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.# 









THE NEW YOHK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

A8TOR. LPK'Oy ANC 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

A8T0R. LTK'nx »NC 



tZ79/ll i'jf'''' v.„*l, r 




N.z: 



NORTH ISLAND. 




MAP OF NORTH ISLAND OF NEW ZEALAND SHOWING UND DISTRICTS 

iSu Part IV.) 



THE 



NEW ZEALAND 

OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK 

1 9 O 6 . 

FIRTEENXH YEAR OF 133UE:^ 



PBBPABED UNDEB INSTBUOTIONS FBOM THB 

HoNOUBABLB SiR J, G. WARD, K.C.M.G., 

PBIME MINISTER, 
BT 

R. J. VON DADELSZBN, 

BBQISTBAB-OBNEBAL . 



¥ 




WELLINGTON, N.Z. 

BT AUTHOBITT: JOHN MAOKAT, OOVBBNMBNT PBINTBR. 

LOHDOH: BTBB and SPOTTISWOODB, FLBST STBBBT, B.C. 

1906, 



TWE NEW YORK 

PUBUC LIBRARY 



rrOR. LENOX ~AN 
TILOEN FO(j NOATION*. 



PBEFACB. 



Thb work now put forward is the fifteenth issue of the New 
Zealand Official Tear-book. 

All the matter contained in it has been previously arranged in 
tbe form of pamphlets of " Advance Sheets/' according to the usual 
course. 

It has been found impossible to introduce the results of the 
census of April, 1906, except as to the populations of counties and 
boroughs, further particulars not being yet tabulated. The im- 
portant work of compiling the statistics of manufactories and the 
great primary industries — information for which is obtained by 
means of the Census Enumerators — is now proceeding, and will be 
ready for publication next year. 

E. J. VON DADELSZEN. 
Begistrar-Oeneral's Office, 

Wellington, N.Z., 29th September, 1906. 



CONTENTS.- 



Pabt I— Ibtroductobt: Official. 

Page 

KewZealand 1 

Sacoessive Qovernon 19 

Sapreme Court Jodget, Past and Preaent . . SI 

EzeoQtiTe Coonoils, 1848-M.. .. 32 

Parliaments 88 

SnooassiTe Minittriea 24 

Pnmiexi 86 

Speakers of the Legislative Council 85 

Speakers of the Honae of Representatives . . 86 

Foreign Consols 86 

The Colonial Office .. 38 

Crown Agents for the Colonies 89 

Honours held hy Colonists 89 

Governor of New 2^1and SO 

Ezeontive Council, April, 1906 81 

The General Assemhly .. 88 

Official LUt 87 

Ecclesiastical .. .. 61 

Defences, Military and Naval 68 

Depots for Shipwrecked Mariners 66 

Graving-docks and Patent Slips . . 69 

Harhoars, PUotage, Port Charges, Ao. .. 78 

Lighthouses . . 85 

New Zealand Newspapers 87 

The Customs Taiiff of New Zealand 94 

Exemptions from Duties of Customs 108 

Excike Duties . . 109 

Timber-export Duties .. 110 

*' Preferential and Reciprocal Trade Act, 1908 " . . Ill 

Fees payable under Land Transfer Act 118 

Duties on Estates of Deceased Persons 114 



Becti 



Pabt II.— Statistical. 

I. Education 115 

II. Law and Crime . . 144 

III. Local Governing Bodies .. 159 

IV. Licenses and Licensed Houses 198 
V. Meteorology . . 200 

VI. Vital Statistics . . . . . . 807 

VI f. Imports: Customs and Excise Revenue 255 

VJIL Exports, and Total Trade 290 

IX. TiansporK and Communication 825 

X. Manufactories and Works 885 

XI. Labour Laws 858 

XII. Occupation of Land ; and Live-stock 860 



00NTBNT8. 



Pafs 

SeoiioD XIII. Agrioulture .. 874 

;XIV. Mining . . .. 887 

XV. Aooumalaiion : Prioes and Wages . . 899 
XVI. Finance— 

Subsection A. — RcTenue and Expenditure of the 

General Qovernment . . . . 418 

• B.— Taxation 484 

C— Public Debt .. .. .. 487 

XVII. Population . . . . 454 

» XVIII. Representation .. .. .. .. .. 470 

XIX. Grown Lands . . . . . . . . . . 484 

• XX. Land for Settlements . . . . . . . . 490 

, XXI. Government Valuation of Land and its Improvements 495 
l^pplemental : Statistical View of Fifty Years' Progress of New 

Zealand, &c. . . . . . . . . . . . . 588 

Pabt III.— Abtiolbs on Spboial Subjects. 

Section I.— 

The Land System of New Zealand . . . . . . . . 551 

Advances to Settlers . . . . . . . . 564 

The Land and Income Tax Assessment. . . . 578 

** The Government Valuation of Land Act, 1896 " . . 581 

Rating on Unimproved Value of Land . . . . . . 581 

State Fire Insurance . . . . . . . . 58S 

Old-age Pensions . . . . . . . . . . 584 

Preferential and Reciprocal Trade 589 

Section II.— 

Agriculture in New Zealand . . 590 

Tree-planting .. .. .. .. 611 

iSection III.— 

The Mineral Waters of New Zealand . . 616 

Other Government Tourist and Health Resorts . . . . . . 684 

A Day on White Island .. .. .. 687 

Maori Marriage Customs . . 688 

Pabt IV.— Dbsobiftions of Land Distbicts. 

Auckland Land District . . . . 646 

Taranaki Land District . . . . 660 

Hawke's Bay Land District . . 668 

Wellington Land District . . 678 

Marlborough Land District . . . . 685 

Nelson Land District . . . . 691 

Westland Land District . . . . . . . . . . 696 

Canterbury Land District . . . . 707 

Otago Land District . . . . . . . . . . 717 

Southland Land District . . 727 



Annexed Islands. 



Oook and other Annexed Pacific Islands 



733 



Appendix. 
Dates of certain Principal Events in the History of New Zealand 



744 



(General Index 



759 



Maps ahd Diagbams. 



THE 



NEW ZEALAND 

OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK 

1906. 



ADDENDA ET CORRIGENDA. 



Paqs 24. — Sixteenth ParliiLmerii : Firat seFiioQ opc^ned 2Tth June, I9Q6 ; pro- 
roguod 3rd July, 1906. Second aeision opened 21st Augnat, 1906 » 

Pe^ge 25« — SuccesBive Ministries: Beddon Ministry resigned owiog to dearth of 
Right Hon. R. J. Seddon, 2U6 June, 1006. 28 Hall Jones— &«8umed ofaoe 
2lic Juti«, 1906; resigned 6th Augtiat, 1906. 29 Ward— aasttitied oifioa 
6bb August, 1906. 

PremierA of Suoc^ssive MiniBtrieB: Hon. William Hall- Jonoi ; Sir 
Joaeph George Ward, JC.O.M.G. 

Page 26.— Speakers ol tbe House of RepreHentatWes : Arthur Robert Guinneas, 
29fcb November, 1905 ; reappoimed 27&k Jyno, 1906. 

Foreign CodruIh: Coniiul for Puragnav, A. E Kernot, Wellington; 
Consul General for Belgium (with juri&idiction over the Provincial Dis- 
tricts of Hawko's Bhv, Taratiaki, and Wellington), Hon. Charles John 
JohBston, MXC.» Wellington; Actiitg-C mgultir Agent for France* John 
We^^ley Budtlio^ Chriftt^htiroh ; G nBUl General for Norway for Australia 
and New Zeal^tnd, O- R5mckf, M«liKiuriie; Vice Consul for Norway for 
Australia and New ZeaUnd, J Gunderson, Melbourne; Vice naul Eoi 
Norway, Roland St. Ciai% AuckUud ; Consul for Norway, A. W, Newton, 
Wellington; Vice Confiul fur A '■gen tine Rppubbo at Dunedin (with juris- 
diotino over Naw Zeiland), Hrtn. T. F«rgu8 ; Honorary Oon«iilfl for OfriM, 
George Dunoet, Auckianl, Harold Beau^^hamp, Wellington, J. G. F. 
Palm^-r* Christchuroh, J. A. Roh^ris, Dunedin ; Consular Agent for 
United States of America, J. G. Duncan, Wellington. 

C insular A^ent for United States of Amerioft ftt Dunedin : F. 0. 
Bridgeman, 7u>t Bndgman* 

Page 33.— Members of the Leg'slative Council : Hon. D. Pinkerton, died 23rd 
June, 1906; Hon. F. Arkvvright, resigned. 

Page 35. — ^Members of the House of Repre'^eniative'^ : Speaker, Arthur Robert 
Guinnes^i; Chairman of Committees^ Roderick McKenzie. 

M mber for Wangaoui : Hogan, James Thomas, not Hogan, John 
Thomas. 

Page 36.— Member for Weetland ; Be'ldon, Thomas Edward Youd, elected in 
place of the late Righc. Hon. R. J. Seddon. 

Member for Kaipara : Stall worthy ^ John, not Sballworthy, John A. 

Page 43. — ^Under-Seorelar; Native Department i H. F. Edger. 

Page 56. — Surveyor-General ; T» Humphries. 



TH£ NE^^'' YOKTs.! 

PUBLIC LIBRA A Y; 



A8T0R. LENC-*' ^■<^ 




L 



OF MIDDLE ISLAND OF NEW ZEALAND SHOWING UNO DISTRICTS 

(S4t Part ir.) 



THE 

NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOR, 

1906. 



PART I.-INTRODUCTORY: OFFICIAL 



NEW ZB-ALAND. 

Thb Colony of New Zealand consists of three main islands, with 
several groups of smaller islands lying at some distance from the 

Cincipal group. The main islands, known as the North, the 
iddle, and Stewart Islands, have a coast-line 4,330 miles in 
length: North Island, 2,200 miles; Middle Island, 2,000 miles; 
aod Stewart Island, 130 miles. Other islands included within the 
colony are the Chatham, Auckland, Campbell, Antipodes, Bounty, 
and Kermadec Islands. The annexation of the Cook and sundry 
other islands has necessitated an enlargement of the boundaries of 
the colony, which will be specially treated of further on. 

New Zealand is mountainous in many parts, but has, never- 
theless, large plains in both North and Middle Islands. In the 
North Island, which is highly volcanic, is situated the famous 
Thermal- Springs District, of which a special account will be given. 
The Middle Island is remarkable for its lofty mountains, with their 
magnificent glaciers, and for the deep sounds or fiords on the western 
coast. 

New Zealand is firstly a pastoral and secondly an agricultural 
country. Sown grasses are grown almost everywhere, the extent of 
land laid down being more than twelve and a half millions of acres. 
The soil is admirably adapted for receiving these grasses, and, after 
the bush has been burnt off, is mostly sown over without previous 
ploughing. In the Middle Island a large area is covered with 
native grasses, all used for grazing purposes. The large extent of 
good grazing- land has made the colony a great wool, meat, and 
dairy-produce country; while its agricultural capabilities are, speak- 
ing generally, very considerable. The abundance of water and 
the quantity of valuable timber are other natural advantages. 
1— Ybk. 



WBW ZRAI*AND OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK. 



New Zealand is, besides, a mining country. Large deposits of 
coal are met with, chiefly ou the west coast of the Middle Island. 
Gold* alluvial and in quartz, is found in both Islands, the yield 
having been over sixty-seven millions sterling in value to the pre- 
sent time. ¥uU statistical information on this subject is given 
further on, compiled up to the latest dates. 

Disco VEKY and Early Settlement. 

The first authentic account of the discovery of New Zealand is 
that given by Abel Jansen Tasman, the Dutch navigator. He left 
Batavia on the l^th August, 1642, in the yacht " Heemskirk," 
accompanied by the " Zeehaen *' (or ** Sea- hen *') fly-boat. After 
having visited Mauritius, and discovered Tasmania, named by 
him ** Van Diemen's Laud,** in honour of Anthony van Diemen, 
Governor of the Dutch possessions in the East Indies, he steered 
eastward, and on the 13th December of the same year sighted the 
west coast of the Middle Island of New Zealand, described by Mm 
as "a high mountainous country, which is at present marked in 
the charts as New Zealand." 

Tasman, under the belief that the land he saw belonged to a 
great polar continent, and was part of the country discovered some 
years before by Schouten and Le Mai re, to which the name of 
Staaien Land had been given, gave the same name of Staaten 
Land to New Zealand ; but within about three months afterwards 
Schouten's *' Staaten Land*' was found to be merely an inconsider- 
able island. Upon this discovery being aunouncetJ, the country 
that Tasman liad called Staaten Land received again the name 
of ** New Zealand," by which it has ever since been known. Tasman 
sailed along the coast to a bay, w^here he anchored. To this he 
gave the name of Murderers (now Massacre) Bay, on account of 
an unprovoked attack on a boat's crew by the Natives, and the 
massacre of four white men. Thence he steered along the west 
coast of the North Island, and gave the name of Cape Maria van 
Diomen to the north-western extremity thereof. After sighting 
the islands of the Three Kings he finally departed, not having set 
foot in the country. 

There is no record of any visit to New Zealand after Tasmaa'e 
departure until the time of Captain Cook, who, after leaving the 
Society Islands, sailed in search of a southern continent then 
believed to exist. He sighted land on the 6th October, 1769, at 
Young Nick's Head, and on the 6th of that month cast anchor in 
Poverty Bay. After having coasted round the North Island and the 
Middle and Stewart Islands — which last he mistook for part of the 
Middle Island — he took his departure from Cape Farewell on the 
3l8t March, 177Q, for Australia, He visited New Zealand again in 
1773, in 1774, and in 1777. 

M. de Surville, a French officer in command of tlie vessel ** Saint 
Jean Baptiste,*' while on a voyage of discovery, sighted the north- 
east coast of New Zealand on the 12th December, 1769, and re- 



OOLONIBATION. 



3 



rained for a short time, A visit was soon after paid by another 
&nch officer, M. Marion du Fresne, who arrived on the west coast 
North Island of New Zealand on the 24th March, 1772, but 
was, OD the 12th June following, treacherously raurdered at the Bay 
of Islands by the Natives, 

In 1793 the **D£edalus," nuder the command of Lieutenant 
Hanson, was sent by the Government o£ New South Wales to New 
[Zealand, and two chiefs were taken thence to Norfolk Island. 
There was after this an occasional intercourse between the islands 
of New Zealand and the English settlements in New South 
Wales. 

Id 1814 the first missionaries arrived in New Zealand — Messrs, ! 
Hall and Kendall — who had been sent as forerunners by Mr, 
Marsden, chaplain to the New South Wales Government. After 
a short stay they returned to New South Wales, and on the 19th 
November of that year again embarked in company with Mr. 
laxsden. who preached his first sermon in New Zealand on Christ- 
mas Day, 1814. He returned to Sydney on ihe 23rd March, 1815, 
Heaving Messrs. Hall and Kendall, who formed the first mission 
ivtion at Rangihoua, Bay of Islands, under the auspices of the 
Church Missionary Society. Six years later, in 1821, the work of 
srangeliEatioo was put on a more durable basis; but the first station 
of the Wesley an mission, established by Mr. Leigh and his wife, at 
the valley of the Kaeo, Whangaroa, was not taken possession of 
nntU the 10th June, 1823. 

Colonisation. 

The first attempt at colonisation was made in 1825 by a com- 
pany formed in London. An expedition was sent out under the 
command of Captain Herd, who bought two islands in the Haurald 
Gulf and a strip of land at Hokianga. The attempt, however, 
was a failure, owing to the savage character of the inhabitants. 
lo consequence of frequent visits of whaling-vessels to the Bay 
of Islands, a settlement grew up at Kororareka — now called 
lussell — and in 1333 Mr. Busby was appointed British Resident 
Bre. A nuraber of Europeans gradually settled in diflFerent parts 
the country, and married Native women. 

In 1838 a colonisation company, known as the New Zealand 
Dmpany, was formed to establish settlement on systematic prin- 
tiples* A preUminary expedition, under the command of Colonel 
7illiani Wakefield, was despatched from England on the 12th May, 
1839, and arrived in New Zealand in the following August, Having 
chased land from the Natives, Colonel Wakefield selected the i 
lof Port Nicholson, in Cook Strait, as the site of the Erst settle- 
ment* On the 22nd January, 1840, the first body of inimigranta 
rived, and founded the town of Wellington. About the same time 
-namely, on the 29th January, 1840 — Captain Hobson, R.N., 
ived at the Bay of Islands, empowered, with the consent of the 
Natives, to proclaim the sovereignty of Queen Victoria over tha 



I 



4 NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK, 

Islands of New Zealand, and to assume the government thereof. A 
compact called the Treaty of Waitangi, to which in less than six 
months five hundred and twelve names were affixed, was entered 
into, whereby all rights and powers of sovereignty were ceded to the 
Queen, all territorial rights being secured to the chiefs and their 
tribes. New Zealand was then constituted a dependency of the 
Colony of New South Wales, but on the 3rd May, 1841, was pro- 
claimed a separate colony. The seat of Government had been 
previously established at Waitemata (Auckland), round which a 
settlement was formed. 

The New Zealand Company having decided to form another 
settlement, to which the name of "'Nelson** was to be given, de- 
spatched a preliminary expedition from England in April, 184 1» for 
the purpose of selecting a site. The spot chosen was the head of 
Blind Bay, where a settlement was established. About the same 
titvie a number of pioneers anived in Taranaki, despatched thither 
by the New Plymouth Company, a colonising society which had 
been formed in England, and had bought 50,000 acres of land from 
the New Zealand Company. 

The next important event in the progress of colonisation was the 
arrival at Port Chalmers, on the 23rd March, 1848, of the first of 
two emigrant ships sent out by the Otago Association for the 
foundation of a settlement by persons belonging to or in sympathy 
with the Free Church of Scotland. 

In 1849 the '* Canterbury Association for founding a Settlement 
in New Zealand" was incorporated. On the 16th December, 1850, 
the first emigrant ship despatched by the association arrived at Port 
Cooper, and the work of opening up the adjoining country was set 
about in a systematic fashion, the intention of the promoters being 
to establish a settlement complete in itself, and composed entirely 
of members of the then United Church of England and Ireland. 

The Maohib. 

Prior to the colonisation of New Zealand by Europeans, the 
earliest navigators and explorers fonnd a race of people already 
inhabiting both Islands. Papers written in 1874 by Mr. (after- 
wards Sir) William Fox, and Sir l>onald McLean, then Native 
Minister, state that at what time the discovery of these Islands was 
matle by the Maoris, or from what place they came, are matters 
of tradition only, and that much has been lost in the obscurity 
enveloping the history of a people without letters. Nor is there 
anything on record respecting the origin of the Maori people them- 
selves, beyond the general tradition of the Polynesian race, which 
seems to show a series of successive migrations from west to east, 
probably by way of Malaysia to the Pacific. Little more can now 
be gathered from tbetr traditions than that they were immigrants, 
and that they probably found inliabitants on the east coast of the 
North Island belonging to the same race as themselves^the descend- 
ants of a prior migration, whose history is lost. The tradition runs 



BOUNDAKlBb AND AHEA. 



I that, generations ago, the Maoris dwelt in a country named Hawaiki, 
and that one of their chiefs, after a long voyage, reached the northern 
I inland of New Zealand. Betiiniing to his home witli a tiattering 
Kdescription of the country he had discovered, this chief, it is said, 
persuaded a number of his kinsfolk and friends, who were much 
I harassed by war, to set out with a fleet of double canoes for the 
new land. The names of most of the canoes are still remem- 
bered, and each tribe agrees in its account of the doings of the 
people of the principal canoes after their arrival in New Zealand ; 
and from tliese traditional accounts the descent of the numerous 
uibes has been traced. Calculations, based on the genealogical 
staves kept by the tohungast or priests, and on the well-authenticated 
f traditions of the people, indicate that about twenty-one generations 
[have passed since the migration, which may therefore be assumed 
[to have taken place about five hundred and twenty-five years ago. 
The position of the legendary Hawaiki is unknown, but many places 
in the South Seas have been thus named in memory of the mother- 
land. The Maoris speak a very pure dialect of the Polynesian 
[language, the common longue, with more or less variation, in all the 
[eastern Pacific islands. When Captain Cook first visited New 
I Zealand he availed himself of the services of a Native from Tahiti, 
l^'hose speech was easily understood by the Maoris. In this way 
[much information respecting the early history of the country 
and its inhabitants was obtained which could not have otherwise 
been had. 

For results of recent researches as to probable origin and present 
I numbers of the Maoris, see Year-book for 1901. 

" BOUNDAKIES AND ArEA. 

The Proclamation of Captain Hobson on the 30th January, 1840, 

Sve as the boundaries of the colony the following degrees of 
jtude and longitude ; On the north, 34^ 30' S, lat. ; on the 
^ south, iT 10^ S. lat.; on the east, 179" 0' E. long.; on the west, 

166'^ 5' E. long. These limits excluded small portions of the 
I extreme north of the North Island and of the extreme south of 
I Stewart Island. 

[ In April, 1842, by Royal Letters Patent, and again by the 
f Imperial Act 26 and 27 Vict., c. 23 (1863), the bomidaries of the 

colony were altered so as to extend from 33° to 53^ of south lati- 

inde and from 162'^ of east longitude to 173^ of west longitude. 
l3y Proclamation bearing date the 21st July, 1887, the Kermadec 
Llaiands, lying between the 29tli and 32nd degrees of south lati- 
Itude and the 177th and 180th degrees of west longitude^ were 
'declared to be annexed to and to become part of the Colony of New 

Zealand. 
I By Proclamation bearinR date the 10th Jime, 1901, the Cook 
■Group of islands, and all the otlier islands and territories situate 
I within the boundary-lines mentioned in the following Schedule, were 
[included in the Colony of New Zealand:— 



e 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK. 



A line oomzucDoing at a point at tbe iniorscotioD of the tweoty-third degree 
of south latitude and the oDe-hundredaiid'fiftj'Kiitth degree of longitude west of 
Oreenwieh, and proceeding due Dortb to the point of ioterRecticiii of the eighth 
degjree of Routh lacHude and the one-huDdredandBfty sixth dc^gree of longitude 
west of GreenwLoh; thence due weat to the point of iDierfiection of the eighth 
degree of ROULh latitude and the one-hundred-and-Rixly-iieveDth degree of 
loT)gi1ude vest of Greenwich; thence due Fouth to the point of interfiection of 
the seventeeDih degree of south latitude and the one-hundred>and-Bizty-seYentb 
degree of longitude west of Oreenwich ; thence due west lo the point of inter- 
eection of the seventeenth degree of Routb latitude and the one-hundred^and* 
seventieth degree of longitude west of Greenwich ; thence due soytti to the poinl 
of intersection of the twenty- third degree of flouth latitude and the one^hundred- 
and-BBventieth degree of longitude weat of Greenwich; and thence due east to 
the point of interiiieotion of the twenty third degree of south latitude and the 
one-Fiundred-and-fiftyeixtb degree of longitude west ol Greenwich. 

t'lie following now constitute the Colony of New Zealand : — 

1. The island commonly known as the North Island, with its 
adjacent islets, having an aggregate area of 44,468 square miles, or 
28,459,520 acres. 

2. The island known as the Middle Island, with adjacent ialets, 
having an aggregate area of 58,525 square miles, or 37,456,000 acres. 

3. Stewart Island, and adjacent islets, having an area of 665 
square miles, or 425,390 acres. 

4. The Chatlmm Islands, situate 636 miles eastward of Lyttel- 
toD in the Middle Island, with an area of 375 square miles, or 
239,920 acres. 

5. The Auckland Islands, about 200 miles south of Stewart Island, 
extending about 30 miles from north to south, and nearly 15 from 
east to west, the area being 210,650 acres. 

6. The Campbell Islands, in latitude 52"^ 33' south, and longitude 
169"^ 8' west, about 30 miles io circumference, with an area of 45,440 
acres. 

7. The Antipodes Islands, about 458 miles in a south -easterly 
direction from Port Chalmers, in the Middle Island. These are 
detached rocky islands, ajid extend over a distance of between 4 
and 5 utiles from north to south, Area, 12,960 acres. 

8. The Bounty Islands, a small group of islets, thirteen in num- 
ber, lying north of the Antipodes Islands, and about 415 miles in 
an east-south-easterly direction from Port Chalmers, Area, 3,300 
acres. 

9. The Kermadec Islands, a group lying about 614 miles to the 
north-east of Eussell, in the Bay of Islands. Baou! or Sunday 
Island, the largest of these, is about 20 miles in circuit. The next 
in size is Macaulay Island, about 3 miles round. Area of the group^ 
8,208 acres, 

10. Islands forming the Cook Group: — 

Barotmiga, — Distance from AuckUnd, 1,638 mitea ; circumference, 

QO miles ; height. 2,920 fu 
Mangaia, — DUtance from PUrotonga, 110 miles j circumference, 

30 miles; height, 656 :t. 
Aiiu. — Diatftnoe from R&rotonga, 116 mile^ : ciroumferenoe, 20 milea; 

height, 374 fL 



ABE A OK COMMONWEALTH STATE8 OF AUSTRALIA. 7 

AittUaki. — DiBtanoe from RarotoDga, 140 milea ; oiroumferenoe, 

13 mileR: height, 866 ft. 
Mauke, — Distance from Barotonga, 150 miles ; oiroumferaDce, 6 miles ; 

height, ahoat 60 f s. 
MUiaro. — Distance from Rarotonga, 140 miles ; circumference, 5 miles ; 

height, about 50 ft. 
TakuUa — Distant from Rarotooga, 126 miles. 
The Herveys (^thnuae and ilou^u).~Didtanc from Rarotonga, 120 miles. 

Total area of above Group, 150 square miles. 
11. Islands outside the Cook Group : — 

Savage or Nine. — Distance from Rarotonga, 580 miles ; oiroumferenoe, 

40 mileii ; height, 200 ft. ; area, abjut 100 square miles. 
PalmersUm. — Didthnce from Rjirotonga, 273 miles ; au atoll, 4 miles 

by 2 miled. 
Penrhjftt, or Tongareva, — Distance 735 miles from Rarotonga ; an atoll, 

12 miles by 7 miles. 
Humphrey f or Manahiki, --Distance from Rarotonga, 650 miles ; an 

atoU, 6 miles by 5 milts. 
Rierson^ or i2a/caan^a.— Distance from Rarotonga, 670 miles ; an atoll, 

3 miles by 3 miles. 
Danger^ or Pukapuka, — Distance from Rarotonga, 700 milei ; an atoll, 

3 miles by 8 miles. 
Suwarrow. — Distance from Rarotonga, 530 miles; au atoll. 

Total area of islands outside the Cook Group, 130 square miles. 

The total area of the colony is thus about 104,751 square miles, 
of which the aggregate area of the outlying groups of islands that 
are practically useless for settlement amounts to about 498 square 
miles. 

Area of tJie Commonwealth States of Australia. 

The areas of the several Australian States, as stated by different 
authorities, vary considerably. The total area of the Australian 
Continent is given as 2,944,628 square miles, according to a com- 
putation made by the late Surveyor-General of Victoria, Mr. J. A. 
Skene, from a map of Continental Australia compiled and engraved 
under his direction; but the following areas are taken from the 
latest official records of each colony : — 

Square Miles. 
Queensland .. .. .. 668,497 

New South Wales . . . . 310,700 

Victoria .. .. .. .. .. 87,884 

South Australia 903,690 

Western Australia . . . . 976,920 



Total, Continent of Australia 2,946,691 

Tasmania .. .. .. .. 26,215 



Total, Commonwealth of Australia . . 2,972,906 

The size of these States (with New Zealand) may be better realised 
by comparison of their areas with those of European countries. 
The areas of the following countries — Austria-Hungary, Germany, 
France, Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Sweden and Norway, Portu- 
gal, Spain, Italy (including Sardinia and Sicily), Switzerland, Greece, 



8 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAK-BOOK. 



Roumanian BDlgaria, Servia^ Eastern Roumelia, and Turkey in 
Europe — containing on the whole rather less than 1,600,000 square 
miles, amount to httle more than hall the extent of the Australian 
Continent. If the area of Kussia in Europe be added to those of 
the other conn idea the total would be about one-seventh larger 
than the Australian Continent, and about one-twelfth larger than 
the Australian States, with New Zealand. 

Arm of the Colony of Neio Zealaiul, 

The area of the Colony of New Zealand is about one-seventh 
less than the area of Great Britain and Ireland, the Middle Island 
of New Zealand being a little larger than the combined areas of Eng- 
land and Wales. 



UtiH«d Kiugdoxu. 

England and Wales 

Scotland 

Ireland 

Total . , 

Xew Ze&Ia.Qd. 

North Island 
Middle Island . » 
Stewart Island .. 
Chatham Islands 
Other ]:^1atids 

Total . , 



Area In 
SquAFo Uil«<t« 

58,311 
30,463 
32,531 



121,305 

Area to 
Sqnare MIle«. 

58,525 
665 
375 
718 



104.751 



I 



Physical Features of the North Island. 

The North Island extends over a little more than seven degree 
of latitude, a distance in a direct line from north to south of 430 
geographical or 498 statute miles ; but, as the northern portion of 
the colony, wdiich covers more than three degrees of latitude, 
trends to the westward, the distance in a straight line from the 
North Cape to Cape Palliser, the extreme northerly and southerly 
points of the island, is about 515 statute miles. 

This Island is» as a whole, hilly, and in parts mountainous in 
character, but there are large areas of plain or comparatively level 
country that are, or by clearing may be made, available for agricul- 
tural purposes. Of these, the principal are the plains in Ilawke'g 
Bay on the east coast, the Wairarapa Plain in the Wellington 
District, and a strip of country along the west coast, about 1250 
miles in length, extending from a point about thirty miles from the 
City of Wellington to a little north of New Plymouth. The largest 
plain in the North Island, Kaingaroa, extends from the shore of 
Lake Taupo in a oorth-north-eaatcrly direction to the sea-coast in 
the Bay of Plenty ; but a great part of it is covered with pumice- 
sand, and is unlit for tillage or pasture. There are several smaller 
plains and numerous valleys suitable for agriculture. The level or 



€ 



PHYSICAL FEATURES OF THE NOBTH ISLAND. 9 

QDdulating country la this Island fi.t, or capable o! being made 
&i^ for agriculture has been roughly estimated at 13,000,000 
acres. This includes lands now covered with standing forest, and 
swamps that can be drained ; also large areas of clay-m arl and 
pumice-covered land. The clay-marl in its natural state is cold 
and uninviting to the farmer, but under proper drainage and culti- 
ration it can be brought to a high state of productiveness. This 
kind of land is generally neglected at the present time, as settlers 
pn?Xer soils more rapidly remunerative and less costly to work. 
The larger portion of the North Island was originally covered 
ith forest. Although the area of bush land is still very great, 
\l year by year the amount is being reduced, chiefly to meet 
le requirements of settlement, the trees being cut down and burnt, 
and grass* seed sown on the ashes to create pasture. Hilly as the 
country is, yet from the nature of the climate it is especially suited 
for the growth of English grasses, which will flourish %vherever 
there is any soil, however steep the land may be ; once laid down 
in grass very little of the land is too poor to supply food for cattle 
and sheep. The area of land in the North Island deemed purely 
pastoral or capable of being made so, while too steep for agricul- 
tural purposes, is estimated at 14.200,000 acres. In the centre of 
the Island is a lake, about twenty miles across either way, called 
Taupo. A large area adjacent to the lake is at present worthless 
pumice country. The Waikato River, the largest in the North 
Island, flows out of the north-eastern corner of this lake, and runs 
thence north-westward until it enters the ocean a little distance 
south of the Manukau Harbour. This river is navigable for small 
steamers for about a hundred miles from its mouth. The Maori 
King-country, occupied by Natives who for several years isolated 
themselves from Europeans, lies between Lake Taupo and the 
western coast. The River Thames, or Waihou, having its sources 
north of Lake Taupo, flows northward into the Firth of Thames, 
It is navigable for about fifty miles, but only for small steamers. 
The other navigable rivers in this island are the Wairoa (Kaipara), 
the Wanganui, and the Manawatu, the two last of which flow 
towards tbe south-west into Cook Strait. 

The mountains in the North Island are estimated to occupy 
about one-tenth of the surface, and do not exceed 4,000 ft. in 
height, with the exception of a few volcanic mountains that are more 
lofty. Of these, the three following are the most important : — 

1. The Tongariro Mountain, situated to the southward of Lake 
Taupo. It consists of a group of distinct volcanic cones, the 
lava-streams from which have so overlapped in their descent as 
to form one compact moontain-masa at the base. The highest oi 
these cones is called Ngauruhoe, and attains an elevation of 
7,615 ft. The craters of Ngauiiihoe, the Eed Crater (6,140 ft.), and Te 
Mari (4,990 ft.) are the three vents from which the latest discharges 
^M lava have taken place, the most recent having occurred in 1868, 
^^■bese craters are still active, steam and vapour issuing from them 




10 NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL ^EAU-BOt>K, 

with coDsiderabie force and uoise, the vapours, charged with puugent 
gaaes and acids, making it dangerous to approach too near the 
crater-Hp&. 

2. Kuapehu, This mountain lies to the south of Ngauruhoe and 
Tongariro, It is a volcanic cone in the solfatara ^itage, and reaches 
the height of 9,008 ft., heing in part considerably above the line of 
perpetual snow. The most remarkable feature of this mountain is 
the crater lake on its Bummit. wliich is subject to slight and inter- 
mittent eruptions, giving rise to vast i^uantities of steam. In 
March, 1895, such an eruption took place, forming a few hot springs 
on the niargm of the lake, and increasing the heat in the lake 
itself. This lake lies at the bottom of a funnel-shaped crater, the 
atcep sides of which are mantled with ice and snow. The water occu- 
pies a circular basin about 500 ft. in diameter, some 300ft. below the 
enclosing pe^aks, and is quite inaccessible except by the use of ropes. 
This lake, and the three craters previously mentioned on Tongariro> 
are all in one straight line, which, if produced, would pass through the 
boiling springs at Tokaanii on the southern margin of Lake Taupo, 
the volcanic country north-east of that lake, and White Island^ an 
active volcano in the Bay of Plenty, situated about tweuty*seven 
miles from the mainland. 

3. Mount Egmont. This is an extinct volcanic cone, rising 
to a height of 8,260 ft. The upper part is always covered with 
snow. This mountain ia situated close to New Plymouth, and is 
surrounded by one of the most fertile districts in New Zealand. 
Rising from the plains in solitary grandeur, it is an object of extreme 
beauty, the cone being one of the most perfect in the world. 

It is estimated that the area of mountain -tops and barren 
country at too high an altitude for sheep, and therefore worthless 
for pastoral purposes, amounts, in the North Island, to 300,000 acres. 

Without a doubt the hot springs form the most remarkable 
feature of the North Island, They are found over a large area, ex- 
tending from Tongariro, south of Lake Taupo» to Ohaeawai. in the 
extreme north — a distance of sonie 300 miles ; but the principal seat 
of hydi'otheruial action appears to be in the neighbourhootl of Lake 
Rotor ua, about forty miles north -north -east from Lake Taupo, By 
the destruction of the famed Pink and White Terraces and of Lake 
Rotomahana during the eruption of Mount Tarawera on the 10th 
June, 1886, the neighbourhood has been deprived of attractions 
unique in character and of unrivalled beauty ; but the natural 
features of the country — the numerous lakes, geysers, and hot 
springs, some of which possess remarkable curative properties in 
certain complaints— are still very attractive to tourists and invalids. 
The world-wide importance of conserving this region as a sanatorium 
for all time has been recognised by the Government, and it is now 
dedicated by Act of Parliament to that purpose. 

Notwithstanding the length of coast-line, good harbourB in the 
North Island ai'e not numerous. Those on the west coast north of 
New Plymouth are bar harbours, xinsuitable for large vessels. The 



f FHYSICAL PEATtTRBS OF THE BAIDDtiE ISLAND. 11 

pducipal harbours are the Waitemata Harbour, on which Auckland 
IS situated — this is rather a deep estuary than a harbour ; several 
excellent havens in the northern peninsula; and Port NichoUon, 
on the borders of which Wellington is situated. This is a land* 
locked harbour^ about six miles across, having a comparatively 
narrow but deep entrance from the ocean. The water is deep nearly 
throughout. 

The Cape Colville Peninsula is rich in gold-bearmg quartz* 

Cook Stbait. 

Cook Strait separates the North and Middle Islands. It is some 
en miles across at its narrowest part, but in the widest about 
iy\ The strait is invaluable for the purpose of traffic between 
di^erent parts of the colony. j 

Physical Features of thk Middle Island. 

The extreme length of the Middle Island, from Jackson's Head, 
la CrOok Strait, to Puysegur Point, at the extreme south-west, is about 
525 statute miles ; the greatest distance across at any point is in 
Ota^'o (the southernmost) District, about 180 miles. 

The Middle Island is intersected along ahnost its entire length 
by a range of mountams known as the Southern Alps. Some of the 
summits reach a height of from 10,000 ft. to 12^000 ft., Mount Cook, 
the highest peak, rising to 12,349 ft. 

In the south, in the neighbourhood of the sounds and Lake 
Te Anau, there are many magnificent peaks, which, though not of 
great height, are, owing to their latitude, nuarlv all crowned with 
perpetual ice and snow. Further north the mountains increase in 
tieight — Mount Eamslaw, at Lake Wakatipu ; and Mount Aspiring, 
which has been aptly termed the New Zealand Matterhorn, 9,949 It. 
ID heii^ht, at Lake Wanaka. Northward of this again are Mount 
Cook (or Aorangi), Mount Sefton, and other magiiiticent peaks. 

For beauty and grandeur of scenery the Southern Alps of New 
Zealand may worthily compare with, while in point of variety they are 
said actually to surpass, the Alps of Switzerland. In New Zealand 
few of the mountains have been scaled ; many of the peaks and most 
of the glaciers are as yet unnamed ; and there is still Jn parts of the 
Middle Island, a fine field for exploration and discovery— geogra- 
phical, geological, and botanical. The wonders of the Southern Alps 
are only beginning to be known; but the more they are known the 
more they are appreciated. The snow -line in New Zealand being 
flo much lower than in Switzerland, the scenery, though the moun- 
tains are not quite so high, is of surpassing grandeur. 

There are extensive glaciers on both sides of the range, those 1 
on the west being of exceptional beauty, as, from the greater abrupt- 
neea of the mountain-slopes on that side, they descend to within 
about 700ft. of the sea-level, and mto the midst of the evergreen 
forest. The largest glaciers on either side of the range are easily 
AOoessible. 



12 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAR BOOK. 



The following gives the sizes of some of the glaciers on the 
easteru slope : — 



Name. 



T&siQan 
Murcbison 
God ley 
Mueller 
Ht>oker 



AreH^ 


LflDgtll 


areaktaet 


Averaea 


of Glacier. 


of OlaolAJT, 


Width, 


Width. 


AcroB. 


Ikllles cb. 


3^ Ilea cb. 


Miles ch. 


13,eG4 


18 


2 14 


1 15 


5.800 


10 70 


1 5 


66 


5,312 


8 


1 55 


1 3 


3,200 


8 


U 61 


FtO 


a,4ic 


7 25 


61 


il 



The AUetsch Glacier io Switzerland, according to Ball, iii the 
'* Alpine Guide,*' has ao average width of one mile. It is in length 
and width ioferior to the Tasmao Glacier, 

Numerous sounds or liorda penetrate the south-western coast. 
They are long, narrow, and deep (the depth of water at the upper 
part of Milford Sound is l»270ft., although at the entrance only 
130 ft,), surrounded by giant mountains clothed with foliage to the 
snow'line, with waterfalls, glaciers, and snowfields at every turn, 
Sorae of the mountanis rise almost precipitously from the water's 
edge to 5»000ft. and 6,000 ft. above the sea. Near Milford, the 
finest of these sounds, is the great Sutherland Waterfall, 1,904 ft. 
high. 

The general surface of the northern portion of the Middle Island, 
comprising the Provincial Districts of Nelson and Marlborough, ia 
mountainous, but the greater part is suitable for grazing purposes. 
There are some line valleys and small plains suitable for agriculture^ 
of which the Wairau Valley or Plain is the largest. Deep sounds, 
extending for many niiles, break the coast*hne abutting on Cook 
Strait. The City of Nelson is situated at the hea*l of Blind Bay, 
which has a depth inwards from Cook Strait of about forty statute 
miles. 

The Provincial District of Canterbury lies to the south of the 
Marlborough District, and on the eastern side of the Island. To- 
wards the north the land is undulating ; then there is a stretch of 
almost perfectly level country extending towards the south-west 
160 miles, after which, on the south, the country js undulating as 
far as the borders of the Otago District. On the east a block of 
hill country rises abruptly from the plain and extends for some miles 
seaward. This ita Banks Peninsula, contaiinng several good harbours, 
the principal being Port Cooper, on the north, ou which is situated 
Lyttelton, the chief port of the district : the harbour of Akaroa, 
one of the finest in the colony, is on the southern coast of this 
^^ peninsula. 

^H The District of Otago is, on the whole, mountainous, but has 

^H many fine plains and valleys suitable for tillage. The mountains^ 
r except towards the west coast, are generally destitute of timber, 
^^- and suitable for grazing sheep. There are goldJields of considerable 



STEWART ISLAND. 



13 






the iuterior of this district. The inland lakes are also 

kable features. Lake Wakatipu extends over fifty-four 

miles in length, but its greatest width is oofc more than four mlleB^ 
and its area only 114 square miles. It is l»070ft, above sea-level, 
and has a depth varying from 1,170 ft. to l»296ft. Te Anau Lake is 
mewhat larger, having an area of 132 square miles. These lakes 
bounded on the west by broken, mountainous, and wooded 
iuntr)% extending to the ocean. 
The chief harbours in Otago are Port Chalmers, at the head of 
which Punedin is situated, and the Bluff Harbour, at the extreme 
south. 

The District of Westland, extending along the west coast of the 
Middle Island, abreast of Canterbury, is more or less auriferous 
throughout. The western slopes oi the central range of mountains 
are clothed with forest trees to the snow-line ; but on the eastern 
side timber is scarce, natural grasses covering the ground. 

The rivers in the Middle Island are for the most part mountain- 
rrents, fed by glaciers in the principal mountain -ranges. When 
le snow melts they rise in flood, forming, where not confined by 
ky walls, beds of considerable width, generally covered by enor- 
mous deposits of shingle. The largest river in the colony as regards 
volume of water is the Clutha. It is 154 miles in length, but is 
only navigable for boats or small river-steamers for about thirty 
miles. The Rivers Buller, Grey» and Hokitika, on the west coast, 
are navigable for a short distance from their mouths. They form 
the only ports in the Westland District. In their unimproved state 
they admitted, owing to the bars at their mouths, none but vessels of 
Email draught ; but, in consequence of the importance of the Grey 
aod Buller Kivers as the sole ports available for the coal-export 
trade, large harbour- works have been undertaken, resulting in the 
deepening of the beds of these rivers, and giving a depth of from 
ft. to 26 ft. of water on the bar. 

The ai'ea of level or undulating land in the Middle Island avail* 

ble for agriculture is estimated at about 15,000,000 acres. About 

il3»000,000 ai*e suitable for pastoral purposes only, or may become 

so when cleared of forest and sown with grass-seed. The area of 

barren land and mountain-tops is estimated at about 9,000,000 

acres. 

Stbwakt Island. 

Foveaux Strait separates the Middle from Stewart Island. This 
si island has an area of only 425,390 acres. 
Stewart Island is a great tourist resort during the summer 
'months, and is easily reached by steamer from the Bluff, distant 
about 25 miles. 

The principal peak is Mount Anglem, 3,200 ft, above sea-leveU 
which has an extmct crater at its summit. Most of the island is 
rugged and forest-clad; the climate is mild, frost being seldom ex* 
grienced; and the soil, when cleared of bush, is fertile. 



I 



pl4 NEW ZBALAND OPFlCIAIi YBAK-BOOK, H 

The chief attracfcions are the numerous bays and fiords. Paterson 
Inlet ia a magnificeni sheet of water, about ten miles by four miles, 
situated close to Half-moon Bay, the principal port, where over iwo 
hundred people live. Horseshoe Bay and Port William are within 
easy reach of Half- moon Bay. Port Pegasus, a land-locked sheet 
of water about eight miles by a mile aod a half, is a very fine 
harbour. At ** The Neck " (Paterson Inlet) there is a Native settle* 
ment of Maoris and half-castes. The bush is generally very 
dense, with thick undergrowth. Rata, black-pine, white- pine, miro, 
and totara are the principal timber trees. Fish are to be had in 
great abundance and variety ; oysters form an iinportaot industry. 
Wild pigeonSj ducks, and mutton-birds are plentiful 

I The Outlyino Islands, 

[ The outlying group of the Chatham Islands, 480 statute miles 
east-south-east from Wellington, and 536 miles eastward of Lyt- 
telton^ consists of two principal islands and several unimportant 
islets. The largest island contains about 222,490 acres, of which an 
irregular-shaped lake or lagoon absorbs 45,960 acres. About one- 
quarter of the surface of the land is covered with forest, the rest 
with fern or grass. The hills nowhere rise to a great height. Pitt 
Island is the next in size ; the area is 15,330 acres. The greater 
portion of both islands is used for grazing sheep. 

The Kermadeo Group of islands, four in number, is situated 
betweeu 29^ 10' aud 31*^ 30' south latitude, and between 177" 45' 
and 179"^ west longitude- They are named Raoul or Sunday Island, 
Macaulay Island, Curtis Islands, and L*Esperance or French Rock, 
The principal island, Sunday, is 600 miles distant from Auckland. 
The islands are volcanic, and in two of thern signs of activity are 
still to be seen. The rainfall is plentiful, but not excessive. The 
climate is mild and equable, and slightly warmer than the north 
of New Zealand. The following are the areas of the islands and 
islets of the group: Sunday Island, 7,200 acres; Herald group of 
islets, 85 acres ; Macaulay Island, 764 acres ; Curtis I8land8» 126 
acres aud 19 acres ; L'Esperance, 12 acres : total, 8,208 acres, 
Sunday Island is twenty miles ia circumference, roughly triangular 
in shape, and at the highest point 1,723 ft. above the sca-levei» It 
is rugged and broken over a very large extent of its surface^ and, 
except in a few places, covered with forest. The soil everywhere 
on the island is very rich, being formed by the decomposition 
of a dark-ccloured pumiceous tuff and a black andesitic lava, with 
which is closely mixed a fine vegetable mould. The great luxuriance 
and richness of the vegetation bear witness to the excellence of 
the soil, which is everywhere — except where destroyed by eruptions^ 
and on the steep chffs — the same rich loam. Want of water is one 
of the drawbacks. Three of the four lakes on the island are fresh, 
but so difficult of approach as to be practically useless. 

The AuoKLAKD Islands are about 290 miles south of Bluff Har- 
bour, their position being given on the Admiralty chart as latitude 



THE OUTLYING ISLAKD8. 16 

SXrSr 29* 8., and longitude 166'^ 19' 12" E. They have several 
good harbours. Port Ross, at the north end of the principal island, 
was described by the eminent French commander, D'Urville, as 
one of the best harbours of refuge in the known world. At the 
southern end of the island there is a through passage extending 
from the east to the west coast. It has been variously named 
Adams Strait and Carnley Harbour, and forms a splendid sheet of 
water. The largest of the islands is about 27 miles long by about 
15 miles broad, and is very mountainous, the highest part being 
about 2,000 ft. above the sea. The west coast is bold and pre- 
cipitous, but the east coast has several inlets. The wood on the 
island \s, owing to the strong prevailing %vind, scrubby in character. 
The New Zealand Govern inent main tains at this island a depot 
of provisions and clothing for the use of shipwrecked mariners. 

TheC*oOK Islands, with others now included within the extended 
boundaries of the colony, are as under* : — 

Rabotonoa (Cook Group) : A magnificent island, rising to a 
height of 3,000 ft., clothed to the tops of the mountains with splendid 
Yegetaiion. It has abundant streams, considerable tracts of sloping 
land, and rich alluvial valleys. The two harbours are poor. 

Manoaia, the south-easternmost of the Cook Group, is of 
volcanic origin, and about thirty miles in circumference. The 
productions, which are numerous and cheap, are obtained by 
assiduous labour. 

Atid (Cook Group) resembles Mangaia in appearance and extent. 
It is a mere bank of conil, 10 ft, or 12 ft. high, steep and ragged, 
eicept where there are small sandy beaches and some clefts, where 
the ascent is gradual. 

AlTUTAKi (Cook Group) presents a most fruitful appearance, its 
sb<»res being bordered by flat land, on which are innumerable cocoa- 
QQt and other trees, the higher ground being beautifully interspersed 
wich lawns. It is eighteen miles in circuit. 

Maukb or Parry Island (Cook Group) is a low island ; it is aboul 
two miles in diameter, well wooded, and inhabited. 

MiTiARO (Cook Group) is a low island, from three to four miles 
long and one mile wide. 

Hervey Islands (Cook GroupJ : This group consists of two 
Is, surrounded by a reef, whicli may be 10^ miles in oircum- 

NitTE, or Savage Island, lying east of the Friendly Islands, is a 
coral island, thirty-six miles in circun\ fere nee, rising to a height of 
200 ft. It has the usual tropical productions. 

Palmerston Island, lying about 500 miles east of Niue and 
about 220 from the nearest island of the Cook Group (Aitutaki), id 
lemarkable as the '' San Pablo " of Magellan, the first island dis- 
covered in the South Bea. It has no harbour. The soil is fairly 
f^tile^ and there is some good hardwood timber. 

'Notee OD Aniieitd Ifil&oda " ; following deeonpiiorifl of 




I 



16 NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOK. ^^1 

Penrhyn Island (Tongareva) lies about 300 miles north-east of 
Manahiki, It is one of the most, famous pearl islands in the Pacific, 
and there is a splendid harbour, a lagoon wiib two entrances, tit for 
ships of any size. 

Manahiki, lying about 400 miles eastward of Danger Island^is an 
atoll, about thirty miles in circumference, valuable from the extent 
of the cocoanut groves. The interior lagoon contains a vast deposit 
of pearl-shell. 

Eakaanqa is an atoil, three miles in length and of equal 
breadth. 

Danger Island (Pukapuka) : Next to the 10th parallel, but 
rather north of the latitude of the Navigators, and east of them 
are a number of small atolls. Of these, the nearest to the Samoan 
Group — about 600 miles — is Danger Island » bearing north-west of 
Suwarrow al>out 250 miles. 

SuwARKow Island has one of the best harbours in the Pacific. 
It lies about 500 miles east of Apia, the capital of ihe Samoan Group. 
It is a coral atoll, of a triangular form, fifty miles in circumference, 
the reef having an average width of half a mile across, enclosing a 
land-locked lagoon twelve miles by eight, which forms an excellent 
harbour. The entrance is half a mile wide, and the accommoda- 
tion permits of ships riding in safety in all weathers, with depths of 
from three to thirty fathoms. It is out of the track of hurricanes, 
uninhabited, but capable by its fertility of supporting a small popu- 
lation. As a depot for the collection of trade from the various 
islands it ought to be very valuable. 

Constitution. 

British sovereignty was proclaimed over New Zealand in January, 
1840, and the country became a dependency of New Sooth Wales 
until the 3rd May, 1841, when it was made a separate colony. The 
seat of Governmeot was at Auckland, and the Executive included 
the Governor » and three gentlemen holding office as Colonial Secre- 
tary, Attorney-General, and Colonial Treasurer. 

The successors of these gentlemen, appointed in August, I841« 
May, 1842, and January, 1844, respectively, continued in office until 
the establishment of Responsible Government on the 7th May; 1856. 
Only one of them — Mr. Swainson, the Attorney* General — sat as a 
member of the fii^t General Assembly, opened on the 27th May, 
1864. During the session of that year there were associated with 
the permanent membei^s of the Executive Council certain members 
of the General Assembly. These latter held no portfolios. 

The Government of the colony was at first vested in the 
Governor, who was responsible only to the Crown ; but in 1852 
an Act granting representative institutions to the colony was 
passed by the Imperial Legislature. Under it the constitution of 
a General Assembly for the whole colony was provided for, to 
consist of a Legislative Council, the members of which were to be 
nominated by the Governor, and of an elective House of Eepresenta- 



PUBLIC LIBHAnV 



A8T0h. LENOX AND t 

TILDEN ^Onr -A- 



tiree. The first session of the General Assembly was opened on the 
27th May, 1854, hut the members of the Executive were not respon- 
Bible to Parhament. The first Ministers untier a system of Respon 
Bible Government were appointed in the year 1856. By the Act 
of 1852 the colony was divided into six provinces, each to be 
preaided over by an elective Superintendent, and to have an elective 
Rrovincial Council, empowered to legislate, except on certain specified 
stibject&. The franchise amounted practically to household sufifrage* 
In eiwh case the election was for four years, but a dissolution of the 
Provincial Council by the Governor could take place at any time, 
DecessitatiDg a fresh election both of the Council and of the Superin- 
tendent, The Superintendent was chosen by the whole body of 
electors of the province ; each member of the Provincial Council 
by the electors of a district. The Provincial Governments^ after- 
waids increased to nine, remained as integral parts of the Con- 
stitotion of the colony until the 1st November, 1876, when they 
were abolished by an Act of the General Assembly, that body having 
been vested with the power of altering the Constitution Act. On 
Ihe same day an Act of the General Assembly which subdi\ided the 
oolony (exclusive of the areas included within munici pah ties) into 
counties, and established a system of local couoty government, came 
ioto force. 

GOVEKKMENT. 

The Governor is appointed by the King. His salary is £5,000 
I year, wilb an anntial allowance of £1,500 on account of his esta- 
Bhment^ and of £500 for travellmg-expenses, provided by the 
riony. 

Members of the Legislative Council hold their seats under writs 
BQmmons from the Governor. Till the year 1891 the appoint- 
*liiefit& were for life ; but in September of that year an Act was passed 
making appointments after that time tenable for seven years only, 
Ihoagb Councillors may be reappointed. In either case seats may 
be vacated by resignation or extended absence. One member of 
the Council is an aboriginal native chief. 

The members of the House of Representatives are elected for 
years from the time of each general election ; but at any tima 
, dissolation of Parliament by the Governor may reader a general 
pelection necessary. Four of the members are representatives of 
tfative constituencies. For the purposes of European representa- 
tion the colony is divided into seventy-six electoral districts, each 
returning one member. The full nun*ber of members composing the 
House of Representatives is thus eighty. Members of the House i 
of Representatives are chosen by the votes of the inhabitants iti>] 
every electoral district appointed for that pui-pose. No person who,^ 
being a bankrupt within the meaning of *' The Bankruptcy Act, 
189'2/* has not obtained an order of discharge under that Act shall 
be quaiiOed to be nominated as a candidate for election, or to be 
elected, or to take his seat as a member of the House of Rtspresenta- 
lives, anything in any other Act to the contrary notwithstanding. 




w 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAR-BOOK. 



In 1889 an amendinent of the Representation Act was passed, 

which eoDtained a pro\nsion prohibiting any elector frotn giving hia 

vote in respect of more than one electorate at any election. *' The 

- Electoral Act, 1893," extended to women of both races the right 

I kn FR^ister as electors* and to vole at the elections for members of 

I the House of Representatives. The qualification for registration is 

I che same for both sexes. No person is entitled to be registered on 

more than one electoral roll within the colony. Women are not 

qualified to he elected as members of the House of Representatives. 

I The electoral laws are the suhject of special comment further on 

I in this work. Every man registered as an elector, and not specially 

I excepted by the Electoral Act now in force, is qualified to be elected 

I a member of the House of Representatives for any electoral dis- 

I trict. For European representation every adult person, if resident 

I one year in the colony and three months in one electoral district, 

I can be registered as an elector. Freehold property of the value 

■ of £25 held for six months preceding the day of registration 
until 1896 entitled a man or woman to register, if not previously 

■ registered under the residential qualification ; but the Amendment 
I Act of 1896 abolished the property qualification (except in case of 
I existing registrations), and residence alone now entitles a man or 
I woman to have his or her name placed upon an electoral roll. For 

Maori representation every adult Maori resident in any Maori elec- 
toral district (of which there are four only in the colony) can vote. 
Begistration is not required in Native districts. [The above pro- 
visions are now incorporated in " The Electoral Act, 1905,** which 
consolidates the electoral laws, with such amendments a^ were 
found necessary.] 

I Thb Skat of Government. 

I Up to the year 1865 the seat of Government of New Zealand 

" was at Auckland, Several attempts were made by members of 
Parliament, by motions in the Legislative Council and House of 
Representatives, to have it removed to some more central place; 
but it was not until November, 1863, that Mr. Domett (the then 
ex -Premier) was successful in carrying resolutions in the House of 
Hepresentatives that steps should be taken for appointing some 
place in Cook Stnut as the permanent seat of Government in the 
colony, The resolutions adopted were : ** (1.) That it has become 
necessary that the seat of GovernniGnt in the colony should be 
transferred to some suitable locality in Cook Strait. (2.) That, in 
order to promote the acconiplishment of this object, it is desirable 
^^ that tlie selection of the particular site in Cook Strait should be left 
^H to the arbitrament of an impartial tribunal. (3.) That, with this 
^W view, a Bill should be introduced to give effect to the above reaolu- 
m kions." On the 26th November an address was presented to the 

I Governor, Sir George Grey, K.C.B., by the Commons of New Zea- 

I lan<i, requesting that the Governors of the Colonies of New South 

I Wales, Victoria, and Tasmania, might each be asked to appoint one 



SUCCE881VE OOVBKNOKB. 



19 



Commissioner for the purpose of deteritiiniug the best site in Cook 
Strait. Accordingly, the Hon. Joseph Docker, M,L,C., Now South 
Vales ; the Hon. Sir Francis Murphy, Speaker of the Legislative 
CoiiDCil« Yictoria; and B, C. Guun, Esq., Tasmania, were appointed 
Cotxunissioners. 

These gentlemen, having made a personal inspection of all suit* 
able places^ arrived at the unanimous decision " that Wellington, in 
Port Nicholson, was the site upon the shores of Cook Strait which 
preeeated the greatest advantages for the adtmnistratiuu of the 
government of the colony/* 

The seat of Government was, therefore, in accordance with the 
recomiuendation of the Commissioners, removed to Wellington in 
February, IB60. 

Public Wokks. 

Nearly all the public works of New Zealand are in the hands of 
the Government of the colony, and in the early days they simply 
k^t pace with the spread of settlement. In 1870| however, a great 
impetos was given to the progress of the whole country by the 
inauguration of the ** Pubhc Works and Immigration Policy/* which 
fifovided for carrying out works in advance of settlement* Railways, 
roads, and water-races were constructed, and immigration was con- 
ducted on a large scale. As a consequence, the population increased 
from 267,000 in 1871 to 501,000 in 1881, and to 382,462 in Decem- 
ber^ 1905 ; besides whom there were 43.143 Maoris, and also 12,292 
persons residing m the Cook and other Pacific Islands within the 
eitended boundaries of the colony. 



SUCCESSIVE GOVERNORS. 

BtfOCBflSION OF GOVKHNORS OP NeW ZEALAND, AND THE DaTES ON 
WHICH THEY ASSUMED AND RETIRED FROM THE GOVERNMENT. 

Captain William Hobson, B.N., from Jan., 1840, to 10 Sept., 
1^2. 

[British iovorei^ty wtts proclaimed by Gapti^ij] Hobson in January, 
1840, and New Zealand became a dependency of the Colony of New 
South W&loH until 3rd May, 1641, at which date it was proclaimed a 
separate colony. From Januar>', 18i0, to May, 1841, Captain Hobnon 
WAa Lieutenant 'Governor of New Zealand under Sir George Gipp6, 
Goyumor of New South VValoa, and from May, 18il, Governor of New 
Zealand ; the 8«at of Govornment being at Auckland, where he died in 
September^ 1842. From the time of Governor Hobson'a death, in Sep- 
tember, 1B42, until the arrival of Governor Fit^roy, in December, 1843^ 
the Government was carried on by the Colonial Secretary, Lieutenant 
Shortland.] 
Laeuieoant Shortland. AdHjinietrator, from 10 Sept., 1842, to 26 

Dec, 1843. 
Captain Robert Fitzroy, R.N., from 26 Dec, 1843, to 17 Nov., 
1845, 



20 



SEW ZEALAKD OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK. 



Captain Grey (became Sir George Grey, K.C*B.^ in 1848), from 18 
Nov., 1845, to 31 Dec, 1853. 

[Gftptftin Grey held the commiBBion aa Lieutenant-Governor of the 
colony until the 1st January, 1848, when he was swoni in as Governor- 

^m in Chief over the Islands of New Zealand, and as Governor of the Pro* 

^ft vince of New Ulster and Governor of the Province of New Munsier* 

H After the passing of the New Zealand Constitution Act, Sir George 

^M Grey was, on th© 13th September, 1852» appointed Governor of the 

^M colony, the duties of which o£!]ce he assumed on the Tth March, 1853, 

H In August, 1847, Mr, E. J. Eyre was appointed Lieutenant-Governor of 

H New Munster : he was sworn in, 28th January, 1848, On 3r^ January^ 

^m 1848, Major -General George Dean Pitt was appointed Lieutenant- 

^K Governor of New Ulster: he was sworn In^ 14th February, 1848; died* 

^m 8th January. 1851 ; and was succeeded as Lieutenant Governor by 

H Lieutenant -Colonel Wyn3-ard, appointed 14th April, 1861; sworn in, 

^1 26th April, 1&51. The duties of the Lieutenant-Governor ceased on the 

H assumption by Sir George Grey of the office of Governor, on the 7tb 

■ March. 1853.] 

Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Henry Wynyard, C,B., Administrator, 

from 3 Jan., 1854, to 6 Sept., 1855. 
Colonel Thomas Gore Browne, C.B,, from 6 Sept., 1855, to 2 Oct., 

1861. 
Sir George Grey, K.C.B., AdminiBtrator, from 3 Oct., 1861 ; Go. 

vernor, from 4 Dec 1361, to 5 Feb., 1868. 
Sir George Ferguson Boweu, G.C.M.G., from 5 Feb., 1868, to 19 

Mar., 1873. 
Sir George Alfred Arney, Chief Justice, Administrator, from 21 Mar. 

to 14 June, 1873. 
Sir James Fergosson, Baronet, P.O., from 14 June, 1873, to 3 Dec, 

1874. 
The Marquis of Noromnbv, P.G., G,C.M,G., Adtninistrator, from 

3 Doc, 1874 ; Governor, from 9 Jan., 1875, to 21 Feb., 1879. 
James Prendergast, Esquire, Chief Justice, Administrator, from 

21 Feb. to 27 Mar,, 1879. 
Sir Hercules George Robert Robinson, G.C.M.G., Administrator, 

from 27 Mar., 1879; Governor, from 17 April, 1879, to 8 Sept., 

1880. 
James Prendergast, Esquire, Chief Justice, Administrator, from 

9 Sept. to 29 Nov., 1880. 
The Honourable Sir Arthur Hamilton Gordon, G.C.M.G,, from 

29 Nov., 1880, to 23 June, 1882. 
Sir James Prendergast, Chief Justice, Administrator, from 24 June, 

1882. to 20 Jan., 1883. 
lieutenant * General Sir William Francis Drummond Jervois, 

G.C.M.G., C.B.. from 20 Jan., 1883, to 22 Mar., 1889. 
Sir James Prendergast, Chief Justice, Administrator, from 23 Mar, 

to 2 May, 1889, 
The Earl of Onslow, G.C.M,G„ from 2 May, 1889, to 24 Feb., 

1892. 
Sir James Prendergast, Chief Justice, Administrator, from 25 Feb,, 

to 6 Juue, 1892. 



SUPREME OOUBT JUDGES. 21 

The Earl of Glasgow, G.C.M.G., from 7 June, 1892, to 6 Feb., 1897. 
Sir James Prendergast, Chief Justice, Administrator, from 8 Feb., 

1897. to 9 Aug., 1897. 
The Earl of Ranfurly, G.C.M.G., from 10 Aug., 1897, to 19 June, 

1904. 
The Right Honourable William Lee, Baron Plunket, K.C.M.G., from 

20 June, 1904. 



SUPREME COURT JUDGES. 

Supreme Court Judges, past and present, with Dates of 
Appointment, and of Resignation or Death. 

Sir W. Martin, appointed Chief Justice, 10 Jan., 1842. Resigned, 
12 June, 1867. 

H. 8. Chapman, appointed, 26 Dec, 1843. Held office until March, 
1852. Reappointed, 23 Mar., 1864. Resigned, 31 Mar., 1875. 

S. Stephen, appointed, 30 July, 1850. Appointed Acting Chief 
Justice, 20 Oct., 1855. Died, 13 Jan., 1858. 

Daniel Wakefield, appointed, Oct., 1855. Died, Oct., 1857. 

Hon. H. B. Gresson, appointed temporarily, 8 Dec, 1857. Per- 
manently, 1 July, 1862. Resigned, 31 Mar., 1875. 

Sir G. A. Arney, appointed Chief Justice, 1 Mar., 1858. Resigned » 
31 Mar., 1875. 

i. J. Johnston, appointed, 2 Nov., 1858. Died, 1 June, 1888. 

C. W. Richmond, appointed, 20 Oct., 1862. Died, 3 Aug., 1895. 

J. S. Moore, appointed temporarily, 15 May, 1866. Relieved, 30 
June, 1868. 

C. D. R. Ward, appointed temporarily, 1 Oct., 1868. Relieved, 
May, 1870. Appointed temporarily, 21 Sept., 1886. Relieved, 
12 Feb., 1889. 

Sir J. Prendergast, appointed Chief Justice, 1 April, 1875. Re- 
signed, 25 May, 1099. 

T. B. Gillies, appointed, 3 Mar., 1875. Died, 26 July, 1889. 

J. S. Williams, appointed, 3 Mar., 1875. 

J. E. Denniston, appointed, 11 Feb., 1889. 

E. T. Conolly, appointed, 19 Aug., 1889. Resigned, 9 Sept., 1903. 

Hon. Sir P. A. Buckley, K.C.M.G., appointed, 20 Dec, 1895. 
Died, 18 May, 1896. 

W. B. Edwards, appointed, 11 July, 1896. 

P. W. Pennefather, appointed temporarily, 25 April, 1898. Re- 
signed, 24 April, 1899. 

Hon. Sir Robert Stout, K.C.M.G., appointed Chief Justice, 22 June, 
1899. 

J. C. Martin, Acting Judge, appointed, 12 April, 1900. Resigned, 
4 Dec, 1900. 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAB-BOOK. 



Theophilus Cooper, appointed, 21 Feb., 1901. 
F. E. Chapman, appointed, 11 Sept., 1903. 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL, 1843-56. 

Membebb of the Executive Council of the Colony of New 
Zealand pbevioub to the Establishment of Besponsiblb 

GOVEBNMENT (NOT INCLUDING THE OfFIOEBS COMMANDING THE 
FOBOES). 

Willoughby Shortland, Colonial Secretary, from 3 May, 1841, to 

31 Dec, 1843 ; succeeded by Mr. Sinclair. 
Francis Fisher, Attorney-General, from 3 May to 10 Aug., 1841 ; 

succeeded by Mr. Swainson. 
George Cooper, Colonial Treasurer, from 3 May, 1841, to 9 May, 

1842 ; succeeded by Mr. Shepherd. 
William Swainson, Attorney-General, from 10 Aug., 1841, to 7 May, 

1866. 
Alexander Shepherd, Colonial Treasurer, from 9 May, !1 842, to 7 May, 

1856. 
Andrew Sinclair, Colonial Secretary, from 6 Jan., 1844, to 7 May, 
1856. 

[The three gentlemen last mentioned were nominated by Her late 
Majesty as ex officio members of the Executive Council. Two of them, 
the Colonial Secretary and the Colonial Treasurer, were not members of 
the General Assembly, opened for the first time 27th May, 1854, but 
all three remained in office until the establishment of Responsible 
Government.] 

James Edward FitzGerald, M.H.R., without portfolio, from 14 June 

to 2 Aug., 1854. 
Henry Sewell, M.H.B., without portfolio, from 14 June to 2 Aug., 

1854. 
Frederick Aloysius Weld, M.H.R., without portfolio, from 14 June 

to 2 Aug., 1854. 
Francis Dillon Bell, M.L.C., without portfolio, from 30 June to 11 

July, 1854. 
Thomas Houghton Hartley, M.L.C., without portfolio, from 14 July 

to 2 Aug., 1854. 
Thomas Spencer Forsaith, M.H.B., without portfolio, from 31 Aug. 

to 2 Sept., 1854. 
Edward Jerningham Wakefield, M.H.R., without portfolio, from 

31 Aug. to 2 Sept., 1854. 
William Thomas Locke Travers, M.H.R., without portfolio, 31 Aug. 

to 2 Sept., 1854. 
James Macandrew, M.H.R., without portfolio, from 31 Aug. to 2 

Sept., 1854. 



PARLIAMENTS. 



23 



PARLIAMENTS. 

NUMBEB OF PABLIAlfENTS SINCE THE CONSTITUTION ACT PASSED 
FOB CONFBBBINO REPRESENTATIVE INSTITUTIONS UPON THE 

Coix)NT OP New Zealand, with the Dates op Opening and 
Closino op Sessions and Dates op Dissolution. 



parliament. 



Date of Opening of 
Sessions. 



Date of Prorogation. 



Flnl (disaolTed 15th September, j 
1855) I 



Seeond (dissolTed 5th November, ; 
1860) 



Third (dissolved 27th January, 1866) 



27 May, 1854 
81 August, 1854 
8 August, 1855 



15 April, 1856 . . 
(No session in 1857) 
10 April, 1868 
(No session in 1859) 
30 July. 1860 



8 June, 1861 

7 July, 1862 
19 October, 1863 . . 
24 November, 1864 
26 July, 1865 



9 August, 1854. 
16 September, 1854. 
15 September, 1855. 



16 August, 1856. 
21 August, 1858. 
5 November, 1860. 



7 September, 1861. 
15 September, 1862. 
14 December, 1868. 
18 December, 1864. 
30 October, 1865. 



Fourth (dissolved 30th December, 1 
1870) 1 



30 June, 1866 
9 July, 1867 
9 July, 1868 
1 June, 1869 

14 June, 1870 



8 October, 1866. 
10 October, 1867. 
20 October, 1868. 

3 September, 1869. 
13 September, 1870. 



Fifth (dissolved 6th December, 
1875) 



14 August, 1871 
16 July, 1972 

15 July, 1873 
3 July, 1874 

20 July, 1875 



16 November. 1871. 
25 October, 1872. 
3 October, 1873. 
31 August, 1874. 
21 October, 1875. 



Sixth (dissolved 15th August, 1879) 



Seventh (dissolved 8th November. 
1881) 



l\ 15 June, 1876 
19 July, 1877 
26 July, 1878 
11 July, 1879 



Eighth (dissolved 27th June, 1884) 



24 September, 1879 
28 May, 1880 
9 June, 1881 



18 May, 1882 

14 June, 1883 

5 June, 1884 



31 October, 1876. 

10 December, 1877. 
2 November, 1878. 

11 August, 1879. 



19 December, 1879. 

1 September, 1880. 

24 September, 1881. 



15 September, 1882. 
I 8 September, 1883. 
I 24 June, 1884. 



24 



MEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAR-BOOK. 

Parliaments — continued. 



Parliament. 


Date of Opening of 
SesBloos. 


Date of Prorogation. 


Ninth (dissolved 16th July. 1887) . . ■ 


7 August, 1884 . . 
11 June, 1885 
13 May, 1886 
26 April, 1887 


10 November, 1884. 
22 September, 1885. 
18 August. 1886. 
10 July, 1887. 


Tenth (dissolved 8rd October. 1890) \ 


6 October, 1887 . . 
10 May, 1888 
20 June, 1889 
19 June, 1890 


23 December,1887. 
31 August, 1888. 
19 Septemb6r,1889. 
18 September,1890. 


Eleventh (dissolved 8th November, J 
1893) 1 


23 January, 1891 . . 
11 June, 1891 
23 June, 1892 
22 June, 1893 


31 January, 1891. 
25 September. 1891. 
12 October, 1892. 
7 October, 1898. 


Twelfth (dissolved 14th November, J 
1896) 1 


21 June, 1894 . . ' 24 October, 1894. 
20 June, 1895 • • , 2 November, 1895. 
11 June, 1896 . . t 19 October, 1896. 


Thirteenth (dissolved 15th Novem-J 
ber. 1899) 1 


7 April. 1897 

23 September, 1897 

24 June, 1898 
23 June, 1899 


12 April, 1897. 
22 December, 1897. 
6 November, 1898. 
24 October, 1899. 


Fourteenth (dissolved 5th Novem-j 
ber, 1902) | 


22 June, 1900 
1 July, 1901 
1 July, 1902 


22 October. 1900. 
8 November, 1901. 
4 October, 1902. 


Fifteenth (dissolved 29th Novem- 
ber, 1906) 


29 June, 1903 
28 June, 1904 
27 June, 1905 


25 November, 1903. 
8 November, 1904. 
31 October, 1905. 



SUCCESSIVE MINISTRIES 

BiNOB THE Establishment of Bebponsible Govebnment in New 
Zealand in 1856. 



Name of Ministry. 



Assumed Office. 



Retired. 



1. Bell-Sewell 

2. Pox .. 

3. Stafford 

4. Fox .. 

5. Domett 

6. Whitaker-Fox 

7. Weld.. 

8. Stafford 

9. Fox .. 

10. Stafford 

11. Waterhouse 

12. Pox .. 
18. Vogel 
14. Pollen 



7 May, 1856 
20 May, 1856 

2 June, 1866 
12 July, 1861 

6 August, 1862 . . 
30 October, 1863 . . 
24 November, 1864 
16 October, 1866 . . 
28 June, 1869 

10 September, 1872 

11 October, 1872 . . 

3 March, 1873 . . 

8 April, 1873 . . 
6 July, 1875 



20 May, 1856. 

2 June, 1866. 
12 July, 1861. 

6 August, 1862. 
30 October. 1863. 
24 November, 1864. 
16 October. 1865. 
28 June, 1869. 

10 September, 187S. 

11 October, 1872. 

3 March, 1878. 
8 April, 1873. 
6 July, 1875. 

15 February, 1876. 



^^^^m PREMIKRS. Sft 1 


SuccBssiYB MimsTKiRB— continued, | 


NftiiMof Minifitry. 


Asian] ed Office, 


Retired. 1 


15, Vog^ 


15 February, 1676 


1 September. 1876. 1 


16, Attoson 


1 September^ 1876 


13 September. 1876. 1 


IT. Atkinson (reconxiituted) 


13 September, 1876 


13 October, 1877. ^M 


18. Grey . . 


ISOctobtr. 1877 ,. 


8 October. 1B79. ^H 


19. OaII ., 


8 0ctober» 1879 .. 


21 April, 1882. ^H 


11 Whiuker 


21 April, 1882 . . | 25 September, 1883. V 


U. Atkinson 


25 September, 18S3 16 August, 1884. | 


:: >tmt.Vogel ., 


16 AuguBt, 18S4 .. 


28 August. 1884. | 


ikiuson .. , 2B August, 1884 .,; 


3 September. 1884. I 


-> ^toui^Vogtl .. .. _ 3 Si^ptembpr, 1884 


8 October, 1887. ^M 


'25, AlkiDt^n 


8 October, 1887 , . 


24 January, 189L ^M 


i6. B&ilanc6 


24 January. 1891, , 


I May. 1893.- ^M 


37. S«ddon 


1 May, 1993. 


1 


* OwiQg to Ibe death of tiie PremiBr, tb« Hoo. J. B&11aiio«. on 97fch April, IflOi. ^^1 


PREMIERS OF SUCCESSIVE MINISTRIES. ^ 




Name of Premieir. 1 


HAorr SewelL 


Sir Julius Vogel, K.O.M.G. 1 


Wiliiim Fox, 


Harry Albert Atkinson, ■ 


Edward William Stafford. 


Harry Albert Atkinson (Ministry recon- 1 


Wmiam Fox. 


stitutcd). ^J 


Alfred Domett, 


Sir George Grey. K.C.B. ^H 


Frederick Whitaker. 


Hon. John Hall. ^H 


Fredarick Aloysiua Weld, 


Frederick Wbitaker, M.L.C. ^M 


Edward William Stafford. 


Harry Albert Atkinson. ^^B 


William Fo3c. 


Robert Stout. ^H 


Hon. E^iward William Stafford ' Harry Albert Atkinson. ^H 


{jp. ,.^ '^f"r«^en W^aterhouse, 


Sir Robert Stout. K.C.M,G. ^H 


H in Fox. 


Sir Harry Albert Atkinson, K.G.M.G ^H 


H Vogel, C.M.G. 


John BallancG. ^^M 


H^ Da»i«l Pollen, M.L.C. 


Rt. Hod. Richard John Seddon, P.O. 1 




■ 


SPEAKERS OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, ^M 


WITH Dates of their ApporNTMENT and Dates of Retihemknt 1 


OR Death. \ 


Same of Speaker 


Date of 
AppoiiitmeDt. 


Bate or Retirement 1 
or Doath« 1 


Bon. William SwainRoa .. .. 16 Mt*y, 1854 .. 


8 August, 1855. 1 


Hoo, Frederick Whitaker . . . . 8 August, 1855 . . 


12 May, 1856. ^^M 


Hoo. Thomai Houghton Bartley .. 12 May. 1856 .. 


1 July. 1868. ^M 


HcB* Sir John Larkina Cheese Richard- I July, 18G6 . . 


14 June. 1879. ^H 


♦oo, Ki, 1 


■ 


Hon. Sir William Fitzherbert, K.CM.O. 14 June» 18711 . . 


22 April, 1387. ^H 


Hon. GeofK^ Marsdeo Waterboiiee . . 1 22 April, 1887 , , 


21 September, 1837. f 


H<)fi SirWiHlamFitaherbort, K.O.M.G. i 2lSoptembera867 


23 January, 189L J 


H Harry Albert Atkinson, 


23 January, 1891 


28 June, 1392. ^M 


H*^i,. .... .icnry John Mil (er.. 


8 July, 1892, 


m 




October, 1897 


9 July 1903. 1 


Hon, W. C. Walker, CM.G. . . 


9 July. 1903 .. 


5 Janaar?. 1904. J 


Hoo. John Rigg (Actingf .. ,, ' 5 January^ 1904 


7 July, 1904. ^m 


Hon. Sir A. J. Cadman, K.C JI.O. . . ' 7 July, 1904 . . 


23 March. 1905. ^H 


Hon. R. H. J- Beeves (Acting) , . 23 Miirch, 1905 . . 
Hoo, a C. Bowea -, .. .. / 4 July, 1905. 


1 4Jul?a^5< ^1 


_ J 


.fl 



26 



NBW ZBALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 



SPEAKERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 
WITH Dates of their Election and Dates of Retirement. 



Name of Speaker. 



Sir Charles Olifford, Bart. . . 

Sir David Monro, Kt. Baoh. 

Sir Francis Dillon Bell, K.O.M.G., C.B. 
Sir William Fitzherbert, K.O.M.G. . . 
Sir Qeorge Maurice O'Borke, Kt. Bach. 



Hon. Major William Jukes Steward . . 
Hon. Sir George Maurice O'Borke, Kt. 
Bach. 

Arthur Robert Guinness 



Date of Election. 

26 May, 1854 
15 April, 1856 .. 
3 June, 1861 
30 June, 1866 . . 

14 August, 1871 . . 

15 June, 1876 .. 
1 1 July, 1879 

24 September, 1879 

18 May, 1882 
7 August, 1884 
6 October, 1887 

23 January, 1891 

21 June, 1894 
6 April, 1897. 

22 June, 1900 
29 June, 1908. 



Date of Retirement. 



8 June, 1861. 

18 Sept., 1870. 
21 October, 1875. 
13 June, 1879. 



3 October, 1890. 
8 Noyember, 1893. 



5 November, 1902. 



FOREIGN CONSULS. 

Consuls of Foreign Countries residing in, or with Jurisdic- 
tion OVER, New Zealand, 31st March, 1906. 



Country 
represented. 


1 
Office held. i Name. 


Place of 
Residence. 


• 
Argentine Re- 


Vice-Coneul . . 


Hon. T. Fergus . . 


Dunedin. 


public 








Austria- Hungary 


Consul - General 


Otto, Baron Hoenniug-O'Car- 


Sydney. 




for the Com- 


roU 






monwealth of 








Australia, New 








Zealand, and 








the South Sea 








Islands 






^ 


Consul 


bL. Langguth 


Auckland. 


Belgium 


Consul - General 
for Australasia 
and Fiji 


F. Huylebroeck . . 


Melbourne. 


• 


('lonsul 


Kon. Charles John Johnston 


Wellington. 


• 


Vice-Consul 


G. F. Johnston 


m 


« 


Consul 


Joseph James Rinsey 


Christohurch. 


, 


• 


John Burns 


Auckland. 


m 


H 


George Lyon Denniston 


Dunedin. 


Braeil 


Vice-Consul . . 


A. H. Miles 


Wellington. 


Chili . . 


Consul - General 
for the Com- 
monwealth of 
Australia, and 
New Zealand 


William Brown . . 


Sydney. 



FOREIGN CONSULS. 

Foreign Consuls — continued. 



27 



Connftry 
npreMDt«d. 



Denmark 



Frtnoe 



OermAD Empire 



Greece 
Hondaras 



lUily .. 



Japan 

Liberia 

Netherlands 



Office held. 



Oonsul (for North 
Island) 

Consul (for South 

Island) 
Vice Consul 



Consul (for New 
Zealand) 

Chanoelier 

Vice- Consul .. 

Consular Agent 
* 

Consul -General 
for Common- 
wealth of Aus- 
tralia, New 
Zealand, and 
Fiji 

Consul 

» (acting) 



Vice-Consul . . 

Vice- Consul .. 

Consul - General 
for Common- 
wealth of Aus- 
tralia and New 
Zealand 

Consul - General 
for Common- 
wealth of Aus- 
tralia, New 
Zealand, and 
Fiji 

Consular Agent 



Consul 

Consul 

Consul - General 
for Common- 
wealth of Aus- 
tralia, New 
Zealand, and 
Fiji 

Consul 

Vioe-Consul 



Name. 



Place of 
Residence. 



Francis Henry Dillon Bell . 



Emil Christian Skog 

Frederick Ehrenfrled Baume 
William Edward Perry 
Odin Henry Mdller 
Robert Boeufv6 

AuguBte A Lelidvre 
Percival Clay Neill 
George Humphreys 
Harold Beauchamp 
Paul Von Buri . . 



Carl Seegner 

Willy Fels 

Philip Kippenberger 

Friedrich August Krull 

Eberbard Focke . . 

Joseph Frank Dyer 

Frederic Walsh 



C. Bertola 



Thomas Wallace . . 

Roland Thomas Robertson 

James Mills 

Geraldo Giuseppe Perotti 

Richard A. Carr . . 

A. S. Aldrich 

A. M. Meyers 

W. L. Bosschart . . 



Hon. Charles John Johnston 

George Ritchie 

Ambrose Millar 

Harold Featherston Johnston 

a, de Vriee 



Wellington 
(Principal 
Consulate). 

Christchurch 

Auckland. 
Hokitika. 
Dunedin. 
Auckland. 



Dunedin. 
Christchurch. 
Wellington. 
Sydney. 



Auckland. 

Dunedin. 

Christchurch. 

Wanganui. 

Wellington. 

Sydney. 



Melbourne. 



Christchurch. 

Wellington. 

Dunedin. 

Greymouth. 

Auckland. 

Wellington. 

Auckland. 

Melbourne. 



Wellington. 
Dunedin. 
Auckland. 
Wellln^n, 



NEW ERALAND OPPIOIAL TEAR-BOOK. 

FoBEiON Consuls — continued. 



Coantry 
represented. 


Office held. 


Name. 


Place of 
Residence. 


Korway 


Consul -General 
feting) for 
m m n- 


Hans Jdrgen Gundersen 


Melbourne. 










wealth of Aus- 








tralia, New 








Z'^aland, and 








the adjacent 








Islands 






Portugal 


Consul . . John Duncan 


Wellington. 


* 


Vice-Consul . . Henry Rees Qeorge 


Auckland. 


• . . 


.. Arthur Donald Stuart Duncan 


Wellington. 


• 


. . Charles William Rattray . . 


Dunedin. 


Russia 


Consul-General 


Michel Oustinoff . . 


Melbourne. 


Spain . . 


Consul-in Chief 
rwith juris- 
diction over 


Henry Cave 


Melbourne. 










Australia and 








New Zealand) 






Spain.. 


Honorary Vice- 

Consul 
Consul 


Alexander H. TurnbuU 


Wellingtm. 


Sweden 


Arthur Edward Peirce 


Wellington. 


H • ' • • 


Vice -Consul . . 


Sidney Jacob Nathan 


Auckland. 


t> • . 


* 


Albert Kay e 


Christchurcb 


United States of 


Consul-General 


William A. Prickitt 


Auckland. 


America 


(for New Zea- 
land, Fiji, So- 
ciety, and 
other S >uth 
Sea Islands) 






• . 


Vioe-Consul- 
General 


TiConard A. Bachelder 


Auckland. 


• ■ 


Consular Agent ! Frank Graham 


Christchurcb 


. 


John Duncan 


Wellington. 


" 


Frederick Orlando Bridgman 


Dunedin. 











HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR NEW ZEALAND, IN LONDON. 

The Hon. W. P. Reeves, Westminster Chambers, 13, Victoria 
Street, S.W. (Appointed as from 14th June, 1905.) Secretary — 
Walter Kennaway, C.M.G. 

THE COLONIAL OFFICE. 
(Downing Street, S.W., London), with Dates of Appointment. 

Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies —Eight Hon. Earl of Elgiiii 
K.G., G.C.S I.,G.C.I.E.. 11th December, 1905. 

IJnder Secretaries : Parliamentary — The Hon. Winston L. S. Churchill, 
M.P. Permanent— Sir Montagu Frederick Ommaney, K.C.B., G.C.M.G., June, 
1900. 

Assistant Under-Secretaries : Fredericlc Graham C.6. ; Charles P. Lucas, 
O.B. ; H. B. Cox, C.B. (Legal) ; and Reginald L. Antrobus, C.B. 



BOKOU&B HSLD BT COLONIBTS. 



39 



CROWN AGENTS FOR THE COLONIES, 
'WwiwwwKwr. Qj^nDKxa, 8.W. Cnr Opfice: 1, ToxiCNHOOgB BcjtLOtit^ft, E.C.| 

London, 
Crowo Agents -Sir Ernest Edward Blake, K C M.O ; Major Maurice Alex- 
' Cameron, C.M.G,, late R.E. ; and Williatn Hopworlh Mercer, C.M,G, 



HONOURS HELD BY COLONISTS, 

PillVT COUKCIL. 

Right Hon, Richard John, 1897. 

''IziaBfS CaSTMANTORBS OF THK MoST DlSTmOOlSHBD ObOER OF ST. MiGSAKL 

AHD St. George iK.CM.G,). 

fiQlkff, Sir Walter Lawrv, 1686. Pereeval, Sir Weatby Brook, 1894. 

Ball, Hon. Sir John, 1832. Siout. Hon. Sir Robert. 1886. 

BMtor, Sir Jamefi, 1887, Ward. Hon. Sir Joseph Oeorge« 190L 

Kkiobts Bachelor (Kt. Bach.). 
Campbell, Sir John Logan. 1902. Prendergist, Hon. Sir James, 1881, 

Miller. Hon. Sir Honry John, 1901, Rasfiell, Sir William Russell, 1902. 

''TBorke. Hon. Sir George Maurice, 1830. Steward, Hon. Sir William Jukea, 1902. 

COMPAKIONS of the MoBT HONOCIBAIII^R OrDER OP THE BaTH (C.B.). 

Ct*dock, Major Montagu, 1900. Porter, Colonel T. W., 1902. 

I>*»icfi, Brevet-Colonel R. H , 1900. Robin, Brevet Colonel Alfred William, 

Kew&Il, Coloo«l Stewart, 1900. 1900. 

CoitPAVIOKS OF THE MoST DtSTDfOmsHKO OrDBB OF ST. MiCHACL AKD 

St. George (C.M.G.). 
BftiLchop, Lieu^.^Colonel A., 1902. Kennaway. Walter, 1891. 

Oodgeon, Lieut. -Colonel Walter Ed ward, Richardfioo, Hon. Edward, 1879. 

1990. Roberts, John, 1891. 

^wsej, Lient.-Colonel Thomag, 1900. 

CoMPANxoNB, Dieting uisKttD Service Oroeb (D.S.O.). 



Poison, Major D., 1900. 
Stevenson, Capiain B., 1902. 
Todd, Captain T. J. M., 1900. 
Walker, Captain G. H , 1901. 



Abbott, Lieut. -Colonel F. W.. 1902. 
B:irUett, Miijor E., 1902. 
Hcktfv, Lieutenant D A., 1902. 
Hughes, Captain J. G , 1900. 
if .jor, Major C. T., 1900. 

CoiiFANiOKS, Imperial Service Order (1.6.0). 
Gray, Wilii^m, 1906. Hey wood, James B,, 1905. 

RoVAL Red Cnosa, 
WmUmson. Mias J. M. N., 1900. 

Victoria Cross. 
HardhjUD, Lieut. W, J., 1JH31. 

New Zealand Cuoh&, 



Mcnuon, Thomas, 1869, 
Biddle, Benjamin, 1869. 
Bl^k, Bokimon, 1869. 
Hill, George, 1869. 
Lingard, William, 1869. 
'' B, Francis Joaeph, 1869. 



Moling, Christopher, 1809. 

M*ir, Gilbert, 1870. 

Preeo', George, 1869. 

Roberts, John Mackintosh, 1869. 

Shepherd, Richard, 18G9 

Wrigg, Harry Charles William, 1893.' 



NBW SIALAKD OFFICIAL TBARBOOK. 

DiBTnTQin»Hii> Conduct Medals awarded to Membrbb of N«w 

CONTINOBNTS JN SoUTH AFRICA (189&-1902). 



ZSAUkV 



Baigent, Private Tvunbop. 
Black, Sergeant- ^lajor G. C, 
Burr, Sergeant Major W, T, 
CaBBidy. Sergeant W. 
Fletcher, Btirgeant Major W. 
Free, Private A. 
Kent, Sergeant W. 



I/Angham, Sergeant- Major J. 
Lockett, Sergeant- Major E. B, 
Pickett, SorgeantMajor M, 
Rouse, Farrier Sergeant G, 
Wade, Privato H, B. 
White, Serge ant' Major H, 



Peksons allowed to retain the Title of *" Hokourablb " within He* 
Majesty's Dominions 

By deapatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies, dated Downing 
Street f 15th June, 1893, Hib Excellenoy the Governor was apprined that the iitli 
.r^d " Honourable,*' appertaining to MemberB of the Executive and Legislative 
Councils in colonioa possessing Respongible Government, whether confined to 
duration of office or continued for lifpt waa approved by Her late Majesty for aM 
and recognition throughout her dominions, either during office or for life, as tb» 
case may be. 

By further despatch of 10th March, 1B94, the Secretary of State annoutioed 
that be was prepared in future to submit for the approval of the Sovereign tbd 
recommendation of the Governor of any colony having Responsible Government 
that the President of the Legislative Council or the Speaker of the Legislative 
Assemblv may, on quitting office after three years' service in their respective 
offieet, be permitted to retain the title of " Honourable, '* This title is now 
held by Sir G. M. O'Rorke and Major Sir William Jukes Steward. 

BoeideB the Members of the Executive and Legislative Councils, the follow- 
ing ex-Miniatera, wbone oam'^s do n^t Hppoar in the lint given above, are allowed,, 
as snch, to retain the title of "Honourable'*: Bryce, John, 1864; Fergni^ 
Thomaa, 1891; Hialop, Thomas \V., 1S91 ; Johnston, Walter W., IfiSi; 
Mitchelaon, Edwin, lft9i ; Oliver, Richard, isSi ; Reeves, WilUam P., 1896; 
RiehardRon, George P,, 1891 ; Thompson, Thomaa, 1900; Tole, Joiieph A., 1888. 

Retired Judges of Stpreme Court. 
By despatch of 29th August, 1877, it was announced that retired Judges of 
the Supreme Court may be allowed the privilege of ben ring the title of '* Honoiar- 
able" for iife, within the colony. Thi^ title is now held by Sir Jamea Prender 
gaat and the Hon. Kdward Tennyson Conclly. 



GOVERNOR OF NEW ZEALAND, 

IsT April, 1906. 

Plunket, His Excellency The Right Honourable WilHam Lee, fifth 
Barou (United Kingdom, 1827), formerly an Attache in the Diplo- 
inatic Service, and stibsequently Private Secretary to successive 
Lords Lieutenant of Ireland (1900-4) ; Knight Commander of 
St. Michael and St. George; Knight Commander of the Royal 
Victorian Order; son of fourth Baron (Archbishop of DublinJ; 
horn 19th December, 1864 ; succeeded 1897 ; married, 1894, Laay 
Victoria Alexandrina Hamilton Temple-Blackwood, daughter ol 
first Marquess of DufiFcrin and Ava, K.P., (j.C.B., &c. Issue : Two 
sons (Flonourables Terence and Brinsley) four daughters (Honour- 
ables Helen, Eileen, Moira, and Joyce). Appointed 9th March, 
1904. and assumed office 20th June, 1904, as Governor and Com- 



[Inset. See page SI. 1 
ALTERATIONS TO DATE (31st AUGUST, 1906). 
ExBCunvB Council, 213t June, 1906. 
His Excellency the Governor presiding. 
Hon. William Hall-Jones, Prime Minister, Colonial Treasurer, Minister of 
Labour, Minister of Education, Minister for Public Works, and Minister 
of Marine. 
Hon. Sir Joseph George Ward, K.C.M.G., Colonial Secretary, Minister for 
Railways, Postmaster • General and Electric Telegraph Commissioner, 
Minister of Industries and Commerce, and Minister of Public Health. 
Hon. James Carroll, Native Minister and Commissioner of Stamp Duties. 
Hon. James McGowan, Minister of Justice and Minister of Mines. 
Hon. Thomas Young Duncan, Minister of Lands and Minister for Agriculture. 
Hon. Charles Houghton Mills, Commissioner of Trade and Customs and 

Minister of Immigration. 
Hon. Albert Pitt, M.L.C., Attorney-General and Minister of Defence. 
Hon. Mahuta Tawhiao Potatau te Wherowhero, without portfolio. 
Clerk of the Executive Oonncil— Alexander James Willis. 

Executive Council, 6th August, 1906. 

His Excellency the Governor presiding. 

Hon. Sir Joseph George Ward, K.C.M.G., Prime Minister, Colonial Treasurer, 

Postmaster-General, Commissioner of Electric Telegraphs, and Minister 

of Industries and Commerce. 
Hon. William Hall- Jones, Minister for Railways and Minister for T*uhlic 

Works. 
Hon. James Can-oil, Native Minister and Commissioner of Stamp Duties. 
Hon. James McGowan, Minister of Justice, Minister of Mines, and Minister 

of Immigration. 
Hon. Albert Pitt, M.L.C., Attorney-General, Colonial Secretary, and .Minister 

of Defence. 
Hon. John Andrew Millar, Commissioner of Trade and Customs, Minister 

of labour, and Minister in Charge of the Marine Department. 
Hon. Robert McNab, Minister of Lands and Minister for Agriculture. 
Hon. George Fowlds, Minister of Education and Minister of Public Health. 
Clerk of the Executive Council— .Mexander Jamea Willis. 



BOBCUTIVB COUNCIL. 81 

maader*in*Chief in and over His Majesty's Colony of New Zedand 
and its Dependencies* Salary, £5,000. Allowance on account of 
establishment, £i,500, and travelling-expenses, £500 per annum. 
The allowance is not payable for atjy period durini? which the 
Governor is absent from the colony. Residences : Old Connaught, 
Bray, County Wicklow. Ireland ; Government House, Wellington ; 
Government House, Auckland, 

Private Secretary : Horace Clare Waterfield, Esq. 

1st Aidede-Camp : Captain Francis Powell Braitliwaiie, 5th 
Northumberland Fusiliers. 

Aides-de-Camp : Lieutenant the Honourable Arthur Maurice 
Robert Bingham, 5th Lancers. Captain John Hugh Boscawen 
(honorary). 

Administrator of the GovBRNiiiBNT. — The Chief Justice, 
appointed under a dormant Commission, 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 

l8T April, 1906. 

TaK annual appropriation for Ministers' salaries is fixed by 
statute at the sum of £8,900, of which £1,600 is for the Prime 
Minister, £1,300 for the Minister for Railways, and £1,000 for each 
ad six other M misters. All Ministers to whom salaries are appro- 
priated are members of the Executive Council, holding one or more 
of the olBces specified by law. Members of the Executive Council 
travellmg within the colony on public servjce are entitled to 
allowance not exceeding £1 lOs, per day when so engaged, but 
not during the time a Mmister is attending a session of the General 
Afldembly. The meuibers of the Executive Council to whom 
•alaries are payable, and who are not otherwise provided with 
reatdences at the seat of Government, are entitled to an allowance 
ID lieu thereof at the rate of £200 a year. 

The Executive Council now consists of: — 

His Excellency the Governor presiding. 

Bt. Hon. Richard John Seddon, P.C, Prime Minister, Colonial 

Treasurer, Minister of Defence, Minister of Labour, Minister of 

Education, and Minister of Immigration. 
Hon. Sir Joseph George Ward, K.C.M.G,, Minister for Railways, 

Colonial Secretary, Postmaster-General and Coanmiasioner of 

Electric Telegraphs, Minister of Industries and Commerce, and 

Minister of Public Health. 
Hon. James Carroll, Native Minister and Commissioner of Stauip 

Duties, 
Hon. William Hall-Jones, Minister for Public Works and Minister 

of Marine, 
Hon. James McGowan, Minister of Justice and Minister of Mines, 
(23rd January. 1900.) 



NEW ZBALAND OmcIAL TBAH-BOOK, 



Hon. Thonms Yoimg Duncan, Minister of Lands and Minister for 

Agriculture, (2nd July, 1900,) 
Hon. Charles Houghton Mills, Commissioner of Trade a.nd CustomB, 

(29th October, 1900.) 
Hon. Albert Pitt, Attorney-General. (22nd June, 1903.) 
Without Portfolio, Hon, Maiiuta Tawhiao Potatau te Wherowhero* 

(22nd May, 1903.) 

Clerk of the ExecutiTe Goanoil— A1* rander Janne* Willis. 



THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 

Legislative Council. 

The number of rn embers at present constituting the Legislative- 
Council is thirty-eight. The number cannot be less than ten, but i& 
otherwise unlimited. Prior to 1891 Councillors summoned by the 
Governor held their appointments for life ; but on the 17fch of Sep- 
tember of that year an Act was passed giving the Council power to- 
elect its own Speaker for a period of five years, and making future ap- 
pointments to the Council tenable for seven years only, to be reckoned 
from the date of the writ of summons of the Councillor's appointment, 
though every such Councillor may be reappointed. The qualifications 
are that the person to be appointed be a male of the full age of twenty- 
one years, and a subject of His Majesty, either natural-born or 
naturalised by or under any Act of the Imperial Parliament or by or 
under any Act of the General Assembly of New Zealand. All con* 
tractors to the public service to an amount of over £60 and Civil 
servants of the colony are ineligible as Couueillors. Payment of 
Councillors is at the rate of £200 a year, payable monthly. Actual 
travelling-expenses to and frfcra Wellington are also allowed. A 
deduction of £1 5s. per sitting- day is made in case of an absence 
exceeding fourteen sitting-days in any one session, except through 
illness or other unavoidable cause. Under " The Legislative 
Council Act, 1891," a seat is vacated by any member of the- 
Council (1) if he takes any oath or makes any declaration 
or acknowledgment of allegiance, obedience, or adherence to any 
foreign Prince or Power ; or (2) if he does, or concurs in, or adopts, 
any act whereby he may become a subject or citizen of any foreign 
State or Power, or is entitled to the rights, privileges, or immunities- 
of a subject of any foreign State or Power ; or (3) if he is a bank- 
rupt, or compounds with his creditors under any Act for the time 
being in force ; or (4) if he is a public defaulter, or is attainted of 
treason, or is convicted of felony or any infamous crime; or (5) it 
he resigns his seal by writing under his hand addressed to and ac- 
cepted by the Governor ; or (6) if for more .than one whole sessioa 
of the General Assembly he fails, without permission of the Governor 
notified to the Council, to give his attendance in the Council. By 
the Standing Orders of the Council, the presence of one- fourth of 
the members of the Council, exclusive of those who have leave of 



^^^V L8016LATIVB COUNCIL* 88 


ab^Dce» is necessary to constitute a meetitig for the exerciee of its 


powers. This rule, however, may be altered from time to time by 


the Ck>unciL 


The ordinary sittiDg-days are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Tlmredays, 


and Fridays, from 2,30 p.m. to 5 p.m.i resuming again at 7.30 p,m* 


when necessary. ^H 


BoM« or Mbmbers of the Honourable the Legislative Council 1 


OF New Zealand (Ist April, 1906). _^J 


Speaker— Hon. 0. C. Bowzn. ^H 


Oh&irm&D of CommittceB— The Hon. W, 0. Smith, ^^ 


Nftma. 


Provincial 
DIstiiet. 


Date of AppointmeaK 1 


Axkwzight, tbe Hon. Francis .. 


Wellington . , 


13 December, 1903. 1 


B&ilU«, the Hon. William Dougl&B Hall .. 


Marlborough 


8 March, 1861,' J 


B^dty. the Hon, Alfred 


Otago 


18 March, 1903. ^M 


Beeb&D, the Hon. Wniiain 


Auckland . . 


22 Ji]ne. 1903. ^H 


Boh, the Hon. William Moaat ., 


Otago 


16 October, 1899. ^^ 


Bowen, the Hon. Charles Uhriatopher . . 


Canterbury . . 


23 January, 1891.* J 


Camcro68, the Hon. Walter Charles Fre 


Tajan&ki . . 


16 March, 1903. ^J 


dtrick 




■ 


Pddwick, the Hon, Henry 


Otago 


16 October, 1899. ^H 


Piaser, tbe Hon. Francii Htimphrie 


Wellington . , 


22 June, 1899. ^H 


Gtorge, the Hon. Seymour Thoroe 


Aucktaud .. 22 June, 1903. ^H 


Qoorley, the Hon. Hugh 


Otftso . , n J y ne . J 899. ^1 


Harris, the Hon. Benjamin 


Auckland . . 3 February. 1904. J 


Bolmea, the Hon. James 


Wesiland 


IS April, 1902. ^M 


Jeiikiiiaon, the Hon. John Edward 


Canterbury , . 


6June, 19(X). ^M 


3(dmston, the Hon. Charlee John 


Wellington . . 


23 January, 1891.* ^B 


Jones, the Hon. George 


Otago 


13 December, 1902. 1 


Kelly, the Hon. Thomaa . , . . | Taranaki . . ! 16 October* 1899. | 


KtUy, the Hon. Witltam 


Auckland. . . 


3 February, 1904. I 


LooisiiOD, ihe Hon. Charles 


Canterbury . . 


22Deoembf^r;1000, 1 


Uaodonald, the Hon. Ihomaa Kennedy . . 


Welliogton . . 


22 June, 1903. 1 


lIcLean» the Hon. George 


Otago , . ; 19 December. 1881,* | 


^^JKaraball, the Hon. James 


Webttand . . 


18 April, 1902. ^M 


^^Biller, the Hon. Sir Henry John. Kt. . . 


Otago 


8 July, 186^,* ^M 


^^HDfitgomery, the Hob. W' illiam. . 


Canterbury . . 


16 October, 1899. ^M 


1 Ormond, the Hon. John Davics 


Hawke'a Bay 


20 January, 1691.* ^H 


1 Oi^rke^ the Hon. Sir George Maurice, Kt. 


Auckland . . 


25 June, iDOi. ^H 


r ru-n. the Hon. David 


Otago 


3 Fibruary. 1904. ^^ 


1 e Hfin. Albert, Lieut. -Colorel 


Nelson 


28 December, 1899. 1 


L iV!r^>^H. the Hon. Richard Harman Jeffares 


Nelpon 


18 Dtcember, 1902. 1 


Rigg, the Hon. John *. 


Wellington . . 


6 June, 1900, 1 


Scotland, tbe Hon. Henry 


Taranaki . . 


24 February, 18G8.* 1 


fimith, the Hon. William Co wper 


Hawke*8 Bay 


13 December, 1903- 1 


Stevens, the Hon. Edward Cephaa John . . 


Canterbury . . 


7 March, 18b2.' J 


Thompson, the Hon. Thomaa .. 


Auckland .. 


IS March, 1903. ^m 


Tra«k, the Hon. Francia 


NeUon . . |, 18 March, 1908. ^H 


Walker, the Hon. Lancelot 


Canterbury . . 


15 May, 18S5.* ^H 


Whrrowhero, the Hon. Mahuta Tawhiao 


Auckland . . 


22 May, 1908. ^H 


Totatau te 


■ 


WjgTtm, the Hon. Heory Francis * * Canterbury . . 


22 June, 1903. ^M 


* Lifti inembbrs. 1 


^^ d^Vbk. ^J 



34 



NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TSAR-BOOK. 



Olerk of ParUftmentfl, Clerk of the Legialativo Oounoil, bod Ex&imner of 
Standing Ordera upon Private Bills^Leonard Stowe. 

Clork'AssisUnt — Arthur Thomas Bothamley, 

Second Clork^ Assistant — George Moore. 

Interpreter^ Prank Herbert Phillips. 



House of Representatives. 

The number of memberB constitufciug the House of Representa* 
tives 18 eight y^seveoty- six Europeana and four Maoris. This 
number was fixed by the Act of 1900, which canie for the first time 
into practical operation at the general election of 1902. Previously 
(from 1890) the House consisted of seventy-four members, seventy 
Europeans and four Maoris ; and previously to that (from 1881) of 
ninety 'five members, ninety- one Europeans and four Maoris, The 
North Island at present returns thirty-eight European members, 
and the Midiile Island thirty-eight* The elections are triennial, 
except in the case ol a dissolution by the Governor. Every regis- 
tered elector, being of the male sex, and free from any of the dis- 
qualifications mentioned in "The Eiectoral Act, 1905," is eligible for 
membership. All contractors to the public service of New Zealand 
to whom any public money above the sum of £50 is payable, directly 
or indirectly, in any one financial year, as well as the Civil servants 
of the colony, are incapable of being elected as, or of sitting or voting 
as, members. The payment made to members of the House of 
Bepresentatives is £25 per month, amounting to £300 per annum, 
subject to certain deductions for absence during session not due 
to sickness or other unavoidable cause. TraveUing-expenses to and 
from Wellington are also allowed. This scale of payment came 
into force on the 7th November, 1901, uader the provisions of **Th© 
Payment of Members Act, 1901." Twenty members, inclusive 
of the Speaker, constitute a quorum. Unless otherwise ordered, 
the sitting-days of the House are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 
and Fridays, from 2.30 p.m. to 5.30 p.m., resuming at 7.30 p.m. Order 
of admission to the Speaker's Gallery is by ticket obtained from 
the Speaker. The Strangers' Gallery is open free to the public, 



HOUBK OF liEPKESENTATIVBB. 8fi J 


Boll or Membrbs of this House of BGPRESENTATivBft ^H 


(IsT Apkil, 1906). ^H 


Spemker— ^^M 


Cbairmiui of Commibtees — ^^H 


Ksme. 


Eleetoral Dtatiioi. 


Bate whett Wrlti mail« 1 

retiimable* ■ 


For European EleetoraUs, 




1 


Aitken, John Gntbrie Wood 


Wellmgton East . , 


IS Deeembsr, 190&. M 


AJifioo, Kwen William 


Waitemata 


^ 


All«n, Edmund Oiblett . , 


Chalmers.. 




^^H 


Allen, James 


Bruce 




^^H 


Arnold^ J&mes Frederiok 


1 Dunedin South 




^^H 


Bftrber, Williatn Henry Peter 


Newtown 




^^H 


Barclay , Alfred Richard _ 


Dunodin North 




^^H 


Baomo, Frederick Rbrenfreid 


Auckland East 




^^H 


Bennttf James . 


Taapeka ., 




^^H 


Bollard. John 


Eden 




^^H 


Baddo, David . . 


Kaiapoi , , 




^^H 


CaJToll, Hon« James 


Waiapu * . 




^^H 


Col tin, Jamefl . . 


Butler 




^^H 


Davey, Thomas Henry , . 


ChristchurehKaat. . 




^^1 


DDloD, Alfred .. 


Hawke's Bay 




^^1 


Duncan, Bod. Thomae Young 


0am aru , . 




^^H 


Ell, Henr? George 


Chriatchurch South 




^^H 


Field, William Hughes _ 


Otaki 




^^H 


Ptsfaer, Francis Marion Bates 


Wellington Central 




^^H 


FUtman, Frederick Robert 


Gerald ine . , 




^^1 


Fowlds, George . . 


1 Grey Lynn 




^^1 


Frmser, Alfred Levavaeour DurelK. 


, Napier ' , . 




^^1 


Fraaer, William 


Wakatipu 




^^H 


Graham, John .. 


City of Nelson 




^^H 


Gcay, Charles Matthew . . 


Cbrtatohurch North 




^^H 


Greenslade, Henry Jamee 


Waikato .. 




^^H 


Ooinnefis, Arthur Robert, . 


Grey 




^^H 


Hall. Charlei .. 


Waipawa., 




^^H 


Hall' Jones, Hon. William 


Timaru . . 




^^H 


Hanan, Josiah Alfred 


Invercargill 




^^H 


Hardv, Charles Albert Creery 


Selwyn , . 




^^H 


Honies, William Herbert 


1 Bay of Plenty 




^^H 


Hogan, JohD Tiiomas 


Wanganui 




^^H 


Hogg, Alexander Wilson 


Masterton 




^^H 


Hornsby, John Thomas Marryat ., 


Wairarapa 




^^H 


Houston, Robert Morrow 


Bay of Islands 




^^H 


Isird, Chwles Hayward . . 


Wellington North . . 




^^H 


JeucingSj WUiiam Thomas 


Egmont ,. 


1 

1 1 


^^H 


Kidd, Alfred .. 


AnckUnd Central . . 




^^H 


lurkbridc, Matthew MiHdlevood ,, 


Manukau 




^^H 


Lauren«otj, George 


Lyttelton., 




^^H 


Lawry, Frank * . 


Parncll , . 




^^H 


Leth bridge, Frank Yates 


1 Oroua 




^^H 


Lewiif, CbaHes .. 


Courtenay 




^^H 


McGcwan, Hon. James . . 


Thames . . 




^^H 


MoKcniEie« Roderick 


Motueka , , 




^^H 


liMkeozie, Thomas 


Waikouaiti 




^^H 


MoLMblan. John 


1 Ashhurton 




1 



86 



NEW BBALAMD OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOE. 



Boll of Membbrs of the House of Bbprbsbntativbb- 
contintied. 



Name. 


Electoral District. 


Date whea Writs made 
returnable. 


For European ElectoraUs- cotitd 






MoNab, Robert 


Mataura .. 


13 December, 1905. 


Maopherson, Jobn Andrew 


Mount Ida 


^ 


Malcolm, Alexander Scott 


Clutha . . 


^ 


Major, Charles Edwin 


Hawera .. 




Mander, Francis 


Marsden . . 


„ 


Maasey, William Ferguson 


Franklin . . 




Millar, John Andrew 


Dunedin Central . . 


^ 


Mills, Hon. Charles Houghton 


Wairau .. 


» 


Poland, Hugh .. 


Ohinemuri 


^ 


Poole, Charles Henry 


Auckland West 


, 


Beid, Donald (jun.) 


Taieri 




Remington, Arthur Edward 


Rangitikei 




RhodeP. Robert Heaton . . 


EUesmere 




Ross, Robert Beatson 


Pahiatua . . 


^ 


Rutherford, Andrew William 


Hurunui .. 


. 


Seddon, Rt. Hon. Richard John, P.O. 


Westland 


„ 


Sidey, Thomas Kay 


Caversham 


^ 


Smith, Edward Metcalf . . 


Taranaki . . 


„ 


Stallworthy, John A. 


Kaipara .. 


„ 


Stevens, John . . 


Manawatu 


„ 


Steward, Hon. Sir William Jukes, 


Waitaki .. 


^ 


Kt. Bach. 






Symes, Walter .. 


Patea 




Tanner, William Wilcox . . 


Avon 


., 


Thomson, John Charles . . 


Wallace .. 


„ 


Ward, Hon. Sir Joseph George, 


Awarua . . 




K.C.M.G. 






Wilford, Thomas Mason . . 


Hutt 




Witty, George . . 

Wood, William Thomas . . 


Riccarton 


. 


Palmers ton 


- 


For Maori Electorates. 






Heke, Hone 


Northern Maori 


11 January, 1906. 


Kaibau, Henare 


Western Maori 


^ 


Parata, Tame .. 


Southern Maori 


, 


Ngata, Apiran* Turopa . . 


Sastem Maori 


" 



Clerk of House of Representatives — H. Otterson. 

Clerk- Assistant — A. J. Rutherfurd. 

Second Clerk- Assistant — A. F. Lowe. 

Sergeant-at-Arms — Major T. V. Shepherd. 

Reader and Clerk of Bills and Papers— E. W. Kane. 

Chief Hansard Reporter — Silas Spragg. 

Hansard Supervisor— M. F. Marks. 

Interpreters — L. M. Grace, D. F. G. Barclay. 

Clerk of Writs— H. Pollen. 

Deputy Clerk of Writs— R. F. Lynch. 

Chief Librarian— Charles Wilson. 



OFFICIAL LIBT 



87 



OFFICIAL LIS1\ 



Ist April, 1906. 



PRIMIC MINiaTKKiJ OFHCK. 
Prime Kinitter — Bt. Hon R, J. Seddon. 

PC 
^^r^imry to Cabiiiefc and Clerk of the 

Bzectiiire Council --A. J. Willi* 



COLONIAL SKOROABY'S J>IC 

PAKTMKN'L 

Cuisr Offick. 

CoiouUl Secretary— Hon. Sir J, G. W»nS. 

K.CMO. 
Under-Secrelanr — Hugli Pollen 
Chief Clerk— R". F. Lyneh 
Olerks^J. F, Andrews, A. B. Kennedj. 

F, A. de La More. F. Krans 
Officer in Charge of Oovemnient Build- 

it?ifii — W. H. Hennah 

ArmT OFrtos. 

Oantfotler and Audiior-General — J. K 

^arbiirton 
AMistant Controller and Auditor— J. C ' 

QaTjn 
Oliief Clerk— L. C. Ro»krnge I 

Ckrk*— W. O. Holdawonh, H. 3 Pollen. 

B, J. A. Sterenfon, J. T. Duinbell, 

C. E. Easton, E. A. Catpj 
CWeta-O, a. Snjith. J. A. Ha?, &. 8. 

Oapper, H. T. Thorap*on, B, K. 

Sunlfj, J, P. Rutherford, T. Treahj, 

A. A. Catrnfi, H, L. Murbrook 
lltra CIrrkt— D. C. litnee, A. K BTble^ 

C. E, Bright. E. E. Snijthe, J, McC. 

H«intUon, T. 8. Hainer 
CKief Audit Inspector and Audit of 

Looal Bodiet-P. P, Webb 
a#rk— J. Ward ' 

Audit Officer, AffenlGenenr* Office, 

London— C. F. W, Palliier 
Audit In»pector«— A. H. Maclean, J. ' 

Kine« A. W. Eamet, O. H. T. Enston, 

C. F. Jolin»on, H. A, Lamb, A. A. 

BMhiiiie, J, H. Fowler, R. A. Gray 



RSGtBTBAft-GENKJlAL'B OfFICI, 

Kegislrar-General — E, J. Von Dadelizen 
L'hief Clerk rind Depirly Hei^itttrar- 

General — O. Dnirj 
Carr<r#pOTtdenctt and Record* Olerk — 

W. W. Cook 
Statiaticitl Clerka — F. H. Machattie. 

W. M. Wright 
Clerk and Eraitiiner of Return* from 

Oinciating MinisterB and Kegiatmrt — 

G, A, Scliooh 
Llerlu for Seikrcliei, Dooument«, Stc, — 

Ben Keys, C. Jiinion 
Indei Clerk— S, CofT^v 
Cadet— J. W, Butcher 



RnOrBTBARS OF HlHTHB, DlATHH. *l«l» 

Four Chief Towhm, 
AiicHand— E. H. Ti?uii» 
Wellington— F. W/Mansftdd 
Uliriftlchurt'li — L- C: Williams 
Dunedin — H Maxirrll 

[There are aUo 211 District Regie* 
Lmri located ihroughoul tlie colon/.] 

CohOtuAL Museum and OBflKftyATOBiaa. 
IHrector — A. Han lUon 
I »t ronooiieal Observer — ^T King 
Meteorological Obserrera — 
North Island— 

Auckland, T. F. CheeieniAn 

Cambridge, Dr. Fenireath 

Rotornaf Dr. A. H, Woblmann 

New Pljmoiilh. a. W. Palmer 

Momohalii, F. Gillanderg 

Levin, D. M. C«le 

Tauranga, Or, W. Brown 

Giahorne, A. Cuthbcrfc 

Meeunee^ Rev. Dr. Eennedj, 
F-R.Met.S 

Wellington, Ref. D. C. Batei, 
F.B.Met.8. 



38 



KBW ZSALAITD OFFICIAL TBAR-SOOK. 



South liland — 

Kelion, J. Sharp and Dr. Hudson 
Kaikoura, Dr. Qann, RR Met.S. 
Haniner Spa, J. B. G^mld 
Linooln, O. 0raT 
Ohriilchureh, W. F. Skey, B.8c. 
Leith Valley, Duneclia, H, Skey 
Timani, R Ferg HIIRO 11 
HoktLik&j A. D. M&crarlane 
ItiTercargillt D* Q. Oilmonr 

KbW ZiALAND iNaTITCTl- 

Pr«aident— Sir Janu^s Hector, RR.!=i. 
Hon,Trea»urer — J. W. JoyiiL, M.A. 
Sepr^tiry— T. II. Gill, M.A., LL,B, 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC 

HEALTH. 

Miuiiter of HeftHh — Hon. Sir J G. 

Ward. K.O.M.G. 
Dir«*ct^>r and Chief Health OfReer. &c.^ 

J. Mahxilm Mason, MT>., B.P.H.^&c. 
Atiiitant Chief Health Officer — Dr. 

Thofiifti H. Ambrose Talinliae, 

M.R.C.S.Eng , D.P.H., Sic. 
WelJingtoti : Bncterit>logi§t. and Distriet 

H^&lih Offict?r— R. H, Makgill, M.D. 

KdiiL, D.P,H. Caiifcb. A»»i«tftiit Bac- 

L«riologiet arni Aafti»iatit in Vaccine 

Lftboratorj — J. A, Hurley 
Native HeaHh Ortic<»r— Dr. Mawi P.* 

tnare 
Chief Clerk— J. J- D. Grii 
Accountant — H. Easlgate 
Olcrki— H. B. Magrath, T. P. BuU«r, 

J. W. TaTlor, L. J. Eli, Typifies. 

Gwenliinn Craig, G, T^Iiirtelli 
Pat)iologi4— .LA Gilnith, M.B.CV S. 
AriFilyHts — Wellington, J. S. McLaiiriTii ; 

Auckland, J. A. Pond ; Dunedin, J. G. 

Bhiek; Chriitclnirdi, A. A. Bicker- 

tOD 

District Healili Officers — Nehon, Dr 
Juiiiied Hudson; Nnpier, Dr, F. 
L De Lisle ; Auckinnd, Dr. J. P. 
Frengley ; Dunediti, Dr. F, Ogston ; 
Chriatchurch, Dr. H. E. Finch ; 
GreTinonth, Dr C, G. Morice 

Port Henllh Officers— Pi cton, Dr. W. E 
Redman ^ Ottmaru, Dr, A. Doughi» ; 
Wnnganiii, Dr. R. C. Eurle; Port 
ChalmcrB, Dr. G. Hodgfs ; WelNng* 
ton. Dr. H. Pollen j Westport, Dr. M 
Mackenzie j Greynioiith. Dr. C* G* 
Morice; Timaru, Dr, E. T. Thomas ; 
Onehunga, Dr, W. G, Scott i Auck- 



land, Dr E, W. SymrmiiTi ; Kaipani, 
Dr. W. H. Horton; Whauijarei, Dr. 
W, W* Baiter; BlufT, Dr. J . Torrance ; 
Lyttelton, Dr. C. H, Upbam ; Giabome, 
Dr, J. W. Williami ; Napier, Dr. T, C. 
Moore ; Npw Pirmouth, Dr H. A- 
McClelland j Hokiaiiga, Dr. D. B, 
Cftlo; Thamei, Dr. F. A, Bett; Whiti- 
anga, Dr. H, 8. Lindsay ; Nelson, Dr 
J. Hudion ; ChHthatn XsWndsi Br. 
H. W. Pigeon 
Sanitary Inipectord — Ciiief Intpectof : 
C- A. Schaner^ Wellington. Inspec- 
tors : Wellington, C. E, Miller, A. P. 
Bennett, and J. A. Brownlie ; Dune- 
din, W. E. QladBtonc ; Strafford, F. B. 
Gardiner J A*ickland,C. C. WinBlenlej 
and R. Grieve j Napi*»r, D. Monro ; NeU 
ion. C. Middleton ; Cbrifitchuircli, R. H. 
McKen^ie and Mt Kerihaw ; Inrer- 
cargili, K. Cameron ; Marton, F. C, 
Wilion i Master ton , C. Dorizac ; Fetid- 
tng, M. O^Brien ; Blenbeini, J, John- 
Eton i Wanganui, S. H Sargeant 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIES 
AND COMMERCE. 

MiniBter— Hon Sir J. G. Ward, K,C.M,G, 
Secretary — T. E Donne 
Chief Clerk -C. R O. Robieson 
Account*nt — R. E. Hayea 



' DEPARTMENT OF TOURIST AND 
HEALTH RESORTS. 

I Minister— Hon. Sir J. Q.Ward, KC.M,a 
I Stiperin ten dent — T, E- Donne 
I Chief Clerk— C. R. C. Rcbieton 
, Account ant — R. E. Hayai 

Inspector^F- Moorhouie 
I Journaliit — J. Cowan 

Draughtsman, J McDonald 

Clttrks— H. Kirk, P. J. Kelleher. J 
I Andrews, J. W. Hill, S. J. Collett, 
I G. F. McGirr. G. A. Cormack, W. R. 

Aekins, J. H. Burr, C. Freyberg 
' Shorthand-writ era and Typists — S. Bi* 
I mani, N. Lambert 

District Agents — Auckland, E. H. Mont* 

gomery *, Te Aroha, W. Hill ; Rotorum, 

I C. Walnut t ; Ohristduiri^h, G. W. O. 

Moon; Ditnedin, J. A. Tipping: In 

I tercargtllj W. R. Blow 



OFFICIAL LIST. 



QoTeraroent Balneolofritft, Rotoroa — 
A S. Woblmann. \LD., U.^OS., 

Uoupe Surgeon, Rotorua — J. M, 3. heriw, 

FRCaL, DP.H, 
Eetidctit Medie&l Officer, Te Arob* — 

a, G. Kenny, M.B, 
K&na^^r, Hftnmer Hot Spring«— J. B» 

Gould 



COLONIAL TREASURER'S DE- 
PARTMENT. 
Cttiitr Office. 
Oolotiisl Tre&iurer— Rt, Hon. R. J. Sed- 

ddo, P.O* 
9errerarT to the Treiwury, ReceiT^r* 
General. FajmaaUr-OeneraK nnd Re* 

futrnrof New Zealand CaueoU — JameM 
t. ilerwood 
AnieUnt SecreUry and Af'oouiiUnt t4> 

the Trefuwrr — Robert J, Collint 
OmMhier—C. K, Chituj 
Cbiretponding Clerk — H. Blundell 
Clerk*^R. B. Vincent, K. L. Mowbray, 

A. O. Gibbes, Jft«, J. Eftson, U. N. W. 

ChMrcb, A. J. ilorgan, T. J. Davii, 

F. H. Tuckey, H. Uawthom, W. Wil- 

fon, O* C. Roddft, E. Fisher^ L. 

McInto»b, W. Gillander», M. F.Alst€D, 

D. M. Schmmm 
Cadets — W. L. Clapton, A. Hore, P. 

DunsUit, G. K. Bogle, H. Stafford, 

K, M« Joyce*, A, Henderson 
Cailrtic*- E. M.Tnylor, K. A. C. Barrage, 

R. B. Banki 

Vbisi'I'LT SociKTtsB, Tbjidx Ukioits, 
FiiTK Art* and Dramatic Works 

COFTBIOUT, AKP UirCLASSiriBD 

SocmiKs kiotSTBT Offici, 

Begittrar and Actuary^-George Lealie 

Renting Barri»ter^ — L. G. Reid 

Clerk and Deputy Kegiitrar— 0. T. 

Bensoni 
Oidette— M A. Brideon 



LAHD A5D INCOME TAX DK^ 
PARTMENT. 

CkMikmis#taner— P. Hejtt. 
Deputy Commisetoner — ^ F, J* M. D\ 
WalfnfleT 



Liiri» Tax. 

Clerk in Charge — H. Nancarrow 
Clerki — D. R. Purdie, E. W. Wat- 
son, K. Randell, J. N. Grants J. 
Ferguson, H* 8. Barron, 0. E, J. 
Dow land 

Ifcomb Tax. 
Clerk in Charge — J. M. King 
Clerks— W. M. Tyer«, D. G. Clark, G. W. 

Janiach, M. Fmser, C. T. Rout, E. J. R, 

Camming, J. M, Park 
Receir* r of Land and Income Tax — 

C. V. Ereeft 
Shorthand* writer and Typewriter (Pii* 

Tate Secretary to Rt. Hon, the Pre> 

mier)— J. StoTenaon 
Cadtta— N. H. Mackie, G. C. Smith, 

J. S. Arthur 
Cftdette— K. L. Morgan 



OLD-AGE PENSIONS DEPART- 
MENT. 

Head Qfflee — Government Bull din jjt, 
Wellinglori. 

Regiatrar— J. Eman Smith 

Chief Clerk— G. C. Faehe 

Accountant — U, E. Williams 

Clerks — F. \L Leckip, F, G, Twiw, 

R. S. Stoke^ J. H. Reynolds, J. S. 

Lambert, P. Cunningham 
Cadets— G. N» Morns, L. 0. Barnes, 

A. H. PardU 

Di-piatT Registrars — 

Auckland— S. Ruddock, Cailrt— J, H. 

Boyea 
Wellington— L. Crow 
Christchurch— L. 0. Williams 
Dunedin — Philip A. Keddelh Cadet 

— B. E, Murphy. 
Inft-reargill— J. E. Colyer* Cftdet— 

E. B. Patrick 
Cororoandrl — J. Mclodoe 
Darjjavillo— S, Thompson 
Hamiltoa^ — W. Shannghan 
HeleUBville— G. A. Tapp 
Kaitaia — W. Sefton 
Marigunui— J. Henry 
Maungflturoto— J. ilemphill 
Otabuiui — G. Foreman 
Raglan— W. McCarthy 
Rawene— G. H. Fry 



^■^40 KEW SBILAND OFriOlAl* TBAR-BOOK. ^H 


^H Bot^rua— J. Walt 


CROWN LAW DEPARTMENT, 


^H But«eU--B. J. Partons 


Attornej-General— Hon, Albert Pitt 


^H Tktipo— W. Bern 


flolioitorGeiiOTal — F. Fitchett» M.A., 


^H ^ftrkwoHh -fi M. rTolvn«on 


LL.D, 


^H Whaiigare^— J. FitxQerftM 


Aiaiitant Law Officer— L. G. Reid 


^^1 Whangnrcm— 'P. J Ctimiody 


Acting Law Draft Bin an —W. JolliflTe 


^^H TiiiitJi««— J, Jordan 


Chief Clerk— E. Y. Red ward 


^H Opoliki'C. 0*Rei11j 


Clerk (abo Prirate Secretary to Attor»ij- 


^H Piieroa— H. R Biiih 


General)— K N. G. Poiilton 


^^m TaurangM— W. A. Thoni 


Olepfc— J, Chriitie 


^H Te Aroba^H, R Bti^h 




^H Whakatane-W. Eeelffl 
^^H Giibome— G. J. A. Johnstone 






^^B Foft Awanui— C H. Mt^lUop 
^H Napier^K. B. Mathias 


DEPARTMENT OF JD8TJCE- 


^^V DaTiiie?ifke — S. TaiiiW 


HiAD Ofpiob. 


^^1 , Warp^iwa— «r. Ecdeion 


Mimat«r of Juati(^e — Ifbti. Jamoa 


^1 Wairoa~H II. Oarr 


MeGowan 


^H N«w Plrniotith— W. A. D. Banks 


Under-Secretary— F. WaldegraTe 


^M 8t ratford -M. Folrj 


Ckief Clerk— G. C. B. Jordan 


^^1 Wanganui— G. A. Barton 


Trafislator— G. H. DttFiei 


^^H Hawera^-A. Trimble 


Cterka— C. E, Mattliews, G. F. Dixon, 


^H Marton-H. C. N. T.Hdttij 


W. T. Gordon ^ L A. B. Taulenberg 


^H Patea<-M. O'BHen 


Cadet— Q. H. A. Tanner 


^^H Feilding — W. Matrarera 




^H Carte rio n — H . Sal mon 


Pathnt Offigb. 


^^m MaBtertan-^E. Rhw^oti 


Rejfiatrar of Patents, Detignt^ and Trade 


^B Lak i — T. 0* Rou rke 


Markf- F, WaldrgraTe 


^1 Paluatiia— W. J. ReeTc 


DepiitT Registrar— J. 0. Lewi* 


^H Palmeriton North -C. J. Hewlett 


Clerk^Marj Ejre 


^B Neliion-E. 0. Kelling 


C»det— J. T Biihop 


^M Motueka— J. C. WiilU 




^^M Blenli(^inj — J Terrj 


JfTDimau 


^H HaTelock— A, T. Ohing 
^^H Akaroa — ^D. Jark^on 
^H Aroborlej— M. Boche 
^H Ashbnrton— T. W. Tayler 


Supreme Court Jndff^s. 
Chief Juatice — 

Wellington— Sir R. Stout, E.C.M G. 
Judges — 

Wellington — Theo. Cooper^ F. B, 

Cht&pttmn 
Auckland— W. B. Edwards 
Christ ohurfli— J* E. Denniaton 
Dunedin — J. S. William* (on leave) 


^»^ Cukerdeii— A. 8, Bird 
^^^^^LKaiapoi — A. Q. A all by 
^^^HKaikourn— J. P. Clarkion 
^^^^^ Timiiru — T. ITowley 

^M Fair lie— 3. Kidd 


^1 VVaimale— W. Y. Purcliai« 
^H Grffjmoulh — B. Harper 


Uhtrirt Court Jiidg99, ^H 


^H Reef ton — A. Aftkeubeok 


Hamilton and Thames— C. C* Kettle 


^M Hokiiika— J. C. Mulfroj 
^H WeflLport— E. D Mo^ej 
^H Onmaru— R. P. Ward 


Wairarapa, Wanganui, New PljmoutUj 


fitratford, Hawera, Palmerston North, 


Paliiatua, Nelson, A (nb burton, Timaru, 


^H B»tlohiUia— W, A Mattbe«r» 


Oamaru, Queen«lown, Nasehj, Law- 


^^H Lawrence— A, M. Ejea 


rence, Imrerrargili, Gore, Hokitika^ 


Orejmoutb, Westport, Reefton, and 


^m Millon— D. McRae 


Eumara-'W. R. Haaelden 


^^^^ Na»0bj— F, VV. Hart 




^^^^Palment^n Soiitli— W. Milliard 


Rt^ittrart nf the Supreme Court, ^^fl 


^^^^^pWaiktoiiaiti — J. Burrowa 


Auckland -R. E. G. Thomas ^H 


^^^^^ Quecnitowii— A. A. Mair 


New Pljmoiitb— T. Hutchison ^H 


^^m Rirerl^o — J. M. Adam 


Wanganui — R, L. Stanford ^^M 


^H Chatham TslandB— R. W. Rayrjer 





^^^^m OrFlClAL. LIST. 41 1 


Napier— H. W. BAibani 


Sokitika— J. Park ^H 


Gwborne— W- A. Barton 


Grejinouth— H. Hannan ^^H 


Wellington — D. G. A, Coop«tr 


Timaru— J. W. Whit« ^^1 


5el*on^ — H, Kjre Keunj 


Oamaru — A. G. Crragh ^^H 


Blenheim— T, ScoU-Stoith 


Queen»town— Weilpj Turton ^^M 


Chri^tcl lurch — A. R. Bloittin 


(nTerctirgil)— T. M. Macdonald ^H 


Hokittka— R, iL At?beaoa 


^^H 


Dunedin — G. A, KinR 


Stipendiary Maoist rateM, ^^M 


iDverc&rgtll — J, \i. Cv\jer 


Auckland— C. C Kettle ^H 




Waikato, Jkc— H. W. NorilK^roft ^^M 


Sheriff*. 


ODehunffa, ^.— H. W. Dfer* ^^M 


Auekkiid— R, E. Thoinai 


RuB06i\, <lc.— H. S. Flomme ^^M 


Taranaki — W. A. D. Bftiiks 


Taunuaga, Aa--J. M. Kob«rU* ^^B 


Hapkf^'* Bftj— H. W- Bmbaiit 


Tbames, Ac— R. S. Bunli* ^^1 


P^%trij Bftj— W. A. Barton 


Giiborne, &g.^W. A. Burton ^^^1 


WrHjiigioii— D, Q. A. Cooper 


New Plymouth- T. Hutuhtioii ^^M 


W^irivrnpa — E» Rawioii 


Hawcrm, Ac.— A. Tut-nbuU ^^H 


WaJiganiii and Ranettik^*!— 0. A Barton 


Wanganui, Ao. — R. L. Stanford V 


ItaumwAtu^C. J. Hevilett 


Pftbn^r»ton North, Ao. — A. D. Thomnaa 1 


ITelaan — W. Lleapa 


We III ng ton, Ac.— A. Mc Arthur, M.A., 1 


Weatland North— K. D. Mofilejr 


LL,D. I 


Cftttral We«iknd— A. A*k«nb«ck 


Waimrapa, Ac.— W. P. Jarne. _^M 
Napter, Ac.^H. W. Brabant ^H 


Martborotigh — ^J, Terrj 


Canterburj— A. K. Bbiani 


Nelson, Ac.^H. Eyre Kenn> • ^H 


Timaru — 0. A. Wmv 


BleDheim, Ac. — T. Seott Smith* ^^U 


WrtiUtid — E. J Ach e«on 


Cbriatcl lurch, Ae.^H. W, Biibop ^H 


OUffO— a A. King 


Kaittpoi, Ac.— V, G. Daj ^^ 


8omlil»*«d— J R. Coly*fr 


Timaru, Ac»— C. A. Wra? 1 




Grejmoutb, WcMport, A*.— W. G. K* 1 

Kcnrick* 1 


Cfomm Soli(*(tort. 


AaoUbrid^Hoit. J A. Tol« 


flokitika, A<\— E. J, At^heaon* 1 


■^Plymouth— W, Kerr 


Diinedin. Ac.— H, Y. Widdowaon, 0. 0, 1 


m^»rne-J. W. NoUn 


Graliam ^^« 


Ifftpier — II. A. Cornforcl 


Oamaru, Ac— J. Ki^ddoU* ^H 


WeUingtoti— F, IT, D. Bell 


Hilton. A^.— O. Cruiekflhunk* ^H 


Wati^imi— S. T. Fitjtht*rb#rt 


Cljrde, Ac— F. J. Bur^feai* ^H 


Pfclrremton North— H, 3. Pitzherbert 1 


Naseby— J. MeEinii!»* ^H 


N*l.on-C Y. F<?n 


Irirercafgill, &u. — S. E. McCarth* • ^^ 


Bteiihritu— K McCalluni 


w, a Rida«*ii* 1 


ChritUhurch— T. W. Stniig<*r 


Chnthani lilandi— Dr. U. W. Pigeon 1 


Timaru— J. W, While 


1 


Dunedin — J. F. M. Fnwer 


Official A4$igneifM m Bankruptty. ^J 


iDTen-arpill— T. M. MamJonaJd 


Auckland— K. Gerard, J.F. ^H 


Oamarti— A- G Crengh 


Wellington— J. Ailicroft, J.P, ^H 




Cbristchuri'li— G. L, Greon^Aod ^^M 


Crumm PfoMevniarM (DUtrivi CouritJ. 


Dunedm— 0. C Graham, SM. ^H 


Haniilton and Thamei— Hon, J. A. Tole 


V 


Kew Pljniouth-W. Kerr 


C^«rlFf d/' Ditirict and MagiatmUt^ J 


Simtford— W. Kerr 


Cavr^«. ^J 


Ha wen— R, L Barton 


Thamea — J» Jackion ^^| 


Watigaimi-«. T, Fitxhtrbrrt 


Ilatiiillon — W» i^hnna^^han ^^H 


Pa»merpt^»n North— H. S- Fitiherbert 


New Plymouth— W. A. D. Banks ^H 


Pahiitiia— W Toa*will 


Hawf)m — A. TfiMibk ^^H 


|{a«terton— A . R, Buiinj 


StrHlford- M. Foley ^^1 


N»Wo— C. V. Fell 


Wangnnm— C. A. B*irtt>n ^^H 


Weitport and fircfion- A, A. Wilion 


Pftlmeratoo North— 0. J. Hewlett 1 


•ArealMiWftrdi 


BUI of a>t.lfle1d», ^H 


tiiiriiii . 


■ 



42 



NEW ZEALAND OrFlCIAL TEAK- BOOS. 



Mftjicrton — E. Eiiwion 
pAbiftiu*— W. J. Reeve 
NeUoij— E. C. Kelling 
HokitikB-J C. Mtlfroj 
KumAra — A. F. Brnt 
Grejoioulh — B. Harper 
Weiiport— E. D, Mosley 
Reeftun — A. A»kenbeck 
Tinmru— T, Uovrler 
Ashburtou— T. w/l\rler 
Oftmaru— K. P. Ward' 
liiTere»r|riU — J. R, Cotjer 
Gore — J. M. R^dger4 
Queenilown— A. A. Miiir 
Lawrence — A. M. Eve« 
Nwebj— F, W. yari 



Ssteit^ert of Qofd Seven tte, Mmm^- 
Btgitirar*^ and Clerkt of Warden** 
titid Mapieiratft* CouriM^ 

Thames^ — J. Jordan 

Coromandf] — J. Meliviae 

Paeroa— H. R. Bush 

Waihi— E. W Care 

Tayraiiga— W. A. Thorn 

Wbarvgarci^ — J* Fitljiemld 

HaTelock (Marl borough)— A. J. Ching 

Nebuii— E. C. Kelliog 

Blenheim — Joltri Terrv 

Molueka-J. C. N. Willi* 

CoJliiipwooil— J. N Nii!d[?r 

Weetiiort— E D, MoBlej 

Charleflton — £► BrtipUj 

E«ef I on — A . A • keti bf-ek 

Ahaura— F. Bird» luii. 

0rejmouth - B. Harper 

Euuiara— A F, Bent 

Hokitika— J C Malfroj 

Aihburioii— T. W. Tarler 

Nasebj, &e.- F. \\\ Hart 

Wyndharu— D. Bogue 

Olyde. Black'i, and Alexandra— F. T. D 

JolTreT 
Oromvrell— 0. E, Bowltug 
Quceiistowiiaiid Arrowioirn — A. A. Mair 
Lawretiee — A M. Kyei 
Gore — J. M. R^nlgers 
RiTerton— J. M. A Ham 



ClmfkM of Mapiatratei Court t. 

Auckland-ILIL G. Ralfe 
Gisborne — G J. Jolnist^iue 
Napier — R, B. MatUiat 
Hasting* — D. Batikfi 
Wairoa— H. H. Carr 
DanneTirke — 8. Tanalej 



MaHon, Ac.— H. C. N. Udley 
Feilding— W. Malrarert 
Otaki -T. O'Rourke 
WflUinffton— A. H. Holtn«it 
Cliri*! church — W. Martin 
Lyltelton— W. D. Walla<?e 
Kaiapoi— A. G. Ashbj 
Waimate— W. Y. Purehaae 
Dunedin— W. G. ?, 0'€a!la«han 
Port Cliftlinera — J. Miller 



OoitONKliUt. 

Aiicklarid, T. Greabutn ; Arrowl4>wii, H. 
Gmbam • Co rum and el ^ A. R. H, 
i^wiiidlev 1 CuUingwood, E. Davidaon ; 
D^AnneTirke, 1\ L. Buick j Feilding, 
J. J. Baguall ; FoilOD, A Fra*cr; 
Haniiltot), J, 9. Bond; Hawera^ C, K. 
Major J Kawhia. T. D. Hamilton j 
Marton, J. J, McDonald ; Otahuhu, S. 
Luke; Qtakip VT. H Simcox ; Paeroa^ 
W. Forrcit; Piihi, J. B. Ariell ; Pal- 
tneraion North, J. Mowletn ; Port 
Albert, L. P. Becroft ; Queenttown, 
L. Hotopj Rug an, W. H. WalJi.; 
Midhir^l, J. Mwckaj ; Taihn|>e, J. P. 
Aldridge ; Tuknkfi, A, Sinclnir; Tapa- 
nui, \V. Quin ^ Thunieft. A Bruee | 
Tauranga, AC 11 Tovt<y ; Te Awu- 
nmtu, J, B. Tc'iLsdalej Te Xopuru^ 
T.Webb J Wathi, M. 1> King; Wai* 
pawa, J, C. Taylor J Wel]iii|»ton, J. 
Aiherofi ; Wealporl, G. B. Sinclairj 
Wbangarei, J. M, Kiilen ; WoodvLtl«« 
E, J. Oolbard. All Stipendiary Ma^ia^ 
tratei are ex offtcia CoroHera, 



Native Land Copkt. 

Chief Judge— H- G Selh Smith 
Judge*— IL W, Bmbaot. H. F. Edger. 

W. G Mair. H. D, Johiieon, J. M. 

Btilkmiii, J. Palmer 
Regi^lrare — Au\kl»i>d. J. W. Browne; 

disbome, J- Brooking j Wellingfoii, 

B. C. Siui 



CommUel&nen of ike Naihe Land Court, 

E. S. Bu»h, A. Ttmibidl C. C. Kettle, 
J. M. Robert*, H. W. Biihop, H. 
Eyre Kenny, R. L. Stanford, T. 
Hutchison, G. Cruiek«hank, R. S* 
Fiorance : Sub - roiuniisaionet't — J. 
Brooking, W- A. Tbom 

OoTeronierii Native Agent, Otorobanga 



OFFIOIAL L£ST. 



43 



CM Jttdee--U. a. Srtli 8miUi 
JttdgCi^The Juilf es o( the Nfttue Laad 

Court 
htainf9 — The Begutrnra of the Nali?e 

Liad Court 

1900/' 

8iij»ruile«dent~P. Slieridan 
Adait&ittraiivd Otfieer — P. 3h«*ridjin 
Kwiwdrf— R, C. Sim 

PreMtnis of Boards. 
^f Tokerau— J. W- Browne 
of ManiapotO'TuwUareto*^ — 
I p. PiK'ke? 
IH*lncl of VViikato— W. Q. Mair 
I*"'" ■' of Wtiariki — Jftckson Palriier 
{ r«? Ikaroa^Gilbert Miiii* 
*jf Aot«a — ThomaB William 
¥nhrr 

?EIBON8 DltrABTlIRIfT. 

loipecior — Lieut-Colonel Arthur Eumej 

Clerk*— T. £. Richardson, W. Gktilan 

rlllen — ^ AurkUnd, Frmiim E^ei-tori 
ItvorDO ; Duncdin, Jobu Henrj 
^nUbj ; Hokitikft, Thoina« Roaaon 
t^omUm ; Inrercargill, AlexAtidef Atm^ 
.tr.>na - Ijjrtteltoii, Matthew Michael 
; Nnpier^ Michael Flannery; 
Fljmouih, Burtholoriiew Llo;fd I 
ri - Waiiganuif Robert T. K. 
V ; Welliugton, Patrick Samuel 
W&toUpu, Alemnder Wil- 
I i >bert« J Hauiiier Sprinf;^, James 
inonio* Reid ; Dumf^ree, KdMmfd 
Murphj i Waipa Vallej, Ed^ward 
Byrne 



ID TELKQRAPU DfiPART- 
MENT, 

^General and Electric Tele- 
^ CummittioDer — ^tlon. Sir X (3t. 
rmni, K.C M O, 
»*^t»r_T— W, Graj, 1,3.0, 

<«iideiil. of Electric Linee—J. £. 

iivLtiBnt Secretary and In»peotor — T. 

Bom 
CpQtrotler of M^oey-ordert and davingi* 

bankf, and Accountaut — G^, Gray 



Chief Clerk— B. Roberiion 

Aeaii taut Control ter of Monej^ordera and 
Savings - bariki^ and A^aUtant Ac* 
couDbiiiit^W, R. Murria 

Clerka, Secret arv's OfBoe— F, V, Water* 
(Second Clerk). W. Crow, J. C, Wil- 
liamson, W. Beswick, V. J, Bro^an, 
T, Ward, H. D. Grocott. J. C- Red- 
mondf A. T. Markiuann, W, J, Gow, 

F, W. Fufby. J, B, J*>Mlan» 3. Ma^s- 
alistor, J. P. P. Clottalon, W, J. 
Wilkie» W. H. BarneU. A. Dunovan, 
C* T, Andrew 

Mat! Agetita— W. labister^ D- E. Lind- 
aay 

Clerks, Inspector's Bniitcb — G» V, Hud* 
son, J. Brennan. W. A. Tanner, 9. M. 
ifarriBon. U. McGill. G. A. Maskew, 
J. L. M. K.^krles^P. Clarke 

Clerks, Aeeouiilant's Branoli — J, L. U. 
Ledger. H. A. R. Huggma. J. M. Tabu- 
teau, W. Chegwiddt^n, H. CoruwalK 
R. D. Kelly, J. IL Kibble white. 
D. A. Jenkins, C, B. Harton, W, J. 
Drake, J. G. Roache, J. Co;^*le, F. E, 
Beamish, G. H. Harni, U, 0. Milne, 
0, W. J. Panting. H, C. Hiukson, 
P. D. Hoskioe, J. Robertson, W. R. 
Wttkelin, F, Stewart, G. G» Eoee, 
H. K Combs, J, K. Hull, A .Marshal!, 

G, F. W. Krautr. F, G. A, Eaglea. 

C. G. Collins, T, M. Highet, J. C. A, 
Dudley, W. I. Dawson, W. K. 
Fret hey, J, 9nell, W, Gilbert; T. A, 
Churches, C. H. Clinkard, J. M. 
Dale, 11* A. Lamb, R» M, Porteou*, 

D, Rutherford, W. A. Smith, R. H. 
Twose, E. White, C. Gamble, S. H. A, 
LeTien, J. Madden, J. Aleinnder, 
P, Cutforth, A, Leeden, C. B^ Bwrde- 
kin, G. Footej J, A. Uumplirey, J. G. 
Sclimidt, C. L. W hitehetiil, E'. J. L, 
Whilinj?, G, B. Williamson, J. W. 
Buchanan, W, M. Krcts, J. McMorrau, 
N, V. Ross. K. E. Mortimer. H. A. 
Hamilton, O. L. T. Harrison, W, 0. 
Furdie, W. M. Moore, S. G. Turner, 
U. F. G, Bringezu, E. At kin, D. 
McCurdy, H. D. Smith, II. B, Rand- 
rup, E. Bermiiiffhaui, S. Broel, E, 
Harris, B, M. Ktnny, V. Johnston, 
M: A. M. MacLeod, C. M. A. Smith, 
M, J. MackcUar, M. A. Asquitli* £, £. 
Wanren, R. E. E. Alexander 

Electrician — T. Buckley 

Assistant l£lectricianB— W, H. ChisholiD| 

R. M. Baird 
Meohaniciana— R. Heinili, F. Palmer 



44 



NSW ZIALAITD OFFICIAL TBAR-OOOR 



8 tori' keeper — J. Black 

AftfUtant Stopekee|ier^C. B. Mtmn 

Clerts in Store— C. Nirbolli, T. Pttlmer, 

W. H. CftHer, M. Mt'Otlirnij, J. G. 

Howard, J. L. Murplij, S. a O. Cox» 

J, W. Brabjri 

Chief PoflTMA8T»Ea. 

Auckland— D. Cumiiiin| 
♦TlitiKieft— H. W. CApper 
•Gisborno— W. H, Renner 
ir»pier— J, 11 Slieiith 
•New Phmoulh-F. 1). Holdi»warLi» 
•Wanpraniii^D. Miller 
Wellii>gtoii — J* A. Hutton 
•Blenlveitii— E. Nortb croft 
•Nelson— S. P. Stcvt*ji* 
•Wciiport — H. Loeie 
•Grovmoulb — G. W. Sampson 
•Hokiiikii— D. St. George 
Chriilditi.-ch— .1. F. McBeth 
•Timuru — W. McHutrbeaon 
•Oamaru-W. W. Beawick 
Duiiedin— J. W, Wilkin 
•Inverc«rgitl— C. J A, 11, Tippii.g 

InSPKCTORB of TRLBOBAPHfl. 

Auekliind^VV*. G. Meddinga 
Cbriitobiiroh^J. W. GttimawHT 
Dynedin— J. OrcljiBlon 
Nebon — C. 0, RoberUon 
Wellington— W. 8. Furb? 

ABB18TANT iNaPKCTORa OP PogT 
OFFICKS. 

P. Curtis (Northi^rn Districl). W. J. 
Chaney (Cent nil Dislrk'l), W. St. G. 
DouglM (Midland DiBtricl),T. T. King 
(Southern Dittrict) 

OFVtC?RltS IN OhABOK Of TllLiOHAPH 

Offiosb. 

AuokUnd— H. F. Seager 
Napier— B, H. K»»Ti 
Wtllington — II. \\\ rinrringlon 
OiiristchurcU — B N, Martin 
Dun^din- J. G. Ballard 

Board op Appkal 

F, G B. VValdegriLfe, Uuder-SecrtiLary, 
Department of Juitic« (Clmirnian), 
noniititited 

J. K. Ixignn, 9upt*riniendent of Electric 
Line«. norttinated 



F. M. Sciillj, Repreaenting PobIaI 

Braneb, elected 
W, F, Young, Represent ing Telegraph 

Branch, ekoted 



DEFARTMKNT OF TRADE AND 
CUSTOMS. 

Comml»Biotier of Trade and Otiatomv— 
Hon, C, H. Mill? 

Secretati'T and IuBpeclor of Cuatoma — 
W.T.* Glasgow 

Chief Clerk— T. Lar^hin 

Clerks, CuBlomi — C. H. ManBOn^ A. 
Barron 

Cadets -K. H, Smrtb, W. Wnllace 

Audit-H. W. llVewer. W. B. Mont- 
gome rj, Q. F. MoKellar 

COLLKCTOas OF CUSTOM^. 

Auckland— A. Rose 

Potfru Buy- W. J. Hawlej 

New Plvuioutb— J. II > Hempton 

Napier— E. R, C. Boweii 

Wellington — I). J oh nit on 
I Wanganui — A, Elliott 
j Xelaoo — R, Cart-er 

Weatport— H. J. Crowthep 

GreT mouth — J. Howie 

Hokitika— W. Rose 

Lytlelt/On and Chriitelnireh— J, MflU 

Timaru — C S. Niion 

Oamarii— T M. CuUen 
' Durteiiiti- C. W. S, ChauiberUiii 

Tnvercurgill and BluflT Harbour — A. 
McDjwell 

Offtobsb IK Ckakqi op Ports, ANr» 

COABTWAITKBS. 

ThameA — T. C. Bajrldon, C«a«t waiter 
Russell — H. 9tepheu«nH Coast wmter 
Taurang»— C. K. Nicbolas^ Ofllifer in 

Charge 
Whangaroa — A. G. Ratdifle, Coast waiter 
Wbangarei — J. Monro, Coastwaiter 
MAOgonui — H. G. Hunt, Olfirpr in 

Charge 
Hokianga — 0. 0. Courteimj, Coaatwaiter 
KaiparA — J. C.Smith, OStcer in Charge 
Waitara^J. Cameron, Coaatwaiter 
Palea — J. W. Glenny, OfEcer iu Charge 
Wairuu^H, A. Jackman, Offlicer in 

Charge 
Picton — T, W, Lecoeq, Officer in Uharge 
Chatham Islands — Dr. H W. Pigeon^ 

O/llcter in Cliarge 



■ C3ointiiiiad povt and telegraph offloea. 



OFFlOIAL^Tit 



MABINK DEPARTMENT, 
Minister of Marine — Hon, W, HalKJortf* 
8eer©UirT— O* Allfwrt 
Cbw-f derk-J H. Mf^Alister 
Qerki — W. Cant<>t>, B W« UMtf 
Cmdrt^—V. B> Btilcber, J. P. Ctrnpch 
Cmn^tt — M, Fub<^r 
ICuine Enff)ti««r for the Col on j — P. 8. 

Hitj, M InirrK. 
nautical AdTit<*r hud Cliief KiaTnirtfr of 

If Mter* and Matef— H. S. Blnckbunie 
Weather Report«r—R. A, Edwin, Com. 

RN 
8up«riiit#ndent of Mercantile Marine 

and Emtniner of Ma«ter» find Mate*, 

AuckUnd— C. E. W. FJfmiDg 
AMi*Unt— T. A. G. At wood 
Sep^riniendetit of Mercantite Marine 

a&d Eiamioer of MaBtera and Matei. 

Wellington — O. O. Smith 
A0«i«t«Dt— T. G. Keane 
Saperintendf'nt of Mercantile Marine 

and Kxammef of Mu»ter« and Mare«. 

LjltelJon — J- A. H. Marciel 
Supenniendent of Mercantile Marine 

and Examiner of Ma«ter» and Mat«»i 

Duiiddtn — N. Beaumont 
Ur o( 9M. "Hinismoa ** — J BoUon^ 

aater of •.»,*' Tulanekai "—C. F, Poii 



Ikspsctobs of Ska-fishcbirb. 
Wrlliiigton, Cbief Int peotor — L F. 

ATaoo 
Rafflufi ^ J. W McCarthy 
&u*ieU — U. Stephen eon 
Vriia«sfare»^A. McDonnell 
Ifinultftu — J- Ncale 
FiuKjaTij^a — ^C. C Courlenay 
W iiihi — W. H. McKinnon 
Waiiicanui — O C. ClouBton 
A.J. k land— J, P. Bennett, H. C Haj. 

Intn irston North— M. D. Sta^^pool* 

F. liiDg — J, Forsler 

Fji iHi — E, J. Whiiehoote 

a..ktuU — J. Mark* 

He* Brig1iU>n — E. J. Row* 

Doneittn — T. J. SlulliTan, J. llclntjra 

Bloff— P McGrath 

8ievmt1 I -land— J. M. Irwin 

RtfMer— G, T. Baker 



H A IBO Cr RM A iTBKfl . * 

QMn$wo06^¥. Staliard 
PiipoD«a— E. 0. SUlUrd 



Foxton— J B. Hall 
Hokianga— G. M Art in 
Eaipara — J, Chrintv Smiih 
Manukau— J, Nc^iilf 
&fotueka— H. L. Mofalt 
Pieton-^T. Edwardf 
Port Robinson — J. Sinclair 
Ru0>el] — H. St4'phen»on 
Wairau— H. Fiftk 
Waiiapii— 8. Fittall 



INSFKOTION OF MACHlKERr 

DEPARTMENT. 



Mmigiier 
Jonci 



Charge — Hod. W, IJall- 



Cbief Inipector of Macbinerj; Principal 
Engineer Suneyor of Steamers, Prin- 
cipal SurvcTor of Ships, and Chief 
Examiner of Marine Engineers and 
Staiionarj-enpine Drirert — K> Duncan, 
Head OfDee, Wellington 

Accountant— R P. Milne 

Clerkfi— W. D. Andrews, J. G, Mae- 
pherpon, J. M. Healf , iind J, Driecoll 

Cad Ms— Head ofllce : W. M, Eggleatone. 
H, M. Mullin-, J. C. O'Leary j Auck- 
l»nd office : W. J. Craig 

Inipectons of Machinerjj Engineer 3yr- 
revore of Steamer* and Surrey on of 
8hipft, and Exainineri of Marine 
Eugineert and Stationarj • englnv 
Brifers : — 

Auckland — H. Wctherilt, W. R. 
Douglas. P. Grant 

Napier— M. Sharp 

Wanfranui — 9. DalrTtnpIc 

Wellington - A. Cahert, C, W R. 
Suifted, W. Cullen 

KeUon— N. D. Hot>d 

Chri»tchureb — P, J. Carman 

Timaro — J. WilHamiOn 

Dunedin — A* Walker, A. Ramiaj 

InTercargill— A. W. Bethtine 

Board of Examiners of Stationary, Trae- 
tion» LoconiotiTe, and Winding EDgiue 
Drirera — Robert Dytn.'nn, Cliief In- 
tpector of Mftchinerj, MJnst.Nar.A,, 
Chairman ; John Hnvfa, F.S. G.O., 
Inspecting Engineer of Mine§ j P, 8, 
Haj, M.A., M.In^t.C.E , Engineer-tn* 
Chief ; R* P, Milne, Secretary 



* Tba more ImporUal barbotirt art oonlroUed by local Boardit ooi by %h9 KaHoe 



46 



NBW ZBALANO OmciAL TBAK-BOOK. 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 
DBPARTilENT. 

Minister in Charge — Hon, W, Hall- 
Jones 

Gi>remmeut Printer, Stntionefj Office 
Manager, and ContrwHer of Stamp 
Printing — John Maekaj 

CJiiuf Clerk and Accouuiaut — B, B. Allei) 

Cl«rk«— N. B. K. Manl^^y, F, Barraud, 
J. W. Hall, R. Watts, A. Stace, W, 
Hiatchings, A. WilliftpiP, Q. QaraliaiD, 
a T. Williamt 

Ciwlets— P, C. Jordan, C. P. Coagrofe 

Cadette— i; L. M&dden 

Copy Super? iaor — M. F. Mnrkt 

MrchanicaIi Division, 
Su peri u tending O veneer — J. F. Eogeri 
Print in g Braoeh — 

0?er»eeri— O. Tattle, W. P. McQirr, 
W. A. G. Skinner 

Night Foreman — D. Jo«lin 

Readeri— W. Fuller, H. S. Mountier, 
W. Siittierland, P, Riddiek 

Stereo tjper and Elect rot jper-^W. J. 
Kirk 
Binding Branch— 

OTerifler — W. Fratiklin 

Sub'OTersefr^G. H Broad 

Forewoman— A, O'Malley 
Miohine^room^ — 

O^reraeer — J. Pliillips 

SulnoTerseer^J* Hugbea 
Stamp Brunch — 

OTerseer — J. Burns 
Lithographic and Photographic Branch — 

Orcr*eer — D. Rofw 

Chief Draughtflman—G. N. SturteTant 
Engineer — T. R. Barrer 



Nelaon— W. W, de Caitro 
Marlborough— F. Broughlon 
Canterbur?— P G. Withen 
Timaru — W» MeHutehison 
Otago— P. C. CorliB* 
Southland— C. E. Niitder 
Weetland^K. J, Acheion 



STAMP DEPAETMKNX. 

OommisHioner of Stamp Duties — Hon* 

Jamea Carroll 
Secretary forStainps — C A. Sd.G. Hickion 
Chief Clerk— 0. H. W. Diion 
Accountant — J. P. Murphy 
CiJjBtodiaii aii'i Isiuer of Stampi — W. H. 

Shore 
Cleria— V* WiUeston, J. Murray 
Chief Stamper — A. A. Somerrille 
CadeUe— 0, Molntoeh 
Cadet— R* Wiik^lin 

DBPirrT CoMHieaioKBAB or Stamfb, 
Auckland — E, Bamford 
Giabome — R* N. Jonea 
Taranaki— T. Hutchison 
Havrke'a Bay— Thomat Hall 
Wellington— C. A. St. Q. Uiokaon 
Wanganui— D. Miller 



LAND TRANSFER DEPARTMENT 

AND DEEDS REGISTRY. 
Registrar-General of Land and Deeds — 

J. M. Bat ham 
Secretary, Land and Deeda — C, A. St. 0. 

Hick BO n 

District Land REQiBTRABfl ANt> 

RgOlSTHABEJ Of DlBDi. 
AtjL'kland — E. Bam ford 
Tnranaki — T. Hutchison 
VVeUington— J. M, Btiihnm 
Hawke'a Bay— Thomas Hall 
Poverty Buy^R^ N. Jonea 
Nelaon— -H. Ejre Kenny 
Marlborough— T. Scott'Smith 
Canterbury — G. G, Bridge* 
Otago— W. Wyinka 
Southland— C. E. Nalder 
Wettland — R. J. Aoheeon 

BXAlCIItBafl OF TlTLSt* 

Auckland— E. Bamford 
Taranaki— T. IJutchiaon 
Wellington^H. Ho worth iind J.. 

Bathmn 
Hawke'a Bay — Thomat Hall 
PoTcrty Bay— R. N. Jonee 
Nelaon — H. Eyre Kenny 
Marlborough— T. Scott-'Smith 
Canterbury — G. G. Bridge a 
Otago— W. Wyinks 
Southland— C. E. Nalder 
We*tland — R. J. Acheaon 

Rbqistrab op CoJfFAKIM, 
C, A. St. G. HkkHon 

RcOISTaABS OP BniLDiNO SOeiSTlBfl, In • 

J>UfiTRIAL AND PROVIDENT SoCUrTlRa, 
ANI> AsaiaTANT RBOlflTRABa OF COM- 
PAiriBS. 

Auckland — E. Bam ford 
Poferty Bay— E. N, Jonee 
Turanaki — T. Hutehitou 
Hawke^a Bay — Thorn aa Hall 
Welliitgtoii-C. H. W. Diion 
NeWn— W. W. de Castro 
Marlborough — F. Brougl'ton 
Canterbury— P- G- Withera 
Otago— P. C* Corlbft 
Southland— C. E. Naldor 
Weetland— R. J. Aolo»OD 



OFFICIAL LIST, 



47 



KDCCATION DEPARTMENT. 

MiciMUr of Education — Bight Hon. 
a J. Seddon, LUly, PC. 



II SAP OmcB, 

Ii»peeU>r*QeD«r»l of Schooli — Qeor^e 
Hofben, MA. 

M«ereUn for Educmlion — Sir E. 0. 
Otbb4-t, Bart, 

▲Mutant Inspector 'General — W. J 
jtoderson. M-A„ LL D. 

Cbitff Clerk— F. E. de Castro 

CUmkw^Y. D. Thornton, B A., H J. Bar 
f*lt* T. a, Oiib^n, J. Beck, L Darcr, 
If, 0. D, Or»nt, J. Cooper, F. W. 
ICaiar. A. J. H. Benge, H, J. Batli 
I5a»e, G Q. E night. C. G, Reei», 
n. L. J. Madiu, J. Turner, E. 
MeEeozie, H. T. Croxtxin, I. John- 
■ic»ii#. D. WaUon« J. A. Orr» J. R 
MeCluno, J. G. Jordon, A. M, Palmer, 
L. P. Arthur, W; L, Durtn, C. A, 
B^rendeen, B. £gi«T, C. G. Murraj, 
£. Wmdftor 

Hatits Schoolb Bravcr. 

tiiap«etor--W. W, Bird. MA. 
Ai^itoiit Intpector— J. Portions, M«A. 
Cleri lu Qiarge— F. L» Seveme 

llarTAL Mfj> Technical Ikstbuotiov 
Beanch, 

Inipeetort — M. U. Browne (in charge of 
Braneb). K. C. liaac 

Pnuc ScHC»oLS Oadstb Bbakch* 

OAetr Commaodtoe — Lieiit.*Co)onel 

L W, Lotedaj, y.fi, 
Oltrk— T Mclneruey 

iMiCBTRlAL SCHOOI« BrAVCB. 

AiiitUnt lii»peetor» — K, H. Pope (in 
dk*rg« of Branch), T. A. Walker, and 
ICi«» J. St«warl (also a Tisiting 
Ot&ctr) 

TiikUitg Officsra— Mr. K G. Hjde. Mra. 
A. Tooog. MiY. C. F. Bcftle 

rOorffram^af School*. 
lingers of Indu*triai Schools— 
Auckland (Mount Albert)— Mise 8. E. 
FackaoD 



Bojs' Trail sing Farm, Weraroa — G, 

M. Burlinsou 
Receiving Home, Wellington— Mrs. 

E. S. Dick 
Receiving Home, Cbristchuroh — ^Mim 

A, B. Cox 
Te Oranga Home, Cbrist4;btirch — Mra. 

E. T, Branting 
Burnham— T. Archej 
Oarersham- (Vacant) 
Offidal Correspondent for Bo&rd«d^oul 
Children, Otaga— Misi J. SieTwrigbt 

Pritate Seh&oU, 

St. Mary's, Auckland— Rer. H. F, Hol- 

brook 
St. Joseph's, Wellington — Vei^ Ber. 

W, J. Lewii, V.Q. 
3t. Marj's, KeUon— Rer, J, D. Clancj 

(acting) 
St. Vincent de Pmiri, Dunedin — Rer, J. 

Coffej 



8CBOOL 70E DsAP-MtTTSS, SimiriB. 
Acting-Director— J, E. SteTcns 



E0UOATIOIt BOAKDB, WITH NaHI 
SbORBT ABIES. 

Auckland— T. £. Rice 
Tarinaki— P, 8. Whitcombe 
Wanganui — ^W. J. Carnon 
Wellington— G. h. Stewart 
Hawke s Bay — G. Crawihaw 
Marlborough— J. Smith 
NeUon— S. Ellis 
Grey— C. Phillip* 
Westland— A. J. Morten, B.A, 
Oanterburj North — H. 0, Lane 
Canterbury South— A. Bell, M.A. 
Otago— P. G, Prjde 
Southland — J. Neill 



SsCKKTARIBa TO ScMOOL UoMiltS- 
fllOltllifi. 

Auckland — II. N. Garland 
Taranuki-F, P. Corkill 
Wellington— J. H. N Wardrop 
Hawke's Bay— K. P. A. Platford 
Msrlborough — J. Smith 
Nelson— A. T. Jones 
Westland-A. J, Morton 
Caiil^rbury — il. H. Pitman 
Otago -C. Maoandrew 



48 



NBW SBALaNO opfigial tbar-book. 



ME!^TAL nOSPITALa 
loipector — Dunenn MttoQregor^ M.A., 

M,B., CM . LL a« 
AftsittAiit Tn«peL'Njr*t— J. F. 3, H«f» 

M.B., CM., af»d Mra. GrtiC^ Noill 
Medie&l dupeniireiident, Aui?klnud Hen- 

tftl Hoapiral-R. M, Bealtie. MB. 
Medical Supi'nntoiifipiit, Clirist^&Jinreh 

Mpntal Hospital — W, tiaistei* Qtom, 

M,D, 
M«dictt] Sup«rinten{i«nt, Ponru& M«ntaJ 

Hovpital—Gnij U&s4el], M D. 
MeHiciil Superintendent, Wellb^gton 

Meniftl IJoipit*! — A. TroBby. M.R.C.S. 
MeHtml Superintendent, Seiirliff Mrntal 

Hoppital— F, TruhT Kinp, ILB. 
9uperintend«nL» iJukitikii M entail lion- 

pital— John Dowi^ey J MedicttI Olliier, 

H, Mftcandrevr, M.B. 
Bupermti^ndeTU, NeUon Mental Honpitul 

^Oeorge Criaptimn j Medical Ollicer, 

W. J. Mackiij, M.D. 

Afhburii HttU, Wuikari (prif alft hoipitalj 
— Propriotova, \)r. E. W, Alexmider 
And Eiecntor of Jamea Uiime ; Medi- 
c«) Officer, E. If. AlexAnder, M.B, 
CM. 

Home for D^feotirei, RicbmaDd — 
Sleward, lUntj Buttle j Mutron, 
Mftiildft C. Buttle 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR. 

Miniat^r of Labour — ^Rt. Hon, E. J, 

Seddon, P.O. 
Welliniiton^ 

Secratary for Labour, Chief lr«»p«etor of 

F«ictone«, <*nd Registrmr <jf IriduslriEil 

Union* — E, Ti-egeiir 
Deputy Cliiff-f Itimjiectof of Factories 

and Deputy Rcgblrar of Industrial 

Union*— J urn e« Mac'kay 
Accountant — ^F. Rowley 
CWrkft — J, \\\ Collini, W. J. 

McKeown, W. J. Jamieion. A, J. 

Iilirrwood, T. McItitOBh, J. Morgan 
Sli(»rtband - writer and Typi»te — R, 

Rit#on 
Cftdt-U— E, M. Cft«er» Thomafl Boyoe 
Cadette— N. V. Saxon 
losppctors of Factor I e*— 

Wellini^toii — J. B. Lindtay, 0. E, 

Aldriilge, M. S. Hawtlionie 



Auckland— H. Fprj?u»oii, fi. A. L« 

Cren, Cbrk— W, Liuklater. Cadet 

— W. E SlianahHti 
Napier -W.J- Blake 
Wttngaimi— W. n, Mt-Quartpr* 
Pttlmerston Nartli — H, H. Knowlet 
Nel-on— 3. Tyson 
Qr^y mouth— J. Udell 
Chriafchurch — J* Slianaghan, W. H. 

HapKer. Citfrki— Q. H. Wood.S. M. 

Wilson 
Aihburton— R. 8. Bean 
Timaru— P. Keddie 
Oamaru^— T, U'Orady 
Dunedm — J. Loma*, P. Hally. 

Clerki— J. Miuwi-n, W. King 
Inrercargili-^L. D. Bri welt 

And J 60 local luppe 'torn* 
(There ar« al^to 200 Bureau AgenU in 
different partt of tlie colotiy,) 



Mo* 
H 



MINES DEPARTMENT- 
Chikf OryicjE. 
Muiiiter of Mitiea^ — ^Horj, James 

Gowan 
Under - Secretary for Minei — T. 

Haaer 
fnipet^iing Enginepr—JLvhn Haye* 
CluotClerk— IL E Radidstfe 
Anftly*t— J. S. Mackurin, D.So., F.O.S. 

Aaflistant — W. Dunovan 
Geiduigitt — Alexander MuKjiy, F O.S, 
Dr»uglit»mao— C- IL Pierard 
Short hand* writer— J. T. Watkim 
Cadet— T. H. Sberwood 

iKflPKCTORS OP MiKEa. 
Tliameft and Auckland Districts— JainM 
CouHf»i Wnihi— Awistant ItvBpector, 
Boyd Beonie: Canterbury, Dtinedin, 
nod SouthJaiid DiBtrict*— E. R. Qreeii ; 
Ai*iKfant. Inspector^ H*tb rt Mclnloth *, 
Clerk, if. Patori : West Coa«^ Dig- 
tricta — U. Tennent ^ AimiiUQt In' 
ipector, A. H. Richard* j Cadet - C. M. 
VV^ilton 



Secretary' 



Ml KINO BuBsau. 
-P, Oalvm 



MAWA01M8 OF WaTSU-KACI 

Wtti nieu' KuniMra — J. Rucbf ord 
Mount i^la— R. Murray 



L 



•A'an hoMa appolntrarnta of Inapeotor of fioapttala and Chariiabk loatliatioiu 
Be^ittnr of Nuracs and &Ii>lw)Tcti. * 

f Alao Asaiktaut Laapcotuni of Haspitala and Chatitabla Inatirmtiara. 



OVFICIAI* LIST. 



49 



SOHOOLA 07 MlNU. 
IjocUir^TB and Inst rat- tors : Th&me« — 
O. G. Adttma i Aftiiatatit, W. A. 
Oiren, M*A. : Ooromandel — D* V, 
All<»ni W«ihi— A. H, V. Mt^nfan, 
M.A.: Kitrttn^nhake—R. B. McDuff: 
Beefton — J. Heodersoa 

GOAKD OY fiXAXTiriBS iriTDBR *' ThE 

Co*L'Kiifis Aer, 1891." 
The SurTejrorGeneral ; tbo Ifi«peL4ing 
Engineer of Mtnefl; tbe Chief In- 
ipeotor of itiiphmorj, WelliDgton j 
J^met Biihop ; JoiiutUAii Dixan i and 
H. A* Qordon 

BOA^D Of EXAMINBKS CFfTDBB *' ThI 

MxniJto A(yr, 1898;* 
Smuo official memberi as abore Board, 
excepting the Chief Inspector of Ma- 
ohitierjt Wellington, with the follow- 
ing prirate ineuibers : H, A. Gordon, 
F.G,S., Auckland J Ttiomn* Aitken 
Dunlop, Tba^JoeB^ Betimiuin Sulher- 
land, Aeeftonj and M. P. Hornl- 
brook, Waiomo 
Tbe 3 urrejor- General it ClmiFman of 
both Bo&rd«. aud Mr. T. H. Uamer 
ia the Secretary 

St4ti CoAL-unrss. 
Head Q^c**—G re/ mouth. 
Hanager — Jame« Binl^op 
AcoouDtarit — L. H. Kileri 
Afent, Westpurt— II. Crowther | 

Managing Ag«»Dt, Wellington — Aleiandt- r 
ICaeDougall 



DKPARTMKNT OF AGRICUL- 

lURE. 

MitiUler in Charge — Hon. T. Y. Duncan 
Hkaj> Office. 

Secretary for Agriculture and Chief In- 
ip*<7tor of 3tx>L*k— J. D. Ritchie 

Chief Clerk— R* Kratt 

Clerk in ciiarge of Co rrei pond once 
Branch— F, 8, Pope 

Clerk in charge of AecounLfr Branch— 
J. K. D. Spirer 

Clerkfi — Cf>rre«pondencc Branch : E. J, 
Fit«gibbon. R. W, Atkiuion, T. D. U. 
Hall J CadetiP— J- R. F. Oameron, 
H. T. P»jT'ei I>. Patterson. Acconnts 
Br«.ne*i : S. l\ E. Sharp. D« Sinclaif, 
A. MeT^pgart. V A. Mdla ; Cad 
W. A. Pje 



TBTIVTNAttT Dnr»toK. 

P«lliolagi«t and Chief Vetennariaii — 

J. A. Gilrtith. M.R.C,V.S. 
A#ii»tant Chief Yplerinarian -^ C. J 

R«Jte», M.R.C.V.S. 
Lahorator? Astinlant — G. H. Barker 
Olerki— iL K. Carej, D. L. Luxford, A. 

Ironside; Cadet, H. R. 3«ddon. 
Feteriuarinni (.Vfi.R.aV.S.)— Auckland^ 

J. %ons; New Plynioiith, A. B, 

Youn^ ; Pal merit on North, W- SUp- 

lej*MD. ; Chrifltohurch, J. G. Claj- 

ton J Duuodin, i. Ki^rrigan 
Vet-erinarianB and Afeat Intpeoton 

(il«. RX.y.S ) — Aut'kbnd, W. II. 

Hawthoro j Qinborne, C, R. Neate; 

HastingB, D. H. Rait; Wanganui, 

V. A. Biiitkes i Aramohot P. M. 

Edgar J Waitara, F. Glover j Petooe, 

D, apiliBan ; Ngahauranga, W, C. 
Quinnell ; Nflaoti, A- W. Bitrnet ; 
Btflfast. J. R, Cbarllonj A»liburtoii» 
F. 0. Robertson ; Timaru, T, G. Lilioo; 
Pftr<*ora, T, G. Palgmve ; Oamarij, T, 
CiinuiMghatn ; Dunedtri, W. D. Snow- 
ball ; I nve rear gill, D, Machatlie^ W, T. 
dabin 

Vefceriiittriani and Meat Inspt'ctor* — 
Auckland, II. Marsttfk (Ont.) j ChrisN 
church, H. S.S- Kvle (Melb) 

Meat Infp'Ctorn — ThumeB, J, Jarman j 
Paeroa, F. Beatlie j Wtiihi, W. T, 
Wjnjrard j Nnpier, B. Ferguson j New 
Pljraouth, T. J. Keiikefl ; llawera, 

E. 1\ B. Worthy J Stnitford,G, Thorn- 
Bon; FflUding. a. W. Mitchell j Bten- 
beim. A, D. Gilliee j Wf at port, W. 3. 
Oirawell ; Ljltelton, B. Thomson ; 
Gore, F. Stewart 

AB»i!«tiiut M*'ut InB[>et'tors— Auckland, 
J, Preiton J Gifbornep H, W. Binney, 
G, B, William* I Tomoanm, S. T. 
Eratt ; Fukipakt, D. Klliutt ; Long- 
burn, W. H. Rodney ; Fatea, W. A. P. 
Sutton ; Petone, 0. Afttoo ; Ngahau* 
ranga, V, J. Stone ; Picton, J. Millea j 
lilington, G. Furd j Belfast, T. An- 
denon; SmilliBeld, A. \L R. Midt; 
Dunedin, T. P, Short j Mataura, W. C. 
Moore ; Tnrercargilt, J. 0. Mackley. 

Daimt DiviiiON, 
Dairy Commissioner— J. A, Kinfella 
Asaifiianb Dairy Commitaiouer — D. 

Cuddie 
Clerk— R. W. Wilkiuson 
Dairy losiruotor* — W. M. Singleton, 

A. O, Shirley, W. Grant, F. Thomion, 

J. Sawers, and N. Fulton 



: 



50 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAH-BOOK. 



Dfiirj Instrurtrcpi — N. Breeu 

Dttirj -prod lire Grader*— Auckland, A. A. 
Thornton ; New PWiinoulb, J. Jo}in- 
•ton and L. Hunsiir; Putea, W.Wriijhl j 
Wellington, E. A. li'owden and N. 
Fulton; LjtJ«ltoB an<i Port Cbftlru ere, 
W. Omrit / BluiT» J. Sawers 

Clerks to Dairj product 0rad*r8— Au^k 
land, J. O' Lord j New Plymouth, 
J. S. Flerniiig; LTltellou, K. F. 
CroAbte; Duncdin, J. UuttoD ; BlufF^ 
R, Hulton 

Biological ani> HottTinTLTrnAi. 
Division. 
Biologist— T W. Xirk, FJ. S. 
Aisiitttnt Biologb* — A. H. Cockafne 
Fruit'preeerving Eipert — ^W* Jtiqaei 
Bee Eipprt— I. HopkitJ* 
Clerk* -B. Quirk, J. Hjlan^, W. K, 

Llifjd-Williumft 
Atsiftn^tit Kntomoloeifit^ — Aurkland, Cap- 

Ui»i T. Broun. FrE.S. 
PomologislA — Nortlii Island, W. J. 

Pulnier, W* A. Boucher, A. G, Sitnni»; 

Soytli Isknd, J C Bluekiworr 
Fruit Inspector* — AuckSiitid, CtiplHin T. 

Brour, F.E S., Qeorge Harnett ; Wei 

lington, H. Ptilethoirpe j Christeburdi^ 

A. C. Bmale , IVuijodiri, A. F. CargilJ 
Oreliaird Inspector^ — North Inland^ W. 

C. Thompson, E, A. Reid, D. H, Wil- 

litimioti J Say ill Island, E. HabbiL*. 

J- Alliin 

ViTiciuTraiL DivrsioK. 
Viticiiliuri«t — R, Bnigato , 

Clerk— P. G. Andrew 

Pori.TUT DiviajoK. 

Chief Puulrrv Expert— D, D. D>de 
Asiifltflut Poultry Expert— F. Brown 
Pouitrj Grader i — Aurkbind, R W. 

Puimsford ; Wellingtuti, T. F* Ldhy ; 

Cbri^t^-hufeb, 6. Newton; Dutiedin, 

T, Burke 
Poultry * station Managers — Huftkura, 

C. Cu»*en i Mamohaki. A. Granl ; 

Burnham, J, Rote; Mdton, A Carr 

FiBBK Division. 
Ciiief Fibre Exi^rt—O. J. Fulton 
Henip Oradere — Auckland , W H. O. 
J oh t into n ; WeUioglon, C. A, D. Haw- 
kirtB (Grader in charge), W. II. Ferris 
W. G C, Reid, J. Stewart j Biulf, 
W. H, Middlemiae 



Clerk, Chief Fibr# Enperi'e Olllce— G. T, 

luck IT 
CK^rk.. to Grader— Wellington. E, Wjun* 

Williams ; Bluff, R. Hattoi> 

aiAKtTBK-STlHItlSINO DIVI8IOK. 

Iiifpei'tor* of Manureilerilising ^ISyd- 
ueT, F. U- Laurie; Calcutta, H, L. 
Ward 

ChEMHAL DIVI8IOK. 

Cbii'f Chemiit— B, C. Aston, F.C,9. 
A§«tNtant Cbeniist — H. Lfirkin 
LaboratoTT Assisttintjii— E. W. Ludwif^ 
\\ R. Packliaii) 

Stattbtical BivieioN. 
Compiler of Statiatici^F. 0, Hjonring 
I (4chn«) 
Clerk— A. C. Pbilpott 

EXPKBIME^'IAL FaHMS. 

Superintendent of tiie Experiuiental 
Farins in the Auckland District *- 
E. Clifion 

Orerneera — BtekeretafFe, H. Wineer ; 
Waerenga, 8. F, Anderfloti; Ruiikura, 
n, Dibnle; Anitaki (Hawke't BaT)v 
T. F. Ellis; Wcr^roa, J Drytdale ; 
Mr>niohaki, F. GiUanderft 

LlV«'8TO0K QuUiAlCTlUS STATlOlTfl. 
Caretakers — Aueklaud, Thomas Hillj 
Wellington, J, P, Eoaa j Lyiieium^ 
W. J. Thoma» 

l58FBCT0as op StOCK, 

Auckland District— Auckland, 'E. CUf- 
ton ^iu charge of di^trirt) ; OhaeAwai, 
D. A Grahiim; Wluingarei, 'J. T. 
Stone ; Aurkhmd, F. H. Brittain, 
R. Hull; Hamilton, MX E.jm ; Kilti- 
Bhi^ J. Kerr; Tftumngm, 'A. H. 
Burltill 

Hawke'e Buv Dii^triet — Napier, •W. 
Udler (in charge of diitriet) j Gia- 
borne, *C- Tliomson aJid D. Fleming; 
Te Puin, W. B- Hmgslon j Wairoa, 
•T- C* Webb ; Hastiiigu, F. G, Wajnei 
Woodvilk', •D. Munro ; Waipukuran, 
J. Harvey 

Wairarapa District — Ma§lerton, *0. H, 
Jenkinson (in charge of di*triet) j 
tlarterton, •V, A. HudilleBlon 

Wett CoftBt (North Island) District — 
Wangamii, 'A K. Bliindell (iu chargt 
of district}; Feilding, J. C. Miller; 



J 



OFFICIAL LIST. 




Eufttrrrnie^ W. Daljflietlr ; Wang*- 
uwi, W. B. Eutliorfurij ; ITaweri. 
•J. W. Detm\ Stmtfard, *S. Budge? 

MAoavfttu Dittrict— PftliL<?r»ton North, 
*J. Duncan 

Wrtiiini^rofi Diatrict — Wellington^ 'A* 
! K, J. Drummoad iy>ori) 
horough, Nelion, »iid W«»l Oout 
i^iAlHct — Nebon, T. A* Fmser (in 
chitrgo of diBlrtci). A- T* P, Hubbard j 
Richmond, G, 8. Cooke; Blenbeitn, 
*J. ^oore I Hokitika, *C. 0. Empson 

C*nt«rb«t7 Diitrict — Chriiftchurcb, 
*II, T. G. Turner (in charge of 
aUinct) J Kftikuura, 'K. W. Sutton j 
RfithtrhAm, 'J. Monro ; Rattgiom, 
C. A, CuntiinghiLm ; Lincoln, J* G. 
Scoit I A»hburron» B, FulkHon ; 
Timani, J. C. Huddlwlon i Fwrlie, F, 
Mackenzie 

Otago District — Diinedin, J. L. Bruce 
(in charge of dbtrk't) ; Kurow, W. 
Will*; Uamaru, 'A* Iron*id«i P«U 
mertton, U. II ill ; Duoedin. 'J. E. 
Thomson (port), B. Fountain ; Musgiel, 
B. I Ooatiigc ; Na«rby,0. Shnw J Clyde, 
• r, N. Bailer j Lawrence, *Q. MeUod j 
Tapsnni, T. Gdleapie ; Boiauthn. 1\ 
OilzDoar; Gore, S. M. Tut lor; hivtr- 
cargill. -B. Wright ; Bluff, J. W- Ray- 
mood (port) ; Qu«rntti>«rn, W* M. 
Monro 

— Wbani^rei, A. Stone (cadet); 
Auckland, W, C Robinaon, E. J. 
Otei'i»tfr, G* H. Oraham, C. Camp- 
bellf £. A. Farrint^ton ; Hamilton, 
P. Edward* i Napit-r, A. CbUooU, 
W, McN. Miller ; AfaAttrton, A, E. 
Eowdeo ; Palmerston North, W. Nettle* 
fold J Wanganui, D, Bill j NcUon, 
£, B. Burdekiu ; Blenbeiin, J. Camp- 
bell ; Christchurch, J. Longton j 
TiiJi&ru, W, Pogton ; Dun«din» U G. 
Brace i Inrercargid, J. W. Bell. 
W. U. McLew (cadet) 

B£0T41S4^S Of BaANDa. 

Auckland— W. C, Robinion i Watigauuit 
a Betl; XehKiu. B. B. Burdekin 

<T*ie In9p«*otor« of Stock fin arktjd ' are 
alto Eegiitmre uf Bmnda.) 



'IkSFVCTOIB U3fDSB SL&UaflTB&l NO AOT. 

The Infpeoton of :)toek are Inspectors 
mider tlie Slsoghtc^riDg Aot. 



LxspKCToiia OF DjimiBS. 

Auckland, W. R. Brown ; tfamilton, S» 
Seddon ; Thankw^ J, Jnrnnin ; Waibi, 
W. T. W^n)ftfd ; l*»i row, F, B*nitie ; 
G id borne, G. M. VVillmnjjuoii j Xapier, 
J, G. Parker; New Plymouth. T. J. 
Beaket : Stratford, G. Ihamaon; 
Hawura, E. T. B. Worthy • Feihiing, 
G. \\\ Mitchell; Wellington, J. 
Drummond} Lyttcltun, B. Ihom- 
aou ; Chriatcbtirch, A. Marphenon i 
Blenheim, A. D. Gillie* i Wisttport, 
W, 3. Canwed; Dunedin, Ajeiatant 
luiipector, J. C. Robtnson ; Qore, F. 
Slewart 

(The Inspi^ctora of Stock ftre alio ia- 
itpectora of Dairiei,) 

Insfect&bs or Noxioca Wixus. 

Ot»hiihu, A, Dickson ; Auekliind, J. C. 
Htt«ikin«; IIiiniiU<^n, K. Seddon ; Tau* 
ruTiga, r MollaU ; Ha»ting», J, G. 
Parker J Waipawn, tl. McLean ; Xew 
Plymouth, R. Crockett ; Matapu, J. 
He^lop ; Hnvrera, J. M. Htgnett } 
Stratford, F, Arden j OunterTtl'e, 
A. P. Smith ; Blenheim, G* J. Ward ; 
Ni-l-oiip W. J. Ward j intercargdl, 
M, O'Meara 

(The Iiiipeoior« of Stock are also In- 
spectors ot Noxious Weeds,) 



IjiaPSCTOBS U^DEK RjLfiQIT Hui&AVOB 

Act. 

The Inspectors of Stock are Inspectors 
under the R»bbit Xm*ADce Act. 

Rabbit Agents — Nguruawahia, B. fiaylyi 
Oambridgf*, B. AiexAnder ; Kiliikifii, 
J. Cases Wai«», W, C. King j Pahia- 
tua, T. Bacon ; Uppfr Rangiiikei, 
C, WarsGii J Maeterton, J. Hallignu; 
TnuerUf 11, Miinro; Alfreiton» H. S. 
Dssheri JohnsoiiTille, W. Iio»#; Levin, 
W» S. Goodall ; Blenheim, G. Gie j 
Mcluoka» A. C. Huck worth ; Mount 
Somer^, C. Brarngan ; Fairlie. W. Juhn- 
ston J Waimnle, E, F. iJulliTan ; Lees- 
ton, C S. Nerille j Kurow, E.T. Payne i 
Miiheno, F. Urquhiirt; Inch Valley, 
A. Hughe« I Waikouaiti, B. Grnut ; 
Taieri, H. McLeod; Suiton, R, Irting; 
Waitiifttft» a 8. Dftlglieih ; Clyde, A. 
Clarke ; Roiburgh, J. G. John- 
ston J Lawrence, E. Fowh-r j Owaka, 
I F. W. Blairi Bivlcluibtt, H. A. 
Mniiro J r»pQnui, A. C. Clapoolt ; 



j 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAR-BOOS 



Bare, M^ McLeod i Liim«deii, H- 
Heckler; Wjndilmin, D. McLeod j In- 
Tercftrgill, J. McKellar j E-iTertofi, 
J. R. Whjtjorti ; Oromw**!!, 8. W* 
Finli ; QueeDfttoirn, J. Wilion 



RAILWAYS DEPAHTMKNT, 
Minister for Rail wa^i— Hon. Sir J. O 
W»fd, K.C.M.O. * 

Head Office. 

Cliief Clerk -R W. McViltj 

Clerka— E. J. Andrew*, B. M. WilBon. 
W. S. Rirller, J. L. Day, J O. DufT, 
J. His-kp, J. K. Widilop, J. ¥. Fogo, 
D. MacKfllur, J. Thomson, W. A 
Welling^ P. J. MeGoverii, W. P 
MilUr, F. M. 81ierwood, H Oerftrri. 
F. a Fmi-er. A, J. Leiruk, VV. If 
RrnniCf J, A, Jones. A. H. Q Lamberi. 

0. H. Iloare 

Audit Inspectopi— n. Munro, R. Hinlop. 

1, Farit. H. Williawe 

Eailvrnj Arcotintnni — H, DttTideon 
gj^.rit^— J. 11 l^rtviea, S P. CuHifl, G. Q 
WtUoii, J^ MrLe4ni, K. Unvj. A. Morris, 
C. Batten, J Fiitli, W. B Ficbt-r, E, J 
Flt-ming, H, II. Leopard. R. J. Lor, 
W, Bourki'. X pAlUe, F. W. Jjiali. 
A, U. Hutit, H IJ. Smith, W. E. 
Aheri), F. K Port«?ou% A. D. C. Gob- 
linan^ T. A. O'Connor, A. E. Wilson, 
fC. C. Felton. J W, Dayman. W, H 
Siinmoni. J. B. Gatjntli?U, P. J 
Wright, A. 1\ pRrkt'B, H J. Heath, 
X, IJ, JuivEf, N. O. McKaj 

Stoues Branch. 
a Lore* Manaeer— O. Fetlon 
filar«« Audit Inupcetor — F. J. Dawe* 
Ol«rka— M, C. Kowe, 0. U. Noric, S 
Alf>e, U. W. Burhor, A. E Bujei, W. 
G. Wmy, R. P. Bray, L. G. Porter, 
8 8. MiiHngton, J. L. Leydon, 
A, O. Lincoln, J Brabinpr J. Iliije»» 
V. C. Hardie, G. D. PkUIc, W, P. 
McCormick, J. P. HdrrlB, H. K. 
Adam^oti 

THAFFiu Bkakch. 
Chief TralUc Miuiaper— IL Biiiton 
Rt^lit'Ting Diitrici Traffit- Manugw — H. 
Baiter 



Clerks— J. E. Annetrong. G- A 

Robif>8on, J. D. Na»l) 
TralTic Siiprrinlcnd*fiit« — WelliHgtdn^ T. 

Arthtjr; Duiiedin, A, Grant 
Diniric!) Managpri — Whangarei, J. D. 

HarriB j Aiickknii, T, W. Wa)t« ^ 

Waiiganiii, W. J. Stringlemnn j Weit- 

land, J. Aihl<»y i Chrjitchurcli, S. F. 

Whitjcombe; InTermrgiil, C. A. Piper 
SmtionmaBtpre in Cimrgp^ Knwakawa^ 

A. M. Arthur; Knihn, R. B, Peat; 

Gisbornc^ G. G Wellsted ; Wesiporl, 

1\ liay-Mackeniie ; Ndson^ E. G. 

Wdaon ; Pirton, T. S. Edwards 

Maiwtknakcb Bbakch. 

Chii'f Engineer for Wcirkjog Ratlwaja— 
I J. Coom, M.IrvBtC.E. 
j Inapecting Engineer — J. Burnett, MJnal. 
C.E. 

Signal F"iigiiiefrr — H .J. Wynne, A.M.ln«U 
C.E 

Hallway I^»»d OfTieer-J. T. Ford 

Inspector of Brtd^^e CoDatruetion — A H. 
Alabaster 
, Eleelrioiftii— J. 1\ Fahy, A,M.LE.K. 
' Elect rie Me«;iianii"i»n — T» Hendrj 

Electrir Lines liiepector — E. A. Tomkie* 

Office Engineer— G. A. Troup 

Draughtjmen— J. B<^8ftnt, Ad. Howitt, 
A. S. Henderson, W. W. Fry, A. 8. 
Wanebrouigh, E. C. M. McE&v 

Clerks --W. P. Hicks W. A/Mirama. 
II Jesnip, T. IL Wil»<on, E, S. EelU, 
H, W, Rowden, J IL Robb, F. J. 
Rowden, E, D. Richarda, W. B. 
O'Brien I, G. P. Parrell, T, TreziMJ, 
If. McAhtter, F. T. A. WilliamB> 
G- H Ft-arn, V. W, W. Yminior©, 
R Greig, A. C. F. Duff, P. McGrath, 
W IL Lindop 

Diitrict Engineers — Auckland, D. T. 
Mclnloah ; Wanganui^ C, H. Bias; 
Wellington, F. J. Jones j Weitport 
and Westbind, F. 0. Widdop i Christ* 
church, H. Macandrew J Dunedin, 
F, W\ Mac Lean ; Inirerc*rgill, A- J. 
Mi.'Crt»die 

Re*ident Engineer — Fetone, A. C. Koch 

LoooMonvE Bbafcb, 
Chief Mechanicll Engineer— A , L, Bealtie 
Clerks— J. P. Kelly, R. Aekins, D. J>, 
Weir, B- A, Harris, J* Wortbingtoo^ 
C. H. Virtue, H. McKeowen, C. L, 
Pet I it. N P. G. Ewnrt, L. C Fama, 
N, G. Hawthorn, J M. Porteoua, 
J, p. MrKeowen, L* G. Artustroiig^ 



OKI IC14L LIST, 



fy 



J, R, Ifob«*rt.50i», J. M. Hf»mingw*j, 
P, Hurg^, P E, Cleiiry, L. A. J. Km^rt. 
M. H. Satlitiin 
Cliicf Prnugiiifin«w— R. PjreSmith 

C. Q, Q. B^rrv 
r ^ - fct"R, H P, Ronavne 

I -J, W. NichoU 
I^ . -iii#»er«^Auckl*nd, A. V 

Mncdminlci ; WelIing1on-Napier-Ne« 
PljmoutlK G A- Prarfton ; Kurunui 
Bhiir, n. H. Jackson; Weitport and 
Weittland, £. E. Gillon. R^Heving, 
7, T. MuriBon 
Brtik^ Kneni*'er — J. H, Foi 
hoco Ji»«i>erLor — E. L, W. HaskinN 

BoABD or Apfial. 

^orik I aland. 

II Kvre Kennj, Stipendtnrjr Msgislmie 
Cltairnion. appointed b\ t lir GoTcnior I 

W. BofTlra, TiAffic Clerk, Wellington,' 

W. T. Wil-on, EMgincman, el«:ted 
M J, Mack, Guuni, elected 
W. Morriifcm, Oiifigfr,, elected 
W. O. D KTarif, Turner. Poloue, 
fleeted 

I'liiiirniiiti (to be appointed by tbo Go 

rtmor) 
J. Qmj, Traffie Iti*pector, Christchurcb* 

elerUd 
A. Williani*, Guard, Ifirercargill, elected 
J, Robert ion, EDgitiemnn^ InTercsrgill, 

rjfcted 
J H, Jonf«» Turner, Addinglou, elected 
T Hall. Ganger. Dunedin, elected 



n'BIJC WORKS DEPARTMENT, I 

Bkap Ofpick, 
UtiiUter for Public Worka— Hon. W. 

Hal! *roiie» 
Coder Secret ary—H. J, H. Blow 
lof ineerinCiiief — P. S. Hay. M.A.. 

M In-tX.E, 
ln»|irctin0 Engineer — H. W. Holme*, 

* - —J, Campben, F R.I.B.A, 
rk— W, IK Dtiuibcll 

., , .ant — O, J- Claplium 

Land p<m"h»4e OfTner— H. TliompnoJi 
AmUUiiI l^aJid-pur<'hiiic Officer—E. Buld 
Record Clerk— 11, W. H. Milljiii 



Clrrkf— G. :C Sebniidl, P. S, W»Jdie» 
A* Bidden, A. 11, Eimbell, K. 
Jaeobf, C, E. Crawford, W. McKa- 
mnrs. H. F. CiirliPt A* Siimpton, J. J. 
Bennett, A. L, Goldfineb. L. While, 
K. W>bb. E, Tfudiill. P. J. JeunelL 
W H. Boji, R. Bro*n 
Cliier Draiiizbttman — W. G. Rutberford 
nraughlimen — E. Jaek«on, C. A. Law. 
fence, W» Wirbern, L. L. Bioliardu, 
W, G, C Swon, J. H. Pric<-. A, E 
King, R. G. Applegartb, A. F Mjirrae, 
S* W. Mav-SomerriJle, A- T. Ford» 
G.T. Venning. M. Walker H. C, NuMb, 
A. Stevenson, I>. M. Eenn, R, H, 
Warner, P. F, M Burruwf, A. S, Col- 
Tin 
11 end 8lorekeep*r — J. C, Fulton 
I EnKineering CadeU— T. M, Ball, H. O. 
, SImtinoii, T. G. C. Mackay, G. H. J. 
I M ell sop 

I Arcliit^^einnl Cadet— B. F. Kelly ' 

Clerical Ctidet-L. W, Wogan 
Clerital CadeileB — W. L. J. Mellaop, 
G, F. Ed en borough 

DiBTRicr OmcB6. 
Districl Engineer* — Auckland^ C, K 

Yiokerman; Dunedin, E, R. Ui»ber, 

MJnul.C.E. 
Resident Engineer! — Tatbapej G» L* 
I Cook, M.lnit.CK ; Pinaka. J. D. 

Loueb, AMoe.M.lnst C.E, ; Obakune, 

J. J. Hay, MA.-. NeUon, W. A. 

81min ; Wrslport, K. A. Young, Amoc, 

M^lnslCE. ; GreTmouth, J. Tlitrnj- 

•on, BE., M.ln^LC.E. ; Springfield. 
I X A. WrUon, M.lnjtCE. ; Stratford, 
' F. W, Furkert 
AMi»istant Engineers — S. J. Harding^ J, H. 

Dobnon, F. M. Hew^on, J. llitniiBli, 

J. U. Ijewis, G. C. Mc'Glushan, C. K, 
I Armslrong^ W. Widdowion, H, Dick* 
: »on, J. W. E. MeEnnis, A. Rosi*, 
', J. V. Haskell, J. Meenan, A, Stewart. 

W. P. Moyniban, W. Slierrail. C. J, 

McKeniie, F, P. Bartlej, J. J. Wilson. 

F. S. Dy *on, J Wood, H. Vickerman. 

B.Sc., L. B. Canjpbell, J. Korrii 
Engineering Suriejora — U. it. Atkinauni 

H, M. W. Ricbirdaon 
Engineering Cadet» — W. E. Fittgerald, 

P. Keller, F. C\ Hay, H. M. Sharp. 

T. M. Crawford, H. T. Thompson. 

R. Park, H. PaUerson, W, Hall-Jonei. 

jan„ A. J, Bilker, C. D HandJey. 

A, D Thorpe, W. G. Pearce, G, G* 

WiUon, J. R, Marki, F. £ii4ell, W.tt. 



King 



I 



64 



SEW ZSALAJfD OFFICIAL TKAH-600K. 



UraughUmeii— C. Wood, J. Biiird, W. If. 
Hie-lop, T, J, Mc'Coiker. J. J. Fmscr. 
H. a W. WrinK, J. B. Koberlton, 
W. J. C. SUxie, A. W. Kemp 

Clerks— C. T. Rush brook, A. R. Stone, 
J. H. DtntoD. A. J. Sufdiffc, E. VYad- 
dril, T. J. Gardiner, J, Holroyd, E. W, 
I/Es-trange, A. R. Tnylcr, M. E, Bdiikf*. 
H. OmTP, G. T. Gmee, E. Q Benle, 
J, A. ^^nar*-, 0. A. Aiftbone, K, J. 
KdHttrde, L, M. Sbem, S. A. Hollftnd, 
L. W, Purconfl, W. A. Bi^wic, A. D. 
Park, H, M. U'DoimWI, H. Uolviu, 
W. Soiherim, C. Bnll. E. J. M. S«r- 
geut, A, Ho«5, P. il. Benton, R. M. 
Cur roll 

t^torekeeper* — T. DougluB^ S. J. Mou- 
crieir, K. Kidd 

'Clerical Cadeiie— E, J. Colqulioun 



DEPARTMENT OP ROAOa 

Head Officb, 

Minister in C barge — liou, W. Hall- 

Chief En|iine<?r— C. W, HuratbouBe 

Chief Ckrk'-W. 3* Short (eolicitorj 

Chief Aecotiiit&nt — J. R. Smylh 

AiMBlBtit Accounlaut — 

Clerks- J. O. Anaun, il. Ariiuir, E. U. 
Bak<rr, W. BanlttT, F. Blake, J. W. 
Bbek, C E. Beiirjett, J. Coiinell, 
0. ElliaoD. A, W, Itines, R. F. Mud- 
den, F. Mueller, R. B. Oir. J. B. 
Poytil^r, L. E. Jc»hii!«on . 

Dxauf^btsmnn — Q. H. Murmv 

Cadetfl— «I^' D. Brosiiau, Q. F, Jack»ort| 
J. M. Tudhope 

nut rut Officers. 

Diilricfc Rottd Eiigiiieer» — Aurkkud, 
A. B. Wright; To Km Li, T. Burd ; 
Rotorua, A. C. TurTier j Ha\vke*a Bay, 
D. N. McMdlan ; Taranaki, G. T. Mur- 
rmy ; Wfltiganui, K. II. Reii.ri*»j j Wei* 
liiigt4jri, Q, F. Robinson ; Marlboraugh. 
0. H- William* i Canterbury. F. B. 
Wither ; Sauthland, J. H. Trefirder 

Aiiistaut Road Engineem — Aui'kbial, 
A, n* Vickeruian j Rotorua, C. B. 
Turner^ K. M. Doniddson ; Te Kmti, 
A* Julian, A. L, Sealy; Wellington, 
T, Carroll 

Dittrict AccoutitJiiils— Auckland, G. A. 
KalU'dder ; Wellington, R. Moire 



Clerka — AuL^kland, II. J, Katie nd er ; 
Rotor iia, W. J. Wigga ; Te Kmti, 
F. fl. 8im^ C. Turner I Huwke'a Bay, 
P, S. Foley ; Turanaki. J, Clarke, O. W, 
Riehardft j Wangtnui, F. Maii^oD, W» 

I Mereon, J. R. Cade, R. F. Bnllantiue j 
Welliriiiton. P. J. Morrjin, S, d'A. 
Qrut, T. C, Duncfvij; ^'el3on, J. A. 

I Hny ; Marlborough, F. H. lbbet«oti ; 

I Wejtilniid. L. Cooler j Caiiterbury, 
P. W. Willson ; Otago, W. If. Trimble; 

j SouthUnd. N. J. Ryan, R. W. Gdl 
Cadets— A uekl and, U. Watkiuson, W, E. 

I Mnrdoiii Rotorua, C. W. Carrerj 
iBranukij IL Powt li ; Wanganui, H. A- 
JoTre, T. L. Cooper j Southland, F. K. 
Wdkie 

i DmiightsnieD — Auckland, R, 0. Ander- 
son j Kt>toriin» F. i. Klli»; Te Kuiti, 

I J. T. V. Kirby; Havrko'* Bay, P. 3. 
Reauey, W. IL Qilmour ; Tttnuiakt, 

I C. H. Lftwu J Welliugton, G, R. Ibbet- 
»on 
Road luapeetora — Auckland, Q-. Q, 
Meiaiee. R. J. BalT, R. R. Menziea, 
R. Ui!l, II. II- Tbooippou, S. R. Jamee, 
J. fliggiijs, J. W, Civil ; Kotorua, W, 
Fairlt-y ; le Kuiu, R» Barroo, B. J. 
Early » J. Williau]>iH>ii ; UawkeV* 

I Bay, T. E Straucbon, D* Q-, 
Rob* rtaon ; Taratmkt, W» J. Wor- 
thingtoii, H. C. Stromboui, E. Julian, 
R, D, To<^awill ; Wangai^ui^ A. L. 

j Soofiiit, R, S. Suinniem, B, WollT, W. 

' Waiera i Wellingtoo, W. Nathan, 
J, C. acoU, C. Uardiivge, G. T. Wliit- 
taker ; Ncle-oUj J, F. Raarnusaen, J. 
Brougli I Weelland, W, Adair ; Can- 
terbury, R. H. Young, U, Hurrell ; 
Otago, B. Marr, J. Ke'ly ; SouLliland, 
H, a Su( ton 
Btidge Inspector — To Kuili, M. W. 

For«ylh 
Overseeri — Ai^ckland, A. L, Mensies ; 
Kotoruft, G. 11. Donnldfou, B. Re illy j 
Te Kuiii, W. Bond, J. Sn vLh ; Hawke'a 
B^y, J. Allison, A. W. Horrid, J. McLeod, 
E, Haliett, W. Braob ; Taranaki. W. 
Kigg, C. ^kitrop, G. Den i eon, C. E. 
Ban'ou, J. Cwddy ; Wanganui, J. A. 
Rutherford, E. A. Vine," J. Corlett, 
E Gould, G. F. Mane-ou, A. II. 
Wriglit ; Weliinglon, W. Boy den, W. 
Cam|jbeli j Nelson, M. Greep, J. Quinn, 
U, Gillhtink ; Marl borough, T. Jame«, 
D. Wiilaoo J We»tland, A. M. Beer, 
P, Purcell ; Otago, P. FiUpatrick j 
Sou ill land, J. Maber 



OFFICIAL LIST. 



56 



DKPAHTMKNT OF DEFENCE. 

MinUli^r of D«-f«»nce— The Right Hon. 

Richmrd John Scddon, P.C. 
PriTM« SecrcUrj — CnpUin Richard 

John SpoUwood SeddoQ, K.Z^M. 
Under-S<?crer»rf — 
Senior Clrrk — Thornn* FrAtictt Qrcy 
Cleriod C*d©t— iJiitid Siaiile/ Ltoh* 

HKAl>qfTAETIB8 STAPP. 

ComtniifidiitU of the New Zr&Und De* 

fpTicc Forces —CoJott el James Melrille 

B«bin^07{, H,M. General Staff (locnl 

If ttj or • G «*n e ral) 
St«^ Ofric«*r to Councandant — Ciiptnin 

UUarle* Lionel Kirw«& CaiupWll, 16tli 

(Tl»e <Jueen*») Laneert 
A4«i«t«nt Ad j 11 taut - General — Brevet 

Lieutenant - Colonel Edward Wftlter 

Clervaui Chajitor, N Z.M. 
StmS OflSrer of Artillerj — Major G#orge 

j^apter Johiiitoo, N.Z.M. (Captain 

H.G.A.) 
Staff OBtwr Engineer Sertice* — Captain 

AUc\ Chriftopber Robinton (R^Ej, 

Intpivltiig Officer Defence Cad el « and 
Defeno^ Rifl^ Club# — Captain Jobi* 
Getbin Jlug1ie«, D.8.0,, NXM. 

SttrreMt- General — SidiieT Skertnah 
(VJX), NXM , K.Z.M.C. I 

Cbie! Clerk -Wilbam Edward Butl«r | 

Clerka — John Frederick Roekstrgw, 
William Rickford Collet t, Henry Binij 
^ '" Jiioobe, George Francis Rudkin 
!*rid writer and Tjpute— EliiMb<>tb 
lid Gardiner 

lysTitucTOBs* 
Artitlerj Initrvictor — Maeter^Gunner 

G'Hvr^e S Richardson (R.A ) 
E Muirjcer InMriictnr — Smff Sergeant* 

Major J. P. Eutfell (R.E) 

Ckstnut. BoAftp or Mixitavt Ex ami 

Kreaident — BreTet-Colonel William Hd- 
d^n Webb. N.Z.M. (late H,M. lOflib | 
Fool) I 

Ki«?culiTe Officer — Lieutcnoiii Tlioma* | 
W McDonald 

Clerk — Fr *n k Jen ni ngu I 

Mti.rrAiiT pgicsioKft BoAki}. 
Pretident^Bri^de Surgeon-Lteutetiant- 
Colotiftl WUliam Edward CoUioif 
5XM.C 



Membifr« — Surgeon - Major Jaiuet R. 
Purdj. N.Z.M.C. j feurgeon - Captain 
William £. Herbert, N.Z M. 

^ Dbfbhcs Stosb Dipahtmivt. 

J)i;f«nce Storekepp<?r — James O'Sullifan 
Asautant Storekeeper — Frederick Silver 

Niw ZxAi^KD Febmakeitt Fobcs. 
Mo^al iVVip Zealand Jriitlff^. 
Officer Cvmnmnditiff^ 
Major John Edward Hutne 

Ojlficgrt, 
Captain Herbert Edward Pilkingtoti 
Captain William P. Wail 
Lieutenant MurrnT Menzie* Gardner 
Lieutenant George B. B. Mickle 
Lieutenant Robert O Che«nej 
Lieutenant 6jduejr G. handle 
Cadet—Iron Xalham Staodiab 

£oyat 3>ie Zealand Kn^inetrt, 
Lieutenant Frank S)mon 
Lirutenatit Bnjner B. Sn*_vihe 
LieuU'nunt John Evelyn Dui^an 
Hoiiorar) Captain Robert Frmaer 

{Lieut. R.K.R^) 
Honorary Cnptain Reginald Moor« 

bona.* (Ltent. RN.R.) 
Honorary Lieutenant John Macpherson 
Hnrvorary Lieutenant William George 

Nelaon 

Surgf*on ' Qnptain E. W. SLarmau, 

Ji ZMC, (Auckland) 
Surgeon Captain Hamilton A. U. 

Gilmer, N.Z M. (Wellington) 

Honorarif Chaplain*, 
ReT. George P. Durya (Welling l^n) 
Rev, Edward Eliot Charabera iV.D.), 
(Lyttellon) 

OfFICSRS COMMAxV'DlNG MlLITlA AKP 
TOLrJfTEEK Dl&TttlCTfi, AwfTTAKTS, 
kVU l^HlSQlVkh MkiUCAJ* OFPICKllfi, 

Aucklitwd, 
Offlcvr Commiindinif Diairict — BreTel- 

Colonel Richard HuUoti Dariea, C,B.. 

N.ZM, 
Prindpul Mt'diral OHlcfr — Brigade 

Surgeon - Lieutenant • Colonel H«nry 

Walker, N.Z.M.C. 



56 



SEW ZBALAKO OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 



Officer &>m mending Dlitrict — Brefel- 
ColonA WiJliatii HMen Webb»N.Z.M< 
(Ute H.M. Umb Fool) 

Adju'iiTit — Mjjof Lewii John Jojee^ 

Principal Mfdic&l OlHctT ^ Brigade 
:^iirgeoii-Lirateinttnt-Coloa(fl William 
Edward CoUitiS, N.ZJIO. 

O nicer Commanding Dbtrict — Major 
(t4*tTipuirftrj LteyteMar.t'On^loneU George 
Ceeil liurleigli Wolfe, N.Z.M. (Itite 
CftpUin R.ftLLJ.) 

Afytlt^M^t^ Lieut <*imnl (toinporary Cap- 
rain) Sjdney ViiieenL Trajk^ N.Z M. 

PrnieipAl Mnlicnt Officer — Brigade 
Surjjeon. • Lieu^ellallt, - C^>l0!ipl Walter 
Relf Pearlesfl (V.1X)» N.Z.M.C. 

Canterburtf, 
OUicfftr Commafuling Difl^riet^Lieulen- 

tttit'Colant'l Arthur Uuuohop, CM.Q-^ 

N.Z.M- 
Principal Medical Officer — Brigade 

SuTgi'on - Ltetjteimiit ■ Colonel Wnlter 

Tbomoi (V.D), N.Z.M.C. 

OiBi'er Coninmnding District — Bre v» t- 
Colanel Alfred Willi.im Robin, C,B., 
N.Z.M. 

Principal Mt-dical Offii-er — Brieadti 
Surgeon • Lieulenant • Colonel Harrj 
Archibald dtf Lautotir (V.D.). N,Z,M,0. 



NEW ZKALAND POLICE DEPART- 
MENT. 
Bead O^tt . 
Coin miMii oner — Walttr Binuie 
Chief Clerk and AccoutiUnt — Sub- 
Inspector Arthur li. Wright 

Insppctori^Johii Ciillen, John Wybrant 
Elliion^ Rahert Jftmea GdUeii, Terence 
O'Brien, Kweti ^[ttcdonell, Nicholas 
Kiely. Kdwifcrd Wilaon, Alfred Jame» 
Mifchell 

8 ub* Inspectors — Patriek Bltick. Henrjr 
Green^ J(»hn Dwjer, John O'DonoTiin, 
Arthur H. Wrighf, DotigloM Gordon 



DEPARTMENT OP LANDS' AND 

SUKVKW 
Head Okficb. 

MiniAler of Lands and C «mmia«ioDer of 
Suki« Forest! — Hon. Tbotuju Toang 
Duncan 

Under-Secretary for Crown Lands — 
W. C. Kensington 

Acting Survejof ► Qeoeral — T. Hum- 
phries 

Chief Draughtainan — F. \V, Flanagan 

Chief Clerk-F.T. O'Neill 

Audi lor of Ltind Refenua — W, Q, 
Runcie 

Accountant — R, A, Pateraon 

Auckland DiaxRicT. 
Chief Surrejor and Commiafioneir of 

Crown Lands — J. Alacki nsii» 
Dinlrict SurvejorA— -J, Langrnuir, G. A. 

Martin, il. D. M. Has^ard, W, J. 

Wh* ekr, T. K. Thompson, R. S, Gal- 

braith 
As#i*tant SurTPTopB — A. G. AUom, H, F. 

Edgecumbe, W, C, O^Nelll 
Chief Draughlsman — C. R. Pollen 
Receiver of Laud Rerenue — T, M. 

Taj lor 

HAWKB'i i-iA¥ DiaTEicr, 
Chief Snrvevor and Comnii<*Bioner of 

Crown L»n'l*"E» C. G^ild Smith 
District Lana OfQcer, Gi«borae^ — F* 9. 

StniLh 
Distriot Surfeyora — F* B. Smith, T- 

Chief DraiightftTma-^Jamei Haj 
Receiver of Land Rerenue— F, Bull 

TlKAKAKt DiaTBlCT, 

Chief Surrejor and Coinmisiioner of 

Crown Lands — F. Simpson 
District Sorrejorn— H. M. Skeot, G. H. 

BuUard, W. T, Morpelh 
Chief Draughtsinati^ — W- H, 8kinner 
Ret^etrtr oF Land Revenue — F. A. CuUen 

Wkllinotow DiaTHlCT. 
Chief Surveyor and CominiAiiouer of 

Crown Lands— J. Stnuichon 
Di-trict Surreyors— J. D. CUnne, F, A- 

lhoinp«or»» II. J, Lowe, J. McJLiy, 

J. R. Stntchan 
AiMstimii Surveyors — II. E, Girdle* 

Bione, E. A* Marchant 
Chief Druughtsnion^L* Smith 
Receiver of Laud Rereuue— T, G. Waitt 



OFrtCIAL LIST. 



67 



rhief SufT^yor and Comnitft^iuner ol I 
i.'flrii Lmidf— W, G. Mrirmv I 

buUK^l Surrey <*n — J. A, Moiitgotneric, j 
J.Snodgna*, B. T. Sudd, J. D. Thom^ 
foil I 

Clii«fDimufh«ftnin— W D, B Murm? I 

lUrPfTer of Land Reveime — A. J. Red- ' 



Cbttf Surf(*yor and Commii^ioner of 

Crown Undi-H. Trent 
Piilrict Surreyor— D. W- Gilliet 
Aniftant Surrejor— W. C, MoAliater 
Ctikef DimagbUroao and Beoei ver of Land 

KfTfDue — W. Annslrotig 

WlTTLAVS DiaTKlCT. 

CM 8arrpyor and Commissioiier of 
Crown Landt — G, J, Roberta 

Dulfict 9urTe>ora — W. Wilson, H. 
HAttland, D/A. I. Bitrrnn 

ChH Dmaghttman— T. M. Grant 

R^-ffifer of Land RcTeniie — A. D. A. 
MtrftfUne 

CAKTlBBniT DriTBICT. 

Chj^f Surrejer and Commisiioner of 
Crown Laiidt — T. Huniphne» (aUo 
Arling: S u tT ej or G<'»t*!ra I) 

DiilriH Sorter on — T. N. Brodrick. 
0. MrCla're 

Cliiff I)rftiiplif*m*n — C« B* Shanks 

Rr ...... .f Land Keren we— A, A. McNab 

nt of Village Settlemente— 



OTa(K» DlSTBlCT. 
Cluff Surrejor iind CotnmiMioner of 

CV«3wr» Land» — Dutid Barron 
' t SurveTor*— E. H. Wilmoi, D 

ader, W. T. Neil! 
i-ji<ri lir'auplit^mttn — 9. Thompion 
KtofjTtfr of Land Refenue— G A. Rende 

SOUTBI^AKD DiSTBlCT. 
rfff SurreTor atid Conimiiiioner of 

ilrict 8upTeyor — 

ti Drauphtiman^G. Robinnon 

dierof Land Rerenue— H. L. Welcli 

HsKltsKA OF Land Boauds. 
bland— J. Mackenitt*. J. Ren«l»aw, 
R, nnrrit^ M. VV. Armitrotig, 
W. M. Bankarl 



Hiiwke** Bav*-E. C. Gold Smith, T. 
Hvde, R/ R. Groom, C- R. Bainei, 

0,'E Burtram 
Taranaki — F. SimpBODi J. HeAlop, 

JaTni>a Rartenbury, J. B. Connettf J, 

McClug|i;iige 
Wellmgtijn--ir Stniyehon, A* Reete, J. 

Slefenft, J. Piiwson, F, H» Robitiroo 
Nelson— W. O. Miirraj, O Ljnch, J. S, 

Wrntt, G. Walker, A. Bincluir 
Marlborough — H. Treni, ^J. Redwood, 

A. P. Seymour, H. M Reader, G. 

Renner 
Weitland —0. J. Robertt, J. S. Lang, A, 

CunidiiTig, M. Fulbck, G. Melliii^on 
Canterbury — T. Liumpliriet, A. C. 

Pringle, J, Seiily» J, Allan, J. StcTen- 

fon 
Otago— D, Barron, G. Li»ing«l.one, J. 

Tuugh, J. M. McKeniie, W, Dalfat 
SotiMiliind — J. Hay, A. Kmiioi*, J, 

Melniyre, D. King, J. AIcLeim 

Subtsyobb' Boabd UKDiB *'Thk Nsw 
Zkauikd Ikstitctb op SUBVEYOa* 
A^'D Boa KB op Eiaiiinkes Act, 

The Surrey or- General 
John Strauehotj, Esq 
Morgan Caikeek, Esq 
The Hon G. F. Richardson 
I Thoroai Ward. Eaq. 

I The Surrey or* General it ex qfflria a 
I meinher of the BcNird. Of Ihe nomii^ 
I nated memberf, two are B«*leeted antiually 
by the Minister of Land*, and two by 
rhe Council of the Inslitureof SurTejora. 
The Board is one of the Federated Boarda 
of Auatrahiaia,^ and work<« in eonjunetion 
wiiU I hem. 

*NAT]TB LaVB FiTBCaABB BOAED, 

Officer iTj Charge— P. Sheridan 

State Fohksts Bbakoh. 
Chief Fori^ater— H- J. Mai thews 
Numcrynien in Charge— RotoruH, H A. 
Goudie : Ewfburn, A. W. Roberta j 
Tai'Hnui, R. G H.jbiiiann ; Kurow, 
N* Craig ; Starborough, W, CroTiib f 
Hanmer 8pr»ngi», T. B. Ourle ; Rua* 
Ungata, L J. A da mi 



IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT. 

Minialer for Tmncigration — Ktglit lion, 

R. J. Seddon 
Under- Secretary — W. C Kenringlon 



58 



HEW ZEALAND OPFEOIAL YEAH*BOOK. 



VALUATION DEPARTMENT. 

Miiiitter in Charge — f'on. C. H. MilU 

Valuer-aencmi— O. F- C Canipbell 

Officers in Chargo — A. J. McGtowiin^ 
Aucklftnd ; A. E, Fouler, Welling^ 
ton J K. Hepworth» Clirist^hurt'li j A, 
Ololhier, Dimedin ; T* 0«win, ItiTer- 
Oftrgill 

Clerks— J. W. Black, II. L. Wiggitii. 
G, Halliday, J. Atkinsoti, C. J. LoTatt, 
H. A, Andereoii, F. C. Donglta 

Draught! man — H. H. Setd 

inipectinff Valuer — John P» Dugdale 

Diitrict \ ttluer* — James L Wil*on, jun., 
Whangareii W. F. Thompson, Peria ; 
W. Garrett, J, J. ReTnolds, B. J 
Esam, a. W. Hjde, Auckland i H. D 
Coutls, Te Kuiti j C. F. Lewia. G-is- 
borne ; W. E. Griffin, Napier ; H. J. C 
CoutU, Hawera; S. HilU New Ply- 
moatli ; A. Barnii, Wnngauut ; R. 
Gardner, Palmer*ion North ; G. II. 
Llo/d, Woodrille J J. Fraser^ Master 
Um J J. Ames, F. N. Maptin, Welling- 
toDi T. W. CaTerhill Petone ; E. 
Kennj, Piotou ; J. Glen, Nelson ; 
J» Webster. Ookitika ; il. Muppaj, 
W. L. Eerrjahan, A. Freeman, Chn»t- 
chureh j K. A. Atkinson, Oaoiarn ;. 
W. L. Crftig, J. Wrigbt. U. G. 
FUi«er, Dunedin ; R. Milne, Milton ; 
J. George, Queenslown i John Smaill, 
Gore; A, Pvper. Inrereargill 

Clerks— Auckland, T. C. Souif^rs, F. B 
Robertson ; Cliristchurc)!, A» Millar, 
J. M. Wbeeler, C. J. Walker j 
Dunedin, C. de R. Andrews 

CadelB— Aueklatid, P. G- Penrce j Wcl- 
lirifiton, G. J, Russell, W. LoTelh A. T. 
MeCaw, C. J. Hurley ; Cbri^lcburch, 
H* fl- FatcU J Dunedtu, D. Corcomn. 
F. K Tucker; IriTrrrar^ill. G. Forbc* 

CAdeltei — Wellington, G. F. Cook© j 
CliHslcburch, N, dn^ythe ; Dunedin, 
M. J, Dryi»da]e 



Aho for (he folUmng dUtriei§ : 
Auckland — 

J. Kaekenzie, Comnibsion«r of Crowti 
Land I 

E. Hall 
II»wtte*« Bat — 

£. C* Gold Smith, Commiisioner of 

Crown Lands 
Thonms Hyde 
Wellington — 
' J. Straui-hon, CoQimissirner of Crown 
I' Lands 

Alexander Reose 
Taiarvaki — 

F. Sinipion, Commissbner of Crown 
liands 

John Heslop 
Mftrlborougb — 

H. Trent, CommUtioner of Crttwn 
Lands 

J. H. Redwood 
Nelson — 

W. G, Murray, Commiisioner of Crown 
Lands 

Franeia Hamilton 
West land — 

G. J- Roberls, Commiisioner of Crown 
L«ndi 

(A ricunry at present ©lists) 
Canterhiiry— 

1\ Humphries, Cotomissionerof Crown 
Lands 

A. C. Fringle 
Otago — 

D. Barron, Commissioner of Crown 
Irtind* 

A. MeEerrow 
Soathland — 

J. Uuj» Com miss iouer of Crown Lauds 

A. Ktiiroas 



•■THE LAND FOR SEITLEMENTS 
ACT, imW/' 

hk^an PlTBCBASB BoA&D. 

Obairman and Land Purchase In- 
spector — A, Barron 

Under-Secretary for Lands — W. C* Kens- 
ington 

SurTeyor- General — J. W. A, Marchant 



FDBLIC TRUST OFFICE 

Publte Trustee — J, W, Poynton 
Deputy Pub: 10 Trunlee and Chief Cterk^ 

A, A, E, Duncan 
Soiit'itor — F. J. Wilson 
fnnpfctor — T. S. Eonaldson 
AccounUnt— T. D, Kendall 
Examiner — A. Purtiie 
Clerks- in-Charge — T, Stephens, W, A. 

Fordham, C. Z&c'hftrifth» P. Herrey. 

Cloiks-E. C. Reeve, P. T. Fair, G, A. 

Sm>tb, E. A. SmTthe, E. N, U. 

Browne, W. Barr. K* 0. Hales, S. W. 



OFFICIAJ^ LIST, 



58 



SmiU), C A. Goldsmitb, 11 . Mmitert. 
R. Pric*, N- M. Chwni»r, H, Turner. 
a M, CftWer*, M. E. Niih, J. Meuiiw. 
K. P. HaT, A. a Brelherion. N. M, 
M*edoog:ftn. A. L. Ohappeli, G. H. 
CbeiUrman. D. H, W, Du Tall. 
A. H. T. Jonei, J. W. Mnod jndd, K. K, 
McLean, A. Mack»r. P» NhtW, E, C. 
Qarkc, G. H* Eliiff,*, a/J. Tobin. 
W. G. Baird 

DUirict Ajfrnl, Cbriatchurcli — M. C 
Bariiell. Clerk* — W. S. McGowan, 
G. P. Purncll, P, A, Dcrerem, A. K. 
Hadfield. A. W- IronBide 

Dutrict Agent, Auckknd— E. F, Warron. 

Clerks— A. J. CroM, G. M. Morri*, 
A K JordaTi, S- Hunter 

Di^trct Agent. Napier ^ J. B. Jack. 
Oftdeiee— J, J, Hutfon, 

Diftrici Agent, Dunedin — F. H, Moriee. 
Clfrrkf— J. Allen, C. F. Young, T. K. 
Moon, R A. Ward 

DittriM Ageni, Grejmouth— T. B. Saj 
well. Cadel— A. W, WaUcr» 

Diftnct Agent, NcUon— E. P, Watkii 
W«ai Coatt SetUement Heter?eg Aget)) 
and District AfEeiii, New Pljmouth— 
Tbomaf W- Fither. Clerk*— IfOuwin, 
A. Quirmej 



GOVKRNMKNT INSURANOH 
DEPARTMENT 

Commiftiouer— J, H. Richardson, FT, A., 
FI AT. 

Aatiaiant Coipnii»aiotier — D. M, Ijucki^' 

AH^mrr— Morri« Fox 

*^ -W. B. Hudson 

— G. W. Barltrop 

thui Jjie<i<calOirH'er— T. Caliill ^hlh 

Ai«i«tant Actuarv — P. Muter 

Cliief Clerk— R C. Nircn 

Office Kxamincr— G, A, KenneLij 

Clerki— J. W, Kinnibargh, W. S. SmilL, 
A, H.Hamprton, A. Arerj, F. B. Boll. 
T, L. Barker, A. L. B. Jordan, H, S 
Manning, H. Rote. C, K Galvrej, A, T. 
Trarcrii. G. Webb, F- K. Kciling, 
J, B. Young, R. P, Hood, a A. :S. 
Campbell, J. A, Tliomion, A. de Caitro, 
H. L. Lefeatam. C. H. E. Sticbburj. 
R. T, Smith, S. P. nawtliome, J. Q, 
Reid, J. R. Samson. R. FuHerlon, G. S 
Kieoll, T. Fouhy, G. E. 8add, W. II 



Woon, W. Spence. 11. Wylie, W J. 
Eirart, T, M. Dimant, B. Treritbick, 
P. A, Anderson, M. A. Spicer. E. Too* 
man, H. Niroll, £. K. Haj, I. Cou]t< 
hard, W. £. Arnold. W. Tbomp«)ii, 
L E. Foot. 

Chief Meiienger — ^W. Archer 

Auckland Agkitct. 
Oi«trict Manager— W. J. Speight 
Chief Clerk— G Crichlon 
Clerks— C. H. Ralph, P. M West 

Napibm Aqbvct, 
Resident Agent — J. H. Dean 

WAKOiKm Aoiwot; 
Resident Aeent— A. K. Allison 
Clerk— F. D. Bankf 

WjttuKGToii AomcT. 

Dislrirt Manager and Siiperrisor of Hew 

Business — G. Robertson 
Chief Clerk— M, J. K, Hejwood 
Clerki — W- C. Marclmnt, A. M, Me* 

Donald, G- H. Brialey 

NuLflON Aojtucr, 
Besideni A gem — A. P, Btirnes 
Olcrk— G. L, Osborne 

GfiBTMOrTH AaiKOT. 

Reaident Agent— R S. Latta 
Clerk— W. OopcUnd 

CHRiB-rcurRCH Agknct. 
District Manager— J. C Prudhoe 
Chief Clerk— J. K. Blenkhorn 
Clerk— G. J. Robertson 

TiMARU AOEHCT, 

Resident Agent— S. T. Wicksieed 



OAiiAur Agency. 
I Ri^sideiil A^eni— A. W. G. Burnes 
I Clerk— J, R. Wallace 



DUNKDrK AOBNCT. 

Difltric't Manager— R. S. McGowan 

Chief Clerk— O H. Finel 

Clerks— A. Marryatt, T. P. Laurenson 

INVERCAIIOILL AOBNrr. 

Resident Agent— J. Fitidlajr 
Clerk— J. liendrj 



60 



NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAR- BOOS. 



ADVANOKS TO SETTLKRS 
OFFICE. 
SuperiDtendent — P. Hejei 
AesUtant Superintendent — W. Waddel 
Accountant— W. N. llincbliffe 
Clerks— J. E. Thompson, C. B. Collins, 

C. T. Fraser, A. W. Knowles, A. A. 

Pricbard, W. Auld, T. W. Foote, 

H. S. O'Rourke, C. D. Wil*on, R. a. 

McLennan, A. Tudliopp, J. F. O'Leary, 

T. W. Vickery. Typist— F. W. Crom- 

bie 
Cadets— J. J. M. Harvey, F. J. R. Gled- 

hUl, S. O. Clarke 



STATE FIRE INSURANCE OFFICE 

Head Officb. 
General Manager — J. W. Brindley 
Acting Accountant and Chief Clerk — 

J. U. Jerram 
Fire Suryeyor— P. H. Pope 



Corresponding and Record Clerk — O. S* 

Jones 
Clerks- a H. T. Skelley, G. W. Owen. 

ish, A. P. Brown. 
Ty piste — A. Coltman 
Cadets — K. J. Thompson, A. Berry, D. 

Button. W. Watson, B. McPherson, 

P. Pal tie 

Branch Bs. 

Auckland, 
Manager — R. J. Lusher 
Chief Clerk— C. J. McKean 
Cadets— N. S. Bojlan, F. R. Grucning 

Canterhurif, 
Manager— F. J G. Wilkinson 
Chief Clerk— K. B. Bain 
Cadets — Cecil Marshall, D. Morrison 

Otago and Soutk'amd. 
Manager — G. J. C Smart 
Chief Clerk— W. Dobson 
Cadets— T. A. Fraser, B. McLetn 



Cadbts in Gotbbnmbnt Sbbyiob to bb Voluntbbbb. 

Cadets in the Civil Service are required, after arriving at the age of eighteen 
years, to serve for three years in a Volunteer corps. Heads of Departments are 
required to see that cadets who come within the regulations join the Volunteer 
Force, and serve for the period named, and also to notify the Under-Secretary for 
Defence of the appointment of all cadets coming within this regulation. 



■ ECCIiESIASTICAL. I 

B JM pift* is no State Church in the colony, nor is State aid given 
Wirtiy form of religion. Govemineut in the early days set aside 
certain lands as endowments for various religious bodies, but nothing 
of the kind has been done for many years past. 

CeUBCH OF THE PROVINCE OF NbW ZeALAND, OO&CMONLT CALLBD 

THE ** Church of England." j 

Bishops, 

The Most Rev. Samuel Tarratt Nevill, D.D., Dunedin ; conse- 
crated 1871 (Primate). 

The Rig;ht Reverend Moore Richard Noligan, D,D., Auckland ; 
consecrated 1903. 

The Right Rev. William Leonard Willianis, D.D., Waiapu ; 
consecrated 1895. 

The Right Rev. Frederic Wallis, D,D.. Wellington; consecrated 
1895. 

The Right Rev. Charles Oliver Mules, M.A., Nel^n ; consecrated 
1892, 

The Right Rev. Churchill Julius, D.D., Christchurch; consecrated 
1890. 

The Right Rev. Cecil Wilson, M.A,, Melanesia; consecrated 
1894. 

Roman Catholic Church. , 

Archbishop, 

The Most Rev. Francis Redwood, S.M., D.D., .\rchbishop and 
Metropolitan, Wellington; consecrated 1874. 

Bishops. 

The Right Rev. George Michael Lenihan, D.D., .\ucklaQd ; con* 
Becrated 1896. 

The Right Rev. John Joseph Grimes, S.M.. D.D., Chris tchurch ; 
-consecrated 1887. 

The Right Rev. Michael Verdon, D.D.» Dunedin^, consecrated 
1896. , 

Annual Meetings and Officers, ' 

The principal present heads or officers of the various Churches, 
iknd the places and times of holding the atiniml or periodical assem- 
blies or meetings, are as follow : — 

Church of E fig land. — For Church purposes, the colony is divided 
into six dioceses — viz., Auckland^ Waiapu» Wellington, Nelson* 
Christchnrch, and Dunedin. The General Synod meets every third 
year in one or other of the dioceses. Representatives attend from 
•eiieh diocese, and also from the diocese of i^Ifclanesia. President, 
Ihe Bishop of Dunedin, Primate. The Diocesan Synods meet 
once a year, under the presidency of the Bishop of the diocese. 
The next General Synod will be held in Duuijdin, on tlie 28ih 
January, 1907. 



62 



NEVT ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAR-BOOK, 



Bomafi Catholic Chturh.— The diocese of Wellington, eBtablisll^l 
in 1848, was in 1887 created an archdiocese and the metropolitwP 
see. There are three sulfragan dioceses — Auckland, Chriatchurch,. 
and Dunedio, A retreat is held annually in each of the four 
dioceses, at the end of which a synod is held, presided over by the 
bishop or archbishop, and at which all his clergy attend. 

In January, 1899, the first Provincial Council of New Zealand 
was held in Wellington, under the presidency of the Metropolitan, 
and attended by ali the suffragan bishops, and a number of priests 
elected specially in each diocese as representatives of the whole 
Catholic clergy in the colony. The decrees of this Council were 
approved by Borne in April, 1900, were published on 1st January^ 
1901, and are now binding in every diocese in the colony. 

Preshyterian Church of Netv J^ealand,— The General Assembly 
will meet on the first Tuesday of November, 1906, in Firat Church, 
Dunediti. Moderator, the Rev. David Borrie, Dunedin ; Senior 
Clerk, Kev. David Sidey» D.D., Napier ; Junior Clerk, Rev. David 
Borrie» Dunedio i Treasurer, Rev, W, J. Comrie ; Presbyterian 
Church Oilicee^ Wellington ; Theological Professors, Rev. John 
Dunlop, MA., D.D.. and Rev. Michael Watt, M.A., D,D.. Dunedin ; 
Tutor in Greek, Mr. James Dunbar, Dunedin. 

Methodist Church of Australasia in Neiv Zealand.^ — The annual 
New Zealand Conference meets on or about the last Tuesday in 
February, the exact date being determined by the President, who 
holds office for one year. Each Conference determines where the 
next one sliall assemble. President (1906-7), Rev. T. G. Brooke, 
New Plymouth ; Secretary, Rev. C. H. Laws, B.A*» Dunedin, The 
next Conference is to meet in Durham Street Church, Christchutch, 

Primitive MetJiodist Cormexion. — A Conference takes place every 
January. The next is to be held at New Plymouth, commencing 
10th January, 1907. The Conference oOkials for the present year 
are : President, Mr, Charles Bellringer, New Plymouth ; Vice- 
President, Rev. J. Olphert, Feilding; Secretary, Rev. Ben Dudley, 
Waddington, Canterbury ; Hon. District Secretary, Mr. D. Goldie, 
Pitt Street, Auckland ; Treasurer of Mission Funds, Mr. Joseph 
Watkinson, Wapiti, Auckland, 

Baptist Union of New Zealand. — President, Mr A. S. Adams^ 
Dunedin ; Vice-President, Mr. H. M. Smeeton, Auckland ; Secretary, 
Rev. R. S. Gray, Christchurch ; Treasurer, Mr. A. Chidgey, Christ- 
church ; Mission Secretary, Rev. J» C, Martin, Christchurch; 
Mission Treasurer, Mr. A, Hoby, Wellington. The Union coraprisea 
39 clmrches, 2r5 preaching - stations, 4,076 members, and a con- 
stituency of 17,000, The denominational organ is the New Zealand 
Baptist; Editor, Rev, F, W. Boreham, Mosgiel. The Foreign 
Missionary Society, with an average income of Jtl,400, employs & 
doctor, a missionary, three zenana ladies, and 13 Native helpers. 
The sphere of operalions is in North Tippcrah, East Bengal* 

Congregatwnal Union of Neto Zealand. — The annual meetings 
iU-e held during the month of February, at such place as may be 



DEFENCES. 63 

tbdded on by vote of the Goancil. Chairman for 1906, Rev. G. 
Heighway, Donedin ; Chairman-elect, Bev. W. Day, Mount Eden ; 
Secretary, Bev. John Wilkins, Auckland; Treasurer, Mr. W. H. 
Lyon, Auckland ; Begistrar, Mr. G. Hunt, Wellington ; Head 
<Mfice, Auckland. In 1907 the meeting of the Council will be held 
at Dunedin. The Committee of the Union meets in Auckland on 
the second Tuesday of each month. 

Hebrews. — Ministers : Bev. S. A. Goldstein, Auckland ; Bev. 
fl. van Staveren, Wellington ; Bev. I. Bernstein, Christchurch ; 
Bev. A. T. Chodowski, Dunedin ; Mr. Alexander Singer, Hokitika. 
Ammal meetings of the general congregations are usually held at 
these places daring the month of Elul (about the end of August). 



DEFENCES, MILITABY AND NAVAL. 

The defence forces consist of the Boyal N.Z. Artillery and Boyal 
N.Z. Engineers, and the auxiliary forces of Volunteers, Field 
Artillery, Garrison Artillery, Engineers (submarine mining and field), 
Mounted Bifles, Bifle, Cycle, Field Hospital and Bearer Corps, 
Defence Bifle Clubs, and Defence Cadets. There is a Commander 
of the Forces, who is an Imperial officer. A Boyal Artillery officer 
is Stafif Officer for Artillery. A Boyal Engineer officer is Staff 
Officer for Engineer Services. To the Under-Secretary for Defence 
all questions of expenditure are referred. 

Militia and Volunteer Districts. 
The two Islands (North and Middle) are divided into five military 
districts, each commanded by an officer of field rank, with an 
Adjutant and clerical staff, besides a staff of N.C.O.s, mostly drawn 
from the Imperial Army, for instruction of Volunteers. 

Boyal N.Z. Artillery. 
This Force is divided into four detachments, which are stationed 
at Auckland, Wellington (headquarters), Lyttelton, and Dunedin; 
their principal duties are to look after and take charge of all guns, 
ordnance stores, ammunition, and munitions of war at these four 
centres. The Force has a strength of 261 of all ranks, the autho- 
rised establishment being 272. 

Boyal N.Z. Engineers. 

This branch is divided between Auckland and Wellington, with 
small detachments at Lyttelton and Port Chalmers, and has a 
strength of 94 of all ranks, the authorised establishment being 101. 
They have charge of two submarine-mining steamers of the ** Sir 
F. Chapman " class, and of all submarine-mining and electric- light 
stores. 

Volunteers. — Field Artillery. 

There are six batteries of Field Artillery. They are armed with 
15-pounder B.L. and 6-pounder Nordenfeldts, on field carriages. 



04 NEW ZBAI.AMD OFFICIAL YEAH-BOOK. 

and go ioto camp antiually for sixteen days. Present strength » 440 
of all ranks (34 officers and 406 other rankB). 

Volunteers. — Naval and Garrison Artillery. 

There are nine Garrison Artillery Corps. They go into camp 
annually for sixteen days. Present strength, 62 officers and 851 
other ranks. 

Volunteers. — Engineers. 

There are six Engineer Corps, two Suhoiarine Mining and four 
Field Corps, with a total strength of 519 of all ranks. The Sub- 
marine Miners have cutters, Ac, provided, and are instrocted in 
rowing, knotting, splicing, signallings and other duties pertaining to- 
this branch of the service. Attendance at an annual camp is alsa 
compulsory. The Field Engineers, besides carrying rifles, are pro- 
vided with entrenching tools and all appliances for blowing up 
bridges or laying land mines. Both Submarine Mining and Field 
Engineers go into camp for sixteen days each year. 

Volukteerb.— Mounted Rifles. 
There are seventy- two corps of Mounted Kifles. These corps go- 
in to camp for an annual training of seveu days. Present strength, 
859 officers, 3,834 other ranks. 

Volunteers, — Infantry Corps. 
In this branch of the service there are a hundred and twenty-ona 
corps, with a strength of 469 officers, 6,569 other ranks. These 
corps go into camp for an annual training of six days. 

Volunteers.— Cycle Corps. 

There are Volunteer Cycle Corps at Wellington, Christchnrch, 
and Dnnedin, of a maximum strength of two officers and thirty- 
two non-commissioned officers, rank and file : they are attached to- 
the infantry battalions at those centres. To the Cycle Coi-ps at 
Christchnrch and Dunedin is attached a Signalling Detachment of 
two officers and thirty-four other ranks. The Signalling Detach- 
ments at other centres are attached to Infantry Corps. 

VoLUKTEEits, — Field HosriTAL and Bearer Corps. 
Volunteer Field Hospital and Bearer Corps at Auckland, Welling- 
ton, Christchurch, acd Dunedin are of a maximum strength of three 
officers and fifty oon-commissioned officers, rank and file. There ifi 
also a Bearer Corps at Nelson of a maximum strength of two officeri^ 
and twenty* five non-commissioned officers, rank and file* 

Volunteers. — Garrison Bands. 
There are five Garrison Bands, with a total membe rship of 139. 

VOLUKTKERS. — DEFENCE CaDET CoRPB. 

There is a force of fifty-eight Cadet CorpSi with a total strengtb 
of 3,129 of all ranks. 



DBFENCBS. 



Defence Eifle Clubr, 

Thefte have lately been established by the Government. Mem- 
bers can purchase rmes at cost-price from Government. An annual 
grant of ammunition is made to those members who fulfil condi- 
tions as to quarterly drille, &c. There are 116 Rifle Clubs, com- 
prising 3,046 members. 

Arms, etc. 

The whole of the adult portion of the Force have Lee*Enfield 
carbines or rifles ; cadets being armed with magazine Lee-Enfield 
and Martini-Enfield carbines. Defence Hifle Clubs are armed with 
magazioe Lee-Enfield rifles. 

Enrolment, etc. 
Members of the Permanent Forces are enrolled to serve for a 
period of eight years from enrolment, the last three, years of such 
being in the Reserve. Every member may, at the expiration of five 
years* service, if of good character, be allowed to continue in active 
service for a period of sixteen years. 

Instructors. 
The Instructors for Artillery and Engineer and Submarine 
Mining Corps are obtained from the School of Gunnery at Shoe- 
bury ness, and from the Royal Engineers respectively, under a three 
years' engagement, on completion of which they return to their 
regiments, if not re-engaged for a further term. 

Capitation. 

An annual capitation of £2 10s. ia granted to each efficient 
garrison and held artillery and infantry Volunteer, £3 10s. to each 
efficient mounted Volunteer, and 1b. 6d. to each efficient caflet. Two 
hundred and thirty rounds of ball cartridge are issued each year 
free to every a*lult Volunteer, and fifty rounds to each cadet over 
thirteen years of age. 

Administration. 

The defence forces of New Zealand are administered under "The 
Defence Act, 1886," and '^The Defence Act Amendment Act, 1890/* 
and the General Regulations of the Defence Forces of New Zealand. 

Expenditure on the Establishment and Maintenance of 
Defences from 1897'-98 to 1904-6.* 



7«u. 



Military 
Ezpenilitare. 



HBjrbour 
Defences. 



Total. 





£ 


£ 


i 


WT-^ .. 


83^004 


2,525 


85,529 


laoa^ . 


114.789 


10,158 


124,947 


ifio^idoo 


184,970 


5,328 


190,298 


I90D-1 


15C/J18 


3,960 


160,178 


imi'2 


250,478 


6,678 


257,156 


190S-3 


293,081 


6,126 


298,207 


19l»-» 


2ai»95a 


2,885 


224,844 


190W 


239.333 


2.515 


241,848 



Tb« vp^GltJ •^pcodltortf OB seeooni of coatingeots for Soaib Africa 1« not ltio\u&«^ . 



66 NSW ZBAhAND OFFICIAL ISAR-BOOE. 

DEPOTS FOR SHIPWRECKED MARINERS. 

H OUTLTINO ISLANBS OP NeW Zb ALAND, 

aIabinmrs are informed that depots of provisions ar.d clothing for 
castaways are established on the foUowiiig islands; — 

Kennadec Islands . — There are two depots, each a small iron 
shed, fitted with spouting and a tank to catch water* and containing 
a ssupply of clothing, biscuits, medicines, tools, ^c. One is in 3(P 
15' 8,, 178^ 31 W., at Lava Cascade, about Ij cftble.s Kouth-east* 
ward of the northern point of Macau lay Inland ; the other is in 
30^ 35' S., 178^' 36' W,, on the southern side of Macdonald Cove 
(crater), on the N.W. side of Curtis Island, 

Snares Islands.— A depot u established in iS^ Qf^ S., 166^ 33|' 
E,, in Boat Harbour, at the eastern end of N.E. Island. 

Bounty Islands. — ^The depot is a hut at an eh?vation of 120 ft., 
visible from the northward, and situated io 47*^ 43 J' S,, 179^ OJ' 
E., southward of the western inlet of the principal island — ^tba 
iiorth-eaatern — of the western group. 

Antipodes Islands. — The depot is a hut at an elevation of 1 00 ft,, 
Tisible from some distance north-eastward, and situated in 49*^ iO' 
S., 178° 50' E,, 300 ft. from the landing-place, on the N,E. side of 
the large island, and half a mile westward of its east point, 

Auckland Islands, — There aro three depots on the principal 
island: one, a square wooden house, in 50^" 33J' S,, 166^ 12' E.» 
and a boat near tlie depot, oo the S. side of Erebus Cove, Port Rofis; 
cm the E, side and at the northern end of the islaud; the second is 
in m^ 44J' S., I660 8' E., at the head of Norniiin Inlet (wrongly 
named " Musgrave Inlet*' on charts), and not at tlie inlet named 
Norman Inlet, two miles and a half northward; the third, and & 
boat for shipwrecked people, is in 50^* 50 J' S., 166^* V E,, in the 
western arm of Camp Cove, Carnley Harbour, at the S. end of the 
island. A lifeboat has been placed on Enderby Island, the north* 
eastern of the group ; another at the N.W. end of Adams Is^land, 
the southern of the group ; and one on Rose It^land, immediately 
S;W. of Enderby Island. 

Campbell Ishmd. — The depot, indicateil by a white staff and a 
boat, is in 52*^ 33' S., 169^ 6|' E., in Tucker Cove, at the head o! 
S. or Perseverance Harbour, on (he east side of the island. 

Finger-posts to indicate the positions of the depots are erected 
on all these islands. The Government steamer visits the Kermadec 
Islands once a yenr ; and the Snares, Bounty, Antipodes, Auckland, 
and Campbell Islands twice a year. 

Vancouver Island, British Columbia* 

Depots with provisions and other necessaries for shipwrecked 
mariners liave been established at Cape Beale Lighthouse in 48*^ 
47J' N,, 1250 13J^ W., and Carmanah Lighthouse in 48<^ 369* N., 
J240 46 J^ W. 




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A»TOR, LtNOX ANC i 



^^■^ DEPOTS FOR BHIinVKEOK£D MABINEB8. 67 

Notice boards have been erected at intervals between Cape Beale 
and Port San Juan (about twelve miles eastward of Carmanah 
Lighthouse), giving information for the u»e of shipwrecked 
mariners respecting the direction and distance of the nearest light- 
bouse, and also of the nearest Indian villige where assistance can 
be obtained, 

A note to this effect has been placed on the Admiraltj charts; 
also, that Cape Beale and Carmanah Lighthouse are telegraph and 
aignal stations. 

InDUH OcEAK: AjtfisTERDAM, ST- PaUL, AND KeBOUBLBH IsLANDS. 

Depoti containing provisions and clothing for the use of ship- 
wrecked seamen have been established by the French vessel-of-war 
** Eure *' on Amsterdam^ St, Paul, und Kergiieleii Islands. 

Amsterdam hland,— The depot is in a large cavern, in approxi- 
mately 370 4Sf' S., 770 32V E., in the side of a hill, about 80O 
yards S., 73^ W. from Hosken Poini, the N.E. extremity of the 
Island, and bears N. 85*^ W,, about 600 yards from the first flagsta^ 
southward of that point. At the entrance of the cavern is a board, 
fixed to two upright tarred poi^tj-, with the inscription, ** France, 
Vivrfs, Vftementa patir naufragh^ ' Eure,' Janvier, 1893^" on it. 
This depot contains 1,350 lb. of preserved beef, 1,125 lb, of biscuit^ 
teo woollen shirts, ten pairs cotton drawers^ ten blankets, and one 
■oldered metal red box containing four packets of matches. Tlie 
landiug-phice used by the '* Eure ^' is about 400 yards southward of 
Ho&kin Point, and under the above flagstaff » 

Directions for finding the Depot. — Having landed, go to either 
of the flagstaff^, from whence a crog=? will be seen ; from the cross 
follow the direction of its arms, leading past two ruins of rough 
gtones, and then directly to the cavern , the entrance to which faces 
fitaward* In the cavern, besides the provisions and clothing, there 
are cot«, a cooking- pot, and dry wood, left by the fishermen who 
ftometiraej* live there. Cabbage and celery will be found near, and 
fisli and lobsters (crayfish) abound near the landing-place, 

St, Paul Island. — The depot is in a hut of rough stones with a 
thatched roof, in approximately 38^ 42 J' S., 77° 34|' E., on the 
northern side of the crater, near the jetty and about 50 yards from 
the flagstaff, and contains 1,350 lb. of preserved beef in boxes of 
Sib., 1,125 1b. of biscuit.^, ten woolkn shirts, ten blankets, and one 
ioldered metal box oontnining four packets of matchea. The pro- 
visions and clothes are in thirteen iron-booped barreU coated with 
tar aod sand, and placed under a tarpaulin. On the door of the 
but is the inscription, '* France^ Vivresi et Vrtements pour nnufra- 
glif * Sure,' Janvier, 1893 '\- and a similar inscription is on a 
board within the hut. 

Kerguehn hland. — The depot is approximately 49*^ 16}' S., 69^ 
40}' E., in the south-eastern part of J«chnianii Petiinsula, Hills- 
borough Day, near the soul h -western shore of the eastern lake, and 
about J mife northward of the coast, opposite Gazelle Basin. It ift 



1 



NBW ZEALAND OPFIGIAL TRAR-BOOK. 



in a cave at the foot of the W. cliff of a rocky chasm, running N. 
and S., and its position is indicated by a stone cairn, 11} ft. in 
height, and about 1 4 ft, broad at the base, erected on the Bummit of 
the W. cliff of the chasm. This cairn, visible from Gazelle Basin, is 
black, and shows clearly against the grey rocks which form the back 
ground* The entrance to the cave has been closed by large stones, 
and on tlie cliff a few yards above it is the inscription, '* Vivres et 
Viiementg, * Sure,' Janvier, 189S.*' This depot contains 2,2501b. 
of preserved beef in boxes of 9 1b., 1,125 1b, of biscuits, twenty 
swan-skin shirts^ twenty pairs of woollen drawers, twenty woollen 
blankets, and four packets of matches. The boxes of preserved beef 
are stowed in a pile, coated with coal-tar. The biscuits are in four 
iron-hooped barrels, thickly covered with coal-tar. The clothes are 
in two similar barrels. The matches are in a hoi similar to the 
beef -boxes, painted with minium (red lead) and with a label of the 
contents on it. 

In the event of the cairn being destroyed, the following direc- 
tions should be followed to find the depot: Land on the N. side of 
the inlet opposite Gazelle Basin, in a small creek, sheltered by a 
rocky point, where boats may go alongside under any circum- 
stances of wind or tide. Proceed directly inland about J mile aa 
far as the shore of the lake, then torn to the westward and follow 
the lake to ita western end, where the chasm in which the depot ia 
situated will be seen on the left hand. 

Crozet Islands. 

Provision depots for the benefit of shipwrecked persons are es- 
tablished at the following islands: — 

Hog Island, — The provision depot is a hut, in 40° 6 J' S., 50^ 
14^' E., near the landing-place on the eastern side of the island, 3} 
miles southward of the Five Giants, which lie off the N.E, point of 
the island. In December, 1887, the French vessel ** La Meurtho " 
left at this depot one ton of preserved beef, } ton of biscuit, | cwt. 
of sardines in oil, twenty blankets, fifteen pairs of shoes, and fifteen 
pairs of cloth trousers, all carefully packed in boxes; also two 
spears, two hatchets, and cooking utensils. 

Possession ixhind. — The provision depot consists of huts, in 46<> 
23' S., 51° 46i' E,» about 100 yards from the coast in the S.E. 
corner of American Bay, which is on the E. side of the island, and 
about 7 miles from Dark Head» the N.E. point. H.M.S. '* Comus/' 
in 1880, left here sufficient provisions for fifty people for fifty days, 
also jerseys, trousers, stockings, and shoes. The provisions were 
intact when the island was visited by the French vessel *' La 
Mourthe'' in December, 1887. 



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PUBLIC LlBiiAKY 



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ORAVINO-DO0K8 AND PATENT BLIPS. 



69 



GRAVING-DOCKS AND PATENT SUPS. 

V88SBL3 TiBiting New Zealand^ and requiring docking or repain, 
win End ample accommodation at the principal ports of tlie colony. 

There are in New Zealand four graving docks ; two of theee are 
dtaaied in Auckland, one at Ljttelton, and one at Port Chalmers, 

Auckland Docks. 
The Auckland docks are the property of the Auckland Harbour 
Board, and cost, with machinery, appliances, dec, £250,300, The 
dimensions of the docks at Auckland are as follow : — 



Length over all , . 
Length on floor . . 
Breadth over all . . 
Breadth on floor . , 
Breadth at entrance 

Depth of water on sill (ai high water, 
ordinary apring tides) 



CftUiope Dock.. 


Auckl&nd Docik. 


525 feet. 


312 feet. 


500 . 


300 , 


no , 


65 . 


40 « 


4a , 


80 * 


43 . 



33 



13i 



Alterations have been made to the lower altars of Calliope Dock 
which will enable vessels of 63 ft. beam to be docked without any 
difficulty. 

The following is the scale of charges for the use of the Auckland 
and Calliope Graving-docks and appliances : — 

AncRuiKn QftAViKO-nocK. £ b. d. 

Entranoe fee . . . . . , . * .,110 

For every vessel of 100 tons (gross register), or under, per 

day .. .. .. .. ..500 

For every vessel from 101 to 200 tons (gross register), per day 6 
For every additional ton (groes register), per day .. i 

Twenty per oent. reduction on the above rates will he allowed when 

two or three vessels dock on the same iide» and rem&in In dock the 

tame numhar of hours, but fiuoh reduction will not h& allowed if any 

of the Auckland Harbour Board's veaeels are docked at the same iimfi 

as another vessel. 
For shores cut in docking or hanging the vessel there must be paid, 

according to injury done, each amount as may be fixed by the Dook- 

ma«tdr. 
For nae of steam kiln, lOe. per day. 
For use of pltch-fnmace, 10s. per day. 



Calliops Qeaviiso nocK. 



£ s. d. 



Entrance fee . . . . . * 5 5 

For all veaMlflnp to 300 tons (gross register), for four days or leas 20 



For all veeaels 301 to 400 tons 

401 to 500 tons 

501 to 600 tons 

601 to 700 tons 

701 to 800 tons 

801 to 'X)Otons 



001 to 1,000 tons 
1,001 to 1,100 tons , 
1.101 to 1,200 tons . 

1,901 tons |grosB register) and upwards, for four 
days or less 



22 10 
25 
27 10 
30 
32 10 
35 
37 10 
40 
45 



60 



70 



NBW ZBAtrAND OFFICIAL TBAJt-BOOX. 



After the foarth day in dock tbe following nies will be charged : — 

For all vessels up to 500 tons (gross rogit$ter) , , Id. per ton a day* 

501 to 1 ,000 tons (gross register) . . 3d. 

H . 1,001 to 3,000 tons ^ .. 2jd. ^m 

B 2,001 to 3^000 tons .* 4^. ^M 

H 3,001 to 4,000 tons .. 2|d. ^M 

^m « 4,001 tons (gross regUter) and upwards Sd. ^H 

Twenty per cent, reduction on the above rates will be allowed when two or 
three vessels dock on the same tide and remain in dock the same number of 
hourSf but such reduction will not be allowed If an^ of the Auckland Harbour 
Board's vessels are decked at the same time as another vessel. 

For shores cut in docking or hang mg the vessel, there sball be paid, ac- 
cording to iniury done, such amount as may be fixed by the Bockmaster. 

During the year 1905, 105 vessels of various descriptions, with 
a total of 28,112 tons, made use of the Auckland Graving-dock, 
occupying it in all 259 days, for repairs or paiotiDg, 

In Calliope Dock 18 vessels were docked, with an aggregate 
toouage of 29,339, and occupying the dock for 173 days. 

Dock dues for the year amounted to £3,208 78. 5d. 

Under arrangement with the Admiralty, a complete plant of 
the most efficient and modern machinery has been provided at 
Calliope Dockyard. The workshops are now erected, and all the 
uiachinery is placed in position, with the escepiion of the shear- 
legs, for which a contract has now been let. This plant in- 
cludes 80-ton shear-legs complete : trolly to carry 80 tons, and 
rails ; 10-ton steam-crane at side of dock, engines, boilers, over- 
head travellers; planing, shapmg, and slotting macliines ; radial 
drills, vertical drills, band saws for iron, punching and shearing 
machines, plate-bending rolls ; 24 in. centre gantry lathe, 70 ft. bed; 
9 in. and 12 in. gantry lathes, milling - machines, emery grinders, 
aerowing - machines, ditto for pipes, horizontal boring - machines, 
Root's blower, smiths* forges (six), coppersmith's forge, le veiling- 
slabs, steam-hammers, lead-fornace, wall-cranes, siinc-bath, plate- 
furnace, jib crane for foundry, circular-saw bench, band saw for wood, 
lathe for wood, general joiners' and carpenters' benches (four), kiln 
for steaming boards, Fox*8 trimmer, cupola to melt 5 tons of metal, 
countersinking - machine, pipe-bending machine, tools of various 
descriptions, moulders* bins, force-pumps for testing pipes, vice- 
benches, electric-light engines, dynamos (two), Ac, and all other 
appliances and macixinery required to render the plant adequate w> 
repair any of His Majesty's ships upon the station or any merchant 
vessel visiting the port. The dock and machinery will be available 
for use, when not required for His Majesty's vessels, in eflfecting 
repairs to any merchant vessel requiring same. Electric lights have 
been provided for workshops, dock, and dockyard. The dockyard 
is now connected by telephone with the central exchange. An 
abundant supply of the purest fresh water is available at Calliope 
Dock and Calliope Wharf ; and a most complete establishment of 
up-to-date machinery and appliances has been provided. 



OBAinNQ-DOCKS AND PATENT SLIPS. 



71 



Wkllinoton Patent Slip. 

The Port of Wellington h^a no dock ; but there is a weJl- 
dqaipped patent slip at Evans Bay, on which vessels of 2,000 tons 
can be eaiely hauled up. This slip is the property of a private com- 
pany, and is in no way connected with the Harbour Board- It 
is 1,070 ft. loDg, with a cradle 260 ft. in length. There is a depth of 
32 ft. at high water at the outer end of the slip. A dolphin and 
buoys are laid down for swinging ships in Evans Bay. 

The comi>any has convenient workshops, which contain machinery 
oeeessary for effecting all ordinary repairs to vessels using the slip. 

During the year ended 3l8t March, 1905, 111 vessels of various 
sizes, of an aggregate of 47,555 tons, were taken up on the slip for 
repairs, cleanmg, paioting, &c. The cliarges for taking vessels on 
the shp and launching them are Is. per ton on the gross tonnage 
for the first full twenty-four hours, and 6d. per ton per day after- 
wards, unless by special agreement. 

Lyttklton Dock and Patent Slip. 

The Graving-dock at LytteltOQ, which is the property of the 

rbour Board, is capable of docking men-of-war, or almost all of 

large ocean steamers now runDiDg to the colony. Its general 

tim«enaions are : Length over all, 503 ft, ; length on floor, 450 ft. ; 

bugth inside caisson at a height of 4 ft. above the door, 462 ft.; 

eadth over all, 82 ft, ; breadth on floor, 46 ft. ; breadth at entrance, 

! ft, ; breadth where ship's bilge would be, on 6 ft. blocks, 55 ft. ; 

^available docking depth at this breadth, 17ft.; depth of water on 

sill at high vrater, springs, 23 ft. 

The scale of charges for the use of the dock and pumping 
machinery' is as follows : — 

Fbr all ireesela up to 300 tons, for four days or less 

301 to 400 tons, 

401 to 500 tons, 

501 to 600 tons, 

601 to 700 tons, 

701 to 800 toDB, 

601 to 900 tons, 

901 to 1,000 toDS, 
1,001 to 1,100 tons, 
1 , 101 to 1 , 200 tons, 
1,201 tona and upwards. 

Alter iho fourth day in dock, the following rates are charged ;— 

For all Testele up to 500 tons 

For all Teste ts of 501 tons to 1 , 000 tons 

For all vessols over 1,001 tons up to 2,000 tone 

2,001 tons up to 3 » 000 tons 

3,001 tons up to 4,000 tons 

4 ,001 tons up to 5 , 000 tons 

Twenty per cent, reduction on the above rates is allowed when two or three 

' can arrange to dock on the same tide and remain in dock the same 

^f of hours. Two vessels of 1,000 tons each can be dooked at the same 

time. The dO-pecQent. rebate is not allowed if any of the Lyttelton Harbour 






£ s. 


d. 




20 







22 10 







25 







27 10 







30 







33 10 







35 







37 10 







40 







45 







50 





rged 
id. 


per ton per day. 


dd. 






2|d. 






2id. 






1 








72 



HSW ZEALAND OFFICI4L TIAR-BOOZ. 



Board's vessels (lfg diocked at the same time as another vessel. The tv^enty- 
four houra constituting the first day of docking commences from the time of th« 
dock being pump^ed oat. 

Any vessel belonging to H.M. Navy or any colonial Govemment, or any 
Gommi&sioned Bbip belonging to any foreign nation, is admitted into the graving- 
dock without payment of the ugual dock dues* but is charged only such sum aa 
is necessary for the reimburiement of actual expenditure of stores^ wages, and 
materials. 

There are electric lights, one on each side of the gravit]g*dock ; 
and there are eBgineering works withio a short distance of it, where 
repairs and heavy foundry-work can he undertaken. 

The graving-dock and machinery cost £106,000. The interest 
and sinking fund on that sum, at 6| per cent., amounts to 
£6,825 per annum. Since its constiiaction the dock dues for 
the twenty- three years ended 31et Decern ber» 1905, amounted to 
£24,222, and the working-expenses to £14,638, leaving a balance 
for twenty-three years ended Slst December, 1905, of £9,584. 

During, the year 1905 twenty vessels were docked, and the 
dock dues amounted to £842 lOs. For the twenty-two years ending 
1905 481 vessels were docked, or an average of about twenty-two a 
year. 

Patent Sup, Lyttelton, 

Alongside the graving-dock is a patent slip, with a cradle 
150 ft. in length, suitable for vessels of 300 tons. 'Jt belongs to 
the Harbour Board, 

Tho following i& the scale of charges :*- 

Up to 75 Ions gross register, £4 for five dayp, and IOh. per day after the fifth day. 
0?er 75 toDB and up to 150 toui groii register, £6 for five dayp, and 15a. per dmy 

after fifth day. 
Ofer 150 tons and up to 250 tons gross register, £8 for five dajfi, and 20p. per day 

aftf r fifth day. 
Over 250 tons gross regieUr, £10 for five days, and 20s. per day after fifth day. 

A *' day " to mean between ianrise and sunset. 

The above rates cover the cost of all labour conucoted with haul trig up and 
lauuchiug (the crew of the veeael to give their afsintance as may be required)^ 
and the cost of blocking a vessel and shifting the blocks after hauling up. 

Otago Gbavino-dock. 

The dock at Port Chalmers is vested in the Otago Dock Trust, 
a body entirely distinct from the Otago Harbour Board. Vessels of 
large size can be taken in the Otago Dock, as the following measure- 
ments wiJl show ;— 

■ Length over all .. .. ,« .. .. 335 feet. 

H Length on the floor *. .. ,» 328 

■ Breadth over all * . . . . . 68 « 

■ Breadth on floor .. .. .. .. 41 «, 

I Breadth where ship's bilge would be .. .* .. 43 . 

I Breadth at dock-gates . . . . 50 » 

^ Depth of water on siU at high water (ordinary spring tides) 17^ , 

Connected with the Otago Dock are a large machine-shop, 
steam-hammer, and forge» with all the appliances necessary for 
performing any work that may be required by vessels visiting the 
port. An 80- ton shear-legs has also been erected for heavy lifts, 



PtCrOTAOS, FOBT CSAROSfi, BTO. 



78 



There is also a patent Blip, used for talcing up small vessels. 

All vessels using the Otago Graving-dock are liable to dock dues 
according to the following scale (unless under special coatract), re- 
vised since the beginning of 1896 : — 

VaBieli uader 200 toos, for the ftnfe three days, or part of £ s. d. 

Ihxmm d&y t .. ,. .« ^.2500 

YdAftU of ^00 tons, and under 800 tons . . . . . . 36 

^ 800 tons and upwards . . . . 50 

And fur ATery day, or E»&rt of a d^y^ after the tirdt three d&ye ; — 



Vtttsels under 300 tons 



300 . and under 400 tons 7|d. 



8d. per register ton per daj« 



400 
500 
000 
700 
800 
900 . 



500 
600 
700 
BOO 
900 
1,000 



7id. 
6}d, 



i»000 tons and upwards 
During the twelve months ended 3Lst December, 1901^ the 
dock was in use 198 working-days. The number of vessels docked 
was forty*seven, having a total registered tonnage of 39»960. 



HARBOUBS. 

PlLOTAOE, POKT CHARGES, ETC, 

PiiOTAOE» port charges, berthage charges, &c., at eighteen of the 
principal harbours in New Zealand, as on the 1st January, 1906 
(compiled by Mr, C. Hood Williams, Secretary to the Lyttelton 
Harbour Board, except as to the port of Giaborne, the information 
in this case being furnished by the Secretary to the Gisborne 
Harbour Board) : — 

AOCKLAJTD. 

Pilotage (not oompalsory) : BalUog-TesseJs, inwards and outwards, dd. p«r ton 

eaoh way. 
Sceamers, inwards and outwards, 2 J. par ton eaoh way when servioes of pilot are 

takeo. 
Pilotage inotudea the removal fee to or from the berth at Id. per ton. 
Port charges : 3J. per ton half-yearly (on all vessels over 15 tons) in one pay- 

ment. Steamers arriviog for ooal, stores, water, or for reoeiving or laDding 

maili or pasaeogers and their luggage, which do not oome to any wharf or 

receive or discharge cargo within the port, are ozeropl from port charges. 
Harbourmaster's fees: Id. per ton. Vessels papng pilotage are exempt. 
Exemption berthage certificates are given to competent masters in the coastal 

and intercolonial trades, but uot to those in foreign trade. 
Berthage : Every person who shall use aoy wharf with any vessel shall pay for 

the use tliereof — Licensed ferry steamers, 10b, to £l 10s. per month ; other 

vessels under 20 tons, 6d, and Is. per d^y^ not exceeding 10s. per quarter. 

For every vessel not inoluded in the above» ^d, per too per day. Outside 

berths, id. per ton per day. 

GiSDoatrs. 

Pilotage (not compulsory) : BaitiDg-vesssla over 100 ionst first lOO tons, 6d. per 
ton ; every too over 100 tons, 25. per ton. Into aod out of Turanganui 
Btveir: 6 siling- vessels, 3d. per ton; sailing -vessels towed, 2d, poc ton; 
», 2d. per ton. 



74 



KBW ZMALAND OPFICIAL TEAR-BOOK. 



Port cbarges: Vesflels, iDtercolonial or foreign, Id, per ton on arrival, not to 
exceed 3d, per ton in any three montbp; vefisela, co&atftl, over 2<)0 tont. 
Id. per ton on arrival, not to fxceer^ 3d. per ton in any three months; 
vessels, coaBlal, 200 tons and under, 3d, per ton on arrival, not to exe©ed 
Hd. per ton in any three months, 

Harbourmaster's fees : Free, 

Berthage alongeide the wharves: Per day or parr, under 50 tons, 5s, ; over 50 
tons acd up to T5 tons, 78. Gd. ; over 75 tons up to 100 tons^ IDs, ; for every 
additionai 50 tons or fraction tboreof, 2^. Cd. Veeeels dlBcbargtng oulside 
of otberB to pay half foregoing dues. Steamers to pay doable rates as per 
tonnage ; and in all cases Bailing-vessels to mair^ way (or ateamers. 

Thamsb, 

Pilotage (compulsory) : In and out— Soiling veBsels up to 100 tons, 6d. per ton. 

aod 2d. for eaob ton over 100 tons ; steamers up to IQO toQfi» 6d. per ton, and 

4d. per ton for each additiouftl ton. 
Port charges : Regular traders, 2d, per ton per quarter ; other yoasols^ 2d* per t m 

each trip, not to exceed le. 3ti per ton in half-year. 
Harbourmaster's fees: Nil. 
Berthage : 20 tons and under, 10s. per ton per quarter ; over 20 tons^ 6d, per ion 

per quarter, or 28. 6d, first 20 tons per day and |d. each additional ton. 
Warps and fenders : NO. 

New Pltiiodtb, 

Pilotage (compulHory), charged both inwards and outwarda : Interoolonial ur~ 
coasting — Sailing-vessels, 3d. per tin; steamers, IJd, per ton: foreign aatl- 
ing- vessel or steamer^ ^d. per ton. 

Port charges: Intercolonial, Id. per ton, payable half-yearly; foreign^ jd, per 
ton on arrival in roadstead. 

Harbourmaster's fees : Nil, 

Berthage r&ie : 3^d. per ton on all cargo laoded^ shipped^ or tranabipped out- 
wards ; on registered toonago also ^d. per too. 

Warpa : Id. per ton register for first 100 tons ; Jd. per ton fox exoo«i. 

Fenders : Is. per day of part of day. 

Water (minimum 3j.) : 5it. per 1,000 gallons. 



Waitara. 

Pilotage : From slgnal-slafT, ^d. per register ton eacli way, In and out, Ooean^ 

going vessels 4d. per register too (one way only). 
Port cbarges : Steamers and sailing-veaselsi 3d, per ton quarterly, payable first 

trip in oach quarter ; out-going vessels, |d. per register ton^ payable each 

trip. 
Harbourmaster's fees : Nil. 

Berthage : Steamers 2d. per ton and sailing-veiiaelfl Sd. per ton every trip. 
Warps and fenders : Nil. 

Pate A, 
Pilotage (in and out) ; Id, per too register. 

Port oharges : 3d. per ton every three months. Light dues, Jd. per ton. 
Harbourmaster's fees : Nil. 
Berthage : 6d. per ton on cargo, as per manifest. 
Warps and fenders : NIL 
Water: 29. 6d, per 1»000 gallons, 

Wairoa, 
Pilotage (compulsory) : 4d, per register ton. 
Port charges : 3d, per ton per quarter. 
Harbourmaster's fees : Nil. 
Berthage, warpn, and fenders : Nib 



FItiOTAOB, PORT CHARQES, ETC. 

NAPtEtt. 

Piloi&ge (not eompultory) : loto Inner H&rbouf^S^iliDg-vdtads, 4ct. per ton ; 
sleamers, 3d* per ton. To roadsle&d^Firit 100 toni : Sailing- veBseU, 6d. 
per (on ; steamerii 3d. per too« Every ton over 100 tons : Sailmg-vesteta, 
^d. per ton ; steamerp, Id. per too. Into Breakwater Harbour— First 100 
tone : Sailing-vcsaeU, 6d. per ton ; steamers^ 3d. per ton. Every ton over IOC 
tons: Sailing 'Veeself, 2d. per ton ; steamers. Id. per ton. Outward pilotage, 
biklt races. 

Port charges : 6d. per ton qn&rterly in adranoe, veisels plying within port only ; 
2d. per ton on arrival of vessels not plying within port, but not to exceed 
Lfl. per ton in any half-year. Ocean-going vessels (aot being '* oolonial 
fcrmding *' or coasting vessels) returning to port within one moatb from date 
o( fir^t arrival are eompt frooi pjrt ohar^ds for secjnd or jubseqaent 
arrivals witbin calendar month. 

Hafboorm water's feet : 59. per vesnel of less than GO tons. Steamers under 60 
tons and licensed as lighters are exempt. Id. per ton, sailing vessels GO tons 
and upwards ; lOs. per vessel, steamers of 60 tons and under VIO tons; Id. 
per ton, steamers of 120 tons and upwards. Vessels paying for pilotage ser- 
Tioe inwards do not pay Harbourmaster's feea. 

HarboQ r- Improve m en t rate : 3d, per ton on cargo taoded, shipped, or tran- 
shipped (weight or measarement at option of Board); Is. ea^h horse or 
l&rge cattle shipped or transhipped ; Ad. each sheen or small animal shipped 
or transhipped. Vessels licenced as lighters, toW'b:>ats, or ferry b:>atB shall, 
whilst actually employed as lighters, tows, or ferry boats, pay 3^. 4d. upon 
each and every trip. 

Ha«cers and moorings: Vessels at wharf in Breakwater Harbour, Id. per ton 
per day, or part of a day, on registered tonnage. Vessels mooiea to buoys 
within Bresik water Harbour, |d. per ton per day or part of a day. 

Fenders: Vessels at wharves in Breakwater Harbour— 5». per day, vessels under 
500 tons ; 7f. per day, vessels of 5<J0 tons and under 1,000 tons ; lOa. per day, 
ve«sets of 1,000 tons and under 1,500 tons; 15a. per day, vessels of 1,500 tons 
and ander 2,000 tons ; £I per day, vessels of 2,000 tons ; and so on, in pro- 
portion. 

Pilotage ' All vessels when piloted by signals from the staf! only, Id. per too 
register. River pilotage, to be charged for auy assistance rendered by the 
pilot or any of bis crew inside the bar, 2d. per ton. When a pilot boards and 
conduots a vessel outside the bar, 3d. per ton. Steamers engaged in ten- 
deriDg ocean steamers at anchor in the roadstead chsbrged half pilotage 
rates. 

PoTi cbarges: Vessels of 500 tons and up to 8,000 tons register, ^d. per ton. 
Hot to exceed 3d. per too in any half-year. Vessels paying pilotage exempt. 
Oeean-going vessels (not being ''ooloniaMrading " or "coastal") returning 
to the port within one mocth of first arrival exempt as regards seoond or 
■abiequent anivals. 

Harbonrmaster's fees : Nil. 

Berthage : For every steamer using auy wharf, belog berthed alongside, and 
whether dif charging or loading cargo or not, 2d, per ton od gross register for 
first day cf eight working- hours, and Id. for every sueoeeding day of eight 
working- hours. For every sailing vessel the charge to be 2d. for first day of 
«igbt workinghours, and |d. for every succeeding day of eight working- 
hour^, not exceeding five days. For every vessel occupying a berth outside 
another Tessol, and loading or disohargiog cargo, |d. per ton on gross regis- 
ter per day of eight working-hours whilst loading or disoharging. Ships' 
dues on vessels detained In pott by stress of weather will not be charged 
after the third day. 

Wkllwoton. 

Pilotage (optional) : Bailing- veseeU inwards, 4d. per ton ; sailing vessels out- 
wards, ad. per ton ; steamers inwards, 3d. per ton ; steamers outwards^ 2d. per 
ton. Pilotage includes the removal fee to or from the berth at |d. pei ton. 



NIBW eUADAtlD OFFICIAL yBAH*fiOOK. 



I Port obarges: 2d. per ton on Arrival ; nob oxoeeding 6d. in any halF-yeftr. Half- 
I yearly days, ls( January and let July. Steamers arriving for coal, storei, 

■ water, or for receiving or landing malls or pasiengerB and their luggage, 
I which do nob come to atiy wharf or receive or diBcharge cargo within the 
W port, ar« exempt from port charges. 

I Harbourmafiter'a or berthing fee on vessels of 120 tons and upwards, |d. per ton; 
I under 120 tons, IDs. Veesels paying pilotage are exempt. Exemption berth* 

m age cettificates are given to competent masters in the coastal and inter- 

m colonial trades, but not to thosQ in foreign trade. 

I Berthage: }d. per ton net register per day or part of a day (day counted from 
I midnight to midnight). VobbcIb berthing after working-hours, and only 

L landing passengers and luggage, not cfaarged for that day. Vessels leaving 

■ whatf after midnight and prior to working hours, and only on such day 
I taking on board pM^cngcrs and luggnge, not charged for such day. Vessels 
I not working cargo after noon on Saturdays pay half rates for such Saturday. 
^^^ No charge for Sundays or holidays. Vessels laid np for repairs, fiitirg-ont, 
^^K &o , ha! f rates .; 
^^P Nelson. 

m Pilotage (compulsory): Stcamen^, inwards and outwatdp,<ld. per registered ten: 
I Fiailitig'Vessel^, inwards and outwardF, 3d. per ten. Minimum pilotage each 

I way (in all cases), JEl. 

I Port obarges: Vessels not paying pilotage, lo I'ay the following, upon first 
I arrival, half-yearly: Vessels over ICK) tons r£gister»ls. per ten*, vessels 

P under 100 tons register, 5d. per ton. 

^ Harbour lights: Vessols not paying pilotage, over 100 tens register, Id. per ton; 
under 100 Ions register, ^d. per ton, on each arrival. 

Harbourmskster's fees: 120 tons and upward?, Id. per ton register; less than 
L 120 Ions, 10s. for each removal of any steamer or sailing-vessel within the 

f harbour. 

Berthage, fenders, and warps ; Nil. 

Westport. 

I Pilotage {compulsory) : For sailing-veBfieis up to 120 tons register. Id. per ton ; 

ft over 120 tons register, and not e:!cceedirg 1,500 tons, 2d. per ton, inwards 

■ and outwards. Far steamers 1,000 to 2,000 tons, £10 (In and out) ; under 
W 1>000 tons, pro rata ; 2,000 to 3,000 tons, £20 ; over 3.000 to 4,000 tons, £25. 

Port charges: Receiving and discharging ships* baUast, Is. per ton; minimum 

charge, 20b. ; Id. per ton for use of shcot. 
Harbourmaster's fees : Nil. 
Berthage : Use of wharf, for every vessel up to 1,400 tons Ijing at wharf. Id. per 

■ ton net register per trip; for every vessel over 1,400 tons lying at a 
h wharf, 2d. per ton net register per trip; minimum charge, 5s. No vessel 
^^^ to he charged for more than one trip in any one week. 

^^P Gribymouth. 

W Pilotage (not compulsory): Signal-station. For sailiDg-vessels, 6d. per ioa; 

P for steamers, -td. per ton, each way. 

Port charges : Discharging ships' ballast, Gd. per ton. 
Harbourmaster's fees : Nil. 

Berthage : Use of wbarf, Gd. per ton net register per trip. Vessels in ballast for 
coal or timber, Id. per Con net register for the first four days ; maximum, 
£5 10s* ; minimum, 58. 

Lyttelton. 

t Pilotage (compulsory) : Inwards and outwards— Sailing Tessets 8jd. per ton ; 
steamers 2^d. per ton. Fore igu- going steamers and sailing- vessels free oo 
second call on same voyage. 
Port charges : 2d, per ton quarterly, in advance, for vessels of 100 tons and up- 
wards ptyiog within the port or employed in coasting only, not to exoeed 6d. 
per ton in any half-year ; 2d. per ton for vessels of 100 tons and upwards 



3TAGE, 



iKO£S, ETC. 



77 



ool plying within the port or cot solely employed in coast tog, not to exceed 
6d. p«r ton in any bftlf year. For exemptioo from pilotage and harbour 
fees, see olaoBes 132, 133, and 134 of '' The HarbourB Aot, 1878." 

Harbonnn&Bter'B feei : Nil. 

Berthing ohargea : On all Testis of 25 tone register and upwards |4. per ton each 
trip. 

Wupi (21 in. eoir bAwsers) : £1 per w&rp for a»e daring a veeserB stay in port, 
not excecdicg (ix montha. 

Fenders (soft wood) : IQf, for fitst day« and 5«* per day after. lOs. for uae of 
each hardwood feLder. 

TiMABU. 

Pilotage (compulsory) : Sailing- vesse I p, Sd. per ton iowards and outwards; when 
tug used, 2d. per te^n : steamerp, 2d. per ton ini^ardB and outwards. Foreign 
•jod intercolonial iteamers under 3,500 cargo tona, working 800 tons or less, 
only ore pilotage fee ; 3,500 tons or over, working 1^000 tons cargo or Iess» 
OLe pilotage fee only. Foreigc-going fitesmer or saUiDg-vetsel oalling more 
than once duricg same voyage before leaving New Zealand, one inward and 
outward rate only (subject to above exemi^tione), 

Port t^harges : Coaster?, IJd. per ton each trip; sailing-vetseU* not ooasters, 3d, 
per ton eaoh tr»p ; steam- vessels, not cootteis. Od. per ton en cargo wofked ; 
in all cases tot to exceed la. 3d, per ton in any half-year, dating from 
the 1st days of January and July in each year. Intercolonial iteamers 
comiig direct or coastwise l^d. per ton register, or 6d. per ton on cargo 
landed and shipped, wbicbevtr rate may be the lesser. 

Harbourmabter'a fcee : Id. per ton each service ; vessels less than 120 tons, 10?. ; 
ttcamerg of 1,000 tons or over, wbioh have loaded wholly in New Zealand or 
A'jstralian ports, working 500 tons of cargo or less, only one Harbourmaster's 
fee. This fee is charged to all veEsela or steamers not pa)ing pilotage^ 

Berthage : dd. pt r ton on ail cargo landed cr shipped. 

Hawsfrs and moorings: Yefisels at wbarrep, jd. per ton regieter (or first ee^eo 
da}a ; {subsequent dayp, ^d. per ton. Vesaels at buoyp, under 800 tons regis- 
ter, 4d. per ton ; over Sw tcnp, j^d. per ton. 

Fenders r Sailing-vessels under 500 tens regit ter, 2a. per day ; uncer 1,000 tons, 
3b, per day ; oter 1,000 tons, 4b. per day. Steamers under 1,000 tons regis- 
ter, 4b. ptr day: uoder 1.500 tons, IOp. per day; under 2,000 tens, 15«, per 
day ; over 2,000 tons. £1 per day. Foreign-going vessels detained in tbo 
port sixty da)Bp half rates thereafter for hawsers and moorirga and fenders. 

jOlMABU. 

Tonnage rate: On cargo, inwards or outwards— Coal, merohandisei stone, pro- 
duce, and timber, 8d. per ten ; wcol, 2s, per ton ; frozen sheep, Id. per car- 
case ; frozen lamb. Id. per carcase; rabbits and bares, 3s. per ton, gross 
weight; all other froztn goods^ 3s. per too ^ gross dead-weight; livestock, 
Is. 8d. per ton. Collected in the aame manner as berthage dues have been 
nolle cteo* 

Warps : ^d. per ton per day for seven days ; }d. per ton per day thereafter. In 
the evect of any vessel reroainirg at any wharf for a period exceeding six 
weeks, the charge for warps will thereafter be reduced to ^d. per ton register 
of Buch vessel fcr each day or part of a day that she may occupy a berth at 
Ibe wharf. 

Otaoo (DUKBDUr). 

Pilotage (compulscry): Inwatds and outwards — Sailing-ves&sls without tug, 6d. 
per ton; i^ith tug, id. per ton: tteamers, 4d. per ton, Fordgn steamers 
oalling twice on one voyage only charged once. All veesels holaing exemp* 
tioo oertificates, one annual pilotDge. For every vessel under steam oarrying 
an exempt pilot ai^d employing a Board's pilot the charge shall be }d. per 
ion for the Upper Harbour. 

Pod ebarges : 6d, per ton half-yearly, all vessels. 



78 



OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOE. 



Hftrtiouimftflter'a fees : Veasela lees thAo lao tons, lOs. ; over 120 (ona* i± 

Ser (0D« 
age : Vessels trading withio the port — 10 toai, 5a. per quarter ; 25 toDS, 
I 10s. per quarter: 50 tons^ 159. per quarter; 100 tons, £1 per quarter. 
I VesselB trading beyond the port — Sailmg- vessels ^d. per ton (maximum, 
I eighteen days, £10); Bteam^veBaelSt Jd. per ton per day (maximum charge, 
f £15). Vessels laid up for leaa than a month, one-half the above rates ; over 
a month, ^d, per ton per month. 
Towage : When aaaistanoe U given to steam-veseela under ateam, one-fourib 
uaual towagft, noi exceeding £5 for Upper Harbour aud £7 for Lower Har- 
bour, 
-JKOTB. — Foreign steamers taking or discharging not more tban 50 tons generai 
I cargo and 100 tone fcoj&en produce pay £50 for port charges, pilotage, and 
I Harbour master 'a fees ; alao maximum charges on any one veaset, not to 
I exceed £1S0 on any one visit ; and in the case of a foreign steamer o ailing 
I twice at the port on one voyag'*, not to exceed £"200. 

Bluff. 
I Pilotage (compulaory) : Steamere, inwards and outwarda, 2^d, pet regiatered ton : 
I aa^itltig-veaaels, 4^d. inwarda and cutwarda if tug not employed ; 2}d. per 
I regiatered ton inwards and outwards if tug employed. Saiiing-veaaels in 
I ballaatf 2|d. per regiatered ton inwards and outwarda. Yesaels exempt 
I from pilotage— Steamers, in and out, 5d. per regiatered toD» payable yearly 
I aailing-veaaelH, in and out, 9d, per registered tou, payable yearly. On 

I application by master or agent of foreign-going steamers ordinary charges 

I for pilotage, port charges, and berthage may he suspended, and a charge of 

I 5a. per ton for inward cargo and lOs. per ton for outward oargo may be 
r Bubstituted theretor^ with a minimum charge of £50. 
Port ohargea : On all veaaeln, per trip, 2d. per registered ton, but no vessel shall 
be required to pay more than 6d. per registered ton in any aix months from 
date of entry. 
Harbourmaater'a fees : NIL 

Beifebage: Steamers, -2d. per ton net regiater for the first day, and Id. per ton 

per week or part of a week thereafter. Sailing- vessels and hulka of over 50 

tona register. Id. per ton net regiater pet week for the first four weeks, and 

Jd, per ton per week tbeteafter. 

Towage asfiistanoe to steamers using their own motive power : Over 3,000 tons, 

£5 ; over 2,000 tons, £4 ; under 2,000 tons, £3, 
Maximum charge for berthage dues, pilotage, and port chargea, £180 in any one 

visit. 
Steamera calling more than once on same voyage only charged one inward and 
outward pilotage. 

Whabfaqe Rates. 

Wharfage rates at eighteen of the piincipal harbours in New 
Zealand, as on Ist Januan^ 19(Xi (coaipiled by Mr. C, Hood 
Williams, Secretary to the Lyttelfcon Harbour Board, except as to 
the port of Gisborne) :^ 

Auckland* 

[ Osnsral Merchandise.— 2s. per ton imporia ; la. per ton eipotta. 

TranahipmentB ; Half rates when declared before landing, or 2a. 6d. per toD, 
includiog labour and seven days' atorage. 
<3rain atid Agricultural Produce.— is. 6d* per ton landed ; la. per ton shipped. 
TranabipmentB : Half ratea when declared before landing, or 2a. 6d. per ton, 
including Tahour and seven days' storage. 
[\Fro9en M^t, Butter^ ttc— 1p. 6d. per ton landed; la. per ton shipped. 

Transhipments : Half rates when declared, or 2a. 6d. per ton^ including 
seven days' atorage and labour* 
Wool* — 6d. per bale, ahtpped or landed. 

Tranahipmeuts : If landed, dumped, and reahipped, Sd. per bate. 



WBAKFAOB KATES. 



79 



Grass* 
ei ports, 



Coal. — Is. 3d. p«r too landed ; 6d. per too shipped. ^ 

TtmnshipmenU : Shipped or disoh&rged over side for steunar's Qss, fiflo. ' 

Ttmb^^Sskmjk, 2fi. per 1.000 ft I&nded ; Is. per 1,000 ft, shipped. BauUc or 
round (lees ISJ per ceot), Is. per 1,000 ft. landed, 6d, per 1,000 ft. 
shipped. 
Ptamogfin' luggage under ball a too, goods carried by band by passeugers and 
single pftdctgM under 5 ft. measurement, free. 

i1 

GiSBOBirx. I 

Oftural MtrchandUe.—lmpotU 5s. to 6d., exports 2s. 6d. to 6d,, by meaaon*] 

ment, from 40 cubic feet to 4 oubio feet ; same tor weigbt. A1e» beer. ' 

aDd porter, per gallon— Import, IJd. ; export, Jd, spirits iind wine^ , 

per toD measuremeDt, 7s. 6d, No export cbarges on goods that havft ' 

paid inward wharfage. , 

Transbipmanta : Fre«. i 

Gmsis and Agricultural Produce.— -Grtkin — Import*, 5a.: exports, Is 

seed— Imports, 5s.: exports, 28. Potatoes— Imports, 5s,. 

2s. 6d. (per 12 sacks). 

Transhipments: Free. 

FroBtn Mtat, Butter, <fe.^Sheep, 2d. pet carcase ; lambs» Id, per 

baunches, legs^ &c.» 9s. 6d. per Ion. J 

Transhipments: Free, 1 

Wool.—1%* dd. per bale, export. 

Transhipments: 3d. per bale if landed and reshipped. Free it transhipped 
into vessel in roadstead. . 

Cool. — 2s. per ton. I 

Transbipments: Free. 1 

TVmfrir.^Sftwn, 4s. per 1,000ft.: baulk, Is* per 1,000 ft., imports; Is., And 
6d., per 1,000 ft., exports. 
Transbipmenis : Free. J 

Traiues. 1 

Qmtfixl Metchandiu,—i», 6d. per ton, imports or exports, without labour. 

Trmn&bipments : Free, if inward wharfage bas been paid ; half rates other- 
wise. 
Qrain and Agricultural Produce,^l$, 6d. per ton, imports or exports, without 
labour. 
TransbipmeiatB : Free, if inward wharfage has been paid ; half ratee other- 
wise. 
Frofrn Meat, Butter, rfc— None shipped. ■ 

Tranabipments : Half rates. I 

VTool —Is. 6a. per ton. I 

Transhipments: Half rates. I 

CoaL—ls. 6d. per ton, without labour. 

Transhipments : Free, if inward wharfage bas been paid ; half rates 
otherwise. 
Timbtr,—^. to Is. per 1,000 ft. sawn timber ; 6d. per 1,000 shingles ; 2a. per lOOa 
props ; If . Gd. per 100 slabs ; 4s. per 100 deepers : 2a. 6d. per lOQH 
posts and rails ; 28. 6d. per 1,000 palings ; Gd. per ton firewood. | 

Kew Plymouth, m 

OfHfral Mirchanduc*—^i. per too. ^ I 

Traoshipments : Is. 6d. p»r ton. " 1 

Orain and AgncuUural Produce,^2a, per ton ; graflfi-seed, 2s. per 20 saoki. I 

Transhipments Is. Gd. per ton. 1 

fyvMis Meat, Butler, ifc— 2». per ton. J 

TraDBbipments : Is. 6d. per too. l 
VPooiL— Gd. per bale ; five bales of 4owt., 2-t. per ton; three bales of over 4cirf.r 
2s. per ton. 

Transhipments: Three quarter rates. J 



ao 



NBW KRAbAMO OrPIOIAI. TBAB-BOOK. 



4 



CoaL — 24. per ton ; brown ooal, I9. 9d, : with Iftbour. ^M 

TrADsbtpmeaU : Thrae quarter r&t^F^ with Iftb^ar. ^ 

Timber. — 480 ft. per ton, 2i, ; hurdwood, 390 ft. p9r ion (rougb or Bftwn), 39. : wm 
labour. 

■ TraBBhipmeDts : Three-quarter rales. 

B Waitaba, 

O&Kiral Merchandise.— law ^fdi, 2s. per toti, iticlading forty- sight hours' itorAge ; 
outwards, 2^. per ton, iaclddiog teo days* storage. Labour provided 
I by the Board. 

I Transhipmentg : Half rates. 

I Orain and Agricultural Produce, — Imports^ 2s> pec Ion; gra^s-aeed, 2s. per 
I 20 aacki. Labour provided. Expr>rka, in not leas than 3-ton lots* Is. 

I ^er (on, 

I Trait ship men ts: Half rat^s. 

I Froftn MtaK Butter, dc. — Is. per ton weight, without labour. 
I TranHhipmeiits : Half rates, without labour. 

I WooL — Dumped, 4^^. per bale; undumpedp 6d. per bile. 
* Transhipments : Hatf ratea. 

Coal, — Xmp:)rts, Is. Gi. pir ton, without labour ; brown oofti, Is. par ton, without 
labour, 
L Tranahipments : Half rates. 

I Timber.— Vader 5,000 ft., ad. per 100 ft, ; ovef 5»000ft., 2d. pec lOO it. : without 

■ labour. Exported whltepino, if ovdr 5,000 It,, l|i. pir 100 ft. : with- 

■ out labour. 
W Tranahipmjnts : Half rates, 
I Patka. 

I General M0rcJvindisi!.—2&. p^r ton» Imports or exp or tfl |f produce shipped direct 

I from South ports, Is. 6d.), 

I Transhipments : Is. pec ton. 

I Orain and Agricultural Produce,— ^a. per ton of 10 sacks graiUi 20 saoks oocki- 

I foot grast seed» 20 sacks bran, 40 sacks ohaff, 16 sacks pollard or rye- 

I grass. Potatoes, export, la. per ton ; import, 3s. per to:i, 

I J'rojin Meat, Butter, de —Batter and obeese Is. per to a, without labour, from 

■ grading wharf ; otherwise, 28., with lab:)ur; Frozen meat, It. for 
I 30 caroasea sheep, 2-$. per caroftse cattle. Cased meats, Is. pir ton, 

■ without labour, 
I TPooL— 6d. per bale, inoluding storage. 
I Coah — la. per toti^ without labour. 
I Timiit, — 4d. per iOO ft. ; labour extra. 

r WAmo^t 

Oensral Merchandiae,—2B, per ton, imports aud exports. 

Grain and Agricultural Produce,— Is, 6i. per ton, importa and exports. 

Butter.— 2*. p«r ton. 

Tf oof.— 9d. per bale, imports and exports. 

Coal — Is. per ton. 

Timber.— 2id. per 100 ft. Exports, fruit, free. Returned emptied, free. 

Napier, 
General Merchandise.— 2 i. per t^n imports, 1^. par ton exports, according to 

t measurement or walght. If labour auppAieJ, aid on 61. imports, 
and 61. exports. Ballast, inwards, 1^. per ton; ou^^waids, 1§. per ton. 
Empiies, half rates, 
bipmeuts : Quarter import ratea. Outer Harbour; half import CftlM, 
Inner or Breakwater Harbours. 
d Agricultural Produce. — 23. import*!, U. exports, according to 
measurement or weight. If labour supplied, aid on 6d. import-), aud 
6d. exports, 
hipmonts : Quarter import rates, Outer Harbour half import ratot^ 



WRABFAOE BATES. 



81 



fVvirit or ChUUd Meat, Sc,-~lmpoti» fue ; exporta 1b. per too, T^Jbw ftmd 
pelti. imports freo ; experts 24. 6d, per ion. 
Trmasbipmente : Qjarter import rat^s, Outer Harbour ; baU impart ratet 
Inner or Breakwater Harbours, 
WoiA. — 6i. per bale, expo^rte only. Imporle, free. 

Touiifaip^neot^ : Wool. f[%%, skins, or iow» 3d. over Me ; 3 1. per bale if 
liuided for traoehipment or damping, 
Gooi —la. importa ; Is. exports. 

TrmnthJpsieDts : Quarter raiee» Outer Harbour; half rates, Innfir or Break* 
water Harbours. Goal Cor engines and freezing ship i, Outer Harbour^ 
free, if declared s^. 
Timber.— 3i. 4d. per 1,000 ft.« imports; Is. 3d. per 1.000ft. exports. 

Tranflbipments : H*ilf latei, Inner or Breakwater Harbours; quarter rates, 
Outer Harbour. 

HvTC-^CKxili olbar tban waol* Bklne, tew* maate, and flax lauded on a wharf for traa- 
it lo a vessel Ijit 
{ at ttma of eatiy. 



tiapmeot lo a vessel lying at anotlier l>»rtb charged inward wharfage only when 



Wanoauui. 

Gtfu^mj MtrehandUi. — Imports, 3i, per ton ; exporbet U. 6d. per ton, 

Tnwebipmenti^ : Half rates. 
Of0tm an^^i Agricultural Produce.— Imports, 3e. pir ton ; exports, 1«. 6d. per ton. 
Potatoes, export, U, p3r ton. 
Triifitbjpments : Half rates. 
^rmm Meat. Butter, cite.— Sheep, Ji. per caroaes ; lamb^, (d. per carcase ; leg*, 
shoulders, and loin? oalauUted at so many to a oaroase, aooording to 
freigbt 

WM.— 3d. p>r bale. 

Transhipments : Half rates. 
CooJ. — If. 3d. per tm. Goal for ship's U9e, outward, 3d. per too. 

Transbipmoots: Half rates. 
Timber. — 6d. per 100 ft. ; far shipment, ^. ; wbite-plns, Id. 

Tranahipments : Half rates, 

Wbllxnotow. 

Merchaiuiiie. — 2^. p3r ton inwards, including labour and one night's 

aiori^e. Glass, acids, and special goods, 5s. per ton. Inward oargo 

landed aft^r noon on Friday is stored tree till noon on following 

Moodaj; landed aiter noon on Saturday is stored free till 5 p.m. 

on the following Tuesday, is. per ton outwards, including labour. 

Qlaae, acids, and spacial goods, 2s. 6d. per ton. Railway wharfage^ 

Is, inwards, 6d. outwards, without labour. 
Transhipments; 2^. 6d. per ton, iaoluding labour and seven days' storage. 

Qlase, acids, and special goods, 5s. per too. Over side of vessel lying 

At wharf, 6d. per ton. If shifted more than a quarter of a mile. 

6d. per ton extra. 
and Agricultural Produce.— 29. per ton inwards, tncluding labour and 

one night's storage ; Is. per ton outwards, inoluding labour. Railway 

wharfage — Is. inwards^ 6d. outwards, without labour. 
Tr&nshipments : %^. per ton, incluiing labour and seven days' storage. 

Over side of vessel at wharf, 6d. per ton. If shifted more tban a 

quarter of a mile, 6d. per ton extra. 
Meat, ButUr^ tic. — la, inwiiktds, la. outwards, par ton, without labour. 

Hallway wharfage — la. inwards, 6d. outwards, per ton, without 

labour. 
TfftDabtpments : M^iat, Is. 3d. por ton, without labour ; butter, 2s. 61. per 

ton, includiig labour and storage. Meat, butter, Mq,, over side of 

fMseJ at wbarf, 6d. per ton. 



82 



NEW ISKikLAND OFFICIAL TBAIt-BOOK. 



Wool— id, per b&le tit Rallwiky Wharf, without Uboiir; 6d. per b&le at ofclifr 
wharves, tnclQding labour. 
Transbipmente : 6i. per bale. includtDg labour, and 3d. additional if stared. 
If shifted more than a quarter of a mile, 3d. per bale extra. Over fiido 
of ves&el to veBsoI at wh>&rf, 3d. per bale. 
Coal, — Is, per ton imports, 6d. per ton exports, without labour. B&ilway 
wliarfage— 16. per ton inwariSf Gd. per ton outwardt, without labour 
Traushipmeota : AorosB wharf for steamer's uiei free. From vesMl or hulk 
to vessel at wharf» free. 
r»m6er,— 2d, per lOQft. Inwarde; IJd. per 100 ft. outwards, without labour. 
If labour supplied, 2d, per 100ft. added iDwards, and l|d. outwards. 
Railway wharfage^ 2d. inwards IJd. outwards, without labour. 
TrauHhipments: 2& 6d. par toD, including seven davi^ storage aud labour* 
If sbificd more than a quarter of a mile, Cd. per ton extra. Over 
vessel's side into another vessel at wharf, 6d. per ton. 
Harbotir-improvcment Bate.— The charge of 3d. per ton shall be made to and 
payable by ships to the Board, bs a harbour improvement rate, on all 
goods landed on the wharves or landing-places under the control of 
^_ the Board, except on coal and on ballast, and except on euoh goods 

^H as are the products of the Colony of New Zealand and are landed for 

^m the purpoee of iranEhipment to vessels to be carried out of the colony: 

^H Provided lb at for the purposes of this by-law the following measure- 

^H meuts shall be taken: Empties, half toonage; wool, five bales io (he 

^B Ion ; great cattle, each one ton ; small cattlei twelve to the too ; 

^B timber, 500ft. supi^rficial measurement to the ton; bricks, slates, 

^H and tiles, 500 to the ton ; cart^ and carriages, each two tons [ Ioom 

^B hides, twenty- five to the ton. 

Nelson. 
Qeneral Mtrchundiae.—2s. per ton, imports and expoit*, with labour. 

Transhipmeuts : Free when not landed on wharf ; 28. 6d if landed. 
Qrain and Agricultural Produce.— Is. 6i. per ton» imports and exports, with 
labour. 
TrftDBhipmeniB : Free when not landed on wharf ; 2s. 6d. if landed. 
Fraten Meat, Butter ^ <fc.— None shipped. 

Transhipments : Free when nob land d on wharf , half rates if lauded. 
Wool* — Exports, Is^ per bale ; imports free 

Transhipments Free when not landed on wharf ; half rates if landed. 
CoaL — li. per ton imports ; 24. with labour. Free, exports ; 24. 6d. per ton witb 
labour. 
Transhipments: Free when not landed on wharf. 
Timber.— Id. per 100 ft. super., import; Id. per lOO ft. super., export; 2^. per 
ton bj measurement : with labour. 
Transhipments: Free when not landed on wharf; half rates if landed on 
wharf, Reahipments, 2tj, 6d. per ton. 

Westpobt. 
Oeneral Merchandise.— 2b. per ton, and Is. per ton for receiving and delivering. 
Transhipments: 2e. Gd. per ion, inoludiog labour and one week's storage; 
Is. per ton if transhipped to vessel or lighter,, 
Grain and Agrtctdiural Produce*— 2b, pet ton., and Is. per ton for reoeiving and 
delivering. 
Transhipments : 2s, Gd. per ton, Including labour and one week's storage ; 
Is, per ton if transhipped to vessel or lighter. 
FroB&n Meat, Butter, dc, — 2s, par ton, and Is. per tin for receiving and 
delivering. 
Transhipments : 2s. 6d. per ton, inetadlng labour and one week's storage. 
Wool — 6d, per bale. 

Transhipments : Ss. 6d, ^r tooi including labour and one week'i storage ; 
Is, per ton if transhipped to vessel or lighter. 



WHAEFilOB BAI 



<k»L^%d. per ion. 
Timber.— 2d. per 100 ffc. 



If for eiport &Qd carried by raiJi free. 
Greymouth, 



<hn4rul Merchandise,— 3ti. per ton. Thifs o barge ttioludes la. a ton for reoeiTing 
and delivering, Coko, brickB, and fireclay carried by rail for export, 
free. 
TraoBhtpmente : 2f. 6d. per ton, including labour mnd oce week's storage; 
l9. per ton if tran shipped to vessel or lighter. 
Oratn and Agricultural Prodttce —3b. per ton. This charge includes U. m ton 
for receiving and delivering. 
Transhipments: 2^, 6d. per ton, including labour and one week's storage; 
1». per ton if trac shipped to vessel or lighter, 
TVoaeit Me^it, Butter, ttc, — 38. per ton. This oliarge inoludea le. a ton for 
receiving and delivering. 
TiaJiehipmenta : 2a. 6d. per ton, including labour and one week's i-torage* 
IFooL— 6d per bale, 

Xranahipmeuts : 29. 6d. per ton, including labour and one week's storage; 
l9. per ton if tranahtpped to vessel or lighter. * 

Clooi.^ — 6d. per ton inward*; ontwatdst free, if carried by rail, 
!Wb«r, — InwardB, 2d. per 100 ft. ; outwArds, free, if carried by rail. 

Lyttelton. 

Gtneral MerthartdUe. — Is, 9i. per ton. 

Transhipments : Free, whether landed on wharf or otherwisoi 
Qrixm. atid Agfric^diural Produce*--Od* per ton. 

Transhfpmenls : Free. 
Frosen Meat, Butter, ifc.—Sd. per ton. 

Transhipments ; Free, whether landed on wharf or otherwise. 
WooL—^^ per bale. 

Transhipments . Free, 
Coal*— 8d, per ton. 

Tr&oshipmeuts : Free, whether landed on wharf or otherwise. 
Timber.— 3^6. per 100 ft. 

Transhipments : Free. 

N.B.— All reshipments of goods from Lyttelton tmdei declaration, (reeu 

TtMABO. 

O4n0rul Merchandise. -Is. per ton. 

Transhipments : Half rates. 
Ofttjii and AgriciUtural ProdiKe.—le. 6d. per ton» 

Tr&Dsbipments : Half rates, 
Frcfgn H^at, Butter, dc.—l%. Gd. per ton weight, 

TraosbipmeDls: Half rates, 
Wool.—ls^^ per bale. 

Transhipments : Half rates. 
Cdai.— 2s. j)er ton. 

Transhipments : Half rates. For bunkering purposes, free, 
Timh^.—Adi. per 100 ft. 

Transhipmenta : Half rates. 

4h mra l Merchandise. —'2%, pet ton. 

Tr&DshipmentA : Free, 
^Tratn and Agricultural iVocfnes.— 2a, per ton. 

Trmnthlpnjents : Free. 
Pr^atn M tat. Butter^ tic— ^d. per sheep. Butter, 
Other frozen gooda, 2s. per ton 

Tranabipments : Free. 
WooL—^^ per bale, 

TEAOsbipments : Free. 



as merohandise, 2b, per ton. 



84 



NKW KEALAND OFFICIAt. TSAB-BOOS. 



Coal. — 2fl. per ton. 

TranflbipmeDta: Free. 
Timber,— 5d. and 7d. per 100 ft. FenoiDg postn and stAls, 4s. per 100, Palmgf^ 
7d. per 100. 
Tt&Qahipmenta: Free. 
Stone,— id. par foot. 

Live Cattle aiul Horses.— ^n, 6d. ^t^ch ; yearlingB, bAif rate^. Sheep, 2d, eaob; 
pigs, 4d. oAoh, 

Otaoo (Durbodi). 

Qetieral Merchandiie.--U., 2s., 3f., is., Aod 5e. per too, importe ; 2s. aod 3s. per 
totir expoctf. (CiaAsificd.) MauQl&ctured artccles and articles wblcb 
have paid an import duty, free. Beer 2s. per tOQ. A rate of 2a. per 
ton by weight upon all fiour» malt, meal, tallow, bone, ores, aod 
quartz. 
TranehipmeDtfi : la. per ton. 
Grain and Agricultural Produce.— 1?. por ton, imports; 6d. pet ton by weighti 
exports; bran and pollaid, exportSt free; flour and oatmeal, 2fl. A 
rate of 6d. per ton by welgbt upon all barley, wbeat, cats, rye, beanat 
whole peas, maize^ potatoes, turnips, carrote, otttonei straw, bay, and 
building-stone. 
Traosbipmetits : Is. per ton. 
Froiin Meat, ButUr, tf^^.—Flax, fungus, rabbits, live-stoek, and beef, Ifl. per Iod 
imports {measurennntj, €d. per ton ixpoits; butter atd cbeeae, im- 
ports, 4s. per ton (weight) ; frozen meat, imports, 5^^. per ton. 
TransbipmenCB : Is. per ton. 
Wool.—Bv^otts, 23. 3d. per ton, wool, skins, and hides; 4s, per ton, imports 
(three bales to ton). 
Transhipments : le, per ton by measarement. 
CoaLSn. per ton, imports ; expo r la free. 

Transhipments : Is, pti ton. 
Timber.Sd, and 3d. per 100 auperfieial feet, imporis ; exporte, free, 

TrausbipmentB : Is. per Ion by measurement. Notice o£ tranablpment 
muEt be given nithin twenty-four hours after ship^a arrival. 

Bluff. 

twnerai Merchandise,— U. lOd. per ton, imports and exports. 

Transhipments : Free when not lacded on wbarf ; balf rates if landed. 
Grain and Agricultural Produ^^.— lid. per ton, imports and exports. 

TraiiBhipmentB : Free when not landed on wharf ; half rates if landed, 
Frottfi Meat, Butter, dc.— lid. per ton, exports; oheese, le. per ton. 

Transhipments : Free when not landed on wharf ; hall rates If landed. 
Wool. — Eiporta, 9d. per bale ; imports, free. 

Transhipments ; Free when not landed on wharf ; half rates if landed. 
Cool* — Is. Ba. per ton, imports ; free exports. 

Tranabipments : Is. 6d. per ton when la&ded ex hulk ; free when not landed 
on wharf. 
Timber,^l9. per 1,000 ft. super., import ; le. per 1,000 ft. super., export. 

Trtnahipments Free when not lacded on wharf ; half rates if landed en 
wharf. 



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NBW ZBALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK 



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NBW ZEALAND NEWSPAPERS. 87 

NEW ZEALAND NEWSPAPERS. 

Thebb are (January, 1906) 226 publications on the register of 
newspapers for New Zealand. Of these, sixty-two are daily papers, 
thirty-three are published three times a week, twenty-four twice a 
week, sixty-eight once a week, two fortnightly, one three-weekly, 
and thirty-six monthly. 

The names of the newspapers, with the postal districts and towns 
in which they are printed, are given in the following list, the second 
column showing the day or period of publication. 

M. signifies morning paper ; E. evening paper. 

Auckland. 
Auckland — 

Auckland Free Press (M.) . . Saturday. 

Auckland Star (E.) . . . . Daily. 

Auckland Weekly News and Town and Country Journal (M.) Thursday. 
Bible Standard (hi.) . . . . Monthly. 

Christian Worker (M.) . . 

Church Gazette (M.) . . 

New Zealand Farmer, Bee and Poultry Journal (M.) 

New Zecdand Farmerd' Weekly and Land Agents' Rec )rd 

(M.) .. .. .. Tueslay. 

New Zealand Graphic, Ladies* Journal, and Youths' Com- 
panion (M.) . . . . . . . . Wednesday. 

New Zealand Herald (M.) . . Daily. 

New 'Zealand Illustrated Magazine (M.} . . Monthly. 

New Zealand Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic Review 

and Licensed Victuallers' Gazette (M.) . . Thursday. 

New Zealand Joyful News (M.) . . Monthly. 

New Zealand Motor and Cycle Journal (M.) . . 
New Zealand Worker (E.) . . . . Wednesday. 

Observer (M.) . . . . . . Saturday. 

Saturday Night (E.) 

Sentinel (E.) . . . . Thursday. 

Sharland's Trade Journal (M.) . . . . Monthly. 

Tourist and Resources of New Zealand (M.) . . 

Voice (M.) . . . . . . . . Saturday. 

Cambridge — 

Waikato Indepenient (E.) .. Tues.,Thur., Sat. 

Coromandel — 

Coromandel County News and Kuaotunu and Mercury Bay 

Mail (E.) . . . . ' . . Tuesday, Friday. 

DargaviUe — 

North Auckland Times (£.) . . Mon., Wed., Fri. 

Wairoa Bell and Northern Advertiser (E.) . . Tuesday, Friday. 

Hamilton — 

Waikato Argus (E.) .. .. .. Daily. 

Waikato Times and Thames Valley Gazette (E.) 
Helensville— 

Kaipara Advertiser and Waitemata Chronicle (M.) . . Wednesday. 

Kawakawa — 

Bay of Islands Times (M.) . . Thursday. 

Northern Luminary (£.) . . Friday. 

Kawhia — 

Rawhia Settler and Raglan Advertiser (E.) . . 
Kohukohu — 

Hokianga County Times and North-western Representa- 
tive (E ) . . . . Saturday. 



88 NIW 8BALAHD OFPiaAL T1A»-B00K. 

Mangonai — 

Mangonai Oooniy Times and Northern Bepresenkatife (B.) Toeiday. 
Onehunga— ! 

Manukau Ooanty Ohroniole and Aaokland Prorinoial 

Times (M.) .. Saturday. 

Raglan- 
Raglan Oounty Chroniole (M.) . . Friday. 
Rotorua— 

Hot Lakes Chroniole (M.) . . Wed., Batofday. 

Warkwoith- 

Rodney and Otamatea Times, Waitemata and Kaipara 

Gazette (E.) . . Friday. 

Wbangarei — 

Morning Press (M.) . . Tues., Thor., Bat. 

Northern Advocate (E.) . . . . Daily. 

** , , Thames. 

Karangabake — 

Qoldfields Advocate and Ohinemari County Chroniole (M.) Tom., Thur., Sat. 
Opotiki— 

East Coast Guardian (E.) . . Wed., Saturday. 

Opotiki Herald, Whakatane County and East Coast 

Gazette (E.) . . Tuesday, Friday. 

Paeroa — 

Ohinemuri Gazette (E.) .. Mon., Wed., Fri. 

Tauranga— 

Bay of Plenty Times and Thames Valley Warden (E.) . . 
Te Aroha— 

Te Aroha and Ohinemari News and Upper Thames Advo- 
cate (E.) .. .. .. Taes., Thar., Sat. 

Thames — 

Thames Advertiser (M.) . . . . . . Daily. 

Thames Star (E.) .. .. .. ... 

Waihi- 

Waihi Daily Telegraph (E.) . . . . « 

Gisbome- Gisborne. 

Gisbome Times (M.) . . . . . . . . Daily. 

Poverty Bay Herald (E.) .. ... 

Inglewood- N"^ Plymouth. 

Inglewood Record and Waitara Age (E.) . . . . Mon., Wed., Fri. 

New Plymouth — 

Budget and Taranaki Weekly Herald (M.) . . Saturday. 

Daily News (M.) . . . . . . . . Daily. 

Taranaki Herald (E.) . . . . . . , 

Taranaki News (M.) . . . . . . Saturday. 

Opunake — 

Opunake Times (E.) . . . . Tuesday, Friday. 

Stratford — 

Stratford Evening Post (E.) .. .. Daily. 

Waitara— 

Waitara Evening Mail and Clifton County Chroniole (E.) Mon., Wed., Fri, 

Dannevirke- Napier. 

Dannevirke Advocate (E.) .. .. .. Daily. 

Dannevirke Daily Press (E.) . . . . ... 

Hastings- 
Hastings Standard (E.) • . . . ... 

New Zealand Bulletin (M.) .. .. Saturday. 



NBW ZSAIiAND NBWBPAPBBS. 



89 



Kapier— 

D&Uy Telegraph (E.) . . . . Daily. 

Hawke'B Bay Herald (M.) .. « 

New Zealand Fire ana Ambulance Record (M.) . . Monthly. 

New Zealand Health Joamal (M.) 

Saturday Night Advertiser (E.) .. .. Saturday. 

Waipawa— 

Waipawa Mail (E.) . . Tues., Thur., Sat. 

Wairoa— 

Wairoa Guardian and County Advocate (E.) .. .. Mon., Wed., Fri. 



Eltham— Wakganui. 

Eltham Argus and Rawhitiroaand Kaponga Advertiser (E.) 
Hawera — 

Egmont Star (M.) 

Hawera and Normandy Star, Patea Oounty Ohroniole, and 
Waimate Plains Gazette (E.) . . 
Hunterville — 

Hunterville Express and Upper Raogttikei Advertiser (E.) 
Kaponga — 

Kaponga Mail and District Advertiser (E.) 



Waimate Witness and Kaponga Advocate (E.) 
Mangaweka— 

Settler (E.) .. ... 

Marton — 

Rangitikei Advocate and Manawatn Argus (E.) 



Patea County Press (E.) 
Taihape — 

Post(B.) 

Taihape and Waimarino News (E.) 
Wanganui — 

New Zealand Good Templar Watchword (M.) 

New Zealand Tit Bits (M.) 

Wanganui Chronicle (M.) 

Wanganui Herald (E) . . 

Weekly Chronicle and Patea-Rangitikei Advertiser (M.) . 

Yeoman (M.) 



Daily. 

Saturday. 

Daily. 

Tues., Thur., Sat. 

Mon., Wed., Fri. 

Tues., Thur., Sat. 

Daily. 

Mon., Wed.. Fri. 

TueV, Thur., Sat. 

Monthly. 
Saturday. 
Daily. 

Saturday. 
Friday. 



^ ^ ^ Wellington. 

Carterton— 

Wairarapa Leader (E.) . . . . Daily. 

Wairarapa Observer, Featherston Chronicle, East Coast 
Advertiser, and South County Gazette (E.) 
Eketahuna — 

Eketahuna Express and County Gazette (E.) . . Tues., Thur., Sat. 

Feilding— 

Feilding Star (E.) .. .. ..Daily. 

Foxton — 

Manawatu Herald (E.) . . . . . . Tues., Thur., Sat. 

Greytown North — 

Te Puke ki Hikurangi (E.) . . Friday. 

Wairarapa Standard and Featherston Advocate (E.) . . Men., Wed., Fri. 
Levin — 

Manawatu Farmer and Horowhenua County Chronicle (E.) 
^lart inborougb — 

Martinborough Star and District News (E.) . . . . Tuesday, Friday. 



90 



MBW EBALAND OFFICIAL TIAR-BOOK. 



Wellington— contimud, 
Masterton— 

Wairarapa Age (M.) . . Daily. 

Wairarapa Daily Times (E.) . . . . • 

Wairarapa Matuhi Press (M.) . . Wednesday. 

Weekly Star and Wellington District Advertiser (M.) . . Thursday. 
Otaki— 

Otaki Mail and Horowhenua County and West Coast 

Advertiser (E.) .. .. Mon., Wed., Pri. 

Pahiatua— 

Pahiatua Era (E.) .. Daily. 

Pahiatua Herald (E.) . . ... 

Palmerston North — 

Manawatu Daily Times (M.) . . • 

Manawatu Evenirg Standard (E.) . . 
Petone — 

Hutt and Petone Chronicle (E.) . . Tues., Thar., Sat. 

Wellington- 
Church Chronicle (M.) . . . . Monthly. 

Evening Post (E.) . . . . Daily. 

Farmers' Union Advocate (M.) .. Saturday. 

Liberal Herald . . . . Monthly. 

New Zealand Craftsman (M.) 

New Zealand Dairyman and Farmers' Union Journal (E.) 

New Zealand Fi ee Lance (M.) . . . . . . Saturday. 

New Zealand Qrccer and Storekeeper and Shopkeepi «-s* 

Advocate (M.) . . . . . . Monthly. 

New Zealfiind Mail, Town and Country Advertiser (M) . . Wednesday. 

New Zealand Mines Record (M.) . . . . Monthly. 

New Zealand Primitive Methodist (M.) 

New Zealand Railway Review (E.) ,♦ 

New Zealand Times (M.) . . . . . . Daily. 

New Zealand Trade Review and Price Current (M.) . Three-weekly. 

New Zealand Truth (M.) . . . . Saturday. 

Pest and Telegraph Officers' Advocate (E.) . . Monthly. 

Progrefs(M.) 

Prohibitionist (E.) . . . . Pri., fortnightly. 

Young Man's Magazine (M ) . . Monthly. 

Woodville — 

Examiner (E.) . . Mon., Wed., Fri. 

Freeman (E.) . . Monthly. 



Blenhehn- Blenheim. 

Marlborough Express (E.) 

Marlborough Heiald (E.) 
Havelock — 

Pelorus Guardian and Miners' Advocate (M.) . . 
Pioton — 

Marlborough Press, County of Sounds Gazette (E.) 



.. Daily. 

. . Tuesday, Friday. 
.. Mon., Wed., Pri. 



Collingwood — 

Golden Bay Argus (E.) . . 

Motueka— 

Motueka Star (E.) 

Nelson- 
Colonist (M.) 
Nelson Evening Mail (E.) 

Takaka— 

Golden Bay News (E.) . . 



Nelson. 



.. Thursday. 

. . Tuesday, Friday. 

.. Daily. 

.. Thursday. 



NBW ZEALAND NEWSPAPERS. 91 



Charleston- Westport. 




Charleston Herald, Brighton Times, and Croninville Re 




porter (M.) 


. Wed., Saturday, 


Morchison — 




Buller Post (E.) 


. Tuesday. 


Westport— 




Buller Miner (M.) 


. Friday. 


Westport News (M.) .. 


Daily. 


Westport Times and Evening Star (E.) 


• 


Obeymouth. 




Grejmouth — 




Evening Star and Bnmnerton Advocate (E.) . . 


Daily. 


Grey River Argus (M.) . . 


^ 


Weekly Argus (M.) 


Weekly. 


Reef ton— 




Inangahua Herald and New Zealand Miner (M.) 


Daily. 


Inangahua Times and Reef ton Guardian (E.) 


• 


HOKITIKA. 




Hokitika— 




Hokitika Guardian and Evening Star (E.) 


Daily. 


Leader (M.).. 


Saturday. 


West Coast Times M... 


Daily. 



Kumara — 

Kumara Times and Dillman's and Goldsborough Adver- 
tiser (E.) .. .. .. .. , 

Ross- 
Ross and Okarito Advocate and Westland Advertiser (M.) Wed., Saturday. 

Chbistchubch. 
Akaroa — 

Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser (M.) . . Tuesday, Friday. 

Ashburton — 

Ashburton Daily News (E.) . . . . Daily. 

Ash burton Guardian (E.) .. .. » 

Ashburton Mail, Rakaia, Mount Somers, and Alford Forest 

Advertiser (M.) .. .. Tues., Thur., Sat. 

Cheviot — 

Cheviot News (M.) . . . . . . Tuesday, Friday 

Christchurch — 

Canterbury Times (incorporatiog " Sportsman " and *' New 

Zealand Cyclist") (M.) ..Wednesday. 

Lyttelton Times (M.J . . . . Daily. 

New Zealand Church News (M.) . . Monthly. 

New Zealand Co-operative News (M.) 

New Zealand Poultry-keeper and Fanciers' Chronicle (M.) 

New Zealand Schoolmaster (E.) 

New Zealand War Cry and Official Gazette of the Salva- 
tion Army (M.) . . . . . . Saturday. 

Press (M.) . . . . . . Daily. 

SpecUtor (M.) . . . . Tuesday. 

Star(E.) .. .. Daily. 

Truth (E.) . . . . . . . . « 

Weekly Press (incorporating •• The Referee ") (M.) . . Wednesday. 

White Ribbon (M.) . . Monthly. 

Kaikoura — 

Kaikoura Star and North Canterbury and South Marl- 
borough News (E.) .. Daily. 



92 NBW 8IALAND OFFICIAL TBAH-BOOK. 

Ohbistohubch — conitnued. 
Raogiora — 

Standard and North Oanterbury Guardian (M.) . . Wed., Saturday. 

Southbridge — 

Ellesmere Guardian (M.) . . . . . . • • 

Temuka- ^'*'^«^- 

Geraldine Guardian (M.) . . . . . . Tues., Thar., Sat. 

Temuka Leader (M.) . . . . . . • • • mm 

Timaru— 

Mercantile and Bankruptcy Gazette of Kew Zealand (M.) Thursday. 

Pioneer (M.) . . Monthly. 

Timaru Herald (M.) . . Daily. 

Timaru Post (E.) ... 
Waimate^ 

Waimate Advertiser (M.) . . Tues., Thar., Sat. 

Wai mate Times (M.) .. .. .. .. # » , 

Oamabu. 
Oamaru — 

North Otago Times (M.) . . . . Daily. 

Oamaru Mail (E.) . . ... 

DUNEDIN. 

Alexandra Souch— 

Alexandra Herald and Central Otago Gazette (E.) . . Wednesday. 

Balclutha— 

Glutha Leader (M.) .. .. .. Tuesday, Friday. 

Free Press (M.) . . . . . . ... 

Clyde- 

Dunstan Times, Vincent County Official Gazette, and 

General Goldfields Advertiser (E.) . . . . Monday. 

Cromwell — 

Cromwell Argus and Northern Goldfields Gazette (E.) . . 
Dunedin — 

Evening Star (E.) .. .. .. .. Daily. 

Farmers' Circular (M.) . . . . . . . . Thur., fortn'ly. 

Farmers' Standard of New Zealand (M.) . . . . Monthly. 

New Zealand Baptist (E.)* 

New Zealand Guardian (M.) . . . . . . « 

New Zealand Journal of Education (M.) . . . . » 

New Zealand Mining, Engineering, and Building Journal 

(M.) .. .. .. .. Thursday. 

New Zealand Public Opinion (M.) . 

New Zealand Tablet (M.) 



Otago Daily Times (M.) 

Otago Liberal and Workman (M) 

Otago Witness (M.) 

Outlook (M.) 

Red Funnel (M.) 

Triad (M.) . . 

Tribune (M.) 

Weekly Budget (M.) 
Lawrence — 

Tuapeka Times (M.) 
MQton— 

Bruce Herald (E.) 

Milton Mirror (E.) 



Friday. 
.. Thunday. 
.. Daily. 
.. Saturday. 
.. Thursday. 
.. Saturday. 
. . Montbly. 
.. Monthly. 
.. Friday. 
.. Saturday. 

. . Wed., Saturday. 

. . Mon., Thursday. 



* Edited in MoBgiel by Bev. F. W. Boreham. 



MBW ZEALAND NEWSPAPERS. 



DoNEDnr — continued. 
Moigiel- 

V. Taieri Advocate (E.) 
Haaeby— 

Mount Ida Ghroniole (M.) 
Palmenton — 

Palmeraton and Waikouaiti Times (M.) 
RoKbnigh — 

Mount Benger Mail (M.) 
Tapanni — 

Tapanui Courier and Central Distriots Gazette (M.) 



. Tues., Friday. 
. Friday. 
. Friday. 
. Wednesday. 
. Wednesday. 



Ikysbcaboill. 
Arrowtown — 

Lake County Press (E.) . . Thursday. 

Gore — 

Mataura Ensign (E.) . . . Tues., Thur., Sat. 

Southern Standard (M.) . . Tuesday, Friday. 

luTercargill — 

Southern Cross (M.) . . . . Saturday. 

Southlander (M.) . . Friday. 

Southland Daily News (E.) . . Daily. 

Southland Times (M.) . . • . • 

Weekly Times (M.) . . . . Friday. 

Orepuki — 

Orepuki Advocate (M.) . . . . Saturday. 

Otautau— 

Otantau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle iM.) . . Wednesday. 
Queenstown — 

Lake Wakatipu MaU (E.) . . Friday. 

Biverton — 

Western Star and Wallace County Gazette (E.) . . Tues., Friday. 

Wtnton— 

Win ton Record, Hokonui Advocate, and Otautau Guardian 

(M.) .. .. .. .. .. Friday. 

Wyndham — 

Wyndham Farmer (M.) 



Wyndham Herald (M.) 



. . Men., Wed., Fri. 
. . Tuesday, Friday. 



The foregoing towns are arranged according to the postal dis- 
trict in which they are situated. 

Taking the provincial districts, Auckland has 50 pubHcations 
registered as newspapers, Taranaki 13, Hawke's Bay 13, Wellington 
50, Marlborough 5, Nelson 13, Westland 8. Canterbury 27, and 
Otago 47. 



94 NBW ZBALAND OFFICIAL TSAR-BOOI. 



THE CUSTOMS TARIFF OF NEW ZEALAND, 

Ufider the Customs and Excise Duties Acts, 1888 and 1895, " The Tdbate» 
Excise Duties Act, 2896,'' " The Customs Duties Amendment Act, 1900,'* 
and •• T}ie Preferential and Reciprocal Trade Act, 1903." [For raUe under 
last-named Act, see p. 111.] 



TABLE OP DUTIES. 
The headings of the reRpeotive classes in this Table and in the Table o 
Exemptions are used solely for convenience of classification, and shall not in* 
any way aSeot the articles specified therein, or be construed to indicate the- 
material of which any such article is made. 

The word ** iron " includes steel, or steel and iron combined. 

Neither steam-engines, nor parts of steam-engines, nor steam-boilen (land 
or marine) are included in the expression "machines" or ** machinery '* ii» 
either this Table or the Table of Exemptions. 

The abbreviaton "n.o.e." means not otherwise enumerated. 

In computing ad valorem duties the invoice value is increased by 10 per 
cent. 

Class I. — Foods and Articles for Human Consumption. 
Names of Articles and Rates of Duty. 

1. Almonds, in shell, 2d. the lb. 

2. Almonds, shelled, n.o.e., dd. the lb. 

3. Bacon and hams, 2d. the lb. 

4. Biscuits, ships' plain and unsweetened, 3s. the owt. 

5. Biscuits, other kinds, 2d. the lb. 

6. Boiled sugars, comfits, lozenges, Scotch mixtures, and sugar-candy, 2d. the 

lb., including internal packages. 

7. Candied peel and drained peel, 3d. the lb. 

8. Capers, caraway seeds, catsup, cayenne pepper, chillies, chutney, ourry powder 

and paste, fish-paste, gelatine, isinglass, liquorice, olives, 20 per cent* 
ad valorem. 

9. Chocolate confectionery, and all preparations of chocolate or coooa — 

In plain trade packages, 3d. the lb. 

In fancy packages, or in small packages for retail sale, 20 per cent, ad 
valorem. 

10. Confectionery n.o.e., 2d. the lb., including internal packages. 

11. Currants, Id. the lb. 

12. Fish, dried, pickled, or salted, n.o.e., 10s. the cwt. 

13. Fish, potted and preserved, 2d. the lb. or package of that reputed weight,. 

and so in proportion for packages of greater or less reputed weight.* 

14. Fruit, fresh, viz. :— 

Apples, pears, plums, cherries, peaches, nectarines, medlars, apricots, 

quinces, tomatoes. Id. the lb. 
(No duty exceeding ^d. the lb. to be levied on apples and pears from 

14th July to 3l8t December.) 
Currants, raspberries, gooseberries, blackberries, and strawberries, ^i. 

the lb. 
Lemons, ^d. the lb. 

15. Fruits, dried, 2d. the Ib.f 



* Sucb as iR of foreign produce or manufacture, subject to preferential dnty (Beep.UlX 
i This refers to dried fruits other than currants and raisins. 



THE CUSTOMS TARIFF, 



95 



16. Fruits preserved in juice or RVtup, 25 per ceot. ad valotem. 

17. Fmit-pulp aad p&niallj preserved fruit D.o.e., l^d, the lb, 
IB. Fruits preserved by Butpharotu ftoid, Id. the lb, 
19. Glucose, Id. the lb. 
90. Hoiiey« 2d. the lb. 
^I. J&ms, jeilies, marmalade, and preset vee* 2d. the lb. or package of that 

reputed weight, and so in proportion for paokagea of greater or less 

reputed weight. 
9S. Jellies concentrated in tablets or powder» 4d. the lb. 
is. Maizena and ooruflour. |d. the lb. 
M, Meats, potted or preserved, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
25. Milk, preserved, 25 per cent, ad valorem, 
dG. Moatfrrd, 2d. the lb. 
"37. Nate of all kindK, except cocoa nuts, 2d. the lb. 



98. 

31. 
S2. 
33. 
U, 

35. 

m 

38. 

40. 

41. 
^2 



Ojsiers, preserved, 2d. the lb. or package of that reputed weight, and so in 

proportion for packages of greater or less reputed weight. 
P«axl bailey, Is. the cwt. 
Pe&s. split, 28. the owt. 
Piokles, 38. the imperial gallon. 
Provisions, n.o.e., 20 per oent. ad valorevi. 
B&isins, Id. the lb. 
Rioe flour, 6a. the cwt. 
Sardines, inctuding the oil, 2d. the lb. 
Saucer, 4s. the imperial gallon. 

Spices, including pepper and pimento, unground, 2d, the lb. 
Spices, including pepper and pimento, ground, 4d. the lb. 
Sugar, ^d. the lb. 
Treacle and molasses, ^d. the lb. 

Vegetables, fresh, dried, or preserved, 20 per cent, ad valorevi. 
Vinegar, table, not ezoeeding C-5 per oent. of acidity/ 6d. the gallon. 



Class I L— Tobacco, 



And 



43. Cigarettes, not exceeding in weight 2^ lb. per 1,000. 178. 6d. the 1,000. 

for all weight in excesu of 2^ lb. per 1,000, 6d. the oz. 

44. CigarB, 78, the lb, 
46. Snnfl, 78. the lb. 

46. Tobacco, 3a. 6d. the lb. 

47. Tobacco, unmanufactured, entered to be manufactured in the oolony In any 

Uoensed tobacco manufactory, for manufacturing purposes only» into 
tobacco, cigars, cigarettes, or snuff, 2s, the lb. 



Class HI. — Alcoholic Beverages, and Materials for Making 

Same. 

48l Ale, beer of all eorts, porter, cider, and perry, the gallon, or for six reputed 
qoart bottles, or 12 reputed pint bottles, 2s, the gaOon. 

49. Cordials, bitters, and liqueurs, 16a. the liquid gallon. 

50. HoDfi, 6d. the Ib.f 
5K MaJt, 2s. the bushel. 
5% Bice malt, Id. the lb. 
l&S, Solid wort, 6d. the lb. 

54. Spirits and strong waters, the strength of which can be ascertained by 

Sykee's hydrometer, 16a. the proof gallon. 

(No allowance beyond 16'5 under proof shall bo made for spirits or 
atroDg waters of a lees hydrometer strength than 16 5 under proof.) 

55. Spirits and strong waters, sweetened or mixed » when not exceeding the 

streDgih of proof, 16s. the liquid gallon. 



* VlDflRar exeeedittg 6 5 per oeol. of aoidlty to be brenti^d &■ acetic scid. 

t Buob u is of foreign produce or maauracture.imhject to proferentlal doty (» 



ap.UI)* 



RBW £BAUANO OFFIOUL TIAR-BOOK. 



56. Spiritfi and stroDg waters in oatea Bball be obarged a« follows* sftmely : — 

Two gfklloDs and under, as two gallons ; over two gallons and not exceed- 
ing tbree, as three gallons; over three gallons and not exceeding foar» 
as four gallons; and so on for any greater ^juantity contained in any 
case. 

57, Spirits or strong waters, mixedl with ingredients in any proportion eiceeding 

33 per cent, of proof spirit, and althongh thereby coming under any other 
defiignation, excepting patent or proprietary medicineR^ or tinoturee acd 
medicinul spirits otherwise eoumerated, 16s. the liquid gallon. 

56. Wine, AusttaliaBi containing not more than 35 fet cent, of proof spirit 
verified by Sykoses hydrometer, the gallon^ or for six repnted quart bottles^ 
or twelve reputed pint bottles, 5s. the gallon* 

59. Wine, other tha.ii §parkling and Australian, containing less than iO per cent. 
of proof spirit verified by Sykes's hydrometer, the gallon, or for liz 
reputed quart bottles, or twelve reputed pint bottles^ 68. the gallon. 

GO. Wtne« sparkUng> 9s, the gallon. 



I 



Materials fob 



Clabs IV.^Non*alcoholic Bevebages, and 

MAKING Same, 

61* Aerated and mineral waters and e0ervesoing bever»gei»t SO per c«iifc. ad 

valortm. 

62. Chicory, 3d. the lb. 

63. Chocolate, 3d, the lb. 

64. Cocoa, 3d. the lb. 

65. Coflee, essence of, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

66. Coiee, roasted, 3d. the ib. 

67. Syrups; lime- or lemon-juice aweetened ; raspberry vinegar, 25 per oenl. ad 

valorem. 

68. Tea. 2d. the lb.' 

Claba Y. — Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, and Druggists* 

Sundries. 

69. Acid, acetic, n.o.e., containing not more than 30 per cent, of acidity^ Ijd. 

the lb. 
For every 10 percent, of acidity or frtcLioD thereof additional, )d. the lb. 

70. Acid, tartaric. Id. the lb. 

71. Baking' powder, yeast preparations, and other fermeDta^ 20 per cent, ad 

vahrem, 

72. Obemicals n.o.e., including photographic chemicals, and glacial acetic Mid 

(B.P. staodard}* 15 per cent, ad vatonm. 

73. Cream of tartar. Id. the Ib^f 

74. Drugs and druggists' Bundriea und apothecaries' warer, n.o.e., 15 per cent, 

ad valorem. 

75. Essences, flavouring, epirituouB^ 16s. the liquid gallon. 

76. EsseciceSy davouring, n.o.e.^ 15 per cent, ad valorem. 
77- Eucalyptus oil, in bulk or bottle, 20 per ceot, ad valorem, 
7d. Glycerine, refined^ 20 per cent, etd valorem. 

79. Opium, 40s. the lb. 

80. Patent medicines, 15 per cent, ad vakr«m. __ 

81. Proprietary medicines, or medioamentp, (1) bearing tlie name of the pro- 

prietor on label or package; (2J bearing a prefixed name in the poa- 
sessivecEiee ; (3) n.o.e., prepared by any occult secret or art, 15 per oeot 
ad valmtm, 

82. Saccharine, except in the form of tabloids or tablets, Is. 6d. the ounce. 



mt, 

i 



**^Frou:i and after the tbirlj-flnt day of March, ooo IboQFaod alue hundred and fotv, 
00 dutf Ahall b« levt&ble on tea grown in an v part of the Biriti»b domtnloos, except on 
lea In paekots not exceeding one pound in weight." (Bectlou 9 of " The Preferential and 
Beoirrooal Trade Act. 1903."') 

\ Buoh as i« of foreign prodtjce or manufaettire, (ub^ect lo preff rcniial duty (see p. 111)^ 



TH8 ODSTOUS TARIFF. 



97 



I 



SS. Saraftpartlla, 15 per cent, ad valonm, 

94. Sodft, c&rbocftte axid bicArbon^te. Is. the cwt. 

85. Sod^ cr>stal8. 28. the owt. 

86. TisciDrefi aod medicinal »piriifi of any recognised pbarmacopcei»t containing 

more than 50 per cent, of proof spirit, la. the lb. 

87. Tinctnree aLd medicinal spirite of any recognised pharmacopcBie, containirg 
50 per cent, proof epirit cr lea*, 16 per cent, ad valortm. 



Class VI.— Clothino and Textile Goods. 



f 



Apparel and ready made clotfaing, and all articles n.o.e. made up i?^bolJy cr 
in part from textile or other pieee-goodp, 25 per cent, ad valorem. 

89. Apparel made by British or foreign tailors ; dresa, mantle, or jacket makerp, 

io the order of rcaidents in the colony, and intended for the individual 
use of such residents, whether imported by the residenta themselves or 
through an importing firm, 40 per cent, ad valorem. 

90. Blankets, 20 per cent, ad valoiem, 

91. CoUare and cufip, of paper or other materia), 25 per cent, ad valonm* 

92. Cotton counterpanes, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

93. Cotton ptece-goodp, to include turkey twill a, dreaa prints (hard>aptin and 
plain^ woven), where the invoice value does not exceed 4d, the yard ; ard 
cotton piece goods n.o.e., 10 per cent, ad valorem. 

Cotton piece-goods— namely, tapestry; cretcnnea; chintz art ctdpe, and 

aergea ; velvetcenp, velvet?, and pluahes, all kinda ; dama&ka ; mcquette; 

sateens; linenettes; crepona; crimps ; zephyrs ; ginghams; turkey twills; 

prints; printed cottons; piques; voatinga; quiltingp, and marcetla^; 

mnalina of all kinds ; nets ; window-neta ; hotlandit, curtains, and blinds ; 

diapers; ticks, including coloured Belgian ; towellings; laceSi 20 per cent. 

ad valorem. 
^. Drapery n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valonm. 
06. Feathers, ornamental (including oairicb), and artificial flowers, 25 per cent. 

ad valoreift. 
yi. Forfar, dowlas, emd flax sheeting, n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valortm* 
'^. Furs^ 25 per cent, ad valorem, 

99. Haberdashery n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valofem. 

lOO. Hait of all kinds, including straw hats, also caps, 25 per cent, ad 

wdortm. 
lOL Hosiery n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valorem, 
102. Lace, and lacea, n.o.e., 25 per cent, ad valorem. 
108. Hillinery of all kinds, including trimmed hata, caps, and bonnets, 25 per 

cent, ad valorem. 

104. Ribbons and crape, all kinds, 25 per cent, ad valorem, 

105. Bugs, woollen, cotton, opossum, or other, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
1C6. Shawls, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

107* Silks, satins, velvets, plushes, n.o.e., composed of dik mixed with any other 

goaterial, in the piecp, 25 per cent, ad valofevi, 
lOS. Textile piece-goods other than cotton or silk, 20 per cent, ad valorem* 

100. l7cDbrella», parasols, and sunBhadei^, 20 per cent, ad valorevt. 
no. ITame n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

Class VII. — Leatheb and Makufactures of Leather. 

111. Boots, fboes, and slippers, n.o.e.; goloshes, ologs, pattens, vampe» uppers, 
and laces, 22} per cent, ctd valorem,* 

lis. Btel-plates, and toe stiffeners and plates, 22} per cent, ad valorem. 

U8. Leather- 
Leather belting, and belt-leather, harness, bridle, legging, bag, kip (other 

than East India), Id. the lb. 
Buff and split, including aatln bidet and tweeds, 3d. the lb. 



^^^B NBW SSEALAKD OFFICIAL TICAR-BOOH. ^H 

^ CordovaQ, levanted l^atber, roans, sheepskiiiii, morocco n.o.c, basils, W. 

K the lb. 

V Sole lealber, 2d, ibe lb. 

H East India kip, Persians, iambekins a&d goatskins (dressed other than 

^V moroooo), kangaroo and wallabi skins (dressed), tan and coloured caif, 

2d. the lb. 
Leather n.o.e., Id. the lb. 

114. Leather board or compo, 4d. the lb. ^_ 

115. Leather b\g8 and leather cloth bags, n.o.e. 20 per cent, ad valorem, ^M 

116. Leather, chamoiB, 20 per cent, ad valoiem. ^| 
117« Leather oat into sbapeer 22^ per cent, ad valjrem. ^H 

118. Leather ]cggiDg«i, 22 j per cent, ad vahrevt, ^| 

119. Leather luanafactureB n.o.e., *20 per cent ad valofetn 

120. Portmanteaux; trunks; travelling b^gs and brief bag:^ of leather or leather- 

cloth, 10 in. in length and upwards, and carpet-bagfl, 25 per ot^nt. nd 
valorem. 

121. Siiddlery and hameas ; whips and whip-thongs, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

Class VIII. — Furniture and Household Fubnishino. 

122* Baaket and wicker ware n.o.e., not being furniture, 20 percent, ad valorem** 
123. Carpetfi, and druggets; tl lorcloth : mats, and matting, 20 p?r cent, ad 

vaior&tn. 
121, Deakp, 20 per codI. ad valorem. 

135. Furniture and cabinetware, n.o.e., and other than iron, 25 per cent, ad 

valoi-em* 

136. Furniture, knife, and ptate powder and polish, 20 p?r cant, ad valorem. 
127 Mantel pieces, other than »tone, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

128. Upholstery n.o.e., 25 per cent, ad valtaem, 

Clahs IX. — CHL*»fA, Glass, and Earthen Goods. 

129. Bricks, known as Hrebrioks, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

130. Ohina, poroelain, and partanware, 20 per cent, ad valorem.* 
13 L Drainage pipes and tiles, 20 per cent, ad valyrem, 
132, Earthen flooring and garden -tjks, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
183 Eartlienware, stoneware, and brown wtire, 20 per cent, ad valorem^* 

134. Filters, 20 per cent, ad valoj'evt. 

135. Fireclay, ground, and ftroolay goods, 20 per cent, ad valarevi, 

136. Glass, crown, sheet, and common window, 29. the 100 superficial feet.* 

137. Glassware ; also plate glass, and glass poiii^hed, coloured, and other kiods, 

n.o.e. ; globes and chimneys for lamps, 20 per cent, ad valorem,* 

138. Lamps, lanterns, and lampwick, 20 per cent, ad valorem.' 

139. Plate-glass, beTellad or silvired ; mirrors and looking glasses, framed or tin 

framed, 25 per cent, ad valorem. 

Class X. — Fakcv Goods, Musical Inbtrumentb, etc. 

140. Artificial flies, 25 per cent, ad valorem. 

141 Oards, playing, 6i. per paok. 

142 Clocks, 20 per cent, ad valorem* 
14S Dressing- cases, 20 per cent, ad valorem 
144 Fancy goods, and toys, 20 per cant, ad valorem.* 

145. Fishing tackle, mcluding artificially baited hooki other than flies, 20 per 

per cent, ad valorem, 

146. Jewellery ; plate, gold or Hilverf : greenstone, cut or polished, 20 per o«Dt* 

ad valorem. 

• Such as iH of foreign prodtice or tui*nofiicture, «tihject to pvpforiMitlttl duty (see p, lU) 
i Plate, sold or aUver, if of foreign jirodnce or manufacture, subject to preferential 
doly(Bdep. 111). 



■ THK CUSTOM !i TAHIFF. 99 

^^^^BBpui la Ili6 pi«c« lor piofcure frftm6§, ooniic€s» or oeiJiogp, 15 p«c oe&t* 

U8. MuAicid iDsirumeou of all kinds n.o.e,, 20 per ceiit» a<i valorem,* 

14^. Oil, perfamed, 'X) per ceDi. ad vaioi4tn, 

150. Fapier-iD«43b6 ware* ^ per cent, ad valorem. 

151, Perfumery c.o.e.i 25 per eeni. o^^ ra^or^m. 

153* Perfumed spiriu &nd Cologne-wA&er, ^I lOd, tbe liquid galloo. 
153* Photographic goods u.o.e.f 20 per ceus. ad valorem, 

154. Pictures, painticgB, drawings, eogra?ing8| and photographB, framed or un> 
framed; picture or photograph frames aud mounts, 20 per cent, ad 

Fli.iedw&re, 20 per cent, ad Doloreni.t 

BteiUM, statue t tee, caits^ and bronset, 20 per cent, ad vaUyrnm. 
157. Tobacco pipes and caseSf cigar aod cigarette holders and oasen, cigarel ta 

papers and oasea, 35 per cent, ad vahrem. 
l^- " preparations n*o.e,, 25 per cent* ad valortm, 

V' *, 20 per cent, ad valorem, 

li> '. Y^ Aijkiiig' Sticks, 20 per cent, mi valorem. 

Cuiss XI. — Paper Manufactures and Stationeky. 

Calendars and show-cards, all kinds, 25 per cent, ad valorem, 

Caxdboard boxes complete, or cardboard cut and shaped for boxes (inoluding 
match-boxes), '25 per cent, ad valcMrem. 

Direotcriee ef New Zealand, or of any part thereof; also covers for direc- 
tories, 25 per cent, ad valorem. 

HandbiJls, programmes and ciioulars, playbills and printed posters, 20 per 
cent, ati valorem. 

Ink, frnting, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
'*'''■ Paper bags, coarse (including sugarbagp), 7s. 6d. (he owt. 

: aper bsgs n.o.e., 25 per cent, ad valorevt. 

I'uperhangings, 15 per cent, ad valorem. \ 
it/i. Paper, wrapping— tiz., blue candle, glazed cap, gUzed casings, tmall band, 

lumber hand, and tissue, 5s. the cwt t 
no. Paper, wrapping, other kinds, including brown, cartridge, and sugar papers^ 
5t. the owt.t 

171. Printed matter relating to patent or prcprietaty medicines; trade cata- 

toguffl, price-list«, and fashion-plates of the goods of firms or persons in 
the colony, 25 per cent, ad valorem, 

172. Stationery and writing paper n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valorem, 

ltd. Stationery, manufactnrea— viz., account- books; manuscript books; bill- 
bead, invoice, and statement forms; printed or ruled paper; counter- 
bcoks; cheque and draft forms; tags; labels; blotting pads ; sketoh- 
bocks. book covers; copyirg letter- books ; manifold writers; albums 
(other iban for photographs); diaries; birth day -books ; plain or (aint- 
iined ruled books ; printed window- tickets ; (rinied, lithographed, or em- 
bomd ataiioneiy; and Christmas, New Year, birthday, and Easter cards 
and bcoklets, 25 per cent, ad valorem, 

171. Stereotypes and matrices, 25 per cent, ad valorem. 

CLASfi XIL^Manufactureb of Metal. 
175. Bicyclot, trioycieii, and the like vehicks; also finished or partly finished or 

machined parts of same, n.o.e., including wcldless steel tubing cut to 

short lengths, 20 per oent. ad valorem,] 
\l*j. Boilers, land and marine, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

I'T Brass cocks, valvf s, unions, lubricators, and whistles, 20 per oeol. ad i*alorem* 
i7H Brass manufactures n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valorem, 
in. Oftrtriagei (shot), 10 io 24 bore, la. 6d. the 100. 



• |*t»ii(iM. If of rorofgn mannfat^ttire. ar*? Mul>ifet to preferential duty (see p. Ill) 

lttu«li mm iBOl forv^u prodtieti^ or iiiMaufacture, sabject to prelerentul duiy (see p. lltip 



390j6g 



i 



100 



NKW SBALAND OmCUL TBAK-BOOS. 



180. 
181. 
182, 
183. 
184. 
185. 
1S6. 
187. 

IBS. 

189. 
190. 
191. 

192 

193. 
191. 

195 

196. 
197. 
198. 

199. 

aoo. 

201. 



9ia. 



S23. 



Cartridge cases, 9d. the 100. 

CartridgeB ti.o.e.. 20 per cent, ad valortm, 

Casir registering maohiiiea, 10 per cent, ad vahr^m. 

CofHa-f urnitura, 20 per oent. aa valorem. 

CompoBHion piping, Sa. Gd. the cwi. 

Copper mariufaoturea n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

Oopytng prosseB, 1^ per cbdI. ad valoretn, 

Crab-wiuobes, crattes n.o.e., capstans, and wiodlasaeB, 20 per oent. ad 

valorem, 
Outlery, 20 per cent, ad valorem* 
Firearm <(, all kinda, 20 per cent, ad valorem.* 
Galvanised iron manufactures n.o.e., 25 per cent. a<2 valorem, 
Qasometers, and otber apparatus for producmg g^s ; also gas-meters, 10 per 

cent, ad valorem. 
Gaspipes, iron, 5 per cent, ad valorem. 

Hardware, ironmongery, and holloware, 20 per cent, ad valorem.' 
Iron bridges, and iron material n.o.e. for tbe coastruction of bridges, 

wbarves, jetties, or patent sUpa, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
Iron columna for builaings, and otber structural ironwork, 20 per cent* ai 

valorem • 
Iron doors for safes and Vftults, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
Iron galviknised corrugated sheets, screws, and nalli, 2it. per owt. 
Iron galvanised tiles, ridging, guttering^ and spouting, 20 per cent* td 

valor ein. 
Iron gates and gate-posts, staples, standards, straining posts and apparatus, 

20 per cent, ad valorem* 
Iron nails, 23, per cwt.* 
Iron pipes, and fittings for same, inoluding main-cocks, 5 per cent* ad 

valorem.* 
Iron, plain galvanised sheet and^hoap, la. Gd. the cwL 
Iron tanks, exceeding 200 gallons an i not exceeding 400 gallons, 10s. eaob. 
Iron tanks of and under 200 gallons. 53. each. 
Iron work emd wire work, 20 per cent, aii valoretn. 
Japanned and lacquered metal ware, 25 per cent, ad valorem. 
Lawn-mowers, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
Lead, in abcets. Is. 6d. tbe cwt. 
Lead piping, 38. 6d. the owt. 
Machinery n.o.e., 20 per cent.oii valorem* 
Machinerj, electric^ and appliances, 10 per cent, ad valorem. 
Machinery for flour-mills, woollen mills, paper-mills, rope and twine 

making, dredging, saw-milling, plaiing, oil refining, boring; and also 

machinery for refrigerating or preserving meat, leather-splitting ma- 

ohinee and band-knives for same, 5 per cent, ad valorem. 
Manufacturer, n.o.e., of metal, or of metal in combination with any othat 

materia], 20 per oent. ad valorem. 
Nails n.o.e., da. tbe ewt. 

Printing machines and presses, 5 per cent, ad valorem. 
Pumps and other apparatus lor raising water n.o.e*, 20 per cent, ad 

valorem* 
Railway and trainway plant and materials n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
Sad-irons, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
Shot, 10a. the cwt. 
Soda-water machines; also, maohines for aerating liquids, 5 per oent. ad 

valoi'em. 
Steam-engines and parts of fiteam- engines n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
Steam-engines, and parts thereof, including the boiler or boilers therefor, 

imported sp^oiallj for mining or gold-saving purposes and processes, or for 

dairying ptirpoaes, 5 per cent, ai valorem. 
Tinwar<5, and timmitbs* f iirniture n.o.e.. 23 per oBn'. a i vtlorem 



i 



*Suith Msis oftoceiga produf^e or mban raetare, vubjeoc toprefereutl«l diityCwe p. lU)* 



THE CUSTOMS TARIFF. 101 

324. Wa*«r«rork8 pipes, iron, 5 per oent. (id valorem. 

2ij Weighbridges and weighing-machines, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

226. Wire mattresses and webbing, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

2*27. Zinc tiles, ridging, guttering, piping, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

228. Zinc manufactures n.o.e., 25 per oent. ak valorem. 

CliASB XIII. — TiMBBR, AND ARTICLES MADE FROM TiMBER. 

229. Bellows, other than forge, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

230. Blocks, wooden tackle, 20 per oent. ad valorem. 

231. Buckets and tubs, of wood, 20 percent, ai valorem. 

232. Carriages, carts, drays, wagjns, and parambula^iors, and wheels for the 

same, 20 per oent. ad valorem. * 
2:33. Carriage shafts, spokes, and felloes, dressed ; bent carriaga timber n.o.e., 

20 per cent, ad valorem, 
2M. Djors, glazed with ornamental glass, 48. each. 
23-i. Doors, plain, 2d. each. 

236. Sashes, glazed with ornamental glass, 49. the pair. 

237. Sashes, plain, 2^. the pair. 
23d. Timber, palings, 2d. the 100. 
2^39. Timber, posts, 8 1. the 100. 
240. Timber, rails, 4^. the 100. 

211. Timber, sawn, dressed, 4$. the 100ft superficial. 
242. Timber, sawn, rough, 2ii. the 100 ft. superficial. 
343. Timber, shingles and laths, 2s. the 1,000. 

244. Woodenware and turnery n.o.e, and veneers, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

Class XIV. — Oils, Paints, etc. 

245. Axle-grease, and other solid lubricants, 20 per cent, ad valorem, 

146. Samess oil and composition, and leather dressiag, 20 par cent, ad valorem, 

247. Naphtha, 6i. the gallon. 

24S. Oil, linseed, 61. the gallon. 

249. Oil, mineral, including shale* waste or unrefined mineral-oil n.o.e., 6d. the 

gallon. 

250. Oil n.o.e., 63. the gallon. 

251. Oil olive, in bulk, 6d. the gallon. 

252. Oil vegetable, in bulk, n.o.e., 6d. the gallon. 

253. Oil vegetable or other, in bottle, 15 per cent, ad valorem. 

•I'A Pdkmts and colours ground in oil or turpentine, 2-i. 6d. the cwt. 

255. Paints and colours mixed ready for use, 5s. the owt. 

2.76. Patty, 28. the cwt. 

2.57. Stearine, l^d. the lb. 

258. Stearin) for match-making, f d. the lb. 

-259. Varnish ; enamel paints ; gold size, 28. the gallon. 

-260. Whiting and chalk. Is. the cwt. 

Class XV. — Agricultural and Farm Products, etc. 

201. Animals, food for, of all kin5s, n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valorem. 

262. Cattle (homed), lOs. each. 

263. Chaff, £1 the ton. 

264. Grain— namely, barley, 2s. the 100 lb. 

2r*5. Grain and pulse of every kind n.o.e., 9d. the 100 lb. 

266. Grain and pulse of every kind, when ground or in any way manufactured, 

D.o.e., Is. the 100 lb. 
'267. Horses, £1 each. 

268. Linseed, £1 the ton. 

269. Maise,9d. the 1001b. 



* Socb as Is of tofign prodace ormtaafActare, subject to preferential duly i^s^e vAV\^. 



MBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK. 



270. Ooione. £1 the toD. 

271. Prepared otkUmetkl, £1 5s. the ton. 



279, 
273. 
274. 
276. 
276. 
277. 
278. 
279. 

280. 

281, 
282. 
28.3, 
284. 
285. 
380. 
287. 

288. 

289. 



I 



300. 
801. 
d02. 
803. 
304. 




Class XVI. — Miscbllai^eocs. 
Bags, floyr, 20 per oent. ad valorem, 

Bftgs, calico^ (orfor, hessian, And linen » 20 p«r oent ad valorem. 
Bagging and bags n.o.e., 15 per cent, ad valorem. 
Blacking and boot-glossi 20 per oeoi. ad valorem, 
Blacklead, 20 per cent* ad valorem. 
Blue, 2d. Ibe lb 

Brooms, brusbee, and broBhware. n.o.e., 25 per cent, ad valorem, 
BruabeSf bair, and oombs; toil«t, oloibes, and bat bruebGB, 20 per cent, ad 

valorem, 
GandJefl, Id. ibe lb. or package of tbat repuUd weight, and so in proportioo 

lor packages of greater or less reputed weigbt* 
Cement, 2s. tb© barrel,* 

Cordage and rope, n.o.e., 20 per oent. ad valorem,* 
Cork* cut, includttig butige, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
Fireworks n.o.e., 20 per cent, ad valorttn. 
Flock, 10 per cent, ad valorein. 
Glue and size, Ijd. the lb. 
Granite, aawn on not more than two aides, and not dressed or poliabed, 

5 per cent, ad valorem. 
Marble, granite, and other stone, drensed or polished, and articles made 

therefrom, including mantelpieocs, 25 per oent. ad valorem. 
Matches — 

Wooden, in boxf b containing not more than GO matches, la. the gross of 
boxes. 

In boxes containing over GO and not more than 100 matches, 2s^ Ibe 

gross of boxes. 
Id boxes ooDtaining more than 100 matobes, for every 100 matches 
or fraction thereof contained in one box, 2^, the gross of boxes. 
Wax^ *' plaid vestas " in cardboard boxes containing under 100 matches^ 
Is, the gross of boxes. 
*'' Pocket vestas *' in tin or other boxes contatQing under 100 matohfls, 

Is. 4d. the gross of bc»xeE. 
** Sportsman's," *' Ovale," and **No. 4 tin vestas,*' in boxes contain- 
ing not more than 20O matches, 4a. 6d, the gross of boxes. 
Wax, other kinds, for every 100 matches or fraction thereof contained 
in one box, 2s. 3d. the gross of boxes. 
Nets and netting, 20 per cent, ad valorem, 
ParafiB^n wax, |d. the lb. 
Powder, sporting, 6d. the lb. 

Sacks, other than oornsaoks and jute sacks, 15 per oent. ad valorem. 
Sausage ekine and casings (including brine or salt), 3d. the lb* 
Soap, common yellow, and blue mottled, 5s. the owt. 
Soap, n.o.e., 25 per cent, ad valorem. 

Soap- powder, extract of soap, dry soap, and soft-soap, 20 per oent. ad poktntm* 
Spirits, methylated, Is, the liquid g&Uon, 
Spirits, eleared from warehouse, methylated, under prescribed oonditioDi, 

6d* the liquid gallon. 
Starob, 2d. the lb. 

Tarpaulins, tents, rick and wagon covers, 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
Twine n.o,e., 20 per cent, ad valorem. 
Washing- powder, 20 per cent, ctd valorem. 
Wax, mineral, vegetable, and Japanese, l^d. the lb. 

In addition to any duty chargeable by law on any goods imported into . 

colony, a further duty of 20 per cent, ad valorem ahaU be charged 
when the goods are prison-made. 



* Suoli as is of loreigQ pruduti« or laaaaf&ctof e, subjeot lo prslersoUal duty (see p, lilU 



THE CUBTOM6 TAHIFF, 



108 



TABLE OF EXEMPTIONS FROM DUTIES OF CUSTOMS. 

Ci*Ass I. — Foods, etc* 

Names of Arti£U$, 

KB. Almonds, Burbary, BSoiJy, and French, used in ooafeoUoDers' manufacinr^i. 

tOL Aoohoviefl, salted, in oaaks. 

SOT. Arrowroot. tagOf Upioca, macaroni, vermiceHi, and prepared groau, 

306. Salt. 

300. Rtce. dressed or undressed. 

310. Rioe muiafacfeared into starch in bond. 



I 



Class IV, — Non-alcohouc Bkvebaoeb, etc. 



Cocoa-beann, 
CofiEee, raw. 



Ci«ass V. — Drugs, etc. 



818* 



315. 
316. 



3IT. 
318. 

319. 



324. 



Aeldfi — Tis, : boraoic; Garbolio» in bulk ; 6aorio; mariatic ; nitrio; oxalic; 
oleic; picrio ; pyrogallio; salioylto ; sulphuric. 

Concentrated extracts or esseocea in liquid form or preserved in fat for per- 
fume-man ufaoturio g pur poses in manufacturing warehouses, in bottles of 
not less than 1 lb. id weight. 

Disinfectants, 

Drugs and chemicals— viz : alum ; sulphate of alamiaium ; sulphate of 
ammonia; anbydrou^t ammonia; aniliQe dyes; ar.-tenic ; bluestone, or 
sulphate of copper; borax; catechu; chloride of calcium; nitrate of 
silTer ; cochineal; creosote, crude or commercial; glycerine, crude; 
gum, arabio aad tragaoanth ; gum benzoin ; artificial gum arabic ; gum 
damar; phosphorus; potash, caustio potash, and chlorate of potash; 
pearlash; prussiateof potash ; cyanide of potassium ; cy&ntde of sodium ; 
liquid chlorine ; sal-ammoniac ; saltpetre; acetate of soda, crude ; soda- 
aah: oaustie ioda; nitrate of soda; silicate of soda; sulphate of soda; 
sulphide of sodium; hyposulphite of soiium ; strychnine; sulphur; 
chloride of zinc ; iron sulphates ; gall-nuts; turmeric; s^dron ; nitrous- 
oxide gas ; tree-washes ; insecticides ; maUtne ; chlorodyne, ^ 

BvseotiaT oiU, except eucalyptus ; ood-liver oil ; oil of rhodium. 

Horse drenches. 

Medicinal barki, leaves, berbs, flowerif roots and gums. 

Scfub-exterminafeor. 

^heep'dip; sheep-drenohea ; sheep licks. 

-argical and dental instruments and appliances.* 

Scientific and assay balances, retorts, flasks, and othet appliances for 
chemical analysis and asgay work. 

Water- hardening chemicals for brewers' use. 



Class VL — Clothing and Textiles, 

dS$. Aoeoutrements for military purposes, excepting uniform olothiug^f 

8^. Brace^elastic and brace-mountings. 

88T. Bunting, in the piece. 

SiS. Batter- and cheese cloth. 

339. Buttons, Upefl, wadding, pins* needles. 

330. O^iico, white and grey, also cotton sheetings, in the piece. 



* If of fofTfign manuUeture, subject to dutr (see p. 119). 

t BBbJeoc to Ihe provt-^ionfl of eeetlon 28 of ^' The Defc>nce Act. 1900," as follows :— 

Equipifneiit* to be admit ttnl fres of Cu»tom» Duty, 
*fiL All lUiUtary clothing, saddlerx, and eciujpmoati} imported inio the oolony for the 
teft4/bltf use nf n Volunreer corps aball, on the certificAte iu writing of the liiluVK^eT ol 
Oifeoee Ouit the tamo u-e or hmre ^eeo tea ported tot ecioh purpose, bfs a^m^Ued \u%o t>\i« 
•otosf fnpe of Ca0»om0 datr- " 



iiittl. 



104 



NBW ZEALAND OPPICIAL TEAR-BOOK. 



331. 
332. 
333. 



33i. 
335. 
336, 



337, 
338. 
339. 



340. 
341 

342. 
343. 
344. 

345. 



846. 



347, 
348. 



Gordisroy, molec'kin, and plain beaver ekin, of cottoD, in ibd piece. 

Coloured cotton shirtings; HaDnelette shirtingo.* 

Forfar, dowla')> and 3aic BfaeettDg, when cut up under svipervision in sizes 
not exceiding 47 in. x 36 in. (or makisg fionrbag^, and not exoeedii>g 
54 in. for linirg wool mats. 

Fur-sklna, green or sun dj-ied. 

Gold or silver laoe or braid for military olotbing. 

Hatmakers' materials— viz. : (tilk pJu»b ; felt hoods; sbellao; gaUoona; 
oalicoee; s pale hoards for hat-boxes; leathers and linings; blocks; 
moulds; frames; ventilators; and tassels. 

Hessians, plain or striped, and scrini, 

Leather-oloth. 

Minor article!) (required in the making up of apparel ^ hoots, staoeB, hat^, 
caps, saddlerj, umbrellas, parasob, and sunshades), enumerated in any 
order of the Commissioner, and published in the QatetU. 

Sailcloth » canvas, and unbleached double- warped duck, in the piece. f 

Sewing cottons, silks, and threads; crochet, darning, and knittiog oottose; 
angola mendings not exceeding 45 yards, on cards. 

Silk for Hour- dressing. 

Silk twist (shoemakers* and saddlers^). 

Staymakers* bindings eyt ]etf«, corset-fasteners, jean, ticks, lasting, sateeii, 
and CO tell. 

Tailors^ trimmings— viz. : plain-ODloured imitation hair-clolh ; cacyas ; 
plain Vtrona and plain diai;onal, and such patterns of checked ItaHan 
cloth aa may be approved of by the Commissioner of Customs ; Italian 
cloth of cotton or wool; buckram ; Wftdding and padding; silk, worsted, 
and cotton bindings and braids; staybindings; Russia braids ; shoulder- 
pads; buckles; silesias; drab, slate, and brown jeans; pocketiDga; 
slate, black, and brown dyed unions and linens. 

Umbielta makers' matGrials-- viz.: teverEibie and levauiine silk mixtUKB, 
gloria, and sa.tin de cfa^ne cf not less than 44 in. in width ; alpaca cloth, 
with border; zanella cloth, with border; also other piece goods on such 
conditions as the Commissioner may approve ; sticks, runners, notches, 
oapp, ferrules, cups, riba, stretchers, tips, and rings. 

Union shirtings the invoice value of which does not exceed 6d. the yard.* 

Waterproof material in the piece. 



349. 
350. 



351. 
352. 
353. 
354. 
355. 
356. 
357. 
356. 

359. 



Class VII. — Leather, and Articles used in Leatbsb 

Manufactures. 
Boot elastic. 
Bootmakers' linings, canvass, plain or coloured, bag and porimante 

linings, of such materials, qualities, and patterns as may be approved 

the Commissioner. 
Boots, shoes, and slippers— viz., children's, No. to 3. 
Cork soles, and sock soke. 

East India kip, crust or rough-tanned, but undressed. 
Goatiikins, crust or rough- tanned, but undressed. 
Grindery, except heeU and toe plates. 
Hogskins. 

Kangaroo-, wallabi-skins, undressed. 
Leather, japanned or enamelled ; goatskins, dressed as moroooo, eoloured 

(ether than black). 
Saddle-trees. 



* l^henever any dFipute luriset &■» to the applic&tion of the exemption In favoor of 
coloured eottoa. flRDDelette, or ncion £birtin^i>, m the e&se or fabiicK alleged to be tueh 
shixtingfl, the Commiisfilaner lias |»ower to decide such diepute: and m caie of doubt oq 
his part, be may require itae fftbriG in diripute" to bo cut up for fthirt-tnaking, under stich 
oooditioni oe he prescribee. iSee iectiouO of " Tbe Customs sod Eicise Duties Act. lf)0,S."k 

f If of foreign mannfacture. subject to duty (see p lU). 



THE CUSTOMS TABIFF. 



100 



10a SJLdiler*' ironmongery (except bits uid stirrup irons), hames, and moanU 
for harness ; etcatning, eurcingle, brace, girth, and roller woba ; ooUar- 
check, and (be same article plain, of sucb quality as may be approved by 
the Comoiiasioner ; legging- buckles. 

861. Tiffining materiaU, crude. 1 

Class VIII, — Furniture, btc. 1 

3GS. Blind webbing and tape. 

3^. Upholsterers* webbing, hair aeatiag, imitation hairseating ; ourled baif; 
gtmp add cord of wool, cotton, or silk ; tufta, and studs. 

Class IX.— China, Glass, etc. 

3&I. BoltUs, empty, plain glass, not being cut or ground; also, jars up to 3 in. 
in diameter at the moutb. 

365, G\m,§s platcij (engraved) for photo- lithographic work, 

366 Jars or other dutiable vesseU, containing free goods or goads subject to a 
Axed rate of duty, and being ordinary trade packages for the goods con- 
tained in them. 

Class X. — Fancy Goods, etc. ' 

367. Aelion work and keys, in frames or otherwise, for manufaoture of orga^^j, 

harmoniums, and pianos ; organ pipes and stop-knobs. 
866. Artists' caivas, coloura, bruBhes, and palette knives. . 

869 UagiC'lan&ems, lenses, and slides. 1 

3T0. Micrcscopas ajid astronomical telescopsH, and lenses for same. 

871. Musical instruments, specially imported for Volunteer bands. 

872, Paintings, statuary, and works of art, preaented to or imported by any 

public institution or art association registered as a holy corporate, for 
display in the buiidingit of such institution or association, and not to be 
•old or otherwise disposed of. 

87^ Photographic cameras and lenees. 

'V. ■ k^raphs of personal friends in letters or packets. I 

lis itones, out or uncut and unmounted 

i;t. .^euAiMzed surfaces lor photographic purposes. 

Class XL— Papeh, ktc. 

377. Bookbiiid«rs' materials— vis., cloth, leather, thread, headbanda webbing, 

end-papers, tacketing-gut, marbling- colours, marble- paper, blue paste for 
ruling ink, staple preisoa, wire staples, staple-sticks. 

378. Butter-paper, known a<) parchment paper or waxed paper. 

879. Cardooari and pasteboard, of sizes not lesi than that known as " royal." 

830. Cardbo&rd boxes, material for— viz., gold and silver paper, plain and em- 
bossed, gelatine and coloured papers, known as " box papers." 

881. Cartridge-paper for drawing -book 6. { 

683. Cloth-lined boards, not less than ** royal." 

666. Cloth lined papers, enamelled paper; ivorite and gelatine ; metallic paper; 
not lees than 'Memy." 

864, Copy>books and drawing- books. 

665. Copying paper, medium and double foolscap, in origin&l mill wrappers and 
labels, 

686 Hand made oheqae-paper« *| 

687. Ink, printing. 

688. Masticated para, 

660. Millboard* and bookbinders* leather-board. 

690. Paper, band-made or machine-made book or writing, of ^intn not less than 

the size known as *' demy," when in original wrappers. 
691 Fnntingpaper.* 

693. Printed books, papers, and music, n.o.e, 
693. School tiatos, and edocational apparatus. 



• if of foreign jzraoii/a<)£ore, subjecl to duly ^se^ p. 111% 



106 



NBW SEAL. AND OFFICIAL T^Ali BOOK. 



Ci*ABS XII,— Metals. 

394. All m&obiuery for ftg^ricultural purpo&eB, inoludiDg chiifT cutters, corn* 
ortiBherB ; Gor&'Shellerfii Also articles used in manufivotunttg the aame— 
viz., ohaf! > ouUing knives, tilt - rakes, fittinga for tbreshing - millB. 
forgiDgs for plough*". 

305. AM agriouUural impiementfi. 

$96. All bolts vLud Duts, bl&Dk or screwed nuts, black or finished outs, 

397. Anobors. 

396. ArtiQcerB* tools. 

399. A%G& and batohets; spades^ shovels, and brks pioks ; matioein ; qu&rti 

and knapping hammers ; scjthea^ iheep shears, reaping-hooks ; soldering- 
irons; paperbangers* acissors ; butchers' sawa and oleavers. 

400. Axlen, axle-arms and boxes. 

401. Band-saws and folding saws, including frames, 

402. Bellows- nails. 

403. Bicycles and trioycles, fittings for — Tiz., rubber tires, pneumatic ttrea, out- 

side covers, and inner tubes; rubber and cork handles, and pedal- 
rubbers ; also drop-forglnga and stampings, ball-bearings, weldlesa sleel 
tube in full leiigthst rima, forks, and spokes, in the rough. * 

401, Blaoksmitha' an vile, forges, aad fans. 

4C.5. Blowers, 

406. Brass and copper, in pigs, bars, tubes, or sheets. 

407. Brass tubing and stamped work, in the cough, for gasaliera and bracketft. 
406, Caps, percussion 

409. Card' cloth itig for woollen-mills. 

410. Chain pulleys, and chains for same. 

411. Chains, trace and plough chains; or metal articles required to repaii or 

complete riding or driving harness or saddlery to be repaired or made io 
the colony. 

412. Ghamfetiog. crozing and bowellirg machine for cask-mskiog. 

413. Copper and composition, rod, bolts, sheathing, and nails, 

414. Couch roll jackets, machine- wires, beater-bars, and stralner-platee for 

paper mills. 

415. Cfuciblts. 

416. Emery-grinding machines and emery-wheels. 

417. Empty iron drums, not exceeding 10 gallons capacity. 

418. Engineers', boilermakers', brass iinishers', smiths*, and alt metal- and wood- 

workers*^ machine and hand tools, 

419. Engine governors. 

420. Eyelets. 

421. Fire-engines, including Merry weather's chemical fJre-engioea, 

422. Fish-hooks. 

423. Galvanising baths, welded. 

424. Gas eogineg and hammers, and oiUengines,* 

425. GlasBmakors' moulds. 

426. Hydraulic cranes, 

427. Iron^ and brass- wove wire and wire gause ; also wire netting, _ 
426. Iron boiler-plates and unfianged end-plates tor boilers; boiler-tnb«8 not ei- 

ceeding 6 in, in diameter, and unflanged ; Bowling^ expansion rings; 
furnace- Hues. 

429. Iron, plain black sheet, rod,bolt| bar» plate/ hoop, and pjg.f 

430. Iron rolled girders. 

431. Iron plates, screws, and castings for ships, 

432. Iron wire n,o.e., including fencing-wire, plain and barbed, 

433. Ltead, in pigs and bars. 

434. L:>com olives. 

435. Machine ftaws. 



* If of foreign mauafntiture, subject to duty leee p, ill)., 
t Hoop aad pig iron notoflooted by preferential tariff. 



THE CUSTOMS TARIFF. 107 

i36. Mftchinery exolosnely for tiie parpose of the m»Dufeu3tare of beet-rooi 
■agar. 

437. Maobinery for dairying purpoaes. 

438. Machinery of every desoription for mining purposes, inoluding machine 

pomps, bat not inolading machinery for dredging. 

439. Machinery for gold-sanng parposes and processes. 

440. Metal fittings for tranks, portmanteaux, travelling-bags, leggings, bags, and 

satchels. 

441. Metal sheaves for blocks. 

442. Metallic capsules. 

443. Perambulators and the like vehicles, fittings for, n.o.e. 

444. Perforated or cellular sheet zinc or iron. 

445. Portable engines on four or any greater number of wheels, with boiler of 

locomotive type ; also traction-engines. 

446. Printing type and materials n.o.e. 

447. Rails for railways and tramways.* 

448. Reapers and binders, and reaping and mowing machines, and extra parts 

for same ; materials for manufacturing agricultural machinery, namely, 
reaper-knife sections, fingers, brass and steel springs, malleable castings, 
discs for harrows, mould- boards and plough- shares, mould- board plates, 
and steel share-plates cut to pattern, skeith-plates ; ploughs and harrows ; 
combined threshers. 

449. Riddles and sieves. 
450 Rivets and washers. 

451. Separators and coolers for dairying purposes. 

452. Set-screws, engineers* studs, and split-pins. 
45.3. Sewing, knitting, and kilting machines. 

454. Spiral springs (except sofa and mattress springs). 

455. Steam and hydraulic pressure and vacuum gauges. 

456. Steel rami, black or finished, for hydraulic cranes or jiggers. 

457. Surveyors' steel bands and measuring-tapes. 
4&9. Swords. 

4.0U. Tacks of all kinds. 

460. Tea- packing lead. 

461. Tin, in pigs, bars, or sheets. 

162. Tinsmiths' fittings, including stamped or blocked tin, planished or un- 

planished. 
i()6. Tins, tops of, ornamented. 

464. Welded and flanged boiler-fumaces, plain or corrugated. 
4t>5. Wire, of brass, copper, or lead. 
406. Zinc, plain sheet. 
467. Zinc plates and copper plates for photolithographic work. 

Glass XIII. — Timbek, etc. 

168. Ash, hickory, and lancewood timber, un wrought. 

469. Blacksmiths' bellows. 

470. Brush woodware. 

471. Carriage and cart shafts, spokes and felloes in the rough ; hubs, all kinds; 

poles if unbent and unplaned, all kinds ; bent wheelrims. 

472. Carriage and cart makers' materials— viz. : springs, mountings, trimmings, 

brass hinges, tire-bolts, shackle-holders, step treads, and other iron 
fittings (except steps, lamp-irons, dash- irons, seat rails, and fifth wheels), 
rubber-cloth. 
47.3. Chums. 

474. Lignum-vitse. 

475. Sieves, hair. 

(T'*^ Wooden handles for tools. 

*Se6 preferential tariff, p. 111. 



108 



2ffBW S£ALAN£> OFFICIAL flAB-fiOOE. 



Cla&s XIV, — Oils, etc. 

477. Beosine in bulk. 

478. Oils— viz. : caDdlenut, fish, kerosftue^ penguin » palm, se&l, wh&le. 

479. PiitDtii i^nd oolours n.o.e. 

480< Sh&le oil, once run. suitable for gMm&king. 
48 L Spttitsof int. 

482. TarfreDtiQe, drierSf and terebene. 

Class XV. — Miscellaneous. 

483. Apparalus and appll&noes solely tut teaching purposes, as may be approved 

by the ComtniBsioner. 

484. Bags made of New Zealand tow oi ^ax, 
465. Belting for maobincry, other than leather. 

486. Binder twine. 

487. Bricks, other than fire-bricks, 

488. Building maierials n.o.e. 

489. Brushes for oream-fioparatocs and combined screens. 
4D0. Cat dit- nuts and candlenut keruels. 

491. Candle wick. 

492. Canvas aprons and elevators for reapers aod biuders. 
493* Carpenters' bai^kttii. 

494. Charts and maps, 

495. Gonfeciioncra' moulding starch. 
49C. CottoD waeLe, 

497. Dye siuf!s and dyeing materials, crude. 

498. Felt sheath ng. 

499. Food preservAtive n.o.e. 
aoo. Gam boots.* 

501. Hawsers of liin. aod over. 

502. Honey and brown Windsor soap oompositjon. 

503. Iron and steel cordage/ 

504. Jute bnggiiJg, bags, and sacks, 

505. Manures. 

506. Marble, and other stone, hewn or rough sawn, not dressed or polished. 

507. Keimakers' cotton twine. 

50d> Official supplies for consular oflicers of countries where a eimilar ezemptioo 
exlbts m fervour of British Consuls, 

509. Papermakers' feltB, 

510. Passengers' baggage and elTect?, including only weatiDg<appar<fI aod other 

persona! lileots that have been worn or ate in use by persons arriving in 

the colony : ilIijo iinplementiip matrumentSi and tools of trade, occupa- 

tioD, or employment of such peraooB ; and household or other electa cot 

H exceeding £lO0 in value, which have been in use for twelve months prit r 

B to embaikatioD by the persons or families bringing them to the ooloo) \ 

m and tiot intended for any othi^r person or persons or for Eale f ; also cabin^ 

furnishings belooging to such persons, 

51 L Plaster oi Pat is. 

512. Powder, blasting and meal. 

513. Ship- chandlery n.o.e. 

514. Ships' rockets, blue lights, and danger- signals. 

515. Stones, mill- grinds oil- and whet-. 

516. Tobacco for sheepwash or for insecticide, after being rendered unfit for 

human oouBumption to the satiBfaction of the Commissioner. 

517. Treacle or molasses, mixed with bo ue- black io proportions to the 

faction of the Commisiiioner. 

518. Tubular woven cotton-cloth io the piece, for meat wiaps. 

519. TypewritErs. 



* If of titvkiigu tnanufnGiiJi 0, subject to duty (b«o p. 111^ 

{ iQcluii'Ug bicycles wbich have been iu use Cor twelve minths. 



THE CUSTOMS TAKIFF, 



109 



'590. Wax, bottling. 

[521. Wool packs Aod wool pockets. 

I 522. Y&TD — vis. : ecir, flax, bemp. 

I 523. Aitioles u.d materiAls (&b may from time to time be ipeotfied by the Com- 
missioEfr) which are suited only for, and are to be used solely roi 
t^e fabrication of goods within the colony. All decisions ol the Com* 
mieeioncr in reference to artiotes so admitted free to be published from 
lime to time in the QaittU. 
Aod all articles not otherwise enumerated. 



TABLE OP EXCISE DUTIES. 
[ 525. Tobacco, Is. the lb.* 
I 596. Cigars, cigarette^ and snufT, Is. 6d. the lb.* 

597. Beet, 3d. the gallon, 

598. Articles in which spirit is a necessary ingredient, manufactured in a ware-<- 
houae appointed under section 26 of **The Cuatoma Laws Oonaolidatlutifl 
Aot, 1882," namely^ 

Tinctures, essenoee, extracts, and medicinal spirits of any recognised 
pharmacopoeia conlaining more than 50 per cent, of proof spirit, 
9d. the lb. 

Tinctures, eaeeoces, extracts, and medicinal spirits of any recognised i 
pbarmacopceia containing les* than 50 per cent, of proof spirit, 3dJ" 
the lb. 

Culinary and Havouring essences, 12s. the liquid gallon » from 1st Feb- 
ruary» 1896, 

Perfumed spirit, 203, the liquid gallon, from Ist February, 1896. 

Toilet preparations which are subject to 16s, the liquid gallon on im- 
portation, r2s. the liquid gallon. 

Toilet preparations which are subject to 25 per cent, duty ou impotta- 
tion, 68. the liquid gallon. 



DUTIES IMPOSED BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR UNDER 
SECTION 17 OF '*THE CUSTOMS AND EXCISE DUTIES ACT* 

529, OUve-t tones, ground (see New Zealand Gatette, loth May, 1890), 4d. the Ib^ 

530. Brewers' caramel (see New Zealmui OaittU, 2l8t August, 1890), Sd. the lb. 
r531. Liquid heps (see New Zealand QastUe, Slat December, 1693), 6e. the lb. 

532. The United Asbe&tos Patent Salai^tander DecorationB {see New Zealand 

Qaiette, 14 th May, 1896), 15 per cent, ad valorem. 
Hatches of auy material other than wood or wax, a duty corresponding to 

the duty payable on wooden roatobes (see New Zealand Qaiettej 27th 

April, 1899). 
534. Fibre conduit pipes and fittings for same (see New Zealand OateUe, iih 

May, 1899), 5 per cent, ad val^yrem. 
585. Caramel c«real (see New Zealand QaueiU, 14tb March, 1901), |d. the lb* 



* '*Tti« Tobacoo Excise Dtiltes Acl, 3690." sectioo 2, enacts:— 

^**0& and after the thirty first day of Deoember, one cbotie&tid eight hundred tnd 

tf^it, cectiotj three of 'The Cmtoms sod Eiciie Dutk^i Act. 1861,' thall be deenied 

» repealed and in lien of the dutiei imposed by that Bcctiou there hIjaII bo levied, uol- 

-ji. aa4 ^aid, on and afttr that day, npon tobaoco manufactured in the colony, at the 

Ifffia of making the entry for home consumption thereof, (he eever&J duties of t^tcise 

~ UowiBg. Ibat i« to aajr — 

!Oiitobaooo . ... .,. ... ... One shilUng the pound. 

^D eltfarv and snuff ... .„ ... ... One ehilllug and aijcponce the poood. 



rdn ciljifmoe 

U toaoQfactured by machinery 
If made by hand ... 



Two Bhitlingfi and sixpence the pound. 
One shilling the pound." 



110 NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TSAR-BOOK. 

536. Gompo-board (see New Zealand QaactU^ 12th December, 1901), 4s. the 

100 fc. super. 

537. Leather-board or compo cut into shapes (see New Zealand OazetU, 20th 

AugURt, 1903). 4d. the lb. 

538. Gfeamalina (-lee New Zealand Gazette, 17th Sep^^mber, 1903), Id. the lb. 

539. Ground ooooa-sheHs (see New Zealand Gazette, 7(h January, 1904), 3d. the lb. 

540. Brunak (see New Zealand Gazetiee, 8th September, 1904), 3d. the lb. 

541. Tartaraliae, a substitate for oream of tartar (lee New Zealand OazetUt 

22nd Dacember, 1904), Id. the lb. 

542. Bush's Cream of Tartar Substitute (sec New Zeilaixd Gazette, 26th Jannarj, 

1905), Id. the lb. 



MODIFICATIONS. 
On and after Ist July, 1904, the Customs tariflf is modified in 
respect of the undermentioned articles imported into the Cook and 
other Islands within the extended boundaries of the colony : — 

CUret, 2s. the gallon (in lieu of 6s. the gallon). 
Horses, lOs. each (in lieu of £1 each). 

Drugs imported by missionary societies for dispensation among the Natives, 
free. 



OPIUM PROHIBITION. 
**The Opium Prohibition Act, 1901," makes it unlawful for any 
person to import opium into the colony in any form suitable for 
smoking. Permits may be issued by the Commissioner of Trade 
and Customs for the importation oi the drug in the following 
forms : — 

Opium, crude. 
Opium, in powder. 
Opium, extract of, solid. 

No permit shall be issued to any person of the Chinese race. 
Heavy penalties are prescribed for breaches of the above law. 

** The Opium Prohibition Act Amendment Act, 1902," makes it 
illegal to have opium in possession, except the kinds stated above, 
which can be held under permit. 



TIMBER EXPORT. 
" The Timber Export Act, 1901,*' authorised the collection, by 
Order in Council, of the following duties : — 

Schedule. 

Logs, round . . . . . . ( 38. per | Or such lesser duty as the 

Logs, squared with axe or saw. . \ 100 superficial I Governor by Order in 
Half logs . . ( feet. J Council determines. 



Flitches of any particular kind, 
or pieces of such size as the 
Qovernor by Order in Council 
from time to time determines 



Si. per 

100 superficial 

feet 



Or such lesser duty as the 
Governor by Order in 
Council determines. 



THE 0U6TOM8 TARIFF. 



Ill 



An Order in Council dated the 27th March, 1902, directs that there 
shall be levied, collected, and paid previous to exportation from 
New Zealand, duties upon white-pine and kahikatea timber as 
under : — 

Logs, round . . . . ds. per 100 auperfloial feet. 

Logs, cut in half 

LogP, squared with aze or saw, 10 in. by 10 in. or [ 
iU equivalent, or over . . j 

Flitchep, any width, and not exceeding 10 in. thick, 28. per 100 aaperfioial feet. 

A further Order in Council, dated 10th April, 1902, directs that 
duties on kauri timber shall be charged as under : — 
Logs, round . . . . Ss. per 100 superficial feec. 

Logs, cut in half 
Logs, squared with aze or saw. . 

^Wcrnew ':':'^'°^ ^}''' ^ ^!^^^ "!^ ^''''' '"'} 2«. Pe^ 100 superficial feet. 

** The Timber Export Duty Act, 1903," forms part of and is to 
be read with •' The Timber Export Act, 1901." The following 
duties may. by Order in Council,* be substituted for those in the 
Schedule to the last-named statute : — 



Logp, round . . 

Logs, squared with aze or saw . . 

Half logs .. 

Flitckes of any particular kind, 
or pieces of such size as the 
Governor by Order in Council 
from time to time determines 



SCHEDQLB. 

5s. per 

100 superficial 

feet 

Ss. per 

100 superficial 

feet 



Or such lesser duty as the 
Qoveruor by Order in 
Council determines. 

Or such lesser duty as the 
Grovcmor by Order in 
Council determines. 



" THE PREFERENTIAL AND RECIPROCAL TRADE ACT, 1903." 
The above Act forms part of and is to be read together with 
"The Customs Lftws Consolidation Act, 1882." Certain goods 
I enumerated in these Schedules) imported into New Zealand, not 
being the produce or manufacture of some part of the British 
dominions, are to be subject to duty or extra duties as set forth 
hereunder : — 

Abticlb named in First Schedule. 

(An additional daty equal to the amount payable under auy tariff (or the 
time beiug in force in New Zealand.) 
Cement. 

Abticlbs named in Second Schedule. 

(An additional duty equal to one-half of the amount payable under 
any tariff for the time being in foroe.) 

Basket and wicker ware, n.o.e., not being furniture. 

Bicycles, trioyclep, aiid the like vehicles; also finished or partly finished or 

machinea parts of same, n.o.e., including weldless steel tubing cut to short 

lengths. 
Boots, shoes, and slippers, n.o.e. ; goloshes, clogs, pattens, vamps, uppers, and 

laces. 
Candles. 



• No order yet issued. 



112 



MEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 



I 



Cafriages, carta, drays, wagms, and perambulatord« and wheels for same. 
Gbioa, porcelain, and pat i an ware. 

Cordage and rope, n,o.6. 

Cream of tartar. 

Earthenware, stoneware, and brownware. 

Fancy goods and toys. 

Firearms, all kinds. 

Fish, potted and preserved. 

Furniture and cabinet Wcire, n.o.e«, and other than iron. 

Glasa, crown, sheet, and c^jmmoa window, 

Glaaaware ; also plaie-gla^s, aod glasi poliahsd, coloareJ^ and other kindSt n.o.e. 

globes and cbimDeja for lamps. 
Hardware, iron moo gory, and hollo ware, 
Hops, 
Iron nails. 

IroQ pipas, and fittings Cor sama, inoluding myn-oocks. 
Lamps, lanteroi, and lamp-wiok. 
Musical matrnoifints — viz., pianos. 
PtiperhangiogR. 
Paper, wrapping— viz., blue candle, glazed cap, glared casings, small-hand, 

lumber-hani, and tisane. 
Paper, wrapping, o:ber kinds, including brjwn, cartridge* and eugar papers, 
Plate and pi it ed ware. 
Pumps and other apparatus for raising water, 

ARXrCLES NAMEl* IN THIBD SCHEDULE, 

(Daties equal to 20 p3r oentum of the valae for duty as defined by the 
principal Act, or by any Aet amendnig the principal Aot») 

Bioyeles aid tricyoles, fittings for— viz^, rubber tires, pneumatic tire?, outside 
covers, an^ inner tnb^s ; rubber and cork bandies, and peda i- rubbers ; also 
drop-forgiags and stampings, bUUbearings, wolilesa steel lube in fuil leuglhi, 
rims, forks, and spolces in the rough. 

Gis-engines aui hammers, and oil-anginai. 

Gum boots. 

Iron aid steel cordage. 

Iron, plain black sheet, rod, boll^ bar, and plate < 

Printing'paper,* 

Bvila for radwaya and tramways,! 

Sailcloth, canvas, and unbleached double warped duck. 

Surgical and dental instruments and appliancca. 

The Act also provides that from and after the Slat March, 
no doty shall be leviable ou tea grown io any part of the British 
dominions, except on tea in packets not exceeding one pound in 
weight, 

[The main features of the Act, including its provisions as to re- 
ciprocity of trade, will be found described in Part III, of this 
volume.] 



• No <iiity as above dwcribed is to be levied on prlnliiig-papers Imported by and foe 
the aie of the pr •priecora of any rogisteratl new^papor. if tc Is proved to Ibe B&tisfaeiloa 
of the Collector ttiA, they «rd imporied under a valid contract for tbesQiiply of such 
p&peri for a period no^ exceeding three ye^rs, eoteroi iuto prior to the 16tu No?embttr« 
1901 

t No preferential dutv will l>> loviod oa rails for tramw kys and other goods oieoUoned 
In the above Schedules directly imported before 3ifit March, 1906, for use Id the oonirruc- 
tlon or equipment of amy tramway for whmb plaaa an] spaclAaatioafl have been com - 
ploted or are ia course of preparatloa oa the passiiig of the Act 



k 





FEBS PAYABLE UNORR LAND TEAKSFEH ACT. 



FBES PAYABLE UNDER LAND THANSFER ACT. 

FAir48i^ TO District Lasd Rkoistrars under *• The Lakd TiiANsifeB 
Act. 1885/* 



r Ui« briQginif t^nd and or the proTUions of this Acb (over and above 

the co8t of advenigeineots) — 
When the title consists of » Crown grant, and none of the land 

included therein h&s bden dealt with 
Wnen the title is of any other desoription and the vatae exceeds 

£300 
When the title ia of any other description and ibe value esocadi 

£300 and docs not exceed £300 
Woen the title is of aoj other description and the value exceedn 

£100 and does not exceed £200 
Wnen the title is of any other descripUoo and when the Talus 

does not exoeed £100 

i9Dirit>atioii to the A^turance Fund upon first bring ng laid uuder 
ibe Aol,^ 
Is the pound sterling 



£ a, 

2 

1 
15 
10 
5 



For every application t j bring land under the Act 

Tot every oertifi'^^ate of title on transfer where the consideration 

does not exceel £100 
For every other certificate of title 
Regitiering memorandam of transfer* mortgage, incumbrance, or 

leaae 
Registering transfer or discharge of m rtgag^ or of incumbrance, 

or the transfer or surrender of a lease 
Registering proprietor of any estate or interest derived by settle 

ment or transmission 
For every power of attorney deposited . . 
Far every registration abstract 
For canoelling registration ab^trekot 
For every revjcati jn order 
Noting caveat 
Cancelling or withdrawal of caveat* and for every notioe relating 

to any caveat 
For every search 
For every general searoh 
For every map or plan deposited 
For every instrument declaratory of trusts, and for every will or 

other instniment deposited . . 
For registering recovery by proeeeding in law or equity or re-entry 

by Ussee .. 
For registering vesting of lease in mortgagee, oonseqaent on refusal 

of Trustee in Bankruptcy to accept the same 
For entering notioe of marriage or death 
For entering notice of writ or order of Supreme Court , , 
Taking affidavit or ^itatutory declaration 
For the exhibition of any deposited instrument, or for exhibiting 

deads surrendered by applicant proprietor 
For certified copy, not exceeding five folios 
For every folio or part folio after first five 
For every notice to produce deeds or instruments 
For every outstanding inter, st noted on cenf Qoate of title 
When any instrum*?nt purports to deal with land moludod in mort) 

than one grant or oertihcate, for each registration memorial 

after the first 



--^ ■■"■'-^ 



04 

5 

10 

1 

10 
6 



10 

10 

1 
6 
10 
10 



5 

2 

5 

5 

10 

10 




114 NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TSAR-BOOK. 

Regulatums. 

All fees under the Act shall be dae and payable in advance. 

Wht re several properties are included in one form of application there shall 
be charged in respect of each property an aj^pllcation fee and a fee for bringing 
the land under toe Act. Land included within one outer boundary shall be 
deemed one property for the purpose of this regulation. 

In all cases a fee of one pound (£1) is hereby prescribed as the charge to 
te made for advertising notice of application ; provided that, whenever it is 
necessary that unusual publicity shall be given to any application, the District 
Land Begistiar may require payment of such additional sum as shall, in bis 
judgment, be sufficient to defray the cost of such advertisements. 

In all cases where ai^plicatiun is made to bring land under the Act, and 
the certificate c f title is directed to issue and is issued in the name of the appii- 
cant, the fees fcr bringing fcuoh land under the Act, with the exception of the 
" application fee,*' mav, at the request of the applicant, remain unpaid until 
such land is dealt wiih by him as registered proprietor. The District Land 
Registrar shall retain any such certificate of title until the fees due upon the 
same have been paid, aid, until such payment, shall not rrgister any dealing 
with the land included in such certificate of title. 

Printed forms supplied by the Registrar for use under the Act shall be 
charged for at the rate of one bhilKng each. Solicitors, land-brokerii, and others 
having forms printed for their own use, and at their own expense, shall, on 
approval of such forms Ij the Registrar, be cntiiled to have the same sealed 
free of charge. 



DUTIES ON ESTATES OF DECEASED PERSONS. 

By the Amendment Act of 1885 the Schedule of Duties payable 
under the principal Act of 1881 has bten repealed, and the follow- 
ing imposed in lieu thereof : — 

1. When the value does not exceed £100 . . Ko duty. 

2. Upon any amount exceed. ng £100 but nut exceedirg £1,000 — 

On thefirtt£100 .. .. No duty. 

And on the remainder . . £2^ per cent 

3. Upon any amount exceeding £1,000 but not exceeding £5,000 £8^ per cent. 

4. Upon any amount exceedir.g £5,000, but not exceeding £20,000 £7 per cent. 

5. Upon £20,000 and any amount over that bum . . £10 per cent. 

6. Strai gers in blood, excepting adopted children . . £8 per cent. 

addiUonal. 

These duties are leviable upon the final balance of the real and 
personal estates. 

The exemption in respect of property passing absolutely to 
widow at death of husband is now extended vice versd. 

There are also special provisions in the law affecting children, 
grandchildren, step-children, and adopted children inheriting pro- 
perty. 

The above duties also apply to deeds of gift. 



PART II.— STATISTICAL. 



SECTION I.— EDUCATION OF THE PEOPLE. 

Thb information obtained at the time of the census in respect of 
the degree of education of the people is remarked upon in the 
Year-book, 1903. Later particulars are now given as to schooling. 

School Statistics to 31st December, 1904. 

It has been found impossible to collect the full statistics relating 
to schooling for the year 1905 in time for this work, and the figures 
for the previous year are accordingly given. 

The number of schools, teachers, and scholars, as in December, 
1904, are shown in the following summary : — 



Dwoiption of Sehoob. 



BlTBOPBAX. 

PabUe (GoTemmeiit) leliools (sohoUn 

otlier tluui lfM»ii and half-CMtei) . . 
Public (aoTemmeiit) schooto (half-CMt«8 

Uring among Soropeans) . . 
OoUece^ grammar and high schoola 

(■idea or endowed) 
Phrate scboola (excluding Maori icholan) ! 
Industrial tchools and orphanages . . j 
NftUve Tillage achools, European ctiildren i 

ittffndl"g 
Private Native boarding-echools. Euro- | 

pean children attending . . | 

School for Deaf-mates 
Jubilee Instttote for Blind. . 

Totals — Europeans . . 

Natiti. 

N'atiTe ▼Ulage'scbools supported by Qo- 
remment (excluding European child- 
ren stated above) 

Private Native boarding-seliooto (main- 
tenance of scholars paid by Oovem- 
ment) 

Private Native boarding-schools (main- 
fc*****^^ of schnlara paid from endow- 
ments) . . 

Private Native day-schools . . 

Public (Ooremment) schools, Maoris 
Attending 

PubBe ((ioveniment) schools, half-castes 
living m Maoris attending . . 

Prirate schools for Europeans. Maoris 



Totals— NaUves 



Number 
of Instructors. 



Number of Scholars for 

the Fourth Quarter 

of 1904. 



F. Total. Boys. Girls. Total. 



I ; If I 

1,785 1,416 2,302, S.Tlsj ] ^'^^^l ^^'^^^ 
594; 554 



27 
295 



2,109 



100 



134' 



724 



I 

•189i 
858; 



1 
4,766 



2.443 

6,785' 

396 

231 

9 
36 
13 



1.595 

9,593 

367 

198 

5' 

29' 

8 



132,029 

1,148 

4.038 

16.378 

763 

429 

14 

65 

t21 



79.241 75,644 154.885 



I 



73 105 J 178 1.855 1,470 3,325 



161 



91 



109 



83 118 



201 



^ 130 
63 


72 
33 


202 
96 


1,187 


854 


2,041 


146 


111 


257 


36 
3.453 


31 
2.626 


67 
6,709 



• Excluding M vMtlng teachers. t Excluding men, wonicu, ladd, and girL), in addition 

t>> the children in the eefaooi, who were receiving technical and industrial training. * And 1 1 

flev 



116 



MCW ASA LAND OmclAL 7BAE-BOOK. 



Thus at the end of 1904 there were 2,-2lS schools of all clasi^ 
at which members of the European and Maori races were being 
educated. This was an increase of 53 on the number in 1903. The 
public primary schools numbered 1,785 in 1904» against 1,741 in 
1903. The number of aided or endowed colleges, grammar, and 
high schools was 27, an increase of 2 on the number for the previous 
year. The number of private schools from which returns were 
received by the Registrar-General was 295, an increase of 7. There 
were also ten industrial schools and orphanages, public and private, 
at which education was given, aa well as a school for deaf-mutes 
subsidised by Government, and a scliool for the blind. 

The number of schools established for the etiucation of the 
Native or Maori race was 109, the same number as in 1903. 

Public (Governfnent) Schools. 

Compared with 1903, there was in 1904 an increase of 1,907 in 
the number of pupils belonging to the public schools at the end of 
the year, and the average attendance shows an increase of 3,459 for 
the whole year^ and of 3,733 for the fourth quarter. 

School Attendahcs: a>d Yeabl.y Ihcrsasb raoM 1877 to 1904. 



Sobool Attflndanoe. 



Ytmtly Inoreaaa on 



y«Ar 



So 



afgi ' fe«g 

Mm I =5 



Average Atfcendenee* a 




Average AttenduMsef 



Fourth 
Quarter 



Whole 
Year. 



1877 


1 


iN5,oee 


' 




1 










1«7« 


90M9 


66, (MO 


407496 


45.581 


.». 


... 


9,362 






mst 


50,707 


1 75.506 


57»:N)I 


fia,0<l7 


738 


8.868 


10,586 


7,886 


f,m 


16BU 


6B,1^ 


t«,401 


, 68.946 


00.685 


74^ 


8,417 


6,835 


5,645 


7.568 


mi 


74,a50 


KJ.560 


6;j.009 


0l,*r23 


74'J3 


6,8»S 


1,159 


69 


1,197 


1662 


76,309 


! w.nii 


66,126 


*IH,700 


7»6 


1.960 


3,619 


3,417 


1.887 


18B» 


79,116 


92.470 


70,077 


67t373 


74-0 


3.107 


5.207 


3.651 


3.064 


l^ 


W,«»3 


07. a* 


74.150 


78,667 


761 


6.4«7 


' i.m 


4.573 


5.9B4 


1885 


«U,07O 


J02,4t>7 


60,183 


78,1*37 


766 


5.787 


5.169 


5.633 


5,070 


ibm 


95.377 


ioo.;-3a 


ast.atn 


80.737 


761 


4,707 


3.921 


3,178 


9«410 


1887 


90,908 


110,019 


87.38fi 


S5,m 


77D 


3,869 


4.691 


4.035 


4.WIII 


i88S 


10S,5M 


na.flHS 


00,849 


90.108 


79a 


4,39» 


1.766 


3,463 


4,471 


IBSO 


104.919 


115. 456 


94.308 


93.:<74 


803 


1.386 


8.771 


3,450 


8.806 


1800 


108 JAB 


117.918 


O6.«70 


94,633 


79-9 


3.238 


8.45a 


8.868 


1.968 


liOl 


U0,6fi& 


119.523 


96,a04 


97.(te8 


80-3 


8.607 


1.611 


[-406] 


8,486 


1099 


112.279 


122.0^ 


100.017 


OO.trTO 


80^ 


1.614 


3.W7 


4.6.VI 


9,018 


im 


iH/m 


m,(m 


90,««72 


98.615 


78-6 


8.096 


2.K;6 


t-».046] 


C-4651 


i0M 


116,819 


l«7,300 


1U7.03S 


104«096 


81-8 


8.514 


2.614 


6,279 


4.W5 


ifloe 


n:».90o 


129.856 


108.708 


108,394 


89-8 


3,<'8l 


2,556 


1.078 


3.808 


1W6 


188.IS5 


131,037 


110,274 


no, 517 


68-3 


8,596 


1,181 


1.586 


8,188 


im 


183.53S 133.197 


111.968 


118. i»a 


89'9 1 


1,108 


1,160 


1,678 


i,au 


18U6 


123.66& 


m.621 


109.561 


111. 636 


881 


8S8 


[-570] 


[-8.S91) 


[-0081 


ia» 


lS3.a07 


Wl,316 


100.050 


110,;*16 


h%^ 


[-685] 


-306J 


f-snj 


1900 


12)J]6 


nio,7tk 


111.4JN 


111,747 


841 


m 


f-591 


2,448 


1,431 


1901 


1^.7S5 


lM,3dl 


119,:^64 


111,707 


841 


t-<»ij 


6>27 


SS6 1 


00 


1»« 


Dit.iAB 


1.13.9P2 


in. 5.^ 


113.711 


84D 


73J 


Oil 


[-798] 


1.914 


1903 


124,095 


IS3,56H 


114,2^3 


U:i047 


m-9 


6:19 


1.300 


8.076 


t-^»4J 


190^1 


125.150 


i:i5.<75 


117,965 


116. we 


855 


r.055 


1,907 


3,733 


H,lfiO 



• From 1877 to 1603 sinolnetTel the "flirict" average t» givou. aod for lubeeqaeolyeart 
ftbe " working" average, i From 1877 to 1804 (iucluBivo) the inor^aee on the **etrief 

ftverage ie given, aod (or eabMqoent yeari thaft on the " workiog" average. 



SCHOOL STATISTICS. 



in 



lu tUfi rtjpoH of the Minister of Education the figures are thus 
commented upon : — 

The average of Ihs weekly rdl-tmmberB afaows a further increase for 1904^ 
being ],5Bi It^rg^r thcui la 1CK}3. The ti^ures for 1903 were 131,718, &nd for 1901, 
I3Ci»282, The atimber on iho roll at the «ud of the year likewise showa a cc*ii* 
iidembte inerease, being 135,475, or 1/J07 more than the number enrcUed at the 
tod of 1^.13, 

There ta abo a verj satUf^torj improvcioent in the staad&rd of regularity 
ol attendance attained during tte year, Damely, 85'5 per cent., or 1'6 per cent. 
abo«« that for 1903. This improvement, it may be noted, took place gradually 
Ibronghout the whole ytar. In the first quarter the average daily btteoviance 
WBA 85 07 per cent, of the average weekly rcU-number, in tLe second quarter 
8o'15 per cent., in the third quarter 85'3d per cent., aud in the last quarter 
86'3C percent. 

A r% forcnco to the above table will show that, ejccepUng the year 18U3, when 
Ihere was a fallng-vf! of over 2 per cent., and the jenra JB'J9 and 1903, when 
there was a ffiUingoi! of 1 per oeut., there hts been an almost cootinuiuy 
Unprovinient in regularity lI attendance, until the colony hus reached a per- 
centage which compares favourably with that of the United Kingdom, or of any 
of the Btatesi of the Australian Commonwealth, so far as coniparia n can he made 
with those countiicf. Unfortunately, an exact comf^arison cannot be made v^ith 
the United Kingdom, or Canada, or the Australian States (t'xcept Wobtern 
AuUralJa), as the average weekly enrolment is not there recorded. Taklig, 
however, the net ai nual enrolment, according to the figures for 1901 as giveo in 
Whiiaker s Atmanac, the average datly attendance was, in Errgland, 84' 4 per 
rent. : lo Scotland, 85'2 per cent.; in Ireland. 664. For Canada cnly the totiJ 
ei ij given in the repotts of the seveial provlncea, and the peroentage of 

thereon for 1903 was, in (be Province of Quebec, 74 7, and in 
I 0. The lati^st Qgmea available for (he Australian States are tho^e 

I cordmg to which the percentage was, for New South Walo», G3 4 per 

cll , ^ V ctoria, (>7*0 per cent,; for Queentiland, 71'7 per cent.; V t South 
Austraiia, 69 9 per cent. In Wesiem Auttralia, it »as 82 7 per oent« of the 
afcrage weekly enrolmeiit. In Tasmania there is only available for comparison 
ihm average number on the lolls from month to month, (f which the avirage 
daily aiiendance was 74 5 per cent. In Gape Colony the percentage of attend- 
\ to the average roil was 81 9 lor the year ending the 30th June, 1904. 



Education at the public schools is free (except that, at such as 
are also district high schools, fees are charged for the teaching of 
the higher branches) and purely secular. The attendance of all 
children between the ages of 7 and 14 is compulsory, except when 
exemptions are granted, or a child is being otherwise suffi- 
iy educated. 

ie subjects to be taught at the priinai'y schools are required 
the Education Act to be the following : Beading, writing, arith- 
Jetic, English grammar and composition, geography, history (in- 
ladmg civic instruction), elementary science and drawing, object- 
Bssons, vocal music, physical instruction, moral instruction, nature- 
lady, health, aud (in the case of girls) sewing and needlework, 
ae prmciples of domestic economy, also handwork for both sexes. 
?roviiiiou must also be made for the instruction in military drill o! ' 
all boya in these schools. 

A new syllabus of instruction was introduced in April, 1904, aud 
aiTVigements made for the training of teachers ; grants are voted, 
~ }.e iuteQlioa being to have a training-college at each of the four 



118 NEW EEALAND OFFICIAL TIAB-BOOK. 

chief towns in the colony. There is also a vote for instruction of 
teachers in handwork for purposes of manual and technical instruc- 
tion. 

Income and Expenditure of Education Boards. 

The total income of the various Education Boards for the year 
1904 was £6*25,755, including £2,767 of refunds, fines, &c. The grants 
by Government amounted to £616,350, including receipts from edu- 
cation reserves. These grants consist of payments to the Board of 
every district of a sum suHicient to pay the salaries of teachers and 
pupil-teachers in the district, and further payments of a sum of £250 
per annum, together with a sum of lis. 3d. per annum for each 
child in daily average attendance at a public school. (The Go- 
vernor may by Order in Council declare that in lieu of the payments 
hi^^t named there shall be paid to the Boards a capitation allowance 
of 1 2s., and in addition £250 per annum to each Board having a 
daily average attendance of less than 8,000 children.) There is aJso 
a varying sum for the establishment and maintenance of normal or 
trainiiit; schools, and for the support of such schools already esta- 
blishe<i ; also grants for school buildings and for technical education. 
The income from local receipts was £6,638. 

The total expenditure in 1904 amounted to £603,010, of which 
the sum of £462.357, including £16,735 for manual and technical 
instruction, was laid out on the maintenance of the schools. 

The receipts and expenditure of tiie Education Boards, numbering 
thirteen altogether, are tabulated below, with further particulars: — 

RE(.'EI1»TS and EXPENDITUUE OF EDUCATION BOARDS. 

Exi>enditure. £ b. d. 

Hoardn' adiiiinistrRtion ... 31,060 15 2 
Toachers'and pupil-teachers' 
ftalariv.s and piipil-teacherfi' 
loilKing-allowanceB ... 406.3iJ3 8 *J 

Iiicidcnta] oxpenBCS of 

KoilOOls - 

Or.linarv .. £:«,40C 15 
Capitation at 
\H\. ... 4/254 



UrceijtU. 




£ s. 


d. 


Halances, 1st Jan nan 


. . 1101 




.. li.4sr> 17 


11 


Government Rrants- 










RentH from rt^- 










SiTVOS ... 


£44,4*29 


9 11 




Hftlanr^o of grants 










for salaries of 










tenrhcrs autl pu 










pil-irachorrt 


:u'n),A'M\ 12 


b 




Allowance at f*23(i 










anti «-npitation 


Tl.lMT 


4 


2 




other RranlK 


7.»K)5 


'2 


b 




Total for main 










tcnance 


4aJ.9a'3 


9 


5 




S(OiolarBhi])K and 










d i H t r i c t high 










schools... 


1U.226 


7 


7 




Manual and 










technical in- 










rttrnction 


H.:nc 


1 


b 




li u i 1 d i n R R and 










tcHchers' liouf.i» 










allo^vaIHro^ 


IH.KO 


9 


1 




Total froiii Cio- 
vi-mment ... 














GiG.:r)0 7 


9 


Local r^ci-ijits— 










l''t*es.donaii()n.«,4rc. 


4.r4V() ]i 







Intort'Ht, rents, drc. 


1.U77 


9 


11 


11 










Kefunda. fines, d:c. 






... '2lnX 17 


2 




£C:^2.«J4l 4 


~0 



36.750 15 

Salaries of relieving teachers 2,567 10 5 

ScholarHhips and secondary 

ednoat.ion... ... 20,517 12 11 

Traininfj of teachers ... 3.G27 18 

Manual and technical in- 
struction ... ... ... 16.735 7 7 

HuildinRH, house allowances, 

sites, titc. ... ... .. 83.499 1 6 

Kefunds and sundries ... 1,(>28 4 3 

Halancc, 31st December, 1904 29,230 11 9 



£6:)2,e41 4 9 



TBCHNICAL EDUCATION. 



119 



Technical Education. 
he Education Act of 190 i provides for public instruction in such 
manual and teclmical subjects as are set forth in the rei^latioua 
thereunder. The same Act provides also for the instruction id 
elementary handwork of pupits attending primary or secondary 
'lools. All classes recognised under the Act are ehgible for grants 
of necessary buildings, furniture, apparatus, and material, and 
ir capitation, and sub^dies of £1 for £1 on voluntary contributions. 
During 1904 capitation was paid on classes for drawing (various 
bmuches), painting, modelling, design, wood-carving, architec- 
ture, carpentry aod joinery, plurabiog, painters* and decorators* 
work, mechanical and electrical engineering, natural and experi- 
ental science (various branches), farriery and smithing, languages, 
bathematics, commercial subjects, cookery, laundry-work, dress- 
aaking, inilJinery, tailoring, wool-sorting, and vocal music. 

Special annual grants are made to Education Boards for the 
;iaimenance of traming classes for teachers in subjects of manual 
technical instruction prescribed for school classes. 
Provision has also been ma^le for free technical education. Fer- 
gus complying witii the conditions prescribed by the regulations 
~ entitled to hold junior free places at technical schools or 
Bses. These free places are tenable for two sears, and may be 
>n tinned under certain conditions for three years as senior free 
aces. In order that the substratum on which technical education 
18 based may be sound, it is made a condition of the tenure cf the 
Junior Technical Scholarships that the holders shall receive instruc- 
tion in one or u)ore subjects of general instruction, such as English 
and arithmetic or some other branch of mathematics, in addition to 
instraction in tecimical subjects. Holders of senior free places are 
required to take up definite courses of technical instruction. 

The controlling authorities of classes for manual and t^.chnical 

instruction are Education Boards, governing bodies of secondary 

sehoolfl and university colleges, and, in the case of certain classes in 

"Tice before the passing of the Act of 1901, the managers of 

classes. School classes, or classes held in connection with 

primary or secondary schools, are under the control of the Education 

Boanls or of the governing bodies respectively, *• Special classes" 

— that is, continuation classes, and classes for manual or technical 

'n^t met ion— are estabhshed and controlled by the same bodies. 

lege classes" are classes for higher teclmical instruction 

rcLtuiished and controlled by the governing body of a university 

OolJe^. Classes tnay also be establiBhed by Borough Councils, 

County Councils, aud other local authorities acting jointly with an 

Hduculion Board or university college ; these are called ■* associated 

-^^,*' and all the contributing bodies may have a voice, accord- 

_ J the share of the cost of maintenance borne by them, in the 

ft. tioii of managers for the classes. It is worthy of note, but not 

perhaps generally understood, that the Act and regulations 

andcr ofifer just as great inducements for the establisbmeut of 

for dairy- work and for agriculcui*al insr ruction as for other 

claeaea for technical instruction ; even more, perhaps, for in certain 




i 



120 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TKAR-EOOK. 



oases capitation may be paid to country classes at one and a half 
times the rate paid to town classes. There is now really nothing to 
prevent any district or any body of persons in a district from starting 
classes under the Act and securing grants sufficient to equip and 
carry on the classes, unless it be the comparatively small number of 
thoroughly competent instructors tliat are to be obtained. This, 
however, is an evil that is being gradually removed as those who 
have been attending training classes for teachers in these subjects 
become qualiBed, The Education Department conducts every year 
examinations on behalf of the Board of Education. South Kensing- 
ton (science and art subjects), and the City and Guilds of London 
Institute (technological subjects). In 1904 examinations were held at 
twelve centres. At the science and art examinations, 295 out of 437 
candidates who presented themselves for examination in various 
subjects were success fuh At the technological examinations 261 
candidates passed out of a total of 336. The Institute reported that 
the number of separate subjects in which candidates are examined 
increases from year to year, and likewise the number of centres from 
which candidates are drawn, also that some of the papers sent from 
New Zealand for examination, particularly those in plumbing, were 
of a high order of excellence. Tne percentage of failures in New 
Zealand is less than in England, although a smaller proportion of 
colonial students qualify in the honours grade. 

The subjects taken up in school classes included cookery, wood* 
work, elementary practical agriculture, dairy- work, swimming and 
life-saving, first aid and ambulance, dressmaking, and laundry-work, 
and elementary practical physics and chemistry. 

In connection with the Canterbury College there is an endowed 
School of Engineering and Technical Science, providing for courses 
for the university degi'ee of B.Sc. in engineering or for the asso- 
ciatcsinp in engineering. Two hundred and six students attended 
in 1904. 

The Cauterbm^ Agricultural College has an endowment of 
62,CX)0 acres of land, of the rental value of £1,500 per annum, and 
possesses extensive buildings, and an experimental farm of a very 
complete character. The institution ofifers an opportunity to acquire 
a thorough knowledge of the science and practice of agriculture. 
Two years' residence at the college is accepted by the University 
of New Zealand as pai-t of the curriculum quaUfying for the degree 
of B.Sc. in agriculture. The college accommodates forty students. 

There are several Schools of Mines located in districts in 
which mining is actively carried on, and the Otago University 
maintains a professorial chair of mining and metallurgy, to which 
the Government makes an annual grant of £500. The number of 
students in mining io 1904 was about 300. 

With the view of encouraging attendance at recognised tech- 
nical schools and classes, arrangements have been made with the 
Railway Department by which students attending classes registered 
with the Minister of Education may obtain railway tickets at special 
rates. Free railway tickets are issued to holders of free places at 
teohaicsLl schools. 



TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 121 

In the twenty-eighth aunual report, the Minister of Educfttiou 
remarks as follows on nianiial training and technical instruction : — 

A rcTiew of tbe year's work shows that oonKtderable progre^a has been made 
iy coDtrollirg autboritics throughout the colony in the direction of improving 
rziMiDg arr&ngemetits and providing additional facilitiea for instnicbion in 
mlij^^^' ^^ teolmoiog; and manual trainir g. T\ ere ia now no f^ducation district 
m which some provision, more or leps adequate, bas Dot been made for such 
msiraLtion,&nd there arc indicutitns that in those diBtrictsin which ibe movement 
ia mcsl rerent the local autborities inier^nted in the matter will have no reason 
to regard their ffforts ae other than ecccuraging. Where it haa been found that 
there waft a well grounded demand for instruction, the Government has provided 
tbe Qtcessary funde for tbe equipment and maintenance of the claasej^, as will 
ad for buildings where tbe circumstances renderod special accommodation neres- 
Miry- In many cases, local bodied and otht rs have shown their interest in tbe 
work in a pra- Ileal mann' r by oontribuiirig to the furids of the classeF. Coinci- 
dent with this t videcce of local ellort ia an increase in the niimbt r of nasociatcd 
claf^ fl— that is to fay, classes for technical instruc-tii n conducted in coDJnnction 
with tbe controlling authority by managers representing the variooa coritributing 
bt dies. There is little reason to fear that claases established on these lines are 
likely to prove other than succefsfu'. 

The msmhor of technioal, continuation^ and school classes recognised during 
3901 was 2^599, as againat 2,287 for the prGvious year. Of the classes for 1Q04» 
5^001 were classes (or handwork in ccnnection with over 700 primary and 
wcODd&ry schools, while 598 were special, associated, or ocllege classes for 
lnBlruoiion in the several branches cf pure and applied art and science, and in 
ptnmbing, carpentry and joinery, cookery, dressmaking, and commercial Bubjects. 
While I be actual number of technioal classes was not gireatly in advance of that 
for 1903, the returns Bhow a gre^i increase in the avi rage attendance at them. 
For 1CM)3 the average aittndance was about 6,300, and for 1904 about 13,700, 
Technical classes are htld at about fifty different places. 

Id many of the public schooEs all the standards received instruction in some 
one or other of the brauches of handwork. In several districts arrangements 
bare been made whereby the older pupils in tbe city and suburban sehools 
receive instruction in woodwork and cookety. During the year 156 cookery 
ctaaees and V20 woodwork classes were in operation, while, at the technclogica) 
examiitatio&s of the City and Guilds cf London Institute, 102 public school 
teachers piissed tl^e examitiatiors in cookery, and eighty-acven in woodwcrk. In 
ooly one education dimrict were school classes for instructlm in dairy! rg esta- 
bJished. IncrraFed attemion is to be given to a practical instruction in element* 
ary e^rioulture in primary acboolit. During the 3 ear forty seven clashes In six 
r^e^tlon diitricti were working under tbe Act as against tiiiriy*mx for 1903. It 
la io be regretted that there is not mere evidence e f a dijfintto moveminl on 
the part of controlling authorities to arrange for the regular inai ruction in 
"-^"""^ ^i^ificts of tchooJ-cbildroo, aa well a* of those who have left Bchool, in 
iving a direct bearing on rural pursuits. With the co-opiralion and 
\\ bodies interested in agricultural snd pat^toral matters oontroliicg 
•ntticrittta shmld be able to are their way to arrange for suitable courses at 
aocvenient ctntres. If tbe classes vere brought under the Aot^ subsidy would 
bn on the contributions of local bodies and others, and the classes would 

K for capitation and for grants in aid of the necet^sary apparatus and 

tii»c(r<)»i The funds available from these and other sources, dt^ch as the fees of 
rtoteble, should tiufiice for the eMoient cairying-on tf the oliiiifeB. As far as the 
iniftlog of teachers of country schools is concerned, there would aeem to be no 
f»iinfi why E^Jucatiou Boards should mt devo e a \ roportion of the grants they 
reee^re eibch year for the training of teachers in ^ubji cts of manual and teohnical 
tion to the mail tenance of training-classes in rural acience. In tie ca^e 
-tmaller edat ation districta co-operation on the part of tbe Boards should 
f nnMe nuch classes to be p>laced on a satisfactory footing. 

There ba« been a oonBiderable incrcafd in tbe number of persons receiving 
free insimotion under the n^lations for lechnieal HcboUreh^ps. During the 
J ear S52 scholars rec ited free instruoiicn at ten lecbnical schools. In not e. 
few caeca definite conrtes 0/ work have bean entetid upon, an4 ^hcte o^tftVn^v 
eeiioQ^ iit»t there mU im a gubstantml ioerrase tiext yenr, noi onV-j m VV^ 




122 



MBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 



number of free scholars, but also in the number of teohnioal lohooli giving fr^e 
iostruotion along definite lines. 

The total expeoditure on manual and technical instruction for 190i was 
£27,425 Is. The detaiU are as follows : Oapitation on all classes, £11,801 ISs. 6d. ; 
grants for buildings and equipment, £9,255 17s. 2d. ; grants for material for class 
use, £798 Gs. 9J. ; subsidies on voluntary contributions, £1,175 lOs. lOd. ; 
technical training of teachers, £1,853 ; railway fares of instructors and student-'. 
£364 2s. 9J. ; expenses in connection with the examination of the Board of 
Education, South Kensington, and of the City and Guilds of London Institute, 
£518 128. 4d. ; inspeotion, £978 15s. 3d. ; sckolardhips, £634 148. 3d. ; sundries, 
£44 96. 3d. The sum of £107 2s. 6d. was recovered by way of examination fees 
and from sale o! materi H used at examinations, leaving a net expenditure of 
£27,317 18:^.Gd. 

Manual and Technical Instruction, 1904.— School CfjissES. 



Subjects of Instruction and Number of Classes 
in each Subject. 



Controlling .\uthoritv. 



I Q 

11 '' 









''hi 






I « 



I i 

S ^ - 






j 



KducatioD Board, Auckland ... 

Education Board, Taranaki ... 

Board of Qovernori*, High 
School, New Plymoutli 

Education Board, Wauganui... 

Board of Governors. High 
School, Palmerbton North 

Education Board, Wellington 

Board of Governors, Welling- 
ton Ck)llege and Girls' High 
School — 
Girls" High School ... 

Education Board, Hawke's Bay 

Education Board, Marlborough 

Education Board, Nelson 

Board of Governors, Nelson 
Colleges— 
Boys' College 
Girls' College 

Education Board, Grey 

Education Board, Wostland .. 

Education Board, North Can- 
terbury 

Board of Governors, Canter- 
burv College- 
Boys' High School 

Girls' High SchoDl ... 

Board of Governors, A^hbur- 
ton High School 

Educatioj Board, South Can- 
terbury 

Board of Governors, Timaru 
High Schools — 
Boys' High School ... 
Girls' High School 

Education Board. Otago 

Board of Governors, Otago 
High Schools- 
Girls' High School 

Education Board, Southland... 

Board of Governors, South- 
land High Schools- 
Boy b' Hign School ... 
Girls' High Schools 

Totals 



9« 



1 1 
1120 



2a-i 



119 
192 



45 
6 
fil 



14 



15 47i..., 19 «I ' 1 8 

9 ' ...I...' 8, 2; ..: 8| 3 ... I S 

2 ...j II ...^ ...; _ ... I ... 

9 cl 1 29 16 1 1 . 13 i 2 

... 3,...' 3... 2 1 2 1 

18 ' 34 2 19, ..' 2 6.2 



1 
16 



1 ... sm 

... I 1 114 

........ H 

1 ..' »r 

... I... la 



. .., .. ..■ 5 ... ; ... 

4 2 21 1 I... 2 I 5 

}'JA -u:---, .-1.? 



6 2; 10 2; ...' 

...I..:..' 1-3...'.. 

4i I 



1 17 



I... 1 
.. 1 1 ...i... 
1 30 26 

I 



..' I::. 

12 6 ...' 



iO ' 



3, 1 1 

...'... 2' 3 ... 
2: 2 



... ' 2 2' ... 

... I ..J I ... 

1 ' 3, 3 21 3-...'... 3 ... 



I 



I 



2,. 



IHl: 



2' 2 ..; ...,...;... 3. ... 

19... 28 16' 11...,...' 21 



.. 3 '...;. 

2 , 7 .. 41' 7i 1 . 



9 
(0 
11 
95 



4 
4 

1 

16 
304 



6 
13 

4 

80 



140 



24^ 



725 il,22ll ad 



, ...; ' ...12! ' ... , ... : a I 

I 3i ......,'...■ 2| ... I 2 1 S 1...^ 



TBCHNIGAIi EDUCATION. 



12S 






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piim»l.l9qiraoj;)paTiqaa4^ j 



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124 



NEW ZEALAND OPKICIAI. TBAR-BOOR. 



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TBCHHICAL EDUCATION. 



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126 



MKW EEALAND OFFICIAL TIAB-BOOK. 



The following table shows the results of the examinations 
conducted in the colony on behalf of the Board of Education, South 
Kensington, and the City and Guilds of London Institute : — 



Abt and Science Examinations, 1904. 
[" C " represents candidates ; '* P " 







1 


Subjects 




1 3 1 


of 


' "d 


3 


RzamiuatioD. 


. s 


>i 1 




' M 


1 ^ 




, ^ 


» 




a 


. s 




< 


>5 



O i 

i' 

i 

q 



Art- . ; ■ 1^ 

Freehand drawing „ \ J15 5. J.., Ifi! 6 3^ a,.. .. 1 ., « 

Model ... ,, I 17 14'. , , li 1, G| fi-..- 1' 1 8 

Geometrical drawing 1 .H.>.,«,j 4l ^ E. S... .. ...[...L. 

Perspective ... ... i 3 3.. ,., \. :.„'.-. ...' 1, I, 1 ..... 

Blackboard drawing ... ' .„. ...Lh... .-! .- !■ 1 ,- 

Drawing common ub- , ... . „..,. i „ ...» Ij ll » 

jectB from memorv ' i ' I 

Memory drawing of ... L. i 

plant-form , 

Drawing in light aDd l5lfi...L.l2' CI 4 1 1 i ... 

shade , 

Design .. .... ,..,,„. li l^.,,.., 22 I 

Painting from still life 1 ] „ ' ..* S 1 3 

Principles of oruamont ... ... «.l„J.,. 9 'i 

Anatomy ... ... .,...,. .^j.., i, *i 9 

Drawing from the nu- ,, ,^ ...... -.. .*, .., 

tique ■ ' , , 

Drawing from life .i,,..., a I .. I..,l...l. 

Modelling the het.d ... .. .. s£ a..J I 

Architecture... ., ' , 1. 3,.. j 



11 



&; 4. 



.,].. 



Students' works -1 |i...... 

Science- 
Practical plane and 

solid geometry 
Machine constructioi] 21 LI' 1 1 

and drawing 
Building conntructLon 7 Tr... .. 

and drawing 

Mathematics ... ♦♦. 

Applied mechanics . *, ... 

Steam ... a -i' , ... 
Theoretical inorganic ,. 

chemistry 
Magnetism and olec- a 71., 

tricity 
Sound, light, and heat 
.Vgricultural science 

and rural economv 
Botany 
Human phyHiology ... 



2 117 7. 



■1- '■• 
3 li.,. 



1 1 
7 (j 



11 1' 1] 1 



5' t' 



'i 1. 



I 1. 
i 1. 



,:ri:::::i 



1 1- 



PC 



'I'T 



Totals illO 71' 



S, 17 ,33; I M5 40 W n j 5 |9t}ll4 , 3 



■Y' 



r 



i 1 



OP 

1711 
3218 



& 4 



1 9 



1 1 



a.., 



OP 

i i 



s f 



1 
fi J... 



r 



434941 1835516 3 



P 

iu 

I 51 

\u 
u 
i 
I 



Is 
I 



m 9 
J 



ft I 

ll 



iq IS 
I 
1 



43T|i9S 



* A book prize was gained by a Napier student. 



TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 



127 



Tbchnolooical Examinations, 1904 




Snbjecti of Ei£«miiutiuti. 


i 

< 


s 

s 

1 

1 


1 




1 I'f 1' 1 




PC I* 


C PC'I* OJP^C'P C'l» C I* UPC |P 



Plambers' work (preliminary) . 

Principlet of plnmbing (ordin&ry) 

Plumbers' work (ordinarr) 

Principles of plnmbing (nonoars) 

Carpentry and joinery (preliminary) 

Cari^ntrf and joinery (ordinary) 

Electric lig*it and po ver (preliminary) 
(orlinary) ... 
(honour^) 

Wiremen'a work 

Telegraphy and telephony fordinary) ... 

Mechanical engineering, Part I i ordi- 
nary) 

Mechanical engineering. Part II (ordi- 
nary) 

Painters* and decorators' work (ordi- 
nary) 

Brickwork ford nary) ... 

Ciss-mannfactnre (ordina^'y) ... 

Woodwork, first year ... 
• final 

Cookery 

Totals 



1412. 



: 2 1 I .. I 



1 1 1 

9 9 7 •> 3 31210 3 3 

...' 2 1...; ' 

1 1 ...... 1 1 ll 1 ' 

1 1 Si 2 1 i... ... 



1 1 

\ 2 1 



J . 



2 . . 

3 1. 



5 5 
8 1 . 

ll 1. 
4: 1 . 

I!; 



11. 

1 1 . 

1111 



..' 1 1 

..|.. 2 1... 



I 



I 



I 



1 1 



I 



...; ..•...!...• 1 1 j...: I 1| 1 2 2 

42,35..,! I 1 li 6i C 1 ... 6 3 18 16.:^7 18 111 79 

1, l...i |...'...'... ' li ,... 3' 2 ..I. ..HOI 5\ 15| 8 

36|33...' '..: I........ ...I...I :« .3244 37'1I3 102 

1099311 710' 832:2210' 9 I...1I3' 9 •)9 r>3 9l!f.o;336|2Cl 



The expenditure for the year is given in detail : — 

SCMMABY OF EXPENDFTUBE BY GOVEBNMENT ON MaNUAL AND TECHNICAL In- 
8TBUCTI0N FOB YeAB ENDING SlST DeCEMBEB, 1904. 

£ 8. d. 



Capitation 

Subsidy of £1 for £1 on contributions. 

Grants — 

Baildings and apparatus 

Class material . . 

Training of Teachers— 

Auckldind Education Board . 

Taranaki 

Wanganui 

Wellington 

Hawke*8 Bay 

Nelson 

Grey 

Westland 

South Canterbury ^ 

Otago 



£ 8. 

9,255 17 

798 6 



578 








100 








150 








200 








150 








125 








75 








150 








125 








200 









1I,R01 12 G 
1,175 10 10 



10,054 3 11 



1,853 



128 NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOX. 



Railway farei of instrootors of training-classes 

, students attending registered classes. 

Expenses in connection with Examinations — 
Science and Art Board of Educaticn, South 

Kensington 
City and Guilds of London Inbtitute 





£ P. d. 


. . 


241 15 8 


. 


122 7 1 


£ s. d. 




167 16 




350 16 4 





518 12 4 



Inspectors — 

Salaries 716 13 4 

Travelling-expenses 262 1 11 



Scholarships 

Mounts, &o.f fcr plaster casts 

Puhlications, &c. 

Sundries 



978 16 


3 


634 14 


2 


19 11 





20 2 


8 


4 15 


7 



27,425 1 



Less recoveries (examination fees, £105 28. 6d. ; proceeds of sale 

of material used at examination, £2) .. 107 2 6 



Total .. £27,317 18 6 



Secondary or Superior Schools. 

There were 27 subsidised or endowed schools for higher educa- 
tion in December, 190i. The names of these secondary schools, 
with the numbers of pupils on the rolls in the last term or quarter 
of the year, and the fees charged, are stated below. These schools 
must not be confused with the district high schools, although they 
nearly all admit to free places holders of Education Board Scholar- 
ships and of National or Queen's Scholarships, besides all who gain 
certificates of proficiency within prescribed limits of age, &c. There 
are grants payable under the Secondary Schools Act varying from 
£4 to £10 15s. for each free place, according as the net income from 
endowments is small or great. This is a modification of the grants 
previously authorised, which were at the uniform rate of £6. The 
number of endowed secondary-schools giving free tuition to all 
qualified pupils at the end of 1904 was 20, and the number of pupils 
holding free places was 1,595. There were besides about 387 
holders of scholarships and exhibitions given by these schools, or by 
Boards of Education, or by the secondary schools not coming under 
the conditions. It will be noticed that the pupils numbered alto- 
gether 4,038. 



8EOONDAKT OB SUPERIOR SCHOOLS. 



129 



ATTKltnAKCK AND FeB8 AT CERTAIN SECONDARY SCHOOLS. 





Staff. Attendance for Last Term or 


50 


Annual Kates of 






Quarter of 1904. 






1 

55 


Fees. 


Scboolf. 


i 
1 


1 


P 


23 




15 to 18. 

Over 18" 
Yearn. 


1 


$ a 
< 


For 

Day- 
school 
(bourse. 


For 
Board, 
exclusive 
of Day- 
school 
Tuition. 












1 




' 


£ s. d. 


£ 8. d. 


Wbaogarei High Scbool 


3 




J6.... 
J b'.'s 

la. 7 


16 
10 


18' 1 
6 ... 


35 
15 


33) ' 
13; •• 


8 8 




Anekland Grammar 
School 


17 


1 


138 
69 


116 fi 
50; 6 


264 
131 


352) 
124; •• 


' 10 10 
18 8 


[ ••• 


Thames High School ... 


3 




jfi::: 

la.... 

8 


16 
10 


'i ■ ••. 


30 
18 


28) ■ 

16; • 


8 8 




Mew PI y month High 

Schotl 
Waoganai Girls' College 


4 
10 


9 
6 


26 
16 

48 


21 ... 

2S ... 
75' 23 


47 
44 

154 


441' 
39) ' - 

111 62 


6 6 

f 10 10 
I 8 8 


1 40 a 


WcDiouiiii Collegiate School 


13 




2 


39 


lie! 18 


175 


171 1 132 


(12 
1 9 


} 45 


Palmeraton North High 
School 


5 


3 




61 
4S 


26' 1 
16... 


89 
58 


811 

54 f - 


10 




WelliDgton College (Boys') 


13 


1 


* 


69 


204 16 


293 


2C6 1 80 


'13 4 

1 10 12 


} 42 


Wellington Girls' High 
School 


9 


3 6 


48 


120; 9 


183 


165 ^ ... 


(13 4 ( 
( 10 12 


) 


Nspier Boys' High School 
Napier Girls' H^h Scbool 


6 


1! U 


50 


63 ... 


114 


104 ' 25 


10 4 ( 


40 


6 


5: 11 


5& 


35 5 


103 


i9 16 


10 4 


43 3 


Marlborongb High Scbcol 


i 


"*. iff.... 


21 
33 


29 3 

18 1 


53 
52 


47 1 
43; •• 


8 11 




Xelson College (Boys') ... 


9 


2 8 


87 


100 15 


190 


161 ; 77 


no 10 
18 8 


] ■ 40 


Nelson Girls' College ... 


8 


1 9; 


60 


77| 12 


158 


144 1 33 


J 10 10 
1 8 8 


' 40 


Christcburcb Boys' High 
School 


11 


7 3 

1 


97 


no] 9 


210 


210 ... 


J 7 10 
110 10 
'990 
■| 12 12 ( 


[ - 


Christchnrcb Girls' High 


9 


6 1 


74 


6^ 1 


145 


135 ... 


) 


School 
Christ'* C*ii Jej, v. Grammar 


12 


8 29 


94 


90 14 


2:7 


211 ' 80 


(14 3 
-11 6 


) 45 
[ 42 


School 












1 


i 7 17 6 


Raugiora High School .. 


3 




3ni 9 ... 
22. 13 1 


40 

fe 

5;^ 


39) 

34 f - 


9 9 




. r H'i?b^*»i^^':>t 


3 


34| 14 ... 
34| 19 ... 


45 1 
50) • 


6 6 




Tiicani Boys' High School 


4 


1 


\ 


58 35 ... 


93 


85 ... 


9 




Timarn Girls' High 


4 


2 




44 44 7 


95 


89 ... 


9 




School 




















Waitaki Boys' High 


4 


1 




41 


70 2 


113 


106 03 


7 10 


42 8 


School 


















Waatelu Girls' High 


3 


2 




20 


21 4 


45 


42 ... 


7 10 




School 




















Otago Boys' High School 


10 


4 


1 


163 


120 5 


298 


289 24 


10 


43 10 


Otago Girls' High School 


7 


8 




93 


106 3 


204 


179 9 


10 


40 


SoQthland Boys* High 


5 


1 




67| 48 ... 


115 


111 ... 


10 


... 


Scbool 


















Southland Girls' High 
Scbool 


4 


2: ... 


59 40 2 

1 ' 


101 


95 


10 




Totals 


U9 


^ 1 0.42 


10871202 89 
736! 744 74 


2,44.M 
1,595 


?-^l.^ 


... 


i 



In six cases no secondary school is maintained by the governing 
body : these are the Auckland Girls* High School, Gisborne High 
School. Grey mouth High School, Hokitika High School, Akaroa 
High School, and Waimate High School ; but in all cases the funds 

6-ybk. 



130 



NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



cure applied, in whole or in part, to the establishment of scholar- 
ships or in aid of local district high schools or other secondary 
schools. 

Income and Expenditure of Secondary or Superior Schools. 

A summary of the accounts of income and expenditure for the 
year 1904, as furnished by the governing bodies of the secondary 
or superior schools in the colony, shows the total receipts to 
have been £87,720. To this total, rents of reserves contributed 
£23,382 ; interest on investments, and other receipts from endow- 
ments, £7,953 ; fees, £35,265 ; Government payment for technical 
instruction, £449 ; for free places, £10,006 ; and miscellaneous, 
£10,665. 

The total expenditure amounted to £86,901, of which sum office 
management and expenses absorbed £2,987 ; teachers' salcuries, 
£44,486 ; scholarships and prizes, £2,201 ; buildings, furniture, in- 
surance, rates, and rent, &c., £17,051 ; and other expenditure, 
£20,176. 

A summary of the accounts for the year 1904, exhibiting further 
details, is given below : — 



To 



Secondary ob Supe 


Rfceipta. 


£ s. d. 


Credit balances on Ist 




January, lii04 


31.572 3 10 


Endowment reserves sold 




and moitgage moneys 




repaid... 


3.993 6 3 


Rent of reserves 


23,381 15 4 


Interest on moneys in- 




vested ... 


3.959 8 10 


Reserves Commissioners' 




payments 


4,710 13 11 


Government payments— 




For technical instruction 


449 7 7 


For free places 


10,005 15 8 


School fees (tuition) 


27,46:5 12 8 


Boarding-school fees 


7,H)1 17 10 


Books, Ac, sold, and re- 




funds... 


247 13 6 


Sundries not classified ... 


5,706 7 5 


Debit balances, 31st De- 




cember, 19J4 ... 


2,153 6 8 


£121.44') 9 r> 



RiOR Schools, 1904. 

Expenditure. £ s. d. 
By Liabilities on Ist January, 

1904 1,106 9 10 

Expenses of management 2,967 7 

Scho)] salaries ... ... 44,4&; 18 6 

Boarding-school accounts 7,036 18 6 

Examination expenses ... 396 15 

Scholarships and prizes ... 2,900 12 7 
Printing, stationery, Juel, 

light, <k.- 3,774 7 1 

BuildingR, furniture, in- 
surance, rent, and rates 17,050 15 10 
Expenditure on endow- 

men 8 5,283 11 

Interest ... ... ... 896 17 4 

Sundries not classified ... 2,767 7 B 
Credit balances, Slst De- 
cember. 1904 ... ... 33,436 9 5 



£121,445 9 6 



District High Schools. 
Besides 1,595 qualified pupils receiving free tuition at second- 
ary schools, there were 2,291 pupils receiving secondary education 
in secondary classes belonging to' the district high schools at the 
end of the year 1904. 

A table is given showing the number of qualified pupils attending 
these district high schools on the 31st December, 1904— viz., 2,330. 



DI8TBI0T HIGH SCHOOLS. 



131 



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182 



ISTRW ggALAND OPFICIAL TSAR-BOOE, 



It will be noticed that there is a substantial increase in the 
rnmber of pupils during the year 1901 who received free insiruction 
in secondary subjects, and that the schools performing the function 
increased from 50 to 52 in number. 

New Zealand Ukivkrsity. 

The introduction of university education into New Zealand was 
effected by the Superintendent and Provincial Council of Otago, 
who in 1869 passed an Ordinance under which the University of 
Otago was established. Following closely on the founding of this 
institution was the establishment of the University of New Zea- 
land under an Act of the General Assembly, ** The New Zealand 
University Act, ]870/' This University Bubsequently received a 
Boyal charter, whereby the degrees which it confers are declared 
entitled to "rank, precedence, and consideration" throughout the 
British Empire " as fully as if the said degrees had been 
conferred by any university of the United Kingdom/* It was 
apparently contemplated by Parhament (vide section 19 of the 
Act last quoted) that the New Zealand University and the Otago 
University should be amalgamated ; but the negotiations for this 
purpose having failed the two institutions remained for some time 
distinct bodies. In the year 1874» however, the University of Otago 
surrendered or put in abeyance its power of conferring degrees, and 
became aliiliated to the University of New Zealand, and at the 
same time it was stipulated that the University of New Zealand 
should not directly exercise functions of teaching. 

" The New Zealand University Act, 1874," which repealed the 
statute of 1870, gave power to the Senate to confer, after examina- 
tion, the several degrees of Bachelor and Master in Arts, Bachelor 
and Doctor in Law, Science, Medicine, Music, and also in such 
other departments of knowledge, except theology, as might be deter- 
mined by the said Senate in tfie future. 

By statute passed in 1904 further powers were given to confer 
the degrees of Doctor of Literature ; Master of Laws; Master of 
Surgery ; Master of Science ; and Bachelor, Master, and Doctor of 
(a) Veterinary Science, (b) Dental Surgery, [c] Engineering (Mechan- 
iciih Electrical, Civil, Mming, Metallurgical, Naval Architecture) ; 
(d) Agriculture, (e) Pubhc Health, (/) Commerce. 

Powers are granted to confer also ad eiinJefu degrees. 

In 1902 an Amendment Act was passed reconstituting the Senate, 
which now consists of twenty-four members or Fellows, five to be 
elected by each of the four University College districts — that is to 
say, two by each governing body, two by each District Court of 
Convocation, and one by each Professorial Board. The reomioing 
four members are nominated by the Governor in Council 

In the year 1873 the Superintendent and Provincial Council of 
Canterbury passed an Ordinance for founding **The Canterbury 
College," and the college was accordingly established with the 
same standard of university education as that of the University 



NEW ZBAIiAND UNIVERSITY. 133 

of Otago, but without the power of conferring degrees. It was 
affiliated to the University of New Zealand. 

In December, 1878, a Boyal Commission on University and 
Secondary Education was appointed by the Governor, which met in 
July, 1879, and reported that two colleges, with an income of £4,000 
each, ought to be established in Auckland and Wellington, and that 
suitable buildings, at a cost of £12,500 each, should be erected in 
those cities. In the following year the Koyal Commission repeated 
these recommendations. 

•* The Auckland University College Act, 1882," which became 
law on the 13th September in that year, definitely established the 
college, and endowed it with a statutory grant of £4,000 per annum. 
By *• The Auckland University College Reserves Act, 1885," three 
blocks of land, containing about 10,000 acres each, and a block 
containing about 354 acres, which had been devoted to the purpose 
of promoting higher education in the Province of Auckland, became 
vested in the Council of the University College. 

The Auckland University College was affiliated to the University 
of New Zealand by the Senate of the University on the 6th March, 
1883, and on the 21st May in the same year the college was opened 
by the Governor. 

Nothing was done for Wellington until the year 1894, when an 
Act was passed entitled "The Middle District of New Zealand 
University College Act, 1894," which said, *' There shall be esta- 
blished in the City of Wellington a college to be connected with the 
University of New Zealand," and provision was made for a governing 
body to be called the Council, but no provision was made for any 
pecuniary grant nor any endowment, and, though certain members of 
the Council were appointed, nothing could be done for want of funds. 

Not until 1897 were the needs of Wellington actually attended to. 
In the session of Parliament that year the Right Hon. Mr. Seddon, 
P.C, Premier of the colony, introduced the Victoria College Act : an 
Act, as stated in the preamble, ** to promote higher education by 
the establishment of a college at Wellington in commemoration of the 
sixtieth year of the reign of Her Majesty Queen Victoria," the college 
being intended to embrace in its work the Provincial Districts of 
Wellington, Taranaki, Hawke'sBay, Nelson, Marlborough, and West- 
land. The Act was passed on the 22nd December, 1897, and the 
Council was formed as provided in the Act, and tlie work of 
organization was begun. The Act provides for the payment out of 
the Consolidated Fund of a grant of £4,000 a year, and also requires 
the Council to give six scholarships each year, called ** Queen's 
Scholarships," to persons of either sex under the age of fourteen 
years, upon the results of an examination under such conditions 
as the Council may provide. The Act further sets apart a parcel 
of land 4,000 acres in extent in the Nukumaru Survey District 
(Wellington Provincial District) as an endowment for the College. 

The Council of the College has established eight chairs : classics, 
English, mathematics and mathematical physics, chemistry and 



KHW eSALAim OFFICIAL TKAB-BOOS. 

physics, biology, law (iwo), and modern languages ; and lecttirei 
in mental science, history, general history, and political econ 
It is intended as fxinds allow to add other subjects. 

The New^ Zealand University is not a teaching body, as above 
explained, undergraduates hitherto for the most part keeping their 
terms at one or other of the aflQliated institutions — the Auckland 
University College, the Victoria College, the Canterbury College, 
and the University of Otago— each of which has now a staff of 
professors and lecturers. On the lat June» 1905, the number of 
graduates who had obtained direct degrees was 1,018, 

The number of undergraduates on the roll of the University 
at that date was 3,160 (exclusive of such as had not performed 
any academical act for a period of ten years), but only 1,761 
were keeping terms {not including undergraduates who had 
not, in the last three years, entered at a college or come up for 
ar.y college or university examination), of w^hora 1,167 were males 
and 694 females. One hundred and eighty-six of the males and 
twenty- seven of the females were medical students. The numbers 
of students attending lectures at the affihated institutions during the 
year 1904 were as follow : At the Auckland University College, 
12B matriculated and 84 non -matriculated ; at Canterbury Col- 
lege^ 210 matriculated and 67 non'matricukited ; at the Otago 
University. 257 matriculated and 30 noti-matriculated. The Vic- 
toria College, before mentioned, affords further facilities for uni- 
versity students, and in June, 1905, had a total of 193 students 
on the roll — 174 matriculated and 21 non-matrieulated. 

The names of the officers forming the controihng body of ibi 
New Zealand University for the year 1905 were : — 

Visn-oB. 
Hb Excellency the Governor. 

Univbrsitt Officers. 
ChAnfellor a908). Sir Robert Stout, K.O.M.G, 
Vice-Chan oellnr (1903), Charlea Christopher Bowen. 
Registrftr (1899), John William Joynt, MA., Dublin, 
Assieiant- Registrar (1904), Barclay Hector. 

Office: WelliDgtoD, 



Firit ap- 
poiatea. 
(•) 1871- The 

10D8. 



The Senate. 
First 



ReTerend Jobo Chapman 
Andrew, M,A ♦ Oxon, 
FrerlerJck Eiirenfried fiaume. 
LLH. N,Z. 
(b) iBg], Charles CbriBtopber Bowen. 
(■) 1H83. Frc*deriek DouglaB Brown, M.A., 
B.Stv, Oxnn. 
1S77. JohD Macinillau Brown, M.A., 

ISKKI Jolui l^ankino Brown. M,A., 0%ou 
(t) 1908. Th« Itc'verend Andrew Canieron, 
B.A.RZ. 



pointpda. 
1904. 

i9oa, 
(•) lesj. 

190:4. 
1908 



William Kdwftrd CoIIine, If-B.. 

Loud.; M,R.C.8., EnR. 
Charles Henry Herbert Cook, M.A., 

CiiDlab. 
Tbe Reverend William Albert 

Evans. 
Frederick Fitebett, If.A., LKD^ 

Renrv Awdrew Oordon, ¥,QM. 

A M T C £ 
Janae* Hay/W.A., IiIi,B,» N.Z 
Oeorige Hoflben. M.A., CanUb, 



l») Retired (in acoordaace with the Act) Id 1908, r«-e)ectei] 1903. (b) nelir«id 

leSi, rtt-elected ia 1688; retirod <izi acGordanoe with tha Aot) in 1903. re-ete«ted 1900, 



PRIVATB AND DENOMINATIONAL SCHOOLS. 



135 



Thb Ssnatb — continued. 



flrttap* 
poiated. 

h)1901. ltieluurdCockbnrnHaclaarin,M.A.. 
LL.D., C*otob.. M.A., N.Z. 
1903. William CbiBbolm Wilson Mc- 
Dowell, B.A., M.B.. CM.. Bdin. 
(•) 1879. Sir George Maurice O Rorke, Kt., 
M.A.. LL.D . Dnblin. 
Oeoroe Sunuel Sale, M.A., Cantab. 
The Ueverend William Salmond. 
M»A.. D.D., Bdin. 



t»)iada 



First ap- 
pointed. 
(«) 1890. Jobn Halliday Soott, M.D., Edln.: 

M.K.C.8.. EnR.; P.K.H.B. 
1903. Bobert Julian Scott, M.Inst.C.B.. 

M.Inst.M.E.. A A I.E.E. 
(•) 1877. John Shand, M.A., LL D., Aberd. 
(«) 1884. Sir liobert Stout. K.C.M.Q. 

1003. Joseph Aut^stus Tole, B.A., LL.B.. 

Sydney. 



(•) Beiired (in accordance with the Act) in 1903, re-elected 19(13. 



Pkivatb and Denominational Schools. 

There were 295 private schools in the colony at the end of 1904, 
an increase of 7 on the number in 1903 : 30 were for boys, 77 for 
girls, and 188 for children of both sexes. The number of pupils at- 
tending them was 16,378 — namely, 6,785 boys and 9,593 girls, not 
conn ting 67 Maoris, 36 boys and 31 girls. The number of Euro- 
pean pupils at these schools was greater than in 1903 by 769. Of 
the private schools, 149 were Roman Catholic, with an attendance 
of 11,373 pupils. 

The following gives, for the past ten years, the number of private 
schools and of Europeans attending them, the number of Boman 
Catholic schools and pupils being also shown separately : — 



Year. 



Number 

of 
Private 
Schools. 



Pupils. 



Included in Previous 
I Numbers. 



Boys. 



1895 . . 


298 


6,187 


1896 . . 


283 


5,845 


1897 . . 


278 


5,974 


1898 . . 


294 


6,043 


1899 . . 


307 


6,219 


1900 . . 


304 


6,152 


1901 . . 


309 


6,244 


1902 . . 


297 


6,451 


1903 . . 


288 


6,406 


1901 . . 


295 


6,785 



Oirls. 

8,472 
8,102 
8,473 
8.789 
9,076 
9,403 
9,100 
9,173 
9,204 
9,593 



Totals. I Schools 



Pupils at 
catholic I »Xllc 



lioinan 



Schools. 



14,659 
13,947 
14,447 
14,782 
15,295 
15,555 
15,344 
15,624 
15,609 
16,378 



114 
115 
120 
124 
133 
132 
129 
139 
139 
149 



10,458 
I 9,590 
I 9,642 
I 10,175 
; 10,526 
I 10,687 
! 10,448 
j 10,802 
; 10,812 
I 11,373 



The total number of children of European d ascent (including 
such half-castes as live among Europeans) known to be receiving 
education at school at the end of 1904 was 154,885 ; of these, 
146,383 were from 5 to 15 years of age. The census showed also 
5,055 children receiving tuition at home in 1901, against 6,352 
in 1896. No doubt increased school accommodation in country 
places does away with the need for tutors and governesses to a 
certain extent. 

The distribution of the private schools in tlie various provincial 
districts of the colony is shown in the next page : — 



136 



NBW ZBALAUD OFFIOIAL llAR-BOOll. 



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SCHOOLS FOB NATIVES. 



137 



Schools for Natives. 

The nomber of Native village schools in operation at the end of 
1904 either supported or subsidised by the Government was 100. 
In addition, there were six boarding-schools for Native children, 
the cost of whose maintenance was partly paid either by the Govern- 
ment or from endowments, and three private Native day-schools. 

At the five boarding-schools, St. Stephen's and Te Ante for boys, 
and Hukarere, St. Joseph's, and Victoria Schools for girls, the 
Government offers 113 scholarships, tenable for two years, for child- 
ren of predominantly Maori race who pass the Fourth Standard 
at the Maori village schools. At the end of the year 91 of these 
places were occupied, 36 by boys, and 55 by girls. 

Maori children attending public schools who pass the Fifth 
Standard before reaching the age of fifteen may obtain allowances 
of £20 a year to enable them to attend a secondary school or to 
enter upon industrial pursuits. There are seven scholars receiving 
higher education and two boys serving apprenticeships under these 
conditions. 

The number of Maori children attending schools during the 
fourth quarter of 1904 was 6,079 — namely, 3,453 males and 2,626 
females. These included 312 half-castes at the Native village 
schools who were living as members of Maori tribes, and 257 at 
pabhc European schools. 

The numbers at the several schools in 1903 and 1904 were as 
under : — 



Schools. 



I Total of both 
Soxos. 



1903. 



At public European schools . . 1,183 

Ai Native village schools . . 1 , 847 
At subsidised or endowed board- ' 

ing-schools . . . . 117 
At private European or Native ' 

schools . . . . . . 107 



Maori Cbildreu attending Schools. 
Boys. ! Girls. 

190J. 1001 

867 



1901. 



1903, 



Totals ..3,254 



1,333 

1,855 j 1,451 , 1,470 

166 134 127 



99 



6i 



3,453 2,515 2,626 




6,079 



There was thus, in 1904, an increase of 199 in the number 
of Maori boys, and 111 in the number of Maori girls, attending 
school. 

Seventy-two out of the 100 Native village schools in opera- 
tion on Slst December, 1904, were under the charge of masters 
and twenty under mistresses, and one under the joint control of 
a master and mistress ; there were besides eighty-four assistants, 
and eleven sewing-mistresses. The salaries paid to the head teachers 
range from £80 to £264 and those for assistants and sewing- mis* 
tresses from a nominal sum to £50. 



18H K£W ZSALAHD OFFIOUL lEAR-BDOK. 

The net expenditure on Native schools for 1904 was as follows: 
Teachers* salaries aod allowances, £16,070 17s. 9d, ; teachers' re- 
moval allo'watices, £419 13s. 2d. ; books and school rexjuisites, 
£723 lis. lOd. ; repairs and small works, £651 Ss. 5d. ; inspec- 
tion. £520 16s. 8d. ; travelling-expenses of Inspectors, £295 13s. Id. . 
boarding-schools * scholarships, and apprenticeship charges £2»307 
18b, ; bniidings, fencing, furniture, &c., £3/272 13s, lid* ; technical- 
instruction classes, £185 Ss. ; model kainga, £125 28. lOd. ; sun- 
dries, £308 lis, 3d.: total, £24.881 9s. lid. 



ScHObABSHlPS. 

Na tional Sc kolars hip $ * 

An Act to encourage higher education in New Zealand by t^ 
granting of National Scholarships was passed in 1903, and has since 
been incorporated in '* The Education Act, 1904/* Provision is made 
for the establishment of junior and senior scholarships, the necessary 
funds being furnished by the Colonial Treasurer. 

A junior scholarship is ofilered in each education district for 
every five thousand or part of five thousand children in average 
yearly attendance, tenable for three years, with an extension of one 
year under certain conditions. The value of a junior scholarship 
is £10 per annum in addition to tuition fees. Candidates must be 
under fourteen years of age. A scholarship shall not be awarded 
to or held by any child whose parents are in receipt of a net annual 
income exceeding £250. 

Four senior National Scholarships are offered in each university 
district to persons of either sex under nineteen years of age who 
have been holders of junior scholarships or Education Board 
scholarships, and will be awarded on the result of the junior 
scholarship examination of the University. The value of a senior 
scholarship is £20 per annum in addition to tuition fees, and it is 
tenable for three years. 

Where the holder of a junior or senior National Scholarship is 
obliged to live away from home in order to prosecute his or her 
studies an additional sum of £30 per annum shall be paid. 



Queen* s Scholar$hips, 

" The Queen's Scholarships Act, 1903,'* provides for the ei 
blishment in connection with the Victoria College, and out of its 
funds, six junior aod four senior scholarships, each tenable for three 
years, but an extension of one year can be obtained under certain 
conditions in the case of junior scholarships. Each junior scholar* 
ship is valued at £10 per annum in addition to tuition fees, and the 
holder of each senior scholarship is entitled to receive £20 per 
annum. In both cases an additional £30 per annum is paid if 
bolder is obliged to live away from home. 



th? 



ii^P 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 



139 



Education Board Scholar shivs. 
Particulars of the scholarships and the expenditure of the Boards 
thereon in 1904 are given in detail. 





I|g" 






^2 


Boards' 




Edacation 
Districts. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


1 


Expenditure 
on Scholar- 


Annual Value, fto. 




!•§« 






|h 


ships in 1904. 












Tears. 


£ s. d. 




AneklaJid ... 


85 


66 


19 


3 


1.841 7 11 


10 at £30. 22 at £25, 17 at 
£20. 36 at £15. 


Taranaki 


11 


8 


8 


Varies 


283 2 


6 at t^o, 1 at £2J 10s.. 4 at 
£10. 


W&nganui 


96 


34 


11 


Varies 


737 13 3 


14 at £}0, 11 at £15. 


Welliogton 


SB 


15 


23 


2 


910 12 


8 at £:i5, 2 at £ 18 188., 1 at 
£17. ^ at il5. 


Hawke's Bay 


ao 


14 


16 


2 


498 1 2 


2 at £40, 4 at £:« 4b., 7 at 
£:«, 1 at £22 108.. 1 at 
£12. 5 at £10 48.,! at £10. 
4 at 18 Ps . 5 at £2 2s. 


Uarlborongh 


6 


2 


6 


2 


155 


3 at £35. .5 at £10. 


KelMn 


17 


10 


7 


2 


377 6 


3 at £.50 108.. 3 Nt £40. 2 at 
£25. 9 at £1 5s. 


Cray 


4 


1 


3 


Varies 


64 10 


1 at £2^ 2 at £2 >. I at £8. 


Weatiand 


6 


3 


2 


2 


60 


2 at £24. 1 at £12. 2 at £4. 


North Canterbury 


as 


17 


19 


2 


l,2;i6 10 6 


22 at £4(1. 14 Ht £20. 


Sontb Canterbury 


24 


16 


8 


2 


336 19 10 


9 ar £.2-2 I0«., 1 at £13 lOa., 
14 at £7 1"8. 


Otago 


51 


S3 


18 


Varies 


1.114 8 4 


5 at (40, 1 at £15. 5 at £:M, 
2 at £2.->. Mat £20, 8 at 
£15. fi at £.2 10s., 11 at 
£7 lOs. 


Southland 


20 


16 


4 


2 


615 11 9 


15 at £35. 5 at £15. 


Totals. 1904 ... 


354 


210 


144 


... 


8,260 1 9 




Totals. 1903 ... 


350 


203 


147 




8,550 4 





Industrial Schools. 
In December, 1904, the total number on the books of all the 
industrial schools was 1,918, or 9 more than at tlie close of the 
yeax 1903. On the books of the Government industrial schools 
there were 1,387, an increase of 21 over the corresponding number 
for 1903 ; on the books of the private industrial schools there were 
531, or 12 less than at the end of the previous year. Tiie number 
in residence at Government schools was 299, and at private indus- 
trial schools 304, so that 603 was the total number of "inmates'* 
actually in residence. The number boarded out was 548, 8 being 
from private schools and the rest from Government schools. There 
were 7 girls maintained in various correcuve institutions, 2 girls in 
cottage homes, 3 boys at the School for Deaf-mutes, Sumner, and 
9 boys at the Gostley Training Institution, Auckland. The total 
number of inmates dependent on the schools for maintenance was 
therefore 1,172, or 37 more than the number at the end of 1903. 
The remaining 746, although still subject to control and suoervision, 
were not dependent on the schools for maintenance. They may 
be classified as follows : Licensed to reside witii friends, 178 ; at 
service, 494; in hospital, 4; in lunatic asylum, 5; in the Gostley 
Training Institution, Auckland, 3 ; in other institutions, lo ; in 
gaol, 3 ; absent without leave, 44 — namely, 29 from service, 13 tioiu 
the schools, and 2 from friends. 



140 



NEW ZBALAND OFFICIAL YBAH-BOOK. 



The cost of the Government industrial schools and the amount 
recovered (from Charitable Aid Boards, from parents, from sale of 
farm-produce, &c.) are next shown : — 

Ck)ST OF QOVSBNMSNT INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS, 1904. 



Boardingout. 
Rohna\ <^o*^ ^f (Included 
^"**°*- 1 School. inflrst 
oolunin). 


Salaries. | 
flnt colnnmOj 


Net Cost. 


. e. a. 
Auckland .. 2,236 9 9 
Levin .. 4,606 1 10 
Burnham .. 6,043 4 
Oaveraham ... 9,340 11 8 
TeOraogaHome 1,315 3 9 
Receiving Home, 3,739 8 4 

Weliiogton 
Receiving Home, 3,327 17 7 

Christchurch 


£ B.' d. 
1,142 2 5 

3,280'il 9 
2,619 *7 6 
2,229 12 4 


1 

£ B. d. £ B. d. 

360 5 01.026 7 11 

206 14 8 704 1 5 

1,902 12 3 559 15 4 

1,529 9 4 4,172 7 4 

484 7 9 61 18 10 

310 3 01,966 2 8 

351 3 10|1,174 7 1 

! 


J a. d. 

1,210 1 10 
8,902 5 
5,483 11 
5,174 4 4 
1,253 9 11 
1,773 5 8 

2,158 10 6 


Totals .. 30,614 19 3 


9,271 14 


5,144 15 10 


9,664 15 


7 


20,950 3 8 


Salaries and expenses of Asi 

Officers 
Travelling-expenses of manage 
Refund of inmates' earnings 
Contingencies 


listant In»p 
rs and otben 


Mtors and Viiitmg 
I,. 


£ 


1,839 4 3 

112 19 8 
101 6 3 

113 9 7 


Total net cost . . 


23.117 3 5 



There were six Government industrial schools in existence in 
1904, and the numbers of inmates on their books at the end of the 
year were as follows : Auckland, 135 ; Receiving Home, Welling- 
ton, 195 ; Receiving Home, Christchurch, 236 ; Burnham, 231 ; Te 
Oranga Home, 63; Caversham, 527: total, 1,387. Those belong- 
ing to private industrial schools were distributed as follows : St. 
Mary's, Auckland, 135; St. Joseph's, WeUington, 69; St. Mary's, 
Nelson, 280; St. Vincent de Paul's, Dunedin, 47 : total, 531. 

The next table shows payments made by the Government on 
account of inmates in private industrial schools, the recoveries, and 
the net expenditure by the Government. The contributions from 
Charitable Aid Boards to these schools, being made directly to the 
managers, are not included in the recoveries shown. 

QOVEKNMENT EXPENDITURE ON PRIVATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS (B.C.), 1904. 



School. 


1 

j Payments. 

1 


1 
Becoveriee. 


NetBzi>enditiix»by 


St. Mary's, Auckland . . 

St. Joseph's, Wellington 

St. Mary's, Nelson 

St. Vincent de Paul's, Dunedin 


£ 8. d. 
1,204 15 

328 

1,137 1 9 

81 3 6 


£ 8. d. 
130 19 

57 6 10 
379 8 

26 7 


£ 8. d. 

1,078 16 

270 13 2 

757 13 9 

54 16 6 


Totals . . 


2,751 3 


594 10 


2,156 19 5 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 



141 



During 1904 inmates were maintained in eight other institutions, 
and the expenditure on this account was as follows : Gostley Train- 
ing Institution, Auckland, £170 12s. ; Miss M. Duffs Home, Auck- 
land, £10; St. Mary's Home, Otahuhu, £12 128. lOd. ; Mission 
Home, Jerusalem, Wanganui (Mother Aubert's), £31 4s. ; Levin 
Memorial Home, Wellington, £13 4s. 5d. ; Miss E. Knott's Home, 
Christchurch, £17 15s. 8d. ; Miss C. Sloane's Home, Ghristchurch, 
£1 58.; Mount Magdala, Christchurch, £128 18s.; Rhodes's 
Convalescent Home, Ghristchurch, £1 128. 6d. ; Avon Pine Sana- 
torium, Christchurch, £80 14s. Id. ; Salvation Army Maternity 
Home, Christchurch, £17 ; Gordon Street Refuge, Ghristchurch, £3 ; 
Nursing Hospital, 10s. 6d. 

In the Government schools the policy is to board out all children 
of suitable age and character. The authorities of the private 
schools do not as a rule adopt the boarding-out system. 

The total number of inmates of the private and Government 
industrial schools is given for the years 1903 and 1904, and the 
variations in the numbers boarded out, in residence, or at ser- 
vice : — 









ImCATBS, 


1908 


AND 1904. 














Boarded out. jin Residence.' A* ^Jf^*^®' 


Totala. 


-^■^ 


i 


1 


1 


'^- 1 '^- 


f i 


- ■' " 


i 


i 


i' 


i 1 


1 


i 




i 


f-i 


1 


1 


lii 


n 1 a 


1,1 


1" 


1 1 


GoTArnment 








1 


[ ' 1 1 ' 


■ 


1 




Bchoolt— 












1 , 








Aoeiclatid 


63 




m < 


u 


98 


,. ./ 28 iO 3' ... 13 


131 4 


.. 135 


Hcc^ivingHoiDe. 


185 


81 


• • 


166 


, ^ 


1 .. r 31 .,' 3 


28 


166^ 29 


. 195 


VVellingtoEi 














1 1 


1 






Te OtArgi Home, 


, , 


»♦ 


• 1 


* > 


31 


9 


, ' iC' 25 ... 2 


23 


56, 1 


., 63 


Chri«Ecbiiroh 














' 




1 




B « e « i T i n g 130 




m , 


131 


10 


, , 


% %\ m, .: 2 


97| 


239' .. 


3, aae 


H^ietfl.Climt' 












J * 


1 






churob 














i i 








Barnham 


2 




1 


1 


m 


7 


.. 99168 .. 27 


131 


2fi2 .. 


23 231 


CftTer»ham * * 


I7f 






176;i37 


.Jifjsaaoa, i8| ,, 


226i 


522, 6 


. . 527 


Priiftto Scb 00 li- 










1 . ■ ; 1 


, 






st. MiJ7*flf Auck 
St, Joaephy 


*; 


.. 


■ • 


., 


83|.,, s! 78 48' Ol .. 

1 J 1 > 


57! 


131. 4| 


., \B5 


., 


« * 


^^ 


• ■ 


34'„I 6< 39; ^6' ..i 5 


*i' 


80 .. 


IJ 69 


WeUIngton 








i 








St. Mmij\ N«l. 


1 


9 


»» 


3160; 7|.. 167,130 .. 20 


tio 


291 .. 


n 2^0 


son 








III' 








St. Vmotnt d« 


4 




, , 


5 as 6.. 31 12 .. 1( 11 


41 6 


,. 47 


Pftui*«, Dun- 








. , 1 






tain 








. ' ' 1 1 

1 1 . _ 






Total! .< 


612 


B1 


1 


6486C0W*27 60:^797 BO ^►7C7l,9mJ 55 

1 ' 1 1 


4ti 1,918 



142 iTMW svalaHd official tsah-book* 

Institute for the Blind* 

The Jubilee Institute for the Blind at Auckland ia a private in- 
Btifcutiou, and not in any way under Government control. Being, how- 
ever, a ** separate institution "* under the Hospitals ami Charitable 
Institutions Acts^ it receives a subsidy at the rate of 24s. in ihe pound 
upon the voluntary contributions raised bv the Trustees, and, in addi- 
tion » payment is made to it by the Eiiucation Department on account 
of pupils for whose tuition the Department ia responsible. The Trus^ 
tees have received, at various times, other grants in aid of buildings. 
The total amount paid on account of Govern nie^it pupils during the 
year 1904 was £428 lt>8. lOd, The Department also paid £23 for 
the separate tuition of a pupil in Christcburch ; £102 IQs. was re- 
covered from parents and others. The numl>er of Government 
pupils at the end of 1903 was 22 ; 2 of these left during the year 
1904, and 4 w^ere admitted; the number of such pupils at the close 
of the last year was accordingly 24. 

School for Deaf'Vmtes. 

The roll of this school includes all the known deaf-mutes of 
gchool age and of sound intellect m the colony wlio have been 
brought under the notice of the Education Department. 

The inclusion in the School Attendance Act of 1901 of provisions 
dealing with blind and deaf children marks an important step in the 
education of these unfortunate members of the community. Hitherto 
many parents, either through carelessness or wdfully, have neglected 
to Bend such children to the institutions maintained for their special 
instruction ; but now the Minister of Education has the power to 
enforce attendance, due provision being made for a contribution 
by parents towards the cost of maintenance or for free adroission 
where parents are not in a position to contribute. The imme- 
diate consequence is an unusual increase in the number of can- 
didates for a»lmission to the Sumner School for Deaf* mutes. 
The number in residence at the end of 1901 was thn^ty-six boys 
and twenty-nine girls, or two boys more and one girl less than at 
the end of 1903. 

The method of instruction used at Sumner is the oral method, 
in favour of which there is a vast predorniimnce of expert opinion, 

As regards the adoption of that system, the Minister of Educa- 
tion remarks, *' It is a matter for cont^*ratuIation that this colony 
from the first adopted the oral method of teaching, m which children 
are taught to converse by watching the lips of others. In America, 
where manna! and mixed methods were at first largely in vogue, 
they are being rapidly discarded in favour of oral instruction, 
and New Zealand has accordingly been saved the expense and 
inconvenience of changing from inferior systems of tieaf-muto 
education to that which is now almost universally admitted to be 
the best,** 

Sundai/'Schools. 

The returns for the census of 1901 showed that 107,113 pupils 
^rere aUeDdiug Sunday-schools, and ihete were 1L,299 teachers. 



^H 8UBSIDISRD FUBLIO LIBKABIBB. 143 

■ SC7BSIDI6BD POBLIC LIBRARIES, 1904-5- | 

The outnber of Jibraries participating in the vote granted 
for subsidies shows an increase of fifteen as compared with 
the Dumt5er aided in the previous year. In order that the pur- 
pose intended to be served by the vote may be attained, it is made 
a condition for participation that the whole of the subsidy granted to 
each library' in the previous year shall have been expended in the 
purchase of books. 

The number of libraries subsidised was 411 : the income £13»604 ; 
amount on which subsidy calculated, £17,402 ; and amount of 
subsidy, £3,000. * ^ 

SUPPLBMKKTAL ; TRAIKINO OF TEACHERS. 

Far the training of tefteherB, Feconclarj an<i primary, provision has been 
made hy tbe efitabliflhtneiic of a Don-reRidentiai trai^iirg colUge in each of the 
four chief cenires of popiilatic n— AucJsla^id, Chrif«tc*iurch, Dunedin. and WeU 
liDgton. Trammg ictitititiionR for primar} te&cber- have for many years been in 
oreraiion in Chri^tchurch and Ducetii"* satinlying the needs in thin regard of 
their re^p«ctive districts, Biid incidentally of the colony. Recendy, tba training 
arrangemenU .of the colony have undt-rfone reorganiicationf a more liberal 
^ '^c al provi&ioii has bren mti^e by PmliBmerit, and ts^o additloDal training 
jiiona have been opentrd. Grar»ts for new buildinga iifgently required for 

ing purposes in Auckland and Wellington have been voted by Parliamfiit; 

I atd towards a much-neeued improvement in the Rcconmnodau'oa at Duncdin 
I active etops are also being tfiken. Tbe four training colleges now in operation 
I are calculated to pio\ide adequale meaiiB of training on modern lioea lor a 
I total of 8120 students, and during the fir^t qunrter of 1906 220 stadenta were 
B^petnally in attendance, 28 at Auckland, 65 at Chiibtchurcb, 74 at Dunedin, and 
HpB at \Vrllingt(>n. 

■™ Connected with each training college is a normal or practieing Bchool, which 
inelndes, besides the ordinFiry olaBseit of a pniilic elementary nohool, a model 
"country ** school of forty children and a secondary department* The secondary 
department afiords cpporiunitieB of prAciical training to thoae who intend to 
take up secondary ^ork either in the bigb schooli or in the upper departmentB 
of dktriei high Bchools. 

Aocordirg to the regulatioDB adopted, students of a training college take 
Etifliah and other non-t^pecial t'Ubjecte at the univerBity college, and attend 
Ucturefi in the methods of teaching nnd in tbe history and principles of education, 
Qud«r the principal, who Ib g**! erally also by appointment Ihe university col- 
lege lecturer in education. Every one is required to take up at least one 
t»rat}ch of science, special attention being directed to nature-study and ele- 
meiiiary agriculture; and baodwork of various forme suited to school purposes 
^ao receives a prominent place in the curricuium. 

A papiUieaober in any education district wlio has satisf 1.0 tori ly completed 
kit term of service may enter at the training college most convenient for hirn, 
tbe complete course extending over two yearn. During thiB period he reoeivefi^ 
in addition to the amount of his university college feei^, a sum of £30 a year, 
with a further allowance of £30 if he ir GutnpeHed to live awav from home to 
attend the college. Advantages not qui'.e mo great are also ojldred to otbor 
quadified candidates who have not been pupi^ teachers. Others again may be 
Bdmitted for longer or shorter periods akbuugh they may for Bome time hftve 
been engaged in the practice of trteir profesfiion. 

Tbe total annual cott of maintaining the four training collGgCB Ih approxi- 
tnatelj £90,000, a sum which includes, however, the cost of teaching 1,600 to 
1,800 children in the practiaing Bchools, whose instruction would otherwise have 



■ 



to be provided for. 



1 



SECTION II.— LAW AND CRIME. 
Civil Cases. 

Sittings of the Supreme Court are held for trial of ci^il cases 
at Auckland, Gisborne, New Plymouth, Napier, Palmerston North, 
Wellington, and Wanganui, in the North Island ; and at Blenheim, 
Nelson, Hokitika, Christchurch, Timaru, Oamaru, Dunedin, and 
Invercargill, in the Middle Island. 

The number of writs of summons issued in the Supreme Court in 
1904 was 536, against 484 in 1903, 488 in 1902, 485 in 1901, and 
414 in 1900. The number of civil cases tried increased from 209 in 
1903 to 222 in 1904. Of these last, 40 were tried before common 
juries, 10 by special jury, and 172 by Judge without jury. The 
total of amounts for which judgments were recorded in 1904 was 
£46,004. There were 45 writs of execution issued during the year. 

Forty cases were commenced at jQfceen District Courts in 1901. 
Tiiirteen of these cases were tried before juries, and 13 before a 
Judge only, making a total of 26 cases tried. Twelve cases lapsed 
or were discontinued. The total of amounts sued for was £7,832, 
and judgments were recorded for £2,767. Before the Magistrates' 
Courts 19,569 cases were tried, against 16,571 in 1903 ; the affgre* 
gate sum sued for during 1901 being £335,147, and the total for 
which judgment was given £179,829. 

Court of Appeal. 

Five Crown (criminal) cases were reserved from the superior 
Courts to be brought before the Court of Appeal in 1904. In all 
cases the convictions were affirmed. There were appeals from 32 
civil cases, of which 9 were allowed, 13 dismissed, and 10 were not 
prosecuted. Judgment was given on 1 other case removed to the 
Court of Appeal. 

Bankruptcy. 

The petitions in bankruptcy during 1904 numbered 257, of which 
217 were made by debtors and 40 by creditors. This number is 
53 more than the number of petitions for the preceding year. 

Of the bankruptcies in 1904 : in 12 cases the liabilities were 
under £50; in 45, from £50 to £100; in 80, from £100 to £260; 
in 52, from £250 to £500 ; in 40, from £500 to £1,000 ; in 19, from 
£1,000 to £2,000 ; in 4, from £2,000 to £5,000 ; in 4, £5,000 and 
upwards. In 1 case no statement was filed. 

The following gives the number of petitions, the total amount 
of the unsecured assets, the amount of debts proved, and the 
amount paid in dividends and preferential claims for the yean 
1896 to 1904 :— 



OtVOBCB. 



145 







Debtorm* 










Hnitiber of 


exploding 
AtaotmU 


Ajnounta 


1 


AmouDU vmUi 


Y«mr, 


Pttiitions 


roAliacid by 


Aiuuuut of 


la DlTJdeods 


In B^xA- 


Omclikl 


liebls iirovod. 


litid l^reforeoi* 


1 


niploy. 1 






lulCUiuuw 


' 




Cr«dlU»n« 












£ 


f 


£ 


i 


ia» 


412 


115,455 


7U712 


256,870 


37,492 


1807 


415 


T3,466 


40/J42 


183^344 


45,015 


laea 


407 


9n,CH3B 


45.474 


285,154 


30.994 


IB99 


389 


5'J,434 


34,268 


158 ^d3l 


JS0,064 


1900 


304 


77.6y9 


53,415 


141,800 


37,411 


1901 


222 


58.fJ58 


49,781 


84,452 


30,356 


vao% 


2a5 


ijl,(X^ 


S'J/i.h 


1I0,!)95 


29.40G 


tMB 


ao4 


H>,767 


ii^7(ii 


68,019 


17.618 


t9(M 


a57 


6e»094 


43.514 


125,39^ 


28,103 



The degree to which private assignment of estates is resorted to 
cannot be ascertained, 

Divorce. 

In 1898 the Legislature of New Zealand passed a Divorce Act, 
iod the signification of Her late Majesty's assent thereto was duly 
notified by His Excelloncy the Governor in a Proclamation dated 
tbd 1st April, 1899, bringing tl>e Act into operation from the 1st 
Jime of that year. 

This Act placed persons of either sex practically on an equality 
m regards petitions for dissolution of marriage; the same grounds, 
id substance, for a decree of divorce applying to man or woman. 
It, together with the Acts of 1667 and 1881, are now compiled in 
**Th€ Divorce and Matrimonial Causes Act, 1904." 

Besides this important alteration of the law, the grounds for 
diTorce are extended as under : — 

1. Adultery, on either side. 

2. Wilftd desertion continuously during tve years or more. 

3. Habitual drunkermesa during four years and upwards on the 

part of husband, along with failing to support wife or 
habitual cruelty; or habitual drunkenness for a like period 
and neglect, with unfitness to discharge her household 
duties on the part of the wife. 

4. Conviction, with sentence of imprisonment or penal servitude 

for seven years or upwards, lor attempting to take life of 
petitioner. 

Every decree for dissolution of marriage is in the first instance to 
be a decree nisi, not to be made absolute till after the expiration of 
such time, being not less than three months from the pronouncing 
thereof, as the Court shall by order from time to time direct. 

The petitioner need not necessarily move to make absolute any 
decree nitsi that may be pronounced. 

A decree for a judicial separation may be obtained either by the 
husband or wife on the ground of adultery, or of cruelty, or of deser- 

i without oause for a period of two years. 



146 



NEW ZKALAKD OFFICIAL ^MAK-BOOK. 



The petitions in 1904 aiider **The Divorce and Matrimonial Causee 
Act, 1867/' were 162 in number, bein^ 13 more than those for 1903: 
166 Mvere for dissolution of marriage, and 6 for judicial separation ; 
111 decrees for dissolution of marriage were granted. The proceed- 
ings under the Act for the years 1896 to 1904 were as follows: — 





Petitions for 


D^oreeft for 


1 Year 








F 


DfMolution of • Judicial 


DilMlutfOQ of 


Jodiclft] 




MurrUga. 


Sepumtiou. 


lf«rriA«e. 




1896 


55 


6 


36 




1897 


48 


10 


83 




1898 


51 


13 


32 




1899 1 


112 


1 


46 


16 


IDOC* 


111 


5 


as 




1901 ' 


139 


1 


103 




1902 


136 


2 


91 


f • 


1903 . 1 


146 


a 


136 




19t>4 


156 


6 


111 





The Act of 1898 has evidently operated in the direction of in- 
creasing largely the number of petitions and decrees for dissolution 
of marriage or judicial separation. 

The proportion of petitions and decrees for dissolution of marriage 
to the number of marriages was up till 1898 higher in New ZeaJand 
than in England and Wales, but lower than in New South Wales 
or Victoria. The full effect of the operation of the new law in 
New Zealand is now, however, being experienced. 

As early as 1889 an Act was passed in Victoria to allow of 
divorces being granted for wilful desertion, habitual drunkenness 
with cruelty or neglect, imprisonmeut under certain circumstances 
of either party, and adultery on the part of the husband. This 
multiplication of the causes for divorce has largely increased the 
proportion of decrees in that State. 

An Act of a similar tenor w^as passed in New South Wales in 
1892, and brought into working in August of that year, under 
which, and an amending Act of 1893| in addition to adultery since 
marriage on the part of the wife, and adultery and cruelty on the 
part of the husband, petitions for divorce can now be granted in 
that State on any of the following grounds :■ — 

Husband u. wife : Desertion for not less than three years : 
habitual drunkenness for a similar period ; refusing to obey 
an order for restitution of conjugal rights ; bemg imprisoned 
under a sentence of three years or upwards; attempt to mur- 
der or inflict grievous bodily harm, or repeated assaults on 
him wathin one year previously. 
Wife V. husband : Adultery, provided that at the time of the 
institution of the suit the husband is domiciled in New South 
Wales ; desertion for not less than three years ; habitual 



CBIMINAL CASES. 



147 



dmnkexmess with cruelty or neglect to support for the same 

period ; refusing to obey an order for restitution of conjugal 

rights ; being imprisoned for three years or upwards, or having 

within five years undergone various sentences amounting in all 

to not less than three years; attempt to murder, or assault 

with intent to inflict grievous bodily harm, or repeated assaults 

within one year previously. 

To entitle either party to seek relief on these grounds, he or she 

must have been domiciled in the State at the time of instituting 

the suit for three years or upwards, and should not have resorted 

to the State for the purpose of the suit. When a wife seeks for a 

decree on the ground of three years' desertion, if she was domiciled 

in New South Wales when the dftsertion commenced, she shall not 

be deemed to have lost her domicile by reason of her husband 

having thereafter acquired a foreign domicile. 

The divorces in New South Wales and Victoria since the divorce 
law has been altered in the direction of increasing the grounds for 
decrees are as under. With these are given the figures for New 
Zealand under the old law up to 1898, and according to the Act of 
1898 up to 1904. The figures for New South Wales tend to show 
that on altering the law there was a large accumulation of cases to 
get rid of, which increased the number of decrees to a degree which 
was not subsequently maintained. 





New Soulh Walen 


Victoria. 


New Zealand 


Tear. 


Divorces. 


Divorces. 


Divorces. 


1893 


306 


85 


25 


19H 


313 


81 


20 


1895 


301 


85 


18 


1896 


234 


106 


36 


1897 


246 


117 


33 


1898 


247 


87 


32 


1899^ 


232 


105 


46 


1900* 


219 


93 


85 


1901* 


252 


83 


103 


1902* 


245 


loy 


91 


1903* 


206 


101 


136 


1904- 


216 


140 


111 




• Acl of 1808 in force in I 


^ew Zealand. 






Criminal C/ 


lSES. 





Charges before Magistrates. 

The number of charges heard before the Magistrates' Courts in 
1904 was 31,603. Repeated charges against the same person are 
counted as distinct. Of the charges in 11)04, 569 were against 
persons of the aboriginal native race, an increase of 24 on the 
number for the previous year. 

If the Maoris be excluded, the number of charges (exclusive 
of lunacy) in 1904 is found to have been 30,934, an increase of 
181 upon the number for 1903 ; and the proportion per 1,000 of 
population was 3660, against 3750 in 1903. 

Persons charged with lunacy and committed to mental hospitals 
lia?e been excluded from the calculationa for this and previous ^'^^.\^ 



us 



NEW ZEALAND OFFIOIAL YBAB-BOOE. 



shown, so that the figures now given will diSer somewhat from 
those appearing in former issues of this book. 

The figures, both numerical and proportional, covering a period 
of twenty- three years are subjoined : — 



Ohabgks bbforb Maqisteates. 







Proportion 






ProporttoB 


Year. 


Number. 


per 1.000 of ' 
Mean 


Tear. 


Number. 


p«^M 


1882 


21,622 


Population. ' 
42-45 


1899 


22,118 


PopuUtioD. 
29-48 


1885 


22,297 


38-89 I 


1900 . 


24,084 


31*54 


1888 


18,370 


30-35 1 


1901 


25,885 


83-20 


1891 


16,714 


26-54 


1902 


28,076 


3519 


1894 


16,820 


24-76 


1903 


80,758 


87-60 


1897 


19,390 


26-87 


1904 


30,934 


36 60 



Summary Convictions, and Convictions in Superior Courts. 

The summary convictions in 1904 numbered 25,672, incladinft 
435 Maoris. 907 persons, 33 of whom were Maoris, were committed 
for trial or sentence at the Supreme and District Comrts, a de- 
crease of 7 on the number committed in 1903. 

Dealing with the summary convictions for all offenceB, the 
figures for 1900 and onwards (excluding the Maoris) are : — 

SUMMABT 

ComnonoiiB. 

PropoartloD 



Year. 

1900— 
Offences against the person . . 
Offences against property 
Other offences 


Namber. 

724 

1,476 

.. 16,285 

.. 18,485 


Mmn 
Popalation. 

0-95 

1-98 

21-8a 


Totals 


24-21 


1901- 
Offences against the person . . 
Offences against property 
Other offences 

Totals . . 


778 

1,736 

.. 17,812 

.. 20,326 


l-OO- 

2-2a 

22-90 

26ia 


1902— 
Offences against the person . . 
Offences against property 
Other offences 


540 

1,759 

.. 19,826 


0-6& 

2-20 

24-85- 


Totals 


.. 22,125 


27-7a 


1903- 
Offences against the person . . 
Offences against property . . 
Other offences 

Totals . . 


644 
.. 1,767 
.. 22,364 

.. '24,765 


0-79- 

215 

27-25 

3019' 


1904- 
Offenccs against the person . . 
Offences against property 
Other offences 


666 
.. 1,801 
.. 22,770 


0-79 

2-18 

26-95. 



Totals 



25,237 



29-87 



CHlMUiAIi CASES. 149 

In dealing with the summary convictions in the Magistrates' 
Comrts each offence is reckoned as a distinct person. The total 
number is from time to time swelled by the inclusion of breaches 
of statutes, the provisions of which give rise to fresh offences 
against the public welfare not strictly criminal, so that com- 
parisons with past years are somewhat affected. 

But the groups of serious criminal offences do not show any 
advance in criminality taken over a period of five years. 

The total of summary convictions for offences against the person 
(excluding Maoris) was 666 for the year 1904, which is actually a 
smaller number than that for 1900 (724), notwithstanding increase 
of population. Of these 666 summary convictions in 1904, the 
greater number (603) were on account of common and aggravated 
assaults, and there were 28 for attempt to commit suicide. 

Of offences against property, theft not otherwise described is the 
most common, showing for 1904 1,211 summary convictions. 
There were besides 32 for specific kinds of theft, and 27 for house- 
breaking. Obtaining money and goods under false pretences caused 
94 summary convictions, and wilful damage to property 417. These 
are the principal items only. 

Under the heading ** Other Offences" (those relating to good 
order included), drunkenness comes first with 9,566 summary con- 
victions, of which 926 were in respect of females. Prohibition 
orders numbered 1,700, including 129 made against women. The 
committals to the Inebriate Institution numbered 9. The subject 
of drunkenness is separately dealt with under a special heading. 

Further offences against good order include 3,231 summary con- 
victions simply defined as *' breach of by-laws," and 1,715 for in- 
sulting behaviour, language, &c., and indecent, riotous, or offensive 
conduct. Also, 247 for assaulting or resisting police. Under 
"Vagrancy," idle and disorderly persons show 558 summary con- 
victions, with rogues and vagabonds 253. The chief items only are 
referred to above. 

Offences against public welfare are dealt with in remarks above. 
Of 78 persons (excluding the Maoris) convicted in the superior 
Courts during the year 1904 for offences against the person only three 
were females. Assault, with or without robbery, was of this class 
the offence which caused the most convictions, these amounting to 38 
altogether, including wounding. There were also 11 convictions 
for indecent assault, 7 for rape, with attempt to commit, and 8 for 
oiher similar offences. For murder and manslaughter 4 persons were 
convicted. 

The convictions for offences against property were far more 
numerous than those against the person, amounting to 162, of 
whom 6 were females. Theft was the principal cause, showing 
79 convictions, exclusive of burglary with robbery, for which 
47 convictions were recorded. 

Besides the above, there were 14 convictions for forgery and 
ottering, 14 for obtaining goods on false pretences and receiving 
stolen goods, and 8 for arson. 



]50 



NEW ZEALAND OFFIOIAL YEAR-BOOK. 



Outside of convictions for offences against person and property, 
24 of a miscellaneous nature remain, making ap a total of 264 
convictions in the higher Courts, excluding 248 persons sent for sen- 
tence by Magistrates. 

But the figures previously referred .to only deal with persons 
convicted in the higher Courts. The committals for sentences 
under ** The Indictable Offences Summary Jurisdiction Act, 1900," 
were : — 



For offonoes against the person 
For offdDce4 against property 
For miscellaneous offeuces . . 

Totals 



Persons. 


Hale*. 


20 


20 


199 


191 


29 


29 



Females. 



248 



240 



Offences against the person include 7 for assault, 5 for indecent 
assault, 2 for attempted suicide, and 6 others. Against property the 
offences in greatest number were: For theft undescribed, 74; for 
specified theft, 32 ; breaking and entering with theft, 36 ; forgery 
and uttering, 36 ; fraud and false pretences, 13 ; receiving stolen 
goods, 4 ; other offences, 4. Miscellaneous offences include — 
escaping from custody, 9 ; making false declaration, 8 ; perjury, 6 ; 
other offences, 6. 



Punishments, 

Including 7 Maoris, the convictions in the superior Courts, 
together with 248 sent from Maj^istrates' Courts for sentence, num- 
bered 519 (persons). Particulars of sentences for these higher 
Courts, and of the punishments consequent on summary convictions 
in the lower Courts, are appended in two tables : — 



Tablb showing tue Skntences op Criminals tried and convicted iw thi 
Supreme and District Courts during Five Years. 



Puuisbmeiits. 



Death .. 

IiiiprisonmeDt with or without hard labour.. 
Fined .. 

Imprisonment with whipping 
Released under " The First Offenders' Proba- 
tion Act, 1886 " 
Held to bail, or awaiting pleasure of Court . . 
Sent to industrial school . . 

Totals .. 



1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1 


1 








286 


272 


253 


305 


411 


2 


17 


9 


10 


12 


2 


1 


•• 


6 


1 


74 


61 


63 


45 


70 


25 


12 


12 


13 


24 


' 




2 


1 


1 


•391 


1354 


♦339 


§380 


11519 



* Including 22 Maoris. f Inci tiding 26 Maoris. t Including 5 Maoris. | Including 
16 Mauris. g including 7 Maoris. 



DBUNKBMNES8. 



161 



Table sbowtko the Pumishmknts inflicted consequent on Summary Con- 
victions IN Magistrates* Courts during Five Years. 



P'm*fhTn#iit#. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


Rne .. 

ImprifODineni in lieu of fine 

Peremptory imprisonment 

Recognisance 

Whipping 

Other .. 


9,206 
1,895 
1,723 
121 
15 
5,525 


9,905 
1.910 
1,948 
105 
20 
6,438 


11,471 

1.874 

1.734 

123 

35 

6.888 


13,631 

1,956 

1.969 

101 

28 

7,080 


13,133 

2,530 

2,067 

130 

85 

7,342 


ToUls .. 


18,485 


20,326 


22,125 


24,765 


25,237 



N.B.^lieoris have been excluded from this table. 



Drunkenness. 
Excluding Maoris, the proportion of convictions for drunkenness 
per 1,000 of population was 9-60 in 1900, 10 32 in 1901, 10 34 in 1902, 
10-70 iu 1903, and 1132 in 1904. The number of convictions to 
which the proportions for the years 1900 to 1904 relate were as 
under : — 



Tear. 
1900 
1901 
1902 



Number. 
7,252 
8,032 
8,244 



Year. 

1903 
1904 



Number. 
8,774 

9,566 



The totals of charges for drunkenness for the same years were : — 

Number. 
7,319 
8,086 



Tear. 
1900 
1901 
1902 



8.311 



Year. 
1903 
1904 



Number. 
8,872 
9,626 



Among the New - Zealand - born population of European de- 
scent there is evidence of less drunkenness than among persons 
who have come to the colony from abroad. At the census of 1901, 
out of- the total population of New Zealand over 15 years of age, 
51-86 per cent, were found to have been born here; while the pro- 
portion of the convictions for drunkenness of New-Zealand-born 
Europeans to the total convictions was in the year 1900 about 17 
per cent. only. 

Daring the five years 1900 to 1904, inclusive, the consumption of 
beer in the colony per inhabitant would seem to have increased, 
the proportion having been 8*7 gallons in the earlier year, against 
9 gallons in the later one. Excluding the Maoris, the same 
result is found to obtain, the figures being 9* 15 for the year 19CX) 
and 9*45 for 1904. Wine and spirits also show an increase in the 
consumption per head of population. 



152 



NBW ZBALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOE. 



The following calcalations are made to show the results, in- 
cluding and excluding Maoris : — 

Consumption of Beer, Wine, and Spibits per Head of Population 
(including and excluding Maoris). 



1900 
1001 
1002 
1903 
1904 



Beer. 
Oal. 

8-696 

8-919 

8777 

8-987 

8-996 



Including Maoris. 

Wine. 
Oal. 

0145 

0151 

0150 

0142 

0135 



Ezolnding Maoris. 



Spirits. 
Gal. 

0-684 

0-726 

0-716 

0-718 

0-729 



Beer. 
Oal. 

9160 

9-413 

9262 

9-460 

9-456 



Wioe. 
Gal. 

0162 

0169 

0158 

0149 

0-142 



Spirits 
GaL 

0720 

0-766 

0-756 

0-755 

0-766 



The actual quantities of beer, wine, and spirits used in the 
colony were, for the five years : — 



1900 .. 

1901 .. 

1902 .. 

1903 .. 
1904*.. 



Beer for 

Consumption. 

Qals. 

6,986,900 

7,323,290 

7,380,883 

7,759,330 

7,989,990 



Wine for 

Consumption. 

Gals. 

116,188 

123,592 

126,450 

122,490 

120,120 



SpiriU for 

Consumption. 

Gals. 

649,982 

596.071 

602,021 

619,649 

647.155 



In Australia the consumption per head of alcoholic liquors for 
1903, according to Mr. Coghlan, is as quoted below : — 



New South Wales.. 
Victoria . . 
Qaeeusland 
SDUth Australia 
Western Australia 
Tasmania 



Spirits. 

Gal. 

Per Head. 

0-79 

0-61 

0-86 

0-46 

1-42 

0-53 



Wine. 

Gal. 

Per Head. 

0-67 

1-24 

0-38 

2-22 

0-75 

018 



Beer. 

Gal. 

Per Head. 

955 
11-61 

9-49 

8-33 
21-82 

8*61 



In the States of Western Australia, New South Wales, and 
Queensland charges for drunkenness are, in proportion to popula- 
tion, more numerous than in New Zealand. The order of the 
States for the year 1903 in this respect is as under : — 



Charges op Drdnkenn 
Queensland 
Western Australia 
New South Wales 
Victoria 



IN Proportion to Population. 
14-02 per 1,000 
16-14 
15-39 
10-45 



* It has been estimated by the Government Statistician of Victoria that each gallon of 
beer (including ale and stout) costs the consumer in that State 38. ; each gallon of tpirito 
358.; and each gallon of wine lOs.- allowing in each case for a certain proportion being 
consumed privately. 

If tbeae figures may be applied to the consumption of alcoholic liquors in New Zealand, 
the average cost per head of the total population is found to be £2 168. 7d., and of the adult 
population £5 59. lid. This is considerably lower than that shown for any of the States of 
the Australian Commonwealth, with the exception of Tasmania. In the Victorian Year 
Book. 1904. the figures have been bo applied to this colony. 



ORIMB AMONO87 MAORIS. 



163 



Crime amongst Maoris, 

The Native population of the colony has hitherto been regarded 
as stationary, and comparisons of the numbers of summary convic- 
tions by the higher and lower Courts are given. The number for 1897 
is swelled by 108 persons convicted of trespass. The figures relating 
to convictions by the superior (Courts are small and fluctuating, the 
proportionately large increase in 1898 being caused by the inclusion 
of sixteen convicted of conspiring to prevent the collection of taxes. 





Summary Convictions of Maoris. 






Year. 
1891 .. 




Namber. 
. 298 


Tear. 
1898 




Number. 
. 349 


1892 .. 




. 293 1 


1899 




. 300 


1893 .. 




. 253 


1900 




. 253 


1894 .. 




. 321 


1901 




. 298 


1896 .. 




. 316 


1902 .. 




. 330 


1896 .. 




. 332 


1903 . . 




. 421 


1897 .. 




. 460 


1904 




. 435 


Cos 


vicnoNa 


OF Maoris 


IN Superior Cour 


TS. 




Year. 
1891 .. 


Con- 
Tiotions. 

. 7 


Namber of ' 
Pervons ; 
oonyiotod. 

7 


Year. 

1898 


Con- 
victionfl. 

. 21 


Number of 

Persons 

convicted. 

35 


1892 .. 


. 16 


15 


1899 


. 8 


7 


1893 .. 


. 13 


12 


1900 .. 


. 22 


22 


1894 .. 


. 25 


24 


1901 


. 26 


26 


1895 .. 


. 17 


51 


1902 


5 


5 


1896 .. 


. 19 


19 


1903 


. 16 


16 


1897 .. 


. 16 


12 


1904 


7 


7 



The figures for superior Courts do not include persons sent up 
from the Magistrate's Courts for sentence under " The Indictable 
Offences Summary Jurisdiction Act, 1900." 



Police, 

The strength of the Police Force in New Zealand on the 
31st December, 1905, was a total number of 656 persons. Of these, 
the police at the four chief centres numbered 282, being 83 at Auck- 
land, 78 at WelUngton, 60 at Christchurch, and 61 at Dunedin. 
The remaining members of the Force (374) may be deemed as 
belonging to the country. 

The expenditure (exclusive of the cost of buildings) on the whole 
Police Force for the year ended the 31st March, 1905, amounted to 
£128.879. 



154 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TKAU-BOOK. 



Prisoners in GaoL 

The total number of prisoners received in the different gaols of 
the colony during the year 1904 was 5,170, including persons await- 
ing trial but not convicted within the year, and counting as distinct 
persons repeated admissions of the same person, as well as transfers 
from gaol to gaol of convicts undergoing sentence. In 1903 the 
number received was 4,786, so that the figures for 1904 show an 
increase of 384. Of 5,170 admissions for 1904, 9 were for debt, 
and 49 on account of lunacy ; while 152 were Maoris imprisoned 
for various offences. If the debtors, lunatics, and Maoris be 
excluded, the number of persons received into gaol is reduced to 
4,960, against 4,606 in 1903. 

The number of persons in gaol (including Maoris) at the end of 
the year 1904 was 750, or 11 more than in 1903. 



pRisoNEBS IN Gaol (31st Decbmbeb). 



Year. 


Undergoing 
Sentence. 


Debtors 

and 
Lunatics. 


On Remand 

and awaiting 

Trial. 


Total 


1889 


611 


3 




19 


683 


1891 


494 


4 




36 


634 


1893 


463 


6 




33 


502 


1895 


. . 531 


5 




46 


582 


1897 


. . 623 






51 


674 


1899 


. . 508 






58 


566 


1901 


. . 661 


1 




51 


713 


1903 


. . 688 






51 


739 


1904 


. . 701 






49 


750 



Of the prisoners previously convicted received in 1904, 513 men 
and 47 women had been convicted once ; 333 men and 36 women 
twice; 1,435 men and 391 women three or more times : making a 
total of 2,281 men and 474 women. 

Besides the returns from the Prisons Department, a separate 
card for each admission is furnished for every gaol. Such cards as 
show convictions are arranged alphabetically according to name of 
prisoner, and where several are found referring to the same person, 
all are thrown out but one ; then the number of cards retained 
equals the actual number of distinct convicted prisoners received in 
the various gaols during the year. In 1904 this number (excluding 
Maoris) was 2,896, an increase of 54 on the number in 1903. 
These figures do not include children committed to the industrial 
schools simply on the ground that they are neglected or destitute. 

The following table shows the number of distinct persons (exclu- 
sive of Maoris) received into gaol after conviction during 1904, classi- 
fied according to nature of offence, religion, birthplace, and age: — 



PBIS0NEB8 IM OAOL. 



166 



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156 NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOK. 

The number of distinct persons (exclusive of Maoris) imprisoned 
after conviction, in the past fifteen years, counting one offence only 
when the same person was imprisoned more than once, with the 
proportion per 10,000 persons living, is added : — 

Distiiict Persons imprisoned after Co7iviction, 







Proportion 






Proportion 


Year. 


Prisoners. 


per 10.000 1 
of Population. 


Year. 


Prisoners. 


per lOjOOO 
of Popniation. 










1890 


.. 2,397 


38-61 


1898 . 


. 1,982 


26-92 


1891 


.. 2,113 


33-55 


1899 . 


. 2.125 


28-38 


1892 


.. 2,164 


33-69 


1900 . 


. 2,116 


27-71 


1893 


.. 2,111 


31-92 


1901 . 


. 2,345 


9014 


1894 


.. 1,955 


28-78 


1902 . 


. 2,396 


30-03 


1895 


.. 1,930 


27-87 


1903 . 


. 2,842 


34-65 


18% 


.. 1,936 


27-11 


1904 . 


. 2,896 


84 27 


1897 


.. 1,884 


25-84 









There has been since 1890 a reduction of 4-34 per 10,000 in the 
proportion to population. In New South Wales the proportion for 
190 i was 51 per 10,000 persons. 

It must be understood that the actual number of imprisonments 
was much in excess of the figures given, as many persons were 
several times imprisoned, either for offences differing in kind or for 
repetitions of the same offence. Thus, persons returned as im- 
prisoned for larceny underwent other imprisonments for drunken- 
ness, &c. Some returned as convicted of drunkenness were several 
times in gaol during the year for the same offence, or for another, 
such as assault, riotous or indecent conduct, &c. Often there 
were several charges preferred against the same person at the 
one time, of which the most serious followed by conviction has beeo 
selected. 

The proportions in every 100 distinct convicted prisoners belong- 
ing to each of the four principal religious denominations, \rith 
proportions of prisoners at each age-period, and particulars as to 
birthplaces and ages, will be found in the Statistical Volume for 1904, 
on page 542. 

Expenditure on Gaols and Prisoners, 

The gross expenditure on the gaols of the colony (exclusive of 
the cost of buildings) for the year ended the 31st December, 1904, 
was £31,035 ; and the net expenditure, after deducting value of 
services rendered, £16,588. 

The prisoners in the gaols during the year 1904 were main- 
tained at a net cost to the State of £25 18s. 2d. per head, against 
£25 16s. 6d. per head in 1903. 

Cri7}ie amongst the Neio- Zealand-bom. 
While the New-Zealand-born formed at the last census 67 per 
cent, of the whole population of the colony, they contributed in 
1904 only 29 per cent, of the prisoners received in gaol. Of the 
New- Zealand-born population, however, a lai-ge number are under 
fifteen years of age, a period of life at which there are very few 



FIBST offenders' PROBATION ACT. 167 

prisoners; and therefore another comparison is necessary. It is 
foand that the New-Zealand-bom over fifteen years formed 52 per 
cent, of the total population above that age ; but, as before stated, 
New-Zealanders constituted only 29 per cent, of tlie total number 
received in gaols. 

The total number of New- Zealand-born distinct prisoners (ex- 
elading Maoris) received for the year 1904 — 844 persons — is found 
(0 be 140 in excess of the number for 1903. Of those received in 
1904, 98 were under twenty years of age. As before stated, the plan 
adopted in preparing the foregoing tables is to count each prisoner 
only once, and to exclude all who are not convicted prisoners, besides 
dealing only with the number received during the year, instead of 
with the full number in gaol, which would, of course, include those 
brought forward from the previous year. The comparative results 
for a series of years given by this method are held to be more 
v&luable than those brought out by one which includes prisoners 
merely awaiting trial, and continual repetitions of the same in- 
dividuals. 

Tree-planting by Prisoners. 

There are now four tree-planting prison-camps established — viz., 
Waiotapu and Waipa Valley in the North Island, and Dumgree and 
Hanmer Springs in the South Island. There were 138 prisoners at 
these camps at the end of 1904, and a considerable amount of plant- 
ing, clearing, fencing, and other work was carried out during tlie 
year. In his report of the year 1904 the Inspector of Prisons thus 
comments on the system : — 

Tbe Belection of prisoners for the trde-planting establishments is a matter of 
great diflScuUy and anxiety, but experience his proved that a careful study of 
dispoaiiion and temper is more important than a consideration of the o£[ence for 
wfaioh imprisonment has been awarded. Of coarse, there are exceptions to every 
role, and some of the quietest and best workers in a town prison are idle and 
rowdy when sent tree-planting, while, on the other hand, some of the idle and 
nwdy in a town prison prove quiet and good workers when sent tree-planting. 
On the whole, however, it must be admitted that the majority of those sent 
planting appreciate the attempts that are being made on their behalf to reform 
them, and uiow it by their work and conduct. 

First Offenders' Probation Act. 

Ninety-one persons were placed on probation in the year 1904, 
as against 110 in 1903. Of these, 25 were discharged after satis- 
factorily carrying out the conditions of their licenses, 1 was re- 
arrested, 1 absconded, and 64 remained under the supervision of 
Probation Officers. 

Of the 1,657 persons placed on probation since the introduction of 
the Act in October, 1886, no less than 1,421 had by tlie end of the 
year 1904 been discharged after satisfactorily carrying out the con- 
ditions of their licenses, 94 had been rearrested and sentenced to 
various terms of imprisonment, 1 committed suicide, 2 died, 3() 
absconded, 1 was sent to a lunatic asylum, and 102 remained ful- 
filling the conditions of their terms of probation. 



Year. 


Inqaesto on SdIi 


BidM. 






Total. 


1902 


69 5 


74 


1903 


91 16 


106 


1904 


89 16 


105 



158 KBW ZBALAKD OFFICIAL TIAR-BOOK. 

The amount of costs which the various Courts directed to be 
paid during the year 1904 was £202 58. 6d., of which £103 IQs. 
has been actually paid. The approximate cost of keeping tiiese first 
ofifenders had they been sent to prison would have amounted to 
£3,820, which sum, added to the amount of costs, &c., actually paid, 
represents a saving of £3,917 19s. 

Liqtiests. 

The number of bodies on which inquests were held in 1904 was 
1,057, including 24 Maoris. In 813 cases the bodies were of males, 
and in 244 of females. 

The inquests on suicidal deaths in 1904 show a decrease on the 
number for the previous year. The figures for each of the last seven 
years were : — 

v^.. Inquests on Suicides. 

*®"- Males. Females. Total. 

1898 ..69 8 77 

1899 61 18 74 

1900 52 11 68 

1901 ..71 18 84 i 

The verdicts given at the inquests held in 1904 may be classified 
as under : — 

Nature of Verdict. Mali^ "|!'eSSt£n5«^. 

Accident .. ..408 74 482 

Disease and natural causes . . 295 145 440 

Intemperance . . 8 2 10 

Homicide 5 2 7 

Suicide 89 16 106 

Not classed 8 5 18 

813 244 1,057 

Of the accidental deaths, drowning is the most fatal form. 
The verdicts show that 150 bodies were found drowned, giving a 
percentage of 31 12 on the accidental deaths from all causes. 

Fire Inquests, 

The inquests on fires held during 1904 numbered 28. In 10 
cases the verdict was incendiarism ; in 3, accident ; and in 15 
no evidence was forthcoming. 



SECTION III.— LOCAL GOVERNING BODIES. 

Counties, Boroughs, etc. 

For purposes of local government New Zealand is divided into 
counties and boroughs. Although the boroughs, of which there were 
101* in March, 1905, lie geographically within the counties, yet by the 
law they are not considered as part of them. On the 31st March, 
1905, the counties numbered 97. The number is increased from 
time to time as need is found for further division. In the year 
1878 there were only 63 counties. Interior to the counties 
are the road and town districts, but much of the country is out- 
Ijing, many road districts having been merged, especially on gold- 
fields territory. 

There were, however, 214 road districts (six without Boards) 
in existence in March, 1905, and 32 town districts. One of these 
latter is the special Town District of Botorua, constituted under 
"The Thermal- Springs Districts Act, 1881." Besides the above 
there were 34 river protective districts (excluding Inch-Glutha, 
in Brace County, which is also a road district), 3 drainage districts 
(Christchurch, Dunedin, and Hobson's Bay Watershed), 3 water- 
supply districts (one without Board), and 20 land drainage districts 
under the Land Drainage Act of 1893 (two without Boards). The 
Harbour Boards numbered 26, excluding Coromandel, Fortrose, and 
Half-moon Bay, for which the County Councils of Coromandel, 
Southland, and Stewart Island act as the Harbour Boards. 

These bodies levied rates in the financial year 1904-5 to the 
amount of £1,019,431, of which £704,315 consisted of general rates, 
and £315,116 special and separate rates. The sum of £81,985 was 
raised by licenses, and £19,962 by other taxes, making £1,121,378 
altogether, which sum is equivalent to £1 6s. 4d. per head of the 
mean European population. In the year 1903-4 the local taxa- 
tion was £1 5s. 5d. per head, or lid. less than in 1904-5. 

It will be seen from the table on the next page that revenue 
derived from rates increased from £401,393 in 1884-85 to £1,019,431 
in 1904-5. Revenue from Government has, on the other hand, 
decreased in the same period (twenty-one years) from £364,082 to 
£166,635. Receipts which cannot be classed as "revenue" were 
£430,561 in 1884-85, against £1,350,631 in 1904-5; but these 
figures vary from year to year according to circuaistances, such as 
large operations by way of construction of works, for which money 
has to be specially raised. 

The receipts (distinguishing revenue from other sources of in- 
come) and expenditure of the various local bodies, with the amount 
of rates collected, and the amount of indebtedness on account of 
loans for each of the past twenty-one years, are shown in the 
following table : — 

• Id April, 1008, the Borooffhs of Linwood, St. Albans, arul Sydenham were inoorporated 
in the City of Christchurch. and the Borough of Melrone became part ot the City ofWel- 
liofftoo. On 1st November, 1904, the Borough of Caversbam was incorpoTatc(\ \n U\q C\\>n 
of Danedin. On l%%Apri), 2906, the Borough ot South punedin was incorpotalcA \v\ \\\ft 
Cit J of J>an0dJa. 



160 



NKW ZKALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK 







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RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE. 



161 



The indebtedDess of local governing bodies on account of out- 
sUnding loans has increased in twenty-one years from £4,313,223 
to £10,018,242, exclusive of moneys borrowed from Government 
under "The Roads and Bridges Construction Act, 1882," •* The 
Government Loans to Local Bodies Act, 1886," and the Local 
Bodies' Loans Acts, 1901, 1902, and 1903, which represented a 
further indebtedness of £1,626,353 at the end of March, 1905. 

Taxation by Local Bodies. 

Table showing the Revenue of Local OoverDinflf Bodies derived from Hatefi, 
Licenses, and other Taxes during the Year 1904-5. 





Bates. 


Licenses. 


Other Taxes 




Local Bodies. 


General. 


Special and 
Separate. 


Total. 




£ B. d. 


£ 8. d. 


£ B. d. 


£ B. d. 


£ s. d. 


OoonliM* 


271,940 19 8 


67,000 3 5 


20.527 1 


9,855 12 5 


S69..S23 16 6 


Baroofihs^ 
ToirnHoards* ... 


239.428 15 11 
3,647 17 3 


223:399 3 2 
317 8 4 


55,797 13 1 
3,202 6 3 


8,324 10 6 
410 12 8 


526,930 2 8 
7,678 4 6 


Road Boards* ... 


94,593 10 4 


14.769 14 6 


2,457 17 1 


1,358 19 10 


113. IhO 1 9 


BiTer Boards* ... 


8,338 4 2 


2,012 14 9 




2 9 6 


10,353 8 5 


Land Drainage 












Boards* ... 


3,496 19 3 


1.080 9 1 






4,577 8 4 


Bsrbcmr Boards f 


49.447 15 5 








49,447 15 6t 


Oty and Subur- 












ban Drainage 












Boards t 


26.693 6 8 


1,871 2 2 






28,C64 8 10 


Ghrislchurch 












Tramway B'rdf 


6,727 17 4 








6,727 17 4 


Water - supply 












Boards* .. 




6,165 2 8 




9 18 6 


6,175 1 2 


Totals 


704,315 6 


815,116 18 1 


81,984 17 5 


19,962 3 5 


1.121,378 4 111 



* For year ended 3l8t March, 1905. t Wellington Harbour Board, for year ended 

30th September, 1904; Christchurch Drainage Board, for vear ended dUt December, 
1994; Dnnedin Drainage and Beweiage Board and Cbrihtcburch Tram^vay Board, for 
year ended 3lBt March, 1905 ; and Hobc^on'B Bay W'atert^hcd SeMvage Boaid. to SUt March, 
iSOA. : Wharfage dues, charges, fees, tolls, rents. &c., amounting to £527.800 Ob. Od., have 
Bot been classed as taxation. | Equal to £1 68. 4d. i^er bead of tbe mean European 

popolation of the colony for the financial year 1904-5. 

Receipts and Expenditure, 1904-5. 

A summary of all the trausactions for the year 1904-5 is given 
on pages 162 to 165. The total revenue of the local bodies for 
the financial year was £2,274,653, and they further received a sum 
of £1,350,631 which could not properly be termed " revenue," making 
altogether a grand total of receipts amounting to £3,625,284. The 
rates formed 45 per cent, of the revenue proper. Licenses, rents, 
and other sources yielded 48 per cent., and 7 per cent, was granted 
by the General Government. 

While. the revenue proper of the counties amounted to £497,704, 
of which those bodies raised £338,941 by way of rates, the Road 
Boards' revenue was only £152,013, out of which £109,363 repre- 
sented the result of their rating. The boroughs had the far larger 
revenue of £969,459, including £462,828 of rates, and their receipts 
under the heading of licenses, rents, and other sources amounted to 
the considerable sum of £472,425. In the matter of receipts from 
Government, of which a table is printed on the next page, the 
counties received the bulk of the money. 



162 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAK-BOOK. 






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REOBIPTS, EXPENDITURE, AND LOAMS. 



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164 



NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL \BAB-BOOK. 



Local Qovebmino Bodies. — Receipts, Expenditubb, akd Loams— con/intied. 



Financial Tear ended 
3l8t December, 1904. 



Receipts :— 
Revenue from— 

Rates 

Licenses, n^nts, and other sources 

Oovernmentf ... 

County 

Total revenue 
Receipts not revenue ... 

Total receipts 

Expenditure:— 
Public works ... 
Charitable aid and hospitals... 
Management ... 
Other expenditure 

Total expenditure 

Liabilities (including loans) 

Loans t 



Harbour 
Boards.* 



City and 
Suburban 
Drainage 
Boards.* 



:::i 



£ 8. d. 

49.447 16 6 

627,800 9 



577,256 16 2 
103,930 6 11 



6.187 3 1 



178,969 7 8 



17.669 3 1 
480.870 16 6 



. I 677,509 7 3 



4.549,015 11 



4.382,551 



£ s. d. 

28.064 8 10 
698 10 10 



28.662 19 8 
86,962 8 2 



114.626 7 10 



90.782 1 8 



6.917 17 2 
24.841 16 2 



122.641 16 



366.928 12 11 



2,305 



Totala-all 
Local Bodies. 



£ 8.d. 

1.019.431 4 1 

1.081.265 5 3 

106,635 3 5 

7,381 12 3 



2,274.653 5 
1,360,630 115 



3,625,288 16 5 



1.996,9D8 18 7 

90.392 17 9 

188.254 11 8 

1.222.464 18 1 



3.497,321 5 7 



nO,92(V048 16 1 



;10,018.242 



* Wellington Harbour Board for year ended 30th September, 1901 ; Christohnreh 
Drainage Board for year ended 31st December, 1904 ; and Dunedin Drainage and Sewerage 
Board for year ended 3lBt March, 1905. \ See notes to table on previous page. t Not 
includina loans, amounting to ^61,526,353. repayable by instalments, under "The Roads 
and Bridges Construction Act, 1882." " The Qovernment Loans to Local Bodies Act, 1886." 
" The Loans to Local Bodiea Act, 1001," and Amendment Acts, 1902 and 1903. 

The expenditure of the local bodies amounted to £3,497,321. 
In the counties the cost of management, including salaries, travel- 
ling-expenses, rent, printing and advertising, collection of rates or 
tolls, legal expenses, and sundries, was £61,845. The Borough 
Councils expended in the same way £77,492, and the Boad Boards 
£15.995. 

The percentages borne by the cost of management to the total 
receipts and total expenditure were : — 

Cost of Management 
per Cent, of 

Counties 
Boroughs 
Road Boards 



Total Total 

Receipts. Expenditure. 
9-4 9-5 

4-5 4-8 

80 7-9 



Harbour Boards. 

The amount of receipts and expenditure for each of the Harbour 
Boards in the colony for the year ended 31st December, 1904 (ex- 
cepting Wellington, the accounts for which were made up for the' 
year ending 30th September, 1904, and Coromandel, Fortrose, 
Half-moon Bay and Horseshoe Bay, Now River and Riverton, to 
31st March, 1905), also the liabilities at date of balancing, including 
outstanding loans, have been tabulated in another statement. 



HARBOUR BOARDS. 



165 



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166 



NEW ZEALAND OFPIOIAIi TBAB-BOOK. 



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LOANS OF LOCAL BODIES. 



167 



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£ 

305.000 

7.800 

2,729.886 

1.980 

44.300 

18,070 

21.900 

1.133.551 

123,855 


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168 



NEW ZBAIiANP OFFIOUti YEAR-BOOK. 



From the tables on the preceding pages it will be seen that 
the total amount owing was, on the 31st March, 1905, £10,018,242. 
But, against this, accrued sinking funds to the value of £l,O13,0i6 
were held, leaving a net debt of £9,005,196, exclusive of moneys 
borrowed from the General Government and repayable by annud 
instalments. 

The total annual charge (excluding exchange and commission) 
stood at £534,995, of which £487.145 was for mterest, and the re- 
mainder, £47,850, contributions to sinking fund accounts. 

Of the tctal net indebtedness in 1904-6 the debt of the 
Borough Councils, £4,382,962, formed the largest item, while the 
Harbour Boards owed £3,913,740. 

On referring to the comparative table on page 160, a great 
advance in tlie outstanding loans of local governing bodies will be 
noticed, Betw^een 1895 and 1905 the gross indebtedness increased 
from £6,685,510 to £10,018,242, an addition of £3,332,732 or over 
50 per cent, during the ten years. During the same period the 
population advanced at the rate of 25 per cent., and the value of land 
and improvements (1891-1905) from £122,000,000 to £197,600,000, 
or at the rate of 62 per cent, in fourteen years. 

The aggregate int^^rest-charge for the year under review was 
£487,145, and £296t656 of this w^as payable on loans raised outside 
the colony. The average rate of interest payable to bondholder« 
was £4 178. 6d, per cent. 

While the average rate of interest on the above-mentioned debt 
is found to be less than 5 per cent., nearly three millions were 
raised at 5 per cent., and over two millions and a quarter at 6 per 
cent, or over. 

The Local Bodieb' Loans Acts, 1901. 1902, and 1903. 

The Act of 1901 consolidates all former measures dealing with 
the borrowing- powers of local bodies. It does not affect the securi- 
ties issued for any loan raised under any Act repealed. 

As to Government loans to local bodies, the yearly rate of in- 
terest and the period during which interest is payable by the local 
authority have now been altered by the Amendment Act of 1903, 
and stand as under : — 

At the option of the authority concerned^- 

(a.) Five per centum per annum for a period of twenty-six years ; 
or 

(b.) Four and a half per centum per annum for a period of thirty- 
two years ; or 

(c.) Four per centum per annum for a period of forty-one years. 

The Amendment Act of 1902 empowers the Colonial Treasurer 
to lend to small boroughs, having at the time of the last preceding 
census a population of less than tw*o thousand persons, any sum not 
exceeding £2,000 in any year for the purpose of making streets 
within the borough. 

The interest payable in respect of every existing loan the period 
of which is twenty-six years shall be 4| per centum per annuo). 
There are piovifeions for readjustment of ihe rate of interest on 




MUNICIPAL FBAKOHISB, ^^^^^^V 169 



loins for twenty-six years existing at the time of the passinij: of the 
Act of 1903, which are regulated by the length of the period over 
which the repayment of the loan is extended. 

At the expiration of the period during which interest is payable 
the liability of the local authority shall cease without further pay> 
ment. 

MUNICITAIi FhANCHISB. 

"The Municipal Corporations Act, 1900/* with its amending < 
Act of 1902, deals with the franchise in the case of boroughs, and ' 
proTides that, in addition to the persons who are already entitled 
to be enrolled, every person shall be so entitled who possesses the 
freehold or residential quallBcations stated in the Act. 

The possession of the freehold quahli cation is defined as being 
the beneficial and duly registered owner of a freehold estate in land 
of the capital value of not less than £25, situated in the borough, 
notwithstanding that any other person is the occupier thereof, or 
part thereof, under any tenancy. 

Every person is deemed to possess a residential qualification 
within a borough if he is, and for at least three months last past 
has been, a residential occupant within such borough. 

No person may be entered in the burgess lists in respect of more 
qoalifirations than one ; but any person who has more than one 
qualification may select the one in respect of which he wishes to be 
entered. 

In the case of husband and wife, any quaUfication possessed by 
one of them is deemed to be possessed by each. 

No person enrolled on a burgess roll has more than one vote, and 
no person enrolled by virtue of the residential qualification can vote 
on any proposal relating to loans or rates. 

bicfit&jiSED Batinq-powers of Counties, Eoad and Towk 

Districts. 
By •• The Counties Act Amendment Act, 1903/' section i, it is 
provided that^ notwithstanding anything in the principal Act, the 
maximum general rate that may be made and levied shall be — 
(a.) In counties where there are no road or town districts, a 
rate of threepence in the pound on the capital value of 
the rateVble property therein, or its equivalent on the 
unimproved value or annual value ; and 
(ft.) In counties where there are road or town dlstrictSj — 

(i.) In outlying districts, a rate of threepence in the 
pound on the capital value^ or its equivalent as afore- 
said; 

(0.) In all other parts of the county, a rate of three* 
halfpence in the pound on the capital value, or its equiva- 
lent as aforesaid. 
And under section 5 the Couuty Council may make and levy 
nieSi called *' separate rates," in addition to or in lieu of any general 
ratoi upon all rateable property in any nding of a county ; or may 
by special order make or levy any such rate upon all rateable pro- 
perty within the portion of the county defined in the order. But the 



170 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAB-BOOK. 



total amount of separate rates and general rates together is not to 
exceed in any one year the amount of the maximum general rate 
prescribed by the last preceding section (No. 4, quoted above). 

By **The Road and Town Districts Rating Act, 1903," the 
rating-powers of the Boards are extended. Under section 2 the 
maximum general rate that may be made and levied in any year in 
a road or town district is a rate of three-halfpence in the pound on 
the capital value of the rateable property of the district, or its 
equivalent on the unimproved value, or two shillings in the pound 
on the annual value, as the case may be. Under section 3, where 
road districts are divided into subdivisions, no separate rates made 
and levied in any year may, with the general rates, exceed in any 
subdivision the amount of the maximum general rate aforesaid. 

Rating on Unimproved Value. 

A special article on this system of rating (which it is optional 
with local governing bodies to adopt or not) is given in Part III. of 
this work. 

The results, as shown by notifications in the New Zealand 
Gazette^ of proposals to levy rates on the unimproved value of 
land are given in full. 

Table showing tiik Result op Polls taken undkb "Thb Ratino os 
Unimproved Value Act, 1896," and Amendment Act of 1900, to 
31st March, 1906. 





i 


1 




Votes recorded. 


■ — ■ 


Date of Poll. « 

1 

i 


Result of 
Poll. 


For. 


Ij 


1 
1 


Akitio County 


.. 16 Feb., 


1905 ' 


Carried . . 


112 = 


32 


3 


Ashburton Boroug.i . . 


.. 14 Jan., 


1903, 


Rejected . . 


102 


199 


4 


Auckland City 


... 7 Aug., 


1901 


« • • 


753 


1,697 


. , 


Avenal Borough 


.. ' 7 Deo.. 


1904 


Carried 


48 


10 


2 


Awatore Road District 


. . 3 May, 


1905 


.. 


146 


d 




Balcluiha Borough . . 


7 July, 


1902 




60 


33 


, , 


Blenheim J5orough . . 


. . 17 June, 


1903 


.. 


224 


64 




Buller County 


. . 10 Sept., 


1904 


. 


302 


84 


5 


Campbell town Borough 


. . 14 Sept., 


1904 




101 


86 


6 


Castlepoiut County . . 


8 Nov., 


1905 




66 


45 




Cheviot County 


.. 6 Oct., 


1898 




165 


41 




Chriatchuroh City 


. . 30 June, 


1902 


• 


596 


612 




Devonport Boroug»'(*) 


. . 30 Oct., 


1900 


, 


356 


109 




Ekelahuna County . . 


1 Feb., 


1900 


., 


149 


21 


"l 


Peilding Borough 


16 Apiii, 


1901 


m 


268 


66 


1 


Foxton Borough 


. . 20 June, 


1902 


Rejected .. 


53 


98 


4 


Gore Borough 


. . 7 July, 


1901 


Carried . . 


122 


67 


5 


Grey Lynn Borough . . 


. . 20 Mar., 


1901 


• 


140 


71 


2 


Greymouth Borough.. 


. . 23 Feb., 


1898 




214 


48 


1 


Hamilton Borougli^*) . . 


. . 13 Feb., 


1901 


m 


77 


52 


, , 


Hastings Borough 


.. 14 July, 


1902 


Rejected .. 


250 


265 


15 


• 


. . 30 Aug., 


190.-i 




314 


374 


21 


Hawera Borough 


8 April, 


1903 


Carried . . 


1 129 


9 


1 



(ft) HropoBal to rescind the adoption of the Act rejected. Poll taken Gtb June. 1904. For 
roscisiiun, 176 : against, 415 ; informal. G. (b) l>ropoBal to rescind the adoption of the Act 
rejected. Poll taken 8rd May, 1904. For rescisttioD. 116 ; against, 148. 



KATIKO O 


H 


BVftlT VAttjE, 


■ 


mi 


TaBI:;B BHOWIKG TUE RbSOLT 07 1 


Polls taken » £tc,- 


-GtmtiMud. 1 




Dale of PolL 


lieiuHof 
Poll. 


Votea recordad. I 




i 


1 








u 
o 
En 


I 


1 


Hefttbcate Eoad District 


H Mar., 


1905 


Rejected . . 


185 


403 


14 


Hokiiingft County 


11 Mar., 


1699 


Carried 


109 


25 


6 


Hokitikft Borough 


5 May, 


1901 




212 


63 , 


1 


HuDUA Road DiBtriot 


5 April, 


1899 




60 


2 


^ ^ 


In&ngataaa County > 


H Mtiy, 


1896 




284 


11 


2 


InvercargUl Borough . 


5 June. 


1901 


,. 


386 


174 


4 


EAiapoi Borough 


7 Sept. 


1906 


B^jeoted . 


83 


251 


16 


K&iniiiga Couoly 


U Jan., 


1905 


4*arri©d 


142 


54 


2 


Karori Borough 


4 April, 


1898 


► 


93 


3 


1 


Kikwhia County 


21 Nov., 


1905 




96 


7 






30Mi^y, 


1901 




376 


38 


2 


Lower Hiatt Borough 


12 Oct, 


1901 




94 


68 


4 


HaoAwatu Road DiBtnct(^) . , 


6 Jan,. 


FJOO 




105 


10 1 




Maori Hill Borough . . 


05 Jan , 


1904 




119 


27 


^^1 


Ifara^tai Roi\^ Diatriot 


*i June, 


1900 




16 




^^H 


Mareretu Road Dtatnct(«) 


28 Ju'ie, 


1902 




24 




:: H 


Maaterton Borough . 


29 Au«., 


1901 




221 


139 ' 


6 ^ 


If anku Road District 


1 July, 


1904 


Hejected . . 


23 


39 


1 


ICelroae Borough^'*) . 


3 Mar., 


1898 


Carried . . 


236 


40 


6 


Miramar Borough 


30 Nov., 


1905 


w » • 


117 


45 


1 


Mosgiel Borough 


27 BVb., 


1902 


Hejected ., 


58 


87 


1 


New Plymouth Borough 


IC Mar., 


1905 


■ • - 


167 


313 


4 


Norma nby Town District ^*) . . 
North east Valley Borougn , , 


16 Nov,, 


1897 


Carried . 


82 


66 


3 


12 Jan., 


1905 




202 


172 




North Invercargill Boroagh . . 


1 April, 


lyOH 




107 


24 


"'2 


Onslow Borough 


20 Mar., 


1901 




HO 


8 


, ^ 


Pahiatua Borough 


19 June, 


1897 




13G 


38 


I 


Pahiatua County 


27 June. 


1901 




350 


31 


3 


Palmcrston North Borough 


5 Mar, 


1897 


• , ^ 


402 


12 


3 


Papakum Road Disiriot 


10 Mar,, 


1900 


• , , 


30 


1 


, , 


Pelonxa R'3ad Distriot 


31 Mar., 


1900 


» . . 


98 


41 


^ , 


Pefcon© Borough 


6 Nov., 


1901 


Rejected , . 


100 


134 


4 


# ■ • 


23 Mar.. 


1905 


Carried , . 


811 


112 




Pietoo Borough 






Rejected . . 


27 


73 


1 


• 


30 July, 


1903 


Carried .. 


47 


38 


9 


Raglan County 


23 Nov., 


1901 


Carried' ,. 


116 


85 


2 


Si. AJbans Batough . . 


13 Feb., 


1902 


Carried , , 


350 


218 


15 


Sooth lovcrcargill Borough , . 


2 Feb., 


1902 


» * . 


106 


54 


1 


Southland County . . 


1 Mar., 


1902 


m ' « 


919 


574 




Spreydon Fioad Diatriot 


16 May, 


1901 




141 


57 


4 


Stratford County 


29 June, 


1901 




399 


23 


2 


Stratford Borough 


23 July, 


1902 




137 


64 


I 


Satnner Borough 


21 Nov.. 


1901 


earned ' . . 


91 


19 


, , 


Sydenham Borough (') 


UMar., 


1901 


Carried . . 


353 


193 


* » 


Takaka County 


3 Sept. 


1905 


m • • 


136 


40 


5 


TaraUhi-GirbertOD Road Dis 

trict^f) 
Tauranga County 


26 Aug., 


1897 


* • , 


261 


53 


, 


9 Feb., 


1901 




90 


13 


' ■ 


Timani Borough 


10 Oct,, 


19O0 


Rejooted . . 


93 


246 


» ^% 


. 


18 April, 


1906 




372 


440 


^ \ 


.- ,.. ^^. ^t oi.-.„^ .V u ,>;.^ 


(•») Road diatrlct oat now In e^ 


detence 


(«) Hiatal 1 
llogioti Citv! 1 




Rating AcJt, 18W-" {^) Now puJ 
I of the Act re jousted. For prop 


6 of W«J 
Dial, S3 


iUU>rfUK.k, .>. IM .^U>y i-lAJL Ui *.,UilSt 


church City. («) Boad distrlc 1 1 


lot oow 


in extatoDCti. 1 


* N*w poll taken onder Aci of iguQ. 








J 


1 ^ ir 








J 



172 



iND OFFICIAL YEAK-BOOK. 



TaBLM SKOWINQ THE RkBULT OF POLZ^ 


TAKKJr, BTC.- 


- continued. 






DKle of Foil 


Roiult of 
Poll. 


Votes recorded. 


1 " 




1 


1 


f 






1 


1 


1 


Wmimarino County . . 


23 Sept., 3903 


Carried . , 


4$ 


13 




Wfiimftto Borough 


2 Feb,. 1901 


W - P 


235 


61 


14 


Wftimnte County 


1 Nov., 1900 


. 


368 


162 


, 


Wftipawa County (•) .. 


2 Feb., 1898 


M » • 


462 


98 


' a 


WftJ r&rapa No rtu Go u n ty (*) . . 


6 Nov., 1893 


R«jected(») 


381 


68 


10 


Wauarapa Sauth County 


*i3 Oct.. 1902 


Carried .. 


187 


8 


* » 


WaTiRRimi Borough . . 


17 Deo,, 1903 


Eejeoted , . 


30d 


331 


2 


Wullington Citv 


11 Nov., 1901 


Carried . , 


1,261 


591 


^ , 


West Harbour Borough 


18 April. 1904 




62 


30 


2 


Westpcrt Borou|;h . . 


19 April, 1904 


m • ' 


280 


168 


7 


Wba« g*irei Borough , . 


21 S'-pt.. 1905 


Rejecfeed . . 


166 


226 


i 


Winton B rough 


2UNov.. 1901 


Carried . , 


39 


31 


1 


Woodville Borough . . 


21 lUr., 1898 


m • ♦ 


175 


7 


1 


WooUton BorouRh . . 


24 June, 190^2 


Carried- .. 


252 


190 


7 



(») IncludlcK Woodvillo County aioce LQtifiUtute<^. ^b) PqU taken i^rior to comim; tnbo 
operatioD of seotioo :2 of *'The Ijoc&J Qovernwout Votiae Reform Kc%, 1B99"; leM Ibao 
oiie*(hird of rRt©p«».y#r» voted, and proposal conftequeotly reject «d. TUe county bM 
iiuce l>eeti i^ubulividikl aDcl aisorbrd in other eountlos. * Now poll takoo utnler Acl 

ofl90U. 

A county having decided to levy rates ou the uaimproved value 
makes it compulsory for all interior Town and Boad Boards to adopt 
the same system of rating. But in counties where the Counties 
Act is suspended, or whore a general rate is not levied, the rate- 
payers of any Koad Board may take a poll on the question. It iB 
also permissible for any Town Board within a county not rating on 
the unimproved value to adopt that system, the decision to do so 
having been carried by vote of the ratepayers. The date of the 
polling did not, in some instances, allow of a rate on the unim- 
proved value being struck for the year ended 31&t March, 1905. 

New Legislation, 

** The Counties Act Amendment Act, 1904/' provides that the 
Council of any new county, as soon as the whole principal Act has 
been brought into force, may borrow by way of overdraft an amount 
not to exceed the estimated receipts for the first year, exclusive of 
Government grants and subsidies, moneys borrowed, or moneys 
received from separate rates. 

The Council of any county may, by special order, and without 
taking a poll, borrow money by way of special loan sufficient to 
clear off any overdraft as existing on the 31st March, 1904, Alter 
the extinction of any such overdraft it shall not be lawful for the 
Council to owe to its bankers on overdraft at the end of any finan* 
cial year any sum exceeding the amount of revenue for that year 
then outstanding atid uncollected. 

The Act also deals with the construction and repair of footpaths 
within road or town districts at cost of county, appointment and 
powers of Fire Inspectors, licensing of billiard-rooms, and grants to 
cemetery true lees. 



M8W IiB0I8IiATIOIf. 



173 



•*The Town DistrictB Act, 1881/' and Amendment Act, 1883, 
previously repealed, are now revived by "The Town Districts Act, 
K^Ji *' The Governor may declare that any area wherein there are 
Dot less than fifty householders shall be a town district. 

** The Land Drainage Act, 1904/' consolidates and, where neces- 
firy, amends the law relating to the drainage of land. ** The Land 
DraiDage Act, 1893,'* and the Amendment Act, 1894, except section 9 
of the latter, are repealed. 

"The Native Land Rating Act, 1904/' extends the powers 
already possessed by local authorities for the levying of rates over 
Native lands, and affords greater facilities for the recovery of such 
rates. 

*• The Bead Boards Acts Amendment Act» 1904/' enacts that 
any Boad Board in a county wherein the operation of ** The Counties 
Act, 1886,*' is suspended may, with the consent of the Governor, 
giTen by Order in Council, construct waterworks and levy water 
rates, as provided in sections 3 to 6 of '* The Boad Boards Act 1882 
Amendment Act, 1888.** 

**The Local Elections Act, 1904/* consolidates and amends the 
law relating to local elections, and to the taking of polls on pro- 
posals submitted to the vote of local electors. A noticeable inno- 
vatiou is the form of ballot-paper and method of recording votes : 
the voter, instead of scoring out the name of the candidate selected 
by him. marks a cross opposite to the name, in a space ruled for 
tbe parpose. The enactments repealed are *' The Regulation of 
Local Elections Act, 1876," "The Regulation of Local Elections Act 
Amendment Act, 1888/' and section 16 of '* The Municipal Corpora- 
tions Act Amendment Act, 1902," 

** The Timber and Flax Royalties Act, 1905,*' provides that one- 
half of the revenue received by the Receiver of Land Revenue in 
fMpect of royalty under any license for cutting timber or flax, and 
yable into the Consolidated Fund, shall be payable to the local 
thoriiy within whose district the timber or flax is obtained and 
ihe revenue was derived, and shall be applied by such local autho- 
rity exclusively in constructing, repairing, and maintaining roads. 
Revenue received from any district where no local authority exists 
shall be applied for the purposes aforesaid under the direction of the 
Minister or of such person as he may appoint. 

Whenever it appears that any moneys paid to any local autho- 
rity ander this A.ct have not been properly applied to the objects 
for which they were so paid, the Colonial Treasurer may proceed 
for the recovery of such moneys, or may deduct the amount from 
any subsidy or other moneys payable at any time to the said local 
authority under any Act* 

Rates, etc, Boroughs, Couktiks, Town and Road Dibtkictb. 

The amount of rates levied by the various Borough Councils, 
Coanty Councils, Town Boards, and Road Boards, with other par- 
ticulars, as returned by those bodies for tbe 31st March, 1905, will 
be found on the following pages : — 



Hit,, 




174 



SMW UALAWD OmCIAL TIAR-BOOK. 



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NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOK. 



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for repaymeut 
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183 



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184 



MEW ZBALAND OFFIOIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



Town Districts, 1904-6. 





id 


Number of 1 


Amooot of Bate 










levied 










in the Pound on 




««•§ 


^ 


1 


S 


the Capital. 


Town DUIrioU. 


111 


1 




Annual, 

or UnimproTed 

Value 

of Property. 












8. d. 


Kamo . . 


250 


78 


77 


124 


0| 


Helensville 


400 


124 


114 


120 


•0 6 


Papakura 


298 


85 


157 


204 


0|P) 


Te Awamufcu 


350 


60 


65 


80 





Kibikihi 


vjo 


4*5 


75 


300 


m 

^ 


Ngaruawahia 


mo 


90 


140 


140 


Rotorua 


1,500 


400 








Opotiki .. 
Wailara (Raleigh) f. 


750 


300 


206 


saa 


0| 












QpQiiake 


550 


155 


195 


540 


1 0) 


Normanby 


356 


90 


150 


150 


•0 ^ 


Matjaia (no tnformationl .^ 


i30 










Waverley 


416 


116 


121 


121 


OJ 


Lethbridge (Turakina) 


201 


63 


56 


73 


*o e 


BnU-i .. 


650 


127 


135 


179 


•i m 


Halconfibe 


336 


81 


142 


730 


n 0(*) 


Clyde (Waiioa) .. 


800 


130 


170 




Of 


Taradale 


90O 


ISO 


199 


199 


I 


Ormondville 


493 


149 


151 


215 


|0 21 


Waipawa 


690 


171 


131 


im 


im 


Kaikora Nortb . . 


280 


63 


10? 


135 


•0 6 


FeatberHton 


635 


129 


170 


200 


ir 


John&oovill© 


800 


)60 


190 


196 


Havolock 


316 


76 


Bl 


137 


I 


Amberley 


417 


95 


90 


131 


01 


South bridge 


250 1 


120 


240 




Of 


HftiTipBtead 


1,250 


262 


280 


sac 


0| 


Tif^wBld.. 


560 


115 


189 


250 


Oj 


Geraklinet* 












OrG>town (Aliantou) 


170 


52 


70 


116 


0| 


Out'ram * , 


420 


63 


67 


111 


mh 


Clinton ,, 


440 


93 


123 


135 


n 


Wyndham 


650 


130 


128 


226 


■1 


OtftUtau 


675 


125 


127 


195 


oit»j 



* On the annual value. 



t Now GouftlUuted munlolpa] boroughs, 
uuluip roved vitJtie. 



t On the 



(1) id. special. (>) id. special 
cial. (0) id- special ; 



specii . _ 

value where supplied. 



ii) M. apuclal, («) l^d. special. (•) t^.. ^. 

(0) id. special ; Ad. library separate. (7) Water rate. 7 per cent, on annual 

(•) |d. special. 



LOCAL OOVBBMINO BODIES. 



185 







Road Districts, 1904-5. 














Number of 


5I 6 


it i 




3^ 








nt of lia 
a the Po 
•nthe 
bal Vala 


52« 


County and Dlslricl. 


1 


i 


9-S 


aa'S> 




4 


1 


1 


s§ 


Amou 

levied ii 



Capii 


Amou 

levied ii 

on 

impro 


MoDgonai 










d. 


d. 


Whangaroa 








• 








Hokianga 


• (No road districts 


) 












Bajr of Islands 
















Hobson 














Whangarei— 














Hiknrangi 




495 


100 


93 


160 


3 




Kaurihohore 




191 


35 


46 


46 


} 




Slaraa 




274 


64 


87 


114 






ilaangakaramea 




288 


60 


73 


42 


} 




Maunu 




, , 


164 


186 


226 


1 




Otonga 




300 


. , 


, , 




} 




Paroa Bay . . 




215 


60 


110 


201 


i 




Roarangi 




103 


33 


58 


77 


i 




Waikiekie . . 




205 


27 


92 


208 


1 




Waipu North 




224 


62 


80 


126 


J 




Whareora 




•• 


67 


73 


86 


i 




Oiamatea — 














Mangawai ^. 


268 


50 


90 


95 


J 




Mareretu 




44 


123 


161 


li 




Matakohe 


423 


86 


128 


335 


} 




Whakapirau (no Board). 














Rodney— 














Ahuroa 




41 


13 


34 


80 


1 




Albertland North 




65 


10 


41 


41 


! 




Albertland South 




322 


74 


155 


190 


i 




Romokoriki 




62 


13 


43 


43 


J 




Sfahurangi East 




151 


29 


96 


96 


^ 




Matakana East 




132 


21 


37 


40 


h 




Matakana West 




172 


47 


71 


71 


1 




Puhoi 




, 596 


83 


125 








Tauhoa 




371 


61 


87 


180 






Warkworth 






175 


195 


322 


1 




Wharehine . . 




; '' 


20 


37 


38 


f 




Waitemata— 












Kaukapakapa .. ; 543 


100 


182 


392 


i 




Pukeatua 660 


90 


239 


280 


1 




Whangaparaoa 66 


26 


37 


60 


J 




Eden- 












Arch Hill 1,671 


415 


305 


546 


ls.{i) 




Avondale 


. 




1,075 


245 


426 


502 


«{'• 





(1) On annual value ; 4M. special ; 2d. separate, hospital and charitable aid. 
(>) |d. septrate, hospital and charitable aid. 



186 



NUW ZBALAND OKKICIAL YlfiAK-BOOK. 



Road Districts, 1904-5 — continued. 



County aud Blatrlet. 



"33 

4 



Nmnberof 



a 



I 



i 
5£ 



s9 J 

♦a- *» *" *" 



in 



"Eden— continued. 
Edon Terrace 
Epsom 
Mount Albert 
Mount Eden 
Mount Roskill 
Mount Wellington 
One- tree Hill 
Orakei 

Panmure Township 
Point Chevalier 
Kerauera 
Tamaki West 

Monukau — 
Awhitu 
Drury 

Howick Town 
Hunua 
Karaka 
Mangere 
Manure wa . . 
Maraetai 
Mauku 

Maungatawhiri 
Mercer Township 
Opaheke (1904) 
Otahuhu 
Pakuranga . . 
Papakura 
Paparata 
Paparoa 
Papatoetoe . . 
Pokeno 

Pollok Settlement 
Pukckohe East 
Pukckoho West 
Tamaki East 
Turanga 
Waipipi 
Wairoa 
Waiuku 



2,011 
750 

2,085 

5,129 
581 
954 

1,283 

259 

684 

2,186 

375 



480 
220 
565 

1470 ' 1 
145 ; 
226 ! 
340 I 

20 

70 I 

500 I 

115 ; 



413 I 
382 i 
224 
266 ' 
188 
702 I 
200 

82 ' 
380 , 
378 I 
229 I 
369 ! 
1,211 ! 
271 I 
373 ' 

373 ; 

166 ' 
176 ' 

398 I 

88 , 

942 I 

1.153 ; 

580 I 
227 ; 

905 ; 



792 



105 ; 
90 
76 

51 I 
65 ! 

206 
70 

25 ; 
105 

52 

52 ' 
80 i 

285 I 
67 

126 
88 
47 I 
40 I 
73 I 

26 I 
230 , 
235 ' 

121 ; 

47 
280 I 
216 , 



350 452 
327 , 366 
655 ' 898 
,237 1 1,500 
219 269 



220 

278 

15 

90 

487 
150 



492 1 205 



130 
123 
138 
119 
125 
161 

75 

24 
143 

63 

63 

260 

74 
126 
116 

71 

39 

98 

21 
241 
260 
127 

68, 
320 
213 
220 



310 
374 ' 
22 I 



615 
184 



175 
190 
177 
206 
200 
226 
100 
32 
159 
103 
150 



99 

140 i 
161 

91 I 

39 
100 

43 i 
264 , 
264 i 
149 

68 ' 
320 
271 
224 



d. 

'.p. 

1 
i 
I 

it 



I 



i 
f 

J,IO) 

i(") I 

in j 



2iCi 



li 



i< 



(1) gd. spocial. (3) lAd. special; «^,d. separate, hospital and charitable aid. 

i^) A()- i^-. special ; id. hospital and charitable aid ; Jd. lighting. («) gd. apecial. for 

interest on loans ; |d. gas. (6) ^d. hospital and charitable aid. (0) ^. special. 

(7) id. special ; ftd. hospital and charitable aid. (») Jd. aud 14d. special. (») i^., 

id., id., and Jd. special. (lO) Jd. special : Jd. separate. (il) id. hospital and chskri- 

tableaid. (iSj^d. special. (i^j jd. special, id. separate, Buckland Subdivision. 

(1*) id. special. (l») ^d., Jd., Jd., and Jd. special. (Wj Five special, various. 



LOCAL GOVERNING BODIES. 



187 



Road Dibtbicts, 1904-5 — continued. 





^ 




Number of 


ll ^i1 8 




fl 








i2£.| <S£>| 


Ctmatf led Blattiot. ! 


i 
! 


1 


,1 


if! 


IJii 


Coiomandel ) 






! 




d. 


d. 


Thames (No road districts.) 












Ohinemuri 






1 




' 


Piiko— 










1 

1 


Matamata .. 


262 


1 100 


1 100 


120 


! 


Wftitoa 


1,322 


1 279 


383 


522 


Waikato— 




1 






1 


Cambridge . . 


562 


' 100 


142 


142 


1 




Hnntly 


966 


1 


218 


411 


i 




Kirikiriroa .. 


964 


230 


313 


313 


i 




Tamahere 


248 


1 68 


70 


70 


1 




Whangamarino 


443 


, 112 


238 


361 


i 




Waipa- 














Newcastle .. 


391 


, 94 


' 156 


176 


i ' 


Pukekura 


810 


j 200 


250 


480 




Rangiaohia . . 


607 


' 90 


118 


120 


1 


Tuhikaramea 


98 


1 28 


64 


64 


1 





Raglan— 
Karamu (i 
Te Akau ( 


ao Board) . . 
no Board) . . 


78 
32 




i 






Awakino \ 
Waifeomo 












tst^Taupo (No road districts.) 
EastTaupo 1 
Rotorua / 












Taaranga — 
Katikati 
TePuke 
Te Puna 


409 

477 
169 


88 

160 

41 


139 1 
200 i 
146 


277 
210 
208 


i') 


Whakatane 

Opotiki 

Waiapu 


(No road districts.) 












Cook- 
Aroha 
Hangaroa 
Kaiti 
Ngatapa 
Onnond 


58 

489 

482 


12 

20 

60 

210 

120 


12 1 

22 1 

95 

160 , 

114 1 


12 

42 

135 

180 

165 


(') 




(1) No rate struck 


{^) Sd. and ^\. special. 





1* 



188 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOK. 



Road Districts, 1904-6— conimii«<i. 



OdUaly iud DiMlctoL 



^1 



Kombsraf 



4 

3 

I 



s 

I 



E 



'a 

'A * 

4-c s 



Is 



Cook— e-<»Ui««eii. 
Patut&hi 
Pou&wa 
Foverly Bay 
Taruberu 
Te Af Bii 
TititAfigi 
Wftikohu 
WalmcLtft 



CUfton. (bfo road dmtriotH.) 

Tarftnaki — 
Barrett 
Carrington 
Egmont 
Elliot 
Frankley 
Henui 

Hurford Upper 
Mangorei 
Moa 
Oakura 
Okato 

Omata (1904) 
Tataraimaka (1904) 
Waitara West 
Waiwakaiho (1904) 
Werekino. (No information.) 



638 

m 



78 
45 



.. I 183 
^26 .* 
294 , 70 

44 ' 25 
S2S I 100 
S04 00 

SO 10 

•■ I ^ 







d. 


105 


2^ 


iM 


49 


69 


(•) 


163 


315 


J 41 


n 


188 




60 


75 


*) 


116 


130 


(** 


as 


63 


<'r 


10 


i IT 


1 ^') 


91 


102 

1' 


1 1 



439 


130 


176 


318 ' 




. . ; 341 


93 


110 


176 1 


i<*/ 


635 


172 


172 


247 ! 




235 


65 


107 


112 , 


. . 


67 


104 


206 


10) 


393 


126 


230 


250 1 


i 


56 


15 


16 


20 


; ; 


276 


51 


70 


82 


i 


.. 2,836 


450 


500 


550 1 


^r, 


333 


100 


95 


95 


W' 


345 


72 


85 


154 


iK»0| 


294 


74 


53 


162 i 


3 


152 


30 


36 


61 . 


ii") 


814 


177 


180 


180 1 


350 


80 


101 


184 ' 


i 



Hawera— 
Waiinate 



2,619 : 360 i 400 



590 



Egmont — 
Parihaka 



345 



Stratford — 
Manganui 

Patea — 
Kohi 
Motoroa 
Okotuku 



(1) No general rate ; id. npeoial. 



1,734 ' 355 ! 380 



I 

166 34 

60 1 18 

134 I 24 



30 
20 
29 



(3) No rate struck. 



581 



30 
20 
33 



I*) 

i 



(») No general i 



A<1> special. («) No general rate; \d. special. (6) No general rate; J^d., |cl 

' " "" ' d. special ; Ad. separate, over part of district. (7) Jd. specij 

(8) ^. special 



special. 
Veale Koad. 
dlsftricl 



,d. separate, over part of district. (f) \ ^ 

kl. (9) ^. rpeoial. (lO) |<l. special, orer pa 

(U) ^. to'ld. special. \y^) Special, various. 



LOCAL OOVBRNING BODIES. 



189 





Road Districts, 1904-6 


—continued. 








^ 




Kamber of 


^i . 


-33 












Amoont of Ua 
levied In the Po 
on the 
Capital Vain 


Ui§ 


ConatyaadDistilel. 


] . 
1 1 


1 




Amount of 
levied in the 
1 on the U 

improved \ 


?tX»ti— continued. 










d. 


d. 


PateaEast .. 


401 


75 


87 


385 


(■) 




Patea Wesi 


777 


200 


209 


630 


(') 




Wairoa 


105 


22 


30 


30 


(•) 




Waitotara-Momohaki 


496 


103 


110 


184 


(•) 




Whenoakura-Waitofcara 


818 


42 


44 


44 


(') 




£.1."o}(No"addi.triot..) 














Wanganui — 














Kaiu>k6 


606 


135 


128 


254 


i 




Kaakatea 




55 


43 


135 






Uangawhero (1904) .. 




150 


138 


138 


h) 




MataoDgaoDga 




300 


320 


. 478 




Purua 




190 


200 


320 


} 




Wangaehu Upper (1904) 




250 


190 


261 


« 




Rangitikei \ 




1 










Kiwitea 






1 






; ! 


Kairanga 
Oroaa 


- (No road distriots.) 












Pobangina 












1 


Hanawatu J 










1 


florowhenua — 












Otaki 


1,280 


263 


317 


884 


h'l ' 


Te Horo 


512 


i 123 


148 


472 




H.tke% Bay} («"«•«'<»"'"«"'•> 




1 






■ 
1 1 

1 


Waipawa— 




1 
t 






i j 


Noraewood . . 


1,206 


210 


280 


309 


1 .. 1 il 


Ruataniwha North 


651 


140 


142 




' .. , h 


Takapau 


608 


112 


92 


120 


.. ! (') 


Waipawa 


274 


' 59 


75 


78 


• i 


Waipukurau.. 


741 


198 


209 


•• 




Patangata— 












Oero 


305 


55 


60 


07 


i 


Patangata 


294 


. 49 


50 


99 


* 


Porangahau . . 


433 


92 


91 


158 


h 


Tamumu 




35 


21 


33 


{') 


Wallingford . . 




24 


31 


56 


i ' 


Wanstead 




21 


57 


* • 


'"i 



(1) No rate etraok. 
id. each tpeciaL 



(>1 ^d., id., M. specia 
(«) id., H^'» Aiid lid. special. 



[d. special. 



(') A<i-. tS^ . il'^M and Ihreo of 



190 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



Road Districts, 1904-5 — continued. 









Kmnbcrof 


Iff 


Ill 


Oouatjruiid Dbilflc:!. 


1 


1 


*t, 




Wool villi X 
Web©r ' 
Pftbiatua 
C&atle point 








1 
1 




d. 




iLketahuna 

^[&urteeTill6 

Maaterton 

Akitio 

Wairarapa South 

Featherston 


WNo road dj». 
triote.) 














Hutt- 

Makara 

Plimmerton. (No Board.) 
Seatoun 


257 


39 
260 


49 
400 


66 
1,500 


I 




Sounds. (No road districts.) 














Marlborough— 
Awatere 
Omaka 
Pelorus 
Picton 

Spring Creek 
Wairau 




785 
1,603 
1,218 
847 
819 
930 


154 
335 
237 
190 
139 
220 


162 
542 
255 
163 
143 
230 


582 
477 
258 
185 
260 


! 

i 


UP) 



Kaikoura ] 

Collingwood I (No road districts.) 

Takaka J ' 



Waimea— 
Dovedale 
Moutere Upper 
Riwaka 
Stoke 

Suburban North 
Waimea West 



Buller >^ 

Inangahua 

Wes^tland ^ '^° '°*^ districts.) 

Amuri 

Cheviot 



286 
397 
687 
,183 
559 
460 



57 
100 
154 

125 

78 



64 
100 

210 

129 

80 



06 



80 



?! 



Ashley- 
Ashley 
Gust 



ii)}d. special. 



. . 713J 

(3) ^. special 



505 
161 



213 
142 



280 
182 



(S) No rate struck. 



l^OCAL QOVKRKINa BODms. 191 1 


' KoAD DfBTKicTs, IdOi-d-'Coutinned. ^^| 




^ 


Number of 




jli J 


Coimty and Oiskriel, 


Is 

-'1 


1 


i£ 1 


111 1 


4 

1 


5 
1 


i 

it 

II 


AthJcy — cortiiTtuerJ 




d. d. 1 


EywtoQ 


S49 


275 


275 


! 


^^m 


Ejxeton Went 


40i S5 


75 


75 


t 


^^H 


K<»w&i 


1.851 570 


670 


790 


^^H 


Mftndeville and K(iogior& 


2/257 537 


460 


6550 


i 


^^1 


Oxford 


1,973 ; 675 


476 


867 


m 


^^1 


W&i|Nkni 


1.095 


350 


300 


653 


h 


■ 


Sclwyn — 












■ 


Atoo 


., 1220 


894 


1,131 


1 1*) 




CouTieuAy ,. 


2,560 


430 


463 


754 


i 


^^1 


EUdsmere . . 


3,497 


, , 


607 


850 


i 


^^1 


H&lawell 


t.S78 


215 


200 


230 


1 


^^1 


Beathoote .. 


3,995 


675 


y<.m 


1,216 


1 (') 


^^1 


Lake Coleridge 


177 


36 


31 


70 


J 


^^1 


Lincoln 


1,213 


977 


248 


274 


h ^M 


Malvern 


965 ! 170 


Hi 


233 


It ■ 


Mdvern East 


625 1 143 


160 


263 


^! 


^^H 


Malvern Sovitli 


428 . 81 


207 


304 


ki') 


■ 


Rakaia 


825 206 


207 


357 




Riocarton 


5,713 .. 


1,284 


1,520 




^^B 


3{nreydon 


1,467 , 603 


624 


651 


, ^ 


>»(') ] 


SpriDgB 


U872 


460 


435 


470 


8*') 


^M 


TnUpu 


324 


96 


62 


100 


ii'i 




Templetou . . 


2,938 


609 


572 


678 


&(•) 


^^H 


WaimAkariri Upper , , 




21 I 41 


•' 


(') 


■ 


4karoa- 












■ 


Akaroa and Waiuui . . 


1.308 


270 


248 


248 


^ 


■ 


Le Boo*« Bay 


316 


58 


83 


91 


('") 




litUe River . . 


816 


800 


200 


316 




^^1 


Okain'fl Bay . , 


520 


90 


103 


130 


!(") 


■ 


Pigeon Bay . . 


258 


56 


51 


67 


t 


■ 


Moant Herbert, (No road dintriots. ) 












■ 


Aabburton— 












H 


Ani^ia 


80 


69 


121 


S('«) 


1 


Ashburton Upper 


2,002 420 


600 


818 


J 


Cotd»Ueam ,, 


319 85 


90 


167 


1 


H 


LoriRbpach , . < > 


1,836 ,, 


264 


389 




^' ■■ '^:.ttt.. . 


.. 265 


287 


389 




^ 


meriB 


928 18a 


203 320 


1 


[ll iVI spoeial ; Byre Water^ritce, ^il, fier acre. (>) |d. ipeclal : id,. Ad., ^d.. M, 1 

•ttd Ad teparate. («! i*„d. siieciaf, Opawa Ward. (». Ad. aod ^d. ipeoial ; Jd. J 

•tpaiale (e» nio. destruotion i mall birds. (<^j ^d Rcparar«, k%9 rftte ^^M 
(^ M. tep^rale, w rate {^) ^d. unBclal ; pepitrato, A^i wter supply; ^^M 
^.boepital aod cLi ut; ^. destruetioti tin all Uini«; Ad. tramway, 4«) No ^^M 


1 



192 



MBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL T8AB-B00K. 



KoAD Districts, 1904-5 — continued. 













■s 


<s 




^ 




KQiab«T of 




1" J 




" 








111 


«2«j 


Coiiiitjr«aaDlaM«4* 


f 


! 


ii 


If. 


At b bn rton — continued. 










d. 


d. 


Ranfiltatft ,. 


797 


120 


131 


ail 


I 




South Hftkaift 


, ^ 


370 


390 


550 




Wetkftiiui .. 


1.230 


333 


280 


334 


i 




Gor&ldtne— 














Geraldiue .. 


a,2ao 


BflO 


4Sa 


939 


t 




Mount Fee} .. 


193 


ISO 


108 


175 


! 




Ttfmuka 


2,980 


500 


57* 


868 




Levek \ 


'i 












MackeiiEie 














W^lj^i' <**" «*'* aistneta,) 














Wailiemo 














WftikouaiU / 














Pecinflula — 














OtftRO Mtadi* 


SOI 


67 


58 


104 




i 




Pedmaula 


1,324 


234 


335 


460 








Portobeljo .. 


, , 


268 


360 


405 




I 




Tomahawk . . 


137 


20 


a9 


43 


m 




Tareri— 














Half-way Bubh, (No Beard,) 














Bruco— 














Balmoral 


476 


74 


66 




i») 




Inch^Chitlia (Road and River) . . 


344 


60 


61 


68 


i 




Mouj>t Stuart 


618 


104 


115 


129 


1 




Cluthft ' 














Tuapeka 
















Matiiototo 


(No road diairicts.) 














Vincent 
















Lake 
















So u til land— 














InvoreargilL {No Board.) 














Tuturau 


733 


113 


134 


140 


1 




Wallace 1 














Fiord 


, (No road dia- 














Stewart IpI and 


^ tricta.J 














Ghatbam lalAnd^ 















(1) i<3. special. 



(>) No rate liruck. 



JECTION IV.— LICENSES AND LICENSED HOUSES, ETC^ 
Licenses and Licensed Houses. 

During the year ended the 31st March, 1905, 2,250 licenses for 
the sale of intoxicating liquors were granted. Of these, 1,415 were 
publicans' and accommodation licenses, 7 New Zealand wine, 74 
packet, 177 wholesale, and 577 conditional licenses. The fees paid 
amounted to £50,558, and formed part of the revenue of the local 
governing bodies of the districts in which the licenses were issued. 
Particulars are given in the following table : — 

Number op Licenses granted during the Year 1904-5, and the Amount 
OF Fees paid to Local Bodies therefor. 



Licenses. 
Publicans* licenses 
Acccmmodation licenses 


In Counties. 
565 
202 

767 

11 

13 

452 

1,243 


In Boroughs. 
648 

648 

7 

63 

164 

125 

1,007 


Totar. 

1,213 

202 


Total licensed houses 
New Zealand wine licenses . . 
Packet licenses 
Wholesale licenses 
Conditional licenses 

Total licenses granted . . 


1,415 

7 

74 

177 

577 

2,250 



Amount of license fees paid to local bodies £18,372 £32,186 £50,558 

The average number of persons to each licensed house in 
counties and boroughs respectively, for 1904-5, is next shown : — 

Number vafimatAri Average Number of 

of Licensed Po\^Xtion Persons to 

Houses.' I'opulation. ^^^^^ Licensed Honie. 

Counties .. .. 767 410,318 535 

Boroughs .. .. 648 414,763 640 



Totals .. .. 1,415 825,081 583 

In 1903-4 the number of licensed houses in counties was 766, 
and those in boroughs 638, giving a total of 1,404 houses, or 11 less 
than in 1904-5. The average number of persons to a licensed 
house decreased from 540 in 1903-4 to 535 in 1904-5 in counties, 
and increased in boroughs from 625 in the former to 640 in the 
latter year. 

* I.0., houses holding publicans' or accommodatiou licenses. 
7— Ybk. 



194 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK. 



The annual fees paid for licenses are — 

(1.) For a publican's license — £ 

(a.) Within the limits of a borough or town district . . 40* 

(b.) Outside the aforesaid limits . . . . . . . . 85 

(2.) For a New Zealand wine license . . . . . . . . 1 

(8.) For an accommodation license, a sum to. be determined by 

the Licensing Committee, not exceeding. . . . . . 90 

(4.) For a packet license — 

(a.) For a vessel exceeding 50 tons register . . 10 
(6.) For a vessel not exceeding 50 tons register 5 

(5.) For a wholesale license . . . . . . . . 90 

(6.) For a conditional license, according to duration of license, a 

sum not exceeding . . . . . . . . . . 90 

The approximate capital value of the licensed houses in the 
counties was stated at £771,204, and the same for certain of the 
boroughs at £741,684:. There was, besides, an annual value of 
£109,719 for otlier licensed houses in the boroughs, which, capitalised 
at 6 per cent., would represent £1,828,650. The capital value of 
all licensed houses would therefore be about £3,341,538. 

The total number of persons engaged in or connected with the 
sale or manufacture of wine, spirits, beer, cordials, Ac, was re- 
turned at the census of 1901 as under : — 







Males. 


Females. 


Persons. 


Hotelkeopers . . 




1,341 


215 


1,556 


Relative assisting 




133 


631 


764 


Manager, clerk 




104 


22 


196 


Hotel servant, cook 




1,376 


2,657 


8,933 


Barman, barmaid 




178 


349 


527 


Manager, secretary, steward of club-house 


115 


27 


142 


Wine, flpirit, merchant . . 




50 


3 


63 


Assistant 




10 


1 


11 


Clerk, storeman 




55 


1 


56 


Traveller 




31 




31 


Cordial, &c, seller 




6 


, , 


6 


Brewer, bottler, and others 


engaged in 








brewing 




G()6 


4 


610 


Relative assisting 




8 


1 


9 


Maltster and assistants . . 




147 


.. 


147 


Wine-manufacturer 




16 


.. 


16 


Cordial, &c., maker, bottler 




231 


7 


238 


Assistant, clerk, traveller, <^c 




130 
4,537 


2 


132 


Total.^ 


3,820 


8.857 



Local-option Poll. 

Under **The Alcoholic Liquors Sale Control Act, 1893," each 
electoral district constituted for the election of a member of the 
House of Representatives is a licensing district, and electors for 



♦ Between the hours of six in the uiorning and ten at night. For an el even -o'clock 
license an ad'litioual £3 must be paid. 



loOal-option poll. 195 

the House of Bepresentatives are also electors under the Licensing 
Acts. Under •* The City Single Electorates Act, 1903," the three 
electoiates of the cities of Auckland, Wellington, Chrifctchurch, and 
Ducedin in each case foim one electorate for the purpose of 
taking a local-option poll. 

Under the Amendment Act of 1895 the licensing poll is taken 
&t the same time as the general election of members of the House 
of Representatives. The questions for the decision of the voters 
are,— 

(1.) Whether the number of licenses existing in the district 

shall continue. 
(2.) Whether the number shall be reduced. 
(3.) Whether any licenses whatever shall be granted. 
The voter may vote for one or two of these proposals, but no 
more. 

The method of determining the result of the poll in each district 
by the Returning Officer is as follows : — 

(1.) If the number of votes recorded in favour of the continuance 
of existing licenses is an absolute majority of all the voters whose 
votes were recorded, the proposal is deemed to be carried, and the 
licenses continue until the next poll, subject to certain provisions 
in special cases. 

(2.) If the number of votes recorded in favour of a reduction in 
the number of licenses is an absolute majority of all the voters 
whose votes were recorded, the proposal is deemed to be carried, 
and supersedes the proposal for continuance of licenses. The 
Licensing Committee then reduces publicans' licenses by not less 
than 5 per cent, or more than 25 per cent, of the total number 
existing, excluding forfeitures. Provision is made that when a 
reduction vote is carried the licenses shall be reduced by one 
at least when the total number does not exceed ten, two when 
not over thirty, and three at least when the licenses exceed 
thirty. 

(3.) If the number of votes recorded in favour of the proposal 
that no license shall be granted is not less than three-fifths of all 
the voters whose votes were recorded, the proposal is declared to 
be carried, and supersedes the proposal for reduction and for con- 
tinuance, and no licenses can be granted. 

(4.) If none of the proposals respecting licenses is carried by 
the prescribed majority the licenses continue as they are until next 
poll, subject to certain provisions in special cases. 

(5.) Where any licensing poll is declared void, provision is made 
in " The Licensing Acts Amendment Act, 1904," for the taking of a 
fresh poll. 

The result of the poll taken on the 6th December, 1905, as 
made up from returns received from the officer in charge of the poll 
in each licensing district, is as follows : — 



196 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 



A a 



fO 3 ; 
® as 

a® - 



3 O 
550 



O 



a 

o 






.5 S 

§0 



.2.2 S.2 5 

ki C 2 h S 

ssSss 

« Q) B a rj « 

o g 2 s 2 

6 O O A O 




r-ciC3ci;».toO'*»<oacoc'icooooQO'*oo«i'<Ni-tOQi-'0'*o 

rJ«O05Ci'Mt*i-tt:*O-*l>C5^t*aCOaD'<»«OTj«Oe5oit*r-0Q 
1-4^ C^ t-T c{ CO C^' C^" 2^' S^' (?r r-* »H !N ?f <N of o{ ci »H <N* «H r-T CT 



<MOOO0««0CS»-'5t-<N.-l©10S»0O.HC0»CO00 
t:*CpCO>OQ<MCCt^'HQOaO«Ot-*-iQOrHQCOt- 
COOOOO«OOOOOCc5»-OOaOrH,-lQOt-r-l 


0> t- CC »-l 


OlCCC^G'100CTO»(M(NW<NO«'*CO'*CCCO««CO<N00<NCOCC0O 


Ot-<N(MQ0XOrHOf-^'^Q'«<<Oe0OCM»0OC0CM'^OC5O'H 
t-^00G>l'*C^XCCOL-OOrHr-lt-0>i-^S<N00<0Q000t-O 
OOCC'MO'^'^CC<M(NL-T-it-<Nt-«H«300'^C^'^t-»HOCCO 



CCO'^OOOOO»COCC"^O;0O».'3OW5"^»0^"^O»O»0O 



55 



aiClO'MCNOu':OXt-r-iO<NC0< 

CSCiXOCCl'^r-cOO-t'^OODC 
"? L-' C O CI -r Ci "^ X t- C5 O O d < 



r-'C^'MC^XCC<71'M'MC1.HO«COCO'*<MOlC0C?1CO<NO«O<IC^C0O» 



OOCircOQ^OOOOiOOOt-COClfHiLOi-trHCOCCt^OOC: 
-T<K'Or-XOXOC:0'^«0^— iCOt-XOS-^OOOt-^OOi-ltOX 
C5i-i'CCOT*<?itXr-OCJt»COOT»<0050>©«OICiCOCOOC50'«* 



>4 --I 



ClrH'ML^COi?10qClCqrHrHCCOiC^rHTH(N»HrH«H»-(C<Jt-lf-tr-t 



fl o 

O eJ I 



^2d 



t-OT*<TtlC0'Tj»ClCMr-tC5OC5C5X»-l01«5G^O'^^r-l05cC'«*'l^ 
OCM»-'»OC5Cl'MOCC"fX005Xt:*T«l(MOGO'-<'-<CO"^T-iO?0? 

r-Toi oroft-^^'c^'of !?{ t^r-Tcf of cf^of of 00 cNtH of CQ 01 oi of of o<i 





BESULT OP LOCAL-OPTJON POLL. 



197 



I ^ 



® _ 
tf o 

.2 2 
§►2 



2 'g'S'S'S -S 'S'^ 

t n fc -c g c fc c 

*•» *»g *» » »« »Sfl5c «tg »^q§ 

eS OtfoS o^So 

a fts P^D Oi o s p, 

.9 S.S2.S 2 $.9 2 

§ ogog oggo 



a c ■ 



1 ! 



si 


Total 
Number of 
Valid Votes 
recorded. 



ri522':?S2S2^S3Q^ri^oo»oocit-L-ao»H'^'<ji 


CO (M t- 


CX>00>CO<NC«05«HC>lt-*rpOCJC500<OOOr-»COrHrH 


. CO Si o 
• 00 CO X 



COiHCO»-l»-l<MOOCO©li-liH(N.HClrHC<Jr-tG^OO»rH»-lrH rnrMiH 



CO M 00 « « CO O CO « « CO CO CqCO C«l ci C^C^oToTcN <N (N *(M*C0 3^ 



io>ot-t-'*>caot*«30cot*oO'^coot-co<N'^<ML^ oi«.-:co 

C0t-XiHt*X»-l«O'H^t-»-l30'*CO<M»Ot*Tt<OiCO«OQp C0»0 

<M 00"^CO Oi X '«*« CO >0 U3 O CO CO «H CO r-» O '^ t- CM O S O • ^ O '^ 

CO -^ CO -^ oo»oxt*>o«»oocoio CO -^jT-^irTaTio CO CO ■'^ * '^i.-^ -^ 



^^cpX»0C0<N'*OC0C0Tj«OC0OCQt*Cit*C001''J<T*i (MCOt- 

C5eOX;OL^COt*OOOOOCOt-L'-»OCO».'>05XOOt*0 OXsO 

O»0CQ»COClXt-t"^C0^'^'*C0'«JiC0l>'Ot-Ttit-XO •Ci'-iCO 

CO of CO C^TcM CO 00 TjTcN »-l of <M iH 0» rH oTiH Ol X of rH iH of * tH CO of 



)C<IXCiOO^COCOOCOX»OCOOOOt-CiOt:- 



rs o 
35 



3 

9 «'* 



5 5k 



00 o t^ 

t- »o ■^ 

• O X CO 



Ol 1-t Ol rH .H 0« t* CO « rH rH i-i f-l 



Olt-lOlt-rHTHrHrH — «01tH 



t-l:»0005»-IC«CNCO'^C5a»COCOX»O^OrHOq^01rH rNOi-^ 

t-Q'^c?o«xxcot*»HocoiocooixoTnccL'-xQ »nxt- 

iH X rH O X O X O X O CO O O CO X t- Ol CO CO X X CO O rH CO o 

CO iH CO of i-Tof 00 00 of 01 of CO <M Ol i-l r-T of Ol O ofrH ^ of • Ol of of 



::^L 



'Tt»»OOSCJCO'^'-<COt*COO'^0?0»H-«1iXrHOL^>001X OCO^ 
XQ'«*»«C5IXrHOOOOI'^»HXO>OOXOaiCOrHOX C0 0101 
CiOXf-HOOICOOiCOOCOCnOrHL-XO'^'MOICOCOCi Cii-i«0 

t-^O 00 CO »rri^CO 00 CO »000'«HCO'*'«*«'^OCO Co'iTtjT'.ji • -^ t> o 
0» 'N 

1 1 

c g - 



198 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



9} U O 

S S fl 

2 8,-2 
S2| 

O O O 



i 

u 
08 
O 

2 

O 

525 




o 2 o • .2 2 S 2 
5o§8 §o6o 



1 



s 
s 

3 



»C00C0OC0<0'^'*H« 



C0r-i|>Q0«0(M00a0O 



'«*< ^ CO CO «0 »-l •* 0><N Ot*»HO> 

O CC CO »H (N O iO <0 >0 00 'H tM OQ 

L-(Mr-»Cir-»Ci(N<NO • •t«C000O 

c^fcicf of cTof of of of * oTofcoof 






XOlOOGOt^OlOSO"^ 

C5coaot>Tj«oooo 

■^CC ?0 O 00 CO -^-^-^ 



01O1C5O00Oi00501 
—tl-CCiHOOOlTjtX 

?^ ^' of ?c oT CO of of .-H 



O) 00 00 <N 
. rH -^ -* CO 



00 »-l Ol CO 

CO -* Q Oi 

• 00 >o ^ Tl« 



o ».': oi CO o "O CO Q ?:• 

i-<?OC505r-iO'^OCO 
t^ 01 C5 L'- O L^ O O 'H 

of r-T ^' of x" of of of ^ 



1-1 0« CO 01 



O 4A 

o 






00 'M Ol O CO Ol 00 Ol CO 
— 'L^C00 010lt-i.-tCO 
X O O O O O t* CO r-t 

I ^.-<rHoiaico»-(.-toi 



X r-i lO >0 01 OJ t- O C5 

O -J- ^ CO ^^ CO '<*<' 1« Tj< 



-t* CO 00 O 

CO oi t- 01 

CO Oi O X 



X 0> rH ■<») 
O Tt» rH CO 
C5 "^ "^ OJ 



00 CD 00 
gOfc- 



V-4C4 C 

Sooc 



SS3 



00 
CO 



gag '^lol 



8 ;2ijcfcfcf 



o 



3 



S (fl CO O) 00 ' 
CB 2 O O ^ 



'M o »o 

«0 U3 CO 



S 3 



eS u 

<=* a 
&6 



3a 

o S -r fl 



eS 



".- ® 



Is 






o 



•I 
I 



a 

>^ rfi s 

•3=1 



•a 



KB8ULT OF LOOAL-OPTIO!* POLL. 199 

From the foregoing table it will be seen that 182,884 votes were 
recorded in favour of continuing existinf^ licenses — including three 
districts, Clutha, Ashburton, and Mataura, where the vote (6,170) 
was for restoration of the licenses cancelled at the poll taken in 
1902—151,057 for reduction, and 198,768 for no-license (including 
1,989 votes cast for non-restoration in the Clutha, Ashburton, and 
Mataura districts). 

Id eighteen of the sixty-eight licensing districts the majority of 
the voters was in favour of continuance, in forty no proposal was 
carried, in four reduction, in three no-license was carried, and in 
ihree non -restoration was carried. In thirty-six of the districts — 
Marsden, Eden, Manukau, Franklin, Thames, Waikato, Bay of 
Plenty, Waiapu, Hawke*s Bay, Waipawa, Pahiatua, Masterton, 
Wairarapa, Egmont, Taranaki, Hawera, Patea, Rangitikei, Oroua, 
Palmerston, Manawatu, Otaki, Newtown, Hatt, Waitaki, Mount 
Ida, Waikouaiti, Eaiapoi, Chalmers, Courtenay, Selwyn, Timaru, 
Taieri, Bruce, Wallace, and Awarua— a majority of the votes polled 
was for no-license, but not in sufficient number to make up the 
three-fifths required to carry that issue. Of the total number of 
P'^rsons (396,417, including those whose votes were informal), 221,674, 
or 55-92 per cent., were men, and 174,743, or 4408 per cent., were 
women. Compared with' the polling in the year 1902, this shows 
a numerical increase of 41,380, or 2295 per cent., on the part of the 
men, and 36,178, or 26*11 per cent., on the part of the women, 
clearly showing that the latter are now taking greater interest in 
local-option matters than they formerly did. 

A comparison with 1896, 1899, and 1902 of the votes recorded 
and the number of persons who went to the poll is shown in the 
next table : — 



\,'«»«o •^^^•^o^ ♦^.. I N' umber of Persons who recorded 

Number recorded for | y^^^g (including informal). 



Year. of Persons 

on HollB. Continu- Rednc- i No 

&nce. tion. . License. 



Males Females. Totals. 



1306 .. 339,230 139,680 94,655 98,312 151,235 108,663 1259,898 

1S99 .. 373,744 , 142,443 ! 107,751 ' 118,575 160,959 120,863 281,822 

1902 .. 415,789 j 148,449 132,240 151,524 : 180,2'.M 138,565 ' 318,859 

l'J05 ... 476,478 I 182, 8S4 151,057 198,768 ; 221,674 174,743 i 396,417 

The large increases in the number of votes recorded for no- 
license or reduction are prominent features in the above table. It 
i8 also interesting to note the substantial increase shown in the 
number of persons who went to the poll, tliough these latter must 
not be accepted as absolutely correct throughout. 



SECTION v.— METEOROLOGY. 



Temperature, Rainfall, Atmospheric Pressure, and Wind, 

THROUGHOUT NeW ZEALAND, AS OBSERVED AT TWELVB 

Stations, for the Year 1905. 



The Observations webe taken at 9.90 a.m. 



Stations and Months. 



Temperature 
I in Shade. 



Rainfall. 



Fall. 



OQ o 
2^ 



Preyailing 
Wind. 



Auckland (lat. 36° 60' S. ; 


1 Fahr. 


; ° Fahr. 


No. 


Inches. 


Inches. 1 


long. 174° 60' 40" E. ; alt. 


1 

1 










126 ft.)— 










1 


January 


78-6 


480 


12 


2-79 


29-80 SW. 


February 


78-0 


550 


6 


0-66 


8001 1 SW. 


March 


780 


530 


6 


2-64 


80-08 ■ SW. NE. 


April 


, 730 


43-5 


12 


3-20 


3004 SW. 


]May 


68-0 


450 


11 


2-29 


3005 1 S. SW. 


June 


620 


370 


23 


600 . 


29-94 i SW. 


July 


600 


400 


18 


3-88 , 


29-99 S. SW. 


August 


60-5 


39-6 


15 


305 1 


30 09 1 SW. 


September . . 


630 


430 


26 ; 


4-48 1 


29-76 SW, NW. 


October 


, 66 5 


440 


21 


5-87 1 


29-91 NE, SW. 


November 


71-0 


450 , 


14 1 


2-20 ' 


29-92 SW, NW. 


December 


760 


490 ' 


11 ' 


2-96 


3007 1 SW, NE. 


Rotorua (lat. 38° 9' S. ; 






1 
1 




i 


long. 176° 15' E. ; alt. 






1 




1 


926 ft.)— 






1 




1 


January 


890 


42-0 


7 1 


1-53 1 


30-26 i SW. 


February 


850 


430 


8 ' 


0-73 ' 


30-35 NE. 


^larch 


790 


410 


5 1 


0-42 1 


30-41 NE. 


April 


740 


34-0 


6 ! 


2-29 


30-31 SW. 


May 


68-0 ' 


330 


16 


3-53 


30-34 SW." 


June 


600 , 


310 


17 


10-31 1 


30-10 1 SW. 


July 


590 ' 


310 


13 


7-45 1 


30-17 SW. S. 


August 


650 1 


330 


8 ■ 


3-21 


30-31 ! SE, SW. 


September . . 


63 1 


38-0 


20 


5-47 1 


29-90 i SW. 


October 


700 


430 


20 


7-37 


30-12 NE. 


November 


770 1 


43-0 


11 


3-11 


30-11 SW, W. 


December . . 


80-0 1 


45-0 


7 . 


2-42 


30-31 SW, S, NW 







METEOBOIiOGY. 




20 




Temperatare 
in bhade. 


Rainfall. 


II 




SuUoDi and Months. 


1 


1 




Fall. 


Prevailing 
Wind. 


Httnee (lat. 39° 32' S. ; i '' l^ahr. 


= Pahr. 


No. 


Inches. 


Inches. 




long. 176° 53' E. ; alt. 












14 ft.)- 














J&nuary 


. 




6 


1-51 


. , 




Februaiy 




. 830 


43-5 


2 


012 


30-11 t 




March 




820 


450 


11 


1-69 


30-12 


NE. 


April 




810 


340 


8 


1-99 


29-99 


SW. NW. 


% 




740 


320 


13 


13-13 


30-09 


SE. 8W. 


Jane 




69-7 


30-2 


15 


608 


29-87 


SW. 


July 




; 67-0 


29-6 


13 


6-31 


29-95 


SW. 


August 




64-5 


29-8 


12 1 


5-64 


30-08 


SW. 


September . 




67-2 


35-5 


16 


3-52 


29-64 


SW. 


October 




730 


370 


14 


4-93 


29-83 


SW, NE, E. 


November 




81-0 


41-0 


14 


3-24 


29-77 1 


NW, SW. 


December . 




, 81-0 


39-5 


14 


1-62 


29-96 

i 


NW, SW. 


^•w Pijrmoath (lat. 39° 3' 








1 
i 


• 


|5*S.; long. 174° 4' 58" ; 












^.; alt. 200 ft.)— 












January 730 


430 


15 


2-78 


29-91 i 


W, NW. 


February 




760 


460 


6 


1-74 


:30-ll ' 


SW, W. NW. 


March 




760 


470 


10 


1-26 


30-16 


SE, SW. 


April 
May 




700 


380 


24 < 


4-30 


30-08 


SW, SE. 




690 


400 


17 


4 41 ' 


30-10 


SE, SW. 


June 




690 


310 


24 ; 


14-84 


29-88 ■ 


SE. SW. 


July 




67.0 


350 


24 


5-18 i 


29-95 


SE. 


August 




. 680 


390 


19 


3-70 1 


3006 


SE. 


September . 




650 


450 


26 


6-71 


29-09 . 


NW, SE. 


October 




650 


430 


26 


9-31 


29-87 


NW, NE. 


November 




' 720 


450 


22 


6 02 ! 


29-89 


NW. 


December 




750 


410 


16 ; 


3-68 


3009 


NW. 


Momabaki (lat. 34° 46' S. ; 






1 






long. 174° 42' E. ; alt. 












250 ft.)— 1 




1 




i 

1 




January .. i 740 


44-4 


14 ' 


217 


29-80 


W, NW. 


February 




, 79-8 


44-7 


3 


014 


30-00 


S. 


March 




75-1 


410 1 


6 : 


204 


30-07 


W, N. 


April 




68-7 


360 


13 i 


3-43 


29-96 


W. 


May 




66-5 


350 


12 


3-89 ! 


30-03 


S, W. 


June 




. 61-8 


31-2 , 


19 


8-80 , 


2907 


w, s. 


July 




58-3 


30-1 


13 


1-70 


29-76 


N, W, S. 


August 




; 64-2 


30-2 


12 


2 38 


29-99 


N, S, W. 


September . 




60-3 


361 


21 


4-6G 


29-55 


W, S, N. 


October 




; 67-8 


37-2 


18 


612 


2976 


W.N. 


November 




72-7 


40-2 


17 


4-54 


2979 


W. 


December . 




. ' 77-2 


390 


15 


4-41 


29-70 i 


W. 



202 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOK. 



SIfttioni ABd llonthi. 



Tamperalare 
In Shade. 



s 

I 



I 

3 



RainlklL 



Si 



Fall. 



II 

ll 



PreTftlUnc 

WlBd. 



Leviu (iat. 40° 37' 8. ; long. 
175" 17' E. ; alt. 119ft.)- 

January 

February 

Marob 

April 

May 

June 

July 

AngiiRt 

S-ptember . . 

O-'tober 

November 

December 



Wellington (Iat. 41° IG' .26" 
S.; long. 174° 46' 20" E. ; 
alt. 140 ft.)- 



o Fniir • ° Fahr. 



353 
382 
36-5 
313 
310 
25 
20 
25-8 
29 8 
310 
390 
34 4 



.. 72 


. . 800 


. . 73 


. . 70 5 


. . 670 


. . 61-8 


. . , 58 2 


.. 66 


. . 1 63-3 


.. 68 8 


.. 70 


.. 78 



I 



January 


. 756 


Fel)ruary 


. 770 


March 


. 73-2 


Apnl 


. ' 73 2 


May 


. j 65 5 


June 


. 61 7 


July 


. ■ 62 9 


AugUNt 


. 62 8 


September . . 


. 1 59-5 


October 


. 640 


November 


. 718 


December 


. ; 740 

! 


1 

Christchurch (Ut. 43" 32' 
S.; long. 172^ 3>i'E.) - 


Jantiary 


. 88 9 


February 


. 1 79-8 


Marcu 


. 77 2 


April 


. : 781 


May 


. 67 


June 


. 69 


July 


. , 59 5 


August 


. 5S4 


September .. 


. 59 4 


October 


. 67-2 


November . . 


. 1 76-8 


December . . 


. ' 86 6 



398 
41-2 
368 
303 
29 8 
22 3 
26 1 
23-8 
31 7 
31 
33- 1 
346 



No. 



I 



' 41-9 12 

I 45 " 

\ 45 8 

i 400 

I 430 

I 30 5 
33-2 

, 32-5 

' 38 5 

; 41-3 

I 43 8 

! 41 6 



luches. 



1-36 
109 
2-75 
224 
1-82 
9-37 
117 
1-59 
524 
5 81 
290 
316 



22 I 

14 

19 

18 

13 

15 

13 



14 I 

8 ; 

11 i 

14 : 

6 , 

15 
14 
11 
15 
14 
9 
12 



232 
1-45 
539 
426 
678 
8 65 

2 19 
273 
602 
617 

3 32 
289 



165 
2 39 
1-79 
136 
98 
600 
1-86 
103 
6 62 
3-23 
2-29 
1-35 



Ineheii. 



29-71 
29-83 
29 90 
29-94 
30-03 
3011 
80 13 
3018 
29 81 
29 87 
2975 
29-79 



29 85 

30 09 
3012 
2998 
3011 
29-88 
29 95 
3010 
29-65 
29 83 
29 77 
29 96 



29 82 
30.06 
3007 
29-92 
3008 
29 85 
29 91 
80-06 
2962 
2976 
29 65 
29-88 



NW. 

NW. 

NVV. 

NW. 

E. 

E. 

E. 

E. 

E, NW. 

NW. 

NW. 

NW. 



S, N. 
S, N. 
N, S. 
N, NW. 
N, S. 
S. 

s. 

N, S 
S, NW. 
N. S. 
N. NW. 

N, NVV. 



I 



SW, NE. 
SW, NE. 
NE. 

SW, NE. 
SW, NE. 
SW. 

SW. NE. 
SW, NE. 
SW, NE. 
SW. NE. 
W. SW. 
SW. NE. 



IfSTBOBOIiOaT. 



203 





Temperalnxe 
In&ada. 


B^^n^r" 


II 






i 

i 


1 


II 


Fall. 


Prevailing 
WindT^ 


Liacoln College, Oaater- 


°Pahr. 


«Fahr. 


No. 


Inches. 


Inches. 




bar/ (lat. 43° 89' 16^ 8. ; 




' j 








loDg. 17Sr»38'59*B.; alt. 












42 f s.)— 












JftDuary 


94 


407 13 


1-86 


2984 


SW, NE. 


February 


88-9 


433 9 


305 


3005 


NE. 


March 


81-5 


390 11 


1-70 


3007 NE. 


April 


806 


311 ; 11 


1-65 1 


29-92 


NE. 


May 


693 


31-6 1 10 i 


2-21 


30 09 


NE, SW. 


June 


703 


24-5 14 i 


4-24 


29-86 


SW, NE. 


July 


621 


27-7 1 16 ; 


1-55 


29-93 


NE, SW. 


August 


614 


270 1 13 


1-38 


30 06 1 NE, SW. 


September . . 


61-6 1 33-5 1 16 i 


4-39 


29 03 ; SW, NE. 


October 


71-2 


31-6 14 


295 


29 75 ; NE. 


November . . 


79-9 


34-6 12 I 


215 


29-65 NE, SW. 


December 


87-2 


350 ' 13 ; 

1 


1-66 


29 88 NE, SW. 


Hokitika (lat. 42<» 41' 8(r 8. ; 




' 1 




' 


long. 170° 49' B. ; alt. 




j 1 






12 ft.)- 




1 






January 


800 


37-0 10 


3-80 


29-87 : SW. NW. 


February 


75-5 


460 8 ! 


4-79 


30-07 SW. 


March . . . . ' 


760 1 44-5 ' 10 


7-46 


30 12 SW. 


April 


750 34 1 15 ' 


5-72 


3001 SW. 


May 


650 


32 5 , 10 


G-59 


30-99 E, NW. 


June 


640 


270 13 


1118 


29 84 E, NW. 


July 


585 


300 ' 18 


12-27 


29-92 E, NW. 


AQgUSt 


640 


31-0 13 


6-62 


30-06 E. 


September . . 


780 


350 ; 18 


801 


29-58 E, SW. 


October 


650 


360 21 


813 


29 78 SW, NW, E. 


November 


680 


38 , 20 : 


10-56 


29-76 NW, SW. 


December . . 


74-0 


390 20 

1 ' 


8-70 1 


29-95 NW, S\^^ 


Leith Valley, Danedin (lat. 




1 


1 




45° 52' 11" S. ; long. 170° 










31' r'E.; alt. 300 ft.)— 




1 






January 


800 


40 i 21 


5-91 


29-78 SW. NE. 


February 


740 


41-0 1 10 


259 


29-97 W. NE. 


March 


820 


420 ; 14 


231 


29 97 W, NE. 


April 


650 


380 ' 17 ■ 


4-39 


29-89 SW, W. 


May 


630 


32 12 , 


3 52 


30 00 SW, W. 


June 


610 


310 13 


2-38 


29-78 SW, W. 


July 


680 


32 14 : 


2 22 , 


29-83 SW, NE. 


August 


680 


320 


8 1 


0-84 


29-96 ; SW. NE. 


September .. 


660 


330 


24 


11-05 


29-58 NE, SW. 


October 


700 


34 


17 i 


7-18 


29 74 I NE, W. 


November . . 


740 


360 


15 


5 96 


29-67 ' NW. W. N. 


December . . 


830 j 


380 1 


15 


5-49 


29-88 


SV^,^. 



204 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAB-BOOK. 





"'r^h^Je^^^ «-i"'-»- 


II 

Kg 


\ 

I 


Stations and Months. 


1 


owest. 

Wet 
Days. 


Fall. 


PrevailiDg 
Wind. 




X 


A 1 ^ 




So 




Ohatbam Islands (lat. 43''52' 


o Fahr. 


»Fahr. No.' 


Inches. 


Inches. 




S.; long. 176° 42' W.; alt. 












100 ft.)— 




1 








January 


GGO 


42 ; 20 


4-95 


29-56 


SW. E. 


February 


700 


440 i 8 


1-45 


29-75 


N, SW. 


March 


680 


410 


18 


6-75 


29-87 


SW. 


April 


650 


390 


15 ■ 


4-32 


29 68 


SW, W. NW. 


May 


600 


350 


15 


0-82 


29-88 


SW. 


June 


60-0 


310 


19 


269 


29-58 


SW. 


July 


550 


330 19 


3-54 


29-74 


SW. N. BE. 
SE, SW, N. 


August 


570 


360 24 


7-97 


29-83 


September . . 


590 


390 26 


516 


29-43 


NE, SW. 


October 


i 640 


340 12 


2-86 


2976 


SE, N. 


November 


660 


390 ! 16 


3 75 


29-60 


NW. 


December 


68-0 


410 


13 


2-48 


2971 


SW. NW. 



Twelve Stations : Comparative Table : Year 1905. 





Temperature 
in Shade. 


Rainfall. 


% 














■*» u 






"S 


•a 


1 




Ǥ 




stations. 


d 


d 
*» 2 




Greatest 




Whid. 


• 


Sd 


? d 


2 d 


Fall, 








.aQ 


|Q 


0-3 land Date. 


©35 






s 


3 


r 




^ 






Fahr. 


' ° Fahr. 


1 
No. 


Inches. 


Inches. 




Auckland 


78-5, 
19 Jan. 


37-0, 
5 June 


173 


1-82, 
2 Mar. 




SW. 


Rotor ua 


890, 
17 Jan. 


1 31-0. 
5 Juno 


1:^8 


2-57, 
1 June 




SW. 


Meaneo 


830, 
8 Jan. 


29-6, 
19 July 


i:t8 


3-95, 
22 May 


29-95 


SW. 


New Plymouth 


1 76-0. 


310, 
5 June 


229 


2-40, 
31 May 




SE. NW. 


Momahaki 


' 79-8. 
23 Feb. 


3001. 
3 July 


163 


r63, 
IC) Dec. 




1 w. 


Levin ... 


HOO. 
5 Feb. 


2.50, 
7 June 


! 149 


208, 
25 June 




NW. 


Wellington 


770, 
6 Feb. 


30r), 
5 June 


172 


1-93, 
25 Oct. 


29-94 


iN,S. 


Christchurcb ... 


1 88-9. 
1 16 Jan. 


2-2-3, 
5 Juno 


143 


1-51 
9 June 


29 89 


SW, NE. 


Lincoln 


94 0. 
i 16 Jan. 


1 -i-i-s. 
1 5 June 


152 ! 


1-40 
12 May 


29 89 


NE, SW. 


Hokitika 


800 
30 Jan. 


270 
5 June 


: 176 1 


343 
25 July 


29 92 


SW% E. 


Dunedin 


830 
13 Dec. 


310 
2 June. 


: 180 


3-29 
1 Sept. 


29-83 


SW. 


Chatham Islands 


700, 


310 


205 


1-75 




SW. 




25 Feb. 

1 


5 June 


1 


17 Mar. 




1 
i 



METEOBOLOOr. 



205 



I 


J 


^^frSi9!9SlS^$la 


^ ^ Si 72*r77 |;5T c Q m^ 


1 W 


M^liS3S|SES 


S S 2 S£S28 S^s S 8 89 




^^SK9 939&3 


^ e S 7=:'r'»-^ ^8« 2 & 98 


S^'s ^ S S o § S i s 


? 9 2 9SSSS^ 9S;S S i: S8| 


1 


•3 


^SKS1I^$3&$ 


S £! S ar^SolS sss s g ss 


to 


^S:SS^SSS8S59 


9 9 9 SI9SSS 3S9 2 9 ^9! 


6 


93 


^:;S9 9 99S8S9 


9 ;: 9 Sili91S n«sc ;: C 9^ 


S'tSS^SSSIrsS 


9 9 9 i:^i99 E229 9 S 99 




^&S$?79l98t 


g ;: 9 ;59S?99 9SSS P 1^ gg 


^d3S:?^Sf!SS 


9 S l: 9SS29S^ 9;:S 9 ^ 89 




4 


^^^^^ssiiiss? 


?i SI 9 5g$39 3555 g e eg 


s 


?*S£gSSg£SSR 


S 9 ^ 9il:Sg K^ft 9 9 89 




^3 s i s sg s» Ii $ ^ 


s: ? 9 $S$$t $^S g f£ c^i! 


i^'S £^ S S 3 g SS f ? 


o 8 ;? $ig33 9^3 3 9 99 


l~ 


^3s$is?ss39a 


2£ ?! 8 ^9999 999 S! ^ i:lC! 


^fS ^ & s g ^ ^ s s 


S 8 E: 9SBS9I: 9fS 9 9 89 


>;!*3 


fUB^^^^UM^ 


£ I^ 9 S?9li9s3 99^ ^ S && 


;ii^ 


j'gaesissp^^s 


9 8 9 £S9e£& 9SS 9 8 £8 


?: 


J 


«^a 2 S 9 9 S i S !S 


9 & g aas999 •a:? s 9 se 




sf 


?-E«iiSffiS£l3« 


J B m e:9999 g&g 9 3 5:9 




^ 


*^5SS^58^85 


^ - g •«*S-> ^9?3 S & 99 


»• 


?'g358§8aafs 


E: a; 9 :»599^ 999 9 g 89 


1 

-2 


— 


^^sa^ss^ss 


9 g e: ^S«r7? ^^T 6 9 99, 


£ 


f-gssnggsss 


^ 8 Z ^5993 999 S ^ 89 


.1^ 


^9SSS^S98S 


^ g 9 ?S*rT'? ^S? £ 9 SS 


j^gasiigssx 


S 9 9 $999%r ^S9 iS S: S9| 


oj: 

1 

'ii 

i 


il 
^1 


• • T : r • : I : 

^in or y^ > 'X' ^ b* r. :j X 


S i OS 

/filler- . ^^•^I^iIIh 

« a w « B •? e 



NEW EBALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 








II 






* 


II 


* 






8 








8 
















<-t 






2 


iS 

a 






2 


5 

a 


, 




p 








9 








^ 


H. 


C 




-3 


a 


O 


1 

q 


1^4 

s. 
a 


g 


g 
5 


1 
s 

"5 


a 


.a 


S2 

5 




a 


=3^ 


» 


s 


■a•-^ 


•f 






"5.S 


00 

1 


1 


1 


"3.2 


1 


:z; 








c^ 









SECTION VI.— VITAL STATISTICS. 



BiBTHS. 

Thb number of births registered in the colony during 1905 was 
23,682, or 27 -22 in every 1,000 persons living. The rate is the 
highest reached since the year 1894, the number of births being 
916 in excess of that for the year 1904, an increase of 4 02 per 
cent. From 1882 until the year 1899 there was a regular fall in 
the birth-rate. The number of births registered in a year reax^hed 
19,846 in 1884, and, after falling to 17,876 in 1892, has risen to 
23,682 in 1905 as stated above. 

The figures for each year from 1882 are worthy of notice, 
especially in connection with the subsequent particulars given as 
to marriages solemnised and the growth of population : — 



Tear. 

1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 



Number of 
Births. 

19,009 
19,202 
19.846 
19,693 
19,299 
19,135 
18,902 
18,457 
18,278 
18.273 
17,876 
18,187 



Rate per 1,000 
of Population. 

37-32 
36-28 
36-91 
34-35 
3315 
3209 
31-22 
3007 
29-44 
2901 
27-83 
27-50 



Year. 

1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 



Number of 
Births. 

18,528 
18,546 
18,612 
18,737 
18,955 
18,835 
19,546 
20,491 
20,655 
21,829 
22,766 
23,692 



Rate per 1,000 
of Population. 

27-28 
26-7e 
26-33 
25-96 
25-74 
25-12 
25 60 
2634 
25-89 
2661 
26-94 
• 27-22 



The marriages have increased 
of the colony also. 



numerically, and the population 



Year. 

1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1693 



Number of 
Marriages. 

3,600 
3.612 
3,800 
3,813 
3,488 
3,563 
3,617 
3,632 
3,797 
3.805 
4,002 
4,115 



Mean Popula- 
tion (excluding 
Maoris). 
509,309 
529,292 
652,590 I 
673,362 
582,117 I 
596,374 
605,371 
612,716 
620.780 
629,783 
642,245 
661,349 



Year. 

1894 
1895 
1806 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 



Number of 
Marriages. 

4,178 
4.110 
4,843 
4,928 
5,091 
5,461 
5,860 
6,095 
0,394 
6,748 
6,983 
7,200 



Mean Popula- 
tion (excluding' 
Maoris). 

679,196 
692.417 
706,846 
721,609 
736,260 
749,984 
763,594 
777,968 
797,793 
820,217 
845,022 
870,000 



208 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAR-BOOK. 



The average number of children to a marriage may be aa 
tained by comparing the number of legitimate births for a serief 
years with the marriages, but commencing with the marriages 
the year preceding that for which the first number of births is tali 

The figures for the twenty-year period 1886-1905 show a dec! 
in the proportion of births to every marriage in the preceding y 
from 490 to 324, as below : — 



Year. 


Marriages. 


Legitimato 
Blrthe. 


Proportion of Bi 
to every 

in Ihe Precedi 
Year. 


1885 


3.815 






1886 


3.489 


18,697 


4-90 


1887 


3,565 


18.618 


5-31 


1888 


3,617 


18.325 


514 


1889 


3,632 


17,845 


4-93 


1890 


3.797 


17,675 


4-87 


1891 


3,805 


17.635 


4-64 


1892 


4.002 


17.283 


4-64 


1893 


4,115 


17.614 


4-37 


1894 


4,178 


17.824 


4-33 


1895 


. 


17.711 


4-24 


1895 


4,110 






1896 


4,843 


17,778 


4-32 


1897 


K928 


17,911 


3-70 


1898 


5,091 


18,154 


3-68 


1899 


5,401 


18.00G 


3-54 


1900 


5,800 


18,640 


3.41 


1901 


G,(.K)5 


19,554 


3-34 


1902 


6,304 


19.734 


3-23 


1903 


6.748 


20,835 


3-26 


1904 


G,983 


21,737 


3-22 


1905 


. 


:>2,G00 


3-24 



If the average result be taken out for the ten years 188(>-li 
it will be found to represent 4-73 births to a marriage. Dea 
similarly with the figures for 1896-1905 the result is an averag< 
3*49, so that regarded annually or decennially there is a decided 
to be observed. 

In the Australian States a similar decrease is noticeable. 

New Zealand had in 1880 the highest birth-rate (40-78) 
1900 the case was reversed ; but in 1905 the New Zealand rate 
higher than that of Queensland (1904), New South Wales, Vict( 
and South Australia. 



BIRTHS. 



209 



The movement over ten years is calculated as under : — 

BiBTH-BATES PEB 1,000 OF POPULATION. 



Stkte or Colony. 



1896. 



1897. 



1898. 



1899. 



1900. 



1901. 



1902. ' 1903. i 1904. i 1905. 



Qaeeneland 


. 3006 


New South Wales 


. 28-85i 


Victoria 


. 27-33: 


Sooth Auatralia 


. 28-461 


Wtttem Australia 


. 22 65 


Tasmania 


. ;28-16 


New Zealand . . 


. [26-33 



I I ' ^ I , ! I 

29-92I28-28 27-31 30-21 28-28127-68 24-71 2712' . . 

28-42 27-14l27-1027-43'27-60|27-17 2528 26-73|26-73 

26-59,25-72:26-71 25-82|25-77i25 23 24 46 24-65:24-83 

126 97 24-98125-51 25-78 25-39124-85 2343 24-70123-82 



25-82,29-35|30 64 31-46 30-32 
27-73 26-24'25-98 28 25'28-40 
25 96 25-74 2512 25-60|26-34 



30-09 30 27 30-34'30-30 
28-95 28.61 29 59 29-32 
25-89 26-61 26-94 27-22 



This table shows that although New Zealand had in 1900 the 
lowest birth-rate in Australasia, the rate in this colony for 1905 was 
higher than that of Victoria and some others. 

A declining birth-rate is noticeable in many civihsed countries, 
and attention has been drawn by statisticians and political econo- 
mists to the serious consequences that 'may result. That fertility 
among women in New Zealand is decreasing, from whatever causes, 
further facts will tend to show. 

Taking the number of married women in New Zealand at 
what may be considered the child-bearing ages (i.e., from 15 to 45 
years, inclusive) as shown by each census since 1878, and for 
the same years the number of legitimate births (excluding plural) 
registered, the birth-rate per 1,000 married women of the above- 
siated ages is easily found, and is shown to be steadily declining, 
la 1878 the rate was 337 per 1,000, in 1896 it had fallen to 252, and 
in 1901 to 244 ; or, in other words, in 1878 one married woman of 
the ages specified in every three gave birth to a child, while in 1901 
the rate was one in four only. The figures for each census year are 
given below. 

bibth-bates (legitimate) peb 1,000 married womkn at cuild-bearing 
Ages fob each Census Year, 1878 to 1901. 



YeAr (Census). 



1878 
1881 
1886 
1891 
1896 
1901 



Number of 
Married Women 

between 

15 and 45 Years 

of Age. 

50,995 
57,458 
02,704 
63,165 
69,807 
79,406 



Number 
of Legitimate 

Births 
(Confinements). 

17,196 
18,003 
18,532 
17,455 
17,596 
19,355 



Birtli-rate 

per 1,000 

Married Women 

of from 15 to V) 

Years of Age. 

337-2 
313-3 
295-5 
276-3 
252-1 
243-8 



And another table is given, showing for a period of twenty years 
the numbers of married women at the quinquennial periods of age 
belonging to the full term 15 to 45 years, with the proportions 
that those numbers bear to every 100 married \vomen living at 
15-45. 



210 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 



These proportions are found to have diminished appreciably at 
the earlier ages, 15-20 and 20-25 ; but the numbers of the living are 
much smaller at those ages than at the higher ones, 25-30 and 
onwards to 40-45, and the effect of this lesser number of wives at 
the lower ages in reducing the birth-rate would not be so much as 
might at first be thought probable. 

It is, however, undoubtedly a fa,ct that to have a growing propor- 
tion of wives at the earlier productive ages is the best position, but 
it is not the one which obtains at present in New Zealand. 

Marbied Women ukder 45 Ykars of Age, given according to Age gboups» 
>£ AT THK Censuses of 1881, 1891, and 1901; with the Pbopobtion in 
EACH Group for kvfry 100 of the Whole. 

Married Womi-n under 45, excluding Chinese. 



AKe-Kfoupp. 


Nil 111 
1881. 


bers at Census. 


Proportions per Cenl. 




1891. 1901. 


1681. 


1601 


1901. 


15-20 
20-25 
25-:^.0 
30-35 
35-40 
40-45 


1.233 

8,996 

.. 13,133 

.. 12,050 

.. 11,811 

9,629 


750 
8,^62 
14,540 
14,576 
12,959 
11,478 


777 
10,053 
17,923 
19.617 
16,854 
14,182 


2- 14 
15-66 
22-86 
22-08 
20-55 
16-76 


1-19 
14-03 
23-02 
23-08 
20-51 
1817 


0-98 
12-66 
22-67 
24-70 
21-28 
1786 


Totals 


.. 57,458 


63,105 


79,406 


10000 


10000 


10000 



A further table shows the dechning birth-rate, and the increase in 
the inarriage-rate, in the United Kingdom. 



Birth and Marriage Rates in the United Kingdom, 1886, 1891, 1896» 

1901, AND 1903. 

Births. Marriages. 







- 


Kato per 


^ 


Bale per 


Year 




Nuuibor. 


1.000 of 


Number. 


1.000 of 




Population. 




Population. 




Population. 


1B8G 


. . 36.313,582 


1,145,577 


31-5 


241,180 


66 


1891 


.. 37.802.440 


1,148 259 


30-4 


275,970 


7-3 


1B9G 


.. 39,599.(i72 


1,152,144 


290 


296.080 


7-5 


1901 


.. 41,550,773 


1,162,975 


28 


313,851 


7-5 


1903 


.. 42,J71,219 


1,183,601 


27 9 


316,415 


7-6 



The above figures are taken from the report of the Registrar- 
General of England (6Gth number), pubHshed in 1905. 

The birth-rates for ten years in Great Britain and certain coun- 
tries of the European Continent are also given from the same 
source. Tlie rates in England and Wales, and in Scotland, are 
higher than those in New Zealand, but the rate for Ireland is 
lower. France has the lowest rate of all quoted : — 



MABBIAQE-BATES. 



211 



BiBTH-BATSS Df EUROPEAN COUNTRIES, 1894 TO 1903. 



Number of Births per 1.000 of Moan Population. 



Cottotriee. 


ISM. 


1806. 1896. 

1 


1807. 


1808. 


1899. j 1900. 1901. 


1902. j 1908. 


Hungary 


41-5 


41-9 


40-6 


40 3 1 37-7 


39-3 39-3' 37-8 


38-8 ' 36-7 


AosVrU 


86-7 


381 


380 


37-6 


36-2 


371 37-3' 36-9 370 


Italy 


36-4 


34-7 


34-7 


34-6 


33-4 


33-8 32-9 32-6 33 3 


31-5 


German Empire 


35-9 


361 


363 


360 


361 


35-8 35 6 35-7 


351 




Neiherlanda .. 


32-7 


32-8 


32-7 


32-6 


31-9 


320 31-6 32-3 


31-8 


31-6 


Scotland 


29-9 


300 


30-4 


300 301 


29-8 29-6i 29-5 


29-2 1 29-2 


Norway 


29-8 


306 


30-4 


300 


30-3 


30-9 301| 29-8 j 291 287 


Eogland and 


29-6 


30-2 


29-6 


29-5 


29-3 


291 28 7 28-5 1 28-5 28-4 


Wales 










1 


Belgiam 


290 


28-6 


290 


29-0 ' 28-6 


28-8 ' 28-9; 29-4 , 28 4 ■ 27*5 


Sweden 


271 


27-6 


27-2 


26-7 


27-1 


26-4 1 26-9 27 1 26o 


25-6 


S^vitserland .. 


271 


271 


27-9 


281 


28-4 


28-9 28-6: 291 28 7 


27-7 


Ireland 


22-9 


23-2 


23-6 


23-6 


23-2 


22-9 22-7 22-7 230 23-1 


Fr Anoe 


22-3 21-7 ' 22-5 


22-3 


21-8 




21-9 21-4 220 . 21-7 211 



From the year 1895 marriages have shown an increase, the rate 
being then 6-94 per 1,000 of population. In 1905 the rate rose to 
8-28, the highest record since 1875, when it was 894 per 1,000 of 
mean population. The number of marriages solemnised in 1905 was 
7,200, an increase of 217 on the number for 1904. 

Mabrtaqe-rates in Australasia per 1,000 of Population fob Five Years. 



1901. 



1902. 



190:J. 



1904. 



1905. 



Queensland 


. 6-61 


6-31 


5-72 


5-93 




New South Wales 


. 768 


7-53 


6-86 


7-21 


7-42 


Victoria 


. 699 


702 


6-29 


6-80 


7-24 


South Australia . . 


.. 614 


661 


625 


6-85 


700 


Western Australia 


.. 9-65 


9-77 


933 


8-83 


8-48 


Tasmania 


. . 7 68 


7-47 


7-57 


7-55 


7-61 


New Zealand 


. . 7-83 


801 


8-23 


8-26 


8-28 



In April, 1896, New Zealand had 83,659 children living under the 
age of five years, and in March, 1901, the number was 86,806, an 
increase of d,147i although the population at all ages increased in 
the Quinquennium by 9*86 per cent. Between 1886 and 1891 the 
chiloren living under five years actually decreased in number by 
3,624, the increase of population of all ages (8-33 per cent.) being 
less than between 1891 and 1896 (12-24 per cent.^, or 1896 and 
1901 (9-86 per cent.). The number of children under one year to 
the total population at all ages,* according to the results of four 
censuses, was : — 

Childron ander Total Population 
Que Year. (all Agea). 

Census 1886 .. .. .. 18,355 578,482 

1891 .. .. .. 16,443 626,658 

1896 .. .. .. 17.070 703,360 

1901 .. .. .. 18,381 Tl^,1\^ 



212 NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAR-BOOK. 

Thus, in 1886, with a population of 678,482 persons, there were 
18,355 children under one year, against 18,381 children of that age 
in 1901, with a population of 772,719 persons. 

The births registered in 1885 were 19,693, against 19,646 in 
1900. The birth-rate fell from 34-35 per 1,000 of the population 
in 1885 to 25-60 in 1900. 

Deducting 1,469, the number of deaths of children under one 
year registered in 1900, from 19,546, the number of births for that 
year, leaves 18,077, or within 304 of the living children under one 
year at the time of the last census. 

Twin Births. 

There were 242 cases of twin births (484 children), and triplets 
were registered in three instances, in 1905. The number of children 
born was 23,682 ; the number of mothers was 23,434 : thus, on an 
average, one mother in every 97 gave birth to twins, against 93 
in 1904, and 97 in 1903. 

Illegitimacy. 

The births of 1,082 children were illegitimate : thus 46 in every 
1,000 children born were born out of wedlock, against 45 in 
1904. 

The following table gives the rates of illegitimacy in Australasia. 
The rate in 1905 in New Zealand was less than in any of the Aus- 
tralian States except South Australia and Western Australia: — 

Proportion of Illegitimate Births in every 100 Births 

Wnr Queens- New South victoria Soutli Western Tasmnnin ^®^ 

^^^^ lan.l. Wales. Victoria. Australia. Australia, ^^smania. 2.ea,\tLnd. 



189G 


5-22 


5-71 


5 03 


3-45 


561 


5-91 


4-48 


1897 


GOi> 1 


G-58 


5-42 


3-53 


5-27 


5-74 


4-41 


1898 


G 04 ' 


6-93 1 


5-29 


362 


4 99 


509 


4-23 


1899 


0-97 


715 ! 


5-49 


3-95 


4-91 


608 


4-40 


1900 


G-40 


701 1 


5-91 


4 24 


4-82 


5-43 


4-63 


1901 


5-93 


7-lG 1 


5-58 , 


3-98 


388 , 


5-94 


4-57 


190-2 


G04 


GGO ' 


551 


4 36 


3-96 ' 


5-86 


4-46 


1903 


G-7G 


G-71 , 


5-73 


4-18 


4C>9 


5-61 


4-55 


1904 


G80 


7-12 1 


5-74 : 


4 01 


4-36 


5-82 


4-52 


1905 




7-37 1 


5G1 


437 


419 


5-52 


4-57 



These figures show the proportion of illegitimate births to every 
100 births for this colony to be very steady for the period 1896-1906 ; 
the ditference amounts only to 009 per cent, on a comparison of the 
first and last years. 

The total number of births registered was 19,299 in 1886 and 
23,682 in 1905, while the illegitimate births rose from 602 to 1,082. 
The causes that led to the fall in the birth-rate certainly did not 
greatly affect the number of illegitimate children. 



IliLEGITIMACY. 



213 



The number of spinsters in the colony between 15 and 45 
increased during the ten years from 65,035 (census 1891) to 100,310 
(census 1901), or at the rate of 55*9 per cent., while the illegiti- 
mate births increased from 638 to 937, or at the rate of 46*9 per 
cent. only. 

It would therefore appear that the larger proportion of illegiti- 
mate births now obtaining cannot with any certainty be taken 
as indicative of increased looseness of living on the part of the 
people. 

The following figures, showing the rate of illegitimacy per 100 

births in Australasia and in the United Kingdom, are based on 

statistics for a period of five years in the former, and ten years in 
the latter : — 



Country. 


UleRitimate 

Births 

per Cent. 


j Country. 


Illegitimate 

Births 

per Cent. 


New South Wales 
Victoria 
Queensland 
S3Qth Australia 
Western Australia 


69 
5-7 
64 

. 1 4-2 
43 


1 Tasmania 

New Zealand . . 

England and Wales 
i| Ireland 

Scotland 


' 58 
4-.'3 

1 4-2 
2-6 
7-2 



Of the total number of children born in Australasia during the 
five years ended 1900, 5-67 per cent, were illegitimate, as com- 
pared with 4-42 per cent, in the United Kingdom for the same 
period. 

The figures in the next table, which give the percentages of 
illegitimate births in a number of foreign countries, cover iu most 
cases a period of five years. 





Illegitimate 




Illegitimate 


Country. 


births 


I Country. 


mrths 




per Cent. 




per Cent. 


Germany 


. . ! 908 


France 


882 


Prussia 


. . ; 7-68 


[ Belgium 


7-67 


Bavaria 


. . 1 13-43 


1 Netherlands 


2G0 


Saxony 


. . 1 12 89 


' Sweden 


1113 


Austria 


14-20 


Norway 


743 


Hungary 


913 


Italy 


6-45 



For England and Wales the proportion of illegitimate births to 
the total births in 1903 was 3-9 per cent., having gradually dimi- 
nished from 7 per cent, in 1845. The minimum rate was 24 per 
cent., in Monmouthshire, and the maximum 11 per cent., in Mont- 
gomeryshire. For London the percentage was 3-6. 

The average proportion of illegitimate births in Scotland in five 
years was 6*3 per cent., but in Ireland the extremely low average 
of 2-6 per cent, obtained. 



214 NIW ESALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 

The Lbgitimation Act. 

An important Act was passed in 1894, entitled the Legitima- 
tion Act, which makes provision for the legitimation of children 
bom before marriage on the subsequent marriage of their parents. 
Under this Act any child born out of wedlock, whose parents 
afterwards marry, is deemed to be legitimised by such marriage 
on the birth being registered in the manner prescribed by the 
Act. For legitimation purposes Registrars must register a birth 
when called upon to do so by any person claiming to be the father 
of an illegitimate child ; but such person is required to make a 
solemn declaration that he is the father, and that at the time of the 
birth there existed no legal impediment to his marriage with the 
mother of the child. He has also to produce the evidence of his 
marriage. It will thus be seen that in cases dealt with under the 
Act registration becomes the test of legitimacy. In the December 
quarter of 1894, 11 children were legitimised ; in the year 1895 the 
number was 68; in 1896, 56; in 1897, 48; in 1898, 59; in 1899, 
41 ; in 1900. 62 ; in 1901, 47 ; in 1902, 96 ; in 1903, 65 ; in 1904, 
87 ; and in 1905, 84; making altogether 724 legitimations since the 
passing of the law. 

" The Infant Life Pkotection Act, 1896." 

By this statute it has been rendered unlawful for a person to take 
charge, for payment, of an infant to maintain or nurse for more than 
three days without holding a license as an infants' home keeper. 
The house of such a person must be registered as an infants' home. 

The administration of tliis law is a matter entirely managed by 
the police. The licensed homes are periodically inspected, and the 
results have shown that licensees generally comply with the required 
conditions, the homes and infants being well looked after. 

The Commissioner in his report for the year ended 31st March, 
1905, writes :— 

During the year there were 528 registered homos throughout the colony, 
roprescDting 728 infants, against 644 homes and 854 infants in 1903. 

Twenty-one deaths occurred in the homes during the year, against twenty- 
eight in the preceding year. Five licensees were prosecuted for hreaches of the 
Act, and convicted, against six prosecutions and four convictions in 1903. Three 
licenses \sere cancelled, and no neglect by licensees was disclosed at inquests. 

Births and Bikth-rates in the Four Chief Cities. 

The total number of births registered as occurring in the four 
chief centres and suburbs in 1905 was 6,335, as against 5,970 for 
the previous year. 

There is increase in the births for the four chief cities and sub- 
urban boroughs found on comparison with figures for 1904, The 
birth-rates for 1905 were : — 



NATURALISATION. 



215 



Auckland City . . 

and five enburban boroughs 
Wellington City . . 

, and two suburban boroughs 

Christchurch City 

and OLe suburban borough 
Dunedin City 

and six suburban boronghs 



Birth-rates per 1.000 of 
Moan Population. 
30 06 

27-88 
2972 

29-38 
2970 

29-63 
23 90 

23-97 



By the inclusion of the suburbs the rate is raised at Dun- 
edin, but lowered at Auckland, Wellington, and Christchurch. It 
will be observed that Christchurch has the highest rate, Wellington 
next highest, Auckland and Dunedin following with intervals. 
The difference between the Christchurch rate (29-63) and the Dun- 
edin rate (23'97) is considerable. The birth-rate for the whole 
colony last year was 27 -22 per thousand. Auckland, Wellington, 
and Christchurch are thus over the average, and Dunedin below it. 

The birth-rates for three of the central boroughs last year show 
a rise when compared with 1904. In Auckland the rate fell from 
3108 to 30-06; but it rose in WeUington from 2677 to 2972, in 
Christchurch from 27*63 to 29-70. and in Dunedin from 22*40 to 
23-90. The rates for five years, 1901 to 1905, are :— 

Births per 1,000 of Population. 





1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


Auckland (without subarbs) . . 


30 00 


30-80 


31-67 


31-08 


3006 


Wellington 


26-35 


25 29 


29-22 


20-77 


29-72 


Christchurch 


2412 


25-84 


20 69 


27 53 


2970 


Dunedin 


2204 


19-9C 


19-54 


22-40 


23-90 



Naturalisation. 

Aliens residing in the colony may, on taking the oath of alle- 
giance to His Majesty, obtain letters of naturalisation entitling 
them to enjoy all the rights and privileges that a natural-born 
subject of the United Kingdom can enjoy or transmit within this 
colony. Six hundred and seven aliens (585 men and 22 women) 
were naturalised in 1905. 

The number belonging to each nationality was as under : — 
Number of Aliens naturalised in 1905. 

Natives of — 
German Empire . . 
Norway 
Sweden 
Denmark 

Russia and Finland 
France and posse* sions 
Belgium 
Italy . . 
Spain . . 
Austria-Hungary 
China . . 
Japan . . 



M. 


F. 


Natives of— 


M. 


F. 


.. 87 


13 


United States of America 


18 


1 


.. 46 


1 


Argentine Republic 


2 





.. 78 





Netherlands 


5 





.. 61 


3 


Switzerland 


14 


1 


.. 33 





Portugal and possessions . 


2 





6 


1 


Turkey and Syria 


20 





2 


1 


Houmania 


2 





.. 17 





Greece . . 


5 





2 





Iceland . . 


1 





. . 138 


1 


Malta .. 


1 





.. 35 





West Indies 


1 





2 





Samoa 


1 






216 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAR-BOOK. 



The number of natives of each country naturalised during the 
last twenty- three years is next shown. 



Natives of— 




Natives of— 




Germany 


1,674 


Netherlands 


65 


Sweden with Norway 


. 1,295 


Greece 


51 


Denmark 


904 


Portugal . . 


62 


China .. 


375 


United States of America . 


97 


Italy and Sicily . . 


234 


Belgium .. 


33 


Switzerland 


185 


Other countries 


145 


Russia in Europe 


269 






Austria-Hungary . . 


558 


Total 


. 6,088 


Fran<je . . 


141 







By section 2 of ''The Aliens Act Amendment Act, 1882," re- 
pealed and re-enacted by section 2 of *' The Aliens Act Amendment 
Act, 1892," it is provided that when the father, or mother being a 
widow, has obtained naturalisation in the colony, every child who 
during infancy has become resident with them in New Zealand 
shall be deemed to be naturalised, and shall have the rights and 
privileges of a natural-born subject. 

Marriages. 

The marriages for 1905 show" an increase on the number for 
the previous year. The number was 7,200, or 217 more than in 
1904. The marriage-rate rose from 8-26 per 1,000 persons living in 
1904 to 8'28 in 1905, the rate for the latter year being the highest 
obtained since 1875, when it stood at 8*94 per 1,000 persons. The 
improvement shown during the last ten years sets New Zealand 
in a good position relatively to the Australian States. 

The rates for a series of fifteen consecutive years were : — 



Marriages per 1,000 of the Population. 



Year. 


1 Queen s- 
' land. 

1 

7-18 


New South 
Wales. 

7-39 


Victoria. 
7-69 


South 
Australia 
(Proper). 

7-31 


Western ' 
Australia. 


Tas- 
mania. 

663 


New 
Zealand. 


1891 


800 , 


604 


1892 


6-67 


6-77 


664 


6-51 


7-29 


6-51 


6-23 


1893 


5-91 


6-40 


5-99 


6-26 


6-34 1 


5-51 


6-22 


1894 


5-70 


6-20 


5 98 


609 


6-24 


5-43 


615 


1895 


0-23 


0-35 


600 


5-88 


6-83 


5-32 


5-94 


1896 


605 


6-59 


6-48 


6-20 


8-45 


5-88 


6-85 


1897 


G-05 


6-72 


6-36 


5-46 


10-73 


6-23 


6-83 


1898 


6-03 


GG6 


0-53 


618 


9-89 ' 


6-29 


6-91 


1899 


6-78 


6-89 


7-01 


6-24 


' 9-89 


6-37 


7-28 


1900 


6-88 


7-38 


6-96 


6-50 


10-27 , 


7-71 


7-67 


1901 


GGl 


7'68 


G-99 


6-44 


9-65 


7-68 


7-88 


1902 


6-31 


7-53 


7-02 


G-61 


9-77 ' 


7-47 


8-01 


1903 


5-72 


6-80 


G-29 


6-25 


9-33 


7-57 


8-23 


1904 


5-93 


7-21 


(')-80 


6-91 


8-83 


7-55 


8-26 


1905 


. 


7-42 


7-24 


7-00 


8-48 - 


7-61 


8-28 



1903 


8-2 


1903 


8-1 


1902 


7-9 


1903 


7-8 


1902 


7-8 


1903 


7-7 


1903 


7-5 


1903 


7-5 


1903 


7-2 


1903 


7-1 


1903 


71 


1903 


7-0 


1903 


60 


1903 


6-8 


1903 


5-2 



MARRIAGES. 217 

The improved rate for this colony is higher than the rate for 
the European countries given in the table following, with the excep- 
tion of Spain. 

Marriages in evert 1,000 of the Populatiom. 

Spain 

Hungary 

German Empire 

England and Wales 

Austria 

France 

Netherlands 

Switzerland 

Italy 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Scotland 

Norway 

Sweden 

Ireland 

Of the marriages solemnised in 1905, 6,582 were between 
bachelors and spinsters, 196 between baxjhelors and widows, 316 
between widowers and spinsters, and 106 between widowers and 
widows. 

Divorced men and women have been classified as bachelors or 
spinsters: 35 divorced men and 52 divorced women were married 
during the year. 

Included amongst spinsters are six married women, and 
amongst the bachelors four married men, who elected to go 
through the form of marriage with other persons under the pro- 
tection of the provisions of section 204, subsection (5), of "The 
Criminal Code Act, 1893," which runs, " No one commits bigamy 
by going through a form of marriage if he or she has been con- 
tinually absent from his or her wife or husband for seven years 
then last past, and is not proved to have known that his wife or her 
husband was alive at any time during those seven years." 

The total number of marriages solemnised (7,200) does not 
include marriages where both parties are of the aboriginal native 
race, such persons being exempted from the necessity of coniplyng 
with the provisions of the Marriage Act, although at liberty to take 
a^ivantage thereof. Twenty-four marriages in which both parties 
were Maoris were contracted in 1905 in terms of the Act : 8 by 
Registrars, 4 by clergymen of the Church of England, 1 by 
a Roman Catholic minister, 3 by Methodist ministers, and 8 by 
ministers of the Church of the Latter-day Saints. 

BacheI/ORS and Spinsteks in New Zealand. 
The results of three censuses in respect of the number of 
bachelors of 20 years and upwards, and spinsters of 15 years and 
upwards, in the colony show some interesting features. In 1891 



218 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAR-BOOK. 



there was an excess of bachelors over the spinsters amounting^ to 
3,497 men. But by 1896 not only had the preponderance of the 
male clement been lost, but an excess of spinsters over bachelors 
was reported amounting to 1,786 women, while in 1901 this excess 
had risen to 3,572 women. 

It is noticeable how differently the numbers for the provincial 
districts have been affected by the process in operation. An ex- 
cess of baclielors was preserved in Auckland, Taranaki, Hawke's 
Bay, Wellington, Marlborough, Nelson, and Westland from 1891 to 
1901. In Canterbury, however, an excess of spinsters was found 
in 1891 of 2,516, which increased to 3,997 in 1896 and to 4,918 
in 1901 ; while in Otago an excess of 773 spinsters in 1891 increased 
to 2,066 in 1896, and diminished slightly in 1901, when there were 
1,899 more spinsters than bachelors. These two important districts 
of the Middle Island have lost large numbers of bachelors by 
departures to the North Island. The following table exhibits the 
particulars for each provincial district : — 





Census. 


1891. 


Census, 


lf.96. 


Census, 1901. 




£ 




£ 


i 


i 


£ 




^£2 ' 


^2| 


o22 


O t'Z 


ogl 


^B| 


Provincial DistriotH. 


SI* ■ 


III 






1 PI 


,111 




i:*S 


Kooj 


kIs . 


Wtav. 


wis 


Kxt 




> 




> 


> 


> 


> 




O 


c 


o 




o 

rse 


o 





Total excess . . , 


3,497 






1/ 


3,572 


Auckland 


ir>6 




703 




521 




Tarauaki 


121 




524 






805 




Hawke'fi liay 


1,837 




1,142 






425 




Wellif)gton 


2,129 




G37 






32 




Marlborough 


G14 




' 183 






158 




Nelson . . 


1,48G 




1 590 






637 




Westland 


900 




601 






666 




Canterbury 




2,5iG 




3,997 




• 4,918 


Otago . . 




773 




2,066 


, , 


1,899 


Chatham Islands 


15 




7 




1 




Kermadec Island>i 




2 


1 








•• 



Makiuages by Ministers of various Denominations. 

Of the marriages in the year 1905, 2-4*24 per cent, were solemnised 
by niinisters of the Church of England, 26-43 per cent, by ministers 
of the Presbyterian Churches, 16-76 per cent, by ministers of the 
Wesleyan and other Methodist Churches, 10-2-2 per cent, by ministers 
of the Roman CathoHc Church, 6-75 per cent, by ministers of other 
denominations, and 1560 per cent, by Registrars. 

The following shows the proportions of marriages by ministers 
of the principal denominations in the past eight years, and the 
percentages of tliese denominations to the total population in 
1901 :— 



AQE6 OF PBH80NS MARRIED. 



219 



Percentage of Marriages. 



Denomination. 



1806. 1809. 1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. i 1904. { 1905. 



o o g^ 
• '■S oS 

S oog 



Church of England 
PresbTterians 
Methodisto 
Bom&n Catholics . . 
Other denominations 
By Registrars 



28-37 
2602 
13-98 
10-37 
9-25 
1701 



24-17 
25-30 
12-91 
10-87 
934 
17-41 



22 681 
26-38| 
13-2d' 
10-82| 
10-201 



24-91| 
24-48 
13-19, 
10-53 
10-20 



24-581 
25 95 
12-951 
9-94 
10071 



16-691 16-69 16-51 



25-521 24-121 
25-31 25-46 
13-32I 16-30l 
1008 11-14, 
9-87! 654' 
15 90: 16-44 



24-24 
26-43 
16-76 
1022 
6-75 
15-60 



40-84 
22-87 
1086 
14-23 
11-20 



100 00 100 00 100-00|100-00 10000 100 00100 00 100 OOi 100-00 

I I I 

Marriage by the Registrar is found to be less frequent than 
it was eight years ago, the percentage falling from 17 01 in 1898 
to 15-60 in 1905. 

Marriaob Beoister sioned by Mare. 

Of the men married in 1905, 18, or 2-50 in every 1,000, and of 
the women 28, or 388 per 1,000, signed the register by marks. 

The illiteracy of the people, as measured by the proportion of 
married persons who affix marks instead of signatures to the mar- 
riage register, has greatly decreased of late, having fallen since 1881 
from 3204 per 1,000 among men to 2-50 per 1,000, and from 57*98 
per 1,000 to 3*88 per 1,000 among women. This is shown in a very 
striking manner by the following table : — 

Persons in eveby 1,000 married who signed by Mark. 



DenominatioD. 


1881. 


1891. 1 


1901. i 


1905. 




















M. 


F. 


M. 

8-29 


F. 
10-66 


M. 
1-32 


F. 

1 
3-29| 


M. 
2-29 


F. 


Church of England . . 


i 16-59 


27-15 


115 


Presbyterians 


' 10-25 


29-61 


5-79 


8 69 


2-68 


469' 


0-53 


1-58 


Wesleyans and other 


'■ 32-41 


41-79 


8-93 


10-71 


3-73 


3-781 


0-83 


3-31 


Methodists 


1 






1 




1 






Roman Catholics 


,117-78 


133 33 


31-33 


18-28 


6 23 


7-79: 


1-36 


4-08 


Other denominations 


1 10-36 


2072 


9-26 


1 


161 


3-2-2 






By Registrars 


39-22 


93-61 


27-42 


43-08 


13-77 


15-73 

1 


9-80 
2 .50 1 


1425 


Total marriages 


1 3204 


57-98 


13-93 


1082 


4-59 


6-23 

! 


3-88 



The proportion of illiterates in 1901 and 1905 was greatest among 
those married before Registrars. Previously the proportion was 
largest among Roman Catholics ; but since 1881 it has, as shown 
by the table, most remarkably decreased. 

Ages of Persons married. 

Of the persons married in 1905, 133 bridegrooms and 1,214 
brides were tinder 21 years of age — one of the bridegrooms was 



220 XEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAR-BOOK. 

between 16 and 17, five between 17 and 18, and thirteen between 
18 and 19. Of the brides, one was under 15, three were between 
15 and 16, and twenty-tlivee between 16 and 17 years of age. The 
proportion of men married is greatest at the ages of 25 to 80, and 
of women at from 21 to 25 years. 

The following are the proportions of men and women married at 
each age-period to everv 100 marriages in the years 1891, 1901, 
and 1905 :— 





Age. 


1H91 




1901 




idai 


i. 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Under 21 


vears . . 


1-55 


20-79 


1-93 ! 


17-16 ! 


1-85 . 


1686 


21 and under 25 . . 


20-99 


43 99 


24-94 


39-97 ; 


23-89 ' 


38-43 


25 


30 .. 


36-19 


2297 


3708 


26-89 1 


4004 


27-93 


30 


40 .. 


. . 25-94 


8 72 • 


27-12 


12-73 ' 


26 54 


13-46 


40 


50 .. 


6 44 


2-71 


604 1 


2-44 


50S 


229 


50 


00 .. 


2-26 


66 


1-77 ' 


0-57 i 


1-47 


0-69 


60 


70 .. 


0-55 


010 


092 


0-24 1 


061 


031 


70 and upwards . . 


008 


•• 


0-20 


•• 


0-32 


0-03 



Kegistrars of Marriages are prohibited by law from issuing cer- 
tificates for the marriage of minors without the consent of their 
parents or lawful guardians, if there be any in the colony. If a 
declaration be made in any case that there is no parent or law- 
ful guardian in the colony, then a certificate may be issued after 
the expiration of fourteen days following the date on which the 
notice of intended marriage is given. 

A marriage may not be solemnised except after the delivery to 
the minister or Hogistrar who ofliciates of a certificate issued by a 
Registrar autliorising such marriage, and if any persons knowingly 
and wilfully intermarry without such certificate the marriage is 
null and void : and no clergyman or minister of any denomination 
is empowered to solemnise niarriages until his name has been 
placed on the Registrar-General's list of officiating ministers for 
the year. 

ilarriage with a deceased wife's sister in New Zealand was 
legalised in the year 1880, and an Act was passed in the year 1900 
which legalised marriage with the brother of a deceased husband. 
This Act is retrospective, including in its provisions marriages 
between sucli parties which had previously been solemnised as well 
as those contracted after the statute was passed, and declaring all 
these to be valid, and the issue born prior or subsequent to the 
passing of the Act to be deemed born in lawful wedlock. 

The measure was reserved for the signification of her late 
Majesty's pleasure. The Royal assent has since been given, and 
the Act came into force in New Zealand bv Proclamation dated the 
22nd May, 1901. 

The ages at which persons may contract binding marriages 
are the same as in England — 12 years for females and 14 for 



NUMBER OF MINISTFBS 



221 



males. Marriage may be contracted at earlier ages than those 
stated, but would be voidable at the discretion of either of the 
parties upon reaching the age of 12 or 14, as the case may be, and 
without the necessity of proceedings in Court. 

Although in New Zealand the age at which girls may legally 
marry is as above, nevertheless, by the criminal law, to unlawfully 
carnally know a girl under the age of 16 years is now a punishable 
offence. The age of consent was raised from 15 to 16 by statute 
passed in 1896. 

The average age of the men married in this colony in 1905 was 
^9*65 years, and of the women 25*75 years. In England the mean 
age of those whose ages were stated was (in the year 1903) 28 49 
years for men, and 26-35 years for women. Thus the average age 
at marriage in the colony would appear to be higher for men, but 
lower for women, than in England. 

The proportion of bridegrooms under 21 is much greater in Eng- 
land than in New Zealand, and the proportion of brides under 21 
in the colony somewhat higher. 

In England, in 1903, of every 1,000 bridegrooms whose ages 
were stated, 46 were under 21 years of age, and of every 1,000 
brides 152 were under 21 years of age. In New^ Zealand, in 1905, 
the proportions were 18 bridegrooms and 169 brides of similar ages 
in every 1,000 married : — 



Ymr. 
1890 


Bridegrooms 

under 21 
in every 100. 

. . 1-89 


Brides under 21 

in 

every 100. 

22-75 


Year. 

1901 


Bridegrooms 

under 21 
in every 100. 

. 1-93 


Brides under 21 

in 

every 100. 

17'lG 


1892 


. . 1-62 


2014 


1902 


. 139 


16-59 


1894 


. . 1-44 


19-53 


1903 


. 1-G2 


ic-oi 


189G 


.. 1-96 


19-51 


1904 


. 1-73 


17-Gl 


1898 
1900 


. . 1-57 
. . 1-67 


1813 
17-34 


1905 


. 1-80 


16-90 



Number of Ministers. 

The number of names on the list of officiating ministers under 
the Marriage Act is (April, 1906) 1,148, and the denominations to 
which they belong are shown hereunder : — 

No. I Denomination. No. 

341 Auckland Society of the New 

Jerusalem Church . . . . 1 

263 Independent Free Church . . 1 

196 Salvation Army . . lU 

Catholic Apostolic Church . 4 

174 Seventh-day Adventists . . 4 

21 Unitarians . . 1 

35 Brethren . . . . 3 

44 Latter-day Saints 2 

10 Chrietadelphian 1 

6 Church of Our Father.. 1 

16 Unitarian Free Cburcli . . 1 

4 Total .. ..1,148 



Denomination. 
Ohurch of England 
Presbyterian Church of New Zea 

land 
Roman Catholic Church 
Methodist Church of Australasia 

in New Zealand 
Congregational Independents 
Baptists 

Primitive Methodist Connexion 
Lutheran Church 
Hebrew Congregations . . 
Ohurch of Christ 
Free Methodist Church of New 

Zealand 



222 



new zealand official tbar-boox. 

Deaths. 

m 



The deaths in 1905 numbered 8,061, being equivalent to a 
rate of 9*27 in every 1,000 persons living, as against 9*57 in 1904. 
The lowest rate experienced since the year 1887, when the deaths 
were 1029 per 1,000 of the population, was that for 1896 (9-10). 

Comparative Death-rate for thb Period 1895 to 1905. 



Country. 



1H95. IH96. ia07. 1 1898. ' 1899. i 1900. 



New Zealand 


091 


Queensland 


11-381 


New South Wales 


11-79 


Victoria 


13-25 


South Australia* . . 


11-251 


Western Australia 


17-781 


Tasmania 


11-38. 


England and Wales 


18-7 ' 


Scotland 


19-4 


Ireland .. 


18-4 


Denmark 


lG-8 


Norway . . 


15-7 


Sweden . . 


15 2 


Austria . . 


27-7 1 


Hungary 


•29-7 


Switzerland 


19-1 


German Empin . . 


-22-1 


Netherlands 


18-6 


France . . 


22-2 


Italy . . 


25-0 



9-10 
12-lOi 
12-30 
13-35, 
11-48 
16-45] 
11-63 
170 
16-6 
16-6 I 
15-6 
152 
15-6 
26-4 
28-9 
17-7 
20 8 
172 
20-0 
24 



.1 

9-14, 9- 
11-3312 
10-88,12 
12-9015 
11-24,13 
169716 
11-5313 
17-4 17 
18-4 18 
18 4 18 
16-5 15 
15-3 il5 
15-4 il 
25-6 24 
28-5 
17-6 
21-3 
169 
19-5 
21 9 



84| 10-24 
6612-07 
48:11-82 
9411428 
06|12-14 



1901. 1902. 1908. 



9-43 
11-73 
11 16; 
12-75! 
10-64 



0513-76 
51|12-2o 
'18-2 
181 
17-6 
,17-3 
;16-9 
;17-7 
25-4 
'27-2 



12-92 
1106 

18 2 I 
18-5 ■ 
19-6 I 
16-9 
15 9 ! 
|16 8 
25-2 I 
26 9 ' 
17-6 '19 3 I 
21-5 ;22-l 
17-1 '17'8 
21-1 121-9 I 
21-8 23-8 



9-81 
11-88 
11-68 
13-22 

nil 

13-36 

10-45 

16-9 

180 

17-8 

15-8 

14-9 

160 

24-2 

25-4 

18-C 

20-7 

17-2 

201 

21-9 



10-40 9-57i 9-27 



12 38 
11-59 



1904.; 190& 



1011. 
10 62:1 



Sioia 
12-10 
1014 
lo-sa 

-" i;10-2S 



l-84|ll-92 
►•2 !l5-4 
•2 il6 6 
!l7-5 
;14-6 
jl48 
'151 



1101;] 



126 1 

2 117 6 

4 .. 

3 156 

5 19-2 
1 .22-2 



* Excluding the Northern Territory. 



In this statement New Zealand is conspicuous as showing the 
lowest death-rate. The rates for the principal Australian States 
are a little higher, but, generally speaking, far below those for the 
United Kingdom or the European Continental States mentioned 
in the table. 

Perfect accuracy in comparing one country or colony with another 
can only be attained by the use of what is termed an ** index of 
mortality." The proportions of the living vary in regard to the 
dilTerent age-groups, and the ordinary death-rate — which is calcu- 
lated on the population as a whole — does not afford a true means 
of judging of the relative healthiness of the places compared. But 
by taking a population like that of Sweden, and applying the per- 
centage at each age-group to the death-rates, a standard of health or 
index of mortality can be arrived at. This has been done for New 
Zealau'l, in accordance with a resolution of the Statistical Con- 
ference held at Plobart in 1902, and the result is expressed in tabular 
form . 



DEATH-RATES OF THE FOUK PRINCIPAL CITIES. 223 

Index of Mobtauty in New Zealand for 1905. 



Ages. 



Sstimftted 

Mean 

Population, 

1905. 



Under 1 year 
1 and under 20 years 
90 and ander 40 years 
iO and under 60 years 
60 years and upwards 

Totals 



20,706 
365,226 
286,491 
138,765 

58,812 



Namber > Death- 

of ; rate 

Deaths, i per 1,000, 

1905. 1905. 



Percent&f^e of ; ludex of Mor- 
Population j tality in 

of Sweden, 1800: New Zealand 
(Standard). | per 1,000. 



870,000 



1,599 
867 
1,242 
1,271 
3,082 



8,061 



77-22 
2-37 
4-34 
916 

52-40 

9-27 



2-55 
39-80 
26-96 
19-23 
11-46 



1-97 
0-94 
1-17 
1-7G 
6-01 



10000 



11-85 



A similar calculation for the States of the Australian Commou- 
wealth has been made for 1904. The results, when compared with 
the actual rates, exhibit to what degree the age- constitution of the 
population affects the death-rate. The figures for New Zealand are 
also given. 

Year 1904. 
Index .\ctual 



Qaeensland . . 


. . 13 23 


10-01 


New South Wales 


.. 14 10 


10-62 


Victoria 


.. 14-29 


11-92 


South Australia 


. . 13-32 


10-22 


Western Australia 


.. 1500 


11-91 


Tasmania 


.. 14 36 


11-01 


New Zealand . . 


.. 1204 


957 


(1906) .. 


.. n-8o 


9-27 



Deaths and Death-rates of the Four Piuncipal Citiks and 
THEIR Suburbs. 

In the earlier annual reports on the vital statistics of the four 
<jhief towns the central boroughs alone were dealt with, particulars 
respecting the suburbs not having been obtained. But tliis omission 
was held to be a grave defect, as the suburban death-rate may 
differ much from the death-rate at the centre. Steps were there- 
fore taken early in 1895 to collect statistics of the suburban boroughs 
as well as of the four chief cities. As regards Auckland and Christ- 
church, the whole of the area usually recognised as suburban has 
not yet been brought under municipal government, and the statistics 
given below do not deal with such portions as still remain in road 
districts. The omission, however, is not very important, for there 
are in either case quite enough suburbs included within borough 
boundaries to give a fair idea of the death-rate of greater Auckland 
and greater Christchurch. As further boroughs are formed the 
viial statistics will be made to include them. 

The total number of deaths registered for the four centres in 
1905 was 2,388 — viz., 2,007 in the cities, and 381 in the suburbs. 



224 NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAR-BOOK. 

By including the suburbs the death-rate for last year is lowered 
at three of the four centres. The rates for the year are : — 

De&tb-rates per 1,000 
of Mean Popolation. 

Auckland Oifcy . . . . . . . . 12-15 

and five suburban boroughs . . 10*52 

Wellington City .. .. .. .. 10-55 

and two suburban boroughs . . 10-21 

Christchurch City . . . . . . . . 1076 

« and one suburban borough . . 10*89 

Dunedin City . . . . . . . . 11-18 

and six suburban boroughs . . 10-12 

If the suburbs are included, the death-rate is found to be highest 
at Christchurch and lowest at Dunedin ; Auckland and WellingtoD 
taking second and third places respectively. The death-rate for 
the colony was 927 per 1,000 of mean population. The four 
centres might be expected to show a higher average than this. 

If the number of deaths of infants under one year be excluded^ 
the mortality among the rest of the population is found to have beea 
for 1905 and 190^ in the following ratio to the 1,000 living : — 





1904. 


19051 


Auckland (including suburbs) 


8-11 


7-96 


Wellington 
Christchurch 


7-89 


7-38 


7-62 


8-25 


Dunedin 


.. 9-60 


8-51 



The degree of infantile mortality is perhaps best shown in the 

proportion of deaths of children under one year of age to every 100 

births. For 1905 and 190-4 the proportions at the chief centrea 

were, — 1904. 1905. 

Auckland (including suburbs) . . . . 7*01 9'15 

Wellington . .. 9*53 962 

Christchurch . .. 1030 890 

Dunedin . .. 9*30 671 

Thus in 1905 the proportions for Dunedin and Christchurch are 
less than those found at either of the other two chief cities. 



Mortality at Four Centres, excluding Suburbs. 

Excluding suburbs, and dealing with the deaths at all ages 
m the four cities or central boroughs only, the rates for 1905 are 
found to be lower than in the previous year at Wellington and 
Dunedin, but higher at Auckland and Christchurch. The figures for 
four years are given : — 

Deaths per 1,000 of Population. 
1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 

Auckland (excluding suburbs) . . 1721 1297 11-11 12*15 

Wellington , .. 12 58 11-30 10-76 1055 

Christchurch ., .. 12 24 11-39 10-50 10-76 

Dunedin . .. 1186 14-77 13-59 11-ia 



PEATHB. 225 

Omitting the deaths of infants under one year, and calcu- 
lating the rate on the population of one year of age and upwards, 
two of the horoughs show lower rates for- 1905 than for the pre- 
vious year. 

Deaths per 1,000 of PopnlatioD, excluding 

Infants (under One Yrar of Age). 
1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 

Auckland (exclading suburbs) . . 9 93 12 86 9*45 9 24 9 39 



Wellington 

Cbristchurch 

Dunedin 



812 9-64 8-84 8-42 7*80 
10-69 903 8-83 7-87 846 
10-88 1035 13-61 1190 964 





1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1004. 


1905. 


iockland (excluding suburbs) 


.. 11-67 


15-41 


1208 


693 


1013 


Wellington 


..10-43 


12-97 


9-28 


965 


10-02 


Christchurch 


.. 11-35 


13-32 


10-49 


10-36 


8-60 


Dunedin , 


.. 907 


8-60 


7-27 


8-74 


7-21 



Subjoined is a tahle showing the rates of infant mortality in the 
four cities for each of the past five years, together with the mean 
rates for the period. 

Deaths of Children under One Tear to every 100 Births. 

Mean of 
Five Years. 

11-22 

10-45 

10-82 

818 

Causes of Death at Four Centres, including Suburbs. 

While treating of the death-rates at the chief cities and surround- 
logs, it is desiraole to refer to the causes of mortality, which is 
done in the remarks that follow. The deaths for the whole colony, 
classified according to their cause, are treated of at length a little 
further on. 

Specific Fihrile and Zymotic Diseases (at Fcui Chief dntres). 

The mortality from these diseases was lower at each of the four 
centies in 1905 than in the previous year. The total deaths in 
this class were 115 for 1905 and 202 for 1904. 



Auckland and suburbs 
We lington 
Cbristchurch 
Dunedin 



hs from Febrile and Zymotic 
Diseases. 


1901. 


1905. 


.. 52 


45 


.. 65 


34 


.. 86 


27 


.. 49 


9 



202 115 



Of the above, diarrboeal diseases caused most deaths in 1905 
at the four centres taken together, the total number being 44. 
Influenza came next, with 13 deaths, typhoid fever 10, whooping- 
cough 2, diphtheria 8, scarlet fever 5, and other zymotic com- 
plaints 33. 

8— Ybk. 



326 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAR-BOOK. 



Comparison of the deaths for each city, including suburbs, 
shows, — 



Zymotic, Ac, Diseases. 


Auckland. 
1905. IWL 


Wellington. 
1906. 1904. 


Ohristehurch. 
193S. 1904. 


Donedin. 
1005. 1904. 


Diarrhoeal diseases 


21 


24 


12 


30 


9 


21 


2 


17 


Influenza 


3 


4 


3 


5 


4 


3 


3 


14 


Typhoid fever 


7 


9 


2 


4 


1 


2 




4 


Measles 








4 










Scarlet fever . . 


2 


1 


3 


3 










Babonic plagun 


. 


1 


.. 




.. 








Diphtheria 


3 


3 


4 


6 


.. 


2 


1 


.. 


WhoopiDg-cough 


. 


.. 




.. 


1 


1 


1 


2 


Obher zymotio diseases 


y 


10 


10 


14 


12 


7 


2 


12 



Parasitic Diseases (at Four Chief Centres), 

Hydatids were fatal at Ghristchurch (1 death), and at Dun- 
edin (1 death). 

Dietetic Diseases (at Four Chief Centres). 

These numbered 18, 8 being due to want of breast-milk, scurvy, 
or malnutrition, 6 to alcoholism, and 4 to delirium tremens. 



Constitutional Diseases (at Four Chief Centres). 

The deaths at the four cities numbered 466 in 1905. The first 
in importance of these diseases, and of all causes of death, is tubercle. 
The figures for 1904 and 1905 show 259 and 211 deaths for each 
year respectively. 

Phthisis and other Tubercular Diseasee. 





riithisia. 


other 

Tubercular 

Diseases. 


Phthisis. 


other 

Tubercular 

Diseases. 


Auckland and suburbs 


.. 37 


.. 12 


45 


10 


Wellington 


28 


14 


60 


18 


Ghristchurch 


44 


10 


42 


16 


Dunedin 


47 


19 


51 


27 



156 



55 



188 



71 



The mortality from tubercular diseases for 1905 is 884 per cent, of 
the total deaths at the four boroughs and their suburbs from all 



causes. 



Deaths from cancer rose at the chief towns from 184 in 1904 
to 191 in 1905. The latter number is 800 per cent, of deaths for 
the year from all causes. 



DEATHS. 227 

The number of deaths from cancer at the four chief towns and 
their suburbs for each of the last live years was as under : — 





1901. 


1903. 


1908. 


1904. 


1906 


ADckland and suburbs 


.. 32 


44 


37 


45 


35 


Wellingion 


.. 38 


37 


47 


44 


47 


Cbriatchurch 


41 


25 


33 


38 


49 


Danedin 


.. 43 


69 


62 


67 


60 



164 165 179 184 191 

Diabetes shows 32 deaths in 1905, against 24 in 1904. 

Developmental Diseases (at Four Chief Centres). 

There were 283 deaths in this class, of which 110 were from 
premature births, 157 from old age, and 16 from other causes. 

Local Diseases (at Four Chief Centres). 

Deaths in this class were 52 more than in 1904, the figures 
being 1,275, against 1,223. Diseases of the circulatory system 
were the most fatal of this class, amounting to 302. Diseases of 
the nervous system show 2t3 deaths — 102 from apoplexy. Diseases 
of the respiratory system show 279 deaths for 1905, against 272 
in the former year. Bronchitis, pneumonia, congestion of the lungs, 
pleurisy, and allied diseases form this group. 

Under the head of "Diseases of the Digestive System" there 
were 251 deaths at the four centres, including 94 from enteritis; 
peritonitis, 14 ; gastritis, 19 ; cirrhosis of liver, 14 ; jaundice and 
liver-disease, 21 ; and dentition 9. From appendicitis 15 deaths 
are particularly noted . 

Diseases of the urinary system caused 109 deaths. The remain- 
ing deaths were : 4 disease of organs of special sense, 10 of the 
lymphatic, 31 of the reproductive systems, 2 of the organs of 
locomotion, and 4 of the integumentary system. 

Violent Deaths (at Four Chief Centres). 

There were 139 violent deaths, 109 of which were classed as 
accidental. Seven of these latter were caused by fractures, and 19 by 
falls. In 11 cases deaths resulted from the deceased being run over 
by a cart, tram, train, &c. Nine deaths were from burns or scalds, 
16 by drowning, 6 by suffocation, 3 by poisoning, 9 by injuries to 
head, spine, hip, &c. ; besides 9 from accident at birth, and 20 
others. 

One death was classified as homicide. Of 28 suicides, 7 were 
by shooting, 2 by cutting throat, 7 by poison, 7 by hanging, 3 by 
drowning, 1 by suffocation (gas), and 1 by jumping from a house. 

Vital Statistics op Australasian Capitals, 1904. 

The vital statistics of the chief cities, with their suburbs, of Aus- 
tralasia show that the death-rate in Wellington (N.Z.) for 1904 was 
lower than that of anj other ol the principal towns for the same ^e^t . 



228 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAK-BOOK. 





Estimated 
Mean 
Popula- 
tion. 


Births. 


Deaths. 


Excess 


Cities (including 
Suburbs). 


Total 
Number. 


Rate per 

1.000 
of Popula- 
tion. 


Total 
Number. 


Rate per 
1.000 

of Popula- 
tion. 


of Mirths 
. over 
Deaths. 


Melbourne 

Sydney . . 

Adelaide 

Brisbane* 

Perth . . 

Hobart 

Wellington 


504,960 

614,800 

169,397 

125,068 

48,400 

34,888 

55,618 


11,886 
13,215 
4,016 
3,301 
1,780 
999 
1,479 


23-64 
25-67 
23-71 
26 40 
36 78 
28-64 
26-59 


6.558 

5,675 

2,022 

1,433 

823 

555 

680 


1299 
1102 
11-94 
11-46 
1700 
15 91 
1043 


5,828 

7,540 

1,994 

1.868 

957 

444 

899 



♦ Ten-mile radius. 



Average Age at Death, and Expectation op Life. 

The average age at death of persons of either sex, in each of the 
ten years 1896-1905, was as follows : — 





Males. 


Females. 




Males. 


Females. 


1896 . 


3G 80 years 


32-41 years. 


1901 .. 


41-64 3 ears 


37 68 years. 


1897 . 


38-80 . 


34-77 . 


1902 .. 


4107 . 


84 83 . 


1898 . 


39-29 . 


35-69 . 


1903 .. 


39-56 . 


3543 „ 


1899 . 


37-73 . 


3354 . 


1904 .. 


41-47 . 


33-44 , 


1900 . 


40-31 . 


36-14 „ 


1905 .. 


4303 . 


3913 . 



The average expectation of Ufe at each year of age has been 
compiled from a table given in a paper on the rates of mortaUty in 
New Zealand which was published by Mr. George LesHe. This is 
the best and most up-to-date information procurable, but it is not 
guaranteed by the authorities of the Government Life Insurance 
Department. 

The table shows, on comparison with New South Wales figures 
(Coghlan's), that at birth the expectation of life to the male infant 
in New Zealand is considerably greater than in that State, the 
figures being 54-^4 years (N.Z.), against 49*60 (N.S.W.), and for 
females 5726 and 52-90. 

At 21 years of age the expectation in New Zealand for males is 4377 
years, against 41-35 (N.S.W.), and for females 45*59, against 43*62. 

At age 45 the comparison is, for males, 25*23 years (N.Z.), 
23-27 (N.S.W.) ; females, 27*46 years (N.Z.), against 25*34 (N.S.W.). 

At the age of 70, the limit of a normal life, the figures for New 
Zealand are— males 9*48 years, females 10*23, against 8*64 for both 
sexes in New South Wales. 

Throughout the compirison is in favour of this country. 



ORPHANHOOD OF CHILDREN. 
EXPBCTATIOM OF LiFE IN NeW ZEALAND. 



229 





Average 
of Life 


DnraMon 




Average Duration 




Average Duration 




Years. 




of Life 


: Years. 




of Life 


Years. 


Age. 


Male. 




Age. 






Age. 








Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Pemale. 





54-444 


57-261 


35 


32-829 


34-954 


70 


9 481 


10227 


1 


59-102 


61-214 


36 


32 054 


34-215 


71 


898S 


9 673 


i 


59160 


61-220 


37 


31-282 


3:3475 


72 


8 504 


9i;io 


3 


58626 


60 617 


.M8 


30511 


32-7.34 


73 


H-ti;35 


8-604 


4 


57-9-24 


59-934 


.39 


29-744 


31-990 


74 


7-586 


8 095 


5 


57 167 


59148 


40 


2^-9^9 


31-243 


75 


7 163 


7-614 


6 


56 396 


5S-343 




28-220 


.30-493 


76 


6-758 


7164 


7 


55-606 


67-521 




27-465 


29-7:39 


77 


6 379 


6742 


8 


51791 


56 &« 




26-715 


28981 


78 


6-.r22 


6:349 


9 


5:i956 


55-825 




25 971 


28-2-21 


79 


5683 


5 9S2 


10 


53(KH 


54 9x3 


45 


25-2:31 


27-458 


HO 


5-:«2 


5-a36 


U 


52 212 


64 069 


46 


24-499 


£6-694 


81 


5-055 


5-312 


12 


51-:115 


53-180 


47 


2:1-773 


25-927 


83 


4-765 


5005 


13 


50-4il5 


52-294 


48 


23055 


25163 


8:3 


4-489 


4-714 


U 


40-539 


51-415 


49 


22-344 


24:399 


84 


4-229 


4-439 


15 


48-6 W 


.W-54> 


60 


21-636 


23-640 


a5 


8-982 


4-180 


16 


47-803 


49-690 


51 


20-9:12 


22-S85 


86 


3747 


3-935 


17 


46-960 


48-r*47 


5:4 


20-231 


2-2135 


BI 


3-52^5 


3-705 


18 


46-l:i9 


4S-015 


63 


]9-:530 


21.392 


89 


3-313 


3-487 


19 


4V*« 


47-198 


54 


18-8 <6 


20-a55 


89 


3110 


3-2H3 


» 


445'>1 


46-39 i 


55 


18-lM) 


19-9-26 


90 


2-914 


3-089 


21 


41-775 


4V593 


50 


17-478 


li>-203 


91 


2-72 J 


2-905 


23 


4.3-005 


44-80^J 


57 


16-8-22 


18-4H5 


92 


2-325 


2-731 


i^ 


42-2 i5 


44-021 


58 


l'i-183 


17-776 


93 


in a 


2-564 


24 


41-46.3 


43-244 


59 


15-56J 


17-07 r 


94 


2-101 


2-400 


2i 


40-1584 


4-2-474 


6) 


14049 


16:385 


95 


1-843 


2-2:38 


dr, 


:«-899 


41-708 


61 


14-:i4H 


15-705- 


96 


1-553 


2082 


27 


39-108 


40-946 


62 


1:3-754 


15-0:i7 


97 


1-247 


1-931 


28 


s-rug 


40-187 


63 


1:3-170 


14:386 


98 


0-900 


1-774 


^ 


37-.'i28 


.39-431 


64 


12-HOO 


13-752 


99 


0077 


rox) 


» 


.S6-736 


38-078 


65 


12-046 


1:3 i:<5 


100 


0-000 


14-24 


SI 


35-949 


37 928 


66 


11-512 


l-2-.'V34 


101 




1195 


32 


35161 


37-181 


. 67 


10 994 


11-945 


102 




0-889 


33 


34-<84 


.''6-4:« 


68 


10-4H6 


li:«5 


103 




0-500 


34 


33^ »5 


3>-695 


69 


9-981 


10-79-2 









Orphanhood of Children. 

New Zealand statistics give detailed information on this subject, 
which appears to be unique. In a paper read by Mr. H. W. Manly, 
actaary of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, on the 27th April, 
1903, before the Institute of Actuaries at London, under the heading 
** Children's Benefits," he stated that in order to ascertain the ages 
and the number of children left by a married man at his death he 
had to go to the same source as Mr. King did when he constructed 
his table of " Family Annuities " — viz., the *' Statistics of the Colony 
of New Zealand." And further, after announcing his intention of 
making very considerable use of the information, he gave the tables, 
grouping five ages together. (*• Journal of the Institute of Ac- 
tuaries," October, 1903.) 

Although the subject is not one of general interest, as the Year- 
book is more often referred to than a statistical volume, it may be 
excusable to draw attention here to the tables published for the 
year 1905 and the experience of the quinquennial period, as shown 
in the " Statistics of New Zealand." 

The first table shows, for the year 1905, the total number o( m^ii 
who died at each year of age from twenty upwards ; \k\^ xc^x^'^ cA 
married men stated in the registers as having died (a) cVi\\d\^%^, 



280 



NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



(b) leaving children ; and the number and ages of the children living 
at the time of the father's death. The next is a similar table, but 
giving five years' results for all ages of the fathers. A condensation 
of the table is shown. 







New Zealand, 


1901 TO 1905. 










Number of Married 
Men who died 




Number and Ages of Living Iwae. 


Ages of Married 
Men at Death. 




















• 




Child- 
less. 


Leaving 
Children 


Under 5 


5tol0. 'lOtolS. 

1 


15 to 21. 


2tand 
over. 


Not 
specified. 


20 to 30 


73 


158 


234 


35 


1 






13 


30 . 40 


130 


639 


717 


674 


303 


48 


, , 


83 


40 . 50 


150 


946 


600 


958 


1,074 


978 


330 


151 


50 . 60 


190 


1,403 


260 


626 


1,075 


1,925 


8,174 


417 


60 . 65 


132 


1,050 


55 


175 


397 


999 


4,131 


251 


65andupwardtt 


644 


4,290 


63 


186 


479 


1,336 


19,645 


1,286 



A table has also been prepared showing, for the year 1905, the 
number and ages of the youngest orphan children left. 

Infantile Mortality. 
Subjoined is a classified statement of the deaths of infants under 
one year during 1905, with the ratio of the deaths in each class to 
the 1,000 births during the year : — 



Year. 



Sex. 



Under 1 
Month. 



land 


Sand 


6 and 


under 3 


under 6 


under 19 


Months. 


Months. 


Months. 



Total 
under 

12 
Months 



1905 



1905 



j , Male 
1 Female 



Male 
Female 



Number op Deaths. 
..I 406 I 159 I 165 
.. I 308 I 126 I 125 

Deaths to the 1,000 Births. 

.. I 33-53 I 1313 I 13-63 
.. I 26 61 10-89 I 10 80 



171 
139 



1412 
1201 



901 
698 



74-41 
6031 



Seventy-four out of every thousand of male children born, and 
sixty of every thousand females, are found to have died before 
attaining tlie age of one year. The mortahty is thus one in thirteen 
of male children and one in seventeen of females, even in New Zea- 
land, where conditions are far more favourable to infant life than in 
Australia, at least as far as relates to the cities. 

It will also be seen from the figures that the chances of living 
during the first year of age are far greater for female than for male 
infants. Thus, during the year 1905 there were — 

100 deaths of males to 71 deaths of females under 1 month of age ; 

100 « 83 « from 1 to 3 months of age ; 

100 » 79 « from 3 to 6 months of age ; 

100 V 85 « from 6 to 12 months of age ; 

100 » 81 « under 12 months of age ; 

The rates of infantile mortality — that is, the proportion the 
deaths of children under one yeat ol a^e \i^«»x \.o \»\i'^\\Tths — are 
higher in the Australian States tYian m "iiVevj Ti^^wA. 



INFANTHiE MORTALITY. 



231 



Dealing with the results for ten years, the deaths of infants 
under one year are in the large proportion of three-fourths of the 
total deaths under five, as might he expected, the first year being 
the tenderest period. (See notes to tables.) 

Deaths of Infants undbb One Yeah, and Pbopobtion to Bibths. 



Year. 



1S96 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 



Means of ten years 



Deaths of Infants under 1 Year 


11 


5"§ 




of Age. 


(Totals for each 


^° . 


Hi? 


Year, and Means of 10 Years.) 


^i t 












J3 


5l| 
229 


o -* o 
S'gS 

304 


en 

Hi 
111 


ii 




Proportion of 
of Infants 
Year to eve 
Births. 


566 


340 


1,439 


18,612 


77-3 


512 


240 


269 


333 


1,354 


18,737 


72-3 


573 


289 


306 


312 


1,510 


18,955 


79-7 


619 


389 


378 


420 


1,806 


18,835 


95-9 


607 


288 


293 


281 


1,469 


19,546 


75-2 


610 


272 


392 


289 


1,503 


20,491 


76-3 


666 


344 


313 


390 


1,712 


20,055 


82-9 


692 


346 


367 


365 


1,770 


21,829 


811 


669 


260 


356 


331 


1,016 


22,766 


710 


714 


285 


290 


310 


1,599 


23,682 


07-5 


623 


294 


327 


310 


1,584 


•20,411 


77-6 



.N'OTB.— The total number of deaths of infants for the period included in the table is 

Deaths of Childben undbb Five Years, and Proportion to Deaths at 

ALL Ages 





Deaths of Children under 1 to 5 Years 


all 
ear, 
ars. 


Q 1^ 






of Age. (Totals for each 


is ,6 






Year, and Means of 10 Years.) 


^""fS 










. 






.•S2 


«5 0< 


Year. 




Sea 

^ a 


d a 


m a 


11 
Ii 


Ii 


III 


Us 






9 


9 


3 


9 1 -9 


H 


Q 


1896.. 


1,439 


215 


59 


76 


64 1,853 


6,432 


28-81 


1897 . 






1,354 


187 


84 


69 


38 , 1,732 


6,595 


26-26 


1898 . 






1,510 


200 


91 


72 


47 1 1,920 


7,244 


26-50 


1899 . 






1,806 


291 


111 


74 


56 2,338 


7,(^80 


80-44 


1900 . 






1,469 


205 


93 


64 


58 1 1,889 


7,200 


20-24 


1901 . 






1,563 


208 


85 


68 


52 1,976 


7,034 


2.3-88 


1902 . 






1,712 


307 


118 


92 


61 1 2,290 


8,875 


27-34 


19a3 . 






1,770 


275 


126 


HI 


04 1 2,346 


8,528 


27-51 


1904 . 




. 


1,616 


169 


83 


63 


43 i 1,974 


8,087 


24-41 


1905 . 






1,599 


176 


97 


61 


46 i 1,979 


8,061 


24-55 


Means of ten) 


1.584 


223 


95 


75 


53 1 2,030 


7.584 


26-76 


years f 















NoTK. — The total number of deaths included in this table of children under 6 years is 
»J87. 



1232 



miW EMAhATW OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOX. 



Although 16,838 infants (under one year) were lost to the colony 
by death during the decade, and 20,297 children under five» the thiid 
talle shows much more satisfactory results for this colony than tor 
New South Wales or Victoria in the matter of the preservation of 
infant life. Dealing with averages of tive years, in New Zealand 
only 77 infants under one year are found to die out of every 1,000 
boru, against 102 in New South Wales and 98 in Victoria. 



L ¥.^r 


Proportion of De^thfi of Infanta nofler 1 Year of 
Asa to every lAM>Birthfl, 


■ 


New Ze^uLd. 


New South WiLioa. 


Viotorfa. 


1900 

1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 


75-a 

76-3 
82-9 
811 
710 


103-3 
103-7 
109-7 
110-4 
62-4 


95-3 
102-9 
108-6 
106 4 

776 


Means of fife years . . 


773 


101*9 


932 



European countries show still higher mortality of infants than 
the principal Australian States: England and Whales, 152 (under one 
year) to every 1,000 births; France, 152; Italy, 167 ; Hungary, 
214. Sweden (9H) and Norway (91) are notable exceptions. 

The principal causes of mortality in children under one year for 
New Zealand are given, with the numbers of deaths for five years 
from such causes. Premature birth stands first in order of import- 
ance, marasmus or debility coming next* 

• Tlie report of tb« Bnyal Ci>tn»jJisiiion on the decline of ih« bkth-tate In New South 
Walen (liDi). IxeHidteit giving »tfitiBtJG8 of iiif«utile iiiortiiUty« de^cribei the rmhlUiovn tlMi 
cp*iate in productufj sitrh Htortnlity. KecoinmeDdationB ai e »Uo incbde, mid the Atlbject vf 
feeding and cftro (»f InfuntsdeAlt witli. 

Tlie cBiiRoa whicli operate In producing infantile mortality botli nmong legiUoiAiet 
and illcKitiiiiitdfi in New Soiit}i WhI* b, aif" liiiniiiE'ift^fd ae nitder:— 

1. Prrmfttiirc birtd ; do ecthe viabihty toiistquent npon imperfectlona iti tb« procesf 
of dovclopuieiit ; dif-enict ftcquiri^d before Llrtb ; iuiurLuI and unpniiea vjnlijjity axij^uif 
befori? or in pioce-B of birth, 

2. Deffctive care of ihtt new-born by jpnotRnt or caiele&a midwivefl* 

3. Ill boMltb of motbcn-", and conK.equtt]t inaUUlty to provide tbe natural nutritloii of 
iofaDta and rr>quL«.iie nnrain^*. 

4. A want of knowtedye of tbo proper modca of rearing infanta (exemphfled uiadcr 
seven ho&di* ). 

5. InJ ur ion 1^ quality of proprietary and otbor artifLcial foods, often recklessly Adver- 
tised , # 

6. Injiirloui quality of milk uodor tlio conditions in which It is ccmmonly supt*licd 
And Ufted 

7. iDJiiriou* effects cf chemicat pree^ervatlves in milk, and in preparaiionft of miUl 
used as Infant food. 

8 tnRulfloient public maternity hospital acconimcdation for tbo partnrlent wofnen 
unODi? the po< rer cla^Bes. 

9. Ini^utbcienl public-bofipUf^i accoiivtnodation for the trentment of sick infanis, 

10. 'J b<e prevalence of epidemic prevt-ntable i}ise«S(> in inrantn. 

11. Tbo nndtie incideof e of " summer eliarrinfsp," or acutct gasiro-intoFtinal ctttanh. 
The ^'unistes tending to produce mortality in ttio illet^ititnate infauts were found to bs 

(io Now South ^^ ak*hi :— 

13 Iklatf rnal inrilffercnce, anil the focIaI and «rononiic dlf-abilitire of the motberK. 

l^. Di'fective nianitgeuiunt of iuktUntiona and places where iliegiiiuiate infants fti« 
received. 

H, Sorret adoption of children for en in. 

15, Sfparittion of infMnta tnm their mDtbors, 

16. Infanticide and faHicido of viable infants. 



0AUSB8 OF DEATH. 
Deaths undkb Ons Y bar. —Principal Causes. 



233 



Principal Caases of Deaths of 
Infaats. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1906. 


Miasmatio diseases 


41 


92 


191 


36 


20 


Dlarrboe&l diseases 


95 


176 


122 


152 


92 


Premature birth 


264 


308 


301 


291 


360 


CoDTuUions 


91 


82 


103 


95 


96 


BroDchitis, pneamonia, pleurisy.. 


207 


235 


241 


149 


208 


Eoteritis 


116 


154 


167 


231 


193 


Mftrasmos. &c. . . 


260 


294 


270 


273 


258 



A table is added to show that higher mortality obtains in the 
large towns than in New Zealand as a whole ani two States of 
Australia. 





WelJioffton hUd 
Bubiirbft. 


Bydaflf ftDd Suburbs. 


Mo.boarue&Dd Suburbs, 






5 






t 


lii 




1 


lii 






fl ' 




'4 


Q^n 




a . 


p a^ 


Tear 


1 


4 


1^1 
l3s 


i 


!; C M 


1 


-A 


lit 




ICi 


«£ 


h a t^ 


m 


« a 


^ 


S» 




2 

s 


V 


P 


1 


J2^ 

ii 


FJ 


1 


5-^ 
P 




^ 


P^ 


&N 


Q 


& 


t" 


P :^ 


1900 


lp343 91 


732 


13.127 


1,332 


1090 


12,067 


1,364 


113-0 


im 


1,836 13S 


lOO'S 


13,601 


1,517 


1204 


13,375 


1,536 


124-1 


mi 


1.331 173 


130-2 


13,002 


1,457 


112-1 


12,493 


1,590 


197 "2 


im 


t,530 141 


938 


13,74^} 


1,483 


11 6-3 


13.012 


1.493 


134-8 


im 


1,479 
1.37S 


141 


95-3 


13,315 


1.300 


9S*4 


11,886 


1,102 


93-T 




136 


98^4 


13.739 


1,416 


nil 


12,168 


1,417 


ll6-fi 



Causes of Death (the Whole Colony). 

The deaths registered in the colony during 1905, arranged in 
the several classes according to their assigned causes, give the 
rates shown on the next page. 



234 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 





i « 
i 3 

i ^ 

i S 



I a 



£ 






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«55 . 53$ 



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Hosceixoih o •©& 



«eO"*Of-jg«o 09-«9S 



f^gfg^a ^g«*« 



^ooweiocu 



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$883 



!88::S 

«o<^b 



cnob 



5^5:8 

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CD CC 



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0AU8B8 OF DEATH. 



235 



The next table shows, for either sex, the number of deaths from 
each cause registered during the year 1905 : — 

Gausbs of Death. 



C«ia««oM)e*tli. 



Ordttn uid DfMSMft, 



C&QfieAorBeflith. 



Or<l«rs mod DLe«A««a^ 



; Cbicken-poz ... ... i 

I Measles ... 

! Epidemic rose-rash, ra- 1 
beola : 

Scarlet fever, scarlatina , 
I Typhus ... ... — I 

; Babonic plague 

■ Dengue ... ... ... ' 

BftlaptfiPg fever ,*. 

I >MiooiimgH;oiJgli 

Djpluht<ria 
rerebro-ftpini^l fever 

I fever ... 

; Enteric fever, typhoid ... 
Other miasmatic diseases 

Total Order 1 

Obdkb 2.— IMarrfcopoZ. 
Simple cholera ... 
Diarrhoea 
. Dysentery 

Total Order 8 

Order S.— Malarial. 
Remittent fever... 
Ague 
Beriberi 

Total Order 3 

I Order 4.—ZoogenouM. 
. Hydrophobia ... 

Glanders 

Splenic fever 

Cow-]>ox and other effects 
of vaccination... 

: ToUlOrder4 

1 Onr EB 5.— Venereal. 
SynbiiiB... 

(ionorrhoea, stricture of 
urethra, ulcer of groin 

ToUlOrderS 

Ou>EB B.— Septic. 
Fba««d8e[)a 
BnrslpeliLs ^ *^* ^ 
Fy K mia. «ep Ueiemi& 

i«plicffuiia 

Total Order 6 

ToUl Class I. 



... I 
4" 



"W 



f7 



6 10 



m 



wsn 



IB 






1:2 5. 



I h* 



if 



Qg 



m 



13 



184 



I 



Thrush ... 

QTber dlficaies from vege- 
table pnraaitea 

Hycl^lid disease 

WorQis ,-, 

Other dlcicafies from ani- 
mal para^Ue^- 

Total Class II. ... 

Ularvatfou, eipomire ... 

Want of Irreaet-miLk 

Sfsurvy ... 

Inteuiperance— 

Cbronie alcoUolIsm ... 
I Delirium treEiieiis 
I Other dietetic diveasfiA ... 

I Total Class III. ... 

I 

i Rheumatic fever 

I Khoumatism 

' Gout 

■ Rickets ... 

, ^.-:,+iJ,Li... ... 

I I Tabea mBfitiutedca, tii- 
Iriere ular peri ton 1 1 Is .. . 

Tubfirptilar nicningitiB, 
acute hydrocopliaiud ... 

PhthWs-.. 

Other foriDft of tuberfiu- 
loslPt scrofula ... 

Purpura, bfcmorrliagic 
dlathesiii 

An«timiaK cb^orosieJeoocK 
oylbnoila 

Dlabotes ]yelllt^)« 

Other coiiBtitutlotial dis- 
eases ... 

Total Class IV. ... 

Premature birth 

Atelectasis 

Cvaiiosis 

Spina bifida 

Imperforate anus 

Cleft palate, hare-lip ... 

Other congenital defects 

Old age ... 



12, 





... 


12! 


4 


5: 


1 
1 
1 


22 

7; 

6 


4 
*3 


42 


_i« 



21 
4 

1 

1 
313 



251 

48 

b 

22 
35 

i 

767 



Total Class V. 



196 
8 
3 
1 
1 
1 
i 

325 



639 



53j 



I ' £ 



i 

OiiDKli l.—Dineases of Ner- 
vous System. 
' 1 n a a lu ni a 1 1 D n of tbo 
I brftlnor its mpiiibranoR 
Ccrt^^) r o-Eipi 11 B.1 III en 1 iJigi t Ifi 

' AjkOploKV 

I Softening of brahi 
I Memiiilegtft. braJii paraly- 
Bis 



67 

1 
168 
16 



4i 1ft 



1ft 

8 
8 
ft 

» 
7 
9 



8 

1 

4 

66ft 



111 
4 



3; 
2S3I 



17! 3A 



36 
242 



75 
4gft 



73 
11 



S! 



60 
79 



6701,437 

1641 360 

4 IS 

6; 8 

6 7 
1 

l| 9 

7, 11 

253 678 

979 



440 



I 

52, 119 

9 

909 

94 



1 
131 

8 



i 39 



236 



NBW ZBALAND OFFICIAL TEAR-BOOK. 
Causes op Dkatu— continued. 



CAttAei or Defttb^ 
Orden uid DJBeas«K. 






C«o»«« &f DeAtb. 



Orders AUd DbetftM. 



I'. 



Flfi^ at iut&ue ... 
Ctiort'ii .,. 
Ejtili^) Hy 
Cl^DV11]:f^ldt1» 

X.Atviipipftiiie'i Ptridulutt ... 
ttlJopnilMG ttMaitiiR 
^'Ai nvli'^in-. (UfiiAEfi'i of 

i}ii]iHl vMvd 

Otber rllfit&ti:<iol uervoilfi 
Total Order 1 



OiTJii^n 2.~PifffiHeit of 

Otiliis, offti rln"*... 
EfiSMikxiR. viid dlsiiMefi of 

nope ... 
Opb 1 1 » a] n 1 1 »3 J] d d liseMei 

of sye ... 

Tot&l Older S 



r/t tH J u t my Sif*- fi-ttt . 
EDdocaiditiB. VAtvuliir 

PericaidJttfi 

T1y|iiM'i I [i|-1iv of lirmt *^^ 

Fkity degeneration of 

benrt ... 
An^jfin 1>eutorJB... 
RvTii n]*«9 

Ftti^'^di^^iii, till oiiiboiis ... 

PlsieliiHi 

Vni Ico^i' veia^, vilei 
Oflier rlipHM^eft of cItchIa- 
lory «>Ht4 Til ... 

ToUi Order £1 ... 



OnT>FR A.—DiMrttfirir of 

OiJkt ilii'irni'ea of lu-yajc 
And trifcr^lifa ... 

Tlri»n>3iMlii 
f Hi-iiLiioniilK 

PIbiiHhv,. 

Oihwr dii>v«n«« of reftiiira- 
toryB^Btim ,., 

T0t*lOrder4 



1^ 



93 



IT 
ft 

J?. 
5Sl 39*2] 



13J 




m 

6 

98 
13 
HI 



17 
€4H 



I. 
JflU 

61 



24S 
4 

i 

4 

i 

E3 



Sti 



D 

HI 
17 
11 

m 

3 



♦Oil 



1 



\m 



m m 



573 im D^O 



Oni>Fii S.^Df*ea*a of 

Btftiimthlv, ciQcruzu ovIb 

DtnUtuB 

h or t« ll I roa t» q ulu ly 

])>p.|ii fmlft 

Bs^uifeieuiefiiB ,., 

Meiiina ... 

Diht'Afcf.'fi of roiuM;li, g|L9- 

liillf; .„ 
Entt-rrtia 
U k-i'^ B tion t perfoi'BtloD , 

nf initri^tjne 
Ileiifi. obiuucUon of la* 

te^LJue 
Strtci lire or itranGtilALtoii 

oriLiCt-aU&e ... 
IiMDE^BuatrfiptiDD ot in tea- 
tine 
Heinlft ,,, 

FiRltjlA 

i'erJioiiitJi 

AF.t:ire« .,. 

Gnn-etoneB 

L' h H 108 ife of I i ver 

Oilivr ^U^eaftes ol Uver, 

]]f»f Atii i»^ jauudlc^e 
Al'pendiclim 
Otlier (l)ir«B.«es of digea- 

iive ay at em 

TotftlOtderfi 

OitiaKR B.— BiMrtnen of 
Lympimtic Kytfetn and 

J m tilt $9 Uhiiidtt. 
DiFcafea of l^iniiiiAtle 

ayattm 
DJttnp'cta of ipleen 
pronrlicuct'l^ ... ,» 

Add i B on'B dtseoao 

Tot&l Order 6 



OnuKR 7.— Di*wiea af 

Acnie neHirUis... 
Brpght'ii alat-aae 

VlHOlilL 

l^n|)l>11?Bfrlon of urJiio 

i^n^niMturla 

tiJht'tvi'eFi of bladder and 

V>TOfatttte 
Other dJiiP*ipeH of iiriua,rj 

Byf.ti^ni ikldiicy-diaeftBee 

uudeacxJbed) ,.. 

Totft] Order 7 



OiitiEn K--ri»etti>f» of 
Jirprt»1nctiv€ SifWtrtn, 

{ei4 iJii^ffiHeii of ofigaua 
of eeueralioD,— 

Ovarian dUeafie 



ir 

S 
4 

4 

S 

u 

135 
9 
36 

4 

m 






110 



10 



£0 
IK 



f>' 19 

B| t 

F5 119 

m -260 



IS 

I* 



s 

56 

8 
10 

at 

f 

t1 



WJ 



a; 6 



a«. 



i 

34| 43 
67' IS^ 
]3| 31 

"'}* S 
9 



2eft liol 375 



m! 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



237 



Causes of Death — continued. 



Cui»B of Deattw 



^ I Ord«r« luid Dlftoues, 



C&ue#i. of De^tbi, 



Ord(»n and Dim^Mefi, 



pradttcHpt S^»t«H— ttd. 
iaO Oifrn&eeft of organs of 

Dts^Aea of uicrys tJad 

DUordem of tueiuy-Qft- 

' Uoa ... 

I Pflhn«ft] &bBctffia 
! DiieM«« of t««t9«, pen is, 
•crotuin, Jfcc. .,. 

ik\ Dise^a^ Of p&rtari- 
' tlon,— 

AbortJoih luJe^irriaiid ... 
; Puf^rperaJ mAofa. 

Fuerp«r4l coiivylilonfl ,., 
Macenia p'l'svla (flood- 

I iagi 

. Pblegifiaaift dolcDa 
Other ac(;ideiila of child- 
birth ... 

Total Order 8 

Oftn£i» 9.—Bi*mwr» of 
Otnanm of I^ocomoHtm. 

CAiifls . n ecro!iia . . . 

AftHniUK ofltitifl 

Otiier diaeaaes of OFBani 
of loeoiuoUoQ ... 



Tot«J Ordeir 9 
OftDsn Uh—Di*m*e4 qf 

Carbuaelo 

P}]]«|EniOD, collQlltU 
Lupai ... 
Ulcer, bed-florv ... 
Ecaemih ... 

Otbor dii«afl«B of integu- 
iDGiit»ry syakiia 

Total Ordor 10 ,.. 

TouaClMftVl. .,, 



9. 447 



US 



lit 



1317 



13 
4,961 



-< a: 



Oroeb L— Jfvultffi£ or 

Fr&c turvfi, coi 1 1 uttioaa , , 

G u n allot wo tmda 

Cot, stab 

Buru, scald 

Bunatxoko 

l^omcD ... 

DrowDlDf! 

SufTOfiaCloi] 

Otherwitta 

Total Order I 

Our Kit 2.—Hf}mieMe. 
Murdtii-, oiandlaiigbtfir .. 
Wouudfi in tj&itlo 

TotAlOrdor^ 

G u ti i4l lot w ounda 
Cut. »tab 
Poison ... 
Drown lag 
Hanging 
OtberwJid 



OniiRit 4. 



ToiaJ Order 3 

Exe^Hfion. 



SOI 

3D 

10 

It 
IB 



it^ 



ToUl Claai VIL ... 

DropKy ,,. 
Mara^iniis, A.c. ... 
Mortlfleatlon, gnngrene ... 
Tiiujour... 

.4IJSCOHH .>^ 

Ifffitiiorrhn^i) 

Bud [Ion (o&uee uriaacer- 

tained) 
Other ill-donned &□<! uotr 

a|feciQtid causea 

Total Clftfia VUL ... 
General totals ... 



49#^ 



m2 
1 



177 



9s sm 



^ 



in 



120 

1 

2 



lao 



i,€dff3.^Sil^,0ftl 



9m 

lA 

so 
"it 

ST 
2T 



B4 

IT 
IS 

li 

15 
S 



I 
61^ 



13 



307 



Mortality from Febrile and Zymotic Diseases. 

The deaths in 1905 from specific febrile or zymotic diseases 
amounted to 391, a proportion of 4-49 in every 10,000 persons 
living, and a decrease of 177 on the number of deatlis in 1904, 
when the proportion was 672. 

The feature of last year's mortality is the comparative freedom 
of the colony from some of the epidemic diseases most fatal to 
children — viz., measles, scarlet fever, scarlatina, and whooping- 
cough — the total deaths from these causes being only 21, against 
58 in 1904 and 478 in 1903. 



238 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAR-BOOK. 



The diseases in this class that have caused the greatest mortality 
daring the past ten years are stated in the table that follows. Of 
these, diarrhoeal complaints were by far the most fatal, causing 
2,282 deaths in the decennial period. Influenza comes next, with 
1,319 deaths ; typhoid fever third, with 838 deaths ; whooping- 
cough fourth, with 579 deaths; mesisles fifth, with 505 deaths; 
diphtheria next, 472 deaths; scarlet fever, with 228 deaths; and 
puerperal fever, with 201 deaths : — 



Diseases. 


1896. 


1807. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1901. 


1905. 


Measles .. 


1 


1 


56 , 


137 


9 


6 


134 ! 143 


10 


8 


Scarlet fever and 


4 


2 


2 : 


. ^ 


10 


17 


39 131 


13 


i ItJ 


scarlatina 




















1 


Diphtheria 


74 


49 


45 


53 


63 


44 


54 


23 


27 


35 


Whooping-cough . . 


24 


2 


G ' 


123 


90 


9 


83 


204 


35 


' 3 


Influenza 


89 


120 


219 1 


135 


181 


219 


117 


5C 


113 


70 


Diarrhceal diseases 


334 


257 


275 


298 


199 


139 


275 


184 


193 


128 


Enteric or typlioid 


124 


106 


120 


93 


68 


95 


53 


61 


73 


45 


fever 






. 
















Puerperal fever . . 


10 


18 


19 


15 


24 


20 


25 


28 


21 


21 



The mortality from measles from 1896 to 1898 was not great, 
but rose to 137 deaths in 1899, falling again to 9 deaths in 1900 
and 6 deaths in 1901, again rising to 134 in 1902, and further to 
143 deaths in 1903. During 1904 and 1905 this disease was not 
epidemic in the colony, and caused only ten and eight deaths 
resp'ictively. From scarlet fever and scarlatina there were only 10 
deaths last year, as compared with 131 in 1903, and 13 in 1904. 
The mortality from diphtheria, which was 74 deaths in 1896, fell to 
35 deaths in 1905, the figures for the intervening years not pre- 
senting any strikmg features. 

Whooping-cough in 1896, 1897, and 1898, caused 32 deaths. 
In 1899 the mortality sprang up again to a total of 123 deaths, 
against 90 in 1900, 9 in 1901, and ^3 in 1902. In 1903 the 
mortality was heavy, the number of deaths being 204, but in 1904 
only 35 deaths are recorded from this complaint, while last year the 
number was further reduced to 3 deaths. 

Tiio deaths from influenza numbered 70 in 1905, as against 
113 in the previous year. The fitjures for the eight previous years 
ranged from 89 to 219, the last being for the years 1898 and 1901. 

From diarrhceal complaints the deaths in 1905 were 128, against 
193 in 1904; while in 1896 the mortahty reached the height of 
334 deaths, and in 18vS9 was even higher (355), with a much smaller 
population than in 1905. 

Enteric or typhoid fever was less fatal in 1905 than in 1904, 
the figures being 45 deaths, against 73. The highest mortality 
during the deceniiium was in 1896, when the deaths numbered 124 
for the colony. 



VACCINATION. 



Bubonic Plaguk. 



239 



The year 1900 eaw the outbreak of the disease known as the 
bubonic plague, in Sydney and other parts of Australia. In that 
year there was one death from plague in New Zealand, which 
occurred at Auckland. None happened in the year 1901, but 
three deaths from this cause, all males, were registered at Auckland 
during 1902. No deaths from plague were recorded in 1903, but 
one death occurred in 1904. Last year no deaths were ascribed to 
this cause. The Public Health Department is taking every possible 
precaution. 

Vaccination. 

The vaccinations registered for the last ten years are as under : — 





Total 






Proportion of 




Vacciiiatious 
registered 
of Children 


Vaccinations 
of Children 

under 
1 Year of Age. 


Number of 
Births 


Successful Vaccinations of 


Year. 


Children under 


Children under 




under 


registered. 


14 Years of Ace 
to Total Births. 


1 Year of Age to 




14 Years of 




Total Births. 




Age. 






Per Cent. 


Per Cent. 


1905 


.. 3.818 


2,079 


23.682 


16- 12 


8-78 


1904 


.. 18,368 


2,323 


22,766 


80 68 


10-20 


1903 


.. 11,683 


5,566 


21,829 


53-52 


25-50 


1902 


8,763 


2,611 


20,6.55 


42-43 


12-64 


1901 


3,768 


1,984 


20,491 


18-39 


9-68 


1900 


.. 4,525 


3,151 


19,546 


2315 


16-12 


1899 


.. 5,133 


3.379 


18,835 


27-25 


17-94 


1898 


.. 10,349 


5,507 


18,955 


54-60 


2905 


1897 


.. 12,440 


6,162 


18,733 


6641 


32-89 


1896 


.. 11,917 


5,727 


18,612 


6403 


30-78 • 



The number of successful vaccinations of children registered in 
1905 was 3,818, against 18,368 in 1904. The fall prior to 1902 was 
consequent on the alteration of the law relative to vaccination in 
England, and subsequently in this colony, while the increase shown 
for the three years 1902-4 was no doubt due to a slight visitation 
of Bniall-pox from abroad, which caused one death in 1903. 

Nine children out of every hundred born in 1905 are shown to 
have been successfully vaccinated in that year. This is a falling- back 
to the position which obtained in 1901 as regards vaccination of in- 
fants. The exemptions taken out will also be found from the sub- 
sequent remarks to have fallen in number. The procedure under the 
new law as regards vaccination is similar to that previously in force. 
The Registrar issues a notice when a birth is registered, with forms 
for certificate as to the result of vaccination attached. Vaccination 
is Btill compulsory, if exemption is not secured in four months from 
date of birth. But everything is now subject to the provisions of 
the " exemption clause," which is the main feature, and governs 
the rest. Any parent or custodian who has conscientious objec- 
tions — believing that vaccination would be injurious to the child's 
health — can apply for a certificate of exemption to a Magistrate or 
Registrar of Births ; and, when the child's parent or guardian is 
resident outside of a borough, the application may be made to and 
certificate granted by a Justice of the Peace. 



240 



NSW ZEALAND OPPIOIAL TBAR-BOOX. 



Thirteen thousand one hundred and seventy-nine exemption cer- 
tificates were issued from the 13th October, 1900, when the Act 
came into force, to the end of the year 1905. Of these 1,966 belong 
to the year 1905, when, as before stated, the successful vaccination 
of children under one year of age amounted to 2,079, or 9 per cent. 
of births. 

When no exemption certificate is obtained, the law now allows 
to the parent twelve months instead of six from date of birth in which 
to vaccinate, and a similar period from date of taking charge of 
child in case of a custodian. There are penalties for not vaccinating, 
as before. One conviction for neglecting to vaccinate a child re- 
moves liability until the child is four years of age. 

The figures given above do not include Maoris vaccinated, nor 
vaccinations of adult persons other than Natives. 

Parasitic Diseases. 

There were 16 deaths from parasitic diseases, the proportion 
per 10,000 living being 018. Deaths from hydatids numbered 16 in 
1905. 

Dietetic Diseases. 

Under the class '* Dietetic diseases " are included 33 deaths 
from intemperance. But these cannot be said to represent the full 
extent of the mortality really caused by the abuse of alcoholic 
liquors. Many deaths of intemperate persons are attributed to 
disease of the liver, kidneys, &c., in the medical certificates. 

Constitutional Diseases : Phthisis, Cancer, etc. 

The deaths from constitutional diseases in 1905 numbered 1,437, 
or 16-52 per 10,000 of population, and 18 out of every 100 deaths 
from all causes. This class of disease is more fatal than any other 
except that defined as *' Local diseases," on account of the great 
numbers of deaths from cancer and phthisis, with other tubercular 
complaints, which are classed as " Constitutional." 

The number of deaths from phthisis was 496 in 1905. The 
deaths in 1905 were in the proportion of 5*70 in every 10,000 
persons living, against 7 08 in the previous year. 
■':> Figures for ten years are quoted, showing that the total number 
of deaths from this disease in 1902 was the highest recorded during 
the decennium, though the rate has been higher in some of the 
previous years. 

Year. 

1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1908 
1904 
1905 





Deaths from Rate 


Phthisis. 


per 10.000. 


.. 623 


7-40 




596 


826 




697 


811 




693 


7-91 




677 


7-56 




696 


766 




617 


778 




670 


696 




698 


708 




. 496 


6-70 



CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 



241 



Of the persons dying from phthisis in New Zealand during 1906, 
more than one-half were born in the colony. The numbers are : 
total of deaths from phthisis, 496 ; 275 of them having been New- 
Zealand-bom. The proportion is 55 per cent. 

At the census of 1901 the New -Zealand -born were shown to be 
67 per cent, of the population, which would give the approximate 
number of the same in 1905 as 582,900. The death-rate from 
phthisis amongst these persons was, judging from the numbers in 
the table annexed, 472 per 10,000 living. 

The death-rate from phthisis in the United Kingdom is stated by 
the Registrar- General to be at the rate of 1203 per 10,000 living for 
the year. 

Deaths from Phthisis, 1905. 

Table showing the Number of PersoDS who died from Phthisis in the Colony 
during the Year 1905, classified aooordiug to Age, Sex, and Length of 
Residence in the Colony. 





Ages At De^itl] 


u 




Leo^tb of Ik«id^oe lb 


« 
















J&J 




tho Colosj, 


IJ 




IB 

B 


s 


r 

4» 


s 








11 


1 




O 


<o 


g 




s 


^ 


^ 


IS 


g ^n 


^^ 


MaX£A. 






















tJQdcT 1 ronrntla 




k*l 


... 


1 


^ 


2 




,. 


.F^ 


... , a 


llo e iit{)ti tbfl 


"i 


..♦. 


.t- 


,„ 


i 


1 


1 






... ' 4 


ftoliiuuatbe 


„. 






B 




,,, 


m 




■ 1. 


.., I s 


li03 jei-r» 




W,' 


..H 


1 


a 




*,, 




... 


... ! 3 


Sto3yeu-4 


.** 




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B 


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4 


a to 1 >e»n 


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1 






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lOiolSyoari 




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15t#fl0y>^n 


.h. 


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1 


3 




1 


..t 


1 


i}i{}33v«&ni 


\ ... 1 








3 




■3 


3 


t.F 


... > T 


]|$veArs«nd upwftrdi 




.*. 




... 





'3 


14 


^ 


la 


f 1 ca 


Kdl known 






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5 


7 


7 


4 


4 ' 


1 M 


Born in colon j ,, 


'« 


'l 


£ 


m 


41 


la 


a 


1 


I 


1 ^^^ 


TolaJ* 


3 


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71 


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B 


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4@e 



242 NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAK-BOOK. 

Ill Australasia the rate is materially increased by the deaths 
of persons who have come from other councries either already 
suffering from phthisis or predisposed thereto. There is no reason 
for believing that this circumstance has more effect on the death- 
rate in Australia than in New Zealand; so that the lower rate 
referred to in previous issues of this work as obtaining in this 
colony may be taken as proof of the superiority of its climate for 
withstanding consumptive tendencies. 

Phthisis is now known to be and is treated as an infectious 
preventable disease caused by the Bacillm tuberculosus, which is 
communicable in many ways. Certain constitutions are far more 
predisposed than others to receive this bacillus, especially under 
conditions of life unfavourable to robust health, when a nidus is 
formed for the development of the bacillus. The Government has 
estabhshed a sanatorium for consumptives at Cambridge in the 
Waikato, and further institutions are contemplated. 

From other forms of tuberculosis the deaths in 1905 were 182, 
or 209 per 10,000 of population. Thus a large addition has to be 
made to the deaths from phthisis to appreciate the full mischief 
done by tubercular disease. 

Deaths frojn all Tubercular Diseases. 

' The mortality from all forms of tubercular disease, taken to- 
gether, has been at the average rate of about 10 persons per 10,000 
living for thci last ten years. This rate is far lower thaii that which 
obtamed in England during the year 1903, when the proportion was 
17-42 per 10,000 living. 

A table is supplied showing the results for each of ten years in 
New Zealand. Besides the death-rate from tubercular diseases, it 
also shows the percentage of deaths by tubercle to those from all 
causes, which was from 841 to 11-57 per cent, for the decennial 
period 1896-1905. 

Decennial Table, 1896-1905, showikg the Death-rate from Tubebcuc per 
10,000 Living and Perckntage of Total Deaths. 



Number 
Mean of HeathM from 



Percentage'of 



Y-r. PoiMUution. T^Zi^^'' Rate per 10.000. Total Delth. 

Diseases. ^^*^*» *-l Causea. 

1896 .. .. 706,846 680 9-62 10*67 

1897 .. 721,609 763 10 57 11-67 
1808 .. .. 73(),260 769 10"44 10*62 

1899 749,984 795 10*60 10-36 

1900 713,594 752 985 10 44 

1901 .. 777,968 775 9 96 10*16 

1902 797,793 802 10*05 9*68 

1903 .. 820,217 769 9*88 9*02 

1904 845,022 799 0*40 9*88 

1905 .. 870,000 678 7*79 8*41 



TUBEROULAK DISEASES. 



243 



DscxHHiAL Table, 1896-1905. ~ Deaths from various TubercuUr Diseases 
registered in New Zealand, specifying the Number under and over Five 
Years of Age. 

Persons. 





Tabes 

Tutioroular 


Totwreal&f 

Acuta 


PbtbtHlfl. 


Other Forms 

of 
TuberculoflU, 


ToUl Deatlii 
Toberculosl*. 


5 




Per itdni Lift. 


H.^droti«pUalui 






ScrofQlm. 


^ 


year. 














< 




II 


it 


MS 


il 


11 


il' 


Il - 4 


li 


II 


1 


1106 .. 


36 


11 


30 


^ 


B 


518 


10 


33 


90 


590 


680 


m! ,. 


35 


9 


33 


32 


7 


5B9 


13 


45 


83 


675 


763 


IBSB .. 


37 


12 


ST 


38 


10 


587 


- U 


37 


95 


674 


769 


\m ,., 


43 


19 


82 


40 


10 


663 


12 


56 


97 


698 


795 


woo .. 


m 20 


24 


55 


13 


564 


9 47 


66 


685 


752 


1»1 


30 , 2S 


30 


31 


10 


58S 


U 52 


84 


691 


775 


190S .. 


26 . 19 


36 


30 


5 


612 


8 


66 


75 


727 


802 


1903 .. 


22 2d 


39 


B5 


9 


561 


11 


64 


81 ; 688 


769 


1904 .. 


17 ; 18 


41 


U 


5 


593 


12 


66 


78 721 


799 


1905 .. 


15 19 


37 


SB 


i 


4D2 


8 


05 


Oi ; 614 


678 



Nine deaths from ''lupas" recorded during the decennium have 
not been included in the above table. They were all deaths of adult 
persons (3 males and 6 females), excepting 1, aged 13 years. Two 
deaths of females, aged 13 and 69 years respectively, were registered 
as from this disease in 1905. 

It will be seen that the term ** tubercular diseases" includes 
"phthisis," '* tabes mesenterica," '* tubercular peritonitis," " tuber- 
cular meningitis," ** acute hydrocephalus," with other forms of 
tuberculosis (scrofula, &c.). Of these the mortality from phthisis 
forms by far the greatest part of the whole. Thus, in 1905 there 
were 496 deaths from phthisis out of a total of 678 deaths from all 
tubercular complaints. Of 496 deaths by phthisis, only 4 were of 
persons under 6 years of age. 

Examination of the next table, giving the full series of ages 
of persons who died from tubercular disease during the year 1905, 
shows that of 34 deaths from tabes mesenterica, with tubercular 
peritonitis, 15 were of children under 5 years. Also that, of 75 
deaths from tubercular meningitis, with acute hydrocephalus, 37 
were of persons under 5 years, and 24 from 5 to 20 years. Under 
"other forms of tuberculosis" (excepting phthisis) the greater 
numbers of deaths are at ages under 30 years. 

The mortality from phthisis is heaviest at 20-30 years, being 183 
deaths out of 496 of all ages ; but large numbers are found in the 
columns as far as that for the advanced term of 65 to 70 years, at 
which the deaths for 1905 were 20, and 16 deaths from this cause 
are of persons of 70 years and upwards. 



244 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 



Table showing the Nuinbi r of Deaths from Tubercular Diseases registered in 
New Zealand during the Year 1905, arranged in Groapi of iges. 













P«r»ow«. 


























i 


i! 






























i 


ll 






> 


» 






























^ 


>•.- 






1 


1 

5 




B 2 


B 


f 
& 

@ 


1 


a 


4 

o 

i 


5 










IS 

1 






il 


1 

3 


T»b*-ii iiiofigutfriGn, 


12 


1^ 


31 


1 !! 


s 


< ' 




1 


I 




1 












li 


34 


tLil>C'rcul&r peri' 




, 




1 




1 


























ti^miCrs 












1 


























T u iM-rt^u 1 nr i h en 1 ii- 


12 


at 


n 


H b 


Ti 


l' a. 


n 


M 


1 


_ 


i 












» 


fS 


EitiR, iMutw liydro- 








1 






























ceplmluft 












1 


























PbtlllBlH 


2 


4 


I 


7 a=* 


(^ 


«£> OJ 


46 


3^ 


iJS ^1 


S5 


as 


fiQ 


9 


A 


9 


^ 


m 


OUicr fornjn *if tu- 


;i 


a 


Q 


i & 


ii 


:i ^ 


7 


A 


4 3 


5 


1 


» 








fi5 


n 


bert::uLo(9iH. scrofulA 








' 




1 






1 


















TntKli* 


lO fi] 


I -JO 47 


ins 


ino 7M 


00 SH 


:a S4 


SJ 


r> 


ti 


9 


5 


£ 


ail 


m 



To show tlie mortality from tuberculosis ia various parts of 
the colony, a table ^ivinj^ the deaths in the various provincial dis- 
tricts is added, which, however, only shows that the mortality is 
distributed very much according to population. The deaths' in 
the North Island are, however, found to be 48 fewer than those 
for the South Island, or 315 deaths and 363 deaths for those 
divisions respectively : — 

Tablk showing the Number of Deaths from Tubercular Disease reRistered in 
tach Provincial Dis«riot «f N«»w Zealand dudng the Year 1905. 



Provincial 
District. 


Tabes 

Mesfutorira, 

1 ubfrcniar 

Peritonitis. 


Tubercular 

Meningitis, 

Acute 

Hydrocephalus. 


Pbthisis. 


FovmVot ToUVDc^th. 

Tuberculosis,! t„w?S^i. 
Scrofula, '1 Tuberculosii. 


Auckland 
TaraTiaki 
Ha^^ke'8 Bay 
\V»-IIington .. 
Mailboiough 
NiImh 
Weatland 
Canterbury .. 
Otago 


y 

1 
1 
6 

3 

10 


8 
9 

17 

2 

13 
21 


117 

16 

27 

C3 

7 

29 

5 

lul 

131 


19 
3 
2 

13 
4 
4 
2 
6 

20 


153 

29 

34 

99 

11 

37 

9 

124 

182 


Totals . . 


34 


75 


496 


73 


678 



Le<^islative action, before referred to, has been already taken in 
the direction of guardinjjj the life and health of the people from 
tubercle ; further than this, the complete isolation of consumptive 
patients, with the disinfecting of their sputa and of everything that 
has been in contact with them, is suggested from time to time as a 
necessary measure. 

Cancer. 

The deatlis from cancer during the year 1905 were 566. There 
were more deaths of males than of females, the numbers being — 
males 313, females 253. The rate of mortality per 10,000 living was 
6-51. The apparent increase in deaths from this disease is shown 



CANCBB. 



245 



hirtber on and compared with that of England. But the increase is 
not believed by all authorities to be a fact to the extent represented, 
but partly the result of more careful certification of the causes of 
death » and of improved diagnosis in cases of what is termed inac- 
cessible cancer. 

It is certain, however, that out of a total of 8,061 deaths from 
all causes in New Zealand during 1905, 566, or 7 02 per cent., were 
caused by cancer. 

The death-rate from cancer is not so great as that from tubercular 
diseases, but is nevertheless a most alarming matter, not only on ac- 
count of the number of deaths, but because of its progressive increase. 
A decennial table shows that the deaths from cancer per 10,000 
persons living rose from 5 50 in 1896 to 7 10 in 1903, 6 76 in 
1904, and 6*51 in 1905 ; and that whereas 605 out of every ICO 
deaths were attributable to cancer ten years ago, the proportion 
had grown to 7 02 last year. 

TiBLX showing for each of ihe Ten Years 1896 to 1905 the Number of Persons re- 
gistered as having died from Ganci r, the Proportion of Deaths from Cancer 
per 10,000 living, and the Petcentage of all DeatI s attributed to Cancer. 











Deaths from 






Estimated 


Deaths 


Total 


Cancer 


Percent age of 


Year. 


Mean 


from 


Deaths, all 


per 10,000 


Total Deaths 




Population. 


Cancer. 


Causes. 


of Living 
rersiinB. 


due to Cancer. 


18% 


706,846 


389 


6,432 


550 


605 


1897 


721,609 


395 


6,595 


5 47 


5-. 9 


1898 


736,260 


471 


7,244 


6-40 


6-50 


1899 


749,984 


468 


7,660 


6-24 


609 


1900 


763,594 


430 


7,200 


563 


5-97 


1901 


777,968 


515 


7.634 


062 


6-75 


1002 


797,793 


536 


8,375 


672 


6 40 


1903 


j 820,217 


582 


, 8,528 


710 


6-82 


1904 


1 845,022 


571 


, 8,087 


676 


7 06 


1905 


870.000 


566 


1 8,061 


6-51 


702 



To exhibit how cancer afifects the different parts of the human 
body in respect of each sex, the experience of five years (1901 to 
1905) is shown in a succeeding table. Of any single organ affected, 
the stomach is the one most liable to be the seat of cancer among 
males, while the mouth, lips, tongue, and throat, taking all these 
organs together, show a large number. Next to the stomach, 
the liver is with males the organ which is most often attacked, 
to judge by mortality records, and next in order come the in- 
testines and rectum. Afterwards follow the kidneys, bladder, and 
urethra. 

Amongst the females, the organs of generation — ovaries, uterus, 
and vagina — as a group, show most cases of mortality from cancer ; 
but, as with the males, the stomach is, of any single organ, the 
one most affected, the breast, liver, intestines, and rectum follow- 
ing. Females do not contract cancer in the mouth (judging by the 
returns of deaths), tongue, " lips, and throat to nearly the same 
extent as prevails among males. Whatever may be the cause, the 
figures are remarkable, being only 6 5 out of every 100 deaths from 
cancer among females, against 28 3 out of every 100 of males d^'vu^ 



246 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TSAR-BOOS. 



from the same cause, or, expressed in numbers, 74 deaths of 
females occurred against 400 of males from cancer in the mouth, 
(fee., in a five years' experience of mortality. 

Deaths fbom Gancbb, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, and 1905. 

Table showing the Number of Deaths of Males and Females from Caooer daring 

the YeaH IQT)! to 1905, clasHified accor.)ir.g to the Part of the Body affected. 



Part affected. 



1901. 












1902. 






1903. 



IliU 



19M. 






3 "i 



190Sw 



II 

SB'S 



u 

n 

£ CO 



Males. 



Mju&h, lip, tongue, 
throat, neok, & j. 

Stomach . . 

Intesiines, rectum 

Liver 

Kidoeyfl, bladder, 
urethra, <&o. 

Leg, foot, (fee. 

Luog 



Not specified 
Totals 



Month, toDgue, i 
throat, (fee. . . , 

Brea«»t 

Stonmoh . . 

Intestines, rectum .. ! 

Kidneys, bladier . . i 

Ovary, uterus, vagina i 

Liver . . . . 

Gall-bUdder, spleen, ' 
pancreas . . I 

Lung, spine, thigi), i 
shoulder . . , 







Per 




»'er 




I'er 




Per 




Per 


le. 




Cent. 




Cent. 




Cent. 




Cent. 




Cent. 




60 


24-69 


63 


24- 14 


99 


33-56 


99 


32-46 


79 


26-69 




97 


3992 


112 


42 91 


96 


32-54 


107 


3508 


107 


3615 


, , 


32 


13 17 


32 


12-26 


35 


11-87 


31 


1116 


29 


9-80 


•• 


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15 23 


38 


14-56 


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11-87 


42 


13-77 


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16-55 




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460 


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5-76 


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4-26 


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845 












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i-64 


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1-53 


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3-06 


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0-98 


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lOOOO 


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100 00 


295 


10000 


305 


100 00 


296 


10000 


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255 


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•• 


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•• 


18 




17 


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206 ! . . 


:^25 


.. 


323 


.. 


313 





Femilcs. 




38 
Gl 
19 

2 
55 
29 



Not specified 



Totals 



217 
.. I 33 

.. 250 



2-77 


16 


17-51 


3.} 


28-11 


43 


8 76 


33 


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1535, 33 


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1617 


20(;0 51 


, 21-98 55 


23-71 


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21-70 


15.35 28 


1 1207 32 


13-79 


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1447 


3 721 5 


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20-46 48 


20 09 68 


2500 


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15-09 


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0-93J 4 


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10000'232 


10000 


232 


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18 
-253 




. . !257 




248 




.. 



Considering^ the numbers of persons dying at the dilTerent age- 
periods, the following table of ten years' results shows the age of 
30 years to be the time of hfe at which deaths from cancer begin 
to be numerous (it is really 35 for males and 30 for females). The 
maximum of deaths is reached at the period GO to 65 for males, and 
b^ to 60 for females. Tliese remarks are given without reference to 
the numbers of persons living at the various ages. 

Deaths from cancer, it will be observeci, are very rare among 
children under 5 years, and not frequent in those above that age. 



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248 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TSAB-BOOK. 



The following extract from a contribution to the Lancet, by Dr. 
W. Vernon Shaw, is of interest : — 

" The growth of cancer oelld is to be looked upon as an effort of reprodno- 
tion in damaged tissue, the incidence of the damage falling upon the nuclear 
Btructures. This damage alters the nature of these Btruoiures 8) that the vege- 
tative functions of the cell run riot, and the cells become parasitic towards the 
organism in which the growth is taking place. The nature of the changes in the 
cancer cells and their life-history thus becomes the important point fcom whioh 
the origin of the cancer process must be determined. 

<* What is the cause of this vegetative activity ? Is it an initial damage to 
the cells in response to which there is an over active attempt at repair? Ttie 
peculiar frequency of such disease in organs once active but now undergoing 
iDVolatioEi would suggest this explanation, and also, the frequent origin of 
malignant growths in damaged tissue further sjpports this view." 

The death-rates for cancer in respect of each sex are given for 
each of ten years, selected to show the position as from 1886 to 
1905 :— 

Deaths fbom Cancer in eveby 10,000 Persons of bach Sex uyino 
IN New Zealand. 

lear. 
1886 

1890 

1894 

1898 

1899 

1900 

The mortality was higher among the males than among the females 
(with the exception of 1890 and 1901), which is the reverse of English 
experience, where the rate was 7*32 per 10,000 of males and 10 03 of 
females for the year 1903. In the United Kingdom, however, the 
rate of increase is so much higher among males than with females 
that the Begistrar-General calculates equilibrium will be reached in 
about the year 1932, and thereafter the rate among males would 
exceed the rate among females. 

The increase in the numbers for the sexes together for England 
and New Zealand is represented in the proportions below : — 



Males. 


Females, 


Year. 


3-69 


3-67 


1901 


4-72 


4-79 


1902 


666 


5-27 


1903 


6-77 


5-98 


1904 


6-85 


5-56 


1905 


612 


509 





Males. 


FemalM. 


6 48 


677 


705 


635 


7-51 


6-68 


7-23 


628 


6-79 


618 



Deaths from Cancer in every 10,000 Persons living. 



Year. 


New Zealand. 


England. 


Year. 


New Zealand. 


Englan 


1881 


2 69 


5-20 


1899 .. 


. . 6-24 


8-29 


1886 . . 


3-68 


6 90 


1900 .. 


5-63 


8-28 


1891 


4 68 


6-92 


1903 .. 


710 


8-71 


1896 .. 


5-50 


7-64 









MORTALITY FROM DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES. 



249 



The actu&l number of deaths of persons of either sex and all ages 
registered in New Zealand daring the last fifteen years was : — 



1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 



Males. 


Fomales. 


Totals. 


164 


141 


295 


173 


134 


307 


188 


144 


332 


240 


168 


408 


208 


175 


383 


205 


184 


389 


210 


185 


395 


263 


208 


471 


271 


197 


468 


246 


184 


430 


265 


250 


515 


296 


240 


536 


325 


257 


582 


323 


248 


571 


313 


253 


566 



Totals .. 



3,680 



2,968 



6,648 



Mortality prom Developmental Diseases. 
The total of deaths from developmental diseases was 979, or 
11-25 per 10,000 persons living. The mortality from premature birth 
comprised 3t0 deaths, and that from atelectasis, cyanosis, and other 
congenital defects 41 deaths. The proportion of deaths from pre- 
mature birth varies from 11 to 15 out of every 1,000 births, and 
that from congenital defects from 2 to 4 per 1,000 births. Parti- 
culars for ten years exhibit the annual rates : — 

NUMBEB AND PROPORTIONS PER 1,000 BiRTHS. 

Deaths from Premature Birth. Deaths from Congenital Defects. 



Tear. 


Number. 


Proportion 
per 1,000. 


1896 


230 


12-36 


1897 


211 


11-26 


1808 


251 


1324 


1899 


261 


13 86 


1900 


276 


1412 


1901 


264 


12-88 


1902 


303 


14-66 


1903 


301 


13-79 


1904 


291 


12-78 


1905 


360 


15-20 



Number. 

46 
52 
54 
47 
55 
63 
79 
67 
58 
41 



Proportion 
per 1,000. 

2-47 

2-78 

2-85 

2-50 

281 

307 

3-82 

307 

2-54 

1-73 



Stating the result in another way, there was one death from 
premature birth to every 66 births in 1905, and one death from con- 
genital defect to every 578 births. In England the proportion of 
aeaths from premature birth to every 1,000 births was as high as 
19-93 in the year 1900. 



250 new zealand official tear-book. 

Old Age. 

Deaths from old age in 1905 numbered 578, against 470 in 1904. 

Mortality from Local Diseases. 

Deaths by diseases of the nervous system were 913, or 11*33 out 
of every 100 deaths from all causes, and 1049 out of every 10,000 
persons living. Of the 913 deaths, 299 were due to apoplexy, 
121 to convulsions, and 119 to inflammation of the brain and its 
membranes. Paralysis, including hemiplegia and paralysis of the 
insane, caused 172 deaths, and locomotor ataxia 10 deaths. Para- 
plegia, with diseases of the spinal cord, caused 33 deaths. Deaths 
from nervous diseases (excluding convulsions of children) numbered 
792, or 9- 10 per 10,000 persons living. 

Diseases of the circulatory system resulted in 1,014 deaths, being 
12 58 out of every 100 from all causes, and 11*66 per 10,000 persons 
living. Of the total number in this order, endocarditis and valvular 
disease of the heart contributed 649 deaths. From angina pectoris 
there were 36 deaths, from syncope 141, from aneurism 17, and 
from other forms of heart-disease (hypertrophy, fatty degeneration, 
and pericarditis) 96. 

Diseases of the respiratory system show 980 deaths, of which 
782 were attributable to bronchitis and pneumonia. TaJcen together, 
these two complaints were the cause of more deaths than was 
phthisis; and adding 56 from pleurisy, 15 from croup, 14 from laryn- 
gitis, and 113 from other respiratory diseases, the mortality in the 
order is found to be 12- 16 per cent, of the total deaths, and 11*^6 
per 10,000 of the population. 

Deaths from diseases of the digestive system also formed a large 
proportion of the whole (969 per cent.), the number being 781. 
Enteritis was most fatal, showing 260 deaths, Uver-diseases (93), 
gastritis (119) coming next, while 53 deaths were due to appen- 
dicitis. 

Of 375 deaths from diseases of the urinary system in 1905, the 
deaths from Bright's disease of the kidneys (albuminuria) numbered 
199. 

Of the groups, (a) and {b), constituting the order styled ** Diseases 
of tlie reproductive system," the greater mortality is found under 
(b), " Diseases of parturition." In considering the deaths of 
women in childbirth the number from Order 6, Class I., under the 
designation " Puerperal fever, pyaemia, septicaBinia," have also to be 
dealt with. 

As the figures are highly important, a special comparative state- 
ment has been made out, giving besides the number of deaths of 
mothers the proportions in every 10,000 children born. These pro- 
portions, taken over ten years' comparison, fluctuate irregularly, the 
extreme limits being 38 37 per 10,000 births in the vear 1900, and 
58-64 for the year 1903. 



H0SFITAL8. 



251 



Year. 



Women dying in Childbirth. 



Deaths of Women in each Tear. 



In Childbirth. | 



From Puer- 
peral Fe\ er, ^c. 



Total. 



IBOG 


77 


10 


1 87 


WTi ,. 


64 


18 


; 82 


18» . . 


72 


19 


1 91 


1899 . . 


71 


15 


86 


1900 . . 


61 


24 


1 75 


1901 . . 


70 


20 


' 90 


IQCa . . 


85 


25 


! no 


1903 . . 


100 


28 


' 128 


1904 . . 


85 


21 


106 


1905 . . 


79 


21 


1 100 



Deatl 8of 

Mothers to fvery 

10,000 Children 

Born.* 



46-74 
43-76 
48 01 
45-66 
88-37 
43-H2 
58-26 
68-64 
46-56 
42-23 



* Still-births are not registered. 

But any conclusion drawn from the above figures must be held 
as qualified by the remarks on page 209 touching the matter of 
diminished fertility of wives at the child-bearing ages. 

Violent Deaths. 

Deaths by violence form a large item in the total mortality. In 
1905 the proportion per 10,000 of persons living was 7 07, the total 
number of deaths having been 615. 

Of 498 males who died violent deaths, 69 were suicides. The 
deaths of females by violence were far fewer than those of males, 
ftmounting to 117, and out of these only 20 committed suicide. A 
table given previously states the full Hst of deaths from external or 
violent causes for the year 1905. 

Accidental deaths numbered 520— males 425, and females 95. 
Of the total male deaths, 201 resulted from fractures or contusions, 
and 126 from drowning. Of the female deaths, 16 were due to 
drowning. 

Hospitals, Mental Hospitals, Benevolent Asylums, and 
Charitable Institutions. 

Hospitals. 

Prior to the abolition of provinces the hospitals of the colony 
were supported mainly out of provincial revenues. After that 
event the expenditure for hospitals was for the most part charged 
against the revenue of counties and municipal corporations, until 
October, 1885, when ** The Hospitals and Cliaritable Institutions 
Act, 1885," came into force. 

The portion of the colony included witliin the three principal 
islands— the North, Middle, and Stewart Islands — is divided into 
thiny-tive hospital districts, each consisting of one or more counties 
with the interior boroughs, to be presided over by elective Boards, 
designated "Hospital and Charitable Aid Boards." 

The revenues of these Boards accrue from the following sources : — 

(1.) 'BieniB and projStB of land and endowments vested in \,\\ft^o^xv\^ 
or set Apart for the beneBt of particular in8t\lu\.\o\\^ \ 



2o2 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAB-BOOK. 



(2.) Voluntary contributions ; 

(3.) Grants from contributory local autborities ; and 

(4.) Subsidies from the Consolidated Fund (these being at the 
rate of 10s. for every £1 of bequests, but in no case ex- 
ceeding £500 in respect of any one bequest ; £1 4s. for 
every £1 of voluntary contributions ; and £1 for every £1 
received from any local authority). 

The contributory local authorities (being the County and Borough 
Councils, and Boards of road and town districts where the Counties 
Act is not in force) are empowered by the Act to raise by special 
rates the amounts assessed by the Hospital District Boards as 
their proportionate contributions to the Hospital and Charitable 
Aid Fund. 

The District Boards undertake the general management and 
control of those hospitals that are not incorporated in terms of 
the Act, and are required to contribute to the support of the in- 
corporated hospitals. To be incorporated a hospital must have 
as many as 100 subscribers contributing not less than £100 annu- 
ally by amounts of not less than 5s., and must have been declared 
by the Governor in Council, after receipt by him of a duly signed 
petition, to be a body politic and corporate, under the government 
of trustees. 

There are 47 hospitals in the colony, of which 25 are incor- 
porated institutions, while 22 are directly managed and controlled by 
District Boards. In 1905 these hospitals afforded accommodation 
for 1,268 male and 780 female patients, a total of 2,048. The number 
of cubic feet of space included witliin the walls of all the sleeping- 
wards was 2,799,235, which gave an average of 1,367 cubic feet 
to each bed. 9,744 males and 4,833 females were admitted as 
patients during the year 1905, and 925 male and 358 female 
patients were inmates at the end of the year. The total number 
of indoor patients during the year was 15,837 — viz., 10,624 males 
and 5,213 females. 

Outdoor relief was also given to a very large number of persons ; 
but, as in some of the hospitals no records are kept of the outdoor 
patients, it is impossible to state the number of distinct persons who 
received such relief. 

The total revenues of the various hospitals as at five dififerent 
annual periods were : — 



Voluntary contributions and be- 

quo!it8 
Payments by patients . . 
From Government 
From Hospital Boards and local 

authorities 
Rents and other sources 

Totals.. 



1900-1. 1901-2. 



1902^. 



100:^4. 



1901-& 



£ 
7,330 

15,998 
47,074 
86,812 



£ \ £ ' £ \ £ 

11,154 ! 11,539 I 14.260 20,052 

18,083 19,613 I 21,185 21.798 

54,387 ; 55,881 i 59,099 I 59.947 

40,638 ' 44,013 I 43,960 ' 50,323 



6,908 7,588 8,222 ! 17,149 16,342 



\Vi4.1^'2 \^V,%5Q \^^,ae.a aS5,653 'l68.462 



MENTAL A8YLUM6. 263 

Benevolent Asylums and Ckaritahle Institutions. 
The Tarious benevolent asyluins and charitable institutions are 
placed on a &iuular footing to the hospitals. Most of the Boards of 
QOBpital districts are aUo CliarituUe Aid Boards ; but, for the 
parpose of distributing charitable aid only, sonie of the hospital 
mstricts have been united into larger districts, so that, although 
there are thirty-five Boards for hospital purposes, there are only 
tvienty-four for charitable-aid purposes. 

Returns were received from ei-^hteen benevolent asylums (not 
induding orphanages), established for tiie 8U[)port of indigent 
perBons. The number of inmUes in these institutions at tlie end 
of 1905 was 1,237, of whom 726 were males and 511 females. Out- 
door relief was given by one of these institutions to 1,752 persona 
(iacliiding 1,073 children), 

AucklaJid Sailors' Home, 

There is a Sailors* Home at Auckland for the use of seafaring 
men resident in or visiting the town. Ti»e late Edmund Costley 
baring left a large sum for charitable piirpost^s. it was resolved to 
employ the bequest in building and endowing an institution where 
sailors might be received witliout distinction of race or religious 
belief, and board, lodging, and refreshments provided for them, 
together with such instruction and amusements as might tend to 
promote their social comfort and general welfare. 

The Home, built in 1B87, has room for ihirty^iive inmatefi» 
who are charged 15s. a week for board and lodging. It is managed 
by a council of eight members elected by the subscribers to the 
institution. The laie Primate of New Zealand, who first originated 
the scheme, was Life President. 

Orphan Asylums. 

There were in 1905 four orphan asylums in the colony, one main< 
tftined by a District Hospital Board, one by the Clmrcli of Ejigland 
authorities, and two by clergy of the Horn an Catliolic Cliurch ; tliree 
of them receiving, at the charge of the State, orphan, destitute, and 
other children committed to them by a Stipendiary Magistrate. 

Exclusive of the children so coiamitted, 29 male and 27 female 
orphans were received during the year 100-5, and 67 male and 94 
female orphans remained as inmates at iha end of the year, 

Orphanages receiving committed children are, for that purpose, 
constituted " industrial schools/* 

Mental Hospitals, 

There are seven public mental hospitals in the colony, maintained 
wholly or in part out of the public revenue. There is also one 
private hospital, licensed by the Governor for the reception of 
the mentally atflicied. 

The amount of sleepingaccornmolation provided in each of the 
public mental hospitals is shown in tabular form, giving separately 



254 



NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TSAB-BOOX. 



the number and cubic contents of the sleeping-rooms intended for 
one person only, and of the dormitories occupied by severed inmates 
conjointly, together with the number of patients actually in the 
hospitals on the 31st December, 1905 : — 



ISKeping-roomsfor One Person only. 


Person. 


1 

i g 'of Cubic Feet. 


Id mates 

(I'atieuto) 

on 

31st December. 

1905. 


i 

a 


Number 
of Cubic Feet. 


Inmates 

(Patients) 

on 

3JstDecembei. 

1905. 



130 


116,704 


130 


67 ' 


60,380 


67 


70 


65,466 


70 


33 , 


27.863 


33 


38 


29,269 


38 


81 


69,651 


81 


189 ! 


152,215 


189 


G08 


521,548 


608 



84 


358,149 


50S 


16 


100,173 


171 


18 


355,528 


538 


14 : 


65,111 


109 


9, 


95,987 


188 


37 1 


254,600 


460 


62 


827,883 


538 


lyo ; 

1 


1,557,631 


3,451 



Auckland 

WelliDgton 

Porirua 

Nelson 

Hokitika 

Ghristchurcli 

Seaclift 

Totals 



At Ashburn Hall, Waikari, there are seventy-eight rooms, 
each for one person only, with an aggregate cubic content of 
77,461 ft. The number of patients on the dlst December, 1905, 
was 53. 

At the end of 1905, 1,810 male and 1,249 female patients (in- 
cluding 55 out on trial) were under the care of the mental hospital 
officers of tlie colony. Of these, 1,715 males and 1,149 females 
were regarded as incurable, 34 males and 21 females were out on 
trial, and 61 males and 79 females were supposed to be curable. 
209 male and 158 female patients were discharged during the year. 

The following shows the proportion of the mentally afflicted — 
or, rather, of inmates of mental hospitals and those out on trial — 
to the population (exclusive in each case of Maoris) at the end of 
the years stated : — 



1884, 


1 patient 


to every 


393 of 


population 


1886, 


, 


„ 




370 




1888, 


^ 


^ 




365 




1890, 


. 






348 




1892, 


^ 






339 




1894. 


,. 


^ 




316 




1896, 








308 




1898, 








300 




1899. 




., 




296 




1901, 








286 




1903, 




^ 




284 




1905. 


„ 


„ 




286 





It must not be overlooked that the proportions are increased by 
the admission into tlie hospitals of inebriates, idiots, and others who 
should not properly be there. 



SECTION VII.— IMPORTS ; CUSTOMS AND EXCISE 
REVENUE. 

Imports. 

The quantities and values of imports used in making up the %ures 
given in this portion of the statistical information are obtained 
from Customs entries, verified where necessary, as with goods subject 
toan o^ valorem duty, by examination. In estimating the value of 
imports, ad valorem goods are taken at their invoice value increased 
by 10 per cent., and include the value of case, cask, or covering 
(sec. 39, ** Customs Laws Consolidation Act, 1882 "). Value of all 
other goods includes freight and charges to time of arrival at port 
of discharge. Goods transhipped at a foreign port are regarded 
as imported from the country where they were originally shipped. 
The countries named, however, may not be those of origin, as no 
attempt is made to trace the goods beyond the ports disclosed by 
the documents presented to the Customs. Very little cargo in 
transitu passes through New Zealand. 

The total declared values of the imports in 1905 amounted to 
£12,828,857, being a decrease on the corresponding total in 1904 of 
£462,837. These figures, however, include specie. The value of 
coin brought into the colony in 1905 was £347,679, against £391,664 
in the previous year, and if these amounts are excluded the de- 
crease on the values of all other articles will be £418,852. 

The value of imports for the year 1890, and for each of the ten 
latest years was : — 

Imports, Imports. 

inclusive of exclusive of 

Specie. Specie. 

£ £ 



Year. 



1890 . 

1896 . 

1897 . 

1898 . 

1899 . 

1900 . 

1901 . 

1902 . 

1903 . 

1904 . 

1905 . 



6,260,525 

7.137,320 

8,055,223 

8,230,600 

8,739,633 

10,646,096 

11,817,915 

11,326,723 

12,788,675 

13,291,694 

12.828,857 



5,928,895 

7,035,379 

7,994,201 

8,211,409 

8,613,656 

10, 207,. 326 

11,353,416 

10,958,038 

12,075,959 

12,900,030 

12,481,178 



In 1901 the Government imported railway plant valued at half 
a million sterling, against far smaller quantities introduced n the 
subsequent years. 



256 NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 

It is found that the value of imports, exclusive of specie, only 
rose from £5,928,895 in 1890 to £6,115,953 in 1895, after which 
there ensued a steady advance year by year to £11,353,416 m 
1901. For J 905 the amount was £12,481,178. This is less than 
that for 1904. The movement for 1896-1905 shows that the total 
imports have increased by nearly 80 per cent, in value during that 
period. In quantities of various imports the increases vary, and 
full particulars of every kind of article imported in 1905 are to he 
found in detail further on, which may be critically examined with 
those in similar tables given in the previous issues of this book. 

The degree of expenditure of loan-moneys raised abroad by the 
general and local Governments somewhat affects the question when 
considering the rise of imports. And, when consulting the ngures re- 
lating to expenditure out of loan accounts, the matter of aids from 
the Consolidated Fund (which are included) presents itself, besides 
other features in connection with this subject. 

The expansion of imports is still further to be considered in con- 
nection with the condition of the manufactures of the colony, for an 
increase of imports arising from a decline of internal manufactures 
would scarcely be regarded as a satisfactory position. But there 
has been great development of the manufactures of New Zealand 
since 1895, not only in the great primary industries, but throughout. 

It is desirable to consider not only the total value of the import 
trade for different years by comparing figures, but to ascertain the 
rates per capita of population, to judge whether the imports are 
relatively greater or less than they have been. The fairest com- 
parisons are from calculations made after deducting specie imported, 
for in the year 1894, as an instance, no less than £797,843 was 
brought to the colony in coin, and in 1903 £712,716. The amount 
last year (190o) was £347,679. The figures for 1890 and each year 
from 1896 onwards stand thus : — 

Imports per Head of mean Population, 
excluding Maoris. 
Years. Including Excluding 

Specie. Specie. 

£ B. d. £ B. d. 

1890 .. .. 10 2 9 11 

189G . 

1897 . 

1898 . . 

1899 .. 

1900 . 

1901 . 

1902 .. 
1903 
1904 .. 
19O.0 .. 

Using the figures exclusive of the specie, comparisons for years 
since 1896 show that imports increased annually with almost un- 



10 1 11 


9 19 


1 


11 3 3 


11 1 


7 


U 3 7 


11 3 


1 


11 13 1 


11 9 


8 


13 18 10 


13 7 


4 


15 3 10 


14 11 


11 


14 3 11 


13 14 


8 


15 11 10 


14 14 


5 


15 14 7 


15 5 


4 


14 14 11 


14 6 


11 



IMPORTS. 

RISE m VALUE OF IMPORTS INTO NEW ZEALAND, 
1895. 1900, and 1905. 









12,119^15* 


' 




.ffl.516,240/ 




Bntuh PtMooou 
£3.9U.35a 


12.625372. 




fomgn Stales 




17.795.28i 




mim- 




Uiiibed Eiogdoni 
16.504.484 


BHIiBb PocmnoM 


Dnitcd KiDgdom 




Tttr. 1895. 

189* 

1900 


• iReliK'td ii 

&!«$ iKf Arofri 

£\W)Wn 
41431501 


110.646,0%. 
7«u-. 1900 

\ r«r«if D 3UUI ift im 


Oi*rm4T 
JHEOS- 


112.82^.857. 
I»r. 1906. 

1 





^M/^I^ 



1MP0BT8. 



267 



broken reguiarity until 1905, the rise being at the rate of £6 Ss. 8d. 
per bead. For the last year (1906) there was considerable decline 
in tbe rate, making the increase between 1896 and i905 only 
£4 7s. lOd. per head. The figures for the years 1890 and 1895 
exhibit a decrease per head of population. 

A table is given further on showing, for five years, the principal 
articles imported, arranged in groups according to their nature. 



Impobts from Diffebent Countries. 

The imports from the United Kingdom to New Zealand in 1905 
were valued at £7,795,284, a decrease of £187,056 on the value 
of goods imported from the Home-country during the previous year. 
From British colonies and possessions the imports were £2,912,379, 
a decrease of £134,975 on the amount in 1904. 

Figures for ten years are given, showing that imports from 
British possessions increased by 79 per cent., whereas those 
from foreign States advanced at the far higher rate of 167 per cent., 
mainly in consequence of the development of inwards trade with the 
United States oi America, about which full particulars will be found 
further on : — 

Imports from 





United Kingdom. 
£ 
.. 3,714,476 


British Colonies 
and Possessions. 


Foreign States. 

£ 


1896 .. 


1,628,661 


794,188 


1897 . . 


.. 6,392.738 


1,662,985 


999,500 


1898 .. 


.. 5,148,833 


1,927,817 


1,153,950 


1899 .. 


.. 6,526,645 


2,036.797 


1,176,191 


1900 . . 


.. 6,604,484 


2,625,372 


1,516,240 


1901 . . 


.. 6.885,831 


2,913,866 


2,018,218 


1902 . . 


.. 6,851,462 


2,583,005 


1,892,266 


1903 . . 


.. 7,512,668 


3,135,474 


2,140,533 


1904 .. 


.. 7,982.340 


3,047,354 


2,262,000 


1905 .. 


.. 7,795,284 


2,912,379 


2,121,194 



The following are the values of imports from dififerent countries 
or places in 1905 and 1904, given in the order of the increase or 
decrease from each : — 



Coantry, Colony, State, ftc. 


1905. 
£ 


1004. 
£ 


Increase. 
£ 


Victoria 


652,901 


603,005 


49,896 


Tasmania 


58,503 


37,166 


21,397 


Bengal .. 


294,333 


275,349 


18,984 


France . . 


67,689 


55,110 


12,579 


Friendly Islands 


24,958 


17,503 


7,455 


Ce>lon .. 


179,809 


172,759 


7,050 


Java 


9,177 


4,621 


4,o56 


Aastria . . 


7,676 


4,468 


3,208 


Society Islands .. 


9,294 


6,217 


3.077 


Greece .. 


17,019 


14,076 


2,943 


Switzerland 


7,026 


4,091 


2,935 


Maiden Island .. 


9,654 


6,862 


2,792 



9-Ybk. 



^8 



NBW UALAMD OFHOIAL TBAR-BOOX. 



Ck>uiitry. Colony, Stale, 


Ac. ^f^ 


1901. 


InoreMa 


Norway 


5,566 


2,974 


2,592 


Turkey . . 


1,918 


486 


1,477 


lUly 


80,889 


19,006 


1,888 


Surprise Island . . 


6,990 


5,678 


1,247 


Denmark 


8,805 


2,647 


1,158 


Asia Minor 


17,649 


16,618 


986 


West Indies (British) 


408 


270 


188 


Brazil 


103 


, , 


103 


New Caledonia .. 


. • .. 76 


, , 


75 


Canary Islands .. 


284 


172 


62 


Bombay 


898 


837 


61 


Arabia 


39 


, , 


89 


New Hebrides . . 


59 


20 


39 


Persia 


33 




33 


Natal 


58 


41 


17 


Orange River Colony 


14 


11 


3 


Chili 


2 


•• 


2 


Country, Colony. State 


.Ac. «y- 


1904. 


Decrease. 

£ 


United Kingdom 


.. 7,795,284 


7,982,840 


187,056 


New South Wales 


.. 1,047,757 


1,176,817 


129,060 


United States of America 


.. 1,488,501 


1,527,916 


89,414 


Fiji 


456,629 


516,539 


59,910 


Belgium 


78,151 


120,066 


41,915 


Germany 


277,467 


808,804 


81,837 


Western Australia 


17.898 


32,606 


14.708 


Canada 


74,085 


88,644 


14,569 


Holland 


18,421 


29,388 


10,967 


Sweden 


10,438 


16,954 


6.616 


Japan . . 


79,260 


84,629 


6.369 


Burmah 


8,445 


13,733 


5,288 


South Australia . . 


35,760 


39,917 


4.167 


British Columbia 


22,034 


24,841 


2,807 


Philippine Islands 


7,284 


9.823 


2,639 


Hongkong 


14,684 


16.736 


2,052 


Singapore 


35,128 


36,732 


1,604 


Portugal 


1,763 


2,540 


777 


Queensland 


2,838 


3,525 


687 


West Indies 


886 


1,461 


676 


Spain .. 


1,618 


1,903 


286 


Ellice Island 


. 


228 


228 


Cape Colony 


394 


689 


196 


Norfolk Island .. 


78 


211 


133 


Sandwich Islands 


36 


112 


76 


Sumatra 


. 


76 


76 


Transvaal Colony 


98 


160 


67 


Egypt 


821 


875 


54 


China .. 


4,406 


4,440 


84 


Aden .. 


. . 


32 


82 


Malta 


• . 


27 


27 


Gibraltar 


. . 


22 


23 


Navigators Islands 


134 


148 


14 


Russia .. 


4 


8 


4 


Argentine Republic 


. . 


3 


3 


Rhodesia 


. 


3 


8 


Madras 


418 


420 


2 



DffPOBTS. 



259 



Imposts, Nobth and Middlb Islands. 

Separating the value of the imports for the North Island from 
that of the Middle Island, it is found that while in 1895 the 
former received imported goods to the value of £3,513,960, against 
£2,859,231 for the Middle Island, in the year 1905 the North Island 
imports exceeded those of the other to a far greater extent, the 
Tallies being respectively £7,635,679 and £5,004,635, or an excess 
for the North Island of £2,631,044, or 52*57 per cent. 

Imports, by Pbovincial Districts. 



The values of imports in 


each 


provincial district 


during 1895 and 


1906 were as under : — 












1806. 


1900. 






£ 


£ 


Aaokland 




1,620,697 


3,238.604 


Taranaki 




49,326 


107,309 


Hawke'8 Bay 




184,476 


276,760 


Wellington 




1,669,463 


4,014,116 


Marlboroagh 




10,644 


28,743 


NelBon .. 




128,088 


161,667 


Westland 




89,106 


77,706 


Canterbtuy 




1,130,776 


2,322,841 


Otago :. 




1,650,719 


2,413,678 



The value of imports hy parcel-post (£26,938 in 1895 and 
£188,543 in 1905) must be aydded to the above figures in order to 
make up the totals (including specie) of £6,400,129 and £12,828,857 
for the respective years. 

Imports, by Ports. 



The following table 


gives the value of the 


imports for each port 


in New Zealand for years 1905, 1900, 1895, 1890, arranged 


in order 


of magnitude 


for 1905 


— 












1906. 


1900. 


ij'gs. 


1890. 






M 


£ 


£ 


£ 


Wellington 


) • 


3,8b7,729 


2,767,066 


1,680,802 


1,233,184 


Aoekland 


, 


, 


3,166,470 


2,617,329 


1,692,658 


1,385.969 


LTttelton and 


Chris 


t- 










ohuroh 






2,096,617 


1,770,709 


1,066.719 


1,174,370 


Dimedio 






2,016,840 


2,158.177 


1,343,779 


1,662,629 


IiiTarcargiU and Bluff 




328.976 


288,170 


178,141 


120,050 


Nipier 






276,760 


209,418 


184,475 


162.097 


TiiDAra 






227,224 


143,090 


75,056 


95.202 


WftDganui 






176,887 


145.267 


78,661 


49,637 


NeUon 






132,661 


140,514 


116.769 


141,980 


Hew Plymontb 






86,343 


67,338 


37,486 


12,971 


Poverty Bay 






76,254 


49,278 


23,170 


17,731 


(kmanx 






68,362 


47,659 


28,799 


54,075 


Oreymonth . . 






65,246 


59,460 


28,661 


79,877 


Wetiport 






29,106 


37,750 


11,319 


9,442 


Wairan 






22,690 


15,942 


9,638 


18,964 


Patea 






20,966 


15,661 


11,839 


11,604 


Hokiiika 






12,461 


12,693 


10,444 


13,549 


Picton 






6,163 


1.591 


906 


683 


Kaipara 






4,639 


7,883 


1,634 


1,294 


TftQiaDga 






1,141 


3,639 


3,435 


1.493 



260 



mw EIALAND OFFIOIAL TIAR-BOOE. 



Articles impobtbd. 

By means of the accompanying table, in which the articles 
imported are arranged in groups according to their nature, the 
increases in value can be traced to their specific heads : — 

Imports for Five Yeabs. 

1002. 



Group of Principal Articles 
iiuiK>rt«d. 



Apparel and slops 

Boots and shoes 

Ootioii piece-goods 

Drapery 

Ilabordanbery 

Hats and caps 

HoHiory 

IjiniM) manufactures 

Iblillinery 

Silks 

Woollens 

Totals.. 



Agricultural implementK 

Cutlery 

Hardware and iron- 
mongery . . 

Kails and railway bolts, 
&c. 

Iron and steel, other, 
pig, wrought, wire. 

Machinery . . 
Kails 

Railway plant 
Sewing-machinos 
Tools, artificers' 

Totals 



1901. 



£ ; 

463,194! 

211,2I5> 

470,568 

448,863 

110,746 

70,013 

101,481 

89,915 

43,380 

121,937 

348,066 



2,474,978 



10,744 
27,149 

315,239 

148,344 



682. 906. 

6(X).0l9- 
40,034' 

514,511 
38,227 
84,523 



£ 

511,397 

202,931 

498,485 

449,503 

102,569 

75,222 

115,071 

71,170 

45,701 

139,522 

393,033 



2,604,604 



11,518 
29,993 



1903. 



£ 

582,997 

245,689 

556,564 

611,717 

118,049 

77,853 

125,618 

94,794 

60,503 

128,223 

436,161 



1904. 



£ 

603,894! 

256,165! 

550,775: 

601,888 

112,816 

87,984 

143,940 

88,693 

67,567 

140,154 

452,271 



1906. 



£ 

614,859 

283,311 

518,854 

483,681 

116,276 

83,117 

144,370 

81,587 

62,706 

119,727 

438,480 



2,938,118 3,006,147 2,945,868 



9,001 
27,160 



334,965 355,562 
85,1631 131,592 



8,857 
37,797 

341,442 



9,091 
38,595 

314,148 



140,929. 120,064 



I 



815,260.' 

561.649 

4J,114j 

122,. 303! 

37,005' 

88,273 



795,758: 

642,075 

39,440 

122,164 

51,095 

98,076' 



849,929; 
797,618, 

40,7031 
183,9981 

45,749' 
110,8471 



826,167 

671.080 

44,981 

79,966 

33,741 

115,741 



2,461,69t; 2,130,243' 2,271,9231 2,557,869| 2,253,574 



Sugar 
Tea 



Totals.. 



Boer 

8pirit«» 
Tobacco 
Wine 



4J^,93(i' 
219,089! 



709,02.'> 



34,94<« 
243,824! 
221,8Sl« 

63,837 



-I- 



402,138 
197,127" 



43,627 
235,36'.) 
212, (>d4 

60,350 



441,843 
204,236' 



504,820 
237,738! 



38,620 
246.263 
260,478 

57,560 



Totals.. 564,499, 551,980 602,921 



* IncludeB methylated and perfumed tpiriu and spirits of wine. 



424,534 
226,427 



599,265' 646,0791 742,5681 650,961 



36,796 
263,645 
255,257 

56,867 


39,935 
242.623 
281,639 

61,825 


612,565 


615,822 



IMPORTB. 



261 



Imports fob 1 


P'lVIB Ybabi 


i—continttid. 




3ro«xpof Principal Ariietea 
imported. 


igoi. 


' 1908. 


19m. 


1904. 


19015. 




£ 


M 


B 


£ 


£ 


pAper 


194,986 


181,486 


212,541 


234,982 


236,231 


Printed books 


140,347 


149,194 


171,672 


194,240 


183,560 


Stetiooery . . 


113,422 


112.676 


136,968 


152.224 


160.157 


Talala.. 


438.755 


443,956 


5^1,161 


581,446 


579,948 


Armt, &rn munition, find 












■- . , 


201,663 


129,733 


138,146 


122,457 


122,650 


tnotor- 












cara, ;inu mOtOr-OjxleS 






16.598 


25,441 


48,913 


Amomobiles, &o.,iDmte- 












naiafor .. 


, . 


^ . 


1,159 


3,204 


3,590 


Eftgs and sacks 


214,987 


135,674 


109,040 


12:3,673 


138,868 


Bicycl-fi i«id tricycles 


64.057 


62,633 


71 ,032 


72.548 


70.42a 


Frtclei ckud irioycleft, 












fiuingi for 


71,178 


81,544 


90,487 


97.667 


120,540 


V 


151,334 


125,732 


158,143 


138,093 


155.786 


chemicals, And 












^'i.-.p.gi4U' wares 


212.430 


240,341 


261,861 


288.502 


265,411 


Fsncv good a . , « , 


145,356 


148»072 


177,227 


149,529 


151,972 


preserved, bottled, 
Sried) 






















248.985 


175,866 


283,382 


213,966 


217,841 


OlMssod gl&sflware .. 


133,434 


138,908 


145,059 


158,586 


138,857 


Humre i 


134,186 


154,964 


120.711 


147,995 


173.784 


Musical iDiiraiueiitB . . 


116,396 


110.663 


113.849 


127,277 


123,795 


Oili 


238,3% 


251,415 


248.859 


278,414 


255,198 


T-mb r 


179,152 


146,561 


163,497 


161,236 


133,276 


Other imports (exolad 












ing specie) , . 


2.602.894 


2.736,484 


8,046,634 


3,290.877 


3.260,146 


Total imports (ox- 












cladinff specie) 
Specie iioport«d 


11,853,416 


10,958,038 


12,075,959 


12,900,030 


12,481,178 


464,499 


363,685 


712,716 


391,664 


347,679 


ToM imports * . 


11,817,915 


11,326.723 


I2,78a»675 


13,291,694 


12,828,867 



01 £12,481,178, the total value of ^oods importeti during 1905, 
the chief items were as under : — 

Articles. 

Clothing, drapery. Ac. 

Metal, maobinery, and Implements, 

Tea and sugar 

Wine, beer, spirits, and tobacco 

Puper, books <knd stationery 

Other imports 



Value. 

2.945,868 

2,263,674 

660.961 

615.822 

679,948 

5,435,005 



Proporttoo 

per Cent 

2360 

1806 

621 

4-93 

4 65 

43 55 



£12,481,178 10000 

The declared value of the clothing, drapery, Sec, imported de- 
creftsed from £3,006.147 in 1904 to £2.94o,S6B in 1905. In 1901 fche 
?alue of these imports was £2,474,978. The iron, macliinery, and 
implements imported in 1905 were valued at £2,253.574, a decrease 
of £20^422 on the corresponding figures for 1901 (£2,461,696). 



NBW EBALAm» OFPICUt TBAR-BOOE. 

The value of sugar and tea ttnported in 1905 shows a decrease* 
when compared with 1904. of £91,597. Beer, wine, spirits, and 
tobacco show an increase of £3,267— from £612,555 in 1904 lo 
£615.822 in 1905, 

To the total value of ** Other imports (excluding specie)/* in 1905 
(£3,319»522), shown in the table above, patent medicines contributed 
a sum of £51,853; earthenware, £67,074; floorcloth and oilcloth, 
£87,765; furniture and upholstery, £67,281; cement, £69.995; 
leather and leather manufactures. £105,443 ; and seeds, £90,005, 

Amongst the articles imported belonging to this group are 
automobiles, motor cars, and motor cycles to the number of 357. 
valued at £48,913, of which 208 came from the United Kingdom » 
48 from France, and 59 from the United States of America. 

Materials for the above vehicles to the value of £3,590 were 
also introduced, mostly from England, America, and Germany. 

Goods imported by means of the "parcels-post" system during 
1905 were valued at £188,543. 

Goods received from the Cook and other annexed Islands are 
now treated as New Zealand produce, and not as imports. The 
total in 1905 was valued at £44,179, and the principal articles of 
produce a>s follows : Limejuice, £274 ; raw coffee, £254 ; copra, 
£5,183; fruit, £33,319; cocoanuts. £218 ; hats, £4,263. 

VAiiUB OP Free and Dutiable Imports. 

The values of the imports into New Zealand during the years 
1904 and 1905 are given in the next table, classified according to 
the duties to which they were hable, and arranged so as to show 
the declared value of goods on which specific or ad valorem duties 
at various rates are payable, and of those admitted free of duty : — 



Dnti9i to whicti ImporU liftbl«. 



bl*.. 


Vftln« of Import!, 1004. 


ViUne of Import*, lOOS. 




J 


2.562,839 


J 


2.375.78T 




208,516 




152,655 I 


^ 




4.001 




6,944 


■ 




283,348 




994,816 


■ 




231,529 




213,140 


■ 




2,788.980 




2,661,071 


■ 




213,448 




214,861 


■ 




1,807,001 




1,298,087 


■ 




361,557 




334.347 


■ 




47,893 




71,497 


■ 




22, 3U 




25,394 


■ 




8B8 




1,112 


■ 




4,169 


5,868,644 

165,989 


710 


6.274,534 
188,543 




., 


.^ 


Die) 




4,802.606 




4,642,064 


- 


:: 


391,664 




347,679 


«. 


13,291,694 


12,628.857 



Specific duties 
Ad wtlorsm dutids — 
5 per GOD t. 
TJparoetit. ,. 

10 per cent 

15 per cent. 

20 per cent. 

22^ p«r cent. < . 

25 per ceni« 

30 per cent. 

33J per cent. . . 

87^ per cent. . . 

40 per cent. 

Various 

Faroe] B- post (varioui) 
Duty-free (excluding specie) 
Specie Imported . . 

TotftlB 



SUQAR. 



263 



The proportioDB of free and dutiable goods imported during 
1899, 1902, 1904, and 1905 are compared with similar figures for 
1894, the year preceding that in which the altered tariff came into 
force: — 





:8M. 


1 
1899. 1002. i 1004. 


1905. 


Free 
Dakiable 


£ 

1,871,772 
4,118,405 


£ 
2,942,999 
5,670,657 


£ £ 
4,072,984' 4,802,608 
6,885,0541 8,097,422 


£ 

4.642,064 
7,839,114 


Imports (l6B8 specie) 


6,990,177 


8,618,656 


10,958,038; 12,900,030 


12,481,178 


Total net duty received* 


1,572,467 


£ 
2,046,452 


£ 
2,289,783 


£ 
2,655,166 


£ 
2,656,134 


Datj, per cent, of imports-^ 
(a.) On dutiable imports 
(6.) On all merchandise 


Per Cent. 
88-18 
26-25 


Per Cent. 
3609 
2376 


Per Cent. 
33-26 
20 90 


Per Cent. 
32-79 
20-58 


Per Cent. 
33-88 
21-20 



' Inclading excise daties levied on certain imports manufactured in bond. 



SUGAK. 

The value of sugar (including glucose, molasses, and treacle) 
imported in 1905 was £424,534, a decrease of £80,286 on the amount 
for 1904 (£504,820). The value of this import for the last three 
years has averaged only £457,066 per annum ; but for the three 
years, 1882, 1883, and 1884, the average, with a much smaller 
population, was £615,207 for each year. The smaller average 
amount for the last three years is due not so much to a reduction 
in the quantity imported as to the fall in the price of sugar, and 
partly to the fact that the proportion of refined to raw sugar has 
vastly decreased. 

The following figures, giving the average consumption per head of 
sugar in Australasia, are, saving those for New Zealand — and ex- 
cluding a proportion (301b. per head) deducted on account of Maoris 
—taken from " The Official Year-book of New South Wales, 1904-5." 
The figures stating the consumption of tea, wine, beer, spirits, and 
tobacco, given further on, are also taken from the same source : — 



Annual Consumption 


OP SuGAB PER Head in Australasia. 






Lb. 




Lb. 


Qaeensland .. 


1230 


New Zealand 


101-3 


New South Wales 
Western Australia 


109-2 
107-6 


Victoria 


100-7 


South Australia 


101-8 


Tasmania 


\Q^iA 



264 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TIAR-BOOE. 



Tea. 

The quantity of tea imported in 1905 was 5,906,653 lb. 
Supposing Maoris to use, on an average, lib. per head per annum, 
the consumption of tea per hea^ of the population, exclusive of 
Maoris, would be 67 lb. in 1905. 

AvERAQB Annual Consumption of Tea pbb Hkad at Australasia. 

Lb. 
.. 6-9 
.. 67 
.. 6-2 





Lb. 




Western Australia 


.. 96 


Victoria 


South Australia 


.. 8-2 


New Zealand 


New South Wales 


.. 7-2 




Queensland 


.. 70 





Beer, Spirits, and Winb. 

During 1905 excise duty was paid on 7.796,160 gallons of beer; 
and 218,270 gallons of beer, 634,827 gallons of spirits, and 113,189 
gallons of wine were entered at the Customs for home consump- 
tion. 

The actual quantity of beer made and used in the colony has 
increased from 5,382,960 gallons in 1896 to 7,796,160 gaUons in 
1905 :— 

Bfer makcfactubed in New Zealand on which Bxcisk Duty was paid. 





Qal. 




Gal. 


1896 


. . 5,382,960 


1901 


. . 7.134.800 


1897 


.. 5,741,200 


1902 


. . 7.179.360 


1898 


.. 6.013,120 


1903 


. . 7.666,200 


1899 


.. 6,261,200 


1904 


.. 7,786,480 


1900 


.. 6,811,280 


1905 


. . 7,796.160 



The following table gives the consumption per head of alcoholic 
liquors by the people, excluding and including Maoris, showing 
separately the proportions of beer, wine, and spirits in 1896, and 
from 1898 to 1905. To the amount of beer manufactured in the 
colony in each year on which excise duty wa,s paid has been 
added the amount brought into consumption from imports : — 









B€ 


>er. 


Spirits. 


Wine. 


Year. j 






1 




Excluding 


Including 


Excluding 


Including 


Excluding Including 




Maoris. 


Maoris. 


Maoris. 


Maoris. 


MaorU. Maoris. 




Gal. 


Gal. 


Gal. 


Oa,. 


Gal. Gal. 


1896 




. 


7 873 


7-453 


639 


0-605 


0-141 0133 


1898 






8-427 


7-995 


0-668 


0634 


0-146 0189 


1899 






8-583 


8150 


687 


0-653 


0148 0-141 


1900 




9-150 


8-696 


0-720 


0-684 


0-152 0-146 


1901 




. 1 9-413 


8-919 


0-766 


726 


0-159 0161 


1902 






9252 


8-777 


0-755 


0716 


0-158 150 


1903 






9-460 


8 987 


0-755 


0-718 


0149 142 


1904 






9-455 


8-996 


0-766 


0-729 


0-142 0-186 


1905 






9-212 


8-777 I 


0-730 


0-695 


0130 0124 



TOBACCO. 



265 



A comparison of the consumption of beer, spirits, and wine per 
head in Australasia on an average of five years is added : — 





Beer. 


Bpirito. 


Wine. 




Beer 


Spirits. 


Wine. 


Qaeensland 

New South Wales 

Victoria 

South Australia . . 


Oal. 
11-4 
10-6 
13-7 
8-90 


Oal. 
108 
0-89 
083 
045 


G&l. 
034 
0-78 
1-30 
3-31 


Western Australia 
Tasmania 
New Zealand (in- 
cluding Maoris) 


Gal. 

24-90 
910 
8-71 


Gal. 
1-68 
0-62 
0-70 


Gal. 
098 
016 
015 



Besides showing the quantity of alcoholic liquor consumed during 
the year, it seems desirable to give some information as to the actual 
cost to the colony of the beer, wine, and spirits imported, not in- 
cluding duty, which is merely so-much taxation raised by means of 
the importer, but all held in the colony and used by the Government 
for the benefit of the people. 

In the year 1905 the value of the various kinds of potable 
Bpints imported reached the sum of £231,893, of imported beer to 
£39,935, and wines to £51,825 ; making altogether £323,653 paid 
to merchants abroad. 

If to the above total be added £584,712, the estimated value of 
the beer manufactured in the colony, and £8,000 the estimited value 
of wine made, the cost for the introduction and manufacture of 
alcoholic beverages comes to £916,365 for the year 1905, against 
which may be set £5,765, representing the value of the small 
export for the same period. 

Tobacco. 
The tobacco entered for consumption in 1905 was 2,327,809 lb., 
and the consumption per head of population, including Maoris, 
2-65 lb. 



ATsaiOB Annual OoNSUMFnoN psb Head of Tobacco in various Oountbies. 




Lb., 


Lb. 


Holland 


.. 6-92 


New Zealand . . 


. 2-65 


United States 


. . 4-40 


Tasmania 


. 2-30 


Turkey 


.. 4-37 


South Australia 


. 214 


Western Aostralia 


.. 4-86 


Canada 


. 211 


Aastria-Hangary 


. . 3-77 


France 


. 205 


Denmark 


. . 3-70 


Victoria 


. 202 


Switserland 


. . 3-24 


Sweden 


. 1-87 


Belgium 


. . 316 


Spain 


. 1-70 


Oermany 


. . 800 


United Kingdom 


. 1-41 


New South WaJei 


. . 2 69 


Italy 


. 1-34 




. . 2-65 


Bussia 


. 1-28 



266 



NSW ZBALAND OFFICIAL TSAR-BOOK. 



Details of all Abtiolbb of Impost. 

Details of all imports for 1905, giving quantities and values of articles 
introduced into the colony, with the amounts entered for home con- 
sumption, and the amount of duty received, are next shown : — 

General Imports into the Colont of New Zealand dubino the Ybab 1905. 
(For rates of daty, see Tariff, pp. 94 to 100.) 







Value of 


Entered for Home 


Amoanlof 


ArtifllAA. 




Consumption on 


Duty receifti 


AXUOIOBi 


Imporled. 


Imports. 


Importation and 
ex Warehouse. 


inclodiiy 
PreferaBtlsL 


Aoid-- 




£ 




£ 1. d. 


Aoetic 


387,6781b. 


3,856 


458,0131b. 


3,862 11 7 


Carbolic 


38,803 . 


668 


, , 


, , 


Salioylio 


2,358 . 


163 


, , 


, , 


Sulphuric 


25,049 . 


237 


, , 


, , 


Tartaric 


100,667 . 


4,961 


93,419 lb. 


389 4 n 


Unenumerated 


79,055 . 


1,335 




, , 


Alkali- 










Potash and caustic pot- 










ash 


722 cwt. 


1,156 


, , 


,, 


Soda ash 


15,473 . 


5,795 


, , 


• • 1 


Soda, carbonate and bi- 










carbonate 


12,792 . 


5,128 


18,064 cwt. 


653 4 6 


Soda, caustic . . 


13,898 „ 


9,442 


1 


,, 


Soda crystals . . 


50 . 


19 


49 cwt. 


4 18 9 


Soda Hilicate . . 


5,812 . 


1,939 


, , 


, , 


Unenumerated 


2,505 . 


1,619 


, , 


., 


Alum . . 


2,786 . 


1,009 


., 


,, 


Animals, Living— , 










Bees .. .. .. ' 




15 


, , 


, , 


Birds . . 


2,491 No. 


507 




• • 


Cats .. .. , 


1 . 


3 


, , 


, , 


Cattle, horned . . 


28 . 


3,631 


28 No. 


14 


Deer .. 


61 . 


555 


, , 


, , 


Dogs .. 


162 . 


852 


• • 


^ , 


Ferrets 


3 . 


1 




, , 


Frogs 




1 


, , 


, , 


Goats 


9 No. 


10 




, 


Horses 


205 , 


14,894 


197 No. 


197 


Ladybirds 




5 


, , 


, , 


Leeches 




8 




, , 


Monkeys 


'6 No. 


6 


.. 


.. 


Pigs .. 


5 . 


100 


, , 


, , 


Poultry 


1,405 . 


2,241 


, , 


.. 


Raccoons 


5 . 


25 




, , 


Sheep 


201 . 


3,402 




., 


Squirrels 


2 . 


1 


.. 


, , 


Wallabies 


3 . 


2 


.. 


, , 


Apparel and slops n.o.e. . . 




613,747 


£613,149 


163,287 8 5 


Apparel and slops made to 
the order of residents in 


















the colony 


, , 


1,112 


£1,104 


441 12 


Arms, ammunition, and ex- 










plosives- 










Accoutrements 




708 


, , 


, , 


Caps, percussion 


7,657,270 No. 


850 


.. 


• • 



OBNBKAL IMPOKTB. 



267 



nunition, and ex- 

M (shot), 10 to 

•e 

»• D.o.e. 



Total Qaantities 
Imported. 



Vftlae of 

Total 
Importe. 



on for dynamite, 

te 

a 

jotexiT, oordite, and 
jr explosives 
s« stores 

blasting 

sporting 



cplosives 
lerated 



i hams 

sacks — 

ks 

lerated 

nd sacking 

re and wiokerware 

ner 

iatber . . 

iher than leather 

, non-alooholio^ 

and mineral 
s 

»ence 
oe, sweetened . . 

unsweetened 
lerated 
nd trioyoles 
Is for 



fcnd other kinds, 
plain 



179,3571b. 
26 No. 

., printed 

shoes.. .. 122,55ddoB.pr. 

ober soles and | 

for same . . i 

9 8 .. .. i 4,565 doz.pr. 

ois .. .. ' 2,051 , / 



4,698,750 No. 
9,014,238 . 
92,200 • 
2 . 



102,0001b. 
9,788 No. 
153,449 ooils 

465,2301b. 

618,520 lb. 
30,215 « 
112 owt. 
60 No. 
60,0681b. 

24,985 owt. 

940 lb. 

486,082 doB. 
39,883 . 



2 owt. 
215,826 gaUs. 
33,248 lb. 



19,285 doB. 

2,469 galls. 
17,154 , 

12,172 No. 



89,1191b. 
61 owt. 



14,322 

6,248 

148 

4,305 

1,491 

5,354 

24,406 

3,980 

21,676 

13,974 

16,306 

2,405 

116 

131 

2,952 

3,278 

3,962 

47 

133,708 

5,160 

1,266 

4,616 

1 

39,935 

3,968 

24,088 



3,917 

9,641 

562 

2,223 

500 

70,428 

120,540 

3,905 

120 

15,104 

3,741 

4,566 

960 

4 

188,560 

263,541 

1,796 

2,481 

14,393 



Entered for Home 
Gontamption on 
Importation and 
ex Warehouse. 



Amount of 
Daty reoeiTed, 

iDolodlag 
PrefenntiaL 



4,649,200 No. 
£5,524 
90,700 No. 



£10,504 



17,421 lb. 
112 owt. 



940 lb. 



£680 

£170 

£4,674 

£1 

218,270 galls 

31,9461b. 



£3,969 

£10,127 

£646 

£425 
£71,159 
£61,843 

87,1021b. 
46 owt. 
£14,947 

£3,766 
204,2071b. 



£269, 1S6 
£1,693 
£6,207 



£ s. d. 

3,486 18 9 

1,104 17 6 

33 19 11 



2,792 8 7 



435 10 
55 18 



7 18 10 



135 17 

25 10 

1,290 5 

4 

21,827 



532 8 9 



793 17 5 

2,025 7 6 

161 8 5 

106* 4 5 

14,646 8 

11,380 11 8 

725 17 

6 17 10 

2,989 9 1 

763 2 1 

1,701 14 7 



65,699 8 
497 5 



NSW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 

Gbnbbal Imports into the Colony of New Zealand dubino 1905— eotUinusd, 







Value o! 

Total 


En tared for Ho me 


Amoiatit of 


ArticlAA. 


Total QuADtitlM 


CoDflumptJop OQ 


]>aty r«c«rTitd 




Im^rtfrd. 


tmporto. 


BE WarsbouBa* 


lavlodiPir 
PrafercDdk 






^ 




£ a. d 


Borax . . 


2,902 cwt 


3,963 






Braflfl— 










Fif , b&r, tube, or a heel . . 


1,087 . 


4,8% 






Tubing and stamped w:irk 










in the rougb 


47? . 


^,381 




* 1 


M&nuf&cturea . . 


p. 


13,122 


£18,029 


3,60S 14 1 


Bdckfl— 










Building 


3,024 No, 


15 


,, 


*m 


Mra ,. 


306,904 . 


1,637 


£1,637 


327 10 1 


Obher kiuda 


77,iax , 


301 


i» 




Brush ware and broom a — 










Bf oc m» 


L,263dos. 


863 


£863 


315 15 1 


Bnii^heB (clothes, hair, 










b&t, f\nd toilet) 


*♦ 


14,921 


£14,872 


2,974 $ ti 


Unenumarated 




8,441 


£8,466 


2,121 IS I 


M&tertAts for ,. 




7,402 






Buckets And tube — 










Iron . , 


S45d&2. 


216 


£214 


5a JO ] 


Wood 


49 - 


26 


£26 


5 4 C 


Building materi&la, unenu* 










mei Ated 




16,685 






Butter .. 


804 on t. 


8,627 


£27 


5* i a 


Candles , , 


3,415, 50Slb, 


41,686 


2,354,206 lb. 


9,815 H 1 


Oanea and rat too s 




1,778 


, . 




Canvaa .. 




44,091 


£242 


48' a (1 


Caramel, brewere' 


19,237 lb. ' 


261 


18,663 ib. 


283 5 i 


ctrcal 


ISO , 


2 


112 . 


4 1 


Cards, playing . . 


99, 4 IS packs 


1,728 


7l,325pai;ka 


1,783 2 J 


Carpeting lind druggetmg . . 




56,490 


£54,968 


10,992 11 11 


OAmages, Ac*— 










Automobilep, motor caw. 










and motor cycle b 


357 No. 


48,913 


£49.486 


12,4'il 9 1 


Aulomobillee, &c., toB,- 










teriftlji for . . 




3,590 


£3,967 


1,046 3 ' 


Oarriftges 


407 No. 


8,500 


£8,946 


2,S35 19 


Carta, drays, and wagonfl 


Ill No. 


1,588 


£1,567 


894 3 1 


Steam-niL tor lorriert 


4 , 


2,642 


£2,642 


52S 10 


Feraiiibulatora and go- 










oar ta 


236 . 


489 


£142 


105 2 


Materials for , , 




17,593 


£17,502 


8,98S i 


Materials for— via., axleF, 










aile armti and boxes . . 


1 « 


15,675 






Owrriage and oart aha f Is, 










i DO tea, and icUoes in 
the ruugh 










, ^ 


8/265 






C&irriage and cart makiti* 










materlalB 


1 . 1 


18,509 


* * 




Caaka. empty 


448 No. 


453 


£449 


6^' If 


Cement,. 


156.469 barreU 


69,995 


141,194 barrvlH 


14,121 18 


Ohaina and ohain cabli^a . . 


$M90^i. 


9,359 







GBNBBAL IMPORTS. 



269 



QmsmtLAL Imfobts ihto thb Oolokt ov New Zbalabd dubibo 1905— coiUinti^d. 






Ts.1u»of 

Total 
Itiaports. 


Ei]t«r«d for Homs 


AtnoHut of 


ArtUM. 


Importfld. 


CaimmiipiiDn on 
Itoportatiou aod 
«x W&r«bou4Q. 


Duty r«c«JT«dt 
Pnf«r«QtfiL 






£ 




£ i, d. 


Caiwoo»1 


8,851 cwt. 


3,692 






CbMFe .. 


60 , 


344 


£179 


35 18 


Gbieorj . . 


106 lb. 


6 


1081b. 


1 7 


QiixL^ pof cc l&i n , &nd pArUn 










W«iO 




35.233 


lB,m 


7,877 1 


CbekB 


40,073 No, 


15,926 


£14,771 


4,39i 13 11 


Onii 


ie9,046toni 


155.786 






GoeoA ftnd chocol&t« 


193,4911 lb. 


49,696 


488,179 lb. 


5,102 4 10 


CooM^beani 


381.370 * 


6/J18 




• B 


Coao&'biii ter 


li7;037 , 


6,788 




.. 


Ooeowtil. d«fiic(»kd 


244,083 . 


8,768 






OoiM— 










lUv 


336,418 lb. 


9,183 


* * 


.. 


Boul«d 


2,330 . 


112 


3,7101b. 


as 17 6 


ODh« 


2,053 tons 


8,882 


. . ^ 


,.. 


Oonbt 




6,949 


£7,028 


1,405 11 11 


Oofflfeetionerj— 










Cbocolaie in plftiu trftde 










|)uk«giis 


441 ,0951b. 


12,903 


229,0691b. 


2,863 7 4 












■g«i 




U,186 


£13,991 


2,798 5 U 


UQenumerAied 


6^, 545 lb. 


16,568 


517,8321b, 


4,315 5 4 


"zr .. .. 


215 cnt. 


1,125 




« « 


( Pig, bar, iheet, and tub« 


4,872 . 


20,l8t 


, * 


, m 


BodwidboU .. 


153 . 


705 




.. 


iheftibiog 


1,055 . 


4,460 




.. 


Huiuf&oKartP , . 




601 


£581 


116 4 


Gop^ 


127 tons 


1,686 


. » 




Copdftge 


4.757ewt, 


11,681 


£13,819 


2,897 8 10 


Hawsers of li in. and over 


m . 


292 




.. 


Iron and steel . . 


11,926 . 


26,474 


£316 


63 4 


Cork, oa( 




10,096 


£10,071 


2,014 6 8 


, in the rough 


21 cwt. 


49 




.. 


O&clOB piece gooda— 










Botter and «heese oloth 




3,784 






Cslioo, wbito and grey . . 




163,975 






Corduroy, moleskm^ and 










b«a^«rskin . - 




2,282 






Leather eloth . . 




6,700 






Shirtmgs, coloured cotton 




32,564 






Shirtings, flannelette . . 




4,241 






Shirtings, Union 




2,897 






Tabnlar woven cotton 










cloth 




17,425 




.. 


Waterproof material 




6,273 






Unenumerated 




278,713 


£274,411 


41,744 8 8 


Cotton — 










Raw 


60,234 lb. 


1,706 






Waste 


6,265 cwt. 


9,141 






Wick 


137,2881b. 


5,S84 






Cutlery . . 




38,595 


£38,25*1 


7,650 3 



TJTO 



MSW BBALAHD OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 









Yalneof 


EDt«r6d for Hoii» 


Amoant < 


ki^cAm. 


Total Quutitles 


CoDfuinjptlon oq 


Duty r&eelT 


Imported. 


1 Ol&l 

LmporMi. 


Impcjrtfttion VDd 
ox Warebouie. 


fueludJi^ 






£ 




£ I. 


Boors, plftin 


l,34SNo. 


730 


1,348 No. 


134 16 


Drape rj 




274,030 


£272,111 


54,422 a 




. . 


75,576 


£71,792 


18,697 19 


Bibboaa aod crape 




48,419 


£46,982 


11,746 10 


TailofB* trimmidgH 




65,666 




• * 


Drugs, ctaemic&U, and drttg- 










giitft' waree— 










Baking- powder, ye&il pne- 










paratione. &o. 




623 


£890 


126 S 


Gb&micals d.o.6. 




4,875 


£4,743 


711 6 


Creftm of tartar 


951,8291b, 


83.862 


944,698 lb. 


5,860 


DcugE, druggista" aundriefl, 










and apothecaries* warea 




96,210 


£95,633 


14,344 IS 


Gljcerino, refined 




2.732 , 


£2J57 


551 6 


Tidctares and m«dioiDa1 










Apirits 


2a,&35]b. 


1.786 


23 ,727 lb. 


i.ise 6 


Waabiog- powder 




1,305 


£1,244 


243 15 


Anhydrous ammonia .. 




5,466 




.* 


Araeoic 


1,394 ewt. 


1.123 


, . 


■ m 


Disinfeotaots ,, 


^ , 


6,191 


■ ■ 


' * 


Pood preaervative 




6,810 




■ ■ 


Guma 


* * 


3,058 


4 , 


, , 


Inaeotioidea and lr«e- 










waslieft 


r w 


2,640 


, , 


«■ 


MaLtiue 




935 






Med ici □ al barke , 1 eaYoa , 4c . 




1,573 




. t 


Phosphorus . . 


- 1 


891 




. I 


Potassi um - oy ao ide 


e^uacwt. 


36,953 






Sheep-dip 




37,270 






Sheep and horae drenobod 










and Bheup-lioks 


- » 


67 


■ « 


■ I 


Vanilla beaut .. 


6430 lb. 


421 


^ ^ 


. > 


Unenumeiated 


» > 


30,625 


1 


.. 


Djea 


.* 


13,249 


' t 


" 


E&rtbenware 


.. 


67,074 


i%3,425 


18,099 


Eggs for setting . . 




■ * 




^ , 


73d0B. 


76 


, . 


, , 


Engine-packing .. 


8,630 cwt. 


12,359 


, , 


, , 


Essences, flavouring — 










Spirituous 
Unenunxerated 


2,223 galls. 


5,536 


2,136 galls. 


1,708 9 


• • 


279 


£272 


40 16 


Essential oils- 










Eucalyptus 


7,1061b. 


2,388 


£2,473 


494 18 


Other kinds 


40,110 . 


6,423 


•• 


•• 


Fancy goods and toys 




161,972 


£148,897 


87,448 17 


Felt sheathing . . 




8,463 


, , 


, . 


Fire-engines 


127 No. 


693 




, , 


Fire-hose and other ap- 










pliances 


, , 


2,434 


, , 


,, 


Fireworks 


.. 


1,100 


£1,094 


218 16 





GKKB&AIi IMPORTS. 


^ 


271 1 


OsvMRAt* Imfobts ihto tbx Coloht of Nbw ZmkLAixD DoarKo 1905— ootUtniMd. 1 






y&lae of 
Imports. 


Bnlerttd for Home 


Amount of 


Artie iM- 


TotAl Qoaotlllw 


CoDfiiroptioo on 


Duly receiir«d* 


Imiionod. 


Tmportalioti ftjod 


inclcdiac 






es WArebouie. 


Preferential. 

£ 6. d. 


Ifcb- 




£ 




AneboTies, salted 


10 OWt. 


32 


* , 




JkM, pickled, or B&lted 


1.967 . 


3.586 


1.990 OWt. 


991 19 e 


?ottei! and preserved . . 


2,107.6741b. 


47.570 


1,997.604 lb. 


17,377 14 7 


ickle— 
iaI aiea .. 












506 


£633 


126 12 


Fiih-hooks 


, . 


814 






Unenumerabed 


• » 


5,696 


£5,658 


1,131 la 3 


Fab-ova^ 


» « 


650 






fbek 


158 OWt. 


114 


£118 


11 16 


Vborcbth and oilcloth . . 


^ ^ 


87.785 


£86,897 


17.379 S 2 


Flour 


6.S67o«iitah 


2,542 


6,126o6iitalB 


306 6 1 


Foods, ftnim&l— 










QmR 


140 tons 


424 


140 tons 


140 7 1 


\ 0o«Biiinemted 




5,104 


£5,119 


1,023 16 6 


1bodt« lariniMseoaB — 










IttOWTOOt 


147,4341b. 


1,395 


, . 


■ « 


liieftjoDi and veiinio«)li 


19a, 081 


2,669 


• • 


, , 


Uftixeoa and cornflour . . 


1,407,608 , 


17,646 


1,435,4761b. 


1,495 5 9 


Sigo and tapioca 


20,81>6o¥Ft. 


11 .039 




, , 


Unenumerated 


' 


2.284 






IVoiU^boltled and preserved 


104,550 doa. 


28,973 


£28,026 


7.006 10 


Froito, dried — 










CnrraDta 


3,a73,40iaib. 


24.853 


3,132.16 2 lb. 


13,050 13 6 


BaiftinB 


3.134,642 . 


34,277 


3,086,340 . 


12,869 16 


UDcnttmerated 


1,873,829 . 


23,533 


1,829.110 , 


16,242 11 8 


B^pfla, freBb 










^Kpplet, pears, plums, Ao. 


3,347,689 , 


82,:i84 


3.346,789 * 


9.107 13 8 


^^KmooB 


796,838 , 


7.223 


773,792 , 


1,612 I 4 


^^orrants, ra^pberrief » Ac. 


37,058 ^ 


324 


37,058 , 


77 i 1 


I Other kinds 


541,693,858 . 


116,071 






1 o„..*- lemon and orange 










n brine ., 


698,637 , 


3.555 




» fr 


., ^olp, and partially 










nraieiTed frail 


77.122 , 


748 


32,915 lb. 


206 14 4 


fK 


3 OWt 


4 




. . 


FBraitnre, cabinctwar*, and 










upholstery . . 


., 


45,540 


£45.666 


14.609 19 a 


Kapok 


6,682 OWt. 


15.598 


. , 


. . 


Unaniinieraled 




6,143 




. , 


Pimiiture, knife, and plaie 










porwder and polish 


. « 


7p889 


£7,648 


1,529 10 4 


Fi. . 




7.646 


£6,929 


1,732 6 5 


Gataline and isinglasB 


118,479 tb. 


7.004 


£6,941 


1,388 5 7 


GUat^ 










Eoiltea, empty 




37.700 






liirror^and looking glaase* 




6,586 


£6,538 


1,63410 XI 


Plato* bevelJed, Ac, 




10,320 


1 £10,311 


2,577 16 


• oiber kindB 


306.271 sup. fL 


11,050 


£11,984 


2,732 4 5 


Wiadbw 


2,478,002 . 


22,383 


2,489,400 flup. ft. 


3,440 18 


MMware 


. , 


49,918 


as, 284 


10,387 7 9 


Qtlwt and tiae . . 


200J17lb. 


8,681 


198.0131b. 


1.237 U T 










A 



!J72 VBW BBALAKD OFFICIAL TSAB-flOOK. 

Obhbbal Impobts ihto thb Oolont of Nbw Zbaulhd DUBDia 1905.— 



ToUl Quimtltl* 



Gold .. 

Gnin GiGd pulse — 

Barlej 

Beans And peu 

Oibts .. 

Wbe*t 

UQeiiumer&bed 

Ground, unenunier&ted. 
Gre&se . . 
Grindery — 

Heel &Dd toe pl«t«i 

liQCDumerftted 
Gum, kauri 

Haberd&ifaery 
Buttons, ka. *, 
Sewing cotbODi,»llka, mnd 

UuenumCTikt^d 

Eardwftra, hollow ue, «Qd 
ironmongery 
€of!]u-furDitur^ 
Hardw&re 
Hftti ftod caps . . 
H&tlera' xanteriftlB 
Hamp . > 
Hid&a . . 
Houe^ . . 
Hops 
BoaJery 

Indiiiriibbdr and gutta-per 

cba goodi 
Ink- 
Printing 

Writing 
Instnimonls, musical— 

Harmoniuma and organs 

Pianos 

Un enumerated 

For Volunteer bands 

Materials for , , 
Inslruments, oihei IdndS'^ 

Optical 

ScienttBc 

Surgical and dental 

Surveying 

Unenum crated 
Irtm and eteet^ 
' AMgh 



160 oentalA 

1,186 , 

30,773 , 
ISS . 

14,S06 . 
9,834 , 
5,450owt. 



13 tuns 



600 cwt. 



77|S05do£. 

156 toni 
!S,S2BNo. 
924 lb. 
45,710 . 



16&,435kb. 



42S 
4,401 No. 



ya1o« of 


ERt*rfld for Home 




CoHfltitopttOQ OB 


D 


tmporlft. 


ImportAtioii mad 


1 


£ 






780 


, , 




la 


" 




121 


162 oeotaiB 




1,078 


1,186 . 




6,N7 


20,760 * 




ais 


438 . 




6,453 


14,508 . 




5,767 


8,340 . 




4,896 


£3,933 




1,131 


£1,143 




30,785 


. , 




1,744 


" 




36,648 


£36,530 


I 


34,255 


■■ 




53,713 






1,661 


> * 




3,58! 






261,497 


£257,148 


K 


2,846 


£3,416 




2,§a2 


* ^ 




8?, 117 


£82,7S8 


2C 


15,233 


, , 




0,487 


'" 




3,038 






6 


234 lb. 




3,1)92 


43,605 . 


] 


144,370 


£144,373 


Sf 


15,354 


£13 





291 tout 



6,990 
1*777 

j 5,733 

101,091 

I 16,543 

4S8 

2,650 

I 3,133 

6,044 

30,471 

1,295 

148 

2,048 



£1,603 

£5,331 

£100,141 

£16,458 

£350 



£14,735 



£38 



OBNBItAL IMPORTS. 



273 



GurxBAL Impobts orao thb Colony of Nbw Zxaland dubikq 1905^contintied. 







Value of 
Total 


Entered for Home 


AtUOQQt Of 


A^tJOllM- 


ToUl QuanltlJe* 


CozuumptioQ oo 


Doty recAiTad, 




imporied. 


ImpoTU. 


Importatioti aad 
ex Warehoiiie. 


iMCllllliDg 

iTelenntial. 


IiOTi Aod iteel — canld. 




, 




£ 1. d. 


B&r, bolt, &£id rod 


17,948 lODH 


129,166 


£1,506 


301 4 


BqUb ftind nutf 


17,9CScivt. 


19,937 


« t 




Cftatingfl for ships 


50 cone 


1,411 






Gftlfaaised manufftelurss 




1,731 


£1,700 


425 2 6 


Hoop . , 


1,390 tone 


13,011 






Hoop, g^^Tanifted 


3,fi39cwt, 


2,472 


3,862 cwt. 


289 IB 5 


Pig .. 


6,713 tons 


26,443 






Pipec uid fitiloga 


9,797 . 


100,^1 


£99,857 


5,106 8 7 


Ewli,. 


16,900 , 


102,672 


£4.458 


891 13 


R*ilwft5 bolttf &ttd fMtec- 










iags 


1,^ . 


17,392 


£407 


81 10 




4,8iS ^ 


40,765 


£1,953 


391 12 


Sheat, f&lvajaised, oonru- 










gated 


3de,253owt. 


223,135 


294,559cwt. 


20.455 19 


Sheet, galTraniBed, plain 


57%77S , 


44,154 


59,938 , 


4.495 7 a 


Staples and ebandardM , * 


719tnfift 


7,537 


£7,514 


],W2 17 11 


T*oks 


3,03SNo. 


11,639 


3,873 Ho, 


1,769 5 


Wira^ fenemg, barbed . . 


4,702 tonB 


50,451 






Wir«^ fencing, pUin 


10,383 , 


95,624 






Wire, telegraphto emd 










lekphonio 


233 . 


9,03:^ 






Wire ntiitiDg . . 




37,351 






Wire, UDenumeratfld 


577 tons 


8,367 






Unanuinerated 


112 , 


931 




,, 


Jims, jellies, %nd preierves 


430,5Bllh. 


7,976 


445,1261b. 


3,709 7 6 


Jillies, concentrated 


114,627 ^ 


4,401 


Ml.tHJO . 


1,605 1 H 


Jewellery 




10,286 


8,943 . 


1.788 10 6 


lAtQpt, Ian terns, and lamp- 










wick ,, 


* , 


34,605 


£34,445 


8,713 10 7 


Lard 


128 cwt. 


253 


£267 


53 8 


Lead— 










pjgi and bars . . 


BSdtona 


12.440 


* - 




Pipe (ineludiag eomposi 










tion) .. « .. 


392 cwt. 


448 


84?cwt. 


60 15 8 


Sbeet 


17.409 , 


15,3G3 


15,982 . 


1,193 13 10 


Manufaeturea 




160 


£160 


32 


Leather. 


675,3871b. 


87,940 


509.329 lb. 


4,002 16 


Ghamoii 


^ ^ 


892 


£828 


165 13 3 


Leatber manufactureB^ 










E<Jot and shoe TampB, 










uppers, and lacd* 




13,018 


£13,103 


3,403 11 1 


Uoenumerated 




3,563 


£3,505 


729 19 3 


Ltgbthou-^e, mate Hale for.. 




001 


i * 


, , 


Linen pioee-goodi— 










Forfars, do w las, and fiaz 










f Aheetings 


, , 


23,063 


£14,002 


349 


LtoeiiA n.o.e. . . 




16,&38 


£17,081 


3,416 4 


Heesiaaa ar^d ftcrim 




41,884 




* 


Uiieniimerated 


* m 


2 




* 


LlDieed 


11 tons 


133 


11 tona 


10 18 6 


Lif Qorioe 


** 


2,847 


£3,857 


571 7 1 



274 NSW SSALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOO&. 

GsMEBAii Imports into the Colony of New Zealand during 1905— contiiMiri 



Artleloa. 






EDt«E9d for Horao 

CODIUITiptJOQ OQ 

loaportAtiot] Aad 
■x WArehouft»« 



Machinery and maohines— i 
Agricultural (including { 
agricultural implementH); 
Agricultural, ploughs and 

harrows 
Biscuit and confectionery 

making 
Briek- making .. 
C«metii makizig 
Cranes 

Cranes, hydraulic 
Dairying 

engines for 
boilers for 
Dredging 
Electric 
Engines, steam 

gas and oil 
gas and oil 

parts of 
boilers for 
Flour-milling .. 
Fuel economisers 
Qas-making 

Knitting . . i 

Mining 

engines for 
boilers for . . ] 

Paper-milling .. 
Portable and traction en 

gines 
Printing 
Refrifjeratiiig .. 
Rope and twine making 
Sewing 

Woodworking .. 
"Woollen'millJng 
Unenumerated 
Materials for,and parts for 
Malt 

Rice- malt 
Manures — 
Bonedust 
Guano 

Unenumerated 
Marble- 
Dressed or polished, and 

manufactures 
Hewn or rough-hewn . . 
Matches and vestas- 
Wax .. (boxes) 
Wooden 
Mats and matting 
Meats, potted and preserved 



88 No. 
1,105 * 

32 No. 



153 No. 



80 No. 



9, 950 No. 



'2, 546 bush. 
8,5601b. 

13,580 tons 
5,619 . 
26,954 . 



447 tons 

64,991 gross 
43,491 . 



& 

100,423 

9,091 

626 
; 3,249 
I 593 
I 1,045 
I 12,611 
I 25,509 
I 528 
, 1,057 

7.106 
1 159, 794 

9,0l'6 
68,130 

827 

8,399 

4,040 

327 

36,845 

2,267 

36,919 

1,029 

556 

699 



£626 
£3,249 

£598 
£1,045 



32.200 

30,478 

5.534 I 

865 

33,741 ! 

17,988 

6,322 

87,046 

8.953 

848 

67 



65,832 
16,679 
91,223 



10,017 1 
3,165 j 

8,916 I 
3,123 j 
10,064 
3,400 I 



£834 

£8,602 

£4,039 

£327 

£35,278 



£756 
£556 
£615 



£27,177 

£5.609 

£885 



£5,563 

£79,693 

£685 

2,882 bush. 
8,5601b. 



£10,178 



69,434 gross 
36,455 . 
£10,058 
£2,899 



Aixitfanl 
Izkltidin 



135 i 
649 IC 
118 IS 
2G9 C 



£899 


44 U 


£1,297 


64 11 


£7,106 


355 C 


£114,689 


11,468 IS 


£8,641 


1,728 i 


£25,421 


5,084 i 



166 U 
1.720 i 

201 U 

65 ( 

3,527 le 



37 U 
27 U 
30 1£ 



1,858 Vi 

280 S 

44 t 



278 I 

14,177 16 

114 i 

288 2 

85 18 



2,544 11 



4.260 n 

1,847 12 

2,011 IC 

579 le 



^^^ 


OBHBRAL IBiPQETS. 




276 


OsirSRAl. tUPORTB tSTO THE COLONY OF NkW ZB ALAND DIXaiKO 1905 


—conUnued, 






VblQOOf 

ToIaI 


Entered for Home 


AmoQ&l of 


-A^tlthtm 


ToUJ Quutltiee 


Coneumption on 


Duty recoived. 




Imported. 


Importa. 


iDQporUtioti Slid 
ex WarehoQH. 


Ineluding 
Prerereotlal. 


lll«<dieiQee« pateot hnd pro- 




£ 




£ B. d. 


pridtvy 


.. 


51,863 


£53.112 


7.966 16 10 


yLtUH, mMiiifftctarea ol^ 










Anchors . . ^ . 


987 No. 


839 






Iikp^nned &nd lacquered 










metAlw&re 


^, 


947 


£944 


236 1 3 


Biveta uid wftabers 


7,663 cwt. 


8,186 




J ^ 


TJwki 


1,902 . 


3.032 




• m 


Typewrilars 


753 No. 


10,322 




. . 


Wdgbbridgas and weigh- 










iog-iDBchiiiet 


t , 


9.466 


£9,019 


1.803 14 10 


Uotnamer&ted 




79.946 


£33,893 


6.778 11 10 


V«iA] tbealhiog, other than 










oopper 


442 owl. 


1.519 






Milk, preaerved .. 


621.9471b. 


11,606 


£10,600 


2,626' 5 


MHliziery — 










F^Mlbers , orna me n tal * . 


,, 


4,418 


£4,434 


1,108 10 


Olbar kinds . . 


• » 


58.288 


£58.024 


14.506 1 6 


lliuuud 


236,0061b. 


13,036 


233,3181b. 


1,944 5 7 


ir«ib^ 










Inm .. 


77,764 cwt. 


44,781 


76,978 cwt. 


11.011 19 1 


Uoeoumerftted 


67 . 


200 


66 . 


9 18 6 


Kapbtha (wood) _ 
HuU— 
AlmoadA, in ibell 


10,546 galls. 


2,095 


9,562 galls, 


239 1 


S3. 119 lb. 


666 


31.6841b. 


263 3 11 


AiiaoDdB, shelled 


39,982 , 


3,661 


36,176 , 


452 4 1 


Alsumds, Barbary, &o, , > 


265,324 . 


8,306 






CoooikoutB 


82,662 No. 


140 








69.88316. 


1,381 


70,7891b. 


689' 18 2 


Oakmn .* 


379 cwt. 


489 






Om 


3,015 No. 


ti37 




« * 


Oili- 










OaAlor, balk . . 


88.609 galla. 


8.427 


57,665 galls. 


1,441 12 4 


Qasrior, boUl«d 


l,aoedoai.pts 


518 


£509 


76 7 


Cod liTer 


19,780 galls. 


8.656 






Col«a 


30,784 . 


2.375 


13.513 galls. 


837 16 9 


Fisb, penguin « and seal 


44,493 , 


3,083 




, , 


Unmid 


295,925 , 


80.076 


289.511 galls. 


7,237 16 7 


UxmibI, kerosene 


4,674.339 , 


139,767 


, , 


. . 


, other kinds 


220,798 . 


17,753 


204.845 gaUfl. 


5,121 2 7 


Ol!?s. bnlk 


6,565 , 


1,218 


6.887 ^ 


147 3 6 


OliTe, bottled .. 


1.787 . 


665 


£842 


126 6 6 


Whale 


130 , 


23 




, , 


Unenumerated, balk . . 


296,630 . 


24,219 


271. 538 galls, 


6,788 8 10 


Un enumerated, bottled 


9,429doz.pts 


4,295 


£4,403 


660 8 10 


Uiienumerated 


464, 742 galls. 


17,923 






Oilmen's stores . . 


, 


8,720 


£8,695 


1.738*19 8 


Onions .. 


80, 770 cwt. 


15,039 


29,999 cwt. 


1.499 19 2 


Oplam 


1091b, 


107 


102 lb. 


203 19 2 


1 . - -.__^. 








m 



i 


276 NEW 


ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 




It 

■V 


Qbnekal Ihpobts into thb Golomy of New Z^aisAXD dubutq 1905— con/w 


;. 






?ft]i]eot 

Total 

Importe. 


Ent«r9d for Homt 


Amof 




Arlioltf. 


ToiAl Qt]ATittU«i 
toaporled. 


Cooauiriiitioo on 
ImpoTtAtioii ftOd 
ei WaTBhouifl. 


Dviyrm 




Paints and colours- 




£ 




£ 




Ground in oil . . 


42,791 owt. 


48,822 


41,882 owt. 


5,JS9 




Mixtd ready for use 


8.126 . 


17.964 


7.178 , 


1,794 


* 


Uiienumerated 


14,374 . 


15,567 


. . 


, 




Paper- 












Bags, ooarse 


' 262 cwt. 


426 


263 cwt. 


98 




Bags, other kinds 


5,443 . 


8,062 


£8,107 


2,026 


■ 


Butter-paper . . 


5,843 . 


9,768 


. , 


, 


K, 


PaperhangingR 




26,998 


£37,581 


6,070 




Printing 


157,436 cwt. 


133,436 


£2.803 


660 




Wrapping 


8,643 , 


9,955 


8,615 cwt. 


2,680 




Writing 


; 21,097 . 


34,106 


, , 


, , 


; 


U n on umi rated 


' 1,894 . 


3.480 


. , 






Pearl barl. y 


1 1,326 . 


708 


1.344 owt. 


67 




Peas, split 


i 1,661 . 


878 


1,698 . 


169 




Peel, candied and dried 


10,224 lb. 


246 


9,8811b. 


128 




Perfumery- 












Perfumed ppirits 


. 1.362 galls. 


5,687 


1,877 galU. 


2,065 




Toilet preparations 




12.293 


£12,801 


3,075 




Unenuiii« rated 


' 


526 


£609 


127 




Photographic goods 


1 


6.100 


£6.052 


1,310 




Goppcr, glass, and zinc 












plates for photo-litho- 


j 










graph io work 




402 








Photographic cameras 


1 










and lenses . . 




9,088 








Sensitised surfaces for 












photographic purposes 




21,295 








Pickles . . 


1 6,360 galls. 


1.698 


5.788 galls. 


868 




Pictures, painting?, draw- 


1 










ings, ergravii gs, and 












pijo.tf^^diu^'hn . .. 


i 


11.802 


£11,404 


2,280 




PaiutiTgR, &c., f(r mu- 












seums, SiLC. . . 


1 


690 


. , 


, 




Family portraits 


1 


2 




, 




Picture frames and mounts 


1 


6,404 


£6.408 


1.281 




Pitch .. 


1 994 cwt. 


560 








Plant", trres, and shrubs . . 


'• 


6.078 




, 




Plastc r of-paris . . 


11, 757 cwt. 


2,398 


, , 


, 




Plato and platedware 


1 


72,149 


£70, 130 


14,615 




Portmaiitoai X and travel- 


1 










ling bai?s 


1 


7.031 


£6,995 


1,748 




Leather bags and leather- 


1 










cloth bags . . 


1 


184 


£184 


36 




Potatoes 


: 2,786 tons 


16,371 


£13.022 


3.256 




Seed potatoes . . 


690 . 


4,723 








Pdniing materials— 


! 










Siettotypes and matrices 


i 


265 


£263 


65 




Type anH materials, n.o.r. 




16,108 




, 




Provisions — 


1 










Epgs 


6,644 doz. 


162 


£174 


34 


1 


G^gg^t desiccated, white 






1 




1 


and yolk 


' 


1,205 


£1.205 


241 





QBNBBAL IMPORTS. 




277 


QxsBa^i. IxFOBTS uno thb Colony of Nbw Zealand oaRiNo 1905 


—continti^. 






Valns of 
Importa. 


Ki>t«i-tMl for Bota« 


A moan 1 of 


jjtjnlai. 


TotaJ QUADtitioi 


Confuiui'Cton 10 Q 


Doly riM^etted. 




Icatioritfa. i 


linportnioji aod 


InoLndlBig 






«x WarvhouaQ. 


FraiersDiial. 


Fh»vifii(^Ds— ctmlinusd* 




£ 




£ 8. d. 


Egip, liquid, white ADd 










jolk 


« - 


441 


441 


88 4 


PmnfiJoKii D.o.«. . . 


. > 


13,7u3 


£14,253 


2,850 12 2 


P^tBipi .. 




9,403 


£3,341 


2,144 18 7 


ttifttf .. 


5, 746 Off t. 


2,769 


5,755 cwt. 


575 10 6 


^|ttidail?«t 


9,eoeib. 


1,039 


.. 




ftulw&j plaal — 










Loeomotiirea . . 


2 No. 


1,975 






tJikenumcrftled 


, , 


77,991 


£1,693 


338 12 


BMin 


14,483 cwt. 


6,927 






Bice 


82,557 . 


52,253 


> i 




Bice flour 


96 . 


79 


9Scwt. 


29 10 9 


Biee meal refuse . . 


8,447 , 


613 






Bag. 


•• 


17,306 


£l7,32i 


3,464* 3 7 


'SMcb&rine 


17,591 oz. 


334 


15.103 01. 


1,132 14 9 


Sttddlery &ud barness (in- 










cluding whip»i) 


, , 


29,925 


£29,841 


5,968 5 11 


Harness oil, composition. 










and leather-dressing . . 


, , 


2,121 


£2,093 


418 11 4 


Saddlers' ironmongery and 










materials 


, , 


19,951 






Collar-check . . 




6,513 






Salt 


16,639 tons 


35,089 






Rock salt 


605 . 


9G0 






Saltpetre 


88 . 


2,021 1 




Sauces .. 


14, 169 galls. 


9,190 , 14, 176 galls. 


2,835* 3 8 


Saosage-skins 


194,b871b. 


11,365 1 196,7151b. 


2,458 18 9 


Seeds- 




1 




Grass and clover 


21 ,436 cwt. 


62,253 ; 




Unenomerated 


, . 


27,762 1 




Sbale .. 


141 


354 




Shells 


193 cwt. 


614 1 




Ship- chandlery n.o.e. 




5,502 j 




Silks. &c. 




119,727 £118,396 


29,599 1 5 


Silk fcr flour-dressing . . 




54 1 




Silver .. 


122 oz. 


lo 




Skins and pelts- 








Fur-skins 


5,768 No. 


314! 




Kangaroo and wallabi . . 


120 . 


16 




Uii«fiii me rated 


20,266 . 


1.154 ! 




Slates, roofing . . 
Soap- 
Soap powder, extract of 


238,444 . 


J, 728 1 

1 






! 


• 


soap, Ac. 




7,591 I £7,485 


1,496 19 1 


Unenumerated 




36,843 1 £37,329 


9,332 5 1 


Specie- 




1 
1 




Gold 




330,000 




Silver 




17,449 , 




Copper 




230 







278 



NSW ZBALAMO OFFICIAL TSAB-BOOK. 



Obnbbal Imports into thb Oolont of New Zb4L4HD DaazHO 1905— can^tfitM 






Value of 

Total 
Imports. 


Entered fbrHmne 


Amoonl 


ArtkdM. 


Total QuanUties 
Imported. 


Conramptiao on 
Importation and 


Dntyreoe 

iDcladii 

Frererenl 


peoimeDs illustrative of 


1 
i 


£ 




£ i 


> natural soienoe 


1 


282 




, , 


Spioes — 


1 








Ground 


' 22.0061b. 


844 


22,8711b. 


381 : 


Unground 


1 658,371 . 


13.485 


566.419 • 


4.720 i 


Spirits- 




I 






Bitters, cordials, and 


' 


1 






liqueurs 


' 8,496 galld. 


2.999 


2,821 galls. 


2,256 1! 


Brandy 


; 68,884 . 


28,902 


62,412 « 


49,929 1 


Geneva and gin, un- 










sweetened . . 


1 90.963 . 


21.915 


74.916 . 


59,988 


Methylated . . 


1 79 . 


12 


79 . 


3 11 


Rum 


11,075 , 


2.401 


13,789 . 


11,080 1 


Sweetened 


\ 5.963 . 


1.748 


6,293 « 


5,084 : 


Whisky 


465,697 , 


170.464 


466,979 « 


873,582 11 


Unenumerated 


3.425 . 


3.464 


3.666 . 


2.981 11 


Spirits of wine . . 


67,462 . 


4.981 


1,818 . 


1.454 1 


Methylated, in hond 


. . 


, , 


61.401 . 


1,585 1 


Sponges 


. 


250 


£204 


80 I 


Starch .. 


977,2871b. 


10,734 


960,1411b. 


8.001 : 


Starch, cOnfectionerd' 










moulding 


100,567 . 


690 


, , 


, , 


Starch waste . . 


643,920 , 


1,277 


, , 


, , 


Stationery- 










Manufactured . . 




64,727 


£61,667 


15,416 1 


Unenumerated 




57,664 


£48.039 


9,607 r 


Apparatus and appliances 










for teaching purposes 




7,562 


. . 


, , 


Bookbinders' materials . . 




7,879 


, , 


,. 


Cardboard boxes, mate- 










rials for 




15,198 


, . 


^ ^ 


Unenumerated 




7,137 


, , 


,, 


Steamers in eections 


INo. 


1,565 


, , 


,, 


Steariae 


98 1b. 


2 


981b. 


o'l 


For match-making 


362,786 , 


6,680 


362.786 , 


1,138 1 


Stone- 










Building 


629 tons 


1,209 


, , 


., 


Flagging 


1 . 


5 


. . 


, , 


Granite and other stone. 










dressed or polished . . 




6,011 


£5,003 


1,250 1 


Granite, unwrought 


11 tons 


68 


£58 


S 1 


Grind, mill, oil, and 










whet stones . . 


, , 


8,198 


, , 




Sugar- 










Raw 


824,880 cwt. 


412,190 


5,7121b. 


11 11 


Refined ... 


9,898 , 


8,298 


89,433,518 . 


186,819 11 


Glucose 


6,968 . 


3,999 


820,855 . 


8,418 ! 


Molasses 


21 . 


28 


13,874 . 


28 11 


Golden syrup . . 






2,419,176 . 


5,089 11 


Molasses and treacle mixed 










with bone-black 


, , 


, , 


1,391 cwt. 




Treacle 


20 , 


24 


920,4421b. 


1,9171: 


Sulphur 


8,318 « 


2,843 


.. 





GENRRAL IMPORTS. *279 

Qbsbrai. Impobts uito thb Ck>LONT OF Nbw Zealand during 1905— continued. 



AHLt^m 






Billow ,, 

Bark .. 
Other klfkda 

TMpaalizu mod tantA 

tatile pieee-gooda other 
ititkn 9] Ik, colton, Imeo, 
or wooHed 

Artie ]e« m«de tip from 
other lb AD apparel 
fimbtr— 

LaihA and fbinglei 

Lose ,. 

Log*, hewn 

Pfttings 

Poft£ . , 

RaUa . . 

Sawn^ imdreii^ 

SawD, dressed * . 

Unesamerated 
Tin- 
Block 

Foil 

Shees 
Tinware 
Tinsmiths' 

fittingfi 
Tobacco — 

Unmanufaotured 

Manafactured . . 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Snoff 
Tobacco-pipes and cases, &o 
Tools and implements — 

Axes and hatchets 

Engineers' machine tools 

Scythes 

Sheep-shears 

Spades, shovels, and forks 

Unenumerated 
Tramway plant . . 
Turpentine, terebine, and 

driers 
Twine . . 

Nets and netting 

Binder 

Unennmerated 



furnishings and 



3,666 tons j 81,536 

I S»390 

I 2,921 

I .. 138 

15,906.653 lb. 226,427 



66,611 

15,GG8 

9,396 

35,597 

3,560 

769 

1)52 

77,702 

2,881 

1,6*J3 



1,927,917 No. 

2,637 * I 

a,925,667eup. rtJ 

548, 186 No. ' 

22,543 ^ 

8.390 « 

11,074 673 sup. ft. 

136,683 , ' 



3.212 owt. 
24,042 Lb. 
54,038 owt. 



28,045 lb. 
1,997,669 . 
60,967 . 



Entarod for Homa 
GonatiTiipUOQ oo 
Im^ort&tJou and 
et Warehouse. 



64,0431b. 



£66,060 
£15,58 
1,927 ,000 No. 



548,300 No. 

22,Q25 ^ 

S,390 . 

10.397.630 aup. 

1S5,710 . 



Ainoanl ot 
Duty receive^ 

inHudfng 
Prefwencftl 



£ s, d. 



24,246 
1,432 
43,683 i 
13,279 ' £13,417 



27 
533 



■ 13,211 
I 3,396 

I 193 

I 
i 

548 

B8 

16 

ft. 10,397 

I 271 

i 



m 3 

13 9 



19 I 
15 6 
13 10 



€ 8 

2 

16 9' 

12 7 

e 5 



286,763 
1,286 



95,334 gaiU. 
459,0991b. 

751 owt. 



2,909 

1,093 

184,402 

22,008 

73,828 1 

208 
24,950 I 

8,697 I 

22,294 I 

1,788 

2,971 ! 

14,069 . 

115,741 

24,141 

10,275 ! 

16,486 I 

1,195 ' 

1,969 : 

341 



16,7161b. 
1,982,439 . 
63,116 . 
112.386,952 No. 
20,596 oz. 
1,4101b. 
£25,015 



3,354 6 1 



1.671 

346,926 

22,090 

98,338 

614 

493 

6,253 



11 8 
18 3 



£24,160 



£15,111 
£1,195 



4,882 2 



3,022 
239 



6 2 








i 






V^neof 

Toul 


Enleved for Hom^ 


Am. 


t 


ArtlelM. 


Totftl Quuitm«B 


CoovumptioEi OQ 


Dutr 


:■: 


Imptirfted. 




Pref* 


I 






£ 




£ 


1 


Umbrellas and parasols . . 




17,290 


£17.086 


3.41 


■G 


Materials for . . 


1 


5,956 


•• 






Varnish and gold-size 


1 46,487 galls. 


21,499 


44.888 gaUs. 


4.48 




Vegetables, fresh, dried, or 










!. 


preserved 


., 


2,235 


£2.012 


40 




Vinegar 


43,095 galls. 


5,007 


42.556 galls. 


1,06 


{ 


Watches 

Watchmakers* materials . . 

Wax- 


34,989 No. 


15,418 
476 


£15.122 


3.0S 


■■! 


Beeswax 


157 owt. 


1,106 


. , 




1 


Parafian,&c. .. 


940,2691b. 


10,859 


969.8281b. 


3.01 


I 


Uneiiumerated 


8.754 . 


216 


3,211 . 


S 




Whftlebone 




6 


.. 






Whiting and chalk 


11,205 owt. 


1.106 


11.121 owt. 


55 




Wine- 










■'■" 


Australian 


43,946 galls. 


15.193 


47,627 galls. 


11,9C 




Sparkling 


10,700 . 


19.166 


9.978 . 


4.48 




Other kinds 


I 52,803 , 


17.467 


55.581 . 


16,67 




Woodenware 


1 


58.232 


£44,066 


7.61 




Wool— 












Greasy 


251,2461b. 


6,841 








Scoured 


4,966 ^ 


293 








Woollen piece goods 




406,546 


£406,250 


81,2^ 




Blankets 


14,462 pairs 


4.981 


£5,108 


1,02 




Wool packs 


' 32,695 doz. 


38,538 






; 


Woolpockets 


373 , 


248 


•• 






Yarns 


** 


9,647 


£9,647 


1,9S 




Coir, flax, and hemp . . 


i 


4,828 


•• 






Zinc manufactures— 


1 










Tilefl, ridging, &o. 


•• 


741 


£436 


8 




Unenumerated 


1 


431 


£431 


10 




Zinc- 


1 










Perforated sheet 


1 428 cwt. 


945 








Plain sheet 


' 8,415 . 


12,359 








Spelter 


5,237 . 


7,038 








Minor articles . . 




5,863 








Articles atid materials suited 












only for and to be used 












solely in the fabrication 












of goods within the colony 




29,195 


.. 






Miscellaneous goods- 












Manufactured . . 




18,022 








Unmanufactured 




6,706 








New Zealand exhibits re- 












turned from St Louii 










1 


Exhibition 




3,500 








Parcels-post 




188,543 




89.72 



^V OSKREAL IHPOKTS. 9S1 1 


GejiRiu.t« TicpoiiTS tHTo Tfts Ooi^inr of Nbw ZEAUUirD duadto ld05— <:ofi/tnfiiil. 1 






VaJuA of 

Total 
Imports. 


Botwed for Home 




Articles. 


Total Qaaatllles 
InipoiriBd. 


Consoinptlon on 

Importalioa anct 

ejK Warehouse. 


Amount of 
Duty rec«lT«€ 


Excj^ic Duties, 




£ 


£ p. S 


tMM0co, manufikotared 




11 


910 6 i 


Oip« 


* * 


^ , 


, , 


72 13 \ 


dgamtes m&d« by, hand . . 




.. 


. * 


2 3 i 


Clgftreu«s made by m»> 










ohineiy 






, , 


9 ( 


fhttniAiOOpceiA imotaree, es- 










muut, extraoU, and medi- 










ciba] fipirirs conUtnmg 










Bare than 50 per cent, of 










m froofftpirils 




. . 


• * 


2,240 d i 


■ FliAnn&cof ceia tinctures, 










^1 fMences, extracts, and 
^1 mcdicmal spiritHcontatC' 












■ 






| ing less than 50 per cent. 










am of proof •pint! . . 


t » 




» • 


15 13 fl 


ni (Xdtcafy and flftvoaring 










rawncvii 




.. 


154 19 Q 


Pv^ttiaed fptrits. , 


. • 


50 Q 


foilit pr#»parfttioTis 




12 3 a 


The Cook Islands^ atid Niue or Savage Island, now part of New Zea« 


Und, have not been considered in the table of imports m;vie up by the 


Department of Trade and Costoms. Details of goods received from those 


ifiljuids in 1905 are given on page 262. 


Customs Rkvenub, 


The Customs and excise duties received during the last five 


years are shown in detail, also the rate of revenue per head of mean 


population, inclusive and exclosive of Maoris, for each year :— 




1«U. 39Q8L 


1909. 


19M. 


1905. 


Customs Dutibs. 


Jl 


£ £ 


2 


£ 


Bpirjta 

WlBO 


478,816 


483,582 498,256 


630,664 


609,928 


35,864 


36,745 


35,7 U 


35,018 


33,072 


Ate, bf «f, Ac. 


18,849 


20,152 


20,41S 


20,351 


21,827 


Cigars, cigareltes^ and enufi 


90,490 


94,992 


107,834- 


110,151 


121,435 


Tobacco , , 


296,016 


294,272 


322,227 


341,127 


348,600 


Tta 


45»1K)5 


42,405 


43,60f- 


4,838 


634 


Coffee « cocoa» &c. . , 


4,G47 


5,288 


5,95! 


6.884 


6,136 


Bcgtit and molassoe 


173.055 


185,484 


192,675 


200.266 


196,736 


Opiutp ., 


6.618 


♦i71 


n9& 


M73 


♦204 


outer goods by weight 


151,286 


166,687 


184,951 


198,331 


201,498 


ad valorem 


808,531 


867,209 


982, 80( 


1,098.387 


1,097,968 


Other duties .. .. ! 50,:il6 


65,219 


76, 24.^ 


79,758 


75,000 


Parcels poet 


22^405 


22,737 


31,031^ 


34,341 


39,728 


Tota)ii, Oustomfl duties 


3.191,798 


2,285,04313,501.896 


2,650,189 


2,652,666 


..„...„.„„« J 


M 



282 



MBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOX. 



1901. 



1908. 



1903. 



1904. 



1905. 



Excise Duties. 
Tinotures — New Zealand . . 
Cigars, cigarettes, and snuff 

— New- Zealandmanufao- 

tured . . 
Tobacco — New - Zealand - 

manufactured . . 
Beer — New Zealand 

Totals, excise duties . . 





£ 
•2,198 


£ 
t2.454 


£ 
:8,56(^ 


£ 1 i 
§8.450 ||2,^ 




174 


190 


871 




466 




2,596 
89,185 


2,096 
89,742 


1,651 
94,440 




1,061 < 
97.38l! 97,4 




94,153 


94,482 


100,0221 


102,808 


100,i 


^ 


8. d. £ 


s. d. 


£ 8. d. ' £ 

1 


8. d. 1 £ 8. ( 


2 

2 


16 4 2 17 8 
18 5 2 14 4 


8 1 
2 17 10 


8 2 9 Is 1 < 

2 19 8 2 18 






2 5 
2 3-6 


2 4-4 
2 8 


2 5-3 
2 8-8 


! 

2 610 2 
2 36 2 



Revenue from Customs duties 
per head of mean popula- | 
tion (excluding Maoris) . . 

Ditto (including Maoris) . . 

Revenue from excise duties 
per head of mean popula- 
tion (excluding Maoris . . 

Ditto (including Maoris) . . 



* Including £173 duty on culinary flavouring essences, and £19 on perfcui 
spirits. t Including £183 excise duty on calinary and flavouring essences, £5 perfiu 
spirits, and £1 toilet preparations. t Including £103 excise dutv on culinary i 
flavouriog essences. | lacluding £281 excise duty on culinary and flavouring 68seo< 
and £8 toilet preparations. n Including £165 excise duty on culinary and flavoui 
essences, and £62 toilet preparations. 

The Customs revenue for the year 1905 amounted to £2,652,6( 
and the excise duties to £100,919. The revenue from Customs v 
£3 Is. per head of population excluding Maoris, and £2 18s. '. 
if they be included. In 1890 the Customs revenue was £2 98. J 
per head of European population, and the proportion increai 
to £2 lis. Gd. in 1892. During the next two years there wag 
falling-off ; but 1895 and following years, except for a slight fall 
1901, show increases, the proportion for 1904 being higher th 
in any year since 1878. Details for sixteen years are given : — 



Customs Revenue per Head of European Popolation. 



1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 



£ 8. d. 




£ s. 


2 9 3 


1 1898 


. a IS 


2 9 7 


1 1899 


. a 14 


2 11 G 


1 1900 


. 2 16 


2 10 4 


1 1901 


. 2 16 


2 6 4 


! 1902 


. 2 17 


2 6 9 


; 1903 


. 3 1 


2 9 11 


! 1904 


. 3 2 


2 13 


1905 


. 3 1 



Dating from 1890, the taxation by way of Customs and exc 
duties together increased from £2 lis. 2d. in that year to £2 19s. ! 
in 1900, declined to £2 18s. 9d. in 1901, increasing to £3 5s. ! 
in 1904. For the year 1905, althougli the collections under th< 



CUSTOMS REVEKDB. 28^ 

heads show an increase, the amount per head of population was 
£3 33. 4d., a decrease on the previous year*s total of Is. lOd, per 
bead. 

Besides an alteration of tariff in ld9f) in certain items, in the 
jmr 1900 certain duties were lowered and exemptions granted. 
The duty on tea was brought to 2d. per pound, instead of 4d, ; 
currants and raisins were lowered to Id. per pound ; candles to Id. ; 
cocoa and roasted coffee to 3d, There was also reduction on stearine 
for match-noaking, on paraffin-wax, and wax matches. The duty on 
patent and proprietary medicines was made 15 percent., also that on 
certain drugs and chemicals, while the charge on steam-engines, 
or parts thereof, became 5 per cent. Various exemptions came into 
force. 

With these circumstances there has heen a greater import of tax- 
able articles, which would seem to indicate that purchasing-power 
bad increased. It is at least certain that the value of imports rose 
from Je5,990,177 (excluding specie) in 1894 to £12,481,178 in 1905, 
w^hile the changes of tariff were effected. 

The Customs revenue for 1905 was increased by the sura of 
£64,327 in consequence of "The Preferential and Reciprocal Trade 
Act, 1903," bat the exemption in favour of British* grown tea has 
resulted in a considerable loss of revenue. The duty collected on all 
tea imported in 1903 was £43,606, while in 1905 only £5,534 was 
received. The preferential duties which have been imposed on 
articles not British produce or manufacture are stated on page 111, 
following the main tariff, and the provisions of the Act as to reci- 
procity, &c will be found set out in a special article in Part III, 
Bat, for convenience, a full statement is also given of the original 
r&tee and additional duties further on in this section. 

The tariff (general and preferential), as before stated, has 
bddD given in full in Part I. (see paiges 94 to 112). The Tates 
of duty levied include 16s. per gallon on spirits ; 308, per gallon 
on perfumed spirits; 7s. per pound on cigars and snuff; 17s. 6d. 
per 1,000, of 2^1b. and under, and 6d. per ounce weight over 
2^ lb. per 1,000, on cigarettes; also Ss. 6d. per pound on manu- 
factured and 2s. on unmanufactured tobacco. Sparkling wine is 
charged 9s. a gallon ; Australian, 5s. ; other kinds, 6s. ; ale and 
beer, 28. The duty on cocoa, chocolate, and chicory is 3d. per lb, ; 
raw coffee, 2d. ; roasted, 3d. Tea produced in British dominions 
is free (from the Slst March, 1904), except in packets not exceeding 
1 lb. in weight, when the duty ia 2d. per lb., and the same duty is 
chargeable on tea of foreign production. Sugar, molasses, and 
treacle pay ^i., and glucose Id. per pound- Opium is charged 
iOs. per pound, but this article, in a form suitable for smoking, 
cannot now be legally imported* The Opium Prohibition Acts, 
1901 and 1902, make the importation or possession of opium suitable 
for smoking illegal. The remainder of the Customs revenue, with 
small exception, is made up of charges on goods by weight, ad valorem 



284 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOK. 



duties, ranging from 5 to 40 per cent., and receipts from the foreign 
parcels-post. There is also an excise duty of Is. per pound on 
tobacco; Is. 6d. per pound on cigars, cigarettes, and snuff; 3d. per 
gallon on beer; 9d. per pound on tinctures, &c., manufactured in 
the colony, containing more than 50 per cent, of proof spirit, and 
3d. per pound when less than 50 per cent. Also, 12s. per gallon on 
culinary and flavouring essences, and 20s. on perfumed spirits. 

By *' The Tobacco Excise Duties Act, 1896," the excise duty on 
cigarettes made in the colony is now (from the 31st December, 1896) 
2s. 6d. per pound on machine-made and Is. per pound on hand-made 
cigarettes. 

''The Tobacco Act Amendment Act, 1896," enacts that all 
packages of manufactured tobacco shall be labelled before leaving 
the manufactory, and provides for the issue of warrants to use 
cutting-machines for cutting duty-paid manufactured tobacco for 
sale (or to be used in the manufacture of cigarettes by hand), and to 
manufacture cigarettes by hand, under certain conditions. 

The duties authorised by ** The Timber Export Act, 1901," and 
''The Timber Export Duty Act, 1903," will be found given on 
page 110 in detail, with the full tariff. 

'* The Preferential and Reciprocal Trade Act, 1903." 

The following goo:is are liable to an additional duty under the 
above Act when not the produce or manufacture of some part of 
the British dominions : — 



Rate 

prescribed by 

the Tariff. 



Additional Dnij 

when 

of Foreifnx 

Production or 

Manufacture. 



Cement . . 

Hasket and wick-r ware n.o.e., njt being I 

furni'.ure ■ 

Bicycles, tricycles, and th^ like vehicles ; alM i 

finished or partly finished or machined 

p;iri8 o( same n.o.e., including weldless 

steel tubing cut to short lengths 
Boots, shoes, and slippers n.o.e. ; goloshes, 

clog<«, pattens, vamps, uppers, and laoes 
Can.iles . . . . . . . . . . ' 



Carriages, carts, drays, wagons, peranabula- 

tors, and wheels for the same 
China, porcelain, and parian ware . . 
Clocks . . 

Cordage and rope no. c. 
Cream of tartar 

Earthenware, stoneware, and brown ware 
Fancy goods and toys 
Firearms, all kinds 



28. the barrel 
2o p.c. ad val. 

'20 



22i 

Id. the lb. or 
package) of 
that reputed 
weight 

20 p.o. ad val. 

20 

20 

20 

Id. the lb. 

20 p.c. ad val. 

20 

20 



28. the b irrel. 
10 p.c. ad val. 

10 



Hi . 

^d. the lb. or 
I package of 
I that reputed 
j weight. 

10 p.o. ad val. 

10 

10 

10 

}d. the lb. 

10 p.o. ad tal. 

10 

10 



PBBFBBBNTIAL AND BECIPKOCAL TRADE ACT. 



285 



Kate 

prescrilied by 

the Tariff. 



Additional Duty 

when 

of Foreign 

Production or 

Manufacture. 



Fbh, p3tied and preserved 



2d. the lb. or j Id. the lb. or 

package of i package of 

that reputed that r< puted 

weight I weight. 

25 p.o. ad val. 12} p.o. ad val. 

28. the 100 Is. the 100 sup. 

sup. ft. ft. 

20 p.o. <ul val. 10 p.o. ad val. 



Pamitare and oabinetware n.o.e., and other 

than iron 
OlaM, orown, theet, and oommon window . . 

GlftMware ; alno plate glass, and glass polished, 

eoloared, and other kinds n.o.e. ; globes and 

efaimneys for lamps 
Hardware, ironmongery, and hoUoware 

lion nails 

Iran pipes, and fittings for same, including 
mainooeks 

Lamps, lanterns, and lamp- wick 

Ua^ieal instruments — viz., pianos . . 

Paperhangings 

Paper, wrapping — vis., blue candle, glazed 
cap, glased oasings, small-hand, lumber- 
hand, and tissue 

Psptr, wrapping, other kiodi*, iooluding 
brown, cartridge, and sugar papers 

Plate and platedware 

Pomps and other apparatus for raising water 

B cycles and triojoles, fittings for — viz., 
rabber tires, pneumatic tires, outside 
coTers, and inner tubes ; rubber and cork 
bandies, and pedal-rubbors ; also drop- 
forgingH and stampings, ball-bearings, weld- 
less steel tube in full lengths, rims, forks, 
and spokes in the rough 

Gis engines and hammers, and oil-engines . . 

Gam boots 

Iron and steel cordage 

Iron, plain black sheet, rod, bolt, bar, and 
plate 

Printing- paper* 

Rails for railways and tramways* . . 

Sail-cloth, canvas, and unbleached double- 
warped duck 

Surgical and dental instruments and ap- 
pliances 

Tea4 .. . .. ..iPree (except 2d. the lb. (If 

when in of foreign 
packets not ^ growth.) 
• exceeding 1 lb. 

_ • in weight). 

* See next page. 

tAll tea of foreign growth is liable to a duty of 2d. the lb. Tea Rrown in any 
pritith poesession is only liable to duty at 2d. the lb. when in packets noi exceeding 1 lb 
in weight. 



20 p.c. ad. val. 10 p.c. ad val. 

I 6d. the lb. . . 3d. the lb. 

I 2s. the cwt. . . Is. the cwt. 

5 p.c. ad val. 2} p.c. ad val. 

20 . 10 . 

20 . 10 . 

15 . 7J . 

58. the cwt. .. 2^. 6d. the owt. 



53. ... 28. 6d 

20 p.o. ad val. 10 p.c. ad val. 
20 , 10 . 

Free ..20 



20 

L>0 

20 
20 

20 

20 
20 

20 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL yBAB-BOOK. 



Esitract from •* The Pnftreniial and B^Hproeal Trade Act, 1903.*"^ 

BzBmpbio&i frooi provistoai of McUoaa t and i. 

4. The provlBiodB o( Beotioos two And three hereof shiktl not be &ppl)OAble in 
the case oi — 

{a.) Goods imported on or before the thirtj^-first dey of March, one thoacand 
Dine hundred and four, if it ie proved to the mtiefaction of the CoUeotor 
chat hn order for the goods was sent from New Zealand on or beforf 
ihe sixteenth day of November, one thousand nine hundred and 
three < 

{b.) Printing papere imported by and for the use of the proprietors of any 
registered newspaper, if it ia proved to the satisfaction of the Collector 
that they are imparted under a valid contract for the supply o( each 
papers for a period not exceeding three years, entered into prior to 
the sixteenth day of November, one thoueand nine hundred and 
three, 

(c.) Rails for tramways and other gocdp mentioned in the Scbedulea hereto 
directly imported before the thirty -first day of March, one thoufiand 
nine hundred and six^ for use in tbe Gonstraction or equipment of any 
tramway for which plans and specifioations have been completed or 
are io oourse of preparation on the passing of thia Act. 



In connection with the subject of preferential duties, tables 
annexed to illostrate the position in regard to two specially selected 
important foreign States at the time the additional duties were 
authorised. The table for United States also exhibits the fact that 
free goods have been introduced at a far greater rate than those which 
paid duty since the year 1896 : — 



Imports from United STATisa of Amkbioa. 



h 


On the Kaet Oo%sl. 


Do the Wml Co»st. 


Tot&I Imports. 


^ Ye«. 


Adioit!ed 


On whkh 


Admitted 


On wliiob 


Admitted 


On which 




Free 


Duty 


Free 


Duty 


Fnw 


Dttiv 
P^yhtdA. 




of Duty. 


Pb^ftble. 


of Duty. 


Pftyabl». 


of Duty. 




JL 


£ 


£ 


M 


M 


£ 


1896 


127.235 


292,451 


20,663 


52,483 


147.898 


344, 94& 


1S97 


155,780 


866,209 


24,906 


81,199 


180,636 


447,408 


1B98 


282.332 


416,223 


27,477 


72,379 


909,809 


4dO,60S 


1309 


250,656 


437,250 


31,359 


56,044 


282,015 


493,294 


1900 


377,569 


5S0.717 


42.567 


61.020 


420,136 


641 .737 


1901 


618,312 


556,433 


146.023 


94.41*2 


•764,336 


650,925 


ID02 


627,525 


619.050 


53,661 


118,701 


581,166 


737,751 


1903 


622. 5B1 


716,954 


57,430 


144.393 


580,011 


861,847 


1904 


629,560 


679,742 


61,509 


167.104 


681,069 


846,846 


1905 


541,685 


668,933 


64.415 


173,468 


596,100 


842,401 



* Of Ibii lam £1OOJ07 yalue w«s for OoTerntneiit uaot. 




FBINCIPAL ARTICLES IBfPORTBD FROM UNITED STATES. 



287 



To show the nature of the imports from the United States of 
America a statement giving the articles and values thereof for the 
year 1905 is introduced. Examining the figures, it will be found 
that tobacco to the value of £155,085 was imported into New Zealand 
last year ; boots and shoes, £61,150 ; oils, £171,763 ; hardware, &c., 
iron and steel, with machinery, tools and implements, &c., came to 
£403,632. The rest is a very miscellaneous list of articles, to which 
:frait contributed more than £40,000. 



liiBT OP Principal Articles imported from United States of 

America in 1905. 



Apparel and slops, n.o.e. 
Armi, ommiinition, &«. 
Belting, other than leather. . 
BicyoleB and trioyoles 
Biejeles and tricjoles, ma- 

tearials for 
Books, fto., printed 
Boots and shoes 
Brass, manufactures 
Broehware and brooms 
Bailding materials 
OanTas 
Cards, playing 
Carriages, &c. — 

Automobiles, motor cars, 
and motor cycles 

Carriages 

Carts, drays, perambulators, 
&c. .. 

Materials for 
Clocks 
Coffee, raw 
Confectionery 
Cordage .. 
Cotton piece-goods. . 
Cutlery .. 
Drapery . . 
Drugs, chemicals, and drug 

gists' wares 
Engine-packing 
Fancy goods and toys 
Felt sheathing 
Fish, potted and preseryed . . 
Foods, farinaceous . . 
Fruits, bottled and preserved 
Fruits, dried 
Fruits, fresh 
Furniture, cabinetware, and 

upholstery 
Furniture, knife, and plate 

powder and polish 
Qlass bottles, empty 
Glassware 
Grain and pulse 



£ 




£ 


11,808 


Grease 


2.583 


16.041 


Grindery . . 


3,214 


2,027 


Haberdashery 


4,768 


2,246 


Hardware, holloware. and 






ironmongery 


39,085 


5,532 


Indiarubber and gutta-percha 




8,796 


goods 


3,327 


61,150 


Ink, printing . . ^ 


1.771 


1,848 


Instruments, musical 


5.462 


2,574 


Instruments, other kind? 


11.546 


6,713 


Iron and steel 


103.316 


3,875 


Lamps, lanterns, and lamp- 




1.064 


wick 


11,137 




Leather 


22,372 




Leather manufactures 


3.769 


8,758 


Machinery and machines— 




3,811 


Agricultural (including 






agricultural implements i 
Agricultural— ploughs am 


.53,479 


1.047 




16.045 


harrows 


3,490 


9,212 


Dairying 


4,289 


1,040 


Electric 


41.325 


2,453 


Engines, gas and oil 


19,849 


1,493 


Gas-making 


6,938 


11.308 


Mining.. 


2.555 


1,228 


Printing 


2.742 


2,669 


Refrigerating 


3,752 




Sewing 


22,832 


16,674 


Woodworking . . 


6,550 


2.095 


Other .. 


32,676 


10,260 


Manures, unenumerated 


1,117 


3.105 


Marble, and manufactures of 


1.629 


4,726 


Medicines, patent and pro- 




4.383 


prietary 


10,532 


18,918 1 


Metal, manufactures of— 




26,986 1 


typewriters 


3,995 


13,. 335 


weighbridges and 






weighing-machines 


3,797 


12,660 


unenumerated 


18,183 




Nails 


24,631 


3,814 ' 


Oils- 




3,303 . 


Kerosene 


137,515 


7,348 


Other kinds 


34,248 


2.247 


Onions 


7,115 



288 



NKW EBALAND OmCIAL TXAB-BOOK. 



List of Principal Articlbs imported from United States of 
America in 1905 — continued. 



Paints and colours - 


£ 


Sausage skins 


£ 
10,684 


ground in oil 


1,740 


Seeds, grass 


and cloTer 


7,475 


mixed ready 


for use.. 5,802 


Soap 




8.095 


unenumerated 1,925 


Spirite .. 


, , 


1,841 


Paper bags 


2,027 


Siationery, 


manniactared 


4.d27 


Paperhangings 


2.163 


< 


other 


7,625 


Paper— 




Stone 




1.046 


Prioting 


28,429 


Sugar, glucose 


3,660 


Wr.tiDg 


1,584 


Timber .. 




4,876 


Other kinds 


2,H07 


Tinware . . 


, , 


1,885 


Perfumery 


2,379 


Tobacco, manufacfeurod 


.. 103.687 


Photographic goods 


2,645 


cigars 


5,620 


Picturts, paintings, draw. 


cigarettes 


45.778 


ing(), &o. 


1,994 


To( Is and implements 


60.754 


Piciure frames and mount? . . 1 , 735 


Tramway plant 


17,849 


Plasterof-paris 


1,682 


Turpentine. 


tarebin^, a 


id 


Plate and plated ware . . 2,074 


driers .. 


, , 


19,774 


Potatoes .. 


7.181 


Varnish and 


gold-sise 


9,557 


Pf in ting materials 


1,681 


Watches .. 


, , 


8.600 


Pro vit- ions — eggs . . 


1.227 


Wax, paraffin. &c... 


6,09T 


Provisions, n.o.e. . . 


2,052 


Woodenware, mouldings 


6,448 


Pumps 


4,016 


• 


other 


90,915 


Railway plant 


1,487 


Oihf r imports 


49.850 


Saddlery and harness 1 , 949 










* 


materials 






£1,488.501 


for 


1.354 








Imports from Ge 


RMANY, 1896-1905. 






1 

1 Admitted Free i 


D which Duty 


Proportions per Cent 


Vttar 






I ttar. 


1 of Duty. 1 


Payable. 


Admitted Free 


On which 




• 1 23,404 




of Duty. 


Duty Payable. 


1806 


£ 
77,977 


2308 


7692 


1897 


29,101 


127,965 


18-53 


81-47 


1898 


. ' 29,957 


123,145 


19-57 


80-43 


1899 


. i 34,937 


125,668 


21-76 


78-24 


1900 


.', 39,149 ' 


142,925 


21-50 


78-50 


1901 


. 1 40,377 


158,144 


20-33 


7967 


1902 


. , 46,084 


164,476 


21-89 


7811 


1903 


70,191 


204,106 


25-59 


74-41 


1904 


. 1 69.594 


239,210 


22-54 


77 46 


1905 


64,920 


212,547 i 


23-40 


7660 



Among the imports from Germany the principal items in value 
were musical instruments, fancy goods and toys, iron and steel, 
machinery, hardware, &c., and glassware. 



FBlNOIFAIi ARTICLES IlfPOBTBD FROM OBRHAMT. 



289 



List of Principal Articles imported from Germany in 1905. 



Adds, ac«tio 


1,260 


Apparel and slops, n.o.e. 


8,367 


6uketwar« and wiokerware . . 


1,082 


Boots and shoes 


2,899 


Bnuhware and brooms 


2,181 


Building materials . . 


2,076 


Ouna, porcelain, and parian- 




ware 


6,208 


Clocks 


1,840 


Ootton piece-goodfi . . 


2,116 


GnUery 


1,708 


Dapery .. 


8,620 


Drug#, cbemioals, and drug- 




gists' wares 


4,987 


Dyes 


1,167 


Eerthenware 


1,770 


fsDoy goods and toys 


28,706 


Fictarms .. 


1,122 


Pnmiiare, cabinetware, and 




apholstery 


6,478 


Qlass— 




Bottles, empty . . 


2,162 


Other kinds 


1,262 


Glassware .. 


11,080 




1,249 


Hardware, hoUoware, ard iron- 




mongery.. 


10,249 


Hosiery 


2,126 


Instruments, mosioal — 




Pianos .. 


47,368 


Other kinds 


1,789 



Instruments, other kinds 


1,680 


Iron and steel 


12,067 


Lamps, lanterns, and lamp- 




wick 


7,941 


Leather .. 


1,336 


Machinery and machines . . 


10,004 


Manures .. 


9,488 


Matches and vestas 


1.076 


Metal, manufactures of 


1,909 


Nails 


8,040 


Naptha (wood) 


1,852 


Paperhangings 


2.836 


Paper, printing . . 


3,269 


, other kinds.. 


3,621 


Picture-frames and mounts. . 


1,030 


Plate and platedware 


1.365 


Seeds (grass and clover) 


6,928 


Spirita 


3,967 


Stationery (manufactured) . . 


2,942 


other .. 


4,036 


Textile piece-goods 


1,468 


Tobacco .. 


1,822 


Tobacco pipes and cases, &c. 
Tools and implements 


1,761 


2,648 


Wooden ware (mouldings) . . 


4,979 


Woollen piece-goods 


3,101 


Zinc (plain sheet) . . 
Other imports 


. 8,128 


26,240 


Total.!.. 


£-277,467 



10-Ybk. 



SECTION VIII.--EXPORTS AND TOTAL TRADE. 

Thb quantities and values of exports used in making up the figui 
given in this portion of the statistical information are obtained frc 
Customs entries. In estimating the value of exports the ** free 
board in New Zealand" value is given, and, as regards the ma 
items, tbe Collector of Customs examines carefully the amour 
stated, and compares them with current price-lists, to prevent ai 
overestimate. As a further safeguard, the values of wool, froz* 
meat, oats, wheat, tallow, phormium fibre, butter, and cheese a 
submitted tp the various Chambers of Commerce for their approi 
prior to the publication of the figures. Goods transhipped are i 
garded as destined for the counti-y where it is intended to lai 
them. 

The value of all the exports in 1905, inclusive of specie (£13,871 
was £15.655,947. The value of New Zealand produce exporte 
£15,503,530, gives an average of £17 I6s. 5d. per head of populatio 
against £17 5s. 7d. for the previous year. The increase in t 
value of exports of New Zealand produce for 1905 in respect 
that for 1904 amounts to £901,743, or 618 per cent. 

While a considerable increase is noticeable in the value of expoi 
of New Zealand produce for 1905 when compared with that for 19 
(£901,743), the imports, on the other hand, have already been shov 
to have fallen from £13,291,694 to £12,828,857, a decrease 
£462,837. 

The balance of trade was at the end of last year as under : — 

£ 
Exports, 1905 15,655,947 

ImportB, . .. 12,823,857 



Excess of exports for year . . £2,827,090 

The (Ufference is greater than that shown for the previo 
year (1904), when the balance of trade in favour of the colony w 
only £1,456,654. 

Exports to Differe?U Countries. 

The values of exports for the years 1895 and 1905 to the Unit 
Kingdom, the Australian States, with other British possessions, a 















DIV 


\GHm No ? 


EXPORTS. 




RISE IN VALUE OF EXPOfiTS FROM NEW ZEALAND, 




189&, 1900, and 1905. 






Foreign SUtoe 




, 


£9TO.337-* 






Foreip SUtes 




Britiftli Poaetiioni 
£2.591,002. 


' 


£654.039- 




BntUli ?onan)ODi 




^H 


n.m,m. 




Tfoitad Eiogdom 
illOSTJia 






fonign Stat«i 
X413,516/ 




United {Cingdam 










siMim 












X102S9,342 












United Kingdam 
















^.045,846, 














MJbdOmA. SUmMl Mlh,6bbMT 


k 


Imi.im, JmrAm. Tetr. 1905. 


p 

L 


' IndniM in fomtn Smm w« miimhI* to 


m 


Ditlb4 SUUg of liD(!ne» QinButy 


m 


1«9& £316 639 £l4Hi 


^H i«oo. imiot XMiw 1 


q 


im mim tmm. 



^■i%<^^ 



II 



TitDEN '■>_;;.: 



BXPOBTB TO DIFFERENT COUNTRIES. 



291 



to foreign countries, show the extent and development of outward 
trade ia regard to its distribution, considered for such period : — 



Countries. 








1895. 
£ 


1005. 
£ 


Unitei) King<1om . . 






. 7.045,646 


12,087,818 


New S<>uih Wales 








6-25, 691 


1,321,358 


Victoria . . 








350,931 


866,989 


Queensland 








20,364 


10,141 


Western Atistralia 








19,049 


36.043 


South Austialia .. 








12,089 


33,897 


Tasmania 








7.009 


26,598 


Oilier British possessions 








55,809 


21)6,831 


Uiii led States 








316.639 


716,301 


Other foreign porto 








96.877 


260,026 



£8.550,224 £15,655,947 

A comparison for the period 1896-1905 of the value of the export 
trade with the United Kingdom, Briiish colonies and possessions, 
and foreign countries, exhibits an increase of about 126 per cent. 
in case of exports to foreign States, against a rise of 92 per cent. 
in value of goods sent to British possessions, calculated on very 
much greater figures. The exports to the United Kingdom have 
risen about 60 per cent, in the decade. 



Ye*r. 



1896 
18'J7 
1898 
1899 
1000 
1001 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 

The following are the values of exports to different countries or 
places in 1905 and 1904, arranged in order of magnitude of increase 
or decrease in ihe later year to each : — 

Country. Colony. State. Ac. 

^e» South Wnles 
Uuited Kingrom 
'S^"'te«l StHte* of America 
^P^ Colony .. 

Q ''^guese East Africa 





Exports to 






Biiiish Cnlouies 


'• 


United Kingdom. 


and 

POBSeSBiODB. 


Foreign States. 


£ 


£ 


£ 


7,541,981 


1,346,544 


432,580 


8,168.123 


1,380,502 


468,368 


8.265,499 


1,532,511 


710,945 


9,427.515 


1,850,239 


660,581 


10,2o9.342 


2,332,780 


654,039 


9. 295,. 375 


2,907.412 


678,637 


9,450,648 


3,577,815 


616,514 


11,3-J5,075 


2,821,608 


843,695 


11,876.273 


2,0H8,C.9l 


788,884 


12,087,818 


2,591,802 


976,327 



1905. 


1904. 


locrease. 


£ 


£ 


£ 


.. 1,321,353 


843,720 


477,633 


. 12,0S7,818 


11,876,273 


211,545 


710,301 


598,921 


117,380 


02,404 


25,906 


36,498 


42,709 


12,420 


30,289 


48,903 


25,812 


23,151 


38,U58 


23,931 


15,027 


10,3«)4 




10,:^04 


7,649 




7,049 


26,598 


19,858 


6,740 



MEW 2BALAND OFFIOfAL YBJA-BOOK. 



Country, Colony, State, ftc. 


1906. 

J 


1904. 


Inereaae 

£ 


Navigators Islands 


45,185 


89,735 


5.400 


British Columbia 


8,620 


8,541 


6.079 


Friendly Islands 


39,434 


35,483 


4,001 


Denmark 


6,260 


3,080 


8,180 


Spain 


2,627 


, , 


2.627 


Japan 


3,544 


1,319 


2.225 


Society Islands 


27,089 


25,067 


2.022 


Qaeensland .. 


10,141 


8,214 


1,927 


New Caledonia 


3,643 


2,166 


1,377 


Belgium . . 


8,639 


7,314 


1,825 


Bengal 


4,240 


3,329 


911 


Caroline Islands 


1,373 


546 


827 


Argentine Republic 


1,734 


928 


806 


Transvaal Colony 


1,452 


730 


722 


New Britain . 


1,226 


667 


559 


Mftiaen ItJlaud 


555 


29 


526 


South Atiatralia 


33,897 


33,502 


395 


West IndioB 


866 


. , 


366 


Solomon Islands 


1,882 


969 


863 


Egypt 


260 




260 


Marshall Islands 


575 


825 


250 


Malta 


208 


,, 


208 


Italy 


118 


11 


107 


Banks Island . . 


87 


, , 


87 


Bombay 


76 


80 


46 


Philippiue Mandi 


56 


15 


41 


New Hebrides 


65 


26 


89 


China 


100 


73 


27 


New Guinea . . 


7 


, , 


7 


Orange River Colony . . 


18 


14 


4 


ChUi 


2 


, , 


2 


Peru.. 


1 


•• 


1 


Country, Colony, State, Ac. 


1905. 


1904. 
£ 


Decrease 
£ 


Hong Kong . . 


13,589 


36,031 


22,442 


Natal 


113,062 


127,503 


14,441 


Fiji 


46,904 


55,621 


8,717 


Victoria 


866,939 


871,935 


4,996 


Western Australia 


36,043 


40,393 


4,350 


Brazil 


865 


8,367 


2,502 


Fanning Island 


100 


2,171 


2,071 


Holland 


466 


2,423 


1.957 


Uruguay 


8,137 


8,813 


676 


Norfolk Island 


1,931 


2,332 


401 


Easter Island 




390 


390 


Sandwich Islands 


845 


1,219 


374 


Sweden 


168 


528 


360 


Uganda 


. • • 


217 


217 


Caylon 


266 


425 


159 


Singapore 


581 


705 


124 


Switzerland . . 


110 


218 


108 


Surprise Island 


9 


71 


62 


Rhodesia 


1 


28 


27 


Burmah 


9 


16 


7 


Norway 


• • • 


6 


6 


Russia 


■ • 


4 


4 


Madras 


19 


21 


2 


Austria 


S 


7 


1 



BXPOBT8. 



298 



Be-exports. 

The re-export trade of the colony would seem from the sub- 
joined figures to have been almost stationary for the last twelve years. 
The re-exports of merchandise in 1905 were valued at £138,539, 
or less than 1 per cent, of the total exports, excluding specie. 

ExpoBTs OF BamsH, Fobbign, and othbb Oolonial Pboduob 
(bxcludihq Spxcib). 





M 




M 


1894 .. 


. . 136,402 


1900 


.. 168.009 


1895 .. 


.. 127,966 


1901 


.. 179.350 


1896 .. 


.. 122.671 


1902 


.. 136.860 


1897 .. 


.. 144,966 


1903 


.. 133,734 


1898 .. 


.. 124,860 


1904 


.. 186,963 


1899 .. 


.. 123,682 


1906 


.. 138.539 



With these sums may be contrasted the re-export trade of New 
SoQth Wales — a State having less than double the population of 
New Zealand — which, exclusive of bullion and specie, amounted 
in 1904 to £5,680,829, or no less than 2107 per cent, of the value 
of all goods exported. 

Exports from the North and Middle Islands. 

The exports from the North and Middle Islands respectively, 
excluding '• Parcels-post," during the last five years were as 



^der :— 








Yeir. 


North blAiid. Middle iBlaDd. 


Proportion to 


Total Export. 




I £ 


North Island. 


Middle lAland. 


1901 .. 


.. 6,077,724 6,787,546 


47-24 


52-76 


1902 .. 


.. 7,085,275 6,543,389 


5199 


4801 


1903.. 


.. 7,994,227 6,995.307 


53-33 


46-67 


1904 .. 


.. 8,369,848 6,358,278 


56 88 


4317 


1905.. 


.. 8,648,646 6,986.691 


55-31 


44-69 


The North Island exported in 1905 


more than 


half of the 


total for the two Islands. 







Exports from Different Ports, dtc. 
The following table gives the values of the exports from each 
port in New Zealand for the years 1905, 1900, 1895, 1890, arranged 
ui order of magnitude for 1905 : — 



294 nw SEALAKD OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 





1906. 
£ 


vxo. 

M 


1805. 


isoa 


Wellington 


.. 8.035,803 


2,315,395 


1,140,854 


1,506,383 


Auckland 


.. 2.643.495 


2.008.801 


1.302,075 


1,237,600 


LytWlton and Chrisicburch 2,459,034 


2.522,912 


1,635,881 


2,251,412 


Dunedin 


.. 1,633,814 


1.478,071 


1,017,489 


1,117,011 


Timaru . . 


.. 1.042,403 


932.949 


474,658 


624,809 


Kapier .. 


.. 1,038.301 


770,169 


870.422 


963,520 


InvercargilPand Bluff 


.. 893,730 


741,750 


595,277 


475,997 


Poverty Bay 


.. 600,452 


450,125 


136,539 


183,700 


Now Plymouth . . 


.. 484.663 


503,921 


108,846 


61,968 


Oreymouth 


.. 412,396 


255,386 


257,065 


237,700 


Wanganui 


.. 403,670 


886,960 


241,053 


118,615 


Patea . . 


.. 286,737 


87,717 


40,817 


34,706 


Oamaru 


.. 201.641 


324,616 


300,893 


464,017 


Wairau and.Picton 


218,093 


141,033 


123,365 


228,030 


Kaipara 


.. 155.360 


144.680 


90.621 


100,978 


Nelson .. 


81,173 


68,303 


63.727 


68,668 


Wcstport 


56,428 


45,897 


40.736 


43,956 


Hokitika 


27.919 


25,475 


74,646 


87,409 


Tauranga 


. . 


616 


1 


33 



During the period covered by the above table the value of the 
exports from nearly all of the ports was substantial, and in some 
cafcos remarkable. The percentage of increase for the four chief 
pons of the colony was: Auckland, 113 60; Wellington, 101-53; 
Dunedin, 37-31 ; and Lyttelton, 9 22. 

Value of Articles exported. 

A comparative table showing the values of New Zealand domestic 
exports, according to their nature, for eighteen years will be found 
further on, with comments. The development for the period, ex- 

Sitjssed in nioney value, is from seven millions and a quarter to 
(toen millions and a quarter. 

But first a comparative statement of exports according to value 
1^- '> years is given, showing the amounts for various 

being the produce or manulacture of the colony, 
)8: — 



BXPOBT8. 



295 



Valub of Pbincipal Abticlbs exported, 1904 
Tear 1904. Tear 1005. 



The Minx. 
Coal 
Gold 
Silver and minerals 

Total 

The Fishbbibs. 

Pinh 

Ovstera 

Other 

Total 

The Fobbbt. 

PnDKTis 

Kaiiri-gum . . 
Tiinlier— 

Sftwn and hewn 

Other 

Total 

Animals and Pboduob. 
Bacon and bame 
Beef and pork (salted) 

Butter 

Cheese 

Hides 

Livestock 

Prexerved meats 

Proien meat 

lUbbit-skins . . 

San8age-f*kin8 

Shf^ep-skins and pelts . . 

Tallow 

Wool 

Other 

Total 

AORICULTUBAL PbODUCTS. 

Bran and sharps 
Chaff 
Ploar 
Grain- 
Barley 

Beans and peats 
Maize 
Malt 
Oau 
Wheat 
Hops 
Oatmeal 
Potatoes 

Seeds lertL^s and clover) 
Other kinds 

Totals .. 



£ £ 

189.898 107,062 

1,987,501 2,003.986 

128.709 128.860 



AND 1905. 




Increase 


DecreaM 


in 


in 


1906. 


1905. 


£ 


£ 




32,836 


106.435 




6.151 


.. 



2.251,108 2.329.858 78.750 



18.284 
2.785 
2.693 

23,762 



21,166 
2,547 
1.994 

25.707 



2,882 



1,945 



238 
699 



11,156 


7,408 


, , 


3,758 


601.817 


661,444 


59,627 


•• 


254.021 


318,895 


64,874 




2,194 


3,668 


1,474 


•• 


769,188 


891,410 


122,222 


•• 


6.222 


4,405 


1,817 


10.601 


18,851 


3,250 




1,380,460 


1.408,557 


28,097 




185,486 


205.171 


19,685 




53,431 


98.826 


45,395 


.. 


37,733 


58,791 


16,058 




64,588 


74.451 


9,863 




2,793,599 


2,694,432 




99,167 


40,843 


66,983 


26,140 




56,484 


47,299 




9,135 


401,726 


500,744 


99,018 




3/>7,974 


347,888 




10,086 


4,678,826 


5,881,383 


707,507 




16,485 


28,790 


7,305 




10,079,408 


10,921,521 


842,118 




8,895 


13,268 


4,378 




474 


1,483 


1.009 




8.079 


8,685 


556 




13,822 


11,409 




1,918 


40,113 


38,858 




1,255 


53 


136 


88 




96 




, , 


96 


212,724 


99,664 




118,060 


126,035 


144,874 


18,339 




28,740 


20,088 




8,702 


548 


168 




885 


9,3G6 


8,017 




6,849 


95.S35 


80,598 




15,287 


19,963 


11,687 




8,826 



£559,248 £428,280 



£130,963 



296 NKW ZBALAND OPPICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 

Value op Principal Articles bxpobted, 1904 and 1905— continued. 

Increase Decrease 
Tear 1904. Tear 1906. in in 









1906. 


1905. 


Manufactores. 


£ 


£ 


£ 


£ 


Apparel 


2,105 


2,817 


712 




Leather 


67,940 


60,966 


, . 


6,974 


Phormium fibre . . * 


710,281 


696,467 


, , 


13,814 


Woollen manufactures 


6,857 


7,102 


745 


, , 


Other manufactures . . 


109,679 

896,362 

22,716 


116,608 
882,960 


6,929 


•• 


Total 


•• 


13,402 


Miscellaneous 


23,794 


1,078 


•• 


Total exports (colonial produce 








and manufactures) . . 


14,601,787 


15,603,530 


901,743 




Specie 


9,598 


13,878 


4,280 




Other exports (British and 










foreign) 


136,968 


138,539 


1,576 


•• 



Total exports . . £14,748,348 £16,655,947 907,599 

The class designated ** Animals and Produce *' shows by far th^ 
greatest value, the sum for 1905 being £10,921,521, which include^- 
£5,381,333 for wool and £2,694,432 for frozen meat. The totaL 
value of exports in this class increased daring the year by £842,119* 
on a total of £10,079,408 in 1904. 

Although the value of wool exported in 1905 is greater than that^ 
for the previous year, the quantity will be found to have decreased. 

"The Mine" takes second place among the classes for total 
value, with an export of coal, gold, silver, and other minerals 
amounting to £2,329,858 for 1905, being an increase of £78.750 oib 
£2,251,108, the export for the previous year. 

** Agricultural Products," principally grain, potatoes, and seeds, 
show a decrease of £130,963 on the value exported in 1904, some of 
the items showing a considerable falling-ofif. Wheat, however, is an 
exception, for the increase of export value is £18,339 for the year. 

** The Forest" shows an export for last year valued at £891,410, 
which is an increase of £122,222 on the figures for the previous year. 
Sawn and hewn timber was exported to an increased value of 
£64,874, and kauri-gum by the sum of £59,627. 

•* Manufactures " are set down at £882,960 in 1905, being 
£13,402 less than in the previous year. Phormium fibre shows a 
decrease on the operations for 1904 of £13,814. Woollen manufac- 
tures sent abroad increased by £745, leather decreased by £6,974, 
and apparel, with other manufactures, increased by £6,641. 

The smallest group in respect to value is ** The Fisheries." The 
total for the group was £25,707 last year, an increase of £1,945 on 
the value of similar exports in 1904. 

Quantities of Articles exported. 

The exports of New Zealand produce or manufacture for the 
last two years have also to be considered in relation to quantity, 



BXPOBT8. 



297 



and the articles are again grouped in the next table according to 
the same classification as that used for purposes of comparing the 

values. 

QUANTITIBS 07 THB PaDffOIPAL ABTXCLES 07 NsW ZSALAND PbODDCE 

BXPOBTBD. 



Items. 


Year 1904. 


Tear 1005. 


Inorease 
in 1906. 


Decrease 
inl905. 


The Miner- 










Goal .. .. Tons 


165.220 


122,817 


, , 


42,403 


Gold .. .. Oz. 


620,323 


620,485 


162 


1 


Siher 


1,094,461 


1,179,744 


86,283 




Hinenls .. Tons 


1,607 


691 


, , 


916 


The Fisheries :— 










Pbh .. .. Owt. 


9.601 


11,286 


1,684 




Oysters .. .. Doz. 


836,868 


304,671 




31,197 


Whalebone .. Lb. 


8,248 


6,152 


1,904 




The Forest :— 










Fungus .. .. Owt. 


4,936 


3,428 




1,508 


Gam (kauri) .. Tons 


9.203 


10,883 


1,680 




Timber (sawn and hewn) S.ft. 


60,326,992 


75,370,136 


15,043,146 




Animals and Produce:— 










fiacoD and hams . . Owt. 


1,674 


1,252 




422 


Beef and pork (salted) » 


7,458 


9,994 


2,536 




Better .. .. ^ 


314,360 


305,722 




'8.638 


Cheese 


84,626 


88,662 


4,036 




Hides .. ..No. 


64,823 


101,378 


46,555 


[\ 


Live-stock (cattle, 










horses, sheep, pigs) . 

Heato (preserved) .. Owt. 

• (frozen) .. « 


8,677 


12,986 


4,409 




22.788 


28,589 


5. 751 




1,912.979 


1,690,684 




222.295 


Saosageskins . . » 


12,460 


11,202 


. . 


1,258 


Skins (rabbit) .. No. 


6,103,930 


8,831,107 


2,727,177 




. (sheep) and pelts ^ 


6,037,460 


4,931,191 




1,106,269 


Tallow .. .. Owt. 


322,480 


318,942 




3,538 


Wool .. .. Lb. 


144,647,376 


139,912,737 




4,734,639 


Agricultural Products :— 










Bran and sharps . . Tons 


3,664 


4,215 


551 




Chaff 


109 


286 


177 


, , 


Flour .. .. ^ 


387 


448 


61 




(Jiain, barley .. Bush. 


75,193 


49,215 




25,978 


, beans and peas 


193.017 


187,829 




6,188 


, maize .. • 


420 


757 


337 


. , 


. malt .. . 


374 






374 


. oats 


2.693,417 


1,076,916 




1,616,501 


, wheat « 


813,635 


967,151 


153,616 




Hops .. .. Owt. 


6,758 


3,301 




2,452 


Oatmeal .. Tons 


94 


12 


, . 


82 


Potatoes .. « 


3,698 


341 




3,367 


S6ed8(grass and clover) Bush* 


259,240 


250,029 


. . 


9,211 


Manufactures : — 










Ale and beer . . Gals. 


20,306 


10,723 




9,583 


Oordage .. Owt. 


615 


3,757 


3,142 




Leather .. .. • 


11,177 


9,830 




1,347 


Phormium fibre . . Tons 


26,936 


27,877 


941 


, , 


Soap .. .. Owt. 


8,251 


7,637 


•• 


614 



* At 901b. to the bushel. 



S98 



nw ZBALAND OPPICIAL TXAB-BOOK. 



The increases in certain articles, amongst them wheat, silver, 
timber, kaurigum, hides, and rabbit -skins, are very satisfactory, 
and in some cases considerable; while, on the other hand, the 
export of coal, wool, frozen meats, sheep-skins and pelts, oats and 
hops, with eome other items, declined in 1905. 

New Zealand Province exported : Value for eighteen Years. 

The position as to value in respect of a period of eighteen years, 
1888 to 1905 inclusive, is presented in a table giving the domestic 
exports for each. The most important items of export given under 
the heading ** Other New Zealand Produce '* are coal, silver, 
minerals, fish, oysters, fungus, kauri-gum, timber, bacon and hams, 
salted and preserved meats, tallow, sheep and rabbit skins, hides, 
sausage-skins, and live-stock. The aggregate value of these in 1905 
was £2,348,229. 

Exports of New Zealand Prodccb. 






Wool. 



188813.115,098 

18893,970,376 

18904, 150,5% 

1891|4, 129,080 

1892|4,313,307 

1893!3.774,738 

1894'4,827,010 

189513,002,131 

189G|4,39l,848 

1897 4,443,144 

189S|4.045,804 

189914.324,02 

190(jj4,749.190 

1901 13,099,103 

1902!3.354,5G3 

1908i4,041 274 

1904 1 4, 073.820 

1905 5,331,383 



Gold. 



£ 
914,309 

785,490 

761,300 

1,007,172 

951,903 



Frozen «""«»• 

Meat. ' ^x"°^ 
•^ I Cheese. 



Agricul- 

taral 
Produce. 



£ 

628,800 

783,374 
1,087,017 
1,194,724 
1,033,377 



915,921,1,085,107 
887,805:1,194,645 
l,lG2,18l[l,2G2,711 
1,041, 428:1. 251, 993 
980,20411,500,280 
l,080,09ljl,098,750 
1,513,180 2,088,850 
1,439,002 2,123,881 
1,753,784|2,253,202 
1,951,420 2,718,703 
3,197,043 
2,793,69W 
2,094,432 



2,037,832 
1,987,501 
2,093,936 



£ 

197.170 

213,945 

207,087 

280,933 

318,204 

354,271 

800,483 

378,510 

411,882 

553,122 

539,460 

713,617 

909,731 

1,121,091 

1,309,341 

1,513,005 

1,605,940 

1,013,728 



£ 
905,907 

1,424,297 



Mana- 
factures 



Other I 
N.Z, Pro- 
duce. 



Total 



£ 
288,3^ 

509,680 

1,289,864 547,947 

894,4671420,357 

1,035,687 367,677 

716,546 345,636 

317,655'224,958 

326,029Jl88,70: 

572,355|198,081 

495, 175' 197,00l|l, 360.735 

410, G77|253,805 1,696,796 

913,678 378.0661,867,716 

1 , 230 , 565 ,549.342'l ,992,932 

1 ,632,386 425.142 1,905,692 

1 ,046, 980755 2822,302,268 

744,846 823,368'2,480.775 

669,243 896,362'2.126,310 

423,280:882.960'2,408.801 



£ 
1.260,461 

1,288,647 

1,393,687 

1,616,756 

1,345,703 

1.365,164 

1.266.626 

1.409,889 

1,309,749 



£ 
7,255.128 

9,042.008 

9,428,761 

9,400.094 

9,365,868 

8,557,443 

9,085,148 

8,890,153 

9,177,336 

9,596,267 

10.324.988 

11.799,740 

13,055,249 

12,690,460 

13,498,599 

14,838,192 

14,601,787 

15,503,530 



The preceding table shows that the value of the exports of New 
Zealand produce fell from £9,428,761 in 1890 to £8,390,153 in 
1895, then rose to £13,055,249 in 1900, and had in 1905 increased to 
£15,503,530, the highest value yet attained in any one year. 



DIAGRAM No 3. 



lass 

1900. 
1905, 


VALUE OF EXPORT OF FROZEN MEAT, 1895 1900, 1905. 




MUm,7\l 










je2,123,8BL 










12.694432, 












VALUE OF EXPORT OF BUTTER, 1895, 1900, 1905. 


1 t89& 

mi 

II 1906 


-£227.601 


1 








sj4o,m. 










Mimmi^ 




1 






i 


VALUE < 


}F EXPORT OF PHORM 


iy»l, 1695, 1900, 1905. 





« 



1695 [J mm 

1900 [ JE832.1« 



1906 



'. I 



r'Upi-/^ -^ 






WOOL BZPORTED AND PRODUCED, 



299 



Thus there was a Det increase of exports, since 1895, to tho 
value of £7,113p377, all New Zealand protluce. Witb the amount 
of increase in money must be considered the state of prices of tho 
various kinds of produce. 

The export of wool, measured by quantity, rose from 103,817,0771b, 
in 1890 to 139.912.737 lb. in 1903, or at the rate of 3608 per cenc., 
and that of frozen meat from 898,80 i cwt. to 1,090,081 cwc. 

Gold. too. wiiich was exported to the quantity of 187,041 oz. ia 
1890, increased to 520. 4So oz, in 1905, tiie rate of increase being 
177-33 per cent. 

Wool cxjKivied aitd produced. 

The quantity of wool exported in 1905, as nreviously shown, was 
139.912.787 lb„ valued at £5;3yi,333— a decrease of 4,731,039 lb,. 
Of 3 27 per cent., on the quaniiiy exported in the previous year, 
but an increase of Jfc707,507, or 15 1 4 per cent., on the value, The 
annual production of woul is best estimated by taking the exports 
for thu twelve months immediately precedin*^ the commencement 
of shearin^j;, and adding thereto tfie quantity used in the colony for 
manufacturing purposes. But this meLhod does not allow for wool 
or sheep-skins exported. 

The following shows the produce for each of the last eighteen 
years endinf^ on the 30th September : — 



T«tf eoding 30tb Sap tern ber. 


Qutttititr 

CJKpolltfCl. 


Qimiitlty 
pili'ch4iHH4l hy 


TotaJ AT»iUftl 
Prod u CO. 




LU. 


U., 


lib. 


1888 


8a,27C.i>68 


4. 0711, SOS 


93.355.ft31 


188U 


Uo, 018^507 


3.550,004 


90.174.511 


lau) 


102,522.185 


2.U7'J,2'J3 


106.501,478 


li»9l 


108,61U.473 


2.1)18,073 


111,537,546 


1802 


110,800,(50 


3.38.S,*i'>t 


lU. 240, 004 


IH'JB 


119,043,874 


2,02U.b55 


122.273,729 


1S'.14 


128,490,4.')7 


2.47CJ55 


130,050,013 


'-■'"■ 


120,fJ3:^,7<>9 


3,200, KHi> 


132.03^001 




128,801), GTS 


3.080,984 


132, JW, 007 




134,4lt)/jr>5 


3,208,400 


li7,70'J.424 


mm 


15O.40l,3U'J 


3. 70 i, 831 


151,105,230 


iftOa 


143,044,203 


4.258,305 


147,1K)2.708 


I'JOO 


144,82!J,r,i5 


3.2J3,302 


148,052,007 


3901 


143,004,780 


4.020,024 


147.004,713 


lOOfi 


l.>'j,05i./H'^3 


4,203,912 


150, 8 15.875 


V,tO\ 


160,910,003 


5.204,a->3 


106,214.343 


I'.KH 


Hl,031,n99 


5.l01,4ol 


140,223.150 


VjOo 


140.680,71.7 


3,U51,343 


150,541.110 



From these figures it appears that, notwithstan^in)^' the ap- 
parent decrease frotn 1393 to 1901, and for 1901. the wool-chp h^is 
increased by over 61 J per cent, during the period covered by the 
Uble. 

To arrive at a perfectly correct estimate of the increase in wool- 
production it would be necessary to take into consideration the pro- 
portion of greasy, coured (and sliped), and washed wool exported 



1 



800 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL ¥ BAR* BOOK. 



each year, the waehing process, of course, greatly redacing febe 
apparent weight. The percentages of greasy, scotared. and washed 
wool to the total quantities exported during the last eight years 
are:— 



1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 



QroftBj. 


Scoored ftod 8tlp«d 


W*ab«d. 


Par Cent. 


Per C«nl 


Per Cenk 


7862 


20-36 


l-iH^M 


77 54 


2164 


liffl^B 


78-62 


2010 


I'^mB 


7825 


2061 


1*1^1 


7382 


24 26 


1*9^1 


7647 


2215 


1'8^| 


7987' 


1898 


1-99^ 


82 09 


16-83 


1-09 



I Although the increase in the wool-production since 1888 shown 
above is, of course, mainly due to the greater number of sheep — 
namely. 19.130,875 m April, 1905 — it becomes necessary to no 
that tliere is a diminution since 1902 to the number of 1,211.85! 
In fact, the number of sheep has receded in three years to less thai 
the number for 1892, chiefly in consequence of killing for export. 

A comparative statement for several years is supplied, showing 
the number of flocks in groups of sizes : — 



lElfl 



I 



I 



Numsa 


OP Flocks, 1892 to 1905. 






»il6 of HockB. 


1609. 


lasL 


iao«. 


1898. 


IWJ. 


1009. 


1908. 


Under 500 .. 
500 and under 1.000. . 
1,000 , 2.000.. 
2.000 5,000.. 
5.000 , 10.000.. 
10,000 . 20,000.. 
20.000 and upwards . . 


6.622 
2.033 
1,193 
761 
314 
231 
176 


10.314 

2.427 

1,409 

933 

1 345 

230 

179 

15,837 


12,028 
2,605 
1,460 
892 
340 
281 
147 


12.686 
2.708 

I 2,412* 

341 
231 
144 


12.239 
2.810 

2.62it 

352 
196 

139 


12.428 11.545! 
2,923 3.120 

2.731: §3,064 

342 874 
207 203 

110 97 


Tot^s 


13.530 


17.703 


18,722 


18.357 


18.761 13.423 



• Frooi l/H) to 2,500, 1.798 flocks : from fi,fiOO to 5fiO<K 61 < flocks. 
t FrtiiD l.roo to S.fiOa, IJBftl flocks ; from 9L600 lO S.OOIX t^ (locks. 
I Fioui 1.000 to 1600. fl.081 flocks; from 8,500 to 5,000. &10 fiocka. 
I From ],0D0 to S^fiOO, 2,3lS0 flocks ; from 2,500 lo 5,000. 7'M flocks. 



It will be apparent that the general tendency of increase sin^ 
the year 1892 is towards the multiplication of the smaller flocks, 
whose owners are better able to cope with the rabbit diflBcult 
than the large runholders. 

Export of Eabbit'skins, 
Prior to 1878 rabbit-skins were a very small item in the exporis. 
but in that year the number sent out of the colony amounted to 
3.951,209. Ten years after (1888) the export had risen to 11,809.407. 
from which it increased to 17.041.106 in 1893. the greatest number 
as yet exported in a year. From 1895 the fall was rapid, and the 
export for 1898 only reached 6,607.934 skins. In 1899 there was 
a 6h*ght upward tendency, the number exported being 7,891.648. 



Gir^H 



n 





BZPORT OF RABBIT- 8KINB» BTO. 



301 



which, however, fell to 6,690,898 in the year 1900. In 1901 
7,122,008 skins were exported, and in 1905 the number rose to 
8»831,107 skins. 

The figures for the years 1893 to 1905 are quoted : — 



Year. N™ 


mberofRabbit-tkinB 


Tear. 


Namber of Babbit-skins 


exported. 


exported. 


1893 . . 


. 17,041,106 


1900 .. 


5,690,893 


1894 .. 


. 14,267,885 


1901 .. 


7,112,008 


1895 . . 


. 15,229,314 


1902 .. 


.. 6,139,794 


1896 .. 


. 10,828,612 


1908 .. 


.. 6,101,899 


1897 .. 


8,099,384 


1904 .. 


.. 6,103,930 


1898 .. 


6.607.934 


1905 .. 


.. 8,831,107 


1899 .. 


7,891,648 







From the above it will be seen that the importance of the export 
has very much diminished. The fall, represented in money vsdue, 
has been : — 



V<Mr 


ValaeofBabbit-skiDS 


Year. 


Valae of Babbit-skins 


zwr. 


exported. 


exported. 


1893 


.. 188,962 


1900 


41,689 


1894 


87,993 


1901 


.. 57,046 


1895 


85,022 


1902 


.. 52,566 


1896 


66.699 


1903 


40,727 


1897 


47,472 


1904 


40,843 


1898 


51,607 


1905 


.. 66,983 


1899 


81,118 







While the amount of money received for this produce of the 
colony is less than in some of the earlier years shown, it may be 
a satisfactory result, as seemingly indicating some abatement of the 
rabbit pest. The increase for 1905 is probably due to the more 
vigorous enforcement of the laws relating to the destruction of 
fabbits, as there does not appear to be any report of an unusual 
increase in their number. Large quantities of frozen rabbits are 
DOW exported, and are alluded to in the remarks on the frozen-meat 
industry on the next page. 

Export of Sheep-skins and Pelts. 

These form a more important article of ex|K)rt at the present 
time than the rabbit-skins, though in the year 1888 the position was 
the reverse as regards value in money. In 1888 the number of 
sheep-skins and pelts sent away from New Zealand was 1,646,401, 
against 4,931,191 in 1905, a rise of 199 per cent, for the period 
between those years. The value increased from £88,574 to £500,744^ 
or 499 per cent. Figures for the last ten years are quoted : — 

Tear. 

1896 .. 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 .. 



Export of Staeep-flkioa 


Tear. 


Export of Sheep-skiDa 


and Pelts. 




and Pelts. 


No. 




No 


.. 3,001,791 


1901 . 


.. 4,601,531 


.. 3,688,051 


1902 . 


.. 6,144,680 


.. 4,995,326 


1903 . 


. 7.142,531 


.. 4,960,054 


1904 . 


.. 6,037,460 


.. 4,669,430 


1905 . 


.. 4,931,191 



302 



NBW SBALAND OPPICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



Export of Tallow. 
Besides wool and meat, tallow is largely exported, and since 
the year 1883, when 136,460 cwt. were sent away, the export 
has increased to 847,888 owe. in 1905. In 1904 the quantity was 
322,480 cwt. The latest ten years show the following results :— 







Tallow xxpobtbd. 






Te»T8. 


Cw». 


£ 


Tean. 


Cwt. 


£ 


18'J6 .. 


.. 222,540 


208,821 


1901 .. 


. 830.360 


351,710 


1897 .. 


.. 310,200 


259.964 


1902 .. 


. 4-24,060 


550,131 


1898 .. 


.. 347,160 


802,141 


1903 .. 


. 396,940 


517.871 


1899 .. 


.. 388,620 


311,649 


1904 .. 


. 322,480 


357,974 


1900 .. 


.. 867,780 


368,473 


1905 .. 


. 318.942 


847,888 



The decreases for 1903, 1904, and 1905 synchronize with those 
of the number of bheep in the colony. 

Frozen Meat exported. 
Frozen meat now takes second place among the exports of New 
Zealand produce. In 1905, 1,690,684 cwt., valued at £2,694,432, 
were shipped in the colony. An account of the development of 
the industry was given in a special article in the Year-book, 1894. 
The total export for each year since the commencement of the trade 
has been : — 

Year. 

1882 .. 

1883 .. 

1884 .. 

1885 .. 

1886 .. 

1887 .. 

1888 .. 

1889 .. 

1890 .. 

1891 .. 

1892 .. 

1893 .. 

The above figures for 1899 include 129,224 cwt. (or 4.876.534 
number) of frozei^ rabbits and hares in the skin; those for 1900 
inclu«le 12,260 (731 cwt.) of liares, and 6,501,997 rabbits, weijjhing 
167,971 cwt., valued at £154.856 ; those for 1901 include 42.202 
(2,943 cwt.) of hares, and 4.830.669 (124,353 cwt.) of rabbits, valued 
at £117,813 ; those for 1902 include 23,421 (1.643 cwt.) of hares, and 
4,776.914 (123.229 cwt.) of rabbiis, valued at £118,884; those for 
1903 include 8.145 (588 cwt.) of hares, and 4,452.829 ai2.972cwt.) 
of rabbits, valued at £1(0,088; those for 1904 include 8.509 
(683 cwt.) of hares, and 3,78S,o76 (100,442 cwt.) of rabbits, valued 
at £86,931 ; and those for 1905 include 8,173 (658 cwt.) of hares, 
and 2,807,242 (78,170 cwt.) of rabbits, valued at £60,782: so that 
rabbits can hardly now be looked upon as wholly worthless, 
especially when the export of the skins, previously remarked upon, 
is also considered. 



Lb. 


Year. 


Lb. 


1,707,328 


1894 .. 


. 114.827.216 


9,853,200 


1895 .. 


. 127.018,864 


28,44.'), 228 


1896 .. 


. 128.676,544 


33,204,976 


1897 .. 


. 157,687,152 


38,758,160 


1898 .. 


. 173,798.576 


4.0, 03."), 984 


1899 .. 


. 208,972,624 


61,857 376 


1900 . . 


. 206,6J1,072 


73,504,064 


1901 .. 


. 208,015,264 


100,«.f34,766 


1902 . . 


. 239,. 018,384 


110,199,082 


1903 . . 


. «i66,408,800 


97, 686,. 0.07 


1904 .. 


. 214, 253, 648 


100,262,453 


1905 . . 


. 189, 356. 608 



QBAIM EXPOBTED. 



303 



To ascertain the total value of the meat export in 1905 it is 
Decessary to take into consideration, with the amount of £2,694.432, 
Talue of frozen meat before stated, £6,121 for frozen poultry and 
£14,720 for frozen fish; also the value of preserved meats, 
£74,451 ; of salted beef and pork, £13,851 ; and of bacon and 
hams, £4,405. 

20old exported. 

The amount of gold exported in 1905 was 520,485]oz., an in- 
crease of 162 oz. on the quantity exported in 1904. 

The total quantity of gold entered for duty to the 8l8t December, 
1905, which may be reckoned as approximately the amount obtained 
in the colony, was 17,146,6t^6 oz., of the value of £67,230,584. For 
fuller information, see special section on mining. 



Grain exported. 

The value of the grain exported in 1905 was £294,574. 
gnun exports for 1904 and 1905 were made up as under : — 



The 





eVated '.'. 
y and value 


in04. 


]fl05. 


Wheat .. 
Oats 

Barley . . 
Malt .. 
Maize .. 
Peaa and beans 
Rje aod unenum 


BuHhels. £ 

818,535 126,086 

2,693,417 SJl2,724 

. 76,193 13,322 

874 96 

420 53 

193,017 40,113 

22 3 


BuHljels. £ 
967,151 144,374 
1,076,916 99,664 
49,215 11,409 

"757 '136 

187,829 38,858 

985 133 


Total quantit 


3,776,978 £392,340 


2,282,853 £294,574 



Compared with the previous year, the quantity and value of grain 
exported in 1905 show a considerable decrease. 

From the year 1890 to 1898, inclusive, the decline in the export 
of wheat was very great, while for 1899, 1900, and 1901 there was a 
revival, as will be seen by the following figures. In 1902 and 
1903 the quantity sent out of the colony fell to 194,671 bushels and 
71,700 bushels respectively, in 1904 the export was 813,535 bushels, 
and in 1905 it was 967,151 bushels. 



V*a.r 


Wheat exported. 


Year. 


Wheat exported 


xoar. 


Bushels. 


Kushels. 


1890 


.. 4,467,026 


1900 


.. 2,867,069 


1892 


.. 2,460,774 


1901 


.. 2,301,092 


1894 


228,904 


1902 


194,671 


1896 


463,123 


1903 


71,700 


1898 


10,090 


1904 


813.535 


1899 


.. 2,901,676 


1905 


967,151 



The imports of wheat during 1898 exceeded the exports by upwards 
of 50,000 bushels, but from 1899 to 1905 the imports were prac- 
tically nil, the small quantity introduced into the colony being for 
seeding purposes only. 



B04 



nw SKA LAND OmoiAL TBAB-BOOK. 



In oata, tbe quantity exported in 1905 shows a decrease over 
that for the previous year : — 



Year, 

1891 
1892 
1894 
1896 
1898 
1699 



Sxpor 
Bu»belt. 

4,053.414 
3.830.444 
1,963.288 
2,247,053 
816,210 
3,520.734 



1900 
1901 

1902 
1908 
1904 
1905 



Bxpott of CMS. 

, 5,818,648 

. 10,514.924 

. 5,185,8ia, 

. 4,956.380 

- 2.693,417 

. 1,076,916 



The acreages under cereals for the last four years have been : — 

1903-1903. 190:^1904. lOtM^lOOd. 1906-tSlll 

AQr«t. Acr«B, AoroB, Acra&> 

194.355 230.346 258,015 2i2.965 

483,659 409,390 342,189 360,569 

27,991 34,681 29,484 d9,644 

Butter and Cheese exported. 
The total quantity of butter and cheese exported in the past 
8ev6uteea years, and the amount of either commodity gent to the 
United Kingdom, is tabulated :— 



LftDd iQ wheal (Eoc threshing) 
, oafca 

barley 



Tear. 


Total 

Export of 
Butter 


Butter 

Exported to tbe 

United 

Kingdom. 


Total 
Export of 


t Obeete 
Exported to tbe 
1 Dnit«Ml 
1 Kingdom. 




Cwt. 


Ofrt. 


Cwt, 


Cwt 


1889 


37,955 


21,099 


26,558 


7.638 


1890 




34,816 


26.579 


40,451 


31.043 


1891 




39,430 


28.969 


39,770 


29.500 a 


1892 




53.930 


41,509 


41,493 


30.000 ■ 


1898 




58,149 


52,363 


46,901 


41,667 ■ 


1894 




60,771 


58,845 


55,655 


54.540 


1895 




57,964 


55.194 


76,743 


73.369 


1896 




71,353 


60,092 


71,372 


58,692 


1897 




99.002 


79.849 


77,683 


67.681 


1898 




96,801 


80,814 


68,711 


41.412 


1899 




186,086 


121.502 


69,440 


40.901 


1900 




172,683 


165,871 


102,819 


81.908 


1901 




201.591 


170,903 


104,294 


74.510 


1902 




253.998 


170,207 


74,746 


50.325 


1908 


. . 


285.106 


249,016 


74,780 


64,661 


1904 


* . 


314.360 


299,171 


84,526 


82.046 


1905 


305,722 


282,275 


88,562 


85,653 



Of the butter exported io 1905, 282,275 cwt., valued ai 
£1,301,399, were shipped to the United Kingdom ; 4,013 cwt., 
value iei7,622, to Victoria; 180 cwt., value £798, to New South 
Wales; 2cv7t., value £S, to Tasmania; 70 cwt,, value £337, 
to Western Australia; GlOcwfc., value £3,120, to Fiji; 16,918 cwt.. 
value £76,647, to Cape Colony and Natal ; 1,049 cwt., value £5,891, 
to the South Sea Islands; 3 cwt., value £14, to Norfolk Island; 
85 cwt., value £405, to Transvaal Colony; 90 cwt,, value £462. to 
Holland; 24cwt., value £158, to Bengal; 397 cwt., value £1,764, to 
British Columbia; 5 cwt., value £24, to Dnited States of America; 
and 1 cwt., value £10, to China. 



PHOBMIUM FIBBB EXPORTED. 



306 



Of the cheese exported, 85,653 cwt., valued at £197,555, 
were sent to the United Kingdom; 254 cwt., value £829, to New 
South Wales ; 1,041 cwt., value £2,810, to Victoria ; 354 cwt., value 
£894, to Western Australia; and 251 cwt., value £604, to the 
other Australian States ; 818 cwt., valued at £1,973, to Cape Colony 
and Natal ; and 191 cwt., valued at £506, to other countries. While 
the quantity of hutter exported in 1905 (305,722 cwt.) shows an 
increase of 705 per cent, on the quantity exported in 1889, the 
increase in the export of cheese during the seventeen years has 
been at the rate of 233 per cent. — 88,562 cwt. in 1905, as against 
26,558 cwt. in 1889. 

Phonnium fibre exported. 
Phormium fibre, of which 27,877 tons (excluding 3,283 tons of 
tow), valued at £696,467, were exported in 1905, shows an increase 
in quantity, but a decrease in value, on comparing the figures for 
last year with those for 1904, when the quantity sent away was 
26,936 tons, valued at £710,281. Outside of the question of prices, 
a large permanent development of this industry depends on the 
cultivation and careful selection of the plants used, and on improve- 
ments in the method of preparing the fibre. 

Kauri-gum exported. 
The export for 1905 (10,8S3 tons) is a substantial one, exceeding 
that of the previous year by 1,680 tons. The value was £561,444, 
or an average of £51 lis. 9a. per ton. Full information as to the 
uses of this resin and the kauri-gum industry generally was given in 
a special article in Part III of the Year-book for 1900. It embraces 
interesting matter from the report of the Boyal Commission which 
inyestigated the whole subject in 1898. 

Details of all Exports, 1905. 



Articles exported. 



Qu&n titles. 


Val 


ue in Sterling. 




British. 




British, 




l»roduce 


Foreien, 
and omer 


Produce 


Foreien, 
and other 




and 


and 




Manu- 


Ck)lonial 


Manu- 


Colonial 


Total. 


facturee 


Produce 


factures 


Produce 


of the 


and 


of the 


and 




Colony. 


Manu- 
factures. 


Colony. 


factures. 








k. 


£ 


£ 


K • 


1.361 


, . 


43 


43 


•• 




263 


689 


852 


.. 




2 




2 


92 


**10 


23 


"25 


48 


595 




4,803 




4.803 


26 




66 




66 


374 


9 


17.180 


206 


17,386 


288 




481 




481 


3.653 




541 




641 


11,729 


.. 


30,696 




30,695 



Add- 

Unsnume rated 
^ealtaral implements 
inimali, living — 

Beei 



CsUle, horned 

Dogs 

Hones 

Pooltey 



Ih. 



No. 



806 



NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



Details of all Exi*ortr, 1905 - cofUinued. 





1 


Quantities. | 


Valae in Bterlinf. 






Brirfsb. 




British, 








Prodoee 


Foreitfn, 
and other 
Colonial 


ProdQM 


Foreicn, 
and other 
Colonial 




ArtiolM exporUd. 




and 

Maiia- 


and 
ftlann- 


Tol 






facturet 


Produea 


fact urea 


Prodaca 






of the 


and 


of tha 


and 








Colouy. 


Blana- 


Colony. 


IJana- 










facturaa. 




facturaa. 












£ 


£ 




Apparel and slops 


. 


. . 


, , 


2,817 


3,228 




ArmH, aninjunition, and explo- 












siv*»H — 














Cartriilges .. 


No. 


10,700 


70,800 


49 


288 




D tonal ofR .. 


• 


, , 


9, ICO 




21 




Dynamiie .. 


lb. 


. , 


1.350 


, , 


94 




Firearms . . 


No. 


, . 


35 




240 




Fu-e 


coils 


, . 


894 




45 




Ordnance stores 


. 


, , 






795 




Powder, sporting 


lb. 


25 


775 


1 


80 




blasting 


^ 


, , 


60 




2 




S vords 


No. 


•• 


1 




6 




Bacon and hams — 














Bacon 


cwt. 


733 


, , 


2,607 






Hams 


• 


614 


, , 


1.898 


, , 




BaRS and Racks— 














Cornsacks .. 


doz. 


620 


1,110 


160 


377 




Un en II me rated 


• 


833 


• 14,208 


56 


1,434 




Basketwaie and wicker 


ware 






6 


44 




Bdcbe-de-mer.. 


cwt. 




"20 




102 




Beer 


. galls. 


10 1723 


2,847 


1,265 


633 




Belting- 














Leather 


lb. 


, . 


2,418 


, , 


570 




Oth»r than leather . 




, . 




, , 


370 




BeverngBK, non-aicoholi 


c — 












Aerated waters 


drz. 


1,398 


239 


280 


46 




Liiiiejuice, sweetrnec 


I galls. 




IG 


, , 


3 




himejiiice, unsweetui 


led . 


7,038 


2,546 


359 


130 




Uneiiwmerated 








135 


1 




Bicycles and tricycles . 


No. 


13 


148 


129 


1,044 




Maicriald for 


. 




, , 


39 


1,339 




Biscuits — 














Fancy and other kind 


8 lb. 


16.028 


840 


377 


28 




Ships', plain 


cwt. 


5,473 


2 


4,557 


3 




Blue.. 


lb. 




112 




3 




itoais 


No. 


9 


1 


"415 


26 




.Bones 


tons 


7 




26 






B )oks, printed 


. . 






5,411) 


3,952 




Boots and shoes 


. doz. prs 


" 68 


309 


383 


1,469 




Bran 


tons 


8,972 




12,233 






Brass manufactun'S . 








9 


'*56 




Bricks 


No. 


7,000 




18 






Bricks, fire . . 


• f 


4,400 


, , 


33 






Briinhware and brooms 




, , 




64 


172 




Building mat rials 






, . 




24 




Butter 


cwt. 


305! 722 




1,408,557 


.. 


!.« 



DETAILS OF ALL BXP0BT8. 



807 



Dbtails of all Exports, 1005—eontinued, 





Quantities. | 


Val 


ne in Sterl 


ing. 






Britisli. 




Ihitisl). 






riodnoe 


Foreii^ii, 


Produce 


Foi«i({u, 




ArtielM exported 


and 
BUiiu- 


and oihir 
Colonial 


aud 
Manu- 


NudoUier 
Colonial 


TotaL 




factiires 


Produce 


factures 


Produce 




of the 


and 


of the 


ami 






Colouy. 


Mniiu- 
factures. 


Colouy. 


Manu- 
faciuies. 










£ 


£ 


£ 


lb. 


, , 


250 




7 


7 


3d rabians 


, , 


, , 


. , 


3 


3 


* • • . • 


, , 




2 


123 


125 


lb. 




1,120 


. . 


10 


10 


ig and druggeting 






36 


664 


700 


»s, &c. — 












ges . . No. 


14 


2 


402 


83 


485 


and wagons . . » 


62 


, , 


700 


, , 


700 


v»biles aud moior-cara 












cycles 


, , 


2 


. . 


240 


240 


iliiilaiora 


, , 


9 


, , 


21 


21 


iais for 


, . 


. . 


23 


89 


112 


mpty.. No. 


113 


3,311 


111 


9->0 


1,061 


barrels 


145 


118 


72 


68 


140 


cwt. 


88,562 


. , 


205,171 


, , 


205,171 


fcre . . 


, , 






107 


167 


No. 


2 


'302 


1 


85 


86 


tons 


122,817 


. . 


107,062 




107,062 


nd cbocolate . . lb. 


145 


2,983 


25 


174 


199 


. . . • 


2,250 




41 




41 


«d 


1,377 


2,152 


57 


"71 


128 


tOTlH 


15 




15 


*72 


15 
72 


ionerv — 












)iat«i in plain trade 












kaues .. lb. 




2,540 




113 


113 


umerated 


16,372 


042 


"350 


21 


371 


tons 


19 


119 


258 


980 


1,238 


1 .. .. owt. 


3,707 


429 


5,315 


1,0J5 


6,340 


^nd steel . . • 


, . 


74 


. , 


190 


196 


ut 


•• 


•• 


•• 


121 


121 


3 






.. 


1,053 


1,653 


ing}» .. 




, , 


. , 


48 


43 


lar.woven cotton cloth .. 


, , 


, , 


, . 


2.359 


2,359 


uinerated 








4,128 


4,128 


raw .. lb. 




2^202 




55 
398 


55 
398 


No. 


377 




287 




287 


f 






225 


3! 720 


8,945 


ana .. 








80 


80 


r*' trimmings . . 






, , 


342 


342 


and Iho s 








575 


575 


b d chemicals— 












1^- powder 






7 




7 








668 


52 


720 



808 



NIW KBALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOE. 



£>BTiiL8 OF ALL ExpoBTS, 1905 - eotUmustU 







Qvutlliei. 1 


V»lneia8t«rtiQ#, 






Brltljb, 




British, 








FTOdt)«« 

aod 


Foreign, 
mad otber 


Produce 

And 


uido£!« 




ArtlcaoA AKiKirted. 




llAau- 


Colonial 


Mud. 


OotoBlal 


f 






fmcttireft 


Prodnce 


;ft«tur«H 


Pitidiioe 








ofih« 


mad 


ofibe 


and 








C^toqy, 1 




Golpnj. 


future*. 




Dfugfl and ohenaicfcls- co^tiinmd. 








M 




Creem of Uf t&r 


lb. 




5,600 




1X7 




Drugp, and druggiMa' iUO^riea 




.. 


467 


1,419 




Anhydrous ftmmoiila 








16 


42 




MediciD&l barks 








., 


11 




She©p-dip . * 


lb' 


., 


10J29 


79 


622 
346 




Waibing-powder 


t m 


- 


•• 


" 


54 
135 




Earthenware 




^^ 


* * 


187 


290 




Engine pa^kif^g 


dc*B. 


a.m 




S68 






awl. 


1 


* 16 


32 


902 




Eif(:ncefl, HaVQiiriz^g • ^ 


gals. 




16 




53 




Eflsenbial @iU . . 


lb. 




151 




84 




Fan Of goods and io^R . . 


.. 


■ ■ 




1,093 


3,915 




Gunoeitifia .. 


>. 


. , 


* 4 


44 


11 




Peaibera 


lb. 


13,768 




832 






Fell »beathiTig 


.. 


.. 


.. 


♦ * 


116 




PiBh— 














Dried 


ami. 


28 


42 


87 


66 




Potted and preEcrvid 


lb. 


134,561 


63,974 


6,409 


1,511 




Froze El 


cwt. 


10 » 056 




14,730 




] 


Ova 


No, 


2U.(J0Q 




239 






Fi»htng4aclc'e 






., 


- 


173 




PJoorqloth ftwd oilcloth 










149 




Flour 


tODB 


448 


.* 


3,685 


■ f 




Fcjodfl, atiiirial— 














Chefl 


• 


£186 




li483 


1 f 




Pfc pared ealf*me*l . . 


, 


1 


.. 


10 


7 




Ucenuine rated 






»» 


215 


3 




Food**, farinaceous— 














Maizt^na and corn flour 


lb. 


2.230 


1,878 


14 


31 




PruiU— 




* 










BoUkd and preecrved 


dos. 


240 


857 


70 


104 




Fruits^ dried— 














GurrantB - - 


lb. 




10,014 




112 




Eaisma 


m 




37,794 


i« 


584 




Unrnumerated 


^ 


n 


27,702 


1 


515 




FruitH, fresh * . 


m 


32,205 




ni3 






Pu'pacd partially proiirved * 


37,443 


.. 


441 


-' 




Fungufl 


oi^t. 


3,428 




7,409 






Fumitiare atid upbolatery 


.. 


.. 


*' 


1,064 


463 




Kspok 
Fui&ttijro and otht r poliab 


owt. 


;; 


73 


" 12 


909 
50 




PHTK 


.. 


.. 


.. 


4 


432 





DBTA1L8 OF AULi BXPOBTB. 



309 



DXTAILS OF 


ALL EXPOBTS, 1905— 


eaniinved. 












Quantities. 


Value in Sterling. 






British, 




Britiah. 








Prodaee 


Foreign, 
and other 
Colonial 


Produce 


Foreign, 
and othei 
Colonial 




ArttelMMported. 


and 
Mano- 


and 
Mano. 


Total. 






factoras 


Produee 


factares 


Produce 






of the 


and 


of the 


and 








Colony. 


Mann- 
factoraa. 


Colony. 


Mann- 
facto res. 












£ 


k 


£ 


Qelatine iknd isinglass 


lb. 


810 


9 


67 


1 


68 


61mb botUes, empty . 


• • . 


, , 


, , 


12 


74 


86 


(»MS~ 














Broken 


cwfc. 


947 




61 


, , 


61 


Kirrozs 


• • • 


, , 




1 


1 


2 


CHtssware 


• • • 


,. 




62 


661 


723 


Qlneandsiae.. 


cwt. 


167 


'197 


83 


104 


187 


Oiyeerine 


• 


418 




721 


, . 


721 


Odd 


oz. 


520,485 


"81 


2,093,936 


342 


2,094,278 


Gxain and pulse— 














Barley 


bush. 


49,215 




11,409 


, , 


11,409 


Beans and peas 




187.829 




38,858 






38,858 


KaiM 




757 




136 






136 


Oals 




1,076,916 




99,664 






99,664 


Bye 




985 




133 






133 


Wheat 




967,151 




144,374 






144,374 


Oiaio, groand 


. centals 


45 




23 






23 


Onase 


cwt. 


, , 


"12 




13 


13 


Grindery, n.o.e. 


. . 






. , 


16 


16 


Gam, kanri . . 


tons 


10,888 




561,444 




561,444 


Haberdashery 


. 


.. 


.. 


2 


377 


379 


Sewing cottons 


. . 




.. 




72 


72 


Unenumerated 


. 








40 


40 


Hair 


cwt. 


i!oi3 


" 4 


4,850 


33 


4,883 


Hardware, holloware, 


and iron- 












mongery 


. 




.. 


300 


2,296 


2,596 


Hats and caps 


doz. 


" 33 


344 


38 


560 


598 


Hatters* materials 


, , , 


, , 






260 


260 


Hay and straw 


tons 


208 




554 




654 


Hides 


No. 


101,378 




98,826 


, , 


98,826 


Honey 


lb. 


4,663 




83 




83 


Hops 


cwt. 


3,301 


1 


20,038 


"39 


20,077 


Horns and hoofs 


tons 


82 




1,269 




1,269 


Hosiery 


. 






1,025 


551 


1,576 


Indiarubber goods 


• • ■ 






43 


359 


402 


Ink, printing .. 


lb. 




5261 


•• 


655 


655 


Instruments, musical— 














Ebtrmoniums 


No. 


• • 


3 




65 


65 


Piiknofortes 


• 




15 




562 


562 


Unenumerated 






.. 


8 


685 


693 


Materials for 


. . 








69 


69 


Instraments — 














Optical 






.. 




86 


86 


Scientific . . 








"1I8 


213 


331 


Surgical and dental . 










848 


848 


Surveying .. 




,, 


•• 


•• 




216 1 


216 



310 



HBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAB-BOOK. 



Details of ill Exports, 1905— 


e9ftltrm«<l 










Qu^mmm, 


VjUn« In SterliBg. 






JiriHit* 




ilritiBtu 








Prodofl* 


ftnii ntlier 


Pvodo^ 


Foi eipi. 








Aiid 


Mum- 




Tc 






fAtiiirM 


PlodUQA 


fact lire* 


I't-oducv 






oUhn 


aud 


of file 


ftllcl 








Colouf. 


ll»ny- 


Colottf. 






Iron ftnd Rteel— 








£ 


£ 




Bur, bt^U, fttid rod * . 


ton 


3 


45 


35 


715 




BoliB ftiid tiuts 


ewt. 




9 




12 




ft 1 vft u i^d m ahii f act u ret 








"386 


m 




RaiU 


t m 








s 




Siiri I nfid i^ftU 


torn 




i 




37 




Sljeotf gutvunhed, corru- 














eai* d 


owi. 




1;76.5 


« < 


1,583 




R 1 1 ee t . g U vfcp i sed , pU i n 


« 




263 


, , 


2».6 




Tuikn. 4i)0eii1U. 


No 




Gl i 


, ^ 


loa 




, SOOg^ll. .. 


• 




7 


< 1 


10 




Wire, fencing, Ui bed 


tons 




IG 


, 4 


so^ 




pL^ii . . 


• 




a 


t m 


33 




Wire netting 


, , 




■ ■ 


* > 


151 




UnEHumprawd 


' 


"' 21 


4 


40 


485 




JamR, jellien, and pimervefl 


lb. 


10,S41 


17.8SS 


196 


263 




Jell IPS. cooccUtj-B ted .. 


« 




l,5ti5 


■<, i, 


51 




JeweHeiy 


c w 


« * 


* » 


275 


7^0 




Jvwelkis' Hwetpingft . , 


- 


■' 


- 


857 


- 




Laifipfl, lanlernp, and lampwick 






1 


3SI> 




Lea'+, pfgH &iid biri 


c^vt. 


■ m 


a 


4 t 


2 




Lentl.tT 


■ 


0,830 


11 


60, gee 


3f'[P 




Lentlier mwiu fuel urea 








2B 


275 




Lime 


bush. 


1,548 




75 


■ m 




Liuen pieoegooda 




* I 


t , 


■ « ' 


493 




Liimeed ,, ,. ceDtalf 


1,3D3 




754 


., 




Machinery — 














ARriculbiiriLl 


, ^ 




■ > 


s.aao 


40S 




Plou;?! a and harrowi 






. , 


J,U30 


51 




Dftiry»iiR 








I Ml 


ijca 




Dreitpi- g ,. 








6,0Ul 


3,340 




Electric 








5 


&74 




Kr^giit*-p, Bt«?am 


No. 




4 


, , 


201 




E%ine!i, |2ftii unci ml 


* 




IS 


m k 


754 




Fiuur inihiHg 










00 




GfiiA-itiakifig 






m « 


» r 


339 




^iiniitg 








3,505 


OOQ 




Priiifeiiig 








6lj 


457 




Be wing ftnif koitting 


No. 


1 


129 


JO ; 


511 




Woodworking 






* • 


41 


450 




WouU*ii milling 


■ r 


* > 


r I 


m t 


(^) 




Ufienuihiiated 


« * 


r I 


♦ ■ 


1.745 


8»675 




• Matei iftlji for, aod par La o 


f .. 


>■ 


-- 


47 


29 





DkTAILB OF ALL BXPORTS. 



311 



DSTAILB OF 


ALL Exports, XdOd—cofUmtnnL 








Qiiuitltlee. 


Vftldw Iti Bterllog. 






HriUah, 




BrItJah. 


1 




ProduiJe 


FcireteD* 
aoii ouicrr 


PxtHluee 


Porelfo, 


1 


ArtielM exported. 


and 


aod 


andol£e^| 


JUaiiU^ 


€ol»t»iai 


Mjuid- 


CkttontaJ 






fac t nrei 


Prodace 


fictni-fle 


Produce 


T<i»al. 




of tbe 


and 


of tlie 


and 






Cislouj. 


Umnn- 
ta<!burfl«. 


Colony, 


Uana- 

faptujp*. 




_ 






£ 


£ 


£ 


IRt . . tO'18 


13 




75 




76 


merated 


82 


" 2 


306 


"lO 


316 


lre»:Red or polished 


, , 


, , 


17 


27 


44 


and Testae, gross boxes 


23 


496 


6 


63 


68 


a 




6,283 


, . 


875 


876 


matting 






160 


7 


167 


«n . . . . centals 


345 




163 




163 


•osen . . cwt. 


145,561 




177,372 




177,372 


ailed 


9,956 




13,762 




13,762 


8, frozen . . , 


6,380 




13,403 




13,403 


frozen .. carcases 


2,002,156 


1 








BSOWt. 


646,681 


f •• 


1,271,927 


.. 


1,271,927 


1, « ..carcases 


1,673,523 
791,236 




1,135,796 




1,135,796 


1 (joints), frozen cwt. 


16,025 




23,717 




23,717 


rozen 


2,568 




6,614 




6,614 


waited 


38 




89 




89 


f, frozen . . pairs 


29,588 




6,121 




6,121 


rozen . . cwt 


1,06<) 




1,396 




1,396 


kindj*, frozen . . 


2,366 




3,425 




3,425 


8. frozen in the skins No. 
= owt. 


2,807,242 
78,170 


1 •■ 


60,298 




60,296 


frozen in the skins No. 


8,173 


1 








= C1P»t. 


658 


f •• 


434 




484 


and preserved 


28,539 




74,451 




74,451 


t .. .. lb. 


28,120 




3,014 




3,014 


merated . . cwi. 


350 




1,543 




1,543 


8, patent and proprietary 






51 


647 


698 


tnufac lures — 












merated 




• * 


1,705 


5,730 


7,436 


Titers . . No. 




73 




846 


846 


atid washerd . . cwt. 




31 




32 


32 


r8 .. No 


, . 


1 




7 


7 


bridges 


. , 


•• 


" 50 


7 


57 


d .. cwt. 


6,889 




2,903 




2,903 


rserved . . lb. 


755,039 


49 i 833 


16,597 


liOoS 


17,650 


f 








335 


335 


in, ornamental 


•• 




465 


69 


524 


rous ore . . tons 


535 




5,997 




6,997 


nd 






4 




4 


3 .. .. irns 


1 




40 




40 


•ore . . 


4 




17 




17 


nese^re 


55 


• • 


165 


1 


166 


ite-ore 


28 




1,848 




1,848 


imerated 


68 




247 


8 


250 



312 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOX. 



Dktails of all Bxpobts, 100.^— Cdfi^t4«i. 



Qu&titUie«. 



A? i&olM Nportod. 




Mid otb»r 
Mikuii- 



VftlD« in fit#rUne. 





Britljh, 


JprodQoi 




ATld 


U&na* 


Colouiftl 


faetnrfl* 


ProdniJfl 


oflb« 


UI<1 


Ooloiij. 


Umun- 




tmeium^ 


£ 


M 


141 


^3 


- 


213 




87 , 


2 


" 




19 


" as 


27 


^^ 


15 


« « 


113 


Bm 


, , 


* * 


3 


.* 


S9il 


■ m 


6,389 


53 


659 1 


40 


i * 


♦ V 


67 


5GS 


< i^ 


a 


329 




1,293 


6J40 


652 


a,64f 


*' 




629 


» ^ 


1,569 


108 


6 


519 




6 






fiT 


, ^ 


463 1 


394 


93 




125 


14 





Nftphtfaa .. .. giJIi. 

Nme— 

Almonds, in shdll . . lb. 

Unenumerat^ 



0-*kiam r.. .. owt. 

Owi.. * .. No, 

Oil- 

GAfibor^ bulk , . galls. 

Colia 

Coooanul - . 

Fiahrpeoguiii, aud sea] 

Lias^d 

Keroeane 

Mineral, oth«r kinds , 

Olive, bulk . . 

WbuJe 

Unenumeratied * . # 

Oilmen's stores 
Onions 
Ojaters 

/.ma 

Paints and oolours^ 

Gmund in oil 

Milted, read/ for UM 

Unenume rated 
Paper- 
Bags 

Butter- paper 

Paper- banging! 

Printing 

Wrapping . . 

Writing 

Unenumemled 
Perfnmerj — 

Parfumed spiiiii . . galls. 

Toilet prfpsrationB 

Unenumerat^d 
Phormium .. .. tons 

Tow 
Photographic goods 
Pickles .. .. galls. 

Pictures 
Picture frames and mounts 



QWt. 

do£. 



owt, 



156 



112 



36 



3,894 



44S 
705 

7^946 
35 

13^745 
304,671 



365 

64t 

1 



481 
' 10 



264 

1,111 

659 



5 
66 

95 

747 

20 
163 

642 
163 

354 

809 

635 



3 

127 

7 



27 
3 



877 
283 



399 
446 4 

12 i 



356 
54 
67 



22 



95 





35 




68 ; 


, , 


36 


696,467 




15,473 


.. 


21 


381 


, , 


23 


1,263 


1,370 


3 





DBTAILS OF ALL BXP0BT8. 



313 



1 DBTAIL8 OF 


4LL EZPOBTS, 1906 — 


continued. 










Qu&Uti&iM, 


Value In St^rliag. 


f 




Brjiltb, 




Brititb, 


1 






Prodooc 


ForeJKD, 
and oth«T 
Colociftl 


Piodtico 


For«tgD, 
&nd etber 

Colo D 1ml 




AriMM «iFC»n^ 1 


and 


Md 


TolaL 






futures 


prDduce 


Utiut^t 


Prod Deo 






Of tb« 


«ad 


of the 


a,od 








Colour. 


Mmno' 


Oolosr. 


Mana- 










llaetiir«. 




facta res. 












£ 


£ 


M 


Pitch 


owt. 


448 


GO 


135 


16 


151 


Pt&nfcfl And ihrulM 


, , 






561 




561 


Plate Mid pliitedwwe , . 








25 


2 J40 


3,765 


Plaster of'p Aria 


owt. 




m 




6 


6 


FoUvrd A.tkd sharps 


tort A 


S43 




1,035 


.. 


1.035 


FDrtman^aUx 




, « 


» . 


12 


74 


SB 


Foutoea 


tons 


341 


33 


3.017 


328 


3,345 


Printing materi^Ue 


• ■ 




*4 


81 


241 


322 


Ph^vUionH, n,o.e. 


, , 


. t 




i,sos 


265 


1,573 


Pmops « « p 


-" 


». 


•■ 


178 


219 


397 


BW 


ewt. 


852 


,. 


663 




663 


Sulw&T plailli 








1 


"45 


45 


Hbe ,. 


Olfl. 


« , 


1,362 


- < 


394 


894 


ftoffi 


. 


., 


■• 


a, 037 


15 


3,042 


8tddl«r7 (b&njew) 


I * 


1 


.. 


551 


262 


813 


SaddJafs' ironraougery 


* * 


. . 




10 


10 


Sillpatre 


lOtli 


2 


*, 


21 


21 


SuIkv, wiodovr 


palm 


548 ' 


362 




362 


S«ic«s 


galls. 


27 1 300 


15 


113 


128 


Ssm^e akiiu 


cwt. 


11,303 66 


47.299 


428 


47,727 


Sftedf— 












G»i8 and clover 


« 


44,643 804 


80,598 


822 


81,420 


Uiitnumer»t«d 


, ^ 


. . 


9,400 


872 


3,272 


Sbelb, pearl ^> 


cwt. 


* . 




1 


1 


Sbip^ chandlery 


. 


, . 


ill 


458 


569 


Silk &iece-goqds 


.. 




.. 


1 , 


740 


740 


SiAe^ 


OS. 


1,179,744 1 


190,542 




120,542 


Skins — 




1 

1 








Cftlf &nd other kinds 


No. 


38,264 




8,648 




8,648 


Rabbit 


^Ib. 


a, 831,107 
1,381,057 


1 


66,933 




66,983 


Stieep, wHh wool 


No, 


657,610 
5,344*432 




165,705 


.. 


165,705 


Sbaep, without wool . , 


No, 
---lb. 


4,273,581 
12,599,222 




335.039 


.. 


335,039 


aeslakiiu ,. 


No. 


31 




40 


" 


40 


Bamf— 














Qommon 


awfr. 


7.637 


2 


6,894 


2 


6,896 


OncTiume rated 


, * 


* , 




31 


122 > 


163 


Spooi«^ 














^1d 


. ■ 






*, 


9,378 


9,378 


BilT«c 


♦ . 






- * 


4,500 


4,500 


Specimeas illaair&tivd c 


»f naitirai 












tcience 




.. 


.. 


223 


100 


322 



314 



NE.W ZEALAND OFFICIAL ^EAli-BOOK. 



Details of all Expobts, 1905— oonfititMd. 







Quantities. 


Value in Sterling. 






British, 




Britisii. ; 






Produce 


Foreiuu, 
and other 
Colonial 


Produce 


Foreign, 
andothei 
Colonial 




ArtiolM Axportod. 




and 
Maiiu- 


and 
Mann. 


r 

Tol 






fact urea 


Prodnce 


faetures 


Prodoca 






of the 


and 


of the 


and 








Colouy. 


Mann- 


Oolony. 


Mann- 










factarea. 




factnrea 








1 




£ 


£ 




BpiceE — 














Ground 


lb. 


?60 


, . 


12 


, , 




Unground . . 







1,119 




135 




Spirits — 














Bitters, cordials, &o. 


gallR. 




26 




42 




Brandy 


^ 




927 




456 




Gin and geneva 


, 




917 




288 




Kum 


^ 




78 




:a 




Whisky 


* 




5,571 




2,016 


S 


Stationery 








i;568 


1,398 


\ 


Bookbinders* materials 










53 




Teaching apparatus . . 


.. 






56 






St^ne— 














Building 


tons 


80 




52 


, , 




GreeuHione 


owt. 


222 


. . 


1,645 


. . 


] 


Pumice 


tons 


878 


, , 


2,875 




1 


Wrought . . 




,, 




24 


2 




SuKar— 














Glucose 


cwt. 




15 




17 




Molasses and treacle. . 


• 


90 


8 


83 


7 




Refined 


lb. 


604,545 


133,638 


4,691 


1,085 


i 


Tallow 


tons 


15,700 




340,502 




d4( 


Mutton stock, oleomargarine « 


247 




7,386 




t 


Tanning materials — 














Crude bark . . 


tons 


307 


, , 


1,518 




] 


Other kinds 








, . 


" ^j 




Tar .. 










22 




Tarpaulins and tents . . 








6 


1 




Tea .. 


lb. 




119,419 




4;i42 1 i. 


Textile piece-goods 






•• 1 


3 


442 i 


Textiles, made up 








40 


47 


Timber— 












Logf, hewn . . 


sup. ft. 


207,017 




655 




Sawn, undressed 


♦ 


74,202.637 




306,552 


'.'. 1 30( 


dressed 


. 


960,482 


. , 


11,688 


... i; 


Un enumerated 


.• 




, , 


2,150 


113 1 ! 


Tin- 












Block 


cwt. 


112 




95 




Foil 


• 




1,120 




56 


S'leet 


^ 




105 




118 : 


Tinware 








193 


39 




Tin«»mith8' fittings 










8 




Tobacco— 






1 








Manufatrured 


lb. 




53,517 




4,326 


i 


Ui' manufactured 


• 




7,114 




380 


Cigars 






1,926 




606 


Cig&rtttes .. 


■> 




4,148 




1,730 i 


1 



DETAILS OF ALL BXPOBTS. 



815 



Details op 


ALL Exports, 1905 — continued. 










QiiantitieB. 


Value in Sterling. 






Bririsb. 




British. 








Prod ace 


Foreiuii, 
and other 
Colonial 


Produce 


Foreign, 
and otuer 
Colonial 




Artieles exporUd. 




aud 
Mmiiu- 


and 
Mann- 


Total 






factiires 


Produce 


factures 


Produce 






of the 


and 


of the 


and 








Colouy. 


Manu- 
factures. 


Colony. 


Manu- 
factures. 












£ 


£ 


& 


>.pip€8 




•• 


•• 


28 


39 


67 


and hatcbeto . . 


.. 


.. 


.. 


7 


18 


25 


leerH* ni8 chine toolf 




, . 


, , 


, , 


285 


285 


umerated 


, , 




, , 


72 


856 


428 


line 


galls. 


, , 


248 


, , 


51 


51 


. . 


owt. 


216 


, , 


267 


, , 


267 


and Netting 


, , 


, , 


, , 


31 


. , 


81 


trr-and- binder .. 


cwt. 


1.020 


2 


1,969 


4 


1,973 


las and parasols 


• • 


•• 


•• 


•• 


91 


91 


1 and gold-size . . 


galls. 


35 


430 


9 


171 


180 


)le8 . . 


, , 


, , 




225 


834 


559 


• 


galls. 


15 


18 


1 


4 


6 


8 


No. 




949 




680 


689 


iraffin . . 


lb. 




134 


, , 


4 


4 


one 


cwt. 


46 


•• 


1,197 


•• 


1,197 


alian .. 


galls. 




116 




64 


64 


:ling .. 


^ 




302 




682 


582 


kinds 


^ 


5 


682 


2 


405 


407 


ware . . 






•• 


1,565 


205 


1,770 


y 


lb. 


114,853.124 




4,267,006 




4,267,006 


ed . . 


m 


9.441,2U4 


, . 


469,462 


, , 


469,462 


I 





14,091,702 




584,442 


, , 


584,442 


ed . . 


m 


1.526,617 




60,423 


, , 


60,423 


zkn .. 


doz. 




322 




86 


86 


I piece-goods . . 








3,073 


1,128 


4,201 


blankets 


pairs 


**833 


2 


799 


2 


801 


.. 


•• 




.. 


203 


65 


268 


»r 


cwt. 


2,070 


225 


1.880 


186 


2,066 


factarc8 


•• 






12 


55 


67 


factnred 








559 


935 


1,494 


tnufactured 


•• 




•• 


1,974 


686 


2,660 


post .. 








20.610 




20,610 



'I 



316 



VKW CBALAMD OPFtCIAL TIAB-BOOK. 



flfl 
lit' 






A table is appended giving details of goods foi^arded in the y< 
1905 to the Cook and other Pacific Islands annexed to New Zeala 
in 1901. These do not appear as exports from the colony, bei 
merely part of the internal trade or transactions between one porti 
of what is now New Zealand and another. 



Articles. 

Animals living 

Apparel and slops n.o.e. 

Bags and sacks 

Bisouits 

Boots and shoei 

Batter 

Cement 

Cml 

Cordage 

Cotton piece-goods 

Drapery 

Drugs and druggists' sundries 

Fancy goods and toys . . 

Fish, preserved 

Flour 

Famitare and upholstery 

Hardware, holloware, and ironmongery 

Hosiery 

Iron and steel 

Machinery 

Matches 

Meats, saltei and preserved 

Metal manufactures . . 

Milk, preserved 

Nails, iron 

Oils 

Oilmen's stores 

Perfumery 

Po'.atoos 

Provisions, nnenumerated 

Pumps 

Rice.. 

Ships chandlery 

Soap, common 

Spirits 

Sugar, refined 

Tea . . 

Timber 

Tobacco 

Miscellaneous 



Total value of goods shipped to the Islands 



QuantitleB. 



600 doi. 

2,129 cwt. 

87 doB. pairs 

86owt. 

580barralfl 

1,785 tons 

59cwt. 



71 tons 



2,804 gross boxes 
1,117 cwt. 

6616 Ibe. 

312 cwt. 

8,909 galls. 



9 tons 



617 cwt. 

856 cwt. 
312 galls. 
987 cwt. 
3,032 lbs. 



Vt 



1. 



2. 
1. 



1. 
2. 



4, 

2. 

£29, 



Of the above, goods to the value of £28,216 were forwan 
from Auckland, £398 from Napier, £7 from Wellington, £7 fr 
Lyttelton, and £470 from Dunedin. 

Particulars of goods cleared outwards from these annexed islai 
in 1905 will be found in Section VII, p. 262. 



TOTAIi YALUB OP TRADE. 



817 



Total Value of Trade. 

The Talue of the total trade of New Zealand advanced from 
£13,431,804 in the year 1886, to £28,484,804 in 1905. Bat of these 
amounts some portion was coin. Excluding the specie, the figures 
for 1886 are £12.853,736, and for 1905 £28,123,247. 















EzceMof 










Importa 
(eacclading 


Exports 
(ezcludiDg 


Exports over 

Imports 

(exciading 

Specie). 


Year. 


Total Trade. 


Imports. 


Exports. 










Specie). 


Specie). 




1 
£ 1 £ 


£ 


£ 


£ 


£ 


1886 


13,431,804 


6,759.013 


6,672,791 


6,319,223 


6,534,613 


215,290 


1887 


13,111.684 


6,245,515 


6.866,169 


6,064.281 


6,680,772 


616,491 


1888 


13,709,225 


5,941,900 


7,767,325 


5,430.050 


7,403,206 


1,972,156 


1889 


16.650,727 


6,808.868 


9.341,864 


5,980,583 


9,183.954 


3,203,371 


1890 


16.072,246 


6,960.525 


9,811.720 


6,928,895 


9.669,316 


3,640,421 


1891 


16,070.246 


6,503,849 


9.566.397 


6,431.101 


9.560.859 


3,129,768 


1892 


16,477.907 


6.943.056 


9.534.851 


6,742,644 


9,490,920 


2,748,376 


1898 


15.896,879 


6.911.515 


8,985,364 


6,494,279 


8,680,846 


2,186.566 


1894 


16,019.067 6.788,020 


9.231,047 


5,990,177 


9,221,550 


3,231,378 


1895 


14,950.353 


6.400,129 


8.550.224 


6,115,953 


8.618,119 


2,402,166 


1896 


16,458.425 


7,187,320 


9,321.105 


7,035,379 


9.299.907 


2,264,628 


1897 


18,072,216 


8,055,223 


10,016,993 


7,994,201 


9,741,222 


1,747,021 


1898 


18.748,565 8,230,600 


10,617,955 


8,211,409 


10,449,838 


2.238.429 


1899 


20,677,968 8,739,633 


11,938,335 


8,613,656 


11,923,422 


3.309.766 


1900 


23,892.257 10,646.096 


13,246,161 


10,207,326 


13,223.268 


3,015,932 


1901 


24,699,339 11,817.915 


12,881,424 


11,353,416 


12,869,810 i 1,516,394 


1902 


24,971,700 11.326, 723 


13,644,977 


10,958,088 


13,635,450 2,677,421 


1903 


27,799,053 


12,788,675 


15,010,378 


12,075,959 


14,971,926 1 2,895,967 


1904 


28,040.042 


13,291,694 


14,748,348 


12,900,030 


14,738,750 j 1,838,720 


1905 28,434,804 


12,828,857 


15,656,947 


12,481,178 


15,642,069 ' 3,160,891 



The trade for these years has heen selected for exhibition in 
tabular form because during each of the series there was an excess 
of exports over imports, whereas previously the reverse obtained, 
and the colony was purchasing to an extent not covered by the 
value of the export. During the last twenty years the excess of 
exports over imports, excluding money sent to and from the colony, 
amounted to a total sum of £48,011,037. 

How diflferent the foregoing conditions were from those previously 
obtaining will be seen by observing the balance of trade for the 
years 1881 to 1885, inclusive : — 



Tear. 

1881 
1882 
1883 



Bxoass of Imports 
over Exports. 
£ 
.. 1.406.898 

.. 1.948.485 

761.938 



Tear. 

1884 
1886 



Excess of Imports. 

over Exports. 

£ 

235,981 

639,239 



318 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YBAB-BOOK. 



The gradually declining excesn of imports tamed in 188( 
1887 to a small excess of exports, but subsequently the c 
of exports was very great, and attained the sum of £3,640,4 
the year 1890. 

Again considering the results for the twenty years, 1886- 
during which the balance was in favour of the exports, the exi 
trade is shown for each year per head of population, the calcul 
being made exclusive as well as inclusive of specie, for the pu 
of arriving at exact conclusions as regard trade in goods. 
the year 1S94 the imported money amounted to a sum of £79' 
and in 1903 to £712,716, making a substantial difference ii 
rates. 

Excluding specie, the trade per head of population inci 
from £22 Is. 7d. m 1886, to £32 6s. 6d. in 1905 : imports froi 
17s. Id. to £14 68. 1 Id., and exports from £11 4s. 6d. to £17 19 





Including Si>eci 


e. 


Excluding Specie. 


Year. 


To»al Trade 

pei- Head 

of Moim 

Populaiion 

(excluding 

Mao* is). 


Iui|iortR per 

Head of 

Mean 

Pop lint on 

(exilu 'ing 

Maoris 1. 


Ex}K>rts per 
Head of 

MOHIl 

Populati'^n 

(excluding 

Mauris). 


Tot«l Trade 

per Head 

of Moan 

Population 

(excluding 

Maoris). 


luiiK>ri8per 

HHadof 

Mean 

Population 

(exHuding 

Maorie). 


M 

Popii 

(exel 

Ma< 


188G 


S, 8. d. 

23 1 5 


£ R. d. 
11 12 2 


£ a. d. 
11 9 3 


£ B. d. 
22 1 7 


£ 8. d. 
10 17 1 


£ 
11 


1887 


21 19 8 


10 9 5 


11 10 3 


21 7 5 


10 3 4 


11 


1888 


22 12 11 


9 IG 4 


12 IG 7 


21 4 


8 19 6 


12 


1889 


25 9 11 


10 5 G 


15 4 5 


24 15 9 


9 15 6 


15 


1890 


25 la 10 


10 2 


15 13 8 


24 19 4 


9 11 


15 


18".)1 


25 10 4 


10 G G 


15 3 10 


25 7 10 


10 4 8 


15 


1892 


2-1 13 2 


10 IG 8 


14 IG 11 


25 5 6 


10 9 11 


14 


lft93 


24 9 


10 9 


18 11 9 


22 18 11 


9 16 5 


18 


189 1 


28 U 9 


9 19 11 


13 11 10 


22 7 11 


8 16 6 


13 


189o 


21 11 10 


9 4 10 


12 7 


21 2 8 


8 16 8 


12 


1S9G 


28 5 8 


10 1 11 


18 3 9 


23 2 2 


9 19 1 


13 


1897 


2.) 11 


11 3 3 


18 17 8 


24 11 7 


11 1 7 


13 


1898 


25 9 3 


11 3 7 


14 5 8 


25 G 11 


11 3 1 


14 


1899 


27 11 5 


11 13 1 


15 18 4 


27 7 8 


11 9 8 


15 


1900 


81 5 9 


18 18 10 


17 G 11 


30 18 8 


13 7 4 


17 


1901 


31 15 


15 3 10 


16 11 2 


31 2 9 


14 11 11 


16 


1902 


31 6 


14 3 11 


17 2 1 


30 IG G 


13 14 8 


17 


19C3 


88 17 10 


15 11 10 


18 6 


32 19 G 


14 14 6 


18 


1904 


88 3 8 


15 14 7 


17 9 1 


32 14 2 


15 5 4 


17 


19'V-, 


82 U 10 


11 14 11 


17 19 11 


32 G 


14 6 11 


17 



The higliest record of trade (excluding specie) was that for 
when tlio rate per head was £41 4s. 5d.. the imports, in conseq 
of the hxr«^e expeinliture of borrowed money, amounting at 
time to £24 17s. per head, ajrainst £14 6s. lid. in 1905. 

It has been customary to leave out the Maoris in estimatin 
sum per head, for tlieir industries and necessities swell the v< 
of trade in comparatively so slight a measure that the amour 
head of European population can be more truly ascertains 
omitting them altogether. 



TRADE WITH THE UNITED STATES. 



Trade uith Different Countries, States, or Colonies, 

The trade with the United Kingdom ia 1905 amounted to 
119.883,102, comprising 6980 per cent, of the total. 

With the Australian States trade was done during 1905 to 
the vaUie of £4,110,688, of which New South Wales claimed 
^.369,110. and Victoria £1.519,840. made up as follows:— 

Exports from Njjw Zkalahd. 

i 

To New South Wftles, 1905 . . . . . . 1 ,321 ,853 

. Victoria, 1905 .. ,. .. 866,939 

Imports into New Zeai^akd. g 

From New South VVftles, 1905 . . » , . . 1 ,047,757 

. Victofia, l'J05 .. .. .. .. 652 /JOl 

The latter amounts in each cas« represent the declared values 
of the imports into New Zealand from ihe States mentioned, not 
their export value as given in the New South Wales and Victorian 
retorus. 

Included in the exports to New Zealand from New South Whales 
is coal to the quantity of 169,016 tons, valued at J£155,7H6, 

The imports from the United States in 1905 show a decrease 
when compared with the previous year's figures, and Ihe exports 
an increase. Details of articles imported will be found on page 287. 

The articles of exported New Zealand products for 1905 were : — 

Exports to Unitkd Statbs of Amkrica. i 

Gum (IcAur^), vatae .. .. S09,671 

Phormium f^bre • 136,390 

Wool 112,668 

Sboep-sktnjt and pelta , 99/270 



Saiisikge-bkius 
HidM 

B^bbit^akins 

Oold 

Goftl 

Onioni 

Leather 

Tew 



36,376 
7,230 
6,537 
3,554 
1,875 
1.775 
1,019 
1,599 
451 



with 

1905 



The following table shows the value of the total trade 
the United States for each of the past ten years, 1896 to 
inclasive. during which period the trade has increased consider- 
ably. But the increase is mostly on the side of the imports from 
ihose States* and especially from tlie Atlantic ports, from which 
there is a far greater output to New Zealand than froui the Pacific 
fide. 



320 



NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 



Tbade with the Umitid States. 



I 



Year. 



Imports from 


Ezporte to 


Tote) 










Atlantic 
Porta. 


Pacific 
Porta. 


AtlantSo 
Ports. 


Paolflo 
Ports. 


Tnte. 




419.639 




£ 
73,161 


268,564 


68,025 


819,439 


521,939 


106,105 


252,018 


123,088 


1,003,140 


700,665 


99,866 


387,059 


286,074 


1,423,544 


687.906 


87,403 


387,614 


45,885 


1,206,808 


958,286 


108,587 


424,814 


84,482 


1,520,069 


1,174,745 


240,615 


382,175 


186,904 


1,934,339 


1,146,675 


172,362 


447,628 


42,841 


1.808.901 


1,289,535 


201,823 


563,885 


105,764 


2,111.007 


1,309,302 


218,613 


642,470 


56,451 


2,126336 


1,213,201 


225,297 


641,371 


74,930 


2,154,808 



18% 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 



The development iu the decennial period is at the rate of 
163 per cent., or an increase in value of £1,335,373. 

Figures showing ten years' trade with Germany exhibit ad- 
vancing imports, reaching for the year 1905 to the substantial sum of 
£277,467. Details of articles imported from Germany will be found 
on page 289. 

Trade with Germany. 
Year. Imports from. 

1896 .. 101,381 

1897 .. 157,066 

1898 .. 153,102 

1899 .. 160,605 

1900 .. 182,074 

1901 .. 198,521 

1902 .. 210. 5G0 

1903 .. 274,297 

1904 .. 308,804 

1905 .. .. 277,467 

The principal articles of New Zealand produce exported to 
Germany in the year 1905 were : — 

£ 

Gum (kauri) .. 25,450 

Wool 11,487 

Schcelite-orc 770 

Greenstone 244 



xportt to. 


Total Trade. 


£ 


£ 


5,190 


106,671 


5,468 


162,534 


17,244 


170,346 


28,027 


188,632 


24,186 


206,260 


10,470 


208,991 


9,389 


219,949 


17,584 


291,881 


23,931 


332,735 


38,958 


316,425 



TBADB OF AURTKALABIA. 



t 
t 



Imports frotu. 


£:Kport« to. 


Total Trftde^ 


1* 


£ 


£ 


1*29 


12.506 


12,637 


87 


6,795 


6,882 J 


72 


2,766 


2,as8 1 


215 


90,187 


90,402 ■ 


&03 


405.419 


405,921 


886 


835,476 


825,862 


997 


754.059 


755,056 J 


299 


455.187 


4.55,486 1 


804 


154,398 


155,202 ■ 


559 


176,937 


177,496 



The trade with India and Ceylon reached a total of JE489.993, 
igainst £466,419 in 1904. The imports — tea, rice, castor-oil, wooU 
pibcks, &c.— were reckoned at j^485,d82^ leaving a balance of onljr 
£4,610 for exports 

The value of the South African trade from 1896 to 1905 is aq 
follows :— 

1696 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 

Tkadb of Austha labia. 

The following table gives the value of the imports and exports of 
the different States comprising what is now the Commonwealth of 
Aastralia and the Colony of New Zealand for the year 1904. Tiie Aug 
tr&iian figures in each case include the value of intersiate trade '.- — 



k a. 


o 1 St*«e or Colony. 

1 


Total V*loe of 


Exceu of 


Imports. 


Exporta 


KxportA 

over 
liniKirte. 


6,059,164 


£ 

11,153,383 


1 

5,101/219 




' New South Wales 


27,285,958 


33.007,835 


5.721,877 




rielorta 


20,096,442 


24,404,917 


4,303,475 




Sooth Auitralift (including Northern 
Territory) 


7,450.716 


8,432,205 


l»031,4a9 




Wetlem AuslrAlm . . 


6,673,480 


10.271,511 


iS, 599,081 




iMmania . . 


2,554,454 


2,969,600 


435,146 




Few Zealand 


13,291.694 


14,746.348 


1.456,654 



In the preceding table is given the total trade inwards and out' 
wards of each State and colony, counting twice over the value o£ 
goods produced in one State or colony and carried thence into 
another, and reckoning the same goods three times where they arej 
imported from without into one State or colony and re-exported 
thence lu the same year into another. But, in order to form m 
JQftt idea of the trade of Australasia as a whole, it is necessary 
li-Ybk. 



832 



MBW SBAI.AIID OrWlOlAtt XBAK-BOOK. 



tf 












4 



eliminate the inter- State traffic altogether. From the folloi 
table the value of imports and exports exchanged between 
various States has accordingly been excluded : — 





External Tbadb 


OF AnSTBAIJLBIA. 




Ye&r. 


Total Trade. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


BzoeaB 

of 
Imports. 


Excel 

of 

Expoi 


1885 


£ 
72,220,444 


£ 
41,136.038 


31,084,406 


10.061.632 


£ 


1890 


75,143,818 


38,451,160 


36,692,658 


1,758,602 


, , 


1891 


84,565,778 


41,325,033 


43.240.745 




1.915 


1892 


75,325,933 


34,529,501 


40.796,432 




6.266 


1893 


67,788,738 


27,925,990 


89,862.748 




11.936 


1894 


65,102,202 


26,063,630 


39,128,672 




13.064 


1895 


67,624,317 


27,425,725 


40,198,592 




12.772 


1896 


74,511,262 


34,420,696 


40,090.666 




5.670 


1897 


83,509,568 


37,862,741 


45.706,827 




7,844 


1898 


85,600,442 


37,310,583 


48.289.859 




10,979 


1899 


97,637,194 


39,990,123 


57,647,071 




17,656 


1900 


104,298,717 


48,351,933 


55,946,784 




7,594 


1901 


109,651,267 


60,506,802 


59,144,465 




8,637 


1902 


101,019,347 


47,539,709 


53,479,638 




5,939 


1903 


105,339,392 


46,142,240 


59,197,152 




13,054, 


1904 


118,831,730 


48,411,900 


70,419,830 




22.007, 



It will be observed that in the year 1885 the excess of imf 
over exports for Australasia amounted to no less a sum 1 
£10,051,632, and that live years later the excess of imports 
fallen to £1,758,502. In 1891 the position was completely 
versed, the exports exceeding the imports by £1,915,712. ' 
excess increased to £6,266,931 in the following year (1892), an 
£13.064.942 in 1894, but decreased to £12,772,867 in 1895 
£5,670,070 in 1896. It was £7,844,086 in 1897, £10,979,27< 
1898, and in 1S99 the excess of exports over imports amounte 
£17,656,948. In 1900 there was a falling-off in the value of exp< 
and the excess amounted to only £7,594,851, but in 1901 
balance in favour of exports was £8.637,663. Both imports 
exports decline*! during 1902, and the excess of exports over imp 
was only £5,939,929. In 1903 the value of imports shov 
decrease of over a million and a quarter, while the exports excee 
those of the previous year by nearly five millions and three-quart 
the value of the excess of the latter being more than thirteen 
lions sterling. In 1904 the total imports show an increase of < 



TRADE OF AUSTBAIiABIA. 



328 



two millions and a quarter, and the exports of over eleven millions 
and a quarter, the excess of the latter over the former being twenty- 
two millions sterling, the highest figure yet shown. 'uy 
The trade per head of the population in each of the States of 
the Australian Commonwealth and New Zealand in 1904 was : — 



Trade per Head op the Population in 1904. 



State or Colony. 



I Mean Popola- . 

tion: Imports. 



Exports. 



Total Trade. 



Queensland 

New South Wales 

Victoria . . 

South Aufltralia 

Western Australia 

Taamania 

New Zealand 



519,178 
1,446,440 
1,207,537 
369,697 
236,516 
178,826 
845,022 



£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


11 13 2 


21 9 7 


18 18 5 


22 17 9 


16 12 10 


20 4 2 


20 3 1 


22 18 10 


28 4 3 


43 8 7 


14 5 8 


16 14 4 


15 14 7 


17 9 1 



£ 8. d. 
33 2 9 
41 16 2 
36 17 
43 1 11 
71 12 10 
31 
33 3 8 



But the values of the exports of the Australian States, more 
especially New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia, are 
largely increased by the inclusion of articles the produce or manu- 
facture of other States, colonies, and countries. 

The value of home productions or manufactures exported from 
each State or colony in 1904, and the rate per head of mean 
population, were as follow : — 

state or Colony. 

Queensland 
New South Wales 
Victoria 
South Australia 
Western Australia 
Tasmania .. 
New Zealand 

The next table sets forth the amount of the trade of each of 
the above-na^ed States and colony with the United Kingdom in 
1904:— 



Home Produce 


Per Head of 


exported. 


Population. 


£ 


£ 1. d. 


10,054,237 


19 7 4 


22,700,071 


15 14 10 


17,369,609 


14 7 8 


6,230,773 


16 17 1 


10,146,557 


42 18 


2,648,613 


14 16 3 


14,601,787 


17 6 7 





Imports from 


Exports 


Total Trade 

with 
the United 
Kingdom. 


State or Colony. 


the United 
Kingdom. 

£ 


to the United 
Kingdom. 




£ 


£ 


Queensland 


2,118,293 


1,861,100 


3,979,393 


New South Wales 


7,867,880 


10,148,436 


18,016.316 


Victoria .. 


7,266,239 


7,953,077 


15,219,316 


South Australia . . 


2,035,688 


2,606,557 


4,642,245 


Western Australia 


2,565,302 


4,440,817 


7,006,119 




617,414 


555,013 


1,172,427 


New Zealand 


7,982,340 


11,876,273 


19,858,613 



324 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



The statement appended shows the relative importance of Ans 
tralasia as a market for the productions of the United Kingdom : — 

Exports of Homb Pboduotions from the Uihtbd Kdvodom, in 1904, to- 



British India and Ceylon 

Qermany 

Australasia . . 

United States 

Cape of Oood Hope and Natal 

France 

Argentine Republic 

Dominion of Canada . . 

Belgium 

China 

Italy 

Egypt 

Russia 

Holland 

Sweden and Norway . . 

Turkey 

Brazil 

Japan 

Spain 

Hong Kong . . 

Denmark, Iceland, and Greenland 

Java, &o. 

Chili 

StraiU Settlements 

West India Islands and Guiana 

Portugal 



42,052,353 

25,103,270 

23,651,560 

20,ly7,679 

17,532,521 

15,254,034 

10,847,264 

10,624,221 

9,051,949 

8,808,901 

8,371,354 

8,273,443 

8,229,577 

8,200,340 

7,733,413 

7,346,695 

5,987,681 

4,889,328 

4.337,476 

4,335,957 

3,668,426 

3,374,259 

3,258,958 

3,129,265 

2,557,601 

2,068,178 



The exports to other countries did not amount to £2,000,000 
in any one case. 

Australasia as a whole, with a population of ahout 4,800,000, 
thus takes the third place in importance for consumption of British 
produce, the exports thereto heing more than half the value of 
similar exports to British India, with its 294,000,000 inhabitants. 



DIAQNAM N«. 4. 



TONNAGE OF SHIPPING 

ENTERED INWAB08 AND OUTWARDS. 
1895, ldO€, and 1905. 



INWARDS. 



T«ftr,1906: 
1.139,410 Uma 



' 



T«4r,1900; 



Foreign 

176,092 
tool 



Im, 1895 
ffTJI^l tons 

ij71 toofl. 



319.313 



BhUiOi 

mm 



mm 

tool. 



Cblmiial 

amis 



Bri tilth 
192394 



Cotoual 
500467 

tOOSv 



British 

463.851 
Ions 



OUTWARDS. 



T«u-, 1905t 
1.U1353 toDS. 



Tearja95: 
648.946 loos, 

Foreiga 
51.935 



T«rJ90D: 
825.375 tons. 

Foreign 



tODi^ 



315171 



Bntish 
I Oils. 



68^98 
torn. 



388,438 



Bnlish 
368241 



Forfli^ 

176.010 
tooi. 



CdonJali 
500371 



flriUah 
465171 



• 



»1*V 







ASTOM, _fK{.X fcNi. 



SECTION IX.— TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION. 



Shipping. 

Thk shipping entered inwards during 1905 comprised 637 vesselSi 

cf 1,139,410 tonnage; while entered outwards were 627 vessels, of 
1,141,552 tonnage. Com pari son with the figures for the previous 
year shows in the entries a decrease of 2 vessels and of 15,159 
tons* and in the clearances an increase of 7 vessels and a decrease of 
3,212 tons. Of the vessels inwards, 130, of 462,851 tons, were 
Bntish ; 423, of 500.467 tons, colonial ; and 74, of 176,092 tons, 
foreign. Those outwards numbered 130, of 465,171 tons, British; 
421, of 500,371 tons, colonial ; and 76, of 176,010 tons, foreign. 
Compared with the figures for 1904 tliere was a decrease of 19 
Tesseis and of 32,816 tons in British vessels entered, and an in- 
crease in the colonial shipping entered of 13 vessels and 4,040 tons. 
Foreign shipping shows an increase of 4 in the number of vessels 
4Dd of 13,617 tons entered. Of the entries in 1905, 221, of 103.580 
tons, were sailing-vessels, and 406, of 1,035,830 tons, steamers. Of 
fche clearances, 226, of 106,548 tons, were sailing-vessels, and 
401, of 1,035,004 tons, steamers. The sliippmg inwards and out- 
wards for eleven years is given in the table foUowing : — 

Vksrisls kntebsd, 18D5-1905. 



Te&r. 

18^ ., 

1806 ., 

1897 ,. 

1996 .. 

1899 .. 

1900 .. 

1901 .. 

1903 *, 
1900 .. 

1904 .. 
t006 .. 



t 

> 

611 
589 



... 

600686,890 



ToUl Nambar. 



I 

672,951 
097 



6d0765,St55 

609811,163 
616854,632 

1.089J79 

$17i.ica.0A4 

1 lM,a09 



627 



1 139,410 



i 



22,074 
19,857 
21,542 
24,081 
23,929 
23,791 
29,724 
30,264 
30,600 
31,478 
31,429 



Brittth. 



ColqoiftJ, 



I 

146 
126 
133 
162 
149 
156 ' 
|l75 
172 
145 
149 



1 

299,667 
249,601 
276,020 
329,065 
350,861 
392,394 
448,686 
496,203 
465,741 
495,667 



180462,861 



S_ 

6,837 

I 

5,495 

i 
6,086 

I 
7,910 

6,966 

7,183 

7,713 

8,871 

7,799 
I 

8,648 
I 

8,005 



11 



j 

420319,313 
395 300,176 
395 340,793 
399 369,840 



1 

13,209 

12,210 
13,138 
13,897 



388 892.67114,666 
393 392,61914, 136 



441461,729 
395 429,467 
403478,419 
410 496,427 



16,063 

i 

15,306 

16,497 
16,901 



42350O,467|17,187| 

I I 



Foreign. 



I 



53,971 
68|64,d20 

72 70,086 

I i 

69i66,360 



67,651 
69,7199 
U9.SS7 

ina 

167.S04 
lfla,€75 
176,0(1^ 



500 6 



2,028 
2,169 
2,316 
2,274 
2,277 

,478 
5»948 

,068 
6,304 
6,029 
6,287 



H 



326 



Year. 



NEW ZEALAND OFFIOIAL YBAB-BOOK. 

Vessels cleared, 1895-1906. 
Total Number. 



I 





British 







Oft 




• 


1 


■ 


fli 


s 


t 


§ 


s 


s 


> 


H 


o 


> 



CtoloniaL 






i 



Foreigi 



1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 .. !611 



597|648,946 



1903 
1904 
1905 



;692|G27,65t 

587:075. y3t' 

'C22! 705,798 

• I 

1004 jB07, 860 

613^25,271 

l,075.9O; 

1. 048,771' 

1,113,10.-: 

l,144,7Gl 



. |091 



608 

;620 



1027 1,141 ,5r>-2 



21,619| 134 281,8406,528 
20,217' 123 259,0(54 5,637 
21,409 140 280,2296,240 
24, 130' 150 322,1507,898 
24,117; 152 355,4427,194 
23.4811149 368,2416,978 
30,028| 177 462, 179 7,954 
29,2941,152 447,3517,983 
30,600; 141 462,1227,890 
31,04ti 146487,961 8,341 
31,210 130405,1718,039 



420 315,171 18,068 



4a51,9d5 



402 805,92612,448 67'62,669 
378.327,068 12,881 "egleS.OSG 
408 377,102 13.948 ',69,66,541 



379:886,219 14,656 173 



397 



I 



441 
385 
401 

403 

i 
421 



388,436 14,158 '67 
458,99416,106,73 



487,489 16,171 174 



485,83716,608 

I 

498,27016,669 

! 

500,37116,941 

I 



66,206 
68,598 
154,78S 

163,930:1 
66 165.706 I 



163,5?3j< 
176.010 



Note.— €k)afltiDg-ve8Be]8 are not included in the above table. 

The noticeable feature in the operations for the period co\ 
by the table is a considerable increase of tonnage inwards 
outwards, but not in the numbers of vessels, showing that h 
ships are now used than those of eleven years ago. 

The figures given apply to the external trade only ; but in a 
country such as New Zealand, as yet deficient in roads, but hi 
an extensive seaboard and a number of good harbours, the co 
trade must bo relatively very large, as is evidenced by the fi( 
next given : — 

Shipping entered Coastwise, 1905. 

Number. Tons. 

Sailing-vessels .. .. .. 5,007 313,072 

Steamers .. .. .. .. 20,382 10,016,337 

Shipping oleaked Coastwise, 1905. 

Number. Tons. 

Sailing-vessels .. .. .. 4,978 308,425 

Steamers .. .. .. .. 20,102 10,103,864 

The total number of vessels entered coastwise was thus 25 
of 10,329,409 tons, an increase of 1,578 vessels and 611,606 tor 



RAILWAYS. 827 

^Q figares for 1904. The total clearances coastwise were 25,380 
vessels, of 10,412,289 tons, an increase of 1,707 vessels and 678,320 
^ous on the numbeir for the previous year. 

Beoistered Vessels. 

The number and tonnage of the registered vessels belonging to 
the several ports on the Slst December, 1905 (distinguishing saihng- 
vessels and steamers), was as under : — 

RsoisTBBED Vessels, SIst December, 1905. 



Ports. 



Anckland 

Kapier 

Wellington 

Nelson 

Lyttelton 

Danedin 

InYercargill 

Totals 



1 Sailing-vessels. 

i 


steam-vessels. 


1 

' Vessels. 

i 


Gross 
Toanage. 


Net 
Tonnage. 


Vessels. 


Gross 
Tonnage. 


Net 

Tonnaga. 


21G 


19,568 18,081 


116 


15,580 


8,992 


7 


675 1 562 


20 


2,312 


1,442 


23 


3,689 ' 3,472 


35 


7,109 


3,851 


.. : 10 


301 1 2S0 


12 


1,437 


814 


.. 1 27 


4,873 i 1,710 


10 


2,683 


1,097 


.. , 42 


13,608 1 13,192 


72 


97,990 


59,881 


13 


1,333 ; 1,279 


6 


895 


466 


838 


43.847 1 41.576 


271 


127,906 


76.643 



Railways. 

The history and progress of railways in New Zealand was 
specially described in the Year-book of 1894, as was also the line 
partly built by the New Zealand Midland Railway Company. An 
account of the line belonging to the Wellington and Manawatu 
Railway Company was published in the Year-book for 1895. 

In the year 1860 a contract was let for the construction of the 
first New Zealand railway. Up to the year 1870 there were only 
46 miles of railway in operation. In that year the construction of 
railways came to be part of the pubiic-works policy just then in- 
itiated, and the Railways Act of 1870 authorised certain lines to be 
made and surveys of others. In 1876 tlie abolition of the provinces 
placed the earlier-constructed railways in the hands of the General 
Government. At that time there were 718 miles open for traffic. 

The length of Government railways open for traffic on the 31st 
March, 1906, was 2.407 miles, of which 943 were situated in the 
North Island and 1,464 in the Middle Island. 

The sections of the North Island lines consist of the Kawakawa, 
8 miles; Whangarei, 23; Kaihu, 17; Auckland, 393; Gisborne- 
Karaka, 18 miles; and the Wellington-Napier-New Plymouth, 484 
miles. The Middle Island sections comprise the Hurunui-Bluff^ 



ai^ 



KBW ZBAIfAHD OFFICIAL ¥KAB-BOOS. 



witb branches, 1,249 miles ; Westland, 117 ; Westport» 81 ; Nelson, 
33; Picton, H4 miles. The estimated total cost of conatrnction 
to 3lBt March, 1906, was £22,498,972 (besides jei,593,H3 spem od 
ui3 opened lines), and the average cost per mile of open line £9,410. 

The following statement shows the number of miles of Govera- 
ment railways open, the number of train-miles travelled and of 
pftssengers carried, and the tonnage of goods traffic, for the past 
sixteen years : — 



T-, 


hmmth 


TWLtn- 
mlla««e. 


FMMOg^V*. 


Tickets 


Good* 

uxA 

IiiTe-«tock* 












TonA. 


1890-91 ,. 


1,643 


2,894,776 


3,433,629 


18,881 


2,134.023 


1891-92 ,. 


1,869 


8,010,489 


8. 555, 764 


16,341 


2,123,987 


1893-93 .. 


1.886 


3,002,174 


3.759,044 


16,504 


2,258,23& 


1895-94 .. 


1.948 


3.113.231 


3. 972. 701 


17,226 


2,128,709 


1894-95 ,. 


1,993 


3,221.620 


3,905,578 


28,623 


2,123,343 


1895^96 .. 


2,014 


8,807.226 


4,162,426 


36,233 


2,176,943 


1896-97 .. 


a. 018 


8.409,216 


4,439,387 


43,069 


2.46l.m 


1897-98 *, 


2.055 


3.666,483 


4,672,264 


48,660 


2,628.746 


1898-99 ., 


2,090 


3,tHJ8,708 


4.955,563 


55,027 


3.744,441 


1899-1900 


2.104 


4.187,893 


5,468.284 


63,335 


3,251,716 


1900-1001 


2,212 


4.620,971 


6,243,693 


82,921 


3,461.331 


1901-1902 


2.285 


5.066,3*H) 


7,356.136 


100,778 


3.667.039 


1902-1903 


2.291 


6.443,333 


7.575,390 


118,431 


3,918,261 


1908-1904 


2.328 


5.685,399 


8.306,383 


129.919 


4, 239 » 217 


1904-1905 


2,374 


6,107,079 


8,514.112 


140,453 


4,185.46a 


1905-1906 


2.407 


6.413,573 


8,826,382 


147,989 


4,415.16fi 




* Th« eqttiy«J«iit tonnage for livestock has been fflvtai^ 



H ^H 


^K GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS. 


1 


^^^ REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE. 


1 


1895-1 896, 1900-1 901, ]906'1906. (Financial Years.) 


1 


RECEIPTS. 


EXPENDITURE 


1 


J 


E2J49.704 




^m 


Mimm 








1 












^1,631.239 


^1 


X1J83,(H1 










jeii27,847- 






J 






















£!bim 










1 


1 




























I 


1896-1896 1900-1901. 1905 lRi36 


1895-1896 1900-1901, 190&-1906 


^1 




3 



RAILWAYS, 



3» 



be revenue lor the year 1905-6 amounted to £2,349 J04; 
Ihe total expenditure to £1,621,239, The net revenue — 
165 — was equal to a rate of £3 4s. 9d. per cent, on the capital 

the percentage of expenditure to revenue was 6900. The 
ogs on some of the lines ranged as high as £8 ITs, 4d« per 

Jhe particulars of the revenue and expenditure for the past 
years are given herewith :^ 



i 

P4 



III 



0*4 



'I 

a? 

"3 



o 



' I 

M 

853,503 

864,617 

890, t) 19 

102, Oia 
15885,149 
I6889»2a4 
r? 410, 160158.084 
16433,43060,672: 
« 475.553 
►0515.020 
(1544.976 72.7121 
►2 621,010 79,561 1 
65626,61*8 B7, 27a 1 
►4 704,660; 110,1511 
5738,1581 na.oeiji 
6(786.873! 1*2 &42 1 1 



M 

38,9971 
41.795| 
i4,S01! 
45,200 
43^270 
54,736 



66,418| 
08,488, 



£ i 

690*779 38, 33 2! 1 

G71,469'37,550;i 

707,785,38,3161 

686,469 39, 0Q8|l 

683,726 38, 7061 1 

698,115 40,9561 

774,163|43»751|1 

837,589 44,11711 

882,077:45,6171 

985.72354,6601 

.051.604!57.854jl 

,110, 575:63, 4311 

,189,101;71,966|1 

.293.160:72,6612 

.277.976 78,046 2 

,346,038174,15113 



£ 
, 121^701 
.115.431 
,181,521 
,172,792 
,150,851 
,183,041 
,286.158 
,376,008 
,469,665 
.623,891 
,727,2361 
,874,586! 
,974,038 
,180,641 
,209,241 
,349,7041 






1st' 



§EP5 

£ MO 



111 



£ 

700.703 
706,517 
732,141 
735,358 
732. I GO 
751,368 
789,054 
857,191 



M 

420.998 
408,914 
449,380 
487,434 
418.691 
431.673 
497,104 
518,817 



929,737^539.928 



1,052.368 

1,127,847 

1,252,237 

1.343,415 

1,438,724 

1, 492, 900716, 331 

l,621,239f728,465 



571,533 
599,389 
622,349 
630,623 
741,917 



62-47 
63-34 
6197 
62-70 
63-62 
63-51 
61-35 
62'30 
6326 
6480 
66*30 
6680 
(6805 
65-98 
67-58 
69 00 



8. d. 
18 11 

15 9 
1 

17 9 
14 6 

16 

3 10 

4 10 

5 10 

8 5 

9 8 
8 6 

6 1 
11 8 

6 
4 9 



mt.— For ISMkdG imd «i]hB«quetit yoars the nuLwftys li*ve bi^eij credited wltb th« tiIim 
ee* perfortiied for otKier Ooveriiinont deptutmeDtfl, and debited with the TiJiie of work 
r the railw&ys by other deimrtments. 

revenue per (average) mile of railway ojieo during the 
eas £980, and the expenditure £67G ; equal to 78. 3Jd. and 

per train-mile respectively, 
be total number of oiiles travelled by trains was 6,413,573. 
n addition to the above railways, there were 113 miles of 
ite lines open for traffic on the 31st March, 1906 — including the 
Lington-Maoawatu Kailway, 84 miles. 

Jbe cost of the constrncfciou of the Wellington-Manawatu Rail- 
lb now shown on the books of the company as £821,393, 
fat the rate of £9,778 per mile. The term *' cost of con- 
ation/* as applied to railw^ays, includes value of equipment, 
K-stock, ^c, not merely the road-line and buildings. The 
feamiDgs for the twelve months ended the 28th February, 
lounted to £132,460, and the working- expenses to £75,280^ 
ent to 56 83 per cent, of the gross receipts. 

Aus trains tan Bailwa ys . 
vemment railways open for traffic in Australasia : — 



830 



MBW ZSAIiAND OFFIOIAIJ TBAS-BOOX. 



a 



•8 



<i. 



-B9A|)oaioooq 






5 

O 

H 

CO 






o a, 






o a • 
o.o o 

o tl o 

a- a- 



as 



« e a 






00 



i § K 

oS lO iH 

•O *H V 



§ I ^ § i s § 



00 eo 



C4 



s s 



00 90 iH 



t- r-l O 

^^ ci cT 

00 rH r^ 



s 

C4 



^ CO 



CO 



So 

s s 






9 

eo 



o «* <o 



O 

cT 



^ CO rH 



S 8 S 



00 

cT 





,_, 


o 


»o 


gj 


o 


<N 


00 




CO 




CO 


00 


S 


L« 




t- 




CO 




<N 


to 




















t* 


t- 








»o 


CO 




iH 


o 






S 


"* 


iH 




O 


"* 






o 


-^ 




















•^ 


o 


o 


CO 


-^ 




CO 




CO 


•^ 


•^ 


g 


ar> 


r« 


r^ 




«o 


00 


00 




CO 


O 




o 


<N 


CO 






'^ 


CO 














• 






CO 


CO 


CO 


rH 


tH 




c^ 









8 

IS 



5 

o 






^3 _ci 
€) ^ O 



J 2 

I I 

3 < 

< g 

I 8 



• 


'O 




9 








oO 





0) 


d 


N 


1 




H 


5Z5 



s 

1 1 



s 






00 S'2 

& ^ ® 

.= •2 

■? = ! 

fl c8^ 

^ §Z 
-*» <3 o 

*-• S 

gs a 



CP OB 

« 9 

E CO i. . 

O "S ^ ^ 
"^ CO 



•§ 



rigs 




POSTiLL AND ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH. 



331 



Postal and Electbic Teleqkaph. 

There were 1,937 post-offices in New Zealand at the end of 1905. 

The number of letters, letter-cards, post- cards, books, and 
1>€itteru-packets, newspapers, and parcels dealt with during the year, 
[^^<^rn pared with the number handled in 1904, was as under : — 



Toul NamberdeaU wftli. 



Lelten 

Lett^r-c&rdn 

Post- c&rds 

Bookii uDd patters -packets 

NewfipaperE 

ParoeU 



1^4. 

65,1 19,560 

1,381.874 

2,310,051 

20,107,921 

21,500,744 

as?, 604 



1905. 

69,664,941 

1,431,320 

8,6il,Oi7 

23,707,y01 

23.62ei.a6'2 

a92,0l7 



Increase.^ 

4,545,381 
69.440 
1.340,476 
3,599,980 
2,12.5,618 
34,513 



The average number of letters, &c., posted per head of the popu- 
lation in each of the past six years was, — 





1*00. 


1901. 


ilioe. 


190». 


1901. 


1900. 


Let&i^ra and tetter-cards . , 


4901 


63-49 


6807 


7036 


7340 


7609 


Postcards 


243 


1'8S 


1^55 


168 


2-43 


3 38 


Hooks and par&elfl 


2110 


21-09 


21-45 


2180 


2162 


24-90 


Kewa papers 


1617 


17-81 


16-79 


17-20 


18*23 


19-87 



The facilities afforded for the transmission of parcels through the 
Post Office to places within and without the colony have proved of 
mucli convenience to the public. The regulations admit of parcels 
up to 11 lb. in weight being sent to almost all the ijnponaot 
countries of the world. 

The following table shoWs the number of parcels exchanged with 
khe United Kingdom, the Australian States, &c., in 1904 and 1905 :— 



Ooantry. 



Received. 



Number of F*rcelfi, 

, DeapatebQd. 



1904. 

Dai ted Kingdom and foreign ooiio- 43 , 808 

tries via London 

United States . . .. .. 6,310 

Vanoouver « . « « * . 386 

Victoria .. .. .. 5,937 

New South Wales .. ,, 9,287 

Somth Austraha .. ** 417 

QaeentLland . . . . . . 555 

Tasmania .. <. .. 320 

Western Aostralia , , , . 292 

SamoA 12 

Fiji 67 

Ceylon .* .. 390 

Untguay 

CapeColoov .. .. .. 391 

Katai ' .. .. .. 114 

India . .. \. 601 

Totals *. ,. 67,837 



1006, 
50,777 

6,083 

413 

7,056 

10.734 

443 

641 

358 

313 

20 

93 

340 

357 

85 

685 

76,400 



1W4, 
B,552 

1,321 

280 

3,062 

3,842 

394 

677 

589 

660 

175 

328 

74 

24 

445 

107 

204 

20,640 



ioa.>. 
8,7714 

1,515 

293 

3,067 

4,3iHO 

485 

894 

630 

526 

239 

397 

100 

29 

233 

278 

225 

21,669 



S32 



NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAI4 Y£AB-»OOK. 



The declared value of the parcels received from places outside 
the colony was £188,543, on which the Customs dutv amounted 
to £39J28 la. lOiK 

The number and weight; of parcek dealt with from 1897 to 1905 
are given. The word ** parcels '* in the first-named table includes 
the parcels herein mentioned : — 



1897. 



ISBft. 



Weight, lb. 



19?t5M 
076,054 



fltM,e09 
098,301 



IflBOL I 1900. 



1901. 



1908. 



221,3501 Sn. 
705,836! m,994| 



9VS, 



;,4I2| 901,0701 
,33711,034,913 1,161,584 



1903. 



1004. 



ai7,fi04 soa.oir 



Mofiey-orders and Postal Notes. 

The number of offices open for the transaction of money-order 
business at the end of 1905 was 537. 

During 1905, 417,441 money-orders, for a total sum of £1,511,711 
19b. lOd., were issued at the various post-offices in the colony. The 
money-orders from places beyond New Zealand and payable in the 
colony numbered 30,007, for the amount of £120,087 2s. 3d. 

The number of offices open for the sale of postal notes at the 
end of 1905-6 was G54 : 875,324 postal notes were sold, value 
4276,279 78. 6d. Commission amounted to £5,979 4s. Ud. 

The notes paid numbered 369,392, value £274,678 16s* 6d. 



(^^ 



Mail'Services. 

The cost of the various mail-services between England and New 
Zealand was, in 1905, as follows : — 



Sah Fbahcibco Ssrvics. 
Paymentfl — 

Subaidies, &c, , . 
Interprovmotol and other oharges 



ReoeiptB — 

Com ribut ions from Fiji , . 
Postagea collected in the colony 



1905. 

26.673 18 9 
4,687 7 10 



£31,361 


6 


7 


42 
16,463 


U 

9 


2 

10 


£16.506 


1 






Loss to the colony 



£14,855 5 T 



PbXIKSULAB JLIXD OElANTAXi AKD OBISKT XjOTBS SeBVICKS. 



Payments — 

To P. and O. and Orient Lines . , 
Transit across Australia 

European Contiaent 
Interoolonial sorvtc«e 



J a. d. 

l.ntqi u 4 

169 14 

326 19 1 

2,0!23 13 10 



£3,548 2 3 



MAtL-BEBVICBS. 

raiteges collftoted from England &nd from 

foreign offices 
Posteges coUeoted ia the eolony . . 



Loss to the oolony 



88S 



£ 1. 

1,531 16 
1,877 7 



m,4m 3 6 

£138 la 10 





S&n Franciacro 


P. ftnd O. 


Orient 


London to — 


Service. 


Line. 


Line. 


Auckl&nd 


. 3106 


3<593 


3833 


Wellmgbon 


, . 32r29 


38*18 


3919 


Danedin 


. . 33 36 


39 18 


39-33 


Bluff 


. . 3410 


38*43 


38-57 



The total amouDt of postages collected and contributions received 
tor these services in 1905 was £19,915 4s. 5d. 

The average number of days in 1905 within which the mails 
were delivered between London and each of tlie undermentioned 
ports in New Zealand was : — 

b „„ 

The first Government telegraph-lines in New Zealand were con- 
stracied by the provincial authorities. 

The Canterbury Provincial Government opened a line between 
Christchurch and Lyitelton in the beginning of the year 1863. On 
the li2th February, 1864, the Southland Provincial Government 
opened a line bee ween Invercargill and the Bluff. The General 
Government, subsequently acquired both the above-named lines, and 
furLber established communication by wire between Dunedin and 
Invercargill, also Donedin and Christchurch. on the 25th May, 
1865. 

Messrs. Driver and McLean, merchants, of Dunedin, erected a 
private line between Dunedin and Port Chahners, which was opened 
to the public in 1861, and accjuired by the General Government some 
tune after the opening of through communication between Lyttel- 
ton, Christchurch, Dunedin, and Bluff, referred to above. 

There were 8,355 miles of telegraph-line open at the end of March, 
1906, carrying 25,116 miles of wire. 5,640.219 telegrams were trans- 
mitted during the year; of these, the private and Press messages 
QOmbered 5,351,084, which, together with telephone exchange and 
other telegraph receipts, yielded a revenue of £273,911 Ts, 7d, 

There were twenty-nine central exchanges and seventy-two sub- 
exchanges on the 31st March, 1906. The number of connections 
increased from 13,423 in March, 1905, to 15,333 in March, 1906. 
The subscriptions to these exchanges during the financial year 
amounted to £89,542 Is. 5d. 

The capital expended on the equipment, Ac, of the several tele* 
phone exchanges up to the 31st March, 1906, was £363,192 6s. 9d, 




884 NBW ZBAI<AND OFFICIAL TXAS-BOOK. 

Pacific Gable. 

The cable which was opened for traffic between New Zei 
and Australia and Fiji on the 9th April, 1902, was completi 
Bamfield, Vancouver Island, on the Slst October following, 
opened for international business on the 8th December, 1902. 

The route is from Doubtless Bay, New Zealand, to Vanco 
Canada, vid Norfolk Island, Fiji, and Fanning Island. The 
tralian connection is at Norfolk Island. The deep-sea portic 
the Vancouver-Fanning Island cable is stated to be the longc 
the world. Following the opening of the cable a much fastei 
▼ice between the colony, America, and Europe has resulted. 



SECTION X.— MANUFACTORIES AND WORKS. 

[iDformation respecting iranufaotories and works is collected only once in 
Q^ery five years, at the time of the census. Fresh information, showing the full 
Q^Agnitude of the industries of the colony both as to number and value of 
prodaotion as for the year 1905, is being collected under the authority of the 
Centos Act in connection with the enumeration of the people made on 29th 
April, 1906 ; but the compilation of these manufactory returns is not yet begun, 
&&d meanwhile the information given last year is again repeated.] 

The results of the compilation of the special returns relating to the 
various manufactories, works, etc., in the colony are compared with 
those shown for previous censuses in certain of the tabulated state- 
ments given with these remarks. 

It must be observed, however, that whereas up till the time 
of last census the term *' factory" was rather held to mean an 
establishment where manufacture was carried on wholesale, where 
machinery was employed, and where several hands worked together, 
in the returns for 1901 a ** factory " has been interpreted to mean 
any concern where two or more persons work together at making 
articles for disposal, wholesale or retail^ and without reference to 
machinery being used or not. Thus the return seems to be rather 
one showing industrial workers (and their production) where two or 
more are found together, than one of manufactories to supply the 
wholesale traders or making for export. But the attempt has been 
made to approximate the census results to those of the Labour 
Department, according to special direction. To make the com- 
parison with previous census figures as true as possible, the results 
for all the dressmaking, tailoring, shirt-making, millinery, and other 
establishments, which were not included until 1901, have been de- 
ducted from the totals at foot of the summary table. Any roughness 
in the comparison caused by small concerns employing two persons 
only, and doing a retail business in making or repairing, having 
been included at the last census, but not before, cannot be avoided. 
And indeed it will become clear to any one reading the following 
remarks that the large increase in money value of manufactures 
is obtained mostly on items in respect of which moving down to 
a limit of two persons engaged would not materially alter the 
comparison. 

The totals for the industries do not include mining and quarrying, 
which are dealt with separately. 

Deducting, as above mentioned, from the total value of manu- 
factures for the year 1900 the results for such industries as were 
not included in 1895, a most satisfactory increase is found on 
analysis of items, which has been mainly brought about by develop- 
ments on a large scale in the following industries : — 



336 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAK-BOOS. 



Vai-or of Output fob Ykak 1895 compared with 1900. 
I Inofftifcfte in Five YeATf. 

I ^ 

^ Meat freezing, preserving, &c. ... .., 2,182,616 

Butter and cheese factories ... .,, 1,033,S76 

Tanning, fellmongering, and wool-scouring ... 650,866 
Foundries, boiler -making, range-making, and 

engineering ... ... .., ,.. 621,356 

SawmillB, with sash and door making ... 369 » 882 

Printing estabMshments (not Government) ... 315,161 

Clothing (with boot and shoe) factories ... 242,122 

Breweries and malthonses ... ... 240,468 

Flaxmills .. .. ... ,., 170,946 

Gasworks .,. .. ..* ,». 91,542 

Chaff-cutting works ... ... ... 90,816 

Biscuit- factories ... ... ... ... 79,010 

Bacon-curing eBtabtishments ... ... 73,542 

Coach buihiing and painting . . ... 67,108 

Woollen-mills ... ... ... ... 56,959 

Brick, tile, and pottery works ... ... 56,090 

Aerated-water factories ... ... .., 53,202 

Cycle-factories ... ... ... ... 46,230 

Lime and cement works *.. ... ... 29,261 

I If to these be added the value of the grass-seed after dressings 
£241,239 for the year 1900, the greater part of the increase in the 
total for all manufactured articles (£7,591,789) is accounted for. 
There are a large number of smaller amounts of increase than those 
above stated, but the main lines of development are sufficiently io^ 
dicated. 

The addition of tUe figures in the column for total value of mano- 
factures is not absolutely justified to the fullest extent of the amount 
shown (seventeen million pounds sterling) ; but in the present state 
of New Zealand industries it appears that the degree of repetition 
of value is not so great as to prevent the total given being of great 
help in judging of development. No doubt seventeen million pounds 
is over the fact, because, for instance, butter frozen for export i» 
included in returns for meat- freezing establishments, and also in 
the butter-factory returns ; timber cut is valued under sawmiliiug, 
and some again in the furniture-making line. Also, leather is 
valued in the tanning returns, and some part of it again in the boot 
and saddlery items, But, of the material operated upon, a great 
deal is imported. 

The great primary industries of meat -freezing, butter and cheeso 
making, with some others, do not mainly provide materials fox 
making other wares. 




MAK0PAC1X>RIE6 AND WORKS. 



337 



The iron which is used at the foundries and engineering* works 
t imported to New Zealand. 

But it must be fiuiiiiitted that, as Ihe colony advances in primary 
'ixadus tries, deductions will have co be made with great discrimination 
f^irom the figures in the column ** Value of all manufactures," in 
v^'cspect of the amounts given in the returns. 

As yet it is held that the addition is not so luuch affected by 
r^epetitions as to render the result other than useful ; although, as 
l^efore remarked, the total figures are admittedly in excess of the 
Actual fact. The comparison with previous census results is still 
considered valuable. 

Special tables in the Census Volume, following the summaries, 
fbow clearly that quantities rose as well as the value of manufac* 
tares, so that the development is not merely a question of market 
prices, but of actual output. 

In 1896 the actual increase in five years of the annual output 
Was found to be only JS775.52d. But it was noticed that there 
were special causes for this amount being so small ; and also 
that quantities showed then in many cases a certain dej^ree of 
dbvelbpment of industries, though values had not been maintained 
throughout. 

The year 1896 was admittedly a time when great results could 
Dot be looked for. Severe financial troubles had happened shortly 
Wore. The phonnium and rope industries, iron -working (imple- 
tnants and other) were not thriving, and in other lines matiers were 
not altogether what could have been wished. The inquiry for the 
Jfear 1900 has been made after a period of great prosperity. 



MiJimPAOToaiss and Wobks, 1896 and 19^1. 



Haisber of MUbliiihmeKito* 



HAtid0 employed— 
M&let 
Pammles 



Totals! 



gea paid— 
To niAlefl 
Cem^ea 



Totftlai 




April, March, 

No. No. 

2.450 3,163 



93,986 35,438 
4,408 6,268 

27,389 41,726 



1,776,076 2,896,279 

131,516 S03.3S2 

1,907,61*2 3.098,561 



Lncraane, 

No. 
704 



12,452 
1»885 



14.337 



£ 

1,119,203 
71 » 766 

1,190,969 



* OialttlBe OovemmeDt Railway Workabot}p and GovartimQiit PrintioK Offloa. 

dodiagdresamakizLg, taitoriDs, ihii-t^tiiakitig, uiillixiiiry, dta . for which no returuft 



^'''|i^ 388 WBW SBALAND OPPICIAL tBAR-BOOK. 



m 



iiV" 

if.. I 



i.M 






llAHCFACTOBatg AMD WOBKB, 1896 AVS ISOl— CMtMlNMi. 



H.-p. 
88,096 


JflOL 
H..p. 
89.068 


IM 

in 

- ] 

V 


£ 


£ 




1,063,989 
1,743,073 
3,988,955 


. 1,713.854 
3,419.803 
3,836,574 


641 
671 
83 


5,796.017 


7,959,681 


8.16 



Hone-power 

Total approximate value of — 
Land 
Buildings 
Machinery and plant . . 

Totals 



Under the heading " Hands employed," the males incre 
from 22,98G in 1896 to 35.438, or at the rate of nearly 64-1' 
cent, in five years. The females employed increased at the ra 
4281 per cent. 

The wages paid in the factories or large industrial works c 
with in tlie census returns were returned for 1896 at £1,907, 
and for 1900 £3.098.561. 



' ' The average annual amount of wages paid to male hands 

_ I t £77-2 in 1895 and £817 in 1900. For females, £298 in 1 

i\^; • . against £323 at the last census. The wages of both would see 

i have been more than maintained. 



The increase for the year 1901 over J 896 in the hor8e-p< 
stated in the returns was 10,956, against 6,400 for 1896. 

The approximate value of the land used for purposes of 
factories and industries increased from £1,063,989 in 189( 
£1.713.254 in 1901. The value of the lands used for mining ic 
included in the above figures, and the value of Crown lands 
been omitted throughout. 

A very satisfactory development will be found in the vah 
the machinery and plant, from £2,988.955 in 1896 to £3,826 
in 1901, being at the rate of 2802 per cent, for the period. 
value of the buildings also increased greatly. 

Industries in Pkovincial Districts. 

All the various industries for which returns were received in I 
are given in the statement below, which thus enumerates complc 
the manufactories and works in operation in the colony, specif 
the provincial districts in which they are situated : — 



INDUSTRIES m PBOVINCIAL DISTRICTS. 
ISTDtJSTBMa IN PttOVlNClAt Dl8TBICT9» 



339 



Unuatmetonoa. Workt* ^e 



Number of todustrim in ProvIueiAl DiatrlctB. 



food— 
Me&e fraezing &nd preserviog 

works 
Hftin- and bacon-curiDg es- 

UdU aliments 
Pish ounog ftrid proserviog 

worka 
Butti^r And cheese faoiotiei. . 
'■ t packing 

.^tsd-milk fskotory 

food — 
nulls 

I factories . . • . 

icuu.proBerving and jam- 

maktng works 
SQgtr bdiling and conleo^ 

Uooery vworka 
Sa^ar re fining works 
PruU ounning works 
Baking-powder faoU}ries 
dmk», Darootioa. attd s^mu 
lanie — 

^■talihouses 
^■Colonial -wine making 

A«Tat«d' water factories 

Goffee and f pice works 

Tobac CO man u f ac Lo n as 

Cig&rede ma nu factories 

SaMoe aod pickle faotorioi 

Vinegar- worka 

loa- factories 
Anlinal taattert (nol oiberwise 
olatsed)— 

Booe mills .. .» 

Sckap and candle works 

Oloe-faclory 

Baut« ge- ski D factory 

Boiliog-down works 

Manure-works 

Oleomargarine- works 

Fa^ refin i ng works . . 
Working in wood — 

Co<:}pQrages 

6a w mills, aaah and door lao- 
kiriea 

Barrow and ladder factory , , 

Wood ware and turnery fac- 
toriai 



^ I 



2 
4 

102 



S 
5 



9 
i 
4 
22 
4 
2 
1 
9 
3 
3 



I 
48 

1 

10] 



XI 



a 

33 



8 



8 
4 

87 



10 
8 
1 

34 
4 



3 
36 



4 
66^ 



III 



46 



30 



16 
10 

2 
27 

d 



1 
1 

7 

18 



is 



13 

12 

18 

42 
7 

1 

27 
7 
3 



15 
8 

'17 
5 



70 



34 

39 

38 

247 
7 
1 

78 
20 
13 

36 

1 

1 

11 



74 

33 

14 

125 

18 

3 

3 

23 
4 
9 



6 

34 

1 

10 

14 

5 

1 

1 

23 
334 

1 
38 



840 NBW ZEALAND OFFIOIAL TXAS-BOOK. 

Industribs in Pbotinoial DnrmcTS^eoniifmed. 



Namber of Indaitrias In Prorinoial DIskric 



Manufactorieii, Works, Ac, 



Vegetable produce for fodder — 
Gbaff-outting establishmpntfi 
Qrass- seed-dressing establish' 
ments 

Paper- manufaotore — 
Paper-mills 
Paper bag and box factories, . 

Gasworlcs 

Electric ligbtiDg works 

Processes relatlDg to stone, clay^ 
glass, &o. — 
Lime and cement works 
Brick, tile, and pottery works 
Tobaoco-pipe factory 
Monumental masonry 
Glassworks 
GlaFS-bevelling works 
Electro- plating works . . ' 

Pumice-works 

Metals, other than gold and 
silver- 
Tin ware-factories . . 
Iron and brass foundries, i 
boiler-making, machiniste, 
&c. 
Heel- and toe-plate factoriea 
Engineering.works . . . . I 

Range-making works . . \ 

Spouting aud ridging factories 
Lead-headed-nail woiks 
Iron-pipe and fluming works . . 

Books and publications — 
Printing-offices 

Musical instruments — 

Musical- instrument factoriee 

Ornaments, minor art products, 
and small waren — 
Picture-frame makers 
Basket and perambulator fac- 
tories 
Cork-cutting 
Lapidaries . . . . ' 

Equipment for sports and 
games — , 

Billiard-table factories 

Deitigns, medals, type, and die^ — | 
Rubber-stamp making 

Arms and explosives — 
Ammunition-factory . . I 



15 



6 



13 
13 



2 

10 

5 



& 8 



35 



8 



IS 






1 

IB 



18 
13 



«0 

1 



4 



« 



. 



IS 



1 

S 901 



Sj 18 
14 



3S 
9 



35 



INDUSTBIB8 IN PKOVINOIAL DISTBIOTS. 



341 













Humber of Industrlei In Prorlnelal IMtttiiotv, 


^ 








Sr 


1 


J3 










^1 


H»ii(ifftclor{e«. Wofto, Me. 


5 


j 


1 


1 ' 


1 


% 


1 


1 


1 


Ifichlnes, tools, and lm{)]«- 






















jnents — 






















Agriou 1 turil - implement fac- 


e 


** 


3 


3 




it . 




10 


12 


38 


tories 






















fimeb and bf oom factories . . 


5 


m m 


t m- 


1 


, ^ 


« ■ ' 


* * 


S 


2 


12 


CttUeryfftciory 


1 


i* 


• * 


i • 


* * 


4 * 


i , 


, , 


■ t 


I 


Benowfl-faciuiy 


1 


«• 


« m 


*. 






, , 


. , 


, » 


1 


Gftrri&ges and vebioles— 
















- 






Coach building and palnling 


m 


11 


13 


44 


4 


9; 1 


m 


90 


160 


workfl 












1 








Cjcle-fftctoriei 


8 


i 


3 


10 


• m 


si .. 


S5 


31 


Tl 


Htroeflflj saddlery, and le&ther- 




















ware — 








' 










Saddlery &tid h&m^&fi faotortei 


^ 


7 


7 


29; .. 


5 1 


u 


30j 115 


Whip- thong factorjea 


.. 


#< 


• * 


1 


m-M 




1 * 


* # 


1 


2 


PorLmsn teau - f aotori e« 


i 


• * 


* * 


9 


m w 


» * 


, J 


■ * 


2 


6 


Tanning, fell monge ring, atid 






















wool ^ »ooaring ©stablish- 






















menta .. 


16 


4 


15 


14 


4 


4 


-* 


29 


33 119 


Ship, boaU, and Iheii equip- 






















meat— 






















8bip* aod boat-btilldlng yards 


17 






3 




1 


« * 


S 


1 ^ 


32 


Graving docks and patent Bllp» 


3 


j j 




1 




» T 


• , 


2 


1 


7 


Block &n6 pump factory 


1 


1 ■ 


, , 


, , 




« * 


> ■ 


, , 


.. 


1 


Sail and oilfikin tactofies 


9 


1 


2 


4 




1 


1 


5 


T 


80 


Famiture— 






















Fiijuiture and cabin e&making 


26 


14 


7 


36 


1 


4 


4 


20 


32 


144 


VenetiaD^bltnd works 


'2 






6 




• # 




2 


3 


12 


Mattrew- facto riea . , 


S 






3 




m m 


» » 


2 


4 


12 


Woolf rug, and m&l making. . 


t m. 






, ^ 




» * 




,, 


2 


2 


ObemiealH aod b> -producGd— 






















Perfu in a ry ■ m an u f ac lory 


1 
















■% * 


1 


Vara lab < in an uf aoiorie* 


s 










^^ 






1 


4 


Ink-manufac tones . . 


2 










, ^ 






1 


3 


B arch-man iif»oboricfl 












1 






2 


3 


Ch^micul-wofkH 


S 










^ < 




\ 


5 


8 


Effitoatite paiiil f&otodeB . . 


t i 










1 






3 


4 


S hme p' d i p f ao ioties ., 






2, ,. 




* » 






1 


S 


Match-factories 


, , 






1 




m m 






1 


2 


Herb 1 1 re toed i<? a f aoto ri os . . 


1 






4 




t t 






3 


8 


Blacking' factofjea . . 


1 






1 




> t 






1 


8 


Gi<-c>annt-oil milt .. 


2 




* * i • • 




* 1 






■ m 


2 


Texfilfl Pabriea — 




















WooPoB-niiUa 


J 




1 




" * 




3 


5 


10 


Floek-mtlls 


1 






1 




* * 




1 


2 


5 


DUaomg and dyeing works . . 


5 






S 


!! 


, ^ 




9 


1 


11 


0ra8-*— 






1 














Tai 1 ri ng ea tabli Bhmsn in 


32 


n 


3, 67 


r 


IC 


7 


22 


n 


175 


Dresamaktog and^ mUlinery 


41 


e 


iSj 7e 


^, *'g 


g 


3 


69 


6€ 


290 


establiihrnentfl 








[ 















34a 



NBW ZBAIiAND OFFIOIAI^ TBAA-BOOX. 

Industries in Provincial I>i8TBiGT8^eoiiltnt(«i. 



Ifanufactories, Works, Ste. 



Dress — continued. 

Shirt-iiiaking efstabliRhments 

Gorpot and br^It manufactocie8 

Clothing- factories .. 

Waterproof - factorios 

Boot and Rhoe factories 

Hat and cap factories 

Ho'^iery- factor! ». 8 
FibrouH materials — 

R- pe and twine works 

Bag and sack factory 

Flax-milU 
Returns not included in above . . 

Totals, Census, 1901 . . 
Deduct tailoring, dressmaking, 
shirt-making.and monument al 
masons' establishments, not 
included in accounts taken 
for 1806 and 1891 

Totals, Census, 1901 
(less deductions 
shown above) 
Totals, Census, 189G . . 

Totals, Census, 1891 . . 



Number of Indostriae in Provinoial Diitrlete. 



i 



I 



^ i H < tz: I > 



4[ 
3! 
7 



^ 



I 



1 

31 
1 



3 1 






753 

85 



267 
21 



B 
3 
U 
B 
3 



160 



la 156 



667 



573, 



Si& 144 



123 



147 



577 68 



85 



25 
4 



707 



14 



m 

5 



5^ 



65^ ae 



3%! 60 



3331 77 



19& 
29 



17& 



154 



142 



7a 
10 



4 a 



9 
1 

27 

a 
51 



f 4 



3 

13 



101 



m 



547 



448 



g 

35 



16 



64gl bob' 



10^ 



707 



515 



541 



s 

m 
u 

IT 

n 

1 

101 

T4 



51? 



316S 



Mm 

23M 



The provincial districts, arranged according to the number of 
industries belonging to each, specified in the last census retumfl, 
stand as under: — 

Number of Industries, excluding 
Mines and Quarries. 





1001. 


1886. 


1891. 


Otago 


707 


516 


641 


Auckland 


667 


673 


677 


Wellington 


562 


396 


833 


Canterbury 


647 


448 


380 


Taranaki 


246 


128 


68 


Nel«on 


176 


154 


142 


Hawke'sBay .. 


144 


147 


85 


Westland 


68 


47 


51 


Marlborough . . 


56 


50 


77 



Details of the Principal Industries. 
The principal industries returned at the census of 1901, and 
particulars relating thereto, are given in detail in the following table. 
These^industries are arranged in classes according to their nature : — 



OBTAHiS or THB PBINOIPAL INDOSTBIB8. 



848 



'-• r^ 1-H "O 



g- I- 





893,720 
62,192 


i 


i 


^■- 


368,666 
90,243 
20.935 


8 • -S |g 


-^Hj jo aa^tildvj 
-ntiWR H« JO anriA 


00 


5" 


iH 


: : 


«"l>00 
Q0O»»O 
CO I-H 


88,580 

18*, 163 

553,627 
105.671 


0061 Sniinp nodQ 
p«}ii«i1a JO p»mi 






i 


: : 


<N » ^ 

«5 t- (m" 

^ »-l -**t 

lO r-i 


Q CO C4 iH 

2 S E3S 


-s«joef p»ioi(1m» 




• 


1 

CO 


:« 


(N ^ l> 


0> (MO t- CM O 
r-l Ol rH <H 00 1-H 


t 
1 


HIOX 


1-1 


00 


00 

i 


CO • 


-* CO o 


2 '■ '-^ SS 


■■•Eiin*^ 


2 S 


CO 

t- 


05 


: : 


2SS 


§ . .2 ^ . 

CO * * 


loinn 


i 1 


5 


3 

r-l 


CO • 


^ i-i !>> 

•^ CO 


00 ^ 00 '^ 

rH • • »H 00 ^ 
rH 00 •-« 


1. 
If 


•WOX 






§s? 


lO t- t- 


O S *^S ^^ *^ 


•••rnnaj 




(N 


S 




<M CO (M 




•Mriiv 


iH r-i 


8 

1-H 




S5 


U3 ^ 


00 ;oooo t- lo 

S S -^ 52 


•MTiiBnpoi 
JO a^qraox woi 


s g 


00 


•<* 


t-1-l 


OOO CO 
t* (M I-H 


s •^'^;5 ss 


< 


s 

g 

3 

1 

! 


Animal food — 
Meat freezing and pre- 
serving worksf 
Ham and bacon curing 


establi-hmentsf 

Fish curing and preserv- 
ing worksf 

Butter atid cheese fac- 
tories* 

Babbit-packing 

Condensed-milk factory 


Veeetable food — 

Grain-millsf .. 

Biscuit factoriesf 

Fruit-preserving and jam- 
making worksf 

Sugar boiling and con- 
fectionfry works 

Sugar refining works . . 

Fruit-canning works . . 

Baking-powder factories 
Drinks, narnotics, and 
siimulantfi — 

Breweriesf 

MalthouROFf .. 



M 



S3 



dob 

n 

In 

111 

§£•2 

!=l 

£ OS 

is.8 
5 i«l 



?8 



II 



844 



MBW KSALAHO OPFIOIAL TBAB-BOOK. 





■twmu 


0000C4 too 

OD t* t- *^ ^ 
1-1 «^ to t- 4 






&9 

""1 








03 00 to ei QD 

Si #.^.*,-*.* 

O rH as * * ^ 60 - 

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pdi^maclo lo pvflQ 


sis . %l . 

CO 00 « * • O PS • 




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DBTA1L8 OF THE PBOJOIPAl. INDCSTBIEH. 





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349 



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850 NEW EEALAin> OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 

The Bucceeriin^ statement shows the most important ind 
in operation in 1901, ranged in order of the values of their 
for rJOO, and compared with the results obtained for the yean 
1690, and 1885:— 

Total Value of all Maoufaetarea or Pro 
includiug Ke|)&ira. 



*j- * Meat frepzinp and preBerving and 

boiling down wotki .. 
Tannmu, fcliinorgoriMg, and wool- 
scouring 
BiiitiT Hna ci cose factories 



igoo. 


1805. 


IWik. 


£ 


« 


£ 


3,834,891 


1.662.275 


1,464,659 


1.898,107 


1.237.252 


1,026,349 


1,585,150 


501,274 


160.957 


1.208,089 


898,807 


882,i»69 


924,171 


302,815 


403.635 


858,280 


616,158 


670.316 


704,285 


389,124 


854.559 


682,884 


874,050 


991,812 


C5'.),W8 


418,830 


380,849 


850, 3S2 


302,423 


279,176 


290,507 


199,025 


178,947 


241,239 






241,024 


85,327 


131, 314 


210,077 


148,909 


139,600 


203,492 


32,540 


234,266 


197,989 


118,979 


127,147 


109,313 


78,497 


63,236 


159,504 


80,022 


83,435 


168,049 


152,298 


155,714 


151,811 


98,609 


91,691 


147,020 


63,735 


37,347 


138,094 


102,054 


144,472 


122 230 


00,140 


50,830 


lliiiGOl 


23,702 


33,140 


98,587 


63,723 


14.297 


88,580 


33,235 


17.248 


87,803 


52,400 


70,711 


65,047 


18,817 


5,665 


64,834 


75,320 


41,568 


58,092 


30,108 


27,255 


45,811 


25,233 


35,847 


45,028 


74,339 


64,024 


45,142 


15,881 


19.416 


44,854 


30,106 


31,083 


40,298 


12,240 


4,628 


37,552 


18,276 


9,(»50 


37,521 


19,233 


11,540 


31,205 


9,::57 


6,650 


31,258 


13.417 


6.407 


80,074 


13,472 


10,682 



Sawmill, RHCih and door factories 1,208,089 898,807 882,i»69 1, 
Iron Ki.d bras-s foiinnrio^, b iilcr- 

iiiitkii-g, macbinistH, &c. (not 

includii-g Governmenc Uail- 

way Workhliops) 
Clotliing and bcot and shoe fac- 

torufl 
Printing e«;tHl»iishniont.s (not in- 
cluding Govcrnuient Priiiiiug 

OfTict) 
Grain-niill.s .. 
brL'woriis and mallhouses 
Woollon-iuilU 
Gasworks 
Grush • siod - dressing establiKli- 

niunta 
Furniture and cabinetniaking .. 
Cuac)) building and paiuiing 

works 
Flax-mills 
Bihcuit-fjir'toiiea 
Cliaff cutting works 
Bacon curing csablislimcnts . . 
Soap and candlK works 
AerHt«'d-water fftctoiiew 
Sadul> ry and harness factories . . 
Acr ciiitiinJ-irnplfnieni factories 
Hrick, tile, and pottery works . . 
Spuuiing and ridging works 
Tinwiir.' factories 
Sugar boiling and confectionery 

works 
Rope and t\>ine works 
Cycle- factories 
Ciieiuical-woiks 
Fruit-prcherving and jam-making 

works 
Sliip and boatbuilding works .. 
ColUe and npice works 
L'nio and cement wr rks 
Sail, ttnt, and oiiskin factories. . 
Bene -mills ai.d other manure- 

woi ks 
Woodware and turnery factories 
Cooperages 
HcKieryfactories 
Sauce and pickle works 
Sausage- skin factories.. 



DETAILS OF THE PBINCtPAL INDUBTHtEH. 



851 



Total Value of all ManiiriM?turofl or Producflv 



H&t And cap facto Hot * . 

Fish curing &fid preserving 

works 
EleobriC'ligbting works 
Brush And broom fActoriet 
Herbil-remi^dits f&oiories 
Baking p i«der faobnri« s 
BaHkcrt aod perambulabor fac- 

U>rie3 
Hatirrsfl' factories 
Paper- bibg and otirdboard - box 

faotonoR 
Wa(cr proof f&ctorief? .. 
VcQettan-blmd factories 
Golon'Al-wine works ., 
Other industries in re^p^cb of 

wbicb tbe valUB ct the roanu- 

f&ciiires was leas tban £8,000, 

and feuudrj 



1000. 
£ 

25,641 

25,173 
23,234 
21,131 

18,lti3 

17,942 
15.2y(> 

14,217 
13,378 
13.233 
10,330 



10.902 
10,292 
23,303 
16,153 
11,020 



7,698 

22,354 

9,878 



1090. 

J 

21,628 

10,537 

13,340 

'6,637 

7,381 

i,497 

*i.776 
3,456 



1886. 
13,605 
12,183 
'7.786 
4,120 
4,375 



6.470 
8,626 



805,606 473,037 380,166 235,148 



The order of the principal industries, ranged according to the 
Dumber of hands employed, is as follows :^ 



SawmiUH, sash and door factories .* 
Cloi^^ingand bortt-ari'l-sboe faobories 
Iron and bra^s foundries, boUer-makiog, inaohinists, 

Ac. 
Printing Fstablishments (excluding Government Print- 

irg OfBce) 
Meat freesinef, preserving, and boiling-down works 
Tartfiirig, fellmoogering, and wool-scouring I'ssablish- 

ment^ . , 
Plrvt-mins ., 

WfoUen-milis 

Fumittire and oabinetmaking factories 
Boiler and che«»e factories 
Coach bitildirig and piiiniing works 
Bri<;k, tile, and pottery works 
^Breweries and malthouses 
•t'ftiK'uib-f notaries ., 
''Sftddlery and hfirnei^s factories 
ifrteuhural-implement faotories .. 
Oaiwork4 
GrAiri'itiills 

Aenited- water factories 
Crcle- factories 
Tinware factories .. 
6ogar-b'ilinji and confectionery worka 
Hosiery' lactones ., 
ChAff-cuttin^ works 
SpoiitiuR nnd ridging works 
Sugar r«- fining works 
Soap and candle works 
6a], tent, and oit^kiri faotoricB 
Ship- and boat-bn tiding yards 
Bacon -curing establishments 



dumber of Hands. 


IWl- 


liigc. 


1801. 


6,812 


4,059 


8,24]6 


s.iiua 


4.407 


3,233 


3,590 


1,642 


1,787 


3,134 


2.351 


2,569 


2,283 


2,037 


1.668 


1,963 


1.629 


1,196 


1,698 


647 


3.204 


1,GVI3 


J, 416 


1,175 


1,310 


496 


535 


1.1% 


676 


269 


1,185 


807 


678 


833 


465 


494 


827 


500 


563 


667 


425 


331 


652 


266 


184 


686 


681 


628 


672 


295 


249 


515 


419 


499 


452 


347 


261 


395 


125 


31 


337 


289 


93 


305 


69 


53 


282 


133 


51 


266 


212 


205 


261 


90 


100 


256 


160 


110 


232 


1<»0 


209 


231 


143 


124 


211 


108 


145 


196 


123 


84 



352 



NBW BBALAm> OFFIOIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



Rope and (wine works 

Lime and cement works 

Matob-faotories . . 

Fruit-preserving and jam-making works 

Woodware and turnery factories 

Cooperages 

Fistj curing and preserving works . . 

Brush and broom factories. . 

Sauce and pickle works 

Basket and perambulator factories . . 

Hat and cap factories 

Waterproof-factories 

Ammunition- factories 

Sausage-skin factories 

Paper mills 

Chemical- works 

Paper- bag and cardboard-box factories 

Coffee and spice works 

Rabbit prenerving and packing works 

Grass-seed -dressing establishments 

Colonial-wine works 

Mattress-factories 

Eleotnc-lighting works 

Venetian-blind factories 

Cleaning and dyeing works 

Bone-mills and other manure-works 

Condensed-milk factory 

Graving-docks and patent slips 

Starch and soda works 

Baking-powder factories 

Pumice-works 

Corset and belt manufactories 

Herbal- remedies factories . . 

Vinegar-works 

Portmanteau-factories 

Picture-frame makers 

Tobacco-manufactories 

Sheep-dip factories 

Industries employing under 20 hands 

Special tables relating to the principal industries, with comment8 
on each, have been printed in the Year-books for 1901, 1902, and 
1903. 



NamtMrof HsBdi 


190L 1806. 1 


m. 


192 150 


m 


184 79 


98 


183 191 




167 193 


ii7 


166 81 


51 


188 76 


5S 


187 76 


140 


128 92 


81 


128 68 


41 


118 76 


68 


117 72 


118 


114 93 




106 90 


80 


.. 98 66 


78 


.. 98 84 


48 


96 114 


55 


81 86 


35 


78 119 


81 


62 82 . 




60 ... 


, 


69 63 


S4 


66 


, 


62 


, 


61 46 


29 


61 68 


48 


47 46 


25 


33 




32 29 


64 


82 27 


IS 


29 




28 20 


. 


26 


, 


23 




23 




22 




22 


, 


20 




..7 29 




632 268 


'36 



I 



SECTION XI.— LABOUR LAWS. 

fhe legislation passed by the General Assembly of New Zealand 
and tenned the ** labour laws " comprises the undermentioDed 
statutes and regulations made under various Acts : — 

*'^ The Accidents Comper^saliaii Act, 1901/' 

"' The Accident lasurance CompaDieH Aot^ 1902." 

** The Alcohohc Liquors Sule Control Act Amendment Act, 1895*' : 860- 
tion 10 {re hohday on liceiifiitig-election dikj), 

"Tiie Bank Hclidaypi Act. 1902/' 

•♦ Tbe Bankruptcy AgI, 1892 ** : Seotiona 112 and 120 {re wages of employees). 

** The Ctial Qjinee Act Compilfttion Act, liM)5/' 

** The Ccvrnpanies Act, 1B93": B^ctioiis 1 &nd 249 (r« wages of employees of 
companies tlmt are lieiiig wound up). 

** The Conspiracy Law Amendment Act, 1891 " \re conspiraoy in trade dts- 
putef « &c,). 

•* The Contractors' and Workmen'B Lien Act, 1892/' (See also Threshing, 
maebine Ownerii' Lien Act.) 

** The Criminal Cede Act, 1893 " : Sections IM^ and 213 (re mantera and 
apprenticei.). 

**Tbe Deaths by AocidenU Compensation Act| 1680/' (See aleo Legitima- 
tion Act ) 

*'Tbe Eleofcorftl Act, 1905 " : Section 115 {r^ holiday on election-di%y). 

"The Employers* Liability Act, 1882/* with amend nieuts of IHiU and 1893. 

»» The Fftctorieii Act, 1901/' with amendmentft ot 1902 ad 1905. 

** The Indujitna] Conciliation and Arbitration Acts Compilation Aot^ 1905/' 
jLnd AmeDdmeot Aot, 1905. 

**The Inspection of Machinery Act, 1902," with amendment of 1903. 

" The Kauri-gom Industry Act, 1898/' and Amendment Acts of 1899, 1?>02, 
and 1903. 

- Tbe Labour Day Act, 1899/' 

'" The Labour Department Act, 1903/' 

'' The Land for SottiementB Conj^olidation Act, 1900 '* : Section 13 (pro « 
vieion for workmen's homes)* 

** Tbe Legitimation Act» 1894 " : Seotioo 6, (See Deatbe by Accident Oom- 
peosatinn Act) 

'' Tbe Licensing Act, ISBl " ; Section 131 {re payment of wagea at botasei 
where liquor is sold). 

** The Masiter and Apprentice Act, 18G5/* Master and Appientice : Extract 
from "The Criminal Code Act, 1893/* sections 160 and 213. 

** The Mining Act Compifation Act, 1905/' and Amendment Aoti 1905. 

" The Public Contracts Act, 1000/' 

*'Thc Servants* Registry Offices Act, 1895/' 

** The Shearers' Accommodation Act, 1898/' 

''The Shipping and Seamen Aot, 1903," and Amendment Act^ 1905. 

*'The Shnps and Offices Act, 1904/' and Amendment Act» 1905. 

•* Tbe Titreabing-maohine Owner«* Lien Act, 1895/' 

** The Trade- Union Act. 1878/' and Amendment Act, 1896. 

•*The Truck Act, 1891." 

*»The Wages Attachment Act, 1895/* 

♦*Tbe Wnges Protection Act, 1899" (forming part of and to be read with 
'♦The Truck Act. 1891 "). 

" The Workers' C-^mpenaation for Accidents Act, 1900," with amendment* 
ol 1902. 1903, 1904. and 1905. 

''Tiie Workers* Dwellings Aot, 1905/' and Amendment Act, 1905. 
"The Workmen's Wages Act, 1893/' 

12-Ybk. 



NBW ZEALAND OFlflCIAL TEAH-BOOK. 



The labour laws b&ve been paased io the rfforl to ragut^te c^rtAin c<)n<{itioi 
afF>ctin£ employer and employed. Thi^ir scope M3ibriice« miktiy difBcult poaiuoi 
into whicVi the txigencics of moderu induatri&l ]ife have forced those engaged 
trades ani1 handicrafts. The general tendency of these lawM is to iimehor&t« kl 
position of the worker by preventing tocial oppregsion through undue infiu«fiC4 
or through urtBaciRfactory conditions of f^anitation. It wiU uodoubtedly be km 
that, with the advance of time, these laws are capable of imprijvenit|^^ 
atnendment; but they have already done much to make the livee of om^| 
of fuller and more healthy growth, and their aim is to prevent the initwH^ 
of abunea befoie such abuj^eii attain tormidaMe dimenBions. 

The manufacturing population in New Zealand differs from thatic«oi 
of the Aufltralian States by its wii^e disperfion. The capital city has bitbetf 
been unable to draw to ibstlf the industrial ability of the other pro^meji 
oentret ; and not only do Auckland, Cliriaichurch, and Dunedin vie wtlj 
Wellington as centres of population ^ but &t»«o afi nuclet of commercial acM 
In the second class towns, such as Nelson. Nspit-r, Inverc&rgtU, Ac. ma 
important works are being carried on, while even in the villages and ran 
di^trictft the progress of new settlement necesaitateB the manufacture of aittcl 
which in older communities are produced in speoiaiised h^salities. Ml 
scattered widely at the numeroiiB occupations of colonial country life, sbearij^ 
harvesting, bu5ihJellmg, road-making, or sailing ooaatal vessels, dsc, require le^ 
protection agamiit the dangers and disabiU(.ie«i to which their oUltngsexpol 
them. This general dispersion of iadu<;try necessitatei) not only a wide sy«te| 
of BUpervision, hut legislative measures of a peculiar character, at oofl 
BufEoiently elastic to comprehend many varieties of funotioD, and yet rigid 
orush any apparent abuse, 

The followinf? explanatory notes on the labour iawi of the colony art 
Mr. E. Tregear, Secretary for Labour: — 

**By far the mo^it interesting nnd original of these laws is the Tnduitrf 
Conoilistion and Arbitration Act, ^rst passed in 1894. This, with three tat 
aroendlng Arts, was cons lidated in 1900, but has been am**iided afreah id 19d 
1903, and 19Qi. The subi^tauce of all these may be found in * The Industi 
Conciliation and Arbitrauon Acta CompiUt^on Act, 1905'; but it has t^T 
BUppUmented with the amending Aot of 19Q5. The neceiisity of contlnui 
amendment has been thrust upun the Legis atuftf through the principle 
industrial arbitration of a judicial character being entirely unique and wttbi 
Btaiutory precedent. The law on this suhject has t^L> bo kept flexK^lc in order 
me»-t the continual necessitibs of change and growth. As difficulties imj 
to foresee arise on the untrodden ground, they have to be met by new 
cope with the new situation, and with the knowledge which can only 
with experience* 

** Societies oonsisting of two or more employers, or of seven or moreworkM 
m-iy be registered and become subject to the provisions of the Act nta 
the title of ' iiiiiuBtriiil union/ Any such union may bring a trade dispute befei 
the Board of Conciliation, w^hich Board may pr oeed to inveAtigata the dispuu 
or, on rfquirement of one of the nariiea, may refer the case direct to the Ard 
tration Court. If the dispute is left to tiie Board, after taking evidenoe M 
the Boaid may make a recommendation^ wiiich, if accepted by the particfl. * 
put iiito the form of an industrial agreement and lias the force of law. If tl 
Board's reoommeodation is ignored for a moikth it automatically beoomes U^ 
but if rejected the dispute is carried to the Court of Arbitration, Tuis Court 
oonsiKtinif of a Prej^idpnt, who m a Judge of the Suprt'me Court, and two othi 
members — one elected by the employers* unions, ihe other by the worked 
unions— has wide poweiH, and against its decisi m^ there Im no appeal. Intpi 
tors of Factorifs are InMpectorH of Awards und»*r the Arbitration Act. The lal 
amendments of the Act are mo-tly in the directiou of giving wider notio« 
Court sittiuge, of arrar^gmg for permits bt^ing givfn at lower rates Ibao t 
minimuin wage mentioned in ihe award, and ot greater strioinoas Ld mallei 
threatening to bring about a strike or lock-out. 




LikfiOUB LAWS. 355 

»• *The FA<^torie« Act| 1901 * is a oon sol id at ion of former lef^JBlaiion, but with 
SpArtaiit Amend metit^ within itself and in the years 1902 &nd 1905. The Acts 
p&Bd»'d prior ro 1901 dealt almost exclnaively with the protection of workmg- 
women and cbtldreii, hut thts existing law takes cogDi^ance also of the wr^rking* 
hour«< of mtfn« and Mrranaes for payjnef>t bemg made for overtime- work. The 
forty -five-bour w»-ek is inflisled on for women amd youths, except in woollen- 
mil**, where forty-eig>it houi^aro allowed; but U in^ n are employed over forty- 
* eight hours in one we«'k overtime mtist be piiid. The waives of young pf^rsous, 
the atatutory holidays (with payment therefor), the ref^ulated hours > f overtime, 
the sanitation atHi hygiene of factorieH, pro' ision of tire^e^caner^, drinking water, 
fttj,, are all i-arefully arranged for under this Act* Any establishtneiit whereia 
two or more persons work to produce articles intended for salo is a factory in 
K^w Ze^lau'i. All bak^houaeR, Nit laundries, and all places wherein Aftiatics are 
empb'yi^d are also f»vctorie*». even if only one person is employed therein. This 
low limit is maHe rnainiy for the purpose of in^peot'on, in order tb>it thf^ public 
ibould n<a be injured by taint on food or clothing manufactured m filthy i-ur- 
rotindings, 'S^eAtini!* had almost disappe'^red in New Zenlartd by the pro- 
hibition of sab-contract trg in the iseue of textiles to be made up into gurments. 
The F*ctorifS Act. is prfibably one fi the most complete and perfeci lawa to ba 
found oti tMe statute-book of any colony, and tti grta ly appreciated by tha 
work»*r8, while the hoaest, lair dealing employer is himself thereby protected 
Irom the unacrupulout proceedings of the piratical competitor. 

•* • The Shop^ and Offices Act, 1904,* ia the consolidation of the Shops and 
Shop-iw*i^tant« Acts of 1894, 1895, 1896, and 1901, but was itself amended in 
1906. The Act rt'gulates tie hours of tts&istaniB m shops, not allowing them to 
exceed fifty*two h nns a week or more than nine hours a dav, with some excep- 
llons. Tne shopn are to be kept clean, and to have sanitary oonditiona necessary 
where two texea are employed togt^ther. 

'* A weekly haU-boliday is compul orv, hut the particular day of the week Ifl 
left lo oe cbo4f>ti by each town s-parAtely* CompuUory oloeing of shops at any 
hour whatever is not in^jsted on unless under certain c <Ddit)inR wberehy each 
lr«de 18 allowed to settle its closir^g hoi-r by a majority vote of all ahopkeepers. 
To all voung peri^ons waees of 5:^. a week as a minimum must be paid, with an 
annual ino'eiiMe of 38. per week, until twf^nty years of age is reached. Overtime 
haa to be paid f<<r in both shops and ofHces, but some est&blibbmeots, such as 
banks and shipping offices, are exempt. 

*'The hoars of work and wages are subject to awards of the Arbitration 

•* * The Kmplnyors* Liability Act, 1882,' added to and amended in 1891 and 
1892, is designed to proteot workmen from negligence on the part of employers by 
defining under what circumatances eompensatton for injury or death may be 
recoverable. The Act covers all employment except that of domes tio si^rvice, and 
does not allow r>f * oontractlug out ' from its provisiona, or permit the plea of 
'onmtnon employment to shield the employer or his agent for payment , of 
damages if inourr d. 

'*The laet-mentioned Act has been practically snpersedpd h? ^T*ie Workert' 
OompeD^ation for Accidents Act, 1900' lamenilments 1902, 1903, 1904, and 1905), 
beoaufve, while an accident to a worker bad not to be compensated bv an employer 
under ihe £mploy< rs' Liability Act unleF^s such accident had ooeiirr^d through 
hiB carelessness or through that of his agent, umier the later Act all aooideDla 
are lo be rem pen sated nnlees they are caused by the seri us and wilful mlscon- 
duct of the jierson injur* d. This compensation is In no sem^e intended t'^ be a 
punishment or penalty on the employer, t^ut to be a means of providing for an 
Injured workman or (in case of his deatb) for his family. 

*^A certain number of accider^ts take place— these numbpra can almost be 
oomputed be orebarid bv actuarial expt^rts— in spite of all that care and »-kill can 
do to prevent them. The workman, m case of indnBtrial accident, h>td formerly 
not only the ri^k and pam to bear, but the m^mey-loi^B of wages, the medioal 



• 




i 



856 



NEW ZEALAND OmciAL TBAR-DOOK. 



I 



ezpentieB, and in iK>me Avent^ the ruin o( bia (amiW, in order that promts ttiigl 
be made by others. Novr ibe ezpenne of accident U borne by the busin* 
ilself MS o 6 of the legiLtm^ite expenaefi of OArrying it on. To meet the difficull 
of too gr-tki expense fiklling 8u<idenly on an empioyer through hia having to 
Ur(?o accident com pen g&t ion, provi<>ioii is made by 'The Ooveromeni *" 
InHuraroe Act, 1890/ which inBuren employers against riok of payli 
pentiation. There are aUo several private insuranoA oompanies in tbe 
whicli uodertHko these risks, and are regulated in some degree by • The Acc^d^i 
Innurarict) Coinpaiiiea Act, 1902/ The Workers' Ckrmpensatioo for Aocii 
Aot allows compeoHatiaD np to £100 m case of death, and a leea sum for iDJXLtf 
• Contracting out ' is permitted if the alternative scheme tg accepted as a lij 
equivalent by the Board of C^^noitiation of the distriot. 'The Accidents Coi 
pens-ition Act, 1901/ provides that an independent medical examination of tl 
injured person m^y be order*- d by the Judge before whom a claim of coi 
pensaton for accident is brought. See also * The Deaths by Accidents Coj 
pensatiou Actf ISSO,' which deals with the status of persons to bo bene^u^d 1 
com pe nidation, and also * The LegitimaLlon Act, 1894/ which includee illegitimj 
ubildren as lei^al recipients. 

"'The Workmen's Wages Act, 1893/ states that if a workm^an ahatl detsui 
payment of wage» twenty-four hours or more after they are due, and the wifi 
are not paid, the worker can leg%Uy attach moneys payable to the contractor I 
the employer until suoli wage^ are paid. Without written agreement to tl 
contra ry. all wages mu^t be paid at intervals of not more than one wee' 
Before the passing ol * The Workers* Compensation for Accidents Act, 1900/ 
was ascertained tbac certain employers were taking out accident-iDsuran 
policies on their work'ppoples' risks, BO as to remove their own liability in 
of accident, and deducting premvums therefor from the wages of the 
This wae considered by the Legislature a>4 not only tending to produce m 
or recklesftUFSfl in employers aid their agents or foremeu, by removing froi 
the liabllitv for dam^gi^s through aocideuts, but waa also ooademiied in prineipi 
on the ground that it is agAinst jiuacice to allow an employer to make arbitral 
deductions from any wftge agreed upon and worked for. This caused *TI 
Wag(*B Protection Act, 1899,' to be parsed. It preveots any deduction from h 
fullv earned wagea as premiums for accident insurance, and makee any sui 
deductions recoverable as debts within six months of suoh deductions " 
made. 

^' * The Piibho Contraofce Aot, 1900,' provides that in every contract let by 
public bodv (such as (he Government, a municipality, a Harbour Board, Edui 
tion Btmrd. ic), the contractor must pay such rates to his men for wages, 
time, holidayM, &c.| as are g*^nerally oonsidered usual and fair for such descriptld 
of lahotir in that locality, or as fixed by the Court of Arbitratioyi for theindustijd 
district, whether the contractor is or is not a party to tbe award. 

■ t i^xbe Truck Act, 1S91;' requires that payment of wages or earnings sha 
not be made in goods (locfanicaHy known as * truck ' or barter), but in moD( 
any contrt-account notwitbstanding ; hut there are a few exceptions, such as fj 
advances (or food, tor Is, &c., to men engaged in felling bush. 

" In order to rninimHc the number of cases wherein fraudulent or unfortuni 
contrsctorfi formerly victimised tboir labourers, " The ContractoiB* and Workmen* 
Lion Art, 1892/ waa broucht into existence. This entitles a person 
done work on anv land, building, or chattel to a lion upon such property 
lien is only to be exercised under ceriain restrictiou^, and for a limited 
but it gives priority of claim for wages against other service, and enabj 
proceedings f'^r recr'tvery to b^j taken before thn attached property can be 
of or alienated. With the Cimtrtictors' and Workmen's Lien Act *Tbte 
ing-raathine Owner-' L«en Act. 1895/ is also to be oonsidered. Liens to 
Acqitired for fieourity nf miners* wagefi are dealt, with in * The Mining Acts G< 
pilation Ace, 1005/ luid in * The Mming Act Amendment Act, 1906.' 

'* Among the enactments for the neourity of wurkers' wages may be noti 
The Companies Act, 1903,* which gives priority of paymeot for wages or sali 



if" 



^^V LABOUR LAWS. 357 

ftbove ot>ier dehtfl In the event of fche winding-up of a compaT^y, as * The Bank- 
ruptcy Act, 1892/ d^»e8 in the case of ordinary bankruptcy. ' The Wages 
ActAchmeiit Aec, 1895,' prev«niB wages below £2 a week Crom being byp the- 
CAied for d<>bt. I( does not interfere with any workman being sued for debt 
in the ordinary oourBe, but prevents a particular creditor from £tepping in 
before others and sei^ihg wages in advane*^ b'^Iore Ihey are earned. Tbe wnges 
or e»mit«gs of coaUminers are epecially safeguarded in tbe *■ Tbe Gual-niiiies 
CompiUtioQ Act^ 1905/ and al) coridilioDH c f other mioerft in 'The Alining Acts 
Compilation Act, 1905.' and ' The Mining Act Aniendnient Act, 1905.' No nagos 
payments of ajiy kind may be made to workers in a publiehou!^ or other 
fmisen licensed for the sale of alcoholio liqnors ; penalties are provided under 
The Licensing Aot^ 1881/ (or any such payment. 

***The Kauri-gum Industry Act, 1S98' (with its amending Acts of 1899, 
1902^ and 1903), regulfLtea the conditions under which the foBtii! gum of the gia-ot 
kAori pine is dug and disposed of for sale. It spcoifres th» different olaeses of 
■eiUers who may obtain lici^tiHes for diggini ;um, the varieties of llGen»ea to 
dif7 and sell gum, and the pariicuUr lands en which the right to dig gum may 
be dzerofRed. 

** • The Shearers' Accommodation Act, 1898,* entails on Inspectors of Pac- 
lories the duty of inspecting Bhearingsbed!!! on farm a, runs, and htatinns all over 
the colony. Proper sleeping and otrur accommodatloo haA to he provided for 
•hearers — the moat nomaclic of workmen. If no provision is made, or if th«» 
aeoomiDodaiion in insnfliGlent^ formal notice has to he served on the owner or 
oc>oupi«*r ID regard to improve merits to be effected, and if the notice Ib dis- 
regarded or not fully complied with the offender can be brought before a Miigis- 
trate and fined, 

** The licenses of registry of!ices for domestic or farm servants are regulated 
by 'The Ser?*nta' Registry Offices Act, 1895;' This Act prevents fripniilefft or 
aoeducated persons from becoming the prey of UD8orupulou>«perrtone, ApplioaQts 
for licenses as registry- office keepers have to pay a fee to the GoTernment and to 
preeent a certiflcate of good char act er. Pr p' r ledgers and books, open to in- 
ipection, must be provided, Rtgia try -office keopeis are not allowed to keep 
lodiciDg'hoasefi for servants or have any intert-st in such houses. 

*' * Tbe Shipping and Seamen Act, 1903 ' (with amending Act of 1905)^ con- 
taint all the existing legal provi^iionH affircting tbe protection of life at sea of 
boUi sailors a* d passengerB. They relate to the appcitstmeut of pilots, ships* 
ctffioera and engineers, the engagement and dit^charge of sailor?, the aanitation, 
ventilation, or overloading of vessels, and the number of duly rated handti to be 
engaged in proportiun to tonnage. They endeavour to prtivent injustice to tbe 
•ailor as to advance notes or payments in foreign money, and aUo specify penal- 
liee to be iuEicted for desertion, disobedience, &(i. 

***The Inspection of Machinery Act, 1902' (with Amendment Act, 1903). 
has, as its name implies, the oversight of all macliint ry, whether on land or 
water. It also provideH for proper persons beiug in cijarge of machinery, &o., 
and for certifioaies of engineers and others in charge of engines ard boikrs. 

" • The Labour Department Act, 1903/ establishtd that Department on a 
•tatutory bads, although it bftd b^en in practical exiKtence for some years. Itn 
du^ie<i are to administer the Icibnur la^s, and to furn^<^h inforniatiou on all in 
dust rial matters, while power )h given to certain of itn offiotr*! to cclkot statistics 
With the authority wherewith a Crfiwu Commisfeioner is invested. 

** * Th^ Master and Apprentices Aptt, 1S65 * apples mainly to the indentur- 
ing of children to emp1ioyer», encb ebiidrea being the of!s|iring of destitute 
parents. In other re8pect»4 the Uw of England i^ held to be the law governing 
tile relations between master and approntiie in ibis colony; but this is tem- 
pered by awards of tbe Arbitration Court, which allot tbe rntio of apprentices to 
}oume}men engaged. Special t^ections of the main Act apply to the pumanment 
of appremices for absenting tbtmselves from duty, and to the tine on a master 
(or neglecting or lU-using hia apprentice. 'Tbe Griminat Code Act, 1893/ 



I 



358 NBW BBALANO OFFICIAL TIAB-BOOS. 

seotions 150 and 213, also relates to the proper oare of appreniicei by their 
masters. 

«' Combinations or assooiations of persons (or regalating the trade relations 
between masters and masters, or masters and vtorkmen, or workmen and work- 
men, are to bo found in * Tbe Trade Union Aet, 1878,' wiih its amending Act of 
18i^. Practically, bowover, these relationships are determined bv the Industritl 
Conciliation And Arbitration Act, and it is to tbe latter stainte that atteotion 
must be paid if the relation of worker to employer is to be understood. 

*' * The Conspiracy Law Amendment Act, 1894,' permits any combiDstioo 
of persons in furtherance of a trade dispute, so long as it is not a combins- 
tion for riot, Bedition, or crime. Later legiblation, however, forbids such com- 
bination from attempiing to evade or defeat an award of the Arbitration Court, 
or to promote a strike or lock-out. 

*' Holidays for workers in the different trades are regulated under awards 
of the Arbitration Court, but by btatiite are referred to in the Factories, 
Shops and Offices, and other general Acts. Special enactments relate to* The 
Alcoholic Liquors Sale Control Aot Amendment Act, 1895,' *The Electoral 
Act, 1905,' *The Bank Holidays Act, 1902,' and *The Labour Day Aot, 
1899.' 

"One of the latest departures in 'advanced legislation' is the provision 
of land and dwellings for labour by means of * The Workers* Dwellings Act, 
1905,* 'The Wtirkers' Dweilingfi Act Amendment Ac, 1905,' and a section 
of 'The Land for Sotilenients Consolidation Aot, 1900.' The eicessive rents 
which workmen have had to pay in the chief centres of the oolony needed 
reform in some protective way, and this method of attempting to aohieva 
the object has been adopted." 



Co-operative Public Works. 
Remarks on the co-operative system of constructing public 
works were given in a special article in the Year-book of 1894 
The numbers of workmen employed in this manner under Govern- 
ment Departments during each month of the financial year 1905-6 
were : — 

Roads and 



Month. 


Lands 

and Survey 

Departments. 


Public Works 
Department. 


Total. 


April, 1905 


2,042 


2,197 


4,239 


May, 


1,894 


2,574 


4,468 


June, 


1,849 


2,711 


4,560 


July, 


1,064 


2,888 


4,852 


August, 


1,963 


3,229 


6,192 


September, 


1.947 


8,392 


5,839 


October, 


2,054 


3,445 


5,499 


November, » 


2,208 


3,689 


5,897 


December, 


2,601 


3,745 


6,346 


January, 190G 


2,801 


4,227 


7,028 


February, 


3,198 


4,563 


7,761 


March, 


8,622 


4,624 


8,246 



CO-OPERATIVE PUBLIC WORKS. 



369 



The average 

lows : — 

Year. 

1891-92 

1892-93 

1893-94 

1894-95 

1895-96 

1896-97 

1897-98 

1898-99 

1899-1900 

1900-1 

1901-2 

1902-3 

1903-4 

1904-5 

1905-6 



number of men employed in each year was as 



Annual average last 
fif ceen years 



Roads and 






Lands 


Public Works 


Total. 


and Sarvey 


Department. 


Departments. 






261 


527 


788 


280 


842 


1.122 


933 


1.015 


1.948 


1,103 


962 


2,065 


1,572 


764 


2.336 


1,459 


854 


2.818 


1,552 


890 


2.442 


1,618 


1,194 


2.807 


1,825 


1.243 


3,068 


1,820 


2,090 


3,910 


1,894 


2,678 


4,567 


1,319 


1,733 


8,052 


1,493 


2,305 


3,7^»8 


1.407 


2,119 


8,526 


3,440 


2,345 


6,785 



1,465 



1,437 



2,902 



Labour Department. 

The total number of men for whom employment has been found 
the Department of Labour up to the end of March, 1906. is given 
)w. The statement also exhibits the number of persons de- 
dent upon the men assisted : — 

June, 1891, to Slst March, 1892 . . 
1st April, 1892, to dlst March, 1893 
Ist April, 1893, to 31st March, 1894 
1st April, 1894, to Slst March, 1895 
Ist April, 1895. to 3l8t March, 1896 
Ist April, 1896, to Slst March. 1897 
1st April, 1897, to Slst March, 1898 
Ist April, 1898, to Slst March, 1899 
1st April. 1899, to Slst March, 1900 
1st April, 1900, to Slst March, 1901 
1st April. 1901, to 81st March, 1902 
1st April, 1902, to Slst March, 1903 
1st April, 1903, to Slst March, 1904 
Ist April, 1904, to Slst March, 1905 
1st April, 1905, to Slst March, 1906 



Men. 


Dependents. 


.. 2,593 


4,729 


.. 3,874 


7.802 


.. 3,341 


7,942 


.. 3,030 


8. 888 


.. 2,871 


8.424 


.. 1,718 


4,719 


.. 2,035 


4,928 


.. 2,115 


4,759 


.. 2,147 


4,471 


.. 3,124 


5,432 


.. 1,830 


2,747 


.. 3,704 


5,934 


.. 2,875 


3,237 


.. 3,130 


3,274 


.. 6,903 


7,324 



45,290 



84,605 



SECTION XII. — OCCUPATION OF LAND; AND LIVE- 

STOCK. 

The occupation of land must not be confused with ownership/ 
because there are large parcels of lands held which are unused and 
unoccupied. Neither can lands occupied be properly compared with 
the returns of Crown lands alienated or in process of alienation, for 
certain lands have passed into the hands of Europeans which were 
never made waste lands of the Crown. 

The occupied lands of the colony for 1905-6 have been re- 
turned by the Department of Agriculture at 37,167,460 acres, in- 
cluding Crown lands leased for pastoral purposes only, or 656,306 
acres in excess of the area for the preceding year. 

Tlie comparatively small increase in the area of occupied lands 
is apparently mainly, if not altogether, caused by some of the Crown 
pastoral leases expiring and not being renewed. 

Tables are given showing the numbers and acreages of holdings, 
grouped according to size, for the last five years in which the De- 
partment of Agriculture has compiled the information. 

In 1895 the holdings of over 1 acre in extent, as returned to the 
Registrar-General, numbered only 46,676. Holdings occupied by 
Maoris were excluded, besides holdings of exactly 1 acre, also 
gardens and orchards attached to residences.! 

* The latest iDforination in reference to ownership of land which is available givM 
figures up to the :^l8t March, 19(>2. It i» contained in Parliamentary Keturn B.-20of tbftt 
year, and states the totHl number of owners of land (town and country holdings of all sixes) 
to be 115.713 for the colony. The most important figures (showing ownership of yroduetiv* 
land) are thohc of freehoMcrs outside boroughs and town districts, and exclading holdings 
of under 5 acres. These figures are :— 

New Zeaj.ajjd Owners (Over 5 Acres). 



Year 1902 


... 43,7H5 


Year iaS6 


... 34.450 


,. 1892 


... 38,9.35 


^ 1883 


... 30.764 


., 1889 


... 37,432 







+ At the census of April. 1901, the actual number of persons described in the oensns 
schedtilefi as having occupations necessitating their occupying holdings of land was 40,144 
This number includes 28,:^i7 farmers, 3,220 ruuholders. 8Uo mark^'t-gardeners. 2,388 horti- 
oulturiBts or gardeners, 4,7(n2 dairy-fariuers, 345 fruit-growers, 2i? vignerous, 159 poultry- 
farmers. 35 bee-farmers, and 34 others. 



OCCUPATION OF LAND. 



361 



OccupiBD Lands: Holdings. 
[This and the succeeding statement deal with the full extent of occupied 
^<tAd, including Grown pastoral leases.] 











Number of HoMinRs. 








Siees of Holdings. 
















19C1-9. 


1902-^. 


190 M. 


1904-6. 


1905-6. 


1 acre 


to 10 acres, inclusive 


17,817 


18,348 


18.731 


19,629 


19,787 


10 acres to 50 


11,631 


11,348 


11,386 


11,618 


11,746 


50 




100 


7,130 


7,239 


7,246 


7,640 


7,662 


100 




200 


9,332 


9,400 


9.570 


9,822 


9,9.^0 


200 




320 


6,898 


5,998 


6,146 


6,408 


6,531 


320 




640 


6,201 


6,387 


6,666 


7,043 


7,219 


640 




1,000 


2.324 


2,449 


2.497 


2,609 


2,750 


1,000 




6,000 


2,854 


3,003 


3,075 


3,318 


3,497 


5,000 




10,000 


393 


366 


379 


395 


408 


10,000 




20,000 


234 


217 


223 


225 


287 


20,000 




50,000 


165 


175 


169 


177 


166 


W.OOOi 


aicres and over 


103 


104 


106 


96 


90 



68,982 65,034 66,092 68,680 69,942 
The holdings are shown to have increased by the number of 
5,960 since 190 1-2. 

The total acreage of occupied land for each of the last five years 
is shown : — 







OccupiBD Lands 


: ACRRAOES. 






Sixes of Holdings 1901-9. 


1909-3. 


1903-4. 


1904-6. 


1906-6. 




in Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Ito 


10 inclusive ... 73,954 


73.796 


76.464 


79.136 


79.996 


10 . 


60 


394.620 


314.940 


319,241 


391,444 


324,375 


50 . 


100 


560.888 


566,406 


570.736 


690.969 


»)l.909 


100 . 


900 


... 1.431,539 


1.424.965 


1.462.747 


1.497.078 


1.514.064 


900 . 


890 


... 1,543.749 


1,550.548 


1.504.245 


1,665.285 


1. 692.884 


390 . 


640 


... 9,8«6.787 


9.908,745 


3.016.780 


3.914.473 


3.H06.475 


640 . 


1.000 


... 1,924,969 


1,960,730 


9,(i07.Ml7 


2.129,093 


9.920.149 


1.000 . 


5,000 


... 5,849.516 


6,195,878 


6,171,815 


6,52:^,951 


6.955.810 


5.000 . 


10,000 


... 9.695,849 


9,600,348 


9.612,806 


2.706,2^ 


9.874.569 


lO.OUO . 


90,000 


... 3,285,879 


3,146,714 


3,383,033 


3,265.856 


3.278.498 


9).0O0 • 


50.000 


... 5,578,887 


5,272.992 


5,107.555 


5,317,969 


6.273.472 


50,000 and over 


... 9,571,246 


9.872,225 


10.158.242 


9,199.f^ 


9.056,576 



35,507,889 35,887.447 36.476,481 30.511.154 37.167.460 

In regard to holdings, out of a total of 69,942 in 1906 the large 
proportion of 39,094, or 55*89 per cent., were from 1 to 100 acres 
in extent ; 49,044, or 70- 12 per cent., were from 1 to 200 acres ; and 
o5,575, or 79*46 per cent., were from 1 to 320 acres in size. The 
total number over 320 acres was only 14,367, or 20o4 per cent, of 
the whole, thus indicating a considerable degree of moderately -close 
settlement, although the area of the holdings over the 320-acres 
limit necessarily shows as very large in a table which includes the 
Crown pastoral leases. 

The plan of excluding these leases from the table showing the 
holdings in classes has its advantages, though not now adopted. 

The extent of land occupied as shown in the returns according 
to tenure is tabulated for each provincial district. The acreage in 
the last column of the statement is apparently short of the actual 
facts, judging from the figures shown in the table of *' Crown 
Tenants," as given in the report of the Surveyor-General. The 
difference may he in what has been returned for Crown pastoral 
leases to the agricultural -statistics collectors and tVie ^^^a oh v^Vv^ 
rent is paid given by the Lands Department. 



362 



NEW ZRALAND OFFIOIAL YBAB-BOOK. 

Occupation of Laitd: Tsnubs. 



Provincial Diitriota. 



Totol 

Are* 

of 

Holdings. 



Freehold. 



a « 
2*1 8" 



3 



fmn 
MatlTes. 



Held from 

Crown 

ander 

Difleraat 

Tennnt. 



I 



Aoree. 



Auckland 

Taranaki 

Hawke's Bay 

Wellington 

Marlborough 

Nelson 

Westland 

Canterbury 

OtaRo — 
Otago portion 

Southland portion 
Totals 



.. I 6,294,995 
.. j 1.248.718 
.. I 8.015.558 
4.048.706 
2.439.983 
2.092.836 
635,627 



6.779.815 

7.606.293 
3,005.934 



Acres. 
4,030,885 

680.470 

1.805,416 

2.496,825 

741,258 

984.479 

59,007 

2,863.671 

1.533.395 
1.327.619 



37, 167, 460 16.473,025 



Aeree. 
862,180 

198,475 

250,931 

528,007 

68,948 

82,614 

22,628 

804,008 

569,991 
398.646 



Acres. Aerss. 
867.0391,534,941 

123.876 295.897 

563.123 396.063 

350,657 673.317 

19,5841,610,198 

19,3631,005,880 

8.731 550.961 

49.1533,063.483 

8,2505,494.757 
15,6901,263.879 



3.286.378 



1.520.36615,887.691 



Arranged according to the number of holdings, the provincial 
districts stand in order as under : — 

Auckland .. .. 18,673 holdings. 

OtaKo .. .. .. 14,264 

Canterbury .. .. .. .. 11,792 

Wellington .. .. .. 10.991 

Taranaki .. .. .. .. 5,193 

Hawke's Bay .. .. .. 3.368 

Nelson .. .. .. 3.229 

Marlborough .. .. .. 1.5«8 

Westland . . . . . . 844 

of tlie North Isiand now considerably 
iddle Island, the numbers being — North 
Island, 38.225; Middle Island, 31, W7. For the year 1896-97 the 
returns sliowed 29*535 holdings for thw Middle Island, againsl 
29,369 for the North, besides 36 holdings at the Chatham Islands 
of which no account has been taken recently. 

The full details of holdings and acreages, classified according 
to size, for the year 1905-6 will be found in the table on the following 
page:— 



The occupied holdings 
outnumber those of the M 



OOOUPATION OP IiAND. 



Q 

< 

O 

55 

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A< 

o 
o 
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868 



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864 



NSW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TEAH-HOOE. 



Live-stock. 

A comparative table is presented showing the increase in Iito- 
stock since the year 1868. The figures are taken from the ceosng 
as far as 1891, bat for 1895-96 ami following years the results of 
the enumeration made annually by the Department of Agriculture 
under "The Agricultural and Pastoral Statistics Act, 1895/* have 
been made use of. 







As(i«t 












f9%t. 


BonM. 


Uulee. 


CAttlr. 


She«p. 


GOAtft. 


PlgB. 


Foaitey. 


1868 . 


.. 14,912 ' 122 


137.204 


1,523,324 


U.797 


40,734 


• 


]J8S1 . 


.» 28,275 


153 


193,285 


2,761,383 


12,191 


43.270 


236,08a 


1864 


. 49,409 


339 


249,760 


4,937,273 


12,005 


61.276 


878,414 


1807 


. ' 65 Jlf> 


323 


312,835 


8,418,579 


11.964 


115,104 


676,065 


1871 


. 81,028 


397 


436,592 


9,700,629 


12,434 


151,460 


872, I7i 


1874 


99 » 859 


267 


494,917 


11,70-1,653 


14,276 


123,921 


1,058,19$ 


1878 


, ' 137,768 


241 


578,430 


13,069,338 


14,243 


207,337 


1,303.549 


1881 


. I 161,736 


362 


698,637 


12,985,065 


11,223 


200,083 


1.566,114 


1886 


. 187.382 


297 


853,358 


16,564.596 


10,230 


277,901 


1,679,031 


1S91 


. 211,040 


348 


831,831 


18,138,186 


9.055 


308.812 


1,790,070 


S895-96 


237,418 


426 


1,047,901 


19,826,604t 


• 


2:39.778 




1806-97 


249,813 


434 


1,13B,067 


19,138,493t 


• 


209,834 




1897-Ua 


253,834 


393 


1,2U'J,165 


19.087,9541 


• 


186,027 




1898-99 


258,115 


534 


1.203,024 


19.673.725t 


• 


193.512 




1899-19 


>00 261,931 


459 


1,222,139 


19»348,5U6t 


' 


249,761 




1900-1 


. 266,245 


480 


1,250,680 


19,355, lU5f 




250,975 




l90l-'2 


. 279,672 


406 


1.36U784 


20,233.099t 


• 


224,024 




19a2-3 


. 286.955 


464 


l,46rj,663 


20,342, 727t 


" 


193.740 




190a-4 


. ' 298,714 


468 


1,593,547 


18,954,5531 


• 


226,591 




1904-5 


. 314,322 448 


1,736,850 


18,280,806t 


« 


255,320 




1906-6 


.. 326,537 429 


1,810,9:36 


19,130,875t 


• 


249,727 





* Not enumomted. f NamberB for April, 1895, and years following. 

The stock owned by Maoris in the year 1901, which is included 
above, comprised 317,436 sheep and 36,943 tiead of cattle. Tbe 
BUinber of horses is not specified, but is known to be large. 



Fablb saowmo for saoh County in New Zealani^ ths Nukbbb of Hoi 
Cattle, Shkep. and Pigs jn 1905. 



J 



. County. 


, October, 


Cattle. 

incl tiding 

CaWrB. 


Dftirv CowH, 

lueludefl 

ill 


Sbeep. 
Including 


Octobor, 


1 


190A. 


Ocsiobeir, 
1905, 


foregoing. 


April, 1906. 


igoi 


Hingonui 


1,851 


9,344 


1,263 


17,769 


1.314 


Wbangaroft 


760 


2,098 


180 


7,728 


9U 


B»y of Is lands . . 


2,848 


13,804 


2,350 


25,010 


1.563 


Hokiaiiga 


2,796 


10,633 


1,759 


7.012 


2,537 


Rodney . . 


2.614 


20.326 


5.075 


55,179 


1,411 


Wlmngarei 


5.159 


89,262 


10.718 


21.591 


2.112 


OUhmatea 


2.233 


16,735 


3,920 


36.963 


1,377 


Hobiw^n . . 


1,659 


16,001 


2,560 


16,780 


1.047 


Wftitemata 


2,847 


16,302 


4,807 


29.268 


2.178 


Bdeii . . 


6,071 


6,974 


8.907 


8.520 


1.934 


Munukaa 


9,169 


5b,U5> 


\ ^l.^^l 


n*^,-;^ 


7,933 





■ 


IjlVE-HTOCK. 


■ 


365 


TaBLK saOWIKO TBK NUUBKII 


OF H0B»E8 


Cattle, Shkkp, etc.— 


eotUinasd. 


ll 

^H Coanlv, 


Boraes, 

October, 


Cattle, 
1 iucludlog 
1 Calves, 


Dnirv Cow8. 
' ititslndaci 
Id 


Sboen, 
ineludiEig 


Pi|(«» 


P 


J90A. 


1 Goto her, 
1 1903. 


foregoiQg. 


April. 1905, 


|tj03. 


Coromandel 


1.038 


6,427 


939 


15,334 


729 


Th&mc8 


1,^03 


6,841 


2,452 


4,8;^.0 


l,i68 


Qhineniuri 


2,0'i5 


6,973 


2.886 


2,422 


2,072 


VVa>k&bo 


3.880 


25.730 


8,878 


28,113 


3,955 


lUeltkii . . 


4,291 


35,068 


4,810 


74,352 


2,721 


WnipA ., 


4,15ii 


27,011 


9,0S5 


19,543 


3,740 J 


Piako . . 


3,HG5 


31.621 


8,597 


93,222 


2,279 


E*jit Tftupo Rtid 


l,4iM 


2,803 


701 


36.204 


1,259 


Rotorua 












Waitomo 


1,190 


6,499 


1,487 


|! 29,683 


f 1,321 


Kawhia , . 


88[> 


6,06.1 


609 


715 


AwakiQo 


648 


8.739 


296 


1 307 


West Tanpo 


1,768 


6,911 


972 


|i 


( 2,014 


TtLurangtv 


3,410 


19,504 


3,987 


, 3,476 


2,400 


Whakafcano 


1,536 


7,451 


1,884 


1 19.768 


1,4*J9 


Opotiki . . 
Waiapu . . 


1,771 


8,681 


2,203 


1 17,008 


1.899 


5,:i<i2 


21,412 


606 


' 423,167 


4,306 


Cook . . 


9,262 


77,9fXl 


6,411 


1,012,311 


2,900 


Wairoa , . 


3,677 


16,755 


2,146 


609,015 


1,429 


Hawke'a Ba> 


8,335 


46,782 


4,679 


1,036,135 


3,565 


Patartgata auJ 


2,800 


43,071 


1,062 


713,238 


640 


Webrr 












Waipawa 
WoodviJle 


5.698 
1.4G6 


47,575 
14.536 


9,589 
5,475 


] 678,599 


J 2,643 
1 1,782 


Clifton .. 


2,025 


26,609 


6,020 


19,269 


1,913 


Taranaki 


4,78:i 


54,818 


24,361 


17.986 


6,549 , 


EROiont 


2,Q80 


34,066 


15,740 


4,207 


3.730 .^ 


Stratford 


8,270 


62,536 


20,775 


81,861 


5,068 ^1 


Hawera 


6,273 


86.264 


40,356 


96.725 


14,409 ^ 


Patea . . 


a, 708 


31,933 


9,926 


203,774 


2.709 


Waitotara 


3,28y 


17,667 


4.354 


124,377 


1,624 


Wanganui 


4,152 


23,265 


4,490 


326.907 


1,693 


Waimarino 


1,331 


5,620 


1,466 


61.558 


1,462 


Rangittkei 


7,238 


47,970 


8,752 


661,656 


3.307 


Kiwitea .. 


2,935 


24,086 


6,370 


258,557 


2,081 


Ofoua , . 


2,51G 


17,102 


8,648 


i 226,223 


J 8.322 
; 3,743 


Kairanga 


3,985 


22,572 


9,901 


Pohangina 


1,380 


15.312 


4,965 


116.675 


1.890 


Maoawatu 


3.451 


23,949 


10,505 


126,952 


4,256 


Horowhenua 


3,362 


28,333 


9,73(1 


125,015 


4,810 


Hatt 


5,655 


17,131 


8.366 


193,648 I 


3,897 


Peather«too 


3.456 


30,077 


4,391 


432,611 


1.995 


South Wairarapa.- 


2,432 


22,78?1 


6,158 


108,685 


2,467 


MastertoQ 


4,062 


80,745 


3,254 


524,924 


1,443 


Caatlepoial 


630 


8.456 


216 


151,996 


33 


Akitio . . 


1.59ti 


20,268 


2,378 


153.937 


771 


Pahiatua 


2,343 


23,993 


9,810 


187,302 


3,912 


Skdtatiuna 


1,161 


11,431 


5,158 


56,636 


1,703 


Maorioeville 


513 1 


5,449 


1,753 


62,024 1 


496 


Colling wood 


451 


3,599 


1,215 


43,138 


678 


Takaica . . 


856 


4,175 


1,709 


1.558 


Waicnea 


6,122 


14,410 


5,631 


208,374 


3.951 


BoUer .. 


650 


3,768 


1,340 


3.626 


691 

1 



366 NKW EVALaNO official TBAlt-BOOX. 

Table showinq thb Number of Hobsbs, OATnji, BmiEP, VTC.—eonHwud, 



Ck>anty. 



Horses, 

October, 

1905. 



CatUe, 
iiicludlDg 

Calves, 
October. 

1005. 



Dairy Cowi, 
included 

in 
foregoing. 



Bbeep, 
inelading 

Lam ha, 
April, 1906 



October, 
1905. 



Grey 


1,044 


6.063 


1,934 , 


13,849 


1,056 


Inangahua 


1,055 


6.969 


1.823 ! 


23,251 


969 


WoHtland 


1,G99 


12.411 


2.513 


16.177 


803 


SoumiIr . . 


271 


8,302 


898 : 


174.326 


1,015 


Marlborougli 


4,858 


11.247 


3,245 •; 


472.508 


2.313 


Kaikoura 


1,2-2'J 


4.201 


1.124 ' 


168.206 


480 


Aniuri . . 


1,714 


5,066 


385 , 


409.557 


204 


Clieviot . . 


l,l(i4 


2.560 


588 


176.215 


678 


Ashley . . 


8,475 


19,365 


6,981 ; 


820,653 


6.159 


Akaroa . . 


2,150 


21.578 


5.308 1 
421 > 


234,207 


J 8.203 
833 


Mount Herbert . . 


452 


2.606 


8elw>n .. 


16,858 


34,884 


17,986 , 


768.685 


24,436 


Ashburton 


10.998 


11.586 


4.003 1.006,590 


9.374 


Mackenzie 


1,989 


4.567 


1.866 


4*/9.178 


. 658 


Oeraidine 


5.133 


9.267 


8,206 .1 
2,845 '1 


621,894 


f 3.666 
1,894 


Levels . . 


4,433 


7.901 


Wainiate 


6,570 


14.855 


4,901 


C16.168 


4,699 


Waitaki.. 


7,269 


29.065 


11,836 1 


624.682 


6,666 


Maniototo 


2,499 


8,414 


2,007 


280,682 


510 


Vincent. . 


2,522 


6.270 


1.627 , 


262,267 


811 


Lake 


1.540 


4.038 


868 ' 


160,209 


623 


Waihemo 


1.537 


6.258 


2,434 i 


111,187 


814 


Waikouaiti 


1,676 


11,356 


6,661 , 


76.663 


1.920 


Taieri . . 


7,360 


27,904 


9,937 


199.053 


4.660 


Bruce 


3,995 


11,204 


3.734 , 


164.930 


1.821 


Peninsula 


946 


7,507 


4.522 ! 


1.642 


898 


Clutba .. 


5,287 


20.457 


6.251 ; 


289,389 


2.262 


Tuapeka 


4,254 


8,680 


2.897 


313.257 


1.149 


Southland 


19,971 


77,638 


24,746 


809,337 


10.655 


Wallace and Fiord 


5,909 


25,539 


6.112 


363,995 


2.487 


Stewart Island 


12 


279 


99 


1,475 


76 


Totals 


326,537 ; 1,810,936 
inR 37,07i heifers over two y< 


517. 720* 19,130,875 


249,727 


•Notinclud 


sars old intendec 


1 for dairyit 


>g. 




Live-stock in An 


^tralasia. 






The following gives the 


number ( 


)f the principal kiuds of live- 


stock in Australasia for the 


year 1904 


-5:— 






state or Colony. 




Sheep. 


Cattle. 


Horses. 


Pig> 


Queensland 




10.843,470 


2,722,340 


413,165 


185.141 


New South Wales . 




34,520,894 


2,177,129 


482,663 


330,666 


Victoria . . 




10,167,691 


1,694,976 


372,397 


286.070 


South Australia 




5,820,301 


272.459 


183,481 


111.497 


Western Australia . 




2,856,2tK) 


560,914 


90.102 


69.960 


Tasmania.. 




1,556,460 


202,206 


36,565 


77,943 






April. 1904. 


Oct., 1904. 


Oct., 1904. 


Oct.. 1904. 


New Zealand 




18,280,806 


1.736,850 


314,322 


255,320 



New Zealand thus takes second place in order for number of 
sheep, third place for cattle, and fourth for the number of her 
horses. 



8HBBF. 



367 



The losses in Australia have raisetl this colony to the Seconal 

C>6ition in regard to sheep. To illustrate this, ihe case of Queen s- 
nd shows 19,856,959 sheep in 1B95, falling to 10,843,470 In 1904. 
Cattle fell in number from 7,012.997 in 1894 to 2J22,340 in 

1904. With the advent of good seasons these losses are fast being 
recovered. 

Sheep. 

The returns made to the Department of Agriculture show a 
amaller number of sheep for the year 1886 than the census 
figures given previously, because the account was taken later 
in the year. The particulars are given for that year, and each 
of ten years, 1896-1905, distinguishing the number for the North 
from that in the Middle Island. 

According to these returns, the flocks of the North Island 
increased from 5,285,907 sheep in the year 1886 to 9,388.605 in 

1905, or at the rate of over 77 per cent.^ while sheep in the Middle 
Island decreased from 9,888,356 to 9,7413,270, a loss of 1-48 per 
cent, in the same period. For the North Island the mcrease during 
the twenty years was 4,102,698 sheep, while in the Middle Island 
there was a decrease of 146,086, 



Ye^r. 


North lelaod. 


Middle tsltttid. 


Total. 


1886 


. 5/285,907 


9,888,356 


16.174,263 


1896 


. 9,131,736 


10,006,757 


19,138,493 


1897 


. 9,540,717 


10,147,237 


19.087,954 


1896 


., 9,864,945 


9,808,780 


19,673,726 


1899 


. 9,953,399 


9,395,107 


19,348,506 


19C0 


, 0,998,173 


9,957,022 


19,855,195 


1901 


. 10,218,945 


10,014,151 


20,233,099 


1902 


. Kl.*186,84fi 


10,050,381 


20,342,727 


1903 


. 9,433,831 


9,520,722 


18,954,553 


1904 


. 9.203,903 


9.076,843 


18,280,806 


1905 


. 9,388,605 


9,742,270 


19.130375 



There was a decrease of 1,211,852 in the total number of sheep 
since April, 1902. by the above fip;ures, and a slight decrease between 
1896 and 1905* The export and local consumption of wool de- 
veloped from 111,537,546 lb. for the year ended September. 1891, to 
150,541,110 lb, for the corresponding year of 1905. The export of 
sheepskins and pelts, which in 1890 was 2,292.521 in number, rose 
to 4.931.191 in 1905. 

In spite of the great slaughter required for the export of frozen 
laotton, the number of sheep in New Zealand kept up wonderfully 
until the year 1902, but the two following years showed a consider- 
able decrease. The figures for 1905 exhibit a large increase over 
those for the previous year. 

The proportion of small flocks of sheep has increased very 
considerably, and with smaller tlocks the rabbit difficulty should 
be easier to master than with large ones. 



368 



NRW ZEALAND OFFIOIAL TBAR-BOOK. 



NuMBBB OF Flocks, 1886, 1891, 1896, 1901, 1908, 1904, ahd 1905. 



sue oi Flocks. 


188G. 


1801. 


1806. 


1001. 


1008. 


1004. 


1905. 


Under 500 . . 


6,024 


8,272 


12,028 


11,700 


12,428 


12,177 


11,545 


600 and under 1,000 


1,189 


1,691 


2,605 


8,059 


2,923 


2,909 


3.120 


1,000 
2,000 


2,000 
5,000 


747 
532 


969 
666 


1.4601 
892 1 


2,877* 


2,751* 


2,742* 


3,034* 


6,0<X) 


10, 000 


263 


287 


340 


897 


342 


862 


374 


10,000 


20,000 


228 


239 


231 


189 


207 


199 


2i>3 


20,000 fi 


knd upwards . . 
Totals 


166 


169 


147 


138 


110 


104 


97 




9,149 


12,293 


17,703 


18,860 
190S. 


18,761 
10 


18,493 


18,423 




1901. 


04. 


1905. 


• From 1,000 to 2.500 




2.189 


2,081 


2.078 


2.S50 


• 


2,500 to 5.000 


... 




668 


670 


064 


T34 



2.877 



2,751 



2.742 



3.081 



The average size of the flocks is found to have been 1,659 sheep 
for 1886, 1,081 in 1896. 1,010 in 1903, and 1,038 in 1905. 



Of the provincial districts, that of 
in 1905, Wellington came next, and 
place. The full particulars, showing 
general throughout the colony with the 
are given : — 



Canterbury had most sheep 

Otago occupied the third 

increases since 1904 to be 

exception of Hawke's Bay, 



Provincial District. ^'**in iS^^ 


Mo. of Sheep 
in 1905. 


InoretMor 
DecroMe. 


Canterbury 


4,031.681 


4.486.275 


454,594 


Wellington 


8,682.888 


3.948.588 


265,695 


Otago 


3,360,743 


3.547,768 


187,025 


Hawke'a Bay . 


3,061,188 


2.937.887 


-123,301 


Auckland 


2,037.078 


2,078.313 


41,235 


Nelson 


845.376 


863.161 


17,785 


Marlborough . 


811,828 


815,040 


3,212 


Taranaki 


422,809 


423,822 


1,013 


VVestland 


27,215 


30,026 


2,811 


Totals . 


.. 18,280.806 


19.130,875 


850,069 



The number of breeding ewes in the colony in April, 1905, was 
returned at 10,079,184, and in April, 1904, at 9.222,448, an increase 
of 856,736 for the year. 

Figures for ten years are given. There is an apparent disposi- 
tion now to avoid an unrestrained slaughter for purposes of the 
frozen-meat industry : — 





Bbeedinq-ewes. 




1896 .. 


. . 8,382.781 


1901 .. 


. . 9,906,616 


1897 .. 


.. 8,687,193 


1902 .. 


. . 9,610,149 


1898 .. 


. . 8,445,012 


1903 .. 


. . 9,071,751 


1899 .. 


. . 8,661,746 


1904 .. 


. . 9,222,448 


1900 .. 


. . 9,257,054 


1905 .. 


.. 10.079,184 



8HSBP* 



869 



The annual export 
"six yeajTB has been : — 



aod coiisumptiou of sheep during the last 



Ymf. 



Export of 
Froteu Mutton 

and Lamb, 

includinK l'ioc«« 

at G*iJb 

to ft Sheep. 



Live 

Bheop ei- 

portod. 



EatiLUftted 

ConBtiiiipiion Id 

%ho Ctrilony; 

G&rcaftea. 



Total 



1900 . . 


3.056,185 


3,840 


1,800.000 


4,858,075 


1901 - 


3^400,138 


3.668 


1,834,01X1 


5.237,806 


1902 , 


4,084,578 


48,047 


1,904,000 


6,036,625 


1903 . . 


4,Q22,622 


21,763 


1,1142,000 


6,886,985 


1904 * , 


4,r>17,8*i9 


7,4^0 


1/998,000 


6,023,259 


1903,. 


3,605,592 


11 » 729 


2,050»000 


5.667,321 



It has been estimated that the annual consumption of mutton in 
New Zealand is equivalent to 2- 25 sheep per inhabitant, aud that 
the number of sheep required in the present year (1906) for food 
will be about 2,137,000. {Maoris, for the purposes of this calcula* 
tion, have been included.) 

Two important advantages tliat sheep- farming has in New Zea- 
land are (1) the low cost of the production of mutton, and (2) the 
bigh percentage of natural increase. With regard to the high per* 
centage of increase, there need only be cited a few average returns 
from well-known Hocks to show what excellent lambings New 
Zealand farmers obtain under good management. 

Lj^mbing Returns.— a vBaAOBS. 




BmeAot 
Flooie* 



Breed of 



Br«edof 
Bwiw. 



No. or 

Bwefl. 



Peroest- 

UKOOt 



Bemmtki. 



linooln 



KoniDej 
Lincoln 

Merino 



Cross-bred 
Hallbred 
B.Leic'str 
Lid coin 
R, M&rsh 



Lincoln Lincoln 



Romney 
Bouthd'n 



I Lincoln 
Romney 
I Lincoln 



Merino Merino 
B.Leic*Btri 



Crosfl-bred 

Half-bred , 

I B.Leic*atr 

Lincoln 

fi. Mariih 

E. Leic'str 



Lincoln 

R. Marsh 

E.Leic'strj E.Leic'Htr' 

Shropshire ShropHhire Shropuhirel 
South d'n I Southd'n I Southd'n 



7,517 
I 5,3U1 
1 12,177 
I 1,141 

2,033 

I 

. 14,765 

I 4,235 

8,624 
2,747 
778 
452 
253 
464 
168 
114 



8104 
8505 
10000 
96-17 
94'71 
I 
75-36 
88-94 



80B2 
82 79 
90-77 
B8-0@ 
111 46| 
93-34 
97-41 
96-871' 



V Land merely i 
I surface - &0WII < 
MD English" I 

grass pftB- 
J tiire, 

\ MountainouB 
[country in 
I native pai^tVe, 
) uiiimproved. 



In EngHah 
grasfi posture. 



The above returns are lair average ones, but much higher might 
%YB been shown if exceptional cases had been selected. 



I 



370 



BiEW ZK ALAND OrPIOlAT. YKilK-BUOK. 



GattU. 

The cattle as enumerated in 1905-6 for each provincial distnct 
are given iii the next table. Here is showo the substantial iricreaae 
of 74,086 head of all claasea over the number returned in 1904-5, and 
of no less than 24,678 io the number of cows and beifera for dairy 
purposes. 



1 


« 

, s 

» 9 


1. 


ij 






111 


1 


ProTlQclftl Diitricl. 

L 


1 


isS 


11 


fl 


ri 


Totals 

■ 


Auckland .. 


8,04l' 91,164 


133,933 


84, 096^18, 570! 175,454' 


511,900 


TarAnakt . . 


4,726 34 » 252 


130J04 


10,042 7,9241 99.238 286,916 


Hawke^a B&y 


2.S90 33.114 


25,448 


51,079 4,343| 52,346 168,711> 


Wellington 


6,609, 


68,913 


120,432 


65,72912,311 1^,215 396.300 


Marlborough 


877l 


2,995 


6.327 


1,365 1,113 


6,683 18,750 


NelRou 


743 


5,966 


13.678 


2,717 8,417 


14,015 40,536 


Westlatid .. 


309 


3,591 


4.893 


2.903| 1,130 


5.648 19,47i 


Canterbury 


1,949 


17.048 


i9.670 


3,967' 6,659 46.9151 126,108 


OtaRo— 








1 1 


Olago portiau 


2,378 


18,239 


66,246 


9,0081 4.669 50.704| 141, m 


BoutbUud portion 


1,543 


12,325 


34.065 


11,278 4.928 39.317 103.466 


Totakp 1906*6 . . 


39,06S 287,607 


574,794* 


242,16^64,864 612.434 1.810,936 


, 1904-5 . . 


117,992 262,592 


550, 116- 


218,248 63,496 614,406 l,736,fifil> 


Inorcase 


1,07S 26,016 


34.678 


23.921 1.868 ' 74.086 


DeGreaBB 


i 


_ -J 


1,972, 



* loclufUlng httirers over two yearn oM mteoded for daijryUig: fit,^5 in IQ'H-^aDd 57/T4 
in 1906^5, For aclyal ti umber of dikiry cows in each couDty Bero table ou pages 3(14 lo90& 

Out of a total of 1,810,936 cattle in the colony, the North Island 
is shown to have hail 1,362,474, or 75 percent,, while the Middle 
Island had 448,462, or 25 per cent. Similarly, the dairy cows sud^J 
heifers intended for dairyina[ in the North Island numbered 409.91^^| 
or 71 per cent., and in the Middle Island 164,878, or 29 per cent, ^^ 

Thus, the North Island, which has a slightly greater number ol 
sheep to that of the Middle Island, contains besides three times 
ae many dairy cows and other cattle. 

Of the total number of cattle (1,810.936) given above, 517,720 
were dairy cows. It is found impossible to give a statement of the 
total quantity of batter and cheese made in the colony. All that 
can be said is that there were in August, 1905, 298 cheese and butter 
Ctories, with 448 Bkimming-stations. 473 private dairies, and 195 
aking-houses reported to the Department of Agriculture. A sum- 
mary of the returns reTidered to the Department by the cheese and 
butter factories of their output for the previous year makes it possible 
to arrive at the approximate quantity of cheese and butter made at 
them. 



CATTLE. 



371 



An attempt to estimate the total production of butter in the 
colony can be made, although it would not be safe to put forward 
the result as anything more than a probable approximation to the 
facts. 

First, as to factory production. Accepting the information given 
by the Department of Agriculture, it would amount to 49^ million 
pounds annually at the present rate. This does not seem too high 
considered in the light of the last returns obtained at the census of 
March, 1901, which gave 30 million pounds weight of butter as the 
actual produce for the year 1900, shown in the returns obtained 
Irom each factory. 

Secondly, as to butter made on farms. This can only be esti- 
mated by means of an indirect process. Allowing 20 lb. per head of 
the mean population for 1905, the consumption is shown as nearly 
17^ million pounds weight. Adding 34^ million pounds for export 
gives 51f million pounds altogether as the total supply. Taking 
from 51f millions the 49^ millions shown above as made in factories 
leaves only 2^ milUon pounds for the quantity made on the farms. 

The census returns for 1891 gave an account of all the butter and 
cheese made in the colony, and also stated the number of milch 
cows at that time. Using these figures, and taking 2^ lb. of cheese 
to be the equivalent of 1 lb. of butter, it is calculated that every 
milch cow furnished the milk for 163 lb. of butter (after allowing for 
consumption of milk in the colony). Mr. Murphy allows 200 lb. of 
batter to a cow in New Zealand, and 500 lb. of cheese. According to 
the Year-book of Victoria each dairy cow (wet or dry) produces there 
Annually 386 gals, of milk, which might render 134 lb. of butter. 

The number of butter and cheese factories in each provincial 
district as in August, 1905, with the output for the previous year, is 
next shown : — 



ProYiucial District. 


Number 
of Factories. 


Skimming- 
stations. 


Output. 




Butter. Cheese. 


Butter. Cheese. 




~"" f 




Tons. Tons. 


Aackland 


62 1 9 


113 


3,770J 349 


Taranaki 


87 11 


81 


7,249J ' 413 


Hawke'B Bay 


13 3 


22 


978 177 


Wellington 


30 1 23 


120 


6,689i 


l,278i 


Marlborough 


1 i 3 


1 


18 


228 


Nels )n 


7 1 


6 


255 


9 


Westland 


3 .. 


3 


57 


.. 


Canterbury 


10 8 


41 


1,482 


377J 


Oiago 


11 


20 


61 
448 
444 


2,609 


2,289 


Totals, 1905 . . 


214 


84 


22,108J , 5,121 


. 1904 .. 


284 


20,707 


5, 853 J 


. 1908 .. 


272 


380 


18,035J 
14,716J 


5,038 


. 1902 .. 


264 


276 


5.600J 



372 



NBW BBALAND' OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



Of the above, 12 were returned as "new " in 1905, and in 25 
cases the output was not stated. Three factories combined 
butter* making with milk-preserving, the output of one factory 
being 172 tons. 

In order to encourage dairy farmers to improve the quality of 
their herds, the Government has from time to time imported pure- 
bred stud-bulls, which are located in different parts of the colony. 
A small fee is charged for the service of these animals. 



The increase in horses is shown for four census years : — 

GensuB Yean. 

1880 
1891 
1896 
1901 

At the enumeration made in 1905-6 (October to January), 
the number of horses was found to have increased to 326,966 (io- 
eluding 429 mules and asses), for which particulars are given. It 
will be seen that the Provincial District of Auckland had by far 
the most horses, Otago and Canterbury following, Wellington taking 
fourth place. 



Number of 


Numerical 


Increase 


Hones. 


Increase. 


percent. 


187,882 


23,658 


12-63 


211,040 
237,418 


26,378 


12-50 


266,245 


28,827 


12-14 



Provincial District. 



Eutires. 



I Mares I Mares with , Colts | 
|lear8old.| ti^ig season. | Years old. | 



Auckland 


968 


1 
1 37,194 1 25.806 


9.782 


12,419 


86,169 


Taranaki 


162 


1 9.135 1 7,314 


2,569 


3,165 


22,345 


Hawke's Bay 


189 


1 9.606 1 6,681 


2,617 


2,885 


21,978 


WelliDgton 


651 


[ 21,875 ' 17.875 


6,512 


7,697 


54,410 


Marlborough 


158 


2,531 2,045 


677 


963 


6,859 


Nelson . . 


118 


4.597 1 3,624 


1,127 


1,669 


11.020 


Westland 


64 


1,234 [ 741 


296 


414 


2,749 


Canterbury 


470 


24,440 j 18,150 


6,771 


8,286 


57,117 


Otago— 




1 

i 








Otago portion . . 


346 


16,130 1 12,534 


3,923 


5,992 


38,925 


Southland por- 
tion 


164 


10,369 


7,963 


3,016 


4,383 


25,894 


Totals, 1905-6 


3,180 


137,111 


102,733 


36,289 


47,653 


326.966* 


, 1904-5 


2,966 


134,787 


08,188 


33,915 


44,914 


314, 770* 


Increase .. 


214 


2,324 


4,545 


2,374 


2,739 


12,196 



* Including 420 mules and 



in 1905-6, and 448 in 1904-6. 



PIGS. 



373 



Classified according to breed, the numbers for the two years 
under review are : — 





1904-6. 


1005-6. 


Thoroaghbred 


8,406 


9,308 


Draught 


118,697 


126.490 


Other breeds (harness and saddle) . . 


172.795 


176,153 


Ponies under 14 hands 


14,424 


15,586 


Mules and asses . . 


448 


429 



Totals 



814,770 



826,966 



Thoroughbred stallions, imported and owned by the State, are 
stationed throughout the colony, and are available to breeders at 
moderate fees. 

The export of horses from New Zealand is not so large as might 
be expected. The figures for 1905 are : To Bengal, 144 ; Victoria, 
~ ; New South Wales, 88; Tasmania, 7; Western 
United Kingdom, 4 ; and South Sea Islands, 22 : a 



61 ; Fiji, 51 
Australia, 6; 
total of 383. 



Pigs. 



The figures given in the accompanying table are those compiled 
by the Agricultural Department, and for 1905-6 show a decrease of 
5,593 in the total number of pigs for the previous year — 255,320. 
The Auckland Provincial District has more pigs than any other, 
Canterbury following closely. 

NUMBEB OF PlOS IM EACH PbOVINCIAL DiSTBICT. 







Sows over One 
Year old kept 
for Breeding. 

9,150 


Sows under 


Barrows or 




Provincial 
DiBtricl. 


Boars. 


One Year 
old kept for 
Breeding. 


SowB all Ages 

kept for 

Fattening. 


Totals. 


Auckland 


1,579 


3,923 


44,858 


69,510 


Taranaki 


691 


4,171 


665 


27,944 


88,371 


Hawke's Bay 


291 


1,682 


233 


7,953 


10,069 


Wellington 


1,181 


7,132 


910 


36,684 


44.907 


Marlborough 


109 


594 


278 


2,827 


3,808 


Nelson . . 


226 


1,076 


289 


6,968 


8,649 


Westland 


60 


301 


49 


1,449 


1,869 


Canterbury 


942 


5,947 


1,416 


46,107 


68,412 


Otago— 












Otago portion . . 


617 


2,363 


387 


17,767 


21.034 


Southland portion 


289 


1,721 


328 


10,886 


13.218 


Totals. 1905-6 , 


6,886 


84,037 


8,373 


201,432 


249.727 


1904-6 .. 


6,860 


37,479 


9,623 


201,868 


265,320 


Decrease 


466 


8,442 


1,250 


436 


6,593 



Angora Goats. 

The Goverment has introduced some pure-bred goats by way ol 

encouraging the breeding of this animal. There are several privately 

owned fiocks in the colony, and the production of mohair should be a 

profitable undertaking. The animals thrive on dt^ ^cxviVJo^ <iQv«i\»t^ . 



374 HBW BBALANO OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 



Phoducb of New Zealand. 

Estimated Value of the Produce of New Zeftlund («zola«ve of Building 
Trades outpui) for the Year 1903-8. 

1. AgricuUural, pastoral, and dairy produce . . . . 18,600.000 

2. Mining output .. .. .. .. .. 8,200,000 

3- Finheries and forests .. .. .. .. 1,200,000 

4. Manufactures (othtir than those included above, 

beiug the great primary industries*) .. 4,700,000 



Total (excluding value of building trades outputf) £27,700,000 



* The produce of creat primary indastrien, such as meat-freesiiig estaUiahmenti, 
butter factories, sawmills, Ac, have been included in items 1 and 8. 

f To add the value of building trades output would inerease the total sum to over 
thirty millions sterling. 



SECTION XIII.— AGRICULTURE 

By the Agricultural and Pastoral Statistics Act, passed in 1896 # 
the duty of collecting returns devolved upon the Department 
of Agriculture. The plan adopted is similar to that used in the 
United Kingdom, the account of land laid down in crop being 
made up at an early date, while estimates of produce are made 
after the results of threshing are known. 

A summary of the particulars obtained at the collection made in 
October, 1905, is now shown, with the finally corrected statements 
of yield of the principal crops. Full remarks on the progress of 
agriculture in New Zealand, in respect of all its features in detail, 
are supplied in the special article devoted to the subject which 
appears as the first of Section II, in Part III. 



AOBICULTUKE. 



375 



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376 



NBW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YKAU-BOOK. 



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AGBICULTURB. 



877 



ACBIAOB UHDBB SOWN GRASSES, AND CULTIVATION GBNSBALLT, FOB BACH 
OOUNTT, AS ON THB 15TH OCTOBBB, 1905. 



Ck>unties. 


In Sown 

Graases, 

after 

having 

been 

ploughed. 


In Sown 
Grasses, 

not 
previously 
ploughed. 


liand 
broken 

up 

but not 

under 

Crop. 


Total 
under 
Crop. 


§ 

1 


a 


1 

a 


ii 




Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


MangoDui .. 


6,743 


17,802 


105 


1,168 


86 


177 


27 


Wbangaroa 


481 


6,701 


2 


161 


25 


90 


, , 


Bay of Islands 


6,436 


37,549 


42 


1,226 


141 


289 


68 


Hokianga . . 


745 


31,012 


52 


685 


150 


371 


63 


Rodney 


12.345 


88,120 


763 


1,174 


180 


1,119 


97 


Whangarei 


21,109 


123,568 


169 


2,217 


122 


1,135 


38 


Otamatea .. 


8,621 


87,462 


332 


850 


67 


347 


108 


Hobson . . 


3,908 


45,163 


12 


348 


99 


125 


86 


Waitemata 


24,278 


39,710 


1,414 


1,940 


344 


2,399 


263 


Eden 


15,864 


5,229 


155 


940 


1,402 


636 


292 


Manukau . . 


125,525 


87,635 


4,303 


20,411 


376 


1,447 


1,236 


Coromandel 


3,317 


15,222 


6 


302 


43 


61 


7 


Thames 


4,950 


7,218 


6 


909 


90 


391 


26 


Ohinemuti 


8,791 


9,709 


98 


1,604 


309 


170 


30 


Waikato . . 


73,825 


33,460 


516 


11,689 


162 


487 


9,073 


Raglan 


19,169 


129,904 


335 


4,982 


32 


227 


48 


Waipa .. 


72,148 


11,650 


275 


16,013 


152 


699 


430 


Piako 


134,162 


43,600 


996 


18,602 


102 


278 


991 


Waitomo .. 


4,627 


17,794 


25 


814 


57 


44 


20 


Kawhia 


320 


19,288 




358 


33 


11 


1 


Awakino . . 


131 


41,163 




178 


5 


6 


, , 


West Taupo 


14,443 


9,743 


"60 


2,806 


7 


29 


71 


East Taopo & Rotorua 


4,696 


16,500 


14 


1,376 


60 


58 


3,161 


Taaranga . . 


34,455 


31,555 


943 


10,750 


97 


537 


217 


Whakaiane 


7,432 


12,157 


39 


4,149 


11 


46 


18 


teSL :: :: 


16,381 


16,952 


150 


4,467 


27 


85 


8 


1,729 


217,382 


31 


2,382 


34 


74 


13 


Cook 


32,790 


596,535 


76 


10,965 


282 


476 


824 


VVairoa 


15,933 


266,351 


131 


3,005 


72 


157 


229 


^awke's Bay 


166,091 


346,039 


548 


19,563 


667 


1,116 


1,827 


V^aipawa . . 


79,719 


336,695 


16 


17,906 


225 


194 


1,808 


Vroodville . . 


8,170 


80,792 


29 


1,934 


35 


198 


100 


^atangataand Weber 


70,824 


345,668 


27 


4,171 


113 


107 


772 


Clifton 


16,742 


74,153 


, , 


3,049 


99 


58 


1 


^aranaki .. 


51,615 


96,419 


15 


7,214 


399 


354 


220 


^gmonk 


23,251 


74,692 




3,033 


68 


41 


4 


Stratford . . 


2,882 


188,710 




2,665 


89 


21 


34 


Hawera 


64,197 


141,766 


28 


8,688 


280 


123 


416 


Patea 


36,933 


128,614 


15 


5,629 


58 


162 


416 


Waitotara . . 


21,598 


76,653 


138 


3,904 


191 


230 


167 


Waimarino 


142 


30,531 




530 


10 


21 


, , 


Wanganai . . 


17,813 


174,873 


"27 


3,752 


120 


246 


406 


Rangitikei . . 


62,484 


293,790 


221 


18,251 


822 


608 


1,321 


Kiwitea . . 


4,451 


157,591 


75 


4,076 


32 


128 


67 


Pohangina 


365 


91,956 


3 


862 


14 


130 


26 


Oroua 


9,532 


78,694 


18 


7,157 


113 


313 


181 


Eairanga . . 


15,878 


74,221 


76 


5,048 


407 


441 


234 


Manawatu . . 


35,783 


66,078 


226 


15,859 


120 


131 


467 


Horowhenaa 


4,348 


108,645 


109 


3,319 


145 


299 


164 


Hatt 


7,011 


177,602 


63 


1,733 


684 


254 


> 29a 
^ ^^^ 


Feathenton .. 1 


60,047 


186,074 


257 


io,Be« 


\ nc 


i x^-^ 



378 



NIW XIALAHD OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 

ACRBAGB UNDBB SOWK QRABSKS, BTO. — OOlllNNMtf. 



"" 














*: . 


Counties. 


In Sown 

Grasses, 

aftor 

having 

been 

ploaghed. 

Acres. 


In Sown 
Oraasas. 

not 
previoasly 
ploaghed. 


Land 
broken 

up 
batnol 
ander 
Crop. 


Total 
wider 
Crop. 


a 


1 
a 


8 

1 




Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Aorat 


Acres.' Aom. 


Wairarapa South . . 


28,955 


142.676 


21 


8,666 


88 


151 


282 


Masterton . . 


27.033 


282.786 


424 


12,981 


189 


168 


434 


CaHtlppoint 


2,562 


92,567 


80 


920 


91 


81 


159 


Akitio 


1,186 


115.022 


83 


118 


47 


86 


55 


Pahiatua .. 


1.497 


147.194 


, , 


1.708 


98 


217 


78 


Eketahuna 


2.845 


62.190 


148 


847 


44 


61| 48 


Mauriceville 


662 


41.908 


. , 


261 


19 


29] 15 
861 1,S80 


Marlborough 


59,825 


185.649 


996 


36.649 


968 


SouDds 


2.5G0 


69,255 


2 


298 


8^ 


7* m 


Kaikoura . . 


29,086 


56,154 


61 


8,064 


83 


37 


149 


ColliDgwood 


1.524 


14,378 


6 


280 


18 


76 


8 


Takaka 


4.823 


24.260 


88 


1,966 


18 


210 


4 


Waimea 


29,207 


155.614 


776 


93,281 


891 


9,497 


449 


Bullcr 


728 


8,367 


2 


199 


7Q 


141 


.. 


Inangahua 


5.216 


24,127 


Sid 


979 


5 


74 


8 


Grey 


3,915 


21.710 


, , 


489 


44 


119 


3 


Westland .. 


4.248 


80,163 


1 


977 


94 


102 


3 


Amuri 


58.422 


92,636 


105 


9,994 


76 


22 1,8S4 


Cheviot 


32.432 


20.897 


60 


9,179 


86 


98 


651 


Ashley 


268,296 


164.163 


2.686 


96.044 


687 


44a 2.388 


Selwyn 


294,522 


25.541 


2.980 


187.766 


9,069 


1,816 


5,875 


Mount Heroert 


! 9,929 


23.250 


, , 


706 


14 


84 


106 


Akaroa 


1 11.330 


156,791 


. , 


1,949 


119 


285 


387 


Ash burton.. 


1 425,425 


25,423 


3,083 


174.447 


617 


421 


9,970 


Geraldine . . 


139.043 


30.497 


2.868 


60.564 


970 


245 1,741 


Levels 


84,772 


6,043 


901 


48.842 


424 


263 933 


Waimate . . 


228,334 


31.068 


2,059 


86.478 


254 


147 948 


Mackenzie.. 


68,536 


17,406 


631 


19,468 


126 


37 605 


Waitaki .. 


: 186,997 


35,113 


1,694 


71.123 


461 


3051 931 


Waihemo . . 


34,183 


12,188 


501 


9,996 


67 


62 85 


Waikouaiti 


23,994 


49.270 


336 


6,280 


101 


102 136 


Peninsula . . 


4J5^ 


l:^,tjSl 


, , 


1.350 


176 


18: 48 


Taiori 


90,776 


18,764 


546 


28,566 


659 


337, 446 


Bruce 


' 104,116 


6,018 


519 


35,810 


214 


91. 303 


Clutha 


' lftG,819 


20,827 


1,114 


49,350 


824 


130 529 


Tuapeka . . 


■ 108,081 


16,013 


1.231 


32,667 


161 


477 1.668 


Maniototo . . 


52,122 


2,787 


427 


22,737 


265 


^ ^S 


Vincent 


. 25,564 


36,167 


1.3:% 


14,802 


121 


251, 83 


Lake 


12,413 


9,339 


4,280 


11,483 


130 


78; 904 


Southland . . 


, 538,265 


67,407 


9,881 


186,611 


1,185 


482 88^ 


Wallace and Fiord .. 


154,578 


34,745 


1,610 


57,819 


82 


80 191 


Stewart Island 


145 


561 


' 


13 


18 


^i 1 


Totals.. 


4,773,734 


7.745,727 


54,080 


1.535.384 


18.916 


27.81061,479 



The extent of land in cultivfttioo (iacludiug sown grasses dioi 
land broken up but not under crop) amounted to 14.161,150 acres. 
Of this area, land under artificial grasses comprised 88-45 per cent. ! 
land under f^rain crops. 4o8 per cent. ; land under root and green 
crops, 6- 26 per cent. ; land in garden and orchard, 0*33 per cent J 
and land in fallow, 0*38 per cent. Full details for the last nineteen 
ye&ra are tabulated. 



AOBICULTUBE. 



379 






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o >s «<? ^ 



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tO«<O»O«O>00l>l>r-lG0'«« 



as§§§s§sss;g5sssss2g 


,309,689 
,693,974 
,039,765 
,489,352 
,922,460 
,743,593 
,094,111 
,159,740 
,735,980 
,589,290 
,483,127 
,024,519 
,515,802 
,679,223 
,128,491 
,402,528 
,649,056 
,912,782 
,161,150 



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380 



NBW SBALAND OFFICIAL YllAH-BOOft. 



Wheat. 

The wheat harvest of 1906 showed an average yield of 30*60 
buRhels per acre, the crop realised being 6,798,934 bushels, against 
9,123,673 bushels in 1905. 

Tlie quantity of wheat of the previous season's harvest held by 
fanners in October, 1905, as shown by the gazetted figures, was 
2,990,553 bushels, an amount which excludes stocks of grain and 
flour held by merchants and millers. The total amount of wheat 
exported during the year 1905 was 967,151 bushels. 

The imports of flour during 1905 were 6,367 centals (318 
tons), and the exports 448 tons. 

The area under wheat for threshing decreased from 258,015 acres 
in 1905 to 222,965 acres in 1906, and the decrease was general 
throughout the colony. In addition to the area cut for threshing, 
415 acres were cut for chaff, and 191 acres for ensilage and feeding 
down with stock, so that the total area sown in wheat was 223,571 
acres. 

Of the 222,965 acres in wheat (for threshine) this year, no 
less than 154,918 acres were in Canterbury and 53,495 acres ii 
Otago. 

The area under wheat for grain, the estimated gross prodnoe 
in bushels, and the average yield per acre for each of the last 
sixteen years were : — 



Year. 



1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1893 
1899 
1900 
1001 
1902 
1903 
1*)04 
1905 
1900 



Land under 
>\lieat. 


; Estimated 
Grose Produce. 


Avence 

Yield 

per Acw 


1 Acres. 


ushels. 


BashelB. 




801,460 


5,723,610 


18-99 




402,278 


10,257,788 


25-50 


.. ' 381,245 


8,378.217 


21-96 


242.787 


4,891,695 


20-15 


.. i 148,575 


3,613,037 


24-32 


246,441 


6,843,768 


27S8 


258,008 


5,926,523 


2292 


.. 1 315,801 


5,670,017 


1795 


399,034 


13,073,416 


32-76 


209,749 


8,581,898 


31S1 


200,405 


6,527,154 


3161 


163,402 


4,040,589 


2476 


194,355 


7,457,915 


3S-87 


230,310 


7,891,654 


34-26 


.. , 258,015 


9,123,673 


35-36 




222,905 


0,798,981 


30-60 



AGRICULTURE. 



SSI 



The following gives the area in wheat, and the estimated produce, 
for the Australian States for the season of 1905 : — 



titate. 




Wbefti>crop. 






Acre», 


HiiAbels. 


BUflll6li 

per Acre. 


Qaeensiaiid 


150.958 


2.149.063 


14'24 


New South Wales 


1" 775.955 


IG, 464. 415 


927 


Victoria 


2,277.637 


21.092J39 


9-26 


South Austr&1]& .. 


1.840,157 


12,023.172 


653 


Western Austrikiia, , • . . 


181,467 


2,005.146 


11-00 


TttMnania 


43,0^1 


792.956 


18-40 



The Wheat-crop of the World. 

The estimated wheat-crop of the world for four years is taken 
from the Statistical Year-book of Canada. 1903, with the exception 
of the figures for AustralEusia. 



Countries, 



Prance 
Hut gary . 
Germany - • 

lUly 

United Kingdom 
Other European coun- 
tries 

Total for Europe 



United States of Ams 

riea 
India 

Argentine Hepublio 

AuRtr&tasia 
Other countries 



Bosbeli : 
1900. 



BiiabelB : 

laoi. 



Btiibels: 
1908. 



Btfebelt: 
1903. 



398.000.000 
325,200.000 
152,000,000 
15G.OO0,0O0 
132,000.000 
54,400.000 
365,400,000 



344.000,000 
304.000, tX)0 
134,560.000' 
110.000,000, 
152,000,000' 
.'16,000.000! 
416.40O,O0O[ 



440.000,000 
332,000.000 
182.400,000 
143,200,000 
128.000,000 
58,000,000' 
466,800.0001 



440.000,000 
336.000.000 
173.eJO0.00O 
132.000,000 
160.000,000 
48,000,000 
439,600,000 



1.613.000, 000 1,516. 960, OOO'l. 750. 400. 0001, 729, 2(Xi;000 



600,000.000 
184,0O0.0riO 

6e.ooo.oo<) 

51,183,i:KX»| 

64.880.000; 

152.800.000 



752,000,0001 680,000,000 637,800,000 



252.000.000; 
r>^.,OrXJ.O0^T 
88,62rj,0U0| 
42.584.0001 

150.800,000 



224.000.000l 

100.000,000 

96.884,000 

19.821.000 

164,000,000 



294,000,000 

128,OOfJ,000 

81,810,000 

82,041,000 

164,000,000 



Total other ooun i 1,110. 863. 0001, 342, 004, OOOll, 284. 7a5,000]l. 387, 651,000 
trira 

Grand total 



3,623. 863.0002. 856. 964. 0003.035. 105. 0OO|3, 116, 851. 000 



Consumption of Wheat, 

The yearly consumption of wheat per head of population in New 
Zealand has heen estimated at 6 bushels, and the quantity required 
for seed at 2 bushels to the acre. 

Dsrng these figures, the Department of Agriculture estimates 
that there will be a large surplus quantity after providing for this 
year's wants. 



382 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBA&-BO0X. 



Wheat: Ebtiiiatbd Surplus, 1906. 

The area for threshiDg was 222,188 acres, and the total jield is com- 
puted at . . 

AmouDt of wheat and floar returned on hand, 81st October, 1905 (as 
per returns) 

Amount of wheat and flour imported from Ist November, 1905, to 
28th February, 1906 



Wheat and flour exported from Ist November, 1905, to Bnsheli. 

28th February, 190C .. .. .. .. 126,139 

ConHumption for same period for population of 925,000, 

at the rate of 6 bushels per head per annum . . 1,850,000 



Bnaheb. 
6,796,934 

2,990,553 

7,990 

9,797,477 



Leaving available for all purposes as at 28th February, 1906 
Estimated quantity required for seed (say, 250, OCX) acres 

at 2 buDhels pe'r acre) .. .. 500, (XX) 

Estimated consumption of 980,000 persons, at 6 bushels 

per head, from Ist March, 1906, to 28th February, 1907 5,580,0p0 



1,976,139 
7,821,33$ 



6,060,000 
Apparent surplus .. .. .. .. 1,741,338 

The difficulty of correctly computing the consumption of 
breadstuffs is shown by the great diflferences in the estimates 
arrived at. 

The average quantity required per head of the population (exdu- 
sive of that used for seed) has been calculated at 5*9 bushels for 
New South Wales, aud 5*2 bushels for Victoria, by statisticians in 
those States. 

The average coiisuuiption of wheaten breadstuffs in New Zea- 
land thus appears to be somewliat higher than in New South Wales 
aud Victoria. 

The following is the average annual consumption of wheat per 
inhabitant in some of the principal countries of the world : — 



United Kingdom 


6*6 bushels 


Canada 




..6-6 


France 




..81 


Germany 




..80 


Russia 




.. 21 


Italy 




.. 5-4 


United States 


. . 4-5 



The English consumption during the last twenty-five years appears 
to have ranged from 5^ to 6 bushels per head of population. 



Oats. 

The extent of land in oats sown for grain in 1906 was 360,569 
acres, against 342,189 acres liarvested in the preceding year, an in- 
crease of 18,380 acres. The Provincial Districts of Otago (166,936 
acres) and Canterbury (150,726 acres) account for 317,662 acres of 



AORIOULTDKE. 



88d 



QneensUkiid 

New South Wales 
Victoria 
Soath Australia 
Western Australia 
Tasmania 



BuBhelfi. 


Averftge per Acir«. 


15437 


23*54 


653.646 


ltJl3 


6,20w3»429 


1803 


555,696 


1098 


226^556 


16-40 


1.178,819 


26'^ 



the total area, Wellington taking third place with 21^353 acres. The 
breadth of land in oats for chaffing, ensilage, or feeding down with 
stock was 238,687 acres, an increase of 31,938 acres on the figures 
for 1905. 

The average yield per acre was. in 1906, 35-86 bushels, and in 
1905, 42 53 bushels, and the quantity of produce decreased from 
14.553,611 bushela to 12,707,982 bushels. 

The oat-crop for 1905 in the Australian States was as follows : — 

Acres. 
643 
. 40.471 
. 944.019 
. 50,630 
. 13,831 
. 43,690 

Maize, 

This is a crop of some inaportance. In 1906 there were 10,485 
acres sown for grain, the yield being 633,212 bushels of corn, an 
average of 60 39 bushels per acre, and 2.625 acres sown for chaffing, 
ensilage, or feeding down with stock. Maize is grown only in the 
North Island, with the exception of a few acres in Nelson and 
Marlborough. The Provincial District of Auckland had 11,988 
acres ; Hawke's Bay, 559 acres ; Taranaki, 389 acres ; and Wel- 
lington, 119 acres, in 1906. As considerable interest is taken in 
this crop, the group of counties where it is chiefly grown is stated — 
vij5., Manukau, Thames, Whangarei, Mongonui» Bay of Islands, 
Waikato, Hokiaoga, Tauranga, Whakatane, Opotiki, Waiapu, Cook, 
Wairoa. Hawke's Bay, and Egraont. Small acreages are found in 
nearly all the counties of the Auckland, Taranaki, and Hawke's Bay 
Districts. 

Barleih 

Under barley (for threshing), 29,644 acres were returned in 1906, 
the crop being 1,024,045 bushels, an average yield per acre of 34 54 
bushels. In 1905 the area under barley was 29,484 acres, and the 
\*ield 1,128,164 bushels, or 3826 busliels per acre. There were in 
addition 3,270 acres in barley for ensilage or feeding down with 
stock. 

Bye. 

There were 1,397 acres in rye, yielding 63,086 bushels, or at the 
rate of 38 bushels per acre, in 1906, against 1.129 acres and 
31,612 bushels, the rate being 28 bushels per acre, in 1905. 

PecLS and Beans, 
The area under peas for threshing in the season 1906 was 13,211 
acres, yielding 394,903 bushels, or an average of 29-89 bushels per 
acre, against 11,426 acres and 378,195 bushels, or 33 09 bushels per 
acre, in the previous year. 



884 NEW ZBAIiAMD OFFICIAL TBAB-BOOK. 

Under beans there were 2,054 acres, giving a return of 68,222 
bushels, the average being 33*21 bushels per acre, against 2,545 
acres and 89,964 bushels (35*34 bushels per acre) in 19M. 

Potatoes. 

The area under potatoes was 26.834 acres in 1906, yielding 
the return of 123,402 tons, or a rate of 4*59 tons per acre, 
against 2G,331 acres in 1905, and 134,608 tons (or 5*11 tons 
per acre), an increase of 503 acres, but a decrease of 11,206 tous. 

A comparison of the gross yield of potatoes with the amoant 
exported in eiich of the twelve years 1883-94 showed that for sach 
period an average of 597 lb. per head of population was retained in 
the colony. Allowing for waste, pig-feed, and seed, the avera^ 
amount retained for human consumption was found to be 449 lb. t 
head. 

Turnips, dtc. 
Turnips and rape form a most important crop in a sheep-breeding 
country such as New Zealand, and in 1892 the area of land under 
this crop amounted to 422,359 acres. The returns for 1895 gave 
only 385,788 acres, but for tlie present year 601,321 acres (469,579 
acres in turnips and 131,742 in rape) were set down as under these 
crops ; and there were 9,338 acres in addition, in mangolds (7,090 
acres), beet (277 acres), and carrots (1,971 acres). 

Hops. 
There were 1.008 acres under liops m 1906, as against 894 acres 
last year. No account of the produce for the last nine years was 
taken, but in 1895 the yield was 7,556 cwt. In 1900 the total 
quantity used by the breweries in the colony amounted to 5,020 cwt. 
Of the land under hops in 1906, 937 acres were in the Waimea 
County and 5() in Takaka, both in the Provincial District of 
Nelson. The import of hops in 1905 amounted to 408 cwt., and 
the exports, the produce of the colony, to 3,301 cwt. 

Tobacco, 

The growing of tobacco does not progress in New Zealand 
In 1889, 34 acres were being cultivated ; in 1890, 25 acres ; in 1891. 
16 acres; in 1892. 6 acres; in 1893, 4 acres; in 1894, 4 acres; and 
in 1895, 5 acres, producing 1,599 lb. of dried leaf. Statistics of this 
crop have not been taken since 1895. 

Gardens and Orchards. 

Tlie extent of land in garden was 18.915 acres, of which Ufi^^ 
acres were private gardens and 4,072 acres market gardens, b 
plantations of forest trees tliere were 61,479 acres. 



AQRICULTUKE. 



385 



here were 26,760 acres in orchard in 1906, a decrease of 
icres on the area so returned in the previous year, and 560 
were returned as ** vineyard." The fruit-crop of the colony 
ipplemented hy a considerable import from the Australian 
\s and Fiji. 

Sotvn Orasses and Seeds. 

lew Zealand is essentially suited for grazing purposes, 
rever there is light and moisture English grasses thrive when 
latural bush and fern are cleared off — in fact, the white clover 
lally overcomes the fern ; and, from the mildness of the winter 
)n, there are few places where there is not some growth, even 
e coldest months of the year. In all parts of the colony stock 
although in varying condition, without other food than such as 
can pick up. Sown- grass land, as might be expected, heads 
ist of cultivations. 

t the beginning of the year 1906 there were 12,525,461 acres 
r artificial grasses. Of these, 4,779,734 acres had been pre- 
ly ploughed, presumably under grain or other crops, while 
1,727 acres had not been ploughed. Much of the latter area 
bush or forest land, sown down in grass after the timber had 
wholly or partially burnt off. 

he area under ryegrass for seed in the season of 1906 was 
!6 acres, yielding 987,243 bushels of 201b., or a rate of 32*23 
^Is per acre, against 31,662 acres and 758,387 bushels, an 
kge of 23*95 bushels per acre, in 1905. 

1 cocksfoot there were 37,039 acres, which yielded 8,1 83,571 lb., 
n average of 237 14 lb. per acre, against 39,707 acres and 
t,775 lb. (a rate of 22390 lb. per acre) in the previous year. 

eeds for sowing pasture lands are used much as in Great 
.in, the following being a common mixture : Perennial ryegrass, 
. to 30 lb. per acre ; cocksfoot, 2 lb. ; alsike, 2 lb. ; timothy, 
; cowgrass, 2 lb. ; red clover, 2 lb. ; white clover, 2 lb. ; rape, 
: total, 391b. to 441b. per acre. Pastures are renewed at 
vals of from four to eight years, according to the nature of the 



he following shows the acreage in sown grasses in Australasia 
K)4-5 :— 

Acres. 



^ueeuHiauu 
New South Wales 


607,997 


Victoria 


953,543 


South Australia 


24.912 


Western Australia 


3,964 


Tasmania 


378,346 


New Zealand . . 


.. 12,310,039 


13-yhk. 





386 NBW KBAIiAND OmOIAlJ TBAII-BOOK. 

It will be observed that the acreage of land under sown grassef 
is far greater in New Zealand than in the whole of Australia and 
Tasmania. When compared in size with the States of AastraliA, 
New Zealand is not large — about one-thirtieth of their total 
area — but in respect of grazing capabilities the relative import- 
ance of this country is much greater. Australia is generally an- 
suitablc, owing to conditions of climate, for the growth of Engliab 
grasses, and the amount of feed produced by the natural grasses 
throughout the year is very much less per acre than is obtained from 
the sown-grass lands in New Zealand ; indeed, it may be said that 
the average productiveness of grass land is about nine times as 
great here as in Australia, or, in other words, that land in thii 
colony covered with English grasses may be considered equal for 
grazing purposes to an area of Australian land about nine times u 
great. 

In addition to the artificially sown pastures, the returns for 1906 
show that 22,944,831 acres of unimproved land, including that in 
tussock or native grass, belonged to the occupied holdings, and wem 
available for stock-feeding by the sheep-farmers and cattle-farmei^ 
of the colony. 



OUTPUT OF GOLD. 

ENTERED FOR DUTY FOR EXPORTATION. 
16%. 1900, 1905. 

QUANTITY. 



IBgiS: 293,4930ft 



1900: 373JU01 



1%6. Sa0.465ot 



VALUE, 



189& iUfiiiet 



1900' £1439.602. 



1905 : £2,093,936 



OUTPUT OF COAL. 

1895, 1900, 1905. 



ia95. 738,654 toiu. 



1900: 1,083.990 tons. 



1905. 1,585,756 ta&a 



SECTION XIV.— MINING. 

TfiB natural aiineral resources of New Zealand are very greats 
and have exercised in the past a most important influence on the 
development and progress of the colony. Gold to the value of 
£67/230,584 was obtained prior to the SIst December. 1905 ; the 
value of the produce for the year 1905 having been £2,093,936. In 
the earliest years the gold was obtained from alluvial diggings, but 
at the present time the greatest quantity is taken from gold-bearing 
quartz, which is distributed widely through several parts of the 
colony, and thus there is a much better prospect of the permanency 
of this industry than alluvial diggings alone could give. 

The yield of silver to the end of 1905 amounted to £777,695 in 
value, the quantity mined in 1905 having been 1,179,744 0;;,, valued 
U £1:20,542, 

Of other minerals, the value of the product to the same date 
WDOtiots to £24.866,981, of which kauri-gum yielded £12,920,531, 
and coal, with coke, £11,627.750. 

The quantities and values of precious metals and mjneraia 
obtained during the year 1905, and the total value of all mining 
produce since 1853, are :— 

1005. 





0*, 


Jl 


M 


Gold 


520,485 


3.093,93(; 


67,230,584 


SUver . . 


1,179,744 


120,542 
a.m4,478 


777.695 




1,700,229 


68,008.279 




Totii, 






Copper-ore 


4 


17 


18,228 


Chrome -ore 




. , 


38,009 


ADtimony-ore 




, , 


52,598 


Manganese-ore , 


65 


im 


61,791 


Hiemaiite-ore 






43'J 


Mixed miDGrals . 


632 


8,136 


140.431 


Coal ., 


1.585J56 


838,531 


11,602,931 


Coke (exported) . 


15 


15 


24,819 


K&uii-gum 


10,883 


661,444 


12,920,531 


Sbale . . 




- 


7,211 



£3,622J86 £92,876,260 

Of the gold entered for exportation during the year ended 
Ibe 3l8t March, 1906^viz.. o2t>,200oz., representing a value of 
£2,117,606 — about 56 per cent, came out of quartx-mioes; but, 
if Ibe total yield of gold obtained in the eolony be taken, the 
ralue of which to 31st March, 1906. is £67,754,443, about 25 per 
cent, came from quartz - mioes and 75 per cent, from alluvial 
workingB. 



I 



^ 



^ 



^ 



388 KKW £K ALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOX. 

Gold MINING. 

The history of the finding of gold in this colony was briefly 
sketched in the Year-books for 1893 and 1894, and need not, there- 
fore, be given again, but New Zealand's greatest mine is worthy of 
especial comment An account of the *' Waihi" will be found in 
the Year-book of 1905. 

The following notes on the auriferous ironsand of New Zea- 
land are from a report by Mr. Alexander McKay, F,G.B,, Govern- 
ment Geologist : - 

Aiiriferoua ironeands (chiefly magnetfo axide) are, for the moat p«rt, ooo- 
fiufid to the west, nouth. and south east ooastfi of the Middle Uland of New Ze^ 
land, commoalj kQown as the Bouth Inland, 

The iitanio ironsandB of the west ooast of the North Island, though mixed 
with mflKiietfte, are not usually gold-bearing, and south of Auckland hav^ oot 
been ascertained to contain gold in sufficient quantity to pay for working audi 
deposits. For the most part, these sands have been derived from volcanic roek« 
of young Tertiary date, associated with which, ezoept on the wetlem flanks of 
Mouoi Egmont, there are no lodes carrying gold. 

On the east coast of Cape Colville Peninsula, at Mercury Bay* there ared«^ 
posits of hlack sand that oontain gold, and which it has been proposed to work 
for the precious metaL Possibly, also, there are other similar depoiita on the 
west shore of the Bay of Plenty, where such sands have been derived from anri- 
ferous rooks. The magnetle and titanic ironsands of the North Island are, how- 
ever, not UBually regarded as a repository of gold in paying quantities. 

On the west coast of the S^uth Island, from near Capo Farewell to Fcesflf 
vatioQ Inlet, the sea beaches, formed of material of moderate fineneas of graii} 
foe the moat part, show the presence of magnetio ironsands, and often such nnds 
form a considerable part of the totat material of the beach between hifth- andlow^ 
water mark. Buch sands are at almost all places auriferous, and for the pa«t 
thirty years have been worked for gold. 

Uiiually, where magnetic irousands are found on the beach , deposits of tbo 
same kind, now no longer acted upon by the tide, are present on the higher 
grounds inland, or lie buried under ^rey sands between tide-mark and the foot of 
the firnt terrace. These beach leads have been a great source of gold at mao^r 
parts on the west coast of tlio Bouth Island, At many places, near the rnottlh* 
of rivers and large creeks, the ground is wet, and by dredging or other means w 
is that considerable areas have yet to be worked. This Mrat horiaoii above ot 
inland of tide-mark has deposits of ironeand in all favourable situations along tb» 
west and south coasts of the Islaod, and these are notably developed near the 
mouths of the larger rivers. 

At many places they are covered by flood deposits from rivers or by aeoli^i 
sands drifted back from the beach, and thus it is that discoveries are likely yet to 
be made. 

At higher levels sucoesaive terraces of auriferous ironsands are met wltk, 
principally between the mouths of the BuUer and Hokitlka Rivers and some ol 
the large rivers in Bouth Westland. 

On Addison's Flat aad at CharleBton the ironsand depoeita are developed os 
a most exteoBive scale, and have yielded, and still do, great quantiiiee of gbU* 
At both placos further oxidation of the magnetite has taken place, and rusiy* 
coloured ironsand cements are the results. ThU faet has entailed an eoormoui 
loss of gold to the olaimholdera working the cement, as the gold coated with 
iron- oxide escapes being caught by the means employed for that purpoee, And 
finding its way into the tailing ohaniitils and streams, a part of such escaped go)& 
19 again recovered by various oontrivaooes placed so as to intercept it, and a ptft 
oarned to the seaboard (ends to enrich the black-sand deposits within tide^matk 
Between Charleston and Brighton these deposits ri^e to a height of 600 ft. abov« 
the aea ; more to the south they gradually attain the leaser elevations, and south 
of Hokitika are but little above sea-leveL 



GOLD-MINING. 389 

On tbe shores of Foveaux Strait it is only at Orepoki and near the mouth 
of the Waiau River that these deposits reach any distance inland, or more than a 
very moderate height ahove the level of high- water mark. East of the Bluff, and 
from the vicinity of Dunedin to the northern boundary of the Otago Provincial 
District, the auriferous black-sand deposits are confined to the limits between 
high- and low-water mark, or to less than 25ft. above that. 

Along the east coast, within the Canterbury Provincial District, it is only 
between Lake Ellesmere and the mouth of the Rakaia River that auriferous 
sands payable to work are found. These, however, do not contain notable 
quantities of magnetic ironsand, but for the most part they are grey or garnet- 
iferous. 

North of Ghristchurch, while at places it is evident that great elevation (in 
modern times) of the land has taken place, and old beaches can be traced up to 
at least 400 ft. above the sea, only traces of gold have been found, and black sand 
does not abound. 

The great richness in gold of these sands enabled them to be worked with 
profit when the means employed were both costly and of a rude description. 
At many places the yield was phenomenal, and thus there has beea impressed 
on the New Zealand miner the full importance of the deposits, and black-sand 
claims are still in favour. Many deposits are rich only in particular parts, or 
are poor generally, and any means that tended to lessen the cost of extraction of 
the gold would be a boon to the black-sand miner, and should be hailed accord- 
ingly. 



Gold-dredging . 

During the past year the dredging industry in Otago and South- 
land maintained a high degree of efficiency and gold-producing 
results, ninety-five dredges being employed all the year round in 
Otago and fifty in Southland. The Electric Company's No. 1 
dredge's return of 1,273 oz. for five days' actual dredging in 1904 
still remains the record of gold won for one week's dredging in New 
Zealand. 

On the west coast of the Middle Island the value of the gold 
won was £103,277 17s. 4d. by forty dredges. 



Miners, and Gold entered for Export at different 
Districts. 

The total number of gold-miners employed in 1905 was 9,362, 
as agfiunst 10,898 for the previous year. In some places, more 
especially in Otago, Nelson, and on the West Coast, many of the 
miners do not depend entirely on mining, but employ a part of their 
time in farming and other pursuits. 

In 1901 an Act was passed reducing the fee payable for a miner's 
right from 10s. to 5s. 

The total quantity of gold entered for export during the years 
ending 31st March, 1905, and 31st March, 1906, for the several 
districts, and the total quantity and value of the gold exported from 
the colony from the 1st January, 1857, to the 31st March, 1906, 
are shown hereunder; but this does not necessarily include the 



890 



NIW SBALAND OFFICUL TKAB-BOOX. 



whole of the gold prmiuced, as no doubt much has been takeu 
out of the colony from time to time by people who have evaded 
the duty, and a good deal has been nsed for making jewellery and 
ornament 6 : — 

TaBUE 6HOWINO TBB QUANTtTT AND VaI.U1E OJT QoL0 KKTBBBD FOB ExFOBTA 

TION Fttou New Zealand for the Years ended thb 31st Maboh, 1905 

AND 1906, AND THB TOTAX* QOAMTITT AND YaLDE FAOM jANUAaV, 1S57. 90 

aiRT Marctt. 1%6. 



DiitHot. 



Slat Murtsh. 1906. 



Y«Ar Qtidtne 
SlBt Marcli. 1901'.. 



QUAU^ 

tity- 



Value. 



Quau- 



Valu«. 



Inereaso 
or 

for 
Yoar endiug 
Slit UAT^to, 

19Q8. 



Total Quantity and 

V&loe from Jaauirr. 

1657, M SlAt MMitk, 

1906. 



Auckland ,, 

Wellmgton.. 

Marlborough 

Nelson 

WeatCoftat.. 

Canterbury.. 

Otago 



Os. I £ I OS. I £ I 0». I Os. I i 

2t22,6.'>2 815.499 243.aSl|l,00O.964( H- 25,379 8,759.416! 14, D4aJ!?67 

' .. ' 188 



l«6, 662 ,. I .. I -166 

6J61| 2^.814 4,421 17,650 -3^040 

119,545| 478,050110,9961 448»089| -6»649 

\ 



89.090 
1J12J20 
5A66.022 
99 



20,6ti4,uOf 



170,388 688,551 162J52 655,913' -7,636 6,549.372 26,005,633 



TotaU.. 510,212 2,008,576 526.20012,117,606' 4^0,983 17,276.316'6TJ54,t4$ 

It will be seen from the above table that there was last year 
ao increase iti the export of gold of 6»988 oas. on the figures for thft 
preceding twelve months. 

Of the total quantity of gold entered for exportation last yew 
Auckland contributed illi per cent, ; Nelson. 84 per cent, ; Wes! 
Coast, 21-09 per cent. ; and Otago, 30 93 per cent. 



MlNEKAL PbODUCTIOK (VaLUE) OF AuSTHAliASlA TO EUD Qlf 1304. 

The total value of mineral production for Australasia to the end 
of the year 1904 is shown in the following table: — 






QOLD-MINING. 




391 


Gold-production of Australasia (Quantityy 




The gold-yield 


of Australasia 


(io crude 


ounces) for 


the years 


1898 to 1904 was as under :— 










i»e 


1000. 


IflOS. 


1904. 




Oe, 


0*. 


OS. 


Ol6 


Qaoensl&nd 


.. 920,048 


963,189 


860,453 


630,151 


Hew South Walea 


.. 340,493 


845,650 


190,316 


824,096 


Victori* 


.. 887 » 257 


807,407 


777, 78S 


821,017 


South Austrfvlia 


31,961 


24.086 


28.198 


29,108 


Woitem Auetralift 


., l,tJ50a84 


l,580.9o0 


2,177,442 


2,378.021 


Ta^majiia 


74,233 


8l.li^6 


70,1)90 


65,921 


N«w Zealand . . 


280,175 


^378,6X6 


508.045 


620,323 




3,dd4«351 


1,170,023 


4,613,188 


4,773.687 



The increase for the period is 1,239.186 oz. The mini value of 
Aastralasian gold averages £3 IBs. per ounce, and a comparison 
of value 18 therefore as follows : 1898, £13.430,533 ; 1900. 
£15.868,887; 1902, £17,530,114; 1904, £18.139.440: increase. 
1898 to 1904, £4,708,907, 



Gotd-productwn of the World fur each of the Five Years 1898-1902. 

(Fram fk t&ble compiled in tbo Governtnei}! StatimiofjfeU^A Office. Perth, 
Western Australia.) 

The quantities are given throughouL the table in fine ounces, 
the accepted standard of value for which is £4 4s. llfV^i, per ounce. 



OoniiliiM Aod CoatineQts. 



iaoB< 



1890. 



1900. 



ISXIl. 



Auttrala^iei, 
^i Itorn Ausiralift*. . 

Fldoria . . 

fuMDAland 

lew Ze»l^d 

let! Bontfa fVft!e8 . . 

la . . 

hith Aastr&lia 

\t9 Gninen 

Toc^l ounces 
Toty yaloe 



Fine OS. | Flneos. ; Fine ox. Fixracw. 1 Fineos. 
939,490 1,470,605 1,414,311 l,7a9.416 1,871.038 



788,429 


804,665 


760,319 


730,450 


720,862 


647,487 


668,150 


676,068 


598.413 


640.493 


254,416 


356.231 


388,911 


412,876 


459,406 


282,914 


382,162 


362,116 


173.643 


161,256 


66,267 


77411 


74,444 


69,490 


70,996 


32,474 


18,688 


19,418 


21,946 


22,395 


5,627 


10,403 


7.560 


8,693 


8,693 


3,007,104 


3,787,959 


3,543,137. 


3,718,826 


3,955.139 


12,773,36616,090.22715,050,28915,796.569 


16,800,363 



r 392 NEW ZEALAND OFFtCIAL YEAJt-BOCK, 1 

^B Chld'praduction of the World, 1898-1902—couimneii. 1 


^^f Qonntrlea And OontdneQU. 1BB& 


lam. 


190\ 


im. 


mi 


Africa. 

TratiBvaal Colon j . . 

RhodesU *, 

Madagascar 

Abyssinia .. 

Mozambique 

Ck)ld Coast Colony - , 

Cape Colony 

Natal Eind Zulu land 

French Guinea 
1 Senegal ., 
1 Prenoh Ivory Coast 


Fine ok. 

3,823,367 

14,257 

976 

6.000 

is, 029 

107 

15 

3.606 
2,949 


Fine uis. 

3,637,713 

48,399 

6,809 

6,0(J0 

5,416 

12,077 

120 

56 

5,080 
975 


Fiue OS. 1 Fine OB. 

348,761 231,076 

72,568 143,698 

33,485 30,80C 

5,000 «.00< 

8,475 12,377 

8,944 5,223 

116 71 

U 135 

805 

1,552 1,419 

274 606 


FinsoL 

1,718,921 
i 161, 6SI 

i 

78 
1,441 


^K ToUl ounces 


3,865,308 3,721,654 


479,187. 484,209 


1,949,901 


^H Total value £ 


16,418.785 16»808, 581 


2,085,457| 1.844,402 


8.282.661 


^^^ America. 

United States of Araedoa . . 

Gaoada 
1 South and Central America , . 


1 ' > 

3,118.399 3,437/210 3,829,897| 3,805,500 

666,445 1,028,6201 1,350,1761 1,167,390 

1,096,335 841,8371 828,273! 1,102,942 


3,870,00a 
1,032,95) 
1,110,649 


^K Total ounceR 


4,881,178 5,307,167 


6,008, 346| 6,075,762 


6,012.902 


^M Total value g 


20,733,926 

l,073,/i25 
104, 5a5 


22,543,41225.521,832:25,808,196 


25,541,1^ 


^^ Europe, 
RuBBJa 
Other European countries . . 

Total OUQCBB 

Total value & 

Asia, 
BribiBh India 
China 
(hher Asiatic countries 

L Total ounces 


1,083,643| 1,082,499 1,105,412 
113,7521 127,557 116,140 


l,105.4lt 
120,115 


1,178,110 1,197,2951 1,210,056 1,223,552 

1 


1,235,^7 


6,004,298 5,085, 786( 5,139.901 6,197,319 


5,2Q6,T0a 

469,8S4 
287.996 
276.05T 


377,358 405,763 
261,665! 270,790 
115,902 154,301 


445,381 454,523 
251,092; 231,465* 
205,:i03 277,281 


754,916 


830,774 
3,528,904 


901,7761 963,209 


1,027,887 


^H Total value £ 


8,206,675 


8,830,501 

1 


4.091,707 
12,415,618 


4,aee,i8T 


H^ The World. 
^^L Total ounces 


13,686,616'u,844,84912.142,502lJ 

1 1 


14,171.388 


^9 Total value M 


58,137.045:63,056,91061,578,070152,738,193 


60,196,109 


1 • COAL-MINING. 

I The extent of the coal - measures in New Zealand will inskB 
L coal -mining one of the large ioduetries in the colony, especially 
1 on the west coast of the Middle Island, where bituminous coal exists 
i equal, if not superior, in quality to coal of the same class in any 



OOAL-MIN'ING. 


■ 


393 1 


The progreasive increase in the output of coal from 1678 to the | 


end of 1905 is shown below : — 




1 






Ex ported 








1 


9 a p 


(excludinn 
CoftJ for 
Fuel by 


^ - rt Q 




Year. 


1 




rt o sj :s 


; Tot*' il:r^. 




"3 o'C ^ 


Oc4!&n 
StMmert), 


Total 
tioi] 
witl 
Coll 


>• 


. 


1 

Ton*. 1 Tonii^ 


Toafi. 


Tods. 


Toxift. 


Toos. 


Tons. 


1878 . . 


162.218 


174,148 


336,366 


3,921 


1 332,445 




1879 . . 


J 231,218 69,000 


138.076 


389,294 


7,195 


382,099 


49,654 


1S80 .. 


! 1199, 9S3 68,705 


123,298 


423,221 


7,021 


416,200 


34,101 


1B81 .. 


337 » 202 37,339 


129,962 


467,224 


6,026 


460,598 


44.398 


1882 .. 


378,272 41,010 


129,583 


507. B54 


4,245 


503,609 


43,011 


1883 .. 


, 421,764 43,492 


123,540 


545,304 


7,172 


538,132 


34,523 ^fl 


18^ .. 


460,831 59,067 


148,444 


029,275 


6,354 


622,921 


84,789 ^M 


1885 -. 


' 511,063 30,232 


130,202 


641,265 


2,371 


638,894 


15,973 ^M 


1886 .. 


534.353 23,'i9D 


119.873 


654,226 


2,862 


651,364 


12,470 ^H 


1887 . , 


558,620 24,267 , 


107,230 


665,850 


12,961 


652,899 


1,535 ^M 


1888 .. 


613,895 ,55,275 ' 


101,341 


715,236 


27,678 


637,558 


34,659 ^H 


1889 .. 


586,445 -27,450* 


128,063 


714,508 


39,290 


675,218 


12,340 ^M 


1890 .. 


537,397 50,952 \ 


110, 939 , 


748,336 


33,404 


714,932 


39,714 ^ 


1681 .. 


668,794 31,397 1 


125,318 


794,112 


29,093 


764,019 


49,087 J 


189^ .. 


678,315 4.521 1 


125,453 


798,768 


28,169 


770.699 


6.580 ^m 


l8ilS . . 


691,548 18,233 i 


117,444 


808,9^^12 


24,298 


784,704 


14,105 ^H 


1894 .. 


719,546 27,998 


112,961 


832,507 


25,449 


807,058 


22,354 ^M 


1896 ., 


7^,654 7,108 ' 


108.198 


834,852 


20,151 


808,701 


1,643 ^M 


1896 .. 


792,851 66,197 


101,756 


894,607 


27,974 


866,633 


57,932 ^H 


im .. 


840,713 47,862 ; 


110,907 


951, 6i0 


26,639 


924,981 ' 


58,348 V 


1898 .. 


907,033 66,320 


115,427 


1,022.460 


18,348 


1,004.112 1 


79,131 I 


1899 , , 


975,234 68,201 


9*3,655 , 


1.074.889 


14,146 


1.060,743 , 


56.631 1 


1900 ,, 


ll. 093, 990 118,756 


124,033 


1,218,023 


36,699 1 


1.181.324 1 


120,581 I 


X901 ., 


1.227.638 133.648 


149,764 


1,377,402 


77,563 ; 


1.299,839 i 


118,515 ^M 


1902 .. 


1,362,703 185,064 


127, S53 


1,490,555 


110,666 1 


1,379,989 


80,050 ^M 


1903 ., 


1,420,193 57,491 


163,923 , 


1,584,116 


97,461 


1,486,655 


106,766 ^M 


1004 .. 


1,537,838 117,645 


147,196 


1,685.034 


56,613 , 


1,628.521 


141,866 1 


1905 


1,585,756; 47,918 


169,046 ; 


1,754,802 


41.257 


1,715.546 


85,024 1 




* DocreafiQ. 






It will be Been from the above that, 


with th 


B exception ol 


1889, there has been a steady increase in 


the outpi 


at of coal from 


the mines in the colony year after year 


since recc 


mis have been 


kept by the Mines Department. The yea 


riy incres 


ise in output is 


princjpaily due to the growing demand foi 


• consumji 


tiou within the 


colony. Daring a i^riod of twenty-eight ye 


jars the ai 


loual con sump- 


lion of coal in New Zealand has increased ( 


,0 the ext( 


ant of 1,381,100 


tons, showing that new industries are quick 


iy spriogii 


ag up, requiring 


fuel for generating motive power. 






The total output from the mines last 


year was 


1.585,756 tons, 


as against 1,537,838 tous for 1904, an i 


ncrease c 


:f 47,918 tons. 


Tbe coal imported from other countnes ^ 


ras 169,04 


6 tons, against 


147.196 tons iu 1904, an increase in the 


importati 


on last year of 


121,850 tons. The imports were 168,767 ton 


s from Ne 


w Sooth Wales, 

1 



394 



NEW ZILALAHO OFFICIAL TKAR-BOOK, 



I 



106 tons from Victoria, and 133 toas from ihe Uuited Kingdom. The 
total export of coal was 122,817 tons, all colonial produce. Of 
coal exported, 81,660 tons were for coalmg direct steamers tra 
betweea the colony and the United Kingdom, and has been treate3 
as coal consumed within the coiony, these steamers trading wholly 
between New Zealand and Great Britain. Taking, therefore, the 
output from the mines and the coal imported, there is a total of 
1,754,802 tons, of which 41,257 tons were exported, leaving the con- 
sumption within the colony last year 1,713.545 tons, as against 
1,628,521 tons for 1904, an mcreased consumption of 85,024 tons. 

The largest increase in the output last year was in the Grey- 
mouth district — namely, 36,624 tons. There was also an increased 
production from the mines in the Waikato district of 8,641 tons, In 
the SouthUnd district of 13,714 tons, in the West Wanganui dis- 
trict of 8,348 tons, in the Miranda district of 1,015 tons, in the 
Kavvakawa and Hikurand districts of 15,610 tons, in the Malvern 
distnct of 518 tons ; but there was a decline ia the Whangarei, 
Karno, Ngunguru, and Whauwiiau dinthcts of 7,380 tons, in the 
Mokau district of 527 tons, in the Wtistport district of 18.448 toas, 
in the Reef ton district of 7,247 tons, and in the Otago district of 
2,950 tons. 

The quantities of coal produced in each district are as 
uuiler : — 



Niuue of DiBtrlm. 


Output of Coal. 


InoroMe or 


ApproxiiuAta 
TouU Output or 

Ckial up to Lbe 
.*tl»fc Decern h«r. 


uns. 1004. 


Deoreue. 




Toas* 


TOQS. TOAI. 


Tons. 


Kfiiwak^wft and Hikur&tigi 


d4,8oS 


79,948 +15,610 


1,496,2U 


Whangarei, Kamo, Ngunguru, 








and WbiiuwhAU 


, 19,591 


26,371 - 7,380 


576,171 


Waikato 


! 126,317 


116,676 L -f 8,641 


l,08t);H4 


Mokftu 


8,753 


4,280 ' - 627 


47,y67 


Miranda 


16.357 


15,342 , -f 1,015 


42,192 


PeloruH 


* . 


. . * • 


711 


West Wangftnui 


20.778 


12,430 + S»848 


8J.4y3 


We*tport 


551, b25 


570,273 -18,448 


6,403,416 


Reef ton 


7,8712 


15,119 


- 7.247 


• 132,180 


Qrt^ymoutb « . 


275,75ti 


239,128 ' 


4-36,024 


4.013.303 


Malvern 


25,633 


25,120 


H- 518 


493.214 


Tniiaru 








1U.057 


Otago 


317J31 


320,681 


- 2.950 


5,616,943 


Souihlaud 


126.284 


112,570 


+ 13,714 


1,064.292 


ToUk 


1,585,756 


1,537,838 


+47,918 


21,686,997 


i + ) lacr 


Ba«». I 


— >Docr«Mi 


B. 





The following table, constructed from '* Laboratory Reports of the" 
Geological Survey " (Sir J. Hector) gives the composition of samplei 
of New Zealand coals freshly taken iErom the principal mines : — 



OOAIi-MINING. 



AnalyBld. 



Dmedption. 



r^ooality. 



1:1 a 6 d 



Anthracite 
Bituminous 



Altered brown ooal 
Biimninoua 
Glance ooal 
Bitumtnoas 



1 
9 
3 
4 

5 

e 
a 

9 

10 Pitch coal 
il Bituminous 
ISt Pitch coal 

19 Bituminouii 
14i 
15 

16| . 

17 

181 . 

19 

20 . .. 

21 Altered brown coal 
'12 Bituminout 

23, 

25^ Pitch ooal 

30| OlaitcQ coal 
271 Pitch coal 
281 Brown coal 

31| 

33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
12 
43 
44t Pitch coal 



Pitch ooal 
Brovrn ooal 



Pitch coal 
Brown coal 



Acheron, CanteThurv * . 
Con I brook dale 

Banbury 
Malvern HilU 
Tyneside 
Kakaia Gorge 
Wall send 
Grey River .. 
Kawakawa . . 
Preservation Inlet 
BtftckbflJl, Grey River 
Mokihinui .. 
Coalpit Heath ., 

iSiIokihinui ». 
Brunner Mine 

Weatporl 

Mokihintii ,. 

Bninaer 

Malvern Hilla 

Wallsend 

Otamataura Creek .. 

Near Cape Farewell . . 

Kawakawa . . 

Whangarei .. 
I Kamo . ► , ■ 

I Malvorn Hills 

Fern hill 

Allandale 

Eaitangata . . 

Shag Point ,. 

Horaebufth .. 

Hikurangi, Whang&rer 

Hokonui 

Kaitangata . . 

Nightcaps ,. 

Shag Point ., 

Springfield .. 

Orepuki 

Kattangata . . 

Shag Point ,. 

Allandale 

Orev River . . 



8412! 1 
7483:20 
70'<MJ'22 
6997 25 

66-591 29 
64*5121 
62 87|31 
623729 
6l-16[28 
60 88 28 
6O*20;29 

mirjm 

588138 
i57*92'^J4 



5Cm 
56*21 
5601 
55'59 
64 16 



53^9132 
53'lOj35 
,52-8936 
151 •37138 
:50'15;42 
50 1138 



,5001 

]4999 

|49 95 36 

|47'3134 

I464R33 

|46"21IB2 

44-92 36 

i44/>0l47 

,4428:38 

44-n!38' 

if' 

14:' 

14'' 
|8s 

35-76 ::10 
8472,41 
i34*72!66 



Evapo- 
rative 



1-80 
M6 
252 
99 
415 
082 

eie 

1-66 
1-99 
2-51 
4'33 
801 
397 
102 
396 
15^ 
1-50 
260 
a06 
250 
12-65 
J 41 
2 39 
4 38 

4 18 
801 
961 

U'79 
1300 
1241 

14 66 
16 02 
15-83 

5 99 
16'50 

15 44 



l2-iail0-93ll8 
3 
5 
3 
7 
4 



51 
33 
33 
42 
41 
46 
83 
20 
33 
19 
82 
14 
19 
18 
U 
56 
22 
39 
49 
02 
0^ 
29 
53 
04 
20 
69 
80 
10 
02 
38 
12 
25 
51 
00 
13 



9'70l6i 

9-1015'< 

909|15'^ 

8-27!12i 

8-52 13-^ 

8 30il3 3d' 

81713'82 

80l|l3i 

7'95!l2i 

79l|l21 

7-82|iai 

7'7611-! 

7'6412'I 

7-50ll2 75 

7-36|l2 46 

7'3012-36 

7-2812 30 

7-2012! 

7-04|lM 

6-92|ll-6(f 

6'90|ll-68 

600 11-70 

6'3l!ll60 

6-50,U6a 

6-60 a -Ti 
6'60!lMf 
6-49' 10-90 
6-491099 
615'l0 96 
6'04|lO-22 
6 0010-16 
5 83! 9-87 



'4-44 6- 
17 50 11 
13 22 20 
18-99 4 
6-20 2 




Newcastle, N.8.W. 



Fob Compabiso:*, 

.. i58-33;34-17 
.. 53 34 26'66| 



Best .. ,. i58-33;34-17 183 5 67 7-50|12 8J 
* WorKt ^ .. 5^34!26'66| 3;33 16 671 6 90lu 71 

•The •eoond column bo&ded *'EvAporative Power'* In obt«fned by the orb of | 
oiultfpii* compviterl from thtji results of Prafea«iorLi1vor«ed^e'8 e)ni<?rliODQt»iii>oti the coall 
of New South Wftlc«. The ninltiplp iisod for tb© first eoluniD is thi? ooo which hti» long 
been fft*Doratly nffed for computing tbe evaporative power oT coals; but, to preveataov 
uuCalr aDd prejadicial coiiipAri»oti of oar coaIb with tlicm«of New Houtb Wale«, the fteeouo: 
'eoltimn In given. 



396 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TBAR-BOOK. 



As regards the quality of the coal, it cannot be surpassed. The 
late Sir John Goode, in his presidential address to the Institute of 
Civil Engineers, London, stated : " The bituminous coal found on the 
west coast of the Middle Island is declared by engineers to be folly 
equal, if not superior, to the best description from any port of the 
world." 

The quantity of each class of coal produced in 1904 and 1905 
was : — 



Class of Coal. 



Bituminous and semi-bituminous 

Pitch 

Brown 
Lignito 

Totals 



Oatpat of Goal. 



1904. 



1906. 



Inoreaae 

or 
Decrease. 



Approzimale 
I Total Oatpnt ot 

Goal op to the 
I Slst December. 
190S. 



' Tons. 
I 938,518 
' 24,606 
1 483,858 
1 90,956 


Tons. 
965.083 

23.072 
496,936 
100.665 


Tons. 

26,565 

- 1,434 

18,078 

9,709 


Tons. 

12,380,315 

1,906,650 

6,673.879 

876,153 


.1,537,838 


1,585,756 


47,918 


21,686.997 



The number of coal-mines working during the year 1905 Was, as 
shown by the next table, 177, and the number of persons employed 
3,269. 



Number of '. 

MinoK 

working'. 



Number of Persons employed in each Mine. 



Total 

Number of 

Persons 

employed. 



108 
31 
10 
28 


1 to 4 iu each 

5 , 10 , 
11 . 20 . 
21 and upwards 


177 


1 



186 

210 

158 

2,715 



3,269 



The total output of coal from the above mines was 1,585,756, 
and the average annual output per person 485 tons. 

It is believed that Gs. per ton is a good estimate of the cost, for 
labour only, of coal delivered in rail way- trucks clear of the colliery 
premises, which differs somewhat from the cost at the pit's mouth. 

The average earnings of each person employed have been com- 
puted at £2 IBs. per week, or £150 16s. per annum, throughout the 
colony, but this varies in different districts, for which the figured 
computed by Inspector Green are : — 

AvEHAfiEs OF Weekly Earnings. 

Northern district 
West Coast . 
Southern 

Average for cclony 



£ 8. 


d. 


8 8 


6 


3 9 


6 


2 1 






. . £2 18 



COAJj' MINING, 397 

Tbe wage given for the West Coast district may be somewhat 
more than tfie fact, on account of youths being counted as men. On 
the other hand, the information given for tlie Southern district may 
be ratlier too iow, on account of the more intermittent nature of the 
work. The dredging industry is stated by the Southern Inspector 
to have largely increased coal-conRumption in certain places, each 
steady working dredge consuming 20 tons of coal for at least forty , 
weeks in the year, or, say» BDO tons per annum. ^H 

^^^^ State Coal-mines. ^H 

^^^^^ Seddmiville. ^^ 

I The Seddonville State Coal-mine is divided into three sections* i 

viz., northern, southern, and western. It is in the last two sections 
where workings have been carried on during the past year. Both 
m the southern and western sections ihe coal is much harder than 
m the northern one, and is of excellent quality as regards its steam- 
generating power. Even in the northern section, where the coal is 
softer in character, its calorific value shows it to be a high-class 
coal, and is greatly appreciated by marine engineers. The coal 
from the southern and wesiern sections on being brought to the 
bins is separated into three classes, viz., round coal, nuts, and peas. 
The round coal is that which passes over a bar-grating having slots 
If in, wide. The coal which passes through these slots is lifted 
with elevators on to a shaking screen, whore a stream of water plays 
on it and washes away any impurities from amongst the nuts. The 
holes in this shaking screen are | in. diameter, and what passes 
throiigh this screen is washed down a sluice-box with ripples, and 
again screened over a plate having holes of Jin. diameter. The 
residue is dumped to waste at the present time, but a briquette- 
making plant is now being erected at Westport, and as soon as it is 
completed tlie whole of the fine and soft coal will be manufactured 
into briquettes of such dimensions as will be suitable for locorao- 
lives, marine and land boilers, and also for household purposes. 
The use of briquettes as fuel in America and on the Continent of 
Europe shows its calorific value to be about 20 per cent* more than 
round coal from the same mine. The output from this mine during 
last year was 46,085 tons. 



H 



4 



Point Elizabeth. 

The development of the workings in the Point Elizabeth State 
Coal-mine shows there is an extensive field of excellent coal avail- 
able. The whole of the development- work during the past year ban 
been confined to Nos. 1 and 2 sections. In working up to the rise 
from both adit levels the seam became very thin, but in going to the 
dip an excellent field of coal has been opened up. Two dip headings 
have been constructed from the main level in each section for dis- 
tances of about 20 chains and 34 chains respectively. These head- 
ings are being carried on as rapidly as possible in order to get the 




400 



NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL TKAR-BOOK. 



year the value stood at £3,333,272. Since that date the value 
gradually decreased year by year to £2,636,177 in December 
quarter, 1899, but rose again to £4,052,173 in 1905 :— 





Quarter 

ended 

3lBt December. 


i Coin. 


Gold and Silver 

in 
Ballion or Bars. 


Total Coin 

and 

Ballion. 






1 


£ 


£ 


1891 




2,231,242 


126,346 


2.867,588 


1892 




2,381,819 


141,406 


2,522,725 


1893 




2,480,453 


121,496 


2.601.949 


1894 




3,103,355 


118,121 


8.221.476 


1895 




3,199,889 


183,388 


8.883,272 


1896 




3,171,702 


122,901 


8,294.603 


1897 




2,848,183 


107.635 


2,956,818 


1898 




2,625,896 


126,349 


2,762,245 


1899 




2,511,102 


126,076 


2,636.177 


1900 




2.658,207 


144,025 


2.802.232 


1901 




2,921,268 


142.575 


3.063,843 


1902 




3,124,916 


167,174 


3,292.090 


1903 




3,597,280 


149,300 


3,746,580 


1904 




3,790,483 


162,592 


3.963,075 


1905 




3,849,039 


203,134 


4,052,173 


The figures show 


n for eacli quarter of the year 1 


905 are :— 








Coin. 


Bullion 




March quarter, 


1905 . . 


3,815,769 


133,574 




June 




3,803,936 


136,662 




September 


. . 


3,804,145 


168,173 




December 


. . 


3,849,0^9 


203,134 



lu 1886 the average amount of advances made by the banks vaB 
£15,853,420, equal to £27-23 per head of the mean population. 
The advances gradually declined in amount and proportion to popu- 
lation until 1891, when they were in value £11,549,145, or £18-34 
per head. In 1897 advances stood at £10,892,111, or £15*09 pei 
head, which is the lowest average since the year 1872. From then© 
there was continuous rise both in amounts of advances and rate 
per head of population until 1905, for which the figures ar 




BANK OF NEW ZKALAND. 401 

M16,596,156, or JS19'07 per head. The dis<jount« in 1904 amounted 
to £2,072,356, or £2-45 per head of mean population, and in 1905 
they were £2,125.511, or £2 44 per head. The largest amount of 
discounts in any year was £6,Q61;959 in 1879, a rate of £13 53 per 
head. From 1879 there was a fall year by year until 1896, when 
the sum was £1.756.791, or £2-49 per head. 

An account of tVie special banking legislation of 1893 and its 
subsequent developments will be found in the previous issaes of the 
Year-book, (See page 400, Year-book 1902.) 

»*' The Bank of New Zealand Act, 1903." 
This Act ^as passed in auuclpeitioD of guaranteed isharee or stock ]s»U6d 
under the authority of tbu Act of 1894, to ih& extent of two million pounds 
etorliDgf reaching maturity oa the l^th July of the year 1904 ^ and of 
Ibe erpiry of the term of currency of the debenture* issued by the Assets 
BiMlisation Board (31 at starch, 1904). It also makes provisions under which 
th€ remaining liability of the proprietors of the Bank, under section 21 
of **Tbe Banking Aoi, 1861/' ranks as ordinary uncalled capital, and for the 
fitue of fresh pbares to the Oovcnnneiit in lieu of the preferred shares 
rriginally iasued to the Crown, but afterwards repurchased oy the Bank. 
Besides the above, tho Act deal a with other matters afTectiog the business 
of lb« Bank and the Assets Heal 1 sat loo Board. 

Otdbuiry Sliarts, 

Every ordinary share in iho Bank ia deemed to bo a share of the nominal 
value of £6 13s. 4d., paid up to the extent only of the amount actually paid on 
aocount of iostalmenta of Ibe cull in respect of §ucb share, leaviQg a liability 
of the balance ol instalments, and the furthyr liability ot £3 6s. 8d, per share, 
bnt DO more. 

New Guaranteed Stock, 

The guaranteed stock issued undnr *' The Share Guarantee Aot, 1894/' to the 
exteol of two milliou pounds, matured on the 19th July, 1904, and has bi^en 
rtdeomed by the Bank, and a new issue of guaranteed stock, representing 
the sum of one millioti pounds sterling, having a carreooy not exceeding ten 
3ear«, has been made in lieu thereof. 

^B Prtftrtnct Skartt. 

"^ The preferred shares, representing £500,000 new capital, issued under the 
authority of "The Bank of New Zealand and Banking Act, 1895," and sub- 
sequently repurchased by the Bank, have been cancelled; aud in lieu thereof 
the Government of New Zeaiaud purchased 75,000 preference laharos of the 
Bank, fully paid, representing £500,000 new capitaL The^e shares rank for 
dividend purposes in priority to ordinary shares to the extent of 5 per cent. 
per annum (noa-oumulative), and for dividends in oxoess of 5 per cent, they 
are entitled to only half the rate payable on ordinary shares; so that where, 
ioi example, the dividend on ths ordinary fbares is at the rate of 6 per cent., 
the dividend on the preference shares will be at the rate of 5) percent. The 
maximum rate of dividend payable on preference shares is 10 per cent., while 
that payable on ordinary shares is not limited. Otherwise the preferenoe shares 
eouler the same righta and privileges as ordinary shares. 

A»9ft8 Bfalisatwti Board. 

The Act empowers the Assets Board, for the purpose of redeeming such of 

debentures as are outstanding at maturity, to issue fresh debentures, having 

eurreooyof five years, for a sum not oxceeiSlng in all the face value of the 

' ~De of the outstanding debt, and bearing interest at a rate not higher than 

B| per cent, per annum. 



■beux 

pKeidi 







403 



KIW 2BALAHD OFriClAL TEAK-BOOK. 



I 



Ti]« properties vested id the AnBoiB Bo&rd afb Io be valued m% appomted 
times, and the actual defloieucy bctweeu such value aod the Amount of out- 
standing debKnturts of the Board ofioertainGd, When it is fnan'i tbat the asxett^ 
of tbe Board are (sufficient to meet its liabiltiieSt the Qovenior majr by Order in 
Council deoiaie that the Board fihall Of^ane to exixt, its properties being b&rided 
over to tbfi Bank« which tb«r0upan im to redeem all tbe outat^cidiog debeot