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Full text of "North Carolina manual [serial]"

THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 



C917.0£ 

1967 
c.3 



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 



00017482662 



This book is due on the last date stamped 
below unless recalled sooner. It may be 
renewed only once and must be brought to 
the North Carolina Collection for renewal. 



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MAft-> £. ]Qp 



'69 



NORTH CAROLINA 
MANUAL 

1967 



NORTH CAROLINA MANUAL 

1967 




Issued by 

Tiiad Eure 

Secretary of State 

Raleigh 



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TO THE 

1967 MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

OF NORTH CAROLINA 

TO THE 
STATE, COUNTY, CITY AND TOWN OFFICIALS 

AND TO THE 

PEOPLE OF THE OLD NORTH STATE 

AT HOME AND ABROAD 

THIS MANUAL IS RESPECTFULLY 
DEDICATED 




Secretary of Stati 



CONTENTS 

PART I 
HISTORICAL Page 

The State 3 

The State Capitol 21 

The State Legislative Building 25 

Chief Executives of North Carolina 

Governors of Virginia 28 

Executives under the Proprietors 28 

Governors under the Crown ; 29 

Governors Elected by the Legislature _ 29 

Governors Elected by the People 31 

List of Lieutenant Governors 33 

The State Flag _ 35 

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence 36 

The Great Seal of North Carolina 38 

The State Bird 1 1 

The Halifax Resolution . 4 2 

Name of State and Nicknames _ 4 3 

The State Motto 13 

The State Colors 4 4 

The State Flower - 4 4 

The State Shell __ 44 
The State Song ___ _44, 4 7 

The State Tree . 44 

The State's Most Famous Toast _ 4 4 

Public Holidays in North Carolina 45 

Population of the State since 1675 .. 46 

The Constitution of North Carolina 49 

The American's Creed 91 
The American Flag 

Origin 91 

Proper Display 93 

Pledge to the Flag . 98 
The National Capitol - 99 

Declaration of Independence 102 

Constitution of the United States 107 

PART II 
CENSUS 
Eighteenth Census. 1960 

Population of State 133 

Population of Counties 134 

Population of Cities and Towns 

Incorporated places of 10,000 or more . 134 

Incorporated places of 2,500 to 10,000 _ 135 

Incorporated places of 1,000 to 2,500 

Incorporated places of less than 1.000 - 

Population of United States, 1960 140 

PART m 
POLITICAL 

Congressional Districts 

Judicial Districts (Superior and District Courts) 

Solicitorial Districts 

Senatorial Districts and Apportionment of Senator- 1 46 



VI N'okth Carolina Manual 

Page 
Representativi Districts and Apportionment of Members 

of the House of Representatives . 150 
State Democratic Platform 153 
Plan of Organization of the State Democratic Party . 169 
Committees of the Democratic Party- 
State Democratic Executive Committee . 189 
Congressional District Executive Committees _ 193 
Judicial District Executive Committees . 197 
State Democratic Solicitorial District 

Executive Committees 202 

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees _ 207 

County Vice Chairmen 209 

siatc Republican Platform 211 

Plan of Organization of the State Republican Party 234 

Committees of the Republican Party 

State Republican Executive Committee 253 

Congressional, Judicial, Senatorial and 

Solicitorial District Committees 257 

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees . 257 

County of Vice Chairmen 259 

PART IV 
ELECTION RETURNS 

Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1964 263 

Popular Vote for President by States, 1948-1960 _ 264 

Vote for President by Counties, 1944-1964 266 

Vote for Governor by Counties, Primaries, 1964 . _269. 271 

Vote for Governor by Counties, 



General Elections. 1944-1964 9 



z I z 



9 



Vote for State Officials, 

Primaries, 1952-1960 275 
Vote for Lieutenant Governor by 

Counties, Primaries, 1964 . 277, 279 

v "" for State Officials by Counties, Primaries, 1964 28 o', 282 

Total Votes Cast — General Election, 1960-1964 _ 284 

Vote for Governor in Primaries, 1940-1964 286 

Vote for state Officers by Counties, 

General Election of 1964 287. 29a 

General Election of 1966 ' 292 

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primaries, 1966 . 295 

Vote for Congressmen in Republican Primaries, 1966 _ 296 

Vote for Congressmen, Second Primary, June 25, 1966 297 
Vote for Congressmen, Special Primary, First District 

December 18, 1965 . 298 
Vote for Congressmen, Special Election, First 

District, February 5, 1966 299 

Vote for Members of Congress, 1948-1960 _ 300 
Vote for Members of Congress, 

General Elections. 1962-1964 312 

aeral Elections. 1966 31^ 

Vote for Inited States Senators in Primaries, 1950-1962 322 
Vote for United States Senators in 

Genera] Elections. 1950-1962 300 



Contents VII 

I'.U.I 

Vote for United States Senator, Democratic 

Primary, 1966 324 

Vote for United States Senator, General 

Elections, 1966 3 25 

Vote in Special Election on Question of issuance of 

State of North Carolina Highway Bonds, 

November 2, 1965 326 

Vote on Constitutional Amendment by Counties, 

November 2, 1965 3 2s 

Vote on Prohibition, 1881, 1908, 1933 329 

PART V 
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 

Agencies, Boards and Commissions 333 
North Carolina Institutions 

Correctional __ 375 

Educational 376 

Mental 390 

Centers for the Retarded . 391 

Alcoholic Rehabilitation Centers 391 

Hospitals 392 

Confederate Woman's Home 394 

Examining Boards 395 

State Owned Railroads 404 

PART VI 
LEGISLATURE 

Tbe General Assembly 
Senate 

Officers 40 9 

Senators (Arranged Alphabetically) 409 

Senators (Arranged by Districts) . 410 

Rules 411 

Standing Committees . 4 28 

Seat Assignments 4 40 

House of Representatives 

Officers 441 

Members (Arranged Alphabetically) 4 41 

Members (Arranged by Districts) . 443 

Enrolling and Indexing Departments . 444 

Rules 445 

Standing Committees __ 46 2 

Seat Assignments t~ : ' 

PART VII 
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Elective Executive Officials n I s 1 

Administrative Officials appointed by the Governor _ 4 9 2 
Administrative Officials appointed by Department Heads, 
Boards or Commissions (Subject to approval by 

the Governor) 508 

Administrative Officials appointed by Department Heads, 

Boards or Commissions (With no approving authority) 520 

United States Senators 533 



V 1 1 I XoH'i ii C \i;"i.i\ \ M \M".\i. 

Page 

[Representatives in Congress 536 

Justices of the Supreme Court 546 

Members of the General Assembly 

Senators 553 

Represental ives - 58 S 

Occupational and Professional Classification '17 1 

PART \ III 
OFFICIAL REGISTER 

! uited States < rovernment 

Presideni and Vice President 679 

Cabinel Members 679 
North Carolina Senators and Representatives 

in Congress 679 

! nited States Supreme Court Justices 679 

United stales District Court 

Judges -- 679 

Clerks 679 

District Attorneys 679 
United States Circuit Court of Appeals 

Judge Fourth District 679 

Governors of the States and Territories 680 
State < lovernmenl 

Legislative Department 681 

Executive Department 681 

Judicial Department 681 

Administrative Department 683 

State Institutions 684 

Heads of Agencies other than State 686 

County Government 687 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

State Capitol 20 

The state Legislative Building 24 

Slate Flag 34 

siate Seal 39 

state Bird 40 

Slate Song i Words and Music) 47 

Map of North Carolina 89 

The American Flag 90 

Map Showing Congressional Districts 148. 149 

Organization Democratic Party of North Carolina . 170 

Map Showing Senatorial Districts _ 158, 159 

Vlap Showing Representative Districts . _21S. 219 

Seating Diagram of Senate Chamber 439 

Seating Diagram of House of Representatives _ 476 

Pictures 

Governor 480 

Stale Officers 4S5 

Senators and Congressmen 535. 541 

Justices of the Supreme Court 549 

State Senators 557. 567. 577 

Members of the House of Representatives 

591, 600. 613. 625. 637. 649. 663 



PART I 
HISTORICAL 



THE STATE 

North Carolina, often called the "Tar Heel" state, was the scene 
of the first attempt to colonize America by English-speaking peo- 
ple. Under a charter granted to Sir Walter Raleigh by Queen 
Elizabeth, a colony was begun in the 1580's on Roanoke Island. 
This settlement, however, was unsuccessful and later became 
known as "The Lost Colony." 

The first permanent settlement was made about 1650 by immi- 
grants from Virginia. In 16 63 Charles II granted to eight Lords 
Proprietors a charter for the territory lying "within six and 
thirty degrees of the northern latitude, and to the west as far as 
the south seas, and so southerly as far as the River St. Mattias. 
which bordereth upon the coast of Florida, and within one and 
thirty degrees of northern latitude, and so west in a direct line as 
tar as the south seas aforesaid; ..." and the colony was called 
Carolina. In 1665 another charter was granted to these noblemen. 
This charter extended the limits of Carolina so that the northern 
line was 36 degrees and 30 minutes north latitude, and the south- 
ern line was 2 9 degrees north latitude, and both of these lines ex- 
tended westward to the South Seas. 

In 1669 John Locke wrote the Fundamental Constitutions as a 
model for the government of Carolina. The Lords Proprietors 
adopted these constitutions and directed the governor to put into 
operation as much of them as was feasible. In 16 70 there were 
four precincts (changed to counties in 1739): Pasquotank. Per- 
quimans, Chowan, and Currituck. North Carolina now has one 
hundred counties. 

Carolina on December 7. 1710, was divided into North Carolina 
and South Carolina, and Edward Hyde, on May 9. 1712. became 
the first governor of North Carolina. 

In 17 29 seven of the eight Lords Proprietors sold their interest 
in Carolina to the Crown and North Carolina became a royal 
colony. George Burrington was the first royal governor. Richard 
Everard, the last proprietary governor, served until Burrington 
was appointed. 

North Carolina, on April 12, 1776, authorized her delegates in 
the Continental Congress to vote for independence, and on Decem- 
ber 18. 1776, adopted a constitution. Richard Caswell became the 



Nonru Carolina .Manual 

first governor under this constitution. On November 21, 1789, the 
state adopted the United States Constitution, being the twelfth 
-tat. in enter the Federal Union. North Carolina, in 1788, had 
rejected the Constitution on the grounds that certain amendments 
were vital and necessary to a free people. 

\ Constitutional convention was held in 1835 and among several 
changes made in the Constitution was the method of electing the 
governor. After this change the governor was elected by the peo- 
pl< for a term of two years instead of being elected by the Legis- 
lature for a term of one year. Edward Bishop Dudley was the first 
governor elected by the people. 

North Carolina seceded from the Union May 20, 1861. and was 
readmitted to the Union in July, 1S6S. 

A new state Constitution was adopted in 1868 and since that 

date the governor has been elected by the people for four-year 

terms and he cannot succeed himself. There has not been a new 

constitution since 1868, but numerous amendments have been 

dded to it. 

North Carolina has had a democratic administration since 1900, 
during which period it has made its greatest progress. 

North Carolina has had two permanent capitals — New Bern and 
Raleigh — and there have been three capitol buildings. Tryon's 
Palace in New Bern was constructed in the period, 1767-1770, and 
'he main building was destroyed by fire February 27, 1798. The 
first capitol in Raleigh was completed in 1794 and was destroyed 
by tire on June 21. 1831. The present capitol was completed in 
1 8 10 

The Man in 17 90 ceded her western lands, which was composed 
of Washington. Davidson, Hawkins. Greene. Sullivan, Sumner, and 
Team ssi . .(unities, to the Federal government, and between 1790 
and 1796 the territory was known as Tennessee Territory, but in 
1796 it In came the fifteenth state in the Union. 

In 1738, the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act 
authorizing the establishment of district courts which served as 
ppelant courts. These courts were authorized to be held in Bath. 
New Bern, and New- Town — now Wilmington. In 1746, the General 
Assembly repealed the act of 1738 and established district courts 
to l«e held at Edenton. Wilmington, and Edgecombe. From 17f>4 



The State 5 

until 17 90. other districts were formed as the state expanded in 
territory and developed needs for these districts. By 1790, there 
were eight judicial districts divided into two ridings of four dis- 
tricts each. In 180 6, the General Assembly passed an act estab- 
lishing a superior court in each county. The act also set up judi- 
cial districts composed of certain contiguous counties, and this 
practice of expanding the districts has continued from five dis- 
tricts in 1806 until now there are thirty districts. 

When North Carolina adopted the Federal Constitution on No 
vember 21, 1789, she was authorized to send two senators and five 
representatives to the Congress of the United States according to 
the constitutional apportionment. In 1792, when the first federal 
census had been completed and tabulated, it was found that North 
Carolina was entitled to ten representatives. It was then that the 
General Assembly divided the state into ten congressional dis- 
tricts. In 1812, the state had grown and increased in population 
until it was entitled to thirteen representatives in Congress. Be- 
tween 1812 and 1865, however, the population decreased so much 
in proportion to the population of other states of the Union that 
North Carolina was by that time entitled only to seven repre- 
sentatives. After 18 65 the population of the state showed a steady 
increase so that beginning in 194 3 North Carolina was entitled 
to twelve representatives in Congress. The 1960 census showed 
that the state had nearly a half million more people than in 1950, 
but this increase was not nearly as much in proportion to that of 
some of the other states. North Carolina is now entitled to only 
eleven representatives in Congress. 

Agriculture 

Following several successive years of mounting surpluses of 
tobacco in storage, production of flue-cured tobacco came under 
the acreage-poundage program for the first time in 1965. Com- 
pliance by North Carolina farmers with the terms of this pro- 
gram coupled with unfavorable climatic conditions resulted in ;i 
1965 reduction from the previous year of 259 million pounds of 
flue-cured leaf. Climatic conditions in 1966 were also not favor- 
able for optimum yields of tobacco, and marketings were only 
(54 million pounds above the 1965 level. Since tobacco is, by 



'I XoKTlI (' VROLINA M-VNUAT. 

far, i In largest individual agricultural commodity produced in 
the State, the loss of poundage was bound to have had its impact 
upon ih" agricultural economy of North Carolina. 

The loss in quantities sold was offset to some degree by higher 
unit prices. Nevertheless, the $455 million value placed on all 
tobacco in 1965 was short of the 1964 value by $107 million. 
i'.m Heel farmers recovered about $59 million of this loss in their 
L966 marketings, but returns from sales of flue-cured tobacco 
during the two-year span were $155 million below income at the 
196 1 level. 

The 1965 corn crop in North Carolina produced an average 
yield of 70 bushels per acre to exceed the previous record by 11 
bushels per acre. Due to severe drought in June and July, the 
yield of the 1966 crop declined to 45 bushels per acre -  the 
smallest yield since 1959. Production of 61 million bushels of 
com for grain in 1966 was only about two-thirds as large as 
the 1965 production. Despite higher unit prices in 1966. the 
value of the corn crop declined $24 million in 1966. 

Climatic conditions were also unfavorable for production of 
niton, both in 1965 and 1966. Furthermore, a substantial 
proportion of the 1966 acreage was lost through freezing temper- 
atures in the spring. Production of 93,000 bales of cotton in 
1966 was only about two-fifths as large as the comparatively short 
l 965 crop. 

On the brighter side is the continuing increase in production 
of soybeans and peanuts. The 1966 production for each of these 
crops exceeded the previous records established in 1965 by sub- 
stantial margins. Also, higher prices received for many of the 
agricultural commodities contributed to an increase of $26 mil- 
lion over 1965 in the value of all crops harvested in 1966.  

Production of livestock and livestock products continue to gain 
in their contribution to the agricultural income of the State. The 
total of $410 million realized from sale of these commodities in 
1965 exceeded 1964 by $41 million. Although the 1966 figures 
are not yet available, there is every reason to anticipate an addi- 
tional increase of some $50 million. 

('ash receipts from marketings of all agricultural commodities 
in 1965 amounted to $1,190 million, falling $4S million below 



The State 7 

the record of $1,238 million realized in 1964. With a slight in- 
crease expected in receipts from sale of cultivated crops in 1966 
and a substantial increase in receipts from sales of livestock and 
livestock products, total receipts from agricultural marketings 
in 1966 should establish a new record. 

The value of agriculture to the State's economy cannot be too 
strongly emphasized. In addition to one and one-quarter billion 
dollars annual farm income, consideration must be given to the 
value added to agricultural commodities through processing, 
packaging, and merchandizing. North Carolina farmers spend 
more than one-half billion dollars annually for feed, seed, fert- 
ilizer, petroleum fuel and oil. and other items essential to agri- 
cultural operations. 

Conservation and Development 

North Carolina moved forward by leaps and bounds during 
1965 and 1966, setting the pace for the New South, and press- 
ing forward with Governor Dan Moore's program for Total De- 
velopment of our State's resources to the best advantage of its 
citizens. 

Once again, all existing records were shattered in capital in- 
vestments announced for new and expanded manufacturing facil- 
ities. North Carolina's thriving travel industry set another in- 
come record in 19 65, and final 1966 figures are expected to be 
even higher. Our State Parks enjoyed new records in attendance 
and use by the public. Products manufactured from North Caro- 
lina's vast forest resources continued to yield more than $1 bil- 
lion annually. 

Expansion and development of the technical programs of the 
Divisions of Mineral Resources and Geodetic Survey resulted in 
more knowledge of our State's resouces, and assistance to many 
facet? of the industrial community. 

Research and development of North Carolina's valuable ma- 
rine and estuarine resources under the supervision of the Division 
of Commercial and Sports Fisheries moved ahead at a fast pace, 
highlighted by the beginning of construction on a specially-de- 
signed research ship named in honor of Governor xMoore. 



S North Carolina Manual 

The orderly growth and expansion of many of our State's 
communities was assured during the past two years, due to 
assistance provided by the Division of Community Planning. For 
the first time, a training program was established aimed at filling 
the critical need for experienced community planning experts in 
North Carolina. 

In 1965, $482,430,000 was earmarked for the construction of 
It',.", new plants and the expansion of 373 existing facilities. The 
Qi w and expanded plants created 37,000 new jobs, a record total 
for recent years, and additions to industrial payrolls of $136,- 
951,000, another all-time high. 

Capital investments in new and expanded manufacturing plants 
in L965 were 21 percent over the previous high of $398,983,000 
recorded in 1964. New jobs created rose 28 percent over the 1964 
total and the gain in industrial payrolls in 1965 increased 30 
percent over 1964 figures. 

Capital investment in new and expanded manufacturing plants 
in L966 set an all-time high at $613,581,000, breaking the half- 
billion dollar mark for the first time in history. This record- 
breaking total created 37,455 new jobs for our State's citizens, 
and added another all-time high of $141,812,000 to industrial 
payrolls. 

The 1966 capital investment registered an increase of 27.2 
pi i cent over 1965 figures. 

A breakdown of the 19 65 total shows textiles led all indus- 
trial classifications in numbers of new projects. 146; in new and 
expanded investment, $176,012,000; in employees added, 13,600; 
and in payroll additions, $49,063,000. 

Total investments in new and expanded chemical projects in 
L965 totalled $85,909,000. Rubber and plastics registered a 
L965 total capital investment for new and expanded facilities 
of $27,917,000. 

In 1966, textiles held its lead in total capital investment with 
.$216,252,000 for new and expanded facilities, addition of $34,- 
2oi', iMHi i n industrial payrolls, and the creation of 9,083 new jobs. 

The Apparel Industry also registered significant gains in 1966. 
Capital investments in new and expanded apparel plants totalled 



The State 9 

$18,351,000, with added payrolls of $27,567,000 and the creation 
of 8,908 new jobs. 

In total capital investments for new industries alone, chemicals 
and allied products registered the biggest gain with $105,910,000. 
The total investment for new and expanded manufacturing facil- 
ities in the chemicals and allied products classification totalled 
$126,276,000. Added payrolls totalled $7,150,000 and a total 
of 1,24 9 new jobs were created. 

These new and expanded manufacturing facilities during 19 65 
and 19 66 were the direct result of unprecedented cooperation 
and teamwork at the local, State and Federal levels. The De- 
partment of Conservation and Development continued to work 
closely with North Carolina's industrial development organiza- 
tions, chambers of commerce, banks, railroads, utility companies, 
trucking industry and many other groups to strengthen and 
broaden the State's industrial base. 

During 1966, a major effort in development of export markets 
for North Carolina products was carried out by a far-reaching 
mission to Europe called Exportunity 1966. The mission was 
conducted with the cooperation and assistance of the United 
States Department of Commerce. Secretary of Commerce John 
T. Connor hailed results of the mission outstanding, calling it 
"... the most ambitious and far-reaching program of its type 
ever carried out by a State government." 

Exportunity 1966 was divided into four separate parts: a tex- 
tiles show, a trade mission, an industrial development mission, 
and a travel promotion mission. More than 90 North Carolinians 
covered Europe from Sweden to Italy during a one month period, 
promoting North Carolina's manufactured products, industrial 
advantages, and tourist attractions. As a result of the mission, 
many new jobs will be created, European firms are expected to 
branch out into North Carolina with manufacturing facilities, 
and more European travelers are expected to visit North Carolina. 

The new program of Regional Representatives of the Com- 
merce and Industry Division in Sylva, Salisbury, Washington 
and Lumberton was established and has carried the programs 
of industrial development directly to the people. 

Tourists and travelers spent $560 million in North Carolina 



Id Noutu Cakolina Manual 

in 1965, bringing ;i new record for sales and receipts in our 
st;iie's billion-dollar travel service and transportation business. 

Tourists from outside North Carolina spent $345 million in 
our State in 1965. This was the result of a ten percent increase 
in tourist expenditures. During the last decade, spending by 
visitors from other states lias been increasing at an average 
rate of 7.3 percent annually. Trading with tourists has ex- 
panded well beyond the 5.7 percent yearly growth rate of all 
North Carolina retail business. Meanwhile, the national tourist 
market was rising 5.9 percent annually. 

Fifteen million tourist parties visited or passed through North 
Carolina in 1965, bringing thirty million persons to our State. 
They traveled nearly six billion passenger miles on highways, 
railways and airways. Out-of-state tourists account for one-fifth 
of the nearly twenty-six billion miles of intercity travel by private 
and public transportation. 

This large volume of spending by the transient tourist market 
stimulates North Carolina commerce and industry. Spending 
by travelers has created a $1.2 billion business in North Caro- 
lina which provides service and transportation for persons away 
from home. 

These figures are based on the 1965 North Carolina Travel 
Survey by Lewis C. Copeland. The 1966 report has not yet been 
completed, but all indications are that new records will again 

lie set. 

The 1965 General Assembly renamed the Division of Com- 
mercial Fisheries the Division of Commercial and Sports Fish- 
eries, and rewrote all coastal fisheries laws. The Division was 
charged with stewardship of the State's marine and estuarine 
resources. The new laws further define "all marine and estuarine 
resources" as 'all fish, except inland game fish, found in the 
Atlantic Ocean and in coastal fishing waters; all fisheries based 
upon such fish; all uncultivated or undomesticated plant and ani- 
mal life, other than wildlife resources, inhabiting or dependent 
upon coastal fishing waters; and the entire ecology supporting 
such fish, fisheries, and plant animal life. 

A definite shift in Division responsibilities was carried out 
with increased emphasis and concern being directed toward the 



The State 11 

condition and biology of our total fishery resource, regardless of 
the commercial or sport uses to which it is subjected. Previous 
responsibilities were concerned primarily with the enforcement 
of laws and regulations which pertained to the harvest, sale and 
transport of fish and fisheries products. 

Following the guidance of the General Assembly, the Division 
has given increasing attention to all factors which influence 
coastal fisheries, has worked with numerous State and federal 
agencies concerned with these resources, and has greatly in- 
creased its research and development efforts. 

The market value of finfish and shellfish to North Carolina 
fishermen during the 1964-66 biennium amounted to $25,296,997. 

During the 1964-66 biennium, the Division of Community 
Planning had 20 6 contracts with 18 2 municipalities and counties 
to provide them with technical planning assistance. Of the 86 
communities being assisted on June 30, 1966, 43 of them were 
undertaking advanced planning programs based on earlier studies 
and plans completed in earlier contracts with the Division. 

In July 19 66, applications for Federal grant funds were sub- 
mitted on behalf of 20 communities. 

The Division also initiated in 19 66 its first program to train 
professional community planning experts. The work of this 
division assures the orderly growth of our State's cities, towns 
and counties. 

The 19 65 spring forest fire season was more serious than that 
of 19 6 4. but not as severe as the 19 63 spring fire season. The 
serious drought of fall 19 65 continued into the latter part of 
April 1966. This drought, coupled with unfavorable atmos- 
pheric conditions, resulted in a severe 1966 spring fire season. 
Forest fire losses in 1966, under abnormal conditions similar to 
those of 1963, were reduced by 46 percent with about a three 
percent reduction in the number of fires. 

The U. S. Forest Service has completed a forest survey of 
North Carolina and published preliminary forest resource sta- 
tistics, which continue to emphasize the importance of forest 
resources to the economy of our State. The wood-using industry 
produces well over a billion dollars annually in terms of finished 
products The perpetuation of these benefits from the State's 



12 North Carolina Manual 

forests depends upon maintaining a favorable balance of timber 
-row ili over ilif drain from harvesting raw materials and losses 
<lue to timber mortality. 

For the first time in several years, a safe margin in this 
favorable balance lias been lost due to expansion of our wood- 
using industries. Improvement in this situation is imperative 
if we are to hold and expand our forest industries and continue 
to enjoy the resulting economic benefits. More than 245,000 
small landowners control seventy-eight percent of our State's 
L'n million acres of forest lands. These lands owned by small 
landowners are currently capable of sustaining a higher growth 
rate than they are at present. The Forestry Division is the only 
agency capable of causing material improvement in small owner- 
ship forestry. The future supply of forest raw materials depends 
on the effectiveness of the Division's programs. 

.More than 40 million tree seedlings are produced annually at 
the Division's four nurseries and supplied to landowners at cost 
of production. Forest fire control procedures and training con- 
tinues to become more effective. Pest and insect control efforts 
have minimized timber mortality and growth loss, but are in 
need of increased support in order to remain at its current high 
level of effectiveness. 

The Division of Geodetic Survey is charged with surveying of 
the State to determine the exact positions of various points, 
mathematically taking into account the curvature of the earth's 
surface. Fxpansion of this division has been proposed and dur- 
ing the 1964-66 biennium, 835 control markers were established 
in North Carolina. 

The work of the division has been singled out for its accuracy 
and excellence, and a paper outlining the duties and organization 
of the division was presented to the 1967 annual meeting of the 
American Congress of Mapping and Surveying. 

The value of mineral production in North Carolina totalled 
si'ei.4 million in 1965, reflecting the increasing importance of 
I he mineral industry to the State's overall economic development. 

According to preliminary estimates prepared by the Bureau 
of .Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, 1966, value of mineral 
production in North Carolina increased 9 percent over 1965 to 
a total of $65.7 million, setting a new record high. 



The State 13 

Principal minerals mined were stone, sand and gravel, feldspar, 
mica, and lithium minerals. In addition, the first shipment of 
phosphate rock from new mining activities in eastern North 
Carolina was made April 1, 1966. 

Use by the public of North Carolina's 13 State Parks con- 
tinued to increase by leaps and bounds during 1965 and 1966, 
setting new records each year. The emphasis on total use of the 
park facilities has generated more swimming, camping, hiking, 
boating and fishing by park users. 

In 1965, 2,092,519 persons visited the State Parks, a record 
high for total attendance. 

In 1966, a new record for total attendance of 2,182,300 was 
recorded, showing an increase of almost 90,000 over the previous 
year. 

Planned improvements of current park facilities and an 
orderly program of expansion is being carried out by the State 
Parks Division, aimed at preserving, protecting and renewing 
the quality of those natural resources for which it is responsible. 

The North Carolina Department of Conservation and Develop- 
ment is proud of our State's accomplishments during the past 
two years, and looks forward to ever greater progress toward 
"Total Development" in the coming years. Without the co- 
operation and efforts of countless citizens, State, Federal and 
local officials, this record of achievement would not be nearly 
as impressive. 

Public Health in North Carolina 

North Carolina has a vigorous and effective program of public 
health. 

The State Board of Health and the 66 local health departments 
serving the 100 counties assure an alert concern for the healtb 
conditions in all facilities serving the public. Basic State laws 
empower the health departments to inspect and regulate condi- 
tions affecting health. 

While there were various laws and statutes relating to public 
health measures passed prior to that time, the State Board of 
Health was created by the General Assembly of 1877, and lias 



l 1 North Carolina Manual 

been functioning, with changes from time to time, ever since. The 
General Assembly of 1957 recodified, and to a considerable extent 
modernized, all public health and related laws of North Carolina. 
This was done for purposes of coordination and clarification. 
Guilford has the distinction of being the first county in the United 
states to inaugurate full-time county health work. June 20, 1911. The 
following year, Robeson became the first purely rural county in 
the United States to take this step, but it was not until July 1, 
1949 thai the last four counties provided this service. 

There has been continued progress in public health in these 
more than five decades. Illustrations of this can be found in every 
aspect of the legal responsibilities placed upon the State Board of 
Health. Among these may be noted: compulsory immunization ol 
children beginning at two months of age for poliomyelitis; li- 
censure of nursing and combination nursing and homes for the 
aged and infirm; surveys in the areas of air pollution and en- 
vironmental health; and the establishment of a coordinated State 
Radiological Program. North Carolina published the nation's 
first Occupational Health Manual in 1961. 

The State Hoard of Health is the State agency administering 
the Health Insurance Benefits Program (Medicare). Over a 
million eight hundred thousand dollars a year is being spent on 
surgical, medical and hospital service to handicapped children. 
We have a progressive school health coordinating unit and pro- 
grams of service are being carried on for the aged and for the 
chronically ill. Many preventive services are rendered by the 
modern Laboratory Division and by both the consultant staff oi 
the State Hoard and by the staffs of the local health departments. 

State Highway Ststkms 

Oil January 1, 1966, the State had under its direct jurisdiction 
72,822 miles of highways, roads and streets, a distance equivalent 
to almost three times around the world at the equator. This vast 
mileage is almost 10 per cent of the gross length of all mileage 
under State control in the entire Nation. The three basic sys- 
tems in this North Carolina network are as follows: 

Tim Primary State Highway System in rural areas is made up 



The State 15 

of the U. S., N. C. and Interstate numbered routes, and has a 
length of 11,566 miles, substantially all hard surfaced. The larg- 
est of the three systems is the Rural Secondary System of 57,959 
miles, of which 29.810 miles are paved — the remainder being sur- 
faced with stone, soil or other all weather material. There is 
more rural paving in North Carolina than in any other state except 
Texas, California, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York and Wisconsin. 
Some 96% of the State's rural people live on, or within one mile 
of a paved highway or road. 

In addition to these two rural systems, the State has jurisdiction 
over 3,297 miles of streets which form a part of the State High- 
way and Road systems in municipalities. Of this Municipal Sys- 
tem, 3,090 miles are paved. 

Combining the three systems, the State operates a network of 
4 4.391 miles of paved and 28,431 miles of unpaved highways, 
roads and streets. The State has direct jurisdiction over more 
mileage than has any other road governing body in the nation 
In terms of size and population, no other state exceeds North 
Carolina in the extent of road services provided for its people. 
There are no toll roads or bridges in North Carolina. 

Major emphasis is now being placed on modernizing many ob- 
solete sections of the Primary System, mainly from the $300 
million Bond Issue authorized in the Statewide referendum of 
November. 1965; completing the Interstate Highway System; 
and starting the Appalachian Highway Program. Some 386 miles 
of the Interstate have already been built to final standards and 
opened to traffic. 

Since 1921. the entire Road and Highway Program of the State 
has been financed exclusively from the gasoline tax. motor vehicle 
license fees and Federal Aid. without recourse to property tax- 
ation or aid from the General State Fund. During the past fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1966. the State Highway Fund, including 
Federal Aid. expended $244,621,581 for highway, road, and street 
construction, maintenance, betterments and improvements, in- 
cluding the operation of the Motor Vehicle Department. Highwaj 
Patrol, Highway Safety Division, other state agencies, and the 
retirement of Secondary Road Ponds. 

RtKM Electric ami Telephone Servick 
Rural areas of North Carolina received little benefits from 
rural electrification prior to 1935. which is often spoken of as 



1 6 N'ni: i ii Carolina Manual 

the starting point. At thai time, only 1.SS4 miles or rural lines 
serving LI, 558 farms were recorded by the North Carolina Rural 
Electrification Authority, which was created in that year to secure 
electric service for the rural areas. Today the Authority reports 
in operation 97,786 miles of rural lines serving 900,456 con- 
sumers. In addition to this, there were 237 miles under con- 
struction or authorized for construction to serve 3,036 consumers. 
Electrification has contributed considerably to the great progress 
in agricultural development over the past few years. The electri- 
fied farm provided for comfort and health in farm living through 
lighting, refrigeration, communication, ranges, washing machines. 
freezers, plumbing and all other many useful household electric 
appliances. 

Electric service is essential to modern farm production. Elec- 
tricity is used by farmers in many ways — yard and building light- 
ing; running water; poultry incubators, brooders, and feeders; 
livestock feeding; milking; grain and hay driers; irrigation; and 
many other electric-motor driven pieces of farm producing equip- 
ment. Electricity affords fire protection and the operation of 
many labor-saving devices for the rural home and farm activities. 
Electric service is practically essential in types of farm produc- 
tion; for example, the production of Grade A Milk. 

The 1945 United States Census indicated that only 14,539 North 
Carolina farms had telephone service. The desire and need in the 
rural areas for communication, so essential to the well-being of 
the people was so widespread that the 1945 General Assembly 
enacted the Rural Telephone Act, charging the North Carolina 
Rural Electrification Authority with the responsibility of assist- 
ing rural residences in securing telephone service. Funds and 
personnel were first assigned to the program in 1949, which might 
well be termed the active beginning. Through the activities of 
the State Authority and other State agencies and as a result of 
cooperation on the part of the telephone industry and the organ- 
ization of a number of member-owned Telephone Membership 
Corporations, over eight times as many farms now have telephone 
service as in 1945. In addition, a. greater number of rural non- 
farm residences also have service. 

Public Schools 

North Carolina provides a basic State-supported nine months 
public school term, which is supplemented by the 169 local school 



The State 17 

administrative units. Public school enrollment in 1965-66 was 
1,201,139, the ninth largest enrollment of the 50 states. At- 
tendance is compulsory for children between the ages of 7 and 
16. There were 48,631 teachers, principals and supervisors in 
1965-66. Nearly 60 percent of all general fund taxes collected 
by the State are used for elementary and secondary schools. The 
State finances operation of a fleet of 9,10 8 buses, transporting 
592,318 pupils to the public schools. In 1965-66, there were 
2,164 separated organized public schools in the State, and the 
total value of public school property was $994,752,404. Ex- 
penditures per pupii for current expenses included $2 67.5 6 from 
State funds, $55.36 from federal funds, and $45.37 from local 
sources. The State Board of Education, with three ex-officio 
members and ten members appointed by the Governor and con- 
firmed by the General Assembly, has responsibility for the general 
supervision and administration of the public school system and 
of the educational funds provided by the State and Federal gov- 
ernments; for the formulation of ru'es, regulations and policies 
concerning instructional programs and for fiscal matters. The 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction is the administrative 
head of the public school system and secretary of the State Board 
of Education. Elected every four years by popular vote, he is 
responsible for administering the instructional policies estab- 
lished by the Board, for organizing and establishing the State 
Department of Public Instruction, and for other matters relating 
to administration and supervision, excluding fiscal matters. The 
Controller of the State Board of Education is the executive ad- 
ministrator of the Board in the supervision and management of 
fiscal affairs, including the budgeting, allocation, accounting, 
certification, auditing and disbursing of public school funds ad- 
ministered by the Board. 

Community Colleges 

The 19 63 General Assembly, following recommendations of the 
Governor's Commission on Education Beyond the High School, 
enacted legislation authorizing the establishment of a system of 
community colleges, technical institutes and industrial education 
centers. The Department of Community Colleges, under the 
direction of the State Board of Education, is responsible for State 



is Nobth Carolina Manual 

level administration of this system. These three types of institu- 
tions are commuting, nonresident, multipurpose and community 
centered, offering to high school graduates and others beyond the 
normal high school age opportunities for two-year college par- 
allel programs, technical programs, vocational programs and 
general adult and community service courses. Institutions in op- 
• ration in the fall of 1!)66 were 12 community colleges, 17 tech- 
nical institutes, one industrial educational center, and 13 exten- 
sion units of these institutions. The average annual full-time 
equivalent enrollment for the 43 institutions in 1965-66 was 
25.704. These students were instructed by 986 faculty members. 

Colleges am» Universities 

The University of North Carolina, chartered in 17S9, was the 
first State University in the United States to open its doors. 

Today, the University of North Carolina is composed of four 
units: the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North 
Carolina State University at Raleigh, University of North Carolina 
at Charlotte, and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

There are twelve tax-supported senior colleges located through- 
out the State: Agricultural and Technical College (Greensboro). 
Appalachian State Teachers College (Boone). Asheville-Biltmore 
College (Asheville), East Carolina College (Greenville). Eliza- 
beth City State College (Elizabeth City). Fayetteville State Col- 
lege (Fayetteville), North Carolina College at Durham (Dur- 
ham i North Carolina School of the Arts (Winston-Salem). 
Pembroke State College (Pembroke), Western Carolina College 
i Cullowhee ) , Wilmington College (Wilmington) and Winston- 
Salem State College (Winston-Salem). 

Twelve tax-supported State community colleges, requiring lo- 
cal financial support in addition to State funds, are in operation: 
Central Piedmont Community College (Charlotte). College of the 
Albemarle (Elizabeth City). Davidson County Community Col- 
lege (Lexington). Gaston College (Gastonia). Isothermal Com- 
munity College (Spindale). Lenoir County Community College 
(Kinston). Rockingham Community College (Wentworth), Sand- 
nills Community College (Southern Pines). Southeastern Com- 
munity College ( Whiteville ) . Surry Community College (Dob- 



Tiik Statk 19 

son), Western Piedmont Community College (Morganton), and 
Wilkes Community College ( Wilkesboro) . 

In all there are seventy institutions of higher learning in the 
State. Among the forty-two private or church-related institu- 
tions, there are: one university (Duke University in Durham, one 
of the most heavily endowed institutions of higher learning in 
the world), twenty-seven senior colleges, fourteen junior colleges, 
one theological seminary, and three Bible colleges. 

Total college enrollment in North Carolina institutions of high- 
er learning, both public and private, was 112,805 in Pall 1966. 
and 104,852 in Fall 1965. 

Legal responsibility for planning and promoting a sound, vig- 
orous, progressive and coordinated system of higher education 
for the State rests with the State Board of Higher Education 
Established by the 1955 General Assembly, the Board seeks tli. 
cooperation of other agencies and colleges, public and private, 
in developing a system of higher education that meets the State - 
ongoing and future needs at the highest level of excellence. 



^VEHRSHi 






i»v 




THE STATE CAPITOL 

The original State Capital of North Carolina was destroyed by 
fire on June 21, 1831. 

At the session of November, 1832, the Assembly resolved to 
rebuild on the old site, and $50,000 was appropriated for the pur- 
pose. Commissioners were appointed to have the work done. The 
rubbish was cleared away, the excavations made and the founda- 
tions were laid. On July 4, 1833, the cornerstone was set in place. 

After the foundations were laid the work progressed more slow- 
ly and it was so expensive that the appropriation was exhausted. 
The Legislature at its next session appropriated $75,000 more. 
To do the stone and finer work many skilled artisans had been 
brought from Scotland and other countries. The Building Com- 
missioners contracted with David Paton to come to Raleigh and 
superintend the work. Mr. Paton was an architect who had come 
from Scotland the year before. He was the builder, the architect, 
and designer. 

The Legislature was compelled to make appropriations for the 
work from time to time. The following is a table of the several 
appropriations made: 

Session of 1S32-33 _$ 50,000.00 

Session of 1833-34 75,000.00 

Session of 1834-35. 75,000.00 

Session of 1835 . 75,000.00 

Session of 1836-37_ 120,000.00 

Session of lS38-39_ 105,300.00 

Session of 1840-41_ 31,374.46 

Total $531,674.46 

The stone with which the building was erected was the property 
of the State. Had the State been compelled to purchase this ma- 
terial the cost of the Capitol would have been considerably in- 
creased. 

In the summer of 18 40 the work was finished. At last, after 
more than seven years, the sum of $531,674.46 was expended. As 
large as that sum was for the time, when the State was so poor 

21 



22 North Carolina Manual 

and when the entire taxes for ;ill State purposes reached less than 
$100,000, yet the people were satisfied. The building had been 
erected with rigorous economy, and it was an object of great pride 
in the people. Indeed, never was money better expended Than in 
the erection of this noble Capitol. 

Description of the Capitol, Written by David Pa ton, 

the Architect 

"The State Capitol is 1 HO feet in length from north to south 
by 1 4 ii feet from east to west. The whole height is 97% feet in the 
center. The apex of pediment is t>4 feet in height. The stylobate 
is 18 feel in height. The columns of the east and west porticoes 
-.ivv :> feel l"l> inches in diameter. An entablature, including block- 
ing course, is continued around the building 12 feet high. 

The columns and entablature are Grecian Doric, and copied 
from the Temple of Minerva, commonly called the Parthenon. 
which was erected in Athens about 500 years before Christ. An 
octagon tower surrounds the rotunda, which is ornamented with 
Grecian cornices, etc., and its dome is decorated at top with a 
similar ornament to that of the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates. 
commonly called the Lanthorn of Demosthenes. 

The interior of the Capitol is divided into three stories: First. 
the lower story, consisting of ten rooms, eight of which are appro- 
priated as offices to the Governor, Secretary. Treasurer, and 
Comptroller, each having two rooms of the same size — the one 
containing an area of H49 square feet, the other 528 square feet 

the two committee rooms, each containing 200 square feet and 
four closets; also the rotunda, corridors, vestibules, and piazzas, 
contain an area of 1,370 square feet. The vestibules are decor- 
ated with columns and antae, similar to those of the Ionic Tem- 
ple on the Missus, near the Acropolis of Athens. The remainder 
is groined with stone and brick, springing from columns and 
pilasters of the Roman Doric 

"The second story consists of Senatorial and Representatives' 
chambers, the former containing an area of 2.545 and the latter 
2,849 square feet. Four apartments enter from Senate Chamber. 
two of which contain each an area of 169 square feet, and the other 
two contain <>ach an area of 154 square feet: also, two rooms enter 



The Capitol 23 

from Representatives' chamber, each containing an area of L70 
square feet; of two committee rooms, each containing an area 
of 231 square feet; of four presses and the passages, stairs, lob- 
bies, and colonnades, containing an area of 3,204 square feet. 

"The lobbies and Hall of Representatives have their columns 
and antae of the Octagon Tower of Andronicus Cyrrhestes and the 
plan of the hall is of the formation of the Greek theatre and 
the columns and antae in the Senatorial chamber and rotunda are 
of the Temple of Erectheus, Minerva, Polias, and Pandrosus, in 
the Acropolis of Athens, near the above named Parthenon. 

"Third, or attic story, consists of rooms appropriated to the 
Supreme Court and Library, each containing an area of 693 square 
feet. Galleries of both houses have an area of 1,300 square feet; 
also two apartments entering from Senate gallery, each 169 
square feet, of four presses and the lobbies' stairs, 988 square 
feet. These lobbies as well as rotunda, are lit with cupolas, and 
it is proposed to finish the court and library in the florid Gothic 
style." 




e 






THE STATE LEGISLATIVE BUILDING* 

(Named by Ch. 8, SL 1963) 
By Ralph B. Reeves, Jr. 

The Building Commission 

The 1959 General Assembly appropriated funds and authorized 
the establishment of a Building Commission for the construction 
of a new building for the Legislative Branch of the State Govern- 
ment. The statute provided that two members be appointed by 
each Presiding Officer of the two Houses and that three be ap- 
pointed by the Governor. 

Archie K. Davis and Robert P. Morgan were appointed by Lieu- 
tenant Governor Luther E. Barnhardt; B. I. Satterfield and 
Thomas J. White were appointed by Speaker of the House Addi- 
son Hewlett; and Governor Hodges appointed A. E. Finley, Ed- 
win Gill, and Oliver R. Rowe. 

The Commission elected Thomas J. White as Chairman and 
Robert F. Morgan as Vice Chairman. Paul A. Johnston, Director 
of the Department of Administration, was elected Executive Secre- 
tary; and upon his resignation, the Commission elected Prank B. 
Turner, State Property Officer, to succeed him. 

To perform architectural services, the Commission selected Ed- 
ward Durell Stone of New York with John S. Holloway and Ralph 
B. Reeves, Jr., Associated. 

After prolonged study, the Commission selected a site one block 
North of the Capitol and encompassing a two-block area. The 5%- 
acre site is bounded by Jones, Salisbury, Lane, and Wilmington 
streets. Halifax Street between Jones and Lane streets was closed 
and included within the new site. 

Bids were received in December, 1960; construction commenced 
in early 1961. The 1961 General Assembly appropriated an addi- 
tional $1 million for furnishings and equipment bringing the total 
appropriation to $5% million. 

Based upon the latest census, the cost of the building to citizens 
of North Carolina was $1.24 each. 



*The Building is commonly referred to as THE STATE HOUSE. 

25 



I'C, NOKTH (' \i:«>i I \ \ .M \\ PAL 

Description of the Building' 

The State Legislative Building, though not an imitation of his- 
Loric classical styles, is classical in character. Rising from a 340- 
fool wide podium of North Carolina granite, the building proper is 
2 I- feel square. The walls and the columns are of Vermont mar- 
ble, the latter forming a colonnade encompassing the building 
and reaching 24 feel from the podium to the roof of the second 
Hoor. 

Inset in the south podium floor, at the main entrance, is a 28- 
fool diameter terrazzo mosaic of the Great Seal of the State. From 
the first floor main entrance (at Jones Street) the carpeted 22- 
I'oot wide main stair extends directly to the third floor and the 
public galleries of the Senate and House, the auditorium, the dis- 
play area, and the roof gardens. 

The four garden courts are located at the corners of the build- 
ing. These courts contain tropical plants, and three have pools, 
fountains, and hanging planters. The main floor areas of the 
courts are located in the first floor, and mezzanines overlook the 
courts from the second floor. The skylights which provide natural 
lighting are located within the roof gardens overhead. The courts 
provide access to committee rooms in the first floor, the legislative 
chambers in the second floor, and to members' offices in both 
floors. 

The Senate and House chambers, each 5,180 square feet in 
area, occupy the east and west wings of the second floor. Follow- 
ing the traditional relationship of the two chambers in the Cap- 
itol, the two spaces are divided by the rotunda; and when the 
main brass doors are open, the two presiding officers face one 
another. Each pair of brass doors weigh 1,5 pounds. 

The five pyramidal roofs covering the Senate and House cham- 
bers, the auditorium, the main stair, and the rotunda are sheathed 
with copper, as is the Capitol. The pyramidal shape of the roofs 
is visible in the pointed ceilings inside. The structural ribs form 
a coffered ceiling; and inside the coffered patterns, concentric 
patterns are outlined in gold. In each chamber, the distance from 
the floor to the peak of the ceiling is 45 feet. 

Chandeliers in the chambers and main stair are 8 feet in dia- 
meter and weigh 625 pounds each. The 12-foot diameter chan- 
delier of the rotunda, like the others, is of brass, but its weight 
is 750 pounds. 



The Capitol 27 

Because of the interior environment, the garden courts and 
rotunda have tropical plants and trees. Outside, however, the 
shrubs and trees are of an indigenous type. Among the trees in 
the grounds, on the podium, and in the roof areas are sugar 
maples, dogwoods, crabapples, magnolias, crepe myrtles, and 
pines. 

Throughout the building, the same color scheme is maintained: 
Walnut, white, gold, and red, with green foliage. In general, all 
wood is American walnut, metal is brass or other gold colored 
material, carpets are red, and upholstery is gold or black. 

The enclosed area consists of 206,000 square feet of floor area 
with a volume of 3,210,000 cubic feet. Heating equipment pro- 
vides over 7,000,000 B.T.U. per hour; and the cooling equipment 
has a capacity of 620 tons. For lighting, motors, and other elec- 
trical equipment, the building has a connected service load of 
over 2,000,000 watts. 



28 North Carolina Manual 



CHIEF EXECUTIVES OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Governors of "Virginia" 

Ralph Lane, April _ , 1585-June . , 1586. 
John White, April ..... 1587-August ... , 1587. 



Chief Executives Under the Proprietors 

William Drummond, October .__., 1663-October _.., 1667. 

Samuel Stephens, October , 1667-December ... , 1669. 

Peter Carteret, October ...., 1670-May ... ., 1673. 
John Jenkins, May . . . 1673-November _., 1676. 

Thomas Eastchurch, November ... , 1676- , 1678. 

Thomas Miller, __.., 1677- 

John Culpepper, , 1677- , 1678. 

Seth Sothel, _ , 1678- 

John Harvey, February _ , 1679-August , 1679. 

John Jenkins, November __., 1679- , 1681. 

Seth Sothel, . _., 1682- , 1689. 

Philip Ludwell, December ... 1689- , 1691. 

Philip Ludwell, November 2, 1691- .... 1694. 

Thomas Jarvis, , 1691-. ..._, 1694. 

John Archdale, August 31, 1694...... , 1696. 

Thomas Harvey , 1694- , 1699. 

Henderson Walker, .. .... 1699-August 14, 1704. 

Robert Daniel, .. .... 1704- , 1705. 

Thomas Cary, 1705- , 1706. 

William Glover, , 1706- , 1708. 

Thomas Cary, , 1708-January ...., 1711. 

Edward Hyde, ., 1710-May 9, 1712. 

Edward Hyde, May 9, 1712-September 8, 1712. 
Thomas Pollock, September 12, 1712-May 28, 1714. 
Charles Eden, May 28, 1714-March 26, 1722. 
Thomas Pollock, March 30, 1722-August 30, 1722. 
William Reed, August 30, 1722-January 15, 1724. 
George Burrington, January 15, 1724-July 17, 1725 
Richard Everard, July 17, 1725-May , 1728. 



GOVKBNOKS 29 

Governors Under the Crown 

Richard Everard, May ... , 1728-February 25, 1731. 
George Burrington, February 25, 1731-April 15, 1734. 
Nathaniel Rice, April 15, 1734-October 27, 1734. 
Gabriel Johnston, October 27, 1734-July 17, 1752. 
Matthew Rowan, July 17, 1752-November 2, 1754. 
Arthur Dobbs, November 2, 1754-March 28, 1765. 
William Tryon, March 28, 1765-December 20, 1765. 
William Tryon, December 20, 1765-July 1, 1771. 
James Hasell, July 1, 1771-August 12, 1771. 
Josiah Martin, August, 12, 1771-May ... , 1775. 

Governors Elected by the Legislature 

Name, County, Terms of Office 

Richard Caswell, Dobbs, December 19, 1776-April 18, 1777. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, April 18, 1777-April 18, 1778. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, April 18, 1778-May 4, 1779. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, May 4, 1779-April, 1780. 
Abner Nash, Craven, April, 1780-June 26, 1781. 
Thomas Burke, Orange, June 26, 1781-April 26, 1782. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, April 26, 1782-April 30, 1783. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, April 30, 1783-April 1, 1785. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, April 1, 1785-December 12, 1785. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, December 12, 1785-December 23, 1786. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, December 23, 1786-December 20, 1787. 
Samuel Johnston, Chowan, December 20, 1787-November 18, 1788. 
Samuel Johnston, Chowan, November 18, 1788-November 16, 1789. 
Samuel Johnston, Chowan, November 16, 1789-December 17, 1789. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, December 17, 1789-December 9, 1790. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, December 9, 1790-January 2, 1792. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, January 2, 1792-December 14, 1792. 
R. D. Spaight, Craven, December 14, 1792-December 26, 1793. 
R. D. Spaight, Craven, December 26, 1793-January 6, 1795. 
R. D. Spaight, Craven, January 6, 1795-November 19, 1795. 
Samuel Ashe, New Hanover, November 19, 1795-December 19, 1796. 
Samuel Ashe, New Hanover, December 19, 1796-December 5, 1797. 
Samuel Ashe, New Hanover, December 5, 1797-December 7, 1798. 
W. R Davie, Halifax, December 7, 1798-November 23, 1799. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, November 23, 1799-November 29, 1800. 



30 Nokiii Cmuii.i.na Manual 

Benjamin Williams, Moore, November 29, 1800-November 28, 1801. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, November 28, 1801-December 6, 1802. 
James Turner, Warren, December 6, 1802-December 1, 1803. 
James Turner, Warren, December 1, 1803-November 29, 1804. 
James Turner, Warren, November 29, 1804-December 10, 1805. 
Nathaniel Alexander, Mecklenburg, December 10, 1805-December 1, 

1806. 
Nathaniel Alexander, Mecklenburg, December 1, 1806-December 1, 

1807. 
Benjamin W r illiams, Moore, December 1, 1807-December 12, 1808. 
David Stone, Bertie, December 12, 1808-December 13, 1809. 
David Stone, Bertie, December 13, 1809-December 5, 1810. 
Benjamin Smith, Brunswick, December 5, 1810-December 9, 1811. 
William Hawkins, Warren, December 9, 1811-November 25, 1812. 
William Hawkins. Warren. November 25, 1812-November 20, 1813. 
William Hawkins, Warren, November 20, 1813-November 29, 1814. 
William Miller, W'arren, November 29, 1814-December 7, 1815. 
William Miller, Warren, December 7, 1815-December 7, 1816. 
William Miller, Warren, December 7, 1816-December 3, 1817. 
John Branch, Halifax, December 3, 1817-November 24, 1818. 
John Branch, Halifax, November 24, 1818-November 25, 1819. 
John Branch, Halifax, November 25, 1819-December 7, 1820. 
Jesse Franklin, Surry, December 7, 1820-December 7, 1821. 
Gabriel Holmes, Sampson, December 7, 1821-December 7, 1822. 
Gabriel Holmes, Sampson, December 7, 1822-December 6, 1823. 
Gabriel Holmes, Sampson, December 6, 1823-December 7, 1824. 
H. G. Burton, Halifax, December 7, 1824-December 6, 1825. 
H. G. Burton, Halifax, December 6, 1825-December 29, 1826. 
H. G. Burton, Halifax, December 29, 1826-December 8, 1827. 
James Iredell, Chowan, December 8, 1827-December 12, 1828. 
John Owen, Bladen, December 12, 1828-December 10, 1829. 
John Owen, Bladen, December 10, 1829-December 18, 1830. 
Montford Stokes, Wilkes, December 18, 1830-December 13, 1831. 
Montford Stokes, Wilkes, December 13, 1831-December 6, 1832. 
D. L. Swain, Buncombe, December 6, 1832-December 9, 1833. 
D. L. Swain, Buncombe, December 9, 1833-December 10, 1834. 
D. L. Swain, Buncombe, December 10, 1834-December 10, 1835. 
R. D. Spaight, Jr., Craven, December 10, 1835-December 31, 1836. 



Governors 31 

Governors Elected by the People 

E. B. Dudley, New Hanover, December 31, 1836-December 29, 1838. 

E. B. Dudley, New Hanover, December 29, 1838-January 1, 1841. 

J. M. Morehead, Guilford, January 1, 1841-December 31, 1842. 

J. M. Morehead, Guilford, December 31, 1842-January 1, 1845. 

W. A. Graham, Orange, January 1, 1845-January 1, 1847. 

W. A. Graham, Orange, January 1, 1847-January 1, 1849. 

Charles Manly, Wake, January 1, 1849-January 1, 1851. 

D. S. Reid, Rockingham, January 1, 1851-December 22, 1852. 

D. S. Reid, Rockingham, December 22, 1852-December 6, 1854. 

Warren Winslow, Cumberland, December 6, 1854-January 1, 1855. 

Thomas Bragg, Northampton, January 1, 1855-January 1, 1857. 

Thomas Bragg, Northampton, January 1, 1857-January 1, 1859. 

John W. Ellis, Rowan, January 1, 1859-January 1, 1861. 

John W. Ellis, Rowan, January 1, 1861-July 7, 1861. 

Henry T. Clark, Edgecombe, July 7, 1861-September 8, 1862. 

Z. B. Vance, Buncombe, September 8, 1862-December 22, 1864. 

Z. B. Vance, Buncombe, December 22, 1864-May 29, 1865. 

W. W. Holden, Wake, May 29, 1865-December 15, 1865. 

Jonathan Worth, Randolph, December 15, 1865-December 22, 1866. 

Jonathan Worth, Randolph, December 22, 1866-July 1, 1868. 

W. W. Holden, Wake, July 1, 1868- December 15, 1870. 

T. R. Caldwell, Burke, December 15, 1870-January 1, 1873. 

T. R. Caldwell, Burke, January 1, 1873-July 11, 1874. 

C. H. Brogden, Wayne, July 11, 1874-January 1, 1877. 

Z. B. Vance, Mecklenburg, January 1, 1877-February 5, 1879. 

T. J. Jarvis, Pitt, February 5, 1879-January 18, 1881. 

T. J. Jarvis, Pitt, January 18, 1881-January 21, 1885. 

A. M. Scales, Rockingham, January 21, 1885-January 17, 1889. 

D. G. Fowle, Wake, January 17, 1889-April 8, 1891. 
Thomas M. Holt, Alamance, April 8, 1891-January 18, 1893. 
Elias Carr, Edgecombe, January 18, 1893-January 12, 1897. 
D. L. Russell, Brunswick, January 12, 1897-January 15, 1901. 
Charles B. Aycock, Wayne, January 15, 1901-January 11, 1905. 
R. B. Glenn, Forsyth, January 11, 1905-January 12, 1909. 

W. W. Kitchin, Person, January 12, 1909-January 15, 1913. 
Locke Craig, Buncombe, January 15, 1913-January 11, 1917. 
Thomas W. Bickett, Franklin, January 11, 1917-January 12, 1921. 
Cameron Morrison, Mecklenburg, January 12, 1921-January 14, 1925. 



;{2 NoK'J m (' \i;mi.i\ \ ManUAI 

Angus Wilton McLean, Robeson, January 14, 1 " 11, 192b. 

0. Max Gardner, Cleveland, January 11, 1929-Ja 
J. C. B. Ehringhaus, Pasquotank, January 5, 19. 
Clyde R. Hoey, Cleveland, January 7, 1937-Janua 
J. Melville Broughton. Wake, January 9, 1941-J 
R. Gregg Cherry, Gaston, January 4, 1945-Janua 
W. Kerr Scott, Alamance. January 6, 1949-Janutry , i9o3. 
William B. Umstead, Durham, January 8, 1953-rovember 7, 1954. 
Luther H. Hodges, Rockingham, November 7, 1954-February 7, 1957. 
Luther H. Hodges. Rockingham, February 7, 1957-January 5, 1961. 
Terry Sanford, Cumberland, January 5, 1961-Januar ..- 8, 1965. 
Dan K. Moore, Haywood, January 8, 1965- 



Lieutenant Governors 



:;:: 



•30NS WHO HAVE SERVED AS 
GOVERNORS SINCE JULY 1, 1868 

This List Has Been Compiled From The North Carolina 

Manual of 14J13 And The Manuals Published Every 

Two Years Since That Date. 



Nan 



Tod R. Caldwell 1 

Curtis H. Broaden* 

Thomas J. Jarvls 3 

James L. Robinson..... 
Charles M. Steadman 

Thorn; i M. Holt* 

Rufus A. Doughton 

Charles A. Reynolds... 

W. D. Turner 

Francis D. Winston 

William C. Newland... 
Elijah I.. Paughtridge. 

0. Max Gardner 

W. B. Cooper 

J. Elmer Long 

Richard T. Fountain... 

A. H. Graham _ 

W P. Horton 

R. L. Harris 

L. Y. Ballentine 

H. P. Taylor 

Luther H. Hodges 6 

" uther K. Barnhardt... 

Cloyd Phllpott 4 

obert W. Scott.._ 



County 



Burke 

Wayne 

Pitt 

Macon 

Ntw Hanover 

Alamance 

Alleghany 

Forsyth 

Iredell 

Bertie 

Caldwell 

Edgecombe 

Cleveland 

New Hanover 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Orange 

Chatham 

Person 

Wake 

Anson 

Rockingham... 

Cabarrus 

Davidson 

Alamance 



Term Elected 



1868 

1872 

1876- 

1881- 

1885- 

1889- 

1893- 

1897- 

1901 

1905- 

1909- 

1913- 

1917- 

1921- 

1925- 

1929 

1933- 

1937- 

1941- 

1945- 

1949- 

1953- 

1957- 

1961- 

19G5- 



1872 
1876 
1880 
1885 
1889 
1893 
1897 
1901 
1905 
1909 
1913 
1917 
1921 
1925 
1929 
1933 
1937 
1941 
1945 
1949 
1953 
1957 
1961 
1965 
1969 



Term Served 



1868 
1872 
1876 
1881 
1885 
1889 
1893 
1897 
1901 
1905 
1909 
1913 
1917 
1921 
1925 
1929 
1933 
1937 
1941 
1945 
1949 
1953 
1957 
1961 
1965- 



1870 
1874 
1878 
1885 
1889 
1891 
1897 
1901 
1905 
1909 
1913 
1917 
1921 
1925 
1929 
1933 
1937 
1941 
1945 
1949 
1953 
1954 
1961 



1. Became Governor December 15, 1870 when W. W. Holden was impeached, tried 

and put out of office. 

2. Became Governor July 11, 1874 when Tod 

3. Became Governor February 5, 1879 when 

Senator. 

4. Became Governor April 9, 1891 when D. G. 

5. Became Governor November 7, 1954 when 

6. Died in office, August 18, 1961. 



R. Caldwell died in office. 
Governor Vance was elected U. S. 

Fowle died in office. 
William B. Umstead died in office. 



THE STATE FLAG 
An Act to Establish a State Flag 

The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact : 

Section 1. That the flag of North Carolina shall consist of a 
blue union, containing in the center thereof a white star with tin 
letter N in gilt on the left and the letter C in gilt on the righl <>i 
said star, the circle containing the same to be one-third the width of 
the union. 

Sec. 2. That the fly of the flag shall consist of two equally pro- 
portioned bars; the upper bar to be red, the lower bar to be white; 
that the length of the bars horizontally shall be equal to the per- 
pendicular length of the union, and the total length of the flag 
shall be one-third more than its width. 

Sec. 3. That above the star in the center of the union there 
shall be a gilt scroll in semicircular form, containing in black let- 
ters this inscription: "May 20th, 1775," and that below the star 
there shall be a similar scroll containing in black letters the in- 
scription: "April 12th, 1776." 

In the General Assembly read three times and ratified this 9th 
day of March, A.D., 1885. 

No change has been made in the flag since the passage of this 
act. By an act of 1907 it is provided: 

"That the board of trustees or managers of the several State 
institutions and public buildings shall provide a North Carolina flag, 
of such dimensions and materials as they may deem best, and the 
same shall be displayed from a staff upon the top of each and 
every such building at all times except during inclement weather, 
and upon the death of any State officer or any prominent citizen 
the Flag shall be put at half-mast until the burial of such person 
shall have taken place. 

"That the Board of County Commissioners of the several coun- 
ties in this State shall likewise authorize the procuring of a North 
Carolina flag, to be displayed either on a staff upon the top, or 
draped behind the Judge's stand, in each and every courthouse in 
the State, and that the State flag shall be displayed at each and 
every term of court held, and on such other public occasions as 
the Commissioners may deem proper." (Rev., s. 5321; 1885 c. 291; 
1907, c. 838.) 



THi; MECKLENBURG DECLARATION OF 
20th MAY, 1775 

Declaration 

Names of the Delegates Present 

Col. Thomas Polk .John MoKnitt Alexander 

Ephriam Brevard I [ezekiah Alexander 

Hezekiah J. Balch Adam Alexander 

John Phifer Charles Alexander 

.James Harris Zacheus Wilson, Sen. 

William Kennon Waightstill Avery 

John Ford Benjamin Patton 

Richard Barry Mathew McClure 

Henry Downs Neil Morrison 

Ezra Alexander Robert Irwin 

William Graham John Flenniken 

John Quary David Reese 

Abraham Alexander Richard Harris, Sen. 

Abraham Alexander was appointed Chairman, and John Mc- 
Knitt Alexander, Clerk. The following resolutions were offered, 
viz: 

1. Resolved. That whosoever directly or indirectly abetted or in 
any way form or manner contenanced the unchartered and dan- 
gerous invasion of our rights as claimed by Great Britain is an 
enemy to this country, to America, and to the inherent and in- 
alienable rights of man. 

2. Resolved. That we the citizens of Mecklenburg County, do 
hereby dissolve the political bands which have connected us to the 
mother country and hereby absolve ourselves from all allegiance 
to the British Crown and abjure all political connection contract 
or association with that nation who have wantonly trampled on 
our rights and liberties and inhumanly shed the blood of American 
patriots at Lexington. 

3. Resolved. Thai we do hereby declare ourselves a free and in- 
dependent people, are. and of right ought to be a sovereign and 



*The above is found in Vol. IX, papres 1263-05 of the Colonial Records of North 
Carolina. 

36 



The Mecklenburg Declaration 37 

self-governing association under the control of no power other 
than that of our God and the General Government of the Congress 
to the maintenance of which independence we solemnly pledge to 
each other our mutual cooperation, our lives, our fortunes, and our 
most sacred honor. 

4. Resolved, That as we now acknowledge the existence and con- 
trol of no law or legal officer, civil or military within this County, 
we do hereby ordain and adopt as a rule of life all, each and 
every of our former laws — wherein nevertheless the Crown of 
Great Britain never can be considered as holding rights, privileges, 
immunities, or authority therein. 

5. Resolved, That it is further decreed that all, each and every 
Military Officer in this County is hereby reinstated in his former 
command and authority, he acting conformably to these regnla 
tions. And that every member present of this delegation shall 
henceforth be a civil officer, viz., a justice of the peace, in the 
character of a "committee man" to issue process, hear and deter- 
mine all matters of controversy according to said adopted laws 
and to preserve peace, union and harmony in said county, and 
to use every exertion to spread the love of Country and fire of 
freedom throughout America, until a more general and organized 
government be established in this Province. 



THE GREAT SEAL 

The Constitution of North Carolina, Article III, section 1(1, re- 
i|u ires i hai 

"There shall be a seal of the State which shall be kept by the 
Governor, and used by him as occasion may require, and shall be 
called The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina.' All grants 
and Commissions shall be issued in the name and by the authority 
of the State of North Carolina, sealed with 'The Great Seal of the 
State,' signed by the Governor and countersigned by the Secretary 
of State." 

The use of a Great Seal for the attestation of important docu- 
ments began with the institution of government in North Carolina. 
There have been at various times nine different seals in use in the 
i olony and State. 

The present Great Seal of the State of North Carolina is de- 
scribed as follows: 

"The Creat Seal of the State of North Carolina is two and one- 
quarter inches in diameter, and its design is a representation of 
the figures of Liberty and Plenty, looking toward each other, but 
not more than half fronting each other, and otherwise disposed, as 
follows: Liberty, the first figure, standing, her pole with cap on it 
in her left hand and a scroll with the word 'Constitution' inscribed 
thereon in her right hand. Plenty, the second figure, sitting down. 
her right arm half extended toward Liberty, three heads of wheat 
in her right hand, and in her left the small end of her horn, the 
mouth of which is resting at her feet, and the contents of horn 
rolling out. hi the exergon is inserted the words May 20, 1775, 
above the coat of arms. Around the circumference is the legend 
'The Creat Seal of the State of North Carolina' and the motto 
'Esse Quam Videri'." (Rev., s. 5339; Code ss. 3328, 3329; 1868-9, 
c. 270, s. 35; 1883. c. 392; 1893. c. 145.) 



38 



THE STATE BIRD 

By popular choice the Cardinal was selected for adoption as 
our State Bird as of March 4, 1943. (S. L. 1943 c. 595; G. S. 
145-2). 

This bird is sometimes called the Winter Redbird because it is 
most conspicuous in winter and is the only "redbird" present al 
that season. It is an all year round resident and one of the com- 
monest birds in our gardens and thickets. It is about the size of a 
Catbird with a longer tail, red all over, except that the throat and 
region around the bill is black; the head is conspicuously crested 
and the large stout bill is red; the female is much duller — the red 
being mostly confined to the crest, wings and tail. There are no 
seasonal changes in the plumage. 

The Cardinal is a fine singer, and what is unusual among birds 
the female is said to sing as well as the male, which latter sex 
usually has a monopoly of that art in the feathered throngs. 

The nest is rather an untidy affair built of weed stems, grass 
and similar materials in a low shrub, small tree or bunch of briars, 
usually not over four feet above the ground. The usual number 
of eggs to a set is three in this State, usually four further North. 
Possibly the Cardinal raises an extra brood down here to make 
up the difference, or possibly he can keep up his normal population 
more easily here through not having to face inclement winters 
of the colder North. A conspicuous bird faces more hazards. 

The cardinal is by nature a seed eater, but he does not dislike 
small fruits and insects. 



41 



THE HALIFAX RESOLUTION 

Adopted by the Provincial Congress of North Carolina in Session 

al Halifax, April 12, 1776. 

"The Select Committee taking into Consideration the usurpa- 
tions and violences attempted and committed by the King and 
Parliamenl of Britain against America, and the further Measures 
to be taken for frustrating the same, and for the better defence of 
this province reported as follows, to wit, 

"It appeals to your Committee that pursuant to the Plan con- 
certed by the British Ministry for subjugating America, the King 
and Parliamenl of Great Britain have usurped a Power over the 
Persons and Properties of the People unlimited and uncontrouled; 
and disregarding their humble Petitions for Peace, Liberty and 
safety, have made divers Legislative Acts, denouncing War Fam- 
ine and every Species of Calamity against the Continent in Gen- 
eral. That British Fleets and Armies have been and still are 
daily employed in destroying the People and commiting the most 
horrid devastations on the Country. That Governors in different 
Colonies have declared Protection to Slaves who should imbrue 
their Hands in the Blood of their Masters. That the Ships belong- 
ing to America are declared prizes of War and many of them have 
been violently seized and confiscated in consequence of which 
multitudes of the people have been destroyed or from easy Cir- 
cumstances reduced to the most Lamentable distress. 

•And whereas the moderation hitherto manifested by the United 
Colonies and their sincere desire to be reconciled to the mother 
Country on Constitutional Principles, have procured no mitigation 
of the aforesaid Wrongs and usurpations, and no hopes remain of 
obtaining redress by those Means alone which have been hitherto 
tried. Your Committee are of Opinion that the house should enter 
into the following Resolve, to wit 

"Resolved that the delegates for this Colony in the Continental 
Congress he impowered to concur with the delegates of the other 
Colonies in declaring Independency, and forming foreign Alli- 
ances, reserving to this Colony the Sole, and Exclusive right of 
forming a Constitution and Laws for this Colony, and of appoint- 
ing delegates From time to time (under the direction of a general 
Representation thereof) to meet the delegates of the other Col- 
onies for such purposes as shall be hereafter pointed out." 



NAME OF STATE AND NICKNAMES 

In 1629 King Charles the First of England "erected into a 
province," all the land from Albemarle Sound on the north to the 
St. John's River on the south, which he directed should be called 
Carolina. The word Carolina is from the word Carolus, the Latin 
form of Charles. 

When Carolina was divided in 1710, the southern part was 
called Souuth Carolina and the northern or older settlement was 
called North Carolina, or the "Old North State." Historians had 
recorded the fact that the principal products of this State were 
"tar, pitch and turpentine." It was during one of the fiercest 
battles of the War Between the States, so the story goes, that the 
column supporting the North Carolina troops was driven from the 
field. After the battle the North Carolinians, who had successfully 
fought it out alone, were greeted from the passing derelict regi- 
ment with the question: "Any more tar down in the Old North 
State, boys?" Quick as a flash came the answer: "No; not a bit; 
old Jeff's bought it all up." "Is that so; what is he going to do 
with it?" was asked. "He is going to put it on you-uns heels to 
make you stick better in the next fight." Creecy relates that Gen- 
eral Lee, hearing of the incident, said: "God bless the Tar Heel 
boys," and from that they took the name. — Adapted from Grand- 
father Tales of North Carolina by R. B. Creecy and Histories of 
North Carolina Regiments, Vol. Ill, by Walter Clark. 

The State Motto 

The General Assembly of 1893 (chapter 145) adopted the words 
"Esse Quam Videri" as the State's motto and directed that these 
words with the date "20 May, 1775," should be placed with our 
Coat of Arms upon the Great Seal of the State. 

The words "Esse Quam Videri" mean "to be rather than to 
seem." Nearly every State has adopted a motto, generally in Latin. 
The reason for their mottoes being in Latin is that the Latin 
tongue is far more condensed and terse that the English. The 
three words, "Esse Quam Videri," require at least six English 
words to express the same idea. 

Curiosity has been aroused to learn the origin of our Stat.' 
motto. It is found in Cicero in his essay on Friendship (Cicero de 
Amicitia, Chap. 26) 

43 



1 1 North C vhoi i \ \ M \\r.\i. 

It is a little singular thai until the act of 1893 the sovereign 
State of North Carolina had no motto since its declaration of in- 
dependence. It was our of the verj few states which did not have 
;; motto and the only one of the original thirteen without one. 
I Rev., s 5320; 1893, c. 1 15; G. S. 144-2.) 

The State Colors 

The General Assembly of L945 declared Red and Blue of shades 
appearing in the North Carolina State Flag and the American 
Flag as the official State Colors. (Session Laws. 1945, c. 878.) 

The State Flower 

The General Assembly of 1941 designated the dogwood as the 
State flower. (Public Laws. mil. c. 289; G. S. 145-1.) 

The State Song 

The song known as "The Old North State" was adopted as the 
official sons; of the State of North Carolina by the General Assem- 
bly of L927. I Public Laws. 1927. c. 26; G.S. 149-1). 

The State Shell 

The Genera] Assembly of 1965 designated the Scotch Bonnet 
as the State Shell. (Session Laws, 1965, c. 681). 

The State Tree 

The pine was officially designated as the State tree by the General 
Assembly of L963. (Session Laws, 1963, c. 41). 

The State Toast 

Officially adopted as the toast of North Carolina by the General 
Assembly of 1957. (Session Laws, 1957. c. 777 I. 

Here's to the land of the long leaf pine, 

The summer land where the sun doth shine, 

Where the weak grow strong and the strong grow great, 

Here's to "Down Home," the Old North State! 

Here's to the land of the cotton bloom white. 
Where the scuppernong perfumes the breeze at night, 
Where the soft southern moss and jessamine mate, 
'Neath the murmuring pines of the Old North State! 



Public Holidays 45 

Here's to the land where the galax grows, 
Where the rhododendron's rosette glows. 
Where soars Mount Pditchell's summit great. 
In the "Land of the Sky," in the Old North State! 

Here's to the land where maidens are fair, 
Where friends are true and cold hearts rare, 
The near land, the dear land whatever fate, 
The blest land, the best land, the Old North State! 

(Composed in 1904 &2/ Leonora Martin and Mary Burke Kerr.) 

Public Holidays 

January 1 — New Year's Day. 

January 19 — Birthday of General Robert E. Lee. 

February 22 — Birthday of George Washington. 

Easter Monday. (Applies to State and National Banks only). 

April 12 — Anniversary of the Resolutions adopted by the Pro- 
vincial Congress of North Carolina at Halifax, April 12, 1776, 
authorizing the delegates from North Carolina to the Continental 
Congress to vote for a Declaration of Independence. 

May 10 — Confederate Memorial Day. 

May 20 — Anniversary of the "Mecklenburg Declaration of In- 
dependence." 

May 30 — Memorial Day (Applies to State and National Banks 
only) 

July 4 — Independence Day. 

September, first Monday — Labor Day. 

November, Tuesday after first Monday — General Election Day. 

November 11 — Veterans Day. 

November, Fourth Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. 

By joint Resolution No. 41 of Congress, approved by the Presi- 
dent December 26, 1941, the fourth Thursday in November in each 
and every year after 1941, was designated as Thanksgiving Day 
and made a legal public holiday to all intents and purposes. 

December 25 — Christmas Day. 

(G.S. 103-4). 



46 Noktii C vroi i \ a Manual 

Population of the State Since 1675 

1675 (Estimated) 4,000 

1701 (Estimated) 5,000 

1707 (Estimated) . 7,000 

1715 (Estimated) 11,000 

172-9 (Estimated) 35,000 

1752 (Estimated) 100,000 

17G5 (Estimated) 200,000 

1771 __ . (Estimated) 250,000 

1786 (Estimated) 350,000 

1790 (Census) 393,751 

1800 (Census) 47S.103 

1810 (Census) 555,500 

1820 (Census) 638,829 

1830 (Census) 737,987 

1840 (Census) 753,409 

1850 (Census) 869,039 

1860 (Census) 992,622 

1870 (Census) 1,071,361 

1880 (Census) 1,399,750 

1890 (Census) 1,617,947 

1900 __ (Census) 1,893,810 

1910 (Census) _ 2,206,287 

1920 (Census) 2,559,12-3 

1930 (Census) 3,170,276 

1940 (Census) 3,571,623 

1950 (Census) 4,061,929 

1960 (Census) 4,556,155 



THE OLD NORTH STATE 



(Traditional air as sung in 1928) 



William Gaston 

With spirit 



Collected and abbangui 
bt Mas. E. E. Randolph 




1 . Car - o - li - na! Car 

2. Tho' she en - vies not 

3. Then let all those who 



li - nal heav-en's bless-ings at - tend her, 
oth - ers, their mer - it - ed glo - ry, 
love us, love the land that we live hi, 




While we live we willcher - ish, pro - tect and de- fend her, Tho' the 
Say whose name stands the fore - most, in lib - er - ty'ssto - ry, Tho' too 

As hap - py a re - gion as on this side of heav-en, Where 




IB 







scorn - er may sneer at and wit - lings de - fame her, Still our hearts swell with 
true to her - self e'er to crouch to op - pres-sion, Who can yield to just 
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CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 



PREAMBLE 



We, the people of the State of North Carolina, grateful to Almighty 
God, the Sovereign Ruler of Nations, for the preservation of the 
American Union and the existence of our civil, political and religious 
liberties, and acknowledging our dependence upon Him for the con- 
tinuance of those blessings to us and our posterity, do, for the more 
certain security thereof, and for the better government of this State, 
ordain and establish this Constitution: 

ARTICLE I 

DECLARATION OF RIGHTS 

That the Great, general and essential principles of liberty and 
free government may be recognized and established, and that the 
relations of this State to the Union and Government of the United 
States, and those of the people of this State to the rest of the 
American people may be defined and affirmed, we do declare: 

Section 1. The equality and rights of persons. That we hold it 
to be self-evident that all persons are created equal; that they are 
endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that 
among these are life, liberty, the enjoyment of the fruits of their 
own labor, and the pursuit of happiness. 

Sec. 2. Political -power and government. That all political power 
is vested in, and derived from, the people; all government of right 
originates from the people, is founded upon their will only, and is 
instituted solely for the good of the whole. 

Sec. 3. Internal government of the State. That the people of 
this State have the inherent, sole and exclusive right of regulat- 
ing the internal government and police thereof, and of altering and 
abolishing their Constitution and form of government whenever 
it may be necessary to their safety and happiness; but every such 

in 



50 Xoin ii (' \i:oi i \ \ M w i \i. 

right should be exercised in pursuance of law. and consistently 
with the Constitution of the United States. 

Sec. 4 That there is no right to secede. That this State shall 
evei remain a member of the American Union; that the people 
thereof arc a part of the American Nation; that there is no right 
on the part of the State to secede, and that all attempts, from 
whatever source or upon whatever pretext, to dissolve said Union 
or to sever said Nation, oughl to be resisted with the whole power 

of the State. 

Sec. r>. Of allegiance to the United States Government. That 
every citizen of this State owes paramount allegiance to the Con- 
stitution and Government of the United States, and that no law or 
ordinance of the State in contravention or subversion thereof can 
have any binding force. 

Sec. 6. Public debt; bonds issued under Ordinance of Conven- 
tion of 1868, '68-69, '69-70, declared invalid; exception. The State 
shall never assume or pay, or authorize the collection of any debt 
or obligation, express or implied, incurred in aid of insurrection or 
rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or 
emancipation of any slave; nor shall the General Assembly assume 
or pay, or authorize the collection of any tax to pay, either directly 
or indirectly, expressed or implied, any debt or bond incurred, or 
issued, by authority of the Convention of the year one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-eight, nor any debt or bond incurred or 
issued by the Legislature of the year one thousand eight hundred 
and sixty-eight, either at its special session of the year one thou- 
sand eight hundred and sixty-eight, or at its regular sessions of 
the years one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight and one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine, and one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-nine and one thousand eight hundred and 
seventy, except the bonds issued to fund the interest on the old 
debt of the State, unless the proposing to pay the same shall have 
first been submitted to the people and by them ratified by the 
vote of a majority of all the qualified voters of the State, at a 
regular election held for that purpose. 

Sec. 7. Exclusive emoluments, etc. No person or set of persons 
are entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or privileges from 
the community but in consideration of public services. 



Constitution 

Sec. 8. The legislative, executive and judicial poivers distinct. 
The legislative, executive, and supreme judicial powers of the 
government ought to be forever separate and distinct from each 
other. 

Sec. 9. Of the power of suspending laws. All power of suspend 
ing laws, or the execution of laws, by any authority, without the 
consent of the representatives of the people, is injurious to their 
rights, and ought not to be exercised. 

Sec. 10 Elections free. All elections ought to be free. 

Sec. 11. In criminal prosecutions. In all criminal prosecutions, 
every person charged with crime has the right to be informed of 
the accusation and to confront the accusers and witnesses with 
other testimony, and to have counsel for defense, and not be com- 
pelled to give self-incriminating evidence, or to pay costs, jail fees, 
or necessary witness fees of the defense, unless found guilty. 

Sec. 12. Ansxcers to criminal charges. No person shall be put 
to answer any criminal charge except as hereinafter allowed, but 
by indictment, presentment, or impeachment. But any person, 
when represented by counsel, may, under such regulations as the 
Legislature shall prescribe, waive indictment in all except capital 
cases. 

Sec. 13. Right of jury. No Person shall be convicted of any 
crime but by the unanimous verdict of a jury of good and lawful 
persons in open court. The Legislature may, however, provide 
other means of trial, for petty misdemeanors, with the right of 
appeal. 

Sec. 14. Excessive bail. Excessive bail should not be required, 
nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel or unusual punishments in- 
flicted. 

Sec. 15. General warrants. General warrants, whereby any offi- 
cer or messenger may be commanded to search suspected places, 
without evidence of the act committed, or to seize any person or 
persons not named, whose offense is not particularly described and 
supported by evidence, are dangerous to liberty and ought not in 
be granted. 

Sec. 16. Imprisonment for debt. There shall be no imprison- 
ment for debt in this State, except in cases of fraud. 



52 Xoki ii (' \i:oi.i \ a M \ \iai. 

Sec. 17. No persons taken, etc., but by law of land. No person 
ought lo be taken, imprisoned or disseized of his freehold, liber- 
ties, or privileges, or outlawed or exiled, or in any manner deprived 
of his life, liberty or property, but by fhe law of the land. 

Sec. is. Persons restrained of liberty. Every person restrained 
of his liberty is entitled to a remedy to inquire into the lawfulness 
thereof, and to remove the same, if unlawful; and such remedy 
ought not to be denied or delayed. 

Sec. lit. Controversies at law respecting property. In all con- 
troversies at law respecting property, the ancient mode of trial 
by jury is one of the best securities of the rights of the people, 
and ought to remain sacred and inviolable. No person shall be 
excluded from jury service on account of sex. 

Sec. 20. Freedom of the press. The freedom of the press is one 
of the great bulwarks of liberty, and therefore ought never to be 
restrained, but every individual shall be held responsible for the 
abuse of the same. 

Sec. 21. Habeas corpus. The privilege of the writ of habeas 
corpus shall not be suspended. 

Sec. 22. Property qualification. As political rights and privi- 
leges are not dependent upon, or modified by, property, therefore 
no property qualification ought to affect the right to vote or hold 

office. 

Sec. 23. Representation and taxation. The people of the State 
ought not to be taxed, or made subject to the payment of any 
impost or duty without the consent of themselves, or their repre- 
sentatives in General Assembly, freely given. 

Sec. 24 Militia and the right to bear arms. A well regulated 
militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right 
of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed; and, 
as standing armies in time of peace are dangerous to liberty, they 
ought not to be kept up, and the military should be kept under 
strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power. Nothing 
herein contained shall justify the practice of carrying concealed 
weapons, or prevent the Legislature from enacting penal statutes 
against said practice. 

Sec. 25. Right of the people to assemble together. The people 
have a right to assemble together to consult for their common 



Constitution 53 

good, to instruct their representatives, and to apply to the Legis- 
lature for redress of grievances. But secret political societies are 
dangerous to the liberties of a free people, and should not be 
tolerated. 

Sec. 26. Religious liberty. All persons have a natural and inalien- 
able right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of 
their own consciences, and no human authority should, in any case 
whatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience. 

Sec. 27. Education. The people have a right to the privilege of 
education, and it is the duty of the State to guard and maintain 
that right. 

Sec. 28. Elections should be frequent. For redress of grievances, 
and for amending and strengthening the laws, elections should be 
often held. 

Sec. 29. Recurrence to fundamental principles. A frequent re- 
currence to fundamental principles is absolutely necessary to pre- 
serve the blessings of liberty. 

Sec. 30. Hereditary emoluments, etc. No hereditary emoluments, 
privileges, or honors ought to be granted or conferred in this 
State. 

Sec. 31. Perpetuities, etc. Perpetuities and monopolies are con- 
trary to the genius of a free State, and ought not to be allowed. 

Sec. 32. Ex post facto laws. Retrospective laws, punishing acts 
committed before the existence of such laws, and by them only 
declared criminal, are oppressive, unjust and incompatible with 
liberty; wherefore no ex post facto law ought to be made. No 
law taxing retrospectively sales, purchases, or other acts previous- 
ly done, ought to be passed. 

Sec. 33. Slavery prohibited. Slavery and involuntary servitude, 
otherwise than for crime, whereof the parties shall have been 
duly convicted, shall be, and are hereby, forever prohibited within 
the State. 

Sec. 34. State boundaries. The limits and boundaries of the 
State shall be and remain as they now are. 

Sec. 35. Courts shall be open. All courts shall be open; and 
every person for an injury done him in his lands, goods, person, 
or reputation, shall have remedy by due course of law, and righl 
and justice administered without sale, denial, or delay. 



5 I NOR! 11 (' Mini I \ A MAN! M 

Sec. 36. Soldiers in time o) peace. No soldier shall, in time of 
peace, be quartered in any house without the consent of the owner; 
nor in time o\' war but in a manner prescribed by law. 

Sec. 37. Treason against the state. Treason against the State 
sail consist only in levying war against it or adhering to its enemies, 
giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of trea- 
son unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, 
or on confession in open court. No conviction of treason or attainder 
shall work corruption of blood or forfeiture. 

Sec. 38. Other rights of the people. This enumeration of rights 
shall not be construed to impair or deny others retained by the 
people; and all powers not herein delegated remain with the 
people. 

ARTICLE II 

LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. Two branches. The legislative authority shall be vested 
in two distinct branches, both dependent on the people, to wit: a 
Senate and House of Representatives. 

Sec. 2. Time of assembly. The Senate and House of Representa- 
tives shall meet biennially on the first Wednesday after the first 
Monday in February next after their election, unless a different day- 
shall be provided by law; and when assembled, shall be denomi- 
nated the General Assembly. Neither house shall proceed upon 
public business unless a majority of all the members are actually 
present. 

Sec. 3. Number of senators. The Senate shall be composed of 
fifty Senators, biennially chosen by ballot. 

Sec 4. Regulations in relation to districting the State for Sena- 
tors. The Senate Districts shall be so altered by the General 
Assembly, at the first Session after the return of every enumera- 
tion by order of Congress, that each Senate District shall contain, 
as near as may be, an equal number of inhabitants, excluding 
aliens and Indians not taxed, and shall remain unaltered until the 
return of another enumeration, and shall at all times consist of 
contiguous territory; and no county shall be divided in the forma- 
tion of a Senate District, unless such county shall be equitably 
entitled to two or more Senators. 



Constitution 55 

Sec. 5. Regulations in relation to apportionment of Representa- 
tives. The House of Representatives shall be composed of 120 Rep- 
resentatives, biennially chosen by ballot, to be elected by the counties 
respectively, according to their population, and each county shall 
have at least one Representative in the House of Representatives, 
although it may not contain the requisite ratio of representation. 
This apportionment shall be made by the Speaker of the House of 
Representatives at the first regular Session of the General Assembly 
convening after the return of every enumeration by order of Con- 
gress. The formula set out in Section 6 of this Article shall be 
applied by the Speaker and the new apportionment entered on the 
Journal of the House of Representatives on or before the fiOth 
calendar day of the Session. When so entered, the new apportion- 
ment shall have the same force and effect as an Act of the General 
Assembly, and shall become effective at the next election for members 
of the General Assembly. 

Sec. 6. Ratio of representation. In making the apportionment 
in the House of Representatives, the ratio of representation shall 
he ascertained by dividing the amount of the population of the 
State, exclusive of that comprehended within those counties which 
do not severally contain the one hundred and twentieth part of the 
population of the State, by the number of Representatives, less 
the number assigned to such counties; and in ascertaining the 
number of the population of the State, aliens and Indians not 
taxed shall not be included. To each county containing the said 
ratio and not twice the said ratio there shall be assigned one 
Representative; to each county containing twice but not three 
times the said ratio there shall be assigned two Representatives, 
and so on progressively, and then the remaining Representatives 
shall be assigned severally to the counties having the largest 
tractions. 

Sec. 7. Qualifications for Senators. Each member of the Senate 
shall not be less than twenty-five years of age, shall have resided 
in the State as a citizen two years, and shall have usually resided 
in the district for which he was chosen one year immediately pre- 
ceding his election. 

Sec. 8. Qualifications for Representatives. Each member of the 
House of Representatives shall be a qualified elector of the State, 
and shall have resided in the county for which he is chosen tor 
one year immediately preceding his election. 



56 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 9. Election of officers. In the election of all officers, whose 
appointment shall be conferred upon the General Assembly by the 
Constitution, the vote shall be viva voce. 

Sec. 10. Powers in relation to divorce and alimony. The General 
Assemblj shall have power to pass general laws regulating divorce 
and alimony, but shall not have power to grant a divorce or secure 
alimony in any individual case. 

Sec. 11. Private laics in relation to names of persons, etc. The 
General Assembly shall not have power to pass any private law 
to alter the name of any person, or to legitimate any person not 
born in lawful wedlock, or to restore to the rights of citizenship 
any person convicted of an infamous crime, but shall have power 
to pass general laws regulating the same. 

Sec. VI. Thirty days notice shall be given anterior to passage 
of private lairs. The General Assembly shall not pass any private 
law, unless it shall be made to appear that thirty days notice of 
application to pass such a law shall have been given, under such 
direction and in such manner as shall be provided by law. 

Sec. 13. Vacancies. If a vacancy shall occur in the General 
Assembly by death, resignation or otherwise, the said vacancy shall 
be filled immediately by the Governor appointing the person recom- 
mended by the executive committee of the county in which the 
deceased or resigned member was resident, being the executive com- 
mittee of the political party with which the deceased or resigned 
member was affiliated at the time of his election. 

Sec. 14. Ren iikc. No law shall be passed to raise money on the 
credit of the State, or to pledge the faith of the State, directly 
or indirectly, for the payment of any debt, or to impose any tax 
upon the people of the State, or to allow the counties, cities or towns 
to do so. unless the bill for the purpose shall have been read three 
several times in each house of the General Assembly and passed 
three several readings, which readings shall have been on three 
different days, and agreed to by each house respectively, and un- 
less the yeas and nays on the second and third readings of the bill 
shall have been entered on the journal. 

Sec. 15. Entails. The General Assembly shall regulate entails in 
such a manner as to prevent perpetuities. 

Sec. IK. Journals. Each house shall keep a journal of its pro- 



Constitution 57 

ceedings, which shall be printed and made public immediately after 
the adjournment of the General Assembly. 

Sec. 17. Protest. Any member of either house may dissent from, 
and protest against, any act or resolve which he may think injurious 
to the public, or any individual, and have the reasons for his dissent 
entered on the journal. 

Sec. 18. Officers of the House. The House of Representatives 
shall choose their own Speaker and other officers. 

Sec. 19. President of the Senate. The Lieutenant-Governor shall 
preside in the Senate, but shall have no vote unless it may be 
equally divided. 

Sec. 20. Other senatorial officers. The Senate shall elect from 
its membership a President Pro Tempore, who shall become Presi- 
dent of the Senate upon the failure of the Lieutenant-Governor-elect 
to qualify, or upon succession by the Lieutenant-Governor to the 
office of Governor, or upon the death, resignation, or removal from 
office of the President of the Senate, and who shall serve until the 
expiration of his term of office as Senator. 

During the physical or mental incapacity of the President of the 
Senate to perform the duties of his office, or during the absence of 
the President of the Senate, the President Pro Tempore shall pre- 
side over the Senate. The Senate shall elect its other officers. 

Sec. 21. Style of the acts. The style of the acts shall be: "The 
General Assembly of North Carolina do enact." 

Sec. 22. Powers of the General Assembly. Each house shall be 
judge of the qualifications and election of its own members, shall 
sit upon its own adjournment from day to day, prepare bills to be 
passed into laws; and the two houses may also jointly adjourn 
to any future day, or other place. 

Sec. 23. Bills and resolutions to be read three times, etc. All 
bills and resolutions of a legislative nature shall be read three 
times in each house before they pass into laws, and shall be signed 
by the presiding officers of both houses. 

Sec. 24. Oath of members. Each member of the General Assem- 
bly, before taking his seat, shall take an oath or affirmation that 
he will support the Constitution and laws of the United States, 
and the Constitution of the State of North Carolina, and will 



Xdiiiii Carolina Manual 

faithfully discharge his duty as a member of the Senate or House 
of Representatives. 

Sec. 25. Terms of office. The terms of office for Senators and 
members of the House of Representatives shall commence at the 
t ime of their elect ion. 

Sec. 26. Yeas and nays. Upon motion made and seconded in 
either house by one-fifth of the members present, the yeas and 
nays upon any question shall be taken and entered upon the 
journals. 

Sec. 27. Election for members of the General Assembly. The 
election for members of the General Assembly shall be held for 
the respective districts and counties, at the places where they are 
imu held, or may be directed hereafter to be held, in such manner 
as may be prescribed by law, on the first Thursday in August, 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy, and every 
two years thereafter. But the General Assembly may change the 
time of holding the elections. 

Sec. 28. Pay of members and presiding officers of tin General 
Assembly. The members of the General Assembly for the term 
for which they have been elected shall receive as a compensation 
for their services the sum of fifteen dollars ($15.00) per day 
tor each day of their session for a period not exceeding 120 days. 

The compensation of the presiding officers of the two houses shall 
).e twenty dollars ($20.00) per day for a period not exceeding 
120 days. Should an extra session of the General Assembly be 
called, the members and presiding officers shall receive a like rate 
of compensation for a pereiod not exceeding 25 days. The members 
and presiding officers shall also receive, while engaged in legis- 
lative duties, such subsistence and travel allowance as shall be 
established by law: provided, such allowances shall not exceed 
rhose established for members of State boards and commissions 
generally. 

Sec. 2!». Limitations upon power of General Assembly to enact 
private or special legislation. The General Assembly shall not pass 
any local, private or special act or resolution relating to health, sani- 
tation, and the abatement of nuisances, changing the names of 
cities, towns, and townships; authorizing the laying out. opening, 
altering, maintaining, or discontinuing of highways, streets, or 
alleys: relating to ferries or bridges: relating to non-navigable 



Constitution 59 

streams: relating to cemeteries; relating to the pay of jurors; 
erecting new townships, or changing township lines, or establish- 
ing or changing the lines of school districts; remitting fines, penal- 
ties, and forfeitures, or refunding moneys legally paid into the 
public treasury; regulating labor, trade, mining, or manufacturing; 
extending the time for the assessment or collection of taxes or 
otherwise relieving any collector of taxes from the due performance 
of his official duties or his sureties from liability; giving effect to 
informal wills and deeds; nor shall the General Assembly enact 
any such local, private or special act by the partial repeal of a 
general law. but the General Assembly may at any time repeal 
local, private or special laws enacted by it. Any local, private or 
special act of resolution passed in violation of the provisions of 
this section shall be void. The General Assembly shall have power 
to pass general laws regulating matters set out in this section. 

Sec. 3<>. Inviolability of sinking funds. The General Assembly 
shall not use nor authorize to be used any part of the amount of 
any sinking fund for any purpose other than the retirement of the 
bonds for which said sinking fund has been created. 

Sec. 31. Use of funds of Teachers' and State Employees' Retire- 
ment System restricted. The General Assembly shall not use or 
authorize to be used, nor shall any agency of the State, public 
officer or public employee use or authorize to be used the funds, 
or any part of the funds, of the Teachers' and State Employees' 
Retirement System except for retirement system purposes. The 
funds for the Teachers' and State Employees' Retirement System 
shall not be applied, diverted, loaned to or used by the State, any 
State agency, State officer, public officer or employee except for 
purposes of the Retirement System: Provided, that nothing in this 
Section shall prohibit the use of said funds for the payment of 
benefits as authorized by the Teachers' and State Employees' Re- 
tirement Law, nor shall anything in this provision prohibit the 
proper investment of said funds as may be authorized by law. 

ARTICLE III 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. Officers of the Executive Department ; terms of office. 
The Executive Department shall consist of a Governor, in whom 
shall be vested the supreme executive power of the State; a Lieu- 
tenant-Governor, a Secretary of State, an Auditor, a Treasurer, a 



60 North Carolina Manual 

Superintendent of Public Instruction, an Attorney General, a Com- 
missioner of Agriculture, a Commissioner of Labor, and a Com- 
missioner of Insurance, who shall be elected for a term of four 
years by the qualified electors of the State, at the same time and 
places and in the same manner as members of the General Assembly 
are elected. Their term of office shall commence on the first day 
of January next alter their election, and continue until their 
successors are elected and qualified: Provided, that the officers 
first elected shall assume the duties of their office ten days after 
the approval of this Constitution by the Congress of the United 
Stales, and shall hold their offices four years from and after the 
first day of January. 

Sec. 2. Qualifications of Governor and Lieutenant-Governor. No 
person shall be eligible for election to the office of Governor or 
Lieutenant-Governor, unless he shall have attained the age of 30 
years, shall have been a citizen of the United States five years, and 
shall have been a resident of this State for two years next before 
the election; nor shall a person elected to either of these two offices 
be eligible for election for the next succeeding term of the same 
office. 

Sec. 3. Returns of elections. The return of every election for 
officers of the Executive Department shall be sealed up and trans- 
mitted to the seat of government by the returning officer, directed 
to the Secretary of State. The return shall be canvassed and the 
result declared in such manner as may be prescribed by law. Con- 
tested elections shall be determined by a joint ballot of both 
houses of the General Assembly in such manner as shall be pre- 
scribed by law. 

Sec. 4. Oath of office for Governor. The Governor, before enter- 
ing upon the duties of his office, shall, in the presence of the mem- 
bers of both branches of the General Assembly, or before any 
Justice of the Supreme Court, take an oath or affirmation that he 
will support the Constitution and laws of the United States, and 
of the State of North Carolina, and that he will faithfully per- 
form the duties appertaining to the office of Governor, to which 
he has been elected. 

Sec. 5. Duties of Governor. The Governor shall reside at the 
seat of government of this State, and he shall, from time to time, 
give the General Assembly information of the affairs of the State. 



Constitution 61 

and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall 
deem expedient. 

Sec. 6. Reprieves, commutations and pardons. The Governor 
shall have power to grant reprieves, commutations, and pardons, 
after conviction, for all offenses (except in cases of impeachment), 
upon such conditions as he may think proper, subject to such 
regulations as may be provided by law relative to the manner of 
applying for pardons. He shall biennially communicate to the Gen- 
eral Assembly each case of reprieve, commutation, or pardon 
granted, stating the name of each convict, the crime for which 
he was convicted, the sentence and its date, the date of commu- 
tation, pardon, or reprieve, and the reasons therefor. The terms 
reprieves, commutations and pardons shall not include paroles. 
The General Assembly is authorized and empowered to create a 
Board of Paroles, provide for the appointment of the members 
thereof, and enact suitable laws defining the duties and authority 
of such board to grant, revoke and terminate paroles. The Gov- 
ernor's power of paroles shall continue until July 1, 1955, at which 
time said power shall cease and shall be vested in such Board 
of Paroles as may be created by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 7. Reports from officers of the Executive Department 
and of public institutions. The officers of the Executive Department 
and of the public institutions of the State shall, at least five days 
previous to each regular session of the General Assembly, severally 
report to the Governor, who shall transmit such reports, with his 
message, to the General Assembly; and the Governor may, at any 
time, require information in writing from the officers in the 
Executive Department upon any subject relating to the duties of 
their respective offices, and shall take care that the laws be faith- 
fully executed. 

Sec. 8. Commander-in-Chief. The Governor shall be Comman- 
der-in-Chief of the militia of the State, except when they shall be 
called into the service of the United States. 

Sec. 9. Extra sessio?is of the General Assembly. The Governor 
shall have power on extraordinary occasions, by and with the 
advice of the Council of State, to convene the General Assembly 
in Extra Session by his proclamation, stating therein the purpose 
or purposes for which they are thus convened. 



62 Xoi: MI ( ' vrolina Maxuai 

Sec, LO. Officers whose appointments are not otherwise provided 
for. The Governor shall nominate, and by and with the advice and 
consent of a majority of the Senators-elect, appoint all officers 
whose offices are established by ibis Constitution and whose appoint- 
ments arc not otherwise provided for. 

Sec. 11. Duties nf Die Lieutenant-Governor. The Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor shall bo President of the Senate, but shall have no vote unless 
the Senate shall be equally divided. He shall receive such compen 
sat ion as shall be fixed by the General Assembly. 

See. li'. Succession to office o] Governor. The Lieutenant-Gov 
ernor-elecl shall become Governor upon the failure of the Governor- 
elecl to qualify. The Lieutenant-Governor shall become Governor 
upon the death, resignation, or removal from office of the Governor. 
The further order of succession to the office of Governor shall be 
prescribed by law. A successor shall serve for the remainder of the 
term of the Governor whom be succeeds and until a new Governor 
is elected and qualified. 

During the absence of the Governor from the State, or during 
the physical or mental incapacity of the Governor to perform the 
duties of his office, the Lieutenant-Governor shall be Acting Gov- 
ernor. The further order of succession as Acting Governor shall 
be prescribed by law. 

The Governor may. by a written statement filed with the Secre- 
tary of State, declare that he is physically incapable of performing 
the duties of his office, and may thereafter in the same manner 
declare that he is physically capable of performing the duties of 
his office. 

The mental incapacity of the Governor to perform the duties of 
his office shall be determined only by joint resolution adopted by 
a vote of two-thirds of all the members of each house of the General 
Assembly. Thereafter, the mental capacity of the Governor to per- 
form the duties of his office shall be determined only by joint 
resolution adopted by a vote of a majority of all the members of 
each house of the General Assembly. In all cases, the General 
Assembly shall give the Governor such notice as it may deem proper 
and shall allow him an opportunity to be heard before a Joint Ses- 
sion of the General Assembly before it takes final action. When 
the General Assembly is not in Session, the Council of State, a 
majority of its members concurring, may convene it in Extra Ses- 
sion for the purpose of proceeding under this paragraph. 



Constitution 63 

Removal of the Governor from office for any other cause shall be 
by impeachment. 

Sec. 13. Duties vf other executive officers. The respective duties 
of the Secretary of State. Auditor, Treasurer. Superintendent of 
Public Instruction. Attorney General. Commissioner of Agriculture. 
Commissioner of Labor, and Commissioner of Insurance shall be 
prescribed by law. If the office of any of these officers shall be 
vacated by death, resignation, or otherwise, it shall be the duty of 
the Governor to appoint another to serve until his successor be 
elected and qualified. Every such vacancy shall be tilled by election 
at the first election for members of the General Assembly that 
occurs more than 30 days after the vacancy has taken place, and 
the person chosen shall hold the office for the remainder of the 
unexpired term fixed in the first Section of this Article: Provided, 
that when a vacancy occurs in the office of any of the officers 
named in this Section and the term expires on the first day of 
January succeeding the next election (or members of the General 
Assembly, the Governor shall appoint to fill the vacancy for the 
unexpired term of the office. 

Upon the occurrence of a vacancy in the office of any one of 
these officers for any of the causes stated in the preceding para- 
graph, the Governor may appoint an acting officer to perform the 
duties of that office until a person is appointed or elected pursuant 
to this Section to fill the vacancy and is qualified. 

During the physical or mental incapacity of any one of these 
officers to perform the duties of his office, as determined pursuant 
to the provisions of this Section, the duties of his office shall be 
performed by an acting officer who shall be appointed by the 
Governor 

The General Assembly shall by law prescribe with respect to those 
officers, other than the Governor, whose offices are created by this 
Article, procedures for determining the physical or mental incap- 
acity of any officer to perform the duties of his office, and for de- 
termining whether an officer who has been temporarily incapacitated 
has sufficiently recovered his physical or mental capacity to perform 
the duties of his office. Removal of those officers from office for any 
other cause shall be by impeachment. 

Sec. 14. Council of State. The Secretary of State. Auditor, Treas- 
urer, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Commissioner of Agri- 
culture. Commissioner of Labor, and Commissioner of Insurance 



64 North Carolina Manual 

shall constitute, ex officio, the Council of State, who shall advise 
the Governor in the execution of his office, and three of whom shall 
constitute a quorum; their advice and proceedings in this capacity 
shall be entered in a journal, to be kept for this purpose, exclusively, 
and signed by the members present, from any part of which any 
member may enter his dissent; and such journal shall be placed 
before the General Assembly when called for by either house. The 
Attorney General shall be, ex officio, the legal adviser of the Execu- 
tive Department. 

Sec. L5. Compensation of executive officers. The officers men- 
tioned in this Article shall, at stated periods, receive for their 
services a compensation to be established by the General Assembly, 
which shall not be diminished during the time for which they shall 
have been elected. 

Sec. Hi. Seal of State. There shall be a seal of the State, which 
shall he kept by the Governor, and used by him, as occasion may 
require, and shall be called "The Great Seal of the State of North 
Carolina". All grants and commissions shall be issued in the name 
and by the authority of the State of North Carolina, sealed with 
"The Great Seal of the State", signed by the Governor, and counter- 
signed by the Secretary of State. 

Sec. 17. Department of Agriculture, immigration and Statistics. 
The General Assembly shall establish a Department of Agriculture. 
Immigration, and Statistics, under such regulations as may best 
promote the agricultural interests of the State, and shall enact laws 
for the adequate protection and encouragement of sheep husbandry. 

Sec. IN. Department of .hist ire. The General Assembly is author- 
ized and empowered to create a Department of Justice under the 
supervision and direction of the Attorney General, and to enact 
suitable laws defining the authority of the Attorney General and 
other officers and agencies concerning the prosecution of crime and 
the administration of the criminal laws of the State. 

ARTICLE IV 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. Division of judicial power. The judicial power of the 
State shall, except as provided in Section 3 of this Article, be vested 
in a Court for the Trial of Impeachments and in a General Court 
of Justice. The General Assembly shall have no power to deprive 



Constitution 65 

the judicial department of any power or jurisdiction which right- 
fully pertains to it as a co-ordinate department of the government, 
nor shall it establish or authorize any courts other than as per- 
mitted by this Article. 

Sec. 2. General Court of Justice. The General Court of Justice 
shall constitute a unified judicial system for purposes of jurisdiction, 
operation, and administration; and shall consist of an appellate 
division, a Superior Court division, and a District Court division. 

Sec. 3. Judicial powers of administrative agencies. The General 
Assembly may vest in administrative agencies established pursuant 
to law such judicial powers as may be reasonably necessary as an 
incident to the accomplishment of the purposes for which the 
agencies were created. Appeals from administrative agencies shall 
be to the General Court of Justice. 

Sec. 4. Court for the Trial of Impeachments. The House of Rep- 
resentatives solely shall have the power of impeaching. The Court, 
for the Trial of Impeachments shall be the Senate. When the 
Governor or Lieutenant-Governor is impeached, the Chief Justice 
shall preside over the Court. A majority of the members shall be 
necessary to a quorum, and no person shall be convicted without the 
concurrence of two-thirds of the Senators present. Judgment upon 
conviction shall not extend beyond removal from and disqualifica- 
tion to hold office in this State, but the party shall be liable to 
indictment and punishment according to law. 

Sec. 5. Appellate Division. The Appellate Division of the Gen- 
eral Court of Justice shall consist of the Supreme Court and, when 
established by the General Assembly, an intermediate Court of 
Appeals. 

Sec. 6. Supreme Court. 

(1) Membership. The Supreme Court shall consist of a Chief 
Justice and six Associate Justices, but the General Assembly may 
increase the number of Associate Justices to not more than eight. 
In the event the Chief Justice is unable, on account of absence or 
temporary incapacity, to perform any of the duties placed upon 
him, the senior Associate Justice available is authorized to discharge 
such duties. The General Assembly may provide for the retirement 
of members of the Supreme Court and for the recall of such retired 
members to serve on that Court in lieu of any active member thereof 
who is, for any cause, temporarily incapacitated. 



i;i; Nm;iii Carolina Mantai 

(2) Sessions of the Supreme Court. The sessions of the Supreme 
Court shall he held in the City of Raleigh unless otherwise provided 
by the General Assembly. 

See 6A. Court of Appeals. The structure, organization, and 
composition of the Court of Appeals, if established, shall be 
determined by the General Assembly. The Court shall have not 
less than five members, and may be authorized to sit in divisions, 
or other than en banc. Sessions of the Court shall be held at such 
limes and places as the General Assembly may prescribe. The 
Genera] Assembly may provide for the retirement of members of 
i he Court oi Appeals and for the recall of such retired members 
to serve on that Court in lieu of any active member thereof who is. 
tor any cause, temporarily incapacitated 

Sec. 7. Superior Courts. 

ill Superior Court districts. The General Assembly shall, from 
time to time, divide the State into a convenient number of Superior 
Court judicial districts and shall provide for the election of one or 
more Superior Court Judges for each district. Each regular Supe- 
rior Court Judge shall reside in the district for which he is elected. 
The General Assembly may provide by general law for the selection 
or appointment of special or emergency Superior Court Judges not 
selected for a particular judicial district. 

i'2) Open at all times; sessions for trial of cases. The Superior 
Courts shall lie open at all times for the transaction of all business 
except the trial of issues of fact requiring a jury. Regular trial 
sessions of the Superior Court shall be held at times fixed pursuant 
to a calendar of courts promulgated by the Supreme Court. At least 
two sessions for the trial of jury cases shall be held annually in 
each county. 

i •". i Clerks. A Clerk of the Superior Court for each county shall 
he elected for a term of four years by the qualified voters thereof. 
at the time and in the manner prescribed by law for the election of 
members of the General Assembly. If the office of Clerk of the 
Superior Court becomes vacant otherwise than by the expiration 
 if the term, or if the people fail to elect, the senior regular resident 
Judge of the Superior Court serving the county shall appoint to 
fill the vacancy until an election can be regularly held. 

Sec. s. District Courts. The General Assemblv shall, from time 



CONSTITUTION 67 

to time, divide the State into a convenient number of local court 
districts and shall prescribe where the District Courts shall sit; 
but a District Court must sit in at least one place in each county. 
District Judges shall be elected for each district for a term of four 
years, in a manner provided by law. When more than one District 
Judge is authorized and elected for a district, the Chief Justice of 
the Supreme Court shall designate one of the judges as Chief Dis- 
trict Judge. Every District Judge shall reside in the district for 
which he is elected. For each county, the senior regular resident 
Judge of the Superior Court serving the county shall appoint for a 
term of two years, from nominations submitted by the Clerk of 
the Superior Court of the county, one or more Magistrates who 
shall be officers of the District Court. The number of District 
Judges and Magistrates shall, from time to time, be determined by 
the General Assembly. Vacancies in the office of District Judge 
shall be rilled, for the unexpired term, in a manner provided by law. 
Vacancies in the office of Magistrate shall be rilled, for the unex- 
pired term, in the manner provided for original appointment to the 
office. 

Sec. 9. Assignment of Judges. The Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court, acting in accordance with rules of the Supreme Court, shall 
make assignments of Judges of the Superior Court and may 
transfer District Judges from one district to another for temporary 
or specialized duty. The principle of rotating Superior Court Judges 
among the various districts of a division is a salutary one and shall 
be observed. For this purpose the General Assembly may divide 
the State into a number of judicial divisions. Subject, to the general 
supervision of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, assignment 
of District Judges within each local court district shall be mad< 
by the Chief District Judge. 

Sec. 10. Jurisdiction of the General Court of Justice. 

( 1 I Supreme Court. The Supreme Court shall have jurisdiction 
to review upon appeal any decision of the courts below, upon any 
matter of law or legal inference. The jurisdiction of the Supreme 
Court over "issues of fact" and "questions of fact" shall be the same 
exercised by it prior to the adoption of this Article, and the Court 
shall have the power to issue any remedial writs necessary to giv< 
it a general supervision and control over the proceedings of th< 
other courts. The Supreme Court shall have original jurisdiction 



68 North Carolina Manual 

to hear claims against the State, but its decisions shall be merely 
recommendatory; no process in the nature of execution shall issue 
thereon; the decisions shall be reported to the next Session of the 
General Assembly for its action. 

(2) Court of Appeals. The Court of Appeals, if established, 
shall have such appellate jurisdiction as the General Assembly 
may provide. 

( M ) Superior Court. Except as otherwise provided by the Gen- 
eral Assembly, the Superior Court shall have original general 
jurisdiction throughout the State. The Clerks of the Superior 
Court shall have such jurisdiction and powers as the General 
Assembly shall provide by general law uniformly applicable in 
every county of the State. 

1 4 ) District Courts; Magistrates. The General Assembly shall, 
by general law uniformly applicable in every local court district of 
the State, prescribe the jurisdiction and powers of the District 
Courts and Magistrates. 

(5) Waiver. The General Assembly may by general law provide 
that the jurisdictional limits may be waived in civil cases. 

(6) Appeals. The General Assembly shall, by general law, pro- 
vide a proper system of appeals: Provided, that appeals from Magis- 
trates shall be heard de novo, with the right of trial by jury as 
defined in this Constitution and the laws of this State. 

Sec. 11. Forms of art ion; rules of procedure. 

(.1) Forms of action. There shall be in this State but one form 
of action for the enforcement or protection of private rights or the 
redress of private wrongs, which shall be denominated a civil 
action, and in which there shall be a right to have issues of fact 
tried before a jury. Every action prosecuted by the people of the 
State as a party against a person charged with a public offense, for 
the punishment of the same, shall be termed a criminal action. 

( i' ) Rules of procedure. The Supreme Court shall have exclusive 
authority to make rules of procedure and practice for the appellate 
division. The General Assembly shall have authority to make rules 
of procedure and practice for the Superior Court and District Court 
divisions, and the General Assembly may delegate this authority to 
the Supreme Court. No rule of procedure or practice shall abridge 
substantive rights or abrogate or limit the right of trial by jury. 
If the General Assembly should delegate to the Supreme Court the 



Constitution 69 

rule-making power, the General Assembly may, nevertheless, alter, 
amend, or repeal any rule of procedure or practice adopted by the 
Supreme Court for the Superior Court or District Court divisions. 

Sec. 12. Waiver of jury trial. In all issues of fact joined in any 
court, the parties in any civil case may waive the right to have the 
same determined by a jury; in which case the finding of the judge 
upon the facts shall have the force and effect of a verdict by a jury. 

Sec. 13. Administration. The General Assembly shall provide 
for an administrative office of the courts to carry out the provisions 
of this Article. 

Sec. 14. Terms of office and election of Justices of the Supreme 
Court, Judges of the Court of Appeals, and Judges of the Superior 
Court. Justices of the Supreme Court, Judges of the Court of 
Appeals, and regular judges of the Superior Court shall be elected 
by the qualified voters and shall hold office for terms of eight 
years and until their successors are elected and qualified. Justices 
of the Supreme Court and judges of the Court of Appeals shall be 
elected by the qualified voters of the State. Regular Judges of the 
Superior Court may be elected by the qualified voters of the State 
or by the voters of their respective districts, as the General As- 
sembly may provide. 

Sec. 15. Removal of judges and clerks. 

(1) Justices of the Supreme Court, Judges of the Court of 
Appeals, and Judges of Superior Court. Any Justice of the Su- 
preme Court, Judge of the Court of Appeals, or Judge of the 
Superior Court may be removed from office for mental or physical 
incapacity by Joint Resolution of two-thirds of both houses of 
the General Assembly. Any Justice or Judge against whom the 
General Assembly may be about to proceed shall receive notice 
thereof, accompanied by a copy of the causes alleged for his re- 
moval, at least twenty days before the day on which either house 
of the General Assembly shall act. thereon. Removal from office 
for any other cause shall be by impeachment. 

(2) District Judges and Magistrates. The General Assembly shall 
provide by general law for the removal of District Judges and 
Magistrates for misconduct or mental or physical incapacity. 

(3) Clerks. Any Clerk of the Superior Court may be removed 



70 Xi'i; "i ii C \i<i'i i \A Mani at. 

from office for misconduct or mental or physical incapacity by the 
senior regular resident Superior Court Judge serving the county. 
Any Clerk against whom proceedings are instituted shall receive 
written notice of the charges against him at least ten days before 
the hearing upon the charges. Clerks of District Courts shall be 
removed for such causes and in such manner as the General Assem- 
bly may provide by general law. Any Clerk so removed from office 
shall be entitled to an appeal as provided by law. 

Sec. Hi. Solicitors and solidtori/il districts. 

i 1 i Solicitors. The General Assembly shall, trout time to time, 
divide the State into a convenient number of solicitorial districts, 
for each of which a Solicitor shall be chosen for a term of four 
years by the qualified voters thereof, as is prescribed for members 
of the General Assembly. When the Attorney General determines 
that there is serious imbalance in the work loads of the Solicitors or 
that there is other good cause, he shall recommend redisricting to 
the General Assembly. The Solicitor shall advise the officers of 
justice in his district, be responsible for the prosecution on behalf 
of the State of all criminal actions in the Superior Courts of his 
district, perform such duties related to appeals therefrom as the 
Attorney General may require, and perform such other duties as the 
Genera] Assembly may prescribe. 

( l' ) Prosecution in District Court division. Criminal actions in 
the District Court division shall be prosecuted in such manner as the 
Genera] Assembly may prescribe by general law uniformly applicable 
in every local court district of the State. 

Sec. 17. Vacancies. Unless otherwise provided in this Article, 
all vacancies occurring in the offices provided for by this Article 
shall be filled by appointment of the Governor, and the appointees 
shall hold their places until the next election for members of the 
General Assembly that is held more than thirty days after such 
vacancy occurs, when elections shall be held to till such offices: 
Provided, that when the unexpired term of any of the offices named 
in this Article of the ('(institution in which such vacancy has occur- 
red, and in which it is herein provided that the Governor -hall till 
the vacancy, expires on the first day of .January succeeding the next 
election for members of the General Assembly, the Governor shall 
appoint to fill that vacancy for the unexpired term of the office. 
If any person elected or appointed to any of said offices shall neglect 



Constitution 71 

and fail to qualify, such office shall be appointed to, held, and tilled 
as provided in case of vacancies occurring therein. All incumbents 
of said offices shall hold until their successors are qualified. 

Sec. 18. Revenues and expenses of the judicial department. The 
General Assembly shall provide for the establishment of a schedule 
of court fees and costs which shall be uniform throughout the State 
within each division of the General Court of Justice. The operating 
expenses of the judicial department, other than compensation to 
process servers and other locally paid non-judicial officers, shall be 
paid from State funds. 

Sec. 19. Fees, salaries, and emoluments. The General Assembly 
shall prescribe and regulate the fees, salaries, and emoluments of 
all officers provided for in this Article; but the salaries of judges 
shall not be diminished during their continuance in office. In no 
rase shall the campensation of any Judge or Magistrate be dependent 
upon his decision or upon the collection of costs. 

Sec. 20. Effect of uniform general law requirement. Where the 
General Assembly is required by the provisions of this Article to 
enact only general laws uniformly applicable throughout the State 
or in every county or local court district thereof, no special, public- 
local, or private law shall be enacted relating to the subject-matter 
of those provisions, and every amendment or repeal of any law 
relating to such subject-matter shall also be general and uniform 
in its application and effect throughout the State. 

Sec. 21. Schedule, immediately upon the certification by the 
Governor to the Secretary of State of the amendments constituting 
this Article, the Supreme Court and the Superior Courts shall be 
incorporated within the General Court of Justice, as provided in 
this Article. All Justices of the Supreme Court and Judges of the 
Superior Court shall continue to serve as such within the General 
Court of Justice for the remainder of their respective terms. 

The statutes and rules governing procedure and practice in the 
Superior Courts and inferior courts, in force at the time the amend- 
ments constituting this Article are ratified by the people, shall 
continue in force until superseded or repealed by rules of procedure 
and practice adopted pursuant to Section 11(2) of this Article. 

Upon certification of the Governor to the Secretary of State of the 
amendments constituting this Article, the General Assembly shall 



72 North Carolina Manuai 

proceed as rapidly as practicable, to provide for the creation of local 
court districts and the establishment of District Courts therein: 
District Courts shall be established to serve every county of the 
State by nol later than January 1, 1971. As of January 1, 1971, all 
previously existing courts inferior to the Superior Court shall cease 
tn exist, and cases pending in these courts shall be transferred as 
provided in the next succeeding paragraph of this Section. Until 
a District Court has been thus established to serve a county, all of 
the courts of that county, including the Superior Court, shall con- 
tinue to be financed and the revenues of these courts shall continue 
to be paid as they were immediately prior to the certification of the 
amendments constituting this Article; and the laws and rules gov- 
erning these courts and appeals from the inferior courts to the 
Superior Court shall continue in force and shall be deemed to comply 
with the provisions of this Article. 

As soon as a District Court shall have been established for a 
county, all of the provisions of this Article shall become fully 
effective with respect to the courts in that county, and all previously 
existing courts inferior to the Superior Court shall cease to exist. 
All cases pending in these inferior courts shall be transferred to the 
appropriate division of the General Court of Justice, and all records 
of these courts shall be transferred to the appropriate Clerk's office 
pursuant to rule of the Supreme Court. Judges of these inferior 
courts, except Mayor's Courts and Justice of the Peace Courts, shall 
become District Judges and shall serve as such for remainders of 
their respective terms. 

As soon as a District Court has been established to serve every 
county of the State, all of the provisions of this Article shall become 
fully effective throughout the State. 

ARTICLE Y 

REVENUE AND TAXAJ tOK 

Section 1. Capitation tax; exemptions. The General Assembly 
may levy a capitation tax on every male inhabitant of the State 
over twenty-one and under fifty years of age, which said tax shall 
not exceed two dollars ($2.00), and cities and towns may levy a 
capitation tax which shall not exceed one dollar ($1.00 i. No other 
capitation tax shall be levied. The commissioners of the several 
counties and of the cities and towns may exempt from the capi- 
tation tax any special cases on account of poverty or infirmity 



Constitution 73 

Sec. 2. Application of proceeds of State and county capitation 
tax. The proceeds of the State and county capitation tax shall be 
applied to the purposes of education and the support of the poor, 
but in no one year shall more than twenty-five per cent (25%) 
thereof be appropriated for the latter purpose. 

Sec. 3. State taxation. The power of taxation shall be exercised 
in a just and equitable manner, for public purposes only, and shall 
never be surrendered, suspended, or contracted away. Only the Gen- 
eral Assembly shall have the power to classify property and other 
subjects for taxation, which power shall be exercised only on a State- 
wide basis. No class or subject shall be taxed except by a uniform 
rule, and every classification shall be uniformly applicable in every 
county, municipality, and other local taxing unit of the State. The 
General Assembly's power to classify shall not be delegated, except 
that the General Assembly may permit the governing boards of 
counties, cities, and towns to classify trades and professions for 
local license tax purposes. The General Assembly may also tax 
trades, professions, franchises, and income: Provided, the rate of 
tax on income shall not in any case exceed ten per cent (10%), and 
there shall be allowed the following exemptions, to be deducted 
from the amount of annual incomes, to-wit: for a married man with 
a wife living with him. or to a widow or widower having minor 
child or children, natural or adopted, not less than two thousand 
dollars ($2,000.00): to all other persons not less than one thou- 
sand dollars ($1,000.00), and there may be allowed other deduc- 
tions (not including living expenses) so that only net incomes 
are taxed 

Sec. 4. Limitations upon the increase of public debts. The 
General Assembly shall have the power to contract debts and to 
pledge the faith and credit of the State and to authorize counties 
and municipalities to contract debts and pledge their faith and 
credit for the following purposes: To fund or refund a valid 
existing debt ; to borrow in anticipation of the collection of taxes 
due and payable within the fiscal year to an amount not exceeding 
fifty per centum of such taxes; to supply a casual deficit; to sup- 
press riots or insurrections, or to repel invasions. For any pur- 
pose other than these enumerated, the General Assembly shall 
have no power, during any biennium. to contract new debts on 
behalf of the State to an amount in excess of two-thirds of the 



74 North Carolina Manual 

amount by which the State's outstanding indebtedness shall have 
been reduced during the next preceding biennium, unless the sub- 
ject be submitted to a vote of the people of the State; and for any 
purpose other than these enumerated the General Assembly shall 
have no power to authorize counties or municipalities to contract 
debts, and counties and municipalities shall not contract debts, 
during any fiscal year, to an amount exceeding two-thirds of the 
amounl by which the outstanding indebtedness of the particular 
county or municipality shall have been reduced during the next 
preceding fiscal year, unless the subject be submitted to a vote 
of the people of the particular county or municipality. In any 
election held in the State or in any county or municipality under 
the provisions of this Section, the proposed indebtedness must 
be approved by a majority of those who shall vote thereon. And 
the General Assembly shall have no power to give or lend the credit 
of the State in aid of any person, association, or corporation except 
to aid in the completion of such railroads as may be unfinished at 
the time of the adoption of this Constitution, or in which the State 
lias a direct pecuniary interest, unless the subject be submitted 
to a direct vote of the people of the State, and be approved by a 
majority of those who shall vote thereon. 

Sec. 5. Property exempt from taxation. Property belonging to the 
State, counties and municipal corporations shall be exempt from 
taxation. The General Assembly may exempt cemeteries and 
property held for educational, scientific, literary, cultural, charitable. 
or religious purposes, and, to a value not exceeding Three hundred 
dollars ($300.00), any personal property. The General Assembly 
may exempt from taxation not exceeeding one thousand dollars 
($1,000.00) in value of property held and used as the place of resi- 
dence of the owner. Every exemption shall be on a State-wide 
basis and shall be uniformly applicable in every county, municipality, 
and other local taxing unit of the State. No taxing authority other 
than the General Assembly may grant exemptions, and the General 
Assembly shall not delegate the powers accorded to it by this 
Section. 

Sec. ti. Taxes levied for counties. The total of the State and 
county tax on property shall not exceed twenty cents i20c) on 
the one hundred dollars ($100.00) value of property, except when 
the county property tax is levied for a special purpose and with 



Constitution 75 

the special approval of the General Assembly, which may be done 
by special or general act: Provided, this limitation shall not apply 
to taxes levied for the maintenance of the public schools of the 
State for the term required by Article IX, Section 3, of the Con- 
stitution: Provided, further, the State tax shall not exceed five 
cents (5ci on the one hundred dollars ($100.00) value of property. 

Sec. 7. Acts levying taxes shall state objects, etc. Every act of 
the General Assembly levying a tax shall state the special object 
to which ir is to be applied, and it shall be applied to no other 
purpose. 

ARTICLE VI 

SUFFRAGE AND ELIGIBILITY TO OFFICE 

Section. ] . Who may vote. Every person born in the United 
States, and every person who has been naturalized, twenty-one 
years of age. and possessing the qualifications set out in this Article, 
shall be entitled to vote at any election by the people of the State, 
except as herein otherwise provided. 

Sec. 2. Qualifications of voter. Any person who shall have re- 
sided in the State of North Carolina for one year, and in the 
precinct, ward or other election district in which such person offers 
to vote for thirty days next preceding an election, and possessing 
the other qualifications set out in this Article, shall be entitled to 
vote at any election held in this State; provided, that removal from 
one precinct, ward or other election district to another in this 
State shall not operate to deprive any person of the right to vote 
in the precinct, ward or other election district from which such 
person has removed until thirty days after such removal. No 
person who has been convicted, or who has confessed his guilt in 
open court upon indictment, of any crime the punishment of which 
now is, or may hereafter be, imprisonment in the State's Prison, 
shall be permitted to vote unless the said person shall be first 
restored to citizenship in the manner prescribed by law. 

The General Assembly may, however, reduce the time of residence, 
preceding a Presidential Election, for a person possessing all other 
qualifications of a voter, in which such person shall be entitled to 
vote for the choice of electors for President and Vice President of 
the United States only. Any person eligible to vote for electors for 
President and Vice President of the United States by reason of a 



7t» North Carolina Manual 

reduction in time of residence shall not thereby become eligible to 
hold office in this State. 

Sec 3. Voters to be registered. Every person offering to vote 
shall be at the time a legally registered voter as herein prescribed, 
and in the manner hereafter provided by law. and the General 
Assemblj of North Carolina shall enact general registration laws 
to cany into effect the provisions of this Article. 

Sec. 4. Qualification tor registration. Every person presenting 
himself for registration shall be able to read and write any section 
of the Constitution in the English language. But no male person 
who was. on January 1, 1867, or at any time prior thereto, entitled 
to vote under the laws of any State in the United States wmerein 
he then resided, and no lineal descendent of any such person, shall 
be denied the right to register and vote at any election in this 
State by reason of his failure to possess the educational qualifica- 
tions herein prescribed: Provided, he shall have registered in ac- 
cordance with the terms of this Section prior to December 1. 1908. 
The General Assembly shall provide for the registration of all 
persons entitled to vote without the educational qualifications 
herein prescribed, and shall, on or before November 1, 1908. pro- 
vide for the making of a permanent record of such registration, 
and all persons so registered shall forever thereafter have the 
right to vote in all elections by the people in this State, unless 
disqualified under Section 2 of this Article. 

Sec. 5. Indivisible plan; legislative intent. That this amendment 
to the Constitution is presented and adopted as one indivisible 
plan for the regulation of the suffrage, with the intent and pur- 
pose to so connect the different parts, and make them so depend- 
ent upon each other, that the whole shall stand or fall together. 

Sec. 6. Elections by people and (General Assembly. All elections 
by the people shall be by ballot, and all elections by the General 
Assembly shall be viva voce. 

Sec. 7. Eligibility to offiee; official oath. Every voter in North 
Carolina except as in this Article disqualified, shall be eligible to 
office, but before entering upon the duties of the office, he shall 
take and subscribe the following oath: 

"I» , do solemnly swear tor affirm) that I 

will support and maintain the Constitution and laws of the United 



Constitution 77 

States, and the Constitution and laws of North Carolina not in- 
consistent therewith, and that I will faithfully discharge the duties 
of my office as .... So help me, God." 

Sec. 8. Disqualification for office. The following classes of per- 
sons shall be disqualified for office: First, all persons who shall 
deny the being of Almighty God. Second, all persons who shall 
have been convicted or confessed their guilt on indictment pend- 
ing, and whether sentenced or not, or under judgment suspended, 
of any treason or felony, or of any other crime for which the 
punishment may be imprisonment in the penitentiary, since be- 
coming citizens of the United States, or of corruption or mal- 
practice in office, unless such person shall be restored to the rights 
of citizenship in a manner prescribed by law. 

Sec. 9. When this chapter ope rat ire. That this amendment to 
the Constitution shall go into effect on the first day of July, nine- 
teen hundred and two, if a majority of votes cast at the next general 
election shall be cast in favor of this suffrage amendment. 

ARTICLE VII 

U UNICIPAL CORPORATIONS 

Section 1. County officers. In each county there shall be elected 
biennially by the qualified voters thereof, as provided for the elec- 
tion of members of the General Assembly, the following officers: 
A treasurer, register of deeds, surveyor, and five commissioners. 
(Under authority of the Public Laws of 1935, c. 362, s. 1, pro- 
vision was made for the quadrennial election of registers of deeds, 
certain counties being exempted.) 

Sec. 2. Duty of county commissioners. It shall be the duty of 
the commissioners to exercise a general supervision and control 
of the penal and charitable institutions, schools, roads, bridges, 
levying of taxes, and finances of the county, as may be prescribed 
by law. The register of deeds shall be ex officio clerk of the board 
of commissioners. 

Sec. 3. Counties to be divided into districts. It shall be the duty 
of the commissioners first elected in each county to divide the same 
into convenient districts, to determine the boundaries and prescribe 



78 North Carolina Manual 

the name of the said districts, and to report t lie same 10 the General 
Assembly before the first day of January. 1869. 

Sec I. Townships have corporate powers. Upon the approval 
«)l Lhe reports provided lor in the foregoing section by the Gen- 
eral Assembly, the said districts shall have corporate powers for 
the necessary purposes of local government, and shall be known 
as townships. 

Sec. •",. Sheriffs. In each county a Sheriff shall be elected by the 
qualified voters thereof as is prescribed for members of the General 
Assembly, and shall hold his office for a period of four years. In 
case of a vacancy existing for any cause in any Sheriff's office, the 
governing authority of the county shall fill such vacancy by appoint- 
ment for the unexpired term. 

Sec. (3. Xo debt or loan except by a majority of voters. No 
county, city. town, or other municipal corporation shall contract 
any debt, pledge its faith or loan its credit, nor shall any tax be 
levied or collected by any officers of the same except for the necessary- 
expenses thereof, unless approved by a majority of those who shall 
vote thereon in any election held for such purpose. 

Sec. 7. No money drawn except by lair. No money shall be 
drawn from any county or township treasury, except by authority 
of law. 

Sec. 8. Charters to remain in force until legally changed. All 
charters, ordinances, and provisions relating to municipal corpora- 
tions shall remain in force until legally changed, unless inconsistent 
with the provisions of this Constitution. 

Sec ft. Debts in aid of the rebellion not to be paid. No county, 
city. town, or other municipal corporation shall assume or pay. 
nor shall any tax be levied or collected for the payment of any 
debt, or the interest upon any debt, contracted directly or indirectly 
in aid or support of the rebellion. 

Sec. 10. Powers of General Assembly over municipal corporations 
The General Assembly shall have full power by statute to modify, 
change, or abrogate any and all of the provisions of this Article. 
and substitute others in their place, except Sections 5. 6. 7. and 9. 



Constitution 79 

ARTICLE VI 11 

CORPORATIONS OTFrER THAN MUNICIPAL 

Section 1 Corporations under general laws. No corporation 
shall be created, nor shall its charter be extended, altered, or 
amended by special act. except corporations for charitable, educa 
tional. penal, or reformatory purposes that are to be and remain 
under the patronage and control of the State; but the General 
Assembly shall provide by general laws for the chartering and 
organization of all corporations, and for amending, extending, and 
forfeiture of all charters, except those above permitted by special 
act. All such general laws and special acts may be altered from 
time to time or repealed: and the General Assembly may at any 
time by special act repeal the charter of any corporation. 

Sec. 2. Debts of corporation*, horn .secured. Dues from corpora- 
tions shall be secured by such individual liabilities of the corpora- 
tions, and other means, as may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 3. What corporations shall include. The term "corporation" 
as used in this Article, shall be construed to include all associa- 
tions and joint-stock companies having any of the powers and 
privileges of corporations not possessed by individuals or part- 
nerships. And all corporations shall have the right to sue, and 
shall be subject to be sued, in all courts, in like cases as natural 
persons. 

Sec. 4. Legislature to provide for organizing cities, towns, etc. 
It shall be the duty of the Legislature to provide by general laws 
for the organization of cities, towns, and incorporated villages, 
and to restrict their power of taxation, assessment, borrowing 
money, contracting debts, and loaning their credit, so as to prevent 
abuses in assessment and in contracting debts by such municipal 
corporations 

ARTICLE IX 

KIH'CATION 

Section 1. Education shall he encouraged. Religion, morality, 
and knowledge being necessary to good government and the happi 
uess of mankind, schools and the means of education shall forever 
be encouraged 



SO \<>ii i ii Caw)1 in a Mam \i 

Sec. 2. General Assembly shall provide for schools; separation 
ni the races. The General Assembly, at its tirst session under this 
Constitution, shall provide by taxation and otherwise for a general 
and uniform system of public schools, wherein tuition shall be 
tree of charge to all the children of the State between the ages of 
six and twenty-one years. And the children of the white race and 
the children of the colored race shall be taught in separate public 
schools; but there shall be no discrimination in favor of, or to the 
prejudice of. either race. 

Sec :;. enmities to he divided into districts. Each county of the 
Stale shall be divided into a convenient number of districts, in 
which one or more public schools shall be maintained at least six 
months in every year; and if the commissioners of any county 
shall fail to comply with the aforesaid requirements of this Sec- 
i ion. they shall be liable to indictment. 

Sec. 4. What property derated to educational purposes. The 
proceeds of all lands that have been or hereafter may be granted 
by the Tinted States to this State, and not otherwise appropriated 
by this State or the United States; also all moneys, stocks, bonds, 
and other property now belonging to any State fund for purposes 
of education; also the net proceeds of all sales of the swamp lands 
belonging to the State, and all other grants, gifts or devices that 
have been or hereafter may be made to the State, and not other- 
wise appropriated by the State, or by the terms of the grant, gift 
or devise, shall be paid into the State Treasury, and. together with 
so much of the ordinary revenue of the State as may be by law 
set apart for that purpose, shall be faithfully appropriated for 
establishing and maintaining in this State a system of free public 
schools, and for no other uses or purposes whatsoever. 

Sec. 5. ('mint ii school fund: proviso. All moneys, stocks, bonds, 
and other property belonging to a county school fund: also the 
net proceeds from the sale of estrays; also the clear proceeds of 
all penalties and forfeitures and of all tines collected in the several 
counties for any breach of the penal or military laws of the State; 
and all moneys which shall be paid by persons as an equivalent for 
exemption from military duty shall belong to and remain in the 
several counties, and shall be faithfully appropriated for estab- 
lishing and maintaining free public schools in the several coun- 



Constitution gl 

ties of this State: Provided, that the amount collected in each 
county shall be annually reported to the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction. 

Sec. 6. Election of trustees, and provisions for maintenance, of 
the University. The General Assembly shall have power to pro- 
vide for the election of trustees of the University of North Caro- 
lina, in whom, when chosen, shall be vested all the privileges, 
rights, franchises and endowments thereof in any wise granted to 
or conferred upon the trustees of said University; and the Gen- 
eral Assembly may make such provisions, laws, and regulations 
from time to time, as may be necessary and expedient for the 
maintenance and management of said University. 

Sec. 7. Benefits of the University. The General Assembly shall 
provide that the benefits of the University, as far as practicable, 
be extended to the youth of the State free of expense for tuition; 
also, that all the property which has heretofore accrued to the 
State, or shall hereafter accrue, from escheats, unclaimed dividends, 
or distributive shares of the estates of deceased persons, shall be 
appropriated to the use of the University. 

Sec. 8. State Board of Education. The general supervision and 
administration of the free public school system, and of the edu- 
cational funds provided for the support thereof, except those 
mentioned in Section five of this Article, shall, from and after 
the first day of April, one thousand nine hundred and forty-five, 
be vested in the State Board of Education to consist of the Lieu- 
tenant-Governor, State Treasurer, the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, and ten members to be appointed by the Governor, 
subject to confirmation by the General Assembly in Joint Session. 
The General Assembly shall divide the State into eight educational 
districts, which may be altered from time to time by the General 
Assembly. Of the appointive members of the State Board of Edu- 
cation, one shall be appointed from each of the eight educational 
districts, and two shall be appointed as members at large. The first 
appointments under this Section shall be: Two members appointed 
from educational districts for terms of two years; two members 
appointed from educational districts for terms of four years; two 
members appointed from educational districts for terms of six 
years; and two members appointed from educational districts for 
terms of eight years. One member at large shall be appointed 



V- North Carolina Manual 

for a period of lour years and one member at large shall be 
appointed lor a period of eight years. All subsequent appointments 
shall be for terms of eighl years. Any appointments to fill vacan- 
cies shall be made by the Governor for the unexpired term, which 
appointments shall not he subject to confirmation. The State Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction shall be the administrative head 
 if the public school system and shall be secretary of the Board. 
The Board shall elect a chairman and vice-chairman. A majority 
of the Board shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of busi- 
ng s. The iter diem and expenses of the appointive members shall 
he provided by the General Assembly. 

Sec. «). Poiios and duties of the Board. The State Board of 
Education shall succeed to all the powers and trusts of the Presi- 
dent and Directors of The Literary Fund of North Carolina and 
the State Board of Education as heretofore constituted. The State 
Board of Education shall have power to divide the State into a 
convenient number of school districts; to regulate the grade, salary 
and qualifications of teachers, to provide for the selection and 
adoption of the textbooks to be used in the public schools; to ap- 
portion and equalize the public school funds over the State; 
and generally to supervise and administer the free public school 
system of the State and to make all needful rules and regulations 
in relation thereto. All the powers enumerated in this Section shall 
be exercised in conformity with this Constitution and subject to 
such laws as may be enacted from time to time by the General 
Assembly. 

Sec. 10 Agricultural department. As soon as practicable after 
the adoption of this Constitution, the General Assembly shall 
establish and maintain, in connection with the University, a de- 
partment of agriculture, of mechanics, of mining, and of normal 
instruction. 

Sec. 11. Children must attend school The General Assembly is 
hereby empowered to enact that every child, of sufficient mental 
and physical ability, shall attend the public schools during the 
period between the ages of six and eighteen years, for a term of 
not less than sixteen months, unless educated by other means. 

Sec. 12. Education expense grants and local option. Notwith- 
standing any other provision of this Constitution, the General 



Constitution 33 

Assembly may provide for payment of education expense grants 
from any State or local public funds for the private education of 
any child for whom no public school is available or for the private 
education of a child who is assigned against the wishes of his 
parent, or the person having control of such child, to a public 
school attended by a child of another race. A grant shall be avail- 
able only for education in a nonsectarian school, and in the case 
of a child assigned to a public school attended by a child of another 
race, a grant shall, in addition, be available only when it is not 
reasonable and practicable to reassign such child to a public school 
not attended by a child of another race. 

Notwithstanding any other provision of this Constitution, the 
General Assembly may provide for a uniform system of local option 
whereby any local option unit, as defined by the General Assembly, 
may choose by a majority vote of the qualified voters in the unit 
who vote on the question to suspend or to authorize the suspension 
of the operation of one or more or all of the public schools in that 
unit. 

No action taken pursuant to the authority of this Section shall 
in any manner affect the obligation of the State or any political 
subdivision or agency thereof with respect to any indebtedness 
heretofore or hereafter created. 



ARTICLE N 

HOMESTEADS AND EXEMPTIONS 

Section 1. Exemptions of personal property. The personal prop 
erty of any resident of this State, to the value of five hundred 
dollars (,$500.00), to be selected by such resident, shall be and is 
hereby exempted from sale under execution or other final process 
of any court, issued for the collection of any debt. 

Sec. 2. Homestead. Every homestead, and the dwellings and 
buildings used therewith, not exceeding in value one thousand 
dollars ($1,000.00), to be selected by the owner thereof, or in lieu 
thereof, at the option of the owner, any lot in a city, town or vil- 
lage with the dwellings and buildings used thereon, owned and 
occupied by any resident of this State, and not exceeding the value 
of one thousand dollars ($1,000.00), shall be exempt from sale 
under execution or other final process obtained on any debt. But 



M North Carolina Mancai 

mi property shall be exempt from sale for taxes, or for payment 
of obligations contracted for the purchase of said premises. 

Sec. ::. Homestead exemption from debt. The homestead, after 
the death of the owner thereof, shall be exempt from the payment 
of any debt during the minority of his children, or any of them. 

Sec. 1. Laborer's lien. The provisions of Sections one and two 
of this Article shall not be so construed as to prevent a laborer's 
lien for work done and performed for the person claiming such 
exemption, or a mechanic's lien for work done on the premises. 

Sec. ."). Benefit of widow. If the owner of a homestead die. 
leaving a widow but no children, the same shall be exempt from 
the debts of her husband, and the rents and profits thereof shall 
inure to her benefit during her widowhood, unless she be the owner 
of a homestead in her own right. 

Sec. 6. Property of married women secured to them. The real 
and personal property of any female in this State acquired before 
marriage, and all property, real and personal, to which she may, 
after marriage, become in any manner entitled, shall be and remain 
the sole and separate estate and property of such female, and shall 
not be liable for any debts, obligations or engagements of her 
husband, and may be devised and bequeathed and conveyed by her 
subject to such regulations and limitations as the General Assembly 
may prescribe. Every married woman may exercise powers of 
attorney conferred upon her by her husband, including the power 
to execute and acknowledge deeds to property owned by herself 
and her husband or by her husband. 

S.c. 7. Husband may insure Jiis life for the benefit of wife and 
children. The husband may insure his own life for the sole use 
and benefit of his wife and children, and in case of the death 
of the husband the amount thus insured shall be paid over to the 
wife and children, or to the guardian, if under age. for her or 
their own use. free from all claims of the representatives of her 
husband, or any of his creditors. And the policy shall not be sub- 
ject to claims of creditors of the insured during the life of the 
insured, if the insurance issued is for the sole use and benefit of 
the wife and/or children. 

Sec 8, How deed for homestead may be made. Nothing con- 



Constitution 8"> 

tained in the foregoing Sections of this Article shall operate to 
prevent the owner of a homestead from disposing of the same by 
deed; but no deed made by the owner of a homestead shall be 
valid without the signature and acknowledgement of his wife. 

ARTICLE XI 

PUNISHMENTS, PENAL INSTITUTIONS, AND PUBLIC CHABITIES 

Section 1. Punishments ; convict labor; proviso. The following 
punishments only shall be known to the laws of this State, viz.: 
death, imprisonment with or without hard labor, fines, removal 
from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of 
honor, trust, or profit under this State. The foregoing provision 
for imprisonment with hard labor shall be construed to authorize 
the employment of such convict labor on public works or high- 
ways, or other labor for public benefit, and the farming out there- 
of, where and in such manner as may be provided by law; but 
no convict shall be farmed out who has been sentenced on a 
charge of murder, manslaughter, rape, attempt to commit rape, 
or arson: Provided, that no convict whose labor may be farmed 
out shall be punished for any failure of duty as a laborer, except 
by a responsible officer of the State; but the convicts so farmed 
out shall be at times under the supervision and control, as to 
their government and discipline, of the penitentiary board or some 
officer of this State. 

Sec. 2. Death punishment. The object of punishments being not 
only to satisfy justice, but also to reform the offender, and thus 
prevent crime, murder, arson, burglary, and rape, and these only, 
may be punishable with death if the General Assembly shall so 
enact. 

Sec. 3. Penitentiary. The General Assembly shall, at its first 
meeting, make provision for the erection and conduct of a State's 
prison or penitentiary at some central and accessible point within 
the State. 

Sec. 4. Houses ul correction. The General Assembly may pro- 
vide for the erection of houses of correction, where vagrants and 
persons guilty of misdemeanors shall be restrained and usefully 
employed. 

Sec, 5. Houses ol refuae. A house or houses of refuge may b< 



m; Xm; in Carolina M \ \r ai. 

established whenever the public interests may require it. for the 
correction and instruction of other classes of offenders 

Sec. 6. The sexes arc to be separated. It shall lie required, by 
competent legislation, thai the structure and superintendence of 
penal institutions of the State, the county jails, and city police 
prisons secure the health and comfort of the prisoners and that 
male and female prisoners be never confined in the same room or 
cell. 

Sec. 7. Provision for the poor ami orphans. Beneficent provi- 
sions for the poor, the unfortunate and orphan, being one of the 
first duties of a civilized and Christian slate, the General Assem- 
bly shall, at its first Session, appoint and define the duties of a 
Hoard of Public Charities, to whom shall be entrusted the super- 
vision of all charitable and penal State institutions, and who shall 
annually report to the Governor upon their condition, with sug- 
gestions for their improvement. 

Sec. 8. Orphan houses. There shall also, as soon as practicable, 
be measures devised by the State for the establishment of one 
or more orphan houses, where destitute orphans may lie cared for, 
educated, and taught some business or trade. 

Sec. 9. Inebriates and idiots. It shall be the duty of the legis- 
lature, as soon as practicable, to devise means for The education 
of idiots and inebriates. 

Sec. 10. Deaf-mutes, blind, and insane. The General Assembly 
may approve that the indigent deaf-mute, blind, and insane of the 
State shall be cared for at the charge of the State. 

Sec. 11. Self-supporting. It shall be steadily kept in view by 
the Legislature and the Board of Public Charities that all penal 
and charitable institutions should be made as nearly self-support ina 
is is consistent with the purposes of rheir creation. 

ARTICLE XII 

\ijj u j v 

Section 1. Who are liable to militia duty. All able-bodied male 
citizens of the State of North Carolina, between the ages of 
twenty-one and forty years, who are citizens of the United States, 
shall be liable to duty in the militia: Provided, that all persons 



CONSTITUTION 87 

who may be averse to bearing arms, from religious scruples, shall 
be exempt therefrom. 

Sec. 2. Organizing, etc. The General Assembly shall provide for 
the organizing, arming, equipping, and discipline of the militia, and 
for paying the same, when called into active service. 

Sec. 3. Governor commander-in-chief. The Governor -hall be 
commander-in-chief, and shall have power to call out the militia to 
execute the law, suppress riots or insurrections, and to reppl inva- 
sion. 

Sec. 4. Exemptions. The General Assembly shall have puvver to 
make such exemptions as may be deemed necessary, and to enact 
laws that may be expedient for the government of the militia. 

ARTICLE XIII 

AMENDMENTS 

Section 1. Convention, hoic called. No convention of the people 
of this State shall ever be called by the General Assembly unless 
by the concurrence of two-thirds of all of the members of each 
liouse of the General Assembly, and except the proposition, con- 
vention or no convention, be first submitted to the qualified voters 
of the whole State, at the next general election, in a manner to 
be prescribed by law. And should a majority of the votes cast be 
in favor of said convention, it shall assemble on such day i- may 
be prescribed by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 2. How the Constitution may oe altered. No part of the 
Constitution of this State shall be altered unless a bill to alter 
the same shall have been agreed to by three-fifths of each house 
of the General Assembly. And the amendment or amendments so 
agreed to shall be submitted at the next general election to the 
qualified voters of the whole State, in such manner as may be 
prescribed by law. And in the event of their adoption by a majority 
of the votes cast, such amendment or amendments shall become a 
part of the Constitution of this State. 

ARTICLE XIV 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Section 1. Indictments. All indictments which shall have been 
found or may hereafter be found for any crime or offense com- 



SS \'<>i: in (' VROLINA Mam \i 

milted before this Constitution lakes effect, may be proceeded upuii 
in Uk> proper courts, but no punishment shall be inflicted which is 
forbidden by this Constitution 

Sec. 2. Penalty for fighting duel. No person who shall hereafter 
fighl a duel, or assist in the same as a second, or send, accept, or 
knowingly carry a challenge therefor, or agree to go out of the 
Stale to fighl a duel, shall hold any office in this State. 

Sec. :',. Drawing money. No money shall he drawn from the 
Treasurer but in consequence of appropriations made by law; and 
an accurate account of the receipts and expenditures of the public 
money shall he annually published. 

Sec. 4. Mechanic's lien. The General Assembly shall provide, by 
proper legislation, for giving to mechanics and laborers an ade- 
quate lien on the subject matter of their labor. 

Sec. 5. Governor to make appointments. In the absence of any 
contrary provision, all officers of this State, whether heretofore 
elected or appointed by the Governor, shall hold their positions 
only until other appointments are made by the Governor, or, if 
the officers are elective, until their successors shall have been 
chosen and duly qualified according to the provisions of this Con- 
stitution. 

Sec. 6. Heat of Government. The permanent seat of Government 
in this State shall be at the City of Raleigh. 

Sec. 7. hunt office-holding. No person who shall hold any office 
or place of trust or profit under the United States or any depart- 
ment thereof, or under this State, or under any other state or gov- 
enment. shall hold or exercise any other office or place of trust or 
profit under the authority of this State, or he eligible to a seat in 
either house of the General Assembly: Provided, that nothing 
herein contained shall extend to officers in the militia, notaries 
public, commissioners of public charities, or commissioners for 
special purposes. 

Sec. b. Intermarriage of whites and Negroes prohibited. All 
marriages between a white person and a Negro, or between a 
white person and a person of Negro descent to the third generation, 
inclusive, are hereby forever prohibited. 




i  f4 ■-' • 

\ choWan 1 r 1 * 

" v 




THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

I believe in the United States of America, as a government of 
the people., by the people, for the people; whose just powers are 
derived from the consent of the governed; a democracy in a re- 
public; a sovereign nation of many sovereign states; a perfect 
union, one and inseparable; established upon those principles of 
freedom, equality, justice and humanity for which American 
patriots sacrificed their lives and fortunes. I therefore believe it 
is my duty to my country to love it, to support its constitution, 
to obey its laws, to respect its flag, and to defend it against all 
enemies, 

(The American's Creed by William Tyler Page was adopted by 
an act of Congress, April 6. 1918.) 

THE AMERICAN FLAG, IT'S ORIGIN 

In 1775, the Philadelphia Troop of Light Horse carried a stand- 
ard with thirteen alternate blue and silver stripes in the upper 
left-hand corner. At Cambridge on January 2, 1776, Washington 
without authorization of the Continental Congress raised a flag 
consisting of thirteen alternate white and red stripes with the 
crosses of St. George and St. Andrew in a blue field in the upper 
left-hand corner. It was called the "Union Flag," "Grand Union 
Flag," and the "Continental Flag," and was employed until dis- 
placed by the Stars and Stripes adopted by the Continental Con- 
gress. 

The beautiful tradition that Betsy Ross, as early as June 1776, 
made a Stars and Stripes flag from a pencil sketch supplied by 
Washington but changed the points of the stars from six to five, 
has become a classic. Historians doubt its accuracy. Half a dozen 
localities claim to have been the place where the Stars and Stripes 
was first used. Within New York State such contention has been 
for Fort Ann on July 8, Fort Stanwix on August 3, Bennington 
on August 13, and Saratoga on September 19, 1777. The flag with 
thirteen stripes and thirteen stars, authorized on June 14, 1777, 
continued to be used as the national emblem until Congress passed 
the following act, which President Washington signed: 

"That from and after May 1, 1795, the flag of the United States 
be fifteen stripes, alternate red and white; and that the union be 
fifteen stars, white in a blue field." 

91 



92 North Carolina Manual 

This action was necessitated by the admission of the States of 
Vermont and Kentucky to the Union. 

The flag of 1795 had the stars arranged in three rows of live 
each instead of in a circle, and served for 2 3 years. 

With the admission of more new states, however, it became 
apparent that the 1795 Hag would have to be further modified; 
hence in 1818 a law was passed by Congress providing: 

•'That from and after the fourth day of July next, the Hag 
of the United States be thirteen horizontal stripes, alternate red 
and white; that the union have twenty stars, white in a blue field. 

"That on the admission of every new state into the Union, one 
star be added to the union of the Hag; and that such addition 
shall take effect on the Fourth of July next succeeding such 
admission." 

Since 1818 additional stars have been added until today there 
are 50 on the flag. No law has been passed to designate how the 
stars shall be arranged. At one time they formed a design of a 
larger star. Now they form five rows of six stars each and four 
rows of five stars each. 

Betsy Ross, it is now said, lived at 233 Arch Street, Philadel- 
phia, and not at 239. She made flags, but says Theodore D. Gott- 
lieb, she never made the first Stars and Stripes. He adds: "The 
Department of State, the War and Navy departments, the Histori- 
cal Sites Commission of Philadelphia and other official bodies 
repudiate the legend. The book and pamphlet material available 
is overwhelmingly against the legend. 

"The story arose for the first time on March 14, 1870, when 
William J. Canby read a paper before the Pennsylvania Historical 
Society in which he states that in 183 6, when his grandmother, 
Betsy Ross, was 8 4 years old and he was 11, she told him the 
story. He apparently thought little of it because nothing was done 
until 1857, when at the suggestion of his Aunt Clarissa, oldest 
daughter of Betsy, he wrote out the notes as he remembered the 
conversation. 

"Nothing further was done until 1870 when he wrote his paper. 
The Historical Society of Pennsylvania thought so little of the 
paper it neither catalogued nor kept a copy of it. Even George 
Canby, younger brother of William, disputed several points in the 
paper. 



The Am erica n Flag 93 

"The legend grew to strength from 1888 to 1893 when pro- 
motors secured an option on the so-called Flag House. 

"Modern historical researchers are giving much thought to 
Francis Hopkinson of New Jersey as the possible designer and 
the Fillmore or Bennington flag as the first flag." 

The Proper Display of the American Flag 

(The United States Code, 1958) 
(Chapter 10, Sections 171-172, 174-178) 

Sec. 171. When the national anthem is played and the flag is 
not displayed, all present should stand and face toward the music. 
Those in uniform should salute at the first note of the anthem, 
retaining this position until the last note. All others should stand 
at attention, men removing the headdress. When the flag is dis- 
played, all present should face the flag and salute. 

Sec. 17 2. The following is designated as the pledge of allegiance 
to the flag: "I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States 
of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation, 
under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.*' Such 
pledge should be rendered by standing w T ith the right hand over 
the heart. However, civilians will always show full respect to the 
flag when the pledge is given by merely standing at attention, 
men removing the headdress. Persons in uniform shall render 
the military salute. 

Sec. 174. (a) It is the universal custom to display the flag only 
from sunrise to sunset on buildings and on stationary flagstaffs in 
the open. However, the flag may be displayed at night upon 
special occasions when it is desired to produce a patriotic effect. 

(b) The flag should be hoisted briskly and lowered ceremon- 
iously. 

(c) The flag should not be displayed on days when the weather 
is inclement. 

(d) The flag should be displayed on all days when the 
weather permits, especially on New Year's Day, January 1; 
Inauguration Day, Jan. 20; Lincoln's Birthday, February 12; 
Washington's Birthday, February 22; Army Day, April 6; Easter 
Sunday (variable); Mother's Day, second Sunday in May; .Me- 



'.' I North C u:"i i n \ Maxuai 

morial Day (half staff until noon), May 30; Flag Day, June 14: 
Independence Day, July 4; Labor Day, first Monday in September: 
Constitution Day, September 17; Columbus Day, October 12; 
Navy Day, October 27; Veteran's Day, November 11; Thanks 
giving Day. fourth Thursday in November; Christmas Day, Decem- 
ber 25; such other days as may be proclaimed by the President 
of the United States; the birthdays of States (dates of admission) ; 
and on State holidays. 

(e) The flag should be displayed daily, weather permitting, 
on or near the main administration building of every public in- 
stitution, 

(f) The flag should be displayed in or near every polling plac* 
on election days. 

(g) The flag should be displayed during school days in or 
near every schoolhouse. 

Sec. 17 5. The flag, when carried in a procession with another 
flag or flags, should be either on the marching right; that is. 
the flag's own right, or, if there is a line of other flags, in front 
of the center of that line. 

(a) The flag should not be displayed on a float in a parade 
except from a staff, or as provided in subsection (i) of this 
section. 

(b) The flag should not be draped over the hood, top, sides. 
or back of a vehicle or of a railroad train or a boat. When the 
flag is displayed on a motorcar, the staff shall be fixed firmly to 
the chassis or clamped to the radiator cap. 

(c) No other flag or pennant should be placed above or, if 
on the same level, to the right of the flag of the United States 
of America, except during church services conducted by naval 
chaplains at sea, when the church pennant may be flown above 
the flag during the church services for the personnel of the Navy. 

No person shall display the flag of the United Nations or any 
other national or international flag equal, above or in a position 
of superior prominence or honor to or in place of, the flag of the 
United States at any place within the United States or any Terri- 
tory or possession thereof: Provided. That nothing in this section 
shall make unlawful the continuance of the practice heretofore 
followed of displaying the flag of the United Nations in a posi- 



The Americas Fia« 9;'. 

Lion of superior prominence or honor, aiul other national Hag? 
in positions of equal prominence or honor, with that of the flap 
of the United States at the Headquarters of the United Nations. 

(d I The flag of the United States of America, when it is dis 
played with another flag against a wall from crossed staffs, 
should be on the right, the flag's own right, and its staff should 
be in front of the staff of the other flag. 

(e) The flag of the United States of America should be at the 
center and at the highest point of the group when a number of 
flags of States or localities or pennants of societies are grouped 
and displayed from staffs. 

(f) When flags of States, cities, or localities, or pennants of 
societies are found on the same halyard with the flag of the 
United States, the latter should always be at the peak. When 
the flags are flown from adjacent staffs, the flag of the United 
States should be hoisted first and lowered last. No such flag 
or pennant may be placed above the flag of the United States 
or to the right of the flag of the United States. 

(g) When flags of two or more nations are displayed, they are 
to be flown from separate staffs of the same height. The flags 
should be of approximately equal size. International usage forbids 
the display of the flag of one nation above that of another nation 
in time of peace. 

(h) When the flag of the United States is displayed from a 
staff projecting horizontally or at an angle from the window 
sill, balcony, or front of a building, the union of the flag should 
be placed at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half staff. 
When the flag is suspended over a sidewalk from a rope extending 
from a house to a pole at the edge of the sidewalk, the flag should 
be hoisted out, union first, from the building. 

(i.i When the flag is displayed otherwise than by being flown 
from a staff., it should be displayed flat, whether indoors or out. 
or so suspended that its folds fall as free as though the flag were 
staffed 

(j) When the flag is displayed over the middle of the street, 
it should be suspended vertically with the union to the north in 
an east and west street or to the east in the north and south street. 



!lfi N'llK III ( ' Mini I \ \ M S \ I M 

(k) When used on a speaker's platform, the flag, if displayed 
flat, should be displayed above and behind ihe speaker. When 
displayed from a staff in a church or public auditorium, if it 
is displayed in the chancel of a church, or on the speaker's plat- 
form in a public auditorium, the flag should occupy the position 
of honor and be placed at the clergyman's or speaker's right as 
he faces the congregation or audience. Any other flag so displayed 
in the chancel or on the platform should be placed at the clergy- 
man's or speaker's left as he faces the congregation or audience. 
But when the flag is displayed from a staff in a church or public 
auditorium elsewhere than in the chancel or on the platform it 
shall be placed in the position of honor at the right of the con- 
gregation or audience as they face the chancel or platform. Any 
other flag so displayed should be placed on the left of the con- 
gregation or audience as they face the chancel or platform. 

(1) The flag should form a distinctive feature of the cere- 
mony of unveiling a statue or monument, but it should never 
be used as the covering for the statue or monument. 

(m) The flag, when flown at half-staff, should be first hoisted 
to the peak for an instant and then lowered to the half-staff 
position. The flag should be again raised to the peak before 
it is lowered for the day. By "half-staff" is meant lowering the 
flag to one-half the distance between the top and bottom of the 
staff. Crepe streamers may be affixed to spear heads or flagstaffs 
in a parade only by order of the President of the United States. 

(n) When the flag is used to cover a casket, it should be so 
placed that the union is at the head and over the left shoulder. 
The flag should not be lowered into the grave nor allowed to 
touch the ground. 

Sec. 176. No disrespect should be shown to the flag of the 
United States of America; the flag should not be dipped to any per- 
son or thing. Regimental colors, State flags, and organization 
or institutional flags are to be dipped as a mark of honor. 

(a) The flag should never be displayed with the union down 
save as a signal of dire distress. 

(b) The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as 
the ground, the floor, water, or merchandise. 



The American Flag ;»; 

(c) The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but 
always aloft and free. 

(d) The flag should never be used as drapery of any sort 
whatsoever, never festooned, drawn back, nor up, in folds, but 
always allowed to fall free. Bunting of blue, white and red, always 
arranged with the blue above, the white in the middle, and the 
red below, should be used for covering a speaker's desk, draping 
the front of a piatform, and for decoration in general. 

(e) The flag should never be fastened, displayed, used, or 
stored in such a manner as will permit it to be easily torn, soiled, 
or damaged in any way. 

(f ) The flag should never be used as a covering for a ceiling. 

(g) The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on any 
part of it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, 
figure, design, picture or drawing of any nature. 

(h) The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, 
holding, carrying, or delivering anything. 

(i) The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in 
any manner whatsoever. It should not be embroidered on such 
articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or 
otherwise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that 
is designed for temporary use and discard; or used as any portion 
of a costume or athletic uniform. Advertising signs should not 
be fastened to a staff or halyard from which the flag is flown. 

(j) The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer 
a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified 
way, preferably by burning. 

Sec. 177. During the ceremony of hoisting or lowering the 
flag or when the flag is passing in a parade or in a review, all 
persons present should face the flag, stand at attention, and 
salute. Those present in uniform should render the military 
salute. When not in uniform, men should remove the headdress 
with the right hand holding it at the left shoulder, the hand 
being over the heart. Men without hats should salute in the same 
manner. Aliens should stand at attention. Women should salute 
by placing the right hand over the heart. The salute to the flag 
in the moving column should be rendered at the moment the 
flag passes. 



North Cabuj i n \ Manuai 

Se< ITn Any rule or custom pertaining to the display of the 
flag of the United States of America, set forth in sections 171-178 
of this title, may be altered, modified, or repealed, or additional 
rules with respect thereto may be prescribed, by the Commander 
in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, whenever 
he deems it to be appropriate or desirable; and any such alfpra- 
tion or additional rule shall be set forth in a proclamation 

The Pledge to the Flag 

(.Taught in many of the schools and repeated by pupils daily) 

"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America 
And to the Republic for which it stands. 
One Nation under God, indivisible. 
With liberty and justice for all." 

The Pledge to the Flag, according to a report of the Historical 
Committee of the United States Flag Association (May 18, 1939). 
was written by Francis Bellamy (August 1892), a member of the 
editorial staff of The Youth's Companion, in Boston, Massachu- 
setts. It was first repeated at the exercises in connection with 
the celebration of Columbus Day (October 12, 1892, Old Style). 
The idea of this national celebration on Columbus Day was largely 
that of James B. Upham, one of the junior proprietors of The 
Youth's Companion. 

Francis Hopkinson, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, 
was the designer of the Stars and Stripes — -not Betsy Ross of 
Philadelphia, who made flags. He also designed the first Great 
Seal of the United States, and a number of coins and several items 
of paper currency in the early days of the Republic. 

Hopkinson, born in Philadelphia (September 21, 1737), and a 
graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, was the first native 
American composer of a secular song, "My Days Have Been So 
Wondrous Free." He was a lawyer and later a judge in New Jersey 
and then in Pennsylvania. He died in Philadelphia (May 9, 17 91). 
His portrait, painted by himself, hangs in the rooms of the Penn- 
sylvania Historical Society, Philadelphia. He played the organ and 
harpsichord. 



THE CAPITOL AT WASHINGTON 

The Capitol building in Washington, D. C. ( is situated on i 
plateau 88 feet above the level of the Potomac River and covers 
an area of 153,112 square feet, or approximately three and one- 
half acres. Its length, from north to south, is 7 51 feet, four inches; 
its width, including approaches, is 350 feet; and its location is 
described as being in latitude 38°53'20.4" N. and longitude 
70 e 00'35.7" W. from Greenwich. Its height above the base line on 
the east front to the top of the Statue of Freedom is 287 feet. 
five and one-half inches. The dome is built of iron, and the aggre- 
gate weight of material used in its construction is 8. 909. 20c 
pounds. 

The Statue of Freedom surmounting the dome is of bronze and 
weighs 14,985 pounds. It was modeled by Thomas Crawford, 
father of Francis Marion Crawford, the novelist, in Rome, and 
the plaster model shipped to this country. It was cast in bronze 
at the shops of Clark Mills, on the Bladensburg Road, near Wash- 
ington. The cost of the casting and the expenses in connection 
were $20,796.82, and the sculptor was paid $3,000 for the plaster 
model. It was erected and placed in its present position Decembe. 
2, 1863. 

The grounds have had an area of 58.8 acres, at one time a parr 
of Cern Abby Manor, and at an early date were occupied by a 
subtribe of the Algonquin Indians known as the Powhatans, whose 
council house was then located at the foot of the hill. By sub- 
sequent purchase of ground at the North of the Capitol and at 
the west of the new House Office building the area of the grounds 
lias been increased to 13 9 */£ acres. 

The Rotunda is 97 feet 6 inches in diameter, and its height from 
the floor to the top of the canopy is 180 feet, 3 inches. 

The Senate Chamber is 113 feet, 3 inches, in length by 80 feet. 
3 inches, in width and 3 6 feet in height. The galleries will ac- 
commodate 682 persons. 

The Representatives' Hall is 139 feet in length by 93 feet in 
width and 3 6 feet in height. 

The room, until 1935 the meeting place of the Supreme Court, 
was, until 18 59, occupied as the Senate Chamber. Previous to that 

99 



10n NOR! II C VKOl INA M Wl'AI 

time the court occupied the room immediately beneath, now used 
as a law library. 

The Capitol has a floor area of 14 acres, and 430 rooms are de- 
moted to office, committee, and storage purposes. There are 14,518 
square feet of skylights, 679 windows, and 550 doorways. 

The dome receives light through 108 windows, and from the 
architect's office to the dome there are 3 65 steps, one for each day 
of the year. 

The southeast cornerstone of the original building was laid Sep- 
tember 18, 1793, by President Washington, with Masonic cere- 
monies. It is constructed of sandstone from quarries on Aquia 
Creek, Va. The original designs were prepared by Dr. William 
Thornton, and the work was done under the direction of Stephen 
11. Hallet. James Hoban, George Hadfield, and B. H. Latrobe. 
architects. 

The north wing was finished in 18 00 and the south wing in 1811. 
A wooden passageway connected them. On August 24, 1814, the 
interior of both wings was destroyed by fire, set by the British. 
The damage to the building was immediately repaired. 

In 1818 the central portion of the building was commenced 
under the architectural superintendence of Charles Bullfinch. The 
original building was finally completed in 18 27. Its cost, including 
the grading of the grounds, alterations, and repairs, up to 1827. 
was $2,433,844.13. 

The cornerstone of the extensions was laid on the Fourth of 
July, 1851, by President Fillmore, Daniel Webster officiating as 
orator. This work was prosecuted under the architectual direc- 
tion of Thomas U. Walter until 18 65, when he resigned, and it was 
completed under the supervision of Edward Clark. The material 
used in the walls is white marble from the quarries of Lee, Massa- 
chusetts, and that in the columns from the quarries from Cockeys- 
ville, Maryland. The House extension was first occupied for legis- 
lative purposes December 16. 1857. and the Senate January 4. 
1859. 

The House office building was begun in 190 5 and occupied on 
January 10, 1908; later a story on top was added. The Senate 
office building was started in 1906 and occupied on March 5, 1909. 
The House building cost, with site. $4,860,155: the Senate struc- 
ture. $5,019,251. 



The Nation w Capitoi 101 

Among the paintings in the Capitol are: 

In Rotunda: Signing of the Declaration of Independence, Sur- 
render of General Burgoyne, Surrender of Lord Cornwallis at 
Yorktown, Va., George Washington Resigning His Commission as 
Commander in Chief of the Army, all by John Trumbull. 

Baptism of Pocahontas, by John G. Chapman; Landing of Co- 
lumbus, by John Vanderlyn; Discovery of the Mississippi River 
by DeSoto, by William H. Powell: Embarkation of the Pilgrims, 
by Robert W. Weir. 

In House Wing: Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way, 
by Emanuel Leutze; First Reading of the Emancipation Proclama- 
tion, by Francis Bicknell Carpenter. 

In Senate Wing: Battle of Lake Erie, by William H. Powell; 
Battle of Chapultepec. by James Walker. 



THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 

(Unanimously Adopted in Congress, July 4, 1776, at Philadelphia) 

When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for 
one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected 
them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, 
the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and 
of Nature's God ontitles them, a decent respect to the opinions of 
mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel 
them to the separation. 

We hold these truths to be self-evident: That all men are creat- 
ed equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain in- 
alienable Rights; that among these are Life, Liberty and the pur- 
suit of Happiness. That, to secure these rights, Governments are 
instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent 
of the governed; That, whenever any Form of Government he- 
roines destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to 
alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its 
foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such 
forms, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and 
Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long 
established should not be changed for light and transient causes; 
and, accordingly, all experience hath shewn, that mankind are 
more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right 
themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. 
But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invari- 
ably the same Object, evinces a design to reduce them under abso- 
lute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such 
Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security. 
Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies, and such 
is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former 
Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great 
Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all hav- 
ing in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over 
these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid 
world. 

He has refused his assent to Laws, the most wholesome and 
necessary for the public good. 

102 



Declaeation of I _\ dependence L03 

He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and 
pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his 
Assent should be obtained; and, when so suspended, he has utterly 
neglected to attend to them. 

He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of 
large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the 
right of Representation in the Legislature — a right inestimable to 
them, and formidable to tyrants only. 

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, un- 
comfortable and distant from the depository of their public Rec- 
ords, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with 
his measures. 

He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing 
with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people. 

He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause 
others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of 
Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exer- 
cise; the State remaining, in the meantime, exposed to all the 
dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within. 

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these States for 
that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreign- 
ers; refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither, 
and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands. 

He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing 
his assent to laws for establishing Judiciary Powers. 

He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure 
of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries. 

He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither 
.swarms of Officers to harass our people, and eat out their sub- 
stance. 

He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies 
without the Consent of Our Legislature. 

He has affected to render the Military independent of, and superior 
to, the Civil power. 

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction 
foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; 
giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation: 

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us: 



in i North Carolina Manuai 

For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any 
Murders which they should commit on the inhabitants of these 
States: 

For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world: 

For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent: 

For depriving us, in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by 
jury: 

For transporting us beyond Seas, to be tried for pretended offenses; 

For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbor- 
ing Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and 
enlarging its Boundaries, so as to render it at once an example 
and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into 
these Colonies: 

For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable 
Law r s, and altering fundamentally, the Forms of our Governments: 

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves 
invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever. 

He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his 
Protection and waging War against us. 

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns. 
and destroyed the lives of our people. 

He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign mer- 
cenaries to complete the works of death, desolation and tyranny, 
already begun with circumstances of Cruelty and perfidy scarcely 
paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the 
Head of a civilized nation. 

He has constrained our fellow-Citizens, taken captive on the 
high Seas, to bear Arms against their Country, to become the exe 
cutioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by 
their Hands. 

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has en- 
deavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merci- 
less Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare is an undis- 
tinguished destruction of all ages, sexes, and conditions. 

In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Re- 
dress in the most humble terms; Our repeated Petitions have been 
answered only by repeated injury. A Prince, whose character is 
thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to 
be the ruler of a free people. 



Declaration of Independence 105 

Nor have we been wanting in attention to our British brethren. 
We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their 
legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We 
have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and 
settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and 
magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our com- 
mon kindred to disavow these usurpations, which inevitably inter- 
rupt our connections with correspondence. They, too, have been 
deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. "We must, there- 
fore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, 
and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind — Enemies in War, 
in Peace Friends. 

We, Therefore, the Representatives of the United States of 
America, in General Congress Assembled; appealing to the Su- 
preme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, 
in the Name and by authority of the good People of these Colonies, 
solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and 
of Right ought to be free and independent States; that they are 
Absolved from All Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all 
political connections between them and the State of Great Britain 
is, and ought to be, totally dissolved; and that as Free and Inde- 
pendent States, they have full power to levy War, conclude Peace, 
contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts 
and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for 
the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the pro- 
tection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other 
our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor. 

John Hancock 

Button Gwinnett Edward Rutledge 

Lyman Hall Thomas Heyward, Junr. 

Geo. Walton Thomas Lynch. Junr. 

Wm. Hoopei Arthur Middleton 

Joseph Hewes Samuel Chase 

John Penn Wm. Paca 

Thos Stone Carter Braxton 



lu.; 



Mouth Carolina Mamtai. 



Charles Carroll of Carrollton 

James Wilson 

Geo. Ross 

Caesar Rodney 

Geo. Reed 

Tho. M. Kean 

Win. Floyd 

Phil. Livingston 

Frans. Lewis 

Lewis Morris 

Richd. Stockton 

Jno. Witherspoon 

Fras. Hopkinson 

John Hart 

Abra Clark 

George Wythe 

Richard Henry Lee 

Th. Jefferson 

Benja. Harrison 

Thos. Nelson, Jr. 

Francis Lightfoot Lee 



Robt. Morris 
Benjamin Rush 
Benja. Franklin 
John Morton 
Geo. Clymer 
Jas. Smith 
Geo. Taylor 
Josiah Bartlett 
Wm. Hippie 
Saml. Adams 
John Adams 
Robt. Treat Payne 
Eldridge Gerry 
Step. Hopkins 
William Ellery 
Roger Sherman 
Samuel Huntington 
Wm. Williams 
Oliver Woolcott 
Matthew Thornton 



THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES 

Preamble 

We, the people of the United States, in order to form a more 
perfect Union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, pro- 
vide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and 
secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do 
ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of 
America. 

Article I 

Section 1 — All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested 
in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate 
and a House of Representatives. 

Sec. 2 — 1. The House of Representatives shall be composed of 
members chosen every second year by the people of the several 
States, and the electors in each State shall have the qualifications 
requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State 
Legislature. 

2. No person shall be a Representative who shall not have at- 
tained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a citi- 
zen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an 
inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. 

3. Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among 
the several States which may be included within this Union, ac- 
cording to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by 
adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound 
to service for a term of years and excluding Indians not taxed, 
three-fifths of all other persons. The actual enumeration shall be 
made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress 
of the United States, and within every subsequent term of ten 
years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. The number of 
Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty thousand, 
but each State shall have at least one Representative; and until 
such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire 
shall be entitled to choose 3; Massachusetts, 8; Rhode Island and 
Providence Plantations, 1; Connecticut, 5; New York, 6; New 

107 



L08 North Carolina Manual 

Jersey, 4; Pennsylvania, 8; Delaware, 1; Maryland, 6; Virginia, 
10; North Carolina, 5; South Carolina, 5; and Georgia, 3.* 

4. When vacancies happen in the representation from any State 
the Executive Authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill 
such vacancies. 

5. The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and 
other officers, and shall have the sole power of impeachment. 

Sec. 3 — 1. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of 
two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof 
for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote.t 

2. Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence 
of the first election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into 
three classes. The seats of the Senators of the first class shall be 
vacated at the expiration of the second year; of the second class 
at the expiration of the fourth year; and of the third class at the 
expiration of the sixth year, so that one-third may be chosen every 
second year, and if vacancies happen by resignation, or otherwise, 
during the recess of the Legislature of any State, the Executive 
thereof may make temporary appointments until the next meeting 
of the Legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies.! 

3. No person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to 
the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the United 
States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that 
State for which he shall be chosen. 

4. The Vice President of the United States shall be President of 
the Senate, but shall have no vote, unless they be equally divided. 

5. The Senate shall choose their other officers, and also a 
President pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice President, or 
when he shall exercise the office of President of the United States. 

6. The Senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments. 
When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath or affirmation. 
When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice 
shall preside; and no person shall be convicted without the con- 
currence of two-thirds of the members present. 

7. Judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend further 
than to removal from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy 
any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States; but 



*See Article XIV, Amendments. 
tSee Article XVII, Amendments. 



Constitution of the United States L09 

the party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to 
indictment, trial, judgment, and punishment, according to law. 

Sec. 4 — 1. The times, places, and manner of holding elections 
for Senators and Representatives shall be prescribed in each State 
by the Legislature thereof, but the Congress may at any time by 
law make or alter such regulations, except as to the places of 
choosing Senators. 

2 The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and 
such meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless 
they shall by law appoint a different day. 

Sec. 5 — 1. Each House shall be the judge of the elections, re- 
turns, and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of 
each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a smaller num- 
ber may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to com- 
pel the attendance of absent members, in such manner and under 
such penalties as each House may provide. 

2. Each House may determine the rules of its proceedings, pun- 
ish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence 
of two-thirds, expel a member. 

3. Each House shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from 
time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may in 
their judgment require secrecy; and the yeas and nays of the 
members of either House on any question shall, at the desire of 
one-fifth of those present, be entered on the journal. 

4. Neither House, during the session of Congress, shall, without 
the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor 
to any other place than that in which the two Houses shall be 
sitting. 

Sec. 6 — 1. The Senators and Representatives shall receive a com- 
pensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, and paid 
out of the Treasury of the United States. They shall in all cases, 
except treason, felony, and breach of the peace, be privileged from 
arrest during their attendance at the session of their respective 
Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for 
any speech or debate in either House they shall not be questioned 
in any other place. 

2. No Senator or Representative shall, during the time for which 
he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under the 
authority of the United States which shall have been created, or 



110 North Carolina Manual 

the emoluments whereof shall have been increased during such 
time; and no person holding any office under the United States 
shall be a member of either House during his continuance in office. 

Se< . 7 — 1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the 
House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur 
with amendments, as on other bills. 

2. Every bill which shall have passed the House of Representa- 
tives and the Senate shall, before it becomes a law, be presented 
to the President of the United States; if he approves, he shall sign 
it, but if not, he shall return it, with his objections, to that House 
in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the objections 
at large on their journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after 
such reconsideration two-thirds of that House shall agree to pass 
the bill, it shall be sent together with the objections, to the 
other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if 
approved by two-thirds of that House, it shall become a law. But 
in all such cases the votes of both Houses shall be determined by 
yeas and nays, and the names of the persons voting for and 
against the bill shall be entered on the journal of each House re- 
spectively. If any bill shall not be returned by the President within 
ten days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented 
to him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had signed 
it, unless the Congress by their adjournment prevent its return, 
in which case it shall not be a law. 

3. Every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of 
the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (ex- 
cept on a question of adjournment) shall be presented to the Presi- 
dent of the United States; and before the same shall take effect, 
shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be 
repassed by two-thirds of the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives, according to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case 
of a bill. 

Sec. 8. The Congress shall have power: 

1. To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay 
the debts and provide for the common defense and general wel- 
fare of the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall 
be uniform throughout the United States; 

2. To borrow money on the credit of the United States; 



COKSTITUTIOJV O* THJ UNITED STATES 111 

3. To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the 
several States, and with the Indian tribes; 

4. To establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform 
laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States; 

5. To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, 
and fix the standards of weights and measures; 

6. To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities 
and current coin of the United States; 

7. To establish postoffices and postroads: 

S. To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing, 
for limited times, to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to 
their respective writings and discoveries; 

9. To constitute tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court; 

10. To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the 
high seas, and offenses against the law of nations; 

11. To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and 
make rules concerning captures on land and water; 

12. To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money 
to that use shall be for a longer term than two years; 

13. To provide and maintain a navy; 

14. To make rules for the government and regulation of the land 
and naval forces; 

15. To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws 
of the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions; 

16. To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the 
militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed 
in the service of the United States, reserving to the States respec- 
tively the appointment of the officers and the authority of training 
the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress; 

17. To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever over 
such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may by cession 
of particular States and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat 
of Government of the United States, and to exercise like authority 
over all places purchased by the consent of the Legislature of the 
State in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, magazines, 
arsenals, dock-yards, and other needful buildings; — and 

IS. To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for 
carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers 



1 1- North C vkoj ina M vm al 

vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States. 
or any department or officer thereof. 

Sec. 9 — 1. The migration or importation of such persons as any 

if ilu states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be 

prohibited by the Congress prior to the year one thousand eight 

hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such 

importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person. 

2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be sus 
pended. unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public 
safety may require it. 

3. No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

4. No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in 
proportion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore directed to 
be taken.* 

5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any 
State. 

6. No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce 
or revenue to the ports of one State over those of another; nor 
shall vessels bound to, or from, one State be obliged to enter, clear, 
or pay duties in another. 

7. No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in conse- 
quence of appropriations made by law; and a regular statement and 
account of the receipts and expenditures of all public money shall 
be published from time to time. 

8. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States; 
and no person holding any office of profit or trust under them, 
shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, 
emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, 
prince, or foreign state. 

Sec. 10 — 1. No State shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or confed- 
eration; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; emit 
bills of credit; make anything but gold and silver coin a tender 
in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder; ex post facto law, 
or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or grant any title of 
nobility. 

2. No State shall, without the consent of the Congress, lay any 
imposts or duties on imports or exports except what may be abso- 



•See Article XVI, Amendments. 



Constitution of the United States 113 

lutely necessary for executing its inspection laws; and the net pro- 
duce of all duties and imports, laid by any State on imports or 
exports, shall be for the use of the Treasury of the United States; 
and all such laws shall be subject to the revision and control of 
the Congress. 

3. No State shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any duty 
of tonnage, keep troops, or ships of war in time of peace, enter 
into any agreement or compact with another State, or with a 
foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in 
such imminent danger as will not admit delay. 

Article II 

Section 1 — 1. The executive power shall be vested in a Presi- 
dent of the United States of America. He shall hold his office 
during the term of four years, and, together with the Vice Presi- 
dent, chosen for the same term, be elected as follows: 

2. Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the legislature 
thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole num- 
ber of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be 
entitled in the Congress; but no Senator or Representative or 
person holding an office of trust or profit under the United States 
shall be appointed an elector. 

3. The electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote 
by ballot for two persons, of whom one at least shall not be an 
inhabitant of the same state with themselves. And they shall make 
a list of all the persons voted for, and of the number of votes for 
each; which list they shall sign and certify, and transmit, sealed, 
to the seat of the Government of the United States, directed to 
the President of the Senate. The President of the Senate shall, 
in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives open 
all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted. The per- 
son having the greatest number of votes shall be the President, if 
such number be a majority of the whole number of electors ap- 
pointed; and if there be more than one who have such majority, 
and have an equal number of votes, then the House of Representa- 
tives shall immediately choose by ballot one of them for President; 
and if no person have a majority, then from the five highest on 
the list the said House shall in like manner choose the President. 



ih North Carolina Manuat 

Bui in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by States, 
the representation from each State having one vote; a quorum, 
for tins purpose, shall consist of a member or members from two 
thirds of the Stales, and a majority of all the States shall be 
necessarj to a choice, in every case, after the choice of the Presi- 
dent, tlic person having the greatest number of votes of the electors 
shall be the Vice President. But if there should remain two or 
more who have equal votes, the Senate shall choose from them by 
ballot the Vice President.* 

4. The Congress may determine the time of choosing the elec 
tors and the day on which they shall give their votes, which day 
shall be the same throughout the United States. 

5. No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the 
United States, at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, 
shall be eligible to the office of President; neither shall any per- 
son be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the 
age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen years a resident within 
the United States. 

G. In case of the removal of the President from office, or of his 
death, resignation or inability to discharge the powers and duties 
of the said office, the same shall devolve on the Vice President, 
and the Congress may by law provide for the case of removal, 
death, resignation, or inability, both of the President and Vice 
President, declaring what officer shall then act as President, and 
such officer shall act accordingly until the disability be removed, 
or a President shall be elected. 

7. The President shall, at stated times, receive for his services 
a compensation which shall neither be increased nor diminished 
during the period for which he shall have been elected, and he 
shall not receive within that period any other emolument from the 
United States, or any of them. 

8. Before he enters on the execution of his office, he shall take 
the following oath or affirmation: 

"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute 
the office of President of the United States, and will, to the best 
of my ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the 
United States." 



*This clause is superseded by Article XII, Amendments. 



Constitution of the United States i 1 5 

Sec. 2 — 1. The President shall be Commander-in-Chief of the 
Army and Navy of the United States, and of the militia of the 
several States, when called into the actual service of the United 
States; he may require the opinion, in writing, of the principal 
officer in each of the executive departments, upon any subject re- 
lating to the duties of their respective offices; and he shall have 
power to grant reprieves, and pardons for offenses against the 
United States, except in cases of impeachment. 

2. He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of 
the Senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the Senators 
present concur; and he shall nominate and, by and with the advice 
and consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors, other public 
ministers and consuls, judges of the Supreme Court, and all other 
officers of the United States, whose appointments are not herein 
otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law; but 
the Congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior 
officers as they think proper in the President alone, in the courts 
of law, or in the heads of departments. 

3. The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that 
may happen during the recess of the Senate, by granting commis- 
sions which shall expire at the end of their next session. 

Sec. 3 — He shall from time to time give to the Congress infor- 
mation of the State of the Union, and recommend to their consid- 
eration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; 
he may, on extraordinary occasions, convene both Houses, or either 
of them, and in case of disagreement between them with respect to 
the time of adjournment, he may adjourn them to such time as he 
shall think proper; he shall receive ambassadors and other public 
ministers; he shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed, 
and shall commission all the officers of the United States. 

Sec. 4— The President, Vice President, and all civil officers of 
the United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment 
for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and 
misdemeanors. 

Article III 

Section 1 — The judicial power of the United States shall be 
vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the 
Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The judges. 



ill North Carolina Manual 

both of the Supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices 
during good behavior, and shall, at stated times, receive for their 
services a compensation which shall not be diminished during their 
continuance in office. 

Sec. 2 — 1. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law 
and equity, arising under this Constitution, the laws of the United 
States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their 
authority; — to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public min- 
isters and consuls; to all cases of admiralty and maritime juris- 
diction; — to controversies to which the United States shall be a 
party; — to controversies between two or more States; — between 
a State and citizens of another State; — between citizens of differ- 
ent States; — between citizens of the same State, claiming lands 
under grants of different States, and between a State, or the citizens 
thereof, and foreign States, citizens, or subjects. 

2. In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers 
and consuls, and those in which a State shall be a party, the Su- 
preme Court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases 
before mentioned the Supreme Court shall have appellate juris- 
diction, both as to law and fact, with such exceptions and under 
such regulations as the Congress shall make. 

•".. The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, shall 
be by jury, and such trial shall be held in the State where the said 
crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within 
any State the trial shall be at such place or places as the Congress 
may by law have directed. 

Sec. 3—1. Treason against the United States shall consist only 
in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giv- 
ing them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason 
unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or 
on confession in open court. 

2. The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of 
treason; but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, 
or forfeiture except during the life of the person attainted 

Article IV 

Sectichn 1— Full faith and credit shall be given in each State to 
the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other 
State. And the Congress may by general laws prescribe the man- 



Constitution <u the United States 117 

uer in which such acts, records and proceedings shall be proved, 
and the effect thereof. 

Sec. 2 — 1. The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all 
privileges and immunities of citizens in the several States. 

2. A person charged in any State with treason, felony, or other 
crime, who shall flee from justice and be found in another State, 
shall, on demand of the Executive authority of the State from 
which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having 
jurisdiction of the crime. 

3. No person held to service or labor in one State, under the 
laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any 
law or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or 
labor, but shall be delivered upon claim of the party to whom such 
service or labor may be due. 

Sec. 3 — 1. New States may be admitted by the Congress into 
this Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within the 
jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the 
junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the con- 
sent of the Legislatures of the States concerned, as well as of the 
Congress. 

2. The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all 
needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other 
property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this Con- 
stitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims of the 
United States or of any particular State. 

Sec. 4 — The United States shall guarantee to every State in 
this Union a republican form of government, and shall protect 
each of them against invasion, and. on application of the Legis- 
lature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature cannot be con 
vened), against domestic violence 

Aeticle V 

The Congress, whenever two-thirds of both Houses shall deem it 
necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or, on 
the application of the Legislatures of two-thirds of the several 
States, shall call a convention for proposing amendments, which, 
in either case, shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as part 
of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three 



118 North Carolina Manual 

fourths of the several States, or by conventions in three-fourths 
thereof, as the one or the other mode of ratification may be pro- 
posed by the Congress; provided that no amendment which may be 
made prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight shall 
in any manner affect the tirst and fourth clauses in the Ninth 
Section of the First Article; and that no State, without its con- 
sent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the Senate 

Article VI 

1. All debts contracted and engagements entered into before 
the adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the 
[Tnited States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation. 

2. This Constitution and the laws of the United States which 
shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which 
shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be 
the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every State shall 
be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any 
State to the contrary notwithstanding. 

3. The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the 
members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and 
judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several 
States, shall be bound by oath or affirmation to support this Con- 
stitution; but no religious test shall ever be required as a quali- 
fication to any office or public trust under the United States. 

Article VII 

The ratification of the Convention of nine States =nall be suf- 
ficient for the establishment of this Constitution between the States 
so ratifying the same. 

Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States 
present the Seventeenth Day of September, in the Year of Our 
Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the Twelfth. In witness 
whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names. 

GEO. WASHINGTON, President and deputy from Virginia, New 
Hampshire— John Langdon, Nicholas Gilman, Massachusetts — Na- 
thaniel Gorham, Rufus King, Connecticut— Wm. Saml. Johnson. 
Roger Sherman, New York Alexander Hamilton. New Jersey 



Constitution (>[• Jin. United States Li9 

VVil. Livingston, David Brearley, Wm. Patterson, Jona. Dayton, 
Pennsylvania — B. Franklin, Robt. Morris, Thos. Fitzsimmons. James 
Wilson, Thomas Mifflin, Geo. Clymer, Jared Ingersoll, Gouv. Morris, 
Delaware— Geo. Read, John Dickinson, Jaco. Broom, Gunning Bed- 
ford, Jr., Richard Bassett, Maryland — James McHenry, Danl. Carroll. 
Dan. of St. Thos. Jenifer, Virginia — John Blair, Jas. Madison, Jr.. 
North Carolina — Wm. Blount, Hu. Williamson, Richd. Dobbs Spaight, 
South Carolina — J. Rutledge, Charles Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth 
Pinckney, Pierce Butler, Georgia — W T illiam Few. Abr, Baldwin. 
Attest: William Jackson, Secretary. 

The Constitution was declared in effect on the first Wednesday 
in March, 1789. 

Amendments to the Constitution of the United States 

The following amendments to the Constitution, Article I to X, 
inclusive, were proposed at the First Session of the First Congress, 
begun and held at the City of New York,, on Wednesday, March 4, 
1789, and were adopted by the necessary number of States. The 
original proposal of the ten amendments was preceded by this 
preamble and resolution: 

"The conventions of a number of the States having, at the time 
of their adopting the Constitution, expressed a desire, in order to 
prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further de- 
claratory and restrictive clauses should be added, and as extending 
the ground of public confidence in the Government will best insure 
the beneficent ends of its institution: 

"RESOLVED, By the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the United States of America, in Congress assembled, two-thirds of 
both Houses concurring, that the following articles be proposed to 
the Legislatures of the several States, as amendments to the Con- 
stitution of the United States; all or any of which articles, when 
ratified by three-fourths of the said Legislatures, to be valid to all 
intents and purposes, as part of the said Constitution, namely" 

Amendments 

the ten original amendments 

(.Sometimes called our Bill of Rights) 
(Declared in force December 15, 1791) 



L20 North Carolina Manuai 

Article I 

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of re- 
ligion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging tin 
freedom of speech or of the press; or the right of the people 
peacably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress 
of grievances. 

Article II 

A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free 
State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be 
infringed 

Article III 

No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house 
without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war but in a man- 
ner to be prescribed by law. 

Article IV 

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, 
papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, 
shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon prob- 
able cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly de- 
scribing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be 
seized. 

Article V 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise in- 
famous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand 
jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the 
militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger; nor 
shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in 
jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal 
case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, lib- 
erty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private 
property bp taken for public use, without just compensation. 

Article VI 

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to 
a speedy, and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and 



Constitution op the United Statfs 121 

district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which dis- 
trict shall have been previously ascertained by law, and be in- 
formed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted 
with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for 
obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of 
counsel for his defense. 

Article VII 

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall 
exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved 
and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any 
court of the United States than according to the rules of the com- 
mon law. 

Article VIII 

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, 
nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. 

Article IX 

The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not 
be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. 

Article X 

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitu- 
tion, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States 
respectively, or to the people. 

Article XI 

The judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to 
extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted 
against one of the United States, by citizens of another State, or 
by citizens or subjects of any foreign State. 

(Proposed to the Legislatures of the several States by the Third 
Congress on the 5th of March, 1794, and declared to have been 
ratified by Executive Proclamation, January 8, 1798.) 

Article XII 

The electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by 
ballot for President and Vice President, one of whom at least shall 
not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves: they shall 



122 North Carolina Manual 

name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in dis- 
tinct ballots the persons voted for as Vice President; and they shall 
make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of all 
persons voted for as Vice President, and of the number of votes 
for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit, 
sealed, to the seat of the Government of the United States, directed 
to the President of the Senate; the President of the Senate shall, 
in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open 
all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted; the person 
having the greatest number of votes for President shall be the 
President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of 
electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then from 
the persons having the highest numbers, not exceeding three on the 
list of those voted for as President, the House of Representatives 
shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing 
the President, the votes shall be taken by States, the representa- 
tion from each State having one vote; a quorum for this purpose 
shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the 
States, and a majority of all the States shall be necessary to a 
choice. And if the House of Representatives shall not choose a 
President, whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, 
before the fourth day of March next following, then the Vice 
President shall act as President, as in the case of the death or 
other constitutional disability of the President. The person having 
the greatest number of votes as Vice President shall be the Vice 
President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of 
electors appointed, and if no person have a majority, then from 
the two highest numbers on the list, the Senate shall choose the 
Vice President; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two- 
thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the 
whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person consti- 
tutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to 
that of Vice President of the United States. 

(Proposed by the Eighth Congress on the 12th of December, 

1803, declared ratified by the Secretary of State, September 25, 

1804. It was ratified by all the States except Connecticut. Dela- 
ware, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire.) 

Article XIII 
1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a pun- 
ishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly .-on- 



Constitution of the United States 12:: 

victed, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject 
to their jurisdiction. 

2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appro- 
priate legislation. 

(Proposed by the Thirty-eighth Congress on the 1st of February, 
1865, declared ratified by the Secretary of State, December 18, 
1865. It was rejected by Delaware and Kentucky; was condi- 
tionally ratified by Alabama and Mississippi; and Texas took no 
action/i 

Article XIV 

1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and 
subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States 
and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or en- 
force any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of 
citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any per- 
son of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor 
deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of 
the laws. 

2. Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States 
according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number 
of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when 
the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for 
President and Vice President of the United States, Representatives 
in Congress, the executive and judicial officers of a State, or the 
members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male 
inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citi- 
zens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for 
participation in rebellion or other crime, the basis of representa- 
tion therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number 
of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citi- 
zens twenty-one years of age in such State. 

3. No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, 
or elector of President and Vice President, or hold any office, civil 
or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, 
having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as 
an officer of the United States, or as a member of any State Legis- 
lature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support 
the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insur- 



I 2 I Nortij Carolina Manual 

rection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to 
the enemies thereof. But Congress may, by a vote of two-thirds of 
each House, remove such disability. 

4. The validity of the public debt of the United States, author- 
ized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and 
bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall 
not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State 
shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of in- 
surrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for 
the loss of emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obliga- 
tions, and claims shall be held illegal and void. 

5. The Congress shall have power to enforce by appropriate 
legislation the provisions of this article. 

(The Reconstruction Amendment, by the Thirty-ninth Congress 
on the 16th day of June, 1S66, was declared ratified by the Secre- 
tary of State, July 28, 1868. The amendment got the support of 23 
Northern States; it was rejected by Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, 
and 10 Southern States. California took no action. Later it was 
ratified by the 10 Southern States.) 

Article XV 

1. The right of the citizens of the United States to vote shall 
not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on 
account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. 

2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by 
appropriate legislation. 

(Proposed by the Fortieth Congress the 27th of February, 1S69, 
and was declared ratified by the Secretary of State, March 30, 1870. 
It was not acted on by Tennessee; it was rejected by California, 
Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland and Oregon; ratified by the remaining 
30 States. New York rescinded its ratification January 5, 1870. 
New Jersey rejected it in 1870, but ratified it in 1871.) 

Article XVI 
The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on in- 
comes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among 
the several States, and without regard to any census or enumera- 
tion. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-first Congress, July 12, 1909, and declared 
ratified February 25, 1913. The income tax amendment was ratified 



Constitution oe the United States L25 

by all the States except Connecticut, Florida, Pennsylvania, Rhode 
Island, Utah, and Virginia.) 

Article XVII 

1. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two 
Senators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six 
years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each 
State shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most 
numerous branch of the State Legislatures. 

2. When vacancies happen in the representation of any State 
in the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue 
writs of election to fill such vacancies; Provided, That the Legis- 
lature of any State may empower the Executive thereof to make 
temporary appointments until the people fill the vacancies by 
election as the Legislature may direct. 

3. This amendment shall not be so construed as to affect the 
election or term of any Senator chosen before it becomes valid as 
part of the Constitution. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-second Congress on the 16th day of May, 
1912, and declared ratified May 31, 1913. Adopted by all the States 
except Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, 
Maryland, Mississippi, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah and 
Virginia.) 

Article XVIII 

1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manu- 
facture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the 
importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United 
States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for bev- 
erage purposes is hereby prohibited. 

2. The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent 
power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. 

3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been 
ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the Legislatures 
of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven 
years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the 
Congress. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-fifth Congress, December 18, 1917, and 
ratified by 36 States; was declared in effect on January 16, 1920.) 



North (' vkom \ a M \ \ r ai 



Article XIX 



1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not 
be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on 
account of sex. 

2. Congress shall have power, by appropriate legislation. t<- 
enforce the provisions of this article. 

( Proposed by the Sixty-fifth Congress. On August 26, 1920, it was 
proclaimed in effect, having been ratified (June 19, 1919— August 
18, 1920) by three-quarters of the States. The Tennessee House. 
August 31st. rescinded its ratification, 47 to 24.) 

Article XX 

1. The terms of the President and Vice President shall end at 
noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and 
Representatives at noon on the 3rd day of January of the years 
in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been 
ratified: and the terms of their successors shall then begin. 

2. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and 
such meeting shall begin at noon on the 3rd day of January, un- 
less they shall by law appoint a different day. 

3. If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the 
President, the President elect shall have died, the Vice President 
elect shall become President. If a President shall not have been 
chosen before the time fixed for the beginning of his term, or if 
the President elect shall have failed to qualify, then the Vice 
President elect shall act as President until a President shall have 
qualified; and the Congress may by law provide for the case wherein 
neither a President elect nor a Vice President elect shall have quali- 
fied, declaring who shall then act as President, or the manner in 
which one who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall acl 
accordingly, until a President or Vice President shall have qualified. 

4. The Congress may by law provide for the case of the death 
of any of the persons from whom the House of Representatives 
may choose a President whenever the right of choice shall have 
devolved upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the 
persons from whom the Senate may choose a Vice President when 
the right of choice shall have devolved upon them. 



Constitution of the United States 12, 

5. Sections 1 aud 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of October 
following the ratification of this article. 

6. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been 
ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures 
of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the 
date of its submission. 

(Proposed by the 72nd Congress, First Session. On February 6, 
1933. it was proclaimed in effect, having been ratified by thirty-nine 

states. I 

Article XXI 

1. The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution ol 
the United States is hereby repealed. 

2. The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, 
or possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of 
intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby 
prohibited 

3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been 
ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by convention in the 
several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years 
from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress. 

(Proposed by the 72nd Congress, Second Session. Proclaimed 
in effect on December 5, 1933, having been ratified by thirty-six 
States. By proclamation of the same date, the President proclaim- 
ed that the eighteenth amendment to the Constitution was repealed 
on December 5. 1 933. ) 

Article XXII 
1. No person shall be elected to the office of the President more 
than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, 
or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which 
some other person was elected President shall be elected to the 
office of the President more than once. But this article shall not 
apply to any person holding the office of President when this 
article was proposed by the Congress, and shall not prevent any 
person who may be holding the office of President, or acting as 
President, during the term within which this article becomes op- 
erative from holding the office of President or acting as President 
during the remainder of such term. 



128 \oim 11 (' \i;oi i \ \ M \ \i \i 

2. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been 
ratified as an amendment to the constitution by the legislatures 
of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the 
date of its submission to the States by the congress. 

(Proposed by the 80th Congress in 1947 and became effective on 
Feb. 26, 1951, having been ratified by thirty-six States.) 

Article XXIII 

1. The District constituting the seat of Government of the United 
States shall appoint in such manner as the Congress may direct: 

A number of electors of President and Vice President equal to 
the whole number of Senators and Representatives in Congress to 
which the District would be entitled if it were a State, but in no 
event more than the least populous State; they shall be in addition 
to those appointed by the States, but they shall be considered, for 
the purposes of the election of President and Vice President, to be 
electors appointed by a State; and they shall meet in the District 
and perform such duties as provided by the twelfth article of 
amendment. 

2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by 
appropriate legislation. 

(Proposed by the 86th Congress in June of 1960 and ratified by 
the 38th State, March 29, 1961 and proclaimed a part of the Con- 
stitution, April 3, 1961.) 

Article XXIV 

1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any 
primary or other election for President or Vice President, for 
electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Repre- 
sentative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the 
United States or any State by reason of failure to pay any poll tax 
or other tax. 

2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by 
appropriate legislation. 

(Proposed by the 87th Congress, August 27, 1962 and ratified by 
the 38th State, January 23, 1964.) 

Article XXV 
1. In case of the removal of the President from office or of 
his death or resignation, the Vice President shall become Presi- 
dent. 



Constitution of the United States L29 

1. Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice Presi- 
dent, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall 
take office upon confirmation hy a majority vote of hoth Houses 
of Congress. 

3. Whenever the President transmits to the Presidenl pro 
tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives his written declaration that he is unable to discharge 
the powers and duties of his office, and until he transmits to them 
a written declaration to the contrary, such powers and duties 
shall be discharged by the Vice President as Acting President. 

4. Whenever the Vice President and a majority of either the 
principal officers of the executive departments or of such other 
body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the President 
pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives their written declaration that the President is unable 
to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President 
shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the office as 
Acting President. 

Thereafter, when the President transmits to the President pro 
tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives his written declaration that no inability exists, he shall 
resume the powers and duties of his office unless the Vice Presi- 
dent and a majority of either the principal officers of the execu- 
tive department or of such other body as Congress may by law 
provide, transmit within four days to the President pro tempore 
of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives 
their written declaration that the President is unable to dis- 
charge the powers and duties of his office. Thereupon Congress 
shall decide the issue, assembling within forty-eight hours for 
that purpose if not in session. If the Congress, within twenty- 
one days after receipt of the latter written declaration, or, it 
Congress is not in session, within twenty-one days after Congress 
is required to assemble, determines by two-thirds vote of both 
Houses that the President is unable to discharge the powers and 
duties of his office, the Vice President shall continue to dis- 
charge the same as Acting President; otherwise, the President 
shall resume the powers and duties of his office. 

(Submitted to the Legislatures of the fifty States July 6. L965. 
Ratified bv the 38th State (Nevada) February 10 f 1967.1 



PART II 
CENSUS 



POPULATION OF THE STATE OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Eighteenth Census of the United States: 1960 

The population of North Carolina's urban places continued to 
grow faster than that of the rural areas between 1950 and 1960, 
according to the eighteenth decennial census, issued by Robert W. 
Burgess, Director of the Bureau of the Census, Department of 
Commerce. 

Final figures show that the urban population increased from 
1,368,101 in 1950 to 1,801,921 in 1960, or 31.6 per cent, while the 
rural population increased from 2,693,828 in 1950 to 2,754,234 in 
1960 or an increase of only 2.2 per cent. The final count of the 
Eighteenth Census for the State on April 1, 1960, was 4,556,155 
compared to 4,061,929 in 1950, or an increase of 12.2 per cent. 
Urban residents accounted for 39.5 per cent of the State's popula- 
tion in 1960 as compared with 33.7 per cent in 1950. Rural areas 
in 1960 accounted for 60.5 per cent of the total population. The 
Census Bureau considers as urban areas the incorporated places of 
2,500 or more, or unincorporated places of 2,500 or more located 
outside urbanized areas. The remaining territory is classified as 
rural. 

There were 35 incorporated places of 10,000 or more in 1960. 
Five of these (Chapel Hill, Jacksonville, Lenoir, Lumberton and 
Roanoke Rapids) reached that size since 1950. Charlotte remains 
the State's largest city with a population of 201,564, followed in 
order by Greensboro with 119,574 and Winston-Salem with 111,135. 

According to final figures of the 1960 census 63 of the counties 
gained in population. Onslow County showed the greatest gain 
with an increase of 96.7 per cent. Cumberland County placed 
second with an increase of 54.6 per cent, while Mecklenburg was 
third with a 3 8.1 per cent gain. 

The first census of North Carolina was taken in 1790, returning 
a population of 393,751. The population has shown an increase 
at every census since that time. The population passed 1,000,000 
between 1860 and 1870, 2,000,000 between 1900 and 1910, 3,000,- 
000 between 1920 and 1930, 4,000,000 between 1940 and 1950, 
and 4,500,000 between 1950 and 1960. The present population 
represents a density of 8 6.4 inhabitants per square mile. North 
Carolina's total area in square miles is 52,712. Land area is 
49,142 square miles; water area is 3.57(1 square miles. 

Table 1 presents the figures for counties and for incorporated 
places of 10,000 or more, and Table 2 for incorporated places of 
less than 10.000. 133 



m 



Xmh mi ( ' \i;ui i \ \ M \ \ i \ i 



TABLE 1. POPULATION OF COUNTIES AND OF INCORPO- 
RATED PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE IN NORTH CAROLINA 

1960 



County or Place 

Thb Statk . .. 

Urban... 
Rural 
Per Cent Urban 



lounties: 
Alamance 
Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson. 
Ashe . 



Population 



Avery 

Beaufort 
Bertie... 
Bladen 
Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Cabarrus 
Caldwell. 
Camden . 



Carteret. . 
Caswell... 
Catawba. 
Chatham. 
Cherokee 



Chowan... 

Clay 

Cleveland. 
Columbus. 
Craven . . 



Cumberland. 

Currituck 

Dare. _. 

Davidson 

Davie... .. 



4,556,155 
1,801,921 
2,754,23-1 

39.5 



Ho. 674 

15,625 

7,734 

24,962 
19,768 

12,009 
36,014 
24,350 
28,881 
20,278 

130,074 

52,701 

68,137 

19,552 

5,598 

30,940 
19,912 
73,191 
26,785 
16,335 

11,729 
5,526 
66,048 
48,973 
58,773 

118,418 

6,601 

5,935 

79,493 

16,728 



County or Place I Population 

Counties— Cont. 

Duplin 40,270 

Durham 111,995 

Edgecombe 54,226 

Forsvth 189 428 

Franklin 28,755 



Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville... 
Greene 



Guilford... 

Halifax 

Harnett... 
Haywood.. 
Henderson. 



Hertford . 
Hoke.. 
Hyde.... 
Iredell . . . 
Jackson . . 



Johnston. 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln . 



Macon 

Madison 

Martin .. 

McDowell... 
Mecklenburg 



Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 



127,074 

9,254 

6,432 

33,110 

16,741 

246,520 
58,956 
18,236 
39,711 
36,163 

22,718 
16,356 
5,765 
62,526 
17,780 

62,936 
11,005 
26,561 
55,276 
28,814 

14,935 
17,217 
27,139 
26,742 
272,111 

13,906 
18,408 
36,733 
61,002 
71,742 



County or Place I Populatioi 



Counties- Cont, 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange... .... 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender.. 

Perquiman* 

Person . 

Pitt . 

Polk . . 



Randolph. 
Richmond. . 

Robeson 

Rockingham 
Rowan 



Rutherford 
Sampson. . 
Scotland . 

Stanly 

Stokes 



Incorporated Places of 10,000 or More 



Albemarle . 

Asheville 

Burlington 

Chapel Hill... 
Charlotte... . 
Concord 

Durham 

Elizabeth City 
Fayetteville.. 

Gastonia 

Goldsboro 

Greensboro 



12,261 
60,192 
33 199 
12,573 
201,564 
17,799 

78,302 
14,062 
47,106 
37,276 
>,»:.: 
119,574 



Greenville.. 
Henderson.. 

Hickory 

High Point. 
Jacksonville. 



22,860 
12,740 
19,328 
62,063 
13,491 
Kinston | 24,819 



Surry . . 

Swain... 
Transylvania. 

Tyrrell 

Union... . 

Vance . . . 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington. . 
Watauga . . . 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey .. 



Lenoir 

Lexington.. 
Lumberton. 

Monroe 

New Bern. . 
Raleigh 



10,257 
16,093 
15,305 
10,882 
15,717 
93,931 



26. Ml 
82,706 
12.970 
'< S5n 
25,630 

18.508 
9.178 
26.394 
69,942 
11 ,395 

61,497 
39,202 
89,102 

-,'i 029 
82,817 

45,091 
48,013 
25,183 

in v;;; 

22,314 

48,205 
8,387 

16,372 
4.520 

11.670 

32,002 
169,082 
19,652 
13,488 
17,529 

82,059 

45,269 
57,716 
22,804 
14.008 



Reidsville 14,267 

Roanoke Rapids. 13,320 

Rocky Mount.. .J 32,147 

Salisbury.-- 21,297 

Sanford. i 12,253 

Shelby.... 17,698 

Statesville. . .... 19,844 

Thomasville j 15,190 

Wilmington.. ... | 44,013 

Wilson j 28,753 

Winston-Salem...! 111,135 



Population of Cities and Towns 



135 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF 
LESS THAN 10,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1960 

2,500 to 10,000 



City or Town 



Ahoskie 

Asheboro 

Ayden 

Beaufort 

Belmont 

Bessemer City.. 

Boone 

Brevard 

Canton 

Cary 

Cherry ville 

Clayton 

Clinton 

Dallas 

Davidson 

Draper 

Dunn 

Edenton 

Elkin 

Enfield 

Farmville 

Forest City 

Fuquay Springs. 

Garner 

Graham 

Granite Falls 

Hamlet 

Henderson ville.. 

Kernersville 

Kings Mountain 

Laurinburg 

Leaksville 

Lincolnton 

Longview 

Louisburg 

Lowell 



County 



Hertford.. 
Randolph. 

Pitt 

Carteret.. 
Gaston 



Gaston 

Watauga 

Transylvania. 

Haywood 

Wake. 



Gaston 

Johnston 

Sampson 

Gaston. 

Mecklenburg. 

Rockingham.. 

Harnett 

Chowan 

Surry 

Halifax 



Pitt 

Rutherford . 

Wake 

Wake 

Alamance.. 



Caldwell 2,644 



Richmond. 
Henderson. 
Forsyth . . . 
Cleveland. 



Popula- 
tion 



Scotland 

Rockingham 

Lincoln 

Catawba 

Franklin 

Gaston 



4,583 
9,449 
3,108 
2,922 
5,007 

4,017 
3,686 
4,857 
5,068 
3,356 

3,607 
3,302 
7,461 
3,270 
2,573 

3,382 
7,566 
4,458 
2,868 
2,978 

3,997 
6,556 
3,389 
3,451 
7,723 



4,460 
5,911 
2,942 
8,008 

8,242 
6,427 
5,699 
2,997 
2,862 
2,784 



City or Town 



Marion .. 

Mooresville 

Morehead City. 

Morgan ton 

Mount Airy 



Mount Holly 

Mount Olive 

Murfreesboro 

Newton 

North Wilkesboro... 



Oxford 

Plymouth 

Raeford 

Red Springs . 
Rockingham. 



Roxboro 

Rutherfordton. 
Scotland Neck. 

Selma 

Siler City 



Smithfield 

Southern Pines. 

Spencer 

Spindale 

Spray 



Spring Lake Cumberland 



Spruce Pine. 

Tarboro 

Valdese 

Wadesboro . 



Wake Forest. 
Washington.. 
Wayn es ville . 
Whiteville... 
Williamston. 



County 



McDowell. 
Iredell.... 
Carteret... 

Burke 

Surry 



Gaston... 
Wayne... 
Hertford. 
Catawba. 
Wilkes... 



Granville 

Washington. 

Hoke 

Robeson 

Richmond... 



Person 

Rutherford. 

Halifax 

Johnston... 
Chatham... 



Johnston 

M oore 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Rockingham 



Mitchell. 
Edgecombe. 

Burke 

Anson 



Wake 

Beaufort.. 
Haywood.. 
Columbus. 
Martin 



Popula- 
tion 

3,345 
6,918 
5,583 
9,186 
7,055 

4,037 
4,673 
2,643 
6,658 
4,197 

6,978 
4,666 
3,058 
2,767 
5,512 

5,147 
3,392 
2,974 
3,102 
4,455 

6,117 
5,198 
2,904 
4,082 
4,565 

4,110 
2,504 
8,411 
2,941 
3,744 

2,664 
9,939 
6,159 
4,683 
6,924 



1,000 to 2,500 



Aberdeen. 
Andrews . 

Angier 

Apex 

Archdale . 

Aulander. 
Belhaven. 
Benson... 
Bethel... 
Beulaville 



Moore 

Cherokee. 
Harnett.. 

Wake 

Randolph 

Bertie 

Beaufort . 
Johnston . 

Pitt 

Duplin... 



1,531 
1,404 
1,249 
1,368 
1,520 

1,083 
2,386 
2,355 
1,578 
1,062 



Biltmore Forest. 

Biscoe 

Black Mountain 
Boiling Springs.. 
Bryson City 

Burgaw 

Burnsville 

Carolina Beach. 

Carrboro 

Carthage 



Buncombe 

Montgomery. 

Buncombe 

Cleveland 

Swain 

Pender 

Yancey 

New Hanover 

Orange 

Moore 



1,004 
1,053 
1,313 
1,311 
1,084 

1,750 
1,388 
1,192 
1,997 
1,190 



l.",.; 



Noktii Carolina Manual 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF 
LESS THAN 2,500 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1960— Continued 

1,000 to 2,500— Continued 



City or Town 



Chadbourn . . 
China Grove. 

Coats 

Columbia 

Conover 



Cornelius 

Drexel 

East Spencer... 
Elizabethtown. 
Elon College... 



Fair Bluff... 

Fairmont 

Four Oaks.. 

Franklin 

Franklinton. 



Fremont. 
Gaston... 



Gibsonville 

Granite Quarry. 
Grifton 



Havelock 

Hazelwood.. 

Hertford 

Hillsborough. 
Hope Mills, . 



Hudson 

Huntersville. 
Jamestown. . 

Jones ville 

Kenly 



La Grange. 

Landis 

Liberty 

Lillington . . 

Littleton. . 



Madison.. 

Maiden 

Mars Hill.. 
Marshville. 
Maxton... 



Mayodan. 
Mebane. . 



Mocks ville 

Mount Gilead... 
Mount Pleasant. 



County 



Columbus. 

Rowan 

Harnett. .. 
Tyrrell.... 
Catawba. - 



Mecklenburg. 

Burke 

Rowan 

Bladen 

Alamance 



Columbus. 
Robeson... 
Johnston . . 

Macon 

Franklin.. 



Wayne 

Northampton. 

Alamance 

Guilford 

Rowan 

Pitt 



Craven.. 

Haywood 

Perquimans 

Orange 

Cumberland 

Caldwell. 

Mecklenburg... 

Guilford 

Yadkin 

Johnston 



Lenoir 

Rowan 

Randolph . 
Harnett... 

Halifax 

Warren 



Rockingham. _. 

Catawba 

Madison 

Union 

Robeson 



Popula- 
tion 



Rockingham 

Alamance 

Orange 

Davie 

Montgomery 

Cabarrus 



2,323 
1,500 
1,049 
1,099 
2,281 

1,444 
1,146 
2,171 
1,625 
1,284 

1,030 
2,286 
1,010 
2,173 
1,513 

1,609 
1,214 

1,784 

1,059 
1,816 

2,433 
1,925 
2,068 
1,349 
1,109 

1,536 
1,004 
1,247 
1,895 
1,147 

2,133 
1,763 
1,438 
1,242 

I 1,021 



1,912 
2,039 
1,574 
1,360 
1,755 

2,366 

2,364 

2,379 
1,229 
1,041 



City or Town 



Murphy 

Nashville 

Norwood 

Pembroke 

Pilot Mountain. 

Pinetops 

Pineville 

Pittsboro 

Ramseur 

Randleman 



Richlands 

Rich Square.. 

Robbins 

Roberson ville. 
Roseboro 



Rose Hill.. 
Rowland.. 
St. Pauls. . 
Snow Hill. 
Southport. 



Sparta 

Spring Hope. 

Stanley 

Swansboro... 
Sylva 



Tabor City. 
Taylorsville. 

Trov 

Tryon 

Wallace 



Walnut Cove Stokes 



Warrenton.. 

Warsaw 

Weaverville. 
Weldon 



Wendell.. 

West Jefferson . 

Whitakers 



Wilkesboro. 
Windsor 



Wingate 

Winter ville . 
Yadkinville. 
Zebulon 



County 



Cherokee. 

Nash 

Stanly... 
Robeson.. 
Surry 



Edgecombe 

Mecklenburg 

Chatham 

Randolph 

Randolph 



Onslow 

Northampton. 

Moore 

Martin 

Sampson 



Duplin 

Robeson... 
Robeson... 

Greene 

Brunswick. 

Alleghany. 

Nash 

Gaston 

Onslow 

Jackson 



Columbus 

Alexander 

Montgomery... 

Polk 

Duplin 



Warren 

Duplin 

Buncombe. 
Halifax 



Wake 

Ashe 

Edgecombe. 

Nash 

Wilkes 

Bertie 



Union.. 

Pitt 

Yadkin. 
Wake.. 



Population of Cities and Towns 



137 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF 
LESS THAN 1,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1960— Continued 

Less Than 1,000 



City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 


City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 




Columbus 

Moore 


159 
118 
197 
947 
558 

274 
590 
195 
302 

76 

449 
192 
795 
393 
564 

199 
346 

| 364 

545 

21 

103 
204 
222 
303 
310 

774 

| 711 

201 
617 
539 

274 
300 
638 
466 
596 

169 
187 
332 
633 
298 

593 
52 

342 

267 
504 


Cerro Gordo 

Cherry 

Chocowinity 

Claremont 

Clarkton 

Cleveland 

Clvde 


Columbus 

Washington 

Beaufort 

Catawba 


306 


Addor. 


61 


Advance.. 


Davie 


580 


Alexander Mills 

Anson ville 


Rutherford 

Anson 


728 
662 




Pamlico 

Yadkin 

Bertie 




594 


Arlington 


Haywood 


680 


Askewville 


Colerain 

Columbus 

Conetoe 

Conway . 


340 


Atkinson 


Pender... 


Polk . 


725 


Atlantic Beach 

Aurora.. 


Carteret 

Beaufort.. 

Sampson . 

Nash 


Edgecombe 

Northampton 

Bladen . 


147 
662 


Autryville 


Council 


56 


Baileys 


Cove City... 




551 


Bakersville 


Mitchell 

Avery 


Creedmoor 

Creswell 

Crossnore 

Crouse 


Granville. 

Washington 

Avery 


862 


Banner Elk 


402 


Barnardsville 


Buncombe 

Beaufort 

Edgecombe 

Nash 


277 


Bath 


Lincoln 

Cherokee 

Stokes . . .. 


901 


Battleboro j 


Culberson 


106 


Danbury 


175 


Bayboro 


Pamlico. 

Carteret 

Martin 


Deep Run 




183 


Bayshore Park 

Beargrass 


Delco 


Columbus 

Gaston 


466 


Bell Arthur 


Pitt 


Dell view 


4 


Bennett.- 


Chatham 

Bertie. .. 


Denton 


Davidson 

Jackson 

Surry 


852 


Bertie 


Denver 


113 


Black Creek.. 


Wilson 


Dillsboro 


140 


Bladenboro 


Bladen 


Dobson 


684 


Blowing Rock j 


Caldwell 

Watauga 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Yadkin. 

Rutherford 

Duplin .. 


Dover 


Craven 


651 


Dublin 


Bladen 


366 


Bolivia 


Dudley 


Wayne 


158 


Bolton .. 


Dundarrach 

East Bend 


Hoke 


109 


Boon ville 


Yadkin 

Scotland 

Beaufort 

Avery 




Bostic 


446 


Bowdens 


East Laurinburg 

Edward 


695 


Bridgeton 


Craven 


112 


Broadway 




Elk Park 


460 


Brookford 


Catawba 

Columbus 

Harnett 

Franklin. 

Duplin 


Ellenboro . 


Rutherford 

Richmond 

Wilson 


492 


Brunswick 


Ellerbe 


843 


Bunlevel 


Elm City . 


729 


Bunn 


Emerald Isle 

Eureka 


Carteret 


14 


Calypso 


246 


Cameron 




Everetts 




225 


Candor 


Montgomery 

Carteret 

Jackson 

Nash 


Evergreen 


Columbus 


300 


Cape Carteret 




666 




Faith 


Rowan 


494 


Castalia 


Falcon 


Cumberland 

Pitt 


235 


Catawba. 


Catawba 


Falkland 


140 



j as 



North Carolina Manual 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF 
LESS THAN 1,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1960— Continued 

Less Than 1,000 — Continued 



City or Town 



Fountain 

Franklin ville 

Garland 

Garysburg 

Gates ville. 

German ton 

Gibson 

Glen Alpine 

Godwin 

Gold Point 

Goldston 

Grainger 

Grimeeland 

Grover 

Halifax 

Hamilton 

Harmony. 

Harrells 

Harrellsville 

Hassell 

Hayesville 

Haywood __ 

Highlands 

Hildebran 

Hobgood 

Hoffman 

Holly Ridge 

Holly Springs... 

Hookerton 

Hot Springs 

Indian Trail 

Iron Station 

Jackson 

Jackson Springs. 
James ville 

Jefferson 

Jupiter 

Kelford 

Kenansville 

Kill Devil Hills. 

Kittrell 

Knightdale 

Kure Beach 

Lake Lure 

Lake Waccamaw 



County 



Pitt 

Randolph 

Sampson 

Northampton. 
Gates 

Stokes 

Scotland 

Burke 

Cumberland.. 
Martin 

Chatham 

Lenoir 

Pitt 

Cleveland 

Halifax 

Martin 

Iredell 

Sampson 

Hertford 

Martin.. 

Clay 

Chatham 

Macon.. 

Burke 

Halifax 

Richmond 

Onslow 

Wake 

Greene 

Madison 

Union 

Lincoln 

Northampton. 

Moore 

Martin 

Ashe 

Buncombe 

Bertie 

Duplin 

Dare 

Vance 

Wake 

New Hanover 
Rutherford. _. 
Columbus 



Popula- 
tion 



496 
686 

642 

1M 
460 

162 
501 
734 
149 
98 

374 
188 
362 
538 
370 

565 
322 
259 
171 
147 

428 
713 
597 
518 
630 

344 
731 

558 
358 

72:: 

364 
279 
765 
244 
538 

814 
174 
362 
724 
268 

121 
622 
293 
233 

780 



City or Town 



Lansing 

Lasker 

Lattimore 

Laurel Park 

Lawndale 

Lewarae 

Lewiston 

Liles ville 

Linden 

Locust. 

Long Beach 

Lucama 

Lumber Bridge. 

Macclesfield 

Macon.. 

Magnolia 

Manly 

Manteo 

Margarets ville. . 
Marietta 

Marshall 

Matthews 

Maury 

Maysville 

McAden ville 

McDonald 

McFarlan 

Merry Oaks 

Micro 

Middleburg 

Middlesex 

Milton 

Milwaukee 

Mineral Springs 
Morrisville 

Mortimer 

Morven. 

Newland 

New London... 
Newport 

Newton Grove. 

Norlina 

Norman 

Oakboro 

Oak City 



County 



Ashe... 

Northampton 

Cleveland 

Henderson... 
Cleveland 

Richmond... 

Bertie 

Anson 

Cumberland. 

Stanly 

Brunswick... 

Wilson 

Robeson 

Edgecombe.. 
Warren 

Duplin 

Moore 

Dare 

Northampton 
Robeson 

Madison 

Mecklenburg. 

Greene 

Jone3 

Gaston 

Robeson 

Anson 

Chatham 

Johnston 

Vance 

Nash 

Caswell 

Northampton 

Union 

Wake 

Caldwell 

Anson 

Avery 

Stanly 

Carteret 

Sampson 

Warren 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Martin 



Population of Cities and Towns 



139 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF 
LESS THAN 1,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1960— Continued 

Less Than 1,000 — Continued 



City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 


City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 


Oakley 


Pitt 


17 

5 

787 

522 

139 

211 
50 

262 
65 

906 

323 
265 
563 
525 
509 

833 
215 
457 
530 
416 

259 

948 
797 
188 

1 837 

293 
587 
379 
948 
358 

510 

771 
419 
452 
529 

569 
570 
409 
624 
323 

207 
310 
4S0 

I 490 

29 
302 
205 


Smithtown. . 


Yadkin 

Beaufort 

Anson 


199 


Ocean Isle Beach 

Old Fort 


Brunswick 

McDowell 

Pamlico 

Robeson 

Pitt. 


South Creek 

South Wadesboro 

Speed 


82 
189 


Oriental 


Edgecombe 

Randolph 

Stanly .. 


142 


Orrum 


Staley 


260 


Pactolus . . 


Stanfield 


471 


Palmyra.. 


Halifax 

Beaufort 

Sampson 

Robeson 

Martin 

Caldwell 

Anson 

Wayne 


Stantonsburg.. 

Star 


Wilson 


897 


Pantego 


Montgomery 

Cumberland 

Granville 

Pitt .. 


745 


Parkersburg 


Stedman 


458 


Parkton . 


Stem 


221 


Parmele . 


Stokes 


195 


Patterson . 


Stone ville. 


Rockingham 

Pamlico 

Granville 

Lee 


951 


Peachland . 


Stonewall 


214 


Pikeville. . 


Stovall 


570 


Pinebluff 


Moore 


Swan Station 

Teacheys 


190 


Pine Level 


Johnston 

Beaufort 

Lenoir 

Anson 


Duplin... 


187 


Pinetown 


Todd ..{ 

Townsville 


Ashe 

Vance 


| 52 


Pink Hill 


Polkton... 


195 


Pollocks ville . 


Jones 

Bertie 


Trenton 


Jones 


404 




Trent Woods. 

Trinity 


Craven... 


517 


Powellsville . . 


Randolph 

Idedell 


881 


Princeton . 


Johnston 

Edgecombe 

Robeson 

Burke. 


Troutman 


648 


Princeville . 


Turkey 


Union 


199 


Proctorville 


Union ville 


119 


Rhodhiss j 

Richfield .. 


Vanceboro 


Craven 


806 


Caldwell 

Stanly 




Pamlico 

Moore 


452 




Graham 

Richmond 

Rowan .. 


Vass 


767 


Roberdel . . 


Vaughn 


Greene 


122 


Rockwell. 


Waco.. 


256 


Rolesville. 


Wake 




562 


Ronda 


Wilkes 


Warrensville 

Washington Park 

Watha 


191 


Roper 


Washington 

Transylvania 

Bertie 


Ashe 


116 


Rosman 


Beaufort 

Pender 


574 


Roxobel 


174 


Ruth 


Rutherford 

Sampson 

Polk. 


Waxhaw 


Union 


729 


Salemburg 




Jackson 


166 


e„t j 


White Lake 


130 


Saratoga 


Wilson 


Wilson Mills 

Winfall --.. 


Johnston 

Hertford 

Franklin 

Northampton 

Bertie 


280 




Northampton 

Randolph 


269 


Seagrove 


Winton 

Wood 


835 


Seven Springs 

Severn 


94 


Northampton 

Brunswick 

Edgecombe 

Nash. 


Woodland 


651 


Shallotte 


Wood ville 

Wrightsville Beach. . 

Yadkin College 

Yaupon Beach 

YoungsviUe 


344 




New Hanover... 
Davidson 

Franklin 


723 
75 


P g | 


Wilson 


89 




Pitt 


596 




Pitt 






Sims 


Wilson 











I III 



North Carolina Manual 



POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 
AS OF APRIL 1, 1960 



Area 



United States 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho.. 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana. 

Nebraska. 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

District of Columbia 



Population 



1960 



179 
3 

1 
1 

15 
1 
2 

I 

3 



,323,175 
,266,740 

226,167 
,302,161 
,786,272 
,717,204 
,753,947 
,535,234 

446,292 
,951,560 
,943,116 

632,772 

667,191 
,081,158 
,662,498 
,757,537 
,178,611 
,038,156 
,257,022 

969,265 
,100,689 
,148,578 
,823,194 
,413,864 
,178,141 
,319,813 

674,767 
,411,330 

285,278 

606,921 
,066,782 

951,023 
,782,304 
,556,155 

632.446 
,706,397 
,328,284 
,768,687 
,319,366 

859,488 
,382,594 

680,514 
,567,089 
,579,677 

890,627 

389,881 
.966,949 
,853,214 
,860,421 
,951,777 

330,066 

763,956 



1950 



151,325,798 
3,061,743 

128,643 

749,587 

1,909,511 

10,586,223 

1,325,089 

2,007,280 

318,085 
2,771,305 
3,444,578 

499,794 

588,637 
8,712,176 
3,934,224 
2,621,073 
1,905,299 
2,944,806 
2,683,516 

913,774 
2,343,001 
4,690,514 
6,371,766 
2,982,483 
2,178,914 
3,954,653 

591 ,024 
1,325,510 

160,083 

533,242 
4,835,329 

681,187 

14,830,192 

4,061,929 

619,636 

7,946,627 

2,233,351 

1,521,341 

10,498,012 

791,896 
2,117,027 

652,740 
3,291,718 
7,711,194 

688,862 

377,747 
3,318,680 
2,378,963 
2,005,552 
3,434,575 

290,529 

802,178 



Increase, 1950 to 1960 



Number 



1. 



27,997,377 

204,997 

97,524 

552,574 

—123,239 

5,130,981 

428,858 

527,954 

128,207 

2,180,255 

498,538 

132,978 

78,554 

,368,982 

728,274 

136,464 

273,312 

93,350 

573,506 

55,491 

757,688 

458,064 

1,451,428 

431,381 

-773 

365,160 

83,743 

85,820 

125,195 

73,679 

1.231,453 

269, «36 

1,952,112 

494,226 

12,810 

1,759,770 

94,933 

247.346 

821,354 

67,592 

265,567 

27,774 

275,371 

1,868,483 

201,765 

12,134 

648,269 

474,251 

— 145,131 

517,202 

39,537 

—38,222 



■Less than 0.1 percent. 



PART III 
POLITICAL 



State Congre 




142 






Districts-1966 




143 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS 

(Chapter 7, Extra Session Laws 1966) 

First District — Beaufort, Bertie, Camden, Chowan. Craven, Curri- 
tuck, Dare, Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Jones, Martin, Northampton. 
Pamlico, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Pitt, Tyrrell, Washington. 

Second District — Edgecombe, Franklin, Granville, Greene, Halifax, 
Johnston, Lenoir, Vance, "Warren, Wilson. 

Third District — Carteret, Duplin, Harnett, Lee, Onslow, Pender, 
Sampson, Wayne. 

Fourth District — Chatham, Montgomery, Moore, Nash. Orange, 
Randolph, Wake. 

Fifth District — Caswell, Durham, Forsyth, Person. Rockingham. 
Stokes. 

Sixth District — Alamance, Davidson, Guilford. 

Seventh District — Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, Cumberland. 
Hoke, New Hanover, Robeson, Scotland. 

Eighth District — Anson, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, Richmond, Union. 

Ninth District — Alleghany, Ashe, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Davie. 
Rowan, Stanly, Surry, Watauga, Wilkes, Yadkin. 

Tenth District — Alexander, Avery, Burke, Catawba, Cleveland. 
Gaston, Iredell. 

Eleventh District — Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, 
Henderson, Jackson, McDowell, Macon, Madison, Mitchell. Polk. 
Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania, Yancey. 

JUDICIAL DISTRICTS 

(Superior and District Courts) 
First Division 

First District — Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Dare, Gates, Pas- 
quotank, Perquimans. 

Second District— Beaufort, Hyde, Martin, Tyrrell, Washington. 
Third District — Carteret, Craven, Pamlico, Pitt. 
Fourth District — Duplin, Jones, Onslow, Sampson. 

Fifth District — New Hanover, Pender. 

145 



146 North Carolina Manual 

Sixth District — Bertie, Halifax, Hertford, Northampton. 
Seventh District — Edgecombe, Nash, Wilson. 
Eighth District — Greene, Lenoir, Wayne. 

Second Division 

Ninth District — Franklin, Granville, Person, Vance, Warren. 

Tenth District— Wake. 

Eleventh District — Harnett, Johnston, Lee. 

Twelfth District — Cumberland, Hoke. 

Thirteenth District — Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus. 

Fourteenth District — Durham. 

Fifteenth District — Alamance, Chatham, Orange. 

Sixteenth District — Robeson, Scotland. 

Third Division 
Seventeenth District — Caswell, Rockingham, Stokes, Surry. 
Eighteenth District — Guilford. 

Ninteenth District — Cabarrus, Montgomery, Randolph, Rowan. 
Twentieth District — Anson, Moore, Richmond, Stanly, Union. 
Twenty-first District — Forsyth. 

Twenty-second District — Alexander, Davidson, Davie, Iredell. 
Twenty-third District — Alleghany, Ashe, Wilkes, Yadkin. 

Fourth Division 

Twenty-fourth District — Avery, Madison, Mitchell, Watauga, 
Yancey. 

Twenty-fifth District — Burke, Caldwell, Catawba. 

Twenty-sixth District — Mecklenburg. 

Twenty -seventh District — Cleveland, Gaston, Lincoln. 

Twenty-eighth District — Buncombe. 

Twenty-ninth District — Henderson, McDowell, Polk, Rutherford, 
Transylvania. 

Thirtieth District — Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Jackson, 
Macon, Swain. 



District Divisions 147 

SOLICITORIAL DISTRICTS 

First District — Beaufort, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Dare, 
Gates, Hyde, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Tyrrell. 

Second District — Edgecombe, Martin, Nash, Washington, Wilson. 

Third District — Bertie, Granville, Halifax, Hertford, Northamp- 
ton, Vance, Warren. 

Fourth District — Harnett, Johnston, Lee, Wayne. 

Fifth District — Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, Pamlico, Pitt. 

Sixth District — Duplin, Lenoir, Onslow, Sampson. 

Seventh District — Franklin, Wake. 

Eighth District — Brunswick, Columbus, New Hanover, Pender. 

Ninth District — Cumberland, Hoke. 

Ninth-A District — Bladen, Robeson. 

Tenth District — Durham. 

Tenth-A District — Alamance, Orange, Chatham, Person. 

Eleventh District — Ashe, Alleghany, Forsyth. 

Twelfth District — Davidson, Guilford. 

Thirteenth District — Anson, Moore, Richmond, Scotland, Stanly, 
Union. 

Fourteenth District — Gaston. 

Fourteenth-A District — Mecklenburg. 

Fifteenth District — Alexander, Cabarrus, Iredell, Montgomery, 
Randolph, Rowan. 

Sixteenth District — Burke, Caldwell, Catawba, Cleveland, Lin- 
coln, Watauga. 

Seventeenth District — Avery, Davie, Mitchell, Wilkes, Yadkin. 

Eighteenth District — Henderson, McDowell, Polk, Rutherford, 
Transylvania, Yancey. 

Nineteenth District — Buncombe, Madison. 

Twentieth District — Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Jack- 
son, Macon, Swain. 

Twenty-first District — Caswell, Rockingham, Stokes, Surry. 



148 North Carolina Manual 

APPORTIONMENT OF SENATORS BY DISTRICTS 

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CENSUS OF 1960 

AND THE CONSTITUTION 

(Chapter 1, Extra Session Laws 1966) 

First District — Bertie, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Gates, Hert- 
ford. Northampton, Pasquotank. Perquimans and Washington shall 
elect two senators. 

Second District — Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin and Tyrrell shall 
elect one senator. 

Third District — Carteret, Craven and Pamlico shall elect one 
senator. 

Fourth District — Edgecombe, Halifax, Pitt and Warren shall elect 
two senators. 

Fifth District — Greene, Jones and Lenoir shall elect one senator. 

Sixth District — Onslow shall elect one senator. 

scc< nth District — Franklin, Granville and Vance shall elect one 
senator. 

Eighth District — Johnston, Nash and Wilson shall elect two sena- 
tors. 

Ninth District — Wayne shall elect one senator. 

Tenth District — Duplin. New Hanover, Pender and Sampson shall 
elect two senators. 

Eleventh District — Durham, Orange and Person shall elect two 
senators. 

Twelfth District — Wake shall elect two senators. 

Thirteenth District — Chatham, Harnett and Lee shall elect one 
senator. 

Fourteenth District — Cumberland and Hoke shall elect two sena- 
tors. 

Fifteenth District — Bladen. Brunswick and Columbus shall elect 
one senator. 

Sixteenth District — Caswell and Rockingham shall elect one sena- 
tor. 



District Divisions 149 

Seventeenth District — Alamance shall elect one senator. 

Eighteenth District — Guilford and Randolph shall elect three sena- 
tors. 

Nineteenth District — Davidson, Montgomery, Moore, Richmond and 
Scotland shall elect two senators. 

Twentieth District- — Robeson shall elect one senator. 

Txcenty-first District — Alleghany, Ashe, Stokes and Surry shall 
elect one senator. 

Twenty-second District — Forsyth shall elect two senators. 

T to enty -third District — Rowan shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-fourth District — Anson, Cabarrus, Stanly and Union shall 
elect two senators. 

Twenty-fifth District — Davie, Watauga, Wilkes and Yadkin shall 
elect one senator. 

Twenty-sixth District — Alexander, Catawba, Iredell and Lincoln 
shall elect two senators. 

Twenty -seventh District — Mecklenburg shall elect three senators. 

Twenty-eighth District — Burke and Caldwell shall elect one sena- 
tor. 

Twenty-ninth District — Cleveland and Gaston shall elect two sena- 
tors. 

Thirtieth District — Avery, McDowell and Rutherford shall elect 
one senator. 

Thirty-first District. — Buncombe, Madison, Mitchell and Yancey 
shall elect two senators. 

Thirty-second District — Haywood, Henderson and Polk shall elect 
one senator. 

Thirty-third District — Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Jackson, Macon, 
Swain and Transylvania shall elect one senator. 



APPORTIONMENT OF MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE 
OF REPRESENTATIVES BY DISTRICTS IN 
ACCORDANCE WITH THE CENSUS OF 1960 

(Chapter 5, Extra Session Laws 1966) 

First District— Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Gates, Pasquotank 
and Perquimans shall elect two representatives. 

Second District — Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Tyrrell and Washington 
shall elect two representatives. 

Third District — Carteret, Craven and Pamlico shall elect three 
representatives. 

Fourth District Onslow and Pender shall elect three representa- 
tives. 

Fifth District — New Hanover shall elect two representatives. 

Sixth District — Bertie, Hertford and Northampton shall elect two 
representatives. 

nth District — Halifax and Martin shall elect two representa- 
tives. 

Eighth District — Pitt shall elect two representatives. 

Ninth District — Greene, Jones and Lenoir shall elect two repre- 
sentatives. 

Tenth District — Wayne shall elect two representatives. 

Eleventh District — Duplin shall elect one representative. 

Txoelfth District — Bladen and Sampson shall elect two representa- 
tives. 

Thirteenth District— Brunswick and Columbus shall elect two 
representatives. 

Fourteenth District— Edgecombe and Nash shall elect three rep- 
resentatives. 

Fifteenth District — Johnston and Wilson shall elect three repre- 
sentatives. 

Sixteenth District — Franklin, Vance and Warren shall elect two 
representatives. 

150 



District Divisions 151 

Seventeenth District — Caswell, Granville and Person shall elect 
two representatives. 

Eighteenth District — Durham shall elect three representatives. 

Nineteenth District — Wake shall elect four representatives. 

Twentieth District— Chatham and Orange shall elect two repre- 
sentatives. 

Twenty-first District — Alamance shall elect two representatives. 

Twenty-second District — Harnett and Lee shall elect two repre- 
sentatives. 

Twenty-third District — Cumberland shall elect four representa- 
tives. 

Twenty-fourth District — Hoke, Robeson and Scotland shall elect 
four representatives. 

Twenty-fifth District — Rockingham shall elect two representa- 
tives. 

Twenty-sixth District — Guilford shall elect six representatives. 

Twenty-seventh District — Montgomery and Randolph shall elect 
two representatives. 

Twenty-eighth District — Moore shall elect one representative. 

Twenty-ninth District — Richmond shall elect one representative. 

Thirtieth District — Forsyth shall elect five representatives. 

Thirty-first District- — Davidson shall elect two representatives. 

Thirty-second District — Stanly shall elect one representative. 

Thirty-third District — Anson and Union shall elect two representa- 
tives. 

Thirty-fourth District — Rowan shall elect two representatives. 

Thirty-fifth District — Cabarrus shall elect two representatives. 

Thirty-sixth District — Mecklenburg shall elect seven representa- 
tives. 

Thirty-seventh District — Alleghany, Ashe, Stokes and Surry shall 
elect three representatives. 



152 Noktii Cakoi.ina Manual 

Thirty-eighth District — Wilkes and Yadkin shall elect two repre- 
sentatives. 

Thirty-ninth District — Davie and Iredell shall elect two representa- 
tives. 

fortieth District — Catawba shall elect two representatives. 

Forty-first District — Gaston and Lincoln shall elect four repre- 
sentatives. 

Forty-second District — Alexander, Burke and Caldwell shall elect 
three representatives. 

Forty-third District — Cleveland, Polk and Rutherford shall elect 
three representatives. 

Forty-fourth District — Avery, Mitchell and Watauga shall elect 
one representative. 

Forty-fifth District — Buncombe and McDowell shall elect four 
representatives. 

Forty-sixth District — Henderson shall elect one representative. 

Forty-seventh District — Haywood, Madison and Yancey shall elect 
two representatives. 

Forty-eighth Diistrict — Jackson, Swain and Transylvania shall 
elect one representative. 

Forty-ninth District — Cherokee, Clay, Graham and Macon shall 
elect one representative. 



NORTH CAROLINA DEMOCRATIC PLATFORM 

FOR 1966 

The Democrats of North Carolina, in convention assembled, 
respectfully submit the following Platform of the Democratic 
Party of North Carolina for 1966-67. 

INTRODUCTION 

The 1966 Platform Committee, operating under the guidance 
and direction of the State Democratic Executive Committee, offers 
this document for consideration as a sincere and concise state- 
ment of policies and goals established by the Democratic Party 
to serve the best interest of all North Carolinians. 

The philosophy expressed here is partisan only in the sense 
that it represents dedication to and faith in the kind of govern- 
ment that is responsive to the will of the people, that traditionally 
looks to the future, unhesitatingly aligns itself with progress 
and, without compromise, seeks to enhance the well-being and 
preserve the dignity of the individual. 

Each statement in this Platform is the result of much study 
and deliberation. It is a Platform that represents, not the views 
of the few individuals charged with the responsibility of its 
preparation, but the views of countless North Carolinians who 
subscribe to the belief that the opportunity to earn a productive 
and prosperous life is the birthright of every citizen of this state. 

The accomplishments listed here should be a source of pride 
for every North Carolinian. The goals listed here must be a 
challenge for every Democrat. Good government — the kind of 
government that has become traditional in our state in this cen- 
tury — is not the product of chance. It is the product of determi- 
nation and sacrifice— the product of vision — the product of people 
dedicated to the principles of the Democratic Party. 

With full awareness of our responsibility — a responsibility en- 
trusted to us by the people of North Carolina — this platform for 
progress has been developed. With pride in the past, confidence 
in the present and enthusiasm for the future, this platform can 
be submitted to the people for endorsement. 

153 



154 North Carolina Manual 

1 «><»<; Platform Committee 

I. L. Dean, 6th District — Chairman 

Mrs. G. W. Cover, 11th District — Secretary 

Henry Harrell, 1st District 

John Kerr, Jr., 2nd District 

D. L. Ward, 3rd District 

Harry Horton, 4th District 

John Gallaher, 5th District 

Hector McGeachy, 7th District 

Raymond King, 8th District 

Ray Lackey, 9th District 

Woodrow W. Jones, 10th District 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY AFFAIRS: 

The strength of the Democratic Party in North Carolina has 
long been a deep awareness on the part of the people that ours 
is the party of the people, the party of faith and not fear, the party 
of progress. 

North Carolina Democrats have demonstrated a capacity for 
meeting challenges since the beginning of this century — resulting 
in progress in all areas affecting the well-being of our people. 
Most importantly, it has given this state a reservoir of experi- 
enced, dedicated leadership at all levels of government. 

Today, as we face the great problems and the great opportuni- 
ties of the most exciting and complex age in the history of man, 
the responsibilities that rest with this leadership is overwhelming. 

It is the responsibility that can and will be met by the Demo- 
cratic Party. It will be met because the Party is strong, because 
the Party is dedicated, and because its members are united in 
their determination to continue building a more abundant life 
for all North Carolinians. 

The youthful faction of the Party — the Teen-Dem Clubs and 
the Young Democratic Clubs, both individual units and members 
of the Confederation — continues to expand in size and influence. 
The contribution of these young North Carolinians to their state 
and their Party grows daily, and their vigorous alignment with 
Democratic ideals is not only inspirational, but insures the vitality 
of the Party in the years ahead. 



Democratic Platform 155 

The women of the Party, and especially those members of our 
Democratic Women's Clubs, have assumed additional responsi- 
bility in recent years and merit a special commendation for the 
service they have rendered the cause of good government in North 
Carolina. 

We pledge our continued support for these vital branches of 
the Party and charge the State Democratic Executive Committee 
with the responsibility for actively encouraging and assisting 
their efforts to insure good government in North Carolina. 



STATE GOVERNMENT 

No state in the nation receives more competent and loyal service 
from its public officials and employees than North Carolina. These 
individuals have contributed immeasurably to our state's repu- 
tation for good government. The Democratic Party is fully 
aware of this fact and has sought, through the years, to insure 
the maintenance of these high standards by fair treatment and 
compensation for service rendered. We pledge a continuation of 
this respectful relationship which benefits every citizen of North 
Carolina. 

No less essential to the cause of good government are the pri- 
vate citizens of the state who give their time and talent to service 
on governing and advisory bodies of state agencies, institutions 
and councils. Their contribution to the well-being of our state 
and its people cannot be expressed, but the stability and enlight- 
ened direction of governmental affairs is eloquent testimonial to 
the quality of their service. 

Legislative: The North Carolina General Assembly, chosen by 
the people to insure their progress, has, for more than six decades 
of Democratic leadership, met the responsibility entrusted to it. 
It has proven faithful to the knowledge that ours is a great state 
with great potential. It has proven faithful to the concept that 
ours must remain a state and nation governed by law and not by 
men. It has labored long and effectively to develop that poten- 
tial and protect that concept. We ask that the General Assembly 
continue this dedication. To that end we unhesitatingly pledge 
the support of the Democratic Party. 



L56 North Carolina Manual 

The Judiciary: Improvement in the administration of justice 
is the constant aim of the judiciary in North Carolina. That effort, 
supported by the Democratic Party, resulted in the enactment of 
The Judicial Department Act by the 1965 General Assembly. 
Implementation of this Act will greatly improve the court system 
of the state. 

The North Carolina Courts Commission, an arm of the General 
Assembly, continues to work on legislation for enactment in 1967 
that will further modernize the court system of North Carolina 
to insure equal justice under the law for all men. 

In the firm belief that impartial justice is a cornerstone of 
democracy, the Democratic Party will continue to encourage and 
support all reasonable efforts in the area of judicial reform. 

AGRICULTURE: 

The Democratic Party has traditionally led and, in large 
measure, been responsible for action resulting in the greatest 
farming productivity in the history of mankind. In spite of this, 
technical advances and products of research have forced increas- 
ing numbers of families to leave the farm. Obviously, to strive 
for a better balanced economy while maintaining pace with the 
requirements of a growing population, it will be necessary to 
develop new and better methods of stabilizing our rural popula- 
tion while increasing the income of our farm families. 

The Democratic Party pledges its firm support to all govern- 
mental agencies with responsibilities that relate to these goals. 
North Carolina farm products must be processed and distributed 
so that the farmers of this state receive a fair share of agricultural 
income. Marketing service programs that are directed toward 
assisting farmers and trades people with specific problems should 
be expanded. Research and consumer protection programs should 
be expanded to insure renewed confidence on the part of the 
public in the farm products we produce. Extension programs 
and agency projects designed to improve farm income and all 
facets of rural life should be continued. 



Democratic Platform 157 

CORRECTIONAL. PROGRAMS: 

Democratic leadership has given North Carolina a prison and 
correctional system that is generally recognized as one of the best 
in the nation. Emphasis within the prison system is placed on 
productive work, with increasing attention given to programs of 
education, vocational training and counseling designed to return 
prison inmates to society as responsible, contributing citizens. 
This enlightened approach is equally evident in our juvenile 
correction programs and in the Probation Commission and Board 
of Paroles. We support the continuation of these policies. 

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

The theme of "total development" as envisioned and promoted 
by Governor Dan Moore is moving North Carolina in the direction 
of the most beneficial use of all the State's resources to insure 
economic progress. The goal of making every citizen productive 
and providing every citizen with an opportunity to benefit fully 
from his productivity must be maintained. The past year saw 
all-time records set in capital investments in new and expanded 
industry. More than 37,000 new jobs were created and payrolls 
increased by $137 million. There is every indication that 1966 
will set new records. 

More than 3,300 new business corporations were chartered in 
North Carolina during the past year and more than 400 foreign 
corporations were added to the list authorized to do business in 
our state. Total resources in State-chartered banks rose above 
$3 billion. Greater harmony has been established in the area of 
public and private utilities than has been known in recent 
decades. 

All of these indications of sound progress should be sources 
of pride for the political party that provided the leadership and 
vision which made them possible. But pride in past achievements, 
at this critical time in our history, must serve to instill, not com- 
placency, but a constantly new and vibrant awareness of the 
responsibility we have for the future. There is much that re- 
mains to be done. There are new challenges daily in every eco- 
nomic sphere. And each challenge is an opportunity for economic 
progress — for a better way of life for the people of North Caro- 
lina. The great wealth of our state — its people and its natural 



State Senal 




158 



)istricts-1966 




159 



160 North Carolina Manual 

resources- represents a potential that has only begun to develop. 
The Democratic Party recognizes this potential and eagerly ac- 
cepts the responsibility that it imposes. 

EDUCATION: 

The totai economic and cultural development of North Caro- 
lina requires the full educational development of every citizen. 

The Democratic Party, because it is the party of the people and 
not the party of special privilege, has traditionally given strong 
support to the maximum extension of universal educational op- 
portunity. Under Democratic leadership since the beginning of 
this century, the cause of education has flourished. The dream 
of Charles B. Aycock has become reality. Clearly, the Demo- 
cratic Party is the "Education Party" in North Carolina. 

The public schools come first. Here the foundation for all 
progress is laid. Strong support for public schools is essential. 
It will be continued and strengthened. 

The requirements of the age in which we live demand that we 
place no limit on educational opportunity. Toward this end, we 
have established a system of community colleges, technical insti- 
tutes and industrial education centers to insure the availability 
of facilities offering opportunities for maximum development of 
individual skills. We must expand these facilities and increase 
our efforts to encourage our people to take advantage of them. 

Higher education completes the system of educational oppor- 
tunity required for total development of our human and natural 
resources. Strong support will continue to be given to university 
and four-year college education. 

K ! ACTION LAWS: 

The State Board of Elections and those dedicated men and 
women in every county of North Carolina who continue to admin- 
ister fair, honest, and impartial elections throughout the broad 
election complex of over 2,100 precincts are, in fact, our greatest 
fundamental democratic freedom — the right to vote. 

As Democrats, pledged by tradition to this basic freedom, we 
pledge to continue providing an enviable election process in this 
state. We support the State and County Boards of Elections in 
their continuing work to preserve our free election process for 
present and future generations of North Carolinians. 



Democratic Platform 161 

We further commend the action of the Democrats in the 1965 
General Assembly who provided the leadership for the establish- 
ment of an election law study commission charged with the re- 
sponsibility of recommending any alterations in existing laws 
deemed necessary to insure the voting rights of all our people. 

FISCAL AFFAIRS: 

North Carolina is in excellent financial condition. The bonds 
of the state are rated AAA — the highest rate available to state 
bonds. North Carolina's high and enviable reputation in fiscal 
affairs is due to the fact that sound business principles and fiscal 
integrity have been the basis of the state's policy for over 60 
years. The prudent and sound management of this most basic 
of all governmental functions reflects credit on North Carolina 
Democrats of the past and present and represents a sacred trust 
to be passed on to future Democrats. 

HERITAGE AND CULTURE: 

The Democratic Party has traditionally supported the position 
that an understanding and appreciation of an individual's heritage 
is vitally important to that individual's capacity for appraising 
the present and contributing to the future. 

North Carolina has a great heritage. It should be preserved. 
North Carolina has a great capacity for cultural development. 
It should be pursued vigorously. 

The esthetic reasons for steadily increasing attention to our 
heritage and our cultural development are sufficient unto them- 
selves. But we live in a practical society and in this society 
there is a very definite application of practicality to the develop- 
ment of our heritage and culture. Tourism is our third most 
productive industry. Increasing leisure time will bring larger 
number of visitors to our state and will enable more of our own 
people to seek pleasure and inspiration in North Carolina's his- 
torical sites and cultural developments. 

The Democratic Party pledges increasing attention to activities 
in these areas. 

HIGHWAYS: 

Democratic Administrations in North Carolina have worked 
diligently down through the years to develop a highway system 



162 North Carolina Manual 

which will meet the needs of the people by encouraging the ex- 
pansion of commerce and industry and making travel as safe and 
convenient as possible for our own citizens and the increasing 
number of visitors who contribute substantially to the economy. 

Today, with funds from the $300 million road bond issue, the 
Appalachia Program and other State and Federal sources, high- 
ways are being constructed at an unprecedented rate. 

The Democratic Party pledges its continued support to all 
efforts to expand and improve our existing highway system 
through the fair and equitable distribution and application of 
available funds. 

HUMAN RELATIONS: 

Traditionally, the Democratic Party supports the premise that 
society owes to every citizen the opportunity to progress to the 
limit of his individual interests and talents. We subscribe fur- 
th< r to the premise that this opportunity carries with it commen- 
surate obligations and responsibilities. 

The proud progress registered in North Carolina in recent years 
in human relations reflects credit on all North Carolinians. That 
progress must continue. Toward that end we commend the pro- 
gram of the North Carolina Good Neighbor Council and urge 
continued support for that program. 

We call upon all County Boards of Commissioners and munici- 
pal councils and boards to establish local Good Neighbor or 
Human Relations Councils to supplement the work of the State 
Council. 

LABOR : 

We pledge our continued support for humane labor laws, safe 
and healthful working conditions, just Workmen's Compensation 
and an Unemployment Insurance Program that is fair and equit- 
able to all concerned. 

We support laws guaranteeing employees the right-to-work 
and employers the right to conduct their businesses under the 
laws. In order to assure increased employment, industrial 
schools and proper training for skilled labor will create better 
jobs resulting in a broadened and higher standard of living. 

We subscribe to the premise that "a laborer is worthy of his 
hire" and commend the Democratic General Assembly for having 



Democratic Platform 163 

made North Carolina the only state in the Southeast to enact a 
State Minimum Wage Law for the protection of employees. 

We recommend that North Carolina's women be given equal 
compensation for equal work, equal promotion for equal prepara- 
tion, and we endorse the principle of equal responsibility for all 
employees performing work of comparable responsibility. 

NATURAL. RESOURCES: 

The Democratic Party of North Carolina has traditionally sup- 
ported the premise that, second only to its people, its natural 
resources are its greatest asset. These God-given resources, 
with which North Carolina is more than abundantly endowed, 
exist to benefit man. They are a sacred trust to be used profit- 
ably and equitably by each generation to the extent that the next 
generation is not denied the same benefits. 

With the steady increase in leisure time available to the average 
citizen, we must provide more opportunities for healthful outdoor 
recreation. The preservation of our wildlife resources is essential 
to this effort. 

In view of the fact that water is the best basic of all these 
natural resources, we propose that special attention be given 
at this time to methods of insuring the conservation and wise 
use of the state's water resources. 

PUBLIC HEALTH: 

As a state that has pioneered in the public health field, we 
advocate continued improvement of public health services through 
close cooperation of local, state and federal agencies to insure 
adequate protection for all North Carolinians. 

Recognizing the growth of our population, the outstanding 
public health program now established in North Carolina must 
be carried forward to decrease the infant mortality rate and 
reduce maternal deaths. We must deal effectively with chronic 
disease and environmental health factors. We must continue 
educational activities in all areas where such activities have 
proven to be effective health measures. 

The 1965 Democratic General Assembly is to be commended 
on its positive efforts to confront the tragic disease of alcoholism. 
We urge continued attention to this problem and pledge the 
support of the Democratic Party in those efforts. 



164 North Carolina Manual 

North Carolina has pioneered! in the development and main- 
tenance of an effective mental health program. The Democratic 
Party, with pride in its past contributions in this field, offers its 
pledge of continuing support. 

SENIOR CITIZENS: 

The record of the Democratic Party speaks eloquently for its 
firm belief that the senior citizen occupies a vital position in the 
economic, social and cultural development of the state. We feel 
strongly that the knowledge, experience and talents of these 
individuals must be exploited fully, and we urge that the 1967 
General Assembly give particular attention to the most beneficial 
use of this great asset. We further pledge continuing support 
for the various agencies with responsibilities in areas affecting, 
directly or indirectly, the senior citizen. 

TRAFFIC SAFETY: 

The tragic loss of life due to accidents on our streets and high- 
ways is a challenge to every North Carolinian. It is a particular 
challenge ro the Democratic Party and tne leadership it has pro- 
vided our state. Under the courageous insistence of Governor 
Moore, the challenge is being met. 

The 1965 General Assembly moved positively in the direction 
needed to combat this tragic situation. Its action in establishing 
new laws, programs and agencies to promote traffic safety re- 
flected credit on every member of the Legislature and every 
citizen who supported those actions. 

The Democratic Party feels strongly that this is a problem 
which transcends all political considerations and is deserving of 
the full support of all North Carolinians. We believe the key 
to traffic safety is sound, balanced, imaginative, cooperative 
action by public officials with the courage to lead. We pledge 
our support to that leadership. 

VETERANS: 

With increasing number of North Carolinians acquiring the 
status of veteran through courageous service of Viet Nam, it is 
particularly important that continuing support be given to those 
agencies whose responsibilities relate to veterans and the widows 
and orphans of veterans. 



Democratic Platfokm 165 

TAXATION: 

North Carolina remains at one of the nation's lowest levels 
of combined state and local taxation per capita and at the same 
time offers public service programs which continually rate na- 
tional attention. We advocate continued emphasis on the busi- 
nesslike, economical administration of government; a tax struc- 
ture that equitably distributes the cost of services required from 
government; increased personal exemptions, if economic condi- 
tions warrant, to correspond with federal income tax exemptions, 
and just and firm administration of the tax laws of the state. 

The Democratic Party opposes and will work diligently to pre- 
vent an increase in state taxes. 

WELFARE: 

The Democratic Party recognizes that the prevention and alle- 
viation of poverty are legitimate concerns of government, and as 
such merit action, not by public welfare alone, but by the entire 
community. The effectiveness of this effort at both the com- 
munity and state level, and the extent to which this concern is 
translated into reality, have marked bearing on the total devel- 
opment of the state. In acknowledgement of this fact, the Demo- 
cratic Party pledges continuing interest in and support for wel- 
fare programs with special attention given those programs de- 
signed to help people help themselves. 

NATIONAL AFFAIRS: 

Democratic administrations have benefitted the people of North 
Carolina with able, dedicated leadership. A close working rela- 
tionship between administrations at the state and national levels 
is essential to the continuation of these benefits. Toward this 
end, we encourage continued cooperation with the Democratic 
National Committee and support for the National Administration. 

At this time of crises, when freedom is threatened on many 
fronts throughout the world, we particularly commend the Presi- 
dent for his courage in maintaining this nation's commitment in 
Viet Nam. 

Remembering the confusion, indifference, uncertainty and lack 
of national purpose that characterized Republican administrations 
of the past, we unhesitatingly pledge our support for all nominees 
of the Democratic Partv. 



Democratic Platform 167 

SUMMARY 

The North Carolina Democratic Party for 1966: 

1. Will expand its support for, and encourage greater activity 
on the part of all organizations within the Democratic Party. 

2. Will continue its policy of supporting fair treatment and just 
compensation for public officials and employees. 

.5. Will use every means at its command to insure positive pro- 
grams designed to stabilize the agricultural community and 
increase farm income. 

4. Will continue support for the enlightened approach to cor- 
rectional programs at the state level. 

5. Recognizes the continuing and complex challenge that faces 
North Carolina in its effort to use all of its people and re- 
sources to bring more abundance to its people. 

6. Endorsed Governor Dan Moore's concept that attention to 
total development is the most effective approach to economic 
progress. 

7. Holds to its traditional position that education is the key 
to prosperity and pledges an untiring effort to continue 
expanding and improving the educational system at all levels 
in North Carolina. 

8. Will support all efforts to insure the sacred right of every 
citizen to participate in the election of public officials. 

9. Will maintain fiscal stability of the state. 

10. Will actively promote an appreciation of our heritage and 
the availability of cultural activities and facilities. 

11. Will continue to build highways throughout North Carolina 
on a basis of need. 

12. Will employ every means at our disposal to promote traffic 
safety. 

13. We commend the program of the North Carolina Good 
Neighbor Council and we urge its continued support and 
cooperation from our people throughout the state. 



1C8 North Carolina Manual 

14. Will continue support for efforts to develop fully the skills 
of each citizen and insure that citizen of job opportunities 
at fair wages. 

15. Recognizes natural resources as a valuable asset and pledges 
the conservation and most beneficial use of those resources. 

16. Urges that particular attention be given, at this time, to 
water resources. 

17. Pledges the maintenance of an effective public health system 
with increasing attention given to alcoholism and mental 
health. 

18. Supports programs for Senior Citizens, veterans and vet- 
eran's dependents. 

19. Favors increased tax exemptions where feasible and opposes 
an increase in state tax. 

20. Recognizes the need for welfare programs and lends particu- 
lar support to programs which help people help themselves. 

21. Pledges support for all Democratic nominees. 

2 2. Commends the President on his action with regard to Viet 
Nam. 



PLAN OF ORGANIZATION OF DEMOCRATIC 
PARTY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ARTICLE I 
PRECINCT ORGANIZATION 

Section 1. Precinct Committee: 

The unit of party organization shall be the voting precinct. In 
each precinct there shall be an executive committee consisting of 
five active Democrats, who reside full time in the precinct, at least 
two of whom shall be women and at least two of whom shall be 
men, who should be present when elected by the Democratic voters 
of said precinct at the precinct meeting called by the Chairman of 
the County Executive Committee as provided in this plan of or- 
ganization. The precinct committee so elected shall elect from its 
membership a Chairman and Vice Chairman, one of whom shall be 
a woman and the other of whom shall be a man, and a Secretary- 
Treasurer, provided, however, the Chairman and Vice Chairman 
shall not be from the same immediate family. 

Section 2. Precinct Meeting: 

The precinct meetings shall be presided over by the chairman 
of the precinct committee, but in his absence, the vice chairman 
of the committee shall preside, and in the absence of both the 
chairman and the vice chairman, any member of the committee 
may preside. 

Section 3. Quorum: 

A quorum for any precinct meeting shall consist of not less 
than five registered Democrats in such precinct. In the event a 
quorum is not present the precinct chairman shall notify the 
Chairman of the County Executive Committee who shall call a 
second meeting. If the second meeting shall fail for lack of a 
quorum, the officers of the County Executive Committee shall fill 
all vacancies. 

Section 4. Election of Delegates: 

At the precinct meeting called for that purpose the Democratic 
voters in attendance shall elect delegates and alternates to repre- 
sent the precinct in the county convention; and said delegates or 

169 



ORGANIZATION 
DEMOCRATIC PARTY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



CONGRESSIONAL 
COMMITTEE 



JUDICIAL 
COMMITTEE 



SOLICITORIAL 
COMMITTEE 



SENATORIAL 
COMMITTEE 



170 



PRECINCT 



Delegates 



COUNTY 
CONVENTION 



Deleqates 



STATE 
CONVENTION 



STATE 
EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 



STATE 
CHAIRMAN 



STATE 

VICE 

CHAIRMAN 



NAT'L. 
COMMITTEEMAN 

NAT'L. 
COMMITTEEWOMAN 



PRECINCT 
COMMITTEE 



/ 



/ 



/ 



/ 



/ 



/ 



/ 



/ 



PRECINCT 
CHAIRMAN AN 
VICE CHAIRMA 



COUNTY 
EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 



CAMPAIGN 
COMMITTEE 



SECRETARY 

FINANCE DIR 

TREASURER 

EXEC. DIR. 



!i 



Plan of Organization 171 

alternates, or such of them as shall attend the county convention, 
shall be entitled to vote the full strength of their precinct upon 
all questions, nominations, or elections which may come before 
the county convention. The chairman, or presiding officer, and 
the secretary of the precinct meeting shall certify to the county 
convention the names of the delegates and alternates selected at 
the meeting. 

Section 5. Business Permitted: 

At every precinct meeting, if requested, a vote shall be taken on 
the different questions, nominations, and elections anticipated to 
come before the county convention, and in that event, the chair- 
man or presiding officer and the secretary of the precinct meeting 
shall certify to the county convention the vote so cast, and the 
relative vote as fixed in the precinct meeting shall not be changed 
in the county convention, except by two-thirds vote of the entire 
unit of delegates desiring to change its vote. 

Section 6. Failure to Hold Meeting: 

In case there shall be a failure to hold a precinct meeting in 
pursuance of the call of the chairman of the county executive com- 
mittee, or if at any meeting there shall be a failure to elect dele- 
gates to the county convention, in either event, the precinct execu- 
tive committee shall appoint the delegates and alternates from the 
Democratic voters of the precinct. In the event there shall be a 
failure to elect a precinct committee prior to the day of the County 
Convention the County Executive Committee at its meeting on the 
day of the County Convention may appoint both the precinct com- 
mittee and the delegates to the said convention. 

Section 7. Representation: 

Each precinct shall be entitled to cast in the county convention 
one vote for every 50 Democratic votes or major fraction thereof 
cast by the precinct for the Democratic gubernatorial candidate 
at the last preceding gubernatorial election; provided that each 
precinct shall be entitled to cast at least two votes in the county 
convention. 

The County Executive Committee may, by resolution duly 
adopted, require each Precinct to appoint two delegates and two 
alternates for each vote to which said precinct may be entitled in 
the County Convention. 



172 North Carolina Manual 

Section 8. Removal of Ofi'icers and Committeemen: 

Any precinct Chairman, Vice Chairman or Committeeman, or 
Committeewoman who gives support to, aids, or helps any op- 
posing political party or candidate of any other political party, 
or who refuses or fails to perform his duties in organizing his pre- 
cinct, or who is convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude, 
shall be removed from office in the following manner: 

(1). A complaint setting forth full details and duly verified 
shall be filed with the Chairman of the County Executive Com- 
mittee by three active Democrats as defined in this Plan of Or- 
ganization registered in the county of the said officer or commit- 
teemember. The Chairman of the County Executive Committee 
shall upon approval of the other committee officers and after giv- 
ing 5 days notice thereof, call a meeting of the County Executive 
Committee to hear the complaintant, the alleged offender and any 
other interested parties or witnesses. A two-third vote of those 
members present and voting shall be necessary to remove a pre- 
cinct officer or committeemember. The decision of the County 
Executive Committee shall be final. 

(2). When a vacancy exists because of removal for cause, the 
vacancy shall be filled by the remaining members of the precinct 
executive committee at a duly called meeting by the Chairman of 
the County Executive Committee. Notice of the filling of such 
vacancy shall be given to the chairman of the County Execu- 
tive Committee. If the vacancy is not filled within ten days, the 
Chairman of the County Executive Committee within ten days 
thereafter shall call a meeting of the officers of the County Execu- 
tive Committee who shall fill the vacancy. The Chairman of the 
County Executive Committee shall cause a full detailed account 
of any removal and replacement to be filed with the Chairman of 
the State Executive Committee. 

ARTICLE II 
COUNTY ORGANIZATION 

Section 1. County Executive Committee: 

The Chairman and the Vice Chairman of the several precinct 
committees, the immediate past chairman of the County Execu- 
tive Committee, the President of the duly organized Democratic 



Plan of Organization 173 

Women's Club within a county and the President of the duly or- 
ganized county Young Democratic Club within the county shall 
compose the county Executive Committee; provided that where 
more than one Young Democratic Club or Democratic Women's 
Club exists within a county, the several clubs shall together elect 
one representative on the Executive Committee with each club 
having a vote in proportion to the ratio of its membership to the 
total membership of the combined clubs. The county Executive 
Committee shall meet on the same day as the county convention 
first held in each election year, the meeting to be held either be- 
fore or after the convention at an hour and place to be designated 
in the call therefor. At said meeting a chairman of said county 
executive committee shall be elected. Immediately after the elec- 
tion of the chairman, the committee shall elect one or more, but 
not exceeding three, vice chairmen, a secretary and a treasurer. 
If more than one vice chairman shall be elected the order of 
their successsion shall be designated by title, e.g., first vice chair- 
man, second vice chairman, third vice chairman. Either the chair- 
man or the first vice chairman shall be a woman, and the other 
shall be a man. The chairman, vice chairman or vice chairmen, 
secretary and treasurer need not be members of the County Ex- 
ecutive Committee, but all of said officers shall be ex-officio mem- 
bers of the committee, with the power to vote; however, at any 
organizational meeting of said County Executive Committee said 
ex-officio members shall not have the power to vote. Should any 
precinct official be elected to any county organizational office or 
other office entitling him or her to membership on the county Ex- 
ecutive Committee, he or she automatically vacates the precinct 
office. 

If for any reason there should occur any vacancy in the chair- 
manship of the County Executive Committee, by death, resigna- 
tion, or removal, or is such chairman should be incapacitated, then 
upon a written notice to such chairman signed by the remaining 
officers of the County Executive Committee, the vice chairman or 
vice chairmen, in their order of succession, and thereafter the sec- 
retary, shall, in such order of succession, be vested with full auth- 
ority and power of the chairman until such time as said County 
Executive Committee has met and duly elected a successor to such 
chairman. 

When the County Executive Committee is not in session, the 



174 Noktii Carolina Mam \i 

officers of the County Executive Committee, presided over by the 
Chairman, shall act in the place of the County Executive Com- 
mittee on all matters; unless this plan of organization states that 
action is to be by the entire County Executive Committee. 

Section 2. Additional Precinct Meetings: 

In addition to the common day fixed by the State Executive 
Committee during election years, the Chairman of any County 
Executive Committee may issue a call between October 1st of 
any non-election year and March 1st in any election year 
for a meeting of the County Executive Committee and, in addi- 
tion to any other business specified in the call, the said committee 
may adopt a resolution fixing a common day, times and places for 
the holding of precinct meetings for the purpose of electing pre- 
cinct committees; and fix the day, time and place for the organiza- 
tional meeting of the newly elected County Executive Committee 
for the purpose of electing a chairman and other county officers. 
The County Chairman shall immediately issue a call in writing 
at least 10 days before the day set for the said precinct meetings. 
This call shall be posted at the court house door of the county and 
copies thereof shall be sent as a news item to each news media 
published in the county. 

Any precinct meeting provided in this section shall be held more 
than two weeks before the common day fixed by the State Execu- 
tive Committee. 

Section 3. Duties of Officers: 

The duties of the County Executive Officers shall be: 
(1). The chairman shall be responsible for the organization of 
the county on all levels, including calling of all meetings, holding 
of political instruction classes for precinct executive committees, 
obtaining all materials necessary for the proper function of his 
duties and doing all other things necessary for the proper carry- 
ing out of the best interest of the party. 

(2). One of the vice chairmen shall be responsible for the or- 
ganization and activities of the women members of the County 
Executive Committee and the women's activities in behalf of the 
Democratic Party in the said county, subject to the direction of 
the chairman of the County Executive Committee. 



Plan of Organization 175 

(3). The other vice chairman of the County Executive Com- 
mittee shall have such duties and responsibilities as may be as- 
signed by the chairman. 

(4). The secretary shall have the duty and responsibility of 
keeping all records of the County Executive Committee, including 
attendance at all meetings, of issuing all notices, preparing all 
correspondence, and any other duties that may be assigned to him 
by the said chairman. 

(5). The treasurer shall have the duty of raising all money re- 
quired for the operation of the activities of the Democratic Par- 
ty, keep records of all money received and expended in behalf of 
the Party and forward a list of all donors and expenses to the 
Chairman of the State Executive Committee. The treasurer shall 
also submit any and all reports as required by the law of the fi- 
nances of the County Executive Committee. 

Section 4. Board of Elections: 

The chairman of the Executive Committee in each county shall, 
before submitting to the State Chairman recommendations for the 
Democratic members of the County Board of Elections in such 
county, call a meeting of the County Executive Committee and 
submit such recommendations for the approval of the executive 
committee and only when such recommendations are approved 
by a majority of the committee members present shall same be 
submitted to the State Chairman by the county chairman. The 
time of such meeting of the respective county executive commit- 
tees for the purpose of passing on such recommendations shall be 
fixed by the State Chairman. 

No member or officer of a County Executive Committee shall 
be eligible to serve as a member of a County Board of Elections, 
nor as a precinct registrar or judge of elections. 

Section 5. Rules: 

The county executive committee shall have power to make any 
rules with regard to the holding of precinct meetings which it 
may deem proper, not inconsistent with the rules prescribed in 
this plan; it shall be the duty of said committee to prepare and 
furnish all forms and blanks needed in making the returns from 
said precinct meetings, and any reported challenges and appeals 
therefrom; and it shall have the power to raise the funds neces- 
sary to pay for the expenses thereof. 



176 North Carolina Manual 

The secretary of the County Executive Committee shall forward 
a copy of each precinct organization and the officers of the County 
Organization to the chairman of the State Executive Committee. 

Section C. Removal of County Officers: 

Any officer of the County Democratic Executive Committee who 
gives support to, aids, or helps any opposing political party or 
candidate of any other political party, or who refuses or fails to 
perform his duties in organizing his county, or who is convicted of 
a crime involving moral turpitude, shall be removed from office 
in the following manner: 

(1). A complaint setting forth full details and duly verified 
shall be filed with the Chairman of the State Executive Committee 
by three active Democrats as defined by this Plan of Organization 
registered in the county. The chairman of the State Executive 
Committee shall upon the approval of the other committee officers, 
after giving five days notice thereof, call a meeting of the State 
Executive Committee to hear the complaintant, the alleged of- 
fender and any other interested parties or witnesses. A two-thirds 
vote of those members present and voting shall be necessary to 
remove a county officer. The decision of the State Executive Com- 
mittee shall be final. 

(2). When a vacancy exists because of removal for cause, the 
vacancy shall be filled by the remaining members of the County 
Executive Committee at a duly called meeting of that committee. 



ARTICLE III 

SECTIONAL, ORGANIZATION 

Section 1. Congressional District Executive Committees: 

The Congressional District Executive Committee for each con- 
gressional district in the State shall consist of two members from 
each county in said district who shall be elected at the prelimi- 
nary meeting of delegates from the congressional districts held 
on the morning of the State Convention; provided, however, that 
in any congressional district embracing less than five counties, 
the committee shall consist of three members from each county 
in the district. 



Plan of Organization 177 

Section 2. Judicial District Executive Committees: 

The Judicial District Executive Committee for each judicial dis- 
trict in the State shall consist of two members from each county 
in said district, who shall be elected at the preliminary meetings 
of delegates from the congressional districts held on the morning 
of the State Convention; provided, however that in any judicial 
district embracing less than five counties, the committee shall 
consist of three members from each county in the district. 

Section 3. Solicitorial District Executive Committee: 

The Solicitorial District Executive Committee for each solici- 
torial district in the State shall consist of two members from each 
county in said district, who shall be elected at the preliminary 
meetings of delegates from the congressional districts held on the 
morning of the State Convention; provided, however, that in any 
solicitorial district embracing less than five counties, the com- 
mittee shall consist of three members from each county in the 
district. 

Section 4. State Senatorial District Executive Committee: 

The State Senatorial District Executive Committee for each sen- 
atorial district in the State which comprises more than one county 
shall consist of one member from each county in said district, who 
shall be elected at the preliminary meetings of delegates from the 
congressional districts held on the morning of the State Conven- 
tion. In districts composed of only one county, the County Ex- 
ecutive Committee of said county shall have jurisdiction as in the 
matter of county candidates. 

Section 5. Appointment of Chairmen and Secretaries: 

It shall be the duty of the Chairman of the State Executive 
Committee, as soon as practicable after the State Convention, to 
appoint one member as chairman and one member as secretary of 
each of the committees provided in each of the foregoing four 
sections and fill by appointment any vacancies in the chairman- 
ship or secretaryship thereof as may occur. 

Section 6. One County Districts: 

Should any Judicial, Solicitorial or State Senatorial District be 
composed of only one county then the County Executive Com- 



L7S North Carolina Manual 

mittee of said county shall be the Judicial, Solicitorial or State 
Senatorial District Committee for the respective district. 

Section 7. Rotation of State Senators: 

In all State Senatorial Districts composed of more than one 
county which it has been the custom to concede the right to nomi- 
nate a si nator to one county of the district by a plan of rotation 
or otherwise, the same shall remain in lull force and effect until 
terminated as herein provided. 

The executive committees of the several counties composing 
such Senatorial District may hereafter adopt a plan for the nomi- 
nation of candidates for the State Senate by one or more counties 
composing such district, but such plan shall not be effective until 
the executive committee of each of the counties composing the dis- 
trict shall, by a majority vote, approve such plan and file with 
the chairman of the State Executive Committee a copy of the res- 
olution approving the same. The agreement in any senatorial dis- 
trict composed of only two counties may be terminated by a maj- 
ority vote of the county executive committee of any one of the 
counties and in districts of more than two counties by a majority 
vote of each of the executive committees of at least two counties, 
provided that notice of the termination of such agreement must 
be filed with the chairman of the State Executive Committee at 
least 120 days in advance of the date of the primary election at 
which the candidates for the General Assembly are to be nomi- 
nated. The chairman of the State Executive Committee shall 
promptly notify the State Board of Elections of all such agree- 
ments and of the termination thereof. 

ARTICLE IV 

STATE ORGANIZATION 

Section 1. State Executive Committee: 

The State Democratic Executive Committee shall consist of nine 
men and nine women from each congressional district in the State, 
who shall be elected at the preliminary meetings of delegates from 
the congressional districts, held on the morning of the State Con- 
vention as provided in Section 2, Article VI, provided, however, 
that each county shall have at least one member on the Commit- 
tee. 



Plan of Organization 179 

Section 2. Election of Officers: 

As early as is practical after each State Convention herein pro- 
vided, the Chairman shall call the State Executive Committee to 
meet for the purpose of electing a Chairman and Vice Chairman, 
one of whom shall be a woman and the other a man, and each of 
whom shall serve for a term of two years, or until his or her sus- 
cessor shall be elected. 

Section 3. Appointive Officers and Committees: 

The Chairman of the State Executive Committee, as early as 
practicable after his election shall appoint to serve at his pleasure 
a full time Executive Director, a Secretary, a Financial Director 
and a Treasurer. The chairman may combine any of two of the 
above officers into one. 

Section 4. Ex-Officio Members: 

The officers of the State Executive Committee, the National 
Committeeman, the National Commiteewoman and the President, 
National Committeeman and National Committeewoman of the 
Young Democratic Clubs of the State shall be ex-officio members 
with the power to vote, provided, however, the Executive Director 
shall have no vote at any Executive Committee Meeting. 

Section 5. Convention Calls: 

In each election year the chairman of the State Executive Com- 
mittee shall convene said Committee in the City of Raleigh on or 
before the 15th day of January and at said meeting the following 
business shall be transacted: 

(1). The time and place of holding the State Convention shall 
be determined and duly published. 

(2). A common day shall be fixed, on which all precinct meet- 
ings shall be held for the election of delegates to the county con- 
ventions. 

(3). A common day shall be fixed for the holding of a county 
convention in each county in the State for the purpose of electing 
delegates to the State Convention. 

(4). Elect one member from each Congressional District to the 
Resolutions and Platform Committee. It shall be the duty of the 



180 North Carolina Manual 

Chairman of the State Executive Committee to designate one mem- 
ber of said Committee as Chairman and one member as Secretary. 
The Committee upon call of the Chairman shall organize and pre- 
pare the Party's proposed platform and consider all proposed res- 
olutions addressed to the convention. 

Section 6. Notices: 

Immediately after the adjournment of the above mentioned 
meeting of the State Executive Committee, it shall be the duty of 
the chairman to publish the proceedings of the same and it shall be 
the duty of the secretary of the committee to notify, in writing, 
the several chairmen of the County Executive Committees in the 
State of the respective dates so fixed for the holding of precinct 
meetings and county conventions. Directly after receipt of such 
notice it shall be the duty of each chairman of a County Executive 
Committee in the State to fix the hour and places for holding the 
precinct meetings in his county, the hour and place for holding 
the meeting of the County Executive Committee required to be 
held on the date of the county convention; and thereupon the said 
chairman shall issue a call for the precinct meetings, the county 
convention, and the meeting of the County Executive Committee. 
The call shall be in writing and, at least ten days before the day 
set for the precinct meetings. It shall be posted at the court- 
house door of the county and copies thereof shall be sent to the 
chairmen of all precinct committees in the county for conspicu- 
ous posting in each precinct; a copy of the call also shall be sent 
as a news item to each news media published in the county. 

Section 7. State Campaign Committee: 

As soon as is practical after each State Convention, the State 
Chairman shall call the County Chairmen and First Vice Chair- 
men in each of the Congressional Districts to meet for the pur- 
pose of electing two members of a State Campaign Committee 
from such Congressional District, one of whom shall be a man 
and one of whom shall be a woman; provided, however, no mem- 
ber of this committee shall hold any other party office. 

Section 8. Duties of State Campaign Committee: 

The State Chairman shall be a member ex-officio of this com- 
mittee, shall serve as its chairman, and this committee shall prom- 



Plan op Organization 181 

ulgate and co-ordinate party activities in all counties and dis- 
tricts with State Headquarters under the direction of and in co- 
operation with the State Chairman. 

Section 9. Audit Committee: 

The State Executive Committee shall appoint a committee of 
three whose duty it shall be to audit, not less frequently than 
biennially, the financial accounts and balances of the Committee. 

ARTICLE V. 

COUNTY CONVENTIONS 

Section 1. Meeting: 

All county conventions shall be called to order by the chairman 
of the executive committee of such county, and in his absence, 
by the vice chairman or by one of the vice chairmen in the order 
of succession and in his or their absence, by any member of the 
county executive committee who may be present at the conven- 
tion, and in case none of the foregoing persons shall be present, 
then by any delegate to the convention, and he shall preside until 
a permanent chairman is elected by the convention. 

Section 2. Rules: 

(1). The chairman shall provide the convention with a suffi- 
cient number of secretaries or accountants, who shall reduce the 
votes to decimals and tabulate the same, disregarding all fractions 
after second or hundredth column. 

(2). Nothing herein contained shall prevent the convention 
from making nomination by viva voce or acclamation where a vote 
by township or precinct is not demanded by any delegate present. 

(3). The County Executive Committee shall have the power to 
make such other rules and regulations for the holding of county 
conventions not inconsistent herewith, as may be deemed neces- 
sary or expedient. 

Section 3. Voting: 

Each precinct shall be entitled to cast in the county convention 
one vote for every 50 Democratic votes or major fraction thereof 
cast by the precinct for Governor at the last preceding guberna- 



L82 North Carolina Manual 

torial election; provided that every precinct shall be entitled to 
cast at least 2 votes in the county convention, and each precinct 
may appoint as many delegates to said convention as it may see 
fit, not exceeding three delegates and three alternates for each 
vote to which said precinct may be entitled in the county conven- 
tion. 

The County Executive Committee may, by resolution duly 
adopted, require each Precinct to appoint two delegates and two 
alternates for each vote to which said precinct may be entitled in 
the County Convention. 

Section 4. Nomination Convention Where County Not Under 
Primary Law: 

In all counties in which the selection of candidates for mem- 
bers of the General Assembly and county and township offices is 
not provided for by the primary law, nominations shall be made 
in the following manner: 

(1) The couuty executive committee shall meet and set a time 
and place for holding a county convention for the nomination of 
candidates for the aforesaid offices, and shall also set the time 
and places for holding the necessary preliminary precinct meet- 
ings, and thereupon the chairman of the county executive com- 
mittee shall issue a call for the precinct meetings and the county 
convention, notice of which call shall be sent to the precinct of- 
ficials and published in such manner and form as shall be directed 
by the said county executive committee. 

(2). At the meeting held in each precinct in pursuance of said 
notice, delegates and alternates to represent it in the county con- 
vention shall be elected from the body of the Democratic voters 
of the precinct; and said delegates or alternates, or such of them 
as shall attend the county convention shall be entitled to vote the 
full Democratic strength of their precinct in the nomination of 
candidates and upon all questions which may come before said 
county convention. 

If there is a failure to hold a precinct meeting in pursuance of 
said notice, or if said meeting shall fail to elect delegates to repre- 
sent it in said convention, the precinct executive committee shall 
appoint delegates and alternates from the Democratic voters of 
the precinct. 



Plan op Organization 183 

(3). Each precinct shall be entitled to cast in the county con- 
vention one vote for every 50 Democratic votes, or a major frac- 
tion thereof cast by the precinct for Governor at the last pre- 
ceding gubernatorial election; provided that every precinct shall 
be entitled to cast at least 2 votes in the county convention, and 
each precinct may appoint as many delegates to said convention 
as it may see fit, not exceeding three delegates and three alter- 
nates for each vote to which said precinct may be entitled in the 
county convention. 

The County Executive Committee may, by resolution duly 
adopted, require each Precinct to appoint two delegates and two 
alternates for each vote to which said precinct may be entitled in 
the County Convention. 

(4). The precinct meetings shall be presided over by the chair- 
man of the precinct committee, but in his absence, the vice chair- 
man of the committee shall preside, and in the absence of both 
the chairman and vice chairman, any member of the committee 
may preside. 

(5). The county executive committee shall have power to make 
any rules with regard to holding precinct meetings which it may 
deem proper, not inconsistent with the rules prescribed in this 
plan; it shall be the duty of said committee to prepare and furnish 
all forms and blanks needed in making the returns from said pre- 
cinct meetings, and any reported challenges and appeals there- 
from. 

ARTICLE VI. 
STATE CONVENTIONS 

Section 1. Delegates: 

The State convention shall be composed of delegates appointed 
by the several county conventions. Each county in the State shall 
be entitled to elect to the State Convention one delegate and one 
alternate for every 300 Democratic votes or major fraction there- 
of cast therein for Governor at the last preceding gubernatorial 
election. 

Section 2. Congressional District Meetings: 

A preliminary meeting of the delegates shall be held by each 
congressional district on the morning of the State Convention, at 



184 Xiiktii Cakolina Manual 

rooms to be designated by the State Executive Committee, Cor the 
purpose of selecting the following: 

(1). Elect one member of the committee on Permanent Organ- 
ization, Rules, and Order of Business, which committee will nom- 
inate a permanent president and secretary of the convention. 

(2). Elect one vice president of the convention. 

(3). Elect one district assistant secretary. 

(4). Elect one member of the committee on Credentials and 
Appeals. 

(5). Elect nine men and nine women as members of the State 
Executive Committee, with at least one member being selected 
from each county. 

(6). Elect two members from each county for the Congression- 
al, Judicial, and Solicitorial District Executive Committees; pro- 
vided, however, in districts embracing less than five counties, 
three members of each said committee shall be elected from 
each county in said district. 

(7). Elect one member for each county of the State Senatorial 
Executive Committee where the district embraces more than one 
county. 

(8). In each Presidential election year nominate the number 
of delegates and alternates allotted by the National Committee to 
each Congressional District. 

(9). In each Presidential Election Year nominate one Presi- 
dential Elector for each Congressional District. 

Section 3. Delegates to National Convention and President ial 
Electors: 

(1). The State Convention shall elect the delegates to the Na- 
tional Convention who shall convene promptly at the call of the 
National Committeeman after their election and nominate the 
National Committee representatives and such other officers as are 
required by the Democratic National Committee. 

(2). The State Convention shall confirm the nominations for 
Presidential Electors certified by the several districts and, in addi- 
tion thereto, shall nominate two Presidential Electors at Large. 

Section 4. Rules: 

( 1 ). Such delegates (or alternates of absent delegates), as may 



Plan of Organization 185 

be present at any State Convention shall be allowed to cast the 
whole vote to which their county may be entitled. 

(2). In all conventions provided for by this plan, after a vote 
is cast, there shall be no change in such vote until after the roll 
call is completed and before the final result of the ballot shall be 
announced by the chairman of said convention. 

(3). The chairman of the different county conventions shall 
certify the list of delegates and alternates to the State Convention, 
and a certified list of said delegates and alternates to the secre- 
tary of the State Executive Committee. 

(4). The secretary of the State Executive Committee shall 
make up a roll of all delegates and alternates from the several 
counties and transmit the same to the chairman of the State Con- 
vention. 

(5). In all conventions an election or a nomination may be 
made by any majority, even though it be a fraction of a vote. 

(6). In all State Conventions it shall be the duty of the dele- 
gates from the several counties to choose one of their number 
chairman, whose name shall be reported to the president of such 
convention, and whose duty it shall be to cast the vote of his 
county as directed, and the vote as announced by him shall be re- 
corded unless some delegate from that county shall challenge its 
accuracy, in which event it shall be the duty of the president of 
the convention to cause the roll of delegates from that county to 
be called, when the vote of such county shall be tabulated and re- 
corded according to the response of its delegates; but in no event 
shall the vote of one county be challenged by a delegate from an- 
other county. 

ARTICLE VII. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Section 1. Committee Meetings: 

All committees shall meet as such times and places as the chair- 
man of the respective committee may from time to time appoint 
and designate in the call. 

Section 2. Quorum: 

Thirty (30) per cent of the entire membership of any commit- 
tee shall constitute a quorum. 



186 North Carolina Manual 

Section ;$. Voting: 

Proxy voting shall not be permitted in any executive committee 
meeting. A member of the State Executive Committee may desig- 
nate a Democrat in good standing from within his county to serve 
as his alternate for a particular Executive Committee meeting by 
notifying the party chairman, secretary or executive director of 
such designation in writing prior to the call to order of any such 
meeting, provided however, that no one person may serve as an 
alternate for more than one member at any meeting and no mem- 
ber or alternate may be entitled to more than one vote. 

Section 4. Vacancies: 

Vacancies occurring in any Executive Committee above the pre- 
cinct level shall be filled by the executive committee of the county 
in which such vacancies occur. Vacancies occuring in any pre- 
cinct committee shall be filled by the remaining members of the 
precinct committee. 

Section 5. Candidates in Primary: 

Any member of any Executive Committee, precinct, county, or 
state, or any officer thereof, who announces his candidacy for an 
elective office in the primary shall resign immediately his party 
office, and the vacancy shall be filled within 15 days as heretofore 
provided. 

Section 6. Sub-Committees: 

All executive committees shall have the power to appoint sub- 
committees or special committees for such purposes and with such 
powers in their respective jurisdictions, as may be deemed neces- 
sary or desirable. 

Section 7. Filling Vacancies Among Candidates: 

Vacancies shall be filled among candidates, and the selection 
of candidates shall be as prescribed by statute. 

Section 8. Municipal Committee: 

In the nomination of candidates for municipal offices to be voted 
for in any town or city election, where the same is not controlled 
by charter or legislative enactment, a municipal executive com- 



Plan of Organization 187 

iuittee may be created for the purpose of facilitating the orderly 
selection of such candidates. The committee shall be composed 
of five residents of the municipality, at least two of whom shall 
be men and two of whom shall be women, to be elected biennially 
at a meeting of all members of the regular executive committee 
or committees who reside in the municipality, the meeting to be 
called and presided over by the chairman of the county executive 
committee. It shall be the sole function of any municipal execu- 
tive committee created under the provisions of this section to sup- 
ervise and direct the selection of candidates for municipal offices, 
and to that end, the committee may formulate such rules and reg- 
ulations as may be deemed necessary, or practicable. The com- 
mittee shall elect from its membership a chairman and vice 
chairman, one of whom shall be a woman and one of whom shall 
be a man; and all vacancies in membership shall be filled by the 
committee. 

Section 9. Appeals: 

The right of appeal shall lie from any subordinate committee 
or convention to the committee or convention next superior there- 
to, and in all county or state conventions appeals shall first be 
referred to the committee on Credentials and Appeals, or a special 
committee provided by the convention, and the findings and re- 
ports of such committee had before action thereon by the conven- 
tion. 

Section 10. Reports: 

It shall be the duty of the county executive committees and their 
chairmen to make such reports and furnish such information to 
the chairman of the State Executive Committee and chairmen of 
the several district committees as the said State and district chair- 
men may desire. 

Section 11. Definition: 

An "Active Democrat" is defined to mean a person who is reg- 
istered to vote as a Democrat, and who, as a volunteer, takes part 
in party affairs, giving of his time and/or means to further the 
interest and efforts of the Democratic Party. 



lss North Carolina Manual 

Section 12. Plan-Vs-JLaw : 

In the several counties of the State where primaries are pro- 
vided for by law, whether optional or mandatory, this plan or or- 
ganization shall nevertheless be followed in all matters not in- 
consistent with such laws. 

Section 13. General Rules: 

Procedural or parliamentary questions not specifically covered 
by this plan or rules adopted pursuant to authority granted herein 
shall be governed by the provisions of Roberts Rules of Order. 

ARTICLE VIII. 
AMENDMENTS 

Section 1. Power to Amend: 

The State Executive Committee shall, at any regularly called 
meeting duly held, have power to amend this plan of organization. 

Any amendment adopted by the State Executive Committee in- 
cluding those herein contained shall be effective immediately and 
remain in effect until the same shall be repealed or amended by 
action of the next State Convention. Any change in this plan of 
organization adopted by the State Executive Committee shall be 
presented to the next State Convention by the State Chairman for 
its action thereon. 

* * * * * 

The foregoing is the plan of organization of the Democratic 
party of North Carolina as adopted by the State Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committee, at a meeting held in the city of Raleigh on 
the 16th day of February, 1962. 

BERT BENNETT 
Chairman 

As amended by the State Democratic Executive Committee at a 
meeting held in the City of Raleigh on the 15th day of January, 
1964. 

W. Lunsford Crew, 

Chairman 

REPRINTED BY 

N C DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
APRIL 1966 

J. MELVILLE BRC'JGHTON. JR., CHAIRMAN 



COMMITTEES OF THE STATE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

(From list furnished by Executive Director, 
State Democratic Executive Committee) 

STATE DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

1966 

OFFICERS 

Chairman I. T. Valentine, Jr., Nashville 

Vice Chairman Mrs. Harry K. McDonnold, Asheville 

Secretary Mrs. L. Y. Ballentine, Raleigh 

Finance Director Clyde A. Dillon, Sr., Raleigh 

Executive Director T. S. Secrest, Cary 

EX-OFFICIO 

Nation-al Committeeman W. E. Webb, Jr., Statesville 

National Committeewoman Mrs. John D. Robinson, Wallace 

President, Young Democratic Clubs of N. C Samuel H. Poole, Southern Pines 

National Committeeman, Young Democratic Clubs Lonnie Carey, Burlington 

National Committeewoman., Young Democratic Clubs Mrs. Betty Lewis, Chapel Hill 

Committees 
First District 

County Name Address 

Beaulort W. M. Hodges Raleigh 

Beaufort Mrs. Zeno L. Edwards Washington 

Bertie W. L. Cooke Windsor 

Camden Mrs. Annie Sanderlin Camden 

Chowan George A. Byrum Eden ton 

Craven D. L. Ward New Bern 

Craven Mrs. L. B. Pate Rt. 2, New Bern 

Currituck Mrs. Dudley Bagley Moyock 

Dare Moncie Daniels, Jr Manteo 

Gates Philip P. Godwin Gatesville 

Hertford R. H. Underwood Murfreesboro 

Hyde .Mrs. Dancy W. MarshalL Englehard 

Jones W. Murray Whitaker. Trenton 

Martin H. M. Fulcher Robersonville 

Northampton H. F. Holoman Woodland 

Pamlico .Ned Delamar Bayboro 

Pasquotank Mrs. Gaston E. Small, Jr Rt. 1, Elizabeth City 

Perquimans J- Emmett Winslow Hertford 

Pitt Henry C. Oglesby Grifton 

Pitt Tanice Hardison Greenville 

Tyrrell Eston Brickhouse Creswell 

Washington .Carl Bailey, Jr Plymouth 

Sscond District 

Edgecombe John H. Price Tarboro 

Edgecombe Mrs. Levie Owens Macclesfield 

Franklin Dr. Richard C. Whitfield Franklinton 

Franklin Mrs. Elizabeth Cheatham Youngsville 

Granville .N. E. Cannady Oxford 

Granville Mrs. D. G. Brummitt Oxford 

Greene A. C. Edwards Hookerton 

Greene Mrs. M. Bruton- Taylor '. Walstontnirg 

Halifax Swain Stephenson Weldon 

Hali f ax Mrs. William Dickens Enfield 

Tohnston Marvin Johnson Smithfield 

Johnston Mrs. Wallace Ashley Jr Smithfield 

Lenoir Oscar Waller Rt. 5, Kin«ton 

Lenoir Mollie Hart Kinston 

Vance George T. Dickie Henderson 

Vance Mrs. Frances Horner... Hetvderson 

Warren John Kerr. Jr Warrenton 

Warren Mrs. Parker Williams Warr-ntnn 

Wilson Carl Ren'ro Wil«on 

Wilson Naomi Morris Wilson 

1S!I 



1!mi North Carolina Manual 

Third District 

County Name Address 

i .,, hi i i .C G. Holland Beaufort 

Carterel Alida Willis Morehead City 

Duplin Gerald Carr Rose Hill 

Dupiin'" Mrs. Luther Taylor, Jr Faison 

Harnett W. B. Williams Angler 

Harnett... Mrs. Rachel Spears Lillington 

Lee.... Roy Sowers, Jr Sanford 

Lee... Mrs. Kemp Gaddy Sanford 

Onslow. .James R. Strickland Jacksonville 

Onslow.... Mrs. Annie Price Jacksonville 

Onslow Mrs. Herbert Williams Jacksonville 

Pender Mrs. Robert Grady Johnson Burgaw 

Pender... W. M. Eubanks Rt. 1, Wilmington 

Sampson B. T. Lundy Clinton 

Sampson Mrs - Mae Troublefield Rt. 2, Faison 

Wayne Dortch Lan-gston Golds boro 

Wayne... Mrs. F. B. Jordan Mount Olive 

Wayne James Spicer Goldsboro 



Fourth District 

Chatham .Mrs. Edward S. Holmes Pittsboro 

Montgomery R- B. Jordan Mount Gilead 

Moore .Bess McCaskill Carthage 

M,„.re W. P. Saunders Southern Pines 

Nash Mrs. Raymond Finch Rt. 2, Bailey 

Nash Alex Biggs Nashville 

Orange Clarence D. Jones Hillsborough 

Orange Mrs. Cloe Ann Canada Chapel Hill 

Randolph J- D- Ross, Jr Asheboro 

Randolph... Mrs. W. I. Jones Ramseur 

Randolph .... Tom Boulden Trinity 

Wake John. Williamson Raleigh 

Wake Brooks W. Poole Raleigh 

Wake... W. C. Creel Cary 

Wake.... Mrs. Mabel Penny Hatch Raleigh 

Wake... Mrs. DeWitt Moore Raleigh 

Wake... Mrs. L. M. Massey Zebuion 

Wake. ... Rebecca Barnhill Raleigh 

Fifth District 

Caswell Clarence Pemberton Yancey ville 

Caswell Mrs. Leona Cobb Rt. 1, Ruflfin 

Durham Ralph Strayhorn Durham 

Durham John Steward Durham 

Durham Mrs. Ruth Murray Durham 

Durham Carroll Pledger Durham 

Forsyth Mrs. Odell Matthews Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Mrs. Clark Brown Winston-Salem 

Forsyth.... ...Mrs. Harry Barn-es, Jr Winston-Salem 

Forsyth.... John Gallaher Winston-Salem 

Forsyth.... ...Mrs. Ray J. Reed Winston-Salem 

Person Mrs. A. F. Nichols Roxboro 

Person... E. F. Warren Hurdle Mills 

Rockingham W. C. Stokes Rpidsville 

Rockingham J. Hoyte Stultz, Sr Draper 

Rockingham C. S. Burton Reidsville 

Stokes William F. Marshall Walnut Cove 

Stokes Mrs. Marjorie Christian Danbury 



State Committees, Democratic: 191 



Sixth District 



County Name Address 

Alamance Emerson T. Sanders Burlington 

Alamance D. J. Walker, Jr Graham 

Alamance Mrs. R. Homer Andrews Burlington 

Alamance Mrs. W. D. Rippy Burlington 

Davidson Lee Wilson Lexington 

Davidson Ralph Eanes Thomasville 

Davidson Mrs. Luther Craver Rt. 8, Lexington 

Davidson Jo Ann Gibson Thomasville 

Guilford Mrs. R. N. Linville Oak Ridge 

Guilford Mrs. Gertrude Whorton Gibson ville 

Guilford Mrs. Chase Benson.. Greensboro 

Guilford Mrs. T. G. Johnson Greensboro 

GuiKord Claude K. Josey Greensboro 

Guilford Tom C. Hoyle Greensboro 

GuiTord L. R. Russell Greensboro 

Guil'ord O. A. Kirkman High Point 

Guilford Charles E. Hayworth High Point 



Seventh District 

Bladen J. A. Bridger Bladen bo ro 

Bladen Mrs. George Currie Clark ton 

Brunswick S. B. Frink Southport 

Brunswick Mrs. Edith McBryde Ashe 

Columbus Willard Small Fair Bluff 

Columbus Mrs. Annebelle Williamson Tabor City 

Cumberland Edward J . David Fayetteville 

Cumberland Mrs. Thomas H. Finch Fayetteville 

Cumberland William E. Ower*. Fayetteville 

Hoke Jeff Harris Rt. 3, Red Springs 

Hoke .Mrs. J. M. Andrews Rt. 3, Red Springs 

New Hanover L. J. Poisson, Jr Wilmington 

New Hanover Henry Bost Wilmington 

New Hanover Mrs. Hugh Primrose Wilmington 

Robeson .Mrs. J. E. Watson Red Springs 

Robeson Mrs. Margaret F. Goode Lumberton 

Robeson W. Paul Graham Proctorville 

Scotland R. F. McCoy Laurinburg 



Eighth District 

Anson Robert L. Cagle Wadesboro 

Anson A. Paul Kitchin Wadesboro 

Lincoln Arnold E. Tarr Liivcolnton 

Lincoln Mrs. Hal Hefner Lincoln ton 

Lincoln Hal Hoyle, Jr Lincolnton 

Mecklenburg Mrs. W. M. Boyd, Jr Pineville 

Mecklenburg Mrs. Bishop Dale Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Ray King Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Mrs. Charles Myers Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Jim McMillan Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Joe Stockton Charlotte 

Richmond J. Elsie Webb Rockingham 

Richmond Clyde Causey Rockingham 

Richmond Mrs. Monnie Russo Rockingham 

Union J. Max Thomas Mar^h ville 

Union John R. Millikan Monroe 

Union Mrs. Mary Carriker Monroe 



L92 Noktii Carolina Manual 

Ninth District 

County Name Address 

Alleghany .J. C. Gambill Sparta 

Alleghany .Helen Foiger "..'.Sparta 

Ashe Ira T. Johnston Jefferson 

Ashe Mrs. Ed M. Anderson West Jefferson 

Cabarrus John Roger, Sr Concord 

Cabarrus Mrs. Nell Kirk Kannapolis 

Caldwell Colen. E. Prestwood Lenoir 

Caldwell Mrs. E. F. Ailen Lenoir 

Davie 

Rowan George Uzzell Salisbury 

Rowan Pearl Thompson Rt. 6, Salisbury 

St. -inly Mrs. J. Boger Little Albemarle 

Stanly . raid Rumsill rim 

Surry Fred Norman Elkin 

Surry JVlrs. Robert Merritt Mt. Airy 

Watauga Wade E. Brown Boone 

Watauga Mrs. R. C. Rivers Boone 

Wilkes .. Bill Carrington North Wilkesboro 

Wilkes Mrs. J. M. Anderson North Wilkesboro 

Yadkin Rill Boles Jonesville 

Yadkin .Mrs. Frank Bryant Booneville 

Tenth District 

Alexander Mrs. R. S. Ferguson.. Taylorsville 

Avery O. L. Stroupe Crossnore 

Burke H. J. Hatcher Morganton 

Burke Martha Baker Morganton 

Burke Lillian Butler Morganton 

Catawba J. C. Rudisill Newton 

Catawba Mrs. John M. Abernathy Newton 

Catawba Mrs. Harry VanderLinden Hickorv 

Cleveland Clyde Nolan Shelbv 

Cleveland C. M. Peeler Shelby 

Cleveland Mrs. O. Max Gardner Shelby 

Gaston Dwight L. Beam Gastonia 

Gaston George A. Jenkins Gastonia 

Gaston Betty C. Couthen Gastonia 

Gaston Mrs. J. B. Garland Gastonia 

Iredell John G. Lewis, Jr Statesville 

Iredell Mrs. Joe D. Thompson Mooresville 

Iredell John Raynor Troutman 

Eleventh District 

Buncombe E. L. Loftin Asheville 

Buncombe Mrs. R. R. Williams Asheville 

Buncombe John Spicer Asheville 

Cherokee Mrs. G. W. Cover Andrews 

Clay Mrs. Neal Kitchen Havesville 

Graham Mrs. Ed Ingram Robbinsville 

Haywood Jack West Waynesville 

Henderson Harry Buchanan Henderson ville 

Jackson Marcellus Ruchanan Svlva 

McDowell Mrs. John A. Poteat Marion 

Macon Mrs. John M. Wrinn Franklin 

Madi=on L. B. Ramsey Marshall 

Mitchell Mrs. A. N. Fuller Spruce Pine 

Polk Thurston A Hedge Trvon- 

Ruther'ord Mrs. Virginia Stamey Ruther'ordton 

Swain Dr. Kelly Bennett Brvson 

Transylvania lohn D. Smith Brevard 

Yancey Mrs. Sam Huskins Burnsville 



State Committees, Democratic 193 

State Democratic Congressional District Executive 

Committees 

1966 

First District 

County Name Address 

Beau.ort Milo Gibbs Washington 

Beamort Graham Elliott Washington 

Bertie Lacy Early Windsor 

Bertie C. B. Griffin, Jr Lewiston 

Camden T. F. Leary Shiloh 

Camden W. W. Forehand. Shiloh 

Chowan P- S. McMuiiar*. Edenton 

Chowan J. G. Wood Edenton 

Craven L. John Moore New Bern 

Craven S. Woodrow McCoy Cove City 

Currituck Wilton Walker, Jr Currituck 

Currituck J- M. Bell Shawboro 

Dare Lawrence Swain Manteo 

Dare Jack Cahoon Manteo 

Gates R. E. Miller Gates 

Gates James O. Wright Hobbsville 

Hertford W. Ivy Johnson Ahoskie 

Hertford R- T. Vann Murfreesboro 

HyOi Joe Swindell Swan Quarter 

Hyde C. M. Swindell Fairfield 

Jones Bobby Mattocks Pollocksville 

Jones Mrs. Mary Koonce Franks Rt. 2, Trenton 

Martin Herbert Highsmith Robersonville 

Martin Hugh M. Martin Williamston 

Northampton G. Raynor Woodard Conway 

Northampton R- L. Grant Jackson 

Pamlico Russell Lee Bayboro 

Pamlico Bert Robertson Hobucken 

Pasquotan-k W. F. Thompson Elizabeth City 

Pasquotan-k Mrs. Lorimer W. Midgett Elizabeth City 

Perquimans W. F. Ainsley Hertford 

Perquimans John H. Broughton Hertford 

Pitt C. D. Langston Winterville 

Pitt Hugh Win-slow Greenville 

Tyrrell. W. J. White Columbia 

Tyrrell C. E. Morris Columbia 

Washington Mrs. Howard Walker Plymouth 

Washington Mrs. Jennings Davenport Creswell 

Second District 

Edgecombe .Vinson Bridgers Tarboro 

Edgecombe -C. W. Wickham Tarboro 

Franklin James Speed Louisburg 

Franklin A. E. Pearce Zebulon 

Granville T. G. Stem, Jr Oxford 

Granville W. W. Whitfield Creedmoor 

Greene M. C. Lassiter, Sr Snow Hill 

Greene A. J. Harrell Snow Hill 

Hali'ax William White Roanoke Rapids 

Halifax R. T. Beal Enfield 

Johnston Mrs. Lucille Oliver Pine Level 

Johnston James R. Poole Smithfield 

Lenoir J. C. Hooten Rt. 2, Grifton 

Lenoir W. L. Measley Rt. 1, LaGrange 

Vance Fred S. Royster Henderson 

Vance J. L. Robertson.. Henderson 

Warren W. E. Turner RFD, Henderson 

Warren James H. Limes Littleton 

Wilson Robert Griffin Wilson 

Wilson .Talmadge Greene ...Wilson 



194 Xoutii Cakoi.ina Manual 

Third District 

County Name Address 

Carteret Winston Hill Atlantic 

Carteret Allie Potter Beaufort 

Duplin Jim Smith Chinquapin 

Duplin Mrs. Ruby Blackmore Warsaw 

Harnetl Mack Reitl Hudson Rt. 1, Benson 

Harnett Mrs. Woodrow Hill Dunn 

Lee Lewis C. Lawrence San ford 

Lee W. S. Pittman Sanford 

Onslow Don Hudson Jacksonville 

Onslow Alex Warlick Jacksonville 

Pender Mrs. Ester Padgett Watha 

Pen dei Carrol Hamilton Atkinson 

Sampson H. B. Barwick Clinton 

Sampson- Mrs. Cornelius Matthews Turkey 

Wayne Leslie Jordan Rt. 5, Goldsboro 

Wayne Lindsay Warren, Jr Goldsboro 

Fourth District 

Chatham D. D. Marley Siler City 

Chatham .Harry Horton Pittsboro 

Montgomery George T. McCauley Mt. Gilead 

Montgomery Worth Franklin. Troy 

Moore Mrs. W. G. Brown Carthage 

Moore Hubert McCaskill Pinehurst 

Nash Bill Williams, Jr Middlesex 

Nash O. B. Moss Spring Hope 

Orange J. D. O'Daniel Rt. 1, Chapel Hill 

Orange J. Willard Oakley Rt. 1, Mebane 

Randolph W. Ed Kirby Asheboro 

Randolph W. B. Stamey Liberty 

Wake 

Wake William Joslin Raleigh 

Fifth District 

Caswell .John M. Pleasant Rt. 2, Yanceyville 

Caswell Mrs. James Biackwell Rt. 1, Yanceyville 

Durham C. J. Mueller Durham 

Durham James Hardy Durham 

Forsyth James K. Glenn Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Mrs. Norton Tennille Winston-Salem 

Person D. W. Bradsher Roxboro 

Person E. G. Thompson Roxboro 

Rockingham Charles Nooe Leaksville 

Rockingham Jule McMiehael Reidsville 

Stokes Mrs. Tom Preston Pine Hall 

Stokes Leonard Van Noppen Danbury 

Sixth District 

Alamance John H. Vernon, Jr Burlington 

Alamance L. C. Allen, Jr ...Burlington 

Alamance D. K. Muse Mebane 

Davidson Fletcher Lassiter Thomasville 

Davidson Harlie Rebon- Thomasville 

Davidson Thurman Briggs Lexington 

Guil'ord Capus Waynick High Point 

Guil'ord. Jim Wolf, Jr Greensboro 

Guilford Charles T. Hagen, Jr Greensboro 



State Committees, Democratic 195 



Seventh District 



County Name Address 

Bladen .Worth Hester Elizabethtown 

Bladen !•• A. Smith Clarkton 

Brunswick .W. E. Bellamy, Jr Shallotte 

Brunswick Mrs. Jean Fullwood Southport 

Columbus Mrs. Ann Koonce Chadbourn 

Columbus .Bill Johnson Evergreen- 
Cumberland Mrs. Jane Elkins Fayetteville 

Cumberland John D. Koester Fayetteville 

Hoke Pete Sawyer Raeford 

Hoke Mrs. Elizabeth Barnhardt Raeford 

New Hanover Lawrence Rose Wrights ville 

New Hanover Mrs. Mercer Rowe Wilmington 

Robeson Steven J. Stone Orrum 

Robeson John C. Hasty Maxton 

Scotland James L. Sutherland, Jr Laurinburg 

Scotland Peter D. Jones Laurinburg 



Eighth District 

Anson Clyde Davidson., Jr Lilesville 

Anson Mrs. Adam Hardison Wadesboro 

Lincoln.. A. B. Tart 

Lincoln-. M. L. Huggins Lincolnton 

Mecklenburg James B. McMillian Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Frances Farley Charlotte 

Richmond Mrs. Eunice Lopier 

Richmond Prentiss Taylor 

Union Mrs. Doris Wright Indian Trail 

Union Joe Ross, Jr Monroe 



Ninth District 

Alleghany .Betty Pledsoe Laurel Su rings 

Alleghany Alton Thompson „ Sparta 

Alleghany Robert Gambill .....Sparta 

Ashe Wade E. Van-noy, Jr West Jefferson 

Ashe Thomas Cockerham Jefferson 

Cabarrus John S. Pharr Concord 

Cabarrus Dr. Seth Bostic Kannapolis 

Caldwell Earl Tate Lenoir 

Caldwell J. C. Spencer Lenoir 

Davie 

Davie 

Rowan Robert M. Davis Salisbury 

Rowan Fred Corriher, Jr Landis 

Stanly J. Boger Little, Sr Albemarle 

Stanly Oscar Sikes, Jr Albemarle 

Surry Frank Comer _ Dobson 

Surry Mrs. Kester Sink Rt. 7, Mt. Airy 

Watauga D. Grady Morets, Sr Boone 

Watauga Charles Taylor Boone 

Wilkes S. James Moore North Wilkesboro 

Wilkes Mrs. Vernon Smith North Wilkesboro 

Yadkin Robert Witherman Jonesville 

Yadkin Hubert Reynolds Yadkin ville 



L96 North Carolina Manual 

Tenth District 

County Name Address 

Alexander L. D. Keen Stony Point 

Alexander Mrs. C. B. Price Taylorsville 

Avery Barbara Davenport Rt. 3, Newland 

Avery Zillian McCoury Rt. 1, Newland 

Burke Mrs. Irene G. Bobbitt Glen Alpine 

Burke Carl N. Baker Drexel 

Catawba.. Mrs. Mabel M. Rowe Hickory 

Catawba Mrs. John Busbee Claremont 

Cleveland Hurlan Beason Mooresboro 

Cleveland John. Burn Shelby 

Gaston R. P. Caldwell Gastonia 

Gaston Grady B. Spott Gastonia 

Iredell A. Fred Alexandrie StatesviUe 

Iredell Mrs. John R. McLaughlin StatesviUe 

Eleventh District 

Buncombe Mrs. R. M. Swicegood Asheville 

Buncombe Charles Dermid Asheville 

Cherokee JMyra Walker Andrews 

Cherokee H. A. Mattox Murphy 

Clay A. L. Penland Hayesville 

clav A. S. Beal Hayesville 

Graham Ed Slaughter Robbinsville 

Graham Wayne McClung Robbinsville 

Haywood Tom Garrett 

Haywood Mrs. Carolyn Clayton 

Henderson R. M. Livingston 

Henderson Monroe M. Redden, Jr. Hendersonville 

Jackson Mrs. Wilma Jones Sylva 

Jackson R. U. Sutton Sylva 

McDowell E. J. House Marion 

McDowell W. G. Streetman Marion 

Macon. .._ Ed Potts 

Macon C. T. Bryson Franklin 

Madison. A. E. Leake Marshall 

Madison-. J. G. Gardner 

Mitchell Sam L. Phillips 

Mitchell Benn Robinson 

Polk W. P. Miller 

Polk... Mrs. Aline Thompson 

Rutherford Claude Lowery Forest City 

Rutherford W. G. Cline 

Swain Dwight Welch 

Swain T. L. Jones 

Transylvania Oscar Harbin 

Transylvania Mrs. John A. Brewer 

Yancey Mrs. Evelvr. H. Pate 

Yancey Charles Edwards 



State Committees. Democratic 197 

State Democratic Judicial District Executive Committees 

1966 

First District 

County Name Address 

Camden .Norman Tadlock Belcross 

Camden .Mrs. Margaret Harris South Mills 

Chowan John W. Graham Edenton 

Chowan W. J. P. Earnhardt, Jr Edenton 

Currituck S. A. Walker _ Moyock 

Currituck ..Walton. Griggs Point Harbor 

Dare Martin Kellogg Manteo 

Dare _ Rondell Tilett Wanchese 

Gates F. H. Rountree Sunbury 

Gates Lindy P. Harrell Eure 

Pasquotank JVI. B. Simpson, Jr Elizabeth City 

Pasquotank. .Mrs. W. C. Dawson, Sr Elizabeth City 

Perquimans W. H. Pitt Hertford 

Perquimans -Charles E. Johnson Hertford 

Second District 

Beaufort William B. Rodman Washington 

Beaufort W. B. Carter, J r Washington 

Hyde jteginald McKinney Lake Landing 

Hyde 

Martin Paul Roberson Robersonville 

Martin Phillip Swinson Jamesville 

TyrrelL Mrs. Lonnie Liverman Columbia 

Tyrrell Mrs. Lillian Fisher Creswell 

Washington W. W. White Roper 

Washington Mack W. Morrow Plymouth 

Third District 

Carteret J3arvey Hamilton, Jr Morehead City 

Carteret Mrs. Prentiss Garner Newport 

Craven Albert R. Bell New Bern 

Craven James L. Godwin Havelock 

Craven Dr. Charles T. Barker New Bern 

Pamlico Roy V. Tingle Grantsboro 

Pamlico Julius D. Dees Bayboro 

Pamlico A. R. Connor Oriental 

Pitt John Howell Greenville 

Pitt C. W. Everett Bethel 

Fourth District 

Duplin Criss Blossom Wallace 

Duplin Robert West Warsaw 

Duplin W. E. Craft Kenansville 

Jones Walter P. Henderson Trenton 

Jones Mrs. John W. Creagh Pollocksville 

Onslow Mrs. Lonnie Everett Sneads Ferry 

Onslow Paul Sylvester Jacksonville 

Onslow _ John D. Warlick _ Jacksonville 

Sampson JR. M. Holland Roseboro 

Sampson Joe B. Chambliss Clinton 

Sampson Mrs. Taft M. Bass Clinton 



l!tS 



North Carolina M \\ i \i 



Fifth District 
County 



Name 



Address 



New Hanover Cicero Yow Wilmington 

New Hanover Mrs. Eunice Benway Carolina Beach 

New Hanover Robert Bond Wilmington 

Peivder Josh James Maple Hill 

Pen-der H. C. Walker Curry 

Peml.r Mrs. C. R. Dillard ... Willard 



Sixth District 

Bertie Robert E. Williford Lewiston 

Bertie Moses B. Gillam Windsor 

gertje Mrs. E. S. Pugh Windsor 

g a !j. ax Scott Benton Roanoke Rapids 

Halifax John James Weldon 

Hertford Stuart Curtis Ahoskie 

Hertford T. W. Hill Murfreesboro 

Northampton W. H. Burgwyn, Jr Woodland 

Northampton Dillard Drewett ....Seaboard 



Seventh District 

Edgecombe Cameron S. Weeks Tarboro 

Edgecombe W. Eugene Simmons Tarboro 

Nash Don Evans Rocky Mount 

Nash W. L. Thorpe Rocky Mount 

Nash Mrs. O. C. Holland Middlesex 

Wilson JLouis Meyer Wilson 

Wilson William Holdford Wilson 



Eighth District 

Greene... Walter G. Sheppard Snow Hill 

Greene Sam Jenkins, Jr Walstonburg 

Lenoir John R. Hooten Kinston 

Lenoir Tommy Morris Kinston 

Wayne Thomas Strickland Rt. 2, Goldsboro 

Wayne lames N. Smuh Gold-biro 

Wa y ne Don Ward Mount Olive 



Ninth District 

Franklin Charles Yarborough Louisburg 

franklin W. P. Pearce Louisburg 

Granville Edward F. Taylor Oxford 

Granville „T. S. Royster Oxford 

P ers °n -C. B. Wood .Roxboro 

Person -R- G. Long Roxboro 



Tenth District 
Wake 



.Wake County Executive Committee Raleigh 



State Committees, Democratic 199 



Eleventh District 



County Name Address 

Harnett E. H. McCormick Lillington 

Harnett Jake Lamm Buies Creek 

Harnett Wiley Bowen Dunn 

Johnston Mrs. Macy Hoyle Smithfield 

Johnston Marvin Creech Smithfield 

Johnston A. R. Strickland Rt. 1, Middlesex 

Lee Roy Cashion Sanford 

Lee -Mrs. Nell Forves Sanford 

Lee K. R. Hoyle Sanford 



Twelfth District 

Cumberland Luther N. Packer Fayetteville 

Cumberland J. D. Kinlaw Fayetteville 

Hoke C. A. Hostetler Raeford 

Hoke Mrs. Bobby McNeil Raeford 



Thirteenth District 

Bladen Giles Clark Elizabethtown 

Bladen Sidney Britt Bladen boro 

Bladen M. Graden Melvil Elizabethtown 

Brunswick J. B. Ward, Jr Longwood 

Brunswick A. Earl Milliken Shallotte 

Brunswick .Grover Gore, Jr Southport 

Columbus D. F. McGougan, Jr Tabor City 

Columbus T. F. Enzor Fair Bluff 

Columbus Mrs. Peggy Walton Whiteville 



Fourteenth District 

Durham William Wiley Durham 

Durham R. L. Roycroft Durham 

Fifteenth District 

Alamance H. G. MacLean Haw River 

Alamance Robert B. Saunders Graham 

Alamance Robert L. Nance Burlington 

Chatham .T. D. Thrailhill Rt. 2, Apex 

Chatham C. A. Simmons Mt. Vernon Springs 

Orange William S. Stewart Chapel Hill 

Orange W. Marshall Smith Chapel Hill 

Orange Gordon Cleveland Chapel Hill 



Sixteenth District 

Robeson,. John B. Regan St. Pauls 

Robeson-. Grady Chavis Rt. 4, Lumberton 

Robesoiv. Z. J. Britt, Jr Lumberton 

Scotland Joe M. Cox Laurinburg 

Scotland Walter J. Cashwell, Jr Laurinburg 

Scotland Alderman McLean Wagram 



-"" North Carolina Manual 

Seventeenth District 

County Name Address 

C as «e|| W. A. Cobb Rt. i, R uffin 

Caswell Mrs. Helen Farmer Blanch 

Rockingham J. C. Johnson, Jr ....Madison 

Rockingham Earl W. Vaughn Draper 

Stokes Robert Miller Walnut Cove 

Stokes Mrs. Pearl Baker King 

Surry Preston Brinkly Westfield 

Surry R. J. Harris Pilot Mountain 

Eighteenth District 

Guilford County Executive Committee Greensboro 

Nineteenth District 

Cabarrus R. L. Warren Concord 

Cabarrus Webster Medlin Mt. Pleasants 

Montgomery John Kern Star 

Montgomery Howard Dorsett Mt Gilead 

Montgomery K. A. McLeod Candor 

Randolph Jerry Shupings Asheboro 

Randolph L. T. Hammonds Randleman 

Row an .T. Kern Carlton Salisbury 

Row an James C. Davis China Grove 

Twentieth District 

Anson R- E. Little, III Wadesboro 

Anson J. A. Killian Peachland 

M<""-e. E. O. Brogden Southern Pines 

Moore Lamont Brown Southern Pines 

Richmond Vance McGuirt Hamlet 

Richmond Richard Barbour Rockingham 

Stanly Staton Williams Albemarle 

Stanly Eugene Tanner Albemarle 

Union Johnny Hill Monroe 

Union Mrs. Lois Sims Waxhaw 

Twenty-First District 

Forsyth Thomas R. Yates Winston-Salem 

*orsyth. Prince A. Simmons Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Mrs. Elsie B. Evans Winston-Salem 

Twenty-Second District 

Alexander William P. Ingram Taylorsville 

Alexander Dan Davis Hiddenite 

Davidson.... Ford Myers Thomasville 

Davidson Walt Brinkley Lexington 

Davidson Jack Klass Lexington 

Davie 

Davie 

Iredell Pressley Brawley Mooresville 

Iredell Lynn Nesbitt, Jr Statesville 

Iredell Carl G. Smith Statesville 



State Committees, Democratic 201 

Twenty-Third District 

County Name Address 

Alleghany Worth Folger _ Sparta 

Alleghany J- C. Gambill Sparta 

Alleghany Max Absher Laurel Springs 

Ashe Todd A. Gentry West Jefferson 

Ashe _ Hoyle Stringer West Jefferson 

Wilkes - Cecil Lee Porter North Wilkesboro 

Wilkes John Walker North Wilkesboro 

Wilkes Mrs. Marvin Huffman Purlear 

Yadkin William Shermer Yadkinville 

Yadkin _ .Mrs. Foy Reece Boonville 

Yadkin _ Homer C. Myers Union Grove 

Twenty-Fourth District 

Avery L. L. Cook Rt. 1, Ek Park 

Avery Mrs. Lee Grier Banner Elk 

Madison Dr. W. A. Whitson Marshall 

Madison Swann B. Huff Marshall 

Mitchell Hugh A. Dobbins 

Mitchell U. D. Hensley 

Watauga Clyde Moretz Deep Gap 

Watauga Robert Danner Boone 

Yancey E. L. Briggs 

Yancey C. Wintz Macintosh 

Twenty-Fifth District 

Burke Parks McJimsey Rt. 5, Morganton 

Burke Mrs. Russell Branch Rt. 2, Morganton 

Burke... Valdo Martinat Valdese 

Caldweii -E. F. Allen Lenoir 

Caldwell Ted West Lenoir 

Caldwell Mildred Messick Patterson 

Catawba E. Murray Tate Hickory 

Catawba Stanley J. Come Newton 

Twenty-Sixth District 

Mecklenburg County Executive Committee Charlotte 

Twenty-Seventh District 

Cleveland Sadie Lutz Shelby 

Cleveland Roy Dedmond Shelby 

Cleveland Cameron Wall Rt. 3, Kings Mountain 

Gaston H. B. Gaston, Sr Belmont 

Gaston C. B. Woltz Bessemer City 

Gaston W. J. Allran, Jr Cherryville 

Lincoln S. M. Roper Lincolnton 

Lincoln M. T. Leatherman Lincolnton 

Lincoln W. L. Morris Lincolnton 

Twenty-Eighth District 

Buncombe George Craig Asheville 

Buncombe E. L. Lo f tin Asheville 

Buncombe „ Mrs. Cordelia Graham Asheville 

Twenty-Ninth District 

Henderson L. B. Prince Hendersonville 

Henderson .Mrs. Frances M. Coiner Hendersonville 

McDowell E. P. Dameron Marion 

McDowell Walter Williams Old Fort 

Polk J. W. Durham Rt. 1, Tryon 

Polk Mrs. Raymond Stevenson 

Rutherford .Gray Padgett 

Rutherford Paul Bridges 

Transylvania Don R. Irwin 

Transvlvania Mrs. E. O. Hanson 



Address 



202 North Carolina Manual 

Thirtieth District 

County Name 

^f^ -P r ', Ch ^ rles °" Van Gorder Andrews 

Cherokee L. L. Mason 

Clay Neal Kitchen 

' ' l:lv W. E. Carter Havesville 

Graham.... Modeal Walsh ZZZZZRobbinsville 

Graham Leonard Lloyd Robbinsville 

Haywood Floyd Miller 

Haywood Walter Clark 

Jackson T. M. Massey 

Jackson Bernard Brown 

JJ acon R- S. Jones, Jr Franklin 

Macon Clyde West 

Swain Ray Branton 

Swain Tames Snead 



State Democratic Solicitorial District Executive 

Committees 

1966 

First District 

County Name Address 

Beaufort W. B. Thompson Aurora 

Beaufort Hallett S. Ward ..""^Washington 

Camden Mrs. E. P. Leary Old Trap 

Camden R- K. Benton South Mill 

Chowan .John A. Mitchener, Jr Edenton 

Chowan Lena M. Leary Edenton 

Currituck W. W. Jarvis, Jr Moyock 

Currituck Roy Sawyer Jarvisburg 

Dare. Frank Cahoon Manteo 

J? a 5 e George Fuller Buxton 

Gates.... Mrs. Horace Carter Gatesville 

£ at f s Tazewell D. Eure Gatesville 

Hyde Carl M. Cahoon 

Hyde : .Macon Howard Rt. 1, Belhaven 

Pasquotank John H. Hall Elizabeth City 

Pasquotank Jyi rs . A . O. Smith Elizabeth City 

Perquimans S. M. Whedbee Hertford 

Perquimans Julian White Hertford 

l yrre ]} -H- T. Davenport Columbia 

ryrrell.... Lem A. Cahoon Columbia 

Second District 

Edgecombe Thomas G. Dill Rocky Mount 

Edgecombe George Britt Tarboro 

Martin j) on G . Matthews, Jr Hamilton 

% ar y n -- Leroy Harrison Williamston 

fi aS T"- AIex Bi ^ s Rocky Mount 

„ asl ? . • JRoy A. Cooper, Jr Nashville 

Washington John Stillman Plymouth 

Washington Jean Holton Plymouth 

5™ s on L. H. Gibbons Wilson 

Wilson John Webb Wilson 



State Committees, Democratic 203 



Third District 



County Name Address 

Bertie Mrs. Ray P. Widmer Lewiston 

Bertie J. L. Parker, Jr Colerain 

Halifax J. Edd Knott Roanoke Rapids 

Halifax Wade H. Dickens Roanoke Rapids 

Hertford T. D. Northcott Winton 

Hertford D. J. Tinkham Rt. 3, Ahoskie 

Northampton E. S. Taylor Conway 

Northampton Angus McKellar Jackson 

Vance Mrs. Sara Walker Henderson 

Vance Brooks Harris 

Warren T. P. Hicks Norlina 

Warren W. S. Smiley Macon 

Fourth District 

Harnett Henry C. Strickland Angier 

Harnett Howard Godwin Dunn 

Harnett John W. Spears Lillington 

Johnston George Mast Smith field 

Johnston E. G. Hobbs Selma 

Lee J. Allen Harrington Sanford 

Lee S. Ray Byerly Sanford 

Wayne Herbert Hulse Goldsboro 

Wayne John Kerr, III Goldsboro 

Wayne Fred P. Parker, Jr Goldsboro 

Fifth District 

Carteret Wiley H. Taylor, Jr Beaufort 

Carteret 

Craven Mrs. George Burnette, Jr New Bern 

Craven George H. Bryan Bridgeton 

Greene I. Joseph Horton Snow Hill 

Greene J. Roy Vandi 'ort RFD, Farmville 

Jones Starling Pelletier Maysville 

Jones Mrs. Iona H. Collier Rt. 2, Trenton 

Pamlico Milton Brinson Grantboro 

Pamlico Wilson Brinson Arapahoe 

Pitt Lloyd Fornes Rt. 2, Greenville 

Pitt Alton Barrett Greenville 

Sixth District 

Duplin Rivers D. Johnson, Jr Warsaw 

Duplin Graham Philips, Jr Warsaw 

Duplin Mrs. Henry Stevens, III Warsaw 

Lenoir Dr. W. A. Chantry Kinston 

Lenoir George Rouse, Jr Kinston 

Lenoir 

Onslow Starkey Shaw Richlands 

Onslow Sterling Grant Sneads Ferry 

Onslow Tom Hewitt Jacksonville 

Sampson H. L. Stewart, Jr. Clinton 

Sampson George Walston Clinton 

Sampson Mrs. Mary Carter Garland 

Seventh District 

Franklin John F. Matthews Louisburg 

Franklin James L. Lumpkin Louisburg 

Franklin 

Wake R. L. McMillan, Sr..:. Rnlpigh 

Wake Carl DeVane Raleigh 

Wake Edward Paschal Wake Forest 



204 North Carolina Manual 

Eighth District 

County Name Address 

Brunswick Mrs. S. Bunn Frink Shallotte 

Brunswick D. V. Jones Shallotte 

Brunswick Nelson Bennett Shallotte 

Columbus Alexander Smith Whiteville 

Columbus Fred Suggs Rt. 4, Whiteville 

Columbus .Edward L. Williamson Whiteville 

New Hanover John J. Burney, Jr Wilmington 

New Hanover William E. Huffine Wilmington 

New Hanover Mrs. Beatrice Mclntyre Wilmington 

Pender Mrs. Carolyn Biberstein Burgaw 

Pender E. F. Langston Rocky Point 

Pender Dudley Robbins Willard 

Ninth District 

Bladen Milton Fisher Elizabethtown 

Bladen James Monroe Council 

Bladen Mrs. Leo McDaniel Dublin 

Cumberland Mrs. Ruth Downing Fayetteville 

Cumberland Robert McNeil Fayetteville 

Cumberland W. T. Reaves Rt. 6, Fayetteville 

Hoke William L. Moses Raeford 

Hoke... Mrs. Bobby Carter Raeford 

Hnkt Mrs. Emogene Huff Rt. 1, Aberdeen 

Robeson F. L. Adams Rowland 

Robeson Thurman Anderson Rowland 

Robeson F. Wayland Floyd Fairmont 

Tenth District 

Alamance T. Lawrence Jeffreys Mebane 

Alamance J. Dean Isley Snow Camp 

Alamance J. E. Cross Burlington 

Chatham R. C. Debose Siler City 

Chatham C. E. Durham, Jr Bynum 

Chatham Mrs. Margaret Jourdan Siler City 

Durham Robert Home 

Durham Nelson McGary 

Granville W. M. Hicks Oxford 

Granville Hugh M. Currin Oxford 

Orar.-sre .Glen Caruthers Cedar Grove 

Orar.-ere George B. Spransy Chapel Hill 

Orange Gordon Cleveland Chapel Hill 

Person R. B. Dawes, Jr. Roxboro 

Person Henry Briant Roxboro 

Eleventh District 

Alleghany Jesse Gentry Sparta 

Alleghany P. C. Collins Sparta 

Alleghrny Robert Gambill Sparta 

Ashe Wade E. Vannoy, Sr West Jefferson 

Ashe T. Gwyn Gambill West Jefferson 

Twelfth District 

Davidson Carl Wilson Thomasville 

Davidson Paul S toner Lexington 

Davidson Robert Grubb Lexington 

Guil'ord Ed Washington Jamestown 

GuiTord Julius Frye Greensboro 

Guilford Percy Wall Greensboro 



State Committees, Democratic 205 

Thirteenth District 

County Name Address 

Anson Fetz Mills Wadesboro 

Anson Mrs. John Mack Rt. 4, Wadesboro 

Moore Robert N. Page, III Aberdeen 

Moore J. Douglas Davis Pinebluff 

Richmond Joe Davis Rockingham 

Richmond Mrs. Eunice Bruce Rt. 2, Hamlet 

Scotland J. Calvin Williams Laurinburg 

Scotland Andrew G. Williamson Laurinburg 

Stanly Frank N. Patterson Albemarle 

Stanly Henry Culp, Jr New London 

Stanly 

Union Mrs. Rachel Helms Rt. 1, Indian Trail 

Union Mrs. Dewey English Monroe 

Fourteenth District 

Mecklenburg County Executive Committee 

Gaston County Executive Committee 

Fifteenth District 

Alexander Mrs. Lawrence Fay Stoney Point 

Alexander Herman Lackey Rt. 2, Hiddenite 

Cabarrus John S. Hartsell Concord 

Cabarrus Clyde L. Propst, Jr Concord 

Iredell J. E. McKnight Morrisville 

Iredell Sam H. Ostwalt Rt. 3, Statesville 

Montgomery Ralph Haywood Troy 

Montgomery Charles Dorset Mt. Gilead 

Randolph _ N. M. Lowes Rt. 3, Asheboro 

Randolph Ray Caudle Rt. 4, Asheboro 

Rowan Larry Harris China Grove 

Rowan Ben McCubbins Salisbury 

Sixteenth District 

Burke Mrs. Beulah Hemphill Glen Alpine 

Burke Ted Price Rt. 5, Hickory 

Caldwell Coit F. Barber Lenoir 

Caldwell W. White Granite Falls 

Catawba Marshall V. Yount Hickory 

Catawba Carroll Weathers, Jr Hickory 

Cleveland Dr. Jack Hunt Lattimore 

Cleveland J. Lee Roberts Kings Mountain 

Lincoln David Clark Lincolnton 

Lincoln Clarence E. Leatherman Lincolnton 

Watauga Ray Luther Boone 

Watauga Ray Derrick Boone 

Seventeenth District 

Avery W. C. Brinkley Elk Park 

Avery Ed Suddrath Montezuma 

Davie 

Davie 

Mitchell Mrs. Bonnie Ford 

Mitchell Robert Barron 

Wilkes T. G. Foster North Wilkesboro 

Wilkes Mrs. C. H. Eller Moravian Falls 

Yadkin John Wade Shore Boonville 

Yadkin Mrs. Atl. Logan Yadkinville 



206 North Carolina Manual 

Eighteenth District 

Coun y Name Address 

Henderson K. L. Whitmire, Jr Henderson ville 

Henderson Kenneth Youngblood Henderson ville 

McDowell I. E. Allen Marion 

McDowell Everett C. Carnes 

Polk John E. Coats Saluda 

Poih Aline Dalton Mills Spring 

Rutherford Dan Smith 

Rut her 'ord .Mrs. Reba Lowe 

Transylvania Paul Swofford 

Transylvania .Mrs. Tom Walker 

Yancey .T. A. Buchanan 

Yancey .Roscoe Fox Burnsville 



Nineteenth District 

Buncombe Eugene Smith 

Buncombe .0. E. Starnes, Jr Asheville 

Buncombe Wm. C. Morris, Jr Asheville 

Madison B. D. Meadows 

Madison Troy K. Ramsey 

Madison Carroll Tween 



Twentieth District 

Cherokee Herman Edwards 

Cherokee George Postell 

Clay Mrs. Jane Cunningham Hayes ville 

Clay Frank Moore Hayesville 

Graham Ed Slaughter Robbins ville 

Graham .Wayne McClung Robbinsville 

Haywood Joe Brown 

Haywood Glenn W. Brown 

Jackson Tom L. Clayton Sylva 

Jackson Henry Bryson Sylva 

Macon Joel Dalton Franklin 

Macon George Byrd Franklin 

Swain Taylor Kirkman 

Swain George Davis 



Twenty-First District 

Caswell Eugene E. Carroll, Jr Yanceyville 

Caswell Mrs. Anne W. Pemberton Yanceyville 

Caswell Robert R. Black well Yanceyville 

Rockingham S. J. Webster, Jr Madison 

Rockingham R. P. Richardson Reids ville 

Rockingham 

Stokes Joseph W. Neal Walnut Cove 

Stokes Mrs. John A. Dodson Sandy Ridge 

Surry Mrs. C. J. Carson Rt. 1, Lowgap 

Surry 3. H. Atkinson Siloam 



State Committees, Democratic 207 

County Chairmen — Democratic Executive Committee 

1966 

County Name Address 

Alamance George A. Long Burlington 

Alexander J. M. Lackey Rt. 1, Stony Point 

Alleghany J. C. Gambill Rt. 3, Sparta 

Anson Herman H. Hardison, Jr Wadesboro 

Ashe Thomas S. Johnston Jefferson 

Avery Ralph Gwaltney Banner Elk 

Beaufort Lloyd Sloan, Jr Washington 

Bertie W. L. Cooke Windsor 

Bladen.. R. J. Hester, Jr Elizabethtown 

Brunswick S. Bunn Frink Shallotte 

Buncombe John F. Shuford Asheville 

Burke Johnny R. Clark Morganton 

Cabarrus M. Smoot Lyles Concord 

Caldwell Colon Prestwood Lenoir 

Camden H. A. Leary Camden 

Carteret A. H. James Morehead City 

Caswell Clarence L. Pemberton Yancey ville 

Catawba Charles C. C. Bost Newton 

Chatham Wade Barber Pittsboro 

Cherokee George Postell Rt. 2, Murphy 

Chowan Tom H. Shepard Edenton 

Clay Wilburn Mingus Hayesville 

Cleveland J. Clint Newton, Jr Lawndale 

Columbus R. C. Soles, Jr Tabor City 

Craven A. D. Ward New Bern 

Cumberland Thomas H. Williams Fayetteville 

Currituck S. A. Walker Snowden 

Dare I. P- Davis Manteo 

Davidson Robert L. Grubb Lexington 

Davie Mrs. C. W. Young Mocksville 

Duplin H. L. Stevens, III Warsaw 

Durham I. L. Dean Durham 

Edgecombe W. G. Clark, Jr Tarboro 

Forsyth Mrs. Odell Matthews Winston-Salem 

Franklin Mrs. John C. Pernell Rt. 4, Louisburg 

Gaston Alvin V. Riley Gastonia 

Gates G. P. Kittrell Corapeake 

Graham Boyd Crisp Robbinsville 

Granville Edward F. Taylor Oxford 

Greene Maynard Hicks Snow Hill 

Guilford J. H. Froelich, Jr High Point 

Halifax A. Leonidas Hux Roanoke Rapids 

Harnett Neill McKay Ross Lillington 

Haywood Henry Clayton Waynesville 

Henderson O. B. Crowell Henderson ville 

Hertford C. M. Forehand, Jr Murfreesboro 

Hoke Sam C. Morris Raeford 

Hyde H. E. Rhem Rt. 1, Belhaven 

Iredell John F. Long Rt. 1, Statesville 

Jackson 



'-'" v North Carolina Manual 



County Name 



Address 



Johnston... Darius E. Wilder R t . 1, Middlesex 

Jones James R. Hood Trenton 

Lee. ... Ralph Monger, Jr .......Sanford 

Lenoir 0scar Waller Rt. 5, Kinston 

Lincoln ...Bryan Craige Lincolnton 

Macon Erwin Patton Franklin 

Madison Dr. W. A. Sams Marshall 

Martin N. W. Johnson Oak Citv 

McDowell J. W. Streetman, Jr Marion 

Mecklenburg W. Frank Phillips Charlotte 

Mitchell Ben Robinson RFD, Bakersville 

Montgomery John T. Kern Star 

Moore J. Elvin Jackson .........Carthage 

Nash J. Ed Davenport Nashville 

New Hanover L. J. Poisson, Jr Wilmington 

Northampton T. G. Joyner Garysburg 

Onslow Marshall F. Dotson, Jr Jacksonville 

° ran ,?e -L- J. Phipps Chapel Hill 

Pamlico Hal Rowe Bayboro 

Pasquotank.. .Phil G. Sawyer, Jr Elizabeth City 

Pender Dr. John T. Dees Burgaw 

Perquimans Mrs. Marie S. Elliott Hertford 

Person Gordan P. Allen Roxboro 

Pitt J. Henry Harrell Greenville 

Polk W. H. McDonald Tryon 

Randolph W. C. Lucas Asheboro 

Richmond Hugh A. Lee Rockingham 

Robeson Dickson McLean, Jr Lumberton 

Rockingham Allen H. Gwyn, Jr Reidsville 

Rowan Archibald C, Rufty Salisbury 

Rutherford Woodrow W. Jones Rutherfordton 

Sampson Lewis W. Tappan Clinton 

Scotland Wade Maness Laurel Hill 

Stanly Robert J. Deese Albemarle 

Stokes... R. J. Scott Danbury 

Surry.. Fred Folger, Jr Mount Airy 

Swain Wade Sutton Bryson City 

Transylvania Theodore E. Reid . Br°vard 

T T yrre11 -- Clair E. Morris Rt. 2, Columbia 

Union .... Charles Hunley Monroe 

X, ance ...Bobby Rogers Henderson 

Wake . C. Woodrow Teague Raleigh 

Warre n John Kerr, Jr. Warrenton 

Washington Mrs. Howard T. Walker Plymouth 

Watauga... ...James A. Dagger ..Rt. 1, Boone 

W^ne C. Brantley Strickland Goldsboro 

Wi kes.... Juhus A. Rousseau, Jr North Wilkesboro 

w, ' so . n - Ru-sell L. Stephenson Wilson 

Yadkin James Randleman Jonesville 

Yancey Mark W. Bennett Burnsville 



State Committees, Democratic 209 

County Vice Chairmen — Democratic Executive 

Committee 

1966 

County Name Address 

Alamance Mrs. W. Clary Holt Burlington 

Alexander Mrs. Dan Davis Rt. 1, Hiddenite 

Alleghany Mrs. Helen S. Folger Sparta 

Anson Jane Pratt Wadesboro 

Ashe Mrs. Ruth T. Draughen West Jefferson 

Avery Mrs. Ruth H. Calloway Newland 

ppgn'ort Mrs. Axson Smith Belhaven 

Bertie Mrs. E. S. Pugh Windsor 

Bladen Mrs. Wanda S. Campbell Elizabethtown 

Brunswick .Mrs. Ina Mae Mintz Bolivia 

Buncombe Mrs. J. C Hall Asheville 

Burke Mrs. Aileen Avery Morgan ton 

Cabarrus Mrs. A. W. Thomas Concord 

Caldwell .Mrs. E. F. Allen Lenoir 

Camden Mrs. Grady Stevens Shiloh 

Carteret .Mrs. Rose Merrill Beaufort 

Caswell Mrs. Billy Cobb Ruffin 

Catawba Mrs. John M. Abernethy Newton 

Chatham Mrs. Ada W. Diggs Rt. 3, Chapel Hill 

Cherokee Mrs. Edward Dickey Murphy 

Chowan Mrs. E. N. Elliott Tyner 

Clay Mrs. Dolly Crisp Rt. 4, Hayesville 

Cleveland Mrs. F. A. McDaniel Kings Mountain 

Columbus Mrs. Betty E. Williamson Chadbourn 

Craven Mrs. W. H. Prescott New Bern 

Cumberland Mrs. Rudolph Singleton, Sr Fayetteville 

Currituck Mrs. Dudley Bagley Moyock 

Dare Mrs. Emily Lou Tillett Wanchese 

Davidson Mrs. C. T. Kennedy Thomasville 

Davie Gordon Tomlinson Mocksville 

Duplin Mrs. Mildred B. Stevens Warsaw 

Durham Mrs. Lina Lee Stout Durham 

Edgecombe Mrs. J. W. Sexton Rocky Mount 

Forsyth Clark S. Brown Winston-Salem 

Franklin .Calvin W. Brown Franklinton 

Gaston Mrs. Betty C, Cauthen Gastonia 

Gates Mrs. R. W. Humphries Eure 

Graham Mrs. Stella Sawyer Robbinsville 

Granville Mrs. Joe A. Watkins Oxford 

Greene Mrs. Robert Aiken Snow Hill 

Guilford Mrs. Paul Gilmore Julian 

Halifax Mrs. Jesse Whitehead Halifax 

Harnett Mrs. Fred Thomas Erwin 

Haywood Mrs. Ruffner Jones Canton 

Henderson Mrs. Robert R. Livingston Henderson ville 

Hertford Mrs. E. G. Blythe Harrellsville 

Hoke Mrs. T. J. Harris Rt. 3, Red Springs 

Hyde Mrs. Mildred Gibbs Swan Quarter 

Iredeli Mrs. Jack Raymer Troutman 

Jackson Jane Goward Sylva 



210 



North Carolina Manual 



County 



Name 



Address 



Johnston Mrs. Grace Peedin Princeton 

Jones Mrs. Wayne Haskins Rt. 1, Trenton 

Lee Mrs. Kemp Gaddy Sanford 

Lenoir Mollie V. Hart Kinston 

Lincoln Mrs. John Friday Lincolnton 

Macon Mrs. Jack Sherrill Franklin 

Madison Mrs. Evelyn Anderson Rt. 2, Mars Hill 

Martin Mrs. Jack Sharp Robersonville 

McDowell Mrs. Ralph K. Ostrom Marion 

Mecklenburg Mrs. Lewis Guignard Charlotte 

Mitchell Mrs. A. N. Fuller Spruce Pine 

Mon-tgomery Mrs. R. B. Jordan Mount Gilead 

Moore Mrs. E. O. Brogden Southern Pines 

Nash Mrs. Millard Morgan, Jr Bailey 

New Hanover Mrs. Eunice Benway Carolina Beach 

Northampton Mrs. W. H. Beale, Jr Potecasi 

Onslow Mrs. Christine Koonce Richlands 

Orange Betty June Hayes Hillsborough 

Pamlico Mrs. Perry McCotter, Sr Bayboro 

Pasquotank Mrs. Beverly M. Small Rt. 1, Elizabeth City 

Pender Mrs. Reece N. Lefler Willard 

Perquimans Mrs. Robert Sutton Rt. 3, Herford 

Person Mrs. A. F. Nichols Roxboro 

Pitt Mrs. W. F. Tyson Stokes 

Polk Mrs. Annie Mae Walker.... Rt. 1, Campobello, S. C. 

Randolph Mrs. Bertha Fitzgerald Asheboro 

Richmond .Mrs. Robbie E. Webb Ellerbe 

Robeson Mrs. Betty Ayers St. Pauls 

Rockingham Mrs. J. C. Johnson, Sr Madison 

Rowan Pearl Thompson Rt. 6, Salisbury 

Rutherford Mrs. Charles Ford Forest City 

Sampson .Mrs. Reta W. Henley Roseboro 

Scotland Mrs. W. G. Hunt Laurinburg 

Stanly Mrs. Jeanne Morris Albemarle 

Stokes Mrs. Marjorie P. Christian Danbury 

Surry Mrs. Roxie Roth Elkin 

Swain Minnie Lee Wright Bryson City 

Tran.sylvania Mrs. Julia Fisher Brevard 

Tyrrell Mrs. Borden McClees Columbia 

Union Mrs. Sam R. Gaddy Wingate 

Vance Mrs. Glenn M. Walker Henderson 

Wake Mrs. Ted Daniel Raleigh 

Warren Mrs. W. S. Smiley Rt. 1, Macon 

Washington Victor Alexander Creswell 

Watauga Mrs. Rachel Hartley Boone 

Wayne Mrs. Mary Hall Peacock Fremont 

Wilkes Zelle Harris Roaring River 

Wilson Mrs. E. Sharpe Newton Wilson 

Yadkin Mrs. Ruth Mackie Boles Yadkin ville 

Yancey Maphra Young Green Mountain 



NORTH CAROLINA REPUBLICAN STATE 
PLATFORM 1966 

NATIONAL AFFAIRS 

The present national Administration, and indeed the Demo- 
cratic Party itself, is marked, among other things, hy two ex- 
tremely dangerous trends: One, an ever-increasing unwarranted 
centralization of power in the Federal Government; and two, an 
utter disregard for financial responsibility in our national fiscal 
affairs. 

We ask only for the free opportunity to do things for ourselves 
and our country. This is a nation which has prospered in a 
climate of freedom which has permitted each individual to devel- 
op his maximum potential. We must move away from the dead- 
ening influence of paternalism and return to policies which stim- 
ulate and encourage individual incentive. Then, and only then, 
can our nation march forward to its greater destiny — strong 
enough to discourage outside influences and sensitive to the wel- 
fare of all its citizens at home. 



FISCAL INTEGRITY: 

The national spiraling inflation created by the administration's 
domestic and international give-away program must be curbed 
by more responsible Republican leadership. The record of the 
present administration shows a continuing disregard for the 
importance of fiscal integrity in national affairs. We commend 
the efforts of Congressmen Charles R. Jonas and James T. Broy- 
hill to stem the tide of irresponasible governmental spending, and 
we pledge our best to return them to Congress with others of 
like mind. This state needs more Republican Congressmen to 
help organize the Congress and direct its policies into channels 
more in line with the thinking of the people of North Carolina. 

211 



212 Nouth Carolina Manual 

SECTION 14-B: 

We commend the successful efforts made by the Congressional 
Republican leadership to prevent the repeal by the persent admin- 
istration of Section 14-15 of the Taft-Hartley Act. Although sup- 
porting responsible unionism, we do not feel that compulsory 
unionism is in the best interest of the individual American laborer, 
the American labor movement, nor in the best interest. 

FOREIGN AFFAIRS: 

We regret the irresolution and lack of leadership displayed by 
the current administration in stemming Communist imperialism 
throughout the world, and in particular in Southeast Asia. Be- 
cause of the indecisiveness of the present administration our 
international prestige is at its lowest ebb. and Communist aggres- 
sion moves forward. We call upon our national leadership to 
let the interest and national safety of this country and the West 
be the polar star for the guidance of our foreign policy — and 
pursue that policy with firmness and with strength. 

STATE AFFAIRS 

North Carolina possesses potential unexcelled by any of the 
other 49 states. That potential is the ability of our citizens. This 
state has been unable to utilize its potential because of the one- 
party system of government exhibited by the Democratic Party 
in the last 65 years. When any political party is too long in power, 
it becomes primarily interested in its own perpetuation without 
primary regard to the best interest of the people. Our present 
low position among the states in education, health, welfare, in- 
come, etc. is proof of the results of the one-party system. 

PUBLIC EDUCATION 

With a firm conviction that an excellent educational system is 
the first prerequisite for representative government, and with 
the belief that only educated citizens can preserve the liberties 



Republican Platform 213 

won for them at great cost by their forefathers, the Republican 
Party in North Carolina dedicates itself to the position that 
education is the most important function of State and Local 
Government in a free society. 

We praise the dedication our teachers have shown under ad- 
verse circumstances. North Carolina education programs rank 
near the bottom in the nation in all categories. In spite of low 
ratings in education, the records tend to show that we rank near 
the top in per capita expenditures for education. It seems evident 
that we are paying for more education than our schools are 
providing. 

A comparison of the educational history of Republican States 
with that of Democrat States during the last 65 years points to 
the undeniable fact that Republican States lead the nation in the 
field of education, while Democrat States rank near the bottom 
in every evaluation of school standards. We pledge ourselves to 
the task of elevating North Carolina from the low educational 
position she has occupied during 65 years of Democrat rule. 

The Republican Party favors a program of incentives and 
teacher selection to attract and hold superior teachers. Instruct- 
ors should be highly trained for the areas in which they teach. 
Teachers must be given time to teach and pupils time in which 
to learn. We support special programs for the exceptionally 
talented and for the handicapped. We favor more emphasis on 
physical fitness in athletic programs, and less attention to spec- 
tator sports. 

We propose to strengthen job security for those who teach our 
children by enacting teacher tenure legislation. We feel that 
this would remove political pressures from the classroom. 

We believe that students must attend classes regularly. Be- 
cause the Democrat Party has been unwilling to accept the 
responsibility for adequate truancy laws, there are approximately 
70,000 boys and girls absent from the classrooms each day our 
public schools are open. 

Our Republican congressional candidates if elected would work 
for legislation allowing a certain percentage of the Federal In- 
come Tax paid by the residents of North Carolina to be returned 
directly to the states to be used by the states for education 
without anv federal control. 



214 Nokth Carolina Manual 

North Carolina Republicans, realizing the urgent need for 
more and better public school buildings and plants, propose that 
the State return to the counties 15% of sales and use tax collec- 
tions to be used for this purpose. This program would eliminate 
expensive interest payments on bonds and would return some 20 
million annually to the counties. Within 10 years North Caro- 
lina would have one of the finest if not the finest school plant 
systems in the nation. 

The Republican Party is committeed to the principle that each 
generation should furnish adequate support for the training of its 
youth. It is opposed to programs of deficit finance, which bind 
future generations to relieve the present of its responsibilities. 
We pledge ourselves to efficient administration, maximum use of 
school facilities, and elimination of frills or waste in our educa- 
tional system. We promise constant scrutiny of the entire 
educational system to the end that essentials be held in focus and 
the goal of an educated citizenry be realized. 



HIGHER EDUCATION 

The Republican Party favors continued expansion of our system 
of higher education in keeping with the steady increase of popu- 
lation and growing complexity of modern society. We favor 
careful screening of applicants and high standards of perform- 
ance by those enrolled at such schools. 

We favor an expansion of the regional Industrial Training 
Center Program. 

Believing the Community College is a sound solution for those 
who want such an education as it affords, but are financially 
unable to bear the high cost in colleges and universities, we favor 
the careful location of Community Colleges so that all sections 
of the state will be provided with this facility. We favor better 
financial assistance from the State in capital outlay, especially in 
those sections where the indebtedness and tax rate will prohibit 
the establishment of a community college without greater state 
support. 

We advocate allowing state supported colleges in diverse sec- 
tions of the state to offer masters degrees and doctorates in 



Republican Platform 215 

education in order that teachers may continue their work to- 
wards these degrees while they teach. 

We feel that, in any expansion of our system of higher educa- 
tion, the interests of the State's excellent private colleges should 
be given consideration. 

The Republican Party feels that justice demands that the 
governing boards of all institutions of higher education be select- 
ed on a non-partisan basis. 

LOCAL. CONTROL. OF EDUCATION 

Republican members of the 19 67 General Assembly will work 
for legislation returning to the counties and cities control over 
Boards of Education either by direct vote of the people in non- 
partisan elections or by appointment of the board by duly elected 
county officials. 

ELECTION LAWS 

If the people of our State are to have improvements in their 
election laws, it will be a result of the Republican Party and 
the Republican Party alone. After 65 years of Democrat rule 
the State's election laws are still the delight of the unscrupulous 
politician, being filled with unjust provisions and handy loop- 
holes. 

As each session of the Democratically controlled legislature 
passes with only minimal changes in the election laws, it becomes 
more and more apparent to the people of the State that the hope 
for free and more honest elections lies with the Republican 
Party alone. 

The Republican Party reproves the party in power for its bien- 
nial failure to correct the many faults of its elections laws. It 
refuses to require periodic reregistration. It circumvents any 
actions to prevent ballot box abuses. It steadfastly upholds its 
complete domination of the election boards at every level. In 
some counties it refuses to allow the minority party to name its 
own judges. And in every respect it shows a continual lack of 
concern for truly representative government, 



216 Norte Carolina Manual 

The Republican Party continues t<> advocate: 

1. The transfer of the control of elections from the Democratic 
Party to a system of non-partisan boards of exercising a generally 
judicial function. The election officials should, therefore, be 
appointed with the understanding that they represent the State 
of North Carolina and not any political party. 

2. A statewide periodic reregistration. There is no better 
way of purging the registration books. A substantial number of 
the counties in North Carolina have not had a new registration in 
the last 12 years. The Republican Party advocates a complete 
reregistration every 8 years. 

3. A modern loose-leaf system of registration requiring each 
registrant to sign his name when registering to vote. 

4. The repeal of the civilian absentee ballot law. The altera- 
tions in the absentee ballot laws grudgingly adopted by the 
Democratic legislature have done little to dispell the abuses of 
these provisions. The only means for completely eliminating 
the flagrant abuses of this law is to completely repeal the entire 
section. 

5. The removal of the so-called markers at each polling place. 
These markers no longer serve the function of assisting the voter 
in marking his ballot but instead help the unscrupulous politician 
to control the ballot. 

6. The more widespread use of voting machines with the 
State sharing the cost. Voting machines would obviously result 
in more honest elections, eliminating the stuffed ballot boxes, 
false bottomed ballot boxes, marked ballots and similar frauds. 

7. Requiring the voter to sign a poll book before voting. 
Such action would deter many from voting illegally. 

8. That Federal employees be prohibited from serving as elec- 
tion officials. 

We think it reprehensible that the citizens of this State were 
required to resort to the courts for the elimination of the loyalty 
oath because the Democratic controlled legislature continually 



Republican Platform 217 

defeated Republican attempts to repeal this oath in the legis- 
lature. 

The Republican Party endorses these and any improvement to 
the election laws which would provide more honest and free 
elections. All just and truly representative governments are 
based on honest and free elections. It is upon these foundations 
that the Republican Party bases its goals. 

REALIGNMENT OF SENATORIAL DISTRICTS 

Since the present rule is that State legislative apportionment 
must be based on the one-man one-vote theory, the Republican 
Party believes that the only way to completely comply with the 
rules is to have the only one-member Senate districts and one- 
member House districts. To accomplish full-compliance into 
single-member districts, and realignment after the next census 
should be by one-member districts. 

CONGRESSIONAL REDISTRICTING 

It will be the purpose of Republican representatives and sena- 
tors to redistrict the Congressional districts of North Carolina 
on the basis of making the districts geographically compact as 
far as it is possible without splitting counties. 



'i g North C uoi i\ \ M intjai 

GOVERNMENT TAXES AM) SPENDING 

Wherever the citizen of North Carolina turns, he finds himself 
faced with yet another tax. North Carolina is in the minority of 
states thai levy both general sales and personal income taxes. 
Our sales tax rate is exceeded only by nine states. Our personal 
income tax rate is exceeded by only six states. The rate at which 
we tax corporate income is exceeded in only two states. And 
our motor fuel tax ranks number one with the exception of 
Hawaii and Alaska. Per capita tax collections in North Carolina 
have increased from $54.39 in 1950 to $130.32 in 1964 — more 
than doubling over the fifteen year period. The average tax- 
payer of North Carolina is clearly assuming an ever growing 
burden. To be sure, some of this burden has been used to the 
benefit of the taxpayers. But the Republican Party of North 
Carolina maintains that the taxpayer is not receiving the maxi- 
mum benefit from his taxes. The Republican Party believes that 
the taxpayers not only have a right to know how their hard 
earned tax dollars are being spent, but also to receive maximum 
benefit from these tax dollars. We maintain that the tax burden 
on the average taxpayer can actually be decreased while the 
benefits to him are increased. To these ends, the Republican 
Party makes the following proposals: 

A. Tax Revision 

1. Replace food tax with a normal tax on alcohol and to- 
bacco. 

2. Replace 15% of the sales tax collected, back to the 
counties, giving the counties $20,000,000 per year for 
school building purposes. 

B. Pax Reform 

1. An Educational Trust Fund will be established within 
the office of the State Treasurer. All revenue from the 
general sales tax shall be placed in this trust fund and 
shall be used for education only. The treasurer will be 
authorized to invest this money in short-term U. S. Gov- 
ernment securities or to deposit the money in financial 
institutions within North Carolina which are insured by 
an agency of the U. S. Government. The treasurer will 



Republican Platform 219 

be required to give a short statement monthly and a full 
report biannually to each legislator on the condition of 
the Trust Fund. These statements and reports will in- 
clude such items as income expenditures, location of in- 
vestments, and interest received on the Fund. 
The enactment of this proposal would bring about an 
increase in the benefits to the people of North Carolina 
without an increase in taxes. Although the general sales 
tax was enacted for the purpose of providing funds for 
education, a comparison of tax receipts and education 
expenditures indicates that about twenty per cent of sales 
tax revenue is going for non-educational purposes. The 
Educational Trust Fund would recover most or all of 
this twenty percent for the education of our children. 

2. Full-time students in an accredited college, university 
or vocational school shall be exempt from the state in- 
come tax while they are full time students. Part time 
students in accredited institutions who are taking courses 
which improve their skills may deduct the expenses of 
such part time education from their taxable incomes 
when computing their state income tax. 

C. Expenditure Reforms 

1. To provide a check on the majority party, the member- 
ship of the Advisory Budget Committee shall include a I 
least two members of the minority party. 

2. Members of the press and public shall be allowed to be 
present at all meetings of the Joint Appropriations Sub- 
Committee. 

3. At the end of each session, the Legislature shall appoint 
a Comptroller General who shall have access to all in- 
formation on present and proposed State finances, and 
who shall report periodically to the Legislature on the 
status of State Finances and on the formulation of the 
State budget. 

These three proposals would make a reality of the right 
of the taxpayers to know how their tax money is being 
spent. At the very least it would give the representa- 
tives of the people full access to this information. 



220 North Carolina Manual 

4. Any surplus in State funds existing at the end of any- 
fiscal year shall he used to retire a portion of the out- 
standing debt of the State. The only exception shall be 
funds in the Educational Trust fund. 

5. A commission shall be established to make a study of the 
entire State tax structure and make suggestions for re- 
vamping the tax structure to provide a greater equity in 
the tax system and the maximum benefit to the taxpayer. 
The North Carolina tax system, like those of all other 
states, has been constructed bit by bit. Now is the time 
to take the lead among the states and study our entire 
tax structure as a unit and to make reforms which will 
give business, labor, and the consumer the maximum 
benefit from their tax dollars so they will have to bear 
only a minimum tax burden. 

CIVIL RIGHTS 

We are committed to the protection of rights and equal oppor- 
tunities for all American citizens. Particularly, we object to the 
current practice of the present administration of paying only 
lip-service to equal job opportunities and non-discriminatory hir- 
ing. However, we deplore the arbitrary and capricious methods 
by which the present national administration has withheld or 
threatened to withhold federal funds in order to achieve forced 
racial balance in various programs receiving federal assistance. 
To ignore the free choices of all citizens and to insist upon forced 
racial balance is insulting to members of all races. 

EFFICIENCY I\ STATE ADMINISTRATION 

In order to bring about better state government we advocate 
the following: 

1. The governor should have the power of veto as do all other 
state governors and as does the president. 

2. State employees should be protected by civil service in order 
to attract and hold capable persons. 

o. A comptroller general should be appointed by the legisla- 
ture to oversee the budget and be responsible only to the 
legislature 



Republican Platform 221 

4. The legislature should delegate authority to the counties 
and municipalities of this state in matters which are purely 
of local concern, freeing the legislature to concern itself 
with pressing state matters. 

5. A study commission should be set up similar to the "Hoover 
Commission" to study each individual agency of the state 
with the prime purpose to see if by combining or abolishing 
agencies, a more effective use could be made of personnel 
and money while better serving our citizens. 

STATE EMPLOYEES 

The Republican Party commends the excellent service of State 
Employees who have done their jobs despite the undue burden 
of political pressure exerted by the Democrat Party. It has been 
and is the desire of the Republican Party to enhance the position 
and security of State Employees. Republicans in 1961, 1963, and 
1965 sessions of the General Assembly sponsored and supported 
legislation. A politically free Civil Service System would elimi- 
nate political servitude as it now exists and would allow State 
Employees to concentrate upon the productive work of their 
office. 

GRAFT AND CORRUPTION 

After 6 5 years of control by the Democrat Party, and the record 
of corruption associated with it, it is time for an intensive investi- 
gation of State practices and policies. 

SECRECY IN GOVERNMENT 

We believe that if North Carolinians are to remain free, the 
elected and appointed representatives of the people of North Caro- 
lina must be the major champions of the citizens rights. 

It is reasonable to assume that as North Carolina grows in 
population, State government enlarges in corresponding size, 
scope, and power. 

Government, while seeking just and honorable goals, has be- 
come guilty of abuse of its powers. This has come about largely 
due to untended and unwatched affairs through secrecy in gov- 
ernment. 



State Represei 




222 



Districts -1966 




  ; 



224 Xokmi Carolina Manual 

The Republican Party takes the position that no person, or 
group of persons, has the right to deny people the access to 
meetings and deliberations of any branch of their government. 

We further believe that the citizens of this state have the abso- 
lute and unqualified right to know all the facts concerning the 
a Hairs of their government. 

We oppose secret meetings of any Legislative Committee, and 
Commission Board or Administrative Department. 

We conclude that secrecy in government, if allowed to prevail, 
becomes an unconscious development that ends in a voluntary 
surrender of a free people escaping from freedom to one auto- 
cratic master. 

ROADS AND HIGHWAY 

The Republican Party has consistently advocated a non-partisan 
policy which insists on the appointments of professionally oriented 
Highway Commissioners and the hiring of personnel based on 
qualifications rather than political loyalty. 

We see the present program of automobile inspections as a 
totally inadequate approach towards stemming the shocking high- 
way fatality figures in our State. 

We would recommend more thorough studies of highway safety 
hazards, more consistent policies, a broader backing for our State 
Highway Patrol, and greater attention to the overall condition of 
our rural roads. 

HIGHWAY SAFETY 

There is no simple solution to the increasing slaughter upon 
our highways, but an effective state program dealing with every 
aspect of the problem is urgent. 

Increased emphasis upon driver education, both in our schools 
and adult clinics, and upon public information forums is essen- 
tial in making our citizenry safety-conscious. 

Highway engineering and construction to eliminate locations 
of high accident frequency is a life-saver which cannot be de- 
layed. 

Above all, there should be vigorous and impartial law enforce- 
ment to instill into law violators a healthy respect for the traffic 



Republican Platform 225 

laws. Meddling with the State Highway Patrol for political rea- 
sons is inexcusable whether on a local or gubernatorial level. 

The Republican Party condemns such political shenanigans in 
highway law enforcement and commits itself to a strict, impartial 
enforcement of our traffic laws. 

JUDICIARY 

The administration of justice in North Carolina has needed 
sensible modernization for many years. In the 1961 session of 
the General Assembly the unanimous support of Republican 
members resulted in the submission to the people of constitu- 
tional amendments to pave the way for court improvement. The 
people indicated by their overwhelming approval of these amend- 
ments that they wanted reform. The 1963 Session saw almost no 
activity towards implementing of the approved amendments. 
There were even brags by some of the Democrat members of the 
Legislature that there would be no implementation. In 1964 the 
Republican Party pledged an all out effort to bring about uni- 
formity of the lower court systems of North Carolina and the 
general updating of our court procedures in order to improve and 
expedite the administration of justice and in 19 65 appropriate 
legislation was enacted. The Democrats have demonstrated bad 
faith by opposing Republican sponsored legislation designed to 
allow open election of Judges in the District where they are to 
serve. The Republican Party will continue to advocate open and 
uninhibited election of Judges in this State by the people in the 
District where the Judge is to serve. 

I SE OF STATE FACILITIES BY THOSE ADVOCATING 
OVERTHROW OF OUR GOVERNMENT 

The Republican Party of North Carolina is unalterably opposed 
to the use of State Buildings and facilities, as a forum, by per- 
sons or organizations known to advocate the overthrow of the 
Constitution or Government of the United States or the State of 
North Carolina by force or violence. 

AGRICULTURE 

The Republican Party has long held that minimal agricultural 
diversification, low per capita incomes and a declining rural popu- 



126 North Carolina Manual 

lalion has accentuated the plight of North Carolina farming. 

We recognize the inevitable changes which will be reshaping 
our farm economy through increased technology and mechaniza- 
tion. Therefore, we recommend: 

A. Greatly expanded technical assistance to enable farmers to 
!ace rapidly changing methods of production. 

B. Basic research through experimental stations which will open 
up new potentials in crop diversification. 

('. Availability of reasonable long term capital with which to 
finance needed mechanization. 

Further we feel great emphasis should be exerted through all 
related stale agencies to develop more processing and distribu- 
tion of local agricultural production. We see no valid reason for 
such high proportions of out-of-state agricultural products being 
imported to serve North Carolina markets. 

CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

We believe that the greatesl single indictment against our 
present Conservation and Development Department is the shock- 
ingly low per capita income for the people of our state. 

Standing ai 43rd among the 50 states, business economists 
have predicted it will take a half a century for North Carolina to 
catch up with the rest of the nation in per capita income at the 
present rate of growth. 

We submit this to be the most acute economic problem of our 
state. Attracting industries which utilize comparatively un- 
skilled and untrained labor contributes very little to our overall 
problem of low per capita income. We want to see more emphasis 
on developing industries which would afford higher incomes to 
our state's wage earners 

To this end, we recommend an immediate and sharply expanded 
boost to the Research Triangle. In addition, we recommend any 
other regionally placed sub-centers which might be needed for 
p icialized research, industrialization and development. Diversi- 
fication of industry and more technical jobs created by these 
centers represent the two most logical approaches in attacking 
our states chronic problem of unemployment and under-employ- 
ment. 



Republican Platform 227 



I/ABOK 



The Republican Party commends the working men and women 
of North Carolina, who because of their efforts have raised their 
standard of living and improved their working conditions. 

We strongly support the proposition that through free and 
honest elections the laboring people shall have opportunity to 
determine whether it is their desire to associate with a union or 
not. We do believe, however, that individuals, who after a prop- 
erly conducted election have decided to be represented by a 
union who will be their bargaining agent, be given every oppor- 
tunity to immediately begin bargaining with management. 

While some progress has been made to establish a meaningful 
minimum wage in North Carolina, we believe that additional steps 
should be taken by the 19 67 General Assembly. We are of the 
opinion that the Republican Party should introduce and support 
legislation that would guarantee a $1.25 minimum wage in our 
state by January 1, 1968. 

We further believe that the present North Carolina unemploy- 
ment and working-man's compensation laws are in need of study 
and revision. We believe that a thorough study will show a need 
for a substantial increase in the unemployment and workmen's 
compensation benefits when compared to other progressive states 
of this nation. We therefore propose that the 1967 General As- 
sembly undertake such a study to properly determine equitable 
and honorable workman's and unemployment compensation bene- 
fits. 

We believe that union leaders should set the example for 
proper and honest conduct in the organizing and governing of the 
labor movement and unions. 

Union members should at all times have the opportunity to 
freely and openly express themselves and vote on all matters 
without fear of intimidation or reprisals against them or their 
families. We further believe that all matters pertaining to 
finances, dues, as well as all expenditures of union funds, should 
be freely and openly discussed and voted on by the entire mem- 
bership; and that no monies be expended without the express 
will of the majority of the membership. 



228 North Carolina Manual 

INTERNAL WATER RESOURCES 

The Republican Party of North Carolina believes the need for 
conserving water is of such importance that water resources 
development should be put on a. par with agricultural and indus- 
trial development. While water problems in the State have not 
yel reached serious proportions, there are some developing areas 
whir, total water demands soon may exceed available supplies; 
and adequate water quality shortly may pose serious problems for 
the entire state. Thus, while there is still time to do so, the 
Republican Party of North Carolina advocates that increased 
emphasis be placed on fully developing water resources of the 
State to meet foreseeable State demands for decades to come. 
We must immediately get down to the task of systematic plan- 
ning for the best use of the State's water resources in an orderly 
and rational way. 

HOME RULE 

The Republican Party is alarmed by the increasing centraliza- 
tion of power in Raleigh and Washington. As an example, more 
than one-half of the legislation enacted by the North Carolina 
General Assembly is local legislation not applicable to the state 
as a whole. 

CONSTITUTIONAL. REFORM 

The progress of North Carolina should not continue to be ham- 
pered by an antiquated, out-moded state constitution adopted in 
L868 and cluttered with a hodge-podge of unrelated and confus- 
ing amendments. 

The Republican Party advocates the call of a Constitutional 
Convention for the purpose of drafting and submitting to the 
people a modern up-to-date constitution. 

PURLIC HEALTH 

The Republican Party knowing that sound physical and mental 
health is of basic importance to the life and happiness of the 
people realizes that this is primarily an individual responsibility, 
a local responsibility, a responsibility of charitable organizations, 
a responsibility of the cities and counties. The Republican Party 



Republican Platform 229 

recognizes that it is the responsibility of city, county, and state 
government to safeguard public health in areas beyond the power 
of the individual citizen and therefore it pledges itself to dis- 
charge this obligation and responsibility with maximum efficiency 
and minimum interference with the liberties of the people, and 
to spend the people's money with as much care as if it were all 
our own. 

We pledge our best efforts in making North Carolina's health 
environment the safest in which to live, work, and play. 

More specifically, we pledge ourselves to give immediate atten- 
tion to solving the following important problems: 

1. Pollution of water, soil, and air. Growing population and 
industrial expansion has aggravated existing wide spread 
pollution of streams and water supplies by human and 
industrial wastes. Overloaded and outmoded sewage dis- 
posal facilities, and inadequate water purification facilities 
in many locations have created in many areas situations 
of great and increasing danger to the health of the people. 
Immediate correction of these conditions, with intelligence 
and imagination is imperative. A farseeing, coordinated 
statewide plan, in cooperation with analogous projects in 
neighboring states, needs to be developed and carried out 
without delay to insure purity of surface and ground water 
and the water in our recreation areas. 

2. Programs for making more and better use of the skills of 
elderly citizens through cooperation with and assistance 
to our private enterprise economy sector. 

3. More careful long range planning to improve and maintain 
sanitary conditions in the fringe areas around cities and 
towns particularly the faster growing ones. 

4. Health needs of our growing population demands more and 
better efforts to induce young people to prepare themselves 
for health service careers. This includes opposing the 
incentive-killing effect of federal government aid and con- 
trol of health services. We advocate the establishment of 
a research division within the department of health for the 
purpose of determining if there be elements which may 
induce cancer in cigarette smoke and if such be found 
determining their exact nature and methods of eliminating 
these from processed cigarette tobacco. 



230 Xipk i ii C \K"i iw M \\i \i 

PUBLIC WELFARE 

We recognize thai in every economy there are two groups of 
citizens, one which is unable to provide for itself and the other 
which is unwilling to provide for itself. It is the responsibility 
of our state and local government to care for all those so handi- 
capped by unfortunate circumstances. Under present procedure 
there is too much opportunity for abuses in qualifying for welfare 
assistance. It is true that in all too many cases persons are 
receiving welfare assistance who refuse to work. It is impera- 
tive that more clearly defined limits and restrictions be placed 
upon recipients of welfare assistance to the end that cases of 
necessity are adequately cared for and cases of abuse are imme- 
diately checked and discontinued. 

In many cases it is true that some of the more needy receive 
too little in the way of assistance. The Republican Party be- 
lieves that stricter enforcement of requirements for participation 
in public welfare with more adequate assistance to those entitled 
to receive is essential. 

The Republican Party advocates more exacting legislation 
requiring irresponsible parents to maintain their children and 
requiring adult children of sufficient income to maintain and 
support their needy parents. The enforcement of these laws will 
relieve taxpayers of this \mwarranted burden. 

COMMERCIAL FISHERIES — SALT WATER RESOURCES 

As this division of the North Carolina Department of Conserva- 
tion and Development has functioned in the past, little construc- 
tive emphasis has been placed upon either of the fundamental 
functions of Conservation or development of North Carolina fish- 
ery resources. This lack of emphasis and resulting failure in its 
primary purposes is partly attributable to unnecessary emphasis 
on the activities of tax collection and law enforcement. 

Under the control of the Democrat Party, the operation of the 
Commercial and Sports Fisheries Division of the North Carolina 
Department of Conservation and Development, as presently con- 
ducted, has become a matter of collecting taxes (from the fishing 
industry) with which to pay for law enforcement officers. Many 
of the laws enforced are merely laws levying taxes (or licenses). 
Thus, this agency is, in effect a "political perpetual motion ma- 



Republican Platform 231 

chine," accomplishing only its own continuation. 

The Republican Party advocates the assumption by the Depart- 
ment of Revenue of tax collecting functions of the Commercial 
Fisheries Division which is presently handled by the Department 
of Conservation and the North Carolina Department of Conversa- 
tion and Development. 

Boats are the machinery used by fishermen for making their 
living. For the reason that the farmer's plow is not taxed, the 
fisherman's boat should not be taxed by special licenses. 

We further deem it necessary that the law enforcement func- 
tions of the Commercial and Sports Fisheries Division of the 
North Carolina Department of Conservation and Development 
be assumed by a duly constituted law enforcement agency of the 
State, the North Carolina Waterway Patrol. The North Carolina 
Republican Party believes that, in this way, more effective and 
constructive practices can be established and that valuable con- 
tributions to the economics of the coastal areas of North Carolina 
can be made. We, furthermore, believe that these accomplish- 
ments will "inure" to the general benefit of all North Carolinians. 

Once relieved of these two functions mentioned above, the 
Commercial and Sports Fisheries Division of the North Carolina 
Department of Conservation and Development should direct its 
efforts toward the proper objectives of conservation of basic 
brood stocks of the State's fishery resources and the development 
of the fishing and related industries. 

We believe that the Division of Commercial and Sports Fish- 
eries should be a separate department of government which will 
place added emphasis upon research, seafood processing and mar- 
keting in an attempt to raise the economy of coastal North Caro- 
lina and that this new division should also place added emphasis 
on the development of the sports fishing industry in North Caro- 
lina. 



STATE PORTS 

The North Carolina Republican Party believes that the North 
Carolina port facilities at Morehead City and Wilmington are 
vitally important to the State and its industries by affording the 
opportunity for world-wide commerce; and we advocate that 
major emphasis be placed upon our ports for their expansion in 



_:'.: North Carolina Manual 

art';i.'~ regarding promotion, advertising, and capital improve- 
ments; and we believe that a modern East-West highway is essen- 
tial for the growth and usage of our ports. 

We believe that these port facilities can and should continue 
to operate on a self-supporting basis in the tradition of a free and 
competitive economy. 

COASTAL WATER WAYS 

The North Carolina Republican Party is aware of the tremen- 
dous increase of pleasure boating in our coastal water, and is 
also aware that the lack of concern regarding the boating public 
is a detriment to tourist trade in our coastal areas. Therefore, 
we advocate the following policies: 

1. That there be an acceleration in the construction of boat 
ramps and relief stations in our coastal areas to be under 
the direction of the North Carolina Wildlife Reserve Com- 
mission. 

2. That the State inaugurate a politically free Waterway Pa- 
trol to promote safe boating practices, and to provide assist- 
ance and protection for the boating public; and that there 
be established safety requirements and regulations for the 
operation of high powered boats. 

•".. That the North Carolina Highway Department in the mu- 
tual interest of highway traffic and water traffic adopt a 
policy of increasing the clearances under all fixed and 
draw-span bridges over coastal waterways. 

INLAND LAKES AND RIVERS 

The Republican Party recognizes the rights of all persons to 
enjoy inland lakes and rivers. We also recognize the dangers 
and problems involved w r hen the same streams and lakes are used 
by different persons for different forms of recreation. We propose 
statewide regulation for the protection and control of boaters, 
swimmers, skiers, fishermen and divers while using our inland 
public waters. 

RIGHTS OF CITIZENSHIP 

I'nder the proper interpretation of the philosophy of govern- 
ment that our forefathers dreamed of and we seek to bring into 



Republican Platfobm 233 

realization, we, the Republican Party believe it to be fundamen- 
tally true that the will of the majority ought to prevail within the 
framework of the Constitution. In the proper exercise of that 
will, however, the proper regard must be used to safeguard the 
rights of minorities — whose members are entitled to equal and 
full citizenship of this state, and to the rights and freedom of 
choices of the individual citizen. 

CONCLUSION 

The future of our State is bright, for the people are realizing 
the advantages and necessity of a healthy two-party system of 
government. The shackles and heavy yoke of oppressive and 
lethargic one-party system are rapidly being discarded in North 
Carolina. Control of the government is being returned to the 
people, where it rightly should and will be with the emergency of 
a healthy, competitive, and active two-party system of govern- 
ment. Your vote for Republican candidates, dedicated to these 
our principles of good government, will speed the advent of gov- 
ernment by the people, of the people, and for the people. 

Submitted by Thomas S. Bennett, Chairman 
Platform Committee 



PLAN OF ORGANIZATION OF THE REPUBLICAN 
PARTY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

(STATE REPUBLICAN CONSTITUTION) 

PREAMBLE 

We, the members of the Republican Party of North Carolina, 
dedicated to the sound principles fostered by that party, con- 
scious of our civic responsibilities and rights, firm in our determi- 
nation to give our strength to preserving the American principle 
that government ought and must be of all the people, by all the 
people, and for all the people do, for the purpose of uniting and 
co-ordinating our efforts for maximum power and efficiency, 
herewith establish this instrument, The Plan of Organization of 
the Republican Party of North Carolina. 

ARTICLE I 

Membership 

1. Members 

All citizens of North Carolina who are registered Republicans are 
members of the Republican Party of North Carolina, and shall 
have the right to participate in the official affairs of the Repub- 
lican Party in accordance with these rules. All references herein 
to delegates, alternates, officers, and members shall in all cases 
mean persons identified and registered with the Republican Party. 

ARTICLE II 

Precinct Meetings 

1. Biennial Precinct Meetings 

In each precinct in every General Election year, the County 
Chairman shall call precinct meetings within the dates desig- 
nated by the State Central Committee after giving ten (10) days 
written notice of the time and place of holding same to each 
Precinct Chairman, and after giving one week's notice of such 
meeting in a newspaper of general circulation within the County. 
Failure of the County Chairman to act in compliance with the 

234 



Plan of Organization 235 

provision shall be cause for any registered Republican within 
the precinct to call said precinct meeting by notice in a news- 
paper of general circulation within the County. Every Repub- 
lican registered within the precinct, in attendance, shall be 
entitled to cast one vote. 

2. Elections 

Biennial precinct meetings shall elect a Precinct Committee of 
five or more voters, one of whom shall be elected as Chairman 
and one as Vice-Chairman (one of whom shall be a woman), and 
one as Secretary. Members of the Precinct Committee shall 
hold their places for two years or until their successors are 
chosen. Precinct meetings shall elect one delegate and one alter- 
nate to the County Convention, plus one additional delegate and 
alternate for every fifty (50) votes, or major fraction thereof, 
cast for the Republican Candidate for Governor in the last Gen- 
eral Election. 

3. Credentials 

The Chairman and Secretary of each Precinct shall certify elec- 
tion of officers, Committee members, and delegates and alter- 
nates to the County Convention, on forms stipulated by the State 
Central Committee and furnished by the County Chairman. 
Complete Credentials shall be in the hands of the County Secre- 
tary by the opening of the County Convention. 

4. Other Precinct Meetings 

a. Other meetings of the Precinct general membership may be 
held at such times as shall be designated by the Chairman of 
the Precinct Committee after giving five (5) days notice of such 
meeting; or upon similar call of one-third of the members of the 
Precinct Committee, or ten (10) members of the general precinct 
membership. There shall be no proxy voting. 

b. In the event a Precinct fails to properly organize or the Pre- 
cinct Chairman fails to act, the County Executive Committee 
may direct the County Chairman to appoint a Temporary Precinct 
Chairman to serve until a general membership meeting can be 
called and a new Chairman elected. The County Chairman shall 
call such a meeting within thirty (30) days after appointment of 
the Temporary Chairman. 



236 Nortii Carolina Manual 

ARTICLE III 
Precinct Committee 

1. Duties of Committee 

The precinct committee shall cooperate with the County Execu- 
tive Committee in all elections and party activities; provide the 
County Chairman with a list of party members within the pre- 
cinct suitable for appointment as registrar, election judge, mark- 
ers, counters, and watchers at the polls; and promote the ob- 
jectives of the Party within the Precinct. 

2. Duties of Officers 

The Chairman of the Precinct Committee, with the advice and 
consent of the Precinct Committee, shall have general super- 
vision of the affairs of the Party within his precinct, shall preside 
at all meetings of the precinct, and shall perform such other 
duties as may be prescribed by the Precinct Committee or the 
County Executive Committee. The Vice-Chairman shall function 
as Chairman in the absence of the Chairman. The Secretary 
shall keep all minutes and records, and shall maintain a list of 
registered Republican voters and workers within the Precinct. 

3. Meetings 

Meetings of the Precinct Committee may be held at such times 
as shall be designated by the Chairman of the Precinct Committee 
after giving five (5) days notice of such meeting; or upon similar 
call of one-third of the members of the Precinct Committee. 
There shall be no proxy voting. 

4. Vacancies and Removals 

a. In case of death, resignation, discontinuance of residency 
within the precinct, or removal of any officers or members of the 
Precinct Committee, the resulting vacancy shall be filled by the 
remaining members of the Precinct Committee. 

b. Any members of the Precinct Committee may be removed by 
a two-thirds vote of the Precinct Committee after being furnished 
with notice of the charges against him, signed by not less than 
one-third of the members of the Committee and allowing him 
twenty (20) days to appear and defend himself; provided fur- 
ther that said cause for removal shall be confined to arross 



Plan of Organization 237 

inefficiency, party disloyalty, or failure to comply with the 
County or State Plans of Organization. Such removal may be 
appealed to the County Executive Committee, within twenty f20) 
days, and their decision shall be final. 

ARTICLE IV 

County Convention 

1. Biennial Conventions 

A County Convention shall be called in every General Election 
year by the Chairman of the County Executive Committee, at the 
County seat, within the dates set by the State Central Committee, 
after giving fifteen (15) days notice thereof to all Precinct 
Chairmen and Executive Committee members, after giving fifteen 
(15) days notice of such Convention in a newspaper of general 
circulation within the County. The delegates and alternates 
elected at the biennial precinct meetings, unless successfully 
challenged shall sit as delegates and alternates in the County 
Convention. 

2. Convention Action 

a. Plan of Organization 

The County Convention shall adopt a County Plan of Organ- 
ization, not inconsistent with this State Plan of Organization. 

b. Elections — The County Convention shall 

(1) Elect a Chairman and Vice-Chairman (one of whom shall 
be a woman), a Secretary, and such other officers as may be 
deemed necessary, who shall serve for a term of two years or 
until their successors are elected. 

(2) Elect a County Executive Committee of five (5j or more 
voters, who shall hold their places for a term of tw r o years or 
until their successors are elected. Nominations may be made 
by the biennial precinct meetings for membership on the 
County Executive Committee. 

(3) Elect one delegate and one alternate to the Congressional 
District and State Conventions, plus one additional delegate 
and alternate for every 200 votes, or major fraction thereof, 
cast for the Republican candidate for Governor in the last 
General Election in said County. Each County shall further 



238 North Carolina Manual 

elect one delegate and alternate for each Republican elected 
to the State Legislature and to public office on the state or 
national level from said County in the preceding election. 

c. District Committee Appointments 

One person shall be appointed to each of the Solicitorial. 
Judicial, Senatorial, and Legislative District Committees by 
the County Chairman, with the consent of the County Conven- 
tion, to serve until a candidate is selected with the respective 
District. 

3. Credentials 

The Chairman and Secretary of the County Executive Committee 
shall certify election of officers, committee members, delegates 
and alternates to the District and State Conventions, and District 
Committee members, on forms furnished by the State Central 
Committee. Completed Credentials shall be in the hands of the 
Congressional District Secretary by the opening of the Congres- 
sional District Convention. 

ARTICLE V 
County Executive Committee 

1. Membership 

The County Executive Committee shall consist of the County 
Officers and other persons elected by the County Convention (in 
accordance with ARTICLE IV, sec. 2 (b), and the County Finance 
Chairman. 

2. Poivers and Duties 

The County Executive Committee shall cooperate with the Dis- 
trict and State Committees in all elections and Party activities: 
shall encourage qualified candidates for office within the county; 
adopt a budget; and shall have active management of party 
affairs within the County. It shall apoint a Finance Chairman 
and a Finance Committee of not less than three members, and 
Auditing Committee of not less than three members, and may 
appoint such other Committees as may be deemed necessary. 

:'.. Meetings 

The County Executive Committee shall meet at least twice a 
year upon call of the Chairman after giving ten ilOt days notice 



Plan of Organization 239 

to all members; or upon similar call of one-third of the members 
of the Committee. One-third of the members shall constitute a 
quorum for the transaction of business. There shall be no proxy 
voting. 

4. Duties of Officers 

The Chairman of the County Executive Committee, with the 
advice and consent of the County Executive Committee, shall 
have general supervision of the affairs of the party within his 
County. He shall issue the call for Biennial Precinct Meetings, 
the County Convention, and Executive Committee meetings, and 
shall preside at all the meetings of the County Executive Com- 
mittee. He shall make quarterly reports on the status of the 
Party within his county to the State Chairman, on forms fur- 
nished by the State Central Committee. He shall be responsible 
for the creation and maintenance of a Republican organization 
in every precinct within his County. He shall obtain and pre- 
serve a list of all registered Republicans within the County, and 
shall perform such other duties as may be prescribed by the 
County, District, or State Committees. The Vice-Chairman shall 
function as Chairman in the absence of the Chairman, and shall 
have such other duties as may be prescribed by the County Execu- 
tive Committee. The Secretary shall keep all minutes and 
records, and shall maintain a roster of all precinct officers and 
Executive Committee members. Such records shall be available 
upon request, to any registered Republican within the county. 

5. Vacancies and Removals 

a. In case of death, resignation, discontinuance of residency 
within the County, or removal of any officer or member of the 
County Executive Committee, the resulting vacancy shall be filled 
by the County Executive Committee. 

b. Any Officer or member of the County Executive Committee 
may be removed by a two-thirds vote of the Committee after being 
furnished with notice of the charges against him, signed by not 
less than one-third of the members of the Committee and allow- 
ing him thirty (30) days to appear and defend himself; provided 
further that said cause for removal shall be confined to gross 
inefficiency, party disloyalty, or failure to act in compliance 
with the County or State Plans of Organization. Sucli removal 



240 North Carolina Manual 

may he appealed, within twenty (20) days to the Congressional 
District Chairman and members of the State Executive Committee 
within the District, and their decision shall be final. 

ARTICLE VI 

Coi viy Finance and Auditing Committees 

1 . Finance Committee 

The County Finance Committee shall be composed of the County 
Finance Chairman, the County Chairman, and not less tban three 
persons appointed by the County Executive Committee. They 
shall cooperate with the State Finance Committee and shall have 
active management of fund-raising efforts within the County. 

2. Auditing Committee 

The Auditing Committee shall conduct a yearly audit of the 
financial records of the County and report such audit to the 
County Executive Committee for approval. 

ARTICLE VII 

Solicitorial, Judicial, Senatorial, and Legislative 
District Committees 

1. Membership 

Membership shall consist of those persons appointed by the 
County Chairman with the approval of the County Convention. 

2. Election of Officers 

At some time preceding the State Convention, the District Com- 
mittees shall meet at a time and place designated by the member 
of the Committee from that County within the District having 
the largest population and shall elect, from among their member- 
ship, a chairman and such other officers as may be deemed 
necessary. The officers shall have such duties as may be pre- 
scribed by the State Executive Committee. The Chairmen shall 
report to the State Chairman names of elected officers. 

3. Powers and Duties of Committees 

a. The Solicitorial District Committee shall encourage qualified 
candidates for Solicitor, and shall cooperate with the County 



Plan of Organization 241 

and State Executive Committees in all campaigns. 

b. The Judicial District Committee shall encourage qualified 
candidates for District Judge, and shall cooperate with the County 
and State Executive Committees in all campaigns. 

c. The Senatorial District Committee shall encourage qualified 
candidates for State Senator, and shall cooperate with the County 
and State Executive Committees in all campaigns. 

d. The Legislative District Committee shall encourage qualified 
candidates for the State House of Representatives, and shall 
cooperate with the County and State Executive Committees in all 
campaigns. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Congressional District Conventions 

1. Biennial Convention 

A Congressional District Convention shall be called in every 
General Election year by the Chairman of the Congressional 
District Committee, within the dates designated by the State 
Central Committee, upon twenty (20) days written notice of 
the time and place for holding same to all members of the 
District Committee and to the County Chairmen within said Dis- 
trict. The delegates and alternates elected in the County Con- 
ventions, unless successfully challenged, shall sit as delegates 
and alternates in the Congressional District Convention. 

2. Elections 

a. The Congressional District Convention shall elect a Chair- 
man and a Vice-Chairman (one of whom shall be a woman), a 
Secretary, a Treasurer and such other officers as may be deemed 
necessary, who shall serve for a term of two years or until their 
successors are elected. 

b. In every General Election year, the Congressional District 
Convention shall further elect one member of the State Executive 
Committee, plus one additional member for every 6,000 votes or 
major fraction thereof cast within the District for the Repub- 
lican candidate for Governor in the preceding General Election. 

c. In every Presidential Election year, the Convention shall 
further elect two delegates and two alternates to the Republican 



242 North Carolina Manual 

National Convention: and shall nominate one Presidential Elec- 
tor. 

3. Credentials 

The Chairman and Secretary of the Congressional District shall 
certify election of officers. State Executive Committee members, 
delegates and alternates, and nominee for Presidential Elector 
on forms furnished by the State Central Committee. Completed 
District Credentials, plus completed Credentials for the Coun- 
ties within the District, shall be in the hands of the State 
Credentials Committee Chairman by the deadline set by the 
State Chairman. 

ARTICLE IX 

Congressional District Committee 

1. Membership 

Membership of the Congressional District Committee shall be 
composed of: 

a. The officers elected at the District Convention. 

b. All duly elected County Chairman within the District. 

c. County Vice-Chairmen from those counties within the District 
which gave a majority vote to the Republican candidate for 
President and Governor in the preceding election. 

d. Such others as the District Plan of Organization may provide. 

2. Powers and Duties 

The Congressional District Committee shall encourage qualified 
candidates for Congress, appoint a Finance Chairman, and co- 
operate with the County and State Executive Committee in all 
campaigns. 

::. Meetings 

The Congressional District Committee shall meet at least once 
a year upon call of the Congressional District Chairman. One- 
third of the members of the Committee shall constitute a quorum 
for the transaction of business. There shall be no proxy voting. 

\ Duties of Officers 

a. The Congressional District Chairman, with the advice and 



Plan of Organization 243 

consent of the District Committee, shall have general super- 
vision of the affairs of the party within his District. He shall 
assist the State Chairman in carrying out state programs, super- 
vise the Congressional campaigns until such time as a Campaign 
Manager shall have been appointed, maintain contact with all 
Counties within his District, and shall be responsible for the 
proper organization and functioning of those Counties. He 
shall maintain constant liaison with all County Chairman with 
regard to a Republican organization in every precinct within 
his District. He shall have such other duties as may be pre- 
scribed by the State Executive Committee. 

b. The Vice-Chairman shall be Chief Assistant to the District 
Chairman and shall act as Chairman in the absence of the Chair- 
man; shall maintain liaison with the County Vice-Chairmen 
throughout the District (where applicable) and shall have such 
other duties as may be prescribed by the District Committee. 

c. The Secretary shall keep all minutes and records, and shall 
maintain a roster of all officers of the Counties within the 
District. 

5. Vacancies and Removals 

a. In case of death, resignation, discontinuance of residency 
within the District, or removal of any officer of the Congressional 
District Committee, the resulting vacancy shall be filled by the 
remaining members of the Committee. 

b. Any officer of the Congressional District Committee may be 
removed by a two-thirds vote of the Congressional District Com- 
mittee after being notified of the charges against him signed by 
not less than one-third of the members of the Committee, and 
allowing him thirty (30) days to appear and defend himself; 
provided further that said cause for removal shall be confined 
to gross inefficiency, party disloyalty, or failure to act in com- 
pliance with the District or State Plans of Organization. Such 
removal may be appealed within twenty (20) days, to the State 
Central Committee and their decision shall be final. 

ARTICLE X 
District Finance Committee 

1. The District Finance Chairman shall serve as Chairman of the 
Congressional District Finance Committee, which shall be com- 



244 North Carolina Manual 

posed of the Finance Chairmen of all the Counties within the 
District and the Congressional District Chairman. Other officers 
as may be deemed necessary may be elected by and from the mem- 
bers of the Committee. This Committee shall cooperate with the 
State Finance Committee and with the County Finance Com- 
mittees in all fund-raising efforts. 

ARTICLE XI 
State Conventions 

1. Biennial state Conventions 

A State Convention shall be called in every General Election 
year by the Chairman of the Republican State Executive Com- 
mittee after giving sixty (60) days written notice of the time 
and place for holding same to all members of the State Executive 
Committee and to all County Chairmen. Delegates and alternates 
elected at the County Conventions, unless successfully challenged, 
shall sit as delegates and alternates at the State Convention. 

2. Elections 

a. In every General Election year, the State Convention shall 
elect a State Chairman and a Vice-Chairman (one of whom shall 
be a woman), who shall serve for a term of two years or until 
their successors are elected. 

b. In every Presidential Election year, the Convention shall fur- 
ther elect a National Committeeman and a National Committee- 
woman to serve for a term of four years or until their successors 
are elected; nominate two Presidential Electors-at-large; and 
elect delegates and alternates to the National Convention, in 
addition to those specified under ARTICLE VIII. 2 (c). in the 
number stipulated by the State Chairman as determined by the 
National Rules. The State Chairman. National Committeeman, 
National Committeewoman. incumbent Republican Governor, 
and Republican members of Congress shall be nominees. Persons 
seeking to be delegates and alternates shall notify the State 
Chairman of their intentions at least two weeks prior to the 
State Convention. The State Chairman shall then furnish the 
list of prospective delegates and alternates to all members of the 
State Executive Committee at least one week prior to the Con- 
vention. 



Plan of Organization 245 

ARTICLE XII 

State Executive Committee 

1. Membership 

The State Executive Committee shall be composed of the fol- 
lowing: 

a. The Congressional District Chairman, the Congressional Dis 
trict Vice-Chairman, and those persons elected by the District 
Conventions, under ARTICLE VIII, 2 (b) of this plan. 

b. The State Chairman, Vice-Chairman, National Committeeman, 
National Committeewoman, Secretary, Assistant Secretary, 
Treasurer, Finance Chairman, and General Counsel. 

c. The Immediate Past State Chairman and Vice-Chairman, the 
Permanent Chairman and Secretary of the Preceding State 
Convention. 

d. The Chairman, National Committeeman and National Com- 
mitteewoman of the Young Republican Federation. The Presi- 
dent, President-Elect and Past President of the Republican 
Women's Federation. 

e. All current Republican members of the National Congress, 
the State Legislature, and State Board of Elections. 

f. The County Chairmen from those Counties which gave a 
majority vote to the Republican candidate for President or 
Governor in the preceding election. 

g. The County Vice-Chairmen from those Counties which gave 
a majority vote to the Republican candidates for President 
and Governor in the preceding election. 

2. Potters and Duties of Committee 

The State Executive Committee shall elect a Secretary and an 
Assistant Secretary (one of whom shall be a member of the 
Young Republican Federation), a Treasurer, a Finance Chair- 
man, and a General Counsel, who shall serve for a term of two 
years or until their successors are elected. The Committee shall 
formulate and provide for the execution of such plans and 
measures as it may deem conducive to the best interests of the 
Republican Party. It shall appoint an Auditing Committee of 
at least three members to conduct a yearly audit; approve such 
audit: adopt a budget: and shall have active management of all 



246 North Carolina Manual 

affairs of the Party within the State. It may delegate such duties 
as it deems proper to the State Central Committee. 

3. ( 'ommittee Meetings 

The State Executive Committee shall meet at least once a year: 
upon call of the Chairman, at such times as the State Chairman 
shall determine, after giving fifteen (15) days written notice to 
all Committee members; or upon petition of one-third of the 
members of the Committee. One-third of the members shall con- 
stitute a quorum for the transaction of business. There shall be 
no proxy voting. 

1. Duties of Officers 

a. The State Chairman, with the advice and consent of the 
Central Committee, shall have general supervision of the affairs 
of the party within the State. He shall preside at all meetings 
of the State Executive Committee and shall perform such duties 
as may be prescribed by the State Executive Committee. He shall 
be responsible for the campaigns of the Governor and Lieutenant 
Governor until such time as a permanent campaign manager 
may be appointed. The State Chairman may delegate authority 
to the District Chairmen, to act in his behalf on any matter. 

b. The Vice-Chairman shall be the Chief Assistant to the Chair- 
man; and shall act as Chairman in the absence of the Chairman. 
The Vice-Chairman shall maintain liaison with the County Vice- 
Chairmen, through the District Vice-Chairmen (where appli- 
cable). The Vice-Chairman shall have such other duties as may 
be prescribed by the State Executive Committee. 

c. The National Committeeman and National Committeewoman 
shall maintain liaison with the National Republican Party. 

d. The Secretary shall keep minutes of all meetings. The 
Assistant Secretary shall assist the Secretary in the above duties 
and shall act as Secretary in the absence of the Secretary. 

e. The Treasurer shall be custodian of all funds of the State 
Executive Committee and shall keep a strict account of all re- 
ceipts and disbursements. The Treasurer shall be bonded in an 
amount fixed by the State Central Committee — the premium to 
be paid from party funds. 

f. The General Counsel shall advise the Executive Committee 



Plan op Organization 247 

on all legal matters and shall act as Parliamentarian at all meet- 
ings of the Committee. 

5. Vacancies and Removals 

a. In case of death, resignation, discontinuance of residency 
within the state, or removal of any officer of the State Executive 
Committee, the resulting vacancy shall be filled by the State 
Executive Committee. In case of death, resignation, discontinu- 
ance of residency within the District or removal of any member 
representing a Congressional District, the vacancy shall be filled 
by the remaining members of the Congressional District in 
which such vacancy occurs. 

b. Any officer or member may be removed by a two-thirds vote 
of the Committee after being furnished with notice of the charges 
against him signed by not less than one-third of the members of 
the Committee and allowing him thirty (30) days to appear and 
defend himself; provided further that said cause for removal 
shall be confined to gross inefficiency, party disloyalty, or failure 
to act in compliance with this Plan of Organization. The decision 
of the State Executive Committee shall be final. 

ARTICLE XIII 
State Central Committee 

1. Membership 

The State Central Committee shall be composed of the following: 

a. The Congressional District Chairmen; the Congressional Dis- 
trict Vice-Chairmen shall act in the absence of the Chairmen. 

b. The Chairman, Vice-Chairman, National Committeeman, Na- 
tional Committeewoman, Secretary, Assistant Secretary, Treas- 
urer, General Counsel, and Finance Chairman of the State 
Executive Committee. 

c. The Chairman of the Young Republican Federation and the 
President of the Republican Women's Federation. 

d. The Republican Leader of the State Senate and the Repub- 
lican Leader of the State House of Representatives. 

2. Powers and Duties 

The State Central Committee shall have the power to appoint 
a Campaign Committee, a Publicity Committee, and such other 



248 North Carolina Manttaj 

Committees as it may deem necessary for the proper conduct 
of the affairs of the party: to manage the affairs of the party 
between meetings of the State Executive Committee; to formu- 
late fiscal policy, establish quotas, prepare a budget, to set 
the dates for the precinct meetings, and County, Congressional 
District, and State Conventions during the months of January, 
February, March; and to do all other things pertaining to party 
affairs which it may be authorized to do so by the State Executive 
Committee. It shall be responsible for initiating all campaigns 
for the U. S. Senate and Council of State and ccordinating them 
as determined feasible. The State Central Committee shall keep 
accurate accounts of its proceedings and shall make annual re- 
ports to the State Executive Committee. 

The Committee shall employ as full time Executive Secretary a 
person of highest character and political competence to prosecute 
on a day by day basis the mission of the Committee. The Com- 
mittee shall provide on a full time basis in the Capital city of 
North Carolina, adequate offices for the Executive Secretary and 
such staff as the Committee shall provide for him, which offices 
shall be known as Headquarters, North Carolina Republican 
Party. The Central Committee is charged with, in addition to 
all other duties, the mission of creating an effective Republican 
organization in every political precinct in North Carolina. 

3. Meetings 

The State Central Committee shall meet at least three times a 
year upon call of the Chairman upon ten (10) days notice to all 
members; or upon petition of one-third of the members of the 
Committee. One-third of the members shall constitute a quorum 
for the transaction of business. There shall be no proxy voting. 

4. Duties of Officers 

The officers of the State Executive Committee shall act as 
officers of the State Central Committee, with corresponding 
duties. 

ARTICLE XIV 
State Fixance Committee 
1. Membership 

The Finance Committee shall consist of the State Finance Chair- 



Plan of Organization 249 

man, the Congressional District Finance Chairmen, and the State 
Chairman. The State Finance Chairman shall serve as Chairman 
of the State Finance Committee. Other officers as may be deem- 
ed necessary may be elected by and from the members of the 
Committee. 

2. Poicers and Duties 

It shall be the duty of the State Finance Committee to develop 
ways and means to properly finance the General Election cam- 
paigns and other business and affairs of the Republican Party. 
The Committee shall manage a United Fund Raising Effort in 
cooperation with the State Central Committee only in those 
counties with the approval of the County Executive Committee; 
and cooperate with District and County organizations for effec- 
tive fund-raising campaigns. Said Committee shall not, directly 
or indirectly, raise or collect funds for the benefit of any candi- 
dates for Primary elections. All persons making contributions 
to the State Finance Committee shall be furnished with a 
receipt therefor. Contributions going directly to the National 
Committee or to any candidate shall not be acknowledged by the 
State Treasurer or recorded as a regular contribution to the 
Republican Party of North Carolina. 

Permanent record of all contributors shall be maintained by the 
State Chairman and State Treasurer, and such records shall be 
available upon request, to all County and District Chairmen. 

3. Duties of Officers 

The Finance Chairman shall preside at all meetings of the Com- 
mittee and shall be the chief liaison between the Finance Com- 
mittee and the State Central Committee. Other officers shall 
have such duties as may be prescribed by the Committee. 

ARTICLE XV 
General Convention Procedure 

1. Biennial Conventions 

The County, Congressional Dirstrict, and State Conventions shall 
be called to order by their respective Chairmen or, in the absence 
of the Chairman, by the Vice-Chairman or Secretary, in order 
stated, who shall have the power to appoint the necessary Con- 



250 North Carolina Manual 

vent ion Committees at, or before, the convening of the Conven- 
tion. 

2. Voting Procedure 

No delegate, alternate, or other member of a Convention shall 
east any vote by proxy; provided, however, that any delegate or 
delegates present shall have the right to cast the entire vote 
of the precinct in County Conventions, and of the County in 
District and State Conventions; EXCEPT the registered Repub- 
lican or Republicans, present at a County Convention from an 
unorganized precinct, which has not had its credentials accepted, 
shall have the right to vote one vote each, not to exceed the total 
vote that the precinct would be entitled if organized and its 
credentials accepted. 

3. Special Conventions 

The State Central Committee, at any time in the interest of the 
Republican Party, may direct the State Chairman or the Con- 
gressional District Chairmen to issue call for special Senatorial, 
Judicial, Solicitorial or Legislative organizational meetings, and 
special County and Congressional District Conventions, in any 
or all of the Counties and Districts of the State. The procedure 
for calling regular biennial meetings and Conventions shall apply 
to the calling of special meetings and Conventions so far as 
applicable and not inconsistent with this Plan of Organization. 

ARTICLE XVI 

Official Records 

1. Minutes of Official Actions 

Minutes shall be kept by all Committees and Conventions of 
official actions taken and a copy shall be filed with the Chair- 
man of the appropriate Committee or Convention. 

2. Financial Accounts 

The Chairman, Treasurer, and Finance Chairman of the County, 
District and State Committees shall keep faithful and accurate 
records of any and all monies received by them for the use of 
said Committees and shall make faithful and accurate report 
thereof when so requested. 



Plan of Organization 251 

ARTICLE XVII 

Appointments 

1. Notification 

It shall be the duty of the State Chairman to transmit to each 
County Chairman, notice of all known vacancies in appointive 
positions in his County, in order that eligible Republicans from 
that County may be considered and recommended for such posi- 
tions. The State Chairman shall further transmit notice of all 
known vacancies on a District or State Level to those persons 
having jurisdiction in such appointments. 

2. County Appointments 

When a vacancy occurs in a Governmental office in any properly 
organized County, such vacancy shall be filled by recommendation 
of the State Chairman, only upon majority vote of the Executive 
Committee of the County involved, at a meeting called for that 
purpose. 

3. District Appointments 

When a vacancy occurs in a Governmental office on a District 
level, such vacancy shall be filled by recommendation of the 
State Chairman, only upon majority vote of the National Com- 
mitteeman and National Committeewoman, and each member of 
the State Executive Committee from the District involved, at 
a meeting called for that purpose. 

4. State Appointments 

When a vacancy occurs in a Governmental office on a State level, 
such vacancy shall be filled by recommendation of the State 
Chairman, only upon majority vote of the State Executive Com- 
mittee at a meeting called for that purpose. 

ARTICLE XVIII 

Forfeiture of Official Privileges 

1. Any officer or member of a Precinct Committee, County Executive 
Committee, Congressional District Committee, State Executive 
Committee, or State Central Committee who, for any reason, is 
removed or resigns from said position shall forfeit all rights 
and privileges in any way connected with that position. 



252 North Carolina Manual 

ARTICLE XIX 
Applicability and Effectiveness of This Plan 

1. Rules as to Towns and Cities 

This Plan of Organization is not intended to extend to, or 
establish organizations for the Republican Party of the various 
towns and cities of the State of North Carolina as separate units 
from the precinct and county organizations. Qualified and regis- 
tered Republican voters of the towns and cities of the State may 
organize and promulgate their own rules not inconsistent with 
these rules and the organizations herein established. 

2. Rules as to Comities and Districts 

The Precinct and County Committees and County Conventions, 
and the District Committees and Conventions are authorized to 
promulgate such additional rules and establish such additional 
party officers or committees for their respective organizations, 
not inconsistent with these rules, as shall be deemed necessary. 

?,. Controversies 

Controversies in any County or District with respect to the 
organizations set up therein under this Plan, shall be referred 
to the State Chairman, National Committeeman, and National 
Committeewoman for arbitration, and their decision shall be 
final. 

4. Parliamentary Authority 

Robert's Rules of Order Revised shall govern all proceedings 
except when inconsistent with this State Plan of Organization. 

5. Effective Date of this Plan 

This Plan of Organization shall become effective, and repeal 
and supercede all other rules, immediately upon its adoption at 
the State Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina on March 
12, 1966. This, however, shall not invalidate any action taken 
under the previous rules prior to the above date. 

Dorothy A. Pressek, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PLAN OF ORGANIZATION 



State Committees, Republican 253 



COMMITTEES OF THE STATE REPUBLICAN PARTY 

(From list furnished by Chairman, State Republican 
Executive Committee) 

STATE REPUBLICAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

State Organization 

'Chairman: James E. Holshouser, Jr Boone 

♦Vice Chairman: Mrs. A. E. Verbyla Lenoir 

♦National Committeeman: James E. Broyhill Lenoir 

♦National Co/nmitteewoman: Mrs. Louis G. Rogers Charlotte 

♦Secreta ry : Dorothy Presser Charlotte 

♦Assistant Secretary: James T. Johnson Harrells 

♦Treasurer: Russell Barringer Durham 

♦State Finance Cnairman: Ken Thomas Hickory 

♦Legal Counsel : Ken Thomas Hickory 

Permanent Chairman of Previous Convention: James M. Baley, Jr Asheville 

Secretary of 1966 Convention: Mrs. Grover C. Bolin, Jr Smithfieki 

Young Republican Federation: 

♦President: Jim Culbertson Winston-Salem 

National Committeeman: Dr. John Hall Durham 

National Committeewoman : Mrs. J. Cresimore Raleigh 

Women's Federation: 

♦President : Mrs. Vance Hickman Winston -Salem 

President Elect: 

Past President: Mrs. Frank P. Smith Asheville 

Republican Members of the 1967 General Assembly: 
Senate: 

♦John L. Osteen Greensboro 

Harry Bagnal Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Geraldine Nielson Winston-Salem 

C. U. Parrish Salisbury 

T. R. Bryan, Sr Wilkesboro 

Bruce B. Briggs Swannanoa 

R. T. Dent Spruce Pine 

House: 

George T. Clark, Jr Wilmington 

Coion Biake Candor 

C. Roby Garner, Sr Asheboro 

Ronald K. Ingle Winston-Salem 

Howard A. Jemison Winston-Salem 

E. M. McKnight Clemmons 

Joe H. Hege, Jr ...Lexington 

Wayne Whicker Winston-Salem 

Clyde Hampton Whitley Albemarle 

Austin A. Mitchell Kannapolis 

Samuel A. Troxell ..Rockwell 

James C. Johnson, Jr Concord 

Richard B. Calvert ..Charlotte 

James H. Carson, Jr  --<>» rlotte 

Claude Billings : Traphill 

Jeter L. Haynes Jonesville 



254 North Carolina Manual 



Gilbert Lee Boger Mocks ville 

Homer 1!. To I her; Cleveland 

.1 . I void Poovey Hickory 

H Max Craig, Jr Stanley 

Donald R. Kincaid Lenoir 

Mack S. Isaac Newland 

( '. Kdley Hutchins Black Mountain 

David D. Jordan Ashe ville 

*Don H. Garren Henderson ville 

Charles H. Taylor Brevard 

Congressmen: 

Charles ii. Jonas Lincoln ton 

James T. Broyhill Lenoir 

lames C. Gardner Rocky Mount 



Committees 

First District 

♦John Wilkinson, Chairman Washington 

Frances Rat cliff, Vice Chairman Pantego 

Dr. Joe Liverman Englehard 

J. A. Stafford Elizabeth City 

Dr. Wellington Gray Greenville 

John Whitty New Bern 

Claude L. Green, Jr Roberson ville 



Second District 

*John Adcox, Chairman Henderson 

Mrs. Grover C. Bolin, Vice Chairman Smithfield 

Grover C. Bolin, M. D Smithfield 

John G. Taylor Kinston 

Elmon Batten Wilson 



Third District 

♦Sherman Rock, Chairman Morehead City 

Mrs. James F. Sharpe, Vice Chairman Jacksonville 

James T. Johnson Harrells 

Sam Waller Mount Olive 

Abe Elmore Dunn 

Charles Highsmith Rocky Point 

P. G. May Dudley 

George O' Bryant Jacksonville 

John Van Cannon Sanford 



Fourth District 

* James Cresimore, Chairman Raleigh 

Mrs. George Fozzard, Vice Chairman Chapel Hill 

Donald Paschali Siler City 

Dr. James Owen Troy 

Julian Brady Ramseur 

Clark Langley Staley 

Weldon Smith Asheboro 

William Wilson Raleigh 

William Spurlin Raleigh 



State Committees, Republican 255 

Fifth District 

*J. Banner Shelton, Chairman Madison 

Mrs. Floyd Burge, Vice Chairman Winston-Salem 

G. Fred Steele Durham 

Dr. Eidon D. Nielson _ Winston-Salem 

Ed M. Armtield Winston-Salem 

G. R. Hoover Winston-Salem 

James A. Cannaday Draper 

Wesley Dunlap Walnut Cove 

Sixth District 

*Mrs. Frances Yow, Chairman Greensboro 

Robert Barnwell, Jr., Vice Chairman Burlington 

L. Earl Stewart „ Burlington 

Joe Berrier Thomasville 

Calvin Orrell High Point 

Mrs. Ray D. Wooster High Point 

Willard B. Piper Greensboro 

Virgil Carrick High Point 

William L. Osteen Greensboro 

Billy Weisner Greensboro 

John Eshelman High Point 

G. Wayne Wicker Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Martha Nicholson Thomasville 

Hiram Ward Lexington 

Seventh District 

*Dr. Tom Needham, Chairman Wilmington 

Mrs. C. W. Jackson, Vice Chairman Fayetteville 

George In man Ash 

Deke Baggett Lake Waccamaw 

Morehead Stack Fayetteville 

Mike Vaughan Wilmington 

Tom Keith Lumberton 

William Bullard Wagram 

Eighth District 

*L. A. Crowell, Jr., Chairman Lincolnton 

Mrs. OHn Sikes, Vice Chairman Monroe 

Ed Locke Charlotte 

Mrs. Marion Rowe Charlotte 

R. P. Majors Charlotte 

E. J. Presser Charlotte 

Parks M. King, Jr Charlotte 

J. J. Bunch Charlotte 

Charles F. Coira Charlotte 

William Morrissey Lincolnton 

Chet Rayston Rockingham 

Ninth District 

*Mrs. Walter Zachary, Chairman Yadkin vi lie 

H. R. Hendrix, Vice Chairman Mocksville 

B. B. Graybeal West Jefferson 

Robert Johnson Pinev Creek 

William E. Hall Mocksville 

Mrs. Frances Ridenhour Gold Hill 

Baylass Ridenhour Concord 



L'fm Xui:i ii Carolina M wi \i. 



Hill Carpenter Concord 

Prank L. Smith Lenoir 

Brent Kincaid Lenoir 

Marshall ('lino Lenoir 

S. A. Troxell Rockwell 

Lewis .Sowers .Salisbury 

Eugene McCombs Faith 

Philip T. Almond. Albemarle 

('Ictus Williams Oakboro 

Ralph G. Creene Boone 

Robert Strickland Wilkesboro 

John Hall Wilkesboro 

Walter Zachary Yadkinville 

Tenth District 

'William E. Cobb, Chairman Morganton 

Mrs. Hugh McHargue, Vice Chairman Statesville 

Harlan Robertson Taylorsville 

W. Hall Young Minneapolis 

N. O. Pitts Morganton 

Edward H. Smith Kings Mountain 

Dr. James Hughey Gastonia 

Dan R. Simpson Morganton 

Thomas C. DeRhodes Hickory 

D. D. Wirick Gastonia 

Mrs. Thomas G. Hethcox . Mooresville 

John D. Guigou Valdese 

Charles C. Rink Hickory 

Mrs. F. J. Patterson Gastonia 

Mrs. John E. Davison . Shelby 

Ewell Dagenhart Hiddenite 

Mrs. Ray Sipe Taylorsville 

James Hughes Linville 

Mrs. Earl Greene Cranberry 

T. Cass Ballenger Hickory 

Mrs. Paul Deitz Hickory 

Ed Canupp Statesville 

Eleventh District 

*W. P. Bradley, Chairman Hayesville 

Mrs. W. E. Silvers, Jr., Vice Chairman Mars Hill 

Arthur Buchanan Spruce Pine 

Mrs. Guy Synder Bakersville 

William D. W. Howe Hendersonville 

Mrs. Earl Dorsey Mountain Home 

W. B. Zink Mars Hill 

J. M. Baley, Jr. Asheville 

Don Ramsey Murphy 

R. N. Tiger, Sr Hayesville 

J. Horner Stockton Franklin 

Fred Williams ... Rutherfordton 

Orville Coward Sylva 

Lewis Hamlin Brevard 

Ted M. Jenkins. Robbinsville 

W. R. Yeager.. Waynes-ville 

W. R. Chambers Marion 

Dr. William B. Mitchell Bryson City 

Garrett Bailey Burns ville 

C. G. Fuller Dana 

'Members of Central Committee. 



State Committees, Republican 257 

STATE REPUBLICAN SOLICITORIAL, CONGRES- 
SIONAL, JUDICIAL AND SENATORIAL 
DISTRICT COMMITTEES 

Membership of Solicitorial, Judicial and Senatorial District 
Committees shall consist of those persons appointed by the county 
chairmen with the approval of the county conventions. Member- 
ship en the Congressional District Committees shall be composed 
of the officers elected at the district conventions, County Chairmen 
and Vice Chairmen of counties making up the district, and such 
others as the District Plan of Organization may provide. (See 
Articles VII, VIII and IX of the Plan of Organization.) 

Chairmen — Republican County Executive 
Committees 

1966 

County Name Address 

Alamance Henry Danieley Burlington 

Alexander Ewel Dagenhart Hiddenite 

Alleghany Tom Nipper Sparta 

Anson Mrs. Olin Sikes ...Monroe 

Ashe Lavern Watson Fleetwood 

Avery Jim Hughes Minneapolis 

Beaufort D. S. Swain Washington 

Bertie E. Rawls Carter Powellsville 

Bladen R. D. Marshall, Jr Elizabethtown 

Brunswick H. L. Willetts Bolivia 

Buncombe Dr. W. Montgomery Asheville 

Burke Noah O. Pitts, Jr Morganton 

Cabarrus Dr. E. M. Tomlin Concord 

Caldwell Johnny Farmer Whitnel 

Camden J. B. Burgess Old Trap 

Carteret T. S. Bennett Beaufort 

Caswell H. O. Davis Gibson ville 

Catawba T. Cass Ballenger Hickory 

Chatham LaVern Thornton Goldston 

Cherokee Virgil O'Dell Murphy 

Chowan 

Clay W. P. Bradley Hayesville 

Cleveland Ed H. Smith Kings Mountain 

Columbus Leroy Stocks Whiteville 

Craven John Whitty New Bern 

Cumberland Tim Newton Fayette ville 

Currituck 

Dare V. Gage Williams Wanchese 

Davidson J5. R. Everhart Lexington 

Davie Garland Bowens Mocksville 

Duplin .S. E. Godwin Warsaw 

Durham Col. James Holsinger Durham 

Edgecombe T. R. Satterthwaite Tarboro 

Forsyth W. T. Graham Winston-Salem 

Franklin 

Gaston James Hughey Gastonia 



258 North Carolina Manual 



Gates 

Graham Carniel Crisp Foil tana Dam 

Granville John D. Mackie Oxford 

Greene Arnold Tingen Snow Hill 

Guihord George Marschall Greensboro 

Hali.ax 

Harnett Lyman Whitehead Coats 

Haywood.. Joe S. Schenck Canton 

Henderson... .William D. W. Howe Hendersonville 

Hertford Ralph O'Berry Ahoskie 

Hoke 

Hyde Gene T. Ballance Fairfield 

Iredell Ed Canupp Statesville 

Jackson Lewis Bumgamer Sylva 

Johnston Grover C. Bolin, Jr., M. D Smithfield 

Jones 

Lee C. M. Mcliryde Sanford 

Lenoir. Lawrence L. Moise, II Kinston 

Lincoln Don Pendleton Lincoln ton 

Macon 

Madison W. B. Zink Mars Hill 

Martin C. L. Greene, Jr Robersonville 

McDowell Wade Pyatt Marion 

Mecklenburg Marcus T. Hickman Charlotte 

Mitchell R. T. Dent Spruce Pine 

Montgomery Dr. James Owen Troy 

Moore David Drexel Southern Pines 

Nash Van Watson Whi takers 

New Hanover A. C. Beall Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow Phyllis Hopfer Jacksonville 

Orange T. S. Coile Durham 

Pamlico Ralph Forest Vandemere 

Pasquotank A. W. Houtz Elizabeth City 

Pender W. F. Lewis Rocky Point 

Perquimans 

Person David L. Woody Roxboro 

Pitt H. Franklin Steinbeck Greenville 

Polk J. Rutledge Tryon 

Randolph Worth Coltrane Asheboro 

Richmond Mrs. Olin Sikes Monroe 

Robeson Charles T. Davis McDonalds 

Rockingham J. C. Rodgers Draper 

Rowan John Roy Hann Salisbury 

Rutherford W. Fred Williams Rutherfordton 

Sampson John R. Parker Clinton 

Scotland T. N. Combs Laurinburg 

Stanly Ernest H. Morton, Jr Albemarle 

Stokes.. Clyde Duggins Rural Hall 

Surry Robert Mills Ararat 

Swain Bruce Hawkins Bryson City 

Transylvania Ralph L. Waldrop Brevard 

Tyrrell 

Union Russell Hariin Monroe 

Vance John Adcox Henderson 

Wake Don Kimrey Raleigh 

Warren Arch Ayscue Warren ton 

Washington Bill Prince Plymouth 

Watauga Clyde R. Greene Boone 

Wayne J. C. Jensen Gildsboro 

Wilkes Billy Anderson North Wilkesboro 

Wilson Mrs. F. T. Robbins Wilson 

Yadkin James A. Hutchens Yadkin ville 

Yancev William Wilson Pensacola 



State Committees. Republican 259 

Vice Chairmen — Republican County Executive 

Committees 

1966 

County Name Address 

Alamance Mrs. Betsy Stewart Burlington 

Alexander Mrs. Ray Sipe Taylorsville 

Alleghany Mrs. Beale Poole Sparta 

Anson _ 

Ashe Zola Massey West Jefferson 

Avery Mrs. Earl Greene Cranberry 

Beaufort Mrs. Mary Van Dorp Washington 

Bertie .Mrs. W. E. Sullivan Ahoskie 

Bladen 

Brunswick Mrs. Ruby Babson Freeland 

Buncombe Mrs. Wesley Potter Asheville 

Burke „ Houston Huffman Hildebrand 

Cabarrus Mrs. Sarah James Mt. Pleasant 

Caldwell Sadie Coffey Lenoir 

Camden Helen Stevenson Camden 

Carteret Mrs. Ruth Richardson Morehead City 

Caswell Mrs. W. P. Allred Elon College 

Catawba Mrs. Paul Dietz Hickory 

Chatham Mrs. M. T. Selt Siler City 

Cherokee Mrs. Boyce Stiles Murphy 

Chowan 

Clay Mrs. Geraldine Ford Hayesville 

Cleveland Mary Lou Davison Shelby 

Columbus Mrs. Anne Warren Whiteville 

Craven Mrs. Mary Smith New Bern 

Cumberland Mrs. C. W. Jackson Fayetteville 

Currituck 

Dare Iris Gallop Wanchese 

Davidson Mrs. Martha Nicholson Thomasville 

Davie Mrs. Maxine S. Boger Mocks ville 

Duplin Mrs. Sally H. Blanchard Rose Hill 

Durham Mrs. J. B. Harris Durham 

Edgecombe Mrs. J. O. Carter Rocky Mount 

Forsyth Mrs. L. Ludlum Winston-Salem 

Franklin 



Gaston Mrs. Clyde Pasour Dallas 

Gates 

Graham Ruth Orr Robbinsville 

Granville 

Greene Mrs. Grace Seymour Snow Hill 

Guilford Mrs. Roy D. Wooster, Jr High Point 

Halifax 

Harnett Mrs. Harvey Raynor Dunn 

Haywood Mrs. C. O. Newell.. Lake Junaluska 

Henderson Mrs. Jason Futrell Murfreesboro 



.'(ill 



North Carolina Manual 



Hoke 

Hyde Emmett Garowan Swan Quarter 

Iredell Mrs. T. G. Hethcox Mooresville 

Jackson Ruth Henning Sylva 

Johnston Mrs. Roy H. Jones Benson 

Jones 

Lee Mrs. I. Lutterloh Sanford 

Lenoir ..Mrs. Betty F. Poole ..Kinston 

Lincoln I 'at Marrissey Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison Mrs. Loy Roberts Marshall 

Martin Mrs. Mary Caron Robersonville 

McDowell Mrs. Joyce McCall Marion 

Mecklenburg Mrs. J. B. Rowe Charlotte 

Mitchell Mrs. Guy Snyder Bakersville 

Montgomery Mrs. Esther Chappell Candor 

Moore June Melvin Aberdeen 

Nash Mrs. C. C. Denton Middlesex 

New Hanover Mrs. Polly Mebane Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow George 0' Bryant Jacksonville 

Orange Mrs. Robert Faust Chapel Hill 

Pamlico Vivian Hardison Arapahoe 

Pasquotank Mrs. Maude Channing Elizabeth City 

Pender ..Mrs. Betty Rivenbark Burgaw 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt Mrs. Doris Bailey Greenville 

Polk Mrs. G. Bunch Tryon 

Randolph Annie Shaw Asheboro 

Richmond Mrs. D. F. Rice, Jr Hamlet 

Robeson Mrs. W. H. Kinlaw. Lumberton 

Rockingham Mrs. O. R. Barham Mayodan 

Rowan Mrs. J. F. Hurley, III Salisbury 

Rutherford Mrs. Carolyn S. Gardner Forest City 

Sampson Mrs. Kathleen Carter Salemburg 

Scotland Mrs. Maisie Parker Laurinburg 

Stanly Mrs. Bobbie Jean Furr Stanfield 

Stokes Mrs. Vester Marshall Westfield 

Surry Mrs. Joyce Gordon Siloam 



Swain 

Transylvania Mrs. Cleaves C. Johnson Brevard 

Tyrrell 

Union Mrs. Martha Adams Monroe 

Vance Ruby J. Lassiter Henderson 

Wake Mrs. Walter Hunt, Jr Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington Cathy Carter Plymouth 

Watauga Mrs. Lura Greene Boone 

Wayne Esther Jennette Goldsboro 

Wilkes Mrs. Paul Church Roaring River 

Wilson Carson Murphy Wilson 

Yadkin Mary Vestal Yadkin ville 

Yancey Mrs. Rotha Bailey Burnsville 



PART IV 
ELECTION RETURNS 



ELECTION RETURNS— 1964 

Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States 
and District of Columbia 



States 



Popular Vote 



Johnson 
Democrat 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia. 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada . 

New Hampshire.. 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina... 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Dist. of Columbia 

Total 



4, 



44,329 
227,605 
314,197 
171,877 
476,024 
826,269 
122,704 
948,540 
522,557 
163,249 
148,920 

,796,833 

,170,848 
733,030 
464,028 
669,659 
387,068 
262,264 
730,912 

,786,422 

,136,615 

991,117 

52,618 

,164,344 

164,246 

307,307 

79,339 

182,065 

,867,671 
194,017 

,913,156 
800, 139 
149,784 

,498,331 
519,834 
501,017 

,130,954 
315,463 
215,700 
163,010 
635,047 

,663,185 
219,628 
108,127 
558,038 
779,699 
538,087 

,055,424 

80,718 

169,796 



43,121,811 



Goldwater 
Republican 



479,085 

22,930 

230,706 

243,265 

2,879,108 
296,767 
390,996 
78,078 
905,941 
616,584 
44,022 
143,557 

1,905,946 
911,118 
449,148 
386,579 
372,977 
509,225 
118,701 
385,495 
549,727 

1,060,152 
559,624 
356,528 
635,535 
113,032 
276,847 
56,094 
104,029 
963,843 
131,838 

2,243,559 
624,844 
108.207 

1,470,865 
412,665 
282,779 

1.673,657 

74,615 

309,048 

130,108 

508,965 

958,566 

180,682 

54,942 

481,334 

470,366 

253,953 

638,495 

61,998 

28,801 



27,145,926 



Electoral Vote 



Johnson 
Democrat 



6 
40 
6 
8 
3 
14 



4 
4 
26 
13 
9 
7 
9 



4 

10 
14 
21 
10 



12 
4 
5 
3 
4 

17 
4 

43 

13 
4 

26 
8 
6 

29 
4 



4 

11 

25 

4 

3 

12 



12 
3 
3 



486 



Goldwater 
Republican 



10 
"5" 



12 



10 



52 



* Democratic electors were unpledged, therefore no Johnson vote recorded. 



263 



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Election Returns 



269 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR BY COUNTIES 
PRIMARY, MAY 30, 1964 





I. 


L. 
Richard- 


Dan 




R.J. 




Robert 




Charles 


County 


Beverly 


son 


K. 


Bruce 


Stans- 


Kidd 


L. 


Don 


W. 




Lake 


Preyer 


Moore 


Burleson 


bury 


Brewer 


Gavin 


Badgley 


Strong 




(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(R) 


(R) 


(R) 


Alamance 


6,127 


5,168 


3,825 


20 


83 


149 


828 


41 


124 


Alexander 


226 


611 


1,347 


5 


1 


12 


354 


13 


15 


Alleghany 


241 


987 


1,148 


1 


8 


7 


90 


1 


38 


Anson 


1,273 
95 
23 


1,372 

1,663 

503 


1,221 

1,331 

574 


16 

1 
10 


17 
2 
2 


20 
5 
3 


61 

509 

1,240 


2 

2 

100 


2 


Ashe 


56 


Avery 


415 


Beaufort 


2,742 


1,686 


1,868 





9 


44 


61 


6 


3 


Bertie 


1,288 
2,668 


927 
1,814 


507 
903 


3 
11 


5 

8 


16 
63 


7 
17 


4 



1 


Bladen 


1 


Brunswick 


2,333 


1,823 


945 


22 


25 


30 


515 


13 


13 


Buncombe 


1,212 


6,233 


18,850 


430 


387 


243 


2,790 


149 


495 


Burke 


524 
1,839 


4,916 
3,162 


3,856 
4,058 


40 
75 


9 
29 


77 
98 


1,102 
747 


31 
12 


976 


Cabarrus 


284 


Caldwell 


429 


2,676 


2,848 


35 


15 


82 


1,051 


23 


75 




508 


291 


321 


1 





5 


5 


2 


3 


Carteret 


1,082 


2,516 


2,186 


18 


6 


66 


779 


20 


56 


Caswell 


1,366 


794 


991 


4 


16 


19 


42 


8 


45 


Catawba 


957 


2,455 


4,916 


39 


15 


70 


1,291 


47 


79 


Chatham 


2,094 


1,844 


1,555 


9 


11 


86 


286 


15 


41 


Cherokee _ 


39 


110 


2,544 


1 


2 


1 


171 


9 


9 


Chowan 


798 


644 


221 


2 


2 


3 


8 





1 


Clay 


15 
3,948 


101 

4,509 


574 
5,741 


1 
23 


1 
11 


4 
82 


208 
548 


7 
27 


7 


Cleveland 


79 


Columbus 


4,958 


3,441 


3,138 


37 


48 


86 


152 


6 


9 


Craven... 


2,788 


3,412 


3,010 


20 


18 


134 


163 


III 


22 


Cumberland 


6,312 


6,553 


2,385 


13 


18 


112 


314 


21 


48 


Currituck 


756 


525 


515 


1 


5 


7 


3 


II 


1 


Dare 


472 

1,878 


636 
4,224 


804 
4,735 


4 
17 


4 
I'll 


11 
67 


51 

1,550 


6 
43 


5 


Davidson 


107 


Davie 


296 
3,569 


941 
2,681 


577 
1,643 


4 
9 


6 

17 


11 
118 


1,323 
122 


21 
4 


97 


Duplin 


ti 


Durham 


10,940 


10,657 


4,171 


37 


92 


226 


1,019 


111 


91 


Edgecombe 


2,932 


2,403 


1,863 


ti 


13 


57 


79 


i 


10 


Forsyth 


4,235 


14,593 


8,704 


17 


43 


3311 


1 , 785 


!U 


230 


Franklin 


3,865 


1,423 


1,177 


5 


5 


185 


•i-i 


1 


6 


Cas ton 


3,058 


5,284 


5,657 


79 


30 


123 


1,822 


1!) 


21 1 


Gates 


505 
9 


341 

689 


550 
652 


2 

■i 


3 
5 


3 

7 


8 
205 


1 
9 


3 


Graham 


Hi 


Granville 


3,028 


1,561 


1,253 


7 


16 


92 


31 


6 


3 


Greene 


1,766 


690 


868 


4 


7 


29 


22 





o 


Guilford 


5,362 


23,418 


6,708 


80 


94 


183 


3,270 


188 


984 


Halifax 


4,947 


3,682 


3,852 


11 


50 


102 


38 


8 


i 


Harnett 


5,664 


2,145 


1,583 


7 


11 


155 


296 


4 


li 


Haywood 


539 


1,802 


6,764 


57 


7 


10 


428 


20 


164 


Henderson 


244 


894 


2,903 


15 


5 


8 


1 . 006 


29 


nil, 


Hertford 


1,527 


1,792 


933 


3 


15 


28 


20 


I 


ii 


Hoke 


847 


1,131 


566 


3 


1 


20 


33 


2 


:; 


Hyde.. 


452 
1,790 


463 
3,591 


442 
4,421 


5 

22 


2 

21 


17 
73 


18 
472 


16 


1 


Iredell 


in:; 


Jackson 


114 


479 


4,391 


.9 


1 


9 


235 


4 


ii 


Johnston 


6,450 


3,034 


3,682 


32 


Hi 


408 


522 


17 


17 


Jones 


815 
2,051 
3,496 


1,025 
1,808 
2,678 


894 
1,394 
3,156 


2 

3 

15 


12 

9 

26 


38 
51 
80 


6 
190 

112 


1 
4 
8 


o 


Lee 


is 


Lenoir 


ll 


Lincoln 


611 


2,380 


2,720 


43 


15 


35 


627 


111 


12:: 


Macon 


59 


liS'.t 


2,674 


6 





3 


179 


7 


i I 


Madison 


65 


2,606 


2,765 


:i7 


5 


IS 


283 


is 


11 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR BY COUNTIES 
PRIMARY, MAY 30, 1964— Continued 



County 



Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg . 

Mitchell 

Montgomery.. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover. 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank- _. 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk.... 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham.. 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

.Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes _. 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania . 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake.... 

Warren 

Washington... 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes.. 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



1. 

Beverly 

Lake 

(D) 



Total* 



2,849 

376 

7,688 

29 

575 
1,639 
5,676 
6,358 
2,115 
3,109 
3,127 

466 
2,122 
1,746 

813 
2,274 
4,363 

166 
1,568 
2.662 
3,365 
2,821 
2,625 
1,169 
2,060 
1,434 
1,024 

il'.i.-i 

635 
47 

275 

381 
1,625 
3,768 
15,104 
2,716 
1,276 
86 
4,243 

349 
3,280 

223 
23 

217,172 



L. 
Richard- 
son 
Preyer 
(D) 



1,213 

! . 129 

18,178 

300 

1,481 

2, USD 

2 299 



hid 

617 

680 

851 

,628 

559 

(121 

I, Dim 

399 

2,613 

3,387 

1,750 

4,182 

1,2111 

2,764 

2,476 

1,634 

2,433 

1,426 

3,305 

480 

1,044 

534 

2,290 

2,422 

13,378 

1,731 

1,239 

1,020 

2,865 

3,271 

2,677 

757 

881 

281,430 



Dan 

K. 

Moore 

(D) 



1, 



969 
3,685 

13,987 
697 
940 
I 706 
2,710 
2,709 
1,079 
2,412 
2,079 
925 
496 
s:;: 
329 
583 
3,563 
1,912 
1 . 852 
1,669 
4,047 
3,129 
4.176 
5, nil 
1,494 
1 , 1 69 
1,842 

1 . 7D5 
3,590 
1,612 
2,964 

427 

2. 1S1 
2,065 

10,005 
579 
472 
1,142 
2,845 
1,471 
2,995 
1,066 
1,536 

j:,7,s72 



liruri 

Burleson 

(D) 



I 

59 

386 

25 

9 
Hi 

s 
23 

9 

13 
ID 

8 
7 
1 
:; 
10 
10 
s 

is 

53 

-'7 
20 

-'7 

36 

n 
13 
25 



I.-, 

3 

37 



18 

20 

16 

5 

6 

2 

13 

5 

12 

1 

3 

2. 115 



R.J. 
Stans- 

bury 
(D) 



ID 

10 

72 

1 

3 

1:1 

13 

19 

.'I 

24 

132 

7 

I 

5 

ID 
II 

23 

8 

19 

59 

22 

46 

38 

s 

17 

is 

17 

3 

13 



6 



12 

29 

:;s 

13 

2 



27 

8 

2 1 

4 

I 

2,145 



Kidd 
Brewer 

(D) 



21 

53 

304 

5 

12 
62 

140 
94 
II 
83 
58 
,Vi 
13 
.'.' 
5 

123 
85 
19 
is 
84 
87 
53 
76 
37 
89 
:i7 

12 
25 
19 

6 
17 

6 

55 

97 

1,621 

28 

::ii 

33 

112 

26 

117 

10 

4 

S.D26 



Robert 
L. 

< lavin 

(R) 



Don 

Badgley 

(R) 



.'I 
345 
5,140 
1,593 
2SH 
649 
240 
898 

2D 

118 

609 
49 
49 

2:i 

ID 

17 

86 

681 

1.900 

98 

39 

442 

1,166 

665 

965 

44 

1,101 

449 

555 

87 

342 

12 

275 

100 

1,447 

12 

26 

578 

156 

1. 1)56 

145 

1,115 

90 

53,145 



95 

142 

24 

11 

3 

1!' 

7 
12 
22 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
5 

:;s 

54 

4 

2 

16 
30 
23 
28 

8 

II 

17 

21 

7 

5 

2 

9 

7 

60 
2 

1 
18 
15 
37 
11 
3 I 

5 

2.01S 



Charles 

W. 
Strong 

(R) 

9 

83 

291 

406 

II 

27 

22 

sti 

7 

25 

77 

17 

2 

6 

1 

7 

6 

45 

116 

12 

5 

59 

390 

33 

397 

12 

48 

34 

52 

36 

20 

1 

10 

li 

125 

7 

3 

63 

14 

518 

17 

137 

17 

8,652 



Election Reti i: \ s 



271 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR BY COUNTIES 
SECOND PRIMARY, JUNE 27, 1964 



County 


Moore 
(D) 


Preyer 
(D) 


County 


Moore 
(D) 


Preyer 

(D) 


Alamance 


10,228 
1,834 
1,428 
2,714 
1,624 

713 
4,578 
1,912 
3,643 
2,626 
21,051 
4,868 
6,013 
3,335 

735 
3,257 
2,348 
6,728 
3,913 
3,141 

800 

SSII 

8,416 
6,534 
5,459 
9,250 

I.I Hill 

1,062 
7,090 
1,056 
5,255 

14,101 
4,850 

14,620 
4,896 
9,467 
1,090 
720 
4,256 
2.302 

13,608 
7,514 
7.031 
7,977 
3,747 
2,041 
1,470 
840 
6,822 
4,389 
8,354 


5,792 

690 

861 

1,674 

1,575 

512 

1,929 

1,096 

1,806 

2,215 

6,197 

5,108 

3,150 

2,720 

328 

2,633 

874 

3,054 

1,816 

190 

755 

127 

5,118 

2,891 

3,340 

6,418 

448 

593 

4,583 

1,100 

2,998 

10,861 

2,392 

15,655 

1,407 

6,054 

413 

638 

1,469 

872 

24,211 

3,641 

2,206 

1,921 

1,018 

1,554 

1,013 

474 

3,918 

434 

3,284 


Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 


1,689 
3,388 
6,558 
3,573 
2.923 
2.367 
3,718 
3,872 
23,153 

898 
1,671 
3,425 
7,537 
9,597 
2,973 
4,833 
5,283 
1,180 
2,147 
2.564 

908 
3,733 
7,596 
1 . 8 12 
3,938 
4,964 
8,057 
6,797 
7,740 
6,333 
3,388 
2.452 
3,201 
2,816 
4,889 
1,704 
2,966 

ills 

4,017 
5,314 
25,127 
3,066 
1,192 
1,479 
6,738 
2,864 
5,904 
1,612 
2.145 


990 


Alexander 


l.i 


Alleghany 


2,752 


Anson 


2,704 


\slll' 


Macon 

Madison 


664 


Avery 


401 


Beaufort 


Martin 


1,392 


Bertie 


McDowell 

Mecklenburg 


1,326 


Bladen 


18,712 


Brunswick 

Buncombe 


Mitchell 

Montgomery 


335 
1,833 


Burke 


Moore 


2,369 


Cabarrus 


Nash.. 


2,468 


Caldwell. . 


New Hanover 


5,629 


Camden 


Northampton 

Onslow 


2,339 


Carteret 


2,520 


Caswell 


Orange... 

Pamlico 


4,542 


Catawba. . 


677 


Chatham 


Pasquotank 


1,934 


Cherokee 


Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt.... 


1,737 


Chowan 


580 


Clay... 


1,641 




4,480 


Columbus 


Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham 


347 


Craven 


2,504 


Cumberland 


4,026 


Currituck 


5,438 


Dare 


4,654 


Davie 

Duplin 


Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 


4,765 
3,253 
2,673 


Durham 


1,462 


Edgecombe 


2,696 


Forsyth 


Stokes 


1.745 


Franklin 


Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania 


3,483 


Gaston 


516 


Gates 


1,057 


Graham 


Tyrrell 


615 


Granville 


Union 


2,150 


Greene 


Vance 


2,385 


Guilford.... 


Wake 


14,443 


Halifax 


Warren 


1.589 


Harnett. . 


Washington 


1,484 


Haywood 


Watauga 


921 


Henderson 


Wavne 


3.301 


Hertford.. 


Wilkes 


3,680 


Hoke.. 


Wilson 


3,103 


Hyde.. 


Yadkin 


950 


Iredell.. 


Yancey 


666 




Totals 


. 


Johnston. 


480,431 


293,863 









272 



NoR'i ii Carolina \l \ m m 



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Election Returns 



273 



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Election Returns 275 

VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE PRIMARIES OF 
1952, 1954, 1956 and 1960 

1952 
FOR GOVERNOR— 

William B. Umstead 294,170 

Hubert E. Olive.. 265.675 

Manley R. Dunaway ._ . 4,660 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR— 

Luther H. Hodges .' ...226,167 

Roy Rowe.. 151,067 

Marshall C. Kurfees.. 55,055 

Ben J. McDonald 52,916 

Warren H. Pritchard (R) 13,463 

William G. Lehew (R) 2,798 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF INSURANCE— 

Waldo C. Cheek 313,979 

John N. Frederick.. 126,901 

FOR ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF SUPREME COURT— 

First Primary 

(SHORT TERM) 

R. Hunt Parker... 165.817 

William H. Bobbitt... 142,907 

ItimousT. Valentine 110,930 

Oscar O.Efird 53,561 

(REGULAR TERM) 

R.Hunt Parker 135,079 

William H. Bobbitt. 109,476 

Itimous T. Valentine 86,462 

Allen H. Gwyn 66,301 

F. Donald Phillips 43,356 

Oscar O. Efird 37,794 

Second Primary 

(SHORT TERM) 

R. Hunt Parker 100,614 

William H Bobbitt 99,457 

(REGULAR TERM) 

R. Hunt Parker 99,282 

William H. Bobbitt 96,994 

1954 
FOR STATE TREASURER— 

Edwin Gill .344.796 

Joshua S. James — 149,473 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF INSURANCE— 

Charles F. Gold ....278,913 

John F. Fletcher 197,432 



276 \'<n: i ii C \i:<>i i \ \ MANl w 

VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE PRIMARIES OF 

1952, 1954, 1956 and 1960— Continued 

1956 
FOR GOVERNOR— 

Luther H. Hodges. ...401,082 

Tom Sawyer 29,248 

Harry P. Stokely 24,416 

C. E. Earle, Jr 11,908 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR- 

Luther E. Barnhardt 161,662 

AlonzoC. Edwards 124.611 

Kidd Brewer 56.227 

Gurnev P. Hood 54,747 

J. V. Whitfield 37,275 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE— 

L. Y. Ballentine .324,795 

Kermit U. Gray 86,342 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF INSURANCE— 

Charles F. Gold.. 308,998 

John N. Frederick 90,409 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF LABOR— 

Frank Crane ...191,937 

H. D. Lambeth 101,959 

James R. Farlow 88,261 



1960 

First Primary 
FOR GOVERNOR— 

Terry Sanford 269.463 

I. Beverly Lake ...181.692 

Malcolm B. Seawell .101,148 

John D. Larkins, Jr 100,757 

Second Primary 

Terry Sanford 352.133 

I.Beverly Lake 275,905 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR— 

H. Cloyd Philpott 238,353 

C. V. Henkel 181,850 

David M. McConnell 175.150 

David Bailey (R). 10.704 

S. Clyde Eggers (R) 6,401 

Otha B. Batten (R) 3,645 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF INSURANCE— 

Charles F. Gold.. 422.981 

John N. Frederick 133.370 

J. E. Cameron (R) 11.934 

Deems H. Clifton (R) 6,748 

FOR ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF SUPREME COURT— 

Clifton L. Moore 385,247 

William J. Cocke 148,116 



Election Returns 



277 



VOTE FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR BY COUNTIES 
PRIMARY, MAY 30, 1964 



County 


H. Clifton 
Blue (D) 


Robert W. 
Scott (D) 


John R. 
Jordan, Jr. (D) 


Robert A. 
Flyut (R) 


Clifford Lee 
Bell (R) 


Alamance 


3,305 

607 

635 

1,847 

768 

205 

1,366 

457 

1.960 

1,342 

12,549 

1,978 

3,065 

2,173 

457 

1,451 

742 

3,360 

2,221 

271 

354 

182 

3,276 

4,708 

2,593 

6,820 

423 

632 

2,884 

721 

2,473 

15,131 

2.142 

10,236 

1,943 

4,906 

214 

322 

1,805 

548 

11,258 

3,599 

3,906 

3,719 

1,842 

231 

1,964 

270 

2,858 

1,947 

3,136 

649 

2.427 

2,629 

1,621 

1,051 

315 

1,687 

1,943 

16,278 


9,990 

1,180 

1,135 

1,644 

1,895 

655 

2,474 

1,142 

1,875 

2,639 

3,979 

5,760 

4,081 

2,608 

399 

3,102 

1,881 

3,393 

2,330 

1,864 

921 

165 

8,098 

4,388 

4,295 

4,785 

817 

792 

6,454 

771 

3,805 

5,950 

3,366 

8,325 

2,800 

6,745 

457 

536 

2,557 

2,368 

11,976 

4,521 

3,732 

2,654 

1,111 

971 

332 

706 

5,193 

1,713 

6,818 

1,355 

2,095 

4,254 

2,790 

1,602 

4,594 

1,696 

2,311 

13,444 


1,463 

207 

215 

272 

183 

108 

1,915 

978 

1,443 

463 

5,677 

1,000 

1,579 

640 

169 

713 

311 

1,430 

686 

357 

284 

289 

1,677 

1,450 

2,000 

3,039 

333 

249 

1,180 

163 

1,035 

2,970 

1,208 

5,261 

1,451 

1,679 

556 

205 

1,268 

338 

9,226 

3,931 

1,238 

1,915 

815 

2,893 

206 

277 

1,226 

790 

1,938 

658 

385 

2,232 

706 

418 

282 

1,160 

854 

7,063 


294 

61 

46 

13 

128 

431 

8 

5 

3 

67 

1,151 

603 

167 

275 

3 

177 

32 

263 

127 

41 

2 

38 

130 

28 

44 

88 

1 

26 

555 

352 

34 

220 

20 

731 

10 

247 

4 

35 

15 

9 

1,126 

19 

49 

149 

219 

11 

10 

6 

188 

79 

93 



29 

37 

136 

104 

68 

6 

91 

741 


615 


Alexander 


284 


Alleghany 


57 


Anson 

Ashe 


47 
339 


Avery 


V"! 


Beaufort 


50 


Bertie 


4 


Bladen 


14 


Brunswick 


365 


Buncombe 


1,618 


Burke 


1,213 


Cabarrus 


799 


Caldwell 


706 


Camden 


4 


Carteret 


559 


Caswell 


66 


Catawba 


997 


Chatham 


168 


Cherokee 


112 


Chowan 


6 


Clay 


157 


Cleveland 


454 


Columbus 


124 


Craven 


146 


Cumberland 

Currituck 


263 
3 


Dare 


39 


Davidson 


1,025 


Davie 


796 


Duplin 


84 


Durham 


736 


Edgecombe 


62 


Forsyth 


1,128 


Franklin. 


22 


Gaston 


1,675 


Gates 


5 


Graham 


163 


Granville 


29 


Greene 


12 


Guilford 


2,546 


Halifax 


:'.2 


Harnett 


216 


Haywood 


111' 


Henderson 


845 


Hertford., 


17 


Hoke. 


26 


Hyde 


12 


Iredell 


349 


Jackson 


149 


Johnston 


449 


Jones 


7 


Lee 


145 


Lenoir 


110 


Lincoln 


476 


Macon 


343 


Madison 


182 


Martin 


27 


McDowell 


::n.; 


Mecklenburg 


4,257 



North Carolin \ M \\ i \i 



VOTi: FOR LIKI'TKNANT (iOVKRNOR BY COUNTIES 
PRIMARY, MAY 30, 1964— Continued 



( !ountj 



Mitchell 

Montgomery.. 
Moore 

New Hanover 
Northampton 

( Inslow 

1 irange 

Pamlii o 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk __. 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

! . ;ham - 

Rowan.. 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania.. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wavne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



Blur Dl 



241 
1,680 
1,902 
3,597 
6,304 

(ill) 
2,580 
2,507 

349 
1,205 
1,700 

226 
1,346 
2,876 

476 
2,594 
:;. 105 
5, 163 
3,243 
3,355 
2,612 

1 . 556 
2,384 
2,020 

893 
2,557 

753 
1,614 

202 
2,106 

2, 186 
9,944 
1,982 

505 

475 

3,522 

1 , 1 13 

2,662 

439 



Totals. 



255,424 



Robert w. 
Scott D) 



I. 



5 ;.. 
,1111 

738 
1 . 656 
1,245 
2,183 
1 . 22 1 
5,257 

983 
2,061 
1 . 675 
1,037 
3,350 
5,651 

834 
2,549 
3,076 
1,334 
4.256 
5,017 
1,718 

1,361 
2.512 
1,833 

:;.4sl' 

829 
1,592 

OS) 
3,281 
3,165 
10,169 
2,321 
1,552 
1,448 
3,480 
2,867 
4,015 
1.228 
1,173 



:',os,992 



John 1! 
Jordan, Jr. (D) 



160 

157 

189 

i . 7:i:: 

2,581 

2,475 

725 

1,637 

572 

812 

443 

253 

369 

2,708 

990 

690 

687 

I, 177 

1, 184 

2, 161 
1,187 

777 
357 
522 

958 
266 

79:: 
22ii 

669 

2.352 

17,237 

449 

villi 

174 
2,611 

us:: 

1.955 
193 
321 



Robert A. 
Flynt (R) 



181 

52 

lis 

75 

201 

8 

56 

i 15 

15 

9 

9 

5 

9 

28 

|so 

424 

33 

9 

129 

:;7!i 

117 

339 

15 

202 

150 

197 

38 

7s 

.". 

50 

27 

331 

9 

9 

122 
47 

453 
41 

364 
36 



140,277 



14,640 



Clifford Lee 
Bell (R) 



1,001 

142 

477 

159 

685 

15 

91 

504 

39 

38 

17 

10 

19 

63 

516 

1,296 

65 

28 

308 

I.IIM, 

552 
890 

44 
775 
269 
35S 

83 
240 

10 
231 



iiv.-, 

11 

19 

428 

130 

843 

125 

689 

47 



40,143 



Election Rktlbxs 



279 



VOTE FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR BY COUNTIES 
SECOND PRIMARY, JUNE 27, 1964 



County 

Alamance 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen. 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba.. 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecomb 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham-.. 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Hertford 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 



Blue 

(D) 



5,364 

1,038 

827 

2,289 

900 

328 

2,749 

1,081 

2,928 

1,516 

16,521 

3,356 

4,553 

2,619 

596 

2,053 

1,305 

5,016 

2,931 

526 

666 

494 

5,125 

4,450 

3,705 

9,244 

673 

922 

4,471 

883 

3,438 

11,767 

3,228 

15,786 

3,212 

7,596 

467 

272 

2,498 

883 

16,338 

4,997 

5,895 

5,795 

2,478 

1,274 

1,932 

388 

4,364 

2,316 

5,107 



Scott 
(D) 



10,339 

1,348 

1,269 

1,947 

2,144 

822 

3,281 

1,750 

2,351 

2,861 

8,726 

6,176 

4,309 

3,069 

428 

3,614 

1,677 

4,347 

2,600 

2,551 

828 

387 

7,593 

4,592 

4,655 

5,634 

746 

635 

6,970 

1,147 

4,417 

12,085 

3,763 

12,629 

2,663 

7,181 

813 

957 

2,745 

2,234 

19,435 

5,797 

2,877 

:;. \<x; 

2,072 

2,133 

508 

811 

5,843 

2,377 

5,784 



County 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg.. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery... 

Moore 

Nash.. _. 

New Hanover. 
Northampton.. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt.. 

Polk... 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham... 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania. . 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin.. 

Yancey 

Totals 



Blue 
(D) 



3 
4 
2 
1 

2 

2 
20 

1 
4 
5 
8 
1 
2 
3 

1 

1 

1 
5 

3 
3 

6 
4 
6 
4 

2, 
2, 
2, 
1, 
4, 

1, 

2, 

3, 

21, 

2, 



895 
135 
,332 
,367 
,364 
687 
,591 
,629 
,002 
433 
961 
743 
363 
472 
820 
921 
893 
715 
784 
932 
408 
684 
129 
953 
197 
933 
721 
590 
465 
454 
224 
299 
528 
471 
087 
646 
972 
373 
687 
628 
238 
334 
824 
521 
967 
050 
326 
836 
256 



Scott 
(D) 



359,000 



1,590 
1,914 
4,397 
3,302 
1,963 
1,939 
2,203 
2,349 

18,478 
703 
1,395 
1,022 
4,336 
5,620 
3,235 
4,099 
5,356 
1,075 
2,041 
2,040 
1,013 
3,161 
6,435 
1,109 
3,065 
4,376 
5,878 
5,436 
5,667 
4,874 
3,590 
1,216 
3,184 
2,663 
3,976 
1,470 
1,625 
707 
3,358 
3,618 

16,550 
2,020 
1,676 
1,781 
4,915 
3,876 
4.3S3 
1,629 
1,306 



373,027 



I'M' 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE PRIMARIES, 1964, 

BY COUNTIES 





1 !i iMMISSIONER OF LABOR 


County 


Fran 

Crane (D) 


John B. 
Wardell, Jr. (D) 


Frank 
Castlebury (D; 




7,836 
1,049 

772 
1,774 
1,659 

380 
2,656 
1,344 
2.649 
1 . 889 
11.302 
1.772 
4,988 
2,799 

452 
2,451 
1,364 
4.536 
2,285 
1.121 

859 

279 
6,703 
4,568 
4.303 
7,753 

691 

762 
6,375 

812 

3,467 

11.679 

1.162 

13.017 

2,556 

ti, 121 

495 

373 
3,222 
1,770 
12,524 
6,565 
3,862 
3.946 
1.942 
2.203 
1,451 

584 
4.558 
2,543 
4,945 
1,301 
1,830 
4.675 
2.312 

1 . 857 
4,185 

2 . 227 


2,563 

297 

299 

991 

345 

202 

1,204 

410 

1,195 

907 

1,689 

1,398 

1,872 

1,156 

160 

1,002 

723 

1,599 

853 

423 

248 

97 

2,691 

2,262 

1,760 

2,982 

449 

394 

1,772 

283 

1,295 

1,175 

931 

2,992 

1,565 

2,706 

293 

186 

893 

541 

1 743 

1 697 

1.377 

1.951 

905 

711 

460 

240 

1,767 

778 

1 , 457 

668 

465 

1,843 

977 

477 

278 

790 


2,264 


Alexander 


350 




205 





514 




234 





17H 




825 


Bertie 


351 


Bladen 


1,002 


Brunswick 


802 
4,591 


Burke 


1,680 




1,291 


Caldwell 

Camden . . 

I arti rel 

Caswell 


700 
134 

mm; 
378 


Catawba.. .. . 


1,318 




1,298 


Cherokee . . 


400 


Chowan. 


197 


Clay 


178 


Cleveland 

Columbus . 


2,045 
2.164 


Craven 


1,576 


Cumberland _ 

Currituck.. 


2,446 
144 


Dare 


201 


Davidson .. 

Davie.. 


1,635 
278 


Duplin .. . . .. 


1,246 


Durham . 

>mbe _ 


8,314 
891 


Forsyth . 


3,104 


Franklin 


1,270 


Gaston . .. . 

Gates 


2,833 
150 


Graham 


208 


(Iranville. . . 


672 


Greene... 


542 


Guilford 


9,955 


Halifax 

Harnett. _ _ 

lod. _ 

Henderson 

Hertford ... 


3,109 

2,317 

1,449 

549 

408 


Hoke 


427 


Hyde.... 


112 


Iredell 


1,449 


Jackson . 


638 


Johnston 

Jones 

1 ei 

Lenoir _ 


3,273 
412 

1 . )'.<-. 
1,707 


Lincoln . 


1,123 


Macon. 

Madison. . . . . . 

Martin. 


434 
279 
765 



Election Returns 



281 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE PRIMARIES, 1964, 

BY COUNTIES— Continued 



County 



COMMISSIONER OF LABOR 



Frank 
Crane (D) 



John B. 
Wardell, Jr. (D) 



Frank 
Castlebury (D) 



McDowell 

Mecklenburg. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank— 

Pender 

Perquimans. . 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. 

Rowan 

Rutherford.. 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington.. 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Totals.. 



2,733 
17,984 

486 
1,669 
2,547 
6,125 
5,045 
2,679 
3,162 
4,130 

798 
2,271 
1,517 

841 
2,165 
5,372 

998 
2,695 
2,880 
5,408 
4,018 
5,493 
4,427 
3,013 
2,207 
2,919 
1,666 
4,194 

996 
1,811 

450 
3,904 
3,485 
18,021 
1,909 
1,305 

955 
4,555 
2,858 
5.087 

856 

964 



348,453 



969 

5,550 

143 

388 

948 

1,189 

2,533 

876 

1,702 

1,461 

377 

732 

831 

270 

750 

2,272 

494 

997 

1,428 

2,615 

1,734 

2,149 

2,123 

1,138 

810 

701 

516 

1,923 

291 

971 

266 

749 

1,771 

2,795 

703 

562 

326 

1,607 

615 

1,332 

360 

319 



116,676 



795 

8,013 

122 

335 

1,237 

1,444 

3,456 

975 

1,440 

1,910 

331 

432 

619 

153 

776 

1,850 

404 

1,270 

1,524 

2,036 

1,886 

2,069 

1,236 

903 

617 

786 

369 

908 

221 

822 

156 

776 

2,055 

12,235 

1,638 

620 

302 

1,925 

574 

1,360 

318 

141 



140,350 



I'M 



x 1 1 1 ; i ii c \i:ni i\ \ Manual 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE PRIMARIES, 1964, 

BY COUNTIES 





COMMISSIONER OF INSURANCE 


County 


Edwin S. 
Lanier (D) 


John N. 
Frederick (D) 


John B. 
Whitley (D 


Ralph B. 
Pfaff(R) 


John C. 
Clifford (Rj 


Alamance 


8,086 

698 

632 

1 , 605 

1,301 

349 

3,165 

1,370 

2,590 

1,975 

1 1 , 725 

5,141 

3,916 

2,654 

400 

2,831 

1,050 

4,702 

2,722 

1,105 

871 

239 

6,718 

5,797 

5,382 

9,207 

1,'IS 

785 
7,150 

871 
4,777 
18,857 
4,738 
13,559 
2,996 
6,471 

516 

304 
3,274 
1,973 
20,108 
8,199 
5,596 
3,671 
2,105 
2,230 
1,486 

581 
3,250 
2,325 
5,770 
1,406 
2,803 
5,452 
2,224 
1,452 
3,983 
2.539 


2,179 
225 
237 
791 
407 
131 
562 
301 

1,022 
723 

3,726 

1,094 
873 
107 
645 
400 

1,091 
617 
410 
183 
118 

2,007 

1,319 

1,004 

1,760 
283 
288 

1,104 
190 
804 

1,210 
605 

3,042 
924 

2,537 
175 
253 
725 
361 

2,206 

1,417 
907 

1,679 
495 
297 
378 
165 
804 
709 
853 
428 
421 

1.196 
928 
506 
272 
460 


2,711 

823 

424 

912 

466 

259 

1.279 

487 

1,250 

961 

1,457 

2,113 

3,213 

1,199 

257 

1,015 

1,026 

1,732 

1.1193 

361 

264 

196 

3,024 

1,974 

1,839 

2,785 

322 

355 

1,671 

359 

847 

1,595 

848 

2,729 

1,502 

3,281 

278 

249 

850 

651 

5,917 

2,126 

1,357 

1,965 

804 

924 

507 

257 

4,655 

921 

3,435 

632 

559 

1,937 

1,290 

651 

462 

993 


217 
70 
44 
11 
113 
281 
15 

5 

44 

1,142 

697 

209 

272 

2 

206 

17 

326 

61 

34 

1 

36 

135 

28 

34 

76 

& 

405 

313 

18 

215 

26 

735 

12 

409 

3 

28 

11 

3 

1,184 

16 

43 

170 

242 

6 

8 

2 

201 

46 

73 



30 

35 

164 

87 

64 

6 


678 


Alexander 


270 




58 


Anson 


47 


Ashe 

Avery 

Bearfort 

Bertie.. 

Bladen 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 


374 

'i30 

43 

5 

11 

393 

1 , 663 


Burke 

Cabarrus 


1,102 
767 


Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 


715 

5 

539 


Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 


75 
967 
230 


Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland. 

Columbus 


122 
7 
164 
145 
128 


Craven 


178 


Cumberland 

Currituck 


385 
2 


Dare 

Davidson 


50 
1,181 


Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 


814 

102 

709 

62 

1,145 

20 

1 . 425 

4 

109 


Granville 

Greene 


30 
17 


Guilford 

Halifax 


2,382 
38 


Harnett 


222 


Havwood 


383 


Henderson .. 


•<07 


Hertford... 


22 


Hoke... 


28 


Hyde... 


15 


Iredell 


343 


Jackson 


161 


Johnston 


450 


Jones _ 


6 


Lee 


142 


Lenoir 

Lincoln 


126 
431 


Macon 


354 


Madison 


190 


Martin 


28 



Election Returns 



283 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE PRIMARIES, 1964, 
BY COUNTIES— Continued 



Count} 



COMMISSIONER OF INSURANCE 



Edwin S. 
Lanier (D) 



John N. 
Frederick (D) 



John B. 

Whitley (D) 



Ralph B. 
Pfaff (R) 



John C. 
Clifford (R) 



McDowell 

Mecklenburg.. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery.. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover. 
Northampton.. 

Onslow 

Orange.. 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank... 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham... 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania.. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson.. 

Yadkin 

Yancey. 



Totals. 



2.385 
22,335 

432 
1,656 
3,297 
6,313 
6,636 
2,601 
4,437 
6,869 

859 
2,163 
1,930 

792 
2,178 
7,473 
1,096 
3,282 
3,816 
5,940 
4,328 
5,505 
4,888 
3,110 
2,355 
2,583 
1,391 
4,034 

ssc, 
1,635 

429 
2,748 
4,721 
24,324 
3,124 
1,394 

912 
5,398 
2,492 
5,688 

898 

715 



398,428 



748 

3,598 

107 

203 

565 

1,297 

2,450 

402 

883 

821 

231 

496 

581 

191 

822 

1,067 

336 

682 

940 

1,626 

1,322 

1,313 

1,284 

884 

605 

443 

408 

893 

335 

917 

157 

789 

1,031 

2,164 

481 

324 

278 

812 

592 

711 

335 

310 



1,364 

6,955 

227 

590 

1,019 

1,452 

2,118 

1,681 

1,359 

802 

490 

764 

620 

300 

875 

1,701 

495 

1,254 

1,348 

2,554 

1,964 

3,048 

1,786 

1,107 

757 

1,604 

685 

1,359 

260 

1,040 

334 

1,613 

1,575 

4,826 

688 

809 

417 

2,185 

990 

1,673 

331 

316 



103 

818 

352 

37 

102 

31 

166 

8 

40 

132 

11 

7 

3 

5 

11 

18 

173 

280 

21 

9 

149 

472 

139 

302 

4 

163 

115 

168 

47 

68 

3 

54 

32 

281 

7 

9 

111 

48 

415 

33 

328 

21 



294 

4,060 

1,039 

132 

503 

188 

716 

5 

103 

503 

39 

40 

24 

10 

16 

71 

508 

1,387 

77 

34 

307 

1,977 

527 

930 

46 

796 

310 

385 

77 

249 

12 

223 

68 

1,080 

11 

18 

404 

127 

891 

126 

703 

63 



83,970 



135,384 



13,943 



41,238 



:m 



North Cakolina Manual 



TOTAL VOTES (AST— GENERAL ELECTIONS 
1960-1964 



Democrats 


1960 
President 


Republicans 


l.ilm 1 . Kennedj 
713,136 


Governor 


Richard M. Nixon 
655,420 


-inford 




Robert L. Gavin 
1113,975 


I Bevei i 
1,137 (write-in voti 






Lieutenant Governor 




H.Cloyd Philpotl 
765,519 


Secretary of State 


S. Clyde Eggers 
532. 1 15 


Iliad Eure 
787,985 


Auditor 


David L. Morton 
504,846 


llenrv L. Bridges 
781,164 


Treasurer 


Dallas M. Reese 
503,059 


Edwin Gill 

784,495 




Fred R. Keith 
502,390 


Superintendent of Public Instruction 


Charles F. Carroll 
785,1577 


Attorney General 


Marv Jo Zachan 
499,017 


U'ade Bruton 
777,863 




Donald L. Paschal 
504,280 




Commissioner of Agriculture 


L. Y. Ballentine 
784.934 


Commissioner of Labor 


A. H. Farmer 
503,071 


Frank Crane 
779,832 




T. Paul Messick 
501,954 




Commissioner of Insurance 


< 'harles F. ( Sold 
7SS.339 




J. E. Cameron 
501,262 




Associate Justice Supreme Court 


R. Hunt Parker 
7M.770 




Paul C. West 
500.737 


Clifton I. Moore 
794,791 







1 dw in .->. Lanier 
178,938 



L962 
Commissioner of Insurance 



Claude E. Billings, Jr 
321,511 



Election Returns 



285 



TOTAL VOTES CAST— GENERAL ELECTIONS 

1960-1964— Continued 



Democrats 



Kmery B. Dennv 
477,513 



Republicans 



Chief Justice Supreme Court 



Lewis P. Hamlin, Sr. 
320,429 



Associate Justice Supreme Court 

William B. Rodman, Jr. 
491,012 

Associate Justice Supreme Court 



William H. Bobbitt 
491,220 



Susie Sharp 
494,169 



Lyndon B. Johnson 
800,139 



Dan K. Moore 
790,343 



Robert W. Scott 
815,994 

Thad Eure 

809,990 



Henry L. Bridges 
798,721 



Associate Justice Supreme Court 

Irvin B. Tucker, Jr. 



I'.iM 
President 

Governor 

Lieutenant Governor 

Secretary of State 

Auditor 

Treasurer 



Kdwin Gill 

801,958 



i 'harles F. Carroll 
828,608 



Hade Bruton 
792,902 



James A. Graham 
803,373 

Frank Crane 
824,693 



I' dwin S. Lanier 
804,459 



311,575 



Barry M. Gnldwater 
624.844 



Robert L. Gaviu 
606,165 



Clifford Lee Bell 
526,727 

Edwin E. Butler 
503,932 

Kverett L. Peterson 
503,488 

Charles J. Mitchell 
502,977 



Superintendent of Public Instruction 



Attorney General 



T. Worth Coltram 
506,878 



Commissioner of Agriculture 



Van S. Watson 

198,364 



Commissioner of Labor 



Commissioner of Insurance 



John C. Clifford 
501,349 



286 Nokth Carolina Mam'.m. 

VOTE FOR GOVERNOR IN PRIMARIES 

1940-1964 

1940 

.1. Melville Broughton ...147,386 

W. P Horton - .105,916 

A.J. Maxwell - — - -- 102,095 

Lee Gravely 63.030 

Thos. E. Cooper 33,176 

Paul I) Grady - ---- 15,735 

Arthur Simmons 2,058 

1944 

K. Gregg I 'licrrv 185,027 

Ralph McDonald 134,661 

Olla Kay Boyd - 2,069 

1948 
First Primary 

Charles M Johnson 170,141 

\\ KerrScotl 161.293 

R. Mayne Albright 76.281 

Oscar Barker - 10.871 

W. F. Stanley, Sr 2,428 

Olla Ray Boyd 2,111 

Second Primary 

W. Kerr Scott ....217,620 

Charles M. Johnson 182,684 

1952 

William B. Umstead 294,170 

Hubert E. Olive 265,675 

Man ley R. Dunaway 4,660 

1956 

Luther H. Hodges 401,082 

Tom Sawyer 29,248 

Harry P. Stokely 24,416 

C 1 Karle.Jr 11.908 

1960 

First Primary 

Terry Sanford .269.463 

I. M.-verly Lake - -- 181,692 

Malcolm B. Seawell 101,148 

John D. Larkins, Jr ..100,757 

Second Primary 

Terry Sanford .352,133 

1. Beverly Lake 275.905 

1964 
First Primary 

L. Richardson Preyer 281,430 

Dan K. Moore 257,872 

I. Beverly Lake 217.172 

Kidd Brewer 8,026 

Bruce Burleson. . . 2.445 

R. J. Stansburv 2,145 

Robert L. Gavin (R) 53, 145 

Don Badglev (R) 2.018 

Charles W. Strong (R) 8,652 

Second Primary 

Dan K. Moore 480,431 

L. Richardson Preyer 293,863 



Election Returns 



287 



to 



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589 



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290 



North Caroi.ixa Mam ai 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS BY COUNTIES 
GENERAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 3, 1964 





Attorney 
General 


Commissioner 
of Agriculture 


Commissioner 
of Labor 


Commissioner 
of Insurance 


1 ', Ml II t j 


-c 
<«^ 

tn 

e« a 

1-2 

E-aa 


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HO 


4c 


g 

. s 

3 J 


Q 

■as 

cs g 




s 

o"E 

.si 

^5 


Alamance 


15 swi 

3.667 

.' 327 

4,311 

4,764 

1,313 

r, .,ii.-, 

3.494 

4,570 

4,210 

26.352 

1.' U72 

11,997 

III 11311 

1,015 

6.204 
2,639 

15,920 
5,109 
3,856 
1,937 
1.441 

11,300 
9,422 
7,505 

15,386 
l.6!ix 
1,595 

14.363 
2,926 
7,506 

19,147 
7.977 

2s 352 
1 . s.V.i 

21, 151 
1,703 
1.751 
5,105 
2,920 

32.604 

10.505 
8,225 

10,330 
6,710 
4,176 
2,467 
1 lisii 

13.215 
5.050 
8,779 
2.234 


12,858 

3,644 

1,445 

1,009 

4.328 

2,569 

2.144 

128 

1.335 

3,221 

16,140 

10,115 

12,111 

9,076 

237 

3,684 

884 

15,862 

3.647 

2.975 

369 

I.2M1 

5.529 

2,762 

3,619 

6,407 

308 

517 

15,978 

4,387 

.' 1<I3 

9.736 

2.295 

25, sod 

985 

14,118 

251 

1,384 

1,136 

456 

29,063 

2.100 

4,431 

1 . S52 

7,310 

431 

441 

304 

9.605 

2,896 

5.527 

458 


16.295 

3.659 

2,375 

4,299 

4,807 

1,324 

6,632 

3,499 

4,606 

4.232 

26,425 

12 112 

12,216 

'.I '.I'M 

1,017 
6,231 

2 Mi3 

15,975 
5,239 
3,864 
1,949 
1.441 

12.063 
9.452 
7,680 

15,575 
1 . 759 
1,584 

14,480 
2,998 
7,616 

1!' 198 
7,964 

29. UN 
4.936 

21,567 
1,706 
1,754 
5.213 
2.946 

33.318 

10,851 
8.365 

10.366 
6,85s 

4,195 
2,485 
1,096 
13.455 
5,053 
9,130 
2.253 


12, 192 

3.634 

1,439 

1,011 

4,323 

2,566 

2,126 

12 s 

1.317 

3.101 

16,038 

10.036 

11,918 

<> lllv 

234 
3,653 

875 

15.789 

3.410 

3,069 

360 
1,286 
5.512 
2.736 
3,537 
6,171 

297 

511 

15,562 

4,345 

2,457 

'i.r.sn 

2,483 
24,729 

977 
13,994 

220 
I.Mss 
1,106 

441 
28, [SS 
2,109 
4,347 
4,803 
7.387 

417 

423 

297 
9.3S0 
2,890 
5.290 

448 


16,897 
3,716 
2,339 
4,366 
4,779 
1,189 
6,751 
3,510 
4,683 
4,308 

27,038 

12.372 

12,499 

10,204 
1,022 
6,438 
2.877 

16,581 
5,255 
3,867 
1,972 
1,448 

12,540 
9,564 
8,437 

16,057 
1.770 
1,632 

14.869 
3,033 
7,664 

20,413 
8,177 

30,625 
4,970 

22.647 
1,721 
1,758 
5,255 
2,965 

35.273 

11,146 
8,426 

10,613 
6,978 
4,228 
2,528 
1,114 

13,724 
5,089 
9,033 
2.258 


16,046 
3.667 
2.327 
4,310 
4,754 
1,320 
6,640 
3.491 
4,603 
4.217 

26,271 

12,111 

12,025 
9,930 
1,017 
6,194 
2. sis 

16,004 
5,187 
3,845 
1,940 
1.441 

11.981 
9,448 
8,184 

15.453 
1.761 
1,584 

14,390 
2,944 
7,647 

21,191 
s 167 

28.726 
4,919 

21,503 
1.717 
1,752 
5,201 
2,932 

33,869 

10,985 
8.212 

10.2S1 
6,674 
1. 193 
2,479 
1,091 

13.093 
5.038 
8,946 
2.245 


12,787 


Alexander 


3,394 




1,450 


Anson 


1,046 


Ashe 


4,341 


Aver v 


2,569 


Beaufort 


2,144 


Bertie 


417 


Bladen.. 


1,327 


Brunswick 


3.233 


Buncombe 


16.237 


Burke.. 


10,086 


Cabarrus 


12,143 


Caldwell 


9,099 


Camden 


237 


Carteret 


3,736 


Caswell 


ss|. 


Catawba 


15,836 


Chatham 


3,499 


Cherokee 


3,078 


Chowan 


364 


Clay... 


1,285 


Cleveland 


5,518 


Columbus 


2,766 


Craven 


2,980 


Cumberland 


6 JS7 


Currituck 


268 


Dare 


53 S 


Davidson 


15,914 


Davie 


4,383 


Duplin 


2,436 


Durham 


8,351 


Edgecombe 


2,269 


Forsy t h 


25,451 


Franklin 


987 


Gaston 


14,101 


Gates 


211 


Graham 


1,389 


Granville 


1,126 


Greene 


449 


Guilford 


28,376 


Halifax 


2,073 


Harnett 


4,490 


Haywood 


4,919 


Henderson 


7,376 


Hertford 


425 


Hoke 


432 


Hyde 


293 


Iredell 


9,857 


Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 


2,933 

5,596 

453 



Election Returns 



291 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS BY COUNTIES 
GENERAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 3, 1964— Continued 





Attorney 
General 


Commissioner 
of Agriculture 


Commissioner 
of Labor 


Commissioner 
of Insurance 


County 


to v 

« a 

MS 

E-ffl 


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£~ 

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HO 


!<5 


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8 

e a 
i- >- 
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«5§ 

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£ 

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£o 


Lee 


3,418 
9,597 
6,977 
3,973 
3,405 
5,116 
6,081 
48,792 
1,570 
3,955 
6,377 
10,674 
12,301 
5,418 
6,303 
8,911 
1,781 
5,036 
3,180 
1,786 
4,845 
12,556 
2,998 
9,745 
7,964 
14,689 
11,527 
15,254 
10,214 
8,113 
4,124 
7,488 
4,876 
9,556 
2,274 
4,744 
1,027 
7,559 
6,346 
28,973 
3,696 
2,570 
3,824 
9,663 
8,340 
8,148 
3,461 
3,607 


1,772 
3,020 
5,377 
2,576 
3,399 

683 
3,807 
38,662 
3,086 
3,165 
4,567 
3,802 
10,131 

491 
2,560 
4,592 

727 
1,188 
1,265 

402 
1,187 
2,948 
2,423 
14,170 
1,886 
1,975 
7,333 
13,271 
5,884 
7,125 

597 
S.S95 
4,334 
7,592 
1,415 
3,354 

202 

2,875 

1,640 

14,467 

759 

750 
3,955 
4,914 
11,641 
3,209 
5,792 
2,017 


3,520 

9,634 

7,142 

3,987 

3,415 

5,144 

6,097 

49,791 

1,572 

3,900 

6,442 

10,165 

12,465 

5,423 

6,382 

9,344 

1,794 

5,107 

3,205 

1,801 

4,925 

11,193 

2,997 

10,074 

7,996 

14,726 

11,640 

16,234 

10,205 

8,173 

4,139 

7,538 

5,016 

9,655 

2,278 

4,746 

1,016 

7,580 

6,398 

30,161 

3,727 

2,594 

3,863 

9,771 

8,389 

8,203 

3,493 

3,604 


1.726 
2,987 
5,415 
2,558 
3,398 

662 
3,775 
38,155 
3,082 
3,171 
4,506 
4,451 
9,943 

460 
2,486 
4,225 

727 
1,158 
1,255 

390 
1,132 
2,891 
2,424 
13,247 
1,826 
1,956 
7,224 
12,700 
5,905 
7,093 

591 

K.SII'.I 

4,295 

7,505 

1,407 

3,239 

211 

2,826 

1,598 

13 sun 

842 

712 

3,987 

4,805 

11,598 

3,190 

5,748 

2,016 


3,511 

9,931 

7,158 

4,030 

3,458 

5,196 

6,256 

52,735 

1,602 

3,954 

6,654 

11,149 

13,465 

5,443 

6,502 

9,723 

1,803 

5,202 

3,230 

1,811 

4,960 

11,388 

3,155 

10,294 

8,059 

14,828 

11,859 

16,262 

10,449 

8,246 

4,219 

7,682 

4,971 

9,791 

2,283 

4,931 

1,042 

7,892 

6,503 

30,185 

3,771 

2,647 

3,896 

9,970 

8,420 

8,416 

3,530 

3,613 


3,541 

9,668 

7,040 

3,973 

3,414 

5,140 

6,084 

50,042 

1,567 

3,918 

6,439 

10,904 

12,471 

5,433 

6,378 

9,749 

1,775 

5,082 

3,206 

1,806 

4,871 

12,336 

2,995 

10,631 

s.o:;l> 

14,699 

11,546 

15,284 

10,095 

8,116 

4,144 

7,498 

4,882 

9,591 

2,272 

4,732 

1,022 

7,568 

6,397 

29,652 

3,746 

2,600 

3,852 

9,772 

8,359 

8,281 

3,466 

3,596 


1,742 


Lenoir.. 


2,966 


Lincoln 


5,461 


Macon 


2,567 


Madison. 

Martin 

McDowell 


3,403 

677 

3,820 


Mecklenburg 


38,359 


Mitchell 


3,084 


M ontgomery 


3,185 


Moore 


4,527 


Nash 


3,792 


New Hanover 


10,063 


Northampton 


497 


Onslow 


2,552 


Orange 


4,142 


Pamlico 


732 


Pasquotank 


1,174 


Pender 


1,268 


Perquimans 


395 


Person 


1,171 


Pitt 


2,928 


Polk.. 


2,430 


Randolph 


13,344 


Richmond 


1,858 


Robeson . 


1,969 


Rockingham 


7,338 


Rowan 


13,365 


Rutherford 


5,872 


Sampson 


7,117 


Scotland 


588 


Stanly 


8,889 


Stokes.. 


4,323 


Surry 


7,583 


Swain 


1,422 


Transylvania 


3.265 


Tyrrell 


205 


Union 


2,892 


Vance 


1,606 


Wake 


14,119 


Warren 


727 


Washington 


739 


Watauga 


4,007 


Wayne 


4,841 


Wilkes 


1 1 . 6 10 


Wilson 


3,101 


Yadkin 


5,777 


Yancey 


1,983 






Totals. 


792,902 


506. S7S 


803,373 


498,364 


824,693 


804,459 


501,349 







29* 



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Election Returns 



295 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY, 
MAY 28, 1966, BY DISTRICTS 

THIRD CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 


David N. 
Henderson 


Don 
Howell 


S. A. 
Chalk, Jr. 


James A. 
Walker 


Carteret 


3,795 
3,611 
3,938 
2,621 
5,806 
2,368 
3,473 
5,009 


182 
801 
724 
573 
791 
369 
415 
3,406 


855 
149 
286 
146 
231 
93/ 
203 
190 


326 


Duplin 


888 


Harnett 


1,141 
705 




1,660 


Pender 


423 




484 




847 






Total 


30,621 


7,261 


2,153 


6,474 



FOURTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 

Chatham 

Montgomery.. 

Moore 

Nash 

Orange 

Randolph 

Wake 

Total 



Harold D. 
Cooley 



William A. 
Creech 



Columbus M. 
Tart 



1,453 
1,439 
2,563 
5,150 
2,904 
1,891 
9,877 



25,277 



550 
433 
1,546 
2,182 
2,640 
704 
9,617 



17,672 



89 

58 
210 
127 
1,080 
109 
587 



2,260 



FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 


Harold W. 
Thomerson 


Smith 
Bagley 


William Z. 
Wood 


Nick 
Galifianakis 


Caswell..- . 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Person . 


419 
928 
3,592 
741 
946 
733 


1,455 
2,365 
8,380 
1,678 
2,670 
2,380 


1,341 
578 
6,944 
1,194 
1,081 
620 


554 

14,679 

2,614 

2,422 


Rockingham. .. 

Stokes 


2,221 
312 






Total 


7,359 


18,928 


11,758 


22,802 



SIXTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 


James 
Keplinger 


Horace R. 
Kornegay 


Alamance 


1,849 
1,217 
2,372 


9,676 


Davidson. 


6,564 


Guilford 


16,992 






Total 


5,438 


33,232 







296 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR CONGRKKSMKN IN l)KM()(R.\T!( PRIMARY 
MAY 28, HHid, RY DISTRICT — Continued 

EIGHTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 


JohnG. 

Plumides 


T. L. 
Caudle 




1,123 
2,669 
17,268 
2,753 
2,653 


2,633 




2,009 




7,799 




2,509 




2,371 






Total 


26,766 


17,321 







ELEVENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 


Rov A. 

Taylor 


Bruce E. 
Burleson 




15,612 
1,567 
675 
999 
7,852 
3,083 
3,596 
4,055 
2,711 
2,749 
599 
1,619 
6,161 
2,121 
3,031 
1,275 


1,330 




29 


Clay 


31 




41 




582 




217 




225 




386 




161 




111 


Mitchell - -- 


44 


Polk 


214 




1,770 




64 




341 




47 






Total . --- 


57,705 


5,593 







Election Returns 



297 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN REPUBLICAN PRIMARY, 
MAY 28, 1966, BY DISTRICTS 

TENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 


Terry Parker 
Wallace 


W. Hall 
Young 


Donald D. 
Wirick 


Alexander __ - 


320 
217 
344 
132 
196 
206 
174 


123 

2,000 

798 

162 

74 
170 

42 


430 
210 


Burke 


345 




157 




90 




420 


Iredell 


247 


Total 


1,5*9 


3,369 


1,899 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN REPUBLICAN PRIMARY, 
MAY 28, 1966, BY DISTRICTS — Continued 

ELEVENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 


Joe Sam 
Schenck 


W. Scott 
Harvey 


Buncombe. ... .. . . 


349 

17 

266 

6 

340 

541 

27 

50 

212 

506 

871 

93 

67 

5 

95 
45 


595 


Cherokee.. 


37 


Clay- 


424 


Graham . 


23 


Haywood __ _ 


224 


Henderson '. 


1,653 


Jackson . . . 


40 


McDowell.. __ . . 


26 


Macon 


521 


Madison .. 


341 


Mitchell 


1,690 


Polk.. 


299 


Rutherford _ 


161 


Swain 


14 


Transylvania .. ._ - . 


56 


Yancey . . . 


19 






Total 


3,490 


6,123 







2JKS 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN, SECOND PRIMARY, 
JUNE 25, 1966 

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Person 

Rockingham.. 
Stokes 

Total 



Smith 
Bagley (D) 



1,378 
1. II.' I 
15,999 
1,200 
3,439 
2,843 



Nick 
Galifianakis (D) 



957 

15,625 

9,110 

1,442 

4,747 



32,961 



TENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 


W. Hall 

Young (R) 


Donald D. 
Wirick (R) 




34 

1,981 
193 
160 

40 
127 

69 


125 




354 '• 




147 




241 




163 




337 


Iredell 


295 






Total . 


2,604 


1,662 




t i 



Election Returns 



299 



SPECIAL PRIMARY ELECTION HELD DECEMBER 18, 1965, 

IN FIRST CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT FOR UNEXPIRED 

TERM ENDING JANUARY 3, 1967 



County 


Walter B. 
Jones (D) 


Roger R. 
Jackson, Jr. (D) 


C.Don 

Langston (D) 


0. Woodrow 
Pittman (D) 


Mrs. Sara E. 
Small (D) 


Beaufort.. . 

Bertie.. 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck. 

Dare.. 

Gates. . . 
Hertford. 

Hyde 

Martin . 


2,775 
1,551 

629 
1,119 
1,012 
1,115 

731 
1,073 

591 
3,228 
1,841 

818 
7,748 

537 
1,171 


730 
655 

98 
120 

91 
198 
117 
844 
214 
527 
425 
109 
537 
120 
610 


151 
43 
11 
14 

8 

24 

40 

15 

21 

124 

22 

16 

1,076 

5 

72 


27 
53 

1 
2 

11 

5 

9 

106 

1 

13 

14 
2 

20 
1 
8 


384 
1,526 

59 
154 
124 

19 
122 
636 

90 
758 


Pasquotank 

Perquimans . 

Pitt ... 

Tyrrell 

Washington . . ._ 


353 
119 
959 
129 
591 


Total 


25,939 


5,395 


1,642 


273 


6,023 



SPECIAL ELECTION HELD FEBRUARY 5, 1966, IN FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT FOR UNEXPIRED 

TERM ENDING JANUARY 3, 1967 



County 


Walter B. 
Jones (D) 


John P. 
East (R) 




2,603 

1,716 
450 
728 
674 
981 
482 

1,207 
595 

2,170 

1,544 
543 

6,638 
422 

1,020 


2,937 




1,239 




168 


Chowan ... . .. . 


325 


Currituck _ _ _ _ 


168 


Dare ... . 


283 




135 


Hertford. 


586 


Hyde . 


508 




1,507 


Pasquotank . . 


891 


Perquimans _ _. 


295 


Pitt.. 


3,902 


Tyrrell 


212 




1,152 






Total . 


21,773 


14,308 







300 



Noutii Carolina Maniai. 



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Election Returns 



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312 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 1962-1964 

FIRST CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





1962 


1964 


Counties 


a 
a 
o 
« 

J.- u 

■si 

KQ 


u 

c 
a 
o 

pq 

■Si 

a> - 


Zeno 0. Ratcliff 
Republican 




2,052 

1,264 
357 
736 
637 

1,483 
430 

1,123 
450 

1,703 

1,972 
461 

4,010 
457 
763 


6,794 
3,519 
1,037 
1,988 
1,810 
1,743 
1,772 
4,258 
1,226 
5,254 
5,321 
1,879 
12,666 
1,085 
2,215 


2,374 




531 




154 




362 




281 




482 




216 




424 


Hyde 


295 




715 




1,127 




392 


Pitt 


2,844 


Tyrrell - 


205 




706 






Total 


17,898 


52,567 


11,108 







SECOND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





1962 


1964 




.S 


c 




o5 


« 




■** 




Counties 


a 


a 




O e9 


o S 




fe s 


fe fe 




. O 


. c 




~ ~ 


« E 




. & 






►JQ 


HJC 




2,413 
1,672 
1,004 
2,966 
3,894 
2.036 
3,720 
1,139 
2,206 


8,441 




5,015 




2,988 




11,293 




10,131 




5,489 




6,531 




3,847 




8,671 






Total. - 


21,050 


62,406 







Election Returns 



313 



VOTE FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 1962-1964— Continued 
THIRD CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





1962 


1964 




a 


a 







n 


o 
















4> 






-a 


-a 






a 


a 


rt 


Counties 


w 


w 


a 




5=2 


22 




T=g 


•a 8 


il 




'5 a 

<fl « 


'Si 


jl 




QQ 


QQ 


££ 


Carteret 


5,842 


6,257 


3,608 




3,260 


8,521 


2,814 




3,896 
3,864 


7,855 
8,220 


2,561 

4,386 

449 


Harnett 


Jones 


971 
3,213 


2,287 
6,553 


Onslow 


2,532 


Pamlico 


1,572 
1,524 

5,889 


1,838 
3,329 
8,278 


755 


Pender 


1 309 


Sampson 


7,056 


Wayne 


4,025 


10,097 


5,087 




Total 


34,056 


63,235 


30,557 





FOURTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





1962 


1964 




>> 




>> 


h 


Counties 


"3 


-a 




a 




o 


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«- 




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*a 


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MP 


o« 


KQ 


£<* 


Chatham 


3,527 
12,673 

5,881 


1,945 

11,057 

2,316 


4,959 

13,496 

8,950 


4,123 


Davidson 


16,090 


Johnston 


6,989 


Nash.. 


2,805 
7,339 


564 
10.398 


10,847 
9,442 


4,471 


Randolph 


14,550 


Wake 


13,024 


6,313 


25,776 


22,164 






TotaL 


45,249 


32,593 


73,470 


68,387 







314 



Noktii Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 1962-1964— Continued 

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 



1,440 

14,945 

1,733 

1,016 

Rockingham 8,165 

4,460 



Caswell... 
Forsyth.. 
Granville. 
Person. 



1962 



30 
P2Q 



Stokes 

Surry 7 09? 

Wilkes 8 - 151 



Total 47,009 



<tz 



361 

9,519 

253 

184 

3,536 

3,324 

5,157 

10,093 



32,427 



1964 



o 

o 
CO. 



j= o 
30 



2,908 
26,043 
5,344 
4,976 
10,871 
4,962 
8,914 
8,266 






72,254 67,781 



985 
30,525 
1,138 
1,331 
8,744 
4,601 
8,592 
11,865 



SIXTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 



Alamance. 
Durham. . 
Guilford.. 
Orange... 



1962 



1964 



> 



z 



= 



9. SOI 

9,697 

19,835 

3,688 



Total ----- 43,021 



a 
o 

D 
E 

IS 
3 
- 

ft-'a 

— rt 

^3 

is- 



o 

M 

S5-S 

2 a 

O 0J 

KG 



5,470 

3,341 

17,932 

2,084 



28,827 



16,643 

20,927 

37,292 

9,289 



84,151 



si 

11 



12,436 
9,605 

26,415 
4,508 



52,964 



Election Returns 



315 



VOTE FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 1962-1964— Continued 

SEVENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





1962 


1964 


Counties 


a 
o 
a 

B-w 
oj eg 

a ° 
<Q 


James E. Walsh, Jr. 
Republican 


Alton Lennon 
Democrat 




2,238 


317 
2,319 
1,186 
2,170 

106 
3,328 

313 

156 


4,812 
4,440 
9 895 


Brunswick 


3,699 
5,953 
6,055 


Columbus 


Cumberland 


16,247 

2,523 

14 217 


Hoke 


1,156 
9,008 
3,844 


New Hanover 




15 010 


Scotland 


1,220 


4,213 




Total 


33,173 


9,895 


71,357 





EIGHTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





1962 


1964 


Counties 


a 
13 

o 

* 2 


a 
o 

1-5 

ai 3 

/. — 

~£ a 

« o. 
-a a> 




Charles R. Jonas 
Republican 


Anson 


3,812 
2,594 
5,949 
19,040 
3,527 
4,481 
5,806 
5,717 


1,434 
1,599 
7.307 
40,874 
3,186 
4,403 
2,672 
3,228 


3.740 
2,955 
6,190 
36.029 
3,621 
5,523 
7,467 
6,744 


1 850 


Lee 


2 758 




6 956 


Mecklenburg 


57 062 


Montgomery 


3,557 
5 636 


Moore 


Richmond 


3,702 
4,348 


Union 




Total 


50,926 


64,703 


72,269 


85,869 





316 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 1962-1964— Continued 



NINTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 




Alexander. 
Alleghany. 

Ashe 

Cabarrus. . 
Caldwell. . 

Davie 

Iredell..... 

Rowan 

Stanly 

Watauga.. 
Yadkin 



3.583 

2,329 

4,842 

10,359 

8,854 

Wi 

11,227 
7,831 
3,465 
3,262 



Total ! 66,332 



3,914 


3,496 


1,714 


2,277 


4,357 


4,610 


9,339 


10,590 


8,338 


9,188 


3.944 


2,817 


7,640 


KT.664 


10,144 


13,769 


9,115 


7,116 


4,082 


3,674 


5,021 


3,428 



4,045 

1,672 

4,637 

14,000 

10,441 

JU464 

13,135 

15,793 

9,524 

4,308 

5,976 



67,608 71.629 I 88,195 



TENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





19 


62 


1964 






ger 


U 








d> 


Counties 


a 
a 

■•a 


hi 
hi 

a 

° s 


hiten 
oung 






S.S 


*"S ^3 




*i § 


-3 


►J § "33 




1J 


£ = 


ii : w a 




Off! 


£a *& 


Avery 


1,440 
9,487 

10,497 
6.557 

15,497 
1,524 
7,639 


2.993 
8,796 
12,713 
2,573 
8,845 
2,607 
4,381 


1.367 
12,278 
16,575 
12.897 
23,264 

1,664 
10,639 


2,726 


Burke 


10,050 


Catawba 


15,431 


Cleveland 


5,152 


Gaston .. ._ 


13,188 


Mitchell... 


3,119 


Rutherford ... 


5,817 






Total 


52,641 


42,908 


78,684 ; 55,483 



Election Returns 



317 



VOTE FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 1962-1964— Continued 

ELEVENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 



Buncombe 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

Macon 

Madison 

McDowell 

Polk 

Swain 

Transylvania... 
Yancey 

TotaL 



1962 



1964 



>>a 

O oj 



20.592 
3,732 
1,546 
1,721 
7,945 
5,762 
4,384 
3,580 
4,981 
4,499 
2,711 
2,074 
3,571 
3,693 



70,791 



PQ a 



etfoi 



(2- 

>>a 

o a> 



.3 

O 
 CS 

e-9 



OBS 



16,639 


28,134 


3,870 


3,908 


1,403 


1,456 


1,439 


1,780 


4,949 


10,729 


6,520 


7,067 


3,396 


5,126 


2,843 


4,084 


3,180 


3,325 


3,331 


6,324 


2,456 


3,045 


1,505 


2,369 


3,105 


4,894 


2,786 


3,639 


57,422 


85,880 



16,443 
3,065 
1,281 
1,387 
4,743 
7,085 
2,896 
2,536 
3,775 
3,782 
2,401 
1,400 
3,190 
2,012 



55,996 



:; 1 s 



Nokth Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN GENERAL ELECTION, 
NOVEMBER 8, 1966, BY DISTRICTS 



l'IRST CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 




Couutj 


Walter B. 
Jones (D) 


John P. 
East (R) 




4,547 
2.473 

697 
1.339 
4,331 

933 
1,345 

820 
2,299 

896 

894 
3,207 
2,764 
1,186 
2,552 
1,812 
8,976 

685 
1,783 

43.539 


3,564 


Bertie 


1,650 




403 




601 




4,203 




445 




565 


Crates - - - - .- - ______ 


438 




966 


Byde 


565 


Jones _ _ - .- __-_ 


806 




1,585 


Northampton .. 


1,199 




845 




1,900 


Perquimans . . _ _ - - 

Pitt 


1,456 
4,527 


Tyrrell ... 


301 


Washington . 


1,415 


Total 


27.434 



SECOND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Couutj 


L. H. 
Fountain (D) 


Reece B. 

Gardner ( R i 


Edgecombe _ _ __ 


6,616 
2,693 
2,032 
1,404 
5,243 
5,020 
4,087 
2,694 
2,030 
5,030 


1 828 


Franklin 


820 


Granville _ _ _ 


750 


Greene _______ __ _ 


769 


Halifax . ___ __ _ _ _ _ __ 


1,600 


Johnston - - 


5 , 439 


Lenoir. _ _ __ 


3,621 


Vance . _ 


1,488 


Warren __ _ _ _ 


655 


Wilson 


2,918 






Total 


36,849 


19,888 



THIRD CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Couuty 



• 'arteret 

Duplin 
Harnett 

Lee 

< Inslow 
Pender 
Sampson 
Wayne 

Total 



David N. 
Henderson ( D 



5,117 
3,780 
4,538 
2,254 
5,366 
1,784 
6,260 
4.710 

33.809 



Election Returns 



319 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN GENERAL ELECTION, 
NOVEMBER 8, 1966, BY DISTRICTS— Continued 



FOURTH CON< '.REGIONAL DISTRICT 



County 

Chatham 

Montgomery 
Moore. - 

Nash 

Orange 
Randolph - . 
Wake 

Total 



Harold D. 
Cooley (D) 



3,334 
3,185 
3,514 
6,860 
4,817 
6,509 
18,454 

46,673 



James C. 

Gardner (R) 



3,981 
3,471 
5,247 
5,425 
5,664 
12,623 
24,275 

60,686 





FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL 


DISTRICT 




County 






Nick 
Galifianakis(D) 


G. Fred 
Steele, Jr. (R) 




1,145 

15,058 

16,385 

1,978 

6,855 

4,614 


743 




9,233 




19,830 




1,841 


Rockingham - 






4,565 






4,517 




- 






Total . 


46,035 


40,729 



SIXTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 


Horace R. 

Kornegay (D) 


Richard B. 
Barnwell (R) 




8,205 
11,720 
22,752 


8,368 




12,991 




18,641 






Total - 


42,677 


40,01111 







SEVENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 



Bladen 
Brunswick 
Columbus 
Cumberland 
Hoke . 
New Hanover 

Robeson 

Scotland 



Total 



Alton 
Lennon (D) 



3,622 
3,903 
4,672 

10,054 
1,281 

11,518 
3, 133 
2,1)29 

10.512 



320 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN GENERAL* ELECTION. 
NOVKMBER 8. 1966, BY DISTRICTS Continued 



EIGHTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 


John G. 
PIumides(D) 

1,330 
4,981 
11.972 
1,687 
2,495 

22,465 


Charles Raper 
Jonas i'R) 


Anson. . 

Lincoln 


1.634 
7 033 


Mecklenburg 


40 781 


Richmond 

Union 

Total . 


3,290 
3,644 

56,382 



NINTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 



Alleghany. 

Ashe 

Cabarrus.. 
Caldwell.. 

Davie 

Rowan 

Stanly 

Surry 

Watauga.. 
Wilkes.— 
Yadkin 



Total 



Robert 


James T. 


Bingham (D) 


Broyhill IR) 


1,543 


1,580 


3,581 


4,447 


6,850 


12,251 


5,834 


8,418 


1,886 


4,164 


5,600 


15,345 


5,345 


8,417 


5,505 


7,397 


3,162 


4,028 


5,624 


10,163 


1,952 


4,779 


46,882 


80,989 



TKNTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 

Alexander 

Avery 

Burke.. 

Catawba 

Clevelan ' 
Gaston . 
Iredell 

Total 



Basil L. 


W. Hall 


Whitener (D) 


Young (R) 


3,792 


3.577 


996 


2,094 


10,034 


8,528 


11.565 


10,731 


6,089 


2,296 


13,023 


7,697 


6.618 


5,818 


52,117 


40.741 



Election Returns 



321 



VOTE FOR'CONGRESSMEN IN GENERAL ELECTION. 
NOVEMBER 8, 1966, BY DISTRICTS— Continued 



ELEVENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



County 

Buncombe 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania . 
Yancey 

Total 





Roy A. 
Taylor (D) 


W. Scott 
Harvey (R) 




20,099 
3,463 
1,333 
1,680 
6,805 
5,727 
3,972 
5,303 
3,209 
3,287 
1,257 
2,482 
5,290 
2,012 
3,943 
2,993 


24,066 




3,033 




1,452 




1,465 




2,989 




5,931 




2,706 




3,597 




2,094 




2,942 




2.678 




1.986 




3,370 




1.156 




3,176 




2,546 




1 



72,855 



65,187 



322 Noktii Carolina Manual 

VOTE FOR UNITED STATES SENATORS IN PRIMARIES 

1950-1962 

1950 

First Primary 

Frank P. Graham 303,605 

Willis Smith 250,222 

Robert R. Reynolds 58,752 

Olla Ray Boyd ._. 5,900 

Second Primary 

Willis Smith 281,114 

Frank P. Graham __. 261,789 

1954 

Short Term 

W. Kerr Scott 274,674 

Alton Lennon ___ 264.265 

Alvin Wingfield "l.'.Y. 12,372 

Henry L. Sprinkle 5] 013 

Regular Term 

W. Kerr Scott 312,053 

Alton Lennon ..286,730 

Alvin Wingfield 7,999 

Henry L. Sprinkle _ ~ 2,548 

A. E. Turner 2,361 

Olla Ray Boyd _. 1,674 

W. M. Bostick ~"~" l|293 

1956 

Sam J. Ervin, Ir _ 360,967 

Marshall C. Kurfees 65,512 

1960 

B. Everett Jordan 324, 188 

Addison Hewlett _ .217!899 

Robert W, ( iregory 31,463 

Robert M. Mcintosh 23,988 

1962 

Claude L. Greene, Jr. (Rj 31,756 

Charles H. Babcock (R) !_"."_ J. ~~~~~~ " 20/246 



Election Returns 



323 



VOTE FOR UNITED STATES SENATORS IN 
GENERAL ELECTIONS, 1950-1962 



Democrats 




1950 
Regular Term 


Republicans 


Clyde R. Hoey 
376,472 




Unexpired Term 


Halsey B. Leavitt 
171,804 


Willis Smith 
364,912 






E. L. Gavin 
177,753 


Frank P. Graham 

2,259 (write-in votes) 










1954 








Short Term 





W. Kerr Scott 
402,268 



W Kerr Scott 
408,312 



Regular Term 



Paul C. West 
211,322 



Sam J. Ervin, Jr. 
410,574 



Unexpired Term 



Sam J. Ervin, Jr. 
731,353 



1956 



Joel A. Johnson 
367,475 



B. Everett Jordan 
431,492 



1958 



Richard C. Clarke, Jr. 
184,977 



B. Everett Jordan 
793,521 



I960 



Kvle Hayes 
497,964 



Sam J. Ervin, Jr. 
491,520 



1962 



Claude L. Greene, Jr. 
321,635 



324 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR 
DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY, MAY 28, 1966 



< 'ounty 



Alamance 

Alexander 
Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe .. 

Avery .. 

Beaufort.. . . 
Bertie 

Bladen ... 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden. 

Carteret _ _ 
Caswell 
Catawba 
Chatham . . 

Cherokee 

Chowan . 

Clay 

Cleveland. . 
Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland. 
Currituck .. 

Dare 

Davidson, . 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham .. 
Edgecombe - 
Forsyth 
Franklin. 
Gaston ___ _ 

Gates . 

Graham . 

Granville 
Greene.. . . 
Guilford.. 

Halifax 

Harnett ... 

Haywood- . 

Henderson 

Hertford 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 



B. Everett 
Jordan 

9,042 
191 
1,440 
3,182 
2,258 
349 
3,934 
4,410 
5,061 
3, 0U 

13,586 
6,032 
5,328 
3,616 
1,144 
4,182 
2,514 
5,944 
1,540 
1,389 
777 
588 
8,348 
7,931 
6,(161 

10,857 
1,236 
1,432 
6,452 
980 
3,532 

14,567 
4,500 

10,520 
4,533 

10,275 

1,588 

735 

3,45(1 

2,486 

I 1,619 
5,889 
4,758 
6,780 
2,794 
2,615 
1,606 
1,200 
6,449 
3,280 
6,866 



Hubert E. 
Seymour, Jr. 



3,178 

1,878 

255 

807 

266 

4(1 

1 , 109 

912 

1,079 

949 

2,184 

1,572 

1 ,072 

SSI) 

456 

742 

782 

1,544 

485 

104 

II I 

92 

1,671 

1,637 

1,985 

2 sT'.i 

329 

273 

1,425 

283 

1,228 

2,550 

1,216 

2,976 

1,720 

3,019 

538 

233 

952 

611 

5,460 

1,830 

1,492 

1,227 

399 

:;:7 

757 

444 

1.60S 

431 

1.693 



County 



B. Everett 
Jordan 



Hubert E. 
Seymour, Jr 



Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg.. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery.. 

Moore 

Nash.. , 

New Hanover. 
Northampton- 
Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank. . 

Pender 

Perquimans. . . 

Person 

Pitt __ 

Polk. _. 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. . 

Rowan 

Rutherford. .. 

Sampson. 

Scotland. 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington. .. 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



Total. 



2,096 
3,597 
4,686 
1,169 
2,204 
2,530 
2,460 
3.7SS 
22,484 

535 
1,701 
3,409 
5,664 
10,005 
5,156 
6,348 
4,561 
1,530 
3,444 
2,276 
1,638 
3,573 
6,933 
1,480 
2,193 
4,939 
10,925 
4,452 
7,220 
6,975 
3,530 
2,655 
1,959 
2,958 
4,824 
1,678 
2,7ss 

742 
4,201 
3,891 
14,420 
2,848 
2,327 
1,853 
7,005 

816 
5,041 

989 
1,198 



445.454 



832 

929 

1,644 

888 

435 

105 

531 

588 

5,389 

73 

245 

894 

1,475 

2,141 

1,272 

1,621 

1,944 

496 

726 

613 

360 

1,658 

1,993 

337 

480 

1,293 

2,903 

1,771 

2,405 

1,338 

868 

588 

383 

464 

961 

216 

511 

321 

1,110 

1,291 

4,686 

911 

791 

292 

2,140 

105 

1,529 

160 

99 



116,548 



Election Returns 



325 



VOTE FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR 
NOVEMBER 8, 1966 



( 'ouiitit- 



Alamance - . 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick 
Buncombe- .. 

Burke 

Cabarrus _ 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

CaswelL. ... 
Catawba .... 
Chatham 
Cherokee . - 
Chowan - . . 

Clay 

Cleveland- 
Columbus. 

Craven 

Cumberland 
Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham- 
Edgecombe 
Forsyth 
Franklin- .. 

Gaston 

Gates . 

Graham 

Granville - 
Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett . - 
Haywood - - 
Henderson . . 
Hertford 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell.... 
Jackson - 
Johnston 



SO 

M 



8,599 
3,802 
1,650 
2,022 
3,868 
926 
4,571 
2,475 
3,191 
3,608 

19,301 
9,830 
8,917 
7,024 
697 
4,747 
1,177 

10,855 
3,844 
3,407 
1,332 
1,314 
5,792 
4,128 
4,895 
9,065 
949 
1,322 

11,725 
2,091 
3,253 

14,865 
6,141 

16,345 
2,529 

11,920 

855 

1,652 

2,007 

1,373 

21,756 
4,999 
4,236 
6,492 
5,415 
2,475 
1,215 
868 
6,577 
3,882 
4.588 



1-SGQ 



7,825 
3,649 
1,255 

743 
3,971 
1,947 
2,897 
1,005 

649 
2,773 
24,414 
8,580 
9,554 
6,738 

289 
3,532 

627 

11,156 

3,168 

3,064 

399 
1,456 
2,453 
1,439 
3,135 
3,443 

320 

411 
12,899 
3,632 
2,120 
6,505 
1,959 
17,476 

798 
8,415 

280 
1,472 

720 

721 
16,061 
1,533 
1,941 
2,903 
5,750 

527 

226 

431 
5,792 
2,717 
5,679 



- i 



Counties 



Jones.- 

Lee.. 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg.. 

Mitchell. 

Montgomery. . 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover. 
Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans ... 

Person 

Pitt. - 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham 

Rowan 

Rutherford. 
Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes.- 

Surry. 

Swain ... 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey . .. 



> a 



Total. 



899 
2,232 
3,467 
5,839 
3,100 
3,067 
3,312 
5,107 

24,093 
1,203 
3,407 
4,419 
7,614 
9,701 
2,963 
4,546 
6,088 
1,219 
2,681 
1,597 
988 
2,084 
8,887 
2,467 
7,645 
2,972 
3,252 
6,387 
8,840 
5,342 
5,943 
1,970 
6,148 
4,556 
6,318 
1,916 
3,784 
624 
3,697 
2,581 

21,315 
1,935 
1,742 
3,381 
3,732 
6,066 
4,622 
2,163 
2,962 



ok 
o-a 



501.440 



727 

848 
3,912 
5,465 
2,115 
2,942 

996 
3,632 
25,414 
2,692 
3,053 
4,076 
3,691 
4,949 

823 
1,823 
3,691 

669 
1,409 

757 

420 
1,319 
3,420 
1,954 
11,113 
1,374 

549 

4,600 

11,496 

3,316 

6,232 

331 
7,176 
4,307 
6,184 
1,173 
3,232 

217 

2,063 

1,494 

15,852 

519 
1,089 
3,616 
2,853 
9,461 
3,047 
4,423 
2,539 



•u a 
ex 



400,502 



1 
28 



36 



326 



Nokth Carolina Mam ai. 



VOTES (AST FOR AND AGAINST THE ISSUANCE OF THREE ]i 
HUNDRED MILLION DOLLARS STATE OF NORTH 
CAROLINA HIGHWAY BONDS, AT AN ELECTION 
HELD NOVEMBER 2, 1965 j 



County 



Uamance 
Alexander 
Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort. 
Bertie... 

Bladen 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee ... 

Chowan . 

Clay.. 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson.. . 

Davie .. 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe. 
Forsyth.. . 
Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene . 

Guilford . 
Halifax. . 

Harnett 

Haywood. . 
Henderson 
Hertford. . 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell... 

Jackson 

Johnston 



For 


Against 


1,584 


1,618 


998 


243 


864 


111 


1,385 


217 


2,308 


26(1 


1,677 


106 


2,119 


1,313 


1,129 


295 


1,125 


303 


1,445 


338 


17,503 


2.342 


2,733 


982 


3,012 


2,826 


2,052 


12(1 


360 


39 


1,901 


H71 


1 ,034 


176 


3,471 


1.169 


1,823 


655 


2,637 


84 


458 


87 


1,157 


33 


2,254 


628 


2,135 


370 


2.174 


1.106 


3.550 


1 .512 


342 


111 


510 


74 


2,948 


1.416 


915 


286 


2,101 


1,041 


5,990 


1,876 


2,425 


1,358 


6,477 


2,035 


894 


1,345 


4.194 


1,167 


362 


48 


969 


47 


1.527 


541 


665 


701 


12,504 


3,379 


1,881 


917 


1,382 


1.311 


(.317 


667 


3,536 


208 


1 .012 


185 


545 


178 


368 


199 


2,838 


544 


3,309 


157 


2,027 


1,940 



Countv 



Jones 
Lee 

Lenoir. 

Lincoln 
Macon. 
Madison 
Martin 

McDowell.. . 
Mecklenburg 
Mitchell .... 
Montgomery 

Moore- . 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton 

Onslow . 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt-. 

Polk 

Randolph 
Richmond 
Robeson 
Rockingham . 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson. . 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell. 

Union. ... 

Vance 

Wake.. 

Warren . 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wayne.. 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 
Yancey. 

Total 





For 


Against 




581 
1,310 
2,573 
1,569 
3,039 
1,994 
1.259 
1,867 
10.433 
962 
1,178 
2,545 


380 

502 




1 .007 

425 

91 

75 

419 

109 




1,953 

45 

517 

830 




1,731 1,236 
6,502 1,049 
1,517 1,130 
1,860 1,350 




3,354 732 




708 
1,921 
1.297 

487 
1,246 
2,623 
1.254 
4,417 

931 
1.972 
2,752 
3,631 
2,911 
1,856 

505 
2,906 
1,453 
3,363 
1 ,VII 
2,101 

341 

2,035 

1,608 

10.441 

1,117 

864 
2,312 
2,975 
4,256 
2,021 
1,376 
1,423 

245,194 


327 




729 




287 
172 




275 

1.647 

64 




3,259 

462 

458 

1 ,376 

2,717 


-- 


457 
1,089 

382 
1,060 




403 




398 
31 


- 


211 
85 




223 




712 




5,102 




541 
522 




162 
1,156 




270 




989 




213 




53 

77.517 







Election Returns 327 



VOTE ON CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT BY COUNTIES 



Proposed amendment to the Constitution of North' Carolina 

submitted to a vote of the people at a^GeneralEIection, 

November 2, 1965 



CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ADOPTED 

Chapter 877, Session Laws of 1965. 

Amending Article IV of the Constitution of North Carolina to authorize 
within the Appellate Division of the General Court of Justice an inter- 
mediate Court of Appeals. 



:;l'n 



North Carolina Manual 



VOli: ON CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AUTHORIZING THE 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY TO CREATE WITHIN THE APPELLATE 

DIVISION OF THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE AN 

IMMEDIATE COURT OF APPEALS. NOVEMBER 2, 196 r > 



County 


Foi 

i, lie 


Alexander 


871 




643 




1,250 


\slie 


1,812 




1 . 25 1 


Beaufort 

Bertie 


2,303 
980 


Bladen 
Brunswick 
Buncombe 
Burke 


975 

1,150 

15,712 

2,513 


< labarrus 
Caldwell 


3,216 

l ,s|ii 
325 




1 ,961 




867 




3,383 


' 'hatham 


1,558 


' Iherokee 


2,324 
106 


Clay 

( "leveland 


'.1ST 
2,063 
1 ,797 


('raven 

( )umberland 

Currituck 

Dare 


2,161 
3,781 

2S5 

472 

2,631 


Davie 

Duplin 


729 
1,821 




5,926 


1 Idgecomb 
Forsvth 
Franklin 
i iaston 


2,548 
6,713 
1 ,046 
1,246 




319 


' Irahani 


808 


i Iranville 


1 ,394 


i ireene 
(luilford 


65(1 
12,119 


Halifax 


1 . 956 


Harnett 


1 ,294 


Hayw i 


3 , 858 


Henderson 
Hertford 


3,055 
967 


Hoke 


515 


Hyde 


32 1 


Iredell 


2,582 




2,5117 


Johnston 


1,978 



Against 



1,903 

310 

249 

306 

143 

346 

1 .117:; 

340 

136 

550 

2,738 

1,088 

2.575 

597 

72 

7D(| 

311 

1,181 

769 

250 

104 

Hid 

7(15 

606 

1.225 

1,169 

153 



,561 

357 
,143 

. 52 ( 
,132 

.xss 

.1 III 

.065 

67 

149 

577 

669 

.M^ 
829 

,289 
978 
552 
205 
1(17 
206 
752 
551 

.71;:; 



County 



Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell. 

Mecklenburg 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 

Northampton. 

( Inslow 

( (range 

Pamlico. . 

Pasquotanl- 

Pender . 

Perquimai • 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 
Rockingham. . 
Rowan . 
Rutherford 
Sampson 
Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrreil . 

Union 

Vance 

Wake- 
Warren. . 
\\ ashington 
Watauga 
Wayne 

Wilkes 
Wilson 
Yadkin 
Yaneev 



Total 



For 


Against 


52(i 


388 


1,283 


ISO 


2,117 


1.387 


1,392 


52(1 


2,447 


1111 


1,533 


305 


1,149 


421 


1,613 


261 


10,626 


1.59S 


S17 


132 


1,059 


597 


2,415 


898 


1,926 


97' 


5.94s 


1,393 


1,445 


1,116 


1,935 


1,193 


3,318 


665 


644 


33s 


1,713 


795 


1,064 


Ills 


455 


174 


1,103 


320 


2,782 


1,385 


1,162 


122 


3.591 


3,625 


Old 


441 


1.954 


441 


2,572 


1, 115 


3,544 


2,752 


2,574 


730 


1,697 


1,146 


625 


246 


2,388 


1,403 


1 .2211 


52li 


2,880 


604 


1,133 


552 


1,723 


507 


3()s 


(is 


1,875 


319 


1,552 


732 


11,243 


3,626 


1,079 


561 


920 


474 


1,837 


30 


2,970 


1,020 


3,376 


1 i r 


2,177 


782 


1,072 


37s 


1,141 


.58 



227,917 



si. 7in 



Election Returns 



329 



VOTE ON PROHIBITION 1881 AND 1908 



August, 1881 



May, 1908 



For 
Prohibition 

48,370 



Against 

Prohibition 

166,325 



For 

Prohibition 

113,612 



Against 

Prohibition 

69,416 



Vote on calling convention to consider proposed amend- 
ment to the Constitution of the United States repealing 
the 18th amendment and Election of Delegates. 



November, 1933 



For 
Convention 

120,190 



No 

Convention 

293,484 



Delegates 

For Repeal 

of 

18th 

Amendment 

115,482 



Delegates 

Against 

Repeal of 

18th 

Amendment 

300,054 



PART V 

GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, 
BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 



GOVERNMENTAL BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 



ADVISORY BUDGET COMMISSION 

1925, c. 89; 1929, c. 100; 1931, c. 295; 1951. c. 768; 

G. S. 143-4 

Composition : Six members. Chairman of Appropriations and 
Finance Committees of the House and Senate, and two members 
appointed by the Governor. 

Appointed by the Governor : 

J. C. Eagles, Jr Wilson 

Edward M. O'Herron, Jr. Charlotte 

Appointed by the Legislature: 

Thomas J. White Kinston 

Ralph H. Scott Haw River 

Joe E. Eagles Macclesfield 

Gordon H. Greenwood Black Mountains 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL HALL OF FAME 

1953, c. 1129; G. S. 106-568.14 

Composition : Eight members. Five ex-officio, three appointed by 
the Governor. 

James A. Graham, Commissioner of Agriculture, 

Chairman, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. George Hyatt, Jr., Director North Carolina Agricultural 

Extension Service, ex-officio Raleigh 

V. B. Hairr, State Supervisor of Vocational 

Agriculture, ex-officio Raleigh 

Mrs. Harry B. Caldwell, Master of State Grange, 

ex-officio Greensboro 

B. C. Mangum, President North Carolina Farm 

Bureau Federation, ex-officio Rougemont 

L. R. Harrill Raleigh 

A. C. Edwards Hookerton 

Mrs. Charles Graham Linwood 

333 



334 North Carolina Manual 

STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Rev. s. 3931; Code s. 2184; 1901, c. 479, ss. 2, 4; 1907, c. 497, 
s. 1; 1931, c. 360. s. 1: 1937, c.174; C. S. 4667; G. S. 106-2 

Composition: Eleven members. Ten appointed by the Governor. 

James A. Graham, Commissioner of Agriculture, 

Chairman, ex-officio Raleigh 

J. Atwell Alexander Stony Point 

Richard N. Barber, Jr. Waynesville 

Thomas Gilmore Julian 

Claude T. Hall Roxboro 

Thomas G. Joyner Garysburg 

George P. Kittrell Corapeake 

Charles F. Phillips Thomasville 

J. H. Poole West End 

Henry Gray Shelton Speed 

David Townsend, Jr. Rowland 

STATE BOARD OF ALCOHOLIC CONTROL 

1937, c. 49, ss. 2, 3; c. 411; 1939, c. 185, s. 5; 1941, c. 107, s. 5; 
1961, c. 916; 1965, c. 1102 G. S. 18-37; G. S. 18-38 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Clawson L. Williams, Jr., Chairman Sanford 

W. Fleming Talman, Sr Asheville 

Lawrence C. Rose Wrightsville Beach 

George W. Birmingham, Jr. Durham 

Robert I. Cromley, Sr Raleigh 

Ray B. Brady. Director Raleigh 

EXECUTIVE BOARD STATE DEPARTMENT OF 
ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 

Rev. s. 4539; 1903, c. 767, s. 2; 1907, c. 714, s. 1; 1941, c. 306; 
1943. c. 237; 1945, c. 55; 1955, c. 543; C. S. 6141; G. S. 121-3 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Josh L. Home, Chairman Rocky Mount 

Dr. Gertrude S. Carraway New Bern 

Harry Gatton Raleigh 

Dr. Fletcher M. Green Chapel Hill 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 335 

Ralph P. Hanes Winston-Salem 

Dr. Hugh T. Lefler Chapel Hill 

Dr. Edward W. Phifer, Jr. Morganton 

Dr. C C. Crittenden, Director Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART 

1961, c. 731; G. S. 140-2 

Composition: Fourteen members. Two ex-officio, eight appointed 
by the Governor and four elected by the North Carolina State Art 
Society. 

Ex-officio : 

Dan K. Moore, Governor Raleigh 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent of 

Public Instruction Raleigh 

Appointed: 

Mrs. Charles B. Aycock Kinston 

Egbert L. Davis, Jr Winston-Salem 

Edwin Gill Raleigh 

Robert Lee Humber Greenville 

Mrs. Larry Cohen Greensboro 

Mrs. Charles Kistler Fayetteville 

Smith W. Bagley Winston-Salem 

Mrs. James Semans Durham 

Elected : 

Mrs. Arthur W. Levy, Jr. Raleigh 

Mrs. George W. Paschal, Jr. Raleigh 

Dr. Joseph C. Sloane Chapel Hill 

Joseph Cox Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE ART SOCIETY, INCORPORATED 

1929. c. 314; 1943, c. 752; 1961, c. 547; 1961, c. 1152; 

G. S. 140-11 

Composition: Sixteen members. Four members ex-officio; four- 
members appointed by the Governor; eight members elected by the 
Art Society. 



336 North Carolina Manual 

Ex-officio: 

Dan K. Moore, Governor Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent of Public Instruction Raleigh 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer Raleigh 

Mrs. Julian Porter, Representative of N. C. 

Federation of Women's Clubs Severn 

Appointed : 

Dr. Robert Lee Humber Greenville 

Mrs. George W. Paschal, Jr. Raleigh 

Harry Dalton Charlotte 

Mrs. W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro 

Fleeted : 

Mrs. Claude Strickland Winston-Salem 

Dr. Perry Kelly Raleigh 

Mrs. Cyrus D. Hogue, Jr. Wilmington 

Mrs. Ralph Reeves, Jr. Raleigh 

Mrs. Gordon Hanes Pfaffton 

Mrs. Doak Finch Thomasville 

Alexander B. Andrews Raleigh 

Ernest A. Hamill Asheville 

STATE BOARD OF ASSESSMENT 

1939, c. 310, s, 200; 1941, c. 327, s. 6; 1947, c. 184; 19U1. c. 547; 

G. S. 105-273 

Composition: Four members, all ex-officio under the Act. 

Ivie L. Clayton, Commissioner of Revenue, 

Chairman Raleigh 

Harry Wescott, Chairman Public Utilities Commission Raleigh 

Edwin Gill, Director of Local Government Raleigh 

H. C. Stansbury, Director Department of Tax Research Raleigh 

ATLANTIC STATES MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION 
1919, c. lOSfi; G. S. 113-377.3 

Composition: Three members, two ex-officio, one appointed by 
the Governor. 
Dr. David A. Adams, ex-officio Raleigh 



GOVEBNMENTAL BOAHDS AND COMMISSIONS 337 

Thorne Gregory, ex-officio Scotland Neck 

Walton S. Grigg Point Harbor 

ATOMIC ENERGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

1959, c. 481; G. S. 104C-3 

Composition: Thirty-five members. Three ex-officio and thirty- 
two appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. A. C. Menius, Jr., Chairman Raleigh 

James A. Graham, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Jacob Koomen, ex-officio Raleigh 

Atwell Alexander Stony Point 

Killian Barwick Elizabeth City 

Dr. C. E. Boulware . . Durham 

Dr. C. C. Carpenter Winston-Salem 

Emil T. Chanlett Chapel Hill 

Dr. Clifton E. Crandell Chapel Hill 

Frank Crane Raleigh 

Dr. Gerald Edwards Greensboro 

E. C. Fiss Charlotte 

Dr. Paul Gross Durham 

William F. Henderson Raleigh 

Dr. John I. Hopkins Davidson 

George R. Herbert Durham 

John V. Hunter, III Raleigh 

Dean H. Brooks James Raleigh 

A. L. Jameson Williamston 

Dr. Leo W. Jenkins Greenville 

T. H. LeCroy Rocky Mount 

Edwin L. Jones Charlotte 

Charles J. Nooe Leaksville 

Dr. Robert J. Reeves Durham 

H. B. Robinson Raleigh 

William P. Saunders Southern Pines 

Forest H. Shuford, II Raleigh 

Brig. General M. I. Shuford Jacksonville 

Mrs. Graham Walton Whiteville 



338 North Carolina Manual 

( 'hailes 11. Wheatley Charlotte 

Dr. William L. Wilson, Secretary Raleigh 

Dr. Barnes Woodhall Durham 

Charles D. Barbour Durham 

Vacancy 

STATE BANKING COMMISSION 

1931, c. 243; 1935, c. 266; 1939, c. 91; 1949, c. 372; 
1953, c. 1209; 1961, c. 547; G. S. 53-92 

Composition : Eleven members. One ex-offieio, ten appointed by 
the Governor. 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer, Chairman, ex-officio Raleigh 

William T. Cheatham, Jr. Statesville 

Edwin Duncan, Jr. North Wilkesboro 

E. D. Gaskins Monroe 

Lewis R. Holding Charlotte 

Edward T. Shipley Winston-Salem 

Allen H. Sims Gastonia 

Mrs. Melba G. Smith Bellhaven 

Armand T. Swisher Charlotte 

Paul H. Thompson Fayetteville 

Paul Wright, Jr. Durham 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE BAR COUNCIL 

1933. c. 210; 1937, c. 51; 1955, c. 651; 1961, c. 41; G. S. 84-17 

Composition : Thirty-four members. Four ex-officio as officers of 
the North Carolina State Bar, and one each from the thirty judicial 
districts of the State. 

Officers : 

W. M. Allen, President Elkin 

Charles H. Young, First Vice-President Raleigh 

Claude V. Jones, Second Vice-President Durham 

Edward L. Cannon, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

Councilors: 

E. L. Loftin Asheville 

J. Kenyon Wilson, Jr. Elizabeth City 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 339 

Bonner D. Sawyer Hillsborough 

Martin Kellogg, Jr., First District Manteo 

John C. Rodman, Second District Washington 

Albion Dunn, Third District Greenville 

R. D. Johnson, Jr., Fourth District Warsaw 

Leon H. Corbett, Fifth District Burgaw 

M. Scott Benton, Sixth District Roanoke Rapids 

Henry C. Bourne, Seventh District Tarboro 

Hugh Dortch, Eighth District Goldsboro 

W. L. Lumpkin, Ninth District Louisburg 

Willis Smith, Jr. Tenth District Raleigh 

Kenneth R. Hoyle, Eleventh District Sanford 

George S. Quillen. Twelfth District Fayetteville 

Davis C. Herring, Thirteenth District Southport 

C. V. Jones, Fourteenth District Durham 

John T. Manning, Fifteenth District Chapel Hill 

W. E. Timberlake, Sixteenth District Lumberton 

William M. Allen, Seventeenth District Elkin 

Louis J. Fisher, Sr., Eighteenth District High Point 

Max Busby, Nineteenth District Salisbury 

W. D. Sabiston, Twentieth District Carthage 

H. Gardner Hudson, Twenty-first District Winston-Salem 

W. R. Battley, Twenty-second District Statesville 

Larry S. Moore, Twenty-third District NorthWilkesboro 

Frank H. Watson, Twenty-fourth District Spruce Pine 

Bailey Patrick, Twenty-fifth District Hickory 

Robert G. Sanders, Twenty-sixth District Charlotte 

M. T. Leatherman, Twenty-seventh District. Lincolnton 

H. Kenneth Lee, Twenty-eighth District Asheville 

Ralph H. Ramsey, Jr., Twenty-ninth District Brevard 

Sidney L. Truesdale, Thirtieth District Canton 

STATE COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND 

1935, c. 53, s. 1; 1937, c. 285; G. S. 111-1; 111-3 

Composition : Eleven members. Five ex-officio, six appointed by 
the Governor. 

Judge Sam M. Cathey, Chairman Asheville 

Sam Alford Henderson 



;l " North Carolina Manual 

H. C. Bradshaw Durham 

D. K. Mauney, Jr. Cherryville 

Paul Alford Durham 

Alston B. Broom Fayetteville 

Dr. Howard E. Jensen (Emeritus for Life) Columbia, Missouri 

Ex-officio members: 

Dr. Jacob Koomen, Jr. Raleigh 

Alden P. Honeycutt . . . Raleigh 

Robert A. Lassiter Raleigh 

E. N. Peeler Raleigh 

Clifton M. Craig Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF BOILER RULES 
1935. c. 326; 1953, c. 569; G. S. 95-54 

Composition: Six members. One ex-officio, five appointed by the 
Governor. 

Frank Crane, Commissioner of Labor, Chairman, ex-officio Raleigh 

W. E. Shuping, Jr. Charlotte 

William C. Wallin Winston-Salem 

Wilkes C. Price Asheville 

H. J. Lane, Sr. Henderson 

G. L. Dillon. Jr. Raleigh 

BUILDING CODE COUNCIL 

1933. c. 392, s. 4; 1941, c. 280, s. 2; 1957, c. 1138; 
G. S. 143-136 

Composition : Nine members appointed by the Governor. 

A. W. Roth, Chairman Charlotte 

Jack Council, Vice Chairman Wananish 

Jack Baber Asheville 

J. J. Barnes Fayetteville 

John V. Fox, Jr. . . Greensboro 

Clinton B. Galphin Raleigh 

W. H. Gardner, Jr. Durham 

J. Sidney Kirk . . . Raleigh 

Harold S. Shirley Monroe 



Governmental Boards and Com missions 341 

NORTH CAROLINA CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION 

1965, c. 1002; G. S. 129-131 

Composition : Twelve members. Members of the Council of State 
and the Attorney General, a member of the House of Representa- 
tives appointed by the Speaker of the House, a member of the 
Senate appointed by the Lieutenant Governor, a representative of 
the city of Raleigh designated by the Raleigh City Council and the 
Governor who is to serve as Chairman. 

Governor Dan K. Moore, Chairman Raleigh 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State Raleigh 

Henry L. Bridges, Auditor Raleigh 

Edwin Gill, Treasurer Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent of Public Instruction Raleigh 

James A. Graham, Commissioner of Agriculture Raleigh 

Frank Crane, Commissioner of Labor Raleigh 

Edwin S. Lanier, Commissioner of Insurance Raleigh 

Wade Bruton, Attorney General Raleigh 

Jyles J. Coggins Raleigh 

George M. Wood Camden 

Travis H. Tomlinson, Mayor of Raleigh Raleigh 

E. L. Rankin, Jr., Director, Dept. of Administration, 

Secretary Raleigh 



GOVERNOR RICHARD CASWELL MEMORIAL COMMISSION 

1955, c. 977; G. S. 143-204.1 

Composition : Twenty members. Four ex-officio, sixteen appointed 
by the Governor. 

Ex-officio: 

Dr. C. C. Crittenden, Director Dept. Archives 

and History Raleigh 

Dr. Chas. F. Carroll, Supt. of Public Instruction Raleigh 

Simon C. Sitterson, Mayor of Kinston Kinston 

Richard S. Whaley, Chmn. Board of Commissioners of 

Lenoir County Kinston 

Marion A. Parrott, Chairman Kinston 



342 North Carolina Manual 

( "harles R. Ilolloman Raleigh 

Mrs. George W. Knott Kinston 

Thomas J. White Kinston 

Mrs. W. M. Bellamy Wilmington 

Edmund H. Harding Washington 

R. Hunt Parker Raleigh 

J. Lawrence Sprunt Wilmington 

Mrs. W. H. Belk Charlotte 

Mrs. J. Roger Brooks Kinston 

Colonel Paul A. Rockwell Asheville 

Dr. J. Carlyle Sitterson Chapel Hill 

Mrs. R. O. Everett Durham 

W. Lamont Brown Southern Pines 

Mrs. G. A. Kernodle Burlington 

Mrs. Raymond E. King, Jr. Charlotte 



STATE CIVIL AIR PATROL 

1953, c. 1231; G. S. 167-1 

Composition: Nine members. Six ex-officio and three appointed 
by the Governor. 

Ex-officio: 

Major General Claude T. Bowers, Adjutant General Raleigh 

Col. Donald H. Denton, Wing Commander, Chairman Charlotte 

Lt. Col. Ralph C. Cockrane, Wing Executive Officer Charlotte 

Lt. Lou McAllister, Adjutant Charlotte 

Lt. Col. Robert D. McCallum, Wing Director 

of Communications Charlotte 

Lt. Col. Charles J. Weisner, Coordinator of 

Civil Defense Durham 

Appointed: 

Henry Smith Seven Springs 

Stanhope Lineberry Charlotte 

Sam C. Hair Charlotte 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 343 

CIVIL DEFENSE ADVISORY COUNCIL 

1959, c. 337; G. S. 166-4 

Composition: Members to consist of those designated as Chiefs 
of Service in the Basic Plan and Amendments to the Operational 
Survival Plan of the North Carolina Civil Defense Agency. 

A. Pilston Godwin, Commissioner of Motor Vehicles Raleigh 

W. F. Babcock, Director of Highways Raleigh 

Dan E. Stewart, Director of Conservation 

and Development Raleigh 

Henry F. Kendall, Director, Employment Security 

Commission Raleigh 

Edwin S. Lanier, Commissioner of Insurance ... Raleigh 

Dr. Jacob Koomen, Jr., State Health Director. Raleigh 
Dr. Frank W. Jones, President, Medical Society of 

North Carolina Newton 

Clifton M. Craig, Commissioner of Public Welfare Raleigh 
Rev. M. George Henry, President, N. C. 

Council of Churches Asheville 

Harry T. Wescott, Chairman, Utilities Commission Raleigh 

James A. Graham, Commissioner of Agriculture Raleigh 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, Supt. of Public Instruction Raleigh 

Dr. William L. Wilson, State Board of Health ... Raleigh 

Frank Crane, Commissioner of Labor Raleigh 

Collin McKinne, Director, Veterans Commission Raleigh 

E. L. Rankin, Jr., Director, Department of Administration Raleigh 

D. K. Muse, Commissioner, Burial Association Raleigh 

Claude E. Caldwell, Director, Personnel Dept Raleigh 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State Raleigh 

Wade Bruton, Attorney General Raleigh 

Myron H. McBryde, Director, State Bureau 

of Investigation Raleigh 

Major General Claude T. Bowers, Adjutant General Raleigh 

V. L. Bounds, Director of Prisons Raleigh 

Colonel C. A. Speed, Commanding Officer, 

State Highway Patrol Raleigh 

Clyde P. Patton, Executive Director, Wildlife 

Resources Commission Raleigh 

Jerry Elliott, News Secretary to the Governor Raleigh 

L. H. Gunter, State Highway Commissioner Raleigh 



344 North Carolina Manual 

COMMERCIAL AND SPORTS FISHERIES 
ADVISORY BOARD 

1955, c. 1031; 1965, c. 957; G. S. 113-241, 242. 

( (imposition : Eleven members appointed by the Governor. 

Hugh A. Ragsdale, Chairman Richlands 

Leland V. Brinson Arapahoe 

Lewis J. Hardee . Southport 

Adrian D. Hurst Wilmington 

William A. Shires Raleigh 

Jack C. White Fayetteville 

Dr. Al F. Chestnut Morehead City 

Dr. William W. Hassler Raleigh 

W. J. Lupton Swan Quarter 

Rondal K. Tillett Wanchese 

Edward D. Willis Williston 



BOARD OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPEMENT 

1925. c. 122, s. 6; 1927, c. 57; 1941, c. 45; 1945, c. 638; 1953, c. 81; 
1957, c. 248; 1961, c. 197; 1965, c. 826; G. S. 113-4, 5. 

Composition: Twenty-four members appointed by the Governor. 

J. W. York, Chairman Raleigh 

John M. Akers Gastonia 

John K. Barrow, Jr. Ahoskie 

J. O. Bishop Rocky Mount 

C. David Blanton Marion 

Harry D. Blomberg . . . . Asheville 

Robert E. Bryan . . . Goldsboro 

William B. Carter Washington 

Arthur G. Corpening, Jr. High Point 

Moncie L. Daniels, Jr. Manteo 

Koy E. Dawkins Monroe 

Dr. J. A. Gill Elizabeth City 

John Harden Greensboro 

Gilliam K. Horton Wilmington 

Dr. Henrv W. Jordan Cedar Falls 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 345 

Petro Kulynych North Wilkesboro 

William H. Maynard Lenoir 

W. H. McDonald Tryon 

Jack Pait Lumberton 

John A. Parris, Jr. Sylva 

William P. Saunders Southern Pines 

Oscar J. Sikes, Jr. Albemarle 

R. Patrick Spangler "77 Shelby 

T. Max Watson Spindale 

NORTH CAROLINA DIRECTORS OF SCHOOLS 
FOR THE DEAF 

1961, c. 968; 1963. c. 448; G. S. 115-338 

Composition : Eleven members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. Edgar T. Beddingfield, Jr Statonsburg 

Mrs. James C. Farthing- Lenoir 

Mrs. L. C. Gifford Hickory 

John N. Kalmar Faison 

James G. Northcott, Sr Black Mountain 

O. H. Pons, Sr Valdese 

Cecil Lee Porter North Wilkesboro 

S. J. Westmoreland Marion 

J. J. Wade, Jr Charlotte 

Mrs. Adam J. Whitley Rt. 1, Smithfield 

Roy Benjamin Williams Rt. 1, Elm City 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

North Carolina Constitution, Art. IX, sec. 8; 1955, c. 1372; 

G. S. 115-2 

Composition: Thirteen members. Three ex-officio; ten appointed 
by the Governor and confirmed by the General Assembly. 

Robert W. Scott, ex-officio Haw River 

Edwin Gill, ex-officio Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll, Secretary ex-officio . . Raleigh 

W. D. Herring, Chairman Rose Hill 



s 



346 North Carolina Manual 

J. A. Pritchett, Vice Chairman Windsor 

G. D. Aitken Charlotte 

Garland S. Garriss Troy 

R. Barton Hayes Lenoir 

Charles E. Jordan Durham 

William R. Lybrook Winston-Salem 

Guy B. Phillips Chapel Hill 

John M. Reynolds Asheville 

Harold L. Trigg Salisbury 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 

1955, c. 1186; 1965, c. 1096; G. S. 116-156 

Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor, four 
selected by the Boards of Trustees of State supported senior col- 
leges and two selected by the Board of Trustees of University of 
North Carolina. 

Watts Hill. Jr., Chairman Durham 

Gordon H. Greenwood, Vice Chairman Black Mountain 

Dr. Martin L. Brooks Pembroke 

S. E. Duncan Salisbury 

W. C. Harris, Jr. Raleigh 

Mrs. Harry P. Horton, Secretary Pittsboro 

J. P. Huskins Statesville 

J. Paul Lucas Charlotte 

Dr. Hubert M. Poteat, Jr Smithfield 

John A. Pritchett Windsor 

John S. Stewart Durham 

Lindsay C. Warren, Jr. Goldsboro 

James L. Whitfield Raleigh 

E. J. Whitmire Franklin 

Mrs. George D. Wilson Fayetteville 

Howard R. Boozer, Director Raleigh 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF STATE EDUCATION 
ASSISTANCE AUTHORITY 

1965. c. 1180; G. S. 116-203 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the Governor. 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 347 

Victor E. Bell, Jr. Raleigh 

George Watts Hill, Jr. Durham 

J. Russell Kirby Wilson 

Roger Gant, Jr Glen Haven 

H. Edmunds White Davidson 

Mrs. Carrie W. Harper Greensboro 

Arthur D. Wenger Wilson 

STATE BOARD OF ELECTIONS 

Rev. 4300; 1901, c. 89; 1933, c. 165; 1953, c. 428; C. S. 5921; 

G. S. 163-8 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Lee C. Smith, Chairman Raleigh 

John G. Clark Greenville 

Mrs. Robert W. Proctor Marion 

Hiram H. Ward Denton 

Paul Osborne Wilkesboro 

Alex K. Brock, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

EMPLOYMENT SECURITY COMMISSION 

Ex. 1936, c. 1, s. 10; 1941, c. 108, s. 10; 1941, c. 279, ss. 1-3; 
1943, c. 377, s. 15; 1947, c. 598; G. S. 96-3 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Henry E. Kendall, Chairman Raleigh 

Harold F. Coffey Lenoir 

R. Dave Hall Belmont 

Dr. J. W. Seabrook Fayetteville 

Billy Earl Andrews Durham 

Charles L. Hunley Monroe 

Samuel Farris Teague Raleigh 

EUGENICS BOARD OF NORTH CAROLINA 
1933, c. 224; 1957, c. 1357; 1959, c. 1019; 1963, c. 1166; G. S. 35-40 

Composition : Five members, all ex-officio under above act. 



::ts North Carolina Manual 

Clifton M. Craig, Commissioner State Board of 

Public Welfare, Chairman Raleigh 

Dr. Jacob Koomen, State Health Director Raleigh 

Dr. J. F. Elliott, Superintendent, Murdoch Center. . . . Butner 
Dr. Eugene A. Hargrove, Commissioner of Mental Health. 

State Department of Mental Health Raleigh 

Wade Bruton, Attorney General Raleigh 

Mrs. Sue L. Casebolt, Executive Secretary Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA FIREMEN'S PENSION FUND 

1957, c. 1420; 1959, c. 1212; G. S. 118-19 

Composition: Five members. Two ex-officio and three appointed 
by the Governor. 

Edwin S. Lanier, Commissioner of Insurance, 

ex-officio, Chairman Raleigh 

Henry L. Bridges, State Auditor, ex-officio Raleigh 

B. C. Gibson Charlotte 

I. M. Warren Plymouth 

H. Clifton Blue Aberdeen 

G. E. Summerlin, III, Executive Secretary Raleigh 



GASOLINE AND OIL INSPECTION BOARD 

1937, c. 425, s. 9; 1941, c. 220; 1949, c. 1167; G. S. 119-26 

Composition : Five members. Two ex-officio, three appointed by 
the Governor. 

James A. Graham, Commissioner of Agriculture, 

Chairman, ex-officio . . Raleigh 

John I. Moore, Secretary, ex-officio. Raleigh 

W. A. Cobb . . Ruffm 

Walter C. Jones New Bern 

E. W. McDaniel Elkin 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 349 

GENERAL STATUTES COMMISSION 

1945, c. 157; 1947, c. 114; G. S. 164-14 

Composition: Nine members appointed as follows: One each by 
the President of the North Carolina State Bar and the North Caro- 
lina Bar Association; one each by the Deans of the Law Schools of 
Duke, Wake Forest, and the University of North Carolina; one 
each by the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House; 
and two by the Governor. 

Frank W. Hanft, Chairman Chapel Hill 

H. G. Hudson, Vice-Chairman Winston-Salem 

William R. Britt Smithfield 

Dr. Hugh W. Divine Winston-Salem 

Charles H. Livengood, Jr. Durham 

Carl V. Venters Jacksonville 

John T. Page, Jr Rockingham 

Thomas A. Uzzell, Jr. Asheville 

Thomas L. Young Rocky Mount 

Leon H. Corbett, Jr., ex-officio, Secretary Raleigh 



GOVERNOR'S EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ON THE 
EMPLOYMENT OF THE HANDICAPPED 

1961, c. 981; G. S. 143-283.5 

Composition : Twenty members. Five ex-officio and fifteen ap- 
pointed by the Governor. 

Dan K. Moore, Governor, Honorary Chairman, ex-officio Raleigh 
Frank Crane, Commissioner of Labor, ex-officio Raleigh 

Edwin S. Lanier, Commissioner of Insurance, ex-officio Raleigh 
Henry E. Kendall, Chairman, Employment Security 

Commission, ex-officio Raleigh 

Robert Lassiter, Director, Vocational Rehabilitation, 

ex-officio Raleigh 

W. C. Boren, III Greensboro 

John B. Hatfield Greensboro 

G. Maurice Hill Morganton 

John A. Tate, Jr Charlotte 



350 North Carolina Manual 

Louie Woodbury, Jr. Wilmington 

Gary C. Davis High Point 

Stanley Frank Greensboro 

William II. Ruffin . . Durham 

Dr. James H. Semans Durham 

Stephen H. Van Every Charlotte 

Mrs. James T. Chappell Candler 

Henry Belk Goldsboro 

Mrs. Robert Boyd Lindsay Chapel Hill 

Fred D. Hauser Winston-Salem 

Robert William Watkins Boone 

James S. Massenburg, Executive Secretary Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA GOVERNOR'S COORDINATING 
COUNCIL ON AGING 

1955, c. 977; G. S. 143-283.11 

Composition: Twenty-one members. Thirteen ex-officio, seven 
appointed by the Governor and one appointed by the President of 
N. C. Medical Society. 

Roy Rowe, Chairman Burgaw 

Edward L. Rankin, Jr., ex-officio Raleigh 

Clifton M. Craig, ex-officio .... Raleigh 

Dr. Jacob Koomen, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Eugene A. Hargrove, ex-officio Raleigh 

Philip S. Ogilvie, ex-officio Raleigh 

Ralph Andrews, ex-officio Raleigh 

Henry E. Kendall, ex-officio Raleigh 

Nathan H. Yelton, ex-officio Raleigh 

Frank Crane, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, ex-officio Raleigh 

Mrs. Annie May Pemberton, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. W. Fred Mayes, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. George Hyatt, Jr., ex-officio Raleigh 

Mrs. Edith B. Chance Fayetteville 

Dr. Willis D. Weatherford Black Mountain 

Dr. Lewis C. Dowdy Greensboro 

Dr. John S. Rhodes Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 351 

Mrs. Mildred M. Morgan Concord 

Dr. Edgar T. Beddingfield, Jr Stantonsburg 

Dr. Ewald W. Busse Dui'ham 



NORTH CAROLINA HEALTH INSURANCE 
ADVISORY BOARD 

1961, c. 1044; G. S. 58-262.2 

Composition: Ten members. One ex-officio and nine appointed 
by the Governor. 

Edwin S. Lanier, Commissioner of Insurance, ex-officio. Raleigh 

Dr. Frank W. Jones Newton 

Micou F. Browne Raleigh 

Joseph E. Barnes, Secretary Raleigh 

Hubert F. Ledford Raleigh 

Arthur W. Clark Durham 

C. B. Sessoms Durham 

O. F. Stafford Greensboro 

Mrs. Norman P. Stone Winston-Salem 

Earl Henry Tate Lenoir 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

Rev. s. 4435; Code, s. 2875; 1879, c. 177, s. 1; 1885, c. 237, s. 1; 
1893, c. 241, s. 1; 1911, c. 62, s. 1; 1931, c. 177, s. 1; 
1945, c. 281; C. S. 7048; G. S. 130-1 

Composition : Nine members. Five appointed by the Governor, 
four elected by the Medical Society. 

Dr. Lenox D. Baker, President Durham 

Dr. James S. Raper, Vice President Asheville 

Dr. Ben W. Dawsey Gastonia 

Samuel G. Koonce Chadbourn 

Dr. Oscar S. Goodwin Apex 

Dr. A. P. Cline, Sr Canton 

Dr. Joseph S. Hiatt, Jr Pinehurst 

J. M. Lackey Hiddenite 

Dr. Howard Paul Steiger Charlotte 



352 North Carolina Manual 

STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION 

1933, c. 172; 1935, c. 257; 1937, c. 297; 1941, c. 57; 1945, 
c. 895; 1953, c. 115; 1957, c. 65; 1961, c. 232; 1965, c. 55; 
1965, c. 1054; G. S. 136-1 

Composition: Fifteen members appointed by the Governor. 

Joseph M. Hunt, Jr., Chairman Raleigh 

Don Matthews, Jr. Hamilton 

W. Wilson Exum Snow Hill 

Ashley M. Murphy Atkinson 

Carl Renf ro . Wilson 

J. B. Brame Durham 

Carl Meares Fair Bluff 

Thomas S. Harrington Leaksville 

John F. McNair, III Laurinburg 

George L. Hundley Thomasville 

George H. Broadrick Charlotte 

Raymond Smith Mount Airy 

W. B. Garrison Gastonia 

James G. Stikeleather, Jr. Asheville 

W. Curtis Russ . . . . Waynesville 

STATE ADVISORY COUNCIL 
TO THE N. C. MEDICAL CARE COMMISSION 

1945, c. 1096; 1947, c. 933; 1949, c. 1019; G. S. 131-120 

('(imposition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. W. T. Armstrong Rocky Mount 

Charles A. Cannon Concord 

Dr. W. Ralph Deaton, Jr. Greensboro 

Mrs. Carrie T. Phelps Creswell 

James P. Richardson Charlotte 

HISTORIC SITES ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

1963, c. 210; G. S. 121-8.1 

Composition : Seven members. Four ex-officio and three appointed 
by the Governor. 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 

Dr. C. 0. Cathey, ex-officio Chapel Hill 

G. Andrew Jones, Jr., ex-officio Raleigh 

Henry L. Kamphoef ner, ex-offieio Raleigh 

Dan E. Stewart, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Secretary, ex-officio ... Raleigh 

Ray Wilkinson Raleigh 

James McClure Clarke Asheville 

P. P. McCain Wilson 

NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

1929, c. 120, s. 51; 1931, c. 274, s. 8; G. S. 97-77 

Composition : Three members appointed by the Governor. 

J. W. Bean, Chairman Spencer 

Forrest H. Shuford, II Raleigh 

Wm. F. Marshall, Jr. Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA INSURANCE ADVISORY BOARD 

1945, c. 383; G. S. 58-27.1 

Composition : Seven members. One ex-officio and six appointed 
by the Governor. 

Edwin S. Lanier, Commissioner of Insurance, 

Chairman, ex-officio Raleigh 

Edwin McCracken Haynes Canton 

H. P. Mobley Williamston 

Larry P. Eagles Tarboro 

W. W. Forehand Shiloh 

R. G. Deyton Raleigh 

Max O. Welborn Yadkinville 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL BUILDING REGULATION 

COMMITTEE 

1957, c. 978; G. S. 143-143.1 

Composition: Seven members. (All ex-officio under act. ) 
N. E. Cannady, Chairman, Dept. of Insurance Raleigh 

R. G. Bourne, Vice Chairman, Dept. of Administration Raleigh 



Nobth Carolina Manual 

•T. L. Pierce, Dept. of Public Instruction Raleigh 

Lewis P. Sorrell, Dept. of Labor Raleigh 

Bruce K. Jones, Medical Care Commission Raleigh 

.1. M. Jarrett, Board of Health Raleigh 

Louis Christian, Board of Public Welfare Raleigh 

Kern E. Chinch. Secretary, Dept. of Insurance Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA COMMISSION ON 
INTERSTATE CO-OPERATION 

1937, c. 374; 1947, c. 578; 1959, c. 137; 1961, c. 1108; 
1965, c. 866; G. S. 143-178 

Composition : Eleven members. Three administrative officials 
appointed by the Governor, President of the Senate, Speaker of the 
House of Representatives, three senators appointed by the Presi- 
dent of the Senate and three representatives appointed by the 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

Robert W. Scott, President of the Senate Haw River 

David M. Britt, Speaker of the House Fairmont 

Appointed by the Governor : 

Claude E. Caldwell, Director of State Personnel 

Department Raleigh 

G. Andrew Jones, Jr., State Budget Officer Raleigh 

Dan E. Stewart, Director of Department of Conservation 

and Development Raleigh 

Senate appointments: 

Herman A. Moore Charlotte 

Adrian L. Shuford, Jr. Conover 

Sam L. Whitehurst New Bern 

House appointments: 

Joe E. Eagles Macclesfield 

Thorne Gregory Scotland Neck 

Earl W. Vaughn Draper 



GOVERNMENTAL BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 355 

NORTH CAROLINA JUDICIAL COUNCIL 

1953, c. 74; G. S. 7-448 

Composition: Fourteen members. One member of Supreme Court, 
two judges of the Superior Court, one member of Attorney Gen- 
eral's Office, two Solicitors from Superior Court and eight addi- 
tional members, two of whom shall be appointed by the Governor, 
one by the President of the Senate, one by the Speaker of the 
House, and four by the Council of the North Carolina State Bar. 

William H. Bobbitt, Chairman Raleigh 

Henry A. McKinnon, Jr. Lumberton 

James C. Farthing Lenoir 

Sam J. Ervin, III Morganton 

James L. Newsom Durham 

John C. Kesler Salisbury 

James F. Bullock Raleigh 

Bryan Grimes Washington 

M. G. Boyette Carthage 

Frank H. Watson Spruce Pine 

Bonner D. Sawyer Hillsborough 

W. Marion Allen Elkin 

Dan K. Edwards Durham 

L. B. Hollowell Gastonia 



STATE BOARD OF JUVENILE CORRECTION 

1943, c. 776, s. 1; 1945, c. 847; 1947, c. 226; 1963, c. 914; 
1949, c. 1052; G. S. 134-90 

Composition : Ten members. One ex-officio, nine appointed by the 
Governor. 

Clifton M. Craig, Commissioner Department of 

Public Welfare, ex-officio Raleigh 

C. A. Dillon, Chairman Raleigh 

James M. Fraley Statesville 



*(This Board has the management of the Stonewall Jackson Training School. 
Juvenile Evaluation Center, Eastern Carolina Training School, State Home and 
Industrial School for Girls, Morrison Training School, State Training School 
for Girls and Leonard Training School.) 



"•• r>,; North Carolina Manual 

Paul H. Hi.sscttc Wilson 

Joseph W. Nordan Raleigh 

Shannon T. Lambeth Greensboro 

Mrs. John L. Frye Robbins 

T. Clyde Auman West End 

.Mrs. C. L. Gilliatt Shelby 

Steed Rollins Durham 

Dr. Charles V. Strosnider (Emeritus) Goldsboro 

Blaine M. Madison, Commissioner Raleigh 



JOHN H. KERR RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION 

1951, c. 144; 1953, c. 1.312; 1961, c. 650; G. S. 143-284 

Composition : Twelve members appointed by the Governor. 

Ralph Andrews Raleigh 

G. Ernest Beal Red Oak 

J. O. Bishop Rocky Mount 

Charles F. Blackburn Henderson 

J. C. Cooper. Sr. Henderson 

Dr. William B. Tarry .... Oxford 

X. Warren Weldon, Chairman Stovall 

Robert Clyde Mitchell Manson 

Tom Harrington, Sr. Henderson 

A. Leonidas Hux . . Roanoke Rapids 

Henry M. Shaw, Jr Raleigh 

John T. Church Henderson 

THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE LAW 

ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS' BENEFIT AND 

RETIREMENT FUND 

1937, c. 349, s. 8; 1939, c. 6; 1941, cc. 56, 157; 1943, c. 145: 
1949, c. 1055; 1951, c. 382; 1953, c. 883; G. S. 143-166 

Composition: Seven members. Three ex-officio, four appointed by 
the Governor. 

Henry L. Bridges, State Auditor. Chairman ex-officio Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 357 

Edwin S. Lanier, State Insurance Commissioner, 

Secretary, ex-officio Raleigh 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer, ex-officio Raleigh 

W. A. McCall Charlotte 

T. Dale Johnson Newton 

W. B. Lentz Raleigh 

Travis H. Clements Durham 

E. B. Dixon, Executive Secretary Raleigh 



LEGISLATIVE BUILDING GOVERNING COMMISSION 

1963, c. 1; G. S. 129-17.1 

Composition : Six members. Two ex-officio, two senators ap- 
pointed by President of the Senate and two representatives ap- 
pointed by Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

Robert W. Scott, President of the Senate, 

ex-officio Rt. 1, Haw River 

David M. Britt, Speaker of the House of 

Representatives, ex-officio Fairmont 

Appointed by President of the Senate: 

Thomas J. White Kinston 

N. Hector McGeachy, Jr. Fayetteville 

Appointed by Speaker of the House of Representatives : 

I. C. Crawford Asheville 

Kenneth C. Royall, Jr. Durham 



LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH COMMISSION 

1965, c. 1045; G. S. 120-30.10 

Composition : Twelve members. Two ex-officio, five senators 
appointed by the President pro tempore of the Senate and five 
representatives appointed by the Speaker of the House. 

David M. Britt, Speaker of the House, ex-officio Fairmont 

Herman A. Moore, President Pro tempore of Senate, 

ex-officio Charlotte 



358 North Carolina Manual 

Mrs. Fred Benton, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

(Appointment of members from House and Senate to be made 
within fifteen days subsequent to adjournment of Regular Session 
of the General Assembly.) 



STATE LIBRARY BOARD 

1909, c. 873; 1053, c. 1102; 1955, c. 505; C. S. 6597; G. S. 125-3 

Composition : Eight members. Two ex-officio, six appointed by 
the Governor. 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Jerrold Orne, ex-officio Chapel Hill 

Thad Stem, Jr., Chairman Oxford 

Dr. Mark M. Lindsey, Vice President Hamlet 

Mis. Gordon Tomlinson Mocksville 

Mrs. T. T. Potter Beaufort 

Paul S. Ballance Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Bernice Kellv Harris Seaboard 



LOCAL GOVERNMENT COMMISSION 

1931, c. 60, s. 7; 1931, c. 296, s. 8; 1933, c. 31, s. 1: G. S. 159-3 

Composition: Nine members. Four ex-officio, five appointed by 
the Governor. 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer, Chairman ex-officio Raleigh 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State, ex-officio Raleigh 

Henry L. Bridges, State Auditor, ex-officio Raleigh 

Ivie L. Clayton, Commissioner of Revenue, ex-officio Raleigh 

Walter A. Coble Guilford College 

Vacancy 

Walley Dunham Winston-Salem 

George B. Herndon Fayetteville 

W. H. Turlington Lexington 

W. E. Easterling, Secretary Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 359 

LOCAL GOVERNMENTAL EMPLOYEES' 
RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

1938, c. 390, s. 8; 1941, c. 357, s. 6; 1943, c. 535; 1945, c. 526; 
1947, c. 259; G. S. 128-28 

Composition: Ten members. Two ex-officio, eight appointed by 
the Governor and approved by the Senate. 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer, Chairman ex-officio Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent of Public 

Instruction, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. L. M. Massey Zebulon 

E. O. Falkner Henderson 

Withers Davis Raleigh 

E. L. Phillips Durham 

R. W. Sands Reidsville 

George B. Cherry Raleigh 

C. L. Lineback Salisbury 

S. M. Gattis Hillsborough 

Nathan H. Yelton, Director Raleigh 



MEDICAL ADVISORY COUNCIL TO THE STATE 
BOARD OF MENTAL HEALTH 

1963, c. 668; G. S. 35-70 

Composition : Fifteen members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. Edgar T. Bedding-field, Jr., Chairman Stantonsburg 

Dr. William Anlyan Durham 

Dr. S. P. Gay Greensboro 

Dr. Robert H. Greene Charlotte 

Dr. Joseph D. Mayo, Jr. Henderson 

Dr. John L. McCain Wilson 

Dr. Manson Meads Winston-Salem 

Dr. John C. Reece Morganton 

Dr. John S. Rhodes Raleigh 

Dr. Isaac M. Taylor Chapel Hill 

Dr. Leon W. Robertson Rocky Mount 

Dr. Bennie Brooks Ward Shallotte 



360 North Carolina Mam u 

Dr. T. D. Slagle Sylva 

Dr. Roy Wynn . . Charlotte 

Dr. A. Hazel Zealey Goldsboro 

NORTH CAROLINA MEDICAL CARE COMMISSION 

1945, c. 1096; 1963, c. 325; 1965, c. 16; G. S. 131-117 

Composition: Twenty members. Two ex-officio. eighteen ap- 
pointed by the Governor. 

Edwin N. Brower, Sr., Chairman Hope Mill^ 

Dr. J. Street Brewer Roseboro 

Paul W. Bumbarger, Jr Hickory 

Dr. George L. Carrington Burlington 

Dr. H. Royster Chamblee Raleigh 

J. B. Clemence Salisbury 

Thomas R. Howerton Wilson 

Mrs. Margaret B. Dolan Chapel Hill 

Dr. Powell G. Fox Raleigh 

Ernest J. House Marion 

Dr. William D. James Hamlet 

H. C. McAllister Chapel Hill 

Marshall I. Pickens Charlotte 

Dr. Hugh F. McManus, Jr. Raleigh 

John C. Whitaker Winston-Salem 

Dr. William Raney Stanford. . Durham 

Dr. Paul F. Whitaker Kinston 

Carl P. Worley, Jr Selma 

Dr. Jacob Koomen, Jr., State Health Dh'ector, ex-officio Raleigh 
Clifton M. Craig, State Commissioner of Public Welfare, 

ex-officio Raleigh 

William F. Henderson, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

COUNCIL ON MENTAL RETARDATION 

1963, c. 669; G. S. 35-73 
Composition: Eighteen members appointed by the Governor. 
Ralph H. Scott, Chairman Haw Rivei 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 361 

Dr. Cuurtland H. Davis, Jr., Vice-Chairman Winston-Salem 

Mrs. M. P. Bailey Greenville 

Sam M. Bason Yanceyville 

Dr. Harrie R. Chamberlin Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Mary Faye Brumby Murphy 

Dr. Dorothy Park Griffin Raleigh 

Dr. Sam O. Cornwell Raleigh 

Dr. Theodore D. Scurletis Raleigh 

Reginald S. Wilson Burlington 

Laura Harbison Raleigh 

Nile F. Hunt Raleigh 

Taylor R. Kennerly Greensboro 

Blaine M. Madison Raleigh 

M. Glenn Pickard Burlington 

Mrs. Ruf us W. Reynolds Greensboro 

Harold L. Trigg Salisbury 

Charles E. Waddell Asheville 

Robert L. Denny, Executive Director Raleigh 



STATE BOARD OF MENTAL HEALTH 

1963. c. 1166; G. S. 122-1.1 

Composition: Fifteen members appointed by the Governor. 

John W. Umstead, Jr., Chairman Emeritus Chapel Hill 

H. P. Taylor. Jr., Chairman Wadesboro 

W. P. Kemp, Vice Chairman Goldsboro 

D. W. Royster. Vice Chairman Shelby 

R. V. Liles Wadesboro 

Dr. Yates S. Palmer Valdese 

Dr. John R. Kernodle Burlington 

William L. Thorp, Jr Rocky Mount 

Mrs. J. C. Eagles, Jr. Wilson 

Dr. Samuel L. Elfmon Fayetteville 

Dr. Carl D. Killian Cullowhee 

Frank G. Umstead Chapel Hill 

J. Garner Bagnal Statesville 

Dr. Bruce E. Whitaker Murfreesboro 

Vacancy 
Vacancy 



362 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA MILK COMMISSION 

1953. c. 1338; 1955, c. 406; G. S. 106-266.7 

Composition: Nine members. One ex-officio, eight appointed by 
the Governor. 

James A. Graham, Commissioner of Agriculture, ex-officio Raleigh 

O. A. Swaringen, Chairman Concord 

Neil Bolton Winston-Salem 

J. Everette Flora Charlotte 

Wade M. Hobson ... Yadkinville 

George W. King Ay den 

Mrs. F. A. Needham Graham 

B. F. Nesbitt Fletcher 

Donald L. Paul New Bern 

J. V. Whitaker, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA MUNICIPAL BOARD OF CONTROL 

1917, c. 136, sub. c. 2, s. 4; 1935, c. 440; 1941, c. 97; 
C. S. 2779; G. S. 160-195 

Composition: Three members. All ex-officio under the Act. 

Wade Bruton, Attorney General, Chairman Raleigh 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State, Secretary Raleigh 

Harry Wescott, Chairman Utilities Commission Raleigh 



ADVISORY COMMISSION FOR THE MUSEUM OF 
NATURAL HISTORY 

1961, c. 1180; G. S. 143-370 

Composition: Seven members ex-officio and three members ap- 
pointed by the Governor. 

James A. Graham, Commissioner of Agriculture, ex-offici<> Raleigh 
Dr. Charles F. Carroll, Supt. of Public Instruction, 

ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. A. F. Chestnut, Director, Institute of Fisheries 

Research of U. N. C, ex-officio Morehead City 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 363 

Ralph Winkworth, State Forester, ex-officio Raleigh 

Clyde P. Patton, Director, Wildlife Resources 

Commission, ex-officio Raleigh 

Steven Conrad, State Geologist, ex-officio Raleigh 

William L. Hamnett, Director, Museum of Natural History, 

ex-officio. Secretary Raleigh 

Basil D. Barr, Chairman West Jefferson 

Micou F. Browne Raleigh 

Mrs. Roy E. Cooper Nashville 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF PAROLES 

1953, c. 17; 1955, c. 867; G. S. 148-52 

Composition: Three members appointed by the Governor. 

Marvin R. Wooten, Chairman Cary 

Howard Hepler Raleigh 

William H. Gibson Raleigh 

STATE BOARD OF PENSIONS 

1921, c. 189, s. 1; C. S. 5168(a); G. S. 112-7 

Composition: Three members. All ex-officio under the above Act. 

Dan K. Moore, Governor, Chairman Raleigh 

Wade Bruton, Attorney General Raleigh 

Henry L. Bridges, State Auditor, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

STATE PERSONNEL BOARD 

1965 c. 640; G. S. 126-2 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Fred S. Royster, Chairman Henderson 

C. P. Reinhardt Drexel 

Dr. Lester F. Zerfoss Hendersonville 

Fred D. Hauser Winston-Salem 

R. B. Jordan, Jr Mt. Gilead 

Victor Jones Greensboro 

Mrs. Margaret R. Seagroves Apex 

Claude E. Caldwell, Director Raleigh 



:i 64 North Carol] n a Mam \ i 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

1945, c. 1097; 1949, c. 85)2; I!). - ").*}, c. 191; 1959, c. 523; G. S. 143-216 

Composition : Nine members appointed by the Governor. 

E. N. Richards, Chairman Raleigh 

Henry L. Weathers, Vice Chairman . . Shelby 

Wm. B. Glenn Greenville 

E. G. Anderson Robersonville 

Lamar Gudger Asheville 

Joseph Foil ( Jreensboro 

Frank H. Ross, Jr. Charlotte 

William Pharr McAdenville 

George Purvis Fayetteville 

James W. Davis, Executive Director Wilmington 

STATE PRISON COMMISSION 

1957, c. 349; G. S. 148-1 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Clyde H. Harriss, Chairman Salisbury 

E. F. Allen Lenoir 

Fred S. Cates Hillsborough 

Edgar J. Gurganus Williamston 

Hampton D. Haith Winston-Salem 

J. R. Hooks Fayetteville 

Jack Moody Siler City 

V. L. Rounds, Director Raleigh 

STATE PROBATION COMMISSION 

1937, c. 132, s. 5; G. S. 15-201 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. Clarence H. Patrick, Chairman Raleigh 

John I. Anderson, Jr. Brevard 

William H. S. Burgwyn, Jr. Woodland 

Robert B. Willson. . . . Asheville 

George M. Fountain Tarboro 

Charles M. Clodfelter. Director Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 365 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Rev. s. 1913; Code s. 2331; 1868-9, c. 170, s. 2; 1909, c. 899: 

1917, c. 170, s. 1; 1937, c. 319, s. 1; 1943, c. 775, s. 1; 

1945, c. 43; C. S. 5004; G. S. 108-1 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Robert C. Howison, Jr. Chairman Raleigh 

Mrs. Neil Goodnight, Vice-Chairman Charlotte 

Robert O. Ballance Manteo 

Dr. George K. Butterfield Wilson 

J. C. Carlton Pinetops 

Mrs. Thomas E. Medlin Smithfield 

Mrs. R. Walker Martin Raleigh 

Clifton M. Craig, Commissioner Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA RECREATION COMMISSION 

1945, c. 757, s. 3; 1963, c. 542; G. S. 143-207 

Composition : Ten members. Four ex-officio, six appointed by the 
Governor. 

Dan K. Moore, Governor, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Earle Wallace, Political Science Department, 

UNC, ex-officio Chapel Hill 

Clinton Foust, President, N. C. Recreation Society, 

ex-officio Morganton 

Charles S. Hubbard, Chairman Wilson 

Eric DeGroat Boone 

Mrs. Harriet Pressly Raleigh 

Wallace Tippett Louisburg 

Gus Purcell Charlotte 

Dr. Leonard Robinson Greensboro 

Ralph J. Andrews, Director Raleigh 

ROANOKE ISLAND HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION 

1945, c. 953; G. S. 143-200 

Composition: Twenty-four members. Three ex-officio. twenty- 
one appointed by the Association. 



366 North Carolina. Manual 

Mrs. Fred W. Morrison, Chairman . . . Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. J. E. Winslow, Hertford 

Mrs. Burwell Evans, Secretary Manteo 

Chauncey S. Meekins, Ti'easurer Manteo 

Dan K. Moore, Governor, ex-officio Raleigh 

Wade Bruton, Attorney General, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Director, Department of 

Archives and History, ex-officio Raleigh 

Mrs. L. Y. Ballentine Raleigh 

Archie Burrus Manteo 

Huntington Cairns Washington, D. C. 

M. L. Daniels, Jr. Manteo 

Walter R. Davis Midland, Texas 

J. Sibley Dorton Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Haywood Duke Greensboro 

John Ehle New York, New York 

Mrs. William C. Friday. . . Chapel Hill 

M. Keith Fearing, Jr. Manteo 

Albert W. Card Elizabeth City 

Mrs. O. Max Gardner Shelby 

Edwin Gill Raleigh 

Robert Mason Norfolk, Va. 

Mrs. Luther H. Hodges . . Chapel Hill 

James G. Morton Washington, D. C. 

Sam Ragan . . Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA RURAL ELECTRIFICATION AUTHORITY 
1935, c. 288, s. 1; G. S. 117-1 

Composition : Six members appointed by the Governor. 

Gwyn B. Price, Chairman Raleigh 

Thomas W. Allen .... Creedmoor 

Dr. S. H. Hobbs, Jr. Chapel Hill 

Glenn C. Palmer Clyde 

Sam J. Burrow, Jr. Asheboro 

W. Kitchen Benson Battleboio 



GOYKUN.UKN l.U BOABDS AMI COMMISSIONS II^T 

STATE STREAM SANITATION COMMITTEE 

1945, c. 1010; 1947, c. 786; 1951, c. 606; 1953, c. 1295; 
1959, c. 779; G. S. 143-213 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

J. V. Whitfield, Chairman Wallace 

P. Greer Johnson Asheville 

Mrs. Karl Bishopric Spray 

H. Grady Farthing, Vice Chairman Boone 

Walter M. Franklin Charlotte 

J. Nelson Gibson, Jr Gibson 

W. Grady Stevens Shiloh 

E. C. Hubbard, Secretary & Administrative Officer Raleigh 



THE NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OK SCIENCE AND 
TECHNOLOGY 

1963, c. 1006; G. S. 143-379 

Composition: Sixteen members. One ex-officiu and fifteen ap- 
pointed by the Governor. 

Dan K. Moore, Governor, Chairman, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Paul M. Gross Durham 

Dr. Marcus E. Hobbs Durham 

Dr. Everett D. Palmatier Chapel Hill 

Dr. William F. Little . . Chapel Hill 

Dr. Harold F. Robinson Raleigh 

Dr. Robert W. Truitt. . . Raleigh 

George R. Herbert Durham 

Dr. George E. Nicholson Chapel Hill 

Dr. A. C. Menius, Jr, ... . Raleigh 

Adrian L. Shuford, Jr. Conover 

John T. Henley Hope Mills 

William S. Yeager ... Winston-Salem 

Dr. Bruce B. Allen Charlotte 

Vacancy 

Vacancy 

Peter J. Chenery, Director Durham 



368 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA SEASHORE COMMISSION 
1963, c. 989; G. S. 143-384 

Composition: Twenty-eight members. Seven ex-officio and twenty- 
one appointed by the Governor. 

Ralph J. Andrews, ex-officio Raleigh 

Don Matthews, ex-officio Hamilton 

General Edward F. Griffin, ex-officio. Raleigh 

John Parris, ex-officio Sylva 

General J. R. Townsend, ex-officio Durham 

Frank B. Turner, ex-officio Raleigh 

Orville Woodhouse, ex-officio Grandy 

Woodrow Price, Chairman . Raleigh 

Earl Phillips, Vice-Chairman. High Point 

Arthur B. Bass Tarboro 
William M. Cochrane Washington, D. C. 

Frederic L. Cox • Grif ton 

Braxton B. Dawson Washington 

Larry Forbes Shiloh 

E. Brooks Harris Henderson 

Ray E. Etheridge Elizabeth City 

Monroe Gaskill Cedar Island 

Carroll H. Gilliam Windsor 

Courtney C. Mitchell, Jr. . . . . Kinston 

Thomas B. Hord, Jr. Lawndale 

Angus McKellar Jackson 

Jim Mullen Hatteras 

Eugene Price Goldsboro 

J. V. Schweppe Shelby 

John Swindell Swan Quarter 

Mrs. Estelle Tillett Manteo 

Mrs. George M. Wood Camden 

Alida Willis Morehead City 

William S. Johnson, Jr., Director-Secretary Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions ot»9 

NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY SOCIETY, INC. 

1943, c. 755; 1947, c. 1049; G. S. 140-6 

Composition: Not less than sixteen members. Two ex-otficio, 
four appointed by the Governor, balance chosen by the members of 
the Symphony Society. 

Ex-officio: 

Governor Dan K. Moore Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll Raleigh 

Officers: 

Voit Gilmore, President Southern Pines 

William H. Westphal, Executive Vice President Greensboro 

Lester C. Gifford, Vice President Hickory 

James McClure Clarke, Vice President Asheville 

Jan P. Schinhan, Vice President Kannapolis 

John W. Scott, Jr., Secretary Chapel Hill 

Edward L. Gray, Treasurer Chapel Hill 

Helen Reinhardt, Assistant Treasurer Chapel Hill 

Benjamin F. Swalin, Director Chapel Hill 

Executive Committee: 

James McClure Clarke Asheville 

Mrs. Charles E. Dameron, Jr. Asheville 

Mrs. C. A. Dillon, Jr Raleigh 

Mrs. Fran DiSanto Morganton 

William C. Fields Fayetteville 

Lester C. Gifford Hickory 

Voit Gilmore Southern Pines 

Edward L. Gray Chapel Hill 

M. Eugene Motsinger, Jr Roaring Gap 

Jan P. Schinhan Kannapolis 

John W. Scott, Jr Chapel Hill 

Alexander M. Smith, II Elkin 

Benjamin F. Swalin Chapel Hill 

William H. Westphal Greensboro 

Dr. J. 0. Williams Concord 



:;70 North Carolina Manual 

TAX REVIEW BOARD 
L953, c. 1302; 1955, c. 1350; G. S. 105-269.2 

Composition: Four members, all ex-officio. 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer, Chairman Raleigh 

Harry T. Westcott, Utilities Commission Raleigh 

H. C. Stansbury, Department of Tax Research Raleigh 

Ivie L. Clayton, Commissioner of Revenue Raleigh 

Harlan E. Boyles, Secretary Raleigh 

TEACHERS' AND STATE EMPLOYEES" 
RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

1941, c. 25, s. 6; 1943. c. 719; 1947, c. 259: G. S. 135-6 

Composition: Eight members. Two ex-officio. six appointed by 
the Governor and approved by the Senate. 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer, Chairman, ex-officio Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll, Supt. Public Instruction, ex-olficio Raleigh 

Dr. L. M. Massey. . .. . . Zebulon 

E. O. Falkner Henderson 

Withers Davis Garner 

E. L. Phillips Durham 

R. W. Sands Reidsville 

George B. Cherry Raleigh 

Nathan H. Yelton, Director Raleigh 

TEXTBOOK COMMISSION 

1923, c. 136, s. 325; 1943, c. 627, s. 1 ; 1945, c. 707. ss, 4, 12; 
C. S. 5735; G. S. 115-278.4 

Composition : Twelve members appointed by the Governor and 
the Superintendent of Public Instruction: 

George S. Willard, Chairman Wilson 

Elementary Division: 

Martha G. Johnston . Pineville 

Mrs. Georgia Smith Franklin Greenville 



GOVEBNMEKTAL BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 371 

C. M. King Hendersonville 

Mrs. Inez C. Lewallen Asheboro 

Hazel Perritt Greensboro 

Mrs. Margaret Bird Rentz ... Bryson City 

High School Division: 

Henry C. McFadyen Lenoir 

Joseph Q. Holliday Raleigh 

Mrs. Virginia Hill Mickey Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Mary Wyche Mintz Hallsboro 

Mrs. Catherine D. Penny Durham 

TRYON PALACE COMMISSION 

1945, c. 791; 1955, c. 543; G. S. 121-19 

Composition: Thirty-one members. Six ex-officio, twenty-five 
appointed by the Governor. 

Dan K. Moore, Governor, ex-officio Raleigh 

Wade Bruton, Attorney General, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr, C. C. Crittendon, Director, State Department of 

Archives and History, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dan E. Stewart, Director, Department of Conservation 

and Development, ex-officio Raleigh 

D. Livingstone Stallings, Chairman, Craven County Board 

of Commissioners, ex-offico New Bern 

Mack L. Lupton, Mayor of New Bern, ex-officio New Bern 

Mrs. John A. Kellenberger, Chairman Greensboro 

Mrs. Charles A. Cannon, First Vice-Chairman Concord 

Virginia Home, Second Vice-Chairman Wadesboro 

Mrs. William E. Stroud, Secretary Goldsboro 

John A. Kellenberger, Treasurer Greensboro 

Mrs. William Henry Belk Charlotte 

Mrs. J. Melville Broughton Raleigh 

Mrs. J. Wilbur Bunn Raleigh 

Mrs. Lyman A. Cotten Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Henry F. DuPont Winterthur, Dela. 

Mrs. Inglis Fletcher Charleston, S. C. 

Mrs. O. Max Gardner Shelby 

Alexander H. Graham Hillsborough 



372 Nouth Carolina Manual 

R. L. Stallings, Jr. New Bern 

Robert Lee II umber Greenville 

M is. P. P. McCain Wilson 

Mrs. J. S. Mitchener Raleigh 

Mis. Thomas V. Moseley Kinston 

Carroll P. Rogers Tryon 

George K. Ross Jackson Springs 

Mrs. J. Laurence Sprunt Wilmington 

Mrs. A ml iew Burnet Stoney Morganton 

Mrs. James M. Tyler Kinston 

D. L. Ward New Bern 

Mrs. Stanley S. Wohl Annapolis, Maryland 

Ceit rude S. Carraway, Director New Bern 



NORTH CAROLINA TURNPIKE AUTHORITY 

1963, c. 757: G. S. 136-89.61 

Composition: Four members. One ex-officio and three appointed 
by the Governor. 

George R. Goodwin, Chairman Raleigh 

Joseph M. Hunt, Jr., Chairman, State Highway Commission, 

ex-officio . Raleigh 

Vernon G. James Elizabeth City 

Baxter T. Williams, Jr. Moyoek 

l S.S. NORTH CAROLINA BATTLESHIP COMMISSION 

1961. c. 158; 1963, c. 52; G. S. 143-363 

Composition : Not more than fifteen members. At least one ex- 
officio and the remaining members appointed by the Governor. 

Thomas C. Ellis. Director, Division of Parks, 

Conservation and Development, ex-officio Raleigh 

James C. Bowman Southport 

Percy B. Ferebee Andrews 

J- D- Fitz Morganton 

Mrs. James S. Liverman Scotland Neck 

G. Andrew Jones Raleigh 



GOVERNMENTAJ BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 373 

George Losak Wilmington 

T. Ed Pickard, Jr. Charlotte 

Dick O'Neal New Holland 

James E. Penland Newland 

Eugene C. Thompson Warsaw 

Horace V. Prevatte Wilmington 

John T. Schiller Wilmington 

Jack Spain Washington, D. C. 

Richard T. Vann Murfreesboro 



UTILITIES COMMISSION 

1933, c. 134; 1941, c. 97; 1949, c. 1009; 1959, c. 1319; 
1963, c. 1165; G. S. 62-10 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor and 
.approved by the Senate. 



Harry T. Westcott, Chairman 

Sam 0. Worthington 

Clarence H. Noah 

Thomas R. Eller, Jr. 

John W. McDevitt 

Mrs. Marv Laurens Richardson. Chief Clerk 



Raleigh 
Raleigh 
Raleigh 
Raleigh 
. Raleigh 
Raleigh 



VETERANS COMMISSION 
1945, c. 723; G. S. 165-5 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Wesley B. Cullipher, Chairman Elizabeth City 

Jack Rider .Kinston 

John R. Dickerson Monroe 

W. Dudley Robbins Willard 

William E. Bass Hickory 

Collin McKinne, Director Raleigh 



374 North Carolina Mantai, 

HOARD OF WATER RESOURCES 

1959, <•. 779: G. S. 143-353 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

J. R. Townsend, Chairman Durham 

J. Aaron Prevost. Waynesville 

Glenn M. Tucker, Secretary Carolina Beach 

S. Vernon Stevens, Jr. Broadway 

P. D. Davis Durham 

Wayne Mabry, Vice Chairman Albemarle 

C. H. Pruden, Jr. Windsor 



NORTH CAROLINA WILDLIFE RESOURCES COMMISSION 
1947. c. 263; 1961, c. 737: 1965, c. 859: G S. 143-240: 

Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor. 

HuK'h G. Chatham, Chairman Elkin 

T. N. Massie, Vice Chairman Sylva 

Dr. Joe M. Anderson, Jr., Secretary New Bern 

G. E. Beal Red Oak 

Thurman Bi'iggs Lexington 

James A. Bridger Bladenboro 

James A. Connelly. . Morganton 

Jay Waggoner Graham 

O. L. Woodhouse Crandv 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 375 

NORTH CAROLINA INSTITUTIONS 

CORRECTIONAL 

Eastern Carolina Training School, Rocky Mount 

1923, c. 254, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 5; 1927, c. 144; 
C. S. 7362; G. S. 134-67 

Under the State Board of Juvenile Correction 

1943, c. 776; 1947, c. 226; 1963, c. 914; G. S. 134-91 

Juvenile Evaluation Center, Swannanoa 

Under the State Board of Juvenile Correction 
1943, c. 776; 1947, c. 226; 1963, c. 914; G. S. 134-91 

State Home and Industrial School for Girls, Samarcand 

1917, c. 255; 1925, c. 306, s. 4; 1929, c. 279, s. 1; 
1937, c. 147, s. 1; 1947, c. 226; C. S. 7329; G. S. 134-22 

Under the State Board of Juvenile Correction 

1963, c. 776; 1947, c. 226; 1963, c. 914; G. S. 134-91 

Leonard Training School, McCain 
1959, c. 198 
Under the State Board of Juvenile Correction 
1943, c. 776; 1947, c. 226; 1963, c. 914; G. S. 134-91 

Morrison Training School, Hoffman 

1921, c. 190, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 6; 
1927, c. 63; 1941, c. 241; G. S. 134-79 

Under the State Board of Juvenile Correction 

1943, c. 776; 1947, c. 226; 1963, c. 914; G. S. 134-91 



376 North Carolina Manual 

State Training School for Girls, Kinston 
1943, c. 381 ; 1917, c. 226; G. S. 134-84.1 

Under the State Board of Juvenile Correction 
1943, c. 776; 1947, c. 226; 1963, c. 914; G. S. 134-91 

Stonewall Jackson Training School, Concord 

1907. c. 509, s. 6; 1907, c. 955, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 2; 
C. S. 7313; G. S. 134-1 

Under the State Board of Juvenile Correction 

1943. c. 776; 1947, c. 226; 1963, c. 914; G. S. 134-91 

EDUCATIONAL 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 
STATE UNIVERSITY, GREENSBORO 

Rev. s. 4223; 1891. c. 549, s. 4; 1899, c. 389, ss. 2, 3; 1939, c. 65, 
s. 4; 104:?. c. 132: 1057, c. 1142; 1067. c. 1038; C. S. 5828; 

G. S. 116-46 

Composition : Twelve members appointed by the Governor and 
approved by the General Assembly. 

Robert H. Frazier, Chairman Greensboro 

Elbert E. Waddell, Vice Chairman Albemarle 

Dr. Andrew A. Best Greenville 

J. Mack Hatch Charlotte 

James A. Graham Raleigh 

Dr. Otis E. Tillman High Point 

Frontis W. Johnston . . Davidson 

David W. Morehead Greensboro 

L. L. Ray Greensboro 

George Stockwell Elon College 

J. S. Stewart Durham 

W. B. Wicker ... Sanford 

Lewis C. Dowdy, President Greensboro 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 377 

APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY, BOONE 

Rev. s. 4229; 1903. c. 798, ss. 1, 9, 11; 1907, c. 526, s. 1; 

1915, c. 527, s. 1; 1917, c. 100, s. 1; 1919, c. 231, s. 1; 

Pr. 102.1. c. 204; Pr. 1929, c. 66; 1957, c. 1142; 1967, c. 1038; 

G. S. 116-45; G. S. 116-46 

Composition : Twelve members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the General Assembly. 

William J. Conrad, Chairman Winston-Salem 

John P. Frank. Vice Chairman Mt. Airy 

John H. Vickers ... Charlotte 

Claude C. Armfield, Jr. Lenoir 

George Corn Shelby 

W. B. Rankin Lincolnton 

Lester P. Martin, Jr Mocksville 

Dr. J. B. Hagaman, Jr. Boone 

Mrs. J. E. Broyhill Lenoir 

E. G. Lackey Winston-Salem 

W. R. Winkler Boone 

Wayne H. Shoaf Lexington 

W. H. Plemmons, President Boone 



ASHEVILLE-BILTMORE COLLEGE, ASHEVILLE 

1963, c. 448, s. 22; G. S. 116-45.2; G. S. 116-46 

Composition : Twelve members appointed by the Governor and 
approved by the General Assembly. 

Manly E. Wright, Chairman Asheville 

John M. Reynolds, Vice Chairman Asheville 

J. Gerald Cowan Biltmore Forest 

Mrs. Charles E. Dameron, Jr Asheville 

George Hoyle Blanton, Jr. Forest City 

Bruce A. Elmore Asheville 

C. Dula Hawkins Marion 

William M. Lehmkuhl Biltmore Forest 

Robert F. Phillips Asheville 

Claude Ramsev, Jr. Asheville 



178 



North Carolina Manual 



Dv. Jerome L. Reeves Canton 

Richard B. Wynne Ashville 

William E. Highsmith, President Asheville 



THE CENTRAL ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA, 

OXFORD 

1887, c. 17; 11)27. c. 162; 1963, c. 448; 1965, c. 617; G. S. 115-345 

('(imposition: Thirteen members. Five appointed by the Gov- 
•l nor and eight under the by-laws of the Institution. 



Appointed by the Governor: 
Dr. R. L. Noblin 

M. S. Currin, Secretary-Treasurer 
J. P. Harris, Jr. 
\V. T. Yancey, Vice Chairman 
J. S. Watkins, Jr. 

\ ppointed under by-laws ; 
Dr. J. S. Colson 
R. L. Shepard 
Dr. Allen S. Alston 
L. E. Austin 
Clark S. Brown 
Dr. J. W. Seabrook 
•T. W. Goodloe, Chairman 



Oxford 
Oxford 
Oxford 
Oxford 
Oxford 



Oxford 

Oxford 

Raleigh 

Durham 

Oxford 

Fayetteville 

Durham 



EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY, GREENVILLE 

1907, c. 820, s. 15; 1911, c. 159, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 7: 

1927, c. 164; 1929, c. 259; 1951. c. 641; 1955, c. 1147; 

H>57. < . I 142; 1967, c. 1038; C. S. 5866; G. S. 1 16-45; 

G. S. 116-46 

Composition: Twelve members appointed by the Governor with 
the approval of the General Assembly. 

Robert B. Morgan, Chairman Lillington 

James Whitfield, Vice Chairman Raleigh 

Henry Belk Goldsboro 

Troy B. Dodson Greenville 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 379 

Henry Oglesby Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. J. Russell Kirby Wilson 

Fred F. Bahnson, Jr. Winston-Salem 

William A. Blount Durham 

Reginald F. McCoy Laurinburg 

David J. Whichard, II Greenville 

Irving E. Carlyle Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Terry Sanford Fayetteville 

Leo W. Jenkins, President Greenville 



EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL FOR THE 
DEAF, WILSON 

Under the control and management of the North Carolina Direc- 
tors of Schools for the Deaf. 

1961. c. 968; 1963, c. 448; G. S. 115-338 



ELIZABETH CITY STATE COLLEGE, ELIZABETH CITY 

1921, c. 61; 1925, c. 306, s. 9; 1957, c. 1142; 
1963, c. 422; G. S. 116-45.1; G. S. 116-46 

Composition: Twelve members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the General Assembly. 

Albert G. Byrum Edenton 

McDonald Dixon Elizabeth City 

Martin L. Wilson Selma 

Clarence W. Griffin ... Williamston 

Louis T. Randolph Washington 

Dr. Clifford Jones Elizabeth City 

John Whitted Bond Windsor 

Fred Pendleton Markham, III ... . Elizabeth City 

Roland L. Garrett Elizabeth City 

A. Pilston Godwin, Jr. Gatesville 

John C. Bias Scotland Neck 

Mrs. W. Arthur Tripp Rt. 3, Greenville 

Walter N. Ridlev, President . . . Elizabeth City 



380 Nortij Carolina Manual 

FAYETTEVILLE STATE COLLEGE, FAYETTEVILLE 

1921, c. (51 : 1925, c. 306, s. 9; 1957, c. 1142; 1963. c. 507; 
G. S. 116-45; G. S. 116-46 

Composition: Twelve members appointed by the Governor, ap 
proved by the General Assembly. 



John II. Cook, Chairman Fayettevili 

Gurney E. Edgerton, Vice Chairman Fayettevilh 

Dr. \V. P. DeVane Fayettevilh 

Victor Dawson Fayettevilb 

C. J. Barber Raleigr 

James R. Nance Elizabethtowr 

Dr. G. L. Butler Fayettevilh 

Stewart B. Warren Clintoi 

Emil Rosenthal Goldsborc 

Albert Ellis Jacksonville 

W. R. Collins Smithfielc 

K. A. MacDonald Raeforc 

Rudolph Jones, President Fayettevilh 

THE GOVERNOR MOREHEAD SCHOOL, RALEIGH 

(Formerly The State School for the Blind and the Deaf) 

Rev. 4188; Code s. 2228; 1899, cc. 311, 540; 1901. c. 707; 

1905, c. 67; 1925, c. 306, ss. 10, 13, 14; 1963, c. 448, •>. 28; 

C. S. 5873; G. S. 115-322 

Composition : Eleven members appointed by the Governor. 

Carroll W. Weathers, Chairman Winston-Salen 

W. Paul Morgan Statesvilb 

S. Linton Smith Raleigl 

Welker O. Shue Grahan 

G. P. Henderson Maxtoi 

Harry Shor Raleigl 

H. Edward Knox Charlotb 

J. Floyd Wilson, Jr. Tarbort 

E. L. Hoilowell Edentoi 

Cecil J. Hill Brevan 

Claude E. Teague Chapel Hil 



Governmental Boards and Commission 381 

NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE AT DURHAM 

1925, c. 306, s. 9 (a); 1939, c. 65, s. 4; 1947, c. 189: 
1957, c. 1142; G. S. 116-46 

Composition: Twelve members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the General Assembly. 

Bascom Baynes, Chairman Durham 

Welch Harriss High Point 

Dr. J. M. Hubbard, Sr., Vice-Chairman Durham 

Mrs. Eloise Beech Kinston 

Marshall T. Spears, Sr. Durham 

Clarence Watkins Reidsville 

Robert Brown . . . . High Point 

Mrs. R. S. Ferguson Taylorsville 

Dr. J. R. Larkins Raleigh 

M. H. Thompson Durham 

Dr. J. R. Larkins Raleigh 

Clyde A. Shreve Summerfield 



NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL OF THE ARTS. 
WINSTON-SALEM 

1963. c. 116; G. S. 116-65 

Composition : Thirteen members. One ex -officio and twelve ap- 
pointed by the Governor. 

Benjamin F. Swalin, Conductor, N. C. Symphony, 

ex-officio Chapel Hill 

Wallace Carroll . . Winston-Salem 

A. J. Fletcher Raleigh 

James McClure Clark Asheville 

Hugh Cannon . Raleigh 

Mrs. Dan K. Moore Raleigh 

Mrs. James Boyd Southern Pines 

Mrs. Martha Muilenburg Arlington, Va. 

Sam Ragan Raleigh 

Dr. James Semans Durham 

Smith Bagley Winston-Salem 



•'.si' Nor mi C vroi is a Mani \i. 

R. Philip Hanes, Jr. Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Wilbur Jolly Louisburg 

Mrs. Everette Miller Raleigh 

Robei't Ward. President Winston-Salem 

NORTH ( AROLINA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AT 
M ORG ANTON 

Under the control and management of the North Carolina Direc- 
tors of Schools for the Deaf. 

1961, e. 968; 1963. c. 418; G. S. 115-338 



OXFORD ORPHANAGE, OXFORD 

Private Laws, 1923, c. 119; 1953, c. 60 

Composition: Three members appointed by the Governor, one 
ex-officio and five elected by the Grade Lodge of North Carolina. 

Benjamin Cone, President Greensboro 

Judge William J. Bundy, Vice President Greenville 

Arnold J. Koonce, Sr., Chairman, ex-officio High Point 

Alfred A. Kafer, Jr., Vice Chairman New Bern 

Dr. Charles H. Pugh Gastonia 
Maurice E. Walsh North Wilkesboro 

Robert L. Martin Bethel 

Robert N. Bass, Jr. Raleigh 

William A. Hooks Smithfield 

A. D. Leon Gray. Secretary Oxford 

PEMBROKE STATE COLLEGE, PEMBROKE 

1925, c. 306. s. 9; 1929, c. 238; 1931, c. 275; 1941, c. 323; 
1949, c. 58; 1957, c. 1142; G. S. 116-46 

Composition: Twelve members appointed by the Governor and 
approved by the General Assembly. 

L. W. Jacobs, Chairman Pembroke 

Edward L. Williamson Whiteville 

Ashley Murphy Atkinson 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 



38?. 



Raymond B. Mallary 
James E. Hillman 
Martin Brooks 
Hal Little 
Harry W. Locklear 
Herman Dial 

Zeb A. Lowry 

Elmer T. Lowry . . . 
John Willie Oxendine 
English E. Jones, President 



Tabor City 

Raleigh 

Pembroke 

Wadesboro 

Pembroke 

Maxton 

Pembroke 

Rowland 

Lumberton 

Pembroke 



TRUSTEES UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

North Carolina State University at Raleigh 

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
C. S. 5789; G. S. 116-4 

Composition: One hundred members. Elected by the General 
Assembly. The legal term of office expires April 1st of year indi- 
cated. 

Executive Committee 

Governor Dan K. Moore, Chairman ex-officio Raleigh 

1968 
George Watts Hill Durham 

Rudolph I. Mintz Wilmington 

Vacancy 

1970 

J. Shelton Wicker Sanford 
Archie K. Davis Winston-Salem 

W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro 

Thomas J. White Kinston 

Mrs. Emily Preyer Greensboro 

Lennox G. Cooper Wilmington 



384 North Carolina Manual 

1972 

Wade Barber Pittsboro 

Reid A. Maynard Burlington 

Mrs. A. H. Lathrop Asheville 

Mrs. John G. Burgwyn Jackson 

Victor S. Bryant Durham 
Vacancy 

HONORARY LIFETIME MEMBERS 

Luther H. Hodges Chapel Hill 

John W. Clark Franklinville 

John W. Umstead, Jr. Chapel Hill 
Frank P. Graham New York, New York 

Gordon Gray Washington, D. C. 

Terry Sanford Fayetteville 

EX-OFFICIO 

Dan K. Moore, Governor Raleigh 
Charles F. Carroll, State Superintendent of 

Public Instruction Raleigh 

SECRETARY TO THE BOARD 

Arch T. Allen Raleigh 

Mrs. Ann Houghtaling, Assistant Chapel Hill 

1969 

William A. Johnson Lillington Harnett 

William Medford Waynesville Haywood 

Oscar C. Vatz Fayetteville Cumberland 

Graham W 7 . Bell Fayetteville Cumberland 

R. Walker Martin Raleigh Wake 

John Lassiter Smithfield Johnston 

Luther Hamilton Morehead City Carteret 

William G. Reid Pilot Mountain Surry 

J. Shelton Wicker Sanford Lee 

W. C. Harris, Jr Raleigh Wake 

Walter L. Smith Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Victor S. Brvant Durham Durham 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 385 

Wade Barber Pittsboro Chatham 

Henry A. Foscue High Point Guilford 

Mrs. J. B. Kittrell Greenville Pitt 

C. Knox Massey Durham Durham 
Reid Maynard Burlington Alamance 

A. Alex Shuford, Jr. Hickory Catawba 

L. H. Swindell Washington Beaufort 

Robert B. Jordan, III Mount Gilead Montgomery 

J. Hanes Lassiter Charlotte Mecklenburg 

John Van Lindley Greensboro Guilford 

B. Atwood Skinner Wilson Wilson 

Ben Trotter . . . Leaksville Rockingham 

Fred L. Wilson Kannapolis Cabarrus 

1971 

Wyatt R. Aydlett Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Irwin Belk Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Mrs. Mebane H. Burgwyn Jackson Northampton 

Sam N. Clark, Jr. Tarboro Edgecombe 

T. J. Collier Bayboro Pamlico 

Archie K. Davis Winston-Salem Forsyth 

James C. Farthing Lenoir Caldwell 

Dorothy Glenn Gastonia Gaston 

George Watts Hill Durham Durham 

Mrs. J. Henry Hill, Jr. Hickory Catawba 

Thomas H. Leath Rockingham Richmond 

W. J. Lupton Swan Quarter Hyde 

Thomas McKnight Troutman Iredell 

D. L. McMichael Madison Rockingham 

R. D. McMillan, Jr. Red Springs Robeson 
Rudolph I. Mintz Wilmington New Hanover 

Thomas O. Moore Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Ashley M. Murphy Atkinson Pender 

Douglas M. Robinson Mars Hill Madison 

R. Glenn Stoval Roxboro Person 

David T. Tayloe Washington Beaufort 

Carl V. Venters Jacksonville Onslow 

Henry Weil Goldsboro Wayne 

C. M. Vanstory Greensboro Guilford 

George M. Wood Camden Camden 



386 NOK i ii (' \i:m i \ \ Manuai 



197.'} 



Fred F. Bahnson, Jr. Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Lenox G. Cooper Wilmington New Hanover 

J. Monroe Council, Jr. Lake Waccamaw Columbus 

W. Lunsford Crew Roanoke Rapids Halifax 

E. M. Fennell Hickory . Catawba 

Mrs. George Ferguson Draper Rockingham 

Dr. Amos Johnson Garland Sampson 

Mrs. Albert 11. Lathrop Asheville Buncombe 

Larry I. Moore . Wilson Wilson 

William K. Neal Roanoke Rapids Halifax 

Arthur I. Park Oxford Granville 

John A. Prevost Waynesville Haywood 

M is. L. Richardson Preyer Greensboro Guilford 

Addison H. Reese Charlotte Mecklenburg 

T. L. Richie Marion McDowell 

H. L. Riddle, Jr. Morganton Burke 

Roy Rowe Burgaw Pender 

J. Brantley Speight Winterville Pitt 

John P. Stedman Lumberton Robeson 

C. Lacy Tate Whiteville Columbus 

W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro Wayne 

Mrs. Stewart B. Warren Clinton Sampson 

Cameron S. Weeks Tarboro Edgecombe 

Thomas J. White Kinston Lenoir 

Mis. George D. Wilson Fayetteville Cumberland 

1975 

Arch T. Allen Raleigh Wake 

Ike F. Andrews Siler City Chatham 

W. ('. Barfield Wilmington New Hanover 

Charles W. Bradshaw . Raleigh Wake 

Dr. Francis A. Buchanan . . Hendersonville Henderson 

C.C.Cameron Charlotte .. Mecklenburg 

Mrs. Nancy H. Copeland . . Murrreesboro Hertford 

Frank U. Crowell Lincolnton Lincoln 

Braxton B. Dawson Washington Beaufort 

Xorvin K. Dickerson Monroe Union 

• I H. Froelich. Jr High Point Cuilford 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 387 

Eugene B. Graham, III Charlotte Mecklenburg 

James C. Green Clarkton Bladen 

Robert B. Hall Mocksville Davie 

Mrs. Howard Holderness .... Greensboro Guilford 

Samuel H. Johnson Raleigh Wake 

Wade B. Matheny Forest City Rutherford 

Beverly Moore Greensboro Guilford 

Dr. F. M. Simmons Patterson New Bern Craven 

T. Henry Redding Asheboro Randolph 

[). P. Russ, Jr. Fayetteville Cumberland 

W. P. Saunders Southern Pines Moore 

Ralph H. Scott Haw River Alamance 

Evander S. Simpson Smithfield Johnston 

Hill Ya rbnrough Louisburg Franklin 



NORTH CAROLINA VOCATIONAL TEXTILE SCHOOL 

1955, c. 1372, art. 27; 1963, c. 448, s. 30; G. S. 115A-39 

Composition: Seven members. One ex-officio, six appointed by 
the Governor. 

A. G. Bullard, Director of Vocational 

Education, ex-officio. Raleigh 

Harold Mercer, Chairman Gastonia 

Robert L. Stowe, Jr. Belmont 
Carl F. Mauney. . Kings Mountain 

Sherwood Hedgpeth Greensboro 

J. C. Cowan, Jr. Greensboro 

H. D. Whitener Gastonia 

WESTERN CAROLINA UNIVERSITY, CHLLOWHEE 

1925, c. 270; 1929, c. 251; 1951, c. 1167; 1953, c. 1282: 
1957, c. 1142; 1967, c. 1038; G. S. 116-46 

Composition: Twelve members appointed by the Governor, ap 
proved by the General Assembly. 

Jonathan Woody, Chairman Waynesville 

J. Ramsev Buchanan Sylva 



3SS X.ikmi Carolina Manual 

E. J. Whitmore Franklin 

Dr. Charles 0. Van Gorder Andrews 

Mrs. Dan K. Moore Raleigh 

Modeal Walsh Robbinsville 

Sam J. Ervin. Ill Morgan ton 

Boyce Whitmire Hendersonville 

Pom Mallonee Candler 

Arnold J. Hyde Asheville 

Frank Forsyth Andrews 

Morgan Cooper Forest City 

Paul Reid. President. .. . Cullowhee 

WILMINGTON COLLEGE, WILMINGTON 

1963, c. 448; G. S. 116-45.2: G. S. 116-46 

Composition : Twelve members appointed by the Governor and 
approved by the General Assembly. 

William Horace Corbett Wilmington 

Frederick B. Graham Wilmington 

Charles E. Hartford Wilmington 

Fredrick Coville Atkinson 

Mrs. Cyrus D. Hogue, Jr. . Wilmington 

Addison Hewlett, Jr. Wilmington 

B. D. Schwartz Wilmington 

James Smith Chinquapin 

L. Bradford Tillery Wilmington 

Eugene B. Tomlinson, Jr. Southport 

Raiford G. Trask Wilmington 

Alan A. Marshall Wilmington 

W. M. Randall, President Wilmington 

WINSTON-SALEM STATE COLLEGE, 
WINSTON-SALEM 

1921. c. 61 ; 1925, c. 306, s. 9; 1957, c. 1142; 1963, c. 421 ; 
G. S. 116-45; G. S. 116-46 

Composition: Twelve members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the General Assembly. 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 389 

Winfield Blackwell, Chairman Winston-Salem 

John Hough, Vice Chairman Leaksville 

Clark S. Brown, Secretary Winston-Salem 

Ralph M. Stockton, Jr. Winston-Salem 

Gordon Hanes Winston-Salem 

Thomas B. Rice Winston-Salem 

N. L. Dillard Yanceyville 

Sam J. Burrow, Jr. Asheboro 

Gordon Tomlinson Mocksville 

Rev. William R. Crawford Winston-Salem 

Dr. Samuel 0. Jones Greensboro 

J. Paul Wallace Troy 

Kenneth R. Williams. President Winston-Salem 



I'm Xiiktu Carolina Man'tjai 

MENTAL INSTITUTIONS 

BROUGHTON HOSPITAL, MORGANTON 

1921, c. 183, s. 1; 102:). c. 306, s. 3; 15)17, c. 537 
1951). c. 1028; 1963, c. 1166; G. S. 122-7 

Under the State Department of Mental Health. 

1963, c. 1166: G. S. 122-1 

CHERRY HOSPITAL, GOLDSBORO 

1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 3; 1963, c. 1166: 
G. S. 122-1; G. S. 122-7 

Under the State Department of Mental Health. 

1963, c. 1166; G. S. 122-1 

DOROTHEA 1)1 X HOSPITAL, RALEIGH 

1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1935, c. 306, s. 3; 1947, c. 537 : 
1959, c. 1028; 1963, c. 1166; G. S. 122-7 

I rnder the State Department of Mental Health. 

1963. c. 1166; G. S. 122-1 

JOHN UMSTEAD HOSPITAL, BLTNEK 

1917. c. 537; 1959, c. 1028; 1963, c. 1166; G. S. 122-7 
Under the State Department of Mental Health. 
1963,c. 1166; G. S. 122-1 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 391 

CENTERS FOR THE RETARDED 

CASWELL CENTER, KINSTON 

1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 3; 1945, c. 925, s. 1; 
1959, c. 1028; 1963, c. 1184; C. S. 6159 (a); G. S. 122-69 

Under the State Department of Mental Health. 

1963, c. 1166; G. S. 122-69 

MURDOCH CENTER, BUTNER 
1943, c. 136; 1959, c. 1028; 1963, c. 1184; G. S. 122-69 

Under the State Department of Mental Health. 
1963, c. 1184: G. S. 122-69 

O'BERRY CENTER, GOLDSBORO 
1945, c. 459; 1959, c. 1028; 1963, c. 1166; G. S. 122-7 

Under the State Department of Mental Health. 
1963, c. 1166; G. S. 122-1 

WESTERN CAROLINA CENTER, MORGANTON 

1959, c. 1038; 1961, c. 513; 1963, c. 1184; G. S. 122-1.2; 
G. S. 122-69 

Under the State Department of Mental Health. 
1963, c. 1184; G. S. 122-69 

ALCOHOLIC REHABILITATION CENTERS 

ALCOHOLIC REHABILITATION CENTER, BUTNER 

Under the State Department of Mental Health 
1963, c. 1166; G. S. 122-1 



392 North Carolina Manual 

HOSPITALS 

THE NORTH CAROLINA CEREBRAL PALSY HOSPITAL, 

DURHAM 

1945, c. 504; 1953, c. 893; G. S. 131-128 

( mnposition : Nine members appointed by the Governor. 

Clarence Stasavich ..Greenville 

Dr. Thomas A. Henson . . . Kinston 

Jesse Helms Raleigh 

J. Leslie Atkins, Jr. Durham 

Harold Meyer Chapel Hill 

Grizelle Norfleet Winston-Salem 

Dr. W. M. Roberts Gastonia 

Mrs. R. M. Middleton Lexington 

J. Fleming Wily, Jr. Durham 



THE MOSES H. CONE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 
GREENSBORO 

Pr. 1913, c. 400; 1961, c. 234 

Composition : Fifteen members. Nine elected by the Board of 
Trustees, three appointed by the Governor, one appointed by the 
Greensboro City Council, one appointed by the Guilford County 
Board of Commissioners and one appointed by the Guilford County 
Medical Society 

Officers : 

Benjamin Cone, President Greensboro 

Roger A. McDuffie, Vice President Greensboro 

Howard Holderness, Treasurer Greensboro 

Trustees : 

Mrs. Britt M. Armfield Greensboro 

Dr. Isaac M. Taylor Chapel Hill 

Dr. Claud B. Bowen Greensboro 

Ceasar Cone Greensboro 

Mrs. Julius W. Cone Greensboro 

Herman Cone, Jr. Greensboro 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 393 

Joseph T. Martin Greensboro 

N. P. Hayes Greensboro 

Roy C. Millikan ... Greensboro 

Charles F. Myers, Jr Greensboro 

R. D. Douglas, Jr. Greensboro 

C. M. Vanstory, Jr. Greensboro 

Harold L. Bettis, Secretary Greensboro 

NORTH CAROLINA ORTHOPEDIC HOSPITAL, GASTONIA 

1917, c. 199, s. 4; C. S. 7254; G. S. 131-3 

Composition : Nine members appointed by the Governor. 

J. Harold Lineberger, Chairman Belmont 

Mrs. Nick D. Garden Charlotte 

George Blanton, Jr Shelby 

James E. McKnight, Secretary Mooresville 

J. Robert Wren Gastonia 

Mrs. O. Max Gardner, Sr. Shelby 

Walter L. Smith Charlotte 

Dr. Dorothy N. Glenn Gastonia 

Vacancy 



NORTH CAROLINA SANATORIUMS FOR THE 
TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS 

BLACK MOUNTAIN, McCAIN, WILSON AND CHAPEL HILL 

1907, c. 964; Ex. session 1913, c. 40, s. 1; 1923, cc. 96, 127; 
1925, c. 306, s. 12; 1935, c. 91, ss. 2, 3; 1935, c. 138; 
1939, c. 325; G. S. 131-62 

Composition : One ex-officio. Twelve members appointed by the 
Governor. 

Dr. Jacob Koomen, ex-officio Raleigh 

0. Arthur Kirkman, Chairman High Point 

Paul S. Cragan Sanford 

Mrs. Roy Parker, Secretary Ahoskie 

Hardy Talton Pikeville 



894 North Carolina Manual 

Dr. Charles 0. Van Gorder Andrews 

A. E. Gibson Wilmington 

Forrest Lockey Aberdeen 

Mrs. P. P. McCain Wilson 

J. L. McNeill Raeford 

Mrs. Reid S. Monroe Salisbury 

Dr. M. A. Pittman Wilson 

Mrs. Cecil L. Sanford Laurinburn' 



NORTH CAROLINA CONFEDERATE INSTITUTION 
Woman's Home at Fayetteville 
1913, c. 62; C. S. 5135; G. S. 112-2 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Mrs. W. S. Alexander Fairmont 

Hal Walker Broadfoot Fayetteville 

James Isaac Musgrave Pikeville 

Mrs. Henry L. Stevens, Jr. Warsaw- 
Mrs. Melvin James Weeks Dunn 

Mrs. Robert Earl Williford, Sr. Fayetteville 

Mrs. Gus M. Womble Fayetteville 



Governmental Boards and Commissions' 39"> 

EXAMINING BOARDS 

STATE BOARD OF CERTIFIED PUBLIC 
ACCOUNTANT EXAMINERS 

1913, c. 157; 1925, c. 261, s. 11; 1939, c. 21; 1951. c. 844; 
C. S. 7008; G. S. 93-12 

Composition : Four members appointed by the Governor. 

Charles H. McAdams, Jr., President Sanford 

J. Neveland Brand, Jr., Vice President Wilmington 

T. N. Grice. Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

Richard M. Hunter Charlotte 

Katharine D. Guthrie, Executive Director . . Chapel Hill 



NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF ARCHITECTURE 

1915, c. 270, s. 1; 1957, c. 794; C. S. 4986; G. S. 83-2 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Archie Royal Davis, President Durham 

Fred W. Butner, Jr., Vice President Winston-Salem 

Charles H. Wheatley, Secretary-Treasurer Charlotte 

Robert L. Clemmer Hickory 

J. Bertram King Asheville 

A. Lewis Polier, Executive Director Raleigh 



STATE BOARD OF BARBER EXAMINERS 

1929, c. 119, s. 6; G. S. 86-6 

Composition : Three members appointed by the Governor. 

C. T. Land, Chairman Raleigh 

L. O. Crowe, Vice Chairman Morehead City 

G. C. Clark Hickory 



.96 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF 
CHIROPRACTIC EXAMINERS 

1917, c. 73, s. 1 ; 1933, c. 442, s. 1; 1963, c. 646: 
C. S. 6711; G. S. 90-140 

Composition: Three members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. Ramey F. Kemp, President Mocksville 

Dr. Erie Downing, Vice President . . . . Fayetteville 

Dr. W. Dillon Chambers, Secretary-Treasurer Asheville 

NORTH CAROLINA LICENSING BOARD FOR CONTRA! TORS 

1925, c. 318, s. 2; G. S. 87-2 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

N. K. Dickerson, Chairman Monroe 

J. P. Phifer, Vice Chairman Rockingham 

E. G. Singletary Greensboro 

C. E. Clement Hickory 

E. P. Bond, Jr Lumberton 

James M. Wells, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF 
COSMETIC ART EXAMINERS 

1933, c. 179; 1935, c. 54, s. 2; G. S. 88-13 

Composition : Three members appointed by the Governor. 

Mrs. Iris H. Lawrence, Chairman Raleigh 

Mrs. Ala K. McGuire, Vice Chairman Boone 

Mrs. Lelia M. Thompson, Secretary Lumberton 

Mrs. Catherine B. Munn, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

STATE BOARD OF DENTAL EXAMINERS 

1879, c. 139; 1915, c. 178; 1935, c. 66. s. 1 ; 1961, c. 213; G. S. 90-22 

Composition: Six members elected by the dentists of North 
Carolina. 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 397 

Dr. W. H. Breeland, President Belmont 

Dr. Clinton C. Diercks, Secretary-Treasurer Morganton 

Dr. S. L. Bobbitt Raleigh 

Dr. Freeman C. Slaughter Kannapolis 

Dr. Guy R. Willis Durham 

Dr. R. B. Barden Wilmington 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

1937, c. 87, s. 1; G. S. 87-39 

Composition : Five members, three appointed by the Governor, 
two ex-officio. 

N. E. Cannady, Chairman Oxford 

Oscar Greene, Jr. Kinston 

Howard R. Pancoast High Point 

W. P. Seagraves Raleigh 

John R. McClelland Charlotte 

Mrs. Elizabeth E. Anderson, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EMBALM ERS 
AND FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Rev. 4384; 1901, c. 388, ss. 1, 2, 3; 1931, c. 174; 1945, c. 98, s. 1; 
1949, c. 951, s. 1; 1957, c. 1240 s. 1; C. S. 6777; G. S. 90-203 

Composition : Eight members, seven elected by the North Caro- 
lina State Board of Embalmers and Funeral Directors, one ex- 
officio. 

Dr. Lenox D. Baker, President, State Board of Health, 

ex-officio Durham 

E. C. Cavin, President Mooresville 

Frank L. Yost, Vice-President Rocky Mount 

Charles M. Phillips, Secretary Kenly 

W. N. Stevenson Elkin 

W. D. Townson Murphy 

W. Davie Munden, Sr Morehead City 

■I. Clinton Joyner , . Wilson 

Hyde 0. Robinson, Executive Secretary Raleigh 



:'!is North Carolina Manual 

STATE HOARD OF REGISTRATION FOR PROFESSIONAL 
ENGINEERS AND LAND SURVEYORS 

1921, c. l,s. 3; 1965, c. 940; C. S. 6055 (d); G. S. 89-4 

Composition : Six members appointed by the Governor. 

John D. Watson. Chairman Greensboro 

George S. Rawlins, Vice Chairman Charlotte 

Robert B. Rice, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

Chilton R. Jones Tarboro 

Meriwether Lewis ...... Kinston 

William N. Turner Cullowhee 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF LAW EXAMINERS 

1933, c. 210. s. 10; c. 331 ; 1935, cc. 33, 61; 1941. c. 344, s. 6; 1965, c. 65; 

G. S. 84-24 

Composition: Nine members elected by the Council of the N. C. 
State Bar. 

Marshall T. Spears, Chairman Durham 

Arch K. Schoch High Point 

Charles G. Buck Asheville 

William L. Mills, Jr. ...Concord 

James B. Swails Wilmington 

Warren C. Stack .... Charlotte 

H. E. Stacy, Jr. Lumberton 

E. P. Dameron . . . Marion 

J. E. Tucker New Bern 

Edward L. Cannon, Secretary . Raleigh 

Kingsland Van Winkle, Emeritus Asheville 

George B. Greene, Emeritus Kinston 

Zeb V. Norman, Emeritus Plymouth 

NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY CERTIFICATION BOARD 

1955, c. 505; G. S. 125-9 

Composition: Four members consisting of State Librarian, the 
Dean of the School of Library Science of the University of North 



(jrOVKKNMENTAI BOARDS AMI COMMISSIONS 391' 

Carolina, President N. C. Library Association and one librarian 
appointed by the Executive Board of the North Carolina Library 

Association. 

Nancy Gray, Chairman Wilson 

Philip S. Ogilvie, State Librarian Raleigh 

Paul S. Ballance. President N. C. Library 

Association Winston-Salem 

Margaret E. Kalp. Acting Dean, School of Library Science, 

The University of North Carolina, Secretary Chapel Hill 

STATE BOARD OF MEDICAL EXAMINERS 

Rev. s. 4492; Code, s. 3123; 1858-9, c. 258, ss. 3. 4; Extra 
Session 1921, c. 44, s. 1 ; C. S. 6606; G. S. 90-2 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the North Carolina 
Medical Society. 

Dr. James E. Davis, President Durham 

Dr. Joseph J. Combs, Secretary Raleigh 

Dr. H. Lee Large Charlotte 

Dr. Frank Edmondson Asheboro 

Dr. W. Boyd Owen Waynesville 

Dr. Clark Rodman Washington 

Dr. Vernon Williams Tavlor, Jr. Elkin 



NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF NURSING 

1917, c. 17: 1925, c. 87; 1931, c. 56; 1953, c. 1199; 1965, c. 578; 
C. S. 6729: G. S. 90-158 

Dr. Eloise R. Lewis, Chairman Greensboro 

Eugene J. Smith, Vice Chairman Charlotte 

Mrs. Jessie P. Riser, Secretary Concord 

Mrs. Lillian D. James Hamlet 

Mrs. Helen S. Miller Durham 

Dr. C. F. Irons Greenville 

Dr. E. R. Caldwell, Jr. . Statesville 

J. Grayson Brothers Morganton 

James M. DeVane Lumberton 



400 Xiikmi Carolina Manual 

Mrs. Mae Adams Beard Goldsboro 

Mrs. Doris P. Crowder Durham 

Mrs. Ruth L. Harris Black Mountain 

Mary McRee, Executive Director Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF OPTT< LANS 

[951, c. 108»; G. S. 90-238 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governoi . 

Frank M. McBryde, President Fayetteville 

H. L. Ridgeway, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

William Fluharty Asheville 

Vinson Smith Winston-Salem 

Richard Hamilton Durham 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF 
EXAMINERS IN OPTOMETRY 

1909. c. lit, s. 3; 1915, c. 21, s. 1; 1935, c. 63; 
C. S. 6689: G. S. 90-116 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. Lindsay Fincannon, President Elkin 

Dr. James S. Bailey, Secretary-Treasurer Charlotte 

Dr. John Robinson Wallace 

Dr. G. L. Lang Concord 

Dr. Sidney Christian Williamston 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF OSTEOPATHIC 
EXAMINATION AND REGISTRATION 

1907. c. 764, s. 1 ; 1913. c. 92, s. 1 ; 1937. c. 301. s. 1 : 
C. S. 6701 ; G. S. 90-130 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. Richard C. Baker. President Rockingham 

Dr. Joseph H. Huff, Secretary-Treasurer Burlington 

Dr. Guy T. Funk Winston-Salem 

Dr. Walter C. Eldrett Hendersonvjlle 

Neva A. McCoy Charlotte 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 101 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 
Rev. s. 4473; 1905, c. 108, ss. 5, 7; C. S. 6652; G. S. 90-55 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Frank W. Dayvault Lenoir 

Harold V. Day, President Spruce Pine 

David D. Claytor, Vice President Greensboro 

Clarence E. Page, Jr. Henderson 

W. H. Randall, Jr Lillington 

H. C. McAllister, Secretary-Treasurer Chapel Hill 



STATE EXAMINING COMMITTEE OF 
PHYSICAL THERAPISTS 

1951, c. 1131; G. S. 90-257 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Eleanor Flanagan, Chairman . . . . Durham 

Mary C. Singleton, Secretary-Treasurer Chapel Hill 

Dr. Charles M. Cameron Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Dorothea B. Wray Gastonia 

Olive Wortman Salisbury 



STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 
PLUMBING AND HEATING CONTRACTORS 

1931, c. 52, s. 1; 1933, c. 57; 1939, c. 224, s. 1; G. S. 87-16 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

J. M. Lee, Jr., Chairman Durham 

J. E. Seely .Raleigh 

J. M. Jarrett, Secretary-Treasurer . Raleigh 

Dr. H. G. Baity Chapel Hill 

E. A. Luquire, Jr. Durham 

Finley Lee • Kinston 

J. H. Rogers Asheville 

W. F. Morrison, Executive Secretary Raleigh 



Wl North Carolina Manual 

STATE BOARD OF PODIATRY EXAMINERS 

L916, c. 78, s. 3; 1963, c. 1195; C. S. 6765; G. S. 90-190 

Composition: Three members appointed by the North Carolina 
Pedic Association. 

Dr. Grady Dunn, President Winston-Salem 

Dr. L. D. Abernethy, Jr., Vice President Charlotte 

Dr. Walter H. Hill. Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA REAL ESTATE LICENSING BOARD 
1957, c. 744; G. S. 93A-3 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

J. Toliver Davis, Chairman Forest City 

Carroll V. Singleton Henderson 

Paul W. Crayton New Bern 

J. Bart Hall Belmont 

Kenneth R. Smith Raleigh 

Joseph F. Schweidler, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 



STATE BOARD OF REFRIGERATION EXAMINERS 

1955, c. 912; G. S. 87-52 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

J. C. Lumsden Raleigh 

W. V. Carter, Chairman Raleigh 

W. H. Jones Raleigh 

E. T. Chanlett Chapel Hill 

K. P. Hanson Raleigh 

C. V. Stevens Salisbury 

B. B. Smith Lumberton 

James A. Dean, Executive Secretary Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 403 

STATE BOARD OF SANITARIAN EXAMINERS 

1959, c. 1271 ; G. S. 90 A-2 

Composition: Nine members. Three ex-officio and six appointed 
by the Governor. 

J. M. Jarrett, Chairman, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Jacob Koomen, ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. W. Fred Mayes, ex-officio Chapel Hill 

R. W. Brown, Secretary-Treasurer Asheville 

Dr. H. W. Stevens Asheville 

M. M. Melvin Raleigh 

Joe L. Costin Warsaw- 
Bob C. Sandford Rockingham 

J. S. Canady Fayetteville 

NORTH CAROLINA STRUCTURAL PEST CONTROL 

COMMISSION 

1955, c. 1017; G. S. 106-65.23 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. Clyde F. Smith, Chairman Raleigh 

John L. Reitzel, Secretary Raleigh 

David Dodd, Jr. Monroe 

G. D. Jones Raleigh 

D. R. Nimocks Fayetteville 

NORTH CAROLINA VETERINARY MEDICAL BOARD 

Rev. s. 5432; 1903, c. 503, s. 2; 1961, c. 353, s. 1 : 
C. S. 6755; G. S. 90-180 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. F. B. Coates Reidsville 

Dr. J. I. Cornwell, Secretary-Treasurer Asheville 

Dr. C. R. Swearingen Smithfield 

Dr. J. G. Martin Boone 

Dr. C. C. McLean Southern Pines 



I'M North Carolina Manual 

STATE BOARD OK WATER WELL CONTRACTOR 
EXAMINERS 

1961, c. 997; G. S. 87-70 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Mauley S. Martin, Chairman Warrenton 

Boyce T. Green Canton 

F. Jack Fau Hickory 
J. M. Jarrett .Raleigh 

G. Allie Moore. Secretary-Treasurer Wilmington 
Harry M. Peak Raleigh 
James A. Ingram Raleigh 
Leonard S. Daniel, Executive Secretary Raleigh 



STATE OWNED RAILROADS 

STATE OWNED RAILROADS 
ATLANTIC AND NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD 

Directors: 

Edward S. Dixon Morehead City 

Garland E. Bobbitt Raleigh 

George W. Ipock New Bern 

James R. Strickland Jacksonville 

Lewis Combs Creswell 

R. L. Grant Jackson 

Donald P. Brock Trenton 

Mrs. Elizabeth Pugh Windsor 

Henry Oetjen Raleigh 

Harold Maxwell New Bern 

H. S. Gibbs Morehead City 

D. L. Stallings New Bern 

Officers : 

Edward S. Dixon, President Morehead City 

W. Olin Reed, Secretary-Treasurer Kinston 

James N. Smith, Attorney Goldsboro 

Albert R. Bell, Inspector New Bern 



Governmental Boarus and Commission-. 405 

NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD 

Directors: 

John M. Alexander Raleig'h 

Walter Rucker Greensboro 

Mrs. Winifred T. Wells Wallace 

Rex E. Wood Salisbury 

Joe D. Steed, Sr .... Candor 

Lewis Tappan Clinton 

Archie R. Taylor Lillington 

Ottway Burton Asheboro 

Van Wyck Webb Raleigh 

Eugene Shaw Greensboro 

Ralph Scott Burlington 

James M . Poyner Raleigh 

Officers : 

John M. Alexander, President Raleigh 

Robert M. Martin, Secretary-Treasurer High Point 

I. T. Valentine, Jr.. Attorney Nashville 

Robert M. Swicegood. Expert Asheville 



PART VI 
LEGISLATIVE 



MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA— SESSION 1967 

Officers and Members of the Senate 

OFFICERS 

Robert W. Scott President Rt. 1, Haw River 

Herman A. Moore President pro tern Charlotte 

S. Ray Byerly Principal Clerk Sanford 

Eugene Simmons Reading Clerk Tarboro 

Brooks W. Poole Sergeant-at-Arms Raleigh 

SENATORS 
(Alphabetically Arranged) 

Name District Party Address 

Alford, Dallas L., Jr Eighth Democrat Rocky Mount 

Allen, J. F Nineteenth Democrat Biscoe 

Allsbrook, Julian R Fourth Democrat Roanoke Rapids 

Austin, Jesse H., Jr Eighth Democrat Clayton 

Bagnal, Harry Twenty-second Republican. . . Rt. 1, Winston-Salem 

Bailey, J. Ruffin Twelfth Democrat Raleigh 

Boger, John R., Jr Twenty-fourth Democrat Concord 

Bridgers, Vinson Fourth Democrat Tarboro 

Briggs, Bruce B Thirty-first Republican Asheville 

Brumby, Mrs. Mary Faye.. .Thirty-third Democrat Murphy 

Bryan, T. R., Sr Twenty-fifth Republican Wilkesboro 

Buchanan, Harry E Thirty-second Democrat Hendersonville 

Burney, John J., Jr Tenth Democrat Wilmington 

Byrd, Joe K Twenty-eighth Democrat Morganton 

Coggins, Jyles J Twelfth Democrat Raleigh 

Currie, Claude Eleventh Democrat Durham 

Dent, R. Theodore Thirty-first Republican Spruce Pine 

Ellis, Albert J Sixth Democrat Jacksonville 

Evans, Mrs. Martha W Twenty-seventh Democrat Charlotte 

Futrell, Ashley B Second Democrat Washington 

Gentry, Worth Twenty-first Democrat King 

Gilmore, Voit Nineteenth Democrat Southern Pines 

Green, James C Fifteenth Democrat Clarkton 

Griffin, C. Frank Twenty-fourth Democrat Monroe 

Hancock, Wills Seventh Democrat Oxford 

Harrington, J.J First Democrat Lewiston 

Henkel. C. V Twenty-sixth Democrat Turnersburg 

Henley, John T Fourteenth Democrat Hope Mills 

Kemp, Ed Eighteenth Democrat High Point 

MacLean, Hector Twentieth Democrat Lumberton 

Matheson, Don S Eleventh Democrat Hillsborough 

Maxwell, Charles K Twenty-seventh Democrat Rt. 1, Huntersville 

McGeachy, N. Hector, Jr.. . .Fourteenth Democrat Fayetteville 

McLendon, L. P., Jr Eighteenth Democrat Greensboro 

Moore, Herman A Twenty-seventh Democrat Charlotte 

Morgan, Robert B Thirteenth Democrat Lillington 

Nielson, Mrs. Geraldine R. . Twenty-second Republican Winston-Salem 

Norton, Clyde M Thirtieth Democrat Old Fort 

Osteen, John L Eighteenth Republican Greensboro 

Parrish, C.V Twenty-third Republican Salisbury 

Penn, Frank R Sixteenth Democrat Reidsville 

Rauch, Marshall A Twenty-ninth Democrat Gastonia 

Scott, Ralph H Seventeenth Democrat Rt. 1, Haw River 

Shuford, Adrian L., Jr Twenty-sixth Democrat Conover 

Simmons, I.eRoy G Tenth Democrat Rt. 1, Albertson 

Warren, Lindsay C, Jr Ninth Democrat Goldsboro 

White, Jack H Twenty-ninth Democrat Kings Mountain 

White, Thomas J Fifth Democrat Kinston 

Whitehurst, Sam L Third Democrat New Bern 

Wood, George M First Democrat Camden 

409 



HO Nokth Carolina Manual 

SENATORS 

Arranged by Districts 
i Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

District Name Address 

1st -J. .1. Harrington Lewiston 

1st ( teorge M. Wood Camden 

2nd— Ashley B. Futrell W aahington 

3rd Sam L. Whitehurst New Bern 

4th— Julian U . Allsbrook Roanoke Rapids 

ith Vinson Bridgera Tarboro 

5th— Thomas J. White Kinston 

6th— Albert J. Ellis Jacksonville 

7th— Wills Hancock Oxford 

8th — Dallas L. Alford, Jr Rocky Mount 

8th— Jesse II. Austin, .Ir Clayton 

9th— Lindsay C. Warren, Jr Goldsboro 

10th— John J. Burney, Jr V\ llmington 

10th— LeRoy G. Simmons Rt. 1, Albertson 

Uth— Claude Currie Durham 

Uth -Don S. Matheson Hillsborough 

L2th— J. Ruffin Bailey Raleigh 

12th— Jyles J. Coggins Raleigh 

13th— Robert B. Morgan Lilhngton 

14th— John T. Henley Hope Mills 

14th— N. Hector McGeaehy, Jr Fayetteville 

loth— James C. Green Clarkton 

16th— Frank R. Penn Reidsville 

17th— Ralph H. Scott Rt. 1, Haw River 

18th— Ed Kemp High Point 

18th— L. P. McLendon, Jr Greensboro 

18th— John L. Osteen (R) Greensboro 

19th— J. F. Allen Biscoe 

19th— Voit Gilmore Southern Pines 

20th— Hector MacLean Lumb erton 

21st— Worth Gentry King 

22nd— Harry Bagnal (R) Rt. 1, Winston-Salem 

22nd— Mrs. Geraldine R. Nielson (R) TV inston-Salem 

23rd— C. U. Parrish (R) Salisbury 

24th— John R. Boger, Jr Concord 

24th— C. Frank Griffin Monroe 

2.5th— T. R. Bryan, Sr (R.) Wilkesboro 

26th— C. V. Henkel Turnersburg 

26th— Adrian L. Shuford, Jr Conover 

27th— Mrs. Martha W. Evans Charlotte 

27th— Charles K. Maxwell Rt. 1, Huntersville 

27th— Herman A. Moore Charlotte 

28th— Joe K. Bvrd Morganton 

29th— Marshall A. Rauch Gastonia 

29th— Jack H. White Kings Mountain 

30th— Clvde M . Norton Old Fort 

31st— Bruce B. Briggs (R) Asheville 

31st— R. Theodore Dent (R) Spruce Pine 

32nd— Harrv E. Buchanan Hendersonville 

33rd— Mrs. Mary Fave Brumbv Murphy 



Senate 411 



RULES AND STANDING COMMITTEES 
OF THE SENATE 

1967 
SENATE RULES, SESSION 1967 

Order of Business 

Rule 1. Convening hour. The President shall take the chair 
at the hour fixed by the Senate upon adjournment on the pre- 
ceding legislative day, and shall call the members to order. In 
case the Senate adjourned on the preceding legislative day with- 
out having fixed the hour of reconvening, the Senate shall re- 
convene on the next legislative day at 12:00 o'clock noon. 

Rule 2. Opening the session. The President shall, upon order 
being obtained, have the sessions of the Senate opened with prayer. 

Rule 3. Convening in absence of President. In the absence of 
the President, the President pro tempore shall reconvene the Sen- 
ate and preside, and during such time shall be vested with all 
powers of the President except that of casting a vote in case of 
tie when he shall have voted as a Senator. And in the event of 
the absence of the President and President pro tempore at any 
time fixed for the reconvening of the Senate, the Principal Clerk 
of the Senate, or in his absence also, some member of the Senate 
Committee on Rules, shall call the Senate to order and designate 
some member to act as President. 

Rule 4. Quorum, (a) A quorum consists of a majority of all 
the qualified members of the Senate. 

(b) When a lesser number than a quorum convene, the Senators 
present may send the doorkeeper or any other person, for any or 
all absent Senators, as a majority of the Senators present deter- 
mine. 

Rule 5. Approval of Journal. After the prayer, and upon ap- 
pearance of a quorum, the President shall cause the Journal of 



1 1 2 Xni: 1 1! Caholina Manual 

the preceding day to be read and approved, unless the Chairman 
of the Committee on Journal or some member of the Senate by 
motion sustained by a majority of the members present, have the 
reading thereof dispensed with and the same approved as written. 

Rule 6. Order of Business. After approval of the Journal, the 
order of business shall be as follows: 

( 1 ) Reports of standing- committees. 

(2) Reports of select committees. 

(3) Introduction of bills, petitions, and resolutions. 

(4) Messages from the House of Representatives. 

(5) Unfinished business of preceding day. 

(6) Special Orders. 

(7) General Orders — First, local bills on third reading roll 
call, then local bills on second reading roll call. After that the 
riv(t race second reading local calendar in numerical order, taking 
up the Senate bills in first order. After disposition of the local 
calendar, the public calendar of bills will be considered in the 
same order, that is: 

(a) Third reading roll call bills. 

(b) Second reading roll call bills. 

(c) Second reading bills to be considered viva voce, with Sen- 
ate bills taking precedence in order over House bills. 

But Messages from the Governor and House of Representatives 
and communications and reports from State officers and reports 
from the Committee on Enrolled Bills may be recei/ed and acted 
on under any order of business. 

Conduct of Debate 

Rule 7. President to maintain order. The President shall have 
general direction of the Hall of the Senate, and in case of any 
disturbance or disorderly conduct in the galleries or lobbies, he 
shall have the power to order the same cleared. 

Rule 8. Substitution for president. The President shall have the 
right to call on any member to perform the duties of the Chair, 
but substitution shall not extend beyond one day. 

Rule 9. Points of order, (a) The President shall preserve order 
and decorum and proceed with the business of the Senate according 



Senate 413 

to the rules adopted. He shall decide all questions of order, sub- 
ject to an appeal to the Senate by any member, on which appeal 
no member shall speak more than once unless by leave of the 
Senate. A two-thirds vote of the members present is necessary to 
sustain any appeal from the ruling of the Chair. 

(b) In the event the Senate Rules do not provide for, or cover 
any point of order raised by any Senator, the rules of the United 
States House of Representatives shall govern. 

(c) When a Senator is called to order he shall take his seat 
until the President determines whether he was in order or not; if 
decided to be out of order, he shall not proceed without the per- 
mission of the Senate; and every question of order shall be de- 
cided by the President, subject to an appeal to the Senate by any 
Senator; and if a Senator is called to order for words spoken, 
the words excepted to shall be immediately taken down in writing, 
that the President or Senate may be better able to judge of the 
matter. 

Rule 10. Debating and voting by Lieutenant Governor. The 
Lieutenant Governor, as President of the Senate, being a Con- 
stitutional Officer shall not have the right to debate any question 
or to address the Senate upon any proposition unless by per- 
mission of the majority of members present, and shall have the 
right to vote only when there is a tie vote upon any question or 
election. 

Rule 11. Obtaining recognition, (a) when any Senator is about 
to speak in debate or deliver any matter to the Senate, he shall 
rise from his seat and respectfully address the President. No 
member shall speak until recognized by the President, and when 
two or more members rise at the same time, the President shall 
name the member to speak. 

(b) A Senator who has the floor may yield the floor to another 
Senator only for the purpose of allowing another Senator to state 
a question. Only the Chair may award the floor to any Senator 
for the purposes of allowing that Senator to engage in general 
debate. 

Rule 12. Recognition for extending courtesies. Courtesies of 
the floor and galleries shall be extended only by the President on 



lit Noktm Carolina Manual 

his own motion or upon the written request of a member of the 
Senate to former members of the General Assembly or to visiting 
distinguished visitors. 

Members may designate Honorary Pages by a statement de- 
livered to the Principal Clerk who will have a certificate issued 
therefor. 

The President may upon written request at intervals between 
various orders of business extend courtesies to schools or other 
special large groups visiting in the galleries while they are pres- 
ent, and the President shall, at such times as he deems appro- 
priate, express to those visitors in the galleries the pleasure of 
the Senate for their presence. 

Rule 13. Limitations on individual debate, (a) No Senator 
shall speak or debate more than three times nor longer than 
forty-five minutes on the same day on the same subject without 
leave of the Senate. 

(b) By permission of the President any member of Senate may 
address the Senate from the lectern located on the floor before 
the dais for the purpose of explaining a bill or resolution, stating 
a point of personal privilege or for the purpose of debate. 

Rule 14. Priority of business. All questions relating to priority 
of business shall be decided without debate. 

Rule 15. Reading of papers. When the reading of a paper, 
other than a petition, is called for, and any Senator objects to 
the reading, the question shall be determined by the Senate without 
debate. 

Rule 16. General decorum, (a) Senators and visitors shall un- 
cover their heads upon entering the Senate Chamber while the 
Senate is in session and shall continue uncovered during their 
continuance in the Chamber. 

(b) No remark reflecting personally upon the action of any 
Senator shall be in order in debate unless preceded by a motion 
or resolution of censure. 

(c) When the President is putting a question, or a division by 
counting is in progress, no Senator shall walk out of or across 
the Chamber, nor when a Senator is speaking, pass between him 
and the President. 



Senate 415 

(d) When a motion to adjourn or for recess is affirmatively 
determined, no member or officer shall leave his place until ad- 
journment or recess is declared by the President. 

(e) Smoking shall not be allowed on the floor or galleries of 
the Senate during Sessions. 

Motions 

Rule 17. Motioyis generally. All motions shall be reduced to 
writing, if desired by the President or a Senator, delivered at the 
table, and read by the President or Reading Clerk before the 
same are debated; but any motion may be withdrawn by the in- 
troducer at any time before decision or amendment. 

Rule 18. Motions — Order of precedence. When a question is 
before the Senate no motion shall be received except those herein 
specified, which motions shall have precedence as follows, viz.: 

(1) To adjourn. 

(2) To lay on the table. 

(3) For the previous question. 

(4) To postpone indefinitely. 

(5) To postpone to a certain day. 

(6) To commit to a standing committee. 

(7) To commit to a select committee. 

(8) To amend. 

(9) To substitute. 

Rule 19. Motions to adjourn and to lay on the table. The motions 
to adjourn and to lay on the table shall be decided without debate, 
and the motion to adjourn shall always be in order when made 
by a Senator entitled to the floor. 

Rule 20. Motions to postpone to certain day and to commit. 
The respective motions to postpone to a certain day, or to commit, 
shall preclude debate on the main question. 

Rule 21. Action when previous question pending. When a motion 
for the previous question is made and is pending, debate shall 



416 North Carolina Manual 

cease. After a motion for the previous question is made, pending 
a second thereto, any member may give notice that he desires to 
offer an amendment to the bill or other matter under consid- 
eration ; and after the previous question is seconded such member 
shall be entitled to offer his amendment in pursuance of such 
notice. 

Rule 22. Motion for previous question. The previous question 
shall be as follows: "Shall the main question be now put?" and 
until it is decided shall preclude all amendments and debate. If 
this question is decided in the affirmative, the "main question" 
shall be on the passage of the bill, resolution, or other matter 
under consideration; but when amendments are pending, the 
question shall be taken upon such amendments in their inverse 
order, without further debate or amendment: Provided, that no 
one shall move the previous question except the member submit- 
ting the report on the bill or other matter under consideration, 
and the member introducing the bill or other matter under con- 
sideration or the member in charge of the measure, who shall 
be designated by the chairman of the committee reporting the 
same to the Senate at the time the bill or other matter under 
consideration is reported to the Senate or taken up for consid- 
eration. 

Rule 23. Motion to reconsider. When a question has been once 
put and decided, any Senator who voted in the majority may move 
to reconsideration thereof: but no motion for the reconsideration 
of any vote shall be in order after the bill, resolution, message, 
report, amendment, or motion upon which the vote was taken has 
gone out of the possession of the Senate; nor shall any motion 
for reconsideration be in order unless made on the same day or 
in the next following legislative day on which the vote proposed 
to be reconsidered took place, unless the motion is made by the 
Committee on Enrolled Bills for verbal or grammatical errors 
in the bills, when the motion may be made at any time, Provided 
that when the next legislative day has by motion of the Senate, 
been restricted as to matters which may be considered, a motion 
to reconsider shall be in order on the next succeeding day upon 
which regular business is conducted. No question shall be recon- 
sidered more than once. 



Senate 417 

Voting 

Rule 24. Putting question; division. All questions for a vote 
shall be put as follows: "Those in favor say 'Aye', and after the 
affirmative vote is expressed — "Opposed 'No'." After which the 
President will announce the result. If a division on any vote is 
desired, it must be called for immediately before the result of the 
voting is announced on any question, and upon such call, the 
President shall require the members to stand and be counted for 
and against any proposition under consideration. 

Rule 25. Voting by ayes and noes. The ayes and noes may be 
called for on any question before the vote is taken, and if the 
call is sustained by one-fifth of the Senators present, the roll of 
the Senate shall be called and the ayes and noes taken, and the 
same shall be entered upon the Journal. If a Senator desires the 
ayes and noes recorded on any qustion, he shall address the Chair 
and obtain recognition and say, "Upon that vote or question I 
call for the ayes and noes." Whereupon the President shall say, 
"Is the call sustained?" If one-fifth of the members present then 
stand the roll is called and the ayes and noes recorded. If less 
than one-fifth present stands, the Chair announces, "An insufficient 
number up" and a viva voce vote is then taken. 

Rule 26. Dividing question. If any question contains several 
distinct propositions, it shall be divided by the President, at the 
request of any Senator, provided each subdivision, if left to itself, 
forms a substantive proposition. 

Rule 27. Duty to vote. Every Senator who is within the bar 
of the Senate when the question is stated by the chair shall vote 
thereon, unless he is excused by the Senate or unless he is directly 
interested in the question; and the bar of the Senate shall include 
the entire Senate chamber. 

Rule 28. Excused from voting. Any Senator requesting to be 
excused from voting may make, either immediately before or after 
the vote has been called for and before the result has been an- 
nounced, a brief statement of the reasons for making such re- 
quest, and the question shall then be taken without debate. 

Rule 29. Explanation of vote. Any Senator may explain his vote 
on any bill pending by obtaining permission of the President be- 



118 North Carolina Manual 

fore the vote is put: Provided, that not more than three minutes 
shall be consumed in such explanation. 

Committees 

Rule 30. Appointment of Committees. The President of the 
Senate, unless he has by law disqualified himself from that office, 
shall have the exclusive right and authority to appoint all Com- 
mittees, regular or special, but he may delegate said authority 
in any instance, as he may choose. 

Rule 31. List of standing committees. The following com- 
mittees shall be named by the President of the Senate: 

1. Agriculture 

2. Appropriations 

3. Ranking 

4. Congressional Redisricting 

5. Correctional Institutions 

0. Conservation and Development 

7. Constitution 

8. Counties. Cities and Towns 

9. Courts and Judicial Districts 

10. Education 

11. Election Laws and Legislative Representation 

12. Finance 

1-".. Higher Education 

14. Highway Safety 

15. Insurance 

10. Interstate and Federal Relations 
17. Journal, Enrolling, and Printing 
IX. Judiciary No. 1 

19. Judiciary No. 2 

20. Libraries (Joint) 

21. Local Government 

22. Manufacturing, Labor and Commerce 

23. Mental Health 

24. Propositions and Grievances 
2.',. Public Health 

26. Public Roads 

27. Public Utilities 



Senate 419 

28. Public Welfare 

29. Retirement, Employment Security 

30. Rules 

31. Salaries and Fees 

32. State Government 

33. University Trustees 

34. Veterans and Military Affairs 

35. Wildlife 

Rule 32. Notice of committee meetings. Public notice of all 
committee meetings shall be given in the Senate. The required 
notice may be waived as to any meeting by the attendance at that 
meeting of all of the members of the committee, or by personal 
waiver. 

Rule 33. Membership of committees; quorum, (a) Membership 
on standing committees shall consist of not more than sixteen 
Senators, including the Chairman and Vice Chairman who shall 
be designated by the President, Provided the committee membership 
on the Committee on Education, the Committee on Appropriations, 
the Committee on Finance, the Committee on Agriculture, the 
Committee on Roads, and the Committee on University Trustees 
shall not be limited as to membership but shall be left to the dis- 
cretion of the President. No Senator shall hold membership on 
more than twelve standing committees unless the Rules Committee 
provides otherwise. A quorum of any committee shall consist of a 
majority of the committee. 

(b) Procedure in the committees shall be governed by the rules 
of the Senate, so far as the same may be applicable to such pro- 
cedure; except that no roll call vote may be required in committee. 

Rule 34. Joint committees. The Committee on Trustees of the 
Greater University and the Committee on Journal, Enrolling and 
Printing shall act as the joint committees for the Senate. 

Rule 35. Voting in joint sessions. When any Senate Committee 
sits jointly with the House Committee, the Senate Committee re- 
serves the right to vote separately from the House Committee. 

Rule 36. Final action to be in open session. Notwithstanding the 
inherent right of any committee or subcommittee to hold executive 
sessions, no committee or subcommittee shall take any final action 
on any measure or thing before it except in open session. 



420 North Carolina Manual 

Handling of Bills 

Rule 37. Construction of rules. All provisions of these rules 
applying to lulls shall apply also to resolutions, unless the context 
requires otherwise. 

Rule MS. Introduction of bills, (a) Form of bills. Bills submitted 
fur introduction shall be in the form prescribed by the Joint Com- 
mittee on Printing. When a bill which is introduced is not in the 
prescribed form, the Principal Clerk shall cause the bill to be re- 
typed in the prescribed form, and the retyped copy shall become 
the official copy of the bill for all purposes. The original bill shall 
then be returned to the introducer of the bill and shall not become 
a part of the records or documents of the Senate. 

(li) When a Public Bill is introduced, twenty duplicate copies 
thereof shall accompany the bill, or more copies upon order of the 
Principal Clerk, and twenty duplicate copies shall accompany a 
local bill. 

(c) Public hill*. Whenever a public bill is introduced, the Reading 
Clerk shall stamp one of the duplicate copies with the number 
stamped upon the original bill. The Principal Clerk shall deliver 
the duplicate copy of the bill to the agency designated by the 
Joint Committee on Printing and shall cause (500 copies thereof 
to lie reproduced. Upon delivery of the reproduced copies the 
Principal Clerk shall cause the Chief Page to have one copy there- 
of put upon the desk of each member, and a copy in each member's 
office and shall retain the other copies in his office. A sufficient 
number of the copies for the use of the committee to which the 
hill is referred shall be delivered by the Chief Page to the Chair- 
man or Clerk of that Committee. If the bill is passed, the remaining 
copies shall be delivered by the Chief Page to the Principal Clerk 
for the use of the House. The cost of reproducing the bills shall 
be paid from the contingent fund of the Senate. 

(d) Local bills. Additional copies of local bills shall be reproduced 
only at the direction of the Joint Committee on Printing. When 
that Committee directs that a local bill shall be printed, the pro- 
cedure shall be the same as for public bills. 

Rule 39. Presenting papers to Senate. Every bill, resolution, 
petition, or memorial presented to the Senate shall contain on the 



Senate 421 

outside cover the title of the document and the name of the Senate 
or Senators presenting 1 it. All bills, resolutions, petitions, and 
memorials shall be delivered to the Principal Clerk who shall hand 
them to the President to be referred. The President shall announce 
the titles and references of the documents, and this information 
shall be entered on the Journal. 

Rule 40. Deadline on introduction of certain bills. All bills 
prepared to be introduced by departments, agencies or institutions 
of the State must be introduced in the Senate not later than April 
10 of the session. All local bills must be introduced not later than 
April 1 of the session. A bill may be introduced by consent at any 
time during the session. 

Rule 41. References of appropriations and finance bills. All bills 
introduced in the Senate providing for appropriations from the 
State, or any subdivision thereof, shall, before being considered by 
the Senate be referred to the committee on Appropriations, and 
bills referred to other committees carrying any such provisions 
shall be re-referred to the Senate as being bills to be considered by 
the Appropriations Committee before proper action may be taken 
by the Senate. All bills introduced in the Senate providing for bond 
issues, levying taxes, or in any manner affecting the taxing power 
of the State or any subdivision thereof, shall before being con- 
sidered by the Senate, be referred to the Committee on Finance, 
and bills referred to other committees carrying any such provi- 
sions shall be re-referred to the Senate as being- bills to be con- 
sidered by the Finance Committee before proper action may be 
taken by the Senate. 

Rule 42. First reading; reference to committee. All bills shall 
be read by their titles, which reading shall constitute the first 
reading of the bills, and unless otherwise disposed of shall be re- 
ferred to the proper committee. 

Rule 43. Bills to receive three readings. Every bill shall receive 
three readings previous to its being passed, and the President 
shall give notice at each whether it be the first, second, or third. 
After the first reading, unless a motion is made by some Senator, 
the President shall refer the bill to an appropriate committee. No 
bill shall be amended until it has been twice read. 



122 Noiu'H Carolina Manual 

Rule -14. Reports of Committees. Every Senator presenting a 
report of a committee shall endorse the report with the name of 
the committee and, in case of a minority report, with the names of 
the members making the report. Every report of the committee 
upon a bill or resolution which is not considered at the time of 
making the report, or laid on the table by a vote of the Senate, shall 
stand upon the general orders with the bill or resolution; and the 
report of the committee shall show that a majority of the com- 
mittee were present and voted. 

Rule 45. Unfavorable report by committee, (a) All bills re- 
ported unfavorably by the committee to which they were referred, 
and having no minority report, shall lie upon the table, but may 
be taken from the table, and placed upon the calendar by a two- 
thirds vote of those present and voting. 

(b) When a bill is reported by a committee with an unfavorable 
report, but accompanied by a minority report, the minority report 
shall be placed on the calendar and considered the following day, 
and the question before the Senate shall be "The adoption of the 
Minority Report" and if failing to be adopted by a majority vote, 
the bill shall be placed upon the unfavorable calendar. Before 
a minority report can be considered by the Senate, it must be 
signed by at least three (3) members of the committee who were 
present and who voted on the bill when the bill was considered in 
the committee. 

Rule 46. Recall of bill from committee. When a bill has been 
introduced and referred to a committee, if after ten days the com- 
mittee has failed to report thereon, then the author of the bill may, 
after three day's public notice given in the Senate, on motion 
supported by a vote of two-thirds of the Senators present and 
voting, recall the bill from the committee to the floor of the Senate 
for consideration and such action thereon as a majority of the 
Senators present may direct. 

Rule 47. Calendar; order to be followed. The President and 
the Principal Clerk of the Senate shall see that all bills are acted 
upon by the Senate in the order in which they stand upon the 
calendar, unless otherwise ordered as hereinafter provided. The 
published calendar shall include all bills reported favorably from 
committees, or reported with a minority report attached, or placed 



Senate 423 

on the calendar on motion. Provided, that the published Local 
Calendar may carry the number of each bill, the county or counties 
referred to, and an abbreviated statement of the title of the bill. 

Rule 48. Considering bills out of regular order. Except as pro- 
vided in Rule 49, any bill or other matter may be taken up out of 
order upon order of the President or upon motion sustained by a 
majority of the membership present and voting. 

Rule 49. Third I'eading requirements. No bill on its third 
reading shall be acted upon out of the regular order in which it 
stands on the Calendar, and no bill shall be acted upon on its third 
reading the same day on which it passed its second reading unless 
so ordered by two-thirds of the Senators present. 

Rule 50. Special orders. Any bill or other matter may be made 
a special order for a particular day or hour by a vote of the 
majority of the Senators voting, and if it shall not be completed 
on that day, it shall be returned to its place on the Calendar, 
unless it is made a special order for another day; and when a 
special order is under consideration it shall take precedence over 
any special order or subsequent order for the day, but such sub- 
sequent order may be taken up immediately after the previous 
special order has been disposed of. 

Rule 51. Procedure when necessary number of Senators not pres- 
ent. If, on taking the question on a bill, it appears that a con- 
stitutional quorum is not present, or if the bill requires a vote 
of certain proportion of all the Senators to pass it, and it appears 
that such number is not present, the bill shall be again read and 
the question taken thereon; if the bill fails a second time for the 
want of the necessary number being present and voting, the bill 
shall not be finally lost, but shall be returned to the calendar in 
its proper order. 

Rule 52. Effect of defeated bill, (a) After a bill has been tabled 
or has failed to pass on any of its readings, the contents of such 
bill or the principal provisions of its subject matter shall not be 
embodied in any other measure. Upon the point of order being 
raised and sustained by the Chair, such measure shall be laid upon 
the table, and shall not be taken therefrom except by a vote of 
two-thirds of the qualified membership of the Senate: Provided, no 



424 North Carolina Manual 

local bill shall be held by the Chair as embodying the provisions, 
or being identical with any State wide measure which has been 
laid upon the table or failed to pass any of its readings. 

(1)1 Hills past poind indefinitely. When a bill has been postponed 
indefinitely by the Senate, the bill shall lie upon the table, and 
shall not be taken therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of the 
Senators present. 

Rule 5o. Talcing bill from table. No bill which has been laid 
upon the table shall be taken therefrom except by a vote of two- 
thirds of the Senators present. 

Rule 54. Amending titles of bills. When a bill is materially 
modified or the scope of its application extended or decreased, or 
if the county or counties to which it applies is changed, the title 
of the bill shall be changed by the Senator introducing the bill 
or by the committee having it in charge, or by the Principal 
Clerk, so as to indicate the full purport of the bill as amended 
and the county or counties to which it applies. 

Rule 55. Conference committees. Whenever the Senate declines 
or refuses to concur in amendments put by the House to a bill 
originating in the Senate, or refuses to adopt a substitute adopted 
by the House for a bill originating in the Senate, a conference 
committee shall be appointed upon motion made, consisting of the 
number named in the motion ; and the bill under consideration shall 
thereupon go to and be considered by the joint conferees on the 
part of the Senate and House. In considering matters in difference 
between the Senate and House committed to the conferees only 
such matters as are in difference between the two houses shall be 
considered by the conferees, and the conference report shall deal 
only with such matters. The conference report shall not be 
amended. Except as herein set out, the rules of the United States 
House of Representatives shall govern the appointment, conduct, 
and reports of the conferees. 

Rule 56. Engrossment of bills. A Senate bill when amended 
shall, unless otherwise ordered, be engrossed under the direction 
of the Principal Clerk and sent to the House with the next Senate 
message following engrossment: Provided, that when a bill is 
typewritten and has no interlineations therein, and has passed the 



Senate 425 

Senate without amendment, it shall be sent to the House without 
engrossment, unless otherwise ordered. 

Rule 57. Certification of passage of bills. The Principal Clerk 
shall certify the passage of bills by the Senate, with the date 
thereof, together with the fact whether passed by vote of three- 
fifths or two-thirds of the Senate, whenever such vote may be 
required by the Constitution or laws of the State. 

Rule 58. Transmittal of bUls to House. No bill shall be sent 
from the Senate on the day of its passage except on the last day 
of the session, unless otherwise ordered by a vote of two-thirds 
of the Senators present. 

Legislative Officers and Employees 

Rule 59. Doorkeepers, pages, and laborers. The President shall 
appoint doorkeepers and pages, and such laborers as may be 
necessary, and shall assign to them their duties during sessions, 
and when not in session they shall be under the direction of the 
Principal Clerk and Sergeant-at-Arms, to perform such duties as 
are necessary and proper to the conduct of the Senate. 

Rule 60. Duties of pages. The pages of the Senate shall be 
responsible to and under the direction of the President at all times 
when the Senate is in session, and shall not exceed twenty in 
number, which page so appointed shall be at least 13 years of age. 
They shall report to the Principal Clerk at other times to be as- 
signed such duties as he may direct and shall be under his super- 
vision. 

Rule 61. Principal Clerk responsible for engrossing office. The 
office of the Engrossing Clerk is discontinued, and the duties of 
that officer as heretofore performed by the Engrossing Clerk shall 
devolve upon the Principal Clerk, who is charged with the re- 
sponsibility therefor. 

Rule 62. Committee Clerks, (a) The President of the Senate 
and the Principal Clerk shall appoint twenty-five clerks who shall 
be stenographers to serve as Committee Clerks. The President of 
the Senate and the Principal Clerk may appoint additional clerks 
upon the recommendation of the Rules Committee. 



426 Nokth Carolina Manual 

(h) All Committee Clerks, when not in attendance upon the 
direct duties connected with the committee to which they are as- 
signed, shall report to the Principal Clerk of the Senate and, 
in order to expedite the work of the Senate, shall perform such 
clerical or stenographic work as may be assigned to them. 

Rule n'3. Principal Clerk to prepare Journal. The Principal 
Clerk shall cause the Journal of the Senate to be typewritten in 
duplicate, original and carbon, the original to be deposited in the 
office of the Secretary of State as the record, and the other 
(carbon) copy to be delivered to the State Printer. 

Rule <i4. Principal Clerk to order supplies. All necessary sup- 
plies and stationery for the Senate, its various offices and com- 
mittees of the Senate shall be purchased upon requisition of the 
Principal Clerk with the approval of the President of the Senate. 

General Rules 

Rule 65. President to sign papers. All acts, addresses and res- 
olutions, and all warrants and subpoenas issued by order of the 
Senate shall be signed by the President. 

Rule 66. Privileges of floor. No person except members of the 
Senate, members of the House of Representatives, Clerks, Pages, 
Interns and Employees of the General Assembly designated by 
the President, Judges of the Supreme and Superior Courts, the 
Governor and Council of State, former members of the General 
Assembly, and persons particularly invited and extended the 
privileges of the floor by the President shall be admitted to the 
floor of the Senate during its Session, provided: No registered 
lobbyist shall be admitted to the floor of the Senate or Senate 
Chamber while the Senate is in Session. 

Rule 67. Admittance of Press. The President may assign such 
space or place on the floor of the Senate to representatives of news 
media desiring to report the proceedings of the Senate in ac- 
cordance with the regulations filed with the Rules Committee by 
the President of the Senate. A copy of said regulations shall be 
filed with the Principal Clerk of the Senate and made available 
to any member of the Senate or news media upon request. 



Senate 427 

Rule 68. Absence without leave. No Senator or officer of the 
Senate shall depart the service of the Senate without leave, or 
receive pay as a Senator or officer for the time he is absent with- 
out leave. 

Rule Gt>. Placing matter on Senator's desks. No papers, writ- 
ings, pamphlets, or printed matter shall be placed on the desks 
of the Senators or distributed in the Senate Chamber without 
approval of the Principal Clerk. 

Rule 70. Assignment of Offices. The Chairman of the Rules 
Committee, subject to the approval of the Committee, is authorized 
to make assignments from session to session of committee rooms 
and adjacent offices to designated committees and chairmen and 
shall do so promptly upon appointment in order to facilitate the 
organization of the Senate, and shall make assignments of in- 
dividual offices, subject to the approval of the Committee. In 
making such assignments of individual offices, the said Chairman 
shall give preferential consideration to the respective members 
according to the total length of service which each member has 
rendered in the General Assembly. 

Rule 71. Alterations, suspension or rescission of rules. No rule 
of the Senate shall be altered, suspended, or rescinded except on 
a two-thirds vote of the Senators present. 



128 



North Carolina Manual 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE SENATE 

SESSION 1967 



( OMMITI KK ON AGRICULTURE 

GENTRY, Chairman 
MATHESON, V 'ice-Chairman 

AUSTIN, Vice-chairman 
McGEACHY, Vice-Chair man 
Allen Griffin Scott 

Byrd Hancock Simmons 

Coggins Harrington White of 

Dent MacLean Lenoir 

Ellis Maxwell Whitehurst 

Green Parrish Wood 

COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS 

WHITE OF LENOIR, Chairman 
MOORE, Vice-Chairman 
BYRD, V ice-Chairman 
McGEACHY, V ice-Chairman 
SCOTT, Vice-Chairman 
Allsbrook Burney Matheson 

Austin Dent McLendon 

Bagnal Futrell Morgan 

Bailey Gentry Nielson 

Boger Gilmore Norton 

Bridgers Green Rauch 

Brumby Harrington Warren 

COMMITTEE ON BANKING 

McGEACHY, Chairman 
MacLEAN, V ice-Chairman 
COGGINS, Vice-Chairman 
Alford Futrell Scott 

Bagnal Griffin Shuford 

Bailey Henley Wood 

Currie Kemp 

Dent Moore 



Senate 



429 



Allen 
Austin 
Boger 
Bryan 



COMMITTEE ON CONGRESSIONAL 
REDISTRICTING 

KEMP, Chairman 

GREEN, V ice-Chairman 

NORTON, Vice-Chairman 



Gentry- 
Griffin 
Osteen 
Warren 



White of 

Cleveland 
Wood 



COMMITTEE ON CONSERVATION 
AND DEVELOPMENT 

FUTRELL, Chairman 

HENKEL, Vice-Chairman 

WOOD, Vice-Chairman 



Austin 


Gilmore 


Parrish 


Boger 


Hancock 


White of 


Brumby 


Henley 


Lenoir 


Burney 


Maxwell 


Whitehurst 


Dent 


McGeachy 





COMMITTEE ON CONSTITUTION 

BURNEY, Chairman 

HARRINGTON, Vice-Chairman 

WARREN, Vice-Chairman 



Bagnal 


Green 


Briggs 


Griffin 


Buchanan 


Henkel 


Evans 


Kemp 


Futrell 


Maxwell 



Nielson 

Simmons 

Whitehurst 



t:> 



North Caholixa Manual 



COMMITTEE ON CORRECTIONAL 
INSTITUTIONS 

MAXWELL, Chairman 

W HITEHURST, V ice-Chairman 

ALLEN, Vice-Chairman 

Osteen 

Shuford 

Simmons 



Allsbrook 


Futrell 


Bagnal 


Gil more 


Briggs 


Henkel 


By id 


Matheson 


Currie 


Morg-an 



Allen 

Bagnal 

Briggs 

Coggin* 

Evan? 



COMMITTEE ON COUNTIES. 
CITIES AND TOWNS 

WHITE OF CLEVELAND, Chairman 

MAXWELL, Vice-chairman 

ALLSBROOK, V ice-Chairman 



Hancock 


Penn 


Henley 


Whitehurst 


Kemp 


Wood 


Matheson 




McLendon 





COMMITTEE ON COURTS AND 
JUDICIAL DISTRICTS 

WARREN, Chairman 

GRIFFIN, Vice-Chairman 

WHITE OF LENOIR, Vice-Chairman 



Bailey 


Byrd 


McLendon 


Boger 


Currie 


Morgan 


Bridgers 


Ellis 


White of 


Briggs 


Harrington 


Cleveland 


Burney 


McGeachy 





Senate 431 



COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION 

EVANS, Chairman 
HENLEY, Vice-Chairman 





BYRD, Vice- 


■Chairman 






ALLEN. Vice 


-Chalrmah 


I 


Allsbrook 


Gilmore 




Norton 


Austin 


Green 




Osteen 


Bagnal 


Griffin 




Parrish 


Boger 


Henkel 




Rauch 


Buchanar 


Kemp 




Simmons 


Burney 


MaeLean 




Whitehurst 


Coggins 


McGeachy 






Ellis 


McLendon 







COMMITTEE ON ELECTION LAWS AND 
LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATION 

NORTON, Chairman 
GRIFFIN, Vice -Chairman 
WARREN, Vice-Chairman 
Alford Ellis Moore 

Bagnal Gentry Morgan 

Briggs Hancock White of 

Buchanan Harrington Cleveland 

Currie McGeachy 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

SCOTT, Chairman 

KEMP, Vice-Chairman 

ALFORD, V ice-Chairman 

SHUFORD, Vice-Chairman 

WHITE OF LENOIR, Viee-Chairmun 

Allen Griffin Penn 

Briggs Hancock Simmons 

Bryan Henkel White of 

Buchanan Henley Cleveland 

Coggins MaeLean W r hitehurst 

Currie Maxwell Wood 

Ellis Osteen 

Evans Parrish 



432 



North ('\holina Manual 



COMMITTEE ON HIGHER EDUCATION 

SHUFORD, Chairman 

MORGAN, Vice-Chairman 

McLENDON, Vice-Chairman 

Scott 

Warren 

Wood 



Alford 


Currie 


Boger 


Ellis 


Bridgers 


Matheson 


Brumby 


Maxwell 


Coggins 


Nielson 



COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAY SAFETY 

WHITE HURST, Chairman 

BYRD, Vice-Chairman 
BRUMBY, Vice-Chairman 



Alford 


Harrington 


Osteen 


Allen 


Henkel 


Penn 


Austin 


MacLean 


White of 


Buchanan 


McLendon 


Lenoir 


Dent 


Maxwell 





Allen 

Bagnal 

Byrd 

Futrell 

Gentry 



COMMITTEE ON INSURANCE 

ALFORD, Chairman 

BAILEY, Vice-Chairman 

ALLSBROOK. Vice-Chairman 



Green 


Penn 


Hancock 


Rauch 


Henley 


White of 


McLendon 


Lenoir 


F^rrish 





Senate 



433 



COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND 
FEDERAL RELATIONS 

CURRIE, Chairman 
GILMORE, Vice-Chairman 
FUTRELL, yice-Chairman 



Allsbrook 


Brumby 


Parrish 


Austin 


Henley 


Rauch 


Bridgers 


McLendon 


Shuford 


Briggs 


Nielson 


Wood 



Brumby 
Dent 



COMMITTEE ON JOURNAL, 
ENROLLING AND PRINTING 

MATHESON, Chairman 
KEMP, Vice-Chairman 



Moore 

Nielson 



Simmon; 
Warren 



Alford 
Briggs 
Cnrrie 



COMMITTEE ON JUDICIARY NO. 1 

ALLSBROOK, Chairman 

BAILEY, Vice-Chairman 

BRIDGERS, Vice-Chairman 



MacLean 


White of 


Penn 


Lenoir 


Warren 





COMMITTEE ON JUDICIARY NO. 2 

MORGAN, Chairman 

McGEACHY, Vice-Chairman 

WHITE OF CLEVELAND, Vice -Chair nnu< 



McLendon 



Boger 


Byrd 


Bryan 


Ellis 


Burney 


Griffin 



434 Noktii Cakomxa Manual 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES (JOINT) 

BRUMBY, Chairman 
MacLEAN. Vice-Chairman 
AUSTIN. Vice-chairman 
Bailey Moore Scott 

Bryan Osteen Shuford 

Gilmoiv Parrish White of 

Matheson Perm Cleveland 

COMMITTEE ON LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

GRIFFIN. Chairman 
ALFORD, Vice-Chairman 
ELLIS. Vice-Chairman 
Austin Gilmore Nielson 

Bailey Henkel Osteen 

Bridgers Kemp Rauch 

Burner Moore Shuford 

COMMITTEE ON MANUFACTURING. 
LABOR AND COMMERCE 

BAILEY, Chairman 
CURRIE, Vice-Chairman 
SIMMONS, Vice-Chairman 
B ridge rs Evans Nielson 

Buchanan Gilmore Osteen 

Byrd Kemp Rauch 

Cogens MacLean Shuford 

COMMITTEE ON MENTAL HEALTH 

COGGINS. Chairman 
MORGAN, Vice-Chairman 
ALLSBROOK. Vice-Chairman 
Alford Byrd Norton 

Bagnal Evans Simmons 

Boyer Gentry Warren 

Brumby Green 

Bryan McGeachv 



Senate 



435 



COMMITTEE ON PROPOSITIONS 
AND GRIEVANCES 

HENKEL, Chairman 
HANCOCK, Vice-Chairman 
SIMMONS, Vice -Chairman 



Bailey 


Burney 


Penn 


Boger 


Kemp 


White of 


Bridget's 


McLendon 


Cleveland 


Bryan 


Moore 


White of 


Buchanan 


Osteen 


Lenoir 



COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC HEALTH 

HENLEY, Chairman 
HENKEL, V ice-Chairman 
BURNEY, Vice-Chairman 



Allen 


Evans 


Norton 


Allsbrook 


Green 


Scott 


Bryan 


Matheson 


Simmons 


Ellis 


Nielson 





COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC ROADS 

HARRINGTON, Chairman 

BUCHANAN, Vice-Chairman 

CURRIE, Vice-Chairman 

BOGER, Vice-Chairman 



Alford 


Ellis 


Allsbrook 


Evans 


Briggs 


Gentry 


Brumby 


Gilmore 


Burney 


Green 


Byrd 


Hancock 


Coggins 


Henkel 


Dent 


Henley 



Maxwell 

Nielson 

Norton 

Parrish 

Rauch 

Warren 

Wood 



436 North Carolina Mamu 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC UTILITIES 

SIMMONS, Chairman 
BAILEY, Vice-Chairman 
RAUCH, Vice-chairman 

PENN, V ice-Chairman 

Bridgets Matheson White of 

Bryan Maxwell Lenoir 

Buchanan Morgan Whitehurst 

Dent Norton 

Harrington Scott 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC WELFARE 

MacLEAN, Chairman 
GENTRY, Vice-Chairman 
PENN, Vice-Chairman 
Alien Evans Norton 

Austin Green White of 

Bryan Henkel Cleveland 

Dent Henley 

COMMITTEE ON RETIREMENT. 
EMPLOYMENT SECURITY 





GREEN. 


Ch 


airman 






BRUMBY. 


Vice 


-Chairman 




RAUCH. 1 


'ice- 


Chairmar 




Alford 


Currie 






Penn 


Austin 


Evans 






Shuford 


Bailey 


Futrell 






White of 


Bryan 


Nielson 






Cleveland 



COMMITTEE ON Rl'LES 

MOORE, Chairman 
HARRINGTON, Vice-Chairman 
SHUFORD. Vice-Chairman 
Futrell Morgan White of 

Gentry Norton Lenoir 

Griffin Scott 



Senatk 



437 



COMMITTEE ON SALARIES AND FEES 

HANCOCK, Chairman 

GENTRY, V ice-Chairman 

WHITE OF CLEVELAND, Vice-Chairman 



BagnaJ 


Buchanan 


Moore 


Bailey 


Harrington 


Penn 


Bridgers 


Kemp 


Scott 


Briggs 


McGeachy 


Wood 



Boger 

Brumby 
Currie 
Futrell 
Henlev 



COMMITTEE O.N STATE GOVERNMENT 

WOOD, Chairman 

COGGINS, Vice-Chairman 

EVANS, Vice-Chairman 



Mac Lean 

McLendon 

Morgan 

Osteen 

Parrisli 



Kauch 

Warren 

Whitehurst 



COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY 

TRUSTEES 

McLENDON, Chairman 

MATH ESON, Vice-Chairman 

BUCHANAN, Vice-Chairman 

WHTTEHURST, Vice-Chairman 



Alford 


Harrington 


Osteen 


Allen 


Kemp 


Scott 


Allsbrook 


McGeachy 


Shuford 


Ellis 


Moore 


White of 


Gilmore 


Morgan 


Cleveland 


Giiffin 


Nielson 


Wood 


Hancock 


Norton 





138 



.Vol! I II (' Wfnl I \ \ M \ MM 



COMMITTEE ON VETERANS AND 
MILITARY AFFAIRS 

BOGER, Chairman 

ELLIS, Vice-Chairman 

HENLEY, Vice-Chairman 



Allsbi ook 


Dent 


Burner 


Evans 


Byrd 


Gilmore 


l Ojririns 


Maxwell 



McGeachy 
Rauch 

Warren 



Brumby 

FutreJl 

Gentry 

Hancock 



COMMITTEE ON WILDLIFE 

GILMORE, Chair nun, 

BRIDGERS. Vice-Chairman 

GREEN, Vir, •Chairman 

MOORE, Vice-Chairman 



Harrington 


Parri.sh 


VTacLean 


Penn 


Matheson 


Scott 


Morgan 


Shiifoi< 




/ 





pRESIDE/vr 



I in Xiii: i ii Carolina M vnual 

SKAT ASSIGNMENT CHART— SESSION 1967 

NORTH CAROLINA SENATE 
Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

District Name County Address Seal 

l-t J.J.Harrington Bertie Lewiston. 15 

1st Georgi M Wood Camden Camden.. I l 

2nd Ashley B. Futrell Beaufort Washington ... in 

3rd Sam L. Whitehurst , ('raven New Bern.. 2 I 

1th Julian R. Allsbrook. .. . Halifax . .Roanoke Rapids 8 

4th Vinson Bridgers . Edgecombe Tarbom .28 

5th Thomas J. White Lenoir Kin-tun 1 

6th \lbert J. Ellis Onslow Jacksonville.... .">u 

.'Ii Wills Hancock Granville Oxford 31 

8th Dalla I. Alford, Jr. Nash Rocky .Mount 7 

81 1 1 Jesse H. Austin, Jr Johnston Clayton 22 

9th Lindsay C. Warren, Jr Wayne Goldsboro . . . . , 46 

10th John J. Burney, Jr NewHanovei Wilmington . 13 

I Oth LeRoj G. Simmons Duplin Rt. 1, Albertson 1 1 

llili Claude Currie Durham Durham.... 5 

llth Don S. Matheson Orange Hillsborough 18 

12th J. Ruffin Bailej Wake Raleigh 26 

I'Jth Jyles J. Coggins Wake Raleigh 25 

13th Robert B. Morgan Harnett Lillington . . . . 2 

Mih John T. Henley Cumberland Hope Mills [5 

Mill X. Hector McGeachy, Jr. Cumberland Fayetteville 16 

loth James C. Green Bladen Clarkton 13 

16th Frank H. Penn Rockingham Reidsville. . . .41 

17th Ralph II. Scott Uamance Rt. 1., Haw River 9 

L8th Ed Kemp Guilford High Point 20 

18th L. P. McLendon, Jr Guilford Greensboro .19 

18th John L. Osteen (R) Guilford Greensboro.. . 38 

19th — J.F.Allen Montgomery Biscoe . 27 

l'.ith Voit Gilmore .Moon- Southern Pines 6 

20th Hector MacLean Robeson Lumberton 17 

21st Worth Gentry .. . Stokes King . 23 

'-'2nd I larry Bagnal (R) Forsyth Rt. 1, Winston-Salem .... 34 

22nd Mrs. < leraldme R. Xielson (R). Forsyth Winston-Salem 35 

- :; "l ('. U. I'arnsh (R) Rowan Salisbury . 37 

24th John R. Boger, Jr Cabarrus Concord... 49 

24th C. Frank Griffin 1'nion Monroe. 48 

25th T. R. Bryan, Sr. Ii) . . Wilkes , Wilkesboro. . . 36 

26th C. V. Henkel Iredell Turnersburg. . 39 

26th Adrian L. Shuford, Jr. Catawba Conover 40 

27th Mrs. Martha W. Evans Mecklenburg .Charlotte 3 

27th Charles K. Maxwell Mecklenburg Rt. 1, Huntersville 11 

27th Herman A. Moore Mecklenburg. ..Charlotte.. . 12 

28th Joe K. Byrd Burke Morganton. . . . 30 

29th Marshall A. Ranch Gaston.. . .Gastonia 29 

29th Jack H. White . . Cleveland Kings Mountain 1 

30th Clyde M. Norton McDowell Old Fort 21 

31st Bruce B. Briggs (R) . Buncombe Asheville 32 

31st R. Theodore Dent (R) Mitchell Spruce Pine. 33 

32nd Harry E. Buchanan Henderson Hendersonville 17 

33rd Mrs Mary Faye Brumby Cherokee Murphy 12 



House of Representatives 441 

Officers and Members of the House of Representatives 

OFFICERS 

David M . Britt Speaker Fairmont 

Mrs. Annie E. Cooper Principal Clerk Raleigh 

Sam J. Burrow, Jr Reading Clerk Asheboro 

Archie T. Lane, Sr Sergeant-at-Arms Hertford 

REPRESENTATIVES 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 

Name District Party Address 

Andrews, Ike F Twentieth Democrat Siler City 

Auman, T. Clyde Twenty-eighth. . .Democrat West End 

Bailey, Wesley Thirtieth Democrat Winston-Salem 

Barbee, Allen C Fourteenth Democrat Spring Hope 

Barr, Basil D Thirty-seventh. . .Democrat West Jefferson 

Baugh, Philip Jackson Thirty-sixth Democrat Charlotte 

Beatty, James Tully (Jim) Thirty-sixth Democrat Charlotte 

Billings, Claude Thirty-eighth. . . .Republican Rt. 1, Traphill 

Blake, Colon Twenty-seventh. .Republican Candoi 

Boger, Gilbert Lee Thirty-ninth Republican Rt. 3, Mocksville 

Bowles, Hargrove (Skipper), Jr. Twenty-sixth. . . .Democrat Greensboro 

Britt, David M Twenty-fourth. . .Democrat Fairmont 

Britt, William R Fifteenth Democrat Smithfield 

Bryan, Norwood E., Jr Twenty-third. . . .Democrat Fayetteville 

Bumgardner, David W, Jr Forty-first Democrat Belmont 

Bunn, Thomas D Nineteenth Democrat Raleigh 

Burden, Emmett W Sixth Democrat Aulander 

Burrus, Archie Second Democrat Manteo 

Calvert, Richard B Thirty-sixth Republican Charlotte 

Carson, James H., Jr Thirty-sixth Republican Charlotte 

Chase, Mrs. John B Tenth Democrat Eureka 

Church, John T Sixteenth Democrat ... .Henderson 

Clark, Chatham C Twelfth Democrat Elizabethtoun 

Clark, George T., Jr Fifth Republican Wilmington 

Clark, Richard S Thirty-third Democrat Monroe 

Collier, Clyde M Thirteenth Democrat Rt. 1, Hallsboro 

Collins, P. C, Jr Thirty-seventh. . .Democrat Laurel Springs 

Craig, H. Max, Jr Forty-first Republican Stanlev 

Culpepper, W. T., Jr First Democrat Elizabeth City 

Ragles, Joe E Fourteenth Democrat Macclesfield 

Edwards, Elton Twenty-sixth .... Democrat Greensboro 

Elliott, Guy Ninth Democrat Kinston 

Ervin, Sam J., Ill Forty-second Democrat Morganton 

Euliss, Jack M Twenty-first Democrat Burlington 

Everett, J. A Seventh Democrat Palmyra 

Bxum, James G Twentv-sixth . . . .Democrat Greensboro 

Falls, Robert Z Forty-third Democrat ... Shelbv 

Fenner, Julian B Fourteenth Democrat Rocky Mount 

Forbes, W. A. (Red) Eighth Democrat Winterville 

Garner, C. Roby, Sr Twenty-seventh. .Republican Asheboro 

Garren, Don H Forty-sixth Republican Hendersonville 

Godwin, Philip P First Democrat Gatesvillr 

( iodwin, R. C Third Democrat New Bern 

Greenwood, Gordon 11 Forty-fifth Democrat Black Mountain 

( jregory, Thorne Seventh Democrat Scotland Neck 

Gunn, Jno. O Seventeenth Democrat Yanceyvillc 

Elamriek, Claude M Thirtieth Democrat Winston-Salem 

Ilarkins, Herschel S Forty-fifth Democrat Asheville 

Harrill, William D Forty-third Democrat Forest ('in 

Haynes, Jeter L Thirty-eighth. .. .Republican Jonesvill'e 

Hege, Joe II., Jr Thirty-first Republican Lexington 

High, Sneed Twenty-third .... Democrat Fayetteville 

Hill, William L., II Fifth Democrat Wilmington 

Hofler, \\ . Hance Eighteenth Democrat Durham 



142 Noktii Cakolin a Mani m 

Name District Party Address 

Horton, I Joseph Ninth Democrat Snow Hill 

Thirty-sixth Democral .Charlotte 

Hunter, Thomas B Pwenty-ninth Democral . ... Rockingham 

ilutchins, < . Edley Forty-fifth Republican Hi. I, Black Mountain 

Ingle, Ronald K. Thirtieth Republican Winston-Salem 

Mack S. Fortj fourth .... Republican Newland 

,n Howard A. Thirtieth 'Republican... .Rt. 8, Winston-Salem 

.lernigan, Roberts H., Jr. Sixth Democrat ^.hoskie 

Johnson, Hugh S . Jr. Eleventh Democral Rose Hill 

.Johnson, James < '., Ji Thirty-fifth. . . . Republican Concord 

Johnson, Samuel H. Nineteenth Dei rat Raleigh 

Arthur II. Thirty-sixth Democrat Charlotte 

Jordan, David I >. Forty-fifth Republican Asheville 

Kincaid, Donald K I 'orty-second Republican Lenoir 

Kiser. Roger ( '. Twenty-fourth. . .Democrat Laurinburg 

Leathei man, Clarence E Forty-first Democrat Lincolnton 

Love, Jimmj L. Twenty-second . Democrat Sanford 

\I miiiic \ , \\ K., Jr. Forty-third Democrat Kings Mountain 

McFadj en, Neill I. Twenty-fourth. . .Democrat Raeford 

McGlamery, Wilej \ Forty-ninth Democrat Hayesville 

McKnight, E. M. Thirtieth Republican Rt. 2, Clemmons 

McMichael, Jule Twenty-fifth Democrat Keidsville 

McMillan, A. A Nineteenth Democrat Raleigh 

McMillan, R. D., Jr. . Twenty-fourth . . . Democrat Red Springs 

Merritt, Hugh L. .Thirty-seventh. . .Democrat Mt. Airy 

Messer, Ernest B. .Forty-seventh... .Democrat Canton 

Mills, Fred M., Jr Thirty-third Democrat Wadesboro 

Mills, William D. Fourth Democrat Rt. 1, Maysville 

Mitchell, Austin A Thiity-fourth. .. .Republican Kannapolis 

Molui, .1. F. . Fourth Democrat Richlands 

Mullinax, Loyd A Fortieth Democrat . Newton 

O'Hanlon, I. H. Twenty-third Democrat . Fayetteville 

Paschall, J. Ernest Fifteenth Democrat Wilson 

Penny, Wade II., Jr Eighteenth . . Democrat Durham 

Phillip-. ( '. W. Twenty-sixth . . .Democrat Greensboro 

Pickard, M. Glenn Twenty-first Democrat Burlington 

l'oo\ev, .1. Reid 1 ortieth Republican Hickory 

Quinn, Dwight W. . . Thirty-fifth Democrat Kannapolis 

lale, Hugh A. . ... Fourth Democrat Richlands 

Ramsey, James E. Seventeenth Democrat Roxboro 

Ramsey, Liston B Forty--c\ enth I >emocrat Marshall 

Raynor, Joe B., Jr Twenty-third. . . .Democrat Fayetteville 

Roberson, William R., Jr Second Democrat Washington 

Rountree, II. Morton Eighth I )emocrat Greenville 

Hoy a 11, Kenneth ('., Jr Eighteenth Democrat Durham 

Short, W. Marcus Twenty-sixth. . .Democrat Greensboro 

Speed, James D Sixteenth Democrat Rt. 3, Louisburg 

Stanford. Donald Melver Twentieth Democrat Chapel Hill 

Staton, William W Twenty-second Democrat Sanford 

Stewart, Carl J., Jr Fortv-first Democrat Gastonia 

Strickland. Thomas E Tenth Democrat Rt. 2, Goldsboro 

Sugg, .lame- R Third Democrat New Bern 

la rt. ( '. < traham Twelfth Democrat Clinton 

Tate, Earl II. Forty-second Democrat Lenoir 

Taylor, Charles II Forty-eighth Republican Brevard 

Taylor, Nelson W Third Democrat Morehead City 

Tolbert, Homer B Thirty-ninth Republican Rt. 2, Cleveland 

Troxell, Samuel A Thirty-fourth. . . .Republican Rockwell 

Twiggs, Howard Nineteenth Democrat Raleigh 

Vaughn, Earl \\ . Twenty-fifth Democrat Draper 

Vogler, James B Thirty-sixth Democrat Charlotte 

Whicker, Wayne Thirty-first Republican Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

Whitley, Clyde Hampton Thirty-second. . . .Republican Albemarle 

Whitley, Daniel 1'., Jr Twenty-sixth . . .Democrat High Point 

Williamson, Odell. . Thirteenth.. . Democrat Shallotte 

W lard, Barney Paul Fifteenth. Democrat Princeton 



House of Representatives 443 

REPRESENTATIVES 

Arranged by Districts 

Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

District Name Address 

1st — W. T. Culpepper, Jr Elizabeth City 

1st — Philip P. Godwin Gatesville 

2nd — Archie Burrus Manteo 

2nd — William R. Roberson, Jr Washington 

3rd — R. C. Godwin New Bern 

3rd — James R. Sugg New Bern 

3rd — Nelson W. Taylor Morehead City 

4th— William D. Mills Rt. 1, Maysville 

4th — J. F. Mohn Richlands 

4th — Hugh A. Ragsdale Richlands 

5th— George T. Clark, Jr (R) Wilmington 

5th— William L. Hill, II Wilmington 

6th — Emmett W. Burden Aulander 

6th — Roberts H. Jernigan, Jr Ahoskie 

7th — J. A. Everett Palmyra 

7th — Thome Gregory Scotland Neck 

8th— W. A. (Red) Forbes Winterville 

8th — H. Horton Rountree Greenville 

9th— Guy Elliott Kinston 

9th — I. Joseph Horton Snow Hill 

10th — Mrs. John B. Chase Eureka 

10th — Thomas E. Strickland Rt. 2, Goldsboro 

11th — Hugh S. Johnson, Jr Rose Hill 

12th — Chatham C. Clark Elizabethtown 

12th — C. Graham Tart Clinton 

L3th Clyde M. Collier Rt. 1, Hallsboro 

13th— Odell Williamson Shallotte 

1 It h — Allen C. Barbee Spring Hope 

I 4th — Joe E. Eagles Macclesfield 

1 tth — Julian B. Fenner Rocky Mount 

15th — William R. Britt Smithfield 

1 5th — J. Ernest Paschall Wilson 

15th — Barney Paul Woodard Princeton 

16th — John T. Church Henderson 

16th — James D. Speed Rt. 3, Louisburg 

17th — Jno. O. Gunn Yanceyville 

1 7th — James E. Ramsey Roxboro 

18th— W. Hance Hofler Durham 

18th — Wade H. Penny, Jr Durham 

18th — Kenneth C. Rovall, Jr Durham 

1 9th— Thomas D. Bunn Raleigh 

19th — Samuel H. Johnson Raleigh 

19th — A. A. McMillan Raleigh 

19th — Howard Twiggs Raleigh 

20th— Ike F. Andrews Siler City 

20th— Donald Mclver Stanford Cha-el Hill 

21st— Jack M. Euliss Burlington 

21st — M. Glenn Pickard Burlington 

22nd — Jimmy L. Love Sanford 

22nd— William W. Statou Sanford 

23rd — Norwood E. Bryan, Jr Fayetteville 

23rd — Sneed High Fayetteville 

23rd— I. H. O'Hanlon Fayettevill.' 

23rd — Joe B. Raynor, Jr Fayetteville 

24th— David M. Britt Fairmont 

24th — Roger C. Riser Laurinburg 

24th— Neill L. McFadyen Raeford 

24th— R. D. McMillan, Jr Red Soring* 

25th — Jule McMichael Reidsville 

25th Ear] W. Vaughn Draper 



Ill North Carolina Manuai 



District .Name \ddres^ 

26th Hargove Skipper) Bowles, Jr. Greensboro 

26th Elton Edwards Greensboro 

26th James G. Exurn Greensboro 

26th ('. W. Phillips Greensboro 

26th W. Marcus Short Greensboro 

26th Daniel P. Whitley, Jr. High Point 

27th Colon Blake . . (R) Candor 

27! h < '. Roby ( larner, Sr (]{) A.-hebom 

!8th T. ( Hyde Auman .... West End 

29th Thomas B. Huntei Rockingham 

30th Wesley Bailey Winston-Salem 

30th Claude M. Hamrick. . Winston-Salem 

30th Ronald K. Ingle (R) Winston-Salem 

30th Howard A. Jemison (R> Rt. 8, Winston-Salem 

30th E. M. McKnight (R) Rt. 2, Clemmons 

11 -t Joe 1 1 . Hege, Jr. . . (R) . Lexington 

list Wayne Whicker R) .Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

32nd — Clyde Hampton Whitley. . (R) Albemarle 

33rd Richard S. Clark Monroe 

33rd Fred M. Mills, Jr. Wadesboio 

34th Austin A. Mitchell . (R) Kannapolis 

34th Samuel A. Troxell. . . . (R) . . Rockwell 

35th — James C. Johnson, Jr. .. . II) Concord 

351 b 1 )w ight W. Quinn Kannapolis 

36th — Philip Jackson Baugh Charlotte 

36th James Tullv (Jim) Beam Charlotte 

36th- Richard B. ( lalvert R) Charlotte 

36th James II. Carson, Jr. .(R) Charlotte 

36th— < 1. Patrick Hunter Charlotte 

36th Arthur II. .lone- Charlotte 

36th James B. Vogler. . Charlotte 

37th Basil D. Hair West Jefferson 

37th — P. C. ( Collins, Jr Laurel Springs 

37th Hugh L. Merritt Mt. Airj 

38th— Claude Billings (R) Rt. 1, Traphill 

38th-- Jetei I.. Haynes (R) Jonesville 

39th— Gilbert Lee Boger (R), Rt. 3, Mocksville 

39th Homer B. Tolbert (R) Rt. 2. Cleveland 

10th — Lovd A. Mullinax Newton 

10th J. Reid Poovey (R) Hickory 

list — David \Y. Bumgardner, Jr Belmont 

list H. Max Craig, Jr (R) Stanley 

list — Clarence E. Leatherman Lincoln ton 

ll-i ( 'ail J. Stewart. Jr Gastonia 

12nd Sam J. Ervin, III Morganton 

12nd I). maid R. Kincaid (R) RFD, Lenoir 

12nd— Karl H. Tate Lenoir 

13rd- Robert Z. Falls Shelby 

13rd— William D. Harrill Forest City 

13rd W. K. Mamiey, .Jr Kings Mountain 

I 1th .Mark S. Isaac (R) . Newland 

loth Gordon II. Greenwood .. . Black Mountain 

15th Herschel S. Harkins Asheville 

15th— C. Edley Hutchins . |R> Rt. 1. Black Mountain 

15th- David D. Jordan (R) .Asheville 

16th— Don II. Garren. . iRi Hendersonville 

17th Ernest B. Messer. . Canton 

17th— Liston B. Ramsey Marshall 

18th— Charles II. Taylor (R) Brevard 

19th Wiley A. McGlamerj Hayesville 

ENROLLING AND INDEXING DEPARTMENTS 

Enrolling Clerk Charles A. Hostetler Raeford 

Indexer of Laws Fames H. Walker Raleigh 



House of Representatives 11:. 

RULES AND STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

1967 

Rules of the House 

I. Order of Business, 1-5 
II. Conduct of Debate, 6-12 

III. Motion, 13-18 

IV. Previous Question, 19-20 
V. Voting, 21-26 

VI. Committees, 27-31 
VII. Handling of Bills, 32-45 
VIII. Legislative Officers and Employees, 46-50 

IX. Privileges of the Hall, 51-54 

X. General Rules, 55-58 

1. Order of Business 

Rule 1. Convening Hour. The House shall convene each leg- 
islative day at the hour fixed by the House on the preceding leg- 
islative day; in the event the House adjourns on the preceding 
legislative day without having fixed an hour for reconvening, the 
House shall reconvene on the next legislative day at twelve o'clock 
noon. 

Rule 2. Opening the Session. At the convening hour on each 
legislative day the Speaker shall call the members to order, and 
shall have the session opened with prayer. 

Rule 3. Quorum, (a) A quorum consists of a majority of the 
qualified members of the House. 

(b) On the point of no quorum's being raised, the doors shall 
be closed and the Clerk shall call the roll of the House, after 
which the names of the absentees shall again be called over. Fifteen 
members, including the Speaker, are authorized to compel the 
attendance of absent members, and may order that absentees for 
whom no sufficient excuses are made shall be taken into custody 
as they appear, or wherever they may be found by special mes- 
senger appointed for that purpose. 



I P. Nok i ii ( ' akiii.i \ \ .Mam ai. 

Rule 1. Approval of Journal. The Committee on the Journal 
shall examine daily the Journal of the House before the hour of 
convening to determine if the proceedings of the previous day have 
been correctly recorded. 

Immediately following the opening prayer and upon appearance 
of a quorum, the Speaker shall call for the report of the Com- 
mittee on the Journal as to whether or not the proceedings of the 
previous day have been correctly recorded; the Speaker shall then 
cause the Journal to be approved. Without objection, the Journal 
shall stand approved. 

Rule 5. Order of Business of the Day. After the approval of the 
Journal of the preceding day, the House shall proceed to business in 
the following order: 

(1) The receiving of petitions, memorials and papers addressed 
to the General Assembly or to the House. 

(2) Reports of standing committees. 

(3) Reports of select committees. 

(4) Introduction of Resolutions. 

(5) Introduction of Bills. 

(6) The unfinished business of the preceding day. 

(7) Bills, resolutions, petitions, memorials, messages, and other 
papers on the Calendar in their exact numerical order, 
unless displaced by the order of the day; but messages, 
and motions to elect officers shall always be in order. 

(8) Reading of Notices and Announcements. 



II. Conduct of Debate 

Rule (i. Duties and Powers of the Speaker, (a) The Speaker shall 
have general direction of the Hall. He may name any member to 
perform the duties of the Chair, but substitution shall not extend 
beyond one day. < ■■■< ■••pt in rase of sickness or by leave of the 
House. 

(b) In the event the Speaker, by reason of physical or mental 
incapacity, is unable to perform the duties of the Chair, the Chair- 
man of the Rules Committee shall be Speaker pro tempore, and 
shall perform all of the duties of the Speaker until such time as 
the Speaker may assume the Chair. 



Mouse of Representatives 447 

Rule 7. Obtaining Floor, (a) When any member desires recog- 
nition for any purpose, he shall rise from his seat and respectfully 
address the Speaker. No member shall proceed until recognized by 
the Speaker. 

(b) When a member desires to interrupt a member having the 
floor, he shall first obtain recognition by the Speaker and per- 
mission of the member occupying the floor, and when so recognized 
and such permission is obtained, he may propound a question to the 
member occupying the floor; but he shall not propound a series of 
interrogatories or otherwise interrupt the member having the 
floor; and the Speaker shall, without the point of order being 
raised, enforce this rule. 

Rule 8. Questions of Personal Privilege. At any time, upon rec- 
ognition by the Speaker, any member may rise to speak to a ques- 
tion of personal privilege, and upon objection to his proceeding, 
the Speaker shall determine if the question is one of privilege. 

Rule 9. Points of Order, (a) The Speaker shall decide questions 
of order and may speak to points of order in preference to other 
members arising from their seats for that purpose. Any member 
may appeal from the ruling of the Chair on questions of order; on 
such appeal no member may speak more than once, unless by leave 
of the House. A two-thirds ( % ) vote of the members present shall 
be necessary to sustain any appeal from the ruling of the Chair. 

(b) When the Speaker calls a member to order, the member 
shall take his seat. A member called to order may clear a matter 
of fact, or explain, but shall not proceed in debate so long as the 
decision stands. If the member appeals from the ruling of the 
Chair and the decision be in favor of the member called to order, 
he may proceed; if otherwise, he shall not; and if the case, in the 
judgment of the House require it, he shall be liable to censure by 
the House. 

Rule 10. Limitations on Debate. No member shall speak more 
than twice on the main question, nor longer than thirty minutes 
for the first speech and fifteen minutes for the second speech, unless 
allowed to do so by the affirmative vote of a majority of the mem- 
bers present; nor shall he speak more than once upon an amend- 
ment or motion to commit or postpone, and then not longer than ten 
minutes. But the House may, by consent of a majority of the mem- 



I is Nor in C utoi i \ \ Jh\i \i 

bers present, suspend the operation of this rule during any debate 
on any particular question before the House, or the Committee on 
Rules may bring in a special rule that shall be applicable to the 
debate on any hill. 

Rule 11. Reading of papers. When there is a call for the reading 

of a paper which has been read in the House, and there is objection 
to such reading, the question shall be determined by a majority 
vote of the members of the House present. 

Rule 12. General Decorum, (a) The Speaker shall preserve order 
and decorum. 

(b) Decency id' speech shall he observed and personal reflection 
carefully avoided. 

(c) When the Speaker is putting any question, or addressing 

the Mouse, no person shall speak, stand up, walk out of or cross 
the Mouse, nor when a member is speaking, entertain private dis- 
course.', stand up, or pass between the member and the Chair. 

(d) Smoking or the consumption of food or beverages shall not 
be permitted on the door of the House while the House is in session. 

(e) Smoking or the consumption of food or beverages shall not 
be permitted in the galleries at any time. 



111. Motions 

Rule 13. Muttons Generally, (a) Every motion shall be reduced 
to writing, if the Speaker or any two members request it. 

(b) When a motion is made, it shall be stated by the Speaker, 
or. if written, it shall be handed to the Chair and read aloud by the 
Speaker or Clerk before debate. 

(c) After a motion has been stated by the Speaker or read by 
the Speaker or Clerk, it shall be in the possession of the House; 
hut it may be withdrawn before a decision or amendment, except 
in case of a motion to reconsider, which motion, when made by a 
member shall be in possession of the House and shall not be with- 
drawn without leave of the House. 

Rule 14. Motions, Order of Precedence. When there are motions 
before the House, the order of precedence is as follows: 



House of Representatives 44!) 

Previous question 

To adjourn 

To lay on the table 

To postpone indefinitely 

To postpone to a day certain 

To commit 

To amend an amendment 

To amend 

To substitute 

To pass the bill 

No motion to lay on the table, to postpone indefinitely, to post- 
pone to a day certain, to commit or to amend, being decided, shall 
be again allowed at the same stage of the bill or proposition. 

Rule 15. Motion to Adjourn, (a) A motion to adjourn shall be 
seconded before the motion is put to the vote of the House. 

(b) A motion to adjourn shall be decided without debate, and 
shall always be in order, except when the House is voting or some 
member is speaking; but a motion to adjourn shall not follow a 
motion to adjourn until debate or some other business of the House 
has intervened. 

Rule 16. Motion to Table, (a) A motion to table shall be seconded 
before the motion is put to the vote of the House, and is always 
in order except when a motion to adjourn is before the House. 

(b) A motion to table shall be decided without debate. 

(c) A motion to table a bill shall constitute a motion to table the 
bill and all amendments thereto. 

(d) A motion to table an amendment sent up from the floor 
shall not be construed as a motion to table the principal bill or 
any other amendment which has been offered thereto, and if such 
motion is carried, only the amendment shall lie upon the table. 

(e) When a question has been tabled, the same shall not be acted 
upon again during the session except by two-thirds ( % ) vote. 

Rule 17. Motion to Postpone Indefinitely. A motion to postpone 
indefinitely is always in order except when a motion to adjourn 
or to lay on the table is before the House; however, after one 
motion to postpone indefinitely has been decided, another motion to 



[50 \m; i ii ( ' vROLiiS \ Mani w, 

postpone indefinitely shall not be allowed at the same stage of 
the bill or proposition. When a question has been postponed in- 
definitely, the same shall not he acted on again during the session. 
except upon a two-thirds (%) vote. 

Rule IS. Motion to Reconsider, (a) When a motion has been once 
made and decided in the affirmative or negative, it is in order for 
any member of the majority to move for the reconsideration there- 
of, on the same or succeeding legislative day, unless it may have 
subsequently passed the Senate; Provided, that unless the vote 
by which the motion was originally decided was taken by a call 
of the ayes and noes, any member may move to reconsider. 

(I)) A motion to reconsider shall be determined by a majority 
vote, except a motion to reconsider a motion tabling a motion to 
reconsider, which shall require a two-thirds ( 2 s ) vote. 



IV. Previous Question 

Rule 1!». I'n rums Question. The previous question may be called 
only by the members submitting the report on the bill or other 
matter under consideration, by the member introducing the bill 
or other matter under consideration, or by the member in charge 
of the measure, who shall he designated by the chairman of the 
committee reporting the same to the House at the time the bill or 
other matter under consideration is reported to the House or taken 
up for consideration. 

Rule 20. Form and Effect of Previous Question, (a) The previous 
question shall be as follows: "Shall the main question now be 
put?" When the call for the previous question has been decided in 
the affirmative by a majority vote of the House, the "main question" 
is on the passage of the bill, resolution or other matter under con- 
sideration, including all pending amendments. If amendments arc 
pending, the question shall be taken upon such amendments in 
inverse order. 

(hi The call for the previous question shall preclude all motions, 
amendments and debate, except the motion to adjourn made prior 
to the determination of the previous question. Should the motion 
to adjourn be made prior to the determination of the previous 
question, the House shall vote first on the motion to adjourn 



Hoi ink (ik Rkimjkskatativks 451 

and then, if the motion to adjourn fails, the members shall vote on 
the call for the previous question. 

(c) If the previous question is decided in the negative, the main 
question remains under debate. 

V. Voting 

Rule 21. Stating Questions, (a) The Speaker shall rise to put a 
question. 

(b) The question shall be put in this form, namely, "Those in 
favor (as the question may be) will say 'Aye'," and after the 
affirmation voice has been expressed, "Those opposed will say 'No'." 

(c) Any member may call for a question to be divided into two 
or more propositions to be voted on separately, and the Speaker 
shall determine whether the question admits of such a division. 

Rule 22. Determining Question. Unless otherwise provided by 
the Constitution of North Carolina, all questions shall be deter- 
mined by the members present and voting. 

Rule 23. Voting by Division. Any member may call for a division 
of the members upon the question before the result of the vote 
has been announced. Upon a call for a division, the Speaker shall 
cause the number voting in the affirmative and in the negative 
to be determined. Upon a division and count of the House on any 
question, no member out of his seat shall be counted. 

Rule 24. Roll Call Vote, (a) Before a question is put, any mem- 
ber may call for the ayes and noes. If the call is sustained by one- 
fifth (1/5) of the members present, the question shall be decided 
by the ayes and noes upon a roll call vote, taken alphabetically. 

(b) Every member who is in the hall of the House when the 
question is put shall give his vote upon a call of the ayes and 
noes, unless the House for special reasons shall excuse him, and 
no application to be excused from voting or to explain a vote shall 
be entertained unless made before the call of the roll. 

Rule 25. Voting by Absentees, (a) No member shall vote on any 
question when he was not present when the question was put by 
the Speaker, except by the consent of the House. 



152 Nnii'i ii (' \i:<n i \ \ M \ \ i \i 

ill) [f ;tny member is necessarily absenl on temporary business 
i)f the House when a vote is taken upon any question, upon entering 
the House he shall be permitted, on request, to vote, provided that 
the result shall not be affected thereby. 

(c) When a member who is present is paired with an absent 
member, he shall, when his name is called on a roll call vote, an- 
nounce the pair, which shall be recorded by the Principal Clerk. 

Rule 2t\. Voting by Speaker. In all elections the Speaker may vote. 
In all other instances he may exercise his right to vote, or he 
may reserve this right until there is a tie, but in no instance may 
he vote twice on the same question. 



VI. Committees 

Rule 27. Committees Generally, (a) All committees shall be 
appointed by the Speaker, unless otherwise specially ordered by 
the House. 

(1)) Any member may excuse himself from serving on any com- 
mittee if he is a member of two standing committees. 

(c) The Chairman and five other members of any committee 
shall constitute a quorum of that committee for the transaction 
of business. 

(d) In any joint meeting- of the Senate and House committees, 
the House Committee may in its discretion reserve the right to 
vote separately. 

Rule 28. Appointment of Standing Committees, (a) At the com- 
mencement of the session the Speaker shall appoint a standing 
committee on each of the following subjects, namely: 

Agriculture. 

Appropriations. 

Ranks and Banking. 

Commercial Fisheries and Oyster Industry. 

Commissions and Institutions for the Blind. 

1 iongressional Districts. 

Conservation and Development. 

Constitutional Amendments. 



Hoi sk (if Representatives 453 



Corporations. 

Counties, Cities and Towns. 

Courts and Judicial Districts. 

Education. 

Elections and Election Laws. 

Employment Security. 

Enrolled Bills and Expenditures of the House. 

Federal and Interstate Cooperation. 

Finance. 

Health. 

Higher Education. 

Highway Safety. 

Institutions for the Deaf. 

Insurance. 

Irrigation and Drainage. 

Journal. 

Judiciary No. 1. 

Judiciary No. 2. 

Justices of the Peace. 

Library (Joint). 

Local Government. 

Manufacturers and Labor. 

Mental Health. 

Military and Veteran's Affairs. 

Penal Institutions. 

Printing. 

Propositions and Grievances. 

Public Buildings and Grounds. 

Public Utilities. 

Public Welfare. 

Roads. 

Rules. 

Salaries and Fees. 

Senatorial Districts. 

State Government. 

State Personnel. 

Trustees of the University. 

Water Resources and Control. 

Wildlife Resources. 



I"' I Noh i it Caboli \ \ Mani \i 

(b) The first member announced on each committee shall be 
chairman, and where the Speaker so desires he may designate a 
co-chairman and one or more vice-chairmen. 

Rule 29. Standing Committee Meetings, (a) Standing- com- 
mittees and sub-committees of standing committees shall be fur- 
nished with suitable meeting places. 

(b) Subject to the provisions of sub-sections (c) and (d) of 
this Rule, standing committees and subcommittees thereof shall 
permit other members of the General Assembly, the press, and the 
general public to attend all sessions of said committees or sub- 
committees. 

(c) The chairman or other presiding officer shall have general 
direction of the meeting place of the committee or subcommittee 
and, in case of any disturbance or disorderly conduct therein, or 
if the peace, good order, and proper conduct of the legislative 
business is hindered by any individual or individuals, the chairman 
or presiding officer shall have power to exclude from the session 
any individual or individuals so hindering the legislative business 
or, if necessary, to order the meeting place cleared of all persons 
not members of the committee or subcommittee. 

(d) Upon the affirmative vote of a majority of the members of 
any standing committee or subcommittee, executive sessions may be 
held, but in no event shall final action be taken in executive sessions. 

(e) Procedure in the committees shall be governed by the rules 
of the House, so far as the same may be applicable to such pro- 
cedure. 

Rule 30. Coutui it tec Hearings. The Chairmen of all committees 
shall notify, or cause to be notified, the first named introducer on 
such bills as are set for hearing before their respective com- 
mittees as to the date, time and place of such hearing. 

Rule 31. Committee of the Whole House, (a) A Committee of 
the Whole House shall not be formed, except by suspension of the 
rules, if there be objections by any member. 

(b) After passage of a motion to form a Committee of the 
Whole House, the Speaker shall appoint a chairman to preside 
in committee, and the Speaker shall leave the Chair. 



House of Representatives 455 

(c) The rules of procedure in the House shall be observed in the 
Committee of the Whole House, so far as they may be applicable, 
except the rule limiting the time of speaking and the previous 
question. 

(d) In the Committee of the Whole House a motion that the 
committee rise shall always be in order, except when a member 
is speaking, and shall be decided without debate. 

(e) When a bill is submitted to the Committee of the Whole 
House, it shall be read and debated by sections, leaving the pre- 
amble to be last considered. The body of the bill shall not be 
defaced or interlined, but all amendments, noting the page and 
line, shall be duly entered by the Clerk on a separate paper as the 
same shall be agreed to by the committee, and so reported to the 
House. After report, the bill shall again be subject to be debated 
and amended by sections before a question on its passage be taken. 

VII. Handling of Bills 

Rule 32. Reference to Committee. Each bill not introduced on 
the report of a committee shall immediately upon its introduction be 
referred by the Speaker to such committee as he deems appropriate. 

Rule 33. Introduction of Bills and Resolutions, (a) Every bill 
shall be introduced in regular order of business, except upon per- 
mission of the Speaker or on the report of a committee. 

(b) Any member introducing a bill or resolution shall briefly 
endorse thereon the substance of the same. 

Rule 34. Papers Addressed to the House. Petitions, memorials and 
other papers addressed to the House shall be presented by the 
Speaker ; a brief statement of the contents thereof may be verbally 
made by the introducer before reference to a committee, but such 
papers shall not be debated or decided on the day of their first 
being read, unless the House shall direct otherwise. 

Rule 35. Introduction of Bills, Copies Required, (a) Whenever 
any resolution or bill is introduced, a carbon copy thereof shall be 
attached thereto, and the Principal Clerk shall cause said carbon 
copy to be numbered as the original resolution or bill is numbered, 
and shall cause the same to be available at all times to the member 
introducing the same. 



I ,i| \'oi:i ii Carol] \ \ .M \ m \i 

I h) Whenever a public bill is introduced, it shall be in such form 
and have such copies accompanying same as designated by the 
Speaker, and any bill submitted without the required number of 
copies shall be immediately returned to the introducer. The Clerk 
shall stamp the copies with the number stamped upon the original 
hill. 

Rule .'i(i. Duplicating of Hill ft. The Principal Clerk shall cause 
such bills as are introduced to be duplicated in such numbers as 
may he specified by the Speaker. On the morning following the 
delivery of the copies, the Chief Clerk shall cause the Chief Page 
to have one copy put upon the desk of each member, one copy put in 
the office of each member, and shall retain the other copies in his 
office. A sufficient number of copies for the use of the committee 
to which the bill is referred shall be delivered to the chairman or 
clerk of that committee by the Chief Page. If the bill is passed 
by the House, the Chief Clerk shall deliver the remaining copies 
to the Principal Clerk of the Senate for the use of the Senate. 

( h I The cost of duplicating shall be paid from the contingent 
fund of the House of Representatives. 

Rule 37. Report by Committee. All bills and resolutions shall be 
reported from the committee to which referred, with such recom- 
mendations as the committee may desire to make. 

(a) Farm-able Report. When a committee reports a bill with the 
recommendation that it be passed, the bill shall be placed on the 
favorable calendar. 

(b) Report Without Prejudice. When a committee reports a bill 
without prejudice, the bill shall be placed on the favorable calendar. 

(c) Unfavorable Report. When a committee reports a bill with 
the recommendation that it be not passed, and no minority report 
accompanies it, the bill shall be placed on the unfavorable calendar. 

(d) Minority Report. When a bill is reported by a committee 
with a recommendation that it be not passed, but it is accompanied 
by a minority report sig-ned by at least one-fourth (%) of the 
members of the committee who were present and voting when the 
bill was considered in committee, the question before the House 
shall be: "The adoption of the minority report." If the minority 
report is adopted by majority vote, the bill shall be placed on the 



House of Representatives 457 

favorable calendar for consideration. If the minority report fails of 
adoption by a majority vote, the bill shall be placed on the un- 
favorable calendar. 

Rule 38. Removing Bill from Unfavorable Calendar. A bill may 
be removed from the unfavorable calendar upon motion carried 
by a two-thirds (%) vote. A motion to remove a bill from the un- 
favorable calendar is not debatable; but the movant may, before 
making the motion, make a brief and concise statement, not more 
than five minutes in length, of the reasons for the motion. 

Rule 39. Reports on Appropriation and Revenue Bills. All com- 
mittees, other than the Committee on Appropriations, when fa- 
vorably reporting any bill which carries an appropriation from the 
State, shall indicate same in the report, and said bill shall be 
referred to the Committee on Appropriations for a further report 
before being acted upon by the House. All committees, other than 
the Committee on Finance, when favorably reporting any bill which 
in any way or manner raises revenue or levies a tax or authorizes 
the issue of bonds or notes, whether public, public-local, or private, 
shall indicate same in the report, and said bill shall be referred 
to the Committee on Finance for a further report before being acted 
upon by the House. 

Rule 40. Recall of Bill from Committee. When a bill has been 
introduced and referred to a committee, if after ten days the com- 
mittee has failed to report thereon, then the introducer of the bill or 
some member designated by him may, after three days' public 
notice given in the House, on motion supported by a vote of two- 
thirds ( % ) of the members present and voting, recall the same 
from the committee to the floor of the House for consideration and 
such action thereon as a majority of the members present may 
direct. 

Rule 41. Calendars. The Clerk of the House shall keep a separate 
calendar of the public, local, and private bills, and shall number 
them in the order in which they are introduced, and all bills shall 
be disposed of in the order they stand upon the Calendar; but the 
Committee on Rules may at any time arrange the order of prec- 
edence in which bills may be considered. 



IBS Nor in Carolina Mani \i 

Rule 1^. Readings of Hills, (a) Every bill shall receive three 
readings in the House prior to its passage. The introduction of the 
hill shall constitute its first reading, and the Speaker shall give 
nut ice at each subsequent reading whether it be the second or third 
reading. 

i lit No Mil shall be read more than once on the same day with- 
out the concurrence of two-thirds (%) of the members present 
and voting. 

Rule 43. Effect of Defeated Bill, (a) Subject to the provisions of 
subsection (b) of this Rule, after a bill has been tabled or has 
failed to pass on any of its readings, the contents of such bill or 
the principal provisions of its subject matter shall not be embodied 
in any other measure. Upon the point of order being raised and 
sustained by the Chair, such measure shall be laid upon the table, 
and shall not he taken therefrom except by a two-thirds (%) vote. 

(b) No local bill shall be held by the Chair to embody the 
provisions of or to be identical with any statewide measure which 
has Keen laid upon the table, or failed to pass any of its readings. 

Rule 44. Amendments and Riders. No amendment or rider to a 
bill before the House shall be in order unless such rider or amend- 
ment is germane to the bill under consideration. 

Rule 45. Conference Committees, (a) Whenever the House shall 
decline or refuse to concur in amendments put by the Senate to a 
bill originating- in the House, or shall refuse to adopt a substitute 
adopted by the Senate for a bill originating in the House, a con- 
ference committee shall be appointed upon motion made, consisting 
of the number named in the motion; and the bill under consider- 
ation shall thereupon go to and be considered by the joint conferees 
on the part of the House and Senate. 

(b) Only such matters as are in difference between the two 
houses shall he considered by the conferees, and the conference 
report shall deal only with such matters. The conference report 
shall not be amended. 

(c) Except as herein set out, the rules of the House of Repre- 
sentatives of Congress shall govern the appointment, conduct, 
and reports of the conferees. 



House of Representatives 459 

VIII. Legislative Officers and Employees 

Rule 46. Elected Officers. The House shall elect a Principal Clerk, 
a Reading Clerk, and a Sergeant-at-Arms. The Principal Clerk 
shall continue in office until another is elected. 

Rule 47. Assistants to Principal Clerk and Sergeant-at-Arms. 
The Principal Clerk and the Sergeant-at-Arms may appoint, with 
the approval of the Speaker, such assistants as may be necessary to 
the efficient discharge of the duties of their various offices. One 
or more of such assistants may be assigned by the Speaker from 
the Principal Clerk's office to the office of the Attorney General 
for the purpose of drafting bills. 

Rule 48. Speaker's Clerk, Chaplain and Pages, (a) The Speaker 
may appoint a Clerk to the Speaker, a Chaplain of the House, 
and he may also appoint fifteen pages to wait upon the sessions of 
the House; when the pressure of business may require, the Speaker 
may appoint five additional pages. 

(b) When the House is not in session, the pages shall be under 
the supervision of the Principal Clerk. 

Rule 49. Committee Clerks, (a) The Chairman of each of the 
following committees may, with the approval of the Speaker, ap- 
point a clerk to his committee : Agriculture; Appropriations; Banks 
and Banking; Congressional Districts; Commercial Fisheries and 
Oyster Industry; Conservation and Development; Constitutional 
Amendments; Corporations; Counties, Cities and Towns; Courts 
and Judicial Districts; Education; Elections and Election Laws; 
Employment Security; Federal and Interstate Cooperation; Fi- 
nance; Health; Higher Education; Highway Safety; Insurance; 
Judiciary No. 1; Judiciary No. 2; Local Government; Manufac- 
turers and Labor; Mental Health; Penal Institutions; Propositions 
and Grievances; Public Utilities; Public Welfare; Roads; Rules; 
Salaries and Fees; State Government; State Personnel; Trustees 
of the University ; Water Resources and Control ; and Wildlife Re- 
sources. 

(b) Whenever the Speaker deems it advisable, he may assign a 
clerk to act for two or more committees. 

(c) The leader of the minority party may, with the approval 
of the Speaker, be assigned a clerk. 



liio Nok i ii Caeoj I \ \ Al \ \ I \l 

idi By and with the consent and approval of the Chairman of 
any of the above committees, the clerk of said committee may be 
assigned to special duty with other committees under the super- 
vision of the Principal Clerk of the House. 

Rule 50. Compensation of Clerks. No clerk, laborer, or other 
person employed or appointed under Rules 47, 48, and 49 hereof 
shall receive during such employment, appointment, or service any 
compensation from any department of the State Government, or 
from any other source, and there shall not be voted, paid or 
awarded any additional pay, bonus or gratuity to any of them, but 
they shall receive only the pay now provided by law for such 
duties and services. 

IX. Privileges of the Hall 

Rule 51. Admittance to Flour. No person except members, officers 
and employees of the General Assembly, Judges of the Supreme 
and Superior Courts, State officers and former members of the 
General Assembly who are not registered under the provisions of 
Article 9 of Chapter 120 of the Genei-al Statutes of North Carolina 
shall be allowed on the floor of the House during its session, unless 
permitted by the Speaker. 

Rule 52. Admittance of Press. Reporters wishing to take down 
debates may be admitted by the Speaker, who shall assign such 
places to them on the floor or elsewhere, to effect this object, as 
shall not interfere with the convenience of the House. 

Rule 53. Extending Courtesies. Courtesies of the floor, galleries 
or lobby shall not be extended by the Speaker on behalf of any 
member except upon the Speaker's motion and by written request. 

Rule 54. Order in Galleries and Lobby. In case of any disturbance 
or disorderly conduct in the galleries or lobby, the Speaker or 
other presiding officer is empowered to order the same to be cleared. 

X. General Rules 

Pule 55. Attendance of Members. No member or officer of the 
House shall absent himself from the service of the House without 
leave, unless from sickness or disability. 



House of Representatives 46i 

Rule 56. Documents to be Signed by the Speaker. All Acts, ad- 
dresses, and Resolutions and all warrants and subpoenas issued 
by order of the House shall be signed by the Speaker or Presiding 
Officer. 

Rule 57. Placement of Material on Members" Desks. Persons 
other than members of the General Assembly, officers or staff there- 
of shall not place or cause to be placed any material on members' 
desks without obtaining approval of the Speaker or the Principal 
Clerk. Any printed material so placed shall bear the name of the 
originator. 

Rule 58. Rules, Rescission and Alteration, (a) No standing 
rule or order shall be rescinded or altered without one day's notice 
given on the motion thereof, and to sustain such motion two-thirds 
( % ) of the House shall be required. 

(b) Except as otherwise provided herein, the House upon two- 
thirds (%) vote of the members present and voting may tem- 
porarily suspend any rule. 



162 Norn 11 Carolijn \ M \M M 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE HOUSE 
OF REPRESENTATIVES 



AGRICULTURE 

Speed: Chairman 

Auman: Vice-Chairman 

Falls: Vice-Chairman 

Forbes: Vice-Chairman 

McFadyen : Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Barbee, Billings, Boger, Bowles, Burden, Burrus, Chase, 
Collier, Collins, Culpepper, Eagles, Everett, Fenner. Garner, Gunn, 
Horton, Jernigan, Mitchell, Mohn, Roberson, Staton, Tart, Taylor 
of Transylvania, Tolbert, Whitley of Stanly, Woodard. 



APPROPRIATIONS 

Greenwood : Chairman 

Ervin: Vice-Chairman 

Jernigan : Vice-Chairman 

Johnson of Wake: Vice-Chairman 

Phillips: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Auman. Barbee, Barr. Beatty, Blake, Boger, Bowles, Bunn, 
1 hase, Clark of Bladen, Collins. Eagles, Exum, Falls, Fenner, 
Godwin of Gates. Garren, Gregory. Gunn, Hamrick, Haynes, Hill, 
Horton, Hunter of Mecklenburg, Ingle, Isaac, Johnson of Cabarrus. 
Jordan, Kiser, Leatherman, McFadyen, McGlamery, Merritt. 
Messer, Mills of Onslow, O'Hanlon, Penny, Pickard, Poovey, 
Ramsey of Madison, Ramsey of Person, Raynor, Rountree, Royall, 
Speed, Stanford, Staton, Stewart, Sugg, Tate, Taylor of Carteret, 
Taylor of Transylvania, Troxell, Vaughn, Whicker, Whitley of 
Stanly, Williamson. 



House of Representatives 463 

BANKS AND BANKING 

Godwin of Gates: Chairman 

Gregory: Vice-Chairman 

Hofler: Vice-Chairman 

Paschall: Vice-Chairman 

Short: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Andrews, Bailey, Blake, Bryan, Clark of Union, Collins, 
Eagles, Euliss, Garren, Godwin of Craven, Hunter of Mecklenburg-, 
Isaac, Johnson of Duplin, Jones, McFadyen, McGlamery, McMillan 
of Robeson, Mullinax, Ragsdale, Whitley of Stanly. 

COMMERCIAL FISHERIES 
AND OYSTER INDUSTRY 

Williamson: Chairman 

Merritt: Vice-Chairman 

O'Hanlon: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Burrus, Culpepper, Haynes, Hill, Hutchins, Johnson of 
Duplin, Kincaid, Mohn, Strickland, Sugg, Tart, Taylor of Carteret. 

COMMISSIONS AND 
INSTITUTIONS FOR THE BLIND 

McMillan of Wake: Chairman 

Andrews: Vice-Chairman 

Gunn: Vice-Chairman 

Leatherman : Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Baugh, Bowles, Chase, Everett, Falls, Haynes, Jemison, 
Mitchell, Royall, Tolbert. 

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS 

High: Chairman 

Bunn: Vice-Chairman 

Ragsdale: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Ervin, Garner, Garren, Godwin of Gates, Gregory, Messer, 
Mills of Anson, Pickard, Quinn, Vaughn. 



Hi I Xoi; | || (' \i;ul I N \ M \.\ I Al 

CONSERVATION AND 
DEVELOPMENT 

Jernigan : Chairman 
Andrews: Vice-Chairman 

Bark: Vice-Chairman 
burrus: vice-chairman 

Reps.: Auman, Beatty, Church, Clark of Bladen, Collier, Cul- 
pepper. Everett, Fenner, Garner, Gunn, Harkins, Hege, Isaac, 
Kincaid, Mauney, McKnight, Mills of Anson, Mullinax, Roberson, 
Strickland. Whitley of Stanly. 



CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS 

Andrews: Chairman 

Ham rick : Vice-Chairman 

McMillan of Wake: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Bailey, Carson, Clark of Union, Elliott, Exum, Garren, 
Hill, Penny, Tate, Whitley of Guilford. 

CORPORATIONS 

Edwards: Chairman 

Euliss: Vice-Chairman 

1 1 \mrick : Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Bryan, Calvert, Church, Clark of New Hanover, Ervin, 
Hofler, Horton, Johnson of Cabarrus, Love, Pasehall, Rountree. 
Strickland, Twiggs, Whitley of Stanly. 

COUNTIES, CITIES AND TOWNS 

Horton : Chairman 

Forbes : Vice-Chairman 

Stanford: Vice-Chairman 

Tart: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Billings, Bumgardner, Burrus, Calvert, Church, Clark of 
Union, Collier, Euliss, Hege, Jones, McKnight, McMichael, Raynor, 
Stewart. Troxell. Twiggs, Vogler, Whitley of Guilford. 



House of Representatives 465 

COURTS AND 
JUDICIAL DISTRICTS 

Vaughn : Chairman 

Garren: Vice-Chairman 

Ramsey of Person: Vice-Chairman 

Whitley of Guilford: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Bailey, Britt of Johnston, Carson, Clark of New Hanover, 
Ervin, Godwin of Gates, High, Johnson of Cabarrus, Johnson of 
Wake, Leatherman, Pickard, Rountree, Short, Strickland, Sugg, 
Taylor of Carteret. 



EDUCATION 

McMillan of Robeson: Chairman 

Barbee: Vice-Chairman 

Chase: Vice-Chairman 

Kiser: Vice-Chairman 

Tart: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Auman, Beatty, Blake, Bowles, Collier, Everett, Green- 
wood, Haynes, Hunter of Mecklenburg, Isaac, Jernigan, Johnson of 
Duplin, Kincaid, Messer, Mullinax, O'Hanlon, Penny, Ramsey of 
Madison, Roberson, Royall, Staton, Tolbert, Whitley of Guilford, 
Woodard. 



ELECTIONS AND 
ELECTION LAWS 

Barbee : Chairman 

Johnson of Wake: Vice-Chairman 

McGlamery : Vice-Chairman 

Pickard: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Bailey, Baugh, Collins, Edwards, Forbes, Hege, Hofier, 
Hutchins, Jemison, Ramsey of Madison, Strickland, Tart, Tate, 
Vogler. 



Hiii Nok mi ( ' \ i:< > i i \ \ .M \\ i \i 

ENROLLED HILLS AND 
EXPENDITURES OF THE HOUSE 

Merritt: Chairman 

( i ree n \v( )( >i> : vlce-ch airman 

Ragsdale: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Andrews, Ban-, Chase, Craig, Edwards, Elliott, Godwin 
of Gates, Ingle, Kincaid, Leatherman, Whicker. 

EMPLOYMENT SECURITY 

Mills of Anson : Chairman 

Godwin of Craven: Vice-Chairman 

Quinn : Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Baugh, Billings, Bowles, Calvert, Church, Hunter of 
Richmond, Love, McKnight, Ragsdale, Raynor, Twiggs, Whicker, 
Whitley of Stanly. 

FEDERAL AND 
INTERSTATE COOPERATION 

Forbes: Chairman- 
Eagles: Vice-Chairman 
Vaughn: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Bailey, Calvert, Culpepper, Gregory, Hunter of Mecklen- 
burg, Hutchins. Phillips. Poovey, Quinn, Royall, Stewart, Twiggs, 
Whicker. 

FINANCE 

Eagles: Chairman 
High: Vice-Chairman 
Leatherman : Vice-Chairman 
McMillan of Robeson: Vice-chairman- 
Short: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Andrews, Bailey, Baugh, Billings, Britt of Johnston, 
Bryan, Bumgardner, Burden, Burrus, Calvert, Carson, Church, 
('lark of New Hanover, Clark of Union, Collier, Craig, Culpepper, 



House of Representatives 407 

Edwards, Elliott, Euliss, Everett, Forbes, Garner, Godwin of 
Craven, Greenwood, Harkins, Harrill, Hege, Hofler, Hunter of 
Richmond, Hutchins, Jemison, Johnson of Duplin, Jones, Kincaid, 
Love, Mauney, McKnight, McMichael, McMillan of Wake, Mills of 
Anson, Mitchell, Mohn, Mullinax, Paschall, Quinn, Ragsdale, 
Roberson, Strickland, Tart, Tolbert, Twiggs, Vogler, Whitley of 
Guilford, Woodard. 

HEALTH 

Tate: Chairman 
Hofler: Vice-Chairman 
Vogler: Vice-Chairman 

Reps. : Baugh, Billings, Bumgardner, Chase, Falls, Hege, 
Jemison, Johnson of Cabarrus, Love, McMillan of Wake, Merritt, 
Mills of Anson, Mitchell, Phillips, Raynor, Royall, Stanford, 
Troxell, Woodard. 

HIGHER EDUCATION 

Leatherman: Chairman 

Godwin of Gates: Vice-Chairman 

McMillan of Robeson: Vice-Chairman 

Mills of Onslow: Vice-Chairman 

Reps. : Beatty, Bunn, Carson, Church, Clark of Bladen, Hamrick, 
Harkins, High, Hill, Hunter of Richmond, Ingle, Kiser, McFadyen, 
McGlamery, Phillips, Poovey, Rountree, Stanford, Twiggs, Vaughn. 

HIGHWAY SAFETY 

Gregory : Chairman 
Britt of Johnston: Vice-Chairman 

Euliss: Vice-Chairman 
McMillan of Wake: Vice-Chairman 

Speed: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Bumgardner, Craig, Eagles, Everett, Fenner, Gunn, 
Hamrick, Harrill, Hutchins, Jernigan, Jordan, Poovey, Ramsey 
of Person, Short, Strickland, Tolbert, Whicker, Vogler. 



HiS Noin ii Caimh.ina Manual 



INSURANCE 



k am sky oy Person: Chairman 

Burden: Vice-Chairman 

Horton: Vice-Chairman 

Hunter of Richmond: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Bailey, (lark of New Hanover, Clark of Union, Collins, 
Garren, Greenwood, Harkins, Harrill, High, Isaac, Kincaid, Mc- 
Michael, Mitchell, Mullinax, Pickard, Ragsdale, Royall, Short, Sugg, 
Taylor of Carteret. Vaughn, Whitlev of Guilford 



INSTITUTIONS FOR THE DEAF 

Raynor: Chairman 

Paschall: Vice-Chairman 

Tate: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Bowles, Bunn, Collins, Ervin, Harrill, Hege, Isaac, Love, 
Mauney, Poovey, Rountree, Short, Whitley of Stanly. 



IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE 

Elliott: Chairman 
Burrus: Vice-Chairman 
Horton: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Roger, Bryan, Forbes, Jemison, Poovey, Speed, Troxell. 



JOURNAL 

Auman : Chairman 

Barr: Vice-Chairman 

Edwards: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Blake, Hutchins. Mullinax, Penny, Stewart, Taylor of 
Transylvania, Whicker. 



House of Representatives 4C>9 

JUDICIARY NO. 1 

Hamrick : Chairman 

Ervin : Vice-Chairman 

Garren : Vice-Chairman 

McMichael: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Andrews, Bunn, Clark of New Hanover, Exum, Harkins, 
High, Johnson of Wake, Leatherman, McMillan of Wake, Paschall, 
Rountree, Short, Staton, Stewart, Strickland, Sugg. 



JUDICIARY NO. 2 

Britt op Johnston: Chairman 

Godwin of Gates: Vice-Chairman 

Pickard: Vice-Chairman 

Whitley of Guilford: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Bailey, Bryan, Carson, Clark of Union, Edwards, Elliott, 
Hill, Hofler, Horton, Hunter of Mecklenburg, Johnson of Cabarrus, 
Love, Penny, Ramsey of Person, Taylor of Carteret, Twiggs, 
Vaughn. 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE 

Ramsey of Madison: Chairman 

Falls: Vice-Chairman 

O'Hanlon: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Collins, Garner, Hunter of Mecklenburg, Johnson of 
Cabarrus, Mullinax, Staton, Stewart. 



LIBRARY (JOINT) 

Stanford: Chairman 

Eagles : Vice-Chairman 

Mills of Onslow: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Barbee, Beatty, Billings, Carson, Collier, Harkins, Ingle, 
Kincaid, McMichael, Phillips, Taylor of Transylvania, Troxell. 



1 . Nor i 11 Caroli n \ .M \ n i ai. 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

Pickard: Chairman 
Elliott: Vice-Chairman 
Hunter of Richmond: Vice-Chairman 
Ramsey of Madison: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Baugh, Burden, Clark of Bladen, Exum, Harrill, Haynes, 
Hill, Hunter of Mecklenburg, Ingle, Isaac, Jemison, Mauney, 
.McMillan of Robeson, O'Hanlon, Penny, Rountree, Tate, Whitley 
of Stanly, Williamson. 

MANUFACTURERS AND LABOR 

Messer: Chairman 

McFadyen : Vice-Chairman 

Tate: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Boger, Church, Clark of Union, Craig, Exum, Garren, 
Greenwood, Hamrick, Hege, Ingle, Mauney, Merritt, Quinn, Royall, 
Stewart, Sugg. 

MENTAL HEALTH 

Chase: Chairman 

Ervin: Vice-Chairman 

Raynor: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Beatty, Bowles, Clark of New Hanover, Craig, Culpepper, 
Euliss, Johnson of Wake, Leatherman, McFadyen, O'Hanlon, 
Penny, Poovey, Stewart, Taylor of Transylvania, Tolbert, Twiggs, 
Woodard. 

MILITARY AND 
VETERANS AFFAIRS 

Godwin of Craven: Chairman 

Mills of Onslow: Vice-Chairman 

Raynor: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Barr, Bumgardner, Clai-k of Bladen, Craig, Ervin, Harrill, 
Johnson of Cabarrus, McMillan of Wake, Mitchell, Speed, Staton, 
Troxell, Williamson, Whicker. 



House of Representatives 471 

PENAL INSTITUTIONS 

McFadyen: Chairman 

Messer: Vice-Chairman 

Speed: Vice-Chairman 

Williamson : Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Auman, Blake, Bunn, Elliott, Fenner, Harrill, Haynes, 
Jordan, Riser, McKnight, McMichael. 



PRINTING 

Barr: Chairman 

Greenwood: Vice-Chairman 

Jernigan : Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Barbee, Bowles, Calvert, Clark of Bladen, Eagles, Jordan. 
Kiser, McKnight. 



PROPOSITIONS AND 
GRIEVANCES 

Euliss: Chairman 

Barbee: Vice-Chairman 

O'Hanlon: Vice-Chairman 

Paschall: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Baugh, Carson, Clark of Bladen, Craig, Garner, Hege, 
Mauney, McKnight, McMillan of Robeson, Ramsey of Madison, 
Stanford, Staton, Whitley of Guilford, Williamson. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS 
AND GROUNDS 

McGlamery: Chairman 
Burden: Vice-Chairman 
Phillips: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Boger, Britt of Johnston, Elliott, Jordan, Mills of Onslow 
Sugg, Taylor of Transylvania, Troxell. 



17- North Carolina Manual 

PUBLIC UTILITIES 

Bunn: Chairman 

Mills of Anson: Vice-Chairman 

Ramsey of Person : Vice-Chairman 

Vaughn : Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Bailey, Church, Clark of New Hanover, Clark of Union. 
Eagles. Falls. High, Jones, Jordan, Love, Pickard, Royall. 

PUBLIC WELFARE 

Riser: Chairman 

McMichael: Vice-Chairman 

Mills of Anson: Vice-Chairman 

Stanford : Vice-Chairman 

Tart: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Billings, Burden, Collier, Craig, Elliott, Forbes, Gunn. 
Harrill, Hill, Jones, Jordan, McGlamery, Mills of Onslow, Mitchell, 
Mohn, Phillips. Speed. Taylor of Transylvania, Tolbert. 

ROADS 

O'Hanlon: Chairman 
Falls: Vice-Chairman 
McGlamery : Vice-Chairman 
Ramsey of Madison: Vice-Chairman 
Williamson : Vice-Chairman 
Reps.: Auman, Barr, Billings, Blake, Boger, Bumgardner, 
Burden. Burrus, Collier, Collins, Culpepper, Falls, Fenner, Garner, 
Hamrick. Hunter of Richmond. Hutchins, Jemison, Jernigan. 
Mills of Onslow. Mitchell, Roberson, Royall. Speed, Taylor of 
Carteret. Vogler. 

RULES 

Johnson of Duplin : Chairman 

Edwards: Vice-Chairman 

Elliott : Vice-Chairman 

Vogler: Yice-Chairman 

Reps.: Barbee, Bryan, Godwin of Craven, Greenwood, Isaac, 

Jones. Mauney, McKnight, McMillan of Robeson, Paschall, Quinn, 

Ramsey of Person, Roberson. 



House of Representatives 473 

SALARIES AND FEES 

Gunn: Chairman 

Auman: Vice-Chairman 

Riser: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Beatty, Blake, Britt of Johnston, Everett, Falls, Fenner, 
Gregory. Hutchins, Messer. Roberson, Tolbert, Whicker, Woodard. 



SENATORIAL DISTRICTS 

Hofler : Chairman 

Britt of Johnston: Vice-Chairman 

Messer : Vice-Chairman 

Reps. : Beatty, Boger, Bumgardner, Exum, Fenner, Harkins. 
Horton, Johnson of Cabarrus, Johnson of Wake, Mills of Anson, 
Mohn. Pennv, Tart. 



STATE GOVERNMENT 

Vogler: Chairman 

Bunn: Vice-Chairman 

Johnson of Duplin: Vice-Chairman 

Quinn : Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Billings, Calvert, Edwards, Euliss, Godwin of Gates. 
Greenwood, Harkins, Ingle. Mauney, McMichael, Mohn, Ramsey 
of Person. Rountree. 



STATE PERSONNEL 

Quinn: Chairman 

Chase: Vice-Chairman 

Godwin of Craven: Vice-Chairman 

High: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Blake, Bumgardner, Calvert, Elliott, Gregory, Hill, 
Jemison. Johnson of Wake. Jones, McMillan of Robeson, Mohn, 
Phillips. Staton. 



474 North Carolina Manual 

TRUSTEES OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Paschall: Chairman 
Gregory: Vice-Chairman 
Merritt: Vice-Chairman 
Ragsdale: Vice-Chairman 

Reps: Andrews, Baugh, Bowles, Britt of Johnston, Bryan. Clark 
of New Hanover, Exum, Godwin of Craven, Haynes, Hofler. Hunter 
of Mecklenburg, Hunter of Richmond, Johnson of Duplin, Johnson 
of Wake, Jones, Kiser, McFadyen, Mullinax, Stanford. Tate. 
Woodard. 



WATER RESOURCES 
AND CONTROL 

Ragsdale: Chairman 

Gunn: Vice-Chairman 

Jernigan : Vice-Chairman 

Reps. : Blake, Bryan, Burrus, Carson, Clark of Bladen, Culpepper, 
Exum, Godwin of Craven, Haynes, Ingle, Kincaid, Merritt. Mills 
of Onslow, Roberson. Taylor of Carteret. Williamson. 



WILDLIFE RESOURCES 

Burden: Chairman 

Barr: Vice-Chairman 

Johnson of Duplin: Vice-Chairman 

Reps.: Boger, Carson, Everett, Forbes, Garner, Hunter of 
Mecklenburg, Hunter of Richmond, Jordan, Love, McGlamery, 
McMillan of Wake, Merritt, Messer, Mohn, Poovey, Ramsey of 
Madison, Raynor, Short, Sugg, Taylor of Carteret, Taylor of 
Transylvania, Troxell, Woodard. 



House of Representatives 475 
SEAT ASSIGNMENT CHART— SESSION 1967 

North Carolina House of Representatives 
(Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

District Name County Address Seal 

1st — W. T. Culpepper, Jr Pasquotank Elizabeth City 19 

1st — Philip P. Godwin Gates Gatesville 8 

2nd — Archie Burrus Dare Manteo 37 

2nd — William R. Roberson, Jr Beaufort Washington 49 

3rd — R. C. Godwin Craven New Bern 52 

3rd — James R. Sugg Craven New Bern 76 

3rd — Nelson W. Taylor Carteret Morehead City 75 

4th— William D. Mills Onslow Rt. 1, Maysville 24 

4th— J. F. Mohn Onslow Richlands 36 

4th — Hugh A. Ragsdale Onslow Richlands 23 

5th — George T. Clark, Jr. (R) New Hanover .... Wilmington 113 

5th — William L. Hill, II New Hanover. . . Wilmington 41 

6th — Emmett W. Burden Bertie Aulander 15 

6th — Roberts H. Jernigan, Jr Hertford Ahoskie 16 

7th — J. A. Everett Martin Palmyra 56 

7th — Thorne Gregory Halifax Scotland Neck 55 

8th— W. A. (Red) Forbes Pitt Winterville 64 

8th — H. Horton Rountree Pitt Greenville 63 

9th — Guy Elliott Lenoir Kinston 51 

9th — I. Joseph Horton Greene Snow Hill 42 

10th— Mrs. John B. Chase Wayne Eureka 32 

10th— Thomas E. Strickland Wayne Rt. 2, Goldsboro 20 

11th— Hugh S. Johnson, Jr Duplin Rose Hill 25 

12th— Chatham C. Clark Bladen Elizabethtown. 80 

12th — C. Graham Tart Sampson Clinton 79 

13th— Clyde M. Collier Columbus Rt. 1, Hallsboro 50 

13th— Odell Williamson. _. Brunswick Shallotte 38 

14th — Allen C. Barbee Nash Spring Hope 5 

14th — Joe E. Eagles Edgecombe Macclesfield 6 

14th — Julian B. Fenner Nash Rocky Mount 4 

15th— William R. Britt Johnston Smithfield _. 54 

15th — J. Ernest Paschall Wilson Wilson 31 

15th — Barnev Paul Woodard Johnston Princeton 53 

16th— John t. Church Vance Henderson 35 

16th — James D. Speed Franklin Rt. 3, Louisburg 3 

17th — Jno. O. Gunn Caswell Yancey ville 68 

17th — James E. Ramsey Person Roxboro 48 

18th — W. Hance Hofler Durham Durham 82 

18th— Wade H. Penny, Jr Durham Durham 83 

18th — Kenneth C. Royall, Jr Durham Durham 81 

19th— Thomas D. Bunn Wake Raleigh 10 

19th — Samuel II. Johnson Wake Raleigh 11 

19th— A. A. McxMillan Wake Raleigh 9 

19th— Howard Twiggs Wake Raleigh 12 

20th— Ike F. Andrews Chatham Siler City 22 

20th— Donald Mclver Stanford Orange Chapel Hill 21 

21st — Jack M. Euliss Alamance Burlington 65 

21st — M. Glenn Pickard Alamance Burlington 66 

22nd — Jimmy L. Love Lee Sanford 34 

22nd— William W. Staton Lee Sanford 33 

23rd — Norwood E. Brvan, Jr Cumberland Fayetteville 27 

23rd— Sneed High Cumberland Fayetteville 29 

23rd— I. H. O'Hanlon Cumberland Fayetteville 28 

23rd — Joe B. Raynor, Jr Cumberland Fayetteville 30 

24th — David M. Britt Robeson Fairmont Speaker 

24th — Roger C. Riser Scotland Laurinburg 2 

24th— Neill L. McFadyen Hoke .Raeford 45 

24th— R. D. McMillan, Jr Robeson Red Springs 17 



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SPEAKER 







House of Representatives 



477 



District Name 



County 



Addre.-..- 



25th — Jule McMichael Rockingham Keidsviile 

2.5th — Earl W. Vaughn Rockingham Draper 

26th — Hargrove (Skipper) Bowles, Jr. . . Guilford Greensboro . 

26th — Elton Edwards Guilford Greensboro 

26th — .lames G. Exum ( iuilford Greensboro 

26th— C. W. Phillips Guilford Greensboro. 

26th — W. Marcus Short Guilford Greensboro 

26th— Daniel P. Whitley, Jr Guilford High Point. 

27th — Colon Blake (R) Montgomery Candor 

27th— C. Roby Garner, Sr.  R Randolph Asheboro . 

28th — T. Clyde Auman Moore West End . 

29th — Thomas B. Hunter Richmond . Rockingham. . 

30th- -Wesley Bailey Forsyth Winston-Salem. 

30th — Claude M. Hamrick Forsyth Winston-Salem.. 

30th— Ronald K. Ingle (R) Forsyth Winston-Salem 

30th — Howard A. Jemison (R) Forsyth Rt. 8, Winston-Salem 

30th— E. M. McKnight (R) Forsyth Rt. 2, Clemmona 

31st — Joe II. liege, Jr. (.R1 Davidson Lexington 

31st — Wayne Whicker (R) Davidson Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

32nd — Clyde Hampton Whitley R Stanly Albemarle 



:13rd— Richard S. Clark Union. 



!3rd— Fred M. Mills, Jr 

34th — Austin A. Mitchell (R ) 
34th— Samuel A. Troxell (R) . . 
35th — James C. Johnson, Jr. iR) 
• loth — Dwight W. Quinn 
36th — Philip Jackson Baugh. 
36th — James Tully (Jim) Beatty 



Anson 
Rowan 
Rowan . 
Cabarru~ 
Cabarrus. . . . 
Mecklenburg. 



Monroe. 
Wadesboro 

Kannapolis 
Rockwell 
Concord 
Kannapoli> 

Charlotte 



Mecklenburg Charlotte 



36th — Richard B.Calvert iR) Mecklenburg Charlotte 



!6th— James II. Carson, Jr. (R'l. 
36th — G. Patrick Hunter. . . 
36th — Arthur II. Jones . 
36th — James B. Vogler 

37th— Basil D. Barr 

37th— P. C. Collins. Jr 

37th— Hugh L. Merritt . 
38th— Claude Billings (It). . 
38th — Jeter L. Haynes (R) . 
39th — Gilbert Lee Boger (R) 



Mecklenburg Charlotte 

Mecklenburg.. Charlotte 
Mecklenburg Charlotte 

Mecklenburg . . . Charlotte 

Ashe West Jefferson 

Alleghany . Laurel Springs 

Surry Mt. Airy . 

Wilkes 

Vadkin 

Davie 



Rt. 1, Traphill 
Jonesville 
Rt. 3, Mocksville 
39th— Homer B. Tolbert R Iredell Rt. 2, Cleveland 

40th — Loyd A. Mullinax Catawba Newton. 

10th — J. Reid Poovey (R) Catawba Hickory- 
list — David W. Bumgardner, Jr. Gaston Belmont 



41st— II. Max Craig, Jr (R) . 
41st — Clarence E. Leatherman. 
list— Carl J. Stewart, Jr.. 

12nd— Sam J. Ervin, III 

42nd — Donald R. Kincaid *R) 

12nd— Earl II. Tate 

43rd— Robert Z. Falls 

13rd— William D. Harrill. 
13rd— W. K. Mauney, Jr. . 
I4th— Mack S. Isaac (R). . . 
45th — Gordon II. Greenwood 
15th — Herschel S. Harkins 
loth— C. Edlev Hutchins (R) 
15th— David D. Jordan (R) . . . 

16th— Don H. Garren (R) Henderson Hendersonv ill. 

17th— Ernest B. Messer Haywood Canton. . . 

17th — Liston B. Ramsey Madison Marshall. 

48th— Charles FT. Tavlor (R) Transylvania .... Brevard. 

tilth Wiley A. McGlamery Clay Hayesville. 



(laston Stanley- 

Lincoln Lincolnton 

Gaston Gastonia . . 

Burke Morganton 

Caldwell RED, Lenoir 

Caldwell . . Lenoir . 

.Cleveland Shelby.. 

Rutherford Forest City. . 

Cleveland Kings Mountain 

Avery New land . 

Buncombe Black Mountain. 

Buncombe Asheville . 

Buncombe Rt. 1, Black Mountain 

Buncombe. . . Asheville .... 



Seat 

44 

43 

61 

73 

62 

85 

74 

86 

101 

102 

78 

1 

70 

69 

111 

110 

112 

105 

10(1 

99 

84 

71 

117 

118 

116 

92 

89 

103 

104 

93 

90 

91 

13 

26 

14 

95 

96 

98 

97 

57 

115 

72 

94 

60 

59 

58 

119 

46 

7 1 

87 

88 

100 

39 

40 

107 

108 

109 

18 

17 

11 1 



PART VII 
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 




DANIEL KILLIAN MOORE 
Governor 



Biographical Sketches 

EXECUTIVE OFFICALS 

(Elected by the People) 
DANIEL KILLIAN MOORE 

GOVERNOR 



Daniel Killian Moore, Democrat, was born in Asheville, N. C, 
April 2, 1906. Son of Fred and Lela (Enloe) Moore. Attended 
Public Schools of Sylva, N. C; University of North Carolina; 
graduated with B.S. degree in Business Administration, 1927; 
University of North Carolina Law School, 1927-28. Lawyer and 
business executive. Member Phi Beta Kappa; Masonic Order; 
Civitan Club; Rotary Club. Attorney for Town of Sylva, 1931- 
1933 ; Attorney for Jackson County, 1933; Legal Representative, 
Jackson County Board of Education, for 12 years; Solicitor 30th 
Judicial District, 1945; Representative from Jackson County in 
the General Assembly of 1941; appointed Judge of 30th Judicial 
District, Superior Court, 1948; elected Judge in 1950; resigned 
in 1958. Vice-Chairman, North Carolina Board of Water Re- 
sources, 1959-1964. Member State Democratic Executive Commit- 
tee; delegate, State and National Democratic Party Conventions; 
Precinct Chairman; member various county and State committees. 
Division Counsel and Assistant Secretary, Champion Papers, Inc.. 
Canton, N. C, 1958-1964; Director, University of North Carolina 
Law School Foundation; Director U.N.C. General Alumni Associa- 
tion; former member, Morehead Scholarship Committee; former 
member North Carolina Railroad Board of Directors. Served in 
ETO, U.S. Army, 1943-1945. Member Edenton Street Methodist 
Church, Raleigh, N. C. Married Jeanelle Coulter of Pikeville. 
Tenn., May 4, 1933. Children: Mrs. Edgar B. (Edith > Hamilton. 
Jr., Shelby, N. C, and Dan Moore, Jr., Hickory, N. C. 

4S1 



is: Norn 11 (\\koii\a Manual 

ROBERT WALTER SCOTT 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Robert Walter Scott, Democrat, was born near Haw River. 
Alamance County, June 13, 1929. Son of W. Kerr and Mary 
Elizabeth (White) Scott. Attended Hawfields Graded School. 
lit:;.!; Alexander Wilson School, 1936-1947; Duke University, 1947- 
1949: North Carolina State College, 1950-1952, B.S. degree in 
Animal Industry. Dairy farmer. Member North Carolina and 
American Societies of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers; 
North Carolina Farm Bureau Federation; North Carolina State 
Grange. Master, 1961-1963; with Mrs. Scott, National Grange 
"Young Couple of the Year", 1959. Member Burlington-Alamance 
County Chamber of Commerce; Haw River Junior Chamber of 
Commerce; Soil Conservation Society of America; North Carolina 
Literary and Historical Association. Past Chairman United Forces 
for Education in North Carolina. Alamance County "Youny 
Farmer of the Year", 1957; President North Carolina Society of 
Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers, 1957. Member Alpha Zeta; 
Phi Kappa Phi; Blue Key. Democratic Precinct Chairman, County 
Vice-Chairman and State Solicitorial District Executive Commit- 
tee. 1960-1964. Member State Board of Conservation and Develop- 
ment. 1961-1964; Kerr Reservoir Development Commission, 1961- 
19<i4; North Carolina Seashore Commission, 1962-1964. Member 
Veterans of Foreign Wars. Special Agent, Counter Intelligence 
Corps, U.S. Army, 1953-1955. Member Hawfields Presbyterian 
Church; Elder since 1963; Deacon, 1959-1963. Married Jessie Rae 
Osborne. September 1, 1951. Children: Mary Ella Scott and 
Margaret Rose Scott (twins) ; Susan Rae Scott; W. Kerr Scott 
and Janet Louise Scott. Address: Route 1. Haw River, N. C. 



THAD EURE 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

Thad Eure, Democrat, of Hertford County, was born November 
15, 1899, in Gates County, N. C. Son of Tazewell A. and Armecia 
(Langstun) Eure. Attended Gatesville High School, 1913-1917; 
University of North Carolina. 1917-1919; University Law School, 



Biographical Sketches 483 

1921-1922; Doctor of Laws (honorary), Elon College, 1958. Law- 
yer. Mayor of Winton, 1923-1928. County attorney for Hert- 
ford County, 1923-1931. Member of General Assembly of 1929. 
representing Hertford County. Principal Clerk of the House of 
Representatives, Sessions of 1931, 1933, and 1935, and Extra 
Session, 1936. Presidential Elector First District of North Caro- 
lina, 1932. Escheats Agent, University of North Carolina. 1933- 
1936. Elected Secretary of State in the General Election of No- 
vember 3, 1936, and assumed duties of the office December 21, 
1936, by virtue of executive appointment, ten days prior to the 
commencement of Constitutional term, on account of a vacancy 
that then occurred. Re-elected Secretary of State in General 
Elections of 1940, 1944, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960 and 1964. President. 
Ahoskie Kiwanis Club, 1927. Theta Chi Fraternity; Junior Order; 
B.P.O. Elks and a Grand Lodge Chair Officer, 1956; T.P.A.; Chair- 
man Board of Trustees, Elon College; American Legion, Forty 
and Eight; President, National Association of Secretaries of State, 
1942, and became the Dean in 1961. Keynote speaker, Democratic 
State Convention, 1950, and permanent Chairman, 1962. Congrega- 
tional Christian Church. Married Minta Banks of Winton, N. C. 
November 15, 1924. Of this union there are two children, a 
daughter and a son, Mrs. J. Norman Black, Jr., and Thad Eure, Jr. 
Seven grandchildren. Legal residence, Winton, Hertford County. 
N. C. Official address: State Capitol, Raleigh. 



HENRY LEE BRIDGES 

STATE AUDITOR 

Henry Lee Bridges, Democrat, was born in Franklin County. 
N. C, June 10, 1907. Son of John Joseph and Ida Loraine (Car- 
roll) Bridges. Attended Wakelon High School, 1914-1920; Wiley 
School, Raleigh, 1921; Wakelon High School, 1922; Millbrook 
High School, 1923-1925; Mars Hill Junior College, A.B. degree, 
1929; Wake Forest College, B.A. degree, 1931; Wake Forest Law- 
School, 1932-1933. Attorney-at-law. Member of the Greensboro Bar 
Association; N. C. State Bar. Deputy Clerk, Superior Court 
of Guilford County, August, 1935-September, 1940; December, 
1941-October, 1942; December, 1945-June 1, 1946. (Break in 
dates caused by Military Service.) Secretary and Treasurer. Guil- 



im North Carolina Manual 

ford County Democratic Executive Committee, 1938-1940. Presi- 
dent National Association of State Auditors, Comptrollers and 
Treasurers. 1957; Executive Director National Association of 
State Auditors, Comptrollers and Treasurers, 1958-. Member 
and Past Master of Greensboro Lodge No. 76 Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons. Choraz in Chapter No. 13 Royal Arch Masons: 
Ivanhoe Commandery No. 8 Knights Templar; Sudan Temple 
A. A. O.N. M.S. : Societas Rosecrucians in Civitatibs Foederatis; 
Raleigh Lions Club. Enlisted in National Guard May, 1934, as a 
Private; promoted to Sergeant. February, 1935; commissioned 
Second Lieutenant, June 18, 1935; commissioned First Lieutenant, 
November 18. 1939; promoted to Captain, January 28, 1943, to 
Major on inactive status, January 17. 1947. Entered Federal 
Service. September 16, 1940; released from active duty November 
2. 1941; recalled to active duty October 7, 1942; relieved from 
active duty December 14, 1945. Veteran World War II, Post No. 
53 American Legion Local; Local No. 506 Forty and Eight. Deacon, 
Hayes Barton Baptist Church; member Board of Trustees Wake 
Forest College. 1949-1952, 1955-1958. 1960-1963, 1965-. Appointed 
State Auditor February 15, 1947; elected four-year term 1948; 
re-elected 1952, 1956, 1960 and 1964. Married Clarice Hines, 
December 12, 1936. Two children: Joseph Henry, age twenty-four 
years, George Hines, age twenty-one years. Home address: 2618 
Grant Ave.. Raleigh, N. C. 



EDWIN MAURICE GILL 

STATE TREASURER 

Edwin Maurice Gill, Democrat, was born in Laurinburg, N. C. 
July 20. 1899. Son of Thomas Jeffries and Mamie (North) Gill. 
Graduate of Laurinburg High School; Trinity College, 1922-1924. 
Representative in the General Assembly from Scotland County, 
1929 and 1931. Private Secretary, Governor Gardner, 1931-1933; 
Commissioner of Paroles. 1933-1942; appointed Commissioner of 
Revenue by Governor Broughton, serving from July 1, 1942 to July 
1. 1949. Admitted to the Bar. January 28, 1924, and practiced 
law in Laurinburg, 1924-1931 as a member of the firm of Gibson 
and Gill, and practiced law in Washington, D. C, 1949-1950 as 
a member of the firm of Gardner. Morrison & Rogers. Member 



ure 

:tary of Stale 



L. Bridges 
Auditor 



Gill 
Treasurer 



T. Carroll 
rintendent of Public 
net ion 

Jruton 

jney General 



A. Graham 

[nissioner of Agriculture 



jCrane 

nissioner of Labor 



S. Lanier 

uissioner of Insurance 




|m; Xni; i'ii Cakoj i \ \ M \ m ai. 

<i( North Carolina Bar Association and the Bar of the District of 
Columbia. Collector and Director of Internal Revenue, Greens- 
boro, X. C., 1950-1953. Appointed by Governor Umstead Treas- 
urer of North Carolina, July 20, 1953, and elected to this office 
November 2, 1954. Re-elected for four year term, November 
6, l!). r )<;, Novembers, 1980 and November 3, 1964. Ex-officio: Chair- 
man of Stale Banking Commission; Chairman of Local Govern- 
ment Commission; Director of Local Government; Chairman of 
Tax Review Hoard; Chairman and Investment Officer of Board of 
Trustees of Teachers & State Employees' Retirement System; 
member of Board of Commissioners of the Law Enforcement 
Officers' Benefit and Retirement Fund; member and Investment 
Officer for Board of Trustees of Local Governmental Employees' 
Retirement System; member of State Board of Education; mem- 
ber of State Board of Assessment; member of the Sinking Fund 
Commission. President American Parole Association, 1940-1941; 
President Southeastern State Probation and Parole Association. 
1939-1940; Director American Prison Association. 1939-1940. 
Fleet (1 memb r of Executive Committee of the National Tax As- 
sociation in 1944 for three year term. Elected member of Executive 
Committee of National Association of Tax Administrators in 1946 
for two-year term. Former member of X. C. Probation Commis- 
sion. Former member of State Art Commission; member Board of 
Trustees, X. C. State Art Museum. Member of the American 
Legion; Sigma Nu Phi, Legal Fraternity; Omicron Delta Kappa. 
leadership Fraternity, honorary member, Duke University. 1940; 
Beta Gamma Sigma, honorary member. UNC, Chapel Hill, 1!»63. 
LL.D., Duke University, June 8, 105'.). Methodist. Address: Raleigh, 
N. C. 



CHARLES FISHER CARROLL 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Charles Fisher Carroll, Democrat, was born in Warsaw. X. ('.. 
March 'M , 1900. Son of Charles Fisher and Agnes (Robinson) 
Carroll. Attended public schools of Warsaw, 1906-1915; Trinity 
Park School. 11)15-1917; A.B., Trinity College, 1921; M.Ed., Duke 
University, 1930, LL.D. (honorary) 1954; LL.D. (honorary) High 
Point College, 1952. Teacher and coach of athletics Vance County 



Biographical Sketches 487 

Farm Life School, Middleburg, N. C. 1921-1922. Principal Buena 
Vista High School, R.F.D., Henderson, N. C, 1922-1923; Newport 
Consolidated School, Newport, N. C, 1923-1924 and 1925-1929; 
Long Creek-Grady School, Pender County, 1924-1925; Bryson City 
Elementary and Swain County High Schools, Bryson City, N. C, 
1929-1932. Superintendent Swain County Schools and Supervising 
Principal of Bryson City Elementary and Swain County High 
Schools, 1932-1937. Superintendent High Point City Schools, High 
Point, N. C, 1937 to August, 1952. State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction for North Carolina since August, 1952. Member North 
Carolina Education Association, National Education Association, 
American Association of School Administrators. Member N. C. 
High School Textbook Committee, 1936-1943; N. C. Committee on 
Secondary Schools, Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools, 1945-1950; N. C. Education Commission, 1947-1949; for- 
mer member Policies Committee of Superintendents' Division of 
North Carolina Education Association. President, Council of Chief 
State School Officers, 1960-1961; member Commission on Accredita- 
tion of (Armed) Service Experiences of the American Council on 
Education, 1959-1962; Advisory Council of Project Talent, Uni- 
versity of Pittsburg; National Commission on Safety Education 
of the National Education Association, 1957-1963; member, Presi- 
dent's Panel of Consultants on Vocational Education, 1961-1962; 
former member, National Advisory Committee for the Exchange 
of Teachers; member Board of Control, Southern Regional Educa- 
tion Board since 1952; member and advisory councilman on Educa- 
tion for Exceptional Children of Southern Regional Education 
Board; President, Associated Public School Systems, 1951-1952; 
member Civil Defense Advisory Council; member ex-ofncio, Board 
of Trustees of Greater University; member Board of Trustees, 
High Point College; member ex-officio, N. C. State Art Society; 
Museum of Art; State Library Commission; Teachers' and State 
Employees' Retirement System; Local Government Employees' Re- 
tirement System; North Carolina Atomic Energy Advisory Com- 
mittee; N. C. Recreation Commission; N. C. Symphony Society; 
Governor Richard Caswell Memorial Commission; Advisory Com- 
mission for the Museum of Natural History. Former State Direc- 
tor of Rural Education of the Department of Rural Education of 
the National Education Association. Honorary member and Past 
President of Rotary Club of High Point. Former member High 



is.s Noutii Carolina Manual 

Point Housing Authority; Parks and Recreation Commission; Li- 
brary Board; former Chairman of Budget Committee of High 
Point Community Chest. Mason. Phi Beta Kappa. Member Beta 
Omega Sigma, Kappa Delta Pi and Omicron Delta Kappa fraterni- 
ties. Coordinator of Civilian Defense, High Point, 1943-1945. Stu- 
dent Army Training Corps, 1918. Past Commander, Sergeant Free- 
man Post, American Legion. Methodist. Former Chairman of 
Board of Stewards, Bryson City Methodist Church and Wesley 
Memorial Church in High Point. Married Nellie Jane Wynne of 
Williamston, N. C. One son, Charles, Jr., M.D., of Concord, N. C. 
Address: 2207 Whitman Road, Raleigh. N. C. 27607. 



THOMAS WADE BRUTON 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Thomas Wade Bruton, Democrat, was born in Capelsie, N. C, 
September 10, 1902. Son of David Dudley and Susan Eleanor 
(Wade) Bruton. Attended Montgomery County Public Schools; 
Virginia Military Institute, A.B. degree, 1925; Duke University 
Law School, 1925-1927. Admitted to practice law in North Carolina 
in 1927. Member North Carolina Bar Association; Honorary Order 
of the Coif (1960), Duke University. Representative from Mont- 
gomery County in the General Assembly of 1929 and 1931. Mem- 
ber Officers Reserve Corps, 1925-1940; 2nd and 1st Lieutenant 
Cavalry Reserve; active duty with U. S. Army, 1942-1946, Captain 
to Lieutenimt Colonel; Colonel, JAGC, North Carolina National 
Guard since 1955; retired in 1962. Member Kappa Sigma Social 
Fraternity. Duke University. Methodist. Married Elizabeth Nelms 
Flournoy in 1964. Address: Justice Building, Raleigh, N. C. 



JAMES ALLEN GRAHAM 

COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE 

James Allen Graham, Democrat, was born in Cleveland, Rowan 
County. N. ('., April 7, 1921. Son of James Turner and Laura 
Blanche (Allen) Graham. Attended Cleveland High School, gradu- 
ated 1938; North Carolina State University, 1942, B.S. in Agri- 



Bioukaphical Sketches 489 

cultural Education, permanent President, Class of 1942. Farmer, 
owner and operator of commercial livestock farm in Rowan County. 
Member Grange, Farm Bureau, N. C. Farm Managers and Rural 
Appraisers. N. C. Cattleman's Association, National Association 
of Producer Market Managers, past president and member of 
Board of Directors; named "Market Manager of the Year". Mem- 
ber N. C. Soil Conservation Society, N. C. Branch United Fresh 
Fruit and Vegetable Association, secretary, 1959-1964, Board of 
Directors. Member Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, Board of 
Directors 1967; Scotch Ireland Lodge #154, Cleveland, Rowan 
County, N. C. ; Woodmen of the World, Board of Directors, Execu- 
tive Committee; Raleigh YMCA, Recording Secretary, 1962-1965; 
President, Raleigh Kiwanis Club, 1965, member of Board of Direc- 
tors and chairman of Agricultural Committee; State Committee 
of Natural Resources, State Emergency Resources Management 
Planning Committee. Member Robert Lee Doughton Memorial 
Commission; Board of Trustees, A & T College, 1956-1960, 1962; 
Chairman, committee to administer awards program for Best 
Retail Promotion of N. C. Food Products; secretary-treasurer of 
Capital Area Development Association, 1957-1961; member of 
Board of Directors and president, 1964; Chairman of Agricultural 
Committee; President, Northwest Association of the N. C. State 
Alumni Association and Vice-President, Wake County Association 
teacher of Vocational Agriculture, Iredell County, 1942-1945 
Superintendent of Upper Mountain Research Station, 1946-1952 
General Chairman, First Burley Tobacco Festival, 1949-1950 
President, Jefferson Rotary Club. 1951-1952; Executive Secretary, 
Hereford Cattle Breeders Association, 1948-1956, first full-time 
secretary, 1954-1956; Manager, Dixie Classics Livestock Show 
and Fair, 1946-1952; in charge of Beef Cattle and Sheep Depart- 
ment, N. C. State Fair, 1946-1952; member Board of Directors. 
X. C. Sheep Breeders Association, 1949-1952; Secretary-Treasurer, 
Ashe County Wildlife Club, 1949-1950; member Governor's Coun- 
cil on Occupational Health; N. C. Board of Farm Organizations 
and Agricultural Agencies, Director of Agricultural Foundations 
at North Carolina State University; recipient, State 4-H Alumni 
Award, 1965; honorary member, N. C. Vocational Agricultural 
Teachers Association, N. C. Farm Writers Association, State 
Future Farmers of America and member Governor's State-City 
< Ooperative Committee. Secretary, Southern Association of State 



190 North Carolina Manual 

Departments of Agriculture. Appointed Commissioner of Agricul- 
ture, July 29, 1964 by Governor Terry Sanford to complete the 
term of the late L. Y. Ballentine; elected November 3, 1964. 
Married Helen Ida Kirk, October 30, 1942. Two daughters, Alice 
Kirk Graham and Laura Constance Graham. Home address: 1810 
Sutton Drive, Raleigh, N. C; farm address: Cleveland, N. C. 



FRANK CRANE 

COMMISSIONER OF LABOR 

Frank Crane, Democrat, was born at Waxhaw, N. C August 
18, 1907. Son of James Thomas and Mary Emma (Lathan) Crane. 
Attended Marvin Elementary School, 1913-1918; Weddington In- 
stitute, 1919-1922; Prospect High School, 1923-1927; University of 
North Carolina, A.B., 1931 ; University of North Carolina Summer 
School of 1931, 1932, 1933 and 1934; night course in Personnel 
Management, North Carolina State College, 1939. Athletic Direc- 
tor and Instructor, Welcome High School in Davidson County, 
1931-1934. Safety Director, North Carolina Industrial Commission, 
1934-1938; Administrative Assistant, North Carolina Employment 
Service, 1938-1939; Factory and Wage and Hour Inspector, North 
Carolina Department of Labor, 1939-1940; Director of Concilia- 
tion and Arbitration Division, 1941-1954. Appointed Commissioner 
of Labor by Governor William B. Umstead for the unexpired term 
of the late Forrest H. Shuford, June 3, 1954; elected to the office 
of Commissioner of Labor in the General Election of November 
2, 1954; re-elected for four years November 6, 1956, November 8, 
1960 and November 3, 1964. Ex-officio member N. C. Employ the 
Physically Handicapped Commission. Member Governor's Nuclear 
Energy Advisory Committee; Governor's Committee on Studying 
Problems of Aging, and Governor's Delegate to the 1961 White 
House Conference on Aging; Executive Board International As- 
sociation of Governmental Labor Officials ; Board of the Governor's 
Occupational Health Council; Advisory Committee to the U. S. 
Surgeon General on Occupational Health; Advisory Council on 
Naval Affairs sixth Naval District; President's Committee on 
Safety. Association of State Mediation Agencies; Society for the 
Advancement of Management; American and State Forestry As- 
sociations. Attended thirty annual meetings of Southern Industrial 



Biographical Sketches 491 

Relations Conference. Member Board of Directors Wake County 
Chapter, American Red Cross and Chairman First Aid Committee. 
Member Carolina Bird Club; T.P.A.; Raleigh Elks Club; Raleigh 
Torch Club; Executives Club of Raleigh. Methodist. Married Mary 
Browning Cromer of Monroe, N. C. Office address : Labor Building, 
Raleigh. N. C; Home address: 2608 Hazelwood Drive, Raleigh. 
N. C. 



EDWIN SIDNEY LANIER 

COMMISSIONER OF INSURANCE 

Edwin Sidney Lanier, Democrat, was born in Bullock County 
(now a part of Candler. County), Georgia, on July 19, 1901. Son 
of Richard and Hassie Banks Lanier (deceased), R.F.D. 1, Metter, 
Georgia. Attended State Normal School (a teachers college), 
Athens, Georgia, 1917-21; enrolled in the University of North 
Carolina's School of Commerce, Chapel Hill, N. C, 1921-24, as 
member of the class of 1925; part-time special student in Uni- 
versity of North Carolina Law School, 1930-34 (did not graduate). 
Teacher and athletic coach, 1924-30, Baptist Orphanage High 
School, Thomasville, N. C. Student Financial Aid Director, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, 1930-1961. Member of Chapel Hill, N. C, 
Town Board of Aldermen, 1945-49; Mayor of Chapel Hill, 1949- 
54; County Commissioner, Orange County, N. C, 1954-56; State 
Senator from the 16th Senatorial District, 1957 and 1959. Named 
North Carolina Personnel Director, by the Governor and the 
State Personnel Council, October 31, 1961. Appointed Commis- 
sioner of Insurance by Governor Terry Sanford, July 5, 1962, 
as successor to Charles F. Gold who served as Commissioner of 
Insurance from 1953 until his death on June 28, 1962. Nominated 
by State Democratic Executive Committee for Commissioner of 
Insurance and elected by the people in the November 6, 1962 
General Election for the remainder of the term; re-elected for four 
year term, November 3, 1964. Baptist. Member Board of Trustees, 
Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina, 1945-49. Married Nancy 
Thelma Herndon, Durham, N. C, 1934. Children: Mrs. John Jacobs 
and Edwin Sidney Lanier, Jr. Legal residence: Chapel Hill, N. C, 
Raleigh. N. C. residence: 2436 Oxford Road. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIALS 
APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR 

CHARLES JEROME DUNN, JR. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TO THE GOVERNOR 

Charles Jerome Dunn, Jr., Democrat, was born in Philadelphia. 
Pa., June 29, 1934. Son of Charles Rome and Lelia Mae (Whitley) 
Dunn. Attended Ahoskie High School, Ahoskie, N. C, 1940-1952; 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, A.B. in Political 
Science, 195(5; Graduate School, University of North Carolina in 
Political Science. Farmer. Member American Political Science 
Association. Served in U. S. Army Signal Corps, 1957-1959, SP4. 
Methodist. Married Martha Ellen Sherrill, December 29, 1963. 
Address: 420 Emerson Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 



GEORGE ROBINSON RAGSDALE 

LEGAL COUNSEL TO THE GOVERNOR 

George Robinson Ragsdale, Democrat, was born in Raleigh, 
N. C, March 26, 1936. Son of George Y. and Susan (Jolly) Rags- 
dale. Attended Georgetown Preparatory School, Garrett Park. 
Md., graduated, June 1954; University of North Carolina, Chapel 
Hill, A.B. in English, 1958; University of North Carolina, School 
of Law, LL.B., 1961. Lawyer. Member N. C, Wake County and 
American Bar Associations; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Phi Delta Phi; 
Order of the Golden Fleece, U.N.C., Chapel Hill; Raleigh Kiwani.- 
Club; Sphinx Club of Raleigh. Winner, Richardson Fellowship 
from U.N.C. School of Law to the legal staff of U.S. Senator, Sam 
J. Ervin, Jr., U.S. Senate, Washington, D. C, 1961-1962. Served 
on Exec. Comm., 10th Judicial District Bar Association, 1964-1965. 
Member Roman Catholic Church. Married Adora L. Prevost. 
Waynesville, N. C, October 20, 1962. Children: John Robinson 
Ragsdale, age 3, and George Y. Ragsdale, TI, age 1. Address: 
2401 Churchill Road, Raleigh, N. C. 

492 



Biographical Sketches 493 

GERALD HOPE (JERRY) ELLIOTT 

NEWS SECRETARY TO THE GOVERNOR 

Gerald Hope (Jerry) Elliott, Democrat, was born in Louisville. 
Nebraska, June 16, 1922. Son of the Rev. C. L. and Teressa 
Amelia (Hope) Elliott. Attended Sebring (Fla.) High School, 
1935-1940; University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Special 
Student), 1957-1958. Received Grant from Fund for Adult Educa- 
tion in the Mass Media, 1957. Member Knights of Columbus. 
Editor, Roanoke Rapids (N. C.) Herald, 1947-1948; Station Mana- 
ger-News Director, WCBT Radio, Roanoke Rapids, N. C, 1952- 
1957, News Director, 1948-1952; Newsman, WPTF, Raleigh, N. C, 
1958-1959; News Director, WPTF, 1959-1964; Newsman WTVD, 
Durham, N. C, 1964-1965; Public Information Officer, State High- 
way Commission, July 26, 1965 to October 16, 1965. Served in U. S. 
Army, 1940-1946, discharged as Sergeant; simultaneous service 
as member of Florida National Guard; overseas, Southwest Pacific 
Theatre of Operations, 1944-1945, 31st (Dixie) Division, Artillery 
Headquarters Battery for Division. Member Our Lady of Lourdes 
Roman Catholic Church, Raleigh, N. C. Married Mamie Marie 
Nash, Weldon, N. C, June 19, 1948. Children: Bryan, 18; Hope, 
15; Mark, 11. Address: 2903 Claremont Road, Raleigh. N. C. 



CLAUDE THOMAS BOWERS 

THE ADJUTANT GENERAL 

Claude Thomas Bowers, Democrat, was born in Littleton, N. C, 
July 18, 1899. Son of T. R. and Mary (Dowtin) Bowers. At- 
tended Bowers Private School, 1905-1914; Aurelian Springs High 
School, 1914-1918; North Carolina State College, 1918. Distributor 
of petroleum products. Member North Carolina Oil Jobbers As- 
sociation, on Board of Directors, 1957; Warren County Chamber 
of Commerce, President, 1957-1958; Board of Town Commissioners, 
1947-1951; Warren County Development Corp., President since 
1953; Bute Development Corp., Chairman, Board of Directors since 
1955; Capital Area Development Association, President, 1958- 
1959; North Carolina Veterans Commission, Chairman, 1958-1961. 
Member 40 & 8; Warrenton Lion's Club, President. 1936-1938; 



494 Nouth Carolina Manual 

American Legion, Commander, 1927-1928, 1936-1938; Occoneechee 
Council, Boy Scouts of America, Silver Beaver Award, 1951. 
Served in U. S. Army from September 18, 1918 to November 7. 
1918, and from September 16, 1940 to January 15, 1946 as Private 
to Colonel of the Line; attended Infantry School (Basic Course), 
1930, and Infantry School (Advance Course), 1940. Served in 
North Carolina National Guard from January 18, 1921 to Septem- 
ber 15, 1940, and from January 16, 1946 to March 31, 1959 as 
Private to Major General. Member National Guard Association 
of the United States; Treasurer, National Guard Assn. of the 
U. S., 1963-. Member Warrenton Baptist Church; Board of Dea- 
cons, 1952-1955, 1957- 1960; Chairman of Finance Committee. 
1954-1960. Member Board of Trustees, Meredith College. Adjutant 
General of North Carolina since 1960. Married Hattie Connell, 
1925. One daughter, Mrs. Stanley S. Betts. Address: Warrenton 
N. C. 



EDWARD LEE RANKIN, JR. 

DIRECTOR DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edward Lee Rankin, Jr., Democrat, was born in Chattanooga, 
Tenn., May 12, 1919. Son of Edward Lee and Gladys (Narramore) 
Rankin. Attended the public schools of Spencer, N. C. and Spencer 
High School, graduating in 1936; University of North Carolina. 
A.B. in Journalism, 1940; Naval Officers Training School, Dart- 
mouth College, Certificate, 1942. Member Public Relations Society 
of America; Raleigh Lions Club; Board of Directors, General 
Alumni Association of University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. 
Director of Public Relations for N. C. State Highway Commission, 
June 1946-June 1947; Press Secretary to United States Senator 
William B. Umstead, June 1947-August 1948; worked with Bur- 
lington Mills, August 1948-January 1953, having direct supervision 
of the Public Relations Department; served as Private Secretary 
to Governor William B. Umstead and Governor Luther H. Hodges, 
January 1953-1959; became Raleigh Manager for John Harden 
Associates, January 1, 1960. Served in U. S. Navy from October of 
1941 until January of 1946, with 28 months overseas; entered 
service as Yeoman Second Class and discharged as Lieutenant 
Commander. Baptist; trustee, Meredith College. Married Frances 



Biographical Sketches 495 

Wallace of Jamesville, N. C, June 1948. Children: Jane, age 16, 
Ann, age 13, and Ed. Ill, age 10. Address: 2405 Rockridge 
Court. Raleigh, N. C. 

RAYMOND BROWNING BRADY 

DIRECTOR STATE BOARD OF ALCOHOLIC CONTROL 

Raymond Browning Brady, Democrat, was born in Benson. 
N. C, March 10, 1915. Son of Robert B. and Mary Delia (O'Neal) 
Brady. Attended Benson High School, 1932; Wake Forest Law 
School, LL.B., 1938. Lawyer. Member Wake County Bar Associa- 
tion; North Carolina Bar Association; North Carolina State Bar. 
Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy, December, 1940 to January. 
1946. Member Hayes Barton Baptist Church; Deacon. Married 
Kathryn Harrison, February 16, 1943. Children: Alice Brady. 
age 15 and Dan Brady, age 13. Address: 1508 Duplin Road. 
Raleigh. N. C. 

FRANK LEE HARRELSON 

COMMISSIONER OF BANKS 
(Appointed by the Governor with the approval of the Senate) 

Frank Lee Harrelson, Democrat, was born in Forest City. 
N. C, September 21, 1910. Son of John and Ellen Harrelson. At- 
tended Rutherford College, 1926-1928; N. C. State College, 1931- 
1932, special accounting courses. Served in U.S. Navy, 1942-1945. 
Member Hayes Barton Methodist Church. Married Martha Langs- 
ton. June. 1952. Address: 402 Forsyth Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

DANIEL KELLY MUSE 

COMMISSIONER NORTH CAROLINA BURIAL 
ASSOCIATIONS AND PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERIES 

Daniel Kelly Muse, Democrat, was born in Moore County (Car- 
thage Township), January 15, 1913. Son of James Brazel and 
Luola Belle (Kelly) Muse. Attended Elise Academy (now St. 



196 North Carolina Manx m. 

Andrews College), Robins, N. C, 1926-1930; N\ C. State College. 
1930-1932; sales management courses by correspondence schools. 
President, Mebane Merchants Association; Sales Supervisor, Me- 
bane Tobacco .Market, 194(5-1948; Chairman, Alamance County 
Democratic Executive Committee, 1948-1956; Chairman, Congres- 
sional District Committee, 1966; active in Democratic Party poli- 
tics all of adult life. Presbyterian. Married Lillian Terry, January 
25, 1938. Two children. Address: Mebane. X. C. 



EDWARD FOSTER GRIFFIN 

DIRECTOR NORTH CAROLINA CIVIL DEFENSE AGENCY 

Edward Foster Griffin, Democrat, was born in Louisburg, N. C, 
November 4, 1900. Son of Paul B. and Frances Wilder Griffin. 
Graduate Louisburg High School; University of North Carolina; 
Wake Forest College Law School. Received law license in August, 
1923. Lawyer. Member N. C. State Bar Inc.; Franklin County 
Bar Association, past President; past President 7th Judicial Dis- 
trict Bar Association. Solicitor Franklin County Recorder's Court, 
1936-1940; Franklin County Attorney, 1946-1954; member State 
Democratic Executive Committee, 1946-1953; Chairman Franklin 
County Democratic Executive Committee, 1946-1953. State Senator 
from the 6th Senatorial District in the General Assembly of 
1933 and 1935. Director of N. C. Civil Defense since March 1. 
1954. President National Association State Civil Defense Direc- 
tors, 1960-61. Consultant on Civil Defense Preparedness to NATO 
Council Meeting, Paris, France, Fall of 1960. Enlisted in the 
N. C. National Guard 113th F. A. Regiment, October 1, 1923; 
inducted into the Federal Service, September 16, 1940, and com- 
manded the 113th Field Artillery Battalion as part of the 30th 
Infantry Division through World War II, participating in five 
major engagements in the European Theatre of Operations; dis- 
charged in November of 1946 and again joined the N. C. National 
Guard in August of 1947 as Division Artillery Executive Officer; 
holds rank of Major General and commanded the 30th Infantry 
Division (Old Hickory) of North Carolina National Guard until 
retirement on September 1, 1961, after approximately 38 years 
military service. Member American Legion, past Commander 
Louisburg Post; 40 & 8. past Chef-de-gare. Mason, past Master 



BioouAi'HicAi. Sketches 497 

Louisburg Lodge 413 A.F. & A.M.; 32nd Degree Scottish Kite: 
Shriner. Methodist; Steward for twenty years; Trustee; Lay 
Speaker. Married Mildred Scott Griffin, June 18, 1925. One 
daughter, Mrs. Nancy Griffin Person of Greensboro, N. C. Home 
address: 105 Sunset Avenue, Louisburg, N. C. Official Address: 
Raleigh, N. C. 



DAN E. STEWART 

DIRECTOR DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

Dan E. Stewart, Democrat, was born in Johnston County, N. C. 
January 25, 1903. Son of the late Mr. and Mrs. James E. Stewart. 
Attended grammar school and high school in Coats, N. C, and 
Wilkinsburg, Pa.; N. C. State College (now North Carolina 
State University at Raleigh), B.E. degree in Electrical Engineer- 
ing, 1923. Employed by Westinghouse Electrical Corp. in East 
Pittsburgh and South Philadelphia, Pa. for two years; joined 
Carolina Power and Light Co., February 1, 1925; served for two 
years as Distribution Engineer; for eleven years as Industrial 
Power Sales Engineer; transferred to Asheville as Superintend- 
ent of Western Division, 1938, and after one year, was made 
Assistant Manager of Western Division; transferred to Raleigh. 
1943, to set up the Agriculture Development Program, later ex- 
panding into Industrial and Community Development; made Mana- 
ger, Area Development Dept., 1957; elected Vice President of the 
Company, December 15, 1960. President, Raleigh Lions Club, 1936- 
1937; District Governor, Lions International (District 31-A, 
Western North Carolina), 1940; President, Raleigh Chamber of 
Commerce, 1959, and has served as member Executive Commit- 
tee. Has served as member Board of Trustees, Campbell College. 
Director, Business Development Corporation of North Carolina, 
and as Vice Chairman, Urban Redevelopment Commission of 
Raleigh. Resigned presidency of Capital Associated Industries, 
Inc., and as member Area Development Committee of Edison 
Electric Institute after accepting: present position; plans to re- 
tain membership in American Industrial Development Council and 
Southern Industrial Development Council. Appointed Director. 
North Carolina Department of Conservation and Development by 
Gov. Dan K. Moore, to succeed Acting Director William P. 



498 North Carolina Manual 

Saunders. Member Hayes Barton Baptist Church; Chairman of 
Board, I960; Teacher, Men's Bible Class, since 1938. Married 
Mary Louise Patterson of Greensboro. Address: 2704 Fairview 
Road, Raleigh, N. C. 



HENRY E. KENDALL 

CHAIRMAN EMPLOYMENT SECURITY COMMISSION 

Henry E. Kendall, Democrat, was born in Shelby, N. C, August 
24, 1905. Son of Henry E. and Mary Whitelaw (Wiseman) Kendall. 
Attended Shelby Public Schools; N. C. State College, 1922-1926, 
B.S. degree in Civil Engineering. Member Pi Kappa Alpha; Theta 
Tau Engineering Fraternity; Tau Beta Pi (Scholastic) and Phi 
Kappa Phi (Honor) Fraternities. Engineer with Plumer Wiseman 
& Co., Danville, Va., 1926-1930; Assistant office manager Dibrell 
Bros., tobacconists, Shanghai, China, 1931-1936; engineer, N. C. 
State School Commission, Raleigh, N. C, 1937-1942. Commissioned 
1st Lt. Engineers Corps, U. S. Army, September 18, 1942; served 
twenty months in European Theatre Operations and eight months 
in Asiatic Pacific; separated with rank of Lt. Colonel, August 7. 
1946. Appointed Chairman, Unemployment Compensation Commis- 
sion (now Employment Security Commission) by Governor R. 
Gregg Cherry, July 1, 1946; reappointed by Governor W. Kerr 
Scott in 1949 for four-year term; reappointed by Governor William 
B. Umstead in 1953 for four-year term; reappointed by Governor 
Luther H. Hodges in 1957 for four-year term; reappointed by 
Governor Terry Sanford, 1961 for four-year term; reappointed by 
Governor Dan Moore in 1965 for four-year term. Member Lions 
Club; N. C. Society of Engineers; Raleigh Engineers Club; Amer- 
ican Legion (member of State Administrative Committee, 1950- 
1954 and 1960-1964); member Governor's Executive Committee on 
Employment of the Handicapped; Governor's Coordinating Com- 
mittee on Aging; Governor's Committee on Status of Women. 
Chairman Governor's Advisory Committee on Manpower Develop- 
ment and Training Act. Member Executive Committee of the 
President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, 1957- 
67. Mason. Registered Engineer. President General Alumni As- 
sociation N. C. State College, 1949-1950; Chairman Executive 
Committee Alumni Association, 1950-1951. Vice-President Region 



Biographical Sketches 499 

IV Interstate Conference of Employment Security Agencies, 1950- 
1952, 1958-1959 and 1966-67. President Interstate Conference of 
Employment Security Agencies, 1953-1954, 1962-1963. Member 
Executive Committee same organization. Listed in Who's Who in 
the South and Southwest. Married Eliza Katherine Kerr of 
Yanceyville, N. C. Presbyterian. Address: 2814 Exeter Circle, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



JOSEPH MARVIN HUNT, JR. 

CHAIRMAN STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION 

Joseph Marvin Hunt, Jr., Democrat, was born in Greensboro, 
N. C, October 19, 1906. Son of Joseph M., Sr., and Pattie (Kirk- 
man) Hunt. Attended Riverside Military Academy, graduating 
in 1924; attended Duke University. General insurance business. 
Vice President, Wimbish Insurance Agency. Past President of the 
Greensboro Association of Insurance Agents, Member Greensboro 
Sports Council; Greensboro Chamber of Commerce; former mem- 
ber Duke University Athletic Council; former Mayor Pro Tern, 
Town of Hamilton Lakes; former member Greensboro Special 
School Board; Kiwanis Club; Ambassadors Club; Sedgefield 
Country Club; Sphinx Club; A. & T. College Board; Chairman 
Municipal Study Commission. Representative in the General As- 
sembly of 1953, 1955, 1957, 1959 and 1961; Speaker, 1961. Meth- 
odist; member Board of Stewards, West Market Street Methodist 
Church, 1965-66. Married Grace Boren, October 21, 1933. Chil- 
dren: Joseph M. Hunt, III, born July 2, 1939; Etta Elizabeth Hunt, 
born August 18, 1947. Address 3308 Starmount Drive, Greensboro. 
N. C. 



J. W. BEAN 

CHAIRMAN NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

J. W. Bean, Democrat, was born in Montgomery County. X. C. 
December 7, 1893. Son of 0. D. and Annie (Cornelison) Bean. 
Attended Montgomery County grammar and high schools; Ether 
Academy. Taught two years in a public school. Accepted a posi- 



50ii North Carolina Manual 

linn with the Southern Railway as Clerk, 1916, at Spencer, N. C, 
and was promoted to various positions, including- General Fore- 
man of Southern Railway Supply Department. Identified with 
several railroad organizations. Served as alderman and mayor 
pro tern of Town of Spencer, N. C. Chairman, Spencer School 
Board. 1928-1946. Served as Chairman of the Rowan County 
School Board Association and as Chairman of Spencer Precinct 
Democratic Executive Committee for a number of years. Secretary 
to Rowan County Democratic Executive Committee, 1928-1950. 
Member Executive Committee, International Association of Indus- 
trial Accident Boards and Commissions, 1959-1960. Reappointed as 
member of the North Carolina Governor's Council on Occupational 
Health for a three year term by Governor Sanford, January 4. 
1962; appointed by Governor Hodges as member of the Atomic 
Energy Commission, Sept. 30, 1959. Representative from Rowan 
County in the General Assembly of 1933 and 1935. Secured leave- 
of-absence from the Southern Railway Company in 1935 for six 
months to help organize the North Carolina Works Progress Ad- 
ministration as State Director of Labor-Management and Rela- 
tions. Appointed by Governor Hoey as a member of the North 
Carolina Manpower Commission. Appointed by Governor Brough- 
ton as a member of the Selective Service Board of Appeals, Dis- 
trict No. 6, serving for the duration of the war. Appointed by 
Governor Cherry as a member of a nine-man committee to study 
the needs of Area Vocational Schools in North Carolina. Appointed 
in May of 1966 by Governor Dan K. Moore as a member of the 
Emergency Resources Management Planning Committee. Ap- 
pointed by Governor Cherry in 1945 to a one-year term on the 
North Carolina Medical Care Commission and reappointed in 
L946 for a four-year term. Appointed North Carolina Industrial 
Commissioner by Governor Scott on April 1, 1949, to fill two-year 
unexpired term; reappointed on May 1, 1951, for full six-year 
term. Appointed Chairman North Carolina Industrial Commission 
by Governor Hodges on December 22, 1954 and reappointed by 
Governor Hodges for a full six-year term on August 15. 1957; re- 
appointed by Governor Sanford for six-year term, September 9. 
1963. Baptist. Married Annie Stutts of Seagrove. N. C. Three 
children: two sons and one daughter. Address: Raleigh. N. C. 



Biogkaphk ai Sketches 501 

WILLIAM FLYNT MARSHALL, JR. 

MEMBER OF NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

William Flynt Marshall, Jr., Democrat, was born in Winston- 
Salem, N. C. Son of William F., Sr. and Iva Lee (Isaacs) Mar- 
shall. Attended Walnut Cove High School; Riverside Military 
Academy; University of North Carolina, B.S., 1950; Wake Forest 
College School of Law. LL.B., 1960. Lawyer. Member Stokes 
County Bar; 17th District Bar; Wake County Bar; N. C. Bar 
Association; Kappa Sigma Fraternity; Masonic Lodge. Repre- 
sentative from Stokes County in the General Assembly of 1951. 
Photographers Mate 2/c, 1946. Member First Presbyterian Church. 
Raleigh, N. C. Married Helen Lillian Cantrell, Seaford, Delaware, 
1949. One daughter, Elizabeth Lillian (Beth) Marshall. Legal 
address: R.F.D. #3, W'alnut Cove, N. C; mailing address: 5808 
Chelsea Place, Raleigh. X. C. 



FORREST HERMAN SHU FORD, II 

MEMBER OF NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

Forrest Herman Shuford, IT, Democrat, was born in Gastonia. 
N. C, November 3, 1923. Son of Forrest H. and May (Renfrow) 
Shuford. Attended Ray Street School, High Point, N. C. Fred Olds 
School, Raleigh, N. C. Broughton High School, Raleigh, N. C, 
1937-1941; Wake Forest College, 1941-1943; Duke-Wake Forest 
Law School, 1944-1946. LL.B. Member of Staff, N. C. Attorney 
General, 1947-1949; Attorney-Advisor, U. S. Dept of Labor, 1949- 
1953; Deputy Commissioner, N. C. Industrial Commission, 1953- 
1962; appointed member of the N. C. Industrial Commission. 
December 6, 1962. Member N. 0. State Bar; N. C. Bar Association. 
Wake Co. Bar Association; Rotarian. Served in U. S. Army as 
private, 1943-1944. Member of Board of Deacons, First Presby- 
terian Church, Raleigh, N. 0. Married Grace McDougald Ray, Sep- 
tember 7, 1946. Two children: Forrest H. Shuford, HI, age 14. 
and May Janice Shuford. age 11. Address: 1211 Dogwood Lane. 
Raleigh. N. C. 



502 North Carolina Manual 

ADOLPHUS PILSTON GODWIN, JR. 

COMMISSIONER OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

Adolphus Pilston Godwin, Jr., Democrat, was born October 6, 
1912. Son of A. Pilston and Mable (Hayes) Godwin. Attended 
Public Schools, Gatesville, N. C.; Mars Hill College; Campbell 
College; Wake Forest College, LL.B. degree, 1937. Lawyer. Ad- 
mitted to N. C. Bar, fall term, 1937, Gates County Superior 
Court. Entered law practice with father under firm name of 
Godwin and Godwin, 1937. Member N. C. Bar Assn. Court Study 
Committee, 1955-1965, Chairman, 1964-1965; N. C. Bar Assn. 
Board of Governors, 1958-1961, 1963-1964; President, N. C. Bar 
Assn., 1965-1966. Special Agent, FBI, 1942-1945. Resumed Law 
practice, 1945, and continued to practice at Gatesville, N. C. from 
1945 until November 1, 1965. Member N. C. General Statutes 
Commission for two separate terms; N. C. State Democratic Exec- 
utive Committee, 1946-1966; Board of Trustees, Elizabeth City 
State College; International Assn. of Chiefs of Police; Raleigh 
Executives Club; past Master, Gatesville Lodge No. 126, AF & 
AM. Former President and Chairman, Board of Directors, Tarheel 
Bank & Trust, Gatesville, now serving on Board of Directors. 
Member N. C. Senate from First Senatorial District, Sessions of 
1953 and 1955, and Special Session of 1956. Former member and 
teacher, Men's Class, Gatesville Baptist Church. Married Mildred 
Vann of Ahoskie, N. C. Children: A. Pilston, III, and Gretchen 
Vann Godwin. Address: 2706 Fairview Road, Raleiyh. N. C. 



MARVIN RHEM WOOTEN 

CHAIRMAN NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF PAROLES 

Marvin Rhem Wooten, Democrat, was born in Clinton, X. C, 
May 5, 1928. Son of Henry T., Sr. and Georgia Ann (Kilpatrickl 
Wooten. Attended Clinton Public Schools, graduated, 1945; Pres- 
byterian Junior College, graduated, 1947, A. A. degree; Wake 
Forest College School of Law, LL.B., 1950. Lawyer. Member Phi 
Delta Phi, Legal Fraternity; Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks; Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, past Master Catawku 
Lodge #248. Served in Democratic Party as Precinct Chairman. 



Biographical Sketches 503 

Division Chairman, County Vice Chairman, County Chairman, 
Judicial District Executive Committee, Senatorial District Execu- 
tive Committee and Congressional Campaign Committee. Served 
in U.S. Army, 1950-1953, Sgt., 1st Class. Member Westminster 
Presbyterian Church, Hickory, N. C. Married Frances Irene 
Arndt, May 25, 1957. One son, Marvin Rhem Wooten, Jr., age 
7. Address: 1309 Kingston Ridge Road, Cary, N. C. 

WILLIAM HARRIS GIBSON 

MEMBER NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF PAROLES 

William Harris Gibson, Democrat, was born in Scotland County, 
X. C, April 23, 1908. Son of William Davis and Anna (Seals) 
Gibson. Attended Wagram High School, 1914-1925; Wake Forest 
College, A.B. degree, 1929, M.A. degree, 1942. Member Society of 
Former Special Agents of F.B.I. ; Southern States Probation and 
Parole Association; Raleigh Rotary Club. Representative from 
Scotland County in the North Carolina General Assembly, 1935. 
Special Agent, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1942-1956; Direc- 
tor of Athletics, Wake Forest College, 1956-1964. Member Ridge 
Road Baptist Church, Raleigh, N. C. Married Susan Bradsher 
Hester of Roxboro, N. C, 1935. Address: 2209 Lash Avenue. 
Raleigh, N. C. 

DAVID HOWARD HEPLER 

MEMBER NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF PAROLES 

David Howard Hepler, Democrat, was born in Davidson County, 
N. C, July 2, 1914. Son of Lacy Everette and Ella (Howard) 
Hepler. Attended Fair Grove High School, Thomasville, N. C; 
Wake Forest College, 1932-1934. Member Association of Paroling 
Authorities; National Council on Crime and Delinquency, Parole 
Supervisor, 1942-1943; Parole Investigator, 1943-1956; Adminis- 
trative Assistant Board of Paroles, 1956-1960. Appointed to 
Board of Paroles by Governor Luther Hodges in 1960; reappointed 
to Board by Governor Terry Sanford in 1961 and by Governor 
Dan K. Moore in 1965. Member of Southern States Probation and 
Parole Commission. Member Gamma Eta Gamma. Baptist. Mar- 



r.iii North Carolina Manuai 

ried Thelma Williams, June 26, 1943. Children: Charlie Everette, 
member U. S. Air Force and Shirley Ann. student at East Carolina 
College. Legal Address: Route 2, Thomasville. N. C. Home ad- 
dress: 1802 Sunset Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 

[VIE LAWRENCE CLAYTON 

COMMISSIONER OF REVENUE 

Ivie Law tence Clayton, Democrat, was born in Roxboro, N. C. 
July 12, 1920. Son of Nathaniel R. and Mary (Harris) Clayton. 
Attended Roxboro High School, 1937; George Washington Univer- 
sity, B.S.. Business Administration, 1942. Enlisted and served in 
U.S. Army, 1943-46. Member First Baptist Church of Raleigh; 
Member Board of Deacons. Member Raleigh Kiwanis Club Board 
of Directors; Board of Directors and Executive Committee Raleigh 
United Fund; Executive Committee National Association of Tax 
Administrators; Advisory Council Tax Institute of America; past 
President and member of Executive Committee Southeastern As- 
sociation of Tax Administrators. Married Rebecca Wicker, San- 
ford, X. C. November 26, 1955. Children: Ellen Wicker and 
Lawrence Wicker. Address: 2108 Dunnhill Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 

HUDSON CLATE STANSBURY 

DIRECTOR DEPARTMENT OF TAX RESEARCH 

Hudson Clate Stansbury, Democrat, was born in Oakvale, Miss.. 
September 22, 1915. Son of Criss Monroe and Frances Elizabeth 
(Farmer) Stansbury. Attended elementary school of La Grange. 
Texas. 1922-1929; Copiah-Lincoln Agricultural High School and 
Junior College, 1929-1935; University of North Carolina, B.S. in 
Commerce. 1947. Member National Tax Association; National As- 
sociation of Tax Administrators, Chairman, Research Section. 
1959-1960; Tax Institute; Phi Beta Kappa; Beta Gamma Sigma. 
Appointed Director Department of Tax Research in September, 
1957. Ex-officio member of Tax Review Board and State Board of 
Assessment; Secretary to the State Board of Assessment; Secre- 
tary to the Tax Study Commissions of 1958 and 1966. Corporal 
in United States Army, 1944-1946; participated in Rhineland 
and Central European Campaigns as member of 9th Infantry 



Biographical Sketches 505 

Divison ; awarded Purple Heart. Methodist; member Official 
Board of Fairmont Methodist Church of Raleigh, 1955-1966; 
Secretary of Official Board, 1957; member Finance Commission. 
Married Mary Louise Adams, August 8, 1940. Children : Hudson 
Clate Stansbury, Jr. and Crisstine Marianne Stansbury. Address: 
2727 Everett Avenue, Raleigh, N. C. 

HARRY TRACY WESTCOTT 

CHAIRMAN STATE UTILITIES COMMISSION 

Harry Tracy Westcott, Democrat, was born in Manteo, N. C, 
April 13, 1906. Son of George Thomas and Odessa (Tillett) West- 
cott. Attended Manteo Graded School, 1914-1920; Manteo High 
School, 1920-1924; North Carolina State University, B.S. degree, 
1928. Attended and completed School of Transportation and Mar- 
keting conducted by the University of Chicago in cooperation with 
the U. S. Department of Agriculture in New York, 1938. President, 
Inspectors Association of America, 1941. Marketing Specialist, 
N. C. Department of Agriculture, 1936-1948. Administrator, Fed- 
eral Marketing Agreement and Order No. 81 States of N. C. and 
Virginia. 1H4K. Director of Markets, State of North Carolina, 
1948-1950. Appointed by Governor Scott as a member of the 
Utilities Commission, March 1, 1950. Reappointed for a term of six 
years, February 1, 1951; reappointed in 1957 by Governor Hodges 
for a term of six years and appointed Chairman of the Commission 
August 1. 1958; reappointed in 1963 for term of eight years, and 
reappointed Chairman by Governor Sanford; reappointed Chair- 
man of the Commission by Governor Moore, 1965; elected Vice 
President. National Association of Railroads and Utilities Com- 
missioners. November, 1966. Methodist. Married Helen Rankin 
of Gastonia, N. C, March 21, 1942. Two children: Helen Rankin 
Westcott; Robert Thomas Westcott. Address: 3046 Granville 
Drive. Raleigh. N. C. 

THOMAS ROBERT ELLER, JR. 

STATE UTILITIES COMMISSIONER 

Thomas Robert Eller, Jr., Democrat, was born in Trading Ford. 
N. C. August 23, 1923. Son of Thomas Robert, Sr. and Mary 



506 North Carolina Manual 

Lucy (Safley) Eller. Attended Rowan County Schools, graduating 
in 1941; University of North Carolina, A.B., 1949; University of 
North Carolina Law School, LL.B., 1951. Lawyer. Member North 
Carolina Prisons Commission, 1951-1959; State Democratic Execu- 
tive Committee, 1954-1959; Chairman Transylvania County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, 1954-1958; Town Attorney, Brevard. 
\. ('.. 1953-1959. Voted "Outstanding Young Man of Transylvania 
County". 1955. Member Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; Delta 
Sigma Pi Commerce Fraternity; Order of the Golden Fleece; 
Order of the Holy Grail. Served in World War II. 194:5-1945; 
entered as Private and commissioned Second Lieutenant on battle- 
field; wounded in action in European Theatre and later given med- 
ical discharge; served in Korean War, 1951-1952; discharged 
from Reserves as Captain. 



CLARENCE HUGH NOAH 

STATE UTILITIES COMMISSIONER 

Clarence Hugh Noah, Democrat, was born in Greensboro, N. C, 
February 27, 1900. Son of Zimrie E. and Dena (Bryan) Noah. 
Attended Greensboro and Graham Public Schools. 1907-1917; 
Greensboro Commercial School, 1917-1918; LaSalle Extension 
University of Chicago, 1925-1926; Raleigh Law School. 1928-1931; 
North Carolina State College and Wake Forest College, 1929, 1931. 
1934, 1957. Lawyer. Chairman National Association of Railroad 
and Utilities Commissioners Committee on Rates, Services and 
Operations of Transportation Agencies. Member Wake County Bar 
Association; I. C. C. Practitioners Association; American Society 
of Traffic and Transportation, Inc. Mason. Methodist; member of 
Official Board, 1956-1960. Married Lucile Strickland of Nashville. 
N. C, October 1, 1932. Twin sons, Hugh Bryan and Van Batchelor. 
Address: 1425 Park Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHN WORTH McDEVITT 

STATE UTILITIES COMMISSIONER 

John Worth McDevitt, Democrat, was born in Marshall, N. C. 
April 16, 1913. Son of N. B. and Alice (Hurt) McDevitt. Attended 



Biographical Sketches 507 

Marshall High School, 1930; Mars Hill College, 1930-1933; West- 
ern Carolina College, B.S. degree, 1938; Cornell University, 1943. 
Public school teacher, 1931-1935; Alumni Secretary and Bursar of 
Western Carolina College, 1937-1948; Administrative Assistant, 
Budget Bureau, 1948-1950; State Personnel Director, 1950-1961; 
Director Public Relations and Personnel, Home Security Life 
Insurance Co., 1961-1965; appointed to Utilities Commission, 
February 1, 1966. U. S. Navy, 1943-1945. Baptist. Mason. Married 
Rena Forest Joyner, 1937. Children, Alice Rayburn and Jean 
Forest. Address: Durham, N. C. 



SAMUEL OTIS WORTHINGTON 

STATE UTILITIES COMMISSIONER 

Samuel Otis Worthington, Democrat, was born in Winterville, 
N. C, January 24, 1898. Son of Samuel G. and Lydia Campbell 
(Smith) Worthington. Attended rural schools, 1905-1912; Winter- 
ville High School, 1912-1917; University of North Carolina, two 
years of academic work and two years of law, fall of 1917 through 
summer of 1921. Attorney. Served in the Naval Unit of S.A.T.C. 
at the University from September 1, 1918 to November 1918. 
Served in N. C. State Guard October, 1943 to October, 1944. 
Representative from Pitt County in the General Assembly of 1939, 
1941, 1943, 1945, 1947, 1949, 1951, 1953 and 1955. Member Phi 
Alpha Delta Law Fraternity. Grand Chancellor of the Order of 
Knights of Pythias in the State of North Carolina from June, 
1930 to July, 1931. Supreme Representative from Domain of 
North Carolina to Supreme Lodge Knights of Pythias, 1938-1948. 
Member Greenville Exchange Club; Treasurer, N. C. State Ex- 
change Clubs, 1953-1955. State Utilities Commissioner, June 1, 
1953-December 31, 1954; reappointed June 28, 1955; reappointed 
in 1961 for term of six years. Episcopalian. Married Bessie Har- 
rison, April 29, 1926. Two children : Lina Hackett Worthington 
Mays, Greensboro, N. C, and Samuel Otis Worthington, Jr., Green- 
ville, N. C. Three grandchildren, Robert Worthington Mays, Bess 
Mays and Lydia Campbell Worthington. Home address: Green- 
ville, N. C. Official address: Raleigh, N. C. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIALS APPOINTED 

BY HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS. 

BOARDS OR COMMISSIONS 

(Subject to approval by the Governor) 

GILMER ANDREW JONES, JR. 

STATE BUDGET OFFICER 

(Appointed by the Director Department of Administration) 

Gilmer Andrew Jones, Jr., Democrat, was born in Franklin, 
Macon County, April 19, 1920. Son of Gilmer A. and Maude E. 
(Jacobs) Jones. Attended Macon County Schools, graduated 
Franklin High School, Franklin, June, 1935; Brevard Junior 
College, 1937-1939; John B. Stetson University, 1946-1947; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1947-1949, LL.B. degree. Member X. C. 
State Bar Association; Wake County Bar Association; Phi Alpha 
Delta Legal Fraternity. Chief, Wildlife Protection Division. Xorth 
Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, 1949-1953; Trial Attor- 
ney, State Highway Commission, 1958-1961; Assistant Attorney 
General, North Carolina, 1961-1963; member U.S.S. North Caro- 
lina Battleship Commission, 1961. Served in U. S. Navy-Air Corps, 
active duty, 1940-1945; member Active Reserve, 1945-1963, retired 
January 1, 1963 as Commander. Member Fairmont Methodist 
Church, Raleigh, N. C. Married Betty Eloise MacCartney, August 
2, 1942. Children: Marjorie Eloise Jones and Paul Andrew Jones, 
Address: 3033 Lewis Farm Road, Raleigh. N. C. 

ALFRED CLEMENTS DAVIS 

CONTROLLER STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

(Appointed by the State Board of Education) 

Alfred Clements Davis, Democrat, was born in Hillsborough. 
X. C, June 27, 1915. Son of James Arthur and Myrtle (Neigh- 
bours) Davis. Attended Hillsborough Elementary and High School. 

508 



Biographical Sketches 509 

1921-1931; University of North Carolina, 1931-193(5, B.S. degree in 
Commerce, 1936. Member North Carolina Education Association; 
National Education Association ; American Association of School 
Administrators; North Carolina State Employees Association. 
Delegate to the White House Conference on Education, 1955; 
served on several committees with the United States Office of 
Education in development of handbooks in the State Education 
Records and Reports series. Employed in the Department of 
Public Instruction as Accountant, 1936-1941 and as Director of 
Division of Finance and Statistics, 1941-1943; employed by State 
Board of Education as Assistant Director of the Division of 
Auditing and Accounting, 1943-1949, and as Director, 1949-1960. 
Appointed Controller, State Board of Education, July 21. 1960. 
Methodist; member Board of Stewards, 1963-1964; member Board 
of Trustees of Methodist Retirement Homes, Inc.. 1963-1966. 
Married Mabel Watson Kenyon of Raleigh, August 12, 1939. 
Children: Julia, Jimmy and Walter. Address: 2818 Fowler Avenue, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



JAMES RUSSELL SMITH 

FEDERAL PROPERTY OFFICER 

(Appointed by the Director, Department of Administration) 

James Russell Smith, Democrat, was born in Wilmington, N. C, 
December 31, 1905. Son of James Fulford and Katie Heide 
(Craig) Smith. Attended New Hanover County High School, 1920- 
1923; The Institute of Government, University of North Carolina; 
North Carolina State Highway Patrol Training School, Camp 
Glenn, 1929. Member of the North Carolina State Highway Patrol, 
1929-1960; Patrolman to Colonel, 1929-1950; Colonel-Commanding 
Officer, 1950-1960. Member of the North Carolina Police Execu- 
tives Association, 1949-1959. Member of the International Associa- 
tion of Chiefs of Police, 1949-1959; elected President of the 
State and Provincial Section of the International Association of 
Chiefs of Police for the two successive years, 1958-1959; served 
as a member of the Board of Officers of the International As- 
sociation of Chiefs of Police for the two successive years, 1958- 
1.959. Member of the National Association of State Agencies for 
Surplus Property from 1960; elected President of Area 11 and 



510 North Carolina Manual 

served as a member of the National Committee of the National 
Association of State Agencies for Surplus Property for 1966-1967. 
Member of the North Carolina State Employees Association; Wil- 
mington Light Infantry (W.L.I.) Reserve Corps, Wilmington. 
N. C, Corporal, Battery A, 252nd Regiment, North Carolina 
National Guard, 1922-1929. Author of "Police Traffic Supervision 
in North Carolina," published in the December, 1958 issue of the 
Law Enforcement Bulletin, Federal Bureau of Investigation. 
United States Department of Justice; contributed a number of 
other published articles to magazines and newspapers on subjects 
in the field of Public Safety, Law Enforcement, and Traffic- 
Safety; Co-author of the North Carolina State Highway Patrol 
Operations Manual and its Manual on Police Pursuit Driving. 
Appointed Assistant Federal Property Officer, June 9, 1960, and 
appointed Federal Property Officer for the State of North Caro- 
lina. April 1, 1962. Member of the Masonic Lodge No. 319. 
A.F. & A.M., Wilmington, N. C; 32nd degree Scottish Rite: 
Shriner, Sudan Temple. Episcopalian; former member of the 
Vestry. Married Mary Hemby, Rocky Mount, N. C, November 
15, 1934. Address 404 Cole Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

LAWRENCE ADAMS WATTS, JR. 

GENERAL SERVICES OFFICER 

(Appointed by the Director Department of Administration) 

Lawrence Adams Watts, Jr., Democrat, was born in Wilming- 
ton, N. C. Son of Rev. Lawrence A. and Lallah (Brown) Watts. 
Attended Hugh Morson High School; North Carolina State Uni- 
versity, Class of 1949. Member Professional Engineers of North 
Carolina. Served in Army Air Force, World War II. Member Fair- 
mont Methodist Church. Married Mary Ann Waldrop. Children: 
Lawrence A. Watts, III and Lois W. Watts. Address: 3330 Cole- 
ridge Drive. Raleigh, N. C. 

JACOB KOOMEN (M.D., M.P.H.) 

STATE HEALTH DIRECTOR AND SECRETARY-TREASURER 
STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

(Appointed by the North Carolina State Board of Health) 



Biographical Sketches 511 

Jacob Koomen, Democrat, was born in Bristol. N. V.. September 
18, 1917. Son of Jacob and Eva (Bunschoten) Koomen. Attended 
Pittsford High School. Pittsford. N. Y., 1930-1934; University 
of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y.. B.S. degree, 1939; University of 
Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry, M.D.. 1945; Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, School of Public Health. M.P.H., 1957. 
Member American Public Health Assn.; American Medical Assn.; 
Association of State Health Officers; Conference of State & 
Provincial Health Directors; Southern Medical Assn.; North 
Carolina Public Health Assn.; Medical Society of the State of 
North Carolina; North Carolina Health Council; Wake County 
Medical Society; Raleigh Academy of Medicine; North Carolina 
Tuberculosis Assn.; North Carolina Academy of Public Health. 
Received Reynolds Award, North Carolina Public Health Assn.: 
1960. Author of approximately fifteen papers in various subjects 
related to public health. Served as Senior Surgeon, U. S. Public 
Health Service. Active Duty, 1954-1956, Inactive Reserve since 
1956. Member White Memorial Presbyterian Church. Raleigh. 
N. C; Deacon, 1962-1964; Elder since 1964. Married Ruth Elinor 
Chapin, August 27, 1943. Children: John Chapin, born August 10. 
1945; Marcia Anne, born February 20, 1948; Nancy Carol, born 
December 3, 1952; Neil Chapin, born January 28. 1956. Address: 
909 Dogwood Lane, Raleigh. N. C. 

HOWARD RAI BOOZER 

DIRECTOR NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 

(Appointed by the Board) 

Howard Rai Boozer, Democrat, was born in Monterey, Ken 
tucky, August 14, 1923. Son of Claud D. and Ruth (Foster) 
Boozer. Attended Wilmore, Ky. Public Schools, graduated. 1940; 
Cumberland College; Howard College, A.B. degree, 1946; Wash- 
ington University, St. Louis, B.S., M.A. Ed., Ph.D., 1960. Director. 
Learning Institute of North Carolina; Director, Regional Educa- 
tion Laboratory of the Carolinas and Virginia; Review Com- 
mittee for Construction of Nurse Training Facilities of the 
M.S. Public Health Service; Trustee, Wingate College; member 
American Historical Association; National Council for the Social 
Studies; Phi Delta Kappa: Kappa Delta Pi. Teacher, Webster 



512 N'oim li C \u<>i in v M \M' vi. 

Groves (Mo.) Public Schools. 1949-1951; Staff Associate Ameri- 
can Council on Education, Washington, I). C, 1954-1961; Assistant 
Director Hoard of Higher Education. 1961-1965. Author of ar- 
ticles in professional journals. Served in U.S. Navy, Active Duty. 
L943-1946, 1951-1954; member Active Reserve as Captain, Supply 
Corps, U.S.N.R. Baptist. Married Frances Kintner. August 23. 
L946. Children: Claudia. Margaret, Catherine and Barbara. Ad- 
dress: 1005 Picardy Drive, Raleigh. N. C. 

WILLARD FARR1NGTON BABCOCK 

STATE HICHWAY ADMINISTRATOR 

• Appointed by the State Highway Commission) 

Willard Farrington Babcock, Democrat, was born in Water- 
town, Massachusetts, March 14, 1917. Son of John Brazer and 
Mildred (Willard) Babcock. Attended Brown and Nichols, Cam- 
bridge, Mass., L931-1935; Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
B.S. in Civil Engineering, 1939 and M.S. in Civil Engineering- 
Transportation Option, 1940. Professor of Civil and Transporta- 
tion Engineering at North Carolina State College, 1940-1957: 
Consulting Engineer in Traffic and Transportation Engineering. 
1948-1957. Member American Society of Civil Engineers, Insti- 
tute of Traffic Engineers, Highway Research Board, American 
Road Builders Association, American Association of State High- 
way Officials. Member Chi Epsilon Fraternity, National Presi- 
dent, L948-1952; Tau Beta Pi; Sigma Xi; Theta Tau. Author of 
many publications, including textbooks, consulting reports and 
technical papers. Presbyterian. Married Jane Sweet, March 15. 
1941. Children: John Brazer Babcock, II; Susan Forbes Babcock; 
Sarah Farrington Babcock. Address: 2011 Wells Avenue, Raleigh. 
N. C. 

JOHN LAWRENCE ALLEN, JR. 

CONTROLLER STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION 
i Appointed by the State Highway Commission! 

John Lawrence Allen. Jr., Democrat, was born in Greensboro. 
X. C, January 7. 1923. Son of John L. and Swannie (Putnam) 



Biookaphioal Sketches o13 

Allen. Graduate Greensboro High School and Fork Union Military 
Academy, Fork Union, Virginia. Entered State Government as an 
Interviewer with the Employment Security Commission in 1946; 
served on Employment Security Commission Training Staff, 1947- 
1949; Administrative Assistant, 1949-1952; Business Manager, 
1952-1961; Assistant Director of the Department of Conservation 
and Development, 1961-1963; Assistant State Budget Officer, 
1963-1964; State Personnel Director, 1964-1965. Appointed Con- 
troller State Highway Commission August 1, 1965. Served with 
Army Air Force in the Pacific (1942-1945) and participated in 
the invasion of New Guinea and the liberation of the Philippines. 
Member American Association of State Highway Officials; South- 
eastern Association of State Highway Officials; American Road 
Builders Association; American Society for Public Administration; 
American Management Association; Steering Committee Highway 
Research Program. Past member of Raleigh Optimist Club serving 
as Secretary and Treasurer. Past Chairman Supervisory Com- 
mittee of State Employees' Credit Union. Former member Com- 
mittee on Policies and Practices in Public Employment of the 
Governor's Commission on Status of Women; Raleigh Community 
Relations Committee representing State Government; State Gov- 
ernment Intern Selection Committee; International Association of 
Personnel in Employment Security. Methodist; Past Steward and 
member of Official Board of Wynnewood Park Methodist Church; 
formerly served as Chairman of Official Board, Treasurer, and 
Seci-etary of Wesley Memorial Methodist Church; past member of 
Raleigh Methodist Board of Missions and Church Extension. 
Married Frances Lee Gordon. Three daughters: Sandra (Mrs. 
Paul Rogers), Jacqueline Terry and Jane Gordon. Address: 3<il<; 
Merwin Road, Raleigh, N. C. 



WILLIAM FREEMAN HENDERSON 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
NORTH CAROLINA MEDICAL CARE COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Commission) 

Willam Freeman Henderson, Democrat, was born in Jackson- 
ville, N. C, October 27, 1913. Son of Thomas M. and Viola (Free- 
man) Henderson. Attended Jacksonville High School. 1927-1931 : 



:. I i Nokth Carolina Manual 

University of North Carolina. A.B., 1935; University of North 
Carolina Graduate' School, 1DM7-1938. Member North Carolina 
Hospital Association; Director American Association for Hos- 
pital Planning; President State and Territorial Hospital and Medi- 
cal Facilities Survey and Construction Authorities; Member of 
Board of Directors Association for the North Carolina Regional 
Medical Program; Chairman Medical Center Study Commission; 
member Atomic Energy Advisory Committee. Served in the fol- 
lowing positions: Superintendent of Public Welfare for Randolph 
County; Associate Superintendent North Carolina Children's 
Home; Administrator Onslow County Hospital and Assistant Ad- 
ministrator Moore County Hospital at Pinehurst. Lambda Chi 
Alpha Fraternity, University of North Carolina. President, 1935. 
Served in U. S. Army, 1942-1945. Presbyterian. Married Mary 
Ruth Bruton. May 23, 1941. Children: Thomas Michael Henderson 
and William Bruton Henderson. Address: 214:! Ridge Road. 
Raleigh. N. ( 

JAMES WARREN DAVIS 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

(Appointed by the State Ports Authority) 

James Warren Davis, Democrat, was born in Glassport, Pennsyl- 
vania, April 9, 1913. Son of Chas. Campbell and Grace Margaret 
(Leathers) Davis. Attended Glassport Graded Schools, 1918-1927; 
Glassport High School, 1927-1931; N. C. State College, B.S. degree 
in Forestry, 1937. Member American Society of Civil Engineers; 
Society of American Military Engineers; American Association of 
Port Authorities; South Atlantic Ports Association; Regional Ex- 
port Expansion Council. Baptist. Married Margaret DeLois Os- 
borne of Winston-Salem. Three daughters. Address: Wilmington. 
N. C. 

VERNON LELAND BOUNDS 

STATE DIRECTOR OF PRISONS 

(Appointed by the State Prison Commission) 

Vernon Leland Bounds, Democrat, was born in Salisbury, 
Maryland. October 13. 1918. Son of Floyd S. and Lula F. (Ger- 



Biographical Sketches ">15 

man) Bounds. Attended Elkton High School, Elkton, Md., 1931- 
1935; University of California, Los Angeles, 1941; University of 
Virginia, 1945-1947; University of Virginia Law School, 1947- 
1949, LL.B.; University of Pennsylvania Law School, 1950-1951. 
Member American Correctional Assn., elected to Board of Direc- 
tors, 1966; American Correctional Administrators Assn., appointed 
Treasurer, 1966; National Council on Crime and Delinquency. 
Lecturer in Law, University of Virginia Law School, 1949; Bige- 
low Teaching Fellow, University of Chicago Law School, 1949- 
1950; Bicentennial Fellow in Criminal Law and Administration, 
University of Pennsylvania Law School, 1950-1951; Professor in 
Public Law and Government, University of North Carolina. Insti- 
tute of Government, 1952-1965; Director, University of North 
Carolina Training Center on Delinquency and Youth Crime, 1962- 
1965. Served in U.S. Navy, 1936-1941, A. S. to Chief Petty Officer; 
U.S. Naval Reserve (active duty), 1941-1945, Ensign to Lieuten- 
ant; U.S. Naval Reserve (active duty), 1951-1952, Lieutenant 
Commander; U.S. Naval Reserve (inactive), since 1952. Married 
Marjorie Belle Sorrell, July 15, 1966. One daughter, Bobbi Lee 
Wilson, age 24; one son, Michael F. Bounds, age 22; and one 
stepson, Michael L. Upchurch, age 20. Address: P. 0. Box 1134. 
Chapel Hill. N. C. 



CHARLES MEADE CLODFELTER 

DIRECTOR STATE PROBATION COMMISSION 
(Appointed by the North Carolina State Probation Commission) 

Charles Meade Clodfelter, Democrat, was born in Lexington. 
N. C, January 10, 1918. Son of Dr. Charles M. and Theresa 
Lucille (Hege) Clodfelter. Attended Lexington High School; 
North Carolina State University, Wake Forest College; Institute 
of Government. Member Southern States Probation and Parole 
Conference, Chairman, Resolutions Committee, 1965-1966; National 
Council on Crime and Delinquency. Entered State Government as 
Probation Officer, 1947, Division Supervisor, 1962-1965; appointed 
Director, Probation Commission, November 1, 1965. Served in 
Army Air Force, 1942-1945. Member First Methodist Church; 
Board of Stewards. Married Faye Snipes, August 24. 1940. Four 



f, it; North Carolina Manual 

children; Mrs. Barton Pollard, Reynolds Craig. Janis Claire and 
Carolvn Olivia. Address: 810 Woodlawn Drive. Lexington, N. C. 



FRANK BROWN TURNER 

STATE PROPERTY OFFICER 

(Appointed by the Director Department of Administration) 

Frank Brown Turner, Democrat, of Dare County, was born in 
Oxford. N. C. Son of Lewis B. and Emma Caroline (Bumpass) 
Turner. Attended Durham High School, 1920-24; North Carolina 
State College. B.S., 1928, M.S., 1931. Consulting engineer. Mem- 
ber Professional Engineers of N. C, President, 1956; American 
Society of Professional Engineers; American Society of Mechani- 
cal Engineers; Raleigh Engineers Club, President, 1954; Ameri- 
can Society of Testing Materials. President N. C. State College 
Alumni Association, 1954; Senior Vice-President Planters National 
Bank and Trust Co. Member Theta Tau; Pi Tau Sigma; Phi 
Kappa Phi (honorary). Member Hayes Barton Methodist Church. 
Married Huldah May Brinkley, 1928. Children: Mrs. Camille 
Lawrence; Dr. Ruth Jackson, dentist; Lt. Vance Turner. USAF; 
M is. Jacqueline Bates. 



CLIFTON MORTON CRAIG 

COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

(Appointed by the State Board of Public Welfare) 

Clifton Morton Craig, Democrat, was born in Durham, N. C, 
August 4. 1918. Son of Clifton M. and Hester (Billings) Craig. 
Attended University of North Carolina, B.S. degree in Commerce. 
1 939; George Washington University, 1953, Master Business Ad- 
ministration; U.S. Navy Postgraduate School (Comptrollership) ; 
U.S. Air Force Radar School; U.S. Army Communications School; 
LB.M. Executive Course. Member American Public Welfare Assn. 
Industrial Director, Durham Chamber of Commerce. 1962-1965; 
Colonel. U.S. Marine Corps, active duty, 1940-1962; placed on 



Biographical Sketches 517 

retired list, 1965. Prior to retirement was a member of Secretary 
of Defense Staff, and made management studies for the Secretary 
of Defense. Member First Presbyterian Church, Raleigh, N. C. 
Married Gertrude Iredale of Philadelphia, July 24, 1950. One son, 
age 9 and one daughter, age 5. Address: 5706 Deblyn Avenue, 
Raleigh, X. C. 



ESTON YATES BRICKHOUSK 

STATE PURCHASING OFFICER 
(Appointed by the Director Department of Administration) 

Eston Yates Brickhouse, Democrat, was born in Creswell, N. C. 
August 14. 1913. Son of Frank N. and Mildred (Armstrong) 
Brickhouse. Attended Creswell Elementary School, 1920-1927; 
Creswell High School, 1927-1931; Wake Forest College, 1931-1933; 
Wake Forest Law School, 1933-1934; Wake Forest College, 1936- 
1937, B. S. degree; graduate. Naval Training School, Cornell 
University. 1942; graduate, Advanced Mine Warfare School, Yoi'k- 
town, Virginia. Member Elks; American Legion; VFW; Reserve 
Officers' Association. Chairman, Democratic Party, Tyrrell County; 
Executive Committeeman, Tyrrell County. Entered U.S. Navy, 
July 1, 1942. as Ensign; released to inactive duty, February, 1946; 
recalled to active duty, October 1950; released to inactive duty, 
May, 1952, with rank of Lieutenant Commander. Baptist. Single. 
Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



RALPH JAMES ANDREWS 

DIRECTOR OF RECREATION 

(Appointed by the Recreation Commission) 

Ralph James Andrews. Democrat, was born in Norton, Kansas, 
July 6, 1906. Son of Fred R. and Effie M. (Stout) Andrews. 
Attended University of Nebraska, 1924-1929. BPE and B.SC; 
Graduate Schools of University of Nebraska and University of 
Montana, 1935-1939; Peabody Graduate School. M.A. and 2 years 
of work toward Ph.D. Member American Institute of Park Ex- 



.'lis North Carolina Manual 

ecutives, elected member of Board for L959-1962, Associate Editor, 
L957-1962; American Recreation Society; American Red Cross; 
North Carolina Recreation Society, President. 1949-1950; Ameri- 
can Association Health, Physical Education & Recreation; North 
Carolina Society of Safety Engineers; North Carolina (and Na- 
tional! Adult Education Association; World Press Association; 
X. ('. Travel Council; N. C. Council for Social Service; N. C. 
Family Life Council; Family Camping Club of America; Boy 
Scouts of America (Committeeman). Has worked in education 
in elementary, junior high school and high school through under- 
graduate (Head of Department of Athletics, Health. Physical 
Education and Recreation of Western Carolina College). Professor 
in Graduate School, Peabody College, Coordinator of wartime 
education for the North Carolina State Department of Public 
Instruction and North Carolina Director of a Kellogg Foundation 
Study on School-Community Health Study. Who's Who (in (1) 
American Education and in (2) South and Southwest). Has con- 
tributed many articles to recreation and education journals; As- 
sociate Editor, Park and Recreation, American Institute of Park 
Executives; also articles in American Banker, Journal of Ameri- 
can Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
and others; State College Certificate of Appreciation (1963) in 
recognition of services. Received highest honors of American 
Fnstitute of Park Executives, American Recreation Society (the 
Fellow Award); Appointed by Governor as member of Kerr 
Reservoir Development Commission, Governor's Committee on 
Juvenile Delinquency and Adult Crime, Governor's Coordinating 
Council on Aging, Governor's Committee on Water Safety, and 
North Carolina Council on Natural Resources. Captain, U. S. 
Army. L943-1944 and 1950-1952. Local Commander (1957) and 
State Commander (1958), Amvets. Member Highland Methodist. 
Married Clarine G. Anderson, May 27. 1928. One son, Robin 1)., 
born in 1945, and one daughter, Tarnie F., horn in 1950. Address: 
1419 Ridge Road, Raleig-h. N. C. 



COLLIN McKINNE 

DIRRCTOR NORTH CAROLINA VETERANS COMMISSION 
(Appointed by the Commission) 



Biographical Sketches 519 

Collin McKinne, Democrat, was born in Louisburg, N. C, Janu- 
ary 27, 1921. Son of Malcolm and Ethelynd (Peterson) McKinne. 
Attended Mills Elementary School of Louisburg, 1927-1935; Webb 
School, Bell Buckle, Tenn., 1935-1939; N. C. State College, B.S. in 
Industrial Engineering; graduate, Regular Course, Command and 
General Staff College, U. S. Army. Member Board of Alcoholic 
Control of Town of Louisburg; Secretary-Treasurer Franklin 
County Young Democratic Club, 1953-1954; Deputy State Director 
of Civil Defense, 1954-1955. Appointed Director North Carolina 
Veterans Commission, October 15, 1957. Served in European 
Theatre of Operations, U. S. Army World War II; discharged 
as Captain; member N. C. National Guard since World War II 
and presently Executive Officer 30th Infantry Division Artillery, 
with rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Member Kappa Sigma; Ameri- 
can Legion; Forty & Eight; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American 
Veterans of World War II. Episcopalian; Vestryman, St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church of Louisburg. Married Betty C. Hochenedel of 
Houma, La., March 18, 1944. Two daughters, Jane Elliott and Eliza- 
beth Peterson. Address: Louisburg, N. C. 



GEORGE EUGENE PICKETT 

DIRECTOR DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

( Appointed by the North Carolina Board of Water Resources) 

George Eugene Pickett, Democrat, was born in Durham, N. C, 
October 20, 1907. Son of Henry Saunders and Betty (Ward) 
Pickett, both deceased. Attended Fuller School, Durham, N. C, 
1914-1921; Central High School, Durham, 1921-1926; N. C. State 
University, 1930, B.S. in Engineering; University of Pittsburgh, 
Advance Management, MPE-15, 1955. Member National Society 
of Professional Engineers of North Carolina; American Society of 
Civil Engineers; Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers; 
Society of American Military Engineers; Raleigh Engineers Club; 
Raleigh Lions Club. Served in U.S. Army, 1940-1962, Colonel. 
Member Edenton Street Methodist Church; member Board of 
Stewards since 1964. Married Queoga Ward, October 8, 1926. 
Two sons; George E. Pickett, Jr., Raleigh, N. C. and J. Dan 
Pickett, Charlotte, N. C. Address: 3308 Felton Place, Raleigh, 
\t. C. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIALS APPOINTED BY 

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS 

OR COMMISSIONS 

(With no approving authority) 



CHRISTOPHER CRITTENDEN 

DIRECTOR OK THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 

(Appointed by the Executive Board of the Department) 

Christopher Crittenden, Democrat, was born in Wake Forest. 
N. C, December 1, 1902. Son of Charles Christopher and Ethel 
(Taylor) Crittenden. Attended Wake Forest Grammar and High 
Schools. A.B., Wake Forest College, 1921 and A.M. in 1922, Litt.D. 
in 1956; Yale University, Ph.D., 1930; LL.D., University of North 
Carolina in 1961. Director State Department of Archives and 
History (formerly the State Historical Commission) since 1935; 
Secretary State Literary and Historical association since 1935; 
member American Historical and Southern Historical associa- 
tions; President Society of American Archivists, 1946-1948; Presi- 
dent American Association for State and Local History, 1940- 
1942; President Archeological Society of North Carolina, 1948- 
1950, 1955-1956; member Board of Trustees, Olivia Raney Library; 
member Wake County Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, 1959. Principal 
Roxobel, N. C, Public School, 1922-1923; Instructor in History. 
Yale University, 1924-1925; University of North Carolina 1926- 
1929 ; Assistant Professor of History, University of North Caro- 
lina 1930-1935. Author of North Carolina Newspapers before 
1790; The Commerce of North Carolina 1763-1789; and various 
historical articles and book reviews. Editor-in-Chief the North 
Carolina Historical Review. Baptist. Married Janet Quinlan of 
Waynesville, N. C, 1930. Threa children: C. Jr., born 1933; 
Robert Hinton, born 1936; Ann Lane, horn 1938. Address: 1537 
Caswell St.. Raleigh. N. C. 

520 



Biographical Sketches 521 

JUSTUS BIER 

DIRECTOR, NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART 

(Elected by the Board of Trustees North Carolina Museum of Art) 

Justus Bier was born in Nuremberg, Germany, May 31, 1899. 
Son of Jacob and Minna (Honig) Bier. Studied at Universities of 
Munich. Erlangen, Jena, Bonn and Zurich; Ph.D. Magna Cum 
Laude, University of Zurich, 1924. Member College Art Ass'n of 
America: Southeastern College Art Conference; Southern Art 
Museums Directors Association; Southeastern Museums Confer- 
ence; International Council of Museums; American Society for 
Aesthetics, Chairman of session on problems in Aesthetics, 1954; 
Midwestern College Art Conference, President, 1951-1952; Society 
of Architectural Historians; American Federation of Arts; Asso- 
ciation of American University Professors; International Art 
Critics Association; Delta Phi Alpha (honorary fraternity in the 
German language) ; Kappa Pi (honorary art fraternity) ; Phi 
Kappa Phi (honorary scholarship fraternity). Research Grant 
and Publication Grant, Notgemeinschaft der Deutschen Wissen- 
schaft. 1928. 1930; Albrecht Durer Medal, City of Nuremberg, 
Germany. 1928; August Kestner Medal, Kestner-Gesellschaft, 
Hannover. Germany, 1938; Research Grant, Institute for Advanced 
Study. Princeton, 1953-1954; Guggenheim Foundation, Publication 
Grant. 1959 ; Fulbright Fellow, University of Wurzburg 1960-1961 ; 
Visiting Professor, Free University of Berlin, 1956-1957; Univer- 
sity of Southern California, summer semester, 1959; University 
of Colorado, summer semester, 1963. Director and Curator, 
Kestner-Gesellschaft Art Institute, Hannover, Germany, 1930- 
1936; Founder and Director, Museum fur das Vorbildliche Serien- 
produkt, Hannover, 1930-1936; Head of Fine Arts Dept., Univer- 
sity of Louisville, Kentucky, 1937-1960; Director, Allen R. Hite 
Art Institute, 1946-1960; Art Editor and Art Critic, Courier- 
Journal, Louisville, 1944-1956; Board Member, Deutscher Werk- 
bund, Berlin, 1931-1934; Advisory Board of Art Education, Univer- 
sity of Kentucky, 1947; Advisory Committee, Kentucky State Fair 
and Exposition Center, 1949; member of Boai'd of Directors, 
Louisville Art Center Association 1940-1960; Director, Junior 
Art Gallery, Louisville, 1949-1960; Louisville Council of Historic 
Sites and Buildings. 1950-1953; Professional Advisor. Junior 



522 North Carolina Manual 

League, Louisville, L945-1960; Editorial Council of Journal of 
Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 1951-1953. Author of following 
books: Nurnbergisch-frankische Bildnerkunst, 1922; Delsenbaehs 
Nurnbergische Ansichten, 1 924 ; Tilmann Riemenschn eider, Vol. I. 
1925, Vol. 11, 1930, Vol. III. in print; Old Nuremberg, A Work of 
Art in Town-Architecture, 1928; Tilmann Riemenschneider; Ein 
Gedenkbuch, Sixth Edition, 1948. Articles in American, English, 
French, German and Italian scholarly art journals including Th< 
Art Bulletin, Art in America, Art Quarterly, Studio, Gazette des 
Beaux-Arts, Munchner Jahrbuch der Bildenden Kunst and Metro- 
politan Museum of Art (New York) Bulletin. Married Senta 
Dietzel, March 17, 1931. One son, Max Robert. Address: 201 
Peartree Lane, Raleigh, N. C. 27610. 

GRADY R. GALLOWAY 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
NORTH CAROLINA STATE COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND 

(Appointed by the Commission) 

Grady R. Galloway, Democrat, was born in Jackson County, 
N. C. Son of Elbert Daniel and Sarah (Ward) Galloway. Attended 
Sylva High School, Sylva, N. C, 1933-1937; Western Carolina 
College, Cullowhee, N. C, 1941, B.S. degree; Western Carolina 
College, 1961, M.A. degree. Member National Rehabilitation Assn.; 
Rehabilitation Counseling Assn.; North Carolina Rehabilitation 
Assn.; past president American Association of Workers for the 
Blind; Raleigh Lions Club. President, Western Carolina College 
Alumni, 1963; president, Hawk Creek Lions Club, 1965; Regional 
President, Rehabilitation Counseling Assn., 1962. Treasurer, Blue 
Ridge Chapter, Society for Crippled Children and Adults, 1963- 
1965; member Board of Asheville Exchange Club Workshop for 
Retarded, 1964-1965; member Planning Council of Buncombe 
County for Retarded, 1964-1965. Serving as Commander, U.S. 
Coast Guard Reserve; participated in major invasions of North 
Africa, Sicily, Salerno-Italy, Normandy, Southern France and 
Okinawa; decorated for gallantry in action for performance at 
Salerno, and received citations during other invasions. Member 
Beverly Hills Baptist Church; Sunday School Teacher. Married 
Irene Graham, 1950. Children: Karen, Neal and Mark. Address: 
Route 3, Box 616, Raleigh, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 523 

ISAAC EPPS READY 

DIRECTOR DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES 

i Appointed by the State Board of Education) 

Isaac Epps Ready, Democrat, was born in Johnston, S. C, 
December 17. 1903. Son of Edgar Lowndes Ready and Elise Epps 
Ready. Attended Johnston, S. C, public schools; University of 
South Carolina, A.B. "Cum Laude," 1925, A.M., 1929; New York 
University, Ed.D., 1949; other graduate study: University of 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill; University of Chicago; Harvard 
University, and Columbia University. Member North Carolina 
Education Association; National Education Association; Ameri- 
can Association of School Administrators; Sigma Chi; Phi Delta 
Kappa; Kiwanis Club. Teacher and Coach, Olar, S. C; Rocky 
Mount, N. C; Ridgeland, S. C. Assistant Principal, Central High 
School, Charlotte, N. C. ; Principal, Rocky Mount High School, 
Rocky Mount, N. C; Hugh Morson High School, Raleigh, N. C. 
Superintendent, Roanoke Rapids City Schools; Director, Curricu- 
lum Study, State Board of Education. Member Edenton Street 
Methodist Church. Married Marguerite Cook, 1928. Two sons, 
Epps, Jr. and Judson; one daughter, Lucia (Mrs. Ronnie Waters). 
Address: 744 St. George Road, Raleigh, N. C. 



J. FRANK HUSKINS 

DIRECTOR ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE OF THE COURTS 

(Appointed by the Chief Justice) 

J. Frank Huskins, Democrat, was born in Burnsville, N. C, 
February 10, 1911. Son of Joseph Erwin and Mary Etta (Peterson) 
Huskins. Attended Yancey Collegiate Institute, 1924-1926; Burns- 
ville High School, graduated, 1927; Mars Hill (Junior) College, 
1927-1929; University of North Carolina 1929-1930, A.B. degree; 
University of North Carolina Law School, 1930-1932. Member 
N. C. Bar, Inc.; N. C. Bar Assn.; Wake County Bar; American 
Judicature Society; National Conference of Court Administrative 
Officers; American Legion; Raleigh Executives' Club. Mayor, 
Town of Burnsville, 1939-1942; Chairman, North Carolina In- 



524 Nokth Carolina Ma.nl'al 

dustrial Commission from May, 1949 to January, 1955; Represen- 
tative from Yancey County in General Assembly, 1947 and 194V 
Sessions. Judge, Superior Court, 1955-1965; appointed Director, 
Administrative Office of the Courts of North Carolina. July 1, 
1965. Served in U.S. Navy, 1942-1946; Lieutenant Commander 
U. S. Naval Reserve, Retired. Baptist. Married Mary Bailey (now 
deceased) of Burnsville, N. C, January 22, 1938, no children; 
married Ruth Houck of Spruce Pine, N. C, October 20. 1963. Step 
children: Robert Glenn McNeill, age 23, in U.S. Air Force and 
Ruth Elizabeth McNeill, age 17. Address: Burnsville. X. C: 
Official address: Justice Building, Raleigh, N. C. 



ALEXANDER KENAN BROCK 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY STATE BOARD OF ELECTIONS 

(Appointed by the Board) 

Alexander Kenan Brock, Democrat, was born in Winston-Salem, 
N. C, December 26, 1924. Son of the late Judge Walter E. and 
Elizabeth (Ashcraft) Brock. Attended Raleigh Public Schools; 
The Citadel, Charleston, S. C; University of North Carolina; 
U.S. Army School of Administration; School of Insurance, Hart- 
ford, Conn. Engaged in office furniture business, and also operates 
Brock Office Supply Co.; distributes ULTRAVOX electronic equip- 
ment. Member Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity, and several civic clubs; 
Precinct Committee, 1958-1960; Democratic Finance Committee. 
Wake County, 1961-1962. Long active in political affairs and 
campaigns of the Democratic Party. Served as Sergeant-Major, 
Division Artillery, 75th Infantry Division; Sergeant-Major Head- 
quarters, 195th Labor Supervision Center; inducted 1943 and 
served through December, 1946; attended Army School. Rheims. 
France. Member Saint Timothy's Episcopal Church, Raleigh; 
served as Vestryman, 1955-1957; Treasurer of the Vestry, 1958- 
1.959; Board of Trustees, Saint Timothy's School, 1960-1963; now 
serving as Vestryman and Parliamentarian. Married Doris Pool 
Green of Raleigh and Charlotte. Two children: Kenan, age 18. 
student at East Carolina College, and Danny, age 14, student at 
Canoll Junior High School, Raleigh. Address: 428 Oakland Drive 
(P. 0. Box 2682), Raleigh, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 525 

CAMERON WADDELL LEE 

CHIEF ENGINEER STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Director subject to approval by the Commission) 

Cameron Waddell Lee, Democrat, was born in Asheville, N. C. 
November 23, 1914. Son of Ralph E. and Mabel (Robinson) Lee. 
Attended Asheville City Schools, 1921-1931; University of South 
Carolina, B.S. in Civil Engineering, 1935. Member N. C. Society 
of Engineers; Southeastern Association of State Highway Of- 
ficials; American Association of State Highway Officials; Ameri- 
can Road Builders' Association; appointed as member of Trans- 
port Committee of American Association of State Highway Of- 
ficials, 1960, and a member of the Planning and Design Policies 
Committee, 1964 and Joint AASHO- National Highway Users 
Joint Committee, 1965. Commander U. S. Navy (Reserve); active 
duty, 1942-1946 and 1951-1953. Baptist; formerly belonged to 
Presbyterian Church and served as Deacon, 1948-1951 and Elder 
1954-1957. Married Helen Lawhon of Union, S. C, June of 1942. 
Children: Cameron, Jr., age 23; Richard, age 19; David, age 17; 
Edwin, age 11. Address: 205 West Sycamore Street, Wake Forest, 
N. C. 



MYRON HOMER McBRYDE 

DIRECTOR STATE BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

(Appointed by the Attorney General) 

Myron Homer McBryde, Democrat, was born in Sanford, N. C, 
July 27, 1923. Son of Forrest Glenn, Sr. and Ann (Stone) Mc- 
Bryde. Attended Mclver Elementary School, Sanford, N. C, 
1929-1936; Sanford High School, Sanford, N. C, 1937-1938; 
Rockingham High School, Rockingham, N. C, 1939-1942; Rollins 
College, Winter Park, Fla., A.B. degree, 1950; University of Mis- 
sissippi, School of Law, LL.B., 1954. Lawyer. Member Lowndes 
County Bar Association; Mississippi Bar Assn.; Mississippi State 
Bar; American Bar Assn.; American Judicature Society; Kappa 
Alpha (social fraternity); Phi Alpha Delta (legal fraternity); 
Elks Club; Rotary Club. Vice President, Kappa Alpha Fraternity, 



526 Nok mi (' \i:oi.i.\a Man i \i 

Rollins College, Winter Park, Fla., 1949, President, 1950; Vice 
President, Phi Alpha Delta, University of Mississippi, 1963, Presi- 
dent, 1964; co-founder Phi Alpha Delta Legal Research Exchange. 
University of Mississippi Law School. Attorney, Columbus, Mis- 
sissippi, 1966-19(57. Former instructor in Criminology and Politi- 
cal Science. Mississippi State College for Women, Columbus. 
Mississippi; former Special Agent, Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion. Author, "The Nature of the Judicial Process with Emphasis 
on Legislation". Sergeant, Military Transportation Corps, 1943- 
1946. Presbyterian, Married Ann Garner, August 4, 1950. Chil- 
dren: Bruce Garner McBryde, age 11, and Lory Joan McBryde. 
age 9. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

BLAINE MARK MADISON 

COMMISSIONER OF JUVENILE CORRECTION 

(Appointed by the Board of Juvenile Correction) 

Blaine Mark Madison, Democrat, was born in Olin, Iredell 
County, N. C. Son of Charles M. and Molly (White) Madison. 
Attended Union Grove High School, graduating in 1926; High 
Point College, A.B., 1929; Duke University, M.A., 1933 and M.Ed.. 
1939. Member National Association of Training Schools and 
Juvenile Agencies; American Prison Association; American Wel- 
fare Association ; North Carolina Council for Social Service ; 
Kappa Delta Pi Honorary Scholarship Fraternity in Education. 
Author of numerous professional articles for North Carolina 
Education, North Carolina Christian Advocate, The State, PTA 
Bulletin and Bulletin Service of the Methodist Church of the 
United States. President Adult and Juvenile Delinquency Division 
North Carolina Council for Social Service; President North Cen- 
tral District of North Carolina Education Association, 1950; 
President Raleigh Unit North Carolina Education Association, 
1949; Treasurer Southeastern Division of Child Welfare League 
of America, 1948; Chairman Governor's Committee on Juvenile 
Delinquency and Youth Crime; Special Consultant President's 
Committee on Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Crime; President 
of the National Association of Training Schools and Juvenile 
Agencies July 1965-June 1967; Member of the Professional 
Council of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency Janu- 



Biographical Skkkhis 527 

ary 1966-December 31, 1968; President Raleigh Family Service 
Society, 1949. Appointed Commissioner of the State Board of 
Correction and Training July 1, 1956. Member Raleigh Lions 
Club, First Vice-President, 1951. Member Edenton Street Methodist 
Church of Raleigh; past Chairman Board of Stewards; Teacher of 
Fidelis Bible Class; former Lay Leader of the Raleigh District 
of the Methodist Church; former Treasurer of the Board of Lay 
Activities of the North Carolina Methodist Conference; member 
Board of Education of the North Carolina Conference; Executive 
Committee of the North Carolina Council of Churches; Executive 
Committee of the Southeastern Jurisdictional Council of the 
Methodist Church. Married Helen Williams, 1935. Address: 1809 
McDonald Lane, Raleigh. N. C. 



ELWOOI) BOYD DIXON 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
N. C. LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS' BENEFIT AND RETIREMENT Fl'NP 

(Appointed by the Board of Commissioners) 

Elwood Boyd Dixon, Democrat, was born in Edward, Beaufort 
County, N. C, February 27, 1905. Son of Dr. William Harvey and 
Carrie Maxwell (Boyd) Dixon. Attended Ayden High School, 
Ayden, N. C, 1918-1921; Randolph Macon Military Academy, Bed- 
ford, Va., 1921-1922; University of North Carolina, graduating, 
1926, B.S. in Business Administration; Stonier Graduate School of 
Banking; Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N. J., 1955-1956, 
graduating, 1957. Former Treasurer and Director Raleigh Chapter 
National Office Management Association; past President Raleigh 
Clearing House Association ; former Treasurer and member of the 
Board, Wake County Chapter, N. C. Society for Crippled Children 
and Adults. Former member Advisory Board, Raleigh Y.W.C.A. 
Past Director Raleigh Chamber of Commerce; member and past 
Vice President Raleigh Lions Club. Charter member Delta Sigma 
Pi, National Business Fraternity, U. N. C. Member William G. 
Hill Lodge, A.F. & A.M., No. 218, Raleigh, N. C; Scottish Rite 
Bodies and Shriner, Sudan Temple. Former Vice-President North 
Carolina National Bank, Raleigh, N. C, retired March 31, 1962. 
Member Fairmont Methodist Church, Raleigh. N. C; currently 



528 North Carolina Manual 

Chairman Board of Trustees and member of Finance Committee; 
Chairman Official Board, L954. Married Roberta Smith, LaGrange. 
N. C, March 20. 1<K',2. One daughter, Roberta Harvey, now Mr?. 
Hart H. Gates, Marietta, Ga. Address: 2700 Van Dyke Avenue, 
Raleigh, X. C. 



PHILIP SMYTH E OGILVIE 

STATE LIBRARIAN 

I Appointed by the North Carolina State Library Board) 

Philip Smythe Ogilvie, Democrat, was born in Savannah. Ga.. 
March 14, 1919. Son of Philip Smythe and Mary Eva (Moore) 
Ogilvie. Attended Savannah High School, Savannah, Ga.; St. 
Charles' Jr. College, Catonsville, Maryland; St. Mary's Seminary 
and University, Baltimore, Md., B.A. degree, June, 1944; Catholic 
University of America, Washington, D. C, B.S. in Lib. Sci., Aug.. 
P.I47. Member American Library Assn.; Special Libraries Assn.: 
Southeastern Library Assn.; North Carolina Library Assn. Con- 
tributor to pi"ofessional periodicals. Member Roman Catholic 
Church; Associate Editor, North Carolina Catholic, 1947-1949; 
Executive Secretary, North Carolina Catholic Layman's Assn.. 
1947-1949; Executive Secretary, Catholic Committee of the South. 
1949-1953. Married Joan Marie Forshag of New Orleans, La., 
May 29, 1952. Children: Elizabeth Mary; Patrick Albert; Henry 
Alton; Anne Lillian; Joseph Andrew, and Jane Katherine. Ad- 
dress: 030 Peartree Lane, Raleigh, N. C. 27010. 



W I L L I A M K VV A RT E A STERLING 

SECRETARY LOCAL GOVERNMENT COMMISSION 

(.Appointed by the State Treasurer) 

William Ewart Easterling, Democrat, was born in Marlboro 
County, South Carolina. Son of Gary Thomas and Columbia 
(Wyatt) Easterling. Attended Wofford College, A.B., 1918; East- 
man-Gaines School of Business, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Certified 
Public Accountant. Secretary, North Carolina Local Government 



Biographical Sketches 529 

Commission since November of 1932. Served as Private in United 
States Marine Corps, June of 1918 to July of 1919. Presbyterian; 
Deacon, 1938-1941, 1950-1953; Elder, 1954-57, 1958-62. 1963-68. 
Married Hannah McCutchen Montgomery, October 27, 1927. One 
son, W. E. Easterling, Jr., M.D. Address: 2412 Everett Avenue. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



EUGENE ALEXANDER HARGROVE, M.D. 

COMMISSIONER OF MENTAL HEALTH 

(Appointed by the State Board of Mental Health ) 

Eugene Alexander Hargrove, Democrat, was born in San Elizerio, 
Texas, August 2, 1918. Son of William Franklin and Nell (Dasy) 
Hargrove. Attended Austin High School of El Paso, Texas, 1932- 
1936; University of Texas, A.B., 1939; University of Texas School 
of Medicine, M.D., 1942. Fellow in Psychiatry, University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1947-1950. Physician, specializing in psychiatry. Diplo- 
mate American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, 1950. Member 
American Medical Association; American Psychiatric Association; 
American Academy on Mental Retardation; American Association 
on Mental Deficiency; North Carolina Medical Association; North 
Carolina Neuropsychiatry Association; Wake County Medical So- 
ciety. Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, University of North 
Carolina School of Medicine. Co-author of "The Practice of Psy- 
chiatry in General Hospitals." Also has contributed many articles 
appearing in various medical journals. Served as Captain in Army 
Medical Corps, 1944-1946. Member First Presbyterian Church, 
Raleigh, N. C. Married Ethel Crittenden, September 2, 1946. 
Children: Eugene Alexander, Jr., age 19; Thomas, age 14; William. 
age 13. Address: 2429 Wentworth Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

CLAUDE EDWARD CALDWELL 

STATE PERSONNEL DIRECTOR 

(Appointed by the State Personnel Board) 

Claude Edward Caldwell, Democrat, was born in Meriwether 
County, Ga., Oct. 25, 1918. Son of Lamar and Martha Elizabeth 



530 North Carolina Manual 

(Funderburke) Caldwell. Attended Georgia State College, B.C.S., 
June, L945; Emory University Law School, LL.B. degree, 1948. 
Member Public Personnel Association; American Management 
Association; American Society for Public Administration; Phi 
Delta Phi Fraternity. Member Milbrook Baptist Church; Chair- 
man, Board of Deacons, 11)60-1962; Superintendent, Educational 
Organizations. 1963-1986. Married Mary Frances Tollison. Chil- 
dren: Mary Claudia; Steven Lamar; JohnWeston; Martha Eliza- 
beth, and Nancy Ann. Address: Route 9, Box 38, Raleigh. N. C. 

GWYN B. PRICE 

CHAIRMAN N. C. RURAL ELECTRIFICATION AUTHORITY 

(Elected by the Rural Electrification Authority) 

Gwyn B. Price, Democrat, was born in Warrensville, N. C, June 
2, 1900. Son of Avery A. and Victoria (Graybeal) Price. Attended 
Jefferson High School of Jefferson, N. C; Duke University, 1919; 
Emory & Henry College, A.B., 1924; graduate student University 
of North Carolina, 1928. Owner, Rich Hill Farm. Member Farmers 
Cooperative Council of North Carolina; N. C. Board of Farm 
Organization & Agricultural Agencies; Director Farmers Coopera- 
tive Exchange, Inc.; member Yadkin Valley Dairy Cooperative, 
Wilkesboro, N. C; Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation 
and Skyline Telephone Membership Corporation, West Jefferson, 
N. C. Awarded certificate by the North Carolina State Grange 
for Distinguished Service to North Carolina Farm People, 1954. 
Principal of Jefferson High School, 1924-1938. Chairman North 
Carolina Rural Electrification Authority since 1941. Member 
Rotary Club; The North Carolina State Grange; Kappa Phi 
Kappa; Tau Kappa Alpha; Sigma Chi. Methodist. Married 
Pauline Shoaf, 1925. Children: Joe Gwyn Price and Mrs. Virginia 
Ruth Price Roberts. Home address: Warrensville. N. C. Office: 
Box 630, Raleigh, N. C. 

NATHAN HUNTER YELTON 

DIRECTOR 
TEACHERS' AND STATE EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

(Elected by Board of Trustees) 



Biographical Sketches 531 

Nathan Hunter Yelton, Democrat, was born at Bakersville, 
N. C; son of David and Sarah Jane (Deyton) Yelton. Graduated 
from Yancey Collegiate Institute, Burnsville, N. C; B. S. George 
Peabody College, Nashville, Tennessee; Graduate work at the 
University of North Carolina; and in School Administration, 
George Peabody. Honorary degree of Doctor of Laws presented 
by Elon College during June, 1966, commencement exercises. 
Teacher, elementary and high school principal; Superintendent, 
Mitchell County Schools; State Director Public Assistance 1937-41; 
Executive Secretary, State School Commission, 1941-42; Controller 
State Board of Education, 1942-43; Director N. C. Public Em- 
ployees' Social Security Agency since 1951 and Director and 
Executive Secretary of the North Carolina Local Governmental 
Employees' Retirement System and the Teachers' and State Em- 
ployees' Retirement System since 1945. Captain U. S. Army, In- 
telligence, December 19, 1943 to October 7, 1945 with eighteen 
months overseas; attached to British 11th Armored Division for 
eight months; participated in the invasion of Normandy, North 
France and Rhineland Campaigns; attached to 3rd Army with 
headquarters in Munich in charge of Military Government Educa- 
tion program for Bavaria in the denazification of the German 
School System; promoted to rank of Major. Member Municipal 
Finance Officers Association, U. S. and Canada; Southern Con- 
ference on Teacher Retirement, having served as Chairman in 
1948 and 1964; National Council on Teacher Retirement, a division 
of the National Education Association, having served in the past 
as a member of the Board of Directors and Chairman of the 
Legislative Committee and later as Chairman ; State Democratic 
Executive Committee; Governor's Coordinating Committee on 
Aging — a past Chairman; Board of N. C. Police Voluntary Benefit 
Association; Board of Directors, Raleigh United Fund; American 
Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Governor's Coordinating 
Council on Aging; Raleigh Lions Club. Mason, member Raleigh 
Lodge 500. Presbyterian and Chairman of Board of Deacons. 
Married April 16, 1922 to Cerena Sue Polk (Deceased) of Mary- 
ville, Tennessee; one child, Natalie (Mrs. Robert E. Morton) of 
Chicago, Illinois. Married Betty Glyn Holland of Clinton, N. C. 
May 12, 1956; two children, Molly Dawn and Yolanda Jane. Home 
address: Garner, N. C. Office: Raleigh, N. C. 



..::■ North Carolina Manual 

CLYDE PHARR PATTON 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
NORTH CAROLINA WILDLIFE RESOURCES COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Commission) 

Clyde Pharr Patton, Democrat, was born in Monroe County, 
West Virginia, September 17, 1913. Son of Clyde Thompson and 
Glenna Robinson (Pharr) Patton. Graduated from Herndon, Vir- 
ginia. High School in 1932; Virginia Polytechnic Institute, B.S. 
in Biology in 1936 and M.S. in Wildlife Conservation in 1939. 
Member Wildlife Society; Outdoor Writers Association of Amer- 
ica; N. C. Outdoor Writers Association; N. C. Wildlife Federation; 
Atlantic Waterfowl Council, Chairman 1954, 1955, 1958 and 1959; 
Inteiiiational Association of Game, Fish and Conservation Com- 
missioners. President 1960; Southeastern Association of Game and 
Fish Commissioners, President 1952; Atlantic Flyway Repi'esenta- 
tive. National Waterfowl Council; Editor, Virginia Wildlife Maga- 
zine, 1946-1948. Co-author of "Wild Mammals of Virginia." Author 
of numerous articles in scientific and popular publications. Member 
Raleigh Lions Club. Member Raleigh Lodge No. 500, Ancient, Free 
and Accepted Masons. Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Infantry 
Reserve (ROTO. May 31, 1936; called to active duty with Air 
Force. June 1H41 ; served in European Theatre of Operations from 
August 1!)42 to September 1945; released from active duty as 
Lieutenant Colonel, March 1946; Reserve Officer at present. Execu- 
tive Di lector North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission since 
February 1. 194iS. Presbyterian; Elder; Clerk of Session; past 
president and teacher of adult Sunday School Class. Married Lucile 
Xadine Jennings, December 7. 1945. Address: 1101 Bancroft St., 
Raleigh. North Carolina. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 
SAM J. ERVIN, JK. 

UNITED STATES SENATOR 

Sam J. Ervin, Jr., Democrat, was born at Morganton. N. C, 
September 27, 1896; graduated from University of North Carolina 
with A.B. degree, 1917, and Harvard Law School with LL.B. de- 
gree, 1922; granted these honorary degrees: LL.D., University of 
North Carolina, 1951, LL.D., Western Carolina College, 1955, and 
D.P.A., Suffolk University, 1957; served in France with First 
Division in First World War; twice wounded in battle, twice cited 
for gallantry in action, and awarded French Fourragere. Purple 
Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster, Silver Star, and Distinguished Serv- 
ice Cross ; subsequently served in National Guard ; admitted to 
North Carolina Bar, 1919; practiced law at Morganton from 1922 
until present except during service on the bench; Representative 
from Burke County in the North Carolina Legislature, 1923, 1925, 
1931 ; Chairman, Burke County Democratic Executive Committee. 
1924; member North Carolina State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee, 1930-37; Judge. Burke County Criminal Court, 1935-37; 
Judge, North Carolina Superior Court, 1937-43; member North 
Carolina State Board of Law Examiners, 1944-46; Representative 
from the Tenth North Carolina District in the 79th Congress, 1946- 
47; Chairman, North Carolina Commission for the Improvement of 
the Administration of Justice, 1947-49; Associate Justice, North 
Carolina Supreme Court, February 3, 1948, until June 11, 1954. 
when he qualified as a U. S. Senator from North Carolina under 
appointment of Governor William B. Umstead as a successor to the 
late Clyde R. Hoey; returned to the U. S. Senate by the people of 
North Carolina at the election of 1954, 1956, and 1962 for addi- 
tional terms ending on January 2, 1969; delegate to Democratic 
National Conventions, 1956, 1960; Trustee, Morganton Graded 
Schools (1927-30), University of North Carolina (1932-35. 1945- 
46), and Davidson College (1948-58); chosen Morgantoms Man of 
the Year, 1954; Grand Orator, the Grand Lodge of Masons of 
North Carolina. 1963; Director, First National Bank of Morgan - 

533 



534 North Carolina Manual 

ton; member, American Bar Association. American Judicature 
Society, North Carolina Bar Association, North Carolina State 
Bar, Farm Bureau, Grange, Morganton Chamber of Commerce, 
Newcomen Society, North Carolina Wildlife Association, American 
Legion, Disabled American Veterans, Legion of Valor, Society of 
the First Division, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Veterans of the 
First World War, Royal Arch Masons, Royal and Select Masters, 
Knights Templar, Scottish Rite Masons 33d Degree, Shriners, 
Ahepa. Dokies. Junior Order, Knights of Pythias, Moose, American 
Historical Association, Burke County Historical Society, North 
Carolina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities, North Caro- 
lina Folklore Society, North Carolina Literary and Historical As- 
sociation, Roanoke Island Historical Association, Society of the 
Cincinnati, Society of Mayflower Descendants (State Governor, 
1950-52), Sons of the American Revolution, South Carolina His- 
torical Society, Southern Historical Association, Southern Political 
Science Association, Western North Carolina Historical Associa- 
tion, Morganton Kiwanis Club, General Alumni Association of the 
University of North Carolina (President, 1947-48), Morganton 
Presbyterian Church (Elder); cited by North Carolina Department 
of American Legion for "devotion to the Constitution," Patriotic 
Order of Sons of America for "great and inspiring public services," 
Genera] Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy 
for "defense of constitutional rights," awarded the Cross of Mili- 
tary Service by the United Daughters of the Confederacy, the 
Good Citizenship Medal by the Sons of the American Revolution, 
the Distinguished Citizenship Certificate by the North Carolina 
Citizens Association, and the Patriotic Service Medal by the 
American Coalition of Patriotic Societies. Married Margaret 
Bruce Bell of Concord, N. C, June 18, 1924; three children, Sam 
J. Ervin, III, Mrs. Gerald M. Hansler. and Mrs. Hallett S. Ward. 
Jr. Address: Morganton, N. C. 



B. EVERETT JORDAN 

UNITED STATES SENATOR 

B. Everett Jordan. Democrat, was born at Ramseur, N. C, Sep- 
tember 8, 1896. Son of Rev. Henry Harrison and Annie Elizabeth 
(Sellers) Jordan. Attended Rutherford College, N. C. Preparatory 



Senator B. Everett Jordan 



Fones i-'irst District 



fountain — Second District 



Henderson- Third District 



(Jardner — Fourth District 



(, liltl IllilklS Fifth )>lstl l:-| 



Kome-gay- Sixtl I >i-vi i i>i 




536 X < ) j : i n Carolina Manual 

School. 1**12-1913; Trinity College, 1914-1915. Organized Sellers 
Manufacturing Co. in 1927 and has served as Secretary-Treasurer 
since; also an official in several other textile manufacturing 
companies. Chairman North Carolina Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee. 1949-1954; Democratic National Committeeman from North 
Carolina. 19f> 1-1958; member North Carolina Peace Officers Benefit 
and Retirement Commission, 1943-1958; Chairman Board of Trus- 
tees. Alamance County General Hospital; Trustee American Uni- 
versity. Duke University and Elon College; officer of Alamance 
County TB Association and Alamance County Red Cross. Ro- 
tarian. Shriner, and recipient of Silver Beaver Scout Award. Ala- 
mance County Man of the Year, 1955. Served in Tank Corps. 
United States Army. 1918-1919, with occupation forces in Ger- 
many. 1919. Appointed by Governor Luther H. Hodges to the 
U. S. Senate, April 19, 1958, to succeed W. Kerr Scott, deceased. 
Elected Nov. 8. 1960 for full term ending January of 1967; re- 
elected Nov. 8. 1966 for full term ending January of 1973. Metho- 
dist; Lay Leader. 1935-1940; Chairman Board of Stewards, 1930- 
1950; Teacher Adult Bible Class, 1927-1958; Vice President Board 
of Methodist Colleges, 1952-1956. Married Katherine McLean of 
Gastonia. N. C, November 29, 1924. Children: Benjamin Everett. 
Rose Ai i Gant and John McLean. Address: Saxapahaw, N. C. 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS 
WALTER BEAMAN JONES 

(First District — Counties: Beaufort, Bertie, Camden, Chowan. 
Craven. Currituck, Dare, Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Jones, Martin. 
Northampton, Pamlico, Pasquotank. Perquimans, Pitt. Tyrrell and 
Washington. Population, 384,300.) 

Walter Beaman Jones, Democrat, was born in Fayetteville, N. C. 
August 19. 1913. Son of Walter G. and Fannie M. (Anderson i 
Jones. Attended Elise Academy, 1926-1930; North Carolina State 
College. B.S. in Education, 1934. Office equipment dealer. Director 
Farmville Savings & Loan Association; member Board of Com- 
missioner.-. Town of Farmville, 1947-1949; Mayor pro tern, 1947- 
194:'; Mayor Town of Farmville and Judge Farmville Recorder's 
Court. 1949-1953. Member Masonic Lodge; Scottish Rite: Rotary 
Club. President, 1949; Loyal Order of Moose; Junior Order; Elks 



Biographical Sketches 537 

Lodge. Trustee Campbell College. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1955, 1957 and 1959; State Senator, 1965. Elected to 
Eighty-ninth Congress in Special Election of Feb. 5, 1966 to fill 
unexpired term of the late Herbert C. Bonner. Re-elected to Ninetieth 
Congress, Nov. 8, 1966. Baptist; Deacon since 1945. Married Doris 
Long. April 26. 1934. Children: Mrs. James B. Fountain and Walter 
B. Jones. IT. Address : Farmville, N. C. 

LAWRENCE H. FOUNTAIN 

(Second District — Counties: Edgecombe, Franklin, Granville, 
Greene. Halifax, Johnston, Lenoir. Vance, Warren and Wilson 
Counties Population, 419,370.) 

Lawrence H. Fountain, Democrat, was born in the village of 
Leggett, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, April 23, 1913. Son 
of Sallie (Barnes) and the late Lawrence H. Fountain, Educated 
in the public schools of Edgecomb County and at the University of 
North Carolina. A.B. and LL.B. degrees. Active attorney-at-law 
from 1936 until elected to Congress. Member, local, and state 
Bar Associations; Kiwanis and Elks Clubs; Executive Com- 
mittee East Carolina Council Boy Scouts of America; Board of 
Trustees. Saint Andrews Presbyterian College, Laurinburg, N. C; 
former Jaycee; Reading Clerk North Carolina State Senate, 1936- 
1941; North Carolina State Senator, 1947-1952. World War II vet- 
eran of four years service. Elected to 83rd Congress; re-elected to 
84th, 85th. 86th, 87th, 88th, 89th and 90th Congresses. Member 
House Committees on Government Operations and Foreign Affairs; 
Chairman Intergovernmental Relations Subcommittee of Com- 
mittee on Government Operations and Neai East Subcommittee 
of Committee on Foreign Affairs, 34th-90th Congi esses. Presby- 
terian, Elder. Married Christine Dail of Mount Olive, N. C. One 
daughter. Nancy Dail Fountain. Address: Tarboro, N. C. 

DAVID NEWTON HENDERSON 

(Third District — Counties: Carteret, Duplin, Harnett, Lee, On- 
slow, Pender. Sampson and Wayne. Population, 377,293.) 

David Newton Henderson, Democrat, was born in Hubert, On- 
slow County. N. C. April 16, 1921. Attended Wallace High School. 
graduating in 193^: Davidson College. B.S., 1942: University of 



538 North Carolina Manual 

North Carolina Law School, LL.B., 1949. Lawyer. Member Duplin 
County Bar Association. Assistant General Counsel for Com- 
mittal- on Education and Labor, U. S. House of Representatives, 
19") 1-1 952; Solicitor Duplin County General County Court. 1953- 
195(5; Judge Duplin County General County Court, 1956-1960. Elected 
to 87th Congress, November 8, I960; re-elected November 6, 1962, 
November .">. 1964 and November 8, 1966. Member, House Com- 
mittee on Post Office and Civil Service; Committee on Public 
Works; Chairman, Subcommittee on Manpower Utilization. Mem- 
ber Lions Club, past President and past Deputy District Governor; 
Wallace Volunteer Fire Department (active for 11 years) ; Wallace 
Squadron Civil Air Patrol, Legal Officer; Wallace American Legion 
Post No. 156; English-Brown Post 9161, V.F.W. Member and past 
Master, Wallace Masonic Lodge, 32nd degree Mason. Commissioned 
Second Lieutenant in U. S. Air Force and served overseas in 
India, China, and Okinawa; discharged with rank of Major in 
1946. Member Wallace Presbyterian Church; Board of Deacons; 
Budget Committee; Sunday School Teacher; has conducted worship 
services in absence of ministers; Chairman of North Carolina 
Consolidated College (Laurinburg). Fund Campaign for the Wil- 
mington Presbytery. Married Mary Wellons Knowles of Wallace, 
N. C, December 11, 1942. Children: David Bruce, age 1»; Wiley 
Bryant, age 17; Wimbric Boney, age 13. Address: Wallace. X. C. 

JAMES CARSON GARDNER 

(Fourth District — Counties: Chatham, Montgomery. Moore. 
Nash, Orange, Randolph and Wake. Population, 416,477.) 

James Carson Gardner, Republican, was born in Rocky Mount, 
N. C, April 8, 1933. Son of James Cuthrell Gardner and Sue 
(Trenholm) Gardner. Attended Georgetown Preparatory School, 
1951; North Carolina State University, 1952-53 and L955-56. 
Elected to Ninetieth Congress, November 8, 1966. Chairman of 
North Carolina Republican Party, 1965-66. PFC in U. S. Army, 
1953-55. Member St. Andrews Episcopal Church of Rocky Mount; 
Lay Reader, 1963-66; Sunday School Superintendent. 1966. Mar- 
ried Marie Elizabeth Tyler, October 5, 1957. Children: Sue 
Elizabeth (Beth) born October 31, 1958; Marie Theresa (Terry), 
born May 24, 1962; and Christopher Tyler (Christ), born Aim! 
21. 1965. Address: 3404 Hawthorne Road. Rocky Mount. X. C. 



Bkhjisapiucal Sketchks 539 

NICK GALIFIANAKIS 

(Fifth District — Counties: Caswell, Durham, Forsyth, Person, 
Rockingham and Stokes. Population, 439,672.) 

Nick Galifianakis, Democrat, was born in Durham, N. C, July 
22, 1928. Son of Mike and Sophia (Kastrinakis) Galifianakis. Dur- 
ham High School, 1944-1947; Duke University, 1951, A.B. degree; 
Duke University Law School. 1953, LL.B. Lawyer; Delta Theta 
Phi Law Fraternity. Member of American Bar Association; mem- 
ber North Carolina State Bar; Durham County Bar; 14th Judicial 
District Bar; American Association of University Professors; 
American Hellenic Educational Progressive Association ; Young 
Democrat Club; Kiwanis Club. Recipient of 1963 Distinguished 
Service Award; recipient of 1963 North Carolina Outstanding 
Young Man of the Year Award. Active duty United States Marine 
Corps Reserve, October, 1953 to April, 1956; at present Major 
USMCR. Representative in the General Assembly of 1961, 1963 
and 1965. Elected to 90th Congress, November 8, 1966. Member St. 
Barbara's Church (Greek Orthodox), Durham, N. C. Married 
Louise Cheatham Ruggles of Durham, N. C, April 5, 1963. Ad- 
dress: 2648 University Drive, Durham, N. C; Mailing Address: 
N. C. National Bank Bldg., Durham. N. C. 



HORACE ROBINSON KORNEGAY 

(Sixth District — Counties: Alamance Davidson and Guilford. 
Population. 411,687.) 

Horace Robinson Kornegay, Democrat, was born in Asheville, 
N. C, March 12, 1924. Son of Marvin Earl and the late Blanche 
Person (Robinson) Kornegay. Attended Greensboro Senior High 
School. 1938-1941; Georgia School of Technology, 1943; Wake 
Forest College, B.S. degree, 1947; Wake Forest College Law 
School. LL.B. degree, 1949. Lawyer. Member Greensboro Bar 
Association; North Carolina Bar Association; North Carolina 
State Bar; American Bar Association; American Judicature So- 
ciety; Federal Bar Assoc, of Washington, D. C. Assistant Solici- 
tor for Guilford County, 1951-1953; Solicitor for Twelfth Solici- 
torial District of N. C, 1954-1960. Elected to 87th Congress, 



,40 Nobth Carolina Manual 

November 8, L960; re-elected to 88th Congress, November ->. 1962 
39th Congress, November 3, 1964 and to 90th Congress, Novem- 
ber 8, 1966. Presently serving on two major committees: House 
Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, and the House 
Committee on Veterans Affairs. Member Alpha Sigma Phi. social 
fraternity; Phi Delta Phi, legal fraternity; Omicron Delta Kappa, 
honorary fraternity; Masonic Order, Scottish Rite Bodies. Past 
President Young Democratic Club of Guilford County; President 
Young Democratic Clubs of North Carolina, 1953: Past Vice- 
President of Greensboro Junior Chamber of Commerce: Past Presi- 
dent of North Carolina Solicitor's Association. Member Board of 
Visitors Wake Forest Law School. Served in United States Army 
L943-1946; Machine Gunner in 100th Infantry Division; awarded 
1 ombat Infantryman's Badge, Purple Heart, and Bronze Star. 
Methodist; member Official Board, 1956-1959. Married Annie 
Hen Beale. March 25, 1950. Children: Horace Robinson Kornegay, 
Jr., Kathryn Elder Kornegay, and Martha Beale Kornegay. Ad- 
dress: 200 West Greemvav South, Greensboro. N. C. 



ALTON ASA LENNON 

(Seventh District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick. Columbus, 
Cumberland, Hoke, New Hanover, Robeson and Scotland Popula- 
tion, 448,933.) 

Alton Asa Lennon, Democrat, was born in Wilmington, N. C. 
August 17, 1906. Son of Rosser Y. and Minnie (High) Lennon. 
Attended New Hanover County Public Schools, 1913-1925; Wake 
Forest College, LL.B.. 1929. Lawyer. Former member New Han- 
over Bar Association; former member North Carolina Bar Asso- 
ciation; former member State Bar, Inc. President. New Hanover 
County Bar Association, 1953-1954; Judge, New Hanover County 
Recorder's Hour I, 1934-1942. State Senator in the General As- 
sembly of 1947 j.. id 1951. Served m the United States Senate 
from July 15, 1953 to November 29, 1954, by appointment of 
former Governor William B. Umstead. Elected to the 85th Congress 
in the General Election of November 6, 1956; re-elected to 86th 
Congress, November 4, 1958, to the 87th Congress, November 
8, L960, to 88th Congress, November 6, 1962, to 89th Congress, 
November 3, 1964 and to 90th Congress. November 8. 1966; mem- 



Senator Sarc J. Bifit.. Jr. 



Lennon- -Seventh District 



Jonas- Kighth District 



liroyhill — Xinth District 



Wliitener — Tenth District 











Taylor- Eleventh District 




\ 




.Ml' Nokth Carolina Manual 

her of Committees on Armed Services and Merchant Marine & 
Fisheries; Chairman of Subcommittee on Oceanography. Member 
Internationa] Order of Odd Fellows; Loyal Order of Moose. Mem- 
ber of First Baptist Church of Wilmington, N. C. Married Karine 
Welch, October 12, L933. Children: Mrs. Edna Lee Lennon Frost 
and Alton Yates Lennon. Address: Wilmington, N. C. 



CHARLES RAPER JONAS 

(Eighth District — Counties: Anson, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, Rich- 
mond and Union. Population, 409,759.) 

Charles Raper Jonas, Republican, was born in Lincoln County. 
X. C. December 9, 1904. Son of Charles Andrew and Rosa (Petrie) 
Jonas. Attended Lincolnton High School, 1918-1921; University 
of North Carolina, A.B., 1925; University of North Carolina Law 
School, J.D., 1928. Attorney at law. Member Lincoln County. 
North Carolina and American Bar Associations. President North 
Carolina Bar Association, 1946-1947. Member North Carolina Na- 
tional Guard since December 29, 1928; active duty in United States 
Army, 1941-1946. Elected to Congress from the Tenth North 
Carolina Congressional District, 1952, re-elected 1954, 1956, 1958. 
and 1960; and from Eighth Congressional District 1962, 1964 and 
1966. Methodist. Married Annie Elliott Lee, August 14, 1929. Chil- 
dren: Charles Jonas, Jr., and Richard Elliott Jonas. Address: 
Lincolnton. N. C. 



JAMES THOMAS BROYH1LL 

(Ninth District — Counties: Alleghany, Ashe, Cabarrus, Caldwell. 
Davie, Rowan, Stanly, Surry, Watauga, Wilkes and Yadkin. Pop- 
ulation, 419,416.) 

James Thomas Broyhill, Republican, was born in Lenoir, N. C. 
August 19, 1927. Son of James Edgar and Satie Leona (Hunt) 
Broyhill. Attended Lenoir Public Schools 1933-1946; graduated 
Lenoir High School, 1946; University of North Carolina, 1950. 
B.S. degree in Commerce. Before election to Congress was a fur- 
niture manufacturer; member Southern Furniture Manufacturers 



Biographical Sketches 543 

Association; North Carolina Forestry Association; Industrial 
Planning Committee of the North West North Carolina Develop- 
ment Association; past President and member of the Board of 
the Lenoir Chamber of Commerce, Member of City of Lenoir 
Recreation Commission; City of Lenoir Planning and Zoning 
Commission; Treasurer Caldwell County Republican Executive 
Committee. Young Man of the Year Award, Lenoir and Caldwell 
County, 1957. Member Hibriten Lodge No. 262, A.F. & A.M.; 
Oasis Temple of the Shrine; Loyal Order of the Moose, Lodge No. 
385. Elected to 88th Congress, Nov. 6, 1962; re-elected to 89th 
Congress. Nov. 3, 1964 and to 90th Congress, Nov. 8, 1966. Member 
of Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee of the House of 
Representatives, the Post Office and Civil Service Committee, 
and the Select Committee on Small Business. Member First Bap- 
tist Church of Lenoir. N. C; Sunday School Teacher since 1952. 
Married Louise Horton Robbins, Durham, N. C, June 2, 1951. 
Children: Marilyn Louise, born Oct. 15, 1952; James Edgar, II. 
born July 23, 1954; Philip Robbins. born May 16, 1956. Address: 
New Hickory Road. Lenoir, N. C. 



BASIL LEE WHITENER 

(Tenth District — Counties: Alexander, Avery, Burke, Catawba. 
Cleveland. Gaston and Iredell. Population, 409,174.) 

Basil Lee Whitener, Democrat, was born in York County, S. C. 
May 14, 1915. Son of Laura Barrett Whitener and the late Levi 
Whitener. Attended the public schools of Gaston County, gradu- 
ating from Lowell High School in 1931; Rutherford County Col- 
lege; University of South Carolina; Duke University, LL.B., 1937. 
Honorary Doctor of Laws, conferred by Belmont Abbey College, 
1960 and by Pfeiffer College in 1965. Admitted to North Carolina 
Bar in August of 1937 and immediately entered general practice 
in Gastonia; admitted to District of Columbia Bar in June, 1959. 
Member of American Bar Association; North Carolina Bar As- 
sociation; Gaston County Bar Association, President, 1950; Gen- 
eral Statutes Commission, 1946; Commission to Study Improvement 
of Administration of Justice, 1947-1949; Judicial Conference of 
Fourth Federal Judicial Circuit. Organizer and first President. 
Gastonia Junior Chamber of Commerce, 1938; Vice-President, N. C. 



:, 1 1 North Cakoi.ina Manval 

Junior Chamber of Commerce, 1940-1911 ; instructor, Beimont Abbey 
College, Belmont, X. C, 1938-1941 ; President. X. C. Junior Chamber 
of Commerce, 1941-1942; honorary life member of Gastonia Junior 
Chamber of Commerce; State President, Young Democratic Clubs 
of North Carolina, 1946-1947; Permanent Chairman. Young Demo- 
cratic National Convention at Chattanooga, Tenn.. November, 
L949; Chairman Speakers Bureau, Young Democratic ( 'lubs of 
America, 1948-1949; Chairman Advisory Committee of Young 
Democratic Chilis of America, 11)49-1951; Chairman. Board of 
Regional Directors of the Young Democratic Clubs of America. 
1.951. Delegate to 1948 and 1960 Democratic National Conventions. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1941; renominated in 
1942 but resigned to enter the U. S. Navy. Served as a gunnery 
officer in the U. S. Navy during World War II, being separated 
from service in November of 1945 with rank of Lieutenant. USXR 
now Major, PS AFP (ret.). Appointed Solicitor 14th Solicitorial 
District in January of 1946 and elected in November. 1946; re- 
elected in 1950 and 1954. Elected to 85th Congress, November 6, 
1956; re-elected November 1, 1958, November 8, 1960, November 
6, 1962, November '■>, 1964 and November 8, 1966. Member of 
Judiciary Committee and Committee on the District of Columbia. 
Member North Carolina Tercentenary Celebration Commission. 
MiMiiliT Kiwanis Club; Elks Club; American Legion; Forty and 
Eight; V.F.W.; 32nd degree Mason; York and Scottish Rite 
Bodies; Shriner. Awarded "Watchdog of Treasury" symbol in 
1966; awarded National Merit Medallion of Patriotic Order Sons 
of America at national convention in 1966. Member First Methodist 
Church of Gastonia; member Official Board. Married Harriet 
Priscilla Morgan of Union, S. C, September 26, 1942. Four chil- 
dren: John Morgan Whitener, born October 25, 1945; Laura Lee 
Whitener, horn August 15, 1950; Basil Lee Whitener. Jr., born 
October Pi, 1952; Barrett Simpson Whitener, born June 6, I960. 
Address: Gastonia, X. C. 

ROY A. TAYLOR 

(Eleventh District — Counties: Buncombe. Cherokee, Clay. Gra- 
ham. Haywood. Henderson, Jackson, McDowell. Macon, Madison. 
Mitchell. Polk, Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania and Yuncey. Pop- 
ulation, 120,074.) 



Biographical Sketches 545 

Roy A. Taylor, Democrat, was born in Vader, Washington, Jan- 
uary 31, 1910. Attended the public schools of Buncombe County; 
Asheville-Biltmore College; Maryville College; Asheville Univer- 
sity Law School. Admitted to the Bar in January of 1936. Bun- 
combe County Attorney. 1949-1960. Member Board of Trustees of 
Asheville-Biltmore College, 1949-1960; Lions Club. District Gov- 
ernor, 1952. Navy Combat Veteran World War II; served as Com- 
manding Officer of L. S. T. and discharged with rank of Lieuten- 
ant. Representative in the North Carolina General Assembly. 1947, 
1949, 1951 and 1953. Elected to Eighty-sixth Congress. June 25. 
I960; re-elected to Eighty-Seventh Congress, November 8, 1960, to 
Eighty-eighth Congress, November 6, 1962, to Eighty-ninth Con- 
gress, November 3, 1964 and to 90th Congress, November 8, 1966. 
Baptist; Deacon. Married Evelyn Reeves. Two children: Alan F. 
Taylor and Mrs. Toni Taylor Robinson. Address: Black Mountain. 
N. C. 



JUSTICES OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 
SUPREME COURT 

ROBERT HINT PARKER 

CHIEF JUSTICE 



Robert Hunt Parker, Democrat, was born in Enrield, N. C, 
February 15, 1892. Son of R. B. and Victoria C. (Hunt) Parker. 
Attended Enfield Graded School, graduating in 1908; University 
of North Carolina, 1908-1911; University of Virginia, 1911-1912, 
B.A.: University of Virginia Law School, 1912-1915, LL.B.; Wake 
Forest Law School, summer of 1914; honorary LL.D., University 
of North Carolina, 1958. Field artillery officer in World War I 
with nearly seventeen months of service in France. Representative 
from Halifax County in the General Assembly of 1923. Solicitor 
for the State Third Judicial District. February 23, 1924-September 
24. 1932; Judge Superior Court. September 24, 1932-November 25. 
1952, having been nominated and elected without opposition in 
1934. 1942 and 1950. Nominated in Democratic Primary of 
1952 for Associate Justice of the N. C. Supreme Court and elected 
November 4. 1952, assuming office November 25, 1952; re-elected 
for a term of eight years, November 8, 1960. Chairman of the 
Judicial Council, March, 1962 to February 7, 1966. On February 
5. 19(Ui. appointed by Governor Dan K. Moore to be Chief Justice 
of the North Carolina Supreme Court to serve until January 1, 
1967 (Constitution of North Carolina, Article IV, Section 17) 
upon the retirement of Chief Justice Emery B. Denny. Took the 
oaths of office on February 7, 1966. Nominated without opposition 
for a full term of eight years as Chief Justice and elected without 
opposition to that office in the General Election om November 8, 
1966. Member Confederate Centennial Commission; Governor 
Richard Caswell Memorial Commission; American Legion; 40 
& 8; Veterans of Foreign Wars. Episcopalian. Married Mrs. Rie 
Williams Rand of Greensboro, N. C, November 28, 1925. Home 
address: Roanoke Rapids. N. C. Official address: Raleigh, N. C. 

54(i 



Biographk ai. Sketches .")47 

WILLIAM HAYWOOD BOBBITT 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

William Haywood Bobbitt, Democrat, was born in Raleigh. X. ('.. 
October 18, 1900. Son of James Henry and Eliza May (Burkhead) 
Bobbitt. Attended graded schools of Baltimore, Md.; Charlotte 
High School of Charlotte, N. C, 1913-1917; University of North 
Carolina, A.B., 1921; University of North Carolina School of Law. 
1920-1921. Licensed to practice law January 30, 1922: associated 
with firm of Stewart & McRae until September 1, 1922; member 
of firm of Parker, Stewart, McRae & Bobbitt from September 1. 
1922 to October 1, 1925; member of firm of Stewart, McRae & 
Bobbitt from October 1, 1925 to October 1, 1930; member of firm of 
Stewart & Bobbitt from October 1. 1930 through December 31. 
1938; admitted to practice in State Courts of North Carolina. 
United States District Court. United States Circuit Court of 
Appeals, Fourth Circuit, and the Supreme Court of the United 
States. Member Mecklenburg County Bar Association: North 
Carolina Bar Association; American Bar Association; American 
Judicature Society. Received honorary LL.D. degTees: Davidson 
College, 1953, and University of North Carolina, 1957. Member 
N. C. Commission to study Improvement of Administration of 
Justice in N. C, 1947-1949; N. C. Judicial Council, 1949-1954: 
Past President and life member of Charlotte Civitan Club: Trustee 
of Brevard College, 1933-1952; President, General Alumni Associa- 
tion, University of North Carolina. 1954-1955. Elected resident 
Superior Court Judge of the 14th Judicial District in 1938 and 
again in 1946; served as Superior Court Judge continuously from 
January 1, 1939 through January. 1954; appointed by Governor 
William B. Umstead as Associate Justice, North Carolina Supreme 
Court, February 1, 1954, and served under such appointment until 
1954 General Election; elected without opposition in 1954 Gen- 
eral Election to unexpired portion of term of former Associate 
Justice Barnhill and for full eight-year term beginning January 
1, 1955; elected without opposition 1962 General Election for eight- 
year term beginning January 1, 1963. Member Dilworth Methodist 
Church, Charlotte, N. C. Married Sarah Buford Dunlap (now 
deceased), February 28, 1924. Children: Mrs. John YY. Carter. 
Morganton, N. C; Wm. H. Bobbitt, Jr., Charlotte, N. C; Mrs. 
Ekkehart Sachtler, Midland Park. \ T . J.: Mis. D. S. Moss. Enfield. 



548 Nokth Cabolina Manual 

X. C. H':.« address: Charlotte, N. ('. Official address: Raleigh, 
X. C. 



CARLISLE WALLACE HIGGINS 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Carlisle Wallace Higgins, Democrat, was born at Eunice, N. C. 
October IT. 1889. Son of Martin A. and Jennie C. (Bledsoe) Hig- 
gins. Attended Bridle Creek Academy. Independence, Va., 1905- 
1908: University of North Carolina. A.B., 1912; University of 
North Carolina Law School, 1913-1914. Member North Carolinq 
Bar Association: North Carolina State Bar. Solicitor Eleventh 
Judicial District. 1930-1934; United States Attorney. Middle 
District of North Carolina, 1934-1945. Assistant Chief and Acting 
Chief International Prosecution Section. International Military 
Tribunal. Tokyo. 1945-1947. Representative from Alleghany County 
in the General Assembly of 1925 and State Senator from the 
Twenty-ninth Senatorial District in the General Assembly of 192i». 
Appointed Associate Justice Supreme Court of North Carolina by 
Governor Umstead, June 8. 1954 to succeed Sam J. Ervin, Jr. 
Re-elected to full eight-year term ending Dec. 31. 1966; re-elected 
for full eight-year term beginning January 1. 1967 and ending 
October -HI. 1**74. Member Masonic Lodge; American Legion; Forty 
and Eight. Methodist. Married Myrtle Bryant. Children: C. W. 
Higgins. Jr.. Galax. Virginia; Mrs. Mary Cecile Bridges. Greens- 
boro. X. ' . Official address. Raleigh. N. C. 



SUSIE MARSHALL SHARP 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Susie Marshall Sharp, Democrat, was born in Rocky Mount. 
X. ('.. July 7. 1907. Daughter of James M. and Annie Britt (Black- 
well) Sharp. Attended Reidsville Public Schools, 1913-1924; North 
Carolina College for Women, 1924-1926; University of North 
Carolina Law School, 1926-1929. LL.B. Licensed to practice law 
in H»2s. Member of firm of Sharp and Sharp, Reidsville, N. C. 
1929-1949: City Attorney. Reidsville. N. C, 1939-1949. Membei 



Cliief Justm J -riser 



Justice Bobuiv 



Justice Higgm* 



Justice Shan 



Justice Lafl* 




^tt§£ 



justice Plest 



Justice BrajHtj 




550 Noktu C.vrouna Maxuat, 

Ninth Carolina Bar Association; American Bar Association; 
American Law Institute; N. C. Constitutional Commission of 
L959; Order of the Coif; Order of Valkyries. Honorary member 
of Phi Beta Kappa; Altrusa Club, Soroptimist Club; Delta Kappa 
Gamma; American Business Women's Association, and Raleigh 
Woman's Club. Received honorary degrees: Women's College, 
U. N. C, LL.D., 1950; Pheiffer College, LH.D., 1960; Queens Col- 
lege, LL.D., 1902; Elon College. LL.D., 1963; Wake Forest 
College, LL.D. 1965. Received Achievement Citation, X. C. Federa- 
tion of Business & Professional Women's Clubs, 1959; Distin- 
guished Service Award for Women, Chi Omeg-a, 1959. Special 
Judge Superior Court of North Carolina, 1949-1902. Appointed 
Associate Justice North Carolina Supreme Court by Governor 
Terry Sanford, March 14, 1902, and served under such appoint- 
ment until 1902 General Election; elected 1902 General Election 
to unexpired portion of term of former Associate Justice Emery 
B. Denny (to November 1966); re-elected 1900 General election 
for a term of 8 years. Methodist. Home address: 629 Lindsey 
Street, Reidsville, N. C. Official address: Raleigh. X. C 



ISAAC BEVERLY LAKE 

ASSOCIATE .Il'STICE 

Isaac Beverly Lake, Democrat, was born in Wake Fores:. X. C. 
Son of James Ludwell and Lula Austin (Caldwell) Lake. Attended 
Wake Forest Public School, 1915-1921; Wake Forest College, B.S. 
degree, 1925; Harvard University, School of Law, LL.B., 1929; 
Columbia University, School of Law, LL.M., 1940, J.S.D., 1947. 
Member American Bar Association; X. C. Bar Association; Wake 
County Bar Association. Author of •'Discrimination by Railroads 
and other Public Utilities"; "North Carolina Practice Methods"; 
numerous articles in Law Reviews. Appointed Associate -Justice, 
North Carolina Supreme Court, August of 1965 to succeed Associate 
■Justice William B. Rodman, Jr.; elected for full eight-year term. 
November 8, 1966. Baptist. Married Gertrude M. Bell, September 3, 
L932. One son, I. Beverly Lake. Jr. Address: 10:! N. Mail Street, 
Wake Forest, X. C. 



Biographical Sketches 551 

JAMES WILLIAM PLESS, JR. 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

James William Pless, Jr., Democrat, was born in Brevard, N. C, 
July 1, 1898. Son of James William and Annie Ellis (Miller) 
Pless. Attended Marion (N. C.) High School, graduated, 1913; 
Davidson College and University of North Carolina, 1913-1917; 
Law School, University of North Carolina, 1918-1919. Member 
North Carolina Bar Assn., past Vice President; American Bar 
Assn.; Kiwanis Club, past President; Marion Lake Club, past 
President; Sons of Confederate Veterans; Sons American Revolu- 
tion; American Legion, past Commander; National Lawyers Club, 
Washington, D. C; Masons, past Master; Pythians; Sigma Nu; 
Phi Delta Phi, National President, 1933-1935, Chief Justice and 
member of its Court of Appeals, 1935-1951. Solicitor, 18th Judi- 
cial District, 1924-1934, youngest Solicitor in State when 
appointed; Judge Superior Court, 18th and 29th Districts, 1934- 
1966, youngest Superior Court Judge when appointed; served 
longer as regular Judge of Superior Court than any one; elected 
for longer period without Democratic or Republican opposition 
than any one; President Conference of Superior Court Judges, 
1954-1960. Received John J. Parker Award of N. C. Bar Associa- 
tion, 1963; member N. C. Judicial Council, 1954-1966. Practiced 
law, Marion, N. C. with firm of Pless, Winborne & Pless, later 
Pless Winborne, Pless & Proctor, 1919-1934. Corporal, U.S. Army, 
1918. Member First Methodist Church, Marion, N. C; Trustee. 
Married Marjorie Neal Kirby, June 15, 1922. Children: James 
William Pless, III (deceased), Ann Neal (Mrs. R. T. Lunger), 
Marjorie Kirby (Mrs. C. C. Fesperman, Jr.), and Alan Davidson 
Pless. Address: 304 Viewpoint Drive, and Lake Tahoma, Marion, 
N. C. 



JOSEPH BRANCH 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Joseph Branch, Democrat, was born in Enfield, N. C, July 5, 
1915. Son of James C. and Laura (Applewhite) Branch. Attended 
Enfield High School, 1932; Wake Forest College, LL.B. degree, 



552 North Carolina Manual 

1938. Lawyer. Member Halifax County Bar Association; N. C. 
Bar Association; N. C. State Bar; Masonic Order; Enfield Lions 
Club, President, 1941; Board of Trustees of Wake Forest College 
for many years; Board of Wesleyan College, Rocky Mount, for 
one year. Representative in N. C. General Assembly, 1947, 1949, 
1951 and 1953. Served as Legislative Counsel for Gov. Luther 
Hodges, 1957; Campaign Manager, Gov. Dan Moore, 1964; Legis- 
lative Counsel for Gov. Moore, 1965 Session of General Assembly. 
Chairman, Democratic Party, Halifax County, 1957-1963; Dele- 
gate to National Convention, 1956. Appointed by Gov. Dan K. 
Moore as Associate Justice, N. C. Supreme Court, July 21, 1966. 
and served under such appointment until 1966 General Election; 
elected in 1966 to unexpired portion of term of former Associate 
Justice Clifton L. Moore. Served in Armed Forces of the United 
States from 1943 to 1945. Member Hayes Barton Baptist Church, 
Raleigh, N. C; served as Deacon, Enfield Baptist Church, and as 
Sunday School Teacher for 25 years. Married Frances Jane 
Kitchen, December 7, 1946. One daughter, Frances Jane, and one 
son, James C. Home address: Enfield, N. C; Official address: 
Raleigh, N. C. 



MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

SENATORS 

DALLAS L. ALFORD, JR. 

(Eighth Senate District — Counties: Johnston, Nash and Wilson. 
Two Senators.) 

Dallas L. Alford, Jr., Democrat, of Nash County, representing 
the Eighth Senatorial District, was born in Durham, N. C. Son 
of Dallas Lloyd Alford, Sr., and Sally Kate (Pope) Alford. At- 
tended Durham High School; Duke University. Realtor. Owner 
and operator of Alford Insurance & Realty Company; Past Presi- 
dent Rocky Mount Realtors Association and Rocky Mount Mutual 
Insurance Agents Association. Member Board of Aldermen, City of 
Rocky Mount, 1939-1942; Nash County Board of Commissioners, 
1948-1958, Chairman, 1952-1958; North Carolina Traffic Safety 
Authority, 1966. Chairman Nash County Board of Health, 1952- 
1958; Chairman of the Commission to study Welfare Problems for 
the State of North Carolina, 1962. Mutual Insurance Agent of the 
Year for North and South Carolina, 1966-1967. Member Com- 
mission for the Study of Revenue Structure of the State, 1957- 
1958; member Lodge 1038, B.P.O.E.; 40 and 8; Kiwanis Club; 
Benvenue Country Club, Rocky Mount, N. C; Delta Sigma Phi 
Social Fraternity. Lt. Commander U. S. Navy, 1942-1946. Past 
President North Carolina Junior Chamber of Commerce, Rocky 
Mount Junior Chamber of Commerce and North Carolina County 
Commissioners Association; Director Peoples Bank & Trust Com- 
pany, Rocky Mount, N. C. ; Citizens Savings & Loan Association, 
Rocky Mount, N. C. and Rocky Mount Chamber of Commerce. 
Chairman Twin County Law Enforcement Executive Committee; 
Commander American Legion, 1948. State Senator in the General 
Assembly of 1959, 1961 and 1965. Methodist; member Official 
Board of First Methodist Church, Rocky Mount, N. C, 1938-1965. 
Married Margarette Glenn Griffin, November 17, 1945. Children: 
Dallas L., Ill, Benjamin G., Margarette G. and Catherine Eliza- 
beth. Address: 100 Wildwood Avenue, Rocky Mount, N. C. 

553 



55 I Nor mi C ^roi i\\ Maki m 

JOHN FRANKLIN ALLEN 

(Nineteenth Senate District — Counties: Davidson, Montgomery, 
Moore, Richmond and Scotland. Two Senators.) 

John Franklin Allen, Democrat, of Montgomery County, rep- 
resenting the Nineteenth Senatorial District, was born in Mont- 
gomery County, N. C, March 12, 1927, Son of Barna and Mary 
(Galloway) Allen. Attended Star Elementary and High School, 
1932-1943. Building contractor and nursing home administrator. 
Member Masonic Lodge, Scottish Right Bodies, Shriner and Elks. 
Past Master, Biscoe Lodge Number 437, 1965. Served in the U. S. 
Navy, March 12, 1945 to July 15, 1945. Presbyterian: member of 
Star Presbyterian Church, Elder for 17 years. Married Jean 
Maness, March 12, 1946. Children: Fred, Ray and Kerry. Address: 
Box 8, Biscoe, North Carolina. 



JULIAN RUSSELL ALLSBROOK 

(Fourth Senate District — Counties: Edgecombe, Halifax, Pitt 
and Warren. Two Senators.) 

Julian Russell Allsbrook, Democrat, of Halifax County, repre- 
senting the Fourth Senatorial District, was born in Roanoke 
Rapids, N. C, February 17, 1903. Son of William Clemens and 
Bennie Alice (Waller) Allsbrook. Graduated from Roanoke Rapids 
Public Schools in 1920; University of North Carolina, 1920-1924; 
University of North Carolina Law School, 1922-1924; President, 
student body, 1923-1924; permanent Vice President, Class of 1924. 
Lawyer. Member Halifax County Bar Assn.; North Carolina Bar 
Assn.; North Carolina and United States Supreme Court Bars. 
Presidential Elector from Second Congressional District, 1936; 
former member Board of Trustees Roanoke Rapids School Dis- 
trict; Board of City Commissioners of Roanoke Rapids for one 
term. State Senator in the General Assembly of 1935, 1947, 1949, 
1951 and 1965; Representative from Halifax County in the General 
Assembly of 1941; Democratic nominee to State Senate, 1942; 
resigned to enter U. S. Naval Reserve as Lieutenant, 1942, and 
served until placed on inactive duty, 1945; now Lieutenant Com- 
mander, U. S. Naval Reserve. Chairman, Committee on Platform 
and Resolutions, State Democratic Convention, 1956-1958. Re- 



Biographical Sketches :>">.', 

ceived the 1965 North Carolina Public Health Association Award 
for Distinguished Service Citation for genuine interest in public 
health needs of citizens in all walks of life throughout North 
Carolina and for unselfish and untiring efforts in promoting the 
programs in Public Health that would meet these needs. Appointed 
as delegate to Southern Regional Education Board Legislative 
Work Conference by Governor Moore, held in Asheville, N. C, 
July, 1966. Member Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity; Golden 
Fleece; Order of the Grail; Tau Kappa Alpha Debating Frater- 
nity; American Legion; Woodmen of the World; Roanoke Rapids 
Kiwanis Club; Mason, Widow's Lodge No. 519. Director, Medical 
Foundation of North Carolina, Inc. Past member North Carolina 
Committee on Nursing and Patient Care; Trustee North Carolina 
Symphony, Inc. Secretary, State Municipal Road Commission; 
Trustee, Chowan College, Murfreesboro, N. C. Baptist. Married 
Frances Virginia Brown (now deceased) of Garysburg, N. C, 
June 24, 1926. Children: Richard Brown, Mary Frances and Alice 
Harris. Address: Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

JESSE HINNANT AUSTIN, JR. 

(Eighth Senate District — Counties: Johnston, Nash and Wilson. 
Two Senators.) 

Jesse Hinnant Austin, Jr., Democrat, of Johnston County, repre- 
senting the Eighth Senatorial District, was born in Raleigh, N. C, 
February 13, 1930. Son of Jesse H., Sr. and Blanche O. (Godwin) 
Austin. Attended Clayton Public Schools; Oak Ridge Military 
Institute; N. C. State University, B.S. degree, Agricultural Edu- 
cation, 1953. Farmer. Member Board of Directors, Clayton Mer- 
chants Assn.; Johnston County Board of Commissioners, 1962-1966; 
Masons; Civitan Club; past President, Clayton Rotary Club; 
President, Clayton Industrial Development Assn. Served in U. S. 
Navy, Korean War. Member First Baptist Church, Clayton. Mar- 
ried Helen Canady, 1950. Children: Jesse, III, 13; Kimberly Dale, 
11, and Candy, 6. Address: Rt. 2, Clayton, N. C. 

HARRY STROMAN BAGNAL 

(Twenty-second Senate District — County: Forsyth. Two Sen- 
ators.) 



556 North Carolina Mam \i 



Hairy Stroman Bagnal, Republican, of Forsyth County, repre- 
senting the Twenty-second Senatorial District, was born in Win- 
ston-Salem, N. C, May 5, 1928. Son of Luther N. and Susie 
(Lofton) Bagnal. Attended Reynolds Hij?h School, 1941-1945; The 
Citadel, A.B. degree, 1949. Secretary-Treasurer, Bagnal Lumber 
Company. Served in U.S. Army, 1950-1952, 1st Lieutenant. Mem- 
ber First Baptist Church ; Deacon ; Sunday School Teacher, fifteen 
years. Married Anne Elizabeth Broyles, April 4, 1959. Children: 
Harry S., Jr.; David C; Alice Anne, and Mary Loften Bagnal. 
Address: Route 1, Murray Road, Winston-Salem, N. C. 27106. 

JAMES RUFFIN BAILEY 

(Twelfth Senate District — County: Wake. Two Senators.) 

James Ruffin Bailey, Democrat, of Wake County, representing 
the Twelfth Senatorial District, was born in Jacksonville, N. C, 
April 13, 1919. Son of Isaac Mayo and Ida (Thompson) Bailey. 
Attended Needham B. Broughton High School, Raleigh, N. C, 
1936; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, A.B. degree, 
1941; University of North Carolina Law School, LL.B., 1948. 
Lawyer. Member of Wake County Bar Association ; North Carolina 
Bar Association; North Carolina State Bar. Member Raleigh Ro- 
tary Club, President 1965-66; Pi Kappa Alpha, President Tau 
Chapter, 1940-1941; District President Pi Kappa Alpha, 1952- 
1953; Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity. Served in United States 
Army Air Force, 1941-1945; Lieutenant Colonel United States 
Air Force Reserve. State Senator in the General Assembly of 1965. 
Member Good Shepherd Episcopal Church, Raleigh, N.C.; member 
of Vestry, 1950-1952, 1954-1956, 1961-1963; Junior Warden, 1956, 
1963. Married Nelle Rousseau, January 18, 1945. Children: James 
Ruffin Bailey, Jr., age 14 and Jane Rousseau Bailey, age 10. 
Address: 2502 Kenmore Drive, Raleigh. North Carolina. 

JOHN RAY BOGER, JR. 

(Twenty-fourth Senate District — Counties: Anson, Cabarrus, 
Stanly and Union. Two Senators.) 

John Ray Boger, Jr., Democrat, of Cabarrus County, repre- 
senting the Twenty-fourth Senatorial District, was born in Con- 



obert \V. Scott 
President of the Senate 



lford of Nash 
Allen of Montgomery 
Allsbrook of Halifax 



ustin of Johnston 
Bagnal of Forsyth 
Bailey of Wake 



oger of Cabarrus 
Bridgers of Edgecombe 
Briggs of Buncombe 



rumby of Cherokee 
Bryan of Wilkes 
Buchanan of Henderson 



urney of New Hanover 
Byrd of Burke 
Coggins of Wake 




;,;>s Nok'j n CAitoJ ina Mani \i 

cord, X. ('.. April 2, 1929. Son of John Ray and Jessie (Bost) 
Boger. Attended Concord City Schools; graduated from Concord 
High School, 191(5; Duke University, B.A., 1950; Duke University 
School of Law, LL.B., 1952. Lawyer. President Cabarrus County 
Bar Assn.; member North Carolina Bar Assn.; North Carolina 
State Bar. President, Cabarrus County Young Democratic Club, 
L959-1960; member Kappa Sigma, social fraternity and Delta 
Theta Phi, legal fraternity. Author "Taxation of Renunciations of 
Interests in Decedents' Estates under the Federal Estate and Gift 
Taxes," Duke Bar Journal, Volume 2, No. 1, December, 1951. 
Served in U. S. Army, 1953-1956; First Lieutenant, Judge Advo- 
cate General's Corps. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1961. Methodist; Sunday School Teacher, 1956-1957, 1964-1966; 
Superintendent of Junior Department, 1959-1960; member of Of- 
ficial Board. Married Miriam Leake Morris, July 18, 1959. One son: 
John Ray Boger, III, born July 24, 1960. Address: 101 Louise 
Drive, S.E., Concord, N. C. 

HERBERT VINSON BRIDGERS 

(Fourth Senate District — Counties: Edgecombe, Halifax, Pitt 
and Warren. Two Senators.) 

Herbert Vinson Bridgers, Democrat, of Edgecombe County, 
representing the Fourth Senatorial District, was born in Conway, 
N. C, May 8, 1919. Son of H. A. and Mary (Vinson) Bridgers. 
Attended Enfield High School, Class of 1935; University of North 
Carolina, B.S. Commerce 1942; U. N. C. Law School, LL.B, 1948. 
Attorney. Member of Nash-Edgecombe Bar Association; N. C. 
Bar Association; American Trial Lawyers Association. Served in 
the U. S. Marine Corps, 1941-1946; Major in U.S.M.C.R. (Retired). 
Episcopalian. Married Katherine Boone, 1948. One son, Vinson 
Bridgers, Jr. Address: 612 Lucille Drive, Tai'boro, N. C. 

BRUCE BLIRRY BRIGGS 

(Thirty-first Senate District — Counties: Buncombe, Madison, 
Mitchell and Yancey. Two Senators.) 

Bruce Burry Briggs, Republican, of Buncombe County, repre- 
senting- the Thirty-first Senatorial District, was born in Mars Hill, 



Biographical Sketches 559 

N. C, June 20, 1937. Son of Clarence W. and Eula (Burry) Briggs. 
Attended Mars Hill High School, graduated, 1955; Mars Hill 
College; Western Carolina College; Wake Forest College Law 
School, LL.B., 1962. Lawyer. Member North Carolina State Bar; 
Buncombe County Bar Assn.; American Trial Lawyers Assn.; 
Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity, Justice, 1961-1962, "Most Out- 
standing Member Award," 1962, delegate to National Convention, 
1960. Chairman of Madison County Republican Executive Com- 
mittee, 1962-1964; member N. C. Republican Executive Committee, 
1962-1964; Chairman, 11th Congressional District, 1966 (Repub- 
lican); member Central Committee, N. C. Republican Party; 11th 
District Vice Chairman, N. C. Young Republican Club, 1966. At- 
tained rank of Sp-4, E-4, North Carolina National Guard, 1962- 
1965; presently member U. S. Army Reserve. Listed in "Who's 
Who in American Politics." Member Calvary Baptist Church. 
Single. Address: 28 Sunset Drive, Asheville, N. C; mailing ad- 
dress: P. O. Box 7471, Asheville, N. C. 



MARY FAYE BRUMBY 

(Thirty-third Senate District — Counties: Cherokee, Clay, Gra- 
ham, Jackson, Macon, Swain and Transylvania. One Senator.) 

Mary Faye Brumby, Democrat, of Cherokee County, representing 
the Thirty-third Senatorial District was born in Marietta, Georgia, 
May 11, 1912. Daughter of William H. and Lillian Truman (Gro- 
gan) Martin. Attended Marietta High School, 1929-1933; Young 
Harris College, 1955, Associate Arts degree; Western Carolina 
College, 1962, B.S. in Elementary Education. Manufacturer. Mem- 
ber Business and Professional Women's Club; "Woman of the 
Week" of Cherokee County, August, 1964, Asheville Citizen, Ashe- 
ville, N. C. Author of poems in various newspapers and Anthology 
of Verse called "Christmas Lyrics," 1939, by Beacon Publications, 
New York. Officer in P.T.A. and Business and Professional Wo- 
men's Club, 1963. Served as President of the Murphy Garden Club 
for two years; elected Assistant District Director of Garden Clubs 
in local District I, September, 1964. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1965. Member of International Platform Association; 
National Society of State Legislators; Order of Women Legis- 



..tin \ni; i ii Carolijn \ Manual 

lators; N. C. Council on Mental Retardation; Governor's Ad- 
visory Committee on Beautification ; The Western Carolina Asso- 
ciation Communities; Legislative Co-Chairman of N. C. Garden 
Clubs. Presbyterian; Assistant Superintendent of Sunday School, 
L964; District Chairman, 1960; Pi'esident, Women of the Church, 
L950; Sunday School Teacher for several years. Married Edward 
Hunt Brumby, Sr., September 23, 1934. Two daughters, Mrs. Mary 
Bolan Forrest and Mrs. Ida Hunt Townson; one son, Edward 
Hunt Brumby, Jr. Address: Box <>, Murphy, N. C. 



THOMAS K. BRYAN 

( Twenty-fifth Senate District — Counties: Davie. Watauga, 
Wilkes and Yadkin. One Senator.) 

Thomas R. Bryan, Republican, of Wilkes County, representing 
the Twenty-fifth Senatorial District, was born in Traphill, N. C. 
Attended high school at Traphill; Wilkesboro High School; Berea 
College; John Randolph Neal College of Law in Knoxville, Ten- 
nessee. Lawyer. Licensed to practice in Supreme Court of North 
Carolina. U. S. District Court, U. S. Circuit Court and U. S. 
Supreme Court. Father, grandfather and great grandfather have 
been elected to the North Carolina General Assembly from Wilkes 
County. Past Master of Wilkesboro Masonic Lodge and holds 
honorary membership in every Masonic lodge in Wilkes County. 
Member Church of Christ. Married Dell Dean Bryan from Walker 
County, Alabama. Children : Three sons and three daughters. 
Address: 500 W. Main Street, Wilkesboro, N. C. 



HARRY EUGENE BUCHANAN 

(Thirty-second Senate District — Counties; Haywood. Henderson 
and Polk. One Senator, > 

Harry Eugene Buchanan, Democrat, of Henderson County, rep- 
resenting the Thirty-second Senatorial District, was born in 
Sylva, N. C, September 3, 1898. Son of Marcellus and Laura Belle 
(Leatherwood) Buchanan. Attended Trinity Park School, Durham, 
X. C, 1912-1913; W.N.C. College, 1913-1914; U.N.C., Chapel Hill, 
1914-1915. City Manager, N. C. Theatres, Inc. Chairman, City of 



Biographical Sketcuks 561 

Hendersonville ABC Board; Director Theatre Owners Assn. of 
N. C. and S. C. since 1925; Director, Carolina Motor Club, Char- 
lotte, N. C. ; Chairman, Cherokee Historical Assn. Member Hen- 
dersonville Lodge, B.P.O.E. #1616, Exalted Ruler, 1939-1940. 
Mayor City of Sylva, N. C, 1931-1932. Member N. C. State High- 
way Commission, 1953-1957. Methodist. Married Pearle Long, 
June 19, 1923. Children: Jean Buchanan, Nashville, Tenn.; Mrs. 
C. W. Porter, Hendersonville, N. C. ; Harry E. Buchanan, Jr., 
Atlanta, Ga.; Pearle Buchanan, Hendersonville, N. C. Address: 
1205 Hyman Avenue, Hendersonville, N. C. 



JOHN JAY BURNEY, JR. 

(Tenth Senate District — Counties: Duplin, New Hanover, 
Pender and Sampson. Two Senators.) 

John Jay Burney, Jr., Democrat, of New Hanover County, rep- 
resenting the Tenth Senatorial District, was born in Wilmington, 
N. C, October 5, 1924. Son of John Jay and Effie Mae (Barefoot) 
Burney. Attended New Hanover High, Class of 1943; Wake Forest 
College, B.S. 1950; Wake Forest College Law School, LL.B., 1951. 
Lawyer. Member of New Hanover County Bar Association; N. C. 
Bar Association; American Bar Association. Member of Elks, 
Mason, Shriner, American Legion, Forty and Eight, Wilmington 
Chamber of Commerce; Board of Trustees Sudan Temple. One of 
North Carolina's Outstanding Young Democrats, 1959. District 
Solicitor of Eighth Solicitorial District, 1954-1963. Staff Sergeant 
Co. A, 254 Infantry 63rd Infantry Division; awarded the Bronze 
Star Medal and Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster. Presbyterian. 
Married Catherine Elizabeth Evans, December 20, 1947. Children: 
Deborah Salinda, John Jay, III, and William Shaw. Address: 720 
Forest Hills Drive, Wilmington, N. C. 



JOE KINCAID BYRD 

(Twenty-eighth Senate District — Counties: Burke and Caldwell. 
One Senator.) 

Joe Kincaid Byrd, Democrat, of Burke County, representing the 
Twenty-eighth Senatorial District, was born in Morganton, N. C, 



562 Nok III (' \i;oi.i \ \ Al A\ I Al 

December 28, L923. Son of Elva Leslie (Duckworth) Byrd and the 
late K. H. Byrd. Attended Drexel High School, graduating, 1941; 
Berea College, Berea, Ky., 1941-1942; University of North Carolina, 
A.B., 1947; University of North Carolina Law School, LL.B., 1950. 
Lawyer. Member Burke County Bar Assn.; 25th Judicial Bar 
Assn.; North Carolina Bar Assn.; United States Supreme Court 
Bar. Solicitor Burke County Criminal Court, 1951-1954. Member 
Governor's Speaker's Bureau of Traffic Safety Council, 1956-1958; 
Governor's Committee to Study Needs of the Mentally Retarded 
in North Carolina. 1962-1963; Council on Mental Retardation, 
1963-1965; Drexel School Committee, 1955-1956. President, Berea 
College Thermal Belt (N. C. and S. C.) Alumni Assn., 1956-1958. 
Member Lovelady Lodge #670, A.F. & A.M.; Delta Theta Phi; 
Drexel Lions Club, President. 1956; charter member Morganton 
Jaycees; Board of Management, Drexel Foundation, Inc., Chair- 
man, 11)64-1965; Burke County Morehead Scholarship Committee. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1959; State Senator 
in the General Assembly, Extra Session of 1963. Served in 84th 
Infantry Division in World War II, now Major in Army Reserve. 
Baptist; Deacon; Men's Sunday School Teacher since 1950; Trus- 
tee South Mountain Baptist Camp. Married Gleta Ruby Harris, 
May 11, 1947. Four sons and three daughters. Address: Bvrd 
Street. Drexel, N. C. 



JYLES JACKSON COGGINS 

(Twelfth Senate District—County: Wake. Two Senators.) 

Jyles Jackson Coggins, Democrat, of Wake County, representing 
the Twelfth Senatorial District, was born in Iredell County, N. C, 
January 10, 1921. Son of James Lee and Jeanette (Arney) Coggins. 
Attended Central High School, Iredell County, graduated 1939; 
University of North Carolina, 1939-1940; North Carolina State 
College, 1941, 1946 and 1947. General contractor. Member National 
Association of Cemeteries; North Carolina Cemetery Association; 
Raleigh Merchants Bureau; Raleigh Chamber of Commerce; past 
member of N. C. Association of Quality Restaurants, Inc.; N. C. 
Motel Association; Association of General Contractors; Raleigh 
Board of Realtors; Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen; Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1963; Member N. C. Legis- 



Biographical Sketches 563 

lative Council; N. C. Council on Retardation; N. C. Commission 
on Intergovernmental Relations; State Senator in the General 
Assembly of 1965; Vice Chairman, N. C. Capital Planning Com- 
mission; Chairman, Committee on Mental Institutions; Member 
William G. Hill Masonic Lodge; Elks; American Legion; Raleigh 
Civitan Club. Served in U. S. Navy and U. S. Marine Corps, 
Aviator, First Lieutenant, 1942-1946. Presbyterian. Married 
Frances Katherine Lyon, September 24, 1943. Children: Frances 
Rebecca, Anna Katherine, Deborrah Lyon, Jyles Jacquelyn and 
Judy Carolyn. Address: 3601 Ridge Road, Raleigh, N. C. 



CLAUDE CURRIE 

(Eleventh Senate District — Counties: Dui'ham, Orange and 
Person. Two Senators.) 

Claude Currie, Democrat, of Durham County, representing the 
Eleventh Senatorial District, was born in Candor, Montgomery 
County, N. C, December 8, 1890. Son of John C. and Louise 
(McKinnon) Currie. Attended Oak Ridge Military Institute, 1911- 
1914; University of North Carolina, A.B. and LL.B., 1926. Chair- 
man, Board of Directors of Security Savings and Loan Association. 
State Senator, Eighteenth Senatorial District, 1927; Fourteenth 
Senatorial District, 1945, 1947, 1949, 1953, 1955, 1957, 1959, 1961, 
1963 and 1965. United States Army Air Corps, 1917-1919; Pur- 
suit Observer, Sgt. Presbyterian. Residence: Jack Tar, Durham. 
Address: P. O. Box 1491, Durham. 



RAYMOND THEODORE DENT, JR. 

(Thirty-first Senate District — Counties: Buncombe, Madison, 
Mitchell and Yancey. Two Senators.) 

Raymond Theodore Dent, Jr., Republican, of Mitchell County, 
representing the Thirty-first Senatorial District, was born in Ashe- 
ville, N. C.j December 21, 1932. Son of Raymond Theodore and 
Mary Hunter (Cross) Dent. Attended Harris High School, 1946- 
1949; Sewanee Military Academy, 1949-1951; Virginia Military 
Institute, 1951-1952; University of the South, 1952-1953, 1954- 
1955; Correspondence Courses, University of California. Executive 



564 North Carolina Manual 

and manufacturer, President, Diamond Mica Company. Member 
American Institute of Mining 1 Engineers; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management, American Institute of Management; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Chairman, Mitchell County Republican 
Party, 1966. Corporal, United States Army, 1953-1955. Member 
Trinity Episcopal Church, Secretary, 1966, and Layreader. Married 
Rachel Beverly Home Rose, August 15, 1959. Address: 123 Wal- 
nut Avenue, P. O. Box 386, Spruce Pine, N. C. 

ALBERT JOSEPH ELLIS 

(Sixth Senate District — County: Onslow. One Senator.) 

Albert Joseph Ellis, Democrat, of Onslow County, representing 
the Sixth Senatorial District, was born in New Bern, N. C, June 
6, 1913. Son of Joseph and Mary S. (Rachide) Ellis. Attended 
New Bern Elementary and High School graduating in 1931; 
University of North Carolina, B.S., 1935; University of North 
Carolina Law School, LL.B. degree, 1938. Lawyer. Member Amer- 
ican Bar Assn.; N. C, 4th District Assn., President, 1956; Onslow 
County Bar Assn.; Judicature Society; Jacksonville Kiwanis Club, 
President, 1948; Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce; National 
U.S.O. Council; Onslow County Historical Society. Onslow County 
Attorney, 1952-1962. President U.N.C. Law Alumni Assn., 1963; 
President U.S.O. Committee since 1942; Chairman Onslow County- 
Jacksonville Airport Commission since 1962; Chairman Onslow 
Democratic Executive Commission, 1958-1962; Delegate to Dem- 
ocratic National Convention, 1956 and 1964. Member Knights 
of Columbus; Moose; American Legion; 40 and 8. Jacksonville 
Jaycee "Man of the Year" award, 1963; Director 4-H Development 
Fund, Inc.; Trustee Fayetteville State College; member State 
Committee for Improvement of Courts. Lieutenant, JAGD, 1943- 
1944. Catholic. Married Marie Hargett, October 14, 1940. Children: 
Patricia (Mrs. R. D. Hedrick), Mary, Susan, Elizabeth and Albert 
Charles. Address: 105 Keller Court, Jacksonville, N. C. 

MARTHA WRIGHT EVANS 

(Twenty-seventh Senate District — County: Mecklenburg. Three 
Senators.) 



Biographical Sketches 565 

Martha Wright Evans, Democrat of Mecklenburg County, rep- 
resenting the Twenty-seventh Senatorial District, was born in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Daughter of William John and Martha 
(Hemphill) Wright. Attended public schools, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Boston University, B.S. degree; Columbia University; Lafayette 
College, Easton, Pa., 1957; School for Advanced International 
Studies, Johns Hopkins University, Washington, D. C; Duke Uni- 
versity, 1958, on scholarship awarded by Japan Society and Asian 
Foundation; Duke University, 1960; St. Louis University, Grant, 
1961. Member American Association of University Women; Amer- 
ican Cancer Society; North Carolina Council Women's Civic Or- 
ganizations; Mecklenburg County TB and Health Association; 
National Conference of Christians and Jews; League of Women 
Voters, recipient of Girl Scout statuette for outstanding service 
to the community and organization, 1954; United Appeal Chair- 
man, Residential Division, 1960; member U. S. Army Advisory 
Committee. Charlotte's first "Woman of the Year", 1955; first 
woman elected to Charlotte City Council, 1955; re-elected, 1957. 
Received Downtown Charlotte Association Award for "Outstanding 
Career Woman in Government and Law." Designated by the United 
States Conference of Mayors as the first woman delegate from the 
United States to Conference of International Union of Local Au- 
thorities in Rome, Italy, 1955, also member of the Advance Prep- 
aration Committee of this Conference to prepare agenda and 
promote international public relations. Received from the American 
Christian Palestine Committee a fellowship for study in the Middle 
East, 1956; elected honorary member Hadassah, 1958; awarded 
Grant by National Manpower Commission and attended seminar 
at Arden House, sponsored by Columbia University, 1958. As a 
result of this study by conferees, a publication was released entitled 
"Work in the Lives of Married Women", which reflects employment 
problems of the working women. Received Carnegie Foundation 
Scholarship Grant, 1959, for study at World Affairs Center, New 
York City. Listed in "Who's Who" of American Women. Des- 
ignated "Omega Citizen of the Year" by Pi Phi Chapter Omega 
Psi Phi Fraternity for "worthy community service rendered in 
politics and human relations," 1961. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1963 ; State Senator in the General Assembly of 1965. 
Re-elected 1966. Member Myers Park Presbyterian Church; for 
twelve years served as Orphanage Representative; Pastor's Aide; 



566 Nokth Carolina Manual 

Teacher of Senior High and College Groups; Circle Chairman. 
Leader, coordinator and troop consultant for the Girl Scout pro- 
gram of the church; received Acknowledgment awarded by the 
Session of the Myers Park Presbyterian Church for the unselfish 
and devoted Christian service rendered the Girl Scout Program; 
organized and supervised troops for five years at the church- 
sponsored Oaklawn Community Center. Married Charles H. Evans. 
Address: 2 141 Ilassel Place, Charlotte. N. C. 

ASHLEY BROWN FUTRELL 

(Second Senate District — Counties: Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, 
Martin and Tyrrell. One Senator.) 

Ashley Brown Futrell, Democrat, of Beaufort County, repre- 
senting the Second Senatorial District, was born in Rich Square. 
N. C, October 27, 1911. Son of James Thomas and Addie Jane 
(Brown) Futrell. Attended Rich Square Public Schools; Wilson 
High School, Wilson, N. C; Duke University, B.A. degree, 1933. 
Editor and publisher, Daily News, Washington, N. C. Member 
E.N.C. Press Association, President, 1958-1957; N. C. Press Asso- 
ciation, President, 1960-1961, Community Service Awards, 1957 
and 1962, Best Editorials, 1956 and 1959, Best Features, 1960; 
Southern Newspaper Association; Sigma Delta Chi, national jour- 
nalism fraternity; American Legion, Post Commander; VFW; 
Moose; Rotarian ; Mason; Shriner. President and lifetime member 
Junior Chamber of Commerce; President Washington Chamber 
of Commerce. Member Washington City Board of Education since 
1956; N. C. Seashore Commission since 1962; N. C. Court Reform 
Commission, 1958-1959. Former school teacher; tobacco buyer prior 
to World War II with Imperial Tobacco Co., Wilson, N. C; Athletic 
Coach, Wilson High School, and one year (1936) at Atlantic 
Christian College.