BANK. 

(Office No. 7 Front-street.) 

Incorporated April 1st, 1824. Capital 300,000 dollars. 
Shares 50 dollars each. Discounts Wednesdays and 
Saturdays. Election in June. Dividends, 1st of August 
and 1st of February. 

Leflert Lefferts, President. 
Dan'l Embury, Cashier. 

John C. Freeke, F. C. Tucker, Robert Bache, Henry 
Waring, Nehem. Denton, E. Doolittle, Thos. Everitt, jr., 
Joseph Kissam, Silas Butler, John Schenck, Samuel D, 
Wilkins, James S. Clark — Directors. 

BROOKLYN BANK. 

(5 Front-street, Brookl3'n.) 

Incorporated Feb. 24th, 1832, until 1860. Capital 
200,000 dollars. Shares 20 dollars each. Election 2d 
Tuesday in June. Discount days, Tuesdays and Fri- 
days. This Institution commenced the business of 
Banking on the 29th day of October, 1832. 

Sam'l A. Willoughby, President. 

Rob't I. Crommelin, Cashier. 
R. V. W. Thorne, Robert T. Hicks, Jeffery Smith, 
Conklin Brush, R. E. De Russy, Joseph Moser, Joseph 
Sprague, James Foster, John G. Murphy, Coe S. 
Downing, Samuel Smith — Directors. One vacancy. 

N. F. Waring, Attorney and Counsellor. 

R. D. Covert, Notary. 

SAVINGS BANK. 

(Office corner Henry and Cranberry streets.) 

Balance on hand, April 1834, $98,000. Number De- 
positors, 1060. 

A. Van Sinderen, President. 

H. B. Pierpont ? ^.^^ Presidents. 

Adam rredweli, ) 

Abraham Vanderveer, Treasurer. 

James S. Clark, Secretary. 

Adrian Hegcman, Accountant, 



214 ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 

David Anderson, Robert Bach, J. R. St. Felix, James 

B. Clark, James S. Clark, Andrew Demarest, Josiah 
Dow, Daniel Embury, Eliakim Raymond, Joshua Sands, 
David Stanford, JefFery Smith, Alden Spooner, Fanning 

C. Tucker, Peter Turner, Abraham Vanderveer, Losee 
Van Nostrand, S. B. M. Sands, James H. Clark- 
Trustees. 

INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

BROOKLYN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(Office in the Apprentices' Librarj'.) 

Abraham Vanderveer, President. 

William Ellsworth, Secretary. 
Abraham Vanderveer, William Philip, Robert Bach, 
Horatio G. Onderdonk, James B. Clarke, Thomas I. 
Chew, William R. Dean, John G.Wendell, James Forbes, 
Samuel Smith, Jeffery Smith, Joseph Moser, John Van 
Nostrand, Losee Van Nostrand, Joshua Sutton, Josiah 
Dow, Edwin Hicks, Silas Butler, Obadiah Holmes, 
Charles Wardell, Amasa Wright — Directors. 

LONG ISLAND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

(Office No. 3 Front-street.) 

Capital 200,000 dollars. The Capital stock of this 
Company having all been paid in, the Company are now 
ready to receive proposals for Insuring Houses and 
Buildings generally, Manufactories, Ships, and their 
Cargoes, while in port. Goods, Machinery, Merchandise, 
and Furniture, against loss or damage by Fire, on as 
moderate terms as any office in this state. Money to 
loan upon bond and mortgage upon unincumbered real 
estate. 

Henry Waring, President. 

Richard V. W. Thorne, Vice President. 

Joseph Sprague, Secretary. 
David Anderson, Simeon Benjamin, Conklin Brush, 
James C. Church, Thomas D. Carpenter, Elias Hubbard, 
jr., Robert T. Hicks, Obadiah Jackson, Gerardus C. 



ENVIRONS OF THE CITY Of NEW-YORK. 215 



Langdon, John Lawrence, Jeremiah Lott, Richard JMorti- 
mer, Truman Rawdon, Nathaniel W. Sautbrd, Samuel 
B. M. Sands, John R. St. Felix, Georj?e L. Thatcher, 
Jonathan Trotter, Richard V. W. 'J'horne, Henry 
Waring, Samuel A. Willoughby, Stephen Wood, George 
Gautt— Directors. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

WEEKLY. 

Long Island Star, Alden Spooner,55 Fulton-street. 
Brooklyn Advocate, James A. Bennett, corner of Hen- 
ry and Cranberry streets. 
« 

WARDS. 

The City of Brooklyn is divided into nine Wards, as 
follows, viz. , , T^ Ti- 

1st Ward, is between Hicks-street and the Last River, 

and between Fulton and District streets. 
2d Ward, is between Sands-street, and the East River. 

and between Fulton and Bridge streets. 
3d Ward, is between Fulton and District streets, 

and between Hicks-strcct and Red Hook- 
lane. 
4th Ward, is between Fulton and Bridge streets, and 

between Sands-street, and a line running 

from Red Hook-lane to the Wallabout 

Bridge. 
5th Ward, is between Bridge-street and the Wallabout 

bay and the East River, and the above 

line. 
6th Ward, is between District-street and Red Hook. 
7th Ward, is between the Wallabout bay and the 

village of WiUiamsburg, in tlie town of 

Bushwick. 
8th Ward, is between Red Hook, and the south bound* 

of the City. 
9lh Ward, is between the south bounds of the 7th 

Ward, and the town of Flatbush. 



216 



ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 



LIST OF STREETS, 

IN THE CITY OF BROOKLYN AND ITS SUBURBS. 

Adams-street, from East River, southerly, to Fulton- 
street. 
Amity, East River, easterly, to Red Hook road. 

Atlantic, East River, easterly, to Red Hook road. 

Avenue, Clinton, Newtown road, southerly, to Jamaica 
road. 

Avenue, Washington, Bedford road, southerly, to Jamaica 
road. 

Bridge, East River, southerly, to Fulton-street. 

Baltic, East River, easterly, to Red Hook road. 

Butler, East River, easterly, to Red Hook road. 

Boerum, Cornell-street, southerly, to Wyckoff-st. 

Bergen, Red Hook road, easterly, to Gowanos 

road. 

Bedford, Raymond-street, easterly, to Division-st. 

Bolivar, Raymond-street, westerly, to Jackson-st. 

Bond, Fulton-street, southerly, to Wyckoff-st. 

Cranberry, Fulton-street, westerly, to East River. 

Clarke, Fulton-street, westerly, to East River. 

Constable, Clinton-street, westerly, to East River. 

Clinton, Fulton-street, southerly, to East River. 

Congress, R. H. road, westerly, to East River. 

Cornell, R. H. road, easterly, to Gowanos road. 

Columbia, Poplar-st., southerly, to Joralemon-st. 

Concord, Fulton-street, easterly, to Division-street. 

Cai'U, Tillary-street, southerly, to Fleet-street. 

Charles, Front-street, southerly, to Sands-street. 

Dock, Front-street, to East River. 

Division, Raymond-street, northerly, to Newtown 

road. 

Doughty, Hicks-street, westerly, to East River. 

Duffield, Fulton-street, northerly, to Tillary-st. 

District, Red Hook road, easterly, to Gowsinos 

road. 

Dean, Red Hook road, easterly, to Gowanos 

road. 



ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 



217 



Degraw, Red Hook road, westerly, to Cornell's 

lane. 

Elizabeth, Fulton-street, south, to Doughty-street. 

Evelyn, Fulton-street, westerly, to Moser-street. 

Fleet, Fulton-street, easterly. 

Fulton, East River, south-easterly, to Red Hook 

road. 

Front, Fulton-street, easterly, to Jackson-st. 

Furman, Poplar-street, southerly, to Pierpont-st. 

Fisher, Water-street, northerly, to East River. 

Garrison, South-street, to York-sti-eet. 

Gold, East River, southerly, to Fulton-street. 

Green-lane, Fi'ont-street, southerly, to Sands-street. 

Gerretsen, Red Hook road, easterly, to Fulton-st. 

George, Joralemon-street, southerly, to Wyckoff- 

street. 

Hicks, Fulton-street, southerly, to Butler-st. 

Henry, Fulton-street, southerly, to Red Hook 

road. 

High, Fulton-street, easterly, to Navy -street. 

Hoyt, Gerretsen-street, southerly, to VVyckofT- 

street. 

Jay, East River, southerly, to Fulton-street. 

James, Front-street, south-easterly, to Main-st. 

Jackson, East River, southerly. 

Joralemon, Fulton-street, westerly, to East River. 

John, Bridge-street, easterly, to Navy Yard. 

John, Red Hook road, westerly, to East River. 

Johnson, Fulton-street, easterly, to Carll -street. 

Lawrence, Tillary-street, southerly, to Fulton-st. 

Livingston, Clinton-street, easterly, to Fulton-street. 

Liberty, Nassau-street, southerly, to Concord-st. 

La Fayette, Raymond-street, westerly, to Fleet-st. 

Mercein, James-street, east, to Garrison-street. 

Middagh, Fulton-street, westerly, to East River. 
Main, Fulton-street, northerly, to East River. 

Myrtle, Fulton-street, easterly, to Jackson-st. 
Marshall, Bridge-street, easterly, to Jackson-st. 

Moser, Joralemon-street, northerly, to Pierpont- 

street. 



S18 



ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-TORK. 



Monroe-place, Clark-street, southerly, to Pierpont-st. 

Nassau, Fulton-street, easterly, to Navy Yard. 

Navy, York-street, southerly, to La Fayette-s(. 

Nevius, Fulton-street, southerly, to Wyckoff-st. 

Orange, Fulton-street, westerly^ to East River. 

Poplar, Henry-street, westerly, to \\"illow-street. 

Pineapple, Fulton-street, westerly, to East River. 

Pierpout, Fulton-street, westerly, to East River. 

Pacific, Red Hook road, westerly, to East River. 

Plymouth, Adams-street, easterly, to Jackson-st. 

Prospect, Fulton-street, easterly, to Jackson-st. 

Pearl, Fulton-street, northerly, to East River. 

Powers, Fulton-street, southerly, to Wyckoft-st. 

Prince, Tillary-strcet, southerly, to Fleet-street. 

Remsen, Clinton-street, westerly, to East River. 

Raymond, Tillary-street, southerly, to La Fayette- 

street. 
Red Hook road, Fulton-street, to Red Hook point. 

Sands, Fulton-street, easterly, to Navy-street. 

Smith, Fulton-street, southerly, to Wyckoff-st. 

Schermerhorn, Red Hook road, easterly, to Fulton-st. 

State, Red Hook road, westerly, to East River. 

Sycamore, Raymond-street, easterly, to Division -st. 
Steward's-alley, Water-street, south, to Prospect-street. 

Tillary, Fulton-street, easterly, to Division-st. 

Talman, Jay-street, easterly, to Charles-street. 

Tompkins, Cornell's-lane, southerl}', to Degraw-st. 

Village, Fleet-street, southerly, to Fulton-street. 

Willow, Poplar-street, southerly, to Amity-street. 

Washington, East River, southerly,"to Fulton-street. 

Water, Fulton-street, easterly, to Navy Yard. 

Willoughby, Fulton-street, easterly, to Carll-street. 

Wyckoff, Red Hook road, easterly, to Gowanos 

road. 

West Prospect, Red Hook road, westerly, to East River. 

Y'^ork, James-street, easterly, to Navy Yard. 



ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 219 

The village of Williamsburg, in the town of Bush- 
wick, is situated on the East River, (950 yards wide,) 
opposite Corlaer's Hook, and has intercourse with the 
City of New-York, hy a ferry, from the foot of Grand- 
etreet. 

Flaibush, 5 miles from New-York, is a delightful place 
of residence ; it is the seat of Erasmus Hall Academy, 
and was the scene of a sanguinary battle between tire 
British and Americans in 1776. 

Bath, in the town of New-Utrecht, Long Island, 8 miles 
south of Brooklyn, is a favourite place of resort for sea 
bathing. Here is a well kept public house, with a lawn 
fronting the bay, well shaded with trees, where the 
breezes of the ocean may be enjoyed during the heat of 
summer. 

At Coney Island, which is 2 miles from Bath, and is 
joined to Long Island, by a bridge across a narrow inlet, 
is a fine beach for bathing, with a public house and other 
conveniences. 

Jamaica, on Long Island, is a beautiful and flourishing 
town ; having a village of the same name, 12 miles from 
Brooklyn, and is to be connected with the latter place by 
a rail road. The Union Race Course is situated at the 
west end of Jamaica, about 8 miles from Brooklyn. 

Rockaway, on the Atlantic Ocean, is 8 miles from 
Jamaica, and 20 from New-York. This is a favourite 
resort for sea bathing, the fine beach aftbrding great ad- 
vantages for that purpose. A splendid Hotel, (the Ma- 
rine Pavilion,) has been recently erected by an associa- 
tion of between 70 and 80 gentlemen, of the City of New- 
York, of whom Philip Hone, Jno. A. King and Rob'tRay 
are Trustees. It has been opened the present season by 
Horatio Blake and Alonzo Reed, who have furnished the 
house on a liberal scale, every article being new, and of 
a chaste and appropriate style. The Hotel ia 230 feet in 



^0 ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 

'- ■"■ ■■ — , 

front, 3 stories in height, with two wings, and two mag- 
nificent Piazzas; the front one extending the whole 
length of the mansion, 20 feet in width, ornamented with 
28 Grecian Columns. The rear Piazza extends from 
one wing to the other, a distance of 150 feet. From the 
front is an unrivalled view of the Atlantic Ocean, Sandy 
Hook, and the shipping passing the narrowpjto and from 
the harbour of JNew- York; and the rear affords a pros- 
pect of Jamaica bay and the adjacent country. The 
front Piazza forms a cool and delightful promenade, 
(fronting the Ocean, at a distance of 70 rods,) where the 
eye can contemplate at morn one of the most sublime 
spectacles in nature, namely, the sun rising in all its 
splendour, apparently from the mighty deep. 

Newtown, on Long Island, 8 miles from New- York, is 
a pleasant place of residence; the town abounds in good 
farms and gardens, producing delicious fruits, particular- 
ly the Newtown pippin. 

Flushing, on Long Island, is about 10 miles from the 
City, and is a pleasant and healthy retreat. The village 
is situated at the head of Flushing bay. A steamboat 
and stages go and return, daily, from Flushing to New- 
York. The Linnaean Botanic Garden, at Flushing, was 
established about the year 1750, by William Prince, the 
father of the elder proprietor. The Botanic Garden and 
nurseries attached, cover an extent of upwards of forty 
acres, and contain about 10,000 species and varieties of 
trees and plants. Particular attention has been paid to 
the culture of the vine and the mulberry. The green- 
house department is on a large scale, containing about 
30,000 plants. In the other departments will be found 
fruit trees of all the various kinds — orntimental trees and 
shrubs; herbaceous, flowering, and medicinal plants; 
bulbous and tuberous rooted flowers ; and American in- 
digenous trees and plants. 

Visiters are allowed free access to the garden, on all 
days, except Sunday. 

Letter box, at Swords, Stanford & Co., 152 Broadway. 



ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-¥ORK. 221 

Glen Cove, 20 miles east from New-York; Oyster 
Bay, 26 miles, and Cold Spring, 30 miles, are all places 
of considerable resort, being pleasantly situated on the 
north side of Long Island. 

Westchester, Eastchester, and Neio-Rochelle, in West- 
chester county, are all pleasant towns, situated on 
the north side of Long Island Sound. Most of the 
above places are visited daily by steamboats from the 
City. 

Staten Island, forming the county of Richmond, New- 
York, is about 6 miles from the City; it is separated from 
New-Jersey by Staten Island Sound, and from Long 
Island by the Narrows and New-York Bay. It is 16 
miles long and 7 broad, and is generally rough and hilly. 

The Quarantine Ground, on the southeast side of 
Staten Island, is a place of great resort. Steamboats 
run several times, daily, to and from Whitehall-slip to 
Tompkiusville, where is situated the Quarantine dock ; 
also a number of extensive hospitals, being well regulated 
establishments, placed on a high and healthy spot, 
favoured with breezes from the ocean. The salubrity of 
the place caused the shore to be selected as a fit place 
for receiving invalids and sickly ships, arriving from 
abroad. 

Sailor'' s Snug" Harbour. — This interesting Institution, 
founded by the late Captain Robert R. Randal, for the 
reception of" old and worn-out infirm seamen," formerly 
located at the upper end of Broadway, is now situated 
on Staten Island, near the Quarantine Ground. The 
trustees have erected a large and commodious building, 
where some fifty or sixty disabled seamen have found a 
Snug Harbour for life — where they have every want sup- 
plied, and at the same time are required to occupy only 
as much time for labour as will contribute to their health 
and comfort. A farm belongs to the Institution, contain- 
ing nearly 150 acres of fine land, commanding an exten- 
sive view of the distant city and bay. 



222 ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 

The last annual report of the trustees of the Institu- 
tion has been published. The amount of receipts dur- 
ing the year 1833, including a balance on hand, Dec. 31, 
1832, was $33,733 59; disbursements $31,721 63, leav- 
ing a balance in the hands of the treasurer, on the 31st 
Dec, 1833, of $2,011 96. The amount of funds held by 
the trustees, (the stocks estimated at par value,) is 
$109,929 98; and the receipts for the current year are 
estimated at $32,315 02. 

Perth Amhoy, New-Jersey, is pleasantly situated on a 
fine harbour, 13 miles from New-Brunswick, and 23 
eouth-west of New-York. At South Amboy, on the op- 
posite side of the harbour, the Camden and Ambo^ Rail 
Road commences. This has now become the prmcipal 
thoroughfare between New-York and Philadelphia. 

Long Branch, 30 miles south of New-York, is a 
fashionable resort for sea bathing, in summer, from New- 
York and Philadelphia. An extensive view of the At- 
lantic Ocean is here obtained. 

Newark, New Jersey, is a handsome and flourishing 
town, situated on the Passaic River, 9 miles from New- 
York. The location is on a plain considerably elevated 
above the river, and from the hill on the west side of the 
town there is a fine prospect of the surrounding country. 
The Morris Canal terminates here, and boats descend 
from the canal to the river by an inclined plane, which 
is well worthy of the observation of visiters. Newark 
contains about 13,000 inhabitants, most of whom are oc- 
cupied in various manufactures. Among the articles 
made here, are carriages, leather, saddlery, boots, and 
shoes, plated ware, jewelry, and coach lace, which are 
sent to various markets in large quantities. More than 300 
buildings have been erected during the past year. From 
orchards in the vicinity, the celebrated Newark Cider 
is produced. A steamboat plies regularly from New- 
York to Newark. The distance by water is about 17 
miles. 



ENVIRONS OP THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 223 

Orang-e Springs are deli2;htfully situated, 4 miles 
from Newark, and 13 from New- York, and are much 
frequented during- summer, by numbers, for the benefit of 
the mineral waters, and the enjoyment of the beauties of 
the romantic scenery in tlae vicinity. 

Elizahethtordn is 6 miles south of Newark, and is a 

pleasant residence and place of resort. It is situated on 

creek, which runs into Staten Island Sound, and a 

Aeamboat plies from New-York to the Point, two miles 

from the town. The population of the town is about 3500. 

Paterson, also in Essex County, New Jersey, is a 
large manufacturing village, situated at the Falls of the 
Passaic, 14 miles from Hoboken, (opposite New-York,) 
from whence, to Paterson, a rail-road has been recently 
constructed and is now in operation. The Morris Canal 
passes through the place. The manufactories are nu- 
merous, and among the principal are, 17 coiton mills, 
several machine shops, iron and brass foundries, sail 
duck and paper mills, nail factory, &c. The popula- 
tion is about 9,000. 

The Passaic Falls, at Paterson, are an object of 
curiosiiy, and attract numerous visiters. The river here 
descends over a precipice of 72 feet perpendicular into a 
narrow chasm, and presents a scene of romantic beauty, 
although the eft'ect is much lessoned by the diversion 
of water into the canal which supplies the manufac- 
twies. 

Hohoken, New-Jersey, opposite New-York, where 
the North River is about a mile and a half wide, is a 
favourite resort for the citizens during the summer. 
Steam ferry-boats run from Barclay-street and Canal 
street, New-York, to this place, once in every twenty 
minutes or half hour, during the day; and the fare, in 
summer, is but 65 cents. Near the ferry is a public 
house, in front of which is a fine lawn, where aeata are 



224 ENVIRONS OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 

provided for visiters to enjoy the cool breezes which 
prevail during the warmest weather, and the fine pros- 
pect which the place commands of the city and harbour. 
North of the house, there is a circular railway, on 
which are carriages propelled by the passengers for ex- 
ercise and amusement. The grounds along the river, for 
more than a mile, are the property of the Messrs. 
Stevens, who permit a free public access to them. 
From the lawn a shaded gravel walk extends on the ele- 
vated and rocky bank of the river for about a mile, at the 
termination of which is a grove, called the Elysian 
Fields, where a handsome Pavilion has been erected, 
and from whence is a fine view of the North River and 
the opposite city. 

Wehawken Hill is a mile farther north, and is a ro- 
mantic spot, from whence is an extensive prospect. The 
place where Gen. Hamilton fell, and many duels have 
been fought, is on the bank of the river, below the hill, 

Jersey City, opposite New-York, the residence of 
many persons who transact business in the city, and a 
location for Lottery Offices, offers but kw attractions for 
visiters. 

Of the steamboat excursions, among the most pleasant, 
are those to Staten Island, Shrewsbury, and Amboy, on 
the south-west; Flushing, New-Rochelle, Sands' Point, 
Glen Cove, and Oyster Bay, on the East River; Sing 
Sing, and Tarrytown, on the North River. 



CITIZENS' 

ADVERTISING DIRECTORY. 



SUBSCRIBERS' NAMES AND OCCUPATIONS, 

ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED. 



ARTISTS. 



Agate, F. S. & A., portrait and miniature painters, 8 
Tryon-row, between the Rotunda and Chatham-street. 

Badger, J. W., miniature painter, 254 Broadway, next to 
Peale's Museum. 

Cole, Tiiomas, landscape and historical painter,! Wall- 
street. 

Cooke, Georg-e, portrait, landscape, and historical painter, 
340 Broadway. 

Durand, A. B., engraver^ 80 Anthony-street, corner of 
Broadway. 

Herring, James, portrait painter, and editor of the Na- 
tional Portrait Gallery, 339 Broadway. 

Marchant, E. D., portrait and miniature painter, 29 Day- 
street. 

Morse, Samuel F. B., historical and portrait painter, 65 
Cedar-street. 

Rawdon, Wright, Hatch & Co., engravers, 35 Merchants' 
Exchange. 

Rogers, IN., miniature painter, 1 Cortlandt-street, cor- 
ner of Broadway. 

Smillie, James, engraver, 697 Washington-street. 
15 



226 citizens' advektising directory. 



ARTISTS' COLOURMAN. 
Rover, H., colourman and brushmaker, and manufactu- 
rer of primed canvass for oil paintings, 300 Broadway. 

ARTS, (Dealers in Works of) 
Disturnell, John, dealer in fine engraving?, lithographs, 

&c., 155 Broadway. 
Mears, Charles T., dealer in fine engravings, fancy sta 

tionery, &c., 156 Broadway. 

ATTORNEYS. 
Bogardus, Robert, attorney and counsellor, 53 Cherry- 

StVGCt. 

Maxwell, Wm. H., counsellor and commissioner, takes 

and certifies acknowledgments of deeds m fourteen 

states, 22 Nassau-street. 
Rankin, Robert G., counsellor at law, and commissioner 

to take acknowledgment and proof of deeds, attidavits, 

&c., for Connecticut, U Wall-street. 
Ullmann, Daniel, attorney and solicitor, 25 Pine-street. 

AUCTIONEERS. 
Bixby, N. P., commission book and auction store, 4 Park- 

GiXy, Royal, auctioneer, New-York Long Room, 169 
Broadwav, up stairs. _ , 

Lew, Aaron, auctioneer, 128 Broadway, up stairs. 

Pine & Van Antwerp, 135 Water-street corner of Pine. 

W^oolsey, Charles, commission bookseller and auction- 
eer, l'40 Broadway. 

BAKERS. 

Houghton, J. & G. W., 11 Mott-street. 

Pierce & Luke, variety and Graham bread bakers, Si>2 
Broadway, corner of Leonard-street. 

BASKET MANUFACTURER. 

4verv G. W., willow basket and cradle manufacturer, 

' and wood ware generally, 51 Fulton-street. 



citizens' advertising directory. 227 



BATHING HOUSES, (Proprietors of) 
Stoppani, Charles G., Arcade Batli, 39 Chambers-street. 
Thorp, William M., Greenwich Bath, 337 Hudson-street. 

BEDSTEAD MANUFACTURER. 
Hewitt, F., exclusive patent manufacturer, (received the 
first premium of the American Institute,) 20 Hudson. 

BLACKING MANUFACTURERS. 

Lee & Thompson, manufacture liquid and paste black- 
ins:, equal to any in the world, 4 Cortlandt-street. 

BOARDING HOUSES, (Proprietors of) 

Manning, Mrs. S., 139 Broadway. 
Mix & Tripp, Mrs., 75 Nassau-street. 
Waterbury, Mrs. E., 153 Broadway. 

BOOKBINDERS. 
Riker, J. C, bookbinder and publisher, 15 Ann-street. 
Wells, Charles, bookbinder, 111 Fulton-street. 
Wilson, Stephen T., bookbinder, 136 Fulton-street, 
Brooklyn. 

BOOKSELLERS. 

Appleton (fc Co., Daniel, 200 Broadway. 

Bancroft, Monson, bookseller, stationer, and dealer in 

music, prints, and fancy articles, 389 Broadway. 
Bartlett, (R.) «feS.Raynor, booksellers and librarians, 76 

Bowery. 
Beastall, William, bookseller and chemist, 148 F«lton- 

street. 
Behr, Charles de, 102 Broadway. 
Betts & Anstice, 151 Pearl-street, and 67 Wall-street. 
Bigelow, William, bookseller, stationer, and bookbinder, 

55 Fulton-street, Brooklyn. 
Bliss & Wadsworth, 111 Fulton-street. 
Burger, James M., bookseller, stationer, librarian, and 

blank book manufacturer, 353 Pearl street. 
Callender, F. B., bookseller and stationer, 171 William- 
street, corner of Beekman ; fancy and staple stationery 

of all kinds. 



228 citizens' advertising directory. 

Carvill, G. & C. & H., 108 Broadway. 

Collins, Joseph B., 222 Pearl-street. 

Colman, William A., bookseller, and agent for foreign 
periodicals and newspapers, 122 Broadway. 

Conner & Cooke, publishers, comer of Nassau and Ann 
streets. 

Cotrel, Thomas, 97 Fulton-street. 

Cooledge, Daniel, bookseller, publisher, and bookbinder, 
322 Pearl-street. 

Dando, Stephen, Methodist bookstore, and agent for the 
Christian Advocate and Journal, 29 Spruce-street. 

Day, Mahlon, bookseller, 376 Pearl-street. 

Disturnell, John, dealer in books, fancy stationary, en- 
gravings, maps, music, perfumery, &c., 155 Broadway. 

Doyle, John, 12 Liberty-street. 

Felt & Co., David, Stationers' Hall, 245 Pearl-street, 
manufacturers of blank books, stationery, &c. 

Francis, Charles S., Parthenon circulating library and 
reading room, 252 Broadway. 

Gardner, E. S., dealer in books, prints, and stationary, 52 
Nassau-street. 

Goodrich &. Wiley, books, maps, and geographical works, 
124 Broadway, corner of Cedar-street. 

Greene, A., bookseller and librarian, 1 Beekman-street. 

Harper & Brothers, wholesale dealers, printers, and pub- 
lishers, 82 Clift-street. 

Haven, John P., 148 Nassau-street. 

Hill, Peter, Minerva circulating library, 94 Broadway. 

Leavitt, Lord &. Co., booksellers, publishers, and im- 
porters, 182 Broadway, corner of John-street. 

Phelps, Humphrey, bookseller and map publisher, 336 
Bowery. 

Shaw, James G., 134 Bowery. 

Smith, Jesse, dramatic repository, corner of Chatham and 

^ Frankfort streets, opposite the City Hall. 

Stanley & Co., J., publishers, and book and print sellers, 
Franklin Circulating Library and Reading 
Rooms, 418 Broadway, and 50 Canal-street. 

Stodart, William, bookseller, stationer, and agent for pe- 
riodicals, 2^ Cortlandt-street. 



citizens' advertising directory. 229 

Swords, Stanford & Co., 152 Broadway. 

Wiley, John, wholesale dealer in English and American 

books, 22 Nassau-street. 
Wood & Sons, Samuel, 261 Pearl-street. 

CABINET MAKER. 

Brainerd, Simeon, cabinet, chair, and sofa maker, 58 
Fulton- street. 

CAP MANUFACTURER. 

Davies, Luke, old established wholesale and retail cap 
and stock factory, 102 William-street. N. B. Navy 
and anny caps of every variety. 

CARPET DEALERS. 

Lowe & Connah, importers of carpels and floor cloths of 
every description, 218 Broadway. 

CHINA, GLASS, & EARTHENWARE DEALERS. 

CoUamore, Ebenezer, importer and dealer, wholesale 

and retail, 31 Maiden -lane. 
Drummond, J. P., importer and dealer, wholesale and 

retail, 47 Maiden-lane. 

COACH LACE MANUFACTURER. 

Delapierre, B., military ornaments, fringes, laces, and 
trimmings generally, and gold and silver embroidery, 
90 Fulton-street. 

CONFECTIONERS. 

Delmonico & Brother, confectioners and chocolate man- 
ufacturers, 23 William-street. 

Peirs, Thomas F., wholesale and retail, country orders 
supplied at the shortest notice, 141 William-street. 

Stuart, R. L. & A., manufacturers of confectionary and 
sugar refinery, 285 Greenwich-street, corner of Cham- 
bers-street. 

Thompson, James, confectioner and lozenge manufac- 
turer. N. B. Particular attention paid to supplying 
parties. 171 and 192 Broadway. 



230 citizens' advertising directory. 

COPPERPLATE PRINTER. 

Phelps, William, 1 Wall-street. 

DENTISTS. 

Arnold, Wm., M. D., A. B., dentist, member of the Royal 
College of Surgeons iu London, 26 Warren-street. 

Bostwick, H. dentist, 76 Chambers-street, first house west 
of Broadway, where he will continue to perform 
every operation within the line of his profession, after 
the most approved methods. 

Bryan, E., dentist; also inventor and patentee of Bryan's 
perpendicular tooth extractor, 115 Chambers-street. 

Burdell, John, dentist. The Public are informed that Mr. 
John Burdell, dentist, still continues, and expects to 
continue, in the house formerly occupied by me, No. 
69 Chambers-street, corner of Broadvvav , and that no 
other dentist has been authorized to refer profession- 
ally to me. D. ROSSETER. 

Dell, J., dentist, 152 Broadway. 

Lawyer, A. F., dentist, 43 Cortlandt-street. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Dodd, John B., chemist and apothecary, 193 Broadway, 
corner of Dey-street, and 643 Broadway. 

Feuchtwanger, Dr. Lewis, German drug and chemical 
store and laboratory, 377 Broadway. 

Hull & Bowne, druggists, 128 Maiden-lane. 

Low & Co., Seth, drugs, chemicals, dye stuffs, glass- 
ware, (fee, 115 Maiden-lane, up stairs. 

Milhau, John, importer of French and other drugs and 
chemicals, 183 Broadway. 

Rushton & Aspiuwall, wholesale and retail druggists, 
81 William-street, and 110 Broadway. 

Simonson, Wm., druggist, 79 Fulton-street. 

DRY GOOD MERCHANTS. 

Downer & Co., wholesale dealers in French and India 
silk goods, 134 Pearl-street. 



citizens' advertising directory. 231 

Ely, John, fancy French and millinery goods, 65 Maiden- 
lane . 

Fleet, J. S., importer and dealer in linens and other 
goods, 10 Maiden-lane. 

Holmes, S. &l L., wholesale and retail dealers in linens, 
sheetings, and house keeping articles, 55 Maiden-lane. 

Kingland, E. & P., fancy and staple dry goods, 38 
Maiden-lane. 

Stryker & Co., D. J., wholesale and retail dry gooda, 54 



Maiden-lane. 



ENGRAVERS. 



Adams, J. A., engraver on wood, 39 Merchants' Ex- 
change. 

Foibes, E., engraver on wood, 15 Ann-street, up stairs. 

Johnson, D. G., engraver, 67 Liberty-street. 

Perkins, Jos., writing engraver, visiting cards, and all 
highly finished plain and ornamental lettering engraved 
and printed in the best manner, 4 John-street, near 
Broadway. 

Stiles & Co., S., engravers, 34 Merchants' Exchange. 

Stout, George H., visiting card engraver and printer, 172 
Broadwav, corner of Maiden-lane. 

Wright, (C^ C.,) Durand & Co., engravers and printers, 
45 Maiden-lane, up stairs. Xylographic press— cards, 
labels, &c., wholesale and retail. 

EXCHANGE BROKER. 

Van Buskirk, Charles A., exchange broker, &c., 128 
Broadway. 

FANCY DEALERS. 

Chapman, Wm. H., French and English fancy goods, 

gloves, suspenders, &c., 1 Maiden-lane. 
Deraismes, Boizard & Co., importers and dealers in 

fancy articles, 118 Maiden-lane. 
Dikeman, Mills &. Co., importers and dealers in fancy 

articles, 84 Maiden-lane. 
Lilliendahl, C. D. W., importer of toys, fancy articlw, 

stationeiy, »fcc., 34 Maiden-lane. 



232 citizens' advertising directory. 

Werckmeister, M., wholeiale and retail fancy dealer, 
150 Broadway. 

FANCY HARDVv^lRE DEALERS. 

Clark, Coit «fc Cargill, importers and dealers in lamps of 
every description, silver and plated ware, cutlery, ja- 
pannery, mantel clocks, vases, bronze ornaments, and 
fancy hardware generally, 9 31aiden-Iane. 

Collins, W. «fe L., fine cutlery and fancy goods, and 
manufacturers of silver spectacles and spectacle cases, 
67 Maiden-lane. 

Cox, J. & I., general lamp and furnishing warehouse, 
wholesale and retail, 15 IMaiden-lanc. 

Taylor, Charles R., fishing, fowling, and fancy hardware, 
1^ Maiden-lane. 

Tomes & Miller, importers of plated ware, guns, cutlery, 
watches, jewellery, and English fancy goods, at whole- 
sale; also, agents for Heeley «fc, Son's rhadeographic 
three-slit-pens, 6 Maiden-lane. 

Torrey, Edward P., fancy hardware and lamps, 8 Maiden- 
lane. 

FUR DEALERS. 

Bryan & Son, John, manufacturers, wholesale and re- 
tail, fine seal and otter skins, and all kinds of furs, it 
Albany, and 118 Maiden-lane. 

Dieterich, August F., fancy fur dealer, wholesale and 
retail, 12 Maiden-lane. 

GRATE AND FENDER MANUFACTURERS. 

Gilooly, Andrew, Savage's patent kitchen range, grates, 
fenders, locks, and other smith work, 78 Nassau-street. 

Hampton, A., grates and fenders of the most approval 
and fashionable patterns, 87 Fulton-street. 

GROCER. 

Williamson, Richard, wine merchant and grocer; a large 
and constant supply of French, German, Spanish, and 
Portuguese wine ; also, an extensive supply of superiot 
quality groceries, 19 Maiden-lane. 



citizens' advertising directory. 233 



GUN MAKER. 

Hall, Joseph, rifles, fowling pieces, and pistols for the 
Southern and Western market, wholesale and retail, 
118 Fulton-street. 

HAIR DRESSERS. 

Bardotte, Jo?eph, gentlemen's hair cutter, H6 Broad- 
way, up stairs. 

Cavanna, Mrs., ladies hair dresser, (from Paris,) general 
supply of ornamental hair, wholesale and retail. 

Carter, John, gentlemen's hair cutting and dressing 
rooms, 175 Broadway, 2 doors north of Cortlandt- 
Rtreet, up stairs. Inimitable wigs and toupees made 
to order. 

Hawley, T., 59 Nassau-street, corner of Maiden-lane. 

Jaclarcl, Sebastian, ornamental hair manufacturer, 163 
Broadway. Wig and toupee maker. 

HATTERS. 

Bloomer, E., manufacturer of naval, military, ladies', 
misses', and chizens' hats, caps, and furs, of all kinds, 
of the latest and most approved fashions, 160 Broad- 
way. 

Holmes, E. B., fur and silk hat manufactory, wholesale 
and retail, 1 Park-row. 

St. John, hatter, wholesale and retail, 2 Broadway. 

Tuttle, S., 208 Chatham-square, is constantly manufac- 
turing, and has for sale, hats and caps of every varie- 
ty, wholesale and retail. 

HARDWARE MERCHANTS. 

Kingsland, Richards & Co., importers and dealers in hard- 
ware, 89 Maiden-lane. 

Miller & Smith, importers of hardware and cutlery, 98 
Maiden-lane. 

Wolfe, (J. D.,) Bishop & Co., importers of hardware, 
military and fancy goods, 87 Maiden lane. 



234 citizens' advertising directory. 

HOSIERY AND GLOVE DEALER. 

MichoU, Morland, wholesale and retail hosiery and glove 
dealer, 291 Broadway. 

HOTEL KEEPERS. 

Blake & Reed, Marine Pavilion, Rockaway, Long 
Island. 

Bunker, William I., Mansion House, 39 Broadway. 

Faulkner, William, Western Hotel, 9 Cortlandt-street. 

Holt, Stephen, Holt's Hotel, comer of Fulton and Pearl 
streets. 

Howard, Daniel D., Exchange Hotel, 10 and 12 Broad- 
street. 

Jennings, Chester, City Hotel, Broadway. 

Mahon & Peck, Pearl-street House, and Ohio Hotel, 88 
Pearl-street. 

Milford, Edward, American Hotel, 229 Broadway. 

Niblo, John, Niblo's Hotel, 112 Broadway. 

Sevmour, M'Neil, Atlantic Hotel, 5 Broadway. 

Thurston, Henry, Merchants' Hotel, 108 Broad-street. 

W^ebb, Charles H., Congress Hall, 142 Broadway. 

Williston, O. H., York House, 5 Cortlandt-street. 

LMPORTERS. 

Frasee, Henry F. importer of watch, clock, jewelleri 
dentist, and other mechanical tools, 95 Fulton-street. 

Pardow, Robt., manufacturer and importer of needles, 
fishhooks, &c., 95 Maiden-lane. 

JEWELLERS. 

Gelston, George S., manufacturer and importer of 

jewellery, watches, fancy goods, &c., 189 Broadway. 
Hinsdale, "H., manufacturer of jewellery and silverware, 

dealer in plated goods, &c., 172 Broadway. 
Marquand tS^ Co., importers and dealers in plated and 

silver ware, watches, jewellery, &c., 181 Broadway. 
Reed, Stephen, watches and clocks, rich jewellery and 

silver ware, 179 Broadway. 



citizens' advertising directory. 235 



Rockwell, E. «fc S. S., general assortment of watches 
of the best quality, jewellery, silver ware, &c., 192 
Broadway. 

Tenney, William I., manufacturer and dealer in rich 
jewellery, watches, &c., 251 Broadway. 

LAMP AND OIL DEALER. 

Bailey, Orville, lamp manufacturer, 21 Cortlandt-street. 
LITHOGRAPHERS. 

Bisbee, lithographer and publisher, 4 John-street. 
Desobry, Peter, lithographer, 171 Broadway, comer of 

Cortlandt-street. 
Endicolt tfc Sweett, lithographers, print and music 

dealers, 359 Broadway. 
Imbert, Anthony, lithographer and print dealer, 104 

Broadway. 

LOOKING GLASS MAKERS AND GILDERS. 

Dupignue, E. R., looking glasses, chairs, and window 
blinds, 312 Pearl-street, corner of Peck-slip. 

Marshall, Matthew, looking glass and picture frame 
manufacturer, 174 Fulton-street. 

Williams, John H., wholesale and retail dealer in 
looking glasses, 315 Pearl-street, opposite Peck-slip. 

MANIFOLD WRITERS, (Dealer in) 

Dakin, C. P., manufacturer of the improved manifold 
writer and lead points, 5 Maiden-lane. 

MAP DEALERS. 

Colton & Co., J. H., map publishers, 34 Merchants' 
Exchange. 

Map Establishment, 155 Broadway, between Cortlandt 
and Liberty-streets. C. Mould has constantly for 
sale, as above, FINLEY'S Maps of the World, United 
States and North America, Europe, Asia, Africa, 
South America; also, Palestine on a large scale, and 



236 citizens' advertising directory. 

a General and Classical Atlas. These Maps obtained 
the premium at the last fair of the American Institute. 
Wilson's globes, and a variety of large and pocket 
maps of the most approved authority and of the latest 
editions, always to be obtained at the above place. 

MERCHANT TAILORS. 

Benschoten, J. V., draper and tailor, 21 Cortlandt-street. 

Brown & Kirkham, merchant tailors, 169 Broadway. 

Brundage, Jas. H., woollen draper and tailor, 194 Broad- 
way. 

Clark, George, gentlemen's furnishing store, 175 Broad- 
way. 

Effray, A., draper and tailor, superfine cloths, cassimeres, 
vestings, &c., 146 Fulton-street. 

Fanner & Corey, merchant tailors, 158 Fulton-street, 
one door from Broadway. 

Jarvis, Samuel & Nelson, merchant tailors, citizens' full 
dress, naval and military uniforms, ladies' habits, &c., 
made at the shortest notice, 142 Broadway. 

Lynde & Jennings, draper and tailors, successor toSam'l 
Whitmarsh, 116 Broadway. 

Miller & Bates, drapers and, tailors, 66 Fulton-street. 

Osborn, H. P. & H. B., merchant tailors, 170 Broadway. 

St. John, George, draper and tailor, 3 Ann-street. 

Stokes & Co., merchant tailors, 157 Broadway. 

Underbill & Sellick, merchant tailors, 68 Fulton-street. 

Witherspoon, James, draper and tailor, 63 Hudson-st. 

MUSIC DEALERS. 

Atwell, Joseph F. music saloon, 201 Broadway, near 
St. Paul's Church, piano fortes, music and music mer- 
chandise, wholesale and retail. 

Birch, Thomas, music engraver, printer, and publisher, 
wholesale and retail, 95 Canal-street. 

Floyer, C. F., general assortment of imported music, 
and stationery, 393 Broadway. 

Gerding «fe Siemon, general assortment of pianos, violins, 
flutes, and other musical instruments, 59 Maiden-lane. 



citizens' advertising directory. 237 

Hewitt & Co., James L., music store, and publishers, 
137 Broadway. 

Jollie, Allen R., music seller, and manufacturer of musi- 
cal instruments, 403 Broadway. 

Riley, E., music dealer, wholesale and retail, 29 Chatham- 
street. 

PAINTERS. 

Macomber, D. O., plain and fancy sign painting, oil, 

gilding and graining, 52 John-street. 
Mount, Henry S., ornamental sign painter, 46 William, 

corner of Wall-street. 
Torboss, Luke, painter and glazier, 92 Liberty -street. 

PAPER MERCHANTS. 

Bartlett. C, commission paper warehouse, and card 
factory, 71 Fulton-street, (formerly 76 Bowery.)^ 

Donaldson, R., paper manufacturer and vender, 45 John- 
street. 

Elliott, D., commission paper warehouse, No. 5 Burling- 
slip. 

Poillon, P., jr., commission paper warehouse, 306 Pearl- 
street. 

PENCIL CASE MAKERS. 

Withers & Mason, gold and silver pencil case makers, 
157 Broadway. 

PERFUMERS. 

Hart, H. C, importer and retail dealer in perfumery and 
fancy soaps, English and French fancy goods, Bazaar, 
No. 173 Broadway, corner of Cortlandt-street. 

Parker, Richard, manufacturer and dealer in perfumery, 
wholesale and retail, 36 John-street. 

Prentiss, N. Smith, manufacturer and wholesale dealer, 
45 Maiden-lane. 

PHYSICIANS. 

Coit, Benjamin B., M. D., 28 Vesey-street. 
Evans, Joseph, M. D,., continues to be consulted, (confi- 
dentially,) at his office, No. 14 Peck-slip, old Galen's 

head. 



238 citizens' advertising directory. 

Glover, Ralph, M. D., sells and applies the most improved 
patent Trusses, at his office, No. 2 Ann-street, near 
Broadway. 

Kissam, Daniel W., jr., M. D., surgeon, 81 Chambers- 
street. 

Tonelier, .Tohn S. L., M. D., 75 Grand-street. 

Weed, J. W., physician, 460 Broome-street. 

PIANO FORTE MAKERS. 

Dubois &. Stodart, piano forte makers and music dealers, 
No. 167 Broadway. 

Nunns, R., Clark & Co., piano forte makers, 137 Broad- 
way, and Third Avenue, corner of Twenty -sixth-street. 

Osborn, John, piano forte maker, store 196 Broadway, 
factory ] 84 Chamber-street — 1st premium of American 
Institute. 

POCKET BOOK MAKERS. 

Bussing & Co., manufacturers of fine pocket books, as- 
sortment of 170 different kinds, 70^ William-street. 

Chapmnn, Levi, pocket book manufacturer, gilt, emboss- 
ed, and bronzed thread and card cases, 69 William- 
street. 

Lea «k Coles, morocco and jewel case manufacturers, 
172 Broadway, corner of 31aiden-lane. 

PRINTERS. 
Clayton, Edwin B., 9 Thames-street, rear of City Hotel. 
Mason & Co., general commercial and fancy job printing 

office, 1 Liberty-street, junction of Maiden-lane. 
Mercein, William A., 240 Pearl-street. 
Pearson, William, letter-press printer, 115 Fulton-street. 
Van Norden, James, 49 William-street, over the office of 

the Evening Post. 
West, John T., printer, rear 144 Fulton-sreet. 

QUILL MANUFACTURER. 

Byrne, P., importer, wholesale dealer, and manufacturer 
of quills and wafers. No. 60 William-street. Esta- 
blished in 1816; premium awarded at the fair of the 
American Institute. 



citizens' advertising directory. 239 

READY MADE LINEN, HOSIERY, AND GLOVE 
DEALER. 

Reynold?, Frederick, 153 Broadway. 

REFECTORY, (Keeper of) 
Pattinpon, H., temperance coffee-rooms, corner of Ann 
and Nassau streets. 

SEEDSMEN AND FLORISTS. 

Thorburn &:. Sons, G., 67 Liberty -street. The most ex- 
tensive establishment of the kind in America. 
SEGAR MANUFACTURER. 
John Phmkett, wholesale and retail commission segar 

store, No. 102 Fulton-street. 

STATIONERS. 

Burtsell, John L., corner of Wall and Broad streets. 

De Camp & Co., A., 34 Wall-street. 

Mesier, Edward S., 51 William-street. 

]\Iesier, Peter A., 28 Wall-street. 

Ronalds, Thomas A., 203 Pearl-street. 

Taylor, jr., W. C, 55 Wall-street. 

STOCK MANUFACTURER. 

Mudge, Charles C, 2 Fletcher-street. 

STOVE MANUFACTURER. 

Nott & Co., stove warehouse, 242 Water-street. A 
complete assortment of stoves for halls, stores, steam- 
boats, churches, <fec. 

Willard, William T., stove manufacturer, 213 and 21.5 
Water-street. 

TURNER. 

Ruthven, James, turner of ivory, wood, and metal, and 
dealer in ivory and foreign hard wood, 92 Fulton-street. 



240 citizen's advertising uikectorv. 



TYPE FOUNDERS. 

Conner & Cooke, type and stereotype founders, corner 
of Nassau and Ann streets. • 

Rees, Henry W., type and stereotype founder, 45 Gold- 
street. 

White, Hagar & Co, 45 Gold-street. 

UxMBRELLA BIAKERS. 

Harriot, David & Co., wholesale and retail umbrellas, 7 
Maiden-lane. 

WATCH AND CLOCK MAKER. 
Atkin, John H., 172 Broadway, importer of watche. 
Watches, clocks, and musical boxes carefully repairec ^ 

WATER FILTERER. 

Pure and wholesome water. The only medium ihroug 
which the desirable beveraec can be obtuiued is bj 
using: "Parkes' Portable Filter." They may be ob' 
tained of him at his store No. 1 Wall-street, at from $ ^ 
to $20 each. ' 

Caution. — In justice to himself, J. P. feels bound tk 
warn the i)ublic against the purchasing of a .-puriou 
article, which some unprincipled person or persor. 
arc offering for sale, it bears the impress of h 
name, and closely resembles in its exterior fori 
" Parkes' Portable Filter," but differs wholly in its ir _ 
terior construction, and is consequently useless an ' 
inefficacious. As a security against this fraud, h 
feels bound to inform the citizens of New-York thf 
none are genuine except those purchased at his stor^ 
J. P. not having a single Agent in this city. Englis 
and French Filters rejjaired upon moderate terms. 

WOOLEN DRAPERS. 

Blatchford, S. M., importer and dealer m cloths, cass. 

meres, vestings, &,c., wholesale and retail, 45 iVIaider 

lane. 
Stead, Edward, woollen draper, 86 William-street. 



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