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Full text of "The New York State register. 1843-"



NEW-YOKK 



STATE KEGISTER. 



1943. 




EDITED BY HOLLEY. 



L IRSjl YEA.I of publication. 



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THE 

NEW-YORK 

STATE REGISTER, 

FOR 1843. 



CONTAINING 



AN ALMANAC, 

CIVIL DIVISIONS, AND CENSUS OF THE STATE; 

WITH 

POLITICAL, STATISTICAL AND OTHER INFORMATION, 

KELATING TO THE 

STATE OF NEW-YORK AND THE UNITED STATES. 
ALSO, A FULL LIST OF 

COUNTY OFFICERS, ATTORNEYS, &c. 



EDfXED BY O. l/hOLLEY. 



ALBANY: 
PUBLISHED BY J. DISTURNELL. 



1843. 



Entered, according to act of Congress, in the year 1843, by Jobw Disttjrrsix, in tbe 
Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Southern District of New- York. 



P R E F A C E'. 



The proper ilesij^n of a publication of thii kiml, is to furnish a compre- 
hensive and detailed account of the actual condition of the State, embracing 
its civil divisions, population, productions, trade, and resources; its public 
works, its means of general intercourse, and its principal local improve- 
ments; its wealth, revenue, and expenditures; the organization of its govern- 
ment, with a record of the persons to whom the administration of that govern- 
ment throuc^hout its various departments is committed; the general scope and 
character of its legislation, as exemplified and illustrated by its various insti- 
tutions and methods for the promotion of education, morals, and religion — 
for tlie protection and relief of the destitute, infirm, and helpless — for the 
repression and punishment of disorder and crime— and for the encouragement 
of enterprise, industry, science, and the arts; in short, a picture of the liv- 
ing, actinn-, growing commonwealth, with the manifold means and agencies 
by whicl) ilsp.fTairs are conducted, its resources unfolded, the business of its 
peoi)le '.ransacted, and the good order, comfort, improvement, prosperity, and 
happiness of the community secured and advanced. 

The multiplied relations and connections that exist between the different 
portions of the State, and their continually increasing importance to each 
other as their intercourse extends, all combine to render such a publication not 
merely interesting to the general or occasional inquirer, but eminently con- 
venient and practically useful, especially to those who are engaged in the pro- 
fessional employments of the community, in the various branches of active 
business, or are in any way connected with tlic administration of the laws, or 
with the management of the more important jjublic and local institutions. 

A simple reference to the Table of Contents will show that this Register has 
been compiled and arranged on the plan and according to tlie design above 
indicated; and to all persons employed in public offices, whether of general or 
local jurisdiction — to attorneys and other agents and ministers of the laws — to 
merchants, bankers, manufacturers, and men extensively engaged in business 
of any descrii)tion, or in the management of important institutions — to all who 
have occasion to transact affairs at a distance and by correspondence with pub- 
lic officers, or with professional mei\, or who have occasion to make inquiries 
about local matters appert;iining to places in which they liave no personal 
acquaintance — this Register will be found an exceedingly valuable manual of 
information of many kinds constantly at hand, and vvliich they can prociu-e in 
no other way at so small a cost of time, money, or trouble. 

Besides the daily convenience and utility of the work to professional and 
business men, an I public olficers, the political events and statistics which it 
records, will render this Register exceedingly convenient and serviceable to 
politicians and i)olitical economists, in assisting their inquiries, and in facili- 
tating their examination of political questions. The value of the work is, it 
is believed, very nvich cnhunceJ in this and oLlier respects, by the National 



statistics, and other important matter which it cmbod'es in relation to the Na- 
tional Government and the organization of its various departmen'.s. Indeed, in 
reference to all matters of ordinarj' interest and convenience, this work may 
be regarded as constituting a National as well as a State Registeb. 

In respect to the range of matter embraced in the work, it is believed to be 
as comprehensive, in reference to the topics, and as minute in point of detail, 
as its patrons will desire; and as to the accuracy of its statements, it may be 
truly affirmed that they have been made as exact and reliable as several 
months of assiduous labor and vigilant care could render them. 

There is one more topic, which is regarded as particularly important in this 
connection, and on which a remark may, it is hoped, be found serviceable both 
to the publisher and his patrons. The value of such a vork is materially en- 
hanced by being regularly and pundually continued from year to year. A sin- 
gle volume, or a Register for only one year, is of little use; it is, in truth, no* 
wortli publishing. But if it can be continued punctually and regularly, every 
successive volume rises in intrinsic value. To the transient convenience of 
each number for a single year, is gradually added the permanent value of a 
connected series, till, in the lapse of time, the annual publication become.? a 
great work of perpetual reference, of the most authentic character and of pecu- 
liar interest, from its combination of the two features of confempi'^r -neousncss 
and conntjcted succession. Its Tables of Statistics and Institutions, Cv^mpiled at 
first for the transient purposes of the flying year, are by and by converted 
into the solid materials of everlasting history, and its lists of familiar names, 
collected for the tempoi-ary coavenience of current business, are soon trans- 
formed into the undecaying records of a departed generation, and muster-rolls 
of leading men of their times. 

Considerations like these, it will be at once admitted, enter into the very es- 
sence of the value of compilations like this Register; and they are suggested 
in the belief that they will be regarded as legitimate grounds of appeal to the 
public for that patronage, which is indisjiensable to secure the regular continu- 
ance of the publication. If such patronage shall be aSorded, the annual con- 
tinuation of this Register may be depended on; and as its compiler shall be- 
come more familiar with the sources of information and the wants of the 
public, he will be enabled to render his work more and more acceptable and 
useful. 

One more remark, and this Preface will conclude : — 

The compiler of this Register has within the past year furnished the public 
with a Gazetteer of this State. The two publications so entirely harmonize in 
their objects and in the character of their contents, that they may be fairly re- 
garded as parts of the same general plan, and as calculated, if taken together, 
to increase the convenience and usefulness of each other : both combined, cover 
the whole ground of civil geography anil local description and statistics. 

O. L. H. 
Albany, M.y, 1S43. 



C O N T E N T S . 



Page. 

INDEX 7 

A'fditions and Corrections, 12 

Almanac for 184-}, witli a^'tronomical ami otlipr useful infoiination, 13 

S'atistics of the Vniteil States, and of the several States and I'eniiories .. 17 

Events in 184i, Ike, 29 

Civil Divisions of tlie State of New-York, 33 

Towns in the State of New-Yorlf, with the Poi)nlalion in J840, 37 

(/Oinparati ve View of the Cities in the State, 45 

Chartered Cities and Incorporated Villages, 47 

Unincori)orated ViHases, with the estimated Population in 1840, 50 

t omi)arati\ e View of the Census of the State, 57 

Cens IS of the United States, by States and Territories, 58 

Siatislies of the State of New-York, compiled from the Census of 1840,. 59 

Statement of Real and Personal Es'ate and Taxes, 18J::i, 67 

List of (iovernors and Lieutenant-Governors, 68 

DtHcial Election Ke.urns, 1810-42, 69 

Popular Vote for President of the United Slates, 1836 and IS^IO, 103 

Ijlections of Presitlent and Vice-President of tlie United States, 104 

Extract from a Law respecting Elections, 106 

Post-Oflices and Post-Mas!ersln the Stafe, 109 

Newspapers, &c. published in the State, 143 

Kanks, 152 

List of Chartered Banks, sliowing original Capital, i<e., 1C6 

Free Kanking Associations, 168 

Extracts from Han'; Commissioners" Report, .Ian., 1813, 170 

Safe'y Fund Hank Statement, 173 

Free f5ank Statement, 174 

Hanks in Opera'ion and Bank Capital, 18 IX 178 

Savings Banks, 179 

Insurance Comiian'es, 180 

iMisi'ellanPuus Com)ianies in the City of New-York. 185 

Custom House :md Post-Oflice, " " 187 

Foreign Consils resident in the City of New-York, 187 

Auction Duties, 188 

State Canals, 189 

Tolls on the Canals, (collecled from 1810 to 184i, inclusive,) 195 

Ka'es of Tolls established by the Canal Boai-d, 197 

A Lis', of the Principal Places on the Canals, vvitli the Distances from 

each other, 201 

lliilro.ids, Finisheil or in Progress, 205 

Contemplated Railroads, 209 

Principal Stage Routes, 212 

Lines of Packets sailing from the Citv of New-York 213 

Arrivals at tiie Port of New- York, 1.8^12, ...» 215 

Steamboats, 216 

Ca.'ial Packe s anil 'Transportation Lines 221 

New- York City Statistics 223 

College-* and Universities, 233 

Medical Institutions. 237 

Theological Institutions 241 



VI CONTENTS. 

Page, 

Academies, 246 

Common Schools, 251 

Literary and Scientific Institutions, 256 

Benevolent and Religious Institutions, 263 

State Institutions, 270 

NATIONAL REGISTER. 

Executive Government of the United States, 277 

Post-Offlce Department, 27S) 

United States Judiciary, 280 

Twenty-Eighth Congress, 283 

Army List, 287 

Navy List, 292 

Mint of the United States, 295 

Census of 1840, 300 

Commerce and Navigation, 208 

Tariff of Duties, 313 

Extract from a Treaty between Great Britain and the United States, 318 

Railroads in the United States, 321 

Debts of the several States in tlie Union, 322 

Governors of States and Territories, 323 

Public Lands, 324 

OFFICERS OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK, &c. 

Executive Department, 325 

Legislative Department, 326 

Judicial Department, 327 

Canal Officers, 329 

Funds of the State, 330 

Debt of the State, 334 

Militia of the State, 337 

An Act to Abolish the Office of Bank Commissioner, and for other pur- 
poses, 343 

Statutes concerning Applications to the Legislature, 346 

Courts, 347 

County Officers, Attorneys, &c., 357 

Number of Attorneys and Counsellors in the State, 427 

Commissioners of Deeds, residing out of tlie State, 428 

City Officers, 429 

Election Returns for Mayor, 1843, 432 

Adv ertising Department, 



INDEX. 



I'ai-f.. 
•• 24(5 



ACADEMIES, : 

Comparative View ol,-- 
Disliibution < f Public 

Moneys among, 249 

In the State, 1S4U, 66 

Academy of Design, Nationiil, i59 

Military, West I'oinl, 291 

Additions and Corrections, 12 

Adjutant Geneial's Kcport, 337 

Agricultural Society, Slate, SOB 

Statistics, 61, 303 

Alabama, Statistics of, 24, 323 

Albany and West Stockbridge Railr'd 205 

Institute, 2C0 

Medical College, 23b 

Orphan Asylum, 2G7 

City Officers, 429 

Dist. ol Post Offices from, 109 

Population of, 45 

Railroads ruuning from,- 322 

Steamboats, 219 

County Election Returns, 09 

Officers, 367 

Alexandria, Jcc. Packets. 215 

Aliens in the State, 1836, 57 

Allegany County Officers, 3G0 

Almanac for 1843, 13— 2S 

American Anti-Slavery Society, 264 

Bible Society, 2G3 

Colonization Society, 263 

Home Missionary Society,- 264 

Institute, 259 

Society for the Diffusion of 

Useful Knowledge, 257 

Sunday School Union, 264 

Tract Society, 264 

An Act to abolish the Office of Bank 

Commissioners, ice, 343 

Applications to toe Legislature, Sta- 
tutes concerning, 346 

Apprentices Library, 25S, 260 

Arkansas, Statistics of, 26, 323 

Army List, United States, 287 

Arrivals at the Port of New- York, 216 

Arsenals, Arms, &c., 340 

Assembly, Members of, 326 

Assessments, 67 

Attica and Buffalo Railroad, 205 

Attorneys and ConnscUors, 357 

in the city of New-York, •• 391 
number of in the Slate,-" • 427 

Auburn and Rochester Railroad, 205 

and Syracuse, ■• 205 

Slate Prison, S7.J 

Theological Seminary, 242 

Auction Duties, 18S 

BANKS, In2 

Chartered, 166 

Capital, 169 

Closed or Failed, 177 

Commissioners' Report, 170 

Act to abolish, 343 



Page. 

Banks, Free Associations, 168 

Free Bank Statement, 174 

In operation in the blale, 178 

Liabilities and Resources of, •• 172 

Rules and Regulations, 152 

Safety Fund Statement, 173 

Savings, 179 

Tabic, J77 



under the General Bk'ng Law, 176 

Benevolent Institutions, 263 

Bible Society, American, 263 

Bill of Mortality, New- York City, 229 

Black River Canal, igj 

Blind, Institution for the, 27j 

Number of in the State, 67 

United States, 300 

lUooniingdale 1-unatic Asylum, 240 

Blossburg and Corning Railroad, 209 

Board ol Health, 229 

Trade, ma 

Boats, Canal, 221 

Steam, 216 

British Steamboats on Lake Ontario,- 220 

Brooklyn a d Jamaica Railroad, -205 

City Officers, 430 

Population of, 46 

Broome County Officers, 361 

Buffalo and Black Rock Railroad, 205 

and Niagara Falls, 209 

City Officeis, 4'>7 

Orphan Asylum, 267 

Population of, 4c 

Tonnage, 219 

CALENDAR for 1843, J7 

Canal, Black River, 192 

Cayuga and Seneca, 190 

Champlain, 190 

Chemung, 191 

Chenango, 191 

Crooked Lake, jgi 

Commissioners, 325 

Debt, 333 

Delaware and Hudson, 192 



Erie, 

Genesee Valley, 

Oswego, 

Oneida Lake, 

Packets, 

Transportation Lines, 

Canals, State, 

Distances on, 

In the State, 

List of Principal Places on, • 

Lockages, 

Navigable, 

Officers, 

Rates of Toll on, 

Statement of, 

Table, 

Tolls collected on, 

Catskill and Canajoharie Railroad, 



189 

191 
190 
19-t 
221 
331 
189 
301 
304 
301 
196 
32 
329 
197 
193 
196 
195 
20s 



Cattaraugus County Officers, 362 



VIU 



Page. 

Ciiyuf,a Coiiuty Officers, 3&2 

Census, Comparative View of, 57 

of Cities, 45, 29J 

of Indian Tribes, 301 

of Slate in Counties, 36 

Towns, 37 

of United States, 58, 300 

of Villages, 47 

of the World, 297 

Chamber of Commerce, 185 

Champlain ChuiI, 190 

Lake, Steamboats, 220 

Cliancellois, 328 

Ch-»ncery, Court of, 34S 

Masters and Examiners, •• • i53 

Officers of, 348 

Terms, 350 

Chartered Cities and Incorporated Vil- 
lages, 47 

Chautauqiic Counly Officers, 364 

Chemung County Officers, 365 

Chomngo County Officers, 366 

Churches, 320 

Cities in the Stale, 46 

in the United Slates, 299 

City of NewVork, Arrivals at, 216 

Banks, 158 

Commerce of, 216, 223 
Com. Council of,- 430 
Compa've Popl'n, 45 
Crim'l Statistics, 232 

Debt, 224 

fjlcctious in,- 8-5, 432 

Finances, 223 

Harbor Masters, •■ 391 
Health Officers,-- 229 

Inspectors, 391 

Insiitutions, 228 

Insurance Comp's ISO 

Interments in, 23o 

Manufaciures, ••• 225 

Mortality in, 209 

Packets to & from 213 

Port Wardens 391 

I'ost Office, •••••• 187 

Statistics, 223 

Taxes and Valua- 
tion, 67, 22S 

University of, 233 

Water Comin'rs,- 391 

( ivil I>ivisions of ihc State, 33 

Clinton County Officers, 367 

Coinage, Statistics of, 296 

Collectors of the U. S. t ustoms, 285 

College, Albany Medical, 238 

Columbia, 233 

Geneva, 237 

Hamilton, 236 

of Physicians and Surgeons,- 237 

St. John's, '^44 

St. PuuTs, 244 

Union, 235 

University of New- York City, 233 

Collegiate Schools, 244 

Colonization Society, 263 

Columbia County Olficers, 367 

Cortland County Officers, 369 

Commerce and NHvisation, 

of the United Slates, 308 

of New-York ••- • 225 

of the Several States, -S09 

of th" Uu'ied States, 304 

Cotnmiss iry (Jeneral's Uepartmcut, •■ 340 



Page. 

Coinniissioneis, Canal, 32S 

of Deeds, 368 

residing other States, 428 

Common Councils of Cities, 429 

Common Schools, 251, 345 

Deputy SuperinlMts 263 

Fund, 254 

No. of in the State,- 265 

Companies. Banking, 166 

Insurance, 180 

Miscellaneous, 185 

Railroad. 205 

Trust, 183 

Comparative Census of the State, 57 

View of Cities, 46 

View of Temperature,- 30 

Congress of the United Slates, 2Si3 

Congressional Districts, 34 

Cotmccticut, Stalistics of,- 20, 323 

Consuls, Foreign, Is7 

ConI em plated Railroads, iC9 

Counties and County Scats, 35 

Progressive Population, •••• 36 

County Officers, 3&7 

Courts, 347 

Common Pleas, 356 

Circuit, 351 

Chancery, 349 

City of New-York, 3o6 

Marine- 356 

of Errors, 348 

Superior, 355 

Supreme, 361 

Surrogates, 348 

United Suies, 347 

Criminal Stalistics. 2S? 

Custom House, New-York, 1.-7 

Customs, ("o Hectors, i5cc., a?6' 

Tariffof Duties. 313 

DKAF and Dumb Institutions, i71 

No. of Persons,- 57, 300 
Death.s and Diseases in the Citv of 

Ne w- York, - • ■ - 229 

Debt of Cities in the Union, 323 

New-York City, 92-^ 

New-York State, 334 

the Several Slates, 322 

Delaware and Hudson Canal, 19-J 

County Officers, 3-^9 

State, Statistics of, 21, 323 

Deputy Supcrinltuilents of Common 

Schools, Ibi 

Distances from Albany 

and Washington, 109 

on Ncw-\ork Canals, SOI 

on Stage Routes, 012 

Districts, Congressional, 31 

Senatorial, 33 

Dutchess Coiiuty Officers, hIO 

Duties, Auction, 188 

Tariffof, 313 

KCI.IPSFS in l&4:i, 14 

Editors of Newspapers, 143 

Education, Abstract of. 2£5 

Elections, Extract f'm Law res))ecling 106 
New-York State, from 1789 

to IS42. 68 

Presidential, • 103 

Kelurns, Official, 69,432 

Electoral Votes for President, ICt 

English Coins, 15 

Episcopal Theological Seminary, 343 

Erie County Officers, .^71 



INDEX. 



IX 



Pa^e. 

F.ssex County Officers, 373 

Estates, Kcal ajid Personal, 67 

F. rents in 1812, 20 

Examiners in Chancery, 35S 

Executive Deprirtment of New-Vork,- 326 

Government United States, 277 

Exports and Imports, 310 

FEMALE Institute, Kutf^ers, 24ft 

Festivals and Fasts in 18-13, IG 

Finances, New-Yorlt City, 2-.>3 

Stale, 330 

United States, 281 

Fire Insurance Companies, 180 

Foreign Consuls, 187 

Franklin County Officers, 374 

Library Association, 260 

P'ul'on County Officers, 375 

Funds of the State. 330 

(JKNESEE County Olficers, 375 

• Jeiicsec Valley Canal, 191 

Geneva College, 237 

Geological Rooms, 261 

Georpia, Statistics of, 23, 323 

Gold Coins, Value of, 312 

Governors of the Mate of New- York, 68 
Several States and 

Territories, 323 

(irerne County Officers, 37G 

HAMILTON College, ••• 236 

County Officers; 377 

Literary and Theological 

Institution, 241 

Literary Association, ••• 260 

Harlem Railroad, 207 

Hart wick Theological Seminary, 242 

Havre Packets, 214 

Herkimer County Officers, .377 

Herschell's Weather Table, 16 

Historical Society, 256 

Hudson City Officers, 430 

and Berkshire Railroad, 205 

Lunatic Asylum, 240 

Population of, 45 

River, when closed & opened,' 31 

Steamboats, 218 

ILLINOIS, Statistics of, 26, 3'?3 

Imports and Exports, ■ 310 

Incorporated Academies, 246 

Banks, •• 1.52 

Insurance Companies, •• ISO 

Life and Trust " •• 183 

Railroad " •• 205 

Villages, 47 

Indiana, Statistics of, 25, 323 

Indian Tribes, Census of, 301 

Injunction and Taxing Masters, 343 

Institute, American, 2.5!) 

Institution for the Blind, 272 

for the Instrurtion of the 

Peaf and Dumb, 271 

Institutions, Benevolent, 263 

Literary, 266 

Religious, 263 

Scientific, 25G 

State, 270 

Theological, 241 

Insurance Companies, ISO 

Interments in the City of New- York, • • 230 

Ithaca and Owego Railroad, 206 

JEFFERSON County Officers, 378 

Judicial Department, State, 327 

Judiciary of the United Stales, 

Judges, Circuit Courts, 



Page. 

Judges, County Courts, 357 

Superior Court 355 

Supreme Court, 351 

United States, 347 

KENTUCKY, Statistics of, 25, 323 

Kings County Officers, 379 

Lake Champlain Steamboats, 220 

Erie 0{iened at Buffalo, 32 

Steamboats, 219 

Ontario Steamboats, 220 

Law Institute, 2S9 

Leeislalure of the State of New York, 

Members of, 326 

Lewis County Officers, 380 

Lcwiston Railroad, 205 

Library, State, 273 

Life and Trust Companies, 183 

Literary and Religious Institution,- •■ 24.'» 

Institllutions, 256 

Liverpool Packets, 213 

Live Stock, Statistics of, 61 

Livingston County Officers, 381 

Lockport and Niagara Falls Railroad, 206 

London Packets, 213 

Long Island Railroad, 206 

Louisiana, Statistics of, 24, 323 

Lunatic Asylums, 240, 270 

Lyceum of Natural History, 266 

MADISON County Officers, 382 

Maine, Statistics of, 18, 32 

Manufactories in the State, 65 

Manufactures in the City of N. York,- 225 

Sta", 60 

Ur ed States, ••• 303 

Marine Insurance Cor» anies, 182 

Maryland, Statistics- , 22, 323 

Massachusetts, Statistics of, 19, 323 

Masters and Examiners in Chancery,- 353 

Mayors of Cities, 429 

Mechanics' Institute, 259 

Society, 259 

Medical Institutions, 2.37 

Mercantile Library Association, 263 

Merchants' Exchange Company, 1S5 

Michigan, Statistics of, 26, 323 

Military Academy, West Point, 291 

Posts and Commanders, 289 

Militia of the State, 337 

United States, 288 

Ministers, United States, 284 

Mint of the United States, 295 

Miscellaneous Companies, 185 

Mississippi, Statistics of, 24, 323 

Missouri, Statistics of, 26, .323 

Mohawk and Hudson Railroad, 206 

Monroe County Officers, .383 

Montgomery County Officers, 385 

Mortality in the City of New-York,- •- 229 

Mount Pleasant State Prison, 275 

Miiiual Insurance Companies, 185 

NATIONAL Academy of Design, 259 

Keaislcr, 278 

Navy List, •■■•■ 20J 

New Hampshire, Statistics of,-"- 19, .323 

New-Jersey Railroads, 211 

Statistics of, 21, .323 

Newspapers in the State, 143 

Now-Yoik and Albany Railroad, 207 

and Erie, 207 

.ind Harlem, 207 

City. (See City of N.Yoik,) 

County Officers, S87 

Election Returns, 6* 



INDEX. 



Past. 

New-York Ethnological Society, 258 

Fire Departmeni Fund,---- 266 

Hisiorical Society, 256 

Law Institute, 259 

Lyceum. 257 1 

Orphan Asylurn. 266 I 

Society Library, 356 j 

State A?ricuUnral Society, 263 I 

Canals, • 189 j 

Courts, 343 

Debt, 334 1 

Institutions, 270 | 

Library, 273 1 

Medical Society, 239] 

Officers, 325 1 

Prisons, 273' 

Statistics, 20, 59 

Temperance Society, i?69 

Niagara County Orncers, •- 336 

North Carolina, Statistics of, 23, 323 

.Votaries in the City of New-York, •• 390 

OFFICI.\L Election Returns, 69—102 

Officers of the V. S. Government, 106, 277 

Ohio, Statistics of, 25. 323 

Oneida County Officers, • 399 

Conference Seminary, 242 

Onondaga County Officers, 401 

Salt Springs, ••'- 341 

Ontario County Officers, 404 

Orphan Asyluriis, • 266 

Orange County O.fficers, 403 

Orleans County Officers, 405 

Oswego Canal, 190 

County Officers, 406 

Otseco County Officers, 407 

PACKETS sailing from New-York,-- 213 

Pennsylvania. Statistics of, 21, 323 

Periodicals in the City of New- York, - 14S 
Population of the Slate, in Towns,--- 37 

at different periods, 44 

of the United Slates,- 59, 300 

of the World, 297 

Post-Office, New-York City, 187 

Post-Offices and Post-Masters,-- 109—142 

in the United States, 142 

Ponghkeepsie Collesiate School, 245 

ProEressive Population of the Stsle,- 36 

Public Land, United States, 3-24 

Public Notaries in the City of N. York 39S 

Putnam County Officers, 400 

QUEENS CouQty Officers, 40S 

R.AILRO.ADS. 209 

Contemplated, 209 

in the State, 204 

in the United States, 321 

New-Jersey, 211 

Rales of Toll on ihe Canals, 197 

Real and Personal Estate, 67 

Regents of the University, 32S 

Registered Tonnage of the U. States,- 311 
Religious Denominations in the U. S., 320 
Institutions. 363 



Rensselaer County Officers, 409 

nnd Siratoga Railroad, ■-• 207 
Revenue and Expenditure, U. States,- 281 

Rhode Island, Statistics of, 19, 323 

Richmond Countv Ufficrs, 411 

Rochester City Officers, 431 

Population of, 4S 

Railroad. 207 

Rockland County Officers, 412 

Roman Ca;holic Orphan .Asylum, 366 

Ratgers Female Institute, 245 



! SAILOR'S Snng Harbor. 25S 

■ St. Ann's Hall, 245 

j St. John's College, 244 

1 St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum, 267 

I St. Lawrence Count v Officers, 417 

I St. Paul's College, -' 244 

Salt Springs, 341 

! Saratoga County Officers, 412 

i and Schenectady Railroad, - 208 

Savings Banks. 179 

Schenectady City Officers, 431 

Population of, 45 

County Officers, 4i4 

and Troy Railroad, 308 

Schoharie County Officers, 415 

Scientific Institutions, 256 

Schools. Common, 251 

Seamen's Fund aiid Retreat, 266 

Seminaries, Theological, 241 

Seneca County Officers, 415 

Senate Dislricts, 33 

of the Slate, 3-26 

of the United States, 2S3 

Societies, Benovolent, 252 

Literary, 256 

Religious, 263 

South Carolina, Statistics of, 23, 323 

Stage Routes, 212 

State Institutions, 270 

Prisons, C73 

States, Governors of, 323 

Seats of Government, ic , 324 

Statistics of City of New-York, •>23 

of the State, 20, 59 

of Coinage, 296 

of the United States,--- 17, 803 
Statutes concerning Applications to 

the Legislature, 346 

Steamboats. 216 

Steuben Conntv Officers, 416 

Stock and Exchanee Board, 186 

Suffolk County Officers, 418 

Sullivan County Officers, 419 

Snperiatendent of Common Schools, - - 253 

Superior Court, 355 

Supreme Court. 348, 351 

United States, 239 

Surrogates Court, 343 

Syr.TCiise and Utica Railroad, -20? 

TARIFF of Duties, 313 

Taxes, Table of, 67 

Tennessee, Statistics of, 24, 323 

Theological Seminaries, 241 

Tide Table, 15 

Tiosa Countv Officers. 419 

Tolls on the Canals, 195 

Tompkins County Officers, 4*1 

Tonawanda Railroad, 003 

Tonnage of the United States. 311 

Towns in the State, with Pop'n, 1840,- 37 

formed in 1841-42, 44 

Transportation Lines, 221 

Treaty. Extract from, 313 

Troy City Officers 431 

Population of, 46 

Steamboats, 218 

Trust Companies, 133 

ITLSTER County Officers, 491 

Unincorporated Villages, 50 

Union CoUece, 235 

Tlicoiogicd Seminary, 243 

United States Army List, ■ 237 

Census, 1845, 58, .W) 



INDEX. 



XI 



Poge. 

IJniieU Stuteb Commerce of, 308 

Courts, 347 

Government, 105, 277 

Judiciary, 580 

Military Academy, 291 

Mint, 295 

Naval I.yceum, 209 

Navy List, 292 

Post-Office, 279 

Products of, 303 

Public Lands, 324 

Uailroads in, 321 

Kevcnueand Expenses, 281 

Statislics ot, 17, 303 

Supreme Court, 290 

Tonnage of, 311 

University of the City of New-York, •• 233 

Medical Department, 234 

Regents of, 328 

Utica City Officers, 432 

Population of, 46 

and Schenectady Railroad, 208 

VALUATION of Real and Personal 

Estate, 67, 33fi 

Value of Foreign Moneys, 311 

Vermont, Statistics of, 80, 323 



Vessels employed in Whaling, 216 

Vessels of War, Uniti-d Stales, 293 

Villages, Incorpor.ited, ' 47 

Villages Incorporated in 1842, 4* 

Unincorporated, 60 

Virginia, Statistics of, 22, 323 

Votes in Coimties and Towns, t9 

for President, 103 

WAli Department, 278 

Warren County OfTicers, 422 

Washington County Oflicers, 423 

Distances from, 109 

Water Commissioners, 891 

Wayne County Officers, 424 

Westchester County Officers, 426 

West Point Military Academy, 291 

Whale Ships, 216 

World, Population of, 297 

Wyoming County Officers, 426 

VATES County Officers, 426 

Young Men's Association 

in Albany, 260 

in Buffalo, 261 

in Schenectady, 261 

in Troy, 261 

in Utica, 361 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 



Towns Fokmed in 1843. 



Avoca, erected from parts of Bath, Conhocton, Howard and Wheeler^ Steu- 
ben county. 

Colton, taken from Parishville, St. Lawrence county. 
Greenboro, taken from Rcdfield, Oswego county. 

Village Incorporated in 1843. 

Name. Toion. Countif. Pop. 1940. 

Clinton, Kirkland, Oneida. 800 

Warsaw, Warsaw, Wyoming. 800 

Railroad Incorporated in 1843. 
Cayuga and Sasquefmnnah Railroad, (formerly Ithaca and Owego.) Capital, 
$18,000, divided into shares of $15. 

Incorporated Bank Note Registers, 
Appointed by the Comptroller. 
Henry H. Van Dyck, John F. Bacon. 

CORRECTIONS. 
Chartered Cities. — Troy, 8 Wards, instead of 6. 
Incorporated Villages. — Add Sag Harbor, Suffolk co., incor- 
porated in 1803. 
Post-Masters. — James D. Wasson, P. M., Albany, instead of S. 

Van Rensselaer. 
Sidney D. Smith, P. M., Lansingburgh, instead of S. Bontecou. 
James M. Boack, P. M., Schenectady, instead of T. L. Thompson. 
Howell Gardner, P. M.,West Greenfield, instead of G. B. Rowland. 
Lyndes Emerson, P. M., Wilton, instead of J. K. Allen. 
Newspapers. — Highland Courier, Dem., instead of Newburgh 
Journal, neutral. 

*' 154. Banks. — William A. Davies, President Farmers' and Manufac- 
turers' Bank, Poughkeepsie, instead of James Hooker. 
" 157. Thonuis H. Rochester, President City Bank, Rochester, in place of 

Jacob Gould. 
'< 157. G. R- Clark, Cashier Commercial Bank, Rochester, in place of T. 

11. Rochester. 
*> 161. Theodore F. Hand, Cashier Bank of Vernon, Oneida co., instead of 

S. Case. 
" 163. Oswego Bank, failed March, 1843. 

" 197. Rates of Toll, established by the Canal Board, 1843. (See 
Rates of Toll for 1842.) 

Cu. M. Fr. 

On mineral coal, per 1,000 pounds, per mile, 4 5 

On bar and pig lead, going towards tide water, per 1,000 

pounds, per mile, 4 5 

*' 253. Deputy Superintendents of Common Schools. — Samuel L. 

Holmes, Westchester county, in place of T. Little. 
" 258. American Institute. — T. B. Wakeman, Cor. Secretary and Su- 
perintending Agent, instead of Treasurer, &c. 
" 237. College of Physicians and Surgeons. — Alexander H. Stevens, 

President, instead of J. Augustine Smith. 
" 284. Members of Congress. — Charles Rogers, elected in the 14th Dis- 
trict, instead of William G. Hunter. 
'« 323, Debts of Cities.— Troy debt, $628,000, instead of $361, COO. 



Pag 


e 47. 


a 


49. 


li 


109. 


« 


124. 


" 


134. 


«» 


141. 


<( 


142. 


a 


149. 



ALMANAC FOR 1843. 

With Astronomical and other nseful Information. 

Tlie AnatoinN of iMuii's Body, as sjovcrncd by the 

Twelve Coustfilaiioiis, a<ooi<linir tn ancient Astronoiriy, viz. 
Aries, T tiif Head. 



U Gemini, 

Arms 



^Leo, 
Heart 



:Libra, 
Reins 



^ Sagittarius, 
Thighs 



"Aquarius 
Legs 




^ Taurus, 
Neck 



Cancer, 
Breast 



:Tj;Virgo, 
Bowels 

fTl Scorpio, 
Secrets 



VS" Capricorn 
Knees 



Pisces, ^ I-Vef. 



Names and Characters of the Plafiels, SCc. 



Secondary. 

©€) 

Luna or Moon 



c IJJ Herscliell Middle. Inferior. 

•Sf).Saluiii (S^SolorSun 9 Venus 

•|,lf Jupiter j e.b^lartli ^Mercury 
'•< $ Mars I 

Names and Characters of the Aspects. 
When two plnnets are in the same deg^ree, they are in Conjunc- 
tion, rnarlved (lius : . . - 6 
When <)() dejrrets apart, Sextile, - * 
90 - Qiiartile, - U 
120 - Trine, - A 
l;i() - Opposiiinn, - 6* 
QDragon's head, Asrendiiig, t? Ora-^'oii's tail. Descending Node. 

Chi onolo'j^ical Cj/cles, 

Dominical Letter, ... A I . Solar Cycle, * 4 

Lunar Cycle, 1 

Epact, i 

2 



Roman Indiction,. ... 1 
Julian Period, 6566 



14 

ECLIPSES FOR THE YEAR 1843. 
There will be three Eclipses this year, two of the Sun, and 
one of the Moon, as follows : 

1st. There will be an annular Eclipse of the Sun, June 27th : 
it will be invisible at this place. • The line of central and annu- 
lar eclipse will be confined mostly to the South Pacific Ocean, 
crossing the equator twice, first in longitude 147*^ W., second- 
ly in longitude 99'^ W., from Greenwich. 

2d. The Moon will be partially eclipsed December 6th, a& 
follows : 

Eclipse begins, 6" 24'" P. M. 
Middlcof Eclipse, 7 17 
Eclipse ends, 8 10 

Digits Eclipsed, about 2h, on the southern limb. 
3d. There will be a total eclipse of the Sun December 20th 
and 21st; invisible at this place. This eclipse will be visible 
and total in the eastern part of Arabia, southern part of Hin- 
dostan, and in the south-eastern part of China. 



MOVEABLE FEASTS AND FASTS FOR 1843. 



Ssptuaa<>«ima Sunday, Feb. 12, 

Shrove Sunrlay, Feb. 26. 

Ash Wednesday,. . , , March 1 
First Sunday in Lent " 5. 
Easter Sunday, . , • April 16. 



Ro<Ta!ioii Sund ly, 
Holy Thursday, • 

Wir.tsuirlay, 

Trinity Sunday,* • 
Advent Sunday • < 



May 21. 
May 25. 
June 4. 
June 11. 
Dec. 3. 



EMBER DAYS. 

March 8th, 1 0th and 11th. 1] September 20th, 22d and 23d. 
June 7th, 9th and 10th. || December 20th, 22d and 23d. 



EQUINOXES AND SOLSTICES. 
Vernal Equinox, March21d. Ih. 10m. mor. I Autumnal Equi., Sep. 23d. Oh. 14m. eve. 
Summer Solstice, June 21 10 7 eve. | Winter Solstice, Dec. 22d. 5h. 52m. morn. 



RATES OF POSTAGE IN THE UNITED STATES. 

On single letters, or one piece of naper, not exceeding 30 miles, 6cts. 

Over 30 and not exceeding 80 miles, 10 

Over 80 and not exceeding 150 miles, 12; 

Over 150 and not exceeding 400 miles, ••• ISJ 

Over 400 miles, 25 

Newspaper Postage. — For each paper not carried out of the state where publish- 
ed, or if carried out of the state, but not over 100 mile , 1 cent; over 100 miles, 
and out of the state li cents. 

MAGAZINES AND PAMPHLETS. 

If published periodically, distance not over 100 miles, 1.' cents per sheet, 
do do do over 100 miles, 2V cents per sheet. 

If not do do do not over 100 miles, 4) cents per sheet. 

(Id do do over 100 miles, 6 cents per sheet. 

Small pamphlets, printed on half or quarter slieet royal, or less size, are charg- 
ed with lialf those rates. Eight pages quarto are rated as one sheet, and all other 
sizes in the same proportion. 



]5 

TIDE TABLE. 

The column in the calendar pajres which is headed h. w. shows the 
time of hiffh wafer Jor the port of New- York, and is for that tide wliich 
immediately precedes the southing of the moon. 

The followiiifr Table contains the difference between the time of 
hiirh water at New- York, and a variety of places on the American 
coast. The time of liigh water at any of these places may he found 
by subtracling the difference at the place in question from the time at 
New- York, when the sign — is prehxed to it; and by adding it when 
the sign is -\- . For example, to find the time of high water at Albany, 
May 8 : the column h. w. gives 3h. 41m. evening for the time of higli 
water at New- York ; to wiiich add 6h 33m from the Tide Table, and 
we get lOh. 14m. evening forthe time of hiijh water at Albany. For 
the time of high water at Charleston, Jime 5: the column h. w. gives 
2h 12m evening ; from which subtract Ih 39m, taken from the Tide 
Table, and we have Oh 33m evening for the time required. 
h. 



Albany, + ? ?? 

Boston, 

Bay, Buzzard's,.... 

" Narraganset, . 

" St. Mary's, ... 

Bermuda Inlet, 

Cape Ann, 

" Charles, 

" Cod, 

•♦ Fear, 

« Henry, 

« St. Mary, — 09 

Charleston, — 1 39 

Fort St. John, — 09 

Fryingpan Shoals, — 2 39 

Georgetown Bar, — 2 09 

Harbour Amelia, — 39 

Island, Block, — 1 32 



+ 


2 21 




1 29 





1 32 


4- 


21 


— 


2 09 


+ 


2 21 




1 24 


+ 


2 21 




1 09 



1 29 



Island, Prince Edward,. -\- 

Island, Rhode, — 

Marblehead, ' + 

New-Bedford, — 

Ncwburyport, -|- 2 06 

New-Haven, -f *- 07 



h. ni. 

1 21 

2 24 
2 21 

09 



New-London, 

Newport, 

Norfolk, 

Philadelphia,. . . 

Plymouth, 

Portland, 

Port Campbell,. 
Port Jackson, . 
Providence, 



15 

— 1 29 

— 39 
-}- 5 18 
+ 2 21 
-t- 1 36 

— 09 

— 1 09 

— 44 
St. Salvador, + 6 36 



Sandy Hook, 
Savannah, 



— 2 17 
54 



NOTE. In this Almanac, ilip phages, and the rising ant! sotting of the Moon, 
»S;c. are given in mean time ; but the rising and setting (if the 6nn are given m 
appaiaiC or c/ial time, which may be rednced to mean or clock time, by adding 
thereto when iho sun is slow, or subtracting therefrom wiien it is fast, the cor- 
responding time found in the column entitled sun slow, or sun fast. 



ENGLISH COINS. 



PolU. CIS 

Farthing, 

Penny, 1 

Groat, 7 

Shminff, 22 



Hills. 

H 

H 

4 

H 



Crown, .. 
Sovereign, 
Guinea, . . 
Pound, . . . , 



FRENCH COINS. 

Franc, IS 7^ I Crown, .. 

Five franc 93 7 I Louis d'or, 



Di.lls 
1 
4 
4 
4 


ct«. rniF» 
11 Ih 

84 i 

66 6i 

44 4 


1 
4 


10 
44 4i 



16 



nerschell's Weather Table. 

The following table is constructed upon a philosophical consiJeration- 
of the attraction of the Sun and Moon in their several positions respect 
ing the earth ; and confirmed by the experience of manj' years actual ob- 
servation, will, without trouble^ suggest to the observer what kind of 
weather will most probably follow the Moon's entrance into any of 
her quarters ; and that so near the truth, that in very few instances will 
it be found to fait. When it is said, " Very rainy," it is not designed to 
convey the idea that it will rain all the time,, but talcing the whole of this 
quarter of the moori, and one or two of the first days of the next quar- 
ter, it will be " very rainy,"' compared with the general state of the wea- 
ther for that season of the year ; and so of all the other statements. 

The Moon's entrance, at full, change and qusrrters, during six of the 
afternoon hours, viz. from fowr lo ten, may be followed by fair weather ; 
but this is mostly dependent on the wind. The same entrance during alt 
the hours aftar midnight, except the two first, is unlavorable to fair wea- 
ther, the like, nearly, may be obseiwed in winter. 



CHANGE OP MOON. 


SUMMER. 




WINTER. 


Jf it lie new or liiJl iiioot>, or 


^ 






the tiioon enters into the 
first or last quarters, at the 


> Very rainy, 




Rain and snow. 


hour of 12 at noon. 


y 






Or between the hours of 








2 aG<i 4 p M. 


Changeable, . 




Fair and mild. 


4 and 6, 


Fair 




Fair. 


6 and 8, . 


5 Fair ifwind N. W. . 
} Rainy it S, or S. W. . 


i 


^ Fair & frosty if N or N. E . 


} Rainy if .S. or S. W. 


8 and 10. . 


Ditto, 




Ditto. 


10 and inidnijiiM, 


Fair, 




Fair and, fro :i 7. 


Midnight arui 2 a. m. 


Ditto, . . . . 




^ Hard frost uriless wind S, 
? or S. W. 


2 ami 4, . 


Cold with frequent show 


-rs, 


Snow and storia. 


4 and 6, . 


Rain 




Storm. 


6 and 8, . 


Wind and rain, 




Ditto 


8 an<l 10, 


Changeable, . 




Cold, rain if W., snow if E. 


10 and noon. 


Frequent showers, 




Cold with high wind. 



FESTIVALS AND FASTS IN 1S43. 



Jan. ly Circumcision; 6, Epiph. 8, 
1st S . aft. Epiph. 15, 2d S. aft. Epiph. 
22, 3d S. aft. Epiph. 25, Conv. of St. 
Paul; 29, 4th S. aft. Epiph. 

Feb. 5, 5th S. aft. Epiph. 12Septna- 
ares. 19, Sexagesima; 24, St. Mat- 
thias; 26, Quinquagesima. 

March 1, Ash Wed; 5, 1st S. in 
Lent; 12, 2dS. in Lent; 19 3d S. in 
Lent; 26, 4th S. in Lent. 

April 2, 5th S. in Lent; 9, 6th S. in 
Lent; 14, Good Friday; 16, Easter; 
■23, IstS. aft. Easter; 25, St. Mark; 
30, 2d S. aft. Easter. 

May 1, Sts. Philip and James; 7, 3d 
S. aft. Easter,- 14, 4tb S. aft. Eister; 
21st, 5th S. aft. Easter; 25, Ascen- 
sion ; 28, S. aft. Ascension. 

June 4, Whit S.; 11, Trinity and 
and St. Barnabas; 18, 1st S. aft. Trin. ; 
24, .John Baptist; 25, 2d S. aft. Trin.; 
29 St. Peter. 

July 2, 3d S. aft. Trin. ; 9, 4th S. aft. 



Trin. ; 16, 5th S. aft. Trin. ; 23, 6th 
S. aft. Trin. ; 30, 7th S. aft. Trin. 

Avg. 6, Sth S. aft. Trin. ; 13, 9th S. 
aft. Trin. ; 20, IGth S. aft. Trin. ; 24. 
St. Barthol. ; 27, 11th S. aft. Trin. 

Sept. 3, 12th S. aft. Trin. ; 10, 13tb 
S; aft. Trin.; 17, 14lh S. aft. Trin.: 
21, St. Matthew; 24, 15th S. aft. Trin,. 

Oct. 1, 16th S. aft. Trin. ; 8, 17th S. 
aft. Trin. ; 15, 18th S. aft. Trin. ; 18, 
St. Luke; 22, 19th S. aft. Trin.; 28, 
Sts. Simon and Jude; 29, 20th S. aft. 
Trin. 

Nov. 1, All Saints; 5, 21st S. aft. 
Trin. ; 12, 22d S. aft. Trin. ; 19, 23d 
S. aft. Trin.; 26, 24lh S. aft. Trin.; 
30, St. Andrew. 

Bee. 3, Advent S. ; 10, 2d S. in Ad- 
vent; 17, 3d S. in Advent; 21, St. 
Thomas; 24, 4th S. in Advent; 25, 
Christmas; 2'6, St. Steplien; 27, S. 
John; 28, Innocents; 31, S. after 
Christmas^ 



1843 — 1st Mo. JANUARY, begins on Sunday, hath 31 days. 



MOON'S PHASES. 
First Quarter 8th, 3h. 17ra. eve. I Last Quarter 22d, Sh. 7ra. eve. 
Full Moon 16th, 3h. 33m. morn. | New Moon SOlh, 7h. 7m. morn. 



M 


W. 


Remarks. 


c 


R. 


0S. 


© 


slu 


R.^S. 


H.W. 


• 


1 


A 


Circumcision. 


7 


81 


4 29 


3 


43 


sets 


9 36 


V5 


2 


Mend 


Battle of Trenton, 1777. 


7 


31 


4 29 


4 


11 


6 34 


10 17 




3 


Tuesd 


Battle of Princeton, 1777. 


7 


30 


4 30 


4 


40 


7 37 


10 55 




4 


Wedn 


Newton born 1612.' 


7 


30 


4 30 


5 


7 


8 40 


11 31 


K 


5 


Thurs 


Richmond destroyed, 1781. 


7 


30 


4 30 


5 


35 


9 40 


5 




6 


Frid 


Epiphany. 


7 


29 


4 31 


6 


1 


10 40 


40 




7 


Satur 


Jos. Bonaparte, born, 1768. 


7 


29 


4 31 


6 


28 


11 39 


1 15 


cp 


8 


A 


Battle of New Orleans, 1815. 


7 


28 


4 32 


6 


54 


morn 


1 52 




9 


Mond 




7 2<S 


4 32 


7 


19 


30 


2 33 




10 


Tuesd 


Great fire at CharJestort, 1816. 


7 


27 


4 33 


7 


44 


1 40 


3 29 


a 


11 


Wedn 


Linnaeus, botanist, died, 1788. 


7 


27 


4 33 


8 


8 


2 42 


4 40 




12 


Thurs 


Pestalozzi born, J746. 


7 


26 


4 34 


8 


31 


3 45 


5 56 


n 


13 


Frid 


S. B. Lexington burnt, 1840. 


7 25 


4 35 


8 


54 


4 47 


7 8 




14 


Satur 


Peace with G. B. rat. 1784. 


7 24 


4 36 


9 


16 


5 43 


8 2 


2J 


15 


A 


Charleston, S. C. burnt, 1778. 


7 


23 


4 37 


9 


38 


6 32 


8 53 




16 


Mond 


Battle of Corunna, 1809. 


7 


22 


4 38 


9 


59 


rises 


9 36 


a 


17 


Tuesd 


Dr. Franklin born 1706. 


7 


21 


4 39 


10 


19 


■7 


10 19 


18 


Wedn 


Battle of Cowpens, 1781. 


7 


20 


4 40 


10 39 


8 15 


11 




19 


Thurs 


Inde. ack. by G. B., 17S3. 


7 


19 


4 41 


10 


58 


9 30 


11 42 


w 


20 


Frid 


David Garrickdied, 1779. 


7 


18 


4 42 


11 


16 


10 43 


morn 




21 


Satur 


Louis XVL beheaded 1793. 


7 


17 


4 43 


11 


33 


morn 


24 


.^ 


22 


A 




7 


16 


4 44 


11 


50 





1 S 




23 


Mond 


William Pitt died, 1806. 


7 


15 


4 45 


12 


5 


1 15 


1 54 


^ 


24 


Tuesd 


Fred, the Great born, 1712. 


7 


14 


4 46 


12 


21 


2 24 


2 46 


25 


Wedn 


Conversion of St. Paul. 


7 


13 


4 47 


12 


35 


3 32 


3 56 


f 


26 


Thurs 


Bonaparte es.from Elba,1815. 


7 


12 


4 48 


12 48 


4 34 


5 18 


27 


Frid 


Treaty with France. 1832. 


7 


11 


4 49 


13 


1 


5 29 


6 45 


\? 


28 


Satur 


Peter the Great died', 1725. 


7 


10 


4 50 


13 


13 


6 14 


7 52 


29 


A 


Constantinople burnt, 1730. 


7 


9 


4 51 


13 


24 


6 50 


8 44 




30 


Mond 


Charles I. beheaded, 1643. 


7 


s 


4 52 


13 


35 


sets. 


9 27 


AA/ 


31 


Tuesd 


Palace at Brussels burnt, 1730 


7 


7 


4 53 


13 


4-1 


6 28 


10 5 





STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES AND OF THE SEVE- 
RAL STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



The first permanent settlement in the United States, by the English 
was at Jamestown, Va. in 1607; which continued an English colony til 
July 4, 1776. Peace was made and Independence acknowledged b} 
treaty with England in 1783. The articles of Confederation were en- 
tered into, in 1777. The present United States Constitution framed ir 
1787, went into operation March 1st, 1789. Lousiania. comprising al 
the territory now belonging to the United States west of the Mississippi 
was purchased of France in 1803 ; and Florida, of Spain, in 1819. Th< 
present number of States is 26; and the Territories now organized wil 
soon make three more. The U. S. seat of government is the city o. 
Washington, in the district of Columbia, 10 miles square, formed by ces- 
sions from Maryland and Virginia, placed under the exclusive jurisdic 

2» 



1843—2(1 Mo. FEBRUARY, begins on Wednesday, hath 28 days. 

MOON'S PHASES. 
First Quarter 7th, 1 Ih. 38m. morn. I Last Quarter 21st, 5h 52m. morn. 
Full Moon 14th, 3h. 16m. eve. j New Moon 29th,' Ih. 9m. morn. 



M 


W. 


Remarks. {^R. 


0S.0*ZoR.©s.' 


H.W. 


• 


1 


Wedn 


Fred. Aus;ustusl. died, 1733.7 dU 55'l3 53 7 2S 10 37 


K 


2 


Thurs 


i7 4 4 56 14 1 8 46 11 7 




3 


Frid 


Ratification of Peace at Pa- 7 24 58|14 8 9 27 


11 38 




4 


Satur 


[ris, 1783.7 14 59 14 14 10 27 


7 


op 


5 


A 


Earthquake in Sicily, 1780. 7 05 14 19 1126 


38 




6 


Mend 


Alliance between France and 6 59. 5 1 14 24 7??orn 


1 10 


b 


7 


Tuesd 


[the United States, 1778. 6 5S'5 2jl4 27 27 


1 46 




8 


Wedn 


Earthquake at London, 1760. 6 57 5 3 14 30 1 29 


2 29 




9 


Thurs 


New- York Sur. to Eng. 1674.6 55 5 5.U 32 2 30 3 39 


n 


10 


Frid 


Dr. Hutton died. 1823. ,6 54*5 6']4 33' 3 27 


5 3 




lllSatur 


DeWitl CJinton died 1828. 6 .53j5 7 14 34' 4 20 


6 31 


2S 


I2| A 


[1779.6 52 5 814 34l 5 5 


7 41 




]3JMond 


C'apt. Cook killed at Owyhee 6 50 5 1014 32 5 47 


8 32 


a 


HiTuesd 


Valentine. Sir Wm. Black- 6 49 5 11 14 31; 6 22 


9 17 




15|We,in 


[stone died, 17S0. 6 48,5 12,14 2?i rises. 


10 


w 


l6|Thurs 


Lindley Murray died, 1826. 6 46 5 14 14 25^ 8 23llO 41 




17|Frid 


Peace with Eng. ratified, 1815. 6 45 5 15 14 2l! 9 40[ll 23]:^ 


iSSatur 


Martin Luiher died, 1546. 6 43'5 17 14 16 10 56 morn 




19 A 


'6 42'5 18:14 10 mora 


3 


ni 


20|Moftd 


Voltaire born. 1694. * 6 41 


5 19,14 4' 11 


45 




21jTuesd 


:6 39 


5 21 13 57 1 20 


1 27 


f 


22Wedn 


Washington born 1732. 6 38 


5 22 13 50; 2 27 


2 19 




23|Thurs 


Sir J. Reynolds died, 1792. \6 36 


5 24 13 42 3 26 


3 26 




24Frid 


U. S. ship Hornet captured 6 35 


5 25 13 33' 4 12 


4 57 


\S 


25Satur 


[the Peacock, 1S13.6 33 


5 27113 24 4 51 


6 30 




26 A 


Kemblp, tragedian, died, 1323. 6 32 


5 28 13 15' 5 25 


7 40 


^ 


27|Mond 


Elias Hicks died, 1830. 6 31 


5 29 13 4 5 51 


8 30 




2S 


Tuesd 


6 29 


5 3l|l2 53 6 14 


9 8 


X 



Venus will be Morning Star till Feb. 16, then Evening Star till Dec. 
18, then again Morning Star the rest of the year. 



tion of the U. S. government, and first occupied in 1800. Congress 
meets on the first Monday in December in every year, unless otherwise 
directed by law. The area of States and organized Territories is about 
1,000,000 square miles; and the population, in 1840, was 17,068,666. 

The State Governments are very similar to that of the Federal Go- 
vernment in their organization, being each composed of an executive, le- 
gislative, and judicial department- 

STATES AND TERRITORIES. 

Maine. — Settled in 1630, by English ; belonged to Massachusetts till 
1820, when it was admitted into the Union as a State; capital. Augusta. 
The elective franchise rests on a residence in the State of 3 months next 
preceding any election. Area, 2S,960sq. miles, having an estimated area 
of 3,000 sq. miles taken from it by the late treaty. Pop. in 1840—501,793. 



1843 — 3(1 Mo. MARCH, begins on Wednesday, hath 31 days 



MOON'S PHASES. 
First Quarter 9th, 4h. 55ni. morn. I Last Quarter 22d) 5h. 40m. eve. 
Full Moon 16th, Ih. 4m. morn. | New Moon 30th, 6h. 55m. eve. 



M W. 



Remarks. 



#R.0S.#sZo 


R.^S. 


H.W. 


6 28 5 32 


12 42 


sets. 


9 41 


6 27 5 33 


12 30 


7 20 


10 13 


6 25 5 35 


12 18 


8 20 


10 40 


6 24 5 36 


12 5 


9 18 


11 9 


6 22 5 38 


il 51 


10 18 


11 37 


6 21 5 39 


11 37 


10 59 


5 


6 19 5 41 


11 23 


morn 


36 


6 18 5 42 


11 8 


18 


1 13 


6 17 5 43 


10 53 


1 13 


1 57 


6 15 5 45 


10 38 


2 8 


2 57 


6 13 5 47 


10 22 


2 56 


4 27 


6 12 5 48 


10 6 


3 38 


6 


6 10 5 50 


9 49 


4 14 


75 1 


6 95 51 


9 33 


4 48 


86 


6 8 5 52 


9 16 


5 18 


8 51 


6 7 5 53 


8 58 


rises. 


9 32 


6 5 5 55 


8 41 


8 32 


10 14 


6 4 5 56 


8 23 


9 50 


10 57 


6 25 58 


8 5 


11 6 


11 40 


6 15 £9 


7 47 


morn 


morn 


5 59 6 1 


7 29 


17 


22 


5 58 6 2 


7 11 


1 19 


1 8 


5 566 4 


6 52 


2 10 


2 


5 556 5 


6 3-1 


2 52 


3 5 


5 53|6 7 


6 15 


3 26 


4 36 


5 52,6 8 


5 57 


3 54 


6 6 


5 51 6 9 


5 39 


4 20 


7 15 


5 49 6 11 


5 20 


4 42 


8 2 


5 48 


6 12 


5 2 


5 5 


8 40 


5 46 


6 14 


4 43 


5 29 


9 11 


5 45 


6 15 


4 25 


sets. 


9 40 



Weda 
Thurs 
Frid 
Satur 

A 
Mond 
Tuesd 
Wedu 
Thurs 
Frid 
Satur 

A 
Mond 
Tuesd 
Wedn 
Thurs 
Frid 
Satur 

A 
Mond 
Tuesd 
Wedn 
Thurs 
Frid 
Satur 

A 
Mond 
Tuesd 
AVedn 
Thurs 
Frid 



Bonaparte ar. from Elba, 1815. 
John Wesley died 1791. 
Washineton first elected Pre- 
[sident, 1789. 
James Madison born, 1751. 
CoJ. Crockett killed, 1836. 
Am. fr. Randolph bl. up, 1778. 
Boston Massacre, 1770. 

Bonaparte def. at Laon, 1814. 
Benjamin West died, 1820. 



Plan. Geor. Sidus disc'd, 1781, 

Andrew Jackson born 1767. 

Bowditch died 1838. 

St. Patrick. 

Stamp Act repealed, 1766. 

Equal length day and night. 
Sir Isaac Newton died, 1727. 
Fire at New Orleans, 1788. 
Em. Paul assassinated, 1801. 
Queen Elizabeth died, 1603. 
Rev. Bishop White born, 1767. 
First Printing in Eng. 1471. 
Embargo Law, 1794. 
Raphael born, 1483. 
Gustavus III. assas. 1792. 
Battle of Growchow, 1831, 
Earthquake at Lisbon, 1761. 



T 



X 



op 



New-Hampshire.— Settled in 1623 by English; acceded to the Union, 
June, 1788 ; capital. Concord. Every citizen of 21 years has the right 
to vote. Area, 9,2S0 sq. miles. Pop. in 1840—284,574. 

Massachusetts. — Settled in 1620, bj English; acceded to the Union 
in February, 1788; capital, Boston. One year's residence in the Stale 
and payment of a state or county tax, gives the right to vote. Area, 
7,800 sq. miles. Pop. in 1840—737,698. 

Rhode Island. — Settled in 1636, by English from Massachusetts; ac- 
ceded to the Union in May, 1790; capitals. Providence and Newport. 
By the constitution recently adopted, the qualifications for voting may 
be stated, omitting details, to be a freehold possession worth $134 — or, 
if in reversion, renting for $7, together with a year's residence in the 
state and six months in the town ; or, if no freehold, then two years re- 
sidence in the state and six months in the town, and payment of a dol- 



1843 — Ith Mo. APRIL, begins on Saturday, hath 30 days. • 

MOONS PHASES, 
First Quarter 7th, 6h. 13m. eve. I Last Quarter 2lst, 7h. 33m. morn. 
Full Moon 14th, 9h. 35m. morn. | New Moon 29th, llh. 25m. morn. 



M 


W. 


Remarks. 


0R. 


0S. 


msio 


R.^S. 


H-W. 
10 9 


• 


1 


Satur 


All Fools Day. 


5 43 


6 17 


4 7 


8 10 




2 


A 


Jefferson born, 1743. 


5 42 


6 18 


3 49 


9 11 


10 39 


« 


3 


Mond 


Eruption Mt. Tomboro, 1815, 


5 41 


6 19 


3 31 


10 10 


11 8 




4 


Tuesd 


Goldsmith died, 1774. Harri- 


5 39 


6 21 


3 13 


11 9 


11 39 


n 


5 


Wedn 


[son died, 1841. 


5 38 


6 22 


2 55 


morn 


n 




6 


Thurs 




5 37 


6 23 


2 37 


2 


51 




7 


Frid 


Revolution in Brazil, 1831. 


5 36 


6 24 


2 20 


51 


1 39 


25 


8 


Satur 


[Poles, 1831. 


5 34 


6 26 


2 3 


1 34 


2 37 




9 


A 


Rusians defeated by the 


5 3216 28 


1 46 


2 11 


4 3 


a 


10 


Mond 


Bank of U. S. incorp. 1816. 


5 31 


6 29 


1 29 


2 43 


5 28 




11 


Tuesd 


Bonaparte abdicated, 1814. 


5 30 


6 30 


1 12 


3 15 


6 40 


rrji 


12 


Wedn 




5 28 


6 32 


56 


'3 41 


7 36 




13 


Thurs 


[repealed, 1814. 


5 27 


6 33 


40 


4 13 


8 22 


=2: 


14 


Frid 


Good Friday. Embargo lavv^ 


5 25 


6 35 


24 


4 45 


9 5 




15 


Satur 


Shakspeare born, 1564. 


5 24 


6 36 


9 


7-ises. 


9 51 


TU 


16 


A 


Easter. 


5 23 


6 37 


fa 6 


9 55 


10 36 




17 


Mond 


Dr. Franklin died, 1790. 


5 21 


6 39 


21 


11 3 


11 20 


t 


18 


Tuesd 


Lord Byron died, 1824. 


5 20 


6 40 


35 


morn 


morn 




19 


Wedn 


Battle of Lexington 1775. 


5 18 


6 42 


49 


2 


5 


v? 


20 


Thurs 




5 17 


.6 43 


1 2 


1 26 


52 




21 


Frid 


Texians de. Santa Anna, 1836. 


5 16 


6 44 


1 15 


1 57 


1 45 


^^ 


22 


Satur 


Br. steamer Sirius ar., 1838. 


5 14 


6 46 


1 28 


2 24 


2 46 




23 


A 


Shakspeare died, 1616. 


5 13 6 47 


1 40 


2 47 


4 6 




24 


Mond 


Brazil discovered, 1500. 


5 12 6 48 


1 51 


3 10 


5 20 


>£ 


25 


Tuesd 


Cowper died, 1800. 


5 10 


6 50 


2 2 


3 32 


6 28 




26 


Wedn 


Hume born, 1711. 


5 9 


6 51 


2 13 


3 55 


7 21 


cp 


27 


Thurs 




5 86 52 


2 23 


4 20 


8 




28 


Frid 


James Monroe born, 1758. 


5 76 53 


2 33 


4 49 


8 37 




29 


Satur 




5 5 6 55 2 42 


sets. 


9 9 


b 


30 


A 


Lousiana ceded to the U. S. 5 4|6 56l 2 50 


8 5 


9 42 





lar of tax, or militia service instead. Area, 1,363 ^q. miles. Pop. in 
1840—108,830. 

Connecticut. — Settled in 1633, by English, from Massachusetts ; ac- 
ceded to the Union in January, 1788; capitals, New- Haven and Hartford^ 
Residence of 6 months, or militia duty for a year, or payment of State 
tax, or a freehold of the yearly value of $7 — gives the right to vote. 

Vermont. — Settled in 1763, by English, chiefly from Connecticut, un- 
der grants from New-Hampshire; admitted into the Union in 1791 ; capi- 
tal, Montpelier. One year's residence gives the right to vote. Area, 
10,205 sq. miles. Pop. in 1840—291,948. 

New- York.— Settled in 1614 by Dutch ; submitted to the English in 
1664 ; retaken by the Dutch in 1673; restored to the English in 1674 ; ac- 
ceded to the Union in July, 1788 ; capital, Albany. One year's residence 
in the state and six months in the county gives the right to vote ; but 
every man of color must have a residence of 3 years, and have owned 



1843— 5th Mo. MAY, begins on Monday, hath 31 days. 


MOON'S PHASES, 


First Quarter 7th, 3h. 30m. morn. | Last Quarter 20lh, 1 Ih. Ora. eve. 


Fu 


U Moon 13th, 5h. 50m. eve. | New Moon 29th, 2h. Om. morn. ] 


M 


W. 


Remarks. 


0R. 


0S.0ya*JR.»s. 


H.W. 


• 


1 


Mond 




5 3 


6 57 2 58 9 3 


10 13 


n 


2 


Tuesd 


Battle of Lutzen, 1813. 


5 2 


6 58 3 6 9 59 


10 45 




3 


Wedn 


Bonaparte dec. Emperor, 1804. 


5 


7 


3 13 10 49 


11 20 




4 


Thurs 




4 59 


7 1 


3 19 


11 32 


11 57 


25 


.5 


Frid 


Nap. Bonaparte died' 1821. 


4 58 


7 2 3 25 


morn 


38 




6 


Satur 


Battle of Prague, 1757. 


4 57 


7 3 3 31 


10 


1 29 


a 


7 


A 


Cape Ilaytien des. by earth- 


4 56 


7 4 


3 35 


43 


2 25 




8 


Mond 


Gibbon b. 1647. [quake, 1842. 


4 55 


7 5 


3 40 


1 15 


3 41 


w 


9 


Tuesd 




4 54 


7 6 


3 43 


1 43 


4 53 




10 


Wedn 


West Indies discovered, 1497. 


4 53 


7 7 


»47 


2 11 


6 4 


^s. 


11 


Thurs 


Wm. Pill died, 1778. 


4 52 


7 8 


3 49 


2 40 


7 1 




12!Frid 




4 51 


7 9 


3 51 


3 14 


7 53 


HI 


ISS'atur 


Jamestown, Va. settled, 1607. 


4 50 


7 10 


3 53 


3 50 


8 42 




14 A 


Bishop Porieous died, 1809. 


4 49 


7 11 


3 54 


rises. 


9 33 


t 


15Mond 


Baron Cuvier died, 1832. 


4 48 


7 ]2 


3 54 


9 45 


10 21 




IGTuesd Eng. dec. war asit. Fr , 1804. 


4 47 


7 13 


3 54 


10 38 


11 5 




17iWedn 


Revolution in Venice, 1797. 


4 46 


7 14 


3 53 


11 22 


11 50 


V5' 


ISThurs 




4 45 


7 15 


3 51 


11 56 


morn. 




19Frid 


Sir Joseph Banlvs died, 1820. 


4 44 


7 16 


3 49 


morn 


36 


A^ 


20'Satur 


Columbus died, 1506. La Fay- 


4 43 


7 17 


3 47 


24 


1 27 




21 A 


[ette died, 1834. 


4 42 


7 18 


3 44 


49 


2 18 


X 


22'Mond 


Pope born, 1688. 


4 41 


7 19 


3 40 


1 12 


3 18 




23:Tuesd 


Fed. Con. met in Phil , 1787. 


4 40 


7 20 


3 36 


1 34 


4 25 




24! Wed n 


Queen Victoria born, 1819. 


4 39 


7 21 


3 31 


1 57 


5 25 


T 


25Thurs 


Paley born, 1743, died, 1805. 


4 38 


7 22 


3 26 


2 21 


6 24 




26'Frid 


Calvin, died, 1564. 


4 37 


7 23 


3 20 


2 48 


7 16 


« 


27 Satur 




4 37 


7 23 


3 13 


3 19 


7 58 




28 A 


Willim Pitt born, 17.59. 


4 36 


7 24 


3 7 


3 56 


8 37 




29 Mend 


Att on Sackett's Har. 1813. 


4 35 


7 25 


2 59 


sets. 


9 16 


n 


30 Tuesd 


Pope, the Poet, d. 1764 [Vol 


4 34 


7 26 


2 52 


8 46 


9 53 




31 Wedn 


[taire died, 1778. 


4 33 


7 27 


2 43 


9 31 


10 30 


25 


and paid taxes on a freehold assessed at $250 for a year. Area, 46,200 sq. 


miles. Pop. in 1S40— 2,428,921. 


New-Jersey. — Settled in 1627, by Swedes ; conquered by the Dutch 


in 1655; submitted lo the English in 1664; acceded to the Union in De- 


cember, 17S7 ; capital, Trenton. One year's residence in the State gives 


the right to vote. Area, 6,900 sq. miles. Pop. in 1840— 373,306. 


Pennsylvania. — Settled in 1682, by English; acceded to the Union in 


December, 1787 ; capital Harrisburg. One year's residence in the State 


and ten days in the election district, and payment of a state or county 


tax assessed ten days prior to an election, give the right to vote, except 


that citizens between 21 and 22 years of age need not have paid a tax. 


Area, 43,960 sq. miles. Pop. in 1840—1,724,033. 


Delaware. — Settled in 1627 by Swedes; granted to Wm. Penn in 


1682; separated in 1703; acceded to the Union in Dec. 1787; capital, Do- 


ver. Qualifications of voters the same as in Pennsylvania. Area, 2,068 


sq. miles. Pop. in 1840—78,085. 



1843— 6th Mo. JUNE; begins on Thursday, hath 30 days. 



MOON'S PHASES. 
First Quarter 5th, 9h. 41m. morn. I Last Quarter 19th, 3h. 36m. eve. 
Full Moon 12th, 2h. 17m. morn. | New Moon 27th, 2h. 26m. eve. 



M 



W. 



Thurs 

Frid 

Satur 

A 
Mond 
Tues 
Wedn 
Thurs 
Frid 
Satur 

A 
Mond 
Tues 
Wedn 
Thurs 
Frid 
Satur 

A 
Mond 
Tues 
Wedn 
Thurs 
Frid 
Satur 

A 
Mond 
Tues 
Wedn 
Thurs 
Frid 



Remarks. 



0R. m S. #/as R.©s. H.W. Z 



Port of Boston shut 1774. 
Peace with Fr. and Eng. 1814. 
Earthquake in N. Eng., 1744. 
Henry Grattan died, 1820. 

Bot. Soc. fou'd in Phil., 1806. 
Wash'gt'n ap. com in ch'f 1775. 
Cholera appears in America, 
[1832, 

Malta taken by Bonap. 1798. 
N. York incorporated, 1665. 
Martin Luther excommun'ed 

Battle of Saragossa. 1809. 
Great eclipse, 1806. 
Battle of Bunker Hill 1775. 
War declared, 1812. Battle of 
[Waterloo 1815 
William IV. died, 1837. 
Victorio pro. Queen, 1837. 

Akenside died, 1772. 
Nativity St John Baptist. 
Battle of Charleston, 1776. 
George IV. died, 1830. 
Dr. Dodd exe. for forg. 1777. 
Battle of Monmouth, 1778. 

[Jas. Madison died, 1836. 
Sultan Mahomed died, 1839. 



33,7 
327 
32]7 
317 
31j7 
30 ! 7 
30,7 
307 
29'7 
29 7 
29 7 
28'7 
28 7 
287 
287 



27 7 
2717 
27i7 
27i7 
27 1 7 
27[7 
27|7 



2 35 
2 26 
2 16 
2 7 
1 57 
1 46 
1 36 
1 25 
1 13 
1 2 
50 
038 
26 
14 
1 
slo 11 
24 
37 

50 

1 3 
1 16 
1 29 
1 42 

1 55 

2 8 
2 20 
2 33 
2 45 

2 68 

3 10 



10 12 

10 47 

11 18 
11 46 
morn 

14 

41 

1 11 

1 45 

2 25 

3 14 

4 11 
rises. 

9 53 
10 25 

10 52 

11 16 
11 38 
.norii 

1 
24 

50 

1 19 

1 53 

2 34 

3 21 
sets. 
8 11 

8 47 

9 22 



11 5 
11 46 

28 



18 
12 
13 
23 
24 
33 
35 

8 30 

9 21 
10 9 

10 54 

11 37 
morn 

17 

1 

1 44 

2 27 

3 17 

4 22 



5 21 

6 24 

7 23 

8 10 

8 52 

9 34 
10 14 
10 56 



a 



Maryland. — Settled in 1634 by English; acceded to the Union in 
April, 1788 ; capital, Annapolis. One year's residence in the Slate and 
six months in the county gives the right to vote. Area, 10,829 sq. miles. 
Pop. in 1840—469,232. 

Virginia. — Settled in 1607, by the English ; acceded to the Union in 
June, 1788; capital, Richmond. A freehold in possession, or in the oc- 
cupancy of only a tenant at will or sufferance, worth $25 — or the rever- 
sion of a freehold, to vest on the termination of a life estate, and worth 
$50, — or a leasehold of the yearly value of $20, for a term not less than 
5 years, — or the payment of a state tax within the year by a housekeep- 
er who is head of a family, and has a year's residence, gives the right 
of voting to every citizen, except paupers, felons, and persons in the ar- 
my or navy, not having commissions. Area, 64,000 sq. miles. Pop. in 
1840—1,239,797. 



1«43 — 7th Mo. JULY, begins on Saturday, hath 31 days. 


MOON'S PHASES. 


First Quarter 4th, 2h. 9ra. eve. Last Quarter 19th, 8h. 46m. morn. 


Full Moon 11th, Oh. 12m. eve. New Moon 27th, Oh. 48m. morn. 


M 


W. 


Remarks. 


0R. 


0S.0sZo 


R.Os. 


H.W. 


• 


1 


Satur 


Massacre at Wyoming, 1778. 


4 28 


7 32 


3 22 


9 50 


11 36 




2 


A 




4 29 


7 31 


3 33 


10 17 


16 


w 


3 


Mond 


Fort Erie taken. 1844.^ 


4 29 


7 31 


3 45 


10 46 


1 2 




4 


Tues 


Independ. Adams and Jeff. 


4 29 


7 31 


3 56 


11 14 


1 53 


;£;. 


5 


Wedn 


[died, 1826. Monroe, 1831. 


4 30 


7 30 4 7 


11 46 


2 47 




6 


Thurs 


John Marshall died, 1835. 


4 30 


7 30 4 17 


morn 


3 49 


n. 


7 


Frid 


Sheridan died, 1816. 


4 30 


7 30 


4 27 


23 


4 59 




8 Satur 


Edmund Burke died,- 1797. 


4 3] 


7 29 


4 37 


1 6 


6 15 


t 


9 A 


Braddock defeated, 1754. 


4 31 


7 29 


4 46 


1 59 


7 23 




10 Mond 


Columbus born, 1447. 


4 32 


7 28 


4 55 


2 58 


8 22 


\3 


11 Tucsd 


John Q. Adams born, 1767. 


4 32 


7 28 


5 3 


4 6 


9 13 




12 Wedn 


Alex. Hamilton died, 1804. 


4 33 


7 27 


5 11 


rises. 


10 




13 


Thurs 


Duke of Orleans killed, 1842. 


4 34 


7 26 


5 19 


8 53 


10 40 


A.V 


14 


Frid 


French Rev. com. 1789. 


4 34 


7 26! 5 26 


9 18 


11 19 




15 


Satur 




4 35 


7 25 


5 32 


9 42 


11 54 


X 


16 


A 


Stony Poinftaken, 1779. 


4 36 


7 24 


5 38 


10 5 


morn 




17 


Mond 


Bishop White died, 1836. 


4 37 


7 23 


5 44 


10 27 


27 


T 


18 


Tues 


Pope John XVIII. died, 1009.|4 37 


7 23 


•5 49 


10 51 


1 3 




19 


Wedn 


George IV. Crowned, 1821. 


4 38 


7 22 


5 54 


11 19 


1 41 




20 


Thurs 




4 39 


7 21 


5 58 


11 53 


2 22 


y 


21 


Frid 


Robert Burns died, 1796. 


4 40 


7 20 


6 1 


morn 


3 11 




22 


Satur 




4 41 


7 19 


6 5 


29 


4 21 


n 


23 


A 


Gibraltar taken, 1704. 


4 42 


7 18 6 7 


1 13 


5 32 




24 


Mond 


Battle of Niagara, 1759. 


4 43 


7 17 6 9 


2 2 


6 45 




2,3 


Tues 


St. James. Bolivar born, 1783. 


4 44 


7 16 6 10 


3 6 


7 46122 


26 


Wedn 


Battle of Aboukir, 1799. 


4 45 


7 15 6 11 


4 10 


8 341 


27 


Thurs 


Com. Bainbridge died 1833. 


4 46 


7.14 6 11 


sets. 


9 17 


a 


28 


Frid 


Robespiere guillotined, 1794. 


4 47 


7 13 6 11 


7 44 


9 58 




29 


Satur 


Revolution in France, 1830. 


4 48 


7 12 6 10 


8 20 


10 39 


n 


30 


A 


T. Gray, the Poet, died, 1771. 


4 49 


7 116 8 


8 49 


11 18 




31 


Mond 


French Rev. triumphant, 1830. 


4 50 


7 10! 6 6 


9 18 


11 59;^ 1 


North Carolina. — Settled in 1650 by English; acceded to the Union 


November 21, 1789; capital Raleigh; every citizen of the State one year 


may vote for a member of the House of Commons, but must own fifty 


acres of land to vote for a Senator. Area, 4S,000 sq. miles. Pop. in 


1840—753,419. 


South Carolina. — Settled in 1689, by English; acceded to the Union, 


May 23, 1788 ; capital, Columbia ; voters, residents of the Stale two years, 


and six months of the district where voting ; area, 24,000 square miles 


Pop. in 1840—594,398. 


Georgia. — Settled in 1733, by English; acceded to the Union January 


2,1788; capital, Milledgeville; voters, citizens of the State and six months 


resident of county where voting, and have paid taxes. Area, 60,000 sq. 


miles. Pop. in 1840—691,392. 



1«43— Sth Mo. AUGUST, begins on Tuesday, hath 31 days. 

MOON'S PHASES. 
First Quarter 2il. 6h. SSin. eve. I Last Quarter 18th, Ih. 56m. morn. 
Full moon 10th, Oli. Im.raorn. New Moon 25th, 9h. 41m. morn. 



M 


W. 


Remarks. 


€sR. 


#s. 


B slo 


R.Os. 


H.W 


i) 


1 


Tues 


Continent of America disco- 


4 51 


7 9 


6 3 


9 50 


41 




2 


Wedn 


[vered, 1498, O. S. 


4 52 


7 8 


6 


10 25 


1 P7 


Til 


3 


Thurs 


Trial of Aaron Burr, 1807. 


4 53 


7 7 


5 56 


11 6 


2 17 




4 


Frid 


Crown Point taken, 1759. 


4 54 


7 6 


5 51 


11 54 


3 19 


t 


5 


Satur 




4 55 


7 5 


5 46 


morn 


4 40 




6 


A 


Transfiguration. 


4 56 


7 4 


5 40 


50 


6 6 


vs 


7 


Mond 


Queen Caroline died, 1821. 


4 57 


7 3 


5 33 


1 54 


7 20 




8 


Tues 


Meeting at Ghent, 1814. 


4' 58 


7 2 


5 26 


3 


8 17 




9 


Wedn 


Acces. of Louis Philip, 1830. 


4 59 


7 1 


5 18 


4 8 


9 5 


^? 


10 


Thurs 




5 


7 


5 10 


rise-i. 


9 46 




11 


Frid 


Dog Days end. 


5 2 


6 58 


5 1 


7 45 


10 20 




12 


Satur 


Geroge IV. born, 1762. 


5 3 


6 57 


4 51 


8 8 


10 .52 


X 


13 


A 


Battle of Queenston, 1814. 


5 4 


6 56 


4 41 


8 30 


11 24 




14 


Mond 


Florida War terminated, 1842. 


5 5 


6 55 


4 31 


8 54 


11 53 


T 


15 


Tues 


Nap. Bonaparte born 1769. 


5 7 


6 53 


.4 20 


9 20 


morn 




16 


Wedn 


Lafayette arr. at N. Y- 1824. 


5 8 


6 52 


4 8 


9 50 


25 


8 


17 


Thurs 


Frod. the Great died, 1786. 


5 9 


6 51 


3 56 


10 22 


58 




18 


Frid 


James Beattie difd. 1803. 


5 10 


6 50 


3 43 


11 6 


1 34 




19 


Satur 


Guerriere taken, 1812. [1842. 


5 12 


6 48 


3 30 


11 52 


2 20 


n 


20 


A 


Tr. of Wash. rat. by U. S. S. 


5 13 


6 47 


3 17 


morn 


3 25 




21 


Mond 


William IV^. born, 1765. 


5 14 


6 46 


3 2 


48 


4 48 


25 


22 


Tues 


Bat. of Bosworth Field, 14S5. 


5 15 


6 45 


2 48 


1 50 


6 12 


a 


23 


Wedn 


Washinsion City taken by the 


5 17 


6 43 


2 33 


2 59 


7 19 


24 


Thurs 


[British, IS 14. 


5 18 6 42 


2 18 


4 13 


8 12 




25 


Frid 


W. Herschel died 1822. 


5 20 


6 40 


2 2 


sets. 


8 56 


w 


26 


Satur 




5 21 


6 39 


1 46 


6 49 


36 




27 


A 


Battle on Long Island, 1776. 


5 23 


6 37 


1 29 


7 20 


10 16 




2S 


Mond 


St. Augustin. 


5 24 


9 36 


1 12 


7 50 


10 55 


=^ 


29 


Tues 


St Jolin Baptist beheaded. 


5 25 


6 35 


55 


8 25 


11 37 




30 VVedn 


Paley born, 1743. 


5 27 


6 33 


37 9 5 


19 


"I 


31 Thurs 


Bunyan died, 1688. 5 28 


6 32 


19 9 53 


1 3 






Alabama — Settled in 1713 by French; admitted into the Union in 
1820; capital, Tuscaloosa; voters, citizens of the United States, one year 
resident in the state, and three months in the county where he shall offer 
to vote. Area, 50,875 square miles. Pop. in 1840 — 590,756. 

Mississrpi. — Settled in 1716 by French; admitted into the Union in 
1817; voters, citizens of the United States, one year resident in the state, 
and in the county six months, and have done military duty, or paid 
taxes; capital, Jackson. Area, 45,375 sq. miles. Pop. in 1840 — 375,651. 

LoTJsiANiA. — Settled in 1699 by French; purchased of France in 1803; 
admitted into the Union in 1812; voter to reside one year in the county 
and paid taxes within the last six months; capital. New Orleans. Area, 
48,000 square miles. Pop. in 1840— 352,411. 

Tennessee. — Settled in 1765 by emigrants from North Carolina and 
Virginia; admitted into the Union in 1796; voters, citizens of the United 



1843— 9th Mo. SEPTEMBER, begins on Friday, hath 30 days. 



MOON'S PHASES. 
First Quarter 1st, Oh. 38m. morn. I New Moon 23d, 5h. 59m. eve. 
Full moon 8th, 2h. 4m. eve. First Quarter 30th, 9h. 17m. morn. 

Last Quarter 16lh,6h. 19m. eve. | 



M 


W. 


Remarks. 


BR. 0S. 0/as 


R.©s. H.W 


• 


1 


Frid 


Steele, the Poet, died, 1729. 


5 30 6 30 





10 45 1 55 


J 


2 


Satur 


London burnt, 1666. 0. S. 


5 31 6 29 


18 


Jl 45 2 59 


3 


A 


Peace ratified, 1658. 


5 32 6 28 


37 


morn 4 27 


ys 


4 


Mond 


Brit, brig Boxer cap. 1813. 


5 33,6 27 


57 


50 5 59 


5 


Tuesd 


First Con. met in Phila. 1774. 


5 35 6 25 


1 16 


1 56! 7 10 


/w.- 


6 


Wedn 


Lafayette born, 1757. 


5 36 6 24 


1 36 


3 2 


8 4 


/w 


7 


Thurs 


Hannah Moore died, 1833. 


5 37 6 23 


1 56 


4 6 


8 46 




8 


Frid 


Nativity of Virgin Mary. 


5 39 6 21 


2 17 


5 8 


9 20 


K 


9 


Satur 




5 40,6 20 


2 37 


rises. 


9 52 




10 


A 


Perry's victory L. Erie, 1812. 


5 42 6 18 


2 58 


6 57 


10 23 


T 


11 


Mond 


M'Don. vict. L. Champ. 1814. 


5 43 6 17 


3 19 


7 23|]0 52 




12 


Tues 


Bishop Hobart died, 1830. 


5 44 6 16 


3 39 


7 5i:il 22 


^ 


13 


Wedn 


New London burnt, 1781. 


5 46 6 14 


4 


8 24 11 50 




14 


Thurs 




5 47 6 13 


4 21 


9 1 iinorn 




15 


Frid 


Moscow burnt, 1812. 


5 496 11 


4 43 


9 43l 22 


n 


16 


Satur 


New- York taken, 1776. 


5 50 6 10 


5 4 


10 35 


58 




17 


A 


Matthew Carey died, 1839. 


5 52;6 8 


5 25 


11 33 


1 42 


2S 


18 


Mond 




5 53 6 7 


5 46 7nor7i 


2 45 




19 


Tuesd 


Battle of Poictiers, 1356. 


5 54 6 6 


6 7 


37 


4 12 




20 


Wedn 




5 56 6 4 


6 28 


1 45 5 38 


a 


21 


Thurs 


Sir Walter Scott died, 1832. 


5 576 3 


6 49 


2 56 


6 52 


22 


Frid 


Eq. length of day and nights. 


5 59 6 1 


7 10 


4 12 


7 42 


w 


23 


Satur 




6 06 


7 31 


sets. 


8 28 


24 


A 


Don Pedro died, 1834. 


6 2'5 58 


7 51 


5 45 


9 7 


^Si 


25 


Mond 


Columbus sailed from Cadiz. 


6 3'5 57 


8 12 


6 20 


,9 48 




26 


Tues 


[1493. 


6 55 55 


8 32 


7 


10 32 


"I 


27 


Wedn 


Earthquake at Mexico, 1717. 


6 6 5 54 


8 52 


7 46 


11 14 


28 


Thurs 


Detroit taken, 1813. 


6 7 5 53 


9 12 


8 39 


11 58 


f 


29 


Frid 


St. Michael. 


6 85 52 


9 32 


9 39 


44 


30 


Satur 


St. Jerome. 


6 10 5 .50 


9 52 


10 44 


1 38 


V? 



States, and six months resident in the county where voting; capital, 
Nashville. Area, 40,000 sq. miles. Pop. in 1840—829,210. 

Kentucky.— Settled in 1775 by Virginians ; admitted into the Union 
■n 1792 ; voters, two years resident in the State, and in the county where 
offering to vote, one year preceding the election ; capital, Frankfort. 
Area, 42,000 sq. miles. Pop. in 1840, 779,828. 

Ohio. — Settled in 1788, by emigrants principally from New-England; 
admitted into the Union in 1802; voters, one year resident in the Slate 
preceding the election, having paid or been charged with state or county 
tax; capital, Columbus. Area, 39,000 square miles. Pop. in 1840 — 
1,519,467. 

I.VDiANA. — Settled in 1730 by French; admitted into the Union in 1816; 
voter, one year resident in the State preceding the election, entitled to 
vote in county of residence; capital, Indianapolis. Area, 36,000 square 
raUes. Pop. in 1840—685,866. 

3 



1843— lOth Mo. OCTOBER, begins on Sunday, hath 31 days. 

"~ MOON'S PHASES. 

Full Moon 8th, 6h. 22m. morn. I New Moon 23d, 2h. 42m. morn. 

Last Quarter 16th, 9h. 6m. morn. | First Quarter 29th, 9h. 4Sm. eve. 



M 



W. 



Remarks. 



#R. m S. #/asR.©s.iH. W. • 



Mond 

Tues 

Wedn 

Thurs 

Frid 

Satur 

A 
Mond 
Tues 
Wedn 
Thurs 
Frid 
Satur 

A 
Mond 
Tues 
Wedn 
Thurs 
Frid 
Satur 

A 
Mond 
Tues 
Wedn 
Thurs 
Frid* 
Satur 

A 
Mond 
Tues 



First S. boat to Albany, 1807. 
Maj. Andre ex. 1780. Dr. 
[Channingdied, 1S42. 
Battle of Germantown, 1777. 

Peace with England, 1783. 
Fire in Mobile,500 build. 1839. 
Dr. A. Kippis died, 1795. 
S. Boat Home wrecked, 1837. 

Battle of Camperdown, 1797. 
America discovered, 1492. 
Battle of Queenston, 1812. 
Croton Celebration, 1842. 

Burgoyne taken, 1777. 

Battle of Leipsic, 1813. 
Cornwallis taken, 1781. 
Egypt, fleet des. at Navarino, 
Nelson killed, 1805. [1827' 
Battle of Red Bank, 1777. 

Macedonian taken, 1812. 

Philadelphia settled, 1692. 

Battle of White Plains, 1776 

John Adams born, 1735. 



6 12 5 
6 13 



6 15 
6 16 
6 17 
6 18 
6 20 
6 21 
6 23 
6 24 
6 26 
6 27 
6 28 
6 30 
6 31 



10 11 
10 30 

10 49 

11 7 
11 25 

11 43 

12 1 
12 18 
12 34 

12 50 

13 6 
13 21 
13 36 

13 50 
14 

14 17 
14 29 
14 41 

14 52 

15 3 
15 13 
15 22 
15 31 
15 39 
15 46 
15 52 

15 58 
16 
16 

16 11 
16 14 



11 51 

morn 

57 

1 59 

3 3 

4 4 

5 2 

6 2 
rises. 

6 27 



10 26 

11 29 
morn 

37 

1 47 

3 

4 15 

5 33 
sets 

5 35 

6 29 

7 28 

8 33 

9 42 

10 48 

11 52 
morn. 



2 48 

4 12 

5 39 

6 51 

7 39 

8 17 

8 51 

9 23 
9 53 

10 23 

10 53 

11 23 
11 56 
morn. 

36 



X 



T 



19 
19 
39 
2 
14 
10 
56 

8 40 

9 26 
10 11 

10 56 

11 42 

31 

1 23 

2 24 

3 42 



Illinois.— Settled in 1749 by French; admitted into the Union in 1818- 
voters, resident in the State six months, but can only vote in the county 
where actually residing; capital, Springfield. Area, 52,000 square miles 
Pop. in 1840—476,183. 

Missouri.— Settled in 1763 by French; admitted into the Union in 
1820; voters, citizens of the United States, one year resident in the State 
next preceding the election, and three months in the county; capital 
Jefferson City. Area, 60,000 square miles. Pop, in 1840-383,702. 

Arkansas. — Settled by French emigrants from Lousiania: admitted in- 
to the Union in 1836; voters, citizens of the United States, and resident in 
the State for six months ; capital. Little Rock. Area, 57,000 square 
miles. Pop. in 1840—97,574. 

Michigan.— Settled in 1670 by French; admitted into the Union in 
1836; voters, all white male citizens twenty-one years of age and 



1843— 11th Mo. NOVEMBER, begins on Wednesday, hath 30 days. 



MOON'S PHASES. 
Full Moon 7th, Oh. 2.Sm. morn. I New Moon 21st, Oh. 40m. eve. 
Last Quarter 14th, 9h. 39m. eve. | First Quarter 28th, 2h. 15m. eve. 



M 


W. 


Remarks. 


0R.0S. 


mfas 


R.#9. 


H.W 


• 


1 


Wedn 


All Saints. 


6 55 5 5 


16 16 


56 


4 59 


ii 


2 


Thurs 


All Souls. 


6 575 3 


16 17 


1 57 


7 




3 


Frid 


St. Jean d'Acre taken, 1840. 


6 58 5 2 


16 18 


2 56 


7 1 




4 


Satur 


Canal Celeb. N. Y. 1825. 


6 59 5 1 


16 17 


3 55 


7 44 T 


5 


A 


Gunpowder Plot, 1605. 


7 1 4 59 


16 16 


4 55 


8 22 


6 


Mond 


Princess Charlotte died, 1817. 


7 24 58 


16 14 


5 54 


8 55 « 


'7 


Tues 


New-York Election 1843. 


7 3 4 57 


16 12 


6 53 


9 28 




8 


Wedn 


Milton died 1674. 


7 44 56 


IQ 8 


rises. 


10 




9 


Thurs 


Montreal taj<en 1775. 


7 54 55 


16 4 


6 30 10 31 


n 


10 


Frid 


Dr. Spurzheim died, 1832. 


7 6,4 54 


15 58 


7 23 11 5 




11 


Saur 


St. Martin. 


7 74 53 


15 52 


8 19 11 38 


25 


12 


A 


Battle of Prescott, U. C. 1838. 


7 8 4 52 


15 45 


9 22 morn. 




13 


Mond 




7 9 4 51 


15 37 


10 28 


18 a 


14 


Tues 


Charles Carroll died 1832. 


7 104 50 


15 28 


11 32 


1 3 


15 


Wedn 




7 ll'4 49115 19 


morn. 


1 57 


16 


Thurs 




7 124 48 15 8 


41 


3 AW 


17 


Frid 


Riot in Boston, 1747. 


7 13 4 47 14 57 


I 52 


4 20 


18 


Satur 




7 144 46 14 45 


3 6 


5 30=5: 


19 


A 


Jay's treaty signed, 1794. 


7 154 45 


14 32 


4 22 


6 33 


20 


Mond 




7 16'4 44 


14 18 


5 41 


7 28 1U 


21 


Tues 


Cooke, tragedian, died, 1810. 


7 17 4 43' 14 3 


6 58 


8 19 


22 


Wedn 




7 18 4 42 13 47 


sets. 


9 8^ 


23 


Thurs 


St. Clement. 


7 194 4l|l3 31 


6 11 


9 57 


24 


Frid 


Peace with G. Britain, 1814. 


7 20 4 40 


13 14 


7 21 10 43 Vf 


2.5 


Satur 


New- York evacuated by the 


7 21 4 39 


12 56 


8 30 11 3l| 


26 


A 


[British, 1783. 


7 224 3S 


12 38 


9 40 


17 ox 


27 


Mond 


Great fire m Boston. 1676. 


7 23 4 37 


12 18 


10*44 


1 6 


28 


Tues 


Cardinal Wolsey died, l.')39. 


7 24 4 36 


n 58 


11 47 


1 57,K 


29 


Wedn 


Revolution in Poland, 1831. 


7 25 4 35 11 37 


morn. 


2 52, 


30 


Thurs 


St. Andrew. 


7 26U 34 11 16 


47 


4 ll 



resident in the State six months preceding election ; capital, Detroit 
Area, 65,000 square miles. Pop. in 1840—212,267. 

Florida Territory. — Settled early by Spaniards, being more than 200 
years under Spain; was ceded to the United States in 1819; East and 
West formed into one territory in 1822; capital, Tallahasse. Area, 
57,750 square miles. Pop. in 1840—54,477. 

Wisconsin. — Settled by emigrants chiefly from New-York and the 
New-England States; territorial government established April 20, 1836 ; 
capital, Madison. Area, 80,000 square miles. Pop. in 1840.-30,045. 

Iowa Territory. — Settled by emigrants chiefly from the northern and 
eastern states; territorial government established, June, 1838; capital 
Iowa City. Area, 150,000 square miles. Pop. in 1810— 43,112. 

The Indian Territory, inhabited by numerous tribes of Indians, ex- 
tends from the western boundary of Arkansas and Missouri to Red River 
on the south, and the Punca and Platte or Nebraska on the north; esli. 
mated at about 275,000 square miles. Population unknown. 



1843— 12th Mo. DECEMBER, begins on Fwd ay, hath 31 days. 

MOON'S PHASES. 
Full Moon 6th, 6h. 7m. eve. I New Moon 21st, Oh. 15m. morn. 

Last Quarter l4th, 8h. Om. morn. ) First Quarter 28th, 9h. 59m. morn. 



M 


w: 


•Remarks. 


0R. 


0S. 


#/cES 


R.^S. 


H.W. 


fi) 


1 


Frid 


Erap. Alexander died 1825. 


7 26 


4 34 


10 54 


1 46 


5 6 


cy: 


2 


Satur 


Battle of Auslerlitz, 1805. 


7 27 


4 33 


10 31 


2 45 


6 8 




3 


A 


Bonaparte cr.^Emp. 1804 


7 27 


4 33 


10 8 


3 44 


7 4 


a 


4 


Mond 




7 28 


4 32 


9 44 


4 44 


7 48 




5 


Tues 


Bible trans, into Eng. 1611. 


7 29 


4 31 


9 20 


5 42 


8 28 




6 


Wedn 


Van Buren born, 1782. 


7 29 


4 31 


8 55 


6 39 


9 6 


n 


7 


Thurs 


Newport, R. I. taken, 1779. 


7 29 


4 31 


8 29 


rises. 


9 42 




8 


Frid 


Baxter died, 1691. 


7 30 


4 30 


8 3 


6 14 


10 18 


2S 


9 


Satur 


Milton born, 1608. 


7 30 


4 30 


7 37 


7 16 


10 53 




10 


A 


Trial of Louis XVI., 1792. 


7 31 


4 29 


7 10 


8 19|11 30 




11 


Mond 


Landing at Plymouth, 1620. 


7 31 


4 29 


6 42 


9 25 


morn. 


a 


12 


Tues 


Gay died, 1732.- 


7 31 


4 29 


6 14 


10 33 


7 




13 


Wedn 


Dr. Johnson died, 1784. 


7 32 


4 2-8 


5 46 


11 40 


51 


w 


14 


Thurs 


Washington died, 1799. 


7 32 


4 28 


5 IS 


morn. 


1 39 




15 


Frid 


[fire at N. Y. 1835. 


7 32 


4 2-8 


4 49 


49 


2 33 


-^ 


16 


Satur 


Tea dest. at Bos. 1773. [Great 


7 32 


4 28 


4 20 


2 1 


3 38 




17 


A 


Bolivar died, 1830. 


7 33 


4 27 


3 50 


3 17 


4 46 


TU 


18 


Mond 




7 33 


4 27 


3 21 


4 31 


6 1 




19 


Tues 


Toulon retak. by the French. 


7 33 


4 27 


2 51 


5 47 


7 5 


^ 


20 


Wedn 


Louisiana annexed to the U. 


7 33 


4 27 


2 21 


6 55 


8 3 




21 


Thurs 


St. Thomas. [S 1803. 


7 33 


4 27 


1 51 


sets. 


8 58 


VJ? 


22 


Frid 


Embargo, 1807. [1783. 


7 33 


4 27 


1 21 


6 7 


9 50 




23 


Satur 


Washington resigns his com. 


7 33 


4 27 


51 


7 17 10 35 




24 


A 


Treaty signed at Ghent, 1814. 


7 33 


4 27 


21 


8 25,11 19] 


25 


Mond 


Christmas Day. 


7 33 


4 27 


slo 9 


9 33 


1 




26 


Tues 


[ny and Boston, 1841. 


7 33 


4 27 


39 


10 36 


43 


X 


27 


Wedn 


RT. R. finished between Alba- 


7 33 


4 27 


1 9 


11 35 


1 23 




2S 


Thurs 


Java taken, 1812. 


7 32 


4 28 


1 39 


morn. 


2 5 


T 


29 


Frid 


S. B. Caroline burnt, 1837. 


7 32 4 28 


2 8 


36 


2 52 




30 


Satur 


Royal Society formed, 1666. 


7 31 4 29 


2 38 


1 35 


3 51 




31 


A 


Gen. Montgomery killed, 1775. 


7 31 


4 29 


3 6 


2 35 


4 


a 



The Missouri or Western Territory, extending from Missouri 
to the Rocky Mountains on the west, is bounded on the north by the 
British Possessions in North America, and south by the Indian Territory- 
It is estimated to contain 340,000 square miles; thinly inhabited by 
roving tribes of Indians. 

The Columbia or Oregon Territoy, claimed by the United States, 
extends from the Rocky Mountains, west to the Pacific Ocean ; it is 
bounded on the south by Mexico, and on the north by the British and 
Russian possessions in North America. It is estimated to contain 
350,000 square miles; thinly inhabited by various tribes of Indians. 

The District of Columbia," is under the immediate government of 
Congress. The city of Washington became the seat of government of 
the United States in 1800, and is the residence of the President and the 
other chief executive officers of the National Government. Area, 100 
square miles. Pop. in 1840—43,712. 



29 

EVENTS IN 1842. 

January I. — Sir Charles Bngot, Governor General of the Canadas, land- 
ed at New-York from the British seventy-four gun-ship Illustrious. — 
Albany and West Stockbridge Rail Road opened and cars commenced run- 
ning between Albany and Boston ; using in part the Hudson and Berk- 
shire Rail Road. 

February 1. — News reached New-York of the passage of the Bankrupt 
Act by Congress. 14. — Hudson open from Albany to New- York. 24. — 
Died at Washington, Lewis Williams, the oldest member of Congress from 
North Carolina, having held his seat twenty-five years. 28. — New-York 
city Registry Law repealed by the Legislature. 

March 30. — Henry Clay resigned his seat in the United States Senate, 
and made liis farewell address. 

^pril 1. — The banks in Philadelphia resumed specie payments. 15. — 
Dwelling of Bishop Hughes (Romanist) attacked by a mob. 

May 3. — The " Suffrage Party" Legislature of Rhode Island, met and 
adjourned for the first and last time. 11. — The Florida War ended. 16. — 
Great meeting in the Park, in the cily of New-York, to sustain Thomas 
W. Dorr and the " Suffrage Party" of Rhode Island. 27. — News received 
at New- York of an earthquake in St. Domingo which destroyed 10,000 
persons. 

June 4. — News received at Nevp-York of the great fire in Hamburgh, 
which destroyed one-fifth of the city. 10. — U. S. ship Vincennes, Lt. 
Wilkes, arrived at New-York from the Exploring Expedition in the South 
Pacific and the Antartic Seas, after a cruise of 3 years and 10 months. 

July 6. — Treaty settling the North Eastern Boundary, &.c. between the 
United States and Great Britian, concluded at Washington. 

August 3. — Funeral rites for the death of the Duke of Orleans, Heir Ap- 
parent to the Throne of France, celebrated in New-York ^y the French 
residents. 15. — The Legislature met at Albany to divide the State into 
Congressional Districts, to elect one representative from each. 29. — Ta- 
riff Bill passed by Congress. 31. — Congress adjourned after the longest 
session ever held by that body. 

September 2.— Proclamation of the President of the United States an- 
nouncing the ratification of the Treaty of Washington. 

October 2. — Dr. Channing died at Burlington Vt. 14. — Completion of 
the Croton Aqueduct celebrated in the city of New- York. 

November 8.— Annual State Elections held in this State one day for the 
first time. 

December 9. — Gen. Cass arrived at New-York, from his mission to 
France, having been resident minister there 10 years. 17. — The execu- 
tion of Midshipman Philip Spencer, and two seamen, Cromwell and Small, 
on hoard the U. S. Brig Somers, who were hanged at the yard-arm, Dec. 
1, by order of the Commander, Lt. Alex. Slidell McKenzie, for a conspi- 
racy to mutiny, made known at New-York. 24.— The Attica and Buflalo 
Rail Road completed and cars run through from Albany to Buflalo. 28. — 
Naval Court of Inquiry commenced sitting on board the U. S. ship of the 
line. North Carolina, at the naval station at Brooklyn, to inquire into the 
conduct of Commander McKenzie in banging Spencer and two of his accom- 
plices, on board the Somers. 



30 

Mean Temperature for each of the last six years, 

At five different places in this State, and the general mean of the whole 
period, as taken from the fifty-fifth Annual Report of the Regents of the 
University. 



Albany, 

Erasmus Hall, 

Lewiston, 

St. Lawrence, . 
Utica 



L.I. 



1836. 1837 



44.73 

47.731 
43.541 
40.78 
40.89 



45.79 
09.39 
44.50 

41.78 
43.90 



1838. 



47.15 
50.49 



44.10 
45.84 



1839. 



48.20 
51.33 
46.91 
45.40 
45.92 



1840. 



48.70 
51.34 
48.94 
44.26 
46.63 



Gen. 
1841. iMean. 



48.18 
51.11 
48.85 
43.23 
46.96 



47.12 
50.23 
46.55 
43.25 
45.02 



Whole State, 



44.111 44.86 



45.55 



45.99 



47.12 



46.41 



45.55 



Comparative view of prevailing Winds. 



Albany, 

Erasmus Hall, L. I. 

Lewiston, 

St. Lawrence, ...... 

Utica, 



Whole State, 



s. 


s. 


N.W. 


s 


S. 


N.W. 


N.W. 


N.W. 


N.W. 


N.W. 


N.W. 


N.W. 


s. 


s. 




S.W. 


S.W. 


S.W. 


s.w. 


s. 


S-W. 


s.w. 


s.w. 


N.W. 


w. 


w. 


w. 


w. 


w. 


w. 


N.W. 


N.W. 


N.W. 


N.W. 


N.W. 


N.W. 



Gen. 

Winds. 
S. 

N.W, 
S.W. 

s.w. 
w. 

N.W. 



Quantity of Rain. 



Albany, 

Erasmus Hall, L. I.. . 

Lewiston, 

St. Lawrence, - . 

Utica, 



Whole State,. 



44. 60: 
43.89 



18.54 
33.10 



34.45 



41.17 
34.66 



23.58 



35.15 



42.0.^ 
41.11 



26.78 



32.38 



38.11 
42.90 
17.73 
22.96 
35.44 



32.10 



44.38 
35.93 
2.07 
32.48 
45.81 



37.85 
52.12 
19.00 
20 77 
42.85 



35.38 32.57 



41.35 
41.77 
19.93 
24.18 
39.30 

33.79 



Comparative View of the Temperature for 10 years, from 1826 to 
1835, both inclusive. 

The table giving a comparative view of Temperature for the ten years 
from 1826 to 1835 inclusive, at the same places of observation, shows the 
general mean for that period at Albany to have been 48.94 ; at Erasmus 
Hall, L. L 51.78; at Lewiston, 49.31 ; at Potsdam, St. Lawrence county, 
43.35; at Utica, 45.81 : and the general mean of the whole State for 1826 — 
49.37; for 1827—46.18; for 1828—49.99; for 1829—46.79; for 1830— 
48.16; for 1831—47.10; for 1832—47.46; for 1833-46.96; for 1834— 
47.68; for 1835 — 45.26; and the general mean for the whole 10 years, 
47.64. 

The table of wind for the same 10 years, shows the average prevalent 
wind for the whole State, in 1826 and 1827— N. W.; in 1828— S. W.; in 
1829-30 and 31— N. W.; in 1832— S.; in 1833-4— N. W.; in 1835— S. W. 
& W.; and the general mean for the whole period, S. & S. W. 

The quantity of rain and snow, in each of the same 10 years, as ave. 
raged in the whole State, was in 1826—36.33 : in 1827—44.40 ; in 1828— 
36.74; in 1829—34.96 ; in 1830—38.84 ; in 1831—38.83; in 1832—37.22 ; 
in 1833— 37.03; in 1834— 30.75; in 1835—34.12; and the average of all 
the 10 years, 35. 10 in each year. 



31 



Table of the Periods when the Hudson River opened and closed 
at Albany, so far as the same can now be ascertained. 



Winters. J 


iiv. closed or obst'd by ice. 1 


liver open or 


free of ice. No. days closed. 


1789-90 


February 3, 1790 ' 


March 


27, 1790 


52 days. 


1790-91 


December 8, 1790 ' 


March 


17, 1791 


99 days. 


1791-92 


December 8, 1791 








1792-93 


December 12, 1792 * 


March 


6, 1793 


84 days. 


1793-94 


December 26, 1793 ' 


'March 


17,1794 


81 days. 


1794-95 


January 12, 1795 








1795-96 


January 23, 1796 








1796-97 


November 28, 1796 








1797-98 


November 26, 1797 








1798-99 


November 23, 1798 








1799-1800 


January 6, 1800 








1800-01 


January, 3, 1801 








1801-02 


February 3, 1802 








1802-03 


December 16, 1802 








1803-04 


January 12, 1804 


♦April 


6, 1804 


84 days. 


1804-05 


December 13, 1804 








1805-06 


January 9, 1806 


•February 


20, 1806 


42 days. 


1806-07 


December 11, 1806 


•April 


8, 1807 


121 days. 


1807-08 


January 4, 1808 


•March 


10, 1808 


65 days. 


1808-09 


December 9, 1808 








1809-10 


January 19, 1810 








1810-11 


December 14, 1810 








1811-12 


December 20, 1811 








1812-13 


December 21, 1812 


•March 


13, 1813 


83 days. 


1813-14 


December 22, 1813 








1814-15 


December 10, 1814 








1815-16 


December 2, 1815 








1816-17 


December 16, 1816 








1817-18 


December 7, 1817 


March 


25, 1818 


108 days. 


1818-19 


December 14, 1818 


April 


3, 1819 


110 days. 


1819-20 


December 13, 1819 


March 


25, 1820 


102 days. 


1820-21 


November 13, 1820 


March 


15, 1821 


123 days. 


1821-22 


December 13, 1821 


March 


15, 1822 


92 days. 


1822-23 


December 24, 1822 


March 


24, 1823 


90 days. 


1823-24 


December 16, 1823 


March 


3, 1824 


78 days. 


1824-25 


January 5, 1825 


March 


6, 1825 


60 days. 


1825-26 


December 13, 1825 


•February 


26, 1826 


75 days. 


1826-27 


December 24, 1826 


•March 


20, 1827 


86 days. 


1827-28 


•November 25, 1827 


•February 


8, 1828 


About 50 days 


1828-29 


♦December 23, 1828 


•April 


1, 1829 


100 days. 


1829-30 


♦January 11, 1830 


•March 


15, 1830 


63 days. 


1830-31 


'December 23, 1830 


•March 


15, 1831 


82 days. 


1831-32 


•December 5, 1831 


•March 


25, 1832 


Ill days. 


1832-33 


•December 21, 1832 


•March 


21, 1833 


83 days. 


1833-34 


•December 13. 1833 


•February 


24, 1834 


73 days. 


1834^35 


♦December 15, 1834 


•March 


25, 1835 


100 days. 


1835-36 


•November 30, 1835 


•April 


4, 1836 


125 days. 


1836-37 


•December 7, 1836 


•March 


28, 1837 


111 days. 


1837-38 


•December 14, 1837 


•March 


19, 1838 


94 days. 


1838-39" 


' 'November 25, 1838 


•March 


21, 1839 


116 days. 


1839-40 


' •December 18, 1839 


•February 


21, 1840 


65 days. 


1840-41 


•December 5, 1840 


•March 


24, 1841 


109 days. 


1841-42 


•December 19, 1841 


•February 


4, 1842 


47 days. 



32 

Remarks on the Pieccdiug Table, 

[Taken from the Regents' Report for 1842.] 

Notes. — 1817-18. This winter was long and intensely cold. On the 
third of March, 1818, the ice moved in a body downwards for some dis- 
tance, and there remained stationary. The river was not clear until 
March 25th. 

1820-21. The river closed on the 13th, opened on the 20th, and finally 
closed December 1. This was one of the four winters during a century, 
in which the Hudson, between Powles' Hook and New- York, was crossed 
on the ice. The other three being 1740-41, 1764-65, and 1779-80. 

Jan. 11, 1824. The river was clear of ice, and remained so for several 
days- 

1827-28. The river opened and closed repeatedly during this winter. 
December 21, it closed a second time. 

1830-31. Opened in consequence of heavy rains, and closed again on 
the 10th of January, 1831. 

1832-33. Opened again January 3, closed again January 11. 

1834-35. March 17. River open opposite to the city of Albany. March 
18. Steamboat John Jay came to Van Wie's Point. Ice at the Over- 
slaugh. 

As the river throughout to New- York has not always been clear of ice, 
on the day stated above, the time at which the first steamboat passed from 
New- York to Albany, or vice versa, is also added for a few years. 

1835, March 25 ; 1836, April 10 ; 1837, March 31, Robert L. Stevens; 
1838. March 19, Utica ; 1839, March 25, Swallow ; 1840, February 25, 
Mount-Pleasant; 1841, March 26, Utica ; 1842, February 6, Telegraph. 

Mem. All those marked thus * are derived from authentic records or 
personal observation. 



Lake Erie. — The fodowing table is copied from the Annual Report of 
he Canal Commissioners, to tlie Legislature, January 25, 1841: 

A. TABLE showing the time of the opening of the Canal and 
Lake Navigation. 

Canals navigable. Lake Erie navigable at Buffalo. 

1827, March 21, April 21. 

1828, March 27, April 1. 

1829, May 2 May 10. 

1830, April 20 April 6. 

1831, April 16, May 8. 

1832, April 25, April 27. 

1833, April 19, April 23. 

1834, April 17, April 6. 

1835, April 15, May 8. 

1836, April 25, April 27. 

1837, April 20, May 16. 

1838, April 12, Mar. 31. 

1839, April 20, April 11. 

1840, April 20, April 27. 

1841, April 24, April 12. 

1842, April 20, March 7, 

November 8, 1842, the Canal was closed by ice. 



CIVIL DIVISIONS 

OF THE 

STATE OF NEW-YORK. 



The State isdivitled into 69 counties, which are subdivided into 830 towns, 
and 9 cities containin": (j4 wards. These are the municipal divisions, and 
they are civil corporations, with powers more or less extensive according to 
their charters as granted and modified from time to time by the Legislature. 

There are other divisions more properly termed political. These are the 
Eight Senate Districts; the counties considered in relation to their repre- 
sentation in the 2d branch of the Legislature; and the Congressional Districts. 

The Senate Districts are arrangeil, every ten years, by the Legislature} 
acting under a provision for tliat purpose in the State Constitution, on the 
basis of a census taken under the same authority; and at the same time 
and under the same authority, the Members of the Assembly are apportioned 
among the counties. 

The counties respecfiAely comprised in the several Senate Districts are as 
follow, in the numerical order of llic Districts. 

First Senate District. — New-York, Kings and Richmond. 

Second Seiiate District. — Queens, SulFolk, Westchester, Putnam, Dutchess, 
Rockland, Orange, Sullivan and L'lster. 

Third Senate District. — Columbia, Rensselaer, Greene, Albany, Schenecta- 
dy, Schoharie and Dflaware. 

Fourth Senate District. — Saratoga, Washington, Warren, Essex, Clinton, 
Franklin, St. Lawrence, Herkimer, Montgomery, Fulton and Hamilton. 

Fifth Senate Dis^nV^.— Jefferson, Lewis, Oswego, Oneida, Madison, Otsego. 

Sixth Senate District. — Chenango, Broome, Tioga, Tompkins, Chemung 
Steuben, Livingston, Allegany and Cattaraugus. 

Seventh Senate District.— i)non^.\ngR, Cortland, Cayuga, Seneca, Wayne, 
Ontario and Yates. 

Eighth Senate District. — Monroe, Orleans, Genesee, Wyoming, Niagara, 
Erie and Chau(auf;up. 

These Senate Districts, each represented by four Senators, one of whom is 
elected every year, are inteniled by the Constitution to be as nearly equal in 
the number of snnis as may be, wiihotit dividing counties, in order that the 
people may be represenlcil as equally as possible in the Slate Senate; and for 
the same reason the api)ortionment of Members of Assembly among the 
counties is made on a uniform ratio of (he number of souls to each Member. 
The number of Members of Assembly to which each county is entitled un- 
der the existing apportiotiment, is as follows: 

Albany, 3 JcfTerson, 

Kings, 

I-ewis, 

I-iviii?^lon, 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

KToiit^'onicry, 

New-York, 

Nincnra, 

Oiicidn, 

(>noii(l:ip:i, 

Ontario, 

Oranpe, 

Orleans, ••• 

Oswrgo, 

Otteiro, 

PiJtnuiii, 

Queens, 

Itcnssclaer, 

Kithrnopf' 



Allegany, • 2 

T^roome, 1 

Cattaraugus, 2 

Cayuga, "• 3 

Chautauque, ;) 

Chemung, 1 

Chenango, 3 

Clinton, I 

Columbia, 3 

Cortland, J 

Delaware, 5 

Dutchess, 3 

Erie, 3 

Essex, 1 

Franklin, 1 

Fulton and Hamilton, •• • 1 

Genesec; 2 

Greene, '• 2 

Herkimei, 2 



Rockland,,-. 1 

St. Lawrence, 2 



^:^ratoga, •■• • 
Schenectady,- 
Schoharie, ••- 

Sci eca, 

Steuben, 

Suffolk, 

Sullivan, ••-• 

Tioga, 

Tompkins, •-• 

Ulster, 

Waricn, 

Washington, • 

Wayne, 

Westchester, 
Wyoming, --- 
Yalcs, 



3« 



Total,- 



•• 1 



34 CIVIL DIVISIONS. 

The Senate Districts, moreover, respectively constitute the reg'ular bounds 
of the se\'eral jurisdictions of the Circuit Judges, as do the counties the ju- 
risdictions of the Courts of Common Pleas and General Sessions of the Peace. 

The Congressional Districts, by which the representatives of the State in 
the Congress of the United States are elected every two years, are arranged 
e^ery ten years, according to the apportionments of the national representatives 
among the states, made by Congress on the basis of the national census. 
The state is now divided into thirty-four districts, each electing one member of 
Congress according to the apportionment of the census of 1840, being in a 
ratio of one representative for every 70,680 persons in each state, computed 
according to the rule prescribed by the Constitution of the United States. 

The following are the Congressional Districts, formed by an act of the 
Legislature, September 6, 1842: 

First District — Queens and Suffolk counties. 

Second District. — Kings and Richmond. * 

Third District.— First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Wards of the city 
and county of New-York. 

Fourth DisArtcf.— Sixth, Seventh, Tenth and Thirteenth Wards, do. 

Fifth District.— F.ighn\, Ninth and Fourteenth Wards, do. 

Sixth District. — Eleventh, Twelfth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Wards, do. 

Seventh District. — Westchester and Rockland counties. 

Eighth District. — Putnam and Dutchess. 

Ninth District. — Orange and Sullivan. 

Tenth District Ulster and Delaware. 

Eleventh District. — Columbia and Greene. 

Twelfth District. — Rensselaer county. 

Thirteenth District Albany county. 

Fourteenth District. — Washington and Essex. 

Fifteenth District. — Warren, Franklin, Clinton and north part of Hamilton. 

Sixteenth District. — Saratoga, Schenectady, Fulton and the south part of 
Hamilton. 

Seventeenth District. — Herkimer and Montgomery. 

Eighteenth District. — St. Lawrence and Lewis. 

Nineteenth District. — Jefferson coimty. 

Twentieth District. — Oneida county. 

Tiventy-First District. — Otsego and Schoharie. 

Twenty- Second District. — Chenango, Broome and Tioga. 

Twenty-Third District. — Madison and Oswego. 

Twenty-Fmirth District. — Onondaga county. 

Twenty-Fifth District. — Cayuga and Cortland. 

Twenty-Sixth District. — Tompkins, Chemung and Yates. 

Twenty-Seventh Dictrict. — Seneca and Wayne. 

Twenty-Eighth District. — Monroe county. 

Twenty-Ninth District. — Ontario and Livingston. 

Thirtieth District. — Steuben and Allegany. 

Thirty-First District. — Cattaraugus and Chautauqua. 

Thirty-Second District. — Erie county. 

Thirty-Third District. — Genesee and Wyoming. 

Thirty-Fourth District. — Orleans and Niagara. 

The following Table shows the ratio and the number of the House of 
Representatives under each apportionment: 

Year 1789,— Fixed by the Constitution, 65 Members 

" 1793, Ratio of 33,000, 105 " 

" 1803, " 33,000, 141 " 

" 1813, " 35,000, 181 " 

" 1823, " 40,000, 212 " 

" 1SS3, " 47,700, 242 " 

" 1843, " 70,680, 223 " 



COUNTIES, COUNTY SEATS &c. 



35 



COUNTIES AND COUNTY SEATS, 
la the State of New- York, together with the population of each in 1840. 



COUNTIES. 



Pop. 



County Seats. 



Pop. 



Albany, 

Allegany, 

Broome, 

Cattaraugus, 

Cayuga, • 

Chautauquc, 

Chemung, 

Chenango, 

Clinton, 

Columbia, 

Cortland, ••••. 

Delaware, 

Dutchess, 

Erie, 

Essex, 

Franklin, 

Fulton, 

Genesee, (estimated,)- 

Greene, 

Hamilton, 

Herkimer, 

Jefferson, 

Kings, 

Lewis, 

Livingston, 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery, 

New- York, 

Niagara, 

Onoida, 

Onondaga, 

Ontario, 



Orange, 

Orleans, 

Oswego, 

Otsego, 

Putnam, 

Queens, 

Rensselaer, 

Richmond, 

Rockland, 

St. Lawrence, 

Saratoga, 

Schcnec tad y , •• 

Schoharie, ■ 

Seneca, 

Steuben, 

Suffolk, 

Sullivan, 

Tioga, 

Tompkins, ■ 

Ulster, ' 

Warren, 

Washington, 

Wayne, 

Westchester, 

Wyoming, (estimated,)- 
Yates, 



Total Towns, • 



10 
30 
11 
27 
»-i 
24 
10 
10 
10 
19 
11 
19 
13 
21 
15 
14 
10 
IJ 
11 

7 
19 
20 

6 
12 
10 
14 
19 
10 



27 
9 
11 
9 
10 
14 
10 

17 

15 

21 

13 

8 

839 



G9, 693 
"o,97o 
22, 3:iy 
28, S7i 
60, 3.i8 
47, 975 
20, 732 
40,78iS 
28,157 
43, 252 
24, G07 
3=.,. 396 
62, 395 
G2, 40(i 
23,034 
ie,516 
19,049 
29,9G4 
3n, 44(5 
1,907 
37,477 
GO, 934 
47,GI3 
17,S3(.i 
35, 140 
40, OOS 
64, 90;: 
35,816 
312,710 
31,13 

85,310 

67,911 
4R,ft01 

60, 739 

25,127 

43,619 

49,6' 
12,825 
3 1,324 
60, 259 
10.9G5 
11 ; 966 
50,706 
40, 553 
17,387 
32,358 

24, 874 

4G, 138 
32, 469 
15,029 
20, 527 
37,04b 
45,822 
13,422 

41,180 

42, 057 

48, 687 

29, 663 
20, 437 

2,428,931 



Albany, 

Angelica, 

Binghamton, 

EUicottville, 

Auburn, 

.■Vlayville, 

Elmira, ■ 

Norwich, 

Plattsburgh, ••••■ 

Hudson, 

Cortland, ' 

Delhi, 

Poughkeepsie,"-' 

Buffalo, 

Elizabeth, 

IVIalone, 

Johnstown, ' 

Butavia, •• 

Catskill, 

Lake Pleasant,- • 

Herkimer, 

Watertown, 

Brooklyn, 

Martinsburgh,--- 

Geneseo, 

MorrisviUe, 

Rochester, 

Fonda, ' 

New-York, 

Lockport, 

Rome, )-• 

Whitesboro', ) •- 

Syracuse, 

Canandaigua, •-• 
Goshen, ).... 
Newburgh, \ •••• 

Albion, 

Oswego, ) 

Pulaski, 5 

Cooperstown, •-• 

('armel, 

Hemiistcad C. H. 

Troy, 

Richmond, 

New-City, 

Canton, 

Ballslon Spa, •-• 
Schenectady,- ••• 

Schoharie, 

Ovid, ) 

Waterloo, > 

Bath, 

Kivcr Head, 

Monticello, 

Owcgo, 

Ithaca, 

Kingston, 

Caldwell, 

Sandy Hill, ) .•• 
Salem, S ••• 

Lyons, 

Bedford, )• 

White Plains, J- 

Warsaw, 

Penn-Yan, 



33,721 

900 

2,800 

600 

6,000 

500 

2,300 

1,600 

2,600 

6,671 

1,200 

SOO 

7,500 

18,041 

300 

750 

1,000 

2,000 

2,800 

100 

800 

4,000 

36, 233 

600 

900 

700 

20, 202 

360 

312,710 

6,500 

2,600 

1,800 

6,600 

2,700 

900 

6,000 

1,400 

4,500 

700 

1,400 

360 

lOO 

19,373 

200 

125 

600 

1,500 

6,688 

400 

700 

2,600 

1,400 

460 

600 

1,800 

4,000 

2,300 

200 

1,000 

600 

1,800 

260 

700 

SOO 

1,800 



36 



POPULATION. 
PROGRESSIVE POPULATION, 



Of the several Counties in tlie state, from 1800 to 1840, inclusive; 
according to the United States Census. 



COUNTIES. 



Albany, 

Allegany, 

Broome, 

Cattaraugus, •• 

Cayuga, 

Chautauque, •• 

Chemung, 

Chenango, •••• 

Clinton, 

Columbia, •••• 

Cortland, 

Delaware, 

Dutchess, 

Erie, 

Essex, 

Franklin, 

Fulton, 

Genesee, ••■••• 

Greene, • • 

Hamilton, 

Herkimer, 

Jefferson, 

Kings, 

Lewis, 

Livingston, ••• 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery, • • 

■ New-York, ••• • 

Niagara, •••••• 

Oneida, 

Onondaga, •••• 

Ontario, 

Orange, 

Orleans, 

Oswego, 

Otsego, 

Putnam, 

Queens, 

Rensselaer, ••• 
Richmond, •••• 

Rockland, 

St. Lawrence,' 

Saratoga, 

Schenectady, • 
Schoharie, •••• 

Seneca, 

Steuben, 

Suffolk, 

Sullivan, 

Tioga, 

Tompkins, • • • • 

Ulster,. 

Warren, 

W^ashington, •• 

Wayne, 

Westchester," 
Yates, 



Org:in- 
ized. 



Total,' 



ISOG 
1808 
1799 
1808 
1S36 
1798 
1788 
1786 
1808 
1797 
1G83 
1S2I 
1799 
1S08 
1838 
1902 
1800 
1S16 
1791 
1S05 
1683 
1805 
1821 
1806 
18Q1 
1772 
1683 
1803 
1798 
1794 
1789 
1683 
1824 
1816 
1791 
1812 
1683 
1791 
1683 
1798 
1802 
1791 
1809 
1795 
1804 
1796 
1G83 
1809 
1794 
1817 
1683 
1813 
1772 
1823 
1683 
1823 



pp. Pop. 

1800. in 1810. 



34, 043 



.15,871 



15,666 
8,514 
35, 422 



10,228 
47,775 



12,314 



14,479 



21,700 
60, 489 



22, 047 
7,466 
15,218 
29, 355 



21,636 



16,891 

30, 442 

4, 663 

6,363 



24, 4S; 



9,808 



1)7 
19,734 



6,879 



24, 855 



35, 574 



27, 428 



34,661 

1,942 

8, 130 

45S 

29, 843 
2,381 



21,704 
8,002 

32,390 
8, 809 

20,303 

61,363 



9,477 
2,617 



12,588 
19, 536 



Pop. 
in 1820. 



38,114 
9,330 

14,343 
4,090 

38, 697 

15,268 



31,215 

12,070 
38, 330 
16,50 
26, 5S7 
46,61 



12,811 
4,439 



22, 046 
15, 140 
8,303 
6,433 



25, 144 



41,214 
96, 373 
8,971 
33,792 
25,987 
42, 032 
34, 347 



38, 802 



19,336 

36, 309 

6,347 

7,768 

7,885 

33, 147 

10,201 

18,945 

16,609 

7,246 

21,113 

6,108 

7,899 



26, 576 



44, 289 



30, 272 



63, 093 

22. 996 
1,251 

31,017 
32,962 
11,187 
9,227 
18,444 
32,208 
26,855 
• 37,569 
123,706 
22, 990 

50. 997 
47, 467 
88, 267 
41,213 



12,374 
44,856 
11,268 
21,619 
40,153 

6,135 

8,837 
16,0.37 
36, 052 
13,081 
23, 154 
23,619 
21,989 
24,272 

8,900 
16,971 
20, 681 
30, 934 

9,463 
38,831 



32, 638 



686,766 969,049 1,372,812 1,918,603 i,4afS,9il 



Pop. 

in 1830. 



53, 560 
26,218 
17,582 
16,726 
47, 947 
34, 657 



37, 404 
19,344 
39, 952 
23,693 
32, 933 
50, 926 
35,710 
19,387 
11,312 



51,992 
29, 625 
1,324 
35,869 
48,515 
20, 537 
14, 956 
27,719 
39,037 
49, 862 
43, 595 
202, 6S9 
18,485 
71,3 
68,9 
40, 167 
45, 372 
18, 
27,104 
51,372 
12,701 
22, 276 
49, 472 
7,084 
9,388 
36, 351 
38,616 
12,334 
27,910 
21,031 
33,976 
26,780 
12,37 
27, 704 
36,545 
36,551 
11, 706 
42,616 
83, 6.55 
36,456 
19,019 



TOWNS IN THE STATE OF NEW- YORK, 

WITH THE POPULATION IN 1840. 



Towns. 


Counties. 


Adams 


Jefiierson 


Addison 


Steuben 


Alabama 


Genesee 


Albany City- 


Albany 


Albion 


Oswego 


Alden 


Erie 


Alexander 


Genesee 


Alexandria 


Jefferson 


Alfred 


Allegany 


Allen 


do 


Almond 


do 


Amboy 


Oswego 


Amenia 


Dutchess 


Amherst 


Erie 


Amity 


Allegany 


Amsterdam 


Montgomery 


Ancram 


Columbia 


Andes 


Delaware 


Andover 


Allegany 


Angelica 


do 


Annsville 


Oneida 


Antwerp 


Jefferson 


Arcadia, 


Wayne 


Argyle 


Washington 


Arietta 


Hamilton 


Arkwright 


Chautauque 


Ashford 


Cattaraugus 


Athens 


Greene 


Athol 


Warren 


Attica 


Wyoming 


Auburn 


Cayuga 


Augusta 


Oneida 


Aurelius 


Cayuga 


Aurora 


Erie 


Ausablc 


Clinton 


Austerlitz 


Columbia 


Avon 


Livingston 


Bainbridgc 


Chenango 


Ballston 


Saratoga 


Bangor 


Franklin 


Barker 


Broome 


Barre 


Orleans 


Barrington 


Yates 


Barton 


Tioga 


Batavia 


Genesee 


Bath 


Steuben 


Bedford 


Westchester 


Beekman 


Dutchess 


Beekmantown 


Clinton 


Belfast 


Allegany 


Bellmont 


Franklin 


Bennington 


Wyoming 


Benton 


Yates 



Port. 
2,996 
1,920 
1,798 
33.721 
i;o()3 
1,984 
2,242 
3,475 
1.630 
867 
1,434 
1,070 
2,179 
2,451 
1,354 
5,333 
1,770 
2,176 
848 
1,257 
1,765 
3,109 
4,980 
3,111 
209 
1,418 
1,469 
2,387 
1,210 
2,710 
5,626 
2,175 
2,645 
2,908 
3,222 
2,091 
2,999 
3,324 
2,044 
1,289 
1,259 
5,539 
1,868 
2,324 
4,219 
4,915 
2,822 
1,400 
2,769 
1,646 
472 
2,368 
3.911 
4 



' Towns. 
Bergen 
Berkshire 
Berlin 
Bern 
Betliany 
Bethel 
Bethlehem 
Bigflats 
Birdsall 
Black Rock 
Bleecker 
Blenheim 
Bloom'g-grove 
Bolivar 
Bolton 
Bombay 
Boonville 
Boston 
Bovina 
Boylston 
Bradford 
Brandon 
Brandt 
Brasher 
Bridgewater 
Brighton 
Bristol 
Broadalbin 
Brookfield 
Brookhaven 
Brooklyn City 
Broome 
Brownville 
Brunswick 
Brutus 
Buffalo City 
Burlington 
Burns 
Burton 
Bush wick 
Busti 
Butler 
Butternuts 
Byron 
Cairo 
Caldwell 
Caledonia 
Cambria 
Cambridge 
Camden 
Cameron 
Camillus 
Campbell 



Counties 
Genesee 
Tioga 
Rensselaer 
Albany 
Genesee 
Sullivan 
Albany 
Chemung 
Allegany 
Erie 
Fulton 
Schoharie 
Orange 
Allegany 
Warren 
Franklin 
Oneida 
Erie 

Delaware 
Oswego 
Steuben 
Franklin 
Erie 

St. Lawrence 
Oneida 
Monroe 
Ontario 
Fulton 
Madison 
Suffolk 
Kings 
Schoharie 
Jefferson 
Rensselaer 
Cayuga 
Erie- 
Otsego 
Allegany 
Cattaraugus 
Kings 
Chautauque 
Wayne 
Otsego 
Genesee 
Greene 
Warren 
Livingston 
Niagara 
Washington 
Oneida 
Steuben 
Onondaga 
Steuben 



Pop. 

1,832 

956 

1,794 

3,740 

2,286 

1,483 

3,238 

1,375 

328 

3,625 

346 

2,725 

2,396 

408 

937 

1,446 

5,516 

1,745 

1,403 

481 

1,547 

531 

1,088 

2,118 

1,418 

2,336 

1,953 

2,738 

3,695 

7,050 

36,233 

2,404 

3,968 

3,051 

2,044 

18,213 

2,154 

867 

530 

1,295 

1,894 

2,271 

4,057 

1,907 

2,868 

693 

1,987 

2,099 

2,005 

2,331 

1,359 

3,957 

852 



38 



TOWNS AND POPULATION. 



Towns. 


Counties. 


Pop. 


Canaan 


Columbia 


1,9.=)7 


Canadice 


Ontario 


1,341 


Canajoharie 


Montgomery 


5,146 


Canandaigua 


Ontario 


5,652 


Candor 


Tioga 


3,370 


Caneadea 


Allegany 


1,633 


Canisteo 


Steuben 


941 


Canton 


St. Lawrence 


3,465 


Carlisle 


Schoharie 


1,850 


Carlton 


Orleans 


2,275 


Carmel 


Putnam 


2,263 


Caroline 


Tompkins 


2,457 


Carroll 


Chautauque 


1,649 


Castile 


Wyoming 


2,833 


Castletoh 


Richmond 


4,275 


Catharines 


Chemung 


2,424 


Catlin 


do 


1,119 


Cato 


Cayuga 


2,380 


Caton 


Steuben 


797 


CatskiU 


Greene 


5,339 


Cayuta 


Chemung 


835 


Cazenovia 


Madison 


4,153 


Centerville 


Allegany 


1,513 


Champion 


Jefferson 


2,206 


Champlain 


Clinton 


3,632 


Charlestown 


Montgomery 


2,103 


Charlotte 


Chatauque 


1,428 


Charlton 


Saratoga 


1,933 


Chateaugay 


Franklin 


2.824 


Chatham 


Columbia 


3,662 


Chautauque 


Chautauque 


2,980 


Chazy 


Clinton 


3,584 


Cheektowaga 


Erie 


1,137 


Chemung 


Chemung 


2,377 


Chenango 


Broome 


5,465 


Cherry Creek 


Chautauque 


1,141 


Cherry Valley 


Otsego 


3,923 


Chester 


Warren 


1,633 


Chesterfield 


Essex 


2,716 


Chili 


Monroe 


2,174 


China 


Wyoming 


1,437 


Cicero 


Onondaga 


2,464 


Cincinnatus 


Cortland 


1,301 


Clarence 


Erie 


2,271 


Clarendon 


Orleans 


2,251 


Clarkson 


Monroe 


3,486 


Clarkstown 


Rockland 


2,533 


Clarksville 


Allegany 


326 


Claverack 


Columbia 


3,056 


Clay 


Onontlaga 


2,852 


Clayton 


Jefferson 


3,990 


Clermont 


Columbia 


1,231 


Clifton Park 


Saratoga 


2,719 


Clinton 


Dutchess 


1,830 


Clymer 


Chautauque 


'909 



Towns. 
Cobleskill 
Cochecton 
Coeymans 
Colchester 
Golden 
Coldspring 
Colesville 
Collins 
Columbia 
Columbus 
Concord 
Conesus 
Conesville 
Conhocton 
Conklin 
Conewango 
Conquest 
Constable 
Constantia 
Copake 
Corinth 
Cornwall 
Cortland 
Cortlandville 
Coventry 
Covert 
Covington* 
Coxsackie 
Crawford 
Crownpoint 
Cuba 
Danby 
Dansville 
Danube 
Darien 
Davenport 
Day 
Dayton 
Decatur 
Deerfield 
Deerpark 
De Kalb 
Delhi 
Denmark 
De Peyster 
De Ruyter 
De Witt 
Diana 
Dickinson 
Dix 
Dover 
Dresden 
Dryden 
Duane 
Duanesburgh 



Counties. 
Schoharie 
Sullivan 
Albany 
Delaware 
Erie 

Cattaraugus 
Broome 
Erie 

Herkimer 
Chenango 
Erie 

Livingston 
Schoharie 
Steuben 
Broome 
Cattaraugus 
Cayuga 
Franklin 
Oswego 
Columbia 
Saratoga 
Orange 
Westchester 
Cortland 
Chenango 
Seneca 
Wyoming 
Greene 
Orange 
Essex 
Allegany 
Tompkins 
Steuben 
Herkimer 
Genesee 
Delaware 
Saratoga 
Cattaraugus 
Otsego 
Oneida 
Orange 
St. Lawrence 
•Delaware 
Lewis 

St. Lawrence 
Madison 
Onondaga 
Lewis 
Franklin 
Chemung 
Dutchess 
Washington 
Tompkins 
Franklin 
Schenectady 



Pop. 
3,583 

622 
3,107 
1,567 
1,088 

673 
2,528 
4,257 
2,129 
1,561 
3,021 
1,654 
1,621 
2,966 
1,475 
1,317 
1,911 
1,122 
1,476 
1,505 
1.365 
3,925 
5,592 
3,799 
1,681 
1,563 
2,438 
3,539 
2,075 
2,212 
1,768 
2,570 
2,725 
1,960 
2,406 
2,052 

942 

946 
1,071 
3,120 
1,607 
1,531 
2,554 
2,388 
1,074 
1,799 
2,802 

883 
1,005 
1,990 
2,000 

679 
5,446 

324 
3,357 



• This town was divided on the division of Genesee county in 1841. 



TOWNS AND POPULATION. 



39 



Totvns. Counties. 

Durham Greene 

Eagle Allegany 

East BloomfieUlOnfario 



Eastchester 

Easthampton 

Easton 

Eaton 

Ellen 

Edinburgh 

Eilmeston 

Ethvards 

Elba 

Elbridge 



Westchester 

SufTolk 

Washington 

Madison 

Erie 

Saratoga 

Otsego 

St. Lawrence 

Genesee 

Onondasa 



Elizabcthtown Essex 

Ellenburgh Clinton 

Ellery 

Ellicolt 

EUicottville 

Ellington 



EUisburgh 

Elmira 

Enfield 

Ephratah 

Erin 

Erwin 

Esopus 

Essex 

Evans 

Exeter 

Fabius 

Fairfield 

Fallsburgh 

Farmersville 

Farmington 

Fayette 

Fenncr 

Fishkill 

Flatbush 

Flatlands 

Fleming 

Florence 

Florida 

Floyd 

Flushing 

Forrestburgh 

Fort Ann 



Chautauque 

do 
Cattaraugus 
Chautauque 
Jefferson 
Chemung 
Tompkins 
Fulton 
Chemung 
Steuben 
Ulster 
Essex 
Erie 
Otsego 
Onondaga 
Herkimer 
Sullivan 
Cattaraugus 
Ontario 
Seneca 
Madison 
Dutchess 
Kings 

do 
Ca3'uga 
Oneida 
Montgomery 
Oneida 
Queens 
Sullivan 
Washing-ton 



Fort Covington Franldin 
FOrt Edward Washington 



Fowler 

Franjffort 

Franklin 

Franklin 

Franklinville 

Freedom 

Freetown 

French Creek 

Friendship 



St. Lawrence 

Ilcrkinipr 

Delaware 

Franklin 

Cattaraugus 

do 
Cortland 
Chautauque 
Allegany 



Pon. 

2,8"13 

l,lf^7 

l,98fi 

1,502 

2,076 

2,988 

3,409 

2,174 

1,458 

1,907 

956 
3,Ifil 
4,647 
1,061 
1,171 
2,242 
2,571 
1,084 
1,725 
5.349 
4,791 
2,340 
2,009 
1,441 

785 
1,939 
1,681 
1,807 
1,423 
2,562 
1.836 
1,782 
1,294 
2,122 
3,731 
1,997 
10,437 
2,099 

810 
1,317 
1,259 
5,214 
1,724 
4,124 

433 
3.559 
2,0ft4 
1,726 
1,752 
3.096 
3.025 

192 
1,293 
1,^^31 

<)5() 

62! 
1,244 



Towns. 
Fulton 
Gaines 
Gainesville 
Gallatin 
Galen 
Gal way 
Gates 
Genesee 
Geneseo 
Genoa 
Georgetown 
German 
German Flats 
Germantown 
Gerry 
Ghent 
Gilman 
Glen 
Glenville 
Gorham 
Goshen 
Gouverneur 
Grafton 
Gran by 
Granger 
Granville 
Gravesend 
Great Valley 
Greece 
Greene 
Greenburgh 
Greenbush 
Greenfield 
Greenport 
Greenville 
Greenwich 
Greenwood 
Greig 
Groton 
Grove 
Grovcland 
Guilderland 
Guilford 
Hadley 
Hague 
Halfmoon 
Hamburgh 
ILimden 
Hamilton 
Hammond 
Hampton 
IIami)tonburgl 
Hancock 
Hannibal 
Hanover 
Harmony 
Harpersfield 



Counties 
Schoharie 
Orleans 
Wyoming 
Columbia 
Wayne 
Saratoga 
Monroe 
Allegany 
Livingston 
Cayuga 
Madison 
Chenango 
Herkimer 
Columbia 
Chautauque 
Columbia 
Hamilton 
Montgomery 
Schenectady 
Ontario 
Orange 
St. Lawrence 
Rensselaer 
Oswego 
Allegany 
Washington 
Kings 
Cattaraugus 
Monroe 
Chenango 
Westchester 
Rensselaer 
Saratoga 
Columbia 
Greene 
Washington 
Steuben 
Lewis 
Tompkins 
Allegany 
Livingston 
Albany 
Chenango 
Saratoga 
Warren 
Saratoga 
Erie 

Delaware 
Madison 
St. Lawrence 
Washington 
Orange 
Delaware 
Oswego 
Chautauque 

do 
Delaware 



Pop. 
2,147 
2,268 
2,367 
1,644 
4,234 
2,412 
1,728 

578 
2,892 
2,593 
1,130 

965 
3,245 

969 
1,288 
2,558 
98 
3,678 
3,068 
2,779 
3,889 
2,538 
2,019 
2,385 
1,064 
3,846 

799 

852 
3,669 
3,462 
3,361 
3,701 
2,803 
1,161 
2,338 
3,382 
1,138 

592 
3,618 

623 
2,000 
2,790 
2,872 

865 

610 
2,631 
3,727 
1,469 
3,738 
1,845 

972 
1,379 
1,026 
2.269 
3,998 
3,340 
1,708 



40 



TOWNS AND POPULATION. 



Totvns. 
Hawison 
Harrisburgh 
Hartford 
Hartland 
Hartwick 
Hastings 
Haverstraw 
Hebron 
Hector 
Hempstead 
Henderson 
Henrietta 
Herkimer 
Herman 
Hillsdale 
Hinsdale 
Holland 
H'.mer 
Hoosick 
Hope 
Hopewell 
Hopkinton 
Hornby 
Hornellsville 
Horicon 
Houndsfield 
Howard 
Hudson City 
Hume 
Humphrey 
Hunter 
Huntington 
Hurley 
Huron 
Hyde Park 
Independence 
Ira 

Irondequoit 
Islip 
Italy 
Ithaca 
Jackson 
Jamaica 
Jasper 
Java 
Jay 

J effcrson 
Jerusalem 
Johnsburgh 
Johnstown 
Junius 
Keene 
Kendall 
Kent 

Kinderhook 
Kingsbury 
Kingston 



Counties. 
Westchester 
Lewis 
Washington 
Niagara 
Otsego 
Oswego 
Rockland 
Washington 
Tompkins 
Queens 
Jefferson 
Monroe 
Herkimer 
St. Lawrence 
Columbia 
Cattaraugus 
Erie 
Cortland 
Rensselaer 
Hamilton 
Ontario 
St. Lawrence 
Steuben 

do 
Warren 
Jefferson 
Steuben 
Columbia 
Allegany 
Cattaraugus 
Greene 
Suffolk 
Ulster 
Wayne 
Dutchess 
Allegany 
Cayuga 
Monroe 
Suffolk 
Yates 
Tompkins 
Washington 
Queens 
Steuben 
Wyoming 
Essex 
Schohai-ie 
Yates 
Warren 
Fulton 
Seneca 
Essex 
Orleans 
Putnam 
Columbia 
Washington 
Ulster 



Pop. 
1,139 

850 
2,164 
2,350 
2,490 
1,983 
3,449 
2,498 
5,652 
7,609 
2,480 
2,085 
2,369 
1,271 
2,470 
1,937 
1,242 
3,572 
3,539 

711 
1,976 
1,147 
1,048 
2,121 

659 
4,146 
3,247 
5,670 
2,303 

444 
2,019 
6,562 
2,20 J 
1,943 
2,364 
1,440 
2,283 
1,252 
1,909 
1,634 
5,650 
1,730 
3,781 
1,187 
2,331 
2.25S 
2,033 
2,935 
1,139 
5,409 
1,594 

730 
1,692 
1,830 
3,512 
2,773 
5,824 



Towns. 
Kirkland 
Knox 

Kortwright 
La Fayette 
La Grange 
Lake Pleasant 
Lancaster 
Lansing 
Lansingburgh 
Laurens 
Lawrence 
Lebanon 
Ledyard 
Lee 

Leicester 
Lenox 
Leon 
Le Ray 
Le Roy 
Lewis 

Lewisborough 
Lewiston 
Lexington 
Leyden 
Liberty 
Lima 
Lincklaen 
Lindley 
Lisbon 
Lisle 
Litchfield 
Little Falls 
Little Valley 
Livingston 
Livonia 
Locke 
Lockport 
Lodi 

Long Lake 
Lorraine 
Louisville 
Lowville 
Lumberland 
Luzerne 
Lyme 
Lyons 
Lyndon 
L3-sander 
Macedon 
MacDonough 
Machias 
Madison 
Madrid 
Mai one 
Malta 

Mamakating 
Mamaroncck 



Counltes, 
Oneida 
Albany 
Delaware 
Onondaga 
Dutchess 
Hamilton 
Erie 

Tompkins 
Rensselaer 
Otsego 

St. LawTence 
Madison 
Cayuga 
Oneiila 
Livingston 
Madison 
Cattaraugus 
Jefferson 
Genesee 
Essex 

Westchester 
Niagara 
Greene 
Lewis 
Sullivan 
Livingston 
Chenango 
Steuben 
St. Lawrence 
Broome 
Herkimer 

do 
Cattaraugus 
Columbia 
Livingston 
Cayuga 
Niagara 
Seneca 
Hamilton 
Jefferson 
St. Lawrence 
Lewis 
Sullivan 
Warren 
Jefferson 
Wayne, 
Cattaraugus 
Onondaga 
Wayne 
Chenango 
Cattaraugus 
Madison 
St. Lawrence 
Franklin 
Saratoga 
Sullivan 
Westchester 



Pop. 
2,984 
2,143 
2,441 
2,600 
1,851 

296 
2,083 
3,672 
3,330 
2,173 
1,845 
1,794 
2,143 
2,936 
2,415 
5,440 
1,326 
3,721 
4,323 
1,5€5 
1,619 
2,533 
2,813 
2,438 
1,669 
2,176 
1,219 

638 
3,."C8 

i,i;(;o 

1,672 
3,881 

700 
2,190 
2,719 
1,654 
9,125 
2,236 
59 
1,699 
1,693 
2,047 
1,205 
1,284 
5,472 
4,302 

628 
4,306 
2,396 
1,369 
1,085 
2,344 
4,511 
3,229 
1,457 
3,418 
1,416 



TOWNS AND POPULATION. 



41 



Tou-ns. 


bounties. 


Pop. 


Town). 


Counties. 


Pop. 


Manchester. 


Ontario 


2,912 


Newburgh 


Orange 


8,933 


Manheim 


Herkimer 


2,095 


Newcastle 


Westchester 


1,529 


Manlius 


Onondaga 


5,509 


Ncwcomb 


Essex 


74 


Mansfield 


Cattaraugus 


942 


Newfane 


Niagara 


1,277 


Marathon 


Cortland 


1,063 


Newfield 


Tompkins 


3,567 


Marblefovvn 


Ulster 


3,813 


New Hartford 


Oneida 


3,819 


Marcellus 


Onondaga 


2,726 


New Haven 


Oswego 


1,738 


Majcy 


Oneida 


1,799 


New Hudson 


Allegany 


1,502 


Marion 


Wayne 


1,903 


New Lebanon 


Columbia 


2,536 


Marlborough 


Ulster 


2,523 


New Lisbon 


Otsego 


1,909 


Marshall 


Oneida 


2,251 


New Paltz 


Ulster 


5,408 


Martinsburgh 


Lewis 


2,272 


Newport 


Herkimer 


2,020 


Maryland 


Otsego 


2,085 


New Rochclle 


Westchester 


1,816 


Masonville 


Delaware 


1,420 


New Scotland 


Albany 


2,912 


Massena 


St. Lawrence 


2,726 


Newstead 


Erie 


2,653 


Mayfield 


Fulton 


2,615 


Newtown 


Queens 


5,054 


Mendon 


Monroe 


3,435 


New Utrecht 


Kings 


1,283 


Mentz 


Cayuga 


4,215 


New W^indsor 


Orange 


2,482 


Meredith 


Delaware 


1,640 


New York City New York 


312,710 


Mexico 


Oswego 


3,729 


Niagara 


Niagara 


1,277 


Middleburgh 


Schoharie 


3,843 


Nichols 


Tioga 


1,986 


Middlebury 


Wyoming 


2,445 


Niles 


Cayuga 


2,234 


Middlcfield 


Otsego 


3,319 


Niskayuna 


Schenectady 


693 


Middlesex 


Yates 


1,439 


Norfolk 


St. Lawrence 


1,728 


Middletown 


Delaware 


2,608 


Northampton 


Fulton 


1,526 


Milan 


Dutchess 


1,726 


Northcastle 


Westchester 


2,058 


Milford 


Otsego 


2,095 


Northfield 


Richmond 


2,745 


Mile 


Yates 


3,986 


Northeast 


Dutchess 


1.385 


Milton 


Saratoga 


3,166 


N. Hempstead 


Queens 


3,891 


Mina 


Chautauque 


871 


North Salem 


Westchester 


1,161 


Minden 


Montgomery 


3,507 


Northumb'rlandSaratoga 


1,672 


Minerva 


Essex 


455 


Norway 


Herkimer 


1,046 


Minisink 


Orange 


5,093 


Norwich 


Chenango 


4,145 


Mohawk 


Montgomeiy 


3,112 


Nunda 


Allegany 


2,637 


Moira 


Franklin 


962 


Ogden 


Monroe 


2,404 


Montgomery 


Orange 


4,100 


Ohio 


Herkimer 


692 


Monroe 


do 


3,914 


Olean 


Cattaraugus 


638 


Mooers 


CJinton 


1,703 


Olive 


Ulster 


2,032 


Moravia 


Cayuga 


2,010 


Oneonta 


Otsego 


1,936 


Moreau 


Saratoga 


1,576 


Onondaga 


Onondaga 


5,658 


Morehouse 


Hamilton 


.69 


Ontario 


Wayne 


1,889 


Moriah 


Essex 


2,595 


Oppenheim 


Fulton 


2,169 


Morristown 


St. Lawrence 


2,809 


Orange 


Steuben 


1,824 


Alount Hope 


Orange 


1,565 


Orangcfown 


Rockland 


2,771 


Mount Morris 


Livingston 


4,576 


Orangeville 


Wyoming 


1,949 


Mount Pleasant Westchester 


7,307 


Orleans 


Jefferson 


3,0f)l 


Murray 


Orleans 


2,675 


Orwell 


Oswego 


808 


Nanticokc 


Broome 


400 


Ossian 


Allegany 


938 


Naples 


Ontario 


2,345 


Oswegafchie 


St. Lawrence 


5,719 


Napoli 


Cattaraugus 


1,145 


Oswego 


Oswego 


4,665 


Nassau 


Rensselaer 


3,236 


Otego 


Otsego 


1,919 


Nelson 


Madison 


2,100 


Otisco 


Onondaga 


1,906 


Neversink 


Sullivan 


1,681 


Otsego 


Otsego 


4,120 


New Albion 


Cattaraugus 


1,016 


Otselic 


Chenango 


1,621 


Newark 


Tioga 


1,616 


Otto 


Cattaraugus 


2,133 


New Baltimore Greene 


2,306 


Ovid 


Seneca 


2,721 


New Berlin 


Chenango 


3,086 
4» 


Owasco 


Cayuga 


1,319 



42 



TOWNS AND POPULATION. 



Towns. 
Owego 
Oxford 
Oyster Bay- 
Painted Post 
Palatine 
Palermo 
Palmyra 
Pamelia 
Paris 
Parish 
Parishville 
Parma 
Patterson 
Pawlings 
Pelham 
Pembroke 
Pendleton 
Penfield 
Perrinton 
Perry 

Perrysburgh 
Persia 
Perth 
Peru 

Petersburgh 
Pharsalia 
Phelps 
Philadelphia 
Phillipstown 
Pierrepont 
Pike 

Pinckney 
Pine Plains 
Pitcairn 
Pitcher 
Pittsfield 
Pittsford 
Pittstown 
Plainfield 
Plattekill 
Plattsbursrh 



Counties. 
Tioga 
Chenango 
Queens 
Steuben 
Montgomery 
Oswego 
Wayne 
Jefferson 
Oneida 
Oswego 
St. Lawrence 
Monroe 
Putnam 
Dutchess 
Westchester 
Genesee 
Niagara 
Monroe 

do 
Wyoming 
Cattaraugus 

do 
Fulton 
Clinton 
Rensselaer 
Chenango 
Ontario 
Jefferson 
Putnam 
St. Lawrence 
Allegany 
Lewis 
Dutchess 
St. Lawrence 
Chenango 
Otsego 
Monroe 
Rensselaer 
Otsego 
Ulster 
Clinton 



Pleasant ValleyDutchess 
Plymouth Chenansro 



Poland 

Pomfret 

Pompey 

Portage 

Porter 

Portland 

Portville 

Potsdam 

Potter 

Poughkeepsie 

Poundridge - 

Prattsburgh 

Prattsville 

Preble 



Chaufauque 

do 
Onondaga 
Allegany 
Niagara 
Chautauque 
Cattaraugus 
St. Lawrence 
Yates 
Dutchess 
Westchester 
Steuben 
Greene 
Cortland 



Pon. 

5,340 

3,179 

5,865 

1,674 

2,823 

1,928 

3,549 

2,104 

2,844 

1,543 

2,250 

2,652 

1,349 

1,571 

789 
1,970 
1,098 
2,842 
2,513 
3,082 
1,660 

892 

737 
3,134 
1,901 
1,213 
5,563 
1,888 
3,814 
1,430 
2,176 

907 
1,334 

396 
1,562 
1,395 
1,983 
3,784 
1,450 
2,125 
6,416 
2.219 
1,625 
1,087 
4,566 
4,371 
4,721 
2,177 
2,136 

462 
4,473 
2,245 
10,006 
1,407 
2,455 
1,613 
1,247 



Towns. 
Preston 
Princelown 
Providence 
Pulteney 
Putnam 



Counties. 
Chenango 
Schenectady 
Saratoga 
Steuben 
Washington 



Putnam Valley Putnam 
Queensbury Warren 



Ramapo 

Randolph 

Reading 

Redtield 

Redhook 

Remsen 



Rockland 

Cattaraugus 

Steuben 

Oswego 

Dutchess 

Oneida 



Rensselaerville Albany 
Rhinebeck Dutchess 



Richfield 

Richford 

Richland 

Richmond 

Ridgeway 

Riga 

Ripley 

Riverhead 

Rochester 



Otsego 

Tioga 

Oswego 

Ontario 

Orleans 

Monroe 

Chautauque 

Suffolk 

Ulster 



Rochester City Monroe 
Rockland Sullivan 



Rodman 
Rome 

Romulus 

Root 

Rose 

Rossie 

Rotterdam 

Roxbury 

Royalton 

Rush 

Rushford 

Russell 

Russia 

Rutland 

Rye 

St. Johnsville 

Salem 

Salina 

Salisbury 

Sand Lake 

Sandy Creek 

Sandford 

Sangersfield 

Saranac 

Saratoga 

SaratogaSprings 



Jefferson 
Oneida 
Seneca 
Montgomery 
Wayne 
St. Lawrence 
Schenectady 
Delaware 
Niagara 
Monroe 
Allegany 
St. Lawrence 
Herkimer 
Jefferson 
Westchester 
Montgomery 
Washington 
Onondaga 
Herkimer 
Rensselaer 
Oswego 
Broome 
Oneida 
Clinton 
Saratoga 
do 



Sardinia 

Paugerties 

Savannah 

Schaghticoke 

Scarsdale 



Erie 
Ulster 
Wa3'ne 
Rensselaer 
« Westchester 



Pop. 
1,117 
1,201 
1,507 
1,784 

784 
1,659 
3,789 
3,222 
1,283 
1,541 

507 
3,829 
1,638 
3,705 
2,659 
1,680 

939 
4,050 
1,937 
3,554 
1,984 
2,197 
2,449 
2,674 
20,202 

826 
1,702 
5,680 
2,235 
2,979 
2,038 
1,553 
2,284 
3,013 
3,549 
1,92^- 
1,512 
1,373 
2,298 
2,090 
1,803 
1,923 
2,855 
11,013 
l,859r 
4,303 
2,420 
1,173 
2,251 
1,462 
2,624 
3,384 
1,743 
6,216 
1,718 
3,389 

255 



TOWNS AND POPULATION. 



43 



Towns. 


Counties. • 


Pop 


Towns. 


Counties. 


Pop. 


Schenec'ily CitySchcnectady 


6,784 


Stockport 


Columbia 


1,815 


Schodack 


Rensselaer 


4,125 


Stockton 


Chautauque 


2,078 


Schoharie 


Schoharie 


5,534 


Stratford 


Fulton 


500 


Schroon 


Essex 


1,660 


Stuyvcsant 


Columbia 


1,779 


Schroeppel 


Oswego 


2,098 


Sullivan 


Madison 


4,390 


Schuyler 


Herkimer 


1,798 


Summer Hill 


Cayuga 


1,446 


Scio 


Allegany 


1,156 


Summit 


Schoharie 


2,010 


Scipio 


Cayuga 


2,255 


Sweden 


Monroe 


1,884 


Scott 


Cortland 


1,332 


Taghkanic 


Columbia 


1,674 


Scriba 


Oswego 


4,051 


Ticonderoga 


Essex 


2,169 


Sempronius 


Cayuga * 


1,304 


Tioga 


Tioga 


2,464 


Seneca 


Ontario 


7,073 


Tompkins 


Delaware 


2,035 


Seneca Falls 


Seneca 


4,281 


Tonawanda 


Erie 


1,261 


Sennet 


Cayuga 


2,060 


Triangle 


Broome 


1,692 


Seward 


Schoharie 


2,088 


Trenton 


Oneida 


3,178 


Shandaken 


Ulster 


1,455 


Troupsburgh 


Steuben 


1,171 


Sharon 


Schoharie 


2,520 


Troy City 


Rensselaer 


19,334 


Shawangunk 


Ulster 


3,886 


Truxton 


Cortland 


3,658 


Shelby 


Orleans 


2,643 


Tully 


Onondaga 


1,663 


Sheldon 


Wyoming 


2,353 


Turin 


Lewis 


1,704 


Shelter Island 


Suffolk 


379 


Tyre 


Seneca 


1,506 


Sherburne 


Chenango 


2,7.91 


Tyrone 


Steuben 


2,122 


Sheridan 


Cayuga 


1,883 


Ulysses 


Tompkins 


2,976 


Sherman 


Chautauque 


1,099 


Unadilla 


Otsego 


2,272 


Sidney 


Delaware 


1,732 


Union ' 


Broome 


3.165 


Skaneateles 


Onondaga 


3,981 


Union Vale 


Dutchess 


i;498 


Smithfield 


Madison 


1,699 


Ui'bana 


Steuben 


1,884 


Smithtown 


Suffolk 


1,932 


Utica City 


Oneida 


12,810 


Smilhville 


Chenango 


1,762 


Van Buren 


Onondaga 


3,021 


Smyrna 


do 


2,246 


Varick 


Seneca 


1,971 


Sodus 


Wayne 


4,472 


Venice 


Cayuga 


.2,105 


Solon 


Cortland 


2,311 


Vernon 


Oneida 


3,043 


Somers 


Westchester 


2,082 


Verona 


do 


4,504 


Somerset 


Niagara 


1,742 


Vestal 


Broome 


1,253 


• Southampton 


Suffolk 


6.205 


Veteran 


Chemung 


2,279 


South Bristol 


Ontario 


1,375 


Victor 


Ontario 


2,393 


Southeast 


Putnam 


1,910 


Victory 


Cayuga 


2,371 


Soulli field 


Richmond 


1,619 


Vienna 


Oneida 


2,530 


Southold 


Suffolk 


3,907 


Villenova 


Chautauque 


1,655 


Southport 


Chemung 


2,101 


Virgil 


Cortland 


4,502 


Spafford 


Onondaga 


1.873 


Volney 


Oswego 


3,155 


Sparta 


Livingston 


5;841 


Wales 


Erie 


1,987 


Spencer 


Tioga 


1,532 


WallkiU 


Orange 


4,268 


Springfield 


Otsego 


2,382 


Walton 


Delaware 


1,846 


Springport 


Cayuga 


1,890 


Walworth 


Wayne 


1,734 


Springwater 


Livingston 


2,832 


Warren 


Herkimer 


2,003 


StatFord 


Genesee 


2,561 


Warrensburg 


h Warren 


1,468 


Stamford 


Delaware 


1,081 


Warsaw 


Wyoming 


2,841 


Stanford 


Dutchess 


2,278 


\Var\vick 


Orange 


5,113 


Starkey 


Yates 


2,426 


Washington 


Dutchess 


2,833 


Starks 


Herkimer 


1,766 


'VS'^aterford 


Saratoga 


1,824 


Sterling 


Cayuga 


2,533 


Waterloo 


Seneca 


3,036 


Steuben 


Oneida 


1,993 


Watertown 


Jefferson 


5,027 


Stephentown 


Renssolaor 


2,753 


Watervliet 


Albany 


10,141 


Stillwater 


Saratoga 


2,733 


\Vatson 


Lewis 


1,707 


Stockbridge 


Madison 


2,320 


Wawarsing 


Ulster 


4,044 


Stockholm^ 


St. Lawrence 


2,935 


Wayne 


Steuben 


1,377 



44 



TOWNS AND POPULATION 



Toums. 
Webster 
Wells 

West Almond 
W. Bloomfield 
Westchester 
Westerlo 
Western 
Westfiekl 
Westfielcl 
Westford 
West Monroe 
Westmoreland, 
West Turin 
Westport 
Westville 
Wethersfield 
Wheatficld 
Wheatland 
Wheeler 
White Creek 
Whitehall 
White Plains 
Whitestown 



Counties. 


Pop. 


> Towns. 


Counties. 


Monroe 


2,235 


Willett 


Cortland 


Hamilton 


365 


Williamsburgh 


Kings 


Alleg'any 


808 


Williamson 


Wayne 


Ontario 


2,094 


Williamstown 


Oswego 


Westchester 


4,154 


Willsborough 


Essex 


Albany- 


3,096 


Wilmington 


do 


Oneida 


3,488 


Wilmurt 


Herkimer 


Cautauque 


3,199 


Wilna 


Jefferson 


Richmond 


2,326 


Wilson 


Niagara 


Otsego 


1,478 


Wilton • 


Saratoga 


Oswego 


918 


Windham 


Greene 


Oneida 


3,105 


Winfield 


Herkimer 


Lewis 


2,042 


Windsor 


Broome 


Essex 


1,932 


Wirt 


Allegan}' 


Franklin 


1,028 


Wolcott 


Wayne 


Wyoming 


1,728 


Woodhull 


Steuben 


Niagara 


1,057 


Woodstock 


Ulster 


Monroe 


2,871 


Worcester 


Otsego 


Steuben 


1,294 


Yates 


Orleans 


Washington 


2,195 


Yonkers 


Westchester 


do 


3,813 


York 


Livingston 


Westchester 


1,087 


Yorkshire 


Cattaraugus 


Oneida 


5,156 


Yorktown 


Westchester 



Pop. 

872 
5.094 
2,147 

842 
1,648 

928 
60 
2,590 
1,753 
1,438 
2,417 
1,652 
2,368 
1,207 
2,481 

827 
1,691 
2,390 
2,230 
2,968 
3,049 
1,292 
2,819 



TOWNS FORMED IN 1841. 

Croghan, taken from Diana and Watson, Lewis county. 

Harrietstown, taken from Duane, Franklin county. 

Macomb, taken from Gouverneur and Morristown, St. Lawrence county. 

Pavilion, taken from Covington, Le Roy and Stafford, Genesee county. 

Theresa, taken from Alexandria, Jeflerson county. 

TOWNS FORMED IN 1842. 

Caroga, taken from Bleecker, Stratford and Johnstown, Fulton county. 
Carrolton, taken from Great Valley, Cattaraugus county. 
Collikoon, taken from Liberty, Sullivan county. 
Oakfield, taken from Elba, Genesee county. ' 

Total, 9 Cities, divided into 64 Wards, and 830 Towns. 



VILLAGES INCORPORATED IN 1842. 
Name. Town. County. Pop. 1840. 

Chittenango, Sullivan, Madison, 1,000 

Greene, Greene, Chenango, 750 

Jefferson, Dix and Reading, Chemung and Steuben, 300 

Manlius, Manlius, Onondaga, 1,200 



POPULATION OF THE STATE OF NEW-TORK AT DIFFERENT PERIODS. 



In 1790, 
In 1800, 



340, 120 I In 1810, 
586,756 I In 1820, 



959,049 I In 1830, 
1,372,812 I In 1840, 



1,918,608 
•2,428,921 



CITIES IN THE STATE OP ITEW-TORK. 



45 



Comparative view of Cities in the State of New- York, 

GIV^IXG THE FOPULATION AT DIFFKREXT PERIODS. 

NEW-YORK.— Chartered 1G80. 



Wards. 



Pop. 1S30. 



Pop. isas. 



Pop. 1940. 



First Ward, , 

Second Ward ,...., 

Third Ward, 

Fourth Ward, 

Fifth WanU 

Sixth Ward, 

Seventh Ward, 

Eighth Ward, 

Ninth Ward,...-.., 

Tenth Ward, 

Eleventh Ward, . . . 

Twelfth Ward, 

Thirteenth Ward,.. 
Fourteenth Ward,. 
Fifteenth Ward,*.. 
Sixteenth Ward,f . 
Sevententh Ward,t, 

Total Population, . 



11,337 
8,203 
9,649 
12,705 
17,722 
13,596 
15,898 
20,921 
22, 752 
16,438 
14,901 
11,901 
12,655 
14, 370 



10, 380 
7,649 

10,884 
15,439 
18, 495 
16, 827 
21,481 
28,570 
20,618 
20, 926 
26, 845 
24,437 
17,130 
17,306 
13,202 



10,629 
6,394 
11,581 
15,770 
19, 159 
17,198 
22, 982 
29,073 
24, 795 
29,026 
17,052 
11,652 
18,517 
20,235 
17,755 
22,273 
18.619 



203. 007 



270. 089 



312,710 



• Taken from the Ninth Ward, March, 1832. f Taken from the Twelfth Ward in 1836. 
t TaKeu from the Eleventh Ward in 1837. 

ALBANY.— Chartered 1G86. 



Wards. 



Pop. 1830. 



Pop. 1836. 



Pop. 1840. 



First Ward,. ., 
Second Ward, 
Third Ward,.. 
Fourth Ward, 
Fifth Ward,.. 



6,866 
6,280 
2,011 
5, 875 
3,206 



7,638 
6,742 
3,845 
6,365 
4,519 



9,809 
6,855 
4,137 
7,244 
5,676 



Total Population, 



24,238 



28, 109 



83,721 



IIUDSOV.- 


—Chartered, 


1 7M5. 




Wards. 


Pop. 1830. 


Pop. 1835. 


Pop. 1840. 


First Ward 




2,914 

2,617 


2,854 
1,818 


Second Ward, 




Total Population, 


5,392 


5,531 


5.672 



SCHENECTADY.— OhartPred 175»^i. 




Wards. ■ 


Pop. If90. 


Pop. 1635. 


Pop. 1840. 


First Ward 


],81>^ 
2,450 


2, 300 
3,972 


1,509 
1,557 
1,242 
2,476 


Second Ward, 


Third Ward, 


Fourth Ward, 




Total Population, 


4. 268 


6.2721 


6,748 



46 



CITIES IN THE STATE OF NEW-YORK 
TROY — Chartered, 1810. 



Pop. 1830. 



Pop. 1835. 



Pop. 1840. 



First Ward, 

Second Ward, . 
Third Ward,.., 
Fourth Ward,. 
Fifth Ward, , . , 
Sixth Ward, . . . . 
Seventh Ward,. 
Eighth Ward, . 



2,598 
2,865 
1,435 
3,344 
739 
575 



3,837 
3, 593 
2,451 
5,447 
683 
948 



3,234 
3,778 
2,774 
3, 557 

vSOO 
1,326 
3,037 

828 



Total Population,. 



11.556 



16.959 



19,334 



BUFFALO.— Chartpred, 1832. 



Wards. 



Pop. 1830. 



Pop. 1838. 



Pop. 1840. 



First Ward, . . 
Second Ward, 
Third Ward, . 
Fourth Ward, 
Fifth Ward,,. 



Total Population,, 



8,668 



4,838 
2,805 
1,909 
3,407 
2.702 



3,531 
3,400 
1,829 
5,483 
3,970 



15,661 



18,213 



, UTICA.- 


Chartered 1832. 




Wards. 


Pop. 1S30. 


Pop. 1836. 


Pop. 1840. 


First Ward, 


* 


1,633 

1,755 
2,731 
4,064 


1 738 


Second Ward, 

Third Ward 


2' 392 

3 781 


Fourth Ward, -t . . 


4,871 


Total Population, 


8, 323 


10, 183 


12 782 









BROOKLYN — Chartered 1834, 



Wards. 



Pop. 1S30. 



Pop. 1836. 



Pop. 1840. 



First Ward, . . . 
Second Ward,. 
Third Ward, ., 
Fourth Ward, . 
Fifth Ward, . . . 
Sixth Ward, . . 
Seventh Ward, 
Eighth Ward, 
Ninth Ward, . . 



Total Population, 



1,452 
2,801 
2,191 
3,557 
2.301 



2,993 



1,529 
4,614 
2,660 
5,664 
4,510 
2,132 
2,052 
493 
666 



2,148 
5,447 
3,834 
6,827 
7,415 
4,043 
4,521 
944 
1,054 



15. 295 



24,310 



36,223 



ROCHESTER — Chartered 1834. 



Wards. 



Pop. 1830. 



Pop. 1835. 



Pop. 1840. 



First Ward,. . 
Second Ward, 
Third Ward, . 
Fourth Ward,, 
Fifth Ward, . . 



2,272 
3,314 
2,892 
3.013 
2:913 



2,816 
4,685 
4,203 
3,832 
4,655 



Total Population, 



9.269 



14,404 



20, 191 



CHARTERED CITIES AND INCORPORATED VILLAGES. 47 



CHARTERED CITIES. 
TVHh the (late of Charter, or Incorporation ; number of tvards, coun- 
ties and towns in which they are located, and the population in 1840. 



NAMES. 



Albany, 

Brooklyn*. . , 
Buli'alo,;..., 
Hudson, . . . 
New York,. , 
Rocliester, . , 
Schenectady, 

Troy, , 

Utica, 



Char. Wardsf 



]6S(i 
1S3-J 
\KU 
17S5 
1680 

179>* 
IS 16 
1832 



Counties. 



Albany,. , . . 

Kings, 

Erie, 

Columbia,. . 
New-York,. 
Monroe, . . . 
SK-henectady 
Rensselaer, 
Oneida, . . . . 



Pop. 1840 



33, 721 
36, 233 
18,213 

5, 672 

312,710 

20, 191 

6, 784 
19,334 
12,782 



INCORPORATED VILLAGES, 
Are the whole or parts of Towns, having Charters granted by the 
Legislature, similar in some respects to Cities. There were in 1841 
145 incorporated Villages in the Stale, besides numerous other Un- 
incorporated Villages. 



Names. Inc. 


Towns. 


Counties. 


Pop. 


Albion, 1828 


Barre, 


Orleans, 


1400 
500 

1700 
900 
500 
500 
600 

1300 
800 

5626 
500 
800 
500 


Alexander, 1834 


Alexander., 


Genesee, 


Amsterdam, 

Angelica, 


1830 
183.") 


Amsterdam 

Angelica, 


Montgomery, 

Allegany 


Arcadia, 


1839 
1838 
1839 
1805 
1837 
181.5 
1837 
1836 
1829 
1807 
1823 
1816 
1813 
1837 
1833 
1825 
1829 
1828 
1834 
1829 
1815 
1835 
1841 
1827 
1806 
1810 
1812 
1834 
1825 


Arcadia, 


Wayne, 


Argyle, 


Washington, 


Astoria, 


Newtown, 


Athens,. 


Athens, 




Attica, 


Attica, 




Auburn 


Auburn 




Aurora, 


Ledyard, 

Aurora, 




Auroravirie, 


Erie, 


Bainbridge, 


Bainbridge 

Milton, 


Chenango, 


Ballston Spa, 


Saratoga, 


1500 


Batavia, 


Batavia, 




2000 
1400 
2800 
1800 


Bath, 


Bath, 




Binghamton, 


Chenango, 




Black Rock, 


Black Rock, 


Erie 


Bloomingburgh, 

Bridgewater, 




500 
400 


Bridgewater, 


Oneida, 


Brockport, 


Monroe. . . . . 

Jefferson, 


2000 
1000 


Brownville, 


Brownville, 

Camden, 


Camden, 




700 
1300 
9700 


Canajoharie, 

Canandaigua, 


Canajoharie, 

Canandaigua, 

Lenox, . ».. 


Montgomery 

Ontario, 


Canastota, 




750 


Carthage, 


Wilna 


Jefferson. . . , , . 

Rensselaer, 


600 
350 


Castleton, 


Schodack 


Catskill 


Catskill, 


2800 


Cazenovia, 


Cazenovia, 




1600 


Cherry Valley, 


Cherry Valley, 

Brookfield , 


Otsego, 


lion 


Clarkville, 




450 


Clintonville, 


Au Sable, 


CliQtoa, 


750 



48 



INCORPORATED VILLAGES. 



Names. 



Inc. 



Towns. 



Counties. 



Clyde, 

ColumbiavillCj. 
Constantia, . . . 
Cooperslown, . 

Delhi, 

De Ruyter,. . . . 

Dunkirk, 

EUicottville,... 

Elniira, 

Esperance,. . . , 

F airport, 

Flushing, 

Fort Ann, 

Fort Plain, 

Fredonia, 

Fulton, 

GaineS; 

Galway, 

Geddes, 

Geneseo, 

Geneva, 

Glen's Falls, . . 

Goshen, 

Greenbush, . .. 
Greenport, . . . 

Hamilton, 

Havana, 

Herkimer, . . . . 

Homer, 

Hoosick Falls,. 
Honeoye Falls, 

Ithaca, 

Jamaica, 

Jamestown, . . . 
Johnstown, . . . 

Jordan, 

Kinderhook,. . . 

Kingston, 

Knowlesville,. . 
Lansingburgh,. 

Laurens, 

Le Roy, 

Lewiston, 

Little Falls,... 
Liverpool, .... 

Lockport, 

Lyons, 

Madison, 

Manlius, 

Mayville, 

Medina, , 

Mendon, 

Monticello, 

Montgomery,. . 

Moravia, 

Morrisville, . . . . 



1S35 Galen, 

1812 Stockport, 

1836 Constantia, 

J812 Otsego, 

lS2l Delhi, .. 

1833 De Ruyter 

1837 Pomfret,.. 

1837 EUicottville, 

1815 Elmira, 

18lN Schoharie, 

1837 Elmira, 

1837 Flushing, 

1820 Fort Ann, 

1832 Minden, '. . , 

1829 Pomfret, 

183,5 Volney, 

1832 Gaines, , 

1838 Galway, , 

1832 Salina, 

1832 Geneseo, 

1812 Seneca, 

1839 Queensbury, 

1809 Goshen, 

1815 Greenbush, 

1838 Southold, 

1816 Hamilton,,. 

1836 Catherine and CatlJn 

1807 Herkimer, 

1835 Homer, , 

1827 Hoosick, 

1838 Mendon, 

1821 Ithaca, , 

1814 Jamaica, 

1827 Ellicott, 

1808 Johnstown, 

1835 Elbridge, 

1838 Kinderhook, 

1805 Kingston, 

1836 Ridgeway, 

1801 Lansingbsrgh, 

1834 Laurens, 

1834 Le Roy, 

1822 Lewiston, 

1811 Little Falls, 

1830 Salina, 

1829 Lockport, 

1831 Lyons, 

1816 Madison, 

1813 Manlius, 

1830 Chautauque, 

1832 Ridgeway, 

1833 Mendon 

1830 Thompson, 

1810 Montgomery, 

1837 Moravia, 

1819 Eaton, 



Wayne. 

Columbia, 

Oswego, 

Otsego, 

Delaware, 

Madison, 

Chautauque, . ... 
Cattaraugus, .... 

Chemung, 

Schoharie, 

Chemung, 

Queens 

Washington, ..... 
Montgomery,. . . . 
Chautauque, .... 

Oswego, 

Orleans, 

Saratoga, 

Onondaga, , 

Livingston, 

Ontario, 

Warren, , 

Orange, 

Rensselaer, 

Suffolk, 

Madison, 

Chemung, 

Herkimer, , 

Cortland, 

Rensselaer, , 

Monroe. , 

Tompkins, 

Queens, 

Chautauque, ..... 

Fulton, 

Onondaga, 

Columbia, 

Ulster, 

Orleans, 

Rensselaer, . . 

Otsego, 

Genesee, 

Niagaia, 

Herkimer, 

Onondaga, 

Niagara. 

Wayne, 

Madison, 

Onondaga, ....... 

Chautauque, 

Orleans, 

Monroe, 

Sullivan, 

Orange, 

Cayuga, I 600 

Madison I 700 



INCORPORATED VILLAGES. 



49 



Names. 



Inc. 



Mount Morris, ISSf) 

Nassau, 1819 

New-Berlin, -1816 

Newburgh, 1800 

Norwich, ISlfi 

Ogdcnsburgh, 1S17 

Oneida Castle, 1841 

Oswego 1797 

Ovid, 1816 

Owego, 1827 

Oxford 1808 

Palmyra 1819 

Peekskill, 1827 

Penn-Yan 1833 

Perry ; 1830 

Pittsford 1827 

Plattsbursh, 1815 

Pleasant Valley, 1814 

Port Bvron, 1837 

Port Chester, 1823 

Port Ontario, 1837 

Potsdam, 1831 

Poughkeepsie,.: 1801 

Pulaski, 1832 

JRhinebeck, 1831 

1819 
1814 
1803 
1821 
1810 
1826 
1S31 
1831 
1830 
1813 
1833 
1834 
1834 
1816 
182.5 
1823 
1819 
1831 
1827 
1809 
1827 
1839 
1805 
1824 
18 1() 
1831 
1833 
1836 
1806 
1813 
1827 



Rome,. 

Sackett's Harbof,. 

Salem, 

Salina, 

Sandy Hill, 

Saratoga Springs,., 

Schuylerville, 

Seneca Falls 

Sherburne, 

Sing-Sing, 

Skaneateles, 

Smyrna, 

Spriiigville, 

Stillwater, 

Syracuse, 

Tompkinsville, . . . 

Trenton, 

Ulster, 

Unadilla, .' 

Union Village,. . . . 

Vernon 

Waddington, 

Waterford, 

Waterloo 

Watertown, 

Weedsport, 

Westfield, 

West Troy, 

Whitehall, 

W^hitesborough, . . 
Williamsburgh,. . . 



Towns. 



Mount Morris, 

Nassau, 

New-Berlin, 

Newburgh, 

Norwich, 

Oswegatchie, 

Vernon, 

Oswego, 

Ovid, 

Owego,-. 

Oxford, 

Palmyra, 

Cortland, 

Benton and Milo,.. . 

Perry, 

Pittsford, 

Plattsburgh, 

Pleasant Valley,. . . . 

Mentz, 

Rye, 

Richland, 

Potsdam, 

Poughkeepsie, 

Richlamd, 

Rhinebeck, 

Rome, 

Houndsfield, 

Salem, 

Salina, 

Kingsbury, 

Saratoga Springs,. . . 

Saratoga, 

Seneca Falls, 

Sherburne, 

Mount Pleasant,. . . . 

Skaneateles, 

Smyrna, 

Concord, 

Stillwater, 

Salina,. 

Castleton, 

Trenton, 

Saugerties, 

Unadilla, 

Easton &, Greenwich, 

Vernon, 

Madrid, 

Waterford, 

Waterloo, 

Watertown, 

Brutus 

Westiield, 

Watervliet, 

Whitehall, 

Whitesiown, 

Williamsburgh, 

5 



Counties. 



Livingston, . . 
Rensselaer, . . 
Chenango, . . . 

Orange, 

Chenango, . . . 
St. Lawrence, 

Oneida, 

Oswego, 

Seneca, 

Tioga, 

Chenango, . . . 

Wayne, 

Westchester, . 

Yates 

Wyoming .... 

Monroe, 

Clinton, 

Dutchess, .... 

Cayuga, 

Westchester, 

Oswego, 

St. Lawrence, 
Dutchess, . . . . 

Oswego, 

Dutchess, . . .. 

Oneida, 

Jefferson, . . . . 
Washington, . 
Onondaga, . . . 
Washington, . 
Saratoga, . . . . 
Saratoga, . . . . 

Seneca, 

Chenango, — 
Westchester, . 
Onondaga, . . . 
Chenango, . . . 

Erie, 

Saratoga, . . . . 
Onondaga, . . . 
Richmond, . . . 

Oneida, 

Ulster, 

Otsego, 

Washington. . 

Oneida, 

St. Lawrence. 
Saratoga, . . . . 

Seneca, 

Jefferson, . . . . 

Cayuga, 

Chauiauque, . 

Albany, 

Washington, . 

Oneida, 

Kings, 



50 



UNINCORPORATED VILLAGES, 

WITH THE ESTIMATED POPULATION IN 1840. 



Village!. 


Counties. 


Pov. 


Villages. 


Counties. 


Acra 


iGrreene 


100 


Belleville 


Jefferson 


Adams 


Jefferson 


750 


Bellona 


Yates 


Adams' Basin 


Monroe 


150 


Bellport 


Suffolk 


Adamsport 


Steuben 


125 


Bellvale 


Orange 


Addison 


do 


600 


Bergen 


Genesee 


Akron 


Erie 


300 


Berkshire 


Tioga 


Alabama 


Genesee 


100 


Berlin 


Rensselaer 


Alden 


do 


200 


Berlin Centre 


do 


Alexandria 


Jefferson 


150 


Bcrnville 


Albany 


Alexandria 


Essex 


350 


Bethany 


Genesee 


AUoway 


Wayne 


300 


Bethel 


Ontario 


Almond 


Allegany 


400 


Bethpage 


Queens 


Alps 


Rensselaer 


200 


Bethuneville 


Hamilton 


Alton 


Wayne 


150 


Betf's Corners 


Onondaga 


Amber 


Onondaga 


100 


Big Flats 


Chemung 


Amboy 


do 


200 


Birmingham 


Clinton 


Amegansett 


Suffolk 


200 


Rlack Rock 


do 


Amenia Union 


Dutchess 


200 


Blenheim 


■Schoharie 


Ameniaville 


do 


200 


Bloomville 


Delaware 


Amesville 


Montgomery 


175 


Bolivar 


Allegany 


Amity 


Orange 


100 


Bombay 


Fi-anklin 


Ancram I. Works Columbia 


200 


Boonville 


Oneida 


Andes 


Delaware 


125 


Boston 


Erie 


Andover 


Allegany 


150 


Bouckville 


Madison 


Annsville 


Westchester 


125 


Bouquet 


Essex 


Antwerp 


Jefferson 


300 


Brackabeen 


Schoharie 


Aquebogue 


Suffolk 


100 


Brainard's Bridge Rensselaer 


Arcade 


Wyoming 


300 


Branch 


Suffolk 


Arkport 


Steuben 


175 


Branchport 


Yates 


Ashford 


Cattaraugus 


200 


Branden 


Franklin 


Ashville 


Chatauque 


200 


Brasher's Fall's 


St. Lawrence 


Augusta 


Oneida 


350 


Brewerton 


Onondaga 


Aurelius 


Cayuga 


125 


Bridgehampton 


Suffolk 


Austerlitz 


Columbia 


200 


Bridgeport 


Seneca 


Avoca 


Steuben 


200 


Bridgeville 


Sullivan 


Avon 


Livingston 


600 


Brighton 


Monroe 


Babylon 


Suffolk 


250 


Bristol 


Ulster 


Baileytown 


Seneca 


100 


Broadalbin 


Fulton 


Baker's Village 


Allegany 


200 


Brookfield 


Orange 


Baldwinsville 


Onondaga 


1,000 


Brushville 


Queens 


Bangall 


Dutchess 


100 


Buckram 


do 


Bangor 


Franklin 


150 


Burdette 


■ Tompkins 


Barcelona 


Chautauque 


300 


Burlingham 


Sullivan 


Barnegat 


Dutchess 


180 


Burlington 


Otsego 


Barre Centre 


Orleans 


125 


Burnt Hills 


Saratoga 


Barrytown 


Dutchess 


150 


Burrville 


Jefferson 


Bath 


Rensselaer 


125 


Bushnell's Basin 


Monroe 


Battenville 


Washington 


350 


Buskirk-s Bridge 


Rensselaer 


Bedford 


Kings 


100 


Byrneville 


Schoharie 


Bedford 


Westchester 


250 


Byron 


Genesee 


Beekmantown 


do 


450 


Cadiz 


Cattaraugus 


Beekmanvillc 


Dutchess 


125 


Cadyville 


Clinton 


Belgium 


Onondaga 


350 


Cadysville 


Allegany 


BeUeisIe 


do 


125 


Cairo 


Greene 



Pop. 
300 
150 
125 
100 
200 
300 
300 
125 
300 
200 
250 
100 
100 
200 
200 
200 
100 
150 
150 
100 
200 
600 
500 
100 
400 
100 
200 
100 
125 
150 
125 
300 
150 
175 
125 
200 
150 
400 
150 
100 
175 
400 
175 
150 
150 
125 
100 
200 
100 
200 
300 
125 
150 
400 



UNINCORPORATED VILLAGES. 



51 



Tillages. 
Caldwell 
Caledonia 
Cambridge 
Camilus 
Candor 
Caneadea 
Canningville 
Cannonsviile 
Canoga 
Canterbury 
Canton 
Canton 

Cape Vincent 

Cardiff 

Carlisle 

Carmel 

Carthage 

Caryville 

Cassville 

Castile 

Catharines 

Cato 

Cato 4 Corners 

Caughnawaga 

C'ayuga 

Cenierville 

Cenlertield 

Centreport 

Centreport 

Centreville 

Centre vi lie 

Centreville 



Counties. 

Warren 

Livingston 

Washington 

Onondaga 

Tioga 

Allegany 

Oneida 

Tompkins 

Seneca 

Orange 

St. Lawrence 

Onondaga 

Jefferson 

Onondaga 

Schoharie 

Putnam 

Dutchess 

Genesee 

Oneida 
Wyoming 
Chemung 
Cayuga 

do 
Montgomery 
Cayuga 
Steuben 
Ontario 
Suffolk 
Cayuga 
Allegany 
Chautaiique 
Otsego 



Centre W. Creek Washington 
Chambcrlainville Cattaraugus 
Champlain Jefferson 

Champlaiu Clinton 

Charlotte Monroe 

Charlton Saratoga 

Chatham Columbia 

Chatham 4 Corn. do 
Chaumont Jefferson 

Chazy Clinton 

Chazy Landing do 
Chelsea Richmond 

Chenango Forks IJroome 
Cherry Creek Chautauque 
Cheshire Ontario 

Chester Orange 

Chestertown Warren 

Chesferville Albany 

Churchville Monroe 

Cicero Ononilaga 

Cincinnatus Cortland 

Clarendon Orleans 

Clarksville Cayuga 

Clarkson Monroe 

Clarksville Otsego 



Pop. 

200 

450 

700 

600 

300 

125 

175 

100 

300 

500 

800 

200 

500 

150 

175 

250 

200 

225 

250 

150 

125 

200 

150 

200 

300 

250 

125 

150 

150 

150 

225 

200 

200 

150 

200 

400 

175 

300 

300 

200 

250 

250 

100 

100 

.500 

200 

100 

200 , 

350 

250 

300 I 

300 

400 

200 

300 

700 

200 



Villnges. 
Clavcrack 
Clear Ci-eek 
Clermont 
Cleveland 
Clinton 
Clockvillc 
Clymer 
Cobleskill 
Cochecton 
Coeymans 
Cohoes 
Columbia villa 
Columbus 
Conquest 
Constablevllle 
Cooksburgh 
Coonsville 
Copenhagen 
Coram 
Corbeau 
Cornelia 
Corning 
Cornwall 
Cornwallville 
I Cortlar.d 
I Coventry 
Coventryville 
Covington 
Coxsackie 
Coxsackie La'ng 
Craigville 
Croton 
Crown Point 
Cuba 
Dauby 
Dansville 
Darien 
Dashville 
Dayansville 
Deansville 
Decatur 
Defriestville 
De Kalb 
Delhi 
Delphi 
Delta 
Denmark 
Depauville 
Deposite • 

De Witt's Valley 
Dexter 
Dexterville 
Dobb's Ferry 
Dolsentown 
Dover Plain 
Drfisdcn 
Dry den 



Counties. Pop. 

Columbia 300 

Chautauque 250 

Columbia 150 

Oswego 300 

Oneida 800 

Madison 250 

Chautauque 100 

Schoharie 175 

Sullivan 125 

Albany 700 

do 1, 500 
St Lawrence 250 

Chenango 150 

Cayuga 150 

Lewis 130 

Albany 125 

Ontario 150 

Lewis 250 

Suffolk 100 

Clinton 100 

Jefferson 450 

Steuben 800 

Orange 125 

Greene 100 

Cortland 1,200 

Chenango 200 

do 125 

Wyoming 125 

Greene 500 

do 1,200 

Orange 100 

Westchester 100 

Essex iCO 

Allegany 800 

Tompkins 500 

Livingston 1,600 

Genesee 175 

Ulster 200 

Lewis 125 

Oneida 200 

Otsego 125 

Rensselaer 100 

St. Lawrence 150 

Delaware 800 

Onondaga 250 

Oneida 350 

Lewis 150 

Jefferson 200 

Delaware 600 

Allegany 150 

Jefferson 600 

Chautauque 100 

Westchester 200 

Orange 100 

Dutchess 175 

Yates 400 

Tompkins 500 



52 



UNINCORPORATED VILLAGES. 



Villages. 
Duane 

Duanesbiirgh 
Dublin 
Eundec 
Durham 
Durhamville 
Eagle Harbor 
Earlsville 
East Avon 
East Bloomfickl 
Eastchester 
Easthampton 
Eapt Nassau 
East New-York 
Easton 

East Worcester 
Eaton 
Eddy town 
Eddyville 
Edenville 
Edinbugh 
Etlnam 
Elbridge 
Elizabethtown 
Ellenville 
Ellery 
Ellisburgh 
Ephratah 
ErieviUe 
Esopus 
Essex 
Etna 

Evan's Mills 
Exfer 

Factoryville 
Factoryville 
Fairfiel.l 
Fairhaven 
Fairport 
Fairville 
Fall Creek 
Fallsburgh 
FarmersA'ille 
Farmersville 
Far Roc ka way 
Fayette 
Fayette. 
Fayettville 
Felfs Mills 
Fish House 
Fishkill 

Fishkill Landing 
Five Mile Run 
Flatbush 
Flatlands 
Fleming 
Florida 



Counties. 
Franklin 
Schenectady 
Seneca 
Yates 
Greene 
Oneida 
Orleans 
Madison 
Livingston 
Ontario 
Westchester 
Suffolk 
Rensselaer 
Kings 

Washington 
Otsego 
i\Iadison 
Yates 
Ulster 
Orange 
Saratoga 
Dutchess 
Onondaga 
Essex 
Ulster 
Chautauque 
Jefferson 
Fulton 
Madison 
Ulster 
Essex 
Tompkins 
Jefferson 
Otsego 
Richmond 
Tioga 
Herkimer 
Orleans 
Monroe 
Wayne 
Tompkins 
Sullivan 
Cattaraugus 
Seneca 
Queens 
Chautauque 
Chenango 
Onondago 
Jefferson 
Fulton 
Dutchess 

do 
Cattaraugus 
Queens 

do 
Cayuga 
Orange 



Pop. 


Vilfages. 


Counties. 


Pop. 


loO 


Fonda 


Montgomery 


350 


150 


Fonda's Bush 


Fulton 


150 


100 


Fortlham 


Westchester 


200 


800 


Forrestburgh 


Sullivan 


100 


200 


Forrestville 


Chautauque 


700 


200 


Fort Covington 


Franklin 


800 


125 


Fort Edward 


Washington 


500 


600 


Fort Hamilton 


Queens 


150 


250 


Fort Miller 


Washington 


300 


300 


Frankfort 


Herkimer 


500 


350 


Franklin 


Delaware 


700 


600 


Franklin 


Oneida 


180 


300 


Franklin 


Onondaga 


300 


350 


Franklindale 


Dutchess 


200 


300 


Franklinville 


Cattarau-us 


400 


150 


Freehold 


Greene 


120 


600 


Friendship 


Allegany 


7C0 


150 


FuUersville 


St. Lawrence 


200 


400 


Fultonham 


Schoharie 


125 


150 


Fultonville 


Montgomery 


400 


125 


Gaines' Basin 


Orleans 


100 


150 


Gainesville 


Wyoming 


200 


300 


Gasport 


Niagara 


125 


300 


Genoa 


Cayuga 


200 


700 


Georgetown 


Madison 


300 


100 


Ghent 


Columbia 


100 


250 


Gilbertsville 


Otsego 


300 


200 


Gilboa 


Broome 


200 


250 


Glasco 


Ulster 


250 


125 


Glenco 


Columbia 


100 


600 


Glencove 


Queens 


250 


200 


Glenham 


Dutchess 


500 


350 


Glenville 


Schenectady 


100 


100 


Gloversville 


Fulton 


350 


600 


Gouverneur 


St. Lawrence 


450 


350 


Gowanus 


Kings 


200 


300 


Granville 


Washington 


500 


150 


Grassy Point 


Rockland 


100 


200 


Great Bend 


Jefferson 


150 


150 


Greenville 


Greene 


IcO 


125 


Groton 


Tompkins 


350 


125 


Groveland 


Livingston 


100 


150 


Guilford 


Chenango 


200 


450 


Hadley 


Saratoga 


100 


150 


Hamburgh 


Erie 


200 


600 


Hamtlen 


Delaware 


200 


275 


Hammond 


St. Lawrence 


150 


800 


Hammondsport 


Steuben 


700 


100 


Hampton 


Oneida 


400 


250 


Hannibalville 


Oswego 


200 


800 


Harlem 


New- York 


1.400 


900 


Harpcrsfleld 


Delaware 


'200 


125 


Harpersville 


Broome 


200 


400 


Hartfield 


Chautauque 


ISO 


100 


Hartford 


Washington 


150 


150 


Hartwick 


Otsego 


400 


250 


Hastings 


Westchester 


100 





UNINCORPORATED VILLAGES. 




53 


Villages. 


Counties. 


Pop. 
400 


Villages. 


Covntics. 


Pop. 
150 


Haverstraw 


Rockland 


La Fayette 


Onondaga 


Helena 


St. Lawrence 


125 


Lake Pleasant 


Hamilton 


100 


Hempstead 


Queens 


1,400 


Lakeville 


Queens 


100 


HempsleadHarbor tlo 


300 


Lancaster 


Erie 


600 


Henderson 


Jefierson 


150 


Lansingville 


Tompkins 


150 


Henderson Har. 


do 


100 


Laona 


Chautauque 


400 


Henrietta 


IVIonroe 


200 


Lawyersville 


Schoharie 


150 


Hcuvelton 


St. Lawrence 


250 


Lee 


Oneida 


150 


Hicksville 


Queens 


100 


Leeds 


Greene 


200 


High Falls 


Ulster 


250 


Leesville 


Schoharie 


125 


Highland Mills 


Orange 


150 


Lenox Basin 


Madison 


100 


Hillsdale 


Columbia 


125 


Leonardsville 


do 


250 


Hinsdale 


Cattaraugus 


600 


Le Raysville 


JefiTerson 


200 


Hobart 


Delaware 


300 


Le Roy 


Otsego 


200 


Hogansburgh 


Franklin 


250 


Levanna 


Cayuga 


200 


Holland 


Erie 


125 


Lexington 


Greene 


125 


Holland Patent 


Oneida 


300 


Lex'ton Heights do 


125 


Holley 


Orleans 


300 


Liberty 


Sullivan 


100 


Honeoye 


Ontario 


20u 


Liberty 


Steuben 


300 


Hopkinton 


St. Lawrence 


175 


Lima 


Livingston 


600 


Hornellsville 


Steuben 


500 


Limerick 


Jefierson 


200 


Howard 


do 


250 


Little Lakes 


Herkimer 


150 


Hudson P. Works Columbia 


300 


Littleville 


Livingston 


100 


Hughsonville 


Dutchess 


150 


Little York 


St. Lawrence 


150 


Hulberton 


Orleans 


300 


Livingston ville 


Schoharie 


125 


Hunter 


Greene 


350 


Livonia 


Livingston 


200 


Huntington 


Suffolk 


400 


Lodi 


Seneca 


400 


Hunt's Hollow 


Allegany 


200 


Lodi 


Catt. & Erie 


700 


Hurley 


Ulster 


175 


Louisburgh 


Lewis 


175 


Hyde Park 


Dutchess 


700 


Louisville 


Otsego 


350 


Ira 


Cayuga 


150 


Lowville 


Lewis 


650 


Irving 


Chautauque 


■ 100 


Ludlow ville 


Tompkins 


450 


Irving 


Westchester 


125 


Luzerne 


Warren 


250 


Islip 


Suffolk 


100 


Lynden 


Yates 


400 


Jacksonboro' 


Otsego 


300 


McDonough 


Chenango 


200 


Jacksonville 


do 


125 


McGrawville 


do 


126 


Jacksonville 


Tompkins 


150 


Machias 


Cattaraugus 


250 


Jacksonville 


Onondaga 


200 


MacLean 


Tompkins 


350 


Jamesville 


do 


300 


Maine 


Broome 


300 


Jamesville 


Saratoga 


100 


Maiden Bridge 


Columbia 


250 


Java 


Wyoming 


125 


Malone 


Franklin 


750 


Jay 


Essex 


400 


Maltaville 


Saratoga 


125 


Jericho 


Queens 


250 


Maniaroneck 


Westchester 


250 


Jersey 


Steuben 


150 


Manchester 


Ontario 


200 


Jesup's Landing 


Saratoga 


£.00 


Manchester 


Oneida 


350 


Jerusalem 


Queens 


125 


Manchester 


Dutchess 


250 


Johnsburgh 


Warren 


150 


Manhassett 


Queens 


125 


Johnstown 


Columbia 


175 


Manhatfanville 


New-York 


500 


Keescville 


Ciin'n&Essex 2,000 


Manlius Centre 


Onondaga 


300 


Kelloggsville 


Cayuga 


200 


Mannsville 


JefTerson 


150 


Kennedyville 


Steuben 


200 


Marcellus 


Onondaga 


600 


Kingsboro' 


Fulton 


300 


Marcellus Falls 


do 


100 


Kingsbury 


Washington 


ll') 


Marion 


Wayne 


250 


King's Ferry 


Cayuga 


175 


Malborough 


Ulster 


400 


Kirksville 


(tnondaga 


150 


Martinsburgh 


Lewis 


600 


Knoxville 


Albany 


150 


Marfville 


Cayuga 


200 


La Fargeville 


Jefferson 


150 


Masonville 


Delaware 


200 



5* 



54 



TJNINCOKPORATrD VILLAGES. 



Villages. 


Counties. 


Pop.\ 


Villazes. 


Counties. 


^^?!>- 


Massena 


St. Lawrence 


300 


NewfieUl 


Tompkins 


300 


JNIatteawan 


Dutchess 


1,800 


New Hamburgh 


Dutchess 


100 


Mattituck 


Suffolk 


150 


New Hartford 


Oneida 


800 


Mayfield 


Fulton 


150 


New Haven 


Oswego 


200 


Mechanictown 


CTrange 


160 


New Hurley 


Ulster 


125 


IMechanicsville 


Saratoga 


500 


New Lebanon 


Columbia 


150 


Mecklenburgh 


Tompkins 


350 


N. Leb. Springs 


do 


200 


Mollenville 


Columbia 


125 


New London 


Oneida 


200 


Meredith 


Delaware 


100 


New Paltz 


Ulster 


250 


Mexico 


Oswego 


500 


New Paltz Land' 


g do 


250 


Middleburgh 


Schoharie 


300 


Newport 


Herkimer 


450 


Middleburgh 


Tompkins 


200 


New Rochelle 


Westchester 


800 


Middle Granville Washington 


300 


New Salem 


Albany 


100 


Middlcport 


Niagara 


400 


New Scotland 


do 


125 


Middletown 


Orange 


800 


New Sweden 


Clinton 


250 


Middleville . 


Herkimer 


300 


Newtown 


Queens 


500 


Milan 


Cayuga 


350 


New Utrecht 


Kings 


175 


Milford 


Otsego 


250 


Nev?ville 


Herkimer 


200 


Millport 


Chemung 


340 


New Windsor 


Orange 


250 


Milltown 


Putnam 


200 


New Woodstock 


Madison 


300 


MillviUe 


Olreans 


100 


New-York Mills 


Oneida 


900 


Millville 


Rensselaer 


150 


Niagara Falls 


Niagara 


700 


Milo Centre 


Yates 


175 


Nichols 


Tioga 


400 


Milton 


Ulster 


450 


Nicholsville 


St. Lawrence 


125 


Milton 


Westchester 


180 


Ninevah 


Broome 


125 


Mixville 


Allegany 


125 


Niverville 


Columbia 


100 


Mohawk 


Herkimer 


700 


Noblesville 


Otsego 


100 


Monroe 


Orange 


450 


Norfolk 


St. Lawrence 


300 


Monroe Works 


do 


200 


North Amenia 


Dutchess 


125 


Montezuma 


Cayuga 


600 


North Bloomfield Ontario 


200 


Monticello 


Otsego 


200 


North Chatham 


Columbia 


200 


Montville 


Cayuga 


100 


North East 


Dutchess 


150 


Mooers 


Clinton 


1-50 


North Granville 


AVashington 


350 


Morehouseville 


Hamilton 


100 


North Hoosick 


Rensselaer 


175 


Moresville 


Delaware 


100 


North Salem 


Westchester 


200 


Moi'ganville 


Genesee 


200 


N. White Creeli 


Washington 


500 


Moriah 


Essex 


800 


Norway 


Herkimer 


250 


Moriches 


Suffolk 


ir;0 


Norwich 


Queens 


200 


Morrisania 


_ Westchester 


100 


Nunda Valley 


Allegany 


1,000 


Morristown 


St. Lawrence 250 


Nyack 


Rockland 


800 


Moscow 


Livingston 


400 


Oakhill 


Greene 


200 


Mott's Corners 


Tompkins 


250 


Oakland 


Allegany 


200 


Mottsville 


Onondaga 


300 


Oaksville 


Otsego 


250 


Mount Hope 


Orange 


200 


Old Man's 


Suffolk 


125 


Mount Upton 


Chenango 


225 


Olean 


Cattaraugus 


600 


Munfordville 


Monroe 


300 


Omar 


Chaufauque 


150 


Munnsville 


IMadison 


350 


Oneida Depot 


Mad. & Oneida 200 


Naples 


Ontario 


1,000 


Oneonta 


Otsego 


500 


Naponoch 


Ulster 


500 


Onondaga 


Onondaga 


300 


Near Rockaway 


Queens 


200 


Onondaga Hollow do 


800 


Nelson 


Madison 


225 


Oran 


do 


125 


Newark 


Wayne 


1,200 


Oriskany 


Oneida 


1,200 


Newark Valley 


Tioga 


400 


Oriskany Falls 


do 


600 


New Baltimore 


Greene 


400 


Orleans . 


Ontario 


300 


New Boston 


Madison 


150 


Ossian 


Allegany . 


250 


New Brighton 


Richmond. 


100 


Otego 


Otsego 


300 


New City 


Rockland 


100 


Otisco 


Onondaga 


125 



UNINCORrORATED VILLAGES. 



55 



ViUa«cs. 


Counties. 


Pop. 


Villazcs. 


Counties. 


Pop. 


Otsdawa 


Otsego 


100 


Prattsville 


Greene 


1,000 


Owasco 


Cayuga 


150 


Preble 


Cortland 


300 


Owensville 


Westchester 


100 


Preston Hollow 


Albany- 


200 


Oxbow 


Jefferson 


200 


Pultneyville 


Wayne 


350 


Oyster Bay 


Queens 


400 


Quincy 


Chaulauque 


209 


Oyster Pond 


Suffolk 


300 


Quogue 


Suflblk 


150 


Painted Post 


Steuben 


450 


Ramapo 


Rockland 


400 


Palatine 


Montgomery 


100 


Randolph 


Cattaraugus 


250 


Palatine Bridge 


do 


200 


Ravenswood 


Queens 


100 


Paris Hill 


Oneida 


150 


Raynortown 


do 


200 


Parish 


Oswego • 


150 


Readsville 


Albany 


100 


Parishville 


St. Lawrence 


300 


Red ford 


Clinton 


600 


Parma 


Monroe 


200 


Redhook, Lower Dutchess 


350 


Patchogue 


Suffolk 


500 


Redhook, Uppei 


do 


300 


Patterson 


Putnam 


150 


Redwood 


Jefferson 


200 


Paulina 


Delaware 


100 


Remsen 


Oneida 


450 


Pavilion 


Genesee 


200 


Rensselaer 


Rensselaer 


125 


Pendleton 


Niagara 


2(W 


Rensselaerville 


Albany 


1,000 


P^nfield 


Monroe 


700 


Reynoldsville 


Tompkins 


200 


Perry's Mills 


Clinton 


100 


Richfield Spring 


3 Otsego 


250 


Perryville 


Bladison 


250 


Richford 


Tioga 


250 


Peru 


Clinton 


800 


Richmond 


Richmond 


200 


Peruville 


Tompkins 


200 


Richmondville 


Schoharie 


160 


Peterboro' 


Madison 


350 


Richville 


St. Lawrence 


150 


Pbiladelphia 


Jefferson 


125 


Richville 


Genesee 


250 


Phillipsport 


Sullivan 


100 


Ridgebury 


Orange 


180 


Phillipsville 


Oswego 


175 


Rifton 


Ulster 


125 


Philipsville 


Allegany 


250 


Riverhead 


Suffolk 


450 


Phoenix 


Oswego 


300 


Roanoke 


Genesee 


150 


Piermont 


Rockland 


1,000 


Rodman 


Jefferson 


200 


Pike 


Allegany 


600 


Rondout 


Ulster 


1,500 


Pine Hill 


Genesee 


200 


Rosendale 


do 


400 


Pine Plains 


Dutchess 


250 


Rossie 


St. Lawrence 


800 


Piseco 


Hamilton 


100 


Rossville 


Richmond 


100 


Pitcher 


Chenango 


200 


Rouse's Point 


Clinton 


125 


Pitcher Springs 


do 


175 


Rush 


Monroe 


200 


Pittstown 


Rensselaer 


125 


Rush ford 


Allegany 


700 


Plainville 


Onondaga 


180 


Rushville 


Ontario & Yates 500 


Platfckill 


Ulster 


125 


Russia 


Herkimer 


200 


Pleasant Valley 


Oneida 


200 


Rutlcdge 


Cattaraugus 


250 


Poestenkill 


Rensselaer 


100 


Rye 


Westchester 


200 


Poland 


Herkimer 


250 


St. Johnsville 


Blontgomery 


250 


Pompey Hill 


Onondaga 


450 


Salem 


Chautauque 


180 


Poolville 


Madison 


250 


Salisbury 


Herkimer 


250 


Portageville 


Allegany 


700 


Sampsondale 


Rockland . 


200 


Port Barton 


Steuben 


450 


Sand Lake 


Rensselaer 


175 


Port Gibson 


Ontario 


200 


Sandy Creek 


Orleans 


200 


Port Henry 


Essex 


250 


Sangerfield 


Oneida 


200 


Port Jackson 


Montgomery 


250 


Sardinia 


Erie 


200 


Port Jefferson 


Suffolk 


300 


Sauquoit 


Oneida 


300 


Port Jer vis 


Orange 


250 


Schaghticoke P-ntRensselaer 


1,400 


Port Kent • 


Essex 


250 


Schodack 


do 


350 


Portlandville 


Otsego 


175 


Schoharie 


Schoharie 


450 


Port Richmond 


Richmond 


300 


Scienceville 


Greene 


150 


Postville 


Herkimer 


100 


Scotia 


Schenectady 


200 


Potter's Hollow 


Albany 


125 


Scottsville 


Monroe 


500 


Prattsburgh 


Steuben 


400 


Sennett 


Cayuga 


200 



56 



CNINCOKPORATED VILLAGES. 



Villaees. 
Setauket 
Shawangunk 
Sheliloa 
Shushan 
Sidney Plains 
Siloam 
Sinclairville 
Slatersville 
Sloansville 
Sloatsburgh 
Smithboro' 
•Smithville 
Smiihville Flats 
Sodus 

Sodus Point 
Somers 
Somerville 
Southhampton 
South Bainbridge ' 
South Hartford 
South New Berlin ( 
Southold 
South Sodus 
South Worcester 
Sparta 
Speedsville 
Spencer 
Spencerport 
Spencertown 
Spraker's Basin 
Springfield 
Stafford 
Stamford 
Stanfordville 
Stapleton 
Starksville 
Stark villa 
Sterling 
Sterlingville 
Stimpson'9 Corn'r ! 
Stone Arabia 
Stone Ridge 
Stony Brook 
Strykersville 
Stuyvesant 
Stuyvesant Falls 
Sugerloaf 
Sullivan 
Taberg 
Tappan 
Tarry town 
Theresa 
Thompsonville 
Throopsville 
Ticonderoga 
Tivoli 
Toddsville 



Counties. 


Pop. 


Villager. 


Counties. 


Pop. 


Sullblli 


8U0 


Tonawaiida 


Erie 


600 


Ulster 


100 


Tribe's Hill 


Montgomery 


100 


Wyoming 


150 


Trumansburgh 


Tompkins 


800 


Washington 


150 


Truxton 


Cortland 


300 


Delaware 


100 


Tubbsville 


Steuben 


125 


Madison 


180 


Tully 


Onondaga 


300 


Chautauque 


400 


Turin 


Lewis 


250 


Tompkins 


300 


Tyrone 


Steuben 


250 


Schoharie 


300 


Unadilla Forks 


Otsego 


250 


Rockland 


125 


Union 


Broome 


400 


Tioga 


200 


Union Falls 


Clinton 


125 


Jefferson 


200 


Union Springs 


Cayuga 


600 


Chenango 


400 


Unionville 


Orange 


150 


Wayne 


350 


Valatie 


Columbia 


1,500 


do 


175 


VanBuren HarborChautauque 


100 


Westchester 


250 


Varna 


Tompkins 


200 


St. Lawrence 


175 


Varysburgh 


Wyoming 


225 


Suffolk 


400 


Verplanck-s PointWestchester 


100 


Chenango 


250 


Victor 


Ontario 


3(W 


Washington 


125 


Victory 


Cayuga 


200 


Cijenango 


150 


Vienna 


Ontario 


1,400 


Suffolk 


200 


Virgil 


Cortland 


200 


Wayne 


200 


Voorheesville 


Montgomery 


125 


Otsego 


125 


Wading River 


Suffolk 


180 


Westchester 


150 


Walden 


Orange 


400 


Tompkins 


500 


Walesville 


Oneida 


150 


Tioga 


400 


Walton 


Delaware 


350 


Monroe 


300 


Walworth 


Wayne 


150 


Columbia 


200 


Warrensburgh 


Warren 


400 


Montgomery 


150 


Warsaw 


Wyoming 


800 


Otsego 


125 


Warwick 


Orange 


450 


Genesee 


200 


Washingtonville 


do 


200 


Delaware 


100 


Washingtonville 


Oswego 


250 


Dutchess 


150 


Waterboro' 


Chautauque 


150 


Richmond 


400 


Watervale 


Onondaga 


200 


Rensselaer 


150 


Waterville 


Oneida 


1,000 


Herkimer 


200 


Waver ly 


Cattaraugus 


200 


Cayuga 


200 


Wayne 


Steuben 


150 


Jefferson 


125 


Wellsburgh 


Chemung 


125 


Saratoga 


150 


Wellsville 


Allegany 


250 


Montgomery 


100 


Wemps.ville 


Madison 


350 


Ulster 


150 


West Bloomfield 


Ontario 


400 


Suffolk 


400 


West Charlton 


Saratoga 


150 


Schoharie 


125 


West Chazy 


Clinton 


200 


Columbia 


300 


Westchester 


Westchester 


400 


do 


200 


West Dryden 


Tompkins 


175 


Orange 


140 


Westernville 


Oneida 


250 


Madison 


150 


West Farms 


Westchester 


1,200 


Oneida 


150 


West Point 


Orange 


900 


Rockland 


150 


Westport 


Essex 


600 


Westchester 


1,000 


West Sand Lake 


Rensselaer 


250 


Jefferson 


175 


Westown 


Orange ' 


180 


Sullivan 


150 


Westville 


Otsego 


125 


Cayuga 


200 


Wethersfield Sp" 


s Wyoming 


150 


Essex 


500 


Whalensburgh 


Essex 


250 


Dutchess 


300 


White Creek 


Washington 


700 


Otsego 


250 


Whitehaven 


Erie 


100 



UNINCOKPORATED VILLAGES. 



57 



Villages. 


Counties. 


Pop. 


Villages. 


Counties. 


Pop. 


WhiteplainS 


Westchester 


700 


Windsor 


Broome 


400 


Whitesville 


Allegany 


300 


Winton 


Herkimer 


250 


Whitlockville 


Westchester 


]i5 


Wolcott 


Wayne 


600 


Whitney's Valley Allegany 


150 


Woodville 


Jefferson 


150 


Wilbur 


Ulster 


300 


Worcester 


Ofsego 


200 


Williamson 


Wayne 


175 


■\Vartsboro' 


Sullivan 


250 


Williamstown 


Oswego 


150 


Wyoming • 


Wyoming 


600 


Williamsville 


Erie 


450 


Vonkers 


Westchester 


500 


Willsboroiigh 


Essex 


450 


Yorkshire 


Cattaraugus 


300 


Wilmington 


do 


125 


Yorkville 


New-York 


500 


Windham Centre 


Greene 


200 


Youngstown 


Niagara 


400 



Comparative View of the Census of the State of New-York, 

AT DIFFRENT PERIODS. 



Whole number of souls, 

White persons, 

Free colored persons, 

Slaves, 

Total males, , 

Do. females, 

Aliens, . , 

P.atipers, 

Persons subject to militia duty,. , 

Do. qualified to vote, 

Deaf and dumb persons, 

Blind Persons, 

Insane and Idiots, 

Married females under 45 year's, 
Unmarried do. between 16 and 45 
Do. do. under 16 years. 

Marriages the year preceding, 

Births, 

Deaths, 



State Cen-\ U.S. Census State Cen- U.S.Census 
SUS, 1825. 1?30. SUS, 1835. 1840. 



1,616,458 



822, 897 

793,561 

40, 430 

5,610 

180,64 

296, 132 

645 



2,240 

200,481 

135,391 

361,624 

11,553 

60,383 

22, 544 



1,918,608 

1,868,382 

45,080 

46 



2,174,517 



52,207 



852 
701 



1,102,658 

1,071,859 

82,319 

6,821 

201,901 

422, 034 

933 

889 

2,451 

283,230 

196,499 

456, 224 

15,535 

77, 244 

32,726 



2,428,921 

2,378,890 

50,027 

4 



1,107 

966 

2,330 



Asrriciilturai Statistics. 



9,655,4261 

524,895 474,543 

1,885,771 1,911,244 

4,261,765 5,118,777 

Swine, ! ' 1, .5.54. 358|1, 900, 065 



Acres of improved land, 17, 160, 967 

Horses and mules, | 

Neat Cattle, I 

Sheep,. 



53 



CENSUS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



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• STATISTICS, &c 
STATISTICS OF THE ST>\TE OF NEW-YORK. 



59 



General Statistics of the State of New-York, compiled from the 
United States Census of 1840. 



AGRICULTURE. 

Wheat, 

Barley, 

Oats, 

Rye, 

Buckwheat, 

Corn, 

Wool, 

Hops, • 

Wax, 

Potatoes, • »- 

Hay, 

Hemp and Flax, 

Tobacco, ■ 

Silk Cocoons, 

Sugar, 

Wood, 

Products of the Dairy, 

" Orchard, 

Family -made goods, 

Wine, ■• 



Total value, 



HORTICUI-TURE. 

Produce of market gardens, 

" nurseries and florists, • 

Total value, • 



PRODUCTS OF THE FOREST. 

Lumber produced, 

Tar, pitch, turpentine, Sec. 

Pot and Pearl .\shes, 

Skins and Furs, • 

All other productions, 



Total value. 



Total Production. 



12,286,418 Bushels 
2,520,069 " 

20,675,847 " 
2,973,323 " 
2,2S7,8S5 " 

10,972,286 
9,846,295 

447,250 " 

30,123)614 Bushels 

3,127,047 Tons. 
1, 130 " 

744 Pounds. 
1,735 " 

10,048,109 
3, 058, 923 



Pounds 



Cords. 



6, 799 Gallons 



.Average 
price 



402 Barrels 
7,613 Tons. 



FISHERIES. 

Smoked and dried Ssh, 

Pickled fish, 

Sperm oil, 

Whale and fish oil, 

Whalebone, itc. 



Cast Iron,- 

Bar Iron, 

Lead, 

Other metals, 

Salt 

Granite and other stone,- 



Total valne 
MINES. 



Total value, ■ 



5 Qnt'ls. 

22,224 Rbls. 

400,251 Gallons 
1,369,541 " 



29,083 Tons. 
53,695 " 

670,000 Pounds 



2,867,884 Bushels 



i|l 20 
68 
44 
65 
60 
75 
35 
12 
25 
2» 
10 00 

188 00 

06 

30 

06 

4 00 



Aggregate 
Value. 



$14,743,703 

1,713,646 

9,097,373 

1,936,560 

1,143.942 

8,229,214 

3.445,853 

53, 670 

13, 199 

7, 630, 903 

31,270,470 

212,440 

44 

520 

602, 686 

12,235,692 

10,496,021 

1,701,935 

4,636,547 

6,799 



2 00 
100 00 



2 00 

2 50 

95 

37 



30 00 

80 00 

03 



;i09,071,416 



499, 126 
76,980 



$576,106 



3,691,302 

804 

761,. 300 

15,656 

143,332 



4,812,294 



10 

65, 660 
380, 238 
469,730 
344, 665 



$1,260,203 



872, 640 

4,295,410 

20, 100 

84,664 

716,971 

1,641,480 

$7,631,195 



60 



STATISTICS, &c 



Woollen, 
Cotton, ■•■ 

Silk, 

Flax, 



MANUFACTURES. 



Mixed, 

Tobacco, 

Machinery, 

Hardware, cutlery, &c.-- 

Cannon, 

Small arms, 

Precious metals, 

Various do. 

Granite, marble, &c. 

Bricks and lime, 

Hats and caps, 

Straw bonnets, 

Sole lea ther, 

Upper " 

Other " 

Soap, 

Tallow candles, 

Sperm and wax candles,- 

Distilled liquors, 

Fermented do. 

Gunpowder, 

Drugs, paints, &c. 

Turpentine and varnish, 



Glass, 

Earthen ware, &c. 

Sugar, 

Chocolate, 

Confectionary, ' 

Paper, playing cards, &c. — ••■•' 

Cordage, 

Musical instruments, 

Carriages and wagonsj 

Flour, 

Produce of flour and other mills,- 

Ships built, 

Furniture, 

All other manufactures, 



Total Production. 



Average 
price. 



112 
8,308 



1,252,890 Sides. 
827,993 " 



11,939,834 Pounds. 

4,029,783 " 

353,000 "■ 

11,973,815 Gallons 

6,059,122 " 

1,185,000 Founds. 



1,861,385 Barrels 



60 00 
15 00 



4 60 
2 50 



Aggregate 
value. 



3, 537, 337 

3, 640, 237 

2,415 

46,429 

1,497,067 

831,670 

2, 895, 517 

1,566,974 

6,600 

124,620 

1, 106, 203 

2,466,792 

966, 220 

1,198,527 

2,914,117 

160,248 

6, 638, 005 

2,069,982 

6, 232, 924 

696,991 

442,286 

123,550 

2,993,463 

1,211,824 

142,200 

877,816 

431,467 

411,371 

159,000 

386,000 

5,000 

386, 142 

762,758 

792,910 

472,910 




10,yo3, :icu 
797,317 
1,971,776 
9,616,206 



$39,956,812 



RECAPITULATION. 

Agriculture, $109,071,416 

Horticulture, 675,106 

Products of the Forest, 4,812,291 

Fisheries, 1,260,203 

Mines, 7,531,196 

Manufactures, ■ 89,955,812 

Estimated value of Annual Pr6duc(ions,_- $213,196,036 

LIVE STOCK. 

Horses and Mules, 474, 543 

Neat Cattle, 1,911,244 

Sheep, 6,118,777 

Swine, ; 1,900,065 

Poultry of all kinds, estimated value, $1,153,413 



AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 



ei 



LIVE STOCK, &c. 



COUNTIES. 



Albany, 

Allegany, 

Broome, 

Cattaraugus, 

Chautauque, 

Chenango, 

Chemung, ' 

Cayuga, 

Clinton, 

Cortland, •• 

Columbia, 

Delaware, 

Dutchess, 

Essex, 

Erie, 

Franklin, ■ 

Fulton 

Genesee, 

Greene, 

Hamilton, 

Hrrkimer, 

Jefferson, 

Kings, 

Lewis, •• 

Livingston, 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery, 

Niagara, 

New-YorK, 

Orange, 

Orleans, 

Otsego, 

Oneida, 

Ontario, 

Onondaga, 

Oswego, ■ 

Putnam, 

Queens, 

Rockland, ■ 

Rensselaer, 

Richmond, 

Suffolk, 

Sullivan, 

Saratoga, • 

Schoharie, 

St. Lawrence, ••• • 

Steuben, 

Schenectady, — 

Seneca, 

Tompkins, 

Tioga, 

Ulster, 

Westciiestcr, •••• 

Washington, 

Wayne, 

Warren, 

Yates, 

Total, 



67,478 

129, 655 

60, 669 

66, 525 

136,316 

197,746 

37,976 

18S, 152 

65,555 

99, 160 

123,063 

135,843 

215,950 

79, 835 

81,442 

39, 024 

32, 525 

164, 393 

39, 326 

3,263 

80, 182 

166,390 

48 

36,666 

163,395 

204,616 

132,970 

36, 5HS 

40,531 

262 

60, 213 

69, 663 

236,979 

177,070 

172,190 

169, 650 

63, 842 

14,945 

26,477 

17,392 

134,864 

136 

46,751 

19,476 

96, 656 

71,258 

126,821 

148,133 

18,094 

63,824 

86, 625 

43, 220 

60,840 

20, 043 

210,610 

100,986 

22,775 

86,876 



49 
30 
12 
22 
42 
27 
18 
63 
17 
19 
64 
27 
66 
14 
37 
12 
14 
48 
19 

1 
33 
60 

8 
18 
37 
30 
69 
29 
28 
13 
47 
27 
47 
66 
46 
61 
39 
12 
21 
11 
27 

3 
20, 
10 
61 
31 
41 
34 
1.3 
25 
23 
14 
46 
166 
27 
44 

8 
18 



474,543' l,911,2'r4 6,118,777 1,900,065 

6 



p^s > 



^24,966 
14,160 

9,876 
10,365 
29,141 

9,749 
17, 403 
22, 694 
12,006 
12,798 
29, 606 
13,812 
42, 678 

9,430 
16,825 

7,234 

8, 052 
24, 635 
14,320 
865 
18,915 
22, 655 

7,P04 

5,293 
13,001 
12,246 
26, 766 
15, 155 
13,539 

2,069 
24, 636 
23, 082 
25,781 
37,709 
20, 477 
21,305 
17,680 
12, 172 
62,186 
49, 392 
30, 335 

8,001 
40, 191 

9,231 
34,121 
16,688 
12,-5I0 
12,948 
11,161 
12,719 
10, 626 

9,279 
66, 496 
66,646 
25, 178 
19,081 

7,129 
10,216 






>T3 u 



$126,343 
138,666 

60,654 

97, 680 
267, 220 
256, 394 

62,648 
185,937 

81,439 
137,367 
201,666 
279, 205 
643, 834 

94,827 
108,661 

79, 290 

81,173 
173,801 
157,303 

11,976 
671,361 
407, 607 
246, 230 
137,177 

96, 278 
194,670 
172,744 
120,236 

48,320 

22,400 
669,866 

95,180 
383,123 
837,391 

72, 629 
164,289 
133,992 
149,232 
142,412 

12,927 
272,716 

26,606 
148,637 

106, esi 

167,403 

86,808 

260, 609 

105,563 

8.'5, 059 

61,622 

100, 804 

86,410 

233, 383 

356, 987 

171,398 

136,882 

14,647 

76,116 



$1,163,413 I0,49>,021 



62 



AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 



CEREAL GRAINS. 



COUNTIES. 



Albany, 

Allegany, 

Broome, 

Cattaraugus,- 
Chautauque," 
Chenango, •••> 

Chemung, 

Cayuga, 

Clinton, ■ 

Cortland, ••••■ 

Columbia, 

Delaware, 

Dutchess, 

Essex, ' 

Erie, 

Franklin, 

Fulton, 

Genesee, 

Greene, 

Hamilton, 

Herkimer, 

Jefferson, 

Kings, 

Lewis, 

Livingston, ••• 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery, • • 

Niagara, 

New-York, •••• 

Orange, 

Orleans, 

Otsego, 

Oneida, 

Ontario, 

Onondaga, • • • • 

Oswego, 

Putnam, 

Queens, 

Rockland, 

Rensselaer, ••• 
Richmond, • • • • 

Suffolk, 

Sullivan, 

Saratoga, 

Schoharie, •••• 
St. Lawrence,- 

Steuben, 

Schenectady, -- 

Seneca, 

Tompkins, •-•• 

Tioga, 

Ulster, 

Westchester,.- 
Washington, •- 

Wayne, 

Warren, 

Yates, 



21,008 
232,471 

66, 369 
127,665 
214,897 

99,701 
192,631 
578, 436 

75, 293 
100,765 

28, 249 

94, 120 
171,617 

60,444 
207,492 

64,414 

25, 162 
911,696 

17, 677 
3,021 

84, 723 
406,721 

24, 964 

85, 191 

823,050 

200, 142 

1,074,813 

.34, 281 
454, 823 



94,774 

701,212 

148, 880 

238, 159 

770,235 

656, 799 

138, 002 

12,360 

97,741 

3,650 

21,454 

18, 989 

105, 778 

8,793 

72,001 

72,871 

278, 007 

390, 275 

13,113 

398, 505 

377, 201 

107,002 

67,877 

36, 267 

49, 189 

671,083 

12,961 

362,814 



^.S 



155,902 

22,742 

184, 145 

10,134 

24,789 

10,451 

26, 358 

81,440 

13,289 

29, 935 

1,971 

1,168 

2,540 

3,158 

13,966 

4,084 

22, 860 

85, 832 

2,368 

497 

126,900 

74,640 

760 

20,271 

84, 276 

135,635 

61,787 

193, 630 

47, 786 

100 

1,879 

30,728 

116,715 

98,531 

117,060 

394,615 

11,061 



3,593 



9,488 

5,819 

9,460 

151 

17,005 

217,478 

24,018 

23, 543 

100, 624 

11,147 

9,104 

1,058 



1,181 
9,569 

25, 087 
1,201 

30, 994 



653, 794 
354, 666 

26,443 
254, 339 
353,31 
406, 032 
203, 184 
627, 03S 
145, 226 
276,681 
1,107,702 
464,715 
1,360,613 
170, 396 
424,499 

89,204 
245)718 
692, 172 
309, 382 

13,697 
680, 738 
447, 936 

72,460 
144,880 
305) 519 
343, 207 
623, 665 
422,415 
216,591 
1,105 
417,701 
180,581 
693, 989 
667, 952 
462, 266 
538, 762 
216,177 

96,421 
343, 447 

47, 056 
819,333 

33,793 
258,219 
126,232 
496, 089 
497,953 
334, 009 
387,930 
216,968 
232, 446 
288, 695 
180,967 
223, 133 
449,090 
448, 064 
482, 900 
103,733 
162,483 



Total, 12, 286, 418 2, 620, OesU, 675, 847 2, 979, 323 2, 387, 885 10, 973, 286 



145,941 

4,567 

31,259 

1,112 

1,671 

26, 993 

18,513 

5,321 

31,972 

2,730 

323, 299 

128,053 

176, 550 

29, 121 

5, 639 

15,017 

33, 673 

4,869 

86, 840 

789 

15,935 

18,396 

8,637 

2,473 

3, 624 

3,255 

3,447 

40, 869 

234 



0.3 



326, 668 

472 

68, 236 

6,064 

6,162 

3,593 

1,676 

35, 367 

105, 399 

35, 140 

247, 703 

8,865 

79, 023 

66, 090 

162,950 

129,342 

23, 571 

13,929 

52,278 

6,526 

4,579 

4,987 

168, 809 

99, 574 

136,510 

4,460 

17,567 

2,102 



103,682 
20, 068 
84, 033 

8,37 

9,157 
25,603 
62, 590 
40, 669 
39, 429 
18,015 
97,733 
63, 832 
86, 980 
26,610 
19, 693 
22, 685 
31,011 
19,427 
67, 642 

2,843 
29,035 
36,641 

3,933 

8,498 
26, 498 

6,996 
37, 024 
38,312 
13,579 
5 
112,893 
10,047 
45, 059 
30,241 
16,961 
14,420 
41,618 
37,099 
64j 027 
34,111 
64,767 

4,238 
42, 707 
61,942 
86,974 
80, 609 
34,312 
80,311 
41,288 
19, 798 
71,122 
47,181 
108, 087 
57, 226 
32, 642 
38, 062 
24, 647 
20,991 



AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 
VARIOUS CROPS. 



63 



COUNTIES. 



Albany, 

Allegany, 

Broome, 

Cattaraugus, • 
Chautauque, • 
Chenango, — 

Chemung, 

Cayuga, 

Clinton, 

Cortland, 

Columbia, 

Delaware, •••• 

Dutchess, 

Essex, 

Erie, 

Franklin, 

Fulton, 

Genesee, 

Greene, 

Hamilion, ••• • 
Herk'mer, •••• 

Jefferson, 

Kings, 

Lewis, 

Li-ingston, ■•• 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery, • 

Niagara, 

New-York, ••- 

Orange, 

Orleans, 

Otsego, 

Oneida, 

Ontario, 

, Onondaga, •••• 

Oswego, 

Putnam, 

Queens, 

Kockland, 

Rensselaer, •• 
Richmond, ••• 

Suffolk, 

Sullivan, 

Saratoga, 

Schoharie, •••• 
St. Lawrence, 

Steuben, 

Schenectady, • 

Seneca, 

Tompkins, 

Tioga, 

Ulster. 

Westchester, • 
Washington,- • 

Wayne, 

Warren, 

Yates, 



108,677 
199, 180 

78, 365 
108, 179 
265, 938 
405, 156 

75,996 
335, 625 
108,968 
182,408 
242, 777 
235,032 
413,635 
162,639 
122, 200 

67, 684 

61,583 
308,012 

67,366 

4,078 

168,348 

366,705 

160 

69, 173 
309, 16^ 
365,954 
3G6, 36.'< 

69, 600 

81,874 



373 
2, 224 



1,050 
7,177 
6,774 
1,044 
2,61 
1,434 
181 
60 



25,021 

411 

4,440 



289 
2,906 



6,460 

637 

107, 280 

16,761 



10 



1,845 

1,533 

168,605 

38,724 

14,523 

7,907 



2,600 

101 
1,834 

331 
6,767 

260 
3,560 

312 

29 

1,203 

2,100 

6,876 

523 



mii 



1,388 

1,079 

394 

789 

2,294 

732 

1,331 

2,423 

872 

699 

377 

644 

129 

906 

510 

40 

454 

1,283 

730 



1,162 
911 



148 

2,298 

1,089 

967 

720 

88 



2,282 
1,194 
2,941 
2, 673 
789 
39 



Total, . 



144 

239 
93 

2,000 



155 
91 
620 
200 
63 
603 
798 

1,430 
486 
647 

1,856 
816 
820 
780 

1,.307 

4,362 



395 

2, 045 
809 
347 



9, S45, 295 447j 260 62, 796 30, 123, 614 



640, 632 
6S3, 945 
303,812 
452, 363 
778,219 
772,671 
269, 233 
687, 306 
484, 325 
676, 506 
660,819 
779,424 

694. 136 
470, 236 
656, 382 
468,706 
402, 954 
608, 288 
302, 902 

45, 264 

860, 866 

1,345,818 

95, 305 
634,316 
348, 369 
676, 649 
721,620 
6.59, 829 
388, 692 

18,586 
359, 563 
303,314 
1,293,109 
1,574,109 
395, 844 
800,317 

699. 137 
142, 684 
214,121 

48,117 

759, 346 

47,712 

170,236 

236, 335 

1,019,632 
600, 396 

1,412,272 
680, 958 
240, 535 
199, 387 
339, 657 
368, 198 
264, 698 
6-0, 920 
651,646 
612,701 
221, 134 
170,318 



47, 362 
64, 733 
28,214 
48, 762 
88, 372 

103,529 
28,481 
67,144 
35,048 
69, 562 
56, 21o 
84,007 
85, 859 
42, 424 
65,015 
24, 9;?9 
26, 372 
88, 176 
47,048 
3,130 
96, 864 

116,896 
6,437 
43, 284 
46,884 
65,749 
62, 253 
69, 2701 
23,061 
747 
75, 368 
33,010 

106,910 

178,266 
52,904 
64,045 
47,666 
21,897 
31,437 
20,917 
72,026 
3,610 
42,891 
24,678 
63,131 
53,612 
99,813 
69, 998 
17,742 
38, 049 
46, 981 
34, 060 
79,239 
77, 873 
83,638 
38, 428 
17,601 
27,568 



3,127,047 1,130 6-fi 



22 6-6 

24 1-8 

9 

6 
41 3-4 
106 

12 3-4 
36 1-2 

4 

13 1-4 



24 1-3 



6 1-a 

18 1-3 
4 

14 1-3 
16 



1 
16 
21 1-2 

1 1-4 



11 
10 

3 3-4 
112 

4 



3 
S 
33 3-4 
1 1-4 
4 

3 1-2 
1 



91 1-4 

3 

3 l~t 

7 
30 

39 1-4 
26 3-4 
19 1-3 
«0 3-4 

3 1-6 

1 
16 
33 
205 
.4 1-4 
30 3-4 

3 

3 1-3 



64 



AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 
VARIOUS CROPS. 



COUNTIES. 



Albany, 

Allegany, 

Broome, 

Cattaraugus, .• 
Chautauque,-. 
Chenango, •••• 

Chemung, 

Cayuga, 

Clinton, 

Cortland, 

Columbia, 

Delaware, •■•• 

Dutchess, 

Essex, 

Erie, 

Franklin, 

Fulton, 

Genesee, 

Greene, 

Hamilton, 

Herkimer, •■. • 

Jefferson, 

Kings, 

Lewis, 

Livingston, ••• 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery," 

Niagara, 

New-York, 

Orange, 

Orleans, 

Otsego, 

Oneida, 

Ontario, 

Onondaga, •••• 

Oswego, 

Putnam, 

Queens, 

Rockland, 

Rensselaer, ••■ 

Richmond, 

Suffolk, 

Sullivan, 

Saratoga, ••■• 
Schoharie, •.• . 
St. Lawrence,- 

Steuben, 

Schenectady, •■ 

Seneca, 

Tompkins, •••• 

Tioga, 

Ulster, 

Westchester, •■ 
Washington, • 

Wayne, 

Warren, 

Yates, 



Total,- 



124 

1-2 

396 



200 
10 



14 

25 1-2 



170 



p:6 



24, 366 
567, 73o 
• 62,054 
553,235 
839,223 
344,019 

74, 29G 
206, 546 
184,934 
429, 690 
839 
393, 96 



113,357 
334, 040 
227, 049 

80, 129 

530, 633 

150 

35, 156 
311,136 
512,254 



257, 476 
119,436 
215,619 
181,119 
51,691 
44, 059 



150,786 
351,748 
286, 502 
183,273 
178, 520 
26-1,, 980 
73 



45, 359 

20,010 

133,766 

843, 132 

341,948 

4,423 

25, 845 

88,747 

116,760 

28, 945 



4,216 
150,554 
43, 821 
39, 384 



1, 735 3-4 10, 048, 109 1058, 923 



■S-^ 
"©"o 



29 
19 
8 
2 
33 
14 
69 
16 
19; 

37 

l03 
41 

78 
40 
35 
26 
17 



6 

28. 
12 
31 
17 
14 
29 
13 
27 
17 
12 
37 
204 
24 
41 
6 



3,23(5 



1,026 
5 
16 



227 
10 



°B 



>E8. 



$1,701,935! 6 799 $4,636,647 



MANUFACTORIES. 



65 



TABULAR VIEW, 
Of the principal Manufactories in each County in the State oj Neva- 
York, by the Census of 1840. 



COUNTIES. 



s » 



»4 



Albany, 

Allegany, •••• 

Broome, 

Cattaraugus,- 

Cayuga, 

Chautauque, • 
Chemung, ••• • 
Chenango, — 

Clinton, 

Columbia,- — 
Cortland, ••• • 
Delaware, ••• 
Dutchess, •-•• 

Erie, 

Essex, 

Franklin, • — 

Fulton, 

Genesee, •• - - 

Greene, ■ 

Hamilton, 

Herkimer, •••• 

Jefl'erson, 

Kings, 

Lewis, 

Livingston, •- ■ 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery, • ■ 
NfwYork,---- 

Niagara, 

Oneida, 

Onondaga, -■• • 

Ontario, 

Orange, 

Orleans, 

Oswego, 

Otsego, ■ 

Putnam, 

Queens, 

Rensselaer, ••• 
Richmond, ••• • 

Rockland,' 

Saratoga, 

Schenectady,- • 
Schoharie, - ••• 

Seneca, 

St. Lawrence, - 

Steuben, 

Suffolk, 

Sullivan, 

Tioga, 

Tompkins, 

Ulster, 

Warren, 

Washington, - • 

Wayne, 

Westchester, •- 
Yates, 



II 2 
24 • • - • 
9 .... 

6i 

22 2 

Ij:::: 

ys 1 
s 2 
19 11 
10 1 
24 

la, 11 

22 
19 
8 

"I 
36, 
10 



Total,. 



32b S93 116 12121 30a 861 334 1764 0430l79 306 



6* 



P6 



SCHOOLS, &c. 



COLLEGES, ACADEMIES, SCHOOLS, &c. • 
In the State of New- York, as returned by the U. S. Marshalls. 



-1840. 



COUNTIES. 



Albany, 

Allegany, •••• 

Broome, 

Cattaraugus,' 

Cayuga, 

Chautauque, • 
Chemung,"" 
Chenango, •" 

Clinton, 

Columbia, ••■ 
Cortlpnd, •••• 
Delaware,"" 
Dutchess, — 
Erie, 



Essex, 

Franklin, 

Fulton, 

Genesee, 

Greene, 

Hamilton, 

Herkimer, 

Jefferson, 

Kings, 

4jewis, 

Livingston, ••• 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery," 

New- York, 

Niagara, 

Oneida, 

Onondaga, "" 

Ontario, 

Orange, 

Orleans, 

Oswego, 

Otsego, 

Putnam, 

Queens, 

Rensselaer, "• 
Richmond, — 

Rockland, 

Saratoga, 

Schenectady, • 
Schoharie, •"• 

Seneca, 

St. Lawrence,- 

Steuben, 

Suffolk, 

Sullivan, 

Tioga, 

Tompkins, • " • 

Ulster, 

Warren, 

Washington, •■ 

Wayne, 

Westchester, •• 
Yates, 



Total, • 



4C9 
47 
165 
140 
601 
808 
130 
733 
151 
709 
370 
250 
6-21 
156 
395 



235 

1,262 

97 



11 
I-. o 



280 

325 

1,314 

120 

792 

968 

1,466 

395 

7,230 

413 

2,035 

1,60 

1,372 

1,409 

760 

468 

385 



429 
601 
26 



527 

68 

306 

219 

761 

384 

338 

36 

268 

337 

35 

44 

464 

475 

703 



107 
216 
167 
191 
311 
29S 

99 
344 
102 
172 
181 
284 
107 
271 
141 
108 

89 
381 
123 

13 
191 
312 

53 
155 
178 
253 
310 
116 
208 
137 
441 
330 
242 
170 
163 
330 
302 

63 

78 
241 

14 

30 
160 

45 
198 

99 
363 
347 
152 
101 



225 
158 
104 
193 
182 
121 
112 



12 985 50134,563 10,871 501,156 26,2661 



9,077 

9,166 

6,620 

7,701 

16,186 

14,337 

4,837 

12, 872 

2,784 

10,074 

8,092 

10,651 

4,498 

11,149 

5,634 

4,851 

3,878 

14,718 

3,369 

658 

8,622 

12,314 

5,280 

6,269 

8,708 

12,277 

16,903 

5,556 

23, 833 

7,936 

20, 176 

17, 690 

12,427 

8,727 

8,247 

12,168 

13, 522 

2,936 

3,670 

11,612 

604 

1,120 

6,100 

1,562 

9,294 

4,377 

13,502 

15,085 

7,336 

3,897 

6,614 

12,678 

9,010 

4,119 

7,279 

9,637 

3,922 

6,20 



3,160 
237 
162 

20 
84 



729 

2,931 

151 



£°i2 



260 

267 

2,857 



30 

10 

157 

165 

10,213 



337 



43 

16 

633 

842 
28 



68 
30 
14 
676 
20 



REAL AND PEIISONAL ESTATE AND TAXES. 



67 



STATEMENT, 



Of the aggregate valuations of real and jienoiial estate in the several counties of thin 
State, the amount of toun and countii taxes, and the rate oj taxation on each dollar of 
the corrected aggregate valuations for the year 1S42. 





Ass'd va- 


AssM va- 


Corrected 


Amount of 


Amount of 




COUNTIES. 


ue of real 


lue of per- 


agf-'i-cgatc 


t-tate and 


town tax- 


Total 




estate. 


sonalest. 


valuation. 


CO. taxes. 


es. 


taxation. 


Albany, 


$11,284,3.59 


.f;4,476,60S 


.f 15,769,907 


$09,749 10 


$75,947 .34 


$145,696 60 


AUeg.uiy, 


4,C]G,C10 


175,048 


4,791,604 


17,258 37 


17,365 14 


35,623 51 


Broome, 


1,903,125 


251,293 


2,229,000 


10,466 30 


6,940 29 


17, 406 69 


Cattaraugus, •• 


3.346,914 


70, 194 


3,377,442 


1.3,935 16 


10,949 04 


30, ,884 20 


Cayuga, 


10,749,043 


1,648, 100 


12,297,203 


41,027 19 


12,654 22 


63,681 41 


Chautauqne, •• 


4,499,052 


271,206 


4,770,91s 


18,046 67 


17,101 70 


36,747 37 


Chemung, 


2, 062, 925 


338,279 


2, 697, 9.33 


13,220 00 


7,116 93 


20, 336 93 


ChenHngo, 


3,933,031 


509, 994 


4,441,026 


15,549 30 


12,793 98 


28,343 28 


Clinton, • 


1,.''B3, 165 


90, 577 


1,034,077 


14,336 83 


13,291 24 


27,628 07 


Columbia, 


G, 484,202 


2, 628, 37S 


9,012,680 


27,883 S3 


19,885 44 


47,769 27 


Cortland, 


2, n9,03« 


2;J9, 184 


2, 368, 220 


11,655 23 


6,873 56 


17,428 79 


Delaware, 


3,001,731 


346, 20!- 


3, 347, 999 


11,391 39 


10,638 31 


22,029 70 


Dutchess, 


13,097,050 


4, 588, 086 


19.085,736 


52,600 31 


20, 830 75 


73,431 06 


Erie, 


10, 120, 961 


607, 56y 


11,044,742 


44,015 85 


20,020 11 


64,036 96 


Franklin, 


1,723,357 


48, 509 


1,772,509 


8, 172 43 


8,620 61 


16,793 04 


Essex, 


1,435,312 


1,59, ilb 


1,594,5.30 


8,000 00 


12,014 81 


20,014 81 


Fulton, 


l,l.i3,127 


215,882 


1,309,009 


7,555 57 


10, 184 47 


17,740 04 


Genesee, 


5,771,434 


473,452 


0, 244, 886 


18,344 26 


12,390 80 


30,736 06 


Greene, 


2,534.94.5 


£40, 023 


3, 074, 90S 


19,744 13 


9,633 35 


29,377 48 


Hamilton, 


744, b71 


b03 


745,734 


2,000 01 


4,905 53 


6,905 64 


Herkimer, 


5, 103,370 


931,094 


6, 074, 473 


22, 345 02 


14,227 56 


36, 672 68 


Jefferson, 


6, lb6,0UU 


722,51c. 


6, 90b, 510 


24,388 06 


21,603 59 


45,991 66 


Kings, 


27,1.50,445 


3,389,911 


.30, 640, 356 


3.5,000 00 


133,964 15 


168,964 16 


Lewis, 


1,. 59 1,046 


211,454 


1,802,500 


6,418 75 


8.920 78 


16,3.39 53 


Livingston, • •• 


9, 654, 143 


729,412 


10, 373, 555 


19,015 43 


11,3.55 99 


30,971 42 


Madison, 


0, 4S8,bO0 


801,687 


7, 350, 403 


18,430 88 


12,700 04 


31,130 92 


Monroe, 


14,651,704 


I,3.-57,264 


15,888,968 


49,405 29 


20,022 71 


69,428 10 


Montgomery,- • 


3, 240, 476 


439, 57-1 


3.686,050 


22, 120 00 


16,681.11 


33,801 11 


New- York, •••• 


170,512,342 


01,294,5;-9 


2.37,806,901 


2031,382 66 




2,031,382 66 


Niagara, 


4, 575, OOS 


162,442 


4,737,450 


18,539 25 


9,088 22 


27, 627 47 


Oneida, 


9' 935, 2l9 


2,217,97.'; 


12,153,244 


53,331 09 


25,463 12 


78,794 21 


Onondaga, •••■ 


14i 719,310 


1,891, 961 


10,011,264 


42, 794 25 


32,025 94 


74,920 19 


Ontario, 


11)927,576 


1,903,701 


13,831,277 


29, 153 82 


16,029 89 


45, 183 71 


Orange, 


9) 566, 430 


2, .392, 129 


11,948,265 


44,000 00 


16,539 63 


60, 539 63 


Orle.-ins, 


5j 324,717 


307,254 


5,631,971 


17,399 61 


8,092 16 


25,491 77 


Oswego, 


6) 067, 700 


454,866 


0,112,606 


23,035 33 


23,348 10 


46,393 49 


Otsego, 


4)818,994 


853, 296 


5,672,290 


26, 138 88 


16,841 75 


42,980 63 


Putnam, 


2) 490, 9S4 


460,756 


2,951,740 


7,084 43 


3,781 50 


}!,465 93 


Queens, 


7)945,00fl 


3, 325, 200 


11,270,200 


20, 163 01 


10,937 38 


31, 100 99 


Rensselaer, • • 


8)517,066 


3,788 892 


12, .306, 548 


40,343 53 


10,683 68 


56, 032 21 


Richmond, ••• • 


1)10.5,105 


173,200 


1,278,365 


6,9'10 04 


1,606 84 


8,546 88 


Rockland, 


1,814, .370 


481,841 


2,296,211 


2, 303 94 


4,506 90 


6,870 84 


St. Lawrence,- 


3,403,102 


146,549 


3, 549, 073 


20 383 37 


26,042 21 


46,425 68 


Saratoga, 


6,452,418 


1,149,078 


6,601,496 


23,6.30.60 


10,389 77 


40,020 27 


Schenectady." 


2, 147, 576 


606, 449 


2,653,024 


15,635 32 


11,143 82 


26,779 14 


Schoharie, 


1,665,349 


168, 6.50 


2,034,021 


10,878 93 


11,397 22 


22,276 15 


Seneca, 


5, 089, 072 


612,698 


6,202,370 


17,918 09 


6,613 29 


24,731 98 


Suffolk, 


4, 629, 503 


1,116,424 


5,746,927 


13,444 17 


9,901 41 


23,346 63 


Steuben, 


5,651 090 


4 17, .3.53 


5,986,543 


20,887 12 


16,318 93 


37, 206 06 


Sullivan, 


2,611,9.00 


77, 144 


2, 089, 100 


7, 199 03 


7,882 60 


15,082 23 


Tioga. 

Tompkins, 


1,549,463 


319,919 


1,808,382 


13,078 04 


8,679 34 


21,757 98 


3,300,000 


800, 963 


4, 100 953 


11,616 29 


12,311 61 


23,927 80 


Ulster, 


4, 4.57, 240 


846, 246 


5, 303, 486 


25,804 90 


19,772 82 


45, 677 72 


Warren, 


956, 671 


.37,051 


1,097,667 


7, 102 62 


4,632 16 


11,094 78 


Washington, •• 


5, 324, 252 


919,512 


6, 243 704 


16,389 89 


22,634 63 


39, 024 72 


Wayne, 


7, .372, 940 


452, 222 


7,451,609 


28,451 62 


11,268 40 


39,719 92 


Westchester, • 


6,992,081 


2, 851,. 874 


9, 843, 9.55 


35, 097 74 


20,460 43 


55,649 17 


Wyoming, 


4,202,323 


219,322 


4,482,607 


14,596 74 


11,500 90 


26,097 64 


Yates, 


4,992,512 


339, 808 


5,332,380 


14,774 36 


6,569 14 


20,343 60 


Total, 


504,254,029 


116,595,233 


620, 676, 346 


3,283,400 .39 


963,087 39 


4,246,487 78 



NoTB.— The average rate of county and town tax on $1 of valuation is 6.8-10 mills. 



68 



GOVERNORS AND LIEUTENANT GOVERNORS. 



LIST OF GOVERNORS, 

Of the State of New-York, from the year 1789 to 1842, with the 
of the opposing candidateSj and the number of votes given for each. 



Elected, Governors, Votes, 

1789 George Clinton, 6,391 

1792* George Clinton 8,440 

1795 John Jay, 13,481 

1798 John Jay, 16,012 

1801 George Clinton, 24,808 

1804 Morgan Lewis 30,829 

1807 Daniel D. Tompkins. 35,074 

1810 Daniel D, Tompkins', 43,094 

1813 Daniel D. Tompkins, 43,324 

1816 Daniel D. Tompkins, 45,412 

1817 De Witt Clinton, 43,310 

1820 De Witt Clinton, 47,447 



Opposing Candidates. 

Robert Yates 

John Jay, 

Robert Yates, 

Robert R. Livingston, . , . 
Stephen Van Rensselaer,. 

Aaron Burr, 

Morgan Lewis. 

Jonas Piatt, . . .'. , 

Stephen Van Rensselaer,.. 

Rufus King, 

Peter B. Porter, 

Daniel D. Tompkins, . . . . 



Vottt. 

5,962 

8,332 
11,892 
13,632 
20,843 
22,139 
30,989 
36,484 
39,718 
38,647 

1,479 
45,990 



ELECTED UNDER THE NEW CONSTITUTION, ADOPTED IN 1821. 



1822 
1824 
1826 

1828 
1830 



Joseph C. Yates,. 
De Witt Clinton,. 
De Witt Clinton,. 



Martin Van Buren, . , 
Enos T. Throop,..., 



Solomon Southwick, 2,910 

Samuel Young, 87,093 

William B. Rochester, 96,135 

( Smith Thompson, 106,444 

( Solomon Southwick, 33,345 

5 Francis Granger, 120.361 

I Ezekiel Williams, 2J332 

. Francis Granger, 156,672 

William H. Seward, 168,969 

5 Jesse Buel, 136.648 

^ Isaac S. Smith, 3,496 

William L. Marcy, 182,461 

5 William C.Bouck, 216,808 

^ Gerrit Smith, 2,662 

I Luther Bradish, 186,091 

I Alvan Stewart, 7,263 

Note. — In 1817, the government was administered by the Hon. John 
Taylor, Lieutenant Governor, from February to July. In 1828, after the 
death of His Excellency De Witt Clinton, the government was adminis- 
tered by the Hon. Nathaniel Pitcher, Lieutenant Governor, until the ex- 
piration of the Governor's term of office. In 1829, on the resignation of 
His Excellency Martin Van Buren, March 12th, the government was 
administered by the Hon.* Ends T. Throop, Lieutenant Governor. 



128,493 
103,452 
99,785 

136,794 

128,842 

166,410 
181,905 

166,122 

192,882 
222,011 

1842 William C. Bouck,.. 208,072 



1832 
1834 


William L. 
William L. 


Marcy, . 
Marcy, . 


1836 


William L. 


Marcy,. . 


1838 


William H. 


Seward, 


1840 


William H. 


Seward, 



LIST OF LIEUTENANT GOVERNORS. 



EleeUi. 

mi Pierre Van Cortlandt. 

1795 Stephen Van Rensselaer. 

1801 Jeremiah Van Rensselaer. 

1804 John Broome. 

1811 De Witt Clinton. 

■ 1813 John Taylor. 

1822 Erastus Root. 



Elected. 

1824 James Tallmadge. 

1826 Nathaniel Pitcher. 

1828 Enos T. Throop. 

1830 Edward P. Livingston. 

1832 John Tracy. 

1838 Luther Bradish. 

1842 Daniel S. Dickinson. 



• In the year 1792, the votes of the counties of Clinton. Otsego and Tioga were not 
canvassed. 



OFFICIAL ELECTION RETURNS.— 1840-42. 



ALBANY C0IJ:^TY.— 08,593 InhaMlants— 1810. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1810. | 


RETURNS, 1842. 


fcitics and Towns. 


■<= — «" 

o • 

K ii £ 


a 


S 

m 
a 


IS 

& 


■X 

3 
o 


■ -S 
m 


3 
O 


V 


, Isl Ward,.. 

/ 2d Ward,.. 

. 1 3d Ward,.. 

^ 1 4th Ward,.. 

b J 5th Ward,.. 

>% y 6 th Ward .f. 


1,477 
.1,081 

745 

1,287 

919 


861 
591 
446 

648 
484 


616 
490 
299 

639 
435 


841 
585 
431 
632 

470 


627 
497 
301; 
647 
443 


178 
244 
480 
545 
337 
305 
216 
222 
471 
278 


271 
275 
400 
339 
230 
195 
251 
286 
274 
247 


2 

1 

5 

10 

5 


a ^ 7thWarvi,t. 












1 


- i 8th Vv'ard j • 












1 


"^ i 9th Ward,!. 












3 


f 10th Ward | . 












R 
















Total Albany city, 
Bern 


5,509 
723 
695 
641 
611 
463 
684 
775 

1,580 
635 


3, 030 

3.52 
381 
179 
374 
353 
388 
229 
805 
281 


2,479 
371 
314 
462 
237 
110 
296 
546 
775 
354 


2, 959 
344 
374 
175 
368 
349 
382 
221 
792 
269 


2, 523 
378 
322 
467 
241 
111 
299 
553 
790 
358 


3,276 
322 
338 
153 
360 
326 
354 
162 
772 
209 


2,768 
347 
324 
408 
238 
121 
310 
463 
778 
319 


43 


Bethlehem, 

Cocynians, 

Guilderland, 




New Scotland,.... 
Rensselacrville,. . 

Watervliet, 

Westerlo, 


23 

16 

5 


Total Albany Co. 


12,316 


6,372 


5,944 


6,233 


6,042 


6,272 


6,076 


87 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 428 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 191 " 

Do. Bradish, 1842, 196 ". 

* Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 gave 45 votes for President. 
t Formed by an act of ilie Leeislature, March 30, 1841. 



ALLEftANY COUNTY.— !0,(>T5 Inhsibitaiits— 1840. 






EL 

5oiS 

O b- '- 


Ecrio> 

c 
o 

rJ 


r RETURNS,' 134 


0. ' 

o 


RET15RNS, 1842. 


Cities and To^\'ns. 


» 
c 
> 




'■3 
re 


3 
O 
M 


a 
o 


Alfred 


331 
177 
278 
275 
155 
228 
289 


194 
114 

99 
129 

55 
129 
141 


137 
63 
179 
146 
100 
99 
148 


199 
113 

97 
125 

56 
127 
136 


137i 
641 
179 
148! 
99' 
102 
153 


189 
103 
112 
128 
59 
130 
115 


114 
67 
151 
140 
94 
126 
132 


Cj 


Allen 




Almond, 


23 


Andover 

Angelica, 

Belfast, 





70 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Birdsall, 

Bolivar, 

Burns, 

Caneadea, . . . . 
Centerville,. . . 
Clarksville,. . . 

Cuba, .... 

Eagle, 

Friendshipj ... 
Genesee, .... 

Granger, 

Grove, 

Hume, 

Independence, 
New Hudson, . 

Nunda, 

Ossian, 

Pike, 

Portage, 

Rush ford, . . . . , 

Scio, 

West Almond,. 
Wirt, 



53 


23 


30 


23) 31 


23 


40 


72 


43 


29 


43 


1 29 


41 


41 


164 


117 


47 


115 


4R 


93 


40 


28f) 


125 


155 


119 


162 


95 


140 


274 


169 


106 


167 


105 


132 


84 


77 


S6 


41 


36 


41 


35 


63 


364 


172 


192 


169 


195 


167 


196 


216 


164 


52 


161 


53 


135 


48 


260 


109 


141 


105 


142 


94 


161 


116 


80 


36 


79 


36 


87 


22 


210 


132 


78 


• 132 


79 


130 


80 


12J 


65 


56 


64 


54 


44 


74 


436 


295 


141 


286 


15i 


237 


149 


286 


1J9 


166 


117 


168 


95 


158 


244 


136 


108 


134 


113 


114 


94 


488 


290 


198 


290 


201 


262 


184 


174 


86 


84 


85 


85 


81 


91 


441 


317 


124 


316 


128 


269 


107 


612 


332 


280 


333 


285 


297 


218 


312 


187 


125 


188 


126 


163 


125 


202 


62 


140 


57 


146 


68 


163 


159 


77 


82 


73 


82 


59 


90 


235 


135 


100 


134 


100 


138 


105 


7,514 


4,132 


3,382 


4,079 


3,442 


3,693 


3,287 



20 
3 

35 
1 

17 
1 

12 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 750 votes. 

Do. Seward, <' 637 " 

Do. Bradish, 1842, 406 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 79 votes for President. 



BROOME COUNTY.— 22.338 Inhabitants— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



Barker, 

Chenango, , 

Colesville, 

Conklin, 

Lisle, , 

Nanticoke, 

Panford, 

Triangle, 

Union, 

Vestal, 

Windsor, 

Total Broome Co. 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 



d£ <= 



o a> 



250 
1,074 
627 
29f! 
3:^8 
76 
243 
347 
654 
253 
466 



4.526 



a: 



137 
638 
279 
180 
213 
43 
86 
161 
289 
115 
254 



ll.S 
436 

248 
119 
125 
3:^ 
157 
18(i 
365 
138 
212 



2,395 2.131 



136 
657 
277 
172 
212 
44 
82 
159 
284 
113 
249 



n 



114 
463 
247 
129 
127 
36 
160 
191 
369 
14:-' 
217 



RETURNS, 1842 



n 



124 

527 

270 

162 

172 

34 

60 

126 

250 

94 

191 



89 
545 
234 
154 
102 

33 
181 
172 
382 
138 
208 



386| 2,196U 2,010| 2,238 



1 

30 



1 
23 



16 



84 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 264 vot.«s. 

Do. Seward, " '190 « 

Do. Bouck, 1842,....^ •. 228 " 

Abolition or Liberty Parly, 1840 — 21 votes for President. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



71 



CATTARAlHJirs COUIVTY.— 28,872 Inhabitants— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



AshforJ, .... 

Burton, 

Carrolton,* . . 
Cold Spring,. 
Conewango, . 

Dayton, 

Ellicottville, 
Farmersville, 
Franklinville, 
Freedom, ... 
Great ValJey, 
Hinsdale, ... 
Humphrey, . . 

Leon, 

Little Valley, 
Lyndon, .. . . 
Machias, .... 
Mansfield, . . . 

Napoli, 

New Albion, 

Olean, 

Otto, 

Perrysburgh, 

Persia, 

Portville, ... 
Randolph, . . . 
Yorkshire, . . 



ICLRCTION RETURNS, 1840. 



24S 
101 

"142 
227 
19(i 
217 
26:-! 
2:i7 
319 
151 
374 
8,5 
2i>6 

ur.i 

20!) 

is:: 

233 
205 
113 
392 
301 
172 
8G 
248 
249 



138 
65 

"I'l 

106 

138 

126 

144 

104 

167 

71 

148 

49 

84 

88 

61 

112 

115 

124 

148 

66 

288 

157 

116 

35 

110 

135 



110 
39 

"I'l 
121 

58 

91 
119 
133 
152 

80 
226 

36 

nu 

50 

42 

97 

68 

109 

57 

47 

104 

144 

56 

51 

138 

114 



Total Cattaraugus, I 5,451 ! 2,966 2,485 2,922 2,5461 2,583 2,486 167 



1.34 
64 



111 
39 



70 


72 


106 


121 


138 


61 


123 


9b 


139 


124 


104 


134 


167 


153 


68 


83 


144 


228 


48 


38 


31 


174 


86 


52 


59 


43 


109 


102 


114 


69 


122 


110 


146 


66 


66 


48 


285 


110 


154 


148 


117 


57 


36 


50 


108 


1.39 


130 


119 



RETURNS, 1842. 



123 

66 
15 
58 

119 

102 

128 

116 
82 

131 
76 

152 
50 
74 
83 
68 
75 

103 
98 

140 
69 

247 
91 
93 
37 
87 

102 



117 

53 

22 

68 

117 

57 

92 

126 

132 

132 

72 

225 

45 

146 

57 

39 

103 

75 

88 

73 

45 

106 

135 

49 

64 

142 

106 



1 
10 

6 
11 
26 
12 

2 

1 

17 
2 
2 
6 
5 



15 
5 

33 
6 



Majority for Harrrison, 1840, 481 votes. 

Do. Seward, « 376 " 

Do. Bradish, « 97 « 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840—64 votes for President. 

* Taken from Great Valley, March 9, 1842. 



CAYUGA COUNTY.— .50,338 Inhabitants— 18iO. 





ELECTION returns; 1840 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


o~ a 
o ^ Si 


. 

a 
o 

i-i 

33 


a 

3 

pq 

a 


■6 

V 


3 
O 

pq 


J3 

'-3 
2 


3 
O 
eq 


V 


Auburn, „ 

Aurelius 


914 

580 
428 
438 


633 
259 
208 
213 


28] 
321 
220 
225 


616 
251 
203 
204 


303 
324 
227 
233 


563 
205 
184 
159 


371 
342 
223 
233 


24 
2 


Brutus, 


8 


Cato, 


23 



72 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Conquest, 

Fleming, 

Genoa, 


3901! 
266! 
5091 
438! 
4491 
3291 
939 
411; 
497i 
240' 
480; 
2641 
4071 
3651 
483 
296 i 
405| 
440 


153 
• 114 
307 
176 
332 
188 
416 
140 
167 
105 
284 
111 
203 
226 
258 
210 
270 
191 


237 
15;:. 
20- 
262 
117 
]4i 
523 
271 
330 
135 
196 
153 
204 
139 
■ 225 

8e 

195 

249 


151 

108 
308 
176 
331 
180 
406 
138 
162 
104 
272 
107 
197 
223 
255 
205 
273 
191 


240f 
156 
204 
263 
122 
148 
530 
272 
236 
136 
199 
158 
210 
145 
229 
89 
194 
250 


1?4 
102 
256 
161 
261 
153 
315 
121 
12& 
98 
210 
117 
155 
230 
247 
174 
224 
141 


243 
152 
198 
255 
125 
165 
554 
265 
314 
128 
216 
155 
206 
138 
245 
93 
86 
239 


3 

24 


Ira, 


7 




29 




3 




38 




6 


Niles, 




Owasco, 




Scipio, 


3 


Sempronius, 


n 


Spring-port, 

Sterling-, 


1 

3 


Summer Hill, 


9 
5 


Victory, 


4?. 






Total Cayuga Co. , 


10,028' 


5,164 


4,864 


5,066 


4,963 


4, 369 


5,046 


253 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 300 votes. 

i)o. Seward,- " 103 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 677 « 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 73 votes for President. 



CHAUTAUQUE COITNTY 47,975 Isshabitants— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



Arkwright, . . . 

Busti, 

Carroll, 

Charlotte, 

Chautauque, . . 
Cherry Creek, 

Clymer, 

Ellery, 

Ellieott, 

Ellington, . . . . 
French Creek, 

Gerry, 

Hanover, 

Harmony, .... 

Mina, 

Poland, 

Pomfret, 

Portland, 

Ripifiy, 

Sheridan, 

Sherman, . . . . 
Stockton^ 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 1942. 


6^ 

eC Q t^ 
O >P-i 
H 


c 
o 


s 

3 

m 

a 




a 

3 



J3 




3 

n 


a 

S 
So 


266 


189 


77 


175 


85 


131 


65 




385 


303 


82 


299 


82 


241 


84 


18 


355 


152 


203 


140 


214' 


105 


165 


1 


273 


159 


114, 


154 


118 


148 


109 


2 


■• 585 


340 


245 


333 


249 


296 


218 




212 


112 


100 


107 


103 


91 


79 




162 


90 


72 


87 


73 


82 


54 




445 


276 


169 


268 


174 


259 


159 




536 


340 


196 


330 


197 


331 


213 


5 


336 


203 


133 


187 


138 


1,S6 


124 


1 


131 


83 


48, 


75 


50 


59 


42 




281 


198 


83 


186 


88 


178 


. 92 




748 


457 


291, 


451 


299 


381 


323 


5 


678 


505 


173 


497 


182 


427 


184 




166 


98 


68 


87 


75 


82 


75 




245 


158 


87 


153 


89 


116 


67 


1 


851 


638 


213, 


620 


229 


560 


234 


18 


40] 


309 


92 


296 


98 


248 


84 


7 


410 


216 


194! 


202 


206 


171 


183 




349 


227 


122; 


222 


126 


195 


108 




207 


122 


85 


116 


90 


123 


72 




398 


260 


138 


245 


147 


223 


145 


2 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



73 



Villenovaj 

Westfield, 


2081 
602 


188 
362 


120 

240 


178 
347 


128 
245 


126 
311 


109f 
238 


. 7 


Total Chautauqwe, 


9,330 


5,985 


3,345 


5,755 


3,485l 


5,070 


3,226 


67 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, : 2, 640 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 2,270 " 

Do. Brailish, 1842, ,... 1,844 " 

Abolition or Liberty Part.v, 1840 — 23 .votes for President. 



CHEVITJXf^ rOUVTY 


.— 20,73'i Inhabitants— 1840. 






ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 1S12. 


Cities and Towns. 


III 


d 
o 


3 


"d 




^ 








Olal 
vote 
Pres 

arris 


d 


rt 
^ 


4 

3 


-3 

as 


o 
3 
o 


0) 




H il ffi 


!> 


w 


C3 




pq 


. en 


Big Flats, 


261 108 


153 


106 


154' 


114 


150 




Catharines, 


477 301 


176 


302 


177) 


278 


194 




Catlin, 


190| 75 


115 


74 


116 


76 


109 




Cayuta, 


160 ! 49 


111 


46 


113 


32 


102 




Chemung, 


460 


160 


300 


149 


319, 


133 


281 




Dix, ; . . . 


368 
970 


•14S 
412 


220 
558 


141 

413 


224 
558 


142 
394 


218 
568 




Elmira, ;..... 




Erin, 


249; 


83 


166 
277 


79 
142 


169 

277, 


53 
133 


159 
316 




Southport, 


419 142 




Veteran, 


440 


220 


220 


217 


223 


179 


207 








Total Chemung Co. 


3, 989 


1,693 


2, 296 


1,669 


2, 330' 


1,534 


2,304 


35 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 603 votes. 

Do. Eouck, " 661 " 

Do. Bouclj, 1842, 770 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 9 votes for President. 

CTIE\A\GO COUIVTY.— 10,785 Inhabitants— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Ci'.ies and Towns. 


■55 


d 
p 

C 

n 


d 
o 

M 

a 

> 


■d 

M 
IS 


3 
O 


J3 

-3 


o 

3 
O 




Bainbridge, 

Columbus, 

Coventry, 

German , 


647 
346 
342 

197 
724 
575 
228 
287 
620 
8S6 
319 
705 
244 


380 
194 
179 

99 
32!) 
260 
157 
103 
320 
416 
201 
347 

58 


267 
152 
163 

98 
395 
315 

71 
184 
300 
• 470 
118 
358 
186 


368 
189 
178 

88 
324 
256 
154 
101 
318 
410 
198 
347 

57 


279 
157 
163 
105 
399 
319 
76 
187 
303 
479 
120 
361 
187 


287 
163 
154 

88 
309 
198 
116 

80 
281" 
422 
143 
327 

61 


305 
143 
165 

93 
382 
322 

85 
180 
283 
496 
144 
347 


13 

2 


Greene, 


1 


Guilford, 


R 


Linlflaen, 

MacDonough, 

New Berlin, 

Norwich 


8 

1 
3 


Otselic, 




Oxford, 




Pharsalia, 


187 



74 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Pitcher, 


298 
340 
240 
587 
354 
442 


1391 
2061 
113! 

373 1 

188: 
324 j 


1591 
134 
127 
214 
166 
118 


136 
205 
114 
367 
183 
323 


162 
141 
127 
222 
171 
119 


123 

186 
102 
267 
172 
278 


163 
142 
137 
249 
170 
129 


? 


Plymouth, 

Preston, 

Sherburne, 

Smithville, 

Smyrna, 


1 

31 
2 








Total Chenango, . 


8,381 


4,386i 


3,995 


4,316 


4,077 


3,757 


4,122 


75 



Majority for Harrison 1840, * 391 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 239 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 365 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 25 votes for President. 

ClilNTON COUNTY.— 28,157 Inhabitants— 1840. 





. ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 1 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 




a 
o 


a 

3 


■d 




J3 
















o 


t.4 


u 

s 
o 






H 


ffi 


> 


M 




fH 


m 


{/i 


Au Sable, ... 


437 


196 


241 


195 


242 


182 


240J 1 


Beekmantown, . . . 


378 


1169 


209 


171 


208; 


107 


209i 6 


Blackbrook, 


114 


70 


64 


70 


66 


74 


78i 


Champlain, 


376 


184 


192 


183 


196' 


116 


186, 51 


Chazy 


561 
145 


294 

77 


267 
68 


288 
78 


273 
67 


197 

68 


295 18 


Ellenburgh, 


81 




236 

494 


183 

292 


53 
202 


181 
289 


52 
204 


132 
236 


62 35 


Peru, 


232 


Plattsburgh, 


863 


395 


468 


.392 


473 


313 


442 10 


Saranac, 


227 


163 


64 


159 


67 


146 


78 


Total Clinton Co. 


3,951 


2,023 


1,828 


2,006 


1,848 


1,571 


1,903 121 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 195 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 158 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 332 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party 1840 — 31 votes for President. 

COLUMBIA COUNTY.— 43,352 Inhabitant's- 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 


. RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


1^1 


a 
o 

'u 


ci 

a 

> 




o 
O 




3 
O 
Pi 


08 

s 


g ( 1st Ward,.... 
1 ^2d Ward,.... 


594 
559 


311 

295 


283 
264 


309 
293 


286 
264 


250 
255 


255 
255 


2 


Total Hudson City, 
Aneram , ..,,.... 
Austerlitz, 


1,153 
385 
448 
448 
800 
659 


606 
196 
260 
209 
329 
325 


547 
189 
188 
239 
471 
334 


602 
197 
259 
204 
323 
326 


550 
192 
193 
248 
476 
338 


505 
159 
168 
164 
268 
272 


510 
157 
205 
212 
461 
311 


2 

1 
4 


Chatham, 

Clavcrack, 





ELECTION RETURNS. 



75 



Clermont, .... 

Copakc, 

Oallatin, 

Germantown, . 

Ghent, 

Greenport, ... 
Hillsdale, . . . 
Kinilerhoi k, . . 
I-ivingcston, . . . 
New Lebanon, 
Stockport, .... 
Stuy vesant, ... 
Taghkanic, ... 



Total Columbia. 



2371 


57 


180 


59 


178 


39 


163 


332 


172 


160 


171 


160 


166 


149 


348 


224 


124 


221 


128 


150 


149 


207 


142 


65 


143 


64 


126 


44 


473 


246 


• 227 


245 


227 


184 


226 


238 


141 


97 


142 


95 


90 


111 


564] 


234 


330 


233 


331 


170 


321 


670 


274 


396 


274 


401 


242 


•403 


426 


248 


178 


251 


175 


180 


158 


453 


198 


255 


197 


258 


149 


241 


263 


178 


85 


176 


86 


176 


80 


331 


127 


204 


127 


205 


81 


190 


330 


121 


209 


122 


212 


73 


207 


8,765 


4,287 


4,478 


4,272 


4,517| 


3,362 


4,278 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 191 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 245 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 916 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 5 votes for President. 



CORTLAND COUIVTY.— 2t,G07 rohabitants— IStO. 





ELECTIO?^ RETURNS, 1S40. 


RETURNS, 1342. 


Ciiics ami Towns. 


-So 
o o " 

1^" 


d 
o 

1 


a 

=3 

m 

a 


[3 


o 

a 
o 

m 




• a 
o 
n 




Cincinnatus, 

Cortland ville, 

Freetown, 


268 
796 
197 
736 
200 
259 
263 
467 
70S 
838 
161 


78 
47] 

95 
556 
123 
116 
134 
163 
398 
460 

70 


190 
325 
102 
180 

77 
143 
129 
304 
310 
378 

91 


79 
471 

91 
548 
121 
116 
134 
159 
396 
■ 454 

70 


189: 

328; 

106 

186 

80 

144 

130 

304 

■ 314 

389 

92 


80 
395 

77 
491 
110 

97 

94 
142 
352 
358 

53 


161 
335 
104 
178 

90 
164 
141 
311 
330 
388 

97 


3 
59 
12 

38 


Marathon 

Preble, 


5 

99. 


Scott, 


94 




7 


Truxton, 


9 
5? 


Willett 


1 






Total Cortland Co. 


4,893 


2,664 


2,229 


2,639 


2,262 


2,249 


2,299 


232 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 435 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 377 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 50 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 44 votes for President. 



76 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



DELAWARE COUNTY.— 35,396 Inhabitant?— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1S40. j 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


0--2 " 


a 
o 

M 

Ki 


d 

V 
3 

a 

> 


si 


o 

3 
O 


•3 

CS 


o 
s 
o 
ra 


V 


Andes, . 


379 
253 
288 
399 
480 
623 
287 
166 
330 
444 
267 
320 
491 
604 
362 
363 
426 
353 


251 
149 

91 

79 
254 
173 
182 

81 
185 
193 
153 
163 
211 
321 

99 
182 

73 
148 


128 
104 
. 197 
320 
226 
450 
105 
85 
145 
251 
114 
157 
280 
283 
263 
181 
353 
2y5 


251 

148 

88 

70 

248 

148 

181 

79 

181 

188 

148 

158 

210 

316 

98 

180 

75 

149 


ii:9 

105 
198 
332 
231 
477 
110 
84 
147 
254 
119 
161 
279 
286 
268 
183 
352 
206 


171 

92 

36 

29 

187 

76 

170 

95 

120 

142 

137 

111 

100 

222 

63 

164 

76 

96 


88 

87 

174 

311 

237 

401 

99 

96 

143 

204 

97 

159 

229 

258 

232 

155 

364 

194 


11 


Bovina, 


2 


Colchester, 

Davenport, 

Delhi, 


6 
3 

g 


Franklin, 

Hamden , 

Hancock, 

Harpersfielil, 

Kortright, 

Masonville, 

Meredith, 

Middletown, 

Roxbury, , . 

Sidney 


22 
2 
11 


Stamford, , 

Tompkins,. ....... 

Walton, 


2 
3 

"5 






Total Delaware, .. 


6,835 


2,988 


3,847 


2,916 


3,921 


2,087 


3.526 


95 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 959 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 1,005 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 1,439 ". 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 42 votes for President. 



DUTCHESS COUNTY.— 52,398 Inhabitants- 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



Amenia, 

Beekman,- 

Clinton, 

Dover, 

Fishkill, 

Hyde Park, 

La Grange, 

Milan, 

Northeast, 

Pawling, 

Pine Plains, 

Pleasant Valley, . 
Poughkeepsie,. . . 
Rcdhook, 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 






451 
331 
425 
501 

1849 
473 
417 
380 
392 
355 
319 
463 

1766 
580 



228 
255 
158 
241 
807 
273 
197 
124 
135 
193 
158 
199 
973 
268 



223 
76 
267 
260 
1042 
200 
220 
256 
177 
162 
161 
264 
79:^ 
312! 



226 
254 
154 
235 
796 
266 
197 
124 
133 
191 
154 
194 
982 
262 



n 



227 
76 
272 
267 
1051 
208 
223 
256 
180 
164 
165 
2671 
789: 
316 



RETURNS, 1S42. 



■a 
nJ 

23 


3 
O 

cq 


183 


214 


176 


73 


125 


230 


134 


215 


561 


864 


204 


180 


144 


176 


75 


200 


88 


153 


126 


118 


153 


147 


121 


235 


747 


754 


182 


269 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



77 



Rhinebeck, 

Stanford, 

Union Vale, 

Washington, 

Total Dutchess Co. 



621 


352 


269 


347 


274' 


27C 


242 




508 


246 


262 


242 


267, 


169 


206 




349 


185 


164 


186 


164 


137 


166 




617 


363 


254 


363 


258 


300 


219 




10,717 


5,355 


5,362 


5,306 


5,424 


■3,895 


4,661 


24 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 7 vot<>s. 

Do. Bouck, " 118 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 766 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 16 votes for President. 



ERIE COUNTY.— 02,465 Inhabitants— 1810. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


O [_, . 

da = 

5 £.-3 
5 o o 


a 

o 

u 

a 


d 

3 




O 

D 
O 


'■5 
2 
m 


.a 

o 

o 


r 


^ r 1st Ward,.. 
g % 2tl Ward, . . 

< 3d Ward,.. 
g i 4th Ward, . . 

1 f 5th Ward, . . 
PP ^ ' 


586 

. 583 

342 

631 

488 


251 
383 
2.30 
323 
299 


335 

200 
112 
308 
189 


274 
368 
224 
316 
291 


336 

207 
118 
313 
194 


153 

354 
226 

209 

248 


408 
238 
139 
423 
234 


2 
7 
8 
19 
6 


Total Buffalo City, 
Alden, ' 


2,630 

405 
368 
588 
508 
302 
184 
164 
892 
195 
709 
592 
355 
343 
862 
261 
37] 
475 
316 
197 
368 


1,486 
289 
315 

, 408 
286 
192 
73 
99 
341 
116 
590 
455 
183 
270 
459 
126 
224 
339 
186 
86 
261 


1,144 

116 

53 

180 

222 

110 

111 

65 

51 

79 

119 

127 

17- 

73 

303 

135 

147 

136 

130 

in 

107 


1,473 
292 
305 
400 
271 
187 
69 
95 
332 
112 
586 
447 
182 
263 
454 
121 
222 
335 
183 
80 
254 


1,168 

113 

59 

191 

235 

116 

115 

66 

59 

82 

125 

133 

174 

63 

309 

142 

150 

143 

134 

117 

115 


1,190 
197 
206 
312 
188 
lOS 

49 

89 
253 

74 
317 
316 
145 
187 
347 

90 
146 
283 
134 

64 
160 


1,442 

116 

72 

195 

261 

120 

114 

69 

58 

79 

119 

140 

192 

78 

338 

134 

138 

140 

122 

119 

119 


42 

1 




38 


Black Rock, 


8 
10 


Brandt, 


4 


Cheektowaga, 

Clarence, 


3 

11 

9 


Collins, 


77 


Concord, 


53 




17 


Evans, 

Hamburgh, 

Holland, 


5 

13 

7 


Lancaster, 

Nevvstead, 


17 

5 

16 


Tonawanda, 

Wales, 


16 






Total Erie Co 


11,085 


6,784 


3,691 


6,663 


1 3,809 


4,855 


4,167 


352 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 3, 093 votes. 

Bo. Seward, " 2,854 " 

Do. Bradish, 1812, • 682 " 

AbolUioa or Liberty Party, 1840 — 36 votes for President. 



78 



ELECTION KETURNS. 



ESSEX COiriVTY.— 23,631 Inhabitants— 1R40. 





ELECTIOiSr RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


= 4J 

111 


i 


a 
<a 

a 
m 

a 

> 


& 





J3 

•a 
a 




a 

P3 


i 


Chesterfield, 

Crownpoint, 

Elizabethtown, . . 
Essex 


410 
491 
203 
313 
396 
136 
319 

70 
477 

13 
341 
430 
375 
263 
171 


208 
270 
147 
186 
265 
100 
193 
38 
377 
12 
87 
280 
197 
135 
124 


202 
221 

56 

127 

131 

• 36 

126 

32 
IOC 
■ 1 
25J 
150 
178 
128 

47 


203 
269 
143 
184 
266 
101 
190 
35 
378 
12 
89 
276 
198 
132 
123 


207 
222 

60 
129 
136 

36 
128 

34 
100 
1 
254 
154 
175 
130 

49 


172 
190 
121 
148 
177 

41 
158 

25 

341 

8 

64 
209 
173 
110 
112 


178 
223 

58 
130 
111 

33 
109 

24 
110 

222 
102 
185 
124 
30 


1 

1 


Jav • 




Keene, 

Lewis, 


29 


Minerva, 

Moriah, 


6 


Newcorab, 

Schroon, 




Ticonderoga, 

Westport, 

Willsborough, 

Wilmington, 


« 


Total Essex Co. . . 


4,406 


2,617 


1,789 


2,599 


1,815 


2,049 


1,639 


37 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 

Do. Seward, " 

Do. Bradish, 1842, • 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840—1 vote for President. 



832 votes. 

784 " 
410 " 



FRATVKr,IN COUiVTY 16,-518 Inhabitants— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



Bangor, 

Belmont, 

Bombay, 

Brandon, 

Chateaugay, . . . , 

Constable, 

Dickinson, 

Duane, 

Fort Covington, 

Franklin, 

Harrietstown,* . . 

Malone, 

Moira, 

Westville, 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 



%i\ 



233 

77 
179 

99 
392 
155 
189 

39 
257 

39 

'568 
166 
157 



a 



151 

44 

81 

56 

193 

106 

101 

19 

147 

13 

'377 

49 
103 



82 
33 
98 
43 

199 
49 
88 
20 

110 
26 

191 
117 

54 



151 
44 

78 

56 

188 

108 

99 

19 

142 

13 

"378 

48 

102 



Total Franklin Co. 2,550 1,440 1,110; 1,426 1,141 1,354 1,296 



83 
33 

100 
43 

204 
47 
89 
20 

129 
26 

'193 
119 

55 



RETURNS, 1842. 



138 


102 


48 


30 


75 


107 


63 


40 


172 


226 


116 


70 


91 


86 


11 


9 


123 


161 


5 


37 


2 


11 


345 


234 


56 


122 


109 


61 



16 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 330 votes. 

Do. Seward, . " 285 '' 

Do. Bradish, 1842, 58 votes. 

•Tal'.enfrom Duane in 1841.— Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840—6 votes for President. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



79 



FITTiTON COUNTY.— 1S,0 19 Inhabitants— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, l(-40. 


RETUNKS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 




'i 




•d 




J3 








•~ o *-< 




P3 

a 


9- 


M 

3 
O 


•5 


a 

3 
O 


a) 




H 


X 


" 


c« 


P5 


M 


W 


W 


Bleecker, 


67 


2{» 


47 


19 


49 


12 


43 




Broadalbin 


562 


359 


243 


358 


205 


260 


194 


13 


Ephratah, . 


388 


176 


212 


170 


220 


140 


210 


5 


Johnstown, 


1,066 


725 


341 


711 


353 


659 


336 


11 


MaylieUI, 


532 


284 


248 


280 


254 


194 


247 


3 


Northampton, 


327 


103 


224 


103 


225 


m 


195 


3 


Oppenheim, 


418 


173 


245 


169 


249 


132 


208 


13 


Perth, 


141 
108 


85 
39 


56 
69 


84 
37 


57 

70 


139 
33 


80 
71 


9 


Stratforil, 


11 


Total Fulton Co. . . 


3,609 


1,964 


1,645 


1,931 


1,685 


1,665 


1,584 


61 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 319 votes. 

Do. Sewaril, " 246 " 

Do. Bradlsh, 1842, 81 « 

Fulton ^- Hamilton — Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 29 votes for President. 



GENESEE COUNTY.*- 59,587 Inhabitants— 1840. 




* See Wyominp County, taken from Genesee in 1941, 

f Taken from Elba, April 11, 1842; not yet organized. 
Formed on the division of the county in 1841. 



lO 



ELECTION RETUKNS. 



Pembroke,. . 

Perry, 

Sheldon,..., 

Stafford, 

Warsaw,. . .. 
Wethersfield, 



415 
588 
354 
459 
443 
262 



249 
464 
266 
328 
257 
143 



166 

124J 

88; 

1311 

186J 
119; 



Total Genesee Co. 10,866 7,057 3,809i 6,969 3,908 2,863 2,022 116 



244 
469 
260 
330 
261 
141 



1 

129 
92 
129 
185 
121 



206 
114 



177 
114 



Majority for Harrison, 1840. 3, 248 votes. 

Do. Seward, " ' 3,061 " 

Do. Bradish, 1842, 841 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 156 votes for President. 



GREENE COUNTY.— 30,446 Inhabitants— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


-^ w S 

fii c fc^ 



*^ 
a 


c 

3 
M 
C 

> 




U 
3 


n 





S 


?q 




Athens, 


508 
606 
1,071 
699 
595 
394 
494 
588 
458 
323 
513 


293 
312 
628 
378 
315 
124 
230 
119 
161 
138 
293 


215 
294 
443 
321 
280 
270 
264 
469 
■ 297 
185 
220 


292 
310 
622 
381 
306 
124 
219 
118 
163 
J 29 
295 


217 
303 
453 
322 
286 
273 
275 
477 
303 
194 
223 


207 

239 

500 

248 

262 

178 

86 

84 

84 

75 

. 263 


176 
256 
483 
271 
230 
221 
245 
421 
260 
269 
227 




Cairo, 




Catskill, 




Coxsacliie, 

Durham, 


« 


Greenville, 

Hunter, 




Lexing-ton, 

New Baltimore, . . 

Prattsville, 

Windham, 




Total Green Co. . . 


6,249 


2,991 


3, 258 


2,959 


3,326 


2,226 


3,059 


10 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 267 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 367 " 

Do, BoucJf, 1842, 833 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 7 votes for President. 



HAMILTON COUNTY.— 1,907 Inhabitants— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



Aj'ietta, 

Gilman, 

Hope, 

Lake Pleasant 
Long Lake, . . 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 






36 
18 
136 
54 
10 



14 
10 
31 
24 
ij 



22 

8 

105 

30 

91 



23 

9 

105 

30 

9 



RETURNS, 1842. 



m 

. 16 

10 

113 

27 

10 



ELECTION KETURNS. 



Si 



Morehouse, 

Wells, 


in, 

72 


8 
35 


11 
37 


8 
33 


11 

38 


11 

21 


16 
45 








To'al IlamiUon, . . 


345 


123 


222 


jisl 


225 


100 


237 





Majority for Van Bureh, 1840,. 
Do. Bouck, " . 

Do. Bouck, 1842,. 



99 votes. 
110 « 
137 « 



HERKIMER COUNTY.— 37,474 Inhabitants— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1S40. 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


<5 in -3 


c 
o 


a 

3 


■6 




J3 










.2 


« 




•^ 




-a 






5 o ". 


03 
IS 


£3 


is 

a 
Vi 


o 
P3 


■3 


O 

m 


55 


Columbia, 


419 


127 


322 


124 


340 


75 


279 




Danube, 


341 
38S 


184 
201 


157 

187 


181 
198 


160 
• 190 


164 
145 


16] 

178 




Fairfield, 




Frankfort, 


568 


244 


324 


243 


326 


167 


268 


10 


German Flats, .... 


664 


194 


470 


190 


475 


162 


375 


2 


Herkimer, 


497 


148 


349 


145 


352 


154 


346 


2 


Litchfield, 


351 


145 


206 


145 


207 


90 


162 


5 


Little Falls, 


. 690 


279 


411 


278 


• 418 


263 


375 


21 


Manheim, ; . 


360 


165 


195 


162 


200 


131 


171 


8 


Newport, 


407 


181 


226 


178 


227 


171 


228 


1 


Nor way, 


224 
135 
493 
406 


124 

71 

208 

161 


100 

64 

285 

245 


124 

69 

211 

161 


101 
66 

286 
252 


94 

58 

167- 

81 


114 

70 
234 
194 


1 


Ohio, 




Russia, • 


<s 


Salisbury, 


23 


Schuyler, 


359 


207 


152 


203 


159 


158 


109 




Stark, 


332 

423 
15 


183 
137 

4 


149 

286 

11 


177 

132 

4 


155 

294 

11 


150 

79 

5 


160 

198 

12 






3 


Wilmurt, 




Winfield, 


356 


155 


20] 


- 153 


204 


116 


168 


6 


Total Herkimer,. . 


7, 468 


3,118 


4, 350 


3,078 


4, 423 


2,430 


3,802 


87 



IVIajority for Van Buren, 1840, 1, 232 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " • 1,345 '< 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 1,372 <« 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840—70 votes for President. 



JEFFERSOX COTJtVTY.— C>0,.9«t Inhabitants— 1840. 



■ 


ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 1942. 


Cities and Towns. 


6lS 


d 



ri 


c 

5 

a 


5 
75 


3 



a 
(5 


3 


w 






623 
619 

597 
850 
486 


330 
282 
349 
482 
226 


293 
337 

248 
368i 
260, 


326 

275 
350 
473 
226 


298 
349 
249 
377 
264' 


284 

259 

60 

363 

178 


297 
211 
178 
346 
257 


?3 


Alexandria, 

Antwerp, 

Brownville, 

Champion, 


30 

52 
14 
10 



82 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Clayton, i • • • 


697 
1128 
48-4 
739 
713 
312 
961 
546 
453 
382 
387 
493 

"942 
475 


425 
569 
266 
461 
317 
152 
560 
332 
229 
177 
211 
235 

205 


272 
559 
218 
278 
396 
160 
401 
214 
224 
205 
176 
258 

*493 
270 


421 
571 
266 
460 
815 
151 
554 
331 
229 
173 
208 
231 

'439 
197 


277 
567 
220 
283 
401. 
162 
405; 
220^ 
221! 
216' 
183' 
267, 

'4971 

280; 

.1 


316 
505 
199 
365 
218 
123 
349 
213 
167 
138 
177 
167 
12f 
370 
198 


318 
553 
219 
301 
390 
162 
391 
239 
202 
190 
166 
242 
192 
499 
282 


•30 


Ellisburgh, 

Henderson, 

Hounilsfield, 

Le Ray, 


14 
13 

1 
9 


Lorraine, 


9 

28 


Orleans, 


17 


Pamelia, 

Philadelphia, 


1 
4 

1 


Rutland, 


2 


Theresa,* 

Watertown, 

Wilna, 


7 
27 






Total Jefferson Co. 


11,887 


6, 257 


5,630 


6,196 


5,736' 


4. 774 


5. 635 


292 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 627 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 460 " 

Do. Bouek, 1842, 861 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 59 votes for President. 
' Taken from Alexandria in 1841. 



KINGS COUNTY.— 


47,013 


Inhah 


itantK- 


-1840. 








ELECTION RETURNS! 1840... 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


lot 


£3 




3 


-d 




JS 






■ 


1=1 


■fc 

a 


m 

a 


(8 


u 




'■5 




3 







H 


X 


> 


(» 


. ™ 


M 


n 


C« 


,1st Ward,.... 


303 


21: 


90 


204 


93 


198 


174 


3 


( 2d Ward, ... 


768 


35! 


409 


34;- 


417 


295 


47." 


2 


^ Vsd Ward,.... 


548 


41(1 


138 


397 


144 


408 


176 


2 


^4th Ward, . . . 


964 


558 


40C 


538 


419 


573 


419 


14 


n ^5th Ward 

3 >6ih Ward^.. 


910 


25-; 


65( 


24(i 


66;^ 


27(1 


634 


5 


480 


28'! 


19t 


282 


19; 


238 


35.- 


3 


hthWard, ... 


626 


327 


29: 


323 


302 


396 


. 441 




2 /8th Ward,..; 


117 


3f 


8- 


37 


7i 


38 


97 




" \ 9th Ward, . . . 


120 


87 


3 


87 


3:- 


70 


57 


1 


Total Brooklyn, . . 


4,836 


2,527 


2, 309 


2, 457 


2,34: 


2,59:2 


2, 826 


30 


Busliwiclc, 


m 


102 


94 


9f> 


9i 


8(i 


108 




Flatbush, 


26,^ 


131 


137 


128 


I4f 


118 


16S 




Flatlands, 


m< 


62 


77 


02 


78 


56 


91 




Gravcscnd, 


15; 


104 


51 


106 


50 


90 


. h^ 




New Utrecht, .... 


10: 


65 


137 


6-i 


137 


6S 


13"3 




WlUiamsburgh, . . 


65-1 


302 


352 


29:- 


35> 


314 


395 


22 


Total Kings Co. .. 


6, 44f; 


3, 293 


3, 157 


3, 209 


3,203 


.3,324 


3.725 


f2 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 136 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 6 " 

Do. Bouek, 1842, 401 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1S40 — 24 votes for President, 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



83 



LEWIS COUNTY.— 17,830 Inhabitants— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 1S4'2. 


Cities and Towns. 


o I. ■:: 


d 

o 

1 


c 

% 

PQ 

a 
> 




o 

3 

o 


■3 


3 
O 
M 




Croghan,* 












12 

•271 

60 

37 

104 

109 

257 

235 

49 

184 

65 

136 


63 
193 

61 
104 

60 
232 
161 
224 

86 
159 
163 
210 




Denmark, 


509 
151 
122 

169 
416 
427 
4S8 
189 
356 
273 
373 


317 

79 

31 

107 

141 

266 
2a0 
78 
194 
100 
155 


19i 

7;2 

91 

6;; 

27.- 

161 

238 

111 

162 

173 

218 


309 

79 

31 

107 

139 

262 

248 

77 

194 

99 

152 


197 

72 

91 

62 

■ 280 

169 

241 

111 

163 

173 

• 220 


26 


Grc'ig, 




Hai-i-isburgh, 

Leycletij 


2 
14 


Lowville, 

Martinsbui-gh, .... 

Pinckney, 

Turin, 

Watson, 


12 
9 
2 

1 


West Turin, 




To!al Lewis Co... 


3,473 


] 


,718 


1,755 


1,697 


1,779 


1,519 


1,716 


66 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 37 votes. 

Do. Bouck,, " 82 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 197 " 

Abalition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 37 votes for President. 
* Taken from Diana and Watson in 1841 



LIVIiVGSTOlV COUNTY.— 35,140 Iiiliabitaiits— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 184i. 


Cities and Towns. 


Total No. of 
votes for 
President. 


c 
•E 






o 
o 

w 


1 


3 

o 


a 


Avon, 


592 
.331 
316 
568 
366 
432 
450 
546 
756 
1,061 
560 
572 


393 
211 

189 
.360 
204 
2.^5 
263 
292 
449 
541 
323 
436 


199 
120 
127 
208 
162 
177 
187 
254 
307 
520 
237 
136 


389 
210 
188 
357 
201 
252 
265 
290 
434 
535 
319 
437 


204 
123 
130 
209 
165 
181 
186 
255 
322 
524 
243 
138 


288 
170 
167 
303 
162 
227 
201 
. 280 
344 
489 
256 
329 


189 
114 
130 
160 
142 
208 
178 
225 
314 
516 
199 
140 




Caledonia, 

Concsus, 




Geneseo, 

Grovcland,. . . . . . 

Leicester, 




Livonia, 

Mount Morris,. . . . 




Springwater, 

Yjork, 








Total Livingston, 


6,550 


3,916 


2,634 


3,877 


2,680 


3,216 


2,515 


132 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 1 , 282 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 1,197 " 

Do. Eradish, 1842 701 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 52 votes for President. 



84 



ELECTION RETD-nr.3. 



]>rADISO?f COI'NTY.— !0,003 Tiihabitants— 1810. 



Cities aud Towns. 



Brookfiekl, . , 
Cazenovia, . , 
De Ruytei-j . . 

Eaton, 

Fenner,. 

Georgetown, 
"Hamilton,. . . 
Lebanon, . . , 
Lenox, .... 
Madison, . . . 

Nelson, 

Smithfiekl, . 
Stockbriilge, , 
Sullivan, .... 



ELECTIOiV RETURNS, 1S.10. 



5 o„" 



824 
860 
470 
742 
413 
233 
832 
•196 
1,118 
562 
456 
308 
444 
869 



a 



411 

563 
239j 

3481 
244' 

no 

436 
104 
490 
249 
227 
123 
165 
357, 



413 
297 
131 
394 
169 
123 
396 
92 
628 
266 
229 
185 
279 
512 



Total Madison Co. 8,380 4,266 4,114 4,190.4,196 3,206 3,883 574 



402 
563 
234 
343 
239 
109 
434 
296 
472 
249 
221 
115 
163 
250 



w 



424 
301 
138 
399 
170 
126 
400 
103 
648 
259 
235 
191 
282 
520 



RETURNS, 1842. 



CQ 



296 
46 
169 
291 
193 
110 
382 
228 
344 
172 
147 
61 
114 
238 



383 
326 
155 
348 
151 
97 
387 
100 
629 
242 
203 
168 
230 
464 



40 
105 
23 
46 
17 
30 
16 
25 
42 
26 
15 
95 
30 
64 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 152 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 6 « 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 677 " 

Abolition or Liberty Part}', 1840 — 240 votes for President. 



MONROE COUNTY.— 34,902 Inhabitant!~1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



1st Ward, 
,2d Ward, 
1 3d Ward,.- 
4 4th Ward,... 
■5th Ward,.. 

Pi ^ 

Total Rochester,. 

Brighton, 

Chili, 

Clarkson, 

Gates, 

Greece, 

Henrietta, 

Irondequoit, 

Mendon, 

Ogden, 

Parma, 

Penfield, 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 






497 
608 
522 
531 

607 



2,765' 
394 
413 
73] 
255 
631 
432 
202 
688 
497 
526! 
579, 



268 
351 
259 
297 
351 



1,526 
221 
260 
355 
167 
283 
222 
96 
393 
256 
301 
349 



P5 



229 
257 
263 
234 
256! 



RETURNS, 1342. 



» 



224 
337 
276 
265 
324 



m 



258 
345 
304 
255 
365 



,239! 


1,426 


1,527 


173 


176 


189 


153 


244 


149 


376 


300 


.394 


88: 


142 


122 


34Si 


225 


364 


210 


189 


201 


106 


8S 


127 


295I 


293 


256 


241 


190 


215 


225 


234 


243 


230 


174 


226 



10 
13 
.7 
26 
23 



79 
4 

12 
1 
6 

20 
1 
37 
16 
14 
30 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



S5 



Perrinton, . . 
Pittsford, . . 

Riga, 

Rush, . . . . 
Sweden, . . . , 
Webster, . . . 
Wheatland, 



495 
377 
388 
387 
635 
434 
514 



299 
220 
207 
253 
430 
289 
312 



Total Monroe Co. 11,333 6,468) 4,834|, 6,439 4,894| 5,465 5,220| 273 



186 
157 
181 
134 
205 
145 
202 



226' 
191 
169 
183 
443 
226 
246 



194 
16« 
186 
128 
214 
157 
168 



20 
5 
4 
1 

8 
8 
7 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 1 , 634 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 1,545 " 

Do. Bradish, 1842, 245 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 77 votes for President. 



M0NTG03IERY COUNTY.— 35,818 Inhabitants.— 1810. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


H 


o 


g 

3 


•a 
a 


3 
O 

n 


J3 

•3 
a 

eq 


u 

s 
o 


i. 


Amsterdam, 

Canajoharie, 

Chfirleston 

Floriila, 


834 
904 
433 
739 
594i 
618 
625 
532 
60l! 
346 

6, 126: 


390 
438 
260 
321 
314 
260 
276 
212 
238 
119 


444 
466 
173 

418l 
280 
358j 
3491 
320! 
363 
227 


386 
433 
242 
309 
. 298 
250 
270 
210 
232 
115 


447 
474 
187 
429 
296 
270 
353 
322 
368 
232 


340 
369 
190 
276 
247 
236 
283 
219 
187 
101 


317 
439 
158 
356 
283 
276 
301 
285 
340 
197 


21 
6 


Glen, 




Mohawk, 




Palatine, 

Root, 




St. Johnsville, 




Total Montgomery 


2,828 


3,298! 


2,745 


3,378 


2,4-18 


2,961 


27 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840 470 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " '. 633 ' " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 513 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 9 votes for President. 



NEW- YORK.— 312,710 Inhabitants— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



1st Ward, 
2d Ward, 
3d Ward, 
4(h Ward, 
5th Ward, 
6th Ward, 
7th Ward, 
8lh Ward, 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1S40. 



2pj 



1,790 
1,316 
2, 156 
2,315 
2,621 
2,029 
3, 435 
4.096 



1,203 
889 
1,474 
1,138 
1,452 
806 
1,707 



587 

427 

682 
1,177 
1,169 
1,223 
1,728 
1,962 2, 134( 1,876 

8 



1, 143 

864 
1,417 
1,093 
1,387 

794 
1,659 



607 
443 
70S 
1,185 
1, 18.S 
1,2.TO 
1,7.33 
2,188 



RETURNS, 1843. 




964 

747 
1,264 

866 
1,261 

884 
1,546 
1,877 



695 
444 
746 
1,186 
1,182 
1,236 
l,752j 
l,982i 



5 
3 

13 
6 



86 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



9th Ward, . . 
10th Ward,, 
nth Ward, 
12th Ward, 
13th Ward,. 
14th Ward,. 
15th Ward, . 
16th Ward,. 
17th Ward,. 



3,500 
3, la- 
2, 383 
1,062 
2,793 
2,635 
2,483 
2,506 
2, 709 



1,515 
1,442 
715 
380 
1,138 
1,142 
1,686 
1,063 
1,267 



1 , 985 
1 , 743 
1,668 

682 
1,65 
1,393 

797 
1,443 
1.442 



Total N. York City, 42, 893 20, 958 21, 935| iO, 038 22, 285 19,975 22,017 75 



1,'432 
1 , 353 
653 
355 
1,080 
1,081 
1,619 
1,021 
1.211 



2,023 
1,776 
1,691 

695 
1, 669 
1,413 

809 
1,469 
1,458 



1,559 

1,232 

778' 

519 

1,007 

971 

1,580 

1,679 

1,241 



2, 0661 
1,634 
1,719 

571 
1,546 
1,410 

760 
1,472 
1,616 



Majority for Van Bm-en, 1840, 977 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 2,247 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 2,042 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 153 votes for President. 



NIAGARA COUNTY.— 31,132 luhabitauts— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



Cambria, . . . 
Hartland,. . 
Lewiston, . . 
Lockport, . . 
Newfane, . . 
Niagara,. . . 
Pendleton, . 
Porter, .... 
Royalton, . . 
Somerset, . . 
Wheatfield, 
Wilson,.... 



Total Niagara Co. 



ELECTIOV RETURNS, 1840. 



BJ o t^ 



383 
420 
403 
1,296 
445 
188 
179 
344 
659 
367 
205 
327 



218 
255 
242 
759 
204 
153 
118 
199 
391 
182 
114 
129 



165 
165 
161 
537i 

241 
35! 
6l! 

142! 
268 
185 
91 
198 



211 

252 
236 
745 
204 
150 
114 
198 
389 
180 
108 
131 



5,183 2,964 2, 219 1 2,918 2,2901 2,630 2,278 1.53 



m 



172 

16 

169 

560 

243 

39 

66 

146 

278 

156 

96 

199 



RETURNS, 1S42. 



180 
246 
174 
733 
185 
107 
110 
149 
353 
194 
104 
95 



148 

186 

180 

556 

236 

46 

66 

156 

295 

142 

83 

184 



16 
13 
16 
74 
3 
2 

1 
11 
14 

3 



Majority for Harrison 1840, 745 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 628 « 

Do. Eradish, 1842, 352 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 72 votes for President. 



ELECTION KETURNS. 



87 



ONEIDA rOUXTY 



°,rf.3J0 Inhabitants— 1-940. 



Cities and Towns. 



1st Ward,'. 
2d Ward, . . . 
3d W.inl, . . . 
4th Ward, . 

Total Utica City, 

Annsville, 

Augusta, 

Boonville, 

Bridg^ewaler, .... 

Camden, 

Deerfield, 

Florence, 

Floyd, 

Kirkland, 

T^ce, 

Marc}-, 

Marshall, 

New Hartford,. . . 

Paris, 

Remsen, 

Rome, 

Sangerficld, 

Steuben 

Trenton, 

Vernon, 

Verona, 

Vienna, 

Western, 

Westmoreland, . . 
Whitestown, . . . . 



ELKt'TION RETURNS, 1840. 






1,667 

36S' 
457 
79-2: 

313: 

452 
435 
207 
801 
605 
59(: 
336| 
441 
6-^2 
555 
304 
1,092 
530 
3?1 
fitil! 
592 
«72! 
4S]| 
576' 
603 
735 



883 
179 
207 
343 
160 
283 
175 
82 
86 
322 
154 
125 
208 
392 
315 
216 
522 
253 
196 
352i 
328 
395 
148 
1)3 
30 O' 
419: 



784 
189 
250 
449 
1531 
109 
200 
125 
215 
283 
442 
211 
233 
230 
240 
88 
570 
277 
135 
309 
264| 
477 
333 
463 
303 
316 



877 
177 
204 
333 
158 
279 
167 
82 
86 
323 
149 
126 
210 
391 
315 
214 
519 
24S 
195 
348 
326 
391 
1.52 
104 
305 
424 



785 
19] 
257i 
460 
154 
173 
271 
127 
219 
284 
453 
211 
235 
231 
244 
94 
578 
281 
138 
311 
270 
485 
334 
475 
315 
322 



RETURNS, 1642. 



m 



128 
163 
234 
271 



796 
126 
176 
268 
120 
165 
102 
47 
56 
290 
136 
67 
139 
307 
229 
140 
410 
192 
117 
227 
264 
351 
99 
57 
268 
359 



m 



138 
128 
200 
310 



776 
189 
229 
290 
149 
169 
183 
135 
172 
264 
392 
1.57 
176 
203 
225 
91 
569 
268 
124 
268 
254 
415 
339 
373 
280 
265 



To tal Oneida Co. . 14, 9241 7,156 7. 7681 1 7, 103| 7,898 5, .5581 6,955 622 



MMJorily forV^iii liiiren, 1840, •- • G\-2 votes. 

Do. Houck, •' 795 " 

Do. KoueU, 1843, 1,397 votes 

Abolition or Liberty Parly 1840—393 votes for President. 
*ln 1810, thir votes were not taken by wards. 



ONOND.\f;A COUNTY.— 37,911 Inhabitants— 1840. 



8 
19 
16 
35 

78 
13 
26 

7 

3 
61 

6 
54 

6 
28 
11 

2 
28 

9 
42 

9 
29 

6 
20 
35 
25 
24 
26 

1 
23 
49 





KI 

o t. . 

6£ = 

y^ ,r. ^ 


-KCTIO> 


J KETU 

a 1 

W 1 

7! 


-IN.S, 18 

■3 

a 


10. 

O 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


1 . 
1 c 
1 ° 

1 ■£ 
I 5 




a 
o 


a 


Camilus 


623 
' 500 


! 26! 
300 


362^ 
200 


267 
296 


360 
201 


211 
245 


345 
216 


8 


Cicero, 


32 



S8 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Clay, 

DeWitt,... 

Elbridge, .. 

Fabius, 

La Fayette, 
Lysander, . . 
Manlius, . . . 
Marcellus, . 
Onondaga, . 
Otisco, .... 
Pompey, . . . 
Salina, .... 
Skaneateles, 
SpafTord,.. . 

Tully, 

Van Biu'enj 



574 


312 


262 


573 


271 


30:: 


805 


334 


471 


474 


332 


142 


548 


205 


348 


890 


423 


467 


1,097 


479 


618 


589 


322 


267 


972 


537 


43;:- 


369 


204 


165 


901 


540 


361 


2,096 


1,101 


995 


766 


364 


402 


395 


135 


260 


344 


140 


204 


599 


297 


302 


13, 120 


6,557 


6,563 



310 
270 
322 
333 
203 
422 
481 
318 
540 
201 
534 
1,093 
356 
131 
140 
292 



268 
305 

488 

i4o: 

356 

482' 
609 
272 
435; 
170, 
370 
1,007 
407 
266 
210 
312 



346 
235 
265 
307 
196 
402 
452 
275 
531 
171 
460 
1,112 
325 
145 
109 
237 



202| 
276 
426 
138 
329 
477 
573 
284 
425 
159 
370 
1,1491 
402 
270 
192 
352 



1 

18 
19 
22 

6 

6 
31 

1 
10 
28 
19 
20 
11 

4 
22 

4 



Total Onond aga, . . il3, 120 6 , 557 6,563_6,509l 6,6581 6,024i 6,585l 262 

Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 6 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 149 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, ■, 561 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 105 votes for President. 



OIVTARIO COiriVTY.— 4.^,501 Tiihabitantp— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



Bristol, 

Canadiee, 

Canandaig'ua, . . . 
East Eloomfield, 
Farmington, . . . . 

Gorham, 

Hopewell, 

Manchester, 

Naples, 

Phelps, 

Richmond, 

Seneca, 

South Bristol, . . . 

Victor, 

West Bloomfield, 

Total Ontario Co. 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 



o °f 



393 
238 

1,033 
407 
376 
547 
392 
593 
463 

1,148 
350 

1,204 
250 
489 
396 



K 



232 
115 
609 
282 
295 
311 
212 
331 
231 
465 
217 
733 
156 
303 
336 



161 
12.*^ 
424 
125 

81 
236 
180 
262 
232 
683 
133 
471 

94 
186 

60 



8, 279'i 4,828 3.451 4,786' 3. 49( 



231 
112 
613 
28 J 
298 
307 
211 
325 
227 
458 
212 
726 
1d5 
300 
330 



n 



162 
125 
423 
125 

84 
241 
181 
26'* 
238 
690 
133 
474 

9L 
18P 

62 



RETUi.XS, 1842. 



166 

87 
48 
252 
234 
271 
142 
273 
160 
338 
147 
632 

9- 
257 
234 



153 

93 

440 

107 

90 

211 

192 

247 

237 

673 

122 

562 

83 

193 



3,770i 3,460 352 



13 
41 
21 
15 
22 
28 
11 
11 
28 
61 
14 
7 
25 



58 33 



Majority for Harrison , 1840, 1 , 377 votes. 

Do. Seward, « 1,296 '< 

Do. Bradish, 1842, 310 "' 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 152 votes for President. 



ELKCTIOX RETURNS. 



89 



ORANGE COUNTY 


—50,7.39 lull 


itbitajits— laiO. 






ELECTION RETURNS, )S40. 


RETURNS, 1843. 


Cities and Towns. 


o >- S 

III 

« O 1h 

H 


c 
o 

*^ 
a 


a 

<u 

3 
P5 
C 
a 
> 


t3 

■ tC 


o 

3 
O 


■a 
Id 
u 
CQ 


■ ^ 

o 

3 

o 

m 




IMoominjj Grove, . 

Cornwall J 

Crawford, 

Deerparlr, 

GoshcQ, 


398| 
5111 
427 
304 
660 
2741 
967| 
710, 
8411 
309 
1,525 
4SS 
835 
967 


219 
281 
157 
100 
316 
113 
349 
405 
409 
159 
803 
229 
359 
472 


179 
230 
270 
204 
344 
161 
6J8 
305 
432 
150 
722 
259 
476 
495 


221 
275 
154 
101 
315 
112 
342 
399 
410 
155 
796 
225 
350 
460 


177 

236 
270 
205 
349 
161 
624 
312 
432 
153 
734 
259 
485 
601 


144 
138 
131 

83 
301 

79 
246 
328 
325 
145 
569 
136 
280 
388 


136 
193 
263 
128 
341 
119 
434 
270 
358 
122 
701 
165 
394 
470 


8 
2 

1 


Haniptonburg-h, . . . 

Minisink, 

Monroe, 


1 


Montgomery, 

Mount Hope, 

Newbnrgh, 

New Windsor,. . . . 
Walkill, 


6 
1 


Warwick, 




Total Orang-e Co.. 


9,216' 


4,371 


4,845 


4,315 


4, 898 


3,293 


4,148 


19 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 474 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 583 " 

Do. Houek, 1812, 855 « 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840—3 rotes for President. 



ORLEANS COTJNrY.— 25,127 InlmMtaJifs— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 1342. 


Cities and Towns. 


-.= 0) 1 

o >^ 


c 
o 

CS 

E 




•a 
a 

VI 


3 
O 


.a 
•3 


.a 

3 
O 

pa 


C3 


Barre, 

Carlton, 


966' 
399' 
432 
475 
325, 
469 
669' 
467 
431 


629 
217 
236 
298 
162 
224 
389 
209 
242 


337 
18:' 
196 
177 
163 
245 
280 
.258 
189 


621 
215 
227 
291 

222 
385 
213 
240 


347 

189 
205 
182 
166 
250 
286 
266 
191 


516 
179 
181 
219 
139 
194 
348 
146 
221 


372 
177 
205 
165 
153 
244 
316 
271 
200 


25 
2 


Clarendon, 

Gaines, 


2 

26 


Kendall, 




Murray, 


3 


Rid^cway 

Shelby, 

Yates, 


13 

7 

13 






Total Orleans Co.. 


4,633 


2.C06 


2,027 


2, 578 


2, 082 


2,143 


2,103 


91 



Majority for Harriixpn, 1 840, 579 votes. 

bo. Seward, " 496 " 

Do. Bradish, 1842, 40 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 77 votes for President. 



8* 



90 ELECTION KETURNS. 

OSWEGO COUNTY.— 43,G19 Inhabitants— 1810. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. | 


RETl 

'■3 


JRNS, 1843. 


Cities and Towns. 


hi 


1 
§ 
1 

B 1 


a 

t 

s 
M 

a 

> 


13 

Id 
t 




PQ 


a 

PP 




Albion, 


263 
160 
102 
270 
451 
416 
423 
704 
343 
151 
749 
366 
271 
107 
742 
485 
393 
706 
634 
203 
157 


148! 

64 

31 

133 

223 

268 

155 

468 

238 

58 

414 

227 

128 

38 

384 

266 

148 

403 

237 

98 

63 


115 

96 

71 
137 
228 
148 
268 
236 
105 

93 
335 
139 
143 

69 
358 
219 
245 
303 
397 
106 

94 


142 

58 

30 

132 

221 

270 

153 

460 

234 

58 

406 

223 

128 

35 

366 

259 

144 

393 

234 

94 

61 


120 
101 

77 
140 
231 
148 
272 
253 
111 

99 
338 
149 
143 

365 
229 
249 
319 
40£ 
109 
95 


91 

62 

28 

87 

165 

250 

137 

399 

165 

44 

365 

154 

7b 

31 

289 

220 

120 

332 

189 

91 

70 


134 

83 
81 
172 
252 
150 
254 
287 
108 
124 
354 
134 
127 
• 62 
327 
206 
238 
358 
38-2 
109 
72 


7 


Amboy, 


2 


Boylston, 

Constantla, 

Granby, 


26 
27 


Hannibal, 

Hastings, 


35 

4 

94 


New Haven, 

Orwell, 


29 


Oswco, 


19 


Palermo, 

Parish, 


30 
6 


Redfield, 


?. 


Richland, 

Sandy Creekj 

Schrocppel, 

Scriba, 


22 
14 
15 
28 


Volney, 


87 


West Monroe, .... 
Williamstown, . . . 


6 


Total Oswego Co., 


8,099 


1 4, 192 


3,907 


4,101 


4, 024 


3,365 


\ 4,014 


383 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 285 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 77 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 649 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 166 votes for President. 



OTSEGO COUNTY.— 49,628 Inhabitants— 1840. 






ELECTION RETURNS, 1S40. 


1 RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


^ Q l~i 

H 


Harrison. 
Van Buren. 


•a 

& 




M 


■3 

(5 




3 





Burlington, 

Butternuts, 

Cherry Valley, . . . 
Decatur 


440 
838 
792 
226 
441 
304 
553 
479 
407 
625 
432 


159 281 
412 426 
428 364 
150 76 
221 220 
153 151 
267 285 
224 255 
197 210 
281 344 
195 2371 


153 
410 
420 
147 
216 
150 
265 
225 
191 
278 
195 


288 
427 
375 
80 
223 
156 
29] 
254 
215 
350 
242 


97 
238 
359 
105 
149 

94 
198 
200 
140 
197 
14] 


252 
393 
302 
73 
174 
118 
258 
244 
206 
292 
198 


3 
14 

5 


Edmeston, 

Exeter, 


17 


Hartwick, 

Laurens, 


5 


Maryland, 

Middlefield, 

Milford, 


1 
2 
2 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



91 



New Lisbon, 


406 


131 


275 


121 


283 


74 


247 


4 


Oneonta, 


405 


140 


265 


134 


272 


134 


25] 


1 


Otego, 


424 
909 

264 


211 
412 
124 


213 
497 
140 


205 
405 
124 


217 
505 
145 


168 
331 

88 


219 
444 
133 


1 


Otseg'O, 


7 


Pittsfieia, 




Plainfieia, 


3-28 


162 


166 


158 


170 


137 


146 


4 


Richfielil 


395 


228 


]67 


224 


173 


184 


129 


11 


Springfield, 


513 


231 


282 


222 


289 


179 


272 


2 


Unadilla, 


504 


151 


353: 


143 


356 


109 


271 


8 


Westford, 


305 


161 


144 


158 


143 


136 


126 




Worcester, 


448 


218 


230 


218 


236 


152 


201 


1 


Total Otseg-o Co., 


10,437 


4,896 


5,581 


4,762 


5,690 


3,600 


4,949 


88 



Majority f(^r Van Burcn, 1840, l-2o votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 92S " 

Do. Boiick, 1S42, • 1,349 " 

Abolition or Liherty Party, 1940—00 votes for President. 

rUTNAM COTIVTY.— ISjSS.'j Iiihahitants— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1S40. 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


No. of 
s lor 
ideiit . 


d 
o 


a 

o 


•d 




J3 








Total 
vote 
Pres 


1 






o 


'•3 

(3 

m 


O 




Carmel, 


475! 
378, 
270! 


205 
155 
123 


27V. 
223 
147 


206 
154 
122 


275 
222 
150 


134 
102 

108 


254 


Kent, 


133 


Patterson, 


I27i 


Phillipstown, . . . . 


637 


191 


446 


• 193 


443 


100 


548; 


Putnam Valle),.. . 


355 


63 


29;: 


56 


295 


31 


236 


Southeast, 


388 


183 


205 


181 


208 


142 


155 


Total Putnam Co., 


2.5p3l 


920 


1,58b 


912 


1,593 


617 


1,453 



M.ijority for Van buren, lb40, 
Do. I'oiitk, '•' 

Do. Bouck, 1^^4•^ 



663 votes. 
CSl " 
836 votes. 



QUEKNS COIJIVTY.— :J0,324 Inhabitants— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



ELKtrnON RKTURNS, 1810. 



6-= = 

^ o ^ 



Flushing, 

Hempstead, 

Jamaica, 

Newtown, 

North Hempstead, 
Oyster Bay, 



Total Queens Co., 



56!) 
1,53:2 
657 
614 
655 
1.045 



5, 072 



280 
891 
301 
235 
304 
511 



28.9 

64 

356 

379 

351 

534 



2,522 2.. 550 



283 
891 
291 
230 
300 
492 



M 



293 
639 
359 
382 
355 
551 



2.487 2,579i 



RETURNS, 184i. 



m 



224 
850 
272 
194 
217 
319 



288 
691 
405 
367 
340 
536 



2,077' 2.625 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 

Do. Bouck, " 

Do. Bouck, 134-.', 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1S40— 2 voles for President. 



28 voles. 
92 " 
ft43 " 



92 ELECTION RETURNS. 

RENSSEL.\IOR COUNTY.— G0,259 Inlsalnlaiits— 1840. 



22^ 




ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. | 


RETT 

'■3 
a 


JRNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


Total No. of 

votes for 

President. 


c 
o 


£3 

(2 




.is 

o 
P3 


p 
o 
PQ 


<u 


Mst Ward, 


473 


250 


223 


250 


226 


234 


241 


2 




2a AVai-d, 


593 


357 


236 


353 


243 


310 


285 


10 


.; 


3d Ward, 


4J3 


357 


156 


356 


161 


323 


142 


6 


.ti 


4th Ward, 


543 


339 


204 


334 


208 


322 


231 


16 




5th Ward, . . . 


101 


51 


50 


49 


52 


57 


53 




o 


6th Ward,.... 


156 


101 


55 


99 


57 


107 


67 






7th Ward, .... 


372 


231 


241 


231 


240 


222 


262 


16 




8th Ward, 


124 


78 


46 


77 


46 


107 


63 


1 


Total Troy City,.. 


2, 975 


1,764 


1,211 


1,749 


1,233 


1,682 


1,344 


51 


Ber 
Bn 


lin, 


415 
617 


197 
296 


218 
321 


197 

292 


220 
333 


191 

283 


204 
307 




nswiclf, 




Gia 
Grp 


fton, 


400 
705 


145 

248 


255 

457 


144 

245 


258 
462 


119 
200 


252 
436 




enbush, 


2 


Ho 
Lai 




695 
657 


372 
390 


323 
267 


372 
384 


323 
269 


354 
377 


276 
264 


5 


isingburghj .... 




Nas 
Pet 


sail 


651 

430 


400 
140 


251 
290 


394 
144 


255 
289 


377 
137 


256 
292 




ersburah, 


2 


Pittstown, 


804 


431 


373 


424 


379 


411 


361 




Sand Lake, 


865 


436 


429 


426 


440 


396 


473 


15 


Schaghticoke, 


607 


327 


280 


320 


287 


318 


274 


2 


Schodack, 


794 


337 


457 


336 


461 


306 


409 




Stephentown, . . . 


561 


269 


292 


261 


302 


215 


289 


1 


Tot 


al Rensselaer, . 


11,176 


5,752 


5,424 


5,688 


5,511 


5,366 


5,437 


78 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 328 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 177 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 71 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 33 votes for President. 

RICHMOND COUNTY.— 10.965 Inhabitants— 1810. 





ELECTION RETURNS, IS40. ■ 


RETT 

•5 

a 


JRNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


hi 

rt Q f- 
o ---^ 
H 


o 

W 


a 

i-t 

a 
PQ 
a 
a 
> 


•T3 


O 

PQ 


.a 

5 

m 




Castleton, 


633 

480' 
250' 
391 


304 
267 
121 
211 


329 
213 
129 
180 


302 
261 
120 
204 


343 
217 
130 
184 





.... 




Northfield, 

Southfield, 

Westfield, 




Total Riclimond,.. 


1,754 


903 


Boll 


1 887 


874 


814 


989 





Majority for Harrison, 1840, 52 votes. 

Do. Seward, « 13 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 175 " 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



93 



ROCKLAND COirNTY.— 11,97.''. Inhabitants— 1840. 



, 


ELECTION RETURNS, ISIO. | 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


Total No. of 
votes for 
President. 


p 

a 
X 


S3 

3 

a 

> 


. -a 


M 

a 

3 
O 

pq 




o 

3 
O 


0. 


Clarkstown, 

Haverstraw, 

Orangetown, 

Raniapo, 


569, 
610, 
59ll 
624' 


52 
230 
14S 
201 


517 
374 
443 
323 


50 518 
234 377 
142; 448 

202; 330 


22 
150 

78 
117 


344 
254 
221 
211 




Total Rockland, . . 


2, 294 


0371 l,657l 


628 1,673 


367 


1,030 





Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 1, 020 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 1,045 " 

Do. Bouck. 1842, 663 " 



St. LAWRENCE COUNTY.— 56,706 Inhabitants— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



Biasher, . . . , 

Canton, 

Dc Kalb,.... 
De Peyster, . 
Eilwards, . . . 
Fowler, . . . . 
Gouverneur, . 
Hammond, . . 
Hermon,. , . . 
Hopkinton,.. 
Lawrence, . . 

Lisbon, 

Louisville,. . 
Macomb*,. . . 

Mailrid, 

Massena,. . . , 
Morristown,. 

Norfolk, 

Oswcgatchie, 
Parishville,. . 
Pierrepont, ., 
Pitcairn, . . .. 
Potsilam,. . ., 
Rossie, 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1S40. 


RETURiNS, 1842. 


o t. s 

^ o ^ 


a 
o 

tB 


a' 

« 

3 

m 

a 


-d 

tH 

s 

w 


3 
O 

cq 


J3 

cq 


3 
O 

P3 


Si 


223 




80 


143 


78 


148 


63 


131 




681 




255 


426 


253 


428 


192 


461 


5 


282 




139 


143 


138 


147 


37 


149 


19 


196 




90 


106 


91 


105 


57 


106 




145 




51 


9J 


51 


96 


40 


79 


12 


317 




96 


221 


93 


225 


49 


207 


32 


477 




279 


19S 


280 


200 


150 


180 


15 


337 




190 


147 


184 


153 


133 


159 


1 


219 




141 


78 


140 


81 


58 


98 


28 


229 




119 


110 


121 


108 


84 


106 


7 


339 




137 


202 


136 


206 


80 


180 


21 


497 




355 


142 


355 


141 


216 


162 


11 


259 




111 


148 


111 


150 


83 
34 


159 
98 


4 
6 


666 




282 


384 


279 


387 


219 


343 


3 


381 




208 


173 


210 


175 


146 


179 


1 


503 




x:90 


213 


287 


217 


181 


164 


1 


301 




175 


126 


173 


132 


142 


124 


10 


857 




517 


340 


509 


350 


413 


385 


9 


411 




230 


181 


229 


187 


208 


206 




270 




133 


137 


133 


137 


85 


125 


11 


70 




30 


40 


30 


39 


00 


50 


8 


881 




414 


467 


413 


472 


260 


487 


23 


201 




75 


126 


74 


128 


38 


114 


4 



* Taken from Gouverneur and Morristown in 1841. 



94 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Russell 


230 
582 


72 
334 


15.8 

248 


72 
335 


158 
250 


40 

289 


16S 
244 


90 


Stockholm, 


5 


Total St.Lawrence 


9,554 


\ 4,803 


4,751 


4,775 


4,821 


3,319 


4,864 


256 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 52 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 46 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 1,545 " 

Abolition or Liberty Parlj', 1840 — 41 votes for President. 



SARA.TOGA COUNTY.— 40,553 InhaMtants— 18iO. 



Cities and Towns. 



Ballston, 

Charlton, , 

Clifton Park, 

Corinth, , 

Day, 

Edin])urgh, 

Galway, 

Greenfleki, , 

Hadley, 

Halfmoon 

Malta, ...' 

Milton, 

Moreau, 

Northumberland, 
Providence,. . . . , 

Saratoga, ... . , 

Saratoga Springs, 

Stillwater, 

Waterford, 

Wilton , 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 



•:2 2 <u 



423 
376 
530 
281 
18:J 
305 
529 
662 
174 
494 
308 
644 
.325 
363 
312 
527 
644 
537 
367 
306 



18] 
229 
306 
163 
55 
143 
264 
389 
139 
234 
174 
3I9 
174 
171 
214 
33i 
327 
268 
196 
138 



242 
147 
224 
118 
127 
16-- 
26;, 
273 

3l 
260 
134 
325 
151 
19i 

98 
19. 
317 
269 
171 
168 



Total Saratoga Co. 8, 289 4,416 3,873 4,309 3,970| 3,813 3,953 46 



tJ2 



170 
2!^8 
301 
159 
51 
141 
258 
375 
136 
225 
172 
310 
170 
170 
205 
331 
325 
262 
188 
132 



P5 



253 
148 
221 
119 
183 
162 
27C 
285 
37 
267 
137 
33" 
153 
195 
108 
194 
324 
276 
185 
173 



RETURNS, 1&13. 



« 



169 
199 
292 
137 
46 
109 
211 
325 
^1 
210 
153 
274 
159 
155 
172 
303 
313 
214 
172 
109 



n 



217 
145 
214 
116 
150 
171 
250 
280 
47 
225 
127 
357 
160 
179 
100 
217 
369 
265 
175 
189 



11 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, '. 543 votes 

Do. Seward, " 339 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 140 « 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 16 votes for President. 



SCKOHARIE COUNTY.— 32,358 IiihnMlants— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1S40. 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


o t- ti 


a 
a 


V 

3 






J2 










« 


M 


v> 


^ 


.2 


ji 


Rl 




=« c £ 


a 


a 


? 


5 


-a 

2 


o 


0> 




H 


K 


> 


m 


P9 


CO 


m 


M 


Blenheim, 


527 


300 


227 


281 


248 


239 


234 






478 
375 


291 
178 


187 
197 


269 
173 


209 
201 


216 
126 


195 




Carlisle, 


198! 



ELECTION RETURNS, 



95 



Cobleskill, . . . 
Conesville, . . . 

Fulton, 

Jefferson, . . . . 
MidiUeburgli, 
Schoharie, . , . 

Seward, 

Sharon, 

Summit, 



Total Schoharie, . 



700 


341 


359 


322 


378i 


264 


374 


317 


1.34 


183 


131 


188 


96 


168 


323 


116 


307 


93 


334 


63 


340 


387 


228 


159 


218 


173 


172 


151 


715 


312 


403 


277 


438 


210 


443 


1,048 


478 


570 


452 


592 


428 


568 


411 


203 


208 


203 


208 


186 


207 


479 


158 


321 


149 


33ol 


95 


289 


380 


156 


224 


144 


240| 


84 


208 


6,240 


2,895 


3, 345 


2,712 


3,544! 


2,179 


3,375 



12 
1 



24 



Majority for Van Euren, 1840, 450 votes. 

Do.- Bouck, " 832 « 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 1,196 « 

Abolition or Liberty Parly, 1840 — 26 votes for President. 



SCIIEIVECTADY COUNTY.— 17,387 Inhabitants— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


Total No. of 
votes for 
President. 


S 

X 


B 

5 

a 
> 


•J 



3 



•3 
1-1 


a 



M 




^ r 1st ^V^ard, . . 
2 1 2d Ward, .. 
S ^ 3d Ward, . . 
1 i 4th Ward, .. 


2661 
322j 
231! 

4451 


148 

•211 

160 

273 


118 
111 

71 
172 


144 
202 
150 
264 


121 
119 

80 
180 


130 

167 

88 

269 


129 
164 
112 
215 


1 

1 


Schenectady City,. 

Duanesburgh, 

Glenville, 

Niskayuna, 

Princctown, 

Rotterdam, 


1,264 
648 
592 
151 
230 
444 


792 
262 
265 
79 
141 
213 


472 
38t: 
327 
7k 
89 
231 


760 
259 
25:^ 
70 
140 
212 


500 
397 
342 
76 
91 
237 


654 
222 
258 
55 
107 
160 


620 
362 
317 
87 
85 
228 


2 
3 


Total Schenectady, 


i 3,329 


1,752 


1,577 


1,699 


1,643 


1,456 


1,699 


5 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 175 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 56 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 243 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 5 votes for President. 

.SENECA COUNTY.— 34,874 Inliabitants— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. | 


RETURNS, 194'2. 


Cities and Towns. 


Total No. of 
votes for 
President. 


1 
1-1 

IB 

X 


a 

s 
m 

a 


•T3 


3 



'■3 


3 



00 




365 
804 
312 
475 


185 
425 
168 
157 


180 
379 
144 
318 


181 
414 
164 
153 


184 
386 
151 
321 


160 
326 
140 
117 


183 
415 
150 
334 












Lodi 


1 



96 



ELECTION RETUKNS. 



Ovid, 

Romulus, . . . 
Seneca Falls, 

Tyre, 

Varick, 

Waterloo, . . . 



535 
413, 
790 
309l 
383! 
542: 



310 

227 
387 
132 
19S 
277 



22511 

196 

403 

177 

185 

265 



Total Seneca Co . . 4,9380 2,466 2,472 2,411 2,5271 1,976 2,542 85 



308 
221 
373 
132 
192 
273 



227 
199 
415 
178 
191 
275 



280 
186 
282 
81 
173 
231 



215 

184 
405 
178 
189 
289 



4 
32 
41 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 6 votes. 

Do. Bouck, « 116 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 566 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 13 votes for President. 



STEUBEX COUNTY.— 46,138 luhabitants— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



Addison, 

Bath, 

Bradford, .... 
Cameron, ... . 
Campbell, ... 
Canisteo, .... 

Caton, , 

Cohocton, . . . 
Dansville, . . , 

Eiyvin, 

Greenwood,. . 
Hornby, . . . . , 
Hornellsville, 

Howard, 

Jasper, 

Lindley, .... 
Orange, . . . . , 
Painted Post, 
Prattsburgh, . 
Pulteney, . . . , 

Reading, 

Troupsburgh, 

Tyrone, 

Urbana, 

Wayne, 

Wheeler, . . . . 
Woodhull, ... 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. | RETURNS, 184i 



IS «2 



384 
885 
297 
272 
201 
203 
151 
673 
490 
175 
204 
201 
405 
633 
242 
127 
333 
345 
465 
345 
289 
196 
429 
365 
261 
275 
155 



158 
43] 

97 
174 
153 

86 

71 
332 
203 
107 

57 
108 
190 
320 

86 

74 
108 
207 
176 
142 
154 

59 
]54 
166 
102 
100 

66 



226! 

454 i 
200' 



117 

80 
241 
287 

68 
1471 

93 
215 
313 
156 

53 
225 
138 
289 
203 
135 
137 
275, 
199 
159 
175 

89 



Total Steuben Co.. 8,901 4,081 4,820! 4,007 4,896' 3,236(4,393 128 



155 

418 

94 

17.4 

154 

84 

68 

327 

207 

106 

56 

102 

188 

318 

85 

73 

103 

203 

171 

239 

156 

54 

151 

162 

101 

95 

63 



n 



227 
460 
200 

99 

49 
120 

84 
245 
289 

69 
148 

98 
216 
319 
156 

53 
227 
146 
295 
206 
139 
140 
278 
202 
158 
18I| 

921 



cq 



127 

334 

77 

175 

110 

106 

44 

258 

124 

106 

45 

112 

161 

252 

68 

61 

64 

265 

129 

72 

118 

32 

106 

104 

82 

55 

49 



n 



209 
454 
185 

60 

45 
•93 

73 
232 
233 

60 
104 

75 
230 
281 

99 

54 
208 
161 
268 
162 
153 
132 
245 
177 
128 
164 
108 



20 
19 



2 
1 

4 

3 

10 
24 
7 
18 
1 
8 
1 
1 



Majority for Van Buren, 18 10, 739 votes. 

Do. Bouck, « 889 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 1,157 « 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 42 votes for President. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 87 

SUFFOliK COUNTY.— 32, ?00 Inhabitants— 18J0. 





ELECTION RliTU 


!NS, Is 


iO. 


KKTUKNS, iy4->. 


Cities and Towns. 




c 
o 


a 

3 






J3 








-2? 




w . 


Bi 


^ 




^ 


a 




5 o^ 




a 


& 


s 
o 




3 


S 




H 


a 


>■ 


M 


m 


W 


PQ 


•/.' 


Urookliaven, 


1,284 


4SI 


803 


480 


805 


311 


710 




Easthampton, .... 


364 


8! 


28o, 


74 


289 


37 


218 




Huntington, 


1,231 


3()5 


SfiG 


357 


872 


• 158 


691 






32o 
479 


129 
239 


196 

240, 


128 
233 


197 
247 


58 
111 


174 
198 




Riverhead, 




Shelter Island,, . . . 


68 


38 


30 


38 


30 


16 


. 18 




Smithtnwn, 


881 


1(52 


219 


155 


226 


46 


140 




Soutliampton, 


],024 


640 


384 


636 


3,S7 


387 


293 




Southholtl, 


741 


280 


461 


275 


, 465 


213 


427 


Total F^uffblkCo.. J 


5, 8971 


2,415 


3.482 


2, 376 


3,518 


1,3.38 


2, 869 5 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 
Do. Bouck, " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 



1,067 votes. 
1,142 " 
1,531 « 



SULLIVATV COUNTY.— 15,629 Inhabitants— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1S40. 


RETURNS, 1S42. 


Cities and Towns. 


Total No. of 
votes for 
President. 


d 

o 

X 


a 

(5 

a 
a 
> 


73 

a 


3 

o 


X3 
■3 

2 


■i 

3 
o 
eq 




Bethel, 


268 
127 

*346| 
9l! 
315| 
236 
689! 
315 
166 
600 


10] 
21 

210 
17 

167 
58 

3.54 

134 
85 

328 


168 
106 

136 

74 
148 
178 
335 
181 

81 
272 


9,-^ 
22 

*2io 

16 
169 

58 
351 
131 

83 
331 


170 
105 

"isei 

75' 
1471 
178 
340 
184' 

84 
268 


41 
14 
4 

156 
15. 

145 
38 

314 
66 
62 

272 


164 

73 

40 

134 

60 

110 

148 

297 

146 

51 

247 




Cochecton, 

Collikoon,* 

Fallsburarh, ...... 

Forresburgh 

Liberty, 

Lumberland, 

IMutuakating', 

Neversink, 

Rockland, 

Thompson, 




Total Sullivan Co., 


3,154 l,475l ],679l 


1,469 1,6S7| 1,1 17| l,470l 


14 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 204 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 218 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 353 « 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 9 votes for President. 
* Taken from Liberty, March aO, 1843. 



9 



98 



ELECTION KETURNS. 



TIOGA. COUNTY. - 


-20,.52 


7 Inliabitants 


—1810 




^ 




ELECTION RETURNS, 1940. | 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


CO o ^ 
O !>^ 


s 
o 


d 

3 

> 


7°^ 


3 
O 

cq 


■3 
n 


3 
O 

M 


t 

in 


Barton, 

Berkshire, •. 


465 
198 
673 
347 
359 
1,096 
200 
298 
469 


144 
82 
266 
177 
205 
569 
80 
184 
218 

1,925 


321 
116 
407 
170 
154 
527 
120 
114 
251 

2,180 


137 
82 
264 
176 
205 
568 
70 
181 
217 

1,900 


329 
117 
410 
171 
151 
528 
126 
118 
253 

2,203l 


152 
62 
200 
187 
212 
549 
57 
168 
194 


356 
111 
403 
188 
150 
552 
134 
130 
238 


2 


Newark 




Nichols, 






14 


Richford, 


1 


Tioga 


5 






Total Tioga Co. . . 


4,105 


1,781 


2,262 


22 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 255 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 303 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 481 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party _, 1840 — 5 votes for President. 



TOMPKINS COUNTY— 37,948 Inhabitants— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



Caroline, ...... 

Danby , 

Dryden, 

Enfield,....:... 

Groton, 

Hector, 

Ithaca, 

Lansing, 

Newfield, 

Ulysses, 

Total Tompkins, 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1840. 



;s<«.-2 






495 
5L^ 

1,08 
463 
699 

1,118 

ijin 

716 
719 

598 



222 
292 
567 
31S 
360 
626 
567: 
252 
367 
398 



273 

226 

51 

145 

339 

492 

650 

464 

352 

200 



218 
290 
552 
308 
354 
609 
561 
250 
365 
396 



7,527 3, 9691 3,558 3,903 3,632 3,395] 3,619 103 



p= 



277 
230 
534 
154 
345 
50] 
556 
471 
359 
205 



RETURNS) 1842. 



pq 



207 
284 
479 
287 
295 
552 
437 
201 
274 
379 



280 
237 
503 
150 
310 
516 
596 
454 
365 
208 



Majority for Harrison, 1840, 411 votes. 

Do. Seward, « 271 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 224 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840—32 votes for President 



ELECTION RETURNS. 99 

ULSTER COUNTY.— 15,822 luliabitants— 1840. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1S40. ( 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


Total No. of 
votes for 
President. 


1 ^ 

5 

u 


a 

u 

3 
« 

e 

• > 


-i 

a 


M 
o 

3 
O 

PQ 


■ -3 


3 
O 

pq 




Esopiis, 


385 

409 

1,1591 


270 
233 
574 


115 

i7e 

48.-. 


267 
2:iU 
572 


11!' 

180 
485 


257 
184 

49! 


145 
160 

453 




Hurley, 




Kitii^ston, 




^^a^blcto\vn, 


75G| 


361 


395 


35!) 


398 


270 


296 




Marlborou^li, .... 


489 


253 


236 


248 


240 


19.^ 


219 




New Paltz, 


1, 1-23I 


. 621 


502 


613 


509 


379 


438 




Olive, 


41.2 
440, 


20f' 
252 


203 

18S 


213 

2.^4 


204 
185 


155 
189 


170 
198 




Plaltekill, 




Rochester, 


510 


211 


299 


208 


303 


101 


215 




Saugerties, 


1,066 


513 


553 


512 


557 


376 


536 




Shandakon, 


'262 


126 


136 


125 


137 


55 


104 




Shawangunk, 


776 


314 


4i;;2 


307 


- 461 


267 


437 




Wawarsing, 


785 


389 


396 


387 


398 


323 


396 




Woodstock, 


299^ 


165 


131 


163 


136 


106 


120 




Tofal Ulster Co.,.. 


8,771 


4,491 


4,280 


4, 458 


4,3121 


3,. 351 


3,887 


1 



IMajority for Harrison, 1840, 211 votes. 

Do. Seward, " 146 " 

Do. Bouc-k, 1842 636 " 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 2 votes for President. 



W ATtREA^ COI IVTY.— 13,1!2 I»ilia!»jtnists— IS 40. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1S40. 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


Total No. of 
votes for 
Governor. 


a 
o 
.2 

« 


c 

:5 
a 
a 

> 


•a 

t 
CO 


3 
O 
PQ 




3 

o 

m 




Atliol 


236 
230 
lirl 
328 
128 
IIS 
256 
258. 
736 
288 






141) 

97 

42 

97 

58 

31 

in 

194 

477 

35 


!)» 
133 
110 
2il 

7(, 

87 
142 

64 
259 
25/ 


95 

101 

27 

77 

5(i 

26 

93 

1/2 

483 

33 


1.^0 

15i 

203 
63 
79 

152 
61 

306 

2:^2^ 


10 


Bolton, 


1 


Caldwell, 

Chester, 


14 


Ha"'ue, 


? 




7 


Johiisburgh, 

liUzerne 


9 


Queensbiiry, 

Warrensburgh, . . . 


5 


Total Warren Co., 


2, 730 


1,306 1, 


411 


1,285 


1,445 


1,143 


1,497 


48 



Majority for Van Riirert, 1810, v 105 votes. 

]5o. Bouck, " 160 " 

Do. Bouck, 1812, 354 « 

Abolition or Liberly Party, 1840 — 5 votes for President. 



100 ELECTION RETURNS. 





ELECTION RETURNS, 1640. 


KKrUNKS, 184a. 


Cities and Towns. 


ra O t- 


c 



15 


1 

1 V 

1 K 
1 







-3 

(5 






So 




592 
444 
134 
6 ( 
667 
341' 
703 
719 
17:^ 
338 
487| 

; 60 

526 
140 
5;, 7 
489 
640 


418 
279 

50 
469 
4 88 
197 
389 
429 

77 
271 
294 
201 
34;> 
114 
352 
281 
417 


174 
IGii 

84 
20.1 
179 
149 
314 
290 

90 
J67 
193 
159 
181 

2G 
215 
208 
22 r 


41S 
278 

50 
462 
484 
201 
389 
425 

74 
269 
292 
197 
335 
113 
352 
275 
418 


180 
167 

85 
206 
182 
148 
314 
296 

98 
172 
19 
16 
19: 

27 
218 
210 
210 


341 

5',. 
314 
361 
171 

282 

H- 
207 
204 
Uir 

65 

29;_ 
249 


. I 
14 
'/2 
162 
205 
1.... 

288 
9d 
152 
185 
1 • 
194 
19 
201 
242 
242 


34 


Cambridge, 


1 


Easton, 


!8 


Fort Ann, 

Fort Edwaril, .... 

Granville, 

Greenwich, 

Hampton, '. . 

Hartford, 


12 

2 
8 

32 
1 

28 




16 


JacksOii, 

Kingsb\uy, 

Putnam, . .' 


11 

4 

90 




26 


White Creec, 

Whitehall, 


2 
2 


Total Wash inn-ton, 


8,09ri 


?<, 07 1 


3,02.U 


5.032 


3,067 


4,08'-' 


■\on- 


217 



Sljiority for Harrison, 1840, 2, 047 \ i. 

Do. Seward, " 1,965 

Do. Bradish, 1842, 1, 076 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 28 votes for President. 



WAYN 


E rOTTNTY. 


—42,0 


'■)7 Jtsl»al)ita5i< 


s— IRJO. 


tii-2. 


. 


ELECTION RETURNS, IS 


0. 


RETURNS, 1 


Cities and Towns. 


,_- c- /^ 




'C 

t.1 


c 

3 
a 


•3 

03 





J3 
Pi 



p= 


B 




l,n|- 
. 437 
84 ' 
361 
84!^ 
44C 
388 
378 
64C 
400 
353 
854 
359 


452 
22! 
552 
157 
443 
28.'-' 
237 
255 
213 
203 
165 
447 
179 


560 
216 
2<'2 
204 
40? 
16;:: 
151 
123 
427! 
197 
18S 
407 
1801 


449 
220 
549 
156 
43« 
279 
2:-i5 
250 
311 
197 
157 
443 
173 


57( 

218 

^01 

206 

407 

160 

155- 

1.35 

432 

201 

197 

416 

I861 


385 
184 

45: 

131 

396 
251 
194 
1!»7 
235 
169 
115 
S7J 
132 


681 
202 
295 
211 
422 
171 
124 
122 
414 
182 
180 
421 
147 


3 


Butler, 


6 


Galen 


11 




13 




1 


Macedon, 


17 

18 




?5 


Palmyra, 


16 
16 


Savannali, 

Sodu« 


6 

08 


Walworth, 


22 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



101 



Williamson, 

Wolcott, 


39.3' 

495^ 


187 
215 


206 
280 


187 
214 


211 

:l84 


139 
203 


21« 
300 


8 
2 






Total Wayne Co., 


8,316 


4,309 


3, 9971 


4,258 


4,085 


3,558 


4,010 


192 



Majority for Harrison, 1S40, .312 votes. 

Do. Seward, •' 173 " 

Do. Bouclc, 184':, 45'2 votes. 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1S40 — 36 votes for President. 

WESTCHESTER COUNTY.— 4«,0.SG Inhabitants— 1810. 



Cities and Towns. 



Bedford, 

Cortland, 

Eastchester, . . . . 
Grcenburgh, , . . . 

Harrison, 

Lewisborough, . . 
IHamaroneck,. . .. 
Mount Pleasant, . 

New Castle, 

New Rochelle, .. 

North Castle, 

North Salem, . . . . 

Pclharn, 

Poundridge, 

Rye, 

Scarsdale, 

Somers, 

Westchester, . . . . 

White Plains, 

Yonkers, 

Yorktown, 



ELECTIOiV RETURNS, 1840. 



RETURNS, 1942. 






5o, 



58 
1,003 
240 
676 
173 
3(i() 
15^ 
1, Kfe- 
307 
282 
393 
269 
61 
289 
369 
58 
432 
594 
183 
450 
491 



380 
496 

74 
284 

75 
263 

59 
427 
187 
120 
156 
160 

13 
149 
174 

25 
256 
259 

77 
117 
332 



201 

507 

166 

292' 

98, 

97| 

95; 

735; 

120, 

162i 

237 

109 

48 

140 

19J 

33 

176 

33.3 

116 

33:? 

153 



Total Westchester, 8,437| 4.083 4.354 4,018 4,401 3,109 3,786 



3 79 
4S6 

71 
275 

73 
267 

5< 
426 
187 
116 
117 
ISO 

10 
145 
170 

23 
256 
252 

75 
112 
330 



199 

517 

172 

298 

98 

95 

97| 

733 

122 

164 

245 

109 

49 

141 

199 

34 

178 

337 

117 

335 

162 



« 



323 

4()( 
4.- 

2.36 
52 

202 
30 

357 

138 
67 

105 

125 
13 
99 

140 
18 

193 

202 
77 
57 

221 



187 

422 

125 

290 

93 

70 

74 

731 

105 

145 

210 

88 

31 

83 

199 

30 

144 

272 

112 

213 

162 



Mnjority for Van Buren, 1840, 

Do. Boucli, " 

Do. Rouck, 1842, 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1340 — 9 voles for President. 



271 votes. 
383 " 
C77 " 



WYO.ilING COUNTY.*— 39,GG3 Inhabitants.— 1840. 





ELbXTlON RETURNS, 1840. 


RETURNS, 1842. 


Cities and Towns. 


o — .2 


d 

.i 

a 


3 

m 

e 


•a 

72 


o 
3 
O 

P5 


•3 


3 
O 


5o 


Attica, 

Bennington, 

Castile, 





^ 








182 
106 
165 


160 
196 
203 


3 
73 



Erected in 1841, from the south part of Genesee. 
•9 



102 



rLECTION RETURNS. 



China, 

Covington, , . . 
GainesvillCj . . 

Java, 

Middlebury,, . 
Orangeville, .. 

Perry, 

Shekton, 

Warsaw, 

Wethersfield, . 



Total Wyoming,. 



75| 


62 


53 


I55I 


76 


5 


154' 


190 


14 


n\ 


184 


19 


2371 


151 


3 


120| 


51 


ti 


304| 


161 


79 


174 


127 


14 


207 


202 


54 


107 


126 


12 



2,0t:4 1,889 335 



Majority for Bradish, 1842, 175 votes. 

YATES COUNTY.— 20,414 Inhabitants— 1840. 



Cities and Towns. 



Barrington, . 
Benton,. . . . 

Italy, ...... 

Jerusalem,. 
Middlesex, . 

Milo, 

Potter, 

Starkey, . . . 



Total Yates Co. . 



ELECTION RETURNS, 1S40. 



358 
782 
311 
605 
284 
852 
466 
50J 



4,159 



K 



187 
417 
100 
305 
158 
384 
236 
285 



171 
36; 
211 
301' 
12(^ 
468 
23(1 
21f 



2,072 2,087 



18) 
416 

301 
16(; 
3JHi 
23(- 
287 



2. 059 



m 



177 

37.'. 
221 
SOL 
12t 
48:: 
23l 
22-i 



2, 145 



RETURNS, 1642. 



P3 



J56 
373 
71 
191 
139 
275 
186 
230 



1,621 



n 



166 
359 
222 
243 
105 
466 
203 
215 



1.979 



17 
6 
37 
14 
58 
17 



162 



Majority for Van Buren, 1840, 15 votes. 

Do. Bouck, " 86 " 

Do. Bouck, 1842, 358 « 

Abolition or Liberty Party, 1840 — 44 votes for President. 



RECAPITULATIOIV. 

Total No. of votes for Harrison, (President,) 1840, 225,817 

Do. do, Viin Furea, do. " 212,827 

Do. do. Abolition, do. " 2,808 

Grand total No. of votes for President, 1940, 441,162 

Total No, of votes for Seward, (Governor,) 184", 2-32,011 

Do. do. Bouck, do. " 216,808 

Total No. of votes for Bouck, (Governor,) 1912, 209,072 

Do. do. Bradish, do. " 196,091 

Do. do. Stewart, do, " 7,263 

Grand Total No. of voles for Governor, 1842, 401,426 

Majority for Harrison over Van Bnren, 1940, 13, 200 

Do. Seward over Bouck, " 5,203 

Do. Bouck over BradisU, 1842, 21,981 



ELECTION RETURNS. 103 

ropular vote for President of the IJoited States, 1836 and 1840. 



States. 



Maino, 

Ne\v-Ham|)shire, 
Massachusetts, . . 
Connecticut, . . , 
Rhode Island, . . . 

Vermont, 

New-York, 

New-Jersey, . . . . , 
Pennsylvania, . . 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

Virginia, 

North Carolina,. 
South Carolina,* 
Georgia, ....... 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, .... 

Lousiana, , 

Tennessee, 

Kentucky 

Ohio, ...'. 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

IMissouri, 

Michig-an, ■ 

Arkansas, 



Total in 25 States,. 



Harrison. Van Burcn. Harrison. Van Buren 



(1S3G.) 
15,239 

6, 22S 
42,247 
IS, 7 19 

2,710 

20, 996 

138,54:? 

26,137 

87,111 

4, 733 
25, 852 
23,46S 
23, 626 

24, 930 

16,612 

9, 68S 

3, 383 

35, 962 

36, 687 

105,405 

41,281 

14,292 

8,337 

4,072 

1,238 



( I bMi. ) 
22, 990 
20, 697 
34, 474 
19,291 

2,964 

14,039 

166,815 

25,592 

91,47.^ 

4, 15.- 
22,268 
30,261 
26,910 

22,126 

20,, 506 

9. 979 

3,653 

26, 120 

33,025 

96, 948 

32, 780 

17,275 

10,995 

7,332 

2, 400 



(lain.) 
46,612 
26, 158 
72, 874 
31,601 
5,278 
32, 440 

225,817 
33,351 

144,021 

5,967 

33, 528 

42,501 

46,376 

40,264 
28, 471 
19,518 
11,296 
60,391 
58, 489 
148, 157 
65, 302 
45, 537 
22, 972 
22,' 933 
4,363 



737, 71 1 I 763,5871 1,274, 203 1,128,303 



(1840.) 

46,201 
32,761 
51,944 
25, 296 
3,301 
18,018 

212,527 
31,034 

143,672 

4,874 

28, 752 

43,893 

33,782 

31,933 
33, 991 

16, 975 

7,616 

48,289 

32,616 

124,782 

51,604 

47, 476 

29, 760 

21,131 

6,048 



Majority for Martin Van Buren, 1836, 25, 876 votes. 

Majority for Wm. H. Harrison, 1840, 145, 900 « 



Electoral vote for President and Vice-President, 1840. 



state). 

Maine, 

N. Hampshire, 
Massachnsctts, 14 
Rbodc Island, •• 4 
Connecticut,"- 8 

Vermont, 7 

New- York, 43 

New-Jersojr,- •• 8 
Pennsylvania,- 30 

Delaware, 3 

Maryland, 10 

VirRinia,|- 

N. Carolina ••■15 
S. Carolina,} •• •• 



JIar. V. B. Tyler. Jokmon.. States 



10 



14 

4 
8 
7 

.12 
8 

.30 
3 

10 



Har. 
II 



Georgia,- ••• 
Alabama, ••• 
Mississippi, 
T.onisiana, ■ 
Tennessee, • 
Kentucky, •■ 

Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, ••• 
Michigan, --- 
Arkansas, - - 



Total 234 



V. B Tyler. Johnson, 
' 11 



Majority for Harrison and Tyler over all others, 174 Electoral votes. 



• In South Carolina the Electors are chosen bv the Legislature. 

+ Polk of Tennessee, received one vote for Vice-President. 

I Tazewell of Virginia, received eleven votes for Vice-President 



104 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Elections ol President and Vice-President of the United States. 

George Washington was unanimously chosen first President, and was 
inaugurated April 30, 1789. John Adams was chosen first Vice-President. 



*FiRST Term, 1789— Electors 69. 

Votes. 
George Washington 69 

John Adams 34 

John Jay ' 9 

R. H. Harrison 6 

J. Rutledge 6 

John Hancock ' 4 

George Clinton 3 

S. Huntington 2 

John Milton 2 

J. Armstrong 1 

Edward Teltair 1 

B. Lincoln 1 

♦Second Term, 1793— Electors 135. 

George Washington 132 

' ■ ■ • 77 

50 
4 
1 

71 
68 
59 
30 



.Tohn Adams 
George Clinton 
Thomas Jefferson 
Aaron Burr 

*Thied Term, 1797— Electors 133. 
.John Adams 
Thomas Jefferson 
Thomas Pinckney 
Aaron Burr 

*FouRTH Term,! 1801— Electors 133. 
Thomas Jefferson 73 

Aaron Burr 73 

John Adams 64 

Thomas Pinckney 63 

Fifth Term, 1805— Electors 176. 
Thomas Jefferson for President 162 

Charles C. Pinckney do. 47 

George Clinton for Vice-President 113 
Rufus King do. 14 

Sixth Term, 1809— Electors 176. 
James Madison for President 122 

Charles C. Pinckney do. 47 

George Clinton for Vice-President 113 
Rufus King do. 47 

Seventh Teem, 1813— Electors 217. 
James Madison for President 128 

De Witt Clinton do. 89 

E. Gerry for Vice-President 128 

Jared IngersoU do. 57 

Eighth Term, 1817— Electors 217. 
James Monroe for President 183 

Rufus King do. 31 

Dan. D. Tompkins for V. President 113 



Ninth Term, 1821— Electors 232. 

Votes. 
James Monroe for President 231 

One vote onlv in opposition. 
Dan. D. Tompkins for V. President 218 

Tenth Term, 1825t— Electors 261. 



Andrew Jackson for President 
John Q. Adams do. 

Wm. H. Crawford do. 
Henry Clay do. 

J. C. Calhoun for Vice President 



N. Sanford, 


do. 


Nathaniel Macon 


do. 


Andrew Jackson 


do. 


M. Van Buren 


do. 


Henry Clay 


do; 



99 

84 

41 

37 

182 

30 

24 

13 

& 

2 

Eleventh Tesm, 1829— Electors 261. 

Andrew Jackson for President 178 

J. Q. Adams do. 83 

J. C. Calhoun for Vice President 171 

Richard Rush do. 83 

William Smith do. 7 

Twelfth Teem, 1833— Electors 288. 

Andrew Jackson for President 219 

Henry Clay do. 49 

John Flovd do. 11 

William Wirt do. 7 

M. Van Buren for Vice-President 189 

.John Sergeant do. 49 

William Wilkins do. 30 

Henry Lee do. 11 

Amos Ellmaker do. 7 
Thirteenth Term, 1837— Electors 294. 

M. Van Buren for President 170 

Wm. H. Harrison do. 73 

Hugh L. White drt. 26 

Daniel Webster do. 14 

Wilie P. IMangum do. ll 

SnR. M. Johnson for Vice-President 147 

Francis Granger do. 77 

John Tyler do. 47 

William Smith do. 23 
Fourteenth Teem, 1841 — Electors 294« 

Wm. H. Harrison for President 234 

M. Van Buren for President 60 

John Tvler fur Vice President 234 

R. M. Johnson do. 48 

L. W. Tazewell do. 11 

James K. Polk do. 1 



* This election was according to the old system, in which the highest number of 
votes made the President, and the next highest the Vice-President. 

+ In this case the election went to the House of Representatives, and on the 36th 
ballot Mr. Jefferson was chosen President by the votes of New-York, New-Jersey, 
Pennsylvania, Virginia, Kentucky, Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Mary- 
land. Aaron Burr was Chosen Vice-President. 

i J. Q. Adams elected by the House of Representatives. 

^ Elected by the Senate. 



GOVERNBIENT OFFICERS. 



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106 ELECTION LAW. 

Extract from a Law respecting Election?, 

Passed April 5, 1842. 
TITLE I. — Of the qualifications, disabilities and priviliges of Electors. 
§ 1. Every male citizen of the age of twenty-one years, who shall have 
been an inhabitant of this state one year next preceding any election, and 
for the last six months a resident of the county where he may offer his vote, 
is entitled to vote in the town or ward where he actually resides, and not 
elsewhere, for all officers that now are, .of hereafter may be, elective by the 
people. 

§ 2. No man of color shall vote at any such election, unless he shall have 
been for three years a citizen of this state; and for one year next preceding 
the election at which he shall otTer his vote, shall have been seized and been 
possessed of a freeliold estate of the value of two hundred and fifty dollars, 
over all debts and encumbrances charged thereon; and shall have been ac- 
tually rated and paid a tax thereon. 

§ 3. No person wlio shall have been convicted of an infamous crime, deem- 
ed by the laws of this state a felony, at any time previous to an election, 
shall be permitted to vote thereat; unless he shall have been pardoned be- 
fore or after his term of impx-isonment has expired, and restored by pardon 
to all the rights of a citizen. 

§ 4. Whenever an election shall be held in any city or town, pursuant lo 
this chapter, no declaration by which a suit shall be commenced, or any civil 
process, or proceeding in the nature of civil process, shall be served on any 
elector entitled to vote in such city or town,, on the day on which such elec- 
tion shall be held. 

§ 5. No court shall be opened, or transact any business, in any city or 
tawn on the day such election shall be held tlierein, unless it be for the pur- 
pose of receiving a verdict or discharging a jury, or the naturalization of 
foreigners. 

TITLE II. — Of general avd spcdol elections; the time and purpose of holding 
Ihcm; and the persons by u-hom. held. 

§ I. General elections are such as are held at the same time in every coun- 
ty, for the election of all, or some of the following officers, namely, Go- 
vernor, Lieutenant-Governor, senators, members of assembly, sherili's, clerks 
of counties, coronors, representatives in congress, and electors of president 
and vice-president. 

§ 2. The register and clerk of the city and county of Nevv-York, shall al- 
so be chosen at a general election. 

§ 3. Special elections are .such as are held only in a particular district or 
county, at a time when no general election is held, for the choice of one or 
more of the officers proper to be chosen at a general election. 

§ 4. General elections shall be held on the Tuesday succeeding the first 
Monday of November in every j'ear; si^ecial elections at the times and places 
of which legal notice shall ha\e been given; but no special election shall be 
held witliin forty days previousl)- to a general election. 

§.5. General and sjiecial elections shall be held for one day only. 

§ 6. Special elections shall be held in the following cases: 

1. When an officer other than a Governor, Lieutenant-Governor and elec- 
tor of president and vice-president, proper to be chosen at a general election, 
shall not have been ch.osen by reason of two or more candicTates having re- 
ceived an equal number of votes for the same office. 

2. When the right of office of a person elected to the office of a represen- 
tative in congress, senator, member of the assembly, sberifl", or clerk of any 
county, or sherilf, clerk, or register of ihe city and count}' of New-York, 
shall cease before commencement of the term of service for which such 
officer shall have been elected. 

3. When a vacancy occurs in the office of any member of assembly aftef 



ELECTION LAW. 107 

the last clay of December in any year, ami before the first day of April follow- 
ing', if such vacancy shall ileprive a county of its entire representation. 

4. AVhen in c:ise of an extra session of tlie legislature, any county shall by 
a vacancy in the office of member of assembly^ occurring between the first 
day of April, and ten days before the time appointed for such exti'a session, 
be deprived of its entire representation. 

§ 7. When a special election shall not have taken place as required by law, 
the vacancy which ought to have been supplied by such election shall be 
supplied at the next general election. 

§ 8. All vacancies in the office of representative in congress, senator, 
sheriff and clerk of any county, or sheriff, clerk or register of the city and 
county of New-York, shall be supplied at the general election next succeed- 
ing the happening thereof; but when the term of service of any such officer 
will expire at the end of the year during which the vacancy in his office 
shall occur, no person sliall be cliosen to supply such vacancy; but the usual 
election shall be held for a new officer to hokl during the constitutional term. 
§ 9. If a vacancy proper to be supplied at a general election, shall not 
have been supplied at the general election next succeeding the happening 
thereof, a special election to supply such vacancy shall then be held. 

§ 10. Special elections in tlie first case provided for in the sixth section of 
this Title, shall be ordercil by the board of canvassers having the power to 
determine on the election of the officer omitted to be chosen; and in all oth- 
er cases, such elections shall be ordered by the Governor, who shall issue his 
proclamation tlicrefor. 

§ 11. Such proclamation shall specify the county or district in which such 
special election is to be held; the cause of such election; the name of the 
officer in whose office the vacancy has occurred^ the'tijne when his term of 
office will expire; and the day on which such election is to be held, which 
shall not be less than twenty nor more than forty days from the date of the 
proclamation. 

§ 12. The elections in the several cities and towns shall be by election 
districts. 

TITLE in. — Article Third. — Of elections in cities and towns. 
§ 8. The several cities of this state shall be divided by the common council 
of the said cities respectively, into convenient election districts for the hold- 
ing of all general and special elections, and all elections of the officers of 
such cities who are elective by the people. 

§ 9. Every ward in the city containing not more than five hundred voters 
shall be an election dislriet; every ward in the city containing more than 
five lumilred voters and not more than eight hundred voters, may, on or be- 
fore the first Monday of October next, or in any year thereafter, be divided by 
the common council of such city, if they shall deem expedient, into two 
districts, to contain, as near as may be, an equal number of voters; and eve- 
ry ward of a city containing more than eight hundred voters, shall on or 
before the first Monday of October next, and as often annually thereafter as 
may be necessary or expedient, be divided by the common council of such 
city into two or more districts, in such manner as shall be entire within one 
ward, and shall contain, as near as may be, an equal number of voters; and 
no district shall contain more than eight hundred voters. 

§ 15. The supervisor, assessors, and town clerk of each town, shall meet 
at the town clerk's office in such town on the first Tuesday in September 
next>at ten o'clock in th^ forenoon, and form themselves into a board. And 
they shall, in all cases where any town shall contain more than five hundred 
electors, divide the same into a convenient number of election districts, so 
that each district shall be in a compact form within their town, and shall 
contain not more than five hundred electors, as far as the number can be as- 
certained. But where any tov/n shall contain less than five hundred electors, 
the board may, in their discretion, divide the same into districts. 



108 ELECTION LAW. 

TITLE IV. — Articlk Second. — Manner of Voting, and Residence. 

§ 7. The elecfors shall vote by hpllot; and each person offering to vote, 
shall deliver his ballot, so folded as to conceal the contents, to one of the in- 
spectors, in the presence of the board. 

§ 8. The ballot shall be a paper ticket, which shall contain, written or 
printed, or partly written, anti partly printed, the names of the persons for 
whom the elector intends to vote, and shall designate the office to which each 
person, so named is intended by him to be chosen; but no ballot shall contain 
a greater number of names of persons as designated to any office, than there 
are persons to be chosen at the election to fill such office. * 

§ 9. The names of all the persons voted for by any elector, at any election, 
excepting of electors of president and vice-president, shall be upon one bal- 
lot, which ballot shall be endorsed "State." 

. § 10. When electors of president and vice-president are to be chosen, a 
separate ballot shall be given for them, which shall be endorsed " Electors," 
and shall contain the names of the persons designated by the voter giving 
the same, to be electors of president and vice-president, or any of them. 

§ II. If at a general election, there be one or more vacancies to be sup- 
plied in the office of senator, and at the same election a senator is to be elect- 
ed for four jears, the term for which the person voted for is intended, shall 
be designated on the ballot. 

§ 12. If at a general election for representatives in congress, any per- 
son named in a congress ballot, shall be intended to supply a vacancj' in the 
office of such representative, the ballots shall designate the congress for 
which each person is intended to be chosen. 

§ 21. No person shall be deemed to have lost or acquired a residence by 
being a student in a college, academy, or ahy seminary of learning; nor by 
living in any poor house, alms house, hospital or asylum in which he shall 
be maintained at public expense; nor by being under punishment in any 
prison, bridewell or penitentiary; nor by being absent from his town or 
place engaged in the army or navy of the United States, or in navigating 
any of the waters of this state, the United States, or on the high seas; nor 
by being a soldier of the United States stationed at any place within this 
state, and without having acquired any other lawful residence. 
Art. Fourth Canvass and Estimate of the Votes by the Board of Inspectors. 

§ 35. As soon as the poll of an election shall have been finally closed, the 
inspectors of the said election in their several districts, shall proceed to can- 
vass the votes. Such canvass shall be public, and shall not be adjourned or 
postponed until it shall have been fully completeil. 

§ 36. The canvass shall commence by a comparison of the poll lists, from 
the commencement, and a correction of any mistakes that may be found 
tlierein. 

§ 37. Each box being opened, the ballots contained therein shall be taken out 
and counted unopened, except so far as to ascertain that each ballot is single. 
And if two or more ballots shall be found so folded together as to present 
the appearance of a single ballot, they shall be destroyed, if the whole num- 
ber of ballots exceed the whole number of votes, and not otherwise. 

§ 38. No ballot properly endorsed, found in a box ditterent from that desig. 
nated by its endorsement, shall be rejected, but sliall be counted in the same 
manner as if found in "the box designated by such endorsement, provided 
that by the counting of such ballot or ballots, it shjill not produce an excess 
of votes over the number of voters as designated on the poll list. 

§ 39. If the ballots shall be found to exceed in number the whole number 
of votes on the coresponding columns of the poll lists, they shall be replaced 
in the box, and one of the inspectors shall, without seeing the same, public- 
ly draw out and destroy so many ballots unopened, as shall be equal to such 
excess. 



I>0ST-0FFICE3. 



109 



POST-OFFICES AND POST-MASTERS 

IN THE STATE OF NEW- YORK. 



The Post-Offices in county towns are in small capitals; and the distances 
given from Albany and Washington are from the corrected list by the 
Post-Master General. The new Post-OfRces and changes of Post-Masters 
are included in this table, and the whole corrected by returns from the 
General Post-Office to the I5th of December, 1842. 



Post-Officc. 


County. 


Accord 


Ulster 


Acra 


Greene 


Adams 


Jefferson 


Adams' Basin 


Monroe 


Adams' Centre 


Jefferson 


Adamsville 


Washington 


Addison 


Steuben 


Adriance 


Dutchess 


Akron 


Erie 


Alabama 


Genesee 


Albany 


Albany 


Albion 


Orleans 


Alden 


Erie 


Alder Creek 


Oneida 


Alexander 


Genesee 


Alexandria 


Jefferson 


Alfred 


Allegany 


Allen 


Allegany 


Allen Centre 


Allegany 


Allen's HiU 


Ontario 


Alloway 


Wayne 


Almond 


Allegany 


Alps 


Rensselaer 


Alton 


Wayne 


Amagansett 


Suffolk 


Amber 


Onondaga 


Amboy 


Oswego 


Amenia 


Dutchess 


Amenia Union 


Dutchess 


Ames 


Montgomery 


Amity 


Orange 


Amsterdam 


Montgomery 


Anaquascook 


Washington 


Ancram 


Columbia 


Ancrara Lead Mines 


Columbia 


Andes 


Delaware 


Andover 


Allegany 


Angelica 


Allegany 



Post-Master. 



Miles from 
Albany. Wash'ton. 



10 



J. D. Schoonmaker 76 306 
M. Olmstead . 47 349 

A. Maxon 162 403 

M. Adams 230 379 

C. Hubbard 162 403 

A. Harden 58 430 

W. R. Smith 227 292 

A. B. Stockholm 86 305 

E. M. Adams 268 3S8 

J. Crombie 263 388 
S. Van Rensselaer 370 

N. Bedell 250 392 

H. Lichfield 270 380 

S. Rich 107 412 

V. R. Hawkins 258 382 

J. W. Fuller 195 447 

S. Russell 249 321 

J. W. Stewart 261 341 

C. Botch 268 341 

H. Jewet 217 354 

H. Towar 183 354 

A. Correy 246 321 

0. H. P. Griffis 24 384 
E. W. Lawrence 190 367 
E. M. Conklin 270 353 
A. Niles 142 336 
P. Mo wry 137 386 
Hiram Vail 70 324 
A.Hitchcock 65 32* 
H. N. Morris 56 395 
J. W. Thompson 122 268 

1. Morris 32 400 
A. Thompson 40 410 
John Davis 45 340 
W. Rodgers 50 345 
J. Smith 87 344 
R. L. Brundage 257 317 
A. C. HuU ^ 262 335 



110 



Post-Office. 
Angola 
Antwerp 
Apalachin 
Appling 
Aquebogue 
Argosville 
Argyle 
Arkport 
Arkville 
Arkwright 
Arthurs bur gb. 
Ashford 
Astoria 
Athens 
Athol 
Attica 

Attica Centre 
Attlebury 
Auburn 
Augusta 
Aurelius 
AuriesviIIe 
Aurora 
Au Sable 
Au Sable Forks 
Austerlitz 
Ava 
Avoca 
Avon 
Axeville 
Babylon 
JBainbridge 
Sainb:«idge Centre 
Baiting Hollow 
Baldwin 
Baldwinsville 
Ballston 
Ballston Centre 
Bangor 
Barboursville 
Barcelona 
Barre 
Barre Centre 

Barrington 

Barrytown 

Barryville • 

Barton 

Batavia 

Bath 

Battenville 

Beach Hill 

Beaverbroolc 

Beaverkill 

Bedford 

Beekman 

Beekmantown 



POST- 


•OFFICES, 










Miles from 


County. 


Post-Master. 


Albany. Wash'ton. 


Erie 


C. Taylor 


306 


358 


Jefferson 


A. Drake 


169 


438 


Tioga 


R. Steele 


169 


283 


Jefferson 


Susan Hovs^ard 


169 


410 


Suffolk 


D. Williamson 


229 


309 


Schoharie 


J. Simmons 


46 


395 


Washington 


J. C. Rouse 


46 


416 


Steuben 


J. Hurlbut 


246 


322 


Delaware 


N. Dimmick 


83 


33» 


Chautauque 


S. Clinton 


328 


350 


Dutchess 


J. J. Wiley 


83 


310 


Cattaraugus 


D B. Jewett 


295 


345 


Queens 


D. N. Andrews 


150 


230 


Greene 


E. Pierce 


29 


341 


Warren 


John L. Gilpin 


74 


443 


Wyoming 


A. Wilder 


257 


376 


Wyoming 


W. Tanner 


261 


371 


Dutchess 


P. K. Sackett 


71 


322 


Cayuga 


W. C.Beardsley 


154- 


333 


Oneida 


J. Hall 


100 


370 


Cayuga 


J. A. Partelow 


158 


337 


Montgomery 


J. C. Van Alstine 


. 40 


408 


Cayuga 


C. Campbell 


170 


323 


Essex 


B. Wells 


144 


519^ 


Essex 


S. West 


154 


52? 


Columbia 


A. Brown 


31 


36? 


Oneida 


S. Manchester 


124 


408 


Steuben 


O. Rice 


225 


307 


Livingston 


I. Wells 


222 


355 


Cattaraugus 


S. Cowley 


312 


342- 


Suffolk 


T. T. Carll 


185 


265 


Chenango 


D. Newell 


104 


320 


Chenango 


F. G. Loveland 


107 


317 


Suffolk ■" 


B. F. Young 


221 


301 


Chemung 


J. Goodwin, jr. 






Onondaga 


E. A. Baldwin 


145 


262 


Saratoga 


J. W. Horton 


28 


399 


Saratoga 


J. Safford 


25 


396 


Franklin 


D. Patterson 


219 


530 


Delaware 


J. Van Schoyk 


117 


307 


Chautauque 


I. Shaw 


343 


346 


Orleans 


I. Clark 


252 


390 


Orleans 


B. Matteson 


254 


388 


Yates 


W. Hedges 


201 


322 


Dutchess 


A. Martin 


53 


325 


Sullivan 


C, P. Fuller 


137 


295 


Tioga 


W. Smith 


174 


269 


Genesee 


L. B. Cotes 


249 


374 


Steuben 


L. C. Whiting 


219 


299 


Washington 


T. Graves 


38 


408 


Ulster 


S. N. Hendrik 






Sullivan 


C. S. Woodward 


132 


292 


Sullivan 


S. Waterbury 


97 


326 


Westchester 


N.S.Bates 


125 


270 


Dutchess 


J. Peters 


87 


307 


Clinton 


G. Howe 


169 


554 



POST-OFFICES. 



lU 



Posl-Office, 
Belfast 
Bellfort 
Belle Isle 
Bellville 
Bellport 
Betnus' Heights 
Bennett's Corners 
Bennington 
Benson 
BensonviJle 
Benton 

Benton Centre 
Bergen 
Berkshire 
Berlin 
Bern 
Bethany 
Bethel 
Bethlehem 
Big Brook 
Bis Flats 
Big Hollow 
Big Stream Point 

BiNGHAMTON 

Birdsall 

Black Brook 

Black Creek 

Black River 

Black Rock 

Blauveltsville 

Bleecker 

Blenheim 

Bloomingburgh 

Blooming-grove 

Bloomviile 

Bolivar 

Bolton 

Bombay 

Boonviile 

Borodino 

Boston 

Bouckville 

Bovina 

Bovina Centre 

Brackabeen 

Bramarrl's Bridge 

Braman's Corners 

Branch port 

Brantingham 

Brasher Falls 

Brcwerton 

Bridgehampton 

Bridgeport 

Bridgeville 

Bridgewater 

Brightoa 



Couniy. 
Allegany 
Lewis 
Onondaga 
Jefferson 
Suffolk 
Saratoga 
Madison 
Wyoming 
Hamilton 
Tompkins 
Yates 
Yates 
Genesee 
Tioga 
Rensselaer 
Albany 
Genesee 
Sullivan 
Albany 
Oneida 
Chemung 
Greene 
Yates 
Broome 
Allegany 
Clinton 
Allegany 
Jefferson 
Erie 

Rocklani 
Fulton 
Schoharie 
Sullivan 
Orange 
Delaware 
Allegany 
Warren 
Franklin 
Oneida 
Onondaga 
Erie 
Madison 
Delaware 
Delaware 
Schoharie 
Rensselaer 
Schenectady 
Yates 
Lewis 

St. Lawrence 
Onondasa 
Suffolk ^ 
Madison 
Sullivan 
Oneida 
Monroe 



PostMaster. 
Thos. P. Alexand 
Abram Fox 
M. Armstrong 
S. Houghton 
J.G.Howell 
J. S. Scofield 
P. McDoel 
P.'Durkee 
L. Annibal 
J. Sweazy 
H. Barden 
J. A. Haight 
E. H. Pierson 
A. P. Belcher 
J. Whitford 

D. E. Tyler 
J. K. Barlow 
C. B- Roosa 
N. Adams 
C Haydcn 

E. S. Roberts 

F. Holcomb 
L. G. Townsend 
T. Robinson 
I. G. Freeman 
J. Weed 
T. McElhany 

F. Butterfield 
M. G. Lewis 
M. Klein 
E. A. Campbell 

C. Reed 
J. Ellis 
S. B. Breed 

A. Merwin 
N. Hoyt 
W. Stewart 
W. Randall 
H. Graves 
J. Baxter 
W. Andre 
M. Maynard 
T. McFarlan 
J. Erkson, jr. 

G. D. Hilts 

B. Budd 
J. Braman 
S. Booth 

D. H. Hieby 

C. T. Huiburd 
W. Bailey 
A. Topping 
J G. Downer 
M. L. Bushnell 
M. B. Church 
W. Perria 



Miles 


from 


Albany. Wash'ton. 


!er 268 


341 


150 


449 


137 


354 


173 


403 


209 


289 


26 


396 


117 




264 


370 


m 


434 


184 


337 


189 


332 


237 


378 . 


J4S 


291 


26 


387 


23 


393 


252 


370 


121 


303 


4 


374 


104 


404 


204 


284 


54 


361 


192 


311 


138 


296 


255 


336 


158 


533 


275. 


325 


290 


383 


131 


259 


56 


362 


100 


285 


94 


285 


74 


344 


285 


312 


73 


446 


232 • 


552. 


114 


419 


159 


339 


299 


362 


97 


363 


76 


350 


79 


347 


4b 


381 


16 


369 


35 


402 


201 


327 


136 


435 


236 


520 


144 


362 


254 


283 


132 


363 ■ 


106 


289 


81 


370 


217 


366 



112 



POST-OFFICES. 



Post-office. 
Brimmersville 
Bristol 

Bristol Qentre 
Broadalbin 
Brockett's Bridge 
Brockport 
Bronx 
Brookfield 
Brooklyn 
Brook's Grove 
Brookvilie 
Brownville 
Bruynswick 
Buckbridge 
Buckram 
Bucktooth 
Buel 

Buffalo 
Bullville 
Burdette 
Burlingham 
Burlington 
Burlington Flats 
Burnt Hill 
Burr's Mills 
Burton 
Burtonsville 
Bushnell's Basin 
Buskirk's Bridge 
Busti 
Butler 
Butterfly 
Butternuts 
Byersville 
Byrnville 
Byron 
Cabin Hill 
Cadysville 
Cairo 
Caldwell 
Caledonia 
Cambria 
Cambridge 
Camden 
Cameron 
Camillus 
Campbell Creek 
Campbelltoivn 
Campville 
Canaan 
Canaan Centre 
Canaan Four Corners 
Canadice 
Canajoharie 
Canal 
Cawahdaigua 



County. 
Steuben 
Ontario 
Ontario 
Fulton 
Fulton 
Monroe 
Westchester 
Madison . 
Kings 
Livingston 
Genesee 
Jefferson 
Ulster 

St. Lawrence 
Queens 
Cattaraugus 
Montgomery 
Erie 
Orange 
Tompkins 
Sullivan 
Otsego 
Otsego 
Saratoga 
Jefferson 
Cattaraugus 
Schenectady 
Monroe 
Rensselaer 
Chautauque 
Wayne 
Oswego 
Otsego 
Livingston 
Schoharie 
Genesee 
Delaware 
Clinton 
Greene 
Warren 
Livingston 
Niagara 
Washington 
Oneida 
Steuben 
Onondaga 
Steuben 
Steuben 
Tioga 
Columbia 
Columbia 
Columbia 
Ontario 
Montgomery 
Onondaga 
Ontario 



Post-Master. 
J. Brimmer 
E. Jones 

E. H. Crow 
M. Weston 
Z. Brockett 
J. Gieenleaf 
A G. Morgan 
A. Babcock 
G. Hall 

H. S. Jarvis 
L. Farnham 
J. K. Bates 
C. Bruyn 

0. Buck 
J. Cock 

J. Boardman 
S. C. Hamilton 

C. C. Haddock 
W. Wallace 

D. Jackson 
H. Clark 

G. S. Gorham 
A. E. Arnold 
W. H. Satterlee 

F. Lewis 
J. Lathrop 
J. Burton 

1. Hastings 
S. A. Cook 
I'. Davis 
J^. Watson 
J. Parsons 
H. Sergeant 
S. Stoner 

R. H. Noxen 
L. Clark 
A. Marshall 
H. Cady 
P. C. Mattoon 
Charles Roberts 
G Blakeslee 
C. Molineux 
J. Greene 
H. S. Miner 

E. Mason 

G. Sherwood 
J. Dunham 
Saml. Besley 
J. Mersereau 
S. Frisbee 

H. C. Jewett 
W. A. Lord 
Z. C. Andrews 
H.J. Ehle 
J. D. Norton 
J, M. Wheeler 



Miles from 
Albany. Wash'ton. 

235 290 

212 349 

208 344 

42 423 

68 398 

235 384 

137 246 

88 363 

• 146 226 

249 360 

255 385 

168 420 

85 300 

231 503 

179 259 



62 
288 
103 
184 

79 

83 

25 

166 

297 

217 

29 

323 

178 

161 

94 

249 

46 

243 

85 

173 

44 

63 

229 

283 

34 

128 

225 

139 

224 

223 

154 

24 

26 

25 

218 

50 

147 

195 



387 
381 
2S8 
307 

356 
360 
393 
411 
312 

366 

399 

336 

358 

386 

341 

339- 

384 

384 

345 

548 

346 

436 

363 

406 

404 

397 

304 

347 

304 

288 

282 

362 

364 

363 

334 

395 

354 

341 





POST-OFFICES. 




ii;^ 








Miles from 


Post-OCace. 


County. 


Post-Master. 


Albany. 


Wash'ton 


Canastota 


Madison 


D. E. Kurd 


119 


364 


Candor 


Tioga 


S. Barager 


171 


285 


Caneadea 


Allegany 


A. Burr 


271 


347 


Canfield's Corners 


Tioga 


N. Lounsbury 


166 


272 


Canisteo 


Steuben 


N. C. Taylor 


243 




Cannonsville 


Delaware 


J S. Babcock 


111 


307 


Canoga 


Seneca 


W. Hoskins 


173 


339 


Cantatoe 


Westchester 


A. F. Dickinson 


125 


273 


Canterbury 


Orange 


T. Adams 


89 


289 


Canton 


St. Lawrence 


J.Bailey 


223 


495. 


Cape Vincent 


Jefferson 


J. Davillard 


190 


442 


Cardiff 


Onondaga 


J. Spencer 


132 


335 


Carlisle 


Schoharie 


S. B. Shibley 


36 




Carlton 


Orleans 


R. M. Brown 


258 


401 


Carmei. 


Putnam 


J. Crosby 


100 


287 


Caroline 


Tompkins 


M. Rounsaville 


150 


331 


Caroline Centre 


Tompkins 


H. S. Jones 


173 


303 


Carroll 


Chautauque 


J. Hall 


336 


313 


Carthage 


Jefferson 


W. Blodgett 


152 


431 


Cassadaga 


Chautauque 


J. Beebe 


331 


337 


Cassville 


Oneida 


B. Budlong 


86 


375 


Castile 


Wyoming 


J. B; Halstead 


249 


358 


Castleton 


Rensselaer 


N. N. Seaman 


8 


362 


Catharines 


Chemung 


J. Soule 


182 


295 


Cato 


Cayuga 


T. Daniels 


163 


349 


Cato Four Corners 


Cayuga 


W. S. Ingham 


165 


351 


Cats KILL 


Greene 


Thos. Croswell 


34 


336" 


Cayuga 


Cayuga 


A. H. Hieham 


162 


339 


Cayuta 


Chemung 


Z. F. Chase 


188 


289 


Cazenovia 


Madison 


B. T. Clark 


113 


348 


Cedar Hill 


Albany 


E. 0. Eaton 


8 


363 


Cedar Swamp 


Queens 


p. Luister 


173 


' 253 


Cedarville 


Herkimer 


C. Beckwith 


79 


383 


Central Bridge 


Schoharie 


O.H.Williams 


32 


388 


Central Square 


Oswego 


H. S. Conde 


144 


365 


Centre Almond 


Allegany 


L. Rathbun 


250 


325 


Centre Berlin 


Rensselaer 


J. A. Culver 


28 


• 385 


Centre Cambridge 


Washington 


J. H. Hall 


39 


409 


Centrefield 


Ontario 


R. B. Johnson 


199 


345 


Centre Gorhara 


Ontario 


C. Stone 


201 


335 


Centre Independence 


Allegany 


N. Coval 


270 


30^ 


Centre Lisle 


Broome 


O. H. Arnold 


136 


3/i3 


Centreport 


Suffolk 


S. M. Nichols 


192 


272 


Centre Sherman 


Chautauque 


B . L. Butler 


358 


342 


Centreville 


Allegany 


E. S. Stewart 


265 


342 


Centre White Creek 


Washington 


H. Rice 


39 


409 


Chalmers 


Niagara 


E. Gillet 


291 


410 


Champion 


Jefferson 


J. G. Lynde 


152 


428 


Champion S'th Road JetFerson 


C. J.Johnson 


152 


420 


Champlain 


Clinton 


L. Dbolittle 


185 


560 


Chapelsburgh 


Cattaraugus 


R. Chapel 


305 


320 


Chapinville 


Ontario 


R. Gardner 


198 


344 


Charleston 


Montgomery 


D. J. Jewett 


40 


399 


Charleston 4 Corners 


; Montgomery. 


I. S. Frost 


38 


397 


Charlotte 


Monroe 


P. A. Smith 


224 


375 


Charlotte Centre 


Chautauque 


J. Chandler 


333 


333 



10« 



114 



Fost-Office. 
Charlotteville 
Charlton 
Chateaugay 
Chatham 
Chatham Centre 
Chatham 4 Corners 
Chaumont 
Chazy 
Chemung 
Chenango Forks 
Cheningo 
Cherry Creek 
Cherry Valley 
Cheshire 
Chesnut Ridge 
Chester 
Chestertown 
ChUi 
China 

Chittenango 
Churchville 
Cicero 
CindLnnatu* 
City 

Clarence 
Clarendon 
^larkson. 

Cl>ARKSTOWN 

Clarksville 

Clavearack 

Clay 

Clayton 

Clear Creek 

Cleaveland 

Clermont 

Clifton Park 

Clinton 

Clinton Hollow 

Clintonville 

Clockville 

Clove 

Clovesville 

Clyde 

Clymer 

Clymer Centre 

Cobleskill 

Cobleskill Centre 

Cochecton 

Coeymans 

Coeymans Hollow 

Cohocton 

Cohoes 

Colchester 

Coldbrook 

Golden 

Coldenham 



POST-OFFICES. 










Miles from 


County, 


Post-Master. 


Albany. Wash'ton, 


Schoharie 


E. Northrup 


57 


373 


Saratoga 


H. Belden 


25 


393 


Franklin 


T . P. Roberts 


202 


541 


Columbia 


S. Daley 


18 


362 


Columbia 


R. Sleight 


19 


359 


Columbia 


S. Crandal 


23 


355 


Jefferson 


S. Massey 


178 


430 


Clinton 


A. G. Carver 


178 


553 


Chemung 


J. B. Clark 


182 


268 


Broome 


J. B. Rogers 


127 


307 


Cortland 


A. Pierce 


133 


332 


Chautauque 


C A. Spencer 


324 


340 


Otsego 


W. McLean 


55 


380 


Ontario 


E. S. Nott 


203 


346 


Dutchess 


E. Vincent 


78 


315 


Orange 


S. C. Tupper 


102 


277 


Warren 


J. W. Tubbs 


81 


456 


Monroe 


T. Purdy 


224 


379 


Wyoming 


L. D. Davis 


273 


348 


Madison 


S. Fuller 


129 


352 


Monroe 


G. C. Howard 


234 


381 


Onondaga 


J. Gage 


140 


358 


Cortland 


B. Niles 


128 


327 


Dutchess 


C. Chamberlin 


70 


323 


Erie 


0. R. Hopkins 


270 


390 


Orleans 


D. Sturgis 


243 


392 


Monroe 


S. Walbridge 


236 


385 


Rockland 


J. Wood 


122 


267 


Albany 


D. McCullock 


14 


376 


Columbia 


P, L. Snyder 


34 




Onondaga 


W. Hale 


142 


359 


Jefferson 


L. Grennell 


186 


431 


Chautauque 


M. Sheldon 


319 


336 


Oswego 


A. H. Allen 


234 




Columbia 


W. H. Wilson 


41 


329 


Saratoga 


S. W. Higgins 


17 


387 


Oneida 


C. C. Cook 


99 


380 


Dutchess 


S. Butts 


63 


316 


Clinton 


J. Tuckerman 


153 


528 


Madison 


S. Chapman 


120 


360 


Dutchess 


A. Skidmore 


78 


317 


Delaware 


J. Beadle 


70 


344 


Wayne 


P. V. N. Smith 


174 


354 


Chautauque 


I. F. Gleason 


355 


334 


Chautauque 


D. Dales 


350 


329 


Schoharie 


A. L. Lawyer 


42 


386 


Schoharie 


J. Howe 


44 


384 


Sullivan 


J. C, Curtis 


131 


293 


Albany 


W. Blaisdell 


13 


356 


Albany 


J. Blodgett 


19 


362 


Steuben 


P. C. Cook 


230 


315 


Albany 


H. How 


8 


378 


Delaware 


H. Elwood 


98 


316 


Herkimer 


S. Smith 


86 


410 


Erie 


A. G. Buffum 


286 


365 


Orange 


P. Sears 


90 


292 





POST-OFFICES. 




115 








Miles from 


Post-Office. 


County, 


Post-Master. 


Albany. Wash'ton. 


Cold Spring 


Putnam 


J. P. Andrews 


100 


278 


Cold Spring Harbor 


Suffolk 


D. Hulett 


186 


266 


Colesville 


Broome 


T. Ruggles 


124 


306 


College Point 


Queens 


L. Van Bokkelon 


159 


239 


Colliersville 


Otsego 


J. Goodyer 


73 


355 


Collins 


Erie 


J- Sherman 


312 


.364 


Collins Centre 


Erie 


C. Bigelow 


292 




Collinsville 


Lewis 


H. Collins 


123 


424 


Colosse 


Oswego 


T. Webb 


149 


374 


Columbia 


Herkimer 


M. Springer 


75 


379 


Columbus 


Chenango 


H. E. Storrs 


98 


353 


Commack 


Suffolk 


J. Walius 


187 


267 


Comstock's Landing 


Washington 


J. Woodward 


66 


436 


Concord Centre 


Erie 


A. Ashman 


393 


359 


Conesus 


Livingston 


G. Arnold 


231 


. 346 


Conesville 


Schoharie 


A. Reichtmeyer 


45 


368 


Conewango 


Cattaraugus 


T. J. Wheeler 


316 


338 


Conklin 


Broome 


B. T. Miller 


145 


304 


Conquest 


Cayuga 


L. B. Phinney 


164 


347 


Constableville 


Lewis 


S. Miller 


138 


419 


Constantia 


Oswego 


H. C. ChampUn 


135 


373 


Cooksburgh 


Albany 


A. Hand 






COOPERSTOWN 


Otsego 


R. Davis 


69 


366 


Coopersville 


Clinton 


H. Hayford 






Copake 


Columbia 


E. Wilcox 


49 


342 


Copenhagen 


Lewis 


H. Davenport 


149 


423 


Coram 


Suffolk 


R. W. Smith 


203 


283 


Corbeitsville 


Broome 


S. B. Corbett 






Corfu 


Genesee 


R. Miller 


266 


380 


Corinth 


Saratoga 


B. P. Rogers 


52 


421 


Corning 


Steuben 


S.B.Denton 


213 


287 


Cornwallville 


Greene 


E. B. Austin 


38 


361 


Corllandtown 


"Westchester 


J. McCord 


113 


262 


Cortland Village 


Cortland 


A. Dickson 


143 


314 


County Line 


Niagara 


G. A. Fern 


272 


415 


Coventry 


Chenango 


E. G. Waters 


114 


320 


Coventryville 


Chenango 


J. R. Pratt 


111 


322 


Covert 


Seneca 


E. C Gregg 


176 


309 


Coveville 


Saratoga 


W. Wilcox 


33 


403 


Covington 


Wyoming 


W. Tompkins 


241 


359 


Cowlesviile 


Wyoming 


T. Sargent 


268 


374 


Coxsackie 


Greene 


G. W. Keith 


22 


347 


Craigsville 


Orange 


H. M. Craig 


99 


280 


Grain's Corners 


Herkimer 


R. Grain 


69 


380 


Cranberry Creek 


Fulton 


W. S. Ingraham 


62 


425 


Crainsville 


Montgomery 


J. Groat 


29 


397 


Crawford 


Orange 


C. Slott 


92 


294 


Croghan 


Lewis 


J. Hamen 






Cross River 


Westchester 


W.Hunt 


172 


275 


Crown Point 


Essex 


C. F. Hammond 


106 


478 


Crura Elbow 


Dutchess 


I. Marshall 


69 


309 


Cuba 


Allegany 


S. M. Russell 


280 


317 


Cuddebackville 


Orange 


P. Cuddeback 


109 


272 


Cutchogue 


Suffolk 


B. Case 


238 


218 


Cuyler 


Cortland 


W. Blancbard 


125 


337 


Cuylerville 


Livingston 


N, L. Boroman 







IIG 


tOST-OPl'lCES. 












Miles 


from 


Post-Office. 


County. 


Post-Master. Albany. ' 


RTash'to 


Danby 


Tompkins 


S. Miller 


168 


289 


Dansville 


Livingston 


S. Shannon 


238 


329 


Danube 


Herkimer 


A. Owens, 


70 


393 


Darien 


Genesee 


S. King 


263 


377 


Davenport 


Delaware 


J. Sheu 


69 


361 


Davenport Centre 


Delaware 


P. Andrews 


74 


357 


Day 


Saratoga 


J. Rockwell 


63 


431 


Dayanville 


Lewis 


S. North 


141 


440 


Dayton 


Cattaraugus 


R. Johnson 


312 


350 


Dean's Cornera 


Saratoga 


G. Wright 


33 


406 


Deansville 


Oneida 


J. Dean 


104 


375 


Decatur 


Otsego 


R. Tripp 


61 


375 


Deer River Falls 


Franklin 


R. L. Duane 


197 


530- 


Defriestville 


Rensselaer 


J. E. Van Allen 


4 


374 


De Kalb 


St. Lavprence 


E. P. Townsley 


195 


464 


Delavan 


Cattaraugus 


D. W. Goodenough 


282 


337 


Delhi 


Delaware 


N. Hathaway 


37 


327 


Delphi 


Onondaga 


E. Litchfield 


119 


342 


Delta 


Oneida 


P. F. Peck 


112 


396 


Denmark 


Lewis 


A. Buck 


146 


• 435 


Depauville 


Jefferson 


S. Johnson 


178 


428 


Depuyster 


St. Lawrence 


L. Fay 


198 


467 


Deposit 


Delaware 


S. Lusk 


118 


300 


De Ruyter 


Madison 


M. Spear 


122 


. 340 


Devereaux 


Herkimer 


H. Devereux 






De Witt 


Onondaga 


H. C. Goodell 


126 


351 


De Witt's Valley 


Allegany 


T. Van Scoter 


248 


326 


Dewitlsville 


Chautauque 


J. RusseU 


348 


335 


Dexter 


Jefferson 


J. Eaton 






Dickinson 


Franklin 


M. Heath 


222 


523 


Dix 


Jefferson 


B. V. Vaneps 


186 


438 


Dix MiUs 


Suffolk 


G. Carll 


183 


263- 


Doanesburgh 


Putnam 


B. Doane 






Dobbs Ferry 


Westchester 


E. W. Walgrove 


126 


248 


Dolsentown 


Orange 


T. Sargent 


110- 


273 


Dora 


Broome 


S. Doolittle 






Dover 


Dutchess 


J; Ketchum 


74 


313 


Dresden 


Washington 


L. Allen 


80 


450 


Dryden 


Tompkins 


I. PhiUps 


153 


307 


Duane 


Franklin 


J. Duane 


189 


538 


Duanesburgh 


Schenectady 


C. C. Ager 


23 


393 


Dundee 


Yates 


A. C. Harpending 


190 


316 


Dunkirk 


Chautauque 


W. L. Carpenter 


326 


348 


Durham 


Greene 


P. Adams 


36 


359 


Durhamville 


Oneida 


W. Stillman 


125 


368 


Eagle 


Allegany 


O.Phelps 


264 


355 


Eagle Harbor 


Orleans 


W.P.Collins 


256 


398 


Eagle Mills . 


Rensselaer 


C. H. Dubois 






Earleville 


Madison 


S. B. Webb 


98 


352 


East Avon 


Livingston 


T. Wiard 


218 


399 


East Bainbridge 


Chenango 


S. L. Hathaway 






East Bern 


Albany 


J. I. Gallup 


19 


389 


East Bethany 


Genesee 


D. L. Worthington 


248 


367 


East Bloomfield 


Ontario 


H. W. Hamlin 


203 


349 


East Branch 


Delaware 


C. Baxter 


108 


306 


East Canisteo 


Steuben 


J. Baker 


241 


308 



POST-OFFICES. 



117 



Post-Office. 
East Carlton 
Eastchester 
East China 
East Constable 
East Durham 
East Evans 
East Florence 
East Franklin 
East Genoa 
East Glenville 
East Greene 
East Greenbush 
East Greenwich 
East Groveland 
East Guilford. 
East Hamburgh 
East Hamilton 
East Hampton 
East Hill 
East Hom«r 
East Java 
East Kill 
East Koy 
East Lansing 
East Lexington 
East Line 
East McDonough 
East Nassau 
East New-York 
Easton 
East Otto 
East Painted Post 
East Palmyra 
East Pembroke 
East Pharsalia 
East Pike 
East Pierrepont 
East Rodman 
East Salem 
East Sand Lake 
East Schuyler 
East Solon 
East Springfield 
East Virgil 
East Worcester 
Eaton 
Eatonville 
Edeu 
Edenville 

Edgecomb's Corners 
Edinburgh 
Edmeston 
Edwards 
Edwardsville 
Egypt 
Elba 



County. 
Orleans 
Westchester 
Wyoming 
Franklin 
Greene 
Erie 
Oneida 
Delaware 
Cayuga 
Schenectady 
Chenango 
Rensselaer 
Washington 
Livingston 
Chenango 
Erie* 
Madison 
Suffolk 
Allegany 
Cortland 
Wyoming 
Greene 
Allegany 
Tompkins 
Greene 
Saratoga 
Chenango 
Rensselaer 
Kings 

Washington 
Cattaraugus 
Steuben 
Wayne 
Genesee 
Chenango 
Allegany 
St. Lawrence 
Jefferson 
Washington 
Rensselaer 
Herkimer 
Cortland 
Otsego 
Cortland 
Otsego 
Madison 
Herkimer 
Erie 
Orange 
Saratoga 
Saratoga 
Otsego 
St. Lawrence 
St. Lawrence 
Monroe 
Genesee 



Post-Master. 
E. Gray 
G. Faile 
E. Waterman 
S. Langdon 
L. D. Hill 
R. Ingersol 

C. B. Thompson 
M. Treadwell 
H. Holden 

S. D. Merchant 
U. King 
E. Elygert 
M. Robertson 

D. A. Kelley 
G. Wright 
J. L. Maples 
A. D. Carrier 
T. T. Parsons 
W. Robinson 

A. Gushing 

0. R. Marston 
J. Beach 

1. Quackinbush 
J. Ludlow 

C. W. Pratt 
W, B. Noxon 

B. Randall 
J. Root 

E. W. Strong 
A. Barker 
H. Scovell 
T. Noyes 

J. Sherman 
R. Willett 
J. Grant 
O. FuUer 
J. Dimick 
R. Dean 

D. Hobart 

C. Amidown 
G. H. Elwell 

E. Rockwell 
C. B. Vedder 
H. I.Messinger 
E. B. Bigelow 
A. Morse 

M. S. Van Slycke 

L.PraU 

L. Mead 

A. Gilbert 

G. B. Robertson 

S. Burleson 

E. Ray 

H. I. Pohlman 

A. G. Van Duser 

W. C. Reymond 



Miles from 


Albany. Wash' ton. 


262 


405 


142 


241 


268 


351 


214 


553 


46 


353 


307 


372 


125 


411 


85 


346 


164 


316 


20 


388 


118 


3ia 


241 


336 


104 


326 


284 


369 


92 


368 


267 


347 


248 


■ 339 


136 


322 


263 


356 


57 


364 


260 


355 


52 


362 


114 


S33 


22 


375 


152 


232 


27 


397 


298 


348 


207 


288 


190 


361 


256 


381 


123 


340 


253 


354 


208 


492 


158 


414 


47 


417 


19 


389 


84 


396 


131 


330 


59 


377 


155 


314 


53 


375 


103 


359 


75 


394 


306 


370 


119 


367 


39 


407 


52 


420 


89 


355 


184 


46S 


207 


361 


255 


380 



118 


TOST- 


■OFFICES. 












Miles from 


Post-Office. 


County. 


Post -Master. 


Albany. W 


ash'ton. 


Elbridge 


Onondaga 


A. Wood 


149 


347 


Eleysville 


Erie 


S. Eley 


282 


.386 


Elgin 


Cattaraugus 


W. Little 


285 


325 


Elizabethtown 


Essex 


0. Kellog 


126 


501 


Elizaville 


Columbia 


P. Robinson 


44 


333 


EUenburgh 


Clinton 


J. R. Emmerson 


189 


554 


EUensville 


Ulster 


J. H. TuthiU 


86 


293 


Ellery 


Chautauque 


D. Brovi^n 


343 


330 


Ellicottsville 


Cattaraugus 


I. Day 


293 


335 


Ellington 


Chautauque 


J. F. Farman 


324 


336 


Ellisburgh 


Jefferson 


W. T.Searles 


169 


399 


Elmtra 


Chemung 


R. Birdsall 


195 


279 


Enfield 


Tompkins 


C. C. Applegate 


168 


301 


Ephratah 


Fulton 


T. K. Benedict 


58 


402 


Erieville 


Madison 


J. Durfee 


110 


357 


Erin 


Chemung 


D. I. Stewart 


195 


291 


Erwin 


Steuben 


J. Cooper 


217 


282 


Erwia Centre 


Steuben 


C. Hoffman 


225 


274 


Esopus 


Ulster 


S. Elmore 


66 


307 


Esperance 


Schoharie 


S. 0. Burnett 


29- 


396 


Essex 


Essex 


J. Gould 


138 


509 


Etna 


Tompkins 


W. Marsh 


169 


302 


Euclid 


Onondaa;a 


N. Soule 


144 


362 


Evans 


Erie 


A. At wood 


311 


368 


Evans' Mills 


Jefferson 


W. Palmer 


165 


425 


Exeter 


Otsego 


C. Jones 


77 


367 


Fabius 


Onondaga 


0. E. Castle 


120 


337 


Factoryville 


Tioga 


A. Yates 


178 


365 


Fairfield 


Herkimer 


N. Butler 


79 


398 


Falrport 


Chemung 


J. Westlake 


192 


352 


Fairview 


Cattaraugus 


C. Rice 


269 


337 


Fairville 


Wayne 


J. C. Crandell 


192 


363 


Fallsburgh 


Sullivan 


E. Palen 


197 


304 


Farmer 


Seneca 


E. Chester 


180 


313 


Farmers' Mills 


Putnam 


H. Townsend 






Farmersville 


Cattaraugus 


L. Peet 


279 


332 


Farmingham 


Orleans 


C.Lee 


250 


394 


Farmington 


Ontario 


E. H. Lapham 


205 


351 


Farrell Place 


Clinton 


A. Farrell 


174 


549 


Fayette 


Seneca 


G. W. Buckman 


178 


334 


Fayetteville 


Onondaga 


C. J. Hurd 


123 


348 


Federal Store 


Dutchess 


A. Thompson 


59 


326 


Felt's Mills 


Jefferson 


R. R. Brown 


162 


424 


Fenner 


Madison 


A. Barrett 


112 


355 


Finch ville 


Orange 


N. R. Quick 


115 


273 


Fireplace 


Suffolk 


S. Homan 


212 


292 


Fishkill 


Dutchess 


S. Bowne 


86 


287 


Fishkill Landing 


Dutchess 


M. A. Bogardus 


90 


287 


Fishkill Plains 


Dutchess 


D. Van Bramer 


88 


308 


Five Corners 


Cayuga 


A. Palmer- 


178 


311 


Flanders 


Suffolk 


J. Hallock 




309 


Flalbush 


Kings 


M. Schoonmaker 


151 


231 


Flat Creek 


Montgomery 


. I. Folinsbee 






Fleming 


Cayuga 


W. P. Thornton 


128 


359 


Flemingsville 


Tioga 


D. Fleming 


159 


280 


Flint Creek 


Ontario 


H. Garrett 


184 


349 



POST-OFFICES. 



119 



Post-Office. 
Florence 
Florida 
Floyd 
Flushing 
Fluvanna 
Fonda 
Forrestburgh 
Fort Ann 
Fort Covington 
Fort Edward 
Fort Edward Centre 
Fort Hamilton 
Fort Hunter 
Fort Miller 
Fort Plain 
Fortsville 
Fosterdale 
Foster's Meadow 
Fosterville 
Fowler 
Fowlersville 
Frankfort 
Frankfort Hill 
Franklin 
Franklinton 
Franklinvilfe " 

Fredonia 
Freedom 
Freedom Plains 
Freehold 
Freetown 
Freetown Corners 
French Creek 
Frewsburgh 
Freysbush 
Friendship 
Fullersville 
Fulton 
Fultonham 
Fultonville 
Furgesson's Corners 
Gaines 
Gainesville 
Gales 
Galesville 
Gallatinville 
Gallupsville 
Galway 
Gardncrsville 
Garoga 
Garratsville 
Gasport 
Gates 
Gayhead 
Geddes 
Geneganslette 



County. 
Oneida 
Orange 
Oneida 
Queens 
Chautauque 
Montgomery 
Sullivan 
Washington 
Franklin 
Washington 
Washington 
Kings 

Montgomery 
Washington 
Montgomery 
Saratoga 
Sullivan 
Queens 
Cayuga 
St. Lawrence 
Livingston 
Herkimer 
Herkimer 
Delaware 
Schoharie 
Cattaraugus 
Chautauque 
Cattaraugus 
Dutchess 
Greene 
Cortland 
Cortland 
Chautauque 
Chautauque 
Montgomery 
Allegany 
St. Lawrence 
Oswego 
Schoharie* 
Montgomery 
Yates 
Orleans 
Wyoming 
Sullivan 
Washington 
Columbia 
Schoharie 
Saratoga 
Schoharie 
Fulton 
Otsego 
Niagara 
Monroe 
Greene 
Onondaga 
Chenango 



Post-Master. 

D. G. Dorrance 
J. Wood 

L. L. Moulton 

A. Spalding 

S. Whittemore 
J. B. Borst 
C. Pinney 

E. Broughton 
J. Parker 

J. F. Gandal 
W. Sprague 
J. C. Church 
P. Enders 
L. Viele 
C. L. Simms 
N. Keefes 
J. M. Foster 
E. Hendrickson 
J. Foster 
J. Glazier 
W. Frazer 
W. R.Stevens 

E. Wetmore 
J. H. Merrick 
M. Martin 

F. Partridge 
E. A. Leister 
E. Howlett 

B. Vermilyea 
Andrew Dodge 
A. V. P.Wilcox 

C. V. Perkins 
L Golding 

J. Frew 

W. G. Diefendorf 

W. Wellman 

C. G. Edgerton 

M. L. Lee 

J. Best, jr. 

C. Gardinier 
E. L. Jacobus 
A. Chubb 

E. Cornwall 
J. F. Weller 
J. Watson 
W. W. Hoysradt 
E. Gallup 

E. O. Smith 

D. B. Gardner 

C. Hutchinson 

D. Herringlon 

A. Colwell 

G. M. Howard 

B. Spring 

F. Hubbell 
J. Roos 



Miles from 

Albany. Wash'ton, 

129 414 



111 
104 
155 
335 

42 
120 

68 
226 

49 

46 
157 

38 

54 

48 

126 

162 

159 

187 

235 

86 

87 

84 

4i 

280 

323 

270 

79 

42 

139 

144 

368 

340 

272 

190 

190 

42 

43 

252 
252 
103 
39 
48 
27 
36 
47 
54 
86 

225 

3& 

133 

122 



273 
398 
235 
322 
406 
278 
432 
546 
419 
416 
237 
406 

389 
418 
298 
242 
338 
456 
357 
397 
391 
344 
372 
327 
345 
346 
306 
355 
326 
324 
358 
317 

325 
460 
460 
380 
407 

395 
357 
286 
409 
332 
388 
404 
392 
406 
349 

372 
351 
350 
316 



120 



POST-OFFICES. 



Post-Office. 
Genesee Valley 
Geneseo 
Geneva 
Genoa 
Georgetown 
German 
Germantown 
Gerry 
Ghent 
Gibsonville 
Gilbertsville 
Gilboa 
Gilman 
Girl's Flatts 
Glasco 
Glen Cove 
Glenham 
Glenn 

Glen's FaUs 
Glennville 
Glen Wild 
Gloversville 
Goff's Mills 
Golden's Bridge 
Good Ground 
Gorham 
Goshen 
Gouverneur 
Grafton 
Graham 
Grahamsville 
Granger 
Grangerville 
Granville 
Grassy Point 
Great Bend 
Great Valley 
Greece 
Greenbush 
Greene 

Greenfield Centre 
Greenport 
Green River 
Greenville 
Greenwich 
Greenwood 
Greigsville 
Griffin's Mills 
Griswold's Mills 
Groton 
Grove 

Groveland Centre 
Guilderland 
Guilderland Centre 
Guilford 
Guilford Centre 



County. 
Allegany 
Livingston 
Ontario 
Cayuga 
Madison 
Chenango 
Columbia 
Chautauque 
Columbia 
Livingston 
Otsego 
Schoharie 
Hamilton 
Tioga 
Ulster 
Queens 
Dutchess 
Montgomery 
Warren 
Schenectady 
Sullivan 
Fulton 
Steuben 
Westchester 
Suffolk 
Ontario 
Orange 
St. Lawrence 
Rensselaer 
Orange 
Sullivan 
Allegany 
Saratoga 
Washington 
Rockland 
Jefferson 
Cattaraugus 
Monroe 
Rensselaer 
Chenango 
Saratosa 
Suffolk 
Columbia 
Greene 
Washington 
Steuben 
Livingston 
Erie 

Washington 
Tompkins 
Allegany 
Livingston 
Albany 
Albany 
Chenango 
Chenango 



Post-Master. 
S- Van Campan 
G. Metcalf 
J. Rees 
A. Avery 
E. Whitmore 
H. N. Drew 
W. Overbaugh 
M. Camp 
M. Gilbert 
I. Halstead 
A. Gilbert 
J. Reed 
E. P. Gillum 
I. S. Hoyt 
H. D. Martin 
W. M. Weeks ■ 
T. E. Scofield - 
J. Hanchet 
J. W. Freeman 
W. L. Calkins 
W. M. Bowers 
H. Jones 
W. Goff 
S. Frost 
A. Squires . 

D. Halstead 
J. W. Golt 

E. Dodge 
R. S. Waite 
W. Giaham 
H. Eaton 
H. White 

C. Reed 
H. Weeks 
T. Murphy 

D. Potter 

D. Farrington 

E. Walker 

N. C. Brockway 

F. Juliand 
A. C. Barney 
J. Clark 

A. Winslow 
A. N. Bently 
J. K. Hoeton 
L. Davis 
E. R.Dean 
J. Mitchell 

D. A. Potter 
C. Trumble 
S. C. Jones 
C. H. CarroU 
R. Case 

E. Cheeseborough 
J. Clarke 

C. D. Cobb 



Miles from 
Albany. Wash' ton. 
272 326 
230 347 
176 341 
161 319 
112 348 
123 326 

46 334 
330 330 

27 351 



95 
51 

185 

48 

176 

88 

43 

54 

30 

102 

40 

228 

120 

242 

197 

105 

181 

20 



37 

63 

109 

159 

300 

226 

1 

120 

40 

246 

35 

29 

35 

253 

234 

283 

61 

162 

261 

236 

9 

12 

102 



335 
367 

281 
328 
256 
289 
403 
427 
398 
304 
413 
308 
278 
322 
340 
278 
450 
390 



96 312 



409 
433 
277 
427 
328 
375 
370 
314 
410 
326 
363 
361 
410 
318 
351 
368 
433 
312 
347 
341 
379 
382 
334 





POST- 


•OFFICES. 




lai 








Miles from 


Post-office. 


County. 


Post-Master. 


Albany. Wash'ton. 


Hadley 


Saratoga 


D. Stewart 


5S 


427 


Harlem 


New- York 


J. S. Kenyon 


150 


232 


Ha2;aman's Mills 


Montgomery 


D. W. Candee 


36 


404 


Hague 


Warren 


N. Garfield ' 


91 


464 


Hakottsville 


Delaware 


M. Halcott 


72 


345 


Halfmoon 


Saratoga 


H. H. Rogers 


13 


3S3 


Hall's Coiners 


Ontario 


E. Hall 


184 


337 


Hall's Mills 


Albany 


G. Benn 


31 


364 


Hallsville 


Montgomery 


G. F. Gary 


58 


389 


Hamburgh 


Erie 


J. S. Weld 


300 


372 


Hamburgh on Lake 


Erie 


S. W. Holmes 


300 


379 


Hamilton 


Madison 


B. W. Babcock 






Hammond 


St. Lawrence 


A. A. Hine 


189 


456 


Hammond's Mills 


Steuben 


S. Hammond 


214 


285 


Hampden 


Delaware 


D. Coleman 


89 


329 


Hampton 


Washington 


L. M. Purdy 


73 


443 


Hamptonburgh 


Orange 


J. Strong 


99 


282 


Hancock 


Delaware 


M. Wheeler 


123 


291 


Hannibal 


Oswego 
Chaulauque 


T. Shelton 


176 


362 


Hanover 


B. Tubbs 


315 


353 


Harford 


Cortland 


H. Symann 


150 


301 


Harlemsville 


Columbia 


E. Tracy 






Harmony 


Chautauque 


T. S. Bly 


339 


326 


Harpersfield 


Delaware 


J. B. Bragg 


64 


360 


Harpersville 


Broome 


H. A. Olendorf 


116 


3iO 


Harris Hill 


Erie 


N. F. Porter 






Harrisburgh 


Lewis 


E. Gallup 


145 


427 


Harrison 


Westchester 


C. Miller 






Hartford 


Washington 


C. Parker 


57 


427 


Hartiand 


Niagara 


J. C. Lewis 


270 


410 


Hart's Village 


Dutchess 


D. N. Merritt 


80 


314 


Hartsville 


Onondaga 


P. Thompson 


128 


354 


Hartwick 


Otsego 


L. Harrington 


74 


367 


Hartwick Seminary 


Otsego 


C. Davidson 


73 


369 


Hartwood 


Sullivan 


W. J. Clows 


118 


276 


Hastings 


Oswego 


P. Devendorf 


150 


371 


Havanna 


Chemung 


J. Walker 


194 


299 


Haverstraw 


Rockland 


I. Sherwood 


115 


271 


Haviland Hollow 


Putnam 


B. Haviland 


95 


29S 


Hebron 


Washington 


N. IngersoU 


54 


424 


Hector 


Tompkins 


R. Smith 


184 


311 


Helena 


St. Lawrence 


B. Neven 


236 


. 535 


Hemlock Lake 


Livingston 


E. Stevens 


231 


352 


Hempstead 


Queens 


L. D. Rushman 


167 


247 


Hempstead Harbor 


Queens 


W. Hicks 


170 


250 


Henderson 


Jefferson 


H. Weeks 


181 


412 


Henrietta 


Monroe 


J. H. McHazeltine 223 


368 


Herkimer 


Herkimer 


H. Doolittle 


78 


397 


Hermitage 


Wyoming 


S. Stowe 


255 


360 


Hermon 


St. Lawrence 


R. Healy 


201 


470 


Heuvelton 


St. Lawrence 


W. Thruston 


203 


472 


Hickory Corners 


Niagara 


D. Pomeroy 


280 


403 


High Falls 


Ulster 


J. H. Depuys 


69 


318 


Hishland 


Essex 


S. B. Richardson 


151 


522 


Highland Mills 


Orange 


W. Vail 


97 


281 


Hillsdale 


Columbia" 


I. Foster 


45 


357 



11 



122 


POST- 


•OFFICES. 












Miles from 


Post-Oflice. 


County. 


Post-Master. Albany. Wash'ton 


Hindsburgh 


Orleans 


J. Allison 


245 


394 


Hinsdale 


Cattaraugus 


P. Clark 


287 


313 


Hoag's Corners 


Rensselaer 


W. B.Hoag 


22 


378 


Hobart 


. Delaware 


J. L. Moore 


64 


353 


Hobbieville 


Allegany 


B. Aldridge 


267 


330 


Hoffman's Ferry 


Schenectady 


A. Durham 


26 


394 


Hoffman's Gate 


Columbia 


J. Smith 


41 


353 


Hogansburgli 


Franklin 


G. S. Mills 


234 


538 


Holland 


Erie 


P.D. Riley 


234 


351 


Holland Patent 


Oneida 


P. C. J. De Angelis 


]00 


402 


Holley 


Orleans 


F. P. Gould 


240 


389 


Homer 


Cortland 


G. Cook 


141 


317 


Honeoye 


Ontario 


H. Pitts 


214 


338 


Honeoye Falls 


Monroe 


H. Wheeler 


214 


360 


Hope 


Hamilton 


W. R. Van Arnam 


58 


427 


Hope Centre 


Hamilton 


T. Blake 


6.3 


432 


Hopewell 


Ontario 


N. Lewis 


187 


349 


Hopkinton 


St. Lawrence 


C. S. Chittenden 


215 


512 


Horicon 


Warren 


H. WaterS- 


101 




Hornby 


Steuben 


C. D.Thomas 


205 


294 


Hornellsville 


Steuben 


J. K. Hale 


241 


316 


Hosick 


Rensselaer 


L. H. Cookey 


32 


400 


Hosick Falls 


Rensselaer 


H. W. Fowler 


35 


403 


Houseville 


Lewis 


D.Goff 


130 


429 


Howard 


Steuben 


C. Graves 


231 


311 


Howlett Hill 


Onondaga 


J. Case 






Hudson 


Columbia 


J. McKinstry 


29 


341 


Huguenot 


Orange 


J. S. Van Inwegan 


113 


268 


Hulburton 


Orleans 


A. Reed 






Hull's Corners 


Oswego 


B. Hull 






Hull's Mills 


Dutchess 


E. P. Barton 


63 


322 


Hume 


Allegany 


C. C. Ingham 


263 


345 


Hunter 


Greene 


W. W. Edwards 


54 


356 


Hunter's Land 


Schoharie 


G. W. Tippets 


34 


377 


Huntington 


Suffolk 


W. J. Wood 


189 


269 


Hunt's Hollow 


Allegany 


S. Hunt 


25S 


353 


Hurley 


Ulster 


H. Patterson 


60 


319 


Huron 


Wayne 


S. Upson 


183 


363 


Hyde Park 


Dutchess 


A. H. Smith 


66 


305 


Hyde Settlement 


Broome 


F. Hyde 


134 


SIO 


Hyndsville 


Schoharie 


P. Hynds 


44 


391 


Independence 


Allegany 


W. McMichael 


261 


310 


Indian River 


Lewis 


' J. Barrett 


155 


454 


Ira 


Cayuga 


J. Thompson 


169 


355 


Irondequoit 


Monroe 


C. K. Hobbie 


223 


373 


Irving 


Chautauque 


C. R. Leland 






Islip 


Suffolk 


G. P. Mills 


191 


271 


Italy Hill 


Yates 


E. Doubleday 


204 


320 


Italy Hollow 


Yates 


V. Graham 


207 


323 


Ithaca 


Tompkins 


F. A. Bloodgood 


162 


295 


Jackson 


Washington 


N. Collins 


40 


410 


Jacksonburgh 


Herkimer 


L. 0. Gay 


73 


391) 


Jackson Corners 


Dutchess 


J.J. Stall 


49 


327 


Jacksonville 


Tompkins 


A. Chase 


170 


303 


Jack's Reef 


Onondaga 


C. P. Richardson 


150 


354 


Jamaica 


Queens 


J. C. Smith 


158 


233 



Post-office. 
Jamesport 
Jamestown 
Jamesville 
Jasper 
Java 
Jay 

Jefferson 
Jericho 
Jersey 
Jerusalem 
Jerusalem South 
Johnsburgh 
Johnsonburgh 
Johnson's Creek 
Johnstown 
Johnsvillc 
Jonesviilc 
Jordan 

Joslin's Corners 
Junction 
Junius 
Keene 

Keeney's Settlement 
Keeseville 
Kelloggsville 
Kendall 
KenncJyvillc 
Kent 

Ketcham's Corners 
Keyserville 
Killbuck 
Kinderhook 
Kingsborough 
King's Bridge 
Kingsbury 
King's Ferry 
King's Settlement 
Kingston 
Kinney's 4 Corners 
Kirkland 
Kirkville 
Knowcrsville 
Knowlesville 
Knox 
Kortright 
Kysericke 
Lackawack 
Lafargeville 
La Fayette 
JjSl Grange 
Lairdsville 
Lake 
Lake Hill 
Lake Pleasant 
Lake Ridge 
Lakeville 



POST' 


■OFFICES. 




12a 






Miles from 


County. 


Post-Master. 


Albany. WasU'ton. 


Suffolk 


D. Williamson 






Chautauque 


A. Plumb 


331 


318 


Onondaga 


G. M. Richardson 


127 


348 


Steuben 


J. G. Marlatl 


239 


289 


Wyoming 


A. Barber 


267 


352 


Essex 


G. G. Tobey 


148 


523 


Schoharie 


E. Boies 


56 


375 


Queens 


J. Ellison 


173 


253 


Steuben 


C. McClane 


205 


317 


Yates 


T. Maget 


199 


325 


Queens 


S. S. Jones 


176 


256 


AVarren 


C. Burdick 


88 


457 


Wyoming 


G. W. Johnson 


261 


367 


Niagara 


L.H. Woodworth 






Fult'on 


C. S. Lobdell 


46 


410 


Dutchess 


T. Burroughs 


86 


290 


Saratoga 


J. E. Jones 


21 


391 


Onondaga 


L. H. Mason 


152 


350 


Madison 


S. Tousey 


125 


370 


Rensselaer 


W. B. Brown 


16 


386 


Seneca 


A. B. Slawson 


182 


352 


Essex 


W. J. Lewis 


138 


513 


Cortland 


A. Brown 


134 


333 


Essex 


G. T. Thomas 


147 


522 


Cayuga 


L. N. Fuller 


158 


329 


Orleans 


C. Benedict 


249 


398 


Steuben 


G. Wheeler 


223 


303 


Putnam 


S. Boyd 


99 


292 


Saratoga 


D. Weston 


29 


399 


Livingston 


N. Keyser 






Cattaraugus 


M. Leonard 






Columbia 


D. Van Schaack 


19 


351 


Fulton 


D. Potter 


50 


414 


New-York 


J. Dodge 


136 


238 


Washington 


J. F. Acker 


58 


428 


Cayuga 


D. Adams 


173 


315 


Chenango 


G. H. King 


106 


342 


Ulster 


W. Culley 


57 


316 


Oswego 


J. Martin 


174 


365 


Oneida 


J. M. Kimball 


100 


386 


Onondaga 


0. Hubb 


130 


353 


Albany 


G. Keenholts 


16 


386 


Orleans 


C. J. Hodd 


256 


398 


Albany 


P. Williams 


21 


391 


r)elaware 


M. Kecler 


69 


365 


Ulster 


J. Alliger 


71 


311 


Ulster 


N. S. Perkins 


91 


307 


Jefferson 


C. Ferson 


182 


432 


Onondaga 


C.Williams 


130 


337 


Wyoming 


J. W. Hallett 


i44 


366 


Oneida 


G. B. Pcabody 


102 


384 


Washington 


A. Matthews 


44 


414 


Ulster 


J. P. Winne 






Hamilton 


J. C. Holmes 


81 


450 


Tompkins 


S. H. Lamport 


177 


311 


Livingston 


E. West 


228 


353 



1S54 


POST-OFFICES. 












Miles 


; from 


Post-Office. 


County. 


Post-Master. Albany. ' 


Wash'ton. 


Lancaster 


Erie 


S. Clark 


2.80 


387 


Lansingburgh 


Rensselaer 


S. Bonticou 


10 


380 


Lansingville 


Tompkins 


J. S. Beardsley 


175 


303 


Larned's Corners 


Ontario 


D. D. Dayton 


200 


346 


Lassellville 


Fulton 


W. Lassells 


58 


408 


Laurens 


Otsego 


H. Strong 


83 


358 


Lawrenceville 


St. Lawrence 


L.Hulburd 


231 


513 


Lawyersville 


Schoharie 


T. Lawyer 


44 


388 


Lebanon 


Madison 


W. L. Sheldon 


107 


353 


Ledyard 


Cayuga 


A. Avery 


171 


317 


Lee 


Oneida 


H. E. Gregory 


114 


398 


Leeds 


Greene 


J. H. Person 


38 


340 


Leedsville 


Dutchess 


J. D. Hunt 


68 


327 


Leesville 


Schoharie 


W. Beekman 






Lenox 


Madison 


A. Northrop 


121 


358 


Leon 


Cattaraugus 


W. Kendall 


311 


343 


Leonardsville 


Madison 


D. Hardin 


86 


364 


Leon Mills 


Cattaraugus 


J. Thompson 


315 


341 


Le Raysville 


Jefferson 


W. Phelps 


162 


428 


Le Roy 


Genesee 


J. H. Stanley 


^36 


370 


Levanna 


Cayuga 


S. Boice 


172 


325 


Levant 


Chautauqua 


S. B. Winsor 


326 


323 


Lewis 


Essex 


G. S. Nicholson 


131 


506 


Lewisborough 


Westchester 


C. F. Ferris 






Lewiston 


Niagara 


L. Bement 


297 


410 


Lexington 


Greene 


B. C. Smith 


55 


365 


Leyden 


Lewis 


T. Baker 


120 


425 


Liberty 


Sullivan 


G. Wales 


119 


3C4 


Libertyville 


Ulster 


P. Dubois 


78 


308 


Lima 


Livingston 


I. Nicklisson 


213 


399 


Limerick 


Jefferson 


E. Smith 


172 


424 


Linden 


Genesee 


A. G. Perry 


250 


368 


Lindleytown 


Steuben 


A. C. Morgan 


229 


270 


Lindseyville 


Oswego 


W. T. Hudson 


174 


400 


Linlclaen 


Chenango 


S. Plumb 


122 


336 


Lisbon 


St. Lawrence 


S. Dillingham 


218 


485 


Lisle ^ 


Broome 


A. Howland 


133 


310 


Litchfield 


Herkimer 


T. Harrison 


83 


387 


Lithgow 


Dutchess 


J. Sisson 


75 


319 


Little Britain 


Orange 


B. F. Brooks 


98 


286 


Little Falls 


Herkimer 


M. Bettinger 


91 


390 


Little Genesee 


Allegany 


W. P. Langworthy 


288 


309 


Little Sodus 


Cayuga 


S. Turner 


181 


364 


Little Valley 


Cattaraugus 


C. S. Shepard 


300 


342 


Little York 


Cortland 


G. Curtiss 


134 


321 


Liverpool 


Onondaga 


H. Paddock 


136 


353 


Livingston 


Columbia 


H. Baker 


37 


334 


Livingstonville 


Schoharie 


J. A. Boyd 


42 


369 


Livonia 


Livingston 


A. Beebe 


224 


353 


Locke 


Cayuga 


G. Gregory 


155 


319 


Lock-Berlin 


Wayne 


J. H. Griswold 


180 


362 


LoCKPORT 


Niagara 


H. W. ScoveU 


277 


402 


Locust Tree 


Niagara 


L. B. Horton 


281 


399 


Lodi 


Seneca 


E. Baldwin 


185 


318 


Logan 


Tompkins 


J. S. Smith 


181 


314 


Lorraine 


Jefferson 


L. Hunt 


157 


408 



POST-OFFICES. 



125 



Post Office. 
Louisville 
Low Hampton 
Lowville 
Ludlowville 
Lumberland 
Luzerne 
Lyons 
Lyonsdale 
Lysander 
McConnellsville 
McDonough 
McGrawsvillc 
McLean 
Macedon 
Macedon Centre 
Machias 
Macomb 
Madison 
Madrid 
Magnolia 
Maine 
Maiden 

Maiden Bridge 
Malone 
Malta 
Maltaville 
Mamaroneck 
Manchester 
Manchester Centre 
Mandana 
Manhasset 
Manheim 
Manheim Centre 
Manlius 
Manlins Centre 
Mannsville 
Mansfield 
Maple Grave 
Marathon 
Marbietown 
Marcellus 
Marcellus Falls 
Marcy 
Marengo 
Mariaville 
Marietta 
Marion 
Marlborough 
Marshall 
Martinsdurgh 
Martin's Hill 
Martville 
Maryland 
Masonville 
Massena 
Matiidaville 



County. 
St. Lawrence 
Washington 
Lewis 
Tompkins 
Sullivan 
Warren 
Wayne 
Lewis 
Onondaga 
Oneida 
Chenango 
Cortland 
Tompkins 
Wayne 
Wayne 
Cattaraugus 
St. Lawrence 
Madison 
St. Lawrence 
Chautauque 
Broome 
Ulster 
Columbia 
Franklin 
Saratoga 
Saratoga 
Westchester 
Ontario 
Ontario 
Onondaga 
Queens 
Herkimer 
Herkimer 
Onondaga 
Onondaga 
JclTerson 
Cattaraugus 
Otsego 
Cortland 
Ulster 
Onondaga 
Onondaga 
Oneida 
Wayne 
Schenectady 
Onondaga 
Wayne 
Ulster 
Oneida 
Lewis 
Chemung 
Cayuga 
Otsego 
Delaware 
St. Lawrence 
St. Lawrence 



Miles from 

Post-Master. Albany. Wash'ton 

L. Miller 253 523 

W. S. Miller 78 44S 

S. Leonard 137 436 

P. Wager 172 305 

J. Eldred 129 287 

R. Wells 59 428 

E.Price 180 357 

L. R. Lyon 122 426 

C. Betts 144 364 
J. McConnell 121 391 
J. F. Hill 119 326 
H. McGraw 142 318 
J. Cooper 149 311 
H. Reed 199 356 
I. Odell 202 359 
L. Twamley 286 333 

D. Day 

I. Curtiss 95 365 

C. Pierce 235 505 

R. Whitney 346 333 

E. H. Clark 147 296 
A. Preston 43 333 
L. Van Volkenburg 16 361 

F. P. Allen 214 529 
P. Derby 29 400. 
W. Parkes 30 401 
J. J. Marshall 143 248 
S. A. Power 202 348 
H. Harrison 205 345 
J. Garlock 

A. T. Brown 137 247 

A. Timmerman 64 397 

J. Markell 72 394 

J. S. Rhoades 129 346 

J. P. Haner 135 350 

W. West 166 396 

J. Huggins 300 342 

Z. Washbon 90 340 

H. Hayward 141 318 

C. M. Van Buren 64 318 
S. Dalliba Ml 343 
S. C. Norton 143 345 
A. L. Hebard 98 394 
R. S. Copp 179 355 
S. H. Marsh 

A. Hicks 145 338 

E.R.Wright 201 358 

R. B. Mapes 84 294 

H. L. Haw Icy 93 379 

J. W. Martin 134 433 

J. R. Brown 207 291 

W. C. Hoff 175 358 

F. B. Carpenter 66 362 

D. Orcott 111 313 
A. H. Andrews 47 524 
W. R. Stark 



11' 



126 


POST-OFFICES. 












Miles from 


Post-Ofiice. 


County. 


Post-Master. 


Albany. W 


ash'ton 


Mattituck 


Suffolk 


J. Shirley 


233 


313 


Mayfield 


Fulton 


C. Odell 


&3 


422 


Mayville 


Chautauque 


R. Sackett 


344 


339 


Mead's Creek 


Steuben 


A. Gaylord 


211' 


300 


Mechanicsville 


Saratoga 


C. Vernon 


19 


389 


Mecklenburgh 


Tompkins 


C. Freeman 


174 


307 


Medina 


Orleans 


C. Whaley 


262 


397 


Mellenville 


Columbia 


E. F. Bartlett 


37 


349 


Mendon 


Monroe 


0. L. Sheldon 


210 


356 


Meredith 


Delaware 


S. A. Law 






Merrillsville 


Franklin 


J. R. Merrill 


174 


549 


Mexico 


Oswego 


S. Clark 


156 


381 


Middleburgh 


Schoharie 


F. Stanton 


37 


378 


Middlebury 


Wyoming 


0. Perkins 


247 


365 


Middlefield 


Otsego 


M. Gilbert 


64 


387 


Middlefield Centre 


Otsego 


M. C. Huntington 


62 


373 


Middle Granville 


Washington 


G. N. Bates 


65 


435 


Middle Hope 


Orange 


J. W. Fenton 


88 


290 


Middle Island 


Suffolk 


B. Hutchinson 






Middleport 


Niagara 


T. N. Lee 






Middlesex 


Yates 


D. G. Underwood 






Middletown 


Delaware 


A. Grant 


79 


335 


Middleville 


Herkimer 


V. S. Kinyon 


82 


401 


Milan 


Dutchess 


S. Thorn 


62 


322 


M41ford 


Otsego 


E. Brown 


77 


365 


Milford Centre 


Otsego 


J. Westcott 


77 


359 


Military Road 


Jefferson 


T. Robinson 


179 


431 


Millen's Bay 


Jefferson 


H. Millen 






Miller's Place 


Suffolk 


T.Helme 


207 


257 


Mill Port 


Chemung 


J. Hackney 


199 


292 


Mill's Corners 


Fulton 


E. Alvord 


43 


411 


Milltown 


Putnam 


A. Raymond 


100 


297 


Millville 


Orleans 


S. C. Johnston 


257 


397 


Milo 


Yates 


G. R. Reilay 


193 


320 


Milo Centre 


Yates 


A. Y. Carr 


196 


325 


Milton 


Ulster 


W. Soper 


79 


299 


Mina 


Chautauque 


I. Relf 


363 


347 


Minaville 


Montgomery 


J. Cady 


37 


405 


Minden 


Montgomery 


IP. Kellar 


61 


396 


Minerva 


Essex 


A. West 


94 


469 


Minisink 


Orange 


S. M. Stoddard 


120 


270 


Mixville 


Allegany 


B. F. Green 


267 


349 


Modena 


Ulster 


M. Esterly 


80 


300 


Moffitt's Store 


Columbia 


H. Bigelow 


19 


372 


Mohawk 


Herkimer 


L. L. Merry 


79 


398 


Moira 


Franklin 


C. Lawrence 


227 


518 


Monroe 


Orange 


G. McGarrah 


117 


279 


Monroe Works 


Orange 


J. Coffey 


105 


273 


Montezuma 


Cayuga 


N. Hurd 


162 


342 


Montgomery 


Orange 


J. W. Sears 


95 


288 


MONTICELLO 


Sullivan 


G. Bennett 


110 


294 


Mooers 


Clinton 


J. Fitch 


198 


573 


Mooresville 


Delaware 


J.T. Moore 


58 


359 


Moravia 


Cayuga 


I. Cady 


158 


322 


Moreau 


Saratoga 


G. P. Reynolds 


50 


421 


Morehouseville 


Hamilton 


A. K. Morehouse 


117 


432 





POST- 


• OFFICES. 


Miles 


J27 

from 


Post-office. 


County. 


Post-Master. Albany. ^ 


iVash'ton. 


Morelani 


Chemung 


J. Crawlord . 


198 


301 


Moriah 


Essex 


H. Everest 


115 


486 


Moriches 


Suflolk 


J. M. Fanning 


218 


298 


Motley 


St. Lawrence 


R. Green 






Morristown 


St- Lawrence 


E.AV. White 


199 


466 


MORRISVILLE 


Madison 


J. Farwell 


102 


359 


Morseville 


Schoharie 


D. Morse 


56 


379 


Moscow 


Livingston 


H. Jones 


236 


353 


Mott's Corners 


Tompkins 


W. Molt 


168 


298 


Mottville 


Onondaga 


H. Delano 


149 


343 


Mount Cambria 


Niagara 


J. Hodge 


283 


406 


Mount Hope 


Orange 


A. Thompson 


112 


276 


Mount Morris 


Livingston 


S. Summers 


242 


363 


Mount Sinai 


Suffolk 


C. Philips 


205 


285 


Mount Upton 


Chenango 


W. Gregory 


99 


331 


Mount Vision 


Otsego 


H. Keyes 


79 


362 


Mount Washington 


Steuben 


0. Wheeler 


212 


312 


Mud Creek 


Steuben 


A. H. Gates 


221 


293 


Murray 


Orleans 


S. W. Gibson 


243 


392 


Nanticoke Springs 


Broome 


N. Cadwell 


142 


301 


Naples 


Ontario 


D. H. Chesebro 


220 


S25 


Napoli 


Cattaraugus 


0. Marsh 


308 


341 


Narrowsburgh 


Sullivan 


R. W. Corwin 


141 


283 


Nashville 


Chautauque 


H. F. Smith 


310 


3.^8 


Nassau 


Rensselaer 


S. Van Valkenburg 


12 


365 


Natural Bridge 


Jefferson 


C. Andrus 


153 


452 


Navarino 


Onondaga 


A. L. Cummings 


148 


340 


Neil's Creek 


Steuben 


J. Connor 


229 


310 


Nelson 


Madison 


J. Donaldson 


109 


352 


Nettle Hill 


Chautauque 


W. Strong 


353 


347 


Neversink 


Sullivan 


A. Y. Grant 


99 


312 


New Albion 


Cattaraugus 


S. G. Wright 


307 


347 


Newark 


Wayne 


A. G. Danielson 


186 


357 


Newark Valley 


Tioga 


S. Byington 


154 


285 


New Baltimore 


Greene 


J. Sherman 


15 


354 


New Berlin 


Chenango 


W. D. Knapp 


88 


347 


New Berlin Centre 


Chenango 


A. Greene 


102 


343 


New Britain 


Columbia 


K. M. Davis 


24 


368 


Newburgh 


Orange 


O.Davis 


84 


286 


Newcastle 


Westchester 


M. W. Fish 


128 


270 


New Concord 


Columbia 


J. Chapman 


21 


359 


Newfane 


Niagara 


A. Patterson 


279 


416 


Newfield 


Tompkins 


M. C. Kellosg 


183 


310 


New Hackensack 


Dutchess 


G. W. Jones 


79 


306 


New Hamburgh 


Dutchess 


W. Millard 


79 


306 


New Hartford 


Oneida 


H. SherriU 


95 


384 


New Haven 


Oswego 


S. G. Merriam 


161 


383 


New Hurley 


Ulster 


I. Fowler 


83 


300 


Newkirk's Mills 


Fulton 


G. A. Newkirk ' 


59 


411 


New Lebanon 


Columbia 


H. N. Gilbert 


23 


S68 


New Lebanon Spring 


s Columbia 


B. Nichols 






New Lisbon 


Otsego 


D. M. Hard 


90 


345 


New London 


Oneida 


T. L Rudd 


117 


388 


New Milford 


Orange 


J. Gale 


120 


264 


New Ohio 


Broome 


E. S. Holcomb 


127 


310 


New Paltz 


Ulster 


C. B. Hasbrouk 


74 


306 



128 



POST-OFFICES. 



Post-office. 
New Paltz Landing 
Newport 
New Road 
New Rochelle 
New Salem 
New Scotland 
Newstead 
New Sweden 
Newton's Corners 
Newtown 
New Utrecht 
New Vernon 
New Village 
Newville 
New Windsor 
New Woodstock 
New York 
New York Mills 
Niagara Falls 
Nichols 
Nichollville 
Niles 
Nineveh 
Norfolk 
North Adams 
North Almond 
Northampton 
North Argyle 
North Barton 
North Bergen 
North Big Flatt 
North Blenheim 
North Bloomfield 
North Boston 
North Brookfield 
Northcastle 
North Chili 
North Clarence 
North Clymer 
North Cohocton 
Northeast 
Northeast Centre 
North Easton 
North Franklin 
North Gage 
North GaTway 
North Granville 
North Greenwich 
North Hamden 
North Harpersfield 
North Hebron 
North Hector 
North Hempstead 
North Kortwright 
North Lansing 
North Mendon 



County. 
Ulster. 
Herkimer 
Delaware 
Westchester 
Albany 
Albany 
Erie 
Clinton 
Fulton 
Queens 
Kings 
Orange 
Suffolk 
Herkimer 
Orange 
Madison 
New York 
Oneida 
Niagara 
Tioga 

St. Lawrence 
Cayuga 
Broome 
St. Lawrence 
Jefferson 
Allegany 
Fulton 
Washington 
Tioga 
Genesee 
Chemung 
Schoharie 
Ontario 
Erie 
Madison 
Westchester 
Monroe 
Erie 

Chautauque 
Steuben 
Dutchess 
Dutchess 
Washington 
Delaware 
Oneida 
Saratoga 
Washington 
Washington 
Delaware 
Delaware 
Washington 
Tompkins 
Queens 
Delaware 
Tompkins 
Monroe 



Post-Master. 
C. H. Nichols 
G. B. Raymond 
L. Raymond 
J. T. Ellis 

D. G. Seger 

E. Raynsford 
J. S. Ball 

J. Fitzgerald 
J. Newton 
C. Cook 
W. W. Cropsey 
G. Beebe 
W. I. Gould 
A. Snyder 

F. M. Dunnington 
J. Dyer 

J.L. Graham 
S. Maltbie 
S. Devaux 

C. R. Barstow 
L. Day 

R. Johnson 
H. Edgerton 
W. Floyd 
A. Rice 
J. Ward 
N. Wescott 

D. Stevenson 
J. Barnes 

D. Hooper 

J. C. Scofield 
W. Fink 

A. H. Fairchild 
I. Fuller 

S. G. Sweet 
L. B. Tripp 
R. Fulton 
O. Mansfield 

G. Ross 

E. Heartwell 
S. Robertson 
L. Bassett 
W. Cozzen 
L. Hale 

L. L. Howe 
E. Hanford 

B. F. Bancroft 
W. Reid 

S. W. Andrews 
H. W. Hamilton 
J. Allen 
J. H. Kinnam 
J. H. Poole 
T. Harkness 
R. Beardsley 
B. Tripp 



Miles from 
Albany. Wash'ton. 
73 300 



86 

102 

145 

12 

9 

266 

155 

51 

152 

151 

105 

198 

66 

86 

115 

145 

96 

297 

170 

213 

169 

116 

243 

169 

250 

47 

50 

185 

240 

203 

47 

212 

303 

84 

132 

230 

275 

356 

225 

53 

56 

30 

79 

92 

39 

66 

40 

61 

60 
184 
168 

66 
175 
218 



405 
329 
244 
382 
379 
386 
530 
420 
232 
231 
280 
278 
389 
288 
347 
225 
392 
403 
268 
514 
329 
310 
513 
410 
325 
415 
420 
272 
351 
2S7 
375 
358 
366 
366 
263 
377 
395 
337 
320 
332 
329 
400 
349 
412 
407 
436 
410 

370 
430 
314 
248 
365 
308 
365 



POST-OFFICES. 



129 



Post-Office. 
North Middlesex 
North Norwich 
North Perryburgh 
Northport 
North Reading 
North Ridgeway 
North Salem 
North Sheldon 
North Shore 
North Sparta 
North Stephentown 
North Sterling 
Northumberland 
North Urbana 
Norlhville 
North Wethersficld 
North White Creek 
North Wilna 
Norway 
Norwich 
Nunda Valley 
Nyack 

Nyack Turnpike 
Oakfield 
Oakhill 
Oakland 
Oak Orchard 
Oak Point 
Oak's Corners 
Oaksville 
O'Connelsville 
Ogdensburgh 

Ohio 

Oil Spring 

Olcott 

Olean 

Olive 

Omar 

Oneida Castle 

Oneida Depot 

Oneida Lake 

Oneonta 

Onondaga 

Onondaga Hollow 

Ontario 

Oppenheim 

Oran 

Orangeville 

Oregon 

Orient 

Oriskany 

Oriskany Falls 

Orleans 

Qrwell 

Osborn's Bridge 

Osborn's HoUovt 



County. 
Yates 
Chenango 
Cattaraugus 
Sufiblk 
Steuben 
Orleans 
Westchester 
Wyoming 
Richmond 
Livingston 
Rensselaer 
Cayuga 
Saratoga 
Steuben 
Fulton 
Wyoming 
Washington 
Jefferson 
Herkimer 
Chenango 
Allegany 
Rockland 
Rockland 
Genesee 
Greene 
Allegany 
Orleans 
St. Lawrence 
Ontario 
Otsego 
Monroe 
St. Lawrence 
Herkimer 
Allegany 
Niagara 
Cattaraugus 
Ulster 
Jefferson 
Oneida 
Madison 
Madison 
Otsego 
Onondaga 
Onondaga 
Wayne 
Fulton 
Onondaga 
Wyoming 
Chautauque 
Suffolk 
Oneida 
Oneida 
Ontario 
Oswego 
Fulton 
Broome 



PostMaster. 
A. S. Thomas 
W. Per Lee 

C. Blockney 
S. E. Bunce 
O. S. Thomas 
W. A. Pierce 
J. Hess 

E. H. Parsons 
N. P. H. Barrett 
Wm. Scott 
H. R. Cranston 
W. T. Churchill 
J. Olmsted 
R. L. Chapman 
J. Spier 
T. Skinner 
H. S. Barnum 
S. Lewis 

D. Dubois 
S. Smith 

D. Ashley 

S. W. Canfield 
W. O. Blemis 
G. March 
A. Pierce 
G. Williams 
S. P. Pitts 
J. H. Consall 

E. Cost 

C. Childs 
J. D. Walsh 
P. B. Fairchild 
W. Coppernell 
S. H. Morgan 
J. A. Cooper 

D. Day 

J. L Tappan 

T. R. Stackhouse 

H. Stevens 

E. Stone 

C. W. Hart 
W. S. Fritts 
CD. Easton 
A. Pattison 

J. W. Corring 
G. W. Burr 
L. D. Loomis 
J. Merrill 
J. West 
J. Terry 

D. C.Balis 
L. Ostrander 
G. Allen 

E. Strong 
S. Cook 
J. Carroll 



Miles from 


Albany. Wash'ton. 


210 


331 


108 


342 


302 


358 


195 


275 


195 


314 


113 


281 


267 


365 


153 


231 


238 


339 


35 


380 


174 


367 


38 


408 


55 


424 


256 


371 


36 


406 


86 


411 


112 


336 


253 


352 


128 


262 


128 


264 


257 


382 


34 


361 


254 


357 


259 


403 


181 


346 


73 


362 


. 225 


378 


210 


477 


108 


423 


280 


320 


284 


414 


293 


307 


72 


326 


187 


437 


113 


366 


123 


372 


77 


349 


133 


346 


131 


344 


205 


362 


64 


402 


119 


348 


257 


369 


336 


334 


252 


332 


99 


397 


190 


355 


148 


393 


58 


421 


130 


306 



V30 


POST- 


■OFFICES. 


Miles 


from 


Post-Office. 


County. 


Post-Master. 


Albany. Wash'ton, 


Ossian 


Allegany 


S. Porter 


244 


334 


Oswegatchie 


Lewis 


R. Tyler 


163 


462 


Oswego 


Oswego 


J. Cochran 


166 


373 


Otsego 


Otsego 


E. R. Brewer 


, 86 


340 


Otisco 


Onondaga 


H. Smith 


138 


335 


Otisville 


Orange 


G. Otis 


110 


275 


Otsdawa 


Otsego 


L. S. Osborne 


86 


344 


Otselic 


Chenango 


A. Parker 


86 


•344 


Otto 


Cattaraugus 


S. St. John 


306 


348 


Ovid 


Seneca 


A.S. Purdy 


189 


323 


Ovid Centre 


Seneca 


B. D. Tibbetts 






Owasco 


Cayuga 


U. Mosher 


162 


334 


OWEGO 


Tioga 


D. Ely 


161 


275 


Owensville 


Westchester 


J. Owen 


115 


283 


Oxbow 


Jefferson 


R. H. King 


176 


445 


Oxford 


Chenango 


J. W. Clark 


109 


328 


Oysterbay 


Queens 


J. Colwell 


182 


262 


Oysterbay Sound 


Queens 


T. Carman 


179 


259 


Paine 's Hollow- 


Herkimer 


A. Piper 


74 


385 


Painted Post 


Steuben 


W. J. Gilbert 


212 


286 


Palatine 


Montgomery 


C. Maybee 


56 


"390 


Palatine TBridge 


Montgomery 


L. Spraker 


51 


394 


Palenville 


Greene 


C. H. Teal 


54 


360 


Palermo 


Oswego 


A. R. Beckwith 


157 


380 


Palestine 


Allegany 


D. Fargo 


279 


324 


Palmyra 


Wayne 


D. D. Hoyt 


195 


352 


P melia 4 Corners 


Jefferson 


A. L. Harger 


172 


424 


Panama 


Chautauque 


R. Davis 


345 


324 


Paradox 


Essex 


N. Wheeler 


105 


480 


Paris 


Oneida 


G. W. Head 


96 


378 


Paris Furnace • 


Oneida 


E. Allen 


88 


377 


Parish 


Oswego 


E. E. Ford 


-147 


376 


Parrishville 


St. Lawrence 


E. B. Brooks 


221 


505 


Parksville 


Sullivan 


J. F. Bush 


116 


308 


Parma 


Monroe 


0. Palmer 


231 


380 


Parma Centre 


Monroe 


C. A. Knox 


234 


383 


Patridge Island 


Delaware 


J. Wheeler 


116 


298 


Patchin's Mills 


Steuben 


W. Patchin 


238 


323 


Patchogue 


Suffolk 


J. Ketcha n 


204 


284 


Patten's Mills 


Washington 


S. Andrews 


69 


431 


Patterson 


Putnam 


F. Stone 


92 


295 


Pavilion 


Genesee 


E. Mosher, jr. 


243 


361 


Pavilion Centre 


Genesee 


G. Barnett 






Pawlings 


Dutchess 


G. W. Slocum 


89 


298 


Pawlingsville 


Dutchess 


A. Campbell 


86 


301 


Paynesville 


Onondaga 


N. Dunham 


151 


368 


Pecksville 


Dutchess 


G. Smith 


106 


269 


Peekskill 


Westchester 


W. H. Briggs 


106 


269 


Pekin 


Niagara 


G. C. Hotchkiss 


289 


412 


Peltonville 


Steuben 


J. Gload 


208 


321 


Pembroke 


Genesee 


J. S. Dodge 


262 


387 


Pendleton • 


Niagara 


J. Dunn 


284 


406 


Penfield 


Monroe 


D. E. Lewis 


222 


371 


Penn-Yan 


Yates 


C. P. Babcock 


192 


329 


Peoria 


Wyoming 


J. Gordon 


238 


356 


Pep acton 


Delaware 


C. Knapp 


93 


32! 





POST-OFFICES. 




IJl 








Miles 


from 


Post-Office. 


County. 


Post-Maslcr. 


Albany. Wash'ton. 


Perch River 


Jefferson 


H. Smith 


175 


427 


Perinlon 


Monroe 


C. H. Dickinson 


226 


375 


Perry 


Wyoming 


A. D. Smith 


243 


360 


Perry Centre 


Wyoming 


J. Lathrop 


245 


362 


Perrysburgh 


Cattaraugus 


W. Cooper 


306 


358 


Perry's Mills 


Clinton 


L. Perry 


193 


568 


Perrysville 


Madison 


S. Judd 


115 


358 


Persia 


Cattaraugus 


R. Plumb 


302 


354 


Perth 


Fulton 


J. Swobe 


46 


419 


Peru 


Clinton 


N. Rice 


153 


528 


Peruville 


Tompkins 


W.Baldwin 


165 


309 


Peterborough 


Madison 


H. Williams 


108 


361 


Petersburgh 


Rensselaer 


J. Nolton 


26 


392 


Petersburgh 4 Cor's 


Rensselaer 


S. Reynolds 


31 


397 


Pharsalia 


Chenango 


C. P. Browning 


127 


336 


Phelps 


Ontario 


W. Hildreth 


185 


350 


Philadelphia 


Jefferson 


W. Strong 


172 


432 


Philipsport 


Sullivan 


G. David 


92 


287 


Philipsville 


Allegany 


E. H. Willard 






Phillipsburgh 


Orange 


N. T. Wynkoop 


109 


282 


Phoenix 


Oswego 


J. M. Rice 


148 


365 


Piermont 


Rockland 


P. H. Taulman 


135 


258 


Pierrepont 


St. Lawrence 


A. A. Crampton 


202 


436 


PifTardiana 


Livingston 


D. S. Thompson 






Pike 


Allegany 


H. Hatch 


257 


350 


Pillar Point 


Jefferson 


J. L. Alger 






Pine 


Oneida 


W. Beach 


117 


387 


Pine Grove 


Steuben 


D. Forshea 


198 


306 


Pine Hill 


Ulster 


T. Smith 


175 


349 


Pine Plains 


Dutchess 


R. W. Bostwick 


62 


327 


Pine's Bridge 


Westchester 


C. F. Ferris 


• 123 


265 


Pineviht 


Steuben 


D. B. Bryan 


220 


305 


Piseco 


Hamilton 


E. Thompson 






Pitcairn 


St. Lawrence 


J. Sloper 


171 


470 


Pitcher 


Chenango 


E. C. Lyons 






Pitcher Springs 


Chenango 


O.F. Forbes 


126 


332 


Pittsfield 


Otsego 


R. Spafford 


95 


352 


Pittsford 


Monroe 


H. Fitch 


213 


362 


Pittstown 


Rensselaer 


L. Reed 


25 


393 


Plainfield 


Otsego 


L. Smith 


84 


373 


Plainville 


Onondaga 


J. Buck 


155 


360 


Plattekill 


Ulster 


C. Drake 


85 


295 


Plattsburgh 


Clinton 


L. Piatt 


163 


538 


Pleasant Plains 


Dutchess 


B. L VanKemen 


67 


312 


Pleasant Valley 


Dutchess 


R. B. Sharpstern 


79 


306 


Pleasantville 


Westchester 


A. Browner 


122 


264 


Plessis 


Jefferson 


J. Clark 


189 


441 


Plymouth 


Chenanso 
Rensselaer 


D. Munroe 


120 


344 


Poestenkill 


H. Vanderzee 


13 


3S3 


Point Peninsula 


Jefferson 


W. W^ilcox 






Poland 


Herkimer 


P. A. Finner 


89 


406 


Poland Centre 


Chautauque 


E. Crosby 






Pompey 


Onondaga 


H. Wheaton 


125 


337 


Pompey Centre 


Onondaga 


L. S. Holbrook 


113 


347 


Pondsville 


Essex 


T. Russell 


107 


482 


Poolsville 


Madison 


N. EatoD 


95 


355 



1152 


POST-OFFICES. 












Miles 


from 


Post-Office. 


County. 


Post-Master. Albany. Wash'lon. 


Poplar Ridge 


Cayuga 


A. Shourds 


168 


324 


Portageville 


Allegany 


A. S. Green 


262 


357 


Port-Byron 


Cayuga 


H. D. Eldridge 


158 


341 


Port-Chester 


Westchester 


G. W. Smith 


136 


255 


Port-Crane 


Broome 


I. Bishop 






Porter's Corners 


Saratoga 


0. Peacock 


43 


413 


Port-Gibson 


Ontario 


A. Huntoon 


189 


337 


Port- Glasgow 


Wayne 


M. W. Gage 


186 


366 


Port-Henry 


Essex 


L McVine 


118 


489 


Port-Jackson 


Montgomery 


W. M. Hill 


33 


400 


Port- Jefferson 


Suffolk 


J. R. Mather 


202 


282 


Port-Jarvis 


Orange 


C. Hardenburgh 


117 


264 


Port-Kendall 


Essex 


L. Higby 






Port-Kent 


Essex 


J. R. Dickinson 


151 


526 


Portland 


Chautauque 


J. R. Coney 


332 


352 


Port-Ontario 


Oswego 


S. S. Read 


170 


392 


Porlville 


Cattaraugus 


H. Dusenbury 






Post's Corners 


Chemung 


J. T. Strong 


201 


277 


Postville 


Herkimer 


J. Post 


98 


413 


Potsdam 


St. Lawrence 


J. Smith 


212 


496 


Potter 


Yates 


J. J. Schenck 


201 


326 


Pottersville 


Warren 


J. F. Potter 


87 


462 


POUGHKEEPSIE 


Dutchess 


L Van Benlhuysen 


71 


299 


Poughquog 


Dutchess 


S. V. Rogers 






Poundridge 


Westchester 


W. L. Smith 


121 


274 


Prattsburgh 


Steuben 


S. A. Johnson 


209 


315 


Pratt's Hollow 


Madison 


W. A. Anderson 


106 


363 


Prattsville 


Greene 


F. A. Fenner 


54 


360 


Preble 


Cortland 


J. B. Phelps 


131 


324 


Preston 


Chenango 


D. Noyes 


118 


342 


Princeton 


Schenectady 


H. Van Vranken 


19 


389 


Prospect 


Oneida 


J. Thomas 


103' 


408 


Prospect Hill 


Rensselaer 


L.Blakely 


24 


394 


Providence 


Saratoga 


S. Allen 


41 


409 


Pultney 


Steuben 


J.T.Benton 


213 


316 


Pultneyville 


Wayne 


J. Reynolds 


204 


368 


Pulver's Corners 


Dutchess 


C. M. Morgan 


58 


331 


Punchkill 


Schoharie 


J. R. De Noyelles 


37 


388 


Purdy Creek 


Steuben 


C. N. Hart 


247 


315 


Purvis 


Sullivan 


B. Phillips 


J 09 


314 


Putnam 


Washington 


W. G. Cerbert 






Putnam "Valley 


Putnam 


A. Tompkins 






Quaker Hill 


Dutchess 


J. Toffey 


92 


304 


Quaker Springs 


Saratoga 


E. A. Mosher 


32 


402 


Quaker Street 


Schenectady 


J. Cleveland 






Queensbury 


Warren 


H. Barber 


57 


429 


Quogue 


Suffolk 


J. P. Howell 


235 


315 


Rackett River 


St. Lawrence 


P. \^als 

J. HT Pierson 






Ramapo Works 


Rockland 


113 


265 


Randolph 


Cattaraugus 


T. S. Sheldon 


313 


336 


Ransomville 


Niagara 


D. B. Douglass 


290 


416 


Rathboneville 


Steuben 


R. Rathbone 


233 


298 


Raymertown 


Rensselaer 


C. Baker 


21 


389 


Raymondville 


St. Lawrence 


G. 1. Hall 


246 


516 


Reading 


Steuben 


H. Chapman 


194 


305 


Redfield 


Oswego 


R. Drake 


139 


402 





POST-OFFICES. 


-* 


ItJ^ 








Miles 


from 


Post-Office. 


County. 


Post-Mapter, 


Albany. Wash' ion. 


Red ford 


Clinton 


M.Lane 


185 


atilJ 


Red Hook 


Dutchess 


P. N. Bonesteel 


49 


321 


Red Mills 


Putnam 


W. B. Hazelton 


107 


280 


Redwood 


Jeflerson 


P. Symonds 


188 


440 


Reed's Corners 


Ontario 


M. Reed . 






Reidsville 


Albany 


F. Ward 


18 


372 


Remsen 


Oneida 


A. Billings 


100 


405 


Rensselaerville 


Albany 


J. S. Kenyoke 


26 


369 


Republican 


Oneida 


E; Hunt 






Reservation 


Erie 


D. Evvell 


272 


378 


Rexf'ord Flats 


Saratoga 


N. Cole 


21 


389 


Reynoldsville 


Tompkins 


I. Reynolds 


178 


311 


Rhinebeck 


Dutchess 


T. Wortman 


55 


315 


Rhodes 


Onondaga 


J. Adams 


148 


350 


Rice vi lie 


Fulton 


R. Alexander 


56 


420 


Richburgh 


Allegany 


F. W. Leonard 


282 


315 


Richfield 


Otsego 


J. C. Monson 


72 


376 


Richford 


Tioga 


C. Rich 


144 


295 


Richland 


Oswego 


D. H.Fisk 


155 


385 


Richmond 


Richmond 


J. Johnson 


159 


237 


Richmond Valley 


Richmond 


H. Cole 


167 


245 


Richmondville 


Schoharie 


J. H. Mumford 


47 


381 


Richville 


St. Lawrence 


J. C. Rich 


187 


456 


Ridge 


Livingston 


G. Chidsey 


246 


357 


Ridgebury 


Orange 


G. Hulse 


113 


270 


Ridgeville 


Madison 


D. Penfield 


122 


369 


Ridgeway 


Orleans 


H.Francis 


262 


400 


Riga 


Monroe 


O.lde 


241 


382 


Ripley 


Chautauque 


E. Bruce 


350 


358 


River Road Forks 


Livingston 


W. W. Dake 


247 


358 


River Side 


Ulster 


L. H. M. Butler 






Rochester 


Monroe 


S. G. Andrews 


220 


369 


Rockaway 


Queens 


D. T. Jennings 


168 


248 


Rock City 


Dutchess 


K. K. Buckanon 


59 


310 


Rockland 


Sullivan 


P. Stewart 


102 


321 


Rockland Lake 


Rockland 


T.L Wilcox 






Rock Stream 


Yates 


H. A. Newcomb 


198 


313 


Kockville 


Allegany 


L. Tibbetts 


269 


331 


Rodman 


Jefferson 


W. H. Mofiett 


163 


408 


Rome 


Oneida 


J. Hathaway 


107 


-391 


Romulus 


Seneca 


E Watson 


183 


329 


Rondout 


Ulster 


E. R. Bevier 


59 


314 


Roosevelt 


Oswego 


A. Ross 


145 


370 


Root 


Montgomery 


J. Bowdish 


44 


400 


Rose 


Wayne 


E. N. Thomas 


179 


359 


Roseboom 


Otsego 


W. H. Sutphen 


59 


384 


Rosendale 


Ulster 


J. A. Snyder 


65 


315 


Rossie 


St. Lawrence 


Z. Gates 


183 


4.52 


Rossville 


Richmond 


B. P. Winant 


163 


241 


Rotterdam 


Schenectady 


M. P. Thomas 


22 


390 


Rouse's Point 


Clinton 


N.Webb 


185 


560 


Roxbury 


Delaware 


E. J. Burhans 


65 


352 


Royalton 


Niagara 


E. M. Clark 


271 


406 


Rush 


Monroe 


C. F. Dickinson 


218 


363 


Rush ford 


Allegany 


0. Boardman 


272 


331 


Rushviiie 


Ontario 


P. Vorce " 


159 


331 



12 



ly-i 


POST-OFFICES. 












Miles 


from 


Post-Office. 


County. 


Post-Master. Albany. Wash'ton. 


Russell 


St.Xawrence 


H. Knox 


192 


476 


Russia 


Herkimer 


I. Betticher 


93 


408 


Rutherville 


St. Lawrence 


T. Peacock 






Rutland 


Jefferson 


J. J. Tuttle 


153. 


422 


Rye 


Westchester 


G. B. Strong 


146 


251 


Richfield Springs 


Otsego 


A. R. Ellwood 






Sackett's Harbor 


Jefferson 


E. M. Luff 


174 


415 


Sag Harbor 


Suffolk 


J. Sherry 


260 


340 


Saint Andrews 


Orange 


D. Lawson 


94 


296 


St, Johnsville 


Montgomery • 


L. Averill 


61 


394 


Salem 


Washington 


A, Austin 


46 


416 


Salem Centre 


Westchester 


S. H. Smith 


115 


279 


Salem Cross Roads 


Chautauqua 


S. Hall 


230 


352 


Salina 


Onondaga 


A. H. Newcomb 


133 


350 


Salisbury 


Herkimer 


A. S Gage 


73 


. 413 


Salisbury Centre 


Herkimer 


H. Hadley 


75 


405 


Salisbury Mills 


Orange 


P. Cannon 


93 


287 


Salmon Creek 


Wayne 


W. Filkins • 


196 


367 


Salmon River 


Oswego 


A. R. Angell 






Salt Point 


Dutchess 


R. D. C. Vanderburg 74 


311 


Salt Springville 


Montgomery 


A. T. Hardendorff 


63 


381 


Salubria 


Chemung 


E. Quin 


191 


302 


Sammonsville 


Fulton 


N. Fitch 






Sand Bank 


Oswego 


S. A. Comslock 


147 


393 


Sandbury 


Sullivan 


S. Andrews 


9S 


303 


Sand ford 


Broome 


J. Luscomb 


120 


304 


Sand Lake 


Rensselaer 


G.Butts 


17 


384 


Sandusky 


Cattaraugus 


E. Holmes 


272 


343 


Sandy Creek 


Oswego 


N. Salisbury 


161 


391 


Sandy Hill 


Washington 


T. Toole 


53 


423 


Sandford's Corners 


Jefferson 


J. A. Shipman 


169 


421 


Sangerfield 


Oneida 


D. North 


88 


372 


Saranac 


Clinton 


A. Hull 


181, 


556 


Saratoga Springs 


Saratoga 


J. Ellsworth 


36 


406 


Sardinia 


Erie 


Z. W. Fuller 


276 


343 


Saugerties 


Ulster 


A. B. Dewitt 


45 


331 


Sauquoit 


Oneida 


F. S. Savage 


90 


379 


Savannah 


Wayne 


C. Ives 


168 


348 


Sayvllle 


Suffolk 


D. Howell 


199 


279 


Scha'^hticoke 


Rensselaer 


C. B. Stratton 


20 


390 


Schenectady 


Schenectady 


T. L. Thompson 


16 


384 


Schodack Centre 


Rensselaer 


H. I. Vandercar 


6 


371 


Schodack Landing 


'Rensselaer 


A. I. Johnson 


12 


358 


Schoharie 


Schoharie 


■ J. W. Throop 


32 


3S3 


Schroon Lake 


Essex 


G. W. Lee 


95 


470 


Schroon River 


Essex 


R. D, Lindsay 






Schultzville 


Dutchess 


D. H. Schullz 






Schuyler's Falls 


Clinton 


M. Bullis 


157 


532 


Schuyler's Lake 


Otsego 


I. P. Sill 


75 


365 


Schuylersville 


Saratoga 


J. P. Cramer 


34 


406 


Scienceville 


Greene 


A. Tuttle 


48 


365 


Scio 


Allegany 


B. Palmer 


2.56 


320 


Scipio 


Cayuga 


L E. Beardsley 


164 


329 


Scipioville 


Cayuga 


A. S. Allen 


164 


323 


Sconondoah 


Oneida 


S. S. Breese 


115 


378 


Scotch Town 


Orange 


D. W. Smith 


87 


284 



POST-OFFICES. 



135 



Post-office. 
Scotia 
Scotland 
Scott 

Scottsburgh 
Scottsville 
Scriba 
Searsburgh 
Seely Creek 
Seelysburgh 
Sempronius 
Seneca Castle 
Seneca Falls 
Sennett 
Setauket 
Shandaken 
Sharon 

Sharon Centre 
Shaverlown 
Shawnee 
Shawangunk 
Shelby 
Shelby Basin 
Sheldon 
Shenandoah 
Sherbarne 
Sheridan 
Shermnn 

Sherwood's Corners 
Shingle Creek 
Shokan 
Short Tract 
Shrub Oak • 
Shushan 
Sidney 

Sidney Centre 
Sidney Plains 
Siloam 
Silver Creek 
Silver Lake 
Sing-Sing 
SixTviiie'Creek 
Skaneateles 
Slate Hill 
Slatcsvillc 
Sloansville' 
Smilhsborough 
Smith's Mills 
Smithton 
Smithtown 
Smitliville 
Smithville Flats 
Smoky Hollow 
Smyrna 
Sociality 
Spdus 
Sodus Centre 



County. ■ 
Schenectady" 
Rockland 
Cortland 
Livingston 
Monroe 
Oswego 
Tompkins 
Chemung 
Cattaraugus 
Cayuga 
Ontario 
Seneca 
Cayuga 
Sufloik 
Ulster 
Schoharie 
Schoharie 
Delaware 
Niagara 
Delaware 
Orleans 
Orleans 
Wyoming 
Dutchess 
Chenango 
Chautauqua 
Chautauque 
Cayuga 
St. Lawrence 
Ulster 
Allegany 
Westchester 
Washin 
Delaware 
Delaware 
Delaware 
Madison 
Chautauque 
Wyoming 
Westchester 
Oswego 
Onondaga 
Orange 
Tompkins 
Schoharie 
Tioga 

Chautauque 
Schoharie 
Suffolk 
JcfTerson 
Chenans;o 
Columbia 
Chemung 
Cattaraugus 
Wayne . 
Wayne 



Post-Master. 
B. Cramer 
P. D. Taliman 
H. S. Babcock 
W. Scott 
I. Carpenter 
J. Church 

D. F. -Sears 
W. R. Shepard 
L. T. Thorp 

A. Heald 
T. Ottly 
I. Fuller 
H. Fisher 

J. R. Salerly 

B. H. O. NeiU 
R. Moak 

J. Killer 
A. Shaver 
J. S. Ayre 
G. G. Graham 
J. Gibson 

C. Servoss 

E. Baldwin 
W. I. Horton 
W. C. While 
J. L Eacker 
E. Miller 

A. Thomas 

A. Stephens 
T. Hill 

J. Piatt 
L. Purdy 
M. H. Stevens 
G. Thatcher 
W. Smith 
W. Johnston 

D. Dickey 

E. Ward • 
R. Surelam 
G. E. Stanton 
N. Coburn 
C. J. Burnett 
E. Mills 

J. Heath 

G. L. Schu-yler 

B. Brooks 
R. B. Smith 
A. Wilsey 
J. Mills 

O. H. Harris 
M. Read 
J. Holsapplc 

M. sutiiir 

E. Dutton 
J. Warner 
0. Taylor 



Miles from 

Albany. Wash'ton. 

18 386 

126 260 

149 325 



232 

167 
177 
203 
309 
164 
186 
166 
15S 
200 

83 . 

43 

46 

89 
285 

87 
262 
265 
265 

93 
103 
324 
357 
156 



266 

112 

47 

93 

98 

99 

110 

318 

248 

116 

155 

147 

113 

153 

33 

171 

313 

41 

191 

179 

125 

37 

103 

309 

195 

191 



372 
377 
310 
271 
345 
328 
351 
342 
338 
280 
342 
392 
388 
325 
410 
296 
395 
400 
363 
394 
347 
351 
346 
321 



345 
275 
417 
324 
333 
325 
364 
357 
361 
258 
372 
340 
276 
304 
392 
272 
360 
364 
271 
410 
319 
349 
351 
34/ 
371 
367 



136 



Post-Office. 
Sodus Point 
Solon 
Somers 
Somerset 
Somerville 
South Araenia 
Southampton 
Soujh Argyle 
South Avon 
South Bainbridge 
South Barre 
South Branch 
South Bristol 
South Butler 
South Byron 
South Cameron 
South Canton 
South Chili 
South Columbia 
South Corinth 
South Cortland 
South Danby 
South Dansville 
South Dickinson 
South Dover 
South Durham 
South East 
South Easton 
South Edmeston 
South Edward 
South Franklin 
South Granville 
South Hammond 
South Hartford 
South Kortright 
South Lansing 
South Livonia 
South Lodi 
South Marcellus 
South Middletown 
South New Berlin 
Southold 
South Onondaga 
South Otselic 
South Oxford 
South Owego 
Southport 
South Pultney 
South Royalton 
South Rutland 
South Salem 
South Schodack 
South Sodus 
South Stephentown 
South Trenton 
South Valley 



POST- 


OFFICES. 










Miles from 


County. 


Post-Master. 


Albany. Wash'ton 


Wayne 


W. Wickhara 


201 


377 


Cortland 


H. L. Emerson 


13S 


323 . 


Westchester 


F. J. Coffin 


119 


274 


Niagara 


J. Mathews 


276 


419 


St. Lawrence 


S. Pratt 


176 


445 


Dutchess 


C. Reed 


• 68 


325 


Suffolk . 


A. Foster 


250 


330 


Washington 


W. Congdon 


42 


412 


Livingston 


C. Y. Isham 


224 


353 


Chenango 


J. P. Chamberlain 


110 


314 


Orleans 


D. Ketchum 


256 


386 


Allegany 


R; T. Green 


278 


319 


Ontario 


A. Brown 


213 


349 


Wayne 


0. P. Palmer 


174 


354 


Genesee 


E. Cash 






Steuben 


p. Chase 


230 


298 


St. Lawrence 


A. Ames- 


238 


500 


Monroe 


J. Lynde 


234 


375 


Herkimer 


J. L. Hatch 


72 


^76 


Saratoga 


A. Denel 


47 


417 


Cortland 


J.Siillman 


151 


313 


Tompkins 


A. Bennett 


171 


292 


Steuben 


T. M. Bo wen 


239 


321 


Franklin 


E. Baker 






Dutchess 


S. Preston 


80 


307 


Greene 


P. G. Grant 


50 


352 


Putnam 


0. B. Crane 


107 


291 


Washington 


T. P. Beadle 


30 . 


400 


Otsego 


D. H. Spurr 


93 


351 


St. Lawrence 


J. C. Hall 


ISl 


4G0 


Delaware 


J. R. Finch 






Washington 


S. Woodward 


• 




St. Lawrence 


H. King 


194 


448 


Washington 


J. Allen 


55 


425 


Delaware 


E. Keeler 


69 


349 


Tonipkins 


D. D.Miner 


170 


303 


Livingston 


0. Hastings 


228 


349 


Seneca 


J. Ingersoll 


188 


319 


Onondaga 


H. Slade 


144 


340 


Orange 


L. Vail 


112 


285 


Chenango 


D. Gifford 


. 106 


339 


Suffolk 


S. S. Horton 


241 


321 


Onondaga 


T. J. Fenn 


138 


341 


Chenango 


J. Clark 


119 


339 


Chenango 


E. Park 


115 


322 


Tioga 


C. Lamb 


169 


283 


Chemung 


W. C. Waeir 


197 


277 


Steuben 


L. Drew 


216 


313' 


Niagara 


S. B. Pratt 


274 


394 


Jefferson . 


A.. Chapin 


156 


416 


Westchester 


G. Hawley 


118 


272 


Rensselaer 


J. S. Hare 


13 


364 


Wayne 


E. Rosers 


188 


364 


Rensselaer 


C. Moffit 


28 


373 


Oneida 


E. Thomas 


100 


397 


Otsego 


D. W. Rice 


63 


385- 





roST-OFFICES. 




137 




• 




Mile; 


5 from 


Post-Office. 


County. 


Post-Master. 


Albany. 


Wash' ton. 


South Venice 


Cayuga 


A. Tupper 


163 


321 


Southville 


St. Lawrence 


S. Livinsston 


223 


507 


South Wales 


Erie 


D. S. Warner 


285 


356 


South Weslerlo 


Albany 


T. Sax ton 


27 


363 


Southwick 


Ulster 


I. Van Valkenburg 93 


298 


South Windsor 


Broome 


J. B. Watson 


131 


295 


South AVorcester 


Otsego 


J. B. Strain 


62 


368 


Spafford 


Onondnga 


J. Collins 


154 


334 


Spafford Hollow 


Onondaga ' 


W. 0. Farrell 


137 


331 


Sparta 


Livingston 


H. Havens 


241 


336 


Speedsville 


Tompkins 


L. W. Kingman 


177 


307 


Spencer 


Tioga 


H. Miller 


179 


280 


Spencerport 


Monroe 


C. Church 


234 


380 


Spencertown 


Columbia 


A. P. Holdridge 


29 


359 


Speonk 


Suffolk 


0. TuthiU 


228 


308 


Split Rock 


Essex 


R. Whallon 


133 


504 


Spraker's Basin 


Montgomery 


T. Van Deusen 


47 


398 


Springfield 


Otsego 


W. L. Bigelow 


61 


379- 


Spring Mills 


Allegany 


W. H. Cobb 


269 


297 


Springville 


Erie 


S. Lake 


287 


353 


Springwatcr 


Livingston 


A. Southworth 


226 


341 


Sprout Creek 


Dutchess • 


S. Thorn 


80 


307 


Spruce 


Oswego 


J. Jones 


148 


382 


Square 


Cayuga 


P. Van Keurcn 


161 


326 


Staatshursh 


Dutchess 


James Russell 


61 


309 


Stafford 


Grenesee 


S. Marks 


243 


377 


Stamford 


Delaware 


T. Montgomery 


61 


357 


Sta n ford vi lie 


Dutchess 


W. H. Stewart 


67 


318 


Starkey 


Yates 


B. TuthiU 


188 


315 


Starkville 


Herkimer 


J. R. Hall 


62 


38.5 


State Bridge 


Madison . 


G. T. Kirkland 


119 


376 


Stephentown 


Rensselaer 


. N. Gardner" 


28 


376 


Sterling 


Cayuga 


N. Vilas 


179 


362 


Sterlingville 


Jefferson 


F. Van Ostrand 






Steuben 


Oneida 


M: Brooks 


101 


407 


Stillwater 


Saratoga 


W. J. Bird 


22 


392 


Slockbridge 


Madison " 


H. T. Summer 


113 


366 


Stockholm 


St. Lawrence 


B. Holmes 


223 


507 


Stockport 


Columbia 


C. C. Hoes 


24 


346 


Stockton 


Chautauquc 


P. Laselle 


231 


338 


Stokes 


Oneida 


J N. Husted 


115 


399 


Stone Arabia 


Montgomery 


D. L. Shull 


57 


400 


Stone Church 


Genesee 


M. C. Ward 


240 


375 


Stone Mills 


Jefferson 


W. H. Harger 


176 


426 


Stone Ridge , 


Ulster 


J. H. Wiston 


67 


315 


Stone Brook 


Suffolk 


J. N. Gould 


197 


277 


Stony Creek 


Warren 


J. Thompson 






Stony Hill 


Albany 


J. McEwcn 


9 


379 


StormviUe 


Dutchess 


J. Tompkins 


90 


301 


Stow's Square 


Lewis 


C. Davenport 


140 


439 


Stratton's Fall 


Delaware 


E. W. Stratton 


68 


349 


Strykersville 


Wyoming 


L. P. Runals 


270 


358 


Stuyvesant 


Columbia 


W. Butler 


77 


351 


Stuyvesant Falls 


Columbia 


E. M. Coventry 


27 


350 


Success 


Suffolk 


J. Luce 






Suffolk C. House 


Suffolk 


G. Halsey 


226 


306 



12 



138 



Post-Offlce. 
Sugar Hill 
Sugar Loaf 
Sullivan 
Summer Hill 
Summit 
Susquebannah 
Sweden 
Syracuse 
Taberg 
Taghkanic 
Tannersville 
Tappantown 
Tarrytown 
Ten Mile Spring 
Ten Mile River 
Texas 
The Corner 
The Purchase 
Theresa 
Thompsonville 
Three Mile Bay 
Throopsville 
Ticonderoga 
Tioga 

Tioga Centre 
Tivoli 
Tobehanna 
Tomhannock 
Tompkinsville 
Tonawanda 
Towlesville 
Towners 
Town Line 
Townsend 
Townsendville 
Trenton 
Trenton Falls 
Triangle 
Tribes Hill 
Troupsburgh 
Troy 

Trumansburgh 
Truxton 
. Tully 
Tuliy Valley 
Tunangwant Mills 
Turin 
Tuscarora 
Tuthill 
Tyre 
Tyrone 
Tangore 
Ulslerville 
Unadilla 
Unadilla Centre 
Unadilla Forks 



POST- 


OFFICES. 








• 


Miles 


from 


County. 


Post-Master. 


Albany. Wash'ton 


Steuben 


A. Scoby 


198 


310 


Orange 


E. Wells 


105 


274 


Madison 


E. Hazeltine 


122 


354 


Cayuga 


A. Cook 


149 


325 


Schoharie 


I. W. Baird 


52 


378 


Broome 


W. Doolittle 


122 


304 


Monroe 


R. A. Gillett 


237 


386 


Onondaga 


H. Rayner 


131 


348 


Oneida 


R. Hyde 


118' 


402 


Columbia 


. J. Yager 


41 


347 


Greene 


C. Butler 


60 


352 


Rockland 


M. Barto 


134 


256 


Westchester 


J. Odell 


122 


252 


Cattaraugus 


A. M. easier 






Sullivan 


S. Hawkins 


137 


287 


Oswego 


H. Parker 


165 


387 


Ulster 


A. D. Laden 


77 


336 


"Westchester 


J. I. Carpenter 


133 


258 


Jefferson 


A. Rauney 


183 


435 


Sullivan 


E. Thompson 


105 


299 


Jefl'erson 


S. P. E. Powers 


182 


434 


Cayuga 


C. R. Wolley 


158 


337 


Essex 


G. R. Andrews . 


97 


469 


Tioga 


J. Y. Smith 


176 


277 


Tioga 


W. Ransom 


167 


276 


Dutchess 


J. Outwater 


51 


329 


Steuben 


A. Kendall 


198 


313 


Rensselaer 


J. Reed • 


20 


390 


Richmond 


E. Thompson 


154 


234 


Erie 


J. Kibler 


298 


392 


Steuben 


R. Towie 


227 


307 


Putnam 


J. Towner 


95 


292 


Erie 


C. Wilbor 


275 


382 


Chemung 


S. C. Swine 


194 


302 


Seneca 


W. A. McClellan 






Oneida 


J. Billings 


96 


401 


Oneida 


D. W. Bacon 


93 


403 


Broome 


E. G. Kenney 


126 


307 


Montgomery 


F.. Putnam 


37 


mi 


Steuben 


C.Card 


246 


282 


Rensselaer 


C. H. Read 


6 


376 


Tompkins 


J. McLallen 


173 


306. 


Cortland 


E. Miller 


130 


327 


Onondaga 


H. F. King 


127 


328 


Onondaga 


J. T. Irish 


.131 


332 


Cattaraugus 


F. E. Perkins 






Lewis 


J. 0. Mott 


127 


435 


Livingston 


J. P. Dodge 


249 


346 


Ulster 


J. 0. Hasbrouck 


81 


305 


Seneca 


J.Smith 


171 


347 


Steuben 


S. H. Arnold 


202 


310 


Ulster 


I. Coons 






Ulster 


S. Otis 


94 


292 


Otsego 


Geo. H. Noble 


94 


334 


Otsego 


E. Gresory 


100 


337 


Otsego 


H. H. Babepck 


84 


369 





POST-01 


?FIC£S. 




139 








Miles from 


Post-OflSce. 


County. 


Post-Master. 


Albany. W; 


ash'ton. 


Union 


Broome 


E. Robins 


146 


288 


Union Corners 


Livingston 


W. Youngs 


251 


343 


Union Ellery 


Chautauque 


0. Benedict 


341 


328 


Union Falls 


Clinton 


H. Frizell 


168 


543 


Union Mills 


Fulton 


J. Marsh 


46 


420 


Union Society 


Greene 


E. Z. Carbine 


51 


358 


Union Springs 


Cayuga 


G. P. Morgan 


168 


329 


Union Square 


Oswego 


A. Skinner 


152 


377 


Union Village 


Broome 


S. Salisbury 


137 


314 


Unionville 


Orange 


J. Chandler 


119 


264 


Upper Aquebogue 


Sufiblk 


B. Griffing 


226 


306 


Upper Lisle 


Broome 


G. Wheeler 


133 


316 


Upper Redhook ' 


Dutchess 


J. V, A. Lyle 


46 


324 


Urbana 


Steuben 


A. M. Adist 


211 


307 


Utica 


Oneida 


A. G, Dauby 


92 


•388 


Uxbridge 


Montgomery 


J. P. Yates 






Vail's Mills 


Fulton 


B. Simmons 






Valatia 


Columbia 


W. Bain 


20 


335 


Vallonia Springs 


Broome 


L. Stowell 


114 


310 


Van Buren 


Onondaga 


C. C. Clapp 


141 


358 


Van Buren Centre 


Onondaga 


J. Skinner 


144 


351 


Van Buren Harbor 


Chautauque 


G. C. Osborn 


334 


354 


Van Burenville 


Orange 


I. B. Everett 


107 


278 


Vandermark 


Allegany 


A. Black 


258 


328 


Van Etlenville 


Chemung 


D. C. Van Etten 


183 


284 


Van Hornsville 


Herkimer 


D. Van Home 


64 


382 


Varick 


Seneca 


J. G. Gambie 


186 


332 


Varna 


Tompkins 


W. Scutt 


161 


299 


Varysburgh 


Wyoming 


C. Wilder 


264 


369 


Venice 


Cayuga 


E. W. Bateman 


164 


325 


Verbank 


Dutchess 


J. G. Greene 


82 


309 


Vermont 


Chautauque 


S. E. Palmer 


335 


325 


Vernal 


Wyoming 


0. Collins 


252 


370 


Vernon 


Oneida 


I. Hand - 


108 


371 


Vernon Centre 


Oneida 


N. S. Wright 


105 


.376 


Verona 


Oneida 


G. T. Peekmen 


108 


371 


Verplank 


Westchester 


W. Bleakley 


105 


265 


Versailles 


Cattaraugus 


A. H. Barker 


308 


361 


Vesper 


Onondaga 


C. Tallman 


•135 


332 


Vestal 


Broome 


D. Foster 


147 


289 


Veteran 


Chemung 


W. Van Dusen 


187 


290 


Victor 


Ontario 


A. P. Dickenson 


205 


351 


Victory 


Cayuga 


L. H. Baldwin 


' 169 


• 352 


Vienna 


Oneida 


L. Bridges 


• 120 


383 


Villanova 


Chautauque 


V. Balcom 


323 


346 


Virgil 


CorjLland 


A. E. Hibbard 


149 


308 


Visscher's Ferry 


Saratoga 


W. Shepherd 


17 


387 


Vista 


Westchester 


W. M. Crissey 


119 


276 


Volney 


Oswego 


S. Griswold 


152 


375 


Volusia 


Chautauque 


J. Howard 


348 . 


351 


Waddington 


St. Lawrence 


H. W. Pratt 


228 


495 


Wadham's Mills 


Essex 


L R. Delano 


131 


502 


Wading River 


Suffolk 


Z. M. Miller 


215 


295 


Walden 


Orange 


J. Kidd 


90 


292 


Waldensville 


Schoharie 


H. Walden 


27 


391 


Wales 


Erie 


J. M. Joslia 


272 


369 



140 



Fost-Office. 
Wales Centre 
Walton 
Walworth 
Wampsville 
Wappinger's Creek 
Warren • 
Warrensburgh 
Warsaw 
Warwick 
Washington 
Washington Hollow 
Walerborough 
Waterburgh 
Waterford 
Waterloo 
Watertown 
Watervale 
Water Valley 
Waterville 
Waterville Corners 
Watervliet 
Watervliet Centre 
Watson 
Wawarsing 
Wayne 
Webster 
Weedsport 
Wellington 
Wells ^ 
Wells' Corners 
Wellsville 
Wessex 
West Addison 
West Almond 
West Bergin 
West Bloomfield 
West Branch 
West Brookville 
West Burlington 
West Camden 
West Camp 
West Candor 
West Carlton 
West- Catlin 
West Cayuta 
West Charlton 
West Chateaugay 
West Chazy 
Westchester 
West Clarksville 
West Conesus 
West Constable 
West Davenport 
West Day 
West Dresden 
West Dryden 



POST-OFFICES. 










Miles 


from 


County. 


Post-Master. 


Albany. V 


I'^ash'ton, 


Erie 


M. W. Stevens 






Delaware 


A. N. Wheeler 


97 


321 


Wayne 


L. Eddy 


205 


362 


Madison 


L. Burghardt 


117 


362 


Dutchess 


E. D. Sweet 


■ 78 


294 


Herkimer 


W. Kinne 


64 


375 


Warren 


C. Morgan 


69 


444 


Wyoming 


I. C. Bronson 


251 


363 


Orange 


M. McEwing 


111 


268 


Dutchess 


S. Haight 


79 


314 


Dutchess 


J. S. Simmons 


82 


311 


Chautauque 


F. Holbrook 


318 


331 


Tompkins 


L. Owen 


• 173 


306 


Saratoga 


J. J. Scott 


10 


380 


Seneca 


H. McEwen 


■ 170 


346 


Jefferson 


J. F. Hutchinson 


164 


416 


Onondaga 


I. Curtis 


125 


342 


Erie 


J. F. Lathrop 


303 


373 


Oneida 


C. C. Bacon 


90 


372 


Erie 


A. Wilson 


290 


360 


Albany 


J. M. Barnard 


5 


375 


Albany 


L. Hills 


12 


382 


Lewis 


N. I. Beach 


140 


439 


Ulster 


C. Hoornbeck 


82 


297 


Steuben 


J. B. Mitchell 


198 


316 


Monroe 


O. Reynolds 


214 


371 


Cayuga 


*0. Gallt 


155 


341 


Onondaga 


J. B. Bennett 


144 


352 


Hamilton 


W. R. Weld 


69 


438 


Orange 


J. L. Knapp 






Allegany 


G. B. Jones 


270 


316 


Essex 


Wm. S. Merrian 


135 


510 


Steuben 


R. Saunders 


233 


298 


Allegany 


R. Carrington 


255 


330 


Genesee 


J. D. Doolittle 






Ontario 


E. A. Hall 


209 


355 


Oneida 


R. Dopp 


120 


404 


Sullivan 


A. Westbrook 


180 


274 


Otsego 


T. Moss 


86 


358 


Oneida 


M. Baines 


133 


394 


Ulster 


H. Dederick 


"142 


334 


Tioga 


I. Woodford 


175 


284 


Orleans 


G. Kuck 


262 


405 


Chemung 


G. Crum 


197 


299 


Chemung 


. L.Wood 


195 


296 


Saratog'a 


F. McMartin 


33 


401 


Franklin 


S. F.Morse 


207 


540 


Clinton • 


E. Angell 


173 


547 


Westchester 


S. S. Bowne 


146 


237 


Allegany 


C. Saunders 


289 


308 


Livingston 


J. Henderson 


234 


343 


Franklin 


D. P. Brigham 


221 


560 


Delaware 


C. Miller 


77 


354 


Saratoga 


A. Hunt 


60 


428 


Yates 


J. Bogart 


190 


327 


Tompkins 


J. S. Barber 


169 


305 



POST-OFFICES. 



141 



Post-Office. County. 

West Edmeston Otscso 

Westerlo Albany 

Westernville Oneida 

West Exeter Otsego 

West Farmington Ontario 

West Farms Westchester 

W^est Fayette Seneca 

Westfield Chautauque 

Weslford Otsego 

West Gaines Orleans 
West Galway Church Fulton 

West Genesee Allegany 

West Greenfield Saratoga 

West Groton Tompkins 

W^est Harpersfield Delaware 

W^est Hebron Washington 

West Hempstead Rockland 

West Henrietta Monroe 

West Hills Suffolk. 

West Hinsdale Cattaraugus 

West Kill Greene 

West Lexington . Greene 

West Leyden Lewis 

West Linklaen Chenango 

W'^est Lowville Lewis 

West Martinsburgh Lewis 

W:est Meredith Delaware 
West Middleborough Wyoming 

West Milton Saratoga 

West Monroe Oswego 

"Westmoreland Oneida 

West Niles Cayuga 

West Oneonta Otsego 

West Penfield Monroe 

West Perth Fulton 

West Plaltsburgh Clinton 

West Point Orange 

West Port Essex 

West Richmond Ontario 

W'est Rush Monroe 

West Sand Lake Rensselaer 

West Schuyler Herkimer 

WestSomers • Westchester 

West Stcphentown Rensselaer 

West Stockholm gt. Lawrence 

West Taghkanic Columbia 

West Town Orange 

West Troupsburgh Steuben 

WestUrbana Steuben 

West Vienna Oneida 
Westvllle Otseso 

West Walworth W^ayne 
WestWindfield Herkimer 

West Windsor Broome 

Wetliersfield Wyoming 

•^cthersficld Springs Wyoming 



Miles from 
Post-Master. Albany. Wash'ton. 

E. Chamberlain 90 360 

J. Greene 22 368 

M. Brayton 109 -399 

W. C. Chamberlain 81 371 

P. Hathaway 201 347 

A. Smith 237 246 

S. Gambia 182 336 

Orvis.Nichols 342 345 

G. Skinner 65 379 

H. Noble 256 398 

H. W. Hayes 39 407 

W. Ennis 293 304 

G.B. Lowland 36 406 

T.F.Sherman 170 310 

R. Hotchkiss 66 362 

W. I. Eockes 52 423 

G. Conklin 120 266 

C. Chapman 232 381 

A. Oakley 180 260 

W. S. Pitcher 288 319 

A. Bushnell 69 369 

C. Avery 64 350 

I. Crofoot 229 413 

C. Lee 128 339 
A. Dodge 141 431 
N. N.Harger 137 435 
M. Leet 83 344 
I. S. Thompson 

A. Vedder 31 401 

H.L Jewell 140 368 

A.H. Halleck 103 392 . 

S. Chandler 165 329 

S. Derby 83 353 

E. C. Benedict 217 374 
W. Rob 

N. A. Vaushan 168 543 

C.Berard"' 92 278 

C.B. Hatch 127 498 

S. Reed 220 357 

D. E. Goodinow 221 360 
J. Taylor 14 384 
W. D. Cain 88 392 

E. Frost 1 16 278 
D. Alien 

J. H. Sanford 218 502 

H. Lapham 40 345 

H. O. Halsey 116 267 

C. Bisliop 236 295 
J. Brown 215 311 
S. Jewell 125 383 
H.D, Snyder 68 383 
W. D. Wylie 

D. R. Carrier 78 373 
C. Rose 132 304 
H. Gibhs 258 361 

E. Rood 258 363 



142 



POST-OFFICES. 



Post-Office. 
Wheatland 
Wheeler 
White Creek 
Whitehall 
White Lake 
White Plains 
White Store 
Whitestown 
Whitesville 
Whitlocksville 
Whitney's Point 
Whitney's Valley 
Willett 

Williamsburgh 
Williamson 
Williamstown 
Williams ville 
Willink 
Willsborough 
Willseyville 
Wilmington 
Wilna 
Wilson's 
Wilton 
Windfall 
Windham 
Windham Centre 
Windsor 
Winfield 
Wolcott 
Woodbourne 
WoodhuU 
Woodstock 
Woodville 
Woodwardsville 
Worcester 
Wormley's 
Wrightsburgh 
Wright's Corners 
Wurtsborough 
Wynant's KTh 
Wyoming 
Yates 
Yatesville 
Yonkers 
York 
Yorkshire 
Yorktown 
Youngstown 
Zoar 



County. 
Monroe 
Steuben 
Washington 
Washington 
Sullivan 
Westchester 
Chenango 
Oneida 
Allegany 
Westchester 
Broome 
Allegany 
Cortland 
Kings 
Wayne 
Oswego 
Erie 
Erie 
Essex 
Tioga 
Essex 
Jefferson 
Niagara 
Saratoga 
Onondaga 
Greene 
Greene 
Broome 
Herkimer 
Wayne 
Sullivan 
Steuben 
Ulster 
Jefferson 
Essex 
Otsego 
Steuben 
St. Lawrence 
Niagara 
Sullivan 
Rensselaer 
Wyoming 
Orleans 
Yates 

Westchester 
Living; ton 
Cattaraugus 
Westchester 
Niagara 
Erie 



Post-Master. 
C. Hall 
E. Aulls 
J. D. Mosher 
W. H. Kirtland 
J. Morrison 
W. Horton 
G. Curtis 
M. M. Berry 
M.I.N. Haskin 
W. M. Beyea 
J. D. Smith 
J. Leonard 
J. S. Dyer 

C. L. Cooke 
J. Bennett 
J.Cromwell 
J. Huchinson 
E. Wallis 

L. Higby 
J. Willsey 
H. Carter 
Z. Pennyman 
R, Wilson 
J. K. Allen 

D. Preston 
N. Ormsbee 

A. Stone 

B. H. Russell 
B. Carver 

J. C. Watkins 
\V> B. Falconer 
A. Smith 
S. Culver 

A. V. Wood 
A.Willis 

S. S. Burnside 
R. Stanton 
R. Chamberlin 
S.C.Wright 
W. B. Hammond 
H. Frazer 
W. B. Collier 
P. Saxe 

B. Hobart 

T. A. Farrington 
N. Stewart 
L. Marsh 
J. H. Purdy 
H. W. Phillips 
J. Hill 



Miles from' 
Albany. Wash'lon. 

273 36R' 

216 308 

43 413 

73 443 

118 302 

129 254 

102 "335 

96 392 

265 301 
•125 268 

130 313 
248 329 
134 321 

• 147 227 

200 864 

139 388 

278 391 

278 363 
145 516 
176 290 
153 528 
157 446 
190 420 

43 413 

144 346 

45 363 

49 360 

126 300 

76 375 

180 360 

103 308 
239 295 

69 328 

171 399 

101 -476 

57 371 

223 297 

233 500 

279 406 

97 287 
10 380 

248 366 

266 409 
197 330 
132 242 
238 354 
278 341 
112 275 
298 416 
296 353 



Note. — The number of Post-Offices in the United States on the 27th November, J841, 
■was 1.3,883—1,880 being in the state of New-York. 

In the year 1840 the mail was carried — 
By horse and sulkey, - - 12,182,445 miles; and cost - - - $^789,6()8 
By stage and coach, - - 20,299, '278 " " ... 1.911,855 

By steamboat and railroad, - 3,889,053 " " ... 695,353 



Total, 



36,370,77e 



$3,296,87G 



NEWSPAPERS. 



143 



NEWSPAPERS, 

PUBLISHED IN THE STATE OF NEW-YORK. 



Where the tune is not otherwise stated, the papers are published 
once a week. 

Albany City and County. 



Daily Publications. 
Albany Daily Advertiser, Whig 



Albany Evening Journal, Whig, 

Daily Albany Argus, Dem. 

Albany Morning Atlas, Dem. 

Daily American Citizen, Whig, 
Albany Daily Patriot. Liberty, 

Seini 

Albany Gazette, Whig, 

Albany Journal, Whig, 

Albany Argus, Dem. 

Albany Atlas, (Tri-tccckly,) Dem. 



5 E. W. & C. Skinner, Proprietors. 
I O. L. Holley, Editor. 
^ W. & A. White, Proprietors. 
( Thurlow Weed, Editor. 

E. & S. Croswell, Editors &. Pro. 
< Vance & Co. Proprietors. 
I H. 0'Rielly& Wm. Cassidy, Eds. 
Stone &. Henly, Proprietors. 
Charles T. Torrey, Proprietor. 
-Weekly. 

E. W. & C. Skinner, Proprietors. 
W. & A. White. " 

E. & S. Croswell. " 

Vance & Co. " 



Weekly. 



Albany Weekly Gazette, Whig, 
Albany Weekly Journal, Whig, 
Weekly Argus, Dem. 

Albany Atlas, Dem. 

Albany Microscope, Satirical, 

Albany Switch, do. 

American Masonic Register, Masonic, 
New-York State Mechanic, 
Albany Weekly Patriot, Liberty, 



E. W. & C. Skinner, Proprietors. 
W. & A. White, " 

E. k S. Croswell, " 

Vance & Co., " 

W. S. McCulloch, Proprietor. 
Hugh J. Hastings, Editor & Pro. 
L. G. Hoffman, Publisher. 
J. Munsell, " 

Charles T. Torrey, " " 



The Cultivator, 

District School Journal, 

Northern Light, Literary & Scientific, 

Temperance Recorder, 

Youth's Temperance Enterprise, 



Monthly Publications. 
Agricultural, Luther Tucker, Proprietor. 
Francis Dwight, Editor. 
Alfred B. Street, Editor. 
J'hilip Phelps, " 
M. £. Viele, " 



Golden Rule, (Semi-Monthly.) 
West Troy Advocate, Neutral, 



Allegany Advocate, 
Angelica Reporter, 



Mrs. Maria A, Smith, Editress. 
Wm. Holl&nds, West Troy. 
Allegany County. 

Whig, Erastus Palmer, Angelica. 

Dem. Purdy & Horton, "" 

Broome County. 



Binghamlon Courier and ) jv 

Broome County Democrat, S 
Broome Republican, Whig, 

The Iris, (semi-monthly,) Neut. 



Chas. J. Orton, 

J. B. Penniman, 
N. W. Davis, 



BinghamtoD. 



144 



NEWSPAPERS. 



Cattaraugus County. 



Cattaraugus Republican, 
Cattaraugus Whig, 
Freeman and Messenger,. 
People's Gazette, 
Randolph Herald, 



Dem. R. H. Shankland, Ellicottville. 

Wjiig, D. E.Sill, " 

Whig, G. C. Smith, Hinsdale. . 

Dem. E. Hough, Persia. 

Neutral, J. W. &. L. D. Marsh, Randolph. 



Cayuga County. 

Auburn Journal and Advertiser, W. H. Oliphant, 
Cayuga Patriot, Dem. Allen & Lounsbury, 

Cayuga Tocsin, Dem. L.A.Miller, 

Northern Advocate. Methodist, John E. Robe j, 



Auburn. 



Dunkirk Beacon, 
Fredonia Censor, 
Jamestown Joiirnal, 
Mayville Sentinel, 
Westfield Messenger, 



Elmira Gazette, 
Elmira Republican, 



Chenango Telegraph, 
Norwich Journal, 
Oxford Republican, 
Oxford Times, 



Chautauque County. 

Whig, E. R. Thompson, Dunkirk. 
Whig, W. McKinstry & Co. Fredonia. 
Whig, J. W. Fletcher, Jamestown. 

Dem. Brockway & Phelps, Mayville. 
Whig, C. J .J. Ingersoll, Westfield. 



Chemung County. 

Dem. Mason & Rhoades, 
Whig^ Carter & Polleys, 

Chenango County. 

Whig, N. Pellet, 

Dem. W.& J. Hubbard, 

Dem. R. A. Leil, 

Whig, E. H. Purdy, 



Clinton County Whig, 
Plattsburgh Republican, 



Clinton County. 

Whig, Mr. Tuttle, 
Dem. R. G. Stone, 
Columbia County. 
Columbia Republican, Whig, L. Van Dyck, 

Columbia Washingtonian, Tern. J. R. S. Van Vleet, 
Hudson Gazette, Dem. D. P. Carrique, 

Rural Repository, (semi-monthly) W. B. Stoddard, 

Kinderhook Sentinel, Neut. P. Van Schaack, 



Cortlanil County Whig, 
Cortland Democrat, 



Delaware Express, 
Delaware Gazette, 



Cortland County. 

Whi*, Rufus A. Reed, 
Dem. Seth Haight, 

Delaware County. 

Whig, N. Bowne, 
Dem. A. M. Paine, 

Pntchess County. 



Dutchess Free Press, Dem. 

Poughkeepsie Eagle, Whig, 

Poughkeepsie Journal, Whig, 

Poughkeepsie Telegraph, Dem. 
Anti-Bank Democrat, (monthly) 
Fishkill Standard, Neut. 



Elmiia. 

(I 

Norwich.. 

Oxford. 

(( 

Plattsburgh. 
(( 

Hudson. 

(( 
(( 

Kinderhook. 

Cortland. 
(( 

Delhi. 



Poughkeepsie. 



T. W. Ritter, 

Piatt & Ranny, 

Jackson & Schram, " 

E. B. Killey, '•' 

Duthess Free Press ofR. " 

W. R Addington, Fishkill Landing. 



NEWSPAPERS. 



145 



Erie Count}'. 

Buffalo City. 



Commercial Adv. &, Journal, Whig 

do. do. (tri-wcekly) 

Bufl'alo Courier, St Economist, Dcm. 
Bullalo Daily City Record, Ncut. 
Morning Gazette, Administration, 
Buffalo Patriot and Journal. Whig, 
BulFalo American, Neut. 

Democratic Economist, Dem. 

Der Weltburger, Dem. 

Western Literary Messenger, 
Temperance Standard, (monthly,) 



E. R. Jewett. (Daily.) 

do. 
J. Stringham, (Daily ) 
C. Faxon & Co. (Daily.) 
Faxon & Co. (Daily.) 

Jcwctt &. Manchester. 
T. Foster. 
J. Stringham. 
George Zahm^ 
J. L. Chadbonrne&Co. 
Salisbury &. Clapp. 



Essex County Republican, 
Westport Herald, 



Franklin Gazette, 
The Palladium, 



Fulton County Democrat, 
Fulton County RepubJican, 
Christian Palladium 



Essex County. 

Whig, W. Lansing, Keeseville. 

Dem. A. H. Allen, Westport. 

Franklin County. 

Dem. F.D.Flanders, Fort Covington. 
Whig, Fred. P. Allen, Malone. * 

Fulton County. 

Dem. Waiter N. Clark, Johnstown. 
Whig, George Henry, " 

Mr. Marsh, Union Mills. 

Genesee County. 



Spirit of the Times, 
The Republican Advocate, 
The Times and Journal, 



Dem. 
Whig, 
Dem. 



Batavia. 



Temperance Herald, (monthly,) 



The Le Roy Gazette, 

Catskill Messenger, 
Catskill Recorder, 
Baptist Library, 
Prattsville Bee, 

Frankfort Democrat, 
Herkimer Journal, 
Mohawk Courier, 

The Democrat, 
The Jelfersonian, 
Watertown Register, 



Whig, 



Lucas Seaver, 
Daniel D. Waite, 
Frederick Follett, 
Wm. Seaver &, Son, 
C. B. Thomson, 
Greene County. 
Whig, Wm. Bryan, 
Dem. John R. Sylvester. 
Religious, L. L. & R. H. Hill, 
Neutral, Ed. by an Association, 
Herkimer County. 
Dem. J. M. Lyon, 
Whig, O. A. Rovve, 
Dem. H. N. Johnson, 
Jefferson County. 

Dem. N.W. Fuller, Sncketl's Harbor. 
Dem. A. HuntSc J.C Hatch, Watertown. 
Whig, Wm. Welch, " 

Kings County. 
Brooklyn City. 



Le Roy. 

Cattskill. 
Prattsville. 



Frankfort. 

Herkimer. 

Little Falls. 



Brooklyn Evening Star, Whig, 

Brooklyn Eagle, Dem. 

The Eagle, " 

Brooklyn News & Times, Whig 

Long Island Star, Whig, 

Williamsburgh Democrat, Dem. 

Williamsburgh Gazette, Whig, 



A. Spooner 8t Co. 
J. Van Arnden, 



(Daily.) 
(Daily.) 



J. S. Noble, 

A. Spooner &, Co. 

Thomas A. Devyn, Williamsburgh. 
L. Darbee, " 



13 



146 



NEWSPAPERS. 



Lewis County Republican, 
Northern Journal, 



Ijcwis County. 

Dem. D. S. Baillev, 
Whig, A. W. Clark, 



Martinsburgh. 



Dansville Republican, 
Livingston Express, 
Livingston Republican, 



Livingston Connty. 

Dem. E. Orville Fairchild, Dansville. 
Neut. Wisncr, (semi-mo.) Mt. Morris. 
Whig, Samuel P. Allen, Geneseo. 



C4iittenango Herald, 
Democratic Reflector, 
Hamilton Palladium, 
Madison Observer, 
Madison County Eagle, 
Madison &, Onondaga Abolitionist, 
Union Herald, Neutral, 

Seventh Day Baptist, 



3Iadison 

Dem. 

Dem. 
Whig, 

Dem. 
Whig, 



County. 

Isaac Lyon, Chittenango. 
Waldron & Chubbuck, Hamilton. 

J.&D. Atwood, " 

J. &. E. Norton, Morris ville. 

Wm. R. Phillips, Cazenovia. 

Luther Myrick, " 



James Bailey, 



De Ruy 



Monroe County. 

Rochester City. 



Rochester Daily Advertiser, Dem. 
Rochester Daily Democrat, Whig-, 



Bumphrey & McConnell. 
Strong 8c Dawson. 
Erastus Shepard k Co. (Daily.) 
Strong &. Dawson. 

u 

Bumprhey & McConnell. 
Strong & Dawson. 
Shepard &. Penny. 
Crossman &, Shepard. 
Erastus Shepard. 
J. M. Cook. 



Rochester Evening Post, Neut. 
Monroe Democrat, Whig, 

Tri- Weekly Democrat, " 

Rochester Republican, Dem. 

Rochester Gem, Neutral, 

Western New-Yorker. " 

New Genesee Farmer, (monthly,) 
Penny Preacher, (semi-w.) Relig. 
Western Luminary, " 

Montgomery County. 

Amsterdam Intelligencer, Whig, S. B. Marsh, 

Fonda Herald, Dem. Wm. S. Hawley, 

Montgomery Whig, Whig, Thomas Horton, 

The Radii, Neutral, Levi S. Backus, 

Niagara County. 

Lockport Democrat 8c Balance, Dem. Samuel Wiiglit, 
Niagara Courier, Whig, Thomas L. Flagler, 

New- York City and County. 

Daily Morning Publications. 

Journal of Commerce, Neutral, 
Morning Courier 8c N. Y. Enq. W. 
New- York Daily Express, Whig, 
New-York Standard, Dem. 

New- York Daily Tribune, Whig, 
New- York Herald, Neutral, 

New- York Aurora, '' 

The New- York Plebeian, Dem. 
The Sun, Neutral, 

The Union, Administration, 

Morning Chronicle, Neutral, 

Washingtonian Daily News, Tern. 



Amsterdam. 
Fonda. 
Fultonville. 
Fort Plain.. 



Lockport. 



Hale 8c Hallock, 69 Wall street. 
Jas. Watson Webb, 58 Wall st. 
Townsend 8c Brooks, 112 Broadway. 
John I. Mumford, 64 Wall st. 
Greeley 8c McElrath, 160 Nassau st. 
Jas. G. Bennett, 125 Fulton st. 
Herrick 8c Ropes, 162 Nassau st. 
Slamm 8c Guion, 156 Nassau st. 
M.Y. Beach, cor. FuUon 8c Nas. sts, 
I. Phillips 8c Co. 128 Fulton st. 
John M. Moore, 102 Nassau st. 
L. Starr 8c Co. 114 Nassau st. 



NEWSPAPERS. 



147 



Evening Post, 

New-York Ameri an, Whig, 

N. Y. Commercial Advcriiser, " 
New-Yorli Evening Express, " 
The Evening Tatiler, Neutral, 

Evening Herald, " 



Daly Evening Publications. 

Bern. Win. C. Bryant & Co. 25 Pine st. 
Charles Kins;, 47 William st. 
F.Hall &, Co.'cor. Pine & William St. 
Townsen.i & Brooks, 112Broad'y. 
Dillon 8c Hooper, 27 Ann st. 
Kingsley, Barton & Co. 92 Nassau, 



Semi-Weekly Publications, £[C. 
Bank Note ReportT, John Thof)ipson, 52 Wall st. 

Day's New- York Bank Note List and Counterfeit Detector, 374 Pearl st. 



Deutsche Sclinellpost, (Gtrman.) 
Evening Post, (or the Country, 
Journal of Commerce, 
New-York Semi- Weekly Express. 
New-York Spectator, 
New- York Standard, 
New- York American, 
Semi-Weekly Courier & Enquirer, 
Shipping and Commercial List, 

Weekly Neicspapers 



Eichthal &, Bernhard, 3 Spruce st. 
AVm. C. Bryant k Co. 25 Pine st. 
Halefc Hallcck,71 Wall st. 
Townsf nd & Brooks, 1 12 Broadway 
F. Hall & Co. cor. Pine & William. 
John I. Mumford, 64 Wall st. 
Ch-irles Kins, 47 AVilliam st. 
J. Watson Webb, 58 Wall st, 
Burrilt 8c Clayton, 6 Ton, Building. 



Advocate of Moral Reform, 

Albion, 

Sunday Atlas, 

Bapli.^t .Vdvocate, 

Beacon. 

]5rtler 'j'imes, 

P: other Junatlian, 

Christian Advocate and Journal, 

Christian Intelligencer, (Presbyte'n,) 

Churchman, (Episcopalian,) 

Courier des EtatsUnis, 

Dollar V.'eckly, 

Freeman's Jour. 8c Catholic Register, 

Gazette Extraordinary, 

Lancet, 

Crystal Fount, 

Flag of the Union, 

Mercury, 

New- York Christian Messenger, 

" Evanuelis', 

" Legal Observer, 

" Luminary &, Weekly Mess. 

•' Mechani'", % 

" Mirror. 

1^ Observer, 

" Weekly Evening Post, 

" Weekly Express, 

New-Yorker Zeitung, 
New World, 

National Anti-Slavery Standard, 
-N'oticioso de Ambos Mundos, 
Old Countryman, 
Organ of the Washington Soc"ety > 

and Auxiliari' s, ^ 

Path-Finder, 
People's Press, 



149 Nassau street. 

John S. Bartlelt, 3 Barclay st. 

Herrick,Wi st 8c Ropes, 162 Nassau. 

122 Nassau street. 

G. Vale, Editor, 94 Rosevelt St. 

Wm. Hagadorn, 71 Gold st. 

Wilson 8c Co. 162 Nassau st. 

(Methodist,) 200 Mulberry st. 

Charles Van Wyck, 102 Nassau st. 

James A. Sparks, 111 Nassau st. 

5 Barclay street. 

Herrick 8t Ropes, 162 Nassau st. 

Jas. \V. White, 4 City Hall Place. 

114 Nassau street. 

J. G. Bennett, Fulton cor. Nassau. 

Burnctl8c Allen. Centrec. Chatham 

Isaac Phillips 8c Co. 128 Fulton st. 

Hale8cIIallock, 71 Wall st. 

P. Price, loO Fulton st. 

Hunt cc Johnson, 113 Fulton st. 

S. Owen, 42 Ann street. 

9 Spruce street. 

R. Porter 8c Co. 7 Ann street. 

D. Fanshaw, 148 Nassau street. 

Silu'^y E. Morse 8c Co. Pinec. Wm. 

Wm. C. Bryant !k Co. 25 Pine st. 

Townsendcc Brooks,! 12 Broadway. 

13 Christie street. 

J. Winchester, 30 Annst. 

L. Maria Child, 143 Nassau st. 

R. Raniel,49 Liberty st. 

J. T. Pickering. 3 Barclay st. 

Corner Ann 8t Nassau sis. 

Parke Godwin, 

R. 8i T. Hamillon, 9 Spruce st. 



148 



NEWSPAPERS. 



Protestant Vindicator, 

Rainbow, 

Scottish Journal, 

Sylvester's Reporter, &. Count. Det. 

Spirit of the Times, 

Sunday Mercury, 

Sunday Morning News. 

Sunday Times, 

Two Worlds, 

Truth Teller, 

Universalist Union, 

Washingtonian, 

Washingtonian and Organ, 

Weekly Courier & Enquirer, 

Weekly Evening Post, 

Weekly Herald, 

Weekly Sun, 

Weekly Plebeian, 

Weekly Tribune, 

Weekly Tattler, 

Whip, 



C. K. Moore, 142 Nas?au st. 
160 Nassau street. 
J. G. Cuiumiiig, 160 Fullon st. 
130 Broadway. 

Wm. T. Porter, Ed., 1 Barclay, st. 
Paige, Nichols h. Kraulb, 13 Beek. 
Barnett Jk- Draper, 1 Beekman st. 
Dillon & Hooper, 27 Ann st. 
John M. Moore, 102 Nassau. 
40 Centre street. 
P. Price, 130 Fulton street. - 
Herrick &, R ipes, 162 Nassau st. 
James Burns, 128 Fulton st. 
Jas. W. Webb, 58 Wall st. 
Wm. C. Bryant 8t Co. 25 Pine st 
J. G. Bennett, c. Fullon &, Nassau. 
M. Y. Beach, c. Fulton & Nassau. 
Slaram &. Guinn, c. Nass. &, Spruce. 
Greeley&McElrath, 160 Nassau si. 
Dillon &, Hooper, 27 Ann st. 
George B. Wooldridge, 131 Ann st. 



PERIODICALS. 

Quarterly Publications. 



American Biblical Repository, 
Methodist Mag. and Quart. Review, 
Quarterly Paper of the Foreign ) 
Evangelical Society, ) 

Tailor's Magazine, 
American Eclectic, uevery 2 mo.) 
Christian Family M(gizine, (do.) 



American Agriculturist, 
American Laborer, 
American Messenger, 
American Rail Road Journal, 
American Turf Register &, Sport- > 
ing Magizine, ^ 

Artist, 

Catholic Expositor & Literary Mag. 
Children's Magazine, 
Cyclopedia Indianensis, 

Democratic Review, 

Dollar Magazine, 
Every Youth's Gazette, 
Foreign k. Domestic Mis'ary Chron. 
Home Missionary & Pastor's Journal, 
Hunt's Merchant's Magazine, 
Journal of the American Tern. Union- 
Journal of Christian Education, 

Knickerbacker Magazine, 

Lady's Companion, 

Lyceum Reporter & Critical Mis. 

Magnet, 



J. H. Agnew, 36 Park Row. 
Rev.^. Peck, Ed. 200 Mulberry st. 

John S. Taylor, 145 Nassau st. 

D. & S. G. Williams, 127 Nassau st. 
J H. Agnew, 36 Park Row. 
Rev. D. Newell, Ed. 132 Nassau st. 
Monthly Publications. 

Saxton &. Miles, 205 Broadway. 

Greeley &, McElrath, 160 Nassau st. 

Pub. by Am. Tract So. 150 Nassau. 

1 18 Nassau street, 
5 William T. Porter, Editor, John 
\ Richards Pub. 1 Barclay st. 

F. Quarrd, 64 Reade st. 

168 Fulton St. 

Rev. A. Ten Broeck, Ed. 20 John st. 

Piatt & Peters, 36 Park Row. 
<; J. L. O'Sullivan, Editor, J. & H. G- 
\ Langley^Pub 57 Chatham st. 

Wilson & Co. 162 Nassau st. 

J. Winchester, 30 Ann st. ^ 

23 Centre st. 

H. W. Ripley, 150 Nassau st- 

Freeman Hunt, 142 Fulton st. 

8 Beekman street. 

Rev. Benj. O. Peers Sc Benj. J. 
Haight, Editors, 20 John st. 
; Lewis G. Clark, Editor, John Al- 
' len. Publisher, 139 Nassau si. 
' W. W. Snowden, 109 Fulton st. 

Smith & Cook, 9 Spruce st. 

La Roy Sunderland, 13S Fulton st 



NEWSrArEK". 



149 



Missionary Herald, 

Motliei's Magazine, 

National Preacher, 

Nev\'-Yoik Visitor, 

Parley's Magazine, 

People's Democratic Guide, 

Sargeant's New iMonthly, 

Universal Traveller, 

United Siales Fanner k. Journal 

of American Institute, 
Youth's Friend, 
Youth's Temperance Advocate, 



A. C. Bull, Ag't , Brick Ch. Chapel. 
Corner Nassau &, Spruce sts. 
Rev. W. H. Bidwell, Ed. 150 Nass. 
J. W. Harrison, 465 Pearl st. 
C. S. Francis, & Co. 252 Broadway. 
James Webster, Publiiher. 
Epes Sargeant, Ed. 251 Broadway. 
Daniel Hewitt, 301 Pearl st. 

S. Fleet, 9 Chambers st. 

l.'J2 Nassau street. 



Youth's Cabinet, 

Gazette of Education and Sunday } 



School Journal, 
Olive Plant, 
Sabbath School Advocate, 



8 Beekman street. 
Semi-Monthly PiibUcations. 

N. Southard, 113 Fulton street. 
152 Nassau street. 



Piercy &. Reed, 95 Spruce street. 
200 Mulberry street. 



Oneida County. 



Whig, 



Dem. 
Dem. 

Univer- 
salist. 



Utica Daily Gazette, 
Oneida Whig, 
Ulica Democrat, 
Utica Observer, 
Baptist Register, 
Evangelical Magazine and } 
Gospel Advocate, \ 

Gospel Messenger, Episcopal, 

Mother's Journal, (monthly.) 
The Washingtonian, Temp. 

Young Ladies Miscellany, (monthly,) 
Cysell Hen Wlad yn America, AVelsh, 
Liberty Press, Abolition, 

Roman Citizen, Whig, 

Rome Sentinel, Dem. 

Central New-York Farmer, (mo.) 
Canidcn Gazette, Neutral, 

Cenhadwr Ameiicanaild, Welsh, 



R. Northway, 

do. 

James C. Donaldson, 
J. P. Bush, 
Bennett, Backus & Hawley, 

Grosh & Walker, 

Rev. JohnC. Rudd, 
Bennett, Backus & Hawley, 
J. C. Donaldson, 
Bennett, Backus & Hawley, 
E. E. Roberts, 
W- Bailey, 



Ulica. 



J. P. Fitch, 
Ralph Walby, 
H.N.Bill, 
H. Hatton, 
11. Everett, 



Empire State Democrat, 
Onondasa Stan lard. 
Western State Journal, 
Skancatelcs Columbian, 
Sknaneatclcs Democrat, 



Geneva Advertiser, 
Geneva Courier, 
Ontario Messenger, 
Ontario Repository, 
Phelps Democrat, 



Newburgh Gazette, 
Newburgh Telegraph, 
Newburgh Journal, 



Onondaga County. 

Dem. H. Gumming, 
Dem. Smith &c Farmer, 
Whig, Silas F. Smith, 
" M. A.Kinney, 

Dem. W. A. Beauchamp, 

Ontario County. 

Dem. 
Whig 
Dem 

Whijr 



Rome. 



Camden. 
Remsen. 



Syracuse. 



Skaneateles. 



D<m. 



Scotten, Merrill & Stow, Geneva. 
Ira Merrill, " 

Thos. B. Hahn, Canandaigua. 
George L. Whitney, " 
W. W. Redficld, Vienna. 



Orange County. 

Whiff, S. T. Callahan, 
Dem. E. Pitts, 
Neutral, John D. Spalding, 
13» 



Newburgh, 



150 



NEWSPAPERS. 



Goshen Democrat, Whig, 

Independent Republican, Dem. 

Trse Whig, Whig, 
Middletown Courier, 

Medina Sentinel, 
Orleans American, 
Orleans Republican, 

Commercial Herald, 
Oswego County Whig, 
Oswego Palladium, 
Fulton Mirror, 
Fulton Sun, 
Pulaski Banner, 

Freeman's Journal, 
Otsego Republican, 

Putnam Democrat, 

Flushing Journal, Neutral, 

Hempstead Inquirer, " 

Long Island Democrat, Dem. 

Long Island Farmer, Whig, 

Journal and Messenger, Colored, 
Rcnsself 

Daily Troy Budget, ■ Dem. 

Troy Daily Whig, Whig, 
Troy Daily Herald, Neutral, 

Northern Buds;et, Dem. 

Troy Whig, Whig, 
Troy Temperance Mirror, 

Lansingburgh Democrat, Dem. 

Lansingburgh Gazette, Whig, 



Charles Mead, 
Moses Sweezy, 
R. C. S. Hendric, 



Goshen. 



Middletown. 



Orleans County. 

Whig, John Denio, 
T. C. Strong, 
Henry W. Depeuy, 
County. 
Chester Hull, jr. 
Richard Oliphant, 
John Carpenter, 
Daniel Ayre, 
N. B. Northrup &, Co 
Wm. H. S. Winans, 
County. 

John H. Prentiss, 
Andrew M. Barber, 

Putnam County. 
Dem. W. H. Sloat & Son, 

Queens County. 



Dem. 
Oswego 

Whig, 

Dem. 
Neutral, 

Dem. 
Whig, 
Otsego 

Dem. 
Whig, 



Medina. 
Albion. 



Charles R. Lincoln. 
Charles Wiihitts, 
James S. Brenton, 
Charles S. Watrous, 
S. V. Berry, 



Oswego. 

II 

tc 
Fulton. 

Pulaski. 

Cooperstown. 
(( 

C arm el. 

Flushing. 

Hempstead 

Jamaica. 



Rensselaer County. 



Carroll & Cook, 
James M. Stevenson, 

Ayres, 

Carroll & Cook, 
James M. Stevenson, 
Bardwell &. Kneeland, 



Troy. 



Wm. J. Lamb. 
Edgar A. Barber, 



Lansingburgh. 



Richmoml County. 

Dem. F. L. Hagadorn, Stapleton. 

St. Lawrence County. 

Whig, Albert Tyler, Ogdensburgh. 

Dem. Hitchcock ?t Smith, " 

Saratoga County. 

Whig, James Comstock, Ballston Spa. 

Dem. Corey & Wilbur, Saratoga Springs. 

Whig, G. W. Spooner, " " 

Schenectady County. 

Whig, S. S. Riggs, Schenectady. 

Dem. Abraham A. Keyser, " 

Schoharie County. 
Helderbergh Advocate, (semi-mo.) Ed. by Committee, Schoharie C. H. 
Schoharie Patriot, Whig, Peter Mix, Schoharie C. H 

Schoharie Republican, Dem. Wm. H. Gallup, " 



Staten Island Sun, 

Ogdensburgh Times, 

St. Lawrence Republican, 

Ballston Spa Gazette, 
Saratoga Sentinel, 
Saratoga Whig, 

Schenectady Cabinet, 
Schenectady Reflector, 



NEWSPAPERS. 



151 



Ovid Bee, 

Seneca Falls Courier, 
Seneca Falls Democrat.. 
Seneca Observer, 



Seneca County. 

Neutral, Mr. Fairchilds, 
Whig, John J. Davis, 
Dem. Smith & Pew, 
Dem. Charles Sentell, 



Ovid. 
Seneca Falls. 

Waterloo. 



SufTolk County, 

The Corrector, (semi-weelily,) Whig, Henry P. Hunt, 



Republican Watchri.an, 
Long Islander. 



Republican Watchman, 

Constitutionalist, 
Farmer's Advocate, 
Corning &. Blossburg Adv. 

Owego Advertiser, 
Owego Gazettee, 

• 

Ithaca Chronicle, 
Ithaca Journal, 
Tompkins Volunteer, 

Democratic Journal, 
Ulster Republican, 

Glen's Falls Clarion, 



Dem. Samuel Philips, 

Neutral, Crowell, 

Sullivan County. 

Dem. J. E. Quinlan, 
Steuben County. 
Whig, F. M. Whittemore, 
Dem. Henry D. Smead, 
Whig, Wm. Hull, 
Tioga County. 
Whig, Andrew K. Calhoun, 
Dem. Thomas Woods, 
Tompkins County. 

Whig. D. D. & A. Spencer, 
Dem. Wells & Co. 
Neutral, J. Hunt, Jr. 
Ulster County. 
Whig, W^m. H. Romeyn, 
Dem. Rodney A. Chipp, 

Warren County. 

Neutral, Ellis & Cheeney, 
Washington County. 



Sag Harbor. 
Huntington. 

Monticello. 

Balh. 

a 

Corning. 



Sandy Hill Herald, 
Washington County Post, 
Washington Journal, 
The Champion, 
Whitehall Chronicle, 

Wayne County Whig, 
Western Argus, 
Wayne Sentinel, 
Wayne Standard, 



Dem. E. D. Baker, 
Whig, Wm.Harkness, 
Whig, John W. Curtis, 

Dem. Joseph Holmes, 
Whig, H. T. Blanchard, 
Wayne County. 
Whig, Morley&Cole, 

Dem. C. Poucher, 

Dem. P. Tucker, 
Administration, D. M. Keeler, 
Westchester County. 



Hudson River Chronicle, 
Westchester Herald, 
Highland Democrat, 
Westchester & Putnam Rep 
Westche'feter Spy, 

Attica Democrat, 
Perry Democrat, 
Western New-Yorker, 

Penn-Yan Democrat, 
Yates County Whig, 



Whig, 
Dem. 
Dem. 
Neut. 
Dem. 
Wyomin 

Whig, 
Dem. 
Whig, 



E. G- Sutherland, 
Caleb Roscoe, 



S. Marks, 

C. Rutherford, 

County. 

E. A. Cooley, 
P. Lawrence, 
Mr. Barlow, 

Yates County. 

Bern. Reede & Bennett, 
Whig, Edward J. Fowle, 



Owego. 



Ithaca. 



Kingston. 



Glen's Falls. 

Snndy Hill. 
Salem. 

Union Village 

ii 

Whitehall. . 

Lyons. 

<( 

Palmyra. 
Newark. 

Sing Sing. 

Peekskill. 

White Plains. 



Attica. 
Perry, 
Warsaw. 



Penn-Yaa. 



152 BANKS. 



BANKS. 

There are now, (January, 1843,) in operation in the state of New- 
York, eighty-nine Incorporated Banks, and fifty-two Banking Associa- 
tions; making- a total of one hundred and forty-one Banks, of which 
twenty-nine are in the city of New-York. The amount of capital, &c., 
of the respective institutions, are enumerated in the tables which follow. 

Rules and Regulations of the Banks. 

The Banks in the city of New-York, are open everyday in the year, 
from 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 P. M., except Sundays, Christmas Day, 
New-Year's Day, the Fourth of July, and general holidays appointed 
by legal authority. 

Bills or notes offered for discount, must be enclosed in a letter di- 
rected to the cashier, the day before discount day, advising the name 
of the person upon whose account it is offered, &c. 

The Banks in Albany and Troy, are open everyday, except Sundays 
and holidays, from 10 A. M. to 2 P. M. 

Bills and notes lodged for collection, are collected free of charge to 
the holders, except when at a distance. When protested, the person 
lodging the same pays the charge of protest. 

The rate of discount in the Chartered Banks is 6 per cent per annum, 
(calculating 360 days to the year,) except when notes have over 60 
days to run; when beyond that time the Banks have the privilege of 
charging 7 per cent. The Free Banks are privileged to cliarge 7 per 
cent on all discounts. Three days grace are allowed on all notes, and 
the discount taken for the same. 

Deposits and notes for collection, must be entered in the dealer's 
book at the time when deposited. No interest is allowed on deposits. 

Rates at which Foreign Coins are received at the Banks. 
Silver Coins. Gold Coins. 

Crowns, 109 cents. I French,. ... 93 1-10 cts. penny wt. 

Dollars, 100 " | Great Britain, ?Q4Qin \ 

Five francs, 93 3-10 " I Portugal & Brazil, 5 ^^ ^"^" "^• 

Pistareens, 16 " | Spanish, 89 9-10 do. 

Domestic. 
U. S. Eagle, (old emission,) ^10.66. Do., (new emission,^ ^10.00, 

Albany County. 
Albany City Bani^ — No. 47 State-street. 
Incorporated April 30, 1834; charter expires January 1 , 1864. Cap- 
ital, $500,000. Shares, 100 dollars each. Dividends, April a«d Oc- 
tober. Discount days, Tuesdays and Fridays. 

Erastus Corning, President. Watts Sherman, Cashier. 

Bank of Albany. — 'No. 42 State-street. 
Incorporated April 10, 1792; charter expires in 1855. Capital, 
$240,000. Shares, 30 dollars each. Dividends, May and Noveaiber. 
Discount day, Thursday. 
J. H. Ten Eyck, President. Jellis Winne, Jr., Cashier. 



BANKS, 



153 



Canal Bank. — No. 40 State-street 

Incorpoiated in 1829; charter expires in 1854. Capital, ^^^300,000. 
Sharcs; 20 dollars each. Dividends, March and September. Discount 
days, Wednesdays and Saturdays. 

Robert Hunter, President. Theodore Olcott, Cashier. 

CoM3iK!iciAL Bank. — No. 40 Statc-strcct. 

Incoiporatcd inlS25; charter expires in July, 1845. Capital, $-300,- 
000. Shares, 20 dollars each. Diviilcnds, March and September. 
Discount days, Mondays and Thursdays. 

John Townsend, President. James Taylor, Cashier. 

Mechanics' and Farmers' Bank. — No. 1 Broadway. 

Incorporated in 1811; charter expires in 1853. Capital, ^442,000. 
Shares, 17 dollars each. Dividends, 5 per cent semi-annually, in May 
and November. Discount days, Tuesdays and Fridays. 

Thomas W. Olcott, President. E. E. Kendrick, Cashier. 

Nkw-York State Bank. — No 69 State-street. 

Incorporated in 1804; charter expires in 1851. Capital, §'369,600. 
Shares, 28 dollars each. Dividends, 5 per cent semi-annually, in March 
and September. Discount day, Wednesday. 

Rufus H. King, President. A. D. Patchin, Cashier. 

Albany Exchange Bank. — No. 3 Exchang:e Building. 

Certificates filed December 11, 1838; to continue 662 years. Capi- 
tal, $-311,100, with privilege to increase to i$10,000,000. Dividends, 
January and July. Discount days, Tuesdays and Fridays. 

George W. Stanton, President. Noah Lee, Cashier. 

Broome County. 
BiiooME County Bank. — Binghamton. 
Incorporated in 1831; charter expires in 1855. Capital, ^100,000. 
Shares, 25 dollars each. 

Cyrus Strong, President. ■ Tracy R. Morgan, Cashier. 

Cayuga County. 
Bank of Auburn. — Auburn. 
Incorporated in 1817; charter expires in 1850. Capital, $-200,000. 
Shares, 25 dollars each. ' 

George F. Leitch, President. James S. Seymour, Cashier. 

Cayuga County Bank. — Auburn. 
Incorporated in 1833; to continue 30 years. Capital, ^250,000. 
Shares, 25 dollars each. 

John Beardsley, President. J. N. Starin, Cashier. 

Chautaaqne County. 

Chautauqub County Bank — Jamestown. 
Incorporated in 1831; charter expires in 1860. Capital, $-100,000. 
Samuel Barrett, President. Robert Newland, Cashier. 

Bank of Silver Creek. — Silver Creek. 
Certificates filed in 1839; to continue 661 years. Capital, $100,000, 
with privilege to increase to $1,000;000. 

Oliver Loe, President. Robert Newland, Cashier. 



154 



BANKS. 



Chemung County. 
Chemujvg Canal Bank. — Elmira. 
Incorporated in 1833; charter expires in 1863. Capital, $200,000. 
Shares, 50 dollars each. 

John Arnot, President. Wm. Maxwell, Cashier. 

Chenango County. 
Bank of Chenango. — Norwich. 
Incorporated in 1818; charter expires in 1856. Capital, ^120,000. 
Ira Wilcox, President. Walter M. Conkey, Cashier. 

Columbia County. 

Hudson River Bank. — Hudson. 
Incorporated March 29, 1830; charter expires second Tuesday in 
June, 1855. Capital $150,000. Shares, 50 dollars each. 

Oliver Wiswall, President. Levi A. Coffin, Cashier. 

Farmers' Bank of Hudson. — Hudson. 

Certificates filed March, 1839; to terminate A.D. 1900. Capital paid 
in, ^'133,450, with privilege to increase to g'500,000. Shares, 50 dol- 
lais each. 

Elisha Gilford, President. Henry Jenkins, Cashier. 

Bank of Kinderhook. — Kinderhook. 

Certificates filed in 1838; to continue 50 years. Capital paid in, 
$115,225, with privileg-e to increass to $300,000. Share.s, 50 dollars 
each. 

John P. Beekman, President. Covington Guion,. Cashier. 

Delaware County. 
Delaware Bank. — Delhi. 

Certificates filed in 1839; to continue 100 years. Capital, .$106,100, 
with privilege to increase to $500,000. Shares, 100 dollars each. 
Herman D. Gould, President. Dubois Berhans, Cashier. 

Dutchess County. 

Bank of Poughkeei'sie. — Poughkeepsie. 

Incorporated in 1830; charter expires in 1858. Capital, $100,000. 

Thomas L. Davis, President. E. P. Benjamin, Cashier. 

Dutchess County Bank. — Poughkeepsie. 

Incorporated in 1825; charier expires in 1855. Capital, .$600,000. 

Henry Swift, President. Jairies H. Fonda, Cashier. 

Farmers' and Manufacturers' Bank.— Pouiihkeepsie. 
Incorporated in 1834; charter expires in 18G4. Capital, $300,000. 
James Hooker, President. James Grant, Cashier. 

Pine Plains Bank. — Pine Plains. 
Certificates filed in 1839; to continue 61 years. Capital, $100,000, 
with privilege to increase to $-500,000. 

Reuben W. Bostwick, President. F. W. Davis, Cashier. 

E.^sex County. 
Essex County Bank. — Keescville. 
Incorporated in 1832; charter expires in 1862. Capital, $100,000. 
Silas Arnold, President. Andrew Thompson, Cashier. 



BANKS. 155 

Franklin County. 
Fakmkus Bank of Malone. 

Commenced operations in 1842. Securities deposited with the 
Comptroller, $24,000. 
Wm. H. Scott, President. 

Fnlton County. 

Montgomery County Bank. — Johnstown. 

Incorporated in 1831; charter expires in 1857. Capital, $'100,000. 
James W. Miller, President. N. P. Wells, Cashier. 

Genesee County. • 

Bank of Genesee. — Batavia. 

Incorporated in 1830; charter expires in 1852. Capital, $100,000. 
Shares, 20 dollars each. 

Phineas L. Tracy, President. Jonathan E. Robinson, Cashier. 

Faiimers' and Mechanics' Bank. — Batavia. 
Certificates filed in 1838; to continue 162 years. Capital, $60,515. 
John S. Ganson, President. Marsena Ballard, Cashier. 

Exchange Bank of Genesee. — Alexander. 
Certificates filed in 1838; to continue 162 years. Capital, $69,191. 
with privileg-e to increase to $500,000. Shares, 100 dollars each. 
V. R. Hawkins, President. B. Follett, Cashier. 

Genesee County Bank. — Le Rov. 
Certificates filed in 1838; to continue 161 years. Capital, $100,000, 
with privilege to increase to $1,000,000. 

Israel Rathbone, President. M. P. Lampson, Cashier. 

Greene County, 
Catskill Bank. 

Incorporated March 26, 1813; charter expires January, 1853. Ca- 
pital, $150,000. Shares, 17 and 34 dollars. 

Thomas B. Cooke, President. * Hiland Hill, Jr., Cashier. 

Tanneus' Bank. — Catskill. 

Incorporated March 14, 1831 ; charter expires January, 1860. Ca- 
[>ital, $100,000. Shares, 50 dollars each. 
Orrin Day, President. Frederick Hill, Cashier. 

Herkimer County. 
Herkimer County Bank. — Little Falls. 

Incorporated in 1833; charter expires in 1863. Capital, $200,000. 
Shares, 25 dollars each. 

Henry P-. Alexander, President. A. G. Story, Cashier. 

Agricultural Bank of Herkimer. — Herkimer. 

Certificates filed in 1839; to continue 161 years. Capital, $100,800. 

Harvey W. Doolittle, President. P. F. Bellinger, Cashier. 

Mohawk Valley Bank. — Mohawk. 

Certificates filed in 1839 ; to continue 1000 years. Capital, $100,500. 

E. Morgan, President. Francis E. Spinner, Cashier. 



156 BANKS. ^ 

Jeflersoii conuty. 
Jeffkrson County Bank. — Walertown. 

Incorporated in 1816; charter expires in 1834. Capital, $200,000. 
Shares, 10 dollars each. 

O. Hungerford, President. 0. V. Brainard, Cashier. 

Bank of WATiJRTOwN. 

Certificates filed in 1839; to continue 501 years. Capital, ,^100,000, 
with privilege to increase to ^'2,000,000. Shares, 100 dollars each. 
Willard Ives, President. Wm. H. Angel, Cashier. 

WoosTER Sherman's Bank. — Watertown. 
ConTmenced operations in January, 1842. Securities deposited witli 
Comptroller, $-9,000. 

W. Sherman, Banker. 

Sackett's Harbor Bank. 

Incorporated April 29, 1834; charter expires in 1865. Capital, 
5^200,000. Shares, 50 dollars each. 

E. G. Merrick, President. R. M'Chesney, Cashier. 

Kings county. 
Atlantic Bank. — No. 55 Fulton-street, Brooklyn. 

Incorporated May 10, 1836; to continue until January, 1866. Ca- 
pital, $'500,000. Shares, 50 dollars each. Discount days, Tuesdays 
and Saturdays. 

John Schenck, President. John S. Doughty, Cashier. 

Brooklyn Bank. — No. 5 Front-street. 

Incorporated February 21, 1832; to continue until 1860. Capital, 
$150,000. Shares, 10 dollars each. Discount days, Tuesdays and 
Fridays. 

Whitehead J. Cornell, President. Abraham Halsey, Cashier. 

Long Island Bank. — 'No. 53 Fulton-street, Brooklyn. 

Incorporated April 1, 1824; to continue until 1845. Capital, $300, 
000. Shares, 50 dollars each. Dfscount days, Wednesdays and Sa- 
turdays. 

Leffert LetFerts, President. Daniel Embury, Cashier. 

Lewis county. 
Lewis County Bank. — Martinsburgh. 

Incorporated in 1833; charter expires in 1863. Capital, $100,000. 
Shares, 50 dollars each. 

Ashley Davenport, President. Lyman R. Lyon, Cashier. 

Bank of Lowville. 
Certificates filed in 1838; to continue 463 years. Capital, $102,450, 
with privilege to increase to $500,000. Shares, 50 dollars each. 
J. W. Bostwick, President. Wm. L. Easton, Cashier. 

Livingston county. 
Livingston County Bank. — Geneseo. 

Incorporated in 1831; charter expires in 1855. Capital, $100,000. 
Shares, 25 dollars each. 

Allen Ayrault, President. Ephraim Cone, Cashier. 



BANKS. 157 

Bank op Dansvili.e. 

Certificates filed September, 1839; to continue 100 years. Capital, 
$153,250, with privilege to increase to §'1,000,000. 

Lester liradner. President. L. C. Woodruff, Casliier, 

MacJisoa County. 

Madison County Bank. — Cazenovia. 
Incorporated in 1831; charter expires in 1858. Capital, $100,000. 
Jacob Ten Eyck, President. Charles D. Miller, Cashier. 
Hamilton Bank. — Hamilton. 
Commenced operations in 1841. Securities deposited with the 
Comptroller, $1G,150. 
President. Cashier. 

Monroe Connty. 
RociiESTKR City Bank. 

Incorporated in 1836, for 30 years. Capital, $400,000. Shares, 
100 dollars each. 
Jacob Gould, President. William S. Philpot, Cashier. 

Bank of Monroe. — llochesler. 

Incorporated in 1829; charter expires in 1850. Capital, $300,000. 
Shares, 25 dollars each. 

James K. Livingston, President. Ralph Lester, Cashier. 

Bank of Rochesteu. 

Incorporated in 1824; charter expires in 1845. Capital, $250,000. 
Shares, 25 dollars each. 

James Seymour, President. Henry W. Davis, Cashier. 

Commercial Bank of Rochester. 

Certificates filed in 1839; to continue 100 years. Capital, $334,- 
000, with privilege to increase to $3,000,000. 

Asa Sprague, President. Thomas H. Rochester, Cashier. 

Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank of Rochester. 

Certificates filed in 1839. Capital, $165,897. 

A. G. Smith, President. E. Huntington, Cashier. 

Bank of Brockport. 

Certificates filed in 1838; to continue 160 years. Capital, $150,- 
000, with privilege to increase to $1,000,000. 

Thomas R. Roby, President. John H. Niciiols, Cashier. 

Montgomery County. 
Farmers' Bank of Amsteroam. — Amsterdam. 

Certificates filed in 1839; to continue 100 years. Capital, $100,000, 
with privilege to increase to $250,000. 

C. Miller, President. R. II. Palmer, Cashier. 

Fort Plain Bank. 
Certificates filed in 1839; to continue 161 years. Capital, $100,000, 
with privilege tt) increase to $500,000. 
J. Webster, President. J. C. Dann, Cashier. 

14 



15S BANKS. 

New- York City and Coimly. 
Bank of America. — No. 29 Wall-street, New-York. 
Chartered in 1812, for 20 years; renewed till 1852. Capital, ^'2,- 
001,200. Shares, 100 dollars each. Dividends, January and July. 
Discount days, Tuesdays and Fridays. 

George Newbold, President. David Thompson, Cashier. 

Bank of New-York. — Wall, corner of William. 

Incorporated March, 1791, to endure until 1811; renewed until Janu- 
ary, 1853. Capital, $1,000,000. Shares, 500 dollars each. Divi- 
dends, May and November. Discount days, Tuesdays and Thursdays. 

John Oothout, President. Anthony P. Halsey, Cashier. 

, Bank of the State of New-York. — No. 15 Wall-street. 

Incorporated May 18, 1836, for 30 years. Capital, $2,000,000. 
Shares, 100 dollars each. Dividends, May and November. Discount 
days, Tuesdays and Fridays. 

Cornelius W. Lawrence, President. Reuben Withers, Cashier. 

Butchers' and Drovers' Bank. — Bowery, corner of Grand. 
Incorporated April 28, 1830; to continue till January 1, 1853. Ca- 
pital, $.500,000. Shares, 25 dollars each. Dividends, February and 
August. Discount days, Mondays and Tiiursdays. 

Jacob Aims, President. D. W. Townsend, Cashier. 

Chebiical Bank. — 'No. 216 Broadway. 

Incorporated April 1, 1824, for 21 years. Capital, $500,000. 
Shares, 25 dollars each. Dividends, February and August. Discount, 
daily. 

Isaac Jones, President. John Q. Jones, Cashier. 

City Bank.— No. 38 Wall-street. 

Incorporated in 1812, for 20 years; extended in 1831, for 20 years 
more. Capital, $720,000. Shares, 45 dollars each. Dividends, May 
and November. Discount days, Mondays and Thursdays. 

Thomas Bloodgood, President. G. A. Worth, Cashier. 

Commercial Bank. — No. 1 Hanover-street. 
Chartered April 28, 1834; to continue until 1865. Capital, $500,- 
000; in shares of 50 dollars each. In hands of receiver, R. M. Blatch- 
ford. 

Delaware and Hudson Canal Company. — 53 Williarasf. 
Chartered in 1823, for the purpose of making a canal from the Hud- 
son river to Honesdale, in Pennsylvania, which is perpetual, and with 
banking privileges, which expire in 1844. Capital, $1,922,000; 
$500,000 may be employed in banking. Shares, 100 dollars each. 
John Wurts, President. J. H. Williams, Treasurer. 

Fulton Bank. — Pearl, corner of Fulton-street. 
Incorporated April 1, 1824; tn continue 20 years. Capital, $600,- 
000. Shares, 30 dollars each. Dividends, May and November. Dis- 
count days, Wednesdays and Saturdays. 

John Adams, President. Wm. J. Lane, Cashier. 

Greenw'ich Bank. — No. 308 Hudson-street. 
Incorporated April 17, 1830, for 25 years. Capital, $200,000. 



BANKS. 159 

Shares, 25 loUars each. Dividends, May and Navember. Discount 
days, Tuesdays and Fridays. 

Benj. F. Wheelwright, President. Ricliard N. Newman, Cashier. 
La Fayktte Bank. — No. 38 Wall-street. 

Incorporated April 29, 183 1; to continue until January, 1865. Ca- 
pital, jlf'500,000; in shares of 100 dollars each. In hands of receiver, 
Jvobert C. Cornell. 

Leather Manufactuiiers' Bank. — No. 45 William-street. 

Incorporated Ai)ril 23, 1832; charter expires June 1, 1862. Capi- 
tal, ^1^:600,000. Shares, 50 dollars. Dividends, February and August. 
Discount days, Tuesdays and Fridays. 

Fanning- C. Tucker, President. E. Piatt, Cashier. 

Manhattan Company. — No. 23 Wall-street. 

Incorporated in 1799; cliarter unlimited. Capital, $'2,050,000. 
Shares, 50 dollars each. Dividends, July and January. Discount 
days, Mondays and Thursdays. 

Jonathan Thompson, President. James M. Morrison, Cashier. 

Mechanics' Bank. — No. 16 Wall-street. 

Incorporated March 23, 1810; to endure until the second Tuesday in 
April, 1832. Renewed in 1831, till 1855. Capital, $1,500,000. 
Shares, 25 dollars each. Dividends, February and August. Discount 
days, Wednesdays and Saturdays. 

Shepherd Knapp, President. Francis W. Edmonds, Cashier. 

Mechanics' and Traders' Bank. — No. 370 Grand-street. 

IncorpoiaU^d April 15, 1830; to continue till January 1, 1857. Ca- 
pital, $-200,000; in shares of 25 dollars each. Dividends, January and 
July. Discount days, Mondays and Thursdays. 

John Clapp, President. E. D. Brown, Cashier. 

Merchants' Bank. — No. 25 Wall-street. 

Incorporated in 1805 ; to endure until the first Tuesday in June, 
1832. Renewed in 1831, till 1857. Capital, ,<5;1,490,000. Shares, 50 
dollars each. Dividends, June and December. Discount days, Mon- 
days and Thursdays. 

John J. Palmer, President. 0. J. Cammann, Cashier. 

Merchants' Exchanoe Bank. — No. 173 Greenwich-street. 

Incorporated ■A[)ril 29, 1820, for 20 years. Capital; $'750,000. 
'hares, 50 dollars each. Dividends, January and July. Discount days, 
vVednesdays and Saturdays. « 

Jas. Van Nostrand, President. Wm. H. Johnson, Cashier. 

National Bank.— No. 19 Wall-street. 

Chartered April 30, 1829, for 28 years; with a capital of |S!l,0C0,000; 
1 1830 reduced to $-750,000. Shares, 50 dollars each. Dividends, 
Vpril and October. Discount days, Tuesdays and Fridays. 

.lames Gallatin, President. Thomas Ihinn, Cashier. 

New-York Dry Dock Company. — Avenue D, cor. lOth-st. 

Incorporated April 12, 1825, perpetually with banking- privileges, 
"apital, $420,000. Shares, 30 dollars each. Dividends, January and 
'uly. 

Russell Stebbins, President. J. Washburn, Cashier. 



160 



BANKS. 



Phenix Bark. — No. 24 Wall-street. 

Charter dator! June 15, 1812 ; (or 20 years. Renewed to 1854. Ca- 
pital, §1,200,000. Sliares, 20 dollars each. Dividends, January ami 
July. Discount days, Wednesdays and Saturdays. 

Thomas Tileston, President. N. G. Ogden, Cashier. 

Seventh Ward Bank. — No. 314 Pearl-street. 

Incorporated April 20, 1833, for 30 years. Capilal, g500,000. 
Shares, 50 dollars. Dividends, January and July. Discoinit days, 
Mondays and Thursdays. 

E. Schieffelin, President. Alfred S. Fraser, Cashier. 

Tradesmen's Bank. — No. 177 Chatham-street. 

Incorporated in 1828, for 10 years; renewed in 1831, for 24 years. 
Capital, §400,000. Shares, 40 dollars each. Dividends, July and Ja- 
nuary. Discount days, Tuesdays and Fridays. 

Preserved Fish, President. ' William H. Falls, Cashier. 

Union Bank. — No 17 Wall-street. 

Incorporated March, 1811 ; to endure until 1831. Renewed in 1831, 
till 1853. Capilal, $-r,000,000. Shares, 50 dollars each. Dividends, 
May and November. Discount days, Mondays and Thursdays. 

Frederick Deming, President. Daniel Ebbets, Jr., Cashier. 

American Exchange Bank. — No. 18 Wall-street. 

Certificates filed October 11, 1838; to endure 100 years. Capital, 
$1,155,000, with privilege to increase to $50,000,000. Shares, 100 
dollars each. Dividends, May and November. Discount days, Wed- 
nesdays and Saturdays. 

David Leavitt, President. John J. Fisk, Cashier. 

Bank of Commerce. — No. 15^ Wall-street. 

Certificates filed February 9, 1839 ; to endure 50 years. Capital, 
$3,222,620, wiih privileg-e to increase to §20,000,000. Shares, 100 
dollars each. Dividends, January and July. Discount days, Tues- 
days and Fridays. 

John A. Stevens, President. George Curtis, Cashier. 

Bank of the United States, in New-York. 
Closing up. 

Clinton Bank. 
Closing up. 

Mechanics' Banking Association. — No. 21 Wall-street. 

Certificates filed August 21, 1838; to endure 99 years. Capital, 
§632,000, wit* privilege to increase to §10,000,000. Shares, 25 dol- 
lars each. Dividends, January and July. Discount days, Tuesdays 
and Fridays. 

Frederick Pentz, President. John H. Cornell, Cashier. 

New-York State Security Bank. 
Closing up. 

North Ajierican Trust and Banking Company. 
In hands of receiver, David Leavilt. 

North River Bank. — Corner of Greenwich and Dey-s(reet. 
First chartered February 16, 1821. Re-organized, under the Gene- 
ral Banking Law, July 1, 1842; to continue until 1899. Capital. 



BANKS. 161 

.ft-614,550, with privilege to increase to ^1,000,000. Shares, 50 dol- 
lars each. 
Nathaniel Wecil, President. A. B. Hays, Cashier. 

Wool Guowkrs' Bank. 
Closing up. 

Niagara County. 
CAN.4.L Bank. — Lockport. 
Certificates filed in 1839; to continue 661 years. Capital, $230,000, 
with privile<>;e to increase to §2,000,000. • 

Wm. 0. Brown, President. George W. Rogers, Cashier. 

LocKi'ouT Bank and Trust Company. 
Certificates filed in 1838; to continue 260 years. Capital, $-300,000, 
with privilege to increase to |fj2, 000,000. 

Washington Hunt, President. Geo. W. Jermain, Cashier. 

Onei'.la Co'.nsty. 

Bank of Utica. — Utica. 

Incorporated in 1812; charter expires in 1850. Capital, $600,000; 

of which s- 150 000 is employed at tlie Branch Bank in Canandaigua. 

Shares, 60 dollars each. Dividends, January and July. Discount 

days, Tuesdays and Fridays. 

Henry Huntington, President. Wm. B. Welles, Cashier. 

Oneida Bank. — ^No. 147 Genesee-street, Utica. 
Incorporated in 1836; charter expires in 1866. Capital, $-400,000. 
Dividends, February and August. Discount days, Tuesdays and Fri- 
days. 

Alfied Munson, President. B. B. Lansing, Cashier. 

Ontario Branch Bank. — No. 70 Genesee-street, Utica. 
Capital employed in Utica, i^250,000. 
A. B. Johnson, President. Thomas Rockwell, Cashier. 

B.\nk of Central Nkw-York. — Franklin Square, Utica. 
Certificates filed in 1838. Capital, $-115,200. Shares, 100 dollars 
each. Dividends, January and July. Discount days, Tuesdays and 
Fridays. 

Anson Tiiomas, President. T. O. Grannis, Cashier. 

Bank of Vernon. 
Certificates filed in 1839; to continue 100 years. Capital, $'100,000, 
with privilege to increase to $500,000. 

John J. Knox, President. Salmon Case, Cashier. 

Watervim.e Bank. 
Certificates filed in 1838; to continue 1000 years. Capital, $130,000, 
with privilege to increase to $1,000,000. 

Stanton Park, President, J. Bacon, Cashier. 

Bank of Whitestown. 
Certificates filed in 1839; to continue 1,000 years. Capital, $100,- 
000, with privilege to increase to $1,000,000. 

S. Newton Dexter, President. James S. Thomas, Cashier. 

Bank of Rome. 
Incorporated in 1832; charter expires in 1862. Capital, $100,000. 
John Stryker, President. John Wood, Cashier. 

14* • 



162 BANKS. 

Onondaga County. 
Bank of Syracuse. — Syracuse. 
Certificates filed in 1838; to continue 500 years. Capital, $200,000, 
•with privilege to increase to ^1,000,000. 

John Wilkins, President. Horace White, Cashier. 

Onondaga County Bank. — Syracuse. 
Incorporated in 1830; charter expires in 1854. Capital, ^150,000. 
Shares, 50 dollars each. 

Moses S. Marsft, President. Hamilton "White, Cashier. 

Bank of Salina. — Salina. 
Incorporated in 1832; to continue 30 years. Capital, ^150,000. 
Shares, 50 dollars each. 

Ashbel Kellogg, President. Miles W. Bennett, Cashier. 

Ontario County. 
Ontario Bank. — Canandaigua. 
Incorporated in 1813; to continue until 1856. Capital, ^500,000; 
of which $250,000 is used at the Branch Bank in Utica. Shares, 60 
dollars each. Dividends, May and Noveniber. 

John Greig, President. H. B. Gibson, Cashier. 

Utica Branch Bank. — Canandaigua. 
Capital used in Canandaigua, $150,000. 

Charles Seymour, President. Henry K. Sanger, Cashier. 

Orange County. 
HiGHi.ANn Bank. — Newburgh. 
Incorporated in 1834; charter expires in 1864. Capital, $200,000. 
Gilbert O. Fowler, President. Alfred Post, Cashier. 

Bank of Newburgh. 
Incorporated in 1811; charter expires in 1851. Capital, $140,000. 
John Chambers, President. George W. Kerr, Cashier. 

Powell Bank. — Newburgh. 
Certificates filed in 1838; to continue 100 years. Capital, $135,000, 
with privilege to increase to $1,000,000. 

Samuel Williams, President. Thomas King, Cashier. 

Orange County B.\nk. — Goshen, 
Incorporated in 1813; ciiarter expires in 1862. Capital, $105,660. 
George D. Wickham, President. A. S. Murray, Cashier. 

MiDDLETOWN BaNK. 

Certificates filed in 1839 ; to continue 291 years. Capital, $100,000, 
with privilege to increase to $500,000. 

Joseph Davis, President. Alexander Wright, Cashier. 

Farmers' Bank of Orange County. — Warwick. 
Commenced ooerations in 1842. Securities pledged with the Comp- 
troller, $2,018. ' Lord, President. 

Orleans Connty. 
Bank of Orleans. — Albion. 
Incorporated in 1834; charter expires in 1864. Capital, $200,000. 
Shares, 50 dollars each. 
Alexis Ward, President. Freeman Clarke, Cashier. 



BANKS. 163 

Bank of Albion. 
Certificates filed July 11, 1839; to continue 200 years. Capital, 
,^73,345, with privilege to increase to g-2,000,000. 
lloswell S. Burrows, President. Lorenzo Burrows, Cashier. 

Oswego Conntsr. 

Oswego Bank.— Oswego. 
Incorporated in 1831 ; charter expires in 1859. Capital, $150,000. 
Shares, 50 dollars each. 

Alanson Douglass, President, Henry II. Hurlbut, Cashier. 

Otsc?:o County. 
Central Bank op Ciiekuy-Valley. 

Incorporated in 1818 ; charter expires in 1855. Capital, $120,000. 
Shares, 30 dollars each. 

D. II. Little, President. H. J. Olcott, Cashier. 

Otsego County Bank.— Cooperstown. 

Incorporated April 8, 1830; charter expires in 1854. Capital, $100,- 
000. Shares, 25 dollars each. 

Robert Cannpbell, President. Henry Scott, Cashier. 

Rensselaer Co;ir.ly. 
Bank of Troy. — Corner of First and State-streets. 
Incor[)orated in 1811; charter expires in 1S53. Capital, $4401,000. 
Shares, 20 dollars each. Dividends, March and September. Ditcount 
day, Tuesday. 

Stephen Warren, President. John Paine, Cashier. 

Farmers' Bank of the City of Troy. — No. 16 First-st. 

Incorporated in 1801 ; charter expires in 1853. Capital, $278,000. 
Dividends, June and December. Discount day, Thursday. 

James Van Schoonlioven, President. P. Wells, Cashier. 

Merchants' and Mechanics' Bank. — No. 14 First-st., Troy. 

Incorporated April 29, 1829; charter expires .January 1, 1854. Ca- 
pital, $300,000. Shares, 50 dollars each. Dividends, February and 
August. Discount day, Wednesday. 

George Vail, President. Charles S. Douglass, Cashier. 

TuoY City Bank. — Corner of Fourth and Grand Division-streets. 

Incorporated in 1833; charter expires January 1, 1863. Capital, 
$300,000. Shares, 50 dollars each. Dividends, March and Septem- 
ber. Discount day, Monday. 

Richard P. Hart, President. S. K. Stow, Cashier. 

Howard's Trust and Banking Company. — 205 River-st. 

Certificates filed February 1, 1839; to continue until A. D. 1900. 
Capital, $100,000. Shares, 100 dollars each. Discount day, Monday. 

William Howard, President. George Q. Pomeroy, Cashier. 

COMMF.RCIAL, BaNK OF TrOY. 

Certificates filed January 3, 1839. Capital, $157,500. Shares, 100 
dollars each. Dividends, January and July. 

R. D. Silliman, President. F. Leake, Cashier. 



164 BANKS. 

Bank of Lansingburgh. 
Incorporated in 1813 ; charter expires in 1855. Capital, 0120,000. 
Shares, 10 dollars each. Dividends, April and October. Discount 
day, Wednesday. 

E. W. Walbridge, President. P. M. Corbin, Cashier. 

St. liawrence County. 
Bank of Ogdensburgii. 
Incorporated in 1829 ; charter expires in 1859. Capital, ,^100,000. 
J. Averell, President. J. D. Judson, Cashier. 

Saratoga County. 
Saratoga County Bank. — Waterford. 
Incorporated in 1839 ; charter expires in 1857. Capital, ^100,000. 
John Knickerbacker, President. Moses S. Scott, Cashier. 

Bai^lston Spa Bank. 
Certificates filed in 1839 ; to continue 100 years. Capital, ^125,000, 
with privileg-p to increase to $500,000. Shares, 50 dollars each. 
James M. Cook, President. Isaac Fowler, Cashier. - 

James Bank. — Jamesville. 
' Certificates filed in 1839 ; to continue 661 years. Capital, ^44,934, 
with privilege to increase to $1,000,000. 

J. W. James, President. H. D. Grinell, Cashier. 

Schenectady County. 

Mohawk Bank:. — Schenectady. 

Incorporated in 1807; charter expires in 1853. Capital, 0165,000. 

Shares, 5 and 10 dollars each. Dividends, May and November. 

James Walker, President. Wm. B. Wallon, Casjiier. 

Schenectady Bank. 
Incorporated in 1832 ; to continue 30 years. Capital, $150,000. 
Shares, 50 dollars each. Dividends, May and November. 
Jay Cady, President. Thomas Palmer, Cashier. 

Seneca County. 
Seneca County Bank. — Waterloo. 
Incorporated in 1833 ; charter expires in 1863. Capital, $200,000. 

• Prouty, President. W. V. J. Mercer, Cashier. 

Steuben County Bank. — Bath. 
Incorporated in 1832 ; to continue 30 years. Capital, $150,000. 
Wm. W. McCay, President. John Magee, Cashier. 

Bank of Cornikg. 
Certificates filed in 1839. Capital, $104,000. 
H. W. Bostwick, President. P. J. Mallory, Cashier. 

Tioga County. 
Bank of Owego. 
Incorporated in 1836; to continue 30 years. Capital, $200,000. 
James Wright, President. Jonathan Piatt, Cashier. 

Tompkins County. 
Bank op Ithaca. 
Incorporated in 1829 ; to continue 20 years. Capital, $200,000. 
Shares, 20 dollars each. 

William Randall, President. Wm. B. Douglass, Cashier. 



BANKS. 165 

Tompkins County Bank. — Ithaca. 
Incorporated in 183G; lo continue 30 years. Capital, ^250,000. 
Shares, 100 dollars each. 

Herman Camp, President. Nathan T. Williams, Cashier. 

MEncixANTs' AND Farmkrs' Bank. — Illiaca. 
Certificales (ikd in 1338 ; to continue 100 years. Capital, $-137,400, 
with privilesre lo increase to ^500,000. 

T. S. Williams, President. J. B. Williams, Cashier. 

U^^tter CcAvr.ty. 
Kingston Bank. 
Incorporated in. 1836, for 30 years. Capital, ^«200,000. Shares, 100 
dollars each. 

E. Lounsbory, President. Joseph S. Smith, Cashier. 

Ulstck County Bank. — Kingston. 
Incorporated in 1831 ; to continue 30 years. Capital §100,000. 
Shares, oO dollars each. 

Cornelius Bruyn, President. James S. Evans, Cashier. 

Manufacturkrs' Bank. — Ulster. 
Commenced operations in 1810. Securities deposited with Comp- 
troller, $43,160. 
Moses Y. Beach, President. H. D. Beach, Cashier. 

WashiH^ton Connty. 
Bank of WniTEHArt,. 

Incorporated in 1829 ; charter expires in 1859. Capital, ^1^0,000. 
Wm. A. Moore, President. Hunloke W. Palmer, Cashier. 

Washington County Bank. — Urrion Village. 
Certificates tiled 1839; to continue 211 years. Capital, $102,000, 
with privilege to increase to ^^500,000. 

Henry Holmes, President. E. Andrews, Cashier. 

Westchester County. 
Wiostchester County Bank. — Peekskill. 
Incorporated in 1833; to continue 30 years. Capital, $200,000. 
Pierre Van Cortland, President. Isaac Seymour, Caihier. 

Farmers' and Drovers' Bank. — Somcrs. 
Certificates fded in 1839; to continue 111 years. Capital, $111,150. 
Horace Bailey, President. Egbert Howland, Cashier. 

Wyoming County. 
Bank of Attica. 
Commenced operations in 1839. Securities deposited with the Comp- 
troller, $25,327. 

G. B. llich. President. J. M. Ganson, Cashier. 

Yates County. 
Yates County Bank. — Penn-Yan. 
Incorporated in 1831; to continue until 1859. Capital, $100,000. n 
Asa Cole, President. Wm. M. Oliver, Cashier. 



^ 



BANKS, 



LIST OF CHARTERED BANKS, 

Giving the date of Incorporation, where located, original capital, Umita- 
tion of charter, 4'C 



NAME. 



o 



Bank of New- York, • • • 

Bank of Albiiny, 

Bank of Columbia,- •• 
Manhattan Company, 

Farmers' Bank, 

N. York State Bank, • 
Merchants' Bank,-- •• 

Mohawk Bank, 

Bank of Hudson, 

Mechanics' Bank, 

Mech.& Farm's Bank, 

Union Bank, 

Bank of Troy, 

Bank of Newburgh,-- 
Middle District Bank, 
Bank of America, • • • • 

City Bank, 

Bank of Utica, 

Branch do. 
Bank of Lansingburgh 

CatskiU Bank, 

Orange County Bank, 

Ontario Bank, 

Branch do. 

Niag--jra Bank, 

Jefferson Co. Bank, •• 

Phenix Bank,* 

B'k Wash. & Warren, 

Bank of Auburn, 

Bank of Geneva 

Bank of Plattsburgh, 

Franklin Bank, 

CentraJ Bank, 

Bank of Chenango, •• 
Greene County Bank, 
North River Bank,--- 
Tradesmen's Bank,-- 
ChemicalMan. Com.- 
Del. & Hud. Canal Co. 

Fulton Bank, 

Long Island Bank,--- 
Bank of Rochester, •- 
Commercial Bank,-- 
Dry Dock Company, •- 
Dutchess Co. Bank, •• 

Canal Bank, 

Merchants' E.\- Bank, 

National Bank, 

Merch. & Mech. Bank, 

Bank of Monroe, 

Wayne County Bank, 
Bank of Genesee, •••• 

Bank of Ithaca, 

Ogdensburgh Bank,- 
Bank of Whitehall, •- 



1791 
n9i 
1793 
1799 
ISOl 
U03 
1805 
1807 
1808 
ISIO 
1811 
1811 
1811 
1811 
1811 
1812 
1812 
1812 

1813 
1813 
1813 
1813 

1816 
1816 
1817 
1817 
1817 
1817 
1817 
1818 
1818 
1818 
1819 
1821 
1823 
1824 
1824 
1824 
1824 
1824 
18-25 
1825 
1825 
1829 
18-39 
18-29 
18-39 
1829 
lS-29 
1S29 
18-29 
1829 
18-29 



Governors. 



Geo. Clinton, 

do. 

do. 
John Jay, 
Geo. Clinton, 

do. 

Morgan Lewis 
D.D.Tompkins 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
D. W. Clinton, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
J. C. Yates, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

D. W. Clinton, 

do. 
do. 

E. T. Throop,t 

do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Location. 



Original 
capital. 



New-York, 

Albany, 

Hudson, 

New-York, 

Troy, 

Albany, 

New-York, 

Schenectady 

Hudson, 

New-York, 

Albany, 

New-York, 

Troy, 

Newburgh, 

Po'keepsie, 

New-York, 

do. 
Utica, 

Canadaigua, 
Lansingb'gh, 
Catskill, 
Goshen, 
Can'daigua, 
Utica, 
Buffalo, 
Watertown, 
New-York, 
Sandy Hill, 
Auburn, 
Geneva, 
Plattsburgh, 
New-York, 
Ch'ry Valley 
Norwich, 
Catskill, 
New- York, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Brooklyn, 
Rochester, 
Albany, 
New-Yoirk, 
Po'keepsie, 
Albany, 
New-York, 

do. 
Troy, 
Hochoster, 
Palmyra, 
Batavia, 
Ithaca, 
Ogdensb'rgh 
Whitehall, 



1,000,000 1S53 
240,000' 1855 
180,000 1S32 

2,000,000 

300,000 1S53 
460, OOOj 1851 

1,250, 000 11857 
200,000' 1853 
300,000! 1832 

1,500,00011855 
600,000 1863 
800, 000 ' 1853 
600, 000 
400, 000 
500, 000 

2, 000, 000 

2, 000. 000 

i,ooo;ooo 



1853 
1851 
1832 

1853 
1852 
18.50 



200,000 1855 
400, OOO! 1853 
400, OOOJ 1862 
500,000 1856 



400, 000 
400,000 
700, 000 
400, 000 
400, 000 
400, 000 
300, 000 
500, 000 
200, 000 
200, 000 
90, 000 
500, 000 
600, 000 
600, 000 
500, 000 
500, 000 
300, 000 



REMARKS. 



Safety Fund. 

Safety Fund. 

Failed, 1829. 

Unlimited 

Safety Fund. 

Safety Fund. 

Safety Fund. 

Safety Fund. 

Failed, 1820. 

Safety Fund. 

Safety Fund. 

Safety Fund 

Safety Fund- 
Safety Fund- 

Failed, 1829. 

Safety Fund. 

Safety Fund 

Safety Fund. 

Safety Furni. 

Safety Fund. 

Safety Fund. 

Safety Fund. 

Safely Fund. 

Safety Fund. 

Failed, 1826 

Safety Fund_ 

Safety Fund' 

Failed, 18.5. 

Safety Fund. 

S-rifety Fund. 

Failed. 1825. 
1832 Failed, 1830. 
l855iSafety Fund, 
1856iSafeiy Fund. 
1832! FatVerf, 1826. 
18421 Ch. to F. Bk'g, 

Safety Fund. 

Chartered. 

Chartered. 

Chartered. 

Safety Fund. 



1832 

1854 
1S54 

1850 
1853 
1832 



1855 
1844 
1844 
1844 
1845 



250, 000| 18461 Safety Fund. 
300,000.1845JChartPved. 

700,000 Unlimited. 

150,000llS55!Safety Fund. 
36o,000|l854iSarety Fund. 
750,000 1949 Safety Fund. 



750,000|1 
300,000 1854 
300,000 18.50 

100.000 1856 

100.0001 1852 
200,000 18,50 
100,000 1659 



Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Failed, S. F. 
Safely. Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 



100,00011859 Safety Fund. 



* First chartered in 1812, under the title of the "New-York Manufacturing Com- 
pany," 
t Martin Van Buren resigned as Governor, March 12th, 1829. 



BANKS. 
LIST OF BANKS, &C. CONTINUED. 



1# 



NAME. 



Governors. 



Location. 



Original 
capital. 



w 



REMARKS. 



Butch. & Drovers' B'k, 1830 
Greenwich Bank, •• • i830 
Mech. & Traders' B'k, 1830 
Hudson KiverBank, ■ i830 
Saratoga Co. Bank. •• |830 
Bankof Poughkeepsie, i8,30 
Livingston Co. Bank, is30 
Onondaga Co. Bank,- is30 
Otsego County Bank,- 1330 

Tanners' Bank, i83l 

Ulster County Bank,- i831 

Hank of Buffalo, 1931 

Chautanque Co. Bank, 1831 
Yates County Bank,- • 1931 

Oswego Bank, 1931 

Madison Co. Bank,--- 1831 
Montgomery Co.BankJi931 
Broome County Bank,']831 
Leather Man. Bank,-- 193-3 

Brooklyn Hank, 1832 

Schenectady Bank,--- 19.32 

Bankof Borne, 1832 

Bank of Salina, 1832 

Steuben Co. Bank, -•• 1832 
Essex Co.. Bank, --• • 1832 
Sevent'i VVard Bank,- 1833 

Troy City Bank, ]S33 

Cayuga County Bank, 1833 
Chemung Canal Banli 1833 
Seneca County Bank, 1833 
Herkimer Co. Bank,- 1833 
Lewis County Bank, • 1833 
Westchester Co, Bank 1833 
Albany Cily Bank, -•- 1834 
Com. Bank of x\. Y.-- 19.34 
La Fayette Bank, •-•- 1834 
Farm & Man. Bank,- 1834 

Highland Bank, 1834 

Com. Bank of Buflalo, 1834 

Bank of Orleans, 1834 

Sackett's Harbor B'k, 18.34 

Atlantic Bank, 1836 

Bank State of N. Y. •• 18.36 

Watervliet Bank, 1836 

Kingston Bnnk, 1836 

Oneida Bank, 1836 

City Bank of Buffalo, 1836 
Rochester City Bank, 1836 

Bank of Lyons, 1836 

Tompkins Co. Bank,- 18.36 
Com. Bank of Oswego. 1936 

Bank of Owepo, 1836 

Clinton County Bank, 1936 



E. T. Throop, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

L. Marcy 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 



New-York, 
do. 
do. 
Hudson, 
Waterford, 
Po'keepsie, 
Gcneseo, 
SyracOse, 
Cooperstown 
Catskill, 
Kingston, 
Buffalo, 
Jamestown, 
Penn-Yan, 
Oswego, 
Cazenovia, 
Johnstown, 
Bingham'ton 
New- York, 
Brooklyn, 
Schenectady 
Rome, 
Salina, 
Bath, 

Keesevillc, 
New-York, 
Troy, 
Auburn, 
Elmira, 
Waterloo, 
Little Falls, 
Martinsb'gh, 
Peekskill, 
Albany, 
New -York, 

do. 
P'kccpsie, 
Newburgh, 
Buffalo, 
.Mbion, 
S. Harbor, 
Brooklyn, 
New-York, 
West Troy, 
Kingston, 
Ulica, 
Buffalo, 
Rochester, 
Lyons, 
Ithaca, 
Oswego, 
Owcgo, 
Plattsburgh, 



18.53 

1855 
196' 
1865 
1967 
185b 
1856 
1954 
I864 
ISCO 
IS61 
1861 
1800 
1859 
1869 
1858 
1S5' 
1855 
1862 
I860 
1862 



500, 000 

200, 000 

200, 000 

150,000 

100, 000 

100, 000 

100, 000 

150,000 

100,000 

100, 000 

100, 000 

200, 000 

100,000 

100,000 

150,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

000, 000 

200, 000 

150,000 

100, 000 
150,000 

-150,000 
100, 000 

500, 000 

300,000 

250, 000 

200, 000,1863 
200,000,1863 
200,000 I863 
100,000 1863 
200,000,1863 
600,000 1864 
500,000 1865 
500,000 1865 
300,000,1964 
200, 000 1864 
400,000 1864 
200,000 1864 
200,000 1865 
500,000 1866 
2,000,000 1806 
250,000 1866 
200,000 1966 
400,000 1806 
400,000 1800 
400,000 1860 
200,000 1800 
250,000 1866 
2.50,000 1866 
200,000(1866 
200,000,1860 



Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safely Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Failed, S. F. 
.■Safety Fund. 
Salety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safely Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 

1802 Safety Fund. 
1862 Safety Fund. 
lS62lSafety Fund. 
1862 S-ifety Fund. 

1803 Safety Fund. 
l8e3]Safety Fund. 



1803 



Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Failed, S. F. 
Failed, S. F. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Failed, S. F. 
Safely Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Failed, S. F. 
Safety Fund. 
Safety Fund. 
Failed, S. F. 
Safety Fund. 
Failed, S. F. 
Safety Fund. 
Failed, S. F. 
Safety Fund. 
Failed, S. F. 



NoTB.— The Safety Fund Law, "An act to create a Fund for the benefit of the 
creditors of certain moneyed corporations, and for other purposes," was passed 
Aprils, 18-i9. 



^63 



BANKS. 



FREE BANKING ASSOCIATIONS. 

List of Certificates filed in the Secretary of State's office, pursuant to the 
act entitled " ^n act to authorize the business of Banking; passed 
April 18, 1S3S. 



( 


When 




Original Capital \ 


NAME. 


Location. 


Cer. 


Duration. 


Capital 


may be 


Remarks. 






filed. 




subs'bed. 


i; creased 




Bank of Western N.Y. 


Rochester, 


1838 


100 years 


$180,000 




Failed. 




N. Ame. T. & B'k Co.- 


New- York, 


1838 


463 " 


2, 000, 000 


60, 000,- 000 


Closed. 


Bank of the U. States, 


do. 


1S33 


62 " 


200, 000 


50, 000, 000 




Mech. Banking Ass'n,- 


do. 


183S 


99 " 


128, 175 


10, 000, 000 




Stalen Island Bank, ■■ 


P. Richmond 


ISSS 


100 " 


100,000 


5, 000, 000 


Failed. 


Erie Countv Bank, ••• 


Buffalo, 


1S38 


112 " 


100, 000 


50, 000, 000 


Failed. 


Lockpori B'k & T. Co. 


Lockport, 


1833 


262 " 


500, 000 


2, 000, 000 




Bkof Central N. Y..- 


Utica, 


1838 


1050 " 


100, 000 


2, 000, 000 




Bank of Syracuse, 


Syracuse, 


1S38 


500 " 


100,000 


1,000,000 




American E.v. Bank,-- 


New-Yoik, 


1S33 


100 " 


500, 000 


50, 000, 000 




Farm B'k of Orleans,- 


Gaines, 


1939 


25 " 


200, 000 


500, 000 


Failed. 


St. Lawrence Bank,-- 


Ogdensburgh 


1838 


100 " 


100, 000 


2, 000, 000 


Failed. 


MeVch. & Farm. Bank, 


Ithaca, 


1S.38 


'201 " 


159,000 


2, ooo; 000 




Willous?hby Bank,---- 


Brooklyn, 


1838 


100 " 


100,000 




Closed. 




N. Y. Banking Co. 


New-York, 


1838 


100 " 


1,000,000 


20,000,000 


Failed. 


Chelsea Bank, 


do. 


1838 


150 " 


1,000,000 


10,000,000 


Failed. 


Far. B'k of Seneca Co. - 


Ovid, 


1838 


112 " 


100, 000 


1,000,000 


Failed. 


Tenth Ward Bank,--- 


>few-York, 


1833 


462 " 


100, 000 


10,000,000 


Failed. 


Bank of Waterville,-- 


Waterville, 


1S.38 


1000 " 


100 000 


1,000,000 




MiUer's Bank, 


Clyde, 


1839 


1000 " 


300, 000 


ij 000, 000 


Failed. 


Albany Ex. Bank, ■••• 


Albany, 


1938 


662 " 


100, 000 


10, 000, 000 




Ex. Bank of Genesee, 


Alexander, 


1838 


162 " 


100,000 


500, 000 




F.&M. B'k of Genesee, 


Batavia, 


1838 


162 " 


100 000 


1,000,000 




Genesee Co, Bank, -•- 


Le Roy, 


1S38 


161 " 


100,000 


1 , 000, 000 




U. S. B'k of Buffalo, .- 


Buffalo, 


18.33 


200 " 


100,000 


5, 000, 000 


Failed. 


Bank of KinderhooK,- 


Kinderhook, 


1838 


50 " 


125 000 


300, 000 




Merch.Ex. Bank, ••-- 


Buffalo, 


1838 


100 " 


200 000 


5, 000, 000 


Failed. 


Wool Growers' Bank, 


NewY'otk, 


1838 


100 '< 


100 000 


2, 000, 000 




Bank of Lowville; 


Lowville, 


1839 


463 " 


100 ono 


500, 000 




Powell Bank, 


iVewburgh, 


19.38 


100 " 


130 000 


1,000,000 




Bank of Brockport, •• 


Brockport, 


1838 


160 " 


150 000 


1,000,000 




Fort Plain Bank 


Fort Plain, 


19,39 


161 '< 


100 000 


500, 000 






Jamesvillc, 
Troy, 


1839 


661 " 


106 000 


1,000,000 
1,000,000 




James Bank, - ■••.••-- 
Howard T. & BMig Co. 


1839 


61 " 


loo'ooo 




Com. Bank of Troy,-- 


do. 


1839 


661 «■ 


ICO 000 


5, 000, 000 




Binghamton Bank, 


Binghamton, 


1839 


100 " 


100 000 


1,000,000 


Falled- 


Bank of Vernon, 


Vernon, 


1939 


100 " 


100, 000 


500, 000 




Bank of Lodi, 


Lodi, 


1339 


500 " 


100 000 


1,000,000 


Failed. 


Bank of Corning, 


Corning, 


1939 


100 " 


100,000 


2, 000, 000 




Far. Bank of Geneva, 


Geneva, 


1839 


1000 " 


100, 000 


6, 000, 000 




Far. B'k of Penn-Yan, 


Penn-Yan, 


19,39 


500 " 


100 000 


1,000,000 


Closed. 


Bank of Watertown,- 


Watertown, • 


1839 


501 " 


100 000 


2,000,000 




Bank of Tonawanda,- 


Wheatfield, - 


1839 


100 " 


100 000 


5,000,000 


Failed. 


Washington Bank, --- 


New -York, 


1839 


461 " 


100 000 


2, 000, 000 


Failed. 


Clinton Bank, 


do. 


1839 


300 " 


100 000 


10,000,000 




BallstonSpa Bank,--- 


BallstonSpa, 


1839 


100 " 


100 000 


500, 000 




Farm. Bank of Hudson 


Hudson, 


1839 


61 " 


lOo' 000 


500, 000 




Mer. B'k Schenectady, 


Schenectady, 


1839 


100 " 


100' 000 


1,000,000 


Closed. 


Bank of Commerce, -- 


New-York, 


1839 


50 " 


6,000 000 


50, 000, 000 




Bank of Whiteslown, 


Whiiestown, 


1839 


1000 " 


loo' 000 


1,000,000 




Agri. B'k of Herkimer 
Canal Bank, 


Herkimer, 


1S39 


161 " 


100 000 






Lockport, 


1839 


661 '■■ 


200 000 


2,000,000 




Meclianics' Bank, •-- 


Buffalo, 


1839 


150 " 


loo'ooo 


5, 000, 000 


Failed. 


Washington Co. Bank 


UnionVillage 


18.39 


211 " 


lOo' 000 


600, 000 




City Trust & B'kg Co 
Far. fi, Mech. Bank, •- 


New-York, 


18.39 


160 '( 


loo'ooo 


2,000,000 


Failed, 


Rochester, 


18,39 


!999 '< 


100 000 


2,000,000 




Delaware Bank, - --- 


Delhi, 


1839 


100 " 


loo' ooo 


500, 000 




Mohawk Valley Bank 


Mohawk, 


1839 


1000 " 


loo'cot 


500, 000 




Com. B'k of Rochester 


Rochester, 


1839 


100 " 


400' 000 


3,000,000 




Pine Plains Bank,--- 


Pine Plains, 


1339 


01 " 


loojooc 


500, ooo; 


Farm. B'k of Amster 


Amsterdam, 


1839 


100 " 


100,000 


260,000 


« 



BANKS. 



169 



FHKE BANKING ASSOCIATIONS, &,C 


. — CONTINUED. 








When 




1 Capital 




NAME. 


Location. 


Cer. 
filed. 


Duration. 


Capital 1 may be 
subs'bed. increased 


Remarks. 


Middletown Bank, •••• 


Middletown, 


1339 


291 years 


$100,000' $600,000 




Banii of Dansville,- •• 


Dansville, 


1S39 


100 " 


100,000 1,000,000 




Bank of Albion, 


Albion, 


1839 


200 " 


100,000 2,000,000 




Far. fc Drovers' Bank, 


Somers, 


1839 


lU " 


llljl.Wi 




Bank of Commerce, •• 


Buffalo, 


1839 


.«>00 " 


100,000 10,000,000 


Failed. 


Bank of America, ••• • 


do. 


1S39 


1000 " 


100,000, 1,000,000 


Failed. 


Far. & Mec. E'kOnon. 


Fayetteville, 


1839 


4G1 " 


250,000: 1,000,000 


Closed. 


State Bank of N. Y.-- 


Buffalo, 


18.39 


200 " 


100.000.50,000,000 


Failed. 


Union Bank, 


do. 


1S39 


200 " 


100, 000' 10, 000, 000 


Failed. 


B'kof Silver Creek, •• 


Silver Creek, 


1839 


CCl " 


100,000; 1,000,000 




PhaMiix Bank, 


Buffalo, 


1S39 


Gl " 


600,000l 5,000,000 


Failed. 


North AmericaBank,. 


New- York, 


1839 


IGO " 


100,000; 9f 000, 000 


Closed. 


Bank of Clean, 


Olean, 


1840 


200 " 


100,000110,000,000 


Failed. 


Cattaraugus Co. Bank 


Randolph, 


18J0 


200 " 


100, 000 1 500,000 


Failed. 


N. Kiver Banking Co. 


New- York, 


1840 


100 " 


100,000' 600,000 





LIST OF FREE BANK^J, 

Where no certificate has been fled in the Secretary of State's office, to 1st 
November, ]842. 



limrT**' ■-— '■"— 



NAME. 



Location. 



Com. 
Op. 



Circula- 
ting notes 



Remarks. 



N. Y. State Stock Security Bankj New-York, 

Bank of Attica, -Attica, 

Exchange Bank. Rochester, 

Manufacturers' Bank, Ulster, 

Allegany Co. Bank, Angelica, 

Hamilton Bank, Hamilton, 

Farmers' Bank of Orange Co. •• Warwick, 

Wooster Sherman's Bank, Watertown, 

Farmers' Bank, Malone, 



1S38 
1S39 
18.39 
1S40 
1810 
1841 
1842 
1842 
1842 



$1S,9C0 
25, 327 
34,600 
47, G.'O 
40, .500 
IG, loO 
2,018 
6, 000 
24,000 



S 17, 871 

6,419 

28, £00 

42, .3C!) 

41,760 

8,360 

1,G8C 

6,000 

20, 700 



Closed. 
Failed. 



CHARTERED BANK CAPITAL. 

Extract irom the Comptroller's Report, January 25, 1836. 



Periods. 
In 1800,. 
" 1805,,, 
" 1810,.. 
" 1815,.. 
" 1820,.. 
" 1825,.. 
" 1830, •. 
" 1835,.. 
"• 1840,t. 



Number Banks. 

4 

7 
.... 10 

22 

3.3 
. . . . 40 
. . . . 53 
. . . . 94 
.... 106 



Capital. 
$3,420,000 
5,430,000 
7,430,000 
18.215,000 
21,105,000 
25,105,000 
29,805,000 
31,483,460 
36,733.460 



* Up to 1930, eight chartered hanks, had failed in the State of New-York, with nn 
aggregate capital of ,$2,660,000. In addition to the above, there had been a rodiiclion 
in the capital of sundry banks, amounting to .$2,220,000. Since 1830, ten Safety 
Fund Banks have failed, with an aggregate capital of $3,000,000. 

\ The banks chartered between 1835-40, were twelve in number, all incorporated in 
1836, having an aggregate capital of $5,260,000. 



15 



170 BANK REPORT. 



BANK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 

Extracts from the Annual Report of the Bank Commissioners, dated, 
■ Albany, January 30, 1S43. 

Since the summer and fall of 1839, a diminished movement lias been tak- 
ing place in the operations of our banks; which from its general and pro- 
gressive character fully indicates the influence of causes acting with great 
power upon the business of the country, and contracting the use of money 
for commercial purposes within the smallest possible compass. 

On the 1st of Jan. 1840, and after the second suspension of the banks, south 
and west of New-York, which occurred during the succeeding fall, the returns 
exhibited a diminution of loans and discounts, on the part of the ninety 
chartered banks of the State, to the amount of $15,512,000 — and a reduc- 
tion of the circulation of $S,743,365, as compared with the reports of the 
same institutions on the first of January, 1839. Although a slight increase 
took place during the year 1840, yet the process of contraction has been 
steadily going forward to the present period, in conformity to tlie general 
depression of business, and the prostration of almost every branch of in- 
dustrial enterprise. The great depreciation in the prices of the staple 
agricultural products, has materially contributed to keep down the discounts 
and circulation. The capital now required for their purchase is small in 
amount, as compared with those periods when money was abundant, and 
the business of the banks generally extended. 

Many of our banking institutions are seriously laboring under the con- 
sequences of the unwise expansion of former years ; and it will require 
the utmost prudence, as well as good fortune on iheir part, before they can 
regain their original position. A large amount of discounted debt, sus- 
pended for several years, and wholly unavailable for banking purposes, 
still remains — and it is to be feared that the continued diminution in the 
value of property will eventually render many of the securities worthless, 
which have been heretofore considered sound, and abundantly sufficient to 
protect the banks against ultimate loss. It is, however, gratifying to dis- 
cover, by reference to the statements, that the present reduced action of 
many of the banks at least does not arise from any want of ability to ex- 
tend their loans, or sustain an increased circulation, if required lo do so by 
the fair demands of business. 

It must be evident to all, that a material extension in their operations at 
this time by the discount of accommodation paper, or ^ny other not of a 
strict commercial character, could not fail to do ultimate injury to their 
stockholders and the public. Indeed so far at least as many of the country 
banks are concerned, no single cause has heretofore contributed in so great 
a degree to their embarrassments and the sacrifices which in times of pres- 
sure they are compelled to incur, as loans upon paper not founded on actual 
business transactions. Such paper, however well secured, can seldom be 
depended on in meeting redemptions and those other engagements, which 
on the part of every well managed bank must be fulfilled w-ith the utmost 
promptitude. In some cases which have come under our observation, the 
discounted debt has been found to be sound and free from all objection in 
regard to its entire security, but at the some time so unavailable in its con- 
vertability into cash, as to render it valueless for all practical or useful pur- 
poses in sustaining the credit of the bank. When this state of things ex- 
ists, it will be found that serious sacrifices often become necessary before 
the bank can meet its liabilities; and that the time of its officers, which 
should be devoted to its immediate supervision at home, is often occupied 
in making expensive journies to Albany or New- York, and in devising and 
consummating extraordinary and ruinous modes of raising money, and in 



BANK RErORT. 171 

all cases subjecting the stockholders to the loss accruing from the transact 
tion. 

Again, we conceive that loans upon accommodation paper causes at all 
times great injury to the i)ublic at large, by creating those excessive issues 
in bank circulation which have heretofore taken place, and may be regard- 
ed as one of the causes of the present depression of business througliout 
the country. It may be assumed as an undeniable axiom in the business 
of banking, that such issues are always excessive; and that in precise pro- 
portion to their amount, they derange the just relations of cui-rency and 
trade, produce sudden and unnatural expansion in prices, and disorganize 
the various business interests ol" society. 

The present reduced movement on the part of those banks having abun- 
dant means on hand, may therefore be regarded as evidence of their pru- 
dent administration by a proper conformity to the state of things existing 
around thein, and as exhibiting a determination to forego the acquisition of 
present profits for the sake of their own ultimate safety. 

The condition of the banks in the city of New-York, the great centre of 
the commercial and moneyed transactions of the State and Union, will ap- 
pear by their statements to be uncommonly strong in the possession of an 
extraordinary amount of specie and other funds, whilst their liabilities, ex- 
clusive of capital stock and deposits, are but nominal. The state of these 
institutions presents gratifying eviilence, that when the time shall arrive in 
M'hich extensive moneyed facilities may be required in conducting the ope- 
rations of a renovated and prosperous commerce, no want of means will 
exist in that quarter at least in giving such operations the necessary impulse 
and efficiency. 

The domestic exchanges within the limits of the State have, during the 
past year, not only been uniform but also at rates so low, and so easily ef- 
I'ected at all times, as to in<licate a healthy, although a depressed, action in 
the moneyed affairs of the banks. The law of the 4th of May, 1840, re- 
quiring the country banks to keep agents in New-York and Albany, for the 
redesaption of their circulating notes, has worked with admirable effect in 
preserving uniformity in the rates of discount, and in preventing those im.- 
posJtions which were before too frequently practised upon the public. It is 
well known that prior to this period, it was not unusual to discredit the 
notes of sound institutions, for the sole purpose of purchasing them in 
market; in this manner the inequality in tlie rates of discount between the 
notes of the various country banks became dependant upon causes entirely 
fictitious, and having no reference to the actual stale of the institutions by 
which they were issued. This law has also effectually checked the estab- 
lishment of associations under the general banking law, at places so remote 
and difficult of access, as to render the transmission of the notes for re- 
demption vexatious nnil expensive. 

Durinor the yaronding on the first of the present month, [January] the 
loans and discounts of all the cu.MiTKRKD banks* now remaining, and be- 
ing eighty-five in number, as compared with the same banks on the first «f 
January, 1842, have diminished $2,ri5i), 602. 

The discounted drbt of fortj'-three danking associations has incrensed 
within this period f?n7.l.2()3. making an asrgresatc of diminution in all the 
banks of the Stale, of $l,9S."j. 339. 

The circulation of the chartered banks has al-o been reduced $2,027,810 
and the free banks ?()0,7>t4, showing the whole decrease of circulation to be 
S2,0S8,(-;04. 

The specie of the chartered banks has increased $2,094,602, and the free 
banks $;t74,000, hiakini the whole increase of specie $3,068,602. 

The table below will exhibit a comparative view of the resources and 

* several of the c'lartcrcd banks do nol come under the Safety Fund act. 



172 BANK REPORT. 

liabilities of all the chartered and free banks for the last two years, exclud- 
ing eight, viz: the La Fayette Bank in the city of New- York, the Water- 
vliet Bank, the Clinton County Bank, the Bank of Lyons, and the North 
River Bank whose charter h»s expired, and which has since gone into 
operation under the general banking law, together with the James Bank, 
the Farmers' Bank of Malone. and the Manufacturers' Bank at Ulster — 
which last named association did not make any returns last year. 

RESOURCES OF THE BANKS. 

Jan. I, 1842. Jan. 1, 1843. 

Loans and discounts, $.5-1,543.073 $52,557,734 

Real estate, 3,270,'661 3,568,725 

Stocks and mortgages, 10,291,239 12,446,087 

Specie, 5.329,857 8,388.559 

Notes of other banks, : 5;319,704 4i808'754 

Cash items, 1,495,167 2,272,658 

Due from banks, 8,512,547 4,279,981 

Total, $88,862 248 $88,322,496 

LIABILITIES. 

Circulation, $13,949,504 $11,860,900 

Loans, 117,032 188,144 

Due Canal Fund, 1,411.137 1,495,898 

Deposits, 17,063,774 18,723,030 

Due banks, 9,395,646 12,051,093 

$41,937,093 $44,319.06.^. 
Add capital and profits, 46,925,155 44,003,433 

Total, $88,862,248 $88,322,496 



The line of cash items in the coluinn of resources, in the New-York 
banks, embrace a large amount of treasury notes. 

The reports of the 81 Safety Fund Banks* exhibit nominal profits on 
hand to the amount of $3,359,772. On deducting therefrom the aggregate 
expenses and contributions to the fund amounting to $1,484,718, the balance 
will be $1,875,054, being a little over 6 per cent. 

To determine the circulation of all the banks, the amount of notes of 
other banks contained in the statements should be deducted. 

This account would then stand, in relation to the specie in the banks, as 
follows: 

The 131 banks which have made returns show the cir- 
culation to he $12,031,871 

Deduct notes held by banks, ....*. 4,888,987 

Actual circulation $7,142,884 

Specie, ' 8,477,076 

Excess of specie over circulation, $1,334,192 



* See preceding note. 



BANKS. 

SAl ETV FUND BANK STATEMENT, 

Compiled from the Bank Commissioners^ Report, January, 1843. 
NEW- YORK CITY BANKS. 



173 



NAME. 


Capital. 


Deposits. 


Circula- 
tion. 


Specie. Loans and Div'ds, 
, discounts 1842. 


Bank of America, 

Mechanics' Hank, 

Bank of S. of N. York, 

Phenix Bank, 

Merchants' Bank, 

Bank of New- York, 


$2,001,200 

2, 000, OOC 

2, 000, 000 

1,200,000 

1,490,000 

1,000,000 

1,000,000 

750, 000 

750, 000 

720, OOC 

600, OOf 

500, OOC 

500, 000 

400, 000 

200, OOC 

200, OOC 


$1,151,629 

481,122 

1,432,227 

437, 009 

1,248,040 

1,37.3,639 

928, 024 

612,987 

348, 920 

605, 732 

■468,901 

404, 603 

196,289 

368, 6.57 

194,452 

86, £77 


$321,565 
289, 368 
210,101 
253, OGO 
241,942 
448, 238 
.341,356 
181,686 
160,064 
187, 644 
187,211 
197,913 
120,141 
107,411 
101,027 
44,360 


$944, 5£2 $3,058,149 
353, .^34 1,709,425 
786,110 2,900,508 
325,619' 1,171,387 
596,687, 1,960,923 
421,353 1,425,802 
473, .535; 1,929,283 
250,699, 1,024,963 
108,374' 1,148,906 
218,419' 1,106,248 
132,674 1,003,407 
133,114 938,660 
55,402j 713,201 
64.227! 716,940 
64,936' 322,223 
33, 551 1 £09,524 


$1.30,085 

60,000 
78, 000 
120,781 
SO, 000 
80,000 
62, 500 
56, 2,50 
57, 600 
42 000 
17, 500 
15 000 
40, COO 
14,000 


Naiionnl Bank, 

Merchants' Ex. Hank, • 


Leath, Man. Bunk, •••• 
Butch. fcDrov. Bank,-- 
Seventh Ward Bank, •■ 

Tradesmen's Bank, 

Mcch. & Traders' Bank, 
Greenwich Bank, 


Total, 16 Banks, 


15,311,200 


l'0,S59,0Gsl 3,383,187 


4,968,763 21,339,609 


843,718 



BROOKLYN AND COUNTRY BANKS. 



Brooklyn Bank, 

Atlantic Bank, ■ 

Long Island Bank, 

Westchester Co. Bank, 
Bank of Newliurgh, •■• 

Highland Bank, 

Orange County Bank,-- 
Dutchess Co. Bank, • •• 
Farmers' & Man. Bank, 
B;ink of Poughkeepsie, 
Ulster County Bank, •• 

Kingston Bank, 

CatskiUBank, 

Tanners' Barik, 

Hudson Kiver Bank,--- 

Rank of Albany,- •- 

New-York State Bank,. 
.Mcch. Ic Farm. Bank,-- 

Canal Bank, 

.Mbany City Bank, 

Bank of Troy, 

Farmers' Bank, 

Merch. & Mcch. Bank,- 

Troy City Bank, 

Lnnsingbtirgh Bank,-- 

Saratoga Co Rank, 

Bank of Whitehall, -•• ■ 
Essex County Bank,--- 

.Mohawk Bank, 

Schenectady Bank, 

Montgomery Co. Bank, 

Central Bank, 

»»tsepo County Bank,-- 
Herkimer County Banl, , 
Broome County Bank,- 
Hank of Chenango, - • - • 
Madison County Bank, 
B'k of Utica k Branch, 
Oneida Bank, 



$150,000 
600, 000 
300, 000 

200. noo 

140,' 000 
200, 000 
105, 660 
GOO, 000 
300, 000 
100,000 
100,000 
200, 000 
150.000J 
100,0001 
1.50,000 
240, 000 
369,600| 
442, 000 
300, OOO 
600, 000 
440, OOO 
278, 000 
300, OOO 
300,000 
1 20, 000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
1 C^'', ooo 
160,000 
100,0(jO 
120,000 

.100,000 

200,000 

loo, 000 

120.000 
100,000 
600, 000 
400, 000 



$33, 6SC 
1.39,914 
199, 219 
19,082 
48,360 
29, 278 
28, 3SS 
19,4.38 
46, 1.53 
36, 005 
22, 386 
20, 724 
35, 178 
22, 181' 
39, 650 
98,124 
103,0.50 
196,000 
26, .374 

95. 786 
60, 903 
67, 820 

30. 787 
53, .567 
1.5,062 
14,728 
17.604 
16,560 
63, 892 
32, 207 

9,790 
5, 549 
14,616 
15,995 
14,138 
17,61.H 
17,972 
67,041 
105, 354 

15» 



$]]3, 141 
627,496 
624; 721 
222, 462 
222, 243 
272,151 
232,214 
383,477 
396,973 
184,682 
134,799 
202,959 
152,343 
154,.'j25 
222, .375 
S78, 679 
475, 344 
585, 7.50 ! 
486, 401 1 
f 78, .364 
842, .352 1 
4.37, 911 1 
435,077 
435,684 
186,830: 
1.38, 6.52 i 
166.443' 
142', 777; 
229, 228, 
240,0711 
142,115, 
218,251 1 
207,466 
246,869 
117,1271 
1.52,215 
15,?, 141 
709, 149 1 
612,261/ 



$30, OOO 
15,000 
14,000 
7,000 
10,666 

10, 500 
9, 000 

7,000 



7,000 

12,000 

19,200 

■37,221 

44, 20O 

12, OGO 

40. 000 

37', 400 

1 1,1:0 

24,000 

12,000 

8,400 

7,600 

10,000 

4. 500 

8, 260 

10,500 

9,000 

10,800 

10,000 

14,000 

7,000 

9,600 

10,000 

.36. 000 

28, OCO 



174 BANKS. 

SAFETY FUND BANK STATEMENT, &,C.^-CONTINUEb. 



NAME. 


Capital. 


Deposits. 


Circula- 


Specie. 


Loans and 


Div'ds, 








tion. 




discounts. 


1842. 


Bank of Rome, 


$100,000 


$13,102 


$73,914 


$5,788 


$177,471 


$10,000 


Lewis County Bank,-- 


100,000 


13,784 


72, 864 


3,051 


162,710 


6,000 


Jefferson Co. Bank. 


200, 000 


42, 657 


106,814 


15, 560 


265, 456 


20, 000 


Sackett's Harbor Bank, 


200, 000 


9,015 


49, 541 


11,938 


195, 596 




Ogdensburgti Bank, 


100,000 


17,996 


66, 889 


6,579 


96, 363 










70, 024 
43, 608 


11,219 


176, 156 




Bank of Salina 


150,000 


26,212 


8,468 


199,742 


7,500 


Onondaga Co. Bank, • • - 


150,000 


37, 695 


100,713 


13,261 


274,664 


7,500 


Bank of Auburn, 


200, 000 


46, 191 


91,450 


18,444 


410,210 


16,000 


Cayuga County Bank, • 


250, 000 


42,185 


110,430 


13,777 


321,769 


8,750 


Seneca County Bank, - - 


200, 000 


26,111 


60, 562 


4,562 


209, 210 




Bank of Ithaca, 


200, 000 


n, 127 


64, 663 


5,369 


251,566 


15,000 


Tompkins Co. Bank, •- 


250, 000 


17,940 


73,635 


11,368 


301,875 


10,000 


Bank of Owego, 


200, 000 


13, 826 


52,419 


21,190 


206, 183 


8,000 


Steuben County Bank,- 


150,000 


31,526 


. 62,118 


8,865 


163, 327 


15, 000 


Chemung Canal Bank, 


200, 000 


55,771 


65, 272 


11,959 


280,351 


6,000 


Bank of Genesee, 


400, 000 


52,910 


216,379 


22,617 


533, 837 


4,000 


Ontario B'k k. Branch, 


500, 000 


49, 947 


65, 365 


16,831 


475, 547 


60,000 


Yates County Bank,- •• 


100, 000 


5,510 


83,320 


8,694 


155,742 


4,000 


Li-v^iagton Co. Bank,- : 


100, 000 


54, 610 


114,081 


10,412 


220, 699 


14,000 


Bank of Geneva, 


100, 000 


39, 362 


77,928 


8,775 


167, 635 


8,000 


Bank of Monroe, 


300, 000 


72, 280 


93,447 


11,295 


465, 946 




Rochester City Bank,-- 


400, 000 


46,115 


114,898 


21,657 


510,151 




Bank of Rochester, - - • - 


250, 000 


44, 406 


67, 679 


6,085 


352, 737 




Bank of Orleans, 


200, 000 


25,978 


107, 295 


7,090 


291,113 




Cliautauque Co. Bank, 


100, 000 


28, 906 


82, 026 


13,879 


163,949 




Total 65 Banks, 


14, -240, 260 


2,731,895 


5, 543, 043 


907, 256 


19, 624, 503 


751,507 



FREE BANK STATEMENT, 

Compiled from the Bank Commissioners' Report, January, 1843. 



NAME. 



Present 
Capital. 



Deposits. 



Bank of Commerce, - - - 
American Ex. Bank,- -- 
Mechanics Banking As 
North River Bank, — 

Clinton Bank, 

Farmers' & Drov. Bank 

Powell Bank, 

Middletown Bank, • 
Pine-Plains Bank,- - 
Farmers' B'k of Hudson 
Kinderhook Bank,- • 

Delaware Bank, 

Albany Exchange Bank, 
Com. Bank of Troy, •- 
Howard T. & B. Co.-.- 
Washington Co. Bank, 
Ballston Spa Bank,--- 
Farm. B'k Amsterdam, 

Fort-Plain Bank, 

Ag. B'k of Herkimer, -- 
Mohawk Valley Bank,- 
Bank of Whitestownj- 
B'k of Central N. York, 

Bank of Vernon, 

Bank of Waterville, - - - 
Bank of Lowville, •••• 
Bank of Watertown, •• 
Bank of Syracuse,*- •- 



!3, 222, 620 
1,155,400 
632, 000 
614, 650 
374,700 
111,150 
135, 000 
S4, 000 
100, 000 
138,450 
115, 2-26 
106, 100 
311,100 
157, 500 
100, 000 
102,000 
125,000 
100,000 
100, 000 
100, 800 
100, 500 
100,000 
115,200 
100,000 
130,000 
102,450 
100,000 
218,100 



Circula- 
tion. 



2,119,742 
523, 367 
177,798 
377,386 

8,434 
14,116 
25,910 
18,748 

6,381 
27, 286 
17,046 
19,878 
81,691 
15, 582 
109,284 

4,141 
20, 738 

8,908 

7,482 
10, 681 
11,929 
17,365 
33, 070 

7,202 

6,755 
14,724 
23, 134 
61,665 



Specie. Loans and Div'ds, 
discounts. 1842. 



$204,150 
113,024 
87, 574 
111,905 
1,.547 
21,151 
67, 884 
41,724 
69, 039 
63, 465 
32, 227 
74,079 
55,613 
27,813 
15,677 
39, 301 
34,612 
26, 868 
39,063 
21,620 
36,779j 
34,813 
67,268 
31,000 
63, 933 
51,4.36 
41,433 
72, 309 



:l, 109,823 
276, 490 
66, 805 
79,517 
4,831 
2,656 
10,871 
1,910 
2,976 
9,170 
3,908 
3,853 
6,016 
4,907 
3, 1-24 
6,660 
6,643 
1,460 
3,029 
1,701 
4,350 
2,006 
4,084 
7,679 
5,766 
3,102 
6,285 
9,083 



$2,777,997 
1,458,004 
369, 298 
734, 739 
57, 836 
59,726 
46,128 
49,687 
93,369 
85, 669 
49, 380 
82,404 
360, 612 
122, 180 
65, 499 
39, 406 
52, 394 
24, 229 
37,075 
45, 138 
62, 540 
53, 643 
100, 287 
38, 348 
50, 181 
69, 238 
42, 248 
168,054 



•193,306 
57, 770 



6,669 

6,040 
8,000 
8,127 

7,000 
21,777 
8,612 
27,000 
7,140 
9,375 
3,300 

8,120 

8,000 

8,000 
4,550 
4,098 
4,070 
15, 267 



Statement of 1842. 



BANKS. 



175 



FREE BANK STATEINIENT, — &C. CONTINUED, 



NAME. 


Present 


' Deposits. 


Circula- 


Specie. 


Loans and Div'ds, 




Capital. 




tion. 




discounts. 


1842. 


M.& Far. B'U of Ithaca, 


§137,400 


$4, 518 


$•27,142 


$•-',765 


$63,629 




Far. Bank of Geneva,- 


10l,:iOO 


1,202 


35,000 


20 


17,632 




Com. B'k of Rochester, 


334, 000 


39, 030 


78, 182 


6,377 


169,970 


11,690 


F. & M. of Rochester,- 


165, 897 


707 


101,772 


14, 602 


18,341 




Bank of Krockport,- -- 


150,000 


20, 246 


• 22,484 


4,651 


36,113 




F. &M. B'k of Genesee, 


65,515 


6,196 


24,397 


1,392 


13,297 




Ex. Bank of Genesee, - 


69, 191 


5,438 


35,115 


1,036 


64,421 




Genesee County Bank, 


10J,000 


19,001 


35,958 


6,162 


44,896 


4,250 


Bank of Dansville, 


153, 2.50 


16,273 


38, 905 


3,796 


18, 460 




Bank of Silver Creek,- 


100, 000 


8,813 


66; 581 


20,276 


26, 285 


8,038 


Bank of Albion, 


73,345 


17,605 


18, 953 


3,775 


11,091 


7,000 


Canal B'k of Lockport, 


230, 000 


55, 145 


94, 283 


9,921 


183, 958 


8,050 


Lockport B. & T. Co.-- 


300. 000 


19,259 


33, 669 


6,464 


114,559 




Bank of Corning, 


104.000 


6,934 


61,735 


3,330 


64,019 




James Bank. 


44, 934 




33,410 




14, 660 




Far. Bank of Malone,- 


24,000 




20, 700 




9,000 




Man. Bank of Ulster, • • 


43, ICO 




38, 366 


9,000 


46,934 




W. Sherman Bank, 


9,000 


4,212 


3,558 


409 


10,940 




Total 4C Free Banks, - 


11,048,857 


3,991)251 


^,297,406 


^,738,687 


3071,921 


451,149 



Chartered Batiks not Subject to the Safety Faiid. 



NAME. 


Capital. 


Deposits. 


Circula- 
tion. 


Specie. 


Loans and 
discounts. 


Div'ds, 
1843. 


Manhattan Company, - 


$2,050,000 
600,000 
400, 000 
600, 000 
200,000 
300, 000 


$649, 879 
380, 172 
456, 696 

131,456 


$286, 694 
194,459 
249,010 

78, 269 


$488, 003 
200, 6 19 
102, 739 

26,079 


$1,130,909 

886, 886 
833,810 

460,829 




Chemical Bank, 

Del. & Hud. Canal Co.* 
Dry Dock Company,* •- 
Com.. Bank, Albany, •- 








1 eio rtrtrt 


808, 332 


812,370 


3, 312, 434 











* No returns made to the Bank Commissioners. 



FREE BANKS, 

That have ommittcd to report to the Bank Commission en, but appear in the 
Comptroller's Report of Januaiy, 1843. 



NAME. 


Where Located. 


Securities de- 
posited with 
Comptroller. 


Bank of the U. States in New-York, 

N. York State Stock Security Bank, 

Wool Growers' Bank, 


New- York, 

do. 

do. 
Warwick, 
Hamilton, 
Attica, 


$15,000 

18, 960 

500 

2,018 

16,000 

25,337 


Farniers' Bank of Orange County, • 

Hamilton Bank, 


Bank of Attica, 



176 



LIST OF BANKS, 

ndcr the General Banking Law, shoiving their names and locution; -u-hen 
certificates were filed, securities,, l^c, and the amount of circulating 
notes on the 1st November, 1842. Compiled from the Comptroller's Re- 
port of January, 1843. 



TITLE OF ASSOCUTIONS. 



.A.gricuUural Bank of Heikimei,- 

Albany Exchange Bank, 

American Exchange Bank, 

Bank of Albion, 

Bank of Attica, 

Bank of Brock port, 

Bank of Central New- York, 

Bank of Commerce, • • • 

Bank of Coming, 

Bank of Dans vi He, 

Bank of Lowville, 

Bank of Silver Creek, 

Bank of Syracuse, • 

Balk of United States, 

Bank of Vernon, 

Bank of Walertown, 

Bank of Waterville, 

Bank of Whiteslowu, 

Ballston Spa Bank, 

Commercial Bank of Rochester, 

Commercial Bank of Troy, 

Canal Bank of Lockport, 

Clinton Bank, 

Delaware Bank, 

Exchange Bank of Genesee, 

Farmer's Bank ot Amsterdam, •• 

Farmer's & Drover's Bank, 

Farmers' Sc Mech's. Bank Roch. 

Farmers' Bank of Geneva, 

Farmers' Bank of Hudson, 

Far. & Mecanics Bank of Genesee 
Farmers' Bank of Orange Co.- ■■ 

Farmers' Bank of Malone, 

Fort Plain Bank, 

Genesee County Bank, 

Hamilton Bank, 

Howard Trust & Banking Co.- •• 

James Bank, 

Kinderhook Bank, 

Lockport Bank & Trust Co. 

Merch. fc Farm. Bank of Ithaca,- 
Mechanics' Banking Association, 

Manufacturer's Bank, 

Middle town Bank, 

Mohawk Valley Bank, 

N. Y. State Stock Security Bank, 

North River Bank, 

Pine Plains Bank, 

Powell Bank, 

Washington County Bank, 

Wool Grower's Bank, 

Wooster Sherman Bank, 

Total, 



Location. 



Herkimer, 
Albany, 
New-York, 
Albion; 
Attica, 
Brockport, 
Utic.i, 
New-York, 
Corning, 
Dansville, 
Lowville, 
Silver Creek, 
Syracuse, 
New-York, 
Vernon, 
Watertown, 
Waterville, 
Whitestown, 
Ballston Spa- 
Rochester, 
Troy, 
Lockport, 
New- York, 
Delhi, 
Alexander, 
Amsterdam, 
Somers, 
Rochester, 
Geneva, 
Hudson, 
Batavia, 
Warwick, 
Malone, 
Fort Plain, 
Le Roy, 
Hamilton, 
Troy, 

Jamesville, 
Kinderhook, 
Lockport, 
Ithaca, 
New-York, 
Ulster. 
Middletown, 
Mohawk, 
New-York, 

do. 

Pine Plains, 
Newburgh, 
UnionVillagc 
New- York, 
Watertown, 



o 



1839 
1838 
1338 
1S39 
1S39 
1838 
1838 
1839 
1839 
1839 
1833 
18.39 
1838 
1833 
1839 
1839 
1S3S 
1839 
1839 
1839 
1839 
1839 
1839 
1839 
1838 
1S39 
1839 
1839 
1839 
1839 
1838 
1S43 
1842 
1839 
1838 
1841 
18.39 
1839 
1838 
)838 
1838 
1938 
1840 
1839 
1839 
1838 
1840 
1839 
1838 
1839 
1838 
1843 



Depos'd with Comp. 



Circula- 
Bondsand State ting notes. 
Mori'ges. Stocks. 



$36, 350 
30, 550 



19,9)8 
10, 327 
13,425 
34,313 



25, 550 
66, 300 
43,850 
33, 590 
74, 513 



40; 770 



., 225 
ou,950 
30, 800 



35', 
36 



33, 060 
93, 550 
30, 000 
86, 500 



24,913 

8,500 
15,900 
20, 000 
27, 186 
50, 200 
19, lOr 



46, 125 
46, 000 
11,000 
26, 250 
26, 934 
49, 000 
95, 260 
"27, 350 
60, 000 



39, 900 
27,000 



37,200 
50,000 
32, 325 



2,000 



1,516,-378 3,1.50,57 



$.37 
58 

404: 
15 
15 
15 
44 

465 
70 
60 
34: 
54: 

100 
15 
50' 
46 
70 
55: 
70 
70 
46 
97 
6 
93 
20 
30 
67 

82; 

30 

5o: 

28 
2 
24; 
47 
25; 



18 
51 
34 
46: 

130 
47 
32 
37 
18 

120 
63 
76 
50. 



3, 695, 605 



177 



L,:ST OF BANKS, 

Under the General Banking Law, that have been closed or failed, since 
the passage of the above bill, passed JJpril 18, 1838. Compiled from the 
Comptroller''s Report, January, 1843. 



NAME OF ASSOCIATION. 



Amount of 
securities 
sold. 



Amount 
realized. 



Circula- 
tion at 
time of 
sale. 



o ^ 

Si: 



Allrcany Coimty Bank, 

Bunk ol' America, 

Bank oi Comnierce, 

Bank of Lodi, 

Bank of Tonawanda, 

Bank of Western New-York, • -• 

Bank of Olean, 

Bingham ton Bank, 

CattarauRus County Bank,' ••• 

CheUea Bank, 

City Trust & Banking Company, 

Erie County Bank, 

Farmers' Bank of Seneca Co.- •• 
Farmers' Bank of Orleans,! • •• 
Mectianics' Bank of Buffalo,- ■• 

Millers' Bank of Clyde, 

Merchants' Exchange Bank,.-.- 
New-York Banking Company,-- 

Phcenix Bank at Buffalo, 

St. Lawrence Bank, 

State Bank of New-York, 

Staten Island Bank 

Tenth Ward Bank, 

Union Bank, 

United States Bank, 

Washington Bank, 



Total, 



Anpolica, 
Buintlo, 

do. 
Lodi, 

Tonawanda, 
Rochester, 
Olean, 

Binghampton, 
Randolph, 
New- York, 

do. 
Buffalo, . 
Ovid, 
Gaines, 
Buffalo, 
Clvde, 
Buffalo, 
New- York, 
Buffalo, 
Ogdensburgh, 
Buffalo, 
P. Richmond, 
New -York, 
Buffalo, 

do. 
New- York, 



$.'il,.')0(l 

Hl,"ll-J 

9i,000 

48, IM 

16,000 

100,000 

62,231 

31, (300 

65, 600 

1,000 

2,000 

77, 000 

56, 484 

61,000 

106, 800 

214, 600 

133,000 

26,000 

30,175 

81,277 

5, 000 

25, 200 

13,000 

68, 000 

44, 60C 

10,000 



.$•12,505 21 

57,691 12 

49,031 16 
36,775 61 

10,696 76 

54,863 92 

39, 108 18 

19,344 93 

45,280 66 

248 88 

1,348 20 

37,024 54 

42.882 16 

i2,oie 21 

68,6.30 90 

176,235 43 

76,936 56 

4,3.39 08 

20,171 00 

27,164 16 

805 47 

10,2.57 50 

10,606 40 

35.883 92 
29,812 10 

8,079 71 



$26, 39' 
76,900 
65*, 025 
40,612 
15,485 
74, 393 
53, 234 
25,315 
52, 200 
695 

1,200 
57, 136 
49, 577 
24, 826 
94,396 
182, 470 
111,995 
11 , 240 
27, 490 
59, 974 

2,890 
19, 702 
11,303 
46, 160 
46, 627 
19,235 



36@50 

76^^73 

"76 

83@97 

68 

75 

74@S7 

74^79 

77® 85 

25 

par. 

60(g,72 

imp- 

jtar. 

63 

94 



1,473,322 878,586 20 1,197,569 



42 
73 

32@50 
30 
56 
94 
81 
77 



Note. — In addition to the above, seven of the Free Banks have been closed by their 
own stockholders, and their circulating notes redeemed at par. 

* Average rates of redemption, on stocks, 57.[. Bonds and njortgages, 66 per cent. 
t .Mortgages ,'526,250, not sold — the bills redeemed at par at the Albany City Bank. 



TABLE, 

allowing the principal items of the Bank Statc/ncnts of all the Chartered 
Banks of the Stale for the last six years. 



Capital, 

Circulation, 

Canal Fund, 

Deposits, 

Due banks, 

Loans & discounts. 

Stocks, 

Specie, 

Bank notes, 

Cash items, 

Due from hanks, -•• 



Jan.1,1838 Jan. 1,1939| Jan. 1, 1840 Jan. 1,184) Jan. 1,1842 Jan. 1,1843 
95 banks. 96 banks, i 96 banks. 95 banks. 90 banks. 85 banks. 



Dollars. ' Dollars. | Dollars. 
36, 611, 460 36, 601, 460, 36, 401 , 460 
12, 432, 478 19, 373, 149 10, 360, 592 

4,'465,832 3,291,713 2,992,6.30 
15, 771, 729 18, .370, 044 10, 038, 416 
15,221,487 15,344,098 7,008,241 

60, 999, 770 68, .300, 486!52, 086, 467 



2,795,207 911,023 
4,139,732 6,602,708 
3,616,918 3,907,137 
618,277 2,838,694 
ia,297j899 14,122,940 



3, 647, 970 
5,851,219 
4,380,648 
2, 306, 462 
6, 504, 463 



Dollars. 
36,401,460 
15,235,050 

2, 570, 258 
16,790,218 
10,374,682 

54,691,163 
4,6.30,392 
6, 429, 622 
4,922,764 
2, 1S8,.565 
6,391,771 



Dollars. | Dollars. 
.34, .5.51,460 32,901,280 
12, .372, 704, 9,7.34,465 

1,609,174 1,464,496 
14,379,1.39 1.5,109,164 

8,5.37,777 10,730,602 

49,031,760'44,276,546 
3,682,387 4,843,320 
4,785,524 6,733,399 
4,897,893 3,890,677 
1,607,280 2,248,202 
4,539,489 3,726,370 



178 



BANKS I.V OPERATION AND BANK CAPITAL, 

In the several counties of the Slate of New-York, January, 1843. 



COUNTIES. 



Incorporated Banks 



EanUSj Capital. 



Banking Associations. 



Banks "" Capital. 



Total 
Banksi 



Total 
Capital. 



Albany, 

Broome, 

Cayuga, , 

Chautauque, . . 

Chenaung-, 

Chenango, 

Columbia, .... 
Delaware, .... 
Dutchess, .... 

Essex, 

Franklin, .... 

P'ulton, 

Genesee, 

Greene, 

Herkimer, . . . . 
Jefferson, . . . . . 

Kings, 

Lewis, 

Livingston, . . 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery, . 
New-York, . . 

Niagara, 

Oneida, ...... 

Onondaga, . . . . 

Ontario, 

Orange, 

Orleans, 

• Oswego, 

Otsego, '. 

Rensselaer, . . . 
. St. Lawrence, 

Saratoga, 

Schenectady, ■ 

Seneca, 

Steuben, 

Tioga, 

Tompkins, . . . 

Ulster, 

Washington, . 
Westchester, . 
Wyoming, ... 
Yates, . . . . 



1 
1 
2 

•l 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 



$2,151,600 
100,000 
450,000 
100.000 
200,000 
120,000 
150,000 



1,000,000 
100,000 



100,000 
100,000 
250,000 
200,000 
400,000 
950,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
950,000 



21 1 19,061,200 



1,200,000 
300,000 
800,000 
445, 66( 
200, (X)0 
150,000 
220,000 

1,438,0<X) 
100,000 
100,00(1 
315,00( 
200,000 
1.50,000 
200,000 
450,000 
300, 00( 
100,000 
200,CXJ0 



1 



ltK:),0(K) 



$311,100 



100,000 



250,675 
106,100 
100,000 



24,000 



229,706 



201,300 
109,000 



102,450 
153,250 

16,000 
649,897 
200, 0(K) 
6,033,730 
530,000 
445,200 
218,100 
101,300 
221,018 

73,345 



257,500 
' 169^934 



104,000 



137,400 

43,160 

102,000 

111,150 

25,337 



6 
2 
29 
2 
8 
3 
4 
6 
2 
1 
2 
7 
1 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 
3 
3 
2 
2 

1 
1 



$2,462,700 
100, 0(X) 
450. (K)0 
200;000 
200,000 
120,000 
400,675 
106,100 

1.100, Otto 
100.000 
ii4,000 
100.000 
329,706 
250,000 
401,300 
509,000 
950,000 
202', 460 
253.250 
116; 0(X) 

1,599,897 

200,000 

25,094,93a 

530,000 

1,645,200 
518, 100 
901.30f) 
666;67.S 
273.::45 
150,000 
220,000 

1,695.500 
l(tO',000 
269,934 
315,0(H) 
200,000 
2.54,000 
200,000 
587,400 
343, IC I 
202,0(>0 
311,150 
25,. 337 
100.000 



Total, 



89* I .$33,651,400 



52 $11,126,652 



141 



$-14,778, 112 



Including two branch Banks: one at Canandaigua, and the other at Utica. 



"Note. — In the following counties there are no banks: Allegany, Cattarau- 
gxjs, Clinton, Cortland, Erie, Hamilton, Putnam, Queens, Richmond, Rock- 
land, Schoharie, Suffolk, Sullivan, Warren, and Wayne. 



SAVINGS^ BANKS. 179 



SAVINGS' BANKS. 



Albany Savings Bank. 

Iiicorpoialecl March 24, 1820. Open at the Coininercial Bank, No. 
40 State-sl., every Saturday afternoon, from 5 to 7 o'clock P. M., to 
receive deposits. It pays an interest to the depositors at the rate of 5 
per cent per annum, payable half yearly on the third Wednesday of Ja- 
nuary and July. 

John Townsendj President. James Taylor, Treas. & Accountant. 

Auburn Savings Bank. 
Incorporated' April 11, 1842. 

BuooKLYN Savings Bank. — Oflice, 184 Washington-street. 
Incorporated April 7, 1827. Open every Tuesday and Saturday af- 
ternoon, to receive deposits. Interest paid, 5 i)er cent per annum. 
David Stanford, President. William Ellsworth, Treasurer. 

Bowery Savings Bank. — No. 128 Bowery, New-York. 
Incorporated May 1, 1834. Bank openfor the reception of deposits, 
Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, from 5 to 7 P. M. Dividends 
payable third Monday in January and July. 

James Mills, President. Giles H. Coggeshall, Secretary. 

Greenwich Savings Bank. — No. 11 Sixth Avenue. 
Incorporated in 1838. Open every Monday, Wednesday, and Fri- 
day, from 5 to 7 P. M. Interest payable in January and Julj'. 
Abraham Van Nest, President. Lambert Suydam, Treasurer. 

New-York Bank for Savings. — No. 43 Chambers-street. 
Chartered in 1819. Office open every Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 
and Saturday, from 4 to 6 P. M. Friday afternoons exclusively for fe- 
males. Dividends payable third Monday in January and July. 
Philip Hone, President. John Oothout, Treasurer. 

Seamen's Bank for Savings. — No. 71 Wall-street. 
Chartered in 1829. Office open daily, from 12 to 1 P. M. Interest 
payable in January and July. 

Benjamin Strong, President. Ezekiel Buck, Treasurer. 

Ithaca Savings Bank. 
Incorporated April 28, 1841. 

Palmyra Savings Bank. 
Incorporated April 12, 1842. 

Poughkeepsie Savings Bank. 
Incorporated in 1831. 

Rochester Savings Bank. 
Incorporated April 21, 1831. 
William Pilkin, President. David Scoville, Secretary. 

Savings Bank of Utica. 
Incorporated April 26, 1839. Deposits are received every day. Di- 
vidends, at the rate of 5 per cent, are declared semi-annually, in Janu- 
ary and July. 
John C. Dcvereux, President. S. Williams, Sec. & Treas. 



180 insurance companies. 

Schenectady Savings Bank. 

Incorporated in 1834. Open every Monday afternoon, at the Sche- 
nectady Bank, to receive deposits. Interest of 5 per cent, payable in 
January and July. 

Alonzo C. Paige, President. Thomas Palmer, Treasurer. 

Troy Savings Bank. — Office, No. 8 First-street. 

Incorporated in April, 1823. Deposits received every Monday and 
Saturday. Dividends, 5 per cent per annum. 

Stephen Warren, President. Jacob L. Lane, Sec. & Treas. 



INSURANCE COMPANIES, 

In the City of New- York. 

Mtt^a Fire Insurance Company. — No. 57 Wall-street. 
Incorporated March 31, .1823, for 21 years. Capital, $200,000. 
Shares, 50 dollars. 

Charles Town, President. Henry Lott, Secretary. 

Bowery Fire Insurance Company. — No. 124 Bowery. 
Incor})orated April 24, 1833, for 30 years. Capital, $300,000. 
Shares, 25 dollars. 

James Lovett, President. Peter Pinckney, Secretary. 

City Fire Insurance Company. — No. 44 Wall-street. 
Incorporated in 1833, for 30 years. Capital, $210,000. Shares, 70 
dollars . 

Richard A. Heading, President. D. F. Curry, Secretary. 

Eagle Fire Insurance Company. — No. 59 Wall-street. 
Incorporated in 1806; charter perpetual. Capital, $500,000. Shares, 
100 dollars. 
E^ W. Laight, President. Thomas Glover, Secretary. 

East River Mutual, Insurance Company. — No. 49 Wall. 
Incorporated in 1833 ; amended in 1842, with privilege for IMutual 
Insurance. Capital reduced to $200,000. Shares, 20 dollars. 
Jacob Brouwer, President. Gold S. Silliman, Secretary. 

Equitable Insurance Company. — No. 46 Wall. 
Chartered April 20, 1823, for 21 years. Capital, $300,000. Shares, 
50 dollars. 
Lambert Suydam, President. Joseph Strong, Secretary. 

Firesian's Insurance Company. — No. 47 Wall. 
Incorporated April 19, 1825. Capital, $300,000. Shares, 25 dol- 
lars. 

Jacob Drake, President. Niel Gray, Secretary. 

General, Mutual, Insurance Company. — No. 34 Wall. 
Incorporated May 25,1841; to continue for 30 years. Insure against 
fire, and marine and inland navigation. 

A. Ogden, President. W. B. Bolles, Secretary. 

Greenwich Insurance Company. — No. 306 Hudson-street. 
Incorporated May 6, 1834. Capital, $200,000. Shares, 25 dollars 
Timothy Whittemore, President. Joseph Torrey, Secretary. 



INSURANCE. C03IPANIES. 181 

Howard Lvsuuance Cojipany. — No. 54 Wall. 

lacorporatod March 0, 1825, for 21 years. Capital, $-300,000. 
•Sliarcs, 50 dollars. 

11. Havens, President. Lewis Pliillips, Secretary. 

HuDSoa" Insurance Comtany. — No. 62 Wall. 

Chartered April 6, 1838. Capital, $200,000. Shares, 25 dollars. 
John H. Hurtin, President. A. S. De Peyster, Secretary. 

Jeffkuson Insurance Company. — No. 47 Wall. 

Incorporated Marcli 4, 1824, for 21 years. Capital, $200,000. 
Shares, 30 dollars. 

T. W. Thorne, President. G. T. Hope, Secretary. 

Manhattan Insurance Company. — No. 56 Wall, 

Chartered Marcli, 1821, for 30 years. Capital, $'250,000. Shares, 
50 dollars. 

Samuel F. Mott, President. Thomas Bull, Jr., Secretary. 

Merchants' Fire Insurance Company. — No. 55 Wall. 

Chartered April, 1818. Capital, $500,000. Shares, 100 dollars. 

Jonathan Lawrence, President. A. H. MuUer, Secretary. 

Mutual Fire Insurance Company. — No. 42 Wall. 

Incorporated in 1798 ; renewed in 1809, and stands until revoked by 
the Legislature. Capital, $350,000. Shares, 50 dollars. 
George Ireland, President. Anthony B. McDonald, Secretary. 

Mutual, Safety Insurance Company. — No. 44 Wall. 

Chartered March, 1837; to endure 20 years. Capital, $270,000. In- 
sure, fire and marine risks. 

Zebedee Cook, Jr., President. Josepdi B. Collins, Secretary. 

National Insurance Company. — No. 49 Wall. 

Chartered April 9, 1838, for 30 years. Capital, $150,000. Shares, 
$37.50 each. 
John Brouwer, President. Joseph W. Savage, Secretary. 

• New-York. Contributionsiiip Insurance Company. 

No. 57 Wall-street. 
Chartered April 5, 182 1; to continue 30 years. Capital, $300',000. 
Shares, 50 dollars. 
J. Smyth Ivodgers, President. R. W. Martin, Secretary. 

New-York Fire Insurance Company. — No. 10 Merch. Ex. 

Incorporated April 18, 1832 ; to continue 30 years. Capital, $200,- 
000. Shares, 100 dollars. 

0. H. Jones, President. A. M. Merchant, Secretary. 

New-York Guardian Insurance Company. — No. 64 Wall. 

Incorjiorated April 6, 1838, for 30 years. Capital, $300,000. Shares, 
100 dollars. 

John Van Nostrand, President. Joseph Greenleaf, Secretary. 

North American Insurance Company. — No. 38 Wall. 

Incorporated January 1, 1836. Capital, $250,000. Shares, 50 dol- 
lars. 

Robert Ainslie, President, John McBriar, Sccrelarv. 

IG 



182 INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

North River Insurance. Company. — No. 192 Greenwich. 

Incorporated February, 1822, for 15 years. Renewed for 15 years. 
Capital, $350,000. Shares, 25 dollars. 

Richard Whiley, President. Peter R. Warner, Secretary. 

Sun Mutual Fire and Marine Insurance Company. 

Nos. 6 and 8 Merchants' Exchange. 
Passed April 6, 1842; to continue 20 years. 
A. B. Neilson, President. John Whitehead, Secretary. 

Trust Fire Insurance Company. — 'No. 27 Wall. 
Chartered April 25, 1836, for 30 years. Capital, $150,000. Shares, 
75 dollars. 

Elias G. Drake, President. Lebbeus Chapman, Secretary. 

United States Insurance Company. — No. 55 Wall. 
Chartered April 1, 1824, for 21 years. Capital, $250,000. Shares, 
25 dollars. 

John L. Bowne, President. James Wilkie, Secretary. 

Wir.LIAMSBURGH FiRE INSURANCE CoMPANY. 

Offices, 64 Wall-street, New-York, and Gfand-street, Williamsburgh. 

Chartered April 28, 1836, for 30 years. Capital, $150,000. Shares, 
20 dollars. 

C. Zabriskie, President. A. B. Hodges, Secretary. 



Marine Insurance Companies. 
American Insurance Company. — No. 51 Wall. 
Incorporated March 1, 1815. Capital, $500,000. Shares, 50 dol- 
lars. 

J.J. Palmer, President. D. A. Bokee, Secretary. 

Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company. — 14 & 16 Mer. Ex. 

Chartered February, 27, 1824; to continue until 1845. Capital, 
$500,000. 

W. R. Jones, President. Jacob R. Pentz, Secretary. 

Jackson Marine Insurance Company. — No. 53 Wall. 
Incorporated in 1831; to continue until 1852. Capital, $300,000. 
Shares, 37 1-2 dollars. 

Simeon Baldwin, President. William H. Dibblee, Secretary. 

Merchants' Marine Insurance Company. — 30Merch. Ex. 

Winding up. Incorporated in 1836 ; to continue until 1857. Capi- 
tal, $400..'000. Shares, 100 dollars. * 

Thomas Hale, President. John D. Jones, Secretary. 

Neptune Insurance Company. — No. 34 Wall. 

Incorporated April 1, 1825 ; to continue until 1846. Capital, $250,- 
000. Shares, 50 dollars. 

John R. Hurd, President. Charles J. Johnson, Secretary. 

New-York Marine Insurance Company. — No. 34 Wall. 
Incorporated April 2, 1798. Capital, $500,000. Shares, 50 dollars. 
B. McEvers, President. John H. Lyell, Secretary. 



INSURANCE COJIPANIES. 183 

WASIIIWfiTON IxSUnANCE Co31PANY. — No. 46 Wall. 
Winding: up. Incorporated April 27, 1S31 ; to continue 20 years. 
Capital, 8300,000. Shares, 50 dollars. 

Jacob Harvey, President. Wra. H. Bird, Secretary. 

Life Insaraiice and Trust Companies. 

American Lifk Insurance and Trust Company, 
Baltimore, Md. AjSfencv, 44 Wall-street. 
IncSrporaled in 1833; charter perpetual. Capital, S-2,000,000. 
Shares, 50 dollars. 

John Duer, Vice-President. N. Thurston, Assistant. 

Charleston Life Ins. and Trust Co. — Office, 65 Wall. 
Capital, ^^1,000,000. Shares, 100 dollars. 

L. Gregory, Ass't Vice-President. 

pARiMERs' Loan and Trust Company. — No. 34 Wall. 
Incorporated February 28, 1822. Title altered April S, 1836. Ca- 
pital, ^2, 000,000. Shares, 50 dollars. This company insures lives, 
grants, aiinuities, and executes trusts. 

Ro;)ert C. Cornell, President. Rufus K. Delafield, Secretary. 

GEonaiA Insurance and Trust Company.— Office, 64 Wall. 
Cahilal, ,$'1,000,000. Shares, 100 dollars. 

Wm. T. Gould, Secretary. Justus Harrison, Agent. 

Mutual Life Insurance Company. — No. 44 Wall. 
Incorporated April 12, 1842; to continue until repealed by the Le- 
gislature. 
Morris Robinson, President. Samuel Hannay, Secretary. 

Pruyn & Martin, Agents, Albany. 
New-York Life Insurance and Trust Company. 
No. 40 Wall-street. 
Incorporated March 9, 1830. Charter unlimited. Capital, ^1,000,- 
000. Shares, 100 dollars. 

William Bard, President. C. C. Palmer, Se<yretary. 

Ohio Life Insurance and Trust Company. 
Office, 64 Merchants' Exchange. 
Capital, $2,000,000. Shares, 100 dollars. 

J. N. Perkins, Cashier. 

Southern Life Insurance and Trust Company. 
Office, 12 Wall-street. 
Capital, $-2,000,000. Shares, 100 dollars. 

George Field, Agent. 



Fire Insurance Companies having Agencies in the city of N. York. 

Name and I-ocation. Capital. Agnnt. 

TEtna, Hartford, $200,000 A G. Hazard, 67 Wall-street. 

Firemen's, Boston, 300,000 Asa Bigelow, 51 William. 

Hartford, of Ilfytford, 150,000 John Neilson, Jr. 55 Wall. 

Mantifacturcrs', Boston, ... 400,000 Asa Bigelow, 51 William. 

Mechanics', Newark, N. J., 100,000 J. L. Baldwin, 35 Spruce. 

Merchants', Boston, 500,000 Asa Bisrelow, 51 William. 

National, " 500,000 Thos. Hale, 30 Merch. Ex. 



1S4 INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

Name and Location. Capital. Agont. 

New-Jersey, Newark, $300,000 J. H. Blower, 75 Wall. 

Protection, Hartford, 150,000 A. G. Hazard, 67 Wall. 

Saratoga Mutual, S. Spring-.s, James C. Hallock, 61 Wall. 

Soutliwark, Philadelphia, . . " " 

Spring Garden, " " " 

Washinj^^ton, Providence, .. Asa Big-elow, 51 William. 

Columbia, Philadelphia, ... L. Gregory, 65 Wall. 

Marine Insiirauoe CojsipaJii^s. 

Name and Location. Capital. Agent. 

Mechanics', Newark, N. J., ,«'200,000 L. Gregory, 65 Wall-street. 

New-Jersey, " "300,000 J. H. Brower, 75 Wall. 



INSURANCE COMPANIES, 

Out of the City qf New-York. 

Albany Fire Insurance Company. — Olflce, 56 Stalo-streel. 
Incorporated March 5, 1811 ; charter expires in June, 1851. Capi- 
tal, $300,000. Shares, 60 dollars each. Dividends, Jaiuiarj and July. 
Teunis Van Vechten, President. John E. Lovett, Secretary. 

Firemen's Insurance Company. — No. 44 State-st., Albany- 
Incorporated April 1841; charter expires 1860. Capital, $150,000. 

Shares, 10 dollars. Dividends, January and July. 

James Stevenson, President. 11. Van Rensselaer, Secretary. 

Merchants' Insurance Company. — 165 Broadway, Albany. 
Incorporated April, 1824 ; charter expires 1845. Capital, $250,- 

000. Shares, 25 dollars. Dividends; January and July. 

Ilussell Forsyth, President. John W. Ford, Secrelan'. 

Brooj^lyn Fire Insurance Company. — No. 43 Fulton-st. 
Incorporated April 3, 1824; to continue 21 years. Capital, $102,- 

000. Shares, 17 dollars each. 

William Ellsworth, President. Wm. A. Thompson, Secretary. 
Long Island Insurance Company. — 1 Front-st., Brooklyn. 
Incorporated in 1833 ; to continue 30 years. Capital, $200,000. 

Shares, 50 dollars each. 

J. Sprague, President. S. Alpheus Smith, Secretary. 

Buffalo Fire and Marine Insurance Company. 
Chartered in 1836; charter expires in 1860. Capital, $100,000. 
Horatio Shumway, President. Lucius Slorrs, Secretary. 

Northavestern Insurance Company. — Oswego. 

Incorporated ; charter expires in 1857. Capital, 

$150,000. This company lakes marine and fire risks. 
Theophilus S. Morgan, President. Saml. B. Ludlow, Secretary. 

Rensselaer and Saratoga Insurance (Company. 
Office, 9i Firstrstreet, Troy. 
Incorporated in 1814; charier expires in 1854. Capital, $100,000. 
Gurdon Corning, President. Danie! Hall, Sec. & Treas. 



INSURAN'CE COMPANIES. 



185 



SiUTUAL INSUR.VXCE CO.IU'ANIES IX OPERATION, 

Exclusive of those in the city of New-York, 



Name of Company. 



LOCA'IION. 



Pbesiden't, 



Secretary. 



Ex- 

PIItE. 



Albany Mutual In. Com 



Allegany 
Cattaraug-us Co. 
Cayuga Co. 
Chautauque Co. 
Chenango Co. 
Cherry- Valley 
Clinton &, Essex 
Cortlanil Co. 
Dutchess Co. 
J''ranklin Co. 
Genesee Co. 
Glen Cove 
Herkimer Co. 
I luntinglon 
Jefferson Co. 
Kingston 
Madison Co. 
Mechanics" 
Monroe Co. 



do 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do. . . . 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do 



Montgomerj' Co. do. 



Niagara Co. 
Orange Co. 
Oneiila Co. 
Onlario k, Liv. 
Onondaga 
Oswego Co. 
Rensselaer Co. 
Richmond Co. 
Saratoga Co. 
Schenectady Co. 



St Lawrence Co. do.. . 



SulTolk Co. 
Tompkins Co. 
Unadilla 
Wayne Co. 
Wes'chcster 



do. 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 



do 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do 

do 



Albany, 

Angelica, 

EUicottville, 

Auburn, 

Fredonia, 

Norwich, 

Cherry Valley 

Keescville, 

Cortland, 

Po'keepsie, 

Malone, 

Le Roy, 

Glen Cove, 

Little Falls, 

Huntington, 

Watcrtown, 

Kingston, 

Cazenovia, 

Troy, 

Rochester, 

Canajoharie, 

Lockport, 

Goshen, 

Utica, 

W. Bloonif'ld 

Baldwinsville 

Mexico, 

Lansingburgh 

Richmond, 

Saratoga Sp., 

•^chencc tally, 

Ogdensburgh, 

Southold, 

Ithaca, 

Unadilla, 

Newark, 

New Rochellc 



Carent P. Slaats, 
Samuel King, 
Israel Day, 
.Ion. Richmond 
Leverett Barker, 
David Griflin, 
Wm. Cami)bell, 
Richaril Kecse, 
John Miller, 
James Emott, 
Asa Hascall, 
Aug. P. Ilaseall, 
J. C. Townsend, 
A. Loom is, 



Adriel Elj-, 
j; W. Baldwin, 
Wm. J. Hough, 
Natli. Starbuck, 
Wm. McKnight, 
Daniel Morrell, 
Manus Stickney, 
John S. Crane, 
S. N. Dexter, 
Oliver Phelps, 
J. R. Lawrence, 
Avery Skinner, 
E. (Chichester, 
Jno. Johnson, jr. 
Ransom Cook, 
John Sanders, 
Haron S. Dolj', 



Oarrit Hogan, 18.56 
Ransom Lloyd, 1807 
T. R. Coleman, 1867 
E. W. Arms, 1867 
David Barrel!, 1856 
Abel Chandler, 1856 
Peter Magher, 1862 
Lemuel Stetson, 18.^ 
Harvey Smith, 18.".6 
.Tames E. Slater, 1856 
U. D. Meeker, 1856 
David R. Bacon, 1856 
E. Valentine, 1867 
J. A. Rasbach, 1856 

1858 

J. K. Dutton, 1856 
J. K.Trumpbour 18;'j6 

1856 

Lyman Garfield, 1856 
Levi A. Ward, 118;%" 
Lester Wilcox, 1856 
Jos. T. Bellak, 1867 
H. W. Elliott, 1867 
Aylsworth, 1856 
John Dickson, 18,56 
G. AV. Robinson, 1856 
R. A. Stitt, I18.56 



T. S. Williams, 
Isaac Hays, 
Wm. Sisson, 
M. Bo yles, 



M. L. Filley, 
R. Crocheron, 
Thos. J. Marvin, 
T. R. Van Ingen, 
Wm. C. Brown, 
J. H. Goldsmith, 
Dan. L. Bishop, 
C. C. Noble, 
r. Partridge, 
.las. T. Eclls, 



1856 
1856 
1856 
1856 
1856 
1856 
1860 
1856 
1856 



MISCELLAiVEOU.S COMPANIES 

IN THE CITY OF N. Y. 

Merchants' Exchange Company. — 561 Merch. Excl)an<je. 
Incorporated January 27, 1823. Capital, $1,000,000. Shares, 100 
dollars. 

John A. Stevens, President. Richard C. McCormick, Secretary. 

Chamber op Commerce. 
Meet at the Merchants' Bank, No. 25 Wall-street, on the first Tues- 
day of every month. 

James D. P. Ogden, President, John D. Van Buren, Secretary, 
James G. King, 1st Vice-Prcs't, John J. Palmer,' Treasurer. 

16» 



186 



MISCELLANEOUS COMPANIES. 



New-York Gas Light Company. — No. 176 Centre-street. 

Chartered March 26, 1823; charter perpetual. Capital, ^1,000,000. 
Shares, 50 dollars. 

Wm. W. Fox, President. E. E. Head, Secretary. 

Manhattan Gas Light Company. — 179 Mercer-st., N. York. 

Incorporated February, 1830; charter perpetual. Capital, $500,- 
OOO. Shares, 50 dollars — 27 dollars on each share now paid. 

David C. Golden, President. Samuel H. Howard, Secretary. 

BOAKD OF TuADE. 

Office in Clinton Hall, corner of Beeknian and Nassau-streets. 
John W. Leavitt, President. T. Denny, Corresponding Sec. 

Peru Iron Company. — Office 32 South-street. 
Francis Salters, President. A. T. Van Boskerck, Secretary. 

Seabiens' Retreat. — Office 71 Wall-street. 
Benjamin Strong, President. R. Brumley, Secretary. 

New-York Stock and Exchange Board. 
David Clarkson, President. B. Hart, Secretary. 



TABLE, 

Showing the market price, at different periods, of some of the principal stocks 
sold in the city of New-York, during the year 1S42. 



Stocks. 



New-York State Fives, 1858, 

do do 5is, 1861, 

do do 6s, 1862, 

do do 7s, 1848-9,.... 

Ohio 6s, 1860 

Illinois 6s, 1870, 

Indiana 5s, 

Manhattan Bank, 

Mechanics' Bank, 

Union Bank, 

Bank of America, 

Delaware and Hudson Canal Co.,. . . 

Bank of Commerce, full, 

Mechanics' Banking- Association,. . 

American Exchange Bank, 

Farmers' Trust Co., 

New- Jersey Rail-Roatl, 

Mohawk Rail-Road, 

Paterson Rail-Road, 

Stonington Rail-Road, 

Utica and Sclienectady Rail-Road,. 

Syracuse and Utica Rail-Road, 

Auburn and Sjracuse Rail-Road,. . . 
Auburn and Rochester Rail-Road,. 

Long Island Rail-Road, 

Harlem Rail-Road, 



Jan. 



70 
2Qi 
22 

*56 
61 

100 
88 
951 
82 
55 
60 
25 
65 
54j 
481 
15.1 

123 



81 
97 
531 

7« 



Mar. 



52 

14 

17', 

t60 

59 

100 

88 

91 

70 

38 

55 

19 

64 J 

44^ 

44| 

ll.i 

124 

►104 

*83 

92 

73 



I^Iay. 



82', 

91 

100^ 
77f 
18 
21 
60 
62 

102 
84 
96 
84 \ 
55 
57 
28 
66, 
40, 
50| 
17 

132 

109 
87 

100 
50i 
14f 



July, 



81 
82' 
911 

100: 

75 

17^ 

22, 

*60 

t62 

100 

75 

84; 

80 

52 

58 

18i 

60.1 

38 

45 

17i 

112 

tllO 

-►84 

93i 

49| 

]6j 



Sept. 



79; 
82 
89 
100 
72 
18^ 
21 
60 
60 
102 
80 
82.^ 
82J 
60 
61 
17 
65] 
32 
50 
161 
115 
102 
+85 
89 
49^ 

m 



Nov. 



841 

851 

94 

I02i 

^i* 
18 

20 

61 

58 

100 
76i 
89 
82i 

t61 
58 
15 
64| 
34i 
48 
15| 

115 
97| 
86 
94 
48i 
15f 



• Asked. 



t Offered. 



\ 

CUSTOM HOUSE POST-OFFICE — FOREIGN CONSULS. 187 

CUSTOM HOUSE— Nciv- York. 

Nassau-sfreet, between Wall and Pine. Oi)en dailv, (Sundays ex- 
cepted,) from 10 A. U., to 3 P. M. 

Edward Curtis, Collector. 
Tlionr.as Lord, Naval Officer. 
William Taggard, Surveyor. 

Deputy Collectors. 
Isaac S. Hone, Mathew L. Davis, 

George Davis, Charles P. Clinch, 

James T. Tallman. 

Samuel G. Ogden, Jr., j^uditor. 
Tallman J. Wafers, Cashier. 

j^ppraisers. 
M. B. Edgar, Edward Taylor, M. D. Benjamin. 

NEW-YORK POST-OFFICE. 

Located in the Park, on the south side of Chambers-street, in the 
building formerly called tlie Rotunda. The Branch Post-Office is situ- 
ated in the Merchants' Exchange, corner William-street and Exchange 
Place. 

Office flours, 

April 1st, to November 1st: from 7h A. M., to 7i P. M. Novem- 
ber 1st, to April 1st : from 8 A. M., to 7 P. M. Sundays : from 9 to 10 
A. M., and from 12^ to I5 P. M. John Lorimer Graham, P. M. 



forei(;n consuls. 

Resident in the city of Kcw-York. 

Austria. — Baron Louis Lederer, 72 Greenwich-street. 

Baden. — C. F. Koger, Consul General, 301 Broadway ; J. W. 
Schmidt, Vice do., 34 Broad. 

Bavaria. — George H. Siemon, 39 Nassau. 

Belgium. — Henry W. T. Mali, 41 Beaver 

Brazil. — Louis H. F. De Aguiar, Consul General ; Louis F, Depiga- 
niere, Vice-Consul, 34 Plait. 

Bremen — Herman Oelriciis, 42 Broad. 

C/t(7('.— Franklin H. Delano, 78 South. 

Denmark. — Benjamin Aymar, 34 Soulli. 

France. — Charles Dc Laforest, 93 Greenwich. 

Frankfort — Frederick Wissman, 23 South William. 
>Great Britain. — Anthony Barclay, 26 Broad. 

Greece. — P^ugene Dulilli, 39 Beaver. 

Hamburg. — J. W. Schmidt, 34 Broad. 

Hanover. — Lewis H. Meyer, 9 Broad. 

Hesse J)armstadt. — Anthony Bollerman, 5 William. 

Hessian. — Conrad W. Faber, 44 Broad. 

Luhec. — George W. Kruger, 42 Broad. 

Meclenhurgh. — Charles a Heckscher, 45 South. 

Mexico. — J. Granja, 49 Liberty. 

Montevideo. — John L. Darby, 71 Wall. 

Nassau. — William A. Kobbe, 164 Pearl. 

Netherlands. — John C. Zimmerman. 44 Broad. 

Norivay. — Ernest Zachrisson, 43 Broad. 



138 



AUCTION DUTIES. 



Asw-Grenada. — Mortimer Livingston, Vice-Consul, 22 Broad , 
Portugal. — Philip N. Searle, Vice-Consul, 20 Broad. 
Prussia. — J. W. Schmidt, 34 Broad. 
'Roman States. — Martin Mantin, 32 Piatt. 
Rassia. — Alexis Eustaphieve, 407 Fourth. 
Sardinia. — Louis Mossi, 522 Broome. 
Saxe /lltenhurg. — Charles Hinrichs, 46 Beaver. 
Saxe JViemar. — Lewis H. Meyer, 9 Broad. 
Saxony. — John R. Mahler, 129 Pearl. 

Sicily. — Rocco Mortuscelli, Consul General, 132 Greenwich; Wm. 
. Aspinwall, Vice do., 54 South. 
Spain. — Francisco Stoug-hton, 115 Leonard. 
Sweden. — Ernest Zachrisson, 43 Broad. 
Switzerland. — Henry C. DeRham, 44 Broad. 
Texas. — John H. Brower, 75 Wall. 

Tuscany. — Baron Louis Lederer, Consul General, 72 Greenwich; 
Wm. H. Aspinwall, Vice-Consul, 54 South. 

Trinidad De Cuba. — Hiram P. Hasting's, 27 Broadway. 
Venezuela. — John B. Purroy, 4 Wall. 



H 



AUCTlOPf DUTIE.S. 

Statement of the amounts paid into the State Treasury by New-York Auctioneers, 
on account of vendue duty, for the fiscal year ending 30th September, 1842: 



L, M. Hoffman, $40,637 57 
David Austen,.. 26,407 67 
W. C. Ilasg-erty 26,037 99 
David C. Porter 19,879 45 
Geo. Timpson.. 15,891 34 
S. Draper, Jr. . . 12,380 10 
Chas. W. Foster 9,68<8 11 
T.R. Minturn.. 9,234 26 
John Rudderow 9,033 00 
Walden Pell... 7,348 48 
Robt.Haydock. 6,035 71 
R. LaAvrenee.. . .5,772 12 
K.D.Smith.... 3,303 65 
Wm. Gerard... 2,290 94 
Geo. B. Rollins 2,160 24 
W. H. Franklin 930 93 
R. H. Timpson 345 31 
Wm. J. Bartow 2^)6 92 
Josiah Richards 282 63 
Henry E. Riell 194 63 
Edw. F. Hyde 188 97 



A.J. Bleeclcer.. 
L. L. Forman 
Robt. I. Gerard 
John B. Glover 
Royal Gurley.. 
E.H.Ludlow.. 
S. P. Ing:raham 
Lucas F. Hough 
H. A. Carter... 
Thomas Bell. .. 
G.W. H. Rogers 
Michael Henry 
David Parks. . . 
Chas. Yeoman. . 

John Crowe 

Renj.Mooney.. 
Francis Fleet. . 
F. J. Beams... 
A. E. Bushnell 
J. R.Wheeler.. 
W.G.M'Laughlin 



$179 
170 
125 
94 
t)0 
73 
52 
37 
32 
32 
30 
27 
27 
22 
17 
17 
15 
14 
12 
12 
11 



271H. L. Seixas.. 



S. H. Stuart 

H. C. Tallman 
Ansell Edwards 
Wm.Brainerd. . 
Wm. R. Merritt 
A.M.Christaler 
J. W. Haven. . . 
R. M. Baker. . . 
Jno. Buxton, jr. 
Francis Colton 
Joseph Daymon 
R. Ainslie, Jr. . 
Steph. Crowell 
N.N.M'Laughlin 
Terrence Boyle 
J. P. Beckwith 
Peter Fairchild 
Pat. D. Moran 
Gilbert Lewis. . 
G. O. Bartlett. . 



SIO 94 

10 23 

9 36 

9 30 

6 85 

6 62 

6 45 

5 12 

4 34 

4 03 

3 00 

2 87 

2 43 

2 00 

1 53 

1 46 

79 

49 

43 

30 

10 



Total, $199,507 02 



Conniarativc Statement. 



Year. 



Duties. 



1833 $238,719 

1834 193,470 

1835 273,077 

1836 258,341 

1837 214,458 

1838 142,102 

1839 225,401 

1842 199,507 



Amount of 
sales dutiable. 

$21,985,506 
14,40.3,152 
19,627,355 
18,180,703 
12,711,937 
8,425,,508 
13,364,603 
13,300,463 



Amount of sale.^ 

not dutiable. 

$12,406,813 

13,291,524 

14,684,253 

35,072,589 

6,683,746 

15,238,261 

15,314,430 



STATE CANALS. 189 

STATE CANALS. • 



The Canals constructed, or in course of construction by the State, and 
bclon-zing to it as public property, are nine in number ; and in the follow- 
ing general account of them, the statutory designations of them are adopt- 
ed : 

ERIE CANAL. 

This Canal as first built, was commenced Avith public ceremonies, July 
4, 1817; and it was finished, ready for navigation in its whole extent, 
from Lake Erie at Buffalo, to the Hudson River at Albany, in October, 
1825, at the total cost, including interest and loans, and all other disburse- 
ments, of $10,731,595. Its main trunk, 40 ft. wide at top, 28 ft. at bot-' 
tom, and 7 ft. in depth, with 4 ft. depth of water, is 363 miles long, exclu- 
sive of feeders and side-cuts. It had only 84 lift locks, both ascending and 
descending, giving a rise and fall of only 692 ft.; and but 3 summit levels, 
viz : the Rome level, 69 miles long, extending from Frankfort, 9 miles east 
of Utica, nearly to Syracuse ; the short Jordan level, between the valley 
of the Onondaga Creek at Syracuse, and that of the Seneca Hirer at 
Montezuma ; and the Lake Erie level, extending from Buflalo to Lock- 
port. The Oak Orchard level, also, tliough not a summit, is 60 miles 
long, extending from Rochester to the foot of the Mountain Ridge, at 
Lockport. The lowest level on the line, from which the canal ascends 
each way, is at the Montezuma Marshes. The heights of the more im- 
portant levels above the Hudson, at Albany, are as follows : 

The Rome level, 425 ft.; the Oak Orchard level, 506 ft.; and the Lake 
Erie level, 561 ft. The principal Aqueducts on the original work, were 
as follows : Two, consisting of wooden trunks supported by stone piers, 
across the Mohavvk river, between the Cohoes Falls and Schenectady; one, 
made wholly of stone, across the Mohawk at Little Falls ; and the other, 
consisting wholly of stone, also, and much the most massive and costly, 
across the Genesee river at Rochester. The other features of the original 
work most remarkable, either for difficulty of execution, or, for their 
imposing aspect when finished, were, the section crossing the great marsh- 
es at Montezuma, traversed by the Seneca and Clyde rivers, and during 
the excavation of which, it was necessary to keep pumps driven by horse 
power at work night and day, for a distance of several miles ; the great 
Embankment, 72 ft. in perpendicular height, with a base of about 250 ft. 
in width, across the ravine of the Irondequoit creek, a few miles east of 
Rochester ; the rock excavation through the Mountain Ridge, at Lock- 
port ; and tlie pier and dam at Black Rock, in the Niagara river. 

On the 11th of May, 1835, the Legislature passed an act for the enlarge- 
ment of this canal. By that act, the size of the enlargement and the gene- 
ral outlines of the work, were submitted to the determination of the Canal 
Board, a body, composed of the Board of Canal Commissioners, and the 
Commissioners of the Canal Fund. After such investigation as was deem- 
ed sufficient, the Canal Board in 1836, decided, that the dimensions of the 
enlarged canal should be, as follows : Width at top, 70 ft., at bottom, 42 
ft., perpendicular depth, 10 ft., with 7 ft. depth of water ; the locks to be 
Lu pairs, each lock having its chamber, 110 ft. long, by 18 ft. wide. 

The enlargement having been determined on, operations were commen- 
ced in 1836, and a great amount of work has been done. The Commis- 
sioners have v.isely availed themselves of the occasion, to improve the lo- 
cation of the canal in many places ; straightening the curves wherever 
practicable, shortening the distance, and diminishing the total quantity of 
lockage. In this way, the whole length of the enlarged canal will, when 
done, be about 360 miles, instead of 3()3 ; and taking each pair of locks 
as one rise, or fall, the mmiber of locks ■will be 71, instead of 84. Tkis 



190 * STATE CANALS. 

saving of lockage is effected among the short levels, the long ones reraaiu- 
in^essentially as before. 

The number of other structures of masonry will be increased. There 
will be 37 aqueducts, and 5 weigh locks. 

The cost of the enlargement is estimated at about 23 millions. The 
boats chiefly employed for transportation on the original canal, average 
about 55 to 60 tons. The enlarged canal will accommodate boats of the 
average capacity of about 150 tons ; and, as the cost of towing will be in- 
creased in a much smaller ratio than that of the tonnage, the price of 
freights will be very materially diminished. This diminution is estimated 
at about 50 per cent. 

The amount of business done on this canal, and the annual revenue it 
«has yielded, are exhibited in the tables that follow these general remarks. 

CHAMPLAIN CANAL. 

This canal connects with the Lake Champlain, at Whitehall, and with 
the Hudson river, at Waterford. It was commenced in October, 1817, and 
completed in November, 1819, at a cost of $1,179,872., It is 64 miles long; 
of the^same dimensions in other respects as the original'Erie canal, with a 
total quantity of 188 ft. of lockage, and 21' locks, of which 54 ft. distribu- 
ted in 7 locks, include the rise from the lake to the summit level, extend- 
ing from Fort Ann to Fort Edward, and 134 ft. distributed in 14 locks, 
include the descent to the Hudson at Waterford. 

On its summit level this canal receives a navigable feeder 13 miles long, 
drawing its supply from the Hudson at a point about 2 miles above Glen's 
Falls, and called the Glen's Falls Feeder. 

At Waterford, where the canal unites witl\.the Hudson, the river is con- 
verted into a spacious basin 3 miles long, by means of a dam situated at 
the northern limit of Troy, and at the easterly end of which is a sloop-lock, 
by which the navigation of the Hudson is preserved to Waterford. From 
Waterford, also, a canal called the Junction canal, 3 miles long, and cross- 
ing the Mohawk a little below the Cohoes Falls, connects with the Erie 
canal at Cohoes village ; thus completing the links that unite the northern 
and western trade with each other, and with that of the Hudson. 
OSWEGO CANAL. 

This~canal, connecting with the Erie canal at Syracuse, and with Lake 
Ontario at Oswego, was commenced in 1826, and completed in 1828, at a 
cost of $525,115." It is 38 miles long ; about half its length, however, being 
in the Oswego river, converted into canal, or slack-water, by means of 8 
dams and a tow-path on the river bank. The total quantity of lockage is 
123 ft. distributed among 18 lift-locks, all descending from Syracuse to Os- 
wego. So far as the canal is wholly an excavated work the dimensions of 
its cross-section are the same as those of the Erie canal. 

There is, also, a towing path made by the State along the bank of the 
Seneca river, from its junction with tliis canal to Baldv>insville, by which 
the navigable waters of that stream are made available ; and a similar 
work has been recently done on the Oneida river, to connect the navigable 
waters of that stream and the Oneida lake with the Oswego canal. 
CAYUGA AND SENECA CANAL. 

This work begins in the village of Geneva, at the outlet of the Seneca 
lake, and following the valley of the Seneca river, is fed by its waters, till, 
after sending off a side cut of 2 miles to the Cayuga lake, at East Cayuga, 
it enters the bed of the river, and so continues to Montezuma, where it 
joins the Erie canal on the marsh level. The whole distance from Ge- 
neva to Montezuma is 21 miles, about half of which consists of canal pro- 
per, and the other half of slack water navigation in the river. The whole 
descent from Geneva to Montezuma is 74 ft. divided among 12 locks. The 



STATE CA^'ALS. 191 

canal was commenced in 1827 and finished in 1S29, at the cost of $214,000. 
This work, be it remembered, is the common thoroughfare for the trade 
of the Cayuga, Seneca, and Crooked lakes, the Chemung canal, the Owe- 
go and the Blossburg railroads, and the whole basin of the Upper 
Susquehannah and its wide-reaching tributaries ; and it is obviously des- 
tined to become, at no distant day, very productive, from the carriage of 
coal, gypsum, and salt, and the inevitable expansion of a tiade, springing 
from such resources. 

CROOKED LAKE CANAL, 
This canal, commenced in 1830 and finished in 1833, connects Crooked 
lake near Penn-Yan, with the Seneca lake at Dresden; is 8 miles long, 
has a descent of 269 ft., distributed among 28 lift-locks, and cost $137,000,- 
The locks, which are of wood, will soon require to be in great part re- 
built. 

CHEMUNG CANAL. 

This canal, commenced in 1830 and finished in 1833, connects the Seneca 
lake at its head, with the Chemung river, a branch of the Susquehannah, at 
Elmira, is 23 miles long, besides a navigable feeder 16 miles long, extend- 
ing from the summit level at Fairport, formerly called Horse-Heads, to 
Corning, situate also on the Chemung, westerly from Elmira, and there 
connecting with the railroad which runs to Blossburg, in Pennsylvania. 
The ascending and descending lockage on both the canal and feeder, which 
together are 39 miles long, is 516 ft. divided among 52 locks. Both works 
cost $3-14,000. At Blossburg is an inexhaustible mine of bituminous coal 
of excellent quality^, and the coal trade, which has commenced very favor- 
ably, promises to become a sotirce of much re\ enue to this canal. The 
locks are of wood, and within the last year contracts have been made to 
rebuild them at a cost, including some other improvements, of a little under 
5300,000. 

CHENANGO CANAL. 

This canal extends from the Erie canal at Utica, by way of the village 
of Clinton, on the Oriskany creek ; thence up the valley of that creek to 
the summit level ; thence to the valley of the Chenango river, which it 
follows to the village of Binghamton, on the Susquehannah. It is 97 miles 
long ; was commenced in 1833 and finished in 1837, at a cost of $1 ,737,703. 
The lockage from Utica to the summit is 706 ft., and thence to Bingham- 
ton, 303 ft., the wliole divided among 116 lift-locks, 2 of which are built of 
stone, and the other 114 of wood and stone, called composite. This 
canal is furnished with 7 reservoirs, consisting of natural ponds, having 
their original capacity increased by embankments and dams, furnished 
with flumes and gates to regulate the discharge. 

GENESEE VALLEY CANAL. 

The act for building this canal was passed May 6, 1836, and in 
the succeeding summer the work was commenced. The whole line, from 
Rochester, where it connects with the Erie canal, to Olean, on the naviga- 
ble waters of the Allegany river, is 108i miles long. At a point 4i miles 
south of Mt. Morris, a branch canal extends to Dansville, 11 miles. In 
September, 1840, the Division from Rochester to Squakie Hill, 36 miles, 
was opened for navigation ; and in September, 1841, the Dansville branch 
together with about 5 miles more of the main trunk, was finished, making 
the whole distance now in use, from Rochester to Dansville, 52 miles. On 
this distance there are 19 lift-locks, besides a great amount of other ma- 
sonry, and the whole cost of construction, c.Kclusive of all other charges, is 
stated in the annual report of the commissioners, of January, 1843, at 
$1,399,291.90. 

The same report states that another portion of the line, 58 J miles long, 



192 STATE CANALS. 

with 92 locks thereon, has been put under contract at an entire estirnateci 
cost of $2,772,304.17, on which the work done is stated at $1,717,850.32, 
of which all but $49,152.02 has been paid, leaving work yet to be done to 
the estimated amount of $1,054,453.85. Besides the two portions men- 
tioned, one mile has been completed at a cost of $53,104.81, but is not 
in use. Of the entire line only 7 miles have not yet been put under con- 
tract. ^ 

The most reinarkable work on this canal is the tunnel in Portage. Its 
length is to be 1,180 ft. by 27 ft. in width, and 20 ft. in height ; and for most 
of the distance the roof will require to be supported by an arch of masonry. 

The cost of this canal, excluding the 7 miles not yet under contract, is 
estimated at $4,224,700.88 ; and including the 7 miles, the total cost will 
probably not fall much short of 5 millions. 

BLACK RIVER CANAL AND ERIE CANAL FEEDER. 

This work was commenced under an act of April 19, 1836, in the sum- 
mer of that j^ear. It is to open a navigation from the Erie canal at Rome 
to Carthage, in Jefferson county. From Rome the line passes up the val- 
ley of the Mohawk to the Lansing-Kill, which it follows to the summit 
level in Boonville, and then passes on to the High Falls in the Black river, 
in Turin. From that point to Carthage the navigation is to be continued 
by improving the Black river. The length of the canal is 35 miles ; of the 
improved river navigation, 42^ miles; and a navigable feeder 10 miles long, 
from the Black river, is to enter the summit level of the canal at Boon- 
ville ; making the whole length of this artificial navigation 872 miles. 

The ascent from the Erie canal at Rome to the summit in Boonville, is 
697 ft., divided among 70 locks ; and the descent from the summit to the 
High Falls, is 387 ft., divided among 38 locks. The feeder has but one 
level. 

The commissioners in their annual report of January' 1843, show that 
the line from Rome to the summit, and the whole of the feeder, being the 
portions of most immediate importance, were nearly complete. They 
state the whole length of completed canal to be 14 miles, at a cost of 
$446,841.35. A further extent of 2S miles has been commenced, the esti- 
mated cost of which amounts to $1,313,204.78, on which, Avork to the 
amount of $1,228,515.81 has been done, leaving yet to be done an amount 
of $84,688.97. Of the canal proper, only 3 miles have not yet been put 
under contract. 



DELAWARE AND HUDSON CANAL. 

This work belongs to a private company, but the State has a pecuniary 
interest in it, to the amoiint of $800,000 of State stock, loaned to the com- 
pany, and it is too important in its connection with internal trade, not to be 
noticed. The work was commenced in 1825, and finished in 1829, extend- 
ing from the Hudson river up the valley of the Rondout creek, in Ulster ; 
then across parts of Orange and Sullivan counties, to the Delaware river ; 
then along its bank, in all 84 miles, when it crosses to the valley of the Lacka- 
wana creek, in Pennsylvania, up which it runs 25 miles, to Honesdale, 
where it meets a rail-road, running 16^ miles, to the mining village of Car- 
bondale, making the entire route 124^ miles. The portion of this work in 
this State, was originally constructed by the Hudson and Delaware Canal 
Co.; and the portion in Pennsylvania, by the Lackawana Canal Co. In 
1829, the companies were consolidated by separate acts of the Legislatures 
of the two States ; and the loan of stock, of this State, bearing an interest 
of 4 1 and 5 per. ct. was loaned to the consolidated company, and secured 
by a lien on the entire work, the cost of which was $1,875,000. The capi- 
tal of this company, as originally incorporated, was $1,500,000, with the 
privilege of employing one-third thereof for banking purposes, till 1844. 
when this privilge expires. 



STATE CANVLS. 



193 



STATE3IENT 

Sluncing the amount received by the Collectors upon the Ncw-Yoi'k State Canals, 
for Tolls, Penalties and Copies of Clearances, in 1839, 1840, 1841 and 1842. 

ERIE CANAL. 



Placf of collection. 



Albany,* 

West- Troy,* 
Schenectady, 
Fultonville, . 
Little Falls,.. 

Utica, 

Rome, 

Syracuse, .... 
Rlontezuina, 

Lyons, 

Palmyra,. . . . 
Rocliesfer, . . 
Brockport, . . . 

Albion, 

Lockj^ort, . . , 
Black Rock,., 

Buffalo, 

Waterford, . . . 

Salina, 

Oswes'O, 

(Joneva, 

Havana, 

Fairport, 

Dresden, 

Penn-Yan, . . . 

Oxford, 

Binprhaniton, 
Scottsville, .. ■ 
Dansville, . . ■ 



$343,006 

20b,579 

49,542 

13,4S5 

16,311 

38,570 

32,747 

68,090 

68,152 

17,197 

.33,603 

157,594 

5,301 

21,632 

32,698 

40.778 

214,183 



18,214 
37,636 
18,803 

5,419 
10,7(X} 

2,3S4 
11.127 

1,721 

1,(KJ2 



$295,562 8;5 

186,917 15 

2:3,66f) 78 

10,777 51 

16,504 85 

36,046 31 

36,062 90 

69,384 19 

77,397 88 

21,854 82 

61,199 35 

245,789 53 

7,586 84 

30,843 85 

23,227 00 

54.164 28 

321,417 46 



17,201 37 
35,612 15 
27,8-88 28 

3,562 59 
10,753 00 

4,627 19 
13,821 2.8 

1,601 91 

1 ,012 78 



$336,674 53 

227,689 19' 
20,431 60] 
12,442 21 1 
16,746 76! 
42,412 24 1 
35,871 00 1 
73,496 33 I 
78,997 91 
14,342 34] 
42,734 56 ; 

208,003 62 ' 
16,902 94 : 
22,246 32 
90,280 65 1 
83,934 59 

348,687 99 - 



12,847 00 
47,890 96 
28,(349 05 

4,030 96 
26,864 74 

2,731 69 
14,414 03 

2,461 55 

1,865 82 



$1,466,488 54 '$1,63 J, 520 10 $1,813,650 58 51,568,946 56 



$244,601 37 

175,200 60 

12,102 02 

13,895 51 

10,455 47 

43,372 94 

32,186 44 

74,648 69 

55,552 22 

13,966 96 

37,427 91 

176,030 81 

11,693 32 

42,774 42 

96,039 04 

35,435 59 

374,773 25 

646 49 

10,407 53 

40,620 33 

20,875 18 

3,161 28 

21,447 92 

4,253 45 

7,508 09 

l.a59 15 

1^449 79 

3,137 84 

3,422 98 



CIIAMPLAIN CANAL. 



Albany, 

West Troy, 

Waterford & Sl'p lock, 
Saratop;'a Guard Lock, 
Whitehall, 



$6,414 16 
14,569 79 
53,282 73 



A}.819 96 
12,262 10 
48,159 74 



.«7.361 9f) 
38.200 75 
5,668 42 
14,673 82 
51,936 16 



$4,751 69 
29.014 66 
4,341 34 
11,186 44 
46,669 96 



S.ilina, . . 
Oswego, 



$74,296 68 $65,242 10 $117,841 14! 

OSWEGO CANAL. 

$18,228 071 



$16,()87 761 
17,474 66 



$13,235 S,")! 
16,287 08 



20,116 15 



$95,964 09 



$14.2.59 49 
16,962 70 



$34,162 42I $29,522 93! $38,344 22| $31,222 19 



* Albany and West Troy, for 1839 and 1840, embrace the tolls received at those offi- 
ces belonging to the Champlain canal. 



17 



194 



STATE CANALS. 
CAYUGA AND SENECA CANAL. 



Dresden, 
Peim-Yan, 



Utica, 

Hamilton, . . 

Oxford, 

Binghamton, 



Rochester, 
Scottsville, 
Dansville, 



Higgins',. 



CHEMUNG CANAL. 



CROOKED LAKE CANAL. 



CHENANGO CANAL. 



$8,284 24 
8,737 40 
3,087 60 
1,669 09 



$15,778 33 



$6,559 59 
2,767 15 
2,970 66 
1,704 13 



$8,897 79, 
2,869 24 
4,341 12 
2,707 33 



Place of collection. 


1839. 


1840. 


1841. l&4-.>. 


Montezuma, 


$10,587 46 
4,525 16 

780 13 
1,214 49 

321 71 
1,318 52 


$9,183 56 
5,462 15 

567 17 
1,327 72 

516 14 
1.791 83 


$11,315 53 

6,001 26 

487 15 

3,051 36 

327 14 

2,400 93 


$7,274 63 
5,092 54 




4'57 71 




2,726 72 
501 67 






924 89 










$18,747 47 


$18,848 57 


$23,583 37 


$16,948 16 



Havana, 


$2,914 78 
2,272 49 


$2,444 60 
2,513 81 


$3,136 18 
6,260 24 


$1,952 93 
5,749 12 








$5,187 27 


$4,958 41 1 


$9,396 42 


$7,702 05 





$650 02 
1,071 29 


$552 48| 
1,171 051 


$571 80 
1,445 52 


$344 69 
644 70 








$1,721 31 1 


$1,723 53 i 


$2,017 32l 


$989 39 



$6,291 93 
2,165 95 
3,055 94 
2,101 56 



$14,001 53i $18,815 481 $13,615 38 



GENESEE VALLEY CANAL. 







$2,420 79 
4,509 61 


$3,930 55 
5,997 14 


$3,913 17 






6,495 90 






2,795 04 
















$6,930 40 


$9,927 69 


$13,204 11 



Salina, 



ONEIDA LAKE CANAL. 
..| I I $462 02 1 $462 63 

SENECA RIVER TOWING PATH. 

..1 1 1 $844581 $149 51 



RECAPITULATION. 



Erie Canal, 

Champlain Canal, .... 
Oswego " • • • . 

Cayuga & Sen. Canal, 
Chemung " 

Crooked Lake " 
Chenango " 

Genesee Valley " 
Oneida Lake " 

Seneca R. Tow. Path, 



«1, 466,488 54 
74,296 68 
34,162 42 
18,747 47 
5,187 27 
1,721 31 
15,778 33 



$1,634,520 10 

65,242 10 

29,522 93 

18,848 57 

4,958 41 

1,723 53 

14,001 53 

6,930 40 



$1,813,650 58 

117,841 14 

38,344 22 

23,583 37 

9,396 42 

2,017 32 

18,815 48 

9,927 69 

462 02 

844 58 



$1,616,382 02i$l,775,747 57 $-2,034,882 82 $1,749,204 07 



$1,568,946 56 

95,964 09 

31,222 19 

16,948 16 

7,702 05 

989 39 

13,615 38 

13;204 11 

462 63 

149 51 



STATE CANALS. 



19-5 



TOLLS ON THE CANALS. 

Atnount of Tolls received on the several Canals of this State, in each year, from 
the cotnplctioii of each Canal, to the 31st of December, 1842. 



Erie and Champlain. 

1S20 $5,437 34 

1S21 14,388 47 

I.S>2 64,072 40 

182;J 1u2,9."j8 .33 

1824 340,761 07 

1825 566,112 97 

1826 762,003 60 

1827 859,0.j8 4S 

1828 835,407 28 

1829 795,054 52 

1830 1,032,599 13 

18.31 1,194,610 49 

1832 1,19.5,804 23 

1833 1,422,695 22 

ia34 1,294,649 66 

18.35 1,492,811 59 

1S36 1,556,269 37 

18;;7 1,239,052 49 

]^.i8 1,516,.373 98 

1S.39 1,540,785 22 

1840 1,699,762 20 

1841 1,931,491 72 

,0.., 5Eric,..l,5(i8,946 56 
^**~^^ Cham.,... 95,964 09 



Cayuga and Seneca. 

1828 $279 

1829 8,M3 49 

1830 11,987 81 

18.31 12,920 39 

1832 13,893 04 

1833 17,174 69 

1834 18,130 43 

1835 20,430 11 

1836 20,522 92 

1837 15,968 86 

1838 18,397 57 

18.39 18,747 47 

1840 18,848 57 

1841 23,583 37 

1842 16,948 16 



Genesee Valley. 

1840 $6,930 40 

1841 9,f>27 69 

1842 13,204 11 



Total,... $23, 177,070 41 

Chemung. 

1833 $694 00 

1834 3,378 05 

1S35 4,720 44 

1836 5,086 .38 

1837 4,3.33 80 

18.38 4,394 67 

1839 .5,187 27 

1840 4,958 41 

1841 9..396 42 

1*42 7,702 05 



Total $49,851 49 

Chenango. 

18.37 $11,161 51 

1838 2(»,1()7 90 

IS39 1,5,778 33 

1840 14,(H)1 53 

1841 18,815 48 

1842 13,615 38 



Total $30,062 20 



Oneida Lake. 

1841 $462 02 

1842 462 63 

Total $924 65 



Seneca Rie. Toicing Path. 

1841 $844 58 

1842 149 51 



Total $236,476 58 

Crooked Lake. 

1833 $200 84 

1834 1,473 40 

1835 1,829 63 

18.36 2,365 51 

1837 1,.526 58 

1838 2,013 .311 

1839 1,721 31 

1840 1,723 53 

1841 2,017 32I182O ^-5,437 3n 

18-12 989 39 1821 14,388 47 



Total $994 09 



Total Yearly Revenue, 
on all the Canals. 



Total $15,860 



1822 64,072 40 

1823 152,958 33 

1824 340,761 07 

1825 566,112 97 

J826 762,003 60 

1827 859,058 48 

12,;«5 IS 1828. 838,444 65 

]6,-J71 10, 1829 81.3,137 45 



Oswego. 

1828 $2,757 67 

1829 9,4.39 41 

1830 

1831.;. ... 

1832 1.9,7S6 20 1830 1,0.'J6,922 12 

1833 22,950 47 183] 1 .223,801 98 

18.34 22.1(,S 02 )N32 1,229,483 47 

1835 29, lOS (c'il.S33 1 ,463,715 22 

18;^6 .30, 1.3(; 20! 1X34 1 ;339,799 56 

1837 21.0SS .-;(; m35 1 ',.") 18.972 .39 

1838 27,260 M 1S;?6 l,(il4,(iS0 .'-iS 

1839 34,I(i2 I2IIS.37 1,293,129 80 



1840 29,522 93 

1841 38,-344 22 

1812^ 31,222 19 



Total $93,783 13l Total $346,848 66 



18.38 1,58S,847 87 

1.8:^9 1,616.382 02 

1840 1.775,747 57 

1841 2^034,882 82 

1842 1.749,204 07 



Grand Total, $23,951,944 03 



196 



STATE CANALS. 



TABLE, 

Showing the number of Lod^agcs, &;c., on the Erie Canal— from 1832 to 1842, in- 
clusive — as ascertained at Lock No. 23, near Schenectady. 





S5 


A 


6 ri 






<» 1 


YEAR. 


"3 '3 3 






Navigation 


Navigation 


0) 
CO M 




^ c=« 


oC-S 


t« a; 


opened. 


closed. 


, X> 




° s S 


5c?; 








•sa 




6 3 o 


o 


da 






d S 5 




'Z'i^o 


i-:i 


•12; 2 






l«H C CC 


1832 


18,601 


77.17 


18.66 


April 25, 


Dec. 21, 


241 


1833 


20,649 


86.76 


16.59 


" 19, 


" 12, 


238 


1834 


22,911 


95.46 


15.08 


« 17, 


" 12, 


240 


1835 


25,798 


112.16 


12.84 


" 15, 


Nov. 30, 


230 


1836 


25,516 


118.13 


12.19 


" 25, 


" 26, 


216 


1837 


21,053 


89.92 


16.01 


" 20, 


Dec. 9, 


234 


1838 


27,962 


122.64 


11.74 


" V>, 


Nov. 25, 


22,8 


1839 


^,234 


100.55 


14.32 


" 20, 


Dec. 16, 


241 


1840 


26,987 


118.36 


12.26 


" 20, 


" 3, 


228 


1841 


30,320 


137.19 


10.57 


« 24, 


Nov. SO, 


221 


1842 


22,879 


103.05 


13.97 


" 20, 


" 28, 


222 



It appears from a statement in the Canal Commissioners' Report of 1 v!3, that 
the diiference of time of boats mailing a trip from Albany to Buffalo and back, 
between the years 1841 and 1842, was as follows: Average time of making a 
trip to Bulfalo and back in 1841, running time only, was 19 days; in 1842, 15 
days — being four days quicker than they ran in 1841.* 

It appears also, by a statement from the collector's office at West Troy, that 
the average time of performing trips to Oswego and back, by the boats of the 
' Troy and Oswego line, was, in 1841, 14 days; and in 1842, 11 days. 

There has been a better supply of water than usual from the feeders the past 
season, and the enlarged canal has been brought into use at some places where 
navigation has heretofore been much delayed in times of the greatest business. 
These circumstances have increased the facilities for navigation; but clearing 
out the bottom of the canals, raising the banks at places where they were low- 
est, and equalizing the water on the different levels have been the principal 
causes of enabling boatmen to make quicker trips and carry heavier loads than 
in former seasons. 

By a statement from the same office it also appears that the average weight 
of the down cargoes of twelve of the heaviest laden boats of the Buffalo lines, 

was, in 1841, 54 9-12 tons. 

And in 1842, , 65 5-12 " 

The weight of only four of the up cargoes of these boats is given for 1841, 

showing an average of 53 3-4 tons. 

For 1842, the average weight of twelve up cargoes of these boats 

was, 59 8-12 " 



* The cause assigned for its taking a boat longer in making a trip in 1841, than in 
1842, was on account of frequent breaches in the canal, and the water on the levels 
not being kept at a sufficient height to go along witnout grounding 



RATES OF TOLL 

Established by the Canal Board, 

on PERSONS AND PROPERTY TRANSPORTED ON ALL THE NA- 
VIGABLE CANALS OF THE STATE, FOR THE YEAR 1842. 

Cls. mills, fr. 
Provisions, 4'c. 

1. On flour, salted beef and pork, butter, cheese tallow, 

lard, beer and cider, per 1,000 pounds per mile, 4 5 

2. On bran and ship-sluff^> in bulk, per 1,000 pounds per 

mile, 4 5 

Iron, Minerals, Ores, 4*c. 

3. On salt manufactured in this state, per 1,000 pounds pei 

mile, 2 3 

4. On foreign salt, per 1,000 pounds per mile, 3 

5. 1st. On gypsum, the product of this state, per 1,000 

pounds per mile, 2 3 

2d. On foreign gypsum, per 1,000 pounds per mile,. .. . 4 5 

6. On brick, sand, lime, clay, earth, leached ashes, manure 

and iron ore, per 1,000 [)ounds per mile, 2 3 

7. On pot and peail ashes, kelp, charcoal, broken castings, 

and scrap iron, j)cr 1,000 |)ounds per mile, 4 6 

And on pig iron the same rate of toll except when clear- 
ed on the Oswego or Champlain canals, and going to- 
wards tide water, wlien it is to be charged per 1,000 
pounds per mile, 3 2 

8. 1st. On mineral coal going towards tide water, or going 

north on the Champlain canal having come from the 
west, or going west from Utica or from any point west 
thereof, or going upon any lateral canal; and on an- 
thracite coal going from tide water, per 1,000 pounds 

per mile, . . .' 2 

2d. On all other mineral coal than such as above speci- 
fied, per 1,000 i>oinids per mile, 4 6 

9. On stove and all otlier iron castings, per 1,000 pounds 

per mile, 4 5 

10. On copperas and manganese, going towards tide water, 

y)er 1,000 pounds per mile, 4 5 

11. On bar and pig load, going towards tide water, per 1,000 

pounds pe^- mile, 2 

J7* 



198 RATES OF TOLL. 

Cts. mills, fr. 
Fars, Peltry, Skins, «^c 

12. On furs and peltry, (except deer, butTalo and moose 

skins,) per 1,000 pounds per mile, 10 

13. On deer, buffalo and moose skins, per 1,000 pounds per 

mile, 5 

14. On sheep skins, and other raw hides of domestic ani- 

mals of the United States, per 1,000 pounds per mile, 4 6 

15. On imported raw hides, of domestic and other animals, 

per 1,000 pounds per mile, 5 

Furniture, Sfc. 

16. On household furniture, accompanied by, and actually 

belonging to, families emigrating, per 1,000 pounds 

per mile, 4 5 

17. On carts, wagons, sleighs, ploughs and mechanics tools, 

necessary for the owners' individual use, when ac- 
companied by the owner, emigrating for the purpose 
of settlement, per 1,000 pounds per mile, 4 5 

Stone, Slate, ^c. 
1$. On slate and tile for roofing, and stone ware, per 1,000 

pounds per mile, 4 5 

19. On all stone, wrought or unwrought, per 1,000 pounds 

per mile, 2 3 

Lumber, Wood, §*c. 

20. On timber, squared and round, per 100 cubic feet per 

mile, if carried in boats, 5 

21. On the same, if carried in rafts, (except dock-sticks as 

in next item,) per 100 cubic feet per mile, 15 

22. On round dock-sticks, passing in cribs separate from 

every other kind of timber, per 100 cubic feet per 

mile, 1 

23. On block.s of timber for paving streets, per 1,000 pounds 

per mile, 1 

24. 1st. On boards, plank, scantling and sawed timber, re- 

duced to inch measure, and all siding lath and other 
sawed stuff, less than one inch thick, carried in boats, 
(except such as is enumerated in regulations number 

26 and 35,) per 1,000 feet per mile,' 5 

2d. On the same, if transported in rafts, per 1,000 feet 

per mile, 2 

25. On mahogany, (except veneering,) reduced to inch 

measure, per 1,000 feet per mile, 15 

26. On sawed lath of less than five feet in length, split lath, 

hoop-poles, handspikes, rowing oars, broom-handles, 
spokes, hubs, tree-nails, felloes and boat-knees, per 
1,000 pounds per mile, 2 

27. On staves and heading, transported in boats, per 1,000 

pounds per mile, 2 

28. On the same, if transported in rafts, per 1,000 pounds 

per mile 5 



RATES OF TOLL. 199 

Cts. mills, ff. 

29. On shingles per M. per mile, canied in boats,. 1 

30. On the same, if conveyed in rails, per M. per mile, .... 4 

31. On split posts, (not exceeding 10 feet in length,) and 

rails for fencing, (not exceeding 14 feet in length,) per 

M. per mile, carried in boats 2 

32. On the same, if conveyed in rait?, per M. per mile, 8 

33. On wood for fuel, (except such as may be used in the 

manufacture of salt, which shall be exempt from toll,) 

and tan bark, per cord per mile, 1 

34. On the same if transported in rafts, per cord per mile,. . 2 

35. On sawed stutf for window blinds, not exceeding one- 

fourth of an inch in thickness, and window sashes, per 

1,000 pounds per mile, 5 

j^gricultural productions, S)'c. 

36. On cotton and wool, per 1,000 pounds per mile, 4 5 

37. On live cattle, sheep and hog?, per 1,000 pounds per 

mile, 4 5 

38. On horses, (and each horse when not weighed, to be 

computed at 900 pounds,) per 1,000 pounds per 

mile, 6 

39. On rags, per 1,000 pounds per mile, 4 5 

40. On hemp, manilla and unmanufactured tobacco, per 1,000 

pounds per mile, 4 5 

41. On pressed hay, per 1,000 pounds per mile, 2 3 

42. On wheat and all other agricultural productions of the 

United States, not particularly specified, and not be- 
ing merchandise, per 1,000 pounds per mile, 4 5 

43. On merchandise, per 1,000 pounds per mile, 9 

Articles not enumerated. 

44. On all articles not enumerated or excepted, passing from 

tide water, per 1 ,000 pounds per mile, 9 

45. On all articles not enumerated or excepted, passing to- 

wards tide water, per 1,000 pounds per mile, 4 5 

Boats and passengers. 

46. On boats, used chiefly for the transportation of persons 

navigating any of the canals except the Junction ca- 
nal, per mile, 5 

47. On boats, used chiefly for the transportation of persons, 

navigating the Junction canal, and not connected with 
regular lines of boats for the transportation of persons 
on the Erie or Clianiplain canals, per mile, 50 

48. On boats, used chiefly for the transportation of property, 

per mile, 2 

49. On all persons over ten years of age, per mile, 1 

60. On articles of the manufacture of the United States, go- 
ing towards tide water, although they may be enume- 
rated in the foregoing list, per 1,000 pounds per 

mile, 4 5 



'100 RATES OF TOLL. 

Duiins^ (he present year, there shall be allowed a drawback of se- 
venty-three j)er cent on the amount of tolls paid on the tranH[)ortation 
of mineral coal from the west to tide water or to the Junction canal, 
provided such coal shall be delivered at tide water, or at some point on 
the Junction canal, or on the Champlain canal ; and the like drawback 
shall be allowed of sevenly-three per cent on the amount of lolls paid 
on the transportion of anthracite coal from tide water to Ulica, which 
shall be delivered at that place, or at any point west thereof; the 
amount of such drawback to be refunded to the persons paying- the said 
tolls, under the direction of the commissioners of the canal fund, on 
the production of such evidence as they shall prescribe, of the said 
tolls having been paid, and of the delivery of such coal as herein pro- 
vided. 



EXTRACT 

From the report of the Canal Commissioners, made to the Legisla- 
ture on the 12th day of March, 1821, showing the rates of toll 
agreed to by them, and referred to in section 10^ of Title 7, of the 
Constitution. 

" On salt, 5 mills per ton, per mile, (7 bbls. of 5 bushels each, or 40 
bushels in bulk, being a ton.) 

" Gypsum, 5 mills per ton per mile. 

"Flour, meal, and all kinds of grain, salted provision, pot and pearl 
ashes, one cent per ton per mile. 

" Merchandise, 2 cents per ton per mile. 

" Timber, squared and round, five mills per hundred solid feet per 
mile. 

" Boards, plank, and scantling, reduced to inch measure, and all 
siding, lath and other sawed stuff, less than one inch thick, 5 mills per 
thousand feet per mile. 

" Shingles, one mill per thousand per mile. 

" Brick, sand, lime, iron ore, and stone, 5 mills per ton per mile. 

•' Rails and posts for fencing, two cents per thousand per mile. 

*' Wood for fuel, one cent per cord per mile. 

" All fuel to be used in the manufacture of salt, to pass free. 

" Boats made and used chiefly for the transportation of property, on 
each ton of their capacity, one mill per mile. 

"Boats made and used chiefly for the carriage of persons, 5 cents 
per mile of their passage. 

" Staves and heading for pip-^s, one cent per thousand per mile. 

" Staves and heading for bogheads, 7 mills per thousand per mile. 

" Staves and heading for barrels or less, 5 mills per thousand per 
mile. 

" All articles not enumerated, one cent per ton per mile." 



PRINCIPAL PLACES ON THE CANALS, fee. 

»2 1^1 ^T 



201 



Of the principal places on the Canals, and their distance from each 
other, as adopted by the Canal Board, 



JUNCTION AND ERIE CANALS. 



NAMES OF PLACES. 



Albany, 

Port-Schuyler, • 

VV^est-Troy, 

Junction Ciiamplain Canal,. 

Cohoes, 

Lower Aqueduct, 

Willow-Springs, 

Upper Aqueduct, 

Schenectady, '. . 

Rotterdam, 

Philips' Locks, 

Amsterdam, 

Schoharie Creek, 

Sinithtown, 

Fdltonville, 

Big Nose, 

Spraker's Basin, 

Canajoharie, 

P'ort-Plain, 

Diefcndorf 's Landing, 

St. Johnsville, 

East Canada Creek, 

Itidian Castle, 

Fink's Ferry, 

Little Falls, 

Rankin's Lock, No. 7, 

Herkimer Lower Bridge, < 

Herkimer LIpper Bridge, 

Fulmer's Creek, 

Morgan's Landing, 

Steel's Creek, 

Frankfort, 

Ferguson's, 

Utica, (.function Chenango Canal,) . . 

York Mills 

Whitcsboro', 

Oriskanv, 

Rome, (.function Black River Canal,) . 

Wood Creek Aqueduct, 

Hawley's Basin, 

Stony Creek, 

New-London, 

Higgins', (June Oneida Lake Canal.) 

Loomis', 

Oneida Creek, 

Canastoia, 

New-Boston, 

Chittenango, 

Pool's Brook, 

Kirkville, 

Little Lake, 

Manlius, .' 



Place to Dis. from From From From 
place. Albany. Utica. Rochester Buffalo. 





6 

7 

9 

10 

13 

19 

26 

30 

39 

44 

47 

52 

54 

57 

64 

66 

69 

72 

75 

77 

81 

83 

86 

88 

91 

95 

96 

97 

: 98 

99 

101 

107 

110 

113 

114 

117 

125 

127 

129 

130 

132 

136 

138 

141 

146 

150 

1.53 

156 

153 

160 

162 



110 
104 
103 
101 
100 
97 
91 
84 
80 
71 
66 
63 
58 
56 
53 
46 
44 
41 
38 
35 
33 
29 
27 
24 
22 
19 
15 
14 
13 
12 
11 
9 
3 

3 
4 
7 
15 
17 
19 
20 
22 
26 
28 
31 
36 
40 
43 
46 
48 
50 
52 



269 
263 
262 
260 
259 
256 
250 
243 
239 
230 
2:25 
222 
217 
215 
212 
205 
203 
200 
197 
194 
192 
188 
186 
183 
181 
178 
174 
173 
172 
171 
170 
168 
162 
159 
156 
155 
152 
144 
140 
140 
139 
137 
133 
l3l 
128 
123 
119 
116 
113 
111 
109 
107 



202 



PRINCIPAL PLACES ON THE CANALS. &c 



NAMES OF PLACES. 



Limestone Feeder, 

Orville Feeder, 

Lodi, 

Syracuse, (Junction Oswego Canal,).. 

Geddes, 

Belisle, 

Nine-Mile Creek, 

Camillus, • 

Canton,. . • ► 

Peru, 

Jordan, 

Cold Spring, 

Weedsport, 

Centreport, 

Port-Byron, 

Montezuma, (June. Cay. and Sen. C.) 

Lockpit, 

Clyde, 

Lock-Berlin, 

Lyons 

Lockville, 

Newark, 

Port-Gibson, 

Palmyra, 

Macedonville, • 

Wayneport, 

Perrinton, 

Perrinton Centre, 

Fairport, . ■ • • 

Fullam's Basin, 

Bushnell's Basin, 

Pittsford, 

Billinghast's Basin 

LockNo.3, 

Rochester, (June. Genesee V. Canal.) 

Brockway's, 

Spencer's Basin, 

Adams' Basin, 

Cooley's Basin, 

Broceport, 

Holley, 

Hulberton, 

Albion, 

Gaines' Basin, 

Eagle Harbor, 

Long Bridge, 

Knowlesville, 

Road Culvert, 

•Medina, 

Shelby Basin, 

Middleport, 

Reynold's Basin, 

Gasport, 

LOCKPORT, 

Pendleton, -• • 

Welch's, 

H. Brockway's, 

Tonawanda, 

Lower Black Rock, • 

Black Rock, 

BuiValo, • 



Place to 


Dis. from 


From 


From 1 


place. 


Albany. 


Utica. 


Rochester] 


1 


163 


53 


106 


2 


165 


55 


104 


5 


170 


60 


99 


1 


171 


61 


98 


2 


173 


63 


96 


4 


177 


67 


92 


1 


178 


68 


91 


1 


179 


69 


90 


5 


184 


74 


85 


2 


186 


76 


83 


4 


190 


80 


79 


1 


191 


81 


78 


5 


196 


86 


73 


1 


197 


87 


72 


2 


199 


89 


70 


6 


205 


95 


64 


6 


211 


101 


58 


5 


216 


106 


53 


5 


221 


111 


48 


4 


225 


115 


44 


6 


231 


121 


38 


1 


232 


122 


37 


3 


235 


125 


34 


5 


240 


130 


29 


4 


214 


134 


25 


3 


247 


137 


22 


2 


249 


139 


20 


2 


251 


141 


18 


1 


252 


142 


17 


1 


253 


143 


16 


3 


256 


146 


13 


3 


259 


149 


10 


4 


263 


153 


6 


2 


265 


155 


4 


4 


269 


159 





10 


279 


169 


10 


2 


281 


171 


12 


3 


284 


174 


15 


3 


287 


177 


18 ■ 


2 


239 


179 


20 


5 


294 


184 


25 


4 


298 


188 


29 


6 


304 


194 


35 


2 


306 


196 


37 


] 


307 


197 
199 


38 


2 


309 


40 


2 


311 


201 


42 


1 


312 


202 


43 


3 


315 


205 


46 


3 


318 


208 


49 


3 


321 


211 


52 


3 


324 


214 


55 


2 


326 


216 


57 


7 


333 


223 


64 


7 


340 


230 


71 


2 


342 


232 


73 


4 


346 


236 


77 


6 


352 


242 


83 


8 


360 


250 


91 


1 


361 


251 


92 


3 


364 


254 J 


95 



From 



PRINCIPAL PLACES ON THE CANALS, kc. 



203 



CIIAMPLAIN CANAL. 



OSWEGO CANAL. 



NAMES. 



Albany, 

West-Troy, •••• 

Junction, 

VVaterford, • • • • 
Mechanicsville, 
Stillwater Village, 
lileccker's^asin,- 
Wilber's Kasiu, •• 
V^an Duzcn's L. •• 
Schuylerville,--' • 
Saratoga Bridge, • 

Fort-Miller, 

Moses Kill, 

Fort-Edward, •• • • 
Glen's Falls Fr.-- 
Baker's Basin, • •■ 
Smith's Basin, • •• 

Fort-Ann, 

Comstock's L.--- • 
Whitehall, 




7 
9 
12 
20 
24 
26 
23 
3.J 
36 
33 
41 
44 
49 
61 
62 
57 
61 
Co 
73 



73 
C6 
64 
61 
53 
43 
47 
45 
40 
37 
35 

3a 

29 
24 
22 
21 
16 
U 



CHENANGO CANAL 



NAMES. 



Utica, 

Clinton,"" 

Deansville, • 

Oriskany Falls, • . 

Solsville, 

Bouckville, 

Peck's Basin, — 

HamiltoNjJ 

Lebanon Factory, 

Earlville, 

Sherburne, 

North Norwich, •• 

Plastcrville, 

Norwich, 

Oxford, 

Hayne's Mill, 

Greene, 

Forks, •■ 

Pond Brook, 

Port Crane, 

Crocker's .Mills, •• 
BlNOHAMTOn, 



Place to 
place. 



From 
Utica. 



Bing- 
hamton. 



97 
S3 
83 
78 
75 
73 
71 
67 
65 
61 
56 
62 
60 
46 
37 
27 
23 
15 
13 
8 
7 




CAYUGA & SENECA CANAL. 



NAMES. 



MoNTEXUHlA, •" 

Seneca River, • • 

S. Dcrmont's, •" 

Seneca Falls, ••• 

Chamberlains Mills 

Waterloo, 

Teal's, 

Geneva, 

Lateral canal to East 
Cayuga village two 
miles 



Place to Monte- Gene- 
place, ziima. va. 



Place to From Wliite- 
plnce .'Vlbany hall. 



NAMES. 



Place to Syra- Oswe- 
place, cuse. 



Total, 23 



svracuse, 

Salina, 

Liverpool, • 

Mud Lock, • 

Cold Spring, 

New Bridge, 

Three River Point,- 

Pliopuix, •••« •- 

Sweet's Lock, •••-• 

Ox Creek, 

Fulton, 

Braddock's Rapid,- 
Tiffany's Landing, • 

High Dam, 

Oswego, 



CHEMUNG CANAL. 



NAMES. 



Seneca Lake.' 

Havana, 

Millport, 

Fair Fort,. -■ 

Elmira 

Corning 



Place 


Seneca 


Elmi- 


to p. 


Lake. 


ra. 








23 


4 


4 


19 


6 


10 


13 


7 


17 


6 


6 


23 





22 


33 


22 



Cora- 



FEEJ)ER.—( Chemung Canal.) 



NAMES. 



Fair Port,- 
Miller's Basin 
Head Feeder, 
Corning 



Place 
to p. 



Senecj 
Lake. 



Elmi- Corn- 
ra. ing. 



Canal from Lake to Elmira, 
Feeder, 



6 
13 

20 
22 

23 miles. 
16 



Total, 39 

CROOKED LAKE CANAL. 



NAMES. 



Place 


Senec.T 


Crooked 


to p. 


Lake. 


Lake. 








8 


3 


3 


5 


2 


5 


3 


2 


7 


1 


1 


8 






Dresden, 

Mallory's, 

Andrews & Ways, ■ 

Penn- Yam, 

Crooked Lake, — 

GENESEE VALLEY CANAL, 

AS FAR AS FI.VISHED l!f 1S41. 



NAMES. 



Rochester, • •• 

Scottville, 

Sacketts Basin 
Mount Morris, 
Shaker Set. •• ■ 
Danstille, ••• • 



Place 


Roch- 


Mount 


to p. 


ester. 


Morris 








37 


12 


12 


25 


10 


22 


15 


15 


37 





4 


41 


4 


11 


62 


15 



Dans- 
Tille. 



204 



CANALS AND RAIL-ROADS, 



CANALS IN THE STATE OF NEW-YORK, 

Finished, or in Progress— 1842. 



Name. 



Black River Canal, .... 
Feeder do .... 

Cayuga and Seneca, . . . 

Champlain Canal, 

Glen's Falls Feeder do. 

Chemung Canal, 

Feeder do 

Chenango Canal, 

Crooked Lake Canal,. . 
•Delaware and Hudson, 

Erie Canal, 

Navig-able Feeders do. 
Genesee Valley Canal, 
Dansville Branch do.. 
Oneida Lake Canal, . . . 

Oswego Canal, 

Seneca Ri\ .Tow. Path, 



From 



Rome,-. 

Boonville, 

Geneva, ....... 

Junction Erie, 
Hudson River, 

JetTerson, 

Fairport, 

Utica, 

Penn-Yan, .. . . 
Eddyville,.... 
Albany, 



To 



High Falls, 

Williamsville, ... 

Montezuma, 

Whitehall, 

Champlain Canal, 

Elmira, 

Corning, 

Binghamton, 

Dresden, 

Honesdale, Penn., 
Bufialo, 



Rochester, . . . 
Shaker's Set., 
Erie Canal, . . 
Syracuse, .... 



Glean, 

Dansville, . . 
Oneida Lake, 
Oswego, 



Miles 
finished. 



Total Miles, . 



23 
64 
12 
23 
16 
97 

8 
108 
363 

9 
41 
11 

6 
38 



Miles 
unfin'd. 



819 



35 
10 



67 



112 



* This work extends into the state of Pennsylvania, and is owned by the Delaware 
and Hudson Canal Company, in connection with a rail-road of 16 miles in length. 
The other canals are all owned by the state of New-York, and are all within its limits. 



RAIL-ROADS IN THE STATE OF NEW- YORK, 

Finished, or in Progress — 1842. 



Name. 


From 


To 


Miles 
finished. 


Miles 
unfin'd. 


Albany & W. Stockbrg. 
Attica & Buffalo, 




Mass. State Line,. 
Buffalo, 


38 
31 
78 
26 

3 
23 
26 
40 
34 
29 

3 
24 
47 
16 












Rochester, 

Syracuse, 

Black Rock, 

Niagara Falls, . . . 

Canajoharie, 

Blossburg, Penn., 
W.Stockbrdg. Ms. 




Auburn k. Syracuse, . . . 
Buffalo & Black Rock, 






Buffalo, 




Buffalo & Niagara Fa's 
CatskUl & Canajoharie. 
Corning & Blossburg, . 


Buffalo, 




Catskill, 


52 






Hudson, 












Lewiston, 

Lockport, 

Brooklyn, 


Lockport &N.r:.R 
Niagara Falls, . . . 

Greenport, 

Schenectady, 

Trov 




Lockport & Nia. Falls, 


46 






New-York & Albany, . 

New-York & Erie, 

New-York & Harlem, . 
Rensselaer & Saratoga, 




146 


Piermont, 

New-York, 

Trov 


Dunkirk, 

Westchester Co.,. 
Ballston Spa., .... 

Carthage, 

Schenectady, 

Trov 


46 
14 
23a 

3 
21^ 
20i 

5 
53 
43 
77 


400 
36 


Rochester, 

Saratoga, 

Schenectady, 

Auburn & S. R.R. 

Syracuse, 

Rochester, 

Utica, 




Saratoga & Schenec'dy, 
Schenectady & Troy,. . 




Skaneateles, 

Utica, 




Syracuse & Utica, 








Utica & Schenectady, . . 
Total 


Schenectady, 








Miles, 




724,;- 


680 



KAIL-ROADS. 205 

RAIL-ROADS. 



Albany and West Stockbridce R. R. — Offices at No. 4 Exchange Build- 
ing, Albany, and Depot, Greeubush. 
Chartsred May 5tlf, 1836; expires in 1890. Capital $1,000,000. The 
road is 38 miles long, and connects with the Massachusetts Western R. R. 
at the Stale line. The work was commenced in December, 1840: was 
completed in Dec. 1842; whole cost $1,412,000, or rising $37,000 per mile. 
Marcus T. Reynolds, President. Samuel Cheever, Secretary. 

George Bliss, Agent. 
Attica ANn Buffalo R. R. — Office at Alexander, Genesee Co. 
Chartered May 3d, 1836, for 50 years. Capital $350,000. Shares $50. 
This railroad is 31 miles long; was commenced Sept. 1st, 1841; finish*ed 
Dec. 24th, 1842; whole cost, exclusive of cars, engines and buildings, 
about $2,50,000; or about $8,000 per mile. 

Henry Hawkins, President. V. R. Hawkins, Sec'ry and Treas'r. 

Wm. F. P. Taylor, Agent. 

Brooklyn and Jamaica R. R. — Office No. 57 Merchants' Exchange, 

New- York. 
Chartered April 25th, 1832, for 50 years. Capital $300,000. Shares 
$.50. Leased to the Long Island R. R. Co. for 45 years. 

John A. King, President. Robert Schuyler, Sec'y. 

AcBTTRN AND ROCHESTER R. R. — Office in Canandaigua. 
Chartered' in 1836. Capital .$2,000,000. Shares $100. Length 78 miles; 
completed in November, 1841. Total cost up to March 10th, 1842, includ- 
ing interest on $200,000 of State Stock borrowed, $1,514,455 39. 

Henry B. Gibson, President. Charles Seymour, Sec'y and Treas'r. 

R. Higham, Superintendant and Engineer. 

AirnuRN AND Syracuse R. R. — Office at Auburn. 
Chartered in 1834. Capital $400,000. Shares $100. Length 26 miles. 
Borrowed $200,000 of State Stock. A branch of 5 miles extends from this 
road to Skaneateles village. 

J. Philips Phoenix, President. J. B. Varnum, Secretary. 

Thos Y. Howe, jr., Treasurer. E. P. Williams, Sup't. and Eng. 

Buffalo and Black Rock R. R. 
Chartered in 1833. Capital $100,000. Length 3 miles. Cost about 
$7,500 per mile. 

Ebenezer Johnson, President. James Haggart, Sec'y and Agent. 

Buffalo and Niagara Falls R. R. 
Chartered in 1834. Capital $110,000. Length 23 miles. 
Peter B. Porter, President. Geo. P. Stevenson, Sec'y, Treas'r & Ag't. 

Catskill and Canajoharif. R. R. — Office at Catskill. 
Chorlered in 1*^30. Capital $(i()0 000. Length 78 miles, of which 26 
miles from Catskill built. Borrowed $20(),0()0; and failing to pay the in- 
terest thereon, the railroad was sold at public auction by the Comptroller, 
in May, 1842, for $11,600, to Amos Cornwall. 
Lewiston R. R. 
Chartered in 1836. Capital $50,000. Length 3 miles. It ascends the 
Mountain Ridge and intersects the Lockport and Niagara Falls Railroad. 
Horse power is exclusively used on this road. 

Hudson and Berkshire R. R. — Office in Hudson. 
Chartered in April, 18.32, for .50 years. Capital $450,000. Shares $50. 
Length 34 miles. Opened September, 1838. Borrowed $150,000 of State 
Stock. 
John Powers, President. Josiah W. Faircliild, Sec'y & Treas'r. 

18 



206 



RAIL-ROADS. 



Ithaca and Oswego R. R 
Chartered in 1828. Capital $300,000. Length 29 iniles. Borrowed 
$315,700 in State Stocks, failing to pay the interest on which, this railroad 
was sold at public auction, by the Comptroller, in May, 1842, for $4,500, 
to Archibald Mclntyre and others. 

LOCKPORT AND NIAGARA FaLLS R. R. 

Chartered in 1834. Capital $175,000. Length 24 miles. It is propos- 
ed to extend this road from Lockport to Batavia, to intersect with the line 
from Buffalo to Albany. 

"Washington Hunt, President. Henry Walbridge, Agent. 

Long Island R. R. — Office in Hanover-street, New-York. 

Chartered April, 1834. Capital $1,500,000. Shares $50. Length 93 
miles, from Brooklyn to Greenport; of which 47 miles is in operation. 
Borrowed $100,000 in State Stock. 

Geo. B. Fisk, President. David S. Ives, Secretary. 

Mohawk and Hudson R. R. — Offices in Albany and Schenectady. 

Chartered April, 1826, for 50 years. Capital $1,000,000. Shares $100. 

Length 16 miles. Has a double track. Cost rising $70,000 per mile. 

Wm. Banks, President. Thomas Palmer, Secretary. 

John Costigan, Superintendant. 

STATEMENT, 

Shoiving the expenditures of the Mohaick and Hudson Rail-Road from, its 
organization to January Ist, 1842. 



Years. 


Cost of operating r'd. 


Interest on bonds. 


New construction. 


Total. 


1832. 
1833; 
1834, 
1835, 
1836, 
1837, 
1838 


$27,309 94 
36,652 30 
50,913 58 
66,171 24 
78,850 68 
83,099 05 
84,209 74 
84,441 47 
61,439 76 
61,022 20 






$27,309 94 
36,652 30 






$8,373 32 




59,286 90 




66, 171 24 






78,850 68 






83,099 05 


2,678 79 
7,000 00 
7,000 00 
7,000 00 




86 978 53 


1839 




9l',441 47 


1840, 
1841, 


$3,737 01 

24, 464 82 


72, 176 77 
92,487 02 




$6.34, 109, 96 


$32,142 11 


$28,201 83 


$694,453 90 



Ii\COME AND RECEIPTS, 

From 1832 to 1841, both inclusive. 



Years. 


Passengers. 


Freight. 


United States Mail. 


Total. 


1832 


$51,675 47 
69,300 38 






$51,675 47 


1833, 


$3,708 02 


$450 00 


73,458 40 


1834, 


68,210 35 


12, 733 77 


450 00 


81,394 12 


1835, 


84,776 95 


26,2.87 73 


450 00 


111,514 68 


1836} 


103,470 43 


28, 185 67 


450 00 


132,106 10 


1837, 


97,767 82 


14,429 06 


3, 155 27 


115,352 15 


1838, 


101,023 94 


19,.276 28 


3,939 00 


124,239 22 


1839, 


116,664 26 


25,877 19 


4,688 69 


147,230 14 


1840, 


105,893 99 


12,035 41 


5,386 48 


123,315 88 


1841, 


99,066 12 


11,211 24 


4,088 92 


114^66 28 




$897,849 71 


$153,744 37_ 


$23, 058 36_ 


$1,074,652 44 



RAIL-KOADS. 207 

III addition to the above, durin;^ the same period, the company received 
from premium on stocks and miscellaneous items the further sum of 
?(36,051 98. 

New-York and Aliiany R. R. Co. — Office 54 Merchants' Exchange, 

New- York. 

Incorporated in 1S32 for 50 years. Capital $3,000,000. Shares 100 dol- 
lars each. 

This important work is now in a fair way to be speedily completed, al- 
though there are some conflicting interests in favor of other routes between 
the commercial and political capitals of the state. When a railroad be- 
tween the Cities of New- York, Albany and Troy shall be completed as is 
contemplated by the above company, it will form a connecting link between 
tlie great line of southern railroad^ and those traversing the state of New- 
York and the eastern states, from east to west; therebj' greatly add to the 
convenience of the travelling public during all seasons of the year, and be 
of immense benefit to the city and state of New-York. The distance of 
the proposed route, from Harlem river to the city of Troy, is 146 miles. 

J. J. Coddington, President. Josiah Rich, V. President. 

William Howard, Treasurer. 

New- York and Erie R. R. Co.— Office No. 34 Wall-street, New-YorK. 

Incorporated April 24, 1832. Capital $10,000,000. Shares lOOdollars 
each. The whole length of this road from Dunkirk to Piermont, is 446 
miles, t hence to the city of New- York by water is 24 miles, making the 
tot it distance from Lake Erie to the city of New-York 470 miles. It is 
fin^^i'.eJ from Piermont to Goshen, a distance of 46 miles, on which cars 
run in connection with a steamhoat from Piermont to the city of New- York. 
'J'he work on the unfinished line of this important railroad is for the pre- 
sent suspended for the want of funds, although it has received assistance 
from the state to the amount of §3,000,000. 

Wm. Ma.Kwell, President. James Bowen. Vice President. 

Wm. M. Gould, acting Secretary. JVlward Pierson, acting Treas'r. 

New-York and Harlem R. R. Co. — Office 4 Tryon Row, New-York. 

Incorporated April 25, 1831. Capital $2,950,000. Shares 50 dollars 
each. 

The line of this road commences near the City Hall in the city of New- 
York, and extends north a distance of Smiles, where it crosses the Harlem 
river and enters the county of Westchester. It is authorized by an 
nnienlinent of its charter, passeil in 1S40, to e.xtend their road to the north 
line of the county of Westchester, a distance of 50 miles, and eastwardly 
to tlie line of tlie stale of Connecticut. It is now finished and in opera- 
lion to William's Bridge, where the line crosses the Bronx river, a distance 
of 144 miles from the City Hall. Tlie fare received from passengers, 
during the year 1841, amounted to $99,616 59. 

George Law, President. Benjamin Cox, Secretary. 

Rensselaer and Saratoga R. R. Co. — Office, No. 6 First-street, Troy. 

Incorporated in 1S32, to en lure 50 years. Capital $300,000. Shares 100 
dollars each. 

This road extends from the city of Troy, to the village pf Ballston Spa; 
a distance of 23^ miles. Finished and put in operation, August, 1835. 

George B. Warren, President. Daniel Sackett, Sec'y and Treas'r. 

L. R. Sargent, Superintendant. 

• RoniEHTER R. R. Co. 

Incorporated in 1831. Capital, $30,000. 

This road extends from tlie city of Rochester to Carthage, at the head 
of navigation on the Genesee river ; a distance of about 3 miles. The cars 
are propelled by horse power ; first opened for public use, in Jan., 1833. 



208 KAIL-ROADS. 

Blossburg and Corning R. R. 
Was constructed by two incorporated companies : The ''Tioga Naviga- 
tion Company " oristinally chartered by the Legislature of the State of 
Pennsylvania, to improve the navigation of Tioga river, but afterwards 
allowed to build a Railroad ; and the ^- Tioga Coal, Iron Mining and Manu- 
facturing Company," chartered by the Legislature of this State. The 
former Company, built about 24 miles of the road lying in Pennsylvania, 
and the latter, about 16 miles lying in New- York ; the whole length being 
40 miles — extending from the coal and iron mines at Blossburg, to the vil- 
lage of Corning, in the county of Steuben. The New- York company has 
received aid from the State, to the amount of $70,000. 

The estimated amount of bituminous coal alone, passing over the road 
in 1841, was 40-,000 tons, which can be increased to almost any amount,' as 
the demand increases for this useful kind of coal. 
James R. Wilson, President, Charles S. Cope, Secretary, 

Tioga Navigation Company. 

Bowen Whitney, President, D. C. Ruggle?, Secretary, 

Tioga Coal, Iron Mining and Manufacturing Company. 

Saratoga and Schenectady R. R. Co. — Office, Saratoga- Springs. 

Incorporated in 1831, with[a capital of $150,000. Shares, 100 dollars each. 

-, This road extends from the village of Saratoga Springs, to the city of 

Schenectady ; a distance of 211 miles, where it connects with railroads, 

extendins to the city of Albany, Troy and Utica. First opened for public 

use, July 12, 1832. 

George R. Davis, President. Richard P. Hart, Sec'y ml Treas'r. 

L. R. Sargent, Superintendant. 

Schenectady and Troy R. R. Co. — Office, No. 6 Cannon Plfce. Troy. 

Incorporated in 1836, to continue 50 years. Capital, 8500,000. Shares, 
100 dollars each. 

The lensth of this road, is 20^ miles. Finished and put in operation, 
Nov. 1, 1842. 

Benjamin Marshall, President. Isaac McConihe. Sec'y. 

Skaneateles R. R. Co. « 

Incorporated in 1836, with a capital of $25,000. 

This road extends north from the village of Skaneatelas, to its junction 
with the Auburn and Syracuse Railroad ; a distance of 5 miles. By an 
amendment of its charter in 1841, it is now styled the Skaneateles and 
Jordan R. R. Co ; its capital increased to $50,000, with privilege to extend 
the road to the village of Jordan. 

Syracuse and Utica R. R. Co. — Office, in the village of Syracuse. 

Incorporated in 1836. -capital $800,000. 

This road was opened July 3, 1839. Cost of making and constructing 
$1,072,000. 

John Wilkinson, President. David Wager, Treasurer. 

ToNA WANDA R. R. Co. — Office, in the city of Rochester. 

Chartered April 3, 1832 ; to continue 50 years. Capital $500,000. Shares 
100 dollars. 

This road extends from the city of Rochester, to the village of Attica, 
where it unites with the xittica and Bufl'alo Railroad. Length, 43 miles ; 
commenced during the summer of 1834, and finished in Dec. 1842. 

H. J. Redfield, President. Fred. Wliittlesey, Secretary. 

Utica and Schenectady R. R. Co. — Offices, No. 3 Exchange Building, 
Albany ; Schenectady, and Utica. 

Chartered April 29, 1833, to continue 50 years. Capital $2,000,000. 
Shares, 100 dollars each. 

This road extends from the city of Schenectady, to the ctiy of Utica ; a 



RAIL-ROADS. 



209 



distance of about 77 miles ; running through the valley of the Mohawk, 
for the most of the distance, on the north side of the river. Total paid 
for making and constructin;,' road, to Dec. 31, 1841, $1,968,022 17. Finish- 
ed in 1836, at a cost, of about $20,000 per mile. 

STATE-TIKNT, 

Showing the number of ihroitgh, and icatj passengers transported, and fare 
received in each ijear.from ^iig. 2d., 1836, to Dec. 31st., 1841. 



DATES. 


NO. PASSENGKKS. 


RECEIPTS. 


TOTAL. 


Through. 


Way. 


Transportalion 
of pissengers. 


Transportation 
U. S. Mail. 


Passengers 
and Mail. 


1836, 


45, 391 J 
79, 095 1 
82, 459 
95, 776J 
86, 823 i 
94,871 


30,2241 
59, 8.54 
71,0014 
86,823' 
86,619i 
78, 949 


$168,081 08 
298,265 97 
312,808 08 
375, 309 07 
343,206 58 
367,050 75 




$168,081 03 
309,840 58 
331,371 62 
393,540 56 
364,261 76 
380,673 03 


1837, 

1838, 

1839, 

1840, 

1841 


$11,574 61 
18,563 54 
18,231 49 
21,055 18 
13,622 28 


. Total, 


484,417 


41.3,4714 


$1,864,691 53 


$83,047 10 $1,947,768 63 



In addition to the above, during the same period, the company received 
from miscellaneous items, the further sum of $82,196 36. 

Erastus Corning, President. Gideon Hawley, Sec'y and Treas'r. 

William C. Young, Superintendant and Chief Engineer. 



COxNTEMPLATED RAIL-ROADS. 



Albanv and Goshen Rail-Road. 

Incorporated April 12, 1.842, with a capital of $1,500,000.- 
The projiosed line commences at the villa<re of Goshen, Orange county, 
and passes tlirousjh the counties of Ulster and Greene, to the city of Al- 
bany; it will accommodate most of the principal towns and villages upon 
the west side of the Hudson river in the above counties, and would be 
found of much value to many of the towns and villages upon the east side 
of the river. 

The entire length of the line of the road, from the point where it inter- 
sects the New-York and I'rie Ilail-Road at Goslien, to the city of Albany, 
is ninety-four miles. Estimated cost $1,528,215. 

Hudson and Delaware R. R. Company. 

Incorporated in 18.30, with a capital of $500,000. 
The route of this road, which is located and partly graded, commence.^ 
at the villaire of Newburgh, and runs through the county of Orange into 
tlic slate of Ncw-.Ierscy, terminating at a point on the cast side of the 
Delaware river. It is intended to extend the line so as to tap the coal 
beds of Pennsylvania, intersecting the New- York and Erie Rail-Iload at 
or near Goshen. 

Ogdensburgh and Lake Champlain Rail-Ro.\d. 
This is a projected work of great importance. In 1838 an act was pas- 
sed authorizing a survey of the line of the road, which survey embraced- 
two routes, the northern and the southern, or Jin Sable rovte. The north- 
ern route commencing at the village of Plattsburgh, on Lake Champlain, 

18* 



210 RAIL-ROADS. 

and running westerly through the towns of Malone, Moira, S-.c, to Ogdens- 
burgh, in the county of St. Lawrence. The length of this route via. 
Norfolk, is about 120 miles; estimated cost of constructing tlie same, in- 
cluding engines, &c., is about two millions of dollars. The southern route, 
although somewhat longer, extends up the valley of the Au Sable, through 
the northwest angle of Essex county and across Franklin and St. Law- 
rence counties, terminating at the village of Ogdensburgh. 

A still more southern termination has been proposed, and its merits 
urged in reference to its greater utility and safety in a military point of 
view, and as passing through the great mineral region of the north; to 
terminate at the village of Sackett's Harbor, situated near the foot of Lake 
Ontario, where is a good and secure harbor, and a military position of 
considerable importance. 

Oswego and Syracuse Rail-Road Company. 
Incorporated in 1839, with a capital of $500,000. 
This is a contemplated rail-road, to extend, when finished, from the vil- 
lage of Syracuse to the village of Oswego, a distance of 36 miles. The route 
has been surveyed and found to be highly favorable to the construction of 
a road at a comparatively small expense. The wants of the travelling 
community require the early completion of this road, as it will connect with 
the great line of railroads at Syracuse, and extends to Lake Ontai-io on 
the north. When finished it will form the most expeditious and direct 
route to the northern part of the state, bordering on t!ie River St. Law- 
rence and Canada. 

Saratoga and Washington R. R. Company. 
Incorporated in 1834. Capital $600,000. Shares 100 dollars each. 
The line of this road extends from the village of Saratoga Springs to 
Whitehall, on which there has been about sixty thousand dollars expend- 
ed in the purchase of lands and grading of the same. The work is at present 
suspended, although the interest of the state and public convenience re- 
quire its early completion. 

Hudson River Rail-Road. 
An application is now before the legislature (1843,) for a charter to con- 
struct a rail-road on or near the eastern margin of the river, from the 
cities of Troy and Albany to New- York, and petitions have been presented 
to the senate and assembly, not only from the river towns, but one from 
the city of New-York, signed by some-of her wealthiest capitalists. 

Every one concedes the importance of continuing the line of rail-road 
communication from the west, directly to the city of New- York, our great 
commercial emporium; the benefit of which would accrue, not to that city 
alone, but to the trade and commerce of the state, — a very considerable 
portion of which has recently been diverted to Boston, by the construction 
rail-roads between Albany and Boston. 

Two routes have been suggested, one through the interior of the coun- 
ties lying on the eastern side of the river, for which a charter was granted 
by the legislature about twelve years ago. Another has since been sur- 
veyed running on the bank or in the vicinity of the river, and through the 
river towns, at whose expense the survey was made, and for this route a 
charter is now asked. The distance from the City Hall in New-York, by 
the interior line is 149 miles, and by the river route 144 miles, or five miles 
shorter. The elevation to be passed over on the interior route is 769 feet, 
and on the river line 215 feet, being 554 feet in favor of the latter. To 
pass these elevations requires on the inner road, 55 miles of grading at the 
rate of 30 feet to the mile; and on the other as surveyed, 50 miles" graded 
at 16 and 17 feet to the mile — no grade in the whole distance rising higher 
than 17 feet, and the line from NeV-York to Fishkill landing being almost 
level. The lowest curve required on the river line, and that at a single 
point, will not be of less radius than 2500 feet; while on the interior line 
some of the curves run as low as 1250 feet radius. 



RAIL-ROADS. 211 

The charter proposes a capital of four and a half millions ot dollars, 
eontemplatin? tliat the road shall be constructed in the most permanent 
manner, equal if not superior to the Boston road, which, with the low 
grades required, will enable the fast trains to run at tlie rate of 30 miles 
per hour, making tlie running time between Albrny and^New-York, about 
five hours. 

In addition to the above, tliere-are other rail-road companies incorpora- 
ted, — many of which will, no doubt, in process of time, proceed with their 
contemplated improvements. 



NEW-JERSEY RAIL-ROADS, &c., 

Connected u-ith the lines of travel diverging from the city of New-York. 

Camden and Amboy Rail- Road and Transportation CoMrANY. — Office 
9 West-street, New- York. 

Incorporated by the legislature of New-Jersey, February 4, 1830, to en- 
dure for 30 years. Capital $1,000,000. Shares 100 dollars each. Length 
of road from Camden to South Amboy, 61 miles; commenced in 1830 and 
completed in 1837; cost $1,238,000. 

Robert L. Stevens, President. Ira Bliss, Agent, New- York. 

By the above road passengers leave New-York for Philadelphia &.C., by 
steamboat from foot of Battery Place, North River. 

Nkw-Jersey Rail-Road and Transportation Company. — Office No. 57 
Merchants' Exchange, New-York, 

Incorporated by the legislature of New- Jersey, March 7, 1832, to con- 
tinue 30 years. 

Capital $2,000,000. Shares 50 dollars each. 

This road extends from the Jersey dock in Jersey City, opposite Cort- 
land-street, New-York, to New-Brunswick; a distance of 31 miles, where 
it connects with the Trenton and New-Brunswick rail-road. 

John S. Darcy, Pres't, Newark. John P. Jackson, S^cr'y, Newark. 
J. Worthington, Treasurer, New- York. 

Philadelphia Agent office, foot of Liberty-street, New- York ; from 
whence passengers leave New-York for Trenton, Philadelphia, &c. 
Paterson and Hudson River Rail-Road Company. — Office No. 75 
Cortland-street, New- York. 

Chartered by the legislature of New-Jersey in 1831. Capital $250,000. 
Shares 100 dollars each. 

This road commences at Jersey, opposite the city of New- York, and 
extends to Paterson; a distance of sixteen and a lialf miles. 

James L. Morris, President. A. S. Pennington, Secretary. 

E. B. 1). Ogden, Treasurer. John J. Davis, Agent, N. Y. 

Passengers leave three times daily, from the foot of Cortland-street, 
New- York. 

New-Jersey Steam N.'vvigation Company. — Offices No. 22 Broadway, 
New-York, and Jersey City. 
Incorporated by an act of the legislature of New- Jersey, in 1839. Capi- 
tal $500,000. 

This company own and sail five steamboats of the first class, forming 
the regular mail line from New-York to Boston, running daily to Stoning, 
ton, Newport and Providence, where they connect with rail-roads extend- 
ing to the city of Boston. 

Chas. O. Handy, President and Treasurer. 



212 



STAGE ROUTES. 



PRINCIPAL STAGE FvOUTES, 

IN THE STATE OF NEW- YORK. 



1. From New- York to Sag Harbor , L. I., via Hempstead and 

Patchogiie, 107 miles, 

2. From New -York to Greenport, L. I., via Smitlitown and Riv- 

head, 94 miles. 

3. From Neio-York to Ithaca, via Newark, N. J., Milford, Penn. 

and Ovveg-o, N. Y., 210 miles. 

4. From New- York to Danlniry, Conn., via White Plains, 66 miles. 

5. From New-York to Albany, on the east side of the Hudson riv- 

er, via Peekskill, Poughkeepsie and Hudson, 154 miles. 

6. From Goshen to Albany, on the west siile of the Hudson river, 

via Kingston and Catskill, 104 miles. 

7. From Newbiirgh to Barcelona on Lake Erie, via Monticello, 

Binghamton, Owego, Elmira, Angelica, &c 387 miles. 

8. From Kingston to Delhi, 70 miles. 

9- From Catskill to Ithaca, via Delhi and Oxford, 149 miles. 

10. From Albany to Whitehall, 72 miles. 

11- From yl/ba;ii/ to S)/roc7/sc, via Cherry Valley and Morrisville, 132 miles. 

12- From Albany to Cooperstown, 66 miles. 

13. From Saratoga Springs to Whilehall, via Sandy Hill, 40 miles. 

14- From Saratoga Spri/igs to Caldwell on Lake George, 27 miles. 

15- From Plattsburgh to Ogdensburgh, 126 miles, 

16- From Ogdensburgh to Montreal, via IMassena, 128 miles. 

17- From Utica to Ogdensburgh, via Carthage, 125 miles. 

18- From IJtica to Sackett's Harbor, via Watertown, 94 mUes. 

19' From Vtica to Cooperstown, 34 miles. 

20- From Utica to Binghamton, via Norwich, 93 miles. 

21- From Utica to Mt. Pleasant, Penn. via Mt. Upton, 116 miles. 

22- From Syracuse to Ithaca, 57 miles. 

23. From Syracuse to Watertown, 70 miles'. 

24- From Rome to Oswego, 61 miles. 

25- From Oswego, to Watcrtoicn, 59 miles. 

26. From Oswego to Auburn, 40 miles. 

27. From Auburn to Ithaca, 40 miles. 

28- From Ithaca to Bath, via Jefferson, 53 miles. 

29. From Geneva to Bath, via Crooked Lake, 46 miles. 

30. From Bath to Rochester, via Dansville, 76 miles. 

31- Fi-om Bath to Barcelona on Lake Erie, 165 miles. 

32. From Canandaigua to Geneseo, 31 miles. 

33. From Canandaigua to Batavia, via Avon, 49 miles. 

34. From Rochester to Corning, via Kath, 99 miles. 

35. From Rochester to Olean, via Mt. Morris and Angelica, 98 miles. 

36. From Rochester to Geneseo, 30 miles. 

37. From Rochester to Lockport, via Ridge road, 64 miles. 

38. From Butavia to Lockport, 30 miles. 

39. From Buffalo to Eric, Penn. via Lake Road, 90 miles. 

40. From Bujfalo to Olean, via Ellicottville, 76 miles. 

41. From Z/eu'isfort to Detroit, Mich, via Queenston and Lomlon, 

Canada, 262 miles. 



From Albany to Montreal, via Whitehall, Lake Champloin, 

St. Johns and La Prairie rail road, (summer route,) 254 miles. 

From Albany to Montreal, via Glen's Falls, Caldwell, Schroon, 

Plattsburgh, &c. (Winter route,) 220 miles. 



LINES OF PACKETS. 



213 



LINES OF PACKETS, 

FROM NEW -YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS. 



LoimIoii Packets* 

To sail on the 1st, ] 0th, and 20th of every month. This Line of Packets 
will hereafter be f()nii)Oso(l of the following sliijis, which will succeed each 
other in tlie oriler in whicli tliey are named, sailing- punctually from New-York 
anil Portsmouth on the 1st loih, and 2()!h, and from London on the Tth, 17th, 
and 27th of every month throughout llie year, viz: — 

Ships and Masters. Ships and Masters, 

ST. .TAftlES, W. S. Sebor, PHILALELPHIA, Hovey, 

MONTREAL, E. G. Tinker, SWITZERLAND, S. Chadwick, 

GLADIATOR, T. Britton, HENDRTCK HUDSON, E. E. Morgan. 

MEDIATOR, J. M. Chadwick, ONTARIO, Bradish, 

QUEBEC, F. H. Hebard, TORONTO, R. Griswold, 

WELLINGTON, Chadwick, WESTMINISTER, Moore. 

These ships are all of the first class, about 600 tons burthen, and are com- 
manded by able and experienced navigators. Great care will be taken that the 
beds, wines, stores, &c., are of the best description. The price of cabin pas- 
sasre is now fixed at $h'X) outward, for each adult, without wines anil liquors. 
Neither the ca|)tains nor the owners of these i)ackets will be responsible for 
any letters, parcels or i)ackages sent by tliem, unless regular bills of Lading are 
signed therefor. 

A f ^ Grinnel, Minturn & Co. No 78 South-street, N. Y. 
Jigeius, ^ j^^^ Griswold, No. 70 South-street, N. Y. 

New- York Liverpool Packets. 

The Proprietors of the several Lines of Packets between New- York and 
Liverpool, have arranged for their sailing from each port on the 1st, 7th, 13th, 
l')tii,a nd 25th of every month; the ships to succeed each other in the follow- 
ing order, viz : — 

Ships and Masters Ships and Masters. 

PATRICK HENRY, Delano, ASHBURTON, (ncu;) Huttleson, 

VIRGINIAN, Allen, STEPHEN WHITNEY, Thompson, 

NEW AMERICA, Waite, COLUMBUS, Cole, 

ROSCIUS, Collins, SHERIDAN, Depeyster, 

EUROPE, Furber, SOUTH AMERICA, Bailey, 

INDKPENDKNCE, Nye, GEO. WASHINGTON, J3urrows, 

NEVv^- YORK, Cropper, . UNITED STATES, Britton, 

SIJ^DONS, Cobb, ENGLAND, Lowber, 

CAMBRIDGE, Barstow, GAR RICK, Skiddy, 

OXFORD, Rathbone. 
These ships are all of the first class, and ably commanded, with elegant ac- 
commodations for iiasscngers. The price of passage from New-Yoik to Liv- 
erpool, is fixed at §100, and from Liverpool to New-York at 25 guineas, -exclu- 
sive of wines and liquors. Neither the cajitains nor owners will be responsi- 
Me for any letters, parcels, or packages, imless regular Bills of Lailing are 
signed therefor. 

Agents for ships Oxforil, America, Europe, Columbus, South America, Eng- 
land, Cambridge and New-York, 

Goodhue & Co. or ) j^„,..,York 
C.H. Marshall, S Jyeu-xoih. 
Baring, Broihkrs, & Co. Liverpool. 
Agents for ships Virginian, Sheffield, United States and Stephen Wliitney, 

Bobf.rt Kf.r.mit, New-York. 
T. iSt I. Sands &, Co. Liverpool. 
Agents for .vAip.9 Ashburton, Inilependence, George Washington and Patrick 
Henry, Grinnkll, Minturn & Co. iVeiw-yorfe. 

Chapman, Boowm.vn & Co. Liverpool. 
Agents for sliips Siddons, Sheridan, Garrick and Roscius. 

E. K. Collins &, Co. New-York. 
Wm. & J AS. Brown & Co. Liverpool. 



214 LINES OF PACKETS. 

New-York and Havre Packets. — Union Line. 

To sail from New- York on the 8th, 16th, and 24th, and from Havre 1st, Sth, 
and 24th of every month, as follows, viz : — 

Ships and Masters Ships and Masters. 

ARGO, C. Anthony, ALBANY, Watson, . 

FRANCOIS, Ier A. C. Ainsworth, SILVIEDEGRASSE,W.C.Thompson. 

BURGUNDY, J. A. Wotton, L. PHILLIPPE, J. Casttoff. 

EMERALD, George W. Howe, Dutchesse d Orleans, Richardson. 

RHONE, J. Johnston, SULLY, Wm. Burrows, 

VILLE DE LYON, C. Stoddard, IOWA, D. Lewis. 

These ships are all of the first class, and ably commanded, with superior and 
elegant accommodations for passengers, comprising all that may be required 
for comfort and convenience. 

The price of passage to Havre is fixed at $100, without Wines, which will l>e 
furnished by the steward on board, when requii-etl, at reasonable prices. 

J X, < C. BoETON, Fox & Livingston, No. 22 Broad street. 
ji^eni^, ^ yir^^^ Whitlock, Jr. 46 South street, N. Y. 



Second Line. 

UTICA, Captain Hewitt, sails from New-York 1st January, 1st Maj', 1st 
September. Sails from Havre, 16th February, 16th June, 16th October. 

ST. NICHOLAS, Captain Pell, sails from New- York, 1st February, 1st June, 
1st October. Sails from Have 16th March, 16th July, 16th November. 

ONEIDA, Captain Funk, sailes from New-York 1st March, 1st July 1st No- 
vember. From Havre, 16th April, 16th August, 16tli December. 

BALTIMORE, Captain Funk, sails from New- York 1st April, 1st August, 
1st December. From Havre, 16th January, 16th May, and 16;h September. 
Boyd & Hincken, Agents, No. 9 Tontine Building. 

Antwerp Steam Packet, (Belgian Line.) The steam ship British Queen 
sails from the foot of Clinton street, East River. 

H. W. T. & H. Mali, Agents, 41 Beaver st. 

English Steam Packet, — The steam ship Great Western, sails from 
the foot of Clinton street, East River. 

Richard Irvin, Agent, 98 Front st. 

Hamburgh- Packets, sail once a month from North River side. 

Schjnidt& Balchen, Agents, 83 Wall st. 



OJher Foreign Packets, 

Sailing to ports in North and South America. 

Carthagena Packets, sail once a month from the foot of Fletcher s'reet. 
Everett & Battelle, Agents, 86 South street, 

Havana Packets, sails twice a month from Pier No. 12, East River. 

Rtoses Tayloi', Agent, 44 Soutli st. 

Matanzas Packets, sail once a montli from the foot of Broad street. 

Moses Taylor, Agent, 44 South St.. 

St. John's, N. B. Packets, sail once a week from foot of Broad street. 

P. I. Nevins & Sons, Agents, 11 South st. 

Porto Rico, St. Croix and St. Thomas Packeis, sail twice a month. 
P. Reirson & Co. Agents, 38 Biu-ling Slip. 

Vera Cruz Packets, sail once a month from Pier 10, East River. 

ITargous, Brothers & Co, Agents, 33 South street. 



ARRIVALS AT THE PORT OF NEW-YORK. 



215 



Packet Lines, 

Sailing coasttcise from New-York to different ports in the United States. 

Alexandria, Washington, ami Georgetown, (D. C.) Packets, (two lines,) 
sail from Coeiities Slip and ]?ier 14, East River. 

Apalachicola Packets, (two lines,) sail twice a month. 

Baltimore Packets, (four lines,) sail weekly from the East River side. 

Boston Packets, (four lines,) sail tri-weekly from the East River side. 

Charleston, (S. C.) Packets, (two lines,) sail weelfly from the East River side. 

Fredericksburg, ( Va.) Packets, sail weekly from Coenties Slip. 

Hartford, (Con.) Packets sail from East River side. 

Mobile Packets, (two lines,) sail three times a month from the East River 
side. 

New Brimswick, (N. J.) Packets, (three lines,) sail from foot of Whitehall 
street. 

New Haven, (Con.) Packets, sail from Pier 24, East River. 

New Orleans Packets, (five lines,) sail weekly and every two weeks from 
the East River side. 

Norfolk (Va.) Packets, (two lines,) sail weekly from East River Side. 

Pensacola, (Fa.) Packets, sail from Burling Slip. • 

Petersburg, (Va.) Packets, (two lines,) sail weekly from East River side. 

Philadelphia Packets, (two lines,) sail from the East River side. 

Portland, (IMe.) Packets, sail weekly from Coenties Slip. 

Portsmouth, (N. H.) Packets, sail weekly from Coenties Slip. 

Providence, (R. I.) Packets, sail from Pier 17 East River. 

Richmond, (Va.) Packets, (three lines,) sail weekly from East River side. 

Salem, (Mass.) Packets, (two lines,) sail weekly from East River side, 

Savannaii Packets, (three lines,) sail weekly from East River side. 



Arrivals at the Port of New-York from Foreign Countries— 1842. 



COUNTRIES. 



Ships. 



Steam 
Ships. 



Bai-ks 



Gal- 
liots. 



Brigs. Sch'rs 



Sloops 



Total. 



American, 452 

Belgian, ' ... 

Bremen, 1 15 

British, | 40 

Colombian, 

Danish, ' 1 

Dutch, ... 

French, ' 1 

Hamburgh, | 4 

Italian, 

Lubec, ' ... 

Neapolitan, ' ... 

New Grenatla, 

Norwegian, 

Portuguese, 

Prussian, ' ... 

Russian, I ... 

Sardinian, 

Sicilian, ... 

Spanish, 

Swedish, 4 

Tu.sean, ' 1 

Venetian, i ... 

Venezuelian, ' ... 

Total, I 518 



141 

6 

15 

64 

"i 
1 

4 
10 
2 



544 

3 

12 

208 
7 
3 

"4 
4 
3 
1 

2 
1 
4 



246 

"i 

63 
2 
1 



1,385 

14 

43 

389 

9 

6 

11 

10 

18 

5 

1 

2 

1 

8 

1 

2 

4 

1 

7 

1 

39 

1 

1 

3 



18 



270 



10 



824 



320 



1,962 



216 



WHALE SHIPS STEAMBOATS. 



Comparative Table of Passengers and arrivalsgin Xew-York from 
1835 to 1842, iuclugive. 



Year. Whole number of arrivals. 

1835, 2,094 

1836, 2,293 

1837, 2,071 



1838,. 
1839,. 
1840,. 
1841,. 
1842,. 



1,790 
2,159 
1,953 
2,118 
1,962 



Number of Passengers. 
35,303 
60,541 
57.975 
25,581 
48,152 
62,797 • 
57,337 
74,014 



The whole number of Passengers which ai-rivecl in the United States, from 
foreign countries, during the year 1842, amounted to 110,984 — of which 74,014 
landed in tlie district of New- York. 



Tessels employed iu Whaliut? autl owned in Ihe following Ports, 

in 1811. 



fHrivtmMfirrj.*^ »'^.^: ^m.p^ p.iui^ j /t l \ ^ 



PORTS. 



Cold Sprin; 
Greenport, 
New Suffolk, 
Sag Harbor, 
Hudson, ...... 

Poughkeepsie, 



LoM 



Island, 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Total, 



Ships. 



Barks. 



26 



36 



11 



Brigs. 



Total. 



2 
6 
1 

34 



49 



Arrival ot Whale Ships,— 1842. 

Ports. Vessels. Bbls. Spevm Oil. 

Cold Spring, 1 2,195 



Greenport, . . 
Sag Harbor, 
New-Yorlc, . 



Total,. 



2 
13 

4 

20 



730 
3,790 



6,715 



Bbls. Whale Oil. 

i,8:iO 

67.0 

24,480 

8,300 



35,305 



STEAMBOATS, 

SAILING OUT OF THE PORT OF NEW-YORK 



Mail Line to Stonington, Newport, and Providence, 
(Connecting with rail roads running to Boston.) 



Steamboat INtassachusetts, Capt. Comstock, 
" Rhode Island, " Tlia)-er, 
" Narraganset, " Woolsey, 
" Mohegan, ... 

Providence, 



677 tons. 
589 " 
577 « 
400 " 
434 " 
One of the above boats sail daily, from the foot of Battery Place, N. Y. 

New-Yokk and Boston Rail Road Line, 
(Via Norwich by Steamboat.) 
Steamboat Cleopatra, Capt. Dustan, - . - . 600 tons. 
" Worcester, " J. H. Vanderbilt, - - - 550 " 

« New Haven, ' 500 " 

Leave from Pier No. 1, North River, daily, Sundays excepted, at 5 P. M. in 
summer, and 4 P. M. in winter. 



STEAMBOATS. 217 

Hartford Line. 
Steamboat Globe, Steamboat Kosciuzko. 

The above boats run from 1st April to 1st December, daily, Sunilays excepted, 
atJ4 P. M. from Pock Slip, East River. In winter, passengers for Hartford are 
carried via New Haven. 

New Haven Line. 

Steamboat New-York, Capt. Ricliard Pock. 
" New Champion, Cai)t. J. Stone. 

" Splendid, " Roath: 

The above boats carry the great eastern mail, and leave from Peck Slip, East 
River, daily, Simdays excepted, at 6 A. M. in summer, and 7 A. M. in winter. 

New -York and Bridgeport Line. 

(Connecting with the Housatonic Railroad.) 
Steamboat Croton, Capt. Curtis Peck, Steamboat Nimrod, Capt. Brooks, 

Steamboat Fairlield, Capt. Peck. 
One of the above boats leave New-York daily, Simdays excepted, from 
Catharine Market Slip, at 6 o'clock, A. M. 

. For Keio Rochelle, Glen Cove, Cold Spring, SfC. 

Steamboat American Eagle, leaves daily, during tlie summer months from 
Fulton Market Slip, East River. 

For Westchester, Manhasset, SfC. 

Steamboat Comet, leaves tlaily, during the summer months from foot Ful- 
ton Market Slip, East River. 

For Astoria and Flushing. 

Steamboat Statesman, leaves twice daily, dui-ing the summer months from 
Fulton Market Slip, East River. 

Staten Island Boats. 

Steamboat Staten Island, Steamboat Sampson, 

Run every other hour during the day, between New-Yoi-k and the Quran- 
tine Ground; leave from the foot of "Whitehall street. 

Camden and Amboy Steamboat and Rail Road Line. 

Steamboat Independence, Capt. Forbes, Steamboat Swan, Captain Fish 
The above boats run daily between New-York and South Amboy, N. J. 

For Elizabethport, N. J. 

Cinderella, Cap. F. De Groot, Water AVitch, Capf. Jacob Van Pelt. 

Leave'four times daily, from Pier No. 1, Nortli River. 

For Neicark, N. J. 
Steamboat Passaic, leaves New- York twice daily from the foot of Barclay 
street. 

For New- Brunswick, N. J. 
Steamboat Raritan, leaves New-York daily from foot of Barclay street. 

For Middletoivn Point, N. J. 
Steamboat Rockland, leaves New-York daily from foot of RobinsAi street. 

I^r Red Bank and Shrewshttry, N, J. 
Steamboat Orus, leaves New-York daily, during the summer months, from 
Fulton Market Slip, East River. 



19 



218 STEAMBOATS. "" 

Hudson River Steamboats. 

Passage Boats Sailing FRoai Troy, 
Empire, Capt. S, R. Roe, (night boat,) runs between Troy, Albany & N. York. 
Troy, " A. Gorham, (day boat,) " " " " 

John Mason, Capt. H. Gillespie, runs between Troy and Albany. 
Jonas C. Heartt, Capt. W. W. Tupper, " a « 

Passage Boats running Between Albany and New-York. 
Albany, Capt. J. G. Jenkins, (day boat.) 
( Rochester, Capt. A. P. St. John, (night boat.) 
•jj ^ V North America, Capt. M. H. Truesdell, (night boat.) 
"Es < South America, " L. W. Brainard, " 

S>J J De Witt Clinton, (rebuilding,) 
^ (. Utica. 

Diamond, Capt. A. Flower, (night boat.) 
Swallow, " A. McLean, " 
Steam Tow-Bo ats, employed in towingfreight barges, and carrying passengers. 
Commerce, Illinois, James Fairlie, Oliver Ellsworth, rims between 
Troy, Albany and New-York. 
Steam Tow-Boats running beticeen New-York and Albany. 
Sandusky, Swiftsure, United States, Indiania, Mount Pleasant, Legis- 
lator, Pennsylvania. 

From Stuyvesant. 
Superior, passage and freight boat, runs to New- York. 

From Hudson. 
Columbia, passage and freight boat, runs to New-York. 
Westchester, passage and freight boat, rims to New-York. 
Hope, passage boat, rims to Albany. 

From Catskill. 
Washington, tow-boat, rims to New-York. 

From Saugerties. 
Robert L. Stevens, passage and freight boat, runs to New- York. 

From Rondout. 
Emerald, Norwich, Victory, passage and tow-boats, run to New-York. 
From Poughkeepsie. ' 

Gazelle, passage and freight boat, runs to New-York. 

From Low Point. 
William Young, freight boat runs to New-York. 

From Fishkill. 
Norfolk, tow-boat, runs to New-Y'ork. 

From Newburgh. 
Highlander, passage and freight boat, runs to New-York. 
James Madison, " " " 

Frank, tow-boat, " " 

From Cornwall. 
Gen. Jackson, tow-boat, runs to New- York. 

From Peekskill. 
Columbus, passage boat, runs to New-York. 
Telegraph, " " « 

From Haverstraw. 
Warren, passage and freight boat, runs to New-York. 

From Sing Sing. 
Boston, passage and freight boat, runs to New-York. 

From Nyack and Piermont. 
Arrow, passage and freight boat, runs to New-York. 
,*» A steamboat runs daily, summer and winter, between Piermont and 
N. York, (Sunday excepted,) connecting with rail road cars running to Goshen. 



STEAMBOATS. 



219. 



List of Steamboats plying between BiifTalo and other ports on 
Lake Erie, &c. 



NAMES. 



Tons. 



Masters. 



Where to. 



Benjamin Franklin, 

Buliixlo, 

Bunker Hill, 

Charles Tovvnsencl, . 

Chautauque, 

Chesapeake, 

Chicag'o, 

Cleveland, 

Columbus, 

Commodore Perry,. 

Constellation, 

Constitution, 

Daniel Webster, .... 
De Witt Clinton, . . . 

Dole, 

Fairport, 

G. W. Clinton 

Gen. Harrison, 

Gen. Scott, 

Gen. Vv'^ayne, 

Gov. IMarcy, 

G; sat Wesiern, 

Illinois, 

Indiana, 

James Allen, 

J ames Madison, . . . . 

Julia Palmer, 

Kent,* 

Lexington, 

Milwaukie, 

Missouri, 

Monroe, 

New-England, 

New- York, 

North America, 

Pennsylvania, ...... 

Rhode Island, 

Red Jacket, 

Robert Fulton , 

Rochester, 

Sandusky, 

Star, 

Thomas Jefferson, . . 

United States, 

Waterloo, 

Wisconsin, 



2.')2 
613 
457 
312 
161 
464 
300 
580 
391 
362 
440 
183 
351 
413 



Gilman Appleby, 
Levi Allen, 

D. P. Nickerson, 

E. a. Masters, 
D. Hone, 
John Edmonds, 
A.E. Hart, 
John Shook, 
David \Vilkinson, 
Morris Hazard, 
T. J. Titus, 



259 
19 
324 
240 
390 



A. H. Squier, 



780 
755 
450 



633 

299 



353 

401 
650 
360 
416 
32:1 
362 
.320 
250 
148 
368 
472 
377 
138 
428 
366 



A. Edwards, 
Asa R. Swift, 
S. F. Atwood, 
Ira Davis, 
Amos Pratt, 



A. Walker, 
Archibald Allen, 
J. T. Pheatt, 



John McFadpren, 



Van Allen, 

F. N. Jones, 



Thomas Wilkins, 



L. Gagcr, 
R. Hart, 
R. Folger, 
G. W. Floyd, 



490 Jlenry Randall, 



Detroit and Toledo. 

Detroit, 

Chicago. 

Condemned. 
Barcelona- 
Chicago. 
Detroit. 

do. 

Green Bay, 

Mauniee. 

Detroit. 

do. 

Laid up. 
Chicago. 

Laid up. 
Detroit. 
Canada. 
Maumee. 

Detroit and Maumee. 
Maumee. 

Laid up. 
Chicago, 
do. 
do. 

Laid up. 
Chicago. 

Laid up. 
Canada. 
Detroit. 

Laid up. 
Chicago. 

I^aid up. 
Detroit. — Laid up. 
Sunk. 

Laid up. 

Laid up. 

Detroit. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Laid up. 
Laid up. 
Laid up. 
Chippewa, Canada. 
Cliipago. 



*Brilish steamboat. 

TONNAGE, 

Resistercd in tlif United States District of Buffalo Creek, 30th September, 1841, 
■was as folloics: — 

24 Steamboats, 7,642 55-100 tons. 

53 Schooners, 5,043 40- KX) " 

9 Brigs, 1,662 02-100 " 

2 Shii)S, 6'l-4 78-100 " 



Total Tonnage, 



14,993 75-100 tons. 



220 



STEAMBOATS. 



Steamboats on liake Champlain. 

Burliiifcton, Capt. R. W. Shermarij Whitehall to St. Johns. 

Whitehall, " D. Lyon, " " 

Saranac, Burlington to Plattsburgh and St. Albans. 

The Steamboats Winooski, and Washington, are employed in towing. 

Steamboat on Lake George. 
William Caldwell, Caldwell to foot of Lake George. 

Steamboats on Cayuga Lake. 
Simeon De Witt, and De Witt Clinton, Ithaca to Cayuga Bridge. 

Steamboats on Seneca Lake. r- (Running Summer and Winter.) 
Richard Stevens, Chemung, and Geneva, Geneva to Jeflferson. 

Steamboat on Crooked Lake. 
Keuka, Penn-Yan to Hammondsport. 

Steamboat on Chautauque Lake. 
Chautauqua, Maysville to Jamestown. 



American Steamboats on Lake Ontario. 

Lady of the Lake, Capt. J. J. Taylor, ^ run from Oswego to Lewiston, and 
St. Lawrence, " J. VanCleve, I Oswego to Kingston, dailj". 

Rochester, " G. S. Weeks, i run from Rochester to Ogdensburgh, 

Oneida, " R. F. Child, -? via Oswego, Sackets Harbor and 

Express, " H. N. Throop, ( Kingston, 

Telegraph, " J. W. Tuttle, ^ Oswego to Kingston, via Sackett's 

Clinton, " R. Nichols, • ( Harbor, an Cape Vincent. 

John Marshall, " J. Warner, Sackett's Hai'bor to Kingston. 

United States, (laid up.) 

New-York, Oswego and Chicago Line. 
(For the transportation of freight and passengers.) 
New-York, Oswego, Chicago, Vandalia, (Ericson Propellors,) run from 
Oswego to Chicago via Welland Canal. Leaving Oswego the 1st, 10th and 
20th of each month, diu-mg navigation. 

Broxson, Crocker & Co. Proprietors, Oswego. 

Theroi^ Pardee, Agent, Chicago. 

Lake Vessels. 

In addition to tlie above, about 150 American vessels averaging 100 tons each, 
ply between ports on Lalce Ontario, and to ports on Lakes Erie, Horon, and 
Michigan, generally freighting salt and merchandize up and produce down. 

British Steamboats on Lake Ontario. 

Princess Royal, Capt. Colcleugh, Kingston to Toronto. 
Niagara, " Elmsley, " " 

City of Toronto, " Dick, « " 

St. George, Kingston to Niagara. 

Brockville, Kingston to Dicifinson's Landing. 

Henry Gildersleve, Capt. Bowen, " _" " 

Admiral, Kingston to Rochester. 

America, Toronto to Rochester. 

Gore, Capt. Kerr, " " 

Cliief Justice, " H. Richardson, Toronto to Lewiston. 
Transit, " H. Richai-dson, Jr. " " 

Britannia, - Toronto to Hamilton. 

Poicui)ine, " " 

Queen Victoria, Plamilton to Lewiston. 

Dolphin, Kingston to t)gdensburgh. 

Union, Prescott to Oswego, &c. 

Note. — In addition to the above, several English steamers ply between 
Kingston and Belleville, on the Bay of Quinte. The government steamer 
Cherokee, lying at Kingston, Canada, is a new and finely modelled vessel of 
about 700 tons biu-then. 



CANAL PACKETS. 221 

British Steambuats on the St. Lawrence River. 

Hig'hlaiuler, Cornwall to Corteau dii Lac. 

Chieftain, Cascades to La Chine. 

L(n-(1 Sydenliani, Montreal to Quebec. 

Laily Colboruc, " " 

Queen, «< " 

Riontreal, " " 

The Steamboats Canada, and Noi-th America, are employed in towing. 

Steamboats running on' the SL Lawrence and Ottawa rivers, and the R'uleau Canal. 
Steamers of a small class ply rcg-ularly, during the season of navigation, be- 
tween Montreal and Kingston, Canada; landing at all the intermediate jilaces, 
on the Ottawa anil Rideau Canals, upwards, and on the St. Lawrence down- 
wards, passing over the several rai)iils in the latter river. 



CANAL PACKETS. 

Erie Canal. 
Two lilies of commodious Canal Packets run daily, between Schenectady, 
Utica, Syracuse, Rochester and Bullalo. A boat usually leaves the above 
places in tlie morning, and another in the evening, or on the arrival of the 
rail road cars, during the season of navigation. 

Oswego Canal. 

A line of Packet boats for the conveyance of passengers, run daily between 
Syracuse and Oswego, connecting with lines of steamboats on Lake Ontario, 
and with canal packets anil rail road cars at Syracuse. 

Cayuga and Seneca Canal. 

A line of Packet boats run daily, during the season of navigation, between 
Rlontozuma on the Erie canal and Geneva, where they connect with steam- 
boats on Seneca Lake and rail road cars. 

Genesee Valley Canal. 

A line of Packet boats run daily, between Rochester Mt. Morris and Dans- 
villc. 

Champlain Canal. 

Troy and Whitehall Packet Line, for the conveyance of passengers and light 
freigiit. A boat runs dailj", during the season of navigation, between Troy and 
Whitehall, and another boat runs daily between Mechanicsville and White- 
hall, connecting at the former place with the Rensselaer and Saratoga rail roaii, 
which terminates at Troy. L. A. Carlton, Agent, Troy. 

Isaac V. Rakqr, Agent, Whitehall. 
The Northern Line run two passage boats between Troy and Whitehall, 
daily, Sunilays excepted. Iliram Eddy, Agent, Troy. 

Travis, Eddy & Co. Age?its, Whitehall. 



Transportation Lines, — to Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. 

Union Transportation Company, transports merchandize between New-York 
and Philadelphia, via Camden and Amboy Rail road. Olfice in West st., near 
IJattery Place. A. Decker, Agent, 

Merchant's Canal Line, transports merchandize between New-York and 
Philadelphia, via Delaware and Raritan Canal. Barges leave Pier No. 2 North 
River, New-York, and IGSouth Wharves, Philatlclphia. Office 9 West street, 
New-York, Thompson & Neilson, Agents. 

Bingham's Line, transports merchandize to Pittsburg, Penn. via canal and 
rail road. * Wm. Tyson Agent, 10 West street, N. Y. 

D. Leach & Co.'s Line, transports merchandize to Pittsburg, via canal and 
rail road. L. Robinson, Agent, 13 West St., N. Y. 

19* 



222 CANAL TRANSPORTATIOK LINES, 

Steam Tow-Boat Companies. 

Albany and New-York Line. — Run 11 boats, amounting to 2,900 tons. 
Isaac Newton, Agent, 16 South street, New-York. 
Charles Olmstead k, Co. C6 Quay street, Albany. 

SWIFT3URE Line Steam Tow-Boats. — Run 12 boats amounting to 3,000 tons. 
A. Van Santvoord, Agent, foot of Cortland it Broad sts. 
M. Barnes, Agent, Albany. 

Albany and Canal Line. — Run 11 Boats, amounting to 2,900 tons. 

Joy & Monteith, Agents, 3 State street, Albany. 
Alfred Hoyt, Agent, 16 South street, New-York. 

Troy Tow'-Boat Company. — Run 9 boats, amounting to 2,700 tons. 
James H. Hooker, Agent, Tro)''. 
,• Pope Catlin, Agent, 33 Coenties Slip, New- York. 

New -York and Troy Tow-Boat Company. — Run 5 boats, amounting to 
1,500 tons. G. P. Griffith, Agetit, Troy. 

Walter S. Griffith, Agent, 'Z2 South street, N. Y. 

Canal Traiispoitation L.in?s. 

{Running between New-York, Albany and Buffalo.) 
American Transportation Company. — Agents, H. ]\Iilcs, Broad street, New- 
York; J.M.Hughs, Albany; H. Wright, Rochester; P. L. Parsons & Co., 
and S. Drullard, Buffalo. 

Buffalo Line. — Agents, Hiram Joy, New- York; T. Joy & Co. Albany; Joy 
& Webster, Buffalo. 

Clinton Line. — Agents, Hiram McCollum, 113 Broad st., N. Y. ; William 
Monteith, 100 Pier, Albany; Waring & Stockton, Butfalo. 

Erie Transportation Company. — Agents, D. Bromley, New- York; H. Brom- 
ley, Albany; J. Maxwell, Buflalo. 

Merchant's Transportation Company. — Agents, F. Wilkie, 9 Coenties Slip, 
N. Y. ; R. Hunter h, Co. 97 Pier, Albany; H. Hunter, Rochester; Hunter, 
Palmer & Co. Buffalo. 

New-York Transportation Line. — Agents, Thomas A. Jerome, New-York; 
Chase & Evans, Albany; John R. Evans & Brother, Butfalo. 

New-York and Toledo Line. — Agents, J. J. Folts, New-York; Elias Weed, 
Albany; Beach, Wilkins & Co. Butfalo. 

New-York and Ohio Line. — Agents, Noah Cook & Co. New-York; O. M. 
Tomlinson & Co. Albany; J. Chapman & Co. Rochester; A. R. Cobb & Co. 
Bulfalo. 

Ohio and New- York Line. — Agents, H. Meech, No. 15 South st. New-York; 
Pease & Culver, 66 Quay st. Albany; Kinne, Davis & Co. and Abm. E. Cul- 
ver, Buffalo. 

Merchant's and Miller's Line. — Agents, Y^moTy Pease, New-York; J. H. 
Pease & Co. Albany ; Thomas Pease, to Co. Rocliester. 

Western Transportation Company. — Agents, S. Card, foot of Broad-street, 
New-York; E. S. Prosser, Albany; Northrop & Hay wai-d, Rochester; Gel- 
ston & Evans, Builalo. 

New-York and Hammondsport Line. — C. Schemerhorn, Agent, Albany. 

Merchant's Oswego Line. — Agents, M. B. Spaulding, 15 South street, New- 
York; R. S. Cushman & Co. 66 Quay st. Albany; Wm. Lewis, Oswego. 

Oswego Line. — Agents, R. J. Vandcrwater, 100 Broad street, New-York ; 
W. H. Vanderwater, Albany; H. Fitzluigli & Co. Oswego. ^ 

Ithaca & Elmira Line. — C. P. W^illiams & Co. Agents, Albany. 

New-York and Penn-Y an Line.— B. M. Remer, ^gcftf, Albany. 

New-York and Utica Line.— C. V. Clark, Agent, Albany. 

Chenango Line. — George Anderson, Agent, Albany. 

, Chenango Lake Boat Line. — George Anderson, Agent, Albany. 



NEW-YORK CITY STATISTICS. 223 

Canal Transportation Lines, 

(Runniiis between Neiv-York, Troy, Buffalo, Src.) 
Troy and Ohio Line. — Agents, J. II. Wilg-us, 27 Coenties Slip, NcvV-York; 
Pope Catlin, 33 do. do. N. Y. ; James H." Hooker, Troy; Camp & Hooker, 
Buffalo. 

Troy and Erie Line. — Agents, Ilufus Putnam, New-York; John Ide, Troy; 
■ Coit, Kiniberly & Co. BuUalo. 

Detroit Line. — Agents, Alfred Ringe, 27 CocntiesSlip, New-York; James II. 
Hooker, Troy; Camp & Hooker, Buiialo. 

Troy and Michigan Lino. — Agents, Allen Wlieeler, Broad st. New- York; 
Gurdon Grant, Troy ; G, W. Tilt & Co. Buffalo. 

New-York and Oswego Line. — Agents, George C. Drew, ContiesSlip, New- 
York; J. C. WoodAvard, Troy; C. Comstock & Co. Oswego, 

Troy and Oswego Line. — Agents, J. S. Wyckoflf, Coenties Slip, New-York; 
H. C. Rossiter, Troy; Bronson, Crocker & Co. Oswego. 

New- York, Utica and Oswego Line. — Agents, W. S. Rossiter, CoentiesSlip, 
N. Y. ; H. C. Rossiter, Troy ; Bronson, Crocker & Co. Oswego. 

Northern Transportation Line. — Agents, C. B. Janes, Coenties Slip, N. Y. ; 
L. A. Carlton, Troy; J. V. Baker, Whitehall. 

Nqf thorn Line. — Agents, Hiram Eddy, Troy; Travis, Eddy & Co. Whitehall. 
Vergenncs and Troy Line. — Agents, Pope CatlLn, 33 Coenties Slip, N. Y. ; 
M. D. Hall, Troy; R. Chapman, Vergenncs. 

Glens' Falls Line. — Agents, Pope Catlin, 33 Coenties Slip, N. Y. ; H. S. Os- 
-born, Tro}' ; Sprague & Co. Glens' Falis. 



NEW-YORK CITY STATISTICS. 



NEW-YORK CITY FINANCES. 

The financial condition of the city of New-York on the 1st May, 1841, waa 
as follows, as will be seen by the Mayor's Message, fi-om which the following 
statement is taken — 

" I have requested from the Comptroller and received a statement of the City 
Debt up to the 1st of May last, from which the following appears: 

New-York City Stocks of 1820 and '29 $500,000 

Less amount held by the Commissioners of Sinking Fund. . 91,200 

$408 800 

Public Building Stock $615,000 ' 

Less amount helil by the Commissioners of Sinking Fund. . 15,000 

500,000 

Fire Loan Stock, a contingent liability, $882,000 

Less an equal amount of bontis anil mortgages owned by the 

Commissioners of Sinking Funil , 882,000 

000,000 

Fire Indemnity Stock !J;358,900 

Less amount held by the Commissioners of Sinking Fund. . 122,700 

■ ^ . ^ , 236,200 

P loatmg Debt Stock $350,000 

Less amount held by the Commissioners of Sinking Fund. . I(i8,210 

'~~~-^— 181 790 

Corporation Bonds— a contingent debt $5vS,^),()00 ' 

Less an c(iual amount of liens on real estate 58.'3,000 

000,000 

Water Stocks $7,949,377 

Less amount held by the Commissioners of Sinking Fund- . 298,000 

• — 7,651,377 

Total, ^ $8,978,167 



224 NEW-YORK CITY STATISTICS. 

Tlie City Stocks which will be held by the Commissionei-s of the Sinking- 
Fiind at the close of the present fiscal j'ear, will be sulRcient to cover, and in 
effect cancel the stock of 1820 and '29, and the Public Building Stock. The 
Fire Loan Stock and Corporation Bonds are contingent liabilities of the city, 
for which bonds anil mortgages, anil otlier real estate liens, are held by tlie 
Commissioners of the Sinking Fund, wliicla can be realized and applied to the 
liquidation of tlie debt at any time. Tliese, tlierefore, may be properly con- 
sidered as no part of tlie city debt, but rather as a loan of its credit on full and 
perfect securities. 

The Fire Indeninitj' Stock is, for the most part, payable in twent3^-seven 
years; the provision for its redemption is an annual tax of $25,000 to be levied 
upon the real and pei-sonal estate of the citizens, one-half of which tax 
would, however, accomplish its redemption in the time fixed. 

The X'loating Debt Stock is payable at the rate of §50,000 per annum^ to 
meet which, a tax of the like sum is annually to be imposed. 

It will be seen, therefore, that the principal of all the stocks here mention- 
ed, (and which constitute the entire debt of the city, except that for the con- 
struction of the Croton Aqueduct,) is fully provided for, and capable of being 
redeemed without resoi't to the r-ev^enues of the Sinking Fund after the present 
year; or, in other words, the proper income of the Sinking Fund, on and after 
Maj^ next, when the Croton water will be introduced, will be applicable, sole- 
ly, to the cancelling of the Water Stocks. 

The water debt, as estimated, will reach $12,000,000. It is computed that 
the income of the Sinking Fund, as at present constituted, will alone b« suffi- 
cient to meet and cancel it in forty years. It is to be remembered, too, that 
the Sinking Fund will, long before that period, be greatly enlarged from the 
avails of such real estate as the Corporaiion may sell from time to time." 

FINANCIAL CONDITION OF NEW- YORK CITY— 1842. 

The financial condition of the citj"^ of New-York, on the 7th of Maj'-, 1842, 
was as follows, as will be seen by the Comptroller's Report to the Board of 
Aldermen, from which the following statement is taken. 

CITY DEBT, MAY 7, 1842. 

New-York City Fives, of 1820 and 1829 $500,000 

Public Building Stock 515,000 

Fire Loan Stock 525,000 

Fire Indemnity Stock 358,900 

Floating Debt Stock . . : 300,000 

Assessment and other Temporary Bonds 397,500 

Water Stock" Fives of 1S5S, 1860, 1870 and 1880 8,721,500 

Water Stock Sixes, from 1 to 3 years 1,525,502 

Water Stock Sevens, 5, 10 and 15 j'ears 591,560 

$13,434,962 
Less by amount of the same Stocks held by the Commis- 
sioners of the Sinking Fund 898,522 

Total, $12,536,440 

Extract from the Comptroller's Report, (1841) : 

'' The provisions already established by law for the payment of this Debt, 
are amjile; the faith and property of the city are pledged for the redemption 
of the Water Debt, as well as for the other Stocks of the City; these latter are 
already secured by active means on hand; the payment of the Wafer Stock is 
distributed through a period of forty j^ears; the Sinking Fund, established to 
redeem the old stocks, is continued and made applicable to the Water Stocks, 
by repeated enactments of both the state and city governments. This fund 
alone, without resort to the property of the corporation, is capable of redeem- 
ing the debt within that jieriod; its minimum revenue of $200,000, would 
alone yield in the 40 years $8,000,000, and the compounding thi-ough that time 
would increase it $4,000,000 more." 



NEW-YORK CITV STATISTICS. 225 

EXTRACT, 

From the Reports of the Marshals for taking the sixth Census, corrected and pre- 
pared at the Departmeat of State, by authority of an act of Congress. 

Ag;a^rega(e value, and produce, and number of persons, employed in Mines, 
AsriculUire, Commerce, Manufactures, &c., exhibiting- a full view of the pur- 
suits, industry and resources of the City and Counlj- of New-York, in 1S40. 

BIINES. 

CAST IRON. 

Number of Furnaces, 4 

Tons jiroduced 3,000 

Tons of fuel consumed 4,500 

Number of men employed 56 

Capital invested $23,000 

AGRICULTURE. 

LIVE STOCK. 

Horses and Mules 7,797 

Neat Cattle 3,395 

Sheep 282 

Swine ; 13,998 

Poultry of all kinds, estimated value $2,069 

CEREAL GRAINS. 

Number bushels of Barley 100 

" " Oats 1,105 

". " Buckwheat, 5 

" " Indian Corn '. . 2,525 

VARIOUS CROPS. 

Bushels of Potatoes 18,585 

Tons of Hay 747 

^ VARIETIES. 

Cords of Wood sold 40 

Value of the products of the Dairy $22,400 

" " Orchard $800 

HORTICULTURE. 

Value of produce of Market Gardens . .' 566,640 

" " Nurseries and Florists $24,650 

NURSERIES. 

Number of men employed 106 

Capital invested $26,350 

COMMERCE. 

Number of Commercial Houses in foreign trade 417 

Number of Commission Houses 918 

Cai)i(al invested $^15,918,200 

Retail Dry Goods, Groceries and other stores 3,620 

Capital invested $14,648,595 

Lumber yards and trade 61 

Capital invested $731,500 

Number of men cmplojred 2,606 

IiTlernal Transportation, 

Nuiyl^er of men employed 32S 

Butchers, packers, &c. 

Numlier of men employed 12S 

Capital in\ ested $618,780 

I MANUFACTURES. 

Value of machinery manufactured $l,lc0,000 



226 NEW-YORK CITY STATISTICS. 

Number of men employed 1,41&' 

Value of Hardware, Cutlery, &c. manufactured §135,300 

Number of men employed 145 

Number of small arms made 1,462 

Number of men employed 20 

Value of precious metals manufactured $932,760 

Number of men employed 542 

Various metals, value manufactured Srl,087,80O 

Number of men employed 798 

Value of Gz-anite, Marble, &c., manufactured $403,850 

Number of men employed ." 472 

Bricks and lime, value manufactured $27,000 

Number of men employed 18 

WOOL. 

Number of persons employed 248 

Capital invested 520,000 

COTTON. 

Number of manufactories 18 

Dying; and printing establishments 2 

Value of manufactured articles $150,700 

Number of persons employed 290 

Capital invested. ' $61,300 

SILK. V. 

Number of lbs. reeled, thrown or other silk made 20 

Value of the same $150 

Number of men employd. 1 

Number of females and children employed 1 

Capital invested ' $50 

MIXED MANUFACTURES. 

Value of produced $1,201,700 

Number of persons employed 1,653 

Capital invested ' 4r$507,050 

TOBACCO. 

Value of manufactured articles $187,700 

Number of men employed 209 

Capital invested $55,055 

HATS, CAPS, BONNETS, &C'. 

Value of Hats and Caps manufactured • $1,031,346 

Value of Straw Bonnets, $128,200 

Number of persons employed 1,361 

Capital invested $444,300 

LEATHER, TANNERIES, SADDLERIES, &e. 

Number of Tanneries, 1 

Sides of Sole leather tanned 2,000 

" Upper " " 3,500 

Number of men employed 507 

Capital invested $20,000 

All other manufactures of leather, saddlery, &c 217 

Value of manufactured articles $1,509,156 

Capital invested $545,730 

Number of lbs. Soap 7,813,700 

" « Tallow Candles, 2,0a3,400 

" " Sperm and Wax do., 250,000 

Number of men employed 229 

Capital invested $277,600 

Number of Distilleries 11 

Gallons produced 2,973,278 



NEW-YORK CITY STATISTICS. 227 

Number of Breweries 15 

Gallons produced 1,205,490 

Number of men employed 274 

Capital invested $575,076 

Value of medicinal Drugs, Paints, Dyes, &c §^^225,050 

Turpentine and Varnish, value produced. $1U1,360 

Number of men employed 293 

Capital invested $648,650 

Number of Glass houses 3 

" " cutting establishments 6 

Number of men empl03'ed 104 

Value of manufact'd articles, including loolcing glasses. $137,171 

Capital invested ; $53,000 

Number of Potteji|s 1 

Value of manufucOired articles $14,000 

Number of men employed 12 

Capital invested $3,000 

Number of Sugar refineries 7 

Value of produce $385,000 

" Confectionary made $249,242 

Men employed 327 

Capital invested : $425,706 

PAPER. 

Number of manufactories 1 

Value of produce $25,000 

Value of all other manufactures of paper, playing cards, 

&c $20,137 

Number of men employed 51 

Capital invested $27,900 

Number of Printing offices , 113 

Number of Binderies 43 

" of Daily NewsptQjeis 18 

« of Weekly " .45 

" of Semi & fri-weekly " 5 

« of Periodicals 28 

Men employed 2,029 

Capital invested $1,285,320 

Number of Ropewalks 6 

Value of produce $24,500 

Men employed 61 

Capital invested $9,800 

Value of Musical Instruments produced $353,531 

Men employed 281 

Capital invested $338,400 

Value of the manufacture of Carriages and Wagons, ... $207,874 

Men employed 297 

Capital invested $90,950 

Number of Grist mills 2 

" of Saw mills 8 

Value of produce $331,800 

Men employed 63 

Capital invested $146,800 

Value of Ships and Vessels built $354,000 

Value of Furniture manufactured $916,675 

Number of men employed . . : : 1,319 

Capital invested $826,150 

Number of brick and stone houses built 542 

" wooden " 59 

Men employed 4,033 

Value of constructing or building $1,889,100 

Value of all other manufactures, not enumerated $3,460,320 

Capital invested $2,717,307 

Total capital invested in manufactures, $11,228,894 



22S 



NEW-YORK CITY STATISTICS. 



VALUE OF RE VI, A\D PERSONAL ESTATE, 

In the City and County of New-York, as assessed in 1839, 1840 and 1841. 



"E 


183 


9. 


"1840. 


imi. 


REAL 


PERSONAL 


REAL 


PERSONAL 


REAL 


PERSONAL 


i 
1 


ESTATE. 


ESTATE. 


ESTATE. 


ESTATE. 


ESTATE. 


ESTATE. 


$33,985,591 


$29,560,836 


$32,502,000 


$27,276,549 


$32,144,785 


$27,540,404 


21 16,224,850 


2,032,963 


14,927,600 


1,928,813 


15,015,850 


1,932,583 


3 


12,337,000 


6,183,530 


12,105,500 


5,155,610 


12,133,900 


5,871,610 


4 


8,806,650 


2,005,250 


8,485,005 


1,930,550 


8„733,4o0 


1,880,037 


5 


10,211,900 


3,568,620 


9,460,250 


3,046,155 


9,456,100 


2,856,106 


6 


8,581,372 


2,397,678 


7,735,600 


2,262,378 


J', 979, 750 
•,209,686 


1,824,900 


7 


11,631,580 


4,737,790 


10,621,425 


4,670,421 


4,766,295 


f 


11,251,900 


2,727,548 


10,908,100 


2,340,659 


11,384,100 


2,073,707 


9 


8,807,400 


1,441,058 


8,652,450 


1,129,135 


8,851,950 


1,194,100 


10 


6,196,200 


729,300 


6, 138,850 


718,800 


6,163,900 


736,400 


11 


4,401,800 


56,462 


3,829,400 


68,191 


3,996,800 


95,600 


12 


10,534,225 


2,055,600 


10,073,550 


,291,800 


8,187,329 


1,766,150 


13 


4,313,500 


339, 154 


4,247,000 


307,054 


4,283,800 


226,154 


14 


6,865,300 


2,026,818 


6,844,800 


1,917,473 


6,899,300 


1,835,535 


15 


14,550,500 


8,182,665 


14, 130,700 


8 652,467 


14,361,600 


8,669,521 


16 


17,577,092 


640,000 


17,055,509 


863,630 


15,796,346 


731,730 


17 


10,501,574 


1,325,524 


9,402,725 


1,161,974 


9,708,700 


1,429,624 




$196,778,434 


$70,010,796 


$187,121,464 


465,721,699 


$186,347,246 


.f65,430,456 



GENERAL INFORMATION, 

Principal Institutions in New-York City. llliere Located. 

Alms House, Bellevue, foot of 26th st.. East River. 

American Institute, (Old Alius House,) rear of City Hall. 

Arsenal, ^New- York State) Franklin St., corner Elm. 

Bloominf dale Asylum, (for the Insane) 117tli St., west of 10th Avenue. 

City Prison, Bounded by Centre, Elm, Leonard and Franklin sts. 

Columbia College, '. Foot of Park Place. 

Collets of Physicians and Surgeons, 67 Crosby st. 

Court of Sessions, Halls of Justice, Centre st. 

Deaf and Dumb Institute, 50th st., corner of 4th Avenue. 

Debtors' Prison, .22 Eldridge st. 

Dispensarj', New-York City 114 White st., corner of Centre. 

Dispensary, Eastern, Ludlow st., corner of Essex, Market Place. 

Dispensary, Northern, Waverlj- Place, corner of Christopher st. 

Eye and Ear Infirmary, . . .^ 47 Howard st. 

House of Industry, .'. 190 Chapel St., or West Broadway. 

House of Refuge, East River, near 23d st. 

Lunatic Asylum, ' '. Blackwell's Island. 

Medical College of the New-York University 659 Broadway. 

Mercantile Library Association, — Clinton Hall, 133 Nassau st. 

Merchants' Exchange, Wall St., corner of William. 

Mechanics' Exchange, 7 Broad st. 

Mechanics' Institute, Office, Basement No. 18, City Hall. 

Museum, (American) Broadway, corner of Ann st. 

Museum, (New-York) 252 Broadway. 

Museum, (National) foot of Bowery. 

New-York Society Library, 348 Broadway. 

National Academy of Design, 348 Broadway. 

New-York City Hospital, 319 Broadway. 

New-York Institution for the Blind, 8th Avenue, near 33d st. 

New-York Public School Societyj .140 Grand St., corner of Elm. 

New- York University, Wooster st., corner of Waverly Place. 

Orphan Asylum, Bloorningdale, near 80th st. 

Penitentiary, Blackwell's Island. 

Rutgers' Female Institute, 244 Madison st., near Clinton. 

Stuy vesant Institute, 659 Broadway. 



PUBLIC HEALTH. 



229 



PUBLIC HEALTH. 



Board of Health of the City of New-Yoik. 

The Board of Health consists of the JNFaj'or, Aldermen, and Assistant Alder- 
men, ('seven members with tlie Mayorcorislitutingu quorum.) The Officers are, 
The Ma}-or, ex-qfficio, President. 
Clerk Common Coimcil, ex-officio Secretary. 
Comptroller, do. Treasurer. 

The City Inspector and Assistants, and the Deputy Health Wardens are offi- 
cers connected with the Board of Health. 

The Board of Health Commisii'umers,\% composed of officers appointed by 
tlie State authorities. Present officers, 

Henry Van Hovenburgh, Health officer. Quarantine. 
Alexander F. Vache, Resident Physician, New-York. 
Stephen R. Harris, Health Comiitissioner, do. 

Agent of Commissioners, Quarantine. 



Bill of 3Iortali{y. 

Shoiviiig the number of deaths in the city of Keic-York during the year 1842. 

From the report of the City Inspector, Dr. John H. Griscom, it appears, 
the number of interments during the year, exclusive of the premature and 
still birtlis, was 8,47^, being 56 less tlian in the preceding year. The deaths 
by consum])tion amounted to 1,339, being in the proportion of 1 to (5,114 of 
of tlic whole. Of those 1,339, 719 only where native of the United States, the 
remaining 620 being foreigners, a proportion out of all i-eason when the com- 
parative numbers of the two classes are considered.* 

The places of nativity of the persons 
interred were as follows : — 

United Slates C,i22 

British provinces , 30 

West hidies 26 

Ireland I,2c0 

Great Britain 413 

Germany 226 

France 54 

Other parts Wr Europe 51 

Africa 2 

Boru at sea 2 



Of the interments there were — 

Under 1 year old, 2,098 

, 1 to 2 years 1,8SS 



2 to 5 years •• 

5 to 10 years- • 

10 to 20 years •• 

20 to 30 years- 

30 to 40 years-- 

4j to 50 years-- 

all to 60 years •• 

60 to 70 years- ■ 

70 to 80 years •• 

80 to 90 years.- 

00 to 100 years- 

100 and upward - 

Unknown 



'Total, 



937 
3S1 
331 
970 
977 
CIS 
347 
313 
187 

92 Unknown, 

21 
4 Total,- 

94 

8,476 



8,475 



* Dr. Hayward in his statistics of pulmonary consumption in the cities of Boston, 
New-York and Philadelphia, for 30 years, gives the following as the average projior- 
poriiou of deaths, in the three cities, by consumption, to the whole number of deaths: 

In Boston 1 in 6,ie5 

In Philadelphia 1 in 7,003 

In New-York, 4 1 in 5,447 

By the above table it would appear that the ratio of deaths by consumption in New- 
Vork is higher than in the other cities, and the nutural inference at first sight would 
be that the climate of the city is peculiarly unfavovable^for pulmonary complaints. 
The researches of the city Inspector, however, tend to the establishment of a difl'er- 
ent result. He has shown how large a proportion of the interments reported, by this 
disease, are of foreigners, and gives a reasonable explanation of the causes which in- 
duces so great a mortality among them. 

20 



230 



PUBLIC HEALTH. 
Interments in New- York, 1842. 



DISEASES. 



WHITES. 



EPIDEMIC, ENDEMIC 
ASD CONTAGIOUS. 

1. Fevers. 

Remittent 

Irttennlttent 

Synocha 

Ty phus 

2. Eruptii'C Fevers. 

Erysipelas 

Measles 

Scarlatina 

Small Pox 

Thrush. 

3. Not Classified. 
Cholera infantum • • 

Croup 

Dysentery 

Diarrhtea 

Whooping cough' • • 

Influenza 

Syphillis 

SPORADIC. 

1. Nervous System 

Cephalitas, 

Hydiocephalus 

Apoplexy 

Paralysis 

Convulsions- •••••• 

Diseases of brain- • 

Neuralgia 

Tetanus 

Chorea 

Nervous fever 

Epilepsy 

Insanity •••••, 

Disease of spine- •■ 
Delirium tremens - 
a. Resp'tory Organs 

Laryngitis 

Bronchitis 

Pleurisy 

Pneumonia 

Hydrothorax 

Asthma 

Consumption 

Ile'rrhage fm lungs 
Congestion of lungs 
Disease of lungs- • 
Gangrene of lungs 

3. CirHory Organs. 
luflam. of heart- - 

Aneurisw 

Organic dis.ofheart 

Phlebitis 

Dropsy of heart- •- 
Asphyxia sy'pe suf. 

4. Digesttye Organs. 
Gastritis & entritis 

Peritonitis 

Marasmus 

Worms- — 

Ascites 

Ulceration 

Hernia 

Cholic - 



1 

2 
#30 
6 
1 
65 
2 
2 
3 


1 


ft 





56 
84 
21 

530 
70 

.22 

1339 

20 

49 



Intussusception - 
Hemorrhage from 
ntest. & stomach 
Inflam. of liver •• 

Jaundice 

Disease of liver • 
Disease of spleen 

Teething 

Constipation •• •• 
Cholera morbus- 
Disease & gangrene 

Dyspepsia 

Cancer of stomach 
5. Urinary Organs. 

Nephritis •• 

Ischuria 

Diabetes 

Cystitis 

Calculus 

Stricture 

6. Genital Organs. 

[Childbed 

Ovarian tumor ••• - 
Hemorrhage fr ute. 
luflam. of uterus •- 
Cancer of uterus •• 
Inflam. of scrotum 
iCanccr of breast •"- 

7. Organs of Lo'tion. 

Rheumatism 

jCaries 

jMorbus coxarius- •• 
iWhite swelling- •• • 

8. Integu'ry System. 
29 jUlcer 

jCutaneous disease - 

|Strophulus 

\9. Of Uncertain Seat 

tnfia. & congestion- 
[Hemorrhage 

Dropsy 

.4bcess 

Mort. or gangrane- 

Purpura 

Cachexia 

Scrofula. 

Carcinoma 

Tumor 

Debility 

Malformation, &c - 

OTHER CAOSES. 

Old age, &,c. 

VIOLENT DEATHS. 

Intemperance 

Suicide • 

Drowned 

Killed 

P.urned or scalded' 

Casualty 

Cause not specified 



25 30 



Pre. and stillbirths 
Total interments 



4110 
368 



26 
7 
43 

3831 
299 



PUBLIC HEALTH. 



231 



Abstract of the Report of Interments, 

In the City and County of New -York from January, 1S32 to 1842. 



Men 
Boys 
Women 
Girls 

Total 




Consumption 
»IntcmpeVaiice 

Suicide 

Cholera 

Small Pox 

Colored persons 
Prc'ture & Still born 
Under 5 years of age 



209 
551 

584 
4149 



* The deaths reported from Intemperance cannot be relied on as the whole truth, 
because many deaths of which intemperance has been the principal cause, are re- 
turned under other causes, mostly apoplexy and consumplioii. As reported, how- 
ever, the number of deaths in the last few years, in i>roporlion to the population, ex- 
hV.His a srr'ilifying decrease. The average proportion of deaths to populnion iu 18S5, 
Was 1 to 4:037. 



TABLK, 

Shoirins: the number of pas.icn»;frs that have arrived at the Port of Neiv-York, 
subject to quarantine reguln^ionf), and that have died at the Marine Hospital, 
on Stolen Island, for a 'period of ten years. 



YEAR. 



No. of foreign 


No. of patients 




passengers ar- 


admitted to 


No. of deaths 


riving in the 


Marine Hos- 


in Marine 


port of N. Y. 


pital. 


Hospital. 


56,274 


830 


a5 


47,688 


7,oO 


57 


24,213 


400 


23 


51,677 


1.100 


79 


58,597 


724 


64 


32,716 


526 


60 


46,053 


46:^ 


. 47 


39,461 


448 


63 


38,815 


447 


53 


14,821 


526 


43 



1810 
1839 
1838 
1837 
1836 
1835 
1834 
1833 
1832 
1831 



City Inspector's Offsce. 

(Omcc2Ci(y Hall.) 

.Tohn Griscom, City Inspector. 

.Josepli If. Stearns, Assistant Inspector. 

.lohsi Glitz. Morriso!!, Assis-tant Hoard of Health. 

Cornelius Uoekrnan, Superintendent Public Privies. 

William 15. Gullaglier, Superintendent of Potter's Field. 



m 



232 



CPaSIiNAL STATISTICS. 



CRIMIK^AL STATISTJCS, 

Of the City of Xciv-YoJ-k — 1842. — Showing the Convictions and Jlcqnittah. 

OYER AND TERMI.VER. 

Convictions. Acquit'ls. Totals. 

Murder, 2 3 

Arson in the first degree • 1 

Forgery in the third degree 2 

Receiving stolen goods, [scienter,] 1 

Libel 2 7 4 

GENERAL SESSIONS. 

Manslaughter in the fourth degree 3 

Assault and battAy with intent to kill 3 

Mayhem 1 

Rape '2 

Arson in the second degree ■ 1 

Robbery in the first degree 5 1 

Burglary in the first degree 7 4 

do do secoftd do 10 4 

do do third do 33 14 

Attempt to commit burglary 2 

Forgery in the second degree 1.5 12 

do do third do 7 1 

Bigamy ] 

Perjury 2 2 

Abandoning child in public highway 1 

Receiving challange to fight a duel 1 

Grand Larceny 71 36 

Embezzlement 1 

Petit Larceny • 48 11 

Attempt to commit petit larceny 1 

Receiving stolen gonds, [scienter] 7 7 

Obtaining goods by false pretence 3 4 

Conspiracy • 1 

Counterfeiting U. S. coin, (misd'm'r) 2 

Insuring numbers drawn in a lottery 4 1 

Libel 8 1 

Publishing obscene papers 12 

Piloting without license 1 

Selling unwholesome meat •■•• 1 

Nuisance i 

Keeping disorderly house 16 6 

Riot 6 1 

Assault and battery 73 46 347 164 

Special Sessions. 

Petit larceny 744 138 

Assault and battery •. 267 3.3 — 1031 171 

Grand total convictions and acquittals 1724 

Number of trials in Oyer and Terminer 12 

do do General Sessions 474 

do do Special Sess-ions • 1110 

Total 1605 

Indictments found by grand jury during the year 9C0 

Complaints dismissed do do do 294 

Recognizances to answer returned do do 1814 

Indictments discharged by settlement and nol jiros during the year 173 

MALES. FEMALES. 

Sentenced to be executed by Court of Oyer and Terminer — [one commu- 
ted to imprisonment for life by the Executive — The other commit- 
ted suicide] • 3 

Sentenced by the Court of Oyer and Terminer to state prison 1 

do do do county jail 1 

Sentenced by the General Sessions to state prison 136 15 

do do do penitenticiry 42 6 

do do' do city prison 27 3 

Sentenced by the Special Sessions to the penitentiary 461 101 

do do do city prison-, 126 60 

BOYS. GIRLS. . 

Sent to the House of Refuge by the Court of General Sessions 10 2 

do do do Special Sessions-- 56 7 

Aggregate amount of time of persons sentenced to sta.te prison — 642 years 7 months. 

Nuniber of persons discharged by Court of General Sessions '•••• 167 

do do do Special Sessions 37a — 542 



COLLEGES. ■ 233 

COLLEGES. 



COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

- Til is Institution was incori'orated by roj^al cliarter under tiie name of 
•' Kin.n-'s College," in 1754, and contii-nieil in its riarhls by various acts of tlie 
State Legislature, especally by an act passed April 13th, 1787. It is situated at 
a short distance west of the Park, on a beautiful square between Murray and 
Barclay streets. The Library consisis of about f),OIX) volumes. This college 
has always maintained a higli character as a seminary oflearning, having from 
the beginning enjoyed the services of cniment scholars in the various depart- 
ments of instruction. 

FACULTY. 

Nathaniel F. l\Ioore, LL. D. President. 

Rev. .John McVickar, S. T. D. Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philo- 
sophy, Riietoric, Belles Letters, and Political Economj'. 

Charles Anthon, LL. D. Jay Professor of the Greek and Latin Languages, 
and Literature, and Rector of the Grammar School. 

James Rcnvvick, LL. I). Professor of Natural and Exjicrimental Philosophy 
and Chemistry. 

Henry J. Antlerson, M. 1). Professor of Matliematics, Analytical Mechanics, 
and Physical Astronomy. 

Robert G. Vermilye, A. M. Atljimct Professor of the Greek & Latin Lan- 
guages. 

Hon. James Kent, LL. D. Professor of Law. 

Rev. Samuel H. Tiirner, D. D. Professor of Hebrew Language and Lite- 
rature. 

George C. Schaeller, A. M. Librarian, and Insti-ucior in Drawing and Che- 
mical Manipulation. 

Felix Foresit, Professor of Italian Language and Literature. 

Felix Berieau, Professor of French LaYiguage and Literature. 

Mariano Velasquez de la Cadeva, Professor of Spanish Language and Lite- 
rature. 

The number of undergraduates at the present time, .(January, 1843,) is nine- 
ty. The whole number of Alumni to 1840, was 1,800. There is a Board of 
Trustees, twenty-four in number. Commencement takes place on the day pre- 
ceding the first Wednesday in October. There are two literary societies con- 
nected with the college, composed of students and graduates, called the Pei- 
tliologian and the Philolcxian societies. 

Tlic Grammar Scliool connpeted with (he college, under the superintendence 
of Professor Anthon, sustains a high reputation: the number of pupils is 
about 200. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 
This Institution was chartered in 1831, and opened for students the follow- 
ing-year. Tlie edifice is .situated on Washington Square; it is built in the 
l^n^lish collegiate style of ari'l'itecture, of whib; marble, and presents an ini- 
posmg front. The number of students in all the departments, in 1842-3, was 
679. The Faculty of Science and Letters consists of the following persons, viz : 

GOVERNING FACULTY OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen, LL. D. Chancellor and Profesor of Moral 
Philosophy and Rhetoric, 

Cyrus Mason, D. D. Professor of the Evidences of Revealed Religion, and 
Rector of the Grammar School. 

B. F. Joslin, M. D. Professor of Mathematics, Natiu-al Philosophv, and As- 
tronomy. 

Tayler Lewis, Esq. A. M. Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 
E. A. Johnson, A. M. Professor of Latin Language and Literature. 

C. S. Henrj', D. D. Professor of Intellectual Philosophy, llistoiy, and Belles 
Letters. 

John W. Draper, M. D. Professor of Chemistry and Natural History. 
Professor Johnson, Secretary of the Faculty. 

20» 



234 COLLEGES. 

PROFESSORS NOT OF THE GOVERNING FACULTY, ARE AS FOLLOWS: 

S. F. B. Morse, Professor of the Litei-ature of the Arts of Design. 

Rev. Georg-e Bush, Professor of Hebrew. 

M. Giraud, Acting- Professor of French Languag-e. 

Julio Soler, Professor of Spanish Language. 

Felix Foresti, Professor of the Italian Language. 
The University, altliough in its infancy, is now quite floui-isliing, and hids 
fair to take a high rank amongst similar institutions in tlie United States. The 
Medical Department and the Grammar School are crowded with pupils from 
all parts of the Union. The Avhole is under the direction of a Council, com- 
posed as follows : 

MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL. 

James Tallmadge, President. 
JohH Johnston, Vice-President. 
Theodore Frelinghuysen, Chancellor. 
Wm. B. Maclay, Secretary. 
Paul Spofford, Treasurer. 

Rev. J. M. Mathews, D. D. William Ciu-tis Noyes, Esq. 

Thomas W. Tucker, Esq. Shepherd Knapp, Esq. 

Hon. MjTidert Van Schaick. Rev. George Potts, D. D. 

E. D. Comstock, Esq. Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen. 

S. S. Howland, Esq. Waldron B. Post, Esq. 

Hon. William Kent. Thomas Suffern, Esq. 

Rev. James Milnor, D. D. John C. Green, Esq. 

David Levitt, Esq. W, W. Chester, Esq. 

Rev. Thomas De Witt, D. D. Hon. James Tallmadge. 

George Griswold, Esq. Rev. W. W. Phillips, D. D. 

William McMurray, Esq. Rev. Thomas H. Skinner, D. D. 

Charles B. Rhodes, Esq. Thomas E. Davis, Esq. 

William B. Maclay, Esq. Pelatiali Perit, Esq. 

Robert Kelley, Esq. Charles Butler, Esq. 

John Johnston, Esq. Paul Spofford, Esq. 

R. T. Haines, Esq. Britain L. Woollej', Esq. 

MEMBERS EX-OFFICIO. 

His Honor the Mayor, and four members of the Common Council. 

The University has been in existence but ten years. In that time, it has 
raised from citizens of New- York about $225,000 for its establishment and sup- 
port; and $113,000 of that sum has been raised in the last four 3'ears for the 
payment of debts, and $35,000 of it witliin the last year. The plan and ar- 
rangements of the University are laid in the ti-ue principles of civil and reli- 
liberty. It was originally intended to be a place open to meritorious youth of 
humble condition and small means. Such it has been and is — about one-half 
of all its under graduates have been of this class; and they have been encour- 
aged without distinction of sect or party. 

We understand that tlie jiresent income covers all expenses, and provides for 
interest on the remaining debt, and Icceps the propert)- in repair. — while it gives 
its professors about $1,500 a j'ear; and their hope of increasing this amount is 
made to depend on their own ability and enterprise. Tlie establishment of the 
New-York Historical Society within the Universitj^ Buildings, gives the so- 
ciety elegant accommodations at a very low price, and to the University ac- 
cess to a library, which with its own makes up some 18,000 volumes. 

THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

The handsome edifice situated on Broadway, called the " Stuyvesant Insti- 
tute," has been purchased and converted into a medical college for this De- 
partment of the University. The Faculty of Medicine connected with this 
department is composed as follows : 

FACULTY OF MEDICINE. 

Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen, Chancellor of the University,— President of 
the Facultj'. 



COLLEGES, 235 

Valentine Mott, M. D. Professor of the Principles, Practice, and Operations 
of Surgery. 

Granville Sharp Pattison, M. D. Professor of General, Descriptive, ami 
Surgical Anatomy. 

Jolin Revere, M. D. Professor of the Theorj- and Practice of Medicine. 

Martyii Paine, M. D. Pi-ofessor of the Institutes of Medicine and Materia 
M^aica. 

Gunninjj S. Bedford, M. D. Professor of Midwifery and Diseases of Women 
and ChiULi-cn. 

John William Draper, M. D. Professor of Chemistry. 

The session of the Medical School commencB on the last Monday in Octo- 
ber, anil continues four months. 

The examinations for degrees, commences on the first of March, and are 
continued daily. 

The followinpf are the requisitions for the Diploma: 

'1st. The candidate must he 21 years of age. 

2d. He must have attended two courses of Medical Lectures; one of which 
must have been delivered in the Medical Dejjartment of the University. 

3d. The candidate must liave stuilied medicine for three years, (the terms of 
attending Lectures being included in these.) under tlie direction of a respecta- 
ble Meilicil Practitioner. 

4th. He must write a Medical Thesis, cither in the English, Latin, or French 
language. 

Candidates who have complied with the above requisitions may graduate, 
either at the Commencement of the Medical Department, Avhich takes place 
early in the month of March, or at the University Commencement in July. 

Fkes. — The ]''ces for a full course of Lectures amount to $105. The student 
can attend one or more of the courses, as he may be disposeil, and pay only for 
the lectures for which he enters. ' • 

The Fee for the Diploma is $30. The Matriculation Fee is $5. The Fee, 
for admission to the Dissecting-Rooms and Demonsti-ation is $5. Although an 
attendance on the dissecting-Rooms is considered by the Faculty to be the 
most desirable, it is not obligatory. 

Respectable boarding may be obtained at from $2 50 to $3 00 per week. 

UNION COLLEGE. 

Foimded in 1795. Situated in Schenectady. The general control of its affairs 
is vesteil in a board of twenty-one trustees, eleven of whom hold their seats by 
virtiic of their offices in the state government. These, at present, are William 
C. IJouck, Governor; Daniel S. Dickinson, Lieutenant-Governor; Reuben H. 
Walworth, LTi.D., Chancellor; Samuel Nelson, Chief Justice, and Greene C 
Bronson and Esek Cowen, Justices of the Supreme Court; Samuel Young, Sec- 
retary of State; Azariah C. Flagg, Comptroller; George P. Barker, Attorney- 
General; Nathaniel Jones, Surveyor-General; and Thomas Farrington, Trea- 
snr»'r. The other ten are the Rev. Elii)halet Nott, D.D., LL.D., President of 
tiie college; Rev. Alexander Proudfit, D.D.; Guert Van Schoonhoven, Esq., 
of Waterfonl; Henry Yates, Esq., of Schenectady; Rev. Mark Tucker, D.D., 
of Troy; Jolm P. Cushman, of Troy ; Rev. Jacob Van Vcchten, D.D., of Sche- 
nectady; Edwaril C. Delavan, Es()., of Uallston; Alonzo C. Paige, Esq., of 
Schenectady; and Jacob L. Lane, of Troy. 

The immediate care and discipline of the institution are exercised bythecol- 
Jege faculty, consisting at present of the following persons: 

Rev. Eliphalet Nott, D.D., LL.D., President. 

Rev. Robert Proudfit, D.D., Prof. Greek and Latin Languages. 

Rev. Alonzo Potter, D.l)., Prof. Rhcf. and Moral Philosophy. 

Rev. John A. Yates, D.D., l*rof. Oriental Literature. 

Isaac W. Jackson, A.M., Prof. Math, and Nat. Phil. 

Rev. Thomas C. Reed, A.M., Prof. Pol. Econ. and Int. Phil. 

J. Louis Tellkanipf, J.U.D.,* Prof. German Lang, ami Lit., and 
Lecturer of Civil Polity and History. 

Rev. John Nott, A.M., A'sst. Prof. Greek and Rhet. 

John Foster, A. M., Asst. Prof. Math. 

* Dr. of Laws of the University of Gottingeu. 



236' COLLEGES. 

Jonathan Pearson, A.M., Asst. Prof. Nat. Phil, and Cliern, 
Robert M. Brown, A.M., Tutor. 
William Kelly, A. L»., '^ 

H. Nott, Register. 

The number of the Senior class graduated at the Commencement on the fourth 
Wednesday in July, lS-12, was ninety-six; and the whole" number on the cata- 
logue of the undergraxluates, for the year which then terminated, was two hun- 
dred and sixty-five. 

Candidates for admission to the Freshmen class, are examined in English, 
Latin, anil Greek grammar; in Virgil, Salhist, Cicero's Select Orations, the 
Gospels in Greek, and Jacob's Greek Reader, and in Arithmetic and Geography. 
For admission to any other class, the examination is made in the studies of the 
preceding class. 

Students are received, also, not as regular members of the college, but to 
prosecute any branch for which they are fitted, provided .they submit to the 
college rules. 

Tlie course of study for the four years, embraces: 1. Rhetoric, Elocution, 
and General Criticism; 2. Ancient Languages; 3. Modern Languages; 4. Ori- 
ental Languages and Literature ; 5. Mathematics; 6. Physical Science; 7. Phy- 
siology, Natural Histoiy, &c. ; 8. Moral and Political Science. 
■ The annual expense for college bills, and board in tiie Commons Hall, is 
$1US to $115; for fuel and light, $8.50; for washing, $6 to $8. 

The college librar}', and other collections of books within its walls, embrace 
about thirteen thousand volumes. 

The college has charily funds which yield rising of $3,000. 

flAMILTON COLLEGE. 

Founded in 1812. Situated in the village of Clmton, in Oneida county, 
and about ten miles from Utica. 

The general control of its affairs is vested in a board of twenty-four trustees,, 
as follows : 

Rev. Henry Davis, D.D., Clinton. John J. Knox, Esq., Augusta. 

George Bristol, Esq., Clinton. Josiah Bacon, Esq., Sangerfield. 

Joshua A. Spencer, Esq., Utica. Hon. S. Newton Dexter, Whitesboro. 

Orin Gridley, Esq,, Clinton. Alexander M. Beebee, Esq., Utica. 

Hon. Hiram Denio, Utica. James R. Lawrence, Esq., Syracuse. 

Charles P. Kirkland, Esq., Utica. Samuel B. Woolworth, Esq.", Homer. 

Sands Higinbotham, Esq., Oneida. Rev. P. Alexis Proal, D.D., Utica. 

Hon. Henry A. Foster, Rome. Seth Hastings, M.D., Clinton. 

Hon. Fortune C. M'^hite, Whitesboro. Azariah Smith, Esq., Manlius. 
. Rev. Simeon North, LL.D., Clinton. Rev. Henry L. Siorrs, Yonkers. 

Hervey Brayton, Esq., Western. Rev, John W. Adams, D.D., Sj'racuse. 

Rev. David L. Ogden, Whitesboro. Rev. Robert W. Condit, Oswego. 

Benjamin W. Dwight, Esq., Clinton, Secretary- and Treasurer. 

The immediate government and discipline of the students, are vested in the 
college faculty, consisting of the following persons: 

Rev. Simeon North, LL.D., President, and Prof. Intellectual Pliil. 
Charles Avery, A.M., Prof. Nat. Philosophy and Ciicmisfry. 
Rev. Henry Mandeville, A.M., Prof. Mor. Phil, and Belles Lot. 
Marcus Catlin, A.M., Prof. IMath. and Astronomy. 
John Finley Smith, A.M., Dexter Prof, of Lang. 
Thomas T. Bradford, A.IM., Tutor and Librarian. 
Tlieodore W. Dwight, A.M., Tutor. 

The Maynard Professorsliip of Law, History, Civil Polity njid Political 
EcoYiomy, endowed by the lale William Maynard, Esq., is vacant. 

Commencement is held on the 4th Wednesday in July. The class last gradu- 
ated numbered twenty; and the whole number of undergraduates on tiie cata- 
logue for the year, was one hundred and twelve. ' 

The studies preparatory to entering the Fresljnian class, are grammar in En- 
glish, Latin, and Greek ; Sallust, or Cffisar ; Virg-Tl, Cicero, Greek Reader, Geo- 
graphy and Arithmetic. 

The course for the four years is nuieh as in other colleges. The necessary- 
annual expense for the first twoyears, is from about $75 to $100; for the last two 
years, about $85 to $113. 

The college library, and other libraries within its walls, embrace about nine 
thousand volumes. 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 



237 



GENEVA COLLEGE. 
Cliartcred in LS25; anil situated on the elcvalcil banks of Seneca Lake, in the 

villapfo of Geneva, Onlai-io count}-. The general control of its affairs is vesteil 

in a boanl of twenty-four trustees, as follow : 

James Rees, Chairman, Abraham Dox, 

William Sieuben DeZeng, James Carler, M.D., 

Herman Hunn Uoi>art, L'owen Whiting-, 

David Hudson, " Thomas Dain Eemall, 

Elijah Miller, Jesse Clark", 

llev. John Churchill Rudd, D.D., Rev.Henry John Whitehouse, D.D. 

Joseph Fellows, Rev. ]?enjamin Hale, D.D., 

Rev. Pierre Paris Trvinj^r, M.A., Rf. Rev. B. T. Onderdonk, D.D., 

Rt. Rev. W. H. Delancey, D.D., Mark Hopkins Sibley, 

Rev. Lucius Smith, M.A., Gavia Lawson Rose, M.D., 

William Kerley Strong-, Nathan B. Kidder, Secretary, 

Robert Carter Nicholas, Samuel L. Edwards. 

Officers of Instruction and Government. 
Rev. Benjamin Hale, D.D., President. 
Faculty of Arts. 
Rev. Benjamin Hale, D.D., Startin Prof, of thp Evidence of Christianitj'. 
Horace Webster, LL.D., Prof. Math, and Nat. Phil. 
Gen. Joseph Gardiner Swift, M. A., Prof. Statistics and Civ. Engineering. 
David Prentice, LL.D., Prof. Lat. and Gr. Lang, and Lit. 
Theodore Irving, M.A., Prof. Histor}', Mod. Lang., and Belles Let. 
James Hadley, M.A., Prof, of Chemistry. 

Rev. Edwaril Bourns, M.A., Adjunct Prof. Lat. and Gr. Lang. 
Henry Lorenzo Low, M,A., Tutor. 

Fticulty of Medicine. 
Thomas Spencer, M.D., Prof of Inst, and Prac. of Med. and Dean of the 

Faculty. 
Charles Broadhead Coventr}-, M.D., Prof. Obst. and Med. Jur. 
James. Webster, M.D., Prof. Anat. and Ph3'siology. 
James Hadley, TVI.D., Prof. Chem. and Pharmacy. 
John De La Mater, M.D., Prof. Mat. Med. and General Pathology. 
Frank Hastings Hamilton, M.D., Prof. Princ. and Prac. Surgery. 
Thomas Rush Spencer, M.D., Adjunct Prof. Mat. Med. and Gen. Path. 
Corytlon La Ford, 1\L D., Demonstrator in Anatomy. 
The annual college commencement is held on the first Wednesday in August, 
and the lirst session of the collegiate year begins on Thursday morning, six 
weeks from the annual commencement. 

College charges, including- room-rent, tuition, &c., $45 for the year; pa3'a- 
ble in advance, $15 at the beginning of each term. 

Tlie annual session of tlie Medical Deiiartment commences on the first Tues- 
day of October and continues sixteen weeks. The fees for all the lectures are 
$G2: payable in advance. The medical commencement is held at the close of 
the session. Fee for the medical degree, $20. 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

This valuable instituti(m is situated on Crosby-street, in the city of New-York, 
wliere lectures are deliveretl by its Professors in the various departments of 
medi<'al science. It is governed by a board of twenty-live trustees, the otficers 
of which are the following: 
S. Augustine Smith, M,D., President. Thomas Cock, M.D., Vice- Prest. 
NicoU H. Dering, M.D., Registrar. Fanning C. Tucker, Treasurer. 

Faculty of the Coflkge. 
J. Augustine Smith, 1\LD., Professor of Physiology. 
Joseph M. Smiih, IM.D., Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medi- 
cine and Clinical Medicine. 
John B. Beck, JM.D., Prof, of Materia Medica and Med. Jurisprudence. 



238 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 



John Torrey, M.D., Profes3or of Chemistry and Botany. 

Robert Watts, Jr., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Willard Parker, M.D., Professor of the Principles and Practice of Sur- 
gery and Surgical Anatomy. 

Cliandlep R. Gilman, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and the Diseases of 
Women and Children. 

James Quaclienboss, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

The winter session, (sub-graduate course,) begins annually on 1l:e first Mon- 
day of November, and continues until the lirst of the following Marcii. The 
fee for the full course of lectures by all the Professors, is $108 : but the students 
are not required to lake out all tlie tickets, during- one session. The Matricu- 
lation fee is fi-'5,_and entitles the student to the use of the college library. Gra- 
duation fee, $2o. 

Practical Anatomy. 

To make the college a more thorough school of Practical Anatomy, the Re- 
gents of tlie University have established a Demonstrator's or Dissecting Room 
Ticket. Tlie room will be opened on the tirst Monday of October, under the 
general supervision of the Professor of Anatomy. 

The Demonstrator will attend at such hours during the daj^ and evening as 
may be convenient to- his class. Attendance in this dissecting-room and at the 
the Demonstrations, is optional; but every student is earnsstly advised to avail 
himself of the opportunity. Tickets, $5. 

Private roonis are provided, at a small expense^ for physicians who may wish 
to dissect. 

Graduation. 
• Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine must have attended two full 
courses of lectures, the last in this college; the}- must also have studied Medi- 
cine for three j'ears, under the direction of a regular pliysician, and have at- 
tained the age of twentj'^-one. Certificates of time and age must be furnished. 
Each candidate is required to write a Thesis on some subject connected with 
the science of Medicine, and to hand it in previous to his examination. 

The examination of candidates takes place semi-annually: that for graduat- 
ing in the spring, commences on the first of March, and that for graduation in 
the fall, on the second Tuesday in September. 

Students have access to the New-York Hospital for a fee of if:6, which also 
entitles them to the use of the library, and they have free access to the practice 
of the New-York Eye Infirmary. 

ALBANY MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

The Albany Medical College was chartered February 16, 1839. The charier 
empowers the trustees to confer the degree of Doctor of Medicine, on the re- 
commendation of the faculty and of three of the curators. 

• The college edifice, which is of brick, three stories high, 120 feet front by 
50 feet deep, belongs, with its grounds, to the corporation of the city of Alba- 
ny, and has been leased to the trustees of the college for twenty years, at the 
nominal rent of $1 per year. It is very eligibly situated in Eagle-street, at a 
short distance from the Capitol. 

The expense of fitting up the building, and providing the necessary appara- 
tus, was defrayed by the voluntary contributions of tlie citizens of Albany. 
Since that time, the Legislature has api-)ropriaied flOjOOO for improving the 
building, musuem and library. Of this sum S10,(X)0 have already been expend- 
ed, and ilie college possesses new facilities for demonstrations and for study, 
at least equal to those found in any other Medical ' ollege in this country. 

The Museum contains a great number of specimens of healthy and morbid 
Human Anatomy, of Comparat' \ e Anatomy, of Zoology, and of Mineralogy. 
It contains also a full set of Dr. Thibert's beautifvil models of Pathological 
Anatomy, and Dr. Au/.oux's mannikins and models of healthy anatomy. It is 
at all times open to students, for the purjioscs of studj'. 

Besides the library for reference, a collection of all the standard elementary 
works is set apart for the use of the students during their attendance on lectures, 
without any charge. 

Ample opportunities are afforded for the studj' of Practical Anatomy. Satnr- 
daysare devoted to clinical instruction, and students have an opportimity of see- 
ing a great number of cases of disease, and of witnessing surgical operation*. 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 239 

The annual course of lectures commences on the first Tuesday in October, 
■and continues sixteen weeks. Six lectures are deli vereil daily, during- the course . 
The fees for a full course of lectures, are $70. The Matriculation fee is $5. 
The Graduation fee is $20. 

The requirements for graduation are the same as at other incorporated medi- 
cal scliools in this state. 

Tile following are tlie names of the Faculty Professors : 
Offickus. 
Alden March, M.D., Presidents 
Thomas Ilun, M.D., Registrar. 
T. Romeyn Beck, M.D., Librarian. 
Professors. 
Alden IVIareh, M.D., Prof, of the Principles and Practice of Surgery. 
James M'Naughton, M.D., Prof, of Theory and Practice of Medicine. 
T. Romeyn Beck, M.D., Prof, of Materia Mediea. 
Ebeiiezer Emmons, M.D., Prof, of Obstetrics and Natural History, 
Lewis C. Beck, M.D., Prof, of Chemistry and Pharmacy. 
James H. Armsby, M.D., Prof, of Anatomy. 
Thomas Him, M.D., Prof, of (lie InsUtutes of Medicine. 
Amos Dean, Esq., Prof, of Medical Jurisprudence. 
Curators. 
Piatt Williams, M.D., Mason F. Cogswell, M.D., 

Barent P. Staats, M.D., Peter M^Naughton, M.D., 

James P. Boyd, ]\I.D, 

NEW-YORK STATE MEDICAL SOCIETY. 

The act to incorporate Medical Societies, for the purpose of regulating t!ie 
practice of Physic and Surgery in this state, vvaS passed the 4tli of April, 1806. 
Under this act the Medical Society of t?.e State of New- York organised in 
February, 1807. 
The following are its officers for the present year, elected Feb. 7th5 1843: 
Dr. Samuel White, of Hudson, President. 
" Joel A. Wing, Vice-President. 
'"' Peter Van Oiinda, Secretary. 
" Piatt Williams, Treasurer. 

Censors. 
Southern District. Middle District. 

Dr. James R. Manley, Dr. John McCall, 
" Edward G. Ludlow, " Arba Blair, 

'■ John G. Morgan. <' Ariel Spafard. 

Eastern District. Western District. 

Dr. Jonathan Eights, Dr. Alexander Thompson, 
" Peter Wendell, " Harman Van Dusen, 

•• Carent P. Staats. *' Maltby Strong. 

Permanent Members. 
Dr. Lester Green, of Herkimer, Dr. E. B. Burroughs, of Madison. 

Honorary Members. 
Dr. Enoch Hale, of Boston, Dr. William Parker, of New-York. 

Committee of Correspondence. 

Dr. Chandler R. Oilman, 1st Senate District. 

" A. G. Benedict, 
" Chas. S. J. Goodrich, 
" Daniel Ayres, 
" Reuben Goodale, 
" William I). Purple, 
" George W. Bradford, 
*' Odin Benedict, 

Committee of Publication. 
Dr. T. Romeyn Beck, Dr. James McNaughton, and Dr. Joel A. Wing. 

Committee on Prize Questions. 
Dr. James McNaughton, Dr. Jonathan Eights, and Dr. T. Rom^n Beck. 



2tl 


do 


3d 


do 


4th 


do 


5th 


do 


6th 


do 


7th 


do 


8th 


do 



'240 MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 

The society is composed of one delea:ate from each county that has a medi- 
cal society organised, and sends a delegate to the state society, and the society 
elects annLially two permanent members and two honorary members. The 
delegates are elected by their county societies to serve for four years. 

To afford facility in the examination Of candidates for License to practice, 
the state is divided into four Censor Districts, the southern, eastern, middle 
and western. 

The Southern, composed of the 1st and 2d Senate Districts. 
" Eastern, " '•' 3d and 4th do 

" Middle, " " 5th and 6th do 

" Western, " " 7th and 8th do 

Three Censors are appointed in each of these districts. 

The society publishes its transactions annually, together with the annual ad- 
dress of the President, Prize Essays, and such communications as are i-eceived 
from members and from coimty societies. 

Its funds are derived from diplomas to its licentiates and voluntary contri- 
butions from county societies to the prize fimd. 

BLOOMINGDALE LUNATIC ASYLUM. 
(Connected with the New-York Hospital.) 

The Bloomingdale Asylum for the Insane is pleasantly situated near the 
banks of the Hudson River, distant seven miles from the city of New- York, 
and has attached to it forty acres of land, laid out in gardens, pleasure 
groimds, gravel walks and farm lots, well adapted to the imfortunate inmates. 

The building is erected on one of the most elevated and healthy sites on the 
Island, and sufficiently retired for the comfort and convenience of the pa- 
tients. . 

These are under the immediate superintenilence of a skilful physician, who 
has devoted a number of years to this particular branch of medical science, 
and has visited the various lunatic establishments in England, France and 
Italy; examining the condition of the patients, and inquiiing minutely into 
the mode of treatment pursued therein. 

The ordinary affairs of the house are managed by a warden and mati'on, 
and a sufficient number of kind and careful nurses, are always ready to attend 
to the wants and comforts of the patients. 

The whole establishment is under the general direction of a Committee 
taken from and appointed by the Board of Governors of the New-York Hos- 
pital. 

HUDSON LUNATIC ASYLUM. 

This asylum was established in 1830, by Dr. Samuel "White, of the city of 
Hudson. It is a spacious stone structure, pleasantly situated on one of the back 
streets of the city, which is distinguished for salubrity, and the physical cir- 
cumstances of position, air, water, prospect and general tranquility, are all 
favorable to the object of such an institution. 

Since the establishment of this asylum, it has received 580 patients in all. 
During the year 1842, the number received was 71. Of these 12 had recently 
become insane, 10 of whom wei'e cured, and the other two were recovering.. 
Of the 22 cases of long standing, four were cured, two were recovering, 15 
were much benefited, and one died. 

This asylum is a private institution, and the patients are under the immedi- 
ate charge of the proprietors. Dr. S. White, a physician of established repu- 
tation and great experience, and his son. Dr. George H. White. Their testi- 
mony concurs with that of all others, who have had the management of ^the 
insane, on the modern system of moral treatment combined with regim'en, 
air, exercise and medicines when the bodily condition requires them, namely, 
that cases of recent insanity can almost always be cured, but that they sooner 
become chronic and inveterate than mere bodily disease. 



rnEOLOulCAL INSTITUTIONS. 211 

THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTlOxNS. 



HAMILTON LITERARY AND THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTION, 

Chartered in 1819, ami situated in the village of Hamilton, . in Madison 
county. Tlie general control is vesteil in a Uoanl of 30 Trustees, as follows: 

BOARD OK TRUSTEES. 

Seneca B. Burchard, President^ Hamilton, 
Palmer Townsend, i New-York, 

W'm. Col-fate, | " 

Wni. Cobb, > Vice-Prests. Hamilton, 

Friend Humphrey, | Albany, 

Henry Tower, j Waterville, 

Nathaniel Kendrick, Corresponding:. Secretary, Hamilton, 
Beriah N. Leach, Recording Secretary, •' 

Alvan Pier-cc, Treasurer, " 

Edward Bright, .jr.. Homer, Abraham Spear, Macedon, 

Uriah Hobby, Wliitesboro', Charles W. Houghton, New-York, 

Henry Edwards, rayetteville, A. Simons, Hamilton, 

Charles Walker, Burlington, David McWliorter, Pitcher, 

A. G. Smith, Rochester, George Cursiss, Utica, 

bniith Sheldon, Albany, Archibakl Campell, Hamilton, 

James M. Cassells, Earlville, AVm. Coolitlge, Madison, 

Erastus Vilas, Ogdensburgh, I. Briggs, Hamilton, 

Daniel Eldridge, Perry, J. Edmunds, jr., Hamilton, 

John ]\Iunro, Elbridge, P. R. Gorton, Wooilstock, 

James Cauldwell, Wliitesboro', 

A. Simons, Registrar and Steward. 
•The immediate governnifnt anil instruction of tl.e i)upils are vested in a 
facuKy as follows: 

FACULTY. 

Rev. Nathaniel Kendi-ick, D.D., Prof, of Systematic and Pastoral Theology. 

Rev. John S. Maginnis, Professor of Biblical Theology. 

Rev. Thomas J. Conant, Prof, of Hebrew & of Biblical Criticism & Interp. 

Rev. George W. Llaton, Professor of Civil and Ecclesiastical History. 

Rev. Asahel C. Kendrick, Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

Stephen W. Taylor, Professor of Mathematics and Natural Pliilosophy. 

John F. Richardson, Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

.hihn H. R;iynioiid, Professor of Rhetoric and of the English Language. 

I'hiletus B. Sj)eai', Atljunct Pi'ofessor of Hebrew. 

(icorge R. Bliss, Tutor in Greek Philology. 

There are three departments at this institution, viz : The Academic, ihe 
Collegiate, anil the Theological. The catalogue for 1842-3, shows, in the Isl, 
'.<i students; in the 2d, 153; and in the 3d, 25; making in all 214. 

The Academic department embraces a course of study strlcily classical, ex- 
tending through tv/o years, and requiring, as prc[)aratory to admission, tliaf 
the most thorough course of English studies e\er pursued in our best common 
schools should have been completed. 

The Collegiate department embraces much the same course as other colleges 
in our country, though rather more extensive than some of them, if we may 
judge from the syllabus. 

The Theological department embraces two distinct coui-ses of study, one 
designated the " Shorter Course,'- aibptcd to students somewhat advanced in 
life as well as attainments; and the other a very full circle of stuilies, com- 
I>rehending every branch of learning deemed essential to make an accom- 
plished teacher of the Christian doctrine and i>ractice, church discipline, and 
p;is(oraJ du(v. 

21 



242 THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTIONS. 

Though this institution is placed under the particular patronage and control ■ 
of the Baptists, yet it is open, like most other seats of learning among us, to 
students having the Christian ministry in view, of all denominations. 

One of the peculiarities of this institution, and a very commendable one, is 
& regular and systematic instruction in sacred music. 

The annual commencement is held on the 3d Wednesday in August. 
. The total annual expense, including all charges necessary to be paid to the 
institution, is, iii the Academic department $74, in the Collegiate department 
§84; and in the Theological department $54. 

Connected with the institution is a farm of 130 acres, and a joiners' shop. 

ONEIDA CONFERENCE SEMINARY. 

Founded by the Methodists, and situated in the village of Cazenovia, Madi- 
«on county. 

The Faculty having the immediate government and instruction of the stu-' 
ienta, are as follow : 

Rev. George Peck, A.M. Principal and Teacher of Hebrew. 

Rev. Nelson Rounds, A.M. Teacher of Ancient Languages. 

P. B. Wilder, Professor of Natural Science. 

O. Blanchard, Teacher of Mathematics. 

H. M. Johnson, Preceptor of the English Department. 

Miss Elizabeth A. Taylor, Preceptress. 

Miss M. M. Baber, Teacher of Music. 

AUBURN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 

Incorporated in 1820, having been organized in 1819, by the Presbyterians. 
Situated in tlie village of Auburn, Caj^uga coimty. Tlie general control of the 
institution is vested in a board of 14 trustees as follow : 

TRUSTEES. 

Rev. Levi Parsons, Horace Hill, 

Rev. Seth Smith, John Porter, 

Rev. Miles P. Squier, Rev. Henry Dwight, 

Abijah Fitch, Hiram F. Mather, , 

Jabez Goodsell, J. S. Seymour, 

Rev. Josiah Hopkins, Eleazer Hills, 

Rev. L. E. Lathrop, Rev. Washington Thatcher, 

Henry Ivison, Treasurer and Clerk, 
J. H. Hardenbergh, Auditor. 

FACULTY. 

Rev. James Richards, D.D., Richards Professor of Christian Theology. 
Rev. Henry Mills, D. D., Professor of Biblical Criticism. 
Rev. Luther Halsey, D.D., Prof. Ecclesiastical History and Church Polity. 
P^ev. Baxter Dickinson, D.D., Bellamy and Edwards Prof. Sacred Rhet, and 
Pastoral Theology. 

The course of study extends through three years, and embraces a wide 
i-ange of learning. 

The library contains a valuable collection of rising 5,000 volumes. The 
necessary expenses of the students are moderate. 

HARTWICK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 

Incorporated in 1815, and situated in the village of Hartwick, Otsego coun- 
ty, on one of the tributaries of the Susquehannah. It was endowed with $80,- 
(XX) by John Christopher Hartwicif, a Lutheran, and it is under the patronage 
of the Lutheran denomination of Christians. It has a library of rising 1,(XX) 
volumes. G. B. Miller, A.M., is Principal. 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF THE ASSOCIATE REFORMED 
CHURCH OF NEW-YORK. 

Neu'burgh, Orange county. 

This institution was incorporated in 1836, and is now in a flourishing con- 
dition, under the management of competent professor». 



THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTIONS. 



243 



(;E^fEI^AL THICOLOCICAL seminary of the PROTESTANT EPIS- 
COPAL CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES, 

Located in the City of New- York. 
niis institution is sitiiatOil in thai part of the cily called Chelsea, on 20th-8t., 
ne.ir the Nintli Avenue, 2,j miles from the City Hull. There are two substan- 
tial edifices of stone .for the accommodation of the professors and students. 
The board of trustees consists of all the IJishops of tlie Episcopal Church, ea» 
ojjicio; one other (nistce from each diocese, and one additional for every eight 
clergymen in each diocese. There is a standing' committee, composed equally 
of clergymen and laymen, 'vvitli a treasurer and secrctai-y, who manage Uie af- 
fairs of the institution. 

Profkssors t 
Rt. Rev. RenJ. T. Onderdonk, D.D., Professor of the Nature, Mini*- 
frj- and Polity of the Church; and ex officio Chairman of the faculty. 
Rev. Samuel H. Turner, D.D., Professor of Biblical Learning and tJi« 

Tnlerprefation of Scripture. 
Rev. Bird Wilson, D.D., Professor of Systematic Divinity. 
Clement C. Moore, liL.D., Professor of Oriental and Greek Lit. 
Rev. Jolm D. Ogilby, Professor of Ecclesiastical History.* 
Rev. Benjamin I. Haight, Professor of Pulpit Eloquence. • 

There are three classes in the Seminary, called Senior, MidiUe, and Junior, 
in each of which the term of study is one year. 
This instilutiou is in a highly flourishing condition. 

UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 

J'oi.T ! • i 1S']6; and opened for students the same year. The edifice is of 
lirick, s 'iiated in University Place, near Washington Square. It contains a 
chapel, library, four lecture rooms, and private rooms sufficient for fortj' stu- 
tlenfs. Every student is subject to a charge of ten dollars per annum, which 
covers the whole expense for rooms, library and instruction. The library 
consists of sixteen thousand volumes. It was purchased complete in Germany, 
from the heirs of Rev. Leander Van Eppn, a distinguished theologitwi. Th» 
books are extremely rare and valuable. This institution is under the govern- 
ment of a board of directors, composed of members of the Presbj'terian Church ; 
bat tlic Seminary is open to students of all Cliristian denominations. 

Faculty : 
Rev. Henry White, D.D., Professor of Systematic Theology. 
Rev. Edward Robinson, D.D.,t Professor of Biblical Literature, and 

Librarian. 
Rev. Absalom Peters, D.D., Professor of Homiletics, Pastoral Theo- 
logy, and Church (Jo\-ernment. 

Rev. Samuel H. Cox, D.D., Professor Ecclesiastical History. ., 

Rev. William Patton, D.D., Professor Pastoral Theology. 
W. Wadden Turner, Instructer in the Elements of Hebrew and tlie 
Cognate Languages. 
TJie number of students connected with this institution at the present time, 
(January, lSt.'5,) is one hundred and foui'. Although of recent existence, this 
Seminar}' already enjoys a higli reputation for the advantages it affords to theo- 
logical students, in its valuable library, and the learning and ability of its pro- 
fessors. It has been liberally endowed by merchants and others of the city of 
New-York. 

* This Professorship was endowed by Peter G. Stuyvesant, Esq., and is styled liie 
'•St. Mark's Clinrch in the Bowery Professorship." 

t This gcDtleman is greatly disiinguished by bis Travels ia Palestine, Ac. 



244 COLLEGIATE • SCHOOLS. 

COLLEGIATE SCHOOLS. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE. 
.This is a. Roman Catliolic institution, pleasantly situated at Rose Hill, in 
Westchester county, near the village of Fordham, about 12 miles from the city 
of Nevv-Yoric, on the line of the Harlem Rail-road. The grounds connected 
with it are extensive, anil higiily improved. The prospectus issued by its con- 
ductors, states that the system of government is mild and paternal, yet firm, 
and that the utmost atiention will be paid to the moral as well as iniellectual 
cidture of its pupils. Tlie domestic duties of the establishment are confided to 
the Sisters of Charity.* 

The regular course of studies embraces the Hebrew, Greek, Latin, French, 
and English languages; Poetry, Rhetoric, History, Mytliology, Geograpiiy, 
Book -Keeping, Arithmetic, Algebra, Mathematics, Moral anil Natural Philo- 
sophy ; and when requesteil by parents or guardians, the studies of pupils will 
be specially directed to an enlightened preparation for commercial pursuits.^ 
German, Spanish, and Italian, will also be taught when desired, but at an extra 
charge. The collegiate year begins on the first Monday in September, and 
ends on the 15th of July. 

The charge for board, including washing, mending, and lodging, and for the 
regular course of studies, is J20U per annum. 
The officers and teachers are as follows : 

Rev. John Harley, A.M., Pi-esident and Prof, of Rhetoric and Belles 

Lettres. 
Rev. Ambrose Manahan, D.D., Vlce-Pres't and Professor of Grcr-lc 

and Mathematics. 
Rev. Felix Vilanis, D. D., Professor of Moral Philosophy and ilob. 
Rev. Edward O'Neill, A.B., Treasurer and Professor of Natural Phi- 
losophy and Chemistry. 
Rev. Bernard A. Llaneza, Professor of Spanisli. 
Mr. John J. Conroy, A.M., Professor of Latin. 
Mr. John Harley, A.M., Prefect of Discipline and Professor of Book- 

Keeping. 
Mr. Oertel, Professor of German. 
Mr. Maedonnell, Professor of French. 
Besides the above mentioned, there are six tutors, competent to assist in the 
various departments. 

The Institution was first opened for the reception of studei^ts on the 21ih of 
June, 1S41. 

ST. PAUL'S COLLEGE. 

This Institution is situated at College Point, Flushing, Long Island; and 
is under the particular patronage oi^' the Protestant Episcopal ilenoniinatiou. 
The following list of teachers, and their several departments, will indicate tlie 
course of studies. 

Rev. Wm. A. Muhlenberg, D.D., Rector, Senior of the College Fa- 
mily, Prof, of the Evidences and I2thics of Christianity. 
Rev. Christian F. Cruse, D.D., Prof, of the Hebrew, Greek and Latin 

Languages. 
Charles Gill, Prof. Mathematics and Natural Philosophj'. 
J. G. Barton, Assist. Prof, of Greek and Latin Languages. 
Newton Maj', M.D., Prof. f:hemistry and Mineralogy, and Resident 

Physician of the Institution. 
Rev. L. Van Bokkelen, Secretary, and Assistant Teacher of Greek and ' 

Latin. 
Milo Malian, Instructor of Greek and Latin, and Mathematics. 
Augustine Boursand, Instructor of the French Language. 
T. K. "Wharton, Prof, of Drawing and Perspective. 
J. Augustus Lander, Prof, of Music. 
There are also several Assistant Teachers in the Grammar School. 
All the Professors and Teachers reside at the Institution. 



COLLEGIATE SCHOOLS, 245 

ST. THOMAS' HALL. 

Tliis is an institution, situated in Flushing-, L. I., for the education of boys, 
under the patronage of the Episcopalians, anil is said to bo in a flourishing con- 
dition. It has two departments, classical and commercial. 

Rev. Francis L. Ilawkes, D.D., is tlie Proprietor and Rector. 

ST. ANN'S HALL. 

Tliis institution, also in Flushing-, L. I. is designed for the oihication of girls, 
and is said to be in a flourishing condition. Its course of studies is much the 
same as in other female seminaries of reputation. It is under the patronage of 
the Ejiiscopalians. The Rev. .John F. Scla-ocder is Principal. 

POUGIIKEEPSIE COLLEGIATE SCHOOL. 

(Established in November, 1836.) 

This institution is beautifully situated on a commanding eminence, called 
"College Hill," a little removed from the compact part of the flourisliing vil- 
lage of Poughkecpsie, and enjoys a high reputation under its enlightened Prin- 
cipal, Mr. Charles Burtlett. 

The course of study embraces, besides the ordinary rudiments. Grammar, 
Geography, Rhetoric, Logic, Mathematics, History, Natural Philosophy, Po- 
litical Eeonomj', < ivil Polity, French and Spanisli, and for those who are in- 
tended for College, Greek and Latin. Tliere is an extensive gj^mnasium al- 
taclied to this Institution, for the use of the pupils. 

Tiie mode of governing and training the juipils. is adapted to the develop- 
ment and invigoration of the moral sentiments and to the formation of chai-ac- 
ter on sound principles. 

The annual expense is $2130 for each pupil. This includes all charges, for 
tuition, boarding, lodging, and every thing except music and drawing. 

RUTGERS FEMALE INSTITUTE. 

Incorjiorated in 18;^. The buildings are on Madison-street, near Clinton. The 
number of pupils in November, IS 12, was four hundred and nine. 

Tlie faculty consists of the following persons : 

Charles E. West, A.M., Professor of Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and 
Chemistry, Principal. 

D. Garilner, M.D., Professor of Botany and Geology. 

E. Ives, Jr., Professor of Music. 

W. Woronzotr Uuseh, Prof, of German. 

Julio Soler, I'rofessor of Spanish and Italian. 

Mademoiselle Rosine Gii-aud, Instructress in French. 

Miss Elizabeth Purr, " Drawing and Tainting. 

There are eighteen other female teachers in the various dcjiartmenls. There 
is a Board of Trustees, of which Rev. Isaac Ferris, D.D., is President. Com- 
mittee's of the Hoard- visit the Institute every month, and examine critically all 
the departments.. The object of tlie institution is to afford a complete education 
to the pupils, by passing them through seven distinct departments, the last of 
which is called tlie "Collegiate," comprising the highest English stuiiies pur- 
sued in colleges. 

BLACK RIVER LITERARY AND RELIGIOUS INSTITUTION. 

(Watertown, Jefferson Co.) 
This is a -well ordered and flourishing seminary of learning, numbering en 
an average 180 pupils, in the different departments. 



21' 



246 



ACADEMIES. 



ACADEMIES. 



The following tables and remarks show the whole number of Incorporated 
Acatlemies, and various interesting particulars connected with them, in this 
state, and subject to the visitorial authority of tlie Regents of the State Uni- 
versity. They are taken from the last Annual Report of the Regents, dated 
Marcii 1, 1843. 

CATALOGUE OF THE ACADEMIE.S REPORTING IN 1843, 

With the towns or incorporated villages, andmuntiesin whichthey are established. 



Names of Academies. 



First District. 

Erasmus Hall Academy, 

Grammar School of Columbia College, 

Grammar School of the University of N. Y. 
New-York Inst, for the Deaf and Dumb, . . 
Rutgers Female Institute, 

Total, 5 

Second District. 

Amenia Seminar}^, 

Clinton Academy, 

Dutchess County Academy, 

Farmers' Hall Academy, 

Hempstead Seminary, 

Kingston Academy, . . r 

Montgomery Academy, 

Mount Pleasant Academy, 

Newburgh Academy, 

New Paitz Academy, 

North Salem Academy, 

Peekskill Academy, 

Redhook Academy, 

Rhinebeck Academy, 

Ridgobury Academy, 

Union Hall Academy, 

West Town Academy, . . . 

Total, 17 

Third District. 

Albany Academy, 

Albany Female Academy, 

Albany Female Seminary, 

Claverack Academy, 

Coxsackie Academy, 

Delaware Academy, 

Delaware Literary Institute, 

Greenbush and Schodack Academy, 

Greenville Academy, 

Hudson Academy, 

Jefferson Academy, 

Kinderhook Academy, 

Knoxville Academy, 

Lansingburgh Academy, 

Schenectady Lyceum and Academy, 

Schoharie Academy, 



Flatbush, 

City of New-York, 

do 

do 

do 



Town. 



County. 



Amenia, , 

Easthampton, . . . . , 
Poughkeepsie, . . . 

Goshen, 

Hempstead, 

Kingston, 

Monigomeiy, . . . . 
Mount Pleasant, . , 

Newburgh, 

New Paltz, 

North Salem, . . . . , 

Peekskill, 

Upper Redhook,. 

Rhinebeck, , 

Ridgebury, 

Jamaica, - 

West To^vn, 



Albany city, 

do 

do 

Claverack, 

Coxsackie, 

Delhi, ,. 

Franklin, 

Greenbush, 

Greenville, 

Hudson city, 

Jefferson, 

Kinderhook, .... 

Knox, 

Lansingburgh,. . . 
Schenectady city, 
Schoharie, 



Kings. 
New-York. 

do. 

do. 

do. 



Dutchess. 

Suffolk. 

Dutchess: 

Orange. 

Queens. 

Ulster. 

Orange. 

Westchester. 

Orange. 

Ulster. 

Westchester. 

do 
Dutchess. 

do. 
Orange. 
Queens. 
Orange . 



Albany. 

do. 

do. 
Columbia. 
Greene. 
Delaware. 

do. 
Rensselaer. 
Greene. 
Columbia. 
Schoharie. 
Columbia. 
Albany. 
Rensselaer. 
Schenectady. 
Schoharie. 



ACADEMIES. 



247 



Names of Academics. 



Toirn. 



Troy Academy, 

Troy Female Academy, 

Total, 18 

Fourth District. 

Ames Academy, 

Amsterdam Female Seminarj^, 

Arg-jie Academj^, 

Cambridg'e Washington Academy, ,.. 

Canajoliiirie Academy, 

Canton Academy, 

Essex County Academy, 

I'airfield Academy, 

Fort Covington Academy, 

Franklin Academy, 

(ialway Academy, 

(Men's Falls Academy, 

Gouverneur Wesleyan Seminary, 

(xranville Academy, 

Herkimer Academy, 

J ohnstovvn Academy, 1 

Keesville Acailemy, 

Ogilensburgh Academy, 

Plattsburg'h Academy, 

St. Lawrence Academy, 

Scluiylerville Academy, 

Stillwater Academy, 

Union Village Academy, .' . 

Washington Academy, 

Waterford Academy, 

Total, 25 

Fifth District. 

Augusta Academy, 

Black River Lrtterary & Religious Institute, 

Cherry Valley Academy, 

Clinton Grammar School, 

Clinton Liberal Institute, 

Clinton Seminary, 

De I^ancy Institute, 



Troy citv, . 
do'. . 



Ames, 

Amsterdam, 

Argyle, 

Cambridge, 

Canajoharie, 

Canton, 

Westport, 

Fairfield, 

Fort Covington, . . 

Malone, 

Galway, 

Glen'sFalls, 

Gouverneur, 

North Granville,. . 

Herkimer, 

Johnstown, 

Keesville, 

Ogdensburgh, . . . . 

Piattsburgh, 

Potsdam, 

Schuylerville, 

Stillwater, 

Union Village, . . . 

Salem, 

Waterford, 



County. 



De Ruy ter Institute, 

Fulton Academy, 

Gilbertsvillc Academy & Collegiate Inst.. . 

Hamilton Academj"^, 

Ilartwick Seminary, 

Hobart Hall Institute, 

Lowvillo Academy, 

Oneida Conferance Seminary, 

Oneiila Institute, 

Rensselaer Oswego Academj-, 

Union Literary Soc. of Ellisburgh, 

Utica Academy, 

Utica Female Academy, 

Vernon Academy, 

Whitesboro' Academy, 

Total, 22 

Sixth District. 

Alfred Academy, 

Binghamton Academy, 

Elmira Academy, ...., 

Franklin Academy, 

Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, 

Grotoo Academy, 



Rensselaer, 
do. 



Montgomery. 

do. 
Washington. 

do. 

Montgomery. 
St. Lawrence. 
Essex. 
Herkimer. 
Franklin. 

do. 
Saratoga. 
Warren. 
St. Lawrence. 
Washington. 
Herkimer. 
Fulton. 
Clinton. 
St. Lawrence. 
Clinton. 
St. Lawrence. 
Saratoga. 

do. 
Washington. 

do. 
Saratoga. 



Augusta, 

Watertown, . . . 
Cherry Valley, . . . 
Clinton, 

do 

do 

Hampton, town of 
Westmoreland, 

De Ruyter, 

Fulton, 

Gilbertsvillc, 

Hamilton, 

Hartwick, 

Holland Patent,... 

Lowville, . 

Cazenovia, 

Whitesboro', .... 

Mexico, 

Ucllville, 

Utica city, 

do 

Vernon, 

Whitcsboi'O-, . . . . 



Alfred Centre, . 
Binghamton, . . 

Elmira, 

Prattsburgh, . . . 

Lima, 

Groton, 



Oneida. 
Jefferson. 
Otsego. 
Oneida. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Madison. 
Oswego. 
Otsego. 
Madijon. 
Otsego. 
Oneida. 
Lewis. 
Madison. 
Oneida. 
Oswego. 
JeCTerson. 
Oneida. 

do. 

do. 

do. 



Allegany. 

Broome. 

Chemung. 

Steuben. 

Livingston. 

Tompkins. 



248 



AC.'iDEMLES. 



Names of Academics. 



Ithaca Academy, 

Livingston County High School, 

Oxford Academy, 

Owego Acaxlemy, 

Sherburne Union Academy, ...^ 

Total, 11 

Seventh District. 

Auburn Academy, 

Auburn Female Seminary, 

Canandaigua Academy, 

Cayuga Academy, , 

Co?tland Academy, 

Cortlandville Academy, 

East Bliwmfield Acadcm}'-, ....... 

Faj'etteville Academy, 

Jordan Academy, 

Manlius Academy, 

Moravia Institute, 

Munroe Academy, 

Onondaga Academy, 

Ontario Female Seminary, 

Ovid Academy, 

Pompey Academy, 

Seneca Falls Academy, 

Syracuse Academy, » 

Waterloo Academy, 

Total, 19 

Eighth District. 

Albion Academy, 

Alexander Classical School, 

Aurora Academy, 



Tov:n. 



Ithaca, .... 
Geneseo. .. 
Oxford, '. . . 
Owego, ,.. 
Sherburne, 



County. 



Tompkins. 

Livingston. 

Chenango. 

Tioga. 

Chenango. 



Auburn, [Cayuga. 

do do. 

Canandaigua, Ontario. 

Aurora, Cayuga. 

Homer, Cortland. 

Cortlandville, .... do. 

East Bloomiield, . . k)ntario. 

Fayetteville, Onondaga, 

Jordan, do. 

Manlius, do. 

Moravia, ICayuga. 



Elbriilge, 

Onondaga Hollow. 

Canandaigua, 

Ovid, 

Pompey, 

Seneca Falls, 

Syracuse, 

Waterloo, 



Onondaga. 

do. 
Ontario. 
Seneca. 
Onondaga .^ 
Seneca. 
Onondaga. 
Seneca. 



Albion, Orleans. 

Alexander, Genesee, 

Aurora, town of | 

WillinkjIErie. 
Bafavia, ? Genesee, 



Bethany, 
Broekport, .. 
Buffalo city,. 
Clark son, ... 
Fredonia, 



do. 
Monroe. 
Erie. 
Monroe. 
Chautauque- 



Gaines, ; Orleans. 



Batavia Female Academy, 

Bethany Academy, 

Broekport Collegiate Institute, 

Buffalo Literary and Scientific Academy,. 

Clarkson Academy, 

Fredonia Academy, 

Gaines Academy, 

Jamestown Academy, 

Le Roy Female Seminary, 

Lewiston Academy, 

Mayville Academy, • 

Mendon Academy, .« 

Middlebury Academy, 

Millville A cademy, 

Perry Centre Institute, 

Phipps Union Seminary, 

Rochester Collegiate Institute, 

Rochester Female Academy, 

Seward Female Seminary, 

Springville Academy, 

Westfield Academy, 

Yates Academy, 

Total, 25 

The whole number of Academies in the foregoing list is 142. Besides 
these, however, there are 17 others, not included in the list, because their an- 
nual reports were not made to the Regents. Those 17 are as follow: In 2d 
District, Oyster Bay Academy, Piermont Academy, Poughkeepsie Classical 
School, Poughkeepsie Female Academy, Sullivan County Academy, and 



Jamestown, ,. 

Le Roy, 

Lewiston, 

Mayville, 

Mendon, 

Middlebury, 

Millville^ ■ 

Perry Centre, ... 

Albion, 

Rochester city, . . 

do 

do 

Springville, 

Westfield, 

Yates Centre, . . . . . 



Chautauque, 

Genesee. 

Niagara. 

Chautauque. 

Monroe. 

Wyoming. 

Orleans. 

Wyoming. 

Orleans. 

Monroe. 

do, 

do. 
Erie, 

Chautauque. 
Orleans. 



ACADEMIES. 



249 



Wliite Plains Academy. In 'Sd Diitrict, Schencctadj- Young Ladies' Semina- 
ry, a.nd Clermont Academy. In 4tli District, Cli:imi)lain Academy, Kingsbo- 
rough Academy, anil Moriah Academy. In bth District, Bridgewater Acade- 
my, and Sieuben Academy. In 6th District, Avon Academy. In 7th District, 
Palmyra High School, Yates County Academy and Female Seminar)''. 

Tliesc 17, with the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, and the Grammar 
Schools of Columbia College, and the New- York University, make the whole 
number of Academic Schools subject to the Regents, IBl ; of which, more- 
over, the Regents incorporated during the year the following 10: 

Piermont Academy, at Pierm.ont, in Rockland county, March 15, 1842. 

Dc Lancey Institute, at Hampton, in Oneida count)', April 13, 1842. 

JiinghanUoii Academy, at Binghamton, in Broome county, August 23, 1842. 

Yates Academy, at Yates Centre, in Orleans count)', August 23, 1842. 

Champlaiii Academy, atChamplain, in Clinton county, August 23, 1842. 

Alfred Academy, at Alfred Centre, in AKegany county, .lanuaiy 31, 1843. 

Corllandville Academy, at Corilandville, in Cortland county, .Ian. 31, 18^13. 

Perry Centre Institute, at Pcny Centre, in Wyoming county, Jan. 31, 1S43. 

Monroe Academy, at Henrietta, in Monroe county, February 7, 18-13. 

Norwich Academy, at Norwich, in Chenango county, February 14, 1S43. 

The money distributed among the Academies by the Regents from the in- 
come of the Literature Fund, is tlistributed only to such Academies as make 
the annual reports required by law. The sum thus distributed, in 1842, was 
$40,000, to each of the eiglit Dislricts $5,000, and to the Several Academies in 
each District, in proportion to the number of their pupils respectively. Tiie 
following table, wliich is the summary of a very long detailed statement in 
the last Annual Report of the Regents, shows the distribution of the above 
named sums, by districts, with the number of pupils in each district, and other 
interesting particulars. 



DISTRIBUTIOFf 

Of the Puhlic Moneys aviong the Academies by Districts, ^-c. 







No. of students 










Whole No. of 
students be- 
longing to 


claimed by the 
trustees to have 
jnursued classi- 
cal studies orlUe 


iVo. of stud'ts 
allowed by 
the Regents 
to have pur- 


Amo'nt of mo- 
ney appor- 
tioned by the 


Kales per 
scholar 
in each 
disl'ct. 


Districts. 


. Aeaclcinies 
at the date 


higher branrhes 
of English edu- 


sued said 
sludies for 


the income 
of the Lite- 




of report. 


cation or both, 
for four months 
ot said year. 


four monllis 
of said year. 


rature F'ud. 




1st District. 


1.129 


806 


805 


$5,000 


$6 21 


2d do 


1,1(30 


1,00<) 


997 


5,000 


5 01 


3d do 


1,646 


1,467 


1,410 


5,000 


3 55 


4tli do 


1,593 


1,554 


1,541 


5.000 


3 24 


5th do 


1,672 


2,015 


2,000 


5,000 


2 50 


tith do 


1,168 


1,143 


1,143 


5,000 


4 37 


7th do 


1,827 


1,445 


1,444 


5,(KX) 


3 46 


8th do 


1,917 


1,938 


1,937 


• 5,000 


2 58 


Total, 


1 12,142 


i 11,374 


11,277 


1 !?40,W)0 


I 



The rate per scholar, if the apportionment had been made for the whole 
slate without reference to districts, would have been about $3.55. 

Of the whole number of students claimed to have, pursued classical studies, 
or the higher English course, 6,278 were males, and 5,056 were female.?. 



2.50 



ACADEIVrrES. 



The following table is interesting as showing both the increase of Acade- 
mies and an advancing standard of instruction, during llie last nine years. 

COMPARATIVE VIKW 

Of the number of Aeademie.ifrom u-hich Annual Reports hnve been received, foi- 
the last nine years, with tlic whole number of students iitstructed in them, and 
the mtmher considered as classical students, or students in the higher branches 
of English education, as stated in said reports. 



Years in which re 
ports were re- 
ceived. 



No. of Acadc- Whole number 
mies makiag' of scholars re- 
reports. I ported. 



Number of do. 
considered as 
classical, &c. 



Whole am'nl of 
public money 
distributed. 



1835, . 
1836,. 
1837, . 
1838,. 
1839, . 
1840, . 
1841, . 
1842,. 
1843,. 



64 

65 

69 

74 

106 

119 

127 

131 

112 



5,296 

6,548 

6,056 

6,391 

10,111 

10,881 

11,477 

11,306 

12,142 



3,741 

4,017 
4., 563 
G',0^16 
7,070 
8,842 
]0,1S6 
10,560 
11,277 



$;12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
12, VM) 
40,000 
40,000 
40,000 
40,000 

40,(x;{) 



A lar^-e proportion of the Academies have permanent endowments and fixed 
capital m lands, buildings, libraries, apparatus, &e. The aggregate amoimt 
of this capital belonging to the 142 reporting Academies of 1842-3, is stated in 
the last report of the Regents to be $1,332,857. The aggregate income of all 
the reporting Academies, for the last year, was as follows : 

Revenue from permanent property, «21,.557 

Tuition money, 178,691 

Income exclusive of public money $200,248 

Aggregate of pay to teachers in 1843-3, $1 S6, 182 

do do in 1841-2, 187,6i'^ 

do do in 1840-1, 184,419 

Tire total number of teachers in 1842-3, was 576, of whom 344 make teach- 
ing their permanent profession. 

The courses of study in most of the Academies are liberal, embracing most 
of the valuable branches of human knowledge, as the following list will 
show. Aritiimetic and Algebra, in all; Anatomy in one; Architecture in one; 
Astronomy, in all but 17; Agricultural Chemistry, in one; Botany, in all but 
32; Book-keeping, in all male schools but 31; Biblical Antiquities, in 2;. 
Chemistry, in all but 11; Composition, in all, and as often, on an average, as 



toryin7; Civil Engineering in 3; French, in all but 16; Geography in all; 
Geology in 38; Geometry, i)Iain, in all but 6; Geometry, analytic, in 7; Geo- 
metry, descriptive, in 2; Greek, in all male Academies but 3; Grecian Antiqui- 
ties in 6; German in 6; General History, in all but 21 ; U. S. History, in all but 
40; Hebrew in 5; Hydrostatics in 1 ; Italian in 3; Latin in all male Academies; 
Elements of Law and the Principal of Statutes in 5; Logic in 53; Levelling 
in 4; Logarithms in 6; Music, vocal or instrumental, or both, in 24; Mapping 
in 5; Mechanics in 3; Mensuration in 24; Mineralogy in 22; Mythology in 3; 
Natural History in 31; Navigation in 11; Natural Theology in 20; IN^autical 
Astronomy in 1 ; Optics in 5; Natural Philosophy in all but\3; Moral Philoso- 
phy in all but 67; Intellectual Philo'oi^hy in all but 42; Painting in 18; Physi- 
ology in 43; Political Economy in 22; Rliritoric in all but 32; Roman Antiqui- 
ties in 14; Surveying in all male Academies but 20; Spanish, in 6; Trigonom- 
etry in 53; Technology in 11 ; Pajdagogics, or the Principles of Teaching in 10. 
In the Libraries of 139 of the Academics, the whole number of volumes is 
49,045, and they ai-e generally increasing, as is also tlieir apparatus, , 



COMMON SCHOOLS, 251 

COiVIMON SCHOOLS. 



The Common School System of this State, considerin.^ the whole circle of 
its relations to our political institutions, our civil condition, and the structure 
•of society among us, may well be deemed .the most imi)ortaiit institution of 
the Conunonwcaltli. 

The f^eneial organization of the system may be compendiously described as 
follows : 

The head and centre of the system is the Secreiary of State, who is, by vir- 
tue of that office, SuperiiUciideiit of Common Schools. 

Tlie other permanent administrative agents of the system as cons'ituted by 
law, are the Clerks and Treasurers of counties; the Supervisors, School Com- 
missioners, Inspectors, Clerks, and Collectors of Towns; and the Trustees of 
School Districts; all of wliom are elected by the people, except the Treisu- 
rers of counties, who ar« ap])ointcd by the county Boards of Supervisors. The 
Comptroller and the Treasurer of tiie State are associated with the ilnancial 
■action of the system. 

In the year next following each census of the state, whether taken under the 
authority of the Slate, or of the Uniteil States, ihat is once in every five years, 
it is the duty of the Superintendent to apportion the moneys arising from the 
Common School Fimd, among the counties, and the quota of each countiy 
among the towns and cities therein, according to the ratio of the population in 
c;ich, compareil witli that of the whole state. He then c-ertities such an appor- 
tionment to the Comptroller, and sends notice thereof to each County Clerk, sta- 
ting the day on which the moneys will be paj'able. Thatday is the 1st of Febru- 
ary m each year, and the moneys are paid by the State Treasurer, on the war- 
rents of the Comptroller, to the several County Treasurers, who pay over tho 
town quotas to the School Commissioners of the respective towns, to be distri- 
buted among the school districts. 

Eich County Clerk, on receiving from the Superintendent, notice of the ap- 
portionment, must give notice thereof to the clerk of tlie Supervisors, to be 
laid bSfore their Board at their next meeting, and they must tliereupon assess 
an equal amoimt upon the towns, to be collccteil by the town collectors, with 
legal fees, as they collect their other town taxes. The levy of this sum is the statu- 
tory condition on -which the School Fund money is distributed to the districts. 
These School Commissioners are three in number, elected annually in each 
t<)wn, and thej' are constituted by statute a corporation so far as to enable them 
U> hold property for the use of the schools in the town, and to sue and bo 
Eiied in their otlicial capacity. They also setoff, arrange, and modify the school 
districts; and it is tlieir duty annually, in .Tuly, to report in writing to tho 
County Clerk, the number of districts in their town; the time during which 
tl"ie schools have been kept therein by qualified teachers; the amount of School 
Fund money received, as well as the amount received from the Town Collec- 
tor; the whole number of pupils actually attending school, distinguishing the 
number over five and under sixteen years of age; and in short, to report eve- 
ry thing relating to their iluties, and the general legal condition of the schools. 
The two Insiiectors in each town, together with the Commissionei-s, consti- 
tute a Board for ascertaining, by examination, the qualifications of teachers. 
Any two of the Board make a quorum, and their certificate of qualification is 
necessary to entitle a district to the actual receipt of its quota of the School 
Fund money. It is their duty also to visit the schools. 

The Trustees of the Districts are also a corporation so far as to enable them 
to hold property for the use of the District. They take charge of the school- 
houses, their erection and re|)air; they make the contracts with the teachers; 
provide fuel for the schools; call meetings of the taxable inhabitants of th^ 
district, for levying whatever assessment may be necessary for district pur- 
poses, and apportion such assessments; direct the manner in which the rate 
oills for teachers' wages shall be made up, with authority to say who shall ba 
exemptetl, for poverty ; in short, they have charge of all the pecuniary con- 
cerns of the district, arjd they must make report annually to tlie School Com- 
missioners, who, as already stated, report to the County Clerk, and he to the Su- 
perintendent, thus making Uio chain of accountability complete. 



252 COMMON SCHOOLS. 

Such is an outline of the general org-anization of the Common School sys- 
tem of this state, as it has existed for many years, and as applieil to the towns. 
Tlie cities, and niany of tlie incorporateil villag-es, are accommodated with 
vai'ious modifications of tiie system, adapted to their peculiar circumstances. 
Some additions and improvements have been recently engrafted on the sys- 
tem, but without making any essential changes in its macliinery. Among 
these additions is the appointment of a General Deputy Superintendent, 
who may perform all the duties qf llie Superintendent, in case of his absence, 
or of a vacancy in liis oHlce. By a lav/ of 1841, also, the board of supervi- 
sors in each county, is directed to appoint Oiie, and if the number of school 
districts exceeds 200, may appoint tico Deputy Superintendents, who 
hold their office for two years, and wliose duty it is to visit the schools in their 
several jurisdictions, and examine into all matters relating to the government, 
instruction, course of s^udy, text-books, discipline, and the entire economy 
and management of tlie scliools, school-houses, and districts; to examine the 
teachers employed, and give or annul certificates of qualifications; and by 
every means in their povver to promote sound education and elevate the cha- 
racter of tlie schools. They are, also, to malce annual reports to the Superin- 
tendent on all the above named topics. These Deputy Superintendents are 
paid two dollars per day, for each day of actual service, with the proviso that 
tlieir entire pay for any one j^ear shall not exceed $500 to each. 

But by far tlie most important improvement of the system, is the establish- 
ment of District School Libraries, by acts passed in 1828 and 1839. Those acts 
authorize eacli scliool district to raise by tax, twenty dollars, in the first in- 
stance, and in each subsequent year, ten dollars, to be exclusivelj^ applied to 
the purcliase and augmentation of a libi-ary for the use of tlie school. The 
district clerk, or other person to be appointed at the annual meeting- of the dis- 
trict, is to be the librarian, and accountable ibr tlie safe keeping of the books, 
the property in which is vested in tlie district trustees. To aid these libraries, 
tiie sum ofl;'-55,000, from the U. S. Deposit Fund and an equal amount by tax, is 
to be annually distributed, in like manner as the other school moneys, with 
tlie pi'oviso that at the end of five yeai's this sura may be applied in support 
of the library, or to the payment of teacliers' v/ages, at the option of tlie dis- 
trict. The regulations for the management of the libraries, are to be furnish- 
ed by the Superintendent of Common Scliools, who is also authorized to select 
the library books, when so requested by the trustees of a district, in pursuance 
of the vote of a district meeting. 

By the last annual report of the Superintendent, dated Januaiy 12, 1843, it 
appears that the number of counties in the state was then 59, comprising S^^O 
towns; 9 cities containing 64 wards; and that, on the 1st of July, J842, the 
whole number of school districts, as nearly as could be ascertained from the 
returns, was 10,893, from 248 of which districts no reports had been received. 
At a fair allowance for the usual increase from the 1st of July, the date of the 
School Commissioner's reports, up to tlie date of the Superintendent's report, 
he estimates the whole number of districts at 11,000. 

The whole number of pupils between the ages of 5 and 16 years, residing in 
all the reporting districts, excluding the city of New-York, was, on the first 
of January, 1842, as shown by the returns, 601,765; the whole who attended 
school more or less during the year, with the same exclusion, was 571,130; 
and the whole number thus attending in tlie city of New-York, was 27,61!>. 

The average length of time of attendance in the year, was 8 montlis; but 
the whole number actually attentling, in 43 counties, at tlie time of visiting 
them by the county superintendents, is reported as being only 137,384; while 
the whole number in those 43 counties, returned as having been in school for 
some portion of the year, was 494,292. This shows great irregularitj^ of at- 
tendance. 

The number of volumes in the school libraries January 1, 1842, 816,231, 
showing an increase of nearly 200,000 volumes during the preceding year; 
and the number will probably be increased by the end of this year to 1,000,000 
volumes. 

Out of the city of New-York there are only about 500 colored children at- 
tending schools established under the act of 1841, sec. 15. Of these, 84 are in 
Albany, 31 in Broome county, 175 in Columbia, 140 in Kings, aiul 58 in Or- 
ange. The public money apportioned to them is $400. 



COMMON SCHOOLS. 'iOo 

The average of teachers' wa.::?es d'lrinp: the past year, was fjl? per month for 
male teachers, and fur female teachers ST. 

The following is tiie list of Deputy t-uperintcndents in the several counties. 

DepUXV SCTPERINTENDEiVTS OF COMMON SCHOOLS. 

Albany county — Francis Dwight, Albany oily. 

Allegany — Ralph II. Spencer, Iliint s Hollow; II. Wilson, Little Genesee. 
Jiroome — G. T. I'razier, Bini^lKin>ton. 

Catturaums — E. A. liice, EastOito; Jos. H. Wright, Machias. 
Cayuga — \u. G. Sturkes, Kennet. 
Cluiutauqve — L. Parsons, \Ves'-fiel(l. 
i'hemung — Nathan Tidd, Millport. 
Chenango — 11. K. Bourno, Pitcher. 
Clinton^-1). S. T. Douglass, Plattsburgh. 
Columbia — D. G. Woodin, Austerlitz. 
Cortlind — Henry S. Randall, Cortlanilville, 
Delaicure — R. S. Hujj^hston, Sidney; D. McFarland, Delhi. 
Dutchess — A. S. Ciement, Poughiceepsie; W. Baxter, \\appinirer"s Creek. 
£rie— Enoch S. Ely, Buffiilo. * 

Essex— E,. .1. Shumwaj', Essex. 
Franklin— I'). II. Stevens, IVToria. 
Fulton — F. B. Sprup^ue, Kingsboro'. 
Ccnesc.e — David Ney, Darien. 
. Greene— C. C. W. Cleaveland, Catsldll. • 
Hamilton — B. Holeonib, Morehouseville. 
Herkimer — J. Henry, jr. Little-Falls. 

Jefferson — L. II. Brown, Watertown; Ira ?Jayhew, Adams. 
Kings — Theodore V. Kinp;-, Brooklyn. 
Livingston — Ira Patcliin, Livonia. 

Madison — 'i'hos. Bariow, Canastota; E. I\Iancbes(cr, Pratfs Hollow. 
Monroe — II. E. Rocbesler, Rochester; J. S. Brown, Chili. 
Montgomery — W . Hough, St. Johnsville. 
New-York-' — William L. Stone, New-York city. 
Niagara — 1ST. II. Fitts, LewJs:on. 

Oneida — S. Monlton, Whitesboro'; Elon Comstock, Stokes- ' 

Onondaga — Alanson Eiiwards, Syracuse; Orson Barnes, Baldwinsville. 
Ontario — A. T. Hopkins, Victor. 
Orange — J. C. Toolcer, Montg-omeiy. 
Orleans — E. R. Reynolds, Albion. 

Osvego—O. VV. ilanvlall, Phcenix; D. P. Tallmadg-e, Mexico. 
Of^scgo — J. llctherinplon, Cherry-Valley; L. R. Palmer, Cooperslo»vn. 
Putnam — Stephen C. Barnuni, Soutlieabi. 
Queens- — P. Polter, .lamaica. 
Uem'sclacr — Z. P. Burtlick, Grafton. 
liic':laud—N. G. BluuveK, Scotland. 

St. Lawrence — S. Foor.l, Puts lain; J. Hopkins, Gouverncnr. 
Saratoga — A. Smith, Saratoga Si)rings. 
Schenc-ctadr, — A. Fonda, Schenectady. 
St/wharie—K. Smidi. Cobleskill. 
j'<cncca — A. R. Wheeler, AVaterloo. 
Sietiben—-\i. K. I'inch, Bath. 
Suffiil .—W . S. Preston, Pa'chogue. 
Sulliran — J. W. Myers, INlonlicello. 
Tioga — (i. Williams, Owego. 
Tompkins — .1. S. Denman, Ithaca. 
Ulster — A. G. Hardenbiirgh, Ulster. 
Il'arren — Se h (". Baldwin, Caldwell. 

ir(w/u,ii;foa— William' Wright, Cambridge; Albert Wright. Tdiddle Graji- 
ville. 

H'aiiny — Philo I). Greene, Marion. 
\< estih-:ster—'l\ Little, Wldie Plains. 
H'uoming — A. S. S!e\ens, Attica. 
Yates— H. C. Wheeler, Penn-Yan. 

22 



254 COMMON SCHOOLS. 

COMMON SCHOOL FUND. 

Capital, 

The proceeds of the sales'of all lands belonging- to the state, are, by the 
constitution, appropriated exclusively to the Common School Fund. The 
lands remaining unsold, consist of about 400,000 acres, principally situated in 
the Fourth Senate district, in the northern part of the state, and are valued by 
tlie Survej'or-General at !fi200,000— constituting the unproductive capital of the 
School Fund. 

The productive capital of the fund amounted, on the 30th of September last, 
to $1,96S,290.72, showing a decrease during the fiscal year ending on that date, 
of $68,334.96. This- fund consists of the following items : 

Bonds for lands sold, SI, 014,305 07 

Bonds for loans, ' 409,316 11 

Bank stock, 102,300 00 

« Balance due of the loans of 1792, 1 15,993 72 

do do 1808, 221,176 95 

do do 1840, 33,200 00 

Statestock, 2;i,200 96 

Money in ihe treasury, 48,797 91 

Total, $1,968,290 72 

Expenditures in 1841. 

Amount of public money paid for teachers' wages in the several districts, 

during the year 1841, as reported by the trustees, $588,506 32 

Amount paid for the same purpose, on rate bills, by individuals, 468,688 22 

Total paid for teachers' wages, $1 ,057, 194 53 

do libraries, 98,290 47 

Total, $1 , 155,485 00 

Receipts in 1842. 

Whole am*»unt of public money received by commissioners, from all sources, 

during the year, ending July 1, 1842, $666,903 10 

Amount apportioned for teachers' wages, $573,016 38 

For libraries, 93,269 17 

666,285 55 

Balance in commissioners' hands, $617 55 

Expenditures of 1842. 
On the first day of February last, there was distributed to the several districts, 
under the apportionmet of 1841, from the revenue of the Common School 
Fimd, and the annual appropriation from the income of the U. S. Deposit 

Fund, the sum of $275,000 00 

An equal amount raised by supervisors, 275,000 00 

An amount equal to deficiency of previous year, 1,329 78 

Estimated amount voluntarify raised by towns, 20,000 00 

Income from various local funds, 20,000 00 

Raised under special statutes in New-York city, 60,000 00 

do do Albany, 3,817 86 

do do Buffalo, Rochester, Hudson, &c.. 12,000 00 

$667,147 64 
Amount apportioned for teachers' wages, as per re- . 

port, $573,578 45 

Amount apportioned for libraries, 93,236 89 

666,815 34 

Balance in commissioners' hands, $332 30 



COMMON SCHOOLS. 



255 



ABSTRACT 

From Ihc returns of Commissioners of Common Schools, of the several Touns and Cities 
of the State of New-York ; made on the 1st day of July, 1S42. 



COUNTIES. 



Alliiiny, •••• 
Allegany, •• 
I5roome, ••• 
Cattaraugus,... 2G 

Cayuga, 22 

Cliautauqiie, •• 24 

Chemung, i 10 

Chenango, ••-■' 19 

Clinton, 10 

Coliimliia, -''" 

Cortland, 

Delaware, ••■ 
Dutchess, •••• 

Krie, 

Ki)Sex, 

rrpnklin, •••• 

I'lr.ii.ii, 

lloiit -.ce. 

(>rer;;e. 

Hnmilt. ::i,---' 
Herkimer, ••• 
Jefferson, ••• • 

Kings, ' 

Lewis, 

Livingston, •■ 

Madison, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery, 
New-York, •• 
Niagara, ••••' 

Oneida, 

Onondaga, •• 
Ontario, •••• 

Orange, ' 

Orleans, 

Oswego, 

Otsego, 

I'litoam, ■••• 

()iieens, 

Konsselaer, • 
Kichinond, •• 
Kockland, •• 
Saratoga, • •• 
Scheneetady, 
Schoharie, •• 

Seneca, 

St. Lawrence, 

Sleuhen, 27 

SulTolk, ! 9 

Sullivan, •••• 

Tioga, 

Tompkins, •• 

Ulster, 

Warren, 

Washington, 
Wayne, • ••••' 
Westchester, 
Wyoming, ••• 
Yates, 



Total,- 



S94I0, S9.') 8 



$13,845 60 

10,2U8 25 

4,480 54 

7,423 60 

12,620 IS 

10, i:!9 96 

4,077 58 

9,976 84 

6,34S OS 

9,049 16 

6,065 62 

7,804 86 

10,682 57 

11,783 05 

4,867 36 

3, 124 60 

3,972 25 

6,624 25 

6,724 67 

647 93 

8,162 15 

11,643 55 

10, '♦i 70 

3, 630 93 

6,756 40 

10, .324 58 

22,374 28 

6,139 37 

128,526 25 

5,608 56 

16,426 25 

16,303 24 

8,844 44 

16,035 13 

6,462 65 

8,791 95 

11,366 24 

2,499 57 

6,4.'>0 41 

11,619 08 

2,815 14 

2,099 93 

7,982 22 

2, .372 62 

6,951 41 

6.950 69 
12,996 16 

9,4.32 21 
6.000 24 
3,328 97 
3,804 95 
11,205 69 
8, .349 07 
2,511 .35 
7,640 84 

7.951 09 
8,958 66 
6, 131 46 
4,144 80 



$3,744 2S 
1,803 52 

997 84 
1,122 76 
2,568 40 
2,318 16 
1,003 42 
2,170 45 
1,214 20 
2,133 12 
1,232 98 
1,557 51 
2,601 97 
2,575 53 
1,063 31 

666 01 

982 43 
1,802 89 
1,570 71 
97 41 
1,719 88 
2,806 06 
1,584 49 

816 18 
1,439 06 
2, .304 .32 
2,794 19 
1,407 40 

1,3.52 81 
3,947 80 
3,089 96 
2,093 96 
2, .345 91 
) , 202 24 
2,531 74 
2,534 94 

602 92 
1,322 .32 
2,806 89 

445 60 

624 97 
2,024 90 

636 60 
1,437 03 
1,255 .53 
1,290 17 
2, 105 OC 
1.475 2t: 

730 2{ 

9.52 19 
1,970 78 
2,031 95 

683 00 
1,960 10 
1,927 93 
1,900 40 
1,385 01 

999 67 



815,231 $.588,600 32 $98,2904' 



12, 



$11,371 09 
6, 996 09 
4,131 23 
5,542 30 
11,209 20 
11,105 36 
5,208 58 
7,6.56 56 
3,218 66 
,112 88 
, 191 82 
,277 16 
, 736 45 
, 128 69 
,112 37 
,309 06 
,094 90 
1,002 92 
,l3l 19 
155 16 
,349 00 
1,754 86 
,793 79 
,670 56 
1,618 94 
1,»36 17 
1,204 31 
,022 ..2 

1,665 77 
,742 06 
,550 71 
,121 04 
,710 40 
,096 22 
,791 85 
,906 72 
,415 80 
,.374 44 
,775 42 
, 197 64 
,072 95 
,496 18 
,014 95 
,570 43 
,807 21 
,703 63 
,071 10 
,2.39 00 
,449 00 
,016 27 
, 832 22 
,107 11 
,748 94 
,862 00 
,056 24 
,101 08 
,203 43 
,067 62 



,^408,068 22 598,749 



256 LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INbTITUTIONS, 

LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS- 



THE NEW-YORK SOCIETY LIBRARY. 

Tills is tiie oiliest existing literary association in the city of Ne'.v-York, having 
been founiled in 1754. It is governed by a board of fifteen trustees, vvVio are 
annually elected by tlie stockholders. The library is one of tl^ largest in the 
United States, containing forty thousand volumes, and occupies a new and 
beautiful edifice, situated on Broadway, corner of Leonartl-street. Connected 
with it is a large and excellent reading-room. Tlie "Afheneum " has been 
recently united with this institution, v/hieh now corn])rises the property and 
members of both associations. The rights of membership cost it;25; the annual 
payment is $6; free rights, (perpetual,) $100. 

The present oflficei*s are — GulianC. Verplanck, Evert A. Bancker, William 
Inglis, Daniel Seymour, Alexander R. Rogers, Dayton Ilobart, Frederick Dc 
Pej'sfer, Stephen C. Williams, James D. P. Ogden, Joshua Coit, Rev. Benja- 
min I. Haight, Robert B. Minfurn, Joseph Delafield, Henry Nicoll, and Joseph 
G. Cogswell, Trustees. 

Alexander R. Rogers, Treasurer. Philip J. Forbes, Librarian. 

NEW -YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

This institution was founded in 1804, and has enrolled among its officers and 
members, at difTerent periods, the most distinguished citizens ofthesJa'c, It 
has a library of about twelve thousand volumes, and a cabinet of a itii;uiiie>.and 
works of art, including busts and portraits of eminent persons, a Lirge and valu- 
able collection of coins, numerous original manuscripts, &c. The rooms of 
this society are situated in the Universit)'^ building, on Washington square, and 
are open to members and visiters every day, except Sunday, under the care of 
the Assistant-Librarian. The publications of the society consist of six volumes 
of Transactions, or Collections, embracing inquiries and materials relative to 
the early history of the state and country. Its last volume, (published 1841,) 
edited by George Folsom, presents the only full account of the Dutch colony 
that originally settled New-York, hitherto published. 

The present otRcersof this society are the following: 

Hon. Albert Gallatin, LL.D., President. 

William Beach I-awrenee, and Rev. Thomas De Witt, D.D., Vice-Pres'ts. 

Frederick De Peyster, Cor. Secretary. John Jay, Rec. Secretary. 

llev. Cyrus Mason, D.D., Treasurer. George Gibbs, Librarian. 

The Librarian appoints his Assistant: now George II. Moore. 

The meetings are held, except during the warm season, on the first Tuesday 
of every monil), when original papers relating to historical subjects are reail 
by the members, and slight refreshments are served. Every member is author- 
ized to introduce strangers from other places at the meetings, which are thus 
rendered attractive to persons of literary tastes. 

THE LYCEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

This institution was established in 1818, for the purpose of cultivating and 
encouraging the study of natural science. No other similar association in the 
United States, has labored more successfully in this department of knowledge. 
It possesses a valuable library, and an extensive museum of specimens in natu- 
ral history, collected from all parts of the world, embracing the departments of 
Mineralogy, Geology, Botanj', Zoology, &c. These are contained in a spacious 
building erected by the society, on Broadway, (n«ar Prince -street,) where 
public lectures are also given. 

The present officers of this institution are the following: 
Joseph Delafield, President. 
John Augustine Smith, M.D., and Abraham Halsey, Vice-Presidents. 

John H. Redfield, Cor. Secretary. Robert H. Browne, Rec. Secretary. 

John C, Jay, M.D. Treasurer. Issachar Cozzens, Librarian. 

Anniversary Orator for 1843, Prof. John W. Draper, I\I.D. 



LITERAUY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 



257 



THE NEW-YORK LYCEUM. 

This popular institution was established in 1838, for the purpose of diffusing 
useful kiiowicilp^e among- all classes of the community, by means of lectures, 
&c. At the ainuial meetmg- heUI May 12th, 1842, the Presitlent submitted a re- 
port, by wh ich it appeared, that during- the year then elapsed the income of the 
Lyceum amounted to $4,5t)9.50, and the exiienilitures during- the same period, 
to $4,575. 9j, The income was chiefly derivetl from the avails of public lec- 
tures, and the fees of members; and the expenditures were for the library, 
reading-room, he. 

The officers are the following : 

Isaac T. Smith, President. 

George S. Stitt, Vice-President. Albert G. Zabriskie, Cor. Secretary. 

John L. Salisbury, Treasurer. Lewis G. Forman, Rec. Secretary. 

There are also boards of counsellors and directors. The library and reading- 
room are at 411 Broadway. F'ees of members: — Admittance fee, $2; annual 
dues, $2. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR THE DIFFUSION OF USEFUL KNOW- 
LEDGE. 
This is an imjiortant Institution, and is intended to occupy similar ground In 
this country to that ni tlic Kritish Society, whose name it bears. Particular at- 
tention is given to tlie examination and preparation of school-books — a sub- 
ject whose importance is awakening great attention. 

Hon. James Kent, LL.D., President. 



Vice-Presidents. 



Iloa. 



Josejili Storv, Mass. 
Wm. L. Marcy, N. Y. 
Albert Gallatin, N. Y. 
Reuben H. Walworth, N. Y. 
Benj. T. Onderdonk, D.D., N. Y. 
Peter D. Vroom, N. J. 
Horace Rinney, Penn. 
Robert C. Greer, Penn. 
Roger B. Taney, Md."* 
Jas. Bayard, Del. 
Thomas Sewall, D. C. 
Windham Robertson, Va. 
Wm. C. Rives, Va. 
Wm. Gaston, N. C. 
Joel R. Poinsett, S. C. 
•iohn M. Berrian, Ga. 
Henry Clay, Ky. 
John C. Young, Ky. 
Wni. Hendricks, Ky. 
Charles P. iVIcIlvaine, Ohio, 
Henry R. Schoolcraft, Midi. 



Daniel Webstej-, D. C. 
James Milnor, N. Y. 
Benj. F. Butler, N. Y. 
Roger M. Sherman, Conn. 
Francis Wayland, R. I. 
Edward Everett, Mass. 
Sam'l T. Armstrong, Mass. 
Franklin Pierce, N. H. 
Horace Everett, Vt. 
Robt. P. Dunlap, Me. 
Ruel Williams. Me. 
Wm. R.King, Ala. 
Alexander Porter, La. 
Robert J. Walker, Miss. 
Philip Lindsley, Tenn. 
Jos. Duncan, 111. 
Lewis F. Linn, Mo. 
Thos. J. I^acy, Ark. 
Henry Dodge, Wis. 
John Chambers, Iowa, 



Trustees. 



Hon. Samuel Jones, John Knox, Thos. H. Skinner, William. B. Calhoun, 
Edward Robinson, John Sargeant, Maneius S. Hution, Washington Irving, 
Wm. R. Williams, Daniel D. Barnard, George Peck, Benj. Silliman, Thos. 
R. Vermilyea, George Griswohl, John Proudfit, Hugh IVTaxwell, John O. 
Choules, John L. Mason, Benj. C. Culler, Robert C. Cornell, Samuel Hubbard, 
John Smith Rogers, Thos. McAuley, Gitleon Hawley, I'raneis L. Hawkes, 
John Torrey, Thomas Dewiti, George Bancroft, Samuel Miller, Hiram Ketch- 
uin, Joini P. Durliin, Eleazer Lord, Jacob Janeway, Thomas Day, Leonar.l 
Bacon, Willanl Hall, Gorllandt Van Rensselaer, William Culler, Gorhani D. 
Alibolt, Henry Rosevelt, Alexander D. Bache. 

Executive Committee. 
Thco<lore Frelinghuyscn, Gorham D. Abbott, John A. Dix, Edward Rob- 
inson, Thomas Cock", John Torrey, Charles Butler, John L.Mason, Manciua 
S. Hutton, George Peck, Marshall S. BidwcU, Thos. L. Vermilyea, John B. 

22* 



258 LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 

Beck, Alfred C. Post, Wm. Adams, John O. Choules, Samuel F. B. Morse, 
George B. Cheever, George Folsom, William Cutler. 

Gorham D. Abbott, Secretary. Anthony P. Halsey, Treasurer. 

THE NEW-YORK ETHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

This is an association for the purpose of conducting inquiries into subjects 
connected with the origin, history, and distinctiv e characteristics of nations, 
comprising language, customs, geography, antiquities, &c. Formed in 1842. 

Officers. 
Hon. Albert Gallatin, LL. D., President. 
Rev. Francis L. Hawkes, D.D., ) vioe-Presidents 
Henry R. Schoolcraft, \ Vice-fresulents. 

John R. Bartlett, Cor. Secretary. 
Alex. H. Bradford, Treasurer. 
Cliarles Welford, Recording Secretary. 
This Society proposes to publish a series of memoirs on subjects pertaining 
to Ethnology. 

Other Literary Associations are the followmg: 

The New-York Society of Letters, which meets every Tuesday evening at 
Uie College of Physicians and Surgeons, Crosby-street. 

The Franklin Litei-ary Association, Thalian Hall, Grand-street, every 
Thursday evening. 

The Metropolitan Association, meets Thursday evening at 254 Broadway. 

The Irving Lyceum, meets Monday evening at 554 Broadway. 

The Berean Institute, meets in the Universalist Church in Elizabeth near 
Walker-street, every Monday evening; admittance $1 ; dues 50 cents per quar- 
ter. 

The Mechanics' Lyceum, meets at the Shakspeare, corner of William and 
Duane -streets, every Wednesday evening; admittance 50 cents; dues 50 cents 
per quarter. 

The Carroll Lyceum, meets every other Friday evening at the Library 
Rooms, north-west corner of Broadway and Canal-street; admittance 50 ce*its; 
dues 50 cents per quarter. 

THE MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

This Institution, fovmded in 1821, is composed chiefly of merchant's clerks. 
Its library contains about twenty -four thousand volumes, and is constantly in- 
creasing. An excellent reading-room is connected with it. The number of 
members is over three thousand. 

The officers are annually elected by the members ; they are, at present, the 
following : 

Lewis McMuUen, President. 

Richard Burlew, Vice-President. Anthony Halsey, Cor. Secretary. 

James A. Williamson, Treasurer. William M. Parks, Rec. Secretary. 

Charles M. Wheatley, Cuthbert C. Gordon, Benjamin Pomery, Jr., John O. 
Stevens, John A. Ctork, John T. Lanman, and Henry G. Scudder, Directors. 

Librarian, (appointed by the Board of Officers,) Hem-y S. McKean. 

APPRENTICES' LIBRARY OF THE GENERAL SOCIETY OF MECHA- 
NICS AND TRADESMEN. 

Established in 1820. The library contains about thii-teen thousand volumes, 
and with the reading-room and schools, occupies a spacious building on Cros- 
by-street, near Grand. Open from 6 A.M. to 9 P.M., for members and appren- 
tices. 

Officers for 1843: 

James Van Nordcn, President. 
Shivers Parker, and Jacob A. Westervelt, Vice-Presidents. 

Richard C. Mount, Treasurer. Isaac Fryer, Secretary. 

The schools of this society contain about five hundred pupils, many of whom 
are instructed gratuitously. 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. ii59 

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF DESIGN.^(Rooms in Clinton Hall.) 
Instituted in 1826, by Artists professing the four arts of design, viz : Painting, 
Sculpture, Architecture, and Engraving. 

The annual exhibition occurs in May, and consists of works by living artists 
only, and such as have never before Iwen exhibited by the academy. 

I'he government, is vested in a President, Vice-President, Secretary and 
Treasurer, and two members, constituting a council, who are chosen at the an- 
nual election in May. 

NEW-YORK LAW INSTITUTE. 
Established in 1828, for the convenience of members of the bar. The library 
consists of tliree thousand three hundred volumes, and is kept at the City Hall. 
Members are elected by ballot; fees, $20 initiation, and $10 annually. The 
books are not allowed to be taken out of the City Hall. 
Officers elected May 2d, IS 12, are as follows : 

Samuel Jones, LL.D., President. 
John Anthon, Gerardus Clark, and James W. Gerard, Vice-Presidents. 
Joshua Coit, Treasurer. Alexander H. Dana, Secretary. 

Lewis H. Sanford, Librarian. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 
Office, library, and reading-room, over Marine Court, in the Park. Organized 
January, 1828. Incorporateil, May 2, 1829. For the purpose of encouraging and 
promoting domestic industry in this State and in the L^nited States, in agriculture, 
commerce, nKuuifactures, and the arts, and any improvement made therein, by 
bestowing rewards and other benefits on those who shall make any such im- 
provements, or excel in any of the said branches. 

TRUSTEES: 

Hon. James Tallmadge, President. 

Adoniram Chandler, William Inglis, and John Travers, Vice-Presidents. 

Joseph Titcomb, Cor. Secretary. Gurdon J. Leeds, Rec. Secretaiy. 

T. B. Wakeman, Treasurer and Superintending Agent. 

Annual election, seconci Thursday in May. Stated meetings, second Thurs- 
day in each month. Fifteen Annual Faii-s have been held under the auspices 
of this Institute. 

Tlie library contains about five thousand volumes. Its repository is open 
every day, and the library can be consulted by strangers free of charge. It is 
eouducteil generally upon the most liberal principles, 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK. 

Founded in 1830, and incorporated in 1833. Rooms in the basement of the 
City-Hall, containing a Library and Reading Room. Open every day except 
Sunday, from 9 A. M. to 10 P. M. Meetings are held every fortnight for sci- 
entilic jiurposcs, and during the winter, lectures are given every week. Tho 
otRcers and members of this Society are in general practical mechanics. 

Officers for 1843. 

Robert Smith, (stone cutter,) President. 

William Browning-, (iron founder,) } vice-Presidents. 

Joseph E. Coffee, (engmeer,) ) 

Henry Adriance, (bookbinder,) Treasurer. 

Thomas Ewbank, (lead pipe manufacturer,) Cor. Sec'y. 

James Howland, (accountant,) Recoriling Secretary. 
There is also a board of twenty-four directors, all of whom arc practical 
mechanics. This institution is in a flourishing condition, and its rooms are 
much resortett to by its members. The fee for ailmission is $2.00; annual fee 
$2.00. 

UNITED STATES NAVAL LYCEUM. 
Located at the Navy Yard, Brooklj-n. Organized by the officers of the U. 
6. Navy and Marine Corps, November, 1833. 

Com. Mathew C. Perry, President. Chaplain P. G. Clark, Librarian. 
Lt. A. S. Harwood,Cor. Secretary George A. Farley, Asst. Librarian. 



260 tITERAKY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 

HAMILTON LITERARY ASSOCIATION IN THE CITY OF BROOKLYN. 
H. B. Duryea, President. J. Warren Hill, Secretary. 

APPRENTICES' LIBRARY.— Brooklyn. 
Augustus Graham, President. R. G. Nichols, Secretary. 

FRANKLIN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION.— Hudson. 
This is a Young- and popular Institution, to which is attaclied a large library 
and pliilosopliical apparatus. 

ALBANY INSTITUTE. 

OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1843. 



Richard V. De Witt,) 

Horace B. Webstei', >-Cor. Sec" 

John V. L. Pruyn, ) 



T. Komeyn Beck, President. 

G. W. Carpenter, Treasurer. 

P. Bullions, Librarian. 

Joel A. Wing, Charles Austin, and Lewis Benedict, Jr. Rec. Secretaries. 

OFFICERS OF THE DEPARTMENTS. — FIRST DEPARTMENT. 

Jonathan Eights, President. Richard V. De Witt, Cor. See?y. 

William Mayell, Vice-President. Joel A. Wing, Rec. Secretary. 

Peter Bullions, Librarian. 

SECOND DEPARTMENT. 

Stephen Van Rensselaer, President. Horace B. AVebster, Cor. Secretary. 
Richard V. De Witt, Vice-Presiilent. Charles Austin, Rec. Secretary. 
C H. Anthony, Treasurer. 

T. Romeyn Beck, Lewis C. Beck, Philip Ten Eyck, Ebenezer EmmonSj. 
Horace B. Webster, — Curators. 

THIRD DEPARTMENT. 

Peter Bullions, President. John V. L. Pruyn, Cor. Secretary. 

Daniel D. Barnard, Vice-President. Lewis Benedict, Jr. Rec. Secretary. 

Robert H. Pruyn, Treasurer. 

Specimens in the Museum of the Institute January 1, 1843, 15,506. The 
Library of the Institute contains about 3, £00 volumes. 

The objects of the Institute are literary and scientilic. At its sittings oraJ 
discussions are held, and papers are read on topics connected with the history, 
biography, literature, science, and the arts of the state and the country. 

YOUNG MEN'S ASSOCIATION FOR MUTUAL IMPROVEMENT IN 
CITY OF ALBANY. 

This Institution was founded December 13, 1833, and incorporated by the 
above title, March 12, 1835. It is undoubtedly one of the most useful institu- 
tions in the country. In the language of its charter, it was incorporated " for 
the purpose of establishing and maintaining a library, reading-room, literary 
and scientific lectures, and other means of promoting moral and intellectual 
improvement, with power to take by purchase, devise, or otherwise, and ta 
hold, transfer, and convey real and personal property to the amount of $50,000: 
and to take, hold and convey all such books, cabinets, library, furniture, and 
apparatus as may be necessary for attaining its objects." 

Its government is vested in an Executive Committee consisting of a Presi- 
dent, three Vice-Presidents, a Cor. and a Recording Secretary, a Treasurer, 
and ten Managers, elected annually by such members as are entitled to vote by 
the charter. The association has power, also, to organize from its own mem- 
bers a Debating Society, the officers of which are cx-qffkio members of the 
Executive Committee. Anj' resident of Albany between 16 and 35 years old 
may become a regular member, if approved by the Executive Committee, and 
on entering must pay a fee of $1, and afterwards of $2 annually. 

The sum of $50 in money, or in books to that amount, constitutes a member 
for life; and $5 annually, an honorary member. The Governor, Lt. Govern- 
or of the State, and the clergy of the city, are entitled to admission to the 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS.' 261 

Reatlinjf-rooms and tlic Lectures; members of tlie Lcerislatiire, and of other 
assooiations, and ofllccrs of the Army and Navy, are admitted to flie Readinir- 
rodms, and a member of the society may introduce a non-resiilent to the same 
I)rivileg'e for a month. 

From November Isf, to March 1st, the charter requires at least one public lec- 
ture to be deli\ eretl at flie T^ecture-room in each week. 

Tlie annual meotin;? is fixed on tlie 1st Monday of February, and on the next 
Tuosday the annual elections are made. 

The whole numl)er of members is now about 1,20(), of whom about 10(X) 
are re<::ular, 150 honorary, ;ind 35 life. The Library contains about 'd,'HjO 
volumes, and the Rcadinji'-room, 8') newspapers, and 25 periodicals. 

The Association Rooms are in the Albany Exchange. 

YOUNG MEN'S ASSOCIATION FOR MUTUAL IMPROVEMENT OF 
THE CITY OF TROY. 

Rooms, 197 River-street. Incorporated in 1835. This Institution hasali- 
l)raiy of about 2,0('0 volumes and philosophical apparatus. The Reading- 
room is furnished with i)eriodicals anil newspapers, from dittcrent parts of tlie 
Union. Lectures are occasionally given on ditlerent subjects. 

YOUNG MEN'S ASSOCIATION FOR MUTUAL IMPROVEMENT IN 
THE CITY OF SCHENECTADY. 

Incorporated March 9, 1839, for the pnrpose of establishing and maintaining 
a Library, Reading-room, Literary and Scientific Lectures. The library now 
contains about 3,2(j() volumes. 

Benj. F. Potter, President. Alexander Holland, Cor. Secretary. 

William Lamy, Rec. Secretary. John Bt. Clute, Treasurer. 

The Executive Committee consists of seventeen persons, a President, two 
Vice-Presidents, a Corresponding and Recording Secretary, Treasurer, and 
eleven IManagcrs, who are chosen annually on the second Wednesday in April. 

YOUNG MEN'S ASSOCIATION OF THE CITY OF UTICA. 

Tliis Institution was incorporated in 1834, and now consists of about 250 
members. It occupies rooms in which are contained a library of 2,200 vol- 
times; a Reading-room in which are taken '^tJ ilillerent periodicals and news- 
pajiers, and a Lecture-room in which lectures on various subjects are deliver- 
ed every week from October to May inclusive. 

YOUNG MEN'S ASSOCIATION OF THE CITY OF BUFFALO. 

Incorporated March, 1837. The object of this association is to establish 
and maintain a Library, Reading-rooms, and Literary and Scientific I^ec- 
tures. Tlie library consists of 4,000 volumes, and has 416 contributing, and 71 
honorary and life members. 

Wm. L. G. Smith, President. Theodotus Burwell, Con Seci'etary. 

Phineas Sai'geant, Librarian. 



GEOLOGICAL ROOMS. 

The State Geological Rooms in the Old S'ateHall in the city of Albany, con- 
tain extensive collections illustrating the Natural History of the State of New- 
York. The following is a brief accoimt of the arrangement adopted by the 
Geologists, for the display of the specimens collected during the survey, from 
18.37 to 1842, inclusive. 

By the original plan of the Geological Survey, each Geologist was required 
to make a collection of eiglU suites of the rocks, minerals, soils, &c., of his 
resiiective district. One of these was to be deposited at Albany, as a Slate 
collectl;)n, and tlie seven remaining ones were to be delivered to sucli Litera- 
ry Institutions as the Secretary of State siiould ilircct. In the departments of 
Zoology and Bo'any, a single suite of specimens only, was requireil. In the 
Mineralogical department, although their requirement was not made, the plan 
has been adoi)ted and eight suites iiave been collecled. 

By an act of the Legislature of 1840, the Old State Hail, at that time occu- 
pied by the State Officers, was approjiriatetl for the purpose of arranging and 
exhibiting the collections in (he il'llercnt dcpainients of the survey. 



262' GEOLOGICAL KOOMS, 

The collection is arrang-ed in five rooms, each one presenting a distinct ile-- 
partment of the results of the survej'. Four of these rooms are on the groiintt' 
tloor, and one in the second story ; the latter occupies tlie whole leng'th and 
breatlth of the builtling, being about 70 feet long and 40 wide. This room is 
provided with a gallery extending entirely around it. 

1. The ui)per hall is ilevoted to the Geological Collection strictly, in which the- 
different rocks are arranged in a series of cases in the order in which they oc^ 
cui- in nature; beginning with the lowest known rocks, and progressing 
thi"Ough the series to the highest rock in the state. A single case is devoted to 
each rock or group, and contains an assemblage of specimens characteristic-of 
the same. By this arrangement there are nearly the same facilities ofiered for 
the study of the rocks and their typical fossils as we have in the field. 

2. In the gallery of the same room, another arrangement of similar speci- 
mens is designed, viz: a Geographical one, in which the rocks, minerals, ores, 
&c., from each county in the State, will be arranged in separate cases, thus af- 
fording means of reference to the productions of every part of the State. In 
the same collection it is proposed also to place the soils of each county or town, 
with their relative situation to the rocks occupying the same. This measure, 
if carried into effect, will be of immense advantage, rendering the science of 
Geology, and the whole collection subservient to the interest of agriculture. 
It will at once be seen that if the qualities of the different soils antl tlieir asso- 
ciated rocks are known, the best method of improving them can readily be- 
suggested, and in most cases, as readily carried into effect. For throughout 
the greater part of the State, the m.aterials for replenishing worn out and ex- 
hausted soils are to be found near the surface, and usually readily obtained. 

Since Agriculture is about to take its place among the exact sciences, being 
in fact subject to the laws which govern other sciences or objects in nature, it 
is desirable to know something of its relations to Cliemistry and Geology, as it 
is indeed no other than the results produced by chemical and vital laws upon 
geological productions. . 

3. On the lower floor one room is devoted to the metallic ores and other 
minerals of the State, which are arranged according to their associations. In 
explanation of this mode we renmrk, tliat observation has proved that certain 
m^ineral substances are always found together, in the same beds and untler 
similar conilitions or relations. Those kinds therefore Avhich are found to- 
gether, are placed in the same case. A visiter is thus able to see at a glance,, 
what minerals occur together, and how tliey are generally disposed in their 
native beds, and in what rocks they are likely to be foimd. Thus, as an exam- 
ple, the magnetic and specular oxides of iron always occur in primary rocks, 
brown tourmaline in primary linie stone, chromate of iron in serpentine, tin 
in granite, hematitic iron in roclfs of the Taconic system, &c. 

4. The arrangement of simple minerals in the department of mineralogy 
proper, is according to their composition, or in other words it is made on che- 
mical principles. This methotl has been preferred to the natui-al one in which 
tliey are placed, according to external resemblances. 

5. In the middle room are arranged tlie volumes containing the dried speci- 
mens of the New-York plants. They form together an Herbarium of fifty 
bound folio volumes, arranged according to the natui-al method, on thick fine 
paper. It forms a collection of great value, which may always be consulted 
by those who are pursuing the study of this most useful department of know- 
ledge. 

In addition to the collection of plants, one of the different kintls of M'ood ha?, 
been commenced. This will exhibit the character of our forest trees, an at- 
tempt never before made in tliis country. The trunks are cut in various direc- 
tions for showing their structure and grain, and their adaptation to economical 
purposes. To this collection may hereafter be added the trees indigenous to 
the west and south; and perhaps "also those of foreign growth, ajid of different 
climates. 

It is further proposed to form a collection of fruits, seeds and roots. That of 
fruits, it is supposed, is already in part prepared by the Botanists of the survey. 
In that of seeds and roots, as the different kinds of grain now imdcr culture, 
and oiliers which it is proposed to introduce, it is expected that the State Agri- 
cultural Society will interest itself; indeed great interest is already manifested 



BENEVOLENT AND RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS. 263 

by the society to promote this object, inasmuch as it will form on important 
<;ollcction to the pnictical farmer. 

6. The collection in Zoolog-y is as yet incomplete; except that of birds, and 
•as no cases suitable forllicir arrangement have yet been furnished, they have 
not been pennanenlly arranged. 

7. Since tiie collection was put up, numerous paintings and geological sec- 
tions liave been placed in tlie rooms, which exhibit some of the remarkable 
features of ilistricls of country not often visi(eil. The geological sections serve 
Ut explain more clearly the structure and arrangement of the rocks of tlie 
state. These will be still farther increased, and to which also will be added 
■general anil local maps, colored according to the rock formations. A great 
variety of objects tlierefore are ansvvered by tlie collection; scarcely any sub- 
ject of inquiry can come up which is not directly or indirectly illustrated by 
ilic museum and natui-al histoiy. 

8. The suites of specimens collected for the literary and scientific institu- 
tians of the State, liave been packed and forwarded to the five incorporated 
•colleges, viz: Columbia College, and the University of New- York, in New- 
York city; Union College, at Schenectady ; Geneva College, at Geneva; Ham- 
ilton College, at Clinton. 

This collection is to be considered as a nucleus around which a much more 
oxfensive one will aggregate; and we believe that when it shall be known that 
it is'a safe depository for valuable specimens, all the friends of science will be 
willing to contribute in various ways to its increase. Hence, if the various 
objects are properly managed and encouraged, this collection may be made to 
rival the National Institudon at Washington, the Britisli Museum, or the Jardin 
<tes Plantes at Paris. It will be a place, around wliich will centre our agricul- 
tural societies, mechanic and scientific associations, all of whose objects are 
almost identical, viz : the dissemination of truth and knowledge. 

The llooms are open to the public, daily, free of charge. 



BENEVOLENT & RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS. 



AMERICAN BIHLE SOCIETY. 
(Oflice, 115 Nassau-street, New- York.) 
This institution was formed in 1816, for the sole object of increasing the cir- 
culation of the Holy Scriptures, without note or comment. It is uxiiler the 
direction of a board of Managers, comprising Baptists, Episcopalians, Metho- 
<lists, Presbyterians, Reformed Dutch and Society of Friends. 

John C. Smith, President. William Whitlock, Treasurer. 

John C. Brigham, Secretary. Joseph Hyde, Gen. Agent and Trea.s. 

Rev. E. S. Janes, Financial Secretary. 

AMERICAN BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS. 
(Oflice, Brick Churcli Chapel, 151 Nassau-street.) 
The object of (he Board is to propagate tlie gospel among unevangelized na- 
tions and communities, by means of preachers, catechists, schoolmasters, and 
the press. Principal seat of operations at Boston, Mass., Mission House 37 
Pemberton Square. 

Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen, President. 

William J. Armstrong, Secretary. 

Almon Merwin, Receiving Agent, New-York. 

COLONIZATION SOCIETY OF THE CITY OF NEW- YORK. 
(Oflice, 142 Nassau-street.) 
This Institution was founded in 1831, and is auxiliary to the American Colon- 
ization Society, in conveying to Afi-ica, with their own consent, the free col- 
ored persons of the United States. 

Anson G. Phelps, President. Rev. Alexander Proudfit, Secretary. 

Moses Allen, Treasurer. 



264 RELIGIOUS AMD BENEVOLENT L\.ST1TUTI0NS. 

AMERICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION SOCIETY. 
(Office, 36 Park Row.) 
J. G. Hornblower, President. Rev. Eliakim Phelps, Secreiary. 

William A. Booth, Treasurer. 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 
(Office, 150 Nassau-street.) 

Formed by persons of the Presbyterian, Congregational, Associate Reformed, 
and Reformed Dutch Churclies, in May, 1826. The object is " to assist con- 
gregations that are unable to support the gospel ministry, and to send the gos- 
pel to tlie destitute within the United States.^' 

Henry Dwight, President. Rev. Milton Badger, and ? „ .* • , 

Jasper Corning, Treasurer. Rev. Charles Hall, ^ secretaries. 

AMERICAN SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION SOCIETY. 
(Office 1-16 Chestnut-street, Philadelphia, 152 Nassau-street, New-York.) 
Its object is to establish and sustain Sunday Schools in destitute regions, and 
to supply moral and religious reading for the young. It is composed of all 
evangelical denominations. Its publication list contains one thousand dif- 
ferent volumes, maps, cards, &,c. &,c. ' 
Alexander Henry, President. Herman Cope, Treasurer, 
F. W. Portei-, Cor. Secretary. J. C. Meeks, Agent at New- York. 

AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY. 

(Office, 150 Nassau-st.) 

This institution was formed in May, 1825, and has since stereotyped several 
thousand duodecimo tracts, in Englisii, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, 
German, Danish and Welsh, besides numerous occasional voluuics. It is man- 
aged bj*-{j.ublisliing, distributing and tinance committees. 

T. Frelinghuysen, President, 

Wm. A. Hallock, ^ 

O. Eastman, > Secretaries. 

R. S. Cook, ) 

O. R. Kingsbury, Assistant Sec. and Treas. 

AMERICAN TEMPERANCE UNION SOCIETY. 

(Office, 8 Beekman-street.) 

John H. Cocke, President. John Marsh, Secretary. 

Jasper Corning, Treasurer. 

AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY. 

(Office, 143 Nassau-street.) 

This institution was founded in 183.3; its object is the entire abolition of 

slaveiy in the United States, and to publish the National Anti-Sla\ery Stantlard. 

Lindley Coates, President. Lydia M. Cliilds, Secretary. 

J. T. Hopper, Treasurer. 

AMERICAN AND FOREIGN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY. 

Arthur Tappan, President. Lewis Tappan, Secretary, 

William Shotnell, Treasurer. 

AMERICAN SEAMAN'S FRIEND SOCIETY.— (Office, 71 Wall-street.) 
This institution was formed, January, 1826; commenced the Sailor's Maga- 
zine, and other steady operations, in the fall of 1828. 

Edward Richardson, President. John Spaulding, Secretary. 

Charles N. Talbot, Treasurer. 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 
(Mission House, corner of Centre and Reade-streefs, N. Y.) 
Walter Lowrie, Corresponding Secretary. Rev. D. Wells, Treasurer. 



BENEVOLENT AND RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS. 2Co 

DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE" PRO- 
TESTANT EPISCOPAr> CHURCH. 

Tliis society comiJi-clicmis all persons who are members of the Pvotcstant 
Episcopal Church ill the Uniteil States. The rvlissionary field is regarileil as 
one — The World ; the terms Domestic and Foreign, being understood as terms 
of locality, adoi)ted for convenience. Domestic AIissions are those which 
are estalished within, and Foreign Missions are those which are established 
u-ithout, the territory of the Uniteil States. 

The next annual meeting is to be held in Boston, on the 21st June, 18-13. 

Rev. N. Say re Harris, 218 Rroadway, New-York, Secretary and general 
astent of the Domestic Committee. 

Thomas N. tftanfonl, 152 Broadway, New-York, Treasurer. do. 

Rev. John A. Vaughan, D. D. 281 Broadway, New- York, Secretary and Gen- 
eral Agent Foreign Committee. 

Dr. J. Smyth Rogers, 57 Wall-street, New-York, Treasurer, do. 

THE GENERAL PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION. 

(Depository, 20 John-street, New-York.; 

This Society consists of the Bishops of the Protestant Church, — the presiding 
Bishop being President, and the other Bishops Vice-Presidents thereof, — of 
the Clergy and Sui>printenden!s of the Sunday Schools of the same, and of per- 
sons who contribute in one payment thirty dollars to its funds. 

Rev. A Ten Broeck, 20 John-steel, N. Y. Secretary. 

FEMALE MORAL REFORM SOCIETY.— (OiKce 149 Nassau street.) 
Mrs. C. W. Hawkins, President. Pvlrs. S. R. Ingraham, Secretary. 

?.Irs. Jane Beatty, Treasurer. 

.MARINE BIBLE SOCIETY.— (Office, 71 Wall-street.) 
Hugh Aikrnan, President. 

NEW-YORK BIBLE SOCIETY.— (Olncos 71 Wall and 115 Nassau-street.) 
Alfred Edwards, President. John Slosson, Secretary. 

NEW-YORK CITY TRACT SOCIETY.— (OfTice 150 Nassau-sU-eet.) 

T. Frelinghuysen, President. 
A. R. Wetmore, ) c„^,.««„.-„„ 
Isaac Orchard ^ Secretaries. 

NEW-YORK SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION.— (OlTicc 152 Nassau street.) 
One hundred schools of evangelical denominations in connection. 
ls;uic Ferris, Prc^sidenl. Horace Holden, ? o * • 

J. C. Meeks, Agent. M. C. Morgan, \ '^t'cretaries. 

American and Forkign Bible Society, — (Baptist,) 350 Broome-strect. 
Home Mission Society,— (Baptist,) .350 Broome-s'reet. 
Methodist Book Concern, — ^200 Mulberry-street. 
Missionary Society, — (MefhodisI,) 200 Mulberry-street. 
Board ok Education, — (Presbyterian,) 23 Centre-street. 
Domestic Missionary Society, — (Episcopal,) 281 Bi'oadway. 
Foreign Missionary Society, do. do. do. 

Education Society, do. do. do. 

Tract Society, do. 20 John-street. 

Consistory Rooms, — (Dutch Reformed,) 102 Nassau, corner Ann-street. 
Missionary Society, do. 102 Nassau-street. 

American Society for Meliorating the condition of the Jews, — 
-(Oflice 1 12 Nassau-street.) Rev. Wm. C. Brownlee, D. D. President. 

Rev. Alextinder ProudCit, and eleven others, Vice-Presidents. 
Alexander Jl. Burrill, Rec. Sec'y. Thomas S. Shepard, Treasurer. 

23 



266 BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 

NEW-YORK ORPHAN ASYLUM.— (FoumieJ in 1807.) 
The Asylum is deligJitfully situated at Bloomingdale, about five miles north 
from the City Hall, on the bank of the Hudson river; it is a handsome building:, 
surrounded by nine acres of highly cultivated grounds, which belong to this 
worthy institution. The average number of male and female orphans at the 
asylum is about 200. 

PROTESTANT HALF ORPHAN SOCIETY. 

Located in Twelfth-street. Established in 1835. 

ROMAN CATHOLIC ORPHAN ASYLUM.— (Prince st. corner of Mott.) 
This institution was incorporated in 1817. The establishment is conducted 
by the Sisters of Charil)'. Average number of ori)hans, male and female. 
about 200. ' 

NEW-YORK FIRE DEPARTMENT FUND. 

The object of this institution is to relieve the widows and orphans of deceased 
firemen, and to assist sick or disabled members and their families. The olTicers 
of the Department are elected annually by the representatives of the fire en- 
gine, hook and ladder and hose companies, and fire wardens. Several thou- 
sand dollars are annually expended in deeds of charity under the direction of 
tlie trustees. 

SAILOR'S SNUG HARBOR. 
(Situated on the north side of Statcn Island.) 

This noble charitable Institution, was founded by the testament of Capt. Ro- 
bert R. Randall, who died in 1801, bequeathing a lai-ge landed estate in the city 
of New- York, the income of which, was to be expended in supporting aged 
and disabled sailors. It is under the direction of trustees a]ii)ointed by State 
authority, who have within a few years caused to be erected a large and splen- 
did edifice, consisting of a centre building and two extensive wings, two sto- 
ries in height besides the basement; showing a marble front of 225 feet — at- 
tached to which is a farm of 160 acres of land. 

Upwards of one hundred aged and disabletl sailors, find here a safe retreat, 
free from the cares and storms of life. The remains of the donor are deposited 
in front of the main building, over whch has been erected an appropriate 
monument to his memory. 

SEAMEN'S FUND AND RETREAT. 

Offi»e, 71 Wall-street, New- York. The Retreat is situated on Staten Island, 
near the Quarantine Ground. 

This is a hospital for the reception of sick and disabled seamen. It was 
founded by a law of the State in 1830, levying a tax on each master of a vessel 
of $1.50 for each foreign voyage, and $1.1)0 for every mariner, and 25 cents for 
each voyage coastwise ; v/hich entitles each individual to the benefit of the 
liospital, while sick or disabled. 

The amount collected is about $27,000 annually — in addition to which, the Re- 
treat has had a loan of $45,000 from the funds'of the Marine Hospital, arising 
from alien passengers, arriving at the port of New-York. 

The hospital is a valuable building, of three stories; 208 feet long by 52 
wide, having wings of 34 feet in depth, and two stories high. This hospital 
cost $100,000, attached to which is 37 acres of ground, which cost the State 
about $10,000. It will accommodate 200 patients. 

By a law passed March 17, 1843, " The Trustees of the Seamen's Fund and Re- 
treat in the city of New-York, shall consist of the following persons to wit: — 
The Mayor of the said citj', the Health Officer, the President of the Ship Mas- 
ters' Society and Nautical Institution, the President of (he Marine Society, to- 
gether with seven other persons appointed by the Govorner and Senate, four of 
whom shall be or shall have been shipmasters. 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 267 

ALBANY ORPHAN ASYLUM. 

lliis asylum was founded in 1S30, and incorporated March 30, 1831, by tlie 
name (jf '"' Tlic Society for the Relief of Orplian and Destitute Children in the 
City of Albany." 

Tlie asylum ctlilice, which is of brick, and of two stories on a hif^h base- 
ment, with five acres of lantl, is situated about a mile westerly from the capi- 
tol. The general control of the institution is vested in a board of thirteen 
nianan-ers, liavin;;- a President, Secretary, and Treasurer, chosen from their 
own number, and its domestic concerns are conducted by a Superintendent, a 
Teacher, and an Assistant Tracher, all females. The children are fauglit 
llio rudiments of learning- usual to the common schools; besides which, the 
irirls are taught plain sewing-, knitting, and such household matters as their 
years allow, and the boys are employed occasionally in the garden and about 
the other grounds. After attaining tlie age of eight years, they are bound out, 
the girls till the age of eigiiteen years, and the boys till twenty-one, to such 
persons as- can furnish a committee of managers satisfactory evidence that 
they are suitable persons to receive them. 

The cliildren at present in the Asylum number from 50 to 60. Not a single 
death has occurred in the last year. Indec;!, the iiealth of this institution, for 
a number of years, has been truly remarkable. 

The Asylum is supported mainly by donations from the citizens of Albany. 
During the last year, liowever, the pressure of the times having been such as 
materially to diminish the supplies from this source. Gen. Stephen Van Rens- 
s->I :or. who has in his Manor House Gai-den, at the north part of the city, a 
supo.-i) Century Plant, or American Aloe, (Agnvc Americana,) which has been 
l.'i.-^.c fjr upward of six t)' years, and which in June last gave signs of flowering 
f);-th(' .irst time, permitted it to be exhibited forthe bcnefitof the Asylum. The 
receipts of the exlubition in Albany amount to $1,1^58.27, and in New- York, to 
;j;l,0()0.10. After deducting expenses the net proceeds amounted to $1,972.74, 
with which the managers were enabled to pay the debts and expenses of tlie 
Asylum for the year. 

The Managers are — Archibald Mclntyre, President; John I. Wendell, Ira 
Harris, James Dexter, Rev. Wm. James, John Q. Wilson, Marcus T. Rey- 
nolds, Ichabod 1^. Judson, James D. Wasson, Eli Perry, Lawson Annesley, 
Members; John G. Wasson, Secretary; and Dyer Lathrop, Treasurer. 

ST. JOSEPH'S ROMAN CATHOLIC ORPHAN ASYLUM. 

This Asylum was founded in 1832, and incorporated April 12, 1842. It is 
under tlie immediate care of " The Sisters of Cliarity," subject to the general au- 
thority and direction of a Boanl of Managers. The Asylum edifice is on 
Lodge-street, in the rear of St. Mary's Church. The number of children now 
in this asylum is between thiriy and fcn-ty, who are taught the rudiments of 
common learning, needle work, ordinary houschokl affairs, ^c. Besides the 
cliildren gratuitously taken care of, female boarilers are receivetl and in- 
structed for pay, as one of the means of supporting tlic institution. 

The olTicers arc Thomas Gough, President; Owen Murray, Vice-President; 
John Tracy, Secretary; Peter M. Morange, Treasurer. 

BUFFALO ORPHAN ASYLUM. 

[ncorpora'ed April, 1837. The object of this Institution is to provide an 
asylum for orphan anil destitute children. It was first formed in 1835, by a 
few ciiaritable and benevolent ladies, and is supported by voluntary contribu- 
tions. Tlie asylum buiUling is situated on Niagara-street, and now contains 
ii) inmates. 

Albert II. Tracy, President. Henry Hamilton, Secretary. 

William Madison, Steward and Collector. 

Note. — In addition to the above Institutions, tliere are numerous other insti- 
tutions in the State, which have necessarily been omitted for the want of cor- 
rect information. 



268 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIKTY. 



N. Y. STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



This society was organized at an Agricultural State Convention, iu 
Albany, in February, 1832, and the same year was incorporated. Until 
1S40, its proceedings, embracing many valuable papers on American hus- 
bandry, were published in " The Cultivator," a jiaper establislied by the 
Society, and placed in charge of the late Judsre Buel, as conductor. At its 
annual meeting, in 1841, the society determined to mal^e a more vigorous 
effort to prosecute its objects, and appointed a committee to apply to the 
Legislature for aid: whereupon that body appropriated $8,01)0 annually 
for five years. This sum was apportioned among the counties as follows, 
but was not to be paid until the several respective societies should raise an 
equal sum by voluntary subscription. 

Albany, $20.5 Oneida, 

Allegany, 123 Onondaga,. - 

Broome, 67 Ontario, .... 

Cattaraugus, 86 Orange, ..... 

Cayuga, 151 Orleans, 75 

Chautauque, l43|Oswego, 131 



$255 
2U4 
130 
152 



Chemung 62 

ChenanoQ, 122 

Clintcn,\ 84 

Columbia, 133 

Cortland, 75 

Delaware, 106 

Dutchess, 157 

Erie, 186 

Essex, 71 

Franiflin, 50 

Fulton and Hamilton, 60 

Genesee, 179 

Greene, 91 

Herkimer, 112 

Jefferson, ISI: 

Kings,..: 14J 

Lewis, 53 

Livingston, 117 

Madison, 120 

Monroe, 194 

Montgomery, 107 

New-York to Am. Institute,. . . 950 



Otsego, MS 

Putnam, ;.-S 

Queens, .... ! 1 

Rensselaer, 1^0 

Richmond , 3 ! 

Rockland, 36 

Saratog.a, 121 

Schenectady, 51 

Schoharie, 97 

Seneca , 74 

Steuben, 138 

St. Lawrence, 170 

Suffolk, 97 

Sullivan, 47 

Tioga, 61 

Tompkins, 114 

Ulster, 137 

Warren, 40 

Washington, 12^3 

Wayne, 126 

Westchester, 146 

Yates, 61 

700 



Niagara, 93|N. Y. S. Agricultural Society, 

With this aid, the societj"^, which had struggled for several j^ears for 
existence, at once rose in public favor. Its first Fair was held at Syra- 
cuse in the autumn of 1841, and was well attended. Its second Fair was 
held at Albany, September, 1842, at which there was a more extenr:.ive 
exhibition of improved farm stock, implements of husbandry, &,c., than 
was ever before made in this country on a similar occasion. The socie- 
ty's next Fair is to be held at Rochester, in September, 1843. 

The officers of this society, for 1843, are as follow: 

James S. Wadsworth, Livingston, President. 

Vice-Presidents. 
1st dist., James Lenox, New-York. 
2d " Robert Denniston, Orange. 
3 J " Anthony Van Bergen, Greene. 



STATE TEMI'ERANCE SOCIETY. 269 

4l}i (list., E. C. Dclavan, Saratoga. 

5th " Jonathan 1). I.edyard, Madison. 

6th " Z. A. Leland, Steuben. 

7th " J. M. Sherwood, Cayuira. 

8th '• L. B. Lan^worthy, Monroe. 
II. S. Randall, Cortland Village, Corresponding Secretary . 
I.utiier Tuclcer, Albany, Recording Secretary. 
Ezra P. Prentice, Albany, Treasurer. 

Additional Mkimbehs of the Executive Committee. 

C. N. Bement, Albany. J. McD. McTiityre, Albany. 

H. D. Grove, Buskirli's Bridae. Thos. S. Hillhouse, Watervliet. 

Alex. Walsh, . Lansingbiirgh. 

Since the passage of the law above named, subordinate societies have 
been formed in the counties of Albany, Cayuga, Chautauque, Columbia, 
Chemuns, Clinton, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Erie, Essex, Genesee, 
Greene, Herkimer, Jefferson, Kings, Lewis, Livingston, Madison, Mon- 
roe, Montgomery, Niagara, Oneida, Onondaga, Ontario, Orange, Or- 
leans, Osv.'ego, Queens, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Suffolk, St. Lawrence, 
Schenectady, Seneca, Steuben, Tompkins, Washington, Wayne and 
Yates. 

These societies report to the State Society, and an abstract of their do- 
ings is embraced in the Annual Report of the latter, which is published 
by the Legislature. 



NEW-YORK STATE TEMPERANCE SOCIETY. 



^:: 

This society was organized April 2d, 1829. March 6U\, 18.32, the first 

number of the Temperance Recorder, (the present organ of the society,) 

was issued. Since that time, and up to February 1st, 18J.3, the number of 

publications issued by this society amount to 1.3,067,964. The receipts 

and disbursements of the society, since its organization up to February 

1st, 1343, amounted to $160,159.36. 

The following named gentlemen are the present officers of this society. 

Hon. R. Hyde Walworth, of Saratoga Springs, President. 

John Power, D.D., New-York,^ 

Hiram Corliss, Greenwich, 

Garrit Smith, Peterboro, 1. Vice-Presidents. 

Ben Johnson, Ithaca, ( 

Oliver Teall, Syracuse. 
Ashbel W. Riley, Rochester, j 
Philip Phelps, Chairman, 
Ira Harris, 
Azor Titber, 
Dr. B. P. Staats, 
Rev. L N. AVvckon\ D.D., . ^^ ,• r- 

" B.T. Welch, b.D., ^ Exccutne Comm.tlee. 

Erastus Corning, 

Bradford R. Wood, of Albany, 

S. W. Dana, of Troy, 

Archibald Campbell, Treasurer. 
Otis Allen, Recording Secretary. 

Oliver Scovil, Corresponding Secretary and Ollice Agent. 
Israel Smith, .Auditor. 
Office. 81 State-street, Albany. 

23* 



270 STATE INSTITUTIONS. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS. 



STATE LUNATIC ASYLUM. 
(Situated one mile west of the centre of the city of Utica.) - 

This Institution was founded b)^ an act of the Leg-islatuie, passed March SO, 
1836'. The work v/as commenced in the spring of 1838, when the foundations 
were laid according to a plan contemi)lating the erection of four buildings, 
each of five hundred and fifiy feet front, placed at right angles to each other, 
facing outwards. They were to be connected at tlie angles by verandahs of 
open lattice work, anil each building was to be tiiree stories hig-h exclusive of 
a basement and attic. The surface enclosed by the foundations measures 
thirteen and a half acres, of which the builtlings are to occupy two and a half 
acres. The whole grounds include a productive farm of about ISO acres. 

One of the above buildings was finished according to the above plan in 
1842. It is of the Grecian lioric order of architectiu'e, and is conslructed of a 
dark grey limestone, quarried at Trenton, about eleven miles dis'ant from 
Utica. This edifice was ready for the reception of patients in January, 1843. 
It will accommodate about 300 of them. 

Offi.cers. — Charles A. Mann, Dr. C. B. Coventry, Alfred Munson, Thomas 
H. Hubbard, and Nicholas Devereaux, of Utica; Jacob Sulhei-land, Geneva; 
Theodoric Romeyn Beck, Albany; David Buel, Tro}^; Abraham \ . Williams, 
New-York; Managers. Edmond A. Wetmore, Utica, Treasurer. Amasiah 
Brigham, Superintendent and Physician. Henry A. Buttolph, Assistant Physi- 
cian. Cyrus Chatfield, Steward. Mrs. C. Chatfield, Matron. 

Altliough the edifice now occupied, was not ready for the reception of pa- 
tients till January last, yet tlie board of managers was organized as early as 
April 19, 1842, and their first of the series of Annual Reports required by law 
to be made by the JN'Ianagcrs to the Legislature, bears date February 6, 18-13. 
From this report the following particulars are gatiiered. 

The establishment is supplied with water from a large well dug for. the 
purpose on the premises, and fitted with a force-pump, worked by horse-pow- 
er, which raises the water to a spacious reservoir in the attic of the centre- 
segment of the edifice, from which it is distributed by pipes Avhithersoever it 
is required. The pump can be worked also by hand. The well is 34 feet 
deep, by 16 feet in diameter for the first 23 feet, and 8 feet from that point to 
the bottom. The pump tube is of iron, with a two-inch bore, apd carries the 
water from the well to the reservoir, a distance of 450 feet. 

The buihling is warmed by furnaces in the basement, and the heat is trans- 
mitted by flues. The cooking, washing, and kitchen-work is all performetl 
by what is calied a cooking-range and boilers connected with it. 

The salary of the Superintendent is $2,000; and the institution is fortunate 
in having been able to secure for that post a man so eminently qualified for its 
difficult, delicate, and responsible functions as Dr. Brigham. The salary of 
the Assistant, the Treasurer, and the Steward is $500 to each, and of the Ma- 
tron $200. 

The use to which the Asylum farm will be put, beyond the keeping of such 
swine as may be fed by the offal of the establishment, and the few horses and 
oxen needed for service, will be chiefly the grazing of cows to supply milk, 
which will constitute a principle article of diet, and a large supply of which 
will, therefore, be required. An extensive garden for esculent vegetables, 
fruit, &c. will also be cultivated; and the care of this, and of the farm, will 
furnish ample opportunity for that moderate and cheerful labor, which forms 
so important a portion of the curative treatment at such institutions. Me- 
chanical employments will also constitute a part of the system. 

According to the United States census of 1840, the whole number of luna- 
tics and idiots in this State is 2,340, of whom 739 were at public cliarge. This 
would give, on the whole population of 2,428,921, one lunatic or idiot to every 
1 038 persons. But the Secretary of State, in 1841, reported 803 lunatics at 
the public charge. The highest numbef of both lunatics and idiots, above 
staled, however, is undoubtedly much below the trutli. From fuller data, de- 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 271 

rived from other sources, the whole number of lunatics in the State cannot 
probably be less than 1,250, and of idiols, about 1,500. By the act for org-an- 
izing- this Asylum, it is mad« tlie iluty of the assessors to aseerlain the number 
and names of all insane persons in their respective towirs ami wards in all the 
l^tafc, and send Iheir lists to tlie County CIci-ks to be transmitted to the Trea.- 
surer of tlie Asylum; but tiiis duty has been so little heeded, that the Manag-ers 
are yet without tlie means of knowing eitlier tlie number or condition of this 
unfortunate class of persons. Jiy the same act, tiie patients are received at tiie 
Asylum at Stale charge, on the written order of some Court, Judge, Justice, 
or Su])reine Court Commissioner; anil if at private charge, only on the sworn 
certificate of two physicians of good standing, tiial tliey (the patients,) are 
insane. 



INSTITUTION FOR TIIE INSTRUCTION OF THE DEAF AND DUMB. 

This institution made its first annual report to the Legislature in 1819. It is 
situated in the city of New-York, a little out from its more compact part. The 
corporate boanl, in which is vested the general control of the institution, as 
stated in the last annual report, (the 24!h,) is as follows: 

Officers and Directors. 
Rev. James Milnor, D.D., President, 
(Vacant,) 1st Vicc-Presiilent. 
Robert C. Cornell, 2d Vice-President, 
Robert D. Weeks, Treasurer. 
Harvey P. Peet, Secretary. 
Lewis Seymour, Timothy Hetiges, B. L. Woolle.y, Wm. L. Stone, Shepherd 
Knapp, Samuel Downer, jr., Jacob Dralce, Wm. Kclley, John R. Willis, Hen- 
ry E. Davics, Augustin Averill, Frederick A. Tallniailgo, Samuel S. Howland, 
George S. Robbins, Prosper M. W^etmore, William ^V. Campbell, Benjamin 
R. Winlhrop, William II. Macy, George B. Butler, Israel Russell — Directors. 

•The teachers and other agents engaged in the instruction and discipline of 
tlie institution are as follows: 

Harvey P. Peel, A.M., Principal. 

Professors. 
David Ely Bartlett, A.M., John Hancock Pettingell, A.M., Josiah Addison 
Carj-, A.M., Aaron Lucius Chapin, A.M. Oran VVilkinson Morris, A.M., Jacob 
Van Noslrund, A.M. 

SrM^'rorn"^'"'? Monitors. 

Samuel Sargent, M.D., Physician. 

Miss Harriet Stoner, Matron. 

Mrs. Mary E. Mitchill, Assist. Mati-on. 

Edmund B. Peet, Steward. 

Theodore Goerck, Cabinet Maker. 

John C. Miller, Book-binder. 

John Hackett, Shoeinalcer. 

James M. Trask, Tailor. 

Garret Mead, Gardener. 
This list of teacliers, and their designated functions, furnishes a general in- 
dication of the t)bjects and employments of the institution. 

The number of pupils on the 31st of December, 18-11, was 162. During the 
year 1842, 3G pupils left the institution, and 28 were received, making the inini- 
ber 154 on the 31st Dec. 1842. Of tliese, 117 were supported by this State; 12 
b}- the city of New-York; 5 by the State of New-Jersey; and the residue by 
their friends, or by the institution. 

Receipts. 

The total receipts, during 1842, were $34,582.2.3, including the balance of 

$1,091 .21 on hand :d tlie beginning of the year. Of this amount the jirincipal 

items were as follows : from the ComiJtroIler on account of the State pupils 

$15,379.90; donation under the act of April 3, 1834, $3,000; from Regents of 



272 STATE INSTITUTIONS'-, 

the University $1,013.77; from New-York city $1,954.6"); from New-Jersey 
!3-827.50; from private pupils $948.6-1; for sales of clothiiif;- and cash advanced 
to pupils !»;884. 09; sales of articles from tailor's shop .$487.45: for work done 
in the book-bindery $1,0U0; proceeits of investments in Treasury notes $5,-- 
353.15. 

Expenditures, 
" "The total amount of expenditures in 1842, was ,§31,596.78; leaving- a balance 
in hantl, at the end of the year, of $2,984.45. The whole amount paid for sa- 
laries of teachers and the various assistants, was $8,876.71. 

The average number of deaths per annum, for the last 14 j'ears, has been but 
1 to 130. During the year anew brick building- has been erected for the accom- 
modation of the meclianical branches of the institution, consisting- of a centre,. 
3 stories higli, with two wings of 2 stories, the whole being 140 feet long'\,by 
25 feet wide. 

Terms of admission. 

The annual charge for a pupil is $130, which includes board and every thing 
except clotliing antl travellin": expenses. The regular time of admission is 
tlie 1st of September in each j ear; and none are admitted under 12 nor over 25 
years of age, unless in very special cases and at the discretion of the Board- 



NEW-YORK INSTITUTION FOR THE BLIND. 

This institution was incoi poraled by legislative act, passed May 21, 1831, 
under the name of "The New-York Institution for the Blind." Its general 
control is vested in a Board consisting of a President, Vice-President, Trea- 
surer, Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secretary and twenty Managers, 
Its instruction and discipline are entrusted to a Superintendent, Principal Tea- 
cher, Teacher of Music, vocal and instrumental. Matron, and Teacher of bas- 
ket-making, and band-box malcing. 

From the last annual report, dated March 2, 1843, signed by Anson G. Phelp:», 
President, George F. Allen, Recording Secretary, and Edward Roonie, Cor- 
responding Secretary, and from the accompanying reports of sub-committees 
of the Board, the following particulars are derived : 

In addition to the ordinary rudiments of district schools, the pupils are taught 
Natural Philosophy, Astronomy, Algebra, and Geometry, 

The pupils, generally, are arranged in two divisions, each receiving instruc- 
tion in the alcove branches half the day, and the other half engaged in music 
and manufactures. The inmates of the institution, not included in (he above 
divisions, are eight in number, who are somewhat more advanced in life, and 
are wholly engaged in accomplishing themselves in some species of manufac- 
ttire, or in music. 

During the last year nine new male, and thirteen new female pupils, were 
received, making the whole number, at the close of the year, 38 males and ilO 
females. During the same period 11 left the institution. 

The handicraft employments are willow work, weaving, and band-box and 
other paste-board work. The value of tlie fabrics of the first kind, made du- 
ring the last year, was $2,375.35; of the second, $733.06; of the third, $1,- 
579.68, 

The report of the physician of this institution shows a most gratifying con- 
dition of general health. 

During the vacation, in the month of August, an excursion was made into 
the western part of the State by several of the pupils, under the care of a com- 
mittee of the Managers and officers, for the purpose of diffiising a fuller and 
more general knowledge of the character of the Institution, and the great be- 
nefits it is capable of conferring on the blind. As the Institution is a publ'c 
one, this step was eminently proper, and its results were every way favorable. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 



STATE LIBRARY. 



273 



This Institution was founded in 1818. It is deposited in the Capitol; and in- 
chuies an extensive Law Library of ahoul 5.000 volumes, and a library of gen- 
eral 1 iterature and iscienec of aljoiit the same number, kept in separate apartments. 

The s^eueral superintemlenee of the establishment is committed to certain 
State Oilieers, viz : the Governor, Lt. Governor, Secretary of Slate, Comi)trol- 
ler, anil Attorney-General, wiio are styled Trustees of the State Library, and 
who direct tiie purchases of books and' all other matters connectetl with the 
insLitution, and fallitij? within the jjowors conferred on them by law. They 
appoint the Librarian, also, who receives a salary of §700, and who is required 
to enforce ttie regulations prescribed by the Trustees. 

The latest report of tlie Trustees is dated February 14, IS12, and from it the 
following facts are derived. 

The whole sum appropriated for the use of the Library, for the year ending 
30(h December, 1841, was $4,318.-58. 

The whole sum appropriated for the use of the Library, for the year ending 
1st Jan. 1842, was $4,018.58. 

Among the rare and valuable works in this Library are the following:— 
" Meerman's Treasury of the Civil and Common Law," in 7 vols, folio. This 
fine copy is from the library of tlie late Baron Bonance, of the Exchequer. 
It is a work of high reputation, and it is believed that this is the only copy in 
the United States. A rich addition is also made to the same department in 
'•'The Theodosian Code, with Commentaries by Jacob Gothofried," in (5 vols, 
folio. The other works, worthy of special notice for their scarcity and value 
are, ''Cases of Appeal to the House of Lords," in 12 vols, folio. These cases 
were published only for tlie use of members, and to be obtained only on 
sale of tlie library of a member of that House. 

" Archa^ologia, or Tracts relating to Antiquities," in 25 vols. 4to. 

'•The Gentlemen's Magazine," complete from 1731 to the present time, in 
167 vols. This work, containing, as it does, notices of the current events of 
tlie day, in one unbroken series, for more than a century of the most interest- 
ing periotl of the world, furnishes a mine of history of incalculable value. 

" Journals of the House of Lords and Commons," a complete set from the 
commencement of the printed series in 1508, with indexes, &c., in 188 vols, 
folio. 

"Reports of Parliamentary Committee, from 1700 to 1800," a complete se- 
.ries, in 16 vols, folio. 

It may be added, that several valuable works have been purchased for the 
Library, by the agent of the State, in llollanil, J. Romeyn Brodhead, Esq. 



STATE PRISONS. 



Of these there are two; one at Auburn, in Cayuga count}', and the other at 
Sing-Sing, in Westchester county. 

AUBURN STATE PRISON. 

This prison originated in an act of the Tx^gislature in 1816; and after several 
experiments and mollifications, it was organized on its present jilan of disci- 
pline and management, in 1823. lis general control is vested in a Board of In- 
spectors; and the internal discipline and management are entrusted to an 
Agent, with subordinates. The convicts are loilgcd in sci)arate colls, at night; 
and during the working hours, by day, tliey work in company, but in absolute 
silence, ail speech and communicali(>n by signs, or look-s, being strictly for- 
bidden. Many mechanical employments are pursued, and tliose who enter 
without any are taught some trade. J'arl of the plan has been to let the labor 
of the convicts to contractors, and the a\ ails of this lalmr, as. well as (hat which 
is done directly on public account, go to defray the ex])cnses of the lu-ison. 

The trades plied in the prison are coopering, cotton weaving, shoe-making 
stone-cutting, spinning, comb making, hame making, carpentry, and silk ma- 
Jiinff, 



274 



STATE PKISOKS, 



The manufacture of silk in this prison, was commenced in May, 1511; anil' 
the experiment, so far, has proved very successful. The prison is now a mar- 
ket for cocoons and reeled silk, and the supply comes from various anil distant 
points, both in and out of this state. The article at present made for sale is 
sewing silk, and it is said to be of excellentquality. With the progress of time, 
the manufacture of other fabrics will be introduced; and the business promises 
to become extensive and very important. 

The last Annual Report of the Inspectors, dated Janunry 16, 1843, furnishes 
the following particulais for the year ending September 30, 1843. 

The total amount of earnings of the prison b)^ conviPt labor, erection of 
workshops, &c. is is stated at $Sl,34i). 15 ; and the total amount of cash disburse- 
ments, $6.7,870.79; showing a balance in favor of earnings, $13,478,36. 

The principal sources and items of these earnings were as follow: — From 
(he various mechanic shops of the prison ij54,783.56; fees paid by visitors, 
$1,692.75; small jobs and articles sold for cash ifl, 173. 88; materials and labor 
on workshops within the prison $13,746.48; increase of inventory in silk anil 
other property $8,029.98. 

The total amount of cash receipts from all sources was;i69,100.09, from whicli 
theabove disbursemets being deducted, left a cash balance in favor of the 
prison of $1,235.30. 

The balances due from' contractors on account of their contracts for convict 
labor was $12,585.56; and the value of silk, in diiierent forms, on hand, was 
$8,779.56. ■ 

The report states that early fri the winter just g-one a contract was made with 
a large hardware dealer, Mr. James Horner, of Albany, for the services of not 
less than 10 or more than 300 convicts, for 5 years, at 30 cents each per day, to 
make files, and certain articles of cutlery of foreign fabric, and not now matle 
in this country, the contractor to furnish his own water or s;eam power. It 
was expected that operations under this contract would be commenced in April 
or May, 1843. 

The whole number of convicts in the prison on the 31st December, 1841, was 
707; the number received liuring 184:2, was 244, making a total of 951. 

The number discharged during 1842, was as follows :^by exi)iration of term 
187; by pardon 38; removed to New- York House of Refuge 4; escaped 2; 
removed to Lunatic Assylum 1; died?; leaving in the prison Dec. 31, 1842— 
712. J ) J & t- 

The total number employed under various contracts, were as follows. In 
cooper's shop 34; cotton weave shop 20; shoe shop 38; machine shop 4.3; 
tailor's shop 20; tool shop 28; carpet shop 76; ston« shop 28; spin shop 29; 
comb shop 32; button sliop 8; cabinet shop 57; hame shop 55. 

The numbers employed on State account were as follow: In carpenter's 
shop 12; silk shop 41 ; making machinery for silk shop 3. The residue were- 
employed in the prison kitchen, yards^ hospital and various other services of 
the establishment. 

The contract price for prison rations was one cent per ration more than in 
1841, making a total difference of $2,073.87. The amount of visitors' fees was 
$940-87 less than in 1841 ; which is ascribed to the travel on rail-roads and the 
shorter stops consequent thereon. The diminution of earnings in 1842, caused- 
by the operation of the act of April 9, 1842, relative to mechanical employ- 
ments, is stated at $1,556. 

A new two-story brick workshop, 425 feet long, with a basement under 240 
feet of the length, was erected during the year, and very nearly finished 
throughout. 

The Agent, Henry Polhemus, speaks in very encouraging terms of the suc- 
cess of the silk business as conducted in this prison, and believes it capable of 
advantageous increase to three or four times its prest?nt extent, though 41 con- 
victs are now employed in it. 

The Prison Physician considers the arrangements for eating, sleeping and 
working, as exceedingly well calculated to preserve the health of the con- 
victs; and that the regulations for mental and moral improvement cannot be 
much amendeil. He states the whole number of deaths in the prison, for the 
12 years, eniiing with 1841, at 162, giving an average of 13} per year, in an 
average annual number of 662 convicts. Of those 162 deaths, 71 or nearly half 
were from pulmonary consumption. But in 1842 the whole nuniber of death 



STATE PRISONS. 625 

ivas only 7, out of 712 convicts; and inLS41, the deaths were only 9, out of a 
total number of 707 convicts. He ascribes tliis leniarkuble diminution of 
deaths to the f^eneral humane management of the present agent, Mr. Polhe- 
nuis, and especially to Ihe proper and suHicicnt feeding and clothing of the 
l»risoners, and to the comfortable warming of tlie cells and supply of bed- 
clothes in cold \veatl>er. 

liut (he most remarkable part of the Physician's Report is that which relates 
to the use of cold water, by copious affusion upon the naked head and body of 
the convicts, as a means of discipline. 

This instrument of discipline was introduced, for the first time, in April, 
S842, pursuant to a suggestion made some nine months previously, by Mr. 
Louis Dvvight, President of the Boston Prison Disciplin ijociety, who stated 
that it had beeifusod in the Massachuseits Slate Prison for about two years, 
with eminent success, anil to the exclusion of severe and cruel i)imisliments. 

The first trial of this means of discipline at Auburn, was made on the loth 
of April, by the discharge of two gallons of cold well water, through a funnel 
having at its vertex a bore of 2j inches in diameter, upon the naked head and 
body of one of the most refractory of the convicts. This affusion occupied 
33 seconds of time. The keeper then stopped; but the convict made no ex- 
pressions of submission, and two gallons more were applied in the sam« way. 
Thiscirectually subdued the obstinacy of the convict, who promised reform, 
.and was sent back to his shop, with no laceration of body or still worse exas- 
j)eration of feeling, and he continued obetlicnt and compliant. 

This method has commended itself so highly at the prison, that the physician 
gives it his strongest recomnientlation. 

The report of the Chaplain is also very interesting. Public worship, ac- 
companied by singing, is performed in the prison once every Sabbath ; a Sab- 
bath-school is established; the bible is distributed to the convicts, and the 
Chaplain engages them in personal conversation as much as opportunity al- 
lows. These various means unquestionably do much good; antl the Chaplain 
recommends one more celebration of public worship about the middle of the 
week; prayer with the reading of a short portion of scripture every morning 
at the (able just i>recceding breakfast. He testifies to the permanancy and re- 
ality of sincere religious convictions in many whom he has had occasion to 
observe after leaving i)rison; and furnishes good proof of the great value of 
tlie moral and religious means employed in this establishment. 



MOUNT PLEASANT STATE PRISON. 

This prison is at Sing-Sing, on the east shore of the Hudson river, 33 miles 
above the city of New-York. It was opened for the reception of convicts in 
1S27. It is organized on the i)lan of the Auburn Prison. The i)rincipal prac- 
tical diflercnce between the two, is in the great amount of convict labor be- 
stowed at (he Mount Pleasant Prison, in the marble quarries in the immediate 
contiguity with the prison and very extensive. 

Connectetl with the principal prison, which is for males, is a well arranged 
and distinct department for female convicts. 

From the last Annual Reports of the Insjiectors, and its accompanying docu- 
ments, dated Jainiary Ki, 1S43, the following )5articulars are derived. 

The depressed condition of business in the country generally, materially 
diminished the receipts of the prison, by its effect on the means of contrac- 
tors for fulfilling their engagements, and on the market for the various pro- 
ducts of convict labor. The recent enactment of the legislature for restrict- 
ing the emjiloyment of convicts in mechanical trades. With the tlesign of 
carrying out the enactments referretl to, the production and manufacture of 
silk has been inlroduceil at thisprison, and elforts havealsobeen made to intro- 
duce the manufacture of such articles of hardware as are not made in this 
country, and the making of which at the prison would not interfere with the 
mechanical interests of the community. Something has been done beneficially 
in this way, but the state of the times has vei-y much restricted the results. 

The C(uih receipts ior convict labor during the year, ending September 30, 
1842, were $71,92:5.10; and the disbursements were $72,801.28. 

Some portion of these disbursements were for i)urposes not ordinary; and 
much useful labor was jjcrformed on the prison and its grounds, giving per- 



276 STATE PRISONS. 

manent additional value to (he public property, but not producing income. 
Taking these facts into account, the Agent puts the actual earnings of the es- 
tablishment, for the year, at $5,441.90 more than its disbursements. 

The principal receipts on account of convict labor in mechanical products, 
during the year, were as follow : From the smith and IocIj shop, $3,747. Hat 
shop, $5,t04.98. Boot and shoe shops, $1(),090.51. Brass shop, S3,323.72. 
Cooper-s shop, $12,214.05. Weave shop, $7,249.46. Tool shop, $1,480.69. 

The work done on tiie premises for tlie benetit of the establishment and per- 
manently enhancing the property of the State, consisting chiefly of solid ma- 
sonry, amounted to rising of isl2,000. 

The most productive Ijranch of the prison labor has always been in stone 
quarrying and cutting; but this, during tlie last year, yielded more than $10,000 
less than during the preceding year. 

At the close of the year ending Sept. 30, 1S41, there were in prison 741 males 
and 70 females. During the year ending Sept. 30, 1842, the whole number of 
males received was 234, of females 35, making a total of 1,080. The number 
dischargeil during the last year, by expiration of sentence, was 189 males and 30 
females; by pardon, 34 males and 4 females; by death, 31 males and 6 females; 
making the total number discliarged, including one person sent to the Lunatic 
Asylum, 295, and leaving in prison, Sept. 30, 1842, 720 males and 65 females; 
or 785 in all, showing a diminution of 26 for the year. 

The convicts employed under contracts during the year, were as follows : — 
at coopering 91 ; in carpet shop 57; boot and shoe shops 104; plane-shop 13; 
lock-shop 20; liat shop 24; saddlery shop 28; in all 337. The residue of con- 
victs were mostly employed in the quarries, in dressing stone, and in masomy 
on the premises. 

Of the females, 8 to 10 were employed in the silk department, and the rest 
chiefly in making and mending clotiies for themselves and the male convicts. 

Of the silk business, the agent states that from 1,000 morus multicaulis trees 
planted in the fall of 1841 and tlie spring of 1842, leaves enough were gather- 
ed to produce about ten bushels of cocoons of very superior qualitj^, with cut- 
tings from those trees, and with 5000 more, to be planted in the spring of 1843, 
five acres more were to be covered. Tlie cocoons and raw silk on hand in 
December, 1842, are valued at $617. 54, and the silk machinery at $1,310.40. 
■ To superintend and direct the operations in this department, a European bred 
to the business, Mr. J. Eborall, is employed. Two or three silk looms were 
to be in oiieration the current year, and the agent speaks encouragingly of the 
prospects of this entire department. 

The water required for culinary and all other uses is supplied by well ar- 
ranged works, in great abimdance and of excellent quality. 

The agent speaks in strong terms of the beneficial influence of the la-ors of 
the chaplain on the obedience, content, and industry of the prisoners. 



NATIONAL REGISTER. 



EXECUTIVE GOVERNMENT,— 1813. 

The 14th Presidential term of four years, since the establishment of the 
government of the United States, under the Constitution, began on the 4th of 
March, 1841 ; and it will expire on the 3d of March, 1845. 

.Salary. 

JcHN Tyi.kk, of Virginia, President, $25,000 

Vacant, Vice-President, 5,0(X) 

William Henry Harrison, of Ohio, was elected President, and John Tyler, 
of Virginia, Vice-Presiilent; and assumed their duties on tlie 4th of Marcli, 
1841. On the 4lh of April following President Harrison died; the duties of 
the office in consequence devolved on John Tyler. 



The Cabinet. 

The following are the principal officers in the Executive Department of the 
government, who form the Cabinet, and wlio hold their offices at the will of 
the President. 

Salary. 

Daniel Webster, of Massachusetts, Secretary of State, $6,000 

John C. Spencer, of New-York, Secretary of the Treasury, 6,000 

James M. Porter, of Pennsylvania, Secretary at War, 6,000 

Abel P. Upshur, of Virginia, Secretary of the Navy, 6,000 

Charles A. WicklKfe, of Kentucky, Postmaster-General, 6,000 

Hugh S. Legare, of South Carolina, Attorney-General, 4,000 



State Department. 

Salary. 

Daniel Webster, Secretary, $6,000 

Fletcher Webster, Chief Clerk, 2,000 

DIPLOMATIC BUREAU. 



Salary. 

William S. Derrick, 1,600 

William Hunter, Jr 1,.500 

Francis Markoe, 1,400 

CONSULAn BUREAU. 

Benj. C. Vail, 1,400 

Roberts. Chew, 1,400 

James S. Ringgold, 1,400 

HOME BUREAU. 

T. W. Dickens, 1,400 



Salary. 

Alexander H. Derrick, 900 

Horatio Jones, 1,000 

George Hill, 800 

TRANSLATOR AND LIBRARIAN. 

Robert Greenhow, 1,600 

DISBURSING AGENT. 

Edward Stubbs, 1,450 

PATENT OFFICE. 

H. I. Ellsworth, Com. of Pat. 3,000 
Jos. W . HantI, Chief Clerk, .... 1,700 



24 



278 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 



Treasury Department. 

Salary. 

John C. Spencer, Secretary of the Treasury, 6,0(X) 

McClintock Youn-, Chief Clerk, 2,000 



Salary. 
James W. McCullop, 1st Comp- 
troller, 3,500 

James Larneil, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Albion K. Parris, 2d Comptrol- 
ler, 3,000 

Jonatlian Sever, Chief Clerk, . . . 1,700 
Tully R. Wise, 1st Auditor, .... 3,000 
John Underwood, Chief Clerk, . 1,700 
William B. Lewis, 2d Auditor, . 3,000 

James Eakin, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Peter Hagncr, 3rf Auditor, .3,000 

James Thompson, Chief Clerk,. 1,700 

A. O. Dayton, 4th Auditor, 3,000 

Thomas H.Gilliss, Chief Clerk,. 1,700 
Stephen Pleasonton, 5th Auditoi-, 3,000 
Thomas Mustin, Chief Clerk,. .. 1,700 
William Seldon, Treasurer, .... 3,000 
Wm. B. Randolph, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Thomas L. Smith, Register, 3,000 

Michael Norse, Chief Clerk,.. . . 1,700 



Salary. 
Thomas H. Blake, Commissioner 

of the General Land Office, . . . 3,000 

Cliarles Hopkins, Solicitor, 2,000 

John Williamson, Recorder, .... 2,000 
John M. Moore, Principal Clerk 

of Public Lands, 1,800 

Joseph S. Wilson, Principal 

Clerk of the Private Land 

Claims, 1,800 

William S. Steiger, Principal 

Clerk of the Surveys, 1,800 

Chas. B. Penrose, Solicitor cf the 

Treasury, 3,500 

Nicholas Harper, ") I,lc0 

B. F. Pleasants, \- Clerks, 1,150 

Basil Waring, ) 1,150 

Elisha Whittlesay, Auditor of the 

Treasury for the Post Office 

Department, 3,000 

P. G. Washington, Chief C'k, 2,000 



War Department. 

Salary. 

James M. Porter, Secretary of War, $6,000 

Albert Miller Lea, Chief Clerk, .2,000 

INDIAN DEPARTMENT. I PENSION OFFICE. 

Salary. Salary. 

T. II. Crawford, Commissioner, 3,000 Jas. L. Edwards, Commissioner, 2,500 
Daniel Kurtz, Chief Clerk, 1,600 I Geo. W. Crump, Chief Clerk... . 1,600 

AGENTS FOR PAYING PENSIONS IN THE SEVERAL STATES AND TERRITORIES. 

(No compensation is allowed for the performance of this ti-ust.) 



Albert Newhall, Portland, Me. 
John George, Concord, N. H. 
Isaac Waldron, Portsmouth, N. II, 
Paris Hill, Providence, R. I. 
Thomas Reed, Montpelier, Vt. 
John Peck, Burlington, Vt. 
Franklin Haven, Boslon, Mass. 
A. H. Pomroy, Hartford, Conn. 
Shepherd Knapp, New-York. 
Thomas W. Qlcott, Albany, N. Y. 
Philemon Dickinson, Trenton, N. J. 
Joseph Solms, Philadelphia. 
M. Tiernan Pittsburg, Pa. 
Jacob Alrichs, Wilmington, Del. 
James Swan, Baltimore, Md. 
John Brockenbrough, Richmond, Va. 
Anthony Robinson, Sr., do. 
Archibald Woods, Wheeling, Va. 
John IIusK-e, Fayptteville, N. C. 
Archibald Spears, Charleston, S. C. 
Hugh W. Mercer, Savannah, Geo. 
James A. Girimstead, Lexington, Jv}'. 



Joel M. Smith, Nashville, Term. 
William K. Blair, Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Tliomas Martin, Pulaski, Tehn. 
Robert King, Knoxville, Tenn. 
John W. Campbell, Jackson, Tenn. 
James S. Armstrong, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
John P. Walworth, Natchez, Miss. 
John B. Hogan, Mobile, Ala. 
B. M. LoAve, Huntsville, Ala. 
Patrick Redmond, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
W. C. Anderson, St. Louis, Mo. 
J. F. D. Lanier, Madison, Ind. 
M. C. Fitch, New Albany, Ind. 
Daniel Hay, Carmi, Illinois. 
E. P. Hastings, Detroit, Mich. 
W. E. Woodrulf, Little Rock, Ark. 
A. J. Fisher, Tallahassee, Flor. 
A. M. Reed, Jackson, Flor. 
George W. Jones, Du Buque, Iowa. 
J. P. Van Ness, Washington, D. C. 
J. B. Perrault, New-Orleans, La. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 279 

Navy Departmeut. 

Salary. 

Abel P. Upshur, Sacretani of the Navy, .'. •• . $6,000 

A. Thomas Smith, Chief Cierk, 2,000 



NAVY COMMISSIONERS. 

Salary. 
Com. Lewis Wai-rington, Pi-es. 3,f)00 

Com. Wm. M. Crane, 3,500 

Captain David Conner, 3,500 



SECRETARY. 

Salary. 
Charles W. Goldsboroug-h, 2,000 

CHIEF CLERK. 

William G. llidgley, 1,600 



Post Onice Depart nieut. 

Salary. 

Charles A. Wicklifie, Pofstmaster General, 6,000 

Selah R. Hobbie, Asst. Postmaster General, 2,5t)0 

Philo C. Fuller, do do do 2,500 

John S. Skinner, do do do 2,500 

Jolin Marron, Chief Clerk, 2,000 



DISTRIBUTING POST OFFICES. 

P!;i'es. Offices. 

JNIaine Portland. 

Massachusetts, Boston, 

Rhode Island, Providence. 

Connecticut, Hartford. 

New-York, New-York, Albany, Owejo and Buffalo. 

Pcnnsj-1 vania, Philadelpiiia, Easton, Northumberland, Erie, Pittsburj 

and Washington. 

Maryland, Baltimore. 

Dist. of Columbia, . . AVasliington. 

Virginia, Petersburg, Norfolk, Abingdon and Wheeling. 

North Carolina, Fayetteville, Greensborough and Ashville. 

South Carolina, Charleston and Yorkville. 

Georgia, Augusta, Savannali, Washington and Columbus. 

Alabama, Ilunfsville and Florence. 

Mississip{)), Nalcliez and Vicksburg. 

Louisiana, New Orleans. 

'J'ennessee, Nasliville, Tazewell and Memphis. 

Kentucky, I^ouisville anil Maysvillc. 

Ohio, Cmcinnati, Maysville and Toledo. 

Micliigan, Detroit. 

Indiana, Vincennes and Indianapolis. 

Illinois, Shawnoetown and Chicago. 

Missouri, St. Louis, 

Arkansas, Jackson. 



rOST-OFFICES AND F.XTENT OF THE POST ROADS IN THE UNITED STATES 
AT DIFFERENT PERIODS. 

Number of Post-Offices in 1790, 75. Miles of Post-Roads, 1,876. 

do. do. in 1800, f)03. do. do. 2(),.S20. 

do. do. in ISIO, 2.310. do. do. 36,407. 

do. do. in 1S20, 4,512. do. do. 72,4ft5. 

do. do. in 1830, H,4r)i. do. do. 11.5,175. 

do. do. in 1S41, 13,4t)8. do. do. 155,740. 

do. do. in 1842, 13,733. do. do. 149,732. 



280 



UNITED STATES JUDICIARY. 



REVENUE AKD EXPENSES OF THE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT FOR A 





.'ERIES OF YEARS. 


, 


Year ending-. 


Revenue. 


Expenses. 


June 30, 1835, 


$2,n93,3£6 41. 


$2,757,351 96. 


1.S36, 


3,408,324 86. 


2,841,766 37. 


1837, 


4,100,604 96. 


3,303,429 12. 


1838, 


•4,235,078 88. 


4,621,837 06. 


1839, 


4,477,615 12. 


4,654,718 50. 


1840, 


4,539,266 19. 


4,759,111 19 


1841, 


4,379,317 78. 


4,567,238 39 


1842, 


4,546,246 13. 


4,627,716 62. 



SUPREME COUKT. 

Names. Residence. -Compensation- 
Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice, Baltimore, Rid §;5,000 

Joseph Story, Assistant Justice, Cambridge, Mass 4,500 

vSmith Thompson, do New-York, N. Y 4,500 

.lohn McLean, do Cincinnati, Ohio, 4,500 

Ilcnry Baldwin, do Meadville, Pa 4,500 

James M. Wayne, do Savannah, Geoi 4,500 

John Catron, do Nashville, Ten 4,500 

John McKinley, do Florence, Ala '1.500 

Peter V. Daniels, do Richmond, Va ^^500 

William T. Carroll, Washington, Clerk, Fees, &c. 

ATTORNEY GENERAL. 

Hugh Swinton Legare, South Carolina, 4,000 

REPORTER OF THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

Benjamin C. "Howard, Baltimore, 1,000 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS. 



NAMES, RESIDENCE AND COMPENSATION OF THE JUDGES, OF EACH DISTRICT 
IN THE UNITED STATES. 



DISTRICTS. 



NAMES. 



RESIDENCE. 



.Compen- 
sation. 



Maine, 

New Hampshire, . . 

Massachusetts, 

Connecticut, 

Rhode Island, . 

Vermont, 

N. District, N. Y... 
S. District, N. Y. . . 

New Jersey 

E. District, Pa 

W. District, Pa. ... 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

Virginia, E. Dist... 
Virginia, W. Dist. . 
North Carolina, . . . . 
South Carolina, .... 
Georgia, 



Ashur Ware, Portland, 

Matthew Harvey, Ilopkinton, . . . . 

Peleg Sprague, Boston, 

Andrew T. Judson, Canterbury, . . . 

John Pitman, Providence, . . . 

Elijah Paine, Williamslown, 

Alfred Conkling, Auburn, 

Samuel R. Betts, New -York, . . . 

Philemon Dickerson, . . . Paterson, 

Archibald Randell, Philadelphia,.. 

Thomas Irwin, Pittsburg, 

Willard Hall, ^Wilmington, . . 

Upton S. Heath, |Baltimore, . . . . 

John Y, Mason, Southampton,. . 

I. S. Pcnneypackcr, Harrisonburg, . 

H. Potter, Raleigh, 

Robert B. Gilchrist,. .: . . Charleston, 

John C. Nicholl, Savannah, 



i};l,800 
1,000 
2;500 
1,500 
1,500 
1 ,200 
2,000 
3,500 
1,500 
2,500 
1,800 
1,500 
2,000 
1,800 
1,600 
2,000 
2,500 
2,500 



PUBLIC REVENUE AND EXPENDITCTRE. 



281 



DISTRICTS. 



RESIDENCE. 



Compen- 
sation. 



Afabuma, N. Dist. .. 
Alabama, S. Dist. . . . 
Mississipj)!, N. Dist. 
Mississippi, S. Dist.. 
Louisiana, E. Dist.. . 
Louisiana, W. Dist. . 
Tennessee, E.*Dist. . 
Tennessee, M. Dist.. 
Tennessee, W. Dist.. 

Kendickv, 

Ohio, ..'. 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Arkansas, 

Alicbip:an, 

Florida, E. Dis* 

Florida, M. Dist. . . . 

Florida, W. IVst 

Florida, S. Dist 

Floriila, Apalach. D. 

Wisconsin, 

Iowa, 

District of Columbia, 



William Crawford, 

William Crawford, 

Samuel .1. Gholson, .... 
Samuel J. (iholson, .... 

Rennet A. Crawford, 

Rennet A. Crawford, . . . , 
i\l organ W. Brown, .... 
Morgan W. Pro wn, . . . . - 
I\Io]'g-an W. Brown, .... 

Thomas R. Monroe, 

Ilumpli. W. Leavitt, .... 

Jesse L. H ilman, , 

Nathaniel Pope, 

Robert W. Wells, 

Benjamin Johnson, , 

Ross Wilkins, 

Isaac H. Bronson, 

W. H. Brockenbroug-h.. 

Dillon Jordan, 

William Marvin, 

Samuel AV. Carm;ick, 

C. Dunn, (Chief Judg^e,) , 
Charles Mason, do... 

William Cranch, ilo. . . 



Mobile. 

Mobile, 

Athens, 

Athens, 

New Orleans,. 
New Orleans,. 

Nashville, 

x\asliville, 

Nashville,.. .. 
Frankfort, . . . 
Steul)envi41e, . 

Aurora, 

Kaslcaskia, . . . 
JefiersonCify, 
Little Rock,.. 

Detroit, 

St. Augustine, 
Tallahassee, . . 
Pensacola, . . . 
Key West, . . . 
(not fixed,). . . 
Du Buque, . . . 
Burlingfton, . . . 
Washing-ton, . 



I 2,500 
[2,000 
I 3,000 

1 1,500 

'1,500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,200 
2,000 
1,500 
2,300 
1,8(J0 
1,800' 
2,300 
1,800 
1,800 
] ,800 
2.700 



EXTRACT 
From the Annual Report of the Secretary of the Treasury of the UiiUed States, 
dated Dec. 15, 1842. 
PUBLIC REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR \M>. 
The balance in the Treasury on the 1st January, 1.842, (exclusi\'e 
of the amount deposited with the States, trust funds, anil indem- 
nities,) was S230,4S3 (58 

Tiie receipts into the Treasury during- tlie first 
three quar!ers of the present year amount to §126,616, -593 78 

viz: 

l-'rom customs, f 14,260,830 .^'j 

From lands, 1,091,638 95 

From miscellaneous and inci- 
dental sources, 112,967 17 

I-'r(!m ti-easurv notes per act loth 

Febi-uar)', 1811,- 1,060,206 05 

From treasury note.s per act 31st 

■ January, 1812, 7,794,821 .59 

I'rom loan of 1841, '42, 2,29(), 129 67 

The receipts for the fourth quarter, it it estima- 
ted, will amount to 7,886,000 00 

viz : 

From customs, $4,()0(),(H10 (K) 

From lands, 366, OtX) 00 

I'rom miscellaneous and inci- 
dental sources, 20,1)00 00 

iM-oni treasury notes, 2, .500, 000 00 

I'rom loan, 1 ,()(K),()00 00 

Making the total estimateil receipts for the year,» S;.']4,.502,593 78 

And, with the balance in the Treasury on the 1st January last, 
an aggregate of .*34,733,077 46 

24* ■ 



282 PUBLIC REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE 

The expenditures for the first three quarters of 

the present year have amounted to 5^26,264,832 20 

viz : 

Civil list, foreign intercourse and 

miscellaneous, $4,371,933 93 

Army, fortifications, pensions, ful- 
filment of Indian treaties, sup- 
pressing Indian hostilities, &,c. 7,065,035 95 

Naval service, 6,717,084 17 

Treasury notes redeemed, inclu- 
ding interest, 7,856,400 35 

Public debt, including interest on 
the loan, 254,427 80 

The expenditures for the fourth quarter, are es- 
timated on data furnished by -the respective 

departments, at 8,238,278 15 

viz: 

Civil, foreign intercourse, and 
miscellaneous (including the 
amounts due to States.for distri- 
bution of sales of public lands, 
and amounts due to Mississippi 
and Alabama under act of Sept. 
4, 1841,) $2,144,013 97 

Army, fortifications, pensions, 
fulfilment of Indian treaties, 
suppressing Indian hostilities, 
&c .3,710,436 45 

Naval service, l,828,38o 15 • 

Interest on loan, 152,442 58 

Unclaimed dividends, 3,000 00 

Principal and interest on treasu- , 
ry notes, 400,000 CO 

To which add outstanding warrants issued prior 
to 1st January, 1842, .^805,474 03 

Making, $35,308,634 



Leaving a deficiency in the Treasury on tlie 31st December, 
1842, of 575,556 92 



The above estimates of expenditures for the 4th quarter of the present year, 
include, as it will be perceived, the sum of $805,474.03, being tlie amount of 
outstanding warrants issued prior to the 1st January, 1842. It is presumed, 
however, that a lilce sum v/ill remain outstanding on the 1st January next; and 
that instead of the apparent deficiency as stated above, there will be an actual 
balance in the Treasury, on the 1st January, 1843, of at least $224,CX)0. It is 
expected also, that a like amount of warrants may be outstanding on tlie .30ih 
June, 1843, and at the end of the succeeding fiscal year. 



Of the estimates of the Public Revenue and Expenditures for. the halfcalendtr year 
cnding30th June, 1843. 

The receipts for the half year are estimated as follows : 

From customs, $7,500,000 00 

From lands, 1 ,500,000 00 

From treasury notes and loan, 5,538,113 45 

From miscellaneous sources, 50,000 00 

* $14,588,113 45 



TWENTY-EIGHTH CONGnES.?. 283 

Tlifi expenditures for the half calendar year ending the 30th 

June, ISlo, are estimated at $10,381,186 76 

viz : 

Civil, miscellaneous and foreign intercourse.... $2,7.22,796 80 

Army, fortifications, pensions, fulfilment of In- 
dian treaties, suppressing of Indian hostilities, 
&c $3,033,82!) .'SO 

Naval Service, 4,019,060. 46 

Interest on public debt and treasury notes, 605,500 00 



TWENTY-EIGHTH CONGRESS. 



UNITED STA 

MAINE. 1 

Expires. 

John Fairfield, 1845 

George Evans, 1847 

NEW-HAMPSIIIIIE. 

Levi Woodburj^ 1847 

Charles G. Atlierton, 1849 

VEBMONT. 

Samuel Phelps, 1845 

IVm. C. Upham, 1849 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Riifus Choate, 1845 

Isaac C. Bates, 1847 

RHODE-ISLAND. 

Natlum F. Dixon, 1845 

James F. Simmons, 1847 

CONNECTICUT. 

/. II'. Huntington, 1S45 

.John M. Niles, 1849 

NEW-YORK. 

AT. P. TaUmadgc, 1845 

Silas Wright, J r 1849 

NEW-JERSEy. 

William Dayton, 18 15 

Jacob VV. Miller, t 1847 

I'ENNSYLVANIA. 

Daniel W. Sturgeon, 1845 

James Buclianan, 1849 

DELAWARE. 

Richard II. Bayard, 1845 

Thomas Clayton, 1847 

MARYLAND. 

Wm. D. Merrick, 1S45 

Vacancy. 

VIRGINIA. 

Wm. C. Rives, 1845 

William S. Archer, 1847 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Willie P. Mangiim, 1847 

Wm. H. llaywood, Jr 1819 



TE3 SENATE. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Expires. 

Daniel E. Huarer, 1847 

George M Duffle, 1849 

GEORGIA. 

John M. Berrien, 1847 

Wm. T.Colquit, 1849 

ALABAMA. 

Wm. R. King, 1847 

Artuliur P. Bagby, 1849 

MISSISSIPPI. 

John Henderson, 1845 

Robert J, Walker, 1847 

LOUISIANIA. 

Alexander Barrow, 1847 

Alexander Porter, 1849 

TENNESSEE. 

Two Vacancies. 

KENTUCKY. 

John T. Morehead, 1847 

John J. Crittenden, 1849 

OHIO. 

Benjamin Tappan, '. . . . 1845 

William Allen, 1849 

INDIANA. 

Albert S. White, 1845 

Edward A. Hanagan, 1849 

ILLINOIS. 

Samuel M "Roberts, 1847 

Sidney Breese, 1849 

MISSOURI. 

Thomas H. Benton, 1845 

Lewis F. Linn, 1849 

ARKANSAS. 

Wm. S. Fulton, 1847 

A. II. Sevier, 1849 

MICHIGAN. 

A. S. Porter, 1845 

W. Woodbridge, 1847 



234 



MINISTERS AND CHARGE D AFFAIRS, 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.* 



NKW-YOEK MEMBERS. 

Sela B. Stroner, 
Heniy C. Murplij', 
J. Phillips Phcmix, 
Wm. B. Maclay, 
Moses G. Leonard, 
Hamilton Fish, 
Joseph H. Anderson, 
Richard D. Davis, 
James G. Clinton, 
Jeremiah Russell, 
Zadock Pratt, 
David L. Seymour, 
Daniel D. Barnard, 
IVilliam G. Hunter, 
Lemuel Stetson, 
Chesselden Ellis, 
Charles S. Benton, 

The Senators and Members of the House of Representatives receive a per- 
diem compensation of eight dollars, and a travelling' allowance of eight dol- 
lars for every twenty miles, on gqing to or retiuning fi-om the seat of go- 
vernment. * 

Note. — Those in italic are Whigs. 



1st District, 


2d 




3d 




4lh 




5th 




6<.h 




7tlv 




8tli 




9th 




10th 




11th 




VMh 




13th 




14th 




1.5th 




16th 




17th 





ISth E 


istr 


.et, Preston King, 


19th 


a 


Orville Ilungerford, 


20th 


<i 


Sajnuel Beardsley, 


21st 


is 


J. E. Gary, 


22il 


ii 


S. M. Purdy. 


23d 


ee 


Orville Robinson, 


24th 


a 


Horace AVheaton, 


25th 


a 


George Rathbun, 


26th 


a 


Amasa Dana, 


27 th 


ti 


Byram Green, 


28th 


" 


Thomas Patterson, 


29th ■ 


a 


Charles H. Carroll, 


30th 


a 


William S. Hubbell, 


31st 


a 


Asher Tvler, 


32d 


a 


William A. Moseley, 


33d 


a 


Albert Smith, 


34th 


a 


M'ashington Hunt. 



Envoys Extsaordiaiary, am? Ministeas PJenijitsteutiary, i:i Forcisn 
Countries, with their Ka'.ari'js; Names of Secretaiies and their 
Salaries. 



Ministers and Residence. 


Salary. 


Secretaries of 
Legation. 


Salary. 


Edward Everett,^ Great Britain, London,. 
Charles S. Todd, Russia, St. Petersburgh, 


$9,000 
9,000 
9, COO 
9,000 
9,000 
9,000 
9,000 
9,000 

6,000 




$2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 


J. L. Motley,... 

H. Ledyard, 

Theo. S. Fay,... 
Brantz Mayer, . . 
J. R. Clay, 

R.M.Walsh,.... 






2,000 
2.(X)U 








William Hunter, Brazil, Rio de Janeiro,. 

David Porter, Minister Resident, Turkish 

Dominions, Constantinople, 


2,000 



Chaige d'Ali\ii«es of the United States Govevnnieiit, in Foreis:n 

Countries, with their Residence a?td .Sataiies. - 

■ Salary. 

Isaac R. Jackson, Danish Dominions, Copenhagen, $4,500 

Aaron Vail, Spain, Madrid, 4f500 

Washington Barrow, Portugal, Lisbon, 4,500 

Virgil Maxcy, Belgium, Brussels, 4,500 

Harmanus Bleecker, Holland, Hague, 4,500 

Christopher Hughes, Norwa}' and Sweeden, Stockholm, 4,500 

Ambrose Baber, Sarilinian States, Turin, 4,500 

* In several of the States the election forjicui7ncmic)'s of the 29lh Congress have not 
yet taken place. 

t Mr. Everett was on the 3d of March, 18-13, appointed Blinislcr to China ; whether 
he accepts or not, is not yet known. 



COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS. '.285 

William Boulware, Two Sicilies, Naples, 4,500 

Joseph Eve, Texas, Austin, '. 4,5(X) 

James Semplc, New Grenada, Bogota, 4,500 

Allen A. Hull, Venezuela, Caracc;is, 4,500 

J. S. Pendleton, Chile, Sant- Jago, 4,500 

James E. Pickett, Peru, Lima, 4,500 

William W. Irwin, Denmark, 4,500 

George Brown, Sandwich Islands, 4.500 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

COMMISSIONKKS, 

Under the Act of Congress for carrijing into effcd the Convention with Mexico, of 
April 11, 1839. 

William L. Marcy, New-York, $3,000 

H. M. Braekenridge, Washington, 3,000 

Alexander Dimitry, Washington, Secretary, 2,000 



COMMISSIONEn, 

To mark Boundary Line between Texas and the United States. 

John H. Overton, North Carolina, 2,500 

John R. Conway, Tennessee, Surveyor for the same, ir,000 



COMMISSIONER, 

In conformity to the 6th Article of the treaty between the U. States and Great 

Britain, concluded on the 9fh day of August, 1842. 
Albert Smith, Maine, 2,500 

SECRETARY 

To the President for Signing Patents. •' 
Rf)bert Tyler, Virginia, 1,500 

LIBR.\RV OF CONGRESS. 

John S. Mechan, Librarian,... 1,500 



Collectors of Customs at the Diflferout Post.'^ in the United States, 

With their Compensation, as reported in the Blue Book. 



MAINE. 

Eustport, .Joseph C. Noyes,.. 1,000 00 

Machias, William B. Smith,. 668 49 
Erenchman's Bay, J. M. Hale, 434 21 

Penobscot, Chs. J. Ab))o(,. . . fi38 60 

Bel fusi, George Thatcher,... 1,0.")9 31 

Waldoboro, Gcore Allen 712 43 

Wiscassef, John D. McCrate, 1,359 12 

Bath, Parker Sheldon, 1,025 18 

Portland, Nathan Cummings, 1,812 00 

Saco, John F. Scamman,.... 133 42 

Kennebunk, Daniel Remick, 79 75 

York, Jeremiah Brooks, .... 254 87 

NEW-HAMPSHinE. 

Portsmouth, J. N, Sherburne, 408 12 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Newbiiryport, H. W. Kinsman, 

Ipswich, Azahel li. Wildes,. 263 00 

Gloucester, Geo. W. Pearce, 

Marblehead, Peter Dixcy, . . . ' 2!^ 45 
Salem & Beverly, Jas. Miller, 1,497 90 
Bosfon & CliarlcsJon, I^evi 

Lincoln, 2,200 00 

Plymouth, Schuyler Sampson, 468 48 
Fall River, Phineas W. Lc- 

land, 1,341 67 

Barnstable, Ebenezer Bacon, 600 .38 
New Bedford, Wm. II. Allen, 1,924 31 
Edgartown, Jolm P. Norton, 250 00 
Nantuclcet, Aiulrew J. iMor- 

ton, Acting Collector, .... 675 00 



286 



COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS, 



47 



831 77 



RHODE ISLAND. 

Providence, Walter R. Dan- 
forth, 634 

Bristol & Warren, Samuel S. 
Allen, 722 

Newport, Wm. Littlefield,, . 554 

VERMONT. 

Burlington, Harry Miller, 

Deputy Collector 750 

Albuj-gh, Fred. Hazen, do. . . £00 
West Alburgh, Thaddeus 

Crane, do 500 

S wanton, G. AV. Foster, do.. 360 

Highgate, R. L. Paddock, do 360 

rranklin,Orville Kimpton, do 240 

Troy, Curtis Elkins, do 240 

Richford, John S. Royce, do 240 

Derby, Charles Mahony, do. . 360 

Canaan, William Rich, do 240 

Berkshire, L. H. Potter, do. . 240 

CONNECTICUT. 

Middletown, Austin Baldwin, 831 
Nev/ London,Charles F. Les- 
ter, 

New Haven, J. Donaghe, 

Fairfield, Joshua Tliomson,. 

NEW-YOEK. 

Champlain, Wm. F. Haile,.. 

Oswegatchie, D. C. Judson, . . 

Cape Vincent, Judah T. A ins- 
worth, 

Sackett's Harbor, Leonard 
Denison, 

Oswego, Thomas H. Bond,. . 

Niagara, Amos S. Tryon, . . . 

Black Rock, Timothy C. 
Dwight, 

Buffalo Creek, Jedediah H. 
Latlirop 

Black Rock Dam, Oscar F. 
Crary, 

Tonawanda, Jos. T. Bush, . . 

Cattaraugus Creek, Henry P. 
Wilcox, 

Dunkirk, Earnest Mullett, . . . 

Portland, Charles W. Hen- 
derson, 

Sag Harbor, John P. Osborn, 

New- York, Edward Curtis,. 

Genesee, James K. Living- 
ston, 

Albany, Thos. ]\IcElroy, De- 
puty Collector, ; 

Troy, T. B. Bigeiow, do 

NEW-JERSEY. 

Jersey City, H. Southmayd, . 
Perth Amboy, C. M. Smith, 
Burlington, Gershom Mott,.. 
Little 'Egg Harbor, Clayton 

H. Page, • • • • 

Great Egg Harbor, IMahlon 

D. Canlield, 



1,335 65 

587 07 
394 00 


1,115 78 
1,460 10 


1,014 00 


717 76 


1,359 19 


730 00 


540 00 


500 00 
250 00 


250 00 
250 00 


250 00 

815 92 

6,000 00 


1,004 79 


152 13 
180 44 


300 00 


420 65 



Bridgetown, James G. Hamp- 
ton, fees, and, 2i,0 Oi) 

Newark, Archer Giliord, fees, 250 00 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Philadelpliia, Calvin Blythe, 1,958 25 
Presque Isle, C. W. Kelso,. . 399 58 

DELAWARE. 

Wilmington, H. AVhiteley,. . 593 28 

MARYLAND. 

Baltimore, N.F.Williams... 1,668 44 

Annapolis, Richard Saniis,... 1,263 31 

Oxford, Nicholas Willis, .... 250 00 

Vienna, Charles Leary, 499 34 

Snow Hill, George Hudson. . 318 90 

St. Mary-s, Wm. Coad, 250 00 

Llewellensburg, William J. 

Edelon, 201 CO 

Town Creek, Wm. Floyd, . . 185 00 

DISTRICT or COLUMBIA. 

Georgetown, H. Addison, .... 565 62 
Alexandria, George Brent,.. 753 12 

VIRGINIA. 

Tappahannock, J. A.Parker, 477 68 
Richmond, Thomas Nelson, 1,787 69 
Petersburg, J. W. Campbell, 338 79 
Folly Landing, S. C. White, 219 18 
East River, J. Dangcrfield, . • 222 98 

Yorktov/n, Wm. Nelson, 200 00 

Ciierry Stone, P. S. Bowdoin, 

Wheeling, , ' 

Norfolk & Portsmouth, Con- 
way WhitUe, ■. . . . 1,922 04 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Camden, George W. Charles, 

fees and 250 00 

Edenton, Robert W. Noxon, 208 84 

Plymouth, J. Ramsev, 408 "77 

Washinton, Thos. H."Blount, 465 21 

Newbern, T. S. Singleton,. . . 483 54 

Ocracoke, Svlvester Brown,. 1,009 11 

Beaufort, J .' E. Gibble, 296 (iO 

Wilmington, W. C. Lord;. . . 338 07 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Charleston, Wm. J. Greyson, 1,.328 ('0 
Georgetown, Thos. L. Shaw, 652 19 

GEORGIA. 

Savannah, .Tames Hunter 2,326 40 

Hardwick, Beniamin Stiles,. 200 00 
Sunbury , Wm . Blaxwell, .... 250 00 
Brunswick, Alex. W. Wylly, 498 77 
St. Marys, Archibald Clark, 708 17 

ALABAMA. 

Mobile, John B. Hogan, .... 3,400 00 

Mrssissippi. 
Pearl River,WillisH. Arnold, 250 00 
Natchez, Wm. Gaunt, 200 00 



ARMY LIST, 



287 



LOUISIANA. . 

New Oilcans, Thos. Gibbes 

Morgan, 4,400 00 

Teche, John W. Daugh, .... 986 33 

TENNESSEE. 

Nashville, Joseph Litton, .... 444 00 

KENTUCKY. 

Louisville, N. P. Porter, .... 485 00 

OHIO. 

Cuyahoga, Ceo. B. Merwin, ()71 59 
Miama, Chas. C. P. Hunt,. . . 325 46 
Cincinnali, J. R. Warren (Sur- 
veyor,) 459 66 

Santlusky, Ellas H. Haines, ... 409 04 



MISSOURI. 

St. Louis, J. P. De Forest,* . 600 00 

MICHIGAN. 

Detroit, Edward Brook, 720 00 

FLORIDA. 

Pensacola, Robert Mitchell,. 2,554 16 
St Johns, J. Dell, fees and. . . 500 00 
^palachicola, G. J. Floyd,.. 1,500 00 
St. Augustine John Rodman, 

fees and 602 56 

St. Mark's, Robert W. Als- 
ton, fees and 758 16 

Key West, A. Gordon, 2,068 73 



ARMY LIST. 



Winfield Scott, Major- General, GeneraZ-i/i-Cftic/:— Head Quarters, Washing 

ton City. 
Brevet Major General E. P. Gaines, Department No. 1, New Orleans, La. 
Brigadier-General John E. Wool, Department No. 5, Troy, N. Y. 

Inspectors General of the Army. 
Colonel George Croghan. 
Colonel S. Churchill. 



Field Officers 
First Dragoons, 
Colonel S. W. Kearney, 
Lieut. Col. R. B. Mason, 
Major Clifton Wharton. 

Second Dragoons. 
Col. D. E. Twiggs, 
Lieut. Col. W. S. Harney, 
Major T. T. Fauntleroy. 

First Artillery. 
•Cod. A. Eustis, 
Lieut. Col. B. H. Pierce, 
INIajor L. Whiting. 

Second Artillery. 
Col. James Bankhead, 
Lieut. Col. A. C. W. Fanning, 
^Lajor M. M. Payne. 

Third Artillery. 
•Col. W. B. Armistead, 
Lieut. Col. W. Gates, 
Major John Erving. 

Fourth Artillery. 
Col. J. B. Walbach, 
Lieut. Col. J. B. Crane, 
Maj. F. S. Betton. 

First Infantry. 
•Col. Z. Tavlor, 
Lieut. Col. H. Wilson, 
Major G. Dearborn. 



OF Regiments. 

Second Infantry. 
*Col Hugh Brady, 
Lieut. Col. B. Riley, 
Major J. Plympton, 

Third Infantry. 
Col. J. B. Many, 
Lieuf. Col. E. A. Hitchcock, 
Major W. W\ Lear. 

Fourth Infantry. 
Col. J. H. Vose, 
Lieut. Col. Jolin Garland, 
Major Thomas Staniford. 

Fifth Infantry. 
Col. G. M. Brooke, 
Lieut. Col. J. S. Mcintosh, 
Major W. V. Cobbs. 

Sixth Infantry. 
Col. W. Davenport, 
Lieut. Col. G. Loomis, 
Major W. Hoffman. 

Seventh Infantry. 
Col. M. Arbuckle, 
Lieut. Col. W. Whistler, 
Major J. S. Nelson. 

Eight Infantry. 
•Col. W. J. Worth, 
Lieut. Col. N. S. Clarke, 
Major W. G. Belknap. 



* Brigadier General by Brevet. 



288 



A-RMY hTST. 



General Returns of the Army of the United States, 

Corrected at the Adjutant-General's Office, Dec. \, 1842. 

General Staff, 56 Two Regiments of Dragoons, . 1,26T 

Medical Department, 71 Four Reg-iments of Artillery, . 2,525 

Pay Department, 16 Eight Regiments of Infantry,. 5,518 

Purchasing Department, 2 Recruits & unattached Soldiers, 681 

Corps of Engineers, 46 West Point Detachment, Ill 

Topographical Engineers, ..... 38 

Ordinance Department, 335 Total, 10,628 

The number of non-commissioned oiRcers, musicians, artificers and privates, 
in the several regiments of dragoons, artillery and infantry, according to the 
last returns received, is 8,768; wliich, including the West Point detachment of 
111, and other small detachment and recruits en route to join companies, (681,) 
make an excess over the standard fixed by the act of August 23, 1842, (7,590,) 
of 1,970 men. This excess is continually decreasing, but will not be entirely 
merged in the supply of vacancies occasioned by discJiarges, deaths and deser- 
tions, before the close of the year 1843, 



MILITIA FORCE THE UNITED STATES. 

As stated in the Army Register for 1842. 



States and Territories. 



Maine, 

New-Hampshire, 

Massachusetts; 

Vermont, 

, Rhode-Island, 

Connecticut, 

New-York, 

New-Jersey, 

Pennsylvania, 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

Virginia, 

North Carolina, 

South Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Alabama, 

Louisiana, 

Mississippi,. ■••• 

Tennessee, 

Kentuclty, ••'• 

Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Arkansas, 

Michigan, 

Florida Territory, •••• 
Wisconsin Territory, • 

Iowa Territory, 

District of Columbia,- 

Total, •••• 



27 

9 

9 

13 

6 

9 

136 

19 

52 

4 

22 

27 

2S 

18 

36 

31 

10 

15 

25 

43 



89 
30 

'30 
40 
23 
30 

869 
58 

209 

8 

68 

55 

67 

108 
98 

187 
46 
70 
79 

145 



So 



f^ 



667 
335 
9S 
215 
28 
319 

2,556 
435 

1,614 
71 
544 

1,24.) 
723 
484 
746 
664 
183 
392 
859 

1,038 



566 



24 



622 2,652 14,403 52,413 63,781 



1,846 

1,2 60 

416 

905 

60 

880 

6,619 

1,476 

5,703 

364 

1,763 

4,537 

2,969 

1,980 

2,212 

1,382 

642 

348 

2,644 

3,472 



gSfi 

0-t3 

ili 

o "" ' 



2,154 



1,692 



466 
33 
126 

68 



2, 529 
1,634 

653 
1,173 

115 

1,238 

10,210 

1,938 

7,678 

417 
2,307 
5,861 
3,787 
2,590 
3,092 
2,164 

781 

825 
3,607 
4,693 



2,861 



2,608 

157 

580 

43 

169 

96 



esse". 



£•::£. 



42, 823 
30,479 
86, 662 
26,363 
934 
41,938 

163,389 
37,183 

22S, 593 

8,782 

44, 467 

101,686 
61,431 
46, 227 
64, 220 
42, 168 
14,027 
35, 259 
67,646 
77, 637 



61 , 052 



57, 081 
1,871 

12,206 

784 

5,054 

1,153 



45, 302 
32,113 
87,215 
27,636 
1,049 
43,176 

173,599 
39,171 

236, 171 
9, 209 
46, 864 

107, 547 
65,218 
48,817 
57,312 
44,332 
14,809 
36,084 
71,252 
82,336 

150,268 
63,913 
83, 234 
69, 689 
2,028 
12,786 
827 
6,223 

1,249 



1,341,1141 1,668,387 



ARMY LIST. 
MILITARY POSTS AND COMMANDERS. 



2S9 



Posts. 



Situation. 



Commanders. 



On the Kiamichi, Ark. 

Near the False Washita, Ark 

Arkansas 

Fort Smith, Ark. 

Arkansas 



ms) 
le ) 



On the Marmatou, Mo. 

Kight bank of Missouri, Mo. 
Council Blufi's, Up. Missouri 

Near St. Louis, Mo. 

Iowa Territory 

Iowa Territory 

Prairie du Chicn, Wis. Tor. 
Upper Mississippi, lowaTer. 

Portage, Fox, and Wis.W. T. 

Sault St. Marie, Mich. 

Miehilimackinac, Mich. 

Kight bank ol' St. Clair, Mich. 

Detroit 

Near Detroit 



Veparlmcnt No. 1. 

Fo;rlSe"::::::S^--<"-. Fi°-"=^ - 

Fort Morgan [Mobile Point, Ala. 

Fort rik(! Petite Coquille, La.- ••• 

Fort Wood irhcl' Mcutcur, La. 

Fort Jackson jNear New-Orleans, La 

N. Orleans Barracks-]New-Orleans, La. 

Haton Rogue liarracks Baton House, La. 

Fort Jessup Near Natchitoches, La 

Department No. 2. 

Fort Towson 

Fort Washita 

Fort Gibson 

Fort Smith 

Fort Wayne 

Department JVo. 3. 

Fort Scolt 

Fort Leavenworth •• 

Fort Croghan 

Jefferson Barracks • 
Sac and Fox agency 

Fort Atiiinson 

Fort Crawford 

Fort Saelling 

Department No. 4. 
Fort Wiuncbago- •• 

Fort Brady 

Fort Mackinac 

Fort Gratiot 

Detroit Barracks- • • 
Detroit Arsenal ••••' 

Department No. 5. 
Buffalo Barracks- -• 

Fort Niagara ■ 

Fort Ontario ■ 

-Madison Barracks •• 
Plattsburgh Barracks 
West-Point 
Fort Columbu 
Fort Hamillo 
Fort Lafayette 
Carlisle Barracks 

Fort Mifflin 

Fort TrumliiiU 

Fort Adams ) 
Fort Woleott S "" 

Department No. C. 
Fort Independence- 
Fort Constitution -- 

Fort Preble 

Fort Sullivan 

Hancock Barr.ax-ks ■ 

Fort Fairfield 

Fort Kent 

Department No. 7. 

Fort McHenry 

Fort Severn 

Fort Washington- •• 
Fort Monroe 

D eparimcnt No. 8. 

Fort Johnson 

Fort Caswell 

Fort Macon 

Fort Moullrie ) _ 
Castle Pinckney S' 
Oglclhorp Barracks 



Buffalo, N. Y. 

Vounestown. N. Y'. 

Oswego, N. Y. 

Sackett's Harbor, N. Y.- 

Plattsburgh, N. Y. 

West-Point, N. Y. 



New-York harbor, N. Y.-- 

Carlisle, Pcnn. 

Near Philadelphia, Penn.- 
New-London, Conn. 

Newport harbor, K. I. 

Boston harbor, Mass. 

PortsMuiutb, N. H. 

Portland, .Me. 

iiastport, Me. 

Near Houlton, !\Ic. 

On the .Aroostook, Me. 

On Fish River, Me. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Annapolis, Md. 

Left bank of Potomac, Md 
Old Point Comfort, Va. - •• 



Near Smithville, N. C.-- 

Oak Island, N. C. 

Vear Beaufort; N. C. ••• 

Charleston harbor, S. C. 

Savannah, Ga. 



Lieut. Col. W. Whistler. 

Captain E. S. Hawkins. 

Captain F. Lee. 

Brevet Major G. J. Rains. 

Brev. Brig. Gen. M. Arbuckle. 
Brev. Col. W. S. Harney. 
Col. D. E. Twiggs. 

Lieut. Col. G. Loomis. 
Major T. T. Fauntleroy. 
Col. William Davenport. 
Major W. Hoffman. 



Brev. Maj. W. M. Graham. 
Lieut. Col. R B. Mason. 
Capt. J. H. K. Burgwiuf 
Col. J. H. Vose. 
Capt. J. Allen. 
Capt. E. V. Sumner. 
Lieut. Col. H. Wilson. 
iMajor G. Dearborn. 

Capt. W. R. Jouett. 

eapt. M. E. Merrill. 

Capt. M. Scott. 

Lieut. Col. J. S. Mcintosh. 

Biev. Brig. Gen. G. BI. Brooke. 

Capt. E. K. Smith. 

Lieut. Col. B. Riley. 
Capt. T/»Morris. 
Capt. E. K. Barnum. 
Major J. Plympton. 
Capt. C. A. Waite. 
Major R. Delatield. 

Col. C.Bankhead. 



25 



Capt. J. M. Washington, 
('apt. G. Drane. 
Capt. C. S. Merchant. 

Brev. Col. A. C. W. Fanning. 



Brev. Maj. J. Dimick. 
Capt. G. Porter, 
(y'apt. J H. M'indcr. 
Lieut. Col. B. K. Pierce. 
Capt. P. Van Ness. 
Capt. L. B. Webster. 

Lieut. Col. J. B. Crane. 
Brev. Major J. L. Gardner. 

Col. J. B. Walbach. 
Brev. Lieut. Col. T. Childs. 
Hrcv. Major W. L. McClintock. 
lirev. Brig. Gen. W.K. Armislead. 
-Major J. Erving. 



290 . ARMY LIST. 



Posts. 



Situation. 



Commanders. 



Department No. 9. 

Fori Marion St. Augustine, Fa. Lieut. Col W. Gates. 

Picolata Picolata, Fa. Capt. H. McKavett. 



Fort Shannon 
Fort Micanopy • 
Fort Wa-casassa 

Fort King 

Fort Brooke 

Cantonment Morgan 



PilatUa, Fa. Lieut. Col. N. S. Clarke. 

Micanopy, Fa. Capt. E. B. Birdsall. 

VVarasassa, Fa. Capt. W. R. Monlgomery. 



Alachua county, Fa. ■ 

Tampa Bay.; Fa 

Cedar Keys, Fa. 

Fort Fanning JLeft bank of Suwannee, Fa. 

Fort Pleasant JMadison county, Fa. 

Fort flarriilton Madison county, Fa. 

Fort Gamble Jefferson county, Fa. 

Fort Stansbury iNear Tallahassee 



Capt. T. P. Gwynne. 
Major J. S Nelson. 
Lieut. Col. E. A. HitcUcock. 
Capt. H. Bainbridge. 
Capt. O. Wheeler. 
Lieut. L. S. Craig. 
Capt. L. N. Morris. 
Capt. J. W. Cotton. 



Military Departments. 

The following arrang-ement of Military Geographical Departments, having 
been duly submitted and approved, is published for the Government of the 
Army. 

Department, No. 1. West Florida, and the States of Alabama, Mississippi, 
Louisiana, Tennessee and Kentucky. Head-Quarters, from the 1st of Novem- 
ber to the 30th of June in each year, at New Orleans, and for the remainder of 
the year at the Bay of St. Louis, or Baton Rouge, as the Commander may 
elect. Commanded by Brevet RIajor-Geaeral E. P. Gaines. 

Department, No. 2. The country west of the Mississippi, north of Louisia- 
na antl Texas, and south of'37th degree of north latituile. Head-Quarters, 
Fort Smith. Commanded by Brevet Brig. Gen. Z. Taylor. 

Department, No. 3. The State of Missouri, (above the 37th degree of north 
latitude;) the State of Illinois; the Iowa Territory; that part of the Wisconsin 
Territory west of the 13th degree of longitude west from Washington; and the 
Indian country north and west of the lines indicateiL Head-Quarters, Jeffer- 
son Barraclis. Comrryinded by Col. S. W. Kearny. 

Department, No. 4. Tlie States of Indiana, Ohio and Michigan; the part of 
the Wisconsin Territory not included in Department, No. 3, and the Indian 
country north. Head-Quarters, Detroit. Commanded by Brevet Brig. Gen. 
H. Brady. 

Department, No. 5. The States of Pennsyh^ania, New-York, Vermonf, 
New-Jersey, Connecticut and Rhode Island. Head-Quarters, Troy, N. York. 
Commanded by Brigadier-Gen. John E. Wool. 

Department, No. 6. The States of Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine. 
Head-Quarters, Portland. Commanded by Brevet Brig. Gen. A. Eustis. 

Department, No. 7. Tlie States of Delaware, Maryland and Virginia. 
Head-Quar'ers, Fort Monroe. Commanded by Col. J. B. Walbach. 

Department, No. 8. The .States of North-Carolina, South Carolina and Geor- 
^a. Head-Quarters, Sullivan's Island, Hai-bor of Charleston. Commanded 
by Brevet Brig. Gen. W. K. Armistead. 

Department, No. 9. East and Middle Florida. Head-Quarters, Fort Brooke, 
Commiinded by Brevet Brig. Gen. W. J. Worth. 

The senior officer in the command of troops in a department, will command 
such department until an officer of higher rank shall be sent to the same. 



. ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES. 

The principal officers are a Secretary of War, a Major-General, two Briga- 
dier-Generals, an Adjutant-General, two Inspectors-General, a Quartermaster- 
General, a Commissary-General, a Surgon-General, a Paymaster -General, and 
aChief Eigineer. 

The whole army (Dec. 1S42,) consists of two regiments of Dragoons; four 
regiments of Artillery, anil eight regiments of Infantry. The regular army 
numbers 10,628 ofTicers and men. 



MILITARY ACADEMY. 291 

There arc 72 Military Posts anil Arsenals in the United Stales, besides others 
in a s'aie of forwardness. In times of foreif^n invasion, insiirreetion, or rebel- 
lion, the militia of tlic several stales, wliich numbers 1,G{J8,387 officers and 
men, is under the command of the General Government. 



UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY. 

West-Poim', New-Yokk. 

academic staff. 

.1. (}. To'ten, Chief Eni^ineer, Inspector of MHitanj Academy. 

Ricliard Delafield, JMajor of En!;ineers, Superintendent and Commandant. 

Dennis H. Mahan, A.M., Professor of 'Civil arid Military Engineering. 

Robert Q. Butler, 2d Lieut." of Engineers, Principal Assistant Professor qf 

Civil and Military Engineering. 
Z. P. Tower, 2d Lieut, anti H. G.'Wrifrht, 2d Lieut, of Engineers, Assista7it 

Professors of Civil and Military Engineering. 
Vv'illiam H. C. Barllett, A.M., Professor of Natural and Experimental Philoso- 
phy. 

.losepii Roberts, 1st Lieut. 4fh Art., Principal Assistant Professor of Natural 
and Experimental Philosophy. 

William Cilham, 1st Lieut. 3d Art., Assistant Professor of Natural and Experi- 
mental Philosophy. 

AV rt E. Church, A.M., Professor of Mathematics. 

A!- ■ -v'.vv It. Shiras, Ist Lieut. 4th Art., Principal Assistant Professor of Ma- 
//.. .'- ilics. 

V.'. K. Hanson, 1st Lieut, and Bvt. Capt. 7th Inf., Assistant Professor of Math»- 
vialics. 

Israel Vogdes, 1st Lieut. 1st Art., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Isaacs. K. Reeves, 1st Lieut. 1st Art., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Francis N. Clarke, 2d Lieut. 4tli Art., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

.Tacob W. Bailey, A.M., Professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy. 

Henry L. Kendrick, 1st Lieut. 2d Art., Principal Assistant Professor of Che- 
mistry and Mincralogii. 

Rov. M. P. Parks, Chaplain and Professor of Ethics. 

E. Parker Scamnion, 2d Lieut. Topographical Engineers, Principal Assistant 
Professor of Ethics. 

Claudius Berard. Ist Teacher of French. 

II. R. Ac^nel, 2d Teacher of French. 

■]'. d'Oremienlx, 2d I>ieut. Isl Inf., Assistant Teacher of French. 

Robert W. AVeir, N.A., Teacher of Droning. 

Richard S. Smith, 2d Lieut. 7lh Inf., Assistant Teacher of Drauing. 

.1. A. Thomas, 1st Lieut. 3d Art., Commandant of Cadets and Instructor of In- 
fantry Tactics. 

Josei>Ti II. TOifon, 1st Lieut. Hd Inf., Assistant Instructor of Infantry Tactics. 

'Henry C. Wavne, 2d Lienl. 1st Art., Assistant Instructor of Infantry Tactics. 

*L. II. Allen, 2(1 Lieu). 2d Art., Assistant Instructor of Infantry Tactics. 

E. .T. Sleplal, 2d Lieut. '.k\ Art., Assistant Instructor of Infantry Tactics. 

Miner Knowlton, 1st Lieut. 1st Art., Instructor of Artillery and Cavalry. 

11. R. Ilershberger, Riding Master. 

K. G.Yioulct, Teacher of the Svcord Exercise. 

Military Staff. 

I rv in McDowell, 2d Lieut. 1st Art., -/4rf/«fan(» 
Charles Davies, Paymaster and Treasurer. 
Walter V. AVheaton, Surgeon. 
C. M. Hitchcock, Assistant Surgeon. 

The number of Cadets at the Military Academy, June, 1842, was 221, divid- 
ed into four classes. 



*.4iiil also Assistant insdiicfori «n Ihe Drjiarttncnt oj ArtiUery and Caval 



292 



NAVY LIST. 



Extract from the Report of Board of Visiters, — 1842. 

The annexed table, shoiL-s the parentage and condition of the four classes of 
Cadets on the 1st of June, 1842. 

Cadets — 55 whose fathers are farmers. 

3 " " planters. 

14 " " meclianics. 

.4 " " boarding' house or hotel keepers. 

12 " " pliysicians. 

26 " " lawyers, jiulg-es, &c. 

10 " '" olficers of the army. 

3 " " ofRcers of the navy. 

5 " " in the civil employment of government. 

2 (c ti clergymen. 

18 " " merchants. 



48 had no fathers living. 

21 may be termed miscellaneous. 



-Total 221 . 



One hundred and eighty-two of the above number are represented as being 
in indigent, reduced, or moderate circumstances; and of this number, the 
families of one hundred and forty-four resided in the country. 

Parentage and circumstances of the class of Cadets wliich entered the rilili- 
lary Academy during the month of June, 1842. 

Cadets— 20 whose fathers are farmers. 



7 






l)lanters. 


8 






mechanics. 


1 






hotel keeper. 


6 






physicians. 


7 






lawyers, judges and recorders. 


1 • 






officer of the army. 


1 






officer of the navy. 


4 






civil officers of the government. 


3 






clergymen. 


8 






merchants. 


2S had 


no 1 


fathers 1: 


ivinff. 


4 may 


be termed miscellaneous. — Total 98. 



Ninety-three of tlie above number arc represented as being in indigent, re- 
duced or moderate circumstances; and of this number, the families of thiny 
resided in tlie country. 



Law of Congress relating to the term of service for Cadets, 

''Sec. 28. And be it further enacted, That the term for which Cadets llt?reaf- 
ter admitted into the Military Academy at West Point shall engage to serve, 
be, and the same is hereby, increased to eight years, unless sooner discharg- 
ed. (See act approved July 5th, 1838.) 



NAVY LIST. 

Commanders of Stations. 



Charles Stewart, 
Cliarles W. Morgan, 
Charles Morris, 
T. Ap C. Jones, 
Lawrence Kearny, 



Commodore, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Home Squadron. 
Mediterranean. 
Coast of Brazil. 
Pacific Ocean. 
East Indies. 



NAVT LIST. 



293 



Commanders of Navy Yards. 



John D. Sloat, 
Jolin H.Nicolson, 
l\ratllie\v C. Perry, 
Ciporge C. Reiul, 
John H. Aiilick, 
William H. Sluibrickj 
E. A.F. LavallcUe, 

James Barron, 
Cliarles Stewart, 
Jacob Jones, 
Charles Morris, 
L. Warrington, 
Wm. ]\I. Crane, 
James Hiiklle, 
C. G. Ridffcly, 
John Downcs, 
Jesse D. Elliott, 
Steplien Cussin, 
James Rensliaw, 
A. S. Wailsworth, 
George C. Read, 
H. E. Ballard, 
Samuel Woodhouse, 
E. P. Kennedy, 
Alex. J. Dallas, 
J. R. Nicolson, 
Jesse Wilkinson, 
T. Ap C. Jones, 
William C. Rolton, 
W. 13. Shuln'ick, 



Portsmouth. 

Roston. 

New-York. 

l*)iiladeli)liia. 

Washington. 

Norfolk. 

Pensacola. 



I Henry E. Ballard, Commandhi'^, Balti- 
I more Station. 

I Edward R. Shubrick, Charleston, S. C. 
Station. 
James BicliUe, Governor of the Naval 
.4si//«H/yPhiludelphia.^ 



Captains. — G7. 
C. W. Moi-gan, 
L. Kearnv, 
F. A. Parker, 
E. R. MeCall, 
Daniel Turner, 
David Conner, 
John Gallagher, 
William Rl. Hunter, 
John D. Sloat, 
Matthew C. Perry, 
C.W. Skinner, 
John T. Newton, 
Joseph Smith, 
L. Rousseau, 
George W. Storer, 
Beverlv Kennon, 
E. R. Shubrick, 
1". II. Gregory, 
John H. Clack, 
P. F. Voorhees, 
Ben j. Cooper, 
David Geisinger, 



R. F. Stockton, 
Isaac McKeever, 
J. P. Zantzinger, 
Wm. D. Salter, 
Ch. S. McCauley, 
T. fli. Newell, 
E. A. F. Lavalletfe, 
AVm. A. Spencer, 
T. T. Webl), 
Jolin J'ercival, 
John II. Aulick, 
AV^ V. Taylor, 
Blatlen Dulany, 
S. H. Stringham, 
Isaac RTayo, 
Wm. Mervine, 
Thomas Crabb, 
Thomas Paine, 
James Armstrong, 
Joseph Smoof, 
Samuel I^. l^reezc, 
Benjamin Page. 



Vessels of War of the United States Navy. — Dec. 1842. 



Name and Rate. 



Ships of the. Line. — 11. 
Gims. 
Franklin, 
AVashington, 
Columbus, 
Ohio, 

North Carolina, 
Delaware, 
Alabama, 
Vermont, 
Virginia, 
Pennsylvania, 
New-York, 



Where anil when built. 



74 Philadeli)hia, 
71 Portsmouth, 
74 Washington, 
7l|New-York, 
74JPhiladeli)hia, 
74Gosi)ort, Va. 
74 
74 

74 - 

120Philade!i)hia, 
74 



Frigates, 1st CZass.— 15. 
Independence, Razee, 54[Bost(m, 



United States, 


■ 44 


Constitution, 


44 


Java, 


44 


Potomac, 


44 


Brandy wine, 


44 


Hudson, 


44 


Santee, 


44 


Cumberland, 


44 


Savannah, 


44 



44|Phihulelphia, 
Boston, 
Baltimore, 
Washington, 

do. 
Purchased, 



25* 



Where emploj'eil. 



I'sirjiln ordinary, New-York. 

]81(ij do. do. 

]81!)[Mediterrancan. 

lS-2(i[ Boston. 

1820 Receiving Ship, N. York. 

1S20 Coast of Brazil. 

On Stocks, Portsmouth, 
do. Boston, 
do. do. 

1837,Receiving Ship, Norfolk. 

On Stocks, do. 



181 t Home S(|uadron. 
17fl7,Pacitie Ocean. 
17!'7:Honio S(iuadron. 
1S14 do. do. 

1821 Boston. 
lK2r) Norfolk. 

182(J In Ordinary, N. York. 
On stocks, Portsmouth. 
- In ordinary, Boston. 
iNew-York. 



294 




NAVY LIST. 






Names and Rate. 1 


AVhere and when b 


lilt. 1 


Where employed. 


Sabine, 


44 


. - - 


lOn stocks, New- York. 


Raritan, 


44 


... 


- 1 


do. Philadelphia. 


Columbia, 


44 


Washington, 


1S36 Coast of Brazil. 


St. Lawrence, 


44 


_ - . 


On stocks, Norfolk, 


Congress, • 


44 


Portsmouth, 


1841 Mediterranean. 

1 


Frigates, 2d Class'.— 


2. 








Constellation, 


36 


Baltimore, 


17f)7 


East Indies. 


Macedonian, 


36 


Norfolk, rehidlt, 


1836 


Norfolk, 


Sloops of TFar.— 18 










John Adams, 


'20 


Norfolk, rebuilt, 


1820Coast of Brazil. 


Boston, 


20 


Boston, 


1825!East Indies. 


Vincennes, 


20 


Pfew-York, 


1826'New-York. 


Warren, 


20 


Boston, 


18261 West Indies, 


Falmouth, 


20 


do. 


1827 Home Squadron. 


Fairfield, 


20 


New-York, 


1828 Mediterranean. 


Vandalia, 


20 


Philadelphia, 


1828, Home Squadron. 


St. Louis, 


20 


Washington, 


1828 


Norfolk. 


Concord, 


20 


Portsmouth, 


1828 


Coast of Brazil. 


Cyane, 


20 


Boston, 


1837 


Pacific Ocean. 


Levant, 


20 


New- York, 


1837 


Norfolk. 


Saratoga, 


22 


Portsmoutli, 


1842 


Portsmouth. 


Ontario, 


18 


Baltimore, 


1813 


Rec'ng Ship, N. Orleans, 


Marion, 


16 


Boston, 


1839 


Coast of Brazil. 


Decatur, 


16 


New- York, 


1839 


do. do. 


Preble, 


16 


Portsmouth, 


1839 


Mediterranean. 


Yorktown, 


16 


Norfolk, 


1839 


Pacific Ocean. 


Dale, 


16 


Philadelphia, 


1839 


do. do. 


£rigs.— 8. 










Dolphin, 


10 


New-York, 


1836 


Home Squadron. 


Porpoise, 


10 


Boston, 


1836 


New-York. 


Somers, 


10 


. 


. 


do. 


Bainbridge, 


10 


- 




Boston. 


Oregon, 


10 


. 


- 


New-York. 


Truxton, 


10 


. 


. 


Norfolk. 


Pioneer, 




Boston, 


1826 


Rec'ng vessel, Baltimore 


Consort, 




do. 




do. Portland. 


SchoonETS.— \0. 










Grampus, 


10 


Washington, 


1821 


Home Squadron. 


Shark, 


10 


do. 


1821 


Pacific Ocean. 


Enterprise, 


lONew-York, 


1831 


Coast of Brazil. 


Boxer, 


10 Boston, 


1831 


West Indies. 


Experiment, 


4 


Washington, 


1831 


Receiving vessel, Phil. 


Flirt, 

Wave, 

Otsego, 


i 


Transferred from the 


Coast of Florida, 
do. 
do. 


i 


War Department. 


Phenix, 




_ - . 






Flying Fish, 




Purchased, 


1828 




Steamers.—?). 










Fulton, 


4 


New-York, 


1837 


Atlantic Coast. 


Poinsett, 




Transferred War Dep't, 


Norfolk. 


Missouri, Pai.T/ta?i guns^ IC 


Philadelphia, 


1841 


Home Squadron. 


Mississippi, do. 


IC 


New- York, 


1841 


do. do. 


Union, 










Store, Ships.— 3. 








.r.- 


Relief, 


( 


Philadelphia, 


183( 


Pacific Ocean. 


Eric, 


6 


; Baltimore, 


18i; 


Boston. 


Lexington, 


{ 


1 New- York, 


182: 


)lNorfolk. 



tINITED STATES MINT. 296 

NAVY OF THE UNITED STATES. 

The principle officers of (he Uniloil States Navy consists of a Secretary of 
the Nftvy, and Hoard of Commissioners; 68 Captains; 97 Coninianders; 328 
J^icutenanls; 7t) Surgeons; 63 Pursers; 24 Cliaplains; W'3 Passed Midshipmen, 
and o70 Miilshii)men. 

There are seven Navy Yai'ds in tlie United States, viz. 

Value of Stores on hand, Oct. 1842. 

Portsmouth, • N. H 

Charleston, near Boston, §2,021,987 19 

Brouklyn, near New-York, 2,018,771 17 

Philadelphia 472,278 82 

Washington City, .060, .^jOH 95 

Norfolk, Va 1,809,428 61 

Pensacola, Florida, 172,575 31 

Total, $7,055,560 05 

Tlie number of armed vessels areas follows: 

Ships of tlie Line — 74 and 120 guns, 11 

Ships, razee — 50 guns 1 

Frigates, 1st class — 44 guns 14 

Frigates, 2tl class — 36 guns 2 

Sloops of War — 16 to 22 guns 18 

Brigs of Wai^— 10 guns. ." 8 

Schooners — 4 to 10 guns 10 

St«!amers — 2 frigates : 5 

Store Shiiis 3 

Total 72 Vessels — cai-rying 2,112 guns. 



NAVY YARD, NEW-YORK.— January, 1843. 
(Located on Wallabout Bay, city of J5rooklyn.) 
Matthew C. Perry, Captain Commanding. 
Joshua R. Sands, Commander. Charles V. Morris, Acting Master. 

Klisha Peck, Ijieutcnant. John Hasletf, Surgeon. 

J. T. McDonough, do. McKean Buchanan, Purser. 

Francis Ellisoi\, Master. J. W. A. Nicolson, Midshipman. 

nospiTAL. 
B. Ticknor, Surgeon. William Grier, Assistant Surgeon. 

CIVIL LIST YAUD. 

Paul R. George, U. S. Keeper. Fosler Rhodes, Naval Constructor. 

Aaron Storer, Inspector. 



MINT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



Salary. 
Robert M. Patterson, Director,.. 2,<M) 

Isaac Roach, Treasurer, 2,0(X) 

Franklin Peal, Chief Coiner, ... 2,000 

Jacob R. Eckfeldt, Assayer, 2,000 

lonas R. McClintock, Melterand 

R(ifi,ner, 2,C00 

Branch Mint at New Orleans. 
Salary. 
Joseph M. Kcnnedy,Superi»fen- 

dent, 2,500 

H. C. Cammack, Treasurer, .... 2,(XX) 
Wm. P. Hort, Assayer, 2,000 



Salary. 
Christian F. Gobrecht,En?rai'er, 2,000 
Wm. C. Dubois, j4ssi. Assayer, . 1,300 

Randall Hutchinson, Clerk, 1,100 

Eit. Sprague, CI k of Heigh Koom,l,200 
Geo. W. Edieman, liook-keepcr, 1,100 
Geo. F. Dunning, ^jVcc^or's Clk, 700 



Salary. 
J. L. Riddle, Melter ^ Refiner,.. 2,000 

Philip B. Tyler, Coiner, 2,000 

Joseph R. W ickcs. Clerk, 1,200 

John Bertrand, do 1,200 



* Ucturns cot complete. 



296 



MINT OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Branch Mint ai Dahlonega, Georgia. 

Salary, i Salary. 

Paul Rossjgnol, Superintendent, 2,000 I Daniel H. Mason, Coiner, 1,500 

J. W. T'arnum, Assayer, Melter Sanauel S. Blair, Clerk, 1,000 

and Refiner, 1,500 | 

Branch Mint at Charlotte, North Carolina. 



Salary. 
Burg-ess S. Garther, Superinten- 
dent, 2,000 



Salary, 

John H. Gibbon, Assayer, 1,500 

Jolin R. Boulton, Coiner, 1,500 



Statistics of Coinasje in the Uiiitsrt Stales. 



YEARS. 



Gold. 



Silver. 



Total. 



1793 to 1800 $1,014,290] 



1801 to 1810. 
1811 to 1820 . 
1821 to 1830 . 

1831. 

1832. 

1833. 

1834. 

1835. 

1836. 

1837. 

1838. 

1839. 

1840. 

1841. 



3,250,745 

3.166,510 

1,903,090, 

714,270 

798,435 

978.550 

3,954; 270l 

2,186,175 

4,135,700 

1,148,305 

1,809,595 

1,355,885 

1,675,302 

1,091,598 



Total '§29,182,720 $56,217,185 $85,399,905 



§1,440,445 
3,569,165 
5,970,811 

16,781,047 
3,175,600 
2,579,000 
2,759,000 
3,415,002 
3,443,003 
3,606,100 
2,096,010 
2,333,243 
2,189,296 
1,726,703 
1,132,750 



§2,4.54.743 
6,819,910 
9,137,321 

18,684', 137 
3,889,870 
3,377;435 
3,737,550 
7,369,272 
5,629,178 
7,741,800 
3,244,315 
4,142,838 
3,545,181 
3,402;005 
2,224,348 



The mint at Philadelphia was the only one in operation until 1838. From 
tliat year to 1841, both inclusive, the amount of coinage at the mint and its 
branches was as follows : 



MINTS. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 




§4,581,175 
326,190 
507,025 
517,^)90 


§5,848,489 
1,533,503 


§10,429,664 

1,859,693 

507,025 

517,990 


Branch mint at New Orleans, 

Branch mint at Charlotte, N. C 


Branch mint at Dahlon^a, Geo 








Total, 183S— 41, 


§5,932,380 


§7,381,992 


§13,314.372 



The whole amount of coinage in pieces, from 1793 to 1841, at the mint and 
branches, has been as follows : 

Pieces. 

291,009 

4,700,257 

1,108,538 



GOLD. 

Eagles 

Half eagles . » . 
Quarter eagles. 

SILVER. 

Dollars 

Half dollars . . . 
Quarter dollars 

Dimes 

Half dimes .... 



Value. 

$2,910,090 

23,501:285 

2,771,345 



1,674,822 
97,895,662 

8,2(X1,502 
23,765,325 
23,357.478 



Total 160,993,^93 



1,674,822 
48,947,831 
2,050,125 50 
2,376,532 50 
1,167,873 90 

$85,399,904 90 



POPULATION OF THE WORL'D, 



297 



The amnnnt of copper -coinag-e in the same period, was 89,419;030 cents, and 
anil 7,44(),7i;< half cents, altogeUier of the value of $931,503 8'J; which was all 
coincil at I'liilaclcljjliia. 

No eagles were coined from 180.5 to 1837 inclusive. No half eag^lcs in 1816 
and 1817. No quarter eairlcs before 179(5, nor in 1800-1, nor from ISO!) to 1823, 
except in 1821, nor in 18-28 and 1841. No dollars from 1806 to 18H8, except 
1,000 in 1826. No half dollars from 1797 to 1800, nor in 1815. No quarter dol- 
lars before 17'X;, none from 1798 to 1803, none from 1808 to 1814, and none m 
IS 17, 1S2 K182(i, 1S2'», ami 1830. No tlimes before 17!W),none in 17!I9, 1806, 1808, 
1812, 1S13, lAUi, fo 1819, 1824, and 1826. No half dimes in 1798, 17i>9, 1804, 
and 1^06 to 1828. No cents, except a few specimen pieces, in 1815 and 1823. 
No half cents in 1798, 1801, 1812 to 1824, 1827, 1830, and 1832, and none since 
ISM. 



BALBl'S POPULATION TABLE OF THE WORLD. 



EUKOPE. 



Surface -2,793,000 Geographical Square Mi 

Empire of Austria, • 32,833,900 

KinyJom of Keluium, 3,859,193 

Kepublic of Cracow, 114,000 

Kingdom of Denmark, l,99-',7i3 

Kingdom of France, 32,500,934 

Kingdom of Great Britain and 

Irebind, 24;271,763 

Kingdom of Greece, 035,000 

( Kingdom of K.ivaria, 4,037,017 

I Kin;;dom of Hanover, 1,537,500 

Kingdom of Saxony, 1,414,528 

Kingdom of Wirlemburg, •• 1,530,408 

Electorate of Hesse. 718,000 

GrandDutchy ofUaden,--- 1, 141.747 
Grirnd Dutchy of Hesse, • •• 097,901 
Grand DutchyofSaxe Wei- 
mar, 222,000 

Gr.ind Dutchy of Mecklen- 

burg-Schwerin, 431,000 

i Grand Dutchy of Mecklen- 

burg-Strelitz, 77,000 

Grand Dutchy of Holstein- 

Oldcnburg, 241,000 

Dutchy ot Nassau, 237,000 

S Dutchy of -Brnaswick,' 242,000 

Dutcliy of Saxe-Coburg-Go- 

(ha, 143,000 

Dutchy of Saxe Meiningcn, 130,000 
Dutchy of Saxe Altenburgh, 104,000 
S I Dutchy of Aahalt-Dessau,-- 60,000 

^ Dutchy of Anhalt-Kcrne- 

burgh, 

Dutchy of Anhalt-Kocthcn, 
Principality of Schwarlz- 

burfii-Kndolstadl, 

Principality of Schwartz- 

burgh-Sondershausen, • •- 

Principality of Ueuss-Greitz 

Princip.ility of Ueuss- 

Schlcitz, 

Principality of Reuss-I.o- 
i. benstcin-Ebersdorf, 20,000 



38,000 

34,000 



57,000 



48,000 
23,000 



28,000 



Ics— Population 227,700,000 Inhabitants, 

(Principality of Lippe-Det- 

mold, 

Principality of Lippc-Schau- 

hcnburg, . • 

Principality of WaUieck, -• 
Principality of Hohenzol- 

lern Sigmaringen, 

Principality of Hohenzol- 

leru Hcching, 

cS i Principality of Lichtenstcin 
Landgrave of Hesse Hom- 

burgh; 

Lordship of Kniphausen, •- 

Republic of Bremen, 

Republic of Franlifort, •••• 

Republic of Haml)urgh, 

( Republic of Lubec, 

King(lpm of Holland, 

Republic ol the Ionian Islands, 

( Kingdom of Sardinia,----" 4,333,906 
Kingdom of the two Sicilies, 

(Sicily and Naples,) 

Grand Dutchy of Tuscany, 

Dutchy of Lucca, ••'- 

■§'{ Dutchy of Massa, .-... 

^ Dutchy of Modena, •-•- 

Dutchy of Parma, 

States of the Church, 

I Principality of Monaco, --• 
( Kepublic of San Marino, 



72,000 

26,000 
64,000 

38,000 

15,000 
0,000 

20,000 

2,859 

49,000 

52,000 

14ti,000 

41,000 

2,300,001 

§200,000 



7,414,717 

1,300,000 

143,000 

29,000 

350,000 

410,000 

2,483,940 

OjoOO 

7,000 

Kingdom of Poland, '•■•■ 4,036,700 

3,630,000 
12,720,110 



Kingdom of Portugal,- 

Kingdom of Prussia, 

Emiiirc of Russia, (in Eu-- 

rope,) • 44,118,600 

Kingdom of Spain, 13, 953, 961 

Rcpublicof Andora, (Sp'n,)---- 15,000 

Ropnljlic ol Swiizeiland, 2,037,080 

King'm of Sweden & Norway, •• 3,801,714 
Empire of Turkey, (Europe) -•- 9,470,000 



29S 



POPULATION OF THE WORLD. 



Surface 12,113,000 Gcographi 

Empire oT Turkey, (in Asia,)- 
Empire of Russia, (inAsis,)-- 

Empire of China, 

Empire of Japan, 

Empire of An-nam, 

Kip.gclomof Siam, 

Empire .ol Birniah, 

Jirilisli Indian Empire, 

Kingdom of Sindia, 

Kingdom of Nepaiil, 

Confederation of the Sikhs,- •• 
Triumvirate of Sindhv, 



ASIA. 

cal Sijuare Miles— Popv.!al!on S90,0CO,CCO Jnkabitants. 

13,500,000 Kingdom of Cahaul, 6.600,0(.<:« 

11,992,000 Conffdcra'n of the Heloulcliis,- 2',OCO,(.0<.> 
no, 000,000 Kingdom of Herat, (Eastern 

25,000,000 Korassan,) 1,500,000 

l-l.OOO.OOO Kingdom of Persia, 9,0CC,C0« 

3,000,000 Khanate of Eoiililiara, 2,600.(00 

3,590,000 Khanate of Khiva, fcOO,000 

123,3&8,9i6 Klianate of Kholvhan,- 1,000,000 

4,000,000 Imanate of Yemen, 2,600,000 

2,500,000 Irnanate of Mascate, 1,000,000 

5,500,000 Portuguese Asia, 500, OCO- 

1,000,000 French Asia, 179,000 

AFEICA. 



Svrface 8,516,000 Geographical Square Miles— Population 50,000,000 h-.hr.bitanls 

Pachalic of Egypt, 3,000,000 

Empire of Morocco, 4,500,000 

Algiers, (belonging to France,) 1,500,000 

State of Tunis, 1,800,000 

State of Tripoli, CGO,000 

Kingdom of Tigre, 1,500,000 

Kingdom of Amharra, 1,000,000 

Empire of Bornou, 2,000,000 

Empire of thp Fclatahs, 3,000,000 

Kingdom of Upper Bambarra, • 1,500,000 



Republic of Foula Tore,- • 

Empire of Ashnntce, 

Kingdom of liahomey, 

Kingdom of Renin, 

Kingdom of Changamera, 
Kingdom of Madagascar,- 

Portuguese Africa, 

English Africa, 

Spanish Africa, 

French Africa, 



700,00-0 

3,000,000 

900,OC0 

1,500,000- 

810,000 

2,000,000 

1,440,000 

270,000 

2CS,0C0 

135,000 



AMERICA. 
Surface 11,016,000 Geographical Square Miles — Topxdation 45,OC0,CCO Inha 

United States, 17,068,066 Argentine Republic of Buenos 

Indians in the United States,- -• 300,000 _ Ayres, 

Republic of Texas, 100,000 

Republic of Mexico, 8,000,000 

Kepublic of Guatemala, 1,700,000 

Empire of Brazil, 4,000,000 

Republic of Bolivia, 1,200,000 British America, 

Republic of Peru, 1,736, 9-'3 Danish America, 

Rejjublic of Chili, 1,200,000 — ■ - 

Republic of New Grenada,* •-• 1,137,000 

Republic of Venezuela,* 707,100 

Republic of Ecuador,* 520,000 



Republic of Monte Video, 

Dictatorship of Paraguay, 

Patagonia and Terra cTel Fuego, 
Republic of Hayti, 



Dutch America, 
French America,- • 
Russian America, 
Spanish America,- 
Swedish America. 



hitants. 

C00,00& 
300,000 
600,000 ■ 
1 50,000 
935,000 

2,290,000 
110,0i0 
114,000 
240,000 
60,rCO 

1,240,000 
llM.OOO 



AUSTRALASIA. 

Surface 3,100,033 Geographical Square Miles — Popvlalion ^0,3C0,QC0 7r.hihxlar.ts. 



Kingdom of Siak, (Sumatra,)- •- 000,000 

Kingdom of Acheen, (Sumatra,) 500,000 

Kingdom of .Borneo, 260,000 

Kingdom of Solon, 300,000 

Kingdom of Mindanao, 360,000 

Kingdom of Sandwich Islands, • 130,000 I 



.Tava, Sumatra, &c. (Dutch.)-- • 9,360,000 

Phillippine Islands, fiC. (Sitan.) 2,640,000 

Australia, or New-Holland, 00,000 

Island of Timor, part of, (Pijr- 

lugucse,)--- 137,00i> 



RECAPITULATION. 

Divis'nns. Square miles. Population. 

Europe, 2,793,000 227,700,000 

Asia, 12,118,000 • 390,000,000 

Africa, 8,516,000 60,000,000 

America, 11,045,000 45,000,000 

Australysia, .••• 3,100,000 20,300,000 

Grand loal, 37,673,000 743,000,000 



Pop. to «g. mile 
62 
32 

7 

4 

6 

Average, •• i26 



Formerly Columbia. 



CITIES IN THE UNITKD STATES. 



299 



JAsl of (he l»iiucipal Cities in the United States, 

With the Population iii IS V), ami Distance from the Cities of New -York and 
IVashiiigtoii, by mail route. 



CITIES, &c. 



Aug-iista, I\[aine 

Eangor, do 

Portland, do 

Concord, New-llampshire 

I'orisnioutli, do 

Ooston, Massachusetts 

Lowell, do 

Salem, do 

Biirlington, Vermont 

RIontpelier do 

Newport, Rhode Island 

Providence, tlo 

Hartford, Connecticut, 

N e w Ilavon, do 

Albanj', New- York 

lluflulo, do (by nearest route,) . 

New-York 

Newark, New J ersey 

'i'renton, ilo 

Harrisbiirji^, Pennsylvania 

Piiiladelphia, do , 

Pittsburg- do , 

Dover, Delaware , 

Wilmington, ilo 

Annapolis, Maryland 

Baltimore, do 

Washington, D. C 

J^orfolk^ Virginia 

Petersburg, do 

Richmond ilo » 

Wheeling do 

Raleigh, Nortli Carolina 

Wilmington, do 

Ctiarleston, South Carolina 

Columbia, do 

Augusta, Georgia 

Jlilledgeville, do 

Savannah do 

Tuscaloosa, Alabama 

Mobile, do 

Jackson, Mississippi . . . ._ 

Natchez, ilo ' 

New Orleans, Louisiana 

Nashville, Teimessee 

Frankfort, Kentucky 

Louisville, do 

Cincinnati, Oliio 

Columbus, do • 

Indianapolis, Indian i, 

Chicago, Illinois 

Springfield, do 

at. Louis, M issouri, 

Jefferson City, do 

Detroit, RI iciiigan 

Little Rock, Arkansas 

Tallahasse. I'lorida 



Pop. I&IO. 



Miles fron) 
New-York 



Miles from 
Washing- 
ton. 



5,314 

8,G27 

lo,21S 

4,8!)7 

7,887 

93, 38;^ 

;.0,7Sf3 

15,082 

4,271 

3,725 

8,333 

23,171 

9,468 

12,960 

33,721 

18,213 

312,710 

17, 29 J 

4,035 

5,980 

220,323 

21,115 

3,730 

8,367 

2,793 

102,313 

23,346 

10,920 

11,137 

20, 153 

7,885 

3,24^1 

4,744 

29,261 

4,340 

6,303 

2,095 

11,214 

1,CM9 

12,672 



4,800 

102, 193 

6,929 

1,917 

21,210 

46,338 

6,048 

2,69: 

4,470 

2,579 

16,469 

1,174 

9,102 



1,616 



370 
436 
317 
249 
L66 
207 
214 
221 
2!^KJ 
299 
178 
182 
110 
76 
145 
357 

"io" 

58 

•182 

88 

387 

165 

117 

217 

187 

225 

4.7 

369 

347 

451 

511 

641 

769 

725 

777 

867 

884 

1,083 

1,258 

1,260 

1,371 • 

1,428' 

939 

736 

815 

722 

551 

752 

950 

992 

1,046 

1,180 

675 

1,293 

1,121 



595 
661 
542 
474 
491 
432 
439 
416 
51) 
524 
403 
394 
335 
201 
370 
376 
225 
2J5 
166 
110 
136 
223 
120 
108 
37 
38 

217 
114 
122 
264 
286 
416 
544 
500 
580 
642 
662 
858 
1,033 
1,035 
1,146 
1,203 
714 
551 
590 
497 
396 
573 
812 
780 
856 
990 
526 
1,068 
896 



300 



UNITED STATES CEXSITS, 



Total males, 7,249/266 



Females, 

Under 5 years of age, 1,203,349 

Of 5 ajKl under 10 986,921 

Of 10 and under 15 836,583 

Of 1 5 and under 20 792, 1 68 

Of 20 and under 30 1,253,395 

Of 30 antl under 40 779,097 

Of 40 anil untler 50 502, 143 

^ ' . . , 304,810 



Of 50 and nnder 60 , 

Of 60 and umler 70 173,299 



Of 70 and under 80 
Of 80 and under 90 . . 
Of 90 and under 100 . 
Of 100 and upwards,. 



80,562 

23,964 

3,231 

315 



Total females, 6,939,84J 



CExVSUS,*— 1840. 

EpUome of the whole population of the States and Territories of the United States; 
exhibiting the general aggregate amount of each description of persons, by classes^ 

FREE WHITE PERSONS. — MalCS. 

Under 5 years of age 1,270,790 

Of 5 and under 10 1,024,072 

Of 10 and under 15 879,499 

Of 15 and under 20 756,022 

Of 20 and under 30 1,322,-140 

Of 30 and under 40 .... . 866,43 1 

Of 40 and under 50 536,568 

Of 50 and under 60 314,505 

Of 60 and under 70 174,226 

Of 70 and under 80 80,051 

Of 80 and under 90 21,679 

Of 90 and under 100 2,507 

Of lOa and upwards 476 



Of 55 and under 100 

Of 100 and upwards, 


13,493 

286 




186,467 


FREE COLORED PERSONS. 

Under 10 years of age ...,. 
Of 10 antl under 24 


— Females. 
55,069 
56,562 




41 673 




30,385 


Of 55 and under 100 

Of 100 and upwards 


15,728 
361 



Total females, 199,77? 



Total free colored persons, 386,245 



SLAVES.— ikfaZes. 

Under 10 years of age, 422,599 

Of 10 and under 24 391,131 

Of 36 and under 55 145,264 

Of 24 and under 36 2:35,373 

Of 55 and under 100 51,288 

Of 100 and upwards, 753 



Total males, 1 ,;^ 46,408 



Females. 

Under 10 years of age, 421,470 

Of 10 and under 24 390,787 

Of 24 and under 36 239,787 

Of 36 and under 55 139,201 

Of 55 and under 100 49,692 

Of 100 and upwards, 580 



Total females, . . . . 

Total slaves, 

t Total aggregate,. 



Total free white persons, 14,189,108 

FREE COtORED PERSONS. — MalcS. 

Under 10 years of age 56,323 

Of 10 and under 24 52,799 

Of 24 and under 36 35,308 

Of 36 and under 55 28,258 

"White persons included in the foregoing, who are deaf and dumb, 

under 14 years of age ; 

Of 14 and under 25 do do 

Over 25 do do 

White persons included in the foregoing, who are blind 

Who are insane and idiots at public cliarge 

Who are insane and idiots at private charge 

Total number of persons employed in mining 

In agricultural 

In commerce 

In manufactures and trade 

In navigation of the ocean 

In navigation of canals, lakes and rivers 



1,240,805 



2,487,213 



17,062,566 



1,919 

2,056 

2,700 

5,024 

4,329 

10,179 

15,203 

3,717,756 

117,575 

791,545 

56,025 

33,067 



* For a census of the United States, by States and Territories, see page 58. 

t Total number of persons on board of vessels of war in the United States naval 
service, June 1, 1840, 6,100; making the total aggregate population of the United 
States, 17,063,666.; be = i^ F 



CENSUS OF INDIAN TRIBES. 



301 



In learned professions 

Slaves and colored persons included in the foregoing, who are deaf 

and dumb 

Who are blind 

Who are insane and idiots at private charge 

Who are insane and idiots at public charge 

Total number of pensioners for revolutionary or military services 

Of universities or colleges 

Of students in universities or colleges 

Of acadeni ies and grammar schools 

Of students in acailemies and grammar schools 

Of primary and common schools ; . . . 

Of scholars in common schools 

Of scholars at public charge 

Of white persons over 20 years of age who cannot read and write 



65,236 

977 

1,892 

2,093 

833 

20,7f»7 

173 

16,233 

3,242 

164,159 

47,209 

1,845,244 

468,264 

549,693 



CENSUS OF THE INDIAN TRIBES, 

Residing within the borders of the United States, from the latest authorities. 



TRIBES. 



Natives of tUeiKemoved by the] 

country west U S. Gover't Remaiainji east 
of the Missis-I west of the of the Missis- 
sippi river. [ Missisippi. sippi river. 



Sioux, 

Quapaus 

lowas 

Kickapoos. 

Sacs and Foxes 

Delawares 

Shawnees 

Sacs of Missouri , 

Weas 

Osages 

Piankeshaus 

Kanzas 

Peorias and Kaskaskias 

Omahas 

Senecas from Sandusky 

Senecas and Shawnees , 

Otoes and Missourias , 

Pawnees 

Winnebagoes 

Ca'manches 

Kiowas 

Mandans 

Chippewas, Ottawas and Pota- 

watamies of Indiana 

Choctaws 

Creeks 

Minaterees 

Florida Indians 

Pagans 

Cherokees 

Assinaboines 

Swan Creek 

Appaches 

Ottawas of Maumee 

Crees 

Ottawas and Chippewas 



25, 000 

476 

•470 



*2 


34S 




•414 


3 


7SS 


1 


606 


1 


600 





1,000 
12,500 

19, 200 

1,800 

SOU 



2,000 
36,606 

7, 666 
26,2^6 
"*'8o6 



*505 

•1,059 

•887 

225 

100 

200 

251 
211 

•2, 183 



5,207 
15,177 
24, 594 

3,612 

25,911 

62 

300 



30 



(a) 
3, 323 
744 

(6) 

1,000 

•113 

92 

7,055 



(a) AH removed except a few stragplers. (i) Number not ascertainrd. 
26 



302 



CENSUS OF INDIAN TRIBES. 



TRIBES. 



Natives of the Removed by the 



country west 
of the Missis- 
sippi river. 



U. S. Gover't 
west of the 
Mississippi. 



Remaining east 
of the Missis- 
sippi river. 



Arrapahas 

New- York Indians 

Gros Ventres 

Chickasaws 

Eutaws 

Stockbridge and Munsees. . 

Crows 

Wyandots of Ohio 

Poncas 

Miamies 

Arickarees 

Menomonies 

Cheyennes 

Cliippewas of the Lakes. . . 

Blackfeet 

Caddoes 

Snakes 

Flatheads 

Oneidas of Green Bay . . . . 
Stockbridges of Green Bay 
Wyandots of Michigan.... 
Pottawatomies of Huron . . 

Total 



2,500 
"3,366 
19,266 

*4,666 

'mo 

' 1,266 

'2," 666 

'i,'.366 
2,000 
1,000 

800 



168,682 



4,642 
*278 



3,293 
36S 
320 
575 
661 
•2,464 
2,564 



»675 

*207 

*75 

»100 



85,494 



23, 659 



In addition to the above, there is a scanty population of Indians residing 
east of the Rocky Mountains, embracing the immense territory between 
Mexico on the south and the British possessions on the north. " It is 
evident, however, from the ruins of villages scattered along the banks of 
the Upper Missouri and its tributary streams, that these desolate plains once 
teemed with myriads of human beings. We have the authority of an in- 
telligent British trader, who crossed over to the Missouri in the winter of 
1783, for saying that the population, even at that recent date, was per- 
haps a hundred-fold greater than at the present. The Mandans alone he 
estimated at 25,000 fighting men." 

A reference to the following table, will show the wonderful destruc- 
tion of human life which pestilence and war have produced, in this region, 
in less than a century. t 

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF VARIOUS WANDERING TRIBES, 

Residing east of the Rocky Mountains, but beyond the jurisdiction of the 
agents of government. 

Arsphas • 2,500 

Gros Ventres, Prairie 2,500 

Portions of other tiibes be- 
fore named 18,700 



Yanctons 2,500 

Tetons 3,000 

Ogellalas 1 ,500 

Sowans 12,000 

Yanctonas 6,000 

Blackfeet 13,000 



Total 61,700 



* Those marked thus are from actual census. 

t The small pox was brought from Mexico about the year 1786, which almost de- 
populated this part of the country. Again, in 1838, the same disease swept off at least 
one half of the prairie tribes. 



PRODUCTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 803 



.PRODUCTS OF THE UMTED STATES, 

Compiled from Ihe Census returns, embracing a complete recapitulation of 
the aggregate value and produce, (and Die number of jiersoris employed,) in 
Mines, Agriculture, Commerce, Manufactures, &c.. Sec, exhibitinga full view 
of the pursuits, industry and resources of the United States and Territories. 



Mines. 

iROK.— Cast, Number of furnaces, 804 

■ Tons produced, 286,903 

Bar, Nunjber of blQomeries, forges and rolling mills, 795 

Tons protluced, 197,233 

Tons of fuel consumed, 1,528,110 

Num!)cr of men omploj'ed, including mining operations, 30,497 

Capital in^ ested, ft20,432,131 

Lead. — Number of smelting-houses, counting each fire, one, 120 

Number of pounds produced, 31,239,45.'5 

Number of men cmnlovcd, 1,017 

Capital invested, ". $1,347,756 

Gold Number of smclting-houscs, 157 

Value pro.iuccd, $529,C05 

Number of men emploj-ed, 1,046 

Capital invested, if:234,325 

O:: iizn METALS. — Value produced, $370,614 

Number of men emploved, 72S 

Capital invested, ' $238,980 

Coal. — Anthracite, Tonsraised, (28 bushels each,) 863,489 

Number of men employed, 3,043 

Capital invested, ' S4,355,602 

Bituminous, Number of bushels raised-, 27,603,191 

Men emi)loyed, 3,768 

Capital invested, $1,868,862 

DoMKSi ic Salt. — Number of bushels produced, 6,179,174 

Men employed, 2,365 

Capital invested, $6,998,015 

Granite, Marble and other stone. 

Value produced, $3,695,881 

Number of men employed, 7,859 

Cai.ital invested, $2,540,159 

Agriculture. 

Liv E Stock. — Horses and mules, 4,335,669 

Neat cattle, 14,971 ,tS6 

Sheep, ]9,3]1,874 

Swine, 26,301,293 

PouKry of all kinds— estimated value, $9,344,410 

Cereal Grains.— No. of Bushels of Wheat 84,«23.272 

I5arlev,' 4,161,.' 04 

Oats, ' 123.07 1 ,3Tl 

Rye, ]S.(;i5,r67 

Buck whea', 7,291,743 

Indian corn, 377,531,875 

Various Crops.— No. of pouads of Wool, .35,802,11 1 

lloiis, J,2;^8.502 

AVax, 628,::03t 

Ilushels of Polatoe, 108,298.060 

Tons of riay, 10,248,i08i' 

Hemp and l!ax l'5,25] j 



304 PRODUCTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Tobacco, Cotton, Sugar, &c. 

Pounds of Tobacco gathered, 219,163,319 

Rice, 80,841.422 

Cotton g-athcred, 790,479,275 

Silk cocoons, 61,552^ 

Sngar made, 155,100,809 

Cords of Wood sold, 5,088,891 

"Value of the produce of the Dairy, §33,787,008 

Orchard, §7,256,904 

Gallons of Wine made, 124,734 

Value of home made or family goods, $29,023,380 

Horticulture.— Value of produce of Market gardeners, $2,601,196 

Nurseries and florists, $593,534 

Number of men employed, 8,553 

Capital invested, r $2,945,774 



Commerce. 

Number of commercial houses in Foreign trade, 1,108 

Commission business, 2,881 

Capital invested, $119,295,367 

Retail dry goods, grocery and other stores, 57,565 

Capital invested, $250,301,799 

Lumber yards and trade, 1^793 

Capital invested, ir-io4S,307 

Number of men employed, ^15,693 

Internal transportation — number of men employed, 17,594 

Butchers, packers, &c., do. 4,808 

Capital invested, $11,526,590 

Fisheries. — Number of quintals smoked or dried fish, 773,947 

Barrels pickled fish, 772,3591 

Gallons Spermaceti oil, 4,764,708 

Whale and other fish oil, 7,536,778 

Value of whale-bone and other productions of fisheries, $1,153,234 

Number of men employed, ^36,584 

^ Capital invested, $16,429,620 

Products of the Forest. — 

Value of lumber produced, $12,943,507 

Barrels of tar, pitch, turpentine, rosin, 619,106 

Tons of pot and pearl ashes, 15,933;^ 

Skins ami furs — value produced, $1,065,869 

Ginseng and all other productions of the forest — value,. $526,580 
Number of men employed, 22,042 

Manufactures. — 3Iachinery, Value of machinery manufactured, $10,980,581 

Number of men emploj'ed, 13,001 

Hardware, Cutlery, %c., Value of manufactured, $6,451,!i)67 

No. of men employed, 5,4^ 

Number of Cannon and small arms, Number of Cannon cast, 274 

Small arms made, 88,073 

Men employed, 1,744 

Precious Metals, Value manufactured, $4,734,960 

Number of men employed, 1,556 

Various Metals, Value manufactured, $9,779,442 

Numlier of men employed, 6,677 

Oranite, Marble, ^c, Value manufactured, $2,442,950 

No. of men employed, 3,734 

Bricks and Lime, Value manufactured, $9,736,945 

No. of men employed, 22,80? 

Capital invested in preceding manufactures, $20^620,869 



PRODUCTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 305 

Wool, Number of fulling mills, 2,585 

AVoollen manufactories, 1,4:20 

Value of manufactured goods, ^'20,G%,999 

Number of jiersons employed, 21,342 

Cai)ital invested, $I5,7(i5, 124 

Cotton, Number of cotton manufactories, 1 ,240 

Spintlles, 2,284,631 

Dyeing' and printing- establishments, 129 

Value of manufactured articles, $46,3r;0,453 

Number of persons employed, 72,119 

Capital invested^ , $51,102,359 

Silk, Number of pounds reeled, thrown, or other silk make, 15,745| 

Value of the same, $119,814 

Numlier of males employed, 246 

females and children, 521 

Capital invested, $274,374 

Flax, Value of manufactures of flax, $322,205 

Number of persons employed, 1,628 

Capital invested, $208,087 

Mixed Manufactures, Value of produce, $6,545,503 

Number of persons employed, 15,905 

Cai)ital invested, $4,368,991 

Tobacco, Value of manufactured articles, $5,819,568 

Number of persons employed, 8,384 

Capital invested, $3,437,191 

Hats, Caps, Bonnets, ^c. Value of the caps manufactured, $8,704,342 

Value of straw boimels manufactured, $1,476,505 

Number of persons employed, 20,176 

Capital invested, $4,485,300 

leather. Tanneries, Saddleries, ^-c. 

Number of tanneries, 8,229 

Sides of sole leather tanned, 3,-163,61 1 

upper do. do 3,781,868 

Number of men employed, 26,018 

Capital invasted, $15,650,929 

All other manufactures of leather, saddleries, kc, 17,126 

Value of manufactured articles, $33, 134,403 

Capital invested, $12,881,26^ 

Soap and Candles, Number of pounds of soap, 49,820,497 

Number of i)ounds of tallow candles, 17,5X14,507 

Number of pounds of spermaceti and wax can- 
dles, 2,936,951 

Number of men employed, 5,641 

Capital invested, $2,757,273 

Distilled and Fermented Liquors. 

Number of distilleries, 10,306 

gallons iiroduced, 41,402,627 

breweries, 406 

Number of gallons produced, 23,267,730 

men emi)loyed, 12.223 

Capital invested, $9,147,.368 

Powder Mills, Number of powder mills, 137 

Pounds of gunpowder, 8,977,348 

Number of men employed, 496 

Capital invested, $875,875 

Drvgs, Medicines, Paints, and Dyes. 

Value of meilicinal drugs, paints, dyes, &c $4,151,899 

Value of turpentine and varnish |)roduced, $660,827 

Number of men cmi)loyed, 1,848 

Capital invested, ^ 4,507,675 

26» 



306 PRODUCTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Glass, Earthenware, ^c, Number of glass-houses 81 

cutting establisliments, 34 

men employed, 3,236 

Value of manufactured articles, including looking glasses, $2,890,293 

Capital invested, $2,084,100 

Number of potteries, 659 

Value of manufactured articles, $1,104,825 

Number of men employed, 1,612 

Capital invested, $551,431 

Sii^ar Refineries, Chocolate, ^-c. Number of sugar refineries, 43 

Value produced, $3,250,700 

chocolate manufactured, $79,900 

confectionary made, $1,143,965 

Number of men employed, 1,355 

Capital invested, $1,769,571 

Paper, Number of paper manufactories, 426 

"Value of produce, $5,641,495 

all other manufactures of paper, playing cards, &c. $511,597 

Number of men employed, , 4,726 

Capital invested, $4,745,239 

Printing and Binding, Number of printing offices, 1,552 

Number of binderies, 447 

Number of daily newspapers, 138 

weekly newspapers, 1,141 

semi and tri-weekly, 125 

periodicals, 227 

men employed, ". 11,523 

Capital invested, $5,873,815 

Cordage, Number of rope walks, 388 

Value of produce, $4,078,306 

Number of men employed, 4,464 

Capital invested, ." $2,465,577 

Musical Instruments, Value produced, $923,924 

Number of men employed, 908 

Capital invested, $734,370 

Carriages and Wagons, Value produced, ^ $10,897,887 

Number of men employed, 21,994 

Capital invested, $5,551,632 

Mills, Number of flouring mills, 4,364 

Barrels of flour manufactured, 7,404,562 

Number of grist mills, 23,661 

saw do 31,650 

oil do 843 

Value of manufactures, $76,545,246 

Number of men employed, 60,788 

Capital invested, $65,858,470 

Ships, Value of ships and vessels built, $7,016,094 

Furniture, Value of furniture made, $7,555,405 

Number of men employed, 18,003 

Capital investeil, • $6,989,971 

Houses, Number of brick and stone houses built, 8,429 

wooden houses, 45,684 

men employed, 85,501 

Value of constructing or building, $41,917,401 

All other Manufactures not enumerated, Value, $34,785,353 

Capital invested, $25,019,726 

Total Capital invested in manufachires, $267,726,579 



PRODUCTS OF THE UNITED STATES, 



307 



TABLE. 



Summary, showinj^ as far as practicable, the amount of caiiilal investedin 
various branches of business, which, it uiipears, is $71(j,089,2[,(). Tlie capital 
employed in agriculture is not given; neither is it in some other branches. 



In Iron business, 

Lead do. 

Gold do 

Other metals, 

Coal Business, 

Anthracite, 4,355,602 

Bituminous, 1,808,862 



Salt, 

Granite, Marble and Stone, 

Nurseries, 

In commercial and com- 
mission houses, 

Retail dry goods and gro- 
ceries, &c., 

Lumberyards and trade,. 

Butchers, packers, &c 

Fisheries, 

Various manufactures, .... 

Woollen do. .... 

Cotton manufactures, .... 

Silk do. 

Flax do. .... 

Mixed do. .... 

Tobacco do. .... 



$20,-132,131 

l,34t),7.06 

2:M,325 

238,980 



6,224,464 
6,998,045 
2,540,159 
2,945,774 

119,295,367 

250,301,799 

9,^4.8,307 

11,526,950 

16, l-29,(i2n 

2(),<i-!(),S(if) 

15,765,124 

51,102,359 

274,374 

208,087 

4,368,991 

3,437,191 



Hats, caps, and bonnets, . , 4,485,300 

Leather tanneries, 15,650,929 

manufactured, and 

«addlcs, 12,881,262 

Soap and candl es, 2,7.57,273 

Distilleries and breweries, 9,147,368 

Powder mills, 875,875 

Drugs, medicines, paints, 

and dyes, 4,507,675 

«Iass, 2,084,100 

Earthenware, &c.,. . ., 551,431 

Sugar refineries & chocolate, 1,769,571 

Paper making, 4,745,2:39 

Printing and binding, 5,873,815 

Cortlage, 2,465,577 

]\Iaking musical instruments, 734,370 
carriages and wagons, 5,r51,632 

M'ills, 65.858,470 

iNlalcing furniture, 6,989,971 

All other manufactures, .. 25,019,726 
Total capital invested in 

manufactm-es, 267,726,579 

Grand Total, $716,089,256 



Number of men employed in the various branches of business, according to 
the preceding summary. 



Iron and mining, 

Lead, 

(Jold, 

Other me'als, 

Coal— Anthracite, 3,043 

Bituminous, 3,7t^ 



Domestic salt, 

(iranile, marble, and stone, . . 

Nurseries, 

Lumber yards and trade, 

Internal transportation, 

Butchers, packers, &c 

Fisheries 

Products of the forest, 

Machinery manufacture, 

Hardware and cutlery do 

Cannon and small arms do .... 
Precious metals do.... 

Various metals do .,.. 

Granite, marble, and stone do. 

Bricks and lime do 

Woollen nunufacturcs, 

Cotton do 

6Uk do 



30,4')7 

1,017 

1,046 

728 



6,811 

2,365 

7,859 

8,553 

35,963 

17,.594 

4,808 

36,584 

22,012 

13,001 

5,492 

1,744 

],.556 

6,677 

3,734 

22,807 

21,342 

72,119 

767 



Flax do 

Mixed mnufactures, 

Tobacco do 

Hats caps and bonnets, 

Leather, tanneries and saddle- 
ries, 

Soap and candles, 

Distilleries and fermented li- 
quors, 

Powder mills, 

Drugs and medicines, paints 
and dyes, 

Glass 

Potteries, 

Sugar refineries and chocolate 

Paper making, 

Printing and binding, 

Cordage, 

Musical instruments, , . 

Carriages and wagons, 

Milling, 

Furniture, 

House building, 



1,6-28 
1.5,905 

8,384 
20,176 

26,018 
5,641 

12,223 
496 

1,848 

3,236 

1,612 

1,,355 

4,726 

11,523 

4,464 

908 

21,994 

60,788 

18,003 

85,501 



Grand Total, $631,.'j35 



303 . commerce and navigation. 

Value of Manufactured Goods , as appears by the Tables. 

Machinery made, $10,890,531 | Earthernware, 1,104,825- 

Hiirdware and cutlery, .... 6,451,967 ' Siig-ar refined, 3.250,700 

Precious metals, 4,734,960 I ( ■liocolate, ' 79,900 

Various do 9,779,442 ! Confectionary, 1,143,965 



Granite, stone, marble, &c. 2,442,950 

Bricks and lime, 9,736,945 

AVoollen goods, 20,696,999 

Cotton do 46,350,453 

Silk do ir9,814 

Flaxen goods, 323,205 

Mixed manufactures, 6,545,503 

Tobacco do 5,819,568 

Hats and caps, 8,704,342 

Straw bonnets, 1,476,505 

Leather and saddlery^ 33,134,403 

Dru£:s, medicines, paints 

and dyes, 4,151,899 

Turpentine and varnish,... 660,827 



Paper, 5,641,495 

All other of paper, playing 

cards, &c. • 511,597 

Cordag-e, 4,078,306 

Musical instruments, 923,924 

Carriages and wagons, .... 10,897,887 
Pi-oducts of flouring, grist 

and saw mills, 76,546,246 

Ships, 7,016,094 

^u^ni^Jre, 7,555,405 

Houses, 41,917,401. 

AH other manufactures not 
enumerated, '. . . 34,786,353 



Glass and looking-glasses, . 2,890,293 | Grand total, $370,451,754 



COMMERCE AND NATIGATION. 



The Commerce and Navigation of the United States, for 1841. 

Abstract of the annual statement of the Commerce and Navigation of the 
United States, submitted to Congress. 

Number of vessels, their tonnage and crews, which entered the ports 
of the United States for the year ending the 30th September, 1841; 

Vessels. Tonnage. Men. Boys. 

American 7,735 1,631,909 65,445 2,830 

Foreign 4,548 738,444 48,675 458 



Total, 12,233 2,370,353 114,120 3,288 

The number of vessels which cleared from ports of the United States 
during the same period was: 

Vessels. Tonnage. Men. Boys. 

American 7,790 1,634,156 79,216 3,043 

Foreign 4,554 736,849 44,061 |348 

The value of merchandise imported into the United States dui-ing the 
same period was: 

Merchandise free of duties, $66,019,781 

Paying ad valorem duties, •- 34,610,642 

Specific duties, ... 27,315,804 

Total, $127,946,227 

Imported in American vessels, $113,221,877 

do in Foreign vessels, 14,724,350 

The value of merchandise exported during the same period was: 

American productions, $106,382,722 

Foreign productions re-exported, 15,469,081 

Total, $121,85],80a 



CO^fMERCE AND NAVIGATION. 309 

Of the American productions were carried: 

'In American vessels, $82,"569,389 

In foreign vessels, 23,813,333 

The prominent articles of export were: 

• Cotton, $54:330,341 

Tobacco, :12,576,703 

Flour, .- ^'••. .7.,759,646 

Manufactures, :a,122,546 

Gold and silver coin, 2,746,486 

Pork, . ^ 2,621 ,537 

Rice, 2,010,107 

The tonntige of the United States for the year, ending SeptemHjer 30, 
1841, was: 

In foreign trade, (registered,) 9h[I>,S03 47 

Coasting trade, TenroUed,) 1;076,036 18 

do do (licensed,) ». 31,031 70 

1 ,107,067 88 

Cod fishery, (enrolled,) 60,556 05 

Mackerel, do 11.321 13 

Cod fishery, under 20 tons, 5,995 84 

'.77,873 02 

Total, 2, 130,744 37 

Whale fishery, (registered and enrolled, 11)7,405 17 

Of the enrolled and licensed tonnage there is employed in steam navi- 
gation, 174,342.44. 

The number of vessels built during the year amounted to 7KL Their 
tonnage, 118,893.71. 

The tonnage for the year 1841 is less than that of 1840 by 50,019-79 tons. 



Commerce for each State and Territory for the year 'ending 
October 1, 184.1. 

Imports. Exports. Imports. Exports. 

Maine §700,901 $1,091, 565:N. Carolina, $220,366 $383,056 

N. Hampshire 73,701 10,3-lSjS. Carolina,. 1,557,43.1 i>.043,284 

Vermont 246,739 277,987[L-eorgia, 449,007 :8, 696 513 

Massachus'ts, 20,318,003 11,487,3431 Alabama,. . . 530,819 40,981 271 

Rhode Island, 339,.592 278,46.5 Mississippi,. 

Connecticut, . 295,989 599,348 Louisiana ... 10,256,350 33.387,483 

New-York,.. 75,713,426 33, 139,838!OhiQ,. -. 11,318 793,114 

New-Jersey,. 2,315 19,l66|Kentucky 

Pennsylvania, 10,346,698 5,152,.591 Tennessee,. . 7,523 

Delaware,... 3,276 38,585 Michigan,.. . 137,600 88,529 

Maryland,... 6,:101,313 4,947,166 Missouri, .. . 33,875 

D.Columbia, 77,263 769,331 Floiida, 145,181 36,629 

Virginia,.... 377,237 5,630,2861 

TiJtal, $127,946,177 $121^851,803 



310 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS. 



TABLE, 

Showing the value of Imports into, and Exports from the United States, in 
each year, ending 30th September, frovi 1821 to 1842, both inclusive ; also,, 
the revenue received in each year from customs. 

I VALUE OF IMPORTS. 



YEAR. 


Free of duly. 


Paying duty. 


Total. 


1821 


$10,022,303 


$52,503,411 


$32, .585; 724 


1822 


7, 2!)8, 708 


75, 942. 833 


73, 241,. 541. 


1823 


9,048,288 


68,530.979 


77, 579, 267 


1824 


12, 573, 773 


67,985.234 


80, 549, 000 


1825 


10,947,510 


85, 392, 565 


96, 340, 075 


1826........ 


12,567,769 


72, 406, 708 


84,974,477 


1827 


11,855,104 


67,62?,964- 


79,484.068 


1828 


12, 379, 176 


76,130,648 


88, .509, 824 


1829 


11,805,501 


62, 6S7, 028 


74, 492, 527 


1830 


12,746,245 


58,130,675 


70,876,920 


1831 


13, 456, 625 


89,734,499 


103,191.124 


1832. 


14,247,453 


86,779,813 


101,029,266 


1833 


32,447,950 


75, 670, 361 


108,118,311 


1834. . .- 


68,393,180 


58, 128, 152 


126,521,332 


1835 


77, 940, 493 


71,955,249 


149,895,742 


1836 


92,0.56,481 


97, 923, 554 


189, 980, 035 


1837 


69,250,031 


71,731,186 


140,989,217 


1S38 


60,860,005 


52,857,399 


113,717,404 


1839 


76,401,792 


85, 690, 340 


162,092,132 


1840 


57,196,204 


49,94.5,315 


107,141,519 


1841 


66,019,731 


61,925,757 


127,945,488 


1842* 


29, 956, 696 


69, 400, 633 


99. 357, 329 



1 


VALUE OF EXPORTS. 


Receipts into 


YEAR. 


Foreign m'dze. 


Dom. prod. &e. 


Total. 


the Treasury 


1821 


$21,302,488 


$43,671,891 


$64,974,382 


$13,004,447 


1822 


22, 286, 202 


49, 874, 079 


72,160,281 


17, 589, 762 


1823...... 


27, 543, 622 


47,155,408 


74, 699, 030 


19,083,433 


1824 


25,337,157 


53, 649, 500 


75, 986, 657 


17,878,326 


1825 


32, 590, 643 


66,944,745 


99, 535, 388 


20,098,713 


1826 


24,539,612 


53,055.710 


77, 595, 322 


23,341,332 


1827 


23, 403, 136 


58,921,691 


82, 324, 327 


19,712,2S 


1S28 


21,595,017 


50, 669, 6S9 


72. 264, 686 


23, 205, 52 1 


1829 


16,6.58,478 


55,700,193 


72,358,671 


22,681,966 


1830 


14,387,479 


59,462,029 


73, 849, 503 


21,022,391 


1831 


20, 033, 526 


61,277,057 


81,310,583 


24,224,442 


1832 


24, 039, 473 


63,137,470 


87,176,943 


23,465,237 


1833 


19,822,735 


70,317,698 


90, 140, 433 


29, 032, 509 


18.34 


23,312,811 


81,024,162 


104,336,973 


16,214,957 


1835 


* 20,504,495 


101,189,082 


121, 693, .577 


19,391,311 


1836 


21,740,360 


106,916,680 


128, 663, 040 


23,409,841 


1837 


21,854,962 


95,564,414 


117,419,376 


11,169,290 


1838 


12,452,795 


96,033,821 


108,486,616 


16,153,800 


1839 


17,494,525 


103,-533,891 


121,028,416 


23,137,925 


1840 


18,190,312 


118,895,634 


131,571,950 


13,499,502 


1841 


15, 469, 031 


106, 3S2, 722 


121,851,803 


14,487,216 


1842* 


11,552,831 


92, 559, 088 


104,117,969 


18, 260, 830 



* One quarter of this year partly estimated. 



VALUE OF FOREIGN iMONEYS. 



311 



Note to the preceding Table. 

la 18-12, the excess of Exports over Imports, was, $1, 760, 640 

Diminution of Imports in 1S42, compared with 1S41, 2.8,588, 159 

Do. Exports in 1842, do. do., 17,733,834 

Excess ol' Revenue in 1842, do. do., 3,773,614 

REGISTERED TONNAGE OF THE UNITED STATES, 

With the Number of Tons Entered and Cleared, distinguishing the 

American from the Foreign; from 1830 to 1841, inclusive. 



\E\R. 



1830 . 
1S31. 
1832. 
1833. 
1834. 
1835. 
1^36. 
1837. 
1838. 
1839. 
1840. 
1841, 



Regis'td 
tonna 



576,471 
620,451 
686, 980 
750, 026 
857,438 
88.5,821 
897, 774 
810,447 
822,591 
834, 244 
899, 764 
945, 803 



TONNAGE ENTERED, 

American. . Forcisn. 



967, 277 
922, 952 
949, 622 
1, 111,441 
1,074,670 
1, 3.52, 653 
1,255,384 
1,299,720 
1,302,974 
1,491,279 
1,. 576, 946 
1,631,909 



131,900 
281,948 
393, 0.38 
496, 705 
568, 052 
641,310 
680,213 
765, 703 
592,110 
624,814 
712,363 
736, 144 



TONNAGE 


CLEARED. 


American. 


Foreign. 


971,760 


.133,436 


972, 504 


271,994 


974,865 


387, 505 


1, 142, 160 


497, 039 


1,134,020 


577,700 


1,400,517 


630,824 


1,315,523 


674,721 


1,266,622 


756,292 


1,408,761 


604, 166 


1,477,928 


611,839 


1,646,009 


706,484 


1, 634, 156 


738, 849 



COMPARATIVE TABLE. 



REGISTERED, 

TONAGE. 

18.30 576,471! 

1841 94.5,803, 



TONS ENTERED. 

American. Foreign. 

967,227 131,900 

1,631,909 736,144 



Increase, 369,332 

'' per cent, 64' 



664, 682 604, 244 
68.7 4.57 



TONS CLEARED. 

American. Foreign. 

971,760 133,436 

1,634,156 738,849 



662, 396 



605,413 
452 



The above gives a remarkable increase in the foreign tons trading to the 
United States, during the above period. 



VALUE OF FOREIGN MONEYS, 

AS ESTIMATED AT THE CUSTOM-HOTJSE, BY LAW. 

Aux Cayes, 8| livres are equal to $1 00 

Cayenne ; 8 livres 5 sols of, are equal to 1 00 

Ducat of Naples, •. 80 

Franc of France 18| 

Florin of Trieste 48 

Genoa: 6^ livres are taken as 1 00 

Guadaloupe: 8 livres and 5 sols 1 00 

Guilder of Antwerp 40 

Guilder of Crcfcit . 40 

Guilder of Frankfort, and others of the 24- florin rate 40 

Guilder of Holland 40 

Guilder of Nuremburg 40 

Guilder of St. Gall, 0.40 36-100 

Guilder of Trieste 48 

Guilder of United Netherlands, 40 

Livre of France 18| 

Livre of Geneva 29 



312- VALUE OF FOREIGN MONEYS; 

Li^tre of "Genoa: 6| livres T 00- 

Livre of Leghorn: 6^ livres 1 00 

Louis d'or Rix-dollar. ..'..' 77 

Marc Banco of Hamburg'. 35 

Mil-ries of Azores, 83^ 

Mil-ries of Madeira 1 00 

Mil-ries of Portugal 1 12 

OMnce of Sicily ,. 2 46 

Pezza of Leghorn, 0.90 76-100 

Pound Sterling of England, Scotland and Ireland 4 80 

Pound Sterling of Antigua 2 22 

Pound Sterling of Barbadbes 3 20 

Pound Sterling of Bermuda 3. 00 

Pound Sterling of Halifax 4 00^ 

Pound Sterling of Jamaica »., 3 00 

Pound Sterling of New Providence ►....-. 2 50 

Sial Plate of Spain 10 

Rial Velon of Spain .^ 5 

Ilix.dollar of Bremen 78| 

Rix-dollar of Denmark '..^..-.. ....... 1 00 

Rix-dollar of Berlin, current, 0-68 29-100. 

Rix-dollar of Hamburg 1 00 

Rix.dollar of Prussia, 0.68 29-100.. 

Rix-dollar of Saxony ., 69 

Rix-dollar of Sweden.. ► 1 00 

Ruble of Russia, 75 

Rupee; British India, 44^ 

Star Pagoda of India 1 84 

St.. Bartholomew's, 8s. 3d. 1 00 

St.. Kitts, 9s ..^.. 1 00 

Tale of China 1 48 

Thaler of Bremen-, ^.. 71 

Thaler of Prussia, 68^ 

England:: Guinea 5 07 

"" Sovereign ...■■.■.■ 4 84 

" Seven-shilling piece 1 69 

France:; Double Louis (before 1786) 6 69 

" Louis (before 1786) 4 84 

" Double Louis (since 1786) - 9 14 

" Louis (since 1786) 4 57/" 

' ' Double Napoleon, or 40 francs 7 70 

" Napoleon, or 20 francs 3 85 

Frankfort on. the Maia: Ducat 2 27 

Hamburg: Ducat 2 27 

Malta^ Double Louis 9 27 

" Louis 4 85. 

" Demi Louis 2 33. 

Hollandr Double Rix-dollar, 12 20 

" Rix-dollar 6 04 

'" Ducat 2 27 

" Ten Guilder Piece 4 00 

Portugal: Dobraon 32 70. 

" Dobra 17 30 

" Johannes 17 Oft 

Spain: Pistole 3 98 

Doubloons, Spanish, Mexican and Colombian 15 53 

DOMESTIC. 

United States Eagle, (old emission) 10 66 

" " (new emission).-. 10 00 



TARIFF OF DUTIES. 



313 



TARIFF OF DUTIES, 

On articles imported into the United States: being an abstract of the bill 
■passed by Congress, and approved by the President, in August, 1842. 



Acins. 
AciJs, benzoic, citric, muriatic, 
nitric, oxalic, pyroligneous, and 

tartaric, aopr.cl. 

Boracic acid, 5 do. 

Borax, 25 do. 

Sulphate of quinine, per oz. 40 cts 

Amber, ambergris, ammonia, ar- 
row root, annallo, aniseed, va- 
nilla beans, French chalk, red 
chalk, juiiipei- berries, manga- 
nese, nitrate of lead, all chemi- 
cal salts not enumerated, and 
all carbonates of soda, except 

soda ash, barilla, and kelp, 20pr. ct 

Soda ash, 5 do. 

Books. 
Books, in English, bound, per lb. 30 cts. 
" " in boards or 

sheets, per lb. 20 

But if published abroad more than 
one year, and not republished in 
Ibis country; or if published 
abroad more thaubve years, tlie 
books shall pay but one half the 
rates above specified. But these 
terms of one and five years shall 
not commence before the pas- 
sing of Ibis act. 
Books, Latin or Greek, bound, pr. lb. 15 cts. 
" " unbound, do. 1.3 " 
" Hebrew, bound, do. 10 " 
" " unboimd, do. 8 " 
" in other foreign languugcs. 
— if bound or in boards pr. ?ol. 6 " 
— if in sheets or iiamphlcts, pr.lb. 15 " 
Any books printed 40 yeais bei'ore 
importation, and Reports tfi for- 
eign legislatures per vol. 6 " 

Polyglots, dictionaries, &c. pr. lb. 5 " 
Books of engravings and maps,-- 20pr. ct 

Cotton. 
Cotton, luimanufactured, per lb. 3 cts 
Cotton manufactures, not other- 
wise specified, SOpr.ct. 

Provided, that cottons not printed and 
worth not more than 20 cts. per sq. 
yard, shall be valued at 20 cts.; 
printed cottons, worth not more than 
30 cts. shall be valued at .'iO cts.; 
velvets, moleskins, fusti-ins, &c., 
worth not more than 35 cts. shall 
be valued at 35 cts. 
Cotton twist, yarn and thread, •• 25 pr. ct 
Provided, that twi^t, cV-c. imcolored 
and worth less than Oo cts. per lb. 
fchnll be valued a 6o cts. ; if colored, 
and worth less than 75 cts., it shall 
be valued al 7.") cts. All other col- 
ton twist, &.C. shall pay a duty of 

30 per ct 



4 cts. 

2 " 

3 " 

»d" 

4 " 



1 do. 
y^ do. 

30 do. 



do. 
do. 



20 



Copper, Lead, Tin, &c. 
Copper bottoms, plates & sheets, 30 pr. ct 
" rods bolts, nails, (Sec. 

per lb. 

Copper patent sheathing metal, 

per lb. 

Lead, in pigs and bars, per lb.-- 

" old and scrap, do---- 

" pipes, shot, & sheets, do.- 
Type metal fc stereotype plates, 25 pr. ct 

Types, new or old 25 do. 

Tm, pigs, bars, or blocks, 

" plates, sheets, and foil,---- 
iSilver plated metal and Gerrnan 

I silver, in sheets, 

^German silver, bell metal, zinc, 
I and bronze manufactures, ••• • 

Zinc in sheets, 

Old bells, fit only to be remaiiu- 

faclured, shall be free of duty 
Bronze, powder and liquor, iron 

and red liquor, and seppia,- •• 
Fish. 
Fish, dried or smoked, pr. 112 lbs. 
Mtickerel and herrings, salted, 
I per barrel, 

ll'ickled salmon, do. 

lOlher pickled fish, do. 

do. not in barrels, 20 pr. ct. 

Sardines, &c. preserved in oil, 20 do. 
iFish, from the domestic fisheries, 

and all fresh caught fish, free. 

Fish glue, or isingiass, iOpr. ct. 

I FVRS. 

Furs, undressed, on the skin,-- 6 pr. ct. 
" dressed, on the skin, all 
hatters' furs, not on the skin, 29 

Fnr hats, caps, niufi's, &c. 35 

Fur for hat bodies, not trimmed, is 
Glass. 

Cut Glass vessels, if the cutting 
be not one-third the height or 
length, per lb. -- - 

If the cutting exceeds one-ihird, 
per lb.--- 

llf the cutting exceeds \, per lb.-- 

Cut glass chandeliers, lustres, 
drops, icicles, ornaments, <5cc , 
per lb. 

Plain, moulded, or pressed glass 
articles, weighing over 8 oz. 
per lb. 

— weighing S oz. or under, per lb. 12 

Plain, moulded, or pressed tum- 
blers, per lb. 

If stoppered, or the toltomsi 
gri'und, 4 cts. per lb. addition!;!. 

Articles partly c\it oi polislied, to 
pay duty as if finished. 

Vials and bottles, holding not 

I more tlian (i oz. eacli, pr. gross, 

27 



do. 

$],0O 

1,60 
2,00 
1,00 



do. 



•?6 ets. 



ili 



10 



10 



$i,7a 



314 



TARIFF OF DUTIES. 



$2,26 



2,50 



3,00 



3,00 

4,00 

15 CtS. 



60 
2 

H 

4 
5 
6 

H 
6 
6 



10 



Vials and bottles over 6, but not 

over 16 oz., per gross, 

Vials and bottles, perfumery and 

fancy, uncut, not over 4 oz. 

each, per gross. 

The same, when over 4, and not 

over 16 oz. per gross, 

Bottles and jars, black or green, 

over 9 oz. but not over 1 quart 

each, per gross, 

Bottles and jars, if over 1 quart 

each, per gross, 

Demijohns and carboys, t gall, or 

less, each 

Demijohns and carboys, over i, 

and not over Sgalls., each 

Demijohns and carboys, over 3 

galls., each 

Glass, cylinder or broad window, 

not over 8 by 10 inches, pr. sq. foot, 

" not over 10 by 12, do. 

" " 14l)y 10, do. 

" " 16 by 11, do. 

" " IS by 12, do. 

" above IS by 12, do. 
Crown window glass, not over 10 
by 8 inches, pr. sq. foot,-- 

" not over 10 by 12, do. 

" " 14 by 10, do. 

Crown window glass, not over 
16 by 11 inches, pr. sq. foot, 

" not over 18 by 12, do. 

" above 18 by 12, do. 

Glass in sheets or tables, to pay 

the highest duties imposed on 

window glass. 
Plate glass, polished, not silvered, 

and not over 12 by 8 inches, 

pr. sq. foot, 5 cts. 
The same not over 14 by 10, do. 7 " 
" " 16by 11, do 8 " 

" " 18 by 12, do. 10 " 

" " 22 by 14, do. 12 " 

" above 22 by 14, do. 30 pr. ct 

" if silvered, 20 pr. ct. additional. 

" if framed, ^0 pr. ct 

On all cylinder or broad glass, weigh- 
ing over 100 lbs., and all crown 

glass, over 160 lbs., to the 100 sq. 

feet, another duty on the excess, 

at the same rate as above. 
Glass, colored, porcelain, paint- 
ings on, 30pr. ct. 

Glass, manufactures of, not spe 

cified, 

Ga.tiN. 

Wheat, per bushel, 

Barley, do. 

Rye, do. 

Oats & Indian corn, do. 

Wheat flour, per 112 lbs. 

Indian meal, do. 

Potatoes, per bushel, 

Hemp. 
Hemp, unmanufactured, per ton,- 
Hemp, Manilla, and other India, 

per ton, 

Codilla, or tow of hemp and flax, 

per ton, 

Cables and cordage, tarred, pr. lb. 
Cables and cordage, untarrcd, 

per lb. 

Yarns, twine & packthread, pr. lb. 



7 cts. 
4 " 


8 " 
7 " 

25 pr. ct. 

20 do. 

25 do- 

26 do. 



35 cts. 

16 " 
10 •'« 

12i " 
26pr.ct. 



$9 
IJcts. 
1 " 

2i " 



25 do. 



25 cts 


UO 




15 




10 




70 




20 




10 





$40 

25 

20 
6 cts. 



Seines, per lb. 

Cotton bagging, per sq. yard,- 

Other manufactures, for same use 
as cotton bagging, gunn^ cloih, 
&c., per sq. yard, 

Sail duck, per sq. yard, 

iUissiaaud other sheetings, 

\11 other hemp manufactures, • ■ • 

Linens and flax manufactures, • • • 

Grass cloth, 

Unmanufactured flax, per ton, •-• 

Oil cloth, printed or painted, per 
sq. yard, 

Oil cloth furniture, of cotton flan- 
nel, per sq. yard. 

Oil cloth, other do. 

Oil cloth, for hat covers, &c. do.- 

Floor matting and mats,--- 
Iron. 

Iron bars and bolts, not rolled, 
per ton, $17 

Iron bars and bolts, rolled, pr. ton, 24 

Provided, that iron more finished than 
pig iron, except castings, shall be 
rated as ironbars and bolts ; andiron 
imported for railways, if actually 
laid down for use before March 3d, 
1843, shall be free of duty. 

Iron in pigs, per ton, 

Cast iron vessels, per lb."-- 

All other castings, do. ••-•■ 

Smoothing and pressing irons, hol- 
low ware, and hinges, per lb 

Iron and steel wire, not over No. 
14, per lb. 5 " 

Iron and steel wire, over No. 14, 
and not over No. 26, per lb. 8 " 

Iron and steel wire, over No. 25, 
per lb. n " 

Wire, silvered or plated, 30pr. ct. 

" brass or copper, 25 do. 

" bonnet, silk covered, pr. lb. 12 cts. 
" '■ cotton covered, do. 8 " 

Round or square iron, brazier's 
rods from 3 to 10-16ths inch, nail 
rods or nail plates, sheet, hoop, 
band, or scroll iron, and iron 
cables, per lb. 2J " 

Other iron chains, 30 pr. ct. 

.Anchors, anvils, hammers, pr. lb. 2i cts. 

Cut or wrought iron spikes, do. 3 " 

Cut iron nails, do. 3 " 

Wrought iron, mill irons, iron lor 
ships, locomotives and steam 
engines, and malleable irons or 
castings, per lb. 

Iron tubes or pipes, per lb. 

Saws, mill, cross cut and pit, each 

Tacks, brads, &,c.,less than 16 oz. 
to a 1000, per 1000, 

Tacks, brads, &c., more than 16 
oz. to a 1000, per lb. 

Taggers' iron, 

Provided, that all articles partly man- 
ufactured, shall pay as if wholly 
manufactured; and no article shall 
pay less than the material of which 
it is made, when paying its highest 
duty, and in addition, a duty of 15 pr. ct. 

Old iron, fit only to be remanufac- 
tured, and scrap iron, not 6 
inches in length, per ton $10,00 

Muskets, per stand, 1,50 



4 cts. 



6 cts. 



6 " 
5pr. ct. 



TARIFF OF DUTIES. 



315 



Kifles, each, a,60 

Axes, halclics, planes, chisels, 
drawing and cutting knires, 
sickles, scythes, sliuvels, steel 
and brass saddlery, coach and 
harness furniture, steel yards 
and scale beams, lire arms oth- 
er than muskets and rilles, and 
side arms, 30 pr. ct. 

Square wire for umbrellas, l-ij " 

Screws of iron, called wood 
screws, per lb. 12 cts. 

Screws of iron, all others, aOpr. cl 

" of brass per lb. 30 cts. 

Sheet and rolled brass, 30 pr. ct 

Krass battery, or hammered ket- 
tles, per lb. 12 cts. 

Steel, cast, shear, and German, 
in bars, per cwt. $1,50 

Steel, all other, in bars, per cwt. 2,5( 

Pins, not over 5000 to the pack, 
per pack, 40 cts. 

Pound pins, per lb. 20 " 

Needles, 20 pr. ct. 

Saddlery, common, tinned, &c.-- 20 do. 

Ware, japanned, of papier mache, 
plated, and gilt; all cutlery, 
and all manufactures, not other- 
vise specified, of brass, iron, 
s'""'. lead, copper, pewter, or 

ti.., 30pr.ct. 

Leather 

Leaihcr, tanned, sole or bend, pr lb 
" upper, not specilicd, do. 

Calf and seal skins, tanned and 
dressed, per doz. 

Sheep skins, tanned and dressed, 
per doz. 

Goat skins or moroccos, tanned 
and dressed, per doz. 

Kid skins or morocco, tanned and 
dressed, per doz. 

Goat or sheep, tanned and not 
dressed, per doz. 

Kid or lami), tanned and not 
dressed, per doz. 

Skins tanned and dressed, but not 
in color, to wit : — fawn, kid, and 
lamb, called chamois, per doz. 

Men's boots and bootees, pr.pair. 

Men's shoes and pumps, do. • • • • 

Women's boots 3c bootees, do. • • • • 

Children's do. do. do.---- 

Women's double solod pumps and I 

welts, per \r.uT, 40j 

" shoes or slippers, do.-- 2-'J 

Raw hides, dried or salted, 5 pr. ct. 

Skins, pickled and in casks, 20 do. I 

M.en's leather gloves, per doz.--- $i,25j 

Women's leather habit gloves, 
per doz. 

Children's leather habit gloves, 
per doz. 50 

Women's do extra and demi 
length, per doz. 1,50 

Children's do. extra and demi ' 

length, per doz. 75 

Leather caps, hats, suspenders, , 
and all other suspenders of any i 
material except India rubber, • 
.leather bottles, patent leather, I 
and other leather manufac- 
tures, 3o pr. ct I 



Gets. 

8 " 

$5,00 
2,00 
2,50 
1,60 
1,00 
7 



1,0U 

1,2;)| 

3()j 
60l 

15j 



1,00 



Oil, &.C. 

Oil, olive, in casks, per gall. 20 cts. 

" " salad, in bottles. 30pr.ct. 

" " another, 20 do. 

" spermaceti, foreign fisheries, 
pergail. 25 cts. 

Oil, whale or other fish, foreign 
fisheries, per pall. 15 '• 

\Vhalebone. foreisn fisheries, ••• • 12; pr.ct- 

Spermaceti or wax candles, pr.lb. ' 8 cts. 

W^ax tapers, 30pr. ct. 

Tallow candles per lb. 4 cts. 

fallow, 1 " 

Heeswax and shoemakers wax, •• 15 pr. ct. 
Paper, &C. 

Paper, bank, folio, quarto post, 
letter and bank note, per lb. ••• 17 cts. 

I'apcr, antiquarian, demy, draw- 
ing, elephant, foolscap, impe- 
rial, medium, pot, pith, royal, 
and writing, per lb. 13 " 

Paper, copperplate, blotting, col- 
ored for labels and needles, 
marble or fancy, glass, moroc- 
co, sand, tissue, gold or silver, 
pasteboard and pressing board, 
per lb. I2i " 

Paper, colored copperplate, prin- 
ting and stainers', per lb. 10 " 

Cinders' & paper makers' boards, 
box and mill boards, sheathing, 
wrapping and cartridge paper, 
perlb 3 " 

Paper envelopes and fancy note, 30 pr.ct. 

.Music paper, gilt and metal pa- 
per, fancy paper boxes, 26 do. 

Paper hangings, 35 do. 

Blank or visiting cards, per lb...-- 12 cts. 

Playing cards, per pack, 2b " 

Blank books, when bound, per lb. 20 " 
" " imbound, do. 15 " 

Parchment, vellum, &c , and imi- 
tation, wafers, sealing wax, 
black lead pencils, crayons, 
metallic pens, ink, ink powder, 
and manufactured quills, 25 pr. ct. 

Quills unmanufactured, 15 do. 

Paper not enumerated, per lb..-- 16 cts. 

Rags, waste, or shoddy, do. .••• 4'' 

Silk. 

Silk, bolting cloths, 20pr. ct. 

All other silk manufactures, not 
otherwise specified, per lb. of 
16 ounces, ••• $2*50 

Sewing silk, silk twist, &c. per lb. 2,00 

Pongeesand plain white silks, do. 1,50 

Raw silk, do. 50 

Floss and similar silks, ready for 
manufacture, 25 pr.ct. 

Silk umbrellas, parasols, &c. 30 do. 

Mlk shirts and drawers, 40 do. 

Silk caps and articles of apparel, 
ma de up wholly or in part by hand 30 do. 

Silk or satin shoes and slippers, 
per pair, 30 cts. 

Silk or satin shoes for children, 
per pair, 16 " 

~^ilk or satin boots and bootees, 
per pair, 75 " 

Silk or satin boots for children, 

per pair, 25 " 

.Mens' silk hats, each §1,00 

Womens' silk hats or bonnets, each 2,00 



316 



TARIFF OF DUTIES. 



Spirits, Wine, &,C. i 

Brandy. per sail. $1,00| 

Other spirits, 1st & -id proof, lio. 60! 

" " 3d proof, do. 65 

" " 4th proof, do. 7o| 

" " 5th proof, do. 75! 

" " above 5th proof, do. 90 

Ale, porter, beer, in bottles, do. 20 

" " " not in bottle, do. 15 

Wine, Madeira, Sherry, San Lu- 

car and Canary, per gall. CO cts. 

Wine, Champagne, do. 40 " 
" bottled pert, Burgundy, 
claret, per gall. 33 " 

Wine, port and Burgundy, in 
casks, per gall. 15 " 

Wine, Teneriffe, do. 20 " 

" claret in casks, do. 6 " 

" white of France, Austria, 
Prussia, Sardinia, Portugal, and 
its possessions, — 

in casks, per gall. 7^ " 
in bottles, do. 20 '' 

Red wines from these countries, — 

in casks, per gall. G " 
in bottles, do. 20 " 

Wines of Spain, Germany, and 
the Mediterranean, — 

in casks, per gall. 12^ " 
in bottles, do. 20 " 

Sicily, Madeira and Marsala 
wines, in casks or bottles, 

per gall. 25 " 

Other wines of Sicily, do. 15 " 

Wines not specified, — 

in casks, do. 2-5 '' 

in bottles, do. 65 " 

Provided, that these duties do not 
interfere with subsisting treaties. 

All imitations of spirits and wines, 
shall pay the highest duty imposed 
on the similar article, and when 
wine is imported in bottles, a se- 
parate duty shall be paid on the 
bottles. 

Cordials and liqueurs, arrack, rata- 
fia, and similar articles, per gall. 60 cts. 
Sugar. 

Suear, raw or brown clayed, and 
sirup of sugar, per lb. 2i cts 

Sugar, not raw uor yet refined, 
per lb. 4 " 

Sugar, refined, and sugar candy, 
per lb. G " 

Molasses, per lb. -s- 4^ mills 

Sirups of sugar, &c., entered as 
molasses, shall be forfeited. 

Comfits, sweetmeats, preserved 

fruits, and coafeetionary, 25 pr. ct 

Tobacco. 

Tobacco, unmanufactured, 20pr.ct 

Cigars, per lb. 40 cts. 

Snuff, do. 12 " 

Other manufactured tobacco, do. 10 " 
Wood. 

Wood manufactures, not specified, 30 pr.ct 

Boards, staves, scantlings, un- 
wrought spars, and other wood 
wrought into shape, shall be 
deemed manufactured wood. 

Timber for wharves, firewood, 

rough boards, staves, &c. 20 do. 

Rose, satin, mahogany, & cedar 

wood, 15 do. 



Walking canes, frames and si'cks, 
for umbrellas, &.C., household 
furniture not specified, mtisical 
instTUincnts, carriages and parts 

thereof, 30 pr. ct. 

Wool. 
Wool, coarse, unmanufacture worth 
7 cts. or under at place of expor- 
tation, 5 pr. ct. 

Wool, all other innanufactured,.- 3 cts. 

per pound, and 30 per cent ad. val. 
if wool is mixed, it shall all be ap- 
praised at the value of the finest 
kind. 
Carpeting, Wilton, Saxony, and Au- 

busson, per sq. yard, 65 cts. 
" Brussels and Turkey, do. 55 " 
" Venetian and ingrain, do. 30 " 

" all other, 30pr. Ct. 

I Woollen Blankets, worth not more 

I than 75 cts. each, and not larger 

than 72 by 52, nor less than 45 by 

60inches, 15 pr. ct. 

'other woollen blankets, 25 do 

Hearth rugs, 40 

jWooUcn ana worsted yam, 30 

Do. do. gloves, 

j caps, and hosiery, 30 

jWoollen flannels, bockings, and 

! baizes, per sq. yard, 

iGoat's liair or mohair, unman- 
j ufactured, per lb. 

I do. manufactures, ••••• . 20 

Coach laces, •-. .•• 35 

Ready-made clothing, 50 

'Other articles worn by persons, 
except those otherwise speci- 

I fied. 40 

jLaces, thread, 15 

I " cotton, or trimmmg,.--- 20 
" tassels, knots, &c., of 

gold or silver, 

Articles embroidered in gold or 

silver, ■•■• 

Articles made up as clothes, • • • • 
Combed wool or worsted manu- 
factures, not otherwise speci- 
fied, and combined worsted and 

silk, 

Woollen manufactures not men- 
tioned above, 

Miscellaneous Articles. 

Coal per ton, 

Coke, or culm of coal, per bushel 
Ware, China, earthen, stone, &c. 30 pr.ct. 
Hatsof wool, hat bodies itc. each, 18 cts. 
Hats and bonnets, Manilla, Leg- 
horn, &c. made of straw, grass, 
palm, or any material not spe- 
cified, 35pr. cL 

But all flats, braids, &c , used for 
making hats, shall pay the same 
duty as manufactured hats. 
Ornamental feathers and artificial 
flowers, hair bracelets, chains, 
curls, ifcc, human hair prepared 

for use, and all fans 25 pr. ct. 

Hair unmanufactured, 10 do. 

" cloth, belts, and gloves, ••• 25 do. 
" curled, and moss, for beds, 10 do. 

Feathers, and down, 25 de. 

India rubber cloth, shoes, sus- 
penders, and other articles, •• • 30 do. 
Provided, that ludia rubber sus- 



do. 
do. 

do. 

14 cts. 

1 ct. 
pr. ct. 
do. 
do. 



do. 
do. 
do. 



15 do. 



30 



40 



do. 
do. 



do. 
do. 



$1,76 
5 



TARIFF OF DUTIES. 



317 



7i do. 



do. 
do. 



penders, worth not more than 

§i per doz., shall be valued at $-2 

Clocks and glazier's diainoods, 25 pr. cl 

Ship chronometers, 20 do. 

Witches and watch materials, •• Ih do 

Diamonds, 

Watch crystals and spectacle 
glasses, per gross, $2 

Gems, pearls, &c , 7 pr. ct 

" imitation and mosaics,"" 7^ do. 

Jewelry, of gold, siU-CT, itc, 20 do. 

" imitallun. 25 do. 

Table lops, Scagliola, mosaic, 
inlaid, i.tc., and alabaster and 
spar ornaments, 30 

Silver and gold vessels and 
wares, not otherwise specified, 30 

Strings for musical instruments, 15 do. 

I\I irble unmanufactured, 2S do. 

" busts, statuary, and other 

articles not otherwise specified, 30 do. 

SI lies, tiles, and bricUs, 25 do. 

Baskets and other articles of 
grass, willuw, palm leaf, &c., 25 do. 

Beads of •vax, amber, &c , fancy 

boxes, and combs for the hair, 25 do. 

Brushes and brooms, 30 do. 

Bristles, per lb. 1 ct 

D^)lls, toys, metal buttons, 30pr. ct 

But all such buttons, worth not 
more than $\ per gross, shall 
be valued at $1. 

Oiher buttons, & button moulds, 25 do. 

But lastings, prunellas, &c., in size 
(it only for buttons and shoes, and 
mohair, linen canvass, figured 
s.uin, and brocaded velvet, in size 
and shape suited only for buttons, 
and tortoise shell, ivory, horns, 
and teeth, unmanufactured, and 
horn and bone tips, 5 pr. ct. 

White or red lead, lilhirge, &c. pr.lb. 4cts, 

Whiting and ochres, when dry, do. 1 " 
" when ground in oil, do. 11 '' 

Sulphate of Barytes, do. i" 

Oil, Unseed, hempsced, fee, 

per gall. 

Futty, perlb. 

Cocoa, dates, nuts, woad or pastel, 
and sulphuric acid, per lb. 

Ivory or bone black, do. 

Alum, do. 

Ginger in the root, figs, raisins, not 
specUied, and copperas, j er lb. •• 



l\" 



Almonds, prunes, currants, musca- 
tel and bloom raisins, per lb.-'-. 3 '< 
Chocolate, ground ginger, and sul- 
phate of copper per lb. 4 " 

Chinese cassia, pimento, black pep- 
per, crude camphor, ii;digo, glue, 

per lb. 5 '< 

Cloves, gunpowder, per lb. 8 " 

Sweet oil of almonds, per lb. 9 " 

(Cayenne, African, Chili pepper, 

per lb. 10 " 

Kefined camphor, per lb. 20 " 

Cinnamon, do. 25 " 

Xutmegs, and oil of cloves, per lb. 30 " 

Mace, do. 60 " 

Opium, do. 75 " 

Mustard seed, linseed, quick- 
silver, 5pr. ct. 

Mustard, roll brimstone, calcm.el, 
and other mercurial prepara- 
tions, 25 do. 

Olives, 30 do. 

Soap, Windsor, shaving, tc fancy, 30 do. 

" all other hard, per lb, 4 cts. 

" all soft, per barrel, 60 '• 

Grease and soap stuh's, 10 pr. ct. 

Starch and pearl barley, per lb... 2 cts. 

Corks, 30 pr. ct. 

Manufactures of cork, 26 do. 

Sponges and spunk, 20 do. 

Oranges, lemons, and grapes, •••• 20 do. 



Salt per bushel of 5C lb 

Saltpetre, partly refined, per lb. 
" wholly refined, do. 

Chloride of lime, do. 

Vinegar, per gall. 

Spirits of turpentine, per gall.... . 

Heef anil pork, peril). • 

Hams and bacon, do. 

Prepared meat, poultry and game, 
and Bologna sausages, 

Cheese, per lb. • 

Butter, do. 

Lard, do. 

Maccaroni, jellies, &c. 

Pickles, capers, and sauces,---- 

Castor oil, per gall. 

Oil, ncatsfoot, animal, and vola 
lile, 

Gums, kc, crude, 

" if not crude, and pastes, 
essences, balsams, perfumes, 
&c. not enHmerated, 25 do. 



i 



25 pr. ct. 
9 cts. 
6 '' 
3 " 

30 pr. ct. 

30 do. 
40 cts. 

20 pr. ct. 
15 do. 



The following Articles ake exempt feo.m Duty. 

1. Articles importod for (he use of the United Slates. 

2. ITerchandise, the gTowth or manufaotiirc of the United States, exported 
to a foreig^n country and brougrht back ag-.iin; and personal effects, not mer- 
chanilise, of citizens of the Unitetl Stales dying- abroad. 

3. Paintinf^s and statuary by American artists. 

4. Wearing apparel and personal ctfects, not merchandise, of persons arri- 
ving in the United Stales. 

■O. A]>|)aratns, instruments, books, maps, statuary, cabinets of coins, anti- 
([uitics, bi.c., imported for the use of any phiIosoi)liical or literary society, or 
any college, academy or school. 

(i. Anatomical prejiarations, models of machinery and inventions; speci- 
mens in natural history, trees, shrul)s, plants, bulbs or roots, and garden seeils 
not otherwise specilicd; berries, nuts ami vegetables, used principally in dye- 

27* 



318 EXTRACT FROM A TREATY. 

ing or composing dyes ; all dye woods in sticks ; whale and other fish oils, and 
all other articles the produce of American fisheries; animals imported for 
breed ; fruit, green or ripe, from the West Indies, in bulk ; tea and coffee, when 
imported in American vessels from the places of their growth or production. 

7. Adhesive felt for sheathing vessels, alcornoque, aloes, antimony crude, 
argol, asafcetida, ava root, barilla, bark of cork tree, unmanufactured; bells or 
bell metal, only fit to be re-manufactured, and c'aimes of bells; brass in pigs 
or bars, and old brass only lit to be re-raanufactured; Brazil wood, crude 
brimstone, and flour of sulphur, bullion, burr stones unwrought; cantharides, 
chalk, clay unwrought; cochineal, coins of gold and silver, capper for the use 
of the mint, copper in pigs or bars, and copper ore; plates or sheets of cop- 
per for slieathing vessels, but none is to be so considered except that which is 
14 inches wide and 4S inches long, and weighing from 14 to 84 oz. per square 
foot; old copper fit only to be re-mannfactui-ed; cream of tartar, emefy, flints, 
ground flint, gold bullion, gold epaulets and wings, grindstones, gum Arabic, 
gum Senegal, gum tragacanth, India rubber, in bottles or sheets, or otherwise, 
unmanufactured, and old junk, oakum, kelp, kermes, lac dye, leeches, mad- 
der root, mother of pearl, nickle, nux vomica, palm leaf unmanufactured, 
palm oil; Peruvian bark, pewter when old and only fit to be re-manufactured; 
platina unmanufactured, ivory unmanufactured; plaster of Paris unground, 
rattans and reeds unmanufactured, rliubarb, saltpetre Avlien crude, sarsaparilla, 
shellac, silver bullion, silver epaulets and wings, stones called polishing 
stones, stone called rotten stone, sumac, tartar wlien crude, teuteneciue, turme- 
ric, weld, woods of all kinds, when unmanufactured, not herein enumerated. 

§ 10. On all articles not enumerated above, a duty shall be levied of 20 per 
cent. 

§ 11. When a specific discrimination is notherein made between goods im- 
ported in American or in foreign vessels, an additional duty of 10 per cent is 
imposed on all merchandise brought in vessels not of the United States; and 
a further addition of 10 per cent on goods brought in foreign vessels from any 
place east of the Cape of Good Hope. Provided, that existing treaties and for- 
mer acts of Congress be not infringed. 

§ 12. All duties are to be paid in cash, and goods are to be sold after 60 days 
detention. 

§ 14. On foreign sugar refined in tlie United States, a drawback shall be al- 
lowed equal to tlie duty paid; on spirits distilled from foreign molasses, a 
drawback of 5 cts. per gallon, till January 1st, 1843; at and after that time, the 
drawback shall be reduced one cent per gallon, on the 1st of January of each 
year, till it be extinguished. 

§ 15. No drawback shall be allowed but on goods exported within tliree 
years from their importation. Ten per cent of the drawback on reiineil sugar 
shall be retained, and 2; per cent on all other drawbacks. 

The provisions of this act shall not apply to goods shipped in any port be- 
yond tlie Cape of Good Hope or Cape Horn, prior to September 1st, 1842. 



Extract from a TREATY, 



To settle and define the boundaries between the Territories of the United States 
and the Possessions of Her Britannic Majesty in North America, ^-c. 

Article I. — "It is hereby agreed and declared that the line of boundary 
shall be as follows: Beginning at the monument at the source of the river St. 
Croix, as designated and agreed to by the commissioners under the 5th article 
the treaty of 1794, between the governments of the United States and Great 
Britain; thence, north, following the exploring line run and marked by the 
suiweyors of the two governments in the years 1817 and 1818, under the fifth 
article of the treaty of Ghent, to its intersection with the river St. John, and 
to the middle of the channel thereof; thence up tlie middle of the main chan- 



EXTRACT FROM A TREATY. 319 

ncl of the said river St. John, to tlie mouth of the river St. Francis; thence, 
up tlie mitUlle of the channel of tlic said river St. I'rancis, and of the lakes 
through wliich it flows, to the outlet of the Lake Pohenagamook ; thence, 
southwesterly, in a straight line to a point on tlie nortliwest branch of the riv- 
er St. John, which point shall be ten miles distant from the main branch of the 
St. Jolm, in a straight line, and in the nearest direction — but if the said point 
sliall be found to be less tlian seven miles from the nearest point of the summit 
or crest of the highlands that iliviile those rivers which empty themselves in- 
to the river St. Lawrence from those wiiich fall into the river St. John, then 
the said point shall be made to recede down tlie said northwest branch of the 
river St. John, to a point seven miles in a straigiitline from tlie said summit or 
crest; thence, in a straight line, in a course about south, eight degrees west, to 
tlie point where the parallel of latitude of forty -six degrees antl twcnlj'-five 
minutes north intersects the southwest branch of the St. John; thence, south- 
erly, by the said branch, to the source tliereof in the highlamls at the Mefjar- 
mette portage; thence, ilown along the said highlands which ilivide tlie waters 
wijich emiily tiiemseh es into the river St. Lawrence from those which fall in- 
to the Atlantic ocean, to the head of HalTs stream; thence, down the middle 
of said stream, till the line thus run intersects the old line of boundary survey- 
ed and markeil by Valentine anil Collins, |)reviously to the year 1774, as the 
forty-tifth tlegree of north latituile, and whicli has been known and understood 
to be the line of actual division between the States of New-York and Vermont 
on one side, and the British province of Canada on the other; and, from said 
jioint of intersection, west, along the said dividing line, as heretofore known 
and understood, to the Iroquois or St. Lawrence river. 

Article II. — " It is moreover agreed, that, from the place where tlie joint 
commissioners terminated their labors under the sixth article of the treaty of 
Ghent, to wit: at a ])oint in tlie Neebisli channel, near Aluddj' Lake, the line 
shall run into and along the sliip channel between St. Josepli and St. Tammany 
islands, to the division of tlie channel at or near the head of St. Joseph's is- 
land: thence, turning eastwartlly ant! northwardly around the lower end of St. 
George's or Sugar island, and following the middle of the channel which ilivides 
St. George's from St. J oseph's Island ; thence, up the east Neebish channel, near- 
est to St. George's island, through the middle of Lake George ; thence, west 
of Jonas's island. Into St. Mary s river, to a point in the middle of that river, 
about one mile above St. George's or Sugar island, so as to appropriate and as- 
sign the said island to the United States; thoticc, adopting tlie line traced on 
tiie maps by the commissioners, through the river St. IVIary and Lake Superior, 
to a point nort of He lloyalc, in said lake, one hundred yards to tlic north and 
east of He Cliapeau, which last-mentioned island lies near the northeastern 
point of He Ro3"ale, where the line marked by the commissioners terminates; 
and from the last mentioned jioint, southwesterly, through the middle of the 
sounil between lie Royale and tlie nortliwesfern main land, to the mouth of 
Pigecjn ri\ er and up the said river, to anil througli the north and soutli Fowl 
Lakes, to tlie lalces of the height ol^land between Lake Superior and the Lake 
of the Woods; thence along the water communication to Lake Saisaginaga, 
and through that lake; thence, to and through Cypress Lake, Lac du Bois 
Blanc, Lac la Croix, Little Vermillion Lake, and Lake Namccan, and 
through the several smaller lakes, straits, or streams, connecting the lakes 
here mentioned, to that point in Lac la Pluie, or Rainy Lake, at the 
Cliandiere Falls, from which the commissioners traced the line to tiie most 
nnrth western point of the Lalce of the Woods; thence, along the said line, to 
the said most northwestern point, being in latitude 49 deg. 23 min. 55 sec. north 
and in longitude 95 deg. 1-1 min. 38 sec. west from the observatory at Green- 
wich ; tlience, according to existing treaties, due south to its intersection w^ifh 
4'Hh parallel of north latitude, and along that jiarallcl to the Rocky mountains. 
It being understood that all the water communications and all the usual |)ort- 
ages along tin; lino from Lake Superior to the Lake of the Woods, and also 
Grand portage, from the sliore of T^ako Siiiierior to the Pigeon river, as now 
actually used, shall be free and open to the use of the citizens and subjects of 
both countries." 

RouNDAUY Link. — The extent of boundary line separating the United 
States and territory belonging thereto from the British possessions, and lying 



320 



KELlGIOirs DEN0MINATI0>f3 IN TPfE UNITED SX.VTES. 



between the monument of St. Croix and the Rocky mountains, is estimated as 
follows for each adjacent State : 

Maine, 460 miles. 

New-Hampshire, 40 " 

Vermont, 90 " 

New-York, 420 " 

Pennsylvania, 30 " 

Ohio, 2(KJ " 

Michig-an, 740 « 

Territory west of Lake Sujwrior, 1,150 '•' 

Total leng-th of boundary lijie, 3, 130 " 



SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS IiV 
THE UNITED STATES. 



DENOMINATIONS. 



Baptist, 

do. Freewill, 

do. Seventh Day, 

do. Six-Principle, 

Christians, 

Congregationalists, 

Dutch Reformed, '•• 

Episcopalians, 

FriemlSy 

German Reformed, 

Jews, • 

Lutherans, 

Menonites, 

Methodists, 

do. Protestant, - 

Moravians, 

Mormonites, 

New Jerusalem Church, 

Presbyterians, 

do. Associate, 

do. Associate Refoiuned, . 

do. Cumberland, 

do. Reformed, 

Roman Catholics, 

Shakers, 

Tunkers, 

Unitarians, 

Univcrsalists, 



Total, 



Congrega- 
tions. 



6,319 

753 

42 

16 

1,0LK) 

1,300 

197 

950 

500 

600 



750 
200 



24 



27 

2,807 

183 

214 

500 

40 
612 

15 

40 
200 
653 



17,842 



J.Iinisters, 



4,239 

612 

46 

10 

800 

1,150 

192 

8'19 



180 
"267* 



3,106 

400 

33 



33 
2,225 

87 
116 
450 

20 
545 

45 

40 
174 
317 



Members 



432.000 

33,876 

4,503 

2,117 

150,000 

100, OCX) 

22,515 

150,000 

100,000 

30,000 

15,000 

62,266 

30,000 

686,549 

50,000 

5,7^15 

12,000 

5,000 

274,084 

16,000 

12,000 

60,000 

3.0(X) 

400. 0<X) 

6,000 

3,000 

75,000 

150,000 



15,936 I 2,980,655 



The above statements of the number of churches or congregation*, minisfei-s 
and members of the several denominations, have been derived chiefly from 
recent official documents published by the several societies. 



RAIL-ROADS. 



321 



P.ATL. ROAT^S UN THE UNITED STATES. 

The az^regate lencth of all the Rail Roads now finished in the United 
\States and in operation (l'^42,) are as follows: 



Miles. 

In New-England States, 695 

j\ew-York, 721 

New Jersey, 204 

Pennsyhania, TOO 

Delaware, 4!) 

Maryland, 331 

Virginia 350 

North Carolina, 247 

South Carolina , 198 

Georgia, 350 



Miles' 

In Alabama, 61 

Florida, 32 

Louisiana 76 

Mississippi, 66 

Kentucky, 60 

Ohio, 73 

Indiana, 28 

Michigan, 226 



Total, 4,470 



The amount of road already in operation in this country, exceeds in 
total length, the rail roads in all other countries combined. The cost so 
far is estimated at $120,000,000 and in the course of another year about 
800 miles more of road will be completed. 



Length and Cost of the Rail Roads between Boston and Bnffalo. 

Links. Miles. Cost per mile. Total. 

Boston and Worcester, 444 $51,680 $1,935,981 

Worcester and Stockbridge, 117 } aq ogn ^ 7 "Sflfi 7Q1 

West Stockbridge, and Albany,.... 381$ ^•5;—"^ /,joo,/.i 

Boston to Albany, 200 9,502,772 

Mohawk and Hudson 16 68,750 1,100,000 

Utica and Schenectady, 78 24,382 1,901,785 

Syracuse and Utica, 53 19,750 1,011,000 

Auburn and Syracuse, 26 20,346 630,000 

Auburn and Rochester, 78 19,237 1,500,000 

Rochester and Batavia, 32 12,500 400,000 

Batavia and Buffalo, 42 9,500 400,000 

Albany to BufTalo, 325 $6,942,785 

Boston to Albany, 200 9, .502,772 

Total, 525 $15,445,557 

The following table gives the Net Revenue of five of the principal Rail 
Roads: 



1^35. 

Kil . 
i-;;js. 

1>!.3!>. 
IX.JO. 
1S4I , 
1S42. 



Year. 



Boston 

and 
Worc'r. 



Boston I 
and Western 
Prov'd'e. Rail Road. 



$93, 345 

$S6,050 135,5^3 

102,73l| 94,64.5: 

108,962 145,071; 

105,423, 213,876 $3,288 51 
127, 105 83,402 50,275 67 
147,808[ 108,7641 49,807 54 
180,697 123,6431246,06^98 



Utica and 
Schenectady. 



$192,793 59 
211,796 63 
275,089 77 
254, 185 27 
2J3, 363 90 
2.58, 783 70 



Liverpool 
and 

Manche'cr. 



X\S3,621 
85, 053 
82,910 
102,270 
111, 18] 
130, 100 
134,099 



322 DEBTS OF THE SEVERAL STATES. 

Rail Roads Rnniiin^ from the City of Albany, 

Including all Rail Roads, finished Januaryrl843, that connects with the- 
great chain extending to Buffalo on the west, and to Portland, Maine, ou 
the east. 

IVestern Route. 
From Albany to Buffalo, via Schenectady, Utica, S}Tacuse, Auburn. 

Rochester and Attica, ^ 325 

From Buffalo to Niagara Falls and Lockport, 47 

Branch to Skaneateies, 5- 

From Shenectady to Ballston Spa and Saratoga Springs, 2H 

From Schenectady to Troy, 204 

From Troy to Ballston Spa, 234 

Eastern Route. 

Fi'om Albany to Boston, via- West Stockbridge and Worcester, £09 

From Boston to Portsmouth, N. H., and Portland, Maine, — eastern 

route continued, ^ 104 

From West Stockbridge to Hudson, 33 

From West Stockbridge to Bridgeport, Conn 98 

From Worcester to Norwich, 5S4 

From Boston to Providence, R. 1 41 

From Providence to Stonington, Conn » 47 

Taunton Branch and extension to New-Bedford, Mass 35 

Bedford and Fall River, 13 

From Boston to Lowell, Nashua and Con-Cord, N. H. 62 

Branch from Andover to Haverhill^ 25 

Total number of miles, 1 , 160 



DEBTS OF THE SEVERAL STATES IN THE UNIO]^. 

According to the latest Official Returns, January, 1813. 



Maine, 1,678,367 

New tiampshire, none. 

Vermont, none. 

Massachusetts, 7,272yS39 

Rhotle Lsland, none. 

Conrrecticut, none. 

New- York, 26,893, 165 

New Jersey, none. 

Pennsijlvania, 39,120,128 

Delaware, none. 

Maryland, 20,901 ,049 

Virg-inia, 10,281,686 

Noi-th Carolina, none. 

South Carolina, 7,553,770 

Georgia, 3,181,823 



Alabama, 9,843,536 

Mississippi, 5,500,00<> 

Louisiana, 21,213,000 

Tennessee, 3,016,916 

Kentucky, 3,902,783 

Ohio, 19,947,325 

Indiana, 12,129,339 

llfiMis, 13,836,379 

Missouri, 1,592,000 

Arkansas, 3,900,000 

Michigan, 5.611,000 

Florida, Territory, 3,500,0f 

Wisconsin, do none. 

Iowa, do none.. 

District of Columbia, 1,380,000 



Grand Total Debt of 21 states, $223,258^05 

Yearly interest, about $11,000,000 

The principal i)art of the above debts wore aulhorizeil by the several Legis- 
latures of the Stales, for the following purposes: 

For I5anking, "; $52,640,000 

" Canals, 60,201,551 

" Railroad.s, 42,871,084 

" Turni)ike and other roads, 6,618,9n'8 

Total, $162,.331,593 



Note. — Those States in Italics, being eleven in number, have suffered their 
bonds to be dishonored. 



GOVERNORS OF STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



323 



Debts of the Chief Cities of the United States, 
T^ew-York, ]2,000,()(K) Mobile, 



Philadelphia, 3,118,(XX) Savannah, 

lialtimore, 4,29o,:J7y Albany, . 

Boston, 1,800,(100 Troy, 

New Orleans, 1,758,000 

•Cincinnati, 1,145,000 Total,. 

Charleston, 1,142,000 

The principal part of the above debts consist of moneys borrowed for the 
construction of works to sii|)i)ly the resjjective cities with water, and of city 
bonds loaned to rail -road con^panies. 



513,000 
3£0,tK)0 
435,CR)0 
361,000 

$26,917,379 



GOVERNORS OF STATES AND TERRITOISIES, 

With their Terms of Office and Salaries. 



STATES. 



■Governors. 



Term. 



Expires. Salary. 



Maine, jEdward Kavanaiiyh, (acting,) 

New Hampshire, •• -'Henry Hubbard, 

Vermont, jtlharlcs Paine, 

Massachusets, jMarciis Morton, 

Rhode Island, James Fcnner, 

Connecticut, C.F. Cleveland, 

New- York, j William C. Bouck, 

New Jersey, iWiUiam Pennington, 

Pennsylvania, David R. Port«r, 

Pclaware, jWiUiam B. Cooper, 

Maryland, IFrancis 'I'homas, 

Virginia, iJames McDowell, 

North Carolina, jj. M. Morehead, 

South Carolina, • • - ■ jjamcs H. Hammond, 

Georgia, jCharles J. McDonald, 

Alabama, ;Benjamin Fitzpulrick, 

Mississippi, jT. M. Tucker, 

Louisiana, .Alexander Mouton, 

Arkansas, Archibald Yell, 

Tennessee, James C. Jones, 

Kentucky, Robert P. Letcher, 

Ohio, Wilson Shannon, 

Indiana^ Samuel Bipper, 

Illinois,-" jThomas Ford, 

Missouri, Thomas Reynolds, 



Michigan,- 



John S. Barry, 



Territories. 

Florida, Richard H. Call, 

Wisconsin, 'James D. Doty,--' 

lovva, IJohn Chambers,- 



Y'ear. 'January, 

1/ 1 T 

" 'June, 

" iOctober, 

" January, 

" iMay, 

" May, 

" January, 

'' jOctober, 

" January, 

" jjanuary, 

" iJanuary, 

" March, 

" January, 

" December, 

" November, 

" iDecember, 

" January, 

" January, 

'' November, 

" October, 

" Septeml)€r, 

" December, 

" Decombcr, 

" December, 

" November, 

" jJanuary, 



1844 
1844 
1844 
1844 
1844 
1844 
18461 
1843 
1845 
1844 
1845 
184G 
1845 
1844 
1S43 
1843 
1844 
1847 
1844 
1843 
1844 
1844 
1843 
184« 
1844 
1844 



" December, 1844 
" IMarch, 1844 



July, 



1844 



$1,500 
1,200 

750 
3,6C6 

400 
1,100 
4,000 
2, 000 
4, 000 
1,333 J 
4,200 
3,333J 
2,000 
3,500 
3,500 
3, 600 
3,000 
7,500 
1,800 
2,000 
2,600 
1 , 500 
1,500 
1,000 
1,500 
2,000 



2, 500 
2,500 
2,500 



Note. — The Governors in all the States are elected by the people, except New Jer- 
tcy, Virginia and South Carolina, who arc elected by the Legislatures. 

The Governors of the Territories arc appointed by the President and Senate of the 
United States. The District of Columbia is under the iuime-diate government of 
Congress. 



324 



PUBLIC LANDS, 



TABLE, 

Exhibiting the Seats of Government, S^c, of the several States and Territories m 

the Union. 



STATES. 

Maine, 

New Hampshire 

Vermont, 

Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, •• 

Connecticut, •••• 

Xew York, 

New Jersey, •••■ 
Pennsylvania, • 

Delaware-, • 

Marylacd, ' 

Virginia, •••■'-• 
North Carolina, 
South Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, •••• 

Louisiana, 

Arltansas, 

Tennessee, 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, ••••• 

Indiana, ■ 

Illinois,' ' 

Missouri, 

Michigan, 

Territories. 

Florida, ••■ 

Wisconsin, 

Towa, 



Seats of Gov, 



Augusta, 

Concord, 

Montpelier, ■• 

Boston, 

Providence & 

Newport, 

Hartford and 
New Haven, •• 
Albany, 



Trenton, 

Harrisburg, •• 

Dover, ••• 

Annapolis, •• ■ 
Richmond, •• • 

Raleigh, 

Columbia,-" • 
IMilledgeville, 
Tuscaloosa, •• 

Jacl<son, 

New Orleans, 
Little Rock,-- 
Nashville, •- ■ 
Frankfort, -- - 
Columbus,-- • 
Indianapolis,- 
Springfield, •- 
Jefferson city, 
Detroit, 



Tallahasse, 
Madison, — 
Iowa city, -•■ 



Elections. 



id Monday in Sept. 

2d Tuesday in Piflarch,-- 

1st Tuesday in Sept 

•2d Monday in No v. 

Gov. an4 Sen. in April, 
Rep. in April and Aug. - 

1st Monday in April, ••• 

Tuesday succeeding 1st 

Monday of November 

•2d Tuesday in Oct. 

2d Tuesday in Oct. 

2d Tuesday in Nov. 

1st Wednesday in Oct.-- 
4th Thursday in April, 
Commonly in August, - • 

2d Monday in Oct. 

1st Monday in Oct. 

1st Monday in Aug. 

1st Mon.& Tues. in Nov. 
1st Monday inJuly,---- 

1st Monday in Oct. 

1st Thursday in Aug. -• 

1st Monday in Aug. 

2d Tuesday in Oct. 

1st Monday in Aug. •-•• 

1st Monday in Aug. 

1st Monday in Aug. 

1st Monday iu Oct. 



2d Monday in Oct.- 



Meeting of Legislatures. 



1st Wednesday January. 
1st Wednesday in June. 
2d Thursday in October. 
1st Wednesday in Jan. 
1st Wed. in I\lay and June, 
last Wed. in Oct. and Jan. 

1st Wednesday in May. 

1st Tuesday in January. 
4th Tuesday in October. 
1st Tuesday in January. 
1st Tues. in Jan. biennially. 
last Monday in Dec. 
1st Monday in Dec. 
2d Mon. in Nov. biennially. 
4th Monday in Nov. 
1st Monday in Nov. 
1st Monday iu Dec. 
1st Mon. in Jan. biennially. 
1st Monday in January. 
1st Monday in Nov. bien. 
1st Monday in Oct. bien. 
1st Monday in December. 
1st Monday in December. 
1st Monday in December. 
1st Monday in Dec. hien. 
1st Monday in Nov. bien. 
1st Monday in November. 



1st Monday in January. 
1st Monday in December. 



rUBLIC LANDS. 

Tlie following: Table shows the amount of purchase money received for 
the sales of Public Lands for thirteen successive years: 

1830, $2,433,432 94 

1831, 3,557,023 76 

1832, 3, 1 15,376 09 

1833, ,.. 4,972,284 84 

1834, 6,099,981 04 

1835, 15,999,804 11 

1836, 25,167,833 06 

1837, 7,007,523 64 

1838, • 4,305,564 04 

1839, 6,464,556 78 

1840, 2,789,637 23 

1841, 1,463,364 00 

1842, first 3 quarters, 1,079,366 00 

Total, $84,455,747 83 

Of the estimated 319,536,232 acres of the public domain, to which the 
Indian title has been extinguished, it is supposed about two -thirds has been 
surveyed, about one-half of which has already been sold; leaving- ujiwards of 
200,000,000 acres of land yet to be disposed of for the benefit of tlie Union. 



OFFICERS OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Salary. 

William C. Bouck, Governor, $4,0U0 

Daniels. Dickinson, Lieutenant-Governor, S6 for each 

day's attendance. 
Samuel Young, Secretary of State and Superintendent of Common 

Schools, .7 2,500 

Azariah C . Flags;, Comptroller, 2,500 

Thomas Farrington, Treasurer ^ 1,500 

George P. Barker, Attorney-General, 1,000 

Nathaniel Jones, Surveyor-General , 1,000 

Henry Storms, Comniissary-Gereral , 700 

Lyman Sanford, Jld jut ant-General, 1 ,0(J0 

Robert H. Pruyn, Judge Jldvoccdc-Gcncral , 150 

George VV. Little, dieting Canal Commissioner, 2,000 

Benjamin Enos, do do 2,000 

Jonas Earli, jr., do do 2,000 

D. P. Bissell, do do 2,000 

V SP 16"^ "ir »■) i Canal Commissioners, $5.47 for each day's attendance. 
James Hooker, ) ' ■' 

Chester Ilayden, ) 

Thomas Clowes, > Canal Appraisers, $4 per day, and five cents per 

George W. Cuyler, ) mile for travel. 

AVilliam Baker, Rail-road Co7n}nissioner, $4 per day, andlive cents per 

mile for travel. 

Archihalil Campbell, Deputy Secretary of State and Clerk of the 

Land Office 1 ,500 

Philip Plielps, Deputy Comptroller, 1,500 

George W. Newell, Chief Clerk of the Canal Department, 1,500 

Samuel S. Randall, General Dep. Sxqj. of Common Schools, 1 ,000 

John Willard, Deputy Treasurer, 1,300 

William Cassidy, State Librarian, 700 

do. for attendance on Miscellaneous Library, 125 

James M. Bouck, Private Secretary to the Governor, 600 

Dionysius M. Vandcrlip, Messenger of the Governor, S3 each day. 

Commissioners of the Land Office. — The Lieutenant-Governor, Speaker 
of the Assembly, Secretary of State, Surveyor-General, Comptroller, 
Attorney-General, and the Treasurer. 

Commissioners of the Canal Fund. — The Lieutenant-Governor, Comp- 
troller, Secretary of State, Attorney-General, Surveyor-General, and the 
Treasurer. 

The Canal Board — Consists of the Commissioners of the Caiml Fund 
and the Canal Commissioners. 

Trustees of the State Library. — The Governor and Lieutenant-Govern- 
or ; the Secretary of State, Comptroller and Attorney- General, ^^///ig- 
Trustees. 

28 



326 OFFICERS OF THE STATE. 

LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

SENATORS. 

First Senate District. Morris Franklin, John B. Scott, Isaac L. Varian^ 
John A. Lott. 

Second Senate District. John Hunter, Robert Denniston, Abraham 
Bockee, Abraham A. Dej'o. 

Third Senate District. Erastus Root, Henry W. Strong, Erastus Corn- 
ing, John C, Wright. 

Fourth Senate District. James G. Hopkins, Sidney Lawrence, Edmund 
Varney, Thomas B. Mitchell. 

Fifth Senate District. Sumner Ely, Henry A. Foster, William Ruger, 
Carlos P. Scovil. 

Sixth Senate District, Andrew B. Dickinson, Nehemiah Piatt, James 
Faulkner, Calvin T. Chamberlain. 

Seventh Senate District. Lyman Sherwood, Elijah Rhoades, William 
Bartlit, John Porter. 

Eighth Senate District. Abram Dixon, Samuel Works, Gideon Hard, 
Harvey Putnam. 

Isaac R. Ellwood, Clerk of the Senate, Salary, $1,200 

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. 

Albany. Willis Hall, Aaron Van Schaack, John I. Slingerland. 

.Allegany. Samuel Russell, Robert Flint. 

Broome. Gilbert Dickinson, 

Cattaraugus. Elijah A. Rice, Alonzo Hawley. 

Cayuga. Vincent Kenyon, Alfred Lyon, Darius Monroe. 

Chautauque. Emory F. Warren, Odin Benedict, Adolphus F. Morrison. 

Chemung. Samuel G. Hathaway, jr. 

Chenango. Samuel Medbury, Danforth Wales, Edward Cornell. 

Clinton. Julius C. Hubbell. 

Columbia. Lucas Hoes, Anson Brown, Peter Poucher. 

Cortland. Harry McGraw, George N. Niles. 

Delaivare. Milton Bostwick, Nelson K. Wheeler. 

Dutchess. John M. Ketehara, John Elseffer, Gilbert Bentley. 

Erie. George R. Babcock, Wells Brooks, Milton McNeal. 

Essex. Samuel Shumway. 

Franklin. Joseph H. Jackson. 

Fulton and Hamilton. John L. Hutchinson. 

Genesee. Robinson Smiley, Ira Wait. 

Greene. Aaron Bushnell, Philip Teats. 

Herkimer. John T. Hall, Walter Booth. 

Jefferson. Elihu C. Church, Joseph Graves, Job Lamson. 

Kings. William M. Udall, William Conselyea, 2d. 

Lewis. Amos Buck. 

Livingston. Daniel H. Fitzhugh, Daniel D. Spencer. 

Madison. Venoni W. Mason, Henry Palmer, Lorenzo Sherwood. 

Monroe. Jerome Fuller, Robert Haight, Enoch Strong. 

Montgomery. John Bowdish, John I. ZoUer. 

New-York. James T. Thomson, Edward Sanford, Timothy R. Hibbard, 
George Paulding, Absalom E. Miller, George G. Glasier, Edward H. 
White, Charles P. Daly, David R. Floyd Jones, Daniel C. Pentz, William 
McMurray, Robert Smith, Elbridge G. Baldwin. 

Niagara. Thomas T. Flagler, John Sweeney. 

Oneida. David Murray, John H. Tower, Amos S. Fassett, Dan P. Cad- 
well. 

Onondaga. Thomas McCarthy, Charles R. Vary, Benjamin French, 
Thomas Slierwood. 

Ontario. Jedediah Dewey, jr., James C. Brown, Sylvester Austin. 



OFFICERS OF THE STATE. 327 

Orange. Leonard Lee, John W. Martin, John Van Duzer. 
Orleans. Elisha Wright. 
Oswego. William F. Allen, Alban Strong. 
Otsego. Harvey Hunt, John K. Griggs, Silas Burleson. 
Putnam. Sylvanus Warren. 
Queens. Samuel Youngs. 

Rensselaer. Georg« R. Davis, Henry Vandenhergh, Samuel Couglass'. 
Richmond. Henry Cole. 
Rockland. Cornelius M. Dcmarest. 
St. Lawrence. George Redington, Calvin T. Hulburd 
Saratoga. Azariah E. Stimson, Lyndes Emerson. 
Schenectady. Edward H. Walton. 
Schoharie. John Osterhout, Abraham Richtmeyer. 
Seneca. Matthevi- West. 

Stejiben. Francis E. Erwin, Morris Brown, Ziba A. Leland. 
Suffolk. Samuel B. NicoU, Joshua B. Smith. 
Sullivan. Jonathan Stratton. 
Tioga. Simeon R. Griffin. 

Tompkins. Silvanus Earned, George T. Spink. 
Ulster. William Soper, Edmond Suydam. 
Warren. Pelatiah Richards. 
Washington. James W. Porter, Anson Bigelow. 
IVayne. Philip Sours, Frederick U. Sheffield. 
}''c^tchester. Andrew Findlay, Samuel L. Holmes. 
II -J oming. Eleazer Baldwin, Truman Benedict. 
Yates. Richard H. Williams. 
Henry N. Wales, Clerk of the Assembly, Salary, $1,800 



JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 

Salary. 

Reuben H. Walworth, Chancellor, . • • • $3,000 

Samuel Nelson, Chief Justice Supreme Court,. 3,000 

Greene C. Bronson, Justice Supreme Court, 3,000 

Esek Cowen, do do 3,000 

William T. McCoun, Vice-Chancellor, 1st Circuit, 2,000 

Lewis II. Sandford, Assistant, do for do 2,500 

P'rederick Whittlesey, Vice-Chancellor 8th Circuit, 1,600 

William Kent, Circuit Judge, 1st Circuit, 1,600 

Charles H.Rusgles, do 2d do 1,600 

JohnP. Cushman, do 3d do 1,600 

John AVillard, do 4th do 1,600 

PhiloGridley,. do 5th do 1,600 

Robert Moncll, do (?th do 1,600 

Daniel Mosely, do 7th do 1,600 

Nathan Dayton, do 8th do 1,600 

Nicholas Hill, jr.. State Reporter, 500 

Alonzo C. Paige, Chancery Reporter, 500 

Isaac R. Ellwood, Clerk of Court of Errors, fees. 

John M. Davison, Register in Chancery, 2,000 

and for clerk hire, &c 2,500 

Hiram Walworth, Assistant Register in Chancery, 2,500 

and for clerk hire, &.c 5,000 

William P. Hallett, Clerk Supreme Court, New-York 2,.500 

and for clerk hire, &c 3,000 

Joha Keves Paige. Clerk Supreme Court, Albany, 2,000 

and for clerk hire, kc 2,800 



328 



OFFICERS OP THE STATE. 



Hiram Denio, Clerk Supreme Court, Utica $2,000 

and for clerk hire, '&c 2,800 

Jacob Sutherland, Clerk Supreme Court, Geneva, 2,000 

and for clerk hire, &,c 2,800 

Alexander Forbus, clerk of 2d Chancery Circuit, 1.500 

Gideon M. Davison, do 4th do 1,200 

James W. Williams, do 5th do 1,500 

Robert B. Monell, do 6th do 1,200 

Stephen A. Goodwin, do 7th do 1 ,500 

E. Darwin Smith, do 8th do 1,500 

and for clerk hire, 84c 1 ,500 

Oliver L. Barbour, Chancellor's Clerk, 600 



SERIES OF CHANCELLORS, 

With the Dates of their Appointment. 
Robert R. Livingston, appointed October 17th, 1777. 



John Lansing, Junr., 
James Kent, 
Nathan Sanford, 
Samuel Jones, 
Reuben H. Walworth, 



October 2Sth, 1801. 

February 25th, 1814. 

August 1st, 1823. 

January 24th, 1826. 

April 26th, 182?. 



REGENTS. 



Regents of the University , 



1807, 


February 


n, 


1822, 


February 


7, 


1823, 

1825, 
1826, 
1829, 


February 
January 
January 
March 


14, 
12, 

26, 


1831, 


March 


23, 


1833, 


February 


5, 


1834, 

a 


April 

April 

a 


>!; 


1835, 


January 


20, 


1839, 


April 
February 


8, 
18, 


1840, 




28, 


1842, 


(( 


1, 


<( 


March 


22, 



with the dates of their appointment : 

The Governor, ex officio. 
The Lieutenant-Governor, ex officio. 
The Secretary of State, ex officio. 
Elisha Jenkins, Hudson. 
James Thompson, Milton, Saratoga co. 
Peter Wendell, M.D., Albany. 
John Greig, Canandaigua. 
Gulian C. Verplanck, New-York. 
Gerrit Y. Lansing, Albany. 
John K. Paige, Albany. 
John A. Dix, Albany. 
William Campbell, Cooperstown. 
Erastus Corning, Albany. 
Prosper M. Wetmore, New- York. 
James McKown, Albany. 
John L. Graham, New- York. 
Amasa J. Parker, Delhi, Delaware co 
John McLean, Salem, Washington co. 
Joseph Russell, Troy. 
John C. Spencer, Washington City, 
Gideon Hawley, Albany. 
David Buel, Troy. 
Peter Wendell, Chancellor. 
The Lieutenant-Governor, V. Chancellor. 
T. Romeyn Beck, Secretary, Albany. 



CANAL OFFICERS. 



329 



CANAL OFFICERS 



Appointed by the Canal Board, for 1843. 



COLLECTORS OF T0LL9. 

Erie Canal. 

Albany, Henry C. Southwick, 

West-Troy, David B. Jewett, 

SchenectacI}-, James B. Van Vorst, 

J'ultonville, John McCarthy, 

Little-Falls, Solomon Petrie, 

Utica, Julius A. Spencer, 

Rome, Jesse Armstrong-, 

Syracuse, Parley Bassett, 

Montezuma, David S. Titus, 

Lj-ons, - Jonas W. Goodrich, 

Palmyra, Pomeroy Tucker, 

Rochesler, John Wrig^ht, 

Brockport, Albigence W. Gary, 

Albion, Silas M. Burrong-hs, 

Lockport, Orsamus Turner, 

Black-Rock, Elisha H. Burnham, 

BuUalo, Hiram P. Thayer. 
Chcimplain Canal. 

Waterford and 

Sloop-Lock, Henry B. Scott, 
Saratoga, John R. Mott, 

"Whitehall, Samuel B. Sargent. 

Oswego Canal. 

Salina, Enos D. Hopping, 

Oswego, Samuel Hawley. 

Cayuga and Seneca Canal. 
Geneva, James Bogert. 

Chemung Canal. 

Havana, 
Fairport, 

Crooked Lake Canal 

Dresden, 
Penn-Yan, 

Chenango Canal. 

Hamilton, 

Oxford, 

Binghamton, 

Genesee Valley Canal. 
Scottsville, Thomas R. Mcintosh, 

Dansville, Horatio G. Taggart. 

Oneida Lake Canal. 
Higgins', George B. Fitch. 

SUPEHINTENDENTS OF REPAIRS. 

Erie Canal. 
Section No. 1, James Bradj', 
" " 2, J. C. Burnham, 

" " 3, William McClary, 

" " 4, rarney Becker, 



Section No. 5, Warner Dygert, 

" " 6, George Stone, 

" " 7, Nathaniel Cobb, 

" " 8, Samuel A. Hetfield, 

" " 9, James P. Bartle, 

« " 10, Samuel Mead, 

" " II, Orson Tousley, 

" " 12, William A. Sutton. 

Champlain Canal. 
Section No. 1, James Strang, 
' " 2, William Coleman. 

Osicego Canal. 

Alanson Dodge. 
Cayuga and Seneca Canal. 

Edward S. Latham. 
Chemung Canal. 

Section No. 1, Philo P. Hubbell. 
■■ " 2, Elijah H.Goodwin. 

Crooked Lake Canal. 

Erastus Page. 
Chenango Canal. 

Section No. 1, Curtis Porter, 

" 2, Silas Sherburne, 
• " 3, Joseph Bartlott. 

Genesee Valley Canal. 

Sanford A. Hooper. 



Hiram W. Jackson, 
David P. Brees. 



John Bogert, 
John Ellsworth. 



Marcus Clark, 
James A. (ilovcr, 
Giles Orcutt. 



WEIGH-M ASTERS. 



Albany, 
West-Troy, 
Utica, 
Sy raciise, 
Rochester, 



Daniel D. Shaw, 
Israel Shadbolt, 
Albert C. Allen, 
Isaac Lewis, 
Harry P. Dannals. 



INSPECTORS OF BOATS. 

Albany, Daniel P.Clark, (basin) 

Albany, James N. Straw, (lock) 

Albany, Edw'd Wolverton,(pier) 

West-Troy, Ebenezcr M'adswoitii, 
Troy, Charles Gillesjjie, 

Junction, Daniel Car])enter, 

Schenectady, Jolin Antlrew Barhydl, 
Utica, "Erie, "LewiirC. Loomis, 
Utica,"Chenango,"John AV. Ilaysc, 
Syracuse, Dearborn B. Bickford, 

Montezuma, Lewis Bostedo, 
Rochester, Isaac A. Montross, 
BuHalo, Patrick Milton, 

Wliiteliall, Justin A. Smitli, 
Geneva, Teunis Bonesteel, 

Oswego, Philander Rathbonc. 



28' 



330 FUNDS OF THE STATE. 

FUNDS OF THE STATE. 



General Fund. 

The capital of this fund consists of 33,797 acres of land valued at $19,961 42- 
the auction duties, excepting $33,0(X) annually paid to certain charitable insti- 
tutions in the city of New-Yorlf; the salt duties, and the fees of the register 
and clerks in chancery, and the clerks of the supreme covu-t. 

Permanent Revenue. 
Amount received into the treasury during the year ending 30th 
September, 1842, viz ; 

Auction duties, $200,284 52 

Salt duties, 114,9(j6 99 

Surplus revenue of Erie and Camplain Canal Fund, 200,000 CO 

Fees of the clerks of the supreme court, register, assistant regis- 
ter and clerks in chancery, 40.279 59 

Tax on foreign insui-ance companies, 3,3.35 35 

Pedlers' licences, 4,665 00 

Interest on treasury deposits, 1,297 99 

Fees of the Secretary of State, 1,868 00 

do. Comptroller, 368 52 

First payments on sales of lands, 1,063 58 

Escheats, 70 00 

Interest on arrears of county taxes, 4,717 75 

$572,917 29 

Common School Fund. 

CAPITAL. 

Statement showing the amount of the capital of the Fund, and the increase and 
diminution of the same, during the year ending September 30, 1842, viz : 

Amount of the fund, SOtli Sept. 1841, $2,036,625 68 

Increase of the fund as stated below, 94,143 73 

$2,130,769 41 
Diminished as stated below, 162,478 69 

$1,968,290 72 

To tliis fund also belongs 395,520 acres of land, valued at $258,295. 

Increase of the Fund. 
Bonds for lands, viz : 

For sales of land by the Surveyor-General, $13,332 97 

Transferred from the General Fund, 7,679 60 

do. from the Oswego canal revenue, 98 25 

For sales of lands by the Attorney-General in 1840, 

and 1841, 2,295 43 

Amount erroneously credited in 1841, on account of 
payments of principal into the treasuiy, 353 88 

$23,760 13 

Bonds for loans, viz : 

For loan to Wyomiog county, $10,000 00 

Amount erroneously creiiited in 1841, on account of 
payments of principal into the treasury, 85 00 

10,085 00 

Loan of 1808, 

For amount of error in former statements, 2,357 73 

Money received into the treasury, viz : 

For principal of bonds for lands, $18,119 43 

For principal of bonds for loans 19,052 89 

do. of loan of 1792, 2,665 98 

do. do. of 1808, 1,442 00 



FUNDS OF THE STATE. 331 

"For first pa3'ments on sales of lands, 9,721 O'J 

For reilcmption of land sold for arrears of consi- 
deration, 1,000 24 

For surplus revenue of the U. S. Deposit Fund, . . . 5,851 24 

' $57,852 37 

Transferred from the the General Fund, for amount due on a 
bond cancelled in consequence of the failure of the the title 
to (he land, • 88 00 

$1)4,143 73 

Diminution of the Fund. 

Bonds for lands, viz: 

For principal of bonds paid into the treasury, $18,119 43 

For reversion under Surveyor-General's resale for 

arrears of consideration, 77,290 31 

For reversion under Attorney-Generars resale for 

arrearsof consideration, in 1840, 1S41, 1,4/ / 85 

For amount of bonds cancelled per resolution of the 

Commissioners of the Land-Office, in consequence 

of failure of title to the land for which they were 

given, 121 62 

Bonds for loans, viz : 

For principal of bonds paid into the treasurj', $19,052 89 

For amount of error in former statements, 5,831 03 

Loan of 1786, viz : 

For amount of losses in loans, $331 87 

For amount of error in former statements, 2,483 25 

Loan of 1792, viz : 
For amount of principal paid into the treasury,. . . . <i;2,665 98 
For amount of error in former statements, 12,132 44 

Loan of 1808, viz: 

For amount of principal paid into treasury, $1,442 00 

For amount erroneously charged in 1841, on ac- 
count of principal received into the treasury, 85 00 

Money paid out of the treasury, viz : 

For loan to Wyoming county, $10,000 90 

For bond transferred from Oswego canal revenue, . 98 25 

For surplus moneys on resale of lands, 15 46 

For redemption of lands sold for arrears of consi- 
deration, 235 37 

Amount of bonds transferred from the General Fund, 

Amount transferred to bonds for lanils, for error in 1841, in ac- 
count of payments of jirincipal of bonds into tlie treasury,. . 

Amount IranslVrred to the revenue of the fund for interest inclu- 
ded in cor(aiii bonds taken by tlie Attorney -General, 

Amount transferred to General I'luul, for surplus moneys on 
i-csale of lands bplonging to this fund, paid from the General 
Fund, 



$97,009 21 

24,883 92 

2,815 12 

14,798 42 

1,527 00 



10,3-19 08 
7,679 60 


353 88 


1,582 72 


1,479 74 


$162,478 69 



Revenue. 
Balance of revenue in the treasury on the 30lh September, 18 11, $90,161 92 

Amount received into the treasury during the year ending 30th 
September, 1812, including tlie sum of $165,000 appropriated 
from the income of tlie U . S. Deposite Fund, 255,092 46 



OrjZ FffNDS OF THE STA'^E'. 

Amount transferred from the capital of the fund for interest in- 
cluded in sundry mortgages taken by the Attorney-General 
on resale of lands, 1,936 60^ 



Amount paid out of the treasury during the year, ending 30th 
Sept. 1842, viz : 

Common School dividends, $274,999 00 

Shinecock Indians, 80 00 

Miscellaneous, 10 28 



$347,190 98 • 



275,089 28 
Balance of revenue in the treasury on Sept. 30, 1842, $72,101 70 

literature Fund. 

Capital, 

Amount invested on the 30th Sept. 1842, $268,092 87 

Money in the treasury, 897 70 

$268,990 57 
To this fund also belongs 10,913 acres of land valuetlat $4,845. 

RevevAie. 

Balance in the treasury on the 30th Sept. 1841, $20,271 "83 

Amount received into the treasury during the year ending 30th 

Sept. 1842, viz. : 

Dividends on bank and insurance stock, $13,614 86 

Interest on State stock, 5,886 08- 

Amount appropriated from the income of the U. 

States Deposit Fund, 28,000 00 



Amount paid out of the treasury during the same 
period, viz. : 

Dividends to academies, $48,453 98 

Miscellaneous, 1 .335 64 



47,500 94 



49,789 62 
Balance in the treasury on the 30th Sept. 1842, $17,983 15 

Bank Fund. 

Amount of the capital of this fund on the 30th Sept. 1842, viz. : 

State stock, $100,082 40 

Bonds, 25,000 00 

Money in the treasuiy in notes of suspended banks, 201,358 95 

$326,441 35 
Less amount advanced from the treasury to redeem bills, 11,286 42 

$315,154 93 

The fund was increased during last the fiscal year, as follows, 
viz : 

Contributions paid by r.undr)' banks, $362,310 19 

Proceeds of the sale of the State stock and bonds, 363,123 93 

Redemption of bills, 5,098 25 

$730,532 37 

Diminished during the same period, viz. : 

Redemption of bills, , $529,029 00 

State stock sold and cancelled, 368,436 43 

Miscellaneous, 3,400 00 

$900,865 43 



FUNDS OF THE STATE. '{333 

Revenue. 

Balance in the treasury on the 30Lh Sept. 1841, $10,301 55 

Amount received ilurinj the year endin<j S-ept. 30, 1842, 25,122 58 

?35,424 13 
Amount paid during- tlio same periotl, 6,300 OU 

Balance of revenue in tlie treasury on the 30th Sept. IS 12, $29,124 13 

United States Deposite Fund. 
Capital. 

Amount loaned, $1,630,790 05 

State stock, 1, 100 00 

$1,631,890 05 
Less balance due the General Fund on the sum advanced from 
the treasurj- to make the fourtli instalment withheld by the 
United States, 617,369 33 

Amount received from the United States, $4,014,520 71 

Revenue. 
Amount received into the trex^.ury during the year ending 30th 

Sept. 1,S42, ". $311,737 31 

Balance due the General Fuml on the 30th Sept. 1841, $12,922 75 
Amount of expenditures during the yeai- ending 

30lh September, 1S42, 291,814 56 

$3fJ4,737 31 

Balance in the treasury on Sept. 30th, 1842, $7,000 00 

Mariners' Fund. 

Balance in the treasury on the 30th Sept. 18 12, $25,212 46 

State stock, 22,000 00 

Mortgage of the American Seaman's Friend Society, 10,(X)0 00 

$57,212 46 

TonaAvanda Rail-Road Company Sinking Fund. 

State stock, $2,300 00 

Comptroller's bond, 126 15 

$2,426 15 

Tioisra Coal, Iron, Mining and. Manufacturing Co. .Sinking Fund. 

Sf af e stock, $700 00 

Comptroller's bond, 115 50 

$815 50 

Hudson and Berkshire Rail-Road Company Sinking Fund. 

State stock, ^6,-2CA) 00 

Comptroller's bond, 251 31 

$6,511 31 

Auburn and Rochester Rail-Road Company Sinking Fund. 

State stock, $8,347 00 

Comptroller's bond, , 335 11 

$8,682 11 



334 



DEBT OF THE STATE; 



DEBT OF THE STATE. 



GENERAL FUND DEBT, 

State Stock. 

A'mount issued to John Jacob Astop, per chap. 302, Laws of 1827, and chap. 86- 
laws of 1832, bearing interest at 5 per cent, and 
redeemable at pleasure, $561,500 00 

Amount issued to the Treasurer, per chap. 18, 
Laws of 1840, to redeem 4| per cent stock issu- 
ed for loans from the Bank Fund,, bearing in- 
terest at 5 per cent, anil redeemable Jan. 1, 1848, 350,257 00 ■ 

Anioimt issued per chap. 247, Laws of 1842, to the 
Treasurer, to redeem an equal amount of Comp- 
troller's bonds, bearing interest at 7 per cent, 
and redeemable 1st July, 1844, 95,000 00 

Amount issued to the Ithaca and Owego Rail-road 
Company, per chap. 295, Laws of 1838, and 
chap. 344, Laws of 1840, viz: 4i per cent re- 
deemable in 1858, 287,700 00' 

5| per cent redeemable in 1865, 28,000 00 

Amount issued to the Canajoharie and Catskill 
Rail-road Company, per chap. 240, Laws of 
1835, bearing interest at 5 percent, and redeem- 
able as follows: 1S58, 100,000 00^ 

1859, , 50,000 00' 

ISbO, 50,000 00- 

Amount issued to the New-York and Erie Rail- 
road Company, per chap. 22(3, Laws of 1838, 
and chap. 196, Laws of 1840, viz : 4^ per cent 

redeemable in 1858, 100,000 00 

4i per cent redeemable in 1859, 200,000 00 

5.J per cent redeemable in 1860, 500,000 00 

5.i per cent redeemable in 1861, 1,100,000 00 

6 per cent redeemable in 1861, . . . - 200,000 00 

6 per cent redeemable in 1802, 900,000 00 

$4,522,457 00 

Indian Annuities. 

Amount of principal of the annuities payable to 
sundry Indian tribes, 136,574 27 

Tempohaey Loans. 

6 per cent payable on demand, $70,000 00 

7 " " " 15,619 21 

7 " payable in 1843, 227,327 00 

7 « " 1844, 121.412 07 

7 " « 1847, li;000 00 

I « « 1848, 20,000 00 

465,358 28 

Balance due the Specific Fund. 

Amount of deficiency in the revenue of the General Fund to. 
meet the balance due the other funds, (see statement of bal- <, 
ances below,) 435,416 24 

$5,559,805 79^ 



DEBT OF THE STATE. 



Brought forward, 

CANAL DEBT. 

STATE STOCKS. 

^rie and Champlain canal, $2,993,241 85 

TEric Canal Enlargement, 8,779,202 24 

•Oswego canal, 421,304 00 

Cayuara and Seneca canal, 237,000 00 

Chemun? canal, 596,122 47 

■Crooked^ Lake canal, I20,00(J 00 

^Chenango canal, 2,40S,638 00 

Black River canal, 1,442,694 88 

Genesee Valley canal, 3,366,756 44 

Oneida Lake canal, 50,000 00 

Oneida River Improvement, 59,432,57 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Black River canal, 6 per cent, payable in 18 14, . . $18,967 00 
'Chemung canal, 6 per cent, payable in 1842, 20,000 00 



335 

$5,559,805 79 



19,574,3*12 45 



3S,967 €0 



Grand total, $25,173,165 24 



CONTINGENT DEBT. 

The contingent debt of the State, that is, the stock issued on the faith of the 
people and loaned to rail-road and canal companies, is as follows: 





Act for issuing. 


Redeem- 
able. 


Rate of 

interest. 


Amount. 


Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. 


Chap. 62, 1827 


1847 


5 pi 


•.ct. 


$500,000 


Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. 


" 346, 1829 


1848 


41 




300,000 


Auburn & Syracuse R. R. Co. 


" 293, 1838 


t( 


o 




200,000 


Auburn & Rochester do. 


" 196, 1840 


(C 


0^ 




200,000 


Long Island do. 


" 193, 1840 


c c 


6 




100,0(X) 


Hudson & Berkshire do. 


« 178, 1840 


1865 


5:^ 




150,000 


Tioga Coal Comjiany, 


" 296, 1840 


( I 


51 




70,000 


Tonawanda Rail-road Co 


^' 200, 1840 


(( 


oh 




100,000 


Schenectady &. Troy R. R. Co. 


« 299, 1840 


1867 


6 




10<},000 




$1,-720,000 



The whole sum originally issued and loaned to canal and rail-road compa- 
nies, was $5,035,700^ of this amount, $3,315,700 has already fallen upon the 
ti-easury by the failure of three of these companies to fulfil the obligations 
%vhich were entered into in their behalf. This leaves a balance of $1,720,000, 
on which the respective companies continue for the present to pay tlie interest. 



STATE CANALS. 

The productive property of the State, in addition to the available Fimds, be- 
fore enumerated, are the Public Works, which yielded a revenue in 1842 of 
$1,749,204; an amount more than the interest on the whole debt of the State at 
■file present time. 



336? HEAL AKD P2KS0NAL ESTATE. 

REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE. 

Value of Real and Personal Estate; amount of State, County, and Town Taxes,- 
S,c. (See page 67.) 

Total value of real estate, $504,254,029 00 

Total value of personal estate, 116,595,233 00 

Aggregate value, . . . • $620,849,262 00 

•=. ■ — 

Amount of county and state taxes, $3,283,400 39 

Amount of town taxes, 963,087 39 

Aggregate of town, coiuity and state taxes, $4,246,487 78 

The state tax amounts to 620,676 34 

Amount of town and county taxes, $3,625,811 44 

The number of acres of land assessed in the whole state, is 27,176,934. 
The following is a comparative statement of tlie valuation of real and per- 
sonal estate, and the rate and amount of taxes, from 1835 to 1842. 

Comparative Statement from 1835 to 1842. 

Total amount Rate of assessment 
Year.. Real estate. Personal estate. of taxes.. on $1 of valuation.- 

1835,. $403,166,094 $128,526,103 $2,132,947 53 5.0 

1836, 539,756,874 132,615,613 2,502,463 73 4.9 

1837, 4'J8,430,054 122,021,033 2,703,914 69 4. .34 
1S:^8, 502,864,006 124,680,778 2,860,476 75 4.6 
1839, ■ 519,058,782 131,602,988 3,148,931 54 4.8 
1840,. 517,723,170 121,447,830 3,088,408 22 

1841, 531,987,886 123,311,644 3,173,355 97 

1^42, 504,254,029 116,595,233 4,246,487 78 6.8 

The amount of taxes has more than doubled since 1835, while the aggregate 
valuation of 1842, is only $89, 157,065 more than in 1835. 
Ck»mparing 1842 with 1836, the diminution in the valuation of per- 
sonal estate is $16,020,380' 

And of real estate, 35,502,845^ 

Total dimmution since 1836, $51,523,225 

In a single year, from 1835 to 1836, there was an increase in the assessed 
value of the property of the state, as follows: 

Real estate, ^ $136,239,289 

Personal estate, 2,580,692 

Non-resident debts, 1,134,099 

Total increase in a year, $139,954,080 



The following statement shows the coimties in which the principal part of 

this increase on the real estate, from 1835 to 1836, took place, and the decrease 
in the same counties from 1836 to 1842, viz : 

Increase in real estate Decrease in real estate 

from 1835 to 1836. from 1836 to 1842. 

City and county of New-York, $90,009,878 $57,229,961 

Kings, 6,777,264 7,346,763 

Livingston, .- 7,244,665 2,456,046 

Oswego, 4,618,592 3,268,892 

Wayne, 4,007,680 28,205 

Chautauque, 1,764,767 213,274 

Total, $114,422,846 $70,54.3,141 



MILITIA OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK. o37 

3IILITIA OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK. 

The following general summary of the Militia force of the State, as at 
present organized, is derived from the Adjutant-General's last annual re- 
port, dated Dec. 27, 1842. 

Cavalry and Horse jlriiUcry, — Embraces 4 Divisions, 8 Brigades, 81 
Companies, and the aggregate number, including officers of all ranks, 
and privates, of 5,651. 

Artillery, — Embraces 4 Divisions, 9 Brigades, 33 Regiments, 77 Compa- 
nies, and including officers of all lanks, and privates, an aggregate of 
10,090. 

Infantry, — Embraces 33 Divisions, 66 Brigades, 275 Regiments, 1,020 
Companies, and of officers of all ranks, and privates, an aggregate of 
164,033. 

Rijlemcn, — Embraces 3 Divisions distinctly organized, and 1 Division at- 
tacl'.ed to the 18th Infantry Division; 19 Regiments; 110 Companies, and 
an aegregate, as before, of 6,025. 

Unifurm Companies. — Of these there are 42, including Cavalry, Artil- 
lery and Infantry corps, attached to various regiments of Infantry. 

General Slaj}. — The officers of the General Staff are 9 in number. 

Recapitulation.— GftnexaX Staff 9; Cavalry 5,651; Artillery 10,090; In- 
faniry 164,033; Riflemen 6,025; Uniform companies attached to Infantry 
2.545; making the aggregate of officers and men of all arms 188,353. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS. 

Wil'in.m C. Bouck, Commander-in-Chief. 

Lyman Sanford, ./Idjulant-General. 

Henry Storms, New- York, Cominissary-Gencral . 

Robert H. Pruyn, Albany, Jiidiie-Jldvocate-Gencral. 

Spencer S. Benedict, Albany, Quarter-Mastcr-Geueral . 

James McNaughton, Albany, Sv.r ^con-General . 

Day Otis Kellogg, Troy, Paymaster-General. 

David Hamilton, Wm. Horace Brown, and John U. Nelson, Aids 

de-Camp. 
C. W. Buuck, New-York, Military Secretary. 

MAJOR-GENKKALS. — Cuvnlry. 

1st Division, John Taylor Cooper, Albany. 

2d '' Benedict Arnold, Amsterdam, Montgomery co. 

3i '•' Halsey Saniford Lodi, Seneca co. 

4th " John F. Townsend, Albany. 

Brigadier-Generals. — Cavalry. 

1st Brigade, Solomon White, Port Ontario, Oswego co. 

2<l ■' Isaac I. Piatt, Clinton Hollow, Dutchess co- 

3:1 '' Horatio N. Dryer, Stockport. Columbia co. 

4th " Linus W.Thayer, Warsaw, Wyoming co. 

5th " Robert Halsey, Ithaca, Tompkins co. 

6th " Cornelius Halsey, Plattsburgh, Clinton co. 

7th " Vacant. 

8th " William Comstock Laurens, Ot«ego co. 

Major-Gknerals. — Artillery. 
1st Division, Charles W. Sandford, New-York. 

2 1 " Aaron C. Whitlock,. Kphratah. Fulton co. 

3 1 " Vacant 

Jlh " Nelson Randall, Buffalo. 

29 



337 MILITIA OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK. 

Brigadier-Generals. — Artillery. 

1st Brigade, Samuel J. Hunt, New- York. 

3d " James McCabe, Albany. 

4th " Asa R. Butler, Naples, Ontario co. 

5th " A. G. Rosecrantz, Little-Falls, Herkimer co, 

6th " George P. Morris, New- York. 

7th " George K. Stiles, Cortlandville, Cortland co. 

8th " Volney Randall, Buffalo. 

9th " Vacant. 

10th " Vacant. 

Horse- Artillery. 

1st Brigade, Henry Storms, New- York. 

Major- Generals . — Infantry . 

IstDivision, Henry Floyd Jones, S. Oyster Bay, Queens co. 

2d " Beekman M. Van Buren, .. . Castleton, Richmond co. 

3d " James I. Jones, New- York. 

4th " Aaron Ward, Sing-Sing,Westchester co. 

5th " Gilbert Ogden Fowler, Newburgh, Orange co. 

6th " Joseph S. Smith, Kingston, Ulster co. 

7th " John Brush, Poughkeepsie, Dutchess co. 

8th " John C.Johnson, Catskill, Greene co. 

9th " Leonard G. Ten Eyck, Albany. 

10th " Orville Clark., Sandy-Hill, Washington co. 

11th " St. John B. L. Skinner, Plattsburgh, Clinton co. 

12th " Asher N. Cross, Watertown, Jefferson co. 

13th " Samuel Comstock, Clinton, Oneida co. 

14th " Lewis Averill, St. Johnsville, Mont. co. 

15th " John Mott, Mechanicsville, Saratoga co. 

16th " Edmund B. Bigelow, East Worcester, Otsego co. 

17th " Ichabod S.Spencer, Canastota, Madison co. 

18th " Solomon Robbins, jr Smithville, Jefferson co. 

19th " Samuel B. Hathaway, Solon, Cortland co. 

20th " Jonathan P. Couch, Havana, Chemung co. 

21st " Jesse Babcock, Scipio, Cayuga co. 

22d " Thomas Barkley, Honeoye, Ontario co. 

23d " Hestor L. Stevens, Rochester. 

24th " James Wisner, Olcott, Niagara co. 

25th " Elijah Patridge, Hume, Allegany co. 

26th " JehielHill, Zoar, Erie co. 

27th " C. F. E. Luce, York, Livingston co. 

28th " Garret H. Stryker, New- York. 

29th " William Blake, Norfolk, St. Lawrence co. 

30th " Otto F. Marshall, Wheeler, Steuben co. 

31st " George S. Doughty, New- York. 

32d " John Floyd, New-York. 

33d " John J. Viele, Lansingburgh, Rens. co. 

Brigadier-Generals. — Infantry. 

1st Brigade, Francis E. Erwin, Painted Post, Steuben co. 

2d " Rensselaer W. Robinson,... Cooperstown, Otsego co. 

3d " Thomas S. Cummings, New- York. 

4th " Daniel C. Rouse, La Fargeville, Jefferson co. 

5th " David Gould, Pekin, Niagara co. 

6th " Isaac A. Verplanck, Batavia, Genesee co. 

7th " Marvin B. Converss, Auburn, Cayuga co. 

8th " Chandler Ball, Hoosick Falls, Rens. co. 

,9th " John K. Porter, Waterford, Saratoga co. 



MILITIA OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK. 



339 



lOth " Frederick Pent/, New-York. 

11th " Peter H. Fonda, Fonda, Montgomery co. 

I2tli " Peter Robison, Elizaville, Columbia co. 

13tli " William H. Pratt, Deerfield, Oneida co. 

Mlh " Isaac I. Yates, Schenectady. 

13th " Munson J. Lockwood, Sing-Sing, Westchester co. 

16th " Henry Shipherd, Argyle, Wasliington co. 

17th " David Barrett, Whitehall, Washington co. 

I'^th " Ransom E. Booth, Havana, Chemung co. 

19th " Calvin G. Sawyer, Coshcn, Orange co. 

20tli " Philip H. Lasher, Tivoli, Dutchess co. 

21st " Charles Gray, Herkimer, Herkimer co. 

22d " James H. Siadmore, Cow Neck, Queens co. 

23d '• William Gumaer, Wurtsboro', Sullivan co. 

24th " Lyman Reeves, East Palmyra, Wayne co. 

2.5th " Orrin Griffin,. Hobart, Delaware co. 

26th " James Hasen, Copenhagen, Lewis co. 

27th " Vacant. 

2Sth " John S. Brown, Esperance, Schoharie co. 

29th " George S. Allison, Haverstraw, Rockland co. 

30th " Jacob. L. Scoficld, ■ Fishkill, Dutchess co. 

31st " James Slingerland, Stony Hill, Albany co. 

32d " Vacant. 

33d " Henry H. Huntling, Sag-Harbor, Suffolk co. 

a^t.i " John'McBride, Hamptonburgh, Orange co. 

35ih " James W. Nye, Hamilton, Madison co. 

36th " David Beekman, Jr Homer, Cortland co. 

37th " William Salisbury, Leeds, Greene co. 

38th " Thomas J. Folwcll, Romulus, Seneca co. 

39th " William S. Fullerton, Sparta, Livingston co. 

40!h " William S. Merriam, Lewis, Essex co. 

41st " Ephraim Robbins, Union, Broome co. 

42d " Ira P. Chamberlain, West Chazy, Clinton co. 

43J " Charles H. S. Williams, Fredonia, Chautauque co. 

44th " James E. Underbill, Brooklyn. 

45th " William L. Morris, New-York. 

46th " William E. Lathrop, Rochester. 

47th " David Burt, Buffalo. 

4Sth " Robert C. Kenyon, Fulton, Oswego co. 

49th " Tillcy 11. Pratt, Antwerp, Jell'erson co. 

50th " Sylvester Hunt, Ithaca, Tompkins co. 

51st " Robert Hagadorn, West-Greenfield, Sara. co. 

521 " Nelson McCall, Rushford, Allegany co. 

53d " John B. Lee, Albion, ()rleans co. 

54th " Daniel J. Huntley, Ellicottvilie, Cattarau. co. 

55th " Abel Redwaj', Adams, Jefferson co. 

56th " Philander Hartshorn, Hornellsville, Steuben co. 

57th " Vacant. 

5Sth " Richard L. S.Schicffelin, ... New- York. 

50th " Daniel Lee, New-York. 

60th " Calvin T. Chamberlain, Cul)a, Allegany co. 

61st " John Groesbeck, Albany. 

62d " Matthew Keeler, New- York. 

63d " Henry T. Kierstcd, New- York. 

64th " Frederick E. Mather, New- York. 

65lh " Jeremiah Mescrole, V/illiamsburgh, Kings co. 

66th " James Richardson, Schodack, Rensselaer co. 



340 COMMISSARY-GEiNERAl/s DEPARTMENT. 

Major- Generals. — Riflemen. 

1st Division, Gaylord Campbell, Herkimer, Herkimer co. 

2d " A. F. Whitaker, Benton, Yates co. 

3d " Ashbel W. Riley, Rochester. 

Brigadier- Generals. — Riflemen. 

1st Brigade, Ahira E. Knapp, Guilford, Chenanso co. 

2d " John C. Price, Phelps, Ontario co. 

3d " Horace Gay, Rociiester. 

4th " Nicholas P. Gassier, Little-Falls, Herkimer. 

oth '" Elias Hull, Almond, Allegany co. 

6th " L. Parkhurst, Mexico, Oswego co. 

7th " George Smith, Ovid, Seneca co. 



Commissary-Geneval's Departmout. 

Arsenals, Arms, .\nd Munitions of War. 

The Commissary-General is appointed by tlie Senate and Assembly, in the 
same manner as the Secretary ol' Siafe and the other chief officers of the civil 
Executive Department, and in like manner liolds his office for three years, un- 
less sooner removed by a concurrent resolution of tliose two bodies. His salary 
is S700 a year, payable, as in all other cases, quarterly; and his ncc:v;sary dis- 
bursements in the discliarge of his official duties, are also paid gu^ o. the trea- 
sury, but he receives no fees. 

He has the general charge and oversight of the arsenals and magazines of the 
State, which he is required to keep in good repair; and he mnsr attend to the 
preservation and safe-keeping, cleaning, and repairing of the ordnance, arms, 
and all munitions of war belonging to tlie State, for which purpose he has at 
all times, the control and disposal of them. He must sell out of the arsenals 
to privates in the militia, on tlieir producing the certificates of their command- 
ants, muskets, rifles, and other arms and accoutrements, i)roper to the branch 
of service with whicli they are respectivel3r connected, at the prices paid for 
them by the State ; he must dispose, on the best terms in his power, of all such 
arms, ammunition, and other military implements and property, as are deemed 
unfit for use, make report thereof to the Governor, and pay the proceeds into 
the Treasury; he must, with the approbation of the Governor, and on the 
certificate of the commanders of brigades, issue colors and instruments of mu- 
sic to battalions, proviiledthe expense thereof does not exceed the amount of 
tines actually paid into the Treasury by such brigades; he must issue to the 
several artillery companies such powder and ball as are needed for practice; 
and he must make annual report to the Governor of all his doings, and of the 
amount and condition of the military property of the State, which reports are 
to be transmitted by tlie Governor to tlie Legislature. 

From the Commissary-Generars last Annual Report, dated January 20th, 
1.^3, and transmitteii to the Legislature by the Governor on the 27th of the 
same month, the followin": statements are derived. 

The State Arsenals and Magazines are situated in the City of New-York; at 
Fort Richmond and Tompkins, on Staten Island; at Albany; at Onondaga- 
Hollow, in Onondaga county; at Canaiulaigua, in Ontario county ; at Batavia, 
in Genesee county; at Rufllilo; at Watertown, in Jefferson county; at Russell, 
in St. Lawrence county; at Malone, in Franklin county ; and at Elizabethtown, 
in Essex county; and each is uniler tlie immediate care and custody of a local 
agent called a Keeper. 

The pieces of Ordnance belonging to the State, in number, kind, and coq- 
dition, are as follows : 



ONONDAGA SALT SPEINGS. 341 

1. Iron. 

Pieces. Caliber. Condition. 

26 3"2s, Dismounted. 

54 24s, do. 

1 24, Mounted. 

28 24s, (tiowitzers,) do. 

4 ISs, do. 

4 12s, do. 

11 ys, do. 

2 9s, Dismounted. 

3 fe, do. 

153 (is, Mountetl. 

Whole number of pieces, of iron, 286. 

2. Brass. 

Pieces. Caliber. Condition, 

44 24s, (howitzers,) Mounted. 

8 24s, tlo. Dismounted. 

12 12s, do Mounteil. 

1 mountain 12, do. do. 

27 9s, (cannon,) do. 

5 9s, do Dismounteil. 

117 (is, do Mounted. 

5 (is, do Dismounted. 

3 4s, do. Mounted. 

1 4, do Dismounted. 

4':i 3s, do Mount. & dis. 

2 2s, do Mounted. 

Total number of brass cannon and howitzers, moimted and dismounted, 274. 

Besides wliich tliere arc 2 brass 10 inch morters; 1 brass 8 incli mortar; 1 
brass 5; inch eprouvctte, a machine to i^rove powder. 

Of muskels (lie whole number is 48,473; of riiles2,8S8; carbines 1,133; bra- 
ces of pistols GSo; swonls 3,811; sets of infantry cquiijments, 1(5,958; artillery 
sword belts, 3,044; sets of dragoon e(iuij)ments, LOU; boxes of musket cartridges 
with 1,0(X) in each, 383; of cannon sliot for 12s, 9s, (is, 4s, and 3s, 1,513 tixcd 
rounds; of Sand 10 inch shell, 535; of liowitzer shells for 12s, and24s, 1,057. 

Besides the fixetl ammunition above mentioned, there are large quantities of 
powder and ball in store, both for ordnance and small arms. 

The ammunition issued to artillery com))anies during the 3'ear, was chiefly 
for G iiounders, and amounted to 299 rjuar'er carbs of powder, and 1,459 balls. 
The field [)ieces issued were 131 iron6s; 23 howitzer 24s, and a very few other 
l)ieces. 

The arms and accoutrements received during the year, from U. S. Ordnance 
Department, under the law of Congress for the annual distribution of arms 
among the States, consisted of KiO i)ercussion cannon locks, at $7.50; 2,560 sets 
of infantry accoutrements, at §3.12; 1,700 artillery swords, at $4.25; 1,7(K) 
sword belts and jilales, at $1.50; making a total value of $20,731. 

The report recommends an appropriation by tlie Legislature, of $20,000 to 
put the arsenals in good re[)a)r. 



ONONHACV SALT SPUI.VGS. 



Tliese celebrated salines are the properly of the State. The tract in whicli 
they are found, called the "(mondaga Salt Springs Reservation," is in the 
town of Salina, and embraces within ifs limilsthc Onondaga Lake, and the vil- 
lages of Geddes, Syracuse, Lodi, Salina, and Liver|)ool. Many years ago the 
greater part of the reservaJon was laiil out in village plats, and iarm and jias- 
ture lots, and sold to priva'e citizens, so that the grounds now belonging to tlie 

29* 



342 ONONDAGA SALT SPRINGS. 

State, constitute but a small portion of the original tract. The manufacture ot' 
salt is carried on at all the above named villages except Lodi. Ey means 
of shafts of small bore varying from about 90 to more than 300 feet m depth, 
tubed and fitted with pumps, the brine is raised and poured into reservoirs, 
fi'om which it is distributed in pipes to tlie different works for making salt. Of 
this brine about 45 gallons fiu-nish a bushel of salt; and the revenue of the 
State is derived from a dut}' of 6 cents on each bushel. This duty was ori- 
ginally fixed by the constitution at a shilling; but was reduced to 6 cents by an 
amendment of that instrument adopted in November^ 1833. 

Two modes of making salt are in use at these springs, one by the use of arti- 
ficial heat, and the otlier by evaporation in tlie sun. The former process is 
much the less accurate of the two, ami the salt produced by it is of an inferior 
quality; while the solar salt is purer th.an any other, and enjoys a high reputa- 
tion. By those who are thoroughly acquainted with this subjec t, the duty 
paid by the manufacturer to the State, constitutes but very little less than half 
of the whole cost of production. 

The interests of the State on the reservation, are put in charge of two prin- 
cipal otficers, designated respectively the Superintendent of Salt Springs, and 
Inspector of Salt, in the county of Onondaga. The duties of the latter relate 
chiefly to the quality of tlie salt, its measurement, packing, and the character of 
the barrels in which it is sent to market. The Superintendent has the general 
oversight of the Keservation, the sinking of shafts, the regulation of the 
j)umps, the supply and distribution of the brine to the uiilerent works, the care 
of the State lands to prevent intrusion and trespasses, and the leasing of lots for 
the erection of works for making fine salt. Tiie granting of the lands set apart 
for the manufacture of the coarse or solar salt, is vested in tlie Commissioners 
of the Land-Office. 

The Superintendent and Inspector make annual reports to the Legislature. 
From the last of these documents, dated at Syracuse, January 6, 1843, the fol- 
lowing facts are deri ved : 

During the year 1842, the quantitj'' of salt made and inspected at these salines 
was 2,291,903 bushels, on which duty amounted to $137,514. 18. 

The following statement may serve to illustrate the elfect of the duty on the 
manufacture. The duty, prior and up to 1834, was a shilling per bushel; and 
the quantity made in each year, from 182() to 1833 both inclusive, was as follow s : 
Year. Bushels. 

1826, 827,508 

1827, 983,410 

1828 1,160,883 

1829, 1,291,280 

1830, 1,435,446 

1831, 1,514,037 

1832, 1,652,985 

1833, 1,838,646 

The following statement shows the annual product since the reduction of the 
duty to 6 cents per bushel. 

Year, Bushels. 

1834, 1,943,252 

1835, 2,209.867 

1836, 1,912;858 

1837, 2,161,287 

1838, 2,575,032 

1839, 2,864,718 

1840, 2,622,305 

1841, 3,340,769 

1842, 2,291,903 

Of the total quantif j- of salt annually produced at these springs, about nine- 
tenths are of the kind made by boiling, which usually goes by the name of " fine 
sail," on account of the minuteness of its crystals; and the other one-tenth, 
which forms in very much larger crystals, is commonly designated "coarse 
s.xlf."' 



BANli LAW. Bis 



AN ACr to abolish the office of BANK COM3iISSIONERS, ant^ for 
ollior purposes. 

Passed April 18th, 1843. 
The People of the State of New-York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do 
enact asfollov's: 

§ 1. Every Charfcro.l Bank sliall take an account of its notes for circulation 
on the first ilay of July, oightoeii hundred anil forty-three, and shall return to 
llie Comptroller, under the oath of the i)resident anil cashier, a s'atenient of all 
the notes of the hank which it has in possession, or in any way outstanding- or 
in circulation on that daj', specifying the amount of bills of each denomination, 
and the aggregate amoimt of the whole circulation, and shall at tl>e same time 
deposite with the Comptroller their jjlatos, and no bank shall after the time in 
tliat day to wliich ihe return of the president and cashier is made up, issue any 
of its own notes which have not been countersigned and registered by the 
Comptroller; but if the Comptroller shall be unable to supply any bank with 
countersigneil and registered notes as fast as such bank may require on and 
after the lirsl of Jul}-, eighteen hundroil and forty-three, siicli bank may be 
liermittetl by tlie Cojui)trollej.- to r/;-issue so much of its old circulation within 
the limits prescribed by law, as may be nccessarj', not exceeding the amount 
returneil to be oulstantlingon thatday, nor shall any such issue take place until an 
apjjlication has first been made to tlie Comptroller for countersigned and regis- 
tered notes, and refused; and provided also, that the stockholders of any char- 
tered bank- shall be individually liable for all the notes of its old circulation 
which shall be ouistantling on and after the first of July, eighteen hundred an(l 
forty-four; and after the first day of July, eighteen huntlrcd and forty-four, no 
bank shall pay out any note of any bank \vhich has not been countersigned and 
registered at ihe Com )Uroller's office, as herein provided. And all the notes 
of any bank issued prior to first July, eighteen hundred and forty-three, not 
countersigned and registered, or delivereil to the Comptroller to be counter- 
signed and registered, shall on or before tlie first of Jul}', eighteen hundred 
and forty-four, be redeemed and destroyed in the presence of the Comptroller, 
or of some person to be appointed by him for that purjiose. And a certificate 
of the counting anil destruction of the notes certified to be destroyed shall be 
signed and sworn to by the Comp.'roUer or his agent, and an agent appointed 
by the bank, and d.eposited in the Comptroller's olfice. 

§ 2. It shall be the duty of the Comi)troller to receive and safely keep the 
plates, to be delivered to him by the banks, as prescribed in section first; and at all 
times to cause to be printed from said plates, and deliver to each bank such notes, 
and of sucli denomination as is now allowed by law, as the bank owning such 
))lates may require, not exceeding, together with oulslaniling old circulation, 
and with the notes previously rccciv ed, the amount of circulation now allow- 
ed to such banks by law; and it shall alsn be the duty of tlie Comptroller to 
employ suitable persons whose duty it shall be to countersign such bills in 
such uniform manner as the Comptroller may prescribe, and every note so 
countersigned shall, before it is delivered to the bank, be regisiered in a book 
to be ke|)t by tlie Conii)!roller for that purjiose; and the expenses of prepar- 
ing, countersigning and registering such notes, shall be paid to the Comptrol- 
ler by the banlcs receiving the same, in proportion to the number of notes re- 
ooivcd. And it shall be competent for the Comptroller, when the plates of any 
bank are worn or otherwise unfit for use, to require such bank to furnish new 
l>!a(es, or to j)rocure them himself, at the expense of sucli bank. 

§ 3. Every bank and banking association, shall make a quarterly report to 
the C^nnplrollor, commencing on the first JMonday in August next, to be con- 
tinuo.lonthc first days of November, February, JNTay, and August thereafter, 
in each and every year; which said report shall be made on the oath of the 
president and cashier, and shall contain a true statement of the following items 
on the morning of the said first Mondays of August before any business of that 
day. Loans and discounts, over drafts, due from banks, due from directors of 
said bank, due from brokers, real esta'c, specie, cash items, stocks and promis- 
sory notes, bills of solvent banks, bills of suspended banks, loss and expense 
account, capital, circulation, (distinguishing that received from the Comptrol- 



344 BANK LAW. 

ler, from (he old outstanding bills) profits, amount due to banlis, amount due ta 
individuals, amount due to 1 reasurer of i:^tate, amount due to Commissioners of 
Canal Fund, amount due to depositors on demand, amount due not included 
under either of the above heads. And it shall be the iluty of the Comptroller 
to publisli said reports togetlier in the Slate paper, accompanied with a sum- 
mary of tlie items of capital, circulation anil ileposites, specie and cash items, 
public securities, and private securities, and the separate report of each bank 
shall be published in a newspaper publislied in the county in which sucli bank 
is situateil, at the expense of said bank. 

§ 4. 'The Comptroller shall publish the reports and summary, required by the 
third section, togetlier in one paper, on or before the twentieili day of August, 
November, February, and May in each year, and the expense of such publica- 
tion shall be defrayed by a percentage assessed upon the capital stock of all the 
banks and banking associations of the State, and if any bank shall fail to fur- 
nish to the Comptroller its quarterly report, in time for such publication, it 
shall forfeit and pay to the Comptroller tlie sum of one hundred dollars, to be 
applied by him to the payment of the expense of publishing the quarterly re- 
ports; and if any bank or banking association shall neglect or refuse to malie 
the quarterly report required by the third section for two successive quarters, it 
shall forfeit its charter (if an incorporated bank,) and its privileges as a bank- 
ing company, if organized under the law of Aprils J838, and may be proceed- 
eil against, and its ailairs closed in any manner now provided by law, in case of 
an insolvent bank or banking association. 

§ 5. Wlienever it shall appear from the reports made by any bank, or in 
any other way, that the capital of any banlf has become impaired and reduced, 
it shall be competent for tlie Comptroller to call upon such bank to redeem 
its circulation while its capital continues so reduced, so that the circulation of 
such bank shall not exceed that to wliicli its reduced capital would by law en- 
title it. 

§ 6. Tlie otHce of bank commissioner is hereby abolished; provided how- 
ever, tliat it shall be competent for the Comptroller, whenever he shall have 
good and sulficient reason to suspect the condition of any bank, or the correct- 
ness of its quarterly report, to appoint a special agent to examine the af- 
fairs of such bank, and wlio for that purpose shall have the same powers now 
vested by law in a bank commissioner. And the expenses of sucli investiga- 
tion, if such banl£ shall be proved to have made a false return, or otherwise to 
have been guilty of a violation of law shall be paid by said bank; but if it ap- 
pear that such bank has violated no law, tlien tlie expenses of such examina- 
tion shall be defrayed in the same manner as herein jirovided for defraying tlie 
expenses of the publication of the quarterly reports. 

§ 7. Any bank may at its pleasure, on paying its dues to the safety fund, and 
on depositing with the Comptroller an amount of money equal to the wliole 
amount wliicli any such bank would be liable to pay to the safety fund during 
tlie time of of its original cliarter, and all other debts and demands against if, 
wind up its affairs, distribute its assets among stockholders, and resign its cliar- 
ter, and close its business, by a resolution passed at a meeting of the stock- 
holders, and approved of by a majority of stockholders in interest of such 
bank called for that purpose, a cop)^ of which resolution shall be furnished to 
the Comptroller, and shall also be published for three successive weeks in ihe 
state paper: and if any outstanding notes or oilier demands are not presentett 
within one year, such bank may dcposite with the Comptroller or elsewliere 
under his direction, and subject to his order, on interest, a sum sulTicient to 
meet such outstanding demands, which when presented to the Comptroller, 
sliall be paid by him out of such sum, and such bank may distribute among its 
stockholders tlie surplus of its assets; and after six }'ears from the day on wiiich 
publication of dissolution was first made, the Comptroller shall return to the 
stockholders, to be distributed, the remainder of any of the sum so deposited. 
§8. All acts heretofore passed that conllict with provisions of this act are 
hereby repealed. 



COMMON SCHOOLS. 



lOMMOPf SCHOOLS. 



S45 



M the last sossion of (lie Legislature, an act was passed making some im- 
'portant and beneficial amendments of the Conimon School System. It lakes 
•effect on the 1st of .June, ISi'-i. Its leading i)rovisions are as follow : 

§ 1. Abolisl>cs the oiiices of Common School Commissioners and Inspectors. 

§ 2. Provides for the election in each town of a " Town Superintendent of 
Common Schools,-' to be clothetl witli tlie duties of the School Commissionei-s 
and Inspectors, anil such oilier powers as may be conferred by law; he must 
give boiul with sureties for the faithful application of the school moneys tliat 
come to his hands, and he is paid $1.25 per day for each day necessarily spent 
in his duties. 

§ 3. Associates the Town SuperintcncVsnt wi^i the Supervisor and Town 
Clerk, in the erection and alteration of school districts. 

§ 4. Proviiles that in every county having more than 150 School Districts, the 
Boaril of Sujiervisors may appoint two county Superintendents, and divide the 
county into two Superinlendencies; antl no share of public money shall be ap- 
portioned to any county in which a county Superintendent shall not be appoint- 
ed, unless by the special order of the State Superintendent. 

V 5. Any County Superintendent maj' he removed by the State Superintendent 
for cause; and the vacancy supplied by him till the nextmeeting of the Board of 
Supervisors, before whom the order of removal with the cause thereof, and 
the appointment for the vacancy shall be laiil. 

§ 6. Provides that no public money shall be i)aid to a County Superintendent 
by the Comptroller, without the certificate of the State Superintendent, that the 
County Superintenilent has complietl with his instructions and made his annual 
report. 

§7. Provides that all appeals now made to the State Superintendent shall 
first be made to the County Superintendent, whose decision shall be final and 
conclusive, unless an ai)peal therefrom be made in fifteen days to the State 
Superintendent. 

§8. Proviiles that certificates of qualification given to teachers by County 
Superintendents, maj' be either general for a county, or special for a town, 
and valid in each case till revolced. 

§ 9. Enacts that the consent of a Town Superintendent shall not be necessary to 
enable a County Superintendent to revoke a Tcaclier's Certificate. 

§ 10. Authorizes the State Superintendent to give certificates of qualification, 
on the recommendation of a County Sujierintendent, or other satisfactoi-y evi- 
dence, which sliall be available throughout the State, until revoked by the 
Superintendent. 

§ 11. Authorizes the Boards of Supervisors to pay the postages of County 
Superintendents in their official correspondence. 

§ 12. Divides the District Trustees into three classes, one to go out and one 
to be elected, in each year. 

>) 18. Authorizes the Trustees to correct errors in tax lists and rate bills, with 
the assent of the Town Superintendents. 

9 14. Requires the Trustees to deliver their annual reports between the 1st 
and loth of January, to the Town Superintendents, to be by him filed with tlie 
Town Clerk. 

1^' 15. Authorizes the Town Superintendent to designate the proportions of 
school moneys to teachers and to libraries, and to pay the teacl>ers on the writ- 
ten order of any two of the three trustees. 

§ l(i. Provides for continuing the distribution of public money for the in- 
crease of tlie libraries, except that in certain cases it may be applied to the pur- 
chase of maps, frlobes, &c. instead of books. 

There are some other jn-ovisions of less importance. The first set of Town 
Superintendents, are to be designated on the 1st .lime, 1818, by the Suiiervi- 
t>ar and . Justices of the I'eace of each (own, itiasniueh as the town-meetings in 
the State had generally taken place before the ])assage of the law^ 



346 STATUTES. 

Statutes CoiicRfiiing Applications to the Lesrislature. 

[Chapter 1, Title 3, Part 1, of Revised Statutes.] ^ 

§ 1. All persons applying- to divide or alter the bounds of any county, city 
or village ; or to erect a new county ; or to incorporate a new city or village ; 

And all persons applying for the removal of any court-house, or the impo- 
sing of a tax for making or improving a road, or for ajiy other local purpose 
in any countj^, where all or any of the inhabitants of such county a e proposed 
to be taxed: 

Shall give notice of such intended application, by advertisement to be pub- 
lished for at least six weeks successively, immetliately before such application, 
or before the first day of the session at which the same is to be matle, in a 
newspaper printed in the county or in each of the counties where the objects, 
of such application ai-e intendeil to be carried into effect, and also in case of 
intended application for the imposition of any tax as aforesaid, in the state pa- 
per. 

§ 2. Every association intending to apply to the legislature for an act of in- 
corporation, and every corporation intending to apply for an alteration, amend- 
ment, or extension of its charter, shall cause the like notice of such applica- 
tion to be publishetl in the state paper, and also in the newspaper printed in the 
county in which such corporation is intended to be, or shall have been es- 
tablished. 

§ 3. If no newspaper be printed in a county in which any notice is required 
to be published, such notice shall be published in like manner, in the place 
nearest thereto in which a newsi)aper shall be printed. 

§ 4. If the application be for an act of incorporation, the notice shall speci- 
fy the amount of the capital stock requisite to carry tue objects of sufch incor- 
poration into eirect; and if the application be for an alteration in anj' charter 
already granted, and the notice shall state specifically the alteration mtended 
to be applied for. 

§ 5. The notice of all other applications, of which notice i* required to be 
given, shall specify the nature and object of such intended applications. 

AN ACT relative to applications to the Legislature/or grants of escheated lands. 

Passed April 25, 1829. Reviseil Statutes, vol. 3, p. 171. 

§ 1. Every person hereafter applying to the legislature for a release of lands 
escheated to the state, shall give the like notice of such application in the 
county where such lands may be situate, and in the state paper, as is required 
by the third Title of the seventh Chapter of the First Part of the Revised 
Statutes. 

AN ACT requiring the publication of notices, in certain cases. 

Passed April 27, 1829. Revised Statutes, vol. 3, p. 171. 

§ 1. In all eases ofapplications to the legislature for the passage of laws autho- 
rizing the construction of dan^s, in or across the streams and waters of tliis 
state, which are by law public highways, like notices shall be given and pub- 
lished as are required to be given and publisheil by the third Title of the 
seventh Chapter of the First Part of the Revised Statutes, in cases of ajiplica- 
tions for acts of incorpoi-ations, and in the other cases therein specified. 



UNITED STATES COURT. 347 

COURTS. 



UNITED STATES COURT. 

Southern District of New-York. 

Comprising (he following counties: Columbia, Dutchess, Crccne, Kings, 
New-York, Orange, Putnam, Queens, Richmond, Rockland, Suflblk, Sullivan, 
Ulster, and Westchester. 

Officers of the Courts. 

Smith Thompson, Associate Justice U. S. Sup. Court, Circuit Judge. 
Samuel R. Retts, District Judge. 
James W. Metcalf, Circuit Clerk. 
Charles D. Betfs, District Cleric 
Ogden Hofifrnan, District Attorney. 
Silas M. Stilwell, Marshal. 

U. S. Conunissioners to take Affidai-its, Depositions, Bails, ^c. 

The Clerks of the Circuit and District Courts, their chief deputies, and the 
Deputy Marshal, are Commissioners ex-officio for the City and County of 
New- York; and the County Clerks of the remaining counties comprising the 
Southern District of New- York, are Commissioners ex-officio for those coun- 
ties. 

Court Teims. 

U, S. Circuit Court, 

Equity and Criminal Terms, last Monday in February and July. 
General Terms, first Monday in April and last Monday in November. 



U. S. District Court. 
Oeneral Terms, first Tuesdaj^ in each month. 
Special Court, every Tuesday. 

NoRTHEN District of New-York. 

Comprising the following counties: Albany, Allegany, Broome, Cattarau- 
gus, Cayuga, Chaufauque, Chenango, Chemung, Clinton, Cortland, Delaware, 
Erie, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Genesee, Hamilton. Herkimer, Jeflerson, 
Lewis, Livingston, Monroe, Montgomery, Madison, Niagara, Oneida, Ontario, 
Onondaga, Orleans, Oswego, Otsego, Rensselaer, St. Lawrence, Saratoga, 
Schenectady, Schoharie, Seneca, Steuben, Tioga, Tompkins, Warren, Wash- 
ington, Wayne, Wyoming, anil Yates. 

Officers of the Court. 

Alfred Conkling, Judge. Auburn. 

Anson Little, Clerk, Utica. 

Aurelius Conkling, Deputy Clerk, Auburn. 

Clark Robinson, Marshal, RufTalo. 

Israel G. Wood, Deputy Marshal, Auburn. 

Terms of the Circuit Court of the United States for the North- 
ern District of New-York. 
First Tuesday after (he third Monday in June, at Canandaigua. 
Third Monday in October, at Albany. 

Terms of the District Court of the United States for the North- 
ern District of New-Yokk. 

Third Monday in Januaiy, at Albany. 
" " May, at Rochester, 

t^ccond Monday in July, at Utica. 

•' " October, at Buffalo. 

One term annually in the county of St. Lawrence, Franklin or Clinton, at 
such time and place as the Judge shall appoint. 



348 NEW-YORif STATE COURTS. 

NEW-YORK STATE COURTS. 

The Cotirts of Common Pleas, within their several counties, have a jurisdic-- 
tion concurrent with the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court in civil cases. 
They have also an appellate jurisdiction of causes arising in Justices' Courts. 
The Judg-es of the Common PlcaSj or one Judge of the Common Pleas and 
two Justices of the Peace form the Court of General Session of eacli county, 
which has jurisdiction in all criminal cases of an inferior degree to tliose the 
pimislirnent of winch is imprisonment in the state prison for a less term than 
ten years. 

The Circuit Courts are each held by a Circuit Judge. Their business is the 
trial of questions of facts arising uponcauses in litigaiioain the Supreme Court. 
They have no original jurisdiction. Tliey are Vice-Chancellors except in the 
first and eighth Circuits. Courts of Oyer and Terminer are held simultaneously 
\: it.h the Circuits. These are courts of criminal jurisdiction, and are constitu- 
ted of the Circuit Judge and two more of the Judges of the County Courts for 
the county. They have cognizance of all criminal ofiences. 

The Suprem.e Court has original jurisdiction of all civil actions, at law, ari- 
sing within the State. Practically, however, this jurisdiction only extends to 
actions where the amount in controversy exceeds $50. It has also an appeU 
late jurisdiction in crimnal cases brought before it from, courts having the ori- 
ginal jiiristliction, 1)3^ certiorari or writs of error. 

The Court' of Chancery comprehends all the courts of equity jurisdiction in 
the State. Proceoilings in it are brouglit either before the Chancellor or one 
of the Vice-Chancellors. All actions where relief in equity is sought, may 
be brought before the Chancellor; and any action wliere such relief is sought^ 
may also be brought before the Vice-Chancellor of the Circuit in which the 
cause of action arose, or where either of the defendants live. The proceed- 
ings in either case are entitled in Chancery, and tlie particular court before 
which they are brought is designated. In addition to his original jurisdiction, 
the Chancellor has an appellate jurisdiction in all cases decided by a Vice- 
C4iancellor, or by any Surrogate. 

Surrogates^ Courts — have now the probate of all wills of real as well as per- 
sonal estate, the control of executors and administrators and the charge of 
infants' estates. The Chancellor also has power to issue commissions to take 
proof of wills of both real and personal estates in cases where the witnesses 
reside out of this State. He also has power to appoint general and special 
guardians of the persons and the estate of infants. 

The Court for the Correction of Errors is constituted of the President of the 
Senate, Senators, Chancellor, and Judges of the Supreme Court, &c. It has ap- 
pellate jurisdiction only, and has the review of decrees made by the Court of 
Chancery, which are brought before it upon appeal, and the judgments of the 
Supreme Court brought upiipon writ of error. When sitting as a court of ap- 
peals from the decrees made by the Court of Chancery, the Chancellor has no 
vote in its decisions, and in like manner when acting upon writs of error from 
the Supreme Court, the Justices of that Court have no vote. The decisions of 
this court are final. 



Officers of the Conrt of Chancery- 
Reuben H. Walworth, nhancellor, Saratoga Springs, 
John M. Davison, Register, Albany. 
Hiram Walworth, Assistant Register, New-York. 
Alonzo C. Paige, Reporter, Schenectady. 
Oliver Lorenzo Barbour, Chancellor's Clerk, Saratoga Springs. 

First Circuit. 

William T. McCoun, Vice-Chancellor, New-York. 

Lewis H. Sandford, Assistant Vice-Chancellor, New- York. 

Hiram Walworth, Clerk, ex officio, New-York. 

Charles Edwards, Reporter, New-York. 

Lewis H. Sandford, Injunction Master, New-York. 



NEW-YORK STATE COURTS. .. 

Thomas AiUlis Emnicf, Taxinjc Master, New -York. 
Lucius Robinson, Execplion Master, New-York. 
Philo T. Ruirjjles, •' " " 

Steplien CamVreleng, " " " 

.Second Circuit. 

Charles H. Rugj^les, Vice-Chancellor, Poughkeepsie. 

Alexander Forbus, Clerk, Poughkeepsie. 

Charles Swift, Injunction Master, Poughkeepsie. 

Charles Borland, Taxing ]\Iaster, Montgomery, Orange county. 

Frederick J. CoHin, Exception Master, Somers, Westchester county. 

Nathan Reeve, Exception Master, Newbvu'gh. 

Charles A. Floyd, Exception Master, Huntington, Suffolk county. 

Third Circuit. 

John P. Cushman, Vice-Chancellor, Troj''. 
John M. Davison, Clerk ex officio, Albany. 
John V. L. Pruyn, Injunction Master, Albany. 
Dennis B. GafTiiey, Taxing Master, Albany. 
Benjamin F. Potter, Exception Master, Schenectady. 
Darius Peck, " " Hudson. 

Giles B. Kellogg, " " Troy. 

Fourth Circuit. 

John Willard, Vice-Chancellor, Saratoga Springs. 

G. M. Davison, Clerk, Saratoga Springs. 

Perry G. Ellsworth Injunction Master^ Saratoga Springs. 

Callender Beechcr, Taxing Master, Ballston Spa. 

Marinus Fairchild, Exception Master, Salem. 

Charles Gray, " " Herkimer. 

AVilliam A. Dart, " " Potsdam. 

Fifth Circuit. 

Philo Gridley, Vice Chancellor, Utica. 

James Watson Williams, Clerk, Utica. 

Joseph Benedict, Injunction Master, Utica. 

John G. Crocker, Taxing Master, Utica. 

Joseph C. Patridc-e, Exception Master, Watertown. 

Johns. Randall," " " Oswego. 

James Hyde, " " Richlield. 

Sixth Circuit. 

Robert TMonell, Vice-Chancellor, Greene. 
Robert B. Monoll, Clerk, (ireene. 
Lester Chase, Injunction Master, Greene. 
John J. Taylor, Taxing Master, Owego. 
Robert Gosman, Exception JMaster, Ithaca. 
Joseph Boughton, " " Binghamton. 

David McMastcrs, " " Bath. 

Seventh Circuit. 

Divniel Moseley, Vice-Chancellor, Onondaga. 
Stephen A. Goodwin, Clerk, Auburn. 
Henry Millard, Injunction Master, Auburn. 
Daniel F. Moseley Taxing Master, Skaneateles. 
Joseph D. P. Freer, Exception Master, Cortland viUe. 
John M. Bradford, " " Gene\a. 

Tlieron R. Strong, " " Palmyra. 

Eighth CiRciaT. 

Frederick Whittlesey, Vice-Chancellor, Roche:-!cr. 
E. Darwin Smith, Clerk, Rochester. 
Charles Lee Clarke, Reporter, Rochester. 

30 



549 



350 NEW-YORK STATE COTJKTS, 

Horace Gay, Injunction Master, Rochester. 

Henry K. Viele, Taxing Master, Buffalo. 

AugustusA. Boyce, Exception Master, Locljport. 

Moses Taggart, " " Batavia. 

Chai-les F. Mattison, " " Dunkirk, Chaut. co. 



Court of Chancery. 

Chancellor's Terms. 
4th Monday in January and August, at Albany, and of May and October in 
New- York. 

Motion Courts. 
1st and 3d Tuesdays in every month during the vacations, at the Capitol in 
the city of Albany ; except between the May and August terms, when they ai-e 
held at the Chancellor's dwelling house, at Saratoga Springs. Also each Mon- 
day of every stated term. 

Vice- Chancellor's Stated Terms. 
First Circuit. — Vice-ChanccUor. 
At New- York, 1st Monday in January, April, July and October. 

Assistant Vice-Chancellor. 
1st Monday in each month except July and August, and except in those 
months when he holds a term elsewhere. (See laws of 1839, ch. 101. 1840.. 
eh. 314.) 

Second Circuit. 

3d Monday in February, and 2d in August, at Poughkeepsie, and 1st in June 
and December, at the Court House in Newburgh. 
Special Terms at times and places appointed for holding Circuit Courts. 

Third Circuit. 
2nd Monday in February and December, at Albany; and Wednesday after 
2d Monday in June, and Wednesday after 3d Monday in August, at the Court 
House in Troy. 

Fourth Circuit. 

Monday before 1st Monday in February, at the Court-House in Canton ; last 
Tuesday in April and October, and first in September, at Ballston Spa. 

Special Terms at times and places of Circuits, for hearing causes by consent, 
and for decrees in pro confesso and foreclosure suits. 

Fifth Circuit. 
1st Monday in September, December and March, and 4th Monday in July, at 
Utica. 

Sixth Circuit. 
3d Monday in February at Ithaca; Saturday after 2nd Monday in May, at 
Binghamton ; Saturday after 4th Monday in August, at Owego ; 2nd Monday 
in November, at Norwich. 

Seventh Circuit. 
1st Monday in February, 2d in May, 4th in July and October, at Auburn, 

Eighth Circuit. 
4th Tuesdays in February, May, August and November, at Rochester. 
Vice- Chancellor's Motion Courts. — 2d and 4th Tuesday in each month. 
1st Circuit.— At the City-Hall, New- York. 

3d Circuit.— At the Capitol in Albany, and in each of the other Circuits at 
the places of residence of the Vice-Chancellor, or at such other places as they 
shall appoint for the purpose. 



NEW-YORK STATE COURTS. 351 

CMficers of the Supreme Court, 

Samuel Nelson, Chief Justice, Cooperstown. 
Greene C. Bronson, Justice, Albany. 
Esek Cowen, J ustice, Saratoga Springs. 
Nicholas Hill, jr.. Reporter, Saratoga Springs. 

Ckrks. 

John Keyes Paige, Albany. 
\\ in. Paxson Hallett, New-York. 
Hiram Denio, Utica. 
Jacob Sutherlanil, Geneva. 

General Terms. 
Albany, 1st Monday of January, at the Capitol; New-York, 1st Monday in 
May, at the City-IIali; Utica, 1st Monday in July, at the Academy; Rochester, 
3il Monday in October, at the Court-House. 

Circuit Judges. 

1st Circuit, Wm. Kent, New-York. 

2d " Chas. H. Ruggles, Poughkeepsie. 

3d " John P. Cushman, Troy. 

4'h " John Willard, Saratoga Springs. 

5lh " Philo Gridley, Utica. 

bth " Ro'>ort Moncll, Greene. 

7ih " Daniel Moseley, Onondaga. 

8.I1 " Nathan Dayton, Lockport. 

Circuit Courts 1843 and 1844. 

Circuit Courts and Courts of Oyer and Terminer and General Jail Delivery* 
to be held within the several counties of this State for the years 1843 and 1844, 
have been lixed and appointed by the respect! '(?« Circuit Judges at the times and 
places following, viz : 

First Cihctjit. 

In the city and county of New-York, at the City Hall of the said city, on the 
thirii Monday of March; on the first Monday of May; on the first Monday of 
July; on the fourth Monday of September, and oq the fourth Monday of De- 
cember. 

In tlie county of Richmond, at the Court-House in the said county, on the 
fourth Monday of June, and on the fourth Montlay of November. 

In the county of Kings, at the Court-House in HalTs Exchange buildings, in 
Uie citj- of Brooklyn, or such other place as hereafter shall be provided ac- 
cording to law for holding the county courts of said county, on the second Mon- 
tlay of April, on the first Monday of September, and on the first Monday of De- 
cember. 

Courts forbearing arguments of matters committed, "in pursuance of the 
Act entitled ' An Act relating to tlie Supreme and Circuit Courts,' " to the deci- 
sion of the Circuit Jutigc for said circuit, are appointed to be held at the City- 
Hal! of the city of New-York, on the first Mondays of January, April, June 
and Octot)er, until otiierwise ordered. 

A court for the liearing of non-enumerated motions, in pursuance of the Act 
entitled " An Act to authorize the Circuit Judge of the first circuit to hold spe- 
cial terms for hearing and ileciiling cerlain non-enumeratetl business," passed 
May 2(), 1841, is appointed to beheld at the City-Hall of the city of New- York, 
on the first Saturday of e\ ery month of the year, except the months of Febru- 
ary and August, until otherwise orilered. 

Second Cincutr. 

In Dutchess, at the Conrl-Hiuise in Poughkeepsie, on tlie sixth day of March 
and ninth daj' of October, in the year 1S43; and on the fourth day of Maixh and 
seventh day of October, in the year 1S14. 

In Ulster, at tiie Court-House in Kingston, on the twentieth day of March 
and twenty-third day of October, in the year 1843; and on the eighteenth day 
of March ami the twenty-first day of October, in the year 184-4. 



352 NEW-YORK STATE COURTS. 

In Rockland, at the Court-Hoiise in Clarkstown, on the sixth tlay of April 
and ninth day of November, in the year 1843 ; and on the fourth day of April anU 
sixth day of November, in the j-ear 1844. 

In Westchester, at the Court-House in Bedford, on the tenth day of April, 
and at the Court-House in White Plains on the twentieth day of November, in 
the year 1843; and at the Court-House in Bedford on the eij^htli ilay of April, 
and at the Court-House in White Plains on the eighteenth day of November, in 
the year 1844. 

In Orange, at the Court-House in Newburgh, on the twenty -fourth day of 
April, anil at the Court-House in Goshen on the eighteenth day of September, 
in the year 1843; and at the Court-House in Newburgh on the twenty-second 
day of April; and at the Court-House in Goshen on the sixteenth day of Sep- 
tember, in tlie year 1S44. 

In Sutfolk, at the Court-House in Riverhead on the ninth day of May and the 
fifth day of September, in the year 1843; and on the seventh day of iMay and 
third day of September, in the year 1844. 

In Queens, at the Court-House in North- Hempsted, on the fifteenth day of 
May and the elev^enth day of September, in the year 1843 ; and on the thirteenth 
day of May and the ninth day of September, in the year 1814. 

In Sullivan, at the Court-House in Thompson, on the twenty -second day of 
May and the second day of October, in the year 1843; and on the twentieth day 
of May and the thirtieth day of September, in the year 1844. 

In Putnam, at the Court-House in Carmel, on tlie twenty -ninth day of May 
and the thirteenth day of November, in the year 1843; and on tlie twenty -se- 
venth day of May and the eleventh day of J!>fovember, in the year 1844. 

Chancery Terms. 

The stated Chancery Terms for the hearing of causes before the Veo-Clian- 
cellor of the Second Circuit, are appointed as follows : 

On the third Monday in February and the second Monday in August, at the 
Court-House in Poughkeepsie; and on the first Mondays in June and Decem- 
ber, at the Court-House in Newburgh. 

Special terms are appointed to be holden in the several counties in the Second 
Circuit at the times and places appointed for the holding of the Cii-cuit Courts. 

Courts for hearing arguments upon cases, bills of exceptions, &c., will be 
held at the times and places of holding the stated Chancery terms, and on the 
second and fourth Tuesdays in each month, at the Judge's Chambers in Pough- 
keepsie, when he is not engaged in other courts. 
Third Circuit. 

Schenectadj' — On the first Monday in March and fourth Monday of October, 
at the Court-House. 

Columbia — On the third Monday in March and first Monday in September, at 
the Court-House. 

Albany — On the first Monday in April and first Monday in October, at the 
City-Hall. 

Rensselaer — On the fourth Monday in April and third Monday in November, 
at the Court-House. 

Greene — On the second Monday in May and third Monday in September, at 
the Court-House. 

Schoharie — On the third Monday in May and third Monday jn October at the 
Court-House. 

Delaware — On the last Monday in May and founh INIonday in September, at 
the Court-House. 

Law Terms. 

For hearing cases, &c., for the years 1843 and 1844, on the third Monday in 
February anil first in December, at the capitol in the city of Albany; and on 
the second Monday in June and fourth in August, at the Court-House in the city 
of Troy. 

Stated Chancery Terms. 

On the second Monday in February and second Monday in December, at (he 
capitol in the city of Albany; and on the Wednesday afier the second Montlay 
in June, and Wednesday after the third Monday in August, at the CourtrHouse 



NEW-yORK STATE COURTS. 353 

in the cily of Troy. The daj's of hearing motions and petitions by a standing 
rule of the Court of Clianeery in tlie Third Circuit, are tlie second and fourth 
Tuesdays of eacli montli. 

Fourth Cikcuxt. 

Essex — Tliird Tuesday in January and last Tuesday save one in June, at flie 
Court-House in Jiilizabethtovvn. 

Clinton — Fourth Tuesday in January and last Tuesdaj- in June, at the Court- 
House in Flatlsburg'h. 

Fmnklin — Next Wednesday but one afler the fourth Tuesday in January and 
first Wednesday in July, at the Court-IIouse in Malone. 

St. Lawrence — First Tuesday in February and second Tuesday in July, at 
the Court-House in Canton. 

Herlciniei — I'irst i\loiu!;iy in Ai)ril and third Mondu.y in September, at the 
Court-House in Herkimer. 

Montg-oniery — Seconil ATonday in May and third Monday in November, at 
the Court-House in the village of i'onda, in the town of Mohawk. 

Fulton — Wednesday after the thinl Moniiay in IMaj^, and Wednesday after 
the fourth Monday in November, at the Court-House in Johnstown. 

Saratoga — I'ourth M(jnduy in May and first Monday in December, at the 
Court-House in Ballston 8j)a. 

Warren — Thursday b(-fore the second Monday in June, and Wednesday after 
tlie second Monday in October, at the Court-H(juse in Caldwell. 

Washington — Second Monday in June, at the Court-House in the town of 
Kingsbury, and iirst Montkiy in October at the Court-House in Salem. 

Staled Chancery Terms. 
Tiie first Monday in February, at the Court-House in Canton, in the county 
of St. Lawrence. The last Tuesday in Ai)ril, the first Tuesday in September, 
ami the last Tuesday in October, at the Court-House in Eallsion Si)a. 

Special Cliuncenj Terms, 

Will be held at (he times and places ajjpoinfed for holding (he Circuit Courts 
in each county, but no t!(>croe will be taken at such Chancery terms, (unless 
by consent,) excejit in cases wherein tlic bill of complaint shall ha\ e been ta- 
ken asconfesseil, anil in cases of mortgage foreclosure. 

Law Terms. 
Forbearing cases, bills of exception, is.c., will be licld at the times and 
places of tlie staletl Chancery terms; and also at the office of the Circuit Judge, 
in Saratoga Springs, on the days appointed by the third staiuling rule of the 
Court of Cliancerj' for hearing motions and petitions before the Vice-Chan- 
ce Uor. 

Fifth Circuit. 

Olsogo County — On the Tuesday next after the second Mondays in April and 
September, at the Court-House. 

Matlison County — On the fourth Mondays of March, and tlie third Mondays 
of Se|)'cml)er, at the Courl-House. 

Oneida County — On the third jMonday of April, at the Court-House in 
Rome, in 1S13, and at the Court-House in Whitesboro in 18-14, and on tlie fourili 
Monday of September at the academy in Utica. 

J etlerson County — On the third Mondays of June and December, at the Court- 
House. 

Lewis County — On the Thursdays next before tlie tliinl ]\Iond;iys of June 
and Decenib' r, at the Court-House. 

Oswego Coun'y — On (he fourth Mondays of June, at the Court-Hnuse in Os- 
wego, and the fourlh McHulaysof December, at the Court-House in Richland. 

'l"he staled terms of tiie Court of Chancery for the Otli Circuit, will be held on 
the first Mondays of September, December and March, and on the fourth Mon- 
ilays of July, at the academy in Utica. 

Law terms for hearing of cases, &c. will be heUl at the same times and place* 
as the Chancery terms. 

30* 



354 NEW-YORK STATE COURTS. 

Sixth Circuit. 

Chenango Countj^ — On the fourth Mondays in January^and tlie first Mondays 
in August, at the Court-House m Norwich. 

Tompkins County — On the second Mondays in February, and on the third 
Mondays in August at the Court-House in Ithaca. 

Tioo-a County — On the fourth Mondays in February, and fourth Mondays in 
August, at the Court-House in Owego. 

Broome County — On the second Mondays in May, and the third Mondays in 
November, at the Court-House in Binghamton. 

Chemung County — On the fifth Monday in May, for the year 1843, and the 
fourth Monday in May for the year 1844, and on the last Mondays in Septem- 
ber, at the Court-House in Elmira. 

Livingston County — On the first Mondays in June and first Mondays in Oc- 
tober, at the Court-House in Geneseo. 

Cattaraugus County — On the second Mondays in June, and second Mondays 
in October, at the Court-House in Ellicottville. 

Allegany County — On the third Mondays in Jime, and third Mondays in Oc- 
tober, at the Court-House in Angelica. 

Steuben County — On the fourtli ftlondays in June, and fourth Mondays in Oc- 
tober, at the Court-House in Bath. 

Chancery Terms. 

Tompkins County — On the tliird Mondays in February, at tlie Court-House 
in Ithaca. 

Broome County — On Saturdays after the second Mondays in May, at the 
Court-House in Binghamton. 

Tioga County — On Saturdays after the fourth Rlondays in August, at the 
Court-House in Owego. 

Chenango County — On the second IMondays in November, at the Court-House 
in Norwich. 

Law Terms. 

First Mondays in February, May and December, and tiiird Mondays in Au- 
gust, at the office of the Circuit Judge in Greene. 

Seventh Circuit. 

In the county of Cortland — On the last Monday in March, and on the last 
Monday in August. 

Onontlaga — On the second Monday in April and on the second Monday in 
September. 

Cayuga — On the second Monday in February and on the first Monday in Au- 
gust. 

Seneca — On the fourth Monday in May at the Court-House in Ovid, and on 
the second Monday in November, at tlie Court-House in Waterloo. 

Ontario — On the first Monday in May and on the second Monday in October. 

Yates — On the first Monday in October, and on the thiivl Monday in May. 

Wayne' — On the fourth Monday in February and on tlie third Monday in Au- 
gust. 

The times and places for holding the stated Equity Terms are on tlic first 
Monday in February, on the second Monilay in May, on the fourth Monday in 
July, and on the fourth Monday in October, at tlie Court-House in Auburn. 

And the times and places for hearing special motions in Chancery are on the 
second and fourth Tuesdays of each month, at the Syracuse House in Syracuse. 

The law motion days for hearing cases under the act in relation to Circuit 
Courts, passed in 183:^, are on the fourth Tuesdays of each montli, at the place 
last aforesaid. 

Eighth Circuit. 

Chautauque— On the fourth Monday of January, and second Tuesday in July, 
in each year. 

In Monroe— On the first Tuesday in February and fourth Tuesday in Sep- 
tember. 

In Orleans— On the third Tuesday in February and second Tuseday in Octo- 
ber. 



NEW-YORK STATE COURTS. 355 

In Genesee— On the fourth Tuesday of February, ami second Tuesday in 
September. 

In Wyoming — On tlie first Monday in IMarcli, and third Monday in Septem- 
ber. 

In Niagara — On the second Monday in Marcli and first Monday in October. 

In Erie — On the last Tuesday in March, and tliird Tuesday in November. 

Courts for hearing: special motions for new trials will be held on the first 
Thursdays in January, May, August and November, at the Courl-Ilouse in 
Locliport. 



Superior Court. 

'*' The Superior Court of the city of New York," having jurisdiction only 
in tliat city and county, sits on the first Monday of every month; the terms con- 
tinue four weeks. 

?aniuel Jones, Chief Justice, 

Thomas J. Oakley, and ) . • t t .• 

Aaron Vanderpoel, \ Associate Justices. 

Charles A. Clinton, Clerk. 

J. Prescott Hall, Rejjorter. 

The alternate terms commencing with January, which is an Argument Term, 
are Argument Terms. Causes may be noticeil for trial and tried during the se- 
cond week of Argument Terms. 



The Court of Common Pleas for the city and county of New-York, sits every 
month, commencing on the thiril Monday; tlie terms continue four weeks. 
Micliael UlshoetTer, First Judge. 
William Incrlis, } . ■ ^ t i 

Daniel P. Ingraham, \ ^sssociate Judges. 
Nathaniel Jarvis, Clerk of the city and county of New-York. 



The Court of General Sessions ioT Xhe city and county of New- York, com- 
mences on the first Monday of every month, and may continue until the third 
Saturday thereafter, and is holden by Frcdericlc A. Tallmadge, Recorder of flie 
city, assisted by the Aklermen. Henry Vantlervoort, Clerk. 



The Court of Special Sessions for the city and county of New-York, is lioklen 
by tlie Recorder, assisted by two of the Aldermen of the city. It is held on 
the Friday after the a<ljournment of the General Sessions. 

Henrj' Vantlervoort, Clerk. 



" The Marine Court" of the city of New-York, having jurisdiction in all 
actions of tlebt uniier one hundred dollars, and in suits by seamen for damages 
to any amount — sits every liay. 

Judah Hammond, 'i 

David Ranilull, [-Judges. 

Al])heus Sherman, ) 

Abraham As:en, Clerk. 

Abraham V. Barbiere, Assistant Clerk. 



Courts of Cominon Pleas and General .Sessions. 

liken the month is printed in italic, the Common Pleas only is held in that term. 

Albany, id Tuesday in June and December, and 'M in March and September. 

Allegany, 1st Monday in February, Juno anil October. 

Broome, 1st Monday in February, June anil October. 

Cat'araugus, last Tuesday in January, ;id in June, and 1st in October. 

Cayuga, 3d Monday in January, May and September. 



3-56 NEW-VORK STATE COURT'S, 

Chaufauqiie, 2d Tuesday in February and October, and 4th in June. 

Chemung-, 2tl Tuesday in Januaiy, April, July anil October. 

Chenango, 2d Monday in I'ebrnary, June and October. 

Clinton, 1st ftlonday in January and October, and 2d in May. 

Columbia, 3d Monday in February ami Jvme, and 4th in September. 

Cortland, 2d Tuesilay in February, April antl September. 

Delaware, 4th Monday in February, 3d in June, and 2d in September and De- 
cember. 

Dutchess, 1st Monday in February and June, and last in September. 

Erie, 1st Monday in March, June and Ociober, and 2d in August and Novem- 
ber. 

Essex, 2d Tuesday in January and April, antl last in September. 

Franklin, las-t Tuesday in April and 2d in October. 

Fulton, 3d Monday in January, and 1st in April, August and October. 

Genesee, 1st Tuestlay in February, and 2d in June and October. 

Greene, 2d Monday in February, last in May and 1st in September. 

Hamilton, 3d Tuesday in June and December. 

Herkimer, 1st Monday in February, Jime antl October. 

Jefferson, last Monday in February and May, and 1st in September and Decem- 
ber. 

Kings, 3d Tuesday in January, April, July and October. 

I^ewis, 1st Tuesdajr in January, and 3il in April and Sei)tember. 

Livingston, lastMonday in January, May and September. 

Madison, 1st Monday in February anil October, and 3d in June. 

Monroe, 2d Monday in March, 2d in June, and 1st in October and December. 

Montgomery, 2d Monday in March, June, Se])lember and December. 

New-York, courts of common i)leas, 3d Monday in every month; general ses- 
sions and superior court, 1st Monday in every month. 

Niagara, 1st Montlay in I'ebruarj", June and September. 

Oneida, 2d Monday in February, March, June, September and December. 

Onondaga, 4th Monday in February, May, August and November. 

Ontario, 3d Tuesday in February, May, August and November. 

Orange, 2il Monday in February, last in May, and Isl in September and Dec. 

Orleans, 3d Monday in January, June and September. 

Oswego, 3d Monday in February and September, 1st in June and 2d in Dec. 

Otsego, 1st Monday in February, 3d in June and 2d in October. 

Putnam, 1st Tuesday in February anil 2d in September. 

Queens, 3d Tuesday in February, 1st in June and last in October. 

Rensselaer, lastMonday in January, May and September. 

Richmond, 2d Tuesday in April, September and December. 

Rockland, 1st Tuesdaj' in February, and 3d in April and November. 

St. Lawrence, 3d IMonday in May, September and December. 

Saratoga, 2d Tuesday in April and July, and last in August and December. 

Schenectady, 3d Tuesday in January, last in Ai)ril and 2d in October. 

Schoharie, 1st IMonday in I'ebruary, June and October. 

Seneca, 1st Tuesday in February and October, and 2d in May. 

Steuben, 1st Monday in March, June, September and December. 

Suffolk, 1st Tuesday in January and October, and last in May. 

Sullivan, last Tuesday in January, and 2d in June and October. 

Tioga, 1st Monday iii I'ebruary, Juno and October. 

Tompkins, 4th Monday in January and Sejifember, and 3d in May. 

Ulster, 2d Monday in March, Juno, Septcmbtr and December. 

Warren, 2d Tuesday in February and June, 3d in April and last in September. 

Washington, 2d Tuesday in March, last in May and August, and 1st in Dec. 

Wayne,"4lh Tuesday in January, Rlay and Septendjer. 

Westchester, 4lh Monday in May and September, and 1st in December. 

Wyoming, 1st Monday in June, and 3d in October and February. 

Ya'es, 2d Monday in February and November, and 4tli in May and August. 



COUNTY OFFICERS, ATTORNEYS, i&c. 



.Judges, District Jlltorneys, County Clerks, County Trea- 
surers, Surrogates, S/ierilf's and Deputy SheriJ/s, Coro- 
ners, Masters and Examiners in Chancery, <§'c. Together 
with an alphabetical list of Attorneys in the several coun- 
ties in the State. 

3IoJlf:s of appointment and term ot oflice. 

County Judges — Appointed by the Senate, on the nomination of the Gover- 
nor, for a term of 5 years. 

District Attorneys — Appointed by the Judges of the County Courts, during 
pleasure. 

County C/erfc^Elected by the people for a term of 3 year-s. 

County Treasurer — Appointed by the Board of Supervisors. 

Sheriffs — FJected by the people for a term of 3 yeai-s, and then ineligible for 
3 years. They appoint their own deputies. 

Coroners — Elected same as the SherilT. 

Surrogates — Appointed by the Senate, on the nomination of the Governor, for 
a term of 4 years. 

Masters -and Examiners in Chancery — Appointed by the Senate, on the nomi- 
-nation of the Governor, for a tei-m of 3 years. 

Supreme Court Coinmissioncrs — Appointed by the Senate, on the nomination 
of the Ciovcrnor, for a term of 2 years. 

Recorders — Appointed by the Senate, on the nomination of the. Governor, for 
.a term of 5 years. 

New appointments in 1843 are marked thus (•). 
Re-appointments in 1843 are marked thus (1). 

la^LBANY COUNTY. 

Judges . 
Peter Gansevoort,* (^First Judge,) Albany. 
•Jloberl J. Hilton, t Albany. Kob't VV. Murphev, Rensselaerville. 

John Q. Wilson, Albany. Wm. N. Sill, Bethlehem. 

District y/Uvrney — Henry G. Wheaton, Albany. 

County Clerk. — Henry 15. Hasweli, Albany. 

Treasurer — James Kidd, Albany. 

Surrogate — -Moses Patten, Albany. 

Sheriff — Amos Adams, Albany. 

I'nder Sheriff — Charles Coiikiin, Albany. 

Deputy Sheriffs. 
•fohn D. Livincrslon, Albany. Thomas B. Slilwell, Albany. 

Cornolius G. VV^aklron, Albany. Samuel AValley, Bethlehem. 
John J Colvln, Coeymaiis. James C. Ramsey, New-Scotland. 

Peter Siver, Guilderland Centre. Robert Williams, West-Tro}'. 



858 



COUNTY OFFICERS, ATTORNEYS, &C. 



Coroners. 
Benoni C. Allen, Albany. John McDowell, Albany. 

Wesley Blaisdell, Canymans. Jonathan H. Dyer, Watervliet* 

Hecorder of Albany — William Parmelee, Albany. 

Masters- in Chancery. 

Dennis B.. Gaffney,* Albany. John C. Yates,* Albany. 

John V. L. Pruyn,* Albany. Arthur C. Soiitlnvick,* Albany. 

Albert D. Robinson,* Albany. 

Examiners in Chancery. 

Sylvanus H. H. Parsons, Albany, James Gough,* Albany. 
Abraham Van Vechten, Albany. 

Supreme Court Comvdssioners. 

Recorders and County Judges, of the degree of Counsellor at Laws 
have the powers of Supreme Court Commissioners. (2d li. S. page 
281, § 32.) 

Comviissioners of Deeds. 

Rulandus Le Grand Bancroft, Charles Bryan, Frederick W. Cole 
John B. Frisby, Garrit Gates, Anthony Gould, John E. Hermans* 
Rodman L. Joice, Lemuel Jenkins, Origen A. Kingsley, Abraham 
Morrell, Oran Ott, Edwerd B. Peck, Jacob N. Settle, Lansing Van 
Wie, Elias Warner, Horace Wyman, Robert D. Watson. 

Note — The above office is abolished in towns, and their powers and: 
duties are executed by Justices of the Peace. (See Laws of 1840, chap. 
239, p. 187.) 

Commissioners to take Acknowledgment of Deeds for other States. 
Epaphras J. Sherman, for Connecticut. 
Robert J. Hilton j do 



Attorneys. 



City of .dlbany. 
Allen, Otis 
Allen & Hastings 
Barker, Geo. P"; (Att'y Gen.) 
Barker &. Smith, 
Barnard, Daniel D. 
Benedict, Lewis, jr. 
Blanchard, Anthony 
Blanchard &. Wyman 
Bramhall, Charles H.. 
Burton, John L 
Burwell, Dudley 
Cady, Daniel 
Cagg^er, Peter 
Cantine, Willinm R. 
Carmichael, Peter 
Cassidy, Vv'^illiam 
Cheever, Samuel 
Cheever&t Wells, 
Colt, Joseph S. 
Colvin, Andrew J. 
Colvin &. James, 
Colvin, Henry J. 



Cowen, Sidney J. 

Davis John 

Dean, Amos 

Dean & NewlanJ, 

]3enniston, Gerrit V. 

Doolittle, Edwin A. 

Edwards, Isaac 

Edwards, James 

P^dwards & Meads 

FaTriugton, Thos. (State Treas. 

Ferguson, Fenner 

Ford, John W. 

French, James M. 

Frotliingham, Wm. W. 

Frothingham &, Lansing 

Gaflhey, Dennis B. 

Gansevoort, Peter 

Gansevoort &. Hill 

Gough, James 

Groesbeck, Stephen 

Hadlev, William J. 

Hall, Willis 

Hammond,. Samuel H 



COUNTY OFFICERS, ATTORNEYS, &:c. 



559 



Harris, Ira 

Harris & Shepard 

ilastiugs, Frederick H. 

Hawley, Gtideon 

Hawley, Henry Q. 

Hawley &. Young 

Hawley, Nathan 

Hermans, John E. 

Hisgins, Solomon F.