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Full text of "North American fauna"

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U. # DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SfURtEY 



NORTH AMERICAN FAUNA 



2>To. 2 3 



[Actual (late of publication, January 23, 1904] 



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INDEX GENERUM MAMMALHM: 

A LIST OF THE OKXEK A AND KA.MFUKK OF MAMMj^Lfi 

MY 

T. S. PALMER 
ASSISTANT, BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 



Prepared under the direction of 

Dr. C. HART MERRIAM 
CHIEF OF DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 




WASHINGTON 



01 



\ 

GOVERNMENT 1'llINTING OFFICE 

19 04 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 



NORTH AMERICAN FAUNA 



JSTo. -2S 



[Actual date of publication, January 23, 1SI04] 




* 






INDEX GENEIUTM MAMMALIUM: 



A LIST OF THE 'tENEUA 



AM> families <>;■; ;,i ammals 



T. S. PALMERS • 

ASSISTANT, BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 



Prepared under the direction of 
Dr. C. HART MERRIAM 

CHIEF OF DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 




WASHINGTON 

( i ( > V EK.N M R N T PRINTING OFFICE 





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LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



LT. S. Department of Agriculture, 

Washington, D. ('.. July 6, 1902. 
Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith, as No. 23 of North 
American Fauna, a technical work on the generic names of mammals, 
by my assistant. Dr. Theodore Sherman Palmer. It consists of three 
parts: (1) An annotated list of the generic names of mammals: if) an 
alphabetical list of the families of mammals, and (3) a classified list of 
the generic names, arranged by orders and families. 

The first part was begun by me in L884, but owing to pressure of 
other work I was unable to carry it on, and turned it over to Dr. 
Palmer for completion. The second and third parts are wholly 
Dr. Palmer's. 

Respectfully, C. Hart Merriam. 

Chief, Biological Survey. 
Hon. James Wilson, 

s, cr< in I'lj of . [.grieulture. 

3 



CONTENTS. 



PART I.— ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF GENERA. 

Page. 

Introduction 7 

H istory and objects of the index 7 

References and dates 13 

Authorities and localities 18 

Types and their determination 19 

Hypothetical genera 22 

Changes in form of names 23 

Emendations 23 

Herrera's modified generic names 25 

M isprints 26 

Rejection of names 1 29 

Preoccupied names 29 

Nomina nuda 38 

Indeterminate names 38 

French and common names 39 

Plural snl >generic names 40 

Genera belonging to other classes 40 

Etymology of names 41 

Etymology of the word ' mammal ' 42 

Sources of names 4.3 

Classical names 43 

Barbarous names 45 

Nonsense names 48 

Kinds of names 47 

Mythological names 47 

Geographical names 47 

Personal names 48 

Compounds 52 

Double generic names 59 

Application of names 60 

Names of obvious application .' 61 

Names of obscure application 63 

Acknowledgments 67 

Index of genera and subgenera 71 

5 



6 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALICTM. 

PART II.— ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF FAMILIES AXD 

SUBFAMILIES. 

Page. 

Introduction 719 

History 719 

Stability 721 

Relative rank 721 

Rules concerning family names 722 

Application of rules 723 

Index of families and subfamilies. 725 

PART III.— INDEX OF GENERA ARRANGED ACCORDING TO 
ORDERS AND FAMILIES. 

Introduction 777 

Arrangement 777 

N< imenclature 779 

Outline of the classification adopted 781 

Comparisons 784 

Cross references 784 

Index of genera 787 

Appendix 949 

Additions 949 

Corrections 953 

Index to Part III 957 



No. 23. NOKTH AMEKICAN FAUNA. January, 1904. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 

By T. s. Palmer, 
Assistant, Biological Survey. 

INTRODUCTION. 
HISTORY AND OBJECTS OF THE INDEX. 

Since the publication of the tenth edition of the * Sy sterna Naturae ' 
of Linnaeus, in 1758, the number of generic names of mammals has 
multiplied with ever-increasing rapidity. This fact can readily be 
appreciated if the intervening century and a half be divided into three 
periods of approximately even length: (1) 1758-1800,(2) 1801-1850, 
(3) 1851-1900. At the beginning of the first period only 39 genera 
were recognized, but at its close about 175 generic names had been pro- 
posed, of which probably less than 100 were recognized. At the end 
of the second period (1850) the number was approximately 1,200, and 
at the close of the third had increased to more than 4,000, of which 
1,810 were admitted by Trouessart as entitled to recognition. In 1901 
more than 100 new generic names were added to the list. 

This rapid increase in the number of names has been due partly to 
increased activity in systematic work, partly to subdivision of older 
groups of mammals, partly to duplication of names through inad- 
vertence or otherwise, but more especially to the marvelous develop- 
ment in paleontology. Of the genera described before 1800, only 
three — Mammut, Megalonyx, and Megatherium — belong to extinct 
groups. A few years later this number was augmented by the names 
of numerous forms described from the Paris basin; since then, by the 
names required for the hosts of extinct mammals described from the 
deposits of France, Germany, Greece, India, Australia, the United 
States, and Argentina. 

Investigation has shown the necessity of subdividing older groups, 
as the older generic limits were too broad to permit grouping forms 
with sufficient precision. As a result, the genus of to-day is much 



8 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

more restricted than that of a century or more ago, and consequently 
the recognized genera and subgenera have greatly increased in num- 
ber. Early authors gave little attention to questions of priority, and 
the difficulty of consulting current literature and of keeping abreast of 
investigations made in foreign lands was greater than at the present 
day; hence each author quoted only papers accessible to him and fre- 
quently overlooked those of his contemporaries. Thus, in several 
cases the same group received a different name in English, French, 
and German works. Generic names in all branches of zoology have 
now become so numerous that it is growing more and more difficult to 
select those which have not previously been used in other classes; 
preoccupied names have consequently steadih' increased in number, 
resulting in duplication, which, though difficult to avoid, is none the 
less to be avoided. Unnecessary duplication has also been introduced 
by the work of purists who refused to recognize barbaric or native 
names. The common names adopted as generic terms by Lacepede. 
Lesson, and others, were rejected by Cuvier, Illiger. and their follow- 
ers, because such terms lacked classical origin or form. (See pp. 
29, 45.) 

It is easy to see that under these conditions confusion increased as 
time went on, and it became more and more difficult to ascertain the 
proper name for any particular group. This difficulty has been less- 
ened somewhat in recent years by the publication of indexes of genera, 
of which 8 that include genera and subgenera of mammals may be 
mentioned in this connection. These are Agassiz's ' Nomenclator 
Zoologicus," 1842-40; Bronn's 'Index Pakeontologicus," 1848; Mar- 
schall's ' Nomenclator Zoologicus,' 1873; Scudder\s ' Nomenclator 
Zoologicus,*" 1882; Trouessart's ' Catalogue Mammalium,' 1897-98; 
Sherborn's 'Index Animalium,' 1902; C. O. Waterhouse's 'Index 
Zoologicus," 1902, and the annual volumes of the 'Zoological Record.' 

Agassiz's ' Nomenclator Zoologicus ' brought together about 1,000 
names — most of those proposed prior to 1846; Marschall added 453 in 
1873; and all of these names were republished in Scudder's ' Universal 
Index." Trouessart's ' Catalogue ' of 1898 is a list of recognized genera 
and species, and although including many synonyms, makes no pre- 
tense at completeness in this respect. The annual volumes of the 
'Zoological Record' contain lists of the new genera published during 
the year, but the early volumes did not contain the names of extinct 
groups, and thus far no general index of new names has been pub- 
lished. Agassiz and Marschall, moreover, give only references to the 
place of publication and volume in which published, without the page, 
which is often difficult to find. Scudder, in his ' Supplemental List,' 

"Scudder's 'Nomenclator' consists of two parts: (1) 'Supplemental List,' con- 
taining chiefly additions to the indexes of Agassiz and Marschall, and (2) ' Universal 
Index' of the names published in the indexes of Agassiz, Marschall, Scudder, and 
the Zoological Record. Both parts were brought down to the close of 1879. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 9 

sometimes gives the type or included species with the names, but in 
the 'Universal Index' he gives merely the authority and date without 
reference, and to find the place of publication it is necessary to con- 
sult previous lists. Trouessart also in many cases gives only authority 
and date. 

Notwithstanding these indexes many names were overlooked, and 
as they were gradually brought to light some of those in current use 
were found to be preoccupied and others antedated. As a result, 
names have been shifted so frequently that it has become very difficult 
to keep pace with the changes, and general readers who do not appre- 
ciate the necessity for such changes regard the desired goal of sta- 
bility as practically unattainable. The extent of these changes is 
clearly shown in the case of North American mammals. Of the 160 
or more generic names used by True in his 'Provisional List of the 
Mammals of North and Central America.' in 1885, some 35 or 40, 
or nearly 25 per cent of the entire number, have been changed during 
recent years on what may be termed bibliographical grounds. Ten 
of these names have been found to be preoccupied and the others have 
given way to earlier names. Changes like these can only be avoided 
by having complete indexes which will show not only what names 
have been proposed in a given class and on what species they are 
based, but also whether the same generic names have been previously 
applied to other groups. 

The present index, which differs materially from previous ones in 
containing much information besides the name, authority, and place of 
publication, was undertaken in connection with the systematic work 
on mammals carried on by the Biological Survey, in order to collect 
for convenient reference not only the names given in previous indexes, 
but also those which had been overlooked or which had been published 
since the appearance of these works. Its object is to bring together 
all the generic and subgeneric names" of mammals, both living and 
extinct, which have been proposed since 1758, and to furnish such data 
of a bibliographical nature as to facilitate finding when and where 
each name was published, and to what group it was applied. It gives, 
so far as possible for each name, (1) authority. (2) date of publication, 
(3) order and family, (4) reference to original place of publication, 
(5) important secondary references, (6) variations in spelling, (7) type 
or included species, (8) locality of type species, (9) indication of pre- 
occupation, with cross reference to names, if any, proposed to replace 
them, (10) a statement (if published) of the part of extinct animals — 
as the skeleton, skull, teeth, etc. — which constituted the type specimen, 

a Since it is often merely a matter of personal opinion whether a given group is 
considered as a genus or subgenus, genera and subgenera are here treated alike, 
except that a subgenus is indicated as such and if it has been subsequently raised to 
full generic rank this fact is indicated by a secondary reference. 



10 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

(11) derivation, and (12) in some cases the application of the name. 
These facts, while comprising- the essential data in regard to a given 
name, are of little assistance in ascertaining what names have been 
used for a particular group and which one of several proposed is 
entitled to recognition. To supply this information the names have 
been arranged alphabetically under orders and families, each one 
accompanied by a statement of the authority, date, type or included 
species, and locality. It is thus possible to tell at a glance all the 
names which have been used in each family, the dates when they were 
proposed, the species on which they were based, and approximately 
the localities of these species." In preparing this part of the work it 
became necessary to collect family and subfamily names, only a few of 
which had been previously indexed systematically. The work there- 
fore consists of 3 parts: (1) an alphabetical index of genera giving the 
essential facts in regard to each name; (2) an alphabetical index of 
families and subfamilies, showing the authority, place and date of pub- 
lication, and the order to which the name belongs; (3) a systematic 
index showing the generic names which have been proposed in each 
family, with the more important facts regarding authorities, dates. 
and types. 

The present index was projected by Dr. C. Hart Merriam about 
L884 and was intended at first to include merely the genera of living 
mammals with the exception of the cetaceans. When undertaken by 
the present writer in November, L889, it contained about 250 names. 
Two years later a systematic examination was made of Scudder's 
'Universal Index.' the -Zoological Record' for 1878-91, and general 
works on mammals, and the names thus obtained, accompanied only 
by authority and date, were arranged alphabetically in a skeleton list 
on the plan of Scudder's Index. Additional names were entered in 
this list from time to time and the references looked up and verified 
at the first opportunity. At the close of L891 the number of genera 
verified was about 375; on January 1, 1893, it had increased to about 
650; on January 1. L894, to 2.045; on January I. 1895, to about 3.300; 
on January 1. L896, to 3,850; on January 1, 1897, to 3,900; on Janu- 
ary 1, ISDN, to about 4,275: on January 1, 1899, to 4,318; on January 
1, 1900, to about 4.400; and on July 1, 1902, to about 4.500. As the 
work progressed it was decided to change the plan so as to include all 
recent genera, and finally to make it complete by indexing extinct 
genera. Not only works on mammals but general serials and books 
of reference have been examined for names. Several indexes of 

«It will be observed that no attempt is made to distinguish synonyms from valid 
names excepl in case of preoccupation. Such information must be sought in special 
monographs or works like Trouessart's 'Catalogue Mammalium.' The data given 
in the following pages are merely the raw material which will assist the specialist 
engaged in revising a group to select the names he considers entitled to recognition. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 11 

genera of birds, fishes, Crustacea, insects, etc., have been examined, 
and Scudder's ' Nomenclator ' has been systematically examined at 
least twice for names in other groups which might preoccupy those of 
mammals. In short, no effort has been spared to render the list as 
complete and accurate as possible. 

In August, 1894, the Department acquired from Mr. F. H. Water- 
house, Librarian of the Zoological Society of London, a manuscript 
list of genera of mammals prepared on the same plan as his 'Index 
Generum Avium' published in L889. This manuscript was generously 
offered to the Department by the author upon his learning that an 
index similar in plan to his own, but somewhat broader in scope, was in 
course of preparation. This offer was at one* 1 accepted, and the list 
was found to contain 3,009 names accompanied by references to place 
of publication, while the Department list at that date contained 3,604 
names, of which 2,848 had been veritied. Beside 77 new names and 
101 earlier references, many additional important secondary references 
were furnished by the Waterhouse list, but its greatest value lay in 
the check which it afforded on the whole work. It is interesting to 
note the close agreement in these two lists, independently compiled 
(each author being ignorant of the work undertaken by the other). 
Not only were practically the same names found in the two lists, but 
the references in most cases coincided exactly, and are, therefore, more 
trustworthy than if brought together by one individual. 

While it was obviously impracticable to verify references so numer- 
ous and so widely scattered after the list was in type, as was said to 
have been done in the case of Bronn's celebrated Index, certain checks 
were used during the preparation of the work which eliminated many 
errors. The names were arranged on cards, typewritten to secure legi- 
bility and to avoid errors in spelling. Nearly all the references were 
veritied independently by two persons, and many of the cards after- 
wards looked over by a third. Notwithstanding these precautions, 
many errors have undoubtedly crept in. In fact, with 1,500 names, 
most of which are accompanied by from six to twelve distinct items of 
information, not to mention the thousands of figures referring to vol- 
umes, pages, and years under the references, it can readily be seen that 
the possibility of error is very great. It is hoped that with the checks 
above mentioned, and especially with the acquisition of Waterhouse's 
manuscript, comparatively few names have been overlooked and that 
few errors will be detected in the references; but in statements regard- 
ing types and classification absolute accurac}^ is unattainable, owing to 
the variety of ways in which genera have been proposed and the diver- 
sit}' of views held by leading s}^stematists as to the position of many 
genera or even families. 

At first an attempt was made to fix the type of each genus, but this 
proved impracticable and the plan of including all the species men- 



12 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

tioned in the first description was adopted instead. Later on the types 
fixed by subsequent authors and revisers of groups were noted by 
inserting the word ' t} r pe ' in parenthesis after the species so indicated 
by^ the first reviser, and by marking the reference to the paper from 
which this information was obtained 't} T pe fixed.' All this of course 
necessitated a reexamination of many volumes and greatly delayed the 
progress of the work. Some cases which should have been reexamined 
may have been overlooked, thus adding another possible source of error. 
These details are mentioned, not to magnify the difficulties of the work 
or to condone errors which it may contain, but merely to show the 
probability of finding mistakes in an index of this kind in spite of the 
checks adopted to detect them. 

Although nearly twenty years have elapsed since this index was first 
projected, very little headway was made until 1891, and the work has 
been actually in progress only about twelve years. The long delay in 
bringing it to completion has been due largely to the desultory way in 
which the work had to be done, chiefly at odd moments in the intervals 
between more important official duties. Changes in the plan and the 
reexamination of references delayed it far more than would otherwise 
have been the case. Slow progress in undertakings of this kind is, how- 
ever, not unusual, as shown by Bronn's elaborate "Index Pala?ontolo- 
gicus.* which was fifteen years in course of preparation. The present 
index was supposed to have been almost ready for publication in 1894, 
but had it been issued then it would have comprised only the alpha- 
betical index of genera (Part I) and only 80 per cent of the names now 
included. The delay has resulted in enlarging the original scope of the 
work, the addition of nearly 1,000 names and much of the matter on 
etymology, and the incorporation of many corrections, w T hich, although 
not perceptible, are none the less important. A number of rare books 
containing new names have been acquired, and several valuable general 
works recently published have been examined to the great benefit of 
the work. Among these ma}' be mentioned Trouessart's ' Catalogus 
Mammalium,' Roger's ' Verzeichniss der Fossilen Sai'igethiere,' Miller 
& Rehn's 'List of North American Land Mammals, 1 Thomas's 'Genera 
of Rodents,' Sclater & Thomas' 'Book of Antelopes,' W. L. Sclater's 
'Mammals of South Africa,' Lydekker's 'Deer' and 'Oxen, Sheep, 
and Goats,' the volumes on monkeys, marsupials, and British mammals 
in Aliens Naturalists' Library, Beddard's 'Mammals,' Hay's 'Cata- 
logue of Fossil Vertebrates of North America,' Sherborn's ' Index 
Animalium,' C. O. Waterhouse's 'Index Zoologicus,' and numerous 
special monographs, including the palteontological papers of Ame- 
gbino, Hatcher, Matthew, Osborn, Roth, Scott, and "Wortman. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 13 

REFERENCES AND DATES. 
REFERENCES. 

Great care has been taken to ascertain the original place of publica- 
tion of every genus. This apparently simple object is often difficult 
of attainment, owing to the obscure manner in which some names are 
published and the practical impossibility of determining whether or 
not the reference found is really the first. The matter is important, 
since a difference of a few months or even a few days may decide the 
availability of a name/' A difference in publication of one year caused 
the rejection of such well-known names as Arvicola, Tsomys, and 
Ochetodon, while priority of only three days resulted in the adoption 
of Matschie's Zenkerella in place of De Winton's Aethufrus^ in 1898. 
Hipposidero* Gray is sometimes quoted 1831 (Proc. Zool. Soc. Lon- 
don, p. 53), where it is a nomen nudum, while reference to the original 
description in 1831 (Zool. Miscellany, p. 37) shows it to be a valid name. 
Oreas Desmarest is usually quoted 1822, and if correctly so it is pre- 
occupied hy a genus of Lepidoptera (1806) and by a genus of Polyps 
(1808). It is, however, said to have been described in 1801, and should 
this prove to be a fact the name would supplant Taurotragu.s, which is 
now adopted for the group. 

Different species are also likely to be enumerated in later references, 
and the supposed type derived from a reference commonly accepted 
as the earliest may prove to be different from the actual type as shown 
by the original description. Transference of type may be illustrated 
by the different editions of Linmeus: In the tenth edition, 1758, Man/* 
contains only one species, M. pentadactyla, which is necessarily the 
type; in the twelfth edition, 1766, two species are given, M. penta- 
dactyla and M. tetradactyla, and the latter has recently been given as 
the type of the genus. (W. L. Sclater, Mamm. S. Africa, II, p. 216, 
1901.) 

Secondary references have been freely admitted to indicate the sev- 
eral publications in which a name appeared at close intervals, to indi- 
cate changes in spelling, to call attention to important monographs or 
revisions of groups, to show when subgenera were raised to generic 
rank, and to fix responsibility for determination of types. No 
attempt, however, has been made to include every important second- 
ary reference, and more citations will be found under some names 
than under others. The reason is evident, for while well-known 
generic names may be found in almost any book of reference, some of 

«A few years ago Oldfield Thomas, supposing that Cuvier's well-known genus 
Cricetus dated from the ' Regne Animal,' 1817, proposed to replace it by Hamster 
Lacepede, 1799 (Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1896, 1019). The name, however, was 
used by Kerr in 1792, and in reality has seven years' priority over Hamster. 



14 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

the obscure ones are extremely difficult to find, and hence it is desir- 
able to bring tog-ether the more important facts in the history of 
names published in works which are not generally accessible. 

The references are brief, but at the same time full enough to indi- 
cate clearly the book or paper (without confusing titles of similar but 
distinct works), the edition, volume, page, plate, and figure where the 
name may be found. As a rule the inclusive pagination is given 
instead of the first page or the one on which the generic name appears, 
in order to indicate to some extent the length of the description and 
thus give a clue to the detail with which the group is treated. 

Nearly every reference has been verified, and in the majority of 
cases checked independently by two persons, so as to eliminate as far 
as possible errors due to copying. It is difficult to appreciate the 
time, labor, and energy expended to secure accuracy in this respect. 
Special trips have been made to libraries in distant cities in this 
country, and my assistant has visited the principal libraries in Bergen, 
Berlin, London, and Paris in the quest for rare books. Still, in a few 
instances, it has been necessary to take references to inaccessible works 
at second hand, but these are quoted or accompanied by a statement 
of the authority from which they have been derived. 

DATES. 

The determination of the date of publication is one of the most 
important points connected with nomenclature, as it is the foundation 
of all matters respecting priority of names. In a technical sense the 
publication of a book or paper is distinct from the date of printing 
and practically synonymous with distribution/' Publication is defined 
by the Century Dictionary as "The act of offering a book, map, print, 
piece of music, or the like, to the public by sale or by gratuitous 
distribution." According to the late Dr. Coues, "A printed work is 
'published' if a single copy is placed in a public library." 6 Although 
it is a general rule that the date of publication is to be accepted unless 
there is evidence to show that it is incorrect, yet it must be remem- 
bered that many scientific papers, particularly monographs and elabo- 
rate works, are published in parts, and when these parts are gathered 
in volumes the date on the title page is, in most cases, simply that of 
the last brochure. Such publications, therefore, have both a real and 
an apparent date — the real date being the time of publication of the 
separate parts; the apparent date that on the title page. These two 
dates may vary several months or even years, as in the case of the 
'Proceedings of the U. S. National Museum,' 'Proceedings of the 
Zoological Society of London' for 1850, or the 'Transactions of the 
Zoological Society of London.' An extreme case is that of Pallas' 

"See Allen, 'Science,' N. S., IV, 691, 838, 1896. 

''Coues, in Allen's Mon. N. Am. Pinnipeds, p. 254, footnote, 1880. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 15 

"Zoologia Rosso- Asiatica/ quoted by some authors as 1811 and br- 
others as 1831. This discrepancy in dates is due to the fact that the 
work was partially distributed in 1811, but not completed until twenty 
years later. New genera and species described in such works, if quoted 
from the date of completion, may be incorrectly considered synonyms 
of other names which really appeared later. 

Since, as already mentioned, a difference of a few months or even a 
few days may determine the acceptance or rejection of a name, it is 
important to ascertain, with as much accuracy as possible, the exact 
date of publication, and no effort has been spared to attain this object. 
In the present index, when the real date differs from the apparent 
date, both are cited, the latter being- given in parentheses or in the 
form 'for 1850', etc., followed by the real date at the end of the refer- 
ence. In recent years considerable labor has been expended in ascer- 
taining the dates of publication of some of the more important 
zoological works, and several special papers on this subject have been 
published, chiefly by Richmond, Sclater, Sherborn, and Waterhouse. 
These papers are as follows: 

LIST OF SPECIAL PAPERS GIVING DATES OF PUBLICATION OF WORKS ISSUED IN PARTS. 

Bush, Lucy P. Note on the Dates of Publication of Certain Genera of Fossil Verte- 
brates. <Am. Journ. Sci., 4th ser., XVI, 9(5-98, July, 1903. 
Geoffroy, I. Table M6thodique et Analytique des Ouvrage de Geoffroy Saint Hilaire. 

<Vie, Travaux, etc, d'Etienne Geoffroy Saint Hilaire, Paris, 421-471, 1847. 
Marsh, 0. C. Note on the Dates of some of Prof. Cope's Recent Papers. <Am. 

Journ. Sci. and Arts, 3d ser., V, 235-236, Mar., 1873. 
Richmond, C. W. ( >n the Date of Lac6pMe's Tableaux. <Auk, XVI, 325-329, Oct., 

1899. 
Sclater, P. L. List of the Dates of Delivery of the Sheets of the 'Proceedings' of 
the Zoological Society of London, from the commencement in 1830 to 1859 
inclusive. <Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1893, 436-440. 
Sherborn, C. Davies. On the Dates of the Parts, Plates, and Text of Schreber's 
'Saugthiere.' <Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1891, 587-592. 
Dates of the Parts of P. S. Pallas' . . . 'Nov. Spec. Quadr. Glirium.' <Ann. 

and Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., VII, 236, 1891. 
On the Dates of Shaw and Nodder's 'Naturalist's Miscellany.' <Ann. and 

Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 375-376, 1895. 
On the Dates of the Natural History portion of Savigny's 'Description de 

l'Egypte.' <Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1897, 285-288. 
Note on the Dates of the "The Zoology of the 'Beagle.'" <Ann. and Mag. 

Nat. Hist, 6th ser., XX, 483, 1897. 
Lacepede's Tableaux . . . des Mammiferes et des Oiseaux; 1799. <Nat. Sci., 

XI, 432, 1897. 
Dates of Blainville's ' Ost6ographie. ' <Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., II, 

76, 1898. 
A Note on the Date of the Parts of ' Humboldt and Bonpland's Voyage: Obser- 
vations de Zoologie,' <Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., Ill, 428, 1899. 
Index to the "Systema Naturae" of Linnaeus, Manchester Museum Handbooks, 
Publication 25, pp. 1-108, London, 1899. 
Sherborn, C Davies, and Jentink, F. A. On the Dates of the Parts of Siebold's 'Fauna 
Japonica' and Giebel's 'Allgemeine Zoologie' (first edition). <Proc. Zool. 
Soc. London, 1895, 149-150. 



16 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Sherborn, C. Davies, and Palmer, T. S. Dates of Charles d'Orbigny's ' Dictionnaire 

Univereel d'HistoireNaturelle,', 1839-1849. <Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th 

ser., Ill, 350, 1899. 
Sherborn, C. Davies, and Woodward, B. B. The Dates of the ' Encyclopedie Methodique ' 

(Zoology). <Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1893, 582-584. 
On the Dates of the 'Encyclopedie Methodique: Additional Note. <Proc. 

Zool. Soc. London, 1899, 595. 
Waterhouse, F. H. On the Dates of Publication of the Parts of Sir Andrew Smith's 

'Illustrations of the Zoology of South Africa.' <Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 

1880, 489-491. 
The Dates of Publication of some of the Zoological Works of the late John 

Gould, F. R. S., pp. 1-59, London, 1885. 

Since a number of works are referred to under different dates from 
those indicated on the title pages, the following list has been pre- 
pared to show the authority for the dates assigned to some of the 
more important volumes cited in the index: 

DATES OF PUBLICATION. 

American Naturalist, Vols. XII-XXVI1I. 
XII.— See Ibid., p. 849, 1878. 
XIII-XIV.— See XV, 88, Jan., 1881. 
XV.— See XVI, 34-35, Jan., 1882. 
XVI.— See XVII, 60, Jan., 1883. 
XVIL— See XVIII, 41, Jan., 1884. 
XVIIL— See XIX, 57, Jan., 1885. 
XIX.— See XX, 42, Jan., 1886. 
XXIII, 1889.— See Ibid., 1088, Dec, 1889. 
XXV (Dec. Xo.).— See XXVI, 237, Mar., 1892. 
XXVI.— See XXVII, 27, Jan., 1893. 
XXVIIL— See Ibid., 1013, Dec, 1894. 
Beagle, Zoology of the Voyage of H. M. S. 'Beagle'. — See Sherborn, Ann. and Mag. 

Xat. Hist., 6th ser., XX, 483, 1897. 
Beechey, Zoology of the Voyage of H. M. S. ' Blossom ' <Literary Gazette & Journ. 

Belle Lett.,. London, No. 1179, p. 542, Aug. 24, 1839 (List of New Books). 
Blainville, H. M. D., Osteographie, 1839-64.— See Gill, Smithsonian Misc. Coll. XI, 

No. 230, pp. 32-34, July, 1871. 
Blanford, W. T., Fauna of British India, Mammalia, 1888-91. See Preface.— The first , 
part containing Introduction, Primates, Carnivora, and Insectivora (pp. 1-250) 
was published at the end of June, 1888; the volume was completed at the end 
of 1891 (preface dated Nov. 30), subsequent to Flower & Lydekker's Mam- 
mals Living and Extinct. 
Boitard, Le Jardin des Plantes, 1842. — See Engelmann's Bibliography, p. 9, 1846. 
Bonaparte, C. L., Iconografia della Fauna Italics. — See Oken's Isis, 1835, 757-758; Sal- 
vadori, Boll. Mus. Zool. Anat. Comp., Torino, III, No. 48, 1-25, June 20, 1888. 
Cope, E. D., Miscellaneous papers. — See Cope, Paleont. Bull., No. 13, pp. 2, 4, 6, foot- 
note, Apr., 1873. See also Marsh, Am. Journ. Sci. and Arts, 3d ser., V, 1873, 
235-236; Am. Nat., VII, 290-299, May, 1873; 'Dinocerata,' Mon. U. S. Geol. 
Surv., X, 225-235, 1886. 
Tertiary Vertebrata, Feb., 1885.— See Am. Nat., XIX, 372, Apr., 1885. 
Cuvier, F.,' Dents des Mammiferes, 1821-25. — See Ibid., 'Avertissement,' p. xvi; 
Ferussac, Bull. Gen. etUniv., I, 58-59, 1823; II, 443-447, 1823. 
Histoire Naturelle des Mammiferes, Vols. I-VII, 1818-1842.— See Ibid., Ordre 
Meth., I. pp. 1-4; III, pp. 1-4; V, pp. 1-4; VII, pp. 1-2; also 'Athena?um' for 
July 30, 1828, p. 632. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 17 

Cuvier, George, Tableau Elementaire. — See Bull. Soc. Philom., No. 10, Nivose an 6, 

pp. 79-80, Jan., 1798. 
Cuvier & Geoffroy, Encyclopedie Methodique, 1782-1822. — See Sherborn & Woodward, 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1893, 582-584. 
D'Orbigny, Alcide, Voyage Amerique Meridionale, Vol. IX (Zool. Atlas), Livr. 1-6, 

1836.— See Wiegmann's Arch. f. Natttrg., 1836, Pt. II, p. 163. 
D'Orbigny, Charles, Dictionnaire Universelle d'Histoire Naturelle, 1839-45. — See Sher- 
born & Palmer, Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist,, 7th ser., Ill, 350-352, 1899. 
Geoffroy, E., Description de l'Egypte, Mamm., 1813. « — See I. Geoffroy, Vie, Travaux, 

etc., E. Geoffroy, Saint Hilaire, Paris, 425, 1847. 
Cours de l'Histoire Naturelle des Mammiferes, 1828. — See I. Geoffroy, ibid., 

422. 
Gervais, P., Zoologie et Paleontologie Francaise, Ire ed., Livr. 1, 1848; Livr. II, 1849. — 

See Arch. -Sci. Phys. et Nat., Bibl. Univ. de Geneve, X, p. 151, 1849. 
Gloger, Hand- und Hilfsbuch der Naturgesehichte, 1841. — See Thomas, Ann. and 

Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 189, footnote, Feb., 1895. 
Gould, John, Mammals of Australia. — See Sherborn, Dates of Publication of Works of 

John Gould, London, 1885. 
Horsfield, T., Zoological Researches in Java., pts. 1—4. — See Ferussac, Bull. Gen. et 

Univ., I, 1823, 223-226; Oken's Isis, 1824, 249, 339; ibid., 1825, 692-70o. 
Humboldt & Bonpland, Recueil Observ. Zool., Vol. I, Livr. I-VII (1805-1811).— 

Sherborn, Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., Ill, p. 428, 1899. 
Lacepede, B. G. E., Tableaux Method. Mammiferes et Oiseaux, 1799. — See I. Geoffroy, 

Mag. Zool., 1839, Ire cl., p. 5, footnote; Sherborn, Nat. Sci., XI, p. 432, 1897; 

Richmond, Auk, XVI, 325-329, Oct., 1899. 
Lichtenstein, H., Darstellung neuer . . . Siiugethiere, Lief. 1-3. See Bull. Sci. Nat. 

etGeol., XVI, p. 453, 1829; ibid., XXIV, p. 197, 1831. 
Lichtenstein, H., Doubletten, 1823.— See Oken's Isis, Jena, 1828, 117. 
Lydekker, R., Paleontologia Argentina, II. — See Ameghino, Revista Jardin Zool. de 

Buenos Ayres, XI, ent. 7, p. 193 footnote, July 15, 1895. 
Marsh, 0. C, Miscellaneous papers mi Dinocerata. — See Mon. U. S. Geol. Surv., X, 

225-235, 1886. See also Cope, Paleont. Bull., No. 13, Apr., 1873. 
Maximilian, Prinz, Abbildungen, Lief. 1-14. 1822-31. See Oken's Isis, 1822, p. 1336; 

1823, Beilage No. 3; 1823, p. 1259; 1824, pp. 110, 446, 535, 987, 1103; 1825, p. 

922; 1828, pp. 86, 854-855; 1829, pp. 74, 530; 1831, p. 629. 
Naturalist's Miscellany. — See Shaw & Nodder. 

Owen, Richard. History British Fossil Mammals and Birds. (Parts I— III, contain- 
ing Primates, Chiroptera, Insectivora, Marsupialia, and Carnivora, appeared 

from Feb. to May, 1844.) — See Neues Jahrbuch f. Mineralogie, 1844, 510. 
Odontography: Part I, pp. 1-178, Mar. 16-Apr. 1, 1840; Part II, pp. 179-295, 

Apr. 15-May 1, 1841; Part III, pp. 296-655, before Mar. 2, 1846.— See Bush, 

Am. Journ. Sci., 4th ser., XVI, 96, 1903. 
Pallas, P. S., Zoographia Rosso-Asiatica, 1811. — "See K. v. Baer, Bericht uber Zoogr. 

Rosso-Asiat, von Pallas, 4to, Kbnigsberg, 1832. My researches show that the 

fishes were issued in 1814 and all the rest hi 1811. See also Eversmann, 

Addenda ad Pallas, &c. I have quotations of the book 1819, 1823, among 

many others." (C. Davies Sherborn in letter to G. S. Miller, Oct. 24, 1894.) 
Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 1871-1902. Dates of publication given on back of 

title page of each volume. 
Proc. Linn. Soc. New South Wales, 2d ser., Vols. I-X.— See X, pp. 535-536, 1896. 

« Sherborn (Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1897) gives the date as 1818, but evidence 
in Oken's Naturgesehichte, 1816, and elsewhere, seems to show that the volume on 
mammals appeared prior to 1818, and the apparent date, 1813, is therefore adopted. 

7591— No. 23—03 2 



18 INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 

Proc. U. S. National Museum, I-XXIII. Dates of publication of I- VIII in signature 
marks in text; Vols. IX-XVI in note following list of illustrations; Vols. 
XVII-XXIII in table of contents. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1831-1859.— See Sclater, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1893,435-440. 

Reichenbach, H. G. L., Die Affen. 1862-63. « Issued in three parts. 

(a) Sheets 1-11: pp. 1-76, 77-82, Erklarung; Pis. I-XV. Copy in the museum 
contains an original advertisement bound up and dated Jan. 1, 1862. 

(b) Sheets 12-18: pp. 83-146; Pis. XVI-XXX. 

(c) Sheets 19-27: pp. 147-204, pp. 82b-82i, Erklarung; Pis. XXXI-XXXVIII. 
(Copy in the museum has original advertisement bound up and dated May 1, 
1863, which quotes the Leip. Zeitung, Feb. 15, 1863, for a review.) 

Schlegel & Miiller, Verhandel. Natuurlijke Geschied. Nederl. oberz. Besitt., Vols. I and 

II, 1839-44. — See Engelmann's Bibliography. 
Schreber, J. C. D. von, Siuigthiere, with supplement. — See Sherborn, Proc. Zool. Soc. 

London, 1891, 587-592. 
Schreber vs. Erxleben. — See Thomas, Cat. Marsup. and Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 356, foot- 
note, 1888. 
Snaw & Nodder, Naturalist's Miscellany.— See Bolton, Cat. Period., 622-624, 1885; 

Sherborn, Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 375-376, 1895. 
Siebold, Fauna Japonica, and Giebel, Allgemeine Zoologie. — See C. D. Sherborn and 

F. A. Jentink, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1895, 149. 
Smith, Andrew, Illustrations of the Zoology of South Africa. — See "Waterhouse, Proc. 

Zool. Soc. London, 1880, 489. 
Temminck, C. J., Monographie des Mammiftires, Vol. I, Livr. 1-5. See Oken's Isis, 

1827, 274,278; Vol. II, Livr. 1-2, 1835-38; Miinchen Gelehrte Anzeigen, II, 

pp. 767, 775; ibid., VII, p. 265, 1838. 
Trans. Linn. Soc. London, Vols. XIII, XIV, XV. >> 

Vol. XIII: Part I, pp. 1-274, 1821; Part II, pp. 275 to end, 1822. 

Vol. XIV: Part I, pp. 1-170, 1823; Part II, pp. 171-349, 1824; Part III, pp.350 

to end, 1825. 
Vol. XV: Part I, pp. 1-334, 1826; Part II, pp. 335 to end, 1827. 

AUTHORITIES AND LOCALITIES. 
AUTHORITIES. 

Special care has been taken to credit each name to its proper author, 
but in a few cases the original authority still remains in doubt. Occa- 
sionally genera have been accredited to the editor of a serial or work 
if the author's name does not appear, but for a few names published 
in the ' London Encyclopedia ' even this was unattainable. Double 
citations of authorities have been given only where absolutely neces- 
sary, as in the cases of manuscript names, misprints, and emendations. 
For example, Tonatia is quoted as ' Gray in Griffith's Cuvier ' for the 
reason that the name, while published by Griffith, is distinctly cred- 
ited to Gray; Blainmllimys is given as ' Bravard (MS.) Gervais ' since 
it is credited to Bravard, but dates from the time of its publication by 
Gervais. Similarly a few names in Pictefs ' Traite de Paleontologie ' 
and other works are credited to the original authors, but quoted from 

« Examination by C. D. Sherborn of copy in Museum of Natural History, London. 

t' Dates from F. H. "Waterhouse, who obtained them from the Linnsean Society. 

Vols. XIII and XV were each published in two parts and Vol. XIV in three parts. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 19 

the authority by whom they were first published. Misprints and 
emendations are sometimes given in the form i Kolus (A. Smith) Gray ' 
in order to connect the changed spelling with the original name. 

LOCALITIES. 

In modern systematic work the statement of the type locality of a 
species is considered almost as important as the reference to the origi- 
nal description. An attempt has been made, therefore, to give such 
information as is available concerning the locality of the type species 
of each genus, but with only fairly satisfactory results. In the case of 
genera based on American species, and especially those based on North 
American species, the t} T pe localities are usually stated with some degree 
of precision; but in the case of genera based on Old "World species the 
statements concerning localities are often indefinite and may consist 
simply of the name of the country or the region in which the species 
is known to occur. In the case of extinct groups the statement may 
mention simply the bed or formation in which the remains have been 
found, but to readers familiar with the paleontology of the region this 
will often be clearer than reference to the nearest town, river, or 
mountain. The statement, if any, concerning the locality in the 
original description has been generally followed unless too indefinite 
or known to be erroneous, but subsequent information has been freely 
used in throwing light on obscure type localities. Not only have the 
places been given with as much precision as possible, but they have 
been looked up and, when necessary, enough explanation has been 
added to facilitate finding most of them on any good, modern map. 
While much remains to be done in determining the exact localities 
from which species have been described, particularly in the case of 
Old World mammals, the statements given are as complete as the 
information at hand would permit. 

TYPES AND THEIR DETERMINATION. 

Great importance was formerly attached by some zoologists to the 
definition of a genus, and the late Prof. Cope even went so far as 
to declare that a genus proposed by merely naming the species on 
which it was based (a 'typonym') was not entitled to recognition. But, 
as Dr. Gill explains:" 

The demand in such case is simply that the definition shall he made. It may 
be inaccurate or not to the point; it may be given up at once, and never adopted by 
the author himself afterwards, or by anyone else. Nevertheless, the condition is 
fulfilled by the attempt to give the definition. . . . Certainly it is more rational to 
accept a typonym than to require a definition for show rather than use. Neverthe- 
less, I fully recognize the obligation of the genus maker to indicate by diagnosis, as 
well as type, his conception of generic characters. 

«Proc. Am. Ass. Adv. Sci., XLV, 1896, sep., pp. 20-21. 



20 INDEX GENERUM MAMMA LIUM. 

In a few instances genera have been defined without mention of any 
species, but fortunately such cases are extremely rare in mammalogy. 
Examples may be found in ArrMysomus Pomel, 1848, and Chalco- 
vliloi'ix" Mivart, 1867, two names for a subgenus of South African 
golden moles. No species were mentioned in the original descriptions, 
and no specific names seem to have been coupled with Amblysomus 
until 18T9 6 and none with ( 'halcochloris until 1883. 

The term type' as now understood was unknown a century ago, aud 
the importance of designating some one species on which the descrip- 
tion of the group had been based was not appreciated by the older 
naturalists. A genus may contain ten or more species which subse- 
quently are found to represent as many different genera or subgenera. 
Under such circumstances it becomes of the utmost importance to 
determine which one should bear the name of the original group. To 
determine this point is often an exceedingly difficult matter and in 
complicated cases can only be settled after a full consideration of the 
facts by one who is engaged in monographing the group or who is 
thoroughly familial- with the history of the species involved. 

As Dr. Dall has well said, w *No arbitrary rule will suffice to deter- 
mine, offhand, questions of so much complication as is often the 
decision in regard to the t\pe of an ancient genus which has been 
studied by a number of authors.""' 

To meet the difficulties which frequently arise several methods of 
procedure have been proposed. The most important of these are: 

(1) Selection of the first species. 

(2) The species selected by the first reviser of the group. 

(3) The species, if any. whose name has subsequently become the 
designation of a genus. 

(4) Elimination (especially as restricted by Canon XXIII of the 
A. O. U. Code). 

"Originally spelled Odcochloris. 

&Trouessart, Revue et Mag. Zool., 3 e ser., VII, 277, 1879. 

<A type is the identical individual specimen from which a species has been de- 
scribed. To meet the demands of modern systematists Thomas has proposed the 
following terms for specimens more or less closely associated with the original type: 

( 'otype: " One of two or more specimens together forming the basis of a species, no 
type having been selected." 

Paratope: "A specimen belonging to the original scries, but not the type, in cases 
where the author has himself selected a type." 

Topotype: "A specimen simply collected at the exact locality where the original 
type was obtained." 

Metatype: "A specimen received from the original locality after the description 
has been published, but determined as belonging to his own species by the original 
describer himself." — Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1893, 242. 

See also Sehuchert, ' What is a Type in Natural History?', Science, new ser. , V, 
636-640, Apr. 23, 1897; and Merriam, Ibid, pp. 731-732, May 7, 1897. 

'' Nomenclature in Zoology and Botany, Rept. to the Am. Ass. Adv. Sci., p. 40, 
1877. 



A LIST OF THE GENEKA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 21 

The first two methods date back to the ' Stricklandian Code' of 1S42, 
known also as the 'Rules of the British Association. 1 Both have been 
generally advocated and more or less generally followed, but both are 
beset by serious objections. The simple rule of adopting - the first 
species as the type fails signally when applied to Liniuean genera, some 
of which seem to have their types concealed in the middle of a list of 
species. Thus the type of Mustda would become M. lutris, the sea 
otter; of Mus, M. poroellus, the guinea pig; and of Cervus, C. camdo- 
pardalis, the giraffe. The adoption of the verdict of the first reviser 
is open to the objection of leaving too much to personal opinion in 
determining what constitutes revision (monographing the group or 
merely enumerating the species). Moreover, there is always the diffi- 
culty of actually determining which author was really the first to revise 
the group, and if the one whose verdict has been generally accepted 
proves to have been anticipated by another of different views, change 
and consequent shifting of names are inevitable. 

The third method was advocated by Prof. Alfred Newton" about 
thirty years ago and has recently been adopted by a number of Ameri- 
can zoologists,-' as a rule, in the following form: "'A generic name 
which is the same as that of an explicitly included species (or a cited 
post-Linnsean synonym of such species) takes that species as its type 
regardless of subsequent elimination." This method is open to no 
serious objection and disposes satisfactorily of a certain class of cases 
which, however, are rather limited in number. 

The fourth method, that of elimination, is applicable when others 
fail, but should be used with the restrictions provided by Canon XXIII 
of the A. O. U. Code (p. 43). "If, however, the genus contains both 
exotic and non-exotic species — from the standpoint of the original 
author — and the generic term is one originally applied by the ancient 
Greeks or Romans, the process of elimination is to be restricted to the 
non-exotic species." 

Recently Dr. Jordan,' in discussing the determination of types, rec- 
ognized three general methods: Following the arrangement of the 
original author, elimination, accepting the type designated as such by 
the original author. In the last case the question is very simple, as the 
statement can not be reversed by any subsequent writer. If no type 
is designated he favors adopting the first species as such, with certain 
exceptions. The five principles which he has formulated for guidance 
in determining types are as follows: (1) The species designated as 



« Newton in Yarrell's Hist. Brit, Birds, 4th ed., I, p. 150, 1871; Ibis, 3d ser., VI, 
pp. 94-104, 1876. See also note in Cones's Bibliog. Ornith., Bull. U. S. Geol. Surv. 
Terr., V, p. 751, 1879. 

& See Science, new ser., XVI, pp. 114-115, July 18, 1902. 

c 'The Determination of the Type in Composite Genera of Animals and Plants,' 
Science, new ser., XIII, pp. 498-501, March 29, 1901. See also a still more recent 
article on 'The Types of Linnean Genera,' Ibid., XVII, pp. 627-628, Apr. 17, 1903. 



22 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

such by its author; (2) the first species referred to the genus, or the 
species standing first on the page if no t} T pe is designated explicitly or 
otherwise; (3) in the case of Linnasan genera, the best known European 
or 'officinal' species of the genus; but in case of doubt, the first spe- 
cies; (4) the species, if any, which lias furnished the name of the genus, 
provided it be mentioned by the author of the genus; (5) in case of old 
generic names restricted by common consent to a species not the first 
mentioned by the author, such species may be accepted as the type 
to avoid confusion, provided the restriction antedates any modern 
names for the same genus. 

As already stated, an attempt was first made in the preparation of 
this index to fix the type of each genus, but afterwards abandoned in 
favor of the expedient of enumerating all the species included in the 
genus by the original describer and marking the one indicated as the 
type by a subsequent reviser of the group. 

The types of practically all the genera proposed by Linnaeus have 
been fixed by modern workers: those published by Brisson have been 
fixed by Merriam;" those adopted by Kerr and Oken have been deter- 
mined by Allen; 1 '' those proposed by Gloger have been fixed by 
Thomas;'' those of marsupials and monotremes have also been given 
by Thomas ; d those of antelopes by Sclater and Thomas;' those of 
existing genera of South African mammals by W. L. Sclater ; ; those 
of recent North American genera by Merriam, Allen, Miller, Bangs, 
and Bailey; those of most of the extinct genera by O. P. Hay; r/ and 
many scattered types have been fixed by specialists. Thus the type 
species of the great majority of existing genera are now determined 
with some degree of precision. 

HYPOTHETICAL. GENERA. 

The term 'hypothetical genera 1 is here used to include genera which 
are based on characters assumed to have been possessed by mammals 
still unknown. Probably in no other branch of zoology has this device 
of completing the paleontological record been so freely used. Nearly 
fifty hypothetical genera of mammals have been published during the 
last fifteen years, chiefly by Cope, Haeckel, and Aineghino. These 
genera have been proposed to fill gaps in certain groups or to indicate 
the generalized types from which known genera are supposed to have 
been derived. Several were intended to close the gap between man 
and the higher apes; others to indicate ancestral Primates, Carnivores, 

«■ Science, new ser., I, 1895. 

''Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., New York, VII, 1895; XVI, 1902. 

''Ann. and Mag. Nat, Hist., 6th ser., XV, Feb., 1895. 

<*Cat. Marsupialia and Monotremata Brit. Mus., 1888. 

''Book of Antelopes, 1896-1901. 

/Mamm. S. Africa, 1900-1901. 

?Cat. Fossil Vertebrates N. Am., Bull. 179, l T . S. Geol. Surv., 1902. 



A LIST OF THE GENEKA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 



23 



Rodents, Marsupials, etc. Some have been described with considerable 
detail, and it is interesting to note that in one or two instances extinct 
forms have actually been found possessing- the characters assigned. 
The hypothetical genera thus far proposed are brought together in the 
following list: 

LIST OF HYPOTHETICAL GENERA. 



Aligon Haeckel, 1895, Ungulata. 

Anthropomorphus Ameghino, 1889, Pri- 
mates. 

Archibradys Haeckel, 1895, Edentata. 

Archididelphys Haeckel, 1895, Marsup. 

Archilagus Haeckel, 1895, Glires. 

Archimanis Haeckel, 1895, Edentata. 

Archipatagus Haeckel, 1895, Chiroptera. 

Archipithecus Haeckel, 1895, Primates. 

Archiprimas Haeckel, 1895, Primates. 

Architherium Haeckel, 1895, Monotre- 
mata. 

Architrogon Haeckel, 1895, Glires. 

Archorycterus Haeckel, 1895, Edentata. 

Archnngulatum Haeckel, 1895, Ungulata. 

Bnnotheriuni Cope, 1874, Ungulata. 

Choriotherium Haeckel, 1895 ? 

Collensternum Ameghino, 1889, Primates. 

Coristernum Ameghino, 1889, Primates. 

Diprothomo Ameghino, 1889, Primates. 

Diprotosimia Ameghino, 1889, Primates. 

Diprotroglodytes Ameghino, 1889,- Pri- 
mates. 

Eutypotherium Haeckel. 1895, Typo- 
theria. 

Hinnulus Ogilby, 1837, Ungulata. 

Hippops Marsh, 1892, Ungulata. 

Palahyrax Haeckel, 1895, Ungulata. 



Patrotheriuni Haeckel, 1895, Monotre- 
mata. 

Peragonium Haeckel, 1895, Marsupialia. 

Pestypotherium Haeckel, 1895, Ungulata. 

Pithecanthropus Haeckel, 1866, Primates. 

Proanthropomorphus Ameghino, 1889, 
Primates. 

Procarnassium Haeckel, 1895, Carnivora. 

Prolagopsis Forsyth Major, 1899, Glires. 

Prophalangista Haeckel, 1895, Marsupi- 
alia. 

Protosirena Haeckel, 1895, Sirenia. 

Protanthropus Haeckel, 1895, Primates. 

Protechidna Haeckel, 1895, Monotremata. 

Prothomo Ameghino, 1889, Primates. 

Prothylobates Ameghino, 1889, Primates. 

Protobalaena Haeckel, 1895, Cete. 

Protodelphinus Haeckel, 1895, Cete. 

Pn itosimia Ameghino, 1889, Primates. 

Pr< (troglodytes Ameghino, 1889, Primates. 

Tetraprothomo Ameghino, 1889, Pri- 
mates. 

Triprothomo Ameghino, 1889, Primates. 

Triprotosimia Ameghino, 1889, Primates. 

Triprotroglodytes Ameghino, 1889, Pri- 
mates. 

Tritomodon Cope, 1882, Marsupialia. 



CHANGES IN FORM OF NAMES. 



EMENDATIONS. 

Probably no section of the A. O. U. Code has been the subject of so 
much criticism as Canon XL, which provides that "the original 
orthography of a name is to be rigidly preserved, unless a typograph- 
ical error is evident/ 1 " Stability and priority are two of the cardinal 
principles under the Code, but priority is merely a means of securing 
stability, and applies as well to the adoption of the earliest name as 
to the earliest form of that name. Experience has shown that any 

«See Elliot, 'Canon XL, A. O. U. code,' Auk, XV, 294-298, 1898, and Allen, 'A 
defense of Canon XL of the A. O. U. code,' ibid., pp. 298-303. On emendation of 
names, see also Gill, Proc. Am. Ass. Adv. Sci., XLV, 1896, sep., pp. 9-10; Sclater, 
Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1896, 313; Stebbing, Zoologist, 1898, 423-428. 



24 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

other course leaves the door wide open to emendation and resultant 
confusion. 

How a generic name should be spelled may seem a comparatively 
unimportant matter, but questions of correct form have in certain 
cases proved very fruitful of discussion. Appropriateness and philo- 
logical elegance in scientific names are duly appreciated, but are less 
important than permanence. Correcting misspelled or badly formed 
words causes more confusion than preservation of the original form. a 
Consequently emendations of all kinds are ignored except bj r the com- 
paratively few authors, who refuse to adopt a name which they con- 
sider misspelled, even though the}' may differ among themselves as to 
the correct form. This diversity of opinion exists not only in the 
case of words of barbarous origin, but also in those derived from 
classical roots that offer a choice in forming compounds. The term 
' variants ' is here used to cover the various forms of names. 

Variants are properly of two kinds — emendations and misprints; but 
it is often difficult to tell whether a particular form of a word is a cor- 
rection or is simply a misspelling, due to inadvertence. In the pres- 
ent list special care has been taken to preserve the original spelling of 
eveiy name, and to give the more important variations. 

Emendations. — Some of the variants which are likely to prove most 
troublesome are those involving a change in the initial letter in trans- 
forming Greek derivatives into Latin, alteration in a diphthong, inser- 
tion of h, and substitution of c for k. Egocerus has been corrected to 
vEgocenis; AUurus ; to dElurus; Aplocerus, to JTaplocerus; Reithrodon, 
to Rhithrodon; Rytina, to RJn/tiiui; Kobus, to ('"has; Nesokia, to 
JVesocia. Greek endings and diphthongs are similarly modified to 
convert them into Latin form. Hipposideros becomes Hipposiderus; 
Cheiromys, Chiromys; Pithechew", Pithechirus or Pithecochirus. Pre- 
ferences in spelling are illustrated by such alterations as Allactdga to 
Alactaga, and Ratelus to Ratelhis. Still more radical changes have 
been proposed, such as emending Aodon to Anodon, Megacerqps to 
Megaceratops, and Megatherium to Megalotherium. It has even been 
suggested that Ccelogenys should be transformed into Genyscaslus, on 
the gTound that the Latin form ( 1 cdogenus is an inaccurate translitera- 
tion, since the Latin u does not correspond to the Greek upsilon, and 
that therefore the roots should be reversed in order to obtain a proper 
ending. To illustrate the extent to which emendation may be carried, 
the modifications of 6 names are given below; but the most remark- 

« Hence the importance of following the suggestions for making new names which 
accompany the recent codes on nomenclature. Two papers on this special subject 
are: Walter Miller, 'Scientific Names of Latin and Greek Derivation,' Proc. Calif. 
Acad. Sci,, 3rd ser., Zool., I, pp. 115-143, 1897, KretSchmar, ' Sprachregeln fur die 
Bildung und Betonung zoologiseher und botanischer Namen,' Berlin, 1899. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 25 

able case is the first name — Aplodontia — which is capable of at least 
24 modifications, each one differing- from the rest by a single letter." 

Aplodontia. Aploudon. Haplodontia. Haploudon. 

Aploodontia. Apludon. Haploodontia. Hapludon. 

Aploudontia. Aplodus. Haploudontia. Haplodus. 

Apludontia. Aploodus. Hapludontia. Haploodus. 

Aplodon. Aploudus. Haplodon. Haploudus. 

Aploodon. Apludus. Haploodon. Hapludus. 

Ccelogenus F. Cuvier, 1807. Cselogonus Lond. Encycl., 1845. 

Coelogenys Illiger, 1811. Caelogenys Agassiz, 1846. 

Cselogenus Fleming, 1822. Genysccelus Liais, 1872. 

Coendou Lacepede, 1799. Coendu Lesson, 1827. 

Coendus Geoffroy, 1803. Cuandn Liais, 1872. 

Coandu G. Fischer, 1814. Coendu [a] Lydekker, 1890. 
Coendus Illiger, 1815. 

Hyperoodon Lacepede, 1804. Hyperodon Gray, 1863. 

Uperoodon Gray, 1843. Hyperaodon Cope, 1869. 

Hyperhoodon Gervais, 1850. Hyperoodus Schulze, 1897. 

Nycticeius Rafinesque, 1819. Nycticeyx Wagler, 1830. 

Nycticejus Ternminck, 1827. Nycticea Le Conte, 1831. 

Nycticeus Lesson, 1827. 

Priodontes F. Cuvier, 1827. Prionodon Gray, 1843. 

Priodon McMurtrie, 1831. Prionodos Gray, 1865. 

Priodonta Gray, 1843. 

HERRERA's MODIFIED GENERIC NAMES. 

Perhaps the most radical and most remarkable system of emenda- 
tion ever suggested is that proposed by Prof. A. L. Herrera. He 
proposed to modify all existing generic names in such a way that the 
first syllable and the ending should indicate the class and the king- 
dom to which the genus belonged; names of animals to have masculine 
endings, those of plants feminine endings, and those of minerals neuter 
endings; and the class to be indicated by prefixing the first s} T llable of 
the class name. Thus all generic names of mammals would begin with 
Mam, those of birds with Ave, those of reptiles with Re}>, those of 
batrachians with Batr, and those of fishes with Pis. For full details 
of this scheme of nomenclature the reader is referred to Herrera's 
papers. b The only modifications of mammal names published in the 
first paper are those in the following list: 

"Beside these emendations, an almost indefinite number of anagrams can be formed 
from the original word Aplodontia. 

&Sinonimia vulgar y cientifica de los principales Vertebrados Mexicanos, Mexico, 
1899; see also Science, new ser. X, p. 120, July 28, 1899. A more extended paper 
entitled 'Nouvelle Nomenclature des Etres organises et des Mineraux' containing a 
'Liste des principaux genres des animaux et des plantes' is published in instalments 
in the 'Memorias y Re vista Soc. Cien. Antonio Alzate,' beginning in Tomo XV, 
numbers 5 and 6, 1901. 



26 



INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 



Mamatelesus. 

Mambassarisus. 

Mamblarinaus. 

Mamcanisus. 

Mamcapraus. 

Mamcariacus. 

Mamcastorus. 

Mamcaviaus. 

Mamcercolepteus. 

Mamcoelogen ysus 

Mamconepatus. 

Mamoyclothurus. 

Mamcynomisus. 



Mamdasyproctaus. 

Mamdelphinus. 

Mamdicotylesus. 

Mamdidelphisus. 

Mamdipodomysus. 

Mamfelisus. 

Mamgalictisus. 

Mamgeomysus. 

Mamlepus. 

Mamlutraus. 

Mammephitisus. 

Mammonachus. 

Mammas. 

MISPRINTS. 



Mammustelaus. 

Mammyrmecophagaus. 

Mamnasuaus. 

Mamnyctinomus. 

Mamprocyonus. 

Mainsciurus. 

Mamspermophilus. 

Mamsynetheresus. 

Mamtatusi usus. 

Mamtaxideaus. 

Mamursus. 

Mamvulpesus. 



No special effort has been made to collect misprints, for an attempt 
to index systematically the multitude of misspelled names which occur 
in scientific works and serials would be an endless undertaking - . Many 
misprints, however, which have come to light in compiling the index, 
particularly those in standard catalogues and lists, have been pre- 
served. Occasionally it is impossible to tell whether a word is a 
misprint or an emendation; and some misprints are not only unrecog- 
nizable (as Jin in; I n nus for Bunaelurus), but exceedingly troublesome 
(as ChcerojXitamus for Chcsropsis), a since they seem to be new names or 
take forms which may be subsequently proposed for valid genera. 
Such are Cystophoca for Cystophora, Desmatocyon 1 for Oynodesmus, 
JSbtomys for ffiooUymys, Hyohi-ppus for Hypohippus, Jacalius for Saca- 
////*, Jirneus for Sunkus, Lagocetus for Lagenocetus, Microtolagus for 
Maerotolagus, Perascalops for Parascalops, and Scapasius for Scapanus. 

Although it would seem that obvious misprints should have no sta- 
tus in nomenclature, yet several cases have arisen in which the decision 
has been otherwise, and the way seems to be opened to giving them 
undue importance. Much confusion is likely to arise if, as has some- 
times happened, they are adopted to replace preoccupied names or are 
relied upon to establish the validity of names which would otherwise 
be considered preoccupied. This point may be made clearer by a few 
examples of generic names of fishes and mammals. 

In ichthyology variants of Thynnus and Orcynus have been pro- 
posed to replace the names from which they have been derived because 
the latter are preoccupied. In 1817 Cuvier proposed two subgenera 
of Scomber {Thynnus and Orcynus), which were subsequently com- 
bined by many ichthyologists under the name Thynnus. In 1861 Gill 
replaced Thynnus by Orycnus, due simply to a misreading of the name 
Orcynus, and subsequently replaced it by Orcynus in its proper form. 
In 1863 Dr. J. G. Cooper recognized the two groups of Cuvier, adopt- 

a Beddard, Textbook Zoogeography, 100, 1895. 
b Possibly an emendation and not a misprint. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 27 

ing Orycnus Gill (instead of Thynnus) for one and Orcynus for the 
other. In 1894 Gill showed that Thunnus of South, 1845, antedated 
Orycnus, and this name has been adopted by Jordan and Evermann. 
In revising the group in 1889, Dresslar and Fesler stated the case 
as follows: 

The name Orycnus was first used by Dr. Gill in 1862. It was due to a misreading 
of Cuvier's name Orcynus and it should be placed in the category of emendations of 
that name. If the name itself is preoccupied, erroneous or various spellings of it 
due to misprints, misreadings, or purism ought to be preoccupied also. Orcynus had 
been previously used when Cuvier gave it as the name of the long-finned Tunnies. 
To spell it Orycnus does not save it. . . . The name Orycnus Cooper, it seems to us, 
is preoccupied by its previous use for another genus or subgenus by Gill. It is, 
therefore ineligible. In other words, a generic name originating in a misprint of a 
well-known name can not be later used as the name of another genus. & 

The opposite view, however, was taken by Dr. Gill, who in the 
same year comments on the case as follows: 

As Thynnus is preoccupied in insects, the name Orycnus, applied by Gill to the 
same type, may perhaps be retained although founded on a mistake. . . . The present 
author would have been glad if the name Orycnus could have fallen into 'innocuous 
desuetude,' but inasmuch as it had been specifically and with malice prepense resur- 
rected and proposed for retention by Cooper, it must surely be retained for the genus 
comprising the Tunny and Albicore. <' 

Later, in 1894, he proposed to adopt Thunnus on the following 
grounds: 

The name Thunnus was thus suggested and used as a substitute for Thynnus and 

as sufficiently distinct from the latter; it has classical sanction, the form Thunnus 
being the regular one and preferred by many scholars to Thynnus. Thunnus, it is 
true, is a mere variant of Thynnus, but, being a variant, it is different and as different, 
was formally introduced as a substitute for Thynnus. By most American ichthyolo- 
gists it will therefore be accepted. ,] 

Similar cases have occurred in the generic names of mammals, 
Recently Waite in proposing the name Thylacomys for an Australian 
mouse, called attention to an obscure name given by Owen many 
years previously to a group of marsupials, but contended that because 
the latter was spelled Thalacomys (an obvious misprint), it did not 
preoccupy his name. Subsequently it was shown that Owen's name 
was in reality first printed Thylacomys, but it appeared in one pub- 
lication and the description in another, so that the name might be 
considered a nomen nudum. It had, however, been used afterwards in 
correct form in connection with a marsupial prior to its application to 
a mouse. Waite thereupon admitted that his Thylacomys was pre- 
occupied and replaced it by a new name. Thomas, while admitting 
the claims of Owen's name, with characteristic caution preferred to 

"Fishes N, and Mid. Am., I, p. 869, 1896. 

& Dresslar and Fesler, Bull. U. S. Fish Comm. for 1887, VII, p. 437, 1889. 
cGill, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., XI, 1888, pp. 319-320, July, 1889. 
rfProc. U. 8. Nat. Mus., XVI, pp. 693-694, 1894. 



28 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

adopt the evident misprint, Thalacomys, which was published with a 
description, instead of the correct and really earlier Thylacomys. 

In Wallace's "Geographical Distribution,' published in 1876, JVec- 
tornys is given by mistake as JVeotomys. The accompanying species 
indicate that Nectomys is intended. Fourteen years later, in 1890, 
Thomas proposed JVeotomys as a distinct genus. The question arises, 
Shall Wallace's Weotomys be recognized as preoccupying the later and 
otherwise valid generic name ? 

Thomas in 1896 proposed the name Graurothrix to replace Echi- 
othrix Gray, 1867, because the latter was preoccupied by Echinothrix 
Peters, 1853. In 1898, however, he abandoned Granirothrix on the 
ground that Echiothrix was sufficiently distinct from Echinothrix. 
Recently he has also maintained that the misspelled form in which 
Stenorhynchus was first published was sufficient to protect it against 
preoccupation. He says the "original and still well-known name 
was spelt Stenorhinchus on its first publication in 1826, and I hold 
that the name is not invalidated by the Stenorhynchus or Qtenorynchus 
of earlier authors." 6 

A striking example of the results of carrying out this theory to an 
extreme is shown in the case of the African barbets. The genus 
Pogonias was described byllliger in 1811, based on Bucco cktbms. In 
1815 Leach c described three additional species, which he named Pogo- 
nia sulcirostris, Pogonia la&oirostris, and Pogonvus vieilloti. He also 
referred incidentally to lamirostris as Pogonias lamrostris, thus using 
the genus in three different forms in the same volume. These three 
species now stand as Pogonorhynchus dubius {= sulcirostris), Melano- 
bucco hidentatus (=ldevirostris), and M. vieilloti. Pogonorhynchus, 
proposed in 1833, is now used instead of Pogonias, the latter being 
preoccupied by Pogonias Lacepede, 1800, a genus of fishes. Melcmo- 
bucco was described in 1889, the type being bidentatus (=ldewrostris). 
If Stenorhinchus is sufficiently distinct from Stenorhynchus, Pogonia 
is certainly different from Pogonias, and the various forms of the name 
published in 1815 ought to be available as valid names. It may there- 
fore be claimed that Pogonia used with sulcirostris has precedence as 
an earlier name for the genus now known as Pogonorhynchus, and 
Pogonius used with vieilloti as the earliest name applied to the group 
Melanobucco. 

If misprints are to be given such importance as indicated in these 
examples, JVeotomys Thomas, 1890, must be considered preoccupied, 
Oystophoca is barred forever as a generic name, and some misspelling 
found in an obscure reference is likely to become the proper designa- 
tion for each group whose name is preoccupied. 

a Trans. Zool. Soc. London, XIV, p. 397, June, 1898. 
&Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XV, p. 154, June 20, 1902. 
c Zool. Miscellany, II, pp. 46, 104, 1815. 



A LIST OF THE GENEKA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 29 

REJECTION OF NAMES. 

Many names which now pass current were refused recognition by 
some of the older zoologists, owing to derivation from barbarous roots, 
or, where derived from Latin or Greek roots, because of being com- 
pounded in violation of classical rules. This action was based on 
certain principles of nomenclature laid down by Linnaeus in 1751 in 
his 'Philosophia Botanica.' llliger/' among others, regularly renamed 
genera derived from native words and gave a list of the names he 
rejected according to the rules of Linnaeus. He discarded hybrids, 
such as Hyd/rogallina (223);'' compounds of a syllable of one word 
with the whole of another, as Mehtrsus (221); genera formed by pre- 
fixes, as Perameles (225), or suffixes, as Balsenoptera and Ihlphin- 
apterm (227); words ending in oides, as Talpoirf<a (226); adjectives used 
as substantives, as Ocmdwolvulus, Mdlwora, Setifer (235); ' sesqui- 
pedal' names, or names difficult to pronounce, as Hyperoodon (249); 
names based on a misconception of characters, as Monodon (232); 
names derived from terms used in anatomy or the arts, as Arvicola, 
Lotor, Spectrum (231). It is scarcely necessary to say that none of 
these rules are recognized in modern codes and none of the names 
mentioned are rejected merely on account of their construction. Some 
modern authors even preserve native names and advocate their gen- 
eral adoption (see pp. 15-46). The A. O. U. Code provides (Canon 
XXXI) that " Neither generic nor specific names are to be rejected 
because of barbarous origin, for faulty construction, for inapplica- 
bility of meaning, or for erroneous signification." 

According to this Code, generic names can be rejected on only three 
grounds, viz, (a) because they are preoccupied; (b) because they are 
nomina nuda; (c) because thev are indeterminate, through lack of type 
or insufficient definition (Canons XXXIII, XXXIV, XXXVI). For 
present purposes it will be more convenient to consider rejection of 
names under six divisions, viz, preoccupied names, nomina nuda, inde- 
terminate names, French and common names, plural subgeneric names, 
and names of genera that properly belong in other classes. 

PREOCCUPIED NAMES. 

" A homonym is one and the same name for two or more different 
things. ,,<: ' Generic homonyms arise in two ways: (1) Through igno- 
rance or inadvertence; (2) through transfer or change of type. These 
two causes of origin may be illustrated by the following examples: 
Psammomys was originally applied by Cretzschmar in 1828 to a group 

"Prod. Syst. Mamm. et Avium, pp. xvii-xviii, 1811. 

& These numbers refer to the rules of Linnaeus' ' Philosophia Botanica.' 

c A. 0. U. Code, p. 48. 



30 



IN!>EX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 



of gerbilles (Gerbillina?) of northeast Africa. The same name was pro- 
posed by Le Conte in 1830 for a group of meadow mice (Microtinae) 
from Georgia, and by Pceppig in 1S35 for a group of octodonts (Octo- 
dontina?) from Chile. Both Le Conte and Pceppig were evidently 
ignorant of the previous use of Psammomys at the time their descrip- 
tions were published. Orca was applied by Wagler in 1830 to a group 
of toothed whales, including Delphinus Mdentatus and D. desmaresti, 
while Tursio was used by him for Delphinus peronii from the southern 
seas. Gra} T in 1846 adopted Delphina/pterus for the latter species and 
transferred the name Tursio to another group of dolphins typified by 
Delphinus tursio from the North Atlantic and North Sea. In both 
these cases the names used by the later authors are homonyms, pro- 
posed inadvertently in the case of Psammomys and intentionally in the 
case of Tursio. The extent to which such homonyms have been pub 
lished has not been generally appreciated. About 150 useless names 
are attributable to this source alone, and most of them would not 
have been published if their authors had used more care or had had 
access to a fairly complete list of the genera of mammals already pro- 
posed. A full list of the duplicated names is given below, and one of 
the objects of this index will have been attained if such duplication 
of mammal names is avoided in future. 

List of Homonyms within the Class Mammalia. 



Original name. 



Subsequent name. 



Acanthomys Lessi >n, 1842 Murinse 

Agriotherium Wagner, 1837 Ferae 

AUurogale Fitzinger, 1869 Felidae 

Alee Frisch, 1775 (moose) Cervidae 

Ala. laphus Blainville, 1816 Bovidse 

Amphimoschus Gray, 1852 Tragulicke 

Anisacodon Marsh, 1872 Insectivora 

Anocma F. Cuvier, 1809 Caviidae 

Anotis Rafinesque, 1815 Glires 

Arctogalc Kaup, 1829 Mustelidae 

Arctopithcc us ('Geoff roy' ) Virey, 1819 ..Primates 

Arctotherium BraYard, 1857 Ursidae 

Aspahuc Desmarest, 1804 Glires 

Barburtella Gray, 1821 Vespertilionida? 

Brachyurus Fiseher, 1813 Glires 

Bradylemur Blainville, 1839 Lemurida' 

Bradytherium Grandidier, 1901 Edentata 

Bubalis Lichtenstein, 1814 Bovidae 

Catolynx Severtzow, 1858 Felidae 

Cemae Oken, 1816 Bovidse 

Ceratodon Brisson, 1762 Cete 

Oercopithecus Brunnich, 1772 Cercopithecidae 

Cervicapra Sparrman, 1780 Ungulata 

( fetes Brisson, 1762 Delphinidse 

Chseropithccus Blainville, 1839 Primates 



Acanthomys Gray. 1867 Murinae 

Agriotfu Hum Seott, 1898 Ungulata 

AUurogale ('Filhol') Trouessart, 1885 (extinct). 

Felidae 

Alee Blumenbaeh, 1799 (Irish elk) Cervidae 

Alcelaphus Gloger, 1841 Cervidae 

Amphimoschus Bourgeois, 1873 Cervidae 

'Anisacodon Marsh, 1875 Ungulata 

Ancema Konig, 1825 Ochotonidae 

Anotus Wagner, 1855 Insectivora 

Arctogah Peters, 1863 Viverridae 

Arctopithecus Gray, 1850 Edentata 

Arctotherium Lemoine, 1896 Creodonta 

Aspalax Wagler, 1830 Insectivora 

Barbastellus Gray, 1831 Vespertilionidae 

Brachyurus Spix, 1823 Primates 

Trouessart, 1878 Primates 

Bradylemur Grandidier, 1899 Xesopithecidae 

Bradytherium Andrews, 1901 Ungulata 

Bubalis II. Smith, 1S27 Bovidae 

( atolynx < ;ray, 1867 Felidae 

n urns Gloger. 1841 Bovidae 

( v ratodon Wagler, 1830 Glires 

Cercopithecus Blumenbaeh, 1779 Cebidae 

( 'ervicapra Blainville, 1816 Ungulata 

Cctus Oken, 1816 Physeteridae 

Chseropithecus Gray, 1870 Primates 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 31 

List of Homonym* within the Class Mammalia — Continued. 



Original name. 



Subsequent name. 



ChlamydotheHum Bronn, 1838 ...Glyptodontida 
Chloromys ('F. Cuvier') Lesson, 1827. 

Dasyproetida- 
Ckoerotherium Cautley & Falconer, 1835. . .Suida 
Ouniculus Brisson, 17(52 Dipodida 

( ■tjimijide Gray, 1837 Viverrida 

Puii/ii Frisch, 1775 Cervida 

Da mails H. Smith, 1827 Bovida' 

l)i Iphinapterus Lacepede, 1804 Cete 

1>< Iphis Forskal, 1775 Delphinida 

Dinoeyon Jourdan, 1861 Amphicyonina 

Diodon Storr, 1780 Delphinidse 

Diprotodon Owen, 1838 Marsupialia 

Dromedarius Wagler, 1830 (llama) Camelidse 

Echimys i 'Geoffroy') Cuvier, 1809... Echymiina- 

Echinogale Wagner, 1841 Tenrecida 

Eiiiinothrix Brookes, 1828 Erethizontida' 

Eotherium Leidy, 1858 Ungulata 

Ericius Sundevall, 1842 Erinaceidse 

(,<i/t nn/s Kaup, 1829 Talpida' 

Oaleotherium Jiiger, 1839 Canida- 

GaHctis Bell, 1826 Mustelidae 

Glis Brisson, 1762 Muscardinida 

Gomphotherium Burmeister, 1837 Ungulata 

Hemitragus Hodgson, 1841 Bovidae 

Heterodon Blainville, 1817 Cete 

Illppclaphus Reichenbach, 1835.' Cervidse 

Latax Glogae, 1827 .(sea otter) Mustelidae 

Lemmas Link, 1795 Microtina- 

Leptonyx Gray, 1837 Phocida 

Lophtomys Milne-Edwards, 1867..Lophiomyida 

Lycaon Brooks, 1827 Ferae 

Macropus Shaw, 1790 Marsupialia 

Macrotis Reid, 1837 Marsupialia 

Macrotus Leach, 1816 Vespertilionida 

MandriUus ('Cuvier') Ritgen, 1824. 

Cercopithecida 

Maries Pinel, 1792 Mustelida 

Mazama Raflnesque, 1817 (deer) Cervidse 

Memina (J. Fischer, 1814 Marsupialia 

.'A Hones Uliger, 1811 Murida 

Merycodon (' Leidy') Marschall, 1873. 

Arctiodactyla 

Mesocetus Van Beneden, 1880 Balaenida 

Mesotherium Filhol, 1880 Arctiodactyla 

Micromys Dehne, 1841 Murida 

Micrpsus Leidy, 1870 Primates 

Mungos Geoffroy and Cuvier, 1795 ...Viverrida 



Chlamydotherium Lund, 1838 Dasypodida 

(Moromys (Meyer MS.) Schlosser, 1884. 

Castorida 

Choerotherium Lartet, 1851 Suida 

< » a iculus Meyer, 1790 Leporida 

Wagler, 1830 Murida 

( ynogale Lund, 1842 Canida 

Dama ( ' Bennett ' ) Gray, 1X50 Bovidae 

Damalis Gray, 1*46 Bovidae 

Delphinapterus Lesson and Garnot, 1826 Cete 

Delphis Wagler, 1830 Delphinida 

Gray, 1864 Delphinidae 

Dinoeyon Giebel, 1866 Caninse 

Diodon Lesson, 1828 Physeterida- 

Diprotodon Duvernoy, 1848 Ungulata 

Dromedarius Gloger, 1841 ( camel | Camelida 

Echimys I. Geoffroy, 1838 Echymiina; 

Echinogale Pi unci, 1848 Talpida- 

Echinothrix Alston, 1876 Rhynehomyina 

Eotherium Owen, 1875 Sirenia 

Ericius Giebel, 1871 Tenrecidae 

Galemys Pomel, 1848 Soricida 

GcUeottu Hum Wagner, 1839 Viverrida/ 

GaUctis I. Geoffroy, 1837 Viverrida' 

Glis Erxleben, 1777 Sciuridae 

Gomphotherium ('Filhol') Schlosser, 1884. 

Insectivora 

Cope, 1886 Camelida 

Hemitragus Van der Hoeven, 1855 Bovida 

Heterodon Lund, 1838 Edentata 

Hippelaphus Bonaparte, 1836 Bovida 

Latax Gray, 1813 (land otter) Mustelida> 

Li in in us Tiedemann, 1808 Microtinae 

I.i ptonyx Lesson, 1842 Mustelida 

Lophiomys Deperet, 1890 Muridae 

Lycaon Wagler, 1830 Marsupialia 

Macropus Fischer, 1811 Primates 

Macrotis Wagner, 1855 Ungulata 

Macrotus Gray, 1843 Phyllostomatidae 

MandriUus Milne-Edwards, 1841. 

Cercopithecidae 

Martes ( • Illiger ' ) Wagler, 1830 Viverrida 

Mazama H. Smith, 1827 (goat) Cervidae 

Ogilby, 1837. Antilocaprida 

Memina Gray, 1821 Ungulata 

Mi rimax ( 'uvier, 1823 Dipodida 

Merycodon Mercerat, 1891 Litopterna 

Mesocetus Moreno, 1892 Physeterida 

Mesotherium Moreno, 1882 Marsupialia 

Micromys Meyer. 1846 Muscardinida 

Aymard, 1847 Cricetina 

Microsus Heude, 1899 Ungulata 

Mungos Gray, 1843 Viverrida 



32 



INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 
List of Homonyms within the Class Mammalia — Continued. 



Original name. 



Subsequent name. 



Myopterus Geoffrey, 1813 Noctilionida 

Myospalax Laxmann, 17(i9 Murida 

Myspithecus Cuvier, L833 Lemuridse 

Nelomys Jourdan , 1837 Glires 

X( am >J8 Kaup, 1829 Insectlvora 

Nocti/elis Geoffroy, 184-1 < Felida- 

Nyctalus Bowdich, 1825 Pteropodida 

Nycteris Cuvier & Geoffroy, 1795. 

Megaderinatida 

Nyctimene Bechstein, 1800 PteropodidEe 

Odobenus Brisson, 1762 Fera 

Orca Wagler, 1830 Physeteridse 

Oreomys Heuglin, 1877 Murida 

Orycterotherium Bronn, 1838 Glyptodontida 

Oryx Blainville, 1816 Ungulata 

Otocoldbus Brandt, 1844 Glires 

Otolicnus Illiger, 1811 Primates 

Otomys Cuvier, 1823 Otomyina 

Palseobalxna Seeley, 1864 Balanida 

Palseocyon Blainville, 1*41 Creodonta 

Palxomys Kaup, 1832 Castorida 

Palxopithecus Voigt, 1835 Primates 

Paradoxodon Wagner, 1855 Insectivora 

Pelaurista Link, 1795 Glires 

Phyllorrhina Leach, 1816 Chiroptera 

Phyllotis Waterhouse, 1837 Glires 

Pithecanthropus Haeckel, 1866 (Hypothetical). 

Primates 
Pithecus Geoffroy & Cuvier, 1795. 

Cercopithecida 

Platyct ros Gray, 1850 Ungulata 

Platyodon Bravard, 1853 Glires 

Plabyrhynchm F. Cuvier, 1826 Fera 

Pongo Lace.pe.de, 1799 (orang) Simiida 

1 'ni 1 1 hi i it In riu in Geoffroy, 1833 Fera 

Procavia Storr. 1780 Ungulata 

Profelis I. Geoffroy, 1844 Felida: 

Protobalaena DuBus, 1867 Cete 

Protolabis Cope, 1876 Camelidse 

Protomeryx Leidy, 1856 Camelidse 

Protopithecus Lund, 1838 Cebida 

Protoproviverra Lemoine, 1891 Fera 

Psammomys Cretzschmar, 1828 Gerbillina 

PsammorycU s P< >eppig, 1835 Glires 

Pseudocyon Lartet, 1851 Canida 

Pteronotus Rafinesque, 1815 Pteropodida 

Puea Scopoli, 1777 Phocida 

Rattus Frisch, 1775 ( = Mus) Glires 



Myopterm Oken, 1816 Noctilionida 

Myospalax Hermann, 1783 Spalacida 

Bly th, 1846 Muridse 

Myspithecus Blainville, 1839 Daubentoniida 

Nelomys Lund. 1841 Glires 

Neomys Bravard, 1848-52 Glires 

Gray, 1873 Murida 

Nocttft lis Severtzow, 1858 Felida 

Nyctalus Lesson, 1842 Yespertilionida 

Nycteris Bechstein, 1801 Chin iptera 

Nyctimene Bechstein. 1*01 Chiroptera 

Odobenus Rafinesque, 1815 Sirenia 

Orca Gray, 1846 Delphinida 

Oreomys (Aymard) Trouessart, 1881.Hystrieida 

Orycterotherium Harlan, 1841 Megatheriida 

Oryx Oken, 1816 Cete 

Otocoldbus Severtzow, 1858 Fera 

Otolicnus G. Fischer, 1814 Fera 

Otomys A. Smith, 1834 Dendromyina 

Palseobalxna Moreno. 1892 Balanida- 

Palseocyon I Aid, 1843 Canida 

Palxomys Lazier it Parieu, 1839. .Theridomyidae 

Palmopithecus Lydekker, 1879 Simiidse 

Paradoxodon Filhol, 1890 Artiodactyla 

Scott, 1892 Creodonta 

Petaurista Desmarest, 1820 Marsupialia 

Reichenbach, 1862 Primates 

Phyllorrhina Bonaparte, 1837 Chiroptera 

Phyllotis Gray, 1866 Chiroptera 

Pithecanthropus Dubois, 1*94 Simiidse 

Pithecus G. Cuvier, 1800 Simiida 

Platyceros Pomel, 1854 Cervidse 

Platyodon ( ' Reinhardt ' ) Gervais, 1876. Edentata 

Platyrhynchus Van Beneden, 1876 Cete 

Pongo Haeckel, 1866 (gorilla+chimpanzee). 

Simiida 

Potamotherium Gloger, 1S41 Ungulata 

Procavia Ameghino, 1885 Glires 

Profelis Severtzow, 1858 Felida 

Protobalaena Leidy, 1869 Cete 

Haeckel, 1895 Camelida 

Protoliiliis Wortman, 1898 Ungulata 

Protomeryx Schlosser, 1886 Tragulida 

Protopithecus Lartet, 1851 Simiida 

Protoproviverra Ameghino, 1891 Marsupialia 

I'smii iiiiniiijs LeConte, 1830 Microtina 

Poeppig, 1835 Octodontida 

Psammoryctes Stirling, 1889 Marsupialia 

1'si udocyon Wagner, 1857 Canida 

PteronotU8 Gray, 1838 Chiroptera 

Pusa Oken, 1816 Mustelida 

Pattus Donovan, 1827 (=Arvicanthis) Glires 



A LIST OF THE GENEEA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 33 

List of Homonyms within the Class Mammalia — Continued. 



Original name. 



Subsequent name. 



Rhinastcr Wagler, 1830 Insectivora 

Rhinogale Gioger, 1S41 Mustelidae 

Rhynophytta Peters, 1865 Phyllostomatidae 

Rhynchocyon Peters, 1847 Insectivora 

Sati/rus Oken, 1816 (gibbon ) Simiida; 

Sawo-cetus Agassiz, 1818 Basilosauridse 

Sch izodon Waterhouse, 1842 Glires 

Sctigcr Cuvier, 1800 Tenrecidae 

Stenodon Van Beneden, 1865 Cete 

Sylvanus Rafinesque, 1815 Cebid» 

Sylvicola Blainville, 1837 Chiroptera 

Talpasorex Schinz, 1821 (=Condylura) .Talpidse 
Tapirotfu Hum Blainville, 1817..LopModontidse 

Tardigradus Brisson, 1762 Edentata 

Thinotherium Cope, 1870 Artiodactyla? 

Thylacamys Owen, 1840 Marsupialia 

Tfiylacotherium Valenciennes, 1838. 

Amphitheriidse 

Tragelaphus Blainville, 1816 Bovidae 

Trugidus Brisson, 1762 Tragulida- 

Trichcchus Linnseus, 1758 Sirenia 

Tursio Fleming, 1822 Physeteridse 



Rhinastcr Gray, 1862 Ungulata 

Rhinogale Gray, 1864 Viverridse 

Rhynophylla Gray, 1866 Rhinolophidaj 

Rhynchocyon Gistel, 1848 Chiroptera 

Satyrus Lesson, 1840 (orang) Simiida; 

Saurocetes Burmeister, 1871 Platanistidae 

Schizodon Stutehbury, 1853 Marsupialia 

Setiger Geoffroy, 1803 Erinaceidae 

Stenodon Ameghino, 1885 Edentata 

Sylvanus Oken, 1816 Cercopithecidae 

Virey, 1819 Cercopithecidae 

Sylvicola Fatii >, 1867 Glires 

Talpasorex Lesson, 1827 (=Sealops) Talpidae 

Tapirotherium Lartet, 1851 Suidae 

Tardigradus Boddaert, 1785 Primates 

Thinotherium Marsh, 1872 Condylarthra 

Thylacomys Waite, 1898 Glires 

Thylacotherium Lund, 1839 Didelphyidae 

Tragelaphus Ogilby, 1837 Bovidae 

Tragulus H. Smith, 1827 '. Bovidae 

Trichech us Linnseus, 1766 Ferae 

Tursio Wagler, 1830 : Delphinidae 

Gray, 1843 Delphinidae 



Besides this duplication within the class Mammalia, many more names 
have been proposed which have been previously used in other classes, so 
that the total number of preoccupied names constitutes a very appre- 
ciable percentage of the total number of generic names. Canon 
XXXIII of the A. O. U. Code declares that "a generic name is to 
be changed which has been previously used for some other genus in 
the same kingdom.' 1 Simple as this statement is, it has probably 
given rise to more discussion and to more changes of names than 
any other rule in the Code, merely because of differences in its 
interpretation. 

In the acceptance and use of names some zoologists disregard the 
rule entirely, but of those that recognize its validity some apply it 
only to names previously used in the same class, others only to names 
which are identical in spelling, and still others to names derived from 
the same roots. The first of these interpretations is obviously out of 
accord with the rule. The second is perhaps open to question, but 
the test being merely identity of spelling there can be no difficulty in 
its application, even in the rare cases of names of the same form but 
of different meanings, due to different derivations, as, for example, 
Neoinys Kaup, 1829 (veao, to swim; /ivs, mouse), and JVeomys Gray, 
1873 (veog, new, ^tvs, mouse). The chief differences in opinion have 
arisen in the application of the last class of interpretations, which 
includes names of the same derivation, but with slight differences in 
form clue to gender, choice of connecting vowel of compound words, 
7591— No. 23—03 3 



34 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

or presence or absence of aspirates. Some eminent zoologists maintain 
that a difference of a single letter in two names is sufficient to pre- 
vent the later one from being preoccupied, and cite such cases as 
Pious and Pica. Galeus and Gale, in support of their position. It is 
generally admitted that these names should all stand, since they are 
taken from classical words which were originally applied to very dis- 
tinct organisms; and the validity of this argument is generally recog- 
nized in spite of Principle V of the A. O. U. Code, which declares 
that "a name is only a name, having no meaning until invested with 
one by being used as the handle of a fact, and the meaning of a name 
so used in zoological nomenclature does not depend upon its signifi- 
cation in any other connection." While the question of derivation 
does not necessarily enter into the availability of a name, it may serve 
a useful purpose as a guide in deciding whether names are preoccupied 
or not, as will be seen by some of the examples cited later. A large 
number of names comprise derivatives and compounds of the- same 
Greek or Latin words. These names may have different forms: 

(a) According to gender, as Otostomus, Otostoma, Otostomum. 
Otostomis Menke, 1830, a mollusk; Otostomus Beck, 1837, a mollusk; 
Otostoma Carter, 1856, a protozoan; Otostomum Ehrenberg, 1872, a 
protozoan, all evidently derived from the same Greek words, ovg, ear, 
and ffrofxa, mouth. 

(b) According to the particular Greek dialect from which the words 
have been selected, as Lam/pronessa and La/nvpronetta. Both these 
names are compounds of \afA7tpos, splendid, and vrjtToc, duck; but in 
the former the Epic or Ionic form, vfjGGoc, is used and in the latter its 
Attic equivalent, vrjrta, 

(c) According to whether the original Greek form has been pre- 
served or whether it has been transliterated into Latin form, as Ilip- 
posideros and Hipposiderus. 

(d) According to whether the Greek aspirate has been preserved 
or not, as Abrothrix and Hdbrotfarix; Reithrodon and Rhithrodon. 

(e) According to whether the connecting vowel i or o has been used 
in compounding two classical roots, as Callorhimts and Oallirhinus. 

It is therefore possible to make a number of compounds from the 
same words, all meaning the same thing, and differing from one another 
simply by a letter or two. This may be illustrated by compounds of 
Ka\og, a beautiful, and fivs, mouse. The following list contains no less 
than 16 variations compounded from these words in accordance with 
classical rules, two of which, Calomys and Callomys, have actually been 
proposed for different genera of mice. 

Calimys. Calimus. Kalimys. Kalimus. 

Calomys. Calomus. Kalomys. Kalornus. 

Callimys. Galliums. Kallimys. Kallimus. 

Callomys. Callomus. Kallomys. Kallomus. 

a See also footnote under Callidon, p. 151. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 



35 



These 16 variations of 'beautiful mouse' are all available as valid 
generic designations of mammals (if applied to different animals), 
according to those who "regard all generic names as different unless 
originally spelled alike.' 1 " 

In common English no difference is recognized between enclosure and 
inclosure, gray and grey, meter and metre, program and programme, 
theater and theatre, and similar words. Generic names derived from 
the same words in the same way, and therefore having the same mean- 
ing, even though differing in gender or connecting vowel, should like- 
wise be considered identical. For the sake of expediency or that there 
may be an ironclad rule which all may follow, the opposite course is 
adopted by some writers, but agreement in the matter seems almost 
impossible. A list is here given of 43 actual cases which occur in 
mammalogy and ornithology. 

Examples of Preoccupied Names in Mammalogy and Ornithology. h 



Name adopted. 


Name rejected. 


Preoccupying name. 


Authority for name adopted. 


MAMMALS. 








Callotaria, 1892 


C'allorhinus, 1859 . . . 


Callirhinus, 1850 (Coleop- 


Palmer, Proc. Biol. Soc.Wash., 






tera). 


VII, 156, 1892. 


Carponycteris, 1891 .. 


Macroglossus, 1824 . . 


Macroglossum, 1777 | Le- 


Lydekker, Mamm. Liv. and 






pidoptera) . 


Ext. ,654, 1891. 


Conicodon, 1894 


Calamodon, 1874 


Calamodus, 1829 ( A ves | . . 


Cope, Am. Nat., XXVIII, 594, 
footnote, 1894. 


Dideilotherium, 1889. 


Delotherium,1889 .. 


Deilotherium, 1882 (TJn- 


Ameghino, Act. Acad. Cordo- 






gulata). 


ba, VI, 920-921, 1889. 


Diochoticus, 1894 


Notocetus, 1892 


Notiocetus, 1891 (Bala;- 


Ameghino, Enum. Synop. 






nidae). 


Mamm. Patagonie, 182, Feb., 
1894. 


Dolichophyllum,1891 


Mat-rophyllum, 1838 


Macrophylla, L837 (Cole- 


Lydekker, Mamm., Liv. and 






optera). 


Ext., 673, 1891. 


Euelaphas, 1857 


Elasrnodon, 1846 


Elasmodus, 1843 (Pisces).. 


Falconer, Quart. Journ. Geol. 
Soc, XIII, 315, 1857. 


Eurygeniops, 1896 


Eurygenium, 1895 .. 


Eurygemus, 1849 1 ('oleop- 


Ameghino, Bol. Inst. Geog. 






tera). 


Argent., XVII, 92, 1896. 


Hemiderma, 1855 


Carollia, 1838 


Carolia,1837 (Mollusca) .. 


Lydekker, Mamm. Liv. and 

Ext., 674, 1891. 


Hydrelaphus, 1898 . . . 


Hydropotes,1870 

■ 


Hydropota,1861 (Dipteral 


Lydekker, Deer of All Lands, 
219,1898. 


Kiodotus, 1840 


Macroglossus, 1824 . . 


Macroglossum, 1777 (Le- 


Blyth, Cuvier's Anim. King- 






pidoptera) . 


dom, 69, 1840. 


Latax,1827 


Enhydra,1822 


Enhydris, 1820 (Reptilia). 


Stejneger, Naturen, 172, 1885. 


Linsang,1839 


Pnonodon,1824 


Priodon,1822 (Edentata) . 


Thomas. Ann, Mus. Genova, 
2« ser., X, 9, 1892. 


Mesodectes, 1875 


Isacus, 1873 


Isaca, 1857 (Hemiptera) . 


Cope, Syst. Cat. Vert. Eocene, 
N. M., 30. 1875. 



"Jordan & Evermann, Fishes North and Middle America, I, p v, 1*96 

Dr. Gill states his position as follows: " I agree with those who think that even a difference of a 
single letter in most cases is sufficient to entitle two or more generic names so differing to stand. 
The chemist has found such a difference not only ample, but most convenient to designate the 
valency of different compounds, as ferricyanogen and ferrocyanogen. I am prepared now to go back 
on myself in this respect." (Proc. Am. Ass. Adv. Sci., XLV, pp. 15-16, 1896.) 

Compare also recommendations of Carus & Stiles, Rept. on Rules Zool. Nomenclature, p. 301, 1898. 

&l am indebted to Dr. J. A. Allen, Mr. H. C. Oberholser, and Dr. C. W. Richmond for several of the 
names of birds cited in this list. 



36 INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 

Examples of Preoccupied Names in Mammalogy and Ornithology — Continued. 



Name adopted. 



MAMMALS— UOIlt'd. 

Mystacops, 1891 

Palaeolithops, 1891 .. 



Name rejected. 



Mystacina, 1843 

Lithops, 1SS7 



Sclerocalyptus, 1891 . Hoplophorus, 1839 . 



Titaimtherium 



Trygenycteris, 1891 . . 



BIRDS. 

Abdimia, 1855 



Oompsothlypis, 1850 . 

Cryptoglaux.b 1901 .. 

Cyanocephalus, 1842. 

Erismatura, 1832 

Guara, 1852 

Heleodytes, 1850 



Horizopus.fi 1899 

Horizopus,6 1899 

Megadyptes, 1880 ... 

Micropallas, 1889 ... 



Menodus, 1849 

Megaloglossus, 1885. 



Parula, 1838. 



Preoccupying name. 



Mystacinus, 1822 (Aves) .. 

Lithopsis, 1878 (Hemip- 

tera). 
Hoplophora, 1830 (Or- 

thoptera) . 
Menodon, 1838 (Reptilia). 

Megaglossa, 1865 (Dipte- 

ra). 



Authority for name adopted. 



Lydekker, Manim. Liv. and 

Ext., 671, 1891. 
Ameghino, Rev. Arg., I, 240- 

241, 1891. 
Ameghino, Rev. Arg., I, 251, 

1891. 
Marsh, Am. Journ. Sci. and 

Arts, 3*Ser., V, 486, 1873. 
Lydekker, Maram. Liv. and 

Ext., 655, 1891. 



Sphenorhynchus, 1831 . . . 
Lampronessa, 1832 (Aves) 

Calodromus, 1832 



Eudromias, 1831 (Chara- 
driidse). 



Hylotoma, 1804 (Hynien- 
optera). 



Sphenorrhynchus, Sphenorhynchus, 1831 Sharpe, Cat. Birds Brit. Mus., 

1832. XXVI, 292, 1898. 

Arctonetta," 1855 Lampronetta, 1847 . . Lampronessa, 1832 (Aves). G. R. Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. 

London, 1855, 212. 
Am. Ornith. Union, Check 
List, 122, 1886. 

Calopczus, 1884 Calodromas, 1873 ... Calodromus, 1832 Ridgvvay, Proc. Biol. Soc. 

Wash., II,, 97, 1884. 
Salvadori, Cat. Birds Brit. 
Mus., XXVII, 566, 1895. 

Calopezus, 1884 .. . Eudromia, 1832 Eudromias, 1831 (Chara- Ridgvvay, Proc. Biol. Soc. 

Wash., II, 97, 1884. 
Salvadori, Cat. Birds Brit. 
Mus., XXVII, 566, 1895. 

Ceophlceus, 1862 Hylatomus, 1858 Hylotoma, 1804 (Hymen- Stejneger, Auk, II, 52, 1885. 

Am. Ornith. Union, Check 
List, 215, 1886. 

Parulus, 1824 Stejneger, Auk. I, 168, 1884. 

Am. Ornith. Union. Check 
List, 304, 1886. 

Nyctala.lS Nyctalus,1825( Mammalia) Richmond, Auk, XVIII, 193, 

1901. 
Gymnorhinus, 1841 . Gymnorhina, 1840 (Aves). Am. Ornith. Union, Check 

List, 246, 1886. 

Oxyura,1828 Oxyuius, 1810 (Pisces) Am. Ornith. Union, Check 

List, 124, 1886. 

Eudocimus, 1832 Eudocima, 1820 (Lepi- Am. Ornith. Union, Check 

List, 131, 1886. 
Campylorhynchus, Campylirhynchus, 1821 Palmer, Auk, X, 86, 1893. 
1824. (Coleoptera). Am. Ornith. Union, Auk, XI, 

48, 1894. 
Contopus, 1855 . . . .. Contipus. 1853 (Coleop- Oberholser, Auk, XVI, 331, 

1899. 
Oberholser. Auk, XVI, 331, 

1899. 
Milne-Edwards, Ann. Sci. Nat., 
6°ser., IX, Art. 9, p. 56. 1880. 
Ogilvie-Gmnt. Cat. Birds Brit. 
Mus., XXVI, 644, 1898. 
. Micrathena. 1833 (Arach- Coues, Auk, VI, 71, 1889. 

Am. Ornith. Union, First 
Suppl. Check List, 21, 1889. 
a "As M. Biandt's subgeneric name of Lampronetta is mi near Lampronessa of Wagler, it may be 
thought advisable to change it to Arctonetta."— G. R. Gray. 
6 Not yet accepted by the A. O. U- committee on nomenclature. 



Contipus. 1853 (Coleop- 
tera). 

Syrichta, 1S54 | Syrichtus, 1832-33 (Lepi- 

doptera). 

Catarrhactes, 1841 ..| Catarractes, 1760 (Impen- 
nes). 



Micrathena, 1833 (Araeh- 
nida i 



A LIST OF THE OENETCA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 37 
Examples of Preoccupied Names in Mammalogy and Ornithology — Continued. 



Name adopted. 

birds— continued. 
Nyctanassa, 1887 



Otocoris, 1838 

Otocoris, 1838 

Perissospiza, 1900 . 
Prionornis, 1895. .. 
Rhinoptilus, 1850 . 

Sporophila, 1844.. 
Tilmatura, 1854... 
Zamelodia, 1880 . . 



Name rejected. 



Nyctherodius, 1852. 

Eremophila, 1828 .-. 
Phileremos, 1831... 

Pycnorhamphus, 

1874. 
Prion irhynehus, 

1857. 
Macrotarsius, 1848 . 

Spermophila, 1827 . 
Tryphsena, 1849 . . . 
Hedymeles, 1851... 



Preoccupying name. 



Nyeterodius, 1842 (Arde- 
idse). 



Eremophilus, 1805 (Pisces) 

Phileremus,1809 ( Hymen- 

optera ) . 
Picnoramphus, 1866 



Authority for name adopted. 



Prionorhynchus, 1853 
(Crustacea). 

Macrotarsus. 1795 ( Mam- 
malia). 



Spermopliilus,1822( Mam- 
malia). 

Tripha?na, 1816 (Lepi- 
doptera), 

Hedymela, 1846 (Aves)... 



Stejneger, Proc. U. S. Nat. 

Mus., X, 295, 1887. 
Am. Ornith. Union, First 

Suppl. Check List, 20, 1889. 
Stejnegfer, Proc. U. S. Nat. 

Mus.,V, 33, 1882. 
'Am. Ornith. Union, Check 

List, 238, 1886. 
Oberholser, Proc. U. S. Nat. 

Mus., XXII, 227, 1900. 
Salvin and Godman, Biol. 

Cent. Am., II, 454, 1895. 
Strickland, Proc. Zool. Soc. 

London, 1850, 220. 
Sharpe, Cat. Birds Brit. Mus., 

XXIV, 43, 1896. 
Am. Ornith. Union, Check 

List, 289, 1886. 
Salyin, Cat. Birds Brit. Mus., 

XVI, 385, 1892. 
Coues, Bull. Nutt Orn. Club, 

V, 98, 1880. 
Am. Ornith. Union, Auk, 

XIV, 130, 1897. 



The late Professor Marsh, in explaining- his reasons for retaining 
Titanotherium, says : 

The generic name Titanotherium Leidy is antedated by Menodus Pomel [1849]. 
The latter, however, is essentially the same word as Menodon von Meyer 1838, 
and is also objectionable in its form; hence Titanotherium should be retained/' 

This action was endorsed by Professor Osborn.* Professor Cope, 
who was originally an ardent supporter of the validity of names differ- 
ing by one letter, modified his attitude shortly before his death, so far 
as to change some of his names which he feared might be considered 
preoccupied. Referring in 1894 to his own genus Calamodon, pro- 
posed twenty years before, he said: 

A genus of birds has been named Calamodus [by Kaup, in 1829], a name which is in 
my opinion abundantly distinct from Calamodon. As, however, there are persons 
who, like the American Ornithologists' Union, will make this resemblance an excuse 
for changing the name, I suggest that they call it Conicodon, from the shape of the 
molars as distinguished from those of Stylinodon. c 

In view of this divergence of opinion regarding preoccupied names, 
it has been deemed advisable to discuss the subject somewhat in detail, 
and in preparing the index to keep in mind the needs of various 

a Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., V, 486, footnote, 1873. 
b Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist,, VIII, p. 158, 1896. 
fAm. Nat., XXXVIII, p. 594, 1894. 



38 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

workers. Special care has been taken to refer not only to the names 
which preoccupy mammal names, but also to designations which have 
been proposed to replace them. In marking names as preoccupied 
the author has not been governed by his personal views on the subject, 
but has endeavored rather to subordinate these to general utility. 
And before accepting the statement that a certain name is preoccupied, 
the reader is cautioned to consult such name and determine whether 
the statement coincides with his own views. 

NOMINA NUDA." 

Nomina nuda are generally regarded as having no standing in 
nomenclature, but it is not always easy to decide whether a name is a 
nomen nudum, except where it is published in a list. Ordinarily a 
genus is considered sufficiently characterized if its type species is men- 
tioned, but in case the name of this type itself happens to be a nomen 
nudum the generic name has no standing until the species has been 
properly described. And if this generic name proves to be preoccupied 
and another one is substituted for it, the substituted name is also a 
nomen nudum unless accompanied by a diagnosis or based on a recog- 
nizable species. If the nomen nudum afterward becomes available 
through description, reference to that description accompanies the 
generic name in the index and the name itself dates from this later 
publication. Thus Rh/mosciurus Gray was published in 1843 with 
M. tupaioides from Singapore as the type. The specitic name, how- 
ever, was a nomen nudum and remained undefined until Blyth, i n 
1855, described the species as Sc\iurus\ twpaioides from a specimen 
taken in Malacca.-' In 1867 Gray again published the genus/ but the 
type having been described in 1855, the genus may be considered to 
date from that year instead of 1813, the time of first publication, or 
1867, the time of first publication after description of the type species. 
Some generic names which are practically nomina nuda have doubtless 
been admitted on the basis of a brief description, but such cases can 
be detected only by specialists who by working over the groups are in 
a position to decide whether or not the characters assigned constitute 
a recognizable description. The modern almost universal practice of 
mentioning some species with the genus tends to reduce the number 
of such names. 

INDETERMINATE NAMES. 

Rarer even than nomina nuda, but still worthy of special mention, 
arc a few cases in which generic names have been given to animals 
that never existed. Examples of these are Sukotyro of Kerr, based 

« See Miller, 'The Treatment of Nomina Nuda,' Auk, XIV, 427-430, Oct., 1897. 
>> Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, XXIV, p. 477, 1855. 
■ Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist,, 3d ser., XX, p. 286, 1867. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 39 

on a mythical beast said to have been found in Java; Pamphractus of 
Illiger, based on Testudo squamata Bontius 1658, also accredited to 
Java but never identified with any animal, living or extinct; the equally 
unknown Jffydropithecus Gloger 1841; and Rhinoceroides of Feather- 
stonhaugh, based on a supposed fossil found in Somerset Count} 7 , 
Pennsylvania, which proved to be only a fragment of rock. 

FRENCH AND COMMON NAMES. 

French names have given much trouble in preparing this index, 
owing to the fact that it has been a very common custom to quote them 
in Latin form, but with the date of their first publication as French 
words. Many of Cuvier's genera were first proposed under French 
names, and these were not Latinized until some years later. Obviously 
such names have no more claim to recognition than English, German, 
Arabic, or barbarous common names. But their similarity of form 
to Latin names, and the almost universal practice of treating them as 
such, make it sometimes difficult to ascertain their real date; and it 
may happen that in a few instances changes are necessary because such 
words are antedated by valid generic names. In order to bring out 
this point more clearly, references are given in the index both to the 
first publication in French and the first publication in Latin form, but 
the name takes its date from the latter publication. In a few uncer- 
tain cases French names have been given the benefit of the doubt and 
treated as Latin words in order to avoid the chance of necessitating 
undue change through the rejection of names which should properly 
be accepted. 

The case of Priodon, a genus of edentates from Paraguay, is a good 
example of the uncertainty attached to names originally published in 
French form. Priodon is usually quoted as Cuvier 1822, but seems 
to have appeared in that year only in the form 'Priodonte.' In 1827 
the name was used as a Latin word in the form Priodontes? but it 
does not seem to have been used in the form Priodon until 1831/' In 
1813 it was modified to Prionodon,' 1 a name which, however, had been 
proposed by Horsfield in 1821 for a genus of ViverricUe from Java. 
Recently Thomas, accepting the current date of Cuvier's Priodon, has 
adopted Linsang Miiller 1839, instead of Prionodon Horsfield/ on the 
ground that the latter is preoccupied b} T Priodon Cuvier 1822, although, 
as shown, Cuvier's genus does not seem to have been published in 
Latin form until 1827, three years after the publication of Prionodon 
Horsfield. 

" Hist. Nat. Mamrn., IV, text with pi. (Encoubert), 1822. 
h Lesson, Man. Mammalogie, p. 309, 1827. 
c McMurtrie, Cuvier's Animal Kingdom, I, p. 164, 1831. 
d Gray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., p. xxvii, 1843. 
fi Ann. Mus. Genova, 2d ser., X, p. 9, 1892. 



40 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

PLURAL SUBGENERIC NAMES. 

Some authors have designated within a genus one or more subgen- 
eric groups, and to the sections thus formed applied names in plural 
form. These names are occasionally quoted in the singular by other 
authors as valid subgenera or genera, being assigned to the author 
who originally formed the group, and dated from his publication. 
Thus Lydekker in "Deer of all Lands.' 1898 (p. 125), quotes Palmatus 
Giebel, 1859, as one of the synon} r msof Damn. Reference to Giebel's 
' Saugethiere ' shows that the name was originally published Palmati, 
including Cervus dama and 0. somonensis. Wagner also recognized a 
number of subdivisions of Felis under plural names, e. g., Leonina>\ 
ServaUnae, and Tigrmae, and these have recently been revived by 
Greve under the forms Zeonina, Servalina, and Tigrina. The rule 
adopted in this index has been to ignore plural names as having no 
more status than common names unless subsequently used in the sin- 
gular, when they date from the later author, although in such cases a 
reference to the earlier name is added. Following are a few of these 
names : 

Cati Wagner, Supplement Schreber's Saugthiere, II, p. 532, 1841. 

Cercopitheci Linnaeus, Systeina Naturae, ed. 10, p. 26, 1758. (See Cercopithecus, 

Briinnich, 1772.) 
Gazellse Lichtenstein, Mag. Gesellsch. Naturforsch. Freunde, Berlin, VI, 152, 171- 

178, 1814. (See Gazella Rafinesque, 1815.) 
Inaures Minding, Geog. Vertheilung Siiugeth., 74, 1829 (Subgroup under Phoca; 

a descriptive term including the earless seals and used in contrast with Otaria). 
Leoninae Wagner, Supplement Schreber's Saugthiere, II, p. 460, 1841. (See 

Leonina Greve, 1894. ) 
Lynces Wagner, Supplement Schreber's Saugthiere, II, p. 515, 1841. (See Lynx 

Kerr, 1792. ) 
Palmati Giebel, Die Saugethiere, p. 351, 1855. (See Palmatus Lydekker, 1898.) 
Paxitherinae Wagner, Supplement Schreber's Samjthiere, II, p. 474, 1841. 
Papiones Linn.eus, Systema Naturae, ed. 10, p. 25, 1758. (See Papio Erxleben, 

1777. ) 
Pardinae Giebel, Die Saugethiere, p. 870, 1855; ibid., ed. 2, p. 

Pardina Kaup, 1829. ) 
Servalinae Wagner, Supplement Schreber's Saugthiere, II, p. 

Servalina Greve\ 1894. ) 
Tigrinae Wagner, Supplement Schreber's Saugthiere, II, p. 

Tigrina Greve, 1894.) 
Uncinae Giebel, Die Siiugethiere, p. 870, 1855; ibid., ed. 2, p. 870, 1859. 

GENERA BELONGING TO OTHER CLASSES. 

The last group of rejected names to be considered is that comprising 
those accompanied by descriptions and based on valid species, but now 
known to belong to groups other than mammals, and hence not properly 
entitled to a place in this index. These are mainly designations of 
certain fossils first described from fragmentary remains, the relation- 
ship of which could not be determined with certainty. This group con- 
tains two kinds of names: (a) Those given to forms originally described 



870, 1859. 


(See 


505, 1841. 


(See 


469, 1841. 


(See 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 41 



as bona fide genera of mammals; and (b) those given to forms referred 
to the class Mammalia through error. As examples of the last kind 
may be mentioned the reptilian genera Brithojnts, Kladeisteriodon, 
and Orthopus, and the fish genus Wallago, which were inadvertently 
listed as mammals in the Nomenclators of Agassiz and Scudder. 
These names have not been admitted in the body of the index. Those 
belonging to forms described as mammals, however, are listed in their 
proper places with references to the explanations as to their true posi- 
tion. Altogether a score of such names must be rejected or rather 
transferred to other groups. As shown h\ the following list, nearly 
all of these names belong to reptiles, although two extinct birds of 
southern Patagonia were originally described as mammals, and one 
genus {Chwotherium) was doubtfully referred to the Mammalia or the 
Amphibia. Threu genera — Caryoderma Cope, Tritylodon Owen, and 
Theriodesmus Seeley — have been considered mammals until very 
recently. The Mesozoic genera Theriodesmus and Tritylodon, 
although considered as representatives of the earliest ancestors of the 
Mammalia, have long been known to possess reptilian characters, and 
are now regarded as true reptiles. 

List of Genera referred to Mammalia but now known to belong to other Classes. 



Name, authority, and date. 



Brithopu8 Kutorga, 1838 « 

Caryoderma Cope, 1886 

Chirotherium Kaup, 1835 

Ischyrotherium Leidy, 1856 

Kladeisteriodon Plieninger, 1846 « 

Orthopus Kutorga, 1838a 

Pamphractus Illiger, 1811 

Phorusrhaeos Ameghino, 1887 

Polyclinoides Macdonald, 1864 

Put i/jit ychodon Emmons 

Psephophorus Meyer, 1847 

Pterotherium Fischer, 1814 

Rhinoceroides Featherstonhaugh, 1831 . 

Theriodesmus Seeley, 1887 

Thylacodes Roger, 1894 a , 

Tolmodus Ameghino, 1891 

Tritylodon Owen, 1884 

Tropodon Rafinesque, 1832 



Wallago Bleeker, 1858 « . 



Locality. 



Russia 

Northern Kansas 

Saxe-Meiningen, Germany. 
South Dakota 



Russia 

Java 

Southern Patagonia . 



North Carolina 

Neudorf, Hungary 



Somerset County, Pennsylvania 

Fraserburg, Cape Colony 

White Horse Plains, Australia . . 

Southern Patagonia 

Orange Free State, Africa 

Somerset County, Pennsylvania. 



Present class. 



Reptilia. 
Reptilia. 
Amphibia? 
Reptilia. 
Reptilia. 
Reptilia. 
Reptilia. 
Aves. 
Tunicata. 
Reptilia. 
Reptilia. 
Reptilia. 

Fragment of rock. 
Reptilia. 
Mollusca. 
Aves. 
Reptilia. 
New name for 
Rhinoceroides. 
Pisces. 



a Referred to Mammalia through error. 
ETYMOLOGY OF NAMES. 



It is generally admitted that a name need not mean anything, and 
that in any case its meaning is of very slight importance from the 
standpoint of the systematic zoologist. According to the A. O. U. 
Code of Nomenclature, "a name is only a name, having no meaning 



42 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

until invested with one b}^ being used as a handle of a fact; and the 
meaning of a name so used, in zoological nomenclature, does not 
depend on its signification in any other connection " (Principle V). In 
spite of this declaration, it will be found that most generic names have 
been bestowed for the sake of drawing attention to some characteristic 
or resemblance of the animal, fancied or real. The} T may contain many 
facts of interest, descriptive, geographical, or historical, and the 
knowledge of such derivation ma}" be, and often is, an aid in keep- 
ing in mind the relationship of the group. Unfortunately, very few 
authors have taken the trouble to give etymologies or explain the 
application of their generic names." Agassiz gave derivations in his 
'Nomenclator Zoological*' and his example has been followed in this 
list, but the result is often unsatisfactory. In some cases it is almost 
impossible to tell what the derivation is, and in others the derivation 
may be clear, but the application very obscure. Some of the explana- 
tions are probably erroneous, but with no guide or hint from the 
author the determination of etymology is oftentimes little better than 
guesswork. Liddell & Scott's Greek-English Lexicon and Harper's 
Latin Dictionary have been followed for classical words, and liberal 
use has been made of the Century Dictionary. In a few cases the 
authorities have been given for explanations of barbarous names or 
those of unusual meaning. 

ETYMOLOGY OF THE WORD 'MAMMAL.' 

Before discussing the derivation of generic names it may not be out 
of place to refer briefly to the etymology of the word ' mammal,'' whicn 
Dr. Theo. Gill'' has recently elaborated. One of the best authori- 
ties, the Century Dictionary, gives the following explanation of 
the word: 

Mammal, a. and n. [ = OF. mammal =Sp. mamal = Pg. mamal, mammal = It. 
mammale, n. ; <NL. mammale, a mammal, neut. of LL. mammalis, of the breast, 
<L. mamma, the breast]. 

This derivation, as shown by Dr. Gill, is misleading: 

The name mammalia was first coined and used by Linnaeus in 1758, and was 
formed directly from the Latin; it had nothing to do with French, Spanish, Portu- 
guese or Italian words. . . . 

It was one of the happiest inspirations of Linnaeus to segregate all the mammiferous 
animals — the hairy quadrupeds, the sirenians, and the cetaceans — in a single class. 
No one before had appreciated the closeness of the relations of the several types, 

"Exceptions to the rule are Illiger, Owen, and Waterhouse, who explained the 
etymology of their names. Gaudry gives many derivations in his ' Enchainements 
du Monde Animal'. Dr. D. S. Jordan explains the etymology of all the mammal 
names which occur in his 'Manual of Vertebrates', and the late Prof. O. C. Marsh 
gave derivations in the lists of his new genera, published for private circulation, and 
also in Scudder's 'Nomenclator Zoologicus'. The application of many names will 
also be found in Beddard's 'Mammalia', 1902. 

'''The Storv of a Word— Mammal,' Pop. Sci. Monthly, LXI, pp. 434-438, Sept., 
1902. 



A LIST OF THE GENEKA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 43 

and there was no name for the new class (or concept) as there was for all the others." 
A name, therefore, had to be devised. It was another happy inspiration that led 
Linnaeus to name the class mammalia. . . . 

The name in question was evidently made in analogy with animalia. In animalia 
the principal component was anima, the 'vital principle' or animal life. . . . The 
singular of the word was animal. In mammalia, the essential component is mamma, 
breast; the singular should be mammal. ... In fine, a mammal is a being espe- 
cially marked by, or notable for having, mamma?. 

Not only had the name nothing to do with the alleged derivative Latin words, it 
was not admitted at all into the vernacular speech of France, Spain, Portugal or 
Italy. The naturalists and lexicographers of those countries failed even to appre- 
ciate its etymological aptness and beauty. First, the French had to introduce a new 
word to correspond — mammiferes, or the breast bearers. The other Latin races fol- 
lowed; the Spanish and the Portuguese with mamiferos, and the Italians with 
mammiferi. None of the words quoted in the Century Dictionary are even given 
as nouns in the ordinary dictionaries of those languages— not even in the great dic- 
tionary of Littre. Littre, however, has the words mammalogie, mammalogique and 
mammalogiste. 

Of course the Germans coined a word from their vernacular— Siiugethiere, or 
suckling animals: the cognate nations imitated; the Dutch with Zoogdieren, the 
Swedish with Daggdjuren, and the Danes and Norwegians with Pattedyrene. 

The first writer to use the English word 'mammals' to any extent was Dr. John 
Mason Good. In 'The Book of Nature' (1826), in the second lecture of the second 
series, 'On Zoological Systems,' he specifically introduces it. Quadrupeds is not 
appropriate ' and hence it has been correctly and elegantly exchanged by Linnaeus 
for that of Mammalia,' and he concludes, 'as we have no fair synonym for it in our 
own tongue, I shall beg leave now, as I have on various other occasions, to render 
mammals.' 

The earliest English author to use the singular form to any extent was Eichard 
Owen. In his 'History of British Fossil Mammals and Birds' (1846), for example, 
he alluded to a mastodon as 'this rare British Fossil Mammal' (p. xxii), and he 
asserted that he knew 'of no other extinct genus of mammal which was so cosmo- 
politan as the mastodon' (p. xlii); he said that 'the Myrmeeobius is an insectivorous 
mammal, and also marsupial' (p. 40), and he claimed, conditionally, that 'the Meles 
taxus is the oldest known species of mammal now living on the face of the earth ' 
(p. 111). 

SOURCES OF NAMES. 

The great majority of generic names of mammals have been derived 
from the Greek, a few from the Latin, some from modern languages, 
and a considerable number from native or barbarous names. The 
proportion may, perhaps, be roughl} r estimated as follows: Greek, 70 
percent; Latin, 5 percent; modern languages (exclusive of barbarous 
names), 2 percent; native names, 23 percent. 

CLASSICAL NAMES. 

Apparently every name of an animal used in classical Greek has 
been made to do service in modern nomenclature, and these have been 
modified until they form a large number of the designations in common 
use. The following list, while by no means complete, contains about 
75 of the Greek names of mammals most commonly used: 

"The assertion of Owen that Aristotle fully recognized the class of mammals 
under the name Zootoca is without proper foundation. Long ago, in the American 
Naturalist (VII, 458), I showed that different passages in Aristotle's books negatived 
such a statement, and that the word zootoka was not used as a substantive. 



44 



INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 



aiXovpos, cat. 

al%, goat. 

dxavQiGov, porcupine. 

ocXki), elk. 

dX(hny]t, fox. 

dvi'jp, man. 

dvQoXoip, antelope (?). 

avBpcDTtos, man. 

apKzoc,, bear. 

fiovfiaXis, antelope. 

fiovs, ox. 

^a:A77, weasel. 

(SdwttAz?, calf. 

SsXcpis, dolphin. 

SopKac,, gazelle. 

sXacpo?, deer. 

k\E(paz,, elephant, 

evvSpis, otter. 

Brjpiov, wild beast. 

6chs, jackal (?). 

I'ktk;, weasel. 

iitTtdpiov , pony. 

imtonypic,, zebra (?). 

'ntitoitozauoc, hippopotamus. 

'iititoc,, horse. 

iXVEvuoov, ichneumon. 

KcxurjXondpdaXiz, giraffe. 

KaurjXos, camel. 

Kaitpoc,, wild boar. 

Ka6roop, beaver. 

Keudg, a young deer. 

KEpSao, fox. 

KEpKoitihi/Koc,, a long-tailed ape. 

Kijfios, a long-tailed ape. 

kjJtos, whale. 

KoXoi, goat. 

koviXos, rabbit. 

Kpios, ram. 

Words of Latin derivation are comparatively few in number. Fol- 
lowing are some of the common names of animals a used b}^ the Romans: 



KvvaXcoTtrji,, fox-dog. 

kvvoXvkos, dog-wolf. 

kvoov, dog. 

Xtxyc&s, hare. 

Xdra'z, an aquatic animal (otter?). 

XEonapdoi, leopard. 

Xeodv, lion. 

Xvyk, lynx. 

Xvkoc,, wolf. 

uvo^oz, dormouse. 

live, mouse. 

vvKrspig, bat. 

ozc, sheep. 

opvc, antelope. 

ot'os, ass. 

ovpos, wild ox. 

Ttdvfjyjp, panther. 

ndpftos, pard. 

nifojKos, ape. 

nopraE,, calf. 

Ttpo£, deer. 

pivoKEpooz, rhinoceros. 

dKiovpoi, squirrel. 

tiftdXac, mole. 

tf£s, pig. 

ravpos, bull. 

Tiypic,, tiger. 

r pay os, goat. 

r/ao^og, badger. 

utrn'cr, hyena. 

vpexe, shrew. 

£?, hog. 

v6rpiQ, porcupine. 

0rtAazj^ar, whale. 

ipcoKaiva, porpoise. 

tpGDKij, seal. 

^orpos, hog. 



Achlis. 


Castor. 


Homo. 


Rattus. 


Aper. 


Cervus. 


Ibex. 


Scrofa. 


Aries. 


Cuniculus. 


Leo. 


Simia. 


Asinus. 


Dama. 


Lepus. 


Sorex. 


Balsena. 


Equus. 


Lupulus. 


Sus. 


Bison. 


Ericius. 


Lupus. 


Talpa. 


Bos. 


Erinaeeus. 


Lutra. 


Taurus. 


Caballus. 


Felis. 


Martes. 


Tursio. 


Canis. 


Fiber. 


Meles. 


Unicornus. 


Capella. 


Glis. 


Mustela. 


Ursus. 


Capra. 


Gulo. 


Orca. 


Vespertilio. 


Capreolus. 


Hinnulus. 


Ovis. 


Viverra. 


Capricornus. 


Hircus. 


Porcus. 


Vulpes. 



« Besides these names a few Latin words, such as Arvicola, Lemur, Lotor, Manis, 
Mellivora, Mephitis, Putorius, Spectrum, etc., have come into common use as generic 
names, although they were not originally names of animals. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 45 

Words taken from modern languages are still fewer in number. 
From the French have been derived such names as JFeresa, Genetta, 
Grampus, Guepardus, Muscardinus, Noctula, Palmista, Phalanger 
(originally from the Greek), Rangifer, Ratelus, Rorqual, Rousettus, 
Sagoinus, Sarigua, Tatusia, Vampyrxis, and Verrusus; from the Italian 
Folna, Lontra, Pipistrelhis, and ZibeUlna; from the Spanish Chin- 
chilla (based on the native name) JVutria, and Zor/lla; from the Portu- 
guese Encotibertus ; from the German Oricetus, Desman, Hamster, 
Vormela, and Zibet ha; from the Dutch Poescopia; from the Scandina- 
vian Alces, Lemmus, Narwhal us, and Rosmarus; and from the Russian 
Beluga and Saiga. 

BARBAROUS NAMES. 

The recognition of generic names derived from barbarous words has 
given rise to much discussion. Several of the older systematists 
refused to recognize them, and regularly substituted new ones for 
those which they considered barbarous. One of the Linnaean rules 
adopted by llliger provides that generic names which have no root in 
the Greek or Latin languages should be rejected, and under it are 
enumerated 30 genera of mammals which he renamed," viz: 



Aguti. 


Fennecus. 


Lori. 


Potos. 


Aluata. 


Galago. 


Kangurus. 


Saguinus. 


Anarnacus. 


Gerbillus. 


Kinkajou. 


Tapirus. 


Coati. 


Giraffa. 


Narwalus. 


Tatu. 


Coendu. 


Hamster. 


Ondathra [sic]. 


Tenrec. 


Coescoes. 


Indri. 


Pongo. 


Wombatus. 


Desman. 


Llacma. 


Potorous. 


Yerbua. 


Dugong. 


Lemmus. 







Several later authors followed the same course, and Gloger in the 
preface of his 'Hand- und Hilfsbuch der Naturgeschichte,' p. vi, 1842, 

says: 

Not a little trouble bas been caused by the formation of new scientific names hereby 
rendered necessary, and by substituting for the older and grammatically incorrect 
terms the correct ones which in such cases precede the former. The very objection- 
able barbarisms daily increasing in the language, with which many English and 
more French naturalists corrupt zoological nomenclature, has made such a course of 
procedure necessary, particularly in a book designed for the classically educated 
youth of our higher institutions of learning. 

On the other hand, some authors not only frequently employed 
barbarous names, but also advocated their use. Lacepede apparently 
never missed an opportunity to use them, while Lesson and Gray are 
responsible for the introduction of many native names. Liais even 
went so far as to suggest the substitution of native names for those 
of classical derivation under the plea that — 

It would be incontestably in the interest of science to preserve names from those 
languages of South America which were spoken over a large extent [of country] 



«■ Prodromus Systematis Mammalium et Avium, p. xvii, 1811. 



46 



INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 



rather than to make new Latin names. If the Romans had known America, is it 
certain that the names made from their language would have been adopted by mod- 
ern writers instead of those of the country (i. e., native names), especially when the 
endings were in accord with the rules of their language? At least the chances would 
have been in favor of the adoption of the latter, and in choosing them, there would 
be the double advantage of being logical and of not making ' neologisms. ' (Climat du 
Bresil, p. 329, 1872. ) 

The objection to barbarous names has diminished of late, and many of 
those rejected by Illiger and others are now coming into general use 
for groups for which no earlier classical derivatives are available. 
Some of these words have been adopted practically without change, 
as for example: 



Agouti. 


Coendou. 


Mara. 


Serval. 


Adjidaumo. 


Galago. 


Margay. 


Sika. 


Alouatta. 


Guereza. 


Memina. 


Tatu.« 


Avahi. 


Indri. 


Ochotona. 


Tayassu. a 


Babirussa. 


Kerivoula. 


Pudu.a 


Tenrec. 


Bondar. 


Lama. 


Rusa. 


Vizcacia. 


Chaus. 


Linsang. 


Saimiri. 


Zebu. « 


Others have 


been modified to 


give them Latin 


endings, as— 


Baginia. 


Conepatus. 


Mangusta. 


Salanoia. 


Bandicota. 


Fennecus. 


Mazama. 


Siamanga. 


Barangia. 


Jaguarius. 


Nandinia. 


Simenia. 


Bettongia. 


Kangurus. 


Nesokia. 


Suricata. 


Cabassous. 


Kiodotus. 


Okapia. 


Tapirus. 


Cariacus. 


Kobus. 


Ouakaria. 


Tupaia. 


Coassus. 


Manatus. 


Potorous. 


Unaiis. 



'nonsense names.' 

Finally, reference should be made to names which have been ' coined' 
and which have no true derivation. These are merely arbitrary 
groups of letters sometimes known as 'nonsense names.' They have 
been proposed by authors who, like Ameghino, Gray, and Lataste, in 
making maii3 T names have found the usual sources insufficient or 
unsatisfactory. These names may be divided into two groups: (a) 
Coined or nonsense names, like Asema, Blarina, Degonia, Kogia, and 
Tatera, and (b) anagrams, 6 such as — 



Caliphrium from Licaphrium. 
Cephanodus from Phenacodus. 
Chiroscaptor from Scaptochirus. 
Chochilius from Icochilus. 
Colus from Suloc. 
Corsira from Corsair (?) . 
Cutia from Acuti. 
Decastis from Acdestis. 



Diocartherium from Cardiotherium. 
Eirara from Eraria. 
Genysccelus from Ccelogenys. 
Glisorex from Sorexglis. 
Ideodelphys from Eodidelphys. 
Lymodon from Mylodon. 
MachlydotheriumfromChlamydotherium. 
Magestus from Megastus. 



a The apparently barbarous form of words ending in u disappears if they are treated 
as Latin neuter nouns of the fourth declension, like cornu, genu, etc. 

t> For some striking examples of anagrams in other classes, see Gill, Osprey, V, 
pp. 142-143, Sept., 1901. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 



47 



Matyoscor from Myocastor. 
Nepliacodus from Phenacodus. 
Nopachtus from Panochtus. 
Plohophorus from Hoplophorus. 
Rodiotherium from Diorotherium. 
Sadypus from Dasypus. 
Senodon from Nesodon. 



Senonycteris from Nesonycteris. 
Teonoma from Neotoma. 
Tonostylops from Notostylops. 
Traspoatherium from Astrapotherium. 
Utaetus from Eutatus. 
Xotodon from Toxodon. 
Xotoprodon from Protoxodon. 



KINDS OF NAMES. 



MYTHOLOGICAL NAMES. 



A considerable number of generic names are taken from mythology, 
both classical and Hindu, such as: 



Acdestis. 


Daunus. 


Inuus. 


Pontoporia. 


iEgipan. 


Diana. 


Lamictis. 


Prometheomys. 


Aeilo. 


Electra. 


Lar. 


Satyrus. 


Alastor. 


Eteocles. 


Megsera. 


Silenus. 


Alectops. 


Enphrosyne. 


Menilaus. 


Sivameryx. 


Amnion. 


Faunus. 


Meriones. 


Sivatherium. 


Bram atherium . 


Furia. 


Midas. 


Sphinx. 


Calliope. 


Gorgon. 


Nestor itheri inn . 


Sylvanus. 


Calydonius. 


Hamadryas. 


Ocypetes. 


Tideus. 


Celseno. 


Harpyia. 


(Edipus. 


Titanotherinm. 


Clorinda. 


la. 


Pan. 


Vishnutherium, 


Clymene. 


Idomeneus. 


Paniscus. 





These are open to the objection that they are likely to have been used 
in other groups/' thus necessitating change and consequent multiplica- 
tion of synon3^ms. 

GEOGRAPHICAL NAMES. 

Geographical names have been used mainly in paleontology. In 
spite of the fact that they are mainly hybrid words, they have the 
advantage of convenience, as they are usually based on the type local- 
ity of one of the species. Such are: 



Aethiops. 

Andinomys. 

Annamisus. 

Argyrocetns. b 

Argyrodelphis. 

Argyrohippus. 

Argyrohyrax. 

Argyrolestes. 

Atlantoxerus. 

Bachithenum. 

Boneia. 

Budomys. 

Burramys. 

Cadurcotherium. 



Cayluxotherium. 

Cesserassictis. 

Colhuapia. 

Colhuelia. 

Cournomys. 

Felovia. 

Felsmotherium. 

Gergoviomys. 

Helladotherium. 

Hydaspidothenum. 

Issidioromys. 

Kasi. 

Lafkenia. 

Lelfunia. 



Libytherium. 

Limognitherinm. 

Missourium. 

Mcerithermm. 

Mouillacitherium. 

Otronia. 

Pampatherinm. 

Paranomys. 

Pellegrina. 

Peneromys. 

Plataeomys. 

Platatherium. 

Poiana. 

Prominatherium. 



Puelia. 

Quercytherium. 

Ronzotherium. 

Ruscinomys. 

Samotherium. 

Scaldicetus. 

Sinisus. 

Sivalarctos. 

Sivalhippus. 

Uintacyon. 

Umtamastix. 

Uintatherium. 

Urmiatherium. 

Wynyardia. 



a Unless compounded with a name of a mammal, as for example Prometheomys. 
b Argyrocetus, meaning La Plata whale, dpyvpos, silver, being used as the equivalent 
of the Spanish La Plata, silver. 



48 



INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 



PERSONAL NAMES. 



Proper names have been utilized less, perhaps, for mammals than for 
some other groups, the total number, as shown in the following list, 
being about 80. Prior to 1850 only 11 such names had been proposed, 
but between 1864 and 1866 Gray added 11 more, and in the last four 
years (1899-1903) Ameghino has added 27. Of the total number, Gray 
has proposed 13 and Ameghino 33. Not only have eminent naturalists 
been honored in this way, but governors, diplomats, officers of the 
army and navy, and collectors have also been remembered. 



Genus, authority, and date. 



Albertogaudrya Ameghino, 1901 . . . 
Ameghinotherium Podesta, 1898 . . . 

Amilnedwardsia Ameghino, 1901 . . 

Arminiheringia Ameghino, 1902. . . 
Arsinoitherium Beadnell, 1902 

Asmith woodwardia Ameghino, 1901 . . 



Bayonia DuBocage, 1865 
Benedenia Gray, 1864 



In honor of — 



Berardiopsis Portis, 1886. 



Berardius Duvernoy, 1851 

Blainvillimys Gervais, 1848-52 . 



Bruynia Dubois, 1882 

Burmeisteria Gray, 1865 . 



Burtinopsis Van Bencden, 1872 . 



Albert Gaudry, 1827- , professor of paleontology at the 
Museum d'HistoireNaturelle, Paris; author of ' Animaux 
Fossiles etGeologie de l'Attique,' 1862-1867; 'Enchaine- 
ments du Monde Animal,' 1878-1896. 

Florentino Ameghino, director of the Museo Nacional, 
Buenos Aires; author of 'Mamiferos Fosiles de la Repub- 
lica Argentina,' 1889, and many other contributions to the 
paleontology of Argentina. 

Alphonse Milne-Edwards, 1835-1900, late director of the 
Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris; author of numerous 
publications on mammals. 

Hermann von Ihering, of the Museu Paulisto, Sao Paulo, 
Brazil. 

Queen Arsinoe, born about 316 B. C, daughter of Ptolemy I, 
King of Egypt. She married Lysimachus, King of Thrace, 
and after his death became the wife of Ptolemy Phila- 
delphus. 

Arthur Smith Woodward, 1864- , assistant keeper of geol- 
ogy in the Natural History Museum, London; author of 
' Catalogue of Fossil Fishes in the British Museum, ' 1889- 
1901, and numerous publications on extinct vertebrates, 
especially fishes. 

Lieut. Bayao, of the Portuguese army (?) , who collected 
for the Lisbon Museum in Angola, West Africa. 

Pierre Joseph Van Beneden, 1801-1894, author of 'Descrip- 
tion des Ossements Fossiles des Environs d'Anvers,'and 
numerous papers on cetaceans. 

Captain (afterward Admiral) Berard, of the French navy, 
in command of the corvette 'Rhin,' which collected the 
type specimen of Berardius. 

Admiral B£rard. 

Henri Marie Ducrotay de Blainville, 1778-1850, an eminent 
anatomist of the Paris Museum and Jardin des Plantes; 
author of ' Osteographie des Mammiferes,' 1839-1864. 

A. A. Bruijn, of Ternate, who collected in the Malay Archi- 
pelago, especially in Celebes and New Guinea. 

Carl Hermann Conrad Burmeister. 1807-1891, formerly di- 
rector of the Museo Nacional, Buenos Aires. Argentina; 
author of ' Systematische Uebersicht der Thiere Brasil- 
iens,' 1854-56: 'Description Physique de la R£publique 
Argentine,' 1*79. 

Francois Xavier de Burtin, 1743-1818, a Dutch naturalist 
and physician; author of ' Oryctographie de Bruxelles,' 
1784. 



A LIST OF THE GENEEA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 



49 



Genus, authority, and date. 



In honor of- 



Capaccinius Bonaparte, 1841. 



Carolibergia Mercerat, 1899 



Carollia Gray, 1838. 



Caroloameghinia Ameghino, 1901 

Carolodarwinia Ameghino, 1901 

Carolozittelia Ameghino, 1901 

Choichephilum Ameghino, 1899 

Cuvierimys Gervais, 1848-52 

Cuvierius Gray, 1866 

Daubentonia Geoffroy, 1795 

Dobsoma Palmer, 1898 

Edvardocopeia Ameghino, 1901 

Edvardotrouessartia Ameghino, 1901 . 
Ernestohaeckelia Ameghino, 1901 



Ernestokokenia Ameghino, 1901. 
Eschrichtius Gray, 1864 



Euo-.7enia De Vis, 1891 . . . 

Fabricia Gray, 1866 

Flowerius Lilljeborg, 186" 

Garzonia Ameghino, 1891 
Grimmia Laurillard, 1841 



Monsignor Francesco Capaccini, under secretary of state 
of Rome about 1833-34, and a patron of Bonaparte's 
' Iconografla della Fauna Italiea,' published in 1832-1841. 

Dr. Carlos Berg, 1843-1902, director of the Museo Nacional, 
Buenos Aires, 1892-1902; author of many papers, chiefly on 
entomology. 

? Charles Lucien Bonaparte, 1803-1857, Prince of Canino 
and of Musignano; author of ' Iconografla della Fauna 
Italiea,' 1832-1841. 

Carlos Ameghino, who collected much of the material 
described by his brother, Dr. Florentine Ameghino. (See 
Ameginotherium. ) 

Charles Robert Darwin, 1809-1882, author of 'The Origin 
of Species,' 1859; 'The Descent of Man,' 1871, etc. 

Karl Alfred von Zittel, 1839- , professor of geology and pale- 
ontology, University of Munich; author of ' Handbuch 
der Palseontologie.' 1892-93. 

Choiquefllu, an Araucanian Indian chief of Patagonia. 

Baron Georges Cuvier, 1769-1832; author of ' Recherches 
sur les Ossemens Fossiles des Quadruped.es, ' 1812; ' Le 
Regne Animal,' 1817, etc. 

Baron Georges Cuvier. 

Louis Jean Marie Daubenton, 1716-1799, a co- worker of 
Buffon, and for many years curator of the cabinet of 
Natural History of Paris; best known through his con- 
tributions (especially on anatomy) to Buffon's works. 

George Edward Dobson, 1848-1895, author of 'Catalogue of 
Chiroptera in the British Museum,' 1878, and ' Monograph 
of the Insectivora,' 1882-1890. 

Edward Drinker Cope, 1840-1897, author of 'Tertiary Ver- 
tebrata,' 1885, and many papers on living and extinct 
vertebrates of America. 

Edouard Louis Trouessart, 1842- . physician and naturalist 
of Paris; author of the 'Catalogus Mammalium,' 1897-99, 
and numerous papers on mammals. 

Ernst Haeckel, 1834- , professor of zoology, Zoologisches 
Institut, Jena; author of 'Generelle Morphogie,' 1866; 
• Syst..Phylogenie der Wirbelthiere,' 1895, etc. 

Ernst Koken, - , professor of geology, Tubingen. 

Daniel Fredrik Eschricht, 1798-1S63, author of several im- 
portant papers on cetaceans. 

Sir Richard Owen, 1804-1892; professor of comparative 
anatomy at the Royal College of Surgeons, 1834-1856; a 
director of the British Museum, 1856-1884; author of 
'Odontography,' 1840-1845; 'Anatomy of Vertebrates,' 
1866-1868, etc. 

Otho Fabricius, 1744-1822, author of 'Fauna Grcenlandica,' 
1780. 

Sir William Henry Flower, 1831-1899, late director of the 
Natural History Museum, London, author of numerous 
important papers on cetaceans. 

Don Eleazar Gurzon, governor of the province of Cordoba, 
Argentina. 

Dr. Hermann Nicholas Grimm, who, as early as 1686, 
described the species of antelope which now bears his 
name. 



7591— No. 23—03- 



50 



INDEX GENERUM MAMMAL1UM. 



Genus, authority, and date. 



In honor of — 



Guilielmofloweria Ameghino, 1901 
Guilielmoscottia Ameghino, 1901. 

Harlanus Owen, 1846 

Henricofilholia Ameghino, 1901 .. 

Henricosbornia Ameghino, 1901 . . 

Hunterus Gray, 1864 

Josepholeidya Ameghino, 1901... 

Leidyotherium Prout, 1860 

Leithia Lydekker, 1896 

Leontinia Ameghino, 1895 

Luantus Ameghino, 1899 

Macleayius Gray, 1864 

Massoutiera Lataste, 1885 

Maxschlosseria Ameghino, 1901.. 



Morenella Palmer, 1903 

Morenia Ameghino, 1886 

Munifelis Mufiiz, 1845 

Nelsonia Merriam, 1897 

Oldfieldthomasia Ameghino, 1901 

Othnielmarshia Ameghino, 1901 . 

Owenia De Vis, 1888 

Paulogervaisia Ameghino, 1901. 



Sir William Henry Flower. (See Flowerius.) 

William Berryman Scott. 1858- , professor of geology and 
paleontology, Princeton University; author of 'An In- 
troduction to Geology,' 1897, and numerous monographic 
papers on paleontology. 

Dr. Richard Harlan, of Philadelphia, 1796-1843; author of 
' Fauna Americana,' 1825. 

Henri Filhol, 1843-1902, professor of comparative anatomy 
and director of the anatomical laboratory of the Museum 
d'Histohv Naturelle, Paris, from 1885 until his death. 

Henry Fairfield Osborn, 1857- , Da Costa professor of 
zoology, Columbia University, and curator of vertebrate 
paleontology, American Museum of Natural History, 
New York: author of numerous papers on paleontology, 

John Hunter, 1728-1793, an eminent English anatomist and 
surgeon, who studied the anatomy of whales. 

Joseph Leidy, 1823-1891. one of the leading American pale- 
ontologists; author of 'Ancient Fauna of Nebraska,' etc. 

Joseph Leidy. 

Andrew Leith Adams, 1826(?)-1882, zoologist, army surgeon 
1 1848), and surgeon major (1861); professor of zoology in 
Irish College of Science, Dublin, 1S74-1878, and later pro- 
fessor of natural science in Queen's College, Cork. 

Leontine ; a friend of Dr. Florentino Ameghino 

Luantu, an Araucanian Indian chief of Patagonia. 

William Sharp Macleay. secretary of the Liniuean Society, 
and his son, Sir William Macleay, 1820-1891. 

Lieut. ■ Massoutier, ' chef du bureau arabe de Ghar- 

daia,' Algeria, who collected the type of Ctenodactylus 
mzabi, on which this genus was based. 

Max Schlosser, of the University of Munich; author of 
'Die Affen, Lemuren . . . des Europaischen Tertiars,' 
1887-1890, etc. 

Francisco P. Moreno, 1852- , founder of the La Plata 
Museum, La Plata, Argentina: author of Southern Pata- 
gonia, 1879; Voyage to the Andine Regions of Patagonia, 
1896; Argentine Evidence, 1900. 

Francisco P. Moreno. 

Dr. Francisco Mufiiz (of Buenos Aires? i. 

Edward William Nelson, 1855- , field naturalist of the 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, who has collected extensively 
in Alaska and Mexico, and has published several papers 
on mammals. 

Oldfield Thomas, 1858- , curator of mammals, Natural 
History Museum, London; author of 'Catalogue of the 
Marsupialia in the British Museum,' 1888, and numerous 
papers on mammals. 

Othniel Charles Marsh, 1831-1899, author of ' Monograph of 
the Dinocerata,' 1886, and many papers on extinct verte- 
brates of the western United States. 

Sir Richard Owen. (See Euowenla.) 

Paul Gervais, 1816-1879, author of ' Zoologie et Paleontologie 
Francaises,' 1848-1852, ' Zoologie et Paleontologie Gener- 
ales,' 1867-1876, and numerous other works on paleon- 
tology and zoology. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 



51 



Genus, authority, and date. 



Pichipilus Ameghino, 1890 

Ranculcus Ameghino, 1891 

RieardolydekJieria Aineghiuo, 190i. . 



Ricardowenia Ameghino, 1901 
Romerolagus Merriam, 1890 . . . 



In honor of — 



Rudolphius Gray, 1866 

Rutimeyeria Ameghino, 1901 

Scalabrinitherium Ameghino, 1883 
Selysius Bonaparte, 1841 

Sibbaldus Gray, 1864 

Smutsia Gray, ISO. 1 ) 

Stellera B< iwdich, 1821 

Steno Gray, 1846 

Swinhoia Gray, 1866 

Thomashuxleya Ameghino, 1901 . . 



Thomasomys Coues, 1884 ■ 

Trouessartella Cossmann, 1899 

Trouessartia Cossmann, 1899 ' 

Victorlemoineia Ameghino, 1901 . . . 
Wagneria Jentink, 1886 



Washakius Leidy, 1873. 
Wortmania Hay, 1899 . . 



Zenkerella Matschie, 1898... 



Pichipilu, an Araucanian Indian chief of Patagonia. 

Ranculco, an Araucanian Indian chief of Patagonia. 

Richard Lydekker, 1849- ; author of catalogues of fossil 
mammals, birds, and reptiles in the British Museum; 
'Geographical History of Mammals' ; ' Royal Natural His- 
tory,' and numerous other works on mammals. Co- 
authorof ' Manual of Paleontology,' 1889; and 'Mammals, 
Living and Extinct,' 1891. 

Sir Richard Owen. (See Euowenia. ) 

Don Matias Romero, 1837-1898, Mexican Minister to the 
United States, 1863-1868 and 1882-1898, and who in his offi- 
cial capacity rendered valuable assistance to the U. S. 
I tepartment of Agriculture in connection with its investi- 
gations in Mexico. 

Karl Asmund Rudolphi, 1771-1832, professor at Greifswald 
and Berlin, comparative anatomist and authority on 
Entozoa; author of 'Entozoa sen Vermium Intestinalium 
Historia Naturalis,' 1808, etc. 

Ludwig Riitimeyer, 1825-1895, professor of comparative 
anatomy at Bern. 1853, and Bale, 1855; author of several 
monographs on ungulates, 1863-1881. 

Prof. Pedro Scalabrini, of Parana, Argentina. 

Baron Edmond de Selys-Longchamps, 1813-1900, an emi- 
nent naturalist and statesman, some time president of 
the Belgian Senate; author of 'Etudes de Micromam- 
malogie,' 1839, and ' Kaune Beige,' 1844. 

Sir Robert Sibbald, 1041-1722?, author of a paper on the 
whales of Scotland, entitled ' Balsenologia nova,' 1092, 
and reprinted in 1773. 

Johannes Smuts, a Dutch naturalist who visited Cape 
Colony in the early part of the nineteenth century, 
author of 'Enumeratio Mammalium Capensiuiu.' 1832. 

George Wilhelm Steller, 1709-1745, discoverer of the sea 
cow. 

Nikolaus Steno, 1038-1087, a celebrated Danish anatomist 
and geologist. 

Robert Swinhoe, 1830-1877, British consul at Ajmoy, Shang- 
hai, Ningpo, Cheefoo, and Formosa. 

Thomas Henry Huxley, 1825-1895; author of 'The Theory 
of the Vertebrate Skull,' 1859; 'Evidence of Man's Place 
in Nature,' 1863; ' Manual of the Anatomy of Vertebrated 
Animals,' 1871; and many special papers on anatomy and 
zoology. 

Oldfield Thomas. (See Oldfieldthomasia. I 

Edouard Louis Trouessart. (See Edvardotrouessartia.) 

Victor Lemoine. 

Johann Andreas Wagner, 1797-1861, formerly professor of 
zoology at the University of Munich; author of the sup- 
plement to Schreber's 'Saugthiere,' 1840-1855. 

Washakie, a chief of the Shoshone Indians of Wyoming. 

Jacob Lawson Wortman, 1850- , author of numerous papers 
on vertebrate paleontology. 

G.Zenker, director of the 'Yaunde-Station,' East Africa, 
who collected the type specimen. 



52 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 



COMPOT"\I>S. 



A large proportion of modern generic names are compound words. 
Latin offers comparatively little opportunity for making compounds, 
and the number of such words is relatively small, although modifica- 
tions by prefixes and suffixes are common. The Greek language lends 
itself almost as readily as the German to this kind of word making, 
and nouns are coupled together or modified by adjectives and preposi- 
tions in almost endless variety." Formerly compounds seem to have 
been in disfavor, for Illiger, in 1811, following Linnaeus, rejected them, 
and quotes three Linneean rules as authority for so doing: 

225. N[omina] g[enerica] cui syllaba una vel altera praeponitur (aut aufertur) ut 
aliud genus, quam antea, significet, excludendum est. Perameles. Promerops. 

227. N. g. ex aliis nominibus genericis cum syllaba (madam in fine addita, conflata, 
non placent. Balsenoptera, Ddphinapterus. 

226. X. g. in oides desinentia, e foro (zoologico) releganda sunt. Pelecanoides. 
Picoides. Talpoides. (Prod. Syst. Mamm. et Avium, p. xvii.) 

It is difficult to understand this position, since compounds have the 
sanction of classical writers. Among numerous classical compound 
words which have been used as generic names of mammals may be 
mentioned Acanthonotus, Agricola, Camelopardalis, Cataphractus, 
Cynalopex, Hippopotamus, ffippotigris, Hydropotes, Nyctereutes, and 
Rhinoceros. At the present time compounds are considered not only 
unobjectionable, but highly desirable, for without them it would be 
almost impossible to coin designations for the ever-increasing multi- 
tude of genera and species without resorting to anagrams and arbi- 
trary combinations of letters. They may have the advantage of 
indicating the relationship of a genus, and, what is even more impor- 
tant, of insuring it from being preoccupied in other groups. For 
example, compounds of Mus are usually restricted to rodents, and are 
not likely to be used in any class except mammals; the prefix eu is 
constantly used to distinguish the typical genus or subgenus from 
groups which are aberrant, in contradistinction to such prefixes as 
kemi- and para- or the suffix &ides, which merely indicate resemblance; 
and the intensive za is used to call attention to some prominent or 
striking character. 

Nowhere have compounds been more constantly and more effectually 
employed than in paleontology. Indeed, we have here a certain 
approximation toward the standard which Coues has pictured as the 
ideal name when he says — 

«A few genera have been made by combining words of Greek and Latin derivation, 
thus forming so-called 'hybrid names,' which are very generally (and very properly) 
looked upon with disfavor. Such are: Interodon, Interatherium, Laniodon, Nesciothe- 
rium; some taken from proper names, like Blainvillimys, Cuviermys, etc., and many 
of the geographical names. Such compounds, in the words of a recent writer, "are 
enough to make one's hair stand on end." 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 53 

Systematic zoology, or the practice of classification, has failed to keep pace with 
the principles of the science; we are greatly in need of some new and sharper ' tools 
of thought,' which shall do for zoology what the system of symbols and formulae 
have done for chemistry. We ward some symbolic formulation of our knowledge. The 
invention of a practical scheme of classification and nomenclature, which should 
enable us to formulate what we mean by Tardus migratorius as a chemist symbolizes 
by S0 4 H 2 what he understands hydrated sulphuric acid to be, would be an inesti- 
mable boon to working naturalists. (Key X. Am. Birds, 2d ed., 78, 1884.) 

To a certain extent this is done in some paleontological names. 

Thus words compounded with -therium, or with the prefixes amphi-, 
eo-, epi-^ limno-, meso-, unfit-, mio-^plesio-^plio-, said, jyroto-, are almost 
always used for extinct genera" and should be reserved exclusively 
for them. Prefixes may be briefly and conveniently used to express 
relationship. Amphieyon, Epicyon, and /*, udocyon, all indicate groups 
more or less closely related to the dogs; Cimolestes, a marsupial from 
the Cretaceous; EoKippus^ Miohippus, and Pliohippus were proposed 
for horses which existed in the Eocene, Miocene, or Pliocene; Proto- 
dichobune for a type of artiodactyl which preceded, and Metadichobune 
for one which followed, Dichobune. 

Pliohippus means an animal from the Pliocene related to the modern 
horse; Miosiren, an animal from the Miocene related to modern sire- 
nians; and IAmnofelis, an animal found in an old morass and related 
to living cats, etc. Here the names give (a) the designation of the 
genus, (b) its geological position, and (e) its relationship; while their 
form indicates (d) that the genera are extinct. 

In order to illustrate the great variety of compounds which can be 
made from one word, and at the same time to furnish a ready refer- 
ence list which may be useful in coining new names, it has been deemed 
desirable to give the compounds of six of the words most frequently 
used in making generic names of mammals. These words are: yockij, 
weasel; i'ktlz, weasel; /.a}pv£, ruminant; /*£?, mouse; WKrepiz, bat; 
otfofs, tooth. As will be seen by reference to the lists, the com- 
pounds of these words vary from 39 in the case of /.i/'/pvg, to 350 in the 
case of ptvs, and to more than 450 in that of odovs. In other words, 
about 8 percent of all the generic names of mammals are compounds 
of pvs and more than 10 percent of the entire number are compounds 
of oSovg. 

"There are a few exceptions, such as Amphiaulacomys, Amphisorex, Ceratolherium, 

Dorcalherium (originally applied to an extinct group since found to have living 
representatives), Eonycteris, Eosciurus, Eothenomys, Eoxerus, Eozapus, Epimys, Epio- 
don, Limnogale, Limnolagus, Mesobema, Mesocricetus, Mesomys, Mesoplodon, Metachirus, 
Miopithecus, Protoxerus, but the rule holds good in nine cases out of ten. The dis- 
crepancy in the case of eo is due to its double signification of 'eastern' when used 
for recent genera, and ' dawn ' for extinct groups. Full lists of the genera with 
these 10 prefixes, aggregating about 180 names, will be found in the body of the 
' Index.' 



54 



INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 



Compounds of yaXff, weasel.® 



Ailurogale. 

Arctogale. 

Arctogalidia. 

Ascogale. 

Bdeogale. 

Boriogale. 

Calogale. 

Cebngale. 

Cephalogale. 

Chimarrogale. 

Chirogale. 

Cynogale. 

Dendrogale. 

Eehinogale. 

Galecynus. 

Galemys. 

Galeocebus. 



Galeolemur. 

Galeopardus. 

( raleopithecue. 

Galeopus. 

Galeospalax. 

Galeotherium. 

Galera. 

Galerella. 

GaleriBcus. 

( talerix. 

Galesten. 

Galethylax. 

Galictis. 

(ialidia. 

Galidictis. 

Galogale. 

Geogalc. 



Haplogale. 

Ilelogale. 

Hemigale. 

Hemigalidia. 

Hydrogale. 

Hylogale. 

Ichneugale. 

Limnogale. 

Lutrogale. 

Melogale. 

Microgale. 

Mygale. 

Myxomygale. 

Nectogale. 

Neogale. 

< hivchogale. 

Oryctogale. 



Otogale. 

Palseochirogalus. 

Pal?eogale. 

Peragale. 

Petrogale. 

Phascogale. 

Plesiogale. 

Pcecilogale. 

Potamogale. 

Rhabdogale. 

Rhinogale. 

Rhynchogale. 

Scaptogale. 

Spilogale. 

Stenogale. 

Tseniogale. 

Thvloeale. 



( bmpounds o/iktis, weasel. 



Achlysictis. 

yElurictis. 

Amphictis. 

Arctictis. 

Arctodictis. 

Calietis. 

Cesserasictis. 

Cladosictis. 

Conodonictis. 

Cynictis. 

Cynodictis. 

Deinictis. 

Didymictis. 

Dynamictis. 



Agriomeryx. 

Amphirncerix. 

Blastomeryx. 

Brachymeryx. 

Bunomeryx 

Camelomeryx. 

Capromeryx. 

Choeromeryx. 

Cryptomervx. 

Elomeryx. 



Enhydriclitis. 

Eutrictis. 

Galictis. 

Gallidictia. 

Helietis. 

Hya?nictis. 

Hycenodictis. 

Ictailurus. 

Icticyon. 

letides. 

Ictidomys. 

Ictidonyx. 

Ictioborus. 

Ietitherium. 



Ictonyx. 

Ictops. 

Lamictiy. 

Leptietis. 

Lutrictis. i 

Melictis. 

Myoictis. 

Napodonictis. 

Notietis. 

( >smetictis. 

( >zolirtis. 

Palseictops. 

Palseonictis. 

Parietis. 



Compounds of jurfpv^, ruminant. 



Pelycictis. 

Plesictis. 

Procladosictis. 

Procynk'tis. 

Procynodictis. 

Proplesictis. 

Pseudictis. 

Pseudocladosictis. 

Soricictis. 

Stenoplesictis. 

Thalassictis. 

Theriodictis. 

Thylacodietis. 

Trochictis. 



[Note. — nrjpvg was originally applied toa ruminating fish.] 



Eomervx. 

Haplomervx. 

Hemimeryx. 

Hyomeryx. 

Leptomeryx. 

Lophiomeryx. 

Megalomeryx. 

Merychippus. 

Merychyus. 

Merycochcerus 



Merycodesmus. 

Merycodon. 

Merycoidodon. 

Merycopater. 

Merycopotamus. 

Merycotherium. 

Micromeryx. 

.Myoineryx. 

Xanomeryx. 

Oreomeryx. 



Oromeryx. 

Palreomeryx. 

Parameryx. 

Phanerumeryx. 

Plesiomeryx. 

Promerycochoerus. 

Propateomeryx. 

Protomeryx. 

Sivameryx. 



" Variants due to emendations or mis^Hnts are omitted from the following lists. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 



55 



Compounds of fivi, mouse. 



Abromys. 

Acanthomys. 

Acaremys. 

Acomys. 

Aconaemys. 

Acromys. 

Actenomys. 

Adelomys. 

Adelphomys. 

^Epeomvs. 

Allomys. 

Ammomys. 

Ampbiaulacomys. 

Anchitnys. 

Anchitheriomys. 

Andinomys. 

Anomalomys. 

Antechinomys. 

Anteliomys. 

Apatemys. 

Archseomys. 

Arctomys. 

Aschizomys. 

Ascomys. 

Aspalomys. 

Asteromys. 

Aulacomys. 

Baiomys. 

Batomys. 

Blainvillimys. 

Blarinomys. 

r 3othriomys. 

Brachymys. 

Brachytarsomys. 

Brachyuromys. 

Bramus. 

Briaromys. 

Budomys. 

Burramys. 

Csenomys. 

Callodontomys. 

Callomys. 

Calomys. 

Caluromys. 

Capromys. 

Cardiomys. 

Carpomys. 

Castoromys. 

Celamomys. 

Cephaloinys. 



Cercomys. 

Chsetomys. 

Chalicomys. 

Cheiromys. 

Chiloniys. 

Chiropodomys. 

Chiruromys. 

Chloromys. 

Chrotomys. 

Chrysomys. 

Cimolomys. 

Coetomys. 

Colonomys. 

Cournomys. 

Craseomys. 

Crateromys. 

Cratogeomys. 

Cricetomys. 

Crunomys. 

Gryptomys. 

Ctenomys. 

Cuvierimys. 

Cynodontomys. 

Cynomyonax. 

Cynomys. 

Dactylomys. 

Dasykiys. 

Deilemys. 

Dendromus. 

Deomys. 

Dicolpomys. 

Dinomys. 

Dipodomys. 

Discolomya. 

Dolomys. 

Dremomys. 

Drymomys. 

Ecbimys. 

Eliomys. 

Elomys. 

Eomys. 

Eosaccomys. 

Eoateiromys. 

Eothenomys. 

Epimys. 

Eremiomys. 

Eriomye. 

Erioryzomys. 

Euchaetomys. 

Eumys. 



Euneomys. 

Euryomys. 

Euryzygomatomys. 

Evotomys. 

Galemys. 

Geomys. 

Gergoviomys. 

Gigantomys. 

Graphimys. 

< rrymseomys. 

Guillinomys. 

Gymnomys. 

Gymnuromys. 

Hallomys. 

Haltomys. 

Hapalomvs. 

Hedymys. 

Helamys. 

ETeliomys. 

Heliscomys. 

Hemiotoinys. 

Herpetomys. 

Hesperomys. 

Heterogeomys. 

Heteromys. 

Hodomys. 

Holochilomys. 

Hydromys. 

Hylomys. 

Hypogeomys. 

Hystrichomys. 

Ichthyomye. 

Ictidomys. 

Ischyromys. 

Isomys. 

Issiodoromys. 

Kannabateomys. 

Koalemus. 

Lagomys. 

Lasiomys. 

Lasiopodomys. 

Lasiuromys. 

Leimacomys. 

Lemmomys. 

Lemniscomys. 

Lenomys. 

Leptomys. 

Liomys. 

Lithomys. 

Lomomys. 



Lophiomys. 

Lophuromys. 

Macrogeomys. 

Macrotaraomys. 

Malacomys. 

Mallomys. 

Marcuinoniys. 

Mastacomys. 

Megadontomys. 

Megalomys. 

Megamys. 

Mclanomys. 

Meniscomys. 

Mesomys. 

Micromys. 

Mictomys. 

Mimomys. 

Murilemur. 

Murina. 

Murinus. 

Musaraneus. 

Musculus. 

Myarion. 

Mygale. 

Mygalina. 

Mynomes. 

Myocastor. 

Myocebus. 

Myodes. 

Myogalea. 

Myoictis. 

Myolagus. 

Myolemmus. 

Myomeryx. 

Myomorphus. 

Myuiiycteris. 

Myopotamus. 

Myopotherium. 

Myopterus. 

Myorthius. 

Myoscalops. 

Myosictis. 

Myosorex. 

Myospalax. 

Myosurus. 

Myotalpa. 

Myotherium. 

Myotis. 

Myoxomys. 

Mysarachne. 



56 



INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 



Mysateles. 

Myscebus. 

Myslernur. 

Mysops. 

Myspithecus. 

Mystomys. 

Mystromys. 

Mythomys. 

Myxomys. 

Nannomys. 

Nanomyops. 

Nanomys. 

Neacomys. 

Necromys. 

Nectomys. 

Nelomys. 

Neomys. 

Neoreomys. 

Neotomys. 

Nesoinys. 

Notiomys. 

Notomys. 

Nyctinoinus. 

Nyctomys. 

Ochetomys. 

Octodontomys. 

Odontomysops. 

Oligoryzomys. 

Omomys. 

Onychomys. 

Orchiomys. 

Oreinomys. 

Orenomys. 

Oreomys. 

Oromys. 

Orthogeomys. 

Orthomys, 



Orthriomys. 

Orycteromys. 

Oryctomys. 

Oryzomys. 

Otomys. 

Ototylomys. 

Pachyuromys. 

Pagomys. 

Palseomys. 

Pappogeomys. 

Paradoxomys. 

Paramys. 

Paranomys. 

Pediomys. 

Pedomys. 

Pelamys. 

Pelomys. 

Peramys. 

Perieromys. 

Perimys. 

Peromys. 

Peromyscus. 

Peronymus. 

Petromys. 

Phaiomys. 

Phanomys. 

Phascolomys. 

Phenacomys. 

Phloeomys. 

Phloromys. 

Phractomys. 

Phtoramys. 

Phyllomys. 

Pinemys. 

Pithanotomys. 

Pitymys. 

Platacanthmovs 



Plafeeomys. 

Platyoercomys. 

Platygeomys. 

Plesiarctomys. 

Poecilomys. 

Poephagomys. 

Pogonomys. 

Potamys. 

Procapromys. 

Proechimys. 

Prometheomys. 

Promysops. 

Prospaniomys. 

Protacaremys. 

Protadelphomys. 

Protechimys. 

Psammomys. 

Pseudoconomys. 

Pseudomys. 

Pseudoneoremys-j. 

Pteromys. 

Reithrodontomys. 

Rhinomys. 

Rhipidomys. 

Rhizomys. 

Rhombomys. 

Rhynchomys. 

Ruscinomys. 

Saccomys. 

Scapterornys. 

Schistomys. 

Sciainys. 

Seirtomys. 

Sciuromys. 

Seleromys. 

Scoteumys. 

Sigmodontomys. 



Sigmomys. 

Sitomys. 

Spalacomys. 

Spaniomys. 

Sphwromys. 

Sphiggomys. 

Sphingomys. 

Sphodromys. 

Steatomys. 

Steiromys. 

Stiehomys. 

Synaptomys. 

Tachymys. 

Taxymys. 

Tenomys. 

Theridoniys. 

Thomasomys. 

Thomomys. 

Thrichomys. 

Thryonomys. 

Thylacomys. 

Thylaniys. 

Tillomys. 

Titanomys. 

Trechomys. 

Tretomys. 

Trilophomys. 

Trinodontomys. 

Tylomys. 

Typhlomys. 

Uromys. 

Vesperimus. 

Xenomys. 

Xeromys. 

Xylornys. 

Zygodontomys. 

Zygogeornys. 



Compounds of WKTEpiz, bat. 



Adelonycteris. 

Balionycteris. 

Callinycteris. 

Carponycteris. 

Centronycteris. 

Chilonycteris. 

ChoeronycteriH. 

Chrysonycteris. 

Cynonycteris. 

Eonycteris. 

Eunycteris. 



Glauconycteris. 

Gloionycteris. 

Glossonycteris. 

Glyphonycteris. 

Hsematonycteris. 

Harpyionycteris. 

Hylonycteris. 

Hyonycteris. 

Lasionycteris. 

Leptonycteris. 

Lichonycteris. 



Macronycteris. 

Melonycteris. 

Micronycteris. 

Myonycteris. 

Nanonycteris. 

Nesonycteris. 

Nycterops. 

Otonycteris. 

Palaeonycteria. 

Phyllonycteris. 

Reithronycteris. 



Rhinonycteris. 
Rhynchonycteris, 
Scotonycteris. 
Senonycteris. 

Sericonycteris. 

Sphseronyeteris. 

Syconycteris. 

Taphonycteris. 

Trygenycteris. 

Tylonycteris. 

Uronycteris. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 5/ 



Abathmodon. 

Acanthodon. 

Acerodon. 

Achsenodon. 

Achyrodon. 

Aecolodus. 

Adracodon. 

^Elnrodon. 

Akenodon. 

Akodon. 

Allacodon. 

Allodon. 

Amblyodon. 

Ammodon. 

Amphieynodon. 

Amynodon. 

Amyxodon. 

Anacodon. 

Anantiosodon. 

Anchippodus. 

Anchiaodon. 

Ancodon. 

Ancylodon. 

Aniaacodon. 

Anisodop. 

Anomodoii. 

Anomodonther ium . 

Antaodon. 

Anthropodue. 

Antiacodon. 

Aodon. 

Aplodontia. 

Apterodon. 

Archidiskodon. 

ArctoduB. 

Asthenodon. 

Astrapodon. 

Atelodua. 

Athrodon. 

Aulacodua. 

Bsenodon. 

Balsenodon. 

Bathmodon. 

Bathrodon. 

Batodon. 

Bolodon. 

Bothriodon. 

Brachyodus. 

Bunodontotherium 

Bunolophodon. 

Calamodon. 

Callidon. 



< 'ompounds of oSdov =o8ov$, tooth. 



Callodontomys. 

Carcinodon. 
Cardiodus. 
Carterodon. 
Catodon. 
Caviodon. 
Centetodon. 
Centraeodon. 
Cera tod on. 
Cetodiodon. 
Chelodus. 
Chiodon. 
Choilodon. 
Cimolodon. 
Clsenodon. 
Coelodon. 
Coelodonta. 
Coelogomphodus. 
Colodus. 
Colophonodon. 
Coloreodon. 
Colpodon. 
Conacodon. 
Conicodon. 
Conodue. 
Conodonietia. 
Conodoutes. 
Cordylodon. 
Coresodon. 
Coryphodon. 
Cricetodon. 
Ctenacodon. 
Cynodon. 
Cynodontomya. 
Cynoh ysenodon . 
Dseodon. 
Dasyurodon. 
Delphinodon. 
Diacodon. 
Diaphragmodon . 
Diastomicodon. 
Dibelodon. 
Dichodon. 
Diconodon. 
Dicrocynodon. 
Didelphodon. 
Didelphodus. 
Did y mod on. 
. Didolodus. 
Diellipaodon. 
Dilobodon. 
Dilophodon. 



Dimadon. 

Dimecodon. 

Dimerodon. 

Dinotoxodon. 

Diodon. 

Dioplodon. 

Diplaeodon. 

Diplocynodon. 

Diplodonops. 

Diplomesodon. 

Dipriodon. 

Diproctodon. 

Diprotodon. 

Ditetrodon. 

Docodon. 

Ditonieodon. 

Dolichodon. 

Dorudon. 

Drepanodon. 

Dryptodon. 

Dysodus. 

Ecphantodon. 

Ectacodon. 

Ectoconodon. 

Elaphodue. 

Elasmodon. 

Eleutherodon. 

Eligmodontia. 

Ellipsodon. 

Emmenodon. 

Enhydriodon. 

Ennacodon. 

Enneodon. 

Entelodon. 

Entomacodon. 

Entomodon. 

Eoctodon. 

Eodiprotodon. 

Eomannodon. 

Epiodon. 

Eporeodon. 

Ereptodon. 

Eaaonodontherinm 

Eucardiodon. 

Eureodon. 

Euryacodon. 

Euryodon. 

Euryaodon. 

Eusyodon. 

Eutemnodua. 

Eutomodua. 

Eutrigonodon. 



Gephyranodua. 

Glypbodon. 

Glyptodon. 

Goniaeodon. 

Graphiodon. 

Halodon. 

Haplacodon. 

Harpagodon. 

Harpalodon. 

Hemiacodon. 

Hemicaulodon. 

Hemipsalodon. 

Heptacodon. 

Heptodon. 

Heterodon. 

Hexaprotodon. 

Hexodon. 

Hippodon. 

Hippop< )tamodon. 

Homacodon. 

Homalodontotherium. 

Hyaenodon. 

Hyperoodon. 

Hyperoxotodon. 

Hypexodon. 

Hypisodus. 

Hypodon. 

Hypotenmodon. 

Hypsiprymnodon. 

Hyracodon. 

Hyracodontotheriuni. 

Indrodon. 

Interodon. 

Isodon. 

Isoodon. 

Ithygraminodon. 

Kekenodon. 

Kerodon. 

Kurtodon. 

Lagodua. 

Lamprodbn. 

Laniodon. 

Laodon. 

Leptodon. 

Leptoreodon. 

Leatodon. 

Leucodon. 

Liatriodon. 

Lobodon. 

Lophiodon. 

Lophiodonticulua. 

Loxo (disko) don. 



58 



INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 



Loxodonta. 

Loxolophodon. 

Lycodon. 

Lyncodon. 

Machairodus. 

Macrodus. 

Mannodon. 

Manteodon. 

Mastodon. 

Megacrodon. 

Megalodontia. 

Mellivorodon. 

Menacodon. 

Meniscodon. 

Menodus. 

Merycodon. 

Meryeoidodon. 

Mesacodon. 

Mesodiodon. 

Mesodon. 

Mesoodon. 

Mesoplodon. 

Mesoreodon. 

Metalophodon. 

Metamynodon. 

Microclsenodoh. 

Microconodon. 

Monodon. 

Monoeidodon. 

Mylodon. 

Myloglyptodon. 

Nannodus. 

Napodonictis. 

Neoctenacodnn. 

Neoctodoii. 

Neodon. 

Neomylodon. 

Neotornodon. 

Nesodon. 

Nesodonopsis. 

Nesokerodon. 

Nodus. 

Ochetodon. 

Ocrodnu. 

Octacodon. 

Octodon. 

Octodontotherium 

Odobenus. 

Odontomysops. 

Odontostylus. 

Odontodorcus. 

Oligodon. 

Oliptodon. 

Omegodns. 



Oracodon. 

Oreodon. 

( )n>phodon. 

Orthocynodon. 

Orthodon. 

Oulodon. 

Oxyacodon. 

Oxya?nodon. 

Oxyodontheriuni. 

Pachycynodon. 

Pachynodon. 

Pachyodon. 

Pagiodon. 

Palaeacodon. 

Pabeodon. 

Pahvomastodon. 

Palaeoprionodon. 

Panallodon. 

Paradoxodon. 

Paracyiiudon. 

Paronycbodon. 

Passalacodi)ii. 

Paurodon. 

Pelecyodon. 

Pelycodus. 

Pentacodcm. 

Pentalophodnii. 

Phenacodus. 

Phocodon. 

Physetodon. 

Physodon. 

Plagiaularodon. 

Plagiodontia. 

Planodus. 

Platacodon. 

Platyodon. 

Plectodon. 

Plerodus. 

Plesiphenacodus. 

Pleurodon. 

Pleurocoelodon . 

Pleurostylodon. 

Plicatodon. 

Pliogainphiodon. 

Pogonodon. 

Polyacrodon. 

Polydiskodon. 

Polyeidodon. 

Polymastodon. 

Polyptychodon. 

Portheodon. 

Priacodon. 

Priodontes. 

Prionodon. 



Proacrodon. 

Procoptodon. 

Prohyracodon. 

Proniylodon. 

Pronesodon. 

Proplanodus. 

Prosqualodon. 

Protemnodon. 

Protheosodon. 

Pro th y racodon . 

Protoglyptodon. 

Prot(jgonodon. 

Protoreodon. 

Protoxodon. 

Pseudolestodon. 

l'scudopterodon. 

Pseudotoxodon. 

Pterodon. 

Ptilodus. 

Pugmeodon. 

Putoriodua. 

Quatriodon. 

Rabdiodon. 

Reithrodon. 

Reithrodontomys. 

Rhagodon. 

Rhynchodon. 

Rhyphodon. 

Rhytisodon. 

Ribodon. 

Rothriodon. 

Rytiodus. 

Scelidodon. 

Sceparnodon. 

Schizodon. 

Smirodon. 

Selenacodon. 

Sigmodon. 

Sigmodontomys. 

Smilodon. 

Solenodon. 

Spalacodon. 

Sphenodon. 

Squalodon. 

Stagodon. 

Staurodon. 

Stegodon. 

Stegolophodon. 

Stenacodon. 

Steneodon. 

Stenodon. 

Stenodontherium. 

Stephanodon. 

Stilodon. 



Strabosodon. 

Stylacodon. 

Stylinodon. 

Stylodon. 

Subhyracodon. 

Syllophodus. 

Symborodon. 

Synagodus. 

Synapbodus. 

Synaptodon. 

Synconodon. 

Synodontherium. 

Synostodon. 

Syodon. 

Systemodon. 

Tapinodon. 

Taxodon. 

Telacodon. 

Teleodus. 

Tetrabelodon. 

Tetracaulodon. 

Tetrachenodon. 

Tetracodon. 

Tetraconodon. 

Tetralophodon. 

Tetramerodon. 

Tetraprotodon. 

Tetraselenodon . 

Tetrodon. 

Tbeocodus. 

Theosodon. 

Thkeodon. 

Tbrinacodus. 

Ticbodon. 

Tinodon. 

Toeniodus. 

Tolmodus. 

Tomodus. 

Toxodon. 

Toxodontherium. 

Toxodontophanus. 

Triacantbodon. 

Triacodon. 

Triaularodus. 

Tribodon. 

Trichecodon. 

Tricodon. 

Tricoelodns. 

Triconodon. 

Tricuspiodon. 

Trigodon. 

Triisodon. 

Trilodon. 

Triloplxulon. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 



59 



Trimenodon. 
Trimerodus. 
Trinodontomys. 
Triodon. 

Tripriodon. 
Trirhizodon. 



Tritomodon. 

Tritylodon. 

Tropodon. 

Tylodon. 

Typhlodon. 

Upmesodon. 



Uranodon. 
Xesmodon. 
Xiphacodon. 

Xiphodon. 

Xiphodontheriuni. 

Zetodon. 



Zeuglodon. 

Ziphacodon. 

Zotodon. 

Zygodon. 

Zygodontomys. 

Zygolophodon. 



DOUBLE OEXERIC NAMES. 



A special class of compounds, which may be described as ' double 
generic names,'' has been largely used in the case of mammals. Nearly 
200 such names have been proposed, chiefly to denote resemblance or 
close relationship, and, when well chosen, serve the purpose admirably. 
They have the advantage of being- self-explanatory, and are not apt to 
be preoccupied. They are ordinarily formed by combining two generic 
names into one, as Adwpisorex and Cervalces, although some of them 
may be simply classical compounds of two names of animals, as ( 1 amd- 
qpardalis and Cynalopex. In either case the result is the same. 
Compounds of cyno {kvgov), (/ale, and rnyo (pivs) are most frequent, as 
will be seen by reference to the following list: 

List of double generic names. 

Compounds of therium ( which is never used alone as a genus) are omitted. 



Adapisorex. 

Adapisoriculus. 

Aelurictis. 

Aelurogale. 

Alcelaphus. 

Anchippus. 

Anchitheriomys. 

Antechinomys. 

Anthropopithecus. 

Antilocapra. 

Arctailurus. 

Arctictis. 

Arctocebus. 

Arctocyon. 

Arctodictis. 

Arctogale. 

Aretogalidia. 

Arctomys. 

Aretophoea. 

Arctopithecus 

Bassaricyon. 

Bibos. 

Blannomys. 

Boochcerus. 

Boselaphus. 



Bucapra. 

Budoreas. 

Butragus. 

Camelopardalis. 

Camelomeryx. 

Canimartes. 

Caprolagus. 

Capromys. 

Caprovis. 

Castoromys. 

Catolyux. 

Catopuma. 

Cebochoerus. 

Cebugale. 

Cerdocyon. 

Cervaloes. 

Cervequus. 

Cervicapra. 

Charopitheeus. 

Choerelaphus. 

Chceromeryx. 

Choeronyeteris. 

Cricetodipus. 

Cricetomys. 

Criotaurus. 



Cynailurus. 

Cynalopex. 

Cynarctua. 

Cynhyaena. 

Cynictis. 

Cynocebus. 

Cynocheerus. 

Cynodictis. 

Cynofelis. 

Cynogale. 

Cynomys. 

Cynonasua. 

Cynonycteris. 

Cynopithecus. 

Cynorea. 

Damelaphus. 

Diposorex. 

Doreatragus. 

Dorcelaphus. 

Ducantalpa. 

Elapboctacerus, 

Elaphalces. 

Eiioniys. 

Enhydrictis. 

Enhydrocyon. 



Galecynus. 

Galemys. 

Galeocebus. 

Galeolemur. 

Galeopardus. 

Galeopithecus. 

Galeospalax. 

Galietis. 

Galidictis. 

Gliscebus. 

Glisorex. 

Ilippelaphus. 

Hippocamelus. 

Hippohyus. 

Hipposyus. 

Hipporussa. 

Hippotigris. 

Hippotragus. 

Hysenailurus. 

Hysenarctus. 

Hysenictis. 

Hysenocyon. 

Hyaenodictis. 

Hyelaphus. 

Hyemoschus. 



"Names made by combining two generic terms or two classical names of animals. 



60 



INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 



Hyomeryx. 

Hyonycteris. 

Hyotapirus. 

Hyrachyus. 

Hyracotherhyus. 

Hystriochomys. 

Ictailurus. 

Icticyon. 

lctidomys. 

Lagoniys. 

Leontocebus. 

Leontopithecus. 

Leopardus. 

Lutrictis. 

Lutrogale. 

Lycalopex. 

Lycysena. 

Lycyon. 

Lynchailurus. 



Melictis. 

Melogale. 

Merychippus. 

Merychyus. 

Rlerycochcerus. 

Mioxicebus. 

Murilemur. 

Myocastor. 

Myocebua. 

Myogalea. 

Myoictis. 

Myolagus. 

Myolemmus. 

Myonycteris. 

Myoscalops. 

Myosictis. 

Myosorex. 

Myospalax. 

Myotalpa. 



Myoxicebus. 

Myoxomya. 

Mysatelea. 

Myscebus. 

Myslemur. 

Myapithecus. 

Oedipomidas. 

Onohippidion. 

( hiotragus. 

Ovibos. 

Pardofelis. 

Phocarctos. 

Phococetus. 

Pithecanthropus 

Pithesciurus. 

Pithelemur. 

Rucervua. 

Saurocetua. 

Saurodelphis. 



Sciuromys. 

Sciurotamias. 

Sikelaphus. 

Sorexglis. 

Soricictis. 

Spalacornya. 

Syarctus. 

Talpasorex. 

Tamiasciurus. 

Tapiroporcus. 

Taurotragua. 

Theridomya. 

Theridosorex. 

Theriodictis. 

Tragelaphus. 

Tragulohyua. 

Uraarctua. 

Uraitaxua. 

Vulpicanis. 



APPLICATION OF NAMES. 

Etymolog} 7 in the widest sense of the term properly includes the 
application of names, but the latter subject is so broad as to merit 
special consideration. Although many generic names have been ap- 
plied in such haphazard fashion or based on such apparently trivial 
or obscure characters that it is almost hopeless to attempt to explain 
their application unless the original author has furnished the key, still 
many others have been based on important characters or coined with 
a view of expressing relationships, indicating facts of distribution, or 
throwing light on their history, thus offering an interesting field for 
investigation. No attempt has been made to explain all obscure 
names, particularly those of extinct groups, but the object has been 
chiefly to show the application of the more important ones, especially 
in the case of North American mammals. The explanations given in 
the 'Century Dictionary,' the various recent works on mammals, and 
similar books of reference have been collected, and free use has been 
made of all sources of information which would throw light on the 
subject. 

Apparently every conceivable character, external and internal, posi- 
tive and negative, has been called into play in making generic names, 
and minute or imaginary resemblances have been utilized to such an 
extent that it is sometimes impossible to see the connection between 
the name and the animal even when the derivation is known. But the 
attempt to ascertain whether a certain term has originated in fact or 
fiction, or whether its application has been suggested merely by the 
fancy of the author, is at least interesting, and often successful. In 
classifying names, beginning with those which have an obvious appli- 
cation and passing to those which have none, at least ten subdivisions 



A LIST OF THE GENEKA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 61 

may be made: (1) classical names and their compounds; (2) native 
names; (3) geographical names; (4) personal names; (5) names indica- 
tive of age; (0) names indicating size, form, color, and resemblance; 
(7) names indicating habit and habitat; (8) names based on special 
characters; (9) names of fanciful or poetic application; (10) names 
founded on error or without application. These numerous subdivi- 
sions may be arranged under two main headings: (1) names of obvious 
application, comprising the first seven groups, and (2) names of 
obscure application, comprising the last three groups. 

NAMES OF OBVIOUS APPLICATION. 

(1) Classical mums. — Words of classical derivation taken from 
names of animals (see p. 44), like Gebus^ Gale, Mus, and Pithecus and 
compounded with such prefixes as eu (typical), am phi (on both sides), 
para (near),pseudo (false), za (intensive prefix), etc., need no special 
explanation. Similarly, words like Alticola (high dweller), Terr/cola 
(ground dweller), Hydropotes (water drinker), etc., suggest their own 
application. But in some cases old names of animals have been trans- 
ferred to groups entirely different from those to which they originally 
belonged/' Thus Da&ypus is now applied to the armadillos, which do 
not occur in the Old World, and Cebus (from /c^/iog-, which meant any 
long-tailed monke}-), is now restricted to neotropical monkeys, which 
were entirely unknown to the Greeks. The connection between this 
name and its apparent compounds Arctocebics, Habrocebus, Mici'OGebus, 
and Nycticebus, all applied to Old World lemurs, is not clear, except on 
the theoiy that the latter are not compounds of the modern generic 
name, but of the original Ktj/jog. Similarly, most of the compounds 
of 7ri0rjKOs, ape, are applied to Old World groups, while the root word 
in the form Pithecia is transferred to a South American monkey. 

(2) Native mums. — Native names like Bandicota (pig rat) and Keri- 
voula (plantain bat) constitute one of the most interesting groups (pro- 
viding their derivation can be ascertained), and thej r are usually based 
on such prominent characters that little explanation is required. 

(3) Geographical mimes. — Geographical names (see p. 47) are in most 
cases self-explanatory merely from the derivation, but, as already men- 
tioned, they are usually hybrid words and are sometimes compounds 
of little used names of localities, so that their application is not evident 
at first sight. Typical examples are Ruscinomys from Ruscino, the 
Roman name of the modern town of Perpignan in France; Kasi, a 
subgenus of monkeys from India, named from Kasi, the ancient desig- 
nation of Benares, and Argyrocettcs, "silver whale' of Argentina, used 
in the sense of La Plata (silver) whale. 

(4) Personal mimes. — Personal names (see pp. 48-51) fall into two 

«See Gill (Proc. Ass. Adv. Sci., XLV, sep. p. 11, 1896) for examples of such 
names in other classes of vertebrates. 



62 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

categories — those derived from the name of the collector of the species 
on which the genus was based, like Bruijnia, < 'arloameghinia, and Nel- 
sonza, and those named in compliment to some distinguished person, as 
Garzonia, for Don Eleazar Garzon, governor of the province of Cor- 
doba, Argentina; Oapaccinius, for Monsignor Francesco Capaccini, 
under secretary of state of Rome, and Romerolagus, for Don Matias 
Romero, formerly Mexican minister to the United States. In the first 
group the application is obvious, provided the person is stated as the 
collector; in the second group, however, the application is by no 
means evident, and without explanation is often very obscure. 

(5) Geological names. — Names indicative of age, or 'geological 
names,' are frequently employed in paleontology to show the age of 
the deposits in which the animals were found. The most frequent are 
compounds of <<>-, ////>>-. and plio-/ thus Eopitheem, Miopithecus, and 
Pliqpithecus represent apes from the Eocene, Miocene, and Pliocene. 
Similarly a few compounds have been made from cimo- and caeno-; 
thus Cimolesies, Oimolodon, and Cimolomys indicate mammals from 
the Cretaceous (chalk); and Caenobasileus, Caenopit/iecus, and Csenothe- 
rium, mammals from recent or Quaternary beds." The prefixes hyper- 
(above), infra- (below), proto- (first), pro- (before), meso- (middle), and 
post- (after), are also employed to represent relative age, as Hyper- 
triKjuliis, Infrapitheeus, Protohippus, Pro/inles, 3feso/upj>i/.s, and 
Postpitkecics. Occasionally names have been suggested by the char- 
acter of the beds in which the fossils wore discovered; thus Anthraco- 
therium is a genus from the anthracite or lignite beds of Tuscairy, 
Argillotherium one from the London clay. Chalicotherium one from 
the gravel beds of Eppelsheim, and Sid< rotherium one from the iron 
ore deposits near Mosskirch, Baden. 

(6) Descriptwt names. — Names indicative of size, form, color, and 
resemblance may be found in almost endless variety, and usually present 
few difficulties. Size is indicated in all gradations from the huge J\L ga- 
therium to the pygmy JVannosciurus, but though the meaning of sucn 
names may be obvious, yet they convey no idea of absolute size to show 
that their selection is especially appropriate. Thus while Megamys 
plainly refers to a large rodent, it does not show that the mammal thus 
named was supposed to have been as large as an ox; and while Mic?*o- 
cebus is a small lemur, the fact that some species of the genus are only 
5 inches in length (exclusive of the tail) is not shown. Similarly 
'small shrew' does not suggest the fact that Microsorex is in reality 
one of the smallest mammals, with a total length of only 3£ inches. 
Form is expressed in all gradations from fat {Steatomys) to thin 
(Stenobalaend); from thick {Pachysomd) to slender {Leptomys)\ from 
short {Brachytheriwni) to long (Dolichotheriufn). Color and markings 
play a comparatively unimportant part in the formation of generic 
names, but are used as a basis in a few cases. References to color in 



a Csenolestes, however, hay been applied to a living mammal. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 63 

general are found in Oelsenomys, Chrotomys, and Chrotopterusj to red 
in Erythrocebus, Erythrosciurus, and Rousettus; to white in Beluga, 
Leuoas, Leucocyon, Leueomitra, Leucopleura, and Leucorharwplms; to 
greenish yellow in Chloromys; and to yellow in Chryseus, Ghrysochloris, 
Ohrysocyon, Chrysomys, Chrysonycteris, Chrysospalax, Chrysothrix, 
Icterus, and XantJiarpyia. References to markings may be either to 
spots (Ralionycteris, RJmwstictus, SpUogale), to stripes (Lemniscomys, 
Strigocuscus), to bands (Histriophoca, Ta&niogale), or to a combination 
of colors (parti-colored) or markings (Poecilogale, Pascilomys, Pcecilo- 
phoca). General resemblance is indicated by compounds of aides, ops, 
and opsis (Petauroides, Dipodops, and Ch&ropsis), and by many double 
names of mammals, such as Antilocapra, Orihox, and Taurotmgus. 

(7) Miscdlcmeous names. — Habits and habitat form the basis of a 
great variety of names. Nearly every manner of progression is 
referred to directly or indirectly in the following examples: Creeping 
(Herpestes, Herpetomys), walking (Ocnobates), digging (Tachyoryctes), 
groping about (Pselaphon), running (Dromedarius and Dromdda), fly- 
ing (Pteromys), and swimming (JVectomys); living in the water (Hydro- 
nnjs), on land (Terricola), and underground (Hypogeomys). Habits and 
characteristics of various kinds are illustrated by Ghiropotes (hand 
drinker), Hydrqpotes (water drinker), Nyctereutes (night hunter), and 
Oxygons (shrill wailing). Disagreeable odors are suggested by such 
names as JBdeogale, Afqphitis, Ozolictis, Osmotherwm, and Putorius. 
Character of habitat is often indicated by a prefix or suffix. Thus we 
have names of animals of the water" (Hydrochoerus, Hydrodq/malis), 
sea (Halicore, Thalarctos), rivers (Hippopotamus, PotamocAcerus), 
islands (JVesonycteris, JVesotragus), swamps (Helogale, Limnogale), 
rushes (Thryonomys), fields (Arvicola), gardens (Leirnacomys), trees 
(Dendrolagus, Dry oryx), forests (Hylomys, Ilylobates), plains (Pedio- 
tragus), pampas (Pampatherium), deserts {Xerospermophilus), sand 
(Ammospermqph it us), rocks (Pefroga/e, Riqncapra), caves (Antrosotcs), 
heights (Ilyperacriits), mountains (Oreotragus and Cheamnos), of snow 
and ice (Chionobates, PagopJrilus), and torrid heat (Helaretos, IIe!i<>- 
phoca). Finally, character of the food is sometimes expressed in the 
name, as when the animal feeds on seeds {Spermophifus), grain (Sito- 
mys), rice (Oryzomys, Oryzoryctes), bark (Phlceo?nys), roots (Rhizomys), 
grass (Poebrotherium, Poephagomys, PoepAagus), fruit (Carpom/ys, 
Carponycteris, Syconycteris, Trygenycteris), honey (Mellwora, Melur- 
sus), ants (Myrmecobius, Myrmecophaga), fish (Ichthyomys), or flesh 
(SarcopAH/us and Sarcothraustes). 

NAMES OF OBSCURE APPLICATION. 

(8) Names indicating relationship. — Many names denoting relation- 
ship or based on general characters or habits require further explanation 
than mere derivation to render them intelligible. Thus, Mesomys 
(middle mouse) and Synaptomys (connecting mouse) are evidently 



64 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

intermediate forms, but the names alone do not show that Mesomys 
is related both to the jumping rats and Mus, or that Synaptomys is 
a connectant form between the lemmings and field mice. Aschizo- 
mys (not splitting — in the sense of connecting mouse), which, in a 
somewhat different way. expresses the same idea of connection, does 
not show that it is based on a combination of the characters of 
Microtus and Evotomys. a Likewise, Orthriomys (early mouse) and 
Phenacomys (deceptive mouse) are not self-explanatory. Orthriomys 
was so called from the fact that it suggests an ancient type inter- 
mediate between Phenacomys and the Microtine Pedomys and Arm- 
cola; Phenacomys derives its name from the fact that externally it 
is almost indistinguishable from Microtus. Hodomys (road mouse), 
refers to the animal's habit of making trails, and not, as might be sup- 
posed, to its living along highways. Monachus (monk) is applied to 
the tropical seal, probably because of its more or less solitary habits, 
and Semnopithecus (sacred monkey) to a group of monkeys of India, 
because the type species is considered sacred by the Hindus. Less 
clear are such terms as Cryptomys (hidden mouse), Dinomys (terrible 
mouse), and Xenomys (strange mouse), which merely suggest the 
peculiarities of the groups to which they belong without explaining 
them. Pectinator (comber) and Tamias (steward) convey little idea of 
their appropriateness unless it is known that Pectinator, like Gteno- 
dactyhis, has bristles on the hind feet which are supposed to be used 
in dressing the fur, and that Tamias, the well-known genus of ground 
squirrels, has a habit of laying up stores of food. 

Generic names based on special characters are very numerous. 
They may refer to external characters, such as the skin, hair, head, 
nose, eyes, ears, tail, wings, or feet; to special characters of the teeth, 
skull, vertebrae, ribs, or limb bones; or to the soft anatomy. Those 
which owe their origin to characters of the teeth and skull are very 
common, while those based on the soft anatomy are comparatively 
rare. Not only do special parts of mammals suggest names, but a 
wide range of qualities of each part is represented in nomenclature. 
Thus, characteristics of the skin that give rise to names range from 
narrow (Stmotherium) to broad {Megadei'ma), probably in allusion to 
the size of the flying membranes; those of the hair from soft (Ab- 
rothrix) and woolly {Lagothrix — rabbit hair) to spiny (Echiothrioc) and 
scaly {Lepitherium)\ those of the nose from allusions to a long nose 
(Nasalis and Oxymyctencs) to noseless (Arhinolemur)] those of the ears 
and tail from earless (Aotus) and tailless (Anoura) to large eared 
(Macrotis) and feather-tailed \Pteronura)\ those of limbs from short 
(Brachytarsomys) to long {Megaptera, Macropus). 

The examples just mentioned and some of the designations of teeth 

"Compare the different ways of expressing the same general idea of relationship 
as exemplified by the following names: Amphicetus, Apatemys, Aschizomys, Dolomi/*, 
Inlerodon, Mesomys, Mictomys, Phenacomys, and Syuaptouujx. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 65 

and skulls require no special explanation and should perhaps not be 
classed with names of obscure application. On the other hand, many 
of the terms derived from special characters, both external and 
internal, are exceedingly obscure. Among others may be mentioned 
Heterodon (different tooth), in allusion to the inequality in size and 
form of the teeth; Megantereon (great chin), which refers to the size of 
the lower jaw and not to that of the animal;" Omniatophoca (eyed seal), 
which refers to the immense orbits; Ommatostergus (a worker bereft 
of eyes), which antithetically refers to the apparent absence of eyes; 
Synotus, based on the union of the inner margins of the ears on the 
forehead; and Tomqpeas (stump awl), so called from the short, blunt 
tragus. Names based on cranial or skeletal characters, and many of 
those based on teeth, are of uncertain application unless explained. 
Such are Capered (capero, to wrinkle), from the rugulose character of 
the ear bones; and Megaru won (large nerve), from the large size of 
the neural passage in the atlas. Deltatherium, Lambdatherium, and 
Sigmodon are suggested by the enamel patterns of the molar teeth, 
which resemble the Greek letters A, A, 2, respectively; Syciwn refers 
to the bony walls of the pulp cavity, which close the lateral grooves 
but do not close the pulp cavity below; Nesodon (island tooth) takes 
its name from an island of enamel on the inner side of a molar; 
Ochetodon and R&ithrodon (grooved tooth) refer to grooves on the 
upper incisors; Plagiavlax (oblique groove) refers to grooves on the 
lower premolars; while Plagiodontia (oblique tooth) refers to grooves 
on the molars. 

Perhaps the most puzzling names are those of an indefinite charac- 
ter. Such are Proteles (complete in front), in reference to the full num- 
ber of five toes on the fore feet in contrast to four on the hind feet, 
and names suggesting characters which are rudimentary or absent, 
as At'eles (incomplete) and Colobns (maimed), both referring to the 
rudimentary character of the thumb; Perodicticus, referring to the 
rudimentary index finger; Cholosptts (lame footed), indicating a reduced 
number of toes, and Olbodotes (giver of bliss) on account of the light 
which it throws on the development of the large incisors in the primi- 
tive rodents. 

(9) Fanciful names. — Names of fanciful or poetic signification com- 
prise mythological designations and a few other names. In many 
instances their application is exceedingly obscure, and although usually 
it is not difficult to ascertain the personage from whom the name is 
derived, the explanation of its application, unless given by the original 
describer, may easily be erroneous. Mythological names are objection- 
able, not only because they have been used so frequently in other classes 
that they are likely to be preoccupied, but also because of this ambiguity 
in application. The explanations given in the list will be found unsat- 

«At first sight the name seems to be a misprint or modification of Megatherium 
(great beast). 

7591— No. 23—03 5 



66 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

isfactory in many cases, but the difficulty in working them out may be 
illustrated by a few examples. The genus of monkeys called Diana 
is apparently so named from the white marking or line over the fore- 
head of the type species, which bears a fancied resemblance to the silver 
bow of the goddess Diana. Idomineus, the name of a king of Crete, 
does not seem applicable to a genus of gerbilles, unless it is remembered 
that Idomineus and Meriones were companions in arms in the Trojan 
war, and Meriones having long been used for a genus of Gerbillinae, it 
was thought fitting that a subgenus of the same group should be 
named after his companion, Idomineus. Adjidaumo, as applied to an 
extinct genus of rodents from the western United States, requires for 
many the describer's explanation that the designation was the Indian 
name of a squirrel borrowed from Longfellow's poem 'Hiawatha.' 

(10) Names founded on error. — Names founded on error or without 
application are comparatively few in number, but are still sufficiently 
numerous to warrant mention. Errors as to the relationships of ani- 
mals are to be expected in the case of extinct forms described from 
fragmentary remains, and it is not surprising that additional specimens 
have sometimes shown that an animal belongs to a different family or 
order from the one to which it was originally referred. Such errors 
can be corrected when discovered, but the names in which the} T are 
sometimes embodied must stand as first published. Several generic 
names thus erroneously given are strikingly inapplicable. Thus 
Aceratherium was so named because it was supposed to be a hornless 
rhinoceros, but according to Osborn the animal probabl} 7 did possess 
a rudimentary horn. Ailuravus, originally supposed to be an ancestral 
carnivore, is now regarded as a squirrel. Aodon (the toothless whale 
of Havre) really belongs to the toothed whales, but was described from 
an old specimen of Mesoplodon Mdens which had evidently lost its 
teeth. The well-known genus of zeuglodon, originally described as 
Basilosaurus (king of the saurians) from its supposed reptilian charac- 
ters, is now known to be a cetacean and not a reptile. Condylura 
(knotted tail) was applied to the star-nosed moles b} r Illiger, who 
based his description on a very imperfect figure, in which the tail was 
represented as having a series of nodes. Syperoodon and Uranodon 
(palate tooth) were applied to the same genus of ziphioid whales on 
account of the rough papillae on the palate, which were at first mis- 
taken for teeth. Paradoxurus (strange tail) owes its name to the 
circumstance that the tail, which the animal has power to coil to some 
extent, was originally supposed to be prehensile, a character which 
would certainly be anomalous in the civet cats. Protorhea, based on 
an imperfect femur, was at first supposed to be an extinct struthious 
bird, but was afterwards regarded as a mammal related to the llamas. 
Stemmatopus (wreathed foot) was given to the hooded seal by Cuvier, 
though it is probable that the name intended was Stemmatqps (wreathed 
face), in allusion to the hood, and that the insertion of a u by mistake 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 67 

transferred the allusion to the other extremity of the animal and 
destroyed the application of th# name. 

Finally may be mentioned nonsense names, which comprise coined 
names and anagrams (see pp. 46-47), mere arbitrary combinations of 
letters which have no meaning and no application. Explanations, 
however, arc necessary to call attention to the fact that the names have 
been coined, or. in the case of anagrams, to show from what names 
they have been formed. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 

One of the pleasantest features connected with the preparation of 
this index, and one which has done much to relieve the monotonous 
labor of compilation and cheeking references, has been the hearty and 
generous spirit of cooperation manifested by those to whom applica- 
tion for assistance has been made. Without such cooperation the work 
would have been far from complete; many names here included would 
have escaped notice; many that have been verified would have lacked 
that element of certainty, and material and information of various 
kinds that contribute to the value of the book would have been want- 
ing. I take pleasure in acknowledging my indebtedness for such aid 
to the many individuals who have placed their time, services, and 
information at my disposal. 

To Dr. C. Hart Merriam, who originally projected the index, I am 
under especial obligations, not only for allowing me to work it out in 
my own way and to carry it far beyond the original limits, but also 
for furnishing every aid in the way of clerical help and particularly 
for personal suggestion and supervision. 

My thanks, as well as of all those who use the index, are due to Mr. 
F. H. Waterhouse, librarian of the Zoological Societ} T of London, who 
was engaged on a similar work, and on learning of the present index 
promptly and very generously placed his manuscript at my disposal. 
His list not only added a number of names and earlier references, but 
it furnished an invaluable check on the accuracy of the whole work. 
Since the 3,000 or more names which we had in common have been 
thus verified by two independent workers, much more confidence can 
be placed in the references. Acknowledgment is due to Dr. P. L. 
Sclater, formerly secretary of the Zoological Society of London, who 
has shown great interest in the w T ork and generously offered to have 
references to books inaccessible in this country verified in the library 
of the Zoological Society. To Dr. Theodore Gill I am under great obli- 
gations for several names new to the list, for frequent advice concern- 
ing questions of nomenclature, references to obscure or rare books, 
information respecting family names, and especially for constant 
assistance in determining the etymologies of names and in correcting 
the proof. 



68 INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 

The completeness of the index has been greatly enhanced b}^ work- 
ing naturalists, who have sent separates of their papers containing new 
names, have revised lists of their genera submitted to them for that 
purpose, or furnished information which has made it possible to 
include full lists of the names published by them. In some cases. 
notably that of Dr. Florentino Ameghino, director of the Museo 
Nacional, Buenos Aires (who has named over four hundred genera of 
extinct mammals), the revision of such lists involved considerable 
labor. Among others who have furnished lists of their genera are 
Dr. J. A. Allen, curator of mammals in the American Museum of 
Natural Histoiy, New York; Dr. Ch. Deperet, of Lyons, France; 
Mr. C. W. De Vis, curator of the Queensland Museum, Brisbane; 
Prof. Dr. Alfred Nehring, of Berlin; Prof. Henry F. Osborn, of 
Columbia University, New York; Prof. William B. Scott, of Princeton 
University; Mr. Oldlield Thomas, curator of mammals in the Natural 
History Museum, London; Dr. E. L. Trouessart, of Paris, and Dr. 
F. W. True, of the U. S. National Museum. 

For important aid in looking up or verifying references to books 
inaccessible in Washington, acknowledgments are due Mr. C. Davies 
Sherborn and Mr. Oldfield Thomas, of the British Museum; Dr. J. A. 
Allen, of the American Museum; Mr. S. N. Rhoads, and Mr. Witmer 
Stone, of Philadelphia. 

I am also under obligations to several persons for special assistance 
rendered in various ways. To Mr. W. E. De Winton, of the British 
Museum, for dates and etymology of ^Ethurus; to Dr. Paul Matschie, 
of the Berlin Museum, for publications; to Dr. Santiago Roth, of La 
Plata, Argentina, for copies of papers and for information concerning 
several generic names; to Mr. W. L. Sclater, Director of the South 
African Museum, for information respecting several South African 
rodents; to Mr. F. A. Lucas, of the U. S. National Museum, and 
Dr. E. L. Trouessart, of Paris, for references and assistance in 
other ways; to Dr. William H. Dall and Dr. Leonhard Stejneger, 
for advice regarding questions of nomenclature; to Prof. O. P. Hay, 
of the American Museum of Natural History, for references, numerous 
suggestions during the progress of the work, and for the opportunity 
of examining the proof of his 'Catalogue of Extinct Vertebrates of 
North America;' to Dr. W. D. Matthew, of the American Museum, 
New York, for notes on several doubtful groups of extinct mammals; 
to Mr. Gerrit S. Miller, jr., for several names, for verifying refer- 
ences, and for information regarding the genera of Vespertilionidas 
and Microtin.e; to Dr. Charles W. Richmond, for references and data 
concerning dates of publication of names; and to Miss Mary J. Rath- 
bun, for the privilege of consulting her manuscript catalogue of genera 
of Crustacea in the search for names which might preoccupy names of 
mammals, and also for calling 1113^ attention to the generic names con- 
tained in Brewster's Encyclopedia. 



A LIST OF THE GENERA AND FAMILIES OF MAMMALS. 69 

In the preparation of the manuscript for the press Miss Louise de 
Bonneville has rendered much assistance in checking- derivations and 
looking- up the application of names. 

Finally, special mention should be made of the careful and pains- 
taking- work of Miss Thora Steineger, who under my direction has 
looked up many of the references, indexed most of the families, added 
many names, and typewritten practically the whole list with great 
care. During three trips abroad she verified numerous references in 
the libraries in Bergen, Berlin, London, and Paris, and her visit to the 
library of the Zoological Society of London brought the index to the 
notice of Mr. Waterhouse and eventually resulted in the acquisition 
of his manuscript. 



INDEX OF GENERA AND SUBGENERA. 



A.. 

Abathmodon Lund, 1843. Ferpe, Canidse. 

Oversigt K. Danske Vidensk. Selsk. Forhandl., Kjobenhavn, for 1842, No. 6, 

p. 80, 1848. 
Type (species not given) : From the bone caves of Brazil. 
Extinct. Based on teeth. 

Abathmodon: a, without; /JaO/.ios, step; 68d)v=o8ovs, tooth. 
Abderites Ameghino, 1887. Marsupialia, Abderitidae. 

Enurn. Sist. Especies Mami'f. F6s. Patagonia Austral, p. 5, Dec, 1887. 
Type: Abderites meridionalis Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of the Rio Santa 

Crnz, Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Abderites: An inhabitant of Abdera, an ancient town of Thrace, Greece. 
Aboloceros Gloger, 1841. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse? 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxiii, 138, 1841; Thomas, Ann. <£ 

Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 191, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Type not mentioned. The genus is provisionally proposed to include certain 
extinct, deer-like forms from southern France which are related to the giraffe. 
Extinct. 

Aboloceros: tt/ioAos, a young horse that has not shed the foal teeth; Kspac,, horn. 
Abothrion Aymard, 1853. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anthracotherii*lae. 

Aymard in Pictet's Traite Paleont.. 2e ed., I, 331, 1853. 

Type: Bothriodon crispus. (=Hyopotamu8 crispus Gervais), from Gargas, France. 
"Le D. [B.] crispus Geryajs (Zool. et Pal. fr. p. 95, pi. 12), de Gargas est plus 
douteux. C'est peut-etre un anoplotheroide. M. Aymard propose pour lui le 
nom generique de Abothrinn." 
Extinct. 

Abothrion: a, without; fioOpiov, small hollow. 
Abra (subgenus of Lagonu/s) Gray, 1863. Glires, Ochotonidae. 

Cat. Mamm., Birds, etc., presented by B. H. Hodgson to the Brit. Mus., 2d ed., 

"11, 1863. 
Type: Lagomys (Abra) curzonitv Hodgson, from the Himalayas of Sikkim, India. 
Name preoccupied by Abra Leach, 1818, a genus of Mollusca. 
Abra: The Tibetan name. 

Abrocoma Waterhoise, 1837. Glires, Octodontidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. L, Nov. 21, 1837, pp. 30-32; Voy. H. M. S. Beagle, 

pt, ii, Mamm., No. 4, pp. 83-87, pis. 28-29, Sept., 1839. 
Habrocoma Wagner, in AViegmann's Archiv. Naturgesch., 1842., pt. i, 5-8. 
Species: Abrocoma bennettii Waterhouse, from the flanks of the Cordillera near 

Aconcagua; and A. cuvieri Waterhouse, from Valparaiso, Chile. 
Abrocoma: a/3pos, soft; koixij, hair — from the very soft fur, resembling that of 
the chinchilla. 

71 



72 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Abrornys Gray, 1868. Glires, Heteromyidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1868, 202. 

Type: Abromyslordi from British Columbia. (Abromys=Perognathus Maximilian. ) 
Abrornys: afipoc,, soft; /ivi, mouse — from the long, soft fur. 

Abrothrix (subgenus of Mus) Waterhocse, 1837. (Hires, Muridse, Cricetinse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. L, Nov. 21, 1837, p. 21; Gray, List Spec. Mamm. 
Brit. Mus., 114, 1843 (raised to generic rank). 

Hdbrothrix Wagner, Suppl. Schreber's Siiugthiere, III, 516-523, 1843 (sub- 
genus); Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm. Add., 5, 1846; Index Univ., 170, 
1846; 2d ed., 2, 1848; Burmeister, Uebersicht Thiere Brasil., I, 178, 1854 
(subgenus). 

Type: Mus (Abrothrix) Jongipilis Waterhouse, from Coquimbo, Chile. 

Abrothrix: afipoc,, soft; 0pz'|, hair — from the long, soft hair. 

Acantherium (subgenus of Acanthion) Gray, 1847. Glires, Hystricida?. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1847, 102-104. 
Species: Acanthion javanicum F. Cuvier, from Java; and J. flemingii Gray ( a hybrid 

between a male Acanthion javanicum and a female Hystria: cristata, a bred in the 

Surrey Zoological Gardens). 
Acantherium: aKavba, spine; Brjpiov, wild beast — from the spines on the head, 

back, and other parts of the body. 

Acanthion F. Cuvier, 1822. Glires, Hystricidse. 

Mem. Mus. Hist, Nat., Paris, IX, 424-425, 431-432, pi. 20 bis, tigs. 3-6, 1822; 
Dents Mamm., 177-178, 256, pi. lxvii, 1825. 

Acanihia Gray, Thomson's Ann. Philos., XXVI, 341, Nov., 1825 (misprint). 

Type: Acanthion javanicum F. Cuvier, from Java. In the first reference Acan- 
thion is given as a subgenus but used as a full genus. It seems to be only a 
French name, except on p. 431, where it is abbreviated ('.1. javameum'). 

Acanthion: ccKavfJiGov, porcupine. 

Aeanthochcerus Gray, 1866. Glires, Hystricidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 309-310, pi. xxxi. 

Species: Aeanthochcerus bartlettii Gray (a hybrid between a male Acanthion javani- 
cum and a female Hystrix cristata, bred in the Surrey Zoological Gardens), and 
A. grotei Gray, from India. (See Acantherium Gray, 1847.) 

Aeanthochcerus: cxKavBa, spine; ^ozpoc, hog — from the spines on the nape, back, 
and other parts of the body. 
Acanthodelphis (subgenus of Phocsena) Gray, 1866. Cete, Delphinidse. 

Cat, Seals and Whales Brit. Mus., 304-305, 1866; Synopsis Whales and Dolphins 
Brit. Mus., 8, 1868 (raised to generic rank). 

Type: Phocsena spinipinnis Burmeister, from the Rio de la Plata. 

Acanthodelphis: tixavba, spine; 8e\(pi<;, dolphin — in allusion to the several 
series of dermal spines on the upper edge of the dorsal fin. 
Acanthodon Meyer, 1843. Fer;e, ? 

Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogie, 1843, 701-702. 

Type: Acanthodon fer ox Meyer, from Weisenau, Germany. 

Extinct. 

Acanthodon: dxavQa, spine; d8cov=d8ov<z, tooth. 
Acanthoglossus Gervais, 1877. Monotremata, Tachyglossida?. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, LXXXV, No. 19, p. 838, seance du Nov. 5, 1877. 

Type: Tachyglossus bruijnii Peters & Doria, from a peak of the Arfaks, New Guinea. 

Name preoccupied by Acanthoglossa Kraatz, 1859, a genus of Coleoptera. 
Replaced by Zaglossus Gill, May 5, 1877; by Proechklna Gervais, Nov. 30, 1877, 
and by Bruynia Dubois, 1882. 

Acanthoglossus: ctKavBa, spine; yX&66a, tongue — from the spines on the 
tongue. 



"For detailed description of this specimen, see Waterhouse, Nat. Hist, Mamm., II, 
Rodentia, 4i;s-4(>(>, 1848. 



ACANTHOMYS ACERODON 73 

Acanthomys Lesson, 1842. (Hires, Muridse, Murinse. 

Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Maram., 135, 1842; Gray, List Spec Mamm. Brit. 

Mus., pp. xxiii, 108, 1S43. 
Species, 5: Mus setifer Horsfield, from Java; Mus alexandrinus E. Geoffrey, from 

Egypt; Acanthomys perchal Lesson, from Inaia; Mus platythrix Bennett, from 

India; and M. hispidus Lichtenstein, from Arabia. (See Acomys I. Geoffroy, 

1838. ) 
Acanthomys: aKavBa, spine; //£?, mouse, 'spiny mouse' — from the coarse, 

flattened, grooved spines on the hind part of the back. 
Acanthomys Gray, 1867. (Hires, Muridae, Murinse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 598-599, 1867. 

Type: Acanthomys leucopus Gray, from Cape York, Queensland, Australia. 
Name preoccupied by Acanthomys Lesson, 1842 (=Acomys Geoffroy, L838. See 

Alston, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1877, 124 footnote) . 
Acanthomys: atcavQa,- spine; /<£% mouse — from the flat, channeled, spiny hairs 

on the back and under part of the body. 

Acanthonotus Goldfiss, 1809. Monotremata, Tachyglossida?. 

Yergleich. Naturbeschreibung Siiugeth., pp. xix, 308-309, 1809. 

Type: Acanthonotus myrmecophagus Goldfuss [=Myrmecophaga aculeata Shaw), 
from New South Wales, Australia.' Based on the porcupine anteater of Pen- 
nant (Hist. Quad., II, 2<>2, pi. xcvi). 

Name preoccupied by Acanthonotus Bloch, 17H7, a genus of Pisces. 

Acanthonotus: dKavOovGoro^, prickle backed (from atcavSa, spine; v&ros, 
back) — in allusion to the spiny covering. 

Acaremys Ameghino, 1887. Glires, P>ethizontidfe. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mam if. Fos. Patagonia Austral, p. 9, Dec, 1887. 
Species, 3: Acaremys mwinus Amegbino, A. minutus Ameghino, and .!. minutissi- 

mus Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Acaremys: ccKap)}$, small, tiny; /<£s, mouse. 
Acdestis Ameghino, 1887. Marsupialia, Epanorthidse. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mami'f. Fos. Patagonia Austral, p. 5, Dec, 1887. 
Type: Acdestis owenii Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of the Rio Santa Cruz, 

Patagonia. 
Extinct, 
Acdestis: "Ay8i6zi$, an epithet of Cybele or Rhea, earth goddess or goddess of 

fertility (derivation from Ameghino, but application not evident). 
Aceratherium (subgenus of Rhinoceros) Kaup, 1832. Ungulata, Rhinocerotid;c 
Oken's Isis, 1832, 898-904, pi. xvm, fig. 1; Osborn, Science, new ser., IX, 161- 

162, pi. i, Feb. 3, 1899 (probable presence of horn). 
Acerotherium Kaup, Oken's Isis, 1834, 314 (raised to generic rank); Descr. Oss. 

Foss. Mamm. Darmstadt, cahier 3, p. 49, 1834. 
Type: Rhinoceros incisirus Cuvier, from the Upper Miocene or Lower Pliocene in 

the vicinity of Mainz, Hesse, Germany. 
Extinct. Based on two skulls. 
Aceratherium: a, without; Kepas, horn; fjifpiov, wild beast — from the supposed 

absence of horns; but Osborn has shown that the animal probably possessed a 

rudimentary horn. 

Acerodon Jourdan, 1837. Chiroptera, Pteropodida?. 

Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 2e ser., VIII, Zool, 369-370, Dec, 1837; Comptes Rendus, 

Paris, VI, 3, 1838. 
Type: 'L ' Acerodon de Meyen' Jourdan (=Pteropus jubatus Eschscholtz), from 
the Philippine Islands. (See Dobson, Cat. Chiroptera, 69, 1878). 
Acerodon: a, without; Kspa<;, horn; 68<&v=68ov<;, tooth. 



74 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Acerotherium (see Aceratherium). Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotidse. 

Achaenodon Cope, 1874." Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Ann. Rept. U. 8. Geol. and Geog. Surv. Terr, for 1873, 457-458, 1874; Tert. Vert., 

342-344, pis. lvii, Lvna, 1885. 
Archaenodon Cope, Paleont. Bull., No. 17, pp. 2-3, Oct. 25,1873 (misprint). 
Type: Achaenodon insolens Cope, from the Eocene (Bridger) of Mammoth Buttes, 

near the head of South Bitter Creek, "Wyoming. 
Achaenodon: a, without; x^- lV0 °, to gape; dS(hv = 6dov^, tooth — in allusion to the 

"dental series without diastema." 
Acheus F. Cuvier, 1825. Edentata, Bradypodidpe. 

Dents Mamm., 194-195, 256, pi. lxxviii, 1825. 
Achaeus Ermax, Reise um die Erde, 22, 1835. 
Type: 'Le paresseux ai ' from tropical America. 
Acheus: Proper name "* Axaios, Achpeus. "Nom que rapporte la fahle comme 

etant celui d'un Grec stupide et indolent" (Cuvier). 
Achlis Reichenbach, 1845. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

['Gray 6 ,' fide Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 1, 1842 — nomen nudum.] 
Reichenbach, Vollstiindigste Naturgesch. In- und Auslandes, Siiugeth., Ill, 

12-15, pi. ii, figs. 7-11, 1845. 
According to Reichenbach, Achlis (subgenus) includes 1 species and 2 varieties: 

Cervus tarandus Linnaeus, from Eurasia; Cerms tarandus var. arcUcus Richard- 
son, from the Barren Grounds of North America; and C. tarandus var. sylvestris 

Richardson, from the wooded region between Athapescow Lake and Lake 

Superior, and 80-100 miles from Hudson Bay. 
Achlis: Latin achlis, a wild beast of the north (Aloes'?). 
Achlysictis Ameghino, 1891. Marsupialia, ? 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, Entr. 3a, 147-148, fig. 52, June 1, 1891. 
Type: Achlysictis lelongii Ameghino, from the Lower Oligocene in the vicinity of 

the city of Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct. 

Achlysictis: d^At^j, mist, gloom; /"ktzs, weasel. 
Achyrodon Owen, 1871. Marsupialia, Amphitheriidse. 

Mesozoic Mamm., in Mon. Pakeontograph. Soc, XXIV, [No. 5,] 37-40, pi. n, 

figs. 5-8, 1871. 
Achyrydon: Scudder, Nomenclator Zool., Index Univ., 4, 1882. 
Species: Achyrodon nanus Owen, and A. pusillus Owen, from the Purbeck of 

Durdlestone Bay, Swanage, Dorsetshire, England. 
Extinct. "Represented by four more or less mutilated mandibular rami." 
Achyrodon: cxxvpov, chaff, husks (in the sense of 'pointed'); oScbv = odovg, 

tooth — in allusion to the sharp cusps of the molars. "The resemblance of 

these cusps to needle-points suggested the generic name" (Owen). 
Acinonyx Brookes, 1828. Ferpe, Felidpe. 

" Cat, Anat. and Zool. Museum of Joshua Brookes, London, 33, 1828 " (previous to 

July 14). (Sale catalogue. ) 
Burnett, Quart. Journ. Sci. Lit. and Art, XXVIII, for Oct.-Dec, 1829, 349, 1830. 
Species: Acinonyx guipard, and A. venator (the hunting leopard, type, fide 

Burnett), from Asia and Africa. 
Acinonyx: ccKaiva, thorn, prick (cckis, axiSos, point); ovv%, claw — from the 

nonretractile, pointed, claws. 
Acodon (see Akodon). (Hires, Muridse, Cricetinpe. 

" The original spelling of this name, dating from 1873, is clearly a misprint. 
h Achlis Gray, quoted by Agassiz from Thomson's Ann. Philos., 1825, has not 
been found in the volume cited. 



ACOELOHYRAX ACROBATES 75 

Acoelohyrax Ameghino, 1902. Ungulata, Hyracoidea, Archseohyracidae: 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. C6rdoba, XVII, 10-11, May, 1902 (£ep. pp. 8-9). 
Type: Acoelohyrax coronatus Ameghino, from the upper part of the Notostylops 

beds of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Acoelohyrax: d, without; /cozAos, hollow; + Hyrax. 
Acoelrius Ameghino, 1897. Ungulata, Hyracoidea, Acoelodidse. 

[La Argentina al traves de las Ultimas Epocas Geol., 18, 1897 — nomen nudum.] 
Accdodus Ameghino, Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentina, XVIII, 454, Oct. 6, 1SV»7. 
Type: Acoelodus oppositus Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on a fragment of the mandible. 
Acoelodus: a, without; KoiXrj, hollow; 6dov<;, tooth. " Molaires inferieures 

toutes bilobees. . . Lobe anterieur sans cavite interne, ce caractere servant a 

distinguer les dents de cedes des Adiantides" (Ameghino). 
Acoessus Cope, 1881. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidse. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XIX, 880, 397, May 14-16, 1881. 
Type: Hyracotherium siderolithicum Pictet, from the Lower Eocene of Mauremont, 

Switzerland. 
Extinct.. 
Acoessus: ccki}, a sharp point; ij66oav, less, weaker — in allusion to the character: 

" Vs of inferior molars probably incomplete." 
Acomys I. Geoffroy, 1838. Glires, Muridse, Murinae. 

Ann. Sci. Nat,, Paris, 2eser., X, Zool., 126, Aug., 1838. 
Acanthornys Lessox, Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 135,1842; Gray, 

List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xxiii, 108, 184:!. 
Type: Mus cahirinus E. Geoff roy, from Egypt. 
Acomys: cikj), a sharp point; juvi, mouse — from the spines. The fur is so spiny 

that when the spines are erect the animal is said to be almost indistinguishable 

at first glance from a diminutive hedgehog. 
Aconaemys Ameghino, 1891. Glires, Octodontida\ 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, Entr. 4a, 245, Aug. 1, 1891. 
Acoudemys Sclater, Geog. Mamm., 280, 1899 (misprint). 
New name for Schizodon Waterhouse, 1842, which is preoccupied by Schizodon 

Agassiz, 1829, a genus o^^isces. 
Acormemys: ctKovrj, whetstone; // i~s, mouse. (See explanation under Schizodon. ) 
Acosminthus Gloger, 1841. Glires, Murida?, Murinae. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Natwrgesch., I, pp. xxx, 95, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. Nat. 

Hist., 6th ser., XV^190,*Eeb. 1, 1895. 
Species: Mus cahirinus Gooff roy, from Egypt; and M. dimidiatus Riippell, from 

the region near Mount Sinai, Arabia. 
Acosminthus: ccki), a sharp point; duivOos, poetic word for mouse — in allusion to 

the spiny fur (see explanation of Acomys). 
Acotherulum Gervais, 1850. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, XXX, No. 19, 604, Jan.-June, 1850. 
Type: Acotherulum saturninum Gervais, from the Upper Eocene deposits near Apt, 

Vaucluse, France. 
Extinct. 
Acotherulum: «k?/, a sharp point; dimin. of B??piov, wild beast — in allusion to the 

four conical cups on the upper molars, and also to the small size of the animal. 

Acrobates (subgenus of Petaurus) Desmarest, 1817. Marsupialia, Phalangeridae. 

Nouv. Diet. Hist. Nat., XXV, 405-406, 1817; Waterhouse, Cat, Mamm. Mus. 

Zool. Soc. London, 2d ed., 68, 1838 (raised to generic rank); Thomas, Cat. 

Marsup. and Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 136-138, 1888. 
Acrobata Desmarest, Mammalogie, I, 270-271, 1820. 
Type: Didelphis pygmxa Shaw, from New South Wales, Australia. 
Acrobates: ccKpofiaro*;, going to the top; from ccKpo/Jareco, to climb aloft — in 

allusion to the animal's agility and power of leaping. 



76 INDEX GENERUM MAMMA LIUM. 

Acrocyon Ameghino, 1887. Marsupialia, Borhysenidse. 

Enum. Si^t. Especies Mamif. Fos. Patagonia Austral, p. 8, Dec, 1887. 

Type: Acpocyon sectorius Ameghino, from the lower Tertiary of southern Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Acrocyon: axpov, highest point; kvoov, dog — from the form of the lower fourth 
premolar or hrst molar, which has three tubercles, the middle one being 
higher than either the anterior or posterior. 
Acrodelphis Abel, 1900. Cete, Platanistidse. 

Denkschr. K. Akad. Wiss., Wien, Math. -Nat. CI., LXVIII, 850, 851-853, 856-859, 
Taf. I, figs. 2, 4-6, 1900. 

Species 11, from Europe: Champsodelphi* macrognathus Brandt, from southern 
France; Delphinus lophogenius Valenciennes, from the Miocene of France; ? C. 
scaldensis Du Bus, from the Antwerp Crag, Belgium; C. sp. ? Gervais & Van 
Ben., from Xabregas, Portugal; ? C. denticulatus Probst, from Baltringen, Ger- 
many; ? C. cristatus Probst, from western Germany; ( '. ombonii Longhi, from the 
Miocene of Belluna, Italy; C. letockae Brandt, from the Miocene of Austria; 
? C. fuchsii Brandt, from southern Russia; ? ( '. karreri Brandt, from the Miocene 
of Austria; and Acrodelphis brahuletzi Abel, from the vicinity of Eggenberg, 
Austria. 

Acrodelphis: aKpos, pointed; 8sA(pis, dolphin. 

Acromys ('Wagner') Trouessart, 1881. Glires, Muridae, Murinse. 

Trouessart, Cat, Mamm. Viv. et Foss., Rodentia, pt. n, in Bull. Soc. Sci. 
d' Angers, Fasc. 2, p. 133, 1881; Pelzeln, Brasil. Saugeth. in K.-K. zool.-bot. 
Gesell. Wien, Beiheft zu Bd. XXXIII, 73, 1883. 

Trouessart gives Acromys Wagner, 1847, as a synonym of Drymomys Tscurni, 
1844, referring to Abhandl. K. Akad. Miinchen, V, 318, but the species is 
there given as Drymomys musculus. Pelzeln quotes "Acromys musculus 
Wagner, Cat. Msc." in synonymy under Drymomys musculus. 

Acromys: aKpoz, pointed; /<£?, mouse. 
Acronotus (subg. of DamaMs) H. Smith, 1827. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovida?. 

Griffith's Cuvier, Anim. Kingdom, IV, 346-354, 1827; V, 361-364, 1827; Gray, 
List Spec. Mamm. Brit, Mus., pp. xxvi, 157, 1843 (raised to generic rank) ; 
Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, I, pt, i, pp. 5, 7, Aug., 1894 (in syn- 
onymy, type fixed). 

Species, 5: Damalis bubalis (=AntlIope buselaphus Pallas, L766, type), I>. caama, 
D. suturosa, D. senegalensis, and D. lunata, from Africa. 

Acronotus: axpo{, pointed; vcbros, back — in allusion to the high shoulders. 
Acropetes (subg. of Phalangista) I. (ieoffroy, 1838. Marsupialia, Phalangerida?. 

I. Geoffkov, quoted by Gtjerin Mexeville, Icon. Regne Animal, I, 1829-38; 
Mamm., 20, 1838. « 

Nomen nudum. "Ce genre [Phalangista] est divise par plusieurs auteurs en deux 
sous-genres: l'un, celui des Petauristes proprement dits, renferme presque 
toutes les especes; l'autre, celui des Voltigeurs, acrobata, Desm., ne comprend 
que le J', pigmseus. En outre, un troisieme sous-genre a ete distingue sous le 
nom d' Acropetes ]iar M. Isidore Geoffroy; ce dernier, outre quelques carac- 
teres moins importans, differe considerablement par le systeme dentaire." — 

GUERIN MENEVILLE. 

Acropetes: aicpov, top, height; 7tsro/nat, to fly — in allusion to its arboreal habits 
and its agility in leaping or flying. (Compare Acrobates. ) 
Acrostylops Ameghino, 1901. Tillodontia, Notostylopidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 421, July, 1901 (sep. p. 75). 
Type: A crostylops pungiunculus Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct, 
Acrostylops: a.Kpo%, pointed; 6tvAo$, pillar; oip, aspect. 

" Internal evidence indicates that the text was not published until 1838. 



ACROTHEKIUM ADAPISOREX 77 

Acrotherium Ameghino, 1887. Ungulata, Toxodontia, Nesodontidae. 

Enuni. Sist. Especies Mamif. Fos. Patagonia Austral, p. 17, Dec, 1887. 

Type: Acrotherium rusticum Ameghino, from the lower Tertiary of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Acrotherium: a.Kpo<;, pointed; ftrfpioy, wild beast. 

Actenomys Burmeister, 1888. Glires, -Qetodontidae. 

Anal. Mus. Nat-. Buenos Aires, III, ent. xv, 179, Oct., 1888. 

Type: Actenomys cuniculinus Burmeister from Monte Hermoso, near BahiaBlanca, 
Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Extinct. 

Actenomys: a, negative -\-Ctenomys. "Pero como de este genero, cada una de las 
cuatro muelas que siguen hacia atras, es sucesivamente m;is pequefia (jue la 
primera, no puede ser el animal fusil un Ctenomys verdadero, sino que se pro- 
nunciaen 61 un animal diferente, que propongo llamar Actenomys cuniculinus" 
(Burmeister). 

Aculeata Geofproy, 1795. Monotremata, Tachyglossidse. 

Bull. Sci. Soc. Philomatique, Paris, I (for 1791-96), 102-103, 1795; Thomas, 
Ann. Mus. Civico Storia Nat. Genova, ser. 2 a , XVIII, 621-622, Dec. 14, 
1897 (objections to the name). 

" L'etonnant animal de la Xouvelle-Hollande, recouvert par des piquans comme 
le pore-epic . . . qui est deceit par Georges Shaw (Naturalist's Miscellany, 
No. 39), sous le num de myrmecophaga aculeata, paroit avoir de tres grands 
rapports avec les pangolins et l'orycterope; d'ou il suit qu'au moyen de ces 
importantes acquisitions, on devra desormais compter au nombrede nos ordres 
les plus naturels, celui des edentes, composes des genres suivans: Dasipus, 
orycteropus, myrmecophaga, aculeata, nam is.' megaterium et bradypus." 

Aculeata: Latin aculeatus, prickly — from its spines. 
Acyon Ameghino, 1887. Marsupialia, Borhyaenidae. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamif. Fos. Patagonia Austral, p. 8, Dec, 1887. 

Type: Acycn tricuspidatus Ameghino, from the lower Tertiary of southern 
Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Argon: ex, negative; kvgov, dog. 
Adapis Cuvier, 1821. Primates, Adapidae. 

[Mem. Acad. Roy. Sci. Paris, V, Hist, Acad., 161, 1821-22, nomen nudum.] 

"Analyse des Trav. de l'Acad. des Sciences, pour 1821" (fide Desmarest); 
Recherches Ossem. Foss., nouv. ed., Ill, 265-267, pi. li, fig. 4 A, B, 1822; 
Desmarest, Mammalogie, II, Suppl., 545-546, 1822. 

Type: Adapis 2~>arisiensis Cuvier, from the upper Eocene gypsum beds of the Paris 
basin, France. 

Extinct. 

Adapis: "A name applied by Gesner, about 1550, to the common rabbit, Etym. 

unknown; referred doubtfully to Gr. d- intensive -} Sams, a rug, carpet." 

(Century Diet. ) Adopted for this genus on account of its resemblance in size 

and structure to the rabbit (Encyclopaedic Diet.). 

Adapisorex Lemoine, 1883. Insectivora, Adapisoricidae. 

[Recherches Oiseaux Foss. Reims, II, 76, 1881 — A, gaxidryi, A. remensis, A. min- 
im as, all nomina nuda.] 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, XCVII, No. 23, pp. 1325-1327, July-Dec, 1883; Bull. 
Soc Geol. de France, 3 e ser., XIII, for 1884-85, No. 3, p. 206, Apr., 1885. 

Type: Adapisorex gaudryi Lemoine, from the Eocene ('lafaune cernaysienne ' ) 
near Reims, France. 

Extinct. 



78 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Adapisorex — Continued. 

Adapisorex: Adapts + Sorex — "a cause den affinites qu'il me semble presenter 
a la foia avec les Adapides tertiairea et avec certains Insectivores actuels" 
(Lemoine). 
Adapisoriculus Lemoine, 1885. Insectivora, Adapisoricidse. 

Bull. Soc. Geol. de France, 3° ser., XIII, for 1884-85, No. 3, pp. 205, 212-213, pi. 
xi, figs. 13-16, Apr., 1885; XIX, No. 5, p. 277, pi. x, fig. -41, May, 1891. 

Type: Adapisoriculus minimus Lemoine, from the lower Eocene, near Reims, 
France. 

Extinct. Based on portions of lower jaws with teeth. 

Adapisoriculus: Dimin. of Adapisorex — " par suite de ses faibles dimensions et de 
la complication des molaires." 
Addax« Rafinesque, 1815. Fngulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidre. 

Analyse de la Nature, 56, 1815; Laurillakd in D'Orbigny's Diet. Univ. Hist. 
Nat., I, 619-621, 1841 (subgenus); Gray, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist,, XVIII, 232, 
Oct., 1846 (raised to generic rank) ; Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, 
IV, pt. xiv, 77-88, pi. lxxxvi, text figs. 95-97, May, 1899 (type fixed). 

Type not named by Rafinesque but evidently the Addax of the ancients ('Addax 
R. sp. do' [=espeee du genre precedent, Ant'dope~\) . Laurillard's subgenus 
includes 8 species: Antilope strepsieeros Pallas and A. suturosa Otto {=A. naso- 
macidata Blainville, type) from Africa; A. eurycerus Ogilby, from Senegambia; 
-•1. oreas Pallas, from Africa; A. cervicapra Pallas, from India; A.scripta, from 
Senegambia; A. sylvatica, from South Africa; and A. ogilby Waterhouse, from 
Fernando Po. 

Addax: Proper name — probably in allusion to the twisted horns. " Strepsiceros 
quem Addacem Africa apellat [Pliny]. But ... as the native Arab name 
of the present species [A. naso-maculatus], according to Hemprich and Ehren- 
berg, is 'Abu Akass' (the father of the twist), it seems highly probable that 
we have in it the veritable 'Addax' of the ancients" (Sclater & Thomas, 
1. c, p. 81). 
Adelomys Gervais, 1853. Glires, Theridomyidse or Pseudosciuridae. 

Gervais in Pictet's Traite Paleont., 2e ed., I, 244, 1853; Gervais, Zool. et 
Paleont, Franc., 2eme ed., 33 (synonym of Theridomys vaillanti), pi. 44, figs. 
27-28, pi. 46, fig. 10, 1859. 

Type: Theridomys vaillanti Gervais, from the upper Eocene lignites of Debruge 
near Apt, Dept. Vaucluse, southern France. 

Extinct. Based on portions of jaws. "J'avais d'abord pense quel'especequ 'ils 
representent indiquait un genre nouveau que je me proposais de decrire sous 
le nom d' Adelomys qui a ete cite par M. Pictet. Depuis lors j'ai recueilli 
. . . plusieurs autres debris tres-caracteristiques, que . . . m'ont permis de 
constater que l'espece a laquelle ils appartiennent rentre dans le genre des 
Theridomys''' (Gervais, 1859). 

Adelomys: aSr/Xos, unknown, obscure; mv<z, mouse — in allusion to the uncertain 
affinities of the genus. 
Adelonycteris H. Allen, 1892. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila. (for 1891), 466, Jan. 19, 1892; Mon. Bats N. Am. 
(1893), 111-121, pis. xv-xvn, Mar. 27, 1894. 

New name for Vesperus Keyserling & Blasius, 1839, which is preoccupied by Ves- 
perus Latreille, 1829, a genus of Coleoptera. 

Adelonycteris: adrjXoi;, obscure; vvKrtpic,, bat. 



a "Adace, die addaze'' Frisch (Das Natur-System vierfiiss. Thiere, in Tabellen, 
Tab. Gen., 1775) is an earlier spelling which may be entitled to recognition. 



ADELOTHERIUM ADIASTALTUS 79 

Adelotherium Ameghino, 1887. Ungulata, ? 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamff. Fds. Patagonia Austral, p. 20, Dec, 1887; Act. Acad. 

Nac. Cien., C6rdoba, VI, 619-620, 1889. 
Type: Adeloiherium scdbrosum Ameghino, from the lower Tertiary of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on the anterior part of the lower jaw. 
Adeloiherium: ad?}Ao<;, unknown, obscure; Bypiov, wild beast — "Mamifero . . . 

cuyas afinidades son diffieiles de precisar pues, solo se conoce un fragmento tie 

sfnfisis de la mandibula." 
Adelphomys Ameghino, 1887. (Hires, Octodontidse. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamff. Fds. Patagonia Austral, p. 10, Pec, 1887; Act. Acad. 

Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 139, 1889. 
Type: Adelphomys candidus Ameghino, from the lower Tertiary of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Adelphomys: aSekfios, brother; /<£?, mouse — from its resemblance to Myopotamus 

and Neoreomys. 
Adelphotherium Ameghino, 1887. Ungulata, Toxodontia, Nesodontidse. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamff. F6s. Patagonia Austral, pp. 16-17, Dec, 1887. 
Type: Adelphotherium ligatum Ameghino, from the lower Tertiary of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Adelphotherium: ddsAcpog, brother; Qr/piov, wild beast — froni its resemblance to 

Protoxodon. 
Adenonotus Brookes, 1828. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Tayassuidae. 

Prodromus Synop. Animalium, comprising a Catalogue Raisonne of the Zootom- 

ical Collection of Joshua Brookes, 8vo, London, 11, 1828 (previous to May). 
New name for Dicotyles Cuvier, 1817. The reference is as follows: "Peccaries 

(Genus Adenonotus Brookes, Dicotyles Cuv., Suslajassu Linn.)." 
Antedated by Tayassu G. Fischer, 1814; and by Notophorus G. Fischer, 1817. 
Adenonotus: aSrfv, d8evos, gland; vcoro<;, back — from the dorsal gland. 
Adenota Gray, 1847. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

List Osteol. Spec Brit. Mus., pp. xv, 146, 1847; Knowsley Menagerie, 14, Tab. 

14-15, 1850. 
Type: Antilope kob Erxleben, from Gambia, West Africa. 
Adenota: aSijv, <x8evos, gland; vgotoc,, back — in allusion to the small gland on 

the back. Compare Adenonotus Brookes, 1828. 
Adeotherium (see Adrotherium ) . Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriidse. 

Adianthus Ameghino, 1891. Ungulata, Litopterna, Adianthidse. 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat, I, Entr. 3a, 134-135, fig. 31, June 1, 1891. 
Adianius Ameghino, Enum. Syn. Mamm. Fos. Eocenes Patagonie, p. 27, Feb., 

1894. 
Type: Adianthus bucalus [sic] Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Adianthus: "Parerreur, ecrire Adianius, ddiavros, sec" (Ameghino). 
Adiastaltus Ameghino, 1893. Monotremata (Adiastaltidae). 

Revista Jard. Zool. Buenos Aires, 1, 77, Mar. 15, 1893; Revue Scientifique, LI, 

No. 23, 731, June 10, 1893. 
Type: Adiastaltus habilis Ameghino, from the Eocene beds of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on a humerus. " Je considere ce mammifere . . . comme un 

monotreme presentant quelques caraeteres d'Edente." 
Adiastaltus: d^/dfjrorAroj, not clearly distinguished, i. e. ambiguous — in allusion 

to its systematic position. 



80 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Adiastemus Ameghino, 1894. Edentata, Megalonychidae* 

Enura. Syn. Mamm. Foss. Form. Eocenes Patagonie, 161, Feb., 1894. 

Type: Adiastemus compressidens Ameghino, from the Eocene of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Adiastemus: a, without; Siddrr/jua, diastema, interval. 
Adinoth.eri.um Amegiii.no, 1887. Ungulata, Toxodontia, Nesodontidae. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamff. Fos. Patagonia Austral, pp. 17-18, Dec, 1887. 

Species, 5: Adinotherium magister Ameghino, A. splendidum Ameghino, A. proxi- 
mum Ameghino, A. ferurn Ameghino, and A. nilidum Ameghino, from the 
lower Tertiary of southern Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Adinotherium; a, negative; -f Dinotherium. 

Adjidaumo Hay, 1899. Glires, Geomyidse. 

Science, new ser., X, 253, Aug. 25, 1899; Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, 

U. S. Geol. Surv., 720, 1902. 

Type: Gymnoptychus minutus Cope, from the Oligocene of Colorado. 

Extinct. 

Adjidaumo: Indian name of a squirrel in Longfellow's poem 'Hiawatha,' pt.vin: 

"0 rny little friend, the squirrel, 
****** 

For hereafter and forever, 
Boys shall call you Adjidaumo, 
Tail-in-air the boys shall call you." 

Adpithecus Ameghino, 1901. Primates, Notopithecidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 355-356, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 9-10). 

Species: Adpithecus secans Ameghino, and A. amplidens Ameghino, from the 
'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Adpithecus: Latin, ad, toward, near; pithecus, ape. 
Adracodon Ameghino, 1889. Creodonta, Arctocyonida?. 

Mam. Fos. in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 967, 1889. 

Modification of . I '//'/ro// Filhol, 1881. The name occurs, without description, in 
a list of the genera of the Oligocene fauna of Europe. 

Extinct. 

Adracodon: a.8 po$, thick; ccki), point; odc&v = odovi, tooth. 

Adracon Filhol 1884. Creodonta, Arctocyonidse. 

Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, 7eme ser., IX, No. 1, pp. 19-21, 1884. 
Type: Adracon quercyi Filhol, from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 
Extinct. Based on "une portion de maxillaire inferieur. . . . Toute la partie 

anterieure de la mandibule manque, une partie des alveoles de la earnassiere 

subsiste et les tuberculeuses sont en place." 
Adracon: a.8p6$, thick, stout; cckoov, dart, point — in allusion to the cusps of the 

lower molars. 

Adrastotherium Ameghino, 1887. Ungulata, ? 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamff. Fos. Patagonia Austral, pp. 20-21, Dec, 1887; Act. 

Acad. Nac. Cien., Cdrdoba, VI, 620-621, 1889. 
Type: Adrastotherium dimotum Ameghino, from the lower Tertiary of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Adrastotherium: adpa6ro$, not running away; Brfpiov, wild beast. 
Adrotherium Filhol, 1883. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriida?. 

Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, 7 e ser., VII, 94-96, 1883; Thomas, Zool. Record 

for 1883, XX, Mamm., 45, 1884. 
[Hadro~]lherium Thomas, ibid., Index to New Genera, p. 6, 1884. 



ADROTHERIUM ^ELUEOPSIS 81 

Adrotherium — Continued. 

Adeotherium Nicholson & Lydekker, Man. Palreont., II, 1329, 1889 (misprint). 
Type: Adrolherium depression Filhol, from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 
Extinct, 

Adrotherium: adpoi, stout, large; Biypiov, wild beast. 
.ffigipan RafinesquE, 1815. Primates, Cebidae. 

Analyse de la Nature, 53, 1815. 

New name for Cebus Erxleben, 1777 ("JEgipan R. Cebus Erxl."). 
JEgipan: Aiyinav {ale, goat; llctv, Pan), appellation of the god Pan, in reference 
to his goat-like limbs, horns, and ears. 
Aegoceros Pallas, 1811. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidee. 

Zoograph. Rosso-Asiatica, I, 224-228, Tab. xv-xxi, 1811. 
(Egoccros Lesson, Man. Mamrn., 399, 1827 (under Oris ammon). 
Aegoccrns Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 1, 1842. 

Species, 7: Copra ibex Linnteus, C. segagrus Gmelin, C. hircus Linnpeus, Aegoceros 
ammon Pallas, Ae. musimon Pallas, Ae. argali Pallas, and Ac. oris Pallas, from 
Europe and Asia. 
Aegoceros: a/=, goat; Kepa<z, horn. 
^Egocoerus (see Egocerus). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Aello Leach, 1821. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

Trans. Linn. Soc. London, XIII, pt. i, 69, 70-71, 1821. 

Type: A'ello cuvieri Leach, probably from Jamaica or Cuba (locality not stated). 

Aello: 'AeXAoo, Storm-swift, one of the Harpies. 

-ffilurictis (see Ailurictis). Fene, Felidae. 

Aelurina (see Ailurin). Ferse, Felidie. 

^Elurodon Leidy, 1858. Ferge, Canidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. ScL Phila., 1858, 22. 

Type: .FJurodon ferox Leidy, from the Miocene of the valley of the Niobrara 

Ri\-er, Nebraska. 
Extinct. Based on "an isolated, unworn, upper sectorial molar tooth." 
jElurodon: ai'Aovpoz, cat; o8cov=6Sov<;, tooth — from the upper sectorial tooth 
which " has about the size and proportionate form of that of the common wolf 
of this country or Europe, but has a tubercule or lobe in advance of the princi- 
pal cusp, nearly as well developed as that occupying the same position in the 
cats.'' (Leidy.) 

..aSlurogale Filiiol, 1872. Fera?, Felidre. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, LXXV, No. 2, 93-94, July-Dec, 1872; Ann. Sci. Geol. 

Paris, III, Art. No. 7, pp. 10-14, pi. 16, figs. 23-25, 1872. 
Type: Mlurogale intermedia Filhol, from the phosphorites of Quercy, near Caylux, 

Dept. Tarn et Garonne, France. 
Name preoccupied by Ailurogale Fitzinger, 1869, a genus of living cats. Replaced 

by Ailurictis Trouessart, 1885. 
Extinct. Based on a jaw. 
Mlurogale: al'Aovpos, cat; yaXi}, weasel — "qui sert de lieu entre deux 

families . . . celle des chats ou Felins, celle des Martes on Musteline? . . . 

Par sa formule dentaire elle se rapproche des Putois, mais, independamment 

d'une taille trcs considerable . . . sa molaire principale est tranchante et 

absolument semblable a une dent de Felis." (Filhol. ) 
Aelurops (see Ailurops). Marsupialia, Phalangeridae. 

^ffiluropsis Lydekker, 1884. Fer;c, Felidae. 

Pala-ontologia Indica (Mem. Geol. Surv. India), ser. 10, II, pt. vi, 316-317, 

pi. xxxiii, fig. 4, Jan., 1884. 

7591— No. 23—03 6 



82 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

.flSluropsis — Continued. 

Type: Mluropsis annectam Lydekker from the Pliocene of the Siwalik Hills of 

Asnot, Punjab, India. 
Extiuct. Based on the posterior part of a right ramus. 
Aeluropsis: aiXovpoi, cat; oipis, appearance, 
.ffiluropus ( see Ailuropus ) . Ferrc, Ursidse. 

^lurotherium Adams, 1896. Ferae, Felida?. 

Am. Journ. Sci., 4th ser., I, 442, 443, June, 1896; Matthew, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. 
Hist., N. Y., XII, 41, 1899; Hay, Cat, Foss. Vert, N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. 
Surv., 778, 1902. 
Type: Patriqfelis leidyanus Wortman, from the Bridger Eocene of Wyoming. 
Extinct, Based on a "jaw fragment containing the third and fourth pre- 
molars and the first molar or sectorial." 
jEluvothevmm: al'kovpos, cat; Qrjpiov, wild beast. The genus "may be consid- 
ered as a probable ancestral form of all the Machgerodontime and brings 
them a step nearer the Creodonts." (Adams.) 
Aelurus, .ffilurus (see Ailurus) . Ferse, Procyonidae. 

Aeorestes Fitzixgek, 1870. Chiroptera, Vespertilionid;e. 

Sitzungsber. Math.-Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss., Wien, LXII, Abth. i, 427-436, Oct., 

1870 (sep. pp. 75-84). 
Species 4, from South America: Vespertilio villosissimus Geoffroy, and Y. albescens 
Geoff roy, from Paraguay; P. nigricans Maximilian, from the Rio Iritiba, Brazil; 
and V. /iris Geoffroy, from Brazil. 
Aeorestes: atooptoo, to hover or flit about — in allusion to its manner of flight. 
Aeosciurus (see Eosciurus). Glires, Sciuridse. 

-ffipeomys Thomas, 1898. Glires, Muridse, Cricetime. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., I, 452, June 1, 1898. 
Type: Oryzomys (?) lugens Thomas, from La Loma del Morro (altitude, 3,000 

meters), near Merida, Venezuela. 
fflpeomys: ainoc,, al'itEoc, height; pvs, mouse — in allusion to its elevated habitat, 
the type having been collected at an altitude of about 9,000 feet. 
Aepyceros Sundevall, 1847. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovid;e. 

K. Vetensk. Akad. Handlingar, for 1845-1846, 271, 1847. 
Type: Antilope mdampus Liechtenstein, from central Africa. 

Aepyceros: alitvc,, high; Kepac,, horn — from the long, lyrate, wide-spreading 
horns of the male, 
-ffipyprymnus Garkod, 1875. Marsupialia, Macropodidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1875, 59; Thomas, Cat. Marsiip. and Monotrem. Brit. 

Mus., 102-104, L888. 
Type: Bettongia rufescens <Tray, from New South Wales, Australia. 
Mpyprymnus: ctiitvc,, high; npi'iiva, stern — in allusion to the disproportionate 
development of the thighs and hind legs. (Compare Hypsiprymnus. ) 
Aesthenodon (see Asthenodon). Marsupialia, Amphitheriidse. 

Aesurus PvAfinesque, 1815. Fene, Procyonid;e. 

Analyse de la Nature, 59, 1815. 
New name f or Kirikajou Geoffroy = Kinkajou Lacepede, 1799 ( 'Aesurus R. Kinkajou 

Geof.'). 
Aesurus: ai)6vpos, light as air. 
Aethiops (subgenus of Cercopithecus) Martin, 1841. Primates, Cercopithecidae. 
Gen. Introd. Nat. Hist. Mammif. Anim., 506-508, 1841; Geoffroy, Diet. Univ. 

Hist, Nat,, III, 297, 1843. 
Based on 'the three White-eyelid Monkeys' of Africa. 
Aethiops: Latin aetldops, Ethiopian — in allusion to its habitat. 



AETHURUS AGNOTHERIUM. 83 

Aethurus De Winton, 1898. Glires, Anomaluridae. 

Minutes of Meeting Zool. Soc. London of May 17, 1898, p. 1, May 20, 1898; Zool. 

Anzeiger, XXI, Nr. 560, p. 380, June 2, 1898; Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1898, pt. 

in, Oct. 1, 450-454, pis. xxxiv-xxxv. 
Type: Aethurus glirinus De Winton, from the Benito River, French Kongo, Africa. 
Name antedated (by 3 days), by ZenkereUa Matschie, published May 17, 1898. 

Also preoccupied by Aithurus Cabanis, 1860, a genus of Birds. 
Aethurus: «//0;/?, unusual, curious; ovpd, tail. For about 30 millimeters from 

its base, the tail is clothed with soft fur; beyond this, on the lower surface, is 

a pad of 13 large scales similar to those found in Anomalurus; and at the outer 

end it is bushy, distichous, and squirrel-like. 
Agabelus Cope, 1875. Cete, Platanistidae. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XIV, 363, Jan. -June, 1875. 
Type: Agabelus porcatus Cope, from the Miocene of Cumberland County, New 

Jersey. 
Extinct. Based on "an osseous body which nearly resembles the elongate 

muzzle of a Priscodelphi)ms without teeth," etc. 
Agabelus: ayav, intensive prefix; fieAoz, dart — in allusion to the form of the 

type specimen. 
Agaphelus Cope, 1868. Cete, Balsenidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila., 1868, 159, 221-227. 
Species: Balsena gibbosa Erxleben (type), from the Atlantic Ocean; and A. glaucus 

Cope, from Monterey, California (see Cyphonotus Rafinesque, 1815). 
Agaphelus; ayav, very; dcpa\i)<;, smooth. "The dorsal line as far as the third 

caudal vertebra was entirely smooth without knob or fin, or scar of one, hence 

I suppose the fin to have been situated as in Sibbaldius and at the posterior 

fourth of the length . . . the gular and thoracic regions were seen to be 

entirely without ridges or plicae of any kind, but as smooth as any other part 

of the body, or as the throat of a right ^hale, B. cisarctica Cope" (Cope). 
Aglophema Rafinesque, 1814. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Phocidae? 

"Osserv. sul Gen. Phoca nello Specchio delle Seienze, o Giornale Encic. di 

Sicilia, Palermo, II, 1814," (fide Mina Palumbo); Analyse de la Nature, 60, 

1815; Haldeman, Am. Journ. Sci. and Arts, XLII, 284, 1842 (type fixed); 

Mina Palumbo, Cat, Mamm. Sicilia, Ann. Agr. Sic, 2d ser., XII, 107, 1868. 
Species: Aglophema phoca Rafinesque ( =' Phoca pusilla Linn,'* type), and A. macu- 

lata Rafinesque. 
Aglophema: dyXadi, splendid; 0>)yUty, fame. 
Agnocyon Kaup, 1862. Ferae, Hy;enidae. 

"Beitriige zur naheren Kenntniss der urweltlichen Saugethiere, Heft V, 16, Tab. 

II, fig. 3," 1862, fide Sciilossek, Beitr. Pakiont. Oesterreieh-Ungarns. VIII, 

418, 419, 1890. 
Includes Agnocyon pomeli Kaup, from the Upper Miocene or Lower Pliocene of 

Eppelsheim, Rhein-Hessen, Germany. 
Extinct. Based on a first lower molar. 
Agnocyon: dy v chg, unknown; kvgov, dog. 
Agnotherium Kaup, 1833. Ferae, Hyaenidae. 

Descr. Ossem. Foss. Mamm. Mus. Darmstadt, second cahier, 28-30, Atlas, Tab. 

I, figs. 34, (Carnivora), 1833; Giebel, Saugethiere, 758, footnote, 1859. 
Type: Agnotherium antiquum Kaup, from the Upper Miocene or Lower Pliocene 

of Eppelsheim, Rhein-Hessen, Germany. 
Extinct, Based on one molar and one canine. 
Agnotherium: dyvcbs, unknown; Or/pi'ov, wild beast. 

*"A wholly mythical 'Otary.' "—Allen, Mon. N. A. Pinnipeds, 1880, 194, foot- 
note. 



84 INDEX GENEEUM MAMMALIUM. 

Agorophius Cope, 1895. Cete, Squalodontidae. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XXXIA T , No. 147, p. 139, May 29, 1895; Am. Naturalist, 
XXIX, No. 342, p. 573, June, 1895. 

Type: Zeuglodon pygmseus Midler, from the Eocene of Ashley River, about 10 
miles from Charleston, South Carolina. (Locality fide Leidy, Journ. Acad. 
Nat. Sci. Thila., 2d ser., VII, 420, 1869.) 

Extinct. Based on a mutilated skull. 

Agorophius: ayav, intensive prefix, very; opocp?}, roof— in allusion to the 
marked elongation of the superior cranial wall of the skull. 
Agouti Lacepede, 1799. Glires, Dasyproctidse. 

Tableau des Divisions, Sous-divisions, Ordres et Genres des Mammiferes, 
9, 1799; Nouv. Tableau Meth., Mamm., in Buffon's Hist. Nat,, Didot ed., 
Quad., XIV, 166, 1799; Mem. l'Institut, Paris, III, 494, 1801 (type fixed); 
Palmer, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XI, 243, 248, Dec. 17, 1897; Miller & Rehn, 
Proc. Boston Soc. Nat. Hist,, XXX, 175, Dec, 1901. 

Agilii Froriep in DumeriPs Anal. Zool., aus Franz, mit Zusatzen, 19, 1806. 

Type: Agouti paca ( =Muspaea Linna?us), from South America. 

Agouti: The native name, probably the same as acuti, attentive, vigilant — in ref- 
erence to the habits of the animals. (See explanation under Cittia. ) 
Agricola (subgenus of Arvicola) Blasius, 1857. Glires, Muridfe, Microtinse. 

Naturgesch. Saugeth. Deutschlands, 334-335, 368-374, figs. 202-206, 1857. 

Type: Mus agrestis Linnaeus, from Europe. 

Agricola: Lat. ager, field; colo, to till, to cultivate — 'field mouse,' from its oecur- 
rence in fields, etc. 
Agrichcegus Gore, 1874. Ungulata, Artiodactyla ? 

Glossary Fossil Mamm., 5, 1874. 

"A genus of Ruminant, having some affinities with Meri/copotamus; found in 
Miocene deposits in North America." — Gore. This name has not been found 
except in this place. It is evidently not a misprint for Agriochccrus, as the 
latter name follows it in the Glossary and is defined as "a genus of Mammals 
. . . allied to the Oreodon." 

Extinct. 
Agriochoerus Leidy, 1850-51. TJngulata, Artiodactyla, Agriochceridse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 121-122, 1850-1851; Cope, Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, 
XXI, 559-570, 1884. 

Type: Agriochccrus antiquus Leidy, from the Oligocene of South Dakota. 

Extinct. Based on "a great portion of the face and inferior maxilla, contain- 
ing six molar teeth on each side, and the posterior two molars of both sides 
superiorly of another individual." 

Agriochoerus: aypioc,, wild; x°~ 1 P°^j hog. 
Agriodus (subgenus of Cards), H. Smith, 1840. Fene, Canidae. 

Jardine's Naturalist's Library, Mamm., X, 258-261, 1840; 2d ed., Mamm., I, 
152, 1858; V, 258-261, 298, pi. 23* 2 figs, in text, 1865. 

Type: Agriodus auritus H. Smith ( = Canis megalotis Desmarest), from the Cape 
of Good Hope. 

"The anomalous character of the teeth indicates the food of the Agriodus to differ 
considerably from that of other Carridse, and no doubt the manners of the species 
are equally influenced by this conformation. These considerations induced us 
to prefer the name here assigned to the subgenus to that of Megalotis, which 
Illiger originally bestowed upon the Fennecs." Antedated by Otocyon Mid- 
ler, 1836. 

Agriodus: aypiog, wild (possibly in the sense of aberrant); oSov?, tooth. This 
genus has 4fi or 48 teeth, including a greater number of molars than is pos- 
sessed by any other heterodont mammal. 



AGRIOMERYX AILURICTIS. 85 

Agriomeryx Marsh, 1894. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agriochoeridse. 

Am. Journ. Sci., 3d ser., XLVIII, No. 285, pp. 270-271, fig. 24 in text, Sept., 1894. 
Type: Agriomeryx migrans Marsh, from the Oligocene of South Dakota. 
Extinct. 

Agriomeryx: aypioG, wild; pi}pv£, ruminant. 
Agriotherium A. Wagner, 1837. Ferse, Ursidte. 

Gelehrte Anzeigen K. Bayer. Akad. Wiss., Munchen, V, Nr. 170, p. 335, Aug. 26, 

1837. 
Type: Vrsus sivalensis Falconer & Cautley, from the Pliocene of the Siwalik Hills, 

India. 
Extinct. 

Agriotherium: aypiog, wild; Orjpiov, beast. 
Agriotherium Scott, 1898. Ungulata Artiodactyla, Agriochu-ridie. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XXXVII, 79-81, Apr. 15, 1898 (sep. pp. 7-8). 
Type: AgriotJierium paradoxicum Scott, from the Eocene of the Uinta Basin of 

northeastern Utah. 
Name preoccupied by Agriotherium Wagner, 1837, a genus of Fera?. Replaced 

by C'horotherium Berg, 1899. (Agriotherium Scott should be referred to Pro- 

toreodon — Scott in epist., Sept. 14, 1898). 
Extinct. 

Agriotherium: aypioz, wild; 0?/piov, beast. 
Agustylus Ameghino, 1887. Marsupialia, Borhysenida?. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mam if. Fus. Patagonia Austral, 7-8, Dec, 1887. 
Type: Agustylus cynoides Ameghino, from the lower Tertiary of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Agustylus: ayw, to carry; 6rvXo?, pillar, point (Ameghino). 
Aguti (see Agouti). Glires, Dasyproctidse. 

Aigocerus (subg. of Antilope) II. Smith, 1827. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 
Griffith's Cuvier, Anim. Kingdom, Y, 324-325, 1827; Sclater & Thomas, Book 

of Antelopes, IV, 3, 1899 (in synonymy — type fixed). 
Species 4, from Africa: Antilope leucophsea Pallas (type), A. equina Desmarest, A. 
jgrandicorn is Hermann, and JL barbata II. Smith. Apparently a modified form 

of Egocerus Desmarest, 1822; preoccupied by Aegoceros Pallas, 1811, a genus 

of goats. (See Ozanna Reichenbach, 1845.) 
Aigocerus: a i£, goat; Keptxs, horn. 
Ailuravus Rutimeyer, 1891. Glires, Sciuridse. 

"Abhandl. Schweiz. Pal. Gesellsch., XVIII, 97, pi. vn, figs. 18-19, 1891;" 

Lydekker, Zool. Record for 1892, XXIX, Mamm. 15, 31, 1893; Forsyth 

Major, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1893, 193 (shown to be a rodent). 
Type: Ailuravus picteti Rutimeyer, from the Upper Eocene of Egerkingen, Switzer- 
land. 
Extinct. Based on two lower molars. 
Ailuravus: ai*kovpo<z, cat; aims, ancestor. Originally regarded as an ancestral 

carnivore, hence the name. 
Ailurictis Trouessart, 1885. Ferae, Felidte. 

La Grande Encyclopedic, I, 954, 1885; Cat. Mamm. Viv. et Foss., Carnivores, 

92-93, 1885. 
JElurietis Lydekker, in Nicholson & Lydekker's Man. Pakeont., II, 1446, 1889; 

Lydekker, in Flower & Lydekker's Mamm., Living & Extinct, 524, 1891. 
New name for ^Elurogale Filhol, 1872 (type, A. intermedia — an extinct species 

from France), which is preoccupied by Ailurogale Fitzinger, 1869 (type Felis 

planiceps Vigors & Horsfield, from Sumatra). 
Extinct. 
Ailurictis: ai'Xovpos, eat; /"kt/j, weasel. 



86 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Ailurin* (subgenus of Felis) Geevais, 1855. Ferae, Felidae. 

Gervais, Hist. Nat. Mamm., II, 86-87, 1 fig. in text, 1855. 

Aelurina Gill, Arrangement Fam. Mamm., 60, 1871. 

Ailurina Tkouessart, Cat. Mamm., Carnivores, in Bull. Sue. d'Etudes Scientif. 
d' Angers, Suppl. l'annee 1884, 100, 1885. 

Type: Felis planiceps Vigors & Horsfield, from Sumatra. 

Ailurin: aiXovpos, cat. 
Ailurogale Fitzinger, 1869. Ferae, Felidae. 

Sitzimgsber. Mat. -Nat, CI. K. Akad. Wiss., Wien, LX, lste Abth., 249-251, 1869. 

Type: Felis plant Iceps Vigors & Horsfield, from Sumatra. 

See Ailurin Gervais, 1855; and Tctailurus Severtzow, L858. 

Ailurogale: ai'\ovpo<;, cat; yak?}, weasel. 
Ailurogale Filhol (see .asiurogale ) . Fene, Felidae. 

Ailuropoda Milne-Edwards, 1870. Ferae, Ursidae. 

Ann. Sci, Nat., Paris, 5° ser., Zool., XIII, art. No. 10, 1870; Comptes Rendus, 
Paris, LXX, 342, 1870. 

Ailuropus Milne-Edwards, Nouv. Archives Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, VII, Bull. 
92, 1871; Rechercbes Hist, Nat. Mamm., I, 321-338; II, pis. 50-56, 1873. 

^Fluropns Lydekker, in Flower & Lydekker's Mamm., Living & Extinct, 560- 
561, fig. 256, 1891. 

Type: Ursus melanoleucus David, from Moupin, eastern Tibet, 

Ailuropoda: Ailurus; novs, foot — from the resemblance of its feet to those of 
Ailurus. 
Ailuraps Wagler, 1830. Marsupialia, Phalangeridae. 

Nat. Syst. Amphibien, 26, 1830; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. 
Mus., 193, 1888 (in synonymy, type fixed). 

JElurops Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Index Univ., 9, 1846; ed. 2, [>. .'14, 1848. 

Species, 4: Phalangista ursina, Temminck (type), from Celebes; P. chrysorrhos 
Temminck, P. maculata Temminck, and P. cavifrons Temminck, from the 
Malay Archipelago. Name antedated by Ceonix Temminck, 1S27. 

May be preoccupied by Ail/imps Michaelles, 1830, a genus of Reptilia. 

Ailurops: ai'Xovpoz, cat; oip, aspect — from its size and general appearance. 
Ailuropus Milxe-Edwards, 1871. Ferae, Ursidae, 

Nouv. Archives Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, VII, Bull. 92, 1871; Recherches Hist. 
Nat. Mamm., I, 321-338, II, pis. 50-56, 1873; Gervais, Journ. Zool., IV, 87. 
1875 (in synonymy). 

Mluropus Lydekker, in Flower & Lydekker's Mamm., Living & Extinct, 560- 
561, fig. 256, 1891. 

Emendation of Ailuropoda Milne-Edwards, 1870. " Le mot Ailuropoda ayant ete 
employe precedemment par M. Gray dans une acception differente [as a sec- 
tion, including the Cat-footed Carnivora — see Cat. Cam. Brit. Mus., pp. 3, 5, 
1869] j'ai cru devoir le modifier de la maniere indiquee ci-dessus." (Milxe- 
Edwards, Recherches, p. 321 footnote. ) 

Ailuropus is antedated by Pandarctos Gervais, 1870. 

Ailuropus: Ailurus; nov$, foot — from the resemblance of its feet to those of 
.1 Hunts. 

Ailurus F. Cuvier, 1825. Fera?, Procyonidae. 

Hist, Nat. Mamm., V, livr. L, pi. with 3 pp., text under 'Panda,' June, 1825. 
Aelurus Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Index Univ., 9, 1846; Van der Hoeven, 

Handb. Dierkunde, 2d ed., II, 1015, 1855. 
.E/urus Flower, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1870, 752-769, 10 figs, in text. 
Type: Ailurus fulgens F. Cuvier, from the southeastern Himalayas, India. 

* Possibly only a common name in the first reference, but used as a genus by Gill, 
and as a subgenus by Trouessart. 



AILUKUS ALCE. 87 

Ailurus-- Continued. 

AUurus: aikovpoz, cat, later a weasel (perhaps from aioXos, quick moving, and 
ov/jd, tail) — so called from its resemblance exteriorly to a cat. "This was 
not a very happy choice, as in all structural characters indicative of true 
affinity it is almost as widely removed from the true Cats as any member of 
the group of terrestrial Carnivora." (Flower, 1. c, 753.) 
Akenodon Aymard, 1856. Edentata ? 

Congres Sci. France (1855), I, 233, 265, 1856 (nomen nudum?); Gervais, Zool. 
et Paleont. Francaises, 6d. 2, 255, 1859; Filhol, Ann. Sci. Geol., Paris, XII, 
art. 3, p. 3, 1882. 

Type: Akenodon primsevus Aymard, from the Lower Miocene of Ronzon, near Puy 
en Velay, France. 

Extinct. 

Akenodon: ccKTf, point; d8dbv= oSoi'S, tooth. 

Akodon Meyen, 1833. Glires, Muridse, Cricetime. 

Nova Acta Acad. Cses. Leop.-Carol., XVI, pt. ir, 599-600, tab. xliii, fig. 1, 1833; 

Reise um die Erde, III, 1834. 
Acodon Aoassiz, Index Univ., 5, 1846; 2d ed., 12, 1848; Thomas, Ann. it Mag. 

Xat. Hist., 6th ser., XIV, No. 83, 360-364, Nov. 1, 1894. 
Axodon Giebel, Odontographie, 48, 1855 (emendation). 
Type: Akodon boliviense Meyen, from Pichu-pichun (alt. 14,000 feet), Peru. 
Akodon: O.K7}, point; ddcoi' = 68ov<;, tooth. 
A.lachtherium Dr Bus, 1867. Fer;e, Pinnipedia, Odobenidse. 

Bull. Acad. Roy Sci. Belgique, 2? ser., XXIV, 566, 1867. 

Alorhtmntn Van Bknkdkx, ibid., XXXII, 181, 1871; XLI, 794, 1876 (misprint). 
Type: Alachtherium cretsii Du Bus, from the Upper Crag of the Fort de Wyne- 

ghem, near Antwerp, Belgium. 
Kxtinet. Based on "une moitie complete de machoire inferieure." 
Alactaga (see Allactaga) . Glires, Dipodidre. 

Alactagulus (subg. of Alactaga) Nehring, 1897. Glires, Dipodida 1 . 

Sitzungsl). (tcs. Naturf. Freunde, Berlin, Nr. 9, pp. 151-154, rig. 1, Nov. 16, 1897. 
Type: Alactaga acontion (=Dipus aconti&n Pallas), from southwestern Siberia. 
Alactagulus: Dim. of Alactaga. 
Adastor Weithofer, 1887. Chiroptera, Rhinolophid;e. 

"Anz. Math.-Naturwiss. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, 285, 1887" (fide Zool. Rec 

for 1887, Mamm., 30); Sitzungsber. Math.-Naturwiss. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. 

Wien, XCVI, Ahth. I, fur Jun.-Dec, 1887, 350-351, Taf. figs. 5-8, 1888. 
Type: Alastor heliophygas Weithofer, from the Quercy Phosphorites of Escampes, 

near Lablengue, Dept. Lot, France. 
Extinct. Based on a skull without the lower jaw. 

Alastor: \\Xd6roop, a surname of Zeus, the avenging deity, lit., the unforgetting. 
Adbertogaudrya Ameghino, 1901. 

Ungulata, Astrapotheroidea (Albertogaudryi(he). 
Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 399-400, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 53-54). 
Type: Albertogaudrya unica Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Albertogaudrya: In honor of Albert Gaudry, 1827-, professor of Paleontology in 

the Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris; author of 'Animaux Fossiles et 

Geologie de l'Attique,' 1862-67, ' Enchainements du Monde Animal,' 1878-96, 

etc. 

A.lce Frisch, 1775. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervida?. 

Das Natur-System vierfiiss. Thiere, in Tabellen, 3, Tab. Gen., 1775; II. Smith, 
Griffith's Cuvier, Anim. Kingdom, V, 303-304, 1827. 



88 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Alec — Continued. 

Alces Gray, London Med. Repos., XV, No. 88, p. 307, Apr. 1, 1821; Kaip, 
Entw.-Gesch. und Natiirl. Syst. Europ. Thierwelt, I, 178, 179, 1821). 

Type: ' Das Elendthier ' (Cerrus alces Linnaeus), from Europe. 

Alee: ciXki), elk. 
Alee Blumenbach, 1799. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervkhe. 

Handb. Naturgesch., 6'° Auflage, 697, 1799; "Beitr. Naturgesch., 1st French ed., 
II, 407, 1803" (fide Lydekker, Deer of all Lands, 125, 134, 1898). 

Type: Alee gigantea Blumenbach (=Megaceros Mbernicus Owen, 1844), from 
Ireland. 

Name preoccupied by Alee Frisch, 1775, based on Cervus alces. 

Extinct. 
Alcelaphus Blaixviije, 1816. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, May, 1816, 75; Sclater& Thomas, Book of Ante- 
lopes, I, pt. i, 5, 7, Aug., 1894 (in synonymy, type fixed). 

Species: Antilope bubalis Pallas, 1767 (=-1. buselaphus Pallas, 1766 — type), from 
North Africa; and A. caama G. Cuvier, from South Africa. 

Alcelaphus: AlceA-Elaphus. 
Alcelaphus Gloger, 1841. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Hand- u. Ililfsbuch Naturgesch., I, 143-144, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. Nat. 
Hist., 6th ser., XV, 191, Feb. 1, 1895. 

Type: Alcelaphus alee ( = Cervus alces Linnaeus), the elk of northern Europe. 

Name preoccupied by Alcelaphus Blainville, 1816, a genus of African antelopes. 

Alcelaphus: aXkcr}, elk; eXatpos, deer. 
Alces (see Alee Frisch. ). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Alcicephalus Pooler & Weithofer, 1890. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Girafhdae. 

Anzeiger Math.-Xaturwiss. CI. K. Akad. Wiss., Wien, XXVII, Nr. xvi, 154, 155, 
1890; Denkschrift, Math.-Naturwiss, CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, LVII, 754-765, 
Taf. i-iii, iv figs. 1-4, 1890. 

Species: Alcicephalus neumayri Rodler & Weithofer, and A. codophrys Rodler & 
Weithofer, both from the Pliocene of Maragha, northwestern Persia. 

Extinct. 

Alcicephalus: ccXki'/, elk; tcscpaX)}, head. 
Alectops Gray, 1866. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 114, fig. in text. 

Type: Alectops ater Gray, from Surinam. 

Alectops: \lXi]KT(b, Alecto, in Greek mythology, one of the three Furies; ooip, 

face (see Megsera) — probably in allusion to the animal's grotesque appearance. 

Aliama Gray, 1864. Cete, Physeteridae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 242-243. 

Type: Delphinus desmarestii Risso, from the Mediterranean Sea. 

Aliama: a'/lzoj, belonging to the sea. 
Aligon Haeckel, 1895. Ungulata, ? 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 530, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus, supposed to occur in the Upper Eocene. 
Allacodon Marsh, 1889. Allotheria, Bolodontidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXVIII, 178-179, pi. yiii, figs. 17-31, Aug., 
1889. 

Species: Allacodon lentus Marsh (type), and .1. pumUus Marsh, from the Cre- 
taceous (Laramie) of Wyoming. 

Extinct. "Represented by a number of teeth, several of which were found 
together." 

Allacodon: aXXog, other, strange; ccki), point; 68cbi' = oSov<;, tooth — inallusionto 
the pointed upper molars which "resemble the corresponding teeth oiAlloelon, 
but the cones are more pointed, and there is no true basal ridge." (Marsh.) 



ALLACTAGA ALOUATTA. 89 

Allactaga F. Cuvier, 1836. Glires, Dipodidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1830, 141-142. 

A lactaga Cuvier, Trans. Zool. Soc. London, II, loo, ISMS. 

Type: Dipus alactaga (= Mus jaculus Pallas) from southern Russia and south- 
western Siberia. "A distinct genus for the Jerboas, with live toes, adopting 
the name Allactaga, given by Pallas to a species, as the common generic 
appellation. ' ' (Cuvier. ) 

Allactaga: Aiak-daagha, the Mongol name for Dipus jaculus; from alak, varie- 
gated; daagha, colt. (Pallas, Glires, 291, 1778.) 
Allodon Maesh, 1881. Allotheria, Bolodontidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXI, 511-512, June, 1881. 

Type: Allodon laticeps Marsh, from the Upper Jurassic (Atlantosaurus beds) of 
Wyoming. 

Extinct. Based on "a left upper jaw, with molar and premolar teeth." 

Allodon: aAAos, other, strange; 68&>v = 6Sov<;, tooth — in allusion to the 
premolars.* 
Allomys Marsh, 1877. Glires, Sciuridse (Allomyidae). 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XIV, 253, fig. in text, Sept., 1S77. 

Type: Allonujs nit ens Marsh, from the Miocene (John Day) of Oregon. 

Extinct. 

Allomys: aAAos, other, strange; pvz, mouse. "Probably related to the flying 
squirrels, but the teeth are somewhat like those of ungulates." (Marsh. ) 
Allops Marsh, 1887. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXIV, 331, Oct., 1887; Osborn, Bull. Am. 
Mus. Nat. Hist. N. Y., XVI, 102-103, fig. 7, 1902. 

Type: Allops serotinus Marsh, from the Oligocene (Brontotherium beds) of South 
Dakota. 

Extinct. Based on " a well-preserved skull and various other remains." 

Allojis: of A A of, other, strange; oip, aspect — "another genus nearly related to 
Brontotherium,'' in addition to Brontops, Menops, and Titanops. 
Alobus (subgenus of VespertUio) Peters, 1867. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, 707, Nov., 1867. 

Type: VespertUio {Alobus) temminckii Riippell, from northeast Africa. 

Name preoccupied by Alohas Le Conte, 1856, a genus of Coleoptera. 

Alobus: aAo/los, without a lobe — in allusion to 'den ganzljchen Mangel eines 
Spornlappeus. ' 
Alopex Kaup, 1829. Fera±, Canidaa. 

Entw.-Gesch. & Natiirl. Syst. Europ. Thierwelt, I, 83, 85, 1829. 

Type: Canis lagopus Linnaeus, from Arctic Eurasia. 

Alopex: a\.d>it7}%, fox. 
Alopsis Rafinesque, 1815. Fera?, Canidse. 

Analyse de la Nature, 59, 1815 (nomen nudum). 

Type: Canis sp. ('Alopsis R. sp. do.' [espece du genre precedent, Canis]). 

Alopsis: Contraction of «Ac»7rof, fox; oipi$, appearance. 
Alouatta Lacepede, 1799. Primates, Cebidaa. 

Tableau des Divisions, Sous-divisions, Ordres et Genres des Mammiferes, 4, 1799; 
Nouv. Tableau Method. Mamm., in Buffon's Hist. Nat., Didot ed., Quad., XIV, 
148, 1799; Mem. l'lnstitut, Paris, III, 490, 1801; Muirhead, in Brewster's 
Edinburgh Encyclopedia, XIII, 404, 1830; Miller & Rehn, Proc. Boston Soc. 
Nat. Hist, XXX, 296-297, Dec, 1901 (type fixed). 

Aluatta Fischer, Zoognosia, II, 549-552, 1813; Slack, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. 
Phila., 1862, 515-519. 

* Marsh says: " There are 5 premolars and 2 molars." Two of the former are now 
regarded as molars. 



*M) INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 

Alouatta, — Continued. 

Alouata Trouessart, Cat. Mamni., new ed., I, 32-34, 1897. 
Type: Simla beelzebul Linnaeus, from Brazil. 
Alouatta: Native name. 
Alticamelus Matthew, 1901. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Camelidae. 

Mem. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., New York, I, pt. vn, 426, 429-432, pi. xxxix, Nov., 

1901. 
Type: Procamelus altus Marsh, from the Miocene (Loup Fork beds) of the John 

Day basin, < >regon. 
Extinct. Based on a skull, and bones of the neck and hind limb. 
Alticamelus: bat. altus, high; -j Camelus — in allusion to the long neck, which gives 

the animal almost the height of a modern giraffe. 
Alticola (subgenus of Arvicola) Blanford, 1881. Glires, Muridae, Microtinae. 

Journ. Asiatic Soc. Bengal, L, pt. n, 93, 95, 96, pi. i tigs, b-e, July 30, 1881; 

Fauna British India, Mamm., 430, 1888-91; Miller, N. Am. Fauna, No. 12, 

52-54, pi. ii, fig. 4, text figs. 26-27, July 23, 1896; Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. 

Phila., L899, 291-297, lig. 4. 
Type: A rvicola stoliczkanus Blanford, from the high plateaus of northern Ladak, 

western Tibet. 
Alticola: bat. alius, high; colo, to dwell, to inhabit — from the animal's elevated 

habitat at altitudes of 9,000 to 10,000 feet or more. 
Aluatta (see Alouatta). Primates, Cebidae. 

Alus Gray, 1825. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse? 

Thomson's Annals Philos., XXVI, 342, Nov., 1825. 
Nomen nudum (ex Pliny). 
Alviceola Blaixville, 1817. Glires, Murida?, Microtinae. 

Nouv. Diet. Hist. Nat., IX, 287-288, 1817. 
'Le Genre Campagnol;' type species not mentioned. Probably a misprint for 

Arvicola Lacepede, 1799. 
Amarorhynchus Ameghino, 1894. Edentata, Megalonychidae. 

Enum. Synop. Mamm. Foss. Form, fiocenes Patagonie, 147, Feb., 1894. 
Type: Amarorhynchus Intii* Ameghino, from the Eocene of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Amarorhynchus: djudpa, channel; pvyxos, snout — in allusion to the lower jaw. 

"Mandibule courte, haute et large, avec la symphyse profondement excavee 

et qui termine dans un espece de bee large, plat, et arrondi." (Ameghino.) 

Ambliodon .Ioikoan, 1837. Fene, Viverridae. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, Y, 445-446, 1837; Blaixville, Ann. Sci. Nat,, Paris, 

•2- ser., VIII, 276, 1837. 
Amblyodon Gray, Prod. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 541-542. 
Type: 'L'ambliodon dore' (Paradoxurus auratus Blainville=P. jourdanii Gray), 

from India. (See Gray, 1. c, p. 542.) 
Ambliodon: an(J\i'i, blunt; 6S(bv = 6Sovi, tooth — from the blunt, rounded cusps 

of the posterior premolar and of the molars. 
Amblirhiza (see Amblyrhiza). Glires, Castoroidid;e. 

Ambloctonus Cope, 1875. Creodonta, Ambloetonidae. 

Syst. Gat. Vert., Eocene New Mexico, 5,7-9, Apr. 17, 1875; Kept. U. S. Geol. 

Survey West 100th Merid., IY, pt, ii, 90-94, pi. xxxm, 1877. 
Amblyctonus Cope, Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XIX, 79, 80, 1880. 
Amblyctomus Cope, in Scudder's Nomenclator Zool., pt. i, 360; pt, n, 13, 1882; 

Trouessart, Cat. Mamm. Viv. etFoss., Carnivores, 8, 1885. 
Type: Ambloctonus sinosus Cope, from the Eocene of New Mexico. 



AMBLOCTONUS AMBLYRHIZA. 91 

Ambloctonus — Continued. 

Extinct. Based on "the greater part of the dentition of one side of the cranium 

and that of the posterior part of the mandible, with a number of hones of the 

limbs." 
Ambloctonus: <i///JAt>s, blunt (toothed); Kreivoo, to kill. 

Amblonyx (subgenus of Luira), Rafinesque, 1832. Ferae, Mustelidae. 

Atlantic Journal, I, No. 2, 62, summer of 1832. 
Type: Lutra concolor Rafinesque, from Assam, British India. 
. Amblonyx: ajufi\v$, blunt; oV"4, claw — from its short, blunt claws. 

Amblosia (see Amblotis). Marsupialia, Phascolomyidae. 

Amblotherium Owen, 1871. Marsupialia, Amphitheriidse. 

Mesozoic Mamm. in Mon. Palaeontograph. Soc, XX1Y, No. 5, pp. 29-32, pi. n, 

figs. 1-2, 1871. 
Type: Amblotherium soridnum Owen, from the Purbeck of Durdlestone Bay, 

Swanage, Dorsetshire, England. 
Extinct. Based on a right mandibular ramus. 
Amblotherium: d/i/JAooo, to abort; Bypiov, wild beast — from its small size. 

Amblotis Illiger, 1811. Marsupialia, Phascolomyidse. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 77, 1811. 

Amblosia Illiger, Abhandl. K. Akad. Wiss. Berlin, for 1811, p. 12s, 1815 (mis- 
print). 

Type: Wombatus fossor Geoff roy (=Didelphis ursina Shaw), from Tasmania. 

Name antedated by Phascolomis Geoffroy, 1803; and by Vombalus Geoffroy, 1803. 

Amblotis: a/ifJAoo6i<;, aborted — from the rudimentary tail and the very short, 
nailless hallux. 

Amblychilus (i. Fischer' 1814. Sirenia, Dugongidse. 

Zoognosia, III, 638-639, 1814. 

New name for the Dugong, which had been previously named Platystomus. 
"Hoc caput quani maxime obtusum reddit, etsi os inferius nihil confert. 
Quapropter et nomen Platystomi, et in genere propter terminationem similem 
ssepius recurrentem, mutatum fuit" (Fischer, 1. c. Ill, p. 639). 

Amblychilus: a/i/3\v$, blunt; ^£/Aos, lip. 

Amblyctomus, Amblyctonus (see Ambloctonus). Creodonta, Paleeonictidse. 

Amblyodon (see Ambliodon). Fer;e, Viverridse. 

Amblyotus (subg. of Exochura) Kolenati, 1858. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 
Sitzungsber. Math. -Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, XXIX, Nr. 9, pp. 252-256, figs. 

1-5 in text, Mar., 1858; Fitzinger, ibid., LXII, i Abth., Oct. 1870, 414-418 

(sep., Abth. v, pp. 62-66). 
Type: Amblyotus atratus Kolenati, from the mountains of Silicia, Austria ( Altva- 

ter, etc., alt. 2,400-4,600 ft.). 
Name preoccupied by Amblyottus Amyot A Serville, 1S43, a genus of Hemiptera. 
Amblyotus: dju/3Av<;, blunt; ovs, cards, ear. 

Amblyrhiza Cope, 1868. Glires, Castoroididse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1868, 313. 

Amblirliiza Gervais & Ameghino, Mamm. Fos. Am. du Sud, 64, 1880 (misprint). 
Type: Amblyrhiza inundata Cope, from the cave deposits of Anguilla, West 

Indies. 
Extinct. 
Amblyrhiza: d/i/?Aus, blunt; /oz'Ca, root — from "the roots of the teeth [which] 

were contracted and not so open as in many Rodents." (Cope.) 



92 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Amblysomus (subg. of Chrysochioris) Pomel, 1848. Insectivora, Chrysoehloridse. 

Archiv. Sci. Phys. et Nat., Geneve, IX, 247, Nov., 1848; Gill, Bull. U. S. Geol. & 
Geog. Survey Terr., 1, 2dser., No. 2, p. 112, 1875 (raised to generic rank ) ; Standard 
Nat. History, V, 137, 1884; Trouessart, Revue et Mag. Zool., 3 e ser., VII, 
277, 1879; Dobson, Mon. Insectivora, pt. n, 109, 1883; W. L. Sclater, Mamm. 
S. Africa, II, 168, 1901 (type fixed). 

No type designated. " II y a un sous-type ayant une molaire de inoins a chaque 
machoire, et depourvu de la bulle osseuse de la tempe qui, chez les autres, fait 
partie de l'oreille interne ainsi soulevee en dedans — Amblysomus." (Pomel.) 

Type: Chrysochioris hottentotus A. Smith, from Cape Colony (fide Sclater). 

Name preoccupied by Amblysoma Westwood, 1841, a genus of Hymenoptera. 
(See Calcochloris Mivart, 1867.) 

Amblysomus: a///i/lt3s, blunt, dull; 6<£>//(t, body — from its thick, stout form. 
Amblytatus Ameghino, 1902. Edentata, Dasypodidae. 

Bol. Acad. Xac. Ciencias Cordoba, XVII, 57, May, 1902 (sep. p. 55). 

Species: Amblytatus pandus Ameghino, and ,1. areolatus Ameghino, from thePyro- 
therium beds of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Amblytatus: d/.ift\.vi, blunt, sluggish; tatou, armadillo. 
Ambysus Rafixesoue, 1815. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Phocidae. 

Analyse de la Nature, 60, 1815 (nomen nudum). 

Type: Phoca sp. ('Ambysus R. sp. do.' [espece du f-enre precedent, Phoca"]). 
Ameghinotherium Podesta, 1898. Ungula. ., Typotheria, Typotheriidae.* 

"Un nuevo fosil. El Ameghinotherium curuzA-cuaiiense, 1898, 2 figs.; La Escuela 
Positiva, V, 1-8, 1899; Serrano, Guia Prov. Corrientes, Geol. Curuzu-Cuatia, 
1899" (fide Ameghino, Sinop. Geol.-Palaeont. in SegundoCenso Nac. Repub. Ar- 
gentina, Supl., July, 1899, sep. p. 5). 

Type: Ameghinotherium curuzu-cuatiense Podesta, from the Tertiary of Curuzii- 
Cuatia, Corrientes, Argentina. 

Extinct. Based on a skull. 

Ameghinotherium: Ameghino; Bypiov, wild beast — in honor of Dr. Florentino 

Amegbino, director of the Museo Xacional, Buenos Aires; author of 'Mamiferos 

Fosiles de la Republica Argentina,' 1889, and many other contributions to the 

paleontology of Argentina. 

Ametrida Grav, 1847. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1847, 15; Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., XIX, 407, June, 
1847. 

Type: Ametrida centurio Gray, from Para, Brazil. 

Ametrida: <t'«>/r/j/?, du?/rpi8os, reaper, destroyer. 
Amilnedwardsia Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Condylarthra, Meniscotherii<l;e. 

Bol. Acad. Xac. Cien. C6rdoba, XVI, 386, July, 1901 (sep. p. 40). 

Type: AmUnedwardsia brevicula Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

AmUnedwardsia: In honor of Alphonse Milne-Edwards, 1835-1900, late director 
of the Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris; author of numerous publications 
on mammals. 
Ammodon Marsh, 1893. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci., 3d ser., XLVI, No. 275, 409-110, pi. ix, figs. 2-4, Nov., 1893; 
Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert, N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 656, 1902 (type 
fixed ). 

Species, 3: Elotherium li-idyanum Marsh (type), from the Miocene of Squankum, 
Monmouth County, New Jersey; E. bathrodon Marsh, from the Oligocene of 
South Dakota; and Ammodon potens Marsh, from Colorado. 

*Ameghinotheriid;e of Podesta. 



AMMODON AMORPHOCHILUS. 93 

Ammodon — Continued. 
Extinct, 

Ammodon: a/iijiio<;, sand; 6d&)v = 68ov<;, tooth — probably in allusion to the fact 
that the type species was found near the coast. 
Ammodorcas Thomas, 1891. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1891, pt, n, 207-210, pis. xxi-xxn, Aug. 1, 1891. 
Type: Ammodorcas clarkei Thomas, from the vicinity of Buroa Wells, about 

100 miles south of Berhera, central Somaliland, East Africa, 
Ammodorcas: auuos, sand; fiopKas, antelope, gazelle — from the dry, sandy char- 
acter of its habitat. 
Ammomys Bonaparte, 1831. Glires, Muridse, Microtinse. 

Saggio Dist. Metod. Anim. Vert,, 20 footnote, 1831. 
Modification of Psammomys Le Conte, 1830, which is preoccupied by Psammomys 

Cretschmar, 1828, a genns of Glires. "II nome Psammomys essendo stato 

dato quasi contemporaneamente ad un rosieatore delle vicinanze di Alessandria 

d' Egitto, prendiamo la liberta d' introdurre una piecola mutazione ortografica 

nel nome dato al nucvo genere dal Sig. Leconte, la quale non ne cambia pero 

il significato." 
Ammomys: a/u/iog, sand; /<t~S, mouse — from the sandy character of the soil 

among the pines, where the animal frequently, though by no means exclusively, 

makes its home. 
Amnion Blainville, 1816. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidee. 

Bull. Sci. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, livr. May, 1816, 76. 
Apparently merely another name for Oris. The genus ' Ovis on Ammo)) ' includes 

5 species: "1 A. M. corsicus et Ovis, 2 A. brachiatus, •"> .!. cervmus, 4 [.!.] lanosus, 

5 A. strepsicheros." 
Ammon:"Awioov (=Heb. Anion < Egypt, Amun, Amen, he who is hidden or 

concealed), a name of Jupiter, worshiped in Africa under the form of a ram. 

Ammospermophilus (subg. of Spermophilw) Merriam, 1892. (Hires, Scinridpe. 

Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., VII, 27, Apr. 13, 1892; Troiessart, Cat. Mamm., Viv. et 

Foss., new. ed., fasc. n, 433-431, 1897; Merriam, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XI, 

190, July 1, 1897 (provisionally raised to generic rank — 'subgenus or genus'). 
Type: Tamias leucurus Merriam, from the San Gorgonio Pass, near Whitewater 

station, Riverside County, California. 
Ammospermophilus: ajujuog, sand; -f- Spermophilus — from the sandy color of the 

pelage and the sandy character of the animal's desert habitat. 
Ammotherium (see Amnotherium). Edentata, Megatheriida' (Scelidotherida). 
Ammotrag-us (subgenus of Oris) Blyth, 1840. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 
Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1840, No. LXXXVI, 13, July, 1840; No. XC, 75-77, 

78-79, Mar., 1841; Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist,, VII, 257-258, 261, June, 1841; 

Gray, Cat. Mamm. Brit, Mas., Ungulata, 179, 1852 (raised to generic rank). 
Type: Ovis tragelaphus Pallas, from North Africa. 
Ammotragus: ajujno<;, sand; rpdyo%, goat — from the color. 
Amnotherium Ameghino, 1891. Edentata, Megatheriida' (Scclidotheridse). 

Nuevos Restos Mamff. F6s. Patagonia Austral, p. 39, Aug., 1891. 
Ammotherium, Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5, p. 325, Oct. 1, 1891. 
Type: Amnotherium profundatum Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Amnotherium {Ammotherium) : aju/noi, sand; Qr/p/ov, wild beast. 
Amodus (see Ancodon). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anthracotheriidse. 

Amorphochilus Peters, 1877. Chiroptera, Natalidse. 

Monatsber. K. Pr. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, 1877, 185; Dorson, Cat. Chiroptera Brit. 

Mus., 357-359, 1878. 



( .»4 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Amorphochilus — Continued. 

Type: A morphochilus schnablii Peters, from Tunibez, northern Pern. 
Amorphochilus: ajuopcpos, misshapen, ugly; ^eZAoj, lip — in allusion to the fleshy 
prominence or disk on the upper lip. 

Amphalopex Kaup,* 1862. Ferae, Canidse. 

"Beitr. niiheren Kenntniss urwelt. Saugeth., Heft 5, p. 15," 1862 (fide Fraas, 
Jahreshefte Ver. vaterlond. Naturk. in Wurttemberg, XXVI, Heft n, 160, 161, 
1870); Trouessart, Cat. Mamin. Viv. et Foss., Carnivores, 53-54, 1885. 

Type: Amphicyon intermedium Meyer, from Ulm, Wurttemberg, < Germany (fide 
Fraas, 1. c). 

Extinct. 

Amphalopex: dju<pi,-\ doubtful, ambiguous; dXwicrf^, fox. 

Amphechinus Aymard, 1850. Insectivora, Erinaceidae. 

Ann. Soc. Agr., Sci., Arts et Comm. du Puy, XIV, 109-110, 1850; Pomel, Cat. 

Meth. Vert. Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 16, 1851 (in synonymy); Gervais, Zool. 

et Pal. Francaises, 2 e ed., 53, 1859. 
Type: Amphechinus arvernensis Aymard ( =JErinaceus arvemensis Blainville), from 

the Lower Miocene of Auvergne, France. 
Extinct. 
Amphechinus: dp<f>i, around, on both sides; £/2>os, hedgehog. 

Amphiarctos Blainville, 1841. Fern 1 , Ursidae. 

Osteog. Mannn. Recents et Foss., II, fasc. ix ( Carnassiers, Subursus), 96-100, 

1841. 
Type: Ursus sivalensis Cautley & Falconer, from the Siwalik Hills, India. Name 

provisionally proposed and changed to Sivalarctos on p. 114. 
Extinct. 
Amphiarctos: d/j.ipi, doubtful; ap/cro?, bear. 

Amphiaulacomys Lataste, 1882. Glires, Muridae, Gerbillinae. 

Le Naturaliste, Paris, II, No. 2, pp. 11-12, Jan. 15, 1882; No. 16, p. 127, Aug. 15, 

1882. 

Type: Rhombomys pallidus AYagner ( = Meriones opimus Lichtenstein ), from south- 
eastern Russia. 

Amphiaulacomys: dju<pi, on both sides (in the sense of double); ctvXac, furrow; 
//r?, mouse 1 — in allusion to the double-grooved incisors. 

Amphibos Falconer, 1865. I ngulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Falconer, quoted by Riitimeyer in Verhandl. Naturforsch. Gesellsch. Basel, IV, 
2tes Heft, 331, 1865 (nomen nudum?); Palaeont. Memoirs & Notes, I, 23, 
280, 547, 55*, L868; Mem. Geol. Surv. India (Palaeontologia Indica), ser. 10, 
1, pt. m, 150-153, 174, ]il. xxi fig. 1, pi. xxiv [reissue pis. xxi fig. 1, xxi&- 
xxiii — Hi- iii Hills'], 1878. 

Type: Amphibos acuticomis Falconer, from the Siwalik Hills, India. 

Extinct. Based on crania. 

Amphibos: d/iupi, around, on both sides; + Bos. 
Amphicetus Van Beneden, 1880. Cete, Balsenidae. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. de Belgique, 2 e ser., L, No. 7, pp. 20-21, 1880. 

Species 4, from the deposits in the vicinity of Antwerp, Belgium: Amphicetus 
later Van Benedeu, .!. verus Van Beneden, A. editus Van Beneden, A. rotun- 
duS A T an Beneden. 

*Not Meyer, 1849, as given by Trouessart, 1. c., p. 53. 

fThe preposition ducpi means, primarily, on both sides, on all sides, around. It 
is used to denote relationship and also in the sense of doubtful, ambiguous. 



AMPHICETUS AMPHIDOLOPS. 95 

Amphicetus — Continued. 

Extinct. 

Amphicetus: d/i(pi, around, on both sides; tojroz, whale. A en juger par un 
condyle de maxillaire inferieur les Amphicetes suivent immediatement les 
Plesiocetes et sont intermediaires entre eux et les Heterocetes." 
Amphichneumon (Pomel MS.) Gervais, 1859. Ferae, Viverridse. 

Pomel, in Gervais' Zool. et Pal. Francaises, 2'' ed., 223, 1859. 

Amphicneumon Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., I, 103, 1885 (misprint). 

Apparently a manuscript name applied by Pomel to a lower jaw (No. 26705) 
in the British Museum, from the Lower Miocene of Saint-Gerand-le-Puy, 
France. 

Extinct. 

Amphichneumon: cc/utpi, around, on both sides; Ichneumon. 
Amphichcerus (Bravard MS.) Gore, 1874. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Gore, Glossary Foss. Mamm., 6, 1871 (no authority). 

(Bravard MS.) Lydekker, Paheont. Indica, ser. 10, III, 91, 1884; Cat. Foss. 
Mamm., Brit. Mus., II, 254, 1885. 

Type: Amphichosrus typus Bravard, a synonym of Hyotherium typum (Pomel), 
from the Miocene of Europe. "A genus of Suidse (pigs), possessing long 
canines, projecting downwards in the upper jaw." (Gore. ) 

Extinct. 

Amphichcerus: cipcpi, around, on both sides; x o, i J< >^- hog. 
Amphictis Pomel, 1854. Fera?, Viverridse. 

Cat. Meth. Vert. Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 63-64, 1854; Lydekker, Cat. Foss. 
Mamm. Brit. Mus., I, 102-103, 1885. 

Species: Amphictis antiquus Pomel ( = Viverra antiqua Blainville), A. leplorhynchus 
Pomel, and A. lemanemis Pomel, from the Lower Miocene of Langy, Dept. de 
l'Allier, France. 

Extinct. 

Amphictis: dfi<pi, doubtful, ambiguous; z/crxj, weasel. 
Amphicynodon Filhol, 1882. Ferae, Canidae. 

Ann. Sci. Geol. Paris, XII, Art. 3, pp. 32—39, pi. vnr figs. 23-31, pi. i.\ figs. 
42-17, 1882. 

Type: Oynodon palustris Aymard, from Ronzon, near Puy, Haute-Loire, France. 

Extinct. 

Amphicynodon: d/Kpi, around, on both sides; -\-Cynodon. 
Amphicyon Lartet, 1836. Ferae, Canidae. 

Bull. Soc. Geol. de France, VII, 219-220, seance du Mai, L836 (no species 
named); Comptes Rendus, Paris, V, No. 12, 424, July-Dec, 1837 (no species 
named); L'Institut, V, 336, 1837; "Not. Geol. Dept. du Gers (Annuaire, 
1839);" Notice sur la Colline de Sansan, 16, 1851; Blainville, Osteog. 
Mamm., II ( Carnassiers, Subursus), 113-114, 1841. 

Species: Amphicyon major Blainville, and .1. minor Blainville, from Sansan, Dept. 
du Gers, France. Merely a provisional name in 1836. 

Extinct. Based on "deux demi-m;lchoires et quelques ossemens.'' 

Amphicyon: dp <pi, around, on both sides; kvgov, dog — on account of the resem- 
blance of its teeth to those of ( 'on is. 

Amphidolops Ameghino, 1902. Allotheria, Polydolopidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 42, May, 1902 (sep. p. 40). 
Species: Amphidolops serrula Ameghino, and A. scrrifer Ameghino, from the Noto- 

stylops beds, Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Amphidolops: afi<f>i, ambiguous; + (Poly) dolops. 



96 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Amphidozotherium Filhol, 1876. Insectivora, Talpidae. 

Ann. Sci. Geol., Paris, VII, Art. No. 7, 48-49, pi, xi, figs. 9-11, 1876; Bull. Soc. 
Philomathique, Paris, 7° ser., I, 51, 1877. 

Type: Amphidozotherium cayluxi Filhol, from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 

Extinct. Based on "vine portion de machoire inferieure." 

Amphidozotherium: d/Kpido^og, doubtful; (ir/piov, wild beast — in allusion to its 
supposed relationship with Urotrichus. 
Amphigonus Aoassiz, 1833. Marsupialia, Amphitheriida?. 

[Nenes Jahrb. f. Mineralogie, 1835, 185, — genus not named, 'die rathselhaften 
Didelphys Arten von Stonesfield']. 

"Agassiz, Deutsche Uebersetzung von Bucklands Geology and Mineralogy, 
descrip. pi. n, p. 3footnote, Apr., 1838;" L'Institut, Paris, VI, l e sect., No. 245, 
p. 292, Sept, 6, 1838. 

Type (species not mentioned in L'Institut): from Stonesfield, Oxfordshire, 
England. (Equals A mphitherium Blainville, 1838.) 

Extinct. 

Amphigonus: <h<</>'\ ambiguous; yiyvofiai, to be born — i. e., an animal of uncer- 
tain relationship. 
Amphihapalops Ameghino, 1891. Edentata, Megalonychidte. 

Nuevos Restos Mamif. F6s. Patagonia Austral, 33-34, Aug., 1891; Revista 
Argentina Hist. Nat,, I, entr. 5a, 319-320, Oct. 1, 1891. 

Species 3, from the lower Eocene of southern Patagonia: Amphihapalops conger- 
maims Ameghino, A. gaUaicus Ameghino, and A. cadens Ameghino. 

Extinct. 

Amphihapalops: d/icpi, around; 4- Hapalops. 
Amphilagus (subgenus of Lagomys) Pom el, 1854. Glires, Ochotonidae. 

Oat. Meth. Vert. Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 42-43, 1854; Oervais, Zool. et Pal. 
Francaises, 2°ed., 50, 1859 (synonym of Titanomys msenoviensis) . 

Type: Amphttagus antiquus Pomel, from Langy, Allier, France. "Cest sans 
doute d'apres la figure de cet atlas [Zool. et Pal. Franc., l e ed., pi. xlvi, 
fig. 2], qu'il [M. Pomel] a etabli depuis lors son AmphilagUS antiquus. La 
caracteristique donnee par M. Pomel parait en effet n'etre que la description 
des details reproduits dans notre planche xlvi." (Gervais, 1. c, 50.) 

Extinct. 

Amphilagus: t'</t</>i, around, on both sides; Xaycos, hare — from its resemblance 
to Lagomys and Lagodus. 
Amphilestes Owen, 1859. Marsupialia, Triconodontidpe. 

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 8th ed., XVII, 157-158 (art. Paleontology), 1859; 
Paleontology, 1860, 303. 

Type: AmphitheHum broderipii Owen, from the Stonesfield oolitic slate, England. 

Extinct, Based on "a ramus of a lower jaw." 

Amphilestes: d/icpi, doubtful, ambiguous; Xy6zi)<;, robber. 
Amphimerix Pomel, 1849. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriidaa. 

Archiv. Sci. Phys. etNat,, Bibl. Univ. Geneve, XII, 72, Sept., 1849. 

Amphimeryx Pictet, Traite Paleont, , ed. 2, I, 341, 1853. 

Amphimozryx Gervais, Zool. et Paleont, Francaises, ed. 2, 162-163, 1859. 

Amphimoeryx Schlosser, Morph. Jahrbuch, XII, ltes Heft, 133, expl. to figs. 21, 
26, 1886. 

Species: Anoplotherium murinum Cuvier, and A, obliquum Cuvier, from the Upper 
Eocene gypsum beds of the Paris basin, France. "Nous avions propose de 
les reunir provisoireinent sous le nom generique d' Amphimerix." (Pomel. ) 

Extinct. 

Amphimerix: ccpupi, doubtful; /itfpv£, ruminant — "cenom. . . . signifie rumi- 
nants douteux." (Pomel.) 



AMPHIMOSCHUS AMPHISCIURUS. 97 

Amphimoschus (Falconer MS.) Gray, 1852. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Tragulidse. 
Gray, Cat. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pt. in, Ungulata, 247, 248, 1852 — nomen nudum. 
"Dr. Hugh Falconer (Proc. Zool. [Geol.] Soc, 1843) gave some account of the 
osteology of the foot of this animal [Hyemoschus aquaMcus from West Africa]; 
and in his MSS. he informs me he has proposed to call the genus A mph imosch us. ' ' 
(Gray.) 
Amphimoschus: djuipi, around on both sides; -f- Moschus. 
Amphimoschus Bourgeois, 1873. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

[Gervais, Zool. et Pal. Gen., I, 157, 1867-69, nomen nudum.] 
Journ. Zool., Paris, II, 235-236, pi. x, 1873. 
Type: Amphimoschus ponteleviensis Bourgeois, from the Middle Miocene of Thenay, 

near Pont-Levoy, Loir-et-Cher, France. 
Not Amphimoschus Falconer MS., 1852, a genus of Tragulida?. 
Extinct. Based on lower jaws, a portion of a humerus, and other bones. 
Amphimoschus: d/i<pi, on both sides (in the sense of double) ; Moschus — in allusion 

to the last lower molar, "qui presente un double croissant a son talon ou lobe 

posterieur." 
Amphinasua Moreno & Mercekat, 1891. Fera', Procyonidse. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, I, 235-236, 1890-91. 
Type: Amphinasua brevirostris Moreno & Mercerat, from Tertiary deposits in the 

vicinity of Andalguala, Catamarca, Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on "un craneo en buen estado de conservacion." 
Amphinasua: a/upi, around, on both sides; j Nasua. 
Amphiperatherium Filhoi,, 1879. Marsupialia, Didelphyidse. 

"Ann. Sci. Geol., Paris, X, No. 3, 1879," pp. (fide E. B. Tawney, Geol. 

Record for 1879, 299; 1887). 
Type: Amphiperatherium lemanense Filhoi, from St. Gerand le Puy, Auvergne, 

France. 
Extinct. 

Amphiperatherium: a/Kpi, around, on both sides; | Peratherium. 
Amphiproviverra Am kgiii no, 1891. Marsupialia, Borhysenidae. 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 6a, 397 footnote, Dec. 1, 1891. 
New name for Protoproviverra Ameghino, 1891, which is preoccupied by Pruto* 

proviverra Lemoine, 1891, a genus of Creodonta from the lower Eocene of 

Reims, France. 
Extinct. 

Amphiproviverra: a.fi<pi, around, on both sides; -\- Proviverra. 
Amphiptera Giglioli, 1870. Cete, Bahenida?. 

Note intorno alia Dist. Fauna Vert. Oceano, Firenze, 75-76, 1870; Cetacei osserv. 

Viaggio 'Magenta,' 60, 1874. 
Type: Amphiptera pacifica Giglioli, from the South Pacific, off the coast of Chile 

(S. lat.28° 34', Ion. 88° W). 
Amphiptera: ccjucpi, on both sides; Ttrepov, wing, fin. 
Amphisciurus (Bravard MS.) Lyuekker, 1885. Glires, Seiuridse. 

Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pt. i, 210, footnote (under Sri urns 

feignouxi Pomel) , 1885. 
Type: Amphisciurus fi/j>t<x Bravard. A manuscript name given to specimens in 

the British Museum, consisting of "a fragment of the right ramus of the 

mandible containing p. m. 4 and in. 1 [with other pieces] from the Lower Mio- 
cene of Allier, France. . . . This [No. 31086] and the other specimens from 

the Bravard Collection are entered in the Museum Register as Amphisciurus 

typus Bravard MS." (Lydekker.) 
Extinct. 
Amphisciurus: ccucpi, around, on both sides; -\-Sciurus. 

7591— No. 23—03 7 



98 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Ampbi-sorex (subgenus of Sorex) Divekxoy, 1835. Insectivora, Soricidae. 

Mem. Mus. Hist. Nat. Strassbourg, II, sig. v, 23, 1835; < J-ray, Proc. Zool. >Soc. Lon- 
don, 123, 1837. 

Type: Sorex hermanni Duvernoy, from Europe. [In the supplement on the 
shrews (Mem. Strasbourg, II, p. 4, 1838), Sorex tetragonwrus is made the type 
of the subgenus.] 

Amphi-sorex: d/upi, around, on both sides; 4- Sorex. 
Amphithereuthes Ameghino, 1894. Marsupialia. ? 

Ameghixo in Roger's Verzeichn. Foss. Saugeth., Bericht Naturwiss. Ver. f. 
Schwaben u. Neuburg (a. V. ), Augsburg, XXXI, 13, 1804. * 

Type: Amphithereuthes obscurus from the Tertiary of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Amphithereuthes: dfupi, around, on both sides; -|- Thereuthes, 
Amphitherium Blainville, 1838. Marsupialia, Amphitheriidse. 

L'Institut, Paris, VI, 1'' sect., No. 243, p. 275, Aug. 23, 1838; Comptes Rendus, Paris, 
VII, No. 8, pp. 402-418, 1 pi., tigs. 1-5, July-Dec., 1838. 

Species: Didelphis prevostii Cuvier MS., and _D. bucklandH Broderip, from Stones- 
field, England. 

Extinct. Based on lower jaws. 

Amphitherium: ampi, ambiguous; htjpiov, wild beast. "On pourrait donner le 
nom de Heteroiherium on d' Amphitherium, afin d'eviter les inductions que Ton 
pourrait tirer de l'existence si ancienne d'un mammifere de la classe des 
Didelphes." (Blaixville. ) 

D'Orbigny gives the following explanation of the name: (aju<pi, preposition de 
doute; 6?/piov, animal.) M. de Blainville nomme ainsi le genre qui devra ren- 
fermer le fossile de Stonefield, regarde par quelquea auteurs comme une espece 
de didelphe, par quelques autres, comme un mammifere monodelphe, et par 
plusieurs, enfin, comme un <>vi])are voisin des sauriens ou de certains poissons. 
Les opinions sont done . . . bien loin d'etre arrestees a l'egard de 1' espece de 
cette fossile, et e'est ce que M. de Blainville a voulu indiquer par le nom 
ci-dessus. ( Diet. Univ. Hist. Nat., I, 397, 1849. ) 
Amphitrag-ulus Pomel, 1846. Ongulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Bull. Soc. Geol. de France, 2 B ser., Ill, for 1845-4(3, Feuilles 23-30, pp. 369-371, 
July, 1846; Archiv. Sci. Phys. etNat., Bibl. Univ. Geneve, V, 207, 1847; Cat. 
Meth. Vert, Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 100-102, 1854. 

Type: ( No species named in the first reference. ) In 1847, Anthracotherium minutum 
Blainville is mentioned, and in 1854 the genus contained 6 species: Amphitra- 
gulus elegans Pomel, A. lemanensis Pomel, A. communis Aymard (from Ronzon 
near Puy), A. boulangeri Pomel, A. meminoides Pomel, and ^4. gracilis Pomel — 
all except A. communis from Langy, Dept, de l'Allier, France. 

Extinct. 

Amphitragulus: a.mf>i, around, on both sides; -4- Tragulus. 
Amphitylus Osbokx, 1887. Marsupialia, Amphitheriidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Nov. 1, 1887, 283 footnote; Journ. Acad. Nat, Sci. 
Phila., 2d ser., IX, pt, 2, 192-193, fig. 2; 228, fig. 10b in text, 1888. 

Type: Amphitherium prevostii (= Didelphis prevostii Blainville), from the Stones- 
field slate, Oxfordshire, England. (See Thylacotherium Valenciennes, 1838.) 

Extinct, 

Amphitylus: aju<pi, around, on both sides; rvlr/, swelling, lump— in allusion to 
the crowns of the molars, which have "three cusps, the median cusp slightly 
the largest." 

* Copy received by the U. S. Dept. Agriculture, Washington, D. C, Aug. 10, 1894. 



AMYNODON ANANCUS. 99 

Amynodon Marsh, 1877. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Amynodontidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XIV, 251-252, Sept., 1877; Osborn, Trans. Am. 
Philos. Soc, new ser., XVI, pt. in, 506-507, 1890. 

Type: Diceratherium mlrenum Marsh, from the Eocene (Uinta beds) of Utah. 

Extinct. Based on "a nearly perfect skull and various other remains." 

Amynodon: dfivvoo, toward off, to threaten; ddcbv=65ovs, tooth — in allusion 
to the canines which are developed into greatly enlarged vertical tusks. 
Amyxodon Cautley & Falconer, 1835. Ferse, Mustelidfe. 

Journ. Asiatic Soc. Bengal, IV, No. 48, p. 707, Dec, 1835; Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 
2 C ser., Zool., VII, 61, Jan., 1837; Falconer, Paheont. Memoirs, I, 331, 1868. 

Type: Enhydriodon (Amyxodon) sivalensis Cautley & Falconer, from the Tertiary 
of the Siwalik Hills, India. The species is not characterized in the first two 
papers, and in the Palteontological Memoirs the name Amyxodon seems to be 
an alternative or possibly a subgeneric term occurring in the title of the 
article, "On Enhydriodon (Amyxodon), a fossil genus allied to Lutra, from 
the Tertiary Strata of the Sewalik Hills." 

Extinct, 

Amyxodon: ditv'i, tearing; 68d)i' = d8ov<;, tooth. 
Anacodon Cope, 1882. Creodonta, Arctocyonidse. 

"Pakeont. Bull., No. 34, pp. 181-182, Feb. 20, 1882"; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, 
XX, 181-182, Mar. 16, 1882; Tert. Vert, 427, 1885 (dates of publication). 

Type: Anacodon xirsidens Cope, from the Eocene (Wasatch beds) of the basin of 
the Big Horn River, northern Wyoming. 

Extinct. " Known only from mandibles supporting molar teeth." 

Anacodon: dv, without; aucfy, point; 68cbv = 68ov$, tooth — in allusion to the 
" crowns of molars without distinct cusps, but with a superior surface consist- 
ing of two low transverse ridges separated by a shallow valley." (Cope.) 
Anaema (see Anoema) . Glires, Caviidse. 

Anadolops Ameghino, 1903. Allotheria, Polydolopidse. 

Anales Mus. Nac Buenos Aires, IX (ser. 3a, II), 186, fig. 120, July 18, 1903. 

Type: Anadolops thylacoleoides Ameghino, from the Notostylops beds of Patagonia. 

Extinct. Based on part of the left lower jaw. 

Anadolops: dva, up (?); + (Poly)dolo})s. 
Anahyster Murray, 1861. Fene, Mustelidse. 

Proc. Roy. Soc Edinburgh, II, 157-158, sessions 1860-1861 [read Mar. 28, I860]. 

Type: Anahyster calabaricus Murray, from old Calabar, West Africa. 

Anahyster: 'Belonging to an estuary.' 
Analcimorphus Ameghino, 1891. Edentata, Megalonychid?e. 

Nuevos Restos Mamif. F6s. Patagonia Austral, 34, Aug., 1891; Revista Argentina 
Hist, Nat,, I, entr. 5a, 320, Oct. 1, 1891. 

Type: Analcimorphus inversus Ameghino, from the Eocene of southern Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Analcimorphus: dva\K))i, feeble; /uopq>}'f, form. 
Analcitherium Ameghino, 1891. Edentata, Megatheriidaj (Scelidotheridse). 

Nuevos Restos Mamff. F6s. Patagonia Austral, 39, Aug., 1891; Revista Argentina 
Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5a, 325, Oct. 1, 1891. 

Type: Analcitherium antarcticum Ameghino, from the Eocene of southern Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Analcitherium: avaXK'fys, feeble; brjpiov, wild beast — probably in allusion to the 
dentition of the lower jaw. 
Ananarcus, Ananareus (see Anarnak). Cete, Physeteridae. 

Anancus Aymard, 1855. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidpe. 

Ann. Soc. Agr., Sci., Arts, et Comm. du Puy, XIX, for 1854, 507, 1855; XX, for 
1855, 35, 1859; Congres Sci. France, for 1855, I, 271, 1856; Lydekker, Cat. Foss. 
Mamm. Brit. Mus., IV, 52, 1886 (under Mastodon arvernensis) . 



100 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Anancus — ( !< >nti nued. 

Type: Anmiriis macroplus Aymard, from Mt. Coupet, near Puy, France. 
Extinct. 

Anancus: dv, without ; ayKoc,, bend, hollow — probably in allusion to the tusks or 
upper incisors, which are straight in comparison with those of some species of 
Elepkas. 
Anantiosodon Ameghino, 1891. Edentata, Dasypodidse. 

Nuevos Restos Mamff. Fos. Patagonia Austral, 41-42, Aug., 1891; Revista Argen- 
tina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5a, 327-328, Oct. 1, 1891. 
Type: Anantiosodon rums Ameghino, from the lower Eocene of southern Pata- 
gonia. 
Extinct. " Representado por un trozo de rama mandibular izquierda con parte 

de la sinfisis." 

Anantiosodon: dv, negative; dvrioe,, opposite; 68d>v=ddovs, tooth — possibly 

so named because the opposite teeth are wanting in the type specimen. 

Anaplotherium (see Anoplotherium ) . Cngulata, Artiodactvla, Anoplotheriidae. 

Anaptogonia (subgenus of Arvhcola) Cock, 1871. Glires, Muridse, Microtinse. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XII, 87, 91-92, fig. IS, Jan. -July, 1871; Journ. Acad. 

Xat. Sci., Phila., 2d ser., XI, i »t . 2, pp. 201-203, 1899 (raised to generic rank). 

Anaptagenia Trouessart, Cat. Mamm. Yiv. et Foss., Rodentia, in Bull. Soc. 

d' Etudes Sci. d' Angers, X, for 1880, 2e fasc, 154, 1881 (misprint). 
Type: Arvicola hiatidens Cope, from the Pleistocene of Port Kennedy Bone Cave, 

Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. 
Extinct. Based on several molar teeth. 

Anaptogonia: dv, negative; aicrca, to bind, fasten; yoovia, angle — in allusion to 
the separation of the enamel folds of the molars. 
Anaptomorphus Cock, 1872. Primates, Anaptomorphidse. 

Pakeont. Bull. No. 8, p. 1, Oct. 12, 1872; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XII, for July-Dec, 

1872, 554, Jan., 1873. 
Type: Anaptomorphus semulus Cope, from the Eocene of the northern part of the 

basin of Green River, Wyoming. 
Extinct. 

Anaptomorphus: dv, negative; aitroo, to bind, fasten; jnopipi/, form — probably in 
allusion to the lower jaw, in which the "symphysis, though massive, is not 
co-ossified." 
Anarnak Lacepede, 1804. Cete, Physeterida?. 

Hist. Nat. Cetacees, pp. xxxviii, 164, 1804. 
Ananarcus Dumjsril, Zool. Analytique, 28, 1806. 

Anarcus Froriep, Dumeril's Analyt. Zool. aus Franz, mit Zusatzen, 29, 1806. 
Anarnacus Tiedemann, Zoologie, I, 575, 1808; Rafinesque, Analyse de la Nature, 
61, 1815; Lesson, Man. Mammalogie, 418, 1827 (in synonymy); Nouv. Tab- 
leau Regne Animal, Mamm., 200, 1842; Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 
2, 1842. 
Ananareus Gray, List Spec Mamm. Brit. Mus., p. xxiii, 1843 (misprint). 
Anarmacus Zittel, Handbuch Paleont., IV, 178, 1892 (misprint). 
Type: Anarnak groenlandicus Lacepede, from the coast of Greenland. 
Anarnak: Greenland name of a kind of porpoise. 
Anastylops Ameghino, 1897. Tillodontia, Notostylopi<he. 

La Argentina al traves de las Ultimas Epocas Geologicas, 16 footnote, 1897 
(nomen nudum); Bob Inst. Geog. Argentino, XVIII, 490-491, Oct. 6, 1897 
(sep. pp. 86-87) . 
Type: Anastylops vallatus Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 



ANASTYLOPS ANCHIPPUS. 101 

Anastylops — Continued. 

Anastylops: dva, negative prefix; 6rvXoc,, pillar; ooif), aspect. "Les molaires 

superieures se distinguent par leur face externe qui est convexe sans colonne 

angulaire supplementaire et avec l'arete perpendiculaire externe anterieure 

peu marquee." (Ameghino, 1. c, 86-87.) 
Anatherium Ameghino, 1887. Marsupialia, Borhyaenidae. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Marnif. Fos. Patagonia Austral, p. 8, Dec, 1887. 
Type: Anatherium defassus Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Anatherium: ava, up (?); hrjpLov, wild beast. 

Anathitus Ameghino, 1893. Monotremata (Anathitidae). 

Revista Jard. Zool. Buenos Aires, I, 78, Mar. 15, 1893; Revue Scientif., LI, 

No. 23, p. 731, June 10, 1893. 
Type: Anathitus revelator Ameghino, from the Eocene beds of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on a humerus. " Je suppose qu'il s'agit d'un representant d'un 

groupe de mammiferes encore inconnu constituent la transition si longtemps 

cherchee entre les Reptiles Theriodontes et les Mammiferes Monotremes." 

(Revue Sci., p. 731.) 
Anathitus: Contracted from dvcxOsGD, to run up; 0/?, Bivoz sand — i. e., one who 

runs on the sand. (Ameghino. ) 
Anaurosorex (see Anourosorex). Insectivora, Soricidse. 

Anchilophus Gervais, 1848-52. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidse. 

Zool. et Paleont. Franc;., l e ed., II, Expl. pi. No. 35, p. 8, 1848-52; 2 1 ' ed., 86-87, 

pi. 35, fig. 18, 1859. 
Type: Anchilophus desmarestii Gervais, from the Eoceneof Batignolles, near Paris, 

France. 
Extinct. Based on a fragment of a jaw with teeth. 
Anchilophus: Anchi(therium) ; Xocpo?, crest — in allusion to the crests of the upper 

molars. 

Anchimys Ameghino, 1886. Glires, Caviidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, IX, 71-71, 1886. 
Type: Cardwdon leidyii Ameghino, from the older Tertiary formations of Parana, 

Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on fragments of the lower jaw containing incisors and three 

molars. 
Anchimys: <xyx. 1 , near; uvs, mouse — from its close relationship with Cardio- 

don," denotando asi su proximo parentesco con el mencionado genero." 

(Ameghino.) 

Anchippodus Leidy, 1868. Tillodontia, Anchippodontidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1868, 232. 

AucMppodus Maeschall, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 14, 1873 (misprint). 

Type: Anchippodus riparius Leidy, from the Eocene of Shark River, Monmouth 
County, New Jersey. 

Extinct. Based on a molar tooth. 

AucMppodus: Anchippus; 68ov$, tooth. 
Anchippus Leidy, 1868. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidaa. 

Proc. Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila, 1868, 231-232. 

Auchippns Marsciiall, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 14, 1873 (misprint). 

Type: Anchippus texanus Leidy, from the Miocene of 'Hutchen's well,' Washing- 
ton County, Texas. 

Extinct. Based on "a specimen consisting of the greater and more characteris- 
tic portion of an upper molar tooth." 



102 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Anchippus — Continued. 

Anchippus: Anchi(therium) ; 'iitTtos, horse — "an animal of intermediate character 

to Anckiiherium and Equus." (Leidy. ) 
Anchisodon Cope, 1879. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Hyracodontidse. 

Am. Nat., XIII, No. 4, for April, 270, published Mar. 26, 1879; Bull. U. S. Geol. 

and Geog. Surv. Terr., V, 233, 1879 (date of publication). 
Anchirodon Forbes, Zool. Kecord for 1879, XVI, Marum., 19, 18X1 (misprint). 
Type: Hyracodon quadriplicate Cope, from the Oligoeene (White River beds) of 

Colorado. 
Extinct. "Represented by maxilla.iv teeth only." 
Anchisodon: ciyx 1 , near; z'tfo?, equal; 68(bv = 68ov<;, tooth — in allusion to the 

lower premolars and molars. 
Anchistrum Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Hyracoidea (Acoelodidse) . 

Boh Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 369-370, July, 1901 (sep., pp. 23-21). 
Type: Anchistrum sulcosum Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Anchitheriomys Roger, 1898. Glires, Hystricidae. 

Bericht Naturwiss. Ver. Schwaben u. Neuburg (a. V. ), XX XI II, 7-8, Taf. in, 

figs. 9-10, 1898. 
Type: Hystri.c wiedemanni Roger, from Breitenbronn and Kutzenhausen, Reische- 

nau, Susamthal, Swabia, Germany. 
Extinct. Based on parts of upper incisors. 
Anchitheriomys: Anchitherium; /<£?, mouse — in allusion to its occurrence in beds 

characterized by the presence of remains of Anchitherium. 
Anchitherium Meyer, 1844. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidse. 

Neues Jahrb. Mineralogie, 1844, 298-305. 
Type: Anchitherium ezquerrse Meyer, from the Miocene of el Cerro de San Isidro, 

near Madrid, Spain. 
Extinct. 

Anchitherium: <xyx i , near; brjpiov, wild beast — in allusion to its supposed rela- 
tionship with Rhinoceros, Anoplotherium and Palaeotherium. 
Ancodon (subgenus of Palaeotherium) Pomel, 1847. Ungulata, Anthracotheriidse. 
Archiv. Sci. Phys. et Nat., Bibl. Univ. Geneve, V, 207, June, 1847. 
Ancodus Pomel, ibid., VIII, 324-325, Aug., 1848 (raised to generic rank); Cat. 

Meth. Vert. Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 91-93, 1854. 
Amodus Pomel, Comptes Rendus, Paris, XXVI, No. 25, p. 687, Jan. -June, 1818 

(misprint). 
Type: Anthracotherium velaunum G. Cuvier, from the Miocene of Ronzon, near 

Puy, France. 
Name antedated by Bothriodon Aymard, 1846. 
Extinct. 
Ancodon: dyKcbv, bend; b8dov = 68ov<;, tooth — probably from the selenodont 

character of the upper molars. 
Ancylocoelus Ameghino, 1895. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Leontiniidse. 

Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XV, 650-652, 1895 (sep., pp. 50-52). 
Type: Ancylocoelus frequens Ameghino, from the Pyrotherium beds of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Ancylocoelus: dyKv\o<;, curved; koiAos, hollow. 
Ancylodon Illiger, 1811. Cete, Physeteridge. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 142, 1811; Okex, Lehrb. Naturgesch., 3ter 

Theil, Zool., 2te Abth., 673-674, 1816; Gray, Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 

330, 1866 (in synonymy). 



ANCYLODON ANISOLAMBDA. 103 

Ancylodon — Continued. 

Type: Monodon spurius Fabricius, from Greenland (=Hyperoodon butzkopf Lac6- 

pede, fide Gray, 1. c. ). Practically a new name for Anarnuk Lacepede, 1804. 
Ancylodon: ayKvAoz, curved; oSchv = o5ov$, tooth — "dentes duo parvi pro- 

minuli curvaii in apice maxillae superioris,* alii hulli," (Illiger. ) 
Ancylotherium Gaudry, 1863. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Chalicotheriidse. 

Anini. Foss. et Geol. l'Attique, nigs. 17-18, pp. 129-142, Atlas, pis. xix-xxi, 1863. 
Type: Macrotherium pentelicum Gaudry & Lartet, from Pikermi, Greece. 
Extinct. Based on bones of the phalanges and limbs. 
Ancylotherium: ccvkvAuz, crooked, curved; fafpiov, wild beast — from the curved 

terminal phalanges. 
Andinomys Thomas, 1902. < ilires, Muridae, Orieetina?. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., IX, 225-226, Mar. 1, 1902; Nature, LXV, No. 

16S8, p. 431, Mar. 6, 1902; Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1902, pt. i, 116-117, pi. ix 

figs. 1-4, 6, June 1, 1902. 
Type: Andinomys edax Thomas, from the vicinity of Potosi, Bolivia. 
Andinomys: Andes; /irz, mouse — from the habitat of the type species. 
Andropithecus ( opi;, 1868. Primates, Simiidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., (Oct.) 1868, 286; Origin of the Fittest, 101, 1887. 
Nomen nudum. Possibly only a modified torm oi JZteAnville's Anthropopithecus, 

1838; it is evidently here used for the Chimpanzees or Gorillas. 
Andropithecus: dcvrfp, avSpos, man; itiBr/KOS, ape — i.e. an anthropoid ape. 
Anisacodon Marsh, 1872. Insectivora, Leptictidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. A: Arts, 3d ser., IV, 209, Sept., 1S72 (sep. issued Aug. 7). 
Type: Anisacodon elegans Marsh, from the Eocene in the vicinity of Henry Fork 

of Green River, Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on 'a lower jaw with teeth.' 
Anisacodon: avi6o$, unequal; clki), point; 6$ cov = 68 ov$, tooth — in allusion to 

the inequality in the cusps of the molars. 
Anisacodon Marsh, 1875. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IX, 246, Mar., 1875. 

Type: Anisacodon montanus Marsh, from the Oligocene of northern Nebraska. 
Name preoccupied by Anisacodon Marsh, 1872, a genus of Insectivora. Replaced 

by Diconodon Marsh, 1876. 
Extinct. 
Anisacodon: avido$ } unequal; cucfy, point; 6dd)v = 6Sovs, tooth — in allusion to 

the unequal size of the cones of the last upper molar, the inner posterior cone 

being smaller than the one in front. 
Anisodon Lartet, 1849. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Chalicotheriidse. 

['"'Cat. Man. 1847" (fide Lartet, 1851); Pomel, Comptes Rendus, Paris, XXVI, 

No. 25, 687, Jan. -June, 1848 — nomen nudum.] 
Lartet, in Blainville's Osteog. Mamm. Recents et Foss., IV, fasc. 23 (Anoplo- 

therium ), pp. 68-70, 1849; Lartet, Notice sur la Colline de Sansan, 30-31, 1851. 
Type: Anoplotherium magnum Lartet, from Sansan, Dept. du Gers, France. 
Extinct. 
Anisodon: avi6o$, unequal; 6$ckv = d8ov<;, tooth — in allusion to the molar series, 

and especially the last lower molar. 
Anisolambda Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Condylarthra, Meniscotheriida?. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 383-384, July, 1901 (sep., pp. 37-38). 
Species, 3: Anisolambda fissidens Ameghino, A. longidens Ameghino, and A. latklens 

Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Anisolambda: avidos, unequal; Xd/ifida, the Greek letter A — in allusion to the 

lobes of the lower molars. 

*The statement that the teeth are in the upper jaw is incorrect. 



104 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Anisolophus B'-rmeistek, 1885. Ungulata, Litoptema, Proterotheriidse. 

Anal. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires, III, entr. xiv, 169-172, pi. n, fig. 7, Dec, 1885. 
Type: Anctiitherium australe Burmeister, from the Rio Chico, Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on the dentition. 
Anisolophus: avidos, unequal; Ao</'oc, crest. 
Anisonchus Cope, 1881. Ungulata, Amblypoda, Periptychidse. 

"Paleont. Bull. No. 33, pp. 488-489, Sept. 30, 1881;" Proe. Am. Philos. Soc, 

XIX, 488-489, Oct. 21, 1881; Tert, Vert., 408, 1885 (dates of publication). 
Type: Mioclsenus sectorius Cope, from the Eocene of northwestern New Mexico. 
Extinct. " Known only from dental characters." 
Anisonchus: dvitfoc,, unequal; oyKos, hook, barb — from the inequality in form 

or size of the cusps of the teeth. 
Anisonyx Rafinesque, 1817. Glires, Sciuridse. 

Am. Monthly Mag., II, No. 1, p. 45, 1817; Merriam, Science, new ser., I, 18-19, 

Jan. 4, 1895. 
Type: Anisonyx brachiura Rafinesque (=Arctomys columbianus Ord). Based on 

the 'Burrowing Squirrel' of Lewis & Clark, from the vicinity of the Forks of 

the Clearwater or Kooskooskie River, Idaho. (Merriam, X. Am. Fauna, No. 

r>, pp. 39, 41, 1891.) 
Name preoccupied by Anisonyx Latreille, 1807, a genus of Coleoptera (Genera 

Crustaceorum et [nsectorum, II, 119-121, 1807). Replaced by Phorbantus 

Gistel, 1848. 
Anisonyx: avido*;, unequal; ovv%, claw, nail — from the number (5), and the 

shape of its toes. "The two inner toes of the forefeet very short, and with 

blunt nails, the three others long, and with sharp nails." (Rafinesque.) 
Anisorhizus Ameghino, 1902. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Isotemnidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 27-28, May, 1902 (sep., pp. 25-26). 
Type: Anisorhizus atriarius Ameghino, from the Notostylops beds of Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on a molar, probably the third. 
inisorhizus: am6oc„ unequal, uneven; piqa, root — in allusion to the character 

of the molar which is " a couronne tres basse, etroite en avant, large en arriere 

et porte trois grosses racines." 
Anisotemnus Amecwiino, 1902. Ingulata, Ancylopoda, Homalodontotheriidse. 
Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 25-26, May, 1902 (sep., pp. 23-24). 
Type: Tsotemnus distentus Ameghino, from Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Anisotemnus: dv, negative; -\- Isotemnus. 
Anissodolops Ameghino, 1903. Allotheria, Plagiaulacidse. 

Anales Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires, IX (ser. 3a, II), 148, fig. 72, July 18, 1903. 
Type: Anissodolops St rrifer Ameghino, from the Notostylops beds of Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on a lower molar. 
Anissodolops: <xvi6o<;, unequal; + (Poly)dolops. 
Annamisus (subgenus of 8ns) Heude, 1892. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Mem. Hist. Nat. Empire Chinois, II, pt. n, 106, 107, 1892. 
Includes les 'sangliers de Cochinchine.' It is not clear whether Annamisus is 

intended as a subgenus, or merely as a descriptive term for the hogs of Annam. 
Annamisus: Annum; Sns — in allusion to its habitat. 
Anoa (subg. of Antilope.) (Leach MS.) II. Smith, 1827. Ungulata, Bovidse. 

Griffith's Cuvier, Anim. Kingdom, V, 355, 1827; ( ln.w, " Spicilegia Zool., t. 11, 

figs. 2-3, 1830" (raised to generic rank). 
Type: Antilope depressicornis Smith (=Anoa compressicornis Leach MS.), from 

Celebes. 
Anoa: Native name in Celebes. 
Anodon (seeAodon). Cete, Physeteridse. 



ANOEMA ANOMALURUS. 105 

Anoema F. Cuvier, 1809. Glires, Caviidse. 

Nouv. Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, No. 24, p. 394, Sept., 1809; Ann. Mus. 

Hist. Nat., XIX, 292-293, pi. 15, fig. 12, 1812. 
Ancemas F. Cuvier, Diet. Sci. Nat., LIX, 493, 1829. 
Ansema Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 2, 1842; Index Univ., 20, 1846; 

Cuvier, Hist. Nat, Mamm., VII, Table gen. et meth., 4, 1842. 
Based on the 'cochon d'Inde' (Cavia cobaya Pallas), from Brazil. 
Anoema: Fr. anoeme, 'sans force' (ex-, without; voi//.ux, perception, thought; 

cf. avoi)n<sov, without understanding) — from its supposed lack of intelligence. 

Anoema Konig, 1825. Glires, Ochotonidae. 

"Icones, Foss. Sectiles, pi. x, fig. 126, 1825" (fide Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. 

Brit. Mus., I, 257, 1885, in synonymy); Forsyth Major, Trans. Linn. Soc. 

London, 2d ser., Zool., VII, pt. 9, pp. 449, 450, Nov., 1899 (in synonymy). 
Type: Anoema oeningensis Konig, from Oeningen, Germany. 
Name preoccupied by Anoema F. Cuvier, 1809, a genus of Caviidse. 
Extinct. Based on a skeleton. 
Anoema: a- without; vor/jua, perception, thought. 

Anoglochis (subgenus of Cervus), Croizet & Jobert, 1826.* Ungulata, Cervidse. 
Recherches Ossem. Foss. Dept, Puy-de-D6me (Expl. des planches), 5 U livr. 

pis. i-v, 8 e livr. pi. vin, 1826; Lesson, in Ferussac's Bull. Sci. Nat, et Geol., 

Paris, XI, 98, 1827; Lydekker, Deer of all Lands, 19, 238-243, figs. 65-67,. 

1898 (raised to generic rank). 
Species, 3: Cervus ardei, C. ramosus, and ('. cusanus Croizet & Jobert, from Mt. 

Perrier, Dept, Puy-de-D6me, France. 
Extinct, Based chiefly on antlers, teeth, and long bones. 
Anoglochis: avco, up; yXcoxiS, point: [Parce que] " le l er andouiller du hois est 

eloigne de la couronne." ( Lesson. ) The antlers have a subbasal snag, but no 

brow tine. (Lydekker.) 

Anomalocera (see Anomolocera ) . Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Anomalomys Gaillard, 1900. (ilires, Muridse, Cricetinse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, CXXX, No. 4, pp. 191-192, Seance du 22 Jan., 1900. 

Type: Anomalomys gaudryi Gaillard, from the Miocene of G rive-Saint- Alban, 
France. 

Extinct. Based on a cranium, a palatal arch, and several mandibles showing 
teeth of different ages. 

Anomalomys: avoofiakoe,, irregular, anomalous; uvs, mouse — in allusion to the 
arrangement of the enamel of the molars, "e'est cette disposition de l'email, 
irreguliere par comparaison avec ce qui existe chez les autres Rongeurs, que 
nous avons voulu rappeler dans le nome de genre." (Gaillard. ) 

Anomalurus Waterhouse, 1843. Glires, Anomaluridse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1842, 124-127, Jan., 1843. 
Type: Anomalurus fraseri Waterhouse, from Fernando Po, West Africa. 
Anomalurus: civ&>/iiaAo<;, strange; ovpci, tailf — in allusion to the scales, 15-16 in 

number, arranged in two longitudinal series on the under side of the basal 

third of the tail. 

*The date, 1826, is on the authority of Lesson. Lydekker (1. c, 238) states that 
the explanations of the plates of Croizet & Jobert's work were never published except 
on the original covers of the livraisons. Agassiz (Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., p. 2, 
1842) refers Anoglochis to Fischer's Zoognosia, 1813, but the name is not found in 
that work. 

f Waterhouse gives the derivation as avu/ios, out of law; ovpa, tail. 



106 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Anomodon Le Conte, 1848. Insectivora, Leptictidse? 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 2d ser., V, 106, 1 fig. in text, Jan., 1848. 
Type: Anomodon snyderi Le Conte, from the Pleistocene of 'the lead region' of 

northern Illinois. 
Extinct. Based on " a single tooth . . . supposed to be a superior left canine." 
Anomodon: ch'o/.io$, irregular; 68cov=68ovs, tooth — fioin the fact that the 

canine is much compressed and its fang flattened. 
Anomodontherium Meecerat, 1891. Ungulata, Litopterna, Proterotheriidge. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, I, 450, 461-462, 1890-91. 
Type: Anomodontherium montanum Mercerat, from the Eocene of Monte Leon, 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on two upper molars. 

Anomodontherium: <zvojuo$, irregular; 68dbv = 68ovs, tooth; dr/piov, wild beast. 
Anomolocera Gray, 1869. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Scientific Opinion, London, II, 385-386, Oct. 6, 1869. 
[Proc. Zool. Soc, 1869, 497-499, figs. 1,2— Xenelaphus huamel.'] 
An'omalocera Philippi, Wiegmann's Archiv Naturgesch., XXXVI, Bd. I, 47, 

1870. 
Type: Anomolocera huamel Gray (= Xenelaphus huamel), from Tinta, southern 

Peru. Referred to Capreolus leucotis Gray, but afterwards renamed Xenelaphus 

anomolocera. (Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 4th ser., X, 445, Dec, 1872.) 
Name preoccupied by Anomolocera Templeton, 1837, a genus of Crustacea. 

Replaced by Xenelaphus Gray, 1869. 
Anomolocera: avdoiiak.o<i, irregular, anomalous; K£fjas, horn — from the fact that 

the horns are unlike those of any other deer. 
Anonyx Agassiz, 1846. Ferse, Mustelidae. 

Nomenclator Zool., Index Univ., 24, 1846; 2d ed., 70, 1848; Coues, Century 

Diet., I, 229, 1889. 
Emendation of Aonyx Lesson, 1827. Preoccupied by Anonyx Kroyer, 1838, a 

genus of Crustacea. 
Anoplonassa Cope, 1869. Cete, Physeteridse. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XI, 188-190, pi. v, fig. v, 1869. 
Anoplossa Mabschall, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 1, 1873 (misprint). 
Type: Anoplonassa forcipata Cope, from the Tertiary in the vicinity of Savannah, 

Georgia. 
Extinct. Based on ''a considerable portion of the mandible." 
Anoplonassa: avonXos, unarmed; avadtia, queen. The mandible was 

described as like that of a Squalodon, but "strikingly different from the latter 

iu being for the most part edentulous." 
Anoplotherium G. Cuvier, 1804. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriidse. 

Ann. Mus. Hist, Nat,, Paris, III. 370-382, figs, in pis. 31 et seq., 1804; Regne 

Animal, I, 238, 1817. 
Anoplotherium Oken, Lehrbuch Naturgesch., 3terTheil, 2te Abth., 773-775, 1816. 
Species, 3: Anoplotherium medium G. Cuvier; A. minus G. Cuvier, and A. 

minimum < i. Cuvier, from the Eocene gypsum beds of the Paris basin, France. 
Extinct. 
Anoplotherium: avonXos, unarmed; brjpiov, wild beast — in allusion to the 

absence of horns and claws. According to Lauriilard in allusion to the canines, 

which differ very little from the incisors and thus were not available as weap- 
ons of defense. (D'Orbigny's Diet. Univ. Hist. Nat, I, 566.) 
Anotis Rafinesqtje, 1815. Glires, Spalacidae. 

Analyse de la Nature, 58, 1815. 

New name for Talpoides Lacepede, 1799 ('Anotis R. TalpoidesU). 
Anotis: civ-, without; ore, cbrdi, ear. 



ANOTUS ANTEPITHECUS. 107 

Anotus (subgenus of Sorex) Wagner, 1855. Insectivora, Soriciase. 

Suppl. Sehreber's Saugthiere, V, 550-551, 1855. 
Type: Sorex carolinensis Bachman, from Goose Creek, South Carolina. {Anotus 

Wagner = Blarina Gray, 18.38.) 
Name preoccupied by Anotis Rafinesque, 1815, a genus of Glires. 
Anotus: dv- without; ouj, cbrog, ear — in allusion to the apparent absence of ears, 

due to their concealment by dense hair (compare ( ryptolis). 

Anoura Gray, 1£38. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

Jardine's Mag. Zool. & Bot, II, 490, 1838. 
Anura Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Index Univ., 27, 184(5; 2d ed., 71, 77, 1848; 

Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1893, 335. 
Type: Anoura geoffroyi Gray, from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 
Anounc dv-, without; ov/jd, tail — in allusion to the absence of a tail. 
Anourosorex Milne-Edwards, 1870. Insectivora, Soricidse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, LXX, 341, 1870; Recherches Hist. Nat. Mamm., 264-266, 

1868-74. 
Anaurosorex Guxther, Zool. Record for 1870, VII, Mamm., 9, 1871. 
Anurosorex Anderson, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 4th ser., XVI, 282, 1875. 
Type: Anourosorex squamipes Milne-Edwards, from eastern Tibet. 
Anourosorex: dv-, without; ovpd, tail; -4- Sorex — from the very short tail. 
Antaodon Ameghino, 1886. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Tapiridae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, IN, 151-156 footnote, 1886; Act. Acad. Nac. 

Cien., Cordoba, VI, 496-499, pi. xxxm, fig. 6, 1889. 
Antacodon Roger, Bericht Naturwiss. Ver., Schwaben u. Neuburg, XXXII, 247, 

1896 (misprint). 
Type: Antaodon ductus Ameghino, from "lastoscasdel fondodel RfodeLa Plata," 

province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on an upper molar. 
Antaodon: Aula, Brazilian name of the tapir; oScov — odov^, tooth — in allusion 

to the upper molars. 
Antechinomys Krefft, 1866. Marsupialia, Dasyuridse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 434. 
Type: Phascogale lanigera Gould, from the junction of the Murray and Darling 

rivers, New South Wales, Australia. 
Antechinomys: Antechinus; /iv?, mouse. 
Antechinus MacLeay, 1841. Marsupialia, Dasyuridse. 

Ann. &Mag. Nat. Hist., VIII, 242, pi. 7, Dec, 1841; Gray, List Osteol. Spec. 

Brit. Mus., pp. xi, 30, 1847. 
Type: Antechinus stuartii MacLeay {=Phascogale flavipes Waterhouse), from 

Spring Cove, near Sydney, New South AVales. 
Antechinus: dvri, corresponding to, like; £j?>os, sea urchin. 

Anteliomys (subgenus of M icrotus) Miller, 1896. Glires, Muridse, Microtinae. 

N. Am. Fauna, No. 12, pp. 9, 47-49, fig. 23, pi. n fig. 8, July 23, 1896. 

Type: Microtus chinensis Thomas, from Kiating-fu, west Sze-chuen, China. 

Anteliomys: dvri)\ioc,, eastern; /'£?, mouse — from the habitat. 
Antelopus (see Antilope). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovida?. 

Antelotherium (see Antoletherium) . Ungulata, Proboscidea, Dinotheriid;c. 

Antepithecus Ameghino, 1901. Primates, Notopithecidre. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 356-357, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 10-11). 

Type: Antepithecus brachystephanus Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia 

Extinct. 

Antepithecus: Lat. ante, before; pithecus, ape. 



108 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Anteutatus Ameghino, 1902. Edentata, Dasypodidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. C6rdoba, XVII, 58-59, May, 1902 (sep. pp. 56-57). 
Species: Anteutatus lenis Ameghino, from the ' Notostylops beds; and A. Isevua 

Ameghino, from the Astraponotus beds of Patagonia. 
Extinct, 
Anteutatus: dvri, before; + Eutatus — in allusion to its occurrence long before 

the recent genus Eutatus. 
Anthops Thomas, 1888. Chiroptera, Rhinolophidae. 

Ann. &Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., I, 156, Feb. 1, 1888. 
Type: Anthops ornatus, from Aola, Guadalcanal', Solomon Islands. 
Anthops: avQos, flower; oxp, face — probably in allusion to the complicated nose 

leaf, which (especially its posterior part) suggests a flower. 
Anthorina Lydekker, 1891. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

Lydekkek in Flower & Lydekker's Mamm., Living & Extinct, 674, 1891. 
New name for Tylostoma Gervais, 1855 (type Phyllostoma Udens Spix, from 

Brazil), which is preoccupied by Tylostoma Sharpe, 1819, a genus of Mollusca. 
Anthorina: avQo$, flower; pis, pivog, nose — from the form of the nosedeaf. 
Anthracotherium Cuvier, 1822. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anthracotheriidae. 

Mem. Acad. Roy. Sci., Paris, V, Hist. Acad., 336-337, 1821-22; Recherches 

( >ssem. boss., nouv. ed., Ill, 396-405, pi. lxxx, figs. 1-3, 5-7, 1822; Desmarest, 

Mammalogie, II, Suppl., 545, 1822; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert, N. Am., Bull. 179, 

U. S. Geol. Surv., 651, 1902 (type fixed). 
Anthracotherion Cray, Cat, Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. Brit, Mus., 

262, 1869. 
Species, 'A: Anthracotherium magnum Cuvier (type), and.-l. minimum Cuvier, from 

the lignites < if ( !adib >na, Liguria, Italy; and A. minus Cuvier, from Agen, France. 
Extinct. 
Anthracotherium: avQpa%, avOpaxos, coal; (J?fpiov, wild beast — so called from 

having been found in the anthracite or lignite of Tuscany. 
Anthropithecus Haeckel, 1895. Primates, Simiidae. 

Syst, Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 600, 1895. 
Contraction of Anthropppithecus Blainville, 1838. 
Anthropodus De Lapouge, 1896. Primates, Cereopithecidae? 

"Bull. Soc. Sci. Ouest, Rennes, III, No. 4, pp. 202-208, 1896; fide Bibliog. Zool., 

I, 469, Sept, 28, 1896." 
Type: Anthropodus rouvUlei He Lapouge. 
Extinct. 

Anthropodus: ai'hpcoitoi, man; 68ov%, tooth. 
Anthropodus Schlosser, 1901. Primates Simiida?. 

Zool. Anzeiger, XXIV, Xo. 643, pp. 261-271, 1 fig., May 13, 1901. 
Type: Anthropodus brancoi Schlosser, from the Tertiary (Bohnerz) of Swabia, 

Germany. 
See Anthropodus De Lapouge, 1896. 
Extinct, Based on a third lower molar. 
Anthropomorphus Ameghino, 1884. Primates, ? 

Filogenia, 385, 1884; Act, Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 87-88, 99, 1889. 
Hypothetical genus — "Antecesor comun del hombre y de los antropomorfos 

existentes." 
Anthropomorphus: avftpcoitos, man; /.iop(p)), form. 
Anthropopithecus Blainville, 1838.* Primates, Simiidae. 

Ann. Franc, et Etrang. d'Anat, et Physiol., Paris, II, 360, 1838; Echo du Monde 

Savant, Paris, 6 e ann., Xo. 402, p. 20, Jan. 9, 1839; " Lecons Orales, 1839." 

*This genus may not have been published until 1839. Echo du Monde Savant 
(Jan. 9, 1839) says: "M. de Blainville vient de publier dans les Annales d'Anatomie 
et de Physiologie les observations suivantes." 



ANTHROPOPITHECUS ANTILOPE. 109 

Anthropopithecus — Continued. 

Anthropithecus Haeckel, Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 600, 1895. 

Type: Anthropopithecus troglodytes ( = Simla troglodytes < imelin), from West Africa. 
Antedated by Troglodytes Geoff roy, 1812 (preoccupied); by Pan Oken, 1816; 
and by Theranthropus Brookes, 1828. 

Anthropopithecus: avfjfja)7Co<;, man; iti^ijKo^, ape — from the fact that the chim- 
panzee more nearly resembles man than any of the other anthropoid apes. 

Anthropops Ameghino, 1891. Primates, Cebidse. 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, Entr. 6 a , 387-389, figs. 89-91, Dec. 1, 1891. 

Type: Anthropops perfectus Ameghino, from the Eocene of southern Patagonia. 

Extinct. Based on a portion of the lower mandible with symphysis nearly com- 
plete, and containing the third premolar on the right side and portions of 
other teeth. 

Anthropops: avQpa)7tos, man; oif), aspect — "un mono de caracteres mas elevados 
que el Homunculus." 
Antiacodon Marsh, 1872. Primates, Hyopsodid;e? 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 210-212, Sept., 1872 (sep. issued Aug. 13); 
Osborn, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., XVI, 173, June 28, 1902. 

Type: Antiacodon venustus Marsh, from the Eocene (Bridger) of Henry Fork of 
Green River, Wyoming. 

Extinct. Based on "part of p lower jaw, with the characteristic lower molar." 

Antiacodon: avri, opposite; a/07, point; 6d&}v = 6Sov?, tooth — in allusion to the 
lower molar, in which "the four principal cones stand in nearly opposite 
pairs, but the posterior tubercle is less widely separated from the central pair 
of cones." (Marsh.) 

Antidorcas Sfxdevall, 1847. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Kongl. Vetensk. Akad. Handlingar, for 1845, 271, 1847. 
Type: AntUope euchore Forster, from central Africa. 

Antidorcas: dvri. corresponding to, like; SopKccs, antelope, gazette — from the 
resemblance of the general characters to those of Gazella. 

Antifer Ameghino, 1889. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidre. 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamif. Fosil. Repub. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

Cordoba, VI, 610, pi. xxxvni, fig. 2, 1889. 
Type: Cervus ultra Ameghino, from the Pampean formation (Pliocene), of 'la 

Laguna Adela,' province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct. "Solo conozco de esta especie un trozo de cuerno procedente de su 

extremidad distal." 
Antifer: Lat. ante, before, in front; few, to bear — in allusion to the part of the 

horn on which the description was based. 

Antilocapra Ord, 1818. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Antilocapridje. 

Journal de Physique, Paris, LXXXVII, 149-151, Aug., 1818; LXXXVIII, 

314-315, Apr., 1819; Oken's Isis, 1819, p. 1105. 
Type: AntUope americana Ord, from the plains of the Missouri River, western 

United States. 
Antilocapra: Antilo(pe) + Capra — i. e., goat antelope. 

Antilope Pallas, 1766. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidre, 

Miscellanea Zoologica, 1-15, tab. 1, iv, fig. 3, 1766; H. Smith, in Griffith's 
Cuvier, Animal Kingdom, V, 312-355, 1827; Ogilby, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 
for 1836, No. xlviii, 137, June 27, 1837; Sclater & Thomas, Book of Ante- 
lopes, III, pt. ix, 3-14, pi. xlvii, text figs. 45-46, 1897. 
"Antelopus Cummixg, Hunter's Life in S. Africa, II, 165, 168, 1850," (fide 
Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, IV, pt, xv, 123, 1900 — in synonymy). 



110 INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 

Antilope — Continued. 

Species, 17: "Typusest .J. cervicapra " (Ogilby, P. Z. S., 1336)= Capra cervicapra 

Linnaeus, from India. 
Antilope*: Mid. Lat. antalopus, from L. Gr. dt'OoAoip, a horned animal, probably 
an antelope. 
Antoletherium Falconer, 1868. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Dinotheriidse. 

Palseont. Memoirs, I, 416, pi. xxxiv, figs. 1-2, 1868. 

Antelotherium Lydekkeh, Mem. Geol. Surv. India, I, 72, 1876 (misprint). 
Type: Not given. Name provisionally applied to "a portion of the lower jaw of 
a tapiroid animal" from Attock, Valley of the Indus, India. Antoletherium 
occurs in some fragmentary notes extracted from Dr. Falconer's notebooks, 
edited and published by Charles Murchison. 
Extinct, 

Antoletherium: dvroXrf, the east; Brfpiov, wild beast — in allusion to the type 

locality. 

Antopithccus ( see Arctopithecus). Primates, Hapalida?. 

Antrozous II. Allen, 1862. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1862, 248; Mon. Bats N. Am., 67, 1864; 2d ed., 

Bull. 43, U. S. Nat. Mus., 64-70, pis. viii-ix, 1893. 
Type: Vespertilio pallidus Le Conte, from El Paso, Texas. 
Antrozous: avrpov, cave; Cg5ok, animal. 
Anura (seeAnoura). Chiroptera, Phyllostomatiihe. 

Anurocyon Heude, 1892. Fera?, Canidse. 

Mem. Hist. Nat. Empire Chinois, II, pt. 2, p. 102 footnote, 1892. 
Type: Anurocyon clamitans Heude, from 'Grand Lac' or Tai-hou, on the right 

bank of the Yangtze River, China. 
Anurocyon: dv, without; ovpd, tail; kvoov, dog. 
Anuromeles Heller, 1897. Marsupialia, Peramelidse. 

Abh. und Ber. K. Zool. und Anthrop.-Eth. Mus., Dresden, VI, No. 8, pp. 5-7, 
1 fig. in text, Feb. 27, 1897; Zool. Anzeiger, No. 533, p. 297, June 14, 1897; 
Tbouessart, Cat. Mamm., fasc. VI, 1210, 1899. 
Type: Anuromeles rufiventris Heller, from Bongu, near Astrolabe Bay, east coast 

of New ( xuinea. 
Anuromeles: dv, without; ovpa, tail; + (Pera)meles — on account of its resem- 
blance to Perameles, from which it differs chiefly in being tailless. 
Anurosorex (see Anourosorex). Insectivora, Soricidae. 

Anutaetus Ameghino, 1902. Edentata, Dasypodida?. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 66, May, 1902 (sep., p. 64). 
Species: Anutaetus circundatus Ameghino, from the Astraponotus beds; and .1. 

turtuosus Ameghino, from the Pyrotherium beds of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Anutaetus: dv, negative prefix; Utaetus (anagram of Eutatus) . 
Aodon Lesson, 1828. Cete, Physeteridse. 

Hist. Nat. Mamm. et Oiseaux decouverts depuis 1788 (Compl. ffiuvres Buffon), 
I, 149-158., pi. 3, fig. 1, 1828; Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 201, 1842. 
Anodon Gray, Cat, Mamm. Brit. Mus., pt. i, Cetacea, 71, 1850 (preoccupied). 
Type: Aodon dalei Lesson [=Ziphius sowerbiensis Gray =Mesoplodon bidens (Sow- 

erby) ] from the North Sea, near Havre, France. 
Name preoccupied by Aodon Lacepcde, 1798, a genus of Pisces. 
Ami, m: a without: 68cbv = 6dov 5, tooth — toothless. The 'Toothless whale of 
Havre,' seems to have been an old specimen of Mesoplodon bidens which had 
probably lost its teeth. (BEDDARn, Mamm., 369, 1902.) 

*Ce noni n'est pas ancien, il est corrompu (Vantholops . . . qui semble se rapporter 
aux beaux yeux de l'animal. (G. Cuvier, Regne Animal, I, 266, 1829.) 



AONYX APHELISCUS. Ill 

Aonyx Lesson, 1827. Ferae, Mustelidi >. 

Man. Mammalogie, 1827, 157; W. L. Sclater, Manim. S. Africa, I, 106, L900 (in 
synonomy). 

Anonyx Aoassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Index Univ., 24, 1846; 2d ed., 70, 1848; 
Coues, Century Diet,, I, 229, 1899. 

Type: Aonyx delalandi Lesson (=Lutra capensis Schinz), from the salt lakes on 
the coast of Cape Colony, Africa. 

Aonyx: a, without; owe,, claw, nail — '(-lawless otter,' from the very rudimentary 
claws. 
Aotes Humboldt, 1811. Primates, Cebidse. 

Kecueil Observ. Zool. et Anat. Comp., I, 306-311, pi. xxyiii, 1811. 

Aotus Humboldt, Ibid., p. 358, 1811 (credited to Illiger, but apparently first pub- 
lished here); Humboldt, in Illiger's Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 71, 
1811; Griffith, Cinder's Anim. Kingd., Y, 35, 1827. 

Type: Simia trivirgata Humboldt, from Esmeralda, on the Orinoco, near the junc- 
tion of the Cassiquiare River, Venezuela. 

Aoies: cc, without; ovs, cyroj ear — 'earless,' from the very short- ears, which 
scarcely appear above the hair of the head. 
Apara (subg. of Dasypus) ('Cuvier') McMurtrie 1831. Edentata, I >asypodidge. 

McMurtrie's Cuvier, Anim. Kingdom, I, Mamm., 163, 1831; abridged ed., 94, 
1834. 

Type: Dasypus tririnctus Linnams (the ' Tatou apara' of Marcgrave ) , from Para- 
guay and Brazil. 

Apara: South American name of the 3-banded armadillo. 
Apatemys Marsh, 1872. Glires, [schyromyidse? 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 221-222, Sept., 1872 (sep., issue*! Aug. 17); 
Matthew, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat, Hist., N, Y., XII, 39, 1899; Hay, Cat. Foss. 
Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 725, 1902. 

Species: Apatemys bellus Marsh (type), and A. bellulus Marsh, from the Eocene 
of Henry Fork of Green River, Wyoming. 

Extinct. 

Apatemys: aTtdzrj, deceit; juvs, mouse — from its combination of characters, 
the incisor being described as 'rodent-like,' while the molar is of the 'insecti- 
vore type.' 

Aper Pallas, 1766. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Miscellanea Zoologica, 16-29, tab. ii and iv, tigs. 1, 2, and 4, 1766; Rafinesque, 

Analyse de la Nature, 56, 1815 (new name for Sus Linmeus*). 
Type: Notstated. Thegenus includes the domestic pig, Sus guineensis, etc, which 
are mentioned incidentally in the description of Aper sethiopievs from Africa. 
Aper: Lat,, wild boar. 
Apera Ameghino, 1886. Marsupialia, ? 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordaba, IX, 13-14, 1886. 

Type: Apera sanguinaria Ameghino, from the older Tertiary of Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct, Based on the first upper premolar and a lower canine. 
Apera: a-, without; 7tffpa, pouch — in allusion to the absence of "la fisura per- 
pendicular esterna entre los dos lobulos de la muela." 
Apheliscus Cope, 1875. Primates, Notharctidae. 

Syst. Cat, Vert. Eocene New Mexico, 13, 16-17, Apr. 17, 1875. 

*"I could never believe it right to call animals by neutral names" (Rafinesque, 
Atlantic Journal No. 3, p. 112, 1832). In accordance with this rule, which he seems 
to have adopted in 1814, Rafinesque used Aper instead of Sus, Aries instead of Ovis, 
Caballus instead of Equus, Hircus instead of Capra, Taurus instead of Bos, etc. 



112 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Apheliscus — ( Jontinued. 

Type: Prototomus insidiosus Cope, from the Eocene of New Mexico. 

Extinct. 

Apheliscus: a.(peXrfi, even, smooth; 4- dim. suffix-isctts — from the absence of the 

heel of the last lower molar, which is present in Pantolestes. 
Aphelops Cock, 1873. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinoeerotidae. 

Palseont. Bull. No. 14, pp. 1-2, July 25, 1873; Syn. New Vert, Colorado, 14, 1873. 
Type: Aceratherium megalodus Cope, from the Miocene of Colorado. 
Extinct. "Represented by a perfect cranium with dentition of both jaws nearly 

complete, with large portions of skull and dentition with other bones of other 

specimens." 
Aphelops: (U/nAi)^, smooth; oif>, face — in allusion to the absence of a horn. 

Aphelotherium Cervais, 1848-52. Primates, Adapidae. 

Zool. et Paleont. Franc., 1" ed., II, Expl. pi. No. 34, 1848-52; 2"ed., 170-171, 

pi. :'»4 figs. 12-13, pi. 35 rig. 10, 1859. 
Type: Apheloiheiium duvemoyi Gervais, from the Eocene gypsum beds in the 

vicinity of Paris, France. 
Extinct. Based on a portion of a lower jaw found near Paris, and also some 

lower molars from la butte de Pereal, near Apt, Dept. Vaucluse, France. 
Aphelotherium: a<peA.rtf, even, smooth; 0?/piov, wild beast — probably from the 

'even ami continuous' dental series. 

Aphrontis (subgenus of Sciurus) Schulzk, 1893. Glires, Sciuridae. 

Zeitschr. Naturwiss., Leipzig, 5te Folge, IV, 165, 1893. 
Type: Sciurus vulgaris Linnaeus, from Europe. 
Name antedated by Sciurus Linnaeus, 1758. 
A j ill n>n /is: a.(ppoYTi<z, free from care — from the animal's lively manner and habits. 

[Apholidemys Pomel, 1847. Reptilia, Testudinata. 

Archiv. Sci. Phys. et Nat., Bibl. Univ. Geneve, IV, 328, 1847; C. 0. Water- 
house, Index Zool., 27, 1902. 
Species: Apholidemys sublsevis Pomel, and A. granosa Pomel. 

A group of extinct turtles inadvertently given as a genus of mammals in the 
Index Zoologicus.] 

Aplocerus (subg. of . I ntUope ) II. Smith, 1827. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Grifiiith's Cuvier, Anim. Kingdom, V, 354-355, 1827. 
IlnploceruH Wagner, Suppl. Schreber's Siiugth., IV, 462, 1844. 
Haploceros Lydekker, in Flower & Lydekker's Mamm. Living and Extinct, 351, 

1891. 
Species, 3: Antilope lanigera Smith, from the mountains of northwestern America; 

A. mamma Smith, from the mountains of tropical America; and A. temmama- 

-jnmi Smith, from the mountains of New Mexico. 
Aplocerus: anXooz, simple; Kepac, horn — in allusion to the short, curved horns. 

Aplodontia Richardson, 1829. Glires, Aplodontida?. 

Zool. Joum., IV, No. xv, pp. 333-336, Oct., 1828-Jan., 1829; Fauna Boreali- 

Americana, I, 210, 1829. 
ApludontiaJ. B. Fischer, Synop. Mamm., 2d ed., addenda, p. 598, 1830. 
Iliiji/niliiii Wagler, Nat. Syst. Amphibien, 22, 1830. 
Apluodontia Richardson, Rept. Brit. Ass., V., for 1836, 150, 159, 1837. 
Haploodon and Hapludon, Brandt, Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci. St.-Petersbourg, ser. 6, 

VII, 150 footnote, 1855. 
Haploodon, Haploudon, Haploodus, Haplodus, Haploudus Coues, Mon. N. Am. 

Rodentia, 556-557, 1877 (discussion of etymology). 
Hapludus, Aploudontia, Haploudontia Coues, Century Diet., Ill, 2712, fig., 1889. 



AFLODONTIA ARCHJ2LURUS. 113 

Aplodontia — Continued. 

Type: Aplodontia leporina Richardson [=Anisonyx rufa Rafinesque), from the 

lower Columbia River. 
Aplodontia: cbrvlobj, single, simple; odovs, tooth — from the simple structure of 

the molars. 
Apodemus Kaup, 1829. Glires, Muridae, Murinae. 

Entw.-Gesch. und Naturl. Syst. Europ. Thierwelt, I, 150, 154, 1829. 
Type: Mus agrarius, from Europe. 
Apodemus: dn68i^io<, away from home, abroad — in other words, living in the 

fields (compare name of the type species). 
Aporotus Dr P>rs, 1868. (etc, Physeterida?. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. de Belgique, 2 e ser., XXY, Xo. 5, pp. 626-627, 1868. 
Species, 3: Aporotus recurvirostris I 'u Bus, .1. affinis Du Bus, and .1. dicyrtus I >u Bus, 

from the Antwerp Crag, Belgium. 
Extinct. 
Apternodus Matthew, 1903. Insectivora, Leptictidae. 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., XIX, 202-204, fig. 2, May 9, 1903. 
Type: Apternodus medisevus Matthew, from the White River Oligocene of Pipe- 
stone Springs, .Jefferson County, Montana. 
Extinct, Based on the posterior half of a lower jaw with two complete molars 

and the root of another. 
Apternodus: d, without; nripva, heel; o<5or;, tooth — in allusion to the third lower 

molar, which has the heel much smaller than in the Centetidae (Tenrecidae). 
Apterodon P. Fischer, 1881. Creodonta, Hyaenodontidae. 

Bull. Soc. < u'ol. de France, 3 e ser., VIII, for 1879-80, 288-290, No. IV, June, 1881; 

No. V, 288-290, Aug., L881. 
Type: Apterodon gaudryi Fischer, from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 
Extinct. Based on a lower jaw. 
Apterodon: d, without; rtrepov, wing; 6Swv=o8ovi, tooth — from the form of the 

lower molars. 
Aquias Gray, 1847. Chiroptera, Rhinolophidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1847, 15-10; Ann. & Mag. Xat. Hist., XIX, 408, L847. 
Species: Rhinolophus Indus Temminck, from India; and R. trifoliatus Temminck, 

from Java. 
Arachnocebus Lesson, 1840. Primates, Lemuridae. 

Species Mamm., 207, 243-244, 1840; Xouv. Tabl. Regne Anim.,Mamm., 10, 1842. 
Type: NydAcebus lori Fischer, from Ceylon. Antedated by Loris F. Geoffroy, 

1796. 
Arachnocebus: dpaxvij, spider; Kpfioz, a monkey — in allusion to the long, thin 

body and slender limbs. 
Arseosciurus (subgenus of Sciurus) Nelson, 1899. Glires, Sciuridae. 

Proc. Wash. Acad. Sci., I, 29-30, 88, pi. i, tig. 3, May 9, 1899. 
Type: S<-iun<.-< oculatus. Peters, from Mexico, probably near Las Yigas, Vera Cruz. 
Arseosciurus: dpaloc, slender; -j-Sciurus. ' 
Arceus Goldfuss, 1809. Fene, Ursidse. 

Vergleich. Naturbeschreib. Saugeth., pp. xix, 301-302, 1809. 
Type: Arceus niger Goldfuss, from the vicinity of Patna, Bengal, India. Based 

on the Ursiform Sloth of Pennant. (See Melursus Meyer, 1793.) 
Arceus: ApKEvs, a leader of the Persians. 
Archeelurus Cope, 1879. Ferae, Felidae. 

Am. Xat., XIII, 798a-798b, Dec. 4,1879; "Paleont. Bull., Xo. 31, p. 3, Dec. 24. 

1879"; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XVIII, 372, Dec. 30, 1879; Tert. Vert., 953, 

1885 (dates of publication). 

7591— No. 23—03 8 



114 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Archaelurus — Continued. 

Type: Archaelurus debilis Cope, from the Miocene (John Day) of Oregon. 
Extinct. 

Archaelurus: apxocios, primitive; aiXovpog, cat. "The characters place Arch- 
aelurus at the base of the Felidae, showing that it is the most generalized form 
yt it known. ' ' ( Cope. ) 
Archaenodon (see Achaenodon ) . Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

Archaeocetus Sinzow, 1898. Cete, Delphinidse. 

•• Verhandl. Ruaa. Min. Ges., XXXV, 118, pis. 8-9, 1898" (fide Trouess art, Cat. 

Mamm., new ed., fasc. v, 1071-1072, Nov., 1898). 
New name for Pachypleurus Brandt, 1873, which is preoccupied by Pachypleura 

White, 1853, a genus of Colcoptera. 
Extinct. 

Archaeocetus: dpxaZos, primitive; Kijrog, whale. 
Archseochaegus Giglioli, 1873. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, ? 

Ricerche Intorno Dist. Geog. Gen., 163, 1873. 

Archxochaegus occurs only in a list of Miocene genera of Artiodactyla with Poebro- 
therium, Leptomeryx, Agriochcerus, etc. It ic unaccompanied by authority or 
reference to place of description, and is probably only a misprint. 

Archaeodolops Ameghino, 1903. Allotheria, Polydolopida?. 

Anales Mus. Xac. Buenos Aires, IX (ser. 3% II), 150, 174, figs. 75, 103, July 18, 

1903. 
Type: Archaeodolops clavulus Ameghino, from the Notostylopa beds of Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on part of the left lower jaw. 
Archaeodolops: dpxocio^, primitive; -{-(Poly)dolops. 

Archaeohyrax Ameghino, 1897. Ungulata, Hyracoidea, Archseohyracidse. 

La Argentina al traves de las Ultimas Epocas Geologicas, 3-9, 16 footnote, 1 fig., 
L897; Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XVIII, 431-435, figs. 14-19, Oct. 6, 1897. 

Species: Archaeohyrax patagonicus Ameghino, and A. propheticus Ameghino, from 
the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Archaeohyrax: dpx^To^, primitive; -\-IIyrax. 

Archaeolemur Filhol, 1895. Primates, Leinuridse. 

Bull. Mus. Hist. Nat,, Paris, No. 1, p. 13, Feb. 1895; Carls, Zool. Anzeiger, 

XVIII, No. 480, p. 240, July 22, 1895. 
Type: Archaeolemur majori Filhol, from Belo, Madagascar. 
Extinct. Based on a humerus and the upper part of the radius and ulna. 
Archaeolemur: dpxaios, primitive; -{-Lemur — in allusion to the humerus, which 

somewhat resembles that of Hapdlemur. 

Archaeolophus Ameghino, 1897. Ungulata, Pyrotheriidse. 

La Argentina al traves de las Ultimas Epocas Geologicas, 15, 1897 (nomen 

nudum); Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XVIII, 447-448, fig. 31, Oct. 6, 1897. 
Type: Archaeolophus precursor Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Archaeolophus: dpxodoi, primitive; Xo<po$, neck, crest. 

Archaeomys Laizer & Parieu, 1839. Glires, Theridomyidae. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, VIII, No. 6, p. 206, Jan.-June, 1839; X, 929, 1840. 
New name for Palaeomys Laizer & Parieu, 1839, which is preoccupied by Palaeomys 

Kaup, 1832, a genus of Castoridpe. 
Extinct. 
Archaeomys: apxaio*;, primitivi ; itvz, mouse. 



ARCHAEOPHYLUS ARCHIL AGUS. 115 

Archaeophylus Ameghino, 1897. Ungulata, Typotheria, Interatheridae. 

La Argentina al traves de las Ultimas Epocas Geologicas, 6, 17 footnote, 1 fig. in 
text, 1897; Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XVIII, 423-424, fig. 9, Oct. 6, L897. 

Type: Archaeophylus potrius Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Archaeophylus: apxaiog; primitive; q>v\ov, race. 
Arehaeopithecus Ameghino, 1807. Primates, Archseopithecidae. 

La Argentina al traves de las Ultimas Epocas Geologicas, 5, 13 footnote, 1 fig. in 
text, 1897; Bol. Inst, Geog. Argentino, XVIII, 422-423, fig. 8, Oct. 6, 1897. 

Type: Arehaeopithecus rogeri Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Arehaeopithecus: ap^a/'oj, primitive; iti^Koc,, ape. 
Archeeoplus Ameghino, 1898. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Isotemnidse. 

Revue Scientifique, 4' ser., X, 74, July 16,1898; Sin. Geol.-Paheont., in Segundo 
Censo Nacional, Repub. Argentina, I, 174, 1898. 

Type: Archeeoplus indpiens Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Archaeoplus: d/jxex/o?, primitive; bitXov, arms. 
Archaeotherium Leidy, 1850. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Pro,'. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1850-51, 92-93. 

Type: Archaeotherium nu>rt<>ni Leidy, from the Oligocene of the Bad Lands in the 
vicinity of Fort Laramie, Wyoming. 

Extinct. Based on 'part only of the face.' 

Archaeotherium: apxaios, primitive: Bijpiov, wild heast. 
Archaeotypotherium Roth, 1903. Ungulata, Typotheria, Typotheriidse. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, XI, 152-153, 1903. 

Type: Archaeotypotherium transitum Roth, from the lower Tertiary of Canadon 
Blanco, Territory of Ghubut, Patagonia. 

Extinct. Based on part of the upper jaw with three molars. 

Archaeotypotherium: dpxocio?, primitive; 4- Typotherium. 
Archaeutatus Ameghino, 1902. Edentata, Dasypodidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 56-57, May, 1902 (sep., pp. 54-55). 

Type: Archaeutotus malaspinensis Ameghino, from the Pyrotheriurn beds of Pata- 
gonia. 

Extinct. 

Archaeutotus: apxaios, primitive; -\-Eutatus. 
Archibradys Haeckel, 1895. Edentata, ? 

Syat. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 516, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus; the supposed ancestor of the Xenarthra. 

Archibradys: ccpxi, primitive; jSpaSvi, slow (constituent of Bradypus. ) 
Archididelphys Haeckel, 1895. Marsupialia, ? 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 466, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus, including the carnivorous marsupials from the Jura. 

Archididelphys: ccpxi, primitive; -\-Didelphys. 
Archidiskodon (subgenus of Elephas) Poheig, 1888. Ungulata, Elephantidse. 

Nova Acta Acad. Cses. Leop. -Carol., LIII, Nr. 1, pp. 138, 252, numerous figs., 1888. 

Type: Elephas meridionalis Nesti, from southern Europe. 

Extinct. 

Archidiskodon: dpxi-, primitive; 8ic,Ku<;, disk; 68a>v=6dov<;, tooth — in allusion 
to the enamel disks of the molars. 
Archilagus Haeckel, 1895. Glires, ? 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 502, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus. "Atavus omnium Rodentium." 

Archilagus: dpxi-, primitive; \ay<h<;, hare. 



lift INDEX GENERUM MAMMALTUM. 

Archimanis Haeckel, 1895. Effodientia, ? 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 466, 516, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus from the Eocene; the supposed ancestor of the Nomarthra. 

Archirnanis: apx 1 -, primitive; -\-Manis. 
Archipatagus Haeckel, 1895. Chiroptera, ? 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, Til, 466, 593, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus from the Eocene. " Stammform aller Flatterthiere." 

Archipatagus: ccpx 1 ; primitive; narayoc, literally clatter, but here used in sense 
of bat (cf. patagium). 
Archipithecus Haeckel, 1895. Primates, ? 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 609, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus. "Wenn uns Archipithecus, die gemeinsamc hypothetische 
Stammform aller Affen, bekannt ware, wiirden wir ihn ebenfalls zu den Platy- 
rhinen stellen." 

Archipiihecus: ccpxi-, primitive; Ttfi}fKo<z, ape. 
Archiprimas Haeckel, 1895. Primates, ? 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 600, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus; apparently the supposed ancestor of the Lemurs. 

Archiprimas: Lat. archir, primitive; primas, chief, i. e., an ancestral Primate. 
Architherium Haeckel, 1895. Monotremata, ? 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 466, 470, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus from the Trias, proposed to include the primitive monotremes. 
"Hypothetische Stammgattung aller Saugethiere." 

Architherium: cepx 1 -, primitive; 'J?/piov, wild beast. 
Architrogon Haeckel, 1895. Glires, ? 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 466, 504, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus from the Lower Eocene. "Das hypothetische Urnagethier 
(Architrogon), von dem wir alle Trogontherien ableiten, wird zwischen diesen 
Esthonychiden und den altesten Prochoriaien in tier Mitte gestanden haben." 
(Haeckel, p. 504.) 

Architrogon: apx 1 -, primitive; rpcbyoo, to gnaw — i. e., a primitive rodent. 
Archizonurus De Vis, 1889. Marsupialia, Phalangeridse. 

Proc. Roy. Soc. Queensland, VI, 109, pi. v, 1889. 

Type: Archizonurus securus De Vis, from the Pleistocene of Darling Downs, 
< iueensland, Australia. 

Extinct. 

Archizonurus: cepx 1 -, primitive; Z,(bvij, belt, girdle; ovpd, tail. 
Archorycterus Haeckel, 1895. Effodientia, Orycteropodida? ? 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 516, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus; the supposed ancestor of Orycteropus. 

Archorycterus: apx 1 ; primitive; 6pvKTi)p, digger. 
Archungulatum Haeckel, 1895. TJngulata, Condylarthra, ? 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 466, 530, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus from the Lower Eocene. The supposed ancestor of the Con- 
dylarthra. 

Archungulatum: Lat. arch-, primitive; ungulatus, having hoofs, i. e., an ungulate. 
Arctaelurus CiLooEE, 1841. Ferae, Procyonida?. 

Hand- u. Ililfsbueh Naturgesch., I, pp. xxviii, 55, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 
Nat. Hist., (itli ser., XV, 190, Feb. 1, 1895. 

Type: Ailurus fulgens~E '. Cuvier, from the Himalayas, India. (See AUurus Owner.) 

Arctaelurus: aptcroz, bear; ai'Xovpos, cat. 
Arctias Rapinesque, 1815. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Phocidse. 

Analyse de la Nature, 60, 1815 (nomen nudum). 

Type: Phoca sp. ( 'Arctias R. sp. do' [espece du genre precedent, Phoca]). 

Arctias: aptcroz, bear; -f suffix-za?, denoting a special characteristic. 



ARCTIBEUS — ARCTODON. 117 

Arctibeus (see Artibeus). Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidse. 

Arctictis Temmixck, 1824. Ferae, Viverridaj. 

"Prospectus de Monographies des Mammiferes, Mar., 1824" (fide Flower & 
Lydekker, Mamin. Living and Extinct, 534, footnote, 1891) ; Mon. I, xxi, 1824*; 
XV, 308-311, pi. lxii, 1835-41. 

Type: Le Binturong (Yiverraf binturong Rallies I, from Sumatra. 

This name seems to have been published previous to 1824. "J'ai indique ce 
groupe sous la denomination mentionnee en l'annee 1820, dans un ouvrage 
periodique imprime en langue hollandaise; ... Le nom Arctictis se trouve 
reproduit dans le prospectus du present ouvrage; ce n'est consequemment 
point une reforme du nom Ictides propose par M. Valenciennes avant 1822, et 
sanctionne en 1824 par M. F. Cuvier, ... On me permettra consequemment 
de conserver le nom d' Arctictis pref emblement a celui d' Ictides, pour designer 
le nouveau groupe dont 1' espece-type porte a Sumatra le nom de Binturong^" 
(Temmixck, Mon. I, p. xxi.) 

Arctictis: apKzoc,, bear; iKvie,, weasel. 
Arctocebus Gray, 1863. Primates, Lemuridae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1863, 150. 

Type: Perodicticus caiabarensis Smith, from Old Calabar, West Africa. 

Arctocebus: apKtos, bear; KiJfJos, a long-tailed monkey. 
Arctocephalus F. Cuvier, 1826. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Otariidse. 

['Arctocephale' Cuvier Mem. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, XI, 205-208, pi. 15, fig. 1, 
1824]; Diet. Sci. Nat., XXXIX, 553-554, 1826 (art, 'Phoques'). 

Type: I'hoca ursina (=Arctocephalu8 delalandi Gray =Phoca antarctica Thunberg), 
from the Cape of Good Hope (fide Aelex, N. Am. Pinnipeds, 190, 212, 1880) . 

ArclocephdPus: apKroz, bear; ke^cxa//, head — 'bear head,' from its peculiar 
ursine appearance. 
Arctocyon Blaixyiixe, 1841. Creoclonta, Arctocyonidpe. 

Osteog. Mamm. Recents et Foss., II, fasc. ix (Carnassiers, Subursus), 73-78, 
112; Atlas, II, Subursus, pi. xm, 1841. 

Type: Arctocyon prima vus Blainville, from La Fere, between Nancy and Charmes, 
Dept. Meurthe et Moselle, eastern France. 

Extinct. Based on "une tete presque entiere, sauf la machoire inferieure, et un 
assez bon nombred'autresossements, malheureusement leplus son vent a 1'etat 
de fragments, et que nous designerons, . . . par le nom de PcUseocyon, ou 
mieux d' Arctocyon-" 

Arctocyon: apKros, bear; kvgov, dog. 

Arctocyonides Lemoixe, 1891. Creodonta, Arctocyonidse. 

Bull. Soc. Geol. de France, 3 e ser., XIX, No. 5, p. 275, figs. 25-29, May., 1891. 

Type: Species not given. Based on teeth from the Lower Eocene, near Reims, 
France. 

Extinct. 

Arctocyonides: Arctocyon; £iSo<;, form — in allusion to the teeth. 
A?ctodictis Mercerat, 1891. Marsupialia, Borhyaenida?. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, II, 51-52, 1891. 

Species; Arctodictis munizi Mercerat, and .1. australis Mercerat — probably from 
Patagonia — exact locality not stated. 

Extinct. 

Arctodictis: aptcroi, bear; oSuvs, tooth; I'ktic,, weasel. 
Arctodon Leidy, 1851. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., for 1850-51, 278, '1851 (nomen nudum?); Journ. 
Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. , new ser. , VII, 388, 1869 (synonym of Elotherium morton i ) . 

*See Oken's Isis, 1827, 273-279. 



118 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Ar ctodon — Continued. 

Type (species not named), from Nebraska Territory. 

Extinct. Based on " three broken teeth, consisting of the body of a canine and 

that of two posterior molars." 
Arctodon: apKrog, bear; dSajv = 68ov<;, tooth — so called on the supposition that 
• the teeth "belonged to an animal closely allied to the genus Orsus." 

Arctodus Leidy, 1854. Ferae, TTrsidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1854, No. Ill, 90; Leidy, in Holmes' Post-Pleiocene 

Foss. South Carolina, 115-116, pi. xxm, figs. 3-4, 1860; Hay, Cat. Foss. Yert. 

N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 763, 1902. 
Type: Arctodus pristinus Leidy, from the Pleistocene sands of Ashley River, near 

Ashley Ferry, South Carolina. 
Extinct. Based on the crown of a second lower molar. 
Arctodus: apKrog, bear; 68ov$, tooth — from the resemblance of the molar to 

that of a bear. 

Arctogale Kaup, 1829. Ferae, Mustelidse. 

Entw.-Gesch. und Natiirl. Syst. Europ. Thierwelt, I, 30, 1829. 

Species: Mustela erminea Linnaeus, and M. boccam,ela Bechstein, from Europe. 

Arctogale: apKros, bear; yaXfj, weasel. 

Arctogale Peters, 1863. Ferae, Viverridae. 

Handb. Zool., I, 6ter Bogen, 98, Sept., 1863 (unpublished?); Peters, in Carus & 
Gerstaecker's .Handb. Zool., I, 126, 1868-75; Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. Lon- 
don, 1864, 542-543; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 
75-76, 1869. 

Peters' s original type was Paradoxurus boiei Midler, but Gray, who published 
the genus in 1864, gave as type Paradoxurus trivirgatus < iray. from the Moluccas. 

" ' I have formed this into a genus, on account of the smallness of the teeth and 
the protraction of the palate.' — Peters's letter, Nov. 11, 1864. I had already 
distinguished the genus, but gladly adopt Dr. Peters's unpublished name to 
prevent the useless increase of generic names." (Gray, P. Z. S., 1864, 543.) 

Name preoccupied by Arctogale Kaup, 1829, a genus of Mustelidse. Replaced by 
Arctogalidia Merriam, 1897. 

Arctogale: apKros, bear; yaXfj, weasel. 
Arctogalidia Merriam, 1897. Ferae, Yiverridae. 

Science, new ser., V, No. 112, p. 302, Feb. 19, 1897. 

New name for Arctogale Peters, 1863, which is preoccupied by Arctogale Kaup, 
1829, a genus of Mustelida?. Type: Paradoxurus trivirgatus (iray, from the 
Moluccas. 

Arctogalidia: apKrog, bear;+ Galidia. 

Arctoidotherium (Bravard MS.) Lydekker, 1885. Ferae, Orsidae. 

Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., I, 157, 1885. 
Name quoted by Lydekker as a synonym of Arctotherium Bravard, 1857. 
Extinct. 
Arctoidotherium: apKros, bear; eido$, form; fhjpiov, wild beast. 

Arctomys Schreber, 1780. Glires, Sciuridae. 

Siiugthiere, pis. ccvn-ccxi, 1780; ibid., text, IV, 721-74:;, 1782; <;melin, Lin- 
naeus' Syst. Naturae, ed. XIII, 141, 1788. 

Species figured on the 5 plates: Arctomys marmota, A. monax, A. bobac, A. empetra, 
and A. citillus, all from Europe except .1. monax and A. empetra, which are 
from North America. 

Name antedated by Marmota Frisch, 1775. 

Arctomys: apKros, bear; f-ivi, mouse. 



ARCTONYX ARCTOTHERIUM. 119 

Arctonyx F. Cuvier, 1825. Ferse, Mustelidae. 

Hist. Nat. Mauim., V, livr. li, pi. with 2 pp. text under 'Bali-saur,.' Sept., 1825. 

Type: Arctonyx coUaris F. Cuvier, from the mountains between Bhutan and Hin- 
dostan, northeastern India. 

Arctonyx: apKros, bear; owe, claw — from the long, slightly curved, blunt 
claws 
Arctophcca (subgenus of Otaria) Peters, 1866. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Otariidse. 

Monatsb. K. Pr. Akad. Wiss. Berlin, 276, Taf. n, a, b, c, 1866; Geay, Ann. & 
Mag. Nat. Hist., 4th ser., IV, 269, Oct., 1869 (raised to generic rank). 

Artoplioca ScrnoER, Nomenclator Zool., pt. i, 33, 1882 (misprint). 

Type: Otaria philippii Peters, from Juan Fernandez, Chile. 

Arctophoca: apKros, bear; ;f;(OK)/, seal. 
Arctopithecus ('Geoffroy') Virey, 1819. Primates, Hapalid;e. 

Nouv. Diet. Hist. Nat., nouv. ed., XXXI, 279, 1819; Bowmen, Anal. Nat. Class. 
Manim., 17, 1821; Ritgen, Natiirliche Eintheilung Siiugthiere, Giessen, 32 
[Tafel?], 1824. 

Antopithecus F. Cuvier, Diet. Sci. Nat., LIX, 401, 1829 (misprint in synonymy). 

The name is given as a synonym of Hdpale Illiger, 1811. It was used by 
Geoffroy (Ann. Mus. Hist. Nat., XIX, 118-122, 1S12) as a supergeneric or 
group term, Arctopitheci, including the two genera Jacchus and Midas.* "Plu- 
sieurs auteurs citent dans la synonymie generique, le nom d' Arctopithecus qu'ils 
attribuent a M. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire. On a deja vu que ce zoologiste nommait 
Arctopitheques la tribu que nous appelons Hapaliens avec la plupart des auteurs: 
Arctopithecus n'a jamais e4e pour lui un nom generique." (I. Geoffroy, Cat. 
Meth. Coll. Mamm., 59, 1851.) 

Arctopithecus: a/jKroj, bear; TiifojKos, ape. 
Arctopithecus Gray, 1850. Edentata, Bradypodidre. 

[List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., 1843, p. xxviii — nomen nudum, ex Gesner, 1551]; 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 184°, No. CXCIV, 65, 70-73, pi. xi, Jan. -June, 1850. 

Species, 5: Bradypus gularis Riippell, from Guiana; Arctopithecus marmoratus 
Gray, from Brazil; A. blainvillii Gray, from tropical America; .1. flaccidvs 
Cray, from Venezuela, and .1. problematicus Gray, from Para, Brazil. (See 
Arctopithecus Virey, 1819.) 

Arctopithecus: a/jKroz, bear; 7rz%K"o?, ape. 
Arctotherium Bravaro, 1857. Fene, Ursidae. 

"Observations Geologiques sur le Bassin de La Plata, Buenos Aires, 1857;" " Cat. 
Especes d'Animaux Foss. recueillis dans l'Amerique du Sud, de 1852 a 1860 
(Broch. lithogr., 5 pp., 4°), Parana, 1860" (fide Gervais, Zool. et Paleont. 
Gen., l e ser., 131, 1867-69) ; Zittel, Handb. Paheont., IV, 3te Lief., 641, 1893. 

Species: Ardotherium latidens Bravard, and ,1. angustidens Bravard, from the Plio- 
cene of the La Plata basin, Argentina. 

Extinct. 

Arctotherium: dpKtoi, bear: (Jrjpiov, wild beast. 
Arctotherium Lemoine, 1896. Creodonta, Arctocyonidae. 

Bull. Soc. Geol. de France, 3 e ser., XXIV, No. 5, pp. 340, 342-343, pi. xiv, fig. 1, 
June, 1896. 

Type: Arctotherium cldezii Lemoine, from the Lower Eocene of Jonchery, near 
Reims, France. 

Name preoccupied by Arctotherium Bravard 1857, a genus of Ursidse. 

Extinct. Based on :\ right lower jaw. 

Arctotherium: apKruc, bear; Brjpiov, wild beast. 

*The name ' Les Arctopitheques' is used by I. Geoffroy for a, family of American 
monkeys, including Jacchus and Mida*. (Cours d'Hist. Nat., 10"^ Lecon, 4 Juin, 1828, 
26-27, 1834.) 



120 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Arctotherium. Lydekkek (see Arretotherium). Ungulata, Agriochoeridae. 

Argali (subgenus of Ouis) Gray, 1850. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovida?. 

Knowsley Menagerie, 37, 1850; Cat. Ruminant Mamm. Brit. Mus., 57, 1872. 

Type: JEgoceros argali Pallas, from Siberia. 

Argali: Mongolian and Tungusian name of a wild sheep. 
Argiilotherium Da vies, 1884. Creodonta, ? 

Geol. Mag., London, new ser., Decade III, I, No. x, 438, Oct., 1884. 

Type: Argiilotherium toliapicum Davies, from the London Clay (Eocene) of Shep- 
pey, Kent, England. 

Extinct. Based on a mutilated skull without teeth. 

Argiilotherium: apyiA.Xo$, white clay; Qr/piov, wild beast — from the deposit in 
which the remains were found. 
Argocetus Gloger, 1841. Cete, Delphinidse. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbucn NatUrgesch., I, pp. xxxiv, 169, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & 
Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th Ber., XV, 191, Feb. 1, 1895. 

Type: Delphinapterus leucas ( = Delphinus leucas Pallas) of the Arctic seas. Prac- 
tically a new name fm- Delphinapterus Lacepede, 1804. 

Argocetus: apyo$, shining, glistening; /o/roc, whale — from its pure white color. 
Argyrocetus Lydekker, 1894. Cete, Platanistidse. 

Nat. Science, IV, No. l'4, p. 125, Feb., 1894; Anal. Mus. La Plata, Pakeont. Argen- 
tina, II, for 1893, Art. No. n, 10-12, pi. v, Apr., 1894; Ameghino, Revista 
Jardin Zool., Buenos Ayres, II, entr. 7, p. 193 footnote, July 15, 1894 (date of 
publication). 

Type: Argyrocetus patagonicus Lvdekker, from the Territory of Chubut, Patagonia. 

Extinct. Based on an imperfect skull and some vertebra?. 

Argyrocetus: apyvpoi, silver, i. e., La Plata; K)Jruc : whale. 
Argyrodelphis Lydekker, 1894. Cete, Platanistida?. 

Anal. Mus. La Plata, Pal. Argentina, II, for 1893, Art. No. n, 12-13, pi. vi, 
Apr., 1894. 

New name for Notocetus Moreno, 1892, which is preoccupied by Notiocetus 
Ameghino, 1891. a genus of extinct Balaenidse. Antedated by Diochotichus 
Ameghino, Feb., 1834 (see Ameghino, Revista Jardin Zool., Buenos Ayres, 
II, entr. 7, p. 193%otnote, July 15, 1894). 

Extinct. 

Argyrodelphis: apyvpog, silver, i. e., La Plata; 8eA.(pi$, dolphin. 
Argyrohippus Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Litopterna, Notohippkke. 

[Anal. Soc. Cien. Argentina, LI, 77, Mar. -Apr., 1901 — nomen nudum.] 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 81-85, May, 1902 (sep. pp. 13-17). 

Species: Argyrohippus boulei Ameghino and J. fraterculus Ameghino, from the 
Patagonian formation (Eocene) of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Argyrohippus: apyvpos, silver, i. e., La Plata: "mizoc, horse. 
Argyrohyrax Ameghixo, 1897. Ungulata, llyracoidea, Archaeohyracida?. 

La Argentina al travel de las Ultimas Epocas Geologicas, 16, 1897 (nomen 
nudum); Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XVIII, 435-436, fig. 20, Oct. 6, 1897. 

Species: Argyrohyrax proavus Ameghino, and .1. proavunculus Ameghino, from 
the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Argyrohyrax: apyvpos, silver, i. e., La Plata; -\-IIyrax. 
Argyrolestes Ameghino, 1902. Marsupialia, Triconodontida?. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 48, May, 1902 (sep. p. 46). 

Type: Argyrolestes peralestinus Ameghino, from the Notostylops beds of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Argyrolestes: apyvpos, silver, i. e., La Plata; A^tfr?)?, robber. 



ARHINOLEMUR ARIZOSTUS. 121 

Arhinoleniur Ameghino, 1898. Primates, ? 

Sinopsis Geol.-Paleont., in Segundo Censo Nac. Argentina, I, 243 footnote, 1898; 

Coniptes Rendus, Paris, CXXVII, 395-396, Seance Sept. 5, 1898; Revue Scient., 

4 e ser., X, 371, Sept. 17, 1898. 
Arrhinolemur Ameghino, Corn. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires, I, 116-151, 2 figs, in 

text, Dec. 30, 1899. 
Arhinolemus Tkouessakt, Cat. Mamni., fasc. vi, 1276, 1899 (misprint). 
Type: Arhinolemur scalabrinii Ameghino, from the Tertiary in the vicinity of 

Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on a skull. 
Arhinolemur: a.-, without; pis, pivos, nose; -{Lemur. " II n'existeaucun vestige 

de l'ouverture anterieure des narines, c'est la un cas unique chez lea Mamnii- 

feres." (Ameghino.) 
Ariela Geay, 1864. Ferae, A'iverridae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1861, 565; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. 

Brit, Mus., 163, 1869; Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1882, 86, 90 (in syn- 
onymy) . 
Type: Ariela tasnwnota (A. Smith = Herpestes fasciatus Desmarest), from south- 
eastern Africa. 
Ariela: Ariel, Heb., 'lion of God'; later, a water spirit, a spirit of the air. 
Aries Beisson, 1762. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovida?. 

Regnum Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2il ed., 12, 48-51, 1762; Stokr, Prodro- 

mus Methodi Mamm., 41. tab. c, 1780; Rafinesqce, Analyse de la Nature, 56, 

1815. 
Species, 5: Ovis domestiea, O.laUcaudd, <>. longieauda, O.africana, and 0. guineensis. 
Aries: Lat., ram. 
Aries Link, 1795. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Beytr. Naturgesch., 1, pt. n, 96-97, 1795. 
Includes the genera Ovis and Capra. "Ich habe Ovis mit Capra vereinigt, wie 

schon Erxleben gethan hat, und viele Naturforscher angerathen haben. 

Diesem Geschlecht habe ich den Namen Aries nach Analogie des Namens Bos 

gegeben" (1. c, p. 97). (See Aries Brisson, 1762.) 
Arionius Meyer, 1841. Cete, Squalodontidaj. 

Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogie, 1841, 315-331. 
Arionicus Van Beneden, Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. de Belgique, 2° ser., XXV, 124, 

1868. 
Type: Arionius servatus Meyer, from the Miocene "aus der Molasse von Baltringen 

in Wurtternberg, " Germany. 
Extinct. Based on a fragmentary skull. 
Arionius: \\piovio$, belonging to Arion, a celebrated cithara player of Methymna, 

in Lesbos, who was rescued from drowning by a dolphin. 
Aristippe Kolenati, 1863. Chiroptera, Vespertilioiiida\ 

"Beitr. Kenntniss Phthiriomyiarien, Petersburg, 1863" (fide Koch, Das Wesent- 

liche der Chiropteren, etc., 471, 476, 1863 — under Meteorux). 
Species: VespertiMo discolor Natterer, and Vesperugo nilsxoitii Keyserling & Blasius, 

from Europe. 
Aristippe: A proper name, application obscure. 
Ariteus Gray, 1838. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatida?. 

Jardine's Mag. Zool. & Bot, II, 491, 1838. 
Type: Istiophorus Jlavescens Gray. Locality of type unknown, possibly Jamaica 

(see Dobson, Cat. Chiroptera Brit. Mus., 528, 1878). 
Arizostus Glooer, 1841. Edentata, Dasypodida?. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxii, 114, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat, Hist., 6th ser., XV, 191, Feb. 1, 1895. 



122 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Arizostus — Continued. 

Type: "Das Kahlsehwanzige Cabassu, Dasypus gymnurus" (=-D. unitinctus 

Linnaeus), from Brazil. (See Cabassous McMurtrie, 1831.) 
Arizostus: apt-, intensive prefix; C&>tfr6s, girded — in allusion to the bands of the 
carapace. 
Arminiheringia Ameghino, 1902. Marsupialia, Borhyaenidae (Arminiheringiidae). 
Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 44-46, May, 1902 (sep. pp. 42-43). 
Species: Arminiheringia auceta Ameghino, and A. cuUrata Ameghino, from the 

Notostylops beds of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Arminiheringia: In honor of Dr. Hermann von Ihering, director of the Museu 

Paulista, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Armodillo Wagner, 1763. Edentata, Dasypodidae. 

" Beschreibung des Bareuther Naturalienkabinets, 1763" (fide Agassiz, Nomen- 

clatorZool., Mamm., 3, 1842); Agassiz, Index Univ., 34, 1846; 2ded., 98, 1848. 

Original reference not seen. 

Armodillo: Sp. armadillo, dim. of armado, armed — in allusion to the carapace. 
Armodillo Eberhard, 1769. Edentata, Dasypodidae. 

Versuch eines neuen Entwurfs der Thiergesch., Halle, 31, 285, 1769. 
Species included: Der "gepanzerte Ameisenfresser, verschiedenen Teufelgen 
. . . das mit dem Sch weinskopf ( Tatua porcinus, Armodillo orientalis) das mit 
dem Hundskopf (Tatu-apara, Armodillo nothwt, pedibus altis)" (p. 31). 
Arnee ? , 1845. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

London Encyclopaedia, XXII, 752, 1845 (art. Zoology). 
The genus is described in an unsigned article, without mention of species, but is 

evidently based on Bos arnee of India. 
Arnee: Hindoo arna (fern, arm), name of the wild Indian buffalo. 
Aroeethrus Waterhouse, 1843. Glires, Anomaluridae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1842, 124 footnote, Jan., 1843. 
Name provisionally proposed to replace Anomalurus Waterhouse, 1843, in case 

the latter should prove to be preoccupied. 
Arosethrus: dpoco, to plow; ai'Qpa, air — from the animal's ability to sail in the 
air like a flying squirrel. 
Arretotherium Douglass, 1901. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agriochceridae. 

Trans. Am. Philos. Soc, new ser., XX, pt, in, 269-278, pi. ix figs. 1-3, Dec. 5, 

1901 (sep. pp. 33-42). 
Aretotherium Lydekker, Zool. Record for 1901, XXXVIII, Mamm., 36, 1902. 
Arctotherium Lydekker, ibid., Index New Genera, p. 2, 1902. 
Type: Arretotherium acridens Douglass, from the White River Oligocene (Black- 
tail Deer Creek beds), 25 miles southeast of Dillon, Madison County, Montana. 
Extinct. Based on most of the superior dentition and parts of the skull and 

skeleton. 
Arretotherium: afiprfTos, mysterious; bijpiov, wild beast— in allusion to the 
uncertain relationships of the genus. 
Arrhinolemur (see Arhinolemur). Primates, ? 

Arsinoitherium Beadnell, 1902. Ungulata, Proboscidea, ? 

Nature, LXV, Xo. 1691, pp. 494-495, figs. 1, 2 in text, Mar. 27, 1902. 
Type: Arsinoitherium zitteli Beadnell, from the desert bounding the Fayum de- 
pression, Egypt. 
Extinct. 

Arsinoitherium: Arsinoe; f »njiov, wild beast: "Queen Arsinoe, after whom the 
Fayum was called in Ptolemaic times." (Beadnell.) Arsinoe, daughter of 
Ptolemy I, King of Egypt, was 1 >< >rn al >< tut 316 B. C. She married Lysimachus, 
King of Thrace, and after his death became the wife of Ptolemy Philadelphus. 



AKTIBEUS ASCHIZOMYS. 123 

Artibeus Leach, 1821. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

Trans. Linn. Soc. London, XIII, pt. i, 75, 1821. 
Arctibeus Gray, Mag. Zool. & Bot., II, 487, 1838; List Osteol. Spec. Brit. Mus., 

pp. ix, 7, 1847. 
Arctibius Bonaparte, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1847, 115. 
Artibseus Gervais, Exped. du Oomte de Castelnau dans l'Amer. du Sud, Mamm., 

34, 1855. 
Artobius Winge, E Museo Lnndii, II, 38, 1892. 
Type: Artibeus jamaicensis Leach, from Jamaica. 
Artibeus: apri, straight, exactly fitted; (3aco = fiaivGo, to walk. (Agassiz.) 

Artionyx Osbokn & Woktman, 1893. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agrioehoeridse. 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat, Hist., V, 1-16, figs. 1-5, Mar. 1, 1893. 
Type: Artionyx gaudryi Osborn & Wortman, from the Oligocene (Protoceras 

beds) of White River, South Dakota, 
Extinct, Based on portions of the femora, tibia, fibula, and pes, and the left 

patella complete. Afterwards shown to belong to Agriochcerus. (Wortman, 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist, VII, 145-146, June 14, 1895. ) 
Artionyx: aprzoj, even; ovv%, claw — in allusion to the possession of toes in pairs 

on the hind feet; i. e., a clawed Artiodactyl, in contrast with Chalicotherium, 

which "may be described as a clawed Perissodactyl." 

Artobius ('Leach') Winge, 1892. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

Winge, E. Museo Lundi, III, 3, 10, 38, pi. i, fig. 13, 1892. 

Emendation of Artibeus Leach, 1821. Artobius is preoccupied by Artobium Mul- 
sant & Rev, 1864, a genus of Coleoptera. 

Artophoca (see Arctophoca). Fene, Pinnipedia, Otariidse. 

Arvicanthis Lesson, 1842. Glires, Muridse, Muriiue. 

Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 147, LS42; Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. 

London, 1895, }>t. in, 553. 
Arviaeanthis Beddakd, Cambridge Nat. Hist., X, Mamm., 473, 1902. 
Type: Lemmus niioticus E. Geoffroy, from Africa. 
. 1 rvieanthis: Apparently a contraction of Arvicola-\- acanthis, spine — from the long, 

coarse hairs which project through the woolly under fur. 
Arvicola Lacepede, 1799. Glires, Muridae, Microtinse. 

Tableau Divisions, Sous-divisions, Ordres et Genres Mamm., 10, 1799; Nouv. 

Tableau Method. Mamm., in Mem. l'Institut, Paris, III, 495, 1801; Ord, 

Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., IV, pt, 2, 30.5-306, 1825. 
Type: Mus amphibius Lacepede (=Mus terrestris Linnaeus), from Europe 
Name antedated by Microtus Schrank, 1798. 
Arvicola: Lat. arvum, field; colo, to inhabit. 
Asagis Gloger, 1841. Marsupialia, Didelphyidse. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxx, 82, 1841; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & 

Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 340, 1888 (type fixed); Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th 

ser., XV, 190, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Type species not mentioned by Gloger; according to Thomas it is Didelphis 

murina Linnaeus, from tropical America. (See Marmoset, Gray, 1821. ) 
Asagis: «-, without; day is, pouch — in allusion to the absence of a true pouch. 

Aschizomys Miller, 1898. Glires, Muridae, Microtinse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Oct. 11, 1898, 368-371, figs. 1-4. 

Type: Aschizomys Ummimus Miller, from Kelsey Station, Plover Bay, northeastern 
Siberia. 

Aschizomys: a-, without; (J^'Cca, to split; /ivs, mouse — not splitting, i. e., con- 
necting — in allusion to the combination of characters of Microtus and Evoto)uijs. 



124 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Ascogale Gloger, 1841. Marsupialia, Dasyuridae. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesoh., I, pp. xxx, 83, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 190, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Apparently only a new name for Phascogale Tenxminck, 1827. 
Ascogale: cc6ko<;, a .skin made into a bag; ycxXi), weasel — in allusion to the 

pouch, which is represented merely by a few folds of skin. 
Ascomys Lichtenstkix, 1825. Glires, Geomyidae. 

Abb. K. Akad. Wiss. Berlin, for 1822, 20, fig. 2, 1825; Merriam, X. Am. Fauna, 

No. 8, 120, Jan. 31, 1895 (in synonymy, locality corrected). 
Type: Ascomys canadensis Lichtenstein { = Mus bursarius Shaw), nominally from 

Canada, but probably from the upper Mississippi Valley. (See Geomys Rafi- 

nesque, 1817. ) 
Ascomys: a6KOi, a skin made into a bag, i. e., a pouch; juvi, mouse — in allusion 

to the external cheek pouches. 
Ascopharynx Waite, 1900. Glires, Murida?, Murinse. 

Ann. &Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., V, 223, Feb.. 1900. 
New name for Thylacomys Waite, 1898, which is preoccupied by Thylacomys 

Owen, 1840, a genus of Marsupialia. 
Ascopharynx: aoKu~, bag; <j>dpvyc, throat — in allusion to the throat pouch. 
Asellia (subgenus of Hipposideros) Gray, 1838. Chiroptera, Rhinolophidae. 

Jardine's Mag. Zool. & Bob, 11, 493, 1838; Gray, hist Spec Mamm. Brit. Mus., 

pp. xix, 24, 1843 (raised to generic rank); Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 82. 
Type: Rhinolophus tridens Geoffroy, from Egypt. 
Asellia: Adjective used as a noun, from Latin asettus, a little ass — probably in 

allusion to the long, pointed ears. 
Asinus Frisch, 1775. Ungulata, Perissodaetyla, Equidae. 

Das Natur-System vierl'iiss. Thiere, in Tabellen, Tab. Gen., 1775; Gray, Zool. 

Journ., I, 244-248, pi. v, June, 1824. 
Type: 'DerEsel.' Gray's genus includes 5 species; Equus hemionus Pallas, and 

E. asinus Linnaeus (type), from Asia; K. quagga Gmelin, Asinus burcheUii 

Gray, and Equus zebra Linnaeus, from Africa. 
Asinus: Lat., ass. 
Asmithwoodwardia Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Condylarthra, Phenacodontidae. 
Bob Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 379-380, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 33-34). 
Type: Asmithwoodumrdia subtrigona Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Pata- 
gonia. 
Extinct. 
Asmithwoodwardia: In honor of Arthur Smith "Woodward, 1864 — , assistant keeper 

of geology in the Natural History Museum, London; author of 'Catalogue of 

Fossil Fishes in the British Museum,' 1889-1901, and numerous publications on 

extinct vertebrates, especially fishes. 
Asmodeus Ameghino, 1895. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Homalodontotheriidae. 

Bob Inst, Geog. Argentino, XV, cuad. 11-12, p. 643, 1895 (sep. pp. 43-44). 
Species: Asmodeus scotti Ameghino, and A. osborni Ameghino, from the Pyrothe- 

rium beds in the interior of Patagonia. 
Extinct. A. scotti is based principally on some upper maxillaries, more or less 

perfect, and .1. osborni on a perfect calcaneum. 
Asmodeus: Heb. Ashmodoi, Destroyer (derived by some from Heb. samad, to 

destroy; probably of Persian origin). In later Jewish demonology, a destructive 

demon. (Century Diet. ) 
Aspalax Desmarest, 1804. . Glires, Spalacidae. 

Nc-uv. Diet, Hist. Nat., XXIV, Tab. Meth. Mamm., 24, 1804; Muirhead, in 

Brewster's Edinburgh Encyclopaedia, XIII, 438, 1830 (under Mazology). 
Type: Mus typhlus Linnreus, from Russia. (See Spalax Guldenstadt, 1770.) 
- [.spalax: atinaXa^ = 6na\a£., mole. 



ASPALAX— ASTRAPODON. 1 k 25 

Aspalax AVageer, 1830. Insectivora, Chrysochloridse. 

Nat, Syst. Amphibien, 14, 1830. 

Species: Talpa inaurata Schreber, and T. rubra Linnseus, from South Africa. The 
name is apparently proposed as a substitute for Chrysochloris Lac£pede, 1799: 
"Chrysochloris Lacep., Cuv. Der xeXapxo? . : . der Griechen entschuldigt 
zwar die Zusammensetzung obigen Sippenamens, allein Linne's Talpa rubra 
macht ihn abgeschmackt und verwerflich." ( Wagler. ) 

Name preoccupied by Aspalax Desmarest, 1S04, a genus of < Hires. (See ( Tiryso- 
chlaris Lacepede, 1799.) 
Aspalomys ('Laxmann') Gervais, 1841. Glires, Muridse, Myotalpinae. 

"Eydoux & Souleyet, Voy. 'LaBonite,' I, Zool., Mamm., 56, 1841."* 

Type: Mus aspalax Pallas, from Siberia. 

Aspalomys: Aspal(ax); jn':, mouse. 
Astegotherium Ameghino, 1902. Edentata, Dasypodidse (Stegotheriidae). 

Bob Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 67-68, May, 1902 (sep. pp. 05-66). 

Type: Astegotherium dichotomus Ameghino, from the Notostylops beds of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Astegotherium: a- not; -\-Stegotherium. 
Asteromys Ameghino, 1897. Glires, Cephalomyidae. 

La Argentina al traves de las Ultimas Epocas Geol6gicas, 18 footnote, 1897 
(nomen nudum); Bob Inst, Geog. Argentino, XVIII, 495, Oct, 6, 1897. 

Species: Asteromys punctus Ameghino, and A. prospieuus Ameghino, from the 
' Cretaceous ' of Patagonia. 

Extinct, 

Asteromys: adrrfp, star; pvs, mouse. 
Asterosternm,, .Ameghino, 1889. Edentata, Glyptodontidse. 

Cont. Couocimiento Mamff. F6sil. Repub. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 
Cordoba, VI, 822-824*, pi. lxiy, figs. 2,3,6,8, 1889. 

Species, 3: Asterostemma depressa Ameghino, A. granata Ameghino, and A. Isevata 
Ameghino, from the Eocene of the barrancas of the Bio Chico, southern 
Patagonia. 

Extinct. Based on pieces of the carapace. 

Asterostemma: adrrfp, star; dreppa, wreath — in allusion to the figures on the 
scutes of the carapace. 
Asthenodon Maksii, 1887. Marsupialia, Amphitheriidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXIII, 336-337, 343, pi. ix, figs. and 7, 
Apr., 1887. 

Aesthenodon Osborn, Proc. Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila., Nov. 1, 1887, 290. 

Type: Asfltenodon segn'is Marsh, from the Atlantosaurus beds of the Upper Jurassic, 
of Wyoming. 

Extinct, Based on a right lower jaw. 

Asthenodon: adfJcv)}^, weak; 68a>v = 68ov<;, tooth — in allusion to the 'weak 
canines.' 
Astrapodon Ameghino, 1891. Ungulata, Astrapotheroidea, Astrapotheriidse. 

Nuevos Restos Mamff. Fds. Patagonia Austral., Aug. 13, 1891; Revista Argen- 
tina Hist. Nat., I, Entr. 5a, 299, Oct, 1, 1891. 

Type: Astrapodon carinatus Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern Pata- 
gonia. 

Extinct. " Representado s61o por dos muelas inferiores que. parecen ser el m.! 
de cada lado." 

Astrapodon: Astrapo(therium)', 68&>v = 68ovi;, tooth. 

* I have not seen this reference, and have been unable to find the place where 
Laxmann used the name — T. S. P. 



126 INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 

Astraponotus Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Astrapotheroidea, Astrapotheriidae: 

Bol. Acad. Xac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 401-402, July, 1901 (sep., pp. 55-56). 
Type: Astraponotus assymetrum Ameghino, from the ' Cretaceous ' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Astraponotus: Astrapo(therium); voroc,, south — in allusion to its Patagonian 
habitat. 

Astrapothericulus Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Astrapotheriidae. 

Anal. Soc. Cien. Argentina, LI, 73, Mar. -Apr., 1901; Bol. Acad. Xac Cien. 

Cordoba, XVII, 101-102, May, 1902 (sep. pp. 33-34— type fixed) . 
Species: Asirapothericulus iheringi {= Astrapotherium iheringi Ameghino, type), 

and A. hebetatus Ameghino, from the Patagonian formation (Eocene) of 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Astrapothericulus: Dim. of Astropotherium. 
Astrapotherium Burmeister, 1879. Ungulata, Astrapotheroidea, Astrapotheriidae. 
Desc. Phys. Repub. Argentine, III, Mamm., 517-520, 1879. 
Type: Astrapotherium patagonicum Burmeister, from the headwaters of the Rio 

Santa Cruz, Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on "la moitte posterieure d'un crane . . . et une seule dent 

molaire, la derniere du cote gauche a sa place." 
Astrapotherium: a6rpaitrf, lightning; Brfpiov, wild beast. "Je propose, vu 

l'analogie de cet animal avec le Brontotherium, de lui donner le nom de 

Astrapotherium." i Burmeister.) 
Astromycter Harris, 1825. Insectivora, Talpidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, IX, 400, June, 1825 (from Machias, Maine, ' Star.' | ; Rafi- 
nesque, Atlantic Journ., I, No. 2, p. 61, summer of 18.32; Agass^ Noraenelator 

Zool., Mamm., 2, 1842; Pomel, Archiv. Sci. Phys. et Nat., Bibl. Univ. Geneve, 

IX, 24(1. Nov., L848. 
Astromyctes Gray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xxi, 76, 1843. 
Astromydes Blyth, "Cat. Mamm. Asiat. Soc. Mus., 87, 1863" (fideDoBsox, Mon. 

Insect., II, 131, 1883). 
Type: Astromycter prasinatus Harris [=Condylura cristata (Linnaeus)], from 

Machias, Maine. The full description of the species appeared in the Boston 

Journ. Philos. & Arts, II, 580-583, 1825, under the name Condylura prasinata 

Harris. 
Astromycter: adrrfp, star; /ivkti)p, nose — from the star-like ring of appendages 

at the end of the nose, whence the common name 'star-nosed mole.' 
Atalapha Rafinesojte, 1814. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 

Precis Deeouv. et Trav. Somiologiques entre 1800 et 1814, p. 12, 1814; Analyse de 

la Nature, 54, 1815; Desmarest, Mammalogie, 1, 146, 1820. 
Atalepha Burnett, Quart. Journ. Sci. Lit. & Art, XXVII, 269, Apr.-June, 1829. 
Species: Atalapha sicula Rafinesque, from Sicily; and A. americana Rafinesque 

(== Vespt rtilio noveboracensis Erxleben), from North America. 
Atalapha: Ataleph, Hebrew name of a bat. 
Atelerix (subgenus of Erinaceus) Pomel, 1848. Insectivora, Erinaceidae. 

Archiv. Sci. Phy. et Nat., Bibl. Univ. Geneve, IX, 251, Nov., 1848. 
Type species not given. "Genre Erinaceus, S. G. Atelerix (4-dactylus) ." 
Atelerix: Contraction of (irf/b/5, imperfect; ericius, hedgehog. 
Ateles E. Geoffroy, 1806. Primates, Cebidae. 

Ann. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, VII, 262-269, 1806; Miller & Rehx, Proc. Boston 

Soc. Nat. Hist., XXX, 298-299, Dec, 1901 (type fixed). 
Ateleus, Atelius Fischer, Zoognosia, II, 529^532, 1813. 
Atlii Jes Ruppell, Mus. Senckenberg., Ill, Heft ii, 152, 1842. 



ATELES ATHRODON. 127 

Ateles — Continued. 

Species, 5: Ateles pentadactylus Geoffroy, from Guiana; A. paniscus Geoffroy 

(—Sin/in paniscus Linnaeus, type), A. arachnoides Geoffrey; A. belzebuth 

Geoffroy (nee Simia belzebul Linnaeus), from South America; and A. policomos, 

from 'Sierra Leone.' 
Ateles: dreX)}<;, imperfect — in allusion to the absence of a thumb. 
Ateleus G. Fischer, 1813. Primates, Oebidae. 

Zoognosia, II, 529-532, 1813. 
Emendation of Ateles Geoffroy, 1806. "Ateles, Geoffroy St. Hilaire, a reXeiog, s. 

tfAf o?, perfectus, et a privativo; (nomen itaque, manus imperfcctas indicans, 

scribendum esset, Atelius, s. Ateleus, quam etymologiam secuti sumus" — 

Fischer). 
Atelocheirus E. Geoffroy, 1806. Primates, Cebidae. 

Ann. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, VII, 272, 1806. 
Atelochirus Van der Hoeven, Handboek der Dierkunde, 2d ed., 11, K)4S, L855; 

Coues, Century Diet., I, 361, 362, 1889 (under Ateles). 
Name used only in the description of Ateles belzebuth Geoffroy (not Simia belzebul 

Linnaeus), from South America. "Same as Ateles." (Coues.) 
Atelocheirus: dreXyi, imperfect; X E W, hand — in allusion to the absence of a 

thumb. 

Atelodus (subgenus of Rhinoceros) Pomel, 1853. Ungulata, Rhinocerotidae. 

"Ann. Soc. Lit, Auvergne, XXVI, 114, 1853" (tide Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. 

Brit. Mus., Ill, 91, 1886); Pomel, Cat. Meth. Vert, Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 

78-80,1854; Geryais, Zool. et Pal. Franchises, 2eme ed., 89, 1859 (under 

Ccelodonta) ; W. L. Sclatee, Mamm. S. Africa, I, 297, 1900 (type given as /,'. 

el< it us). 
Species, 7: Rhinoceros rial us Croizet et Jobert, from the Pliocene of Perrier, France; 

R. leptorhinus Cuvier, from the vicinity of Issoire, France; R. ticheorhinus 

Fischer, from Siberia; Atelodus aymardi Pomel, from Haute-Loire, France; 

and also three recent species, R. bicornis Linnaeus, R. keitloa Smith, and R. 

simus Burchell, from Africa. (Pomel, 1. c, 1854.) 
Atelodus; dvEXijc, imperfect; 68ov$, tooth — in allusion to the incisors and 

canines, which are rudimentary or wanting. 
Atheles (see Ateles). Primates, Cebidae. 

Atherurus ('G. Cuvier') F. Cuvier, 1829. Glires, Hystricidae. 

['Les Atherures' G. Cuvier, Regne Anim., 2eme ed., I, 215, 1829.] 
F. Cuvier, Diet. Sci. Nat., LIX, 483-484, 1829; Voigt, Cuvier's Thierreich, 

I, 243-244, 1831; Gloger, Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., pp. xxxi, 100, 1841. 
Atherura Waterhouse, Nat, Hist. Mamm., II, 470-479, 1848. 
Type: Hystrix fasciculata Shaw, from Malacca. 
Atherurus: ccfii'jp, the beard of an ear of corn; ovpa, tail — in allusion to the 

pencil of flattened scaly bristles at the tip of the tail; whence the common 

name 'brush-tailed porcupine.' 
Athrodon Osborn, 1887. Marsupialia, Amphitheriida?. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Nov. 1, 1887,* 290, fig. 3 in text. 
New name for Stylodon Owen, 1866, which is preoccupied by Stylodon Beck, 1837, 

a genus of Mollusca. 
Name preoccupied by Athrodon Sauvage, 1880, a genus of Pisces. Replaced by 

Kurtodon Osborn, Noy., 1887. 
Extinct. Based on a maxilla. 

*This paper was presented for publication June 28, 1887, but was not issued until 
November 1, so that the correction for the preoccupied name appeared almost as 
soon as the name itself. 



128 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIFM. 

Athrodon — Continue m 1 . 

Athrodon: aBpooi, crowded together; 68chv=o8ovs, tooth. "The tall trihedral 

crowns [of the molars] are closely applied at their sides, thus falling into a 

curve." (Osborn). 

Athylax (see Atilax). Fera?, Viverridee. 

Atilax F. Cuvier, 1826. Fera:-, Viverridae. 

Hist. Nat. Mamni., V, livr. liv, pi. with 2 pp. text under ' Yansire,' June, 1826. 

Athylax Blainvillk, Ann. Sci. Nat. Paris, 2'- ser., VIII, 272, Nov., 1837; 

I. Geoffroy, Mag. Zool., 2° ser., I, Mamm. (pis. 17-19), pp. 24, 25, 1839; Gray, 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 556-560, 1 fig. in text; Thomas, Proc. Zool. 

Soc, London, 1882, 72-73. 

Based on the Vansire of Buff on, Atilax vansire F. Cuvier (=Mustela galera 

Erxlehen) from South Africa (nee Madagascar, fide Thomas, 1. a). 
Atilax {Athylax): a, without; 6vA.a%, pouch — "par la consideration de toute 
absence de poche a l'anus." (Cuvier. ) 
Atlantoxerus (subgenus of Xerus) Foesytu-Ma.iok, 1893. Glires, Sciuridae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1893, 189, pi. vin fig. 9, pi. ix fig. 9, June 1, 1893; 
Trouessart, Cat. Mamm. new ed., fasc. n, 405, 1897; Thomas, Proc. Zool. 
Soc. London, 1897, 933. 
Type: Xerus getulus (Linnaeus), from northwest Africa. 

Atlantoxerus: A't\oc<;, arXavros, the Atlas Mountains in northwest Africa; 
Xerus — in allusion to the habitat of the type species. 
Atophyrax Merriam, 1884. [nsectivora, Soricidae. 

Trans. Linn. Soc. N. Y., II, 217-222, pi., Aug., 1884; N. Am. Fauna, No. 10, 

95-98, pi. x figs. 1-4, pi. xii figs. 1-3, 1895. 
Type: Atophyrax bendirii from Fort Klamath, Oregon. 

Atophyrax: a'roTfo?, anomalous; vpaq, shrew — on account of its differences from 

other shrews, and because, in some respects, it is intermediate between Sorex 

and Neosorex, 

Atryptheriurn Ameghino, 1887. Ungulata, Toxodontia, Nesodontidae. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mam if. F6s. Patagonia Austral, 18, Dec., 1887. 

Type: Atryptheriurn bifurcatum Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Atryptheriurn: d, negative; rpvrcaoo, to burrow; Brjpiov, wild beast. 
Auchenia Illiger, 1811. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Camelidae. 

Prodronms Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 103, 1811. 

Auchenias Wagner, in Wiegmann's Archiv Naturgesch., 1843, J, 349. 
Species: Camelus glama Linnaeus, from the mountains of Peru; and C. vicugna 
Gmelin, from the Cordillera in the provinces of Coquimbo and Copiapo, Chile. 
Name preoccupied by A uchen ia Thunberg, 1789, a genus of Coleoptera. Replaced 
by Dromedarius Wagler, 1830, and by Neoauchenia Ameghino, 1891. (See 
Lama Frisch, 1775.) 
Auchenia: avxi)v, neck — in allusion to the long neck. 
Auchippodus (see Anchippodus). Tillodontia, Anchippodontidse. 

Auchippus (see Anchippus). Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equida?. 

Aulacochoerus Gray, 1873. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist,, 4th ser., XI, 435, June, 1873; Hand-List Edentate, 

Thick-skinned and Rumin. Mamm. Brit. Mus., 58, 1873. 
Type: Sus vittatus S. Miiller, from Java (Cat. Carniv. Pachyderm., & Edentate 

Mamm., 332, 1869). 
A'llncochccrus: avA.a£, avXaKos, furrow" x°?P°Z, hog — in allusion to the sheath 
of the upper canines of the male. 
Aulacodes (see Aulacodus). Glires, Octodontidae. 



AULACODON AULOCETUS. 129 

Aulacodon Kaup, 1832. Glires, Castoridse. 

"Kaup in H. yon Meyer's Palseologica zur Geschichte der Erdetmd ihrer Ge- 

schopfe, 1832," p. — (fide Oken's Isia, Jena, 1833, 267, and Agassiz, Nornen- 

clator Zool., Mamm., 4, 1842). 
Type: Aulacodon typus Kaup, from Europe. 
Name preoccupied by Aulacodus Eschscholtz, 1822, a genus of Coleoptera; and 

by Aulacodus Temminck, 1827, a genus of Octodontidse. 
Extinct. 

Aulacodon: avXa'c, avXcxKo^, furrow; 68coi' = 68ov<z, tooth. 
Aulacodon (see Aulaxodon). Edentata, Megalonychidas. 

Aulacodus Temminck, 1827. Glires, Octodontidse. 

[Mon. Mamm. Tab. Meth., p. xxvi, 1824, nomen nudum.] 
Mon. Mamm., vn, 245-248, pi. xxv, 1827. 

Aulacodes Wallace, Geog. Dist. Animals, II, 239, 1876 (misprint). 
Type: Aulacodus swinderianus Temminck, from Africa; exact Ideality unknown. 
Name preoccupied by Aulacodus Eschscholtz, 1822, a genus of Coleoptera. 

Replaced by THaulacodus Lydekker, 1896; the latter, however, is antedated 

by Thryonomys Fitzinger, 1867, based on Aulacodus semipalmatus Heuglin. 
Aulacodus: avXati, avXatcos, furrow; oSovs, tootli — in allusion to the upper 

incisors, which have three longitudinal grooves. 
Aulacomys Rhoads, 1894. Glires, Muridae, Microtinae. 

Am. Naturalist, XXVIII, 182-185, figs. 1-5 in text, Feb. 17, 1894. 
Type: Aulacomys arvicoloides Rhoads, from the vicinity of Lake Kichelos and 

Bnoqualmie Pass, Kittitas County, Washington, at an altitude of 8,000 feet. 
A ulacomys: a vXac,, avXatcos, furrow; /<£'$, mouse — from the narrow longitudinal 

sulcus on each of the upper incisors. 
Aulakodon (see Aulaxodon). Edentata, Megalonychida?. 

Aulaxinuus Cocchi, 1872. Primates, Cercopithecidee. 

Boll. R. Comitato Geol. Italia, Firenze, III, Nos. 3 and 4, pp. 68-69, Tav. i, figs. 

3-5, Mar.-Apr., 1872. 
Aulaxinus Lydekker, in Nicholson & Lydekker, Man. Palaeont., II, 1469-1470, 

1889. 
Type: Aulaxinuus florentinus Cocchi, from the Val d'Arno, Italy. 
Extinct. Based on a lower jaw. 
Aulaxinuus: avXa!-, furrow; -\-Inuus. 
Aulaxodon Harlax, 1830. Edentata, Megalonychid se. 

Journ. Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila., VI, 284, 1830; Med. and Phys. Researches, 319-330, 

pis. xn-xv, 1835 (provisional name). 
Aulakodon Scudder, Nomenclator Zool., pt. r, 39; pt. n, 34, 1882. 
Aulacodon Teouessart, Cat. Mamm., newed., fasc. V, 1106, 1898 (in synonymy). 
Type: Megalonyx laqueatus Harlan, from ' White Cave,' on < rreen River, Edmond- 

son County, 120 miles southwest of Lexington, Ky. "If the whole frame [of 

M. laqueatus] should hereafter be discovered, it may even claim a generic 

distinction; in which case, either Aulaxodon, or Pleurodon, would not bean 

inappropriate name" (Harlan, p. 330). 
Extinct, Based on the following parts of the skeleton of a young animal: "Two 

claws of the forefeet; a radius, humerus, scapula, one rib, and several remnants; 

os calcis, tibia, a portion of the femur; four dorsal and one lumbar vertebra 3 ; 

a portion of a molar tooth, together with several epiphyses" (p. 321). 
Aulaxodon: av\a%, furrow; 68(bv=d8ov<z, tooth. 
Aulocetus* Vax Bexedex, 1861. Cete, Bakenidse. 

['Aulocete' Van Beneden, Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. Belgique, 2 e ser., XII, .480, 

1861]; ibid., XL, 537-539, 1875; Zittel, Handbuch Palaeont., IV, lste Lief., 

182, 1892. 

*This name is usually quoted as if published in 1861, but it has not been found in 
Latin form prior to 1875, in the reference cited. 

7591— No. 23—03 9 



130 INDEX GENERTJM MAMMALIUM. 

Aulocetus — Continued. 

Type: Balsenodon Unzianum Meyer, from the Miocene in the vicinity of Linz, 
upper Austria. 

Extinct. 

Aulocetus: avXoz, tube, groove; kt/toc, whale — "a cause du sillon cranien." 
Austritragus Heude, 1898. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Mem. Hist. Nat. Empire Chinois, IV, pt. i, 14, 1898. 

Based on 'the capricorns of Sumatra' (Naemorhedus sumatrensis). 

Austritragus: Lat. ouster, south; tragus, goat — from the animal's tropical habitat. 
Avahi Jotjkdan, 1834. Primates, Lemurida\ 

"L'Institut, II, 231, 1834" (fide Mivart, Proc. Zool. Soc. Loudon, 1866, 151). 

"Avahis I. Geoffroy, Leeons Mamm., 1835" (fide Mivakt, 1. c. ); Dahlbom, Zool. 
Studier, I, Tredje Haftet, 199, 202-203, 1857; "Milne-Edwards & Grandidiek, 
Hist. Nat. Madagascar, Mamm., I, 320." 

Type: Lemur laniger < irmelin, from Madagascar. (See Microrhynchus Jourdan, also 
published in 1834. ) 

Avahi: Name of the woolly lemur among the Anatala tribe of Madagascar. 
Axis (subgenus of Cervus) II. Smith, 1827. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Griffith's Cuvier, Anim. Kingdom, V, 312-313, 1827; Gray, List. Spec. Mamm. 
Brit. Mus., pp. xxvii, 178, 1843 (raised to generic rank). 

Species: Cervus axis (type), and C. porcinus, from India. 

Axis: "Lat. axis (Pliny), perhaps of East Indian origin." (Century Diet. ) 
Axodon (see Akodon). Glires, Muridae, Cricetinse. 

Aye-aye Lacepede, 1799. Primates, Daubentoniidae. 

Tabl. Mamm., 6, 1799; Nouv. Tableau Meth., Mamm.. in Mem. l'lnstitut, Paris, 
III, 491, 1801. 

Type: Aye-aye madagascariensis [=Sciurus madagascariensis (iinelin), from Mada- 
gascar. Name antedated by Daubentonia ( ieoffroy, 1795. 

Aye-aye: "Malagasy aiay, probably of imitative origin" (Century Diet.). Aye- 
aye means 'look,' but according to Sonnerat it is a cry of surprise of the 
inhabitants of Madagascar (Beddard, Mamm., pp. 538, 549, 1902). 
Azema Gray, 1870. Primates, Lemuridae. 

Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 132, 134, 1870. 

Type: Cheirogah ns smithii Gray, from Madagascar. 

Azema: Probably a coined name. 

B. 

Babirussa Friscii, 1775. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

Das Natur-System vierfiiss. Thiere, in Tabellen, 3, Tab. Gen., 1775; ('Geof- 
froy') Rafixesque, Analyse de la Nature, 56, 1815; Lesson, Man. Mamm., 
337-338, 1827. 

Babiroussus Gray, London Med. Repos., XV, 306, April 1, 1821. 

Babiroussa F. Cuvier, Dents des Mamm., 257, 1825. 

Babyrussa Burnett, Quart. Journ. Sci.,Lit. & Art, XXVIII, for Oct. -Dec, 1829, 
352, 1830. 

Babirusa Lesson, Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 162, 1842. 

Type: Sus babyrussa Linnaeus, from Celebes. 

Babirussa: Malay, babi, hog; rusa, deer — 'hog deer' or more properly 'deer hog,' 

in allusion to the abnormally developed tusks, which have been likened by 

the Malays to those of a deer. (Lydekker, Royal Nat, Hist., II, 436, 1894.) 

Bachitherium Filhol, 1882. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Tragulidae. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, XCIV, No. 3, pp. 138-139, seance du 16 Jan., 1882. 

Bachitherium Filhol, Le Naturaliste, IV, No. 6, p. 42, Mar. 15, 1882. 

Species, 3: Bachitherium insigne Filhol, B. medium Filhol, and-B. minus Filhol, all 
from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 



BACHITHERIUM BAL^ENODON. 131 

Bachitherium — Continued. 
Extinct. 
Bachitherium: Bach, the locality where the remains were found; Bypiov, wild 

heast. 
Badactherium Croizet, 1853. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotidae. 

Croizet in Pictet's Traite Paleont., 2°ed., 1,296, 1853 (nomen nudum?); Ger- 

vais, Zool. et Paleont. Franc., 2" ed., 98-101, 1859. 
Type: Badactherium borbonicum, from the Miocene of Auvergne, France. 
Extinct. 

Badactherium: Possibly from badak, the native name of the two-horned rhinoce- 
ros in Sumatra (Raffles, Linn. Trans., XIII, p. 2) ; Ot/pioy, wild beast. 
Baenodon Ameghino, 1892. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Homalodontotheriidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nae. Cien. Cordoba, XII, entr. 4 a , 461, Jan., 1892. 
Type: Baenodon chubutensis Ameghino, baaed on Golpodon propinquus Burmeister 

(Anal. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires, III, entr. xvm, 389, pi. vn, figs. 4-10, 1891) , 

from Puerto Madryn, near the mouth of the Rio Chubut, Patagonia. 
"La denture qu'il [Burmeister] represente maintenant but la pi, vn, sous le 

meme nom de Colpodon propinquus n'est pas du meme animal que la dent 

precedemment figuree [pi. in, fig. 16] . . . Cet animal resulte ainsi ne 

pas avoir de nom, et je propose de le designer avec celui de Baenodon chubu- 

tensis." (Ameghino.) 
Extinct. Based on teeth. 

Baenodon: /3a, intensive particle; fVo?, old; odcbv—ddov?, tooth. (Ameghino.) 

Baginia (subgenus of Macroxus) Gray, 1867. Glires, Sciuridse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 3d ser., XX, 279, Oct., 1867; Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. 

London, 1897, 933 (type mentioned). 
Type: Sciurus plantani Ljung, 1801 (=>S'. notaMa Boddaert, 1785), from Java or 

Sumatra. 
Baginia: Bajiug, native name of the type species (Gray, List, Spec. Mamm. 

Brit. Mus., 141, 1843). 
Baiomys (subgenus of Stiomys) True, 1894. Glires, Muridaj, Cricetinse. 

Proc. TJ. S. Nat. Mus., XVI, No. 972, p. 758, Feb. 7, 1894. 
Type: Hesperomys {Vesper i mus) taylori Thomas, from San Diego, Duval County, 

Texas. 
Baiomys: fiaios, little, insignificant; fJ.v$, mouse — from its diminutive size. 
Baiosciurus (subgenus of Sciurus), Nelson, 1899. Glires, Sciuridse. 

Proc. Wash. Acad. Sci., I, 31-32, 101, pi. i, fig. 4, May 9, 1899. 
Type: Sciurus deppei Peters, from Papantla, Vera Cruz, Mexico. 
Baiosciurus: fiaio$, little; -{-Sciurus — from its small size. 
Balaena Lixx.eus, 1758. Cete, Bahenidse. 

Systema Naturse, 10th ed., I, 75-76, 1758; 12th ed., I, 105-106, 1766; Brisson, 

Regn. Anim. in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 218-225, 1762; Flower, Proc. Zool. 

Soc. London, 395, 1864 (type fixed). 
Balcena Lesson, Nouv. Tableau Regne Anim., Mamm., 202, 1842. 
Species 4, from the Arctic and Atlantic oceans: Balsena mysticetus Linnaeus (type), 

B. physalus Linnaeus, B. boops Linnaeus, and B. musculus Linnasus. 
Balsena: Lat., whale, from Gr. cpdXaiva, whale. 

Balaenodon Owen, 1846. Cete, Physeterida?. 

Hist. Brit. Foss. Mamm. & Birds, 536-542, figs. 226-229, 1846. 
Type: Bahenodon physaloides Owen, from the Red Crag, Felixstowe, Suffolk, 

England. 
Extinct. Based on 'portion of a fossil tooth.' 
Balaenodon: Balsena; dScbv—do'ovi, tooth. 



132 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Balsenoptera Lacepede, 1804. Cete, Baleenidae. 

Hist. Xat. Cetacees, Tableau Ordres, Genres et d'Especes, pp. xxxvi-xxxvii, 

114-141, pis. iv figs. 1, 2, v fig. 1, vi-vin, 1804; Flower, Proc. Zool. Soc. 

London, 1864, 395 (type given as B. rostrata); W. L. Sclater, Manim. S. Africa, 

II, 183-184, 1901 (type given as B. physalus). 

Balenopterus F. Cuvier, Diet, Sci. Nat., LIX, 518, 1829. 

Species 4, grouped into two sections: the first containing 11. gibbar; the other 

II. jubartes, B. rorqual, and B. aeuto-rostrata. 
Balsenoptera: Balsma; Ttrzpov, wing, fin — 'Fin whale,' in allusion to the strong 
dorsal fin. 
Balaenotus Van Benedex, 1872. Cete, Balsenidse. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. Belgique, 2 e ser., XXX IV, 13-15, 1872. 
Type: Balaenotus insignia Van Beneden, from the vicinity of Stuyvenberg, near 

Antwerp, Belgium. 
Extinct, ' ' Outre les sept cervicales, il y a treize dorsales, fruit lombaires et ti'eize 
caudales qui sont eonservees. Plusieurs cotes et le corps de l'os hyoi'de sont 
^galement conserves. ' ' ( Van Beneden. ) 
Balaenotus: Bdlaena; ovi, cjros, ear. 
Balaenula Van Beneden, 1872. Cete, Bahenidae. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. Belgique, 2 e se>., XXXIV, 11-12, 1872. 
Type: Balaenula balaenopsis Van Beneden, from the gray crag in the vicinity of 

Stuyvenberg, near Antwerp, Belgium. 
Extinct. " Le musee de Bruxelles possede de cette Balsenula, outre la tete apeu 
pres complete, onze vertebres dorsales, douze lornbaires, douze caudales, des 
cotes, et Ton a trouve des ossements de plusieurs individus." 
Balsenula: Dim. oiBahnm. 
Balantia Illiger, 1811. Marsupialia, Phalangerida?. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 77-78, 1811; Thomas, Cat, Marsup. and Mono- 

trem. Brit. Mus., 193, 1888 (in synonymy, ty r pe fixed). 
Species: Didelphis orientalis Pallas (type), from Amboina, Molucca Islands; and 
I). lemurina Shaw, from Australia. Name antedated by Phalange? Storr, 1780. 
Balantia: fiaXavrtov, pouch. 
Balantiopteryx Peters, 1867. Chiroptera, Noctilionidse. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, July, 1867, 476-477. 
Type: Balantiopteryx plicata Peters, from Punta Arenas, Costa Rica. 
Balantiopteryx: fjaXdvnov, pouch; Ttrspvc,, wing — from the wing sac of the 
male, which opens inward at the center of the antebrachial membrane. 
Balenopterus (see Balsenoptera). Cete, Bahenidge. 

Balionycteris Matschie, 1899. Chiroptera, Pteropodidae. 

Fledermause Berliner Mus. Xaturkunde, Lief. I, Megachiroptera, 80, 1899. 
Type: Cynopterus maculatus Thomas, from Sarawak, Borneo. 
Balionycteris: fia\io<;, spotted; vvKrepic,, bat. 
Balcena (see Baleena). Cete, Bala?nidse. 

Bandicota Gray, 1873. Glires, Muridse, Murinae. 

Ann. & Mag. Xat, Hist., 4th ser., XII, 418, Nov., 1873. 

Type: Bandicota gigantea (=Mus giganteus Hardwicke) from southeastern India, 
Coromandel coast, Mysore, and Bengal. (Gray's specimens came from Aru 
Island and Buntimunang, Celebes. ) 
Bandicota: Bandicoot, "said to be a corruption of the Telegu name pandv-kokhu, 
lit,, pig rat." (Century Diet.) Its native name is said to be due to its habit 
of grunting like a pig when attacked or when running about at night. 
Barangia Gray, 1865. Ferae, Mustelidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1865, 123, 1 fig. in text; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., <& 
Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 100-102, fig. 12, 1869, 



BARANGIA BASSARISCUS. 135 

Barangia — Continued. 

Species: Barangia sumatrana Gray (=I/utra barang F. Cuvier), from Sumatra; 
and B J nepalensis Gray, from Nepal, India. 

Barangia: Barang, native Sumatran name of an otter. 
Barbastella Gray, 1821. Chiroptera, Vespertilionida?. 

London Med. Repos., XA T , 300, Apr. 1, 1821. 

Barbastellus Gray, Zool. Journ., II, 243, July, 1825; Thompson's Aim. Philos., 
XXYI, 339, Nov., 1825; Philos. Mag., new ser., A T I, 31, 34, July, 1829; Jar- 
dine' s Mag. Zool. & Bot., 11,494, 1838; Kaup, Entw. Gesch. & Natiirl. Syst. 
Europ. Thierw., I, 95, 96, 1829; Bonaparte. Cat. Method. Mamm. Europei, 
21, 1845. 

Type: Yespertilio barbastellus Schreber, from Burgundy, France. 

Barbastella: French barbastelle, from Lat. barba, beard. "L' animal ... a la 

levre superieure si renflee de chaque cote, qu'il semble au premier coup d'oeil 

qu'il y ait un bouquet de barbe ou des moustaches. ' ' (Daubentox, Hist. Acad. 

Roy. Sci. avec Mem. Math, et Phys., for 1759, 377, 1765.) 

Barbastellus Gray, 1831. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 

Zool. Miscellany, 38, 1831; Dobsox, Cat. Chiroptera Brit. Mus., 171, 175, 1878 
(in synonymy). 

Type: Barbastellus padficus Gray, from the 'Islands of the southern Pacific,' 
probably near Australia. 

This name belongs to a genus distinct from Barbastellus Gray, 1821, but it is 
antedated by Nyctophilus Leach, 1821. 
Barytherium Axdrews, 1901. Ungulata, 

Nature, vol. 64, p. 577, Oct. 10, 1901. 

New name for Bradytherium Andrews, Sept., 1901, which is preoccupied by Bra- 
dytherium Grandidier, Alar., 1901, a genus of Edentata. 

Extinct. 

Barytherium: fiapvs, heavy; Qr/piov, Avild beast — in allusion to its size. 

Basaris (see Bassaris). Ferae, Procyonidfe. 

Basilosaurus Harlan, 1834. Cete, Basilosauri<l;e. 

Trans. Am. Philos. Soc, new ser., IV, 397-403, 1834. 

Type, species not named ( = Zeuglodon cetoides Owen, 1841), from Tertiary forma- 
tions along the Ouachita River, about 50 miles south of Monroe, Ouachita 
Parish, Louisiana. Basilosaurus antedates Zeuglodon Owen, 1839. 
Extinct. Based on several fragments of vertebrae. 

Basilosaurus: fia6i\ev%, king; 6avpo$, lizard — 'king of the saurians,' from its 
large size and supposed reptilian affinities. 
Bassaricyon Allen, 1876. Ferae, Procyonidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1876, 20-23, pi. 1; 1877, 267-268, pi. 2. 
Type: Bassaricyon gabbii Allen, from Costa Rica. 

Bassaricyon: Bassaris; kvgov, dog — from its resemblance to Bassaris. 
Bassaris Lichtexstein, 1831. Ferae, Procyonidae. 

Oken's Isis, Jena, 1831, 512-513; Darstellung, pi. xliii, 1833. 
Basaris Gray, List Osteol. Spec. Brit. Mus., pp. x, 14, 1847 (misprint). 
Type: Bassaris astuta Lichtenstein, from Mexico. 

Name preoccupied by Bassaris Hiibner, 1816-21, a genus of Lepidoptera. Re- 
placed by Bassariscus Coues, 1887. 
Bassaris: ($a66apLc,, fox. 
Bassariscus Coues, 1887. Ferae, Procyonidae. 

Science, IX, 516, May 27, 1887; Rhoads, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., for 1893, 

413-418, Jan. 27, 1894. 
New name for Bassaris Lichtenstein, 1831, which is preoccupied by Bassaris Hiib- 
ner 1816-21, a genus of Lepidoptera. 
Bassariscus: fiaddapi<;, fox, with dim. suffix. 



134 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Bathmodon Cope, 1872. Ungulata, Amblypoda, Coryphodontidfp. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XII (read Feb. 16), 417-420, Jan. -June, 1872; Proc. 

Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., June 25, 1872, 38; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 

179, IT. S. Geol. Surv., 697, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species: Bathmodon radians Cope (type), and B. seruiciitrtvx Cope, from the 

Wasatch beds near Evanston, Wyoming. 
Extinct. 
Bathmodon: /?«fl//oj, step; o8&>v=68ov<;, tooth — from " the dental series [which] 

increases regularly in size, from before backwards, the last being a little larger 

than the penultimate" (Cope). 
Bathrodon Marsh, 1872. Glires, Proglires, Mixodectidte. 

Am. Joum. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 211-212, Sept., 1872 (sep. issued Aug. 13); 

Osborx, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., N. Y., XVI, 212-213, fig. 40, June 28, 

1902 (ordinal position); Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, I'. S. Geol. 

Surv., 793, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species: Bathrodon typus Marsh (type), from the Eocene of Grizzly Buttes, near 

FortBridger; audi?, annectens Marsh, from the Eocene of Henry Fork of Green 

River, Wyoming. 
Extinct. 
Bathrodon: fiahpov, step; d8cbv=68ov$, tooth — in allusion to the difference in 

height of the cusps of tha molars. 
Bathyergus Illiger, 1811. Glires, Bathyergid;e. 

Prodromus Syst. Maimn. et Avium, 86, 1811. 
Type: Mus maritimus Gmelin, from the Cape of Good Hope. 
Bathyergus: ftafivepyeco, to work deep, to plow deep— from the burrowing habits 

of the animal. 
Bathygenys Douglass, 1901. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Atzriochcerida?. 

Trans. Am. Philos. Soc, new ser., XX, pt. in, 256-259, pi. ix, figs. 7-8, Dec. 5, 

1901 (sep. pp. 20-23). 
Type: Bathygenys <il}>li<t Douglass, from the White River Oligocene (Pipestone 

beds), near Whitehall, Jefferson County, Montana. 
Extinct. Based on the anterior part of a left mandibular ramus. 
Bathygenys: ftabvz, deep; ysvv$, the lower jaw — from the depth of the jaw. 
Bathyopsis Cope, 1881. Ungulata, Amblypoda, Uintatheriidpe. 

Am. Naturalist, XV, 75, Jan., 1881; XIX, No. 6, 594, June, 1885; Bull. U. S. 

Geol. & Geog. Surv. Terr., VI, No. 1, 194-196, Feb. 11, 1881. 
Type: Bathyopsis fissidens Cope, from the Eocene beds of Wind River Basin, 

Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on a mandible. 
Bathyopsis: fiafjvs, deep; oipis, appearance, form — from the great vertical depth 

of the mandibular ramus. 
Batodon Marsh, 1892. Marsupialia, Cimolestidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XLIII, 258, pi. x fig. 6, pi. xi figs. 2, 5, Mar., 

1892. 
Type: Batodon tenuis Marsh, from the Cretaceous (Laramie) of Wyoming. 
Extinct. "Represented by several specimens." 
Batodon: (idvoc,, bramble; oScbv = Mot'?, tooth. 
Batomys Thomas, 1895. Glires, Muridye, Murime. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat, Hist,, 6th ser., XVI, 162-163, Aug., 1S95; Trans. Zool. Soc. 

London, XIV, pt. vi, 405-406, pis. xxxni fig. 2, xxxvi figs. 5, 8, June, 1898. 
Type: Batomys grantii Thomas, from Monte Data, northern Luzon, Philippine 

Islands. 
Batomys: (Satoc,, bush, bramble; /ws, mouse — 'bush mouse,' in allusion to its 

habitat. 



BAYONIA BELOPRYMNUS. 135 

Bayonia Barboza du Bocage, 1865. In.sectivora, Potarnogalidaa. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1865, 402-404, 4 figs, in text. 
Type: Bayonia velox (=Cynogale velox DuChaillu), from ' Le district du Duque de 

Braganga,' Angola, West Africa. Name antedated by Potamogale Du Chaillu, 

1860. 
Bayonia: In honor of Lieut. Bayao, of the Portuguese army (?), who collected 

in Angola for the Lisbon Museum. 
Bdelygma (subgenus of Gelasinus) Matschie, 1899. Chiroptera, Pteropodidse. 

Fledermiluse Berliner Mus. Naturkunde, Lief. I, Megachiroptera, 82, 84, 1899. 
Type: Ilarpyia major Dobson, from Neu Laueuburg, Bismarck Archipelago, East 

Indies. 
Bdelygma: /JSeAvypa, abomination, idol — probably from the peculiar and hid- 
eous face. 
Bdeogale Peters, 1852. Fera?, Viverridse. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, 1852, 81-82;* Naturwiss. Reise nach 

Mossambique, Zool., I, Saugeth., 119-125, Taf. xxvii-xxviii, 1852; Thomas, 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1882, 81-82 (type fixed). 
Beleogale Mahschall, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 3, 1873. t 
Species : Bdeogale crassicauda Peters (type), (female) from Tette, and (male) from 

Boror (17°-18° S. lat.) ; and B. puisa Peters, from Mossimboa (11° S. lat,), 

East Africa. 
Bdeogale: fiSeeiv, to stink; yaXrf, weasel — from its characteristic odor. 
Belemnoziphius Huxley, 1864. Cete, Physeteridae. 

Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc. London, XX, pt. iv, No. 80, pp. 392-395, pi. xix, Nov. 1, 

1864; Hay, Cat, Foss. Yert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 597, 1902 (type 

fixed ) . 
Species, 3: Ziphius longjrostris F. Cuvier, from Paris, France; Dioplodon becanii 

Gervais & Van Beneden, from Antwerp, Belgium; and Belemnoziphius com- 

pressus Huxley (type), from the Red Crag, 3 miles east of Ipswich, Suffolk, 

England. 
Belemnoziphius: (ieXspvov, dart; 4- Ziphius — in allusion to the extremity of the 

rostrum, which is "sharply pointed almost like the end of the guard of a 

Belemnite. ' ' 
Beleogale (see Bdeogale). Ferae, Viverridse. 

Belideus (subg. of Petaurus) Waterhouse, 1839. Marsupialia, Phalange ri( he. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1838, 151-152, May, 1839; Nat. Hist. Mamm., I, 

Marsup., 325-337, 1 fig. in text, 1846. 
Bettdens Wiegmanx, Archiv Naturgesch., 1839, II, 418. 
Belidca Gould, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1842, 11 (raised to generic rank) ; Ann. & 

Mag. Nat, Hist., X, 404, Dec, 1842. 
Type: Petaurus sciureus Desniarest ( — Didelphys seiurea Shaw), from eastern 

Australia. 
Belideus: fJs'Xo^, dart, javelin — possibly in allusion to the anterior upper incisors, 

which are triangular in form. 
Beloprymnus, Gloger, 1841. Glires, Dipodidse. 

Hand- u. llilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxi, 106, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat. Hist,, 6th syr., XV, 191, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Based on the species of Dipus with "5 toes, now named Alakdaga." 
Beloprymnus: fieA-og, arrow, dart; npvpva, stern — in allusion to the long tail, 

"man vergleicht diesen auch nicht unpassend mit einem Pfeile." (Gloger. ) 

*" Sometimes quoted as Mitth. Ges. Nat, Freunde Berlin, 19th Nov., 1850, but I 
can not find that this was ever published." (F. H. Waterhouse.) 

fMarschall quotes "Froriep's Tagesbericht, 1850," but the name has not been 
found in this reference. 



136 INDEX GENERUM MAMMAL1UM. 

Belosphys Cope, 1875. Cete, PlatanistidflB. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XIV, 364, Jan. -June, 1875. 
Besophys Alston, Zool. Record for 1875, XII, Mamm., 13, 1877. 
Type: Priscodelphinus spinosus Cope, from the Miocene of Maryland, 
Extinct. 
Belosphys: /3e\o<z, dart; odcpvg, the loin — in allusion to the spiniform lumbar 

diapophj si 3. 
Beluga Rafinesque, 1815. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Analyse de la Nature, 60, 1815; Gray, Spicilegia Zoologiea, 2, 182S; Lesson, 

( lompl. CEuvres Buffon, Hist. Nat. Mamm. Ois. decouv. depuis 1788, 1, 191-196, 

440, 1828; Gray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., 106, 1843. 
New name fur Delphinapterus Lacepede, 1804. 
Beluga: Russian dt-iyra, bieluga (from r>i;.n,iii, bieluii, white) — in allusion to the 

characteristic color of the animal. 
Benedenia Gray, 1864. Cete, Balsenidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 211-215. 
Type: Benedenia knoxii < rray, from the North Sea. 
Benedenia: In honor of Pierre Joseph Van Beneden, 1801-1894, author of 

'Description des Ossements Fossilea des environs d'Anvers,' and numerous 

papers on cetaceans. 
Berardiopsis Portis, 1886. Cete, Physeteridse. 

Vcm. Reale Ace. Sci. Torino, 2 a ser., XXXVII, 326-329, 1886; W. L. Sclater, 

Zool. Record for L886, XXIII, Mamm.. pp. 30, 59, 1887. 
Type: Berardiopsis pliocaenus Portis, from the Pliocene of the valley of Asti, Italy. 
Extinct. 

Berardiopsis: Berardius; "//•/--, appearance. 
Berardius Duvernoy, 1851. Cete, Physeteridse. 

Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 3e ser., XV. Zool., 41, 52-54, 68, pi. i, 1851. 
Berardus Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1863, 200. 
Type: Berardius arnuxii Duvernoy, from the port of Akaroa, near Banks Island, 

New Zealand. 
]li rardius: In honor of Captain I afterward Admiral) Berard, of the Erenchnavy, 

in command of the corvette 'Rhin' during the voyage on which the type 

specimen was collected. 
Besophys (see Belosphys). Cete, Delphinidae. 

Bettongia Gray, 1837. Marsupialia, Macropodidae. 

Charlesworth's Mag. Nat. Hist., I, 584, Nov., 1837; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & 

Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 1888, 104-114 (type fixed). 
Species, 3: Bettongia setosus Gray ( = Hypsiprymnus cuniculus < >gilby, 1838, type), 

from Tasmania ( Thomas i ; II. j>, nicillata Gray, from Australia: and B. rufescem 

Gray, from New South Wales. 
Bettongia: Bettong, native name of a kangaroo. 
Bibos (subgenus? of Bos) Hodgson, 1837. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, VI, pt. i, 499, 1837; pt. n, No. 69, 745-750, pis. xvi, 

xxxix, Sept., 1837; X, pt. i, No. 114, pp. 449-452, Jan. -June, 1841; Echo du 

Monde Savant, Paris, IV, No. 308, p. 38, Feb. 10, 1838 (raised to generic rank); 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., I, 153, Apr., 1838. 
Type: Bibos subhemachalus Hodgson (changed to B. cavifronsin pt. n), from the 

Saul Forest, Nepal, India. 
Bibos: Apparently a contraction of Bison Bus. 
Bicunedens Hodgson, 1863. Glires, Muridae, Microtinae. 

Hodgson, in Gray's Cat. Spec. & Drawings Mamm., Birds, etc., of Nepal and 

Tibet, Brit. Mus., 2d ed., 11, 1863, (synonym of Neodon sikimensis); Blan- 

ford, Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, L, pt. II, No. 2, p. 110, July 30, 1881 (in 

synonymy). 



BICUNEDENS BLARINA. 137 

Bicunedens — Continued. 

Type: Bicunedens perfuscus Hodgson ( = Neodon sikimensis), from Darjiling, India. 

Apparently a manuscript name. 
Bicunedens: hi, two; cuneus, wedge; dens, tooth. 
Bidens G. Fischer, 1814. Cete, Physeteridae. 

Zoognosia, III, 686, 1814. 
Type species not named, but Delphinus diodon Hunter, 1787, Dauphin d deux dents 

Bonaterre, and Le Diodon Lacepede, are given as synonyms. 
Bidens: hi, two; dens, tooth — the Latin equivalent of Diodon. 
Bifa Lataste, 1885. Glires, Muscardinidae. 

Le Naturaliste, 7" ami., No. 8, pp. 61-63, Apr. 15, 1885 (sep., pp. 1-7). 
Type: Bifa lerotina Lataste, from the vicinity of Ghardaya, Mzab, Algerian 

Sahara. 
Bison (subgenus of Bos) H. Smith, 1827. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidie. 

Griffith's Cuvier, Anim. Kingdom, V, 373-375, 1827; Turner, Proc. Zool. Soc. 

London, 1850, 177 (raised to generic rank); Miller & Rehn, Proc. Boston 

Soc. Nat. Hist., XNN, 21, Dec, 1901 (type fixed). 
Species 5, from Eurasia and North America: Bos bison Linnaeus (type), B. gaums 

Smith, B. americanus Gmelin, B. poephagus Smith, and B. gavxus Colebrooke. 
Bison: Lat., wild ox or buffalo. 
Bisonus Hodgson, 1835. LTngulata, Artiodactyla, Bovida?. 

Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, IV, No. 45, p. 525, Sept., 1835; Calcutta Journ. Nat. 

Hist., II, 217, 1842. 
Type: Bisonus gaveus (misprinted gavcens) Hodgson, from the Tarai, Nepal, India. 
Bisonus: Lat., wild ox or buffalo. 
Blainvillimys (Bravard MS.) Gervais, 1848-52. Glires, Theridomyidae. 

Bravard in Gervais', Zool. et Paleont. Franc., II, expl., pi. xlvii figs. 17-18, 

p. 4, 1848-52; 2eme ed., 32, pi. xlvii figs. 17-18, 1859 (under Theridomys 

blainviUei) . 
Blainvillemys <Jiebel, Saugethiere, 517 footnote, 1855; 2d ed., 517 footnote, 1859. 
Blainvilleomys Giebel, Saugethiere, 2d ed., 1087, 1859; Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., 

Rodentia, pt. n, 166, 1881. 
Type: Theridomys? blainviUei Gervais,* from Issoire, Puy-de-D6me, France. "M. 

Bravard avait nomme ce genre BlainviUiinys dans son catalogue manuscrit; 

mais je ne crois pas que ce noni puisse etre adopte, pas plus que celui de 

QwiAerimys. La construction de l'un et de 1' autre est trop peu conforme aux 

regies suivies en nomenclature; c'est pourquoi j'ai laisse provisoirement l'espece 

qui lui sert de type parmi les Th6ridomys. " (Gervais, 1. c, 1848-52, p. 4.) 
Extinct. 
Blainvillimys: Blainville; /ivs, mouse. In honor of Henri Marie Ducrotay'de 

Blainville, 1778-1850, an eminent anatomist of the Paris Museum and Jardin 

des Plantes; author of ' Osteographie des Mammiferes,' 1839-64, etc. 
Blarina (subgenus of Corsira) Gray, 1838. Insectivora, Soricidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1837, 124, June 14, 1838; Baird, Mamm. N. Am., 36, 

1857 (raised to generic rank). 
Blaria (Jray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., p. xxi, 1843; List Osteol. Spec. Brit. 

Mus., pp. xi, 23, 1847; Gerrard, Cat. Bones Mamm. Brit. Mus., 114, 1862. 
Type: Corsira (Blarina) talpoides Gray ( = Sorex talpoides Gapper), from the 

vicinity of Lake Simcoe, Ontario, Canada. (Sorex talpoides = S. brevicaudus Say, 

from Blair, Nebraska). 
Blarina: A coined name. 

* Giebel gives A^chseomys chinchilloides Gervais as the type. 



138 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Blarinomys Thomas, 1896. Glires, Muridse, Cricetinre. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XVIII, .310-311, Oct. 1, 1896. 
Type: Oxymycterus breviceps AVinge, from the bone cave of Capao Secco, Lagoa 

Santa, Brazil. 
Blarinomys: Blarina; f-tvi, mouse — in allusion to its supposed mole-like habits. 

Blastocerus (subg. of Cervus) Wagner, 1844. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 
Suppl. Schreber's Saugthiere, IV, 366-373, Tab. ccLi b , ccxLviii f , 1S44; Gray, 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 18.50, 237 (raised to generic rank). 
Species, 3: Cervus paludosus Desmarest, from Paraguay; C. campestris F. Cuvier, 

from Paraguay; and (?) C. macrotis Say, from New Mexico. 
Blastocerus: fi\cx6ro<;, bud; Kepas, horn — from the form of the horns, which are 

described as erect, three-branched, and without any basal snag (Gray) — thus 

resembling a bud. 
Blastoconus Roth, 1903. Ungulata, Astrapotheroidea(Albertogaudryidae). 

Revista Mus. La Plata, XI, 137-138, 1903. 
Type: Blastoconus robertsoni Roth, from the upper 'Cretaceous' of Lago Musters, 

Territory of Chubut, Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on a molariform tooth. 
Blastoconus: fiXadroz, bud; kgjvos, cone. 

Blastomeryx Cope, 1877. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervida?. 

Rept. IT. S. Geog. Surv. West 100th Meridian, Palseont., IV, pt. n, 350, 360, pi. 
xxxn, fig. 13, 1877; Proc. Am. Phil. Soc. XVII, 222, 1878. 

Type: Dicrocerus gemmifer Cope, from the Miocene (Loup Fork beds) of north- 
eastern Colorado. 

Extinct. Based on "a portion of the right mandible supporting the posterior 
molar." 

Blastomeryx: /iXadroz, bud; /n'/pvc, ruminant — probably from "the accessory 
tubercles, or rudimental columns, between the inner lobes of the inferior 
true molars characteristic of the Cervi." Cope considered Blastomeryx as the 
ancestor of Cervus or Cariacus. (Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, 1. c.) 

Bolodon Owen, 1871. Allotheria, Bolodontidse. 

Mesozoic Mamm., in Mon. Pala?ontograph. Soc, XXIV, No. 5, pp. 54-57, pi. in 

figs. 5-6, 1871. 
Type: Bolodon crassidens Owen, from the Purbeck of Durdlestone Bay, Swanage, 

Dorsetshire, England. 
Extinct. Based on portions of upper jaws. 
Bolodon: /icoXoi, lump; 65coi' = 6dovi, tooth — 'lump-tooth,' in allusion to the 

crowns of the upper molars. 

Bonasus (subgenus of Bos) Wagner, 1844. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Suppl. Schreber's Saugthiere, IV, 515-516, pis. ccxcv, ccxcv" figs. 3, 4, ccxcv b , 

ccxevi, 1844. 
Species: Bos bison Linnaeus, from Europe; and B. ommomtw Gmelin, from North 

America. 
Name preoccupied by Bonasa Stephens, 1819, a genus of Aves. 
Bonasus: fiovadog, wild ox. 
Bondar (subgenus of Paradoxurus) Gray, 1864. Fera-, Vrverridae. 

Proc Zool. Soc London, 1864, 531; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate .Mamm. 

Brit. Mus., 63-64, L869. 
Type: Ichneumon bondar Buchanan MS. ( = Viverra bondar Blainville) , from Nepal, 

India. 
Bondar: Bhondar, native name of the Indian palm-civet in Bengal. (Blanford, 

Mamm. Brit. India, 106, 1888.) 



BONEIA— BORIOUALE. 139 

Boneia Jentink, 1879. Chiroptera, Pteropodidse. 

Notes Leyden Museum, I, Note xxxi, 117-119, Feb., 1879. 
Type: Boneia Helens Jentink, from Bone, Celebes. 
Boneia: Bone, the place in Celebes where the type was collected. 
Boocercus Thomas, 1902. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., X, 309-310, Oct. 1, 1902. 
New name for Euryceros Gray, 1850, which is preoccupied by Eurycerus Illiger, 

1807, a genus of Coleoptera. "But should it prove . . . that there are no 

horns in the West-African females, I would expressly assign as the type of the 

genus Boocercus the East African form [Boocercus eurycerus isaaci Thomas, 

from Eldoma Ravine, British East Africa] which we know to possess them." 

(Thomas.) 
Boocercus: (iove, (3o6$, ox; KspKos, tail — " based <>n the characteristic bovine tail 

of B. eunjeercus." 
Boochoerus Cope, 1879. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse? 

Bull. U. S. Geol. &Geog. Surv. Terr., V, No. 1, pp. 59-67, Feb. 28, 1879. 
Type: BoocJicerus liumerosus Cope, from the Miocene of the John Day River 

region, Oregon. 
Extinct. Based on "a part of the skeleton . . . not accompanied by cranial 

bones or teeth." 
Boochoerus: ftovs, /loos, ox; jo2/jos, hog. 
Boops Gray, 1821. Cete, Balaenidse. 

London Med. Repos., XV, 310, Apr. 1, 1821. 
Type: Balsena hoops Linnyeus, from the Arctic Ocean. 
Name preoccupied by Boops Cuvier, 1817, a genus of Pisces. 
Boops: (iovi, /loos, ox; (Zip, eye, face, from the specific name of the type. 
Bootherium Leidy, 1852. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidee. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1852, 71 (provisional name); Rhoads, Ibid., 

1897, 492. 
Species: Bos bombifrons Harlan, from Kentucky; and Ovibos cavifrons Leidy, 

from the Arkansas River. 
Extinct. Based on skulls. 
Bootherium: jiov<;, /3o6$, ox; Qr/piov, wild beast — from the resemblance of the 

skulls to those of oxen. 
Boreodon Lambe, 1902. Allotheria, Plagiaulacidse. 

Geol. Surv. Canada, Cont. Canadian Paljeont., Ill, pt. n, 79-80, pi. xv, fig. 15, 

Sept., 1902. 
Type: Boreodon matutinus Lambe, from the Mid-Cretaceous (Belly River series) 

of the Red Deer River district, Alberta, Canada. 
Extinct. Based on a single premolor. 
Boreodon: fiopeio*;, northern; d8cbv=ddov<;, tooth — in allusion to the type 

locality. 
Borhyaena Ameghino, 1887. • Marsupial ia, Borhysenidse. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamff. Fos. Patagonia Austral, p. 8, Dec, 1887. 
Type: Borhyaena tuberata Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of southern Pata- 
gonia. 
Extinct. 

Borhyaena: ftopoi, devouring; -\-Hysena. 
Boriogale (subgenus of Maeropus) Owen, 1874. Marsupialia, Macropodidae. 

Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. London, CLNIV, pt. i, 247, pi. xx figs. 12, 12a, 19, pi. 

xxi fig. 5, 1874. 
Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem., Brit. Mus., 27-28, 1888. 
Type: Maeropus (Borio/jale) magnus Owen, from the 'far north of the province of 

South Australia' (Central Australia). 
Boriogale: (iopsios, from the north (i. e., of South Australia!); y^rj, weasel. 



140 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Borio'ikon Poliakoff, 1881. Glires, Muridse, Microtinae. 

Annexe au tome XXXIX, Mem. Acad. St.-Petersbourg, No. 2, pp. 35, 38, 1881.* 

Borimcon Buchner, Wiss. Resultate Przewalski's Reisen, Saugethiere, Lief. 3, 
127 footnote (German text), 1889. 

Type: Mus torquabus Pallas, from the Obi River, western Siberia. 

Name antedated by Dicrostonyx Gloger, 1841; and by Misothermus Hensel, 1855. 

Borioikon: to. fjopeia, the north; oikgov, inhabitant — from the arctic habitat of 
the type species. 
Borophag-us Cope, 1892. Ferse, Canidae. 

Am. Naturalist, XXVI, 1028, Dec, 1892. 

Type: Borophagus diversidens Cope, from the Pliocene (Blanco beds) of the east- 
ern front of the Staked Plains, Texas. 

Extinct. 

Boropliagus: /3opo$, devouring; cpdyoc,, glutton — from its supposed habits, the 
genus having been described as a hyena. 
Bos Lixn/kts, 1758. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Systema Naturae, 10th ed., 71, 1758; 12th ed., I, 98, 1766; Brisson, Regnum 
Anim. in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 12, 51-58, 1762; Ogilby, Proc. Zool. Soc. 
London, for 1836, No. xlviii, 139, June 27, 1837 (type fixed). 

Species, 5: Bos taurus Linnaeus (type), from Poland: B. bonasus Linnaeus, from 
Europe; B. bison Linmeus, from the western United States; B. bubalis Linmeus, 
from southern Asia; and B. indicus Linnaeus, from India and China. 

Bos: Lat., ox. 
Boselaphus Biainville, 1816. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, May, 1816, 75. II. Smith, Griffith's Cuvier, 
Anim. Kingdom, V, 364-365, 1827; Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, IV, 
91-102, pi. lxxxvii, text figs. 98,99, 1900 (type fixed). 

Bosejiliuliix IIorsfield, Cat. Mamm. Mus. East India Co. , 169, 1851. 

Buselaphus Reichexbach, Vollstand. Naturgesch. In- imd Auslandes, Saugeth., 
Ill, 142, Taf. xuv, 1845. 

Species, 3: Antilope picta Pallas, 1777 (=A. tragocamelus Pallas, 1766, type), from 
northern India; .1. gnu Gmelin, and .1. oreas Papas, from Africa. 

See Buselaphus Frisch, 1775. 

Boselaphus: Bos 4- Elaphus. 
Botheratiotherium Blainville, 1838. Marsupialia, Ainphitheriidae. 

Gmnptes Rendus, Paris, VII, No. 8, p. 735, Oct., 1838. 

The name Botheration- Therium was facetiously suggested by the editor of the Lon- 
don Athenaeum "to avoid making an invidious selection of the different claim- 
ants to the right of christening" the fossils from Stonesfield called Amphi- 
therium by Blainville and Thylacoiherium by Valenciennes. (Athenaeum, No. 
571, Oct. 6, 1838, 731.) 
Bothriodon Aymakd, 1846.f Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anthracotheriidae. 

Ann. Soc. Agr. Sci. Arts et Coram, du Puy, XII, 239, 246-247, footnote, 1846; 
Aymakd in Pictet's Traite Paleont., 2 ed., I, 330-331, 1853; Comptes Rendus, 
Paris, XXXVIII, 675, 1854; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U.S. 
Geol. Surv., 652, 1902 (type fixed). 

Bothryodon Gaudry, Anim. Foss. et Geol. l'Attique for 1862, sig. 45, 355, 1866. 

*The title of the paper is: CncTCMaTiiHecKiii ofaopi no.ieBOKi, Bojumnxca Bb Cuoiipn, 8vo, 
pp. 92, figs, of molar teeth in text. [All in Russian except names of species and 
some citations] (fide Lataste, Ann. Mus. Civico Storia Nat., Genova, XX, 265, Mar., 
1884). 

tFor date of publication, see Bush, Am. Journ. Sci., 4th ser., XVI, 97-98, 11)03. 



BOTHRIODON BBACHYCYON. 141 

Botliriodon — Continued. 

Species, 3: Bothriodon platorhynchus Aymard (type), B. leptorhynchus Aymard, 

from the Lower Miocene ot'Puy; and Anthracotherium velaunum Cuvier, from 

the Miocene of Ronzon, near Puy, France. 
Extinct. 
Botliriodon: fiohpiov, dim. of fioOpo?, pit, hollow; oSco v= 68 ovg, tooth; from the 

deep channel or valley separating the pyramidal tubercles of the molars. 
Bothriomys Ameghino, 1889. Glires, Muridas, Neotominye? 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamff. Fusil. Repiib. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

Cordoba, YI, 118, pi. it, tig. 18, 1889. 
Type: Bothriomys catenatus Ameghino, from the Pampean formation (Pliocene ), in 

the vicinity of Cordoba, Argentina. 
Extinct. " Representada por la rama izquierda de la mandibula inferior eon 

toda la dentadura." 
Bothriomys: fiafipiov, dim. of fioQpoS, pit, hollow; fti'i, mouse. 
Bothrolabis Cope, 1888. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XXV, 63, 66-79, Apr. 3, 1888. 
Bothriolabis Lydekker, in Flower & Lydekker's Mamm., Living & Extinct, 

291, 1891. 
Type: Bothrolabis rostratus Cope, from the Miocene (John Day beds) of Camp 

Creek, Oregon. 
Extinct. Rased on 'a cranium nearly entire, but without mandible.' 
Bothrolabis: fioQpos, pit, hollow; Aafiic, holder — from "the alveolus of the 

superior canine [which] is produced downwards below the remaining alveolar 

border so that the fossa for the inferior canine is excavated." (Cope.) 
Bothryodon (see Bothriodon). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anthracotheriidse. 

Brachalletes DeYis, 1883. Marsupialia, Macropodidse. 

Proc. Linn. Soc. New South Wales, VIII, pt. n, 190-193, 1883. 
Type: Brachalletes palmeri De Vis, from Chinchilla, Darling Downs, Queensland, 

Australia. 
Extinct. Based on a femur "associated with, a number of bones which . . . may 

well have belonged to the same animal." 
Brachalletes: /3paxv$, short; dAAo/iai, to spring, leap; + suffix — r?/j, denoting 

agent. 
Brachiopithecus Senechal, 1839. Primates, Simiida". 

Diet. Pittoresque Hist. Nat., VIII, 2 e pt., 428, 1839; "Blainville, Lecons Orales, 

1839." 
Based on the orang and gibbon of the Malay Archipelago. 
Brachiopithecus: (3paxi(*>v, arm; iti^hjKoc,, ape — in allusion to the length of the 

arms. 

Brachycrus (subg. of Merycochcerus) Matthew, 1901. Ungulata, Agriochoeridse. 

Mem. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., I, pt. vn, 397-398, Nov., 1901. 

Type: Merycochcerus rusticus Leidy, from the Pliocene of Sweetwater River, near 

Devils Gate, Wyoming. 
Extinct. 

Brachycrus: (ipajvi, short; Lat. crus, leg. 
Brachycyon Filhol, 1872. Ferae, Canidae. 

Ann. Sci. Geol., Paris, III, Art. No. 7, pp. 15-18, pi. 14, figs. 11-13, 1872; VII, 

Art. No. 7, pp. 63-66, pi. 13, figs. 27-29, 1876. 
Type: Brachycyon gaudryi, from the Phosphorites of Quercy at Caylux, Dept. 

Tarn-et-Garonne, France. 
Extinct. Based on a left lower jaw. 
Brachycyon: jipax'vz, short; kvgov, dog — in allusion to the lower jaw. 



142 INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 

Brachydiastematherium Bockh & Maty, 1876. Ungulata, Titanotheriidae. 

Mittheilungen Jahrb. K. Ung. Geol. Anst., Budapest, Bd. IV, Heft 3, pp. 125-150, 

pis. 17-18, 1876; Tawney, Geol. Record for 1875, 273, 1877 (given by mistake as 

1875); Dai/ton, ibid, for 1876, 250, 1878. 
Brachydiastematotherium Roger, Bericht Naturw. Ver. f. Schwaben u. Neuburg 

( a. V.), Augsburg, XXIX, 53, 1887. 
Type: Brachydiastematherium transilvanieum Bockh & Maty, from the Eocene in 

the vicinity of Andrashaza, Klausenburg, Transylvania, Hungary. 
Extinct. Based on part of a lower jaw. 

Brachydiastematherium: fipccxvs, short; 8id6r7?/ia, diastema; ftrfpiov, wild beast. 
Brachygnatus Pomel, 1848. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anthracotheriidae. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, XXVI, No. 25, p. 687, Jan. -June, 1848. 
Brachygnathus Gekvais, Zool. et Paleont. Franc., I, 96; II, expl. pi. xxxm, p. 7, 

1848-52. 
Type: Anthracotherium gergorianum Blainville, from Gergovia, a mountain near 

Menat, Puy-de-D6me, France. The name occurs only in a list of genera in the 

'Deuxieme tribe des Artiodactyles, Choeroidiene.' 
Name preoccupied by Brachygnathus Perty, 1830, a genus of Coleoptera. See 

Synaphodus Pomel, 1848. 
Extinct. 

Brachygnatus (Brachygnathus): ftpaxvi, short; yvaboc,, jaw. 
Brachylagus (subgenus of Lepus) Miller, 1900. Glires, Leporidae. 

Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XIII, 157, June 13, 1900. 

Type: Lepus idahoensis Merriam, from Pahsimeroi Valley, Custer County, Idaho. 
Brachylagus: fipaxvs, short; Xaydoi, hare— on account of the short skull, ears, 

legs, and tail, the latter not perfectly formed. 

Brachymelis (subgenus of Perameles) Miklouho-Maclay, 1884. 

Marsupialia, Peramelidpe. 
Proc. Linn. Soc. New South Wales, IX, pt. in, 713-720, pi. 38, 1884; Thomas, 

Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem: Brit. Mus., 227, 236, 238, 1888 (type fixed). 
Species: Perameles (Brachymelis) </<ir<i</<issi Miklouho-Maclay (= Perameles cocke- 
relli Ramsay, type), from the northern coast of New Guinea; and P. rufescens 
Peters & Doria ( = P. doreyana Quoy & Gaimard), from New Guinea. 
Name preoccupied by Brachtjmeles Dumeril & Bibron, 1839, a genus of Reptilia. 
Brachymelis: fipcxxv/uehis, short-limbed. 
Brachymeryx Cope, 1878. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agriocho?rid?e. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XVII, 220-221 (sep. issued as Pakeont. Bull. No. 28), 

Jan. 12, 1878; ibid., XXI, 547, 1884 (in synonymy). 
Type: Brachymeryx feliceps Cope, from the Upper Miocene (Ticholeptus beds) of 

Deep River, Montana. 
Extinct. Based on ' two nearly complete crania without mandibles.' 
Brachymeryx: /jfjax 1 '?, short; m'jpv'i, ruminant — possibly in allusion to the two 
last upper molars, which are described as having short roots. 
Brachymys Meyer, 1847. Glires, Muscardinidae. 

Neues Jahrb. Mineralogie, 1847, 456; Bronx's Handb. Gesch. Natur., Ill, Index 

Pakeont, 173, 1848. 
New name f< >r Micromys Meyer, 1846, which is preoccupied by Micromys Dehne, 

1841, a genus of Muridse. 
Extinct. 

Brachymys: [i/yaxvi, short; juv?, mouse. 
Brachyodon Lartet, 1868. Ungulata, ? 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, LXVI, No. 22, p. 1121, Jan.-June, 1868 (provisional 
name), 



BRACHYODON BRACHYTELES. 143 

Brachyodon — Continued. 

Type: Brachyodon eocsenus Lartet, from the Eocene of Issel, Dept. de l'Aude, 
France. 

Extinct. Bashed on a skull. 

Brachyodon: ftpaxvi, short; oScov = odovg, tooth— "en raison du peu de hau- 
teur de la couronne de ses molaires." (Lartet.) . 

Brachyodus Deperet, 1895. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anthracotheriidse. 

Sitzungsber. Math.-Phys. CI. K. Akad. Wiss., Wien, CIV, Heft 3-4, lste Abth., 

397-408, taf. i, n, fig. 1, 1895; Zool. Anzeiger, No. 488, p. 389, Nov. 11, 1895. 
Type: Ardhracotherium onoideum Gervais, from the Miocene of Neuville (Dept. 

Loiret) , France. 
Name preoccupied by Brachyodon Lartet, L868, a genus of extinct Ungulates from 

France. 
Extinct. Based on part of a lower jaw. 
Brachyodus: fipaxvt;, short; oduvs, tooth — "wegen des brachyodonten Banes 

der Backenziihne. ' ' ( Deperet. ) 
Brachyotus (subg. of Vespertilio) Kolexati, 1856. Chiroptera, Yespertilionida?, 
Allgem. Deutsch. Naturh. Zeitg., Dresden, neue Folge, II, 131, 174-177, 1856. 
Species, 3: Vespertilio mystacinus Kuhl, T*. daubentonii Kuhl, and V. dasycneme 

Boie, from Europe. 
Name preoccupied by Brachyotus Gould, is:!7. a genus of birds. 
Brachyotus: fipaxi'?, short; oug, gjto?, ear. 
Brach.ypb.ylla Gray, 1834. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1833, No. XI. L22-123, Mar. 12, 1834; Mag. Zool. & 

Bob, II, 489, 1838. 
Type: BrachyphyUa cavemarum Gray, from St. Vincent, West Indies. 
Brachyphylla: ftpaxvz, short; tpvXXov, leaf — from the short, broad, nose-leaf. 
Brachypsalis (ope, 1890. Fera?, Mustelidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XXIV, 951-951', Oct., 1890. 

Type: Brachypsalis pachycephalus Cope, from the Miocene (Loup Fork) of Ne- 
braska. 
Extinct. "Founded on a left mandibular ramus which lacks the portions ante- 
rior to the canine and posterior to the coronoid. The sectorial is the only 

tooth preserved." 
Brachypsalis: fipaxv?, short; il'uXt:, shears, also an arch. 
Brachysorex (subgenus of Sorex) Duverxoy, 1842. Insectivora, Soricidse. 

Mag. de Zool., 2d ser., IV, Mamm., C, 37-41, pi. 52, 1842. 
Type: Sorex (Brachysorex) brevicaudatus Duvernoy, from New Harmony, Posey 

County, Indiana. 
Brachysorex: fipaxvs, short; -{-Sorex — in allusion to the short tail, whence the 

common name 'short-tailed shrew.' 
Brachytarsomys Guxther, 1875. Glires, Muridse, Cricetinae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1875, 79-80, pi. xvi, figs. 3 a, b, in text. 
Type: Brachytarsomys albicauda Gi'inther, collected between Tamatave and 

Murundava, Madagascar. 
Brachytarsomys: (Ipaxvs, short; rtrpdog, tarsus; fivz, mouse — from the foot, 

which is shorter than the lower leg. 
Brachyteles Spix, 1823. Primates, Cebidse. 

Sim. et Vespert. Brasil. Nov. Spec, 36-38, tab. xxvn, 1823. 
Type: Brachyteles macrotarsus Spix, from the eastern coast of Brazil (provinces 

of Sao Paulo to Bahia) . 
Brachyteles: fJpaxv?, short; rs'Aoj, end, extremity — in allusion to the thumb, 

which is short or absent. 



144 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Brachytherium Ameghino, 1883. Ungulata, Litopterna, Proterotheriida?. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, V, entr. 3, pp. 289-291, 1883; Cont. Conociniiento 
Mamif. F6sil. Repiib. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 561-565, 
pis. xii figs. 39-11, xxm figs. 7, 8, 20, 23, xxxm figs. 4, 5, 1889. 

Type: Brachytherium cuspidatus Ameghino, from the barrancas del Parana, Entre 
Rios, Argentina. 

Extinct. Based on the right ramus of a lower jaw, nearly complete, the last 
premolar and three molars. 

Brachytherium: fipaxi'i, short; Qrjpiov, wild beast. 
Brachyuromys Forsyth Major, 1896. Glires, Muridse, Cricetinse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat, Hist., 6th ser., XVIII, 322-323, Oct, 1, 1896; Proc. Zool. Soc. 
London, 1897, 695-720, pis. xxxvn, xxxix. 

Type: Brachyuromys ramirohilra Forsyth Major, from the Ampitambe forest, in 
the Betsimisaraka country, on the border of northeastern Betsileo, Mada- 
gascar. 

Brachyuromys: /i/ja-^t's, short; ovpct, tail; /<£?, mouse — the tail is shorter than 
usual in the Muridse. 
Brachyurus G. Fisciiek, 1813. Glires, Muridse, Microtinae. 

Zoognosia, I, 3d ed., 14, 24, 1813; ibid., Ill, 55-62, 1814. 

Species, 9: Mux arvalis, M. rulilus, 3/. amphibius, and M. lemmua Pallas; M. tor- 
quatus, M. alliarius; Brachyurus blumenbachii Fischer; B. fulvus and B. niloticus 
Geoffroy. (See Lemmus Link, 1795.) 

Brachyurus: fipaxvi, short; oupd, tail. 
Brachyurus Spix, 1823. Primates, Cebidpe. 

Sim. et Veepert. Brasil. Nov. Spec, 11-13, tab. vii-vni, 1823. 

Species: Brachyurus israelita Spix, from the Rio Negro; and B. ouakary Spix, from 
the forests of the Iya River, a tributary of the Amazon near the border of Peru — 
both from Amazonas, Brazil. 

Name preoccupied by Brachyurus Fischer, 1813, a genus of Muridse. (See Cacajao 
Lesson, 1840.) 
Brachyurus (subgenus of Pithecia) Trouessart, 1878. Primates, Cebida?. 

Revue et Mag. Zool., Paris, .'!' ser., VI, 135, 1878; Cat. Mamm., 28, 1878; new 
ed., fasc. i, 44, 1897. 

Type: Brachyurus calvus I. Geoffroy, from the Amazon River, Brazil. 

Name preoccupied by Brachyurus Spix, which was based on the black-headed 
Uakari, />'. ouakary (=Simia melanocephala Humboldt). Name also preoccu- 
pied by Brachyurus Fischer, 1813, a genus of rodents. Replaced by Cothurus 
Palmer, 1899 (preoccupied); and by Neocothurus Palmer, 1903. 
Bradicebus Cuyier & Geoffroy, 1795. Primates, Lemuridse. 

"Mag. Encyclopedique, No. VI," 1795 — names only — 'Cucang, Bradicebus' (fide 
Gervais, Diet. Pittoresque Hist. Nat., IV, pt, 2, p. 617, 1836); Gray, Cat. Mon- 
keys, Lemurs, and Fruit-Eating Bats Brit. Mus.,92, 1870 (synonym of Nycticebus). 

Bradycebus 'Blainville,' Gray, 1. c, 92, 1870; Forbes, in Allen's Naturalist's 
Library, Handb. Primates, I, 33, 1894 (in synonymy); Stone & Rehn, Proc. 
Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila., 1902, 138, 141 (in synonymy). 

Type: The 'Cucang,' Tardigradus coucang Boddaert, from Bengal, India. 

Bradicebus: fipadvz, slow; kjj/3os, monkey — in allusion to the animal's quiet, 
deliberate movements. 
Bradylemur Blainville, 1839. Primates, Leniuridaa. 

Osteog. Mamm. Recents et Foss. , I, 'Lemur,' 12-13, 1839; Lesson, Species Mamm., 
239-243, 1840; Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 10, 1842. 

Type: Lemur tardigradus Blainville (not Linnaeus), from Java and Sumatra. (See 
Bradicebus Cuvier & Geoffroy, 1796.) 

Bradylemur: (5pa8v<;, slow; -{-Lemur — in allusion to the animal's quiet, delib- 
erate movements, 



BRADYLEMUR BRIAROMYS. 145 

Bradylemur Grandidier, 1899. Primates, Nesopithecid.se. 

Bull. Mus. Hist. Nat. Paris, V, No. 7, pp. 346-348, 5 figs., 1899. 
Type: Bradylemur robvstus Grandidier, from Belo, west coast of Madagascar 
Name preoccupied by Bradylemur Blainville, 1839, a genus of Lernuridae. 
Extinct. Based on the entire lower jaw with the exception of the median 

incisors, and by a part of the left upper jaw bearing the two premolars and the 

two first molars. 
Bradypus Linnjeus, 1758. Edentata, Bradypodidae. 

Systema Naturae, 10th ed., I, 34-35, 1758; 12th ed., I, 50-51, 1766; Illiger, 

Prodrumus, Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 108, 1811 (type fixed). 
Species: Bradypus tridactylus Linnaeus (type), from South America; and B. 

didactylus Linnaeus, 'habitat in Zeylona' — probably Brazil. 
Bradypus: fipaftvitovc,, slow of foot (from (3pa8v<;, slow; Ttov%, foot). 
Bradytherium Grandidier, 1901. Edentata, Bradypodidae? 

Bull. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, No. 2, pp. 54-56, 2 figs, in text, Mar., 1901. 
Type: Bradytherium madagascariense Grandidier, -from Ambolisatra, southwest 

coast of Madagascar. 
Extinct. Based on a femur. 
Bradytherium: (3pa8v$, slow; Qqpiov, wild beast — in allusion to the resemblance 

of the femur to that of Bradypus tridactylus. 
Bradytherium Andrews, 1901. TJngulata, ? 

Zoologist, London, 4th ser., V, 319, Aug. 15, 1901; Tageblatt V. Internat. Zool.- 

Cong., Berlin, No. 6, p. 4, Aug. 16, 1901; Geol. Mag., London, new ser., decade 

IV, vol. VIII, 407-409, figs. 3,4, in text, Sept., 1901. 
Type: Bradytherium grave Andrews, from the Lower Tertiary of the province of 

Fayum, Egypt. 
Name preoccupied by Bradytherium Grandidier, Mar., 1901, a genus of extinct 

Edentata. Replaced by Barytherium Andrews, Oct., 1901. 
Extinct. Based on a mandible and the upper teeth. 

Bradytherium: fipaSvz, slow; brjpiov, wild beast — probably from its size. 
Br amatherium Falconer, 1845. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Giraffidae. 

Quart, Joum. Geol. Soc. London, I, No. 3, pp. 363-365, pi. 14, figs. 3, 4, Aug. 

1, 1845. 
Type: Bramatheriiun perimense Falconer, from Perim Island, Gulf of Cambay, 

west coast of India. 
Extinct. Based on "two fragments of the left side of the upper jaw, including 

the entire series of the superior grinders," and representing different indi- 
viduals; also "the hindmost premolar together with the three back or true 

molars nearly perfect." 
Bramatherium: Brama, the Hindoo God; Brjpiov, wild beast. 
Bramus Pomel, 1892. Glires, Muridae, Microtinae? 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, CXIV, No. 21, pp. 1159-1163, Jan.-June, 1892. 
Type: Bramus barbarus Pomel, from the Quaternary Phosphorites of Trara de 

Nedroma, near Ain-Mefta, Tunis. 
Extinct, Based on ' une mandibule. ' 
Briaromys Ameghino, 1889. Glires, Chinchillidae. 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamif. Fusil. Repub. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

Cordoba, VI, 904-905, pi. lxxii, fig. 15, 1889. 
Type: Briaromys trouessartianus Ameghino, from the Patagonian formation of the 

barrancas near the city of Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct, Based on "un fragmento de la ramaderecha de la mandibula inferior, 

con el incisivo y las tres primeras muelas." 
Briaromys: (ipiapoc,, strong; pvs, mouse — from its close relationship with the 

huge Megamys. 

7591— No. 23—03 10 



146 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Brontops Marsh, 1887. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXIY, 326-328, figs. 5-8, Oct., 1887. 
Species: Brontops robuslus Marsh (type), from the Brontotherium beds of the 

Oligocene, near White River, northern Nebraska; and B. dispar Marsh, from 

the Brontotherium beds of South Dakota. 
Extinct. 
Brontops: Bronto(therium) ; oip aspect. 

Brontotherium Marsh, 1873. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., V, 486-487, June, 1873. 

Type: Brontotherium gigas Marsh, from the Oligocene of Colorado. 

Extinct. "Based on portions of three individuals, one of which has the lower 
jaws and entire molar series complete." 

Brontotherium: (ipovri), thunder; drjpiov, wild beast. 
Bruynia Dubois, 1882. Monotremata, Tachyglossidse. 

Bull. Soc. Zool. France, YI, for 1881, No. 6, pp. 267-270, pis. ix-x, 1882. 

Bruijnia Thomas, Zool. Record for 1882, XIX, Mamm., 40, 1883. 

New name for Acanthoglossus Gervais, 1877, which is preoccupied by Acantho- 
glossa Kraatz, 1859, a genus of Coleoptera. Type: Bruynia tridactyla Dubois 
( = Tachy <glossus bruijnii Peters & Doria), from the Arfak Mountains, northern 
New Guinea. 

Name antedated by Zaglossus Gill, May 5, 1877. 

Bruynia: In honor of A. A. Bruijn, of Ternate, the discoverer of the type 

species, who collected in the Malay Archipelago, especially in Celebes and 

New Guinea. 

Brymomys ( see Drymomys ) . Glires, Muridpe, Murinse. 

Bubalis Frisch, 1775. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Das Natur-System vierfiiss. Thiere, in Tabellen, 2, 1775; Lichtenstein, Mag. 
Gesellsch. Naturforsch. Freunde, Berlin, VI, 152, 153-165, 1814 {Bubalides). 
Rafinesque, Analyse de la Nature, 56, 1815; Sclater& Thomas, Book of Ante- 
lopes, I, pt. i, 5-6, pis. i-v, Aug., 1894. 

Bubalus Ogilby, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1836, No. xlviii, 139, June 27, 1837 
(raised to generic rank). 

Type: Bubalis buselaphus {=AniUope bubalis Pallas, 1767 =A. buselaphus Pallas, 
1766), from North Africa. 

Bubalis: fiov(ia\i<;, an African antelope. 
Bubalus Frisch, 1775. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidpe. 

Das Natur-System vierfiiss. Thiere, in Tabellen, Tab. Gen., 1775; H. Smith, Grif- 
fith's Cuvier, Anim. Kingdom, V, 371-373, 1827; Gray, Fist Spec. Mamm. 
Brit. Mus., pp. xxvi, 152-153, 1843, London Encyclopaedia, XXII (art. Zool- 
ogy), 752, 1845; W. L. Sclater, Mamm. S. Africa, I, 253, 1900 (in synonymy, 
type fixed ). 

Type: 'Der Bi'iffel.' Smith's subgenus includes 4 species: Bos caffrr { type) and 
B. pegasus f from Africa, B. arnee and B. bubalus from India. 

See Bubalis Frisch, 1775, a genus of antelopes. 

Bubalus: Lat., wild ox; "'earlier and more properly an African antelope (=/3ov- 
ficxXoi, buffalo)." (Century Diet. ) 
Bucapra Rutimeyer, 1877. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

"Abhandl. Schweitz. Pala-ont. Gesell., IV, Taf. n, 1877; V, No. 1, pp. 105-112, 
Taf. ii, figs. 6-9, 1878;" Alston, Zool. Record for 1877, XIV, Mamm., 6, 1879; 
Ibid., for 1878, XV, Mamm., 19, 1880. 

Type: Bucapra daviesi Rutimeyer, from the Tertiary of the Siwalik Hills, India. 

Extinct. 

Bucapra: Lat. prefix bu-, great ( = Greek (iov-, probably from (3ov s, ox) ; -{-Capra. 



BUDOMYS BUNOMERYX. 147 

Budomys ('Croizet') Bravard, 1843. Glires, ? 

Ann. Sci. Litt. et Indust, l'Auvergne, VII, 429-430, Sept., 1843 (nomen nudum). 

Type (species not named), from the vicinity of Boudes, near Saint-Germain- 
Lembron, Puy-de-Dome, France. 

Extinct. Based on a jaw. 

Budomys: Boudes, the locality where the remains were found; [ivs, mouse. 
Budorcas Hodgson, 1850. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, XIX, 65-75, pis. i-iii, 1850. 

Type: Budorcas taxieolor Hodgson, from the Mishmi Mountains (eastern Hima- 
layas), Assam, India. 

Budorcas: fiov- (from fiov<$, ox); 8opKa.i, gazelle. 

Buffelus RtiTiMEYER, 1865. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Verhandl. Naturforsch. Gesellsch. Basel, IV, 2tes Heft, 332-334, 1865; Neue 

Denkschr. Schweiz. Gesell. Zurich, XXII, art. 2, p. 52, 1867. 
Species, 3: Bos palsdndicus Falconer, Bubalus antiquus Duvernoy, and Bos indicus 

Linmeus, from India. 
Buffelus: N. Lat,, buffalo. 
Bunaelurus Cope, 1873. Ferae, Mustelidse. 

Synop. New Vert. Tert, Colorado, 8, Oct., 1873; Ann. Rept. U. S. Geol. & Geog. 

Surv. Terr., fur 1873, 507, 1874; Tert. Vert., 946-947, pi. lxvii*, figs. 12-14, 1885. 
Buncelunus Scott, Am. Naturalist, XXVII, 658, July, 1893 (misprint). 
Type: Bunselurus lagophagus Cope, from the Oligocene (White River beds) of 

northeastern Colorado. 
■ Extinct. "Represented by a portion of the right mandibular ramus, which 

contains premolars Nos. 3 and 4, and molars 1 and 2, in complete preservation." 
Bunselurus: fiovi>6<;, hill, mound; diXovpo^, cat. 
Bunochoerus Hemprich & Ehrenberg, 1832. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Symbolic Physica?, Mamm., II, sig. qq., Nov., 1832. 
New name suggested (but not adopted) as a substitute for Phacoehmrus F. Cuvier. 

" Phacochoeri nomen infeliciter fabricatum est, Phascochaeris vero infelicius. 

<PaKOi seu (paKi) Graecis verruca non est, etsi Gallis forsan vox lent'dle in eum 

sensum abeat . . . Phacellochcerus, Phucellochserus aut Bunochoerus ilium sensum 

rectius dedissent. ' ' 
Bunochoerus: (iovvoc,, mound; x°'P°?, hog — from the large cutaneous lobes or 

warts on the sides of the face. 
Bunodontherium Mercerat, 1891. Ungulata, Litoptema, Proterotheriidpe. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, I, 449, 450-455, "pi. xi," 1890-91. 
Species: Bunodontherium patagonicum Mercerat, and Diadiaphorus majusculus Ame- 

ghino, from the Eocene of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Bunodontherium: /Jovvos, hill, mound; odovs, odovros, tooth; Brjpiov, wild 

beast — in allusion to the character of the molars. 
Bunolophodon (subgenus of Mastodon), Vacek, 1877. Ungulata, Elephantidse. 
Abhandl. K. K. Geol. Reichsanstalt, Wien, VII, Heft 4, p. 45, July 1, 1877. 
Species, 5 : Mastodon arvernensis Croizet & Jobert, from France ; M. pentelid Gaudry , 

from Greece; M. atticus Wagner, from Greece; M. longirostris Kaup, from 

Eppelsheim, Germany; and M. angustidens Cuvier, from Europe. 
Extinct. 

Bunolopliodon: fiovvos, hill, mound; X6(po<;, crest, ridge; 6dcbv = 6dovi, tooth- 
in allusion to molars, in which the transverse crests are composed of tubercles. 
Bunomeryx Wortman, 1898. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Homacodontidae. 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat, Hist, X, 97-103, fig. 2, Apr. 9, 1898; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. 

N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 650, 1902 (type fixed). 



148 INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 

Bunomeryx — Continued. 

Species: Bunomeryx montanus Wortman, and B. elegans Wortman (type), frorn 
the Upper Eocene of the Uinta Basin, Utah. 

Extinct. 

Bunomeryx: /jovvos, hill, mound; firfpvk, ruminant — in allusion to the bunodont 
character of the molars. 
Bunotherium Cope, 1874. Ungulata ( Bunotheriidse ) . 

Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 2d ser., VIII, 89, 1874. 

Hypothetical genus. Ancestor of the Ungulates. 

Bunotherium: fiovvo<z, hill, mound; Qr/piov, wild beast. 
Burmeisteria Gray, 1865. Edentata, Dasypodidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1865, 381-382; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate 
Mamm. Brit. Mus., 388, 1869. 

Type: CJdamyphorus retusus Burmeister, from Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia. 

Burmeisteria: In honor of Dr. Carl Hermann Conrad Burmeister, 1807-1891, the 

eminent zoologist of Argentina, formerly director of the Museo National, 

Buenos Aires; author of ' Systematische Uebersicht der Thiere Brasiliens, < 

1854-56; 'Description Physique de la Republique Argentine,' 1879, etc. 

Burramys Broom, 1895. Marsupialia, Phalangerida?. 

Zool. Anzeiger, XVIII, No. 484, p. 371, Sept. 16, 1895; XIX, p. 47, Jan. 30, 1896; 
Proc. Linn. Soc. New South "Wales, 2d ser., X, pt. iv, for 1895, 563-567, pis. xxv, 
xlv, Apr. 29, 1896. 

Type: Burramys parvus Broom, from the Pleistocene (?) near Taralga, New South 
Wales. 

Extinct. Based on portions of jaws. 

Burramys: Burra(burra), the aboriginal name of the type locality in New South 
Wales; //us, mouse. 
Burtinopsis Van Bexeden, 1872. Cete, Balsenidpe. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. Belgique, 2 e ser., XXXIV, 19-20, 1872. 

Type: Burtinopsis similis Van Beneden, from the vicinity of Antwerp, Belgium. 

Extinct. "Nous en possedons a Bruxelles et a Louvain des colonnes vert£- 
brales assez completes." 

Burtinopsis: From burtinii, the specific name of Cetotherium burtinii; otpis, appear- 
ance. In honor of Francois Xavier de Burtin, 1743-1818, a Dutch naturalist 
and physician; author of 'Oryctographie de Bruxelles,' 1784. "Nous pro- 
posons ce nom pour un cetace que Ton pourrait confondre avec le Cetotherium 
burtinii, si Ton n'en possedantque des os separes." (Van Bexedex, 1. c, p. 19.) 
Buselaphus Frisch, 1775. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Das Natur-System vierfuss. Thiere, in Tabellen, Tab. Gen., 1775. 

Type: 'Der Bubal.' 

Buselaphus: (love, ox; eXacpoz, deer. 
Buselaphus Reich enbach (see Boselaphus) . Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Butragus (Blyth MS.) Gray, 1872. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidpe. 

Gray, Cat. Ruminant Mamm. Brit. Mus., 43, 1872 (synonym of Gorgon fascial us) ; 
Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, pt. n, 93, 96, Jan. 1895 (synonym 
of Connoehsetes taurinus). 

Type: Butragus corniculatus Blyth MS. (—Antilope taurina Burchell — Sclater & 
Thomas) , from South Africa. 

Butragus: fiovvpayos, ox goat, a fabulous animal of the ancients. 

c. 

Caballus Rafinesque, 1815. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equida?. 

Analyse de la Nature, 55, 1815. 

New name for Equus Linnseus, 1758. (See footnote under Aper, p. 111.) 
Caballus: Lat., horse. 



CABASSOUS C^ELOPS. 149 

Cabassous (subgenus of Dasypus) McMurtrie, 1831. Edentata, Dasypodidae. 

[ ' Le cabassou ' G. Cuviee, Recherches Ossem. Foss., 3 c eul., V, l re part., 120, 1823.] 
McMurtrie, Cuvier's Animal Kingdom, I, 164, 1831; abridged ed., 94, 1834; 

Palmer, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XIII, 71-72, Sept. 28, 1899 (revived as full 

genus). 
Type: Dasypus unicinctus Linnaeus, from South America. 
Cabassous: Cabassou, or Kabassou, South American name of an armadillo, "peut- 

etre une corruption de Caaigouazou, qui, en guarani, signifie grand habitant 

des forets. (Azara, Hist. Nat. Quad., Paraguay, II, 159; 1801.) 
Cacajao (subgenus of Pithec ia) Lesson, 1840. Primates, Cebidae. 

Species Mamm., 181-183, 1840; Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 1842, 8; 

Reichenbach, Vollstund. Naturgesch. Affen, 75 [1862] (raised to generic rank). 
Type: Simla melanocephala Humboldt, from the Mission San Francisco Solano 

(lat. 2° north), on the Cassiquiare River, Venezuela. 
Cacajao; Native name of this species in certain parts of Brazil and Venezuela. 
Cachalot H. Smith? 1839. Cete, Physeteridse. 

H. Smith? in Jardine's Nat. Library, Mamm., IX, 203, 1839; 2d ed., Mamm., I, 

265, 1858; R. Hamilton, ibid., Mamm. XII, 154-169, pis. 8-10, 1861. 
In Vol. I the generic name is based on the spermaceti whale; in Vol. XII the 

only species described in detail is Physeter catodon Linnaeus, from the northern 

seas. 
Cachalot: Basque cachou, a tooth. "French etymologists derive the French 

word from the English, and that from Catalan quichal, tooth, ' because the 

animal is armed with teeth.' " (Century Diet. ) 
Cachicamus (subgenus of Dasypus), McMurtrie, 1831. Edentata, Dasypodidae. 
['Les Cachicames' G. Cuvier, Recherches Ossem. Foss., 3 e M., V, l re part., 124, 

1823; Regne Anirn., 2 e ed., I, 227, 1829.] 
McMurtrie, Cuvier's Animal Kingdom, I, 163, 1831; Degland, Cat. Mus. Hist. 

Nat., Lille, I, Mamm., 125, 1854 (raised to generic rank). 
Cachicama I. Geoffroy, Resume Lee. Mamm. (extrait Echo du Monde Savant, 

I, 1835), 53; Gervais, Exped. du Comte de Castelnau dans l'Amerique du 

Sud, I, Mamm., 113, 1855. 
Species: Dasypus novemcinctusllmvsiws, and D. septemcinctusSchreher, from South 

America. 
Cachicamus: French cachicame, from cachicamo, the Indian name of the 9-banded 

armadillo on the Orinoco, adopted by Buffon (Hist. Nat., X, 215, 1763). 
Cadurcotherium (subg.* of Rhinoceros), Gervais, 1873. Ungulata, Amynodontidae. 
Comptes Rendus, Paris, LXX VII, No. 2, p. 106, July-Dec., 1873; Journ. de Zool., 

Paris, II, 361-368, pi. xiv, 1873. 
Carcarotherium Gervais, Journ. de Zool., II, 368, 1873 (misprint). 
Type: Rhinoceros {Cadurcotherium) cayluxi Gervais, from the Phosphorites of 

Quercy, France. 
Extinct. Based on "quelques dents, la derniere molaire superieure dans son 

etat d'int£grite et notablement entamee par l'usure a sa couronne ainsi que 

plusieurs molaires inferieures." 
Cadurcotherium: Lat. Cadurcus, pertaining to the Cadurci, a people of Gallia 

Narbonensis, whose capital is supposed to be represented by the modern town 

of Cahors, where the teeth were found; (Jtjpiov, wild beast. " J'ai donne a ce 

genre le nom de Cadurcotherium, qui rappellera qu'il a ete trouve dans le 

Quercy." (Gervais.) 
Caelogenus, Ceelog-onus (see Coelog-enus). Glires, Dasyproctidae. 

Caelops (see Ccelops). Chiroptera, Rhinolophidae. 

*In both papers Cadurcotherium is called a 'new genus,' but is treated as a sub- 
genus in naming the species. 



150 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Caenobasileus Cope, 1877. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidse. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XVI, 584-585 (separates issued as Palseont. Bull. No. 24, 
Mar. 19), 1877. 

Ccenobasileus Scudder, Nomenclator Zool., pt. i, 80, 1882. 

Type: Caenobasileus tremontigerus Cope, probably from Texas. 

Extinct. Based on 'a molar tooth.' 

Csenobasileus: Kaivos, recent; fiadiXevs, king — from its size and occurrence in 
comparatively recent formations. 
Caenolestes Thomas, 1895. Marsupialia, Epanorthidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist, 6th ser., XVI, No. 95, pp. 367-368, Nov. 1, 1895. 

New name for Hyracodon Tomes, 1863, which is preoccupied by Hyracodon Leidy, 
1856, a genus of Ungulates. Type, Hyracodon fuliginosus Tomes, from Ecuador. 

Csenolestes: Kaivos, recent, modern; A^tfr?'??, robber. "The affix 'testes' is con- 
nected in mammalogy with small and ancient fossil marsupials, ... so that 
the above name may be considered to represent an existing animal with 
ancient fossil relatives. ' ' ( Thomas. ) 
Caenomys (Bravard MS.) Lydekker, 1885. Glires, Muscardinidte. 

Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., I, 225, 1885. 

Name given to a specimen of Myoxus murinus, No. 34904 of the British Museum, 
from the Lower Miocene of Puy-de-D6me, France; "entered in register as 
Csenoniys typus Brav. MS." 

Extinct. Based on "the greater portion of the left ramus of the mandible, con- 
taining the incisor and the four cheek teeth." 

Csenomys: Kaivoc,, recent; /<£?, mouse. 
Csenopithecus Rutimeyer, 1862. Primates, Adapidse. 

Neue Denkschrift Allgem. Schweiz. Gesell. gesammt. Xaturwiss., Zurich, XIX, 
(sep. pp. 88-92), Tab. v, figs. 87-88, 1862. 

Ccenopithecus Gore, Glossary Fossil Mamm., 14, 1874. 

Type: Csenopithecus lemuroides Rutimeyer, from the Eocene of Egerkingen, near 
Solothurn, Switzerland. 

Extinct. Based on part of a right upper jaw, containing the last three molars. 

Csenopithecus: klxivoc,, recent; itifir]Ko<z, ape — in allusion to the occurrence of the 
genus in Camozoic or Tertiary times. "Er giebt die erste Andeutung, dass 
in fruherer Tertiaerzeit Affen in Europa lebten" (Rutimeyer). 
Ceenopus Cope, 1880. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XIV, 611, Aug., 1880. 

Coenopus Forbes, Zool. Record for 1881, XVIII, Mamm., 21, Index p. 4, 1882. 

Type: Aceratherium miteCope, from the Oligocene (White River) of South Dakota. 

Extinct. 

Coenopus: Kaivo%, recent; itov%, foot— in allusion to the fact that the feet are 
tridactyl, as in recent rhinoceroses. 
Cainotherium Bravard, 1828. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriida\ 

Mon. Montagne de Perrier, pres d'Issoire (Puy-de-Dome), Paris, 90, 113, 1828; 
"Mon. de Genre Cainotherium, 1835" (fide Gervais, Zool. et Paleont. Fran- 
caises, 2 e ed., 160-162, pi. xxxiv, figs. 7-9, 1859). 

Caenotherium Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Index Univers., 57, 1S4(>; 2d ed., 163, 
1848; Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., II, 167-179, figs. 20-23, 1885. 

Crinotherium Filhol, Le Naturaliste, IV, 42, Mar. 15, 1882 (misprint). 

Includes two unnamed species from Montagne de Perrier, Puy-de-D6me, France. 
"M. Bravard admet trois especes de ce genre aupres d'Issoire, et, dans le cata- 
logue de la collection qu'il a recueillie pour le museum de Paris, il les appelle 
C. commune, medium, et minimum. Leurs debris sont communs a Marcoing, 
pres Volvic, et a Cournon. La premiere et la troisieme figurent deja dans sa 
Monographie du Cainotherium, qui est datee de 1835." (Gervais, 1. c, 160.) 

Extinct. 



CAINOTHERIUM CALLIGNATHUS. 151 

Cainotherium — Continued. 

CainotJierium: Kcnvos, novel, strange; Brjpiov, wild beast — possibly in allusion 
to the teeth, which were of uniform height, a character peculiar to man alone 
among existing mammals. 
Calamodon Cope, 1874. Edentata, Ganodonta, Stylinodontidse. 

Rept. Vert. Fossils New Mexico, 5-6, Nov. 28, 1874; Ann. Rept. Chief of Engi- 
neers U. S. A., App. FF 3, 593-594, 1874; Rept. U. S. Geog. Surv. West 100th 
Merid., IV, 162-170, pis. xli figs. 13-17, xlii, xliii, xliv figs. 1-6, 1877. 

Type: Calamodon simplex Cope, from the Eocene of New Mexico. 

Conicodon Cope, 1894, has been proposed to replace Calamodon in case the latter 
is considered preoccupied by Calamodus Kaup, 1829, a genus of Aves. 

Extinct, 

Calamodon: Ka.Aaj.iot;, reed; 68(hv=d8ov<;, tooth — probably in allusion to "the 
thick coating of cementum which invests those portions of the molars and 
superior incisors which are not protected by enamel. In these teeth, it is 
thicker than the enamel, and forms thickened raised borders surrounding the 
latter." (Cope, 1. c, 1877, 162.) 
Calcochloris Mivart, 1867. Insectivora, Chrysochloridse. 

Journ. Anat, & Physiology [I, No. II, 282, May, 1867— nomen nudum]; II, 
150, "No. I, Nov., 1867." 

Chalcochloris Mivart, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1871, 75; Dobson, Mon. Insec- 
tivora, pt. ii, 109, 1883; W. L. Sclater, Mamm. S. Africa, II, 168, 1901 (type). 

Type: Chrysochloris hottentotus A. Smith, from Cape Colony. 

Calcochloris (properly Chalcochloris): ^aA^o?, copper, brass; ^Acapoj, greenish 
yellow — from the characteristic color of the fur. 
Calictis Gray, 1864. Ferse, Viverridte. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 564-565; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate 
Mamm. Brit. Mus., 162-163, 1869. 

Type: Herpestes smithii Gray, from Ceylon. 

Calictis: KaAos, beautiful; iktis, weasel. 
Caliphrium Ameghino, 1895. Ungulata, Litopterna, Proterotheriidse. 

Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XV, cuad. 11-12, pp. 633-634, 1895 (sep., 33-34). 

Type: Caliphrium simplex Ameghino, from the Pyrotherium beds of Patagonia. 

Extinct. Based on the calcaneum, astragalus, and several fragments of mandib- 
ular rami with some molars. 

Caliphrium: Anagram of Licaphrium Ameghino, 1887. 
Callicebus Thomas, 1903 (see p. 718). Primates, Hapalidse. 

Callidon Gray, 1871. Cete, Physeterida^ 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 4th ser., VII, 368, 2 figs, in text, May, 1871. 

Calliodon Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. v, 1067, 1898 (misprint, in 
synonomy); C. O. Waterhouse, Index Zool., 407, 1902. 

Type: Mesoplodon guntheri Krefft, from Little Bay, near Sydney, New South Wales. 

Callidon: kcxAAi-* from KaAos, beautiful; 68(bv=d8ov$, tooth — from the form 
and surface of the tooth. 
Callignathus Gill, 1871. Cete, Physeterid;e. 

Am. Naturalist, IV, No. 12, pp. 737-738, 740 footnote, figs. 168-171, Feb., 1871. 

Type: Euphysetes simus Owen, from Vizagapatam, Madras Presidency, east coast 
of India. 

Name preoccupied by Calignathus Costa, 1853, a genus of Pisces. 

Callignathus: KtxAos, beautiful; yvaOos, jaw — "on account of the symmetrically 
rounded lower jaw " (Gill). 

* " The first part of the word in many compounds, in which the notion of beautiful 
is added to the chief or simple notion; klxAo- is much less frequent and later." 
(Lie-dell & Scott, Greek-English Lexicon). 



152 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Callinycteris Jentink, 1889. Chiroptera, Pteropodidse. 

Notes Leyden Museum, XI, Note XL, 209-212, pi. ix, figs. 1-1, Aug., 1889. 
Type: Callinycteris rosenbergii Jentink, from Gorontalo, Celebes. 
Callinycteris: KaXoi, beautiful; vvtcrspig, bat. 

Calliodon (see Callidon). Cete, Physeterida?. 

Calliope Ogilby, 1837. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1836, No. xlviii, 138, June 27, 1837; Sclater & 

Thomas, Book of Antelopes, IV, 171, 1900 (in synonymy). 
Type: Antilope strepsieeros Pallas, 1776 [ = Darnalis (S(repsiceros) capensis A. Smith, 

1834], from South Africa. 
Name preoccupied by Calliope Gould, 1836, a genus of Aves (Birds of Europe, II, 

pi. cxviii, orpt. xvi, 1836). 
Calliope: KaXos, beautiful; oip, ottos, eye, face. 

Callirhinus (see Callorhinus). . Ferce, Pinnipedia, Otariida?. 

Callistrophus Wagner, 1860. Edentata, Megatheriidpe. 

Sitzungsber. K. Bayerisch. Akad. Wiss., Mi'inchen, 1860, Heft in, 332-335; Zeit- 

schrift gesammten Naturwiss., Berlin, XVI, 388, Oct.-Nov., 1860. 
Type: Callistrophus prisons Wagner, from the elevated ' Paramos-Terrasse von 

Sisgun ' at the southeastern foot of Mount Chimborazo, 2J leagues from Rio- 

bamba, Ecuador. 
Extinct. Based on a humerus. 
Callistrophus: " KaXXi6rp6(po$, schongelenkig nach der Beschaffenheit der aus- 

sem Gelenkflache des untern Endes." 
CaUithrix Erxlebex, 1777. Primates, Hapalidae. 

Systema Regni Animalis, Mamm., 55-63, 1777; Tiedemaxx, Zoologie, I, 320, 

1808; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., XII, 456-457, Oct. 1, 1903 (type 

fixed). 
CallitrixF. Cuvier, Diet. Sci. Nat,, LIX, 399, 1829 (misprint). 
Species, 6: CaUithrix pUhecia, C.jacchus (type), C. oedipus, V. rosaMa, C.argentata, 

and C. midas, from South America. 
Callithrir:* KaXXiOpiq, with beautiful hair (KaXog, beautiful; 8/n'§, hair). 
Callocephalus (see Calocephalus). Few, Pinnipedia, Phocida?. 

Callodontomys Ameghino, 1889. Glires, Caviidae? 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamif. Fosil. Eepiib. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

Cordoba, VI, 259-260, pi. ix, fig. 27, 1889. 
Type: Callodontomys rastatus Ameghino, from the Eocene of the barrancas of the 

Rio Santa Cruz, southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. "Algunos incisivos aislados, indican la exist encia de un roedor toda- 

via desconocido, del tamano de una vizcacha." 
Callodontomys: koc\6<z, beautiful; 58ov$, oSoVro?, tooth; pvs, mouse. 
Callomenus Ameghino, 1891. Marsupialia, Epanorthidse. 

Nuevos Restos Mamif. Fos. Patagonia Austral, 20, Aug., 1891; Revista Argen- 
tina Hist, Nat, I, entr. 5a, 306, Oct. 1, 1891. 
Type: Callomenus intervalatus Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Callomenus: KaXog, beautiful; pi)v7f, moon, crescent. 

* " Le nom de CaUithrix est, dans Pline 1. VIII, c. 54, celui d'un singe d'Ethiopie, 
muni d'une barbe et d'unequeue floconneuse, qui etaitvraisemblablement 1' ouanderou. 
Buffon l'a applique arbitrairement a l'espece ci dessus," le Callithrixe (Simia solum 
L.). (Cuvier, Regne Animal, 2 e ed., 91, 1829.) 



C ALLOMYS CALLOTAKI A. 153 

Callomys D'Orbigny & Geofproy, 1830. Glires, Chinchillidse. 

Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, XXI, 289-290, Nov., 1830. 

Based on the viscacha and the chinchilla of South America. Callomys was estab- 
lished for the reception of Callomys viscacia D'Orbigny & Geoffroy, Muslaniger 
Molina, and Callomys aureus D'Orbigny & Geoffroy (—Lagidium peruanum 
Meyen, 1833?). It preoccupies Calomys Waterhouse, 1837, a subgenus of Hes- 
peromys. 

Callomys: KaXoi, beautiful; /wj, mouse. 

Callomys (see Calomys). Glires, Muridae, Cricetinae. 

Callophoca Van Beneden, 1876. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Phocidae. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. Belgique, 2e se>., XLI, 798, 1876. 
Type: Callophoca obscura Van Beneden, from the Antwerp basin, Belgium ("la 

troisieme section " ) . 
Extinct. Based on "une partie du bassin et les principaux os des membres." 
Callophoca: KaXo<;, beautiful; (pcbKrj, seal. 

Callorhinus Gray, 1859. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Otariidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1859, 359; Jordan & Clark, Rept. Fur-Seal Invest., 
pt. 3, pp. 2-4, 1899. 

CaUirhinus Gill, Arrangement Fam. Mamm., 69, 1872 (emendation). 

Callorhynchus ('Turner') Greve, Nova Acta K. Leop. Carol. Deutsch. Akad. 
Naturf., LXVI, 322, 1896. 

Type: Arctocephalus urslnus (= Phoca ursina Linnaeus), from Bering Island, Ber- 
ing Sea. 

Name preoccupied by CaUirhinus Blanchard, 1850, a genus of Coleoptera; and by 
CaUirhinus Girard, 1857, a genus of Reptilia. Replaced by Callotaria Palmer, 
1892. 

Callorhinus: /caAo;, beautiful; pi%, pivos, nose. 

Callorhynchus (' Turner') Greve, 1896. Fene, Pinnipedia, Otariidae. 

Nova Acta K. Leop.-Carol. Deutsch. Akad. Naturf., LXVI, 322, 1896. 
Evidently a lapsus for Callorhinus Gray, 1859. The name occurs only in the 
synonymy of Arctocephalus antarcticus and is erroneously credited to Turner. 
Callorhynchus: KaAos, beautiful; pvyxo%, snout. 

Callosciurus (subgenus of Sciurus) Gray, 1867. Glires, Sciuridae. 

Ann & Mag. Nat. Hist., 3d ser., XX, 277, Oct., 1867; Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. 

London, 1897, 933 (type mentioned). 
Type: Sciurus rafflesii Vigors & Horsrield, 1828 (=S. prevostii Desmarest, 1820), 

from Sumatra. 
Callosciurus: xaAos, beautiful; -{-Sciurus — probably from the colors of the pelage. 

Callospermophilus (subg. of Spermophilus) Merriam, 1897. Glires, Sciuridae. 

Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XI, 189 footnote, July 1, 1897; N. Am. Fauna No. 16, 

p. 90, Oct. 28, 1899 (raised to generic rank). 
Type: Sciurus lateralis Say, from the Arkansas River near Canon City, Colorado. 
Callospermophilus: kocAoc,, beautiful; + Spermophilus. 

Callotaria Palmer, 1892. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Otariidae. 

Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., VII, 156, July 27, 1892; Stejneger, Bull. U. S. Fish 

Comm., XVI, for 1896, 20, 60, 66, 1897. 
Collotaria Allen, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., VII, 187, June 19, 1895 (misprint). 
New name for Callorhinus Gray, 1859, which is preoccupied by CaUirhinus 

Blanchard, 1850, a genus of Coleoptera; and by CaUirhinus Girard, 1857, a 

genus of Reptilia. 
Callotaria: KaAos, beautiful; -j-Otaria, a genus of fur seals. 



154 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Callotus Gray, 1863. Primates, Lemuridse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1863, 145. 

Type: Galago monteiri (Bartlett MS.) Gray, from Angola, West Africa. 
Callotus: kcxXos, beautiful; ovi, &?ros, ear — from the long membranaceous ears. 

Calocephalus F. Cuviee, 1826. Ferse, Pinnipedia, Phocidse. 

f Callocephale ' F. Cuvier, Mem. Mus. Hist. Nat. , Paris, XI, 182-190, pi. 12, 1824] ; 

Diet. Sci. Nat., XXXIX, 543-548, 1826 (in article 'Phoques'); Lesson, 

Compl. (Euvres Buffon, IV, 352, 1834. 
Calocephala Blyth, in Cuvier' s Animal Kingdom, 1840, 98; new ed., 1849, 98; 

new ed., 1863, 86. 
Callocephalus Heuglin, Reisen Nordpolarmeer, III, 56, 1874. 
Type: Phoca vitulina Linmeus, from the Atlantic Ocean. 
Calocephalus: KaXos, beautiful; KEcpaXi), head. 

Calodontotherium Roth, 1903. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Homalodontotheriidpe. 
Revista Mus. La Plata, XI, 148-150, 1903. 
Species: Calodontotherium palmeri Roth (type), and C. uarietatum Roth, from the 

upper 'Cretaceous' of Lago Musters, Territory of Chubut, Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on part of the upper jaw containing two molars. 
Calodontotherium: KocXos, beautiful; bSovc,, bdovvos, tooth: Qrfpiov, wild beast. 

Calogale Gray, 1864. Fenr, Viverridse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 560-564; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate 
Mamm. Brit. Mus., 157-161, 1869; Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1882, 63 
(type fixed). 

Galogale Wallace, Geog. Dist. Animals, II, 195, 1876 (misprint). 

Species, 14: Herpestes nyula Hodgson, from Nepal; II. nepalensis Gray (type), from 
Nepal; II. rutilus Gray, from Cambodia; H. microcephalus Temminck (hab. 
unknown); H. sanguineus Ruppell, from Abyssinia; Calogale grantii Gray, 
from East Africa; Herpestes mutgigella Ruppell, from Abyssinia; H. ornatus 
Peters, from East Africa; H. punctulatus Gray, from East Africa; //. mektnura 
(Gray), from West Africa; H. badius A. Smith, from South Africa; Calogale 
venatica Gray, from East Africa; Herpestes gracilis Ruppell, from Abyssinia; 
and //. thysanurus Wagner, from India. 

Calogale: kocXos, beautiful; yocXff, weasel. 

Calomys (subgenus of Mus) Waterhouse, 1837. Glires, Muridse, Cricetinse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. l, Nov. 21, 1837, 21; Jordan, Man. Vert. Animals 

North. IT. S., 5th ed., 321, 1888. 
Callomys Gray, List. Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., 112, 1843 (raised to generic rank). 
Type: Mus ( ('alum;/*) bimaculatus Waterhouse, from Maldonado, Uruguay. 
Name preoccupied by Callomys D'Orbigny & Geoffroy, 1830, a genus of Chin- 

chillida?. 
Calomys: KaXos, beautiful; MV5, mouse. 

Caloprymnus Thomas, 1888. Marsupialia, Macropodidse. 

Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 114-116, Nov. 3, 1888. 
Type: Bettongia rampestris Gould, from South Australia. 
Caloprymnus: klxXos, beautiful; 7tpv/.iva, stern. 

Calops Marsh, 1894. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Protoceratidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci., 3d ser., XLVIII, No. 283, p. 94, July, 1894. 
Type: Calops cristatus Marsh, from the Oligocene (eastern Miohippus beds) of 

South Dakota. 
Extinct. Based on a ' skull in fair preservation.' 
Calops: k<xX6%, beautiful, wip, face. 



CALOTRAGUS CAMELOMERYX. 155 

Calotrag-us Sundevall, 1846. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

K. Vetensk. Akad. Handlingar, Stockholm, for 184-4, 192, pi. xm., figs. 5 and 6, 
1846; Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, II, pt. v, 33, pi. xxvii, fig. 1, 
Jan., 1896. 

Type: Cervus iragulus Forster (=Antttope campestris Thunberg) , from western cen- 
tral Africa. 

Calotragus: KaXog, beautiful; rpdyoe,, goat. 
Calpostemma (see Colpostemma) . Glires, Chinchillidee. 

Caluromys Allen, 1900. Marsupialia, Didelphyidee. 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist. N. Y., XIII, 189-190, Oct. 12, 1900. 

Species, 11: Caluromys philander (=Didelphis philander Linmeus, type), from 
Guiana and northeastern Brazil; C. cicur (Bangs), from northeastern Colombia; 
C. affinis (Wagner), from Matto Grosso, Brazil; C. trinitaMs (Thomas), from 
Trinidad; C. derbianus (Waterhouse) , from Central America; C. derbianus 
ornalus (Tschudi), from Peru; C. lawyer (Desmarest), from Paraguay; C. lanir 
ger guayanus (Thomas), from western Ecuador; C. laniger pallidus (Thomas), 
from northwestern Panama; C. cinereus (Desmarest), from southeastern Brazil; 
C. alstoni (Allen), from Costa Rica. (See Philander Brisson, 1762.) 

Caluromys: Ka\6$, beautiful; ovpa, tail; //us, mouse. 
Caluxotherium (see Cayluxotherium). Insectivora, Erinaceidfe. 

Calydonius Meyer, 1846. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suida?. 

Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogie, 1846, 467. 

Species: Calydonius trux Meyer, and C. tener Meyer, from Chaux-de-fonds, De- 
partement du Doubs, France. 

Extinct. 

Calydonius: KaA.v8d)vio<;, Calydonian, surname of Meleager, who brought about 

the celebrated chase of the Calydonian boar. In mythology " the Calydonian 

boar sent by the enraged Diana and killed by Meleager (Mart. 11, 19)." 

( Century Diet. ) 

Calyptophractus Fitzinger, 1871. Edentata, Dasypodida?. 

Sitzungsb. Math.-Naturw. CI., K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, LXIV, pt. 1, 388-390, 1871. 

Type: Chlamyphorus returns Burmeister, from Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia. 

( 'alyptophr actus is antedated by Burmeisteria Gray, 1865, which was based on 
the same species. 

Calyptophractus: kocXviztoc,, covered; (ppaKroc,, protected — in allusion to the 
carapace or shield composed of horny plates which protects the animal. 
Calyptrocebus (subgenus of Cebus) Reichenbach, 1862. Primates, Cebidse. 

Yollstiind. Naturgesch. Affen, 55, pis. vi-vii, figs. — , 1862. 

Species 14, from South America: Cebus hypoleucus Geoff roy, C. capucinus (Lin- 
naeus), C. gracilis Spix, C. nigrovittatus Natterer, C. libidlnosus Spix, < '.paraguay- 
anus (Fischer), C. barbatus Geoffroy, C. albus Geoffroy, Calbifrons Geoffroy, C. 
apella Erxleben, C. olivaceus Schomburgk, C. chrysopus Cuvier, C. versicolor 
Pucheran, and < '. trepidus Erxleben. 

Calyptrocebus: KaXvitrpa, covering veil; + Cebus — in allusion to the markings 
on the head, which in some species resemble a skull cap. 
Cameleopardalis (see Camelopardalis). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Girafhdse. 

Camelomeryx Scott, 1898. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agriochceridse. 

Proc. Am. Philos, Soc, XXXYII, 77-78, Apr. 15, 1898 (sep. pp. 5-6); Matthew, 
Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist. N. Y., XII, 50, 1899. 

Type: Camelomeryx longiceps Scott, from the Uinta Basin, northeastern Utah. 

Extinct. 

Camelomeryx: Ka.fxrjXo<;, camel; fippv'q, ruminant. 



15(5 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Camelopardalis Schreber, 1784. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Girafnda?. 

Schreber' s Saugthiere, pi. cclv, 1784; "Boddaert, Elench. Anim., 133, 1785;" 

Gmelix, Linnaeus' Systema Naturae, 13th ed., 181-182, 1788. 
Cameleopardalis Bonaparte, Dist. Met. Anim. Vert., 24, 1831. 
Type: Camelopardalis giraffa Schreber (—Cervus camelopardalis Linnaeus), from 

northeast Africa. (See Giraffa Brisson, 1762.) 
Camelopardalis: Kaji?/Ao7rdp8aAi$, giraffe (from Kaptr/Xos, camel; napdaXi?, 

leopard) — in allusion to its size and markings. 
Canielops Leidy, 1854. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Camelidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1854, No. v, 172-173. 
Type: Camelops kansanus Leidy, from the Pleistocene gravel drift of 'Kansas 

Territory. ' 
Extinct. Based on "the left intermaxillary bone, containing the fang of a 

tooth and a small portion of the corresponding maxillary bone." 
Camelops: Ka/n/Aos, camel; oip, aspect — in allusion to its camel-like characters, 

although the genus is considered distinct from both the camel and the llama. 

Camelotheriurn Bravard, 1857. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Camelida?. 

"Observ. Geol. sur le Bassin de La Plata, Buenos Aires, 1857"; "Cat. Especes 

Anim. Foss. recueillis dans l'Amerique du Sud, Parana, 1860" (tide Gervais, 

Zool. etPaleont. Gen., 1° ser., 133, 140, 1867-69). 
Species, 3 (nomina nuda?): Camelotheriurn magnum Bravard, C. medium Bravard, 

and C. mi mix Bravard, from the Pampas formation of the Rio de la Plata. 
Extinct. 
Camelotheriurn: Ka.pijA.os, camel: Bypiov, wild beast. 

Camelus Linx.eis, 1758. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Camelida?. 

Systema Naturae, 10th ed, I, 65-66, 1758; 12th ed., I, 90-91, 1766; Brisson, Reg- 

num Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 12, 31-35, 1762; Hay, Cat. Foss. 

Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 680, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species, 4: ( 'amelus dromedarius Linnaeus (type), and C. bactrianus Linnaeus, from 

Africa; C. glaum Linnaeus, and C. pacos Linmeus, from South America. 
('aim Ins.- Lat. camelus, from kccuijAoc, camel. 
Camphotherium FiLnoL, 1884. Insectivora, Talpidse? 

Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, 7" ser., VIII, No. 2, for 1883-84, 62-63, 1884; 
Comphotherium Filhol, Mem. Soc. Sci. Phys. Nat. Toulouse, 1884, 11-13, pi. n, 

tigs. 17-20; W. L. Sclater, Zool. Record for 1886, XXIII, Mamm., 13, 49, 1887; 

Fiawer & Lydekkek, Mamm., Living & Extinct, 621, 1891. 
Gomphotherium Filhol, 1. c. Mem. Soc. Toulouse, 1884; Schlosser, Die Affen, 

Lemuren, Chiropteren, Insectivoren Europ. Tertiars, Theil III, 69, 1890. 
Type: Camphotherium elegans Filhol, from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 
Extinct. Based on 'deux maxillaires inferieurs.' 
Campicola (subgenus of Arvicola) Schulze, 1890. Glires, Murid;e, Microtinae. 

Schriften Xaturwiss. Ver. Harzes in Wernigerode, V, 24-25, 1890; Zeitschrift 

Naturwiss., LXVI, 159, 1893. 
Species, 3: Arvicola subterraneus Selys, A. arvalis Griffith, and .1. campedris IUasius, 

from Europe. 
Name preoccupied by Campicola Swainson, 1827, a genus of Aves. 
Campicola: Lat. campus, field; colo, to live in — from the animal's habitat. 
Campsiurus Link, 1795. Fe^ee, Procyoniche. 

Beytr. Naturgesch., I, pt. ii, 52, 87, 1795. 
Species, 3: Campsiurus lotor, < '. cancrivorus, and C.flavus ( = Virerra caudivolvula 

Schreber), from America. 
Campsiurus: Kaptf>iovpo$, bending the tail — in allusion to the prehensile tail of 

one of the species, Viverra caudivolvula. 



CAMPSODELPH1S CAPEREA. 157 

Carnpsodelphis (see Champsodelpliis ). Cete, Platanistidse. 

Camptomus Marsh, 1889. Allotheria, Plagiaulacidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXVIII, 87. pi. v, figs. 1-2, 18-23, July, 1889. 

Type: Camptomus ampin* Marsh, from the Cretaceous (Laramie) of Wyoming. 

Extinct. "Represented by the several parts of the skeleton, and fragments of 

teeth." 
Camptomus: Ktxmtzuc, bent, flexible; (o/wc, shoulder — probably in reference to 

the scapula, which has an articular facet for a distinct coracoid. 
Canicula Datjbenton? 1782. Glires, Sciuridse? 

Encyclop. Method., I, 41, 1782 (ex Rzaczinsky). 
Includes " Canicula subterranea de Rzaczinsky, espece de belette ou de gros rat, 

nomine zemni . . . animal du meme genre que le zizel. Le zizel . . . est 

nomine cititius ou citellus dans le latin" (Ibid., 318, .">2in. 
Canicula: Dim. of Lat. canis, dog. 
Canimartes Cope, 1892. Ferse, Canidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XXVI, 1029, Dec., 1892. 
Type: < 'animartes cumminsii ( 'ope, from the Pliocene (Blanco beds) of the eastern 

front of the Staked Plains, Texas. 
Extinct. 

Canimartes: Canis Martes. 
Canis Lixn.kis, 1758. Ferae, Canidse. 

Systema Naturae, 10th ed., I, 38-41, 1758; 12th ed., I, 56-60, L766; Brisson, 

Regnum Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 13, 169-175, 1762; W. L. 

Sclatek, Mamm. 8. Africa, I, 92-97, 1900 (type fixed). 
Species, 7: Canis familiaris Linnaeus (type), C. lupus Linnaeus, C.hysena Linnaeus, 

C. vulpes Linnaeus, C. alopex Linnaeus, C. lagopus Linnaeus, and C. minus 

Linnaeus, from Eurasia. 
Canis: Lat., dog. 
Cannabateomys (see Kannabateomys). ( Hires, < >ctodontidae. 

Capaccinius Bonaparte, 1841. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae. 

Icon. Fauna Italica, I (1832-41) [fasc. xx, 1837, VespertUAo capacemii], under 

Indice Distributive, 1841* [p. iv]. 
Capaecinus Gray, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 3d ser., XVII, 90, Feb., 1866. 
Type: Capaccinius megapodius Bonaparte ( = Vespertilio capacdnii Bonaparte), 

from Italy. 
( 'apaccinius: In honor of Francesco Capaccini, (if Rome, Under Secretary of State 

for Foreign Affairs about 1833-34, a patron and subscriber to Bonaparte's 

' Iconografia della Fauna Italica.' 
Capella Keyserling & Blasius, 1840. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Wirbelthiere Europa's, pp. iv, 9, 28, 1840. 

( 'aprella Marshall, in Trouessart's Geog. Verbreit. Tiere, 66, 1892 (misprint). 
Type: Capra rupicapra Linnaeus, from the Alps of Europe. See Rupicapra Blain- 

ville, 1816. 
Capella: Lat., she-goat. 
Caper Frisch, 1775. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Das Natur-System vierfiiss. Thiere, in Tabellen, Tab. Gen., 1775. 
Type: 'Der Ziegenbock,' from Eurasia. (See Capra. Linnaeus, 1758.) 
Caper: Lat., he-goat. 
Caperea (subgenus of Balsena) Gray, 1864. Cete, Bahenidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 202-203, fig. 2; Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 3d ser., 

XIV, 349, Nov., 1864 (raised to generic rank). 

* For date of introduction, see Salvadori, Boll. Mus. Zool. & Anat. Comp., Torino, 
III, No. 48, pp. 1-2, 



158 INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 

Caperea — Continued. 

Type: Balsena (Caperea) antipodarum Gray, from Otago, New Zealand. 
Caperea: Lat. capero, to wrinkle — from the 'rugulose' character of the tympanic 

bone. 
Capiguara Liais, 1872. Glires, Caviidae. 

Climate, Geol., Faune et Geog. Botanique du Bresil, 545, 1872. 
New name for Hydrocliarus Brisson, 1762. "Nous adopterons done comme nom 

gen6rique le vrai nom indien, et nous prendrons pour designation scientifique 

de l'espece vivante le nom de Capiguara americana." 
Capiguara: Native name from capi or capim, herb; guar a, a tense of the verb u 

signifying one who eats — hence an 'herb eater.' (Liais.) 
Capra Linnaeus, 1758. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Systema Nature, 10th ed., 68-70, 1758; 12th ed., 94-97, 1766; Ogilby, Proc. Zool. 

Soc. London, for 1836, No. xlviii, 137, June 27, 1837 (type fixed). 
Species, 12: Capra hircus Linnaeus (type), and C. ibex Linnaeus, from Europe; C. 

rupicapra Linnaeus, from the Alps; C. depressa Liniueus, and C. reversa Linnaeus, 

from America; C. pygmica Linnaeus, from Guinea; C. gazella Linnaeus, and C. 

cervicapra Linnaeus, from India; C. dor'cas Linnaeus, and C. grimmki Linnaeus, 

from Africa; C. mambrica Linnaeus, from India; and C. amnion Linnaeus, from 

Siberia. 
Capra: Lat., she-goat. 
Caprea Ogilby, 1837. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1836, No. xlviii, 135, June 27, 1837. 
Type: Caprea capreolus, from Europe. See Capreolus Frisch, 1775. 
Caprea: Lat. , wild goat, roedeer. 
Caprella Marshall, 1892. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Marshall, in Trouessart's Geog. Verbreit, Tiere, 66, 1892. 
Misprint for Cipella Keyserling & Blasius, 1840. 
Name preoccupied by Caprella Lamarck, 1801, a genus of Crustacea. 
Capreolus Frisch, 1775. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Das Natur-System vierfiiss. Thiere, in Tabellen, 3, Tab. Gen., 1775; Gray, Lon- 
don Med. Repos., XV, No. 88, p. 307, Apr. 1, 1821. 
Type: 'DasRehe,' Cervus capreolus Linnaeus, from Europe. 
Capreolus: Lat., wild goat, roebuck; dim. of capreus, wild goat. 
Capricornis Ogilby, 1837. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1836, No. xlviii, 139, June 27, 1837. 
Type: AntUope thar Hodgson, from the Himalayas, India. 
Capricornis: Lat. capricornus, steinbok, ibex (from caper, goat; cornu, horn) — 

i. e., with goat-like horns. 
Capricornulus Heude, 1898. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Mem. Hist, Nat. Empire Chinois, IV, pt. 1, 13, 1898. 
Species, 3: AntUope crispa Temminck & Schlegel, Capricornis pryerianus Heude, 

and ( '. saxicola Heude, from the island of Nipon, Japan. 
Capricornulus: Dim. of capricornus, capricorn, having a goat's horns. 
Caprina (subg. of AntUope) Wagner, 1844. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Suppl. Schreber's Siiugthiere, IV, pp. xi, 457-464, 1844. 
Species, 6: AntUope sumatrensis Shaw, from Sumatra; A. goral Hardwuke, from 

Nepal; A. thar Hodgson, from central Nepal ; A. crispa Temminck, from Japan; 

A. lanigera H. Smith, from the Rocky Mountains; and J., rupicapra (Linnaeus), 

from the Alps, Europe. 
Name preoccupied by Caprina Matheron, 1842, a genus of Mollusca. 
Caprina: Lat., pertaining to goats, goat-like — in allusion to the animals' habits 

and mode of life. 



CAPRIOS CARCINODON. 159 

Caprios Wagler, 1830. Insectivora, Talpidae. 

Nat Syst Amphibien, 14, 1830. 
New name for Mygale Cuvier, 1800, which is said to be preoccupied in entomology 

[by Mygale Latreille, 1802 (?) a genus of Arachnida]. 
Caprios: Ka.7tpio<;, like a wild boar — ' qui rostrum porci instar habet.' (Wagler. ) 

Capriscus Gloger, 1841. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxii, 130, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat. Hist, 6th ser., XV, 191, 193, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Type: Sus papuensis Lesson & Garnot, from New Guinea. 
Name preoccupied by Capriscus Rafinesque, 1810, a genus of Pisces. 
( 'apriscus: Kaitpi6Ko<;, dim. of xanpoc,, wild boar. 

Caprolag-us Blytii, 1845. Glires, Leporidae. 

Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, XIV, pt i, No. 160, 247-249, 1 pi., Jan.-June, 1845. 

Onpolagus Gray, Ann. & Mag. Nat, Hist., 3d ser., XX, 225, Sept, 1867 (mis- 
print). 

Type: Lepus hispidus Pearson, from Assam, India. 

Caprolagus: Kaitpoe,, wild boar; \aycb<z, hare — probably in allusion to the coarse, 
bristly fur. 

Capromeryx Matthew, 1902. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae? 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., N. Y., XVI, 318-319, Sept. 25, 1902. 
Type: Capromeryx furcifer Matthew, from the Pleistocene of Hay Springs, near 

the Niobrara River, Nebraska. 
Extinct, Based on "a small jaw containing p 2 -m 3 ." 
Capromeryx: Capra; /n'/pvc, ruminant. 

Caproniys Desmarest, 1822. Glires, Octodontidae. 

Bull. Sci. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, 185-188, Dec, 1822; Mem. Soc. Hist. Nat., 
I, for Dec, 1822, 57-60, 1823; Waterhouse, Nat Hist. Mamm., II, Rodentia, 
286-294, 1848. 

Type: Capromys fournieri Desmarest (=Isodon pilorides Say), from Cuba. 

Capromys: Kaitpoe,, wild boar; /.tvs, mouse — from the animal's alleged resem- 
blance to a wild boar in general appearance, character of hair, color, and man- 
ner of running. M. Desmarest "propose de lui donner le nom de Capromys, 
voulant indiquer par cette designation un certain rapport d'aspect, que les 
poiles grossiers de ces animaux, leurs couleurs generates, la maniere dont ils 
courent, etc., leur donnent avec les sangliers." 

Caprovis Hodgson, 1847. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, XVI, pt. n, new ser., No. 7, 702-704, July-Dec, 1847. 
Type: Ovis musimon (Pallas), from Corsica or Sardinia. 
Caprovis: < 'apra-\- Ovis. 

Caracal Gray, 1843. Ferae, Felidae. 

[Caracala Gray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., p. xx, 1843 — nomen nudum]; 

Ibid., p. 46; Proc Zool. Soc. London, 1867, 277; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & 

Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 38, 1869. 
Type: Caracal melanotis Gray (=Felis caracal Schreber) , from Africa. 
Caracal: French caracal — "said to be from Turkish qara qulaq; qara, black, 

qulaq, ear. ' ' ( Century Diet. ) 

Carcarotherium (see Cadurcotherium ) . Ungulata, Amynodontidae. 

Carcinodon Scott, 1892. Creodonta, Uintacyonidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Nov. 29, 1892, 323. 

Type: Mioclienus filholianus Cope, from the Puerco Eocene of New Mexico. 

Extinct. 



160 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Carcinodon — Continued. 

Carcinodon: KapKivoc,, crab (in the sense of claw); odchy—ddovg, tooth — in 
allusion to the lower molars, which "increase in size posteriorly and, when 
viewed from the side, the trigonid is seen to curve forward and the talon back- 
ward, which gives the crown a claw-like shape." 
Cardiatherium Ameghino, 1883. Glires, Caviidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, V, entr. 3, pp. 270-274, 1883. 

Cardiotherium Ameghino, Cont. Conocimiento Mamif. Fusil. Repiib. Argentina, in 
Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 242-249, pis. xn, fig. 32; xxn, figs. 7-12, 
16-17, 22; xxiv, figs. 1-3; xxv, figs. 4-7, 1889. 

Type: Cardiaiherium doeringi Ameghino, from the barrancas del Parana, Entre 
Rios, Argentina. 

Extinct. Based on the second and third lower molars. 

Cardiotherium: Kapdia, heart; Bijpiov, wild beast. " Por la estruetura particular 
de las muelas . . . en forma de corazon." (Ameghino.) 
Cardioderma (subg. of Megaderma) Peters, 1873. Chiroptera, Megadermatidae. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. "Wiss. Berlin, June, 1873, 488; Dobson, Cat. 
Chiroptera Brit. Mus., 155, 1878. 

Type: Megaderma car Peters, from Abyssinia. 

Cardioderma: Kapdia, heart; dep/na, skin — from the 'cordiform' base of the 
central longitudinal crest of the nose-leaf. 

Cardiodon Ameghino, 1885. Glires, Caviidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac Cien. Cordoba, VIII, entr. 1, pp. 61-65, 1885; Cont. Conocimiento 

Mamif. Fosil. Repiib. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 237- 

238, pi. xxn, fig. 16, 1889. 
Species: Cardiodon mar&hii Ameghino (type), and C. {?) leidyi Ameghino, from 

the barrancas del Parana, Argentina. 
Name preoccupied by Cardiodon Owen, 1841, a genus of Reptilia; and by Cardiodus 

Bravard, 1857, a genus of Caviidae. Replaced by Eucardiodon, Ameghino, 1891. 
Cardiodon: Kapdia, heart; 68cbv = o8ov<z, tooth. 

Cardiodus Bravard, 1857. (Hires, Caviidae. 

"Observ. Geol. sur le Bassin de La Plata, Buenos Aires, 1857;" "Cat. Especes 

Anim. Foss. recueillis dans l'Amerique du Sud (Broch. lithogr., 5 pp., 4°), 

Parana, 1860" (fide Gervais, Zool. et Paleont. Gen., l e ser., 131, 1867-69); 

Trouessart, Cat. Mamm. Viv. et Foss., Rodentia, in Bull. Soc. d' Etudes Sci. 

d'Angers, X, 196, 1881. 
Species, 4: Cardiodus waterhousii Bravard, C. medius Bravard, C. minus Bravard, 

and C. dubius Bravard, from the Pliocene of the La Plata basin, Argentina. 
Extinct. 
Cardiodus; KapSia, heart; oSovs, tooth. 

Cardiomys Ameghino, 1885. Glires, Caviidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, VIII, entr. 1, pp. 59-61, 1885; Cont. Conocimi- 
ento Mamif. Fosil. Repiib. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 
236-237, pi. xxn, figs. 18-19, 1889. 

Type: Cardiomys cavinus Ameghino, from the barrancas del Parang, Argentina. 

Extinct. Based on the first left lower molar. 

Cardiomys: KapSia, heart; /*£?, mouse — in allusion to the three triangular prisms 
of the first lower molar. 

Cariacus (subgenus of Cervus) Lesson, 1842. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 
Nouv. Tableau Regne Anim., Mamm., 173, 1842; Gray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit, 
Mus., pp. xxvii, 175, 1843 (raised to generic rank); Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 
1850, 237. 



CARIACUS CAROLODARWINIA. 161 

Cariacus — Continued. 

Species, 9: < 'ervm rirginiauus Boddaert, from eastern North America; C. paludosus 
Desmarest, from Paraguay; C. mexicanus Gmelin, from Mexico; C. campestris 
F. Cuvier, from Paraguay; C. macrotis Say, from New Mexico; C. leucurus 
Douglas, from the Columhia River; C. clavatus H. Smith, from America; C. 
nemoralis H. Smith, from Central America, and C. nanus Lund, from Brazil. 

Name antedated by Odocoileus Rahnesque, 1832; and by Dorcelaphus Gloger, 1841. 

Cariacus: Cariaeou, native name of a South American deer. 
Carolibergia Mercerat, 1899. Ungulata, Toxodontia, Toxodontidfe. 

Anal. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires, VII (ser. 2, IV), 1-23, pis. 1-3, Aug. 18, 1899; 
Ameghino, 1. c, VII, 395, 1902. 

Type: Carolibergia azulensis Mercerat, from the 'Campode Santa Catalina,' 7 kilo- 
meters south of Azul, Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Extinct. Based on "un crane, . # . . une portion tres reduite de la region orbitaire 
antero-supt'rieure droite, et quelques plaques insignifiantes de bandes d'email 
des molaires superieures, " et une molaire inferieure. 

"Les pieces qui ont servi pour la redaction de ce memoire se conservent dans ce 
Musee on j'ai eu l'occasion de les examiner. Ann de ne pas encombrer la 
nomenclature avec un nom qui n'a pas de raison d'etre, comme paleontologiste 
et comme Directeur du Musee, je me trouve dans la penible obligation de 
communiquer aux paltkmtologistes, que ce genre Carolibergia n' existe pas. . . . 
Carolibergia azulensis est fondee sur les debris d'un jeune Toxodon platensis dans 
lequel F incisive superieure interne ou premiere etait dejii bien d^veloppee et 
en fonction tandis que la deuxieme etait encore enfermee dans 1' alveole." 
(Ameghino, 1. c, p. 395.) 

Carolibergia: In honor of Dr. Carlos Berg, 1843-1902, Director of the Museo 
Nacional, Buenos Aires, 1892-1902; author of many papers, chiefly on ento- 
mology. 
Carollia Gray, 1838. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatida?. 

Jardine's Mag. Zool. & Bot., II, No. 12, 488, 1838. 

Type: Carollia braziliensis Gray (=Phyttostoma brachyotum Maximilian), from 
Brazil. 

Name preoccupied by Carolia Cantraine, 1837, a genus of Mollusca. (See Semi- 
derma Gervais, 1855. ) 

Carollia: Lat., Charles — possibly in honor of Charles Lucien Bonaparte, 1803- 
57, Prince of Canino, and of Musignano, author of ' Iconografia della Fauna 
Italica,' Rome, 1832-41. 
Caroloameghinia Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata ( Carol oameghinidse). 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 354-355, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 8-9). 

Species: Caroloameghinia ma ter Ameghino, and C. tenue Ameghino, from the 'Cre- 
taceous ' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Caroloameghinia: In honor of Carlos Ameghino, who collected much of the mate- 
rial described by his brother, Dr. Florentino Ameghino, director of the Museo 
Nacional, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Carolodarwinia Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Leontiniidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 406, July, 1901 (sep. p. 60). 

Type: Carolodanvinia pyramidentata Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Pata- 
gonia. 

Extinct. 

Carolodarwinia: In honor of Charles Robert Darwin, 1809-82, author of 'The 
Origin of Species,' 1859, 'Descent of Man,' 1871, etc. 

7501— No. 23—03 11 



162 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Carolozittelia Ameghino, 1901. . Ungulata ( Carolozittelidfe ) . 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 388-389, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 42-43). 
Species: Carolozittelia tapiroides Ameghino, and C. eluta Ameghino, from the 

' Cretaceous ' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Carolozittelia: In honor of Dr. Karl Alfred Zittel, 1839 — , professor of geology 

and paleontology at the University of Munich; author of 'Handbueh der 

Palaeontologie,' 1892-93. 
Carpolagus (see Caprolag-us ) . ( Hires, Leporidse. 

Carpomys Thomas, 1895. Glires, Muridae, Murinpe. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XVI, 161-162, Aug., 1895; Trans. Zool. Soc. 

London, XIV, pi vi, 406-408, pis. xxxiv, xxxvi figs. 3, 6, June, 1898. 
Type: Carpomys melanurus Thomas, from Monte Data (alt. 7,000-8,000 ft.), north- 
ern Luzon, Philippine Islands. 
Carpomys: Kapitoz, fruit; //£?, mouse. 
Carponycteris Lyoekker, 1891. Chiroptera, Pteropodidse. 

Lydekker, in Flower & Lydekker's Mamm., Living & Extinct, 654, 1891; 

Blanford, Fauna Brit. India, Mamm., 265-266, fig. 78, 1891. 
New name for Macroglossus Schinz, 1824, which is preoccupied by Macroglossum 

Scopoli, 1777, a genus of Lepidoptera; 
Name antedated by Kiodotus Blyth, 1840. 
Carponycteris: Kocpitoz, fruit; vvKrepic, bat — from its food, which comprises 

' fruit of every description. ' ( Blanford. ) 
Carterodon AVaterhouse, 1848. Glires, Octodontidae. 

Nat, Hist, Mamm., II, 351-354, pi. 16, figs. 7 a-c, 1848. 
Type: Echimys sulcidens Lund, from fhe bone caves of Lagoa Santa, Minas Geraes, 

Brazil. The genus was based on fossil skulls in the collection of the British 

Museum from the same district in Brazil. It has since been found liYing. 

(Winge, E Museo Lundii, I (b), p. 73, 1888.) 
Carterodon: Kaprepos, strong; 6§d>v = 6Sov<;, tooth — in allusion to the molar 

teeth as compared with those of Echimys. 
[Caryoderma Cope, 1886. Reptilia, Testudinata. 

Am. Naturalist, XX, 1044-1046, De<\. 1886; Williston, Science, N. S., VIII, 132, 

July 29, 1898. 
Type: Caryoderma snovianum Cope, from the Miocene (Loup Fork) of northern 

Kansas. Originally described as an Edentate, but subsequently shown by 

Williston to be a tortoise. 
Extinct, Based on 'a portion of the dermal skeleton.' 
Caryoderma: K&pvov, nut; depjiicx, skin — in allusion to "the fact that a portion 

of the carapace is represented by osseous nuclei only which do not articulate 

with each other " (Cope).] 
Casoryx (see Cosoryx). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Castor Linn,eus, 1758. Glires, Castoridse. 

Systema Nature, 10th ed., I, 58-59, 1758; 12th ed., I, 78-79, 1766; Brissmx, 

Kegnum Animale, in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 13, 90-93, 1762. 
Species: Castor fiber Linnaeus (type), from Eurasia; and C. moschatus Linnaeus, 

from southern Russia. 
Castor: Lat,, beaver; irom Kadroop, beaver. 

Castoroides Foster, 1838. Glires, Castoroididae. 

Second Ann. Rept. Geol. Survey Ohio, 80-83, 4 figs, in text, 1838. 
Type: Castoroides ohioensis Foster, from the Pleistocene of Nashport, Muskingum 
Comity, Ohio. 



CASTOROIDES CATOBLEPAS. 163 

Castoro'ides — Continued. 

The name seems to have been suggested by Harlan in a letter to Foster (quoted 

on p. 82). Harlan says: "If you should conclude to construct a new genus, 

how would Castoroides answer for a name?" 
Extinct. Based on 'the right half of two under jaws.' 
Castoroides: Castor; si8o%, form. 

Castoromys Pomel, 1854. Glires, Castoridse. 

Gat. Meth. Vert. Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 23, 1854; Gervais, Zool. et Pal. 

Francaises, 2 P ed., 22, 1859 (under Chalicomys) . 
Type: Chalicomys sigmodus < Jervais, from the Pliocene of Montpellier, France. 
Extinct. 
Castoromys: Castor; itvs, mouse — from the sigmoid enamel folds of the lower 

molars. 

Castylops (see Oatasty lops). Tillodontia, Xotostylopidre. 

Catablepas Gray, 1821. Ungulata, <tt.rtiodactyla, Bovidse. 

London Med. Repos., XV, 307, Apr. 1, 1821. 
Catoblepas II. Smith, Griffith's Cuvier, Anim. Kingdom, IV, 366-372, 1 pi. and 

1 fig. unnumbered, 1827. 
Type: AntUope gnu Gmelin, from South Africa. (See Connochaetes Liechtenstein, 

1814.) 
Catablepas: Lat., Catoblepas; (Jr., KarojfJXftp; lit., 'down looker;' a name used 

by Pliny for an African animal, perhaps the gnu (from KarafiXsitGo, to look 

down, to examine). 

Cataphractus Brissox, 1762. Edentata, Dasypodidse. 

Regnum Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 12, 23-28, 1762; Storr, Pro- 

dromus Methodi Mamm., 40, Tab. B, 1780. 
Species, 7: Armadillo, Armadillo oHentalis, A. indicus, A. mexicanus, A. brasilianus, 

A. guianensis, and A. africanus. 
Cataphractus: Kard^fjaKrog, mailed, clad in full armor — in allusion to the 

armordike or scaly protective covering of the animals. 

Catastylops Ameghixo, 1901. Tillodontia, Notostylopidse. 

Bol. Acad. Xac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 421, July, 1901 (sep., p. 75). 
Castylops Lydekker, Zool. Record for 1901, XXXVIII, Mamm., 38, Index New 

Genera, 3, 1902 (misprint). 
Type: Catastylops pendens Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Catastylops: Kara, down, downwards; drvXui, pillar; otp J aspect. 

Catathlseus Cope, 1881. Ungulata, Amblypoda, Periptychidae. 

Paleont. Bull. No. 33, p. 487, 1881; Am. Naturalist, XV, for Oct., 829-830, Sept. 

22, 1881; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XIX, 487-488, Oct, 21, 1881; Tert, Vert., 387, 

1885 (under Periptychus — date of publication) . 
Type: Catathlseus rhabdodon Cope, from the lowest Eocene beds of New Mexico. 
Extinct. Based on "parts of two or three individuals . . . one of which 

includes nearly all the molar dentition of both jaws." 

Cateorus (subgenus of Vesperus) Kolexati, 1856. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 

Allgem. Deutsch. Naturhist. Zeitg., Dresden, Neue Folge, II, 131, 162-163, 1856. 
Type: VespertUio serotinus Schreber, from France. 

Cateorus: Kari)opo<;, hanging down — from the position of the animal when at 
rest. 

Catoblepas (see Catablepas). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidee. 



164 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Catodon Linnaeus, 1761. Cete, Physeteridae. 

Fauna Suecica, 2d ed., 18, 1761; Lacepede, Hist. Nat. Cetacees, pp. xxxviii- 

xxxix, 165-218, pi. 9, fig. 2, pis. 10-12, 1804; Tiedemann, Zoologie, I, 575, 1808. 
Type: Catodon macrocephalus Linnaeus, from the North Atlantic ( 'Mari Norvegico' ). 
Catodon: Karoo, down; 6dcbv = 6Sovi, tooth — i. e., having teeth only in the 

lower jaw. The upper teeth are rudimentary and simply imbedded in the gum. 

Catoglochis (subgenus of Cervus) Croizet & Jobert, 1826.* Ungulata, Cervidse. 

Recherches Ossein. Foss. Dept. Puy-de-D6me, Expl. Planches, 2 e livr., pi's, i-v; 

3 e livr., pis. vi-ix; 4 e livr.,pls. vi bis, x-xm; 6 c livr., pi. xn bis, 1826; Lesson, 

in Ferussac's Bull. Sci. Nat, et Geol., Paris, XI, 98, 1827; Lydekker, Deer of 

all Lands, 238, 1898. 
Species, 5 extinct and 3 recent: Cervus issiodorensis, C. perrierii, C. etueriarum, 

Croizet & Jobert, from Mount Perrier, France; C. pardinensis and C. arvernensis, 

Croizet & Jobert, from Malbatu, Puy-de-D6me; C. hippelaphus Cuvier, from 

Java; C. elaphus and C. dama Linnaeus, from Europe. 
Catoglochis: Karoo, down; yXooxii, point — "parce que le maitre andouiller des 

bois prend naissance immediatement au-dessus des tubercules de la meule." 

(Lesson.) 

Catolynx (subgenus of Fells) Severtzow, 1858. Ferae, Felidae. 

Revue et Mag. de Zool., Paris, 2 e ser., X, 385, 390, Sept., 1858. 
Species, 4: Fells catus Linnaeus, F. chaus Guldenstaedt, F. torquata Wagner, from 

Asia; and F. caligata Bruce, from Africa. 
Catolynx: Catus -{-Lynx. 

Catolynx Gray, 1867. Ferae, Felidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1867, 267; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. 

Brit. Mus., 15-16, 1869. 
Species: Fells marmorata Martin, t from Java or Sumatra, and F. charltoni Gray, 

from India. 
Name preoccupied by Catolynx Severtzow, 1858, a subgenus of Fdis. 
Catolynx: Catus -\-Lynx — in allusion to the nasal bones, which have the same 

form as those of Lynx. 

Catonyx Ameghino, 1891. Edentata, Megatheriidae. 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat,, I, Entr. 4a, 250, Aug. 1, 1891. 
New name for Platyonyx Lund, 1840, which is preoccupied by Platyonyx Schonherr, 

1826, a genus of Coleoptera. 
Extinct, 
Catonyx: Karoo, down; owe,, claw. 

Catopsalis Cope, 1882. Allotheria, Plagiaulacidae. 

Am. Naturalist, XVI, for May, 416-417, Apr. 24, 1882; Tert. Vert., 170-172, 

1885 (date of publication). 
Type: Catopsalis foliatus Cope, from the Puerco Eocene of New Mexico. 
Extinct. Based on the mandibular ramus. 

Catopsalis: Karoo, down; ipaXis, a pair of shears — probably in allusion to the 
lower jaw on which the genus was based. 
Catoptera (see Cetoptera). Cete, Balaenidae. 

*The date 1826 is on the authority of Lesson. Lydekker (1. c, 238) states that 
the explanation of plates of Croizet & Jobert' s work was never published except on 
the original covers of the livraisons. 

Agassiz (Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 6, 1842) refers Catoglochis to Fischer's Zoog- 
nosia, 1813, but the name is not found in that work. 

| Felis marmorata Martin is the type of Severtzow's Pardqfelis, 1858. 



CATOPUMA CAYLUXOTHEKIUM. 165 

Catopuma (subgenus of Felis) Severtzow, 1858. Ferae, Felidae. 

Revue et Mag. de Zool., Paris, 2 e ser., X, 387, 390, Sept., 1858; Trouessart, 

Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. u, 364-366, 1897. 
Type: Felis (Catopuma) moormensis Hodgson, from the Himalayas of India. 
< 'utopuma: Catus 4- Puma. 
Catta Link, 1806. Primates, Lemuridae. 

Beschreib. Naturalien-Sammlung Universitat Rostock, I, 7-8, Dec. 25, 1806. 
Type: Catta mococo Link (= Lemur catta Linnaeus), from Madagascar. 
Name antedated by Lemur Linnaeus, 1758. 

Catta: From the original name of the type species, the 'cat-like lemur.' 
Cattus Schmerling, 1834. Ferae, Felidae. 

"Recherches Ossem. Foss. Liege, 1834, pp. 92, 94, Atlas pi. xvnr, figs. 23-24" 

(fide Woldrich, Sitzungsber. Math.-Naturw. CI. K. Akad. Wiss., Wien, 

LXXXIV, 1 Abth., 240, 244, 1881). 
Species: Cattus minuta Schmerling, and C. magna Schmerling, from the deposits 

near Liege, Belgium. 
Cattus: Lat., cat. 
Catus Frisch, 1775. Ferae, Felidae. 

Das Natur-System vierfiiss. Thiere, in Tabellen, 12, Tab. Gen., 1775; Fitzinger, 

Wiss.-populiire Naturgesch. Siiugeth., I, 265-279, 1855; Bilder-Atlas zur Wiss.- 

populitre Naturgesch. Siiugeth., figs. 52-53, 1860. 
New name for "Felis, der Kater, die Katze." Fitzinger's genus includes 3 species 

and 4 subspecies: Catus ferus, C. maniculatus, C. domesticus, C. d. kispanicus, C. d. 

striatus, C. d. coeruleus, and C. d. angorensis. 
Caudi volvulus Dumeril, 1806. Ferae, Procyonidae. 

Zool. Analytique, 14, 15, 1806. 
Type: 'Le Kinkajou,' from tropical America. 
Caudivohndus: Lat., cauda, tail; volvo, to roll; + dim. suffix — in allusion to the 

somewhat prehensile tail. 
Cavia Pallas, 1766. Glirea, Caviidae. 

Miscellanea Zoologica, 30-33, 1766; Spicilegia Zoologica, fasc. n, 16, 1767;* 

Schreber, Saugthiere, pi. clxxiii, 1777; pi. clxxiv, 1778; vol. IV, 608-621, 1779. 
Scavia Blumenbach, "Voigt's Mag. neuesten Zustand Naturkunde, III, 683, 1802." 
Seavia Blumenbach, Handb. Naturgesch., 7te Auflage, 83, 1803. 
Savia ( ' Erxleben ' ) Treviranus, Biologie oder Philos. lebend. Natur., Naturf. u. 

Aerzte, I, 211, 1802; II, 176, 1803; Link, Beschreib. Nat. Samml. Univ. Rostock, 

I, 11-12, Dec. 25, 1806. 
Type: Cavia cobaya Pallas ( = C. cobaya Marcgrave, 1648 = C. cobaya Schreber, 

1777), from Brazil. 
Cavia: Indian name. 
Caviodon Ameghixo, 1885. Glires, Caviidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, VIII, entr. 1, pp. 65-66, 1885; Cont. Conocimiento 

Mamif. Fosil. Repub. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, VI, 256- 

258, pi. xii figs. 27-20, xxm figs. 24-26, 1889. 
Type: Caviodon multiplicatus Ameghino, from the barrancas of Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on an incomplete molar. 

Caviodon: Cavia; odcbv = odovs, tooth — from the resemblance of the molar to 
that of Cavia. 
Cayluxotherium Filhol, 1880. Insectivora, Erinaceidae. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, XC, No. 26, p. 1579, Jan. -June, 1880; Bull. Soc. Philoma- 

tique, Paris, se>. 7, IV, 120, 1880. 
Caluxotherium C. O. Waterhouse, Index Zool., 58, 1902 (misprint). 

* The references to Pallas consist chiefly of a description of Cavia capensis ( = Procavia 
capensis), with an incidental mention of C. cobaya. 



166 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Cayluxotherium — Continued. 

Type: Cayluxotlterinm elegans Filhol, from the Phosphorites of Quercy (Upper 

Eocene), France. 
Extinct. Based on 'une tete complete.' 
Cayluxotherium: Caylux, a town in France where the remains were found; BTjpiov, 

a wild beast. 
Cebochoerus Geryais, 1848-52. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

Zool. et Paleont. Franc., l e ed., II, Expl. pi. No. 35, p. 4, 1848-52; 2 e i'd , 

197-198, pi. 35, tig. 3, tig. 20 in text, 1859; Comptes Rendus, Paris, XLIII, 

1160, 1856; "Mem. Acad. Sci. Montpellier, III, 507." 
Choecochoerus Pomel, Archiv. Sci. Phys. et Nat., Bibl. Univ. de ( ieneve, VIII, 

326, 1848. 
Type: Cebochoerus anceps Gervais, from la butte de Perreal, near Apt, Dept. Yau- 

cluse, southeastern France. 
Extinct. Based on a fragment of the upper jaw containing the last four molars. 
Cebochoerus: Kijfios, a long-tailed monkey; x o ?P°S, hog — in allusion to the molars, 

which were regarded as indicating the relationship of this genus with certain 

apes and also with some of the ruminants. 
Cebuella (subgenus of Ilapale) Gray, 1865. Primates, Hapalidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1865, 734; Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats 

Brit. Mus., 64, 1870 (raised to generic rank). 
Type: Hapalepygmsea Spix, from Brazil. 
Cebuella: Dim. of Cebus. ' 
Cebug-ale Lesson, 1840. Primates, Lemuridse. 

Species Mamm., 207, 213-214, 1840; Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mainm., 9, 

1842. 
Type: Lemur commersonii Wolf, from Madagascar. 
Cebugale: /o7/ioj, a long-tailed monkey; yaXfj, weasel. 
Cebus Eberhabd, 1769. Primates, Cercopitheeidre? 

Versuch neuen Entwurfs Thiergesch., Halle (1768), 20, 1769. 
Includes the "' geschwiinzte Meerkatzen ' . . . theds biirtige, theils unbiirtige. 
" Unter die letzten gehort der grosse angolische Affe, der Affe mit Lowenmahnen, 

der Muskusaffe, der Todtenkopf, der Pavian, die Sangouinchen u. s. w." 
Description: "Die Thiere dieser Klasse nahern sich dem Menschen sehr, sie 

gehen von selbst auf den 2 Hinterfiissen, sie haben in proportion mehr Gehirn 

als andere Thiere, ihr Hirnschiidel sieht dem menschlichen iihnlich. Sie 

haben wie der Mensch einen Zapfen im Halse. Sie brauchen die Yorderfiisse 

ebenso wie der Mensch die Hiinde, und ihre Fiisse, besondersdie Hinterfiisse, 

haben die Gestalt der menschlichen Hand." 
Cebus: Kfjfios, a long-tailed monkey. 
Cebus Erxlebex, 1777. Primates, Cebidse. 

Syst. Reg. Anim., Mamm., 44-54. 1777; Geoffroy & Cuvier, Mag. Encyclope- 

dique, III, 463, 1795. 
Species 9, from South America: Simia belzebul Linnaeus, S. seniculus Linnaeus, S. 

paniscus Linnams, S. capueina Linnams, >S'. apella Linnaeus, S. trepida Linnaeus, 

S. fatuellus Linmeus, S. schirea Linnaeus, and Cebus lugubris Erxlebem 
Cebus Rafinesque, 1815. Primates, Cercopithecida?. 

Analyse de la Nature, 53, 1815. 

New name for Cercopithecus Erxleben, 1777 {'Cebus R. Cercopithecus Erxl.' ). 
Not Cebus of Erxleben, 1777, or of modern authors. 
Celaeno Leach, 1821. Chiroptera, Noctilionidse. 

Trans. Linn. Soc. London, XIII, pt. i, 69, 70, 1821. 

Type: Celaeno brooksiana Leach. Locality not stated; probably South America. 
( 'elseno: KeAaivdo, one of the Harpies. 



CELiENOMYB — CENTRACODON. 167 

Celsenomys Thomas, 1898. Glires, Muridse, Hydromyinee. 

Trans. Zool. Soc. London, XIV, pt. vi, 390-391, pis. xxxi, fig. 1; xxxv, figs. 

11-12, June, 1898. 
Type: Xeromys (?) silaceus Thomas, from Monte Data (alt. 8,000 ft.), Lepanto, 

northern Luzon, Philippine Islands. 
Celscnomys: keX<xiv6$, dark colored; pvi, mouse — in contrast with Chrotomys. 
Cemas (subgenus of Perm) Oken, 1816. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Lehrb. Naturgesch., 3ter Theil, Zool., 2te Abth., 727-74-4, 1816; Sclater & 

Thomas, Book of Antelopes, Jan., 1895, pt. ii, 93, 111 (in synonymy under 

Connochsetes — type fixed). 
Species, 31: Cemas gnu, ('. tragocamdus, C. picta, C. bubalus, C. koba, C. strepsice- 

ros, ( '. kuhdu, C. sylvaiica, C. scripta, C. oryx, C. alee*, C. coins, ('. gutlurosa, 

C. dorcas, C. keveUa, C. maculata, C. pygargus, C. marsupialis, < '. arundinacea, C. 

capreolus, C. glauca, C. sumatrensis, C. pasan, C. algazel, C. dama, C. redunca, 

C. rupicapra, C. melanura, C. oreotragus, C. cana, and C. pygmsea. 
Type: Cemas gnu Oken (=AntUope gnou Zimmermann), from South Africa. (See 

Connochaetes Lichtenstein, 1814.) 
Cemas: Ksjud^, a young deer. 
Cemas Gloger, 1841. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxiii, 153-154, 1841. 
New name for Rupicapra Blainville, 1816; type Capra rupricapra Linnaeus, from 

the Alps. 
Name preoccupied by Cemas Oken, 1816, which is based on a species of gnu from 

South Africa; and by Kemas (= Cemas) Ogilby, 1837, based on the goral from 

the Himalayas of India. 
Cemas (see Kemas*). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Centetes Illigek, 1811. Insectivora; Tenrecidse. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 124, 1811. 
Centenes Cuvier, Regne Animal, I, 136, 1817: Fleming, Philos. of Zool., II, 182, 

1822; Martin, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. lxii, July, 1838, 17, 18. 
Centenus Gray, Charlesworth's Mag. Nat. Hist., I, No. 11, p. 581, Nov., 1837. 
Type: Erinaceus ecaudatus Gmelin, from Madagascar. (See Tenrec Laccpede, 1799.) 
Centetes: kfvd/ti):, one who pierces; kevteod, to prick — in allusion to the spines, 

which, in the young, are arranged in longitudinal lines along the back. 
Centetodon Marsh, 1872. Insectivora, Leptictidte? 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 209-210, Sept., 1872 (sep. issued Aug. 7). 
Type: Centetodon pulcher Marsh, from the Eocene, near Henry Fork of Green 

River, Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on "a part of a lower jaw, with the last true molar well pre- 
served. ' ' 
Centetodon: Centetes (from kevtego, to prick): d8<hv=68ovt;, tooth — in allusion 

to the lower molar which resembles somewhat the corresponding tooth in 

Centetes; its anterior elevated portion is comjjosed of three pointed cones. 
Centracodon Marsh, 1872. Insectivora, Leptictidae? 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 215, Sept., 1872 (sep. issued Aug. 13). 
Type: Centracodon delicatus Marsh, from the Eocene of Henry Fork of Green 

River, Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on "a small, nearly perfect lower jaw, containing seven teeth, 

most of them in good preservation." 
Centracodon: Ks'vrpov, sting; dicr/, point; 68oo'v=:6dov<;, tooth — in allusion to 

the pointed cusps of the lower molars. 

* According to Ogilby "the root both of the Greek Kemas and the modern Chamois 
was manifestly traceable to the German word Gems, which is still the name of the 
chamois eastward of the Rhine." (Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1836, 81.) 



168 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIA M. 

Centronycteris (subgenus of Proboscidea) Gray, 1838. Chiroptera, Noctilionidae. 

Mag. Zool. &Bot., II, No. 12, p. 499, 1838; Zool. Voy. H. M. S, 'Sulphur,' Marnm., 
pt. ii, 1843, 23* (raised to generic rank); List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., 
p. xix, 1843. 

Type: Yespertilio calcaratus Maximilian, 1821, f from Fazenda, near Coroaba, on the 
Rio Jucu, near the Rio do Espirito Santo, Brazil. 

Centronycteris: KEvrpov, point, spike; WKTspis, bat — probably in allusion to 
the tip of the tail; the last caudal vertebra alone projects beyond the inter- 
femoral membrane. 
Centurio Gray, 1842. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., X, 259-260, Dec, 1842; Zool. Voy. II. M. S. 'Sulphur,' 
Mamm., pt. n, 26-28, pi. vn, 1843. 

Type: Centurio senex Gray. In the description the locality is given as 'Amboyna;' 
the species, however, is only known from tropical America — Mexico and Cuba. 

Centurio: Lat. centurio, a centurion or commander of a company of infantry, cor- 
responding to a captain in a modern army, whose insignia of rank is the 
shoulder badge or epaulet. The type species of the genus was described by 
Gray as having small epaulet-like tufts of white hair on the shoulders, a char- 
acter which evidently suggested the common designation 'epaulet bat,' as well 
as the generic name. 
Centuriosus (subgenus of Sus) Gray, 1862. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1862, 17; Ibid., 186S, 40-41 (raised to generic rank). 

Type: Sus pliciceps Gray, from Japan. 

Centuri(jsus: Centurio -\-Sus — in allusion to the wrinkled face. 
Ceonix Temminck, 1827. Marsupialia, Phalangerida?. 

Mon. Mamm., I, lere Mon., 10-12, pi. i figs. 1-3, pi. n figs. 1-5, pi. iv, L827. 

Ceony.v Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., <>, 1842; Index Univ., 71, 1846. 

Type: Phalangista ursina Temminck, from the northern part of Celebes. Provi- 
sional name. " J'avais eu l'idee de former des Couscous un genre sous le nom 
de Ceonix; mais ces coupes nombreuses me paraissent parfaitement inutiles, 
et sont a charge a la memoire, lorsqu'elles ne reposent pas sur des caracteres 
faciles a saisir. ' ' ( Temminck . ) 

Ceonix: kecj=keigo, to cleave; 6vv%, claw — in allusion to the long, curved claws. 
Cephalogale Jocrdax, 1862. Ferae, Canidse. 

Revue Soc. Savantes, Paris, I, 126, 129, 1862 ( Cephalogalus, 129); Gebvais, Journ. 
de Zool., I, 257, 258, 1872. 

Type: Cephalogalus geoffroy\_i~\ Jourdan, from the Lower Miocene of Billy, near 
Varennes, Dept. de l'Allier, France. 

Extinct. Based on a skull nearly entire, numerous vertebrae, and the greater 
part of the bones of the limbs. 

Cephalogale: KEcpaXY/, head; yocXiJ, weasel. 
Cephalolophus (see Cephalophus). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Cephalomys Ameghino, 1897. Glires, Cephalomyidse. 

La Argentina al traves de las Ultimas Epocas Geologicas, 18 footnote, 1897, 
nomen nudum); Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentina, XVIII, 494-495, Oct. 6, 1897. 

Species: Cephalomys arcidens Ameghino, and C. plexus Ameghino; from the 'Creta- 
ceous' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Cephalomys: KEtpaXr), head; /<£>?, mouse. 

*This specimen =Emballonura semicaudatots (Peale) — fide Dobson, Cat. Chiroptera 
Brit. Mus., 361, 377, 1878. 

t The specific name is preoccupied by U. calcaratus, Rafinesque, 1818, from North 
America, and has been replaced by Saccopteryx wiedi Palmer (Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., 
XII, 110, 1898). 



CEPHALOPACHUS CEPHALOTES. 109 

Cephalopachus Swaixson, 1835. Primates, Tarsiidfe. 

Nat. Hist. & Class. Quad., 352, 1835. 
Cephalophacus Gray, Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 96, 

1870 (synonym of Tardus). 
CephalophxusTrouess&rt, Rev. et Mag. Zool., 3 e sex., VI, 169, 1878 (synonym). 
Type: Tarsius bancanus Horsfield, from the vicinity of Jeboos, island of Banca, 
• East Indies, (see Tardus Storr, 1780.) 

Cephalopachus: KscpaXy, head; 7caxv$, thick — from the large head. 
Cephalophora Gray, 1842. TJngulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., X, 266, Dec, 1842. 

Cephalophorm Gray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit, Mus., pp. xxvi, 162-163, 1843. 
Emendation of Cephalophus H. Smith, 1827. (See Gray, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 

162, 1846; Knowsley Menagerie, p. 9, 1850.) 
Cephalophora: KecpaXi), head; </>o/3o?, bearing — in allusion to the tuft of hair 

borne on the head. 
Cephalophus (subg. oiAntilope) H. Smith, 1827. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 
(iriffith's Cuvier, Anim. Kingdom [IV, 258], V, 344 T 349, 1827; Sclater & 

Thomas, Book of Antelopes, I, 121-211, pis. xin-xxiii, text figs. 16-22, 1895 

(type fixed) . 
Cephalophora Gray, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., X, 266, Dec, 1842 (raised to generic 

rank). 
Cephalophorm Gray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xxvi, 162-163, 1843. 
Cephalolophus Wagner, Suppl. Schreber's Siiugth., IV, 445, 1844; V, 417, 1855. 
Species, 10: A. sylvicultrix Afzelius (type), from West Africa; .1. quadriscopa H. 

Smith, from West Africa; A. burcheUii H. Smith, from Caffraria; A. mergens 

Blainville, from Caffraria; A. ptoox Lichtenstein, from Guinea; A. grimmia 

Cuvier, from West Africa; A. maxwellii H. Smith, from Sierra Leone; A. cserula 

H. Smith, from Caffraria; A. perpudUa H. Smith, from Caffraria; and A. phi- 

lantomba H. Smith, from Sierra Leone. 
Cephalophus: KecpaAY/, head; Xocpos, crest — in allusion to the tuft of hair on the 

head. 
Cephalorhynchus (subgenus of Delphinus) Gray, 1846. Cete, Delphinidee. 

[Delphinus cephalorhynchus Cuvier, Hist. Nat. des Cetaces, 158-159, 1836] ; Gray, 

Zool. Erebus & Terror, I, Mamm., 36-37, pi. 16, 1846; Cat. Mamm. Brit. Mus., 

pt. i, Cetacea, 106-109, 1850; Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 263-267, 1866; 

Flower, List Spec. Cetacea Brit. Mus., 16-17, 1885 (raised to generic rank); 

W. L. Sclater, Mamm. S. Africa, II, 205-206, 1901 (type fixed). 
Species, 3: Delphinus heavisidii Gray, 1828 (=1>. cephalorhynchus Cuvier, 1836, 

type), and D. obscurus Gray, from the Cape of Good Hope; and Pliocsma 

compressicauda Lesson, from the South Atlantic ("4° S. lat, 26° E. [W.] long. 

from Paris " ) . 
Cephalorhynchus: KetpaXy, head; pvyxos, snout — from the rostrum, which is 

about half the length of the skull, but not well marked off from the rest of the 

head. 
Cephalotes Geoefroy, 1810. Chiroptera, Pteropodidse. 

Ann. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, XV, 104-106, pi. 7, 1810; I. Geoffroy, Diet. Class. 

Hist. Nat., XIV, 707-708, Sept., 1828 (type given as C. pallasli); Matschie, 

Fledermause Berliner Mus. Naturkunde, Lief. I, Megachiroptera, 81, 85-87, 

1899 (type given as C. peronii); Thomas, Proc Biol. Soc Wash., XV, 198, Oct. 

10, 1902. 
Species: Cephalotes peronii Geoffroy, from Timor, Malay Archipelago; and C.pal- 

lasii Geoffroy (=Vespertitio cephalotes Pallas — type), from the Molucca Islands. 
Name antedated by Xyctimene Bechstein, 1800. 
Cephalotes: KE<pa.\oor6c,, with a head — from the name of the type species. 



170 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Cephalotropis Cope, 1896. Cete, Balaenidae. 

Science, new ser., Ill, 880, June 12, 1896; Zool. Anzeiger, XIX, No. 508, p. 336, 
July 20, 1896; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XXXV, No. 151, pp. 141, 143-145, Aug., 
1896. 

Cephalotropus Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert, N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 598, 
1902. 

Type: Cephalotropis coronatus Cope, from the Miocene of the Yorktown formation; 
probably from the Chesapeake region (Maryland?). 

Extinct. Based on a portion of the cranium. 

Cej>halotropis: KecpaX)}, head; rpoitis, keel — in allusion to the triangular occi- 
pital area which has "a low median keel, on each side of which the surface is 
concave, and is marked with numerous irregular fossae." (Cope). 
Cephanodus Ameghixo, 1902. Ungulata, Condylartha, Phenacodontidae. 

Anal. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires, VIII (ser. 3, I), 25, fig. 12, July 12, 1902. 

Type: Didolodus colligatus Ameghino, from the Notostylops beds of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Cephanodus: Anagram of Phenacodux. 

Ceratodon Brisson, 1762. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Regnuni Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 218, 231-232, 1762; Brunnich, 

Zoologke Fundamenta, 48-49, 1772 (no species mentioned); Illiger, Prodro- 

mus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 142, 1811. 
Type: Ceratodon ceratodon Brisson (=Monodon monoceros Linnaeus), from the 

Arctic Ocean. 
Ceratodon: Kepas, Ksparog, horn; 68cbv = 6§ovs, tooth — in allusion to the left 

lower tooth, which is developed into an enormous tusk, more than half the 

length of the animal. 
Ceratodon (see Kerodon) . Glires, Caviidae. 

Ceratogaulus Matthew, 1902. Glires, Castoridfe (Mylagaulidae). 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., N. Y., XVI, 291-294, 299, figs, 1, 3, Sept. 25, 1902. 
Type: Ceratogaidiis rhinocerus Matthew, from the Miocene, Loup Fork (Pawnee 

Creek beds) of Colorado. 
Extinct. Based on "a nearly complete skull, with one ramus of the lower jaw." 
Ceratogaulus: Kepac,, horn; + (Myla)gaulus — in allusion to the "pair of large 

connate processes on the nasals resembling the horncores of some Ungulata. " 

Ceratorhinus Gray, 1867. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotidae. 

Proc. Zool Soc. London, 1867, 1021; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm. & Edentate Mamm. 

Brit. Mus., 313-315, 1869. 
Species: Rhinoceros sumatrensis Cuvier, from Sumatra; and R. monspettiamis, 

Blainville (extinct), from Herault, France. 
Ceratorhinus: Kepas, KSparoi, horn; pit,, pivot, nose — from the two nasal horns. 
Ceratotherium Gray, 1867. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1867, 1027-1030; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate 

Mamm. Brit. Mus., 1869, 319-322; W. L. Sclater, Mamm. S. Africa, I, 297, 1900 

(in synonymy, type fixed). 
Species: Rhinoceros simus Burchell (type), and R. oswdlii Gray, from South 

Africa. 
Ceratotherium: Kepas, KEparoz, horn; brjpioi', wild beast — from the two nasal 

horns. 
Cercaertus ('Gloger') Burmeister, 1837. Marsupialia, Phalangeridae. 

Burmeister, Handb. Naturgesch., 814, 1837. 
Cercartetus Gloger, Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, 85, 1841; Thomas, Cat. 

Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 166, 1888 (in synonymy). 



CERCAERTUS CERCOPITHECUS. 171 

Cercaertus — Continued. 

Type: Phal-arigista mlpina Desmarest (=Didelphis vulpecula Kerr), from Australia. 

Name antedated by Trichosurus Lesson, 1828. 

Thomas dismisses Cercaertus with the remark: "said to be founded on Tricliosurus 
vulpemla, but obviously a misspelt form of Gloger's Cercarte&us." Thomas 
gives the type of Cercartetus as Didelplvis peregrinus Boddaert, but the only 
species mentioned in the original description of the genus is Phalangista nana. 

Cercaertus: KepKo^, tail; aeprda), to lift up. 

Cercocebus Geoffroy, 1812. Primates, Cercopithecidae. 

Ann. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, XIX, 97, 1812. 

Species, 8: Cercocebus fuhginosus Geoffroy, probably from West Africa; Simia 
sethiops Gmelin, from Ethiopia; 8. sabsea Linnaeus, from Senegal; Cercocebus 
radiatus Geoffroy, from India; Simia sinica Gmelin, from Bengal; 8. atys 
Audebert, from India; S. aygula Linnaeus, from ; and S. cynomolgus Lin- 
naeus, from Java. 

Cercocebus: KepKos, tail; Kfjfios, ape — in allusion to the long tail. 
Cercolabes Brandt, 1835. Glires, Erethizontidae. 

Mamm. Exot. Nov., in Mem. Acad. Imp. St.-Petersbounr, ser. 3, Ill, 55-58, 1835. 

New name for the 'barbarous' Coendu Lacepede, 1799. 

Cercolabes: KepKo*;, tail; Xa/i/Jdvao, to grasp — in allusion to the prehensile tail. 
Cercoleptes Illiger, 1811. Ferae, Procyonidae. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 127-128, 1811. 

Type: Viverra caudivolvula Schreber, from Surinam. 

Cercoleptes: KspKoz, tail; A?)7rr?;j, one who takes (hold) — in allusion to the 
somewhat prehensile tail. 
Cercomys F. Cuviee, 1829. Glires, Octodontidae. 

Hist. Nat. Mamm., VI, livr. lx, pi. (Cercomys du Bresil) with 2 pp. text, Sept. 
1829; Nouv. Ann. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, I, 449-452, pis. IS fig. 1, 19 figs. 1, 
2 (French name only), 1832; Wagneb, Suppl. Schreber's Saugthiere, III, 
349-350, 1843. 

Type: Cer comys (Mnwularius Cuvier, from the province of Minus (ieraes, Brazil. 

Cercomys: KepKo<;, tail; /ivi, mouse — in allusion to its rat-like tail. 
Cercopithecus Brunnich,* 1772. Primates, Cercopithecidae. 

[Cercopitheci Linnaeus, Syst. Nat., 10th ed., 26, 1758; 12th ed., 35, 1766.] 
[Brisson, Regnum Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 133, 246-247, 1762f]; 
Brunnich, Zoologiae Fundamenta, 1772, 34, 40-41; Erxlebex, Syst. Reg. Anim., 
Mamm., 1777, 22-44; Martin, " Gen. Introd. Nat. Hist. Mamm. Animals, 1841;" 
W. L. Sclater, Mamm. S. Africa, I, 5-12, 1900 (type fixed). 

Brunnich based his genus on the 'Marekatten.' 

Erxleben in 1777, included 22 species: Cercopithecus hamadryas Erxleben, from 
Arabia and northeast Africa; Simia refer Linnaeus, from southern India; Cer- 
copithecus sene.r Erxleben, from Ceylon; C. vetulus Erxleben, from Ceylon; 
Si in in silenus Linnaeus, from southern India; S. faunus Linnaeus (habitat 
unknown); S. cynomolgus Linnaeus, from southeastern Asia; S. <t/nocephalus 
Linnaeus, from West Africa; S. diana Linnaeus, from Guinea; S. mona Schreber, 
from West Africa; S. sabsea Linnaeus, from northeast Africa; S.patas Schreber, 
from Senegal; S. nictitans Linnaeus, from Guinea; S. petaurista Schreber, from 
Guinea; Cercopithecus talapoin Erxleben, from West Africa; Simia cephus Lin- 
naeus, from Guinea; S. sethiops Linnaeus, from Ethiopia; S. aygula Linnaeus, 

*Sherborn (Index Animalium, 1902), refers Cercopithecus to "Gronovius, Zooph., 
I, 5, 1763." 

t Brisson divides Simia into five stirpes, two of which are not valid subgeneric 
names, e. g., Simia cynocephala and Cercopithecus cynocephalus, hence all are discarded. 



172 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Cercopithecus — Continued. 

from India; S. maura Schreber, from ('Guinea'!) the Malay Peninsula; S. 
sinicus Linnaeus, from southern India; Cercopitliecus roloway Erxleben, from 
('Guinea') Gold Coast; and Simla nemsews Linnaeus, from Cochin China. 

Type: Cercopithecus mona, from West Africa. (Sclater. ) 

( 'ercopithecus: kepkotiVhikoc,, a long-tailed ape (from KepKog, tail; itiHrp<oc„ ape). 
The name was applied by Linnaeus to a subgroup of Simla, including all the 
long-tailed species, in contradistinction to those with short tails, and those in 
which the tail was absent. His divisions were ( 1 ) ' Cauda nulla, Simia veterum, ' 
(2) ' Cauda abbreviata, Papiones,' and (3) 'Cauda elongata Cercopitheci.' 
Cercopithecus Blumenbach, 1779. Primates, Cebidse. 

Handb. Naturgesch., I, 68-69, 1779. 

Species: Simia panOscus Linnaeus, and S. jacchus Linnaeus, from Brazil. 

See Cercopithecus Briinnich, 1772. 
Cercoptenus Gloger, 1841. Marsupialia, Phalangeridae. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxx, 85, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 
Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 190, Feb. 1, 1895. 

Type: Didelphis pygmsea Shaw, from eastern Australia. ( See A crobates Desniarest, 
1817.) 

Cercoptenus: KepKos, tail; itrifvos, winged — in allusion to the broad fringe of 
hair on either side of the tail. 
Cercopteropus Burnett, 1829. Chiroptera, Pteropodidse. 

Quart, Journ. Sci., Lit. & Art, XXVII, 269, Apr. -June, 1829. 

Species: Cercopteropus? xgyptiacus (=Pteropus segyptiacus Geoffroy), from Egypt; 
and C. ampleoncaud\_atus~\ (=Pteropus amplexicaudalus Geoffroy), from Timor. 

Cercopteropus: KipKo$, tail; -\-Pteropus. 
Cercoptochus Gloger, 1841. Primates, Cebidae. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxvii, 41, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 
Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 190, Feb. 1, 1895; Palmer, Science, new ser., X, 493 
footnote, 1899 (type fixed). 

Species: The beardless ouakaris, from Brazil. Type, Simia melanocephala Hum- 
boldt. 

Name antedated by Cacajao Lesson, 1840. 

Cercoptochus: KepKos, tail; TrrG^os, one who crouches — i. e., a ' tailed croucher.' 
Cerdocyon (subgenus of Chaon) H. Smith, 1839. Ferae, Canidae. 

Jardine's Nat, Library, IX, 259-267, pis. xxvii-xxx, 1839; ed. 2, Mamm., I, 
154, 1858; IV, 259-267, pis. 27-30, 1866; V, 291, 1865. 

Species 4, from South America: Cerdocyon mesoleucus H. Smith; C. guaraxa 
H. Smith, from northern Brazil; Cams azarse Maximilian, from Brazil and 
Paraguay, and Vulpes magellanicus Gray, from the Straits of Magellan. 

Cerdocyon: KspScb, fox; kvgov, dog — in allusion to the tail, which has a 'brush 

even larger and longer than that of a true fox.' 

Cerivoula (see Kerivoula). Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae. 

Cerodon (see Kerodon). Glires, Caviidae. 

Cerophorus Bi.aixville, 1816. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Bull. Soc. Philomatique, Faris, 74-76, May, 1816; Osteog., Desc. Icon. Mamm. 
Recents et Foss., IV, Ruminants, 54 footnote, 1850. 

Includes 12 subgenera: Antdope, Gazella, Cervicapra, Alcelaphus, Trugelaphus, 
Boselaphus, Oryx, Rupicapra, Capra, Ovis ou Ammon, Ovibos, Bos. 

Cerophorus: Kepas, horn; <popog, bearing — "la seconde section des animaux 
ruminans comprende les especes qui ont toujours la tete arrnee " — in contra- 
distinction to the first section, which includes the giraffe. 
Gervalces Scott, 1885. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Science, V, No. 120, pp. 420-422, 2 figs, in text, May 22, 1885; Proc. Acad. Nat. 
Sci. Phila., Sept. 1, 1885, 181-202, pi. n, 7 figs, in text. 



CERVALCES CERVILLUS. 173 

Cervalces — Continued. 

Type: Cervus americanus Harlan, from a Pleistocene shell marl beneath a bog, 

at Mount Hermon, Warren County, New Jersey. 
Extinct. Based on 'a remarkably perfect skeleton.' 
Cervalces: Cervus + Alces. 
Cervaria (subgenus of Lyncus) Gray, 1867. Few, Felidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1867, 276-277; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate 

Mamm. Brit. Mus., 38, 1869; Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 4th ser., XIV, No. 83, 

pp. 355-356, Nov., 1874; Bangs, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XI, 48-19, fig. 2, Mar. 

16, 1897. 
Species, 5: Lyncus pardinus, from southern Europe; L. isabellinus, from Tibet; 

L. fasciatus, L. rufus, and L. maculatus, from North America. 
Name preoccupied by Cervaria Walker, 1866, a genus of Lepidoptera. Replaced 

by Eucervaria Palmer, 1903. 
Cervaria: Lat., pertaining to deer; lupus cervarius, a term used by Pliny for a 

lynx. 

Cervequus (subg. of Cervus) Lesson, 1842. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 173, 1842. 
Type: Cervus andicus Lesson, from the Cordillera, South America. 
Cervequus: Cervus + Equus — 'horse deer,' from its large size and the fact that 

it was originally described as a species of Equus by Molina (compare Hippo- 

camelus). 

Cervicapra Sparrman, 1780. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

K. Yetensk. Akad. nya Handlings*, Stockholm, I, 275-281, Oct. -Dec, 1780. 

Type: Antilope cervicapra (Linnaeus), from India. 

In an article on the ' Springbock ' of the Cape region (now known as Antidorcas 
euchore) Sparrman says that Pallas calls tbisanimal - 1 ntilopepygargus. Sparrman 
also mentions Capra cervicapra of Linnaeus, based on figures by Houttein and 
Dodart, but states that the latter figure does not fit the Springbock. He adds: 
"The name Cervicapra might be applied to the entire group of Gazelles, to 
indicate a form intermediate between the deer and goats." This name was 
called to the attention of Mr. Oldfield Thomas, of the British Museum, who, 
after consulting Mr. Bather, replied: "We agree that the name should be con- 
sidered as validly founded, but that (on the name rule) the type of it would 
be Antilope cervicapra Linn. . . . 
Result — Antilope Pall., 1766; syn. Cervicapra Sparrm., 1780. 

Redunca H. Smith, 1827; syn. Cervicapra Blainv., 1816, nee Sparrm., 
1780." (Thomas, in epist., Nov. 26, 1901.) 

Cervicapra: Cervus -\- Capra. 

Cervicapra Blainville, 1816. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, 75, May, 181(5; Sclater & Thomas, Book of 

Antelopes, II, pt. vm, 155-156, Mar., 1897 (type fixed). 
Species, 11: Antilope redunca (type), A. dama, A.grisea, A. steinbock, A. eleotragu-s, 

A. oreotragus, A. grimmia, A. pygmsea, A. saltiana, A. quadricornis, and A. 

acuticornis, from Africa. 
Name preoccupied by Cervicapra Sparrman, 1780, which is based on Antilope 

cervicapra. (See Redunca H. Smith, 1827.) 

Cervillus Heude, 1898. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Mem. Hist. Nat. Empire Chinois, IV, pt. 2, p. 98, 1898. 

Nomen nudum: "Une etude comparee des Capricornides nous a obliges d'y 
reconnaitre plusieurs groupes d'especes; ... De meme nous aurons force- 
ment Cervulus et Cervillus pour les deux groupes de Muntjaks." (Heude.) 

Cervillus: Dim. of Cervus. 



174 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Cervulus (subg. of Cervusf) Blainville, 1816. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, 74, May, 1816; Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 
1850, 234-235 (raised to generic rank) ; Cat. Mamm. Brit. Mus., Ill, Ungulata, 
217-221, 1852. 

No species mentioned in the first description, which is as follows: "Les cerfs pro- 
prement dits . . . sont subdi vises d'apres la longueur du pedoncule qui porte 
les bois, en deux sous-genres: le premier, le genre Cervus, a les pedoncules peu 
ou point apparens, tandis que dans le second, auquel M. de Bv. propose de 
donner le nom Cervulus, le pedoncule est plus long que le bois lui-meme, en 
sorte que ces especes ont en tout terns [sic] la tete armee d' especes de comes 
analogues a eelles de la Giraffe." (Blainville.) 

Type: Cervus muntjqk Zimmermann, from Java. 

Name antedated by MunUacus Rafinesque, 1815. 

Cervulus: Dim. of Cervus. 

Cervus Linn.eus, 1758. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Systema Naturae, 10th ed., I, 66-68, 1758; 12th ed., I, 92-94, 1766; Bkisson, 

Regnum Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 12, 58-65, 1762; Ogilby, Proc. 

Zool. Soc. London, for 1836, No. xlviii, 135, June 27, 1837. 
Species, 8: Cervus camelopardalis Linnaeus, C. dices Linnaeus, C. elaphus Linnaeus 

(type), C. tarandus Linnaeus, C. dama Linnaeus, C. bezoarticus Linnaeus, C. 

capreolus Linnaeus, and C. guineensis Linnaeus. (Ogilby says: "Typi sunt C. 

elaphus et C. saumer aut hippelaphus Cuv.," but the second species is not 

mentioned in the original description, and therefore C. elaphus is the type.) 
Cervus: Lat., stag, deer. 

Cesserasictis Filhol, 1888. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Tapiridae? 

Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, 7' se>., XII, for 1887-88, No. 2, pp. 58-59, 1888. 
Type: Cesserasictis aniiquus Filhol, from the Eocene of Cesseras, Herault, France. 
Extinct. Based on "une portion de maxillaire inferieur . . . Get echantillon 

comprend la derniere premolaire et les trois molaires." 
Cesserasictis: Cesseras, the type locality; iktic,, weasel. 

Ceterhinops Leidy, 1877. Cete, ? 

Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 2d ser., VIII, pt. in, 230-232, pi. xxxiv, fig. 7, 1877. 
( 'ete[pr\rhinops Alston, Zool. Record for 1877, XIV, Mamm., 15, Index p. 2, 1879. 
Type: Ceterhinops longifrons Leidy, from the phosphate beds of Ashley River, 

South Carolina. 
Extinct. Based on "a fragment of the skull . . . composed of portions of 

the frontal, ethmoid, vomer, maxillaries, and intermaxillaries, all intimately 

coossified." 
Ceterhinops: Kfjro<;, whale; pis, pivoe,, .nose; oip, aspect. 

Cetodiodon Jacob, 1825. Cete, Physeteridse. 

"Dublin Philos. Journ. & Scientif. Review, 1825, t." (fide Gray, Cat. Seals & 

Whales Brit. Mus., 328, 331, 332, 1866.) 
Type: Cetodiodon hunteri ( =Delphinus hunteri Desmarest =Hyperoodoa rostratus). 

Based on a specimen stranded in Sept., 1824, at Killiney, near Dublin, Ireland. 
Cetodiodon: ki}to$, whale; Sz's, two; odchv = ddovs, tooth — 'two-toothed whale,' 

from the two small, pointed, conical teeth at the apex of the mandible, which 

are concealed by the gum during life. 

Cetophis Cope, 1868. Cete, Platanistidae? 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1868, 184-185. 

Type: Cetophis heteroclitus Cope, from the Miocene of Charles County, Maryland. 
Extinct. Based on 'caudal vertebra?.' 
Cetophis: K)Jro<;, whale; ocpis, snake. 



CETOPTERA CETUS. 175 

Cetoptera Rafinesque, 1815. Cete, Balsenidae. 

Analy.se de la Nature, Addendum, 219, 1815. 
Catoptera Rafinesque, ibid., p. 61. 

New name for Bahenoptera Lacepede, 1804 (' Catoptera R. Balsenoptera Lac.') 
Cetoptera: Kijroi, whale; ittEpov, fin. 

Cetorhynchus Gervals, 1861. Cete, Platandstidae? 

Mem. Acad. Sci. Montpellier, V, pt. i, 122-124, pi. iv, figs. 5-7, 1861; Zool. et 
Paleont. Gen., l c ser., 1867-69, 152. 

Type: Mesoplodon christolii Gervais, from the Miocene of Poussan, near Mont- 
pellier, Departement du Herault, France. 

Extinct. Based on part of a lower jaw. 

Cetorhynchus: Kijroi, whale; pvyx°i> snout. 
Cetotheriomorphus Brandt, 1873. Cete, BaLenidae. 

Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci. St.-Petersbourg, XX, 161-162, Taf. xxm, figs. 4-8, 1873. 

Type: Cetotheriornorphus dubius Brandt (locality unknown), possibly from south- 
ern Russia. Name provisionally proposed. 

Extinct. Based on "einen sehr kleinen Wirbel ohne Epiphysen und ohne 
Processus spinosus superior." 

CetotheriornorpJms: Cetotherium; /topcpi'/, form. 

Cetotheriophanes (subgenus of Cetotherium) Brandt, 1873. Cete, Balsenidae. 

Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci. St.-Petersbourg, XX, 148-159, Taf. xx-xxn, xxm, figs. 

1-3, 1873. 
Species, 4: Cetotherium cuvieri Brandt (type?), ('. cortesii Brandt, C. capellinii 

Brandt, and C. vandellii Brandt, from Europe. 
Extinct. 

( 'etotheriophanes: CetotherMm; <pavo$, manifest (from (paivw, to appear). 
Cetotheriopsis Brandt, 1871. Cete, Balaenidae. 

Bull. Acad. Imp. Sci. St.-Petersbourg, XVI, 566, Nov. 13, 1871; Sitzungsber. 

Math. -Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wise., Wien, LVI, IsteAbth., 261, 1872; Mem. Acad. 

Imp. Sci. St.-Petersbourg, XX, 165, 1873. 
Type (species not mentioned) from the Tertiary of Linz, Austria. 
"Eine eigene, Cetotherium verwandte, also balanidenartige, folglich zahnlose 

Thiergattung, . . . die ich mit dem Namen Cetotheriopsis belegte" (1. c, 1871). 
"Mir will es vielmehr scheinen, dass meine Abtheilung der Cetotherinen eine von 

den Cetotherien durch Plesiocetopsis zu Plesiocetus und von diesen zu den Ceto- 

theriopsinen und Balaenopterinen hinneigende Gruppe sei" (1. c, 1873). 
Extinct. Based on fragments of a skull. 
Cetotheriopsis: Cetotherium; oz/>z?, aspect. 
Cetotherium Brandt, 1843. Cete, Balsenidse. 

L'Institut, Paris, XI, l c sect,, No. 499, pp. 20, 241, 270, July, 1843; Bull. CI. 

Phys.-Math. Acad. Sci., St.-Petersbourg, I, 145-148, 1843; Hay, Cat. Foss. 

Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 598, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species: Cetotherium rathJdi Brandt (type), and C. priscus (Eichwald), from 

the Pliocene of southern Russia. 
Extinct. Based on a skull with the lower jaw, a number of vertebrae, fragments 

of ribs and other bones. 
Cetotherium: /o/roj, whale; brjpiov, wild beast. 
Cetus Bkisson, 1762. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Regnum Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 218, 225-231, 1762; Wagler, 

Nat. Syst. Amphibien, 33-34, 1830. 
Species, 7: Cetus, Cetus albicans, C. novee anglise, C. mi nor, C. dentibus acutis, C. den- 

tibus falciformibus, C. dentibus in planum desinentibus. 
Cetus: Kf/Toi, whale. 



176 INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 

Cetus Oken, 1816. Cete, Physeteridae. 

Lehrb. Naturgesch., 3ter Theil, Zool., 2te Abth., 674-678, 1816. 

Species, 6: Cetus macrocephaZus, Physeter tursio, Cetus microps, ('. orthodon, and 
two unnamed species. 

See Cetus JBrisson, 1762, a genus of Delphinidae. 
Chaelodus (see Chelodus). Glires, Castoridae. 

Cheenocetus Eschricht, 1846. Cete, Physeteridse. 

Oversigt K. Danske Yidensk. Selsk. Forhandlinger, Kjobenhavn, for 1845, , 

1846; K. Danske Yidensk. Selsk. Skrifter, Naturv. & Math. Aid., Kjobenhavn, 
5te Raekke, I, 97, 1849; Unters. nordischen Wallth., 50, 1849. 

Chenocetus Gray, Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 328, 329, 1866. 

Based on the ' Naebhval ' of the northern seas. 

"Efter de her givne Oplysninger vil NaebhA T alen . . . forblive . . . som Re- 
praesentant for en egen Slaegt, Hyperoodon eller, efter mit Forslag, Chaeno- 
cetus" (p. 97). 

Chsmocetus {Chenocetus): XW V , X ? ? v us, goose; ktjtos, whale. "The name goose 
whale, or its translation, is applied to this animal by the inhabitants of most 
parts of the seas where it inhabits, and it was early described as the goose- 
beaked whale by Pontoppidan (Nat. Hist. Norway, chap, v, 123, 124, fig.)." — 
Gray, 329, 1866. 
Chaenodelphinus Eschricht, 1843. Cete, Physeteridae. 

Forhandl. Skandinav. Naturforsk., 3diemote, Stockholm, den 13-19 July, 1842, 
651-655, 1843; Oken's Isis, Jena, 1845, 437-440. 

Chenoddphinus Duvernoy, Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 3 e ser., Zool., XY, No. 1, 45, 
1851; Fitzixger, Wiss.-populare Naturgesch. Saugeth., VI, 256-262, 1860. 

Type: Bahrein rostrtxta Midler, from the Atlantic Ocean. 

"Le genre Hyperoodon a ete £tabli par Lacepede . . . M. Eschricht avait 
d'abord substitue a cette premiere denomination generique celle de Chenodel- 
phinus; il a plus tard adopts celle de Chsenocetus." (Duvernoy, 1. c, 45.) 

Chaenodelphinus (Chenodelphinus)'. XV V , XV V 6$, gooee; -\-Delphinus. (See Chseno- 
cetus.) 
Chaenohyus ("ope, 1879. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

Paleont. Bulletin. No. 31, p. 4, Dec. 24, 1879; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XVIII, 373, 
Dec. 30, 1879; Am. Naturalist, XXII, 1088, Dec, 1888. 

Clue no) 'uji is Forbes, Zool. Record for 1880, XVII, Mamm., 26, 1881. 

Chserohyus Lydekker, Roy. Nat. Hist., II, 444, 1894 (misprint). 

Type: Chaenohyus decedens Cope, from the Miocene of the John Day River, Oregon. 

Extinct. Based on "the anterior part of a cranium, which includes both inter- 
maxillary bones." 

Chaenohyus: ^ajVo, to gape; us, uos, pig — in allusion to the diastema behind 
the anterior premolar. "Chaenohyus differs from Dicotyles in having the dias- 
tema behind the anterior premolar instead of in front of it" (Cope) . 
Chaerephon (subg. of Nyctinomus), Dobsox, 1874. Chiroptera, Noctilionidae. 

Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, Calcutta, XLIII, pt. 2, p. 144, 1874; Cat. Chiroptera 
Brit. Mus., 431, 1878. 

Type: Nyctinomus johorensis Dobson, from Johore, Malay Peninsula. 

Chaerephon: Xaipecpcbv, a proper name. 
Chaerohyus (see Chaenohyus). Ungulata, Artiodactyla Suidae. 

Chaeromeryx (see Chceromeryx). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anthracotheriidae. 

Chaeropithecus Blaixyille, 1839. Primates, Cercopithecidae. 

"Lecons Orales, 1839"?; Gervais, Diet. Pittoresque Hist. Nat., VIII, l e pt.,90, 
1839; Sexechal, ibid., 2 e pt., 428, 1839. 



CHAEROPITHECUS CH^TOMYS. 177 

Cliaeropitliecus — Continued. 

Chcerupithi ens Gray, List Spec. Mamin. Brit. Mus., pp. xvii, 1843 (synonym of 
Cynocephalus) . 

Species: 'les Cynocephales' of Africa. 

Chseropithecus: x u ?P $, hog; 7TiO)/ko<;, ape, 
Chaeropithecus Gray, 1870. Primates. Cercopithecidaei 

Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 5, 35, 1870. 

Type: Simla leucophsea F. Cuvier, from Africa. 

Name antedated by DriU Reichenbach, 1862. 

Not Choiropithecus Reichenbach, 1862 (based on Simia porcarius) , which ante- 
dates Gray's genus by eight years; nor Chaeropithecus Blainville, 1839, based 
on 'les Cynocephales..' 

Chaeropithecus: jo?/joj, hog; 7tiBTjKo$, ape. 
Chaeropotamus ( Yvikk, 1821. Ohgulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

"Analyse des Trav. de I'Acad. des Sciences, 9, 1821" (fide Desmakest). 

Desmakest, Mammalogie, II, Suppl., 544-545, 1822. 

" Chceropotamus Cuvier, Rechercb.es Ossem. Foss., 2 e ed., Ill, 260, 1822." 

Type: Chaeropotamus gypsorum Cuvier, from the Eocene of the Paris basin, France. 

Extinct. 

Chasropotamus (Chceropotamus): x°zp°Z, hog; 7tora//6^, river — 'river-hog' (com- 
pare Hyopotamus ). 
Chaeropus Ogilby, 1838. Marsupialia, Peramelidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. lxiii, 25-27, July, 1838 (provisional name). 

Chceropus Gray, in Mitchell's Three Expds. E. Australia, II, pi. 27, 1839; Water- 
house, Nat. Hist. Mamm., I, Marsupiata, 388-393, 1846; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. 
it Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 250-251, 1888 (discards ecaudatus as inappropriate 
and adopts < rray's Ch&ropus caslanotis as type of the genus). 

Type: Perameles ecaudata Ogilby ( = Chceropus castanotis Gray, 1842), from the 
Murray River, New South Wales, Australia. 

( 'haeropus ( ( '//<< ropus) : x°ip°S, hog; itovc,, foot — in allusion to the striking resem- 
blance of the fore feet to those of a pig. 
Chaerotherium (see Choerotherium). Ohgulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Chaetocercus Krekft, 1866. Marsupialia, Dasyuridse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 434-435, pi. 36. 

Type: Chaetocercus cristicauda Krefft, from South Australia, probably in the 
vicinity of Lake Alexandrina. 

Name preoccupied by ( 'haetocercus G. R. Gray, 1855, a genus of Birds. Replaced 
by Dosycercus Peters, 1875. 

Chaetocercus: x a ' T7 /, hair, mane; KspKo<;, tail — in allusion to the crested, com- 
pressed tail. 
Chaetodipus (subgenus of Perognathus) Merriam, 1889. Glires, Heteromyidse. 

N. Am. Fauna, No. 1, pp. 5, 21-22, pi. in, fig. 15, Oct. 25, 1889; Osgood, N. Am. 
Fauna, No. IS, pp. 14, 41-62, pis. i figs. 5-8, n 4-9, iv, text figs. 2, 10-15, Sept, 
20, 1900. 

Type: Perognathus {Chaetodipus) spinatus Merriam, from the lower Colorado 
River, 25 miles below the Needles, San Bernardino County, California. 

Chaetodipus: x a * r V, hair; -\-Dipus— in allusion to the stiff hairs on certain parts 
of the body, in comparison with the soft pelage of Perognathus proper. 
Chaetomys Gray, 1843. Glires, Erethizontidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. cxxi, 21-22, July, 1843; Waterhouse, Nat. Hist. 
Mamm., II, Rodentia, 399-404, pi. 21, fig. 1, 1848. 

Type: Hystrix subspinosus Lichtenstein, from Brazil. 

Chaetomys: x a ^ T V, hair; //>-%-, mouse — from the pelage, which consists of short, 
rather flexible spines; or, as described by Waterhouse, of modified hairs, 
intermediate between spines and bristles. 

7591— No. 23—03 12 



178 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Chaetophxactus Fitzinger, 1871. Edentata, Dasypodidae. 

Sitzungsber. Math. -Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, LXIV, Abth. I, 268-276, 

July, 1871. 
Species: Dasypus villasus Desmarest, from the pampas of Argentina; and D. 

minutus Desrnarest, from Port Desire, Patagonia. 
Chsetophractus: x a ^ ZT h hair; (ppatcro*;, protected. 
Chalcochloris (see Calcochloris). Insectivora, Chrysochloridse. 

Chalicomys Kaup, 1832. Glires, Castoridae. 

Oken's Isis, Jena, 1832, 994-995, Taf. xxvi, figs. 1-6. 
Type: Chalicomys jaegeri Kaup, from the Miocene of Germany. 
Extinct. Based on a considerable fragment of the lower jaw with all the molars; 

a fragment of the upper jaw with the first and second molars; 8 separate molars. 
Chalicomys: x c ' c ^ l h xdhiKos, pebble, gravel; nv<Z, mouse — in allusion to the 

character of the beds in which the remains were found. 
Chalicotheriuni Kaup, 1833. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Chalicotheriidse. 

Desc. Ossem. Fuss. Mamm. Mus. Darmstadt, second cahier, 4-8, 30-31, Atlas, 

Tab. vu, figs. 5-7 (Calicotherium), 1833; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 

179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 1902, 691 (type fixed). 
Chalicotherium Pomel, Comptes Rendus, Paris, XXVI, No. 25, p. 687, Jan. -June, 

1848. 
Species: Chalicotherium antiquum Kaup, and Lophiodon goldfussii Kaup (type), 

from the Pliocene of Eppelsheim, Rhein-Hessen, Germany. 
Extinct. 
Chalicotherium: ^«Az|, ja/L/fo?, pebble, gravel; bifpioi', wild beast — in allusion 

to the character of the beds in which the remains were found. 
Chalinolobus Peters, 1866. Chiroptera, Vespertilionida?. 

* Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, 1866, 680, 1867, 480; Dobson, Proc. 

Zool. Soc. London, 1875, 381-388; Cat. Chiroptera Brit. Mus., 246-256, 1878. 
Type: Vespertilio tuberculatus Forster, from Dusky Bay, New Zealand (fide 

Dobsox). 
Chalinolobus: x a ^- iy oi, angle of the mouth; A0/S05, lobe — from the fleshy lobule 

on the lower lip on each side near the angle of the mouth. 
Champsodelphis Gervais, 1848-52. Cete, Platanistidae. 

Zool. et Paleont. Franc., l e ed., I, 152-153, 1848-52; 2 e ed., 311-312, pi. 41, 

figs. 6-8, 1859; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 590, 

1902 (type fixed 1. 
Campsodelphis Paolo, Atti Soc. Veneto-Trentina Sci. Nat. Padova, Ser. II, Vol. 

Ill, 51-52, 1897. 
Species: Delphinus macrogenius Laurillard (type), from Sort, near Dax, Depar- 

tement de Landes, and Leognan, Departement de la Gironde; and D. bordx 

< rervais, from Leognan, Departement de la Gironde, France. 
Extinct. 
Champsodelphis: #«/<^a7, the Egyptian name for crocodiles; SsXcpis, dolphin — 

probably in allusion to the supposed reptilian affinities of the genus, the 

remains having been described originally by Lacepede as those of a gavial. 
Chaon (subgenus of Canis) H. Smith, 1839. Feree, Canidse. 

Jardines Nat. Library, Mamm., IX, 129-267, 1839; Ed. 2, Mamm., IV, 129-267, 

1866; V, 2S7-291, 1865. 
The subgenus includes ten sections: Lupus, Tjyciscus, Chryseus, Thous, Sacalius, 

Cynalopex, Megalotis, Chrysocyon, Dusicyon, and Cerdocyon. 
Charronia (subgenus of Martes) Gray, 1865. Fera% Mustelida?. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1865, 108-109; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate 

Mamm. Brit. Mus., 86, 1869. 



CHARRONIA CHEIROMYS. 179 

Charronia — Continued. 

Type: Mustela flavigula Boddaert, from Nepal, India. 

Name preoccupied (?) by Charonia Gistel, 1848, a genus of Mollusca. 

Charronia: x ( *P oav , li° n — i- e -> lion-like. Possibly from Xapajv, the ferryman 
of the Styx, whose name was probably given on account of his bright, fierce 
eyes. 
Chasmotherium Rutimeyer, 1862. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Pal?eotheriida?. 

Neue Denkschrift. Allgem. Schweiz. Gesell. gesammt. Naturwiss., Zurich, XIX, 
63-67, tab. v, figs. 70-72, 1862. 

Type: ( Itasmotherium cartieri Rutimeyer, from the Eocene of Egerkingen, near 
Solothurn, Switzerland. 

Extinct. Based on four lower teeth. 

Chasmotherium: ^dd/za, space; Qtjpiov, wild beast. 
Chaus Gray, 1843. Ferse, Felidse. 

List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xx, 44—45, 1843; Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 
1867, 275-276; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 33-37, 
1869. 

Species, 5: Chaus? planiceps (= Felis planiceps Vigors & Horsfield ) , from Sumatra; 
C. lybicus (= Felischqus Giildenstaedt, type), from India or Egypt; C. pulchellus 
( = F. pulchella Gray), from Egypt; C. servalinus (= F. servalina Jardine), from 
India; C. coffer (= F. ccffra Desmarest?), from the Cape of Good Hope. 

Chaus: Apparently from native name. 
Cheirogaleus E. Geoffroy, 1812. Primates, Lemuridse. 

Ann. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, XIX, 172, pi. 10, 1812; Cours Hist. Nat., ll e Lecon, 
22-24, 1828. 

Chirogaleus Oken, Lehrbuch Naturgesch., 3ter Theil, Zool., 2te Abth., pp. xi, 
1168-1170, 1816; Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 7, 1842; Schinz, Synop. 
Mamm., I, 104, 1844. 

Chirogale Gloger, Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxviii, 44, 1841; For- 
syth-Major, Nov. Zool., I, 6, 21, 1894. 

Species, 3: Cheirogaleus major Geoffroy, C. medius Geoffroy, and C. minor Geoff- 
roy, from Madagascar. 

Cheirogaleus: x £ ip, hand; yaXfj, weasel — in allusion to the long fingers and the 
freely movable thumb which are well adapted for prehension. 
Cheirolites Meyer, 1848. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidse. 

Bronn's Handb. Gesch. Natur, III, Index Paleont., 286, (454, Cheirolithes) , 1848; 
Scudder, Nomenclator Zool., pt. i, 68, 1882. 

Type: Apparently ElejjJiasprimigeiiiusBlumenhach., from the Pleistocene of Europe. 

The genus (?) is not described here and merely occurs in the synonymy of E. 
primigenivs with the explanation "dent, molar, lamella? singuk-e" (p. 454). 
(See Dicyclotherium E. Geoffroy, 1837.) 

Extinct. 
Cheiromeles Horsfield, 1824. Chiroptera, Noctilionidae. 

Zool. Researches Java, 10 pages (unnumbered), 2 plates, figs, a-g, i-m, o-p, 
1824; Dobson, Cat. Chiroptera Brit. Mus., 405-406, 1878. 

Chiromeles Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., Addenda, 3, 1846. 

Type: Cheiromeles torquotus Horsfield, from Penang or Singapore, Straits Settle- 
ments. 

Cheiromeles: X £ ip, hand; jueAog, limb (Agassiz); x s ip> hand; Lat. meles, badger. 

(Century Diet. ) Possibly in allusion to the first toe, which is separated from 

the others like a thumb and probably opposable to them, thus giving the foot 

the appearance of a hand. 

Cheiromys G. Cuvier, 1800. Primates, Daubentoniidse. 

Lecons Anat. Conip., I, tabl. I, 1800 (Chieromys, obvious misprint); Regne 
Animal, I, 207-208, 1817. 



180 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Cheiromys — Continued. 

Cheyromis E. Geoffroy, Cat. Mamm. Mus. National Hist. Nat., 181, 1803. 
Chiromys Illiger, Prodromus Syst. Marnm. et Avium, 75, 1811; Agassiz, Nomen- 

clator Zool. Mamm., 7, 1842. 
Type: Cheiromys madagascariensis (=Sciv/rus madagascariensis Gnielin), from 

Madagascar. Name antedated by Daubentonia Geoffroy, 1795. 
Cheiromys: X £ ip, hand; //us, mouse — in allusion to the large opposable hallux, 
which gives the foot the appearance of a haud. 
Cheiron Burnett, 1828. Primates, Simiidse. 

Quart. Journ. Sci., Lit. & Art, XXVI, 307, Oct. -Dec, 1828. 

Species: Cheiron Jar (=H6mo lav Linmeus) , from the Malay Peninsula; and C. 
leuciscm ( =Simia leudsea Schreber), from Java. (See Mylobates Illiger, 1811.) 
( 'Ik iron: Xeipoov, Chiron, one of the centaurs, a famous soothsayer and surgeon. 
(The name was probably derived from x £l P, hand, and applied to the gild mns 
in allusion to the great development of their arms and hands). 
Cheironectes (see Chironectes). Marsupialia, Didelphyidse. 

Cheiropotes (see Chiropotes). Primates, Cebida?. 

Cheiropteruges (subg. of Pteropus) Ramsay, 1877. Chiroptera, Pteropodidse. 

Proc. Linn. Soc. New South Wales, II, 17-19, July, 1877. (Full genus on p. 19.) 
Type: Pteropus{ ( Tieiropteruges) alboscapulatus Ramsay, from Duke of York Island. 
Cheiropteruges: x £ ip, hand; nripv^, wing. 
Cheirosciurus (see Chirosciurus) Primates, Lemurid;e. 

Cheirotberium Bruno, 1839. Sirenia, Halitheriid;e. 

Mem. Reale Accad. Sci., Torino, ser. 2, I, 143-160, tav. i-ii, 1839. 
Type (species not given) from Montiglio, Piemonte, Italy. 
Name preoccupied by Cheirotherium Kaup, 1835, a genus of Reptiles. 
Extinct. Based on part of a skull with several teeth, and numerous other bones. 
Cheirotherium: x £i P, hand; B%piov, wild beast— in allusion to the fore limbs, 
which are supposed to have resembled those of Manatus. 
Chelemys (subgenus of Akodon) Thomas, 1903. Glires, Muridse, Cricetinse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., XII, 242, Aug. 1, 1903. 
Type: Akodon megdlonyx ( = Hesperomys megakmyx Waterhouse), from the Lake 

of Quintero, Chile. 
Chelemys: XV^-Vi claw; /'#?, mouse — in allusion to the large fossorial claws. 
Chelodus Kaup, 1832. Glires, Castoridee. 

Oken's Isis, Jena, 1832, 995-996, Taf. xxvi, figs. 1, 2. 
Chelodon Gloger, Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Xaturgesch., I, 105, 1841. 
Chselodus Agassiz, Nornenclator Zool. Mamm., 7, 1842 (misprint). 
Type: Chelodus typus Kaup, from the Miocene of Europe. 
Extinct. Based on "the first upper molar of the right jaw and the last upper 

molar of the left jaw." 
Chelodus: XV^'h claw; oSovz, tooth. 
Cheloniscus \Yagler, 1830. Edentata, Dasypodidge. 

Nat, Syst. Amphibien, 35, 1830. 

Type: Dasypus gigas Cuvier, from South America. New name for Priodon F. 

Cuvier. "Die ebenen, nicht sagefonnig eingeschnittenen Ziihne des Tatu 

lnachen die Abschaffung des Cuvier'schen, ohnehin falsch construirten Sip- 

penamens nothig." (Wag-ler.) 

CJieloniscus: ^eAgj?'?;, tortoise, with dim. suffix — in allusion to the carapace. 

Cheloniscus (subgenus of Tolypeutes) Gray, 1865. Edentata, Dasypodidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1865, 379-380; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate 

Mamm. Brit. Mus., 386, 1869. 
Type: Dasypus tridnctus Linnaeus, from South America. 

Not Cheloniscus Wagler, 1830, based on D. gigas, a species which Gray puts in 
the genus Prionodos. 



CHENOCETTJS CHINCHILLA 181 

Chenocetus (see Chaenocetus) . Cete, Physeteridae. 

Chenodelphinus (see Chaenodelphinus). Cete, Physeteridae. 

Cheyromis, Cliieromys (see Cheiroinys). Primates, Daubentoniidae. 

Chilomys Thomas, 1897. Glires, Muridae, Cricetinae. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XIX, 500-501, May 1, 1897. 
Type: Oryzomys instans Thomas, from Bogota, Colombia. 
ChUomys: jerAoj, lip; //t~s, mouse — in allusion to the prominent upper lip. 

Chilonatalus (subgenus of Naialus) Miller, 1898. Chiroptera, Natalidpe. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., July 27, 1898, 326-328, fig. la in text. 
Type: Natalus micropus Dobson, from the vicinity of Kingston, Jamaica. 
Chilonatabis: ££?Ao?, lip; -\-Natalus — from the conspicuous cutaneous outgrowth 
on the lower lip (as in Chilonycteris), apparently forming a double lip. 

Chilonycteris Gray, 1839. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., IV, 4-5, pi. i, fig. 2, 1839; Dobson, Cat. Chiroptera 
Brit. Mus., 447-148, 1878. 

Type: Chilonycteris macleayii Gray, from Cuba. 

ChUonycterus: ^eZ/log, lip; vvKrspiz, bat — from the lower lip, which is "much 
expanded and folded outwards, with numerous small, rounded papillae in 
front; chin with a horizontal cutaneous expansion." (Dobson. ) 

Chilotus (subgenus of Arvieola) Baird, 1857. Glires, Muridae, Mi^rotina?. 

Mamm. N. Am., 516, 1857. 

Type: Arvieola oregoni Bachman, from Astoria, Oregon. 
ChUotus: ^fiZ/los, lip; ov$, (bro$, ear — in allusion to the thickened margin of the 

ear in the type specimen, a character since found to be abnormal, and in Baird's 

specimen probably due to disease. 

Chimarrogale Anderson, 1877. Insectivora, Soricidae. 

Journ. Asiat. Soc, Bengal, Calcutta, XLVI, pt. 2, 262-263, 1877; Yunnan Expds. 

(1S78), 139-149, pi. v, figs. 17-30, 1879. 
Type: Qrossopus himalayicus Gray, from the Himalayas, India. 
Chimarrogale: x E U ux PP°S, mountain torrent; yaXif, weasel — from the animal's 

habit of living along the banks of mountain streams. 

Chincha (subgenus of Mephitis) Lesson, 1842. Ferae, Mustelidse. 

Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 67, 1842; Howell, X. Am. Fauna No. 

20, pp. 9, 14, 20, Aug. 31, 1901 (name revived* and raised to generic rank). 
Type: Chincha americana Lesson ( = Viverra mephitis Schreber), from North 

America. 
Chincha: Chinche or chincha, perhaps a native name. Cf. Spanish and Portu- 
guese chinche, bedbug. 

Chinchilla Bennett, 1829. Glires, Chinehillidpe. 

Gardens & Menag. Zool. Soc, I, 1, Oct., 1829 1; Gray, Spicilegia Zoologica, II, 

11-12, tab. 7, fig. 1, Aug. 1, 1830; Bennett, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1833, 59; 

Trans. Zool. Soc, I, 59, 1833. 
Type: Mus laniger Molina, from Chile. 
Chinchilla: Spanish name, derived from a native South American name. 

* The adoption of the rule making the type of a genus an included species which 
has the same name reduces Chincha to a synonym of Mephitis, since the type of the 
latter genus becomes V. mephitis, and not V. putorius, as stated by Howell. (See 
Science, new ser., XVI, 114, July 18, 1902.) 

t For date of publication, see Waterhouse, Nat. Hist. Mamm., Bodentia, 234 
footnote, 1848. 



182 INDEX C4ENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

ChinchiUula Thomas, 1898. Glires, Murida?, Cricetinse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., I, 280-281, Apr. 1, 1898. 
Type: ChinchiUula sahamse Thomas, from Esperanza, Puiia region of the plateau 

near Mount Sahama, Bolivia (alt. 4,000 meters). 
ChinchiUula: Dim. of Chinchilla. 
Chiodon Berg, 1899. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Isotemnidpe. 

Comun. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires, I, No. 3, p. 79, May 24, 1899. 
New name for Staurodon Roth, 1899, which is preoccupied bj> Staurodon Lowe, 

1854, a genus of Mollusca. 
Extinct. 

Chiodon: ^zogj, to mark with a x or cross; odcbv = oSovs, tooth. 
Chionobates Kaup, 1829. Glires, Leporidee. 

Entw.-Gesch. & Natiirl. Syst. Europ. Thierwelt, I, 170, 1829. 
Species: Lepus variabilis, and L. borealis, from Europe. 

Chionobates: x 1 ^ 1 ', snow; (Jalvoo, togo, walk — from the animal's white color in 
winter, and its habit of running about over the snow. 
Chiroderma Peters, 1860. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidse. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, 1860, 747-748. 
Type: Chiroderma vittosum Peters, from Brazil. 
Chiroderma: X £ 'P, hand; depjua, skin. 
Chirogale, Chirogaleus (see Cheirog-alus). Primates, Lemuridse. 

Chiromeles (see Cheiromeles). Chiroptera, Noctilionidse. 

Chiromys (see Cheiromys). Primates, Daubentoniidae. 

Chironectes Illk;er, 1811. Marsupialia, Didelphyidse. 

Prod rom us Syst. Manmi. et Avium, 76, 1811; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. &Monotrem. 

Brit. Mus., 366-370, 1888. 
Cheironectes Griffith's Cuvier, Animal Kingdom, V, 191, 1827. 
Type: Imtra minima Zimmermann, from Guiana. 

Chironectes: x £ ip, hand; vrjKrrjs, swimmer — from the webbed hind feet, which 
are adapted for swimming. 
Chiropetes Gloger, 1841. Chiroptera, Noctilionidse. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxviii, 49, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 190, Feb., 1895. 
New name for Cheiromeles Horsfield, 1824. Type: Cheiromeles torquatus Horsfield, 

from the Sunda Islands, Malay Archipelago. 
Chiropetes: X £ ip, hand; nero/iiai, to fly; + suffix — r?/s, denoting agent. (Com- 
pare Ocypetes.) 
Chiropodomys Peters, 1868. Glires, Muridae, Murina?. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, July, 1838, 448-449, pi. i; Blanford, 

Fauna Brit. India, Mamm., 403-104, fig. 130, 1888-91. 
Type: Chiropodomys penicillatus Peters, from India. 

Chiropodomys: x £ *P, hand; itovz, Tto86$, foot; /ivs, mouse^ — probably in allusion 

to the hallux and rudimentary pollex, which are armed with flat nails instead 

of claws. 

Chiropotes (subgenus of PUhecia) Lesson, 1840. Primates, Cebida?. 

Species Mamm., 178-181, 1840; Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 8, 1842. 

Cheiropotes Reichenbach, Vollstand. Naturgesch. Affen, 72-74, 1862 (raised to 

generic rank). 
Type: Chiropotes couxio Lesson, from Para, or the banks of the Rio Orinoco. 
Chiropotes: X £l P, hand; 7t6rT/s, drinker — in allusion to the habit, which this 
monkey is said to have, of drinking with its hands instead of putting its head 
down to the water. 
Chiroscaptor Heude, 1898. Insectivora, Talpida?. 

Mem. Hist. Nat. Empire Chinois, IV, pt, i, 36-10, pi. ix, figs. 1-1 c, 1898. 



CHIROSCAPTOR CHLAMYDOTHERIUM. 183 

Chiroscaptor — Continued. 

Type: Chiroscaptor sinensis Heude, from southeastern Teheli, northern China. 

Chiroscaptor: X £l P, hand; 6k<xiitcd, to dig (modified anagram of Scaptochirus). 
Chirosciurus Cuvier & Geoffroy, 1795. Primates, Lemuridse. 

"Magasin Encycloped., No. VI," 1795 (names only, Khoyak, Chirosciurus) 
(fide Gervais, Diet. Pittoresque Hist. Nat., IV, pt. 2, p. 617, 1836.) 

Cheirosciurus Gray, Proe. Zool. Soc. London, 1863, 145; Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs 
& Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 82, 1870 (in synonymy of Galago) . 

Based on the ' Khoyak ' (Galago sp.? from Africa). Nomen nudum'.' 

Chirosciurus: x £ ip, hand; 4- Sdurus. 
Chirotherium Kaup, 1835. Marsupialia or Amphibia? 

Neues Jahrbuch f. Mineralogie, 1835, 327-328. 

Based on tracks found in the Hildburghausen sandstone, Saxe-Meiningen, Ger- 
many. "Sie haben von den riesigen, sog. Quadrumanen-Fussstapfen von 
Hildburghausen gelesen [Palaeopithecus Voigt] . Ich besitze selbst eine Gesteins- 
Platte mit dergleichen. Die Fussstapfen sind von der Form, wie von I I linden 
. . . Das Thier scheint mir ein riesenmassiges Beutelthier mit Daumen an 
Hinter- und Vorder-Fiissen ... Da das Thier bis jetzt noch neu ist, so habe 
ieh es Chirotherium Barthii genannt und behalte mir vor, wenn es ein Amphi- 
bium wiire, wogegen der Gang streitet, den Namen in Chirosaurus umzu- 
wandeln." (Kaup.) 

Extinct. 

Chirotheriant: X £ ip, hand; dr/piov, wild beast. 
ChiroxCopE, 1884. Allotheria, Bolodontid;e. 

Paleont, Bull. No. 37, p. 321, 1884; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XXI, 321-322, Jan. 28, 
1884. 

Type: Chirox plicatus Cope, from the Puerco Eocene of New Mexico. 

Extinct. Based on "three superior molars; viz: the last premolar, and (lie 
second and third true molars." 

Chirox: X', the letter V (a cross); /5ffi>|, cleft, fissure — in allusion to the cross- 
shaped fissures of the crowns of the molars. 
Chiruromys Thomas, 1888. Glires, Muridae, Murinae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, Aug. 1, 1888, 237-240, 2 figs, in text. 

Type: Chiruromys forbesi Thomas, from Sogere, southeastern New Guinea. 

Chiruromys: X £ ip, hand; ovpd, tail; jtivg, mouse — from the tail, which is modified 
for prehension almost as much as in the Phalangers. 
Chlamydophorus ('Harlan') Wagler, 1830. Edentata, Dasypodidae. 

Wagler, Nat. Syst. Amphibien, 35, 1830; Lenz, Naturgesch. Saugethiere, p. xi, 
1831; Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 8, 1842; Wagner, Suppl. Schre- 
ber's Saugthiere, IV, 183, 1844. 

Emendation of Chlamyphorus Harlan, 1825. " Richtiger ware Chlamydephorus 
oder Chlamydophorus." (Lenz.) 
Chlamydotherium Bronn, 1838. Edentata, Glyptodontidse. 

Lethaea Geognostica, II, 1256-1259, 1287-1288, 1838; Handb. Gesch. Natur, III, 
Index Palaeont., 292, 1848. 

Type (species not named = Glyptodon clavipes Owen), from the clay marls on the 
right bank of the Rio Arapey Grande, 10 leagues above its junction with the 
Rio Uruguay, Uruguay. "Man konnte dieses Geschlecht nach der zum 
Graben geeigneten Starke seiner Platthand wie seines Plattfusses Oryctero- 
therium nennen, so feme keine Panzerreste dazu gehoren, sonst ihm den 
Namen Chlamydotherium geben." 

Extinct. Based on the " linken vorderen und hinteren Extremitaten eines 
noch nicht ausgewachsenen Individuums. ' ' 

Chlamydotherium: ^/lay/vs, x^ a Mv8os, cloak; Bijpiov, wild beast— in allusion to 
the carapace. 



184 INDEX GENEEUM MAMMAL1UM. 

Chlamydotherium Lund, 1838. Edentata, Dasypodidae. 

Overs. K. Danske Vidensk. Selsk. Forhandl. Kjobenhavn, 183S, 11; Ann. Sci. 
Nat,, Paris, 2? ser., XI, Zool., 217, 231, Apr., 1839; Echo du Monde Savant, 
Paris, 6 e ann., No. 430, p. 244, Apr. 17, 1839; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., 
Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 581, 1902 (type fixed). 

Species: Chlamydotherium humboldtii Lund (type), and C. giganteum Lund, from 
the bone caves between the Rio das Velhas and Rio Paraopeba, Minas Geraes, 
Brazil (alt, 2,000 ft.). 

Possibly preoccupied by Chlamydotherium Bronn, 1838, a genus of Glyptodon- 
tidse. In this case Pampatherlum Amegbino, 1880, is the earliest available 
name for Lund's genus. (See Ameghixo, Revista Argentina, I, 252, 1891). 

Extinct. 
Chlamyphorus Harlan, 1825. Edentata, Dasypodidaa. 

Ann. Lye. Nat. Hist. N. Y., I, pt. 2, 235-246, pis. xix-.xxi, 1825. 

Chlamydophorus Wagler, Nat. Syst. Amphibien, 35, 1830; Lenz, Naturgesch. 
Saugethiere, p. xi, 1831; Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 8, 1842; Wag- 
ner, Suppl. Schreber's Saugtbiere, IV, 183, 1844. 

Chlamydephorus Lenz, 1. c, p. xi (misprint). 

Type: Chlamyphorus Iruncatus Harlan, from Mendoza, Cbile. 

Chlamyphorus: /Aa/ruj, x^- a Mv8o$, cloak; (popoc,, bearing — in allusion to the 
shield of horny plates. 
Chlorocebus Gray, 1870. Primates, Cercopithecidse. 

Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 5, 24-25, 1870. 

Species 6: Simla rubra Gmelin, from Africa; & pygerythra F. Cuvier, from South 
Africa; Cercopithecus rufo-wiridis I. Geoffroy, from Mozambique; Simla sabseus 
Linnaeus, from West Africa; Cercopithecus engythithea Gray, from Abyssinia; 
and Cercopithecus cynosurus Geoffroy, from West Africa. 

Chlorocebus: jAcj/jo?, greenish yellow; tojfloi, a long-tailed monkey — in allusion 
to the characteristic greenish or yellowish color. 
Chloromys (F. Cuvier) Rafinesque ( see Cloromis). Glires, Dasyproctidse. 

Chloromys (subg. oiSteneqfiber) (Meyeb -MS. | Schlosser, 1884. ( Hires, Castoridae. 

Nager Europ. Tertiiirs, in Palaeontographica, XXXI, art. 3, pp. 39-40, Taf. x, 
figs. 7-8, July, 1884. (Sep. pp. 21-22, Taf. vi.) 

Type: Chalicomys eseri Meyer, from Weissenau, near Mainz, Germany. "In H. 
v. Meyer's Manuscripte werden die Fig. 7, 8 ahgebildeten Stiicke aus Weissenau 
bei Mainz 'Chloromys' genannt. . . . Diese Merkmale diirften die Trennung 
tier (Tattung Steneofiber in zwei Subgenera vollkommen rechtfertigen. Fiir 
das Fine mochte ich den von H. v. Meyer aufgestellten Namen Chloromys, 
fiir das zweite die Bezeichnung Chalicomys Kaup (non H. v. Meyer) vorschla- 
gen." (Schlosser.) 

Name preoccupied by Chloromys Lesson, 1827, a genus of Dasyproctidae. 

Chloromys: ;rA<»pos, greenish yellow; /<£?, mouse. 
Choecochoerus (see Cebochoerus). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

Choelicotherium (see Chalicotherium). Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Chalicotheriidae. 
Choelopus ( see Choloepus) . Edentata, Bradypodi' lae. 

Choenohyus (see Cheenohyus). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidte. 

Choerelaphus Gloger, 1841. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxn, 130, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 
Nat, Hist., 6th ser., XV, 191, Feb. 1, 1895. 

Type: Sus babyrussa Linnaeus, from Celebes. (See Babirussa Frisch, 1775). 

Choerelaphus: x°ip°S, hog; sAafios, de^v — a classical equivalent of the Malay 
name, babirussa, meaning ' hog deer. ' 



CEKEKODES CHCEROTHERICM. 185 

Choerodes Leidy, 1852. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Hippopotamidse. 

Proc Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 18.52, 52. 

Type: Hippopotamus liberiensis Morton, from St. Paul River, Liberia, West Africa. 

Name preoccupied by Choerodes White, 1846, a genus of Coleoptera. Replaced by 

Choeropsis Leidy, 1853. 
Choerodes: xwp&Svs, like a hog — from its habits. 

Choeromeryx Pomel, 1848. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anthracotheriidae? 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, XXVI, No. 25, p. 687, Jan. -June, 1848; Lydekker, Cat. 

Foss. Mamm. Brit, Mus., II, 165-166, 1885. 
Choeromeryx Lydekkek, Cat, Siwalik Vert. Indian Mus., 37, 1885. 
Type: Anthracotherium siMsirense Pentland, from the Siwaliks of Karibiiri, Gtiro 

Hills, nurtheast Bengal, India. 
Extinct. Based on the right iriaxilla, containing the third and fourth molars. 
Choeromeryx: x°iR°S, hog; pt'jpvc., ruminant. 

Choeromorus Gervais, 1848-52. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Zool. et Paleont. Franc., l e ed., II, Expl. pi. No. 33, p. 7, 1848-52; 2 e ed., 1859, 

185-187, pi. 33, figs. 4-5, 1859. 
Species: Choeromorus mamillatus Gervais, and C. simplex Gervais, from the Departe- 

inent du Gers, France. 
Extinct. Based on two fragments of lower jaws, each containing the last three 

molars. 
Choeromorus: xoipos, hog; opopoc,, closely resembling, a neighbor. 

Choeronycteris (subgenus of Glossophaga) Lichtexstein, 1844. 

Chiroptera, Phyllostomatida?. 
Lichtenstein in Tschudi's Fauna Peruana, Mamm., 70-73, Taf. in, 1844; Wieg- 
mann's Archiv Naturgesch., 1844, I, 247; Peters, Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. 
Wiss., Berlin, 1865, 354; Ibid., 1868, 366 (raised togeneric rank); Dobson, 
Cat. Chiroptera Brit, Mus., 509-511, 1878; Miller & Reiin, Proc. Boston Soc. 
Nat. Hist., XXX, 284-285, Dec, 1901 (type fixed). 
Species: Choeronycteris peruana Tschudi, from the east slope of the Cordillera (alt, 

5,000 ft,), Peru; and C. mexicana Tschudi (type), from Mexico. 
( nosranycteris: x°ip°S, h°g; vvKrspii, bat — in allusion to the long, slender 
rostrum. 
Chceropithecus (see Chaeropithecus ) . Primates, Cercopithecid;e. 

Chceropotamus (see Chaeropotamus). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

Chceropotamus Beddard, 1895. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Hippopotamidse. 

Text-Book Zoogeography, 100, 1895. 

Lapsus for Chojropsis Leidy, 1853: "The small Liberian hippopotamus has 
been placed in a distinct genus, Charropotamus" (not Chavropotamus Cuvier, 
1821). 

Chceropsis Leidy, 1853. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Hippopotamidse. 

Journ. Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila., 2d ser., II, pt. in, 213-224, pi. 21, Jan., 1853. 
New name for Cliarodes Leidy, 1852, which is preoccupied by Choerodes White, 

1846, a genus of Coleoptera. 
Chceropsis: x°{p°S, hog; oipz$, appearance. 

Chceropus (see Chaeropus). Marsupialia, Peramelidse. 

Choerotherium Cautley & Falconer, 1835. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse? 

Journ. Asiatic Soc. Bengal, IV, No. 48, p. 706, Dec, 1835. 

Chaerotherium Cautley & Falconer, Asiatic Researches, Calcutta, XIX, pt. i, 
59 footnote, pis. iv fig. 6, v figs. 2 a, b, d, 1836; Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 2e ser., 
Zool., VII, 61, Jan., 1837. 



186 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Chcerotherium — Continued. 

Type: Chcerotherium sivalense Cautley & Falconer, from the Pliocene of the 

Siwalik Hills, India. (The species is not described.) 
Extinct. 

Chcerotherium: x°?P°$, hog; Qrjpiov, wild beast. 
Choerotherium Lartet, 1851.* Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suida?. 

Notice sur la Colline de Sansan, 32-33, 1851. 
Species, 3: Choerotherium dupuii Lartet, from Jegun, Departement du Gers; C. 

nouleti Lartet, from Rourepos, Departement de Haute-Garonne; and C. san- 

saniense Lartet, from Sansan, Departement du <!ers, France. 
See Choerotherium Cautley & Falconer, 1835. 
Extinct. 
Choerotherium: x°?P°S, hog; Qt/pi'or, wild beast — from the lower molars, qui 

"sont assez bien dans le plan de celles du cochon." 
Choichephilum Ameghino, 1899. Ungulata, Hyracoidea, Archseohyracidse. 

Sinop. Geol.-Paleont, in Segundo Censo Nac. Repiib. Argentina, SupL, July, 1899 

(sep. p. 5). 
Type: ChoichephUum diastematum Arneghino, from the Patagonian formation in 

the interior, near Deseado, Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

( JuyichephUum: In honor of Choiquetilu, an Araucanian Indian chief of Patagonia. 
Choilodon Filhol, 1888. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Tragulidse? 

Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, 7e ser., XII, No. 1, for 1887-88, 17-18, 1888. 
Type: ( hoilodon elegans Filhol, from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 
Extinct. Based on ' une portion du maxillaire inferieur.' 
Choilodon: ko7\o$, hollow; dficov=d8ovi;, tooth — in allusion to 'une cavite en 

forme de cornet' in the fourth lower premolar. 
Choir opithecus (subgenus of Cynocephalus) Reichenbach,! 1862. 

Primates, Cercopithecidse. 
Vollstand. Naturgesch. Affen, 151-152, 1862. 
Type: Sim ia porcarius Boddaert, from Africa. 
Choiropithecus: ,\'"ip°S, hog; 7riO?/Ko$, ape. 
Choiropotamus Gray, 1843. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suida?. 

\Koiropotamus Gray, List. Spec. Brit. Mus., \>. xxvii, 1843 — nomen nudum.] 
List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., 185, 1843; Ann. & Mag. Nat, Hist.. 2d eer., X, 

281, Oct., 1852. 
Type: Sus africanus Gmelin (=8. koiropotamus Desmoulins, 1831), from S. Africa. 
Name preoccupied by Chosropotamus Cuvier, 1S22, a genus of extinct Ungulates 

from France. Replaced by Potamochoerus Gray, 1854. 
Choiropotamus: xoipos, hog; itovapos, river — from its habitat. 
Choloepus Illiger, 1811. Edentata, Bradyi)odidse. 

Prodromus Syst. Manna, et Avium, 108-109, 1811. 
Choloepus F. Cuvier, Diet. Sci. Nat., LIX, 498, 1829. 
Choehpus Tschudi, Archiv Naturgesch., X, pt. i, 253, 1S44. 
Cholopus Agassiz, Index Univers., 83, 1846; 2d ed., 239, 1848; Sclater, Proc. 

Zool. Soc. London, 1872, 861, pi. lxxii; Coues, Cent. Diet, I, 976, 1 fig., 1889. 
Cholsepus Gray, Cat. Bones Mamm. Brit. Mus., 289-290, 1862. 
Choloepus Thomas, Novitates Zool., X, No. 1, p. 42, 1903. 

*The genus is quoted by Lartet as "C. M. 1838. Blainv. Osteog. Fasc. 22, 1847." 
If the first reference is Comptes Rendus 1838, the name is not found in this citation. 

fBlainville, Osteog., I, Primates, 30, 31, 1839, merely refers to Choiropithecus as 
used by classical writers, without adopting the name. 



CHOLOEPUS CHROTOMYS. 187 

Choloepus — Continued. 

Species: Bradypus didactylus Linnaeus, and B. torquatus Illiger, from Brazil. 
Choloepus: jca/lo/Vous, lame-footed — in allusion to the fore limb, which has the 
toes reduced to two; and also probably to the manner in which the animal 
walks. 
Chondrorhynchus G. Fischer, 1814. Ferae, Ursidae. 

Zoognosia, III, 142-143, 1814. 

Type (not given, but evidently) Bradypus ursinus Shaw, from India. "Hoc 
animal singulare proprietates Bradypodis et Ursi conjungit."* (See Melursus 
Meyer, 1793.) 
Chondrorhynchus: ^oV^/joj, cartilage; pvyx°$, snout, muzzle. 
Choneziphius Ditvernoy, 1851. Cete, Physeteridae. 

Aim. Sci. Nat., Paris, 3e scr., XV, Zool., 43, 61-63, 70-71, pi. 2, fig. 5, 1851. 
Type: Ziphius planirostris Cuvier, from the Antwerp Basin, Belgium. 
Extinct. 

Choneziphius: x&> V} l, funnel; -{-Ziphius — in allusion to "lesdeux cavitcs en forme 

d'eutounoirs creusees dans les os incisifs, a la base du rostre et immediatement 

en avant des narines. ' ' 

Choriotherium Haeckel, 1895. Ungulata, ? 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 466, 1895. 

Hypothetical genus from the chalk ( ' Kreide ' ) . The supposed ancestor of the 

Bunotheria. 
Choriotherium: xop lov , chorion; fh/piov, wild beast. 
Chorotherium Berg, 1899. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agriochceridse. 

Commi. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires, I, No. 3, p. 79, May 24, 1899. 
New name for Agriotherium Scott, 1898, which is preoccupied by Agriotherium 

Wagner, 1837, a genus of Ferae. 
Extinct. 

Chorotherium: x&P°?, land, also the northwest wind; Bypiov, wild beast — 
'northwestern beast' — in allusion to the type locality (Utah) of Scott's genus. 

Chriacus Cope, 1883. Creodonta, Oxyclaenidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., May 22, 1883, 80 footnote. 

Type: Pelycodus pelvidens Cope, from the Lower Eocene of northwest New Mexico. 
Extinct. Based on "a single right mandibular ramus which supports the pos- 
terior four molars." 
Chriacus: XP^- 00 -, to puncture; <*ki), point. 

Chronozoon 1)e Vis, 1883. Sirenia, ? 

Proc. Linn. Soc. New South Wales, VIII, pt. in, 392-395, pi. 17, 1883. 
Type: Chronozoon australe De Vis, from the Chinchilla drift, Darling Downs, 

Queensland, Australia. 
Extinct. "The portion of skull . . . consists of the parietal and the upper 

part of the occipital bones." 
Chronozoon: xpovo^, time; ?a>oK, animal. 

Chrotomys Thomas, 1895. Glires, Muridse, Hydromyinae. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XVI, 161, Aug., 1895; Trans. Zool. Soc. Lon- 
don, XIV, pt, vi, 391-393, pis. xxxn, xxxv figs. 8-9, June, 1898. 

Type: Chrotomys whileheadi Thomas, from Monte Data (alt. 8,000 ft.), northern 
Luzon, Philippine Islands. 

Chrotomys: XP&S, XP GOT oi, color; /ivi, mouse — in allusion to the marking of the 
type species, which is distinguished by a pale stripe down the back. 



* Fischer's statement that the animal inhabits Africa is an error. 



188 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Chrotopterus Peters, 1865. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidse. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, Oct., 1865, 505. 
Type: Vampyrus auritus Peters, from Mexico. 
Chrotopterus: XP<*>S, XP oor o?, skin, color; itrepov, wing. 

Chrysaeus (see Chryseus). Ferae, Canidae. 

Chrysailurus (subgenus of Felis) Severtzow, 1858. Ferae, Felidae. 

Revue et Mag. de Zool., Paris, 2e ser., X, 389, 390, Sept., 1858. 
Type: Felis neglecta Gray, from Gambia,* West Africa. 
Chrysailurus: xpv6oz, gold; aiXovpoc,, cat. 

Chryseus (subgenus of Chaon) H. Smith, 1839. Fera?, Canidae. 

Jardine's Nat. Library, Mamm., IX, 167-192, pis. vn-x, 1839; Ed. 2, Mamm., 

I, 153, pi. 3, 1858; IV, 167-192, pis. 7-10, 34, 1866; V, 288-289, 1865. 
Chrysaeus Horsfield, Cat, Mamm. Mus. East India Co., 74, 1851 (in synonymy). 
Species 8, from India, Australia, Sumatra, Java, etc. : Canis primsevus Hodgson, 

C. dukhunensis Sykes, Chryseus scylax Smith, Canis ceylonicus Boddaert, Chryseus 

pahariah Smith, Canis javanicus Desmarest, C. sumatrensis Hardwicke, and 

C. australasise auct. 
Chryseus: xpvdeog, golden — from the prevailing ferruginous or rusty red color 

of the upper parts. 

Chrysochloris Lackpede, 1799. Insectivora, Chrysochloridae. 

[G. Cuvier, Tabl. Elem. Hist, Nat. , 110, 1798 — 'La Musaraigne doree ( Sorex auratus ) ' ] 
Tabl. Mamm., 7, 1799; Nouv. Tabl. Method., in Buff on' s Hist. Nat., Didot ed., 

Quad., XIV, 158, 1799; Mem. l'Institut, III, 493, 1801; G. Cuvier, Lecons 

Anat. Comp., I, tab. i, 1800 (' Chryso-Chlore — Chrysochloris'). W. L. Sclater, 

Mamm. S. Africa, II, 168-176, figs. 135-137, 1901 (type fixed). 
Chrysoris Rafixesijie, Analyse de la Nature, 59, 1815. 
Chrysochlora Blainville, Osteog. Mamm., I, fase. vi (Insectivores), 111, 114, 

figs, in pis. v, ix, 1840; Pomel, Archiv. Sci. Phys. et Nat,, Bibl. Univ. Geneve, 

IX, 247, Nov., 1848. 
Type: Chrysochloris capensis Lacepede { = Talp<i aurea Zimmermann), from South 

Africa. 
Chrysochloris: xP v< l6s, gold; X^^poi, greenish yellow — "from the beautiful 

iridescent hairs which are intermingled with softer and non-iridescent fur." 

(Beddard, Mamm., 514, 1902.) 

Chrysocyon (subgenus of Chaon) H. Smith, 1839. Ferae, Canidse. 

Jardine's Nat. Library, Mamm., IX, 241-247, pi. xxi, 1839; Ed. 2, Mamm., I, 

154, 1858; IV, 241-244, pi. 21, 1866; V, 290-291, 1865. 
Type: Canis jubatus Pesinarest, from Paraguay. 
( hrysocyon: j/jutfoj, gold; kvgjv, dog — in allusion to the color of the upper parts, 

winch is described as 'deep fulvous-red, paler at the sides.' 

Chrysomys Gray, 1843. Glires, Spalacidaa. 

List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xxvi, 150, 1843. 
Type: Bathyergus splendens Riippell, from Abyssinia. 

Chrysomys: xp v( >os, gold; /ius, mouse—from its characteristic color, which is 
indicated also by the common name 'golden mole-rat.' 

Chrysonycteris Gray, 1866. Chiroptera, Rhinolophidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 82. 
Type: Chrysonycteris fulva Gray ( =IIipposiderosfulvus Gray), from Madras, India. 

*The type locality of Gray's species is Gambia, not Sierra Leone as stated by 
Severtzow. 



CHRYSONYCTERIS CIMOLOMYS. 189 

Chrysonycteris — Continued. 

Chrysonycteris: XP V( 5°S, gold; vvKrspis, bat — in allusion to the brilliant golden 
yellow fur. " In some specimens . . . the brightness of the colour [is] prob- 
ably unequalled by that of any other species of mammal." (Dobson, Cat. 
Chiroptera, Brit. Mus., 149, 1878.) 
Chrysoris Rafinesqce, 1815. Insectivora, Chrysochloridse. 

Analyse de la Nature, 59, 1815. 

New name for ChrysocMoris Lacepede, 1799 (Chrysoris R. Chrysochioris Cuv. ). 
Chrysospalax (subg. of Chrysochioris) Gill, 1884. Insectivora, Chrysochloridse. 
Standard Nat. Hist., V, Mamm., 136-137, 1884. 
Species: Chrysochioris villosa A. Smith, from South Africa; and C. trevelyani 

Giinther, from Pirie forest, British Caffraria. 
Chrysospalax: xputfoj, gold; dnciXa^, mole— 'golden mole;' from its character- 
istic color. 

Chrysothrix K at; p, 1835. Primates, Cebidse. 

Das Thierreich, I, 50-52, fig. in text, 1835. 

Type: Simla sciurea Linnaeus, from Brazil. Name antedated by Saimiri Voigt, 

1831. 
Chrysothrix; -ipv6oc,, gold; Opiq, hair — on account of the bright color of the type 

species. 
Chthonergus Noromann, 1839. Glires, Muridse, Microtinse. 

Nokdmanx, in Demidoff's Voy. Russie Merid. et Crimee, III, livr. i, 37-41, 1839;* 

Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 2 e ser., Zool., XII, 229, Oct., 1839. 
Chtono'ergus Keyserlixg & Blasius, Wirbelth. Europa's, pp. vii, 12, 32, 1840. 
Type: Mus murium Pallas (-M. talpinus Pallas) from southeastern Russia. 
Chthonoergus: x fjc ^ 1 ', X^ oy os, earth; spy go, to work — in allusion to its burrowing 

habits. 
Cibeticum Frisch, 1775. Ferae, Viverridse. 

Das Natur-System vierfiiss. Thiere, in Tabellen, 16, Tab. Gen., 1775. 
Type: 'Das Zibeththier.' 

Cimolestes Marsh, 1889. Marsupialia, Cimolestidse. 

Am. Joum. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXVIII, 89, pi. iv, figs. 8-19, July, 1889; 

Hay, Cat, Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 566, 1902 (type 

fixed). 
Species: Cimolestes incisus Marsh (type), and C. curtus Marsh, from the Cretaceous 

(Laramie) of Wyoming. 
Extinct. 

Cimolestes: kijugoAux, chalk; A#tfr?/s, robber — i. e. a 'Cretaceous carnivore.' 
Cimolodon Marsh, 1889. Allotheria, Plagiaulacidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXVIII, 84-85, pi. n, figs. 5-8, July, 1889. 
Type: Cimolodon nitidus Marsh, from the Cretaceous (Laramie) of Wyoming. 
Extinct, Based on an upper molar. 
Cimolodon: KzfiooXia, chalk; oSchv = odovs, tooth — in allusion to its occurrence 

in the Cretaceous. 
Cimolomys Marsh, 1889. Allotheria, Plagiaulacidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXVIII, 84, pi. n, figs. 1-4, July, 1889. 
Type: Oimolomys gracilis Marsh, from the Cretaceous (Laramie) of Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on an upper molar tooth. 
Cimolomys: Ki/icoAia, chalk; juv?, mouse — i. e. a : Cretaceous mouse. ' 

*Date, fide Engelmann's Bibliography, and Ann. Sci. Nat., XII, p. 229, Oct., 
1839. 



190 INDEX GENERUM MAMMAL1UM. 

Cinchacus (subg. of Tapirus) Gray, 1873. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Tapiridse. 
Hand-List Edentate, Thick-skinned, and Ruminant Mamra. Brit. Mus., 34-35, 

1873. 
Type: Tapirus leucogenys Gray, from the Cordilleras of Ecuador near Sunia and 

Asuay. 
Cinchacus: Probably a misprint for Pinchacus (French pinchaque), from an Indian 

word signifying phantom, ghost, or any supernatural or awe-inspiring appari- 
tion. (Roulin, Ann. Sci. Nat., XVIII, p. 47.) 
Citellus Oken, 1816. Glires, Sciuridse. 

Lehrb. Naturgesch., 3ter Theil, Zool., 2te Abth., pp. x, 842-846, 1816; Allen, 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., N. Y., XVI, 375-377, Oct. 11, 1902 (name revived). 
Species: Arctomys citellus (Linnaeus, type), from Eurasia; and Myoxas inauritus 

Oken, from the mountains north of the Cape of Good Hope. (Citellus ante- 
dates Sphermophilus F. Cuvier, 1825.) 
Citellus: From the specific designation of the type, which is the Latin name of 

the 'ziesel.' "Le zizel . . . est nomme cititius ou citellus dans le latin." 

(Encycl. Method., I, p. 320, 1782.) 
Citillus* Lichtenstein, 1827-34. Glires, Sciuridse. 

Darstellung neuer oder wenig bekannter Siiugethiere, Heft 5, Taf. xxxi fig. 2, 

xxxii [4 pp. text], 1827-34; Bennett, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1835, 90; 

Gloger, Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxx, 92, 1841. 
Species: Oiiillus mexicanus Lichtenstein, from Toluca, Mexico; C. leptodactylus 

Lichtenstein, from the Kirgis steppes; and C. mugosaricus Lichtenstein, from 

the Mugosarsk (?) Mountains on the Kirgis steppes, southwestern Siberia. 
Civetta Cuvier & Geoffroy, 1795. Ferae, Viverridae. 

Method e Mammalogique in Mag. Encyelopedique, l e annee, II, 187, 1795; 

Dumeril, Zool. Analytique, 13, 1806 (includes ' les Civettes ' ) ; Rafinesque, 

Am. Month. Mag., I, No. 5, p. 362, Sept., 1817. 
Civetea Beauvols, Cat. Raisonne Mus. C. W. Peale, Phila., 27, 1796. 
Type not mentioned by Cuvier and Geoffroy. Rafinesque gives Civetta faseiata 

Geoffroy, from France; and C. indica Geoffroy, from the East Indies. 
Civetta: French civette, civet cat. 
Cladobates F. Cuvier, 1825. Insectivora, Tupaiidae. 

[Hist. Nat. Mamm., Ill, livr. xxxv, pi. (CerpouBanxring),3pp. text, Dec, 1821.] 
Dents Mamm. [60-61], 251, 1825; Hist. Nat. Mamm., VII, Table Gen. et Method., 

2, 1842. 
Species, 3: Tupaya tana Raffles, and T. ferruginea Raffles, from Sumatra; and T. 

javanica Horsfield, from Java. 
Cladobates: KAdSos, branch; /idr?/?, walker — from the animals' arboreal habits; 

ces animaux "montent sur les arbres avec agilite comme les ecureils." 
Cladoclinus Ameghino, 1894. Marsupialia, Garzonidae. 

Enum. Synop. Mamm. Foss. Form. Eocenes de Patagonie, 102-103, Feb., 1894. 
Type: Cladorfhnix <-<>pci Ameghino, from the Eocene of Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on the posterior part of a mandible and several bones of the 

skeleton. 

*" Lichtenstein separated the ' europiiischen Ziesel (dem polnischen Suslik)' as the 
type of a group which he took out of Cuvier' s genus Spcrmojihilus, leaving the other 
species to be distributed in either Arctomys or SpermopMlus. As the name chosen 
for the new group is the Linmean specific name of the suoslik (changed in spelling 
from citellus to citillus), this species should be construed as the type of the genus 
OitiUus, although he included under it three other species there described as new, 
only one of which, C mugosaricus, is strictly congeneric with C. citellus." (Allen, 
1. c, under Citellus.) 



CLADOCLINUS CLYMENE. 191 

Cladoclinus — Continued . 

Cladoclinus: Khados, branch; kAivco, to bend — "Le caractere principal de ce 

genre consiste dans la branehe ascendente de la mandibule qui est couchee en 

arriere, formant une simple prolongation, presque horizontale, du bord 

alveolaire." 
Cladosictis Ameghino, 1887. Marsupialia, Borhysenidse. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamif. Fos. Patagonia Austral, p. 7, Dec, 1887. 
Clasodictis Roger, Yerzeichn. Foss. Saugeth., in Bericht Naturwiss. Ver. f. 

Schwaben u. Neuburg (a, V.), Augsburg, XXXI, 13, 1894 (misprint). 
Type: Cladosictis patagonica Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of the Rio Santa 

Cruz, Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Cladosictis: kX&8o$, branch; i'ktic,, weasel — from the fact that the genus was 

originally described as a Creodont. 
Clsenodon Scott, 1892. Creodonta, Arctocyonidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Nov. 15, 1892, 298-299; Lydekker, Zool. Record 

for 1892, Mamm., 31, 1893 (type fixed). 
Species, 3: Mwclsenus ferox Cope (type), from the Eocene; M. corrngatvs Cope, 

from the Upper Puerco; and possibly M. protogonioides Cope, from the Lowest 

Puerco — all from New Mexico. 
Extinct. 

< 'hmodon: (Mio)clscnus; 68cbv=d8ov<;, tooth. 
Clasodictis (see Cladosictis). Marsupialia, Borhypenidse. 

Claviglis Jentink, 1888. Glires, Muscardinida?. 

Notes Leyden Museum, X, pts. i-ii, Note r, 41-42, Apr. 1, 1888. 
Type: Claviglis crassicaudatus Jentink, from the Du Queah River, western Liberia. 
Claviglis: Lat. dava, club; glis, dormouse — in allusion to the club-shaped (not 

distichous) tail. 

Cliomys (see Eliomys). Glires, Muscardinida?. 

Clceotis Thomas, 1901. Chiroptera, Rhinolophidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., VIII, 28-30, July, 1901. 
Type: Clceotis percivali Thomas, from Takaungu, north of Moinbasa, British East 

Africa. 
Cla'otis: kXoios, collar; <wf, a?ros, ear — "the whole ear is very like a man's 
'stand-up' collar with angles in front rounded off." (Thomas. ) 
Clorinda Ameghino, 1895. Ungulata, Hyracoidea, Archseohyracidpe. 

Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XV, cuad. 11-12, pp. 624-625, 1895 (sep. pp. 24-25). 
Type: Clorinda diva Ameghino, from the Pyrotherium beds of Patagonia. 
Name preoccupied by Clorinda Barrande, 1879, a genus of Brachiopoda. Replaced 

by Plagiarthrus Ameghino, 1896. 
Extinct. Based on an entire astragalus and the lower portion of a tibia probably 

belonging to the same animal. 
Clorinda: An Amazonian leader. 
Cloromis F. Cuvier, 1812. Glires, Dasyproctidse. 

Ann. Mus. Hist. Nat., XIX, 290-291, pi. 15, fig. 10, 1812. 

Cldoromys Rafinesque, Analyse de la Nature, 56, 1815; Lesson, Man. Mammal- 
ogie, 300-301, 1827; Rengger, Naturgesch. Saeugeth. Paraguay, 259-266, 1830. 
Species: The agoutis of South America. 

Cloromis: xAca/aog, greenish yellow; /<£>S, mouse — in allusion to the characteristic 
yellowish color. 
Clymene (subgenus of Ddphinus) Gray, 1864. Cete, Delphinida?. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 237; ibid., 1866, 214 (raised to generic rank). 
Clymenia Gray, Synopsis Whales & Dolphins, 6, 1868. 



192 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Clymene — Continued. 

Type: Delphinus euphrosyne Gray, from the east coast of England. 

Name preoccupied by Clymene Oken, 1815, a genus of Mollusca. The form 

Clymenia is also preoccupied in Mollusca by < 'lymenia Minister, 1839. 
Clymene: In Greek mythology, daughter of Oceanus and Tethys. 
Cnephseus Kait, 1829. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 

Entw.-Gesch. & Naturl. Syst. Europ. Thierwelt, I, 103, 1829. 
Type: Vespertilio serotinus Schreber, from France. 
Cnephseus: KvF<paTo<;, dark. 
Cnephaiophilus Fitzixger, 1870. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 

Sitzungsber. Math.-Nat, CI. K. Aka.l. Wiss., Wien, LXII, Abth. i, 81-88, June- 
July, 1870 (sep. pp. 69-7(5). 
Species, -1 : 1 r espertUio macellus Temminck, from Borneo; I '. pettucidus Waterhouse, 

from the Philippine Islands; V. ferrugineus Temminck, from Surinam; and 

V. noctiragans Le Conte, from the eastern United States. 
Name preoccupied by Cnephaeophila Philippi, 1865, a genus of Diptera. 
CnephaiophUus: Kvecpaio?, dark; <pi\o%, loving — from its crepuscular habits. 
Coandu (see Coendou). Glires, Erethizontidse. 

Coassus Gray, 1843. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

[Thomson's Ann. Philos., XXVI, 342, Nov., 1825 (nonien nudum ex Gesner)]; 

List Spec Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xxvii, 174, 1843. 
Species: Cervus rufus F. Cuvier, and ( '. nemorivagus V. Cuvier, from South America. 
Antedated by Mazama Rafinesque, 1817; ami by Passalites Gloger, 1841. 
Coassus: French coassou, from gouazou, deer — native name used by the Gauranis 

of Paraguay I A/.ara, Hist. Nat. Quad. Paraguay, I, 43, 70, 1801). 
Coati Frisch, 1775. Fera?, Procyonidae. 

Das Natur-System vierfiiss. Thiere, 16, Tab. Gen., 1775; Lacepede, Tabl. Mamm., 

7, 1799; Nouv. TableauMeth. Mamm., in Buff on's Hist. Nat,, Didoted., Quad., 

XIV, 154, 179!i; Mem. l'Institut, Paris, III, 492, 1801. 
Cuaii Liais, Climats, Geol., Faune, et Geog. Botanique, Bresil, 427, 1872. 
Species: Coati ration, Coati mondi, Coati majus, and Coatiursulus. Lacepede' s genus 

includes Coatinasua (=Viverra nasua Linnaeus), from tropical America. 
Coati: Native name for the Nasua. 
Cobaya G. Cuvier, 1817. Glires, Caviidse. 

Diet. Sci. Nat., IX, 481-482, 1817; Griffith, Cuvier's Anim. Kingdom, V, 270- 

271, 1827. 
Cobaia Aymard, Ann. Soc Agr. Sci., Arts et Comm. du Puy, XVIII, for 1853, 

393, 1854 (genus referred to Pallas as l Cobaia curia. Pal.') 
Type: Curia cobaya Pallas, from Brazil. 
( 'obaya: South American name of the guinea pig. 
Cobus (see Kobus). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Cochilius Ameghino, 1902. Ungulata, Typotheria, Intertherida?. 

[Anal. Soc. Cien. Argentina, LI, 76, Mar. -Apr., 1901 (nonien nudum)]. 
Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 75-77, May, 1902 (sep. pp. 7-9). 
Species, 3: Cochilius volvens Ameghino, C. pendens Ameghino, and C. columnifer 

Ameghino, from the Patagonian formation (Eocene) of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Cochilius: Anagram of Icochilus. 
Cochlops Ameghino, 1889. Edentata, Glyptodontida?. 

Cont, Conocimiento Mamif. Fosil. Eepub. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

Cordoba, VI, 792-793, pis. l rigs. 9-18, Lin figs. 1-2, 1889. 
Type: Cochlops muricatus Ameghino, from the Eocene of the barrancas of the Rio 

Chico, southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. "Conocido por placas procedentes de distintas regiones de la coraza." 



COCHLOPS C(ELOPHYLLUS. 193 

Cochlops — Continued. 

Cocblops: koxXoz, snail shell, spiral; oif>, aspect— in allusion to the figures on 
the plates of the carapace; "cada placa lleva una figura central convexa que 
se levanta ;i menudo en forma de pezon, rodeada de figuras perifericas peque- 
nas." (Ameghino. ) 

Coelodon Lund, 1838. Edentata, Megatheriidse. 

Overs. K. Danske Vidensk. Selsk. Forhandl., Kjobenhavn, 1838, 12; Ann. Sci. 

Nat., Paris, 2" sex., XI, Zool., 220, Apr., 1839. 
Coelodon Lund, Echo du Monde Savant, Paris, 6 e ami., No. 430, p. 245, Apr. 17, 

1839 (nomen nudum). 
Type: Coelodon maquinense Lund, from the bone caves between the Rio das 

Velhas and Rio Paraopeba, Minas Geraes, Brazil (alt. 2,000 ft,). 
Name preoccupied by Coelodon ('Latreille' ) Serville, 1832, a genus of Coleoptera, 

Replaced by Nothrotheriwm Lydekker, 1889, and by Hypocoelus Ameghino, 1891 

(the latter preoccupied). 
Extinct. 
Coelodon: koiXo*;, hollow; 68cbv = 6dovg, tooth— from the resemblance of the 

molars to those of Bradypw tridactylus, in which the grinding surfaces are 

'cupped.' 

Coelodonta Bronx, 1831. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotidae. 

"Neues Jahrb. Mineralogie, 1831, 51-61, Taf. i, etc.," fide Bronn, Lethaea 

Geognostica, II, 836,1207,1211-1213; Atlas Taf. xlvii, fig. 3, 1838. 
Type: Coelodonta boiei Bronn, from the diluvial deposit of Heidelberg, Germany. 
Extinct. Based on the "unversehrt erhaltene Zahnreihe des Oberkiefers. " 
Coelodonta: koiXo%, hollow; oSovs, 686vro$, tooth. 

Ccelog-enus F. Cuvier, 1807. Glires, Dasyproctidae. 

Ann. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, X, 203-209, pi. 9, 1807; XIX, 287, 1812. 
Coelogeni/s Illiger, Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 92, 1811. 
Cselogenus Fleming, Philos. Zool., II, 192, 1822; Griffith, Cuvier's Anim. 

Kingdom, V, 273, 1827. 
Cselogenys Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 5, 1842. 

Csehgonus , London Encyclopaedia, XXII (art. Zoology), 747, 1845. 

Caelogenys Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Index Univ., 57, 1846; 2d ed., 267, 1848. 

Genysccelus Liais, Climats, Geol.j Faune, etc., Bresil, 537, 1872. 

Species: Coelogenus subniger F. Cuvier, from Tobago; and C.fulvus, from eastern 

South America. 
( 'qelogienus: KoiXog, hollow; yews, cheek — in allusion to the enormous hollowed 

zygomata. 

Ccelogomphodus Ameghino, 1891. Allotheria, Plagiaulacidae? 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 2a, 120, Apr. 1, 1891. 

Type (species not mentioned), from southern Patagonia, near the Rio Gallegos. 
The brief description is quoted from a letter from Carlos Ameghino, and the 
name appears only in a footnote. 
Extinct. 
Ccelogomphodus: koiXoz, hollow; yojiupoi, peg; 68 ov?, tooth. 

Ccelophyllus Peters, 1866. Chiroptera, Rhinolophidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 427 (provisional name); Monatsber. K. Preuss. 

Akad. Wiss., Berlin, June, 1871, 303-304. 
Type: RhinolopTvus ccelophyllus Peters, from Moulmein, Burma. 
CaelophyUus: koI\o<;, hollow; (pvXXov, leaf — from the long, hairy cavity in the 

'lancet' of the horseshoe nasal appendage. 

7591— No. 23—03 13 



194 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Coelops Blyth, 1848. Chiroptera, Rhinolophidse. 

Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, XVII, pt. i, new ser., No. 10, 251, Mar., 1818. 
Cselops Tkouessart, Rev. et Mag. Zool., 3 e ser.,VI, 223, 1878. 
Type: Ccelops frithii Blyth, from the 'Soonderbuns of Lower Bengal,' India. 
(a hips: KoiXoi, hollow; oip, aspect — probably in allusion to the large f mnel- 

shaped ears. 
Coelosoma Ameghino, 1891. Ungulata, Litopterna, Macraucheniidse. 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 3a, 137, fig. 34, June 1, 1891. 
Type: Coelosoma eversa Ameghino, from the Lower Oligocene in the vicinity of 

the city of Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct. 
Coelosoma: koTAos, hollow; 6coua, body — in allusion to the crowns of the upper 

molars ; ' ' superficie masticatoria con dos pozos aislados de esmalte. ' ' 

Coelostylops Ameghino, 1901. Tillodontia, Notostylopidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 422, July, 1901 (sep. p. 76). 

Type: Coelostylops crassus Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous ' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Coelostylops: koiAo$, hollow; ctruAo?, pillar; oip, aspect. 
Coelutaetus Ameghino, 1902. Edentata, Dasypodidre. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 64, May, 1902 (sep. p. 62). 

Type: Coelutaetus cribellatus Ameghino, from the Notostylops beds of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Coelutaetus: koiAos, hollow; + Utaetus — in allusion to the surface of the scutes of 
the carapace. "La face externe presente six grandes fossettes circulaires dis- 
posers en deux rangees longitudinales de trois fossettes chaque rangee." 
( Ameghino.) 
Coendou Lacepede, 1799. Glires, Erethizontidse. 

Tableau des Divisions, Sons-divisions, Ordres et Genres Mamm., 11, 1799; 
Nouv. Tableau Method. Mamm., in Buffon's Hist. Nat., Didot ed., Quad., 
XIV, 172, 1799; Mem. l'lnstitut, Paris, III, 496, 1801; Miller & Rehn, Proc. 
Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., XXX, 173, Dec, 1901. 

Coendus E. Geoffroy, Cat. Mamm. Mus. National Hist. Nat., 157, 1803; 
Rafinesque, Analyse de la Nature, 57, 1815. 

Coandu <i. Fischer, Zoognosia, III, 102-105, 1814. 

Coendus Ili.iger, Abhandl. Phys. Kl. K. Akad. Wiss. Berlin, for 1804-11, p. 113, 
1815. 

Coendu Lesson, Man. Mammalogie, 290-291, 1827. 

Cuandu Liais, Climate, Geol., Faune, etc., Bresil, 532, 550, 1872. 

Coendou[a] Lydekker, Zool. Record for 1899, XXXVI, Mamm., 31, 1900. 

Type: ( 'oendou prehensilis ( =Systrix prehensilis Linnseus), from tropical America. 

( 'oendou: Native name for the prehensile-tailed porcupine. 
Coenobasileus (see Caenobasileus). Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidse. 

Coenopithecus (see Caenopithecus) . Primates, Adapidse. 

Coenopus (see Csenopus). Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotidae. 

Ccescoes Lacepede, 1799. ^Iarsupialia, Phalangeridse. 

Tabl. Mamm., 5, 1799; Nouv. Tableau Method., Mamm., in Mem. l'lnstitut, 
Paris, III, 491, 1801. 

Cuscus Lesson, Voy. de la 'Coquille,' Zool., I, 150-160, 'pis. iv-vi,' 1826; 
Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 193, 1888 (in synonymy). 

Cursus Gray, Zool. Voy. H. M. S. 'Samarang,' Mamm., 20, 1850 (misprint). 

Type: Cascoes amboinensis Lacepede ( =Didelphis orientalis Pallas), from Amboina, 
Molucca Islands. Name antedated by Phalanger Storr, 1780. 

Ccescoes: Malay name of the Phalanger. (Gervais, Diet. Univ., IX, 701, 1847.) 



CCETOMYS COLOBOTIS, 195 

Coetomys (subgenus of Georychus) Gray, 1864. Glires, Bathyergidse. 

Proe. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 124-125, figs. 4-5. 
Species: Bathyergus csecutiem Brants, from Natal; and B. damarmm Ogilby, from 

Damara Land, South Africa. 
Coetomys: koitos, sleep, figurative expression for eyes closed; f*v$, mouse — in 

allusion to the diminutive eyes, B. csecutiem having been originally described 

as blind. 

Cogia (see Kogia). Cete, Physeteridse. 

Coleura Peters, 1867. Chiroptera, Noctilionidse. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, July, 1867, 479. 
Type: Emballonura afra Peters, from Mozambique, Africa. 

Coleura: koXeoc,, sheath; oupd, tail — in allusion to the tail being enveloped in 
the interfemoral membrane as far as the last caudal vertebra. 
Colhuapia Roth, 1901. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Isotemnidae. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, X, 255, Oct., 1901 (sep. p. 7). 

Type: Colhuapia rosei Roth, from the 'upper Cretaceous' of Lago Musters, Terri- 
tory of Chubut, Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Colhuapia: Colhuapi, a lake (also known as Colhues) in the Territory of 
Chubut, Patagonia, S. lat. 45° 30'. 
Colhuelia Roth, 1901. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Isotemnidse. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, X, 254, Oct., 1901 (sep. p. 6). 

Type: Colhuelia fruhi Roth, from the 'upper Cretaceous' of Lago Musters, Terri- 
tory of Chubut, Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Colhuelia: Colhues, Indian name of Lago Musters, Patagonia. 

Collensternum Ameghino, 1884. Primates, ? 

Filogenia, 382, 1884; Cont. Conocimiento Mamif. Fosil. Repub. Argentina, in 

Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., C6rdoba, VI, 98, 1889. 
Hypothetical genus — "Antecesor comun del hombre y del gibon." 
CoUensternum: KoWrf£i$, glued together; drspvov, sternum — in allusion to the 
" esternon con los cinco huesos que siguen al manubrio reunidos en uno solo." 
Collotaria (see Callotaria). Fera>, Pinnipedia, Otariidee. 

Colobates (see Colobotis) . Glires, Sciuridae. 

Colobognathus (subg. of Atelodus) Brandt, 1878. Ungulata, Rhinocerotidse. 

Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci., St.-Petersbourg, 7 e ser., XXVI, No. 5, pp. 51-57, 1878. 
Species: Rhinoceros bicoruis Linnaeus, and /.'. simm Burchell, from Africa. 
Name preoccupied by Colobognathus Peters, 1859, a genus of Reptilia. (See 

Opsiceros Gloger, 1841. ) 
Colobognathus: ko\o/3o$, stunted, i. e., short; yvaftos, jaw. 
Colobolus Gray, 1821. Primates, Cercopithecidse. 

London Med. Repos., XV, 298, Apr. 1, 1821. 

Type: Simia polycomos Schreber, from "West Africa. (See Colobus Illiger, 1811.) 
Colobolus: Dim. of Colobus. 
Colobotis (subgenus of Spermophilus) Brandt, 1844. Glires, Sciuridse. 

Bull. CI. Phys.-math. Acad. Imp. Sci. St.-Petersbourg, II, Nos. 23-24, pp. 365- 
366, Mar. 8, 1844; L'Institut, Paris, XII, l e sect., No. 558, pp. 299-300, Sept. 
4, 1844; Baird, Mamm. N. Am., 306, 1857; Allen, Mon. X. Am. Rodentia, 821, 
825-826, 1877. 
Colobates Milne-Edwards, Recherches Hist. Nat. Mamm., I, 157, 1868-74. 
Type: Spermophilus fulvus Keyserlin^ & Blasius, from southern Russia. 
Colobotis: KoXofios, stunted, short; ovs, a?ros, ear. 



196 INDEX GENERUM MAMMA LIUM. 

Colokms Iljjger, 1.811- Primates, Cercopithecidse. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 69, 1811. 
Colobolus Gray, London Med. Repos., XV, 298, Apr. 1, 1821. 
Species: Simia polycomos Schreber, and S. ferruginea Shaw, from West Africa. 
Colobus: Ko\of3o<z, mutilated, docked — in allusion to the rudimentary thumb 

('pollice nullo' — Illiger). 
Colodon Marsh, 1890. Un'gulata, Perissodactyla, Lophiodontidae. 

Am Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXIX, 524, June, 1890. 
Type* Colodon luxatus Marsh, from the Brontotherium beds of the Oligocene of 

South Dakota. 
Name preoccupied by Colodus Wagner, 1861, a subgenus of Rhinocerotidae. 
Extinct. 
Colodon: k6\o$, stunted; ddcbv = ddovs, tooth — in allusion to the absence of 

canines in the lower jaw. 
Colodus (subg. of ChaMcotherium) Wagner, 1861. Ungulata, Rhinocerotidse. 

Sitzungsber. K. Bayerisch. Akad. Wiss., Munchen, II, 81-82, Taf. fig. 4, 1861. 
Type: Rhinoceros pachygnathm Wagner, from the Pliocene (Pikermi beds) of 

Greece. 
Extinct. 

Colodus: /coAos, stunted; odov$, tooth. 
Colonoceras Marsh, 1873. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Hyracodontidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., V, 407-408, May, 1873. 
Type: Colonoceras agrestis Marsh, from the Eocene of Wyoming. 
Extinct. 
Colonoceras: ko\o$, stunted; Kspas, horn — in allusion to the pair of dermal 

horns on the nasal bones. 
Colonomys Marsh, 1872. Glires, Ischyromyidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 220-221, Sept., 1872 (sep. issued Aug. 17). 
Colonymys Allen, Mon. N. Am. Rodentia, 938, 944, 1877; Zittel, Handb. Palseont., 

IV, 2 te Lief., 522, 1893. 
Type: Colonomys celer Marsh, from the Eocene near Henry Fork of Green River, 

Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on 'several isolated molars.' 
Colonomys: koXos, stunted; pv$, mouse. (Marsh.) 
Colophonodon Leidy, 1853. Cete, Squalodontidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., for 1852-53, 377, 1853; Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 

2d ser., VII, 418, 1869 (synonym of SqvModon holmesii). 
Type: Colophonodon holmesii Leidy, from Ashley River, South Carolina. 
Extinct. Based on "a nearly entire tooth, with fragments of five others." 
Colophonodon: koXos, stunted; (povoc,, murder; 68(bv=b8ovs, tooth. 
Coloreodon Cope, 1879. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agrioehieridae. 

Paleont. Bull. No. 31, p. 6, Dec. 24, 1879; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XVIII, 375-376, 

Dec. 30, 1879; Ibid., XXI, 570, 1884; Am. Naturalist, XIV, 60, Jan., 1880; Bull. 

U. S. Geol. and Geog. Surv. Terr., VI, No. 1, pp. 173-174, 1880; Hay, Cat. 

Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 662, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species from the Miocene of Oregon: Coloreinhm ferox Cope (type), from the 

North Fork of John Day River; and C. macrocephalus Cope, from the 'Cove' 

of John Day River. 
Extinct. 

Coloreodon: koXoc,, stunted; + Oreodon — in allusion to the 'reduced dental for- 
mula,' due to the absence or rudimentary development of the first upper 

premolar. 
Colotaxis Cope, 1873. Glires, Ischyroinyidse. 

Pakeont. Bull., No. 15, p. 1, Aug. 20, 1873; Rept. U. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. Terr., 

VII, for 1873, 477, 1874. 



COLOTAXIS CONACODON. 197 

Colotaxis — Continued. 

Type: Colotaxis eristatus Cope, from the Oligocene of Colorado. 
Extinct. 

Colotaxis: koXo<;, docked; ra|z?, arrangement, row. 
Colpodon Burmeister, 1885. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Homalodontotheriidse. 

Anal. Mus. Nac, Buenos Aires, III, entr. xiv, 161-168, pi. in fig. 16, figs. 

a, b, c in text, 1885. 
Type: Colpodon propinquus Burmeister, from the Rio Chubut, Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on two molar teeth . 
Colpodon: KoXitoc,, fold; 6Scbv=d8ov<;, tooth — in allusion to the enamel folds of 

the molars. 
Colpostemma Ameghino, 1891. Glires, Chinchillidse. 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 3a, 141, fig. 40, June 1, 1891. 
Colpostemma Zittel, Handb. Pakeont., IV, 549, 1893. 
Type: Colpostemma sinuata Ameghino, from the Lower Oligocene of the city of 

Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct. 
Colpostemma: KoXitoi, hollow; dreppa, wreath, crown — in allusion to the 

enamel folds of the crowns of the upper molars. 
Colug-o (subgenus of Oaleopitheeus) Gray, 1870. Insectivora, Galeopithecidye. 

Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-Eating Bats Brit. Mus., 98, 1870. 
Type: Galeopithecus philippincnsis Waterhouse, from the Philippine Islands. 
Colugo: Native name in the Philippine Islands. 
Colus (subgenus of Antilope) Wagner, 1844. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Suppl. Schreber's Saugthiere, IV, 419-420, tab. cclxxvi, 1844; Fitzinger, 

Sitzungsber. Math. -Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss., Wien, LIX, Abth. i, 161, Feb., 

1869 (raised to generic rank); Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, III, 

pt. ix, 29, Aug., 1897 (in synonymy). 
Type: Antilope saiga Pallas ( = Capra tatarica Linneeus), from the steppes of 

Siberia. 
Name preoccupied by Colus Humphrey, 1797, a genus of Mollusca. Antedated 

by Saiga Gray, 1843. 
Colus: koXos, a kind of goat without horns. According to Sclater & Thomas ( 1. c. 

p. 33), the word is "said to have been formed by transposition from native 

name ' Suloc. ' ' ' 
Comaphorus Ameghino, 1886. Edentata, Glyptodontidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, IX, 197-199, 1886. 
Type: Comaphorus conciscus Ameghino, from the older Tertiary of Parana, 

Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on a plate of the carapace. 
Comaphorus: Koprj, hair; (popos, bearing. 
Comastes Fitzinger, 1870. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 

Sitzungsber. Math.-Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss., Wien, LXII, Abth. i, 565-579, 

Nov.-Dec, 1870 (sep. pp. 39-53). 
Species, 4: YexpertiUo capaccmii Bonaparte, from Italy; V. megapodius Temminck, 

from Sardinia; V. dasycneme Boie, and V. limnophilus Temminck, from the 

Netherlands. 
Comastes: Kcopadri^, a reveler — probably in allusion to the animals' nocturnal 

habits. 
Comphotherium (see Camphotherium) . Insectivora, Talpida?. 

Conacodon Matthew, 1897. Ungulata, Amblypoda, Periptychidse. 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., New York, XI, 264, 298, Nov. 16, 1897; Hay, Cat. 

Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 695, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species: Maploconus mtoconus Cope (type), and Anisonehus copiwier Cope, from 
the Puerco Eocene of New Mexico. 



198 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Conacodon — Continued. 

Extinct. 

Conacodon: kgovos, cone; <xki), point; 68d)v=d8ov<;, tooth — in allusion to the 
simple round cusp of the third upper premolar. 
Conaspidotherium Lemoine, 1891. Creodonta, Arctocyonidae. 

Bull. Soc. Geol. de France, 3 e ser., XIX, No. 5, pp. 265, 268, 275-276, pi. x, fig. 
30, May, 1891. 

Type: Conaspidotherium ameghinoi Lemoine, from the Lower Eocene near Reims, 
France. 

Extinct. Based on ' ' une dent . . . sur un maxillaire inferieur, relativement 
intact." 

Conaspidotherium: Kabvos, cone; + (Pleur)aspidotherium — in allusion to the 
second lower molar which "est composee essentiellement de deux paires de 
denticules .... II y a done une analogie de forme a reconnaitre entre 
ces trois genres [Conaspidotherium, Pleuraspidotherium et Orthaspidotherium'], 
d'ou le nom que nous avons propose (Lemoine). 
Condylura Illiger, 1811. Insectivora, Talpidse. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 125-126, 1811; True, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., 
XIX, 77-98, figs. 27-38, Dec. 21, 1896. 

Species: Sorex cristatus Linnaeus (type), from Pennsylvania; and Talpa longicau- 
data Erxleben, from eastern North America. 

Condylura: KovSvXog, knob; ovpc't, tail. The original description was based on 
the faulty figure of De La Faille, in which the tail is represented as constricted 
at intervals resembling a string of beads. (True, 1. c, p. 78.) 
Conepatus Gray, 1837. Ferae, Mustelidse. 

Charlesworth's Mag. Nat. Hist., I, 581, 1837. 

Type: Conepatus humboldtii Gray ( = ^^ep}litis conepatl Desrnarest= Viverra conepall 
Gmelin) , from the Straits of Magellan, Patagonia. 

Conepatus: Mexican conepatl — "probably refers to the burrowing of the ani- 
mal."* (Coues, Fur-bearing Animals, 249, 1877.) 
Conicodon Cope, 1894. Edentata, Ganodonta, Stylinodontidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XXVIII, No. 331, p. 594 footnote, July 13, 1894. 

New name provisionally proposed for Calamodon Cope, 1874. "A genus of 
birds has been named Calamodus [by Kaup in 1829], a name which is in my 
opinion abundantly distinct from Calamodon. As, however, there are persons 
who, like the American Ornithologists' Union, will make this resemblance an 
excuse for changing the name, I suggest that they call it Conicodon, from the 
shape of the molars, as distinguished from those of Stylindon." 

Extinct. 

Conicodon: kgdvikos, conical; 68(bv=d8ovs, tooth. 
Conilurus Ogilby, 1838. Glires, Muridaa, Murinse. 

Trans. Linn. Soc. London, XVIII, for 1838-41, 124-129, 1838. 

Type: Conilurus constructor Ogilby, from New South Wales, Australia. 

Conilurus: koviXos, rabbit; otipa, tail — "intended to express the resemblance 
which the animal bears to a small rabbit with a long tail" (Ogilby). 
Coniopternium Ameghino, 1895. Ungulata, Litopterna, Maeraucheniidse. 

Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XV, cuad. 11-12, p. 632, 1895 (sep. p. 32). 

Type: Coniopternium andinum Ameghino, from the Pyrotherium beds in the inte- 
rior of Patagonia. 

Extinct. Based on a calcaneum, three astragali, and some phalanges, all incom- 
plete. 

Coniopternium: Kooviov, little cone; 7trspviov, little heel — in allusion to the 
slender form of the calcaneum. 

* ' ' Nepantla in the Nahuatl language signified a subterranean dwelling. ' ' (Coues. ) 



CONNOOHAETES CONTRACAVIA. 199 

Connochaetes (subgenus of Antiiope) Lichtenstein, 1814. Ungulata, Bovidse. 

Mag. Gesellsch. Naturforsch. Freunde, Berlin, VI, 152, 105-166, 1814; SclaterA 
Thomas, Book of Antelopes, I, pt. n, 93-91, pis. xi-xii, Jan., 1895. 

Connochetes Gray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., p. xxvi, 1843; Cat. Mamm. 
Brit. Mus., pt. in, Ungulata, 119, 1852. 

Connocfmtes Sclater, List Anim. Zool. Soc. London, 8th ed., 150, 1883; 9th ed., 
150, 1896. 

Cmuiochcetes Coues, Century Diet., 1200, 1891. 

Type: Antifope gnu Gmelin, from Africa. 

Connochxtes: kovvos, beard; x a ^ Tr h mane — hi allusion to the conspicuous beard 
and mane. 
Conodonictis Ameghino, 1891. Marsupialia, Borhyamidae. 

Nuevos Restos Mamif. Fos. Patagonia Austral, 28-29, Aug., 1891; Revista Argen- 
tina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5a, 314-315, Oct. 1, 1891. 

Conodictis Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. v, 1212, Nov., 1898. 

Species: Conodonictis saevus Ameghino, and C. exterminator Ameghino, from the 
Lower Eocene of southern Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Conodictis: K(&vo$, cone; 68(bv = dSoin;, tooth; i'ktis, weasel. 
Conodontes Laugel, 1862. Glires, Castoridse. 

Bull. Soc. Geol. France, 2 e ser., XIX, feuille 45, pp. 715-717, fig. 3, Sept., 1862. 

Type: Conodontes boisvilletti Laugel, from the Pliocene of St. Prest, near Chartres, 
Dept. Eure-et-Loire, France. 

Extinct. Based on a skull and a fourth metatarsal bone. 

Conodontes: kwvoc,, cone; oSoi's, dftuvros, tootli — "pour rappeler la forme de 
la derniere molaire." (Laugel. ) 
Conodus Gervais, 1869. Glires, Castoridse. 

Zool. et Paleont. Gen., l e s6r., pi. xv, 1867-69 {Conodontes in text, pp. 80-84). 

Type: Conodus ( = Conodontes) boisvilletti Laugel, from St. Prest, near Chartres, 
Dept. Eure-et-Loire, France. Apparently merely a modification of Cono- 
dontes Laugel, 1862. 

Name preoccupied by Conodus Agassiz, 1843, a genus of Pisces. 

Extinct. 

Conodus: Kc&voe,, cone; 68ov<;, tooth — in allusion to the last molar. 
Conoryctes Cope, 1881. Edentata, Ganodonta, Conoryctidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XV, for Oct., 829, Sept. 22, 1881; "Paleont, Bull., No. 33, pp. 486- 
487, Sept. 30, 1881"; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XIX, 486-487, Oct. 21, 1881. 

Type: Conoryctes comma Cope, from the Puerco Eocene of New Mexico. 

Extinct. Based on "a mandibular ramus which lacks the last molar, and has 
the crowns of the others worn." 

Conoryctes: k&vos, cone; dpvKrrji, digger — from the conic crowns of the canines 
and the first two premolars, and the supposition that the animal ' ' was prob- 
ably a burrower. ' ' 
Conoyces (subgenus of Macropus) Lesson, 1842. Marsupialia, Macropodidae, 

Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 194, 1842; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & 
Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 86, 1888 (in synonymy). 

Type: Macropus brunii Lesson (=M. mulleri Schlegel, 1866), from New Guinea. 
Contracavia Burmeister, 1885. Glires, Caviidse. 

Anal. Mus. Nac, Buenos Aires (III), entr. xrv, 158-159, pi. hi, fig. 6, Dec, 1885. 

Type: Contracavia matercula Burmeister, from the Tertiary of Parana, Argentina. 

Extinct. Based on "dos porciones anteriores del paladar, con las dos primeras 
muelas en el uno y una sola en el otro." 

Contracavia: Lat. contra, opposite, contrary to; + Cavia — in allusion to "una inver- 
sion de la figura de los dos prismas de sus muelas." 



200 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Cordylodon Meyer, 1859. Insectivora, Dimylidte. 

Xeues Jahrb. Mineralogie, 1859, 174-175; Zittel Handb. Palaeont, IV, 569, 1893. 
Cordolydon Bergroth, in. C. O. TVaterhouse's Index Zool., 86, 1902 (misprint). 
Type: Cordylodon haslachensis Meyer, from the Lower Miocene of Haslach, near 

Ulm, Germany. 
Extinct. Based on a right lower jaw with both ends broken off, but containing 

six teeth. 
Cordylodon: KopSvA?/, club; bdcbv = oSovs, tooth — probably in allusion to the 

upper premolars, which arc described by Zittel as 'massiv, kegelformig, 

einspitzig.' 
Coresodon Ameghino, 1895. Ungulata, Litopterna, Nptohippidae. 

Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XV, cuad. 11-12, 630-331, 1895 (eep. pp. 30-31). 
Type: Coresodon scalpridens Ameghino, from the Pyrotherium beds of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Coresodon: Kofipr/Z, frieze; odcov = odovc, tooth — "j'ai employe ce nom, faisant 

allusion a la frise d' email que portent sur leur cote interne les molaires 

superieures de ce genre." — (Ameghino, in epist). 
Corinorhinus (see Corynorhinus). Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 

Coristernum Ameghino, 1884. Primates, ? 

Filogenia, 383, 1884; Cont. Conocimiento Mamff. Fosil. Repiib. Argentina, in 

Act. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, VI, 98, 1889. 
Hypothetical genus: " Antecessor comun del hombre, del gib6n y del orangutan." 
Coristernum: koqeioz, of a maiden; drepvov, sternum — in allusion to the "ester- 

non con los cinco huesos que siguen al manubrio reunidos en tres 6 cuatro 

piezas." 
Cormura Peters, 1867. Chiroptera, Noctilionidse. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, 1867, 475-476, pi. — , fig. 1. 
Type: Emballonura brevirostris Wagner, from Marabitanas, Amazonas, Brazil. 
Cormura: Kopjuos, trunk, stump; ovpd, tail — " Der Schwanz nur die Halfte der 

Schenkelflughaut erreichend und auf ihr niit freier Spitze endigend." 

Corsira Gray, 1838. Insectivora, Soricidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1837, Xo. lix, 123-124, June 14, 1838. 
Species, 3: Sorex vulgaris Linnaeus, from northern Europe; S. forsteri Richardson, 

from British America; and S. talpoides Gapper, from Lake Simcoe, Ontario, 

Canada. 
Corsira: Possibly an anagram of corsair — in allusion to the predatory habits of 

the animal (Gill). 

Corynorhinus H. Allen, 1865. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 

Proc. Acad. Xat. Sci. Phila., 1865, 173-174; Miller, X. Am. Fauna Xo. 13, pp. 13, 

49-54, text figs. 7-10, pis. i fig. 9, in fig. 2, Oct. 16, 1897. 
Corinorhinus Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. i, 105, 1897 (misprint). 
Type: Plecotus macrotis Le Conte, from Georgia (probably near the Le Conte 

plantation, 5 miles from Riceboro). 
Corynorhinus: Kopvvt], club; piz, pivoc,, nose — from the conspicuous club-shaped 

enlargement of the ridge between the eye and nostril. 

Coryphodon Owen, 1845. Ungulata, Amblypoda, Coryphodontidae. 

Odontography, pt. in, Mamm., 607-609, pi. 135, fig. 9, 1845; Hist. Brit. Foss. 

Mamm., 299-305, figs. 103-104, 1846. 
Type: Coryphodon eocsenus Owen, from the Eocene clay of the sea bottom off the 

Essex coast, between St. Osyth and Harwich, England. 
Extinct. Based on a portion of a right lower jaw containing the last molar and 

part of the penultimate molar. 



CORYPHODON — CRASEOMYS. 201 

Coryph.od.on — Continued. , 

Coryphodon: tcopv<f>ri, point; dd&jv=d8ovs ! tooth — "significative of the devel- 
opment of the angles of the ridges [of the lower molars] into points." 
(Owen.) 
Corypithecus (subg.of Semnopithecus) Trouessart, 1879. Primates, Cercopithecidae. 

Revue et Mag. de Zool., Paris, 3 e ser., VII, 53, 1879 (sep. p. 6); Scudder, Nomen- 
clator Zool., pt. i, 87, 1882. 

Type: Semnopitkecus frontatus Miiller, from Borneo. 

Corypithecus: Kopv;, xopvhoc,, helmet; 7ttfJ?/Ko$, ape — in allusion to the erect 
median crest which overarches the forehead. 
Cosoryx Leidy, 1869. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Joum. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 2d ser., VII, 173, 383, pi. xxvm, fig. 8, 1869. 

Casonjx Wallace, Geog. Dist. Anim., I, 138; II, 225, 1876. 

Type: ( 'osoryx jurcatus Leidy, from the Miocene of the Niobrara River, Nebraska. 

Extinct. Based on 'portions of several antlers, or perhaps horn cores.' 

Cosoryx: /<■<&?, interrogative; opv^, antelope. 
Cothurus Palmer, 1899. Primates, Cebidaa. 

Science, new ser., X, No. 249, p. 493, Oct. 6, 1899 (sep. p. 4). 

New name for Brachyurus Trouessart, 1878 (not Brachyurus Spix, 1823), which 
is preoccupied by Brachyurus Fischer, 1813, a genus of rodents. Type, Bra- 
chyurus calvus Geoffroy, from the Amazon River, Brazil. 

Name preoccupied by Cothurus Champion, 1891, agenus of Coleoptera. Replaced 
by Neocothurvs Palmer, 1903. 

Cothurus: KoBovpo$, dock-tailed — in allusion to the short tail. 
Cotylops Leidy, 1851. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agriochoeridse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., for 1850-51, 239, 1851. 

Type: Cotylops speciosa Leidy, from the 01 igocene of 'Nebraska Territory' (now 
South Dakota). Name antedated by Meryeoidodon Leidy, 1848. 

Extinct. Based on a fragment of a face. 

Cotylops: kotvXi/, cup, socket; g3^, face — in allusion to "the remarkably large 
lachrymal depression, which in this fossil appears to have been more hemi- 
spherical than in Oreodon" (Leidy). 
Cournomys ('Croizet') Zittel, 1893. Glires, Theridomyidae. 

Zittel, Handb. Palaeont, IV, 2te Lief., 525, 1893. 

Zittel gives Cournomys Croizet as a synonym of Issiodoromys Croizet, 1845, 
without reference or mention of any species. 

Extinct. 

Cournnmijx: Cournon, a town in Puy de Dome, France, probably the type local- 
ity; pvi, mouse. 

Cramauchenia Ameghino, 1902. Ungulata, Litopterna, Macraucheniidre. 

[Anal. Soc. Cien. Argentina, LI, 76, Mar.-Apr., 1902, — nomen nudum]. 
Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 90-93, May, 1902 (sep. pp. 22-25). 
Species: Cramauchenia normalis Ameghino, and C. insolita Ameghino, from the 

Patagonian formation ( Eocene ) of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Cramauchenia: Kpa/ua, mixed; + Auchenia — in allusion to the possession of a 

combination of characters of the teeth of Protheosodon and Theosodon, and 

also to the relation of the genus to Macrauchenia. 

Craseomys (subgenus of Evotomys) Miller, 1900. Glires, Muridse, Microtinse. 

Proc. Wash. Acad. Sci., II, 87, 89-91, July 26, 1900. 
Type: Hypudseus rufocanus Sundevall from Lappmark, Sweden. 
Oraseomys: Kpa6i<;, Kpade'aos, a mixing; /<#?, mouse — in allusion to the posses- 
sion of a combination of characters of Evotomys and Microtus. 



202 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Craspedura Gray, 1869. Ferse, Mustelidae. 

Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 118, 1869. 

Name merely suggested, but never used, for the otter (Pteronura saribachii) from 
Demerara, British Guiana. "The tail of the Demerara specimen has the same 
marginal rib as the Surinam one; . . . and the sides also are artificially 
extended, giving it a fin-like appearance, which induced me to give it the 
name of Pteronura. Craspedura, or margin-tailed, would have been a much 
more appropriate one." (Gray.) 

Craspedura: k pectin edov, margin; ovpd, tail. 

Crassitherium Van Beneden, 1871. Sirenia, Halitheriidae? 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. Belgique, 2 e ser., XXXII, 164-171, pi. — , 1871. 

Type: Crassitherium robustum Van Beneden, from the vicinity of Antwerp, 
Belgium. 

Extinct. Based on ' ' une partie de la boite cranienne, une vertebre dorsale et 
une serie de sept vertebres caudales." 

Crassitherium: Lat. crassus, thick; Qrjpiov, wild beast — "a cause de la grande 
epaisseur des parois craniennes et de la forme toute particuliere du crane." 
Crater og-eomys (see Cratogeomys). Glires, Geomyidae. 

Crateromys Thomas, 1895. Glires, Muridae, Murinae. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XVI, 163-164, Aug., 1895; Trans. Zool. Soc. 
London, XIV, pt. vi, 408-409, pi. xxxvi, fig. 2, June, 1898. 

Type: Pldaomys schadenbergi Meyer, from Monte Data, northern Luzon, Philip- 
pine Islands. 

Craterouu/x: Kparepos, strong; j.ivs, mouse — in allusion to the fact that "it is 

is about the largest and heaviest member of the Muridpe." (Thomas in epist. ) 

Cratogeomys Merriam, 1895. . Glires, Geomyidse. 

N. Am. Fauna, No. 8, pp. 23, 25, 150-162, plates and figures, Jan. 31, 1895. 

Craterogeomys Allex, Science, new ser., I, No. 25, p. 690, June 21, 1895 (mis- 
print). 

Type: Geomys merriami Thomas, from the Valley of Mexico. 

Cratogeomys: Kpavoi, strong, powerful; -f- Geomys — in reference to the relatively 
great size and strength of the animal. 
Craurothrix * Thomas, 1896. Glires, Muridse, Rhynchornyinae. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XVIII, 246, Sept, 1, 1896. 

New name for Echiothrix Gray, 1867, which is preoccupied by Echinothrix Brookes, 
1828, a genus of Erethizontidse; and by Echinothrix Peters, 1853, a genus of 
Echinodermata. 

Craurothrix: Kpavpog, hard, brittle; Qpi^, hair — in allusion to the bristles inter- 
mingled with the fur. 
Creagroceros Fitzinger, 1874. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Sitzungsber. Math.-Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss., Wien, LXVIII, Abth. i, Jahrg. fiir 
1873, 348, 358, 1874. 

New name for Furcifer Wagner, 1844, which is preoccupied by Furcifer Fitzinger, 
1843, a genus of Reptilia. 

Creagroceros: Kpedypa, hook; Kepas, horn — in allusion to the antlers, which are 
forked, with the small anterior prong curving upward and backward toward 
the posterior one. 
Crenidelphinus Laurillard, 1846. Cete, Squalodontidse. 

Laurillard, inD'Orbigny'sDict. Univ. Hist. Nat., IV, 636, 1846 (art. 'Dauphin'). 

Type (species not mentioned) based on an upper jaw, from Leognan, near Bor- 
deaux, France, which was referred to Squalodon by Grateloup. 

Extinct. 

* Thomas subsequently abandoned this name. See explanation under Echiothrix. 



CRENIDELPHINUS — CRIOTAURUS. 203 

Crenidelphinus — Continued. 

Crenidelphinus: Lat. crena, tooth ;-\-Delphinus — in allusion to the number of lobes 

of the posterior teeth, "le nornbre des lobes est plus considerable . . . ce 

serait done un Dauphin, qui par sa dentition, se lierait aux Phoques." 
Creoadapis Lemoixe, 1894. Primates, Plesiadapidse. 

Bull. Soc. Geol. France, 3 e ser., XXI, 1893, No. 5, pp. 353, 361-362, pi. ix, fig. 1 

Apr., 1894. 
Type: Creoadapis douvittei Lemoine from the Eocene ('la Faune Cernaysienne ' ) , 

near Reims, France. 
Extinct. Based on a considerable portion of the lower jaw. 
Creoadapis: Kpeas, flesh (i. e., carnivorous?); 4- Adapts. 

Cricetodipus Peale, 1848. Glires, Heterornyidse. 

Mamm. & Ornith. Wilkes Expl. Expd., VIII, 52-53, 1848; 2d ed., 48, 1858. 

Type: Cricetodipus parvus Peale, from Oregon. 

Cricetodipus: Cricetus 4- Dipus. 
Cricetodon Lartet, 1851. Glires, Muridse, Cricetinse. 

Notice sur la Colline de Sansan, 20-21, 1851. 

Species, 3: Cricetodon sansaniensis Lartet, C. medium Lartet, and C. minus Lartet, 
from Sansan, Dept. du Gers, France. 

Extinct, 

Cricetodon: Cricetus; 68(&v = d8ovs, tooth — from the resemblance of the molars 
to those of Cricetus. 
Cricetomys (subgenus of Mus) Waterhouse, 1840. Glires, Muridse, Murinse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. lxxxv, July, 1840, 1-3; Lesson, Nouv. Tableau 
Rt-gne Animal, Mamm., 120, 1842 (raised to generic rank). 

Type: Cricetomys gambianus from the Gambia River, West Africa. 

Cricetomys: Cricetus; )J-VS, mouse — from the cheek pouches, a character in which 
the genus resembles Cricetus, while otherwise externally it resembles Mus. 
Cricetulus Milne-Edwards, 1867. Glires, Muridse, Cricetinse. 

Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 5 e s6r., Zool., VII, 375-376, 1867; Recherches Hist. Nat. 
Mamm., 133-137, pi. 12 figs. 1-3, pi. 13 figs. 1-3, 1868-74. 

Type: Cricetidus griseus Milne-Edwards, from China. 

Cricetidus: Dim. of Cricetus. 
Cricetus Leske, 1779. Glires, Muridse, Cricetinse. 

[Zimmermann, Specimen Zool. Geog. Quad., 343-344, 1777 — not a valid genus]; 
Leske, Anfangsgriinde Naturgesch., I, 168-170, 1779; Kerr, Anim. King., I, 
Mamm., Syst. Cat, Nos. 509-515, pp. 42, 242-246,1792; Link, Beytr. Naturgesch., 
I, pt. ii, 52, 75, 1795; Cuvier, Lee. d'Anat, Cornp., I, table i, 1800; Regne 
Animal, I, 198, 1817; ibid., ed. 2, 204-205, 1829; Tiedemann, Zoologie, I, 467, 
1808; Allen, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., VII, 181, 183, June 19, 1895. 

Species 3, from Europe: Cricetus vulgaris Leske (=Mus cricetus Linnaeus) , C. citellus 
(=Mus citellus Pallas), and C. marmota {=Mus marmota). 

Kerr's Cricetus includes 6 species from Eurasia: C. acredula (=Mus migratorius 
Pallas, 1771 = M. accedula Pallas, 1778*), C. germanicus ( = M. cricetus Linnaeus) , 
C. arenarius ( = M. arenarius Pallas), C. phaeus ( = M. phseus Pallas), C. son- 
garicus ( = M. songaricus Pallas), and C.furuncidus ( = M. furunadus Pallas) — 
fide Allen, 1. c. 

Cricetus: Lat,, from Ital. criceto, hamster. According toNehring (Zool. Anzeiger, 

XXI, 494, 1898) the word is derived from the German common name Krietsch. 

Crinotherium. (see Cainotherium). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriidse. 

Criotaurus Gloger, 1841. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, 148-149, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. Nat. 
Hist., 6th ser., XV, 191, Feb. 1, 1895. 



204 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Criotaurus — Continued. 

Type: Ovibos moschatua (Zimmermann), from the region near Hudson Bay, North- 
west Territory. Apparently merely a new name for Ovibos Blainville, 1816. 
Criotaurus: Kpioc,, ram; ravpos, bull — a Greek equivalent of Ovibos. 

Criotherium Forsyth Major, 1891. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, CXIII, No. 18, pp. 608, 609-610, Seance du 2 Nov., 1891; 

Lydekker, Nature, XLIII, 86, Nov. 27, 1890. 
Type: Criotherium argalioides Major, from the Upper Miocene of the island of 

Samos, Grecian Archipelago. 
Extinct. 

Criotherium: Kpios, ram; Hrjpiov, wild beast. 
Crocidura Wagler, 1832. Insectivora, Soricidse. 

Oken's Isis, Jena, 1832, 275. 
Type: Sorex leucodon Hermann, from Europe. 
Crocidura: KpoKis, or KpoKos, the flock or nap on woolen cloth, a piece of 

wool; ovpd, tail — in allusion to the tail, which is covered Avith short hairs, 

interspersed with longer ones. 
Crocuta Kaup, 1828. Fera?, Hysenidre. 

Oken's Isis, XXI, Heft xi, 1145, 1828; Gray, List Spec. Marnm. Brit. Mus., 

pp. xx, 47, 1843; Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1868, 525. 
Crocotta Kaup, Ent.-Gesch. & Natiirl. Syst. Europ.- Thierwelt, I, 74-78, 1829. 
Type: Hyssna crocuta (Erxleben), from Africa; the genus also includes a second 

species not named [//. spelsea]. "Man ziihlt mit Gewissheitzwey Arten hieher, 

welche beyde auch in Europa gelebt haben mussen. Die eine Art liebt noch 

in Africa und ist Hysena crocuta." 
Crocuta: KpoKcordi, saffron-colored — from the prevailing color of the animal. 
Crossarchus F. Cuvier, 1825. Ferce, Viverrid;e. 

Hist. Nat. Mamm., V, livr. xlvii, pi. with 3 pp. text under 'le Mangue,' Feb., 

1825; Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 577; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & 

Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 176, 1869. 
Type: ( 'rossarchus obscurus F. Cuvier, from the west coast of Africa, probably from 

southern Gambia. 
Crossarchus: Kpoddoi, tassels, fringe; dpxos, rectum. 

Crossopus Wagler, 1832. Insectivora, Soricidse. 

Oken's Isis, 1832, 275. 

Type: Sorex fodiens Bechstein, from Europe. 
Name antedated by Neomys Kaup, 1829. 
Crossopus: Kpoddoi, tassels, fringe; itovs, foot. 

Crunomys Thomas, 1898. Glires, Murida?, Hydromyinae. 

Trans. Zool. Soc. London, XIV, pt. vi, 393-396, pis. xxxm fig. 1, xxxv figs. 
5-6, June, 1898. 

Type: Crunomys fallax Thomas, from Isabella, central northern Luzon, Philip- 
pine Islands (alt., 1,000 ft.). 

Crunomys: Kpovvoz, spring, well (Kpovvoi, torrents or streams); /ivi, mouse. 
"The type appeared to be a stream haunter." (Thomas, in epist.) 

Cryptomeryx Schlossek, 1886. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Tragulidse. 

Morph. Jahrbueh, Leipzig, XII, ltes Heft, 74, 93-94, Taf. v figs. 7, 16, 22, 24, vi 
• figs. 6, 9, 1886. 

Type: Lophiomeryx gaudryi Filhol, from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 
Extinct. 
Cryptomeryx: Kpvnzoc,, hidden; /u}pvz, ruminant. 



CRYPTOMYS CUAMA, 205 

Cryptomys (subgenus of Georychus) Gray, 1864. Glires, Bathyergida?. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 124, figs. 3, 6. 
Type: Georychus holosericeus Wagner, from South Africa. 
Cryptomys: Kpvitros, hidden; pvs, mouse. 

Oryptophractus Fitzinger, 1856. Edentata, Dasypodidae? 

Tagebl. 32, Versamml. Deutsch. Naturforscher & Aertze, Wien, 123, 1856. 
Type: Oryptophractus piloms Fitzinger, from Peru. 

Oryptophractus: Kpvnroi, hidden; (ppcxKros, protected — in allusion to the fact 
that the carapace is almost entirely concealed by hair on the back and sides. 
Cryptopithecus Schlosser, 1890. Primates, Microchceridae? 

Die Affen, Lemuren, Chiropteren, etc., des Europiiischen Tertiars, Theil III, in 
Beitr. Pal. Oesterreich-Ungarns, VIII, 65 [451], Taf. iv, figs. 55, 60, 62, 1890. 
Type: Cryptopithecus sideroolithicua Schlosser, from Frohnstetten, Germany. 
• Extinct. Based on a portion of a lower jaw containing two molars. 
Cryptopithecus: Kpvitroc,, hidden; 7tiO^Kog, ape. 

Cryptoprocta Bennett, 1833. Ferae, Viverridpe. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1832, No. iv, 46, May 24, 1833; Trans. Zool. Soc. 

London, I, 137, 1834; Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 545-546. 
Type: Cryptoprocta ferox Bennett, from Madagascar. 
Cryptoprocta: Kpvitroz, hidden; itpGOKToz, anus — probably in allusion to the 

anal pouch. 
Cryptotis (subgenus of Musaraneus) Pomel, 1848. Insectivora, Soricidse. 

Archiv. Sci. Phys. etNat., Bibl. Univ. Geneve, IX, 249, Nov., 1848. 
Type: Sorex cinereus Bachman, from Goose Creek, South Carolina. 
Cryptotis: Kpvrcr6<;, hidden; ovs, &> r 05, ear — in allusion to the concealment of the 

external meatus by the dense hair on the back of the ear. ( Compare Anotus. ) 
Ctenacodon Marsh, 1879. Allotheria, Plagiauiacidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XVIII, 396-397, fig. in text, Nov., 1879. 
Ctenacodus Giebel, Zeitschr. Gesammt. Naturwiss., Berlin, 3te Folge, V, 191, 

1880. 
Type: Ctenacodon serratus Marsh, from the Jurassic (Atlantosaurus beds) of 

Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on "a diminutive right lower jaw, with most of the teeth in 

excellent preservation." 
Ctenacodon: Krais, ktevos, comb; dcKi), point; b8a>v = d§ov<;, tooth — from the 

combdike row of tubercles on the lower molars. 
Ctenodactylus Gray, 1830. Glires, Octodontidae. 

Spicilegia Zoologica, II, 10-11, Aug. 1, 1830; Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1831, 

48-50. 
Type: Ctenodactylus massonii Gray, from the Cape of Good Hope, Africa. 
Ctenodactylus: Krsis, ktevos, comb; SccKrvhog, finger or toe — in allusion to the 

peculiar comb-like bristles <>n the hind feet, which are said to be used in 

dressing the fur. 
Ctenomys Blainville, 1826. Glires, Octodontkke. 

Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, 64, pi. facing p. 56, Apr., 1826; Ann. Sci. Nat., 

Paris, IX, 102, 1826. 
Type: ( tenomys brasUiensis Blainville, from Minas Geraes, Brazil. 
Ctenomys: ktei$, ktevoc,, comb; f-ivz, mouse — in allusion to the combdike 

bristles on the hind toes. 
Cuama Gray, 1821. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

London Med. Repos., XV, 307, Apr. 1, 1821. 
Type: Antilope cuama Cuvier, from South Africa. 
Cuama: From the name of the type species. Cuama is a misprint for caama or 

khama, the Bechuana name of this antelope. 



206 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Cuandu (see Coendou). Glires, Erethizontidaa. 

Cuati Liais, 1872. Ferfe, Procyonidse. 

Climats, G&>1., Faune et Geog. Botanique, Bresil, 427, 1872. 
Emendation of Coati Lacepede, 1799. "Lacepede a adopte pour nom generique 

de ces animaux, en latin et en francais, le nom de Coati, qu'il serait plus correct 

d'ecrire Cuati d'apres l'etymologie indienne. C'est le nom le plus convenable 

a adopter pour ce genre, auquel Storr a donn£ celui de Nasua, . . . consti- 

tuant un barbarisme latin a la fois mauvais et inutile." (Liais.) 
Cuica Liais, 1872. Marsupialia, Didelphyidse. 

Climats, Geol., Faune et Geog. Botanique, Bresil, 328, 330, 1872. 
Species 8, from tropical America: Didelphis myosuros, D. murina, D. pusilla, D. 

dnerea, D. lanigera, D. cras&icaudata, D. tricolor, and D. tristriata, "dontlapoche 

est incomplete et les poils d'une seule espece." 
Cuica: Indian name, from coo, animal; and yeica or tea, gummy — in allusion to 

the appearance of the new-born young in the pouch while still attached to the 

breast of the mother. 
Cultridens Croizet, 1837. Fera?, Felidae. 

"Croizet, in Huot's Nouv. Cours Element. Geol., 1, 265, 1837" (fide Waterhouse 

MS.); Croizet & Jobert, in Bronn's Lethaea Geognostica, II, 831, 1278, 1838. 
Type: Ursus cultridens issidorensis Croizet & Jobert, from the Pliocene of France. 
Name antedated by Megantereon Croizet & Jobert, 1828; by Machairodus Kaup, 

1833; and by Steneodon Croizet, 1833. 
Extinct. 

Cultridens: ~L&t.,culter, cultri, knife; dens, tooth — in allusion to the upper canines. 

Cuniculus Brisson, 1762. Glires, Dipodidse. 

Regnum Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 13, 98-104, 1762; Merriam, 

Science, new ser., I, No. 14, p. 376, Apr. 5, 1895 (type fixed). 
Type: Ouniculus cauda longissima Brisson ( = Dipus idactaga '■ 01ivier= Mus jaculus 

Pallas), from southern Russia and southwestern Siberia. 
Cuniculus: Lat., rabbit. 
Cuniculus Meyer, 1790. Glires, Leporida?. 

Mag. f. Thiergesch., 1, pt. 1, 52-53, 1790; Gloger, Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Natur- 

gesch., I, 104, 1841; Gray, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 3d ser., XX, 224-225, 

Sept., 1867. 
Species, 7: Lejms campestris Meyer ( = Le}>us cuniculus), Cuniculus doinesticus, C. 

angorensix, C. argenteus ( = var. fi cuniculileporis Erxleben) , C. russicus ( = var. 

y Erxleben, and d Gmelin), Lepus dauricus Erxleben, from Europe; and 

L. brasiliensis Erxleben, from Brazil. 
Name preoccupied by Cuniculus Brisson, 1762, a genus of Dipodidse. 
Cuniculus Wagleh, 1830. Glires, Muridae, Microtinse. 

Nat. Syst. Amphibien, 21, 1830; Oken's Isis, 1832, 1220; Coues, Mon. N. Am. 

Rodentia, 243-251, 1877 (type fixed). 
Species, 3: Mus lemmus Pallas, J/, torquatus Pallas (type), and .V. aspalax Pallas. 
Name preoccupied by Cuniculus Brisson, 1762, a genus of Dipodidye; and by 

Cuniculus Meyer, 1790, a genus of Leporida?. (See Dicrostonyx Gloger, 1841; 

Misothermus Hensel, 1855; Borioikon Poliakoff , 1881; and TylonyxSchnlze, 1897. ) 
Cuon Hodgson, 1838. Ferae, Canidse. 

Ann. Nat, Hist., I, 152, Apr., 1838. 
Cyon Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Index Univ., 113, 1846; 2d ed., 326, 1848; 

Blanford, Fauna British India, Mamm., pt. i, 142-147, June, 1888. 
Type: Cuon primsevus ( = Canis primivvus Hodgson) from Nepal, India. 
Cuon: kvgov, dog. 
Cursus (see Coescoes). Marsupialia, Pbalangeridse. 

Curtodon (see Kurtodon). Marsupialia, Amphithermke. 



CUSCUS CYCLOPIDIUS. 207 

Cuscus (see Coescoes). Marsupialia, Phalangeridse. 

Cutia Liais, 1872. Glires, Dasyproctidse. 

Climats, Geol., Faune, et Geog. Botanique, Bresil, 534-537, 1872. 
New name for Dasyprocta Illiger, 1811. "Les Agoutis sont connus au Bresil sous 
le nom de Cutia. ... II y aurait grand avantage a substituer, pour appellation 
du genre le nom doux de Cutia au nom barbare de Dasyprocta." 
Cutia: Anagram of the Indian name aeuti, attentive, vigilant — in allusion to the 
habits of the animals. 
Cuvierimys (Bravard MS.) Gervais, 1848-52. Glires, Theridomyidae. 

Bravard, in Gervais, Zool. et Pal£ont. Franchises, II, expl., pi. No. 47, p. 4, 
1848-52; 2 C ed., 34, 1859, pi. xlvii, figs. 15-16 (under Archseomys); Giebel, 
Siiugethiere, 517 footnote, 1855; 2d ed., 517 footnote, 1859. 
Type: Cuvierimys laurilktrdi Bravard (=Archseomys laurillardi Gervais), from 

Issoire, Dept. Puy-de-D6me, France. 
Extinct. 

Cuvierimys: Curler; /-ivi, mouse. In honor of Baron Georges Cuvier, 1769-1832, 

author of 'Recherches sur les Ossemens Fossiles des Quadrupedes,' 1812; 'Le 

Regne Animal,' 1817, etc. 

Cuvierius Gray, 1866. Cete, Balsenidse. 

Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 114, 164-169, 1866; Suppl. Cat. Seals & Whales 

Brit, Mus., 54, 1871. 
Type: Physalus latirostris Flower, from the coast of Holland. 
Name preoccupied by ( uvieria Peron & Lesueur, 1807, a genus of Acalephs. 
Cuvierius: In honor of Baron Georges Cuvier, 1769-1832. 
Cyanomyonax (see Gynomyonax). Fera?, Mustelidae. 

Cyclochilus (subg. * of Atelodus) Brandt, 1878. Ungulata, Rhinocerotidge. 

Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci., St.-Petersbourg, VII" ser., XXVI, No. 5, pp. 55-56, 1878. 
Type: Rhinoceros si mus Burchell, from South Africa. 
Name antedated by Ceratotherium Gray, 1867. 

CyclochMus: kvkAos, ring, circle; #£zAos, lip — 'labio rotundato instructus.' 
Cyclog-nathus E. Geopfroy, 1833. Ungulata, Artfodactyla, Anoplotheriidse. 

Revue Encyclopeclique, LIX, 78-79, July-Sept., 1833;t Considerations surl'Ossem. 

Foss. Bassin de l'Auvergne, 1833, 4, footnote (read Oct. 7, 1833). 
Type: Anoplotherium laticurvatum K. (leoffroy, from the quarries of Saint-Gerand- 

le-Puy, Auvergne, France. 
Extinct. Based on lower jaws. 

Cyclognathus: kvk\o%, circle; yvdOos, jaw — from the rounded angle of the 
lower jaw. 

Cyclopes Gray, 1821. Edentata, Myrniecophagida?. 

London Med. Repos., XV, 305, Apr. 1, 1821; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 

6th ser., XV, 191, Feb., 1895; 7th ser., VI, 302, Sept., 1900; Palmer, Proc. 

Biol. Soc. Wash., XIII, 72, Sept. 28, 1899. 
Type: Myrmecophaga didactyla Linnaeus, from Guiana. 
Cyclopes: Plural of kvkAqotP, round-eyed {kvkXos, circle; £if>, eye). 
Cyclopidius Cope, 1878. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agriochceridae. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XVII, 1877-78, 221-222 (sep. issued as Pateont. Bull. 

No. 28), Jan 12, 1878; Am. Naturalist, XII, 58, 1878; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, 

XXI, 546-557, 1884; Hay. Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. 

Surv., 670, 1902 (type fixed). 

* Cyclrjchilus is given as a section of the subgenus Colobognathus Brandt. 
t Probably published* several months later, see 'Postscriptum,' p. 95, dated Oct. 29, 
1833. 



208 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Cyclopidius — Continued. 

Species: Cyclopidius simus Cope (type), and C. heterodon Cope, from the Upper 

Miocene (Ticholeptus beds) of Deep River, Montana. 
Extinct, 
Oychpidius: Dim. of kvkAgoi/>, round-eyed — in allusion to the large foramen in 

front of the lachrymal fossa which communicates with the maxillary sinus. 
Cyclorhina (subgenus of Phyllorhina) Peters, 1871. Cbiroptera, Rhinolophidae. 
Monateber. K.' Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, June, 1871, 326-327 (section of 

a subgenus ) . 
Species: PhyUorhina obscura Peters, from Luzon, Philippine Islands; and/', dorise 

Peters, from Sarawak, Borneo. 
Cyclorhina: kvk\o$, circle; pis, pivos, nose. 
Cyclothurus (subgenus of Myrmecophaga) (' Gray ') Lesson, 1842. 

Edentata, Myrmecophagidae. 
[Gray, Thomson's Ann. Philos., X, 343, 1825 — nonien nudum.] 
Lesson, Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 152, 1842; Gray, List Spec.Mamm. 

Brit, Mus., pp. xxviii, 191, 1843 (raised to generic rank). 
Cycloturus Sclater, Proc. Zool. Soc, London, 1871, 546; Flower, Encyclopaedia 

Brittanica, 9th ed., XV, :'>X6, 1883 (art. Mammalia); Flower & Lydekker, 

Mamm., Living & Extinct. 193-194, 1891. 

Type: Myrmecophaga didactyla Linnaeus, from Guiana (see Cyclopes Gray, 1821). 

Cyclothurus: kvkXcotoc, rounded; ovpd, tail — from the tapering, prehensile tail. 

Cylindrodon Douglass, 1901. Glires, Castoridae? 

Trans. Am. Philos. Soc, new ser., XX, pt. in, 251-252, pi. ix figs. 9, 9a, Dec. 

5, 1901 (sep. pp. 15-16); Matthew, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., XIX, 212-213, 

figs. 7-8, 1903. 
Type: Cylindrodon fontis Douglass, from the "White River Oligocene (Pipestone 

beds), in the vicinity of Pipestone springs, near "Whitehall, Jefferson County, 

Montana. 
Extinct. Based on two portions of mandibular rami; one with all the cheek 

teeth and the greater part anterior to the ascending ramus, the other with the 

three posterior teeth and part of the ascending ramus. 
Cylindrodon: KvAivSpoz, cylinder; bhojv =6dovi, tooth. "The teeth are cylin- 
drical, with a central enamel islet and an outer enamel inflection" (Douglass). 
Cymatotherium Kaup, 1841. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidae. 

Akten der Urwelt, 11-14, tab. iv, 1841. 
CymoMherium Okay, Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 

262, 1869. 
Type: Cymatotherium antiquum Kaup, "des Diluviums, bei Oelsnitz im Sachsi- 

schen Vogtland," Germany. 
Extinct. Based on a lower jaw. 

Cymatotherium: Kvim, KVfxaroc,, wave: Brjpiov, wild beast. 
Cynailurus Wagler, 1830. Ferae, Felidre. 

Nat. Syst. Amphibien, 30, 1830; Severtzow, Rev. et Mag. de Zool., 2 e ser., X, 

388, 390, Sept., 1858. 
Cynaelurus Gloger, Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., pp. xxix, 63, 1841. 
Type: Felis jubata Erxleben, from India and Africa. (See Acinon>ix Brookes, 

1828. ) 
Cynailurus: kvqov, kvvo$, dog; al'Xovpos, cat — in allusion to the long limbs, 

claws always partially exposed, and other dog-like characters. 
Cynalicus Gray, 1846. Ferae, Canidae. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., XVII, 298-294, Apr., 1846. 
Cynalius Gray, List Osteol. Spec. Brit. Mus., pp. x, 18, 1847 (misprint). 
Cynalycus Gray, Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., and Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 183, 

1869 (in synonymy). 



CYNALICUS CYNICTIS. 209 

Cynalicus — Continued. 

Type: Cynalicus melanogaster Gray (=Icticyon vmaMcus Lund), from Brazi.. 
Cynalicus: kvvoAvkoz, dog-wolf. 

Cynalopex (subgenus of Chaon), H. Smith, 1839. Fene, Canidse. 

Jardine's Nat. Library, Maram., IX, 222-232, pis. xyi-xyiii, 1839; ed. 2, Mamm., 

I, 152, 1858; IV, 222-232, pis. 16-18, 1866; V, 290, 1865. 

In volume V the genus includes 5 species, from western Asia: Canis corsac H. 
Smith, ' 'anis bokree Sykes, C. chrys-urus Gray, C. pallidus Riippell, and C.turcicus 

II. Smith. In volume IV a sixth species, Cynalopex insectivorus II. Smith 
(=Cbras bengalensis Shaw), is added. 

Cynalopex: KvvaAco7t?/q, fox-dog. 

Cynalycus (see Cynalicus). Fene, Canida?. 

Cynamolgus Reictienbach, 1862. Primates, Cercopithecidae. 

Vollstand. Naturgesch. Affen, 130-137, pi. xxm, tigs. 327-344, 1862; Elera, Cat. 
Sist. Fauna Filipinas, I, 2, 1895. 

Includes 2 subgenera: ZaM (3 species) and Cynamolgus, 6 species: Simia cynoce- 
plialus ( Jmelin, from Africa; Macacus philippensis < Jeoffrov, from the Philippine 
Islands; Presbytia albinus Kelaart, from Ceylon; Macacos carbonarius Cuvier, 
from Sumatra; Cercopithecus mulaita Ziinmermann, from East India; and 
Macacus palpebrosus I. Geoffrey, from Manila, Philippine Islands. 

Cynamolgus: KwdjuoAyoi, dog-milker — the name of an Ethiopian tribe. 

Cynarctus Matthew, 1902. Fene, Canida?. 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist,, XVI, 281-284, fig. 1, Sept. 18, 1902. 
Type: Cynarctus saxatilis Matthew, from the Miocene, Loup Fork (Pawnee Creek 

beds) of Cedar Creek, Colorado. 
Extinct. Based on 'a nearly perfect pair of lower jaws.' 
Cynarctus: kvgov, kvvoc,, dog; apKTO$, bear. 
Cynelos Jourdan, 1848-52. Fene, Canida?. 

Jourdan, in Gervais' Zool. et Paleont. Franc., 1° ed., II, expl. pi. 28, p. 14, 

1848-52; 2 e ed., 216, 1859; in Pictet's Traite Paleont., 2f ed., I, 195, 1853; 

Revue Soc. Savantes, Paris, I, 130, 1862. 
Type: Amphicyon gracilis Pomel, from the Miocene of Saint Gerand-le-Puy, 

Allier, France. 
Extinct. Based on a skull and part of a skeleton. 
Cynelos: kvgdv, kvvo$, dog; f'Ao?, marsh. 
Cynhyaena F. Cuvier, 1829. Fera?, Canida?. 

Diet. Sci. Nat,, LIX, 454, 1829. 
Cynohysena Blaixville, Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 2 e ser., VIII, Zool., 279, Nov., 

1837; Osteog. Mamm. Recents et Foss., II, fasc. vn ( Carnassiers, Canis), 43, 82, 

1840; fasc. xm (Canis), 33, 1843 (emendation). 
Type: Hyaena picta Temminck, from Africa. 

Name antedated by Lycaon Brookes, 1827, which is based on the same species. 
Cynhyaena: kvoov, kvvos, dog; vaiva, hyena — from the combination of canine 

and hyena characters and habits. 

Cynictis Ogilby, 1833. Fene, Viverrida?. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. IV, May 24, 1833, 48-49; Philos. Mag., 3d ser., Ill, 
68, 1833; Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 571-573; Thomas, ibid., 1882, 
82-84. 

Type: Cynictis steedmanni (=Herpestes penicillatus Cuvier), from Uitenhage, Cape 
Colony, South Africa. 

Cynictis: kvoov, kvvoc, dog; /Vr/g, weasel — i. e., intermediate between, or con- 
necting, the dogs and civets. 

7591— No. 23—03 14 



210 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM 

Cynocebus (subgenus of Chlorocebus) Gray, 1870. Primates, Cercopithecidae. 

Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 26, 1870. 

Type: Cercopithecus cynosurns Geoffroy, from West Africa. 

Cynocebus: kvojv, kvvos, dog; Kfjfio<z, long-tailed monkey. 
Cynocephalus Boddaert, 1768. Insectivora, Galeopithecidae. 

Dierkundig Mengelwerk. In het Latyn beschreeven door Pallas, II, 8, footnote 
"1," 1768. 

Type: Cynocephalus volans ( = Lemur volans Linnaeus), from the island of Ternate, 
Malay Archipelago. " Waarom de Heer Houttuin dit geslacht Spookdieren 
noemt; beken ik niet te weeten, alzoo min als de oorsprong van de Latynsche 
naam Lemur. . . . De zoort welke de Heer Pallas hier bedoelt [het vliegende 
Spookdier] is die welke de Heer Seba en na hem de Heer Houttuin de 
vliegende Kat van Ternate noemt . . . ; derhalven waare dezelve beter 
genoemd, de vliegende Meerkat [Cynocephalus volans)." (Boddaert, 1. c) 

Cynocephalus: kvojv, kvvos, dog; KEipcxXi), head. 
Cynocephalus Cuvier & Geoffroy, 1795. Primates, Cercopithecidae. 

[Brisson, Regnum Animate in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 133, 246, 247, 1762— 
'Stirps II, Simla cynocephala,' 'Stirps V, Cercopithecus cynocephalus']; 
"Cuvier & Geoffroy, Mag. Encyc, III (12), 462, 1795;" G. Cuvier, [Tab. 
Elem. Hist. Nat. Animaux, 98-99, 1798— 'les Macaques,' with 4 species;] 
Lecons Anat. Comp., I, tabl. i, 1800 (Macaques — Cynocephalus); Lacepede, 
"Tabl. Meth. Mamm., 4, 1799;" Nouv. Tabl. Method., in Mem. Plnstitut, III, 
490, 1801 (C. maimon); Desmarest, Nouv. Diet. Hist, Nat., XXIV, Tabl. 
Method., 8, 1804. 

Species, 4: Simia cynocephalus Linnfeus (type), from Africa; S. hamadryas Lin- 
naeus, from northeast Africa; S. inuus Linnaeus, from North Africa; and S. 
sphinx Linnaeus, from Africa (fide Sherborn, Index Anim., 1112, 1902). 

Name preoccupied by Cynocephalus Boddaert, 1768, a genus of Insectivora; and 
by Cynocephalus Walbaum, 1792, a genus of Pisces. 

Cynocephalus:* KvvoK£q)cxXo<;, dog-headed (from kvgov, dog; K£(paXi), head) — 
the 'dog-faced baboon.' 
Cynochoerus Kaup, 1859. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

"Beitr. naheren Kenntniss urwelt. Siiugethiere, pi. 3, 1859" (fide Trouessart, 
Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. iv, 813, 1898). 

Type: Cynochoerus ziegleri Kaup, from the Miocene of Germany. 

Extinct. 

Cynochoerus: kvoov, kvvoc, dog; x o 'P°?> hog. 
Cynodesmus Scott, 1893. Ferae, Canidae. 

Am. Naturalist, XXVII, No. 319, pp. 659, 660, July, 1893; Trans. Am. Philos. 
Soc, XVII, 63-75, pi. i, figs. 1-5, May 23, 1894. 

Type: Cynodesmus thooides Scott, from the Oligocene of Deep River Valley, north- 
west of White Sulphur Springs, Meagher County, Montana. 

Extinct. 

Cynodesmus: kvoov, kvvos, dog; Ssdjuos, bond — a connectant form between ancient 
and modern dogs. "Dentition like the microdont forms of Canis, but with 
the skull structure of the more ancient genera." (Scott, Am. Nat., 1. c. ) 

Cynodictis, Bravard & Pomel, 1850. Ferae, Canidae. 

Notice Ossein. Foss. Debruge, pres Apt, 5, 1850; Gervais, Zool. et Pal. Franc., 

l e &L, II, 113-114, 1848-52; 2 e ed, 216-218, pis. 25, figs. 1-4; 26, fig. 4, 1859; Pomel, 

Cat. Meth. Vert. Foss. Bassin de la Loire. 66. 1854; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. N. 

Am., Bull, ""79, U. S. Geol. Surv., 771, 1902 (type given as C. parisiemis). 

* Cynocephale, tete de chien, nom tres connu chez les anciens surtout parce que cet 
animal jouait un grand role dans les figures symboliques des Egyptiens, ou il repr6- 
sentait Tot ou Mercure." (Cuvier, Regne Anim., £d. 2, 97, 1829.) 



CYNODICTIS CYNOMOMUS. 211 

Cynodictis — Continued. 

Species (2, unnamed), from Pereal, near Apt, Vaucluse, France. 

Gervais, in 1852 and later in 1859, gives only Cynodictis lacustoris, from the lig- 
nites of Debruge, near Apt. Pomel, however, in 1854, says: " On les divise en 
plusieurs sous-genres, dont un, le Cynodictis vrai, est des platrieres de Paris, 
Cynodictis parmensis, Nob. (Cyotherium Aym.)." 

Extinct. 

Cynodictis: KvvrjSov, like a dog; ikris, weasel — " une forme intermediate aux 
genettes et aux chiens." (Bravard & Pomel.) 

Cynodon Aymard, 1848. Ferse, Canidae. 

\nn. Soc. Agr., Sci., Arts et Comm. du Puy, XII, for 1842-46, 244, 1848; ibid., 

XIV, 113, 1850 (fide Pomel, Cat. Meth. Vert. Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 66, 1854); 

Gervais, Zool. et Pal. Franc;., I, 113, 1848-52; 2 e ed., 218-219, 1859. 
Type: Cynodon velaunm Aymard, from the Oligoceneof Ronzon, near Puy, Dept. 

Haute-Loire, France. 
Name preoccupied by Cynodon Spix, 1829, a genus of Pisces. 
Extinct. 
Cynodon: Kvy6da>v = Kvv6dovi, the canine tooth (from kvoov, Kvvog, dog; 

odd)}' = ddovs, tooth). 
Cynodontomys Cope, 1882. Glires, Proglires, Mixodectida?. 

"Palaeont. Bull. No. 34, pp. 151-152, Feb. 20, 1882;" Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, 

XX, 151-152, Mar. 11, 1882; Tert. Vert,, 346, 1885 (date of publication, under 

Sarcothraustes); Osborn, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., N. Y., XVI, 205, 208-209, 

fig. 35, June 28, 1902 (ordinal position). 
Type: Cynodontomys latidens Cope, from the Eocene (Wasatch beds) of the basin 

of the Big Horn River, northern Wyoming. 
Extinct, "Generic characters derived from mandibular rami." 
Cynodontomys: kvoov, kvvoc, dog; dSovs, odovros, tooth; /<vs, mouse. 
Cynofelis Lesson, 1842. Fera?, Felidse. 

Nouvfau Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 48-49, 1842. 
Species: Felis jubata Schreber, from India and Africa, and F. guttata Hermann, 

from Africa. 
Name antedated by Cynailurus Wagler, 1830; and by Guepardus Duvernoy, 1834. 
Cynofelis: kvoov, kwo%, dog; 4> Felix. 
Cynog-ale Gray, 1837. Fera?, Viverridse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1836, No. XLVI, 88, Feb. 20, 1837; ibid., 1864, 

522; Charlesworth's Mag. Nat. Hist., I, 579, 1837. 
Type: Cynogale bennettii Gray, from Sumatra (?). 
Cynogale: kvoov, kvvoc,, dog; ycxXfj, weasel. 
Cynogale Lund, 1842. Ferse, Canidse. 

K. Danske Vidensk. Selsk. Nat. & Math. Afhandl., Kjobenhavn, IX, 201-203, 1842. 
Type: Cynogale venatica Lund, from the valley of the Rio das Velhas, Minas 

Geraes, Brazil. 
Name preoccupied by Cynogale Gray, 1837, a genus of Viverridse. Replaced by 

Icticyon Lund, 1843. 
Cynohyaena (see Cynhysena). Ferae, Canidse. 

Cynohyaenodon Filhol, 1873. Creodonta, Proviverrida?. 

Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, 6 C ser., X, 87, July-Dec, 1873. 
Type: Cynohyxnodon cayluxi Filhol, from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 
Extinct. Based on a lower jaw. 
Cynohyienodon: kvoov, kvvos, dog; vaiva, hyena; 6Sd)v= o$ov<z, tooth. 

Cynomomus (see Cynomys). Glires, Sciuridse. 



212 INDEX GENERUM MAMMAL1UM. 

Cynomyonax (subgenus of Putorius) Coues, 1877. Ferae, Mustelidae. 

Fur-bearing Animals, pp. 99, 147-148, 1877. 

Cyanomyonax Trouessart, Cat. Mamm. Viv. et Foss., Carnivores, 44, 1885; new 
ed., fasc. n, 274, 1897.* 

Type: Putorius (Cynomyonax) nigripes Audubon & Bachman, from the Platte 
River, Nebraska. 

Cynomyonax: Cynomys (kvoov, dog; /<£?, mouse) ava£, kingf — ' king of the 

prairie dogs.' The species lives in prairie-dog towns and feeds upon the ' dogs.' 

Cynomys Rafinesque, 1817. Glires, Sciuridse. 

Am. Monthly Mag., II, No. 1, p. 45, 1817; Allen, Mon. N. Am. Rodentia, 891, 
1877 (type fixed). 

Cynomomus H. L. Osborn, Science, XXIII, No. 577, 103 footnote, Feb. 23, 1894. 

Species: Cynomys socialis Rafinesque (=Arctomys hidoricianus Ord, type), and 
C.t grisea Rafinesque, from the plains of the Missouri. 

Cynomys: kvoov, kvvoc,, dog; vvs, mouse. "This genus whose name means Dog- 
rat [was based on the Barking squirrel of Lewis and Clarke. The animals] 
. . . bark like small dogs and live on roots and grass . . . they often sit on 
their hind legs as dogs." (Rafinesque.) 
Cynonasua (see Cyonasua). Fera?, Procyonidse. 

Cynonycteris Peters, 1852. Chiroptera, Pteropodidae. 

Naturw. Reise nach Mossambique, Zool., I, Siiugeth., 25, 1852. 

Type: Pteropus collaris Illiger. (Peters' specimen was collected at Inhambane, 
Gasa Land, southeast Africa, S. lat. 24° . ) 

Cynonycteris: kvoov, kvvos, dog; vvKrepis, bat — probably from its dog-like head. 
Cynopithecus I. Geoffroy, 1835. Primates, Cercopithecidse. 

["Les Cynopithequesl. Geoffroy, Belanger'sVoy. Indes Orient., Zool., 66,1834."] 

I. Geoffroy, in Gervais' "Resume Lecons Mammalogie au Museum, 8°, Paris, 
16, 1835" (fide Archiv. Museum, Paris, II, 574-575, 1841); Gervais, Diet. 
Pittoresque, Hist. Nat., VIII, pt. i, 90; pt. n, 428, 1839; Gray, Cat. Monkeys, 
Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 33, 1870. 

Type: Cynocephalus niger Desmarest, from the Philippine and Molucca Islands. 
"Dans le premier de ces ouvrages, les Cynopitheques ne sont encore consi- 
ders que comme une simple section des Cynocephales . . . Dans le second 
ils sont eleves du rang de genre distinct." (Archiv., 1. c, 575, footnote.) 

Cynopithecus: kvoov, kvyos, dog; Ttfflr]Ko<;, ape — from its dog-like head. 
Cynopterus F. Cuvier, 1825. Chiroptera, Pteropodidae. 

Dents Mamm. [Cynoptere, 39-40], 248, 1825; Matschie, Fledermiiuse Berliner 
Mus. f. Naturkunde, Lief, i, 71-77, 1899. 

Type: Pteropus marginatum Geoffroy ( = Yespertilio sphinx Yahl), from Tranquebar, 
India. 

Cynopterus: kvoov, kvvo%, dog; Ttzepov, wing — 'winged dog,' probably from its 
dog-like head. 
Cynopus I. Geoffroy, 1835. Fera?, Viverridae. 

I. Geoffroy, in Gervais' Resume Lecons Mammalogie au Museum de Paris 
pendant l'annee 1835 (extrait Echo du Monde Savant, I, 37, 1835); Mag. de 
Zool., 2 e ser., I, Mamm. pis. xi-xvi, pp. 4, 5, 1839. 

Type: Herpestes penicillatus from South Africa. A provisional name which equals 
Cynictis Ogilby, 1833. 

Cynopus: kvoov, kvvo%, dog; Ttovs, foot — in allusion to the number of toes. 



*This date is wrongly given as 1874 in C. O. Waterhouse's Index Zool., 93, 1902. 

t Coues gives the last element of the compound as 'oova^ (or aval-) king,' but 
oovac, is merely a contracted vocative of oJ avac, '0 king.' See remarks on the deri- 
vation of Empidonax by A. C. Merriam, Auk, I, 42, Jan., 1884. 



C Y N ORC A C YSTOPHOR A . 213 

Cynorca Cope, 1867. Cete, Squalodontida 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sei. Phila., 1867, 144, 151; 1868, 185-186; Leidy, Journ. Acad. 

Nat. Sei. Phila., 2dser., VII, 423-424, 1869. 
Type: Cynorca proterva Cope, from the Miocene of Ashley River, South Carolina. 
Extinct. Based on teeth. 
< 'i/iiorcn: kvoov, kvv6$, dog; + Orca. 
Cynotherium Stidiati, 1857. Ferse, Canida?. 

"Desc. Foss. Monreale de Bonaria pres de Cagliari, dans A. de La Marmora's 
Voy. en Sardaigne, 3 e pt., Desc. Geol., II, 651, Atlas, pi. vn, figs. 1, 3, 5, 6, 8- 
12,1857" (fideFoRSYTH-MAJOR, AttiSoc. Ital. Sei. Nat,, Milano, XV, 380, 1872). 
Type: Cynotherium sardous Studiati, from Monreale, near Cagliari, Sardinia. 
(According to Forsyth-Major Cynotherium is closely related to, if not identical 

with, Citon Hodgson, 1838, based on Oanig primaevus, from India). 
Extinct. 

Cynotherium: kvoov, kvvo<;, dog; Srjpiov, wild beast. 
Cyon (see Cuon). Feree, Canidre. 

Cyonasua Ameghino, 1885. Fera?, Procyonidc 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, VIII, entr. la, pp. 19-22, 1885; Cont, Conoci- 
miento Mamif. Fosil. Repub. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, 
VI, 313-315, 912-913, pis. xxi, figs. 2-3, lxxix, fig. 18, 1889. 
Cynonasua Lydekker, in Nicholson & Lydekker's Man. Pakpont., II, 1429, 1889. 
Type: Cyonasua argentina Ameghino, from the barrancas del Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on two portions of the left lower jaw. 
Cyonasua: kvojv, kvvos, dog; -\- Xasua. 
Cyotherium Aymard, 1850. Fera?, Canida?. 

Ann. Soc. Agr., Sei., Arts et Comm. du Puy, XIV, 113, 1850; Gervais, Zool. et 

Paleont. Franc., 2 e ed., 219, 1859. 
Type: Oyotherium parisiemse Aymard (=Viverra parisiensis Blainville), from the 

Eocene gypsum beds of Paris, France. 
Extinct. 

Cyotherium: kvgov, dog; Oypiov, wild beast. 
Cyotherium Kaip. Sirenia, Halitheriida?. 

Kaup, fide Zittel, Handb. Palteont., IV, 195, 1892. 

Name given by Zittel as a synonym of HalUherium, but without reference, date, 

or species. It is uncertain whether Cyotherium Kaup is earlier or later than 

< yotheriwm Aymard. 

Cyphobalalena (see Kyphobalsena). Cete, Bahenida?. 

Cyphonotus Rafixesque, 1815. Cete, Balaenidae. 

Analyse de la Nature, 61, 1815 (nomen nudum?); Gray, Cat. Mamm. Brit. Mus., 

pt. I, Cetacea, 18-19, 1850. 
Type: Balaena sp. ( ' Cyphonotus R. sp. do.' [=espece du genre precedent, Balsena'] ). 
Gray gives Cyphonotus doubtfully as a subgenus to include B. yibbosa Erxleben, 

from the Atlantic. 
Cyphonotus: Kvcpoc,, hump; vSjtos, back — i. e., 'humpback whale.' 
Cyrtodelphis Abel, 1900. Cete, Platanistid?e. 

Denkschr. K. Akad. Wiss.,Wien, Math.-Nat. CI., LXVIII, 849, 850-851, 853-856, 

859-868, Taf. i, figs. 1, 3; Taf. ii-iv, 1900. 
Species: Delphinus sulcatus Gervais, and Cetorhynchus chriMolii Gervais, from Dept. 

Herault, France. 
Extinct. 

Cyrtodelphis: Kvpros, curved, arched; 8e\(pis, dolphin. 
Cyrtodon (see Kurtodon). Marsupialia, Amphitheriida?. 

Cystophora Nilssox, 1820. Fera?, Pinnipedia, Phockhe. 

Skandinavisk Fauna, I, 382-387, 1820; ed. 2, I, 310-317, 1847; Allex, Mon. N. 

Am. Pinnipeds, 723, 1880. 
Cystophoca Shufeldt, Am. Field, XXXIV, 222, Sept. 6, 1890. 



214 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Cystophora — Continued. 

Type: Cystophora borealis Nilsson (=Phora cristata Erxleben), from the North 

Atlantic, along the coasts of southern Greenland and Newfoundland. 
Cystophora: kv6tij, bladder; (popci, carrying (from (ps'pco, to bear) — in allusion 

to the inflatable cyst on the snout, which gives rise to the common names 

' bladder nosed ' or ' hooded ' seal. 

D. 

Dacrytherium Filhol, 1876. TJngulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriida?. 

Coinptes Rendus, Paris, LXXXII, No. 4, 288, Seance du 24 Jan., 1876. 
Type: Dacrytherium anthraeoides Filhol, from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 
Extinct. Based on "un crane complet, possedant son maxillaire inferieur en 

place et toutes ses dents." 
Dacrytherium: SctKpv, tear; Qt/piov, wild beast — in allusion to the lachrymal fossa. 
Dactylaena (subgenus of Bahcnoptera) Gray, 1874. Cete, Balpenida?. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist,, 4th ser., XIII, 449, pi. xviii, June, 1874. 
Type: Balsenoptera huttoni (iray [ = Physalus antarcticus Hutton), from Otago 

Head, New Zealand. 
Dactyhena: ScxktvXoz, linger; -j- (Bed-) sena—' finger whale,' in allusion to the 

character: "lingers the length of the forearm bone," in contrast with those 

of Balsenoptera, which are shorter. 
Dactyloceros (subg. of Cervus) Wagner, 1855. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervida?. 
Suj.pl. Schreber's Siiugthiere, V, 352, 1855. 
Type: Cervus dama Linnaeus, from Europe. 
Name preoccupied by Dactylocera Latreillc, 1829, a ru:s of Crustacea. (See 

Dama Frisch, 1775.) 
Dactyloceros: SctKrvXoi, finger; Kepa$, horn — in allusion to the snags which are 

numerous on the summit and posterior margin of the palmated part of the 

antlers. 
Dactylochilus (subg.* of Atelodus) Brandt, 1878. Ungulata, Rhinocerotida?. 

Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci., St. Petersbourg, 7 e ser., XXVI, No. 5, pp. 52-53, 1878. 
Type: Rhinoceros bicornis Linnasus, from Africa. (See Opsiceros Gloger, 1841.) 
Dactylochilus: SctKrvXos, finger; x 8 '^-°$> lip — from the pointed, prehensile 

upper lip. 
Dactylomys I. Geoffroy, 1838. Glires, Octodontidse. 

Echo du Monde Savant, Paris, 5 e Ann., No. 349, p. 201, July 7, 1838; Ann. Sci. 

Nat., Paris, 2 e ser., X, Zool., 126-127, Aug., 1838; Mag. de Zool., Mamm., 27, 

47, pi. xx, 1840. 
Type: Dactylomys typus I. Geoffroy (=Echimy* daetylinus E. Geoffroy), from 

South America, probably Brazil. 
Dactylomys: SclktvXos, finger; f.iv$, mouse — from the elongated third and fourth 

digits of the manus. 
Dactylopsila Gray, 1858. Marsupialia, Phalangerida?. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. cccliii, Apr. 27, 1858, 109-111, pi. lxiii, 5 figs, in 

text; Thomas, Cat, Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit, Mus., 159-161, 1888. 
Type: Dactylopsila trivirgata, from Aru Island (south of New Guinea). 
Dactylopsila: SaKvvXos, finger; ipiXog, bare — in allusion to the naked toes. 
Dgedicurus ( see Doedicurus) . Edentata, Glyptodontidpe. 

Daeodon Cope, 1878. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriid;e. 

Paleont, Bull. No. 30, p. 15, Dec. 3, 1878; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XVIII, 77, Dec. 

30, 1878. 
Daledon Zittel, Hand. Palaeont,, IV, lste Lief., 304, 1892 (in synonymy). 
Dalodon Zittel, ibid., 2te Lief., 308, 1893. 

* Dactylochilus is given as a section of the fubgenua Colobognathus Brandt. 



DSEODON — DAMALISCUS. 215 

Dseodon — Continued. 

Type: Dseodon shoshonensis Cope, from the John Day Miocene, Oregon. 

Extinct. Based on " the terminal portion of the lower jaw . . . It supports on 
the side three incisors, one canine, and two premolars, which form an unin- 
terrupted series." 

Dseodon: Sdios, destructive, dreadful; bScbv = dSovs, tooth — in allusion to the 
powerful canines. 
Dama Frisch, 1775. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Das Natur-System vierfiiss. Thiere, 3, Tab. Gen., 1775; H. Smith, Griffith's 
Cuvier, Anini. Kingdom, V, 306-307, 1827 (subgenus); Burnett, Quart. Journ. 
Sci., Lit. & Art, XXVIII, for Oct. -Dec, 1829, 353, 1830 (raised to generic 
rank); Gray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xxvii, 181, 1843. 

Type: 'Der Damhirsch' (Cervus dama Linnseus) , from Europe. 

Dama: From the specific name of the type. 
Dama (subgenus of Gazella) ('Bennett') Gray, 1850. Ungulata, Bovidse. 

['Sectio Damie' Bennett, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1833, 2; Trans. Zool. Soc. 
London, I, 7-8, pi. i, 1835.] 

Gray, Gleanings from Menagerie & Aviary at Knowsley Hall, 27, tab. xxm, 
fig. 1, 1850; Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1850, No. CCVIII, 114-115, Feb. 24, 
1851; Cat. Ruminant Mamm. Brit. Mus., 39, 1872; Sclater & Thomas, Book 
of Antelopes, III, pt. x, 65, Feb., 1898 (in synonymy, type fixed). 

Bennett's 'section' includes Antil<>j>f mhorr Bennett, from West Africa; A. 
nanguer Bennett (=A. dama Pallas, type), from Senegal; and A. addra Ben- 
nett, from Nubia and Kordofan. 

Gray's subgenus includes 4 species: Antilope soemmeringii Riippell, from Lower 
Abyssinia; A. mohr Bennett, from West Africa; A. dama Pallas (type), from 
West Africa; and A. ruficollis H. Smith, from Kordofan and Sennar. 

Name preoccupied by Dama Frisch, 1775, a genus of Cervidse. 
Dama Allen, 1902. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

[Zimmermann, Spec. Zool. Geog. 351, 531-535, 1777 — not a valid generic name.] 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist. N. Y., XVI, 18-20, Feb. 1, 1902. 

Type: Cervus virginianw Boddaert, from Virginia. 

Name preoccupied by Dama Frisch, 1775. 
Damalis H. Smith, 1827. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Griffith's Cuvier, Anini. Kingdom, IV, 343-346, 2 plates [unnumbered]; V, 
361-367, 1827; Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, I, 5, 1894 (in synonymy). 

Type not mentioned in the original description. The genus includes 4 sub- 
genera, Acronotu8, Boselaphus, Strepsiceros, and Portax. In Vol. IV, p. 346, it 
is stated that the group includes oreas, mama, and strepsiceros, but Sclater & 
Thomas give the type as Antilope buselaphus Pallas, from North Africa. 

Damalis: Sd/taXic, heifer, calf. "In the Greek it is applicable to the young 

bull and the adult cow, and in several languages of Europe and Asia, the first 

or leading syllable constitutes a part of the name of several other ruminants, 

and therefore in zoological phraseology it may be adopted for a genus." 

Damalis Gray, 1846. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., XVIII, No. 119, p. 233, Oct., 1846; Sclater & Thomas, 
Book of Antelopes, I, 51, 1894 (type fixed). 

Species, 6: Damalis lunatus (type), D. senegalensis, D. koba, D. pygarga, D. albifrons, 
and D. ? zebra, from Africa. 

Name preoccupied by Damalis H. Smith, 1827, another genus of Bovidse. 
Replaced by Damaliscus Sclater & Thomas, 1894. 
Damaliscus Sclater & Thomas, 1894. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Book of Antelopes, I, pt. i, 3, 51-91, figs. 7-12, pls/vi-x, Aug., 1894; W. L. 
Sclater, Mamm. S. Africa, I, 137-147, fi<*s. 41-43, 1900. 



216 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Damaliscus — Continued. 

New name for Damalis Gray, 1846, which is preoccupied hy Damalis H. Smith, 

1827, a different genus of Bovidae. The type is given as AntUope pygargus Pallas, 

from Cape Colony, while the type of Damalis Gray (here merely renamed) 

was AntUope lunata Burchell, from the Orange Free State (p. 51) ! 
Damaliscus: Dim. of Damalis. 
Damelaphus Coues, 1896. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

The Nation, LXII, 404, May 21, 1896; Bangs, Proc. Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., 

XXVIII, 219, 1898 (quoted as a synonym). 
Lapsus for Dorcelaphus Gloger, 1841. The name occurs only in a review of 

Cory's 'Hunting and Fishing in Florida,' in the statement: "We doubt not 

that the small deer of the peninsula [Florida] is equally entitled to recognition 

as Cariacus (or Damelaphus) fraterculus." (Coues.) 
Damelaphus: Dama + Elaphus. 
Danis (subgenus of Ursus) Gray, 1825. Ferae, Ursidae. 

Ann. Philos., XXVI, 60, July, 1825; ibid., XXVI, 339, Nov., 1825 (raised to 

generic rank ) . 
Type: Ursus ferox Desmarest ( = Ursus horribilis Ord), from the eastern slope of 

the Rocky Mountains, Montana. 
Name preoccupied by Danis Fabricius, 1808, a genus of Lepidoptera. 
Danis: Stxvos, burnt, dry. Application not clear; the name may possibly refer 

to the color of the hair or to the character of the animal's habitat. 
Daphoenus Leidy, 1853. Ferae, Canidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., for 1852-53, No. x, 393-394, 1853. 
Daphsenus Scott, Princeton College Bull., II, No. 2, 37, Apr., 1890. 
Daphoenus Hatcher, Mem. Carnegie Mus., I, 66-95, text figs. 1, 3-5, pis. xiv, 

xvi-xx, Sept., 1902. 
Type: Daphoenus vetus Leidy, from the Oligocene (White River) of the Bad Lands 

of Nebraska. 
Extinct. Based on "a cranium without the face, a fragment of a left upper 

maxilla containing the posterior three molars," etc. 
Daphoenus: Sacpoivos, blood-reeking — in allusion to the molars which resemble 

those of the wolf. 
Daptophilus Cope, 1873. Ferae, Felidae. 

Palfeont. Bull., No. 16, p. 2, Aug. 20, 1873; Ann. Rept. U. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. 

Terr., VII, for 1873, 508, 1874. 
Type: Daptophilus squalidens Cope, from the Oligocene of Colorado. 
Extinct. 
Daptophilus: SctTtroo, to tear, to devour; 0/aos, loving, fond of. 

Dasicyon (see Dusicyon). Ferae, Canidae. 

Dasurus (see Dasyurus). Marsupialia, Dasyuridae. 

Dasycercus Peters, 1875. Marsupialia, Dasyuridae. 

Sitzungsber. Gesellsch. Naturforsch. Freunde, Berlin, July? 1875, 73. 

New name for Chsetocercus Krefft, 1866, which is preoccupied by Chsetocercus 
G. R. Gray, 1855, a genus of Birds. 

Dasycercus: Sativs, thick; KepKos, tail — in allusion to the crested hairy tail. 
Dasychcerus Gray, 1873. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist, 4th ser., XI, 435-436, June, 1873. 

Species: Sus eerrucosus Muller, from Java; and S. celebensis Miiller, from Celebes. 

Dasychcerus: 8a6v$, thick; ^ofpos, hog. 
Dasymys Peters, 1875. Glire3, Muridae, Murinae. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, 1875, 12-13; W. L. Sclater, Ann. S. 
Afr. Mus., I, pt. 2, p. 218, Mar., 1899. 



DASYMY8 — DASYURODON. 2l7 

Dasymys — Continued. 

Type: Dasymys gueinzii Peters, from the interior of Natal, South Africa (=Mus 

incomtus Sundevall, 1847, from the vicinity of Durban or Port Natal). 
Dasymys: Sadvz, thick, hairy; pv$, mouse — from the stout form and thick fur 
of the type species. 
Dasynotus Wagler, 1830. (Hires, Heteromyidse. 

Nat. Syst. Amphibien, 21, 1830. 
New name for Heteromys Desmarest, 1817. Type, Mus anomalus Thompson, from 

the island of Trinidad, West Indies. 
Dasynotus: 8a6v$, thick, hairy; vwros, back — from the stiff hairs or spines on 
the back. 
Dasyphr actus Fitzinger, 1871. Edentata, Dasypodidse. 

Sitzungsber. Math. -Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wise. Wien, LXIV, Abth. i, 264-268, 

July, 1871. 
Type: Cryptophractus brevirostris Fitzinger, from the Cordillera of Chile. 
Dasyphractus: %a6v$, thick, hairy; (ppaKzos, inclosed, protected — in allusion to 
the thick coat of hair covering the carapace. 
Dasyporca (see Dasyprocta). Glires, Dasyproctidse. 

Dasypotherium Moreno, 1889. Edentata, Dasypodida;. 

Bol. Mus. La Plata, 1889, 38-39. 
Type: Dasypotherium australis Moreno, from Monte Hermoso, about 40 miles east 

of Bahia Blanca, province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on "mucha parte de la coraza dorsal articulada y el ramo iz- 

quierdo de la mandibula inferior." 
Dasypotherium: Dasypus; Qrjpiov, wild beast. 
Dasyprocta Illigee, 1811. Glires, Dasyproctidse. 

Prodromus Syst. Matnm, et Avium, 93,1811. 

Dasyj>orca Gray, Thomson's Ann. Philos., XXVI, 341, Nov., 1825 (misprint). 
Species: Carta aguti Gmelin, from Brazil ami Guiana; and C. acuschy Gmelin, 

from Guiana. 
Dasyprocta: 8a6v7tpooKroz, with hairy buttocks (from Sa6vs, hairy; and 
TtpooKtoi, anus, hinder parts). 
Dasypterus (subg. of Atalapha) Peters, 1871. Chiroptera, Yespertilionida?. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, for 1870, 912-914, 1871; H. Allen, 
Mon. Bats N. A., 2d ed., 137-140, pis. xxiv-xxv, 1893 (raised to generic rank); 
Miller, N.Am. Fauna, No. 13, pp. 13, 115-118, tigs. 33, 34, Oct. 16, 1897 (type 
fixed). 
Species, 4: Atalapha intermedia. (=Lasiurns intermedia Allen, type), from Mata- 
moras, Mexico; A. egregia Peters, from Santa Catharina, Brazil; A. ega { =Nycti- 
cejus ega Gervais), from Ega, Brazil; and A. caudata (=Lasiurus caudatux 
Tomes), from Pernambuco, Brazil. 
Dasypterus: 8adi>s, thick, hairy; itvEpov, wing. 
Dasypus Linn.eus, 1758. Edentata, Dasypodidse. 

Systema Naturae, 10th ed., I, 50-51, 1758; 12th ed., I, 53-54, 1766. 
Species 6, from South America: Dasypus unicinctus Linnpeus ('Africa'). D. tri- 
cinctus Linnaeus ('India'), D. quadricinctus Linna?us, D. sexcinctus Linnaeus, 
D. septemdnetus Linnaeus ('India'), and D. novemcinctus Linnseus. 
Dasypus: Sa6v7tov$, hairy- or rough-footed (from dadvg, thick, hairy, rough; 

TtOVC,, foot). 

Dasyurodon Andreae, 1887. Creodonta, Hysenodontidae. 

Bericht Senckenberg. Naturforsch. Gesellsch., Frankfurt, 1887, 12.5-133, taf. iv. 
Type: Dasyurodon flonheimensis Andreae, from the Middle Oligocene ' Meeressand ' 

of Flonheim, Rhein-Hessen, Germany. 
Extinct. Based on part of the lower jaw. 
Dasyurodon: Dasyurus; 68(bv = 6^oVi, tooth. 



218 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Dasyuroides Spencer, 1896. Marsupialia, Dasyuridje. 

Proc. Roy. Soc. Victoria, new ser., VIII, 5-8, Apr., 1896. 
Type: Dasyuroides bymei Spencer, from Charlotte Waters, Central Australia. 
Dasyuroides: Dasyurus; siSos, form. 
Dasyurotherium Liais, 1872. Marsupialia, Didelphyida?. 

Climats, Geol., Faune, et Geog. Botanique Bresil, 331, 1872. 
New name suggested for Tlujlacotherium Lund, 1839, but suppressed in favor of 

Gamhatherium. " Le nom de Gambatherium indiquerait mieux les analogies 

que ce\ui de Dasyurotherium. ,J (Liais.) 
Dasyurotherium: dadvt;, thick; ovpd, tail; brjpiov, wild beast. 
Dasyurus E. Geoffroy, 1796. Marsupialia, Dasyuridse. 

Mag. Encyclopedique, 2 e annee, III, 469-470, 1796; Bull. Soc. Philomathique, 

Paris, I, l e part., 106, 1796; Ann. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, IV, 353, 1804; Lacepede, 

"Tabl. Meth. Mamm. 5, 1799"; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. 

Mus., 261, 265, 1888. 

Dasurus , London Encyclopaedia, XXII, 743, 1845 (art. Zoology). 

Based on the 'Spotted Opossum' of Phillips, the 'Tapoatafa' of White (Didelphis 

viverrinus Sbaw), from southeastern Australia. 
Dasyurus: 8adv$, hairy, rough; ovpd, tail. 
Daubentonia E. Geoffroy, 1795. Primates, Daubentoniida?. 

"Decad. Philos. et Litt. (No. 28, 10 pluv. an. 3) 195, 1795" (ride Sherbokx, 

Index Anim. 282, 1113, 1902); Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1863,151; Cat. 

Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 96-97, 1870. 
Type: Sciurus madagascariensis Gmelin, from Madagascar. This name antedates 

Cheiromys Lacepede, 1799. 
Daubentonia: In honor of Louis Jean Marie Daubenton, 1716-1799, a collaborator 

of Buffon, and for many years curator of the cabinet of Natural History of 

Paris. Best known through his contributions (especially on anatomy) to 

Buffon' s works. 
Daunus Gray, 1821. Primates, Cercopithecidse. 

London Med. Repos., XV, No. 88, p. 298, Apr. 1, 1821. 
Type: Simia nemzeus Linnseus, from Cochin China. 
Daunus: Aavvo*;, Daunus, a fabulous king of part of the province of Apulia, 

southern Italy (application obscure). 
Decaconus Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Condylarthra, Phenacodontid;e. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 378, July, 1901 (sep. p. 32). 
Type: Decaconus intricatus Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Decacomis: Setter, ten; K(&vo$, cone — in allusion to the number of cones on the 

upper molars. 
Decastis Ameghino, 1891. Marsupialia, Epanorthidye. 

Nuevos Restos Mamff. Fos. Patagonia Austral, 19, Aug., 1891; Revista Argentina 

Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5a, 305, Oct. 1, 1891. 
Species: Decastis columnaris Ameghino, and D. rurigerus Ameghino, from the 

Lower Eocene of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Decastis: Anagram of Acdestis. 
Decticadapis Lemoine, 1883. Glires, Pseudosciuridte? 

[Recherches Oiseaux Foss. Reims, II, 78, 1881 — D. sciuroides, nomen nudum.] 
Bull. Soc. Geol. de France, 3 e ser., XI, for 1882-83, No. 4, p. 269, pi. vi, figs. 37-39, 

May, 1883; XIX, No. 6, p. 289, pi. xi, tig. 146, Aug., 1891. 
Type. Decticadapis sciuroides Lemoine (1891). from the Lower Eocene near Reims, 

France. 
Extinct. Based on teeth. 



DECTICADAPIS DELOTHERIUM. 219 

Decticadapis — Continued. 
. Decticadapis: Stjktikos, able to bite, i. e., a rodent; 4- Adapts — in allusion to the 

occurrence in the Eocene "de rongeurs vrais, . . . qui ont ne.anmoins conserve 

quelques rapports de formes avec les cupulidentes." (Lemoine.) 
Decticus Aymard, 1853. Glires, Muridie, Cricetinae. 

Aymard, in Pictet's Traite Paleont., 2 e £d., I, 250, 1853; Comptes Rendus, Paris, 

XXXVIII, 675, 1854; Congres Sci. France for 1855^ I, 233, 1856. 
Type: Decticus antiquus Aymard, from the Lower Miocene of Puy de Dome, 

France. 
Extinct. Based on ' ' une branche a peu pros complete de la machoire inferieure. ' ' 
Decticus: S^ktiko?, able to bite, i. e., a rodent — in allusion to the incisors. 
Deg-onia Rotii, 1901. Ungulata, Typotheria, Hegetotheridas.* 

RevistaMus. La Plata, X, 251-252, Oct., 1901 (sep. pp. 1-2). 
Species: Degonia kollmanni'Roth, and D. sympathica Roth, from the 'Upper Cre- 
taceous ' of Lago Musters, Territory of Chubut, Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Degonia: A coined name ('Frei erfunden' — Roth). 
Deilemys (subg. of Hesperomys) De Saussure, 1860. Glires, Muridae, Cricetinae. 
Rev. et Mag. de Zool., 2d ser., XII, 98-101, 1860. 
Dilomys Winge, E Museo Lundii, I, pt. in, 149, Dec. 1, 1887. 
Dilemys Bergroth, in C. O. Waterhouse's Index Zool., 108, 1902. 
Type: Hesperomys toltecus De Saussure, from the Cordillera of Vera Cruz, Mexico. 
Deilemys: SeiXr/, evening; juvs, mouse — either from its crepuscular or nocturnal 

habits, or intended as a name modeled after Hesperomys. 
Deilotherium Filhol, 1882. UDgulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriida?. 

Mem. Mamm. Foss. Phosphorites Quercy, in Ann. 8oc. Sci. Phys. Nat. Toulouse, 

1882, 112-113. 
Type: Deilotherium simplex Filhol, from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 
Extinct. Based on a fragment containing the first and second molars. 
Deilotherium: 8si\6<;, cowardly, in the sense of weak; Otfpiov, wild beast. 
Deinictis (see Dinictis). Ferae, Felidae. 

Deinotherium Kaup, 1829. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Deinotheriidse. 

Oken's Isis, 1829, 401-404, Taf. i. 
Dinolherium Kaup, Das Thierreich, I, 268-270, 1835. 
Type: Deinotherium giganteum Kaup, from the Lower Pliocene of Eppelsheim, 

Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany. 
Extinct. 
Deinotherium: 8eiv6$, terrible; (Jrjpiov, wild beast — in allusion to the animal's 

large size and huge tusks in the lower jaw. 
Delotherium Ameghino, 1889. Monotremata (Dideilotherida?) . 

Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 655-657, 1889. 
Dideilotherium Ameghino, ibid., 920-921, pi. xl, fig. 22, 1889. 
Type: Delotherium venerandum Ameghino, from the Eocene (Santa Cruz formation) 

of the barrancas of the Rio Santa Cruz, southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. "Representado . . . por un fragmento de maxilar superior izquierdo, 

con el intermaxilar del mismo lado, con el alveolo rudimentario del primer 

incisivo, ... el incisivo tercero 6 interno intacto, . . . dos dientes intactos de 

la misma forma, luego un trecho de maxilar destruido . . . despues tres 

dientes, a los que les falta la corona." 
Name preoccupied by Deilotherium Filhol, 1882. Replaced by Dideilotherium 

Ameghino, 1889. 
Delotherium: 5??Ao?, manifest, evident; Brjpiov, wild beast— i. e., evidently a 

mammal, although possessing reptilian characters. 

* Hegetotheridae Ameghino, Feb., 1894=Pachyrucidae Lydekker, March, 1894. 



220 INDEX GENEEUM MAMMALICM. 

Delphinapterus Lacepede, 1804. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Hist. Nat. Cetaeees, Tableau Ordres, Genres - et d'Especes, pp. xli, 243-249, 1804; 
Desmarest, Nouv. Diet. Hist. Nat., 2 e ed., IX, 173-175, 1817: Flower, Proc. 
Zool. Soe. London, 1883, 505 (type fixed) . 

Ddphinapiera Bowmen, Anal. Nat. Class. Mamm., 86, 1821. 

Species: Delphinapterus beluga ( =Ddphinus leucas Pallas — type) and J>. senedetta. 

Delphinapterus: SeXfiis, dolphin; a- without; itrepov, wing, fin — in allusion to 
the absence of a dorsal fin. 
Delphinapterus Lesson & Garnot, 1826. Cete, Delphinid;e. 

Zool. Voy. Coquille, I, V pt., 179-180, pi. 9, fig. 1, L826; Lesson, Compl. (Euvres 
Buffon, Hist. Nat, Mamm. Ois. decouv. depuis 1788, I, 190-203, 440, pi. 4, 
fig. 1, 1828; Gray, Zool. Erebus & Terror, 36, pi. 15, 1846; Cat. Seals A: Whales 
Brit. Mus., 276, 1866. 

Type: Delphinus peronii Lacepede, from the Antarctic < >cean, south of Tasmania. 

Name preoccupied by Delphinapterus Lacepede, 1804, which was based on Del- 
phinus leucas, from the Arctic Ocean. Replaced by Leucorhamphus Lilljeborg, 
1861: but see Tursio Wagler, 1830, and IAssodelphis Gloger, 1841, both earlier 
and based on the same species. 
Delphinodon Leidy, 1869. Cete, Platanistidse. 

Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 2d ser., VII, 424-42(1, pi. \\\, figs. 7-12, 1869; 
Hay, Cat. Loss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, V. S. Geol. Surv., 591, 1902 (type 
fixed). 

Species: Squalodon mento Cope (type), and Phoca wymani Leidy, from the Mio- 
cene of Charles County, Maryland. 

Extinct. 

Delphinodon: Delphinus; d8a>Y=68ov<;, tooth. 
Delphino'ides (subgenus of Delphinus) Pedhoni, 1845. Cete, Squalodontidse. 

Actes Soe. Linneenne Bordeaux, XIV, 104, 105-107, "pi. ii," 1845; Comptes 
Rendus, Paris, XXI, 1181, July-Dec, 1845 ( 'Delphinoide'). 

Type: Delphinoides gratelupi Pedroni, from the quarry at Leognan, near Bor- 
deaux, Departement de Gironde, France. 

Extinct. Based on a portion of the upper jaw. " Cette portion tie machoire 
superieure se compose du maxillaire euperieur gauche presque complet, et 
d'une port ; on de l'intermaxillaire ou incisif du meme c6te; quatre dents 
tiennent a ce fragment." 

Delphinoides: Delphinus; ei8o$, form. 
Delphinopsis J. MulLer, 1853. Cete, Platanistidse? 

Sitzungsber. Math. -Nat, CI. K. Akad. Wiss., Wien, X, Heft i, 84-88, Jan., 1853. 

Type: Delphinopsis freyerii Midler, from Radoboj, Hungary. 

Extinct, Based on " ein Theil der Rippen, das SchulterMatt, der zum grossten 
Theil erhaltene Arm mit der Hand, die Lpiphysen von Wirl icln, . . . ferner 
verschiedene nicht mehr zu entwirrende Triimmer von Knochen." 

Delphinopsis: Delphinus; oibis, appearance. 
Delphinorhynchus (subg. of Delphinus) Blaixville, 1817. Cete, Physeteridse? 

Nouv. Diet. Hist. Nat., 2d ed., IX, 151-154, 1817; Lesson, Man. Mammalogie, 
405-406, 1827 ( raised to generic rank) ; Burnett, Quart, Journ. Sci., Lit. A Art, 
XXIX, 361, Apr.-June, 1830 (D. coronatus and I), gangeticus). 

Delphinqrhyncus F. Cuvier, Diet. Sci. Nat., LIX, 517, 1829. 

Delphinorhinchus Paolo, Atti Soe. Veneto-Trentina Sci. Nat, Padova. ser. II, 
vol. Ill, 51, 1897. 

Species, 4: Delphinus geofffensis Blainville, from the coast of Portugal; I), coronatus 
Freminville, from the Polar Sea; D. shawensis Blainville, from India; and 1>. 
pernettensis Blainville, supposed to have been taken off Cape Verde, West Africa. 

Delphinorhynchus: Delphinus; f>i'yx<>^ snout. 



DELPHINUS DENDROLAGUS. 221 

Delphinus Lixx.rcrs, 1758. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Systetoa Naturae, 10th e<l., I, 77, 1758; 12th ed., I, 108, 1766; Brisson, Regnuni 

Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 218, 233-238, 1762; Flower, Proc. 

Zool. Soc. London, 1883. 500 (type fixed). 
Species. 3: Delphinus phocsena Linnaeus, D. c'elyh'a Linnaeus (type), and D. orca 

Linnaeus, all from the Atlantic Ocea:.. 
Delphinus: 8e\(pi<;, dolphin. 
Delphis Forskal, 1775. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Descriptiones Animalium, Avium, Amphib., etc., p. iv, 1775. 
Nomen nudum 1 The genus occurs without mention of species in a list of " Quad- 

rupedia observata, non descripta," but is accompanied by the Arabic name. 
Delphis: 8£A<pi{, dolphin. 
Delphis WagleR, 1830. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Xat. Syst. Amphibien, 34, 1830. 
Type: Delphinus leucas Pallas, from the Arctic seas. (See Delphinapterus 

Lacepede, 1804; and Beluga Rafinesque, 1815, both based on the same species. ) 
Delphis (subgenus of Delphinus) Gray, 1864. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 236-237. 
Type: Delphinus delphis Linnaeus, from the Atlantic Ocean. 
Name preoccupied by Delphis Wagler, 1830, which was based on Delphinus 

1, ucas. (See Eudelphinus Van Beneden & Gervais, 1880.) 
Deltatherium Cope, 1881. Creodonta, Oxyclaenidae. 

Am. Naturalist, XV (for Apr.), 337-338, Mar. 25, 1881; Paleont. Bulb, No. 33, 
p. 486, 1881; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XIX, 486, Oct. 21, 1881; Tert. Vert,, 277- 
283, L885 (date of publication). 

Type: Deltatherium fundaminis Cope, from the Puerco Eocene of New Mexico. 

Extinct. "Represented by the dentition of both maxillary bones minus the 
canines." 

Deltatherium: SiXra. (J), fourth letter of the Greek alphabet; Brjpiov, wild 
beast — in allusion to the base of the third premolar which is a nearly equilate- 
ral triangle. (Cope, Tert. Vert,, 279.) 
Demipus (see Dermipus). Monotremata, Omithorhynchidae. 

Dendrailurus (subgenus of Felis) Severtzow, 1858. Ferae, Felidae. 

Revue et Mag. de Zool., Paris, 2 e ser., X, 386, 390, Sept., 1858. 

Type: Felis strigilata Wagner, from British Guiana. 

Dendrailurus: Se'vSpov, tree; ai'A.ovpo$, cat. 
Dendrobius ( see Dendroleius). Glires, Octodontidae. 

Dendrogale Gray, 1848. Insectivora, Tupaiidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. clxxxi, Aug. 1, 1848, 23-24; Ann. & Mag. Nat. 
Hist.. 2d ser., II, 212-213, Sept., 1848. 

Type: Hylogale murina S. Muller, from Borneo. 

Dendrogale: 8ii'8pov, tree; yaXff, weasel. 
Dendrohyrax Gray, 1868. Ungulata, Hyracoidea, Procaviidae. 

Ann. & Mag. Xat. Hist, 4th ser., I, 48-50, Jan., 1868; W. L. Sclater, Mamm. 
S. Africa, I, 310, 1900 (in synonymy — type fixed). 

Species, 3: Hyrax dorsalis Fraser, from West Africa; H. arboreus A. Smith (.type), 
from South Africa, and Dendrohyrax blainvillii Gray, from East Africa. 

Dendrohyrax: SevSpov, tree; -{-Hyrax — in allusion to its arboreal habits. 
Dendrolagus Muller, 1839. Marsupialia, Macropodidae. 

Verhand. Xatuurl. Geschied. Xederland. Bezitt., Leiden, I (1839-44); Muller, 
Zoogdieren Indisch. Archipel., 33, Tab. [p. 63], 1839; Schlegel & Muller, 
Drie Buideldier. Fam. Kengoeroe's, 138-146, Tab. 19-20, Tab. 22 figs. 1 and 

2, Tab. 23 figs. 1-6, Tab. 24 figs. 1-6, 1842; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. &Monotrem. 
Brit. Mus., 92, 1888 (type fixed). 



222 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Dendrolag-us — Continued. 

Species: Dendrolagua ursinus Schlegel & Miiller (type), and D. inustus Schlegel & 

Miiller, from New Guinea. 
Dendrolagus: SevSpov, tree; Xaydos, hare — in allusion to its arboreal habits.. 

Dendroleius Meyen, 1833. Glires, Octodontidse. 

Nova Acta Acad. Cpes. Leop.-Carol., XVI, pt. n, Tab. xliv, 1833; Reise am die 

Erde, III (Zool. Bericht), 122b (errata), 1834; Wiegmann's Archiv Natur- 

gesch., 1835, I, 397. 
Dendrobius Meyen, Nova Acta, XVI, 600-602, 1833; Reise ura die Erde, 112, 1834 

(misprint). 
Type: Dendroleius degus Meyen, from Chile? 
Dendroleius: SevSpov, tree; Xeia, booty — possibly in allusion to the animal's 

supposed habit of robbing birds' nests in trees. 

Dendromus A. Smith, 1829. Glires, Muridse, Dendromyina*. 

Zool. Journ., IV, 438-439, Jan.-May, 1829. 
Dendromys Smuts, Enum. Mamm. Cap., 32, 1832; A. Smith, S. Afr. Quart. Journ., 

II, 158, 1S34; 111. Zool. S. Africa, Mamm., pi. xxxiv, 1841; W. L. Sclater, 

Ann. S. Afr. Mus., I, pt. 2, pp. 198-200, 1899. 
Type: Dendromus typus Smith [=Mus mesomelas Brants, 1827), from South Africa. 
Dendromus: Sevdpov, tree; /<#?, mouse — 'tree mouse' — from the fact that the 

members of this genus are apparently entirely arboreal. 
Deomys Thomas, 1888. Glires, Muridte, Dendromyina?. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, June 1, 1888, 130, pi. v. 

Type: Deomys ferrugineus Thomas, from the lower Congo River, Africa. 
Deomys: Seoo, to link, i. e., a connectant form; pv<i, mouse — in allusion to the 

upper molars, which are intermediate in character between those of the 

Mures and the Criceti. 

Dermanura Gervais, 1855. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatida?. 

Expd. Comte de Castelnau Am. du Sud, Zool., Mamm., 36, pi. xr fig. 3, 1855. 

Type: Dermanura cinerewm {=Stenoderma cinereum Blainville MS. ), from Brazil. 

Dermanura: Sepjiur, skin; a- without; ovpd tail — in allusion to the presence of 

an interfemoral membrane and absence of tail. 

Dermipus Wiedemann, 1800. Monotremata, Ornithorhynchidse. 

Archiv fur Zool. & Zoot., I, pt. 1, p. 180, pi. in, 1800. 
Derm/pus Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1865, 385; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & 

Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 393, 1869 (in synonymy). 
New name, provisionally proposed for Platypus Shaw, 1799, which is preoccupied 

by Platypus Herbst, 1793, a genus of Coleoptera. 
Dermipus: 8spf.ia skin; itovt,, foot — in allusion to the webbed feet. 

Dermonotus Gill, 1901. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidpe. 

Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XIV, 177, Sept. 25, 1901. 
New name for Pteronotus Gray, 1838, which is preoccupied by Pteronotus Rafi- 

nesque, 1815, a genus of Pteropodidte. 
Dermonotus: Se'p/iux, skin; vcoroz, back — in reference to the extension of the 

skin of the wings and interfemoral membrane upon the back. 

Dermopterus Burnett, 1829. Insectivora, Galeopithecidse. 

Quart, Journ. Sci., Lit. & Art, XXVII, 268, Apr.-June, 1829. 

New name, suggested but not used, for Galeopithecus Pallas, 1780. [Pleuropterus~\ 
"formerly esteemed a Lemur, anil called L. Volans, since Galeopithecus, or 
feline ape, both very inappropriate terms . . Pleuropterus or Dermopte- 
rus would either form a more fitting name." 



DERMOPTERUS DESMODUS. 223 

Dermopterus — ( !< Hit inuei 1 . 

Dermopterus: Sapjno7erspoi, leather winged (from Se'p/itx, skin; itrepov, wing) — 

in allusion to the integumentary expansion connecting the fore and hind limbs 

and tail, thus forming a parachute. 
Desman Lacepede, 1799. . Insectivora, Talpidae. 

Tabl. Mamm., 7, 1799; Tabl. Meth. in Buffon's Hist. Nat., Didot ed., Quad., 

XIV, 157, 1799; Nouv. Tabl. M<§th. Mamm., in Mem. l'Institut, Paris, III, 

193, 1801. 
Type: Desman moschatus ( = Castor moschatus Linnaeus), from southeastern Russia. 
Desman: French and German desman; Swedish desman r&tta, musk rat, from 

desman, musk. 
Desmana Guldenstadt, 1777. Insectivora, Talpida?. 

" Beschiiftigungen Berliner Gesellsch. Naturf. Freunde, III, 108, [1777]" (fide 

Brandt, Wiegmann's Archiv Naturgesch., II, Bd. I, 182, 1836). 
Desman Lacepede, Tabl. Mamm., 7, 1799; Tabl. Meth. in Buffon's Hist. Nat., 

Didot ed., Quad., XIV, 157, 1799. 
Desmanus Rafinesque, Analyse de la Nature, 59, 1815. 
Type: Castor moschatus Linnaeus. The names Mus aquaticus exotieus, Glis moscJri- 

feru8, and Castor moschatus are mentioned in the original decription, all of which 

are synonyms of Mygale moschata, from southern Russia, according to Fischer 

(Zoognosia, III, 598-599, 1814). "Aus den gelieferten Andeutungen iiber die 

Organisation des Wuychuchol mochte sich wohl zur Geniige ergeben, dass ihn 

schon Guldenstadt im Jahre 1776 [1777] . . . mit vollem Rechte zu einer 

eigenen Gattung erhoben hat, die er aber nicht ganz passend Desmana nannte, 

daher der spiitere Cuviersche Name Mygale oder besser Myogale vorzuziehen 

sein diirfte, welcher iibrigens der iiberall angenommene ist." (Brandt, 1. c, 

182.) 
Desmana: French and German desman; Swedish desman r&tta, musk rat, from 

desman, musk. 
Desmatippus Scott, 1893. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidae. 

Am. Naturalist, XXVII, 660,661, July, 1893; Trans. Am. Philos. Soc, XVII, 

79, 84-92, pi. ii, figs. 9-14, May 23, 1894. 
Type: Desmatippus crenidens Scott, from the Miocene of Deep River Valley, 

northwest of White Sulphur Springs, Meagher County, Montana. 
Extinct. Based on teeth, the mandible, radius, ulna, femur, manus, and pes, 

and fragments of other bones. 
Desmatippus: Se'd/ux, Sedutxros, bond; 'irntoc,, horse. Desmatippus "fills the gap 

between Miohippus and Protohippus." (Scott.) 
Desmatocyon Cope, 1894. Fera?, Canidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XXVIII, 790, Sept. 15, 1894. 
Lapsus for Cynodesmus Scott, 1893. 
Desmatotherium Scott, 1883. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Lophiodontida?. 

Cont. from E. M. Mus. Geol. & Archseol. Princeton College, Bull. No. 3, pp. 

46-51, pi. viii, figs. 1-3, May, 1883. 
Type: Desmatotherium guyotii Scott, from the Bridger Eoceneof Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on "the entire upper dentition, lacking the incisors only." 
Desmatotherium: 8s6/.ia, diducxro?, bond; (irjpiov, wild beast. 
Desmodus Maximilian, 1824. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

• Abbild. Naturgesch. Brasilien, 5te Lief., pi. and text, 1824; Beitr. Naturgesch. 

Brasilien, II, 231-238, 1826. 
Type: Desmodus rufus Maximilian, from "den Gebauden der Fazenda von Muri- 

beca am Flusse Itabapuana," province of Espirito Santo, Brazil. 
Desmodus: Sedjn 6s, bundle; odovs, tooth — "Biindelzahn. Gebiss: Schneideziihne 

im Oberkiefer zwei; gross, kegelformig, gekrurnrnt, zusammengedriickt." 

(Maximilian.) 



224 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Desmostylus Marsh, 1888. Sirenia, Halitheriidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXV, 94r-96, figs. 1-:! in text, Jan., 1888. 
Desmotylus C. 0. Waterhouse, Index Zool., 54, 1902 (misprint). 
Type: Desmostylus hesperus .Marsh, from the Pliocene of Alameda County, Cali- 
fornia. 
Extinct. Based on several teeth. 
Desmostylus: Ssdjuog, band, bundle; drvAos, column — in allusion to the molar 

teeth "which are composed of a number of vertical columns closely pressed 

together." ( Marsh. ) 
Deuterotherium Ameghino, 1895. Ungulata, Litopterna, Proterotheriidse. 

Bol. Inst, Geog. Argentino, XV, cuad. 11-12, p. 633, 1895 (sep. p. 33). 
Type: Deuterotherium distichum Ameghino, from the PyrOtherium beds in the 

interior of Patagonia. 
Extinct, Based on a calcaneum and part of a mandibular symphysis. 
Deuterotherium: 8Evrepo$, second; Q-qpiov, wild beast, 
Diabolus Gkay, 1841. Marsupialia, Dasyuridse. 

J. E. Gray, in Grey's Journ. Two Exped. North- West and West Australia, App. 

II, 400, 1841; List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xxii, 97, 1843; ListOsteol. Spec. 

Brit. Mus., pp. xi, 141, 1847. 
Type: Didelphis ursina Harris, from Tasmania. (See Sarcophilus Cuvier, 1837.) 
Diabolus: Sid/joXo?, devil — from its ferocious and destructive habits, whence its 

common name of 'Tasmanian devil.' 
Diabroticus Pomel, 1848. Glires, Castoridse. 

Archiv. Sci. Phys. et Nat,, Bibl. Univ. Geneve, IX, 167, Oct., 1848; Pictet, 

Traite Paleont,, 2° ed., I, 260, 185:;. 
Diobroticus Lydekkee, in Flower & Lydekker's Mamm., Living & Extinct, 458, 

1891. 
Type: Diabroticus schmerlingii Pomel, from caverns (near Liege?) in Belgium. 
Name provisionally proposed for the mandibles referred to Trogoutlierium by 

Owen, and for some teeth identified by Schmerling as those of an Agouti. 
Name preoccupied by Diabrotiea Chevrolat, 1834, a genus of Coleoptera. (Dejean, 

Cat. Coll. Coleopt, 2 e ed., 1834.) 
Extinct. 
Diabroticus: 8ux/5pgotik6<;, able to eat through, i. e., a rodent — in allusion to its 

incisors. 
Diacodexis Cope, 1882. Primates, Hyopsodidse? 

Am. Naturalist, XVI, 1029, Dec. (2?), 1882; Tert, Vert, 492, 1885; Matthew, 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist. N. Y., XII, 30, 1899; Osborn, ibid., XVI, 175, 184, 

fig. 10, June 28, 1902. 
Type: Phenacodus latiouneus Cope, from the Eocene (Wasatch) of the Big Horn 

River, Wyoming. 
Extinct, "The premolars associated with the type and only specimen of Dia- 
codexis laticuneus Cope are those of Hyracotherium hitler; the upper and lower 

molars belong to Hyopsodus, closely allied to II. poweUianus." (Matthew, I.e.) 
Diacodexis: Si-, two; cxkj), point; Sff^t?, bite — possibly in allusion to the last 

three upper premolars, which have two external cusps. 
Diacodon Cope, 1875. Insectivora, Leptictida?. 

Syst. Cat. Vert. Eocene New Mexico, 11-12, Apr. 17, 1875; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. 

N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 740, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species: Diacodon alticuspis Cope (type), from the Eocene of New Mexico, and 

D. celatus Cope, from the Green River Eocene of Wyoming. 
Extinct. 



DIACODON DIAPHRAGMODON. 255 

Diacodon — Continued. 

Diacodon: Si-, two; dicrf, point; 68(hi'=dSovs, tooth — from the form of the 
lower molars, "which are composed of two portions, the anterior much ele- 
vated and supporting two opposite acute cusps; and a posterior, much depressed, 
bounded by some low tubercles posteriorly." (Cope. ) 
Diademia (subg. of Ctrcopiiheais) Reichenbach, 1862. Primates, Cercopitheeidae 
Vollstand. Naturgesch. Affen, 107-109, pis. xvni, xix, figs. 262-270, 1862. 
D'uidema Trouessart, Revue et Mag. Zool., 3 e ser., VI, 122, 1878. 
Species, 4: Cercopithecus roloway, t '. dinna, 0. leucampyx, and ( '. pluio, from Africa. 
Name preoccupied by Diadem a Schumacher, 1817, a genus of Crustacea. 
Diademia: SidS?^ia, diadem — in allusion to the white band or coronet across 
the forehead (see Diana). 
Diadiaphorus Ameghino, 1887. Ungulata, Litopterna, Proterotheriida?. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mam if. Fos. Patagonia Austral, 20, Dec, 1887. 
Diadophorus Lydekker, Zool. Record, for 1887, XXIV, Mamm., 43, 1888. 
Species: Diadiaphorus velox Ameghino, and D. majusculus Ameghino, from the 

Lower Tertiary of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Diadiaphorus: Si-, two; dSidfiopo?, indifferent. 
Dialophus Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Isotemnidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 415,- July, 1901 (sep. p. 69). 
Type: Dialophus simus Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Dialophus: Sid, across; X6(po<;, crest. 
Diana (subgenus of Cercopithecus) ('Lesson') Trouessart, 1878. 

Primates, Cercopithecidse. 
Trouessart, Revue et Mag. Zool., 3 e ser., VI, 124, 1878; Cat. Mamm. Viv. et 

Foss., fasc. 1, Primates, 17, 1879. 
Type: Cercopithecus <liana (Linmeus), from Guinea, West Africa. Name pre- 
occupied by Diana Risso, 1826, a genua of Pisces. 
Pinna: Goddess of the moon, etc. — in allusion to the white coronet of the type 
species, which bears a fancied resemblance to the silver bow of Diana. 
Diaphorocetus Ameghino, 1894. Cete, Physeteridte. 

Enum. Syn. Mamm. Foss. Eocenes Patagonie, 181, Feb., 1894. 
New name for Mesocetus Moreno, 1892, which is preoccupied by Mesoeetus Van 

Beneden, 1880, a genus of Balsenidse. 
Extinct, 

Diaphorocetus: Siacpopoz, different; Ki}ros, whale — i. e., different from Mesocetus 
Van Beneden. 
Diaphorus ( '< Iacdry' ) Gill, 1872. Fera?, Canida>. 

Gill, Arrangement Fam. Mamm., 67, Nov., 1872. 

Gill refers this genus to Gaudry with the statement: "Simocy&n Kaup —Diapft o- 
rus Gaudry," but no other mention of Diaphorus as a generic name has been 
found. Gaudry used it specifically {Metarctos diaphorus) in Bull. Soc. Geol. 
France, XVIII, 529, 1860-61, and in Animaux Foss. et Geol. de 1'Attique, 
pi. vi, figs. 1, 2 (fide Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., I, 146, 1885), 
also in the form Simocyon diaphorus (Kaup), in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc. 
London, XXIV, 1-7, 1868. 
Name preoccupied by Diaphorus Meigen, 1824, a genus of Diptera. 
Extinct. 

Diaphorus: &id<popo$, different — "qui signifie sans doute espece de glouton 
s'eloignant du type ordinaire." (Gaudry, Anim. Foss. 1'Attique, 37, 1862.) 
■Diaphrag-modon Mercerat, 1891-93. Ungulata, Litopterna, Proterotheriidae. 
Mercerat, fide Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. iv, 733, 1898. 

7591— No. 23—03 15 



226 INDEX GENEEUM MAMMALIUM. 

Diastomicodon Ameghino, 1884. Ungulata, Litopterna, Macraucheniidfe. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, VI, entr. 2-3, pp. 197-198, 1884; Act. Acad. Nac. 

Cien. Cordoba, VI, 546-547, 1889. 
Type: ]>i<ist<>)nicodon lujanensis Ameghino, from the Arroyo de Fernandez, about 

a league from Villa de Lujan, province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on part of a lower jaw. 
Diastomicodon : Siai6doo, to dart or shoot through the air, i. e., rapidly; to/hik6<, 

cutting; 6S(hv=6Sov<;, tooth. 
Dibelodon Cope, 1884. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidac. 

Paleont, Bull., No. 39, p. 2, 1884; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XXII, pt, i, for Oct. 21, 

1884, 2-8, Jan., 1885. 
Type: Mastodon shepardi Leidy, from Contra Costa County, California. 
Extinct. Based on 'a last inferior molar tooth.' 

Dibelodon: Si-, two; /te'Aog, dart; 68cbv=o8ovz, tooth — in allusion to the pres- 
ence of upper incisors with enamel bands, in contrast with Mastodon, in which 

the bands arc wanting. (Compare Tetrabelodon. ) 
Dicardia (subgenus of Eocardixi) Ameghino, 1891. < dires, Eocardiidse. 

Nuevos Restos Mamif. Fds. Patagonia Austral, p. 16, Aug., 1891; Revista Argentina 

Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5a, 302, Oct. 1, 1891; Enum. Syn. Mamm. Foss. Patagonie, 

74, fig. 29, Eel)., 1894 I raised to generic rank). 
Species, 3: Dicardia maxima Ameghino, D. modica Ameghino, and D. excavata 

Ameghino, all from the Lower Eocene of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Dicardia: Si-, two; KapSia, heart — in allusion to the fourth lower premolar, 

which consists of two triangular prisms. 
Diceratherium Marsh, 1875. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotid;e. 

Am. Journ. Sri. A Arts, 3d ser., IX, 242-244, Mar., 1875; Hay, Cat, Foss. Vert. 

X. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 644, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species, 3: T>i< , cr<illirriiim armaium Marsh (type), and D. nanurn Marsh, from the 

Miocene beds near the John Day River, Oregon; and D. advenum Marsh, from 

the Upper Eocene (?) of Utah. 
Extinct. 
Diceratherium: Si-, two; Kepaz, horn; ftrfpiov, wild beast — in allusion to the 

transversely paired nasal horns. 
Dicerorhinus ( JuxiKR, 1341. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinoeerotidw. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch.., I, pp. xxxii, 125, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 191, 192, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Type: Rhinoceros sumatrensis Cuvier, from Sumatra. 
Name antedated by Didermocerus Brookes, 1828. 

DicerorJiiiiiis: 8i-, two; Kepaz, horn; pis, pwo%, nose — from the two nasal horns. 

Diceros Gray, 1821. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhmocerotidse. 

London Med. Repos., XV, 306, Apr. 1, 1821; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist,, 

4th ser., XV, 192 footnote, Feb., 1895. 
Type: Rhinoceros bicornis Linnams, from Africa. 
Name preoccupied by Diceras Lamarck, 1805, a genus of Mollusca (tide Thomas). 

(See Opsiceros Gloger, 1841.) 
Diceros: Si-, two; Kspaz, horn — from the two nasal horns. 
Dichobune (subg. of Anoplotherium ) Cuvier, 1822. Ungulata, Anoplotheriida 3 . 

Recherches Ossein. Foss., nouv. ed., Ill, 64, 70*-71, pis. viii figs. 3-4, 6-7, ix fig. 1, 

xii fig. 4, xlii fig. 5, lvi fig. 8, 1822; Desmarest, Mammalogie, II, Suppl., 

545, 1822. 
Dolichotuna Gray, Thomson's Ann. Philos., XXVI, 343, Nov., 1825 (misprint). 
Dichobunus Owen, Trans. Geol. Soc. Lond., 2d ser., VI, 45, 1841 (fide Lydekker, 

Cat, Foss. Mamm. Brit, Mus., II, 165, 1885); Lydekker, in Nicholson & 

Lydekker's Man. Palreont, II, 1331, 1889. 
Diehobunes Phillips & Daubeny, En^yc. Metropolitana, VI, 687, 1845. 



DICHOBUNE DICOLPOMYS. 227 

Dichobune — Continued. 

Species, 3: Anaplotherium leporinum Cuvier (=A. minus Cuvier), A. murinum 

Cuvier (=-1. minimum Cuvier), and A. obliquum Cuvier, from the Eocene 

gypsum beds of the Paris basin, France. 
Extinct. 
Dichobune: §ix a , in two; fiovvos, hill, mound — in allusion to the arrangement 

of the tubercles or ridges in pairs on the posterior molars. 
Dichodon Owen, 1848. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriidse. 

Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc. London, IV, pt. i, No. 13, pp. 36-42, pi. iv, figs. 2-6, 

Feb. 1, 1848. 
Type: Dichodon cuspidatus Owen, from the Eocene sand of Hordwell, Hampshire, 

England. 
Extinct. Based on "a portion of the upper jaw, with the three true molars, the 

third and fourth premolars, the canine and three incisors, and a nearly entire 

under jaw." 
Dichodon: Six<-x, in two; 6Scjv= 6Sov$, tooth — in allusion to the molars. 
Dichotrichus Gray, 1869. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, ? 

Cat. Carniv., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 262, 1869. 
Nomen nudum. ' 'A large number of fossil genera belong to this suborder [Nasuta] , 

as Anopfotherium, Xiphodon, Dichotrichus, . . . ; but many of these are only 

known from a few bones or teeth." (Gray.) 
Extinct. 
Diclidurus Maximilian, 1820. Chiroptera, Noctilionida?. 

Oken's Isis, for 1819, 1629-1630, 1 fig. in text, 1820; Beitr. Naturgesch. Bra- 

silien, II, 239-260, 1826; Dobson, Cat. Chiroptera Brit, Mus., 391-392, 1878. 
Type: Diclidurus albus Maximilian, from the mouth of the Rio Pardo, Brazil. 
Diclidurus: 8ik\/$, double-folding; ovpd, tail — from the form of the tail. "The 

greater part of the tail [is] inferior to the interfemoral membrane, and 

inclosed in a process derived from its inferior surface, its extremity contained 

in a pouch formed in the centre of the membrane which it perforates." 

( Dobson. ) 
Dicodon (see Diconodon). Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriida?. 

Diccelophorus Ameghino, 1888. Glires, Oetodontida?. 

" Lista de los Mamiferos Fosiles de Monte Hermoso, Junio de 1888, p. 6" (fide 

Ameghino, Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 156-160, pi. vi figs. 25-30, 

vn figs. 1-5, 1889). 
Species, 4: Diccelophorus lalidens Ameghino, 1>. simplex Ameghino, D. celsus Ame- 
ghino, and Ctenomys jiriscus Owen — all from Monte * Hermoso, near Bahia 

Blanca, province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct, 
Diccelophorus: Si-, two; koiXoc,, hollow; cpopos, bearing — in allusion to the two 

antorbital foramina in contrast with the single foramen in Ctenomys. "En 

( tenomys existe en la base de la apofisis zigomatico del maxilar una gran 

abertura circular linica . . . pero en Diccelophorus . . . existe una perforacion 

independiente. ' ' ( Ameghino. ) 
Dicolpomys Winge, 1887. Glires, Octodontida 3 . 

E Museo Lundii, I, pt. in, Jordfunde nulevende Gnavere (Rodentia) fra Lagoa 

Santa, Brasilien, 99-101, pi. vm, fig. 10, Dec. 1, 1887. 
Type: Dicolpomys fossor Winge, from ' Lapa da Escrivania Nr. 5,' near Lagoa 

Santa, Minas Geraes, Brazil. 
Extinct. Based on the lower jaws of live individuals. 
Dicolpomys: Si-, two; KoX-itoi, fold, hollow; //£?, mouse — in allusion to the 

arrangement of the enamel folds of the lower molars. 



228 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Diconodon M \rsh, 1876. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XI, 339, Apr., 1876. 

Dicodon Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. it, 740, 1898 (in synonymy); 
C. O. Watehhouse, Index Zool., 106, 1902 (misprint). 

New name for Anisacodon Marsh, 1875, which had previously been used by the 
same author in 1872 for a genus of Insectivora. 

Extinct. 

Diconodon: Si-, two; kc&vos, cone; 68cbv=:d8ovs, tooth — in allusion to the char- 
acter, " last upper molar with two inner cones." 
Dicotyles G. Cuvier, 1817. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Tayassuidse. 

Regne Animal, I, 237-238, 1817; ed. 2, I, 245, 1829; Diet. Sci. Nat., IX, 518-520, 
1817. 

IHcotylus Bowmen, Anal. Nat. Class. Mamm., 71, 1821. 

D//cofr/e.sBLYTH,inCuvier's Anim. Kingdom, new ed., 1840, 131; new ed., 1863, 119. 

Dicotyle Gervais & Ameghino, Mamm. Foss. Am. du Bud, 110-113, 1880. 

Dycotyles Allen, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist, N. Y., VIII, 54, 1896. 

Species: Dicotyles torquatus Cuvier, and I>. labiatus Cuvier, from tropical America. 

Name antedated by Tayassu G. Fischer, 1814. 

Dicotyles: SiKorvXo?, having two hollows (from 8i-, two; kotvXi/, hollow, um- 
bilicus) — in allusion to the gland on the back, which was regarded by old trav- 
elers as a second navel. 
Dicranocerus (subg. of Autilope) H. Smith, 1827. Ungulata, Antilocapridse. 

Griffith's Cuvier, Animal Kingdom, IV, 169-175, 1 pi.; V, 322-323, 1827; Srx- 
devall, Vetensk. Akad. Handlingar, Stockholm, for 1845, 271-272, 1847 
(raised to generic rank). 

Dicranoceras Wiegmann, Archiv Naturgesch., 1838, I, 96. 

Dicranoceros Gloger, Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., pp. xxxiii, 153, 1841; 
Owen, Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, XII, 224, 1856. 

Type: Antilocapra mucricana Ord, from the plains of the Missouri River. (See 
Antilocapra Ord, 1818.) 

Dicranocerus: ftiKfjavw;, twodieaded; Kepttg, horn — in allusion to the two 
prongs on each horn. 
Dicroceras (see Dicrocerus). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Dicrocercus Wallace, 1876. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Geog. Dist. Anim., II, 220, 1876. 

Misprint for Dicrocerus Lartet, 1837. Dicrocercus was used by Cabanis in I860 for 
a genus of Birds. 
Dicrocerus (subg. of Cervus) Lartet, 1837. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Comptes Rendus, Taris, V, No. 6, pp. 158-159 (Dicroceres); No. 12, p. 418 (Dicro- 
cerus), July-Dec, 1837; L'Institut, V, 335, 1837; "Not. Geol. Dept, du Gers, 
1839;" Notice sur la Colline de Sansan, 34-35, 1851. 

Dierdceros Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., Addenda, 4, 1846; Index Univ., 
123, 1846; 2ded., 355, 1848. 

Dicrocercus Wallace, Geog. Dist. Anim., II, 220, 1876 (misprint). 

Dicroceras Beddard, Mamm., Cambridge Nat. Hist., X, 301, 1902. 

No species mentioned in first description, but 3 species included in 1839: Dicro- 
cerus elegans Lartet, D. f crassus Lartet, and D. ?? magnus Lartet, from Sansan, 
Dept. du Gers, France. 

Extinct. 

Dicrocerus: SiKpoo?, forked, cleft; Kepa$, horn — in allusion to the bifid horns. 
Dicrocynodon (Marsh MS. ) Osborn, 1888. Marsupialia, Triconodontidae. 

Marsh, in Osborn' s Mon. Mesozoic Mamm., Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 2d 
ser., IX, 263, 1888 (sep. issued July 25); Additional Genera established by 
Prof. 0. C Marsh, 1880-1889, 14, 1890 (privately issued). 



DICROCYNODON DIDELPHIS. 229 

Dicrocynodon — Continued. 

New name for Diplocynodon Marsh, 1880, which is preoccupied by Diplocynodon 

Pomel, 1846, a genus of Reptiha. 
Extinct. 
Dicrocynodon'. Sixpoos, cleft; kwoSgov—kwoSov^, canine — in allusion to the 

large canine which is inserted by two fangs. (See Diplocynodon. ) 
Dicrostonyx Gloger, 1841. Glires, Muridae, Microtinae. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxi, 97, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 190, 192, Feb. 1, 1895; Milber, North Am. Fauna, 

No. 12, pp. 16, 38-40, pis. i, n, text figs. 14, 15, July 23, 1896. 
The genus includes the North American Lemmings, with "highly peculiar 

(apparently double) foreclaws." Type not mentioned, but according to Miller 

(1. c, p. 38), "an American species, probably Mus hudsonius Pallas," from 

Labrador. 
Dicrostonyx: Sixpoos, forked, bifurcated; ovv^, claw — in allusion to the form of 

the two middle fore claws in winter. The bulbous part beneath the claw 

grows out until it equals or exceeds the latter, thus giving the appearance of a 

double claw. 
Dicyclotherium E. Geoferoy, 1837. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidee. 

Comptea Rendus, Paris, IV, No. 4, pp. 119, 120, pi. fig. 1, Jan. -June, 1837. 
Type: Elephas primigenius Blumenbach, from the Pleistocene of Europe. 
Extinct. 
Dicyclotherium: 8i-, two; kvkAoc,, cycle; Ot/piov, beast — in reference to the age of 

the type species. "JJElephas primigenius aurait, par un miracle de la Provi- 
dence, appartenu A. deux epoques, a deux cycles." 
Didactyles* F. Civier, 1829. Edentata, Myrmecophagidae. 

Diet, Sci. Nat,, LIX, 501, 1829. 

Didactyla Liais, Climats, Geol., Faune, et Geog. Botanique Bresil, 356, 1872. 
Type species not mentioned. "Les Didactyles, Didactyles. lis se distinguent 

des tainanduas en ce qu'ils n'ont que deux doigts an lieu de quatre aux pieds 

de devant, " (See Cyclopes Gray, 1821.) 
Didactyles: 8i-, two; SccktvAos, finger. 
Dideilotherium Ameghixo, 1889. Monotremata (Dideilotherid;e). 

Cont. Conocimiento Mann'f. Fosil. Repiib. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

C6rdoba, VI, 920-921, pi. xl, fig. 22, 1889. 
New name for Delotlieriinn Ameghino, 1889, which is preoccupied by De'dotherimn 

Filhol, 1882. 
Extinct. 
Dideiloifu rium: Si-, two; -\-Deilotherium — i. e., the second genus named Deilo- 

iherium (?). 
Didelphisf Lixx,el t s, 1758. Marsupialia, Didelphyida;. 

Systema Naturae, 10th ed., I, 54-55, 1758; 12th ed., I, 71-72, 1766; Thomas, 

Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 316, 1888 (type fixed). 
Didelphys Schreber, Saugthiere, III, 532-556, pi. 145, 1776; pis. 146a-152, 1777. 
Species 5, from North and South America: Didelphis marsupialis Linnaeus (type), 

D. philander Linnseus, D. opossum Linnaeus, D. murina Linnfeus, and D. dorsigera 

Linnaeus. 
Didelphis: 8i-, two; 8e\<pvs, womb — in allusion to the pouch in which the 

young are placed immediately after birth, and in which they are carried until 

able to care for themselves. 

*This is not a plural form of a French name, but is used as a valid generic name. 
f Evidently a misprint, but adopted as the original spelling and the form used by 
Linmeus. 



230 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALItTM. 

Didelphodon Marsh, 1889. Marsupialia, Cimolestida?. 

Am. Journ. Sei. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXVIII, 88-89, pi. iv, figs. 1-3, July, 1889. 

Type: Didelphodon vorax Marsh, from the Cretaceous (Laramie) of Wyoming. 

Name preoccupied by Didelphodus Cope, 1882, a genus of Creodonta. Replaced 
by Didelphops Marsh, August, 1889. 

Extinct. Based on a lower molar. 

Didelphodon: Didelphis; 68&>v = d8ov$, tooth — in allusion to the crown of the 
lower molar, which resembles that of Didelphis. 
Didelphodus Cope, 1882. Creodonta, Proviverridae. 

Am. Naturalist, XVI (for June), 522, May 20, 1882; Tert. Vert., pp. 283-285, pi. 
xxiv e fig. 13, p. 695, 1885 (date of publication, under Ectodon i. 

Type: Deltatherium absarolcss Cope, from the Eocene (Wasatch) of the Big Horn 
River, Wyoming. 

Extinct. 

Didelphodus: Didelphis; dSovs, tooth — "an opossum-like animal [whose] deli- 
cately acute teeth indicate a diet of insects, which no doubt abounded during 
the Wasatch epoch. ' ' (Cope. ) 
Didelphops Marsh, 1889. Marsupialia, Oimolestidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXVIII, 179, Aug., 1889.* 

New name for Didelphodon Marsh, July, 1889, which is preoccupied by Didel- 
phodus Cope, 1882. 

Didelphops: Didelphis; oi)>, aspect. 
Didelphys (see Didelphis) . Marsupialia, Didelphyidse. 

Didermocerusf Brookes, 1828. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotidse, 

"Cat. Anat. & Zool. Museum of Joshua Brookes, London, 75, 1828" (previous 
to July 14) . 

Type: Didermocerus sumatrensis (= Rhinoceros sumatrensis Cuvier), from Sumatra. 

Didermocerus: Si-, two; Sepfia, skin; Kepa%, horn — from the two horns, which 

are composed of a mass of hardened epidermal cells, growing from a cluster 

of long dermal papilla?. (Flower & Lydekker, Mamin., Living & Extinct, 

403. 406. ) 

Didolodus Ameghino, 1897. Ungulata, Condylarthra, Phenacodontidse. 

La Argentina al traves de las Ultimas Epocas Geologicas, 10, 18, 1897; Bol. 
Inst. Geog. Argentine XVIII, 437-439, fig. 22, Oct. 6, 1897. 

Didolophus Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. iv, 723, 1898; ('. O. Water- 
house, Index ZoqL, 107, 1902 (misprint). 

Type: Didolodus muMcuspis Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Didolodus: Si-, two; 86\o<;, deceit; d8oi'$, tooth. 
Didymictis Cope, 1875. Creodonta, Viverravidse. 

Syst. Cat. Vert. Eocene New Mexico, 5, 11, Apr. 17, 1875; Wortman & Matthew, 
Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., N. Y., XII, 136, June 22, 1899. 

Type: Limnocyon protenus Cope, from the Eocene of New Mexico. (Equals 
Viverravus Marsh, 1872. — Wortman & Matthew, 1. c.) 

Extinct. 

Didymictis: 8i8vpo<;, double, twofold; iktiz, weasel — in allusion to the two 
trochlear faces of the astragalus. 
Didymodon Blake, 1863. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriida?. 

Geologist, London, VI, 8-11, pi. ii, figs. 1 & 2, Jan., 1863. 

Type: Didymodon vauclusianum Blake, from the Eocene of Vaucluse, France. 

*Didelphops is said to have been previously proposed in the errata (of the July 
number ?) , but the reference has not been found. 

fThis name is open to question, as it was published in a sale catalogue. 



DIDYMODON DILOPHODON. 231 

Didymodon — Continued. 

Extinct. Based on " the three molars of the right side." 

Didymodon: 8i8v/.io$, double, twofold; b8cbv = b8ov$, tooth — in allusion to the 
two pairs of cusps on the second and third molars. 
Dieba Gray, 1869. Ferae, Canidse. 

Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 180, 189-190, fig. 25, 1869. 

Type: Cards ardhus Cuvier, from Senegal, West Africa. 

Dieba: Dieb, native name of the wild dog of North Africa. 

Diellipsodon Berg, 1899. Edentata, Megalonychidse. 

Comun. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires, I, No. 3, p. 79, May 24, 1899. 
New name for Elipsodon Roth, 1898, which is preoccupied by Ellipsodon Scott, 

1892, a genus of Creodonta. 
Extinct. 

Diellipsodon: St-, two; + Ellipsodon — i. e., the second genus named Ellipsodon. 
Diglochis (subg. of Census), Gervais, 1859. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidee. 

Zool. et Paleont. Franc., 2 e ed., 149-150, pi. 7, figs. 1-2, 1859. 
Type: Cervus austral is Serres, from Montpellier, Dept. Herault, southern France. 
Name preoccupied by Digiochis Forster, 1856, a genus of Hymenoptera. 
Extinct. 
Digiochis: 8i-, two; ^Agj^zs, point. "Bois . . . simplement bifurques par la 

presence d'un seul andouiller qui nait a pen pres au milieu." (Gervais). 
Dihoplus Brandt, 1878. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotidse. 

Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci., St.-P6tersbourg, YIP per., XXVI, No. 5, pp. 48-51, 1878. 
Species: Rhinoceros schleiermacheri Kaup, from the Miocene of Eppelsheim, Ger- 
many; and R. sansaniensis Lartet, from Sansan, France. 
Extinct. 

Dihoplus: 8i-, two; oitXgv, weapon, armor — from the two horns. 
Dilemys (see Deilemys). Glires, Murida?, Cricetinee. 

Dilestes Ameghixo, 1902. Marsupialia, Borhysenidae (Arminiheringiidae). 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 46, May, 1902 (sep. p. 44). 
Type: Dilestes dilobus Ameghino, from the Notostylops beds of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Dilestes: Si-, two; A#tfr>/j, robber-~iii allusion to the form of the lower molars, 

which consist of two lobes of equal size. 
Dilobodon Ameghixo, 1886. Ungulata, Toxodontia, Toxodontidse. 

["Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, III, entr. xn, 1882 (nomen nudum)."] 
Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, IX, 109-111, 1886; Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, 

VI, 397-399, 1889. 
Type: Dilobodon hdarius Ameghino, from the barrancas del Parana, Entre Rios, 

Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on a first lower molar. 
Dilobodon: 8i-, two; Ao/?6s, lobe; 68(hv6=8ov<;, tooth — in allusion to the first 

lower molar, which is divided into two equal lobes. 
Dilomys (see Deilemys). Glires, Muridse, Cricetinee. 

Dilophodon Scott, 1883. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Lophiodontidse. 

Cont. from E. M. Mus. Geol. & Archseol. Princeton College, Bull. No. 3, pp. 

51-53, pi. vin, fig. 4, May, 1883. 
Type: Dilophodon minuscidns Scott, from the Bridger Eocene of Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on a portion of the right lower jaw, containing the entire molar 

series. 
Dilophodon: Si-, two; Ao0oj, crest; o8(hv = d8ovs, tooth. 



232 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Dimadon Kaup, 1844. Ferae, ? 

Classif. Saugeth. und Vogel, 91, 1844. 

Type: Dimadon cuvieri Kaup. "Hierher gehoren die Reste [from the Eocene 
gypsum beds of Paris] die Cuvier, pi. lxix, figs. 2, 3, 4, abgebildet hat [Ossein. 
Foss., 3 e ed., Ill, 1825]. Ich nenne das Thier Dimadon cuvieri." (Kaup, 1. c.) 
Extinct. 

Dimadon: Sel/Lia, an object of fear, terror; 68(bv—d8ov<i, tooth. 

Dimecodon (see Dymecodon). Insectivora, Talpidse. 

Dimenia ( see Simenia) . Fera?, Canida?. 

Dimerodon Ameghino, 1889. Marsupialia, Didelphyid.e. 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamif. Fosil. Repub. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

Cordoba, VI, 282-283, pi. i, fig. 5, 1889. 
Type: Dimerodon mtdilatus Ameghino, from the Pampean formation (Pliocene) of 
the barrancas of ' La Laguna de Lobos,' province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct. " Representada por la rama mandibular del lado izquierdo de la man- 
dibula inferior, bastante incompleta y sin dientes, pero con los alveolos casi 
intactos de los liltimos cinco dientes." 
Dimerodon: 8inepi)<z, two parted; d8cbv = d8ov$, tooth. 

Dimerostephanos Ameghino, 1902. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Isotemnida'. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 30-31, May, 1902 (sep. pp. 28-29). 
Type: Trimerostephmwsangustus AmeghinOj from the Notostylops beds, Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Dimerostephanos: 8ijuep?}s, two-parted; drscpavo*;, crown. 

Dimylus Meyer, 1846. Insectivora, Dimylid;e. 

Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogie, 1846, 473; Wagner, Wiegmann's Archiv Natur- 

gesch., 1847, Bd. II, 14; Schlosser, Die Affen, Lemuren, Chiropteren, Insec- 

tivoren, u. s. w., Europ. Tertiiirs, I, 104-106, Taf. iv, 11 figs., 1887; Zittel, 

Handbuch Palaeont., IV, 2te Lief., 568-569, 3 figs., 1893. 
Type: Dimylus paradoxus Meyer, from the Lower Eocene of Weisenau, near 

Mainz, Germany. 
Extinct. Based on a fragment of the lower jaw. 
Dimylus: 8i-, two; j.iv\o$, molar — from the molars, which are reduced to two in 

each jaw. 
Dinictis Leidy, 1854. Ferae, Felidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1854, 127,156. 
Deinictis Leidy, ibid., 1856, 91. 
Type: Dinictis _/>?ma Leidy, from the Oligocene of the 'Bad Lands' of Nebraska 

(South Dakota?). 
Extinct. 
Dinictis: Seivos, terrible; ikti$, weasel — from the large upper canines, which 

resemble those of a saber-tooth tiger. 
Dinobastis Cope, 1893. Fera?, Felidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XXVII, 896-897, Oct., 1893. 

Type: Dinobastis serus Cope, from the Pleistocene of western Oklahoma. 
Extinct. Based on " parts of three metacarpals, three phalanges of probably a 

single digit, and the head of the femur. The teeth include five incisors, two 

superior canines, two molars." 
Dinoceras Marsh, 1872. Ungulata, Amblypoda, Uintatheriidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, for Oct., 343-344, Sept. 27, 1872; Mon. U. S. 

Geol. Surv., X, Dinocerata, App., 194-202, pis. i-xiv, xx-lv, text figs. 1886. 
Type: Dinoceras mirabUe Marsh, from the Eocene of Big Bone Buttes, about 20 

miles east-southeast of Fort Bridger, and 25 miles west of Green River, 
Wyoming. 



DINOCERAS DINOMYS. 233 

Dinoceras — Continued. 

Extinct. Based on a skull without lower jaws, cervical and lumbar vertebrae, 
ribs, pelvis, limb bones, etc. 

Dinoceras: Seivoi, terrible; tce'pas, horn— in allusion to the extraordinary pro- 
tuberances of the skull, representing three pairs of horn cores. 

Dinochoerus Gloger, 1841. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suida?. 

lland-u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxii, 131, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 191,193, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Type: Aper sethiopicus Pallas, from southern Africa. (See Phaco-choerus Cuvier, 

1817.) 
Dinochcerus: Seivot, terrible; x°Tp°S, hog — probably in allusion to its general 

aspect, and especially in reference to the tusks. 

Dlnocynops Ameghino, 1898. Ferre, Canidse. 

Sin. Geol.-Pal., in Segundo Censo Nacional, Rep. Argentina, I, 194, tig. 61,1898. 
Type: Cards moreni Lydekker, from the Pleistocene (Upper Pampean) of the 

city of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct. " Tipo el cranio figurado por Lydekker bajo el nonibre de Canis 

moreni." (Ameghino.) 
Dinoeynops: Seivoz, terrible; kvgov, kwos, dog; uip, aspect. 

Dinocyon Jourdan, 1861. Fera?, Canida?, Amphicyoninae. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, LIII, No. 22, pp. 962-963, July-Dec, 1861; Ann. Sci. 

Nat., Paris, 4 L ' ser., XVI, Zool., No. 6, pp. 372-374, 1861; Revue Soc. Savantes, 

Paris, I, 128-129, 1862. 
DynocUm Joxjkdan, Revue Soc. Savantes, Paris, I, 126, 1862. 
Type: Dinocyon thenardi Jourdan, from the Miocene of the vicinity of La Grive- 

Saint-Alban, near Bourgoin, Departement d'Isere, France. 
Extinct. Based on ' une mandibule inferieure' and other fragments. 
Dinocyon: deivoz, terrible, powerful; kvwv, dog — apparently in allusion to its 

size. "Notre chien fossile devait egaler par la taille les plus grands Ours 

connus." (Jourdan.) 

Dinocyon (subgenus of Canis) Giebel, 1866. Fera', Canidae, Caninae. 

Zeitschr. Gesammt. Naturwiss., Berlin, XXVII, 374-375, Mar. -Apr., 1866. 
Type: Canis primceuus Hodgson, from Nepal, India. 
Name preoccupied by Dinocyon Jourdan, 1861, a genus of Ampbicyoninse. (See 

Cuon, Hodgson, 1838; and Primawus Hodgson, 1842.) 
Extinct. 

Dinolemur Filhol, 1895. Primates, Lemuridse. 

Bull. Mus. Hist, Nat., Paris, No. 1, p. 12, Feb?, 1895; Carus, Zool. Anzeiger, 

XVIII, No. 480, p. 240, July 22, 1895. 
Type: Dinolemur grevei Filhol, from Belo, Madagascar. 
Extinct. Based on a humerus and the lower part of a femur. 
Dinolemur: dsivo^, terrible, powerful; -\-Lemur — in allusion to the probable large 

size of the animal. 

Dinomys Peters, 1873. Glires, Dinomyidae. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, 1873, 551-552; [Abdruck aus der] 
Festschrift zur Feier des hundertjahrigen Bestehens der Gesellschaft Natur- 
forsch. Freunde, Berlin, 273 [1-10], Taf. i-iv, 1873. 

Type: Dinomys branicMi Peters, from Amable Marie, Montana de Vitoc, in the 
Andes of Peru. 

Dinomys: Ssiros, terrible, powerful; j-ivs, mouse — probably from its size, which 
• is about that of a paca. 



234 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Dinops Savi, 1825. Chiroptera, Noctilionidae. 

"Nuov. Giorn. de Letter., Pisa, No. 21, p. 230" (May-June), 1825; Ferussac, 

Bull. Sci. Nat. & Geol., Paris, VIII, 386-389, 1826. 
Dynops Lesson, Diet. Classique Hist. Nat., XVI, 579, Oct., 1830. 
Type: Dinops cestoni Savi, from Pisa, Italy. 
Dinops: deivos, terrible; otp, face, aspect — probably from the deeply grooved or 

wrinkled face. 
Dinotherium (see Deinotherium). Ungulata, Proboscidea, Deinotheriida?. 

Dinotomius Williston, 1895. Fene, Felidse. 

Kansas University Quarterly, III, No. 3, pp. 170-172, pi. xvin, Jan., 1895. 
Type: Dinotomius airox Williston, from the Oligocene of the Bad Lands of South 

Dakota. "Both skeletons were found on precisely the same horizon and 

about 20 feet distant from each other, just below the nodular layer which 

marks the upper limits of the Oreodon beds of Wortman." 
Extinct. Based on two skeletons. 
Dinotomius: 8eivo$, terrible; ro/uios, cut — in allusion to the upper canines, 

which have anterior and posterior cutting edges. 
Dinotoxodon Mercerat, 1895. Ungulata, Toxodontia, Toxodontidse. 

Anal. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires, IV (2» ser., I), 208, 211, 213, fig. 4, 1895. 
Type: Toxodon paranen&is Laurillard, from the vicinity of Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct. 

Dinotoxodon: Ssivo?, terrible; -{-Toxodon. 
Dinoziphius Van Beneden, 1880. Cete, Physeteridte. 

Van Beneden, in Van Beneden & Gervais' Osteog. Cetaces Viv. et Foss., 344-345, 

pi. xx, figs. 31-32, 1880 (under Eucetus). 
Type: Dinoziphius roemdorkii Van Beneden, from the Antwerp Crag (Saint 

Nicolas), Belgium. 
Extinct. Based on a tooth. 
Dinoziphius: Ssivog, terrible; -\-7Aphius. 
Diobroticus (see Diabroticus). Glires, Castoridee. 

Diocartherium Ameghino, 1888. Glires, Caviidee. 

"Lista Mamif. F6s. de Monte Hermoso, p. 10, Junio de 1888" (fide Ameghino, 

Act, Acad. Nac. C'ien., Cordoba, VI, 249-250, pi. xn, figs. 25-26, 1889). 
Type: Diocartherium aiistrale Ameghino, from Monte Hermoso, about 40 miles 

east of Bahia Blanca, province of Boenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct, Based on a portion of the upper jaws with the first molar on the left 

side and the posterior part of the left incisor. 
Diocartherium: Anagram of Cardwtherium, to which genus the type species is 

closely related. • 

Dioch.otich.us Ameghino, 1894. Cete, Platanistidae. 

Enura. Syn. Mamm. Foss. Form. Eocenes Patagonie, 182, Feb., 1894. 
New name for Notocetus Moreno, 1892, whicn is preoccupied by Notiocetus Ame- 
ghino, 1891, an extinct genus of Balsenidse. 
Extinct, 

Dioclioticlms: dioxu, distance; i. e., separated; relxos, wall. 
Diodomus Ameghino, 1885. Edentata, Megatheriidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, VIII, entr. 1, pp. 125-127, 1885; Act. Acad. Nac. 

Cien., Cordoba, VI, 716-719, pis. xl fig. 14, xlix figs. 6-8, lxxiv figs. 1, 2, 

1889. 
Type: Diodomus copei Ameghino, from the barrancas del Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on a considerable part of the symphysis of the lower jaw. 
Diodomus: "dioideoo, segonfler; ;/z'=, confinement," (Ameghino.) (8ioi8egq= 

oideoo, to become swollen; pi£=juiya, mixed, blended with.) 



DIODON DIOPLON. 235 

Diodon Stoke, 1780. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Prodromus Methodi Mamm., 42, Tab. c, 1780. 

New name for Monodon Linnaeus, 1758. " Vulgari circa huius animalis fabricam 
errori nimium favere Monodontis nomen videatur." 

Name preoccupied by Diodon Linnaeus, 1758, a genus of Pisces. 

Diodon; Si-, two; o5&)v = dSov$, tooth — in allusion to the teeth, which are 
practically reduced to two in the maxilla. In the female these remain per- 
manently concealed in the alveolus, but in the male the left is enormously 
developed, while the right remains abortive. 
Diodon Lesson, 1828. Cete, Physeteridae. 

Compl. (Euvres Buffon, Hist. Nat. Mamm. Ois. decouv. depuis 1788, I, 124-128, 
440, 1828; Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 200, 1842. 

Species: Delphinus desmaresbi Risso (type), from Nice, France; and D. sowerbyi 
Blainville, from Brodie, Elginshire, Scotland. 

Name preoccupied .by Diodon Linnaeus, 1758 (Pisces); and by Diodon Storr, 
1780 (Delphinidae). "Peut-etre nous blamera-t-on d' avoir employe un nom 
que deja l'ichthyologie avoit eonsacre a des poissons, . . . il nous suffira sans 
doute de rappeler que nos divisions ne peuvent etre rigoureusement considerees 
comme des genres, mais bien comme de petits groupes caraeterises par quel- 
ques partieularites d' organisation." (Lesson, 1. c, p. 123, 1828.) 

Name replaced by Hypodon Haldeman, 1841. 
Diodypus Rafinesque, 1815. Cete, Physeteridse. 

Analyse de la Nature, 60-61, 1815; Gray, Cat, Seals and Whales Brit. Mas., 328, 
1866 (synonym of Jfyperoodon). 

ITomeii nudum. 
Dionyx I. Geoffroy, 1835. Edentata, Myrmecophagidae. 

I. Geoffroy, Gervais' Resume des Lecons de Mammalogie professees au Museum 
de Paris pendant l'aniu'e 1835, par I. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (extrait Echo du 
Monde Savant, I, 1835) 54; Guerin, Icon. Regne Animal, III, Mamm., 27, 
1829-44; Gervais, Diet. Univ. Hist. Nat., V, 709, 1844 (under Fourmilier); 
Hist, Nat, Mamm., II, 260, 1855. 

Type: ' Les fourmiliers a deux doigts aux membres anterieurs' (Myrmecopliaga 
didactyla Linnaeus), from Guiana. (See Cyclopes Gray, 1821). 

Name preoccupied by Dionyx Lepelletier et Serville, 1825, a genus of Coleoptera. 

Dionyx: Si-, two; ovvt,, claw — from the claws of the fore limbs, which are 
reduced to two, whence the common name 'two- toed anteater.' 
Dioplodon Gervais, 1850.* Cete, Physeteridse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, XXXI, No. 15, p. 512, July-Dec, 1850; Zool. et Pak'ont, 
Franc., l e ed., II, Exp. No. 40, p. 4, 1848-52; 2 e ed., 289-290, pi. XL, figs. 3-6, 
1859. 

Diplodon Marschall, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 5, 1873 (misprint). 

Type: Delphinus densirostris Blainville, from the Indian Ocean ('la mer des 
Indes' ). 

Dioplodon: Si-, two; oitXov, weapon; 68(bv=bSovs, tooth — in allusion to the 
two large teeth near the middle of the lower jaw. 
Dioplon f Brookes, 1828. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

"Cat. Anal. & Zool. Museum of Joshua Brookes, London, 44, 1828" (previous to 
July 14). 

Type: Dioplon muntjak (= Cervus muntjak Zimmerm&rm), from Java. 

Name antedated by Muntiacus Rafinesque, 1815. 

Dioplon: Si-, two; oitXov, weapon — from the large upper canines of the male, 
which, with the horns, render the animal 'doubly armed.' 

*In C. 0. Waterhouse's Index Zool., 109, 1902, this date is given as 1846 with 
the reference: Bull. Acad. Belgique, XIII, 258. The generic name, however, does 
not occur in that article. 

fThis name is open to question, as it was published in a sale catalogue. 



236 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Dioplotherium Cope, 1883. Sirenia, Halitheriidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XVII, 309, Mar., 1883; Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Mar. 27, 

1883, 52-54. 
Type: Dioplotherium manigaulti Cope, from the Miocene beds of the Wando River, 

northeast of Charleston, South Carolina. 
Extinct. 
Dioplotherium: Si-, two; onXov, weapon; 0?/piov, wild beast — in allusion to the 

two incisors. 
Dioplum Rafinesque, 1815. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriid.e. 

Analyse de la Nature, 55, 1815. 
Type: "Anojilotherium sp. Cuv." 
Dioplum: Si-, two; oitXov, weapon. 

Diorotherium Ameghino, 1891. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Homalodontotheriida?. 
Nuevos Restos Mam if. Fos. Patagonia Austral, 10, Aug., 1891; Revista Argentina 

Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5a, 296, Oct. 1, 1891. 
Type: Diorotherium egregium Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Diorotherium: Siopos, divider; brjpiov, wild beast — possibly in allusion to the 

diastema between the upper premolar and canine. 

Diphylla Spix, 1823. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

Sim. et Vespert. Brasil. Nov. Spec, 68, tab. xxxvi,"fig. 7, 1823. 
Diphydia, Gray, Philos. Mag., new ser., VI, 29, July, 1829; Agassiz, Nomen- 

clator Zool., Manim., Addenda, 4, 1846. 
Type: Diphylla ecaudata Spix, from Brazil, exact locality not stated. 
Name preoccupied (?) by DiphyUis Oken, 1817, a genus of Mollusca. 
Diphylla: Si-, two; (pvXXov, leaf — from the 'bifoliate' nosedeaf. 

Dipilus Ameghino, 1890. Marsupialia, Epanorthida?. 

Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XI, cuad. vii-ix, 153-155, 175, 187, figs. 5-6, July- 
Sept., 1890. 

Species: Dipilus spegazzinii Ameghino, and D. bergii Ameghino, from the Lower 
Eocene of southern Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Dipilus: AtiitiXvc, (or more properly ArjinvXoc,), Deipylus, a Greek proper name. 
(Ameghino.) 
Diplacodon Marsh, 1875. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriida?. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IX, 246-247, Mar., 1875; Osborx, Trans. Am. 
Philos. Soc, new ser., XVI, pt. in, 512-518, diag. 4, pis. vm, ix, Aug. 20, 1889. 

Type: Diplacodon elatus Marsh, from the Upper Eocene of Utah. 

Extinct. 

Diplacodon: 8ntX6o$, double; &kt), point; 6Schr = dSov<;, tooth — in allusion to 
" the last upper premolar which has two distinct inner cones." (Marsh.) 

Diplobune (subg. of Dichobune) Rutimeyer, 1862. Ungulata, Anoplotheriidse. 

Neue Denkschrift. Schweiz. Gesell. gesammt. Naturw., Zurich, XIX, 74, tab. v, 

figs. 75, 76, 81, 1862 (provisional name). 
Species: Dichobune mulleri Rutimeyer, and Dichobune ?, from Egerkingen, 

near Solothurn, Switzerland. 
Extinct. 
Diplobune: 8inX6o$, double; fiovvos, mound — in allusion to the two anterior 

inner cusps of the lower molars. 



DIPLOCLONUS DIPLOMESODON. 237 

Diploclonus Marsh, 1890. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriidpe. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXIX, 523-524, June, 1890. 
Type: Diploclonus amplus Marsh, from the Brontotherium heds (Oligocene) of 

Smith Dakota. 
Extinct. Based on "a nearly complete skull, in good preservation, but without 

the lower jaws.'' 
Diploclonus: 8nt\6o$, double; kX&jv, twig, branch — in allusion to the apparent 

branching of the horn cores. 

Diplocus Aymakd, 1853. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriidre. 

Pictet's Traite Paleont., 2" id., I, 340, 1853. 
Type: Diplocus gervaisii Aymard, from Gard, southern France. 
Name preoccupied by Diplocus Blanchard, 1845, a genus of Diptera. 
Extinct. Based on ' une machoire.' 
Diplocus: StitXooz, double; aucrf, point. 

Diplocynodcn Marsh, 1880. Marsupialia, Triconodontidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. it Arts, 3d ser., XX, 235-236, 1 fig. in text, Sept., 1880. 
Type: Diplocynodon victor Marsh, from the Jurassic (Atlantosaurus beds) of 

Wyoming. 
Name preoccupied by Diplocynodon Pomel, 1846 (Bull. Soc. Geol., Ill, 372), a 

genus of Reptilia. Replaced by Dierocynodon (Marsh MS.) Osborn, 1888. 
Extinct. Based on " various remains of several individuals found in the same 

locality. The most characteristic of these specimens is a right lower jaw, with 

most of the teeth in'position, and well preserved." 
Diplocynodon: 8nt\6o<, double; kw68gov=kvv68ov ?, canine — "the canine is 

very large, and is inserted by two fangs. This important fact has suggested 

the name of the genus." (Marsh.) 

Diplodon (see Dioplodon). Cete, Physeteridae. 

Diplodon Roth, 1901. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Homalodontotheriid;e. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, X, 252, Oct., 1901 (sep. p. 4). 

Type: Diplodon ampliatus Roth, from the ' Upper Cretaceous ' of Lago Musters, 
Territory of Chubut, Patagonia. 

Name preoccupied by Diplodon Spix, 1827, a genus of Mollusca. Replaced by 
Diplodonops Ameghino, 1902. 

Extinct. 

Diplodon: 8m\6oi, double; 68d>v=68ov<;, tooth — in allusion to the lower pre- 
molars. " La parte anterior de los premolares inferiores . . . es bilobada en 
la cara labial por un surco." (Roth.) 

Diplodonops Ameghino, 1902. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Homalodontotheriidw. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, p. 28, May, 1902 (sep. p. 26). 
New name for Diplodon Roth, 1901, which is preoccupied by Diplodon Spix, 1827, 

a genus of Mollusca. 
Extinct. 
Diplodonops: Diplodon; oif), aspect. 

Diplomesodon (subgenus of Sorex) Brandt, 1852. Insectivora, Soricida?. 

Zool. Anhang Lehmann's Reise nach Buchara und Samarkand (Baerund Ilel- 

mersen's Beitr. Kenntn. Russisch. Reiches, XVII), 299, 1852 (sep. p. 5); 

Melanges Biologiques, St. Petersbourg, II, 592, 1857? (raised to generic rank). 
Type: Sorex pulchellus Lichtenstein, from the Kirghis Steppes, southwestern 

Siberia. 
Diplomesodon: SntAoos, double; /uedot, middle; 68a?v — d8ovi, tooth. 



238 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Diplopus Kowalevsky, 1873. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriida?. 

Proc. Roy. Soc. London, XXI, No. 142, p. 149, 1873; Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lon- 
don, 163, pt. i, 30, pis. xxxv figs. 1, 3-5, xxxvi figs. 1, 4, 7, xxxviii figs. 3, 4, 

6, 11, 12, 1874. 
Type: Diplopus aymardi Kowalevsky, from the Eocene of Hordwell, Hampshire, 

England. 
Extinct. Based on " a number of well-preserved long bones . . . some meta- 
carpals and metatarsals, as well as a well-preserved tarsus." 
Diplopus: 8in\6o$, double; novs, foot — in allusion to the two toes on each foot. 
Diplostoma Rafixksque, 1817. Glires, Geomyid;i\ 

Am. Monthly Mag., II, No. 1, pp. 44-45, 1817. 
Species: Diplostoma fusca Rafinesque (=Mus bursarius Shaw), and D. alba Rafi- 

nesque, from the Missouri River region. 
Diplostoma: 8mA6o<;, double; dro/ua, mouth — on account of the external cheek 

pouches. 
Diplotherium Jourdan, 1852. Ferae, Mustelidse. 

"Revue Societes Savantes, 1852" (nomen nudum) (fide Filhol, Archiv. Mus. 

Hist. Nat. Lyon, III, 64, 67, pi. iv, figs. 12, 15, 1881, under Plesictis mutatus). 
Type: from the Miocene of Grive-Saint-Alban, Dept. de l'lsere, France. Species 

not named by Jourdan, but called Plesictis mutatus by Filhol in 1881. 
Extinct. Based on portions of two lower jaws. 
Diplotherium: SmAoos, double; (Jrjpiov, wild beast. 
Diplotremus Ameghino, 1889. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, ? 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamff. Fosil. Repiib. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

Cordoba, VI, 577-578, pi. xxxiv, fig. 16, 1889. 
Type: Diplotremus agrestis Ameghino, from the Pampean formation (Pliocene), 

of Bahi'a Blanca, Argentina. 
Extinct. "Conocido por una pafte considerable del maxilar superior izquierdo 

con gran parte del paladar, y cuatro muelas." 
Diplotremus: <5/7rAo<K, double; zpfjua, foramen — in allusion to the upper pre- 
molars, " cada uno con dos pozos de esmalte semi-lunares en la superficie 

masticatoria de la corona." (Ameghino.) 
Dipodamys (see Dipodomys). Glires, Heteromyid<e. 

Dipodillus (subgenus of Gerbiilus) Lataste, 1881. Glires, Muridse, Gerbillinse. 
Le Naturaliste, Paris, I, No. 64, p. 506, Nov. 15, 1881; II, No. 2, p. 12, Jan. 15, 

1882; No. 16, p. 127, Aug. 15, 1882. 
Type: Gerbiilus simoni Lataste, from Oued Magra (between M'sila and Barika, 

north of Chott du Hodna), northern Algeria. 
Dipodillus: dim. of Dipus. 
Dipodomys Gray, 1841. Glires, Heteromyidie. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist, VII, 521-522, Aug., 1841; Merriam, Proc. Biol. Soc. 

Wash., VIII, 83-96, 1893. 
Dipodamys Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 10, 1842; Index Univ., 126, 

1846 (misprint). 
Type: Dipodomys ph ilippii Gray, from Real del Monte, about 50 miles northeast 

of the City of Mexico, Mexico. 
Dipodomys: Sirtovs, two-footed; pvg, mouse — from the long hind legs, which 

give the animal the appearance of being two-footed. 
Dipodops Merriam, 1890. Glires, Heteromyidae. 

N. Am. Fauna, No. 3, p. 72, Sept, 4, 1890. 
Type: Dipodomys agilis Gambel, from Los Angeles, California. 
Name antedated by Perodipus Fitzinger, 1867. 
Dipodops: 8iitov<; } two-footed; oip, aspect — from its resemblance to Dipodomys. 



DIPOIDES DIPROTROGLODYTES. 239 

Dipoides Jager, 1835. Glires, Theridomyidse. 

Die Fossilen Siiugethiere in Wurtemberg, lste Abtheil., 17-18, tab. in, figs. 

41-51, 1835; 2te Abtheil., 200, 204, 1839 (provisional name). 
Type (species not mentioned), from Melchingen and Salmendingen, Hohen- 

zollern, Germany. 
Extinct. Based on several molar teeth. 
Dipoides: Dipus (from Siitove,, two-footed); siSos, form. 
Diposorex Blainville, 1838. Insectivora, Macroscelididse. 

Ann. Franc, et Etrang. Anat. et Physiol., Paris, II, 217, 1838; Osteog. Descr. 

Icon. Mamm. Recents et Foss., I, Insectivores, 109, 1840. 
Name provisionally proposed for "les musaraignes gerboises (Macroscelidesy 

of Africa. 
Diposorex: Dipus 4- Sorex. 
Dipriodon Marsh, 1889. Allotheria, Plagiaulacidfe. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXVIII, 85, pi. n, figs. 13-15, July; 1889. 
Type: Dipriodon robustus Marsh, from the Cretaceous (Laramie) of Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on 'the last upper molar of the left side.' 
Dipriodon: Si-, two; Tfpioov, saw; 68chv = d8ovs, tooth — in allusion to the crown 

<>f the last upper molar, which " consists of two rows of cones separated by a 

deep longitudinal groove." 
Diproctodon (see Diprotodon Duvernoy). Ungulata, Hippopotamidpe. 

Diprothomo Ameghino, 1884. Primates, ? 

Filogenfa, 380, 1884; Cont. Conocimiento Mami'f. F6sil. Repiib. Argentina, in 

Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 97, 1889. 
Hypothetical genus defined to show the probable evolution of man. "Segundo 

antecesor del hombre." 
Diprothomo: St-, two; npaaros, first; -{-Homo. 
Diprotodon Owen, 1838. Marsupialia, Diprotodontidae. 

Owen, in Mitchell's Three Expds. Eastern Australia, I, p. xix, 1838; II, 362-363, 

pi. xxxi, fig. 1, 1838; ed. 2, II, 368, 1839. 
Type: Diprotodon optatum Owen, from the Wellington Valley, New South Wales. 
Extinct. " Represented by the anterior extremity of the right ramus, lower 

jaw, with a single large procumbent incisor." 
Diprotodon: Si-, two; 7Tpa)roj, first; 6S(hv = dSovi, tooth — from the two large 

upper incisors. 
Diprotodon (subg. of Hippopotamus) Duvernoy, 1849. Ungulata, Hippopotamidse. 
Comptes Rendus, Paris, XXIX, No. 11, pp. 277-278, July-Dec, 1849. 
Diproctodon Gray, Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 357, 

1869 (misprint, in synonymy). 
Type: Hippopotamus liberiensis Morton, from St. Paul River, Liberia, West Africa. 
Name preoccupied by Diprotodon Owen, 1838, a genus of Marsupialia. (See 

Cheeropsis Leidy, 1853. ) 
Diprotodon: Si-, two; 7T/j&>roj, first; 68(bv = 6Sovi, tooth — in allusion to the sin- 
gle pair of lower incisors. 
Diprotosimia Ameghino, 1884. Primates, ? 

Filogenfa, 382-383, 1884; Cont. Conocimiento Mami'f. Fosil. Repiib. Argentina, 

in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 98, 1889. 
Hypothetical genus, "segundo antecesor del orangutan." 
Diprotosimia: Si-, two; itpeoroc,, first; -\-Simia. 

Diprotrog-lodytes Ameghino, 1884. Primates, ? 

Filogenfa, 384, 1SS4; Cont. Conocimiento Mami'f. Fosil. Repiib. Argentina, in 
Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 99, 1889. 



240 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Diprotroglodytes— Continued. 

Hypothetical genus, "segundo antecesor comun del gorilla y del ehimpance." 
Diprotroglorbjt.es: St-, two; itpcbrot,, first; -f- Troglodytes. 
Dipsus (seeDipus). Glires, Dipodidse. 

Dipterocetus Gloger, 1841. Cete, Physeteridse? 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxiv, 170, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat. Hist,, 6th ser., XV, 191, Feb. 1, 1895. 
New name for Oxypterus Rafinesque, 1814. The genus includes Dipterocetus mon- 

gilori, from the Mediterranean Sea, and D. rhinoceros, from the Pacific Ocean. 
Dipterocetus: Siitrepoc, two-winged, i. e., 'two finned'; Ktjroc, whale — "Kin 

noch wenig bekannte, den gewohnlichen Delphinen ahnliche Walart des 

Mittelmeeres . . . soil zwei Riickenflossen besitzen." (Gloger.) 
Dipus Zimmermanx, 1780. Glires, Dipodida?.. 

Geog. Geschiehte Menschen und vierfuss. Thiere, II, 358, 1780; Schreber, 

Saugthiere, pis. ctxxviii-cexxxn, 1782; ibid., IV, 842-861, 1788-89; Boddaert, 

Elenchus Animalium, I, 47, 1785; Gmelin, Linnaeus' Systema Naturae, ed. 13, 

I, 157-160, 1788; Brandt, Bull. Phys. Math. Acad. Sci. St. Peters! >ourg, II, 

217, 1844. 
Dipsus Gray, London Med. Repos., XV, 303, Apr. 1, 1821 (misprint). 
Species, 6: Dipus jaculus, D. sagitta, Yerbua capensis (= Mus cafer), Dipus hngipes, 

and D. tamaricinus, from Asia and Africa; and I), hudsonius, from Hudson Bay. 
Dipus: Sinovs, two-footed— in allusion to the long hind legs, and the mode of 

progression by great leaps, like the kangaroo. 
Discolomys Ameghino, 1889. Glires, Octodontidse. 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamif. Fusil. Repiib. Argentina, in Act, Acad. Nac. Cien., 

Cordoba, VI, 148-149, 902, pis. vi figs. 17, 23, xxv fig. 8, 1889. 
Type: Discolomys aniens Ameghino, from the Patagonian formation (Oligocene), 

of the barrancas in the vicinity of the city of Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct. " Fundada sobre la primera muela superior del lado derecho." 
Discolomys: Contraction of SidKo*;, disk; Xo^og, oblique; juv<, mouse (Ame* 

ghino) — in allusion to the transverse enamel plates of the upper molars. 
Disopes (see Dysopes). Chiroptera, Noctilionida-. 

Dissacus Cope, 1881. Creodonta, Mesonychid<c. 

Am. Naturalist, XV (for Dec), 1018-1019, Nov. 29, 1881; Tert, Vert,, 344, 1885 

(date of publication). 
Type: Mes(myxriavaj<mus Cope, from the Eocene of northwestern New Mexico. 
Extinct, 
Dissacus: Si6o6z, double; &k?I, point — from the double cusps of the last two 

molars, in contrast with the simple cusps of Mesonyx. 
Distoechurus (subg. of Phalangistu) Peters, 1874. Marsupialia, Phalangerida'. 
Ann. Mus. Civ. Stor. Nat., Genova, VI, 303, 1874. 
Distoechurus Thomas, Cat, Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 139, 1888 (raised to 

generic rank). 
Type: Plialangista (Distoecliurus) permata Peters, from Andai, New Guinea. 
Distoechurus: 8i6roixo$, in two rows: ovpei, tail — in allusion to the arrangement 

of the long hairs of the tail in two opposite lateral rows like the vanes of a 

feather. 
Distornus (see Dystomus). Sirenia, ? 

Distylophorus Ameghino, 1902. Ungulata, Condylarthra, Phenacodontida?. 

Bol. Acad. Nac, Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 19, May, 1902 (sep. p. 17). 
New name for Stylophorus Roth, 1901, which is preoccupied by Stylephorus Shaw, 

1791, a genus of Pisces; by Stylophora Desvoidy, 1830, a genus of Diptera; and 

by Stylophorus Hesse, 1870, a genus of Crustacea. 



DISTYLOPHORUS DOLICHOPHYLLUM. 241 

Distylophorus — Continued. 
Extinct. 

Distylophorus: 81-, two; 4- Stylophorus. 
Ditetrodon Cope, 1885. Ungulata, Aniblypoda, Uintatheriidae. 

Am. Naturalist, XIX, No. 6, p. 594, June, 1885. 
Type: Uintatherium segne Marsh, from the Eocene (Dinoceras beds), east of Fort 

Bridger, Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on a 'lower jaw, and other parts of the skeleton.' 
Ditetrodon: Si, two; vet pa-, four; 68cbv = odovs, tooth — in allusion to the four 

lower premolars and the four symphyseal teeth on each side. 
Ditomeodon Gratiolet, 1869. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Hippopotamidae. 

Gratiolet, in Gervais' Zool. et Paleont. Gen., l e ser., 250 footnote, 1867-69. 
New name for Chcerodes Leidy, 1852, which is preoccupied by Chcerodes White, 

1 846, a genus of Coleoptera. 
Name antedated by Chceropsis Leidy, 1853. 
Ditomeodon: Si-, two; rofj.rj, cut; oSabv = 68 ov$, tooth — in allusion to the single 

pair of lower incisors. 
Dobsonia Palmer, 1898. Chiroptera, Pteropodidse. 

Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XII, 114, Apr. 30, 1898; Matschie, Fledermause Berliner 

Mus. Naturkunde, Lief. I, Megachiroptera, 86, 1899 (synonym of Cephalotes); 

Thomas, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XV, 198, Oct. 10, 1902 (name adopted). 
New name for Hypoderma I. Geoffroy, 1828, which is preoccupied by Hypoderma 

Latreille, 1825, a genus of Diptera. 
Dobsonia: In honor of Dr. George Edward Dobson, 1848-95; author of 'Catalogue 

of the Chiroptera in the British Museum,' 1878, and 'Monograph of the Insec- 

tivora,' 1882-90. 
Docodon Marsh, 1881. Marsupialia, Trieonodontidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXI, 512-513, June, 1881. 
Type: Docodon striatus Marsh, from the Upper Jurassic (Atlantosaurus beds) of 

Wyoming. 
Extinct. 

Docodon: 8 oKog, rafter; o8obv = oSovq, tooth. 
Doedicurus Burmeister, 1874. Edentata, Glyptodont'idae. 

Anal. Mus. Pub. Buenos Aires, II, entr. xn, 393-404, pi. xlii, figs. 1-4, 1874. 
Dsedicurus Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., V, 122-123, 1887. 
Dcedycurus Coues, Century Diet., II, p. 1717, 1889 (under Doedicurus). 
Type: Glyptodon giganteus Serres, from the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct. 
Doedicurus: 8oi8v£, 8oi8vko$, pestle; ovpd, tail — in allusion to the club-shaped 

end of the caudal tube, which is covered with tubercles and a few large disks. 
Dolichodon (subgenus of Ziphius) Gray, 1866. Cete, Physeteridse. 

Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 353-355, fig. 72, 1866; Synop. Whales & Dol- 
phins, 10, 1868 (raised to generic rank). 
Type: Ziphius layardii Gray, from the Cape of Good Hope. 
Dolichodon: 8oA.ixo$, long; b86ov = 68ov$, tooth — from the elongated, arched, 

truncated teeth of the male. 
Dolichophyllum Lydekker, 1891. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidse. 

Lydekker, in Flower & Lydekker's Mamm., Living & Extinct, 673, 1891. 
New name for Macrophyllum Gray, 1838, which is preoccupied by Macrophylla 

Hope, 1837, a genus of Coleoptera. 
Dolichophyllum: SoXixos, long; (pvXXov, leaf — from the erect lanceolate portion 

of the nose leaf. 

7591— No. 23—03 16 



242 INDEX GENEEUM MAMMALIUM. 

Dolichopithecus Deperet, 1889. Primates, Cercopithecidse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, CIX, 982-983, July-Dec, 1889. 
Type: Dolichopithecus ruscinensis Deperet, from the Pliocene of Serrat den Vaquer, 

near Perpignan, Pyrenees-Orientales, France. 
Extinct. Based on ' ' nombreuses pieces bien conservees . . . notamment une 

tete presque entiere, plusieurs mandibules d'adultes males et femelles." 
Dolichopithecus: SoXixog, long; TtiHrjKos, ape. 
Dolichorhinus Hatcher, 1895. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriidje. 

Am. Naturalist, XXIX, No. 348, p. 1090, Dec, 1895. 
Type: Telmatotherium cornutum Osborn, from the Eocene of the Uinta Basin, 

northeastern Utah. 
Extinct. 

Dolichorhinus: 8o\ixo$, long; pis, pivo<,, nose. 
Dolichotherium Gloger, 1841. Edentata, ? 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxi, 112,1841. 
"In friiheren Zeiten hat es im siidlichen Frankreich und sonst hin und wieder 

Geschupfe gegeben, die wahrseheinlich auch vollige Schuppenthiere waren, 

oder wenigstens eine ahnliche, schlanke und kurzbeinige Gestalt und ahnliche 

Krallengelenke besassen, aber nieht bloss eine riesenhafte Grosse erreichten, 

sondern in ihren Kiefern auch Backenzahne trugen, wie der kap'sche Aemsen- 

scharrer ( Dol ichotherium ) . " 
Extinct. 
Dolichotherium: SoXixob, long; Qypiov, wild beast — "Siewohl eine Gesammt- 

lange von 10-12 / oder noch dariiber erreicht haben mogen." (Gloger.) 
Dolichotis Desmarest, 1819. Glires, Caviidae. 

Journ. de Physique, Paris, LXXXVIH, 211, Mar., 1819; Bull. Soc Philoma- 

tique, Paris, 1819, 40; Mammalogie, II, 360, 1822. 
Type: Cavia patachonica Shaw, from Patagonia. 
Dolichotis: SoXixoi, long; ow?, (bros, ear — in allusion to the ears, which are long 

in comparison with those of other members of the family. 
Dolichotuna ('Cuvier') Gray, 1825. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriidse? 
Gray, Thomson's Ann. Philos., XXVI, 343, Nov., 1825. 
Misprint for Dichohune, occurring only in a list of genera: "Anoplotherium, 

Xrjphodon, Dolichotuna, Adapis, Anthracotherium, and Chseropotamus, Cuv. (all 

very much allied to Suina) ." 
Doliocherus Filhol, 1882. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, XCIY, No. 18, pp. 1259-1260, Jan.-June, 1882; Bull. 

Soc. Sci. Phys.et Nat., Toulouse, V, livr. 2, for 1880-81, 194, 1884. 
Doliochoenis Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. iv, 811, 1898. 
Type not stated; from the Phosphorites of Quercy (Upper Eocene), France. 
Extinct. Based on ' ' une tete presque complete, avec toute la portion post^rieure 

du maxillaire inferieur en place," and other fragments. 
Doliocherus: 5oazoj, deceitful; x°ip°S> h°g- 
Dolomys Nehring, 1898. Glires, Muridse, Microtime. 

Zool. Anzeiger, No. 549, pp. 13-16, 3 figs, in text, Jan. 10, 1898. 
Type: Dolomys miller i Nehring, from the Pliocene bone breccia of Beremend, near 

Mohacz, southern Hungary. 
Extinct. Based on teeth. 
Dolomys: <56aos, deceit; l-ivs, mouse — "unter Anspielung auf die Bedeutung des 

Namens Phenacomys" — evidently on account of the puzzling affinities of the 

type species. 
Domnina Cope, 1873. Insectivora, Leptictidae. 

Palreont. Bull., No. 16, p. 1, Aug. 20, 1873. Syn. New Vert. Colorado, 4, 1873; 

Ann. Rept. U. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. Terr, VII, for 1873, 469, 1874. 



DOMNINA DORCOPSIS. 243 

Domnina — Continued. 

Type: Domnina gradata Cope, from the Oligocene of Colorado. 

Extinct. Based on " a portion of the right mandibular ramus with three entirely 

preserved molars. ' ' 
Domnina: Lat. domnus ( = dominus) ruler; 4- dim. suffix -ina — probably in 

allusion to the animal's supposed carnivorous habits. 
Doratoceros* Lydekker, 1891. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

London Field, LXXVIII, No. 2013, p. 130, July 25, 1891; Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 

6th ser., VIII, 192, Aug., 1891; Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes IV, 

193, 1900 (in synonymy, type fixed) . 
Type: AntUope triangularis Gi'mther (=AntUope oryx Pallas), from the Zambesi 

Biver, southeast Africa. 
Doratoceros: Sopv, 8oparo<;, spear; Keptxs, horn — from the long, straight, tri- 
angular horns. 
Dorcas Gray, 1821. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

London Med. Repos., XV, 307, Apr. 1, 1821; Sclater & Thomas, Book of Ante- 
lopes, III, pt, x, 65, 1898 (in synonymy). 
Type: AntUope dorcas (Linnaeus), from North Africa. 
Dorcas: SopKa<;, gazelle;— "so called in reference to its large bright eyes." 

(Century Diet.) 
Dorcatherium Kaup, 1833. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Tragulidse. 

Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogie, 1833, 419; Desc. Ossein. Foss. Mamm. Mus. 

Darmstadt, 5 e cahier, 91-103, Atlas, tab. xxm, figs. 1-16; xxm A, xxm b, 

xxiii c, figs. 1-7, 1839. 
Type: Dorcatherium naui Kaup, from the upper Miocene or lower Pliocene of 

Eppelsheim, Germany. 
Extinct. Based on a nearly, complete lower jaw. The genus also includes one 

living species, D. aquaUcum, from Africa. 
Dorcatherium: SopKcii, gazelle; Oi/piov, wild beast. "Ich habe diese Gattung 

wegen der Ahnlichkeit mit einem Reh : Dorcatherium, und die Art nach meinem 

Freunde, dem Herrn Geheim en-Rathe von Nau, genannt." (Kaup.) 
Dorcatrag-us Noack, 1894. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Zool. Anzeiger, XVII, No. 448, pp. 202-204, May 28, 1894. 
Dorcotragus Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, III, pt. xii, 239-245, pi. 

lxxv, text fig. 87, Oct., 1898. 
Type: Oreotragus megalotis Menges, from northern Somali Land, East Africa. 
Dorcotragus: SopKas, gazelle; rpayos, goat. 
Dorcelaphus Gloger, 1841. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidas. 

Haud- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxiii, 140, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat, Hist,, 6th ser., XV, 191, 193, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Species: Cervus campestris F. Cuvier, and C. paludosus Desmarest, from Paraguay; 

C. rirginiauus Boddaert, C. macrourus Rafinesque, and C. macrotis Say, from 

North America. (See Odocoileus Rafinesque, 1832.) 
Dorcelaphus: 8opK&<;, gazelle; e\a(po$, deer. 
Dorcopsis Schlegel & Muller, 1842. Marsupialia, Macropodidee. 

Verhand. Natuurl. Geschied. Nederland. Bezitt., Leiden, I (1839-44), Drie 

Buideldier. Fam. Kengoeroe's, 130, 131-138, pis. xxi, xxii fig. 3, xxm figs. 

7, 8, xxiv figs. 7-9, 1842; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 

86-92, 1888. 
Type: Dklelphis bruijni Quoy & Gaimard (nee Schreber) {=Macropus mutteri, 

Schlegel, 1866), from New Guinea. 
Dorcopsis: dopKai, gazelle; oipit, appearance, aspect. 

* See Doryceros Fitzinger, 1874, a genus of Cervidai, which is formed from the same 
Greek roots. 



244 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Dorudon Girbes, 1845. Cete, Basilosauridae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., for 1844-45, 254-256, pi. i, May-June, 1845; Leidy, 

Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 2d ser., VII, 428-431, 1869. 
Doryodon Cope, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Dec, 1867, 154-155; ibid., 1868, 186. 
Durodon Gill, Arrangement Fam. Mammals, 93, Feb., 1872. 
Type: Dorudon serratus Gibbes, from the Eocene greensand near the Santee 

Canal, at the headwaters of Cooper River, South Carolina. 
Extinct. Based on teeth and part of a lower maxilla. 
Dorudon: Sopv, spear; 68cbv = d8ov<;, tooth. 
Doryceros Fttzinger, 1874. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidas. 

[Anzeiger Math. -Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss., Wien, X, Nr. 29-30, p. 198, 1873— nomen 

nudum] Sitzungsber. Math. -Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss., Wien, LXVIII, Jahrg. 

fiir 1873, Abth. i, 360, 1874. 
Species: Cervus tsdhudii Wagner, from Peru; and C. nemorivagus F. Cuvier, from 

Brazil. 
Doryceros: Sopv, spear; K£pa<z, horn — from the simple unbranched spike-like 

antlers. 
Doryodon (see Dorudon). Cete, Basilosauridae. 

Doryrhina (subg. of Phyllorhina) Peters, 1871. Chiroptera, Rhinolophidae. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, June, 1871, 314. 
Type: Phyllorhina Cyclops Temminck, from Boutry, Guinea, West Africa. 
Doryrhina: Sopv, spear; pis, pivoc,, nose — from the club-shaped process which 

is directed forward from the base of the sella, or from the slender and some- 
what longer vertical process which projects upward from the margin of the 

transverse erect nose leaf. 
Draximenus ? 1845. Marsupialia, Phalangeridae. 

London Encyclopaedia, XXII (art. Zoology) , 744, 1845. 
Based on the Koala (IApurus cinereus Goldfuss), from eastern Australia. (See 

Phascolarctos Blainville, 1816. ) 
Dremomys (subgenus of Sciurus) Heude, 1898. Glires, Sciuridse. 

Mem. Hist. Nat. Empire Chinois, IV, pt. 2, pp. 54-55, pi. xn, figs. 1-4, 1898. 
Species, 4: Sciurus pemyi Milne- Edwards, and S. collaris Heude, from the prov- 
inces of Moupin and Se-chuen; S. saltitans Heude, from the northeastern part 

of the province of Ngan-hoei; and S. lai.ro Heude, from the Hoang-ho, province 

of Shan-toong, China. 
Dremomys: Spojiios, a running (from rpExco, SpcxnEiv, to run); pvz, mouse. 
Dremotherium E. Geoffroy, 1833. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Extrait du Temps, Paris, Oct. 16, 1833, 622; Revue Encyclopedique, LIX, 81-83, 

footnote, 1833; Etudes Progress, d'un Natural., 94, 1835. 
Dromotherium Coues, Century Diet., II, p. 1767, 1889 (under Dremotherium). 
Species: Le dremothere de feignoux, et le dremothere nain. Type, Dremotherium 

feignoui E. Geoffroy, from the quarries of Saint-Gerand-le-Puy, Auvergne, 

France. 
Extinct. 
Dremotherium: dpo/ios, a running (from Tpex,GO, Spajiieiv, to run) ; brjpiov, wild 

beast. 
Drepanodon ('Bronn') Leidy, 1857. Ferae, Felidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1857, 176; Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 2d ser., 

VII, 54-64, 367, pis. iv, v, fig. 5, 1869. 
According to Leidy, the genus includes Machairodus primsevus Leidy & Owen, from 

Nebraska. 
Nesti, usually given as the authority for Drepanodon, merely used the name 

in 1826 specifically. Leidy, among others, refers the name to him and gives as 

synonyms of Drepanodon: " Megantereon Croiz., 1828; Agnotherium, Machairodus. 

Kaup, 1833; Steneodon Croiz., 1833; Smilodon Lund, 1841, etc. (loc. cit.,1857, 



DREPANODON DROMOCYON. 245 

Drepanodon — Continued. 

176). In 1869 Leidy says: " Bronn, in the Lethea Geognostica, has divided 
the various described species of Drepanodon into three groups, as follows: 
Drepanodon, characterized by having the canines entire or without serrulation, 
and the first lower premolar with a trilobate crown and double fang . . . 
Machairodus . . . Smilodon." 

Extinct. 

Drepanodon: Spenavi], sickle; oddiv = 68ov<;, tooth — in allusion to the immense 
upper canines. (Compare Machairodus and Smilodon.) 

Drill (subgenus of Mormon) Reichenbach, 1862. Primates, Cercopithecidse. 

Vollstiindigste Naturgesch. Affen, 162, 1862. 
Type: Sitnia leucophaea F. Cuvier, from West Africa. 
Not a common name, but adopted as a subgeneric term and used in the same 

way as several other native names. 
Drill: French mandrill, Spanish mandril, said to be from native "West African 

name. " If this form is original, the form drill in same sense is due to a false 

division of the word ... If drill is original, the form mandrill is an English 

compound. ' ' ( Century Diet. ) 
Dromatherium* Emmons, 1857. Marsupialia, Dromatheriidae. 

Am. Geology, pt. vi, 93-95, fig. 66 in text, 1857. 
Type: Dromatherium silvestre Emmons, from the Chatham coal field (Triassic), 

North Carolina. 
Extinct. Based on the left half of a lower jaw. 
Dromatherium: dpojudi, running; fJ)/piov, wild beast. 

Dromedarius Wagler, 1830. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Caruelidaj. 

Nat, Syst. Amphibien, 31, 1830. 
New name for Auchenia Illiger, 1811, which is preoccupied by Auchenia 

Thunberg, 1789, a genus of Coleoptera. Antedated by Lama Frisch, 1775. 
Dromedarius: Lat., dromedary; <^8po/iid<;, running (cf. 8po/.taio$ Ka/n/Aos, 

dromedary, lit. running camel). 
Dromedarius Gloger, 1841. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Camelidae. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxiii, 134, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 191, 193, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Type: Camelus dromedarius Linnaeus, from Africa, 
Name preoccupied by Dromedarius "Wagler, 1830, which was proposed to replace 

Auchenia Illiger, 1811. (See Camelus Linnaeus, 1758.) 
Dromicia Gray, 1841. Marsupialia, Phalangeridae. 

Gray, in Grey's Journ. Two Expd. North-West and West Australia, App. II, 401, 

407, 1841; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. Mas., 140-147, 1888. 
Type: Phalangista nana Desmarest, from Tasmania (fide Thomas). 
Dromicia: Spo/iiKOi, good at running, swift. 
Dromiciops Thomas, 1894. Marsupialia, Didelphyidae. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XIV., No. 81, pp. 186-188, Sept. 1, 1894. 
Type: Dromiciops gliroides Thomas, from Huite, northeastern Chiloe Island, on 

the coast of Chile. 
Dromiciops: Dromicia; oif>, aspect — from its resemblance to Dromicia nana. 
Dromocyon Marsh, 1876. Creodonta, Mesonychidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XII, 403, Nov., 1876. 
Type: Dromocyon vorax Marsh, from the Eocene of Wyoming. 
Extinct. Represented by 'a nearly complete skeleton.' 
Dromocyon: Spojuos, a course, running (rpexoo, edpauov, to run); kvoov, dog. 

* Compare Dremotherium Geoff roy, 1833, which is formed from almost the same 
Greek roots. 



246 INDEX GENERUM MAMMA LIUM. 

Dromotherium (see Dremotherium) Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Drymomys Tschudi, 1844. Glires, Muridre, Murinee. 

Fauna Peruana, 178-180, Taf. xm, fig. 1, 1844; Wiegmann's Archiv Naturgesch., 

1844, I, 251. 
Type: Drymomys parvulus Tschudi, from the forests of central Peru. " Dry- 
momys =Mus — type musculus. ,, (Oldfield Thomas, in epist., Mar. 28, 1898.) 
Drymomys: Spv/ios, coppice, wood; pvs, mouse. 
Dryolestes Marsh, 1878. Marsupialia, Amphitheriidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XV, 459, June, 1878. 
Dryole[i]stes Forbes, Zool. Rec. for 1881, XVIII, Mamin., 31, 1882. 
Type: Dryolestes priscus Marsh, from the Atlantosaurus beds of the Upper Jurassic 

of Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on 'the right lower jaw.' 
Dryolestes: dpvg, Spvog, tree; Aydr?}g, robber. 
Dryopithecus Lartet, 1856. Primates, Simiidse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, XLIII, Xo. 4, pp. 219-223, pi. figs. 7-9, July-Dec, 1856. 
Type: Dryopiihecus fontani Lartet, from the Miocene of Saint-Gaudens, Haute- 

Garonne, France. 
Extinct. Based on three pieces of the lower jaw and a humerus. 
Dryopiihecus: Spvg, Spvos, tree; 7ri0j/Ko<, ape — in reference to the supposed 
arboreal habits of these apes. 
Dry oryx Gloger, 1841. Edentata, Myrmecophagidfe. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Xaturgesch., I, pp. xxxi, 112, 1841; Thomas, Ann. A Mag. 

Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 191, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Type: The Tamandua (Myrmecophaga tebradactyla Linnaeus), from Brazil. 
Name antedated by Tamandva Rafinesque, 1815; and by Uroleptes AVagler, 1830. 
Dryoryx: dpv<;, 8pvo<;, tree; 6pv%, pickaxe — in allusion to the large claws with 
which the animal climbs about trees. 
Dryptodon Marsh, 1876. Edentata, Ganodonta, Stylinodontidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XII, 403-404, Nov., 1876. 
Type: Dryptodon crassus Marsh, from the Lower Eocene of New Mexico. 
Extinct. 

Dryptodon: SpvnToo, to tear; oSchv — dSovs, tooth. 
Dryxis Rafinesque, 1815. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidpe. 

Analysede la Nature, 56, 1815; Gray, Cat. Ungulata Brit, Mus., 47, 1852 (quoted). 
Nomen nudum. 
Ducantalpa Boitard, 1842. Insectivora, Chrysochloridae. 

Le Jardin des Plantes, 118, 1842. 
Type: Ducantalpa rubra Boitard, said to be from Guiana, but probably from 

South Africa. 
Boitard places Ducantalpa next to Chrysochloris and gives as synonyms of 
D. rubra: Chrysocldoris rufa Desmarest and Taljia rubra Gmelin (= T. rubra 
Erxleben). Erxleben's Talpa rubra was based on the Tucan of Fernandez, 
from America (probably a Geomys), and the Taljxi rubra americana of Seba (a 
composite animal ) . 
Ducantalpa: Ducan (= Tucan); talpa, mole — 'tucan mole.' 
Dugong Lacepede, 1799. Sirenia, Dugongida?. 

Tabl. Mamm., 17, 1799; Tabl. Method., in Buffon's Hist. Nat., Didoted., Quad., 

XIV, 193, 1799; Mem. l'lnstitut, Paris, III, 501, 1801. 
Dugungus Tiede.manx, Zoologie, I, 554, 1808. 
Dugongidus Gray, London Med. Repos., XV, 309, Apr. 1, 1821. 
Type: Dugong indicus (= Trichecus dugon Miiller), from the Indian Ocean. 
Dugong: Malay duyong, Javanese duyung. 



DURODON- — DYSTOMUS. 247 

Durodon (see Dorudon ) . Cete, Basilosauridae. 

Dusicyon (subgenus of Chaon) H. Smith, 1839. Ferae, Canidae. 

H. Smith, in Jardine's Nat. Library, Mamm., IX, 248-258, pis. xxii-xxvi, 

1839; ed. 2, Mamm., I, 154, 1858; IV, 248-258, pis. 22-26, 1866; V, 291, 1865. 
Dyskyon Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm. Addenda, 4, 1846; Index Univ., 

132, 1846; ed. 2, 380, 1848. 
Dusocyon Bourguignat, Ann. Sci. Geol., Paris, VI, art. 6, pp. 24, 29, 1875. 
Dasicyon Trouessakt, Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. ii, 299, 1897 (in synonymy, 

misprint). 
Species, 4: Dusicyon canescens Smith, from the vicinity of the Plate River; Canis 

untur[c]ticus auct., from the Falkland Islands; Dusicyon sylvestris Smith, from 

northern South America; and Vulpes fulvipes Martin, from Chile. 
Dusicyon: Svdis, setting of the sun, i. e., western; kvgov, dog — 'western dog.' 

Dymecodon True, 1886. Insectivora, Talpidae. 

Proc. IT. S. Nat. Mus., IX, 97-98, Sept. 2, 1886. 
Dimecodon Coues, Century Diet., II, 1621, 1889 (emendation). 
Type: Dymecodon pilirostris True, from Yenosima, Bay of Yeddo (Tokyo), Japan. 
Dymecodon: 8vo, two; jurfKoi, length; 68d)v = dSovs, tooth — i. e., having teeth 

of two lengths, in allusion to "the alternation of large and small teeth in the 

lower jaw." 

Dynamictis Ameghino, 1891. Marsupialia, Borhyaenidae. 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 3a, 148-149, fig. 53, June 1, 1891. 
Type: Dynamictis t feru Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Dynamictis: Svva/iii, power, strength; iktic,, weasel — in allusion to its size. 
which w T as that of a large bulldog. 

Dysicyon (see Dusicyon). Ferae, Canidae. 

Dysodus Cope, 1879. Ferae, Canidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila., 1879, 188-189. 
Type: Dysodus prayus Cope, 'the Japanese Sleeve Dog.' 

Dysodus: Svd-, bad; oSovs, tooth — in allusion to the degradation of dentition, 
in which the total number of teeth may be reduced to 16. 

Dysopes Illigek, 18.11. Chiroptera, Noctilionidae. 

Prodromus Syst, Mamm. Avium, 122, 1811. 
Dysopus BLYTn, in Cuvier's Animal Kingdom, 69, 1840; new ed., 1849, 69; new 

ed., 1863, 57. 
Type: Vespertilio molossus Gmelin, 'habitat in insulis Americae oppositis.' 
Dysopes: 8v6Gon£Go, to make one change countenance ('horribili specie perter- 

reo,' Illiger) — from the uncouth expression of the face. 

Dystheatus Illiger, 1815. ? ? 

Abhandl. K. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, fiir 1804-1811, 158, 1815— nomen nudum. 
The name occurs, without reference or authority, between Rh in<>li>i>li us and Erina- 
ceus, in a table of genera common to the southern and northern hemispheres. 

Dystomus G. Fischer, 1813. Sirenia, ? 

Zoognosia, I, 3d ed., 15, 19, 1813. 

Distomus Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. v, 1008 (in synonymy); C. O. 

Waterhouse, Index Zool., 112, 1902 (misprint). 
No species mentioned under the genus. 
Dystomus: Svd-, bad; 6r6/.ux, mouth. 



248 INDEX GENERTTM MAMMALIUM. 

E. 

Eboroziphius Leidy, 1876. Cete, Physeteridse? 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., July 11, 1876, 81; Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 2d 

ser., VIII, pt. m, 224-226, pi. 30 fig. 5, pi. 31 fig. 3, 1877. 
Type: Eboroziphius coelops Leidy, from the phosphate beds of Ashley River, 

South Carolina. 
Extinct. Based on a beak. 
Eboroziphius: Lat. ebur, eboris ivory; -\-Ziphius. 

Echidna G. Cuvier, 1798. Monotremata, Taehyglossidse. 

Tableau Element. Hist. Nat. Anim., 143, 1798; Lecons Anat. Comp., I, tabl. i, 

1800. 
Type: Les ' fourmiliers epineux' (= Myrmecophaga aculeata Shaw), from New 

South Wales, Australia. 
Name preoccupied by Echidna Forster, 1788, a genus of Pisces. Thomas (Cat. 

Marsup. &. Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 377, 1888) has claimed that the name was not 

preoccupied, as no species was mentioned as the type of Forster's genus, and the 

description is unrecognizable, it being thus virtually a nomen nudum. Later 

he admitted that the name was preoccupied and adopted Tachyglossus. (See 

Ann. Mus. Civ. Storia Nat. Genova, ser. 2 a , XVIII, 621, 1897.) 
Echidna: e'xtdva, adder, viper — prohably from the sharp spines, which are sup- 
posed to prick like the fangs of a viper. 
Echimys ('Geoffroy') Cuvier, 1809. Glires, Octodontidse. 

Cuvier, Nouv. Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, No. 24, 394, Sept., 1809; Desma- 

rest, Nouv. Diet. Hist. Nat., nouv. ed., X, 54-59, 1817 (includes 7 species); 

Allen, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., N.Y., XII, 262, 263, 1899 (type fixed). 
Echymys ('Jolrdan') Wieomanx, Archiv Naturgesch., 1838, II, 389 [395]. 
Echinomys Wagner, Abhandl. Akad. Wiss. Munchen, III, 203, 1840; Suppl. 

Schreber's Saugthiere, III, 339, 1843. 
Echiomys Wagner, Wiepmann's Archiv Naturgesch., 1841, Bd. i, 121. 
Enchomys Gloger, Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxi, 100-101, 1841. 
Based on the 'Lerot a queue doree ( Echimys cristatus Desmarest), from Surinam; 

and the ' Rat epineux' of Azara (E. sinnosus Desmarest — type), from Paraguay. 
Echimys: kxTvoz, hedgehog; (ivz, mouse (in analogy with £jzo5?/kto?; see also 

note under Echiothrix) — in allusion to the bristly spines which are mingled 

with the pelage. 
Echimys I. Geoffroy, 1838. (ilires, Octodontidpe. 

Echo du Monde Savant, Paris, 5 e Ann., No. 349, p. 201, July 7, 1838; Ann. Sci. 

Nat., Paris, 2 e ser., X, 124, Aug., 1838; Mag. de Zool., Paris, 2 e ser., 30, 1840; 

Allen, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist,, N. Y., XII, 260, 264, 1899. 
Type: Echimys setosus Desmarest, from South America. 
Echimys Geoffroy is not the same as Echimys Cuvier, 1809, the latter being based 

on E. spinosus. Allen has renamed Geoffroy' s genus, Proechimys, taking E. tri- 

nitatis as the type. 
Echimys: exivos, hedgehog; f-iv$, mouse — 'spiny rat,' on account of the bristly 

pelage, which has spines mixed with the fur. 
Echinodes ('Pomel') Trouessart, 1879. Insectivora, Tenrecidge. 

Trouessart, Revue et Mag. de Zool., 3 e se>., VII, 274, 1879; Cat. Mamm. Viv. 

et Foss., Insectiv., 56, 1879; Coues, Century Diet., II, p. 1832, 1889. 
Trouessart gives "Echinodes Pomel, 1848 (sine caract. )" in the synonymy of 

Hemicentetes; but Pomel only uses the name in a tribal or supergeneric sense 

in the form Echindidea in the paper quoted (Biblioth. Univ. de Geneve, Archiv. 

Sci. Phys. et Nat., IX, 251, Nov., 1848). Coues considers it the "same as 

Hemicentetes." 
Name preoccupied by Echinodes Le Conte, 1869, a genus of Coleoptera. 
Echinodes: kxiv&SyS, like a hedgehog, prickly; <£^?^ 05, hedgehog; eiSos, form. 



ECHINOGALE ECHLNO-SOREX. 249 

Echinogale Wagner, 1841. Insectivora, Tenrecida?. 

Suppl. Schreber's Saugthiere, II, 29-30, 549-550, 1841. 
Type: Echinops telfairi Martin, from Madagascar. New name for Echinops 

Martin, 1838, which was previously used in botany. 
Echinogale: £;t;2Vos, hedgehog; ycxAi}, weasel. 

Echinogale Pomel, 1848. Insectivora, Talpidpe. 

Archiv. Sci. Phys. et Nat., Bibl. Univ. de Geneve, IX, 163, 251, Oct., 1848; Cat. 

Meth. Yert. Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 15-16, 1854. 
Type: Echinogale laurillardi Pomel, from the Miocene of Perrier, Auvergne, France. 
Name preoccupied by Echinogale Wagner, 1841, a genus of Tenrecidre. Replaced 

by Scaptogale Trouessart, 1897. 
Extinct. 
Echinogale: £j/>os, hedgehog; ytx\7], weasel. 

Echinomys Wagner, 1840. Glires, Octodontidae. 

Abhandl. Akad. Wiss. Miinchen, III, 203, 1840; Suppl. Schreber's Saugthiere, 

III, 339, 1843. 
Emendation of Echimys Geoffroy, 1809. 

Echinoprocta (subgenus of Eretliizon) Gray, 1865. Glires, Erethizontidre. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1865, 321-322, pi. xi; Latorre, Bol. Soc. Espanola Hist. 

Nat., Madrid, I, 158-162, 1901 (raised to generic rank). 
Type: Eretliizon (Echinoprocta) rufescens Gray, from Colombia. 
Echinoprocta: exivos, hedgehog; itpcoKros, the hind parts — from the spines, 

which are well developed on the hind part of the back. 

Echinops Martin, 1838. Insectivora, Tenrecida?. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. lxii, July, 1838, 17-19. 
Type: Echinops telfairi Martin, from Madagascar. 

Echinops: e^jVoj, hedgehog; oj^ face — from its resemblance to Erinacms, the 
common hedgehog. 

Echinopus G. Fischer, 1814. Monotremata, Taehyglossidre. 

[Zoognosia, I, ed. 3, p. 14, 1813— nomen nudum]; Zoognosia, III, 691-694, 1814. 

New name for Echidna G. Cuvier, 1798. "Nomen Echidnas, ex causis variis, 
conservari nequit." The genus includes Ornitkorhynchus hystrix Home, from 
the vicinity of Port Jackson, New South Wales; and Echidna setosa Geoffroy, 
from Tasmania. (See Tachyglossus Illiger, 1811.) 

Echinopus: ex'^oS, hedgehog; itoix;, foot. 

Echinosciurus (subgenus of Sciurus) Trouessart, 1880. Glires, Sciuriclfe. 

Le Naturaliste, II, No. 37, p. 292, Oct. 1, 1880; Cat, Mamm. in Bull. Soc. d' Etudes 

Scientif. Angers, X, l er fasc. 80-81, 1880; Bull. U. S. Geol. & Surv. Terr., VI, 

No. 2, p. 306, Sept. 19, 1881; Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1897, 933 

(type mentioned). 
Species, 3: Sciurus hypopyrrhus Wagler (type), S. variabilis I. Geoffroy, and S. 

stramineus Eydoux & Souleyet, from Central America and northern South 

America. 
Echinosciums: £#2Vo?, hedgehog; -{-Sciurus — from the coarse, rigid pelage. 

Echino-Sorex (subgenus of Sorex) Blainville, 1838. Insectivora, Erinaceidse. 
Comptes Rendus, Paris, VI, No. 22, p. 742, Jan. -June, 1838; Ann. Franc, et 

Etrang. d'Anat. et Physiol., Paris, II, 221, 1838; Osteog. Desc. Icon. Mamm. 

Recents et Foss., I, Insectivores, 109, 1840. 
Type: Viverra gymnura Raffles, from Sumatra. Antedated by Gymnura Lesson, 

1827. 
Echinosorex: kxlvoi, hedgehog; -\-Sorex. 



250 INDEX GENEBUM MAMMALIUM. 

Echinothrix * Brookes, 1828. Glires, Erethizontidee. 

"Cat. Anat. & Zool. Museum of Joshua Brookes, London, 54 (previous to July 14), 

1828;" Trans. Linn. Soc. London, XVI, pt. i, 97, 1829. 
Type: Echinothrix dorsata {==Hystrix dorsata Linnaeus), from eastern Canada. 
Echinothrix: e^^ ?, hedgehog; bpis, hair — in allusion to the barhe<l quills, or 

spines, which are mingled with and usually concealed by the hair. 

Echinothrix Alston, 1876. Glires, Muriday Rhynchomyinse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1876, 83; Ogilby, Cat. Australian Mamm., 121, 1892. 
Emendation of Echiothrix Gray, 1867. 
Preoccupied by Echinothrix Brookes, 1828, a genus of Erethizontidse; and by 

Echinothrix Peters, 1853, a genus of Eohinodermata. Replaced by Craurotliri.c 

Thomas, 1896. 
Echinothrix: exi yo $, hedgehog; Qpi%, hair — in allusion to the flattened spines 

which are mixed with the fur. 

Echiomys (see Echimys). Glires, Octodontidse. 

Echiothrix Gray, 1867. Glires, Murida?, Rhynchomyinae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1867, 599-600, 4 figs, in text. 

Echinothrix Alston, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1876, 83; Ogilby, Cat. Australian 
Mamm. 121, 1892. 

Type: Echiothrix leucura Gray, said to be from Australia, but more probably from 
Celebes (cf. Thomas, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XVIII, 246, 1896). 

Name preoccupied by Echinothrix Brookes, 1828, a genus of Erethizontidae; and 
by Echinothrix Peters, 1 853, a genus of Echinodermata. Replaced 1 >y < raurothrix 
Thomas, 1896. The latter name was afterwards discarded by Thomas with 
the following explanation: "As I have now joined those who think that names 
should be retained as originally spelt, whether classically right or wrong 
(except in the case of obvious misprints), I am now prepared to consider that 
Peters's Echinothrix of 1853 does not preoccupy < rray's Echiothrix of 1867, and 
therefore again recognize the latter term . . . That the missing out of the 
letter n is not a misprint is shown by Gray having written on the type skin 
what appears to be ' Echithrix,' might be 'Echiothrix,' but is certainly not 
Echinotlrrix." (Trans. Zool. Soc. London, XIV, pt. vi, 397 i< >< >tnote June, 1898. ) 

Echiothrix:^ a contraction of £X' vo ?, hedgehog; Opi:, hair — from the flattened 
spines which are mixed with the fur. 

Echymipera Lesson, 1842. Marsupialia, Peramelidee. 

Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 192, 1842. 
Type: Echymipera kalubu Lesson (= Perameles doreyanus Quoy & Gahnard), from 

Waigiou, New Guinea. 
Echymipera (Echimypera): Echimys; iti)poc, pouch — i. e., a pouched Echimys. 

Echymys (see Echimys, 1809). Glires, Octodontidfe. 

Ecphantodon Mekcekat, 1891. Primates, Cebidae. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, II, 73-74, Oct., 1891; Ameghino, Enum. Syn. Mamm. 

Foss., 10, 1894 (date of publication) . 
Type: Ecphantodon ceboides Mercerat, from the Eocene of the barrancas of the 

Rio Santa Cruz, Patagonia. (See Homunculus Ameghino, Aug., 1891.) 
Extinct. Based on " un fragmento muy destrozado de la rama derecha del 

maxilar inferior con un solo diente roto en su parte postero-interna." 

*This name is open to question, as it was published in a sale catalogue. 
tThis form has classical sanction, compare £^zo<5?/kto5 {=kxi8v68j)Kroc,) Strabo, 
588; Diosc, Noth. I, 103. 



ECTACODON ECTOPHYLLA. 251 

Ectacodon Cope, 1881. Ungulata, Amblypoda, Coryphodontidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XVI, for Jan., 1882, 73, Dec. 30, 1881; Paleont. Bull., No. 34, 

167, 1882; Tert, Vert,, 519, 1885 (date of publication) . 
Type: Ectacodon ductus Cope, from the Eocene (Wasatch beds) of the Big Horn 

River basin, Wyoming. 
Extinct. " 
Ectacodon: ektos, outside; duo), point; 65gjj'=65ouj, tooth — in allusion to the 

crown of the last upper molar. 

Ectocion Cope, 1882. Ungulata, Condylarthra, Phenacodontidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XVI, for June, 522, May 20, 1882; Tert, Vert,, 095-697, pi. xxv e , 
figs. 9-10, 1885; Wortman, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat, Hist., N. Y., VIII, 83, 1896. 

Type: Oligotomus osbornianus Cope, from the Eocene of the Bad Lands of the 
Big Horn River, Wyoming. 

Extinct. 

Ectocion: ekto<;, outside; kigqv, pillar — in allusion to the arrangement of the 
cusps on the upper molars, four of the eight cusps being external, ' ' two prin- 
cipal external, together with two which arise from the external cingulum." 

Ectoconodon Osborn, 1898. Ungulata, Amblypoda, ? 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat, Hist., N. Y., X, 171, fig. 1 f, June 3, 1898. 

Type: Ectoconodon petersoni Osborn, from the Cretaceous (Laramie) of Wyoming. 

Extinct. Based on ' ' isolated superior molars. ' ' 

Ectoconodon: ektos, outside; ko>vos, cone; 65cbv=d8ov$, tooth — in allusion to 
the "two external prominent cones (parastyle and metastyle), reinforcing the 
outer wall of the crown" of the upper molars. (Osborn.) 

Ectoconus Cope, 1884. Ungulata, Amblypoda, Periptychicke. 

Am. Naturalist, XVIII, 795, 796, Aug., 1884; Tert, Vert., 404-105, pi. xxms, 

fig. 12 {Periptychus ditrigonus) , pi. xxix d , figs. 2-6 (Conoryctes ditrigonus) 

1885; Trans. Am. Philos. Soc, new ser., XVI, pt. n, 355-359, 1888. 
Ectogonus Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. iv, 723, 1898. 
Type: Ectoconus ditrigonus Cope, from the Puerco Eocene of New Mexico. 
Extinct. Based on "a right mandibular ramus which exhibits part of the sym- 

physial suture, with the alveoli of the molar teeth, except the first." 
Ectoconus: ektoc,, outside; k&voc,, cone — in allusion to the external eingular cusp 

on the upper molars. 

Ectoganus Cope, 1874. Edentata, Ganodonta, Stylinodontidse. 

Rept. Vert. Fossils New Mexico, 4-5, Nov. 28, 1874; Ann. Rept, Chief of Engineers, 
U. S. A., 1874, App. FF3, 592-593; Rept. U. S. Geog. Surv. west 100th Merid., 
IV, 158-162, pis. xl figs. 34-39, xli figs. 1-12, 1877. 

Type: Ectoganus gliriformis Cope, from the Eocene of New Mexico. 

Extinct. Based " on a number of remains of the crania of two species, includ- 
ing principally teeth, in a good state of preservation." 

Ectoganus: EKrog, outside; ydvoc, brightness, luster — in allusion to the enamel- 
coated anterior face of the incisors. 

Ectogonus (see Ectoconus). Ungulata, Amblypoda, Periptychidse. 

Ectophylla H. Allen, 1892. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatida?. 

Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., XV, No. 913, pp. 441-442, 2 figs, in text, Oct. 26, 1892. 
Type: Ectophylla alba H. Allen, from the Segovia River, eastern Honduras. 
Ectophylla: ektos, outside; (]>vA\ov, leaf — possibly in allusion to the "small 

rounded nodule [in front of the nose leaf] which apparently represents the 

lower part of the median leaf-crest. ' ' 



252 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Edostoma ('D'Orbigny') Waterhouse, 1838. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

D'Orbigny, quoted by Waterhouse, in Voy. 'Beagle,' pt. n, Mamm., No. 1, p. 3, 

1838 (pi. viii, Voy. Amer. Merid., mentioned); Mag. Zool. & Botany, II, No. 

12, 489, 1838 (quoted by Gray) ; D'Orbigny, Voy. l'Amerique Merid., IV, 2 e 

pt., 11, "pi. viii," 1847 (plate quoted as if published in 1836). 
Type: Edostoma cinerea D'Orbigny, from Santa Corazon, Chiquitos, Bolivia. 
Edostoma: s'Sgo, to devour; drojua, mouth — probably in allusion to the canines 

and incisors, which are capable of inflicting a severe wound. 
Edvardocopeia Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Amblypoda (Trigonostylopida). 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. C6rdoba, XVI, 395, July, 1901 (sep. p. 49). 
Type: Edvardocopeia sinuosa Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Edvardocopeia: In honor of Edward Drinker Cope, 1840-97, author of 'Tertiary 

Vertebrata,' 1885, and many papers on living and extinct vertebrates of 

America. 
Edvardotrouessartia Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata ( Albert ogaudryid;e). 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 401, July, 1901 (sep. p. 55). 
Tpye: Edrordotrouessartia sola Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Edvardotrouessartia: In honor of Dr. Edouard Louis Trouessart, 1842- , physi- 
cian and naturalist of Paris; author of the 'Catalogus Mammalium,' 1897-99, 

and numerous papers on mammals. 
Egocerus (subg. of Antilope) Desmarest, 1822. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 
Mammalogie, II, 475-476, 1822; Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, IV, 3, 

1899 (in synonymy, type fixed). 
Aigocerus H. Smith, < rriffith's Cuvier, Animal Kingdom, V, 324-325, 1827. 
(Egocerus Lesson, Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 179-180, 1842. 
JEgocoerus < Hervais, Zool. et Paleont. Franc., 2 e ed., 139, 1859. 
Species: Antilope leucophsea Pallas (type), from Cape Colony; and Antilope equina 

Geoff roy, 1803, from South Africa. 
See Aegoceros Pallas, 1811, containing 7 species of sheep and goats. 
Egoce rus: < u%, goat ; K£pa$, horn — from the large, pointed, simple, goat-like horns. 

Eidolon Rafinesque, 1815. Chiroptera, Pteropodic.ae. 

Analyse de la Nature, 54, 1815. 

Type: Not mentioned. Based on ' Pteropus a queue.' 
Eidolon: si'ScoXov, image, phantom — evidently in allusion to its movements. 

Eira H. Smith, 1839? Ferse, Mustelidae. 

"H. Smith, in Jardine's Nat. Library, Mamm., IX, 1839" (?); ed. 2, Mamm., I, 

201-204, pi. 16, 1858. 
Species, 4: Mustela barbara Linnaeus, Eira ilya H. Smith, E. galera ( F. Cuvier), and 

E. ferruginea H. Smith, from northern South America. 
Eira. (See Eirara ). 

Eirara*LuND, 1839. Ferae, Mustelidse. 

[Echo du Monde Savant, Paris, 6 e ami., No. 430, 245, Apr. 17, 1839— nomen 

nudeni] ; Ann. Sci. Nat, Paris, 2 e ser., XI, Zool., [225], 232, Apr., 1839. 
Eraria Gray, List Spec. Mamm., Brit. Mus., p. xx, 1843 (under Galera). 
Species: Mustela vittata Linnaeus and M. barbara Linnaeus, from northern South 

America. 
Eirara: Anagram of Eraria, the Brazilian name of Mustela vittata. 

*This group is called a 'sous-genre' on p. 225, but is used as a genus on p. 234. 



ELACHOCERAS ELAPHUS. 253 

Elachoceras Scott, 1886. Ungulata, Amhlypoda, Uintatheriidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci., 3d ser., XXXI, 304-307, fig. 2 in text, Apr., 1886. 
Type: Elachoceras parvum Scott, from the Eocene (Bridger beds) of Henry Fork, 

near Fort Bridger, Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on a skull. 
Elachoceras: e'Xaxvg, small, short; KEpas, horn — in allusion to the rudimentary 

maxillary and parietal protuberances indicating the presence of horns which 

were probably small in comparison with those of Uintatherium. 
.Elaphalces* Brookes, 1828. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

"Cat. Anat. & Zool. Mus. of Joshua Brookes, London, 41-42," 1828 (previous to 

July 14). 
Elephalces Brookes, "Descr. & Hist. Cat. Anat. & Zool. Mus. of J. Brookes, 62, 

1830." 
Species: Elaphalces gouazou poucou (=the Gouazou poucou of Azara?), from Para- 
guay; and E. uwricanus, from Mexico. 
Elaphalces: Elaphus -\-Alces. 
Elaphoceros Fitzinger, 1874. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Anzeiger Math. -Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, X, Nr. 29-30, p. 189, 1873— nomen 

nudum; Sitzungsber Math. -Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, LXVIII, Abth. i 

Jahrg. fiir 1873, 352, 1874; LXIX, Abth. i, 596-604, May, 1874. 
Type: Cervus sika Temminck, from Japan. 

Name preoccupied by Elaphocera Gen6, 1838, a genus of Coleoptera. 
Elaphoceros: e\a(po$, deer; Kepas, horn. 
Elaphochoerus Gistel, 1848. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Naturgesch. Thierreichs f. hohere Schulen, p. x, 1848 (under Porcus). 
New name for Porcus Wagler, 1830, which is preoccupied by Porcus Geoffroy, 

1829, a genus of Pisces. (See Babirussa Frisch, 1775.) 
Elaphochoerus: e'Xacpo*;, deer; x°ip°$> hog — 'deer hog' or 'hog deer,' a classical 

equivalent of babirussa the Malay name of the type species. (See BaMrussa 

and Choerelaphus. ) 
Elaphodus Milne-Edwards, 1871. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Nouv. Archives Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, VII, Bull., 93, 1871; Recherches Hist. 

Nat. Mamm. I, 353-356; II, pis. 65-67, 1868-74. 
Type: Elaphodus cephalophus A. Milne-Edwards, from Moupin, eastern Tibet. 
Elaphodus: sXacpoz, deer; b8ov$, tooth — 'toothed deer,' from the large upper 

canines of the male. 
Elaphotherium Delfortrie, 1876. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Actes Soc. Linn. Bordeaux, XXXI, l e livr., 37-39, pi. i, June, 1876; Trouessart, 

Cat. Mamm., new. ed., fasc. iv, 867, 1898. 
Elephotherium Bergroth, in C. O. Waterhouse's Index Zool., 121, 1902 (misprint) , 
Type: Elaphotherium domenginei Delfortrie, from the Miocene of Canton Bazas, 

southern France. 
Extinct. Based on part of a lower jaw. 
Elaphotherium: eXacpoi, deer, stag; Qrjpiov, wild beast. 
Elaphurus Milne-Edwards, 1866. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, LXII, 1090-1091, 1866; Nouv. Arch. Mus., Paris, II, 

Bull., 27, 1866. 
Type: Elaph nrus davidianus Milne-Edwards, from the vicinity of Pekin, China. 
Elaphurus: e'Xacpos, deer, stag; ovpct, tail. The genus is related to the stag but 

has a longer tail. 
Elaphus (subgenus of Cervus) H. Smith, 1827. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 
Griffith's Cuvier, Animal Kingdom, V, 307-309, 1827. 

*This name is open to question, as it was published in a sale catalogue. 



254 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Elaplius — Continued. 

Species: Cervus elaplius, from Europe; Cervus canadensis, from northeastern North 
America; Cervus occidentalis, from northwestern North America; and Cervus 
wallichii from Nepal, India. 

Elaplius: eXa<po$, deer. 
Elasmodon Falconer, 1846. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidse. 

" Fauna Antiqua Si valensis," 1846; Pala?ont. Memoirs, 1, 20-21, 477 footnote, 1868. 

Species: Elephas hysudricus Falconer, and E. namadicus Falconer, from the Pleis- 
tocene of the Narbada Valley, India. 

"The designation of Elasmodus having been preoccupied by Sir Philip Egerton 
for a series of fossil fish, Dr. Falconer, in 1857 [Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, Lon- 
don, XIII, 315], substituted Euelephas lor Elasmodon" (1. c, p. 477, 1868). 

Extinct. 

Elasmodon: eXaffpios, a thin plate; 6Scbv = 68ovc, y tooth — in allusion to the lami- 
nar pattern of the molars. 

Elasmognathus (till, 1865. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Tapiridse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1865, 183. 
Type: Elasmoganthus bairdii Gill, from Panama. 
Name preoccupied by Elasmognathus Fieber,* 1844, a genus of Hemiptera. 

Replaced by TapireUa Palmer, 1903. 
Elasmognathus: eAaduos, a thin plate; yvattoc,, jaw — in allusion to the promi- 
nent ossified nasal septum or prolongation of the mesethmoid, and the thin 

lamelliform expansions of the supramaxillaries. (Gill. ) 
Elasmotherium G. Fischer, 1808. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotidse. 

Programmed' Invitation Seance Pub. Soc. Imp. Nat. Moscou, 23-28, 2 plates, 1808; 

Mem. Soc. Imp. Nat. Moscou, II, 253, 255-260, tab. xxi, xxn, 1809; V, 413, 

1817; Zoognosia, III, 335-337, 1814. 
Type: Elasmotherium sibiricum Fischer, from the Pleistocene in the vicinity of 

Miask, Siberia. 
Extinct. Based on a lower jaw. 
Elasmotherium: kXa6u6c,, a thin plate; Qypiov, wild beast — in allusion to the 

enamel plates of the molars. 

Electra (subgenus of Lagenorhynchus) Gray, 1866. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 268-272, 1866; Synopsis Whales & Dolphins 

Brit. Mus., 7. 1868 (raised to generic rank) ; Suppl. Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. 

Mus., 76, 1871. 
Species, 7: Lagenorhynchus electra Gray (type), locality unknown; Delphinus 

cxruleo-allnts Meyen, from the east coast of South America; Lagenorhynchus 

asia Gray, locality unknown; Phocsena acutus Gray, from the North Sea; 

Lagenorhynchus clanculus Gray, from the Pacific Ocean; Delphinus hreviceps 

Pucheran, from the Rio de La Plata, and Lagenorhynchus thicolea Gray, from 

the west coast of North America. 
Name preoccupied by Electra Lamouroux, 1816, a genus of Polyps; and by Electra 

Stephens, 1829, a genus of Lepidoptera. 
Electra: "'HXsKrpa, Electra — in Greek mythology, a nymph, daughter of Oceanus 

and Tethys, wife of Thaumas and mother of the Harpies. 

Eleotragus Gray, 1843. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xxvi, 165, 1843; Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 

XVIII, 232, 1846; Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, II, pt. vm, 155, 1897 

(in synonymy, type fixed). 
Heleotragus Kirk, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 657-658. 

*Entom. Mon. Abhandl. K. Bohm. Gesellsch. Wiss., V, Bd. 3, pp. 90-91, 1844. 



ELEOTRAGUS ELIGMODONTIA 255 

Eleotragus — Continued. 

Species, 3: Antilope isabdlina Afzelius ( = A. arundinum Boddaert, type), A. villosa 

Burchell, and A. redunca H. Smith, from South Africa. 
Eleotiragus: sXoz, marsh; rpdyo<;, goat — from its habitat in swampy ground near 
springs or river bottoms. 
Elephalces (see Elaphalces). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidee. 

Elephantus Cuvier & Geoffroy, 1795. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidse. 
Mcth. Mammalogique, in Mag. Encyclopedique, l e ann., II, 189, 1795; Lacepede 

& Cuvier, Menagerie Mus. Nat. Hist, Nat., I, 83-125, pi. facing p. 124; II, 

45-65, pi. facing p. 45, 1804. 
Modified form of Elephas Linnaeus, 1758. Species not given in first reference, but 

the name was used by Lacepede & Cuvier for E. indicus. 
Elephantus: Lat. elephant, 

Elephas Linnaeus, 1758. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidse. 

Systema Natune, 10th ed., I, 33, 1758: 12th ed., I, 48, 1766; Brisson, Regnum 

Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 12, 28-30, 1762. 
Elephantus Cuvier & Geoffroy, Meth. Mammalogique, in Mag. Encyclopedique, 

l e ami., II, 189, 1795; Lacepede & Cuvier, Menagerie Mus. Nat, Hist. Nat., I, 

83-125; II, 45-65, 1804. 
Type: Elephas maximus Linnaeus, from Ceylon ['Zeylona']. 
Elephas: e\£<pa<;, elephant. 

Elephotherium (see Elaphotherium). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Eleutherocercus Koken, 1888. Edentata, Glyptodontida?. 

Anhang zu Abhandl. K. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, Nr. I, 1-28, Taf. i-ii, Apr. 26, 1888. 
Type: Eleutherocercus setifer Koken, from the Pleistocene of Uruguay. 
Extinct. Based on "Das Stiick, welches nur den hinteren Theil des Schwanz- 

tubus bildet," 
Eleutherocercus: sXsvOepos, free; KepKos, tail — " mit Ri'icksieht auf die lockere 

Yerbindung des Tubus mit dem Endstiicke der Schwanzwirbelsiiule." 

Eleutherodon Mercerat, 1891. Edentata, Megalonychidae. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, II, 24, 1891. 

Type: Eleutherodon heteroclitus Mercerat, from the Rio Santa Cruz, Patagonia. 
Name preoccupied (?) by Eleutheroda Brunner de Wattenwyl, 1865, a genus of 

Orthoptera. 
Extinct, Based on an imperfect lower jaw. 
Eleutherodon: eXevQepoz, free; 6Scbv=68ov<;, tooth. 

Eleutherura Gray, 1843. Chiroptera, Pteropodida?. 

Voy. 'Sulphur,' Mamm., pt, n, 29, 1843; List Spec. Manim. Brit. Mus., p. xix, 

1843; Dobson, Cat. Chiroptera Brit, Mus., 70 footnote, 1878. 
Type: Pteropus hottentottus Temminck, from the vicinity of Cape Town, Cape 

Colony ("dans les environs de la ville du Cap de Bonne- Esperance et dans 

(Pinterieur."— Temminck, Mon. Mamm., II, 88, 1835.) 
Eleutherura: eXevQepos, free; ovpd, tail — so called from having the tail free 

from the interfemoral membrane. 

Eligmodon (see Eligmodontia). Glires, Muridee, Cricetinse. 

Eligmodontia F. Cuvier, 1837. Glires, Muridse, Cricetinge. 

Ann. Sci. Nat,, Paris, 2 e ser., VII, 168-171, pi. 5, Mar., 1837. 
Elygmodovtia Wiegmann's Archiv Naturgesch., 1838, n, 388 (misprint) 
Heligmodontia Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., Addenda, 5, Index Univ., 
136, 175, 1846; 2d ed., 392, 394, 504, 1848. 



256 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALITJM. 

Eligrnodontia — Continued. 

Elimodon Fitzinger, Sitzungsb. Math. -Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, LV, 

463, 1867. 
Eligmodon Thomas, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XVIII, 307, Oct., 1896. 
Type: Eligmodontia lypus F. Cuvier, from the vicinity of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Eligmodontia: eXiyjuos, a winding, convolution; o8ov$, oSovros, tooth — in allu- 
sion to the zigzag pattern of the molars. 
Elimodon Fitzinger, 1867. Glires, Muridae, Cricetinae. 

Sitzungsb. Math.-Naturw. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, LV, 463, 1867. 
This name seems to be a misprint for Eligmodontia Cuvier. Fitzinger says: "So 

hat er [Wagner] . . . fur Elimodon die Benennung Hesperomys angenom- 

men." In Wagner's Supplement to Schreber's Siiugthiere, III, referred to, 

Eligmodontia and not Elimodon, is the name given. 
Eliomys Wagner, 1843. Glires, Muscardinidae. 

Abhandl. Math.-Phys. CI. K. Bayerischen Akad. Wiss., Miinchen, III, 175-185, 

Tab. ii, rigs. 1-4; Tab. m, fig. 1, 1843. 
Type: Myoxus melanurus Wagner, from the vicinity of Mt. Sinai, Arabia. 
Eliomys: hXeioc, or ekeiog, a kind of dormouse; f*vz, mouse. 
Elipsodon Roth, 1898. Edentata, Megalonychidae. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, IX, 194, lam. vn, fig. 3, 1898 (sep. p. 54). 
Type: Elipsodon heimi Roth, from the 'toba terciaria' of the Rio Collon-Cura, 

Patagonia. 
Name preoccupied by EUipsodon Scott, 1892, a genus of Creodonta. Replaced by 

DielUpsodon Berg, 1899. 
Extinct. Based on four upper molars. 
Elipsodon: eAAeirpi*;, ellipse; 68cbv=d8ovs, tooth — in allusion to the elliptical 

form of the three anterior molars. 
Eliurus Milne-Edwards, 1885. Glires, Muridae, Cricetinae. 

Ann. Sci. Nat, Paris, 6 e ser., Zool., XX, Art. No. 1 bis, p. 1, 1885. 
Type: Eliurus myoxinus A. Milne-Edwards, from the west coast of Madagascar. 
Eliurus: fAezosor eXsiog, a kind of dormouse; ovpd, tail — from its resemblance 

to a dormouse (Myoxus). 
Elius (subgenus of Myoxus) Schulze, 1900. Glires, Muscardinidae. 

Zeitschr. Naturwiss., Stuttgart, LXXIII, 200, Dec. 19, 1900. 
Species: Sciurusglis Linnaeus, from southern Europe; and Myoxus dryas Schreber, 

from southern Russia. 
Elius: e\sio<z or e Aezos, a kind of dormouse. 
EUipsodon Scott, 1892. Creodonta, Oxyclaenidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Nov. 15, 1892, 298. 
Type: Tricentes inxquidens Cope, from the Eocene of New Mexico. 
Extinct. 
EUipsodon: e'XA.eiipi<;, ellipse; 68d>v = 68ov<;, tooth. "The molars are oval in 

shape." 
Ellobius G. Fischer, 1814. Glires, Muridae, Microtinae. 

Zoognosia, III, 72-77, 1814; Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1896, 1021. 
Species, 4: Mus talpinus Pallas, from southern Russia; Ellobius zocov Fischer ( =Mus 

aspalax Pallas), from Dauria; Mus capensis Pallas, from the Cape of Good 

Hope, and M. hudsonius Pallas, from Labrador. Type, by elimination: Mus 

talpinus Pallas. 
Name preoccupied by Ellobium Bolten, 1798, a genus of Mollusca. 
Ellobius: eXXofiiov, earring — from the rudimentary external ears, which are 

somewhat circular in form. 
Elocyon Aymard, 1850. Ferae, Canidae. 

Ann. Soc. Agr., Sci., Arts et Comm. Puy, XIV, 81, 110-112, 1850; Pomel Cat. 

Meth. Vert. Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 66, 1854; Gervais, Zool. et Paleont. 

Franc., 2 e 6d., 219, 1859. 



ELOCYON EMMENODON. 257 

Elocy on — Con tin ued . 

Type: Elocyon martrides Aymard, from the Miocene of Puy, Dept. Haute-Loire, 

France. 
Extinct. Etablie "sur une portion de branche horizontale droite de mandibule, 

et sur une molaire tuberculeuse superieure droite." (Aymard.) 
Elocyon: £Aoj, marsh; kvuv, dog. 
Elomeryx Marsh, 1894. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anthracotheriida?. 

Am. Journ. Sci., 3d ser., XLVIII, No. 284, pp. 176-177, figs. 3-5, Aug., 1894. 
Type: Heptacodon armalus Marsh, from the Oligocene (eastern Miohippus beds) 

of South Dakota. 
Extinct. 

Elomeryx: e'Ao?, marsh; /n)pvc„ ruminant. 
Elomys Aymard, 1848. Glires, Murida?, Murinse? 

"Ann. Soc. Agr., Sci., Arts et Coram. Puy, XII, 227, 1848" (fide Trouessart, 

Cat. Mamm., new ed., 570, 1897); Aymard, in Pictet's Traite Paleont., 2d ed., 

1, 250, 1853; Comptes Eendus, Paris, XXX VII 1, 675, 1854; Congres Sci. France, 

for 1855, I, 233, 1856. 
Type: Elomys priscus Aymard, from the Lower Miocene of Puy-de-D6me, France. 
Extinct. Based on " une machoire inferieure." 
Elomys: eXos, marsh; nv$, mouse. 
Elotherium Pomel, 1847 Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Archiv. Sci. Phys. etNat,, Bibl. Univ. de Geneve, V, 307-308, 1847; Bull. Soc. 

Geol. de France, 2 e ser., IV, for 1846-47, feuilles 63-73, 1083-1085, July, 1848; 

Cat. Meth. Vert. Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 88-89, 1854. 
Type: Elotherium magnum (Aymard), from the Oligocene of Eonzon, near Puy- 

en-Velay, southwestern France. 
Extinct. 

Elotherium: eXoi, marsh; Or/piov, wild beast. 
Elygrnodovtia (see Eligmodontia). Glires, Murida?, Cricetinse. 

Emballonura Temminck, 1838. Chiroptera, Noctilionidse. 

Temminck, in Van der Hoeven's Tijdschr. Nat. Gesch. en Physiol., V, 22-31, 1838. 
Embalanura ('Kuhl') Gray, Mag. Zool. & Bot., II, No. 12, p. 500, 1838. 
Species, 4 : Emballonura monticola Temminck (type?), from the Munara Mts., 

Java; and Proboscidea saxatilis Spix, Vespertilio caninus Maximilian, and V. cal- 

caratus Maximilian,* from Brazil. 
Emballonura: k).if3dXXa), to throw in; ovpd, tail — in allusion to the perforation 

of the interfemoral membrane by the tail, which appears loose on the upper 

surface of the membrane for part of its own length. 
Embassis Cope, 1873. Marsupialia, Didelphyidae. 

Syn. New Vert. Tert. Colorado, 4, 7, Oct., 1873; Rept. U. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. 

Terr, for 1873, 468, 1874. 
Type : Embassis alternans Cope, from the Oligocene (White River) of Colorado. 
Extinct. 
Emmenodon Cope, 1889. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XXIII, No. 268, p. 194, Apr., 1889. 
Type: Elephas cliftii Falconer & Cautley (= Mastodon elephantoides Clift), from 

the Pliocene in the vicinity of Yenankhoung, on the left bank of the Irrawaddy, 

Upper Burma (locality from Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., IV, 

81, 1886). 
Extinct. 
Emmenodon; Derivation doubtful, possibly from e/tijuevijs, abiding in, enduring; 

oScbv = oSovi, tooth. 



*Name preoccupied, see footnote under Centronycteris, p. 168. 
7591— No. 23—03 17 



258 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Enagrus Rafinesque, 1815. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidfe. 

Analyse de la Nature, 56, 1815; Gray, Cat. Mamni. Brit. Mus., pt. m, Ungulata, 

47, 1852 (merely quoted) . 
Nomen nudum. Type: AntUope sp. ('Enagrus Tl. sp. do.' [espece du genre presi- 
dent Antilope] ). 
Enbradys (see Eubradys). Edentata, Megatheriidse. 

Encheiziphius Rutimeyer, 1857. Cete, Physeteridse. 

Yerhandl. Naturforsch. Geseilsch. Basel, I, 559-567, 1857. 
Type: Encheiziphius teretiroslris Rutimeyer, from the Pliocene of Montpellier, 

Dept. du Herault, southern France. 
Extinct. Based on a portion of a skull. 

Encheiziphius: £XX°?> *T.£ £0 ?> spear; 4 Ziphius — in allusion to the form of the 

type specimen, which is described as "einen einfachen, durchaus gerade ge- 

streckten und regelmiissig zugespitzten compacten Speer von fast kreisrunden." 

Enchomys Gloger, 1841. Glires, Octodontidae. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxi, 100-101, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & 

Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 190, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Apparently an emendation or modification of Echimys Olivier, 1809. 
Enchomys: fV^oj, spear; juv<;, mouse — from the spines mixed with the fur. 
Encoubertus (subgenus of Dasypvs) McMurtrie, 1831. Edentata, Dasypodidse. 
[V Ericoubert F. Cuvier, Hist. Nat. Mamm., II, G v livr., pi. with 3 pp. text 
unnumbered, May, 1819]; McMurtrie's Cuvier, Animal Kingdom, I, 163-164, 
1831; abridged ed., 94, 1834. 
Species: Dasypus sexcinctus Linmeus, and D. IS-cinctus Midler, from South America. 
Encoubertus: Portuguese encuberto or encubertado, covered, protected. A name 
given to the 6-banded armadillo by the Portuguese and adopted in French 
form, encoubert, by Buff on (Hist. Nat., X, 209, 1763). 
Encrotaphus (see Eucrotaphus) . Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agriochceridse. 

Endecapleura (subg. of GerbUlus) Lataste, 1882. Glires, Muridse, Gerbillinse. 

Le Naturaliste, Paris, IV, No. 16, p. 127, Aug. 15, 1882. 
Hendecapleura Thomas, Zool. Record for 1882, XIX, Mamm., 28, 1883; Lataste, 

Ann. Mus. Civ. Storia Nat. Genova, XX, 258 footnote, 1884 (emendation). 
Type: GerbiUw garamantis Lataste, from Sidi-Roueld (Ouargla), Algeria. 
Endecapleura: tvdsxa, eleven; itXEvpd, rib. 
Endoptychus (see Entoptychus). Glires, Heteromyidae? 

Engeco Haeckel, 1866. Primates, Simiida?. 

Gen. Morph. Organismen, II, cl footnote, clx, 1866; Hist. Creation, Am. ed., 

II, 275, 1883. 
Type: Engeco troglodytes (= Simia troglodytes Gmelin) , from West Africa. 
Name antedated by Troglodytes Geoffroy, 1812 (preoccupied); by Pan Oken, 1816, 

and by several other names. 
Engeco: Native name. " Der Chimpanze diirfte als generischen Namen am pas- 
sendsten die Bezeichnung beihalten, welche er in seiner Heimath bei den 
Negernfiihrt: Engeco." (Haeckel.) 
Engyscopus Gistel, 1848. Insectivora, Chrysochloridse. 

Naturgesch. Thierreichs f. hohere Schulen, p. viii, 1848 (under Chrysochlaris). 
New name for Chrysochloris Lacepede, 1799 (supposed to be preoccupied by 

Chrysochlora Latreille [1825], a genus of Diptera). 
Engyscopus: hyyvc,, near; 6koti6<;, watcher — i. e., nearsighted — in allusion to 
the concealment of the eyes by skin. 
Enhydr a Fleming, 1822. Fera?, Mustelidse. 

Philos. of Zoology, II, 187, 1822. 



ENHYDRA ENNEODON. 259 

Enhydra— Continued. 

Enydris J. B. Fischer, Syn. Mamm., 228-229, 1829; Lictitexsteix, Darstellung, 

pi. xlix, 1833. 
Enhydris Temmixck, inVander Hoeven'sTijdschr. Nat. Gesch. Physiol., V, 285, 

1838-39; Schinz, Synopsis Mannn., 357, 1844. 
Euhydris Jordan, Man. Vert, Anim. North U. S., 5th ed., 339, 1888. 
Enhydria Zittel, Handb. Palteont., IV, 3"' Lief., 652, 1893. 
Type: Not given, but probably I/utra marina Steller, from the coasts of the North 

Pacific. 
Name preoccupied by Enhydris Merrem, 1820, a genus of Reptilia. (See Latax 

Gloger, 1827.) 
Enhydra: e'vvSpi*;, an otter, from evv8po<z, living in water. 

Enhydrichtis Stefani, 1891. Ferae, Mustelidre. 

"Atti Reale Ace. Eeonomico-Agrar. Georgofili, Firenze, 222-239, 1891," fide 

Matschie, Archiv Naturgesch., Jahrg. 58, II, Heft 1, fiir 1892, 366, June, 1897. 
Enhydriclis Major, Zool. Anzeiger, No. 661, p. 87, Jan. 13, 1902; Proe. Zool. Soc. 

London for 1901, II, 625-628, Apr. 1, 1902. 
Type: Enhydrichtis galictoides from Sardinia. 
Extinct. 

Enhydriclis: Enhydra-j-Ictis. 
Enhydriodon Falconer, 1868. Ferae, Mustelidse. 

Paheont. Memoir*, I, 331-338, pi. 27, figs. 1-5, 1868. 
Type: Enhydriodon sivalensis Falconer, from the Tertiary strata of the Siwalik 

Hills, India. 
Extinct. Based on 'three heads.' 
Enhydriodon: evv8pi<;, otter; 6&(hv=d8ov$, tooth. 
Enhydris (see Enhydra). Ferae, Mustelidse. 

Enhydrocyon Cope, 1879. Fenc, Canidse. 

Bull. U. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. Terr., V, No. 1, pp. 56-58, Feb. 28, 1879; Hay, 

Cat, Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 170, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species: Enhydrocyon stenocephalia Cope (type), and E. basilatus Cope, from the 

Miocene (White River beds) of the John Day River, Oregon. 
Extinct, 
Enhydrocyon: £vv8pi<;, otter; Kvooy, dog — 'the dentition resembles that of the 

Canidse, but the form of the skull resembles that of Putorius and Lutra.' 

Ennacodon Marsh, 1890. Marsupialia, Trieonodontida?. 

Additional Genera established by Prof. O. C. Marsh, 1880-89, 15, New Haven, 

1890 (privately issued). 
Zittel, Handbuch Palaeont., IV, lste Lief., 99, 1892; Roger, Verzeichn. Foss. 

Saugeth., in Bericht Naturwiss. Yer. f. Schwaben u. Neuburg (a. V.) Augsburg, 

XXXI, 10, 1894. 
New name for Enneodon Marsh, 1887, which is preoccupied by Enneodon Prang- 

ner, 1845, a genus of Reptilia; and by Enneodon Heckel, 1853, a genus of Pisces. 
Extinct. 
Ennacodon: hvvea, nine; &ki), point; d8d>v = d8ovs, tooth — from the nine 

pointed teeth behind the canines in the lower jaw. 

Enneoconus Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Condylarthra, Phenacodontkke. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, XVI, 378-379, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 32-33). 
Type: Enneoconus parvidens Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct, 

Enneoconus: evvsa, nine; kSivoc,, cone — in allusion to the number of cones on 
the upper molars. 



2(30 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Enneodon Marsh, 1887. Marsupialia, Triconodontida?. 

Am. Journ. Sei. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXIII, 339, 343, pi. x, fig. 4, Apr., 1887; 

Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert, N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv.,568, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species: Enneodon crassus Marsh (type), and E. affirm Marsh, from the Atlanto- 

saurus beds of the Upper Jurassic in Wyoming. 
Name preoccupied by Enneodon Prangner, 1845, a genus of Reptilia; and by 

Enneodon Heckel, 1853, a genus of Pisces. Replaced by Ennacodon Marsh, 

1890. 
Extinct. 
Enneodon: evvea, nine; ddcov = ddov$, tooth — from the nine teeth behind the 

canines in the lower jaw. 
Entellus (subgenus of Semnopithecus) Gray, 1870. Primates, Cercopithecidte. 

Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 14-15, 1870. 
Species, 3: Semnopithecus johnii (Fischer), S. entellus (Dufresne, type), and 8. albipes 

Geoffrey, all from India. 
Entellus: tvreXXoo, to command — from the fact that the species from which the 

genus is named, Semnopithecus entellus, is held in veneration and treated with 

great honor by the natives. 
Entelodon Aymard, 1846.* Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

Ann. Soc. Agr., Sci., Arts et Comm. du Puy, XII, for 1842-46, 227-242, pi., 

1846; Gervais, Zool. et Palseont. Franc., 2d ed., 194-195, 1859. 
Species: Entelodon magnus Aymard, and E. ronzoni Aymard, from the Oligocene 

of Ronzon, near Puy-en-Velay, Dept. Haute-Loire, France. 
Extinct. 

Vmtelodon: evreXi}g, complete; 6Scov — 68ov<;, tooth — in allusion to the posses- 
sion of the full number of teeth. 
Entelomorphus Ameghino, 1889. Ungulata, Typotheria, Typotheriida?. 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamff. Fosil. Repiib. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

Cordoba, VI, 421^22, pi. xvii, fig. 8, 1889. 
Type: Entelomorphus rotundatus Ameghino, from the Pliocene (Pampean forma- 
tion) of the Rio de La Plata, province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct. "Solo conozco de este animal la parte anterior de la mandibula, con 

la sinfisis y los dientes en parte destruidos." 
Entelomorphus: kvrE\i)s, complete; f.iop<fn), form. 
Entelops Ameghino, 1887. Edentata, Bradypodidse. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamff. Fos. Patagonia Austral, 23-24, Dec, 1887; Act. 

Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 654-655, 1889. 
Eutelops Lydekker, Zool. Record for 1887, XXIV, Index Genera, 6, 1888. 
Type: Entelops dispar Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Entelops: evrEXi}*;, complete; oip, face — probably in allusion to the dentition. 

" Un g£nero verdaderamente anomalo, pues tiene incisivos en la mandibula 

superior y la mandibula inferior con denticion en serie continua en toda su 

parte anterior, hasta la misma sinfisis que forma una barba casi vertical." 

(Ameghino, Act, Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, 1889, 654.) 
Entelostylops Ameghino, 1901. Tillodontia, Pantostylopida?. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, XVI, 425^26, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 79-80). 
Species, 4: Entelostylops eompletus Ameghino, E. incolumis Ameghino, E. triparli- 

tus Ameghino, and E. cestillus Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Entelostylops: kvzeXr}i, complete; drvAos, pillar; oip, aspect, 

Entemnodus (see Eutemnodus). Marsupialia, ? 

*See Bush, Am. Journ. Sci., 4th ser., XVI, 96, 1903. 



ENTOCASMUS EOAUCHENIA. 261 

Entocasmus Ameghino, 1891. Edentata, Ganoclonta, Stylinodontidse. 

Eevista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 3a, 139, rig. 37, June 1, 1891. 
Type: Entocasmus heterogmidens Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Entocasmus: hvroc,, within; x^M a , hollow, gulf — in allusion to the enamel of 
the teeth, "siernpre cubierto por una capa de cemento muy espesa." 

Entomacodon Marsh, 1872. . Insectivora, Leptictidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 214-215, Sept., 1872 (sep. issued Aug. 13). 
Type: Entomacodon minutus Marsh, from the Eocene of Henry Fork of Green 

River, Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on "a fragment of a lower jaw with the last molar perfect." 
Entomacodon: evro/uov, insect (i. e. insectivore? ) ; lxki), point; 68chv=d§ovs, 

tooth. 

Entomodon Marsh, 1872. Primates, Hyopsodidse? 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 214, Sept., 1872 (sep. issued Aug. 13) ; Osborn, 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist,, N. Y., XVI, 173, 180, 189, June 28, 1902 (under 

Sarcolemur). 
Type: Entomodon comptus Marsh, from the Eocene of Henry Fork of Green River,- 

Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on "several isolated teeth, one of the most characteristic of 

which is a last lower molar, in excellent preservation." 
Entomodon: svrojiiov, insect; dSd)v=d8ovs, tooth. 

Entoptychus Cope, 1878. Glires, Heteromyidse? 

Paheont. Bull., No. 30, pp. 2-4, Dec. 3, 1878; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XVIII, 

64-66, Dec. 30, 1878; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. 

Surv., 731, 1902 (type fixed). 
Endoptychus: Dalton, Geol. Record for 1878, 293, 432, 1882 (misprint). 
Species, 3: Entoptychus cavifrons Cope (type), E. planifrons Cope, and E. crassiramis 

Cope, from the Miocene (John Day) of Oregon. 
Extinct. 
Entoptychus: eyrog, within; 7rrv|, 7trvx6i, fold — from the molars, which when 

young have a deep inflection of enamel from one side. 

Enydris (see Enhydra). Ferae, Mustelidae. 

Eoauchenia * Ameghino, 1887. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cameliche. 

Apuntes Prelim. sobreMamff. Estinguidos de Monte Hermoso, 16-17, Apr., 1887; 

Cont. Conocimiento Mam if. Fos. Repiib. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

Cordoba, VI, 598-599, 1889. 
Type: Eoauchenia primitiva Ameghino, from Monte Hermoso, about 40 miles east 

of Bahia Blanca, province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on various separate bones. 
Eoauchenia: j/ct??, dawn; 4- Auchenia — i. e., a primitive Auchenia. 

*The prefix eo- was proposed by Owen to indicate a genus occurring in the Eocene 
and his suggestion has been generally adopted by later authors. The term Eocene 
was invented by Lyell, as Owen explains (Brit. Foss. Mamm., 5, 1846), to indicate 
"the first commencement, or dawn, of the existing state of the animal creation." 
Dobson afterwards used eo- in the sense of ' eastern ' for a recent genus, and the prefix 
has been employed with this meaning for a few groups of mammals from the Ori- 
ental and Ethiopian regions viz, Eonycteris, Eosciurus, Eothenomys, Eoxerus, and 
Eozapus. 



262 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Eobasileus Cope, 1872. Ungulate, Amblypoda, Uintatheriida?. 

Palseont. Bull. No. 6, pp. 2-3, Aug. 20, 1872; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XII, for July- 
Dec, 1872, 485, Jan. 1873; XIII, 54, 1873; Marsh, Mon. Dinocerata, 206-208, 
figs. 180-181, 1886. 

Type: Eobasileus cornutus Cope, from the Eocene of Haystack Mountain, near the 
headwaters of Bitter Creek, Sweetwater County, Wyoming. 

Extinct. Based on the "remains of five individuals." 

Eobasileus: rfioc,, dawn; (ia6i\f v:, king — 'Eocene king,' from its large size, 
second only to that of Loxolophodon cornutus. 
Eocardia Ameghino, 1887. Glires, Eocardida?. 

Observ. Gen. sobre Mamff. Estinguidos Hamad os Toxodontes, 65-66, May, 1887. 

Type: Eocardia montana Ameghino, from the Oligocene (?) of the upper Rio 
Santa Cruz, southern Patagonia. 

Extinct. Based on a single upper molar. 

Eocardia: tyftJS, dawn; KapSicc, heart — in allusion to the prisms of the upper 

molars: " Muelas superiores compuestas de dos prismas triangulares . . . sepa- 

rados por un surco profundo en el lado esterno, y otro poco marcado en el 

interne " (Ameghino.) 

Eochalicotherium Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Isotemnidre. 

Bol. Acad. Xac. Cien., Cordoba, XVI, 417-418, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 71-72). 

Species, 4: Eochalicotherium cretaceum Ameghino, E. crassidens Ameghino, E. robus- 
tiim Ameghino, and E. minutum Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Eochalicotherium: rfdoi, dawn; -{- Chalicotherium — i. e., a primitive Chalicotherium. 
Eoctodon Ameghino, 1902. < Hires, Octodontida?. 

Bol. Acad. Xac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 115, May, L902 (sep. p. 47). 

Type: Eoctodon securiclatus Ameghino, from the Colpodon beds of Patagonia. 

Extinct, 

Eoctodon: fjchc,, da,wn;-\-Octodon — i. e., an Eocene Odtodon. 
Eodasypus Ameghino, 1894. Edentata, Dasypodidse. 

Enum. Syn. Mamm. Foss. Form. Eocenes de Patagonie, 173, Feb., 1894. 

Species: Praeuphractus nanus Ameghino, and /'. limus Ameghino, from the Eocene 
of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Eodasypus: 77a??, dawn; 4- Dasypus — i. e., an Eocene Dasypus. 
Eodidelphys Ameghino, 1891. Marsupialia, Microbiotheridse. 

Nuevos Restos Mamff. Fds. Patagonia Austral, 24, Aug., 1891; Revista Argen- 
tina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5a, 310, Oct. 1, 1891. 

Species: Eodidelphys fortis Ameghino, and E. fa inula Ameghino, from the Lower 
Eocene of southern Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Eodidelphys: r/cbg, dawn; -f- Didelphys — i. e., an Eocene Didelphys. 
Eodiprotodon Ameghino, 1890. Marsupialia, ? 

Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XI, 185, 186, July-Sept., 1890. 

Type not mentioned. Name provisionally proposed for a hypothetical genus, 
the supposed ancestor of Tritomodon and Phascolomys. 

Eodiprotodon: tfebs, dawn; 4- Diprotodon — i. e., a primitive Diprotodon. 
Eohegetotherium Ameghino, 1901. Ungulate, Typotheria, Hegetotherida?. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, XVI, 370, July, 1901 (sep. p. 24). 

Type: Eohegetoiherium priscum Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Eohegetotherium: ?/«?, dawn; + Hegetotherium — i. e., a primitive Hegetotherium. 



EOHIPPUS EOMORPHIPPUS. 263 

Eohippus Marsh, 1876. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XII, 401-402, Nov., 1876; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. 

N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv. 608, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species: Eohippus vaZidus Marsh (type), from the lowest Eocene Coryphodon beds 

of New Mexico; and E. pernix Marsh, from the Coryphodon beds of Wyoming. 
Extinct. 
Eohippus: ?/&>?, dawn; 'iititoc,, horse — i. e., an Eocene horse. 

Eohyrax Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Hyracoidea, Archseohyracidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 363, July, 1901 (sep. p. 17). 
Species: Eohyrax rusticus Ameghino, and E. strangulatus Ameghino, from the 

' Cretaceous ' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Eohyrax: )/«?, dawn; 4- Hyrax — i. e., an Eocene Hyrax: "cegenre . . . c' est la 

souche des Archaeohyracides." (Ameghino.) 

Eohyus Marsh 1894. Ungulata, Condylarthra, Phenacodontidse. 

[Am. Journ. Sci., 3d ser., XIV, 362, Nov., 1877 (nomen nudum); Proc. Am. 

Assoc. Adv. Sci., XXVI (for Aug., 1877), 240, 1878 (sep. p. 36— nomen nudum]. 
Am. Journ. Sci., 3d ser., XLVIII, 259-260, fig. 1, Sept., 1894; Matthew, Bull. 

Am. Mus., Xat. Hist., N. Y., XII, 32, 1899. 
Type: Eohyus distans Marsh (1894), from the Eocene (Coryphodon beds) of New 

Mexico. 
Extinct. Based on a last upper molar. 
Eohyus: r/cwj, dawn; v$, voj, hog — i. e., an Eocene hog. 

Eolicaphrium Ameghino, 1902. Ungulata, Litopterna, Proterotheriidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, XVII, 13, May, 1902 (sep. p. 11). 
Type: Eolicaphrium primarium Ameghino, from the upper Notostylops beds of 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Eolicaphrium: r/do<;, dawn; 4- Licaphrium — i. e. , an Eocene Licaphrium. 

Eomannodon Ameghino, 1902. Allotheria,Plagiaulacida3 (Neoplagiaulacidse). 

[Anal. Soc. Cien. Argentina, LI, 77, Mar.-Apr., 1901 — nomen nudum]; 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 119, May, 1902 (sep. p. 51). 
Type: Eomannodon multitubercidatus Ameghino, from the Eocene (Patagonian 

beds) of Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on the posterior part of the right mandible. 
Eomannodon: rjcoc,, dawn; 4- Mannodon — i. e., an Eocene Mannodon. 

Eomeryx Marsh, 1894. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agriochceridse. 

[Am. Journ. Sci., 3d ser., XIV, 364, 365, Nov., 1877 (nomen nudem); Proc. 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci., XXVI (for Aug., 1.877), 242, 243, 1878 (nomen nudum)]. 
Am. Journ Sci., 3d ser., XLVIII, 266-267, tig. 18, Sept., 1894. 
Type: Agriochosrus pumilus Marsh (1875), from the Eocene of the Uinta Basin, 

Utah. 
Extinct. 
Eomeryx: yobs, dawn; ju?}pv%, a ruminant — i. e., an Eocene ruminant. 

Eomorphippus Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Litopterna, Notohippidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac, Cien., Cordoba, XVI, 373-374, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 27-28). 
Species: Eomorphippus obscurus Ameghino, and E. rutilalus Ameghino, from the 

' Cretaceous ' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Eomorphippus: r/<&>$, dawn; + Morphippus — i. e., a primitive Morphippus. 



264 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Eomys ('Pomel?') Schlosser, 1884. Glires, Muridee, Cricetinse? 

Die Nager Europ. Tertiiirs, in Palaeontographiea, XXXI (sep. pp. 84-85), Taf. 

vin, figs. 17, 24, 32, 1884. 
Type: Eomys zitteli Sehlosser, from the Phosphorites of Mouillac, Dept. Tarn et 

Garonne, France. (Eomys Sehlosser = Omegodus Pomel, 1854?) 
Extinct. 

Eomys: ??£»?, dawn; juvs, mouse — i. e., an Eocene mouse. 
Eonycteris Dobson, 1873. Chiroptera, Pteropodidae. 

Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, XLII, pt. n, 204, pi. 14, fig. 10, 1873; Mon. Asiatic 

Chiroptera, 32, 1876; Cat. Chiroptera Brit. Mus., 94-95, 1878. 
Type: Macroglossus spelieus Dobson, from Farm Caves near Moulmein, Burma. 
Eonycteris: r/cb<;, dawn, the East; vvKtepU, bat — from its habitat in the far East. 
Eopachyrucos Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Typotheria, Hegetotheridae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, XVI, 370-371, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 24-25). 
Type: Eopachyrucos pliciferus Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Eopachyrucos : r/co^, dawn; + Pachyrucos — i. e., a primitive Pachyrucos : " e'est la 

souche des Propacliyrucos, Pachyrucos," etc. (Ameghino). 
Eopithecus Owen, I860.* Primates, Cercopithecidae. 

Palaeontology, 341, 1860; ibid., 2d ed., 374, 1861 (nomen nudum); Gaudry, 

Anim. Foss. et Geol. l'Attique sig. 44, p. 347 footnote, 1866 [Macacus( Eopithecus) 

eocsenus~\; Gore, Glossary Foss. Mamm., 20-21, 1874. 
Type (species not mentioned, but evidently Macacus eocsenus Owen): From the 

Eocene sand near Woodbridge, Suffolk, England. 
Extinct. 

Eopithecus: r/(b<;, dawn, iti^rjKoc,, ape — i. e., an Eocene ape. 
Eosaccomys Palmer, 1903. Glires, Muridse, Murime. 

Science, new ser., XVII, 873, May 29, 1903. 
New name for Saccosiomus Peters, 1846, which is preoccupied by Saccostoma Fitz- 

inger, 1843, a genus of Reptilia. 
Eosaccomys: tfobs, dawn, eastern; 6&kko$, sac; juvs, mouse — i. e., an eastern, or 

Old World pouched rat. 
Eosciurus (subgenus of Sciurus) Trouessart, 1880. Glires, Sciuridae. 

Le Naturaliste, II, No. 37, p. 291, Oct. 1, 1880; No. 40, p. 315, Nov. 15, 1880; Cat. 

Mamm. in Bull. Soc. d'Etudes Sci. d' Angers, X, l er fasc, 67-69, 1880; Bull. 

U. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. Terr., VI, No. 2, p. 304, Sept. 19, 1881; Thomas, 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1897, 933 (type mentioned). 
JEosciurus Elera, Cat. Sist. Fauna Filipinas, I, 20, 1895. 
Species, 5: Sciurus bicolor Sparrmann (type), >S'. giganteus MacClelland, S. indicus 

Erxleben, S. maximus Gmelin, and 8. macrurus Pennant — from Asia and 

Malaysia. 
Eosciurus: tjgoc,, dawn, the East; + Sciurus — from its habitat in the far East. 
Eosiren Andrews, 1902. Sirenia, Halitheriidse. 

Geol. Mag., London, Dec. IV, vol. IX, No. VII, 293-295, figs. 1-3, July, 1902. 
Type: Eosiren libyca, Andrews, from the Eocene of the Province of Fayum, Egypt. 
Extinct. 

Based on a skull. 

Eosiren: r)co$, dawn; dstpi/v, siren, sirenian — i. e., an Eocene sirenian. 
Eosteiromys Ameghino, 1902. Glires, Erethizontidae. 

[Anal. Soc. Cien. Argentina, LI, 77, Mar.-Apr., 1901 — nomen nudum.] 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, XVII, 110-111, May, 1902 (sep. pp. 42-43). 

* Quoted as 1846 by Trouessart (Cat. Mamm., new ed., 770, 1898) and C. O. Water- 
house (Index Zool. 125, 1902), but this date is evidently incorrect. 



EOSTEIROMYS EOXERUS. 265 

Eosteiromys — Continued. 

Type: Eosteiromys homogenidens Ameghino, from the Eocene (Patagonian beds) 
of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Eosteiromys: rf&c,, dawn; -f- Steiromys — i. e., an Eocene Steiromys. 
Eostylops Ameghino, 1901. Tillodontia, Pantostylopidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, XVI, 424, July, 1901 (sep. p. 78). 

Species: Eostylops diversidens Ameghino, and E. ol>/i(juutiix Ameghino, from the 
' Cretaceous ' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Eostylops: f/<h<;, dawn; tfrOAof, pillar; orp, aspect. 

Eosyndactylus Ameghino, 1890. Marsupialia, ? 

Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XI, 185-186, July-Sept,, 1890. 
Type not mentioned. Name provisionally proposed for a hypothetical genus 

supposed to have been the primitive ancestor of the polyprotodont marsupials. 

"Agregare solo, que no dudo de la existencia de los tipos teoricos Tritomodon, 

Eodiprotodon y Eosyndactylus, porque sin ellos no hay explicacion del paren- 

teseo indudableque liga a todos los diprotodontes " (1. c, pp. 189-190). 
Eosyndactylus: r/dji, dawn; dvv, together; 8a.Krvlo$, finger. 
Eothenomys (subgenus of Microtus) Miller 1896. Glires, Muridse, Microtinse. 
N. Am. Fauna, No. 12, pp. 9, 45-47, fig. 22, pi. n, fig. 11, July 23, 1896. 
Type: Arvicola melanogaster Milne-Edwards, from Moupin and western Sechueii, 

Tibet. 
Eothenomys rjooc,, dawn, the East; -Oev, from; jttvi, mouse — in allusion to its 

habitat in the far East. 
Eotherium Leidy, 1853. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. for 1852-53, No. X, 392, 1853; Journ. Acad. Nat. 

Sci. Phila., VII, 390, 1869. 
Type: Eotherium americanum Leidy, from the bad lands (Oligocene) of Nebraska. 
Extinct. Based on "numerous small fragments of bones and teeth, and also 

several entire superior molars." 
Eotherium: ffooz, dawn; (iT/piov, wild beast — i. e., a primitive animal. 
Eotherium Owen, 1875. Sirenia, Halitheriidse. 

Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc. London, XXXI, pt. 1, pp. 100-105, pi. in, figs. 1-4, 

Feb. 1, 1875. 
Type: Eotherium segyptiacum Owen, from the Nummulitic Eocene of the Mokat- 

tam cliffs, south of Cairo, Egypt. 
Name preoccupied by Eotherium Leidy, 1853, a genus of Ungulata. Replaced 

by Eotheroides Palmer, 1899. 
Extinct. Based on "part of the cranium, with a cast of its interior representing 

the brain." 
Eotherium: rjdos, dawn; Qr/piov, wild beast — i. e., an Eocene animal. 
Eotheroides Palmer, 1899. Sirenia, Halitheriidse. 

Science, new ser., X, No. 249, p. 494, Oct. 6, 1899. 
New name for Eotherium Owen, 1875, which is preoccupied by Eotherium Leidy, 

1853, a genus of Ungulata. 
Extinct. 

Eotheroides: Eotherium: si8o$, form — i. e. resembling Eotherium. 
Eotomys (see Evotomys). Glires, Muridse, Microtinse. 

Eoxerus (subgenus of Xerus) Forsyth-Ma.tor, 1893. Glires, Sciuridse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, June 1, 1893, 189, pi. vm, figs. 5-6, 11-12, 16-18; pi. 

ix, figs. 5-6, 11-12, 16-18; Trouessart, Cat. Mamm. Viv. et Foss., new ed., 

fasc. ii, 408-409, 1897; Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1897, 933 (raised to 

generic rank and type fixed). 



266 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Eoxerus — Continued. 

Species, 6: Xerus (Rhinosciurus) laticaudatus Miiller & Schlegel (type), from 
Borneo; A', berdmorei Blyth, from Indo-China; A', tristriatus Charlesworth, 
from India; X. palmarum (Linmeus), from India; A'. i)isignis (Desmarest), 
from Malacca; and A', hosei Thomas, from Borneo. 

Eoxerus: ?/g3j, dawn, the East; + Xerus — in allusion to its habitat. 
Eozapus (subgenus of Zapus) Preble, 1899. Glires, Zapodidse. 

N. Am. Fauna, No. 15, pp. 13, 37, pi. i, fig. 2, figs. 3-4 in text, Aug. 8, 1899. 

Type: Zapus setchuanus Pousargues, from Ta-tsien-lou, Szechuen, China. 

Eozapus: i)cb~, dawn, the East; -\- Zapus — in allusion to its habitat in the far East. 

Epanorthus Ameghino, 1889. Marsupialia, Epanorthida?. 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamff. F6sil. Repub. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

C6rdoba, VI, 2^1-275, pi. i, figs. 10-16, 1889. 
New name for Palseoth ntes { Moreno ) Ameghino, 1887. "Este nombre es imposi- 

ble, debiendose escribir Palseoteuthis, pero desgraciadamente ya ha sido em- 

pleado con anticipacion por D'< >rbigny para distinguir un genero de moluscos." 
Extinct. 
Epanorthus: knavopboa), to correct, to amend — possibly in allusion to the fact 

that this name is a substitute or correction for Palseothentes. 

Epanthropos Cope, 1879. Primates, Hominidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Nov. 4, 1879, 194. 

Provisional name proposed for a genus of man having the number of teeth 
reduced to 28: If, C T , PiiC, M|, if the character becomes constant at some 
future day. "The absence of one or both pairs of the third molars is still 
more common [than the absence of the external superior incisors noted in 32 
families in Philadelphia]." 

Epanthropos: eiti, near; ai'QpGonos, man. 
Epiblema Ameghino, 1886. Glires, Chinchillidai. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, IX, 44-45, 1886. 

Type: Epiblema horridula Ameghino, from the Tertiary of Parana, Argentina. 

Name preoccupied by Epiblema Hiibner, 1816, a genus of Lepidoptera. Replaced 
by Xioepiblema Ameghino, 1889. 

Extinct. Based on the last upper molar of the right jaw. 

Epiblema: eni/JAr/pa, cover, patch — in allusion to the enamel on the last upper 
molar. "Muelas superiores con una hoja de esmalte linica replegada sobre si 
misma y sin discontinuidad de un extremo a otro de la muela, imitando los 
repliegues la forma de laminas transversales. " (Ameghino.) 

Epichriacus Scott, 1892. Creodonta, Oxyclamidai. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Nov. 15, 1892, 296. 
Type: Chriacus schlosserianus Cope, from the Eocene of New Mexico. 
Extinct. 

Epichriacus: hrti, near; + Chriacus — from the resemblance of the upper molars 
to those of Chriacus. 

Epicyon (subgenus of Canis) Leidy, 1858. Fene, Canidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1858, 21-22; Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 2d ser., 
VII, 69, 1869 (raised to generic rank ). 

Type: Canis ( Epicyon) haydeni Leidy, from the Miocene of the valley of the Nio- 
brara River, Nebraska. 

Extinct. Based on "the sectorial molar, the two preceding premolars, and the 
sockets for the tubercular molars." 

Epicyon: hiti, near; kvgov, dog. 



EPIEURYCEROS EPITHERIUM. 267 

Epieuryceros Ameghino, 1889. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamff. Fusil. Repul). Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

C6rdoba, VI, 613-614, pi. xxxvm, fig. 1, 1889. 
Type: Epieuryceros truncus Ameghino, from the Pliocene (Paoipean formation) 

" en los trabajos del puerto de La Plata, en la Ensenada," Argentina. 
Extinct. " Conocido por un cuerno casi entero." 

Epicuri/ceros: hni, upon, near; evpvs, broad; Kspas, horn — in allusion to the 
shape of the horns. "Cuernos cortos y anchos, formados por una lamina osea 
en forma de abanico, que se enancha immediamente encina de la corona, para 
terminal- en un borde delgado del que salen cuatro 6 cinco puntas, poco mar- 
cadas. ' ' ( A meghino. ) 
Epihippus Marsh, 1877. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidre. 

Proe. Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci., 26th meeting (sep. p. 236 footnote), Aug., 1877; Pop. 
Sci. Month., XII, 678 footnote, Apr., 1878; Am. Journ. Sci , 3d ser., XLIII, 
No. 256, p. 353, Apr., 1892; Osborx & Scott, Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XXIV, 
No. 126, p. 257, Sept, 2, 1887; Osborx, Trans. Am. Philos. Soc, new ser., XVI, 
pt, in, 529-530, pi. xi, figs. 3-5, Aug. 20, 1889. 
No species is given in the original reference; Scott & Osborn (loc. cit.) give two 
species from' the Uinta formation, Utah, Epihippus uint.ensu Marsh, and E. 
gracilis Marsh, referring the first to a separate of Marsh's paper from the Proc. 
Am. Assoc, p. 24. [The species has not been found in the copy of the sepa- 
rate examined.] 
"Epihippus might by some be considered to be preoccupied by Ephippus [Cuvier, 
1829], a genus of fishes; but in my opinion all the names should be retained 
as they are (if there is no other objection), on the assumption that more con- 
fusion would result from sacrifice of priority than of classical excellence." 
(Gill, Proc. Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci., XLV, address section F, p. 20, 1896.) 
Extinct. 

Epihippus: zni, upon, near; 'iitno<;, horse. 
Epimys (subgenus of Mus) Trocessart, 1881. Glires, Murid;?, Murinae. 

Cat. Mamm. Viv. et Foss., Rodentia, in Bull. Soc. d' Etudes Sci. d' Angers, X, 2 e 

fasc, 117-122, 1881. 
Species, 58: Old World rats, including Mus caraco Pallas, M. decumanus Pallas, 

M. rattus Linnaeus, etc. , most of which have spiny pelage. 
Epimys: em, near; /.ivg, mouse. 
Epiodon Rafinesque, 1814. Cete, Physeteridse. 

Precis des Decouvertes et Travaux Somiologiques entre 1800 et 1814, p. 13, 1814.; 
Analyse de la Nature, 60, 1815; Desmarest, Nouv. Diet, Hist. Nat,, 2d ed., IX, 
177-178, 1817; Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1865, 528; Cat, Seals & Whales 
Brit, Mus., 340-342, 1866; Mixa Palumbo, Cat. Mamm. della Sicilia, in Ann. 
Agr. Sic, 2 a ser., XII, 118-119, 1868. 
Type: Epiodon urganantus Rafinesque, from the Mediterranean Sea. 
Epiodon: kiti, upon; oSchv = dSovs, tooth. 
Epitherium Ameghino, 1888. Ungulata, Litopterna, Proterotheriidse. 

"Listade las Especies de Mamiferos Fosilesdel Miocene Superior de Monte Her- 
moso, [p.] 15, Junio de 1888," (fide Ameghino, Cont, Conocimiento Mamff. 
Fusil. Repub. Argentina, in Act, Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 569-572, pi. 
xxxiv, figs. 1-10, 14, 17, 1889). 
Type: Epitherium latemarium Ameghino, from the upper Miocene of Monte Her- 
moso, about 40 miles east of Bahia Blanca, province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct, Based on part of a right upper jaw with two molars, a lower molar, 

and an incomplete hind foot. 
Epitherium: eni, upon, i. e., more recent: 0?/pior, wild beast. 



2H8 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Epomophorus Bennett, 1836. Chiroptera, Pteropodidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1835, No. xxxiv, 149, Feb. 12, 1836 (provisionally 

proposed); Trans. Zool. Soc. London, II, for 1835-38, pp. 31-38, pis. 6, 7, 1841; 

Matschie, Fledermause Berliner Mus. f. Naturkunde, Lief, i, 43-59, 1899. 
Type: Pteropus cpoinophorus Bennett ( = P. macrocephalus Ogilby), from the Gam- 
bia River, West Africa. (The name of the type is changed to P. tvhitei in Trans. 

Zool. Soc. London, II, 37-38, 1841.) 
Epomophorus: eiti, upon; co/nos, shoulder; <popos, bearing — in allusion to the 

epaulet-like tufts of yellowish-white hairs which project from the glandular 

pouches near the shoulders of the males. 
Epomops Gray, 1866. Chiroptera, Pteropodidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 65. 
Type: Epomophmus franqueti Tomes, from Gaboon, West Africa. (Proc. Zool. 

Soc. London, 1860, 55.) 
Epomops: Probably an abbreviation of Epomophorus and oip, aspect — from its 

resemblance to that genus. 
Eporeodon Marsh, 1875. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agriochceridae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IX, 249-250, Mar., 1875. 
Type: Oreodon occidentcdis Marsh, from the John Day Miocene of Oregon. 
Extinct. 

Eporeodon: hiti, upon, near; + Oreodon. 
Eptesicus Rafinesque, 1820. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae. 

Annals of Nature, Lexington, Kentucky, I, 2-3, 1820; Miller, N. Am. Fauna, 

No. 13, pp. 13-14, 95, Oct. 16, 1897 (type fixed). 
Species: Eptesicus melanops (= VespertUio fuscus Beauvois, type), from Kentucky; 

and V. mydas, from the Western States (Ohio Valley). 
Eptesicus: Eitnp' (aor. of 7i£ro/.iai) to fly; ozVos, house. "The name means 

house-flyer. ' ' ( Rafinesque. ) 
Equus Linn.eus, 1758. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidae. 

Systema Naturae, 10th ed., I, 73-74, 1758; 12th ed., I, 100-101, 1766; Brisson, 

Regnum Animale m Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 12, 69-72, 1762; W. L. Sclater, 

Mamm. S. Africa," I, 282-297, figs. 73-74, 1900 (type fixed). 
Species: Equus cabaUus Linnaeus (type), from Eurasia; E. asinus Linnaeus, from 

Asia; and E. zebra Linnaeus, from Africa. 
Equus: Lat., horse. 
Eraria (see Eirara). Ferae, Mustelidae. 

Eremiomys Poliakoff, 1881. Glires, Muridae, Microtinae. 

Annexe au tome XXXIX, Mem. Acad. St. Petersb., No. 2, pp. 35, 38, figs. 1-2 in 

text, 1881* (fide Lataste, Ann. Mus. Civ. Storia Nat. Genova, XX, 265 

Mar., 1884); Miller, N. Am. Fauna, No. 12, pp. 17-18, 1896 (type fixed). 
Eremomys Heude, Mem. Hist. Nat. Empire Chinois, IV, pt. n, 61, 1898. 
Species : Oeorychus luteus Eversmann, from the vicinity of the Aral Sea ; and 

Mus lagurus Pallas (type), from Siberia (see Lagurus Gloger, 1841). 
Eremiomys: epyf/aia, desert; juv$, mouse — from the animal's habitat. 
Ereptodon Leidy, 1853. Edentata, Megalonychidae? 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., for 1852-53, No. VII, 241, 1853. 
Type: Ereptodon priscus Leidy, from the Pleistocene in the vicinity of Natchez, 

Mississippi. 
Extinct. Based on a molar. 
Ereptodon: kpenvoo, to crown; 68cbv = d8ovs, tooth. 

* All in Russian except names of species and some citations. The title of the paper 
is: CncTeMaTii'iecKiii o03opi ncueBoia, bo.uiiuhxoi hi. Cut'nipii; 8°, pp. 92, with figs, of molar 
teeth. 



ERETHIZON ERINACEUS. 269 

Erethizon F. Cuviek, 1822. Glires, Erethizontidse. 

Mem. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, IX, 425-426, 432-133, pi. 20ter., figs. 1, 2, 8, 1822.* 
Eretizon Cuvier, Dents Mainm., 178-179, 256, pi. 68, 1825. 
Erethison Cuvier, Diet. Sci. Nat., LIX, 484, 1829. 
Erithizon Burnett, Quart. Journ. Sci., Lit. and Art, XXVIII, for Oct. -Dec., 1829, 

350, 1830. 
Eretison McMurtrie, Cuvier's Animal Kingdom, I, 154, 1831; abridged ed., 90, 

1834. 
Erythizon Alston, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1876, 94. 
Type: Hystrix dorsaia Linnaeus, from eastern Canada. 
Erethizon: epediZoo, to excite, to irritate — in allusion to the spines. 
Ericius (subgenus of Erinaceus) Sundevall, 1842. Insectivora, Erinaceidae. 

Kongl. Svenska Vetensk. Acad. Handlingar, Stockholm (for ar 1841), 223, 

230-237, 1842. 
Species, 8: Erinaceus auriius Pallas, from southeastern Russia and southern Siberia; 

E. platyoiis Sundevall, and E. segypiius Geoffroy, from Egypt; E. hypomelas 

Brandt, from Turkestan; E. collaris Gray & Hardwicke, E. grayi Bennett, E. 

spatangus Bennett, from India; and 'Erinaceus e Dauuria,' of Pallas. 
Name preoccupied by Ericius Tilesius, 1813, a genus of Pisces. 
Ericius: Lat., hedgehog. 

Ericius Giebel, 1871. Insectivora, Tenrecidae. 

Zeitschr. Gesammt. Naturwiss. Halle, neue Folge, III, 57-60, Taf. n, figs. 

1-3, 1871. 
Ericus Bergroth, in C. O. Waterhouse's Index Zool., 129, 1902. 
Type: Centetes semispinosus Cuvier, from Madagascar. 
Name preoccupied by Ericius Tilesius, 1813, a genus of Pisces; and by Ericius 

Sundevall, 1842, a subgenus of Erinaceida\ (See Hemicentetes Mivart, 1871.) 

Ericulus I. Geoffroy, 1837. Insectivora, Tenrecidae. 

Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 2 e ser., VIII, 60, July, 1837; Comptes Rendus, Paris, V, 
374, 1837; Mag. de Zool., 1839, 1, 20-34, pis. 1-4. 

HericuJus Gloger, Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch, I, pp. xxix, 78, 1841. 

Type not mentioned in the original description. In 1839 two species from Mad- 
agascar, Ericulus nigrescens Geoffroy ('espece bien connue') and E. spinosus 
(— Centenes spinosus — 'espece douteuse' ), were placed in the genus. 

Ericulus: Dim. of ericius, hedgehog — from the close-set spines. 

Erignathus Gill, 1866. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Phocidae. 

Proc. Essex Inst., V (Communications), pp. 5, 9, July, 1866. 

Type Phoca barbata Erxleben, from the North Atlantic, along the coasts of Scot- 
land, southern Greenland, and Iceland. 

Erignathus: spi-, intensive prefix; y vdQoz, jaw — so called on account of the 
depth of the jaws. (Gill, Proc. Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci., XLV, sep. p. xix, 1896. ) 

Erinaceus Linn.eus, 1758. Insectivora, Erinaceidae. 

Systema Naturae, 10th ed., I, 52, 1758; 12th ed., I, 75, 1766; Brisson, Regnum 

Animate in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 13, 128-131, 1762. 
Herinaceus Mina Palumbo, Cat Mamm. Sicilia in Ann. Agr. Sic, 2 a ser., XII, 37, 

1868. 
Type: Erinaceus europtcus Linnaeus, from Europe. 
Erinaceus: Lat., hedgehog. 

*In the first reference the name is given as a subgenus, but used as a genus. 
It seems to be only a French name, except on p. 432, where it is abbreviated ( 'E. 
dorsatum') . 



270 INDEX GENEEUM MAMMALIUM, 

Eriodes I. Geoffroy, 1829. Primates, Cebidse. 

Diet. Class. Hist. Nat.. XV, 143-145,* May, 1829; Mem. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, 

XVII, for 1S28, 138-162, pi. 22. figs. 4, 5, 1829: Lesson, Compl. CEuvres Buffon, 

Mamm., IV, 197-205. 1834. 
Species. 3: Eriodes hemidactylus Geoffrey, E. tubifer Geoffroy. and Atelesaraeh- 

noides Geoffroy, from Brazil. 
Eriodes: £picb8i>z, woolly (from epior, wool: efdo:, iovm). 
Eriomys Lichtex>teix. 1829. Glires, Chinchillidse. 

Darstelluiig neuer oder wenig bekannt. Saugeth., Heft VI, Taf. xxvm (2 p. 

text G 1829. 
Type: Eriomys chinchilla Liehtenstein. from South America. Exact locality of 

specimen unknown, but probably Chile, the species being based on skins with- 
out skulls received from the ports of Cartagena, Colombia, and La Guaira, 

Venezuela. 
Eriomys: epiov, wool; uvs, mouse. 
Erioryzomys (subgenus of Oryzomys) Bax<;s, 1900. Glires, Mwidse, Cricetinse. 
Proc. Xew England Zool. Club, I. 96-97, pi. i. tig. 3, Feb. 23. 1900. 
Erioryzomus Lvdekkek. Zool. Record for 1900, XXXVII. Mamm., 30, 1901; 

C. O. Waterhouse, Index Zool., 129, 1902. 
Type: Oryzomys monochrome** Bangs, from Paramo de Macotama, Sierra Nevada 

de Santa Marta. Colombia (alt. 11,000 ft.). 
Erioryzomys: epiov, wool; - Oryzomys. 
Erithizon (see Erethizon). Glires. Erethizontidse. 

Ernestohaeckelia Ameghixo. 1901. Ingulata, Condylarthra, Meniscotheriidse. 
Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 382. July, 1901 (sep. p. 36). 
Species: Ernestohaech Ho aeuleaia Ameghino, and E. acutidens Ameghino, from the 

'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Ernestohaeckelia: In honor of Ernst Haeckel, 1834-, professor of zoology in 

the Zooloirisches Institut, Jena. 
Ernestokokenia Amb.iiino, 1901. Ungulata, Condylarthra, Phenacodontidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI. 380, July. 1901 (sep. p. 34). 
Species: Ernestokokenia nitida Ameghino, and E. marginata Ameghino, from the 

'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Ernestokokenia: In honor of Ernst Eoken, professor of geology, Tubingen. 

Erpetocetus (see Herpetocetus). Cete, Balsenidse. 

Erythizon (see Erethizon). Glires. Hystricidae. 

Erythrocebus | sul >_ r - of ( 'ercopithecus ) Tr> hjessabt, 1897. Primates, Cercopithecida?. 

Cat. Mamm. Viv. et boss., newed., I, 19-20. 1897. 

Species, 4: Simia patas Schreber, from West Africa: Cercopithecus pyrrhonotus 

Hemprich & Ehrenberg, 0. ochraceus Peters, and C. rufo-viridis I. Geoffroy, 

from East Africa. Based on Sclater's "Section C. CercopUheci erythronoti' i Proc. 

Zool. Soc. London, 1893, 249-250,. 
Eryihrocebus: kpvBpos, red; Kff/3os, a long-tailed monkey. 
Erythrosciurus (subgenus of Sciurus) Gray, 1867. Glires, Sciuridpe. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist.. 3d ser., XX, 285, Oct., 1867; Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. 

London, 1897, 933 (type fixed). 
Species: Sciurus ferrugineus F. Cuvier (type), from Cambodia; and S. siamensis 

Gray, from Siam. 
Erythrosciurus: epvQpoz, red; — Sciurus. 

*"Ces details sont extraits d'un Memoire encore inedit qui doit paraitre dans les 
Memoires du Museum et qui est actuellement sous presse" (p. 143, footnote). 



ESCHATIUS EUARCTOS. 271 

Eschatius Cope, 1884. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Camelidae. 

Pakeont. Bull.. No. 39, p. 18, 1884; Proc. Am. Philos. Boc., XXII, pt. i, for Jan., 
35, 18-21, Oct. 21, 1884; Hay. Cat. Fobs. Vert. X. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. 
Burv., 680, 1902 (type fixed). 

Eschatinus W. L. Sclateb, Zool. Record for 1885, XXII, Mamm., 43, 1886. 

Species: Eschatius conidens Cope (type), and E. longirostris Cope, from the Plio- 
cene of Tequixquiac. on the northern edge of the Valley of Mexico. 

Extinct. 

Eschatius: kdxdnoz, i'tf^orrof. farthest, extreme — in allusion to " the reduction 
of the fourth superior premolar to a simple cone, in place of the usual double 
crescent characteristic of the Ruminantia generally. This is the greatest 
known reduction of the premolar series in the Ruminatia." (Cope.) 

Eschrichtius (subgenus of Megaptera) Gray, 1864. Cete, Balaenidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Xat. Hist., 3d ser., XIV, 350, Nov., 1864; Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 

1865, 40-43, 1 fig. in text i raised to generic rank I. 
Species: Balaenoptera robusta Lilljeborg (type), from the Northern Seas; and 

Megaptera novaezealandiae Gray, from New Zealand. 
Eschrichtius: In honor of Daniel Fredrik Eschricht, 1798-1863, author of several 

important papers on cetaceans. 

Essonodontherium Ameghino, 1884. Edentata, Megatheriida?. 

Filogem'a, 230, 1884; Cont. Conocimiento Mami'f. Fosil. Repiib. Argentina, in Act. 

Acad. Nac.Cien., Cordoba, VI. 672-673, 1889. 
Type: Miegath rium gt rvaisi Gervaie & Ameghino, from the Rio Salado, Argentina. 
Extinct Based on a complete skull. 
Essonodontherium: f}66oov, less, weaker; 66cbv, tooth: Bifpiov, wild beast. 

Essoprion Ameghixo, 1891. Marsupialia, Epanorthidse. 

Nuevoa Restos Mami'f. Fos. Patagonia Austral, 20-21, Aug., 1891; Revista Argen- 
tina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5 a , 306-307, Oct. 1, 1891. 

Species: Essoprion coruscus Ameghino, and E. consumptus Ameghino, from the 
Lower Eocene of southern Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Essoprion: ffddoov, less, weaker: TCpieov, saw. 

Esthonyx Cope, 1874. Tillodontia, Esthonychidae. 

Rept. Vert. Fossils Xew Mexico, 6-7, Nov. 28, 1874; Ann. Kept. Chief of Engi- 
neers I". S. A.. App. FF 3, for 1874, 594-596. 

Type: Esthonyx bisulcaius Cope, from the Eocene of Xew Mexico. 

Extinct. 

Esthonyx: k6'ji.cj, to clothe; owl, claw, nail — in allusion to the lower incisors 
with a long, narrow covering of enamel on the external face, ''which may be 
compared with the extremities of the slender fingers of some monkeys with 
narrow nails. (Cope, 1. c. 594.) 

Eteocles Gray, 1821. Insectivora, Tenrecidse. 

London Med. Repos., XV, 301, Apr. 1, 1821. 

Type: 'Erinaceus subspinosus Cuvier' (misprint for E. semispinosus Cuvier ?). 
Ett <>,■],.■;' V_r£oK\i}~, Eteocles — in Grecian mythology, son of CEdipusand Jokasta, 
and brother of Polynices. 
Euarctos (subgenus of Ursus) Gray, 1864. Fera?, Ursidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 692-694; Merriam, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., X, 78, 

Apr. 13, 1896. 
Species: Ursus americanus Pallas I type |, from eastern Xorth America: and U. ame- 

ricanus cinnamomeus Audubon & Bachman, from the northern Rocky Mts. 
Euarctos: ev, well, typical; apKros, bear. 



272 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Eubalaena Gray, 1864. Cete, Bal?enid?e. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 201-202; Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 91-98, 

figs. 6-7, 1866. 
Type: Eubalaena australis (Desmoulins), from the Cape of Good Hope. 
Eubalsena: ev, well, typical; + Balsena. 
Eubradys Leidy, 1853. Edentata, Megatheriidfe. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., for 1852-53, No. VII, 241, 1853; Ancient Fauna 

Nebraska (Smithsonian Cont. Knowledge, VI, art. vu) , 10, June, 1853. 
Enbradys Marsciiall, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 5, 1873 (misprint). 
Type: Eubradys antiquus Leidy, from the Ashley River, South Carolina. 
Extinct. Based on "a fragment of a molar tooth." 
Eubradys: ev, well, typical; fipaSvs, slow — i. e., atypical sloth. 
Eucardiodon Ameghino, 1891. Glires, Caviidse. 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 4a, 241, Aug. 1, 1891. 
New name for Oirdiodon Ameghino, 1885, which is preoccupied by Cardiodon 

Owen, 1841, a genus of Reptilia; and by Cardiodus Bravard, 1857, a genus of 

Caviidae. 
Extinct. 

Eucardiodon: ev, well, typical; + Cardiodon. 
Eucastor (subgenus of Castor) Leidy, 1858. Glires, Castoridse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila., 1858, 23; Allen, Mon. N. Am. Rodentia, 449-451, 

1877 (raised to generic, rank). 
Type: Castor (Eucastor) tortus Leidy, from the Miocene of the valley of the Nio- 
brara River, Nebraska. 
Extinct. Based on "the greater part of an upper jaw, consisting of the upper 

maxillse and interrnaxilhe containing the greater portion of the incisors, 

together with the anterior three molars of both sides." 
Eucastor: ev, well, typical; + Castor. 
Eucebus (subgenus of Cebus) Reichenbach, 1862. Primates, Cebidse. 

Vollstiind. Naturgesch. Affen, 56, pis. vi-vn, figs. — , 1862. 
Species 8, from South America: Cebus fisluhdor Reichenbach, C. macrocephalus 

Spix, C. robustus Maximilian, C. variegatus Geoffroy, C. monachus Cuvier, C. 

cucullatus Spix, C. griseus Desmarest, and C. crassipes Pucheran. 
Eucebus: ev, well, typical; + Cebus. 
Eucervaria (subgenus of Lynx) Palmer, 1903. Ferse, Felidse. 

Science, new ser., XVII, 873, May 29, 1903. 
New name for Cervaria Gray, 1867, which is preoccupied by Cervaria Walker, 

1866, a genus of Lepidoptera. 
Eucervaria: ev, well, typical; + Cervaria. 

Eucervus Gray, 1866. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidsp. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 3d ser., XVIII, No. 106, pp. 338-339, Oct., 1866. 
Species: Cervus macrotis Say, from the Canadian River, New Mexico; and Cervus 

columManus Richardson, from the Columbia River. 
Eucervus: ev, well, typical; + Cervus. 

Eucetites Ameghino, 1901. Cete, Balsenidse. 

Anal. Soc. Cien. Argentina, LI, 80, Mar.-Apr., 1901. 
Type: Eucetites jrdiensis Ameghino (nomen nudum), from the Eocene (Pata- 

gonian formation) of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Eucetites: ktjvo$, whale; with termination -ites* indicative of its fossil character. 

* Compare Ammonites, Belemnites, Ceratites, Goniatites; and in Paleobotany, Cupres- 
sites, Pinites, Taxites, TJiujites, etc. 



EUCETOTHERIUM EUCLADOCEROS. 273 

Eucetotherium (subgenus of Cetotherium) Brandt, 1873. Cete, Balsenidse. 

Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci. St, Petersb., XX, 143, 1873. 
Species, 6: Cetotherium rathkei Brandt, C. Jdinderi Brandt, 0. helmersenii Brandt, 

C. priseum Brandt, C. meyeri Brandt, and one unnamed species — all from the 

Miocene of southern Russia. 
Extinct. 

Eucetotherium: ev, well, typical; 4- Cetotherium. 
Eucetus Du Bus, 1867. Cete, Physeteridre. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Belgique, 2° ser., XXIV, 571-572, 1867. 
Type: Eucetus amblyodon Du Bus, from the Antwerp Crag, Belgium. 
Extinct, 

Eucetus: ev, well, typical; Ki)roz, whale. 
Euchaerops (see Euchcerus). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Tayassuidse. 

Euchaetomys Fitzixger, 1867. Glires, Muridse, Murinae. 

Sitzungsber Math.-Xat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, LVI, 73-74, 1867. 
Species 14, chiefly from India and the Cape of Good Hope: Mus palmarum, M. 

novarae, .V. setifer, M. perched, -V. koJc, M. hardwicHi, M. rufescens, M. ellioti, 

M.lepidus, M. vittatus, M. pumUio, M. parduleus, M. zebra and Ratlus donovani. 
Euchaetomys: ev, well; ^az'r?/, hair; //re, mouse. 
Euchcerus Leidy, 1853. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Tayassuidre. 

Trans. Am. Philos. Soc, new ser., X, art. xxm, 340-341, pis. 35-36, 37 figs. 

5-8, 17, 19, 1853; Ancient Fauna Nebr. (Smithsonian Cont. Knowledge, VI, 

art. vii ), 9, June, 1853. 
Euchaerops Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. iv, 817, 1898 (synonym — 

misprint). 
Type: Euchcerus macrops Leidy (Pleistocene), from a saltpeter cave in Kentucky. 
Extinct. Based on ' an almost perfect head.' 
Euchcerus: ev, well, typical; jofpos, hog. 
Eucholceops Ameghino, 1887. Edentata, Megalonychidse. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mami'f. Fds. Patagonia Austral, 21-22, Dec, 1887; Act. 

Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 692-695, pi. xxxix, figs. 5-9, 1889. 
Species, 3: Eucholceops ingens Ameghino, J', infernalis Ameghino, and E. adteger 

Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Eucholceops: Contraction of ev, typical; + Cholcepus; oip, aspect. The genus is 

described as possessing "una mezcla de los caracteres de los generos Cho- 

Icepus, Megatherium," etc. (Ameghino, 1. c, 1889). 
Euchoreutes W. L. Sclater, 1891. Glires, Dipodidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1890, 610-613, pi. l, 3 figs, in text, Apr. 1, 1891. 
Euchoretes Lydekker, Roy. Nat. Hist,, III, 113, 1895 (misprint). 
Type: Euchoreutes naso Sclater, from (the vicinity of Yarkand?) eastern 

Turkestan. 
Euchoreutes: ev, well; jopfiT))?, dancer — from the animal's manner of progres- 
sion by leaps. 
Eucinepeltus Ameghino, 1891. Edentata, Glyptodontida (Propakehoplophoridpe). 
Nuevos Restos Mami'f. Fos. Patagonia Austral, 40, Aug., 1891; Revista Argentina 

Hist. Nat,, I, entr. 5a, 326, Oct. 1, 1891. 
Type: Eucinepeltus petesatus Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct, 
Eucinepeltus: ev, .well; kiveoo, to move; nsAr?/, shield — i. e., an easily movable 

carapace. 
Eucladoceros (subg. of Cervus) Falconer, 1868. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Ceryidse. 
Palseont. Mem., II, 472-480, pi. 37, 1868. 

7591— No. 23—03 18 



274 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Eucladoceros — Continued. 

Eucladocerus C. 0. Waterhouse, Index Zool., 132, 1902. 

Type: Cervus {Eucladoceros) sedgwickii Falconer, from the Forest bed (Pleisto- 
cene?) of the Norfolk coast at Bacton (Gunn), south of Coal Gap, England. 
Extinct. 
Eucladoceros: ev, well; K\a8o$, shoot, branch; Kspas, horn — in allusion to the 

much branched antlers, which exhibit a greater complexity of structure than 

those of any other deer. 
Eucritus G. Fischer, 1817. Glires, Erethizontidae. 

Mem. Soc. Imp. Nat. Moscou, V, 372, 411, 1817; Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., 

Mamm., 12, 1842. 
New name for Coendou Lacepede, 1799. Type, Hystrix prehensilis Linnaeus, from 

South America. 
Eucritus: evKpiros, easy to discern <£v, w r ell; KpivEiv, to discern. 
Eucrotaphus Leidy, 1850. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Agriochoeridae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. for 1850-51, 90-92; Leidy in D. D. Owen's Rept. 

Geol. Surv. Wis., la., Minn., etc., 563-564, tab. xv, figs. 1-2, 1852. 
Encrotaphus Gore, Glossary Fossil Mamm., 20, 1874 (misprint). 
Type: Eucrotaphus jacksoni Leidy, from the Bad Lands in the vicinity of Fort 

Laramie, Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on ' the central portion only of the cranium.' 
Eucrotaphus: ev, well; Kporcxcpos, temple — from " the large relative size of the 

pars squamosa of its temporal bones." (Leidy 1. c, 564.) 
Euctenoceros (subg. of Cervus) Trouessart, 1898. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 
Cat. Mamm. Viv. Foss., new. ed., fasc. iv, 880, June, 1898. 
Type: Cervus tetraceros Boyd-Dawkius, from the Upper Pliocene of central France. 
Extinct. 
Euctenoceros: ev, well, typical; Kreic,, ktev6%, comb; Kepas, horn — in allusion 

to the tines of nearly equal length, which somewhat resemble the teeth of a 

coarse comb. 
Eucuscus (subgenus of Cuscus) Gray, 1861. Marsupialia, Phalangeridae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc, London, 1861, 315-316; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem. 

Brit. Mus., 193, 1888 (in synonymy, type fixed). 
Species: Phalangista ursina Temminck (type), from Celebes; and Cuscus brevi- 

caudatus Gray, from Cape York, North Australia. (See Ceonix Temminck, 1827. ) 
Eucuscus: ev, well, typical; + Cuscus. 
Eudelphinus Van Bexeden & Gervais, 1880. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Osteog. Cetac£s Viv. et Foss., 600-604, 1880. 
Type: Delphi n us delphis Linnaeus, from the west coast of Europe. Equals Belphis 

Gray, 1864, which is preoccupied by Belphis Wagler, 1830. 
Eudelphinus: ev, well, typical; + Delphinus. 
Eudelphis Du Bus, 1872. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. de Belgique, 2 e ser., XXXIV, No. 12, pp. 500-501, 1872. 
Type: Eudelphis utortezelensis Du Bus, from the Black Crag at 'Fortdu Vieux- 

Dieu, a Mortsel, near Antwerp, Belgium.' 
Extinct. Based on "nombreux fragments de la tete d'une espece a courte 

symphyse. " 
Eudelphis: ev, well typical; dsXcpU, dolphin. 
Euderma H. Allen, 1892. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., for 1891, 467-470, Jan. 19, 1892. 
Type: Histiotus maculatus J. A. Allen, from " Piru, western part of Ventura Co." 

(probably from Castac Creek, near Newhall, Los Angeles County ) , California. 
Euderma: ev, well; Sippa, skin. 
Eudiastatus Ameghino, 1891. Primates, Cebidae. 

Revista Argentina Hist, Nat,, I, entr. 6a, 391-392, fig. 93, Dec. 1, 1891. 
Eudiastus Lydekker, Zool. Record for 1891, XXVIII, Mamm., 22, 1892. 



EUDIASTATUS EULAGOS. 275 

Eudiastatus — Continued. 

Type: Eudiastatus lingulatus Anieghino, from the Eocene of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. " Representado por la parte anterior de la mandibula inferior con la 

sinfisis completa y una pequefla parte de la rama mandibular izquierda." 
Eudiastatus: ev, well; diddraro?, severed, separated. 
Eudolops Ameghino, 1897. Allotheria Polydolopiche. 

La Argentina al traves de las Ultimas Epocas Geologicas, 13 footnote, 1897 

(nomen nudum); Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentine, XVIII, 498-499, fig. 74, Oct. 6, 

1897. 
Type: Eudolops tetragonus Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Eulalops: ev, well; SoXoip, lurker in ambush (from 56Aos, snare, craft; otp, 

aspect), i. e., very deceptive. 
Eudorcas Fitzixger, 1869. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Sitzungsber Math.-Nat. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, LIX, Abth. i, 159, Feb., 1869; 

Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, III, pt. x, 65, Feb., 1898 (in synonymy). 
Type: Gazella laevipes Sundevall, from northeastern Africa. 
Eudorcas: ev, well, typical; SopKoa, gazelle. 
Euelephas (subgenus of Elephas) Falcoxer, 1857. Ungulata, Elephantida?. 

Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc. London, XIII, pt. 4, pp. 315, 317-318, Synopt. Table, 

Nov. 1, 1857; W. L. Sclater, Mamm. S. Africa, I, 317, 1900 (type fixed). 
New name for Elasmodon Falconer, 1846, which is preoccupied by Elasmodus 

Egerton, 1843, a genus of extinct Pisces. 
Species, 7: 1 living and 6 extinct (Miocene and Pliocene), from Eurasia and 

America. Type, Elephas planifrona Falconer & Cautley, from the Siwalik 

Hills, India. (Sclater.) 
Extinct. 

Euelephas: e v, well, typical; sXEcpas, elephant. 
Eugeranops Ameghino, 1891. Edentata, Megalonychidse. 

Revista Argentina Hist, Nat., I, entr. 6a, 397 footnote, Dec. 1, 1891. 
New name for Geronops Ameghino, 1891, which is said to be preoccupied by 

Geranopsis Lydekker, 1891, a genus of extinct birds. 
Extinct. 

Eugeranops: ev, well, typical; -j-Geroitop*. 
Euhyaena (subgenus of Hyaena) Falcoxer, 1868. Ferae, Hysenidae. 

Pakeont. Memoirs & Notes, II, 464, 1868. 
Type: Hy&na striata Zimmermann (=Canis hyaena Linnaeus), from southwestern 

Asia and northern Africa. (See Hyaena Brisson, 1762.) 
Euhyaena: ev, well, typical; ^Hysena. 
Euhyrax Gray, 1868. Ungulata, Hyracoidea, Proeaviidae. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat, Hist., 4th ser., I, 46-48, Jan., 1868. 

Type: Hyrax habessynicus Hemprich & Ehrenberg, from Ankober, Abyssinia. 
Euhyrax: ev, well, typical; -\-Hyrax. 
Euhys (subgenus of Sus) Gray, 1869. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidaa. 

Cat. Camiv., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 339, 1869; Ann. & Mag. 

Nat. Hist., 4th ser., XI, 435, June, 1873 (raised to generic rank); Hand-List 

Edentate, Thick-skin. & Ruminant Mamm. Brit, Mus., 57, 1873. 
Type: Sus barbatus S. Midler, from Borneo. Possibly an emendation of Eusus 

Gray, 1868, which is based on the same species. 
Euhys: ev, well, typical; vs, pig. 
Eulagos Gray, 1867. Glires, Leporidte. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 3d ser., XX, 222, Sept., 1867. 
Species: Lepus mediterraneus V* agner, from Sardinia; and L. judsese Gray, from 

Palestine. 
Eulagos: ev, well, typical; Xaychs, hare. 



276 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Eulamaops Ameghino, 1889. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Camelidse. 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamff. Fosil. Repub. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 
Cordoba, VI, 594-596, pi. xxxv, fig. 1, 1889. 

Eulamops Lydekker, Zool. Record for 1889, XXVI, Mamm., 44, 1890; C. 0. 
Waterhouse, Index Zool., 134, 1902. 

Type: Auchenia parallela Ameghino, from the Pampean formation of the barran- 
cas of the Rio Lujan, near Villa de Lujan, province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Extinct. "Fue fundada la especie sobre un craneo casi completo, pero en tan 
malisimo estado de conservation que solo se ha podido conservar de el una 
parte del paladar con todas las muelas menos il p. 3 izquierdo." 

Eulamaops: ev, well, typical; -{-Lama; otp, aspect — i.e., having the appearance 
of typical Lama. 
Eulemur Haeckel, 1895. Primates, Lemuridse. 

Syst. Fhylogenie Wifbelthiere, III, 600, 1895. 

Nomen nudum; apparently used for the typical lemurs. 

Eulemur: ev, well, typical; + Lemur. 
Eumeles (subgenus of Meles) Gray, 1865. Ferae, Mustelidee. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1865, 140. 

Type: Meles ankuma Temminck, from Japan. 

Eumeles: ev, well, typical; -{-Meles. 
Eumerus I. Geoffroy, 1829. Insectivora, Maeroscelididae. 

Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, XVIII [172, 'Eumere'], 470, Oct., 1829. 

Eumeres Gekvais, Diet. Univ. Hist. Nat., V, 495, 1844; Gill, Bull. U. S. Geol. & 
Geog. Surv. Terr., I, 2d ser., No. 2, p. 109, 1875 (in synonymy). 

Type: Macroscelides typus A. Smith (=Sore.r probosddeus Shaw), from South 
Africa. This name seems to have been published by mistake. The title of 
Geoffroy' s article was changed at the last moment, but the original name on 
pp. 172 and 470 was evidently overlooked. "Cette notice etait deja livree a 
l'impression lorsque j'ai appris, . . . que le genre qui en est l'objet, et que 
je croyais nouveau, vient d'etre etabli dans le Zoological Journal, par M. A. 
Smith . . . j'ai pense que cette notice pouvait encore presenter quelque 
interei, et je la publie en substituant le nom admis par M. Smith a celui que 
j'avais moi-meme adopte." (Geoffroy, 1. c, 165 footnote.) 

Name preoccupied by Eumerus Meigen, 1822, a genus of Diptera. 

En mi run; ev, well; //?/po?, thigh — in allusion to the well-developed hind legs. 
Eumetopias Gill, 1866. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Otariidae. 

Proc. Essex Inst., V, 7, 11, July, 1866; Allen, Mon. N. Am. Pinnipeds, 231-274, 
fig. 37, 1880. 

Eumetopus Marschall, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 6, 1873. 

"'Type: Otaria caMforniana Lesson= Arctocephalus monterierisis Gray,' the 
intended type being Otaria sielleri of Muller," from the shores of the North 
Pacific. (Allen, 1. c. 191.) 

Eumetopias: sv, well, typical; pExooitiocc,, having a broad forehead. 
Eumys Leidy, 1856. Glires, Muridae, Cricetime. 

Proc. Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila., 1856, 90. 

Type: Eumys elegans Leidy, from the Oligocene of the Bad Lands of 'Nebraska' 
(South Dakota?). 

Extinct. Based on "a fragment of the lower jaw containing the middle molar 
and the fangs of two others." 

Eumys: ev, well, typical; j-tvc,, mouse. 
Eumysops Ameghino, 1888. Glires, Octodontida?. 

" Lista de los Mamff. Fos. de Monte Hermoso, 5-6, June, 1888" (fide Ameghino, 
Cont. Conocimiento Mamff. Fosil. Repub. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 
Cordoba, VI, 142-145, pi. vi, figs. 11-13, 1889). 



EUMYSOPS EUPETAURUS. 277 

Eumysops — Continued. 

Species, 3: Eumysops plicaius Ameghino, E. livviplicatus Ameghino, and E. robustus 

Ameghino, from Monte Hermoso, about 40 miles east of Bahia Blanea, 

province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct. 
Eumysops: £v, well, typical; juv?, mouse; otp, aspect — having the aspect of a 

typical mouse. 
Euneomys (subgenus of Reithrodon) Coues, 1874. Glires, Muridae, Cricetinee. 

Proc. Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila., Dec. 15, 1874, 185 footnote; Mon. N. Am. Rodentia, 

118, 119, 1877; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., VIII, 254, Sept. 1, 

1901 (raised to generic rank) ; Allen, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist. N. Y., XIX, 

194-195, 1903. 
Type: Reithrodon chinchiUoides Waterhouse, from the south shore of the Straits 

of Magellan, near the eastern entrance, Tierra del Fuego. 
Euneomys: ev, well, typical; veo<;, new; /-ivs, mouse. 
Eunuchus Rafinesque, 1832. Primates, Hominidse. 

Atlantic Journ., Phila., No. 3, p. 112, autumn of 1832. 
A name sarcastically proposed for the genus Homo. "I have substituted the 

name of Taurus (Bull) to the absurd generic name of Bos (Ox) ever since 

1814 (see Princ. Soiniol.), as I never could believe it right to call animals by 

neutral names. If Mr. F[eatherstonhaugh] and Dr. H[arlan] think otherwise 

they may call themselves Eunuchus sapiens! instead of Homo sapiens!" 

(Rafinesque.) 
Eunuchus: £vvovx°$, eunuch. 
Eunycteris Gray, 1866. Chiroptera, Pteropodidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 64; Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats 

Brit. Mus., 112-113, 1870; Matschie, Fledermause Berliner Mus. f. Natur- 

kunde, Lief, i, 11-12, 1899, (type P. melanopogon Schlegel). 
Type: Pteropus phaiops Temminck, from Macassar, Celebes (see Temminck, Mon. 

II, 66, 1835). 
Eunycteris: £v, well, typical; vvKrspU, bat. 
Euotaria (subgenus of Arctocephalus) Gray, 1866. Fene, Pinnipedia, Otariidae. 
Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 3d ser., XVIII, 236, Sept., 1866; ibid., 4th ser., I, 106, 

Feb., 1868 (raised to generic rank). 
Type: Arctocephalus nigrescens Gray (=Plioca austral is Zinimermann), from the 

Falkland Islands, Patagonia. 
Euotaria: ev, well, typical; + Otaria. 
Euoticus (subgenus of Otocjale) Gray, 1863. Primates, Lemuridse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1863, 140-141, 1 fig. in text, pi. xix; Cat. Monkeys, 

Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 81, 1870; Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 

1872, 850, 860 (raised to generic rank). 
Type: Otogale pallida Gray, from Fernando Po, West Africa. 
Euoticus: £v, well; ootikoc,, of the ear — 'well eared,' from the large, mem- 
branaceous ears. 
Euotomys (see Evotomys). Glires, Muridae, Microtinae. 

Euowenia De Vis, 1891. Marsupialia, Diprotodontidaa. 

Proc. Linn. Soc. New South Wales, 2d ser., VI, pt. n, 160-165, Dec. 22, 1891. 
New name fur Owmia De Vis, 1888, which is preoccupied by Owenia Presch, 

1847, a genus of Mollusca. 
Extinct. 

Euowenia: ev, well, typical; -\-Oivenia. 
Eupetaurus Thomas, 1888. Glires, Sciuridae. 

Journ. Asiat, Soc. Bengal, LVII, pt. n, No. 3, pp. 256-260, pis. xxn, xxm, Oct. 10, 

1888. 



278 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Eupetaurus — Continued. 

Type: Eupetaurus einereus Thomas, based on two 'co-types,' one from the Astor 

district, the other from the vicinity of Gilgit (alt. 6,000 ft.), Kashmir, India. 
Eupetaurus: ev, well, typical; -4- Petaurus. 
Euphilus Ameghino, 1889. Glires, Chinchillidae. 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamif. Fosil. Repiib. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., 

Cordoba, VI, 903-904, pi. lxxii, figs. 7, 13, 1889. 
Species: Euphilus ambrosettianus Ameghino, and E. kurizi Ameghino, from the 

Patagonian formation of the barrancas, near the city of Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct. 

Euphilus: ev, well; ipiXoi, loved. 
Euphr actus Wagler, 1830. Edentata, Dasypodidae. 

Nat. Syst. Amphibien, 36, 1830. 

Type: Dasypus sexcinetus Linnaeus, from South America. 

Euphractus : ev, well; (ppaKzoc,, inclosed, protected — in allusion to the carapace. 

Euphxosyne (subgenus of Clymem ) Gray, 1866. Cete, Delphinidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 214; Synopsis Whales & Dolphins Brit. Mus., 6, 

1868. 
Species, 3: Delphinus microps Gray, from the coast of Brazil; D. alope Gray, from 

Cape Horn ; and D. euph rosyne Gray (type), from the North Sea. ( For localities, 

see Synopsis, p. 6). 
Name preoccupied by Euphrosyna Yon Siebold, 1843, a genus of Vermes. 
Euphrosyne : Ev<ppo6vvrj, one of the three Graces, who presided over the charm 

and brilliancy of life (from ev<ppoov, cheerful). 
Euphysetes Wall, 1851. Cete, Physeteridae. 

Hist, and Descript. Skeleton of a New Sperm Whale,* 37, 1851 [from reprint, 

45-47, pi. 2, 1887]; Gray, Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 392-393, 1866; 

W. L. Sclater, Mamm. S. Africa, II, 188, 190, 1901 (in synonymy). 
Euphycetes Gray, ibid., 391, 1866 (suggested emendation not adopted). 
Type: Euphysetes grayii Wall ( = Physeter breviceps Blainville), from Marouba 

Beach, halfway between Coogee and Botany, near Sydney, New South Wales. 
Euphysetes: ev, well; (pv6?)rf}<;, blower — "a good or easy blower " (Wall, fide 

Gill, Am. Nat , IV, 740, 1871). 
Eupithecops Ameghino, 1897. Primates, Notopithecidae. 

La Argentina al traves de las Ultimas Epocas Geologicas, 13 footnote, 23, 1897 

(nomen nudum); Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XVIII, 421-422, fig. 7, Oct. 6, 

1897. 
Type: Eupithecops proximus Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Eupithecops: ev. well, typical; nifajKos, ape; orb, aspect — i. e., having the aspect 

of a typical ape. 
Eupleres Doyere, 1835. Ferae, Viverridae. 

Bull. Soc. Sci. Nat. France, No. 3, p. 45, Mar., 1835; No. 5, p. 103, June, 1835; 

Ann. Sci. Nat., 2 e ser., IV, Zool., 274-282, pi. 8, Nov., 1835. 
Type : Eupleres goudotii Doyere, from Tamatave, Madagascar. 
Eupleres: ev, well; TtXrjprji;, full, complete — in allusion to the full number of 5 

toes on both fore and hind feet. 
Euprocyon (subgenus of Procyon) Gray, 1864. Ferae, Procyonidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 705-706. 
Type : Ursus cancrivorus Cuvier, from South America. 
Euprocyon: ev, well, typical; -f Procyon. 

* "The work quoted has been lately attributed to Mr. W. S. MacLeay, but as Mr. 
Wall has assumed the responsibility of authorship with the evident consent of Mr. 
MacLeay, there seems to be no good reason for accepting ex parte evidence in the 
case" (Gill, Am. Nat., IV, 73!) footnote, 1871). 



EUPROTOGONIA EURYALUS. 279 

Euprotogonia Cope, 1893. Ungulata, Condylarthra, Phenacodontidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XXVII, 378 footnote, Apr. 5, 1893; Osborx & Earle, Bull. Am. 

Mus. Nat. Hist., New York, VII, 64, Mar., 1895. 
Euprotogonias C 0. Waterhouse, Index Zool., 136, 1902. 
New name for Protogonia Cope, 1881, which is preoccupied by Protogonius Hiibner, 

1816, a genus of Lepidoptera. Antedated by Tetrad senodon Scott, Nov. 15, 1892, 

which is synonymous with Protogonia. 
Extinct. 
Euprotogonia: ev, well, typical; + Protogonia. 

Eureodon G. Fischer, 1817. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suida?. 

Mem. Soc. Imp. Nat. Moscou, V, 373, 417-418, 1817; Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., 

Mamm., 12, 1842. 
Type: Su* aetltiopicus Grnelin, from Africa. Eureodon is apparently a new name 

for Phacochoerus F. Cuvier, 1817, and is antedated by the latter, since Phaco- 

choerus is quoted as a synonym by Fischer. 
Eureodon: kvpvz, evpeo?, wide; 68(bv = d8ovs, tooth. 

Eurhinoceros (subgenus of Rhinoceros) Gray, 1867. Ungulata, Rhinoeerotid;e. 
Proc. Zool. Soc, London, 1867, 1009-1015, figs. 1-2; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & 

Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 300-307, figs. 34-35, 1869. 
Species, 3: Rhinoceros javanicus Cuvier & Geoff roy, from Java; R. unicornis Iin- 

nseus, from India; and R. nasalis Gray, from Borneo (?). 
Eurhinoceros: ev, well; 4- Rhinoceros. 

Eurhinodelphis Dr Bus, 1867. Cete, Platanistida?. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. Belgique, 2 e ser., XXIV, 568-569, 1867; Journ. Zool., II, 

97-112, 1873." 
Eurinodelphis Paolo, Atti Soc. Veneto-Trentina Sci. Nat. Padova, ser. II, vol. Ill, 

53, 1897 (misprint). 
Type: Eurhinodelphis cocheteuxii Du Bus, from the Antwerp Crag, Belgium. 
Extinct. Based on a nearly entire cranium. 
Eurhinodelphis: ev, well; pis, pivo<i, nose; 8e\<pis, dolphin — in allusion to the 

long beak, which is three and a half times the length of the cranium. 

Eurhinorhynchus Vax Bexedex & Gervais, 1880. Cete, Platanistida?. 

Osteog.- Cetaces Viv. et Foss., 493, 1880. 
Lapsus for Eurhinodelphis Du Bus, 1867. 

Name preoccupied by Eurinorhynchus Gray, 1840 (= Eurynorhynchus Nilsson, 
1821), a genus of Birds. 

Eurinodelphis ( see Eurhinodelphis) . Cete, Platanistida?. 

Eurodon (see Euryodon). Edentata, Glyptodontidse. 

Euryacodon Marsh, 1872. Insectivora, Leptietid;e. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 223-224, Sept. 1872 (sep. issued Aug. 17). 
Type: Euryacodon lepidus Marsh, from the Eocene of Grizzly Buttes, near Fort 

Bridger, Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on " a fragment of an upper jaw containing the last two molars 

in perfect condition." 
Euryacodon: evpvs, wide; dtc/j, point; 68(hv = 68ov<;, tooth. 

Euryalus (subgenus of Rhinolophus) Matschie, 1901. Chiroptera, Rhinolophida?. 
Sitzungsb. Gesellsch Naturf. Freunde, Berlin, 1901, 225-227. 
Type: Rhinolophus mehelyi Matschie (=R- euryale Mehely, not Blasius), from 

Bucharest, Rournania. 
Euryalus: From the specific name euryale, "'EvpvctK.jj, one of the Gorgons. 



280 INDEX GENEKUM MAMMALIUM. 

Euryceros (subg. of Tragelaphus) Gray, 1850. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Gleanings from Menagerie & Aviary at Knowsley Hall, 27, tab. xxm, fig. 1, 
1850; Cat. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pt. in, Ungulata, 136-138, 1852; Cat. Ruminant 
Mamm. Brit, Mus, 47-50, 1872 (raised to generic rank); Sclater & Thomas, 
Book of Antelopes, 1Y, 103, 1900 (in synonymy, type fixed). 

Species: Antilope eurycerus Ogilby (type), from West Africa; and Tragelaphus 
angasii Gray, from Port Natal, South Africa. 

Name preoccupied by Eurycerus Illiger, 1807, a genus of Coleoptera. Replaced 
by Boocercus Thomas, 1902. 

Euryceros: svpvKepooc,, with broad, spreading horns (from svpvq, wide; Kspaz, 
horn). 
Eurygeniops Ameghino, 1896. Ungulata, Litopterna, Notohippidae. 

Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XVII, p. 92 footnote, 1896 (sep. p. 8). 

New name for Eurygenium Ameghino, 1895, which is preoccupied by Eurygenius 
La Fert6, 1849, a genus of Coleoptera. 

Extinct, 

Eurygeniops: Eurygenium; oip, aspect. 
Eurygenium. Ameghino, 1895. Ungulata, Litopterna, Notohippidae. 

Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XV, cuad. 11-12, p. 655, 1895 (sep. p. 55). 

Type: Eurygenium laMrostris Ameghino, from the Pyrotherium beds in the inte- 
rior of Patagonia. 

Extinct, Based on a right intermaxillary with the alveoli of three incisors. 

Name preoccupied by Eurygenius La Ferte, 1849, a genus of Coleoptera. 
Replaced by Eurygeniops Ameghino, 1896. 

Eurygenium: svpv$, broad; yevstov, jaw, cheek — in allusion to the intermax- 
illary. 
Euryodon Lund, 1838. Edentata, Glyptodontidae. 

Echodu Monde Savant, Paris, 6 e ann., No. 430, p. 244, Apr. 17, 1838; Overs, K. 
Vidensk Selsk. Forehandl. Kjobenhavn, 1838, 11; Ann. Sci. Nat,, Paris, 2 e ser., 
XI, Zool., 216, 231, Apr., 1839; K. Danske Vidensk. Selsk. Nat. & Math. Afh. 
Kjobenhavn, VIII, 67, 141, Tab. i, figs. 2-6, 1841. 

Eurodon Lund, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., Ill, 422, Aug., 1839 (misprint). 

Type: Dasypus laiidens Lund, 1841, from the bone caves between the Rio das 
Velhas and Rio Paraopeba, Minas Geraes, Brazil (alt. 2,000 ft.). 

See Eureodon Fischer, 1817. 

Extinct, 

Euryodon: svpvs, £vp£o$, wide; 68cbv= ddovs, tooth. 
Euryodon ('Leidy') \V. L. Sclater, 1887. Ungulata, Rhinocerotidae. 

Zool. Record for 1886, XXIII, Mamm., 56, 1887. 

Misprint for Eusyodon Leidy, 1886. 

Name preoccupied by Euryodon Lund, 1838, a genus of Edentata. 
Euryosodon (see Eurysodon). Edentata, Megalonychida?. 

Euryotis Brants, 1827. Glires, Muridae, Otomyinae. 

Het Geslacht der Muizen, 93-99, pi. — , 1827. 

Type: Mus irroratus Lichtenstein, from South Africa. 

Euryotis: ?vpv$, wide; ovg, cbro?, ear — from the large, rounded ears. 

Eurypterna Gloger, 1841. Edentata, Myrmecophagidae. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxi, 112, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat. Hist,, 6th ser., XV, 191, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Type: Eurypterna didactyla ( = Myrmecophaga didaciyla Linnaeus), from Guiana. 

(See Oydopes Gray, 1821.) 
Eurypterna: s-dpvg, wide; 7trtpva, heel. 



EURYSODON EUSMILUS. 281 

Eurysodon Mercerat, 1891. Edentata, Megalonychidse. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, II, 18-23, 1891. 

Euryosodon Lydekker, Zool. Record for 1891, XXVIII, Mamm., 51, 1892 (mis- 
print). 

Species 5, from Patagonia: Eurysodon nasutus Mercerat, from Monte Leon; Eucho- 
lozops adteger Ameghino, Eurysodon boulei Mercerat, and E. rostratus Mercerat, 
from the Rio Santa Cruz; and Eucholaeops inf emails Ameghino. 

'Name preoccupied.' (Lydekker, Zool. Rec, 1891.) 

Extinct. 

Eurysodon: evpvg, wide; 68(bv=dSov<;, tooth. 
Eurystephanodon Roth, 1903. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Homalodontotheriidse. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, XI, 150-152, 1903. 

Species, 3: Eurystephanodon cattanii Roth, E. angusticephalus Roth, and E. cras- 
satus Roth, from the upper 'Cretaceous' of Lago Musters, Territory of Chubut, 
Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Eurystephanodon: Evpv;, broad; 6r£<pavos, crown; 68gjv= ddovs, tooth — 'broad- 
crowned tooth.' 
Eurystomus Roth, 1901. Ungulata, Litopterna, Notohippidse. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, X, 256, Oct., 1901 (sep. p. 8). 

Type: Eurystomus stehlini Roth, from the lower Tertiary of Argentina. 

Name preoccupied by Eurystomus Vieillot, 1816, a genus of Birds. Replaced by 
Pleurystomus Ameghino, 1902. 

Extinct. 

Eurystomus: evpvdro/tio*;, wide-mouthed (from evpvs, wide, broad; dropa, 
mouth). 
Eurytherium Gervais, 1850. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriidse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, XXXI, No. 16, p. 553, July-Dec, 1850; Zool. et Paleont. 
Franc., l e ed., II, expl. pi. No. 36, p. 3, 1848-52; 2 e ed., 165-169, pi. xxvi, 
figs. 1-7, 1859. 

Type: Eurytherium latipes Gervais, from the lignite of Debruge, near Apt, Vau- 
cluse, southeastern France. 

Extinct. Based on metacarpals and metatarsals. 

Eurytherium: £vpv$, wide; Brjpiov, wild beast. 
Euryurus H. Gervais & Ameghino, 1880. Edentata, Glyptodontidse. 

Mamm. Foss. l'Amerique du Sud, 184-187, 1880. 

Type: Glyptodon rudis Gervais, from the province of Bnenos Aires, Argentina. 

Extinct. Based on some bones of the limbs, a fragment of the carapace, and a 
nearly entire caudal tube. 

Name preoccupied by Euryurus Koch, 1847, a genus of Myriapoda; and by Euryu- 
rus Von der Marck, 1864, a genus of Crustacea. Replaced by Neuryurus 
Ameghino, 1889. 

Euryurus: F.vpvc,, broad; ovpct, tail — "pour rappeler que leur principal carac- 
tere distinctif reside dans la forme particuliere de leur region caudale, qui est 
aplatie. ' ' 
Euryzygomatomys Goeldi, 1901. Glires, Octodontidse. 

Bol. Museu Paraense, III, No. 2, p. 179, Aug., 1901. 

Type: Echimys spinosus Desmarest, from the vicinity of Atira, Paraguay. 

Euryzygomatomys: evpvg, wide; Zvyoo/ua, Zvycojiiaros, zygoma; juv$, mouse — in 
allusion to the broad zygoma. 
Eusmilus Gervais, 1876. Fera?, Felidae. 

Zool. et Paleont. Gen., 2* se>., 3" livr., 53-54, pi. xn, figs. 8-12, 1876. 

Type: Machairodus perarmaius Gervais ( = .V. bidentatus Filhol?), from the Phos- 
phorites of Quercy, France. 
Extinct. 



282 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Eusmilus — Continued. 

Eusmilus: ev, well, typical; 6/.dXr/, knife, (sv, well; 6/.uXoz—6/,iiXa^, jaw?) The 
ramus of the jaw was greatly expanded to protect the enormous upper canines. 
Coues, Century Diet., 2032.) 
Eusus (subgenus of Sus) Gray, 1868. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1868, 32. 

Type: Sus barbatus S. Miiller, from Borneo. (See Euhys Gray, 1869.) 

En sus: ev, well, typical; dv$, pig. 
Eusyodon Leidy, 1886. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinoeerotidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Apr. 6, 1886, 37-38, 2 figs, in text. 

Euryodon W. L. Sclater, Zool. Record for 1886, XXIII, Mamm., 56, 1887. 

Type: Eusyodon maxhnus Leidy, from Mixson's bone bed, 10 miles from Archer, 
Levy County, Florida. 

Extinct. Based on "two fragments of a tooth, which together. . . form the 
greater portion of the worn extremity of a lower tusk with the point broken 
off." First referred to the Suidse, but afterwards shown to belong to the 
Rhinocerotidre. (Leidy, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1887, 309.) 

Eusyodon: ev, well, typical; tfi~s, pig; 6Scbv = dSovg, tooth. 
Eutamias (subgenus of Tamias) Trouessart, 1880. Glires, Sciuridae. 

Cat. Mamm. Viv. et Foss., Rodentia, in Bull. Soc. d'Etudes Sci. d' Angers, X, l e 
fasc, 86-87, 1880; J. A. Allen, Abstract Proc. Linn. Soc. N. Y., sep. p. 26, 
July 20, 1894 (type fixed); Merriam, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XI, 189-212, 
July 1, 1897 (raised to generic rank). 

Species, 4: Tamias striata* asiaticm (Gmelin, type), from Asia; T. harrisii (Audubon 
&. Bachman), from the southwestern United States; T. lateralis (Say), from 
the vicinity of Canon City, Colorado; and T. hmdens Cope, from caves in Wythe 
County, Virginia. 

Eutamias: ev, well, typical; -{-Tamias. 
Eutatus Gervais, 1867. PMentata, Dasypodidse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, LXV, 279-280, July-Dec, 1867. 

Type: Eutatus seguini Gervais, from Argentina. 

Extinct. 

Eutatus: ev, well, typical; tatou, native name for the armadillo. 

Eutelops (see Entelops). Edentata, Bradypodidae. 

Eutemnodus Bravard, 1858. Marsupialia, ? 

" Mon. de los Terrenos Marinos Terciarios de las Cercanfas de Parana, 107, 1858" 

(fide Waterhouse MS.); Gervais, Zool. et Paleont. Gen., I, 130, 1867-69; 

Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., I, 21, 22, 1885; Ameghino, Act. Acad. 

Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 340-341, 1889 (in synonymy); Trouessart, Cat, 

Mamm., new ed., 1215, 1898. 
Eutemnodus Trouessart, Cat, Mamm. Viv. et Foss., Carnivores, in Bull. Soc. 

d'Etudes Sci. d' Angers, Suppl. for 1884, 96, 1885 (misprint.) 
Type: Eutemnodus americanus Bravard, from Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct. 

Eutemnodus: £i>, well, typical; te^ivoo, to cut; 68ov$, tooth. 
Eutomodus Ameghino, 1889. Ungulata, Toxodontia, Toxodontidee. 

Cont. Conocimiento Mamif. Fosil. Repub. Argentina, in Act, Acad. Nac. Cien., 

Cordoba, VI, 403, 916-917, pi. lxxi figs. 6, 7, lxxvii figs. 8, 9, 1889. 
New name for Tomodus Ameghino, 1886, which is preoccupied by Tomodus 

Trautschold, 1879, a genus of Pisces. Type, Tomodus elautus Ameghino, from 

the vicinity of the city of Parana, Argentina. 
Extinct. 
Eutomodus: ev, well, typical; te/ivgo, to cut; b8ov$, tooth. 



EUTRACHYTHERUS EXOCHURA. 283 

Eutrachytherus Ameghino, 1897. Ungulata, Typotheria, Eutrachytheriidse. 

Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XYIII, 427-429, fig. 13, Oct. 6, 1897 (sep. pp. 24-26). 
Eutrachytheres Roth, Am. Journ. Sci., 4th ser., IX, 264. Apr., 1900. 
New name for Trachytherus Ameghino, 1889, which is preoccupied by Traehythe- 

rium Gervais, 1849, a genus of Sirenia. 
Extinct. 

Eutrachytherus: ev, well, typical; A- Trachytherus. 
Eutrictis (see Lutrictis). Fera?, Mustelidse. 

Eutrigonodon Ameghino, 1891. Ungulata, Toxodontia, Toxodontidae. 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 4a, 240, Aug. 1, 1891. 
New name for Trigodon Ameghino, 1887 (subsequently corrected to Trigonodon), 

which is preoccupied by Trigonodon Conrad, 1852, a genus of Mollusca. 
Extinct. 

Eutrigonodon: ev, well, typical; -{-Trigonodon. 
Eutrochodon Roth, 1903. ? ? 

Revista Mus. La Plata, XI, 155, 1903. 
Type: Eutrochodon inceptus Roth, from the upper 'Cretaceous' of Lago Musters, 

Territory of Chubut, Patagonia. 
Eutrochodon: ev, well, typical; rpoxos, badger: ddcov = ddov$, tooth. 
Eutropia (subgenus of Delphinus) Gray, 1862. Cete, Delphinidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1862, 145; Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 262-263, 

1866; Proc. Zool. Soc. London 1866, 215 (raised to generic rank). 
Eutrope Gray, Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 255, 1866. 
Type: Delphinus eutropia Gray, from Chile. 

Name preoccupied by Eutropia Humphrey, 1797, a genus of Mollusca. 
Eutropia: ev, well; rpomc, (rportioc, or rpoTti8o<;), keel — with a good keel — in 

allusion to the skull, which is described as 'strongly keeled in the centre 

behind. ' 
Eutypotherium Haeckel, 1895. Ungulata, Typotheria, Typotheriidse. 

Syst. Phylogenie Wirbelthiere, III, 502, 1895. 
Hypothetical genus from South America. 
Eutypotherium: ev, well, typical; + Typotherium. 
Eutypotherium Roth, 1901. Ungulata, Typotheria, Typotheriidse. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, X, 256, Oct., 1901 (sep. p. 8). 
Type: Eutypotherium lehmann-nitschei Roth, from the upper Tertiary of Laguna 

Blanco, Territory of Chubut, Patagonia. 
Name preoccupied by Eutypotherium Haeckel, 1895, a hypothetical genus of 

Typotheria. Replaced by Tacliytypotherium Roth, 1903. 
Evotomys Coues, 1874. Glires, Muridse, Microtinse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1874, 186-187; Miller, N. Am. Fauna, No. 12, pp. 

42-44, pis. i-iii, text figs. 18-19, July 23, 1896; Bailey, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., 

XI, 113-138, pi. in, May 13, 1897; Miller, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XIII, 154, 

June 13, 1900 (name not invalidated by Anaptogonia) . 
Euotomys Schulze, Zeitschr. Naturwiss. Stuttgart, LXXIII, 203, Dec. 19, 1900. 
Eotomys Forsyth-Major, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1902, pt. i, 107, June 1, 1902. 
Type: Mus rutilus Pallas, from Siberia. 

Evotomys: sv, well; ovs, cbros, ear; fivi, mouse — in allusion to the well devel- 
oped ears, which distinctly overtop the fur. 
Exochura Kolenati, 1858. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidre. 

Sitzungsb. Math. -Naturwiss. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, XXIX, Nr. 9, 251-252, 

Mar. 1858. 
Exochura may be a supergeneric group. The type is not specifically mentioned, 

but the diagnosis is followed by a description of the 'subgenus' Amblyotus 

based on .4. atratus Kolenati, from the mountains of Silicia, Austria. 
Exochura: £c,oxo$, standing out; ovpd, tail. 



284 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Exochurus Fitzinger, 1870. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae. 

Sitzungsber Math.-Naturwiss. 01. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, LXII, Abth. i, Heft i-ii, 

75-81, 1870. 
Species, 3: Vespertilio macrodactylus Teniminck, from Japan; V. horsfieldii Teni- 

minck, from Java; and V. macrotarsus Waterhouse, from the Philippine 

Islands. (See Exochura Kolenati, 1858.) 

F. 

Fabricia (subgenus of BaLvnoptera) Gray, 1866. Cete, Balaenidae. 

Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus. [188-194], 382, figs. 49-53 in text, 1866. 
Type: Balsena rostraia Midler, from the North Sea, etc. 
Name preoccupied by Fabricia Blainville, 1828, a genus of Vermes. 
Fabricia: In honor of Otho Fabricius, 1744-1822, author of 'Fauna Groenlandica,' 
1780. 
Faetorius (see Fcetorius) . Ferae, Mustelidae. 

Falcifer Reiix, 1900. Edentata, Myrmecophagidae. 

Am. Naturalist, XXXIV, 576, July, 1900; Miller & Rehn, Proc. Boston Soc. 

Nat, Hist., vol. 30, p. 10, Dec. 27, 1901. 
Type: Myrmecophaga jubata Linnaeus, from Brazil. 

Falcifer: Lat. fair, folds, sickle; fero, to bear — in allusion to the sickle-shaped 
claws of the fore feet. 
Farunculus ('Lesson') Gray, 1867. Glires, Sciuridae. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist, 3d ser., XX, 279, Oct., 1867. 

Probably a misprint for Funambulus Lesson, 1832. The name is credited to 

'Lesson, 111. Zool.,' but Funambulus is the name there used for this group of 

squirrels. Farunculus is not even referred to by Lesson in his Nouveau Tableau 

Regne Animal, 1842. 

Faunus Okex, 1816. Primates, Sirniidae. 

Lehrbuch Naturgesch., 3ter Theil, Zool., 2te Abth., pp. xi, 1227-1230, 1816. 

Type: The Orang utan, Faunus indicus (=Simia satyrus Linnaeus), from Borneo. 

Name preoccupied by Faunus Montfort, 1810, a genus of Mollusca. See Simia 

Linnaeus, 1758. 
Faunus: Lat. Faunus, the protecting deity of agriculture and shepherds, repre- 
sented with horns, and goat's foet. 
Felis Lixx.Ers, 1758. Ferae, Felidae. 

Systema Naturae, 10th ed., I, 41-43, 1758; 12th ed., I, 60-73, 1766; Brisson, 
Regnum, Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 13, 191-201, 1762; Miller & 
Rehn, Proc. Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., XXX, 197-199, Dec, 1901 (type fixed). 
Species, 7: Felis leo Linnaeus, from Africa; F. tigris Linnaeus, from Asia; F. pardus 
Linnaeus, from India; F. onca Linnaeus, from South America; F. pardalis Lin- 
naeus, from tropical America; F. catus Linnaeus (type), and F. lynx Linnaeus, 
from Europe. 
Felis: Lat., cat; also applied to a marten, ferret, and polecat; probably from root 
fe, to produce, bear young. (Century Diet.) 
Felovia (subgenus of Massoutiera) Lataste, 1886. Glires, Octodontid;e. 

Le Naturaliste, 8 e aim., No. 35, p. 287, June 15, 1886. 
Type: Felovia vse Lataste, from the vicinity of Medina, on the upper Senegal River, 

West Africa. 
Felovia: Felou, name of a range of hills on the Senegal River, the type locality 
of the species. 
Felsinotherium Capellixi, 1865. Sirenia, Halitheriidse. 

Atti Soc. Ital. Sci. Nat., Milano, VIII, 281-283, 1865. 

Type: Felsinotherium foreslii Capellini (species not named except by statement 
'dedicaal signor Foreste ' ) , from Bologna, Italy. 



FELSINOTHERIUM FOINA. 285 

Felsinotherium — Continued. 
Extinct. 

FeUinofherium: Lat. Felsina, the ancient name of Bologna, where the type was 
found; Or/piov, wild beast. 

Fennecus Desmarest, 1804. Ferae, Canidae. 

Nouv. Diet. Hist. Nat,, XXIV, Tab. Meth. Mamm., IS, 1804; Mannnalogie, I, 

36, 235, 1820; Gray, Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 

206-208, fig. 29, 1869. 
Type: Fennecus arabicus Desmarest ( — Canis cerdo Gmelin), from the deserts of 

northern Africa. 
Fennecus: fennec or fennek, the Moorish name of a fox. 
Feresa (subgenus of Orca) Gray, 1870. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1870, 77; Suppl. Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 78 

1871 (raised to generic rank). 
Feresia Flower, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1883, 510. 
Type: Orca intermedia Gray, locality unknown. 
Feresa: Feres, local French name of a dolphin, used by Bonnaterre as a specific 

appellation, Del phinus feres, "J'ai conserve a cette espece de Dauphin le nom 

de Feres que lui out donne les matelots provencaux." (Bonnaterre, Tabl. 

Encycl., Get., 28, 1789.) 
Feroculus Kelaart, 1852. Insectivora, Sorieidae. 

Prodr. Fauna Zeylanica, 31, 1852; Wagner, Suppl. Schreber's Saugthiere, V, 

806, 1852; Blyth, Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, XXIV, No. 1, p. 35, 1855. 
Type: Sorex macropus Blyth, from Nuwera Ellia, Ceylon. 
Feroculus: hat. feroculus (dim. olferox, fierce), somewhat fierce or spirited. 
Fiber G. (Vvier, 1800. Glires, Muridae, Microtinae. 

[Tableau Elem. Hist. Nat. Anim., 141, 1798 — T ondatra' (Castor zibethicus)]; 

Lecons Anat. Comp., I, tabl. i, 1800 (names only — 'Ondatra, Fiber'); Regne 

Animal, I, 92, 1817. 
Type: Castor zibethicus Linmeus, from eastern Canada. 
Fiber: Lat., beaver. 
Flowerius Lilljeborg, 1867. Cete, Balaenidae. 

Nova Acta Reg. Soc. Sci. Upsala, ser. 3, VI, art. vi, 11-12, 1867. 
Type: "Floiverius gigas ( Eschricht ) =Sibbaldius borealis G ray , ' ' from the North Sea. 
Flowerius: In honor of Sir William Henry Flower, 1831-99, late Director of the 

Natural History Museum of London, and author of numerous important papers 

on cetaceans. 
Foetorius Keyserling & Blasius, 1840. Ferae, Mustelidae. 

Wirbelthiere Europa's, pp. xx, 68, 1840. 
Ffctorius Trouessart, Cat. Mamm. Viv. et Foss., Carnivores, in Bull. Soc. d' Etudes 

Sci. d' Angers, Suppl. for 1884, 44, 1885. 
Species, 7: Mustela sarmaticus Pallas, from southern Russia; M. putorius Linnaeus, 

from Europe; M. furo Linnaeus, from Africa; M. erminea Linnaeus from Europe; 

M. boccamela Bechstein, from Sardinia; M. vulgaris Brisson, from Europe; and 

M. lutreola Linnaeus, from Europe. 
Foetorius: Lat. fetor, stench. 
Foina* (subgenus of Maries) Gray, 1865. Ferae, Mustelidae. 

Proc. Zool Soc. London, 1865, 108; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. 

Brit. Mus., 86, 1869. 
Type: Mustela foina Erxleben, from Europe. 
Foina: Ital. dial, fuina, foina, foin, polecat. 

* Foina Blainville, 1841, is a specific, not a subgeneric name. 



286 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Fossa Gray, 1864. Ferae, Viverridse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 518-519; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate 

Mamin. Brit. Mus., 52, 1869. 
Type: Fossa daubentonii Gray (=Viverra fossa Schreber), from Madagascar. 
Fossa: foussa, native name of this animal. 
Fossor ('Forster') Lichtenstein, 1844. Glires, Bathyergidee. 

Descriptiones Animalium [edidit Lichtenstein], 31-32, fig., 1844. 
Type: Fossor capensis Forster ( = Georychus capensis Illiger), from Cape Colony, 

South Africa. 
Fossor: Lat. , a digger. 
Fucotherium Kaup, 1840. Sirenia, Halitheriidse. 

Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogie, 1840, 675. 
The name seems to have been suggested and then immediately withdrawn by 

the author. "Da H.\alicore\ Cuvieri [from Europe] oder Hipp.[opotamu8] 

dubius noch keinen Geschlechts-Namen hat, so nehme ich meine Benennung 

Tang-Thier (Fucotherium), die ich im Begriff war ihm zu geben, zuriick." 

(Kaup.) 
Extinct. 
Fucotherium: 4>vko$, seaweed; fypiov, wild beast — from the animal's supposed 

food. 

Funambulus Lesson, 1832. Glires, Sciuridae. 

111. Zool., pi. 43, with 2 pages text (unnumbered), Sept., 1832; Hist. Nat. 

Mamm. Oiseaux decouy. depuis 1788 (Compl. ffiuvres Buffon), V, 390-398, 

1836; Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 108-110, 1842; Thomas, Proc. 

Zool. Soc. London, 1897, 933 (type mentioned). 
Farunculus Gray, Ann. &Mag. Nat. Hist., 3dser.,XX, 279, Oct., 1867 (misprint). 
Type: Funambulus indicus Lesson ( =Sdurus palmarum Linnaeus, not S. indicus 

Erxleben), from India. 
Funambulus: Lat., rope-dancer, rope-walker. 

Funisciurus (subgenus of Sciurus) Trouessart, 1880. Glires, Sciuridae. 

Le Naturaliste, II, No. 37, p. 293, Oct. 1, 1880; ibid., No. 40, p. 315, Nov. 15, 
1880; Cat. Mamm., in Bull. Soc. d'Etudes Sci. d' Angers, X, l er fasc, 84, 1880; 
Bull. U. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. Terr., VI, No. 2, p. 306, Sept. 19, 1881; Thomas, 
Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1897, 932-933 (raised to generic rank; type given as 
S. Isabella Gray, 1862, from the Cameroon Moantains); W. L. Sclater, Ann. 
S. Afr. Mus., I, pt. 2, pp. 183-186, Mar., 1899. 

Type: Sciurus lemniscatus Leconte, 1857, from West Africa. 

Funisciurus: Lat. funis, rope; + Sciurus — from its climbing habits. 

Furcifer (subgenus of Cervus) Wagner, 1844. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 
Suppl. Schreber's Situgthiere, IV, 384-385, 1844; Sundevall, Ofversigt Vetensk. 

Akad. Handlingar, for 1844, 182-183, 1846; Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 

for 1850, No. CCXV, 236, Jan. 24, 1852 (raised to generic rank); Cat. Mamm. 

Brit. Mus., pt. in, Ungulata, 226-227, 1852. 
Type: Cervus antisiensis Pucheran, from the eastern Cordillera of Bolivia, near 

La Paz, at an altitude of 4,000 meters. 
Name preoccupied by Furcifer Fitzinger, 1843, a genus of Reptilia. Replaced by 

Creagroceros Fitzinger, 1874. 
Furcifer: Lat., yoke bearer — so called from the furcate antlers, which have a 

simple beam and a brow antler. 

Furia F. Cuvier, 1828. Chiroptera, Natalida?. 

Mem. Mus. Hist, Nat,, Paris, XVI, 149-155, pi. 9, figs. 1-5, 1828. 



FURIA GALEMYS. 287 

Furia — Con ti nued . 

Type: Furia horrens Cuvier, from the Mana or Amaribo River, French Guiana. 

Name preoccupied by Furia Linnaeus, 1758, a genus of Vermes. Replaced by 
Furipterus Bonaparte, 1837. 

Furia: Lat., a Fury. 
Furiella Gray, 1866. Chiroptera, Natalidae. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 3d ser., XVII, 91, Feb., 1866. 

Type: "Furia Temm[inck], Furipterus Tomes, not Bonap [arte]." 

Furiella: Dim. of Furia. 
Furipterus Bonaparte, 1837. Chiroptera, Natalidae. 

Iconografia Fauna Italica, I, fasc. xxi, 1837 (under P/ecotus auritus [p. 3]); 
Mag. Zool. & Botany, II, No. 12, p. 496, 1838 (quoted by Gray). 

Type: Furia horrens Cuvier, from the Mana or Amaribo River, French Guiana. 

New name for Furia F. Cuvier, 1828, which is preoccupied by Furia Linnaeus, 
1758, a genus of Vermes. 

Furipterus: Furia; 7trsp6v, whig. 

G. 

Galago E. Geoffroy, 1796. Primates, Lemuridae. 

Mag. Encycloped., 2 e ann., I, 49, 1 pi., 1796; Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, 

I, l e part., 96, 1796; Cuvier, Tabl. Element. Hist. Nat., 101, 1798. 
Gallacho Wiegmann, Archiv Naturgesch., 1838, n, 394 (misprint). 
Type: Galago senegalensis Geoffroy (=Lemur galago Schreber), from Senegal, 

West Africa. 
Galago: Native name in Senegal, adopted by Adanson, who first made known 

this lemur. 
Galagoides A. Smith, 1833. Primates, Lemuridae. 

S. Afr. Quart, Journ., 2d ser., II, No. 1, p. 32, Oct.-Dec, 1833. 
Species: Galago demidoffi A. Smith, and G. senegalensis A. Smith, from Senegal, 

West Africa. 
Galagoides: Galago; eiSo<;, form. 
Gale (subgenus of Mustela) Wagner, 1841. Ferae, Mustelidse. 

Suppl. Schreber' s Saugthiere, II, 234, 1841; Schinz, Syst. Verzeich. Saugethiere 

oder Synops. Mamm., I, 342, 1X44. 
Species, 4: Mustela frenata Lichtenstein, from the Valley of Mexico; M. erminea 

Linnaeus, M. hoccamela Bechstein, and M. vulgaris Erxleben, from Europe. 
Gale: yalij, weasel. 

Galea Meyen, 1833. Glires, Caviidae. 

Nova Acta Acad. Caes. Leop.-Carol., XVI, pt. n, 597-599, tab. xlii, figs. 4-7, 12, 

1833; Reise urn die Erde, 109, 1834. 
Type: Galea musteloides Meyen, from the pass between Tacna and Lake Titicaca, 

Peru. 
Galea: ya\hj, weasel — 'eine langestreckte wieselartige Thiere.' 

Galecynus (subgenus of Cams) Owen, 1847. Ferae, Canidae. 

Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc. London, III, No. 9, pp. 55-60, figs. 1, 3, and 5 in text, 

Feb. 1, 1847. 
Type: Galecynus imingensis Owen, from the Miocene of CEningen, Switzerland. 
Extinct. 
Galecynus: yaXi}, weasel; kvgdv, dog. 

Galemys Kaup, 1829. Insectivora, Talpidae. 

Entw.-Gesch. und Natiirl. Syst, Europ. Thierwelt, I, 118, 119, 1829; Wagler, 
Oken's Isis, 1832, p. 1218. 



288 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Galemys — Continued. 

Galomys Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Index Univ., 159, 1846; CotrEs, Century 
Diet., Ill, 2434, 2443, 1889. 

Type: Mygale pyrenaica Geoffrey, ' from the foot of the Pyrenees.' 

Galemys: yaXrf, weasel; /'#?, mouse. 
Galemys Pomel, 1848. Insectivora, Soricidae. 

Arcliiv. Sci. Phys. et Nat., Bibl. Univ. Geneve, IX, 249, Nov., 1848. 

Subgenera, 3: Brachysorex Duvernoy (part), Crossopus Wagler, and Pachyura Selys 
Longchamps, with the following species: Galemys micrurus Pomel (=Sorex 
dekayi De Kay — not Baehman), and G. harlani (Duvernoy); G. (Crossopus) 
fodiens, ciliatus, palustris, platycephalus, hymalaicus; G. (Pachyura) gigantea var. 
pegyptia, candescens, sonnerati var. serpentarius et myosurus, murina, perrotteti, 
etrusca, and gracilis. 

Name preoccupied by Galemys Kaup, 1829, a genus of Talpidse. 

Galemys: yaXfj, weasel; /<t~s, mouse. 

Galeocebus Wagner, 1855. Primates, Lemuridse. 

Suppl. Schreber's Siiugthiere, V, pp. xii, 147, 1855. 
New name for Lepilemur I. Geoffroy, which is considered ungrammatical. Type, 

LepiUmur mustelinus I. Geoffroy, from Madagascar. (Erroneously given as G. 

hi a r inns on p. xii.) 
Galcocebiix: yaXfj, weasel; Kfffio<;, long-tailed monkey. 

Galeolemur Lesson, 1840. Insectivora, Galeopithecidse. 

Species Mamm., 255, 261-262, 1840; Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, 11, 1842; 

Gray, Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs, Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 98, 1870. 
Type: Galeopithecus macrurus Temminck, from Ceylon. 
Galeolemur: yaXfj, weasel; 4- Lemur. 

Galeopardus Heuglix, 1866. Ferae, Felidee. 

Sitzungsber. Math.-Naturwiss. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, LIV, Abth. i, 557, 

1866; Reise in Nordost-Airika, II, 55, 1877. 
Type: Felis serval Schrel>er, from Asia and Africa. 
Name antedated by Leptailurus Severtzow, 1858. 
Galeopardus: yaAi), weasel; TtapSos, leopard. 

Galeopithecus Pali. as, 1780. Insectivora, Galeopithecidae. 

"Acta Aca.l. Sci. Imp. Petrop., IV, pt, 1, p. 208, tab. 7, 8," 1780; Cuvier, Tableau 
Element., 106, 1798; Shaw, Gen. Zool., I, pt. 1, Mamm., 115-121, tab. 38, 1800. 
Galeopus Rafinesque, Analyse de la Nature, 54, 1815. 

Type: Lemur vol-ans Linnaeus, from Asia (Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, and Borneo). 
See Oynocephalus Boddaert, 1768. 
Galeopithecus: ya\fj, weasel; 7ii r )ijKo<;, ape. 

Galeopus Rafinesque, 1815. Insectivora, Galeopithecida?. 

Analyse de la Nature, 54, 1815. 
New name for Galeopitlieeus Pallas, 1780 ('Galeopus Rafinesque, Galeopithecus 

Cuvier ' ) . 
Galeopus: yaXf], weasel; itovc,, foot. 

Galeospalax Pomel, 1848. Insectivora, Talpidje. 

Archiv. Sci. Phys. et Nat., Bibl. Univ. Geneve, IX, 161, 246, Oct., 1848; Cat. 

Meth. Vert. Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 12, 1854. 
Type: Galeospalax mygaloides Pomel, from the Tertiary of Marcouin, near Volvic, 

France. 
Extinct. Based on a humerus. 
Galeospalax: yaXfj, weasel; 6ita.Xaq., mole. 



GALEOTHERIUM GALESTES. 289 

Galeotlierium Jager, 1839. Ferse, Canidse? 

Die Fossilen Saugethiere in Wiirtembergj 2te Abtheil., 71, 200, 203, Tab. x, figs. 

43-47, 1839. 
Type (species not mentioned), from the ' Bohnerzgruben ' of Neuhausen, Wurt- 

temberg, Germany. 
Extinct. Based on two teeth — one molar and one canine. 
Galeotherium: yaXiJ, weasel; Q??piov, wild beast. 

Galeotlierium Wagner, 1839. Fera?, Viverridse. 

Abhandl. Math.-Phys. CI. K. Bayer. Akad. Wiss. Miinchen, III, lste Abtli., 

163-165, Tab. i, figs. 4-5, 1839; ibid., VIII, lste Abth., 119, 1857 (exact date of 

publication). 
Type (species not mentioned), from the foot of Mt. Pentelicus, Greece. 
Name preoccupied by Galeotlierium Jager, 1839, a genus of extinct Canidse (?) 

Replaced by Ictitherium Wagner, 1848. 
Extinct. Based on "em einzelner freier Backenzahn, ein Stuck Unterkiefer 

mit zwei Backenzahnen." 
Galeotlierium: yaXfj, weasel; (irjpiov, wild beast. 

Galera Browne, 1789. Feiw, Mustelidse. 

Civil & Nat. Hist, Jamaica, 2d ed., 485, Tab. 49, fig. 1, 1789; Gray, List Spec. 

Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xx, 67, 1843. 
Type: Mustela barbara Linnaeus, from Brazil. "This creature [the 'Guinea Fox'] 

is often brought to Jamaica from the coasts of Guinea [Guiana], where it is a 

native." (Browne.) 
Galera: Lat. galera = galerum, helmet. 

Galerella Gray, 1864. Fera?, Viverridse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 564; Cat. Carn., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. 

Brit. Mus., 161-162, 1869; Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1882, 63, 68-69. 
Type: Ci/iiidis ochraceus Gerrard (=Herpestes gracilis Riippell), from East Africa. 
Galerella: Dim. of Gale* 

Galeriscus Thomas, 1894. Ferse, Mustelidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XIII, No. 78, pp. 522-524, June 1, 1894. 
Type: Galeriscus jacksoni Thomas, from Mianzini, Masailand, Africa (alt. 8,000 ft. ). 
Galeriscus: Dim. of Galera — from its resemblance in general build to Galera alla- 
mandi. 

Galerix Pomel, 1848. Insectivora, Tupaiidee. 

Archiv. Sci. Phys. etNat,, Bibl. Univ. Geneve, IX, 164, 251, Oct., 1848. 
Galeryx Filhol, Bull. Soc. Philomathique, 6 e st'r.,X, 87-88, 1873. 
Species: Galerix viverrdides Pomel ( — Viverra exilis Blainville), from Sansan, 

France; and G. magnus Pomel, from the Tertiary of Europe? 
Extinct. 
Galerix: Gale + ( Hyst- ) rix. 

Galestes Gore, 1874. Marsupialia, ? 

Glossary Foss. Mamm., 22, 1874; Seeley, in Phillip's Man. Geol., I, 521, 1885; 

Woodward & Sherborn, Cat. Brit. Foss. Vert., 349, Jan., 1890. 
"A genus of insectivorous Marsupials, remains of which have been found in the 

middle Purbeck beds of the Upper Oolites." (Gore.) 
"A supposed Purbeck Mammal, quoted in geological text-books — the name not 

existing in zoological literature." (Woodward & Sherborn.) 

7591— No. 23—03 19 



290 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Galestes — Continued. 

"Apparently taken from a drawing of R. Owen's, preserved in the British 
Museum (Natural History) ... In the Owen MSS., which I fortunately 
rescued for the nation, there is a drawing which formed f. 21 of pi. in of 
Owen, Mesoz. Mamm. (Paleont Soc, 1871), upon which Owen has written 
1 Gale[le]stes [sic] yockfj, a weasel.' " (Sherborn in epist., June 28, 1897.) 

Extinct. 

Galestes: yaAi], weasel; A^tfr//?, robber. 

Galethylax Geryais, 1848-52. Creodonta, Proviverrida? 

Zool. et Paleont. Franc., l e cd., I, 132-133, 1 fig. in text, 1848-52; 2 e ed., 219-220, 

fig. 21 in text, 1859. 
Type: Galethylax blainvillei Gervais, from the Eocene gypsum beds near Paris, 

France. 
Extinct. Based on a lower jaw. 

Galethylax: yocXfi, w r easel; OvXa£, = QvXaKos, pouch — from the supposed marsu- 
pial affinities of the genus. 
Galictis Bell, 1826. Ferae, Mustelidae. 

Zool. Journ., II, 551-552, 1826; Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1837, 46-48. 
Gallictis Waterhouse, Zool. H. M. S. 'Beagle,' pt. u, Mamm., 21, 1839 (mis- 
print). 
Type: Viverra vittata Gmelin, from Surinam (Dutch Guiana). 
Galictis: yakff, weasel; i'ktk;, weasel or yellow-breasted marten. 
Galictis I. Geoffroy, 1837. Ferae, Viverridae. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, Y, No. 17, p. 581, July-Dec, 1837. 
Type: Mustela striata E. Geoffroy, from Madagascar. 

Name preoccupied by Galictis Bell, 1826, a genus of Mustelidae. Replaced by 
Galidictis-I. Geoffroy, 1839. 
Galidia I. Geoffroy, 1837. Ferae, Viverridae. 

Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris. 2 e ser., Zool., VIII, 251-252, Oct., 1837; Comptes Rendus, 

Paris, V, 580-581, 1837; Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 522-524. 
Species, 3: Galidia elegans (Fi&court) , G. unicolor Geoffroy, and G. olivacea Geoffroy, 

from Madagascar. 
Galidia: yaXiSsvs, dim. of yaXff, weasel. 
Galidictis I. Geoffroy, 1839. Ferae, Viverrid;e. 

Mag. de Zool., Mamm., art. No. 5, pp. 32-34 footnote, 37 footnote, pis. xvm-xix, 
1839; Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 547-548; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & 
Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 144-145, 1869. 
New name for Galictis Geoffroy, 1837, which is preoccupied by Galictis Bell, 

1826, a genus of Mustelidae. 
Galidictis: Galidia; ikti%, weasel. 
Gallacho (see Galago) . Primates, Lemuridte. 

Gallictis (see Galictis Bell). Ferae, Mustelidae. 

Galogale (see Calogale). Ferae, Viverridae. 

Galomys (see Galemys Kaur). Insectivora, Talpidae. 

Gamba Liais, 1872. Marsupialia, Didelphyidae. 

Climats, Geol., Faune et Geog. Botanique du Bresil, 328-330, 1872. 
Species and subspecies, 5, from North and South America: Gamba palmata Liais 
( = ChironectesynpocJ:Desm&rest); G. aurita var. brasiliensis Liais; G. auritav&T. 
riryiniaiia (= Didelphis virginiana) ; Didelphis opossum Linnaeus; and D. philander 
Linnaeus, "dont les poehes sont completes et les poils de deux sortes." 
Gamba: " Drrive de came ou game, mamelle, etde mbae, objet, chose, et equivaut 
par consequent a mamelles recouvertes. " (Liais.) 



GAMBATHEKIUM GAZELLA. 291 

Gambatherium Liais, 1872. MarsupiaJia, Didelphyidae. 

Climate, Geol., Faune et Geog. Botanique <lu Bresil, 331, 1872; Ameghino, 

Mam. Fos. Bepub. Argentina, 28, 1889. 
New name for Thylacotherium Lund, 1839, which is preoccupied by Tlu/larotlierium 

Valenciennes, 1838, a genus of Amphitheriidte. Type, Thylacotherium ferox 

Lund, from the basin of the Bio das Velhas, Minas Geraes, Brazil. 
Extinct. 
Gambatherium: Gamba (from Indian words meaning 'covered breasts'); Otjpiov, 

wild beast. 
Gamphotherium Gloger, 1841. Ungulata, Froboscidea, Elephantidse. 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, pp. xxxii, 119, 1841; Thomas, Ann. & Mag. 

Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XV, 191, 192, Feb. 1, 1895. 
Type: Mastodon angustidens Cuvier, from the Miocene of France. (See Gompho- 

therium Burmeister, 1837.) 
Extinct. 
Gamphotherium (Gomphotherium): yo/i^og, bolt, nail; Qypiov, wild beast — in 

allusion to the conical tubercles of the molars. 

Garzonia Ameghino, 1891. Marsupialia, Garzonidae. 

Nuevos Bestos Mamff. F6s. Fatagonia Austral, 21-22, Aug., 1891; Bevista Argen- 
tina Hist. Nat., 1, entr. 5a, 307-308, Oct, 1, 1891. 

Species 4, from the Lower Eocene of southern Patagonia: Garzonia typica Ame- 
ghino, G. annectens Ameghino, G. captiva Ameghino, and G. minima Ameghino. 

Extinct. 

Garzonia: In honor of Don Eleazar Garz6n, governor of the province of Cordoba, 
Argentina. 
Gasella (see Gazella). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Gastrimargus Spix, 1823. Primates, Cebidag. 

Simiarum et VespertUionum Brasil. Spec. Nov., 39-42, tab. xxviii-xxix, 1823. 
Species: Gastrimargus olivaceus Spix, from Cameta, on the Bio Tocantins, and 

Villa Nova, on the Amazon, State of Para; and G. infumatus Spix, from the Bio 

I^a, Brazil. 
Gastrimargus: y adz pifiapy o£, gluttonous. 

Gaveus Hodgson, 1847. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, XVI, pt. 11, new ser., No. 7, pp. 705-706, July-Dec, 1847. 
"Type: Bos frontalis vel gayaeus vel sylhetanus," from India. 
Gavseus: gavi or gaoi, native Indian name of the gayal in Chittagong and Assam. 

Gazella (subg. of Antilope) Lichtenstein, 1814. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovida?. 

Mag. Gesellsch. Naturforsch. Freunde, Berlin, VI, 152, 171-178, 1814 (' Gazella? ) ; 
Bafinesque, Analyse de la Nature, 56, 1815; Blainville, Bull. Soc. Philo- 
matique, Paris, 75, 1816; Ogilby, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1836, No. xlviii, 
137, June 27, 1837 (raised to generic rank); Sclater & Thomas, Book of Ante- 
lopes, III, 65, 1898. 

Gasella II. Smith, Griffith's Cuvier, Aniin. Kingdom, V, 329-333, 1827. 

Species 12. Bafinesque's genus was evidently based on Antilope gazella Pallas, 
1766 ( = Gapra dorcas Linnaeus, 1758) . Ogilby in 1837 stated: "Typus est Gazella 
dorcas (Ant. dorcas)," from Africa. Sclater & Thomas, however, selected .4. 
subguUurosa as the type on the following ground: "This species ^subgutturosa"] 
may be taken as the type of Gazella, as being the only one which is common 
to Lichtenstein' s original genus, and to Blainville's 'Gazella' of 1816. The 
latter author is ordinarily quoted as the original founder of the name, and 
his list includes the best-known species — G. dorcas. But Lichtenstein's genus, 
two years earlier in date, does not contain G. dorcas at all, and the only way 



292 INDEX CIENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Gazella — Continued. 

in which the name Gazella can be properly retained for this group is by regard- 
ing G. subgutturosa as its type" (1. c, p. 65). 

Gazella: French, gazelle; Ital., Pg., gazella; from Arabic, gkazal, wild goat, 
gazelle. 
Gelada Gray, 1843. Primates, Cercopithecidse. 

['Les Geladas' Lesson, Species Mamm., 103-104, 1840; Nouv. Tableau Regne 
Animal, Mamm., 6, 1842 — French name for a group in the subgenus Pap id] ; 
Gray, List. Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xvii, 9, 1843. 

Type: Gelada ruppellii Gray (=Ma,cacus gelada Riippell), from Abyssinia. (See 
Theropithecus I. Geoff roy, 1841 ) . 

Gelada: Native name of this monkey in Abyssinia. 
Gelasinus Temminck, 1837. Chiroptera, Pteropodidse. 

Mon. Mammalogie, II, Mon. 11, p. 100, 1837; Matschie, Fledermause Berliner 
Mus. Xaturkunde, Lief. 1, Megachiroptera, 81-85, 1899. 

Type: Harpyia pallasii Temminck [=Vespeiinlio cephalotes Pallas), from the 
Molucca Islands. 

New name for Harpyia and Hypoderma, mentioned, but not adopted by Tem- 
minck: "Cette innovation [substitution de Hypoderma pour Harpyva~\ nous 
parait aussi superfine que la denomination generique Gelasinus, sous laquelle 
nos naturalistes dans l'Inde nous ont adresse V Harpyia pallasii." (Temminck. ) 

Name preoccupied (?) by Gelasinus Van der Hoeven, 1827 (Handboek Dierkunde, 
I, 446). Van der Hoeven's name is merely a variant of Gelasimus Latreille, 
1817 (Nouv. Diet. Hist. Nat,, XII, 517), a genus of Crustacea. 

Gelasinus: yehadivos, a laugher. 
Gelocus Aymakd, 1855. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Traguli<he. 

"Ann. Soc. Agr.. Sci., Arts et Com m. Puy, XX, 1855" (fide Gervais); Congres 
Sci. France, for 1855, I, 233, 1856; Gervais, Zool. et Paieont. Franc., ed. 2, 
154-155, 1859; Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., II, 159-160, 1885. 

Gelaucus Bonney (?), Geol. Record for 1877, 296, 1880. 

Species: Amphitragulus communis Aymard, and Gelocus minor Aymard, from 
the Oligocene of Ronzon, near Puy-en-Velay, Haute-Loire, France. 

Extinct. 

Gelocus: yij, earth; oik loo, to dwell. " Suivant M. Aymard les animaux de 

Ronzon ont pour la plupart vecu dans des marais; le Gelocus devait avoir des 

habitudes plus terrestres; e'est a cela que son nom fait allusion." (Gaudry, 

Enchainementa Monde Animal, Mamm. Tert,, 78, 1895). 

Genetta (subgenus of Virerra) Oken, 1816. Ferae, Viverrid?e. 

Lehrbuch Naturgesch., 3ter Theil, Zool., 2te Abth., 1010-1012, 1816; G. Cuvier, 
Regne Animal, I, 156-158, 1817; 2 e ed., 155-156, 1829; Griffith, Cuvier's Ani- 
mal Kingdom, V, 153-155, 1827 (raised to generic rank); W. L. Sclater, 
Mamm. S. Africa, I, 52-58, figs. 12-14, 1900 (type fixed as V. genetta.) 

Species, 5: Virerra genetta turcica Oken, from Turkey and the Levant; Virerra 
genetta hispanica Oken, from Spain and France; V. fossa Buffon, from Mada- 
gascar; Genetta capensis {= V. malaccensis) , and V. fasciata Gmelin, from India. 

Cuvier includes 3 species: Viverra genetta Linnaeus (type), V. fossa Buffon, and 
V. fasciata Gmelin. 

Genetta: Old French genette, genet, civet cat. 
Genyscoelus Liais, 1872. Glires, Dasyproctidre. 

Climats, Geol., Faune, etc., Bresil, 537, 1872. 

Emendation suggested, but never used, for Cedogenus Cuvier, 1807. "Le v grec 
ne repondant pas a l'ti latin, le nom de Cuvier n'est pas acceptable, puisqu'il 
renferme une faute d'orthographie; et, pour faire un nom d'apparence reelle- 



GENYSCCELUS— GEORYCHUS. 293 

Genyscoelus — Continued. 

merit latine, il aurait an moins fallu ecrire Genyscoelus et non Ccelogenys. 
Ajoutons enfin que ce nom n'a rien de caracteristique pour le genre Paca . . . 
Ici done encore tout est en faveur de l'adoption du nom americain [Paca] 
dejti choisi par Fischer." (Liais. ) 
Genysccelus: yti'v?, cheek; K"o?Ao?, hollow — in allusion to the enormous, hollowed 
zygomata. 

Geocapromys (subgenus of Capromys) Chapman, 1901. Glires, Octodontidse. 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., N. Y., XIV, 314, Nov. 12, 1901. 

Species, 3: Capromys brownii Fischer (type), from Jamaica ; C. thoracatus (True), 
from Little Swan Island, Gulf of Honduras; and C. ingrahami Allen, from 
the easternmost of the Plana Keys, Bahamas. 

Geocapromys: yfj, earth; -\-Oapromys — in allusion to its terrestrial habits as com- 
pared with the arboreal habits of true Capromys. (Chapman.) 

Geocyon Wagler, 1830. Ferae, Protelidae. 

Nat. Syst. Amphibien, 30, 1830. 
Type: Froteles lalandii I. Geoff roy ( = Yiverra cristata Sparrman) , from the Cape 

of Good Hope, Africa. 
Geocyon: yfj, earth; kvoov, dog. 

Geogale Milne-Edwards & Grandidier, 1872. Insectivora, Potamogalidae. 

Ann. Sci. Nat., 5 e ser., Zool. et Paleont., XV, art. No. 19, pp. 1-5, July, L872. 
Type: Geogale aurita Milne-Edwards & Grandidier, from Mouroundava or Tullear, 

western Madagascar. 
Geogale: yfj, earth; yaXfj, weasel — from the animal's subterranean habits. 
Geolabis Cope, 1885. Insectivora, Leptictidae. 

Tert. Vert., 807-808, pi. lxii, figs. 30-32, Feb., 188-5. 
Type: Geolabis rhynchseus Cope, from the Oligocene of Colorado. 
Extinct. "Represented by portions of two crania which are not accompanied 

by either superior or inferior molar teeth." 
Geolabis: yij, earth; Aa/iz's, handle, holder, forceps. 
Geomys Rafinesque, 1817. Glires, Geomyidae. 

Am. Monthly Mag., II, No. 1, p. 45, Nov., 1817; Merriam, N. Am. Fauna, No. 8, 

109, Jan. 31, 1895 (type fixed). 
Species: Geomys pinetis Rafinesque ( = Mus tuza Ord, type) , from the pine barrens 

near Augusta, Georgia; and G. cineria Rafinesque ( = Mus lnn-sari us Shaw) , from 

the upper Mississippi Valley. 
Geomys: yfj, earth; juvs, mouse — from the animal's subterranean mode of life. 
Geopithecus Lesson, 1829. Primates, Cebidse. 

Diet. Class. Hist. Nat, XV, 52-61, May, 1829 (under 'Sagouin'). 
Geopilliecus seems to be used as a supergeneric term. It contains four divisions 

or groups: CaUithrix Cuvier, NyctipithecusS~pix., Piiheda Desmarest, and Brachy- 

vrus Spix, which are used as genera. 
Geopithecus: yfj, earth; itityKos, ape. 
Georychus Illiger, 1811. Glires, Bathyergidte. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 87, 1811; Allen, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., 

N. Y., VII, 183, June, 1895 (type fixed). 
Georrhychus Minding, Geog. Vertheilung Saugeth., 80, 1829. 
^Georhychus Wagner, Suppl. Schreber's Siiugth., Ill, 369-375, 1843. 
Species, 3: Mus capensis Pallas (type), from Cape Colony; M. talpinus Pallas, from 

Russia; and M. aspalax Pallas, from Siberia. 
Georychus: yEoopvxoi, throwing up the earth — from the animal's habit of 

throwing up heaps of earth along the line of its burrows. 



294 INDEX GENERUM MAMMAL1UM. 

Geosciurus A. Smith, 1834. Glires, Scruridae. 

S. Afr. Quart. Journ., II, No. 2, p. 128, Jan.-Mar., 1831 (provisional name); 

Gray, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 3d ser., XX, 332, 333-334, Nov., 1867; 

Trouessart, Cat. Marnm. in Bull. Soc. d' Etudes Sci. d' Angers, X, 1" fasc, 85, 

1880; Thomas, Proe. Zool. Soc. London, 1897, 933 (type given as X. capensis). 
Type: Sci um* erythopus Geoffroy, from "West Africa. 

Geosciurus: yfj, earth; -\-Sciurus — 'ground squirrel,' from its terrestrial habits. 
Geotrypus Pomel, 1848. Insectivora, Talpidse. 

Archiv Sci. Phys. et Nat., Bibl. Univ. Geneve, IX, 159-160, 246, Oct., 1848; 

Cat. Meth. Vert. Foss. Bassin de la Loire, 11-12, 1854. 
Species: Geotrypus acuHdens Pomel, from the Tertiary of Cournon, near Issoire; 

and G. antiquum (=Iblpa antiqua Blainville), from Puy-de-D6me, France. 
Extinct. 
Geotrypus: yfj, earth; rpvitdoa, to bore — in allusion to its supposed fossorial 

habits. 
Gephyranodus Ameghino, 1891. Edentata, ? 

Revista Argentina Hist, Nat,, I, entr. 2a, 119-120, Apr. 1, 1891. 
Type (species not mentioned), from southern Patagonia (near Gallegos?). The 

description is quoted from a letter from Carlos Ameghino, and the name 

appears only in a footnote without initials of the author. 
Extinct. Based on ' ' un craneo bastante complete ' ' 
Gephyranodus:, y£<pvpa, bridge; dv-, without; 68ov$, tooth. 
Gerbilliscus (subgenus of Gerbillus) Thomas, 1897. Glires, Murida?, Gerbillina?. 
Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1897, pt. in, 433, Oct. 1, 1897; Ann. & Mag. Nat, 

Hist., 7th ser., IX, 441-442, June, 1902 (raised to generic rank). 
Type: Gerbillus bbhmi Noack, from Qua Mpala, on Lake Tanganyika, Marungu, 

East Africa. 
Gerbilliscus: Dim. of Gerbillus. 
Gerbillus Desmarest, 1804. Glires, Murida?, Gerbillina?. 

Nouv. Diet, Hist, Nat., XXIV, Tab. Meth. Mamm., 22, 1804; W. L. Sclater, 

Ann! S. Afr. Mus., I, pt. 2, pp. 190-193, Mar., 1899 (type fixed). 
Species, 3: Gerbillus segyptius Desmarest ( = Mn* longipes Linmeus, type), from 

Egypt; G. canadensis Desmarest, from Canada; and G. pi/ramidum Desmarest, 

from Egypt, 
Gerbillus: Dim. of gerbua or jerboa, from Arabic yarbu, the flesh of the back and 

loins, an oblique descending muscle. Applied to the jerboa in allusion to the 

strong muscles or its hind legs. (Century Dict. ) 
Gerboides ('I. Geoffroy') Gervais, 1855. Marsupialia, Macropodida?. 

Geoffroy, in Gervais' Hist. Nat. Mamm., II, 271, 1855. 
Type: Kaiigurus rufus Desmarest, from Australia. 
Gerboides: Gerbua or jerboa; aiSos, form. 
Gerbua F. Cuyier, 1825. Glires, Pedetidte. 

Dents Mamm., 254, 1825 (synonym of Helamys) . 
Type: Gerbua capensis Cuvier ( =Mus coffer Pallas), from the Cape of Good Hope. 

Probably a modification of Yerbua Forster, 1778. 
Gerbua: a form of jerboa. 
Gergoviomys (Croizet MS. ) Blainville, 1840. Glires, Theridomyida?. 

L'Institut, VIII, 207, 1840; Comptes Rendus, Paris, X, No. 24, p. 931, Jan.-June, 

1S40 (nomen nodum?). 
Type: Gergoviomys sp. Name of a genus of fossils from Auvergne, France, in 

Croizet's manuscript catalogue, quoted by Blainville. 
Extinct. 
Gergoviomys: Gergovia, a mountain near Menat, Puy-de-D6me, France; uv$, 

mouse. 



GERONOPS GLIS. 295 

Geronops Amkouino, 1891. Edentata, Megalonyehida\ 

Nuevos Restos Manu'f. F6s. Patagonia Austral, 39, Aug., 1891; Revista Argentina 
Hist. Nat, I, entr. 5a, 320, Oct. 1, 1891. 

Type: Geronops circulqris Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern Pata- 
gonia. 

Name said by its author to lie preoccupied by Geranopsis Lydekker, L891, a 
genus of extinct birds. Replaced by TSugeranops Ameghino, 1891. 

Extinct. 

Geronops: yipaiv, an old man; oif>, aspect. 
Gigantomys Link, 1794. Marsupialia, Macropodidse. 

BeytT. Naturgesch., pt. i, 70, 1794; Mag. Thiergesch., I, pt. II, 38, 1794; 
Meyer, Zool. Annalen, I, 319, 1794. 

Type: Gigantomys canguru Link (=Didelphis gigantea Schreber = Yerboa gigantea 
Zimmermann), from New South Wales. 

Name antedated by Maeropus Shaw, 1790. 

Gigantomys: yiycc?, yiyavro?, giant; uv$, mouse. 
Giraffa P.kisson, 1762. CTngukta, Artiodactyla, < riraflfida?. 

Regnum Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 12, 37-38, 17(ii'; BrOnnich, 
Zoologise Fundamenta, 36, 46 — 47, 1772 (no species mentioned; Scorou, [ntrod. 
Hist. Nat., 494, 1777; Zimmermann, Geog. Geschichte Mensch. und vierfiissig. 
Thiere, 11. 125-127, 1780; Mekkiam, Science, new Ber., I, No. 14, p. 375, Apr. 5, 
1895. 

Type: Giraffa giraffa Brisson (= Cervus camelopardalis Linnaeus), from Africa. 

Giraffa: French giraffe, Arabic zaraf, zarafa, giraffe. (Century Diet.) The 
Arabic word means 'one who walks swiftly.' (Beddakd, Mamm., 303.) 
Arabic xirapha, 'significant of its graceful appearance.' (Tegetmeier, Lon- 
don Field, vol. 92, p. 226, July 30, 1898.) 
Gladiator (subgenus of Orca) Gray, 1870. Cete, Delphinida?. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1870, p. 71, figs. 1, 3. 

Type: Orca stenorhyncha Gray { — Orca gladiator Gray), from the North Sea. 

Gladiator: Lat., gladiator — probably in allusion to the narrow tapering beak, 
and the animal's blood-thirsty propensities. 

Glauconycteris (subg. of Chalinolobus) Dobson, 1875. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 
Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1875, 383; Cat. Chiroptera Brit. Mus., 247, 252, 1878. 
Species, 3: Chalinolobus poertsis (= Kerivoula poensis Gray), from Fernando Po, 
West Africa; C. argentatua Dobson, from the Cameroon Mountains, West 
Africa; and C. rariegatus ( = Scotophilia rariegatus Tomes) , from Otjoro, south- 
western Africa. 
Glauconycteris: yXavKog, gray; vvKzspis, bat — from the fur, which is light gray 
or cream-colored at the tips. 
Glirisorex (see Glisorex). Insectivora, Tupaiidse. 

Glis Brisson, 1762. (Hires, Muscardinidse. 

Regnum Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 13, 113-118, 1762; "Linnjeus, 
Amoen Acad. VII, 450, 1766" (fide Sherborn, Index Anim., 1902); Mekkiam, 
Science, new ser., I, No. 14, p. 376, Apr. 5, 1895 (type fixed). 
Type: Glis glis Brisson ( = Sciurus glis Linnaeus, 1766), from southern Europe. 
Glis: Lat., dormouse. 
Glis Erxleben, 1777. Glires, Sciuridse? 

Syst. Regni Anim., Mamm., 358-377, 1777. 

Species, 13: Glis wan/iota, Q. monax, <■. canadensis, G. cricetus, G. tscherkessicus, 
G. citclliis, 67. zemni, G. lemmus, G. migratorius, G. barabensis, <>'. arenarius, G. 
lagurus, and G. oeeonomicus. 
Name preoccupied by Glis Brisson, 1762, a genus of Muscardinidse. 



296 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Gliscebus Lesson, 1840. Primates, Lemuridee. 

Species Mamm., 207, 216-217, 1840; Nouv. Tabl. Regne Animal, Mamra., 9, 1842. 
Species: Gliscebus murium Lesson, and G. rufus Lesson, from Madagascar. 
Name antedated by Scartes Swainson, 1835. 

Gliscebus: Lat. glis, dormouse; /o)/io?, long-tailed monkey — in the sense of dor- 
mouse or mouse lemur. 
Glischropus (subgenus of Vesperugo) Dobson, 1875. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidfe. 
Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1875, 472-474. 
Species: Vesperugo nanus Peters, from Mozambique, southeastern Africa; and V. 

tylopus Dobson, from North Borneo. 
Glischropus: ylidxP ?, sticky; itovg, foot — from the elastic, adhesive fleshypads 

at the base of the thumbs and on the soles of the feet 
Glisorex Desmarest, 1822. Insectivora, Tupaiidse. 

Mammalogie, II, Suppl., 535-536 footnote, 1822; Blaixville, Ann. Franc, et 

Etrang. d'Anat. et Physiol., Paris, II, 221, 1838; Osteog., Descr. Icon. Mamm. 

Eecents et Foss., I, Insectivores, 56, 109, 111, pi. in, tigs, in pis. vi-viii, 1850; 

Owen, Odontography, III, 1845. 
Glissorex Minding, Geog. Vertheilung Siiugeth., 64, 182H. 
Glisosorex Giebel, Odontographie, 18, fig. 6, 1855. 
Glirisorex Scudder, Nomenclator Zool., pt. n, 131, 1882. 
Name suggested in place of Sorexglis Diard, 1822. "M. Diard, qui a decouvert 

trois especes de ce genre, lui avait impose le nom de Sorexglis . . . Nous 

pensons qu'en renversant les deux mots dont ce nom se compose, il en resultera 

un autre, plus facile a prononcer, et en cela preferable. Ce nom seroit Ghsore, 

Glisorex. Celui de Tupaia, adopte par M. Raffles, peut aussi, a la rigueur, etre 

conserve. ' ' 
Glisorex: Glis-\- Sorex (anagram of Sorexglis) — 'rodent shrew,' from its arboreal 

habits, resembling those of a squirrel. 
Globicephala Lesson, 1828. Cete, Delpbinidae. 

Hist. Nat, Mamm. Ois. decouv. depuis 1788 (Compl. CEuvr. Buffon), I [276-291, 

pi. 8, 'Globicephale'], 441, 1828; Nouv. Tabl. Regne Animal, Mamm. 200, 1842. 
Globiocephalux Gray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit, Mus., p. xxii, 1843; Zool. Erebus 

& Terror, 32, 1844; Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 243-244. 
Globicephalus Van Beneden, Osteol. Cetaces, 554, 1880. 
Globiceps Flower, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1883, 508-509 (type fixed); 1884, 418 

(preoccupied by Globiceps Lepelletier & Serville, 1825, a genus of Heiniptera). 
Species: Delphinus deductor Scoresby ( = D- melas Traill, type), from the North 

Atlantic; and Delphinus rissoanus Cuvier, from the Mediterranean Sea near 

Nice, France. 
Globicephala: Lat. globus, ball; K£(pa\.i), head — from the globular shape of the 

head, due to the great development of fat in front of the blowhole. 
Globilemur Forsyth Major, 1897. Primates, Lernurida?. 

Proc. Roy. Soc. London, LXII, No. 379, pp. 46-47, pi. 5, figs. 1-3, Sept. 10, 1897. 
Type: Globilemur flacourti Forsyth Major, from the Pleistocene near Nossi-V6, 

southwestern Madagascar. 
Extinct. Based on a skull. 
Globilemur: Lat. globus, ball; + Lemur. 
Globiocephalus (see Globicephala). Cete, Delphinidse. 

Gloionycteris Gray, 1866. Chiroptera, Rhinolophida?. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 82. 

Type: Gloionycteris armigera ( =RhinolophusarmigerTiodgaon), from Nepal, India. 
Gloionycteris: yAoios, gum; wKrspic, bat — in allusion to the large glandular 

elevations on the sides of the forehead. 



GLOSSONYCTERIS GLYPTATELUS. 297 

Glossonycteris Peters, 1868. Chiroptera, PhyUostomatidae. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, 1868, 364-365. 

Type: Glossonycteris lasiopyga Peters, from Mexico. 

Glossonycteris: yX&dda, tongue; vvKrepi^, bat — from the long, slender, exten- 
sible tongue. 
Glossophag-a Geoffroy, 1818. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidse. 

Mem. Mus. Hist. Nat., Paris, IV, 413-418, pis. 17, 18, 1818; Dobson, Cat. 
Chiroptera Brit. Mus. 499-501, 1878; Flower & Lydekker, Mamm. Living 
and Extinct, 674-675, 1891. 

Type: Vespertilio soricinus Pallas, from tropical America. 

Glossophaga: yXa?dda, tongue; (payelv, to eat. It was formerly supposed that 
the long, slender, extensile tongue was used to facilitate the flow of blood in 
the animal's alleged blood-sucking operations. These bats, however, are 
frugivorous, and the tongue is used to lick out the soft pulp of fruits. (Cen- 
tury Dict. ) "The food appears . . . to consist of both fruit and insects, and 
the long tongue may also be used for extracting the latter from the deep 
corolla? of certain flowers." (Flower & Lydekker.) 

Glossotherium Owen, 1840. Edentata, Megatheriidse. 

Zool. Voy. 'Beagle,' pt. i, Foss. Mamm., 57-63, pi. xvi, 1840. 
Type: Glossotherium darwini Owen, from the Rio Sarandis (a branch of the Rio 

Negro, in Banda Oriental), Uruguay. 
Extinct. "Represented . . . by a fragment of the cranium." 
Glossotherium: yX&dda, tongue; Ot//jiov, wild beast. 

Glyphidelphis Gervais, 1859. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Zool. et Paleont. Franc., 2 e ed., 301, 1859; Mem. Acad. Sci. Montpellier, V, 3 e 
pt., 452, 1863. 

Type: Delphinus rostratus F. Cuvier, from the Indian Ocean. (See Gray, Cat. 
Seals & Whales Brit, Mus., 233, 1866.) 

Glyphidelphis: y\v<pic,, the notched end of an arrow; 8e\<pi$, dolphin — in allu- 
sion to the teeth. 

Glyphodon Roth, 1899. Ungulata, Litopterna, Proterotheriidse. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, IX, 383-384, 1899; Ameghino, Sin. Geol.-Paheont., Se- 
• gundo Censo Nac. Repub. Argentina, I, Supl., p. 12, July, 1899. 
Type: Glyphodon langi Roth, from the ' upper Cretaceous' of Canadon Colorado, 

Territory of Chubut, Patagonia. 
Name preoccupied by Glyphodon Giinther, 1858, a genus of Reptilia. Replaced 

by Xesmodon Berg, 1899. 
Extinct. Based on a skull containing the last two molars. 
Glyphodon: yA.V(pr/, carving, notch; 68cbv = d8ov<;, tooth. 

Glyphonycteris Thomas, 1896. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XVIII, 301-303, Oct. 1, 1896. 
Type: Glyphonycteris sylvestris Thomas, from Iinravalles, Costa Rica. 
Glyphonycteris: yXvcpoo, to chisel; vvKrepis, bat— from the large, chiael-shaped 
upper middle incisors. 

Glyphotes Thomas, 1898. Glires, Sciuridse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 7th ser., II, 250-251, Sept. 1, 1898. 
Type: Glyphotes simus Thomas, from Mount Kina Balu, North Borneo. 
Glyphotes: yXixpoa, to chisel — from the broad, chisel-shaped lower incisors. 

Glyptatelus Ameghino, 1897. Edentata, Glyptodontidae (Propabeohoplophoridse). 

La Argentina al traves de las Ultimas Epocas Geologicas, 19 footnote, 1897, 

(nomen nudum); Bol. Inst. Geog. Argentino, XVIII, 507, fig. 84, Oct. 6, 1897. 



298 INDEX GENERLTM MAMMALIUM. 

Glyptatelus — Continued. 

Type: Glyptatelus tatusinus Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Glyptatelus: yXvitros, carved; dra\)'/z, incomplete. 
Glyptodon Owen, 1838. Edentata, Grlyptodontidae. 

"( >wen, in Parish's 'Buenos Ayres and La Plata,' 178, 1838" (fide Lydekker) ; 

Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 2 e ser., XII, 159, 1839; Proc. Geol. Soc. London, III, 

108, 1839; Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., V, 114-121, fig. 21, 1887. 
Type: Glyptodon clavipes Owen, from the Pleistocene of the province of Buenos 

Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct. 
Glyptodon: yXvitro^, carved; 68cbv—d8ov<;, tooth— in allusion to the Muted 

teeth. 
Glyptotherium Osbokn, 1903. Edentata, Glyptodontidae. 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., XIX, 491-494, pi. xliii, Aug. 17, 1903. 
Type: Glyptotherium texanum Osborn, from the lower Pleistocene of Texas. 
Extinct. Based on a "nearly complete carapace, pelvis, sacrum, caudals, and 

complete tail armature." 
Glyptotherium: Glypto{don); Qrjpiov, wild beast. 
Gnathopsis Leidy, 1852. Edentata, Megalonychidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1852, 117. 
Type: Gnathopsis oweni Leidy, from Patagonia (=Megalonyx jeffersonii Owen, in 

Yoy. 'Beagle,' Foss. Mamm., pi. xxix — not M. jeffersonii Cuvier). 
Extinct. 

Gnathopsis: yrdboc,, jaw; oipis, appearance. 
Golunda Gray, 1837. Glires, Muricbe, Murinae. 

Charlesworth's Mag. Nat. Hist., I, 586, Nov., 1837; W. L. Sclater, Ann. S. Air. 

Mus., I, pt. 2, pp. 222-223, Mar., 1899 (type fixed). 
Species, 3: Golunda eUioti (type), ami G. mettada, from Bombay, India; and Mus 

barbara Bennett, from Africa. 
Golunda: Gulandi, native (Canarese) name of the Indian bush-rat. 
Gomphotherium Blrmeister, 1837. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidse. 

Handbuch Naturgesch., 795, 1837. 

Type not mentioned. Characterized by presence of tusks in both jaws. 
Extinct. 

Gomphotherium: yopiftoc,, bolt, nail; Oi/piov, wild beast. 
Gornphotherium ('Filhol') Schlosser, 1884. Insectivora, Talpidae. 

"Filhol, Descr. Mamm. Foss. Phosphorites Querey, in Ann. Soc. Sci. Phys. Nat. 

Toulouse, 1884" (Comphotherium or Gomphotheriumf); Schlosser, Die Affen, 

Lemuren, Chiropteren, Insectivoren, Europ. Tertiiirs, Theil in, 69, 1890. 
Type: Gomphotherium elegans Filhol. Apparently merely a modified form of a 

genus originally described as Camphotherium (Bull. Soc. Philomathique, Paris, 

V1H, 62, 1884). (See Gomphotherium Burmeister, 1837.) 
Extinct. 
Gomphotherium Cope, 1886. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Camelidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XX, No. 7, pp. 618, 619-620, fig. 10, July, 1886; Wortman, Bull. 

Am. Mus. Nat, Hist., X, 114-120, figs. 11-19, Apr. 9, 1898. 
Type: Poebrotherium stembergii Cope, from the Miocene (John Day) of Oregon. 
Name preoccupied by Gomphotherium Burmeister, 1837, a genus of Elephantidas. 
Extinct. 
Goniacodon (subgenus of Mioclsenus) Cope, 1888. Creodonta, Triisodontida?. 

Trans. Am. Philos. Soc, new ser., XVI, pt. n, 320, 321, 1888; Scott, Proc. Acad. 

Nat. Sci. Phila., Nov. 15, 1892, 301-302 (raised to generic rank). 



GONIACODON GRAPHIURUS. 299 

Goniacodon — Continued. 

Type: Triisodon It visanus Cope, froni the Eocene of Xew Mexico. 

Extinct. Based on "part of a right mandibular ramus." 

Goniacodon: yesvia, angle; iw». point; 6Sd>r=6Sovg, tooth — in allusion to the 

fifth or anterior inner cusp of the lower molars, which forms "an anterior 

angle in the outline of the crown." 

Gorgon Gbay, 1850. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Knowsley Menagerie, 20, pi. xix, fig. 2, 1850 (Gorgon fasciatus on plate); Proc. 

Zool. Soc. London, for 1850, No. ccix, 139, Feb. 24, 1851 (subgenus of 

Catoblepas); S< later & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, I, pt. ii, 93, Jan., 1895 

(in synonymy). 
Type: Antilope gorgon H. Smith ( = A. taurina Burchell), from southeastern 

Africa. 
Gorgon: Vopycb, Gorgon, the grim one — in allusion to the animal's eccentric or 

even fierce aspect, due to the facial tufts ami throat and dorsal manes. 

Gorilla I. Geoffroy, 1852. Primates, Simiidse. 

Comptea Rendus, Paris, XXXIV, 84. 1852; XXXVI. 933-936, 18.53; XLYI, 

1130, 1858; Haeckel, Gen. Morphologie Organigmen, II, p. cl footnote, 1866; 

Hist. Creation, Am. ed., II. 275. 1883. 
Type: Troglodytes gorilla Savage, from the Gaboon River. West Africa. 
Name provisionally proposed in 1852, but formally adopted a year later. 
Gorilla: An African word mentioned (in the (ireek form yopiXXa) in the 

Periplus, by Hanno, a Carthaginian navigator of the fifth or sixth century, as 

the. native name of an animal supposed to have been an ape. (Century Diet., 

2579. ) 

Grampus (subgenus) Gray, 1828. Cete, DelphimM;e. 

Spicilegia Zoologica, I, p. 2, July 1, 1828; List Spec Mamm. Brit. Mus., 106, 

1843 (raised to generic rank); Zool. Erebus & Terror, 30, 1846; Flower, Proc. 

Zool. Soc. London, 1883, 510. 
Type: Ddphinus griseus Cuvier, 1812 | = Grampus cuvieri Gray, 1846), from Brest, 

France (locality fide Gray, Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 297, 1866). 
Grampus: Corruption of the French grand poisson, 'great fish.' 

Graphidurus (see Grapbiurus). Glires, MuBcardinidse. 

Graphimys Ameghino, 1891. Glires, Gctodontid;e. 

Xuevos Restos Mamff. Fos. Patagonia Austral, 14, Aug., 1891; Revista Argentina 
Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5a, 300, Oct. 1, 1891. 

Type: Graphimys provectus Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern Pata- 
gonia. 

Extinct. 

Graphimys: ypatp'elov, pencil; nvs, mouse. 

Graphiodon Leidy, 1870. Cete, Squalodontidse. 

Proc. Acad. Xat. Sci. Phila., 1870, 122; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, 

U. S. Geol. Surv., 590, 1902. 
Type: Graphiodon vinearius Leidy, from the Miocene of Gay Head, Marthas 

Vineyard, Massachusetts. 
Extinct. Based on a tooth. 
Graphiodon: ypacpelov, pencil; 66&>v = 6dovi;, tooth — "having allusion to the 

lettered appearance of the enamel of the tooth." (Leidy.) 

Grapbiurus- (F. Cuvieri Smuts, 1832. Glires, Muscardinidse. 

['Graphiure' Cuvier, Hist. Xat. Mamm., VI, livr. lx, pi. (Graphiure du Cap) 

with 2 pp. text, Sept. 1829]; Smuts, Eimrn. Mamm. Cap., 32-33, 1832; Cuvier 



300 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Graphiurus — Continued. 

quoted by Ogilby, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. lxi, 5, July, 1838; Cuviek, 

Hist. Nat. Mamm., VII, Table Gen. et Method., p. 4, No. 254, 1842; W. L. 

Sclater, Ann. S. Air. Mus., I, pt. 2, pp. 186-190, 1899. 
Graphyurus Blyth, in Cuvier's Animal Kingdom, new ed., 1849, 111; new ed., 

1863, 99. 
Graphidurus Wallace, Geog. Dist. Animals, II, 232, 1876. 
Type: G/rapMuruscapmsis Smuts, l&32( = Graphiuredu CapF. Cuvier,Sept., 1829= 

Sciurus ocularis A. Smith, May, 1829), from the Cape of Good Hope, Africa. 
Grapliiurus: ypacpsTov, pencil; ovpa, tail — in allusion to the pencil of hairs 

at the extremity of the cylindrical tail. 
Grimmia* ( subg. of Antilope), Laurillard, 1841. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 
Laurillard, in D'Orbigny's Diet. Univ. Hist. Nat., I, 623-624, 1841 (art. 

'Antilope'); Gray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., p. xxvi, 1843; Proc. Zool. 

Soc. London, 1871, 589-592, fig. 1 (raised to generic rank) ; Cat. Ruminant 

Mamm. Brit. Mus., 22, 1872; Sclater & Thomas, Book of Antelopes, I, pt. in, 

121, May, 1895 (in synonymy, type fixed). 
Species, 6: Antilope grimmia, A. pigmsea Pallas, A. frederici Laurillard, A. sylvi- 

cultrix Afzelius, A. mergens Blainville, from Africa; and A. quadricornis Blain- 

ville, from Nepal, India. Type, Cephalophus rufipilatus (= Antilope grimmia 

Desmarest — fide Sclater & Thomas). 
Grimmia: From the species named Capra grimmia by Linnseus in honor of Dr. 

Hermann Nicolas Grimm, who described it as early as 1686, under the name 

Capra sylvestris africana. (Sclater & Thomas, 1. c, 206.) 
Grison Oken, 1816. Ferae, Mustelidse. 

Lehrb. Naturgesch., 3ter Theil, Zool., 2te Abth., pp. xi, 1000-1001, 1816; Allen, 

Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., N. Y., XVI, 377, Oct. 11, 1902 (name revived). 
Grisonia Gkay, Ann. Philos., XXVI, 339, 1825 (nomen nudum); J. B. Fischer, 

Syn. Mamm., 154 footnote, 1829 (nomen nudum); Gray, List Spec. Mamm. 

Brit. Mus., pp. xx, 68, 1843; Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1865, 122. 
Type: Viverra vittata Gmelin, from Surinam (Dutch Guiana). 
Grisonia: Latinized form of grison, the common name of the genus, from French 

grison, gray-headed — in allusion to the characteristic marking. 
Gronotherium Ameghino, 1887. Ungulata, Toxodontia, Nesodontidaa. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamff. F6s. Patagonia Austral, p. 17, Dec, 1887. 
Type: Gronotherium decrepitum Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Gronotherium,: yp&>vo<;, eaten out; Q?jpiov, wild beast — in allusion to the molars, 

which are hollowed out at the base like those of Toxodon. (Ameghino. ) 
Grymaeomys (subg. of Didelphis) Burmeister, 1854. Marsupialia, Didelphyidaa. 
Syst. Uebers. Thiere Brasiliens, I, Saugeth., 138-142, 1854; Erliiut. zur Fauna 

Brasiliens, 77, 1856; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 340, 1888 

(type fixed). 
Species, 6: Didelphys murina Linnaeus (type), D. ogilis Burmeister, D. jmsilla 

Desmarest, D. tristriata Kuhl, D. brachyura Schreber, and D. velutina Natterer, 

all from South America. 
Name antedated by Marmosa Gray, 1821. 
Grymaeomys: ypvjuia, bag; pvi, mouse — in allusion to the pouch. 

*This name is not found in the reference given in Agassiz's Nomenclator Zool.: 
"Ogilby, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1836." It is usually quoted as 1839, but probably 
was not published until 1841. (See Sherborn & Palmer, Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 
7th ser., Ill, 351-352, 1899.) 



GRYPHOCA GUEPARDUS. 301 

Gryphoca Van Beneden, 1876. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Phocidse. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. Belgique, 2 e ser., XLI, 798-799, 1876. 
Type: Gryphoca similis Van Beneden, from the Antwerp basin, Belgium (" forts 

2 et 4, de la deuxieme et de la troisierne section " ). 
Extinct. Based on "des vertebres lombaires, un bassin presque complet et des 

os de membres anterieur et post£rieur." 
Gryphus Schubert, 1823. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotidee. 

"Kri'iger'sUrwelt, II, 718, 1823" (fide Bronn, Lethaea Geognostica, II, 1174, 

Taf. xliii, fig. 7, 1838); "Schubert, Naturgesch., 302, 1826" (fide Bronn, 

Handb. Naturgesch., IV, Index Paheont., p. 1084, 1848). 
Type: Gryphus antiquitatis Schubert. Based on the report of "fossile Schadel 

des Rhinoceros tichorhinus mit ihren etwas Geyerschnabel-formigen Nasen- 

beinen . . . welche die Yukagiren (im nord-ostlichen Theil des Yakuten- 

Gebietes vom Yama bis zum Kolyma Flusse [northeastern Siberia] ) als 

Schiidel und Krallen eines . . . Riesenvogels betrachten." (Bronn, 1. c, 

1838. ) 
Name preoccupied by Gryphus Brisson, 1760, a genus of Birds; and by Gryphus 

Humphreys, 1797, a genus of Mollusca. 
Extinct. 
Gryphus: Lat. gryphus (=gryps), griffin — from ypiup, a fabulous creature, so 

named from its hooked beak (ypvitoc,, curved, hooknosed). 
Grypolophodon Roth, 1903. Ungulata, Astropotheroidea, Astrapotheriidae. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, XI, 139-141, 1903. 
Species, 3: Grypolophodon morenoi Roth, G. tuberculosus Roth, and G. imperfectus 

Roth, from the upper ' Cretaceous ' of Lago Musters, Territory of Chubut, 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Grypolophodon: ypvitoz, curved; Aocpos, crest; 68(bv=b§ov<;, tooth. 
Grypotherium Reinhardt, 1879. Edentata, Megatheriidse. 

"K. Danske Vidensk. Selsk. Skrifter, Kjobenhayn, 5te Rsekke, XII, No. 4, pp. 

353-380, pis. i, ii," 1879 (fide Forbes, Zoo!. Record for 1879, XVI, Mamm., 

26,1881). 
Gryphotherium Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., newer!., fasc. VI (Index), p. 1402, 1899; 

C. O. Waterhouse, Index Zool., 1.54, 1902. 
Type: Mylodon darwini Owen, from the Pleistocene of Punta Alfa, Bahia Blanca, 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Grypotherium: ypvitos, curved; Qr/piov, wild beast. 
Guandira Gray, 1866.* Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

[List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xviii, 194, 1843 — nomen nudum]; Proc. 

Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 114. 
Type: Guandira cayanensis Gray, from Cayenne, French Guiana. (See Dobson, 

Cat. Chiroptera Brit. Mus., p. 483.) 
Gudamu (subgenus of Clymenia) Gray, 1868. Cete, Delphinidse. 

Syn. Whales & Dolphins, 6, 1868; Suppl. Cat. Seals & Whales Brit. Mus., 70, 1871. 
Type: Delphinus gudamu Owen, from Yizagapatam, Madras Presidency, east coast 

of India. 
Gudamu: Gadamu, Telugu or Indian name of this dolphin. 
Guepardus (subgenus of Felis) Duvernoy, 1834. Fene, Felidse. 

L'Institut, Paris, II, No. 51, p. 145, May:'., 1834; Mem. Soc. Mus. Hist. Nat. 
Strassbourg, II, p. i, 1 fig., 1835. 

* In 1843 both generic and specific names were nomina nuda; in 1866 the genus 
was described briefly. 



802 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Guepardus — Continued. 

Guepar Boitard, Le Jardin des Planter, Mamm., 174, 1842 (raised to generic 

rank). 
Gueparda Gray, List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pp. xx, 46, 1843; Proc. Zool. 

Soc. London, 1867, 277. 
Species: Guepardus flavus Duvernoy (?), and Felis guttata Hermann, from Asia 

and Africa. 
Name antedated by Oynailurus Wagler, 1830. 
Guepardus: French, guepard, hunting leopard (possibly a compound of French, 

guet, a watcher, and Latin pardus, panther, leopard). "According to Hatzfeld 

& Darmstetter, a corruption of the English leopard." (Murray's New English 

Diet., 1901.) 
Guereza Gray, 1870. Primates, Cercopithecidaa. 

Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 5, 19, 1870. 
Type: Guereza ruppellii Gray ( = Colobus guereza Ri'ippell), from Abyssinia. 
Guereza: Native Abyssinian name of this monkey. 
Guerlinguetus Gray, 1821. Glires, Sciuridae. 

London Med. Repos., XV, No. 88, p. 304, Apr. 1, 1821; Nelson, Proc. Wash. 

Acad. Sci., I, 30-31, 98-101, pi. i fig. 7, May 9, 1899. 
Type: ' Le guerlinguet,' Sciurus guerlinguetus Gray ( = S. sestuans Linnaeus), from 

Surinam. 
Guerlinguetus: Guerlinguet, a name used by the French settlers in Guiana and 

adopted by Buffon in 1789 (Hist. Nat., Suppl., VII, 261). 
Guevei (subgenus of Cephalophus) Gray, 1852. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 
Cat. Mamm. Brit. Mus., pt. in, Ungulata, 86-89, 1852; Sclater & Thomas, Book 

of Antelopes, I, pt. in, 121, May, 1895 (in synonymy, type fixed). 
Species, 5: Cephalophus maxwettii (H. Smith, type), from Gambia; C. pygmsea 

(Linnaeus), from South Africa; C. melanorheus Gray, from Fernando Po; C. 

punctulatus Gray, from Sierra Leone; and C. whitfieldii Gray, from Gambia. 
Possibly only a common name. 

Guevei: Native name in Senegal. (Buffon, Hist. Nat., XII, 310, 1764). 
Guilielmofloweria Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Amblypoda, Pantolambdidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 397-398, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 51-52). 
Type: Guilielmofloweria plicata Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Guilielmofloweria: In honor of Sir William Henry Flower, 1831-99, late direc- 
tor of the Natural History Museum, London. 
Guilielmoscottia Ameghino, 1901. Primates, Archaeopithecidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 360, July, 1901 (sep. p. 14). 
Type: Guilielmoscottia plicij era Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Guilielmoscottia: In honor of William Berryman Scott, 1858- , professor of 

geology and paleontology, Princeton University; author of 'An Introduction 

to Geology,' 1897, and numerous papers on paleontology. 
Guillinomys Lesson, 1842. Glires, Octodontida.'. 

Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 126, 1842. 
Type: Guillinomys chilensis Lesson, from ' the fresh waters of Chile.' 
Guillinomys:* guillino, native name in Chile; juvs, mouse. 
Gulo Frisch, 1775. Ferce, Mustelidse. 

Das Natur-System vierfuss. Thiere in Tabellen, 17, Tab. Gen., 1775; Pallas, 

Spicilegia Zoologica, II, fasc. xiv, 25-41, tab. n, 1780; Storr, Prodromus 



* Agassi/, gives the derivation as "Guillino, nom. Insuke; /ivs, mus" (Nomen- 
clatorZool., Mamm., Addenda, 5, 1846). 



GULO GYMNOPUS. 303 

Gulo — Continued. 

Methodi Mamm., 34, tab. a, 1780 (ex Klein, see Gill, Bull. Philos. Soc. 
Wash., II, App., p. vii, 1875-80). 
Type: ' Der Yielfrass' ( = Mustela gulo Linnaeus) from Europe. Pallas gives a 

description of Gulo sibiricus (= Mustela gulo Linnseus). 
Gulo: Lat. glutton. 
Gundi ('Fischer') Lataste, 1881. Glires, Octodontida?. 

Lataste, Bull. Soc. Zool. de France, VI, 223, 1881. 

Gundi is erroneously given as a generic name by Lataste, who refers it to Fischer. 
Following is a full statement of the question: " En 1829 Fischer (Syn. Manim., 
p. 346) mentionne YArctomys gundi avec une diagnose et une indication 
d' habitat qu'il emprunte aux auteurs dont il cite les noma: Rothman, Pallas, 
Pennant, Shaw. Dans cet article, ce dernier nom termine les indications 
synonymiques, et il est suivi de ces mots: 'Gundi araMcus' (le Gundi des 
arabes). C'est vraisemblablement ce passage qui, mal lu, a fait attribuer a 
Shaw un genre et une espece qu'il n'a pas crees, et que personne n'a crees, que 
je sache." (Lataste.) Shaw merely says (Gen. Zool., II, pt. i, 123, 1801): 
"It is called by the Arabs Gundi." This statement is translated by Fischer 
" Gundi Arabibus" (nee arabicus!), and is evidently intended to show that 
Gundi is a common and not a generic name. The animal was named Cteno- 
dactylus by Gray in 1830. 
Gygogeomys (see Zygogeomys). Glires, Geomyidaa. 

Gymnobelideus M'Cov, 1867. Marsupialia, Phalangeridaa. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 3d ser., XX, 287-288, pi. vi, Oct., 1867; Thomas, Cat. 

Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 149-150, 1888. 
Gymnobelides Marschall, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm., 6, 1873. 
Type: Gymnobelideus leadbeateri M'Coy, from Bass River, Victoria, Australia. 
Gymnobelideus: yvjuvog, naked; 4- Belideus — in allusion to the absence of flying 
membranes, which are present in the closely allied Belideus or Petaurus. 
Gymnomys (subgenus of Mus) Gray, 1867. Glires, Murida^, Murine. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1867, 597-598. . 
Type: Mus (Gymnomys) celebensis, from Menado, North Celebes. 
Gymnomys: yv^ivoc, , naked; //£?, mouse — from the naked, scaly tail. 

Gymnoptychus Cope, 1873. Glires, Ischyromyidse. 

Pakeont. Bull., Xo. 16, pp. 5-7, Aug. 20, 1873; Rept. U. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. 

Terr., VII, for 1873, 476, 1874; Hay, Science, new ser., X, 253, Aug., 1899; 

Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 725, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species, 4: Gymnoptyclms chrysodon Cope (type), G. nasutus Cope, G. trilophus 

Cope, and G. minutus Cope, from the Oligocene of Colorado. 
Extinct. 
Gymnoptychus: yvf.iv 6c,, naked; itrvi,, 7trvx6g, fold. 

Gymnopus Gray, 1865. Ferae, Mustelidse. 

[List Spec. Mamm. Brit. Mus, p. xx, 1843 — nomen nudum.] 
Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1865, 118-119; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate 

Mamm. Brit. Mus., 96-97, 1869. 
Species, 4: Gymnopus leucocephalus Gray, from Sumatra and Borneo; Mustela 

kathiah Hodgson, from Nepal, India; M. strigidorsa Hodgson, from Sikkim, 
India; and M. africana Desmarest, from Africa. 
Name preoccupied by Gymnopus Dumeril & Bibron, 1835, a genus of Reptilia; 

and by Gymnopus Blyth, 1843, a genus of Birds. 
Gymnopus: yv/.ivog, naked, itovs, foot — from the bare space behind the pads on 

the soles of the hind feet. 



304 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Gymnopyga (subgenus of Macacus) Gray, 1866. Primates, Cercopithecidge. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1866, 202, pi. xix; Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit- 
eating Bats Brit. Mus., 129, 1870; Forbes, Handbook Primates (Allen's Nat. 
Lib.), II, 12, 1894 (locality given under M. maurus). 

Type: Macacus inomatus Gray, supposed to have come from Borneo, but probably 
from Celebes. 

Gymnopyga: yvju.v6$, naked; itvyi), rump — from the large naked space sur- 
rounding the callosities on the buttocks. 

Gymnotis Fitzinger, 1879. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidee. 

[AnzeigerMath.-Naturwiss. CI. K. Akad. AViss. Wien, XV, Nr. 19, p. 155, 1878— 
nomen nudum]; Sitzungsber. Math.-Naturwiss. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, 
LXXVIII, Heft ii, Abth. i, for July, 1878, 343-350, 1879. 

Type: Gymnotis] wie.gmanui Fitzinger { = Certms gymnotis AViegmann), from north- 
ern South America. 

Gymnotis: yv/nvoi, naked; ov$, <*>ros, ear. 

Gymnura Lesson, 1827. Insectivora, Erinaceidfe. 

Man. Mammalogie, 171, May, 1827; Suppl. (Euvr. Buffon, IV, 429, 1834 (date of 

publication); Vigors & Horsfield, Zool. Journ., Ill, pt. 10, for Apr. -Sept., 

1827, 247-249, pi. vm, Oct., 1827. 
Type: Gymnura raffiesii Lesson (= Viverra gymnura Raffles), from Sumatra. 
Gymnura: yvjiivo?, naked; ovpd, tail — from the naked, scaly, rat-like tail. 

Gymnuromys Forsyth Major, 1896. Glires, Muridse, Cricetinee. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XVIII, 324, Oct. 1, 1896. 
Type: Gymnuromys roberti Forsyth Major, from the Ampitambe forest, in the 

Betsimisaraka country, on the border of northeastern Betsileo, Madagascar. 
Gymnuromys: yv/ivos, naked; ovpd, tail; /'£?, mouse — from the scaly, almost 

naked tail. 
Gypsophoca (subg. of Arctocephalus) Gray, 1866. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Otariida. 
Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist, 3d ser., XVIII, 236-237, Sept. 1866; ibid., 4th ser., 

IV, 269, Oct., 1869 (raised to generic rank); Allen, Mon. N. Am. Pinnipeds, 

191, 213, 1880 (in synonymy). 
Type: Otaria cinerea Quoy & Gaimard (= Otaria forsteri, Lesson), from Australia. 
Gypsophoca: yvipos, chalk; +Phoca— probably in allusion to the prevailing gray 

color of the type species. 
Gyriabrus Ameghino, 1891. Glires, Chinchillidse. 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 4a, 246-247, Aug. 1, 1891. 
Gyrabrius Lydekker, Zool. Record for 1891, XXVIII, Mamm, 33, 1892. 
Type: Gyriabrus glutinatus Ameghino, from the Oligocene of the city of Parana, 

Argentina. 
Extinct. 

Gyriabrus: yvpioe,, round; a (3p 6j, graceful. 
Gyrignophus Ameghino, 1891. Glires, Octodontidse. 

Nuevos Restos Mamif. Fos. Patagonia Austral, p. 14, Aug., 1891; Revista Argen- 
tina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5a, 300, Oct. 1, 1891. 
Type : Gyrignophus complicatus Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Gyrignophus: yvpioi, circular, round; yvocpos, darkness ('confusedly', 

Ameghino). 
Gyrosus (subgenus of Sus) Gray, 1862. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidse. 

Gray in Gerrard's Cat. Bones Mamm. Brit Mus., 278, Mar. 10, 1862; Cat. Cam., 

Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 347, 1869 (in synonymy). 



GYROSUS HADROTHERIUM. 305 

Gyrosus — Continued. 

Type: Sus ( Gyrosus) pliciceps Gray, from Japan. 
. Name antedated by Qenturiosus Gray (Proc. Zool. Soc. London, Jan., 1862, 17). 
These dates are, however, merely relative, January being the date of reading 
before the Zoological Society, and March 10 the date of the preface of the Cata- 
logue, which publication undoubtedly appeared later than the 'Proceedings.' 
Gyrosus: yvpos, round; -{-Sus. 

H. 

Habrocebus Wagner, 1839. Primates, Lemurid<e. 

Suppl. Schreber's Siiugthiere, I, pp. ix, v bis, 257-262, tab. xlii a, 1839; Y, 
140, 1855. 

Species: Lemur lanatus Sehreber, and Propithecus diadema Bennett, from Mada- 
gascar. 

Habrocebus: afipos, graceful; K)]/3o<;, a long-tailed monkey. 

Habrocoma Wagnek, 1842. Glires, Octodontidte. 

Wiegmann's Archiv Naturgesch., 1842, I, 5-8. 
Emendation of Abrocoma Waterhouse, 1837. "Unterdem Nanien Abrocoma, der 

sprachrichtiger in Habrocoma zu verandern ist, stellte Waterhouse im Jahre 

1837 diese Gattung auf." 
Habroc&ma: a/Spo$, soft, delicate; KOf.iT), hair — in allusion to the extremely soft 

pelage, which resembles chinchilla. 

Habrothrix (see Abrotbrix). Glires, Muridse, Cricetime. 

Hadrobyus Leidy, 1872. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, ? 

Proc. Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila., for 1871, 248, Jan. 16, 1872. 
Type: Hadrohyus suprerhus Leidy from the Miocene of 'Alkali Flat,' Bridge 

Creek Valley, Crook County, Oregon. 
Extinct, Based on the greater part of the crown of a last upper premolar or 

true molar. 
Hadrohyus: aSpog, thick, stout; vs, i>6<;, hog. 

Hadropithecus Lorenz vox Libuknau, 1899. Primates, Lemuridae. 

"Sitzungsb. Math.-Phys. CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, 256, 1899" * (fide Zool. Record 

for 1899, XXXVI, Mamm., 25, 1900); Denksch. K. Akad. Wiss. Wein, LXX, 

1-8, Taf. i, figs. 1-7, 1901. 
Type: Hadropithecus stenognathus Lorenz von Liburnau, from the Pleistocene of 

Androhomana, near Fort Dauphin, southeastern Madagascar. 
Extinct. 
Hadropithecus: adpog, thick, stout; 7ti(jr/Ko<z, ape. 

Hadrorhynchus Ameghino, 1891. Marsupialia, Microbiotherida?. 

Nuevos Restos Mainff. F6s. Patagonia Austral, p. 25, Aug., 1891; Revista Argen- 
tina Hist, Nat., I, entr. 5a, 311, Oct. 1, 1891. 
Species .3: Hadrorhynchus tortor Ameghino, H. torvus Ameghino, and H. con- 

spicuus Ameghino, from the lower Eocene of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Hadrorhynchus: aSpos, thick, stout; pvyx°S, snout, 

Hadrotherium ( ' Filhoi,' ) Thomas, 1884. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriidae. 
Zool. Record for 1883, XX, Index new genera, 6, 1884. 
Emendation of Adrotherium Filhoi, 1883. 
Hadrotherium: a8po<;, thick, stout; fh/piov, wild beast. 

*The name does not seem to be given in this reference, which should probably be 
'Anzeiger' instead of 'Sitzungsberichte.' 

7591— No. 23—03 20 



306 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Heematonycteris H. Allen, 1896. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidfe. 

Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., XVIII, No. 1099, p. 777, Oct. 27, 1896. 

Heematonycteris Lydekker, Zool. Record for 1896, XXXIII, Mamm., p. 23, Index 
new genera, 8, 1897. 

Provisional name for a specimen of DiphyUa ecaudata from Brazil, in the Berlin 
Museum, described by Dobson (Cat. Chiroptera Brit. Mus., 551, 1878). " The 
Berlin form is either anomalous as to the number of the upper incisors 
or is a type of a separate genus. It is most likely the former. ... If, 
however, comparisons should not sustain this reference, the name Hxma- 
tonycteris may be assigned the form described by Dobson." (H. Allen.) 

Hsematonycteris: aljua, blood; vvktepU, bat — i. e., a blood-sucking bat. 
Halarctus (till, 1866. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Otariidaa. 

Proc. Essex Inst. V (Communications), 7, 11, July, 1866. 

Type: Arctocephalus delalandii Gray, from the Cape of Good Hope. 

Halarctus: a'As, aXog sea; apxros, bear — i. e., a 'sea-bear.' 
Halianassa Meyer, 1838. Sirenia, Halitheriidse. 

Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogie, 1838, 667. 

Type : Manatus studeri Meyer. " Das weit verbreitete fossile Cetaceum von Flon- 
heim [Rhein-Hessen, Germany], wird ein eigenes, zwischen der Halicore 
(II. dugong) und dem Lamantin (Manatus) stehendes Genus pflanzenfressender 
Cetaceen bilden, f iir das ich den Namen Halianassa, Seekonigin, passend finde 
. . . Ich bezweifle nicht, dass De Christola Halicore Guvieri . . . und als dann 
auch Cuviers Hippopotamus medius und H. dubius so wie mein Manatus studeri 
dazu gehoren, wesshalb ich das Thier Halianassa studeri nenne." 

Extinct. 

Halianassa: a\zo%, of the sea; avaddcx, queen — ' queen of the sea. ' 

Halibalsena Gray, 1873. Cete, Balamidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1873, 139-141, figs. 5a, 5b in text. 

Type: Balaam britannica Gray, from Lyme Regis, Dorsetshire, England. 

HalibaUena : alios, of the sea; + Baliena — i. e., a 'sea whale.' 
Halibutherium Gloger, 1841. Sirenia, Halitheriid?e? 

Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., I, 166-167, 1841. 

Type not mentioned. The genus is proposed to include certain extinct sea-cows 
from France. 

Extinct. 

Halibutherium: alios, of the sea; fiovs, ox, cow; (irjpiov, wild beast. 
Halichoerus Nilsson, 1820. Ferte, Pinnipedia, Phocidse. 

Skandinavisk Fauna, I, 376-382, 1820; 2d ed., I, 298-310, 1847; Allen, Mon. N. 
Am. Pinnipeds, 682, 1880. 

Hah/charus (Hornschuch) Boitard, Le Jardin des Plantes, 198, 1842. 

Type: Halichwrus griseus Nilsson (=Pho<-a grypus Fabricius), from the North 
Atlantic Ocean. 

Halicharus : alios, of the sea; jozpos, hog — i. e., a 'sea hog.' 
Halicore Illiger, 1811. Sirenia, Dugongidse. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 140-141, 1811. 

Type: Trichechus dugong Gmelin ( = Tricheeus dugon Midler), from the coasts of 
the Indian Ocean. Name antedated by Dugong Lacepede, 1799. 

Halicore: alios, of the sea; Koptj, maiden— i. e., a mermaid, from the supposi- 
tion that the dugong has given rise to the myth of the mermaid.* 

*Les Cetaces herbivores "out deux mamelles sur la poitrine et . . . qui de loin, 
quand ils font sortir verticalement leur partie anterieure hors de l'eau, ont pu leur 
faire trouver quelque ressemblance avec des femmes ou des homines et ont probable- 
ment donne lieu aux recits de quelques voyageurs qui pretend ent avoir vu des tritons 
et des sirenes." (Cuvier, Regne Animal, 2e ed., 283, 1829.) 



HALICYON HALMASELUS. 307 

Halicyon Gray, 1864. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Phoeidae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 28-31, figs, of skull in text. 

Type : Halicyon richardii * ( iray , fr< >m Frazer River and Vancouver Island, British 
Columbia. 

Halicyon: aAios, of the sea; kvgov, dog — i. e. , 'a sea-dog.' 
Halipaedisca Gbstel, 1848. Sirenia, Tricheehidae. 

Naturgesch. Tierreichs f. hohere Schulen, 83, 1848. 

New name fur Manatus Briinnich, 1772. Type, Manatus americanus, from the east 
coast of tropical America. 

Halipaedisca: ci\io$, of the sea; 7tai8i6Ktf, maiden — i. e., a mermaid. 
Haliphilus Gray, 1866. Ferae, Pinnipedia, Phocidae. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 3d ser., XVII, 446, June, 1866. 

Type: Halichcerus antarcticus Peale, from the Antarctic Ocean [possibly from the 
coast of California or Oregon]. 

Haliphilus: dAio$, of the sea; (piXog, loving — in allusion to its habitat. 

Halitherium t Kaup, 1838. Sirenia, Halitheriidae. 

[Halytherium Kaup, Neues Jahrb. Mineralogie, 1838, 319, Taf. II, fig. D, 1, 2.] 
Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogie, 1838, 536. 

Type: Halytherium dubium Kaup, from Flonheim, Rhein-Hessen, Germany. 
Extinct. Based on "einen schon erhaltenen unteren vorletzten Backenzahn." 
Halitherium: a'Azoj, of the sea; Or/piuv, wild beast — i. e., a 'sea beast.' 

Hallomys Jentink, 1879. Glires, Muridae, Cricetinae. 

Notes Leyden Museum, I, Note xxvn, 107-109, Mar., 1879. 

Type: Hallomys audeherti Jentink, from Maisine and Savary, northeastern Mada- 
gascar. 

Hallomys: dXXo^iai, to leap — in allusion to the supposed habit of leaping indi- 
cated by the long feet. 

Halmadromus Ameghino, 1891. Marsupialia, Epanorthidae. 

Nuevos Restos Mamif. F6s. Patagonia Austral, p. 20, Aug., 1891; Revista Argen- 
tina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5a, 306, Oct. 1, 1891. 

Type: Halmadromus vagus Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern Pata- 
gonia. 

Extinct. 

Halmadromus: a'A/m, spring, leap; Spo/iio<;, running. 
Halmarhiphus Ameghino, 1891. Marsupialia, Garzoni< la'. 

Nuevos Restos Mamif. Fos. Patagonia Austral, p. 22, Aug., 1891; Revista Argen- 
tina Hist. Nat,, I, entr. 5a, 308, Oct. 1, 1891. 

Species: Halmarhiphus didelpoides Ameghino, and H. nanus Ameghino, from the 
Lower Eocene of southern Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Haimarhiphw: ctAjua, spring, leap; pi(pr?, throw (from pinzoo, to throw. ) 

Halmaselus Ameghino, 1891. Marsupialia, Kpauorthida?.. 

Nuevos Restos Mamif. Fos. Patagonia Austral, i>. 20, Aug., 1891; Revista Argen- 
tina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 5a, 306, Oct. 1, 1891. 
Type: Halmaselus valens Ameghino, from the Lower Eocene of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Halmaselus: dX/ta, spring, leap; tffAoj, 'brilliant,' (Ameghino.) 

*This is the original spelling, but the name should evidently be richardsi, the 
species having been named in honor of Captain Richards, Hydrographer to the 
Admiralty. (Sclater, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1873, 556 footnote. ) 

t Spelled Halytherium in the first description, but this form is evidently a misprint, 



308 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Halmaturus Illiger, 1811. Marsupialia, Macropodidse. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 80, 1811; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & Mono- 

trem. Brit. Mus., 10, 1888 (in synonymy, type fixed). 
Species: Didelphis gigantea Gmelin ( = Yerboa gigantea Zimmermann, type), from 

New South Wales, Australia; and D. bnmii Gmelin, from the Aru Islands. 
Halmaturus: aXjua, spring; ovpd, tail — in allusion to the use of the tail in 
leaping. 
Halodon Marsh, 1889. Allotheria, Plagiaulacida?. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., XXXVIII, 87, pi. m,figs. 1-3, 11-13, July, 1889. 
Type: Halodon sculptus Marsh, from the Cretaceous (Laramie) of Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on " the characteristic fourth premolar of the lower jaw." 
Halodon: a'Acag, disk; 68cbv = d8ovs, tooth. 
Halticus (subgenus of Scirtopoda) Brandt, 1844. Glires, Dipodida?. 

Bull. CI. Phys.-Math. Acad. Imp. Sci., St.-Petersbourg, II, 213-215, 1844. 
Type: Dipus halticus Illiger, from southwestern Siberia. Halticus forms a section 

of Scirtopoda, which latter is a subgenus of Dipus. 
Name preoccupied by Halticus Ilahn, 1831, a genus of Hemiptera. 
Halticus: aAriKot, good at leaping. 
Haltomys (subgenus of Scirtopoda) Brandt, 1844. Glires, Dipodi<l;e. 

Bull. CI. Phys.-Math. Acad. Imp. Sci., St.-Petersbourg, 11,215-217, 1844. 
Species, 4: Dipus segyptius Hemprich & Ehrenberg, D. hirtipes Liechtenstein, D. 
macrotarsus Wagner, and I), mauritanicus Duvernoy, from Africa and Arabia. 
Haltomys forms a section of Scirtopoda, which latter is a subgenus of Dipus. 
Haltomys: ocXto (2d aorist, 3d sing., of dXXopai), to spring, to leap; /*v<i, mouse. 
Halychoerus ( see Halichcerus ) . Ferae, Pinnipedia, Phocida?. 

Halytherium Kattp, 1838. Sirenia, Halitheriidae. 

Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogie, 1338, 319, Taf. ii, fig. d, 1, 2. 
The original spelling of Haliiherium Kaup, 1838; evidently a typographical error. 
Hamadryas Lesson, 1840. Primates, Cercopithecidae. 

Species Mamm., 107-111, 1840; < }ray, Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats 

Brit. Mus., 34, 1870. 
Species: Simia porcaria Boddaert, from the Cape of Good Hope; and Hamadryas 
choeropithecus ( =Simia hamadryas Gmelin? type), from Abyssinia, East Africa. 
Name preoccupied by Hamadryas Hiibner, 1806, a genus of Lepidoptera. 
Hamadryas: ' Anaftpvaz, in Greek mythology, a wood nymph, supposed to live 
and die with the tree to which she was attached. 
Hamela (see Huamela) . Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Hamster Lacepede, 1799. Glires, Murida?, Cricetinae. 

Tabl. Mamm., 10, 1799; Nouv. Tableau Method. Mamm., inBuffon's Hist. Nat., 
Didot. ed.,Quad., XIV, 167, 1799; Mem. l'lnstitut, Paris, III, 495, 1801; 
Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1896, 1019, 1897. 
Type: Hamster nigricans Lacepede, from Europe. 
Hamster: German hamster, the common name of this mouse. 
Hanno Gray, 1821. Primates, Cercopithecida'. 

London Med. Repos., XV, 297, Apr. 1, 1821. 

Type: Simia nasica Schreber, from Borneo. (See Nasalis Geoffroy, 1812.) 
Hanno: Possibly in honor of Hanno, a Carthaginian admiral, wdio visited the 
west coast of Africa in the fifth or sixth century B. C. The narrative of his 
voyage contains the earliest account of some of the larger apes. 
Hapale Illioer, 1811. Primates, Hapalida?. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 71-72, 1811. 

Harpale Gray, London Med. Repos., xv, No. 88, p. 298, Apr. 1, 1821 (misprint). 
1 la pales F. Cuvier, Diet. Sci. Nat., LIX, 401, 1829. 
Species, 3: Simia rosalia Linnaeus, S. midas Linnaeus, and S. jacchus Linnaeus 

(type) , from South America. Name antedated by CaUithrix Erxleben, 1777. 
Hapale: anaXoi, soft — from the long, soft fur. 



HAPALEMUR HAPLOCONUS. 309 

Hapalemur I. Geoffroy, 1851. Primates, Lemuridse. 

L'Institut, 19" .aim., No. 929, p. 341 footnote, Oct. 22, 1851; Cat. Method. Mamm. 
Museum Hist. Nat., Paris, Ppart., 74-7-5, 1851 (" en ce moment sous presse" — 
L'Institut, p. 341); Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1870, 828. 

Hapalolemur Giebel, Die Siiugethiere, 1018, 1855; 2d ed., 1018, 1859. 

Type: ' leMakigriset des auteurs' (Lemur griseus E. Geoffroy), from Madagascar. 

Hapalemur: ait «aos, soft; + Lemur. 
Hapaloides Ameghino, 1902. Edentata, Megalonychidae. 

[Anal. Soc. Cien. Argentina, LI, 78, Mar. -Apr., 1901 — nomen nudum.] 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 131-133, May, 1902 (sep. pp. 63-65). 

Species, 3: Hapaloides ignavus Ameghino, H. ponderosy&Ameghino, and H. laevius- 
culus Ameghino, from the Patagonian formation (Eocene) of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Hapaloides: Hapale; £i8o<;, form. 

Hapalolemur (see Hapalemur). Primates, Lemuridse. 

Hapalomys Blyth, 1859. Glires, Muridse, Murinse. 

Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, Calcutta, XXVIII, 296, 1859. 

Type: Hapalomys longicavdatus Blyth, from the valley of the Sitang River, Ten- 

asserim, India. 
Hapalomys : cata\6<;, soft; pv$, mouse — from the long, soft, dense fur. 
Hapalops Ameghino, 1887. Edentata, Megalonychidae. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mami'f. F6s. Patagonia Austral, p. 22, Dec, 1887. 
Species: Hapalops rectangularis Ameghino, IF. indifferens Ameghino, and H. 

ellipticus Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Hapalops: Hapale; oip, aspect. 

Hapalotis Liciitenstein, 1829. Glires, Muridse, Murinae. 

Darstellung neuer oder wenig bekannter Siiugethiere, Heft vi, tab. xxix [2 pp. 

of text unnumbered], 1829. 
Type: Hapalotis albipes Lichtenstein, from Australia. 
Name preoccupied by Hapalotis Hiibner, 1816, a genus of Lepidoptera. (See 

Conilurus Ogilby, 1838, the next available name). 
Hapalotis: ana\6<;, soft; ov; euro?, ear. 

Hapanella (subgenus of GEdipus) Gray, 1870. Primates, Hapalidae. 

Cat. Monkeys, Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 65-66, 1870. 
Type: Hapale geoffroyi Pucheran, from Panama, Colombia. 
Hapanella: Dim. of Hapale. 

Haplacodon Cope, 1889. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriidae. 

Am. Naturalist, XXIII, 153, Mar., 1889. 

Type: Menodus angustigenis ( 'ope, from the Oligocene (White River beds) of Swift 

Current River, Northwest Territory. 
Extinct. 
Haplacodon: anloos, simple; dtcrf, point; 68cbv=d8ov<;, tooth — in allusion to 

"the presence of but a single internal cusp of the first (posterior) superior 

premolar." 

Haploceros, Haplocerus (see Aplocerus). Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidee. 

Haploconus Cope, 1882. Ungulata, Amblypoda, Periptychidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XVI, for May, 1882, 417-118, Apr. 25, 1882; Tert, Vert,, 415-423, 

pis. xxv e figs. 1-5, xxv f figs. 4, 5, 1885. 
Species: Haploconus lineatus Cope (type), and Mioclsenus angustus Cope, from the 

Eocene (Torrejon) of New Mexico. 



810 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Haploconus — Continued. 

Extinct. 

Haploconus: a7cX6o<;, wimple; kgovos, cone — in allusion to the crown of the third 
upper premolar, which is a simple cone, lacking the large creseentic crest of the 
inner side seen in Anisonchus. 
Haplodon Wagler, 1830. Glires, Aplodontiida?. 

Nat. Syst, Amphibien, 22, 1830. 

Haploodon and Haplodon Brandt, Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci. St.-Petersbourg, 6 e ser., 
VII, 150 footnote, 1855. 

Emendation of Aplodontia Richardson, 1829. 

Haplodon: cnrXooc,, simple; d8ebv=d8uvs, tooth. 
Haplodontherium Ameghixo, 1885. Ungulata, Toxodontia, Toxodontidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, VIII, entr. 1, pp. 79-81, 1885; Cont. Conocimiento 
Mamif. Fosil. Repub. Argentina, in Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 394- 
396, 915-916, pis. xvi fig. 3, xvn fig. 1, lxx fig. 4, xcvi fig. 2, xcvn figs. 1-2, 
xcviii figs. 2, 3, 1889; Revista Jardfn Zool. Buenos Ayres, II, entr. 7, pp. 
220-221, July 15, 1894. 

Haplodontotherium W. L. Sclater, Zool. Record for 1885, XXII, Index New 
Genera, 5, 1886. 

Type:* Haplodontherium wildei Ameghino, from the barrancas del Parana, Argen- 
tina (?). 

Extinct. Based on upper molars and an upper canine. 

Haplodontherium: <V^Aoo?, simple; oSovs, ddovros, tooth; btjpiov, wild beast. 
Haplog-ale Schlosser, 1887. Ferae, Mustelidae. 

Schlosser, in Roger's Verzeich. Eoss. Siiugethiere, 29ter Bericht Naturwiss. Ver. 
Augsburg, 135, 1887; "Schlosser, Beitrage Palaeont, Oesterr. -Ungarns und des 
Orients, VII, 372, 1888." 

Species: Proxlurus medi us Filhol, P. julieni var. priscus Filhol, and Plesictis mutata 
Filhol, from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 

Extinct. 

Haplogah: anXoos, simple; yaXfj, weasel. 
Haplomeryx Schlosser, 1886. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anoplotheriida?. 

Morphol. Jahrbuch, Leipzig, XII, ltes Heft, 96, Taf. vi, figs. 2, 20, 1886. 

Type: Haplomeryx zitteli Schlosser, from the Quercy Phosphorites of France, 
or from Egerkingen Switzerland. (Locality fide Zittel, Handb. Palaeont., 
IV, 380.) 

Extinct. Based on a fragment of the upper jaw with three molars. 

Haplomeryx: a7T\6u<;, simple; fujpvc, ruminant, 
Haploodon Brandt, 1855. Glires, Aplodontiida?. 

Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci. St.-Petersbourg, 6 e ser., VII, 150 footnote, 1855. 

Emendation of Aplodontia Richardson, 1829. "Nach streng grammatikalischen 
Gesetzen muss man Haploodon schreiben. Allenfalls konnte man auch Haplu- 
don sagen." (Brandt.) 
Haplostropha Ameghino, 1891. Glires ? 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 3a, 140, fig. 38, June 1, 1891. 

Type: Haplostropka scalabriniana Ameghino, from the Lower Oligocene of the 
Arroyo Espinillo, 15 miles from the city of Parana, Argentina. 

Extinct. 

Haplostropka: anXoos, simple; 6rpo(pi), turning. 

*In the Revista Jardfn Zool., p. 221, Ameghino states that H. limum should be con- 
sidered as the type; but H. wildei is the oidy species given in the original description. 



HAFLUIXXN HARPALODON 311 

Hapludon (see Aplodontia). Glires, Aplodontidse. 

Harana (subgenus of Cervus) Hodgson, 1838. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Ann. Nat. Hist., I, 154, Apr., 1838. 

Type: Cervus wallichii auct., from India. 

Harlanus* Owen, 1846. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Ill, No. 4, pp. 94-96, July-Aug., 1846. 
Type: Sus americana Harlan, from the Pleistocene of the Brunswick canal, near 

Darien, Georgia. 
Extinct. Based on "the middle part of the right ramus of the lower jaw. . . . 

with the last three (or true) molars, part of the premolar next in advance, and 

part of the socket of another premolar." 
Harlanus: In honor of Dr. Richard Harlan, of Philadelphia, 179(5-1843; author 

of 'Fauna Americana,' 1825. 

Harpagmotherium G. Fischer. 1808. Ungulata, Proboscidea, Elephantidse. 

Programme d'Invit. Seance. Pub. Soc. Imp. Naturalistes, Moscou, 19-20, Sept., 

1808; Zoognosia, III, 337, 339, 1814 (synonym of Mastotherium ); Leidy, Journ. 

Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 2d ser., VII, 393, 1869 (in synonymy). 
Type: Harpagmotherium canadense Fischer (=Mammouth ohwticum Blumenbach = 

Elephas americanus Kerr), from the Pleistocene of the Ohio River. "II faut 

supprimer le nom de Mammouth pour cette espece, les Russes l'attribuant de 

temps immemorial a l'espece fossiles d'Elephans dont les dents donnent l'ivoire 

fossile." (Fischer, 1. c, lit footnote. ) 
Harpagmotherium: apnaypos, robbery; Brfpiov, wild beast — "animal vorace ou 

carnassier de preference, parce qu'il n'est surpasse par aucun animal carnivore 

en grandeur. ' ' ( Fischer. ) 
Harpagodon Meyer, 1837. Fene, Canidse. 

Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogie, 1837, 674; 1838, 413. 
Type: Harpagodon maximus Meyer, 1838, from " der Bohnerz-Ablagerung der 

Altstadt bei Mosskirch," Baden, Germany. 
Extinct. Based on "der grosse Backenzahn aus dem Oberkiefer, oder der 

Reisszahn." 
Harpagodon: apnaq, apnayo^, rapacious; 6Sdov=dSov^, tooth. 

Harpagolestes Wortman, 1901. Creodonta, Mesonychidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci., 4th ser., XII, 286-290, pi. i, tig. 44 in text, Oct., 1901. 
Type: Harpagolestes macrocephalus Wortman, from the lower part of the Bridger 

Beds (Eocene) near the mouth of Smith Fork, Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on ' ' the greater portion of a skull, together with a complete 

humerus of the right side, a distal end of a femur, and a centrum of an axis, 

all belonging to one individual." 
Harpagolestes: ap7ta£, apitayoe,, rapacious; A#<5r ■//?, robber. 

Harpale (see Hapale). Primates, Hapalida?. 

Harpalodon Marsh, 1872. Creodonta, Uintacyonidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 216-217, Sept., 1872 (sep. issued Aug. 13); 

Hay, Cat. Foss.' Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, V. S. Geol. Surv., 761, 1902 (type 

fixed). 
Species: Harpalodon sylvestris Marsh (type), and H. vulpinus Marsh, from the 

Eocene of Henry Fork of Green River, Wyoming. 
Extinct. 
Harpalodon: apnaXeo<;, rapacious; b8dov=b8ov<z, tooth. 

*Thename is spelled Harlamus at the head of the description, but written Harlanus 
in the third line from the end of the article. 



312 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALITJM. 

Harpiocephalus Gray, 1842. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., X, 259, Dec, 1842. 
Harpyiocephalus Gray, ibid., 3d ser., XVII, 90, Feb., 1866. 
Type: Harpiocephalus rtifus Gray (= Vespertilio harpia Temminck, from Volcan 

de Guede, Java). 
Harpiocephalus: Harpy ia; K£(pa\.i), head. 

Harpyia Illiger, 1811. Chiroptera, Pteropodidse. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 118-119, 1811. 

Harpyja Gloger, Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., pp. xxviii, 49, 1841. 

Type: Vespertilio cephalotes Pallas, from the Molucca Islands. 

Name preoccupied by Harpyia Ochsenheimer, 1810, a genus of Lepidoptera. 

Harpyia: apitvia, harpy — a mythological winged monster, ravenous and filthy, 
with the head of a woman and the wings of a bird of prey. 
Harpyiocephalus (*ee Harpiocephalus). Chiroptera, Vespertilionidee. 

Harpyionycteris Thomas, 1896. Chiroptera, Pteropodidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XVIII, No. 105, pp. 243-244, Sept. 1, 1896. • 

Type: Harpyionycteris whiteheadi Thomas, from Mindoro, Philippine Islands (alt. 
5,000 ft.).' 

Harpyionycteris: Harpyia; vvKXEpic,, bat — 'harpy bat.' 
Harpyja (see Harpyia). Chiroptera, Pteropodidge. 

Hathliacynus Ameghino, 1887. Marsupialia, Borhy;enidse. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamif. Fos. Patagonia Austral, p. 7, Dec, 1887. 
Hathlyacynu8A.MKQH.mo, Enum. Syn. Mamm. Foss. Eocenes de Patagonie, 126, 

Feb., 1894. 
Type: Hathliacynus lustratus Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of southern 

Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Hathliacynus: «6Azo?, wretched, i. e., low, imperfect; kz'gjv, kwos, dog. 

Hebetotherium Ameghino, 1898. Edentata, Megatheriidse. 

Sin. Geol.-Paleont., in Segundo Censo Nacional Repiib. Argentina, I, 204, 1898. 

Type: Hebetotherium silenum Ameghino, from the Lower Pampean of La Plata, 
Argentina. 

Extinct. Based on a left mandibular ramus. 

Hebetotherium: r/f3r/ri?s (=r/(5r;rr}p), youth; Q?jpiov, wild beast. 
Hedimys (see Hedymys). Glires, Eocardidse. 

Hedralophus Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Leontiniidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 406-407, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 60-61). 

Type: Hedralophus bicostatus Ameghino, from the ' Cretaceous ' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Hedralophus: eSpa, seat, base; Xocpo^, crest. 

Hedymys Ameghino, 1887. Glires, Eocardidaa. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamif. Fus. Patagonia Austral, p. 14, Dec, 1887; Act. 

Acad. Nac Cien., Cordoba, VI, 218, 1889. 
Hedimys Zittel, Handb. Palaeont., IV, 544, 555, 1893. 

Type: Hedymys iutegrus Ameghino, from the Lower Tertiary of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct . 
Hedymys: f/8vs, pleasing; /'VS, mouse. 

Hegetotherium Ameghino, 1887. Ungulata, Typotheria, Hegetotheridse. 

Enum. Sist. Especies Mamif. Fos. Patagonia Austral, p. 14, Dec, 1887; Revista 

Jardin Zool. Buenos Ayres, II, entr. 7, pp. 205-206. July 15, 1894 (type fixed). 



HEGETOTHERIUM— HELICOPHORA. 313 

Hegetotherium — Continued. 

Species: Hegetotherium mirabile Ameghino (type), and II. strigatum Ameghino, 

from the Lower Tertiary of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Hegetotherium: i]yt/r))<;, leader, chief; Qjjpiov, wild beast. 
Helaletes Marsh, 1872. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Lophiodontidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 218, Sept., 1872 (sep. issued Aug. 13). 
Helatetes Trouessakt, Cat. Mamm., new ed., fasc. IV, 761, 1898 (misprint). 
Type: Helaletes l>oo/>s Marsh, from the Eocene of Grizzly Buttes, near Fort 

Bridger, Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on " the greater portion of a skull with teeth, and the more 

important parts of the skeleton of the same individual." 
Helaletes: e\o$, marsh; avl?)r?/c, wanderer. 
Helarnys F. Cuvier, 1817. Glires, Pedetidse. 

Regne Animal, I, 202-203 footnote, 1817; 2 e ed., I, 209, 1829; Nouv. Diet, Hist. 

Nat, nouv. ed., XIII, 117, 1817; Dents des Mammiferes, 254, 1825. 
HelamisY. Cuvier, Diet. Sci. Nat., XX, 341-344, 1821. 
Type: Mas cafer Pallas, from the Cape of Good Hope. 
Name antedated by Pedetes Illiger, 1811. 
Helarnys: f'A?/=£/A?/, the sun's heat; /ivs, mouse. 
Helarctos (subgenus of Ursus) Horsfield, 1825. Ferre, Ursidse. 

Zool. Journ., II, 221-234, pi. vn, July, 1825. 

Helarrtus Gloger, Hand- u. Hilfsbuch Naturgesch., pp. xxviii, 53, 1841. 
Type: Helarctos euryspilus Horsfield, from Borneo. 
Helarctos: fX?/=e'i\r], the sun's heat; a/jKrw;, bear — probably from its tropical 

habitat. 
Helatetes (see Helaletes). Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Lophiodontidse. 

Heleotragus Kirk, 1864. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 657-658. 
Emendation of Eleotragus Cray, 1843. "The three genera Heleotragus, Adenota, 

and Kol>ns are most intimately related, forming together a single tolerably 

well-defined and natural genus, the subdivision of which is quite artificial 

and very inconvenient. " (p. 658. ) 

Helicoceras Weithofer, 1888. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

"Beitr. Paheont, Oesterr.-Ung., VI, 288, pi. xvm, 1888" (fide Lydekker, Zool. 

Record for 1888, XXV, Mamm., 51, 1890 I. 
Type: Helicoceras rotundicorne Weithofer, from the Pliocene beds of Pikermi, 

Greece. 
Name preoccupied by Helicoceras D'Orbigny, 1840, a genus of Mollusca. Replaced 

by Helicophora Weithofer, 1889 (preoccupied by Helicophora Gray, 1842, a 

genus of Mollusca); and" by Helicotragus Palmer, 1903. 
Extinct. 
Helicoceras: eXic,, sAiko$, spiral; KEpas, horn- — in allusion to the spiral horns. 

Helicolophodon Roth, 1903. Ungulata, Astrapotheroidea, Astrapotheriidic. 

Re vista Mus. La Plata, XI, 141, 1903. 
Type: Helicolophodon giganteus Roth, from the 'upper Cretaceous' of Lago 

Musters, Territory of Chubut, Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on an upper premolar and a lower incisor. 
Helicolophodon: sXt^, eXikos, spiral; X6<pos, crest; 68(bv=d8ovc,, tooth. 

Helicophora Weithofer, 1889. L T ngulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Jahrbuch K. K. Geol. Reichsanstalt, Wien, XXXIX, Heft 1-2, p. 79 footnote, 
July 1, 1889. 



314 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Helicopliora — Continued. 

Helicophorus Zittel, Handb. Palseont., IV, 2 ,e Lief, 418, 1893; Trouessakt, Cat. 

Mamm., new ed., fasc. IV, 932, 1898. 
New name for Helicpceras Weithofer, 1888, which is preoccupied by Helicoceras 

D'Orbigny, 1840, a genus of Mollusca. Helicopliora is also preoccupied by 

Helicopliora Gray, 1842, a genus of Mollusca. Replaced by Helicotragus, 

Palmer, 1903. 
Extinct. 
Helicopliora: eAic, d'Az/cos, spiral; (popo$, bearing — in allusion to the spiral horns. 

Helicotragus Palmer, 1903. I'ngulata, Artiodaetyla, Bovidse. 

Science, new ser., XVII, 873, May 29, 1903. 
New name for Hclicophora Weithofer, 1889, which is preoccupied by Helicopliora 

Gray, 1842, a genus of Mollusca. 
Extinct. 
Helicotragus: £A/|, sAikos, spiral; rpdyos, goat, antelope — in allusion to the 

spiral horns. 

Helictis Gray, 1831. Fer&e, Mustelidse. 

Proc. Zool. Soc; London, pt. 1, No. vm, 94-95, Aug. 5, 1831; Philos. Mag., new 

ser., X, 234, 1831. 
Helictes Gray, ListOsteol. Spec. Brit. Mus., pp. x, 20, 1847. 
Type: Helictis mosckata Gray, from China. 
Helictis: eXr]=E'iXi),\\\e sun's heat; 'ikti:, weasel. (Probably A'Ao?, marsh; zVrtg, 

weasel — Century Diet. ) 

Heligrnodontia (see Elig-modontia). Glires, Muridse, Cricetinse. 

Heliomys Gray, 1873. Glires, Muridse, Murinee. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 4th ser., XII, 417-418, fig. 2, Nov., 1873. 
Type: Heliomys jeudei Gray, locality unknown. 
Heliomys: ff\io$, sun; //t>s, mouse. 

Heliophobius Peters, 1846. Glires, Bathyergidse. 

Bericht Bekanntmachung geeign. Verhandl. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. Berlin, 259, 

Aug., 184(5; Naturwiss. Reise Mossambique, Saugeth., 139-145, Taf. xxxi tig. 2 

[BaAhyergus], xxxv fig. 2, 1852. 
Heliphobius Beddard, Mamm., Cambridge Nat. Hist., X, 481, 1902 (misprint). 
Type: Heliophobius argenteo-cinereus Peters, from Tette, Mozambique, southeastern 

Africa (S. lat. 16°-17°). 
Name preoccupied by Heliophobius Boisduval, 1829, a genus of Lepidoptera. 

Replaced by Myoscalops Thomas, 1890. 
Heliophobius: //Azoc, sun; il>ofiioa, to fear — from its subterranean mode of life. 

Heliophoca Gray, 1854. Fera?, Pinnipedia, Phoeidse. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., 2d ser., XIII, 201-202, Mar., 1854; Proc. Zool. Soc. 

London, for 1854, No. cclxii, 43-44, Jan. 10, 1855; Allen, Mon. N. Am. 

Pinnipeds, 465, 1880 (in synonymy). 
Type: Heliophoca atlantica Gray (=Phoca monachus Hermann), from Deserta 

Grande Island, Madeira. 
Heliophoca: ijXioi, sun; </>cok?/, seal — in allusion to its habitat near the tropics. 

Heliosciurus (subgenus of Sdurus) Trouessart, 1880. (Hires, Sciurida?. 

Le Naturaliste, II, No. 37, p. 292, Oct. 1, 1880; Ibid., II, No. 40, p. 315, Nov. 

15, 1880; Cat. Mamm. in Bull. Soc. d' Etudes Sci. d' Angers, X, l er fasc, 82-84, 

1880; Bull. U. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. Terr., VI, No. 2, p. 306, Sept. 19, 1881; 

Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1897, 933 (type mentioned). 



HELIOSCIURUS HEMIA.CI8 315 

Heliosciurus — Continued. 

Species 11, from Africa: Sciurus rufobrachiatus "Waterhouse, S. punctatus Tem- 

minick, S. aubryiA. Milne-Edwards, S. olivaceus A. Milne-Edwards, S.annulatus 

Desmarest (type), S. aubinnii Gray, S. sharpei Gray, S. abyssinicus (Gmelin) 

Prevost, 8. bongensis Heuglin, S. pcensis A. Smith, and S. purnilio Le Conte. 
Heliosciurus: r}\io$, sun; 4- Seiurus — from its tropical habitat. 
Heliphobius (see Heliophobius). Glires, Bathyergidae. 

Heliscomys Cope, 1873. Glires, Geomyidae? 

Syn. New Vert. Tert. Colorado, 3-4, Oct., 1873; Ann. Kept. XJ. S. Geol. & Geog. 

Surv. Terr., for 1873, 475, 1874. 
Type: Heliscomys vet us Cope, from the Oligocene of Colorado. 
Extinct. Based on 'mandibular rami.' 

Heliscomys: rjXi6i<oc, (dim. of >;Aos), a little nail; //£?, mouse. 
Helladotherium Gaudry, 1860. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Giraffidae. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, LI, No. 22, p. 804, July-Dec, 1860; Forsyth Major, 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1891, 323-326, fig. 3. 
Type: HeUadotherium duvemoyi Gaudry, from the Lower Pliocene, Pikermi beds, 

of Greece. 
Extinct. Based on "une tete presque complete." 
Helladotherium: 'EXXd?, 'EAAaSos, Greece; Qr/pior, wild beast — in allusion to 

the type locality. 
Helogale Gray, 1861. Ferse, Viverridae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1861, 308, 2 figs.; Ibid., 1864, 571; Cat, Bones Mamm. 

Brit. Mus., 76, 1862; Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1882, 79-80. 
Species: Herpestes parvulus Sundevall (type), from Natal; and IF. tsenionotus A. 

Smith, from South Africa. 
Helogale: sAos, marsh; ya\?~/, weasel. 

Helohippus Marsh, 1892. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci., 3d ser., XLIII, No. 256, p. 353, Apr. 1892. 
Type: Lophiodon pumilus Marsh, from the Eocene near Marsh Fork, western 

Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on a portion of a left upper jaw containing three premolars and 

two molars. 
Helohippus: sXo<;, marsh; 'imto<;, horse. 

Helohyus Marsh, 1872. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Helohyidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 207-208, Sept. 1872 (sep. issued Aug. 7). 
Type: Helohyus plicodon Marsh, from the Eocene of Grizzly Buttes, near Fort 

Bridger, Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on "an upper molar tooth in perfect preservation." 
Helohyus: f/lo?, marsh; vs, v6s, hog. 

Helotherium Cope, 1872. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Titanotheriidae. 

Palaeont. Bull. No. 2, p. 1, Aug. 3, 1872; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc.; XII, for Jan. 1871- 

Dec. 1872, 466, Jan. 1873; Sixth Ann. Kept. U. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. Terr., 

for 1873, 606 (under Orohippus). 
Type: Helotherium procyoninum Cope, from the Bridger Eocene of Wyoming. 
Extinct. 
Helotherium: e\o%, marsh; Q?/piov, w T ild beast. 

Hemiacis Cope, 1869. Ferae, Mustelidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1869, 3; [Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XI, 177-178, pi. 
in, fig. 1, 1869 — given as Galera perdicida.] 



316 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Hemiacis — Continued. 

Type: Hemiacis perdicida Cope, from the limestone breccia of a cave in Wythe 
County, Virginia. 

Extinct. " Represented by a left ramus of the mandible, with dentition com- 
plete. 

Hemiacis: fjj.ii-, half; axis, point — in allusion to the molar. "The tubercular 
molar is relatively as in the allied genera {Mephitis and Lutra) but without 
sharp tubercle. ' ' ( Cope. ) 

Hemiacodon Marsh, 1872. Primates, Anaptomorphidee? 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 212-213, Sept., 1872 (sep. issued Aug. 13); 

Osborn, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat, Hist., N. Y., XVI, 200, June 28, 1902; Hay, Cat. 

Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 791, 1902 (type fixed). 
Species, 3: Hemiacodon gracilis Marsh (type), and H. nanus Marsh, from Henry 

Fork of Green River; and H. pucillus Marsh [sic], from Grizzly Buttes, near 

Fort Bridger, all from the Eocene of Wyoming. 
Extinct, 

Hemiacodon: fjjui-, half; <xki), point; 6d(&v=d8ovs, tooth. 
Hemiauchenia Gervais & Ameghixo, 1880. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Camelidse. 
Mamm. Foss. l'Amerique du Sud, 120-123, 1880. 
Type: Hemiauchenia paradoxa Gervais & Ameghino, from the Pleistocene of the 

province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Extinct. Based on a portion of a cranium, including the two maxillaries with 

all the molars in place, and the canine on the left side. 
Hemiauchenia: fjui-, half; 4- Auchenia. Este genero "est;! earacterizado por la 

presencia de seis muelas superiores en serie contfnua, debido a la existencia del 

p 2 que falta tanto en Auchenia como en Palseofama" (Ameghixo, Mam. Fos. 

Argentinos, 503, 1889). 
Hemibelideus (subgenus of Phalang i ista)CouLKH!, 1884. Marsupialia, Phalangeridae. 
Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1884, 385-387, pi. xxxi, 2 figs, in text. 
Type: PhalangiMa ( Hemibelideus) lemuroides Collett, from northern Queensland. 
Hemibelideus: r/ui-, half; + Belideus. "Evidently a transition stage between the 

true Phalangers and the genus Petaurista, having the skull, but not the pata- 

gium of the latter, and the bushy cylindrical tail, but not the skull of the 

Phalanger subgenus THcJwsurus." (Collett.) 
Hemibos Falconer, 1865. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidae. 

Falconer, quoted by Rctimeyer, in Verhandl. Naturforsch. Gesellsch. Basel, IV, 

2tes Heft, 330, 1865; Rutimeyer, Versuch. Natiirl. Gesch. Rindes, Abth. 2, p. 23, 

1867; Falconer, Paheont, Memoirs & Notes, I, pp. 23, 280, 546, 555, 1868; 

Lydekker, Mem. Geol. Surv. India (Pakeont. Indica), ser. 10, I, pt. in, 145-149, 

pis. xxii-xxiii [Reissue pis. xx-xxiv], 1878. 
Type: Hemibos triquetricornis Falconer, from the Siwalik Hills, India. 
Extinct. Based on a cranium. 
Hemibos: rjui-, half; -4- Bos. 

Hemicaulodon Cope, 1869. Sirenia, Halitheriidse. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XI, 190-191, pi. v, fig. 6, 1869. 
Type: Hemicaulodon effodiens Cope, from the Eocene marl pits of Shark River, 

Monmouth County, New Jersey. 
Extinct, Based on a 'right upper incisor.' 
Hemicaulodon: rjf.ii-, half ; xavlos, stalk; b8cov = bftovz, tooth — in allusion to the 

form of the upper incisor. 

Hemicentetes Mivart, 1871. Insectivora, Tenrecida?. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1871, 58-65, 72-73, pi. v, 9 figs, in text. 



HEMICENTETES HEMIGALIDIA. 317 

Hemicentetes — Continued. 

Type: Erinaceus madagascariensis Shaw (= E. semispinosus Cuvier), from Mada- 
gascar. 

Hemicentetes: f}Hi-, half; 4- Centetes. This genus differs from Centetes in the 

presence of a third upper incisor, smaller canines, and in the form of the skull. 

Hemichaerus (Jouedan) Deperet, 1887. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae. 

Arch. Mus. Lyon, IV, 236, 1887. 

Type: Hemicharrus typus Jourdan (Mus. Lyon), from the Miocene of Drome, 
France. 

See Hemichosrus Filhol, 1882. 

Extinct. Based on a cranium. 

Hemichserus (Hemichosrus): fpu-, half; x°ip°S, hog. 
Hemichcerus Filhol, 1882. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suidae? 

Mem. Mamm. Foss. Phosphorites Quercy, Toulouse, 106-111, 1882. 

Type: Hemichcerus htmandini Filhol, from the Phosphorites of Quercy, France. 

Extinct. Based on a lower jaw. 
Hemicyon Lartet, 1851. Ferae, Oanidse. 

Notice sur la Colline de Sansan, 16, 1851. 

Type: Hemicyon sansaniensis Lartet, from the Miocene of Sansan, Dept. du Gers, 
France. Extinct. 

Hemicyon: rj^i-, half; kvgjv, dog. 

Hemiderma Gervais, 1855. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

Exped. Comte de Castelnau, dans l'Amerique du Sud, Zool., Mamm., 43, pis. vn 

fig. 4, ix figs. 8, 8% 1855. 
Type: Phyllostoma brericaudum Maximilian, from the Fazenda of Coroaba in the 
forests on the Rio Jucii, not far from the Rio do Espirito Santo, southeastern 
Brazil. 
Hemiderma: f/juz-, half; dipper, skin. 
Hemiechinus Fitzingek, 1866. Insectivora, Erinaceidae. 

Sitzungsber Math.-Nat, CI. K. Akad. Wiss. Wien, LIV, Abth. i, 565, 1866; Ibid., 

LVI, Abth. i, 858, 1867. 
Species 5, from Egypt, Nubia, Abyssinia, and Sennar: Erinaceus brachydactylus 
Wagner, E. platyotis Sundevall, E. Ubijcus Hemprich & Ehrenberg, E. aegyptius 
Geoff roy, and Hemiechinus pallidus Fitzinger. 
Hemiechinus: ?}pi-, half; f^ZVos, hedgehog. 
Hemig-alago Dahlbom, 1857. Primates, Lernuridse. 

Zool. Studier, I, Tredje Haftet, 224, 225, 230, Tab. x, 1857; Gray, Cat. Monkeys, 

Lemurs & Fruit-eating Bats Brit. Mus., 86, 1870. 
Type: Qalago dcmidoffii Fischer, from Gaboon, West Africa. (See Galagoides 

A. Smith, 1833. ) 
Hemigalago: rj^i-, half; 4- Galago. 
Hemig-ale ('Jourdan') Gray, 1864. Ferce, Viverridae. 

Geay, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 542; Flowee & Lydekkee, Mamm. Living 

& Extinct, 533, 1891. 
Emendation of Hemlgalus Jourdan, 1837. 
Hemig-alea (see Hemigalus). Ferae, Viverridae. 

Hemigalidia Mivart, 1882. Ferae, Viverridae. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1882, 143, 188-189, 206. 

Species: GaMdia olimcea Geoffroy, and G. concolor Geoffroy, from Madagascar. 
Name antedated by Salanoia Gray, 1864. 

Hemigalidia: r//ai-, half ; -\-Galidia — in allusion to the tail, muzzle, claws, and 
other characters, in which it differs from Galidia. 



318 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Hemig-alus Jourdan, 1837. Ferae, Viverridse. 

Cornptes Rendus, Paris, V, No. 12, pp. 442-443; No. 17, p. 593, July-Dec, 1837. 
Hemigalea Blainville, ibid., V, 595, 1837; Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 2? s.'r., VIII, 

[276], 279, Nov., 1837; Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1864, 524-525. 
Hemigale Gray, ibid., 1864, 542; Flower & Lydekker, Mamm., Living & Extinct, 

533, 1891. 
Type: ' L' hemigale zebre' (=Viverra hardwickii Gray), from Malacca or Borneo. 
Hemigalus: rf/^i-, half; y<-i\fj, weasel. 
Hemiganus Cope, 1882. Edentata, Ganodonta, Stylinodontidae. 

Am. Naturalist, XVI, for. Oct. 1882, 831-832, Sept. 28, 1882; Tert. Vert, 405, 

1885 (date of publication, under Hemithheas.) 
Type: Hemiganus vultuosus Cope, from the Puerco Eocene of New Mexico. 
Extinct. 
Hemiganus: fjm-, half; yavos, brightness, polish — in allusion to the enamel of 

the incisors, which " extends but a short distance on the anterior face of the 

tooth." 

Hemimeryx Lydekker, 1878. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anthracotheriidae. 

Rec. Geol. Surv. India, [X, pt. 2, p. 78, May, 1877— not named]; XI, 79-80, 1878; 

Pakeont. Indica (Mem. Geol. Surv. India), ser. 10, II, pt. v, 167-169, pi. xxm, 

figs. 1, 5, Feb., 1883. 
Type: Hemimeryx blanfordi Lydekker (1883), from the Miocene of the lower 

Manchhars of Sind, India. 
Extinct. Based on molar teeth. 
Hemimeryx: ?)/"-, half; /mj/jvq, ruminant. 

Hemiomus Seeley, 1899. Ungulata, ? 

Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc. London, LV, pt. 3, pp. 413—115, 3 figs, in text, Aug. 12, 

1899. 
Type: Hemiomus major Seeley, from the River Medway, near Tonbridge, England. 
Extinct. Based on the distal end of the right humerus. 

Hemiomus: i)iu-, half; gJ//<k, shoulder — " in reference to the absence of ossifica- 
tion of the hinder aspect of the distal end of the bone." 
Hemiopsaldon (see Hemipsalodon). Creodonta, Hyaenodontida'. 

Hemiotomys (subg. of Arvicola) Selys Longchamps, 1836. 

Glires, Muridne, Microtinae. 

Essai Monographique sur les Campanols des Environs de Liege, 7-8, pi. 1, 1836; 
Etudes Micromammalogie, 85-86, 146-147, pis. 1-2, 1839; Baird, Mamm. N. 
Am., 515-516, 1857; Miller, N. Am. Fauna, No. 12, p. 16, July 23, 1896. 

The sul>genus was originally formed for the reception of Arvicola fulvus and .1. 
amphibius (=A. terrestris), from Europe, but fidvus was subsequently found to 
be based on a mutilated specimen of A. arvalis and was withdrawn. (Selys, 
Postscript to Essai Monographique, 1862.) Selys states (1. c, 87, 1839) that 
he does not wish this section considered as a genus or subgenus! 

Hemiotomys: r/jui- half; ov$, caro?, ear; juvt;, mouse — from the small size of the 
ears. 

Hemipsalodon Cope, 1885. Creodonta, Hy;enodontidae. 

Am. Naturalist, XIX, 163, Feb., 1885; Ann. Rept. Geol. & Nat. Hist. Surv. Can- 
ada, new ser., I, for 1885, App., 80c-81c, 1886. 

//, iiiiopxaldon Cope, Am. Naturalist, XIII, 151, Mar. 1889 (misprint). 

Type: Hemipsalodon grandis Cope, from the Oligocene (White River beds) of 
Swift Current River, Northwest Territory. 

Extinct. Based on a jaw. 



HEM1PSAL0D0N HENRICOFILHOLIA. 319 

Hemipsalodon — Continued. 

Hemipsalodon: f/m-, half; ipa\i<;, pair of scissors; ddcoi' = ddovs, tooth — prob- 
ably in allusion to the ' heel' of the third molar, which "is quite short, and 
has a cutting keel" . . . The molars "are interesting on account of their 
illustrating the most primitive form of a sectorial tooth." (Cope.) 

Hemisyntrachelus (subg. of Delphinapterus) Brandt, 1873. Cete, Delphinidae. 

Mem. Acad. Imp. Sri. St.-Petersbourg, XX, 239-242, 1873. 
Species: Delphinapterus cortesii (Laurillard), and D. brochii (Balsamo Crivelli), 

from Europe. 
Extinct. 
Hemisyntrackelus: fp'i-, half; dvv, together; rpa^T/Aog, neck — in allusion to the 

character: "Die beiden oderdrei vorderen Halswirbel vereint, die iibrigen frei." 

Hemithlseus Cope, 1882. Ungulata, Amblypoda, Periptychidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XVI, for Oct. 1882, 832, Sept. 28, 1882; Tert. Vert., 405-408, 

pi. xxv f , figs. 6-9, 1885. 
Type: Hemithlseus koivalevskianus Cope, from the Puerco Eocene of northwestern 

New Mexico. 
Extinct. 

Hemitragus Hodgson, 1841. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Calcutta Journ. Nat. Hist, II, No. VI, 218, July, 1841; Journ. Asiat. Soc. 
Bengal, X, pt. n, 913, July-Dec, 1841; XVII, pt. n, 486, Nov., 1848; Gray, 
Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., XVIII, 230, Oct., 1846; Knowsley Menagerie, 1850. 

Type: Capra qyadrimammis veljharcd Hodgson, from Nepal, India. 

Hemitragus: ffpi-, half; rpayos, goat — from the absence of a beard and presence 
of some of the characters of a goat. The habits are those of the goat. 

Hemitragus Van der Hoeven, 1855. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Handboek Dierkunde, 2d ed., II, 943, 1855. 

New name for Xirmorhedus H. Smith, 1827. Includes Antilope sumatrensis Shaw, 
from Sumatra, and A. gored Hardwicke, from India. 

Name preoccupied by Hemitragus Hodgson, 1841, which is based on Capra quadri- 
mammis vel jharal from India. Van der Hoeven considered the name avail- 
able for this group, as he did not regard Hodgson's Hemitragus distinct. 

Hemiurus ( tervais, 1855. Marsupialia, Didelphyidse. 

Expd. Comte de Castelnau dans PAmerique du Sud, I, Mamm., 101-102, pi. xvi 

fig. 2, pi. xx fig. 1, 1885 (pi. xvi is marked Hemiurus eoncolor, but referred to in 

text as H. hunteri) ; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 354, 1888. 
Type: Didelphys hunteri Waterhouse ( = D. brevicaudata Erxleben), from Brazil or 

Guiana. 
Name preoccupied by Hemiurus Rudolphi, 1809 (Entozoorum Hist. Nat., II, pt. i, 

38, 1809), a genus of Trematodes. 
Hemiurus: fpti-, half; ovpd, tail. 

Hemiutaetus Ameghino, 1902. Edentata, Dasypodidae. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 65-66, May, 1902 (sep. pp. 63-64). 
Type: Hemiutaetus constellatus Ameghino, from the Pyrotherium beds of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 
Hemiutaetus: f}Ui-, half; 4- Utaetus. 

Hendecapleura (see Endecapleura). Glires, Muridse, Gerbillinee. 

Henricofilholia Ameghino, 1901. Ungulata, Astrapotheroidea, Astrapotheriidje. 
Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 404-405, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 58-59). 
Type: Henricofilholia eingulata ( = ? Parastrapotherium cingulatum Ameghino, 1895), 
from the Pyrotherium beds of Patagonia. 



320 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Henricofilholia — Continued. 

Extinct. 

Henricofilholia: In honor of Henri Filhol, 1843-1902, late professor of comparative 
anatomy and director of the anatomical laboratory of the Museum d'Histoire 
Naturelle, Paris. 
Henricosbornia Ameghino, 1901. Primates (Henri cosbornidae). 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 357-358, July, 1901 (sep. pp. 11-12). 

Type: Henricosbornia lophodonta Ameghino, from the 'Cretaceous' of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Henricosbornia: In honor of Henry Fairfield Osborn, 1857-, Da Costa pro- 
fessor of zoology, Columbia University, and curator of vertebrate paleon- 
tology, American Museum of Natural History, New York; author of numerous 
papers on paleontology. 
Hepoona Gray, 1841. Marsupialia, Phalangeridae. 

Gray, in Grey's Journ. Two Expd. Northwest & West Australia, App. II, 
402, 407-408, 1841; Thomas, Cat. Marsup. & Monotrem. Brit. Mus., 166, 1888 
(in synonymy). 

Type: Phalangista cookii Desmarest, from Tasmania. (See Pseudochirus Ogilby, 
1837.) 

Hepoona: Hepoona Roo, native name used in John White's 'Voyage to New 
South Wales,' 1790. 
Heptacodon Marsh, 1894. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Anthracotheriidae. 

Am. Journ. Sci., 3d ser., XLVII, No. 281, p. 409, 3 figs, in text, May, 1894. 

Type: Heptacodon curtus Marsh, from the Oligocene of South Dakota. 

Extinct. Based on a last upper molar. 

Heptacodon: sitrd, seven; rf/o), point; 68(bv = d8ov<;, tooth — from the seven 
cusps of the last upper molar. 
Heptaconus Ameghino, 1894. Ungulata, Litopterna, Proterotheriidae. 

Enum. Syn. Mamm. Foss. Form. Eocenes Patagonie, 44, Feb., 1894. 

Type: Heptaconus acer Ameghino, from the Eocene of Patagonia. 

Extinct. 

Heptaconus: kitra. , seven; k&vos, cone. 
Heptodon Cope, 1882. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Lophiodontidae. 

Am. Naturalist, XVI, 1029, Dec. (2?), 1882; Tert. Vert., 492, 1885 (date of pub- 
lication, under Diacodexis). 

Type: Lophiodon ventorum Cope, from the Eocene of Wyoming. 

Name preoccupied (?) by Heptodonta Hope, 1838, a genus of Insects. 

Extinct. 

Heptodon: kitra , seven; 68cbv=dSovs, tooth — in allusion to the upper molar- 

iform teeth which are seven in number. 

Hericulus (see Ericulus). Insectivora, Tenrecidae. 

Herinaceus (see Erinaceus) . Insectivora, Erinaceidae. 

Herpailurus (subgenus of Felis) Severtzow, 1858. Ferae, Felidae. 

Revue et Mag. de Zool., Paris, 2 e ser., X, 385, 390, Sept., 1858. 

Species: Felis (Herpailurus) yaguarundi Desmarest, and Felis (H) eyra Desmarest, 
from Paraguay. 

Herpailurus: fpitco, to creep; al'Xovpos, cat — in allusion to the animal's habits 
and manner of approaching its prey. 
Herpestes Illiger, 1811. Ferae, Viverridae. 

Prodromus Syst. Mamm. et Avium, 135, 1811 (Herpertes, corrected to Herpestes 
in Errata, 302); Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1882, 63-78, fig. 1 (type 
fixed). 



HERPESTES HESPEROSCIURUS. 321 

Herpestes — Continued. 

Species, ?>: Viverra ichneumon Gmelin (type), I". mungo Gmelin, and V. cafra 
Gmelin, from Africa and Asia. 

Herpestes: f/J7r?/6r)};, a creeper — probably in allusion to its habits, especially in 
pursuit of its prey. This is the derivation given by th • original describer, hut 
the following lias been suggested: irregularly from ep7t(er6v), a reptile, 
serpent + ktiQisiv, to eat, devour. Cf. Spermestes. (Century Diet.) 

Herpetocetus Van Beneden, 1872. (etc, Balsenidse. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. de Belgique, 2" scr., XXXIV, 20, 1872. 
Erpetocetus Van Beneden, ibid., L, 25, 1880; Ann. Mus. Roy. Hist. Nat. Belgique, 

VII, 84, 1882. 
Type: Herpetocetus scaldiensis Van Beneden, from Stuyvenberg and St. Nicholas, 

in the vicinity of Antwerp, Belgium. 
Extinct. Based on maxillary hones. 
Herpetocetus; kpitErov reptile; tcfjrog, whale, "a cause du talon qui termine la 

mandibule en arriere et qui rappelle ee menie os des reptiles sauriens.'* ( Van 

Beneden.) 

Herpetomys (subgenus of Microtus) Merriam, 1898. Glires, Muridse, Microtinse. 

Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., XII, 107-108, Apr. 30, 1898. 

Type: Microtus guatemalensis Merriam, from Todos Santos, Huehuetenango, 
Guatemala (alt. 10.000 ft. ). 

Herpetomys: f'p7tr/c, Fpmfroi, creeper; itv$, mouse — from the animal's mode of 
progression. 
Herpetotherium Cope, 1873. Marsupialia, Didelphyidse. 

Pala?ont, Bull. No. 16, p. 1, Aug. 20, L873; Synop. New Vert. Colorado, 4, 1873; 
Ann. Rept. V. S. Geol. A Geog. Surv. Terr., VII, for 1873. 465, 1874. 

Type: Herpetotherium fuzax *Cope, from theOligocene (White River) of Colorado. 

Extinct. Based on "a left mandibular ramus incomplete at both extremities, 
but exhibiting the crowns and alveoli of five molar teeth." 

Herpetotherium: FpTterov, reptile; Btjpiov, wild beast. 
Hesperocyon Scott, 1890. Fer;e, Canidse. 

Princeton College Bull., II, No. 2, pp. .".T-oN, Apr., 1890. 

Genus described, but no species mentioned: "Hesperocyon becomes extremely 
abundant in the John Day beds [Oregon], but does not pass up in the higher 
Miocene. Its nearest European allies are Cynodon and Cy'riod'tciis.'' (Scott.) 

Hesperocyon: 'i6mpoi } western; ki'oov, dog — in allusion to the type locality. 
Hesperomys Waterhouse, 1839. Glires, Muridse, Cricetinse. 

Zool. Voy. H. M. S. 'Beagle,' pt. n, Mamm., 74-77, pi. 12, 1839. 

Type not designated, but Mus bimaeulatus Waterhouse, from Maldonado, Uru- 
guay, may perhaps be so considered, since this species is compared with 
Musrattus in showing the differences between the mice of the New and Old 
World. 

Hesperomys: iditepos, western; fivi, mouse — i. e., belonging to the western 
hemisphere. 
Hesperoptenus (subgenusof Vesperus) Peters, 1868. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidse. 

Monatsb. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. Berlin, Nov. 1868, 626-627; Dec. 1868, 638-639. 

Type: Vesperus [Hesperoptenus) doria Peters, from Sarawak, Borneo. 

Hesperoptenus: Fdnspoi, evening; irr^voi, winged — i. e., a crespuscular winged 
creature, a bat. 
Hesperosciurus (subgenus of Sciurus) Nelson, 1899. Glires, Sciuridse. 

Proc. Wash. Acad. Sci., I, 27, 83, pi. i, tig. 5, May 9, 1899. 

7r»!»l— No. 23—03 21 



322 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Hesperosciurus — Continued. 

Type: Sciurus griseus Ord, from the Dalles of the Columbia River, Oregon. 
Hesperosciurus: E67tepo<;, western '.-j-Sciurus — 'western squirrel,' from its habitat 
in the extreme western United States. 

Heteroborus Cope, 1880. Creodonta, Arctocyonidse. 

Proc. Am. Philos. Soc., XIX, 79, 80, Aug. 3, 1880; Tert. Vert., 259, Feb., 1885. 
Type: Arctocyon duelii Lemoine, from the Lower Eocene of France. 
Extinct. 

Heteroborus: erepoi, other, different; flopo^, gluttonous. 

Heterocephalus Ruppell, 1842. Glires, Bathyergidae. 

Mus. Senckenberg., Frankfurt a. M., Ill, Heft 2, pp. 99-101, 175, Taf. yiii fig. 1, 
x figs. 3 a-c, 1842. 

Type: Heterocephalus gJaber Ruppell, from Shoa, southern Abyssinia, northeast- 
ern Africa. 

Heretocejjhalus: f'repoj, other, different; KscpaA.?}, head. 

Heterocetus Van Benedex, 1880. Cete, Balaenidse. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. Belgique, 2 P ser., L, 21-22, 1X80; Ann. Mus. Roy. Hist. 
Nat,, Bruxelles, XIII, 23, 1886. 

Species, 3: Heterocetus a flints Van Beneden, Cetotkerium brevifrons Van Beneden, and 
Heterocetus sprangii Van Beneden from the vicinity of Antwerp, Belgium. 
"Depuis longtemps nous avons propose ce nom generique de Heterocetus, mais 
nous avionscru devoir l'abandonner pour un autre nomplusancien [Cetotherium] 
donne par le docteur Brandt de Saint-Petersbourg. En etudiant avec plus de 
soin les earacteres et en comparant les derniers ossements decouverts, nous 
avons era devoir revenir a notre premiere denomination." (1. c. p. 21.) 

Extinct. 

Heterocetus: erepos, other, different; K)Jto<;, whale — i. e. distinct from Cetotherium. 
Heterodelphis Brandt, 1873. Cete, Platanistidae? 

Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci., St.-Petersbourg, XX, 248-253, Taf. xxv, xxvi figs. 1-26, 
1873. 

Type: Heterodelphis klinderi Brandt, from Nikolajew (=Nikolaief), northeast of 
Odessa, southern Russia. 

Extinct. 

Heterodelphis: f'repoj, other, different; deX(pii, dolphin. 
Heterodon (subgenus of Delphinus) Blainville, 1817. Cete, Physeteridse. 

Nouv. Diet. Hist, Nat., nouv. <§d., IX, 151, 175-179, 1817. 

Species, 8: Auarnacus groenlandicus Lacepede, Delphinus chemnitziunus Blainville 
(=Bal,Tna rostraia Chemnitz), D. edentulus Schreber, D. bidenlatus Bonnaterre, 
D. butskode Blainville {=Hyperoodon b utskopf Lacepede), D. sowerbiensis Blain- 
ville, Ej)iodon urganantus Rafinesque, and Delphinus densirostris Blainville. 

Name preoccupied by Heterodon Beauvois, 1800, a genus of Reptilia. (Gill, 
Arrangement Fam. Mamm., 96, 1872). 

Heterodon: trspo<;, other, different; b8(hv=d?>ov<;, tooth. 

Heterodon Lund, 1838. Edentata, Glyptodontidte. 

Overs. K. Danske Vidensk. Selsk. Forhandl. Kjobenhavn, 1838, 11; Ann. Sci. 
Nat., Paris, 2 e ser., XI, Zool., 216-217, 231, Apr., 1839; Echodu Monde Savant, 
Paris, 6 e ann., No. 430, p. 244, Apr. 17, 1839; Afhandl. K. Danske Vidensk. Selsk. 
Nat, & Math. Afh.. Kjobenhavn, VIII, 67, 141, Tab. i, fig. 1, 1841; Liais, Cli- 
mate, Geol., Faune, et Geog. Botanique Bresil, 366-367, 1872. 

Type: Dasypus diversidens Lund, 1841, from the bone caves between the Rio das 
Velhas and Rio Paraopeba, Minas Geraes, Brazil (alt, 2,000 ft.). 

Name preoccupied by Heterodon Beauvois, 1800, a genus of Reptilia; and by 
Heterodon Blainville, 1817, a genus of cetaceans. 



HETERODON HETEROSCIURUS. 323 

Heterodon — Continued. 

Extinct. 

Heterodon: erspoi, other, different; b$cbv=ddovs, tooth — in allusion to the 
inequality in size and form of the teeth. 
Heterogeomys Merriam, 1895. Glires, Geomyidse. 

N. Am. Fauna, No. 8, pp. 23, 26, 179-185, numerous plates and figures, Jan. 31, 1895. 

Type: Georays kispidus Le Conte, from the vicinity of Jalapa, Vera Cruz, Mexico. 

Heterogeomys: erepos, different; -j-Geomys — i. e., different from true Geomys. 
Heteroglyphis Roth, 1899. Ungulata, Litopterna, Macraucheniida?. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, IX, 387, 1899; Ameghino, Sin. GeoL-Palaeont., Segundo 
Censo Nac. Repub. Argentina, I, SupL, p. 12, July, 1899. 

Type: Heleroglyphis dewoletzky Roth, from the ' upper Cretaceous ' of Lago Mus- 
ters, Territory of Chubut, Patagonia. 

Extinct. Based on a single upper molar. 

Heleroglyphis: stepo*;, other, different; yXv<pi}, carving, notch. 
Heterohyrax (subgenus of Dendrohyrax) Gray, 1868. Ungulata, Procaviida-. 

Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist,, 4th ser., I, 50-51, Jan., 1868; Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & 
Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 293-294, 1869. 

Type: Dendrohyrax blainvillii <iray, from East Africa. 

Heterohyrax: erepw;, other, different; + Hyrax — from the fact that the skull "has 
all the characters of the genus Dendrohyrax except that the orbit is incomplete 
behind." (Gray.) 

Heterohyus Gervais, 1848-52. Primates, Microchceridse? 

Zool. et Paleont. Franc., l e ed., II, expl. pi. 35, fig. 11, p. 7, 1848-52; 2 e ed., 
201-202, pi. 35, fig. 14, 1859. 

Type: Heterohyus armatus Gervais, from the Eocene of Buschweiller, Lower 
Alsace, Germany. 

Extinct. Based on a portion of the lower jaw with teeth. 

Heterohyus: erepo<;, other, different; vz, £o?, hog. 
Heterolophodon Roth, 1903. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Homalodontotheriida?. 

Revista Mus. La Plata, XI, 145-146, 1903. 

Type: Heterolophodon amplialus Roth, from the upper 'Cretaceous' of Lago Mus- 
ters, Territory of Chubut, Patagonia. 

Extinct. Based on two upper molars. 

Heterolopliodon: er£po<;, other, different; ao</>os, crest; dda>v = ddov<;, tooth. 
Heteromys Desmarest, 1817. Glires, Heteromyidse. 

Nouv. Diet. Hist. Nat., nouv. ed., XIV, 180-181, 1817; Mammalogie, I, 313, 1820. 

Type: Mus anomalus Thompson, from the island of Trinidad, West Indies. 

Heteromys: srEpog, other, different; /.ivs, mouse — i. e., different from Mus. 
Heteropus Jourdan, 1837. Marsupialia, Macropodidse.- 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, V, 522, 1837; Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 2° ser., VIII, Zool., 
368, Dec, 1837. 

Type: Heteropus cdbogularis Jourdan ( = Kangurus penicillatus Gray), from the 
mountains southwest of Sydney, New South Wales. 

Name preoccupied by Heteropus Palisot de Beauvois, 1805, a genus of Orthoptera. 

Heteropus: £T£po<$, other, different; itovc,, foot — in allusion to the posterior limbs 
and tarsi, which are shorter than in other kangaroos, and exhibit other minor 
differences. 
Heterosciurus (subgenus of Sciurus) Trouessart, 1880. Glires, Sciuridse. 

Le Naturaliste, II, No. 37, p. 292, Oct. 1, 1880; Cat. Mamm., in Bull. Soc. d'Etudes 
Sci. d' Angers, X, l er fasc, 69-73, 1880; Bull. IT. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. Terr., 
VI, No. 2, p. 304, Sept. 19, 1881; Elera, Cat, Sist. Fauna Filipinas, I, 20, 1895 
(raised to generic rank); Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1897,933 (type 
given as S. erythneus Pallas). 



824 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Heterosciurus — t !< mtinued . 

Species, 18, from Asia ami Malaysia: Sciurus erythrseus Pallas (=S. ferrugineus F, 
Cuvier, type), S. hippurus I. Geoffroy, S. prevostii Desmarest, S. lokrioides 
Bodgson, S. lokriah Hodgson, S. leucomus Miiller, 6'. alstoni Anderson, S.pernyi 
A. Milne-Edwards, X rufigenys Blanford, S. modestus Miiller & Schlegel, S. 
diardii (Temminck) Jentink, .V chinensis Gray, .V tenuis Horsfield, S.philippin- 
ensis Waterhouse, S. steeri Giinther, S. rosembergii Jentink, S. murinus Miiller & 
Schlegel, and S. lis Temminck. 

Heterosciurus: erepos, other, different; Sciurus — in allusion to the differences 
between this group and true Sciurus. 

Heterotalpa* (subgenus of Talpa) Peters, 1863. Insectivora, Talpidse. 

Handb. ZooL, I, (iter Bogen, 86, Sept., 1863. 

Type: Talpa wogura Temminck, from Japan. (See Mogera Pomel, 1848. ) 

Heterotalpa: ."rfpoc, other, different;^ Talpa — i. e., different from true Talpa. 
Heterotherium Blaixvillk, 1838. Marsupialia, Ampbitheriidse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, VII, No. 8, p. 417, 1 pi. %s. 1-5, July-Dec, 1838. 

Species: Didelphis prevostii Cuvier MS., and D. bucklandii Broderip, from Stones- 
field, England. "II est plus certain que cet animal doit former un genre dis- 
tinct auquel on pourrait donner le nom <le Heterotherium ou d' AmphUherium.'' 

Extinct. Based on lower jaws. 

Heterotherium: sTspos, other, different; Bypiov, wild beast. "< m pourrait donner 
le nom de Heterotherium on d' AmphUherium, afin d'eviter les inductions que 
Ton pourrait tirer de l'existence si ancienne d'un mammifere de la classe 
des Didelphes." ( Bi.aixyii.le. ) 
Hexaprotodon (subgenus of Hippopotamus) Falconer £ Cavtley, 1836. 

Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Hippopotamidpe. 

Asiatic Researches, Calcutta, XIX, pt. I. 51, 1836. 

Species: Hippopotamus sivalensis Falconer & Cautley,and II. dissimUis Falconer & 
Cautley, from the Pliocene of the Siwalik Hills, India. 

Extinct. 

Hexaprotodon: £^, six; npcbroc,, first; 6dcov — d8oi:, tooth — inallusion to the six 
incisors in each jaw. 
Hexodon Cope, 1884. Edentata, Ganodonta, Conoryctidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XVIII, 794, 795-79(3, fig. 3 in text, Aug., 18S4; Trans. Am. Philos. 
Soc, new ser., XVI, pt. II, 316-317, 1888 (under Conoryctes). 

Type: Hexodon molestus Cope, from the Puerco Eocene of New Mexico. 

Name preoccupied by Hexodon Olivier, 1789, a genus of Coleoptera. 

Extinct. Based on " the superior and inferior dentitions of a single individual." 

Hexodon: e|, six; 68cbr = d8<)r:. tooth — in allusion to the three premolars on 

each side, in contrast with those of related genera in which the number is four. 

Hinnulus Ogilky, 1837. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervida;. 

Proc. Zool. Soc. London, for 1836, No. xlviii, 136, June 27, 1837. 

No species known. "Two [genera Hinnulus and Capreolus'] are more especially 
indicated . . . [and there is] every reason to believe in their actual existence, 
and to anticipate their discovery They will be characterized nearly as fol- 
lows,! and will probably he found, one in the tropical forests of the Indian 
Archipelago, and the other on the elevate. 1 table lands of Mexico or South 

*Heterotalpa may not have been properly published. Peters' 'Handbuch,' although 
printed, seems never to have been generally distributed, and the copy examined is 
perhaps unique. It lacks both title-page and date and is deposited in the lihrary of 
the ' Zoologische Sammlungen,' Berlin. 

tllinnulus: " Rhinaria magna. Sinus lachrymales distincti. Fossae interdigitalea 
nulla-. Folliculi inguinates nulli. Mamma' quatuor." 



HINNTLUS HIPPHAPLOUS. 825 

Himiulus — Continued. 

America. ... Ii may appear a bold, perhaps a presumptuous undertaking, 
thus to predict the discovery of species and define the characters of genera, of 
whose actual existence we have no positive knowledge; but . . . all the anal- 
ogies of nature . . . are in favor of the supposition. " (Ogilby.) 

Hinnulus: Lat., young mule. 
Hipparion Ciiristol, 1832. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidse. 

"Ann. Sci. Indust. du .Midi de Franee, Marseilles, I, 215, 1832" (fide Water- 
house MS. ); Bull. Geol. de Franee, III, p. cxxviii, 1833; L'Institut, II, 75, 
1834; Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogie, 1834, 500; Ann. Sci. Nat., Paris, 2 l sit., 
IV, 225, 1835; Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., Ill, 50-65, fig. 11 in 
text, 1886. 

Apparently no type was named in the original description. Lydekker includes 
4 species: Equus (Hippotherium) gracilis Kaup (1833), from Europe; Hip- 
potherium antelopinwm Falconer & Cant lev (1849), from India; Hipparion richt- 
hofeni Koken (1885), from China; and Sivalhippus theobaldi Lydekker ( 1877), 
from India. 

Extinct. 

Hipparion: ixitdpiov, pony, dim. of 'ittttoz, horse. 
Hipparitherium Christol, 1847. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidse. 

Comptes Rendus, Paris, XXIV, 374-376, Jan. -June, 1847. 

Type: Palseotherium hippoides Lartet, from France. 

Extinct. 

Hipparitherium: Hipparion; f )i/ijiov, wild beast. 
Hippelaphus (subg. of AntUope) Reichenbach, 1835. Ungulata, Bovidae. 

Bildergallerie Thierwelt, oder Naturgesch. Thierreichs, 2te Auflage, Heft vn, 
4-5, Taf. v figs. 3-5, x\v flg. 11, 1835. 

Species, 3: Antilopegnu, and .1. areas, from Africa; am 1.1. picta (=A. tragocamelus), 
from northern India. (See Boselapkus Blainville, 1816.) 

Hippelaphus: iitTtiXacpoi, horse deer (from '/tttto:, horse; e'Xa<po^, deer.) 
Hippelaphus (subu r . of Cervus) Bonaparte, 1836. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Iconografia Fauna Italica, I, fasc. xv-xvi, under ( 'ervus <l<imu [p. 4], 1836; "Sin- 
bevall, K. Vetensk. Akad, Handlingar, Stockholm, for 1844, 178-183, 1846." 

Type species not given but evidently ( 'ervus hippelaphus Cuvier, from Java. This 
group is simply the subgenus Rusa II. Smith, 1827, under another name.* 

Name preoccupied by Hippelaphus Reichenbach, 1835, a subgenus of Antilope. 
Hipphaplous Ameghino, 1885. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidse. 

["Catalogo de la seccidn de la provincia de Buenos Aires en la Exposicidn Con- 
tinental Sudamericana, pag. 39, ano 1882," nomen nudum.] 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. C6rdoba, VIII, 94, 1885; Ibid., IX, 146, 1886. 

Hipphaplus Ameghino, Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., C6rdoba, VI, 521, 1889. 

"Funde el jjenero sobre restos de dos especies distintas, //. bravardii y //. </<//•- 
winii, que no luce mas que nombrar enel catalogo arribamencionado." (Ame- 
ghino, 1. c, 1885.) 

Extinct. 

Hipphaplous: 'iitito$, horse; anAoos, simple. 

*"Nella edizione del Regno animale del Cuvier, data in Inglese dal Griffith, il 
Signor Hamilton Smith distribuisce le specie dei Cervi in gruppi d'ordine inferiore, 
secondoun piano che a noi par lodevole, e che adottiamo con leggiere modificazioni." 
(Bonaparte). These modifications consist in changing the names of four of the ten 
subgenera, viz: Alee to Alces, Rangifer to Tarandus, Elaphus to Cervus, and Rusa to 
Hippelaphus. 



326 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALTUM. 

Hippidion Owen, 1869. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidse. 

Proc. Roy. Soc. London, XVII, No. 109, p. 268, for Feb., 1869; Philos. Trans. Roy. 

Soc. London for 1869, 159, pt. n, 572-573, pi. lxii, figs. 1-10, 14, 16, 1870; 

Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 618, 1902 (type). 
Hippidium Burmeister, Los Caballos Fos. de la Pampa Argentina, 5-68, pis. 

i-viii, 1875; Supl., 3-13, pi. xi, figs. 3-6, 1889. 
Species, 3: Equus neogaeus Lund (type) , and E. principalis Lund, from Brazil; and 

E. arcidens Owen, from the Arroyo Negro, near Paysandu, Uruguay. 
Extinct. 

Hippidion: 'iimoc,, horse; i'Sios (neuter iSiov*), peculiar. 
Hippocamelus Leuckart, 1816. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidse. 

Dissertatiuncula Inaug. de Equo bisulco Molina', 24, 1816; Gray, Cat. Mamm. 

Brit. Mus., pt. in, Ungulata, 226, 227, 1852 (under Fwroifer) ; Thomas, Proc. 

Zool. Sue, London, 1898, 212. 
Type: Hippocamelus dubius Leuckart (=Equus bisirfcus Molina), from the Cor- 
dillera of Chile. 
Hippocamelus: 'imioi, horse; K&prjXoz, camel — from the supposition that the 

animal was intermediate between a horse and a llama. 
Hippodactylus Cope, 1888. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidse. 

Am. Naturalist, XXII, 449, May, 1888. 
Type: Hippotherium antelopinum Falconer & Cautley, from the Siwalik Hills of 

India. 
Extinct. 

Hippodactylus: 'iitno<;, horse; SclktvAo^, toe — in allusion to tbe single metapodials. 
Hippodon Leidy, 1854. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 1854, 90. 
Type: Hippodon speciosus Leidy, from the Upper Miocene of the Bijou Hills, east 

of the Missouri River, South Dakota. 
Extinct. Based on an inferior molar. 
Hippodon: 'irtrtos, horse; 68cbv=d8ov<;, tooth — in allusion to the type specimen, 

' ' an inferior molar of a solipedal animal apparently intermediate to Equus and 

Anchitherium. ' ' ( Leidy". ) 
Hippohyus Falconer & Cautley,! 1845. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Suida?. 

[Falconer & Cautley, in] Owen's Odontography, pt, in, 562-563, Descr. Plates, 

35, pi. 140, fig. 7, 1845; Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus., n, 259, 1885. 
Type: Hippohyus sivalensis Falconer & Cautley, from the Pliocene of the Siwalik 

Hills, India. 
Extinct. 

Hippohyus: '!nito$, horse; vs, vos, hog. 
Hippopotamodon Lydekker, 1877. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Hippopotamidge. 
Records Geol. Surv. India, X, pt. 2, p. 81, May, 1877. 
Type: Hippopotamodon sivalense Lydekker, from the Pliocene of the Siwalik 

Hills, in the vicinity of the village of Asnot, Punjab, India. 
Extinct. Based on part of the left maxilla, including three imperfect teeth. 
Hippopotamodon: Hippopotamus; 68<bv=d8ov<;, tooth. 
Hippopotamus Linnaeus, 1758. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Hippopotamidge. 

Systema Naturae, 10th ed., I, 74, 1758; 12th ed., I, 101-102, 1766; Brisson, Reg- 

num Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 12, 83-84, 1762; W. L. Sclater, 

Mamm. S. Africa, I, 267-272, figs. 67-78, 1900 (type fixed). 



* The neuter form was probably adopted to agree with Hipparion and Hippotherium. 

t Hippohyus is credited to Falconer & Cautley by Lydekker (Cat. Foss. Mamm. 
Brit. Mus., pt. ii, 259, 1885), but their names do not appear in the description of the 
genus in Owen's Odontography. 



HIPPOPOTAMUS HIPPOTHEKIUM. 327 

Hippopotamus — Continued. 

Species: Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus (type), from the Nile; and IF. terrestris 

Linnaeus, from Brazil. 
Hippopotamus: iitTtoTtorapoc,, river horse. 

Hippops Marsh, 1892. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidae? 

Am. Journ. Sci., 3d ser., XLIII, No. 256, p. 351, Apr., 1892. 

Type species not named. "The oldest ancestor of the horse, as yet undiscovered, 
undoubtedly had five toes on each foot, and probably was not larger than a 
rabbit, perhaps much smaller ... It may be called Hippops, and its remains 
will be found at the base of the Tertiary, or more likely in the latest 
Cretaceous. ' ' ( Marsh. ) 

Hypothetical. 

Hippops: 77tTtoi, horse; oip, aspect. 

Hipporussa Heude, 1899. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidae. 

Mtem. Hist. Nat. Empire Chinois, IV, pt. 3, p. 134, 1899; ibid., pt. 4, p. 208, 1899. 
Type: Cervus equimis F. Cuvier, from Borneo and Sumatra. 
Hipporussa: 'i7tno<;, horse; Malay, rusa or russa deer — 'horse deer. 

Hippos Cray, 1869. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidfe? 

Cat. Cam., Pachyderm., & Edentate Mamm. Brit. Mus., 262, 1869 (nomen 

nudum). 
"A large number of fossil genera belong to this suborder [Nasuta], as Anoplo- 

theriiim, Xij>]todon, Dichotrichus, Cainotherium, Merycopotamus, Adapts, Micro- 

chcerus, Hij>]>os, . . . but many of these are only known from a few bones 

or teeth." (Gray.) 
Extinct. 
Hippos: 'iimo%, horse. 

Hipposideros Gray, 1831. Chiroptera, Rhinoloplmhe. 

Zool. Miscellany, 37-38, 1831; Mag. Zool. & Bot., II, 492, 1838. 
Hipposiderus Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, No. xvm, 52-53, Sept. 26, 1834; 

Blanford, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1887, 637-638; W. L. Sclater, Mamm. 

S. Africa, II, 116-118, fig. 121, 1901 (type fixed). 
Species, 8: Hipposideros speor is (type), H. elongatus, H. diadema, H. larvatus, H 

vulgaris, H. deformis, all from Asia; and H. tridens from Africa. 
Hipposideros: 'iimoc,, horse; 6i8r/po<;, iron — i. e., horseshoe — in allusion to the 

form of the anterior part of the complicated nose leaf. 

Hipposyus Leidy, 1872. Primates, Notharctidae. 

Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., June 25, 1872, 37; Osborn, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. 

Hist., N. Y., XVI, 198, June 28, 1902. 
Hypposhyus Ameghino, Act. Acad. Nac. Cien., Cordoba, VI, 960, 1889. 
Type: Hipposyus formosus Leidy, from the Eocene (Bridger) of Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on "an upper jaw fragment with two molars; . . . [and] a 

lower jaw fragment with a single molar." 
Hipposyus: iTtTtoc,, horse; dv<;, 6voc„ pig. 

Hippotamus Rafinesque, 1815. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Hippopotamida?. 

Analyse de la Nature, 56, 1815. 

New name for Hippopotamus Linnaeus, 1758 ('Hippotamus R. Hippopotamus L.'). 
Hippotamus: Old French hippotame (from Lat. hippopotamus), hippopotamus. 

Hippotherium (subg. of Equus) Katjp, 1833. T ngulata, Perissodactyla, Equidae. 
Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogie, 1833, 327; ibid., 1835, 622; Oken's Isis, 1834, 314 
(raised to generic rank); Nova Acta Acad. Caes. Leop. -Carol., XVII, pt. i, 
174-181, tab. 12 B, 1835 (subgenus). 



328 INDEX UENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Hippotherium — ( !< intinued. 

Species: Equus {Hippotherium) gracilis Kaup, and Equus (If.) nanus Kaup, from 
the Pliocene of Eppelsheim, near Darmstadt, Rhein-Hessen, Germany. 

Extinct. 

Hippotherium: 'iitico^, horse; f j>/fji<>r, wild beast. 
Hippotigris II. Smith, 1841. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Equidse. 

II. Smith in Jardine's Nat. Library, Mamm., XII, 321-334, pis. 21-25, 1841; 2d 
ed., Mamm., VI, 321-334, pis. 21-25, L866; Trouessart, Cat. Mannn., new ed., 
fasc. IV. 797-799, 1898; W. L. Scl.vter, Mamm. 8. Africa, I, 282, 1900 (in syn- 
onymy, type fixed); Pocock, Ann. & Mag. Nat, Hist., 7th ser., X, 306, Oct., 
L902. 

Species, 5: Equus zebra Linnaeus (type), Hippotigris antiquorum II. Smith, Equus 
burchelli Gray, Hippotigris quacha, II. Smith, and If. isabelUnus II. Smith, from 
Africa. 

Hippotigris: iititdriypis, a supposed kind of tiger, in reality a wild ass, or possi- 
bly a zebra. 
Hippotragus Sixdevall, 1846. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

K. Vetensk. Akad. Handlingar, Stockholm, for 1844, 196-197, 1846; Sclater & 
Thomas, Book of Antelopes, IV, pt. xm, 3-39, pis. lxxvi-lxxx, Feb:, 1899. 

Type: Hippotragus leucophseus (Pallas), from Africa. (Sec Ozanna Reichenbach, 
1845. ) 

Hippotragus: 'iititos, horse: rpdyos, goat. 
Hircus Brisson, 1762. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Bovidse. 

Regnum Animale in Classes IX distrib., 2d ed., 12, 38-48, 17<>2; Boddaert, 
Elenchus Animalium, I, 50, 1785; Rafinesqtje, Analyse de la Nature, 56, 1815. 

Species: Hircus et Capra domestica, Capra angorensis, Ibex, Ibex imberbis, Capra 
parva americana, Ibex parvus americanus, Supicapra, Rupicapra siberica, 
Gazella indica, Gozella, Gazella bezoartica, G. africana, G. novse hispanise, Capra 
orientalis, < '. syriaca, C. novse hispanise, and C. cretensis. 

Hircus: hat., male gnat. 
Histiophorus (see Istiophorus). Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidse. 

Histiops Peters, 1869. Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

Monatsber. K. Preuss. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, 1869, 399. 

Type: Artibsem undatus Gervais, from tropical America, exact locality unknown. 

Histiops: idriov, web, sail; oip, aspect — evidently in allusion to its relationship 

to Phyllops. The name suggests characters of the ears or nose-leaf, but the 

description was based on the teeth and skull without reference to the skin, the 

type specimen of the species having been lost. 
Histiotus Gervais, 1855. Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae. 

Exped. Comte de Castelnau dans l'Amerique du Sud, Zooh, Mamm., 77, pi. xii, 
figs. 6, 6a, 6b, 1855. 

Type: Plecotus velatus I. Geoffroy, from Brazil. 

Histiotus: idriov, web, sail: uug, carog, ear — from the ears, which are very 
large, triangular, and united at their bases posteriorly. 
Histriophoca Gill, 1873. Fera?, Pinnipedia, Phocida?. 

Am. Naturalist, VII, 179, Mar., 1873; Allex, Hist. X. Am. Pinnipeds, 675-682, 1880. 

Type: Phoca fasciata Shaw I =P. fasciata Zimmermann, from the Kuril Islands, 
North Pacific). 

Histriophoca: hat. histrio, stage-player; tl'/mm-' harlequin seal,' from its 
peculiar and striking pattern of coloration. 
Hodobaenus Sundevall, 1860. Ferte, Pinnipedia Odobenidfe. 

Ofversigt K. Vetensk. Akad. Forhandl., Stockholm, XVI, No. 10, for Dec. 14, 
L859, 442 footnote, 1860. 

Emendation suggested for Odobenus Brisson, 1762. 



HODOB^ENTTS — HOMALODON. 329 

Hodobaenus — ( !< mtinued. 

"It might l>e best to hike this name [Odobaenus] as it is although its meaning is 
not quite clear. The derivation is not given; but it may lie from uSm'c, oftov- 
rog, tooth, in which case the name should read Odontobimus, as proposed by 
Steenstrup, i. e. walking with the assistance of the teeth, which here seems to 
be correct; or from 686$, way, in which case it ought to read Hodobsenus (a sea 
animal which can also walk on a path) ; or from ovdos, field, earth, in which 
case it should be written Udobsenus." (Sundevall.) 
Hodomys Mereiam, 1894. Glires, Muridse, Neotominse. 

Proc. Acad. Nat, Sci. Phila., Sept. 24, L894, 232-237, pi. i\, figs. 1-4, 7-8, text 
tigs. 3 a-d. 

Type: Neotoma alleni Merriam, from Manzanillo, Colima, Mexico. 

Hodomijs: odog, road, path; /tvz, mouse — in allusion to the animal's habit of 

making roads or runways among the agaves and other plants on the brushy 

hillsides where it lives. ( Merriam. ) 

Hoematonycteris (see Hasmatonycteris ). Chiroptera, Phyllostomatidae. 

Holochilomys ('Brandt') Peters, 1861. Glires, Muridae, Cricetinae. 

Abhandl. K. Akad. AViss., Berlin, for 1860, L50, 151, 1861. 

Possibly an emendation of Holochilus Brandt, 1835. < >n page 150 the name is 
given "Holochilus i Holochilomys Brdt. )," wliile on page 151 appears the state- 
ment " Zu der Gattung Holochilomys [Holochilus Wagn. nee Brandt) konnen 
diese Arten [Mus aquaticus und M. squamipesf] nicht gestellt werden." No 
earlier reference has been found. 

Holochilomys: 0X0%, whole, entire; ^eZ/Ioj, lip; in'--, mouse. (See Holochilus.) 
Holochilus (subgenus of Mus) Brandt, 1835. Glires, Muridse, Cricetinae. 

Mem. Acad. Imp. Sci. St. P6tersbourg, ser. 3, III, 428, 1835; Thomas, Ann. & 
Mag. Nat. Hist., 6th ser., XIX, 495-496, May, 1897 (raised to generic rank); 
Miller & Rehn, Proc. Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., XXX, 89, Dec, 1901 (type 
fixed). 

Holochyse Lesson, Nouv. Tableau Regne Animal, Mamm., 137, 1842. 

Species: Mus (Holochilus) leucogaster Brandt (type), and Mus (Holochilus) anguya 
Desmarest, both from Brazil. 

Holochilus: o\o$, whole, entire; jf/Aof, lip — "ob labium superius integrum." 
Holomeniscus Core, 1884. Qngulata, Artiodactyla, Camelida?. 

Palaeont. Bull., No. 39, p. 16, 1884; Proc. Am. Philos. Soc, XXII, pt. i, for Jan., 
1885, 16-18, Oct. 21, 1884; Hay, Cat. Foss. Vert. X. Am., Bull. 171), V. S. Geol. 
Surv., 679, 1902 (type fixed). 

Species: Auchenia vitakeriana Cope, from the Pliocene of Oregon; and A. hesterna 
Leidy (type), from the Pleistocene of California? 

Extinct. 

Holomeniscus: o\o$, whole; /.ufvi6tcos, crescent — in allusion to the "fourth supe- 
rior premolar, [which is] composed of two crescents." 
Holophorus (see Hoplophorus). Edentata, Glyptodontidse. 

Homacodon Marsh, 1872. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Homacodontidse. 

Am. Journ. Sci. & Arts, 3d ser., IV, 126, Aug., 1872 (sep. issued July 22.) 

Type: Homacodon vagans Marsh, from the Eocene of the Bad Lands near Henry 
Fork of Green River, Wyoming. 

Extinct. Based on "the greater part of the skull and skeleton, in excellent 
preservation." 

Homacodon: 6/no<;, similar; dcKr/, point; 68cbv = 68ov<; J tooth. 
Homalodon Burmeister, 1891. Ungulata, Ancylopoda, Homalodontotheriidse. 

Anal. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires, III, entr. xvn, 389 footnote, 1891. 

Abbreviation of Homalodontotherium Flower, 1874, "para evitar la repeticion 
incomoda del nombre extenso." 

Homalodon: 6fiaXoe„ even, level: d8cbv=68ov<;, tooth — in allusion to the 'even 
row of teeth without a diastema.' 



330 INDEX GENERUM MAMMALIUM. 

Homalodotlierium ('Huxley') Flower, 1873. Ungulata, Homalodontotheriidae. 
[Huxley, Ann. Address, in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc. London, XXVI, pt. 2, No. 

102, p. lvii, May 2, 1870 — nomen nudum] ; Flower, Proc. Roy. Soc. London, 

XXI, No. 145, p. 383, 1873. 
Homalodontolherium Flower, Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. London, vol. 164, pp. 173- 

182, pi. xvi, 1874. 
Homalodon Burmeister, Anal. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires, III, entr. xvn, 389 

footnote, 1891. 
Type: Homalodotherium cunninghami Flower, from the Tertiary deposits of. the 

Rio Gallegos, Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on " a nearly complete set of teeth and some fragments of bone." 
Homalodotlierium: 6/urAos even; bdovc,, dSovrog, tooth; Qypiov, wild beast — in 

allusion to the 'even row of teeth without a diastema' (Beddard, Mamm., 

p. 216, 1902). 
Homalostylops Ameghino, 1901. Tillodontia, Notostylopidse. 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVI, 422, July, 1901 (sep.p. 76). 
Species: Homalostylops rigeo Ameghino, and H. intertissus Ameghino, from the 

' Cretaceous ' of Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Homalostylops: 6/iaX6<;, even; 6rvXoi, pillar; orf), aspect. 
Homalurus (subgenus of Sorex) Sciiulze, 1890. Insectivora, Soricidse. 

Sehriften Naturwiss. Vereins Harzes in Wernigerode, V, 28, 1890; Zeitschrift 

Naturwiss., LXVI, 166-167, 1893; Brandes, Zeitschr. Naturwiss., 5te Folge, 

VI, 450, 1895 (raised to generic rank). 
Species, 3: Sorex alpinus Schinz, S. vulgaris Linnaeus, and S.pygmseus Pallas, from 

Europe. 
Name preoccupied by Homalura Meigen, 1826, a genus of Diptera. 
Homalurus: 6/uaX6$, even; ovpd, tail. 
Homelaphus Cray, 1872. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Cervidaj. 

Cat. Ruminant Mamm. Brit. Mus., 90, 1872 (provisional name). 
Type: Homelaphus inornatus Gray, said to have come from South America. 
Homelaphus: 6/uos, same; eXafios, deer. 
Homo Linnaeus, 1758. Primates, Hominidse. 

Systema Nature, 10th ed., 20-24, 1758; 12th ed., 28-33, 1766. 
Type: Homo sapiens Linnaeus, which includes five races: americanus, europseus, 

a&iaticus, afer, and monstrosus. 
Homo: Lat., man (archaic Lat. hemo). 
Homocamelus Leidy, 1869. Ungulata, Artiodactyla, Camelidae. 

Extinct Mamm. Dak. & Nebr., in Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., 2d ser., VII, 

158-159, 382, pi. xiv, figs. 16, 17, 1869. 
Type: Homocamelus caninus Leidy, from the Miocene of the Niobrara River, 

Nebraska. 
Extinct. "Represented by several fragments of jaws with teeth." 
Homocamelus: 6//05, like; -\-Camelus. 
Homocentrus Ameghino, 1891. Primates, Cebidse. 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 6a, 389-391, fig. 92, Dec. 1, 1891. 
Type: Homocentrus argentimis Ameghino, from the Eocene of southern Patagonia. 
Extinct. "Conocido hasta ahora por un fragmento de la parte posterior de la 

rama derecha de la mandibula inferior con la ultima muela intacta y parte de 

la pemiltima." 
Homocentrus: 6jao<;, same, like; Kei'rpov, center. 
Homceocetus Du Bus, 1867. Cete, Physeteridse. 

Bull. Acad. Roy. Belgique, 2" ser., XXIV, 572-573, 1867. 
//o/Hffcctus Van Benkden, ibid., XLIV, 855, 1877. 



HOMCEOCETUS HOPLOCETUS. 331 

Hoinoeocetus — Continued. 

Homocetus Lydekker, Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc. London, XLIII, pt. i, No. 169, 

p. 14, Feb. 1, 1887. 
Type: Homoeocetus rillersii Du Bus, from the Antwerp Crag of Wilryck, Belgium. 
Extinct. Based on fourteen vertebras of the same individual, including the atlas 

and the five following cervicals. 
Homceocetus: ouoio<;, like; Krjroz, whale — from its resemblance to the cachalots, 

both in having the atlas free, and in the form and manner of union of the 

cervicals. 
Homog-alax Hay, 1899. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Tapiridae. 

Science, new ser., IX, 593, Apr. 21, 1899; Cat. Foss. Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, 
■ U. S. Geol. Surv., 627, 1902. 
Type: Systemodon primaevus Wortman, from the Eocene (Wasatch) of the Big 

Horn Basin, Wyoming. 
Extinct. Based on two fragments of skulls. 
Homogala.r: 6f.ioydXaz, foster brother — in allusion to its relationships with 

Eohippus and Hyracother mm. (Hay.) 
Homorhinoceros Ameghixo, 1882. Ungulata, Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotida?? 

"Cat. Sec. de la Prov. de Buenos Aires, en la Exp. Cont. Sud-Am., Mar., 1882" 

(fide Ameghixo, Mam. Fos. Repub. Argentina, 500, 1889). 
Type: " Homorhinoceros plaiensis Ameghino (nomen nudum)," a synonym of 

Plicatodon perrarus Ameghino, from Argentina. 
Extinct. 

Homorhinoceros: 6uo$, like; -^Rhinoceros. 
Homotherium Fabrixi, 1890. Ferae, Felidse. 

"Boll. R. Comitate Geol. Italia, Roma, 3 a ser., I, 121-144, 161-176, pis. iv-vi, 

1890" (fide Lydekker, Zool. Record for 1890, XXVII, Manim., 27, 1892). 
Type: Machairodus neslianusWeHhoier, from the Pliocene of the Val d' Arno, Italy. 
Extinct. Name provisionally proposed. 
Homotherium: 6p6i, same, like; f)Tjpiov, wild beast. 
Homunculites Ameghino, 1902. Primates, Cebidae. 

[Anal. Soc. Cien. Argentina, LI, 76, Mar.-Apr., 1901 — nomen nudum]; 

Bol. Acad. Nac. Cien. Cordoba, XVII, 73-74, May, 1902 (sep. pp. 5-6) . 
Type: Homunculites pristinus Ameghino, from the Eocene (Patagonian formation) 

of Patagonia. 
Extinct. Based on a left mandible with the fifth molar in place. 
Homuncidites: Homunculus, with the suffix -ites indicative of its fossil character. 

(Compare Eucetites.) 
Homunculus Ameghino, 1891. Primates, Cebidae. 

Revista Argentina Hist. Nat., I, entr. 4a, 217, Aug. 1, 1891; entr. 5a, 290-291, 

Oct. 1, 1891. 
Type: Homunculus patagonicus Ameghino, from the Santa Cruz beds, Patagonia. 
Extinct. 

Homunculus: dim. of Lat., homo, man. 
Hoplocetus Gervais, 1848-52. Cete, Physeteridae. 

Zool. et Paleont, Franc., l e ed., I, 161; II, expl. pi. 20 figs. 10, 11, 1848-52; 

2 e ed., 318, atlas, V, pi. 3 fig. 12, pi. 20 figs. 10, 11, 1859; Hay, Cat. Foss. 

Vert. N. Am., Bull. 179, U. S. Geol. Surv., 596, 1902 (type fixed.) 
Species: Hoplocetus crmsideyis Gervais (type), from the Miocene in the vicinity of 

Romans, Dept. du Drome; and H curvidens Gervais, from the Pliocene of 

Montpellier, Dept. Herault, southern France. 
Extinct. Based on teeth. 
Hoplocetus: bit'Ka, arms, armor; Kffros, whale — "il renferme des especes armees 

de dents tres fortes, au moins dans leur partie radiculaire. " (Gervais.) 



332 INDEX UENERUM MAMMALIlTM. 

Hoplophoneus Cope, 1874. Ferse, Felidae. 

Bull. U. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. Terr., No. 1, p. 23, Jan. 21, 1S74: Ann. Rept. 

T. S. Geol. & Geog. Surv. Terr., for L873, 509, 1S74. 
Hoplophomus Scudder, Nomenclator Zool., pt. n, 153, 1882. 
Type: Machaerodus oreodontis Cope, from the Oligocene (White River) of north- 
eastern Colorado. 
Extinct. Based on "a young individual with part of the temporary dentition.'' 
Hoplophoneus: oirXa, arms, armor; (povEvc,, murderer — i. e., an armed carnivore. 

Hbplophorus Lr\i>, 1838. Edentata, Glyptodontidse. 

Overs. K. Danske Vidensk. Selsk. Forhandl. Kjobenhavn, 1838, 11; Ann. Sci. 

Nat, Paris, 2 e ser., XI, Zool., 217-218, 231, Apr., 1839. 
Holophorus Lund, Echo du Monde Savant, Paris, 6 e ann., No. 430, pp. 244-245, 

Apr. 17, 1839. 
Species: Hopldphorus euphraeftis Lund, and II. selloi Lund, from the bone caves 

between the Rio das Velhas and Rio Paraopeba, Minas Geraes, Brazil (alt. 

2,000 ft.). 
Name preoccupied by Hophphora Perty, 1830, a genus of Orthoptera. Replaced 

by Sclerocalyptus Ameghino, 1891. 
Extinct. 
Hbplophorus: oitkoc, arms, armor; (popos, bearing — 'armor-bearing,' in allusion 

to the carapace. 

Hoplotherium (' Laizer & Pariec' ) Meyer, 1841. Ungulataj Anoplotheriidse. 
Meyer, Neues Jahrb. Mineralogie, 1841, 4(>1 ; Agassiz, Nomenclator Zool., 

Mainm., 15, 1842, Index Univ., 186, 1846; 2d ed., 535, 1848; Meyer, "Soc. Sci. 

Nat. Wiesbaden" (fide Journ. l'Institut, X, 100, Mar. 17, 1842). 
Emendation of Oplotherium Laizer & Parieu, 18