(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Advanced Microdevices Manuals | Linear Circuits Manuals | Supertex Manuals | Sundry Manuals | Echelon Manuals | RCA Manuals | National Semiconductor Manuals | Hewlett Packard Manuals | Signetics Manuals | Fluke Manuals | Datel Manuals | Intersil Manuals | Zilog Manuals | Maxim Manuals | Dallas Semiconductor Manuals | Temperature Manuals | SGS Manuals | Quantum Electronics Manuals | STDBus Manuals | Texas Instruments Manuals | IBM Microsoft Manuals | Grammar Analysis | Harris Manuals | Arrow Manuals | Monolithic Memories Manuals | Intel Manuals | Fault Tolerance Manuals | Johns Hopkins University Commencement | PHOIBLE Online | International Rectifier Manuals | Rectifiers scrs Triacs Manuals | Standard Microsystems Manuals | Additional Collections | Control PID Fuzzy Logic Manuals | Densitron Manuals | Philips Manuals | The Andhra Pradesh Legislative Assembly Debates | Linear Technologies Manuals | Cermetek Manuals | Miscellaneous Manuals | Hitachi Manuals | The Video Box | Communication Manuals | Scenix Manuals | Motorola Manuals | Agilent Manuals
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Nocatula, 1964"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/nocatula196441tenn 



38250 




\ VN X 



THE NOCATULA 



TENNESSEE WESLEY AN COLLEGE 



ATHENS, TENNESSEE 



W 
3T8.05 

T256a 
1 964 

Memer - Pfeiffer Library 

Tennessee Wesleyon College 

Athens, Tennessee 



1964 

VOLUME XLI 




STAFF 

Now in its forty-first year The Nocatula 
continues to attempt to capture the spirit of 
life on the Tennessee Wesleyan College cam- 
pus. The staff, as pictured on the title page, 
this year is made up of Lana Mynatt, Duain 
Rich, Sandra Long, Karen Treher Gillikin, 
Allen Dennis, Mary Lou Robbins, Carolyn 
Tilley, Rick Myers, and Phyllis Brock. Staff 
members pictured elsewhere are Alice Hughes, 
Donald Knight, and Martha Whatley. Duain 
Rich is Editor, Mr. Ben McClary, Faculty 
Advisor. 



CONTENTS 

Creativity at Wesleyan: 1963-64 . . 5 

Recognitions 18 

Administration and Faculty .... 20 

Classes 2 5 

Activities 57 

Sororities and Fraternities .... 81 

Athletics 97 

The Meaning of Wesleyan . . . . 108 

Index 110 

Hackberries (literary insert) . . after 72 



_2 





reativity is the essence of Wesleyan life. From a prayer 
spoken in unison in weekly chapel to a lovingly ex- 
ecuted crucifix prepared in art class, from the out- 
landish odors of Banfield Hall and the other-worldish 
mathematical problems left on the greenboards in Old 
College, from idle doodlings on napkins in the cafeteria 
to conscious attempts to capture in a few lines the spirit 
of a frisky campus squirrel: from these and hundreds 
of other everyday occurrences creativity radiates from 
our campus. 

Creativity is education (with a small e) ; it begins 
when ideas and experiences are brought together pro- 
ducing something new. It has no single place of origin. 
It may come in the classroom, or in a coffee discussion 
in the College Shop, or in Lawrence Hall at dawn with 
your roommate asleep and the cold Tennessee air blow- 
ing into your face through an open window. Creativ- 
ity is — not anytime nor anywhere, but some times and 
some places. The Wesleyan year — 1963-64 is no excep- 
tion — is filled with fbose times, the campus with those 
places. 






We do not know if Wesleyan fruitflies will be 
in the biosatellite scheduled to be launched from 
Cape Kennedy late in 1965, but they could well 
be, for Dr. Adams (left) and his students have 
made genetic history with their long-range ex- 
perimentation. But this is a small part of the 
total science program. Note, for example, the 
new affiliation with the Marine Biology Summer 
Institute on the Mississippi coast and the $2 5,000 
grant from the National Science Foundation 
used to buy advanced equipment, giving Wes- 
leyan one of the most completely instrumented 
undergraduate chemistry departments in the 
state. A full-time research program sponsored 
by N S F has enabled students Steve Kyker and 
Jack McConnell to do significant original re- 
search under Dr. Honaker. 

The Biology Department was also a recipient 
of a National Science Foundation grant amount- 
ing to almost $13,000 and intended to be used 
to advance Biological Science Curriculum Stu- 
dies, a new approach to teaching biology in high 
school. Wesleyan was one of the thirty-seven 
institutions of higher learnings selected to take 
part in this program. 





The biggest excitement in the Science com- 
munity has been occasioned by the preparatory 
efforts for the construction of the Fisher Hall 
of Science (below). Also housed in this building 
will be the Math Department which this year 
has been concerned with developing a program 
in Modern Math. A seminar (above) began 
formal work which will be culminated by a 
Modern Math Institute held during the summer. 
Headed by Dean Bowhng, the Math faculty, 
consisting this year of Mr. Ketron and Mr. Senn, 
began for Math majors a regular working semi- 
nar which has sparked much interest within the 
department. 




The distance between Robert Joseph Fisher's type- 
writers (pictured below) in the Methodist Historical 
Collection in the Merner-Pfeiffer Library and the giant 
IBM machine in the newly refurbished Business Ad- 
ministration quarters in Ritter Hall is a great one in- 
deed. The Business program offered through both day 
and night school is one of Wesleyan's most popular 
courses of study. The Office Machines course with its 
automatic gears, ringing bells, heavy electric cords, and 
revolving disks fills the unexperienced viewer with a 
feeling of awe. 

It is difficult to imagine a more congenial person 
than Mr. Hutson, Director of the Evening College and 
renowned IBM operator. Miss Hedley has this year 
added much charm to this previously all-male depart- 
ment. Then there is "Judge" Puett with a pipe in one 
corner of his mouth and homespun philosophy in the 
other. 





Moffitt Hall, the home of the ingenious English 
Department whose many creative efforts are re- 
flected throughout this book, is also the location 
of Wesleyan's Art Department. Headed by Mrs. 
Martha Hale, a well-known artist, the Art De- 
partment adds much sparkle to campus life. The 
top of campus hill was brightened this year by the 
modernistic art work designed by Mrs. Hale and 
applied to the Moffitt Hall shutters by her students. 
In abstract form the drawings illustrate the vari- 
ous aspects of Wesleyan's art program. 

Mrs. Fred Puett, teacher of Arts and Crafts, has 
a studio which is a fantasy land. Her collection of 
student-made art work makes it a wonderful place 
— like Disneyland — for just visiting. There a but- 
ton can become a flower, rags a doll, or dripping 
candle tallow a "painted" picture. Over it all 
(above left) broods Nocatula. 

Whatever the circumstances Nocatula is a fine 
old girl. R. V. Jennings in his poem entitled "Hu- 
moresque" may have captured her indomitable 
spirit in his refrain: 

The hag Nocafnla sifs 
High in the limbs of the oak, 
Grinning her toothless grin: 
She knoiL's uhat the shouting 
is all about I 
Whether you like this or her Indian-maiden image 
doesn't really matter — because either way "she 
knows . . . !" 




10 



Andy Harper and Harry Coble are magic 
words because they represent the transform- 
ing power of the individuals whom they iden- 
tify. Under their influence a Chattanooga boy 
can become a Pirate of Penzance, or a Knox- 
ville girl can become a Cockney Eliza Doolit- 
tle, or a Maryville lad can develop into a scene- 
stealing Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Witness: 
from the Spring Show of 1963, Gilbert and 
Sullivan's The Pirates of Penzance; or, The 
Slave of Duty, Lundy Lovelace (opposite 
page) as the Pirate King and Tom Gutridge 
(right) as the Sergeant of Police. Below are 
some members of the cast of Wesleyan's pro- 
duction of Tivelfth Night, part of the local 
observation of Shakespeare's Quatercenten- 
nial. Behind the Wesleyan footlights Fabian 
(Randall Trent) and Antonio (Haney How- 
ell) conspire, Viola (Rachel Edds) and Sebas- 
tian (Jim Bacchus) smile on Oliva (Agatha 
Shumake) , and Sir Andrew Aguecheek (Joe 
Eldridge) and Maria (Nancy Lutes) do what 
it looks like they're doing. Who can forget, 
though, Tom Gutridge's Malvolio! And Doug- 
las Henry's musical contribution as Feste, 
Oliva's "allowed fool" who had "an excellent 
breast" to sing. 





.ataa»>yl-.«rtrtMi««l(iwa»ffl' i^itw.JSgJW"- ■ ■ 



11 







Were you at Wesleyan during summer, 1963? 
Fowler and Centennial Halls were open, but most 
of the students were commuters, many of them 
teachers working on certification. The annual 
Tennessee Literature Seminar brought several no- 
table writers including Wilma Dykeman to the 
campus. Following this, a Creative Writing Work- 
shop sent elementary teacher out under the trees 
to compose Italian sonnets and haiku. One such 
teacher was Miss Beulah Ottinger, a sister of Mrs. 
Lewis and Mrs. Robeson, whose personal beauty 
testified to the truth of the rumor that as young 
girls the Ottinger sisters were notorious heart- 
breakers. Senator Kefauver's untimely death was 
the saddest event of the warm months. His memo- 
rial in the D-PA brought national attention to its 
author, Wesleyan student Allen Dennis. During 
two different weeks the Holston Conference's Sen- 
ior Youth Assembly and the Woman's Society of 
Christian Service gave life to campus activities. 
And if you were lucky. Miss Bradley gave you 
some ice cream from her hand-operated mixer — 
cranked by Betty Williams. Were you — by any 
chance — with Chi Rho when it (part of it) got 
lost going to Parksville Lake? Did you see Miss 
Jones when she came for her introductory inter- 
view? Did Dr. Adams send you a picture postal 






12 



card from the Marine Biological School? Did you 
miss the Archers and Mr. McClary when they were 
at Rugby cataloging the Hughes Public Library? 
September brought new faces — both faculty 
and students . . . Mr. Blazier . . . Miss Hedley 
. . . Miss Jones . . . Mr. Ketron . . . Dr. Lacy . . . 
Mr. Senn . . . Dr. Schafer ... on leave — and much 
missed Mr. Sallis and Mr. Alton Smith . . . un- 
happily a recurring illness kept Mrs. Myers out of 
the library most of the quarter . . . President and 
Mrs. Mohney went to Europe with a group of 
Methodist Educators (see Mrs. Mohney, opposite 
page, bottom, among the ancient ruins of Athens, 
Greece) . . . they were welcomed back by a giant 
sign across the back of Blakeslee Hall . . . Brown 
and Dana, folk-singers, twisted the nose of the 
Student Body, which loved the pain ... an active 
concert series included Jose Molina's Spanish Ballet 
and the Kaleidoscopes . . . President Kennedy's 
assassination brought academic life to a standstill 
as the College sponsored an impressive memorial 
service on November 2 5... the flag flew at half- 
mast until students returned in 1964 . . . Basket- 
ball started with all of its accompanying excite- 
ment . . . John Lee, it was noted, had grown even 
taller . . . And the faculty got ready for a Christ- 
mas party to end all Christmas parties: rumor has 






it that Mr. Mathis performed several ballet move- 
ments dressed in red tights and that Miss Greenhoe 
had blue hair and eyebrows and that Miss Jones 
wore a mourning veil! 

Winter quarter began with deep snow — as win- 
ter quarter should . . . En Garde became a reality 
. . . the wood butchers cut down the magnolia 
in front of Ritter Hall "so the grass will grow" 
but the courageous efforts of Mrs. Coe saved the 
one by the flag pole . . . the KD's Hootenanny was 
a major success with hitherto undreamed-of tal- 
ent being uncovered . . . Martha Whatley invented 
the 20c game . . . Mr. Coble produced "Fumed 
Oak" to the delight of visiting high school seniors 
. . . Brooks Hays came — accompanied by Look 
photographers (don't forget to clip your picture 
out of Look and paste it on the blank spot on the 
right) . . . leopard was rather obviously the fash- 
ion fur of the year on the Wesleyan campus . . . 
Mary Walker seems at home with leopard duster, 
slippers, and pillow. Mrs. Gulley — always just 
right — adds the final touch to this picture as she 
does to any Wesleyan function which she attends. 






"^1 I /ij^i 







j,viyv/*:^'i!?';.^'iXti*.*:~-?. 



14 





... ^"^r 




Concerts continued: Robert MacDonald, pian- 
ist, and Marilyn Dubow, violinist . . . Mr. Ugly 
was Jack Edmonds . . . The Lettermen came to 
Wesleyan and were as good as they were expected 
to be . . . Dr. Harry Merrill of L.S.U., who will 
head Wesleyan's English Department next year, 
read a paper on Machiavelli to interested Wesleyan 
Scholars . . . Bishop Short and the Trustees had a 
two-day meeting on campus . . . R. V. Jennings 
did another television program of the Roundtable 
. . . And we mustn't forget the Debate Tourna- 
ment in Cookeville . . . This being Leap Year a 
Twirp Queen was elected . . . sadly the College 
marked the departure of the Shillings as he went 
on to work on a doctorate in Administration . . . 
happily the College welcomed the able new Assist- 
ant to the President, Jack King ... If you haven't 
already heard about it, get Joe Bowden to tell his 
dinosaur story. He might even draw a picture for 
you on the blank space to the left. The Neic Ex- 
ponent pulled a real April Fooler: can you forget 
Division I with the Beatle bobs? And what about 
Mr. McClary burning his Harbrace Handbook! 
(Confidentially it was really Buzz Beach's.) 



15 



Spring: Choir on tour . . . mock Republican 
Convention with Representative Brock in at- 
tendance . . . Dr. Alwin Thaler, noted Shake- 
spearean, came to Wcsleyan as part of Shake- 
spearean Quatercentennial . . . Greek Week- 
end was somehow sandwiched into the schedule 
. . . My Fair Lady students, alumni, and visitors 
agreed was fair indeed . . . Plans for breaking 
ground for the Fisher Hall of Science . . . 
Honors Assembly proved to be a time to remem- 
ber for many . . . Final Examinations . . . Grad- 
uation and the end of four years at Wesleyan 
for those who started as freshmen here in 1960. 








\ 






>^ 



y^ 




The footprints of the Falcon (symbol of 
"student concern") would not allow a snow of 
complacency to go unmarred. These marks 
wherever they appear denote a striving spirit to 
better our campus and our world. They are one 
of the several creative symbols around which 
Wesleyan students build their college lives. 

This is the Prologue to The Nocatida, review- 
ing some of the creative highlights of the past 
academic year. The pages that follow should be 
read with our theme always in mind: creativity 
is the essence of Wesleyan life. 



* Here begins a picture story, "A Typical Night in Centennial Hall.' 
Haney Howell and Steve Carlson studying? (continued on p. 45) 



17 



THE NOCATULA 

recognizes Professor Harry Coble's 
Contributions to Wesleyan Cultural Life 




"Teacher, actor, playwright, director, 
dancer, choreographer" is a description that 
applies to very few people anywhere and to 
only one person at Tennessee Wesleyan Col- 
lege. It is our good fortune that Harry Coble 
is not only as versatile as this description in- 
dicates but that he is completely capable in 
all facets of his work. 

A widely travelled native of North Car- 
olina, Mr. Coble holds degrees from the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina and from Emer- 
son College. His many professional appear- 
ances include those with Ted Shawn, Men 
Dancers in nationwide tours, in off-Broad- 
way productions of the Dramatic Work- 
shop, and as performer-choreographer in the 
summer productions Horn in the West, The 
Lost Colony, and The Stephen Foster Story. 
He served for four years with the United 
States Army during World War II and 
taught at the New England Conservatory 
and at Union College before coming to Ten- 
nessee Wesleyan. 

Since Mr. Coble joined the Wesleyan fac- 
ulty in 19 56, the academic program has 
been augmented and the performing arts 
have thrived. Playwright and director of the 
College Centennial production The Legend 



of Nocatnla in 19 57, he has staged a won- 
derfully varied panorama of theater and has 
built a department of speech and drama 
which offer a wide selection of courses. His 
productions have involved students, towns- 
people, and faculty and have ranged from 
classical Greek to modern experimental 
drama, including Shakespearean comedy, 
Victorian melodrama, romantic comedy, 
satire, and religious drama. He has also 
staged and choreographed musical comedies 
with the College Choir and has, on occasion, 
portrayed memorable characters in campus 
productions. 

Students are attracted in increasing num- 
bers to tryouts, plays, and courses offered 
by Mr. Coble. Uniquely creative himself, 
he expects and draws creativity from stu- 
dents, actors, and technical assistants. This 
is perhaps his greatest achievement. 

His gifts of perception, talent, and dis- 
ciplined training are combined with a special 
sensitivity to people and with the ability to 
participate in life on and off stage. His devo- 
tion to initiative, his sophistication, his sense 
of humor, his honesty, and his fine sense of 
values are subtly but firmly impressed upon 
all who know him. 




18 



THE NOCATULA 

thanks Chaplain Howard Hinds for his many contribu- 
tions to Wesleyan Hfe during his four years on campus. 



Chaplain Howard Hinds, a native of 
Knoxville, is a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Tennessee and Emory Universi- 
ty. He is a member of the Pi Kappa 
Alpha, social fraternity, and the Theta 
Phi, scholastic fraternity. With the 
United States Army he served two years 
on active duty as a First Lieutenant. 

A versatile personality, he is in de- 
mand for many student activities which 
throw him into direct contact with a 
majority of the students. His many re- 
sponsibilities include his advisorship of 
the Student Christian Association, Cir- 
cle K, and Phi Kappa Phi fraternity. 
One of his most important roles, how- 
ever, is his chairmanship of the Reli- 
gious Life Council. In addition to this, 
he is Wesleyan's golf coach. 

He also participates in civic organiza- 
tion as a member of the Kiwanis Inter- 
national and the Board of Directors of 
the YMCA. 

The open door of Chaplain Hinds' 
office is a symbol of his readiness to serve 
each student. His congenial personality 
and leisurely manner are an invitation 
for friendship. As one of his advisees 
said, "I feel that he is my friend. He 





puts forth a sincere effort to help me; 
he's not just doing a job." 

Many students like his sense of humor 
and his charm. He is always good for a 
laugh, but his appeal has served a more 
worthy purpose than just to delight the 
students. For example, recently when a 
visitor remarked that Wesleyan's men 
were unusually courteous, it was the 
concensus of those present that the 
Chaplain had decidedly influenced the 
chivalrous behavior of many of the male 
students. 

Perhaps he is best known to many 
students as "Happy Chappy," actually 
a title of respect, for he has shared his 
unique happiness with all. One never 
ceases to be impressed by his exuberant 
spirit that can set the spirit of any 
standstill group into vibration. 

Chaplain Hinds, who will be remem- 
bered as an ideal combination of light- 
hearted participation in fun and serious 
dedication to a purpose, does his job 
with a smile, and having done his job 
simply and honorably has placed his im- 
print on Tennessee Wesleyan College 
and particularly on the minds and the 
lives of the students who have known 
him. 



19 




ADMINISTRATION 



CHAPLAIN HOWARD N. HINDS, through his work with 
the Religious Life Council and the Student Christian Association, 
has helped this College to grow spiritually and physically. He 
holds a B.S. from the University of Tennessee and a B.D. from 
Emory University. 

DEAN OF ADMISSIONS PAUL RIVIERE is dean of Wes- 
leyan Deans, having served longer than any other member of the 
administration. He is a graduate of Emory University and has 
taught in the Atlanta Division of the University of Georgia. 

ACADEMIC DEAN FRANK GULLEY, JR., received a B.A. 
from the University of Kentucky, a B.D. from Emory University, 
and a Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University. Dean Gulley has taught 
at Vanderbilt Divinity School and the University of Illinois. 

MRS. MARY NELLE GRAVES came to Wesleyan in 1951 
from East Tennessee State College where she had served as sec- 
retary to the president. Her official title is Secretary to Faculty, 
Administrative Committee, and Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees. 

WESLEYAN PRESIDENT RALPH W. MOHNEY is also 



President of the Affiliated Independent College of Tennessee. He 
served as Superintendent of the Kingsport District of the Holston 
Conference of The Methodist Church from 1956 to 1959 when 
he was elected President of Tennessee Wesleyan College. 

MR. CHARLES "BUDDY" Liner, as Director of Recruitment, 
also supervises the Wesleyan Ambassadors who serve as official 
hosts for all college events related to the Offices of Development, 
Recruitment, and Alumni Relations. 

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT ROY B. SHILLING, a 

graduate of Southern Methodist University, has sparked Wes- 
leyan's "Decade of Destiny." 

DEAN OF STUDENTS FLOYD BOWLING holds a B.A. 
from Lincoln Memorial University, a M.S. from the State Uni- 
versity of Iowa, and a D. Ed. from the University of Tennessee. 
As Dean of Students he works closely with student activities. 

MR. TOM LOTTI came to Wesleyan as Business Manager in 
1963. A retired major from the Finance Corps of the U.S. Army, 
he has served as Chief of the Internal Audit Division in France 
and has taught financial subjects in Indiana. 




Roy B. Shilling 

Assistant to the President 

"a fellow of plain and uncoined 
constancy" 





Frank Gulley, Jr. 

Dean of the College 

"They that stand high have many 

blasts to shake them." 



Ralph W. Mohney, President 
"Sweet and voluble is his discourse" 




D. T. Lotti 

Business Manager 

"Much condemned to have an 

r IiHi^ palm 






Paul Riviere 

Dean of Admissions & Registrar 

"I'll wipe away all trivial fond 

records." 



Floyd E. Bowling 

Dean of Students 

"kind umpire of men's miseries" 





k 



Howard N. Hinds 

Chaplain 

"so wise so young" 



Mary Nelle Graves 

Administrative Secretary 

"the mirror of all courtesy" 



Charles J. Liner 

Director of Admissions 

"one man in his time plays many 

parts" 




William H. Adams. Jr. 
Professor of Biology 
"goes beyond textbook's 
limits" — D.M. 




William B. Cate 

Assistant Professor of 
Physical Education 
"gentleman of high stature" 
— H.W. 




BuDD L. Duncan 

Assistant Professor of 

Chemistry 

"An analytical house mother" 

— M.O. 






Robert 


T. 


Blazier 


Instructor 


' in 


Education 


'Humor . . 


. is 


his 


teaching" — ■ 


H.J 




m 


■ 


|H^^ffi 


m 


•Sh 


,«.", 



Cai<(ji\n I'. Bradley 
Instructor in Biology 
"Never too late" — P.S. 




Harry W. Coble 

Associate Professor of 
Speech and Dramatics 
"a paradox of creativity 
and discipline" — M.W. 



J. Van B. Coe 
Assistant Professor of 
Economics 
"E'coe'nomics" — H.K.B. 





Mary L. Greenhoe 
Assistant Professor of Music 
"a gracious person — sincere 
and dedicated" — A. A. 



Martha B. Hale 

Instructor in Art 
"captures more in pictures 
than can be found in 
words " — B.C. 



Charles A. Browning 
Associate Professor of Physics 
"as thoughtful as knowledge- 
able" — M.N. 




Raymond Downing 

Assistant Professor of 

Modern Languages 

"demands less of his students 
than of himself" — J.G. 




Andrew H. Harper, Jr. 
Associate Professor of Music 
"makes music a joy" — H.K.B. 




Martha K. Hedley 

Instructor in Business 
Administration 
"Teacher at mind, student 
at heart" — J.M. 




Carl B. Honaker 

Professor of Chemistry 
"direct, interesting, adept" 
— J.O.E. 




B. T. Hutson 
Associate Professor of 
Business Administration 
"Friendliness, his strongest 

point; memory, his weakest" 
—H.K.B. 




Doris Jones 

Instructor in English 
"Capable, versatile, humor- 
ously expressive " — P.C. 



22 



FACULTY 







Paul Ketron 
Instructor in Mathematics 
"Can it be proven?" — L.L.L. 



E. Russell Lacy 
Associate Professor of History 
"a teacher in the true sense" 
— M.F.T. 



Ben H. McClary 
Assistant Professor of English 
"versatile, generous, unique" 
— K.T.G. 



Robert H. Mathis 
Instructor in History 
"a real history professor" 
— S.L. 




Claryse D. Myers 

hibrarian 
"efficiency exceeded only by 
thoughtfulness" — D.A. 





J. Emerick Nagy 
Associate Professor of 
Education 
"requires work and deter- 
mination" — B.W. 



Anne Puett 
Instructor in Art 
"strong personality with 
feminine touch" — R.O.A. 




Charles Sallis 
Assistant Professor of History 
"a dream of a teacher" 
— M.L.R. 




Harrylyn G. Sallis 

Assistant Professor of Music 

"a challenging teacher" — A. P. 




Carolyn F. Staley 

Instructor in Physical 

Education 

"Sharp, gentle, sophisticated" 

— P.C 

Pictured else where: 

Mark Schafer 
Professor of Political Science 






C. C. Senn 
Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics 
"explains his subjea to 
perfeaion"' — H.B. 



Alton L. Smith 
Instructor in Mathematics 
"his concern is for his 
students" — S.L. 



M. Clifton Smith 
Associate Professor of 
Education 
"adds enough wit to make 
class refreshing"- — C.C. 






Genevieve Wiggins 
Assistant Professor of English 
"a good advisor, a great 
Chaucerian" — D.K. 

Mildred Archer 

Associate Professor of English 



23 



Jack H. Wilson 
Associate Professor of 
Religion 
"LEADER"— J.W. 

William H. Archer 

Associate Professor of 

Modern Languages 



William B. Yates 
Instructor in Speech 
"an unsung cynosure" 
— R.V.J. 

Fred Puett 

Instructor in Commercial 
Subjects 



STAFF 



Carolyn Allison, 

Secretary to the Dean of Admissions 
and Registrar 

Evelyn M. Bowling, 

Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Vera Coe, 

Assistant to the Librarian 

Sally D. Ealy, 

Secretary to the Dean of Admissions 
and Registrar 

WiUiam Elrod, 

Assistant to the Business Manager 

Maggie Ensminger, 

Reference Assistant in the Library 



Blanche L. Greene, 

Head Resident, Lucy Hornsby Fowler Hall 

Janet Faye Johnson, 

Secretary to the Director of Admissions 

Ida Ruth Lewis, 

Head Resident, Lawrence Hall 



Dixie C. Liner, 
Nurse 

Janette Morrison, 

Secretary to the Business Manager 

Reba Parsons, 

Relief Resident, Lucy Hornsby Fowler Hall 



Melinda Ray, 

Secretary to the Business Manager 

Elizabeth R. Reed, 

Cataloging Assistant in the Library 

Sally Robeson, 

Head Resident, Centennial Hall 



Nancy H. Seepe, 

Secretary to the Dean 

James A. Snell, 

Representative of Morrison's Food Service 

Louie Underwood, 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Betty Carolyn Ward, 
Periodicals Librarian 

Norma Whitehead, 

Secretary to the Assistant to the 
President 

Mary Kate Wohlwend, 

Secretary to the Librarian 

Pictured elsewhere: 

Robbie J. Ensminger, 

Secretary to the President 

Mildred Smith, 

Bookstore Manager 




24 




CLASSES 



Seniors 27 

Juniors 3 8 

Sophomores 43 

Freshmen 51 



25 




CLASS PRESIDENTS 

William Lockerby, Freshman 
Mary Lou Robbins, Jimior 
Raymond Barr, Sophomore 
Carl Tarpley, Senior 



For pictures of other class officers, 
see pages 37, 38, 43, and 51. 



Through the weekly meetings of the Student 
Council and other organizational gatherings, 
the class presidents make known the ideas and 
desires of their individual classes. But the door 
of Wesleyan's President Mohney is always 
open to them — as to all students. Occasional 
"Big Five" Summit meetings, such as the one 
pictured here, help to cement the bond be- 
tween students and administration. 

26 • .. • •.. • .V , ■■::■ ' 



^■v .'. 



38^50 




SENIORS 



JAMES H. ACKERMAN 
25 Jewett Avenue 
Clifton, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Arts 
Beta Beta Beta, 4; Roundtable, 2. 

RODNEY J. ACKERMAN 
Route 1, Highland Avenue 
New Jersey 
Bachelor of Arts 

Inter-Fraternity Council, 2, 3; Sigma Phi Epsilon, 1, 2, 
3, 4, Pledge Educator, 2; Circle K, 3, 4. 

WILLIAM HOYLE ALBRITTON 
2801 Highland Drive 
Cleveland, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Wesleyan Scholar, 3, 4; National Methodist Scholarship; 
Student Council, 1, 2; President of Freshman Class, Vice- 
President of Sophomore Class; Neti' Exponent Staff, 3; 
Inter-Fraternity Council, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer, 4; Sig- 
ma Phi Epsilon, 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 2, Senior Marshall, 
3, President, 4; Circle K, 1, 2, 3, 4; Debate Team, 3, 4; 
Choir, 1, 2, 3; Brigadoon; South Pacific: Ambassador, 2; 
SCA, 1, 2, 3, 4; Religious Life Council, 3, 4; Chi Rho, 
1, 2, 3. 

SANDRA ALLEN 

3298 Van Buren Street 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Bachelor of Science 

Panhellenic Council; Kappa Delta, 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 3, 

Membership Chairman, 4; SAM, Secretary-Treasurer. 



GENEVA S, ATKINS 
500 Pennsylvania Avenue 
Etowah, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

JOHN BARRY BARNETT 
1319 Ohio Avenue 
Etowah, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 



JOSEPH A. BOWDEN 
206 East Third Avenue 
Lenoir City, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

Secretary of Junior Class; Inter-Fraternity Council, 3; 
Phi Sigma Kappa, 1, 2, 3, 4, Inductor, 4. 

TOMMY BURNETT 
3008 Creekwood 
Nashville, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

Transfer from Cimiberland Junior College; Who's Who 
Among Students in American Universities and Colleges; 
Student Council, 4, President of Student Body, 4; Inter- 
Fraternity Council, 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 3, 4; Circle 
K, 3, 4, Board of Directors, 4; Debate Team, 3, 4; Sci- 
ence Club, Steering Committee, 4; Round Table, 3, 4; 
SCA, 3, 4; Religious Life Council, 4. 



Merner - PfeiFfer Library 
Tennessee Wesleyon ColJ«9« 27 
Atlwns, Tfl 




SENIORS 



JAMES ELMER BYRD 
Indian River Village 
LaFollette, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

RICHARD CAMP 
5212 Rellin Road 
Knoxville, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 



BOBBY M. CARTER 

Concord, North Carolina 
Bachelor of Arts 
Choir, 4. 

BEN D. CHISM, JR. 

2512 Henderson Avenue 
Cleveland, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 
Science Club, 2; Choir, 2. 



JAMES EDWIN DAVIS 
Georgia Avenue 
Etowah, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 
SAM, 2; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4, Basketball Manager, 4 

CHARLES ROSS DERRICK 
Route 1 

Englewood, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 



LYNN E, DERREBERRY 
Copperhill, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

CHARLES E. DIXON 
985 Benton Pike 
Cleveland, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 



28 



SENIORS 



JUNE TO^X^SEND DOTSON 
708 Washington Avenue 
Etowah, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 
Transfer from Carson-Newman. 

BETTY JEAN DOUGLAS 
535 Warren Street 
Madisonville, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges; Wesleyan Scholar, 3; Alpha Beta, Treas- 
urer, 3; Delta Rho Mu Music Fraternity, 3, 4, Secretary- 
Treasurer, 2; Freshman Chemistry Award, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Yates Award, 1; Sherman Music Award, 3; Kap- 
pa Delta, 1, 2, 3, 4, President, 2; Treasurer, 3, 4; Science 
Club, 2; Choir, 1, 2, 3, 4; Brigadoon, South Pacific, 
Pirates of Penzance. 

JACK EDMONDS, JR. 

40 English Street 
Teaticket, Massachusetts 
Bachelor of Arts 

Inter-Fraternity Council, 2, Secretary-Treasurer, 3, Presi- 
dent, 4; Pi Kappa Phi, 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian, 2, President, 
3, Warden, 4; Ambassador, 3. 

PIERCE JACK EDWARDS 
Galax, Virginia 
Bachelor of Arts 
SCA, 2, 3; Chi Rho, 3, 4. 

JAMES OWEN ELLIS 
205 Green Street 
Athens, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges; Wesleyan Scholar, 3, 4; Chemical Rubber 
Company Award, 1, Chemical Rubber Company Award 
for Physics, 2, TWC Scholars' Award, 3; Pi Sigma 
Kappa, 4; Circle K, 2, 3, 4. 

JAMES S. FRANKS, JR. 
507 Cherokee Drive 
Newport, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

William Rule Essay Contest, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa, 3, 4; 
Circle K, 2, 3, 4; Beta Beta Beta, 3, 4. 





JUDITH WHITSON FURMAN 
Cookeville, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

PHIL GARDNER 

215 Ridgedale Avenue 
Florham Park, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Arts 

Round Table, 1, 2, 3, President, 2; William Rule Essay 
Award, 2; Student Council, 3, 4; New Exponent Staff, 
1, 2, 3; Inter- Fraternity Council, 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary- 
Treasurer, 1, 2; Pi Kappa Phi, 1, 2, 3, 4, President, 1, 2, 
Warden, 3, Chaplain, 4; Brigadoon, South Pacific, Pirates 
of Penzance; Ambassador, 2; SCA, 1, 2, Worship Chair- 
man, 3, President, 4; Religious Life Council, 2, 3, 4. 



29 




SENIORS 



SANDRA GARRISON 
South Main 
Sweetwater, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

KAREN TREHER GILLIKIN 
606 Ohio Street 
Athens, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges; Wesleyan Scholar, 2, 3; Dell A. Biggs 
English Award, 2; Student Council, 2; Nocatida Staff, 1, 
2, 3, Editor, 2; Choir, 1, 2; South Pacific; Ambassador, 1; 
SCA, 1, 2; Chi Rho, 1, 2, 3. 



JAMES HATCHER GRAHAM, JR. 

506 Lincoln Avenue 

Newport, Tennessee 

Bachelor of Arts 

Pi Kappa Phi, 3, 4, Scholastic Chairman, 4; Choir, 2. 

JUDY GROSECLOSE 

Route 3 

Wytheville, Virginia 

Bachelor of Science 

Beta Beta Beta, 3, 4, Secretary, 4; Alpha Xi Delta, 3, 4, 

Marshal, 4; WAA. 



KENNETH EARL GUFFEY 
Overland Road 
Athens, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

SUE ELLA HANKINS 
5501 Crestwood Drive 
KnoxviUe, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

Who's Who in American Universities and Colleges; 
Beta Beta Beta, 3, 4, Vice-President, 4; Panhellenic 
Council, 2; Kappa Delta, 2, 3, 4, Editor, 2, President, 3, 
4; Choir, 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 3, 4; .yoz///:) Pacific, Pirates of 
Penzance; Ambassador, 2; SCA, 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 3, Vice- 
President, 4; Religious Life Council, 3, 4, Secretary, 4; 
Chi Rho, 2. 



WILLIAM ALBERT HENRY 
Star Route 

Spring City, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

WILLIAM LARRY HICKS 
Strange Road 
Lenoir City, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 
Sigma Phi Epsilon, 2, 3, 4. 



30 



SENIORS 



JOHNNY HUDDLESTON 
902 Cleve Street 
Old Hickory, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

Student Council, 2, 4; SAM, 4; Basketball, 2; Tennis, 
3,4. 

MARGARET ALICE HUGHES 
Charleston, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges; Wesleyan Scholar, 4; Senior Class Secre- 
tary; Nocatula Staff, 4; Choir, 3, 4; Pirates of Penzance. 

NORMAN B. JACKSON 
Dunlap, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Phi Sigma Kappa, 3, 4, Pledgemaster, 4; Circle K, 3, 4; 
SAM, 4. 

JOE HARRISON JENKINS 
Tapoco, North Carolina 
Bachelor of Science 
SAM, 4. 

ROSS VERNON JENNINGS 
315 Cherokee Street 
Kingsport, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges; Wesleyan Scholar, 3, 4; Pi Gamma Mu, 4; 
Alpha Beta, 3, 4; Dell A. Biggs Award, Balfour Award, 
Senior Debate Award; Student Council, 4; Senior Class 
Boy Representative, 4; Nocatula Staff, 1, 2, 3, 4; Neiv 
Exponent Staff, 2, 3, Editor, 4; Roundtable, President 3, 
4; Sigma Phi Epsilon, 3, 4, Scholarship Chairman, 4; 
Circle K, 2, Treasurer, 3; Debate Team, 3, 4; South 
Pacific, 2; Ambassador, 3. 

EDWARD J. JOHNSON 

126 Englewood 
Englewood, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

JUDITH KAY JONES 
1401 Lament Street 
Kingsporth, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges; Delta Rho Mu Music Fraternity, 1, 2, 3; 
Student Council, 1, 3; Freshman Girl Representative; 
Circle K, Sweetheart, 2, 3; Choir, 1, 2, 3, Accompanist, 
2, 3; Sottth Pacific, Pirates of Penzance; Ambassador, 

1, 2; Religious Life Council, 3. 

ALAN H. KENNEDY 
234 Augur Street 
Hamden, Connecticut 
Bachelor of Arts 

Student Council, 1, 2; Freshman and Sophomore Boy 
Representative; Nocatula Staff, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon, 1, 

2, 3, 4; Pledge President, 1, Pledge Educator, 2, Guard 
and Social Chairman, 3, Vice-President, 4; Roundtable, 
1, 2, Vice-President, 2; Choir, 1, 2; Brigadoon. 




31 




SENIORS 



JAMES L. KINSER 
Greenback, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 
SAM, 4. 

DONALD R. KNIGHT 
Lynnwood Apartments 
Athens, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 
Choir, 4. 



GARY STEPHEN KYKER 

Farrel Street 
Niota, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

Wesleyan Scholar, 3, 4; American Chemical Society; Na- 
tional Science Foundation Research Grant, 3, 4; Vice- 
President of Freshman Class; Sigma Phi Epsilon, 1, 2, 3, 
4, Guard, 1; Science Club, Treasurer, 3; Golf,l, 2, 3, 4. 

LAKIE MONROE LILLARD 
Benton, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 
Phi Sigma Kappa, 3, 4. 



LUNDY LOVELACE 
606 Johnson Street 
Athens, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Circle K, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President, 2, Director, 3, President, 
4; Choir, 2, 3, 4; President, 3, 4; 5oz/;^ Pacific, Pirates of 
Penzance; SCA, 2, 3, 4, Fellowship Chairman, 3. 

LeANN LUTTRELL 

3607 East Kesterwood Drive 
Knoxville, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Panhellenic Council, 4, Secretary-Treasurer; Alpha Xi 
Delta, 3, 4, Chaplain, 4; SCA, 2, 3, 4; Secretary of Ten- 
nessee Methodist Student Movement; Religious Life 
Council, 4; Chi Rho, 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 3, Vice-Presi- 
dent, 4. 



CLIFFORD LYNCH 

Madisonville, Tennessee 

Bachelor of Science 

Phi Theta Kappa; Beta Beta Beta, 4. 

MILTON LEWIS McILWAIN 
118 Woodmont Circle 
Clinton, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

Beta Beta Beta, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Inter-Fraternity 
Council, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon, 2, 3, 4, Pledge Educator, 
3, Comptroller, 4; Circle K, 2, 3, 4. 



32 



SENIORS 



ROSE ANN MALONE 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

ANN MASON 
1113 Price Street 
Sweetwater, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 
Sigma Kappa, 1, 2, 3, 4; SCA, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



BARBARA ROSE MILLER 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

PAUL LEE MOORE 
705 Wabash Street 
Athens, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 
Chi Rho, 3, 4. 





LARRY BEA NOLEN 
Cedar Springs Drive 
Athens, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 
Phi Sigma Kappa, 1, 2, 



3,4; Tennis, 2; SAM. 



JOHN E. PENN 
106 Parma Road 
Oak Ridge, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

Bar Association Award, 3; Student Council, Vice-Presi- 
dent, 3; Inter-Fraternity Council, 3, 4, President, 3; Phi 
Sigma Kappa, 3, 4, Secretary, 3, President, 4; Circle K, 
3, 4; SAM, 3, 4, President, 4; Choir, Steering Commit- 
tee, 4; SCA, 3, 4, Religious Life Council, 4. 



WILLIAM B. PETTY, JR. 

1607 23rd Street, South 
Arlington 2, Virginia 
Bachelor of Science 

Student Council, 4; Vice-President of Senior Class; Inter- 
Fraternity Council, 4; Pi Kappa Phi, President, 4, Scholar- 
ship Chairman, 3; Circle K, 3, 4; Vice-President, 4; Choir 
3, 4; Pirates of Penzance; SCA, 3, 4, Projects Chairman, 
4; Religious Life Council, 4. 

RICHARD PICKELL 
708 "C" Street 
Lenoir City, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 
Basketball, Baseball, 3, 4. 



33 




SENIORS 



NEETA A. PUETT 
Box 66 

Athens, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Wesleyan Scholar, 2, 3; Sigma Kappa, 1, 2, 3, Registrar, 
1, Secretary, 2, 3; Debate Team, 1, 2; SCA, 1, 2, 3; 
Model United Nations Delegate, 2, 3. 

KAY RAYFIELD 
Box 86 

Blountville, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges; Wesleyan Scholar, 3, 4; Alpha Beta; Span- 
ish Award, 2; Class Secretary, 1, 2; Bulldog Staff, 2; Al- 
pha Xi Delta, Journal Correspondent, 2, President, 3, 4. 

LEON RAYFIELD 
Route 5 

Lenoir City, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

DENNIS DUAIN RICH 
1625 Washington Avenue 
Kingsport, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges; Wesleyan Scholar, 4; Herman Hickman 
Award, Walter Clyde Curry Award; Student Council, 4; 
Nocatula Staff, Editor, 4; Neu> Exponent Staff, 3; Phi 
Sigma Kappa, 4; Circle K, 3, 4, Board of Directors, 4; 
Ambassador, 3; Religious Life Council, 3, 4; Basketball 
1,2,3. 

CATHRYN ANN RICHESIN 
Route 2 

Philadelphia, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Wesleyan Scholar, 4; Phi Theta Kappa, 1, 2, Vice-Presi- 
dent, 2; SCA, 2, 3; Chi Rho, 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 4. 

CAROLYN GRACE ROBINETTE 
Sweetwater, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 
Sigma Kappa, 4. 



DAVID PRATT 
1 1 Delores Drive 
Altamonte Springs, Florida 
Bachelor of Arts 

Annual Staff, Photographer, 3, 4; Paper Staff, 3, Photog- 
rapher; Choir, 2, 3; Brigadoon, South Pacific; Ambas- 
sador, 3; Chi Rho, 2, 3, 4, President, 3. 

JAMES WILLIAM PRICE 

Wyandotte Avenue 
Big Stone Gap, Virginia 
Bachelor of Arts 
Sigma Phi Epsilon, 3, 4. 



34 



SENIORS 



PATRICIA ROWE 

1040 South Orlando Avenue 

Cocoa Beach, Florida 

Bachelor of Arts 

New Exponent Staff, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Delta, 3, 4; Briga- 

doon, South Pacific, Pirates of Penzance. 

JAMES H. RUTHERFORD 

Route 2 

Decatur, Tennessee 

Bachelor of Arts 

SCA, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Rho, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JUANITA WOMAC SCARBROUGH 
318 Lynn Avenue 
Athens, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

Bulldog Staff, 2; Panhellenic Council, 2; Kappa Delta, 
1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President, 2, 3, Educational Chairman, 3. 

AGATHA SHUMAKE 
Route 5 

Staunton, Virginia 
Bachelor of Arts 
Choir, 3; South Pacific; SCA, 3, 4; Chi Rho, 3, 4. 



LYNDA GARRISON SMITH 
Route 2 

Spring City, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

DELANE STILES 
Route 1 

Englewood, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 





CARL E. TARPLEY, JR. 
Salem, Virginia 
Bachelor of Science 

Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges; Student Council, 2, 3, 4; Class President, 
2, 4, Vice-President, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa, 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Vice-President, 4. 

JOYCE E. TARPLEY 
Salem, Virginia 
Bachelor of Arts 



35 




SENIORS 



ELIZABETH BANKS WILHITE, JR. 
107 Forrest Avenue 
Athens, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

National Methodist Scholarship; Kappa Delta Sorority, 
1, 2, 3, Treasurer, 2, Scholarship Chairman, 3; Delta Rho 
Mu Music Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Choir, 1, 2, 
3, 4, Soloist, 3, 4, Trio, 2; Kismet, South Pacific, Pirates 
of Penzance; SCA, 1, 2, 3, 4; Life Service Girls, 1, 2. 

MEL B. WILHITE, JR. 
107 Forrest Avenue 
Athens, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Delta Rho Mu Music Fraternity, 2, 3, 4; Student Council, 
1; Class Vice-President, 1; Choir, 1, 2, 3, 4, Soloist, 3, 4; 
Kismet, South Pacific, Pirates of Penzance; SCA, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Chi Rho, 2. 



CAROLYN WAYNE TILLEY 
Kingston, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Wesleyan Scholar, 4; Phi Theta Kappa Honorary Fra- 
ternity; Girl Representative, 2, 3, 4, Student National 
Education Association Treasurer, 2; Nocattda, 2, 4. 

BEATRICE VINSANT 
Cedar Grove Road 
Jacksboro, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 



MARY ANN WARE 

Box 563 

Copperhill, Tennessee 

Bachelor of Science 

SANDRA GAIL WEBB 
507 Lord Street 
Maryville, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Arts 

Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges; Wesleyan Scholar, 4; Phi Theta Kappa, 2; 
Neu' Exponent Staff, 4; Transfer from Hiwassee College. 



MARTHA WHATLEY 

1409 Fiske Street 
Cocoa, Florida 
Bachelor of Arts 
New Exponent Staff, 3, 4; 

BETTY JO WHITAKER 
South Ohio Avenue 
Etowah, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 



Nocatula Staff, 4. 




36 



SENIORS 



ARVELLA WILLIAMS 
Etowah, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 
Transfer from East Tennessee State University. 

ELIZABETH J. WILLIAMS 

LeConte Drive 
Maryville, Tennessee 
Bachelor of Science 

Riddle and Wallace Prize, Mrs. F. O. Foree Award; Sen- 
ior Class Treasurer; Panhelienic Council, 3, 4, Vice- 
President, 4; Sigma Kappa, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer, 3, Second 
Vice-President, 4, Athletic Chairman, 3, 4; Debate Team, 
2; SCA, 1, 2, 4; Religious Life Council, 4; WAA, Man- 
ager of Softball, 2; Vice-President, 3. 

CHRIS C. O. WONG 

Sibu 

Sarawak, Malaysia 

Bachelor of Science 

Mr. and Mrs. George Yates Prize, 1, The Chemical Rub- 
ber Company Award, 2. 





Senior Class Officers: Bill Petty, Boy 
Representative; Carolyn Tilley, Girl 
Representative: Elizabeth Williams, 
Treasurer: Ross V. Jennings, Vice- 
President: Carl Tarpley, President; 
Alice Hughes, Secretary. 



(Below) President Tarpley conducts Sen- 
ior Class meeting. 




JUNIORS 



Junior Class Officers: Lana Mynatt, Girl Represen- 
tative; Mary Lou Robbins, President; Bill Ketcher- 
sid, Boy Representative; Joe Bowden, Secretary. 
(Kathy Edgemon, Vice-President, pictured else- 
where) 



WILLIAM C. AIKEN 
408 MiUigan Drive 
Greeneville, Tennessee 

MELINDA ALFORD 
518 Clinton St. 
Harriman, Tennessee 

SALLY C. BAXTER 
40 Woods Hole Road 
Falmouth, Massachusetts 



PATSY ANN BENNETT 

4 Castle Avenue 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 
ERIC BOLLINGER 

4040 Hershberger Road 

Roanoke, Virginia 
PHYLLIS S. BROCK 

Box 322 

Englewood, Tennessee 



BARBARA D. CLEMENTSON 

Route 1 

Decatur, Tennessee 
EVANGELINE SUE COCHRAN 

Box 194, Route 1 

Unicoi, Tennessee 
JAMES TOMMY COLEMAN, JR 

1292 Farrow Road 

Memphis, Tennessee 



MARGARET PENNY COLL 
129 Nyetimber Parkway 
Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 

JUNE M. COLVIN 
1316 Winder Street 
Athens, Tennessee 

MILDRED SUE CRUMLEY 
Indian River Village 
LaFollette, Tennessee 



JUNIORS 



WILLIAM H. CURTIS 
Route 3 
Knoxville, Tennessee 

GEORGE R. DAVIDSON 
1033 Highland Avenue 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

MELBA M. DAVIS 
Delano, Tennessee 



F. ALLEN DENNIS 
608 Johnson Street 
Athens, Tennessee 

JOHN OLIVER DUNN 
Route 1 
Townsend, Tennessee 

RANDY C EDGEMON 
Route 2 
Ten Mile, Tennessee 



HORACE M. ELLIS, III 
205 Green Street 
Athens, Tennessee 

RELUS K. FLEMING 
601 Virginia Avenue 
Athens, Tennessee 

EARL LYNN FREEMAN, JR. 
Route 1 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

THOMAS M. HELT 
311 Beechwood Drive 
Knoxville, Tennessee 

FRED C. HICKS 

Englewood, Tennessee 

CHARLES W. HOGAN 
46 16 Alabama Avenue 
Lynchburg, Virginia 



LARRY W. HUFFMAN 
2355 Oak Avenue 
Buena Vista, Virginia 

MONA FA YE HUNT 
Box 15 
Tellico Plains, Tennessee 

ROBERT L. INGRAM 
Red Hill Road, Route 1 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



DANNY E. JOHNSON 
Shoemaker Apartments 
Athens, Tennessee 

JAMES W. JOHNSON 
1400 Bell Street 
Athens, Tennessee 

FRED C. KEENER 

7 Brookside 
Sweetwater, Tennessee 





JUNIORS 



WILLIAM KETCHERSID 

Box 413 

Spring City, Tennessee 

MARY MARLENE LATHAM 
Route 5 
Sevierville, Tennessee 

JOHN L. LEE 

218 West Fairview Road 
Oak Ridge, Tennessee 

ALICE L. LOOMIS 
South Lee Highway 
Sweetwater, Tennessee 

GAIL E. LOWERY 
3419 Deli Trail 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

GEORGE DUDLEY LYTLE 
3589 Hildana Road 
Shaker Heights 20, Ohio 

MARGARET LEE McKENZIE 
Box 309a, Route 5 
Athens, Tennessee 

WILLIAM PETER MILLER, JR. 
100 Second Avenue 
Jonesboro, Tennessee 

LYNN P. MONDAY 
Route 19 
Knoxville 20, Tennessee 

RICHARD W. MYERS 

3348 North New Jersey Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

LANA MYNATT 

125 Fair Street 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

MARGARET JEANNE NEAS 
115 North Willow Street 
Erwin, Tennessee 

DON R. NOLEN 

509 Cedar Springs Road 
Athens, Tennessee 

REBA JOYCE PATTERSON 
Route 1 
Trenton, Georgia 

JOHN R. PYLE 
Route 2 
Port Jervis, New York 

JUDITH C. RAPIER 
119 Epperson Avenue 
Athens, Tennessee 

FLOYD H. RENO 
Route 1 
Athens, Tennessee 

MARY LOU ROBBINS 
Bland Road, Route 1 
Clinton, Tennessee 



rHlI'lli <::i iflk : 



sasa 




Ralph Koger, Meryl Noe, Bill Fox, and Tommy Coleman: Waiting for the cafeteria line to open. 

(confinued on page 42) 



JUNIORS 

EWART S. ROBINSON 
100 Peach Road 
Oak Ridge, Tennessee 

JAMES E. ROGERS 
Route 1 
Englewood, Tennessee 

KATHLEEN E. ROWE 

1040 South Orlando Avenue 
Cocoa Beach, Florida 



PATRICIA L. SATTERFIELD 

2908 Oswald Street 
Knoxville, Tennessee 

EARLENE L. SIMPSON 
Box 111 
Oakwood, Virginia 

PAMELA J. SNELBAKER 
41 Copper Street 
Woodbury, New Jersey 

ROBERT E. SOWDERS 

Box 113 

Calhoun, Tennessee 

WILLIAM ROY SPRINKLE, JR. 
704 Elizabeth Street 
Athens, Tennessee 

TAMES MICHAEL STEWART 

2141 East 27th Street 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 



MILDRED A. SUTTON 
Box 30 
Etowah, Tennessee 

EDWARD W. TAYLOR 
Box 282 
Crisfield, Maryland 

JERRY L. TIPTON 
Burkhart Road 
Knoxville, Tennessee 





JUNIORS 

MARY FRANCES TROTTER 
Box 1024 
Pulaski, Virginia 

CHARLOTTE LOUISE TURNER 
130 Circle Drive 
Etowah, Tennessee 

ALAN VAN OSTENBRIDGE 
166 Francisco Avenue 
Little Falls, New Jersey 

HUGH W. WALKER 
1100 Watercrest Drive 
Knoxville, Tennessee 

RICHARD A. WALKER 
Womach's Trailer Park 
Athens, Tennessee 

MARILYN R. WARD 

Route 4 

Sweetwater, Tennessee 

JO HENRY WESTCOTT 
Womach's Trailer Park 
Athens, Tennessee 

LINDA L. WESTON 

1725 White Street 
Knoxville, Tennessee 

WILLIAM H. WIBEL 
60 Boulevard 
Mountain Lakes, New Jersey 

SAM R. WILLIAMS 
1104 Huffland Drive 
Loudon, Tennessee 

PEGGY R. WOMACK 

Box 305 

Athens, Tennessee 

GENE WORTHINGTON 
2213 Martha Berry Drive 
Knoxville, Tennessee 



Gil Martin, Mr. Snell, Larry Westcott, Mary Walker, behind the serving counter as Meryl Noe is the first 
student through the cafeteria line. (coniinued on page 53) 




SOPHOMORES 



Sophomore Class Officers: Raymond Barr, Presi- 
dent; Roy Sewell, Vice-President; Eddie Barham, 
Boy Representative; Cheryl Corum, Girl Represen- 
tative. (Judy Hutsell, Secretary, pictured else- 
where ) 




INGRID R. ADKINS 
3111 13th Road 
Arlington, Virginia 

LOU DEANA ARMES 
Wartburg, Tennessee 

HERMAN C. AU 
924 Carden Street 
Rossville, Georgia 



G. FAYE BACON 
Box 5, Clark Road 
Harrison, Tennessee 

JUDITH A. BANGS 
109 George Avenue 
Pearl River, New York 

CHARLES E. BARHAM 
1409 Bethune 
Rossville, Georgia 



W. RAYMOND BARR 
Warren Street 
Athens, Tennessee 

ALMA MAXINE BENNETT 
Big Spring, Tennessee 

SANDRA W. BLUNT 
Route 3, Target Rock Road 
Huntington, New York 



HELEN BRANDT 

1275 South River Street 
Marshfield, Massachusetts 

HARRI KAY BROOKS 
925 Washington Street 
Sturgis, Kentucky 

LLOYD E. BUTT 
28 Jefferson Avenue 
Everett, Massachusetts 





SOPHOMORES 



LINDA C. BUTTRAM 

723 Elizabeth Street 
Athens, Tennessee 

TIMOTHY R. CARPENTER 
305 Kilgore Street 
Athens, Tennessee 

JAMES J. GATE 
Box 371 
Jasper, Tennessee 

VAN DARNELL CHANCE 
417 Burns Road 
Knoxville, Tennessee 

WILLIAM CLIMER 
319 Lynn Avenue 
Athens, Tennessee 

CHERYL ANN CORUM 
2226 Coker Avenue 
Knoxville, Tennessee 

JOE W. DAKE 
Route 2 
Greenback, Tennessee 

JANE E. DEFRIESE 
120 Morningside Drive 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

ALICE SUE DEW 

Box 43 

Powell, Tennessee 



LEE DOUGLAS 

3672 Knollwood Drive 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

JAMES C. EASTON 
20 Roger Avenue 
Cranford, New Jersey 

MARY JANE EPPERSON 
Cedar Springs Road 
Athens, Tennessee 

AILENE EVERETT 
Route 1 
Athens, Tennessee 

JAMES G. FAIR 
1609 Betts Avenue 
Athens, Tennessee 

JAMES P. FORBES 
147 Stigall Street 
Camden, Tennessee 

FRANCES M. FREESTONE 
412 Elkmont Road 
Concord, Tennessee 

JUDY ALICE GREEN 
111 Alabama Avenue 
Clinton, Tennessee 

ROBERT KENNY GROSS 

3609 Craig Road 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 



A typical night in Centennial Hall: John 
Wesley Hill, David Archer, and Joel Jones 
sharing Mrs. Robeson's newspaper, tele- 
vision set, and conversation. 

(conlinued on page 46) 




SOPHOMORES 

GUY B. HAMILTON 
213 Holmes Street 
Boonton, New Jersey 

GATHA MAE HARD A WAY 
609 Raven Street 
Athens, Tennessee 

CYNTHIA P. HICKS 

Main Street 
Niota, Tennessee 



SARAH ANNE HIPP 
302 Peachbloom Drive 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

ELIZABETH ANN HITCH 
802 Mountain View Avenue 
Maryville, Tennessee 

JUDITH LYNN HOLT 
Route 1 
Bybee, Tennessee 



MARTHA L. COOPER 
Route 2 
Georgetown, Tennessee 

HANEY HOWELL 
Box 248 
Copperhill, Tennessee 

DAVID A. HURD 

1 34 North 6th Street 
Pulaski, Virginia 



FRED A. HUTSELL 
Route 2 
Riceville, Tennessee 

JUDY A. HUTSELL 
Tuckahechee Pike 
Maryville, Tennessee 

SARAH ISENHOWER 
Route 1 
Calhoun, Tennessee 





SOPHOMORES 

HAROLD R. JACKSON 
2606 Grace Street 
Knoxville, Tennessee 

DAVID C. KEEBLER 
Route 9 
Jonesboro, Tennessee 

NANCY E. KETCHERSID 
2905 East 37th Street 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 



CAROLYN L. KETNER 
Route 5 
Morristown, Tennessee 

RICHARD C. KILE 
1802 McBrien Road 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

DONNA JANE KING 
Copperhill, Tennessee 



JOYCE L. KRONMILLER 
Box 55, Route 1 
Dover, New Jersey 

ROBERT H. LAMB 
Box 550, Oak Street 
Athens, Tennessee 

GRACIE A. LAMPHERE 
Greene Acres 
Kingston, Tennessee 



JOHN H. LANE 

1018 North Runyan Drive 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

PAUL R. LEACH 
Route 2 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

LOUISE ANNE LEITCH 
Route 3 
Maryville, Tennessee 



Joe Gothard, Mahlon Bryan, Joel West, Larry Oldham, and David Archer in Centennial Hall's tele- 
vision room— at this split second the darkness mode bright by the photographer's flashbulb. 

(continued on page 49) 




SOPHOMORES 



JEAN CHIEN S. LIU 
Volunteer Heights 
Crossville, Tennessee 

JAMES R. LONG 
134 Circle Drive 
Etowah, Tennessee 

JEROME E. LONG 
109 West Locust Street 
Johnson City, Tennessee 



MARY J. LONG 
Box 321 
Etowah, Tennessee 

SANDRA CARROLL LONG 
905 Sterling Avenue 
Maryville, Tennessee 

LINDA LEE LONGMIRE 
Route 1 
Andersonville, Tennessee 



JOHN B. LOVE 
Cedar Springs Road 
Athens, Tennessee 

LOUIE DON LUSK 
7113 Sheffield Drive 
Knoxville 19, Tennessee 

GEORGE A. McGREW, JR. 
Box 505 
Jasper, Tennessee 



HILDA E. MARTIN 
Walland, Tennessee 

NANCY E. MARTIN 
Box 468 
Lake City, Tennessee 

RICHARD M. MILLER 
Ruggles Ferry 
Knoxville, Tennessee 



RICHARD A. MOMO 
Reidy Place 
Hewitt, New Jersey 

BETTY MOON 

Big Springs, Tennessee 

KATHRYN L. MURRAY 

7330 Mindello Street 
Coral Gables, Florida 



DORIS JOAN MYNATT 
125 Fair Street 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

KEITH A. NICHOLSON 
914 Rosedale Avenue 
Loudon, Tennessee 

MERYL D. NOE 
Route 1 
Corydon, Indiana 





SOPHOMORES 



SPENCER D. NOE 

Route 1 
Corydon, Indiana 

STEPHEN W. OVERALL 
223 Hemphill Avenue 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

CHARLES MICHAEL OVERSTREET 
2915 Pine Drive 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

ANA RITA PEREZ 

511 East Madison Avenue 
Athens, Tennessee 

CLYDE J. PERRY 

1322 Young Avenue 
Maryviile, Tennessee 

ALICE ELIZABETH PICKET 
Box 645 
Kingston, Tennessee 

SUE ANN POLBOS 
54 Heck Avenue 
Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

MARY RUTH POLLARD 
Route 1 
Kodak, Tennessee 

DONNA VIRGINIA RAY 

413 Madison, East 
Athens, Tennessee 



LINDA J. RAY 
Route 5 
Athens, Tennessee 

MARTHA SUE RENFRO 
1300 Fairfax Avenue 
Knoxville, Tennessee 

RICHARD M. REYNOLDS 

23337 C. 45th Street 
Los Alamos, New Mexico 



SHARON LEE RICHARDS 
6401 SW 62 nd Terrace 
South Miami, Florida 

BARBARA J, ROBERTS 
Route 2 
Decatur, Tennessee 

LYNDA ANN RODERICK 
924 Barnabas Street, SW 
Athens, Tennessee 

JANELLE ROGERS 
East Broadway 
Rogersville, Tennessee 

JOHN S. ROLLINS 
Cannon Place 
Jasper, Tennessee 

OLIVIA D. RUDD 
503 Mitchell Street 
Knoxville, Tennessee 



SOPHOMORES 



MARGARET SANDERS 
Route 5 
Lawrenceburg, Tennessee 



EDWIN F. SAXMAN, III 
721 Broad P Chestnut 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



WILLIE ROY SEWELL 
Box 923, Route 2 
Lakeland, Florida 



EUGENIA A. SHEETS 
College Street 
Madisonville, Tennessee 



BARBARA Q. SIMMONS 
Box 606 
Copperhill, Tennessee 

STANLEY M. SIMMONS 
Box 606 
Copperhill, Tennessee 

WILLIAM A. SMALLING 
Box 445 
Galax, Virginia 



JOHN N. STEVENS 
1819 Harrison Avenue 
Orlando, Florida 

FREIDA J. STURGILL 
Box 337 
Wise, Virginia 

MARGARET V. SWAFFORD 
190 
Pikeville, Tennessee 





SOPHOMORES 



BRENDA R. THOMAS 
Route 3 
Sweetwater, Tennessee 

MARY KATHRYN TOOMEY 
108 Fourth Street 
Maryville, Tennessee 

JERRY T. TOWNSEND 
Route 1 
Calhoun, Tennessee 

MELVIN L. TURNER 
Route 4 
Maryville, Tennessee 

JOE H. WALKER 

Box 34 

Harriman, Tennessee 

EDMONIA L. WARD 
Box 66 
Bulls Gap, Tennessee 

TYRESHA ANN WATTS 
539 Eastanallee Avenue 
Athens, Tennessee 

KENNETH L. WELLS 
814 Spears Avenue 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

CHARLES S. WESLEY 
Route 3 
Stuxgis, Kentucky 

JAMES L. WESTCOTT, JR. 
515 Talley Road 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

JAMES E. WHEDBEE 
239 Oak Hill Avenue 
Knoxville, Tennessee 

JEAN CELL WHITE 
Box 6b, Route 6 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



DONALD D. WILLCOX 
36 Ox Ridge Lane 
Darien, Connecticut 

BARBARA H. WILLITS 
229 West High Street 
West Chester, Pennsylvania 

PETER M. WOHLWEND 
815 North Jackson Street 
Athens, Tennessee 




Honors English 202 in the 
spell of Mrs. Archer's dry wit: 
Harri Kay Brooks, Mike Over- 
street, Judy Green, Lynda 
Roderick, Alice Pickel, and 
Sandra Long. 




FRESHMEN 



JOYCE C. AILOR 

1417 Audena Drive, KnoxviUe, Tennessee 

DAVID E. ARCHER 

179 Oak Road, Norris, Tennessee 



JO ANN BABB 

306 West Second Ave., Lenoir City, Tennessee 



Freshman Class Officers: Bill Lockerby, President; Joe Eldrldge, 
Boy Representative; Dickie Sharpe, Treasurer; Connie Beaver, Vice- 
President; Sylvia Bates, Secretary. (Pat Cole, Girl Representative, 
pictured elsewiiere) 



NOVELLE BALL 

830 Lyon Street, Flint, Michigan 

MARY M. BALLEW 

Route 1, Athens, Tennessee 

MARGARET SUE BARNES 

Box 192, Route 3, Blountville, Tennessee 

SYLVIA JEAN BATES 

307 LaFayette Street, Athens, Tennessee 



CONNIE M. BEAVER 

416 Lexington Drive, Rochester, Illinois 

LINDA MAE BISHOP 

4609 Florida Avenue, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

SUSAN J. BLACKBURN 

3333 Adair Boulevard, KnoxviUe, Tennessee 

BARBARA J. BLAKE 

1126 Quebeck Street, Silver Spring, Maryland 



INGRID TRUDI BORK 

581 West Meadow Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey 

MARGARET ELIZABETH BRADLEY 
2107 Kidd Street, Maryville, Tennessee 

DANIEL W. BRADSHAW 
Townsend, Tennessee 

EVA GLYN BROCK 

Box 5, Englewood, Tennessee 



JEANNE J. BROCK 

Box 31, Englewood, Tennessee 

MAHLON D. BRYAN 

Box 7, Tellico Plains, Tennessee 

BRENDA FRANCES BURGER 
Route 1, Tellico Plains, Tennessee 

ROBERT HAL BUTTRAM 

1 09 Ada Street, Athens, Tennessee 





FRESHMEN 



WALTER W. CADGER, III 

51 Lakeview Drive, Crafton, Ohio 

MARY ELIZABETH CAMPBELL 

1 1 10 Sioux Street, Athens, Tennessee 

REBECCA S. CAMPBELL 

1110 Sioux Street, Athens, Tennessee 

EMILY S. CATE 

512 Lynn Avenue, Athens, Tennessee 



ROY ANTHONY CAWOOD 
Route 2, Riceville, Tennessee 

DONALD R. CHANDLER 
Route 2, Seymour, Tennessee 

VIRGINIA E. CHISM 

2512 Henderson Avenue, Cleveland, Tennessee 

DAVID L. CLONTS 

1517 South Lee Highway, Cleveland, Tennessee 



LARRY O. COLE 

18 West Ridgecrest, Kingston, Tennessee 

PATRICIA A. COLE 

61 7 Vendover Drive, Johnson City, Tennessee 

PATRICIA J. COLLINS 

205 50th Street, Charleston, West Virginia 

TOLLTON E. COULTER 

1212 Woodlawn Drive, MaryviUe, Tennessee 



JUDY ANN COX 

406 Ocala Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 

JUDITH CUNNINGHAM 

104 Douglas Street, Athens, Tennessee 

CHARLES CLAY DANNEL, JR. 

1627 Scenic Drive, Athens, Tennessee 

CHARLES STEPHEN DAVIDSON 

1 704 Jourolmon Avenue, Knoxville, Tennessee 



WILLIAM F. DAVIS 

Falls of Rough, Kentucky 

JAMES DOUG DEARSTONE 
Route 3, Greeneville, Tennessee 

KAREN J. DUNCAN 

Route 4, Clinton, Tennessee 

WILLIAM EDDIE EAVES 

1311 San Hsi Drive, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

RACHEL F. EDDS 

Halls Lane, Madison, Tennessee 

JOSEPH T. ELDRIDGE 

1752 Old Niles Ferry, MaryviUe, Tennessee 

FRANK B. ENSLEY 

1201 21st Street, Cleveland, Tennessee 

DAVID F. ENSMINGER 

619 Madison Avenue, Athens, Tennessee 

MARY JANE FILLER 
Route 1 , Niota, Tennessee 

SUE FINCH 

2006 Myrtle Avenue, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

JANIE LOU FINE 

Box 254, Lenoir City, Tennessee 

SHARON LEE FISH 

5926 SW 28th Street, Miami, Florida 



52 




GEORGE C. FOLTZ, JR. 

Draper, Virginia 
JUDY ANN FRYE 

Box 97, Tellico Plains, 

Tennessee 
ZENIA RUTH FRYE 

708 High Street 

Athens, Tennessee 
CHERYLE L. GRIFFIN 

833 Belvior Hill Drive 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 

SHELLEY F. GRIFFITH 

4226 Benton Drive 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 
RAYMOND R. HACKETT 

Box 362, Copperhill, Tennessee 
STEPHEN HAMBAUGH 

719 Southern Parkway 

Athens, Tennessee 
LINDA W. HAMPTON 

Route 5, Athens, Tennessee 

ROBERT M. HARRIS 

115 Cherry Trail 

Middletown, New Jersey 
BARBARA J. HARRISON 

313 Tusculum Boulevard 

Greeneville, Tennessee 
DOUGLAS L. HENRY 

Route 2, Box 130 

Kingston, Tennessee 
MORGAN F. HOTALING 

127 Llewellun Road 

Montclair, New Jersey 

JOHN F. HORESCO, III 

1191 Huntington 

Bridgeport, Connecticut 
HARRY L. HOWARD 

403 Jefferson Street 

Oregon, IlUinois 
TEDDY L. HOWARD 

195 Hilltop Circle 

Trumbull, Connecticut 
FREDA A. HUMPHREY 

1107 18th Street 

Cleveland, Tennessee 

BARBARA J. IDOL 

Route 3 

Corryton, Tennessee 
ANDREA G. INGLE 

502 Bonnie Lassie 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 
EDWIN JACKSON 

423 Chester Street 

Athens, Tennessee 
ROBERT L. JACKSON 

Barowntown Road 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 





,.,-J-ft 




dtikM^ 





53 




FRESHMEN 



JUDITH M. JOHNSON 

909 Snowdon Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 

JOANN CAROLYN JONES 
Route 1, Greenback, Tennessee 

JOEL T. JONES 

4901 Coster Road, Knoxville, Tennessee 

JUDITH C. JONES 

315 Longwood Street, Chickamauga, Georgia 

ELEANOR ONG KAM 

40 14 Elmhurst 73, New York, New York 

DARROLD WAYNE KEY 

310 Tennessee Avenue, Etowah, Tennessee 

NITA M. KIDWELL 

Route 11, GreeneviUe, Tennessee 

BARBARA J. KNIGHT 

708 North Oak Street, Dayton, Tennessee 



HOWARD L. LAMON 

Route 4, Maryville, Tennessee 

MILDRED SUE LAMON 

Box 67, Route 5, Cleveland, Tennessee 

CLOYD ROBIN LAWSON 

616 Robertsville Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 

JAMES T. LEWIS 

1019 Georgia Avenue, Etowah, Tennessee 



WILLIAM H. LOCKERBY 

24 Bellflower Circle, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

ARNETTA GAIL LOCKNER 
Route 1, Telford, Tennessee 

NANCY J. LUTES 

3306 Black Oak Circle, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

REBECCA N. McCALL 

Route 2, Greenback, Tennessee 



WALTER S. McCLURKAN 

426 Clinton Street, Harriman, Tennessee 

MARION FOY McDAVID 

Webster Pike, Harriman, Tennessee 

EMMA L. MARTIN 

Star Route, South Pittsburg, Tennessee 

GILL D. MARTIN 

202 Bales Avenue, Chattanooga, Tenn. 




Steve Overall, Bill Aiken, Sam Williams, Mike 
Overstreet, Eddie Barham, and Harold Jackson 
provide a final look at night life In Centennial Hail. 



FRESHMEN 



JOHN EDWARD MASON 

4880 Old Dominion, Arlington, Virginia 

CAROLINE E. MASSEY 

109 Linden Street, Lookout Mountain, Tennessee 

EDDY MATTHEWS 

Route 4, SevierviUe, Tennessee 

CAROLYN L. MEAGHER 

308 Randolph Avenue, Huntsville, Alabama 



DONALD H. MOORE 

1700 Howard Road, Knoxville, Tennessee 

GEORGIA MORRIS 

Route 2, Ten Mile, Tennessee 

SUSIE MORRIS 

Anderson Pike, Signal Mountain, Tennessee 

BEVERLY J. MURPH 

Box 5, Route 2, Harriman, Tennessee 



MARY JESSICA NEESE 
Box 76, Norton, Virginia 

LINDA C. ONKST 

5904 Toole Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 

CARYL GRACE PEDEN 

Box 62, Route 3, Kingston, Tennessee 

MARY KATHY PERRY 
Route 2, Englewood, Tennessee 



CASSANDRA PHILLIPS 

101 Holcomb Street, Kingsport, Tennessee 

PATRICIA E. PRATER 

Route 9, Maryville, Tennessee 

ANN MAYO PRATT 

Box 6, Charleston, Tennessee 

CHARLES R. QUEENER 

106 Kentucky Street, Jellico, Tennessee 



BIRDIE LEE QUILLIAN 

867 Dalton Circle, Morristown, Tennessee 

JAMES H. QUINN 

907 West First Avenue, Lenoir City, Tennessee 

MICHAEL M. RAULSTON 

800 Holly Avenue, South Pittsburg, Tennessee 

GARY DOUGLAS RAYMER 

Cave Creek Road, Loudon, Tennessee 



ROY T. ROBERTS 

Farrell Street, Niota, Tennessee 

PATRICIA ROCH 

721 Fairmont Avenue, Chatham, New Jersey 

MARY REBECCA ROOS 

2417 Tecoma Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 

NANCY RUTH ROSEN 

Route 1, Macungie, Pennsylvania 

GLENDA J. ROSS 

Box 155, Englewood, Tennessee 

JOHN D. SAYLORS 

11 Grassy Cove, Crossville, Tennessee 

ANNA CHRIS SCHMIDT 

Highland Avenue, Calhoun, Tennessee 

RICHARD M. SHARPE 

2211 Tomassee Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 




55 




FRESHMEN 



DIANNE SHEELY 

Box 155, Calhoun, Tennessee 

REBECCA SUE SHELL 

909 Moore Street, Athens, Tennessee 

DAVID M. SHERROD 

1 1 6 Fronda Lane, Knoxville, Tennessee 

ALLEN C. SIMMONS 
Copperhill, Tennessee 



JAMES W. SLACK, JR. 

Route 1, Decatur, Tennessee 

ALLEN GEORGE SMITH 

2621 Valley View Road, Knoxville, Tennessee 

DOROTHY LEE SMITH 

Route 4, Newport, Tennessee 

MARLA J. SMITH 

748 Gentry Road, Chattanooga, Tennessee 



MARY SUZANNE SMITH 

1104 Snowdon Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 

GEORGE STAMES 

4951 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, Tennessee 

BARBARA A. SUTTON 
Box 30, Etowah, Tennessee 

PHYLLIS JOY THACH 

1412 McFarland Avenue, Rossville, Georgia 



JOHN DAVID THACKER 
Route 1, Dublin, Virginia 

VIRGINIA THOMPSON 

1309 Woodberry Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 

FRANK R. TRENT 

Route 2, Whitesburg, Tennessee 

MARY DAWN TYLER 

Box 15, Amhurst, Englewood, Tennessee 



KATHY A. VAN ALLEN 

Little Switzerland, Knoxville, Tennessee 

MARY E. WALKER 

1100 Watercress Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 

ALMA S. WARD 

Route 4, Sweetwater, Tennessee 

VINCENT L. WEBB 

120 Nasson Lane, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 



JOEL C. WEST 

1311 Woodcrest Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 

SAIvIUEL P. WEST, JR. 

3238 Haywood Avenue, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

ANN WESTCOTT 

Womack Trailer Park, Athens, Tennessee 

GLORIA L. WRIGHT 

Box 326, Greeneville, Tennessee 

STACY WOOD, JR. 

Box 20, Route 1, Clinchco, Virginia 

JO LYNNE WOODS 

10 Kriswood Drive, Rossville, Georgia 

LILA G. YARBROUGH 

Box 348, Athens, Tennessee 



56 




Honors . 
Organizations 



59 

67 



ACTIVITIES 



57 




Headed into the 
Day Students' Lounge 
for an executive session: 



Tommy Burnett, 
President 

John Penn, 
Vice-President 

Judy Jones, 

Secretary 

Rick Myers, 
Treasurer 

Dean Floyd Bowling, 

Faculty Advisor 



WESLEY AN STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



58 



WHO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS 

IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES 

AND COLLEGES 



Tennessee Wesleyan College contributed twelve names to the roster 
of the 1963-64 college elite. Selected by the student body and the 
faculty, the men and women pictured on this and the following two 
pages represent Wesleyan at its best as they are recognized by Who's 
Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges, a na- 
tional honor organization in existence since 1934. 

Members are chosen on the basis of scholarship, participation and 
leadership in academic and extra-curricular activities, citizenship, and 
promise of future usefulness. A certificate of recognition is presented 
to the student upon graduation. In addition to this, the national head- 
quarters maintains a reference or placement service for honorees. 






TOMMY BURNETT (above) is one of the most striking, well-rounded, and 
congenial personalities to graduate from Wesleyan. This campus has been a prov- 
ing ground for his many aims in life; attending law school, being a lay preacher, 
going into politics, and serving people in every aspect of his life. 

DUAIN RICH (left), an outstanding English major who came to Wesleyan 
to play basketball, was awarded in 1962 the Herman Hickman Award in English, 
recognizing his athletic and scholastic prowess. In 1963 he received the Walter 
Clyde Curry Award signifying his excellence in Middle English. Active in all 
phases of college life, his future plans include graduate school and a college 
English professor's life. 




SUE ELLA HANKINS (above), majoring in Biology and English, looks ahead to 
medical school. Her regular contributions to campus activities have made her weU 
known to the student body, while her leadership qualities have two times won her 
election to the presidency of her sorority. 



59 




ALICE HUGHES (left) is the epitome 
of friendliness and efficiency. Transfer- 
ring from Hiwassee College in her junior 
year, she quickly became a campus fixture 
as a student secretary in Dean Galley's 
office. After graduate school she plans to 
teach English. 



KAREN TREHER GILLIKIN {right), 
completing her work in three years, will 
move with her husband, a 1963 Who's 
Who selection, to Atlanta where she will 
do graduate work in Christian Education. 
Often a study in perfection, she has been 
an example to be copied by students and 
faculty alike. 



KAY RAYFIELD (below), an attractive, 
neat, and a always well-dressed red head, 
has been active in both academic and 
social campus circles. She plans to be 
married in June and, eventually, to teach 
history. 



BETTY JEAN DOUGLAS (below right) 
is an outstanding music major whose 
areas of interest reach into virtually all 
phases of Wesleyan academic life. After 
graduate school she plans to teach music 
theory in college. 




ROSS V. JENNINGS (above), a rare combination 
of urbanity and intellectualism, has been connected 
in some way with every worthwhile part of Wes- 
leyan's campus life since he arrived four years ago. 
Tradition has it that he was "The Falcon," symbol 
of "student concern." A career in law will probably 
follow graduate work of a liberal arts nature. 




60 



WHO 



JUDY JONES (right) complete with bubbling personality and vi- 
brant red hair, has been a striking feature on the Wesleyan campus 
during the three years it has taken her to complete four years of work. 
A superb musician, she has been active in Wesieyan's dynamic music 
program. 



JIMMY ELLIS (right), industrious, intelligent, and the possessor of 
a captivating smile, will do graduate work in his field of special in- 
terest, chemistry. Active in the Wesleyan science program and in 
athletic and social life, he plans to stay in college permanently — as a 
professor. 



SANDRA WEBB (below), holder of the highest scholastic average 
in the graduating class, is an English major who plans to teach im- 
mediately and to go to graduate school eventually. Her unerring wit 
holds her in good stead in all circumstances. 



CARL TARPLEY (below right) has served the student body through 
his work with the Student Council for three years. Deserving equal 
time, however, is his beautiful wife Joyce, an outstanding English 
major and a fine mother. Carl intends to attend law school, probably 
at the University of Richmond. 







Milton Mcllwain, by vote of the Student Body, is Mr. TWC for 1964. As a charter 
member of Circle K and of Beta Beta Beta, of which he is president, Milton has con- 
tributed to campus activities. His fraternity is Sigma Phi Epsilon, which he serves as 
Pledge Educator and Comptroller. Also he has been active on the Inter-Fraternity Coun- 
cil. The best indication, however, of his warmly appealing personality is the fact that 
he is currently the Sweetheart of Alpha Xi Delta sorority. Milton's always neat appear- 
ance, his unfailing pleasant word for everyone he meets, and his infectious smile com- 
bine with many other qualities to make him a happy choice for Mr. TWC. His parents 
are Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Mcllwain of Clinton, Tennessee. 



Mr. ZWe 



62 




Mfss zwe 



Judy Jones is in many ways an ideal Miss TWC. Her activities on this campus have 
been as varied as her many facets of beauty are. A music maior, she has served the 
choir and the school as an accompanist. This year she has most successfully worked as 
The Student Body Secretary. Her complete attractiveness has made her twice the Sweet- 
heart of Circle, and she reigned in 1962-63 as Miss McMinn County. Her parents are the 
Rev. and Mrs. Elton F. Jones of Kingsport, Tennessee. In June, 1964, Judy will marry 
David Sullins of Athens, now a student in the Memphis School of Optometry. 



63 





Senior 



The jollou'ing comments are quotations from colleagues of the Senior 
Superlatives, jelloiv seniors who selected these individuals for this 
honor. 

PHIL GARDNER: Chaplain Hinds' right-hand man . . . founder of 
Pi Kappa Phi . . . dedicated to the programs of the S.C.A. in an effort 
to encourage student participation. 

R. V. JENNINGS: Encylopedic homo sapien . . . little fingers in 
many pies . . . intellectual calculator who is always willing to help . . . 

SUE ELLA HANKINS: Unselfish dispensation of KD charm . . . 
lady hermit of the Biology Department ... a great sorority president. 

CARL TARPLEY: Short in height but full of enthusiasm and good 
ideas . . . his versatility ranges from domestic to academic . . . little 
dictator who always gets the job done. 



ALAN KENNEDY on the trot: Although he is usually late, 
he's well worth waiting for! Here he is seen rushing up to 
Lawrence Hall one minute after the group picture of the 
Senior Superlatives was taken ... he walks softly and carries 
a big stick . . . Connecticut Yankee in King "William's 
Court . . . combination of dry wit and tardiness. 



64 




Superlatives 



JUDY JONES: Unusual combination of beauty, talent, and 
enthusiasm . . . her sense of responsibility is her greatest qual- 
ity .. . her tiny fingers produce sweetest melodies . . . the 
night train from Memphis that never returns. 

TOMMY BURNETT: Combination of intelligence, perserver- 
ance, and common sense ... his ability as an administrator is 
unique . . . runs the Student Council democracy by autocracy . . . 
dynamic personality who will excel in any field. 

MILTON McILWAIN: His financial footing and controlling 
the purse strings of the Sigma Phi Epsilon ... a contagious 
smile — especially with females. 

KAY RAYFIELD: An aid to the administration . . . neat as a 
pin, smart as a tack . . . devoted to Alpha Xi Delta as president. 



JOHN PENN: Friendliness and "orneriness" characterize this 
fellow . . . everybody's dependable, steady friend ... an individ- 
ualist who exercises good judgment. 

BILL ALBRITTON: Well-rounded leader who excels in differ- 
ent fields ... a scholar possessing outstanding linguistic abili- 
ties ... he hears bells — June wedding bells! 

LUNDY LOVELACE l pictured elsewhere): One of the most 
talented individuals on campus . . . always has sincere interest 
in others . . . Old Faithful to the Music Department. 

JIMMY ELLIS (pictured elsewhere): Devoted follower of Al- 
bert Einstein . . . accompanied only by his awards and a solitary 
laboratory . . . hometown chemist who will be a boon to the 
sciences. 



65 




Mf- Ugly-1964 



JACK EDMONDS 

Mr. Ugly is a much-sought-after honorary title 
awarded to a Wesleyan male as the culmination of 
a semi-formal dance sponsored by the Freshman class. 

The event serves as both a fund-raising and social 
activity since the honoree is elected by votes costing 
one cent each. The money collected is added to the 
cofers of the Freshman class and reappears in social 
and philanthropic forms throughout the remainder 
of the year. 

Candidates are selected from the Wesleyan student 
body. The only two requirements are that each candi- 
date must be between the ages of three and ninety- 
three and must be of the masculine gender. 

Mr. Ugly himself — with a bath brush as a seeptre 
— reigns over his motley court — which has no equal 
even in a Walt Disney comedy. Everyone agrees that 
Jack Edmonds is perfect as Mr. Ugly for 1964. 




Candidates: 

Donald Lusk 
Jack Edmonds 
Allen Simmons 
Hugh Walker 
Donald Chandler 
Norman Jackson 




Tommy Burnett 
President 



John Penn 
Vice-President 



Judy Jones 
Secretary 



Rick Myers 
Treasurer 



WESLEYAN STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



The Wesleyan Student Government is composed of the president, 
vice-president, girl and boy representatives from each class, and 
student body officers elected by the entire school. The organization 
works to better student-faculty relations, organizes school elections, 
and provides weekend activities. The Wesleyan Student Govern- 



ment also serves the college by presenting weekly assembly pro- 
grams, holding freshman orientation, and acting as a means of 
communication between the student body and the administration. 
{For location of the "lights" of Wesleyan pictured above, see page 
112.) 



Wesleyan Student Government: (first row, left to right) Carolyn Tilley, 
Connie Beaver, Mary Lou Rcbbins, Cheryl Corum, Lana Mynatt, Kathy 
Row/e, Judy Jones; (second row) Joe Eldridge, Bill Lockerby, Rick 



Myers, Roy Sewell, Phil Gardner, Carl Tarpley; (third row) Eddie Bar- 
ham, John Penn, Raymond Barr, Dean of Students Floyd Bowling 
(advisor), Tommy Burnett, Bill Ketchersid, R. V. Jennings. 







w 



1 




EN GARDE became a reality on January 15, 1964. 
Under the general direction of the SCA Council and 
with Bill Albritton as its director, EN GARDE has 
quickly established itself as an institution on the Wes- 
leyan Campus. The opening night saw an ecstatic group 
of students sipping coffee and eating doughnuts while 
listening to Malcolm Boyd's "Study in Color." 

This Wesleyan Coffee House is a transformation of 



the former Burkett's. Decor includes an old fishing net 
hanging from the ceiling, antiquated fencing helmets 
over the doorways (these contribute the name), bits of 
modern art gazing stoically down on the patrons, and 
much empty space on the walls inviting aspiring artists 
and poets to give vent to their creative skills. The dark- 
ness is lighted only by candles and bright conversation. 
Scheduled and unscheduled entertainment is provided 
by the students. 



68 



STUDENT CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

The Student Christian Association, the only organization on 
Wesleyan's campus which includes every student, has the re- 
sponsibility of appealing to a variety of students and not to 
any single segment of the Student Body. It is under the direction 
of a council made up of elected representatives from various 
phases of college life. 

One of the most significant functions of SCA is the regular 
Wednesday evening program. It attempts to present current 
problems with a new approach. Students are compelled to con- 
sider or reconsider old and new problems. 

During fall quarter SCA programs were designed to assist new 
students in their orientation to college life. Beginning with "This 
is College" and "The Student Dilemma" in which a panel of 
faculty members and students discoursed on the triangle made 
up of the academic, the spiritual, and the social aspects of col- 
lege life, the series ended with "You Are Your Aims," a person- 
to-person confrontation with Mr. and Mrs. William Archer. 

A series entitled "Inquiry into Faith" used a College Shoppe 
atmosphere to induce animated discussion led by Dr. Jack Wil- 
son. The discussion generated not simply questions and answers 
but also some mumal understanding among diversified student 

elements. 

Another series was introduced with a film, Headlines. The 
succeeding programs included "What Makes for a Successful De- 
mocracy?" with Mr. Charles Sallis, "The United Nations" with 
Dr. Ruth Stephens, and "The Supreme Court Decision on Prayer 
in Public Schools" with the Rev. 
Mr. Duff Green. 

EN GARDE (see opposite page) 
is a physical expression of the ac- 
tivity of SCA during this academic 
year. Other activities sponsored by 
SCA included representation of 
Wesleyan in the Model United Na- 
tions Assembly in Nashville, se- 
lected quality motion pictures for 
the students, and participation on 
the thought-provoking drama semi- 
nars at the University of Tennessee. 



(Upper Right) Allen Dennis, Phil Gardner, 
Mrs. Archer, Mr. Archer discuss "aims." 

(Right) Student Christian Association Coun- 
cil. (First row, left to right) Sue Ella Han- 
kins, Deana Arms, Brenda Thomas, LeAnn 
Luttrell, Nancy Ketchersid, Kathy Toomey. 
(Second row) Phil Gardner, Ralph Bristol, 
Chaplain Howard Hinds, Bill Petty, Harry 
Howard. 




(Above) This dramatic crucifix, its lines copying the emotional 
appeal of folk art, served as the motif for the SCA's Lenten liter- 
ature. Notice Gene Hamilton's wood, wire, and cloth adaptation, p. 4. 





RELIGIOUS LIFE COUNCIL 



(front row, left to right) 
Mr. Harper, Judy Jones, 
Mrs. Sallis, Cheryl Corum, 
LeAnn Luttrell, Sue Ella 
Hankins, Betty Williams, 
Phil Gardner (second row) 
Tommy Burnett, Dean Gul- 
ley. Bill Miller, Chaplain 
Hinds, President Mohney, 
Dean Bowling, Bill Albrit- 
ton, John Penn 



The Religious Life Council directs the religious 
program on the Wesley an campus. It serves as an 
advisory council to the chaplain and directs rec- 
ommendations to the Executive Committee re- 
garding policies and philosophies of religious ac- 
tivities. Membership includes both appointed fac- 
ulty members and student representatives from 
major campus organizations. 



H' 



CHI RHO 



Chi Rho is an organization composed of students who are entering 
or are considering a church-related vocation. The group meets once a 
month for a period of fellowship and discussion by a resource leader. 
The purpose of the meetings is to better acquaint members with the 
various responsibilities that they will face in their vocations. 




(Front row, left to right) 
Nancy Ketchersid, Virginia 
Chism, Carol Peden. (Sec- 
ond row) Sue Barnes, Con- 
nie Beaver, Barbara Idol, 
Cathryn Richesin, Alma 
Ward, Marilyn Ward, Pat 
Satterfield, LeAnn Luttrell, 
Andrea Ingle, Agatha Shu- 
make, Dr. Wilson, advisor. 
(Third row) James Whed- 
bee, Harry Howard, Joe 
Eldridge, John Lane, Guy 
Hamilton, Dick Kyle, Bill 
Miller, Steve Overall, Bill 
Smalling, David Keebler, 
John Horesco, David Pratt. 




WESLEYAN SCHOLARS 



The Tennessee Wesleyan Scholars Program is an honorary society, 
membership in which is one of the highest honors that can be 
bestowed on a Wesleyan student since only a student with an ac- 
cumulative average of B or better is eligible. 

A student may become a Scholar if he is nominated by a 
faculty member and if he receives the unanimous vote of the 
Scholars' Committee. This year's program is under the supervision 
of the Committee made up of Dr. Jack Wilson, Chairman; Mrs. 
William Archer; Dr. Eric Lacy, Dr. Frank GuUey; Dr. J. Emerick 
Nagy; and Dr. Carl Honaker. 

The Wesleyan Scholars Program is designed to provide students 
of superior ability the opportunities for advanced study in specific 
areas in an informal and enjoyable atmosphere. 



The 1963-64 program has emphasized the study of the sixteenth 
century. Some of the important events of the fall and winter 
quarters were lectures on Shakespearean drama by Professor Harry 
Coble {below), a trip to Knoxville to see a professional produc- 
tion of A Man for All Seasons, a lecture by Dr. George K. Sch- 
weitzer to the Scholars and guests at a dinner on January 20, and 
a lecture by Dr. Harrv Merrill on Machiavelli. Special events of 
this nature are scheduled thoughout the academic year. 

As pictured above, the 1963-64 Wesleyan Scholars are Dr. Wil- 
son (advisor), Carolyn TiUey, Neeta Puett, Ross "V. Jennings, 
Buddy Ellis, Allen Dennis, Duain Rich, Bill Albritton, Jimmy El- 
lis, Sandra Webb, Karen Gillikin, Cathryn Richesin. Dr. Honaker 
(advisor). 



ifrrr---:|- 





tl|p mm 




The New Exponent strives to integrate the various 
facets of Tennessee Wesleyan life by reporting the 
departmental, organizational, and campus aaivi- 
ties. Working under the motto "Laborantes Cum 
Studio" (Working with enthusiasm under pres- 
sure ) , the staff seeks not only to report events, but 
also to interpret college life through creative ef- 
forts in poetry, essay, and editorial writing. 

Staff members (left to right) are: Martha Whatley, 
Feature Writer; IVIiss Genevieve Wiggins, Faculty Spon- 
sor; Patricia Rowe, Artist and News Editor; Cheryl Grif- 
fin, Feature Writer; Sue Barnes, Feature Writer; Nancy 
IVlartin, News Editor; Hugh Wall<er, Sports Editor; San- 
dra Webb, News Editor; Sandra Long, Associate Editor; 
Mary Walker, Feature Writer; Ross V. Jennings, Editor 
in Chief. 



BIT & PIECES FOUND IN AN OLD COLLEGE WASTEBASKET; OR, HAS ANYONE HERE SEEN EMILY DICKINSON?* 



Softly, the sun outlined the church steeple in the early 
morning haze. As yet, the doors were not open, but the 
quiet stillness seemed suitable and preparatory to the wor- 
ship service . . . 

There is a moral — 
Somewhere in 
That green triangle of . . . 
a tree? 

A dry leaf tossed by a cold winter wind — I too am lost 

A note on "Morning Sickness" — I've got something here, 
I think — If I just has a little more time to play with it. 
If you'll go easy on it now I'll polish & finish it over the 
weekend — and please do not circle my & with a red pen — 
or blue — or black — or purple crayon. 

... a light in Moffitt — 
A thing or two, 

Or, maybe, even three has happened, 
or might; 
But it will never be 
As cold as once it was 

Man, I'm goin' to my pad — 
This world is too sad 

A nasty thing this writing rhyme. 

A struggle just to please our Ben, 
And keep from failing bad this time. 




i^ 3i(rE J5 ^ ^ HI € 




Miss Doris Jones 

About her talents we make no bones. 

She's an unusual lass. 

Brains, looks, plenty of class. 

If you ask me, he has flipped his 20c! 

Mr. Goldwater sat on the fodder, 
Scheming on TVA. 

Along came a liberal and sat on a toadstool 
And frightened poor Barry away. 

Creativity is the central nervous system of a college. 

"Ah-choo!" sneezed the erstwhile baseball player, now em- 
ployed by the Goldwater Funeral Home. "I dropped my 
peppermint stick in the embalming fluid — Oh-h-, what a 
new taste in candy!" 

A fly lit on the dark coil of her hair and stomped (?) 
across her neck. 

Can it be written 
with 
sun 

wind and 
blowing flag? 

Once upon a time there existed a Square-Root-of-a- 
Minus-One. It was very misunderstood. 

"I'll just close my eyes," I said, 
"And it may go away! " 

I dreamed I went spelvmkin" in my TWC sweatshirt . . . 
I dreamed I was caught at Freddie's in my TWC sweatshirt! 



Had we but world enough and time 
To cut a class would be no crime. 

The Jamaican sun set the distant banks of clouds ablaze 
in violent shades of red and purple and sank silently into 
the Caribbean. Only a few bronzed bodies remained on the 
bleached expanse of the beach. James Teiter sat alone . . . 

munch munch d k d dk 
D munch d d dk d dk 

Munch much munch: "Be gone" 

All around his lair 
So scholarly we sit: 
Listening to air! 

A single snowflake 
fell upon my lip: I 
tasted infinity 

ShaU I compare thee to a block of stone? 

Thou art more cold and much more unfeeling . . . 

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood. 

And now that I'm lost either one looks good. 

So take away your bachelor's life so fine 
But give to me my wife and children nine. 

*probable unwary contributors (in alphabetical order): 
Claude Abbott, Harri K. Brooks, Allen Dennis, Karen T. 
Gillikin, Judy Green, Larry Griffith, Steve Hambaugh, 
Sandra Long, Philip Morris, Neeta Puett, Harold Reno, 
Edward Taylor, Randall Trent, Martha Whatley, Donald 
WiUcox. 



HACKBERRIES, a 
literary insert to 
The Nocatula. Published 
as a Supplement to 
The New Exponent. 
Volume II, Issue II 
Tennessee Wesleyan 

College 
Athens, Tennessee 




"ARGONAUTICA": REPLY 

"They were good lads, the comrads who did not grumble;' 

like madam's maid who lived her service, 

loved her past patched room. 

The Justice of young Socrates 

continues, shining through our golden balance. 

The ram's horn heard at Marathon 

blasts lately in the wall of Troy. 

Daedalus and his father soar from life 

to never-ending depths of justice. 

Quixote's sheep accepted the wind and rain, 

accepted thirst and freezing. 

And the oarsmen used to say that 

if it was to know itself 

into itself the soul had to look. 

They were good lads, saw themselves, 

accepted, 

"their souls became one with their rowlocks." 

They were 

For the soul to know 
For the oar to know 
For the soul to know 
it is into itself 
that it must look. 



Judy Green 



UPSTREAM 



The rushing stream moves with uncharted course 

With downward sweeping strokes it makes its way; 

Fotever leaving in its path remorse. 

It shows contempt for the weak who obey. 

Its swerving course denies a chanced delay 

For those uncaring souls who hesitate 

But only those who swim upstream can sway 

The dominion. They can violate 

The sweeping stream, and having swum upstream are great. 



ON DIVINE LOVE 



Deana Armes 



I ever question love that is divine; 

O God, what nature is this love from three? 

Erotic, spongy mind? Is is like mine? 

Pray tell. God spoke! My son, look on the tree. 

'Tis plain, where even you can know, for He 

There speaks my love. It bleeds, yet cares, ignoring 

All suffered wrongs. As father's love makes plea 

His own to save; so mine does there outpout. 

My love, exposed, revealed, laid bare. Demand you more? 

Bob Ingram 



INSOUCIANCE 

Smile like a fox against the wild. 

Stare brownly, all wrapped in green. 

Do not give a thought to the way 

Others look at your countenance. 

Just blandly hang against the hall 

Never reminding yourself, once in a while, 

That falseness purchases, as some say, 

A costumed, contrived room for a ball 

To be given when time, like soldiers filed, 

Marches out of existence; 

And forget that you believed years ago. 

That love is always a child 

To fondle like a lonely thing 

Hidden in itself behind a smile. 



TOMORROW 



Sandra Long 



i 



The grayness came upon the world slowly 

Softly, steadily, surely — 
And covered the earth with its dullness 
While man slept, unheeding its coming. 

Minds unexercised become lethargic, 
Withstanding not the onslaught of darkness. 

Freedom to man came to mean enslavement to choices. 
Man's God-given right to choose was forsaken. 
Swallowed up in the search to be free . . . 
Bondage! they ctied. Give us bondage! 

Big Brother, we pledge you our love. 
No longer we search in the shadows for truth. 
You teach what our minds can contain. 
Big Bfother, we pledge you our loyalty. 

What matters that life is fear bounded on either side by 

oblivion. 
From nothing I came, to nothing I go. 

To wofk, to eat, to sleep. 
Nothing there is but this. 

Watching furtively, 

Listening endlessly. 

Following blindly, 

Man has come to this state. 

Yet clings still to the grayness and fear. 

Phyllis S. Brock 



RONDEL 

A lone tree stands on yonder hill; 
It stands for misdeeds of mankind. 
"Was it in vain?" inquires the mind, 
"For misdeeds linger with us still! " 

It was in vain for those who still 
Refuse to seek the Christ so kind. 
A lone tree stands on yonder hill; 
It stands for misdeeds of mankind. 

For Christ did die upon the hill 
To give the sinner peace of mind 
And let the world salvation find. 
This one great cause reminds us still — 
A lone tree stands on yonder hill. 

Philip Morris 




DE L'AUTONNE 

Une piece du bronze sous un arbre 
Est joint par Tor et le cuivre. 
L'esperance d'or qui est courbe' 
Par la pluie des larmes 
Qui avaient commence en doute. 
Les pensees qui se repondent 
Comme les pieces d'or sont 
disperciees par le vent. 
Les tas et les piles se transforment 
Sous la froidure dane le noiceur et 
le teinte grise dans plomb. 

Les tas pureut refleter du lustre 

a une fois . . . glorieux. 
Maintenant — 

Cornimpus . . . 

Obscenes. 

Sandra Long 




EPITAPH 

While those who walk by this cemetery 

Believe me dead, gone for Eternity, 

I am deceiving them. 

For, although I am entombed and 

Blanketed with the earth, 

I am only dormant, encased in slumber. 

I live on in many varied forms: 

My children, their offspring and 

Posterity yet unarrived shall one and all 

Bear characteristics which are mine, 

Mine alone and could have no other source. 

Patty Rowe 



YOUR HAUKIS BLUID 

Your haukis bluid was nevir sae reid 
Edward, Edward, 

Your haukis bluid was nevir sae reid! 

To me she was not good or true, 
Mother, Mother, 

To me she was not good or true. 

But I still love her so. 

Why does your heart so loudly beat, 

Edward, Edward, 
Why does your heart so loudly beat, 
And why the tears do flow? 
The blood so red is not my hawk. 
My heart has love no more. 

Why does the death beU toll so loud, 
Edward, Edward, 

Why does the death beU toll so loud? 

The bell toUs not for hawks. 

I know for whom the bell doth toll, 
Mother, Mother, 

I know for whom the bell doth toll, 

It tolls for my dear love. 

And why did you murder your love, 
Edward, Edward, 

And why did you murder your love? 

She was so good to you! 

She would not cook the food I like, 
Mother, Mother, 

She would not cook the food I like. 

Or let me watch T. V. 

James Slack 



SONNET 4 

What glory manned that devious, glorious ship 

One which no winds of victory could blow? 

Halt, ship of wood, for which strong voices clip. 

Iron murmurs pierce your hulk and theirs, and glow. 

The white-foamed green, if it could sailors chide, 

Then they themselves, and it, could aptly nile. 

How often did they calm in darkness ride 

In that celestial and terrestrial pool. 

That grasping gasp is not an oarsman's cry; 

Courageous swishes, stars were all their bate. 

They could not salty, lime-encrusted die. 

Their world of midnight songs they helped create. 

And for every Corinth they sailed through, 

They halted, then sailed paintedly askew. 

Judy Green 



MUNDAYNE MORN 

Herald of a byone day. 

The cock-crow goes unheeded. 

Thru morning mist the busy sun 

Eases over the hill 

Revealing the cracker box residence 

Wherein, upon the couch of Tethe, 

Dwells the weary scholar. 

His mind engaged in adventures soon forgotten 

In lands of Oz and Adnotten 

But from these worlds the alarm does snatch 

To one where one must find two socks that match. 

Dennis WiUcox 



I 



i 



UNCLE TOM'S RAMBLIN' 
(A Modern-Day Pilgrim) 

There is a fine, young man who does walk slow, 
As gayly cross the campus he does go, 
With head held high he nods to everyone. 
Talking with him can always be good fun. 

The words flow smoothly from his open mouth, 
His accent tells that he is from the south. 
He speaks to us on every Thursday morn. 
Sometimes with laughter, and sometimes with scorn. 

He tells the student body what he thinks. 
And something he dislikes, he says it stinks. 
He talks of upcoming activities. 
In hopes that all of us he'll surely please. 

We give him our attention as he stands, 
In front of us, always moving his hands. 
And he tells us of the thriUing events, 
On which the Council's money has been spent. 

Wherever he goes, he draws people near. 
And all the nice, sweet girls think he's so dear; 
Most everyone likes him, he's a good guy, 
We look at him as he goes strolling by. 

He has a goal, a pilgrimage in life. 
It may be that he's looking for a wife. 
Or possibly he's just out to have fun. 
And not get serious with anyone. 

Yet, he might be going into teaching. 
For right now he does a lot of preaching. 
On every Sunday morning in a church. 
And people's minds he constantly does search. 

Perhaps he thinks along another line. 

As a politician he'd be just fine; 

Maybe there's something else he wants to be, 

Anyhow we'll just have to wait and see. 

Meanwhile he will continue on his way. 
Making a pilgrimage from day to day; 
One that will surely lead him to that goal, 
And give him final joy within his soul. 

This has been a tale, if you don't know yet, 
About a fellow named Tommy Burnett, 
So watch him some time as he goes amblin'. 
And then you'll know of Uncle Tom's Ramblin'. 

Shelley Griffith 



Trickling waters run 

with noisy laughter o'er rocks 
shining 'neath the sun 

— Ann Pratt 




Seeing a blue lake 

meeting a great azure sky 
distills dread of fate 

— Joy Thach 




He placed his finger 

on the verse he had read — ■ 
there his thoughts lingered 

— Sylvia Bates 




Music in the air: 

the notes float across the bay; 
the fish listen . . . 

— Mary Walker 




A song of beauty 

echoing through the dark night 
stills the fear in me. 

— Costen Aytes 




LOST LOVE 

I laughed at love with bitterness and scorn, 

For how could I know you would come to me 

And on my hand love's old glove would be worn. 

And in my heart, my soul would come alive? 

I had no warning; love came tenderly: 

A glance, a smile, a kiss — and suddenly 

I knew our love was strong and would survive. 

I paid no heed to warning voices now; 

Your words of love were all my ears could hear 

I listened to your words and praised each one, 

Yet even then my heartbreak had begun. 

Not fearing heartbreak, I fought hard to gain 

Your love, your heart, with minimum of pain 

It can't be done and now you've set me free. 

Roswell Perdue 



My heart is broken 

as I recall the sad blue 

words that were spoken. 

— ^John Saylors 




Eyes of azure blue, 

eyes piercing hazel shade 
scrutinizing you 

— Sue Barnes 




THE IRONY OF LAUGHTER 

SCENE: A large box seemingly filled with feathers on an 
otherwise vacant stage. 

There is a man in this box. He takes a deep breath and 
begins to laugh. He laughs more and more; before long 
the sound of his laughter attracts the attention of people 
who wander curiously onto the stage. 

Scores of them have gathered and stand with their hands 
folded, unmoved by the laughter from luithin the box. 
Then, slowly, the outsiders begin to have comical grins on 
their faces. In a short time they are all smiling. 

The laughter from within the box continues. 

The young children outside begin to giggle and the 
adults laugh uproariously. Before long they are all in a 
mood of gaiety. 

Suddenly a trickle of red carrying a few bits of feathers 
comes out of the bottom of the box. As the people see it, 
the laughter diminishes in volume. The laughter from 
within the box had already ceased. As the stream of blood 
reaches farther out, the outsiders begin to move away 
from the box, occassionally tittering or giggling. 

The man inside had just cut his throat. 

Barry Grace 



BOREDOM 

I sit and dream and wander 

Far off; my playful mind strays 

Past the window; outdoors go my thoughts 

Dancing on warm sunshine rays. 

Inside here Hamlet puzzles me. 
His true self our knowledge evades; 
So my thoughts wander far way. 
Leaving Hamlet to more serious maids. 

H. K. Brooks 



A NURSERY RHYME FOR 1964 

The bear and the dragon set to sea 

In a beautiful boat of red. 

They chatted and talked for the first few miles 

But quarreling at last was bred. 

The dragon was ancient and the bear so new 
That, of course, they could not agree. 
So they parted their ways and set out to prove 
The best way of destroying me. 

Philip Morris 



IN THE BOOKSTORE 

Strategy in Poker, Business, and War 
Is found beneath Kierkegaard. 

"Business," "Education" and then more 
Novels line the shelf. 

Closeby, King Lear and Huckleberry Finn 

Wait patiently 
For browsers, buyers, and other men 

To take them from the rack. 

Words of wisdom, bitterness, and gaiety, 
Words — thousands of them. 

Words holding truth for the noble and laity, 
Words — screaming to be heard. 

Sue Barnes 



A WILLCOX: SUNDAY MORNING 

Smelling, moof swoof whew phew, 
Wift waft weary old tennis shoe. 

Tasting, snik snac num yum, 

Wish wash last nite's chewing gum. 

Hearing, riz raz bizz buzz, 

Wick wack drafts thru blanket fuzz. 



Dennis Willcox 




I THOUGHT I SAW . . . 

I thought I saw a kangaroo 
That studied books of law; 
I looked again and saw it was 
A lobster's mighty claw. 
"If that is coming in," I said, 
"I think / shall withdraw." 

I thought I saw a ladies' club 

In love with the aesthetic; 

I looked again and saw it was 

Some crabs who waxed poetic. 

"I think I'd laugh at that," I said, 

"Were it not so pathetic." 

I thought I saw a clergyman 
So pious and devout; 
I looked again and saw it was 
A pig with purple snout. 
Said I, "It may be fair within. 
But it's hideous without!" 

I thought I saw a dinosaur 
Consuming cheddar cheese; 
I looked again and saw it was 
Old Aristophanes. 
"I don't know any Greek," I said, 
"Will you excuse me please?" 

I thought I saw a lemon tree 

Within a feeding station; 

I looked again and saw it was 

A liberal education. 

"I'll think about this long," I said; 

"There must be some relation." 

I thought I saw a college prof 
With lectures neatly bound; 
I looked again and saw it was 
A spot of desert ground. 
'There is a moral there," I said, 
"If it could just be found." 

Genevieve Wiggins 



salutes Mrs. Vera Coe, 

courageous member of the 

Library Staff, who on January 23, 1964, 

saved from the cruel woodman's 

saw the last of Wesleyan's historic 

magnolia trees. 



THE BALLAD OF THE ALMOST-GONE 
MAGNOLIA TREE 

To be sung to tune of "24 Hours to Tulsa," 
accompanied by bass drum and saxophone 

Late on that night in 'G^ 
The Administrators met behind closed door; 
Their mission was to decide the fate: 
Should the magnolia tree go that date? 

chorus 
Listen, my children and you shall know 
Of the midnight trip of Mrs. Coe. 

At that time they decided 

That the magnolia tree would be divided; 

By the butcher's saw it would go 

From magnificent high to pitiful low. 

How Dean Coe pleaded and pleaded. 
But alas his cries went unheeded; 
All he heard was a cruel "No! 
That magnolia tree has to go." 

Home to his wife he quickly went, 

His thoughts becoming violence bent. 

"Wife, oh wife dear, gather round; 

They're cutting the magnolia to the ground." 

"Oh, that cruel act I will not believe; 
Oh, quiet my fears and my mind relieve! 
Myself I'll sacrifice, now see. 
If they cut bark from that dear tree." 

That night to the campus herself came, 
Disquised so no one knew her name; 
With her she carried a heavy chain 
And a lock so weighty it gave her pain. 

The next morning when the men came by 
A shock, a sight met their eye: 
A courageous woman they did see 
Chained and locked to the magnolia tree. 

Strange harsh words she did moan! 
"From this time on, let it be known 
The magnolia tree behind Old College 
Shall ne'r be touched by saw or sledge!" 

Trudy Bork 



Zree Jmagery at Wesley an 




m^^a^^n^ ainiBNac 



September 
13 Registration. 

15 Cafeteria begins serving black bread and water 
to meet net profit quota. 

18 High administrative figure is seen at court- 
house beginning action to drop *"h" from last 
name. 

25 Thumper Perdue arrested on noisy muffier 
charge ... to be represented in court by 
George Furman. 

26 Thumper Perdue gets chair. 

30 Mr. McClary receives first poison pen note 
ever delivered in a cone of cherry ice cream. 

October 

1 Representatives of Stanrich Studio arrive to 
take NocatuU pictures. 

4 Addled by her TWC experiences, her breath 
reeking with peppermint lifesavers, Stanrich 
Studio's Rosella Etter gives Lawrence E. (see 
previous page) the complete sales talk when 
Mother Whatley takes him in for a sitting. 

7 Duain Rich arrested by Smog Cormnission in 
spite of clever yachtsman disguise. 

8 English 201 students are in the ninth circle of 
Hell. 

11 Miss Doris Jones is identified as the D. J. of 
Capote's "The Headless Hawk." Less than five 
hours later, Miss Jones is blackballed by Fac- 
ulty Women's Club for Novel Noodle recipe. 

19 Students blow up Townsend Hall as mild 
protest against new cut system. 

25 Spanish Dancers in Cultural Life Concert; lat- 
er in Lawrence Hall Mrs. Lewis dislocates 
right hip executing step she had seen at con- 
cert. 

31 (Halloween^ Fine feathered friends visit Mof- 
fitt Hall. 

November 

6 Dr. Ruth Stephens is Dr. Ruth Stephens at 
SCA meeting. 

7 Discipline Committee did not meet. 

10 Eminent Scholars Alice Loomis and R. V. Jen- 
nings drop Continental Novel. 

16 Dr. Schafer gets driver's license. 

17 "Crash" Schafer wins demoUtion race through 
Athens streets. 

18 Funeral of Lawrence E. 

22 Following Junior English Examination on the 
21st, the world is plunged into deep mourn- 
ing. George Furman takes events especially 
hard. 

28 Thanksgiving Day: birthday of Maud Muller 
of Dial soap and Band Aid fame. 

December 

3 Annual Candlelight Service in Chapel results 
in cancellation of fire insurance. 

4 William Shakespeare does not take TWC's 
production of Twelfth Night lightly; Will 
(the janitor) runs screaming from Moffitt 
Hall when bust in Mrs. Archer's office groans. 

9 UnseasonaJ Athenians give croton oil punch 
to caroling SCA group. 

13 Fall Quarter grades due; Faculty Christmas 
Party covered by talent scout seeking replace- 
ments for all the members of "The Beverly 
Hillbillies "^cast. 

24 Snow. 

25 Snow and Christmas. 

31 Snow; Suffering from snow blindness. Miss 
Jones loses Lynnwood Apartments; Miss Brad- 
ley sings "Twenty-four Hours to Tulsa" to de- 
lighted audience of friends. 

January 

1 Miss Bradley continues singing, but much of 
the glamour has worn off. 

2 Administration grim over the possibility that 
it may need to find replacements for the entire 
English faculty as the result of favorable talent 
scout report, (see Dec. J 3) Speculation runs 
high among students as to the exact role which 
each teacher would play. 

3 English Department turns its back on TV offer 
and with Harbrace Handbook in hand goes 
back to work, 

4 Apparently as a result of recent upheavals, 
Thursday falls on Saturday. 

9 Wesieyan Scholars class devoid of scholars; 
many died of academic excitement. 

13 Jack Edmonds declared ugliest man on campus. 

14 Last of the Big Spenders show up in the per- 
son of Duncan West. 

15 Toll Coulter turns out to be 31 years old. En 
Garde is raided by a detachment of crack li- 
brary guards; a torn copy of Motive and a 
frayed copy of volume two of John Wesley's 
sermons are found concealed in the netting. 

16 Faculty Meeting: Holiday Inn in Cleveland. 

19 Suffering from gout brought on by excessive 
eating on the l6th, the Science Faculty cancels 
classes. 

24 Most popular instruaor on campus supercedes 
own popularity by arriving to observe student 
teachers at their first class meeting. 

27 Robert MacDonald, Pianist in Concert. 

February 

2 Brooks Hayes arrives with Look photographer. 

3 Alert student Haney Howell begins lawsuit 



against Look magazine, charging blindness 
brought on by excessive use of flashbulbs. 

7 UT Biology Dept. here investigating rare case 
of atavism. 

8 Hcx)tenanny: halfway through the opening 
number, Steve Overall realized he had forgot- 
ten his guitar. 

10 Board of Trustees relieved to learn that the 
Miss Reba Parsons involved in a Miami night 
club scandal is not Wesieyan "s Miss Reba Per- 
sons. 

12 Miss Greenhoe reported missing! Last seen 
sneaking into trunk of Pianist Robert Mc- 
Donald. 

14 Humanists and scientists debate movement of 
a fly: does it stomp? 

17 Fly imagery in Lord of the Plies causes Judy 
Green to lose her lunch. 

1 8 Confused sophomore mistakes Bishop Short 
for Robert Frost, uttering in amazement, "Mr. 
McClary said you died!" 

20 Junior English Examination: George Furman 
drops mourning. 

24 Mary Lou Robbins and Mary Frances Trotter 
announce (loudly) that they are dropping out 
of school (MLR's 57th time, MFT's 89th). 

29 The Archers attending Tennessee Philological 
meeting at Sewanee discover that it is possible 
to slide up a mountain; At the meeting, they 
hear paper on Milton's Smells. 

March 

3 The Lettermen sing. 

6 Nocatula deadline: aides of Publisher find it 
necessary to treat Mrs. Helen Morgan for shock 
when copy arrives on time for first time in 
history. 

10 Sandra Webb heard to be languishing of the 
vapors. 

12 B.R.O.C. has it that a member of the English 
Department is taking part-time job driving a 
Good-Humor Truck. 

13-17 Winter Examinations. 
18-23 Spring Vacation. 

15 Only Tom Gutridge's hair dresser know for 
sure 

20 Dean Bowling accepts position with Hawaiian 
Eye 

23 Registration. 

24 Spring classes begin. 

26 Mary Walker drops Office Machines after be- 
ing dragged through the IBM Machine. 

27 Workmen trying to repair IBM Machine find 
Alice Dew — who had been pulled in with 
Mary Walker — still clogging the delicate ma- 
chinery. 

28 Miss Hedley, who had voluntarily committed 
herself after she thought she heard the IBM 
Machine calling for help, is released from 
Lyonsview and remrns to take up her regular 
assignments. 

April 

1 The New Exponent proves something. 

2 Mary Frances Trotter decides for the 1 00th 
time that she will not drop out of school; then 
learning that Dr. Lacy plans a test for the 3rd, 
she reverses her decision for the 101st time. 

5 Arbor Day: due to misunderstanding every 
tree on campus hacked down. 

7 Bill Yates leaves College Shop after 7-month 
stay. 

9 Kathy Perry sets record running across campus 
in bare feet. 

14 Haney Howell uses a vocabulary of 25 differ- 
ent words on WLAR. 

15 Mr. Lottie misplaces a comma in 1964-1965 
budget. 

18 Dr. Nagy's new book, Effective 20c' s in the 
Classroom, published. 

19 Bill Elrod finds misplaced comma; the five 
faculty members who had been fired for budg- 
etary reason on the 15th are reinstated. 

24-26 Greek Weekend. 
27 Greek probation begins. 

May 
1 Homecoming for Alumni; Spring Show: My 
Fair Lady; in the excitement Bill Petty forgets 
that the time is 1964 and — to Mr. Harper's 
horror — sings "I am the Very Model of a 
Modern Major-General" without a single 
hitch. 

8 May Day Festivities. 

9 Discipline Committee and representatives of 
VFW and the Birch Society hold joint meet- 
ing for purpose of taking pictures to be used 
to counteraa unfortunate publicity resulting 
from May Day Festivities. 

11 Mr. Mathis heard to remark: "The trouble 
with this world is there are too many soft 
sweeties in it." 

13 Tip Smith's new book The Band Aid and How 
to Use It hailed as classic in its field. 

14 Anonymous letter in The New Exponent de- 
scribes Discipline Committee as "the tail that 
wags the dog." 

15 After hearing visiting psychologist insist that 
clothes reflect the inner condition of the wear- 
er, Duain Rich appears in snow white suit. 

18 Alert faculty member observes that Al Ken- 
nedy really isn't always late; he just looks that 



way; reporcs of Miss Greenhoe and Robert 
MacDonald's trunk continue to drift in; David 
Pratt writes from Vienna that the musical 
community there is sunding on its ear and a 
post office official admits that certain selea 
individuals get occa^onal interesting postal 
cards signed "M.G." 
24 Mr. McClary burns three-years worth of Eng- 
lish folders; displaying her knowledge of an- 
cient history, Pat Cole compares this to the 
burning of the library at Alexandria. 

June 

1 Examinations begin. 

7 Graduation. Because of a miscalculation on 
seats, Betty Williams and Sandra Webb have 
to sit on the floor. Getting up to march on the 
stage, Betty — her feet alsleep — falls breaJcing 
both arms and her glasses. On the 8th, using 
her toes, she is still adding O's to the amount 
for which she is sueing the College. 

TWO VERSES ON A SINGLE 

BIOLOGICAL THEME 

I. ODE TO A FRUIT FLY 

(Translated from the Mandarin Chinese) 
Fruit fly is sweet. 
Fruit fly is nice. 
Fruit fly is good, 
When stirred in with rice. 

Such was his life. 
Such was his fate. 
Farewell, fruit fly, 
That the Chinaman ate. 

Philip Morris 

II. A RED-EYED FEMALE FRUIT FLY'S 
LAMENT FOR HER WILD-EYED MATE 
(In the manner of Ben Johnson's "Echo . . .") 
Softly, softly ever fall the tears! 
Oh drop dead, you mean ole man, 
You took my male, 'tis more than I can bear, 
And left me in solitude in my can! 

Weap barebones and flowers 

Tears fall hke showers. 

How can we bear the hours? 
Oh could I but die! 

Woe, woe, woe, 
Nevermore will I fly! 
Oh Dr. Adams, Fie! Fie! 

Martha Whatley 

MpHlpyan IGpxtrntt 

AVERAGE: a grade of AG on a Dr. Nagy test 
BOREDOM: Old College 104 at 2:45 on a hot 

fall afternoon 
COLD : mashed potatoes in the cafeteria 
COMFORT: not sitting on the bleachers in the 

gym 
DESPAIR: hearing that Mr. McClary will teach 

all E 203's Spring quarter 
DOOM: a late research paper in E 103 
EXASPERATION: Mrs. Smith filling faculty 

book orders 
FAITH: Duain Rich reading a synopsis of The 
Red arid the Black the night before an hour test 
FALL: when new faculty members come 
FRUSTRATION: Dean GuUey sitting beside you 

in Chapel 
GORGEOUS: Mrs. Staley in a red dress 
HELP: the instructor over-sleeping on the morn- 
ing of an 8 o'clock test 
HOT: the water you are in when Dean Bowling 

sends for you 
INVISIBLE: Howard Lamon in Miss Wiggins' 

class 
JUSTICE: Dr. Nagy's postponing a test and add- 
ing two chapters to the assignment; the lemon 
tree in the College Shop 
KNOWLEDGE: the ditto machine during final 

examinations 
LEADERSHIP: Tommy Coleman at a banquet 
MIRACLE: 5 point curve on Dr. Wilson's test 
NOW; the time to go to the College Shop for 

coffee. 
OCCASIONAL: daily quizzes in English 201 
QUIET: what happens when Mrs. Archer enters 

her classroom 
RELIEF: hearing the final bell ring after the 
eager instructor has already reprimanded you 
for being tardy 
REVENGE: not laughing at Dean Coe's jokes 
SECURITY: last year's French book with transla- 
tions written in the margins; a roll of turns; 
living in the room the farthest distance away 
from Mrs. Greene in Fowler Hall 
SPRING: the time for preparing My Fair Lady 
SUCCESS: David Lepchitz passing the Junior 

English Examination 
TOMORROW: when you will begin working on 

the history research paper 
UNIQUE: a day without a Ketron theorem 
VICTORY: getting your post office box open; 

getting up for Samrday breakfast 
WINTER: when you repeat fall classes 
YESTERDAY: when the unfinished history re- 
search paper was due. 







En Garde 




The Coffee House, rapidly 
becoming an American college 
tradition, has made its appear- 
ance on the Tennessee Wesley- 
an campus. On Wednesday, Jan. 
the back room of Old 
was christened En 
general director 
Later that even- 
e was officially 
an ecstatic group 
and doughnuts 
ing to Malcolm 
in Color." 

le overwhelming 

general student 

kind consent of 

[ohney, it was de- 

;ontinue En Garde 

[hts-a-week accom- 

the Wesleyan stu- 

formation of Old 
to En Garde in- 
old fishing net 
1 the ceiling, an 
ncing helmet over 
from which Bill 
[iration for the 
of modern art 
ly down upon table 
ash trays, and 
space on the wall 
Cpired artists or bud- 
(20 cents) to fill 
leir work. The dark- 
be lighted only by 
ind bright conversation. 

^udent Christian Asso- 
" u ncil who are 
tors and executors of 
have long felt 
of a place that wili 
relaxing atmosphere 
students can exchange 
le, sing, play carda-in 
pla-ce where students 
'^i i-' ci: liue natures 

litics 



progress 



one of "the.figgf,t^„"T.W.C. ^':0 




JOj anp 



J 8voj|is[ni^® jSuof) 



■snduiBo jno 



■raj saiiiAi)3B 
ap!Aojd 0) idiuajiB 






i '-JBI )B ^poq ,u3p,„s am git 

,J ^iJpun DUB i,n„„„;,?r P"""' 



rei'"" PUB uo,,..a<,„^, ,^,;'^ 



i ^n 






"■'f?,?-.- 



i C - U O ^ 

? ; § S % %'»'? 

» 9 ?• " 



til 



Faculty Advisors maintain lively interest in Wesleyan Publications. 



73 




(above) Dinner for outstanding high school seniors visiting Tennessee Wesley- 
an during one of two Hospitality Weekends 



(below) TWC Ambassadors: (first row, left to right) Barbara Harrison, Joy 
Thach, Carol Peden, Susan Blackburn; (second row) Sam West, Cheryl Corum, 
Becky Roos, Mary Walker, Harry Howard; (third row) Bill Miller, Hal But- 
tram, Toll Coulter, Gill Martin, Don Moore 




>* *^, . "fe!* 



TWC AMBASSADORS 

Fourteen select Tennessee Wesleyan students are elected anual- 
ly to a campus organization known as the TWC Ambassadors. 
Members of the organization serve as official hosts for all 
college events related to the Offices of Development, Re- 
cruitment, and Alumni Relations. In addition they participate 
in the high school visitation program conducted by the Re- 
cruitment Office. College sponsor for the group is Mr. Charles 
(Buddy) Liner, Director of Student Recruitment and Alumni 
Relations. 



(below) Hal Buttram and Cheryl Corum carrying bags for visiting high 
school seniors 




74 



CIRCLE K 

The Circle K was organized on the campus 
of Tennessee Wesleyan during the Winter 
Quarter of 1961-1962. This club is based 
on the principles of the American-Canadian 
way of life and is designed to encourage 
leadership, citizenship, and personal initia- 
tive. Circle K is also a service club in which 
the members are ever ready to aid any other 
organization, plus answering the needs of 
the faculty or administration. The member- 
ship of Circle K is limited to only those 
with the most desirable personal characteris- 
tics and outstanding promise of usefulness 
to the campus and community. 




(Above) John Penn, Board of Directors; Keith Nicholson, Vice-President; Jim Ellis, Treasurer; 
Rick Myers, Secretary; Norman Jackson, Board of Directors; Buddy Ellis, Board of Directors. 
(Pictured elsewhere Lundy Lovelace, President) 



(Below, left to right, first row) Mr. Ketron, Eddie Barham, John Penn, Buddy Ellis, David Keebler; 
(second row) George McGrew, Bill Ketchersid, Mike Overstreet, Rick Myers, Jimmy Ellis, Pete Wohl- 
wend; (third row) John Love, Bill Glimer, Bill Albritton, Norman Jackson, Bill Smalling, Miton Mc- 
Ilwain; (fourth row) Raymond Barr, Keith Nicholson, Jim Franks, Rodney Ackerman, Jim Peck. Judy ]ones, Sweetheart of Circle K 



»«* 1—^ 



(3 ^ 




75 






1 



^' 




(left to right, first row) Sue Ella Hankins, Gloria Wright, Faye Bacon, Pat 
Cole, Flora Ketner, Pat Collins, Susan Blackburn, Sherry Vichery, Carol 
Gray, Carolyn Meagher, Judy Cox, Nancy Ketchersid, Sarah Ann Hipp 
(second row) Betty Douglas, Kathy Van Allen, Betsy Wilhite, Alice Hughes, 
Pat Roch, Harri Kay Brooks, Anna Aytes, Nancy Martin, Sandra Blunt, 
Nancy Rosen, Judy Johnson, Linda Longmire, Alice Pickel, Judy Jones, 



Carol Peden (third row) IVlel Whilite, Bill Aiken, Cheryle Griflin, Alma 
Ward, Sue Finch, Lynn Woods, Don Lusk, Ed Jackson, Douglas Henry, Harry 
Howard, Lundy Lovelace, Agatha Hardaway, Pat Satterfield (fourth row) 
Bill Petty, Darnell Chance, Gill Martin, Costen Aytes, Tom Gutridge, Dick 
Kile, Joe Westcott, Art Keeble, Larry Griffith, Bill Miller, Steve Overall, 
David Keebler 



WESLEY AN CHOIR 



It can be said that the Choir truly represents the College in its 
appearances in junior colleges, high schools, and churches both 
in and out of the Holston Conference. The Choir also contributes 
much to this campus for hospitality weekends and for the weekly 
chapel services. 

At the beginning of fall quarter there was a flurry of excitement 
in the air centered around the "painless auditions" and prospective 
new choir members. It was amazing how quickly the choir tried 
to make the new people feel that they belonged to the group. 
Preparation was started immediately for the fall concert, which 
consisted of contemporary songs by American composers (adap- 
tations of poems by Robert Frost and e. e. cummings) and Vi- 
valdi's Gloria. This concert was also presented at Young Harris 
College in Georgia. 

After Christmas holidays, the Choir looked forward to the 
tour, March 21-29. The Choir traveled into the northern end of 



the Conference singing in high schools during the day and in 
churches at night. The music for the tour included some French 
music, The Messiah, and excerpts from My Fair Lady. The tour 
gave a feeling of unity to the Choir and many oppormnities for 
the members to sing for different occasions. In the midst of all 
this there was also great anxiety concerning who would get the 
leads in My Fair Lady. Suddenly there was a mass exodus to the 
library as Choir members desparately tried to check out the scores. 
This year's Spring Show, My Fair Lady, was definitely one of the 
best performances that this Choir has done. 

The Choir concluded the year with a Choir Party, singing for 
graduation, and reading new music for the forthcoming year. 
It is the inspiration, enjoyment, and closeness of the group, the 
love, devotion, and respect for their director that make it so sor- 
rowful for the senior members to leave the Tennessee Wesleyan 
Choir. 




Choir Officers: 
Faye Bacon, Assistant Librarian; Sue Ella 
Hankins, Secretary; Betty Douglas, Ward- 
robe Mistress: Nancy Ketcherside, Assist- 
ant Wardrobe Mistress; Pat Satterfield, 
Librarian: Darnell Chance, Social Chair- 
man; John Lane, Assistant Business Man- 
ager; Bill Miller, Business Manager; Bill 
Petty, Treasurer: Lundy Lovelace, Presi- 
dent. 




Andrew Harper 
Director of Wesleyan's Music Program 



WESLEYAN CHOIR WOMEN: 

(left to right) Gloria Wright, Sue Ella Hankins, Pat Satterfield, Nancy 
Rosen, Alma Ward, Alice Pickel, Sarah Ann Hipp, Linda Longmire, Judy 
Johnson, Pat Roch, Lynn Woods, Susan Blackburn, Carolyn Meagher, Pat 



Cole, Sherry Vichery, Alice Hughes, Cheryle Griffin, Sue Finch, Betty 
Douglas, Sandra Blunt, Nancy Ketchersid, Nancy IVlartin, Faye Bacon, 
Anna Aytes, Judy Cox, Carol Peden, Gatha Hardaway 





DEBATE TEAM 



(Above) Mike Raulston, Bill Albriton, Frances Freestone, Alien Dennis, Mary 
Long, Tommy Burnett, Mary Lou Robbins, Haney Howell, Ceie White, William 
B. Yates, R. V. Jennings. 



The Tennessee Wesleyan College Debate Team, currently in its 
third year of participation in intercollegiate debate, is also en- 
joying its most successful season. 

Under the direction of William B. Yates, Debate Coach, the 
team took its first championship since attaining senior college 
status, when the team of Bill Albritton and Allen Dennis won 
the best affirmative team trophy in a tournament held at Carson- 
Newman college. 

The debaters have participated in, or will participate in, at 




least eight tournaments this academic year: the Ap{)alachian In- 
vitational at Boone, North Carolina, the Carson-Newman Invita- 
tional at Jefferson Ciry, the Murfreesboro Novice Tournament 
at Murfreesboro, the Maryville Novice Invitational at Maryville, 
the U.T. Invitational at Knoxville, the Lenoir Rhyne Invitational 
at Hickory, North Carolina, the Southeast Invitational in Deland, 
Florida, and the Tennessee State Forensic Tournament at Cooke- 
ville. 

Tommy Burnett, a senior, won first place in extemporaneous 
speaking in the Appalachian tournament and also placed third in 
the after-dinner speaking. In addition to the four varsity debaters. 
Bill Albritton, Tommy Burnett, Allen Dennis, and R. V. Jennings, 
participants in the 1963-64 debate program at Tennessee Wes- 
leyan also include Haney Howell, Mike Raulston, Rick Myers, 
Fred McArthur, Mary Long, Mary Lou Robbins, Frances Free- 
stone, Nancy Lutes, Ann Pratt, and Cele White. Having finally 
broken the winning ice at Carson-Newman, Wesleyan debaters 
are looking forward to more accomplishments this season. 



78 



PI GAMMA MU 

(left to right) Mr. Mathis, R. V. Jennings, Sandra Garrison, Dr. 
Sciiafer, Gene Worthington, Barbara Clementson, Mr. Coe, 
Bill Ketchersid 



Pi Gamma Mu is a national honorary social science 
fraternity. Its membership is restricted to students with 
forty quarter hours in the social sciences with a cumu- 
lative average of "B." Its purpose is to encourage and 
improve scholarship in the social sciences. 



THE CIRCUIT RIDERS 

(below) Jim Rutherford, Larry Cayior, Charles Dixon, Jack Mar- 
tin, Ken Myers, Bob Ingram 

This is a group of practicing Methodist ministers who 
are also full-time Wesleyan students. With Chaplain 
Howard Hinds as their sponsor, it is difficult to imagine 
a more lively or on-the-move organization. 





WESLEYAN BAND 

(right) Claud Abbott, John Love, Ralph Bristol, Larry 
Cole, Bill Climer. 

Representing the Wesleyan Band, which some- 
times numbers as many as twenty members, are 
these five young men who provide the Band's 
hard musical core. Under the direction of Mr. 
Harper, this group serves as a Pep Band at the 
ball games and wiU take part in the Spring 
Show, My Fair Lady. 



Society 
for the 
Advancement 
of 
Management 

SAM was organized on this cam- 
pus in 1959 for all students of 
Business Administration. The 
purpose of SAM is: "through re- 
search, discussion, publications, 
and other appropriate means to 
conduct and to promote study 
and understanding of the social, 
psychological, and economic im- 
plications of scientific principles 
of modern management." 




(Above, first row, left to right) John Penn, (Vlartin Humphry, Ailene Everett, Norman Jackson, Joe Bow/den; 
(back row) John Huddleston, Mr. Hutson, John Stevens, Richard Walker, Joe Jenkins, Ken Wells. 



BETA BETA BETA 




The Eta Omega chapter of the National Honor- 
ary Biological Society was installed on the cam- 
pus in 1962. Members are chosen on the basis 
of scholastic achievement including a minimum 
of fifteen hours of biology and the attainment 
of high ethical and moral ideals. The purpose 
of this organization is to stimulate sound scho- 
larship, to promote the dissemination of scien- 
tific truth, and to encourage investigation in 
the life sciences. Activities include regular 
meetings, outings, and attendance at regional 
meetings by appointed delegates. 



(Left, first raw, left to right) Judy Groseclose, Sally 
Baxter, Joyce Patterson, Sue Ann Polbos, Earlene 
Simpson, Mildred Sutton; (second row) Gill Martin, 
Karen Dawson, Allison Perry, Cheryl Corum, James R. 
Long; (third row) Don Moore, Dr. Adams, Jim Franks, 
Miss Bradley. 



80 




Alpha Xi Delta 84 

Kappa Delta 86 

Sigma Kappa 8 8 

Phi Sigma Kappa 90 

Pi Kappa Phi 92 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 94 



SORORITIES 

AND 

FRATERNITIES 



81 




Each sorority and fraternity selects a fellow 
college student whose appearance and person- 
ality epitomizes the ideal person in the mind 
of that organization. Collectively the "sweet- 
hearts," each with his own distinctive honor- 
ary title, reflects the best of Greek life at 
Tennessee Wesleyan College. 

The "sweethearts" selected for the 1963-64 
are pictured here as a group; on later pages 
they appear in individual shots. 



Phi Sigma Kappa 
Pi Kappa Phi . 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Sigma Kappa 
Kappa Delta 
Alpha Xi Delta . 



. Lana Mynatt 

Cheryl Corum 

Mary Lou Robbins 

Ronnie Martin 

Tommy Burnett 

Milton Mcllwaine 



82 







di 










^^^B^^^ ^jpsn|R|^ 




J 








Wiley Rosenbaum 
King of Wesleyan Greeks 



Jean Burton 
Queen of Wesleyan Greeks 



Qrcek Weekend, 1968 



Greek Weekend, held during spring quarter, plays a tremendous 
role in strengthening the fraternity system at Tennessee Wesleyan 
College. 

The activities of 1963's Greek Weekend began with a Friday 
night skit competition. From among the sororities Alpha Xi 
Delta won first place with the theme "Around the World with 
Alpha Xi Delta." Kappa Delta sorority took second place. Sigma 
Phi Epsilon took first position among the fraternities; Pi Kappa 
Phi, second. 

Field events on Saturday included egg-tossing, sack-racing, 
three-legged racing, etc. for the girls. Kappa Delta sorority 



emerged with an impressive score. The fraternities engaged in 
more strenuous activities. Phi Sigma Kappa taking top honor 
in this area. 

Saturday night featured a banquet and dance as the finale of 
a memorable weekend. Trophies were awarded to the winners 
of the earlier competitions, and the Greek King and Queen were 
announced. King was Wiley Rosenbaum of Phi Sigma Kappa, 
while the Queen was Jean Burton, Alpha Xi Delta. Other mem- 
bers of the royal court were Lana Mynatt, Kappa Delta; Mary 
Ann Monk, Sigma Kappa; Jack Edmonds, Pi Kappa Phi; and 
Fred Fuller, Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



83 



ar^VAiui fff//i 



xkwn^imfM 



ssa 




Alpha Xi Delta: (left to right, first row) Margaret Sander, Alice Dew, Pat 
Cole, Penny Coll, Suzanne Smith, Andrea Ingle, Sandi Phillips, Judy Cox, 
Barbara Willits, Faye Bacon; (second row) Mary Walker, Connie Beaver, 
Susie Morris, Pat Satterfield, Harri Kay Brooks, Sue Barnes, Hilda Martin, 



Pat Prater, Freda Humphrey; (third row) Jean Burton, Linda Longmire, 
Mary Frances Trotter, Judy Green, Marilyn Ward, Sue Cochran, Beth Hitch, 
Cheryle Griffin; (fourth row) Sandra Long, Kay Rayfield, Sharon Richards, 
Mary Neese, Kay Murray, Trudi Bork, Judy Cunningham. 



ALPHA XI DELTA 




1963-64 was a good year for the Alpha Xi's. Fall quarter we were 
still new in the new sorority room in Fowler Hall. We had bought 
some new furniture, and the 1962-63 pledges had refinished the 
old pieces we wanted to keep. 

After rush, we had eighteen pledges, among them Vice-President 
Connie Beaver and Girl Representative Pat Cole of the freshman 
class. 

Harri Kay Brooks was a cheerleader (and did!). Other campus 
activities involving Alpha Xi's were The New Exponent of which 
Sandra Long was co-editor, the Wesleyan Scholars of which Kay 
Rayfield was a member, and the Wesleyan Ambassadors on which 
Mary Walker served. Elected to Who's Who in American Colleges 
and Universities was Kay Rayfield. Quite a number of our sisters 
were active in Chi Rho and in the Wesleyan Choir. Sportsminded 
sisters had fun participating in Wesleyan intramurals. 

Mrs. Bill Hutson served as a helpful and willing advisor. 



84 




Around the white piano singing an Alpha Xi song: Sandra Long, Jean 
Burton, Judy Grosclose, H. K. Brooks (at piano), Mary Frances Trotter, 
Kay Murray. 




Milton Mcllwain, Dream Man, was honored at the Au- 
tumn Sweetheart Party. Milton surprised the Alpha Xi's 
at Christmas by presenting each girl an Alpha Xi doll. 



Alpha Xi Officers: (below, left to right, seated) Faye Bacon, Scholarship; 
Mary Frances Trotter, Membership; Kay Rayfield, President; Hilda Martin, 
Corresponding Secretary; LeAnn Luttrell, Chaplain; (standing) Linda Long- 



mire, Secretary; Judy Green, Journal Correspondent; Jean Burton, Assistant 
Treasurer; Kay Murray, Mistress of the Robes; H. K. Brooks, Treasurer; 
Pat Satterfield, Athletic Director; Sandra Long, Pledge Trainer. 





This fall found the KD's busily at work the week before school 
started, planning for the rush period. To make things more excit- 
ing, we moved into our newly decorated sorority room. The room 
is of Rural French decor, with blues and greens being the predom- 
inate colors. We are especially proud of our room, not to mention 
the first annual Greek Week trophy which occupies the place of 
honor. 



KAPPA DELTA 

Our rushing resulted in nineteen pledges who have proved them- 
selves worthy by their projects and activities. The officers of the 
pledge class are: Nan Hughes, President; Susan Blackburn, Vice- 
President; Becky Roos, Secretary; Judy Jones, Treasurer; and Vir- 
ginia Thompson, Chaplain. 

Out projects have been numerous, including the gift of baskets 
of food to needy families at Thanksgiving and Christmas and 
contributions for buying school lunches for needy children. We 
visited the Rehabilitation Center in Oak Ridge and bought several 
items of needed equipment for the center. 

In the intramural volleyball tournament, the KD's won first 
place. We have done our share in helping the TWC basketball 
team, by furnishing three cheerleaders: Joan Mynatt, Head Cheer- 
leader; Mary Lou Robbins; and Lana Mynatt. 

The three fraternity sweethearts were selected from among our 
sorority, and two of our members, Betty Douglas and Sue Ella 
Hankins, were chosen for Who's Who. 



Kappa Delta: (left to right, first row) Sue Ella Hankins, Scherry Vickery, 
Linda Onkst, Lynn Woods, Sue Renfro, Judy Jones, Joy Thach, Betty Doug- 
las; (second row) Lana Mynatt, Linda Weston, Lee Quillan, Barbara 
Knight, Sylvia Bates, Emily Cate, Marianne Daniels, Carolyn Meagher, Nan 
Hughes, Sai-ah Ann Hipp, Mrs. Roy Shilling (advisor); (third row) Kathy 



Rowe, Jane DeFriese, Patty Rowe, Becky Roos, Joan Mynatt, Brenda 
Thomas, Judy Johnson, Janelle Rogers, Kathy Van Allen, Susan Blackburn, 



Mary Lou Robbins; (fourth row) Jeanne 
Thompson, Sandra Blunt, Donna Ray. 



Neas, Cheryl Corum, Virginia 





Playing Records: Patty Rowe, Joan Mynatt, 
Judy Jones. 

Tommy Burnett, Kappa Delta King of Diamonds. 
(righi) Even though he has been busy with his 
many campus responsibilities. Tommy has al- 
ways been ready to help us in our projects. 




Kappa Delta Officers: (seated) 
Sue Ella Hankins, President; Kathy 
Rowe, Editor; Lana iVlynatt, Vice- 
President; (standing) Betty Doug- 
las, Treasurer; Mary Lou Rob- 
bins, Secretary. 



87 




Sigma Kappa Officers: (left to right) Carolyn Ketner, Scholarship; IMeeta 
Puett, Recording Secretary; Betty Williams, Second Vice-President; June 



Colvin, Treasurer; Gail Lowry, President; Sally Baxter, Registrar; Ann 
Mason, First Vice-President; Julia Holland, Activities Chairman. 



(Right) Ronnie Martin, Sigma Kappa Sweetheart. 

(Below) Betty Williams — as usual — has the "floor" while Carolyn Ketner, Neeta 
Puett, and Donna King look and listen. 





SIGMA KAPPA 

Sigma Kappas returned this fall in deep anticipation of what the 
year would bring. We have continued to work on our sorority 
room, using original art as our prime decorative feature. A paint- 
ing done by Mrs. Fred Puett is a focal point of our scheme. 

We are proud of our pledge class. Under Betty Williams' leader- 
ship, these young ladies gave a tea for the pledges of all campus 
sororities and a dinner party for Sigma Kappa actives. 

Sigmas worked as head af the Polio Drive for Wesleyan. Christ- 
mas and Halloween Parties added much to the fun of the year. 
Already we are planning our lake-outing for Spring and looking 
forward to the traditional brunch given by one of our honorary 
members. 

Since the Sigmas won the All-around Athletic Trophy last year, 




we are working toward new trophies this year. 

Mrs. Sally Ealy has served faithfully as our advisor during this 
year. 



Sigma Kappa: (below, bottom row, left to right) Mary Ann Mason, Jo Ann 
Babb, Janie Fine; (second row) Olivia Rudd, Sherry Proaps, Betty Williams, 
Donna King, Carolyn Robinette, Judy Hutsell, Judy Bangs; (third row) Betsy 



Campbell, Linda Ray, Gail Lowry, Carolyn Ketner, Neeta Puett, Carmen 
Ailor; (fourth row) Julia Holland, June Colvin, Sally Baxter, Cynthia Hicks, 
Becky Campbell. 




89 




PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

The Phi Sigs returned to school this fall after ending a fine 1962-63 
academic year by winning the first annual Greek Week Competition and 
by receiving the Scholarship Award from the College. 

During the summer we moved into a new house located across the 
street from the Library. A little paint and some new furniture have given 
us the most interesting house on campus. Mrs. Willson, who lives next 
door to us, has become a sort of unofficial fraternity mother, helping with 
flower arrangements and in many other ways. 

Our Moonlight girl is Lana Mynatt, as pretty in daylight as moonlight. 
Her willingness to help us in any way possible has meant much to the 
group. 

At the end of rushing, which included a successful smoker, we pledged 
twenty men. Our pledges carried out several projects including a car- 
wash and a chile supper. 



(Above) John Penn and Carl Tarpley 



(Left) Lana Mynatt, Phi Sigma Kappa Moonlight Girl 







(Below) Phi Sigma Kappa Officers: John Penn, President; Joe Bowden, Inductor; Fred 
Keener, Sentinel; Tom Coffey, Treasurer; Carl Tarpley, Vice-President. Pictured else- 
where: Roswell Perdue, Secretary 




90 




Phi Sigma Kappa: (Bottom row, left to right) Dr. IVIarl< Schafer (Advisor), 
Lana IVIynatt (Sweetheart); (second row) Roy Sewell, Joe Bowden, Larry 
Nolen, David Lepchitz, David Archer; (third row) Lakie Lillard, David 
Groves, Tom Coffey, Carl Tarpley, Jimmy Ellis, John Penn, Norman Jacl<son; 



(fourth row) Steve Hambough, Russell Hackett, Robin Kidwell, Lynn Elder, 
Normon Miller, David Hurd; (fifth row) Relus Fleming, Lynn Freeman, Ros- 
well Perdue, Eric Bollinger, Haney Howell; (sixth row) Bob Tutterow, Duain 
Rich, Jim Franks, John Lee, Spencer Noe, Meryl Noe 



A new tradition has developed this year. Every Sunday evening the Phi Sigs meet 
at the house for a T-bone dinner, which is always tasty. 

One of the most pleasant of our individual parties was the Thanksgiving Dinner 
cooked by Burkett. Dr. Schafer had two very fullplates of food! Other parties 
included a dance for which the Tempos played. Dr. Schafer and Miss Jones 
twisting helped to make them a blazing success. And our Halloween Party, chap- 
eroned by Chaplain Hinds and Miss Jones, found everyone dunking for apples 
and eating marshmallows, including the chaperones. 








91 




PI KAPPA PHI 

The Pi Kapps had a very rewarding year by simply being a part of the 
fast growing Greek-Letter Fraternity System here on the Wesleyan 
Campus. 

Last spring quarter we obtained our first house, which is located at 
215 Blount Street. We painted and remodeled both inside and out, 
furnished the house, and now we have something of which we are all 
proud. We give much thanks to Mrs. C. H. Martin, a neighbor, who 
helped us plan and contributed a great deal of housekeeping advice. 



Pi Kappa Phi: (below, bottom row, left to right) Jack Ed- 
monds, Cheryl Corum (Sweetheart), Hatcher Graham; (second 
row) Doug Dearstone, Harry Howard, Toll Coulter, Phil Gard- 
ner; (third row) Doug Henry, Don Moore, David Keebler, 
Howard Lamon; (fourth row) Eddie Eaves, John Mason, Tom 



Gutridge, John Lane, Harold Jackson, Ralph Bristol; (fifth row) 
Joe Drake, Joe Eldridge, George McGrew, Stanley Simmons, 
Allen Van Ostenbridge; (sixth row) Joe Moser, Ronnie Martin, 
Don Chandler, Al Simmons, Dick Momo, John Horesco 




92 



This year we pledged seventeen men who have proved to be a great asset. 
Among other things they helped to plan and execute our traditional pancake 
supper. 

Our Rose of Pi Kappa Phi is Cheryl Corum, pretty as a rose. Her great zeal, 
interest, and help have been a valuable boon to the fraternity. 

The high point of our social activities this fall was a party given in honor 
of our Rose and her court. Miss Bradley and Mr. Blazier sat quietly munching 
and chatting, perhaps about old college days and the teaching profession. What 
conversation pieces! 

In the intramural football program we ended sharing second place with the 
Phi Sigs, but we played good hard ball to win this position behind the first 
place Raiders. 

We are looking forward to getting our Charter from the National Council 
this spring. 





Cheryl Corum, Pi Kappa Phi Rose 



(Above) In front of the Pi Kappa Phi fireplace: Hatcher 
Graham, Tom Gutridge, Allen Van Ostenbridge 

(Right) Pi Kappa Phi Officers: Hatcher Graham, Archon; 
Alan Van Ostenbridge, Treasurer; Tom Gutridge, Secretary; 
Phil Gardner, Chaplain; Jack Edmonds, Warden; David Kee- 
bler. Historian 



93 




Sigma Phi Epsilon: (left to right, front row) Steve Overall, Milton Mcllw^ain, 
Bill Smalling, IVIary Lou Robbins (Sweetheart), Bill Albritton, Bill Climer, 
Richard IVIiller; (second row) Gil Martin, Randy Trent, Rick Meyers, Darnell 
Chance, George Huntley, Jerry Long; (third row) Jack McConnell, Butch 
Richardson, Doug Cass, Jim Price, Gordon Elkins, Bill Lockerby; (fourth 
row) Mr. Bill Yates (Advisor), Tommy Burnett, Joel West, Eddie Barham, 
Bob Harris, Jim Easton, Roy Roberts, Lynn Monday, Hal Buttram, Jim 



Bacchus, Cliff Stoneburner; (fifth row) Larry Hicks, Bill Aiken, Bob Lamb, 
Grant Hollenbeck, Al Kennedy, Larry Cole, Claude Abbott, Gene Worthlng- 
ton, John Love; (sixth row) Steve Kyker, Dick Sharp, Sam West, Randy 
Sykes, Ken Wells, Clyde Perry, Bob Jackson, R. V. Jennings; (seventh row) 
Donald Willcox, Dick Kyle, Joe Walker, Hugh Walker, Keith Nicholson, 
Rodney Ackerman, Tim Carpenter, Larry Huffman 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON 



The Brothers of Sigma Phi Epsilon returned to their Home behind 
the "Red Doors" on College Street this fall full of the spirit which 
marks the Sig Ep man. 

Tommy Burnett led the Wesleyan Student Government as Presi- 
dent; Rick Myers served as Treasurer. Ross V. Jennings edited 




The Neu' Exponent; Milton Mcllwain was elected by the Student 
Body as Mr. TWC. The Kappa Delta's selected Tommy Burnett 
as King of Diamonds, while Milton Mcllwain was the Dream Man 
for Alpha Xi Delta. Brothers Burnett and Jennings headed the 
list of Who's "Who selectees; they were also Senior Superlatives 
along with Bill Albritton, Alan Kennedy, and Milton Mcllwain, 
Hugh Walker played Varsity Basketball; Jim Easton swung for 
the Baseball team. 

Highlighting the year's social events and service activities have 
been a Beatnik Party, a Christmas Party for the underprivileged 
children, a Road Block for the March of Dimes, the Award Ban- 
quet, and the Pledge Princess Dance where Scherry Vickery from 
Gatlinburg, Tennessee, was elected to that honor. 

Queen Mary Lou Robbins was honored at the Sweetheart Ball. 
Attending her in the SPE Court were all the Queens of Hearts: 
Kay Murray, Judy Hutsell, H. K. Brooks, and Penny Coll. These 
girls also helped serve our Sunday Evening Bar-be-ques at the 
House. 



94 




Sig Eps in den: (above) John Love, Eddie Barham, Clyde 
Perry, Jim Bacchus 

IVIary Lou Robbins, Sweetheart of the Golden Heart; (right) 
reigns in an unprecedented second year. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon Officers: (below) Bill Albritton, President; 
Bill Smalling, Secretary; Milton IVIcIlwain, Treasurer; Larry 
Huffman, Historian; Alan Kennedy, Vice-President; Gordon 
Elkins, Pledge Educator 






(left to right) Lana Mynatt, President of Panhellenic Council, Kappa 
Delta; LeAnn Luttrell, Alpha Xi Delta; Mary Frances Trotter, Alpha Xi 



Delta; Betty Wilhams, Sigma Kappa; Kathy Rowe, Kappa Delta. Pictured 
elsewhere, Ann Mason, Sigma Kappa. 



PANHELLENIC 
COUNCIL 



INTER-FRATERNITY 
COUNCIL 



The Panhellenic Council is the governing body of sorority life 
on the Wesleyan campus, making all the rules for rushing, pledg- 
ing, and initiation concerning the sororities. The activities of 
"Greek Week" form an important part of the work of the Coun- 
cil. Two delegates from each of the three sororities make up the 
Council. The president of the Panhellenic Council is elected 
each year from the representative delegates. 



The Inter-Fraternity Council is set up to promote the fraternity 
system on the Wesleyan campus. The Council governs the 
fraternity rush rules, establishes committees for intramural athlet- 
ics, and organizes the fuctions of "Greek Week." Three rep- 
resentatives from each of the three fraternities make up the 
Council, with a president elected independently each year by 
the IFC. 




(left to right) Carl Tarpley, Phi Sigma Kappa; Bill Petty, Pi Kappa Phi; 
Phil Gardner, President of Inter-Fraternity Council, Pi Kappa Phi; Bill 
Albritton, Sigma Phi Epsilon; David Keebler, Pi Kappa Phi; Tommy 

96 



Burnett, Sigma Phi Epsilon; (second row) Tom Gutridge, Pi Kappa Phi, 
John Penn, Phi Sigma Kappa; Joe Bowden, Phi Sigma Kappa; Milton 
Mcllwaine, Sigma Phi Epsilon. 




If 111 - ; ,j La fH 



T'T 







ATHLETICS 



97 




CHEERLEADERS: 



Linda Buttram 
Mary Lou Robbins 
Joan Mynatt, head 
Lana Mynatt 
Harri Kay Brooks 



An Original Yell from lc)63-64 
Dog food! [clap, clap, clap} 
Dog food! [clap, clap, clap] 
Dog food! [clap, clap, clap} 
Dog food! [clap, clap, clap} 
Dog food! [clap, clap, clap} 



98 




THE BASKETBALL BULLDOGS 



THE TENNESSEE WESLEYAN BASKETBALL BULL- 
DOGS, despite some disappointing early season losses and 
the departure of regulars Teddy Baker and Larry Westcott, 
proved themselves a courageous group of yearlings by 
galloping down the late season stretch and into the tourna- 
ment whirl looking like a true team. 

With Captain Richard Pickell being the only senior on 
the squad, inexperience posed a major problem during the 
initial contests. Of the seven "starters" on the squad, be- 
sides Pickell, two (Tom Davis and BiU Johnston) were 
junior college transfers; one was an inexperienced junior 
(John Lee), one was a sophomore (Ken Gross); and two 
were freshmen (John Saylors and Doug Raymer). With 
this group of youngsters, in the basketball sense, Coach 
Buddy Cate worked diligently to create a smooth-running 
squad which many feel will not reach its peak until next 
season when all return. The season, however, held many 



thrills for Bulldog fans: the maturity of John Lee, as a 
rebounder, the steadiness of high-scoring Tom Davis, the 
court leadership of Richard Pickell, the all-out hustle of 
Ken Gross, and the deadly shooting of frosh John Saylors. 

Carson-Newman and the University of Chattanooga, 
perenniel roadblocks in the Wesleyan schedule, took per- 
haps too lightly the Bulldog yen to win and at least one, 
Chattanooga, tasted defeat (81-80) because of their com- 
placency. As for the Eagles — this year the Baptists must be 
living right — and few will forget that shot from the 
corner. 

All year long Wesleyan fans pulled with those flip- 
turning cheerleaders for a team that specialized in hustle, 
zeal, and organization. We cheered their victories and felt 
a personal depression at each defeat. The Wesleyan spirit 
takes pride in all of the Bulldogs. 



iLfy. 




John Saylors 



Doug Raymer 



Ken Gross 



SOME FINE FELLOWS* 
By Allen Dennis 

As we watched the Tennessee Wesleyan College Bulldogs' 1963-64 campaign come to 
a halt last Friday night in the McQuiddy gym of David Lipscomb College, it was with 
a tinge of sadness. This was a season that saw many thing happen. 

It saw Richard Pickel ( pictured left with Coach Buddy Cate ) , a man whom many 
thought would never make it as a college ballplayer, come through in fine style and 
pull the Bulldogs through on more than one occasion. 

It saw Johnny Saylors, who needs only a mustache to be a dead ringer for John 
Wilkes Booth, make the starting team as a freshman and surprise all with his char- 
acteristic coolness of play that carried over from his high school days. 

It saw Doug Raymer, a freshman from Kingston, carry a lot of the lead for the 
Bulldogs and help when it was needed. It saw Kenny Gross show some offensive 
talent for perhaps the first time since coming to Wesleyan. Ken has always been a 
great defensive man, but this season he has developed into a fine offensive player. 

The season saw Tommy Davis, a likable junior from Caneyville, Kentucky, take 
charge of the Bulldogs' offense and make the all-'VSAC team. The season saw BiU 
Johnson give shades of Jack Henry at the center slot, and big John Lee show some 
good encouraging improvement at the center slot. 

But most of all, as one who knows each of these boys pretty well, it has shown 
how a fine group of young gentlemen can work together. They're all modest per- 
formers who let their basketball ability speak for them, and, too, they're good boys. 
*from Daily Post-Athenian, February 25, 1964. 




Tom Davis 



Bill Johnston 



John Lee 




Shorter is not getting shorter. 



Night class in modern dance. 



Sunday drivers are a paii 




'I'm serious. Mother; it was a basketball with red hair!" 



CANDID 

BASKETBALL 



The ball, John, the ball! 



101 





TENNIS COACH J. B. VAN COE at the water fountain. With the 
addition of the Jones Beene Tennis Center to Wesleyan's athletic 



physical plant comes the chance that Tennessee Wesleyan College 
will soon have an opportunity to host the VSAC tournament. 



102 




TENNIS 



As pictured above, the tennis team of 1963 was composed of Bill Johnson, Johnny 
Huddleston, Jackie Robinson, George Simpson, Richard Camp, Eddie Newton, Buddy 
Ellis, and Raymond Barr, (Notice spectator in background) Jackie Robinson, who won 
the number one singles title in the VSAC in 1962 as a freshman, played his usual 
outstanding brand of tennis, but there were many good number one netters in the VSAC 
this season, and Jackie failed to defend his title. Johnny Huddleston, a transfer from 
Cumberland Junior College, was one of the bright spots in the season as the consistent 
junior won a great portion of his matches. 



GOLF 



General success was the byword for the 
Wesleyan Golfers last season. Under the 
direction of Chaplain Howard Hinds, the 
golfers compiled a record of 4-2 in match 
play for the year, and compiled an ad- 
mirable record in the VSAC tournament 
held in Jackson. 

Flavis Casson, David Pless, Kenneth 
Hickman, Dickie Waddell (pictured 
right), David Lepchitz, and Steve Kyker 
(pictured elsewhere) were the main 
fortes. 




103 




(left to right) Tommy Helt, Richard Picl<ell, 
Randall Bigham, Ronald Allen, Jerry Tipton, Bi 



Roy Sewell, Jim Easton, 
I Bork, Roger Richardson, 



Coach Buddy Cate, David Morton, 
Freeman, Jim Davis, Bill Fox. 



John Wilborn, Donald Dones, Lynn 



BASEBALL 



There is one consolation for the 1964 Baseball Bulldogs: there 
is only room for improvement. Facing a tremendous challenge 
last season with only three lettermen returning from the previous 
year, the Bulldogs finished a most dismal season with a 0-13 
record. 

Jim Davis, outstanding third sacker, outfielder, and pitcher 
was a bright spot in the Bulldog's somewhat spotty performance. 
This all-VSAC third sacker of 1962 will be back again this season. 

Roy "Luke" Sewell, who donned the catcher's equipment last 
season when David Morton — starting catcher for the past two 
years — suffered an arm injury, came along extremely well for 
the Bulldogs in the latter part of the season. 

A lack of strong pitching kept the Bulldogs down last year, 
but the return of Lynn Freeman, and the arrival of several 
transfer athletes should bolster the sagging pitching corps. 




104 



INTRAMURALS 



WESLEYAN INTRAMURALS opened viciously with the 
bone-cracking jar of unpadded bodies colliding, and another 
season of touch ( ? ) football brought a collegiate atmosphere 
to the campus. Sigma Phi Epsilon, the pre-season dark horse 
had, of all things, a coach, while co-favorites Phi Sigma Kappa 
and the Raiders were bidding to win on brute strength. As it 
happened though. Pi Kappa Phi proved to be the "sleeper," 
surprising the Phi Sigs and insuring the championship for 
Big Daddy Sprinkle's Raiders the second year in a row. 

Girls' "Volleyball followed immediately and Kappa Delta 
sorority made a determined bid to win in a hurry. The 
Independents, however, pushed them to the limit before bow- 
ing to the tall and talented KD's. 

Intramural basketball brought a host of talent, male and 
female, to the gymnasium. Of the nine men's teams. Phi 
Sigma Kappa, loaded by intramural standards, seemed certain 



to cop the title, baring upsets by strong Raider and C.H.R. 
squads. As the season moved along the Phi Sigs proved 
themselves worthy of an undefeated season, and the regular 
season trophy, twice breaking 100 points and boasting the 
league's leading scorer, Duain Rich, with a 32.1 average. 
David Lepchitz of the Tankers was voted the league's top 
defensive performer. 

In the girls' action Sigma Kappa sorority went undefeated 
to take first place. The Independents again provided tough 
competition, but the Sigma's well-balanced attack, led by 
Joyce Newman, was enough to take the hard-fought final 
game. 

Wesleyan's intramural program is taking on new life and 
scope each year with more events for individuals and groups, 
men and women. The Wesleyan spirit favors such a wide 
scope of athletic activity available to everyone. 




105 





SiyHHMMMMilWHMlillllli^ll 

INDEPENDENTS (first row) Anna Maria Perez, Mary Jane Fillers, Beverly Murph, Gracie Lamphere; (sec- 
ond row) Barbara Idol, Lee Douglas, Miss Bradley, Georgia Morris, Ruth Frye; (third row) Maxine Ben- 
nett, Emma Martin, Linda Buttram, Joyce Patterson, Linda Bishop, Barbara Roberts; (fourth row) Sue 
Polbos, Nancy Lutes, Ingrid Atl<ins, Barbara Blake, Carolyn Burger. 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION (first row) Sherry Proaps, Janie Fine, Jo Ann Babb, Pat Collins, 
Gracie Lamphere, Anna Maria Perez, Betty Williams, Beverly Murph; (second row) Oliva Rudd, Judy 
Bangs, Judy Hutsell, Lee Quillian, Harri K. Brool<s, Nan Hughes, Carolyn Burger; (third row) Joyce Pat- 
terson, Sue Polbos, Emily Cate, Sylvia Bates, Mary Wall<er, Connie Beaver, Joan Mynatt, Judy Jones; 
(fourth row) Carolyn Ketner, Nancy Lutes, Maxine Bennett, Trudi Bork, Virginia Thompason, Brenda 
Thomas, Emma Martin, Linda Buttram. 




THE MEANING OF WESLEY AN 



To determine the meaning of Wesleyan, remem- 
ber its history, for the institution as it exists to- 
day is the natural product of over one hundred 
years of development within The Methodist 
Church, the community of Athens, and the 
fraternity of the alumni. 

The College has been related to one of the 
branches of The Methodist Church during its 
entire history. Organized first as the Athens 



MiMa 



\^»nnuiH,mu 



Female College in 18 57, this institution has gone 
through many changes, becoming in 192 5 Ten- 
nessee Wesleyan College. Each year the Holston 
Conference and the Woman's Division of Chris- 
tian Service of the Board of Missions of The 
Methodist Church contribute financially to the 
operation costs, making possible an ever-expand- 
ing academic program. Wesleyan's presidents 
(picture above) have always been Methodist 
ministers, and the College's religious ties are 
more firmly strengthened through the efforts of 
such ministers as the Rev. Mr. Harrison Marshall 
of Trinity Methodist Church and the Rev. Mr. 
Gordon Sterchi of Keith Memorial Methodist 
Church (left) who work with the students. 

Originally developed as a community college, 
Tennessee Wesleyan today draws strong support 
from the immediately surrounding area. Espe- 
cially helpful is the College's Advisory board, a 
group of representative business and profession- 
al leaders of Athens. 



108 



Commuter students are sprinkled generously 
through all the classes, and these students after 
graduation have usually proved to be the backbone 
of a strong Alumni Association. The Maynard Ellis 
family (right), living almost within the limits of 
the campus, is an example of what the College and 
the community have meant to each other. Buddy 
and Jimmy Ellis currently play important roles in 
campus life; an older sister, Helen (now Mrs. John 
Walker of Memphis), graduated in 1961; their 
father attended Wesleyan and his father graduated 
from this institution when it was Grant Universi- 
ty. The younger members of the family anticipate 
attending Wesleyan as it continues to grow. 

Sparked by Athenian W. R. Selden as its presi- 
dent, the Wesleyan Alumni Association is advanc- 
ing a dynamic program to keep the college expand- 
ing. The annual dinner meeting of the Association, 
held in conjunction with the Spring Show, is a 
focal point of all elements of Wesleyan life. 




(above) The Maynard Ellis Family: IVIr. and Mrs. Maynard Ellis, Jr., 
Ruth Ellen, Marion, Buddy, and Jimmy 



(below) Against a bacl<ground of bricl<s from Old College, the Wes- 
leyan Alumni Association: Harold White, Treasurer; Robbie Ensminger, 
Secretary; W, R. Selden, President. Not pictured: Jack Carr, Vice- 
President. 




109 



INDEX 

To Student, Faculty and Staff Names 



Abbott, Claude 72-A, 79, 94 
Ackerman, James H. 27 
Acketman, Rodney 27, 37, 94 
Adams, William H. 6, 12, 22, 80 
Adkins, Ingrid 43, 107 
Aiken, Bill 38, 54, 76, 94 
Ailor, Joyce C. 51, 89 
Albritton, William H. 27, 37, 65, 

68, 70, 75, 78, 94, 95, 96 
Alford, Melinda 38 
Allen, Ronnie O. 23, 104 
Allen, Sandra 27, 37 
Allison, Catolyn 24 
Afcher, David 16, 45, 46, 51, 91 
Archer, Mildred 12, 72-H, 23, 69, 

71 
Archer, William H. 12, 23, 69 
Armes, Deana 23, 43, 69, 72-B 
Atkins, Geneva 27 
Au, Herman C. 43 
Aytes, Anna 22, 76, 77 
Aytes, Costen 72-E, 76 

B 
Babb, Jo Ann 51, 89, 107 
Bacchus, Jim 11, 94, 95 
Bacon, Faye 16, 43, 76, 77, 84, 

85 
Baker, Ronnie L. 51 
Baker, Teddy 99 
Ball, Novella 51 
Ballew, Mary 51 
Bangs, Judith 43, 89, 107 
Barbara, Eddie 43, 54, 67, 75, 94, 

95 
Barnes, Sue 13, 51, 70, 72-E, 72-F, 

84 
Barnetr, John Barry 27 
Barr, Raymond 6, 25, 26, 53, 67, 

75, 103, 105 
Bates, Sylvia 51, 72-E, 86, 107 
Baxter, Sally 80, 88, 89 
Beaver, Connie 14, 51, 67, 70, 84, 

107 
Bennett, Maxine 43, 107 
Bennett, Patsy 38 
Bigham, Randall 
Bishop, Linda 51, 107 
Blackburn, Susan 51, 74, 76. 77, 

86 
Blake, Barbara 51, 107 
Blazier, Robert 1 3, 22 
Blunt, Sandra 43, 76, 77, 86 
Bollinger, Eric 38, 91 
Bork, Bill 104 
Bork, Trudi 16, 51, 72-G, 84, 

107 
Bowden, Joseph 27, 38, 80, 90, 

91, 96 
Bowling, Evelyn 24 
Bowling, Floyd 7, 20, 21, 57-58, 

67, 70, 72-H 
Bradley, Carolyn 6, 12, 22, 72-H, 

80, 107 
Bradley, Elizabeth 51 
Bradshaw, Danny 51, 105, 106 
Brandt, Helen 43 
Bristol, Ralph 68, 69, 79, 92 
Brock, Eva 51 
Brock, Jeanne 51 
Brock, Phyllis S. 1-2, 38, 72-B 
Brooking, Charles 15 
Brooks, Harn Kay 22, 43, 50, 
72-A, 72-F, 76, 84, 85, 94, 97- 
98, 10^, 112 
Browning, Charles 22 
Bryan, Mahlon 46, 51 
Burger, Brenda 51 
Burger, Carolyn 10^ 
Burnett, Tommy 8, 2^, 57-58, 59, 
65, 6^, -0, 78, 81-82, 87, 94, 
96, 112 
Burton, Jean 37, 83, 84, 85 
Butt, Lloyd 43, 49 
Bunram, Hal 23, 51, 74, 94 
Buttram, Linda 44, 97-98, 107 
Byrd, Jim 28, 37, 105, 106 
Byrd, Sue Crumley 38 



Cadger, Walter 52 
Callahan, Cyrus 37 
Camp, Richard 8, 28, 103 



Campbell, Mary E. 52, 89 

Campbell, Rebecca 52, 89 

Carlson, Steve 17 

Carpenter, Timothy 44, 94 

Cart, lack 109 

Carter, Bobby 28 

Cass, Doug 94 

Casson, Flavis 103 

Cate, Buddy 22, 99, 100, 104 

Cate, Emily 52, 86, 107 

Cate, James J. 44 

Cawood, Roy Anthony 52 

Caylor, Larry 79 

Chance, Van Darnell 44, 76, 94 

Chandler, Donald 52, 66, 92 

Chism, Ben 28, 37 

Chism, Virginia 52, 68, 70 

Clementson, Barbara 22, 38, 79 

Climer, William 44, 75, 79, 94 

Clonts, David 52 

Coble, Harry 11, 14, 18,22, 71 

Cochran, Sue 38, 84 

Coe, J. Van B. 22, 72-H, 79, 102, 

103 
Cde, Vera 14, 24, 72-G 
Coffey, Tom 37, 90, 91 
Cole, Larry 52, 79, 94 
Cole, Patricia 22, 52, 72-H, 76, 

77, 84 
Coleman, Tommy 38, 41, 72-H 
Coll, Penny 23, 38, 84, 94 
Collins, Patricia 52, 76, 107 
Colvin, June 38, 88, 89 
Corum. Cheryle 7, 23, 43, 44, 67, 

■'0, 74, 71-82, 86,92,93 
Coulter, Toll 52, 72-H, 74, 92 
Cox, Judy Ann 52, "'6, 77, 84 
Crumley, Sue [see Byrd] 
Cunningham, Judith 52, 84 
Curtis, William 39 

D 
Dake, Joe W. 44, 92 
Daniels, Marianne 86 
Dannel, Charles Clay 7, 52 
Davidson, Charles S. 52 
Davidson, George 39 
Davis, James Edwin 28, 104 
Davis, Melba 39 
Davis, Tommy 99, 100 
Davis, William F. 52 
Dawson, Karen 80 
Dearstone, James Doug 52, 92 
Defriese, Jane 44, 86 
Dennis, Allen 1-2, 12, 39, 69, 

72-A, 78, 100 
Derreberry, Lynn 28 
Derrick, Charles Ross 28 
Dew, Alice 44, 72-H, 84 
Dixon, Charles 28, 79 
Dones, Donald 104 
Dotson, June T. 29 
Douglas, Betty Jean 29, 60, 76, 

-7, 86, 87 
Douglas, Lee 44, 107 
Downing, Raymond 22 
Duncan, Budd 6, 22 
Duncan, Karen 52 
Dunn, John Oliver 29 

E 

Ealy, Sally D. 24, 89 
Easton, James C. 44, 94, 104 
Eaves, William Eddie 52, 92 
Edds, Rachel 7, 11, 52 
Edgemon, Kathy Rowe 38, 41, 67, 

86, 87, 96, 107 
Edgemon, Randy C. 39 
Edmonds, Jack 15, 29, 37, 66, 

73-H, 83, 92, 93 
Edwards, Pierce Jack 29 
Elder, Lynn 91 
Eldridge, Joe 11, 51, 52, 67, 70, 

92 
Elkins, Gordon 94, 95 
Ellis, Buddy 39, 71, 75, 103, 109 
Ellis, Jimmy 22, 29, 61, 65, 75, 

91, 105, 109 
Ellis, Marion Dake 109 
Ellis, Mr. and Mrs. Maynard 103, 

109 
Ellis, Ruth Ellen 109 
Elrod, William 24, -2-H 
Ensley, Frank B. 52 



Ensmingcr, David F. 52 
Ensminger, Maggie 24 
Ensminger, Robbie 24, 109 
Epperson, Mary Jane 44 
Etter, Rosella 72-H 
Everett, Ailene 44, 80 

F 
Fair, James 44 
Fillers, Mary Jane 52, 107 
Finch, Sue 52, 76, 77 
Fine, Janie 52, 89, 107 
Fish, Sharon Lee 52 
Fleming, Relus 39,91, 106 
Foltz, George 52 
Floyd, David 105 
Forbes, James 44 
Fox, Bill 41, 104, 106 
Franks, Jim 6, 29, 37, 75, 80, 91 
Freeman, Earl Lynn 39, 91, 104 
Freestone, Frances 44, 78 
Frye, Judy 52 
Frye, Ruth 52, 107 
Fuller, Fred 83 
Furman, George 72-H 
Furman, Judy W. 29, 37 

G 
Gardner, Phil 69, 64, 67, 69, 70, 

74, 92, 93, 96 
Garrison, Sandra 30, 79 
GiUikin, Karen T. 1-2, 23, 30, 60, 

71, 72-A, 112 
Gothard, Joe 46 
Grace, Barry 72-F 
Graham, James Hatcher 30, 37, 

92, 93 
Graves, Mary Nelle 20, 21 
Gray, Carol 76 

Green, Judy 22, 44, 50, 72-A, 
72-B, 72-D, 72-H, 84, 85, 112 
Greene, Blanche 24, 72-H 
Greenhoe, Mary 12, 13, 22, 72-H 
Griffin, Cheryle 52, 72, 76, 77, 84 
Griffith, Larry 72-A, 76 
Griffith, Shelley 52, 72-E 
Groseclose, Judy [see Hughes] 
Gross, Kenny 44, 99, 100 
Groves, David 91 
Guffey, Kenneth 30, 37 
Guinn, James H. 55 
GuUey, Frank, Jr., 20, 21, 70, 71, 
72-H 

Gulley, Ann 14 

Gutridge, Tom 11, 13, 72-H, 76, 
92, 93, 96 

H 

Hackett, Russell 52, 91, 106 

Hale, Martha 9, 22 

Hambaugh, Steve 52, 72-A, 91 

Hamilton, Gene 4, 69, 112 

Hamilton, Guy B. 45, 70 

Hampton, Linda 52 

Hankins, Sue Ella 30, 37, 59, 64, 
68, 69, 70, 76, 77, 86, 87 

Hardaway, Gatha Mae 45, 76, 77 

Harper, Andrew 11, 12, 22, 70, 
72-E, 74, 77, 79 

Harris, Robert M. 52, 94 

Harrison, Barbara 52, 74 

Hedley, Martha 13, 22, 72-H 

Helt, Thomas M. 39, 104 

Henry, Bill 8, 30 

Henry, Doug 52, 76, 92 

Hicks, Cynthia 45, 89 

Hicks, Fred C. 39 

Hicks, William Larry 30, 94 

Hickman, Kenneth 103 

Hill, John Wesley 45 

Hinds, Howard 19, 20, 21, 29, 69, 
70, 91, 103 

Hipp, Sarah Anne 45, 76, 77, 86 

Hitch, Elizabeth Ann 45, 84 

Hogan, Charles W. 39 

Holland, Julia 88, 89 

HoUenbeck, Grant 94 

Holt, Judith Lynn 45 

Honaker, Carl 6, 22, 71 

Hooper, Martha L. 45 

Horesco, John F., Ill 52, 70, 92 

Hotaling, Morgan 52 

Howard Harry 52, 69, 70, 74, 76, 
92 



Howard, Teddy 52 

Howell, Haney 11, 17, 45, 72-H, 

78, 91 
Huddleston, Johnny 31, 80, 103 
Huffman, Larry W. 39, 94, 95 
Huffman, Larry W. 39, 94, 95 
Hughes, Alice 2, 31, 37, 60, 76, 

77 
Hughes (Groseclose), Judy 30, 

37, 80, 85 
Hughes, Nan 86, 106, 107 
Humphrey, Freda 52, 84 
Humphry, Martin 80 
Hunt, Mona Faye 39 
Huntley, George 94 
Hurd, David A. 45, 91 
Hutsell, Fred A. 45 
Hutsell, Judy 43, 45, 89, 94, 107 
Hutson, W. T. 8, 22, 80 

I 
Idol, Barbara 52, 70, 107 
Ingle, Andrea 52, 70, 84 
Ingram, Robert L. 39, 72-B, 79 
Isenhower, Sarah 45 

Jackson, Norman 31, 37, 66, 75, 

80,91, 106 
Jackson, Edwin 52, 68, 76 
Jackson, Harold 8, 22, 46, 54, 92 
Jackson, Robert L. (Bob) 9, 52, 

94 
Jennings, R. V. 15, 23, 31, 37, 
60, 64, 67, 71 72, 72-H, 73, 
78, 79, 94 
Jenkins, Joe Harrison 31, 80 
Johnson, Danny E. 39 
Johnson, Edward J. 31, 37 
Johnson, James W. 39 
Johnson, Janet Faye 24 
Johnson, Judith M. 54, 76, 77, 86 
Johnson, Bill 68, 103 
Johnston, Bill 99, 100, 101 
Jones, Doris 12, 13, 22, 72-H, 91, 

112 
Jones, Joann Carolyn 54 
Jones, Joel 45, 54 
Jones, Judy 54, 86, 87, 107 
Jones, Judy 13, 31,37, 57-58,61, 
63, 65, 67, 70, 75, 76, 112 
K 
Kara, Eleanor Ong 54 
Keeble, Art 76 
Keebler, David C. 46, 70, 75, 76, 

92,93,96 
Keener, Fred C. 39, 90 
Kennedy, Alan H. 31, 64, 94, 95 
Ketchersid, Nancy E. 46, 68, 69, 

70, 76, 77 
Ketchersid, Bill 38, 40, 51, 67. 

75, 79 
Ketner, Carolyn L. 46, 88, 89, 

107 
Ketner, Flora 76 

Ketron, Paul 7, 13, 23, 72-H, 75 
Key, Darrold Wayne 54 
Kidwell, Nita M. 54 
Kidwell, Robin 91 
Kile, Richard C. 46, 70, 76, 94 
King, Donna Jane 46, 88, 89 
King, Jack 15 
Kinser, James 8, 32 
Knight, Barbara J. 54, 86 
Knight, Donald 2, 23, 32, 37 
Koger, Ralph 41, 106 
Kronmiller, Joyce L. 46 
Kyker, Steve 6, 32, 37, 94, 103 

L 
Lacy, Eric Russell 13,22,21, 

72.H 
Lamb, Robert H. 46, 94 
Lamon, Howard L. 54, 72-H, 92 
Lamon, Mildred Sue 54 
Lamphere, Gracie 46, 107 
Lane, John 17,46, 70,92 
Latham, Mary Marlene 40 
Lawson. Cloyd Robin 54 
Leach, Paul R. 46 
Lee, John 13, 40, 91, 99, 100, 

101 
Leitch. Louise Anne 46 



110 



Lepchitz, Dave 37, 72-H, 91, 103, 

105 
Lewis, Ida Ruth 12, 24, 72-H 
Lewis, James T. 54 
Lillard, Lakey 8, 32, 91 
Liner, Charles 20, 21, 74 
Liner, Dixie C. 24 
Liu, Jean Chien S. 47 
Lockerby, William 25-26, 51, 54, 

67, 94 
Lockner, Arnetta Gail 54 
Long, James R. 47, 80 
Long, Jerome E. 47, 97 
Long, Mary J. 47, 78 
Long, Sandra 1-2, 23, 47, 50, 72, 

72-A, 72-B, 72-D, 84, 85 
Longmire, Linda 17, 23, 47, 76, 

84, 85 

Loomis, Alice L. 40, 72-H 

Lotti, Tom 20, 21, 72-H 

Love, John Bible 47, 75, 79, 94, 

95 
Lovelace, Lundy 10, 11, 32, 37, 

65, 75, 76 
Lowery, Gail 8, 40, 88, 89 
Lusk, Louis Don 47, 66, 76 
Lutes, Nancy 11, 54, 74, 78, 107 
Luttrell, LeAnn 32, 37, 69, 70, 

85, 96 
Lynch, Clifford 32 
Lytle, George Dudley 40 

M 
McAfee, Jim 106 
McArthur, Fred 78 
McCall, Rebecca N. 54 
McClary, Ben 2, 12, 12, 23, 72-C, 

73, 112 
McConnell, Jack 6, 94 
McGrew, George A., Jr. 47, 75, 92 
Mcllwain, Milton 32, 37, 62, 65, 

75, 81-82, 85,94, 95,96 
McKenzie, Margaret Lee 40 
Malone, Rose Ann 33, 37 
Marshall, Harrison 103 
Martin, Emma 107 
Martin, Gil 42, 74, 76, 80, 94 
Martin, Hilda E. 47, 84, 85 
Martin, Jack 79 

Martin, Nancy E. 47, 72, 76, 77 
Martin, Ronnie 6, 81-82, 88, 92 
Mason, Ann 13, 33, 37, 88, 89, 

96, 112 
Mason, John Edward 55, 92 
Massey, Caroline E. 55 
Mathis, Robert 13, 23 72-H, 79 
Matlock, Steve 16 
Mathews, Eddy 55 
Meagher, Carolyn L. 55, 76, 77, 

86 
Merrill, Harry 15 
Miller, Barbara Rose 33 
Miller, Norman 91 
Miller, Richard M. 47, 94 
Miller, William Peter, Jr., 40, 70, 

74, 76 

Mohney, Ralph 13, 20, 21, 70, 

108 
Mohney, Mrs. Ralph 12, 13 
Momo, Richard A. 47, 92 
Monday, Lynn P. 40, 94 
Monk, Mary Ann 83 
Moon, Betty 47 
Moore, Don 15, 22, 55, 74, 80, 

92 
Moore, Paul Lee 33, 37 
Moore, Susie 55, 84 
Morgan, Helen 72-H, 112 
Morris, Georgia 55, 107 
Morris, Philip 72-A, 72-B, 72-F, 

72-H 
Morrison, Janette 24 
Morton, David 104 
Moser, Joe 92 
Beverly, Murph 6, 55, 107 
Murray, Kathryn L. 47, 84, 85, 

94 
Myers, Claryse 13, 23 
Myers, Ken 79 
Myers, Richard 1-2, 40, 57-58, 

67, 75, 78,94, 106, 112 
Mynatt, Doris Joan 22, 40, 47, 

86, 87, 97-98, 106 

Mynatt, Lana 1-2, 38, 67, 81-82, 
83, 86, 87, 90, 91, 96, 97-98, 
112 



^ 



m 



v^- 



N 
Nagy, Emerick 23, 71, 72-H 
Neas, Margaret Jeanne 40, 55, 84 
Newman, Joyce 105 
Newton, Eddie 103 
Nicholson, Keith A. 47, 75, 94 
Noe, Meryl D. 22, 41, 42, 47, 52, 

53, 91 
Noe, Spencer 48, 91, 106 
Nolen, Larry Bea 33, 40, 91 

O 
Oldham, Larry 46 
Onkst, Linda C. 55, 86 
Ottinger, Beulah 12 
Overall, Steve 13, 48, 54, 68, 70, 

72-H, 76, 94 
Overstreet, Mike, 22, 48, 50, 54, 

75 

P 
Parson, Reba 24, 72-H 
Patterson, Joyce 40, 80, 107 
Peden, Caryl Grace 55, 70, 74, 

76, 77 
Penn, John 8, 33, 37, 57-58, 65, 

67, 70, 75, 80, 90, 91, 96, 112 
Perdue, Roswell 72-E, 72-H, 90, 

91, 105, 106 
Perry, Clyde 48, 94, 95 
Perez, Anna Maria 48, 107 
Perry, Allison 80 
Petty, Bill 7, 13, 33, 37, 68, 69, 

76, 96, 72-H 
Phillips, Cassandra 55, 84 
Pickell, Richard 33, 99, 100, 101, 

104 
Pickel, Alice 23, 48, 50, 76, 77 
Pless, David 103 
Polbos, Sue 6, 48, 80, 107 
Pollard, Mary Ruth 48 
Prater, Patricia E. 55, 84 
Pratt, Ann 55, 72-E, 78 
Pratt, David 34, 70, 112 
Price, James William 34, 94 
Proaps, Sherry 89, 107 
Puett, Fred 12, 23 
Puett, Mrs. Fred 9, 23, 89 
Puett, Neeta 14, 34, 37, 71, 72-A, 

88, 89, 112 
Pyle, John R. 40 
Perry, Mary Kathy 55, 72-H 

Q 

Queener, Charles R. 55 
Quillian, Birdie Lee 55, 86, 107 

R 
Rapier, Judith 40 
Raulston, Michael M. 55, 78 
Ray, Donna Virginia 48, 86 
Ray, Linda J. 48, 89 
Ray, Melinda 24 
Rayfield, Kay 34, 37, 60, 65, 84, 

85 
Rayfield, Leon 34, 37 
Raymer, Doug 55, 99, 100 
Reed, Elizabeth R. 24 
Renfro, Martha Sue 48, 86 
Reno, Floyd H. 40, 72-A 
Reynolds, Richard M. 48 
Rich, Duane 1-2, 34, 59, 72-H, 

91, 105, 106, 112 
Richards, Sharon Lee 48, 84 
Richardson, Butch 94 
Richardson, Roger 104 
Richesin, Cathryn Ann 34, 37, 

70, 71 
Riviere, Paul 20, 21 
Robbins, Mary Lou 1-2, 23, 25- 

26, 38, 40, 67, 72-H, 78, 81- 

82, 86, 87, 94, 95, 97-98, 112 
Roberts, Barbara 48, 107 
Roberts, Roy T. 55, 94 
Robeson, Mrs. 12, 24, 45 
Robinette, Carolyn Grace 34, 37, 

89 
Robinson, Ewart S. (Robbie) 41 
Roch, Patricia 55, 76, 77 
Roderick, Lynda Ann 48, 50 
Rogers, James E. 41 
Rogers, Janelle 58, 86 
Robbins, John 8, 48 
Roos, Mary Rebecca 55, 74, 86 
Rosen, Nancy Ruth 55, 76, 77 
Rosenbaum, Wiley 83 
Ross, Glenda J. 55 
Rowe, Kathy [see Edgemon] 
Rowe, Pat 35, 72, 72-D, 86, 87 



THE NOCATULA LEGEND 



A wounded English officer from Fort Loudon 
was befriended by an Indian Chief and nursed 
back to health by Nocatula, daughter of the 
Chief. The soldier, given the name of Conncs- 
toga. "The Oak," was accepted into the tribe 
and married Nocatula. A jealous suitor attacked 
Conncstoqa with a knife. As he lay, dying 
Nocatula confessed her eternal love and 
plunged a knife into her breast. Buried to- 
gether, the Chief placed an acorn in 
Coniiestoga's hand and a hackberry in Nocatula's 
hand, symbolizing undying love. From these 
there developed two trees which stood on 
this spot for 150 years. 



^^"ITT 



.,«*-^>,^ 



^^^.' 



^1^ 






■^ 



V-^^l 









% '^^ 



"ti. ?• 



Rudd, Olivia D. 48, 89, 107 
Rutherford, James 35, 37, 79 

S 
Sallis, Charles 13,23,69 
Sallis, Hareylyn G. 23, 70 
Sanders, Margaret 49, 84 
Satterf^eld, Pat 6, 22, 41, 70, 76, 

77, 84 
Saxman, Edwin F., Ill 49 
Saylors, John D. 55, 72-E, 99, 

100, 101 
Scarbrough, Juanita 35 
Schafer, Mark 13, 72-H, 79, 91 
Schmidt, Anna Christine 55 
Seepe, Nancy H. 24 
Selden, W. R. 109 
Senn, C. C. 7, 13,23 
Sewell, Roy 43, 49, 67, 91, 99, 

104 
Sharpe, Richard M. 51, 55, 94 
Sheely, Dianna 56 
Sheets, Eugenia A. 49 
Shell, Rebecca Sue 56 
Sherrod, David M. 56 
Shilling, Roy B. 15, 20,21, 74 
Shilling, Mrs. Roy B. 86 
Shumake, Agatha 11, 35, 37, 70 
Simons, Allen C. 56, 66, 92 
Simmons, Barbara Q. 49 
Simmons, Stanley 6, 49, 92 



Simpson, Erlene L. 41, 80 

Simpson, George 103 

Slack, James W., Jr. 

Smalling, William A. 49, 70, 75, 

94, 95 
Smith, Allen George 56 
Smith, Alton 13,23 
Smith, Dorothy Lee 56 
Smith, Lynda 35 
Smith, Maria J. 56 
Smith, Mary Suzanne 56, 84 
Smith, M. Clifton 23, 72-H 
Smith, Mildred 15,24, 72-H 
Snelbaker, Pamela 41 
Snell, James A. 24, 42 
Sowders, Robert E. 41 
Sprinkle, WiUiam Roy, Jr. 41, 

105 
Staley, Carolyn F. 23, 72-H 
Stames, George 56 
Sterchi, Gordon 108 
Stevens, John N. 49, 80 
Stewart, James Michael 41 
Stiles, Delane 35 
Stoneburner, Cliff 94 
Sturgill, Freida J. 49 
Sullins, David 63 
Sutton, Barbara A. 56 
Sutton, Mildred A. 41, 80 
Swafford, Margaret V. 49 




p. 3: Mosaic, "Jesus entering Jerusalem," by Ann Mason. 

p. 4: Crucifix in natural wood, cloth, and wire, by Gene Hamilton. 

p. 61: Tommy Burnett, the expansive chandelier in the blue and white Main Dining 
Hall; 

John Penn, the impressive central light in the green and brown President's 
Dining Room; 

Judy Jones, the sparkling crystal chandelier in the plush lounge of Fowler 
Hall; 

Rick Myers, the fixture of many lights illuminating the Library. 

Publisher: Foote & Davies, Inc., Atlanta, Ga.; Publisher's representative: Mrs. Helen 
Morgan; Special Art Work: Miss Doris Jones; Index Committee: H. K. Brooks, Karen 
GiUikin, Judy Green, Neeta Puett; Photographer: Stanrich Studio; Athletic shots: 
David Pratt. 



112 



Swafford, Don 105 
Sykes, Randy 94 

T 
Tarpley, Carl 25-26, 35, 37, 61, 

64, 67,90,91,96 
Tarpley, Joyce 14, 35 
Taylor, Edward W. 41, 72-A 
Thach, Phyllis Joy 56, 72-E, 74, 

86 
Thacker, John David 56 
Thomas, Brenda R. 50, 68, 69, 

86, 106, 107 
Thompson, Virginia 56, 86, 107 
Til ley, Carolyn Wayne 1-2, 36, 

67, 71 
Tipton, Jerry L. 41, 104 
Toomey, Mary Kathryn 50, 69 
Townsend, Jerry T. 50 
Trent, Frank F. 56 
Trent, Randall 72-A, 94 
Trotter, Mary Frances 17, 23, 42, 

72-H, 84, 85, 96 
Truman, Robert 11 
Turner, Charlotte Louise 42 
Turner, Melvin L. 50 
Tutterow, Bob 17, 91, 106 
Tyler, Mary Dawn 56 

U 
Underwood, Louis 24 

V 
Van Allen, Kathy A. 56, 76, 86 
Van Ostenbridge, Alan 42, 92, 93 
Vichery, Sherry 76, 77, 86 
Vinsant, Beatrice 36 

W 
Waddell, Dickie 103 
Walker, Helen Ellis 109 
Walker, Hugh 22, 42, 66, 72, 73, 

94, 99 
Walker, Joe 94 
Walker, Mary 42, 56, 72, 72-E, 

72-H, 74, 84, 107 
Walker, Richard 80 
Ward, Alma S. 56, 70, 76, 77 
Ward, Betty Carolyn 24 
Ward, Edmonia L. 50 
Ward, Marilyn R. 42, 70, 84 
Ware, Mary Ann 36 
Watts, Tyresha Ann 50 
Webb, Sandra 36, 61, 71, 72, 

72-C, 72-H, 73 
Webb, Vincent L. 56 
Wells, Kenneth L. 50, 80, 94 
Wesley, Charles S. 50 
West, Duncan 72-H 
West, Joel 46, 56, 94 
West, Sam 74, 94 
Westcott, Ann 56 
Westcott, James L., Jr., 50 
Westcott, Jo Henry 42, 76 
Westcott, Larry 42, 99 
Weston, Linda L. 42, 86 
Whatley, Martha 2, 13, 36, 72, 

72-A, 72-H, 73 
Whedbee, Jim 23, 50, 70 
White, Harold 109 
White, Jean Cole 50, 78 
Whitehead, Norma 24 
Wibel, William H. 42 
Wiggins, Genevieve 23, 72, 72-C, 

72-G. 72-H, 73 
Wilborn. John 104 
Wilhite, Elizabeth 36, 37, 76 
Wilhite, Mel 36, 76 
Willcox, Donald D. 50, 72-A, 

72-D, 72-F, 94 
Willits, Barbara H. 50, 84 
Williams, Arvella 37 
Williams, Betty 12, 23, 37, 68, 

70, 72-H, 88, 89, 96, 107 
Williams, Sam R. 42, 54 
Wilson, Jack H. 23, 69, 70, 71, 

72-H 
Wood, Stacy, Jr. 56 
Woods, Jo Lynne 56, 68, 76, 77, 

86 
Wohlwend, Mary Kate 24 
Wohlwend, Peter M. 50, 75 
Womack, Peggy R. 42 
Wong, Chris 6, 37 
Worthington, Gene 42, 79, 94 
Wright, Gloria L. 56, 76, 77 

Y 
Yarbrough, Lila G. 56 
Yates, William B. 23, 72-H, 78, 

94 




j^/iiiyrr^vriiiTA^\ 




(.UXETVVCRITAS^ 







I 









'H^! 



f^f LUXET*VERITAS\ -*