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Full text of "Nocatula, 1929"




Tennessee Weslepan College 



Athens, Tennessee 



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SPECIAL SENIOR EDITION 



Vol. 10, Mo. 15 



1 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/nocatula19291015tenn 




To the Members of the Graduating Class of 1929: 



Accept my hearty congratulations upon your successful completion of the junior college 
course. I can assure you that this is no mean accomplishment. The very fact that you have reached 
this objective shows that you are possessed of some distinguishing marks of merit. For every one of 
you who is finishing this course there are at least twenty-five or thirty others who entered grade 
school at the time that you did who have fallen by the wayside, so far as their educational program 
is concerned. The fact that you have carried on to the end is no small compliment to your ability 
and to your determination. At the same time, this distinction that is yours carried with it, as do all 
distinctions, added responsibility. The world has a right to expect more of you than ; t does of the 
other twenty-five or thirty to whom I referred. My chief hope for you is mat this expectation will 
not result in disappointment, so far as you are concerned, and that you will continue to press on- 
ward and upward to the large career of which you are capable. 

One thing which we have hoped to impress upon you at Tennessee Wesleyan, and which, I be- 
lieve you have come to recognize, is the fact that the successful life consists in doing successfully every 
task that comes to hand. I trust .that this may be a guiding principle for each of you. My best 
wishes go with you. 

Yours sincerely, 
PRESIDENT JAMES L. ROBB. 




NOCATULA 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor in Chief _ w. D. Johnston 

Literary Editor Chelsea Laws 

Sports Editor Tom Cash 

Assistant Sports Editor Dimples Kirklr.nd 

Alumni Editor Johnson Townley 

Religious Editor J. p. Wyatt 

Faculty Editor M'.ss Gladys Dejournette 

Joke Editor George Hanna 

Staff Artist Mouzon Psters 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager W. D. Johnston 

Circulation Manager Thomas Phillips 



GENERAL STAFF 

Martha Johnson, Kenneth Magee, Mary Noel, Creston Barker, 
Valeria Ogle, and Annabelle Skillern 






HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF '29 



It was spring and all the world was happy. The event 
called for just such a seascn as Spring. The class of '29 at 
old Wesleyan was making its final preparations to say adieu 
to the shaded walks, and whispering trees, and the soon- lo- 
be-silent halls deprived of their laughter and the busy hum 
of students at work. Old Wesleyan had guarded the class oC 
'29 well; some had entered her portals as tiny acorns and 
grown to be mighty oaks that could stand the hardest win- 
ters and severest storms of life. 

But now in the Spring of '29 the time has come when 
friends must part, some to meet again, some maybe never to 
meet again. The last one has gone and as I stand on the 
bottom step in the archway, where I have so many times 
stood and watched the Seniors as they passed in and out the 
campus, I think of what the future holds for my comrades; 
but breaking my reverie I myself take the last step and am 
no longer a student of Tennessee Wesleyan. 

Tempus fugit. A thousand years have elapsed and I, a dis- 
embodied apparition, cannot rest till I 
have found a history which seems to 
have been lost. It is the history of the 
class of '29. After a search over the 
mass of ruins of what was once the 
buildings of the college I was about to 
give up in vain; yet something caused 
me to search on. Day after day I toiled 
on in what seemed to me an endless 
search. The spirit of Professor Fisher 
was laughing sarcastically at my end- 
less search for this bit of truth and I 
was growing weary; my spirit was bent 
and heavily burdened, but I stumbled 
on in hope — over the huge stones and 
masses of bricks and steel. Book after 
book I found do, here was Tom Cash's 
long lost Economics which nearly drove 
him mad way back in the Spring of '29; 
and here was Miss Johnson's cracked 
stove with a bale of hay wire merrily 
defying the efforts of time to render this 
warm-hearted friend of the students 
apart. And here is a record of love's 
coming to life after a winter of hiber- 
nation. It was a balmy Spring, that March of '29. Vally 
should have been more careful. Kemp told her to burn 
his notes. I thought perhaps that this valuable docu- 
ment might have been stolen by Mrs. Hammontree and 
that she had tucked it away in her laboratory. But the day 
was over and my spirit returned ten minutes late for the 
first period class the next morning.refreshed for a hard day's 
search. As the sun was casting its oblique beams on my 
weary back I had nearly given up hope. All day I had been 
searching amidst bones of innumerable dissected frogs, when 
I came to a mass of unclassified bones, fish, frogs, grasshop- 
pers, snakes and other denizens of the biology laboratory. 
This was my last search. I scattered bones helter skelter and 
there was the precious history, the last issue of the Nocatule, 
and now my spirit could rest in quiet contemplation of this 
valuable record. 

The eld North State has contributed its part of the stalwart 
sons of this class. When I read the names of Howard Den- 
nis, Tcm Cash and J. Walden Tysinger, a picture came to me 




MISS JESSIE JOHNSON 
Class Sponsor 



of Howard Dennis whispering chapel announcement in lieu 
of Dean Miller; Tom Cash with a pencil and paper in his 
hand at the basketball games, and Tysinger preaching hell 
out of his congregation of sinners. 

Lo, here is a lone son of Pennsylvania! Roxy dragging his 
heavy heels up to Miss Moffitt's piano to frighten out of it 
one of the immortal compositions of his beloved Chopin. 

The old Dominion state contributed to the class roll, dig- 
nified and studious May Long, who helped Mrs. Stone keep 
her sheep in the fold. 

Yes, and how in the world did Howard Guthrie get way 
up here from Florida? But that's just another of Nature's 
phenomena. Howard and his cornet are always blowing 
around. 

Ha. bright eyes from Alabama flash at me. Shades of Bir- 
mingham envelop me and I grow dizzy in the memory there- 
of. I see Bill as if yesterday, and such a lot of feminine 
loveliness in one personality is hardly believable. 

Windswept Kansas also contributed, 
and we find the ever mischievous Paul 
Terry here before us in black and white. 
Yes, he was playing the villain in "A 
Corner of the Campus". And if I re- 
member rightly he was playing the he- 
ro in another corner of the Campus. 
We think that this little paly will prob- 
ably end in a fade out at Cullman, Ala , 
with Gladys Parker. 

Tennessee as characteristic has vol- 
unteered many of her sons and daugh- 
ters. Here is Chatter Laws on the flag 
head of the issue. Well. I remember 
Chatter and her full lipped smile. She 
could write, talk and was she mischiev- 
ous? — here, Mrs. Cummings, you take 
the witness stand. 

Townley, what can we say about him 
Let us quote his lugubrious roommate. 
"Doc": "Johnson has more ideas than 
anybody I have ever seen. One weeK 
he plays the sax and the next the clari- 
net." His versatility included more than 
dabbling in music. Classes, music, 
plays, literary societies, debating, and Chatter were all in the 
day's work for him. And Doc Phillips, his roommate, always 
found amidst bottles labeled poison, and always doctoring 
somebody for something they didn't have. 

Fred Whitehead and his roommate, Frank Sexton, cannot 
escape the searching eye of the historian. Fred's abil-ty as 
an athlete was only topped by his ability as a student. A; 
a lover we refer you to Jim Lee for he does not love before 
crowds as he plays. Frank, known as "Crip", was noted for 
his intricate discussions in Economics and his attention to 
Doctor Brock's daughter. 

The Jenkins's "Sweeney" and his uncle, Hicks, also roomies. 
Hicks felt like he owned the place by right of the Hcmescea \ 
Laws; if he had just stayed another year Dean would have 
given him the deed. Sweeney was the boy who was a mem- 
ber of everything. Literary society member, chemistry stu- 
dent, cum laude. hash slinger at "Mack's" and one of these 
mysterious Pi Phi Pi's who never met before 11 o'clock. 
(Continued on Page 25) 




STUDENT COUNCIL 

Johnson Townley President 

Gladys Parker Vice-President 

Chelsea Laws Secretary 

W . D. Johnston Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Jessie Kelly Beulah Clayton 

Paul Terry J. P. Wyatt 

rmily Johnson Sue Beth Dennis 

Manson Green Charles Dye 

Leila Winecoft Myrtle Patterson 
J. Walden Tysinger 




SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY 



The Oriental Skies! Far-famed and far-sung; over-reach- 
ing every poet land of mystery and drama. Heeding its woo- 
ing whisper we are enabled to learn a little of the infinite and 
to solve a little the secrets which the blue depths well know 
but have heretofore pitingly withheld. We leave the prac- 
tical world behind, while our imaginations wing themselves 
on languid, listless winds which know not cloud nor storm 
save as recollection past. 

Just a year ago, in the good year nineteen hundred thirty- 
nine, we chanced to be in Chinese waters. (The purpose of 
the trip is being withheld as it has not reached its fullest de - 
velopment yet). A curious experience was experienced here, 
one might say, which will be set down here at no short 
length. On the wharf at Shanghai we saw an old man - 
he seemed old — sitting and talking and smoking. His small 
beady eyes seemed familiar, and as we could readily see 
that he was not an Oriental, we inquired. He was, we dis- 
covered in the process of our question- 
ing, Tom Cash. He sat on the wharf 
for hours at a time smoking his pipe 
and expounding Epicurus et cetera to 
the wharf workers and the coolies. The 
sight of him bruoght back memories to 
us of our class of twenty-nine at Wes- 
leyan. We fell to making conjectures 
as to what the other members of the 
class were doing. While in this frame 
of mind, we were led to an ale house, 
where, coming into contact with the 
baleful influence of opium fumes et 
cetera, one member of the group fell in- 
to a stupor — no, he didn't get drunk — 
and had a nightmare — what else could 
it have been? — and the whereabouts oi 
every member of the twenty-nine class 
were revealed to him. The ones whim 
he remembered will be set down here 
to satisfy the curiosity of other mem- 
bers cf the class. We have it as fol- 
lows : 

Johnson Townley, when sober, acts 
in official capacity as director of the 
Townley School of Dramatics. He is 
author also of several popular songs. Lee Elbridge Rothrook 
writes the music. Among them, the most recent is, "I don't 
knew who kissed you first, but I've kissed you last." Roth- 
rock teaches music and typing in some high school. 

Among those who are educating themselves off the rising 
generation (of course they're teachers) are Eula Barker; 
Pansy Thomas; Beulah Clayton who teaches dancing; Jessie 
Kelley; Prank Sexton, who married a school madam and 
thus get himself involved in the profession; Young Querry, 
who teaches Chemistry; Creed Mantooth, who teaches Span- 
ish to the ninos de Espana; Catherine Walker, who teaches 
Art; Latham, who is the county superintendent of public 
instruction somewhere; and Frank Perry, who is principal of 
a colored school in southern Alabama. 

May Long and Annabelle Skillern (People may talk about 
the Prince of Wales but it cannot be denied that we have 




PRESIDENT JAMES L. ROBB. 
Tennessee Wesleyan College 



the Princess of Whale, I mean Wales.) have gone into busi- 
ness for themselves. They pose for before and after pictures 
for a reducing tonic. 

After Marie Rogers and Catherine Lane got into opera a 
year or two ago, New York closed its opera houses to pro- 
tect the public. Who blames them? Marie is now singing 
Dutch operas in Siberia; Catherine is singing Italian operas 
in Argentina. 

Myrtle Patterson is on the Pacific Coast waiting for ships 
which seem never to come in. But occasionally they do come 
in; then "Glory be, she makes whoopee!" 

Howard Dennis is directing a glee club in some university. 
He says that he only needs twenty-five or nineteen good 
tenors and twenty-seven or ten good basses to have a good 
club. 

Lura Cook recently lost a match in 
tennis to the contender for the cham- 
pionship. Did she feel like thirty cents? 
Absolutely not! She couldn't possibly 
feel like less than sixty cents! 

Rat Ray is a tailor. Yes. you're right! 
He makes clothing. 

Ghormley and Tysinger are serving 
their ideals in the Church. Ghormley 
fills an excellent pastorate. He fills the 
door, too when he passes through, and 
he fills a rather large body when he 
feeds his face. Tysinger is another 
chicken-eating preacher. 

Hicks Jenkins has been in the state 
penitentiary for a year. Oh, no! What 
a cruel thought! He isn't a prisone<\ 
He is the chaplain. He likes to visit 
his nephew, Eugene, who is a tooth me- 
chanic. Eugene pulls a mean molar — 
if one allows him to do so. 

Ruby Bailey is following in the foot- 
steps of Aimee Semple McPherson. 
Rather broad steps they are, but then 
Ruby has rather large abilities. 
Fuzzy Green tried a season as Clown 
with Ringling Bros., but failed and has gone into a less re- 
sponsible position — football coaching. 

Whitehead started to take the examination for the Rhodes 
Scholarship, but when he asked to see Mr. Rhodes, he was 
dismissed as incompetent. He says that he is going to get 
tiiat scholarship if he has to go see Mr. Rhodes personally. 
When he does that he will be wearing feathered attachments 
to his shoulders or asbestos trousers. 

Wilsie Wilder is married — this prophecy includes two se- 
niors — and he stays out late at night — running a moving pic- 
ture projector. 

Lucille Keys awaits anxiously the close of every baseball 
season. Her man plays with St. Louis, in which village they 
live. 

Katie Peterson discovered the trigonometric functions of r 
mousetrap and now lives off the fat of the land. No, she 
didn't marry a butcher. She patented a mouse-trap with a 
self loader, an automatic ejector, and balloon tires. 
(Continued on Page 29) 




THE QUILL DRIVERS 

HONOR LITERARY SOCIETY 

Chelsea Laws President 

Johnson Townley Vice-President 

Mouzon Peters Secretary-Treasurer 

Miss Gladys Dejournette - Sponsor 

MEMBERS 

W. D. Johnston J. F. Wyatt 

Dimples Kirkland Ruby Bailey 

Thomas Cash Merle Asheworth 
Annabelle Skillern 






SENIOR CLASS WILL 



We, the Senior Class of Tennessee Wesleyan College, being 
of sound mind and desiring to dispose of all our properly, 
both real and personal, do hereby bequeath unto the Faculty 
and Students of Tennessee Wesleyan College, the following 

1. We leave unto the class of '30 our athletic ability and 
school spirit, trusting that they will ever hold the ideals of 
true sportsmanship foremost in their minds. 

2. Unto the class of '31 we bequeath our desire for the 
pursuance of higher learning. 

3. Unto the Faculty we express our sincere sympathy for 
their untiring efforts to lead us in the ways of righteousness. 

4. To the student body we bestow the privilege of having 
as good a time as possible. 

5. Yula Barker leaves all of her lipstick, powder, rouge 
and all other cosmetics for Ruth Crawford to use next year. 

6. Clyde Love leaves unto John Thompson his sheiking 
mannerisms, and unto Charles Dye, he leaves the task of 
continuing his harmonica harmonies. 

7. Annabelle Skillern leaves her superfluous flesh to Elsie 
McGlothin. 

8. Tom Cash very graciously bequeaths his stoicism or in- 
difference to Mrs. Cummings. 

9. Ruby Bailey leaves her loud ways to 
Addie Lou Norwood. 

10. Doc Phillips leaves to the physi- 
cians of Athens, his large pactice of medi- 
cine. 

11. Gladys Parker leaves her innocence 
to Joe Lynch. 

12. Fred Whitehead leaves his captain- 
ships to Charles Weaver. 

13. Valeria Ogle gives her grouchiness 
to Mrs. Collins and hopes that she will use 
it to the best advantage. 

14. Howard Dennis gives his knowledge 
as a barber to the most promising Junior 

15. Beulah Clayton leaves her position 
as monitor to Kay Jones, and hopes that 
she will succeed in collecting as many 
bribes from the boys as she has this year. 

16. Sweeny Jenkins bequeaths his aspirations as a den- 
tist to Kemp Harris. 

17. Mary Lena Daves gives her highest regards to Pro'. 
Douglass. 

13. Rupert Chormley wills his interest in the Wesleyan 
Brotherhood to Ray Slagle. 

19. Lucille Keys gives her extensive library to Jennie Lee 
Wagner. 

20. Paul Terry leaves to Red Ketron his knowledge of 
practical pranks and hopes he will carry them out very suc- 
cessfully. 

21. Lura Cook bestows her idiosyncrasies upon Thelma 
Miller. 

22. J. Walden Tysinger wills to Red Parrott his love for the 
human race. 

23. Bill Johnson leaves all of her English work to Alia 
Hawk. 

24. Paul and Creed Mantooth give unto Robert Brown 
their "Philosophies of Life." 

25. Jessie Kelley leaves unto Lawrence Floyd her A-Plus- 
es; he may need them. 




BENNETT HALL 



26. Mouzon Peters offers his love to Merle Ashworth to 
tide her through next year. 

27. Catherine Lane bestows upon Charlie Mehaffey her 
deepest affections. 

23. Hicks Jenkins leaves to Frank Rollins his complete 
"History of Tennessee Wesleyan." 

29. Katie Peterson wills her quiet and dignified manner 
to Cecil Cox. 

30. Frank Perry leaves his deepest sympathy to the chap- 
erons. 

31. May Long very gladly gives her position as assistant 
matron to anyone desiring it. 

32. Ycung Querry wills his Spanish note book to the first 
student who feels that he will need it. 

33. Imogene Carr leaves her musical abilities to Gladys 
Johnson. 

34. Margery Ledford leaves her disposition to Marjorie 
Miller. 

35. Wilsie Wilder gives Bill Johnson to any student who 
will take her for next year. 

36. Manson Green leaves his fine school spirit to the stu- 

dents at large. 

37. Pansy Thomas leaves her permanent 
wave to Wilma Baker. 

38. Marie Rogers wills her vampish 
characteristics to Alice Wieghe. 

39. Edith Cox leaves a bottle of per- 
oxide to Edna Babb. 

40. George Hanna leaves his position 
as joke editor to some unlucky student. 

41. Myrtle Patterson wills her ways to 
giving advice to Tom Winecoft and asks 
that she look out for Merle next year. 

42. Roxy bestows his remarkable talent 
for playing Mozart, Chopin, Beethoven 
upon Leavitt Little. 

43. Bonnie Williams gives her best re- 
gards to the ' Zoo." 

44. Ralph Smith wills his good looks to 
Smith. 
Katherine Walker leaves her parking space in front 



"Pal' 
45. 

of Bennett to Coach Eaynes. 

46. — Howard Guthrie gives his stubbornness to W. D. 
Johnston. 

47. Dorthy Ellictt wills her voice to Dora Freeman. 
43. Rathburn Ray bequeaths his dignified ways to Presi- 
dent Robb. 

49. Chelsea Laws gives unto Rachel Wade her literary 
abilities. 

50. Frank Sexton gives his love mania to Joe Jones for 
next year. 

51. Johnscn Townley leaves all of his troubles as Presi- 
dent of Etudent Council to anyone who has the time to de- 
vote to them. 

We. the Senior Class of Tennessee Wesleyan College, do 
hereby declare this to be our last will and testament. 



Signed: 



EVELYN STONE. 




ATHENIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



W. D. JOHNSTON 

Fall Term 



PRESIDENTS 

THOMPSON WEESE 
Winter Term 
COACH W. D. HAYNES, Sponsor 



H. L. DAVIS 
Spring Term 



SAPPHONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



PRESIDENTS 

EMILY JOHNSON ■ VIRGINIA MAE IMMEL 

Pall and Winter Terms Spring Term 

MISS GLADYS DEJOURNETTE, Sponsor 






SENIORS OF 1929 



9 • 



We know the time is almost here, 
When we must leave old Wesleyan dear. 
We feel that folks won't have to guess, 
Tc know our class is a success. 



V/e like to think we've been the best. 
And what we've done will stand the test, 
We've tried a helping hand to lend, 
And hope cur work will never end. 



They'll say the class of twenty-nine. 
Has been a class with record fine. 
At every task we've set right in, 
And we have always tried to win. 



We've tried to let ambition lead, 

So some day we may each succeed. 

We have not dreamed away each day, 

We grasped each chance that came our way 



We've tackled Math, and French class, too. 
The hardest tasks we've tried to do. 
But with our work we've had some fun, 
There's been a place for everyone. 



We now stand on the great divide. 
Looking on the other side, 
Great honors we hope we may gain, 
Out there in the world of fame. 



We've met our teachers with a smile, 
And they have helped us o'er each mile, 
We've been so glad they would hlep us. 
That we have tried to never fuss. 



Time now comes swiftly rushing by, 
And with our standards very high, 
We plunge headlong into the strife, 
And hope to make the best of life. 



The world to us is beckoning, 
And at the time of reckoning, 
We hope that we may lead the line, 
This dear old class of twenty-nine. 

JOHNSON SMITH TOWNLEY. 

9 




CLASS OFFICERS 



FRED WHITEHEAD "Fred". 

Walland, Tennessee. 

Ambition: To give the world the best I have. 

Honors: President P. L. S. '28, President Senior Class '29, Captain Football '28, 
Captain Basketball '29, Baseball '27-'28-'29, Valedictorian Senior Class. 

VALERIA ALICE OGLE "Vally", 

Knoxville, Tennessee. 

Ambition: To become Mrs. William K. Harris, Jr. 

Honors: Gamma Gamma, K. L. S. '28-'29, Y. W. '28. J. R's '28, Student Council 

'28, Nocatula Staff '29, Glee Club '28- '29. 

MOUZON B. PETERS "Mooson", 

Burrville. Tennessee. 

Ambition : To find out why I am alive, and to justify myself in staying alive. 

Honors: P. L. S. '28-'29, President Debating Club '29. 

ERNEST DAVIS "Ernie". 

Rogersville, Tennessee. 

Ambition: Overcome difficulties. 

Honors: P. L. S. '23-'29, Basketball '29, Y. M., Class Treasurer. 

BEULAH CLAYTON "Topsy", 

Baxter, Tennessee. 

Ambition: Best English teacher out. 

Honors: K. L. S. '27-'23-'29, Debating Club '27-'2S-'29, Student Council '28, Sigma 

Tau Sigma, President Y. W. '28-'29. 

PAUL TERRY "Dutch", 

Athens. Tennessee 

Ambition: Discover the whichness of what — Senior Class Play. 

Honors: P. L. S. '29. Male Quartet '29, Student Council '29, Y. M., Glee Club '29. 

Director Senior Class '29. 

EMILY FRANCES JOHNSON "Bill", 

Birmingham, Alabama. 

AmDition: To surprise the family by making something of myself. 

Honors: President Gamma Gamma '29, President S. L. S. '28- '29, Y. W. C. A. '27- 

'28-'29, Student Council '29. Director Senior Class '29, Nocatula Staff '29. 

WILSIE ELIHU WILDER "Buck", 
Jellico, Tennessee. 

Ambition: To be president of the United States. 

Honors: President P. L. S. "27, Football '27-'23-'29, Manager Basketball '29, Stu- 
dent Council '27-'28, Pres ; dent Debating Club '28, Director Senior Class '29, P. L. 
S. '28-'29, Glee Club '23, Y. M. '27-'23-'29, Senior Class Play, Nocatula Staff '29. 



c-^T ENNESSEE WESLEYAN 




ATHENS, TENNESSE E„^ 





RUBY MAY BAILEY "Bobo", 
Wadley, Alabama. 

Ambition: To serve humanity by speaking and living what I preach. 
Honors: Y. W., K. L. S. Chaplain, Second prize Patten Oratorical Contest 1928, 
president of Wesleyan Service Club '29, Debating Club, Sec. Oratorical Associa- 
tion, Beau-not Club, member of Quill Driver. 

EULA ELLEN BARKER "Little Barker", 

Haleyville, Alabama. 

Ambition: To be a kindergarten teacher. 

Honors: K. L. S. '29, Y. W. '29, Wesleyan Service Club '29, Music Club '29. 



TOM CASH "Tom", 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 

Ambition: To have a good home, good wife, good books, good wine, good job. 

Honors: P. L. S. '29, Quill Driver '29, Football '29, Nocatula Staff '29. 

IMOGENE CARR "Gene", 

Harriman, Tennessee. 

Ambition: Superintendent of a Hospital. 

Honors: K. L. S. '29, Beau-Knot Club '29, Glee Club 1928, MofLtt Club '23-'23 



EDITH COX ' Egypt", 

Baileyton, Tennessee. 

Ambition: Musician. 

Honors: K. L. S., Sigma Tau Sigma, Basket Ball Squad of 1029. 

LTJRA COOK "Cookie", 

Epworth, Georgia. 

Ambition: To be a doctor. 

Honors: K. L. S. '29, Reporter to Nocatula '23, W. W. '29. Basket Ball '28-'29, 

W. '29. 



MARY LENA DAVES "Linkus", 

Crossville, Tennessee. 

Ambition: To be Home Economics teacher. 

Honors: Y. W. '28-'29, Debating Club '27-'29, K. L. S. '27- '29, Sigma Tiu Si^ma. 

J. HOWARD DENNIS "Big Boy", 

Statesville, North Carolina. 

Ambition: To serve fellow beings. 

Honors: President Junior Class '28, Male Quartet '27-'28-'29, Gl=2 Cub '23-'2'> 

Y. M. '28-'29. P. L. S. '27-'28-'29, Senior Class Play '29. 



<\.T ENNESSEE WESLEYAN 




ATHENS, TENNESSEE,^ 




DOROTHY MAE ELLIOTT "Dot", 

Tacoma, Washington. 

Ambition: To make the most of life. 

Honors: Y. W.. '29. Moffitt Music Club. '29, Wesleyan Service Club. Girls' Glee 

Club '29, K. L. S.. Sigma Tau Sigma '29. 



MANSON GREEN "Fuzzy". 
Ambition: To be a pill roller. 
Honors: Football '23, A. L. S., Representative Student Council '29, Senior Play. 

J. HOWARD GUTHRIE "Jay". 

Tarpon Springs. Florida. 

Ambition: Make A under Prof. Douglas. 

Honors: Y. M. C. A.. Wesleyan Quartet '29, Glee Club '28-'29, Phi Pi Phi, President 

P. O. W. '23, Mus'c Club '29. 

RUPERT R. GHORMLEY "Gorm". 

Athens, Tennessee. 

Honors: Weslevan Brotherhood 1928-'29. member of P. L. S. 



EUGENE JENKINS "Sweeny". 
Knoxville Tennessee. 
Ambiticn: To be a dentist. 

Honors: Glee Club '28-'29, Y. M. '29, Basketball '28-'29, Philo '29. Debating Club 
'29. Phi Pi Phi '29, Orchestra '28-'29, Music Club '29, Senior Class Play '29, Stu- 
dent Council '28. 

HICKS LAFAYETTE JENKINS "Jiggs". 

Knoxville, Tennessee. 

Ambition: To serve God through serving the public. 

Honors: P. L. S. '27-'28-'29, Y. W. '29. Student Council '27. 



JULIA RUTH JORDAN "Aunt Matilda", 
Ambition: To be a successful teacher. 



3ARA LUCILE KEYS "Cille". 

Jonesboro. Tennessee. 

Ambition :To be a novelist. 

Honors: K. L. S. '28-'29, Sigma Tau Sigma '2e-'22, Student Council '29, Music Clui 

'29, Y. W. '28-'29. 



rx.T ENNESSEE WESLEYAN 




S ATHENS, TENNESSE E.,^ 





JESSIE KELLEY "Jessie Bill". 

Etowah, Tennessee. 

Ambition: First woman president. 

Honors: Student Council '29, K. L. S. '29, Glee Club '29. Wesleyan Service '29. 

CATHERINE S. LANE "Kitty", 
Greeneville. Tennessee. 

Ambition: To live so that I will not have to be asked whether I am a Christian 
or not. 

Honors: Y. W. '28-'29, Wesleyan Service Club '29, Glee Club '28-'29. Girls" Quar- 
tet '28-'29, Music Club '28-'29, President Beau-Not Club '29, K. L. S. '28-'29. 

WILLIAM T. LATHAM "Red", 
Athens, Tennessee. 
Ambition: Big Time Policeman. 
Honors: Football '27-'28, P. L. S. 

CHELSEA LAWS "Chatter". 
Johnson City. Tennessee. 
■ Ambition: To be a novelist. 

Honors: President K. L. S. '29. Student Council '29, Nocatula Staff '29, President 
Quill Drivers, Music Club '29. Senior Class Play '29. 



MARGERY LEDFORD "Majority", 

Athens, Tennessee. 

Ambition: To be a great writer. 

Honors: Y. W., S. L. S. '28-'29. Oratorical Association. 

NETTIE MAE LONG "Nettie", 

Blacksburg, Virginia. 

Ambition: To be a college Engl ; sh teacher. 

Honors: K. L. S. '28-'29, Sponsor Sigma Tau Sigma '29, Wesleyan Service Clin 

'29. 

GLADYS GERTRUDE PARKER "Parker", 

Cullman, Alabama. 

Ambition: To find out what it is all about. 

Honors: K. L. S. '28-'29, Y. W. '29, Student Council '28-'29, Senior Class Play. 

MYRTLE L. PATTERSON "Mut", 

Spring City. Tennessee. 

Ambition: French instructor. 

Honors: S. L. S. '27-'28-'29, Sigma Tau Sigma '27-'2S. Student Council '23- '29, 

Y. W. 



<-v.T ENNESSEE WESLEYAN 




ATHENS, TENNESSE E„^ 




J. FRANK PERRY "Perry", 

Athens, Tennessee. 

Ambition: Success must come. 

Honors: P. L. S., Glee Club '28-'29, Y. M. '29. 



KATIE JANE PETERSON "Petie". 

Crossville, Tennessee. 

Ambition: College English professor. 

Honors: K. L. S. '29, Y. W., Sigma Tau Sigma. Salutatorian of Senior Class. 



THOMAS TYLER PHILLIPS "Doc", 

Rockwood. Tennessee. 

Ambition: To be a quack. 

Honors: A. L. S„ Petty-Manker doctor '29. Y. M., Nocatula Staff '29. 



YOUNG QUERRY "Querry". 
Copperhill. Tennessee. 
Ambition: Chemical Engineer. 
Honors: Y. M., A. L. S. '28-'29. 



RATHBURN A. RAY "Ray", 

Athens. Tennessee. 

Ambition: To do the impossible. 

Honors: A. L. S.. Y. M. C. A., Student Council '27-'28, Glee Club '28-'29, Rep. A. 

L. S.. Bayless Prize Debate '28. 



MARIE ROGERS "Ree". 

Ambition: Teach Home Economics. 

Honors: W. W. Club, S. L. S., Glee Club, Y. W. 



ROXY ROTHROCK "Roxy". 

Williamsport, Pennsylvania. 

Ambition: Musical comedy star. 

Honors: President Music Club, Assistant Director Music, Glee Club pianist '27- 

'28-'29. A. L. S. '27. 



FRANK C. SEXTON "Crip". 
Etowah, Tennessee. 

Ambition: To be of service to everyone. 
Honors: Y. M.. Football '28. 



cx.T ENNESSEE WESLEYAN lift 




ATHENS, TENNESSE E„^ 




seniors 




ANNABELLE LEE SKILLERN "Nance", 

Soddy. Tennessee. 

Ambition: To be an editor. 

Honors: S. L. S. '28-'29, Y. W. '28- '29, Quill Driver '28-'29. 



RALPH SMITH "Snipe", 
Stanford, Tennessee. 
Ambition : Engineer. 
Honors: A. L. S., S. O. T. 



EVELYN STONE "Evalina", 

Etowah. Tennessee. 

Honors: K. L. S. '28-'29, Music Club '28, Prize for Most Improvement in English 

'28, Prize for Interest and Improvement in Music '28, Y. W. '28. 

AUGUSTA PANSY THOMAS "Shorty", 

Daisy. Tennessee. 

Ambition: Artist. 

Honors: S. L. S. '28-'29, President W. W. Club '28, Glee Club '29. 

JOHNSON SMITH TOWNLEY "Johnson"; 

Knoxville. Tennessee. 

Ambition: President of the United States. 

Honors: Cheer Leader '28-'29. Quill Driver '28-'29, Debating Club '28-'29, President 

P. L. S. '29. Glee Club '28-'29, President Student Council '29, Phi Pi Phi, Nocatula 

Staff '29, Y. M. '28, Senior Class Play. 



J. WALDEN TYSINGER "Ty", 

Lexington, North Carolina. 

Ambition: Best minister possible. 

Honors: Wesleyan Brotherhood, Y. M., Student Council, Oratorical Club. 

CATHERINE WALKER "Cat". 
Athens. Tennessee. 
Ambition: To be a sculptor. 
Honors: S. L. S. '29. 



BONNIE MAE WILLIAMS "Bow" 

Etowah, Tennessee. 

Ambition: To be a good housewife. 



o^T ENNESSEE WESLEYAN 




ATHENS, TENNESSE E„^ 




FOOTBALL REVIEW 

@ 

Outside of one basketball game and one or two football 
games the Wesleyan students have nothing to be ashamed 
of in the way of athletics. 

When a team is beaten by a superior team there is nothing 
to be ashamed of but when an inferior team humbles it, then. 
there is something to regret. 

Looking back over the football season we find that the 
team won five and lost four games. They started out like 
a house afire when they took the game from Maryville Col- 
lege, a team with a superior rating, by a score of 13 to 6. 

As the season progressed the team had its ups and downs 
One Saturday it would look like a team of well trained col- 
legians and then it would play the game of a country high 
school. 

The two games that the Coach and team regretted were the 
King game and the Bryson game. The King game went 
fourteen to 6 and the Bryson game 24 and 6. These games 
went to teams which football experts judged inferior to Wes- 
leyan — therefore the blot on the Escutcheon. 

The two games which the Wesleyan students have the 
right to be most proud of were the Union game which they 
took by a score of 46 to 0, and the showing against U. T. 
Frosh. Although the Frosh game was dropped by a score of 
34 to 0, it was a good game from the Wesleyan stand- 
point. The Frosh had their best team in years. They had 
the Wesleyan eleven outweighed much. They had reserve 
material galore — and they used all of these advantages. 
Six of the Wesleyan players were carried off the field and 
when the game ended few Wesleyan regulars were in the 
lineup. 

Scoring for the nine games give Wesleyan a composite- 
score of 216 and her opponents 118. 



ATHLETICS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

9 

Athletics are popularly thought of as a barrier to good 
scholarship and it is always a subject of front page interest 
when a great athlete takes a Rhodes Scholarship or some 
similar scholarship recognition. 

The public in general thinks of athlet s as students who 
have perfectly marvelous muscles but whose grades read 
like the thermometer of a polar expedition. 

The athletes of the graduating class this year thoroughly 
disprove that athletics are a bar to good scholarship. The 
valedictorian of the class has had an athletic career running 
fcur years back. He has captained two teams this year and 
has always participated in athletics the year round, taking 
part .n baseball, basketball and football. 

Of the ether men of major athletic standing who are grad- 
uating three are rated by the faculty and fellow students as 
excellent students and the remainder as students of more 
than the average ability and industry. 

In this group it would seem that athletics stimulated the 
mind. 



ATHLETIC CUP 



Many Wesleyan Seniors have never noticed the Athletic 
Cup which sets in Mr. Currier's office. This is practically the 
enly athletic award given at Wesleyan and deserves mention. 

This cup was proposed six years ago by Messrs. Roberts and 
Blair and was given by them to the school. They proposed 
that each year the names of students most valuable to the 
team, selected by the squad, should be engraved on the cup. 
This year the name of Roy Walden was engraved under those 
cf Joe Durham, Bullets Boyer, Bud Strange, Here Alley and 
Rube McCray. 

Two graduating players this year have played with ail 
these men. Thev are Wilsie Wilder and Fred Whitehead. 



L6 




GIRLS IN ATHLETICS 

@ 

They are tanned in the face by the shining suns and blow- 
ing winds. 

Their flesh has the old divine suppleness and strength. 

They know hew to swim, to row, to ride, wrestle, shooi„ 
run. strike, retreat, advance, resist, defend themselves. 

They are ultimate in their own right, they are calm, clear, 
well posed of themselves. 

It was many years ago when the poet Whitman wrote those 
words but this graduating class of Tennessee Wesleyan and 
the future graduating classes are seeuig and will see it corns 
true. It was of the girls he was speaking. 

We were looking thru the "Exponent" issues of the nineties 
just the other day and lo and behold here was a specimen of 
the discreet, shy, but somewhat gay (it is toldi nineties. 
Her dress, her expression and everything about her qualified 
her for a spectator in the athletic contests of her day. 

Not so today. The girls of Tennessee Wesleyan although 
they were treated somewhat as a side issue, provided with 
only one activity and clothed in antiquated uniforms came 
out about fifteen strong for basketball and rivaled the bo\s 
in ability and activity. More power to the girls. Here's 
hoping that some day they will have tennis teams, hockev 
teams, swimming teams, coaches and equipment, and that 
the Walt Whitman prophecy will be even truer than it is to- 
day. 



GRADUATING ATHLETES 

When the thump of the pigskin and the thud thud of the 
basketball is first heard next year no two of the graduating 
Wesleyan athletes will find themselves trying out for the 
same team, for the six graduating letter men are dispersing 
to all points cf the collegiate globe. 

Fred Whitehead, the only four letter man in the group will 
st-11 be competing for the big W. But this time it will be a 
W of another color. It seems that old John when he passed 
thru this section of the country also founded colleges in Ken- 
tucky and Ohio. It is at Kentucky Wesleyan where Fred will 
betake his lumbering frame and his Olympic manner. 



Howard Guthrie, letter man in two sports, baseball and 
basketball will follow John's trail out to Ohio and try hit, 
batting eye at Ohio Wesleyan. 

Sweeney Jenkins, who earned his yellow W as a member of 
this year's only thrice defeated basketball team, doesn't 
want to get too far from home. He will go to U. T. 

Wilsie Wilder, for three years tackle, seems to be having: 
a hard time making up his mind (he's probably waiting for 
Bill to make up hers) where he will finally betake his athlet- 
ic form and argumentative mind. He has Mercer University 
in mind right now. 

Fuzzy Green, the smallest man in the Wesleyan back- 
field, will go back on his Alma Mater. Alabama, and try his 
luck at Auburn. 

Red Latham, who matched Wilsie Wilder at tackle, savs 
that he will forsake the athletic field and locker room and 
take on professorial habits at the beginning of the next 
school year. He will try his hand at school teaching. 



TENNIS AND BASEBALL 

@ 

Tennis is a coming Sport at Wesleyan. Besides the vari- 
ous amateurs who play for well deserved pleasure in front of 
Petty every evening. Wesleyan supported a tennis team which 
need not look askance from anyone. 

The team composed of Jerry Vestal, John Thomas, Raul 
Leon, Kyle Haynes and Howard Guthrie, up to date has 
played four matches. 

In the match with Hiwassee College, the first of the sea- 
son, they swept the docket clean, taking every match. Mary- 
ville College fell before them 5 to 2. They dropped matches 
to U. of Chattanooga and Baylor. 

While the college supports no official baseball team, thru 
the efforts of Coach Haynes the boys have banded themselves 
together into a nine which has won four and lost one game. 

A tattered looking bunch they were with uniforms of every- 
body from the Chattanooga Lookouts, to uniforms which 
have no right to be called uniforms, but nevertheless they 
pounded the old pill all over the field. 

Probably with the showing that nine men can make with 
no effort at school sponsorship, the school will see fit to put 
out a baseball team in the future. 



17 




BASKETBALL 

By far the most successful team on the campus this year 
was the basketball team captained by Fred Whitehead. 
A representative lineup of this team which won thirteen 
games and lost only three would be: 

Hanna (F) ; Vestal (F); Whitehead <C>; Walker (G.i; 
Posey (Gi. 

Substitutes for Wesleyan: Fulkerson <G>. Jenkins (F), 
Davis (F), Ragan (C), Walker, Guthrie, (F). 

This team started out in a manner which made the stu- 
dents heave a big sigh and say: ' We won't get to cheer mucii 
this winter," but after dropping games to Birmingham South- 
ern and U. T„ both four year colleges, they went to the finals 
in the Southern Junior College Tournament at Asheville 
without suffering a defeat. 

The play cf the team was characterized by a fast, clean 
dribbling and passing attack and a close five man defence 
This method of play made them almost unbeatable. George 
Hanna always led the floor offense and the ball usually 
landed in the basket from the hands of Whitehead or Vestal 
to whem he fed the ball. 

The last home game was the best game played in the Wes- 
leyan gym last winter. In this game the Bulldogs won from 
the Kncxville Y, 37 to 11. Knoxville was rated as a mighty 
geed independent team. 

The true metal of the team was tested on the trip which 
ended up the scheduled season. Wesleyan was slated to lose 
at least two out of three of the trip games and she came 
thru winning them all. The last game at Sue Bennet was the 
clcsest of the season, the Bulldogs taking it in the last min- 
ute of play by a field goal which put them one point in the 
lead. 

At the tournament in Asheville. the Asheville Citizen gave 
them an equal rating with any team there. They won their 
preliminary games by large scores and only lost by five 
points to Bluefield College, of Bluefield. West Virginia. 
And next year is coming. 



SPORT COMMENTS 

® 



The Sports Editor has suffered thru this year, making nary 
a comment on the subject of sports in general and as he is 



now singing his swan song as a contributor to the columns of 
the noble Nocatula he is going to give the subscribers of 
this sheet a few of his mental verdicts on the subject of 
sports and sport editors w.fchout extra charge. 

College sports have suffered some very justifiable criticism 
from the academicians in the past few years because of 
the tendency of sports to usurp the first page in college 
newspapers, relegating such things as literary societies, schol- 
arship societies, dramatics, etc., to positions under ten point 
headlines and on the pages where advertising predominates. 
Commercialism has also been leading these hounds of re- 
form a merry chase as has the tendency of the coaches to 
dictate the policy of the school. One Chinese American stu- 
dent described the American College as an athletic institu- 
tion where certain of the more feeble were afforded an oppor- 
tunity for study. 

Our institution is more cr le;s free of all these so called 
evils. Inevitably so because it is not heavily enough en- 
dowed to be commercial and because denominational sm is 
so prevalent that any other icrce must lift its head with fear 
and trembling for it will sure get it knocked down again. 

The trouble in cur school is not too much athletics, but too 
little athletics. By this we mean that the athletics of trie 
school is carried on by too few people. 

Although the modern youth is much touted for his strength 
of body and freedom of spirit, it remains that the average 
boy is constitutionally averse to physical exercise and that 
the average college graduate has a physical development 
which makes him unfit for a hundred yard dash and common 
house labor. 

This may be the fault of the modern trend of college 
thought — that mind is more important than the body— or 
the modem methods of operation, which is such in the large 
college that none but the exceptinoal can stand the commsr- 
cialized competition and in the smaller colleges that so lit- 
tle equipment is offered and so little variety of sports that, 
it is soon taken up by the select few. 

As we see it this should be combated in two ways — tif it 
should be combated at all and if we are right in our premiss ' 
— first the college student should be taught the value of 
physical perfection, not merely from a utilitarian standpoint, 
for it is the mind that earns the living in this age, but from 



IS 




GAMMA GAMMA 

Emily Johnson President 

Virginia Mae Immel - Sec. -Treasurer 

Valeria Ogle Reporter 



an esthetic standpoint, and from the standpoint of the per- 
sonal satisfaction that a perfect physique can give. Here- 
tofore this has been done in a negative way. We have been 
told what not to do and we have been given synthetic meth- 
ods of getting our play and exercise but there has been lit- 
tle positive effort to instil a love of the body in the minds oi 
the students of the country. 

Second there should be a positive effort to minimize the 
importance of the varsity athletics and make athletics a 
subjective rather than an objective concern and to give every 
student in the school the chance to participate in the games 
he prefers without having to compete with athletic students. 

If it is deemed so very important by the school auhorities 
that the athletes should have mental training we see no 
reason why it should not be just as important that the av- 
erage student should not have athletic training. Certain sub- 
jects are required of all the students and we cannot see the 
great difference in the intrinsic value between them and ath- 
letics. The athletic temperament is a classic quality and 
should be encouraged. 



SPORTS DISCUSSION 

• 

We have listened to many dormitory bull sessions as to 

the relative value of the different sports which are played in 
college. The discussion has usually been confined to the 
three major sports, basketball, football and baseball. The 
three major sports are mainly for the boys of athletic body 
and temperament and should be treated as such — the inter- 
est of the majority of students in them is the interest 
of the spectator. 

From the point of view of the player probably football is 
the more value, for in it one gets the combination of 
track, wrestling, boxing, and basketball. It is physical de- 



velopment and the enormous crowds seem to testify that 
this is the more popular from the spectators' point of vie>v 
— we beg to differ we think that basketball is the tenser of 
the two games. Football has all the thrill of machine like 
teamwork, the thrill cf clever running and hard tackles but 
it is a game played in stops and gees and it is a game played 
in heavy pads. B?.si:ettall is a game which requires as 
much stamina. It is a game which is played with the barest 
of uniform. The pretty play cf the muscled arm is in plain 
view. It is a game played much faster than football and a 
game taking a much quicker eye and a clearer head than 
football. The eye of the spectator can never be relaxed. 
The team work is more evident and prettier. A one man 
basketball team is far less possible than a one man footbpil 
team. Baseball, we think is precluded from the race because 
of its professional aspect and because of the slowness of 
game allows inattent'en. 

From the standpoint of the student who wants a good so- 
cial game and a body builder at the same time we think that 
both tennis and golf are far superior to the major sports. 

When a football player graduates from college the chances 
are that he will never again wear a football uniform and lire 
chances are that his fine athletic action will degenerate into 
mere talk and reading of the sport page. 

Both tennis and golf are social sports which can be played 
with little equipment and little organization. Neither cf 
them demands youthful vigor but both can furnish a good 
outlet for youthful vigor. They are the games which can be 
played with undiminished pleasure throughout a life time 
If the technique of these games not gained in college, or 
the majority of cases they are never played. So it seems to 
us that they should be rated higher in the scale of collegiate 
athletics because they are fitted to serve a greater number of 
people for a longer time. 



1(1 




WHO'S WHO IN THE SENIOR CLASS 



GIRLS 

Best student Katie Peterson 

Second best Margery Ledford 

Most studious , Yula Barker 

Second most studious Mae Long 

Best all-round Chelsea Laws 

Second all-round - Emily Johnson 

Most Popular Chelsea Laws 

Second most popular Gladys Parker 

Most Beautiful Valeria Ogle 

Second most beautiful Chelsea Laws 

Best dressed Marie Rogers 

Second best dressed Emily Johnspn 

Most Aristocratic , Emily Johnson 

Second most aristocratic Dorothy Elliott 

Best athlete Lura Cook 

Second best athlete Lucile Keys 

Best musician Evelyn Stone 

Second best musician Imogene Carr 

Most dignified Ruby Bailey 

Second most dignified Catherine Lane 

Most sociable Gladys Parker 

Second most sociable Chelsea Laws 

Most artistic , Catherine Walker 

Second most artistic Pansy Thomas 

Best actress Gladys Parker 

Second best actress Valeria Ogle 

Faculty's pet Ruby Bailey 

Biggest all 'round Annabelle Skillern 



BOYS 

Best student Fred Whitehead 

Second best student Ycung Querry 

Most studious Doc. Phillips 

Second most studious Young Querry 

Best all 'round Manson Green 

Second best all 'round Doc. Phillips 

Most popular Johnson Townley 

Second most popular George Hanna 

Most handsome Rathburn Ray 

Second most handsome Ralph Smith 

Best dressed George Hanna 

Second best dressed Lee Rothrock 

Most aristocratic Howard Guthrie 

Second most aristocratic Lee Rothrock 

Best athlete : Fred Whitehead 

Second best athlete George Hanna 

Best musician , Lee Rothrock 

Second best musician Howard Guthrie 

Most dignified Howard Dennis 

Second most dignified Wilsie Wilder 

Most sociable Hicks Jenkins 

Second most sociable Manson Green 

Most artistic Mouzon Peters 

Second most artistic- Eugene Jenkins 

Best actor , Johnson Townley 

Second best actor , Howard Dennis 

Faculty's pet , Hicks Jenkins 

Ugliest , Roxy 

Biggest all 'round Rupert Ghormley 



20 



THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF CITIZENSHIP 



Winner of 1st Prize in the Wm. Rule Essay Contest 

• 

"For none of us liveth to himself and no wan dieih to him- 
self."— Paul. 

Because of the lack of responsiveness on the part of most 
people, for ages it has been the habit of reformers to go to 
extremes in presenting their ideas. With this fact in mind, 
it behooves me to try to guard against writing of ideals that 
only perfect beings can carry out. John Jay well expressed 
the idea I have when he said, "I do not expect mankind will, 
before the millennium, be what they ought to be; and there- 
fore, in my opinion, every political theory which does not 1?- 
gard them as be'ng what they are will prove abortive." 

The responsibility of citizenship is not very different from 
any other responsibility. In every case of accountability ther; 
is a giver and a person to whom something is entrusted. In 
a sense, the giver becomes a creditor and the receiver a debt- 
or. Hence, at once appear two general aspects of the re- 
sponsibility of citizenship. The first concerns the making of 
a debt and the second concerns the paying of that debt. 

A child has no choice but to become a debt to society; the 
debt has been made before he is given a chance to decide 
whether or not he 
chooses to be under ob- 
ligation. However, 
the decision about mak- 
ing with the govern- 
ment what Roosevelt 
called a "square deal" is 
up to the citizen himself. 
Though a person is not 
born with the power to 
perform voluntary acts, 
and as Woodworth, the 
psychologist, says. "Ob- 
viously he cannot imag- 
ine an act till he has had 
experience of that act." 
he does gain the power 
progressively till at length he assumes practically all of the 
responsibility for his mental and physical welfare. 

This is an age of extended credit in the business world. 
As a matter of fact, almost anything from a farm to a pair 
of shoes may be bought on time. The idea of suspicion an J 
distrust is less obvious than it has been in times past, and 
today a man no sconer hears that his factory has burned to 
the ground than he begins plans for borrowing money to re- 
build. Such a liberal policy as this should not only be true- 
in business but in civic matters as well. There being no oth- 
er way of paying the debt to society except by first becoming 
more indebted, the citizen need not hesitate to take the bes: 
that his home and community offer in wealth and comfort. 
True it is, the more he takes the more he owes, but again the 
better prepared he is to solve society's problems the easier it 
is for him to meet his debt. 

Our talents in the form of opportunities for wealth, reli- 
gious freedom, and free schooling in this country have not 
been given us to hide in a napkin for fear of assuming re- 
sponsibility for the outcome, but rather that they may be re- 
turned to the giver with usury. Perhaps our greatest op- 
portunity is that cf training in the school for citizenship. As 




OLD CHAPEL 



Dunn says, "Education is not only a privilege; it is a duty, 
because every citizen owes it to his community to equip him- 
self to render the best citizenship possible." Why, sociolo- 
gists tell us that the best way of caring for the feeble-minded 
is in sending them to school ! According to Walter R. Smith, 
"Education is not only the kindliest but the cheapest way of 
dealing with all sorts of un-normal children." Then will not 
education pay in case of the normal child? Our country h;is 
not yet reached its capacity in supporting educational ad- 
vances. Statistics show that the amount of money spent 
in 1920 for tobacco and cigarette holders exceeded the expen- 
diture for public education by more than 800 million dollar- 
The amount spent annually for insurance is twice that for 
public education. Until our masses and our legislators are 
convinced that education comes before idle pleasure and un- 
til everyone is willing to sacrifice tremendously for the ad- 
vance of education, so long will we have poverty of thought 
and lack of ideals in this blessed land. 

We are told that the freedom of speech and press, the 
right to plead for redress of grievances, protection while trav- 
eling in a foreign country, the privilege of possessing arms 
domestic security, and a fair trial in the courts are points 

of advantage which our 
government guarantees 
to its citizens over the 
rule of the savages. We 
boast of liberty and free- 
dom. Are we free? 
Should we like to be at 
liberty to do anything 
whatever we pleased? 
Ruskin wisely points 
out. "Throughout the 
world, of the two ab- 
stract things, liberty and 
restraint, restraint is al- 
ways the more honor- 
able." After a second 
thought we may not 
want complete liberty. 

The restraint which our government gives to the citizen is 
covered in the debt that is thrust upon him, which debt he 
is asked to increase and to pay. No doubt many of the peo- 
ple of America who have secured naturalization papers cr 
who have been born in this country, for that matter, are 
really without a country and are unworthy to sing "My 
Country 'Tis of Thee." To be a loyal citizen requires more 
than standing when the "Star Spangled Banner" is played. 
This requires complete settlement of the debt one contracts, 
and perhaps a little more. 

Just as people hate to be dunned for a grocery bill, so do 
they hate to be reminded of a civic debt. And in case of the 
latter debt, part of the payment is often avoided by the adop- 
tion of a way of thinking in which the ' citizen" is every- 
body in general and nobody in particular. 

It seems hardly necessary to say that when debts are not 
paid the creditor inevitably loses out, but many forget the 
fact. 

Just as the positive forms of commandments are more 
impressive than the negative forms, so I think the power 
of suggestion is stronger than that of command; consequenc- 
(Continued On Next Pagel 



21 




PRESIDENTS 

PHILOMATHEAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



FRED WHITEHEAD 
Fall Term 



CHARLES MEHAFFEY 
Winter Term 



JOHNSON TOWNLEY 
Spring Term 



KNIGHTONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



VALERIA OGLE 
Fall and Winter Terms 



CHELSEA LAWS 
Spring Term 



(Continued From Preceding Page I 

ly, in telling how the citizen's debt may be paid I choose to 
take the "can" attitude rather than the "should" attitude. 
Though there is no definite point where a citizen ceases to 
be a debt to society or where he begins to pay back what he 
has borrowed, in general the time of debt-making belongs to 
youth and the time of debt-paying to maturity. 

The citizen's first debt is to the home. He can pay it by 
actively pursuing an honest vocation. As only three out of 
every ten in the United States work, and as these three must 
support themselves and seven others, it is easy to see how 
any avoidance of duty here would play havoc with the na- 
tion's welfare. 

The debt to the school closely follows. With the late ex- 
pansion of school curricula to include things formerly taken 
care of by the home, such as, physical training, manual train- 
ing, domestic science, and religious training, the responsibili- 
ty of the citizen to the school increases. The citizen can meet 
this debt by giving his time or money. He will realize t'.i? 
latter means when the time comes to pay his taxes. 
Often an opportunity for canceling part cf the debt to so- 
ciety comes in the form of small jobs regarding civic beauty. 
It may be to plant a few flowers, to keep the street clean in 
front of the house, to mend a hole in the pavement, or to 
take care of the trees. 

Regarding attitude toward law, the citizen can accept the 
siatu.es whether he likes them or not. He can respect the 
officials for the office they hold if not for their own strength 
of character. He can discourage all forms of fun which mork 
tl-.e law by not engaging in them himself. 

Regarding the operations of the government, the citizen 
can support all efforts to secure an economical administration 
of tl.e affairs of the community. He may willingly serve on 



a jury when the time comes that he is needed. He may re- 
port all law breakers whether they are akin or dear to him 
or not. He may strive to keep honest men in public offices 
by carefully studying the records of the men running for the 
jobs and by being strictly honest in his voting. He miy 
spend seme of his odd moments in finding out how his gov- 
ernment works if he does not know, and if he does, he may 
explain it to someone who does not. He can take off a few 
minutes from the reading of the murder scandal or the sport 
events to follow the actions of the legislators he has helped 
to elect. He can refuse to join his neighbors in puliing for 
a road that is neded in some other community worse than 
in his own. Or, when the time comes that no person can 
fill a particular public office quite as well as he himself, the 
citizen may put himself to some inconvenience just to serve 
his community and country. 

The citizen can be tolerant about other people's idiosyn- 
crasies, realizing that there is no 100 per cent citizen, yet 
acknowledging that in the midst of an imperfect people can 
be icund wonderful examples of loyalty and gentleness as 
aptly illustrated by the life of the late Capt. William Rule, in 
whese memory this essay is written. 

The responsibility of world-wide citizenship the citizen 
may realize reaches his every-day life and may be met by at- 
tending to little tasks of which the "still small voice" of his 
conscience tells him, He may not forget that ideas brought 
together in a mechanical fashion about the mid-night hour 
by the essay writer do not always contain workable sugges- 
tions, f.rd that ideals toward which he intends to work must 
be sought out by his own deliberate thinking. And most of 
all, the citizen may not forget that in a moral sense he is r. 
steward of all God has lent him and that all must be re- 
turned with interest. 

THOMAS MILLIGAN. 



22 



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(Continued From Page 3) 



Katie Peterson, whom I salute as the salutatorian of the 
class, hails from Crossville (you will have to look on the map) 
Her picture was run in all the Tennessee papers, for seldom 
does a student star in high school and in college, too. 

The last of the Jellicoans (he must have been dumber than 
the rest) went out with the class of '29. Wilsie came to school 
to be a preacher and he is leaving to be a senator and later 
President of the United States (personally I think he is a 
liar, but I will wait and see). Wilsie was a stubborn man to 
run over on the football field and a stubborn man to argue 
with in English class. (This bit of histary written by Tom 
Cash.) 

Marie Rogers now occupies my attention. I wonder if she 
has a hair-cut yet. Marie, the long haired vamp, was out- 
standing amid so many short haired vamps (upstarts from 
the Junior class.) She stood high in her classes and her 
many friends grieved at the parting. 

Here I see a eclumn called ' Signed by the Bishop." Yes, 
I remember now; that was Mouzon Peters' pseudonym. 
Mouzon's object in life was to live that he might die. I 
suspected him of being a disciple of Sinclair Lewis, or H. L. 
Mencken, but I was never able to discover a Mercury in his 
room. Anyway he was brilliant and usually sarcastic. 

Sweet tones cf female voices now assail my ears. Cath- 
erine Lane is singing a solo and Imcgene Carr is accompany- 
ing her at the piano. 

I wonder if Lura and Pansy have ever taken that long- 
planned trip to Chattanooga. Lura with her laugh, like 
water coming up out of a pump, was a good student in spite 
of her strong brown arms. Her love of beating boys at ten- 
nis, and her basket eye which made her the high scorer in 
many of the girls' games. Athletics and chemistry were her 
specialties and she was not averse to boys. Pansy's one 
plump smile was her inevitable companion. 

My eagle eye alights on the name of Vallie Ogle. I was 
never certain whether Vallie was a Senior or a Junior. She 
could not pull Kemp up to Senior standing, so she had to 
go down and associate with the Juniors. Vallie was never 
able to finish a recitation. She told half of it and the Dean 
always had to take for granted that her resulting giggle was 
meant for the remainder of it. 

If my memory is correct, Ralph Smith hails from the 
metropolis cf Stanford. Ralph is one of the Waisman boys 
and one of Prof. Stubbs' chemistry students. Almost any 
evening around four o'clock he could be found in the chem- 
sitry laboratory boiling 'things'. I always thought that these 
things were water, but maybe they weren't. 

Like Saul, Red Latham stands head and shoulders above 
his classmates. He is the tallest man in the class and has 
the reddest hair. Red was a football player, night watch- 
man, (he never caught anybody in two years) and one boy 
who was proud of the fact that he came from the country. 
He never even claimed a village for his home town. 

After viewnig Red Parrot and Buck Weaver (pardon me 
for mentioning so insignificant a person as a Junior) we 
hardly see hew Newport, Tenn., can send out such contradic- 
tory people. Paul and Creed Mantooth did their work quiet- 
ly as contrasted with the whoopee methods of Red and Buck. 
Marjory Ledfcrd came into prominence on a wave of Car- 
lyle. Carlyle was the cpen sesame for her scholastic ability 
(in English), for members cf the English class will remember 



that it was she who stuck by Professor Fisher till the bitter 
end on that long ordeal thru Sortor Resartus. 

Ruby Bailey, the quietly efficient president of Wesleyan 
Service Club, although one of her high ideals faded into an 
illusion when her coming young Bishop Harvey Cook forsook 
her for other girls, nevertheless retained the most of them 
and remained one of the idealists of the class. She was a 
geed student, a quiet but thorough thinker, and had a high- 
ly communicable faculty for expressing her thoughts. 

I sometimes wonder if Mary Lena is going to get married 
or teach school, but I have never decided. You see she is 
specializing in Home Economics and I am sure that she will 
do cne of the two. 

What I thought to be a true romance story turned out to 
be a brother and a sister, but I was not the only one fooled, 
for every cne thought that Eula and Creston Barker were 
madly in love, and that no other relation existed. 

Ernest Davis' many faculties as student and his many so- 
cial qualities made him one of the all-around boys of the 
elzss. Ycu felt the presence of this sandy-haired lad, and 
yet lie never made a great noise about himself; he seemed to 
just shp into the crowd and there you are — that's Ernest. 

Here are some more prominent members of the Senior 
class. Jessie Kelley's class record, especially in English, is 
one that every student does not make. Little Keys, I guess 
she is outstanding in keeping 'Lefty' in right trim. It seems 
that Jordan is the next name to shine. She has slipped into 
cur midst since last term and her scholastic work ranks 
among the highest. 

Beulah Clayton and Cecil Cox are the next on trial. Mrs. 
Stone says 'she is very mischievous,' that will do. Beulah, you 
are a good Senior. Cecil is noted for her long comments in 
English class. 

Frank Perry is almost a stranger, but we claim him as a 
Senior. I have been thinking if Frank's ability as a singer 
would some day make him famous. 'Rat' Ray is another one 
of those fellows who keep their doings a dark secret; but I 
guess it is best. 

Some contrasts — here is Annabelle, the biggest all-around 
girl in the class. Annabelle has a very pleasing smile, (she 
tells me a lot of lies) and is a big friend to every one. And 
here is Evelyn, — the contrast is not in friendliness, for sel- 
dom do we see Evelyn but what she is smiling. 

Myrtle with her high ideals and her quiet way of express- 
ing herself has won many friends in the class and she will be 
long remembered. Dorothy is from that far West state uf 
Washington. Dorothy is an actress and I am beginning to 
believe she is about to start a life long play. 

Here are three Seniors. Swafford, Williams, and Querry. 
They all put out to sea, and one is already married — the 
ethers soon will be. 

The last, but not the least is Rupert Ghormley (I am the 
first who has ever had the nerve to call him Rupert). Ru- 
pert has several distinctions. He is chubby, bald, and cheru- 
bic. He is one preacher with a high sense of humor. Rupert 
did good class work and was an ardent supporter of all the 
activities of the school. The girls liked to tease him because 
he is the only man in the senior class who has to account 
for himself when he comes home at night. Mrs. Ghormley 
sees to that. 

Written by WILSIE ELIHU WILDER. 



25 



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HU^P^ 



Bill: "Why didn't Tom Cash finish his investigations in 
find.ng the best methods of teaching fish worms tricks?" 
Wilsie: "He couldn't tell which end their brains were in." 

® ® 
Guthrie: (with a case of "flu") "Doc, can you do anything 
for me?" 
Doc Philips: "Let me feel of your purse." 

© ® 
Traveling Salesman: "Want any Swiss cheese?" 
Hicks Jenkins: (working in cafe) "No, — none of our cus- 
tomers are Swiss." 

® ® 

Mrs. Ketron: (seeing Mouzon Peters leaving the dining 

room with a hunk of meat) "Did you not have enough to eat. 
Mcuzon?" 

Mouzon: 'Yes ma'am." 

Mis. Ketron: "Then why are you carrying out that piece 
of steak?" 

Mouzon: "I need it to make a hinge for my trunk." 

® ® 
Valeria: "I had an awful fright at the theatre last night." 
Chatter: "I know it, I saw him with you." 

® ® 
Prof. Fisher: (having parted the Man tooth brothers) 

"Why are you boys fighting?" 
Paul: "I said a pear was oblong, and he said it was round." 
Prof. Fisher: "Come now, shake hands and call it square.' 

® ® 
"Why is a lady's belt like an ash cart?" 
"I suppose because it goes 'round and gathers up the waist." 

® ® 
Prof. Stubbs: "Roxy, I understand you are running an or- 
chestra of your own, now?" 
Roxy: "Yes, and it's certainly the best ever." 
Prof. Stubbs: "How many pieces have you in it?" 
Roxy: "Three — piano, stool and cover." 

® ® 
I received a check from heme. I asked Smith to Cash it 
for me; this he did. I tool: the money and bought Gas to fill 
the tank of my Carr. Everything was all set; me and marie 
got in and rolled off down the Lane and out into the cedar 
grove — there we stopped. She said, "Let's Parker." 'Suits 
me, I said, "but let's be sure there are no Laws around ior 
we may want to Terry here a Long while." As we sat on the 
Green grass and gazed upon the flowers with slender stems 
and Whiteheads I felt as though — well, in short, my heart 
went Pat-ter, Pat-ter, Pat-ter, and as I plucked violet, rose 
and Pansy I told her I had one Querry to ask. She says, 
"I'm waiting, Fisher out." As I told her my Love I placed 
tlie floweis in her hand and asked that she keep them as the 
Keys to my heart. I promised that if she would be my Bak- 
sr, Cooke, Ray of sunshine. I would employ a Sexton immedi- 
ately. She turned her smiling face toward me and the 
sweet look she gave grew slowly, Wilder and Wilder, and the 
answer she gave curdled my blood — I stood as a Stone while 
my teeth began to Chatter. When I had regained my 
strength I said, as I stepped into my faithful Carr, I'm going 
to ride back but you'll have to Walker." 



"What can be done with the by-products of gasoline?" 
"Usually they are taken to the hospital." 

® ® 

Townley: "Do you see that scar on my face? That's my 
birthmark." 

Fuzzy: "Is that so?'" 

Townley: "Yes, I took a sleeper last month and got into 
the wrong berth." 

® ® 
Querry: "Did you hear the story about the peacock?" 

Perry: "No." 

Querry: 'It's a beautiful tale." 

® ® 
Prof. Douglas: "If a man springs from a monkey; wl 
does a woman spring from?" 
Sweeny: "From a mouse." 



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(Continued From Page 5) rut on them becauss they are refusing to allow him to tie 

pink ribbons on his cornet. 

Marjorie Ledford travels and lectures for the Y. W. C. A. 
George Hanna made All American forward in Basket ball Imogene Carr is still in deal . old Earrlman looking cver 

and has to have his hats made to order. opportunities while looking over a drug store counter. 

Have you a pain anywhere on the anatomy? See Dr Valeria Ogle tried to get into the movies but her voice 

Thomas T. Phillips. He is the best doctor in Niota. didn't photograph well. She is now living on a farm call- 

Evelyn Stone is the pet of Broadway. Her popularity from ing chickens and hogs to develop a visible voice, 
her musical ability is astounding. She can now play for fivs Paul Mantooth cusses out the athletes of Newport Hi' and 

full minutes without repeating a single time. gets a monthly check for that responsible position. 

Mary Lena is an old maid registrar of some college in the Paul Terry, in casting around for a suitable occupation. <:>■■ 

middle west. She hasn't given up hope yet. vcted his life to the explanation of the Einstein theory of 

relativity. 

Ralph Smith, in exhaustive chemical research, discovered 
a cheaper substitute for butter, and his factories have been 
unable to manufacture enough to supply Petty Manker din- 
ing hall. 
This is all that can be remembered by our friend. If his 
The" Blue Jews" dance orchestra is having trouble get- memory were better, he would know the whereabouts of four 
ting Ho-vard Guthrie to sign up this season. He is holding more seniors — I'm all four of them! 

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in basketball in Virginia. 

Clyde Love is professor of Law at Riceville University, 
Ricsville, Tennessee. Wit'i all his attractiveness he finds it 
no easy task to resist the wiles of the fair sex. 



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Manufacturing Company I We Carry a Complete Line of 

g Fresh Vegetables 



8 "THERE'S A HILL STORE NEAR YOU" | 

Athens, Tennessee g patronize it | 

1 I 

g OOur business is selling BUILDING materials which are used in the BUILDING of houses g 

§ and other kinds of buildings. g 

g There is. however, a kind of BUILDING which is of more importance that the BUILDING g 

g of material structures, and that is the BLILDING of the structure which will equip you for g 

g life's work; i. e., the acquisition of knowledge and the BUILDING of character. g 

g We are sure there is no better places for the BUILDING of these requisitesi than is found g 

g in Tennessee Wesleyan college, and we hope every student, who is not graduating, will re- 8 

g turn another year. g 

I 1 

! Sherman=Hammer Supply Company § 

"The House of Service" 1 

Telephone 13 — Athens, Tennessee g 

34 



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INNERS 



GOOD EVERY DAY 

PRICES RIGHT 

Palace Cafe 

r. l. Mcelroy, Mgr. 

\ 

C^ndy For 

! GRADUATION 




Drugs Drinks Sandwiches 

B. and S. 

Drug Company 

35 



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The University of Chattanooga | 



MAINTAINS HIGHEST STANDARD 

IN 

INSTRUCTION, SCHOLARSHIP 
EQUIPMENT, STUDENT ACTIVITIES 






College of 
Liberal Arts and Science 

Chattanooga. Tennessee 



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36 



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The University of Chattanooga | 



MAINTAINS HIGHEST STANDARD 



IN 



INSTRUCTION, SCHOLARSHIP 
EQUIPMENT, .STUDENT ACTIVITIES, 






College of 
Liberal Arts and Science 

Chattanooga. Tennessee 



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36