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Full text of "North Carolina manual [serial]"

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UNIVERSITY OF N.C AT CHAPEL HILL 



00017482341 



This BOOK may be kept out TWO WEEK 1 - 
ONLY, and is subject to a fine of FP 
CENTS a day thereafter. It— was—ta k e n ■'*■»*• 

on the day indicated below: 









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PUBLICATIONS OF THE 

NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE LIBRARY 



NORTH CAROLINA MANUAL 
1931 



COMPILED AND EDITED 
BY 

H. M. LONDON 

LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE LIBRARIAN 



RALEIGH 

NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

1931 



OBSERVER PRINTING HOUSE, CHARLOTTE, N. C 





1931 








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PREFACE 

This volume is issued by the North Carolina Historical Com- 
mission in order to furnish in succinct form information about the 
State, its government and institutions, which otherwise would re- 
quire much investigation in many different sources. Unless other- 
wise stated, the data in each case is the latest available. 

Similar manuals were issued by the Secretary of State in 
1903, 1905, and 1907, and by the North Carolina Historical Com- 
mission in 1909, 1911, 1913, 1915, 1917, 1919, 1921, 1923, 1925, 1927 
and 1929. The demand for these volumes has been so great that 
all editions except those of 1925 and 1927 have been exhausted. 

The minimum cut of twenty percent in the 1930-1931 appro- 
priation of the Historical Commission as a result of the general 
condition of State finances has compelled a sharp reduction in the 
size and scope of the 1931 edition of the Manual. The sections, 
"Executive Departments," "Judicial Departments," "State De- 
partments, Boards and Commissions," "State Charitable and Cor- 
rectional Institutions," "Miscellaneous," and "Constitutions," 
which are found in previous editions, have been omitted. 



NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



Thomas M. Pittman, Chairman, Henderson 

M. C S. Noble Chapel Hill 

Heriot Clarkson Raleigh 

Mrs. Thomas O'Berry Goldsboro 

Miss Nell Battle Lewis Raleigh 

A. R. Newsome, Secretary, Raleigh 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Official Register for 1931-1932 7 

The Legislative Department: 

Officers and Members of the Senate 13 

Senatorial Districts 16 

Rules of the Senate .... 17 

Standing Committees of the Senate 29 

Officers and Members of the House of Representatives 35 

Rules of the House of Representatives 41 

Standing Committees of the House of Representatives.. 55 

New State Boards and Commissions: 

Industrial Commission 63 

State Board of Barber Examiners 65 

Platforms of Political Parties, 1.930: 

State Democratic Platform . 69 

State Republican Platform . 77 

Election Returns: 

Popular and Electoral Votes for President by States, 1928 85 

Popular Vote for President by States, 1912-1924 86 

Vote for President by Counties, 1916-1928 88 
Vote by Counties for Governor in Democratic Primaries, 

1920-1924 90 

Vote for State Officers in Democratic Primary, 1928 92 
Vote for State Officers in Democratic Primaries, 1924, 1928 

and 1930 . 94 
Democratic Primary Vote, June 5, 1926, for United States 

Senator 95 

Democratic Primary Vote, June 7, 1930, for United States 

Senator ' 96 

Republican Primary Vote, June 7, 1930, for United States 

Senator 97 

Vote for Governor by Counties, 1920-1928 98 

Vote for State Treasui-er by Counties, November 4, 1930 100 

Vote for United States Senator, 1920-1930 101 

Vote for Members of Congress, 1922-1930 103 

Vote for Constitutional Amendments by Counties, 1930 11- 



G Contents 

Page 
Census: 

Population and Area of the Several Slate.s ami Terri- 
tories, 1 '.MO-1930 121 
Population (estimated) of North Carolina, 1675-1786 123 
Census of North Carolina, 1790-1840 124 
Census of North Carolina, 1850-19:10 125 
Population of North Carolina Cities and Towns, 1900-1930 128 

North Carolina Counties and County Seats ..., 138 

Economic Development of North Carolina 141 

Biographical Sketches: 

Executive Officials 145 

Justices of the Supreme Court 151 

Members of Congress , 155 

Members of the General Assembly 163 



OFFICIAL REGISTER FOR 1931-1932 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Richard T. Fountain President of the Senate ...Edgecombe 

Willis Smith Speaker of the House of Representat-ves Raleigh 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

0. Max Gardner Governor Cleveland 

R. T. Fountain Lieutenant-Governor Edgecombe 

James A. Hartness Secretary of State Iredell 

Baxter Durham Auditor i Wake 

Nathan O'Berry Treasurer. Wayne 

A. T. Allen Superintendent of Public Instruction ...Alexander 

Dennis G. Brummitt -Attorney-General Granville 

0. M. Mull Executive Counsel .Cleveland 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT 

SUPREME COURT JUSTICES 

Walter P. Stacy Chief Justice New Hanover 

W. J. Adams Associate Justice Moore 

Heriot Clarkson Associate Justice Mecklenburg 

George W. Connor Associate Justice Wilson 

W. J. Brogden Associate Justice Durham 

SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES 

W. L. Small . First District Pasquotank-Elizabeth City 

M . V. Barnhill 1 Second District N ash-Rocky Mount 

Garland E. Midyette Third District .. Northampton-Jackson 

Frank A. Daniels Fourth District Wayne-Goldsboro 

J. Paul Frizzelle Fifth District Greene-Snow Hill 

H. A. Grady Sixth District. - Sampson-Clinton 

VV . C. Harris - . Seventh District Wake-Raleigh 

E. H. Cranmer Eighth District-.. -..Brunswick-Southport 

N. A. Sinclair Ninth District ..Cumberland-Fayetteville 

William A. Devin Tenth District ..Granville-Oxford 

J. H. Clement Eleventh District Forsyth-Winston-Salem 

H . Hoyle Sink Twelfth District Davidson-Lexington 

A. M. Stack Thirteenth District. ..Union-Monroe 

W. F. Harding Fourteenth District Mecklenburg-Charlotte 

J. M. Oglesb y Fifteenth District Cabarrus-Concord 

Wilson Warlick Sixteenth District Catawba-Newton 

T. B. Finley. .Seventeenth District Wilkes- Wilkesboro 

M ichael Schenck Eighteenth District Henderson- Henderson ville 

P. A. McElroy Nineteenth District... Madison-Marshall 

Walter E. Moore Twentieth District... Jackson-Sylva 

special judges 

G. V. Cowper Kinston 

Clayton Moore... Williamston 

Cameron F. MacRae Ashevillc^ 

J. H. Harwood.. -. - Brysou City 

emergency judoes 

C. C. Lyon - Elizubethtown 

Thomas J. Shaw Greensboro 



8 Official Register 



SOLICITOUS 

EmBIBT K. I.f.ary ..First District Chowan-Kdenton 

DoNNXLL ( J i li.i a m Second District Edgecombe-Tarboro 

R Hi NT I'vrkeh Third District . Halifax- Roanoke Rapids 

('. I.. Wiii.ums Fourth District Lee-Sanford 

D. M. ClARX Fifth District Pitt-Greenville 

J. A. Powers _ --Sixth District Lenoir-Kinston 

J. C. LITTLE Seventh District Wake-Raleigh 

Woodub K Ki.1.1 m _ Eighth District New Hanover-Wilmington 

T. A. McNeill Ninth District Robeson- Lumberton 

\\ . B. I'mstead.. Tenth District ...Durham-Durham 

Carlisle W. Hiogins Eleventh District Alleghany-Sparta 

GbOROI A. Yin Twelfth District Guilford-Greensboro 

F. D. Phillips Thirteenth District Richmond-Rockingham 

J. G. Carpenter Fourteenth District Gaston-Gastonia 

V,. V. Long Fifteenth District Iredell-Statesville 

I.. S. Spi rling Sixteenth District Caldwell-Lenoir 

John H. Jones Seventeenth District.. .Wilkes-North Wilkesboro 

J. W. Pless, Jr ...Eighteenth District McDowell-Marion 

Zebulon V. Nettles Nineteenth District Buncombe-Asheville 

John M. Queen Twentieth District Haywood-Waynesville 

CORPORATION COMMISSION 

W. T. Lee Chairman Haywood 

George 1 '. Pell Commissioner Forsyth 

Stanlei Winborne Commissioner. Hertford 

R. Otis Self Chief Clerk Jackson 

I. M Bailey Attorney Onslow 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS, AND COMMISSIONS 

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT r/ 

J. Van B. Metts The Adjutant General New Hanover 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

W. A. Graham Commissioner Lincoln 

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND PRINTING 

F. D. Grist Commissioner .Caldwell 

DEPARTMENT OF INSURANCE S 

D. C. Bonet Commissioner Lenoir 

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE l/ 

A. J. Maxwell Commissioner Craven 

STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION 

R. A . Doughton _ . _ Chairman Alleghany 

Charles Ross -..Attorney.. Harnett 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH /^-~ 

Dr. W. P. Jacocks -Secretary... Bertie 

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

J. W. Harrelson ...Director Cleveland 



Official Register 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITIES AND PUBLIC WELFARE [^ 

Mrs. W. T. Bost.. Commissioner- ...Wake 

CHILD WELFARE COMMISSION I ^~ 

E. F. Carter _ Executive Secretary ..Wake 

NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

A. R. Newsome Secretary ..Union 



LIBRARY COMMISSION 

Miss Marjorie J. Beale Secretary Wake 

STATE LIBRARY 

Miss Carrie L. Broughton Librarian.. Wake 

LAW LIBRARY y 

John A. Livingstone Librarian Wake 

SALARY AND WAGE COMMISSION I/' 

0. M. Mull Executive Secretary Cleveland 

STATE PRISON j^ 

George Ross Pou .Superintendent Johnston 

INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

Matt H. Allen... Chairman ..Wake 

COUNTY GOVERNMENT ADVISORY COMMISSION 

C. M. Johnson.. Executive Secretary ..Pender 

BUDGET BUREAU 

0. Max Gardner, Governor, Ex Officio Director Ceveland 

TAX COMMISSION 

Fred w. Morrison Secretary Wake 

BOARD OF EQUALIZATION' 

LeRoy B. Martin Secretary ..Yadkin 



10 



Official Register 



Cali m.mi, 1931-1932 



DiM 


Spring, I 


1931 


Spring, 1932 


Fall, 1932 


1 


Judge i Sradj 


Judge Frizzelle 


Judge Daniels 


Judge Midyette 


2 


Judge Harris 


1 . i ■ i 1 ■, 


Judge Frizzelle 


Judge Daniels 


3 


Judge Cranmer 


r rls 


Judge Grady.. 


Judge Frizzelle 


4 


Judge Sinclair - . . 


Judge Cranmer. 


Judge Harris 


Judge Grady 


5 


Judge Devil 


Judge Sinclair 


Judge Cranmer 


Judge Harris 


C 


Judge Small 


Judge Devin. 


Judge Sinclair 


Judge Cranmer 


7 


Judge Barnbill 


Judge Small. 


Judge Devin 


Judge Sinclair 


8 


Judge Midyette 


Judge Barnhill 


Judge Small 


Judge Devin 


9 


Judge l 'aniel 


Judge Midyette 


Judge Barnhill 


Judge Small 


10 


Judge Frizzello 


Judge Daniels 


Judge Midyette 


Judge Barnhill 


11 


Judge \\ arlick 


Judge Oglesby 


Judge Harding 


Judge Stack 


12 


Judgi 


Judge Warlick . . . 


Judge Oglesby _. 


Judge Harding 


13 


Judge Schenck.. _ . 


Judge Finley 


Judge Warlick 


Judge Oglesby 


14 


Judge McElroy 


Judge Schenck 


Judge Finley 


Judge Warlick 


15 


Judge Moore_ 


Judge McElroy 


Judge Schenck. 


Judge Finley 


it; 


Judge Clement 


Judge Moore... _ _. 


Judge McElroy 


Judge Schenck 


17 


Judge Sink.. 


Judge Clement . 


Judge Moore 


Judge McElroy 


18 


Judge Stack 


Judge Sink 


Judge Clement 


Judge Moore 


19 


Judge Harding. 


Judge Stack 


Judge Sink _ 


Judge Clement 


20 


Judge Oglesby. 


Judge Harding . .. 


Judge Stack _ 


Judge Sink 



PART I 



THE LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



1. Officers of the Senate. 

2. Members of the Senate (Arranged Alphabetically). 

3. Members of the Senate (Arranged by Districts). 

4. Senatorial Districts. 

5. Rules of the Senate. 

6. Standing Committees of the Senate. 

7. Officers of the House of Representatives. 

8. Members of the House of Representatives (Arranged Alpha- 

betically) . 

9. Members of the House of Representatives (Arranged by 

Counties). 

10. Rules of the House of Representatives. 

11. Standing Committees of the House of Representatives. 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE SENATE 



R. T. Fountain 

Rivers D. Johnson. 
LeRoy B. Martin.. 

0. P. Shell 

B. F. Smith 

A. CORET 

Exum T. Lewis 



OFFICERS 

^ President ^ Edgecombe 

.President pro tern Duplin 

. Principal Clerk Yadkin 

. Sergeant-at-Arms Harnett 

_ Reading Clerk Wake 

. Engrossing Clerk Martin 

.Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms Nash 



SENATORS 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 



Name 



District 



Party 



Post Office 



Baggett, J. R 

Bennett, Dr. K. E._ 

Bernard, S. G 

Blount, M. K 

Burrus, Dr. John T. 
Burt, E.R.... 

Campbell, Wm. B... 

Clark, W. G 

Clarkson, F. 

Clement, Hay den... 

Dortch, Hugh 

Dunlap, Frank L.._, 

Folger, John H 

Gower, Dr. F. G.... 

Grant, A. T 

Gravely. L. L 

Grier, H. P 

Gwyn, Allen H 

Hardy, Dr. Ira M._. 

Harmon, Roy A 

Hatchett, T. H 

Haywood, F. J 

Hendren, W. M 

Hicks, A. A 

Hinsdale, J. W 

Horton, W. P 

Johnson, M. M 

Johnson, R. D 

Jones, W. R 

Lawrence, Lloyd, J.. 

Lindsey, T. H 

Lovill, W. R 

Lynch, W. E 

McKee, Mrs. E. L.. 

McLean, W. K 

McSwain, Peyton... 

Nixon, Kemp B 



Twelfth 

Thirty-third . _ . 

Thirty-first 

Fifth 

Seventeenth 

P^ighteenth 

Ninth 

Fourth. .- 

Twentieth 

Twenty-first 

Eighth 

Nineteenth 

Twenty-third.. 

Eighth 

Twenty-fourth . 

Sixth 

Twenty-fifth... 
Seventeenth 

Seventh 

Thirtieth 

Sixteenth 

Twentieth 

Twenty-second. 

Fifteenth 

Thirteenth'. 

Thirteenth 

Twelfths 

Ninth 

Eighteenth 

First 

Tenth.' 

Twenty-ninth. . 
Eleventh 

Thirty-second.. 
Twenty-seventh 
Twenty-seventh 

Twenty-fifth... 



Democrat . . 
Democrat. _ 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 

Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 

Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 

Democrat. . 

Democrat.. 
Republican. 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 
Democrat. . 

Democrat. . 
Republican. 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 
Democrat . _ 
Democrat. . 

Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 

Democrat.. 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 

Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 

Demoi 



Lillington, N. C. 
Bryson City, N. C. 
Asheville, N. C. 
Greenville, N. C. 
High Point, N. C. 
Biscoe, N. C. 

Wilmington, N. C, 
Tarboro, N. C. 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Salisbury, N. C. 

Goldsboro, N. C. 
Wadesboro, N. C. 

Mount Airy, N. C. 

Clayton, N. C. 
Mocksville, N. C. 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Statesville, N. C. 
Reidsville, N. C. 

Kinston, N. C. 
Elk Park, N. C. 
Yanceyville, N. C. 
Concord, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, X. C. 
Oxford, N. ('. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Pittsboro, N. C. 

Aberdeen, N. C. 
Warsaw, N. C. 
Rockingham, N. C. 

Murfreesboro, X. C. 

Southport, N. C 
Boone, N. C. 
(id, N. C. 

Sylva, .'v. C 
Columbus, V C. 

Shelby, X. <'. 

Lincolnton, 



1 1 



Legislative Department 





SENATORS— 


Continued 




Name 


District 


Party- 


Post Office 


Peel, I Ibert S 

Powell, W. B. 


Second 

'IVnth.... 

Nineteenth.. 

Third 


Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 


Williamston, N. C. 
Whiteville, N. C. 


Price, li I 


Monroe, N. C. 


Pritchett, J. \. 


Windsor, N. C. 


Rankin. R. Grady 

ell, T. o. 


Twenty-sixth 

Fourteenth-. 

Sixteenth 

Sixth.. 

Second.. 

Seventh.. __ . __. 
First 

Twenty-eighth- _. . 

Fourth.- - 


Gastonia, N. C. 


Umstead, J. W. . 

Dzzell, Tims. H 

Ward. H. S. 


Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Wilson, N. C. 

Washington, N. C. 


Ward, U in. F. 


New Bern, N. C. 


WTiedbee, Charles 

Williams, B. F. 


Hertford, N. C. 
Lenoir, N. C. 


Zollicoffer, A. C. 









SENATORS 

(Arranged by Districts) 



First District — L. J. Lawrence, Murfreesboro (D) ; Chas. Whed- 
bee, Hertford (D). 

Second District — Elbert S. Peel, Williamston (D) ; H. S. 
Ward, Washington (D). 

Third District— J. A. Pritchett, Windsor (D). 

Fourth District— W. G. Clark, Tarboro (D) ; A. C. Zollicoffer, 
Rosemary (D). 

Fifth District— M. K. Blount, Greenville (D). 

Sixth District— Thos. R. Uzzell, Wilson (D) ; L. L. Gravely, 
Rocky Mount (D). 

Seventh District — Wm. F. Ward, New Bern (D) ; Dr. Ira M. 
Hardy, Kinston (D). 

Eighth District— Br. F. G. Gower, Clayton (D) ; Hugh Dortch, 
Goldsboro (D). 

Ninth Disfciff-Wm. B. Campbell, Wilmington (D) ; R. D. 
Johnson, Warsaw (D). 



Senators 15 

Tenth District — T. H. Lindsey, Southport (D) ; W. H. Powell, 
Whiteville (D). 

Eleventh District — W. E. Lynch, Rowland (D). 

Twelfth District — J. R. Baggett, Lillington (D) ; M. M. John- 
son, Aberdeen (D). 

Thirteenth District — W. P. Horton, Pittsboro (D) ; J. W. Hins- 
dale, Raleigh (D). 

Fourteenth District — T. 0. Rodwell, Warrenton (D). 

Fifteenth District — A. A. Hicks, Oxford (D). 

Sixteenth District — J. W. Umstead, Chapel Hill (D) ; T. H. 
Hatchett, Yanceyville (D). 

Seventeenth District — Dr. John T. Burrus, High Point (D) ; 
Allen H. Gwyn, Reidsville (D). 

Eighteenth District — E. R. Burt, Biscoe (D) ; W. R. Jones, 
Rockingham (D). 

Nineteenth District — Frank L. Dunlap, Wadesboro (D) ; H. L. 
Price, Monroe (D). 

Twentieth District — F. O. Clarkson, Charlotte (D) ; F. J. Hay- 
wood, Concord (D). 

Twenty-first District — Hayden Clement, Salisbury (D). 

Twenty-second District — W. M. Hendren, Winston-Salem (D). 

Twenty-third District — John H. Folger, Mount Airy (D). 

Twenty-fourth District— A. T. Grant, Mocksville (R). 

Twenty-fifth District — H. P. Grier, Statesville (D) ; Kemp B. 
Nixon, Lincolnton (D). 

Twenty-sixth District — R. Grady Rankin, Gastonia (D). 

Twenty-seventh District — Peyton McSwain, Shelby (D) ; W. K. 
McLean, Columbus (D). 

Twenty-eighth District — B. F. Williams, Lenoir (D). 

Twenty ninth District — W. R. Lovill, Boone (D). 

Thirtieth District — Roy A. Harmon, Elk Park (R). 

Thirty-first District — S. G. Bernard, Asheville (D). 

Thirty-second District — Mrs. E. L. McKee, Sylva (D). 

Thirty-third District— Dr. K. E. Bennett, Bryson City (D). 



16 Legislative Department 

senatorial districts 

Ch. 161, P. L. 1021 

First District — Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Gates, Hertford, 
Pasquotank and Perquimans counties shall elect two senators. 

Second District — Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin, Pamlico, Tyr- 
rell, and Washington shall elect two senators. 

Third District — Bertie and Northampton shall elect one senator. 

Fourth District — Edgecombe and Halifax shall elect two sena- 
tors. 

Fifth District — Pitt shall elect one senator. 

Sixth District — Franklin, Nash and Wilson shall elect two 
senators. 

Seventh District — Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, Lenoir, and 
Onslow shall elect two senators. 

Eighth District — Johnston and Wayne shall elect two senators. 

Ninth District — Duplin, New Hanover, Pender, and Sampson 
shall elect two senators. 

Tenth District — Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, and Cumber- 
land shall elect two senators. 

Eleventh District — Robeson shall elect one senator. 

Twelfth District — Harnett, Hoke, Moore, and Randolph shall 
elect two senators. 

Thirteenth District — Chatham, Lee, and Wake shall elect two 
senators. 

Fourteenth District — Vance and Warren shall elect one senator. 

Fifteenth District — Granville and Person shall elect one sena- 
tor. 

Sixteenth District — Alamance, Caswell, Durham, and Orange 
shall elect two senators. 

Seventeenth District — Guilford and Rockingham shall elect two 
senators. 

Eighteenth District — Davidson, Montgomery, Richmond, and 
Scotland shall elect two senators. 

Nineteenth Distri-ct — Anson, Stanly, and Union shall elect two 
senators. 

Twentieth District — Cabarrus and Mecklenburg shall elect two 
senators. 

Twenty-first District — Rowan shall elect one senator. 



Rules of the Senate 17 

Twenty-second District — Forsyth shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-third District — Stokes and Surry shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-fourth District — Davie, Wilkes, and Yadkin shall elect 
one senator. 

Twenty-fifth District — Catawba, Iredell, and Lincoln shall elect 
two senators. 

Twenty-sixth District — Gaston shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-seventh District — Cleveland, Henderson, McDowell, 
Polk, and Rutherford shall elect two senators. 

Twenty-eighth District — Alexander, Burke and Caldwell shall 
elect one senator. 

Twenty-ninth District — Alleghany, Ashe and Watauga shall 
elect one senator. 

Thirtieth District — Avery, Madison, Mitchell, and Yancey shall 
elect one senator. 

Thirty-first District — Buncombe shall elect one senator. 

Thirty-second District — Haywood, Jackson, and Transylvania 
shall elect one senator. 

Thirty-third District — Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, and 
Swain shall elect one senator. 



RULES OF THE SENATE, 1931 

Order of Business 

1. The President having taken the chair at the hour to which 
the Senate shall have adjourned, and a quorum being present, the 
Journal of the preceding day shall be read, unless otherwise or- 
dered by the Senate, to the end that any mistake may be corrected. 

2. After reading and approval of the Journal, the order of 
business shall be as follows: 

(1) Reports of standing committees. 

(2) Reports of select committees. 

(3) Introductions of petitions, bills and resolutions. 

(4) Unfinished business of preceding day. 

(5) Special orders. 

(6) General orders. First, bills and resolutions on third read- 
ing; second, bills and resolutions on second reading. But mes- 
sages from the Governor and House of Representatives and com- 



18 Legislative Department 

munications and reports from State officers and reports from the 
Committees on Engrossed Bills and Enrolled Bills may be received 
and acted on under any order of business. 

Powers and Duties of the President 

3. He shall take the chair promptly at the appointed time and 
proceed with the business of the Senate according to the rules 
adopted. At any time during the absence of the president, the 
President pro tempore, who shall be elected, shall preside, and he 
is hereby vested, during such time, with all powers of the Presi- 
dent except that of giving a casting vote in case of a tie when 
he shall have voted as a Senator. 

4. He shall assign to doorkeepers their respective duties, and 
shall appoint such pages and laborers as may be necessary, each 
of whom shall receive the same compensation as is now provided 
by law. 

Of the Clerk 

5. The President and Clerk of the Senate shall see that all 
bills shall be acted upon by the Senate in the order in which they 
stand upon the Calendar, unless otherwise ordered as hereinafter 
provided. The Calendar shall include the numbers and titles of 
bills and joint resolutions which have passed the House of Repre- 
sentatives and have been received by the Senate for concurrence. 

6. The Clerk shall certify the passage of bills by the Senate, 
with the date thereof together with the fact whether passed by a 
vote of three-fifths or two-thirds of the Senate, whenever such 
vote may be required by the Constitution and laws of the State. 

7. All necessary supplies and stationery for the Senate, its 
various offices and committees of the Senate shall be purchased 
upon requisition of the Principal Clerk, with the approval of the 
President of the Senate. 

On the Rights and Duties of Senators 

8. Every Senator presenting a paper shall endorse the same; 
if a petition, memorial, or report to the General Assembly, with 
a brief statement of its subject or contents, adding his name; if 
a resolution, with his name; if a report of a committee, a state- 



Rules of the Senate 19 

ment of such report, with the name of the committee and mem- 
ber making the same; if a bill, a statement of its title, which 
shall contain a brief statement of the subject or contents of the 
bill, with his name; and all bills, resolutions, petitions, and me- 
morials shall be delivered to the Clerk and by him handed to the 
President to be by him referred, and he shall announce the titles 
and references of the same, which shall be entered on the Journal. 

9. All motions shall be reduced to writing, if desired by the 
President or any Senator, delivered at the table, and read by 
the President or Clerk before the same shall be debated; but any 
such motion may be withdrawn by the introducer at any time 
before decision or amendment. 

10. If any question contains several distinct propositions it 
shall be divided by the President, at the request of any Senator, 
provided each sub-division, if left to itself, shall form a substantive 
proposition. 

11. When the President is putting a question, or a division 
by counting shall be had, no Senator shall walk out of or across 
the chamber, nor when a Senator is speaking pass between him 
and the President. 

12. Every Senator wishing to speak or debate, or to present a 
petition or other paper, or to make a motion or to report, shall 
rise from his seat and address the President, and shall not pro- 
ceed further until recognized by him. No Senator shall speak 
or debate more than twice nor longer than thirty minutes on the 
same day on the same subject without leave of the Senate, and 
when two or more Senators rise at once the President shall name 
the Senator who is first to speak. 

13. Every Senator who shall be within the bar of the Senate 
when the question is stated by the chair shall vote thereon, un- 
less he shall be excused by the Senate or unless he be directly in- 
terested in the question; and the bar of the Senate shall include 
the entire Senate Chamber. 

14. When a motion to adjourn or for recess shall be affirma- 
tively determined, no member or officer shall leave his place un- 
til adjournment or recess shall be declared by the President. 



20 Legislative Department 

Standing Committees 
15. The following committees shall be named by the Lieuten- 
ant-Governor : 

On Agriculture. 

On Appropriations. 

On Banks and Currency. 

On Claims. 

On Commercial Fisheries. 

On Congressional Districts. 

On Conservation and Development. 

On Constitutional Amendments. 

On Corporation Commission. 

On Corporations. 

On Counties, Cities, and Towns. 

On Distribution of Governor's Message. 

On Education. 

On Election Law. 

On Engrossed Bills. 

On Federal Relations. 

On Finance. 

On Caswell Training School. 

On Game Law. 

On Immigration. 

On Insane Asylums. 

On Institutions for the Blind. 

On Institutions for the Deaf. 

On Insurance. 

On Internal Improvements. 

On Journal. 

On Judicial Districts. 

On Judiciary, No. 1. 

On Judiciary, No. 2. 

On Justices of the Peace. 

On Labor and Commerce. 

On Manufacturing. 

On Military Affairs. 

On Mining. 

On Penal Institutions. 

On Pensions and Soldiers' Home. 

On Propositions and Grievances. 



Rules of the Senate 21 

On Public Health. 

On Public Roads. 

On Railroads. 

On Rules. 

On Salaries and Fees. 

On Senate Expenditures. 

On Senatorial Districts. 

16. Joint Committees 

On Library. 

On Printing. 

On Trustees of the University. 

On Consolidated Statutes. 

On Water Commerce. 

On Trustees State College. 

17. The Committee on Engrossed Bills shall examine all bills, 
amendments, and resolutions before they go out of the possession 
of the Senate, and make a report when they find them correctly 
engrossed: Provided, that when a bill is typewritten and has no 
interlineations therein, and has passed the Senate without amend- 
ment, it shall be sent to the House without engrossment, unless 
otherwise ordered. 

18. The Committee on Appropriations shall carefully examine 
all bills and resolutions apropriating or paying any moneys out 
of the State Treasury, except bills creating or increasing salaries, 
which shall be referred to the proper committee: Provided, said 
committee shall report to the Appropriations Committee the amount 
allowed, and keep an accurate record of the same and report to 
the Senate from time to time. 

19. Every report of the committee upon a bill or resolution 
which shall not be considered at the time of making the same, or 
laid on the table by a vote of the Senate, shall stand upon the 
general orders with the bill or resolution; and the report of the 
committee shall show that a majority of the committee were 
present and voted. 

20. No committee shall be composed of more than 18 mem- 
bers. 



22 Legislative Department 

On General Orders and Special Orders 

21. Any bill or other matter may be made a special order for 
a particular day or hour by a vote of the majority of the Senators 
voting, and if it shall not be completed on that day it shall be re- 
turned to its place on the Calendar, unless it shall be made a 
special order for another day; and when a special order is under 
consideration it shall take precedence of any special order or sub- 
sequent order for the day, but such subsequent order may be taken 
up immediately after the previous special order has been dis- 
posed of. 

22. Every bill shall receive three readings previous to its be- 
ing passed, and the president shall give notice at each whether 
it be the first, second, or third. After the first reading, unless a 
motion shall be made by some Senator, it shall be the duty of the 
President to refer the subject matter to an appropriate commit- 
tee. No bill shall be amended until it shall have been twice read. 

Proceedings When There is Not a Quorum Voting 

23. If, on taking the question on a bill, it shall appear that a 
constitutional quorum is not present, or if the bill require a vote 
of a certain proportion of all the Senators to pass it, and it ap- 
pears that such number is not present, the bill shall be again read 
and the question taken thereon; if the bill fail a second time 
for the want of the necessary number being present and voting 
the bill shall not be finally lost, but shall be returned to the Calen- 
dar in its proper order. 

Precedence of Motions 

24. When a question is before the Senate no motion shall be 
received except those herein specified, which motions shall have 
precedence as follows, viz.: 

(1) For an adjournment. 

(2) To lay on the table. 

(3) For the previous question. 

(4) To postpone indefinitely. 

(5) To postpone to a certain day. 

(6) To commit to a standing committee. 



Rules of the Senate 23 

(7) To commit to a select committee. 

(8) To amend. 

(9) To substitute. 

25. The previous question shall be as follows: "Shall the main 
question be now put?" and until it is decided shall preclude all 
amendments and debate. If this question shall be decided in the 
affirmative, the "main question" shall be on the passage of the 
bill, x-esolution, or other matter under consideration; but when 
amendments are pending the question shall be taken up on such 
amendments, in their order, without further debate or amendment. 
However, any Senator may move the previous question and may 
restrict the same to an amendment or other matter then under 
discussion. If such question be decided in the negative, the main 
question shall be considered as remaining under debate. 

26. When a motion for the previous question is made and is 
pending, debate shall cease, and only a motion to adjourn or lay 
on the table shall be in order, which motions shall be put as fol- 
lows: adjourn, previous question, lay on the table. After a motion 
for the previous question is made, pending a second thereto, any 
member may give notice that he desires to offer an amendment 
to the bill or other matter under consideration; and after the 
previous question is seconded such member shall be entitled to 
offer his amendment in pursuance of such notice. 

Other Questions to be Taken Without Debate 

27. The motions to adjourn and lay on the table shall be de- 
cided without debate, and the motion to adjourn shall always be 
in order when made by a Senator entitled to the floor. 

28. The respective motions to postpone to a certain day, or to 
commit, shall preclude debate on the main question. 

29. All questions relating to priority of business shall be de- 
cided without debate. 

30. When the reading of a paper is called for, except petitions, 
and the same is objected to by any Senator, it shall be determined 
by the Senate without debate. 



24 Legislative Department 

31. Any Senator requesting to be excused from voting may 
make, either immediately before or after the vote shall have been 
called and before the result shall have been announced, a brief 
statement of the reasons for making such request, and the ques- 
tion shall then be taken without debate. Any Senator may ex- 
plain his vote on any bill pending by obtaining permission of the 
President before the vote is put: Provided, that not more than 
three minutes shall be consumed in such explanation. 

Questions that Require a Two-Thirds Vote 

32. No bill or resolution on its third reading shall be acted on 
out of the regular order in which it stands on the Calendar, and 
no bill or resolution shall be acted upon on its third reading the 
same day on which it passed its second reading unless so ordered 
by two-thirds of the Senators present. 

33. No bill or resolution shall be sent from the Senate on 
the day of its passage except on the last day of the session, un- 
less otherwise ordered by a vote of two-thirds of the Senators 
present. 

34. No bill or resolution after being laid upon the table upon 
motion, shall be taken therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds 
of the Senators present. 

Decorum in Debate 

35. No remark reflecting personally upon the action of any 
Senator shall be in order in debate unless preceded by a motion 
or resolution of censure. 

36. When a Senator shall be called to order he shall take his 
seat until the President shall have determined whether he was in 
order or not; if decided to be out of order, he shall not proceed 
without the permission of the Senate; and every question of order 
shall be decided by the President, subject to an appeal to the Senate 
by any Senator; and if a Senator is called to order for words 
spoken, the words excepted to shall be immediately taken down 
in writing, that the President or Senate may be better able to 
judge of the matter. 



Rules of the Senate 25 

Miscellaneous Rules 

37. When a blank is to be filled, and different sums or times 
shall be proposed, the question shall be first taken on the highest 
sum or the longest time. 

38. When a question has been once put and decided, it shall 
be in order for any Senator who shall have voted in the ma- 
jority to move a reconsideration thereof; but no motion for the 
reconsideration of any vote shall be in order after the bill, reso- 
lution, message, report, amendment, or motion upon which the 
vote was taken shall have gone out of the possession of the Senate; 
nor shall any motion for reconsideration be in order unless made 
on the same day or the next following legislative day on which 
the vote proposed to be reconsidered shall have taken place, un- 
less the same be made by the Committee on Enrolled Bills for 
verbal or grammatical errors in the bills, when the same may be 
made at any time. Nor shall any question be reconsidered more 
than once. 

39. All bills and resolutions shall take their place upon the 
Calendar according to their number, and shall be taken up in 
regular order, unless otherwise ordered. 

40. No smoking shall be allowed on the floor of the Senate 
Chamber during the sessions. 

41. Senators and visitors shall uncover their heads upon enter- 
ing the Senate Chamber while the Senate is in session, and shall 
continue uncovered during their continuance in the Chamber. 

42. No Senator or officer of the Senate shall depart the ser- 
vice of the Senate without leave, or receive pay as a Senator or 
officer for the time he is absent without leave. 

43. No person other than the executive and judicial officers 
of the State, members and officers of the Senate and House of 
Representatives, and ex-members shall be permitted within the 
Senate Chamber. 

44. No rule of the Senate shall be altered, suspended, or re- 
scinded except on a two-thirds' vote of the Senators present: Pro- 
vided, that this shall not apply to Rule 55. 



26 Legislative Department 

45. In case a less number than a quorum of the Senate shall 
convene, they are authorized to send the doorkeeper, or any other 
person, for any or all absent Senators, as a majority of the Sena- 
tors present shall determine. 

46. The aye's and no's may be called for on any question be- 
fore the vote is taken, and if seconded by one-fifth of the Senators 
present, the question shall be decided by the aye's and no's and 
the same shall be entered upon the Journal. 

47. The Chairman of the following Committees, with the ap- 
proval of the President of the Senate, shall appoint clerks in 
order to expedite the business of the Session of 1931, as follows: 

Finance 

Appropriations 

Judiciary No. 1 

Judiciary No. 2 

Counties, Cities and Towns 

Rules 

Propositions and Grievances 

Agriculture 

Education 

Roads 

Public Health 

In addition to the above named clerks, the President of the 
Senate shall, upon recommendation of the Rules Committee, ap- 
point four additional clerks who shall perform such duties as may 
be assigned them by the Principal Clerk of the Senate. 

All Committee Clerks when not in attendance upon the direct 
duties connected with the Committee to which they are assigned, 
shall report to the Principal Clerk of the Senate and, in order to 
expedite the work of the Senate, shall perform such clerical or 
stenographic work as may be assigned to them. 

48. Every bill introduced into the Senate shall be printed or 
typewritten. Amendments need not be typewritten. 

49. All bills shall be read by their titles, which reading shall 
constitute the first reading of the bill, and unless otherwise dis- 
posed of shall be referred to the proper committee. A bill may be 
introduced by unanimous consent at any time during the session. 



Rules of the Senate 27 

50. The Chief Engrossing Clerk of the Senate shall appoint, 
with the approval of the President of the Senate, as his assist- 
ants not more than four competent stenographers and typewriters. 
Should the public business require more than this number the pre- 
siding officer may appoint such additional ones as may be neces- 
sary. Such stenographers and typewriters shall work under the 
direction and supervision of the Engrossing Clerk. They shall 
also make for the members who introduce a bill, without extra 
cost, one original and two carbon copies of all bills. 

51. The Journal of the Senate shall be typewritten in dupli- 
cate, original and carbon, the original to be deposited in the office 
of the Secretary of State as the record, and the other (carbon) 
copy to be delivered to the State Printer. 

52. All bills and resolutions reported unfavorably by the 
committee to which they were referred, and having no minority 
report, shall lie upon the table, but may be taken from the table 
and placed upon the Calendar at the request of any Senator. 

53. That in case of adjournment without any hour being 
named, the Senate shall reconvene the next legislative day at 11 
o'clock A.M. 

54. When a bill is materially modified or the scope of its ap- 
plication extended or decreased, or if the county or counties to 
which it applies be changed, the title of the bill shall be changed 
by the Senator introducing the bill or by the committee having 
it in charge, or by the Engrossing Clerk, so as to indicate the full 
purport of the bill as amended and the county or counties to which 
it applies. 

55. The pages of the Senate shall be responsible to and under 
the direction of the President at all times when the Senate is in 
session. They shall report to the Principal Clerk at other times to 
be assigned such duties as he may direct and shall be under his 
supervision. 

56. After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass on any 
of its readings, the contents of such bill or the principal provisions 
of its subject-matter shall not be embodied in any other measure. 
Upon the point of order being raised and sustained by the Chair, 



28 Legislative Department 

such measure shall be laid upon the table, and shall not be taken 
therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of the elected member- 
ship of the Senate: Provided, no local bill shall be held by the 
Chair as embodying the provisions, or being identical with any 
State-wide measure which has been laid upon the table or failed 
to pass any of its readings. < 

57. That in the event of the absence of the President of the 
Senate and the President pro tempore, at any time fixed for the 
reconvening- of the Senate, the Principal Clerk of the Senate or, 
in his absence also, some member of the Senate Committee on 
Rules shall call the Senate to order and designate some member to 
act as President. 

58. Whenever a public bill is introduced, a carbon copy thereof 
shall accompany the bill. The Reading Clerk shall stamp the copy 
with the number stamped upon the original bill. Such copy shall 
be daily delivered to the joint committee hereinafter provided for. 
The Chief Clerk shall deliver the carbon copy of the bill desig- 
nated to be printed, as hereinafter provided for, to the public 
printer and cause 400 copies thereof to be printed. On the morn- 
ing following the delivery of the printed copies, the Chief Clerk 
shall cause the Chief Page to have one copy thereof put upon 
the desk of each member and shall retain the other printed copies 
in his office. A sufficient number of the printed copies for the use 
of the committee to which the bill is referred shall be by the 
Chief Page delivered to the chairman or clerk of that committee. 
If the bill is passed, the remaining copies shall be by the Chief 
Page delivered to the Chief Clerk of the Senate for the use of the 
Senate. The cost of printing shall be paid from the contingent 
fund of the House of Representatives. The Chairman of the Rules 
Committee of the House and the Chairman of the Rules Com- 
mittee of the Senate shall appoint a sub-committee consisting of 
two members of the House and two members of the Senate from 
the body of the House and the Senate and such chairman shall 
notify the Chief Clerk of the House and of the Senate who has 
been so appointed. Such sub-committee shall meet daily and ex- 
amine the carbon copies of the public bills introduced and de- 
termine which of such public bills shall be printed and which shall 
not, and stamp the copies accordingly. Such sub-committee shall 
serve for one week unless for good cause the chairman of the 



Standing Committees of the Senate 

respective Rules Committees shall determine otherwise. If the 
member introducing a public bill, which the Committee shall de- 
termine should not be printed, so desires, he may appear before the 
Committee at the next meeting thereof with reference thereto. 



SENATE COMMITTEES 
Session 1931 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 

Agriculture— Senators Price, Chairman; Hatchett, Dunlap, 
Hardy, Burt, Lovill, Lynch, Nixon, Pritchett, Clark, Hicks. 

Appropriations — Senators Gravely, Chairman; Burt, Burrus, 
McKee, Jones, Powell, Dunlap, Blount, Uzzell, Campbell, Dortch, 
Folger, Gower, Gwyn, Johnson of Moore, Lawrence, Ward of Cra- 
ven, Lovill, McSwain, Pritchett, Zollicoffer, Hardy, Harmon. 

Banks and Currency — Senators Lawrence, Chairman; Johnson 
of Moore, Burt, Dunlap, Folger, Gower, Hicks, Horton, Lindsey, 
McSwain, Nixon, Uzzell, Gravely. 

Caswell Training School — Senators Hardy, Chairman; Baggett, 
Bennett, Clarkson, Dortch, Gower, Hatchett, Harmon, Johnson of 
Moore, Lawrence, Lindsey. 

Claims — Senators Johnson of Moore, Chairman ; Zollicoffer, Wil- 
liams, Whedbee, Ward of Beaufort, Rodwell, Hatchett, Jones, Hen- 
dren, Harmon, Gwyn. 

Labor and Commerce — Senators Jones, Chairman; Bernard, 
Campbell, Lovill, Lynch, McSwain, Price, Pritchett, Ward of Cra- 
ven, Grant, Clarkson. 

Commercial Fisheries — Senators Campbell, Chairman; Wil- 
liams, Hicks, Clark, Peel, Blount, Lawrence, Grier, Lindsey, Rank- 
in, Hardy. 



30 Legislative Department 

Congressional Districts — Senators Grier, Chairman; Rodwell, 
Dunlap, Gravely, Clark, Campbell, Burrus, Blount, Bernard, Peel. 

Conservation and Development — Senators Rankin, Chairman; 
Lindsey, Umstead, Burnett, Ward of Craven, Johnson of Duplin, 
Clement, Lawrence, Grant, McKee, Lovill. 

Consolidated Statutes — Senators Hinsdale, Chairman; Hen- 
dren, Bernard, Baggett, Clarkson, Folger, Dortch, Clement, Lovill, 
Nixon, McSwain, Powell, Zollicoffer. 

Constitutional Amendments — Senators Ward of Beaufort, 
Chairman; Grier, Baggett, Bernard, Clement, Haywood, Hicks, 
McSwain, Lovill, Rodwell, Umstead, Whedbee, Hendren. 

Corporations — Senators Hendren, Chairman; Bernard, Burrus, 
Clarkson, Clement, Grant, Grier, Hicks, Johnson of Duplin, Jones, 
McLean, McSwain, Nixon, Peel, Pritchett, Rankin. 

Corporation Commission — Senators McSwain, Chairman; Bag- 
gett, Bernard, Burt, Campbell, Dortch, Clement, Folger, Gower, 
Harmon, Hatchett, Horton, Price. 

Counties, Cities and Towns — Senators Clark, Chairman; Hins- 
dale, Clement, Burrus, Clarkson, Powell, Dunlap, Gravely, Ber- 
nard, Blount, Dortch, Folger, Gwyn, Uzzell, Hatchett, Horton. 

Courts and Judicial Districts — Senators Clement, Chairman; 
Lynch, Clarkson, Powell, Dunlap, Uzzell, Dortch, Grant, Gwyn, 
Hicks, Horton, Johnson of Moore, McSwain. 

Distribution of Governor's Message — Senators Lindsey, Chair- 
man; Pritchett, Zollicoffer, Williams, Whedbee, Ward of Craven, 
Umstead, Rankin, Price, Powell, McSwain, McLean, Lynch. 

Education — Senators Folger, Chairman; Baggett, McLean, 
Clark, Blount, Uzzell, Grier, Johnson of Duplin, Campbell, Horton, 
Burrus, Dunlap, Lovill, McKee, Price, Pritchett, Gravely, Rankin, 
Harmon. 



Standing Committees of the Senate 31 

Election Latvs — Senators Powell, Chairman; Jones, Bennett, 
Bernard, Lovill, Nixon, Haywood, Hicks, Lynch, McSwain, Price, 
Burrus, McKee, Whedbee, Blount. 

Engrossed Bills — Senators Zollicoffer, Chairman; Bennett, Bag- 
gett, Williams, Whedbee, Ward of Craven, Price, Powell, Nixon, 
McSwain, McLean, Lynch, Lindsey. 

Enrolled Bills — Senators Lovill, Chairman; Hinsdale, McLean, 
Lawrence, Gower, Grier. 

Federal Relations — Senators Clarkson, Chairman; Baggett, 
Dortch, Folger, Gower, Grant, Grier, Gwyn, Hendren, Johnson of 
Duplin, Johnson of Moore, Nixon. 

Finance — Senators Dunlap, Chairman; Ward of Beaufort, Bur- 
rus, Haywood, Hinsdale, Lynch, McKee, Rankin, Burt, Bennett, 
Gravely, Peel, Blount, Folger, Grier, Hendren, Johnson of Duplin, 
Whedbee, Umstead, Clark, Hicks, Clement, Price, Grant, Hatchett. 

Game Laws — Senators Nixon, Chairman; Lindsey, Rankin, 
Johnson of Moore, Lawrence, Williams, Grier, Hinsdale, Horton, 
McLean, Clark, Umstead. 

Governmental Reorganization — Senators Lovill, Chairman; 
Hicks, Hinsdale, Price, Hendren, Clark, Folger, Nixon, Ward of 
Craven. 

Immigration — Senators Uzzell, Chairman; Powell, Pritchett, 
Rankin, Rodwell, Umstead, Price, Nixon, McLean, Lynch, Lindsey, 
Jones. 

Insane Asylums — Senators Gower, Chairman; Hardy, Harmon, 
Hatchett, Hinsdale, Johnson of Moore, Lawrence, McLean, Peel, 
Umstead, Burnett. 

Institutions for the Blind — Senators Hatchett, Chairman; Ber- 
nard, Blount, Burrus, Burt, Clark, Clarkson, Gower, Hardy, Hicks, 
Horton. 



32 Legislative Department 

Institutions for the Deaf — Senators Williams, Chairman; Zolli- 
coffer, Whedbee, Price, Powell, McLean, Lovill, Hatchett, Harmon, 
Gwyn. Baggett. 

Insurance — Senators Baggett, Chairman; Jones, Umstead, Ben- 
nett, Dunlap, Lovill, Clark, Burt, Grant, Peel, Blount, McSwain. 

htt (Dial Improvements — Senators Hardy, Chairman; McLean. 
Baggett, Bennett, Burt, Campbell, Zollicoffer, Williams, Ward of 
Beaufort, Rodwell, Pritchett, McKee, Lynch, Lindsey. 

Journal — Senators McLean, Chairman; Ward of Craven, Law- 
rence, Horton, Haywood, Lindsey, Jones, Harmon, Hardy, Gwyn, 
Dortch, Clarkson. 

Judiciary No. 1 — Senators Blount, Chairman; Clement, Lynch, 
Jones, Powell, Dunlap, Uzzell, Baggett, Campbell, Gravely, Gwyn, 
Harmon, Hendren, Johnson of Duplin, Lawrence, McSwain, Nixon, 
Rodwell, Whedbee. 

Judiciary No. 2 — Senators Horton, Chairman; Hicks, Dortch, 
Johnson of Moore, Hinsdale, Clarkson, Peel, Bernard, Folger, 
Grant, Grier, Jones, Lovill, McLean, Pritchett, Ward of Beaufort, 
Ward of Craven, Williams, Zollicoffer. 

Justices of the Peace — Senators Lynch, Chairman; Hatchett, 
Baggett, Whedbee, Gower, Peel, McLean, Rodwell, Pritchett, Price, 
Williams, Burt. 

Library — Senators Umstead, Chairman; Baggett, McLean, Bur- 
rus, Uzzell, Rodwell, Pritchett, Lawrence, Peel, Gwyn. 

Manufacturing — Senators Haywood, Chairman; Gower, Burt, 
Clement, Dortch, Folger, Grant, Gwyn, Rankin, Zollicoffer, Hins- 
dale, Johnson of Duplin. 

Military Affairs — Senators Dortch, Chairman; McLean, Dunlap, 
Burt, Campbell, Gower, Gwyn, Hardy, Harmon, Haywood, Hendren, 
Johnson of Moore, Jones. 

Penal Institutions — Senators Hicks, Chairman; Burt, Powell, 
Dunlap, Uzzell, Gravely, Ward of Beaufort, Grier, Hatchett, Price, 
Hinsdale, Gower. 



Standing Committees of the Senate 33 

Printing — Senators Gwyn, Chairman; Lindsey, Clarkson, Cle- 
ment, Gravely, Haywood, Hendren, Hicks, Johnson of Duplin, M 
Kee, McLean, Nixon. 

Pensions and Soldiers' Home — Senators Pritchett, Chairman; 
Price, Dunlap, Baggett, Bernard, Clarkson, Folger, Grier, Gwyn, 
Hatchett, Rodwell, Ward of Craven, Williams, Ward of Beaufort. 

Propositions and Grievances — Senators Ward of Craven, Chair- 
man; Haywood, Bernard, Campbell, Clement, Gower, Grant, Gwyn. 
Hardy, Hendren, Hicks, Hinsdale, Johnson of Duplin, Zollicoffer. 
Williams. 

Public Health — Senators Burrus, Chairman; Bennett, Gower, 
Hardy, McKee, Uzzell, Blount, Clark, Dortch, Gravely, Hinsdale, 
Johnson of Duplin, Price, Rankin, Zollicoffer. 

Public Roads — Senators Peel, Chairman; Burrus, Johnson of 
Duplin, Hinsdale, Clarkson, Dunlap, Baggett, Gravely, Ward of 
Craven, Rodwell, Lindsey, Grier, Hicks, Folger, Lovill, Blount, 
McKee, Clark. 

Public Welfare — Senators McKee, Chairman; Uzzell, Gravely, 
Baggett, Rankin, Grant, Hatchett, Haywood, Johnson of Moore. 
Horton. 

Railroads — Senators Burt, Chairman; Ward of Beaufort, Bag- 
gett, Zollicoffer, Williams, Whedbee, Umstead, Rodwell, Rankin. 
Pritchett, Price, Powell. 

Rules' — Senators Johnson of Duplin, Chairman; Blount, Hor- 
ton, Folger, Dunlap, Clark, Burrus, Peel, Haywood, Lovill. 

Salaries and Fees — Senators Bennett, Chairman; Campbell. 
Clark, Clarkson, Burt, Dunlap, Clement, Dortch, Folger, Gower. 
Grant, Grier, Gwyn, Horton, Hinsdale. 

Senatorial Districts — Senators Rodwell, Chairman; Hicks, Dun- 
lap, Gravely, Grier, Whedbee, Clark, Campbell, Folger, Harmon. 
Horton, Nixon, Peel. 

Senate Expenditures — Senators Lovill, Chairman: Ni 
Hatchett, Johnson of Duplin, Lynch, McLean, Rodwell. Pritch 
Williams, Zollicoffer, Clark, Folger. 



34 Legislative Department 

Trustees of State College — Senators Bernard, Chairman; Dun- 
lap, Price, Pritchett, Gravely, Hardy, Hinsdale, Lynch, Johnson of 
Moore. 

Trustees of the University — Senators Whedbee, Chairman; 
Blount, Rankin, Burrus, Nixon, Dunlap, Umstead, Clarkson, Hardy, 
Folger, Powell. 

Water Commerce — Senators Lindsey, Chairman; Whedbee, Law- 
rence, Campbell, Ward of Craven, Ward of Beaufort, Clark, Blount, 
Uzzell, Zollicoffer. 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



OFFICERS 

Willis Smith Speaker 

Thad Eure Principal Clerk 

B. L. Lunsford Reading Clerk 

C. M. Higgins. _• Sergeant-at-Arms 

J. F. Burkhead Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Miss Rosa B. Mund Engrossing Clerk 



. Wake 
. Hertford 
.Buncombe 
Davidson 
.Randolph 
.Cabarrus 



REPRESENTATIVES 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 



Name 



Allen, Claude W. 



Bender, R. P Jones 



Binford, H. N Rockingham 



Black, Sam. 

Braddy, C. L 

Brinson, J. J 

Brooks, E. C, Jr._ 

Brown, W. T 

Bruton, T. Wade. 

Burgin, W. 

Butler, A. L 



Cherry, R. G.._. 

Cloud, E. B 

Coffield, 0. R.... 

Connor, H. G 

Cox, R. M 

Cox, Thos. A 

Cranor, H. A 

Crouse, R. F._._ 
Crudup, John B. 



Davis, George E._ . 

Davis, J. S 

Davis, R. B 

Day, N. E 

DeHart, James 

•Dillard, JohnH.. 
Dosher, Wilbur R. 



Edwards, Henry B... 

Ervin, S. J., Jr 

Etheridge, R. Bruce 

Ewbank, John 

Ewing, W. C ._. 



Flanagan, E. G._ 
Fulghum, R. T._ 



Garibaldi, Joe 

Gatling, G. D.___ 
Gattis, S. M., Jr. 
Gay, A. C 



County 



Granville- 



Cabarrus . 

Bladen 

Pamlico, N. C. 

Durham 

Perquimans 

Montgomery... 

Davidson 

Sampson 



Gaston 

Polk 

Rutherford . 

Wilson 

Forsyth 

Jackson 

Wilkes 

Alleghany.. 
Vance 



Hyde 

Warren 

Edgecombe. _. 

Onslow 

Swain 

Cherokee 

New Hanover- 
Cleveland 

Burke 

Dare 

Henderson 

Cumberland _ _ 



Pitt 

Johnston . 



Mecklenburg.. 

Gates 

Orange 

Northampton- 



Party 






Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Republican... 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Republican... 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat . 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 



Post Office 



Creedmoor, N. C. 

Pollocksville, N. C. 
Madison, N. C. 
Harrisburg, N. C. ,.\o. 2. 
Council, N. C. 
Grantsboro, N. C. 
Durham, X. C. 
Hertford, N. C. 
Troy N.C. 
Lexington, N. C. 
Clinton, N C. 

Gastonia, X. C. 
Trvon, N. C. 
Ellenboro, N.C. 
Wilson. X. C. 
Winston-Salem, X. C. 
Cullowhee. X. ('. 
Wilkesboro, N. C. 
Sparta, X. C. 
Henderson, X. C. 

Lake Landing, N.C. 
Creek, X. C. 
Rocky Mount, N C. 
Jacksonville, X. C. 
Brvson City, X. C. 
Murphy, X. C. 
Wilmington. N. C. 

Shelby, N.C. 
Morganton, X. C. 
Manteo, X. C. 
Hendersonville, X. ('. 
Fayetteville, N.C. 

Greenville, X. C. 
Kenly, V C. 

Charlotte, X. C. 
Gates, X. C 
Hillsboro, N 
Jackson, X. ('. 



"Died February 11, 1931. 



36 



Legislative Department 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



Name 



Gill, E. M 

ham, Ernest. 

m r, R. T 

Groves, J. A. 
• iwaltney, J. L... 
Gwyn, X. H 



ead, VV. I 

Hamilton, Luther.. 

Hanes, R. M 

Harris, R. L 

Haynes, C. H 

Helms, T. L. A 

Henrv, W. M 

Hipps, R. E 

Holmes, J. \\ . 
Hood, Gurney P... 

Howell, J. S 

Huffman, E. W. G. 



James, J. C 

Jeffress, E. B 

Jones, Henry H... 
Johnson, D. Mac. 

Johnson, E. K 

Johnson, R. G 

Johnson, V. R 

Johnston, Ira T... 
Johnston, Julius.. 
Jolly, D. M 



Kiffian, Dr. P. B 

"Kitchin, Clement S, 



Leake. H. H 

LeGrand, J. P 

Long, J. Dolph 

Long, Dr. T. W. M.._. 

Loven, Ed. S 

Lumpkin, W. L 

Lyon, J. M.„ 



MaeLean. A. D 

McBee, J. C 

McDevitt, N. B. ... 

hern, Laurie. 

igan, D. F 

McRae, John A 



Marshal!, J. A 

ne, .Mrs. Lillie M. 

Mess, 0. B 

Moye.J. C 

Morphew, R. B 



Neal, W. W 

Newman, H; 
Norman, Z. V 



County 



Scotland . . 
Robeson... 
Watauga . . 

Stanly 

Alexander. 
Caldwell.. 



Camden 

Carteret 

Forsyth 

Person 

Surry-J 

Union 

Transylvania . 

Haywood 

Pitt.... 

Wayne 

Buncombe 

Rowan 



Pasquotank. 

Guilford 

Hertford 

Halifax 

Currituck. .. 

Pender 

Chatham 

Ashe 

Caswell 

Kenansville.. 

Clay 0. 

Halifax 



Stokes 

Davie 

Alamance- 
Halifax 

Avery 

Franklin.. 
Yancey... 



Forsyth 

Rockingham . 

Nash 

Greene 

Graham 



McDowell 

New Hanover. 
Washington- 



Party 



Beaufort 

Mitchell 

Madison 

Hoke 

Columbus 

Mecklenburg . Democrat 



Democrat. . 
Democrat . . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 

Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. _ 
Democrat. . 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 

Democrat. . 
Democrat . 
Democrat. _ 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat.. 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. _ 
Democrat.. 
Democrat- . 

Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 

Democrat.. 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat.. 
Democrat- 
Democrat.. 

Democrat.. 
Republican. 
Democrat.. 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 



Democrat- 
Democrat . 
Democrat- 
Democrat. 
Democrat- 
Democrat. 
Democrat- 
Democrat- 



Post Office 



Laurinburg, N. C. 
Red Springs, N. C. 
Blowing Rock, N. C. 
Albemarle, N. C. 
Taylors ville, N. C. 
Lenoir, N. C. 

South Mills, N. C. 
Morehead City, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Roxboro, N. C. 
Mount Airy, N. C. 
Monroe, N. C. 
Brevard, N. C. 
Canton, N. C. 
Farmville, N. C. 
Goldsboro, N. C. 
Asheville. N. C. 
Salisbury, N. C. 

Weeksville, N. C. 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Cofield, N. C. 
Edfield, N. C. 
Currituck, N. C. 
Burgaw, N. C. 
Pittsboro, N. C. 
Jefferson, N. C. 
Yancey ville, N. C. 
Kenansville, N. C. 

Hayesville, N. C. 
Scotland Neck, N. C 

King, N. C. 
Mocksville, N. C. 
Graham, N. C. 
Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 
Linville, N. C. 
Franklinton, N. C. 
Burnsville, N C. 

Washington, N. C. 
Bakersville, N. C. " 
Marshall, N. C. 
Raeford, N. C. 
Tabor, N. C. 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Walnut Cove, N. C. 
Spray, N. C. 
Spring Hope, N. C. 
Snow Hill, N. C. 
Robbinsville, N. C. 

Marion, N. C. 
Wilmington, X. (.'. 
Plymouth, N. C. 



! December. 1 !, 1930. 



Members of the House of Representatives '-M 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



Name 


County 


Party 


Post Office 


Parker Fred P. Jr. 


Wayne . . 


Democrat 

Republican... 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat. 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Republican. .. 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat - 

Democrat 


Goldsboro, N. C. 


Pinnh J. C. 


Yadkin .... 


Cycle, N. C. -~ 


Pitts, Oscar T. . 


Catawba 

Gaston.. 

Mecklenburg.. 

Buncombe. . . . . 


Hickory, N. C. 


Puett, John F. . 


Dallas, N. C. 


Readling, J. B. . 


Cornelius, N. C. 


Reed M. L. 


Asheville, N. C. 




Polk 


Trvon, N. C. 


Ruffin Dr J. B. 


Bertie .. 


Powellsville, N. C. 




Richmond 


Rockingham, X. C. 


Seawell A A F. 




Sanford. N. C. 


Sigmon, W. H 

Smith, J. C. 


Lincoln . 

Martin 


Denver, N 
Robersonville, X. C. 


Smith, Willis 


Wake 


Raleigh, N. C. 




Moore . 


Carthage, V C. 


Sutton, F. I. 


Lenoir 


Kinston, N. C. 


Tatem C. W. 


Tvrrell... 


Columbia, X. C. 




Anson 

Brunswick 


\\ . . 




Southport, X. ('. 




Iredell 


■ .illc, X. ('. 




Guilford 


High Point, X. C. 




Rowan. _ 




Upchurch, J. Sherwood.. 

Ward W L 




Raleigh, N. C, 




Asheboro, X. ('. 


Waynick, C. M 

White A. E. 


Guilford .. .. 


High Point, N. C. 


Robeson . . . 


Lumbert'ni, V < '. 


White, J. F 

Whitley, R. B. 


Chowan. 

Wake .. ... 

Craven . . 

Johnston. . 

Nash -. 

Harnett 

Durham 


Edenton, X. C. 
Wendell, X. C. 


Willis, David H. 


New Bern, X. C. 


Woodall, Preston . 


Benson. X. C. 


Woodard, W. C. 


Rocky Mount. X. C. 




Dunn, X. C. 




Durham. X. ('. 









REPRESENTATIVES 

(Arranged by Counties) 

Alamance — J. Dolph Long, Graham (D). 
Alexander — J. L. Gwaltney, Taylorsville (D) 
Alleghany — R. F. Grouse, Sparta (D). 
Anson — F. E. Thomas, Wadesboro (D). 
Ashe — Ira T. Johnston, Jefferson (D). 
Avery — Ed. S. Loven, Linville (D). 
Beaufort — A. D. McLean, Washington (D). 
Bertie— Dr. J. B. Ruffin, Powellsville (D). 
Bladen— C. L. Braddy, Council (D). 



38 Legislative Department 

Brunswick — James W. Thompson, Southport (D). 

Buncombe — M. L. Reed, Asheville (D) ; J. S. Howell, Ashe- 
ville (D). 

Burke — S. J. Ervin, Jr., Morganton (D). 

Cabarrus — Sam Black, Harrisburg, R. 2 (D). 

Caldwell — N. Hunt Gwyn, Lenoir (D). 

Camden — W. I. Halstead, South Mills (D). 

Carteret — Luther Hamilton, Morehead City (D). 

Caswell — Julius Johnston, Yanceyville (D). 

Cataivba — Oscar Pitts, Hickory (D). 

Chatham — V. R. Johnson, Pittsboro (D). 

Cherokee — *John H. Dillard, Murphy (D). 

Chowan — J. Fernando White, Edenton (D). 

Clay— Dr. P. B. Killian, Hayesville (D). 

Cleveland — Henry B. Edwards, Shelby (D). 

Columbus — D. F. McGougan, Tabor (D). 

Craven — David H. Willis, New Bern (D). 

Cumberland — W. C. Ewing, Fayetteville (D). 

Currituck — E. R. Johnson, Currituck (D). 

Dare — R. Bruce Etheridge, Manteo (D). 

Davidson — W. O. Burgin, Lexington (D)?- 

Davie — J. P. LeGrand, Mocksville (D). 

Duplin — D. M. Jolly, Kenansville (D). 

Durham — E. C. Brooks, Jr., Durham (D) ; Victor V. Young, 
Durham (D). 

Edgecombe — R. B. Davis, Rocky Mount (D). 

Forsyth — R. M. Hanes, Winston-Salem (D) ; R. M. Cox, Win- 
ston-Salem (D) ; J. A. Marshall, Walnut Cove (D). 

Franklin — W. L. Lumpkin, Franklinton (D). 

Gaston — R. G. Cherry, Gastonia (D) ; John F. Puett, Dallas 
(D). 

Gates— G. D. Gatling, Gates (D). 

Graham — R. B. Morphew, Robbinsville (D). 

Granville — Claude W. Allen, Creedmoor (D). 

Greene— J. C. Moye, Snow Hill (D). 

Guilford— V. B. Jeffress, Greensboro (D) ; C. M. Waynick, High 
Point (D) ; Thos. Turner, Jr., High Point (D). 



* Died February 11, 1931. 



Members of the House of Representatives 39 

Halifax — D. Mac Johnson, Enfield (D) ; *Clement S. Kitchin, 
Scotland Neck (D) ; Dr. T. W. M. Long, Roanoke Rapids. 

Harnett — J. R. Young, Dunn (D). 

Haywood — R. E. Hipps, Canton (D). 

Henderson — John Ewbank, Hendersonville (D). 

Hertford — Henry H. Jones, Cofield (D). 

Hoke — Laurie McEachern, Raeford (D). 

Hyde — George E. Davis, Swan Quarter (D). 

Iredell — D. E. Turner, Mooresville (D). 

Jackson — Thos. A. Cox, Cullowhee (D). 

Johnston — Preston Woodall, Benson (D) ; R. T. Fulghum, 
Kenly (D). 

Jones — R. P. Bender, Pollocksville (D). 

Lee— A. A. F. Seawell, Sanford (D). 

Lenoir — F. I. Sutton, Kinston (D). 

Lincoln — W. H. Sigmon, Denver (D). 

Macon — Dr. W. A. Rogers, Franklin (D). 

Madison — N. B. McDevitt, Marshall (D). 

Martin — J. C. Smith, Robersonville (D). 

McDowell— W. W. Neal, Marion (D). 

Mecklenburg — John A. McRae, Charlotte (D) ; Joe Garibaldi, 
Charlotte (D) ; J. B. Readling, Cornelius (D). 

Mitchell— John C. McBee, Bakersville (R).*^ 

Montgomery — T. Wade Bruton, Troy (D). 

Moore — U. L. Spence, Carthage (D). 

Nash — 0. B. Moss, Spring Hope (D) ; W. C. Woodard, Rocky 
Mount (D). 

New Hanover — Wilbur R. Dosher, Wilmington (D) ; Harriss 
Newman, Washington (D). 

Northampton — A. C. Gay, Jackson (D). 

Onslow — N. E. Day, Jacksonville (D). 

Orange — S. M. Gattis, Jr., Hillsboro (D). 

Pamlico — J. J. Brinson, Grantsboro (R). 

Pasq\iotank — J. C. James, Weeksville (D). 

Pender — R. G. Johnson, Burgaw (D). 



*Died December 21, 1930. 



40 Legislative Department 

Perquimans — W. T. Brown, Hertford (D). 

Person — R. L. Harris, Roxboro (D). 

Pitt— E. G. Flanagan, Greenville (D) ; J. W. Holmes, Farm- 
ville (D). 

Polk—E. B. Cloud, Tryon (D). 

Randolph — W. L. Ward, Asheboro (R)."^ 

Richmond — D. E. Scarborough, Rockingham (D). 

Robeson — A. E. White, Lumberton (D) ; Ernest Graham, Red 
Springs (D). 

Rockingham — H. N. Binford, Madison (D) ; Mrs. Lillie M. 
Mebane, Spray (D). 

Rowan — George R. Uzzell, Salisbury (D) ; E. W. G. Huffman, 
Salisbury (D). 

Rutherford— 0. R. Coffield, Ellenboro (D). 

Sampson- — A. L. Butler, Clinton, (R).r 

Scotland— E. M. Gill, Laurinburg (D). 

Stanly — J. A. Groves, Albemarle (D). 

Stokes— H. H. Leake, King (D). 

Surry — C. H. Haynes, Mt. Airy (D). 

Swain — Dr. Jas. DeHart, Bryson City (D). 

Transylvania — W. M. Henry, Brevard (D). 

Tyrrell— C. W. Tatem, Columbia (D). 

Union — T. L. A. Helms, Monroe (D). 

Vance — John B. Crudup, Henderson (D). 

Wake— Willis Smith, Raleigh (D) ; J. Sherwood Upchurch, Ra- 
leigh (D) ; R. B. Whitley, Wendell (D). 

Warren — J. S. Davis, Creek (D). 

Washington — Z. V. Norman, Plymouth (D). 

Watauga— R. T. Greer, Blowing Rock (D). 

Wayne — Fred P. Parker, Jr., Goldsboro (D) ; Gurney P. Hood, 
Goldsboro (D). 

Wilkes— H. A. Cranor, Wilkesboro (D). 

Wilson— U. G. Connor, Wilson (D). 

Yadkin— J. C. Pinnix, Cycle (R).*^ 

Yancey — J. M. Lyon, Burnsville (D). 



Rules of the House of Representatives 41 

RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

1931 

Touching the Duties of the Speaker 

1. It shall be the duty of the Speaker to have the sessions of 
the House opened with prayer. 

2. He shall take the chair every day at the hour fixed by the 
House on the preceding legislative day, shall immediately call the 
members to order, and, on appearance of a quorum, cause the 
Journal of the preceding day to be approved. 

3. He shall preserve order and decorum, may speak to points 
of order in preference to other members, rising from his seat for 
that purpose, and shall decide questions of order, subject to an 
appeal to the House by any member on which appeal no member 
shall speak more than once, unless by leave of the House. A 
two-thirds vote of the members present shall be necessary to 
sustain any appeal from the ruling of the Chair. 

4. He shall rise to put a question, but may state it sitting. 

5. Questions shall be put in this form, namely, "Those in favor 
(as the question may be) will say, 'Aye'," and after the affirma- 
tive voice has' been expressed, "Those opposed will say 'No'." Upon 
a call for a division the Speaker shall count; if required, he shall 
appoint tellers. 

6. The Speaker shall have a general direction of the hall. He 
shall have a right to name any member to perform the duties of 
the Chair, but substitution shall not extend beyond one day, ex- 
cept in the case of sickness or by leave of the House. 

7. All committees shall be apointed by the Speaker, unless 
otherwise specially ordered by the House. 

8. In all elections the Speaker may vote. In all other cases he 
may exercise his right to vote, or he may reserve this right until 
there is a tie; but in no case shall he be allowed to vote twice on 
the same question. 

9. All acts, addresses and resolutions, and all warrants and 
subpoenas issued by order of the House shall be signed by the 
Speaker. 



42 Legislative Department 

10. In case of any disturbance or disorderly conduct in the 
galleries or lobby, the Speaker or other presiding officer shall have 
power to order the same to be cleared. 

11. No persons except members of the Senate, officers and 
clerks of the General Assembly, Judges of the Supreme and Su- 
perior Courts, State officers, former members of the General As- 
sembly, and persons particularly invited by the Speaker shall be 
admitted within the hall of the House: Provided, that no person 
except members of the Senate and officers of the General Assembly 
shall be allowed on the floor of the House or in the lobby in the 
rear of the Speaker's desk, unless permitted by the Speaker of the 
House. 

12. Reporters wishing to take down debates may be admitted 
by the Speaker, who shall assign such places to them on the floor 
or elsewhere, to effect this object, as shall not interfere with the 
convenience of the House. 

13. Smoking shall not be allowed in the hall, the lobbies, or the 
galleries while the House is in session: Provided, that smoking 
may be permitted in the lobby in the rear of the Speaker's desk. 

Order of Business of the Day 

14. After the approval of the Journal of the preceding day, 
which shall stand approved without objection, the House shall 
proceed to business in the following order, viz. : 

(1) The receiving of petitions, memorials, and papers ad- 
dressed to the General Assembly or to the House. 

(2) Reports of standing committees. 

(3) Reports of select committees. 

(4) Resolutions. 

(5) Bills. 

(6) The unfinished business of the preceding day. 

(7) Bills, resolutions, petitions, memorials, messages, and 
other papers on the Calendar, in their exact numerical order, un- 
less displaced by the orders of the day; but messages and motions 
to elect officers shall always be in order. 

No member shall rise from his seat to introduce any petition, 
resolution or bill out of order unless he is permitted so to do by 
a suspension of the rules. 



Rules of the House of Representatives 

On Decorum in Debate 

15. When any member is about to speak in debate or deliver 
any matter to the House, he shall rise from his seat and respect- 
fully address the Speaker. 

16. When the Speaker shall call a member to order, the mem- 
ber shall sit down, as also he shall when called to order by another 
member, unless the Speaker decides the point of order in his 
favor. By leave of the House a member called to order may clear 
a matter of fact, or explain, but shall not proceed in debate so long 
as the decision stands, but by permission of the House. Any mem- 
ber may appeal from the decision of the Chair, and if, upon ap- 
peal, the decision be in favor of the member called to order, he may 
proceed; if otherwise, he shall not, except by leave of the House; 
and if the case, in the judgment of the House, require it, he shall 
be liable to its censure. 

17. No member shall speak until recognized by the Chair, and 
when two or more members rise at the same time, the Speaker 
shall name the member to speak. 

18. No member shall speak more than twice on the main 
question, nor longer than thirty minutes for the first speech and 
fifteen minutes for the second speech, unless allowed to do so by 
the affirmative vote of a majority of the members present; nor 
shall he speak more than once upon an amendment or motion to 
commit or postpone, and then not longer than ten minutes. But 
the House may, by consent of a majority, suspend the operations 
of this rule during any debate on any particular question before 
the House, or the Committee on Rules may bring in a special rule 
that shall be applicable to the debate on any bill. 

19. While the Speaker is putting any question, or address- 
ing the House, no person shall speak, stand up, walk out of or 
cross the House, nor when a member is speaking entertain private 
discourse, stand up, or pass between him and the Chair. 

20. No member shall vote on any question when he was not 
present when the question was put by the Speaker, except by the 
consent of the House. Upon a division and count of the House 
on any question, no member without the bar shall be counted. 



44 Legislative Department 

21. Every member who shall be in the hall of the House for 
the above purpose when the question is put shall give his vote 
upon a call of the aye's and no's, unless the House for special 
reasons shall excuse him, and no application to be excused from 
voting or to explain a vote shall be entertained unless made be- 
fore the call of the roll. The hall of the House shall include the 
lobbies and offices connected with the hall. 

22. When a motion is made, it shall be stated by the Speaker, 
or, if written, it shall be handed to the Chair and read aloud by 
the Speaker or Clerk before debate. 

23. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the Speaker 
or any two members request it. 

24. After a motion is stated by the Speaker or read by the 
Clerk, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the House, but may 
be withdrawn before a decision or amendment, except in case of 
a motion to reconsider, which motion, when made by a member, 
shall be deemed and taken to be in possession of the House, and 
shall not be withdrawn without leave of the House. 

25. When a question is under debate no motion shall be re- 
ceived but to adjourn, to lay on the table, to postpone indefinitely, 
to postpone to a day certain, to commit or amend, which several 
motions shall have precedence in the order in which they stand 
arranged; and no motion to lay on the table, to postpone indefi- 
nitely, to postpone to a day certain, to commit or amend, being 
decided, shall be again allowed at the same stage of the bill or 
proposition. 

26. A motion to adjourn or lay on the table shall be decided 
without debate, and a motion to adjourn shall always be in order, 
except when the House is voting or some member is speaking; 
but a motion to adjourn shall not follow a motion to adjourn until 
debate or some other business of the House has intervened. 

27. When a question has been postponed indefinitely, the same 
shall not be acted on again during the session, except upon a 
two-thirds' vote. 

28. Any member may call for a division of the question, when 
the same shall admit of it, which shall be determined by the 
Speaker. 



Rules of the House of Representatives 45 

29. When a motion has been once made and carried in the 
affirmative or negative, it shall be in order for any member of the 
majority to move for the reconsideration thereof, on the same or 
succeeding day, unless it may have subsequently passed the Sen- 
ate, and no motion to reconsider shall be taken from the table 
except by a two-thirds' vote. But unless such vote has been taken 
by a call of the yea's and nay's, any member may move to recon- 
sider. 

30. When the reading of a paper is called for, which has 
been read in the House, and the same is objected to by any mem- 
ber, it shall be determined by a vote of the House. 

31. Petitions, memorials, and other papers addressed to the 
House shall be presented by the Speaker; a brief statement of 
the contents thereof may be verbally made by the introducer before 
reference to a committee, but shall not be debated or decided on 
the day of their first being read, unless the House shall direct 
otherwise. 

32. When the aye's and no's are called for on any question, 
it shall be on motion before the question is put; and if seconded 
by one-fifth of the members present, the question shall be de- 
cided by the aye's and no's; and in taking the aye's and no's, 
or on a call of the House the names of the members will be taken 
alphabetically. 

33. Decency of speech shall be observed and personal reflection 
carefully avoided. -, . 

34. Any member may arise at any time to speak to a question 
of personal privilege, and upon objection to him proceeding, the 
Speaker shall determine if the question is one of privilege. 

35. Fifteen members, including the Speaker, shall be autho- 
rized to compel the attendance of absent members. 

36. No member or officer of the House shall absent himself 
from the service of the House without leave, unless from sick- 
ness or inability. 

37. Any member may excuse himself from serving on any 
committee if he is a member of two standing committees. 



46 Legislative Department 

38. If any member shall be necessarily absent on temporary 
business of the House when a vote is taken upon any question, 
upon entering the House he shall be permitted, on request, to vote, 
provided that the result shall not be thereby affected. 

39. No standing rule or order shall be rescinded or altered 
without one day's notice given on the motion thereof, and to sus- 
tain such motion two-thirds of the House shall be required. 

40. The members of the House shall uncover their heads upon 
entering the House while it is in session, and shall continue so 
uncovered during their continuance in the hall, except Quakers. 

41. A motion to reconsider shall be determined by a majority 
vote, except a motion to reconsider an indefinite postponement, or 
a motion to reconsider a motion tabling a motion to reconsider, 
which shall require a two-thirds' vote. 

42. After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass on any 
of its readings, the contents of such bill or the principal pro- 
visions or its subject-matter shall not be embodied in any other 
measure. Upon the point of order being raised and sustained 
by the Chair, such measures shall be laid upon the table, and shall 
not be taken therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of the elected 
membership of the House: Provided, no local bill shall be held by 
the Chair as embodying the provisions or being identical with any 
State-wide measure which has been laid upon the table, or failed 
to pass any of its readings. 

42%. That the name of the Committee on Fish and Fisheries 
be changed to Commercial Fisheries to which shall be referred 
all coastal fishing problems. Also that the Committee on mines 
and mining be abolished and instead a Committee shall be desig- 
nated as the Committee on Conservation and Development to which 
shall be referred all matters pertaining to Inland Fisheries, Geol- 
ogy and Mining, Forestry, Water Resources, and State advertis- 
ing. 



Rules of the House of Representatives 47 

Standing Committees 

43. At the commencement of the session a standing commit- 
tee shall be appointed by the Speaker on each of the following 
subjects, namely: 

On Agriculture. 

On Appropriations. 

On Banks and Banking. 

On Claims. 

On Commerce. 

On Commercial Fisheries. 

On Congressional Districts. 

On Conservation and Development. 

On Constitutional Amendments. 

On Corporation Commission. 

On Corporations. 

On Counties, Cities, and Towns. 

On Courts and Judicial Districts. 

On Education. 

On Election Laws. 

On Engrossed Bills. 

On Expenditures of the House. 

On Federal Relations. 

On Finance. 

On Game. 

On Health. 

On Immigration. 

On Insane Asylums. 

On Institutions for the Blind. 

On Institutions for the Deaf and Dumb. 

On Insurance. 

On Internal Improvements. 

On the Journal. 

On Judiciary No. 1. 

On Judiciary No. 2. 

On Manufactures and Labor. 

On Military Affairs. 

On Oyster Industry. 

On Penal Institutions. 

On Pensions. 



48 Legislative Department 

On Private and Public-Local Laws. 

On Privileges and Elections. 

On Propositions and Grievances. 

On Public Roads. 

On Public Welfare. 

On Regulation of Public-Service Corporations. 

On Rules. 

On Salaries and Fees. 

On Senatorial Districts. 

Joint Committees 

On Enrolled Bills. 

On Justices of the Peace. 

On Library. 

On Printing. 

On Public Buildings and Grounds. 

On Trustees of University. 

On Revision of the Laws. 

The first member announced on each committee shall be chair- 
man. 

44. In forming a Committee of the Whole House, the Speaker 
shall leave the Chair, and a Chairman to preside in committee 
shall be appointed by the Speaker. 

45. Upon bills submitted to a Committee of the Whole House, 
the bill shall be first read throughout by the Clerk, and then again 
read and debated by sections, leaving the preamble to be last con- 
sidered. The body of the bill shall not be defaced or interlined, 
but all amendments, noting the page and line, shall be duly entered 
by the Clerk on a separate paper as the same shall be agreed to 
by the committee, and so reported to the House. After report, the 
bill shall again be subject to be debated and amended by sections 
before a question on its passage be taken. 

46. The rules of procedure in the House shall be observed in 
a Committee of the Whole House, so far as they may be applicable, 
except the rule limiting the time of speaking and the previous 
question. 



Rules of the House of Representatives 49 

47. In a Committee of the Whole House a motion that the 
committee rise shall always be in order, except when a member 
is speaking, and shall be decided without debate. 

48. Every bill shall be introduced by motion for suspension 
of the rules, or by order of the House, or on the report of a com- 
mittee, unless introduced in regular order during the morning 
hour. 

49. All bills and resolutions shall be reported from the com- 
mittee to which referred, with such recommendations as the com- 
mittee may desire to make. 

50. Every bill shall receive three several readings in the 
House previous to its passage, and the Speaker shall give notice 
at each whether it be its first, second or third reading. 

51. Any member introducing a bill or resolution shall briefly 
endorse thereon the substance of the same. 

52. All bills and resolutions shall upon their introduction be 
referred by the Speaker, without suggestion from the introducer, 
to the appropriate committee. No bills shall be withdrawn from 
the committee to which referred except upon motion duly made 
and carried by a majority vote. 

53. The Clerk of the House shall keep a separate calendar of 
the public, local, and private bills, and shall number them in the 
order in which they are introduced, and all bills shall be dis- 
posed of in the order they stand upon the Calendar; but the Com- 
mittee on Rules may at any time arrange the order of precedence 
in which bills may be considered. No bill shall be twice read on 
the same day without the concurrence of two-thirds of the 
members. 

54. All resolutions which may grant money out of the Trea- 
sury, or such as shall be of public nature, shall be treated in all 
respects in a similar manner with public bills. 

55. The Clerk of the House shall be deemed to continue in 
office until another is appointed. 

56. On the point of no quorum being raised, the doors shall 
be closed and there shall be a call of the House, and upon a call 



50 Legislative Department 

of the House the names of the members shall be called over by the 
Clerk and the absentees noted, after which the names of the 
absentees shall again be called over. Those for whom no excuse 
or sufficient excuses are made may, by order of those present, 
if fifteen in number, be taken into custody as they appear, or may 
be sent for and taken into custody wherever to be found by special 
messenger appointed for that purpose. 

Previous Question 

57. The previous question shall be as follows: "Shall the main 
question be now put?" and, until it is decided, shall preclude all 
amendments and debate. If this question shall be decided in the 
affirmative, the "main question" shall be on the passage of the bill, 
resolution or other matter under consideration; but when amend- 
ments are pending, the question shall be taken upon such amend- 
ments, in their order, without further debate or amendment. If 
such question be decided in the negative, the main question shall 
be considered as remaining under debate; Provided, that no one 
shall move the previous question except the member submitting 
the report on the bill or other matter under consideration, and the 
member introducing the bill or other matter under consideration, 
or the member in charge of the measure, who shall be designated 
by the chairman of the committee reporting the same to the House 
at the time the bill or other matter under consideration is reported 
to the House or taken up for considex'ation. 

When a motion for the previous question is made, and pend- 
ing the second thereto by a majority, debate shall cease; but if 
any member obtains the floor, he may move to lay the matter under 
consideration on the table, or move an adjournment, and when 
both or either of these motions are pending the question shall 
stand: 

(1) Previous question. 

(2) To adjourn. 

(3) To lay on the table. 

And then upon the main question, or amendments, or the 
motion to postpone indefinitely, postpone to a day certain, to com- 
mit, or amend, in the order of their precedence, until the main 
question is reached or disposed of; but after the previous question 
has been called by a majority, no motion, or amendment, or de- 
bate shall be in order. 



Rules of the House of Representatives 51 

All motions below the motions to lay on the table must be made 
prior to a motion for the previous question; but, pending and not 
after the second therefor, by the majority of the House, a motion 
to adjourn or lay on the table, or both, are in order. This con- 
stitutes the precedence of the motions to adjourn and lay on the 
table over other motions, in Rule 25. 

Motions stand as follows in order of precedence in Rule 26: 

Previous question. 

Adjourn. 

Lay on the table. 

Postpone definitely. 

To commit or amend. 

When the previous question is called, all motions below it fall, 
unless made prior to the call, and all motions above it fall after 
its second by a majority required. Pending the second, the mo- 
tions to adjourn and lay on the table are in order, but not after 
a second. When in order and every motion is before the House, 
the question stands as follows: 

Previous question. 

Adjourn. 

Lay on the table. 

Postpone indefinitely. 

Postpone definitely. 

To commit. 

Amendment to amendment. 

Amendment. 

Substitute. 

Bill. 

The previous question covers all other motions when sec- 
onded by a majority of the House, and proceeds by regular 
graduation to the main question, without debate, amendment, 
or motion, until such question is reached or disposed of. 

58. All committees, other than the Committee on Appropri- 
ations, when favorably reporting any bill which carries an ap- 
propriation from the State, shall indicate same in the report, 
and said bill shall be referred to the Committee on Appropria- 
tions for a further report before being acted upon by the 
House. 



52 Legislative Department 

59. The Principal Clerk, the Engrossing Clerk, and the 
Sergeant-at-Arms may appoint, with the approval of the 
Speaker, such assistants as may be necessary to the efficient 
discharge of the duties of their various offices, and one or more 
of whom may be assigned by the Speaker from the Engrossing 
Clerk's office to the office of the Legislative Reference Librarian 
for the purpose of drafting bills. 

60. The Speaker may appoint a Clerk to the Speaker, and 
he may also appoint ten pages to wait upon the sessions of the 
House, and when the pressure of business may require, he may 
appoint five additional pages. 

61. The chairman of each of the following committees — Ap- 
propriations, Counties, Cities and Towns, Education and Finance 
— may each appoint a clerk to the said committees; and the 
chairman of Judiciary Committee No. 1, and of Judiciary Com- 
mittee No. 2 may jointly appoint a clerk to serve both of said 
committees, all by and with the approval of the Speaker. 

62. That no clerk, laborer, or other person employed, or ap- 
pointed under Rules 59, 60 and 61 hereof shall receive during 
such employment, appointment or service any compensation from 
any other department of the State Government, or from any 
other source, and there shall not be voted, paid, or awarded any 
additional pay, bonus or gratuity to any of them but said per- 
sons shall receive only the pay for such duties and services as 
now provided by law. When the House is not in session, the 
pages shall be under the supervision of the Principal Clerk. 

63. The chairman and five other members of any committee 
shall constitute a quorum of said committee for the transaction 
of business. 

64. The Committee on the Journal shall examine daily the 
Journal of the House before the hour of convening, and report 
after the opening of the House whether or not the proceedings 
of the previous day have been correctly recorded. 

65. When a bill shall be reported by a committee with a recom- 
mendation that it be not passed, but accompanied by a minority 
report, the question before the House shall be, "The adoption of 



Rules of the House of Representatives 53 

the Minority Report," and it failing to be adopted by a majority 
vote, the bill shall be placed upon the unfavorable calendar. Such 
minority report shall be signed by at least three members of the 
committee who were present when the bill was considered in com- 
mittee. In the event there is an unfavorable report with no 
minority report accompanying it, the bill shall be placed upon 
the unfavorable calendar. To take a bill from the unfavorable 
calendar, a two-thirds vote shall be necessary. 

66. Whenever a public bill is introduced, a carbon copy thereof 
shall accompany the bill. The Reading Clerk shall stamp the copy 
with the number stamped upon the original bill. Such copy shall 
be daily delivered to the joint committee hereinafter provided for. 
The Chief Clerk shall deliver the carbon copy of the bills desig- 
nated to be printed, as hereinafter provided for, to the public 
printer and cause 400 copies thereof to be printed. On the morn- 
ing following the delivery of the printed copies, the Chief Clerk 
shall cause the Chief Page to have one copy thereof put upon the 
desk of each member and shall retain the other printed copies in 
his office. A sufficient number of the printed copies for the use 
of the committee to which the bill is referred shall be by the 
Chief Page delivered to the Chairman or Clerk of that committee. 
If the bill is passed, the remaining copies shall be by the Chief 
Page delivered to the Chief Clerk of the Senate for the use of the 
Senate. The cost of printing shall be paid from the contingent 
fund of the House of Representatives. The Chairman of the Rules 
Committee of the House and the Chairman of the Rules Com- 
mittee of the Senate shall appoint a sub-committee consisting of 
two members of the House and two members of the Senate from 
the body of the House and the Senate and such chairman shall 
notify the Chief Clerk of the House and of the Senate who has 
been so appointed. Such sub-committee shall meet daily and 
examine the carbon copies of the public bills introduced and de- 
termine which of such public bills shall be printed and which 
shall not, and stamp the copies accordingly. Such sub-com- 
mittee shall serve for one week unless for good cause the chair- 
man of the respective Rules Committees shall determine otherwise. 
If the member, introducing a public bill, which the Committee 
shall determine, should not be printed, so desires, he may appear 



54 Legislative Department 

before the Committee at the next meeting thereof with reference 
thereto. 

67. Whenever any resolution or bill is introduced a carbon 
copy thereof shall be attached thereto, and the Principal Clerk 
shall cause said carbon copy to be numbered as the original 
resolution or bill is numbered, and shall cause the same to be 
available at all times to the member introducing the same. In 
case the resolution or bill is a public resolution or bill, an ad- 
ditional carbon copy shall also be attached thereto for the use of 
the Public Printer, under the provisions of Rule 66. 

ARTICLE II 
Constitution of North Carolina 

Sec. 29. Limitations upon power of General Assembly to 
enact private or special legislation. 

The General Assembly shall not pass any local, private, or 
special act or resolution relating to the establishment of courts 
inferior to the superior court; relating to the appointment of 
justices of the peace; relating to health, sanitation, and the 
abatement of nuisances; changing the names of cities, towns and 
townships; authorizing the laying out, opening, altering, main- 
taining, or discontinuing of highways, streets, or alleys; relating 
to ferries or bridges; relating to non-navigable streams; relating 
to cemeteries; relating to the pay of jurors; erecting new town- 
ships, or changing township lines, or establishing or changing the 
lines of school districts; remitting fines, penalties, and for- 
feitures, or refunding moneys legally paid into the public treas- 
ury; regulating labor, trade, mining, or manufacturing; extend- 
ing the time for the assessment or collection of taxes or otherwise 
relieving any collector of taxes from the due performance of his 
official duties or his sureties from liability; giving effect to in- 
formal wills and deeds; nor shall the General Assembly enact 
any such local, private or special act by the partial repeal of 
a general law, but the General Assembly may at any time re- 
peal local, private, or special laws enacted by it. Any local, 
private or special act or resolution passed in violation of the 
provisions of this section shall be void. The General Assembly 
shall have power to pass general laws regulating matters set 
out in this section. 



Standing Committees of House 55 

house committees, session 1931 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 

Agriculture. Messrs. White of Robeson, Chairman; Sigmon, 
Holmes, Ruffin, Graham, Davis of Hyde, Mrs. Mebane, Ewing, 
Johnson of Currituck, Braddy, Johnson of Pender, McGougan, 
Jones, Black, Johnston of Caswell, McEachern, Cox of Forsyth, 
James, Allen. 

Appropriations. Messrs, Harris, Chairman; Cox of Forsyth, 
Garibaldi, Morphew, Dillard, Burgin, Coffield, Norman, Brown, 
Holmes, Ewing, McEachern, Turner of Guilford, Hipps, Whitley, 
Graham, Edwards, Cranor, Sutton, Dosher, Seawell, Davis of 
Edgecombe, Haynes of Surry, Spence, Bruton, Johnson of Pender, 
Woodard, Young of Durham, Black, Butler, Brinson. 

Banks and Banking. Messrs. Cherry, Chairman; Hanes of 
Forsyth, Flanagan, Ruffin, Leake, Haynes of Surry, McEachern, 
Etheridge, Burgin, Newman, Holmes, Davis of Edgecombe, Rog- 
ers, Cloud, Harris, McGougan, Ewing, Sutton, Whitley, Woodard, 
Greer, Hood, Coffield, Turner of Guilford, Ward. 

Claims. Messrs. Tatem, Chairman; Ewing, Woodard, Johnston 
of Caswell, Lumpkin, Moye, Turner of Iredell, Allen, Cloud, 
Gwyn, Davis of Edgecombe, Uzzell, Thomas, Ewbank. 

Commerce. Messrs. Woodard, Chairman; Henry, Brooks, 
Johnson of Chatham, Howell, Halstead, Bender, Davis of War- 
ren, Hanes of Forsyth, Upchurch, Helms. 

Commercial Fisheries. Messrs. Hamilton, Chairman; Davis of 
Hyde, Davis of Warren, Etheridge, White of Chowan, Tatem, 
Johnson of Currituck, Brown, Willis, Halstead, Bender, Thomp- 
son, James, Hood, Dosher, Lumpkin, Gatling, Brinson. 

Congressional Districts. Messrs. Crudup, Chairman; Gill, 
Etheridge, Edwards, Moss, Cranor, LeGrand, Young of Durham, 
Reed, Ewing, Burgin, Spence, Cherry, Sutton, Flanagan, Neal, 
Waynick, Long of Halifax. 

Conservation and Development. Messrs. Coxe of Jackson, 
Chairman; Hamilton, Whitley, Garibaldi, Willis, Greer, Ewing. 
Etheridge, Gwyn, Cranor, Jolly, Cox of Forsyth, Tatem, Waynick, 



56 Legislative Department 

White of Chowan, Sutton, Neal, Moss, Thompson, Day, Howell, 
Gill. 

Constitutional Amendments. Messrs. Long of Alamance, Chair- 
man; Mac-Lean, Turner of Guilford, Cranor, Moss, Connor, Mor- 
phew, Gill, Gay, Brooks, Young of Harnett, Seawell, Ervin, Butler. 

Corporation Commission. Messrs. Bruton, Chairman; Killian, 
Dillard, Etheridge, Cranor, Moye, Gill, White of Robeson, Pitts, 
Halstead, Johnston of Ashe. 

Corporations. Messrs. Turner of Guilford, Chairman; Dillard, 
Connor, Scarborough, Groves, Davis of Edgecombe, Readling, 
Gay, Seawell, Cherry, Henry, Rogers, Burgin, Howell, Parker. 

Counties, Cities and Towns. Messrs. Neal, Chairman; Pitts, 
Holmes, Greer, Burgin, Day, Braddy, McGougan, Dosher, Ewing, 
Bruton, Hipps, Johnson of Pender, Cox of Forsyth, Etheridge, Gill, 
Johnson of Halifax, Long of Alamance, Lumpkin, Ward, Long of 
Halifax. 

Courts and Judicial Districts. Messrs. Brooks, Chairman; Sut- 
ton, Moss, White of Chowan, Long of Alamance, Howell, Gattis, 
McRae, MacLean, Huffman, Morphew, Bender, Johnson of Chat- 
ham, Turner of Guilford, Halstead, Spence, Crouse, Lumpkin, 
Young of Harnett, Crudup, Bruton, Butler. 

Drainage. Messrs. Holmes, Chairman; Tatem, Johnson of 
Currituck, Davis of Hyde, Scarborough, Woodall, Halstead, Nor- 
man, Thompson, Jones, Johnson of Chatham, Gatling, Willis. 

Education. Messrs. MacLean, Chairman; Ewing, McRae, 
Jeffress, Harris, Woodard, Cox of Forsyth, Mrs. Mebane, Neal, 
Holmes, Johnston of Ashe, Whitley, McGougan, Ruffin, Con- 
nor, Halstead, Uzzell, Coxe of Jackson, Coffield, Bruton, Gattis, 
McEachern, Norman, Graham, Dosher, Ward, McBee, Long of 
Halifax. 

Election Laws. Messrs. Ewing, Chairman; Crudup, Young of 
Harnett, Dosher, Haynes of Surry, Edwards, Pitts, Upchurch, 
Bruton, MacLean, McEachern, Neal, Crouse, Graham, Davis of 
Hyde, Morphew, Gill, McDevitt, Ewbank, Cranor, McBee, Butler. 

Engrossed Bills. Messrs. Lumpkin, Chairman; Gattis, Thomas, 
Bender, Uzzell, Black, Crudup, Bruton, Johnston of Caswell, 
Readling, Etheridge. 



Standing Committees of House 57 

Expenditures of the House. Messrs. Pitts, Chairman; Coffield, 
Johnson of Pender, Jeffress, Black, Puett, Tatem, Allen, Upchurch, 
Flanagan, Uzzell, Dillard, McBee. 

Federal Relations. Messrs. Jolly, Chairman; Loven, Brooks, 
Thompson, Leake, Hanes of Forsyth, Hamilton, Johnson of Hali- 
fax, Etheridge, Readling, Allen, Gwaltney, Mrs. Mebane, Brinson. 

Finance. Messrs. Spence, Chairman; Harris, MacLean, Hanes 
of Forsyth, Hood, Moss, Brooks, Upchurch, White of Robeson, 
Flanagan, Coxe of Jackson, Reed, Ewbank, Greer, Neal, Groves, 
Connor, Ervin, Newman, Crouse, Waynick, Gill, McGougan, Ewing, 
McRae, Day, Crudup, Cherry, Rogers, Ward, Long of Halifax. 

Game. Messrs. Johnson of Currituck, Chairman; Sutton, 
Readling, Johnson of Halifax, Ruffin, White of Chowan, Crouse, 
Etheridge, Braddy, Hood, McDevitt, Ewing, Johnson of Pender, 
Ervin, Woodard, Crudup, Flanagan, Upchurch, Johnson of Cas- 
well, Loven, Brinson. 

Governmental Reorganization. Messrs. Jeffress. Chairman; 
Seawell, McLean, Tatem, Garabaldi, Burgin, Davis of Edgecombe, 
Rogers, Cherry, Cox of Jackson, Holmes, Ewing, Long of Ala- 
mance, Johnson of Pender, McBee. 

Health. Messrs. Rogers, Chairman; Moye, Sutton, Upchurch, 
Ruffin, DeHart, Killian, Coffield, Gwaltney, Loven, Braddy, 
Thompson, Howell, Lyon, Helms, Long of Halifax. 

Immigration. Messrs. Newman, Chairman; Johnson of Hali- 
fax, Woodall, Smith of Martin, Leake, Davis of Hyde, Parker, 
Thompson, Lyon, Jones, James, Turner of Iredell, Dosher. 

Insane Asylums. Messrs. Graham, Chairman; Johnson of 
Chatham, Ruffin, Mrs. Mebane, Puett, Dosher, Rogers, LeGrand, 
Brooks, Garibaldi, Turner of Iredell, Johnston of Caswell, Ervin. 
Sigmon, Lumpkin, Gwyn. 

Institutions for the Blind. Messrs. Ruffin, Chairman; Johnson 
of Halifax, Allen, Killian, Rogers, Moye, Bender, Braddy. Ful- 
ghum, Bruton, Johnson of Chatham, Smith of Martin, Gill, 
McGougan, Marshall. 



58 Legislative Department 

Institutions for the Deaf and Dumb. Messrs. Gwyn, Chair- 
man; Turner of Iredell, Davis of Warren, Braddy, McDevitt, 
Woodall, Ervin, Garibaldi, Black, Brown, DeHart, Binford, Gat- 
ling, Coffield, Haynes of Surry. 

Insurance. Messrs. Hanes of Forsyth, Chairman; Woodard, 
Johnson of Ashe, Turner of Guilford, Crouse, Etheridge, Read- 
ling, Long of Alamance, Graham, Seawell, Cherry, Uzzell, Groves, 
Morphew, Haynes of Surry, Ervin, Brooks, McRae, Davis of 
Edgecombe. 

Internal Improvements. Messrs. Dosher, Chairman; Hamilton, 
Readling, Newman, Bender, Waynick, Spence, McDevitt, Johnson 
of Currituck, McBee. 

The Journal. Messrs. Thomas, Chairman; Scarborough, 
Crudup, Brooks, Turner of Iredell, Gatling, Gay, Young of Dur- 
ham, Gattis, Bruton, Parker. 

Judiciary No. 1. Messrs. Moss, Chairman; Seawell, Day, 
MacLean, Johnston of Ashe, Norman, Connor, Dillard, Brooks, 
Morphew, Crudup, Ewbank, Turner of Guilford, Gill, Newman, 
Cherry, Spence, Long of Alamance, Bruton, Johnson of Halifax, 
Huffman, Butler. 

Judiciary No. 2. Messrs. Sutton, Chairman; McRae, Young 
of Harnett, Bender, White of Chowan, Willis, Halstead, Parker, 
Young of Durham, Thomas, Cloud, Ervin, Crouse, Johnson of 
Chatham, Lumpkin, Smith of Martin, Gattis, Uzzell, Burgin, 
Jolly, Gay, Edwards. 

Manufactures and Labor. Messrs. Young of Harnett, Chair- 
man; Turner of Guilford, Mrs. Mebane, White of Robeson, Hipps, 
Edwards, Black, Long of Alamance, Uzzell, Harris, Gay, Hood, 
Cherry, Johnson of Currituck, Burgin, Ward. 

Military Affairs. Messrs. Allen, Chairman; Johnston of Ashe, 
Bruton, Morphew, Cherry, Johnson of Halifax, Hanes of Forsyth, 
Day, Ervin, Gwyn, LeGrand, Dosher, Gattis, Leake, Young of 
Harnett. 

Oyster Industry. Messrs. Etheridge, Chairman; White of 
Chowan, Brown, Davis of Warren, Day, James, Willis, Hamilton, 
Brinson. 



Standing Committees of House 59 

Penal Institutions. Messrs. Flanagan, Chairman,; Dosher, 
Gattis, Edwards, Moss, White of Robeson, Sutton, Upchurch, 
Readling, Hanes of Forsyth, Sigmon, Jeffress, Allen, Willis, 
Loven, Rogers, Ervin, Howell. 

Pensions. Messrs. McEachern, Chairman; Johnston of Ashe, 
Flanagan, Harris, Johnson of Currituck, Sigmon, Gatling, Davis 
of Warren, Cranor, Brown, Lyon. 

Private and Public-Local Laws. Messrs. Crouse, Chairman; 
White of Chowan, McGougan, Brooks, Young of Durham, Cloud, 
Huffman, Jolly, Thomas, Scarborough. 

Privileges and Elections. Messrs. Cloud, Chairman; McRae, 
Ervin, Loven, Leake, LeGrand, Hamilton, Johnson of Currituck, 
Young of Durham, Johnson of Halifax, Brinson, Ward, Butler. 

Propositions and Grievances. Messrs. Seawell, Chairman; Gat- 
tis, Binford, Brown, Davis of Edgecombe, DeHart, Fulghum, 
Gwaltney, Gay, Helms, Henry, Huffman, Long of Alamance, Jones, 
Lyon, Hanes of Forsyth, Johnson of Chatham. 

Public Roads. Messrs. Connor, Chairman; Jeffress, Norman, 
Ewbank, Coxe of Jackson, Johnston of Ashe, Pitts, Braddy, Ruf- 
fin, Gill, McGougan, Willis, Coffield, Hamilton, Crudup, Graham, 
Ewing, Rogers, Brooks, Halstead, Edwards, Brown, Etheridge, 
Tatem, Whitley, Reed, Groves, Parker, Gwyn, Woodard, Loven, 
Greer, McBee. 

Public Welfare. Mrs. Mebane, Chairman; Johnston of Ashe, 
Ruffin, Johnson of Halifax, Crudup, Upchurch, Neal, Garibaldi, 
James, White of Robeson, Etheridge, Davis of Edgecombe, Bur- 
gin, Coffield, Lyon, Moye, Sigmon, Pinnix. 

Regulation of Public Service Corporations. Messrs. Norman, 
Chairman; Coxe of Jackson, Thomas, Uzzell, Woodall, Waynick, 
Killian, Woodard, Hipps, Scarborough, Gwaltney, Reed, Puett, 
Marshall, Ward. 

Rules. Messrs. Cox of Forsyth, Chairman; MacLean, Connor, 
Sutton, Moss, Cherry, Crudup, Brooks, Johnson of Pender, Ta- 
tem, Pitts, Johnston of Ashe, Harris, Crouse, Ewing, McBee. 



60 Legislative Department 

Salaries and Fees. Messrs. Johnson of Pender, Chairman; 
Davis of Edgecombe, Young of Durham, Ervin, Braddy, Greer, 
DeHart, Binford, Crouse, Jeffress, Fulghum, Black, Killian, 
Flanagan, Cloud, Garibaldi. 

Senatorial Districts. Messrs. Gill, Chairman; DeHart, Pitts, 
Brooks, Gay, Dillard, Crouse, Henry, Groves, Smith of Martin, 
Haynes of Surry, Neal, Coxe of Jackson, Edwards, Crudup, 
Fulghum. 



JOINT COMMITTEES 

Enrolled Bills. Messrs. Ervin, Chairman; Parker, Lumpkin, 
Halstead, Johnson of Halifax, White of Chowan, Jolly, Bender. 
Huffman, Scarborough, Gatling, Willis, Howell. 

Justices of the Peace. Messrs. White of Chowan, Chairman; 
Davis of Warren, Binford, Ervin, Young of Harnett, Brown, 
Cloud, Day, Fulghum, James, Marshall, Parker, Brinson, Butler. 

Library. Messrs. McGougan, Chairman; Binford, Mrs. Meb- 
ane, Tatem, Flanagan, Spence, Allen, Lumpkin, LeGrand, Huff- 
man. 

Printing. Messrs. Gatling, Chairman; Brooks, Hood, Woodard, 
Henry, Hipps, Gay, Jones, Killian, Helms, Jeffress, Pinnix. 

Public Buildings and Grounds. Messrs. Brown, Chairman; 
Woodall, Waynick, Sigmon, Upchurch, Uzzell, Thomas, Pitts, 
Newman, McRae, McBee. 

Revision of the Laws. Messrs. Johnston of Ashe, Chairman ; 
Bender, Connor, Day, Long of Alamance, Ervin, Gill. Gay, Jolly, 
Norman, Seawell, Butler. 

Trustees of University. Messrs. Waynick, Chairman; Sutton. 
Woodard, Hanes of Forsyth, Young of Durham, Connor, Cloud, 
Crouse, Johnson of Pender, Jeffress, McRae. 

Trustees of State College. Messrs. Hipps, Chairman; Johnson 
of Currituck, Tatem, Brooks, Allen, Davis of Edgecombe, Greer, 
Graham, Holmes, James, Loven. 



PART II 



NEW STATE BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 



1. North Carolina Industrial Commission. 

2. State Board of Barber Examiners. ^ i j I 



NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

Chapter 280, P. L. 1929. 



Composition — Three members. 

Personnel — Matt H. Allen, Chairman, Raleigh; J. Dewey Dorsett, 

Raleigh; Thurston A. Wilson, Raleigh. 
Executive Secretary — E. W. Price, Raleigh. 

Commissioners 

Appointment — By Governor. 

Term — First appointment for two, four and six years, subsequent 
appointments for six years. 

Compensation — Chairman, $4,500; commissioners $4,000 each. 

This Commission was created by the Legislature of 1929 in the 
adoption of the Workmen's Compensation Act for the purpose 
of administering the Act which is recognized as one of the most 
beneficial social and economic pieces of legislation of modern 
times. 

The Compensation Act provides a system of insurance to pay 
employees injured in industrial accidents that arise out of and 
in the course of the employment. The Act assures an injured 
employee compensation for his injuries at a time when the com- 
pensation will be of greater benefit to him during disability, also 
at a time when his injury may require that he change his vocation 
by reason of loss of limb or other permanent disability. Should 
the injury result in death, the employee's dependents are pro- 
vided funds at a time when the loss of the wage earner is most 
greatly felt, as well as caring for funeral expenses not to exceed 
$200.00. 

Prompt and skillful medical and hospital aid is assured to 
speedily restore the injured employee to his former earning capa- 
city without cost to the employee and with a guarantee that the 
bills for this treatment will be paid and not charged off by the 
physician as charity. Thus the Act places upon industry the cost 
of industrial accidents and relieves the State of many potential 
charity wards. The employer is benefited by the assurance that 
the cost of industrial accidents in his plant will be borne by all 



64 New State Boards and Commissions 

industries through the insurance feature; that the employee will 
be speedily restored to usefulness and that expensive litigation 
arising from damage suits with the attendant antagonisms en- 
gendered between employee and employer are abolished. Both 
The employer and employee are benefited by the Act and con- 
tribute to its costs, the one contributing the premiums to pro- 
vide insurance against compensation and medical costs and the 
employee contributing 40 percent of his weekly wage, and in 
many cases contributing as much as seven days without recover- 
ing any compensation. This mutual contribution to defray the 
cost of industrial accidents makes both the employee and the em- 
ployer interested students in the study of prevention of accidents; 
the prevention of accidents being far more beneficial to both than 
the compensation for injuries received. 

In the administration of the Act the Commission has to pass 
upon the ability of employers to provide insurance by providing 
a bond rather than purchase of an insurance policy which necessi- 
tates an examination into the financial condition of such em- 
ployers. Rules of procedure had to be formulated and adopted 
by the Commission for the uniform administration of the Act. 
Forms, in the number of forty-eight, for the reporting and in- 
vestigation of accident claims and agreements for payment of 
compensation were devised and adopted. Only eight of these are 
required in the handling of injury claims. Provision for indexing 
and recording the reports of accidents as received on the average 
of one hundred and fifty each day. In the year ending June 30, 
1930. there were filed 37.370 reports of accidents and 9,681 agree- 
ments were approved providing for payment of SI, 208, 386. 00 com- 
pensation. 

Medical and hospital bills were approved by the Commission in 
the amount of §581,439.00 and paid by the insurance carriers or 
self-insuring employers. 

In 647 cases the Commission conducted hearings upon dis- 
puted claims. Opinions were filed in 376 allowing compensation 
and denying compensation in 182 cases, the remaining cases be- 
ing under investigation. In conducting these hearings the Com- 
missioners travelled a total of 32.191 miles at a cost of S5.688.93. 

The Commission's files and the files of the insurance carriers 
are The only sources of information as to the costs of compensa- 
tion benefits and medical expense incurred under the Act. Since 



State Board of Barber Examiners 

the insurance premiums are primarily based upon these costs, it 
is desirable that the Insurance Commissioner be provided with a 
check upon these costs in order to approve the reasonableness a 
adequacy of the rates on compensation. 

The study of cause and resulting disability, also frequency of 
occurrence and severity of accidental injuries, is desirable for the 
purpose of taking steps to prevent recurrence of accidental in- 
juries. To tabulate the information necessary for these studie> 
is another important duty of the statistical department of the 
Commission. 

In November, 1930, the Commission sponsored a State-wide 
Safety Conference which was attended by a very large and repre- 
sentative group of employers, employees and representatives of 
insurance carriers. It is expected that great results from the 
meeting will be achieved in the industries of the State in the study 
and prevention of accidents. Annual meetings of similar nature 
are planned for the future. 



STATE BOARD OF BARBER EXAMINERS 

Chapter 119, P. L. 1929. 

R. P. Branch, Secretary, Raleigh. 

Composition — Three members. 

Personnel — J. M. Cheek, High Point; J. G. Shannonhouse, Jr., 

Rocky Mount; S. R. High, Durham. 
Appointment — By the Governor. 
Term — Six years overlapping. 

Qualification — Five years' practice in North Carolina. 
Compensation — $10 per diem and expenses. 

Function 

To meet at least four times a year in Raleigh or other place? 
designated to examine applicants for certificates of registration 
practice as registered barbers or apprentices, to keep a record of 
receipts and disbursements and to make annually to the Governor 
a full statement of same and of its work during the year witl 



66 New State Boards and Commissions 

such recommendations as it may deem expedient. Act only ap- 
lies to barbers in cities and towns with a population of five hun- 
dred or more at the 1930 census, except that it does apply to all 
towns in Bladen county irrespective of population. 

Historical Note: Created by act of General Assembly of 1929. 



PART III 



PLATFORMS AND POLITICAL PARTIES 

1930 



1. State Democratic Platform. 

2. State Republican Platform. 



State Democratic Platform, 1930 69 

state democratic platform 

Adopted July 3, 1930. 

The Democratic party of North Carolina by its representatives 
in state convention adopts this declaration of principles and poli- 
cies and submits it for the approval of the people of the state; 

The Democratic party presents itself to the people of North 
Carolina on its record as their tried and proved vehicle of govern- 
ment derived from the will of the governed and directed solely 
to the common welfare. 

For more than 60 years, excepting a brief and lamentable 
period, the people of North Carolina have governed themselves 
by means of the Democratic party. It has never failed them, and 
never will, because it is of them, and is controlled by them. Every 
two years it calls upon all who would advance the Democratic 
principles to organize it, to name its candidates and leaders, and 
to determine its policies. It is proud that 332,000 men and women 
participated in its latest primary. It has no existence apart from 
the people and no function save to determine their will under the 
principle of the rule of the majority and within the historic stan- 
dards of the party. Its doors are open to every man and woman who 
would serve the common welfare as voter or official by means of 
any measure or policy consistent with its principles. It offers to 
them the historic political principles of the rule of the majority; 
equal rights to all, special privileges to none; simplicity in govern- 
ment; individual liberty; personal initiative; local self-government 
and invites all who would sustain these vital principles to join with 
it in devotion to them, and in pressing them forward until they 
shall have been established securely in the structure of our re- 
public and our commonwealth. 

We invite with confidence the scrutiny of the record of the 
Democratic Party as a vehicle of human and public progress. It 
was by means of the Democratic Party that this commonwealth 
was reorganized and restored after the devastation and ruin of 
the Civil War and Reconstruction. It was by means of the Demo- 
cratic Party that white supremacy was established. It was by 
means of the Democratic Party that our system of courts and our 
processes of justice were developed; that the present great and 
beneficent free-school system was created, affording a sound edu- 



70 Platforms of Political Parties 

cation to every child in the state; that our institutions of higher 
education were preserved, enlarged and given precedence amongst 
the foremost; that the operation of the saloons and distilleries 
was prohibited and the temperance cause advanced ; that the state's 
charitable institutions were enlarged and made adequate; that our 
systems of public health and public welfai'e were developed; that 
our magnificent system of public roads was created; that our 
agricultural department was created and expanded so as to reach 
into and aid every home; that our modern election system was 
brought forth. In a word, under the rule of the people by means 
of our party, North Carolina has become a great, modern, forward- 
looking and forward-moving commonwealth, in which not only the 
necessities of the common welfare have been met, but also the 
aspirations and the ideals of a great people have been realized in 
a measure that gives our state a unique interest and position 
throughout our land, and even throughout the world, and that 
provides the standards and sources of an ever-advancing civiliza- 
tion. 

So much of progress achieved, so faithful a record of re- 
sponsiveness to human need and human hope, is the guarantee 
that the Democratic Party may now be trusted as no other may 
to guide our commonwealth in the peculiar and distressing con- 
ditions through which our people are passing, largely due to Re- 
publican incapacity and neglect of duty. We shall conserve our 
progress. We shall foster agriculture, commerce and industry. 
We shall voice the rights of the toiler and have regard likewise 
to the great structure of commerce and industry. And we shall 
strive that the farmer shall sow and tend in confidence of a just 
reward in the day of harvest. We shall preserve the fundamental 
liberties of a free people, maintain order and justice, and con- 
serve all that makes for material, industrial, agricultural, moral 
and spiritual progress. We offer now, as our fathers have here- 
tofore, to the people of North Carolina the Democratic Party as 
the vehicle of their will, the vindicator of their rights and the 
voice of their aspirations. 

We indorse and commend the record of our Democratic sena- 
tors and representatives in Congress and the faithful and efficient 
administration of all department of the state government by Demo- 
cratic state officials. We especially indorse and commend the ad- 
ministration of Governor O. Max Gardner. Democratic statesmen 



State Democratic Platform, 1930 71 

of the past have set a high standard in public service for the 
chief executive of the state, and Governor Gardner is measuring 
up to the high standard set by distinguished predecessors. In 
maintaining a sound fiscal policy in these times of extreme eco- 
nomic difficulties, in helpful and progressive legislation he has 
promoted, and in his leadership toward a great and more secure 
economic independence for our people, he is rendering high service 
to the state. 

In legislation he supported and the general assembly enacted: 

The Australian Ballot Law, which guarantees to every qualified 
citizen a convenient and accurate method of casting a secret ballot, 
in party primaries and in general elections. 

A Workmen's Compensation Law, which guarantees to every 
employee speedy and certain compensation for personal injury. 

A State Bond and Sinking Fund Commission, to supervise the 
issuance of bonds and creation of indebtedness by all local units 
of government. 

Reduction of property taxes by a three million dollar state par- 
ticipation in the costs of county highways and six and a half 
million dollars participation in the cost of public schools. 

Agriculture 

In his "Live-at-Home" policy, Governor Gardner has furnished 
an inspiring leadership for the agricultural interests of the state. 
In the effort, the resources of the Department of Agriculture, the 
Extension Service of the State College of Agriculture and En- 
gineering, the property and facilities of the state's prison, and 
the agricultural and public schools of the state have been so co- 
ordinate as to present this program of balanced agricultural pro- 
duction, aided by pure bred seeds and thoroughbred livestocks. 
Every energy of the state government has been directed toward 
better agricultural conditions and improved marketing facilities. 
The direct and indirect benefits of this program reach every class 
of business and industry in the state. 

Agriculture is the basic industry in all civilized lands. Out 
of its fruits a people are fed and clothed. It furnishes the raw 
material from which others gather their gains. Above all others, 
it should receive the fostering care of government. 

The farmers are affected by economic laws extending through- 
out the nation. The national government should seek to invigorate 



72 Platforms of Political Parties 

these forces so that they may serve the farmer as equally as other 
businesses and industries. Such was the case under the just and 
beneficent legislation of the Wilson administration. The farmer 
has suffered his greatest period of disadvantage under recent Re- 
publican administrations. Promise after promise to aid him has 
been made only to be broken by a Republican President and Con- 
gress. 

It is the duty of the national government to exercise all of 
its constitutional powers to aid the farmer in his dire distress. 
The application of Democratic principles to national legislation 
is the surest means of restoring prosperity to the American farmer. 

Public Roads 

Our system of modern state highways, adequately maintained, 
is aiding materially in the development of the state, agriculturally, 
commercially and industrially, and in serving the convenience and 
pleasure of our citizenship. The sound financial plan on which 
it was developed, and the efficient manner in which it was con- 
structed, are an enduring satisfaction to the Democratic Party, 
that bore the major responsibility for its conception and execu- 
tion. 

Since 1927 the state has followed a policy of extending the 
mileage of the state system by taking over the more important 
county highways into the state system which has in this way been 
extended in three years from 6,797 miles to 8,963 miles. As the 
state system expands the burden of county road maintenance be- 
comes less, and reduces this burden of tax on property. Under this 
plan it will be an exceptional case that will justify any county 
incurring further bonded indebtedness for the construction of any 
road within its borders. In addition to this extension of the state 
system the last general assembly provided for distribution to the 
counties approximately three million dollars per annum, either 
in cash or in state maintenance of county roads, from the in- 
creased gasoline fund. The state should continue as rapidly as 
possible its policy of relieving the counties of maintaining public 
roads, and thus extend further relief to property taxes for county 
road maintenance. 

We recommend a larger use of state's prisoners in state high- 
way work, to furnish useful employment to idle prisoners. 



State Democratic Platform, 1930 73 

Public Schools 

As declared in its last state platform, the Democratic Party is 
the party of education and of progress in North Carolina and 
under the leadership of Aycock, Mclver and other great leaders, 
past and present, it added an educational qualification to the right 
of suffrage, while at the same time assuring its free exercise by 
a state-wide school term of six months at least, which, in most of 
the counties, has been increased to eight months and in many com- 
munities to nine months each year. 

The Democratic party, therefore, reiterates that the time has 
come in the economic progress and development of North Caro- 
lina when educational opportunity and the cost of providing it 
shall be more nearly equalized and the benefits as well as the 
burden fairly distributed over the entire state. 

The state out of indirect sources of revenue has rapidly in- 
creased its contribution to the support of public education until 
the tax rates necessary among the several counties to provide the 
current operating costs of the constitutional school term have been 
equalized and the educational opportunities have been increased. 

In addition to this, by a wise policy of permissive legislation 
over a long period of years, local communities, as they saw fit, 
have provided educational opportunities far beyond the constitu- 
tional requirement. When the local tax burden on farm lands 
for this purpose became oppressive, and the rural people were 
no longer able to support the schools which they had erected for 
their children, the Democratic legislature of 1929 set aside 
$1,250,000 as a tax reduction fund on farm lands in local school 
districts. By the aid of this fund the high schools for the great 
rural population have been kept open and a great burden of taxa- 
tion lifted from the back of the farmers. By this act the Demo- 
cratic Party solemnly committed itself to an adequate support of 
the rural school. The Democratic Party pledges anew its faith 
in the public schools and promises to reduce as rapidly as possible 
the ad valorem taxes necessary for their support. 

Taxation 

The burden of taxation on property necessary to sustain the 
standard of facilities and public services in North Carolina is 
recognized to be heavy, and has been greatly accentuated by the 



74 Platforms of Political Parties 

diminished productive quality of lands and property as measured 
in income. We recognize the need for substantial relief, and 
pledge our continuing efforts to achieve it. The record will show 
that the Democratic Party has not been and is not now unmind- 
ful of this great need. Before undertaking its program of ex- 
panding state institutions and services it set up a modern state 
income tax and expanded its income from corporate franchises, 
licenses and inheritances, so that the state's program of expansion 
not only did not increase the tax burden on property but entirely 
removed the state tax on property. It has greatly increased state 
participation in the costs of schools and local reads and pledges a 
continuation of this policy. It established a county government 
advisory commission to assist counties with their fiscal problems. 
It has assumed responsibility of supervising local bond issues. In 
recognition of the changed order of economic conditions it has set 
a standard of retrenchment in expenses of the state government 
and institutions by scaling a million dollars from appropriated 
expenses for the last fiscal year, and two million dollars for the 
present fiscal year. It has a tax commission making a continu- 
ing study of all phases of the state and local taxation, with the 
view of keeping our tax system abreast with the best of changes 
and improvements in other states. The heart of the Democratic 
Party of North Carolina beats in unison with the needs of its local 
units of government and with the problems of community life 
throughout the state, and we submit our cause to the confidence 
of the people in the earnest purpose and endeavor of the Demo- 
cratic Party, that has always met every emergency in the history 
of the state, to solve this problem without injustice to any class 
of taxpayers. The Democratic Party has always denounced op- 
pressive and unjust taxation, both in the state and in the nation. 
It again declares that taxation is a burden to be borne by those 
most benefited and best able to bear it, and it opposes any system 
which discriminates against homes, farms, factories and other 
real estate. 

We approve the achievement of the present administration in 
enforcing methods of economical management to all agencies of the 
state, and recommend that the general assembly give careful con- 
sideration to the further benefits that may be obtained by con- 
solidations of governmental agencies in both state and local gov- 



State Democratic Platform, 1930 75 

ernments and the reducing of tax burdens by the practice of rigid 
economy. 

Capital and Labor 

There must be frank recognition and encouragement of the 
rights of both capital and labor if we are to have a satisfactory 
and continuing progress of industrial development and a more 
wholesome industrial life in this state. We believe the time has 
come when we can have the cooperation of each of these groups in 
the revision of our labor laws so as to provide for a lower maxi- 
mum schedule of working hours and greater limitations upon 
working of women and children in industry. 

Prohibition 

The Democratic Party stands firmly for the enforcement of 
every provision of the constitution of the United States, including 
the 18th Amendment and points with pride to the fact that the 
Democratic General Assembly of North Carolina enacted ade- 
quate legislation guaranteeing concurrent enforcement of the 18th 
Amendment of the Constitution of the United States. We pledge 
the Democratic Party to the enactment of such additional legisla- 
tion as may be necessary for the better enforcement of the 18th 
Amendment and other laws against the sale of alcoholic liquors in 
the state. We denounce the Harding, the Coolidge and the Hoover 
administrations for their respective failures to enforce the 18th 
Amendment and the laws enacted pursuant thereto. 

Equal Freight Rates 

We pledge a continuing support of the contest for equal freight 
rates for our commercial interests and for our agricultural and 
industrial producers to and from all markets in this country. The 
last General Assembly made an additional appropriation of thirty- 
six thousand dollars per annum for this purpose. 

We approve the action of our senators and representatives in 
Congress in securing additional appropriations for improvement 
of our facilities for transportation of freight by water. 



76 Platforms of Political Parties 

Public Health 

For many years it has been the policy of Democratic state ad- 
ministration to support and sustain the State Board of Health in 
its program to eliminate infectious and contagious diseases, and 
to promote sanitation, healthy living conditions, and to disseminate 
wholesome information to promote the development and mainten- 
ance of a healthy citizenship. The success of this work has been 
very gratifying and should receive our continuing support. 

Mental and Physical Defectives 

In the broader field of humanities, our institutions ministering 
to our mental and physical defectives have better equipment and 
larger capacity for serving these unfortunates. Their claims 
upon the strong must not be unheard or neglected. 

Great Smoky Mountains National Park 

We approve the action of the General Assemblies of 1927 and 
1929 in joining with the State of Tennessee and with patriotic 
private organizations and individuals in creating the Great Smoky 
Mountains National Park, and we take pride in the energy with 
which this great enterprise has been prosecuted by these patriotic 
organizations representing the State of North Carolina. 

Need for Democratic Unity and Strength 

In neither state nor country does the Republican Party at this 
time offer any well-considered remedy for our difficulties, local or 
national, or any leadership that can be safely followed. At no 
period in the country's history has the national government shown 
a more complete failure of remedy or leadership in meeting condi- 
tions of distress. While the Democratic State Government of 
North Carolina is re-adjusting its operations to meet definitely 
changed economic conditions, the national government continues 
to expand governmental costs. The Secretary of the Treasury 
forecasts a deficit of a hundred million dollars for the next fiscal 
year and a consequent increase in federal taxation to further ac- 
centuate economic difficulties. Every gesture of agricultural re- 
lief has been a complete failure, evei-y promise has been broken, 
and under the pretense of agricultural relief a new tariff bill has 
been enacted which greatly increases the burdens of agriculture 



State Republican Platform, 1930 77 

and adds a billion dollars a year to the living costs of our people. 
While the whole country suffers from economic depression from 
unmarketable surplus of products of farm and factory, which can 
be relieved only by increasing foreign markets, they enact the 
highest tariff laws in the history of the country, and invite all 
foreign markets to close their doors to our surplus products. 
Thirty-seven foreign nations have erected retaliatory barriers, and 
others threaten to do so. This unwise legislation has engendered 
a spirit of resentment against our country and its products in all 
foreign markets. Bread on sale in London bakeries carries pla- 
cards, "Not made from American wheat." After ten years of 
Republication administration our people find business prostrated, 
labor unemployed and confusion and distress nation-wide. We 
have an unnatural condition of surplus and hunger. These con- 
ditions obtain under an administration that promised to abolish 
poverty. The Republican Party is disci-edited and divided. People 
are demanding the return to power of the Democratic Party and 
the application of Democratic principles. Our party should gather 
unity and strength for this great opportunity of service, and we 
in North Carolina should make our contribution by regaining the 
temporarily lost ground in this state and by electing to the next 
Congress a Democratic senator and ten Democratic congressmen. 
We appeal to all people of North Carolina, without regard to 
previous political affiliation, to support our earnest endeavors to 
work out the best solution of our difficulties at home, and, through 
the Democratic Party, to restore the government at Washington 
to genuine representatives of the people, and to rescue it from the 
control of the increasingly powerful special interests that domi- 
nate its policies. 



STATE REPUBLICAN PLATFORM 
Adopted April 17, 1930 

The Republicans of North Carolina assembled in party conven- 
tion in the city of Charlotte, this April 17, 1930, view with satis- 
faction and pride the record of the party and its ever increasing 
popularity. We look to the future with abounding faith thai 
our party will continue to grow in strength and in the confidence of 
the people. It is the day for which we have hoped and for the 



78 Platforms of Political Parties 

advent of which we have devoted our energies for more than a 
quarter of a century. Today, as we reaffirm our allegiance to the 
great principles which have guided us in the past, we are con- 
scious of entering that era in which the Republican Party must 
assume the responsibilities of administering the Government of 
North Carolina. The party has achieved this position in the con- 
fidence of the people of our State by its consistent devotion to the 
ideals of clean, honest and efficient government, and by its faith- 
fulness to the cause of the people. The Republican Party in 
North Carolina has struggled upward and onward through the 
vicissitudes of persecution and the disadvantages of grossly and 
unfair election laws, until by the force of the righteousness of its 
cause and the wisdom of its policies, it stands today conscious of 
its superior moral strength and proud of its history. It is ready 
for the approaching contest and is prepared to assume supremacy 
in the State. 

Taxation 

We deplore the unfortunate condition to which the Democratic 
Party in North Carolina, through its unwise, unbusiness-like and 
extravagant policies, has brought the affairs of our state with 
reference to taxation. The Democratic system of taxation has 
seriously affected business and industry, practically destroyed land 
values and has placed upon the people of the state, particularly 
the farmers and home owners, tax burdens which are intolerable 
and impossible for them to bear. We demand a complete readjust- 
ment and revision of the tax system in North Carolina, to the 
end that all classes of property, personal as well as real, intangible 
as well as tangible, shall bear their just proportion of the tax 
burden and that land shall be relieved of its present grossly un- 
just proportion of the tax burden. And we recommend to the 
next General Assembly that there be submitted to the people of 
North Carolina the question of calling a constitutional convention 
for the purpose of revising our fundamental law to meet the 
modern requirements of government. We offer this method in 
substitution of the present "patch-work," piece-meal system of at- 
tempting to amend our constitution every four years after the plan 
now proposed for the amendment of the State Constitution for 
the purpose of the classification and taxation of intangible per- 
sonal property. 



State Republican Platform, 1930 79 

Democratic Extravagance 

We believe that it is high time to call a halt to gross extrava- 
gance in the administration of the affairs of the state; to the 
creation of new offices, high and low, with which to pay political 
debts; to the wholesale increase of bonded indebtedness by the 
state, the counties and municipalities; and to the extravagant 
waste of the people's money under the guise of a "program of 
progress." We believe in progress, but we believe that it should 
be attained along sane and reasonable lines and always kept within 
the limits of the power of the people to pay. The party in power 
owes it to the people to curtail expenditures, abolish unnecessary 
offices, reduce excessive salaries, and safeguard by proper limita- 
tions the creation of bonded indebtedness, and its failure to do 
so in the face of dire distress which it has brought upon the people 
proves it to be unworthy of confidence and unfit to govern. If 
placed in power by the voters of the state, we pledge ourselves 
to reduce taxes as speedily as circumstances will permit, to practice 
the most rigid economy in the administration of the State's af- 
fairs, and guarantee the elimination of the gross waste and lavish 
extravagance which has been practiced so long by the Democratic 
Party. What the State needs more than new sources of taxation 
is simplification of and rigid economy in government. 

Education 

Whereas, Article IX, Section 1, of the State Constitution pro- 
vides that "religion, morality and knowledge being necessary for 
good government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the 
means of education shall forever be encouraged," and Section II 
requires that the General Assembly "shall provide by taxation 
and otherwise for a general and uniform system of public schools 
wherein tuition shall be free of charge to all the children of the 
state, between the ages of six and twenty-one years." And, 

Whereas, the Legislature has failed to carry out, in full mea- 
sure, this provision of our Constitution, and instead of providing 
a state system that is "general and uniform," has provided a dual 
system wherein the counties have in a large measure been re- 
quired to finance the public schools. 

Therefore, we demand that the state assume its constitutional 
obligations to provide for a general and uniform system of free 



80 Platforms of Political Parties 

public schools of the state for the Constitutional requirement of 
school term so as to furnish equal educational opportunities to all 
the children of the state. 

Law Enforcement 

We believe in the impartial enforcement of all laws by the duly 
constituted authorities of the State and Nation, and we renew our 
pledge to the vigorous and impartial enforcement of prohibition 
as provided in the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution of 
the United States, the National Prohibition Act and the Prohibi- 
tion Laws of the State of North Carolina. 

Unfair Election Laws, etc. 

We demand that the so-called Australian Ballot Law adopted 
at the last session of the General Assembly of North Carolina be 
amended so as to give the people of the State a genuine Aus- 
tralian Ballot to the end that there will be secured to every citizen 
of North Carolina the right to cast a secret, free and untrammeled 
ballot and to have that ballot honestly counted; and to the further 
end that all parties may be equally represented in the election 
machinery of the state. 

We insist upon the demands heretofore made that the present 
iniquitous and grossly misused and abused absentee ballot law be 
repealed or so amended as to render impossible the corrupt and 
fraudulent practices so freely and easily perpetrated under the 
law in its present form. 

We condemn the administration of the State Banking Laws 
by the present State Corporation Commission and the Banking 
Department thereof for its inexcusable negligence and inefficiency 
which has resulted in numerous unnecessary bank failures and 
consequent suffering on the part of innocent depositors. 

We repeat our demands for a change in the system of selecting 
judges of our Courts in North Carolina to the end that we may 
have a non-partisan judiciary in the state. 

We condemn now and shall never cease to condemn the 
cowardly, corrupt and contemptible practice of the Democratic 
Party in North Carolina of appointing school boards, other boards 
and officers in the Republican counties of the state while it permits 
the people to elect these officials in counties that are Democratic. 



State Republican Platform, 1930 81 

Protection 

It is our ambition to make life happier and better for the 
masses, to safeguard the laborer and guarantee to him a high 
standard of living which he has so long enjoyed under Republican 
rule. We recognize that in North Carolina, as well as elsewhere, 
there are many basic industries dependent upon the Protective 
Tariff for which the Republican Party has always stood. 

We, therefore, re-assert our profound faith in the policy of 
protection as advocated and practiced by the National Republican 
Party, for we believe that the policy of protection is one of the 
foundation stones of the welfare, happiness and prosperity of the 
laborer, the farmer, the manufacturer and all of the American 
people. Without protection business stagnates, industries wither 
and perish and the laboring man finds himself without a job and 
the farmer finds no market for his products. 

The National Republican Administration 

We heartily endorse and approve the splendid record of con- 
structive achievements of the administration of President Herbert 
Hoover. By persistent adherence to sound Republican policies the 
pledges of the party have been carried forward with unequalled 
promptness. A fund of five hundred million dollars has been made 
available for the aid of the farmer — thirty million dollars of this 
fund has already been loaned for the aid of the cotton growers 
of the south. A reduction of one hundred and sixty million dollars 
per annum in taxes has been effected. The tax on smaller incomes 
has been reduced 66 percent. Nevertheless, the reduction of the 
National debt has continued with marked rapidity, so that the in- 
debtedness as of 1919, amounting to twenty-six billion, five hun- 
dred million dollars has been reduced to sixteen billion, five hun- 
dred million dollars, or at the rate of approximately one billion 
dollars for each year since the Republican Party has been restored 
to power. The record of the United States Treasury under Secre- 
tary Mellon is unsurpassed. 

It is of interest to note that while the taxes and bonded in- 
debtedness of the State of North Carolina under Democratic rule 
have constantly inci-eased by leaps and bounds, both the National 
debt and National income tax rate under the Republican rule have 
been greatly reduced. 



82 Platforms of Political Parties 

We point with pride to the foreign policy of the administra- 
tion — the settlement of the French loan; the withdrawal of troops 
from Nicaragua; the establishment of cordial relations with 
Mexico and above all the adoption of the London Naval Agreement 
which marks another great step towards the conservation of peace 
and the happiness of our people. 



PART IV 



ELECTION RETURNS 



1. Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1928. 

2. Popular Vote for President by States, 1912-1924. 

3. Vote for President by Counties, 1916-1928. 

4. Vote by Counties for Governor in Democratic Primaries, 

1920-1924. 

5. Vote for State Officers in Democratic Primary, 1928. 

6. Vote for State Officers in Democratic Primaries, 1924, 

1928, and 1930. 

7. Democratic Primary Vote, June 5, 1926, for United States 

Senator. 

8. Democratic Primary Vote, June 7, 1930, for United States 

Senator. 

9. Republican Primary Vote, June 7, 1930, for United States 

Senator. 

10. Vote for Governor by Counties, 1920-1928. 

11. Vote for State Treasurer by Counties, 1930. 

12. Vote for United States Senator, 1920-1930. 

13. Vote for Members of Congress, 1922-1930. 

14. Vote for Constitutional Amendments by Counties, 1930. 



Vote for President 



85 



POPULAR AND ELECTORAL VOTE* FOR PRESIDENT IiY 

STATES, 1928 





a 

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Electoral 
Vote 


State 


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43 
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""Alabama 


120,725 

52,533 

77,751 

1,162,323 

253,872 

296,614 

68,860 

144,168 

99,369 

99,848 

1,768,141 

848,280 

623,818 

513,672 

558.064 

51,160 

179.923 

301,479 

775,566 

965,396 

560,977 

26,889 

834,080 

113,300 

345,745 

18,327 

115,404 

925,796 

69,617 

2,193.344 

348.923 

131,441 

1,627,543 

394,052 

205,341 

2,055,382 

117,522 

5,858 

157,603 

195,388 

367,036 

94,618 

90.404 

164.609 

335,844 

375,551 

544 . 205 

52,748 


127,796 

38,537 
119,196 
614,356 
133,131 
252,040 

36.643 
101,764 
129,602 

53,074 
1,313,817 
562,691 
378,936 
193,003 
381,070 
164,655 

81,179 
223,626 
792,758 
396,762 
396,451 
124,539 
662,562 

78,578 
197,959 

14,090 

80,715 
616,517 

48,094 
2,089,863 
286,227 
106,648 
864,210 
219,206 
109,223 
1,067,586 
118,973 

62,700 
102,660 
157,343 
341,032 

80,985 

44,440 
140.146 
156,772 
263, 7S1 
450,259 

29,299 


460 

429 

19,595 

3,472 

3,019 

329 
4,036 

124 
1,293 
19,138 
3,871 
2,960 
6.205 

837 








7,071 
41,445 

30,233 

113,495 
17,192 
97,650 

1,451 
56,842 


3 

13 

6 
7 
3 
6 

4 
29 
15 
13 
10 
13 

6 

8 

15 

12 

18 
4 
8 
3 
4 

14 
3 

45 

12 
5 

24 

10 
5 

38 


12 


Arizona 

Arkansas 


184 

317 

112 

675 

730 

59 

3,074 

64 




13,996 


q 


California.. . . . 

Colorado 

Connecticut . . 
Delaware. 
•"Florida 


622 


547.967 

120,741 

44,574 

32,217 

42,404 


J4 






46,774 
454,324 
285,589 
244,882 
320,669 
176,994 




Illinois .. . 


3,581 
321 
328 
320 
293 


1,812 
645 
230 

340 




Indiana _ _ _ 

Iowa.. ... _ ... 

Kansas _ 

/ Kentucky. . 


in 




1,068 
1,701 
6,262 
3.516 
6,774 
263 
3,739 
1,667 
3,434 






98,744 
77,853 

~568~634 
164.526 




/Maryland. 

Massachusetts 

Michigan.. . 

Minnesota 

Mississippi. . . . 

<• 'Missouri 

Montana _ 


636 
2,461 
2,881 
4,853 


906 

773 

799 

1,921 


"is 

hi 


"563 


340 


171,518 
34,722 

147,786 

4,237 

34,689 

309,279 
21,523 

103,481 
62,696 
24,793 

763,333 

174.846 
96,118 

987,796 












New Hampshire. . 
New Jersey. 


464 

4,897 

156 

107,332 


173 

1,257 


500 




New York 

i/North Carolina. __ 

North Dakota 

Ohio 


10,876 


4,211 




842 
8,683 
3,926 
2,720 

18,647 


936 
2,836 


1,515 




Oregon . 

Pennsylvania . 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina. . . 

South Dakota 

Tennessee. 

Texas. 

Utah _ ... 


1,094 
4,726 


1,564 
330 


5 


47 
443 
631 

722 
954 










9 


232 
111 
209 

47 




54,943 
38,045 
26,004 
13,633 

45,964 
24.463 
179,072 
111. 76,7 
93,946 
23,449 


5 

12 

20 

4 

4 

[2 

7 

8 

13 

; 








Virginia 

Washington.. 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 


250 
2.615 
1,313 

18,213 
788 


179 
1,541 

401 
1,528 


174 
1,068 

181 










Total 


21,429,109 


15,005,497 


267,835 


48,228 


21,181 






in 


87 











*Minor parties vote (not included in above table): . 

For Varney, prohibition: Indiana 5, 496; Michigan, 2, 728; New Jersey 160; Ohm 3,55 
3, 875; Vermont 338; West Virginia 1,703; Wisconsin 2,245; total 20,101. 

For Webb, farmer-labor: Colorado 1,092; Iowa 3,088; Oklahoma 1,284; South Daki total 6,391. 

Scattering: California 261; Connecticut 6; Louisiana 18; Manic 1; Wisconsin 41; total 327. 

Total of popular votes: 36,798,66!). 

Hoover's plurality: 6,432, 6 1 2. „,,-,,. , ■ . 

Note: California Hoover total includes 14,394 votes for \ arney, Prohibition I artj . winch partj mdi 
Mr. Hoover. Pennsylvania Foster total includes 2,687 labor parly vote. South < arollD 1 Hoovei 
includes 2,670 anti-Smith Democrats voting for Hoover. 



86 



Election Returns 



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Vote for President 



87 



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Election Returns 



VOTE FOR PRESIDENT BY COUNTIES, 1916-1928 



Counties 



1916 



Alamance 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen.. 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland-- _ 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Hertford 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell. 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones.. 

Lee 



5£W 



2,476 

954 

796 

2,046 

1,898 

360 

1,957 

1,461 

1,261 

810 

4,229 

1,621 

2,080 

1,725 

368 

1,165 

849 

2,569 

1,839 

1,362 

610 

400 

2,764 

2,143 

1,780 

1,971 

945 

470 

2.675 

910 

1.824 

2,463 

2,028 

4,115 

2,057 

3,019 

826 

476 

1,713 

1,066 

4,616 

2,312 

1,992 

403 

66 

977 

780 

840 

3,335 

1,306 

3,468 

712 

1,054 



1. If 



2 o 
M 9, 



2,278 

1,187 

641 

301 

1,930 

1,158 

1,274 

116 

651 

989 

3,830 

1,474 

2,314 

1,659 

86 

1,246 

338 

2,614 

1,501 

1,362 

91 

453 

1,497 

1,327 

542 

1,217 

87 

363 

2,801 

1,245 

1,527 

1,837 

135 

3,585 

396 

2,542 

309 

460 

648 

294 

3,670 

299 

1 , 603 

1,523 

1,795 

209 

110 

277 

2,073 

1,288 

2,857 

233 

573 



1920 



OH 



5,255 
2,045 
1,409 
3,175 
3,431 

397 
3,522 
1,840 
1,939 
1,253 
10,167 
3,262 
4,418 
2,931 

540 
2,070 
1,239 
5,404 
3,186 
1,761 
1,091 

755 
5,181 
3,111 
3,413 
3,233 
1,000 

825 
4,797 
1,624 



bo to 
— ■- 
.~ O 

"So 
«.£ 



398 

646 

343 

123 

742 

148 

796 

644 

2,622 

1,649 

9,615 

3,429 

3,919 

4,229 

2,496 

1,104 

1,266 

1 , 134 

6,470 

2,385 

6,030 

964 

2,327 



4,619 

2,643 

1,201 

433 

3,808 

2,503 

2,266 

212 

1.064 

1,362 

8,917 

3,592 

5,148 

3,298 

142 

2,315 

505 

5,935 

2,906 

2,506 

209 

911 

2.953 

1,783 

731 

1,972 

86 

632 

590 

2,591 

2,697 

3,550 

24 

6,792 

589 

5,803 

327 

915 

833 

439 

7,920 

524 

3,311 

3,000 

3,337 

221 

166 

530 

4,402 

2,355 

5.588 

385 

1,143 



1924 



> o 



4,859 
2,291 
1,643 
2,372 
4,333 

357 
3,048 
1,785 
1,551 
1,118 
10,098 
4,137 
4,449 
3,348 

436 
2,261 
1,075 
5,754 
3,446 
1,742 

714 

953 
3,749 
2,757 
2,942 
2,923 

670 

820 
6,507 
1,795 
2,924 
4,837 
2,274 
7,404 
1,991 
5,654 

679 

841 
2,220 
1,119 
8,804 
3 , 232 
3 , 296 
4,582 
3.007 

932 
1,146 

653 
6,449 
3,100 
4,656 

692 
1,834 



OH 



3,217 
2,437 
1,234 

225 
3,952 
2,189 
1,502 

159 



1,296 
6.285 
3,190 
3,510 
2,503 

132 
1,854 

467 
5,998 
2,755 
2,314 
98 
1,090 
1,743 
1,629 

325 

1,372 

52 

629 
6,227 
2,672 



6 



542 

093 

171 

315 

302 

566 

215 

907 

461 

182 

822 

268 

2,895 

2,440 

3,548 

164 

141 

305 

3,565 

2,788 

4.910 

179 

710 



o o 
fa-S 
cs.S 



93 
20 

6 
25 

3 
14 
93 

5 

23 

41 

467 



189 
26 

9 
15 

4 

167 

15 

23 

5 
18 
37 
26 
44 
37 
13 

2 

56 
13 

37 

221 

109 

459 

13 

82 

1 

11 

14 

7 

317 

83 

11 

8 

48 

3 

4 

16 

136 

17 

23 

2 

10 



1928 



M 



coH 



4,260 
1,722 
1,414 
2,947 
3,458 

390 
3,533 
2,000 
1,552 
1,018 
12,405 
2,881 
4,869 
2,291 

624 
2,045 

936 
4,916 
2,680 
1,911 

936 

903 
4,914 
2,854 
2,494 
3,297 
1,253 

883 
5.220 
1,085 
2,647 
4,482 
4.184 
6,639 
2,831 
6,702 

572 

963 
2,962 
1,181 
9.872 
4,882 
3,554 
4 . 173 
3,149 
1,030 
1,154 

590 
4,836 
3,171 
5,041 

486 
1,715 



Oi o 

O S> 
gjj 

Ka 

6,810 
2,605 
1,368 

726 
4,337 
3,273 
2,521 

374 
1.911 
1,931 
16,590 
5,108 
6,548 
4,207 

245 
3,133 

749 
7,556 
3,318 
3,239 

352 
1,106 
4,766 
3,533 
2,237 
3,534 

166 

814 
8,960 
2,959 
2,911 
8,723 

977 
13,258 

729 
9,702 

558 
1,260 

858 

542 
16,541 

890 
4,740 
4,472 
5,210 

393 

311 

682 
6,712 
3,512 
7,696 

658 
1,416 



Vote for President 



89 



Vote for President — Continued 



Counties 



1916 



^a 



bo u 



1920 






8 .2 



1924 



03 .£ 



OH 






1928 






men 



Lenoir___ 

Lincoln 

Macon _ _ 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg- . 

Mitchell 

Montgomery. - 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover. 
Northampton . 

Onslow. _ 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank- .. 

Pender 

Perquimans. .. 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. . 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania- 
Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake.. 

Warren 

Washington.. 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



Totals 



1,666 
1,521 
1,146 

972 
1,472 
1,274 
4,508 

462 
1,222 
1,337 
2,189 
2,355 
1,518 
1,197 
1,230 

710 
1,177 

970 

645 

953 
2,839 

679 
2,747 
1,553 
2.894 
2,316 
3,053 
2,445 
1,3(19 

938 
2,110 
1,569 
2,029 

829 

821 

416 
2,662 
1,451 
4.627 
1,217 

651 
1,141 
2,625 
1,632 
2,052 

879 
1,273 



168,383 



667 

1,369 

1,069 

1,965 

281 

1,218 

1,257 

1,298 

1,196 

1,047 

826 

492 

45 

785 

1,158 

527 

270 

400 

288 

917 

719 

750 

3,031 

650 

1,453 

1,957 

2,320 

1,871 

2,727 

137 

1,941 

1,852 

2,977 

1,128 

841 

392 

702 

558 

2,461 

227 

486 

1,352 

1,446 

3,470 

730 

1,721 

1,082 



120.890 



2,560 

3,331 

2,177 

1,340 

2,561 

2,809 

11,313 

697 

2,321 

2,679 

4,031 

4,102 

2,305 

1,557 

1.993 

1,286 

1,736 

1,580 

1,042 

1,646 

4,196 

1,361 

5,110 

3,341 

6,183 

4,507 

6,421 

5,101 

2.246 

1 . 705 

3,843 

1,999 

3,547 

1,434 

1.542 

718 

4,1 lis 

2,461 

8,020 

1,865 

1,116 

1,721 

4,794 

2,843 

3,496 

1,350 

2,280 



305,447 



1,153 

3,137 

2,050 

3,616 

530 

2,561 

3,421 

2,153 

2,304 

2,279 

1,556 

712 

165 

853 

1,737 

1,008 

507 

699 

487 

1,566 

864 

1,326 

6,297 

1,124 

2,220 

3,605 

4,888 

4,015 

5,353 

306 

4,312 

2,926 

5,170 

2,239 

1 ,680 

532 

1,404 

SI 6 

3 , 653 

295 

971 

2,631 

2,822 

6 . 4.J 1 

1,374 

3,301 

2,596 



232,848 



2.191 
2,909 
2,178 
1,471 
1,999 
3,023 
8,443 

689 
2,483 
2,771 
3,129 
4,735 
1,662 
1,122 
1,879 

798 
1,236 
1,175 

550 
1,576 
3,197 
1,613 
5,397 
2,475 
4,064 
4,467 
4,816 
5,101 
2,021 
1,469 
3,832 
2,309 
4,418 
1 . 769 
1,776 

638 
2,721 
2,013 
8,376 
1 . 742 

883 
2,365 

3,586 
2,619 
1,381 



514 
2,658 
2,015 
3,252 

216 
2,590 
2,572 
1,540 
2,077 



1,974 

823 

1,190 

144 

423 

1,065 

459 

305 

253 

295 

1,025 

512 

1,445 

6,336 

599 

314 

2,566 

3,560 

3,897 

3,188 

205 

3,594 

2,482 

4,990 

2,178 

[,814 

442 

672 

470 

2,975 

166 

v'l 

J.i.i... 

6.131 
574 

2,156 



25 
42 
18 
74 
9 

25 

437 

8 

5 

38 
131 
405 
17 
31 
66 



12 

17 
8 
3 

56 
13 
24 

163 
14 
89 

7:{x 

29 
35 
11 
50 
44 
66 
24 
22 
1 
32 
21 
485 

6 
8 
42 
11 
81 
11 
21 



2,363 
2.913 
2.191 
1.093 
2,818 
3,430 
9,690 

827 
2,016 
2,639 
4,249 
2,760 
1,723 
1,072 
1,799 

878 
1,943 

998 

609 
1,235 
4\646 
1,616 
4,188 
2.975 
4.7MO 
3.411 
4,783 
4.146 

1,761 
3,000 

1,970 
3,647 

1,723 

1 . 7-2-2 

475 

2,395 
9,341 

.Mi:;: 

3,720 

2 802 

761 
2,476 



284,270 191,753 6,651 



1,311 
3,930 
2,903 
4,776 

411 
3,423 
12,041 
3,436 
2,653 
3,290 
2,066 
4,248 

456 
1.253 
J .--.I 
1,099 

814 
1.300 

600 
1.123 
1,395 
1,873 
7.414 
2,045 
2,767 
5,585 
7 . '.'57 
5,762 
5 579 

588 
4,597 
3 . 7511 
7.(11.-. 
2,484 
2,165 

rui.-. 
2. 448 
1,449 
6,720 

379 

3,159 
1,340 

1,933 

2.712 



90 



Election Returns 



VOTE BY COUNTIES FOR GOVERNOR IN DEMOCRATIC 

PRIMARY,* 1920-1924 





1920 
First Primary 


1920 
Second Primary 


19 


24 


Counties 


a 
o 
.2 

t-r 

o 


Li 
CD 

csi 

o 


bfl 

Hi 


o 

o 

2 


Li 

a 

-3 
OS 

a 


3 


CQ 




134 
187 
131 
590 
214 
18 
438 
694 
694 
91 

1,873 
633 
303 
270 
161 
449 
89 
891 
535 
147 
282 
101 
46 
806 

1,263 
413 
408 
202 
553 
160 
265 
752 

1,254 
514 

1.323 
956 
128 
53 
518 
209 
497 
359 
368 

1,674 

378 

250 

450 

92 

1,578 
397 

1,154 
464 


488 
183 
60 
834 
107 
157 

1,086 
229 
229 
306 

1,443 
146 
149 
262 
277 
427 
219 
292 
349 
195 
247 
13 

2,219 

699 

718 

957 

99 

68 

281 

50 

697 

608 

713 

1,094 
715 

1,258 
196 

627 
373 
692 
1,177 
595 
395 
228 
576 
177 
254 
478 
297 
577 
251 


182 

14 

60 
569 

45 
9 

73 
350 
316 
172 
217 

55 
284 

31 
106 
136 
375 
343 
319 

17 
137 

26 
521 
420 
124 
443 
184 

30 
833 
237 
133 
410 
457 
510 
547 
279 
120 
2 
282 

70 

1,298 

607 

542 

113 

22 
213 
233 
201 
313 

30 
178 

32 


358 
375 
320 
986 
429 
41 
579 
627 

1,037 
209 

2,052 
737 
532 
361 
142 
382 
292 

1,033 
689 
315 
232 
103 
390 

1,011 

1,451 
840 
450 
189 
886 
277 
741 

1,106 

1,604 
936 

1,349 

1,375 
189 
180 
847 
284 

1,031 
915 
783 

1,162 
478 
406 
469 
492 

1,959 
266 

1,924 
453 


488 
203 
200 

1,082 
173 
308 

1,220 
517 
334 
445 

1,967 
359 
321 
443 
158 
273 
433 
401 
390 
106 
186 
26 

3.248 

1,322 
951 

1,323 
135 
13 
752 
211 
757 
584 
767 

1,410 
632 

1.494 
145 

713 
576 

1,307 
999 
682 
553 
257. 
592 
189 
444 

1,011 
339 

1,240 
378 


1,349 

375 

1,002 

1,883 

2,153 

216 

2,153 

1,059 

2,623 

295 

5,297 

1,492 

1,172 

1,663 

334 

987 

505 

980 

1,400 

298 

590 

100 

3,341 

2.961 

1,738 

1,908 

863 

501 

1,831 

402 

2.036 

3,609 

1,798 

2,802 

1,351 

3.080 

448 

353 

1,314 

348 

2,222 

2,721 

1,285 

3,222 

869 

512 

745 

421 

4.082 

1,568 

2,725 

455 


491 




81 




162 




1,516 


Ashe -. 


202 


Averv .. 


193 


Beaufort .. 


1,167 


Bertie . . 


1,131 


Bladen . 


901 


Brunswick. 


116 




2,007 


Burke 


194 


Cabarrus 


123 


Caldwell 


464 




615 


Carteret 


337 


Caswell 


637 




418 


Chatham 


1,375 


Cherokee -- 


78 


Chowan . 


593 


Clay 


42 




1,204 


Columbus 


1,117 


Craven 


1,728 


Cumberland . . .. . 


1.128 


Currituck . 


416 


Dare. 


188 


Davidson - 


538 


Davie . 


145 


Duplin . - 


817 


Durham _ 


924 


Edgecombe 


1,402 


Forsyth 


504 


Franklin.. 


1,860 


Gaston 


369 


Gates 


314 


Graham 


77 


Granville. 


1,303 


Greene 


1,266 


Guilford 


1,616 


Halifax 


1,840 


Harnett ... 


1,834 


Haywood 


1,321 


Henderson 


474 


Hertford . . ... 


926 


Hoke 


448 


Hvde. . 


812 


Iredell 


930 


Jackson ... . . ... 


350 


Johnston 


1,927 


Jones _. _ . 


304 



Primary Vote for Governor 



91 



Vote by Counties for Governor in Democratic Primaries* 

1920-1924— Continued 



Counties 



1920 
First Primary 



a 



1920 
Second Primary 



o 



a 



1924 



pa 



Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg.. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery. . 

Moore. 

Nash 

New Hanover. 
Northampton . 

Onslow. 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank . _ . 

Pender 

Perquimans.. 

Person 

Pitt. 



Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham.. 

Rowan 

Rutherford. _. 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry. 

Swain 

Transylvania. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington.. 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



Totals. 49,070 



458 

240 

227 

175 

215 

537 

309 

5,022 

108 

205 

298 

953 

615 

398 

418 

85 

201 

188 

215 

69 

62 

896 

177 

1,031 

853 

1,974 

76 

733 

453 

194 

401 

316 

154 

315 

210 

245 

11 

528 

215 

1,090 

485 

36 

92 

690 

915 

1,161 

130 

386 



230 

900 

543 

73 

226 

274 

421 

496 

160 

49 

69 

521 

1,097 

1,023 
313 
358 
327 
332 
268 
435 
170 

1,392 
138 
147 
274 

2,536 
546 

1,104 

1,158 
183 
205 
333 
103 
294 
98 
91 
146 

1,152 
500 

2,281 
541 
247 
25 
917 
117 
292 
130 
464 



48,983 



346 
290 
398 

21 

22 
118 

21 
,048 

14 
615 
697 
321 
482 
399 

98 
256 

28 
350 
430 
141 
164 
792 
1 
811 
686 
615 
290 
535 

88 
162 
276 
468 
100 
377 

16 

17 

31 
898 
398 
1,593 
315 
137 

43 
462 

61 
354 

140 

11 



30,180 



788 

530 

364 

350 

269 

632 

422 

3,443 

62 

474 

695 

1,395 

1,167 

957 

431 

181 

246 

420 

691 

112 

180 

1,457 

256 

1,373 

1,077 

1,861 

447 

856 

613 

331 

557 

721 

384 

580 

286 

345 

51 

791 

376 

2,131 

678 

151 

271 

1,106 

1,435 

1,640 

261 

285 



70 332 



368 

1,050 
595 
224 
147 
361 
507 

1,506 
182 
304 
202 
873 
735 
835 
298 
440 
220 
279 
235 
219 
277 

1,480 
177 
512 
785 

2,472 
718 
878 

1,029 
206 
424 
464 
197 
715 
78 
286 
107 

1,463 
412 

2.5M5 
542 
124 
24 
955 
186 
823 
195 
392 



1,113 

2,049 

1,429 

678 

496 

1,598 

1,149 

5,958 

202 

881 

1,431 

1,593 

2,393 

1,523 

835 

701 

615 

1,261 

874 

554 

556 

2,795 

1,024 

1,408 

2,731 

5,536 

1,212 

2,984 

2,699 

634 

1,871 

651 

318 

1,512 

527 

284 

182 

2,838 

939 

4,596 

534 

711 

2,109 

1,772 

339 

856 



61,073 151,197 



532 

1,480 

430 

382 

186 

783 

653 

2,449 

189 

136 

622 

1,712 

1,463 

1,455 

402 

770 

171 

686 

320 

954 

2,492 

125 

594 

660 

1,314 

1,055 

1,218 



682 
722 
633 
231 
156 
576 
23 
633 
340 

1,418 

875 

277. 

83 

1,551 

1,575 
153 
515 



■ 



"The Republican party held no gubernatorial primary. O. Max Gai m his 

candidacy for the Democratic nomination in 1928. 



92 



Election Returns 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY. 

JUNE 2> 1928 





Lieutenant-Governor 


Cc 

of Lab 


mmissioner 
or and Printing 


Counties 


a 
Q-S 

- M 

-° 5 

o « 

1-5 J 




a 

'a 
c 

3 

o 


Q 

-id — 


c 

T3 

S 
1H 

394 

46 

7 

373 

12 
147 
879 
341 
685 
172 
3.860 
221 
148 

51 
121 
672 
466 
100 
279 
122 
247 

51 
566 
953 
274 
1.059 
198 

89 
176 
109 
265 
2,296 
843 
656 
1,307 
481 
403 

43 

932 

870 

782 

1,287 

601 

1.461 

1.310 

762 

316 

322 

58 
930 
902 
137 


►-S o 

5s E 

x a* 




280 
27 
49 
201 
49 
93 

1,140 
263 
550 
378 

4,643 
124 
182 
245 
110 

1,092 
280 
589 
435 
58 
129 
56 

1,810 
787 

1,310 
974 
268 
236 
450 
223 

1,403 

2,810 
404 

1,814 

1,176 

1,250 
329 
32 
518 
223 
686 
466 

1,346 
700 
552 
92 
523 
653 
399 
194 

1,588 
751 


175 
40 
73 

519 
64 
57 

1,337 

1,010 

1,704 
i46 

4,917 

1.049 
96 
395 
380 
482 
270 
344 
322 
135 
428 
71 

2,860 

1,152 
616 

1,795 
551 
207 
334 
230 
339 
663 
225 

1,272 
612 

1,544 

277 

9 

858 

87 

728 

2,185 
203 

1,961 

858 

997 

130 

61 

82 

1.021 

874 

46 


833 

72 

31 

1,117 

135 

310 

428 

254 

783 

183 

2,314 

269 

148 

113 

167 

501 

456 

356 

1,105 

67 

110 

16 

872 

1,210 

1,389 

1.172 

137 

36 

639 

31 

351 

1,401 

3,246 

1,076 

1,589 

3,481 

12!' 

56 

1,125 

1,571 

1,563 

1.438 

624 

1,426 

393 

306 

534 

101 

154 

297 

1.022 

172 


573 

.64 

132 

1,053 

135 

326 

1,748 

981 

1 . 683 

429 

7,258 

621 

220 

699 

506 

1 306 

438 

1.086 

356 

128 

286 

86 

4,403 

1,895 

2,995 

2,124 

714 

371 

755 

174 

1,381 

1.635 

1,857 

3,205 

1.477 

5,339 

242 

56 

1,147 

697 

1.002 

1,692 

1.251 

2.426 

415 

278 

738 

321 

523 

441 

2.103 

813 


305 




19 




25 




345 




101 




27 




165 




175 




531 




67 




862 




571 


Cabarrus - 


50 


Caldwell 


35 




48 




48 


Caswell. - - 


138 




141 




1,268 




13 




100 


Clay . 


5 


Cleveland - 


385 




317 




134 




510 




60 


Dare -. 


12 




481 


Davie - - - 


198 


Duplin __ . 


355 




865 


Edgecombe - 


826 


Forsyth _ _ _-_ - . -_ 


263 




379 


Gaston 


487 


Gates -_ _ 


42 


Graham _.__ .. -__ 


1 




382 


Greene. . _ 


179 


Guilford 


508 


Halifax .. 


892 


Harnett .. _ - _ 


289 




235 




98 


Hertford . 


90 


Hoke 


129 


Hyde... 


51 


Iredell. 


23 


Jackson _. ___ 

Johnston.. _ -- 

Jones .. __ 


133 

309 

56 



Primary Vote for State Officers, 1928 93 



Vote for State Officers in Democratic Primary, 
June 2, 1928,— Continued 



Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell... 
Mecklenburg- 
Mitchell 

Montgomery. 
Moore. .. 
Nash. 



New Hanover. 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans... 

Person 

Pitt 



Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. 

Rowan 

Rutherford... 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington.. 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



Counties 



Lieutenant-Governor 



a m 
-a 5 

•-5 1-3 



Totals. 



— M 



695 


411 


1.732 


987 


207 


404 


53 


61 


76 


138 


96 


738 


78 


256 


3,632 


2,578 


74 


86 


186 


93 


339 


551 


397 


227 


1,004 


1,544 


299 


2,040 


842 


94 


385 


190 


314 


115 


482 


403 


399 


199 


102 


64 


603 


245 


314 


872 


170 


403 


612 


219 


1.901 


498 


2,182 


1,610 


900 


465 


665 


1,084 


1,488 


959 


273 


44 


565 


283 


593 


351 


206 


143 


186 


69 


73 


55 


75 


59 


16 


11 


2,107 


948 


594 


1,151 


3,244 


2,695 


335 


1,207 


245 


83 


105 


16 


2,959 


429 


129 


391 


963 


276 


290 
315 


41 
259 



8-' 



789 
899 
983 
51 
180 
615 
28 
5.310 
500 
705 
1,463 
2,413 
777 
262 
865 
954 
362 
335 
839 
92 
835 
2,563 
427 
1,047 
1,073 
3,892 
1,447 
1,473 
1,380 
72 
1,103 
809 
187 
151 
109 
131 
277 
902 
1,242 
4.434 
985 
349 
51 
645 
678 
1,690 
83 
711 



68,480 I 62,866 84,471 



Commissioner 
of Labor and Printing 



3-g 



811 

2,030 

1.193 

49 

204 

569 

221 

4.214 

238 

431 

1,420 

1,939 

1,836 

1,112 

996 

601 

511 

700 

668 

112 

521 

2,008 

534 

1,148 

1,710 

5,265 

1,189 

1,777 

1,896 

62 

938 

689 

421 

227 

165 

41 

59 

1,821 

1,572 

3,454 

996 

351 

158 

2,156 

799 

[,739 

240 



115,442 



a 

a 

'3 
r. 



758 

1,157 

404 

95 

135 

741 

127 

6,815 

394 

467 

575 

731 

836 

722 

334 

467 

81 

271 

521 

129 

553 

1,086 

462 

412 

1,357 

1,517 

1.001 

996 

700 

48 

618 

638 

116 

99 

60 

168 

103 

1,300 

761 

5.083 

1,125 

237 

29 

853 

209 

717 

24 

077 



1.70 









305 
323 

6 ! 

7 

35 

.,1 
14 

950 

80 

83 

356 

223 

442 

40i. 

270 

425 

64 

219 

297 

14 

484 

474 

32 

512 

382 

939 

535 

45i. 

274 

274 

367 

426 

45 

80 

13 

9 

28 

500 

435 

1,761 

a 

14 

734 
198 

In! 
31 



28,207 



94 Election Returns 

vote for state officers in democratic primaries, 

1924, 1928 and 1930 

1924 

for governor- 
Angus Wilton McLean 151,197 

Josiah William Bailey — _ _ , 83,574 

FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR— 

J. Elmer Long _. __ __ - 80,231 

R. R. Reynolds — 68,676 

T. C. Bowie 62,086 

FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL— 

Dennis G. Brummitt 78,411 

Charles Ross _ - - 70,448 

Fran k Nash 53,167 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF LABOR AND PRINTING— 
First Primary : 

M. L. Shipman 81,011 

Frank D. Grist 69,158 

O. J. Peterson — 31,556 

L. M. Nash - — 19,180 

Second Primary: 

M. L. Shipman 36,847 

Frank D. Grist - - 69,382 

FOR CORPORATION COMMISSION— 

George P. Pell .123,558 

Oscar B. Carpenter 78,240 

FOR STATE AUDITOR— 

Baxter Durham - - 119,900 

James P. Cook 1_ _. 83,162 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE— 

W. A. Graham 92,561 

Fred P. Latham _ 76,808 

T. B. Parker ----- 37,776 

FOR INSURANCE COMMISSIONER— 

Stacey W. Wade — 61,463 

J. Frank Flowers 41,340 

1928 

for lieutenant-governor- 
John D. Langston 68,480 

W. H. S. Burgwyn - - — 62,866 

R. T. Fountain 84,477 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF LABOR AND PRINTING— 

Frank D. Grist 115,442 

M. L. Shipman 66,391 

Oscar J. Peterson 28,207 

1930 
FOR CORPORATION COMMISSIONER— 

George P. Pell __ ----- 167,083 

James H. Holloway — 86,227 



Vote for U. S. Senator 



95 



DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY VOTE, JUNE 5, 1926, FOR UNITED 

STATES SENATOR 



Counties 



Alamance 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick... 
Buncombe... 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland. 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe.. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates__ 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson... 

Hertford 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 



633 

58 

632 

,918 

111 

285 

.484 

781 

,506 

350 

,911 

,313 

806 

,096 

602 

,129 

867 

973 

,589 

700 

536 

322 

,725 

,676 

,863 

,183 

474 

185 

725 

310 

.796 

,212 

|562 

,962 

,959 

,385 

281 

162 

,495 

,059 

,117 

,455 

,473 

,300 

684 

568 

466 

517 

,567 

374 

,254 



« 



135 

107 

341 

1,040 

232 

644 

437 

1,081 

972 

68 

6,973 

524 

143 

365 

331 

852 

272 

549 

1,179 

419 

505 

169 

2,191 

1,780 

1,171 

913 

883 

407 

518 

77 

716 

1,900 

638 

1,196 

1,239 

1,019 

389 

151 

877 

464 

857 

1,100 

1,115 

3,278 

1,199 

955 

141 

542 

887 

1,761 

1,255 



Counties 



Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Mecklenburg.. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery.. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover- 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank... 

Pender 

Perquimans. .. 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. . 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry.. 

Swain 

Transylvania. 

Tyrrell.. 

LInion 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington ... 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



■r, 

a 

> 

o 
■/. 



Totals. 



641 
107 
330 

'.IS'.I 
253 
499 
226 
,306 
,708 
381 
761 
.187 
,125 
,147 
,767 
944 
,249 
527 
756 
814 
174 
,127 
,108 

290 

,106 
.033 
,864 
,251 
,234 
:km 
559 
,541 
,309 

481 

628 

431 

17S 

,480 

.217 

,586 

..'.".7 

228 

185 

.381 

4S4 

163 

948 









369 
1,187 
1,467 

507 

390 

388 
981 

2. n45 

324 
1.141 



1.564 

1.050 
463 
586 
460 
454 
478 
821 
361 

2. 3 7'. i 

41)'. 

94 

1,652 



-.v. 
242 
628 

1,263 
195 
663 
415 
290 
192 
702 
711 
321 

1,444 



- 
1.2:. I 
22.! 

is 

: - 
22i, 

839 



■ 



96 



Election Returns 



DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY VOTE, JUNE 7, 1930, FOR UNITED 

STATES SENATOR 



Counties 


5 

a 
a 

Esi 


>> 
'3 

CQ 


D, 

OS 


Counties 


F. M. Simmons 


J. W. Bailey 


a. 

m 

to 

m 

H 




1,262 

184 

284 

1,432 

366 

103 

1,346 

1,059 

1,193 

529 

5,892 

599 

527 

507 

397 

832 

919 

918 

527 

169 

474 

41 

1,667 

1,917 

3,279 

1,916 

357 

124 

771 

410 

1,428 

3,230 

1,533 

5,289 

1.239 

3,324 

390 

69 

1,074 

1,183 

3,580 

1,308 

1,139 

1.446 

475 

912 

445 

639 

3,113 

254 

932 


2,637 

657 
1,115 
2,407 
2.087 

154 
2,395 
1,669 
1,311 

688 

10,062 

1,934 

1,636 

1,030 

728 
1,750 

779 
3,665 
1,839 
1,156 
1,061 

539 
4,105 
2,338 
1,514 
2,154 
1,168 

571 
3,732 

713 
1,688 
4.381 
2,466 
4.511 
2,332 
4.199 

587 

661 
2,654 
1,283 
6,610 
3,111 
2,594 
3,697 
1,848 

866 

952 

536 
2,573 
2.244 
2,376 


32 
6 

62 

29 

2 

2 

18 

3 

26 

24 

249 

6 

6 

4 

2 

16 
15 

26 

10 

2 

9 
3 

59 

107 

19 

31 

19 



8 

4 

23 
71 
7 
50 
32 
72 
15 
7 
30 
19 
38 
21 
16 
35 
17 
10 
10 
16 
33 
11 
11 


Jones 


979 

1,096 

2,295 

747 

316 

252 

697 

553 

5,989 

146 

652 

877 

1,726 

4,696 

1,175 

1.339 

656 

476 

835 

785 

473 

816 

2.333 

374 

648 

2,378 

4,934 

1,908 

2,070 

1,736 

718 

1,186 

581 

496 

1,057 

123 

251 

82 

2,374 

1,752 

6,225 

1,028 

431 

268 

2,644 

463 

2,583 

517 

136 


257 
1,057 
1,600 
2,038 
1,653 
1,110 
2,213 
1,680 
5,158 

585 
1,166 
1.538 
2,730 
1,769 
1,238 

752 
1,626 

773 
2.094 

784 

782 
1,443 
3,864 
1,212 
2,258 
2,235 
2,808 
2,350 
3,623 
3,327 
1,323 
1,685 

968 

939 
2,397 
1,332 
1.523 

293 
3,381 
1,863 
7,572 
1,666 

587 

697 
2,799 
1,623 
2,517 

551 
1,000 


5 




Lee . 


20 




Lenoir 


10 




Lincoln . . . 


47 




Macon 


21 




Madison 


7 




Martin 


25 




McDowell- 


21 




M ecklenburg 

Mitchell 

Montgomery. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 

Northampton 

Onslow 


85 


Brunswick 


3 




12 


Burke 


24 


Cabarrus _ 


12 


Caldwell 


87 


Camden 


4 




17 




Orange, . - - 


13 


Catawba _ 


Pamlico- _.._-_ 

Pasquotank 

Pender 


8 


Chatham 


9 




7 


Chowan 


Perquimans - 

Person . 


V 


Clay 


46 




Pitt 


61 




Polk 


22 




Randolph 


9 




Richmond. 

Robeson - 


118 




78 




Rockingham 

Rowan 


34 




72 




Rutherford _ . 


41 


Duplin 




3 


Scotland 


40 




Stanlv 


8 




Stokes - - 


9 




Surry -. - - 


6 






6 


Gates _ . 


Transylvania 


8 
6 






61 




Vance . 


24 


Guilford 


Wake 


59 






31 




Washington .. . 


6 




Watauga. . 


1 






22 


Hertford 


Wilkes 


8 




Wilson . - 


15 


Hyde 


Yadkin 

Yancey 

Totals 


9 


Iredell 


4 








129,875 


200,242 


2,592 







Republican Primary Vote for U. S. Senator 97 



REPUBLICAN PRIMARY VOTE, JUNE 7, 1930, FOR UNITED 

STATES SENATOR 



Counties 


» 

a" 

O 

O 


-a 

m 
a 
'> 


-3 

'tZ 

S 

60 

t- 
O 




H. Grady Dorsett 


Countie- 


oa 

O 



.id 


3 

S 

I- 


T3 

t- 
09 
— 

Cm 

S 

t~ 
I 
O 


E 



O 
= 


Alamance _ 


101 

40 

2 

35 

39 

222 

"21 


27 

21 

62 

28 

222 

246 

12 

8 

174 

388 

17 

20 

48 

71 

8 

27 
4 
56 
15 
8 
1 
1 

12 

413 

36 

61 

3 

8 

59 

18 

9 

35 

24 

350 

13 

42 

8 

1 

9 

2 

125 

12 

19 

6 

112 

10 

3 

4 

88 

2 

44 


73 

31 

10 

13 

65 

1,396 

88 

3 

5 

14 

3,288 

140 

38 

95 


8 
1 

2 

113 

1 

5 

15 

17 

2 

3 

1 


Jones.. r 

Lee. -. _ 


4 

48 
31 

7 

2 
114 
10 
38 
142 
52 
29 
14 
11 
37 

1 
29 
27 
55 

8 
49 
12 
13 
35 

3 

65 
11 
25 
25 
304 
41 

I.II.S'.I 

3 

65 

439 

428 

2 

17 

14 

41 
26 
51 

1 
2 

26 
153 

86 

28 

!U7 

6 


1 

17 
8 
6 
2 

24 

7 

11 

168 

4.' 

41 

55 

15 

58 

13 

10 

6 

5 

8 

2 

3 

22 
15 

2 
139 

6 
80 
29 
223 
18 
19 
23 
28 
482 
83 

1 

5 
19 
14 

9 
127 

3 

10 

128 

25 

334 

37 

898 

4 


4 

22 

20 

211 

3,023 

1 

644 

90 

961 

48 

138 

25 

16 

5 

2 

21 

20 

6 

6 

9 

23 

16 

346 

96 

45 

12 

107 

281 

994 

22 

19 

48 

593 

147 

516 

26 

72 

21 

115 

I 
6 

64 
23 

137 

5 

537 

286 


4 




Lenoir 






Lincoln. 


4 




Macon . 


2 


Avery - --. 


Madison 


40 


Martin__ . 






McDowell- 


3 


Bladen 


48 
442 
102 
24 
67 
22 


Mecklenburg... 

Mitchell... 


16 

21 


Buncombe 


Montgomery. 

Moore .. . 


2 
10 




Nash 


3 


Caldwell 


New Hanover. 

Northampton. 

Onslow 


4 




1 




425 

8 

57 

47 

27 

2 

6 

64 

9 

20 

40 

6 

13 

90 

116 

173 

202 

4 

365 

19 

76 


100 

16 

60 

58 

498 

7 

272 

95 

3 

10 

11 

2 

17 

261 

57 

8 

140 

5 

125 

27 

225 

165 

3 

15 

518 

26 

34 

813 

2,015 

8 

9 

12 

60 

253 

107 


11 
1 

1 

43 

2 

5 
2 
2 
4 

1 

18 

13 

2 

101 

1 

24 
2 

24 
1 

1 
17 
3 
3 
6 
172 
1 

1 

19 
2 

7 


1 




Orange 


51 




Pamlico 


1 




Pasquotank. 


• > 




Pender. 










Clav 


Person. 


9 




Pitt 






Polk 


3 




Randolph 


14 






5 


Currituck 


Robeson. .. 

Rockingham 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 


5 


Dare 


5 


Davidson ___ 


259 


Davie . 






5 




Scotland 


•> 


Edgecombe 




5 


Stokes 


96 






30 




Swain 






Transylvania 

Tyrrell 








4 




9 

3 

292 

32 

377 

15 

506 

4 

11 

13 

63 

14 

159 


Union 


10 






3 


Guilford 


Wake . - 


28 


Halifax 

Harnett . 






Washington 
Watauga 










Wayne 


6 


Hertford 




.". 


Hoke 






Hyde 


Yadkin 


191 


Iredell 




1 






9.098 


6,277 















98 



Election Returns 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR BY COUNTIES, 1920-1928 



Counties 



Alamance. .. 
Alexander... 
Alleghany... 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick .. 
Buncombe.. 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell.... 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee... 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland... 
Columbus. . 

Craven 

Cumberland 
Currituck... 

Dare 

Davidson... 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville... 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood... 
Henderson. . 
Hertford.... 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston... 



1920 



C CS 
o t - 

OJ o 



274 
000 
417 

340 

628 
403 
559 
886 
991 
311 
412 
314 
394 
953 
565 
094 
250 
424 
219 
762 
129 
763 
116 
313 
464 
316 
974 
846 
907 
634 
432 
706 
395 
250 
786 
220 
812 
655 
662 
664 
594 
540 
902 
227 
525 
165 
266 
170 
351 
398 
076 



«9 



4,624 

2,643 

1,187 

422 

3,800 

2,497 

2,212 

147 

1,010 

1,381 

8,005 

3,566 

5,226 

3,222 

116 

2,292 

496 

5,912 

2,895 

2,474 

162 

913 

2,978 

1,655 

604 

1,849 

69 

624 

5,844 

2,583 

2,704 

3,494 

292 

6,759 

552 

5,749 

294 

916 

793 

427 

7,788 

413 

3,318 

2,962 

3,604 

210 

156 

475 

4,194 

2,354 

5,336 



1924 



£a 



4,934 
2,292 
1,648 
2,391 
4,350 

460 
3,081 
1,836 
1,691 
1,123 
10,826 
4,089 
4,539 
3,374 

396 
2,313 
1,074 
5,831 
3,271 
1,767 

733 
1,004 
3,789 
2,855 
3,081 
3,304 

639 

823 
6,558 
1,807 
2,981 
5,233 
2,437 
7,875 
1,987 
6,694 

664 

871 
2,218 
1,132 
9,236 
3,329 
3,336 
4,569 
3,066 

986 
1,160 

657 
6.505 
3,170 
4,727 



3 = 



3,168 
2,429 
1,242 

209 

3,891 

2,151 

1,283 

85 

600 
1,247 
6,011 
3,227 
3,604 
2,466 

161 
1,832 

443 
6,028 
2,752 
2,317 
80 
1,124 
1,796 
1,428 

221 
1,093 



638 

6,202 

2,680 

1,502 

2,752 

92 

5,256 

270 

3,467 

95 

906 

433 

151 

6,453 

185 

2,824 

2,375 

3,406 

108 

112 

352 

3,608 

2,779 

4.842 



1928 



Ota 

& ° 
s a 

OQ 



5,600 
2,430 
1,648 
3,263 
4,097 

481 
4,062 
2,186 
2,185 
1,214 
15,393 
3,847 
5,991 
3,004 

696 
2,712 
1,257 
5,759 
3,352 
2,149 
1,084 

961 
6,453 
3,661 
3,744 
4.312 
1,288 

977 
7,223 
1,553 
3,361 
6,671 
4,662 
11,176 
3,118 
8,640 

755 
1,058 
3,241 
1,332 
13,523 
5,379 
4,219 
4,837 
3,881 
1,288 
1,321 

722 
6,539 
3,356 
5.931 



Vote for Governor 



99 



Vote for Governor, 1920-1928 — Continued 





19 


20 


1924 


1928 


Counties 


3 

$H 

O 

c « 
o *- 
t. ^ 
o o 

a a 


E- 
V 

*- — 

>-3.a 

3£ 


a 
►J 

a 

5= a 


C 
'■£ a 

8 1 


O) 

a 
-a 

a 

s s 

OQ 


* = 

- - 
r. — 

■ * 
12 


Jones 


999 
2,319 
2,882 
3,326 
2.101 
1,330 
2,577 
2,821 
11,221 

736 
2,305 
2,708 
4,072 
4,342 
2,329 
1,578 
2,081 
1,291 
1,816 
1,611 
1,057 
1,629 
4,156 
1,387 
5.066 
3.219 
6,185 
4,469 
6,427 
5,092 
2,428 
1,671 
3,901 
2,001 
3,569 
1,418 
1,549 

717 
4,025 
2,459 
8,145 
1,891 
1,115 
1 . 753 
4,847 
2,884 
3.530 
1,355 
2,306 


328 

1 , 155 

1,024 

3,127 

2,037 

3,609 

496 

2,563 

3,360 

2,235 

2,309 

2,242 

1,518 

472 

126 

822 

1,786 

1,011 

417 

672 

480 

1,582 

834 

1,349 

6,243 

1,134 

2,111 

3,592 

4,853 

4.002 

5,333 

296 

4.273 

2,899 

5.173 

2,252 

1,659 

535 

i . 199 

804 

3,349 

244 

971 

2,600 

2.776 

153 

1.296 

:; 295 
2,574 


711 

1,862 
2,294 
2,948 
2,651 
1,430 
2,012 
3,084 
8,978 

747 
2,510 
2,872 
3,253 
5,295 
1,705 
1,163 
2,015 

909 
1,020 
1,219 

557 
1,603 
3,362 
1,659 
5,395 
2,719 
4,778 
4,481 
5,335 
5,170 
2,089 
1,511 
3,968 
2,298 
4,504 
1 . 795 
1,842 

193 
2,782 
2.271 
9.300 
1,827 

si - 
2.4 05 

2,659 

i 389 
2,649 


150 

677 

395 

2,679 

2,218 

3,110 

193 

2,557 

2,128 

1,604 

2,060 

1,848 

765 

558 

101 

364 

1,193 

393 

548 

208 

283 

1,004 

433 

1,407 

6,286 

504 

610 

2,569 

3,638 

3,842 

3,316 

138 

3,529 

2,490 

4,979 

2.177 

1 , 775 

599 
613 

2,267 
94 

2 747 

6,148 
467 

185 627 


824 
2,110 
2,955 
3,503 
2,544 
1,316 
2,905 
3,859 
15.213 

985 
2,558 
3,051 
1,853 
4,695 
2,104 
1,426 
2,432 
1,069 
2,278 
1.547 

884 
1 . 125 
5.274 
1 . 828 
5,560 
3,679 
5 816 
4,667 
6,324 
5,312 
2 750 
2,036 

2,444 
1,678 
i 8! 5 
1,973 
540 
3,495 
2 901 
11,856 

! 038 
3,199 

4.1S5 

2.714 

362.009 


301 
1,176 

3,752 
2,542 
3,558 
300 
3.222 
7,373 
3,316 
2 476 


Lee 


Lenoir . 


Lincoln -. 


Macon 


Madison 


Martin 


McDowell. _. 


Mecklenburg . 


Mitchell 


M ontgomery 


Moore . 


3 165 


Nash __ 


1 38° 


New Hanover 


! 129 


Northampton 


160 


Onslow 


7.55 


Orange 


2,045 
810 


Pamlico 


Pasquotank 


430 


Pender .. 


770 


Perquimans 


380 


Person 


■I" 


Pitt.. 




Polk 


1 645 


Randolph .. 


■ 


Richmond 


1 ,470 


Robeson, . 


1,837 


Rockingham 


4.71:! 


Rowan _ _ 


6,924 


Rutherford 


5.121 


Sampson 


5,160 


Scotland 


341 


Stanlv. 


4,175 


Stokes 




Surry . 


i 195 


Swain.. __ _ 


2,335 


Transylvania. . _ 


2.010 


Tyrrell _ 


462 


t T nion . . . __ 


1,598 


Vance _. 

Wake 


E 
4,209 


Warren - 




Washington. . 


! 059 


Watauga 




Wayne 


3,515 


Wilkes 




Wilson 


1 , 25 1 


Yadkin. 




Yancey .. 


2,475 








308,151 


.'.'in 175 


294. 141 





100 



Election Returns 



VOTE FOR STATE TREASURER BY COUNTIES, NOV. 4, 1930 



Counties 



Alamance.. 
Alexander. . 
Alleghany. . 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick __ 
Buncombe.. 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell- .. 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham... 
Cherokee. __ 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland . _ 
Columbus. . 

Craven 

Cumberland 
Currituck. . 

Dare 

Davidson. __ 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

( rreene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood. .. 
Henderson.. 
Hertford... 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 















0> 




« 


(_ 


O 


ffl 


a 


o 


JS 




a 


o 


Z 


i-S 


6,512 


5,318 


2,571 


2,154 


1,691 


1,312 


2,110 


119 


4,067 


3,584 


331 


1,458 


3,442 


1,260 


1,397 


58 


1,480 


439 


1,640 


1.419 


16,491 


10,989 


4,743 


3,838 


6.978 


4,208 


4,834 


3,073 


416 


28 


2,936 


1,889 


971 


155 


7,289 


5,540 


3,328 


2,551 


2,553 


2,650 


543 


14 


1,240 


1,146 


5,164 


2,108 


2,807 


1,232 


2,582 


487 


2,843 


781 


604 


12 


957 


346 


8,313 


6,768 


2,064 


2,074 


2.704 


964 


4,964 


2,610 


2,640 


119 


8,841 


4,703 


1,593 


123 


10,946 


6,671 


503 


71 


1.240 


1,186 


2,000 


130 


803 


70 


12,262 


8,899 


3,495 


133 


5,071 


3,282 


5,382 


2,591 


4.045 


3,777 


795 


22 


1.095 


74 


348 


73 


7,677 


4.055 


3,881 


3,226 


8,436 


5,118 



Counties 



Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

M aeon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg- 
Mitchell 

Montgomery . 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank.. 

Pender 

Perquimans. .. 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham . 

Rowan 

Rutherford . . . 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington.. 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson. 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Totals 



b 



Z 



573 
,597 
,058 
,032 
,707 
.743 
,682 
,059 
,362 

926 
,352 
,658 
.784 
.706 
,669 
,116 
,709 

886 
,777 

989 

679 
,613 
.019 
,133 
,653 
,648 
,178 
,047 
,903 
,453 
,966 
,745 

722 
739 
,430 
,018 
.318 

435 
,375 
.605 
,872 
,354 
,141 
,852 
,668 
,073 
,433 
,256 
,826 



332,157 



6 



83 

479 

261 

3,756 

2,292 

2,364 

34 

2,689 

3,132 

2,030 

1,933 

2,014 

359 

359 

78 

115 

794 

737 

234 

106 

82 

642 

229 

1,561 

5,662 

429 

367 

3,872 

4,651 

4,559 

3,514 

117 

4,084 

2,502 

4,955 

2,215 

1,971 

157 

501 

152 

1,013 

32 

764 

2.740 

1,948 

3,953 

283 

2,138 

2,521 



196,370 



Vote for U. S. Senator 



101 



VOTE FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR 1920-1930 





1920 


1924 


19 


26 


1930 


Counties 


a 

1 

O g 

o 

co § 

$ a 


a 

S a 

O o 

S3 — 
H o. 


to 
C 

o 
B 

ib 

rag 

S a 

6hQ 


i-7 

V 

a 

*> - 

la 

<:K 


□ 
s 

S 

°§ 
t« a. 


o 
rt 

S3 

. c 
"-s rt 

0_Q 
IS 

l<2 


'rt 

« 

■a 8 
M 


■p 
rt 

J3 

'S3 

— 
. a 

— - 

*5 - 

Ml -2 
t. — 
0, 

<D & 

OK 


Alamance 


5,289 
2,045 
1,426 
3,375 
3,630 

404 
3,564 
1,887 
2,000 
1,317 
10,413 
3,311 
4,429 
2,966 

563 
2,094 
1,253 
5,436 
3,229 
1,753 
1,133 

763 
5,202 
3,337 
3,463 
3.341 

974 

845 
4.933 
1.636 
3,442 
4,772 
3,413 
8,309 
2,799 
7,236 

812 

653 
2,671 
1,662 
9,808 
3,547 
3,918 
4,225 
2,522 
1,168 
1,274 
1,169 
6,493 
2,399 
6 081 


4,6(14 

2,639 

1.182 

423 

3,793 

2,496 

2,214 

145 

1,003 

1,378 

7,914 

3,562 

5,208 

3,208 

118 

2,289 

493 

5,907 

2,894 

2,473 

172 

913 

2,945 

1.639 

603 

1,836 

67 

624 

5,819 

2,579 

2,699 

3.472 

247 

6,717 

540 

5,743 

294 

914 

793 

427 

7,733 

404 

3,312 

2,962 

3.498 

210 

154 

476 

4,384 

2,354 

5,332 


4,955 
2,297 
1,658 
2,404 
4,350 

461 
3,084 
1,836 
1,703 
1,130 
10,536 
4,097 
4,533 
3,383 

433 
2,311 
1,085 
5,845 
3,430 
1,765 

735 
1,008 
3,795 
2,848 
3,081 
3,316 

590 

837 
6,431 
1,813 
2,995 
5,200 
2,452 
7,871 
1,998 
0,693 

672 

865 
2,243 
1,136 
9,373 
3,342 
3,349 
4,569 
3,084 

985 
1,165 

676 
6,512 
3,138 
4,787 


3,180 

2,424 

1,220 

209 

3,891 

2,150 

1,276 

83 

584 

1,227 

5,982 

3,199 

3,596 

2,464 

136 

1,822 

439 

6,173 

2,731 

2,308 

79 

1,222 

1,789 

1,425 

221 

1,085 

36 

625 

6,191 

2,676 

1,498 

2,793 

87 

5,243 

268 

3,484 

194 

909 

430 

151 

6.435 

184 

2,823 

2,476 

3.252 

106 

112 

320 

3,600 

2,800 

4,826 


4,360 
2,320 
1,412 
1,694 
3,908 

416 
1,242 

729 
1,457 
1,173 
8,699 
3,550 
4,804 
2,893 

152 
2,389 

817 
5,171 
3,133 
1,842 

228 

845 
3,040 
3,126 
1,237 
1,835 

346 

713 
6,144 
1,953 
2,100 
3,228 

794 
4,790 

843 
4,443 

950 

858 
1,006 

503 
6,589 
1,139 
3,278 
3,672 
3,273 

472 

753 

3(17 

4,774 

2 550 

1 6.079 


3,304 
2,203 
1,073 
64 
3,404 
1,499 

197 
21 

439 
1,026 
4,411 
3,185 
3,997 
1,580 
14 
1,112 

273 

4,688 

2,002 

2.063 

11 

952 

797 

1,002 

81 

902 
12 

508 
5.971 
2,450 

650 

1,213 

16 

2,849 

138 
2,054 

175 

976 

109 

31 

4,445 

109 

2,705 

1,568 

■; 683 
31 
35 
54 

1 946 


6,346 
2,471 
1.711 
2,122 
4,014 

399 
3,468 
1,423 
1,468 
1,584 
15,338 
4.581 
6,868 
4,844 

531 
2.936 

946 
7,225 
3,324 
2.378 

545 
1,243 
5,013 
2,673 
2.282 
2,691 

601 
1,037 
8 339 
1,893 
2,681 
4.803 
2,627 
7,971 
1,605 
10.S55 

512 
1,218 
1,961 

79;! 

1 1 . 699 

3,487 

1 968 

5 . 229 



1.070 

7.39:', 


5,550 




2,152 


Alleghany 


1,386 




134 


Ashe . 


3 . 929 


Avery 


1,797 


Beaufort .. . 


1.260 


Bertie... 


61 




514 


Brunswick . 


1,521 
12,413 


Burke 


3,929 


Cabarrus 


4.3(15 


Caldwell . 


3,192 


Camden 


51 


Carteret 


2,005 


Caswell 


226 




:>.774 




2.926 


Cherokee . 


2.9H2 


Chowan 


23 


Clay 


1,164 


Cleveland 




Columbus 


1,319 


Craven .. . _. 


685 


Cumberland 


967 


Currituck 


13 


Dare 


120 


Davidson ... 


6,832 


Davie . . 


2.104 


Duplin. 


1,047 


Durham 


3,049 


Edgecombe .... 


299 


Forsvth _. . 


5.997 


Franklin 


170 


Oaston 


i 01 


Gates 


79 


Graham 


1,181 


Granville 


293 


Greene 


103 


Guilford 




Halifax 


191 


Harnett 


18 


Haywood 

Henderson 


2 . 755 
3.981 


Hertford 




Hoke.. 


86 


Hyde 

Iredell.. 


4,256 


Jackson 

Johnston 


:; 255 
5 . 1 75 



102 



Election Returns 



Vote for United States Senator, 1920-1930 — Continued 



Counties 



Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg.. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery.. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover. 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank ... 

Pender 

Perquimans... 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. . 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania.. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington... 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



Totals 310,504 



1902 






000 
,364 

881 
337 

,106 
335 
574 
817 
542 
737 

,337 
747 

,084 

,342 
330 

,574 

,127 
291 
817 

,606 
060 

, 656 
201 
390 
078 

,368 
297 

,512 

,438 
111 

,433 

,702 
911 
009 
581 
419 
549 
717 
203 
508 
307 
894 
115 
757 
867 
884 
539 
360 
306 



<rt 



337 

1,124 

1,021 

3,125 

2,033 

3,610 

498 

2,568 

3,253 

2,554 

2,294 

2,223 

1,511 

472 

127 

821 

1,727 

1,010 

416 

672 

478 

1,565 

821 

1,350 

6,239 

1.098 

2,055 

3,587 

4,888 

3,993 

5,289 

286 

4,275 

2,988 

5,153 

2,252 

1,664 

535 

1,365 

768 

3,278 

240 

970 

:*.:.: is 

2,766 

6,458 

1,319 

3,290 

2,574 



229,343 



1924 



s a 

03 



717 

1,874 
2,285 
2,948 
2,648 
1,414 
2,022 
3,082 
8,970 

745 
2.517 
2,878 
3,281 
5,268 
1,713 
1,172 
2,036 

909 
1,317 
1,229 

570 
1,639 
3,403 
1,656 
5,452 
2,724 
4,777 
4,489 
5,350 
5,171 
2.097 
1,498 
3,959 
2,314 
4,511 
1,795 
1,837 

648 
2,782 
2,263 
9,318 
1,829 

802 
2,405 
3,797 
3,573 
2,777 
1,393 
2.635 



!95,404 



< a 

<K 



146 

675 

396 

2,673 

2,212 

3,045 

190 

2,543 

2,110 

1,604 

2,059 

1,849 

757 

501 

96 

364 

1,185 

393 

236 

209 

270 

982 

416 

1,408 

6,285 

503 

614 

2,573 

696 

847 

279 

145 

520 

485 

4,970 

2,177 

1,770 

448 

607 

354 

2,084 

94 

812 

2,659 

1,203 

ii,147 

468 

2,874 

2,126 



184,393 



1926 



cS 



^Q 



425 

1,374 

1,375 

3,115 

2,542 

955 

910 

2,934 

2,877 

429 

2,266 

2,091 

1,833 

1,050 

941 

744 

1,547 

436 

609 

681 

476 

1,124 

1,617 

1,711 

5,440 

2,414 

2,352 

3,188 

3.372 

3,909 

'2,564 

716 

3,263 

2,137 

4,623 

1,876 

1,919 

500 

1,359 

1,382 

4,554 

1,033 



2,923 
2,731 
3,550 
896 
935 
2,219 



is 
la 



30 

291 

277 

2,847 

2,079 

1,789 

38 

2,815 

424 

925 

1,465 

1,170 

242 

103 

118 

104 

741 

103 

84 

98 

72 

408 

127 

1,366 

5,487 

265 

252 

1,944 

1,561 

2,861 

2.620 

61 

2,879 

2,607 

4,607 

1,840 

1,908 

278 

228 

165 

493 

20 

618 

2,895 

997 

6,014 

110 

2,131 

2,259 



218,934 1142,891 ,324,393 



1930 



.2 3 



531 

1,499 
1,922 
4,023 

J.S.'.. 

1,692 
1,732 
3,922 
7,678 

938 
2,352 
2,558 
2,699 
2,363 
1,660 
1,099 
1,616 
1,091 
1,785 

945 

663 
1,661 
3,232 
2,035 
5,602 
2,597 
4,041 
5,862 
7,622 
5,529 
3,015 
1,745 
4,633 
2,653 
6,449 
2,036 
2,383 

435 
2,266 
1,595 
7,540 
1,327 
1,139 
2,836 
4,400 
3,076 
2,544 
1,170 
2,793 



OK 

133 

596 

367 

3,847 

2,400 

3,127 

59 

2,766 

4,106 

2,126 

2,007 

2,158 

448 

863 

109 

198 

895 

821 

316 

207 

105 

723 

367 

1,554 

5,785 

590 

564 

3,979 

4.946 

4,718 

3,679 

171 

4,141 

2,631 

5,033 

2,232 

1,999 

156 

622 

239 

1,427 

65 

723 

2,755 

2,221 

4,022 

483 

2,267 

2,526 



210,761 



Vote for Members of Congress 



103 



VOTE FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS, 1922-1930 

FIRST CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





19 


22 


19 


24 


1926 


19 


28 


1930 


Counties 


T3 
EG 03 

I 1 

BO 


tZ 

a c 

03 S3 

W c, 
. o> 


a 

9 

E~ 

03 

o?" 

a 33 
3Q 


0? 

3 

00 

« g 

- o 

-IS. 


a 

03 

So 


a 

CD 

t- 
E 
C3 

w 

l> a 


-*3 

O 
O 

8 

II 


c 

o: 

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S 8 

3Q 




1,854 
223 
312 
368 
648 
708 
438 
470 

1,030 
607 
455 

1,653 
611 
824 


557 

6 

2 

10 

473 

141 

28 

79 

39 

150 

108 

89 

307 

432 


3,097 
443 
708 
606 
809 
668 
971 
712 

1,927 

1,178 
550 

3,285 
584 
849 


1,193 

125 

69 

18 

559 

176 

81 

202 

173 

172 

235 

354 

380 

741 


1,235 
167 
232 
348 
785 
940 
471 
339 
880 
611 
478 

1,622 
496 
897 


3,910 

691 
1,075 
1,284 
1,021 

749 
1,281 

718 
2,813 
2,145 

870 
5,019 

548 
1,016 


2,037 
104 
133 
54 
659 
243 
108 
342 
292 
435 
370 
941 
448 

1,043 


3,749 


Camden 


574 




559 




603 




1,187 




520 


Hertford _ - 


857 


Hyde 


367 


Martin 


1,736 




1,883 




709 


Pitt 


3,304 




479 




1,458 






Totals 


10,201 


3,401 


16,387 


4.478 


9,501 


23,140 


7,209 


17,985 







SECOND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





1922 


1924 


1926 


1928 


19 


30 


Counties 


a 

3 a 
5Q 


V 

. 03 
K g 


> = 

si a 
0. 

SpS 

45 

30 

113 

188 

292 

74 

57 

370 


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03 

03 

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a a 

ja 53 




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0> 
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s a 
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B 

03.2 

o,S 


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765 
1,228 

826 
1,314 
1,402 

800 

978 
1,214 


1,844 
2,098 
1,080 
3,219 
2,092 
1,734 
1,761 
2.484 


736 

806 

498 

1,161 

1,374 

1,033 

987 

889 


2.111 
4,483 
1,243 
5,234 
2,701 
2,002 
2.207 
4,148 


104 
430 
230 
332 
553 
124 
144 
1.082 


1,440 
2,523 

805 
3,502 
2.017 
] ,669 
[,339 


50 




142 




74 


Halifax 


137 




284 




85 






Wilson ,- 


315 








8,533 


16,312 


1,169 


7,484 


24,129 


3.005 


15,987 


1,124 







104 



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112 Election Returns 

vote on constitutional amendments and refer- 
endum by counties, 1930. 



Proposed Amendments to the Constitution of North Carolina and 

Referendum Submitted to a Vote of the People at the 

General Election November 4, 1930. 



Constitutional Amendment Rejected 

Amendment to Section 6, Article IV — Increasing the number of 
Supreme Court Justices from five to seven. 

Chapter 142, Public Laws, 1929. 

That Section 6 of Article IV of the Constitution of North Caro- 
lina be and the same is hereby amended to read as follows: 

Sec. 6. Supreme Court Justices. The Supreme Court shall 
consist of a Chief Justice and six Associates. 

Constitutional Amendment Rejected 

Amendment to Section 23, Article IV — Providing for Solici- 
torial Districts. 

Chapter 140, Public Laws, 1929. 

That Section 23 of Article IV of the Constitution of North 
Carolina be amended to read as follows : 

Sec. 23. The State shall be divided into twenty solicitorial 
districts, for each of which a solicitor shall be chosen by the quali- 
fied voters thereof, as is prescribed for members of the General 
Assembly, who shall hold office for the term of four years, and 
prosecute on behalf of the State, in all criminal actions in the 
Superior Courts, and advise the officers of justices in his district. 
But the General Assembly may reduce or increase the number of 
districts. 

Constitutional Amendment Rejected 

Amendment to Section 3, Article V — Authorizing the classifi- 
cation of real and personal property. 

Chapter 108, Public Laws, 1929. 

(a.) That Section 3 of Article V of the Constitution of North 
Carolina be amended to read as follows: 



Amendment and Referendum 113 

Sec. 3. Taxation shall be ad valorem and uniform as to each 
class of property. Laws shall be passed taxing, by a rule that is 
uniform as to each class of property, all moneys, credits, invest- 
ments in bonds, stocks, joint-stock companies, or otherwise; and, 
also, all real and personal property according to its true value in 
money. The General Assembly may adopt such classification of real 
property and of personal property as it may find to be reasonable. 
The General Assembly may also tax trades, professions, franchises, 
and incomes: Provided, the rate of tax on incomes shall not in any 
case exceed six percent (6 r /c), and there shall be allowed the fol- 
lowing exemptions, to be deducted from the amount of annual in- 
comes, to-wit; for married man with a wife living with him, or 
to a widow, or widower having minor child or children, natural 
or adopted, not less than $2,000; to all other persons not less than 
$1,000; and there may be allowed other deductions (not including 
living expenses), so that only net incomes are taxed. 

(b.) That Section 9 of Article VII as to uniformity of muni- 
cipal ad valorem taxes be repealed. 



REFERENDUM ADOPTED 



Referendum Authorizing Issuance of an Additional $2,000,000 
World War Veterans Loan Bonds. 

Under Chapter 298, Public Laws, 1929 a referendum was held 
on the issuance of two million dollars loan fund bonds, the pro- 
ceeds to be added to the present revolving fund for lending money 
for the purchase of homes to the veterans of the World War, or 
the Spanish-American War, or the Philippine Insurrection or the 
China Relief Expedition, who at the time of entering such service 
resided in North Carolina and saw service for a period of sixty 
days, and a majority of the votes was cast in the affirmative on 
the proposition for "World War Veterans Loan Bonds" authoriz- 
ing the issuance of said bonds. 



114 



Election Returns 



vof 



E ON FOREGOING AMENDMENTS 



Counties 



Amendment Providing 


World War Veterans' 


for Solicitorial 


Loan 


Districts 


Fund Bonds 


For 


Against 


For 


Against 


1,702 


3,060 


4,140 


2,347 


948 


1,449 


1,594 


1,279 


69 


682 


196 


647 


251 


1,450 


800 


1,091 


395 


1,850 


1,056 


1,698 


195 


212 


594 


192 


893 


1,873 


1,713 


1,403 


170 


721 


561 


499 


382 


954 


641 


796 


442 


239 


1,064 


322 


10.651 


3,904 


15,221 


2,744 


995 


1 . 300 


3,063 


965 


3,049 


2,062 


5.363 


1,516 


1,284 


1.390 


2,705 


977 


89 


106 


293 


44 


379 


1,025 


1,441 


316 


390 


279 


547 


210 


2,978 


1,668 


4,449 


1,553 


432 


3,856 


1,469 


3,226 


1,080 


946 


1,864 


776 


92 


305 


204 


229 


300 


84 


228 


131 


1,390 


2,074 


2,828 


1,515 


688 


1,649 


1,366 


1,400 


578 


890 


1,648 


498 


755 


2,151 


1,762 


1,552 


219 


127 


406 


56 


193 


130 


360 


67 


2,846 


5,895 


3,613 


5,786 


372 


802 


765 


614 


597 


2,161 


968 


1,961 


2,276 


1,715 


3,729 


1,293 


440 


1,623 


1,258 


1,023 


3,207 


4,541 


5,441 


3,719 


320 


1,053 


872 


683 


4,731 


2,930 


8,492 


1,889 


36 


238 


94 


212 


408 


255 


698 


275 


584 


1,022 


1,044 


666 


70 


592 


223 


476 


5,850 


4,592 


8,190 


3,949 


1,342 


1,364 


1,868 


906 


888 


4,242 


2,450 


3,238 


2,090 


1,593 


4,329 


926 


1,717 


1,057 


3,214 


741 


159 


439 


265 


385 


128 


786 


386 


599 


83 


152 


206 


91 


1 , 722 


3,561 


3,487 


2,992 


915 


583 


1,381 


554 


1,060 


2,748 


2,679 


2,117 



Alamance.. 
Alexander.. 
Alleghany.. 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick . 
Buncombe. 

Burke 

Cabarrus... 
Caldwell. __ 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham. .. 
Cherokee... 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland.. 
Columbus.. 

Craven 

Cumberland 
Currituck.. 

Dare 

Davidson _ . 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville... 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood.. 
Henderson.. 

Hertford 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johns ton... 



Vote on Constitutional Amendments 



115 



Vote on Foregoing Amendments — Continued 



Counties 


Amendment Providing 

for Solicitorial 

Districts 


World Wai 
Lo 
Fund 


Veterans' 
m 
3onds 




For 


Against 


For 


Against 




50 

414 

484 

977 

923 

500 

188 

2,138 

3,364 

326 

388 

722 

615 

1.354 

310 

107 

565 

166 

620 

154 

213 

486 

361 

497 

851 

582 

1,228 

2,205 

2,676 

1,544 

547 

413 

859 

549 

1,214 

1,480 

1,090 

118 

698 

355 

2,246 

193 

176 

1,046 

888 

919 

622 

168 

886 


382 

1,165 

1,247 

1,466 

457 

801 

1,223 

1,110 

2,470 

342 

1,848 

2,702 

1,836 

621 

1,109 

892 

879 

523 

545 

601 

366 

751 

2,527 

637 

4,964 

1,342 

2,570 

2,026 

3,003 

3,212 

2,995 

671 

2,343 

1,567 

1,667 

386 

606 

207 

988 

924 

4,484 

760 

1,034 

786 

3,538 

1,946 

1,450 

2,011 

1,072 


244 

998 

963 

1,468 

1,460 

1,200 

467 

2,509 

4,850 

676 

890 

1,788 

1,310 

2,046 

842 

206 

1,012 

819 

1,021 

579 

391 

1,012 

964 

628 

1,871 

1,660 

2,440 

3,303 

4,356 

2,845 

1,039 

884 

1,563 

1,094 

2,780 

3,668 

1.682 

215 

1,003 

735 

4,472 

451 

624 

1,629 

1,369 

1,770 

1,214 

585 

1,487 


247 




727 




865 




1 310 




649 




534 


Martin . .. 


1,050 


McDowell 

Mecklenburg _ _ _ ._ 


998 
2,032 


Mitchell . 


305 


Montgomery . . . 


1,550 




1,281 


Nash_._ _ 

New Hanover - 


1,314 
484 




745 




821 


Orange . . 


757 


Pamlico 


280 


Pasquotank. _ .. 

Pender.- . 


380 
328 


Perquimans 


218 


Person.. . .. 


568 


Pitt. .. 


2,068 


Polk 


637 


Randolph. 


4,624 


Richmond. ___- 


842 


Robeson ... . -_- 


1,645 


Rockingham. ... 


1,519 


Rowan. . . . 


2,294 


Rutherford . -. 


2,719 


Sampson 


2,807 


Scotland.. _... 


444 


Stanly 


2,139 


Stokes 


1,394 


Surry 


1,291 


Swain 


311 


Transylvania 


485 


Tyrrell . . - 


150 


Union . . 


999 


Vance . 


643 


Wake 


3,083 


Warren 


603 


Washington .. 


781 


Watauga . . . 


721 


Wayne.. . .. 


3,326 


Wilkes.... 


1,688 


Wilson 


1,061 


Yadkin 


1,746 


Yancey 


928 






Totals 


102,705 


153,332 


180,184 


121,546 







116 



Election Returns 



Vote on Foregoing Amendments — Continued 



Counties 



Alamance _. 
Alexander.. 
Alleghany., 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick.. 
Buncombe.. 

Burke 

Cabarrus... 
Caldwell... 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba.. _ 
Chatham... 
Cherokee. .. 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland. . 
Columbus. . 

Craven 

Cumberland 
Currituck. . 

Dare 

Davidson.. 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford.... 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood . . . 
Henderson.. 

Hertford 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 



Amendment Increasing 


Amendment Authorizing 


Supreme Court to 


Classification of 


Seven Members 


Property 


For 


Against 


For 


Against 


1,811 


3,636 


2,271 


3,064 


844 


1,621 


930 


1,503 


74 


750 


99 


683 


191 


1,575 


246 


1,475 


232 


2,116 


763 


1,750 


210 


334 


511 


203 


660 


2,236 


881 


1,879 


117 


880 


259 


688 


246 


1,175 


474 


946 


416 


374 


721 


196 


10,669 


5,806 


13,134 


3,255 


935 


1,444 


1,175 


1,429 


3,296 


2,535 


3,678 


1,999 


987 


1,818 


1,887 


1,327 


79 


153 


166 


78 


249 


1,122 


450 


1,114 


257 


447 


341 


334 


2,528 


2,309 


2,867 


1,780 


314 


4,076 


699 


3,679 


1,020 


1,250 


1,602 


754 


96 


339 


150 


275 


154 


154 


109 


84 


1,105 


2,683 


1,731 


1,989 


399 


2,116 


804 


1,711 


478 


1,251 


715 


989 


767 


2,230 


636 


2,046 


213 


169 


225 


129 


179 


147 


173 


152 


2,572 


6,570 


3,065 


6,003 


356 


922 


483 


783 


263 


2,392 


320 


2,295 


2,468 


2,190 


2,545 


1,712 


463 


1,730 


745 


1,596 


3,357 


5,245 


3,412 


4,780 


183 


1,272 


246 


1,141 


4,871 


3,425 


5,027 


2,970 


35 


281 


57 


229 


437 


314 


442 


237 


584 


1,156 


588 


1,108 


41 


665 


79 


594 


5,616 


5,818 


6,866 


4,423 


1,113 


1,828 


1,030 


1,608 


764 


4,113 


922 


4,293 


2,021 


2,104 


2,453 


1,626 


1,571 


1,710 


2,487 


891 


98 


577 


156 


472 


94 


891 


185 


770 


61 


195 


90 


163 


1,987 


3,987 


2,399 


3,438 


1,007 


645 


1,062 


594 


973 


3,389 


1,476 


3,116 



Vote on Constitutional Amendments 117 



Vote on Foregoing Amendments — Continued 



Counties 



Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico. 

Pasquotank . . 

Pender 

Perquimans . . 

Person. 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham.. 

Rowan. 

Rutherford.. . 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington. . 

Watauga 

Wavne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Totals... 



Amendment Increasing 

Supreme Court to 

Seven Members 



For 



37 

283 

444 

1,038 

833 

412 

136 

2,232 

3,721 

240 

359 

750 

512 

1,423 

131 

57 

539 

149 

453 

150 

175 

404 

269 

357 

925 

698 

903 

1,772 

2,638 

1,425 

519 

379 

867 

485 

1,154 

1,406 

992 

64 

497 

358 

2,065 

149 

175 

946 

759 

812 

472 

179 

860 

96,062 



Against 



432 

373 

413 

527 

820 

107 

365 

161 

3,200 

427 

2,075 

2,781 

2,021 

938 

1,441 

963 

1.110 

638 

758 

674 

440 

966 

2,768 

795 

5,378 

1,672 

3,051 

2,294 

3,568 

3,801 

3,262 

684 

2,550 

1,674 

2,031 

518 

866 

326 

1.470 

999 

5,205 

916 

1,112 

986 

3,970 

2,168 

1,668 

2,073 

1,350 



180,950 



Amendment Authorizing 

Classification of 

Property 



For 



63 

429 

506 

1,116 

1,255 

871 

203 

2,384 

3,684 

242 

690 

886 

694 

1,975 

324 

107 

649 

199 

573 

224 

305 

511 

415 

622 

1,025 

791 

1,087 

2.358 

3,336 

1,864 

878 

640 

923 

724 

1,204 

1,548 

1,183 

177 

792 

314 

2,280 

311 

261 

968 

1,384 

1.417 

697 

260 

1,083 



120,264 



Against 



389 

1,154 

1,331 

1,375 

457 

673 

1,275 

1.007 

2,459 

359 

1,746 

2,537 

1,802 

538 

1,181 

886 

892 

565 

562 

590 

331 

783 

2,601 

627 

4,878 

1,511 

2,652 

1,908 

2,838 

3,165 

2,922 

609 

2,372 

1,531 

1,726 

397 

663 

197 

969 

896 

4.850 

749 

1.003 

964 

3,308 

1,760 

1,392 

1.892 

1 . 155 



152.7611 



PART V 



CEiNSUS 



1. Population and Area of the Several States and Terri- 

tories, 1910, 1930. 

2. Population (Estimated) of North Carolina, 1675-1786. 

3. Census of North Carolina, 1790-1840. 

4. Census of North Carolina, 1850-1930. 

5. Population of North Carolina Cities and Towns, 1900- 

1930. 

6. North Carolina Counties and County Seats. 

7. Summary of North Carolina's Economic Progress, 1900- 

1929. 



Population and Area of United States 121 



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CC QO C-l 

o — — 
cr, cr> c 



a a a 
o o c 



POPULATION (Estimated) OF NORTH CAROLINA, 1675-1786 

1675 4,000 

1701 5,000 

1707 7,000 

1715 11,000 

1729 35,000 

1752 100,000 

1765 200,000 

1771 - 250,000 

1786 350,000 



124 



Census 



CENSUS OF 


NORTH CAROLINA, 1790-i850 




Counties 


Date of 
Forma- 
tion 


1790 


1800 


1810 


1820 


1830 


1840 


1850 


1 Alamance 


1840 
1847 
1859 
1749 
1799 














11 444 


2 Alexander 














5,220 


3 Alleghanv 














4 Anson _ 


5,133 


8,146 
2,783 


8,831 
3,694 


12,534 
4,335 


14,095 
6,987 


15,077 
7,467 


13 489 


5 Ashe 


8,777 


6 Avery 


7 Beaufort . 


1705 
1722 
1734 
1764 
1791 
1777 
1792 
1841 
1777 
1722 
1777 
1842 
1770 
1839 
1672 
1861 
1841 
1808 
1712 
1754 
1672 
1870 
1822 
1836 
1749 
1881 
1732 
1849 
1779 
1846 
1779 
1872 
1746 
1799 
1770 
1758 
1855 

I SOS 

1838 
1759 
1911 
1705 
1788 
1851 
1746 
1779 
1907 
1791 
1779 
1842 


5,462 

12,606 

5,084 

3,071 

8,118 


6,242 
11,249 
7,028 
4,110 
5,812 
9,929 
5,094 


7,203 

11,218 
5,671 
4,778 
9,277 

11,007 
6,158 


9,850 
10,805 

7,276 

5,480 
10,542 
13,411 

7,248 


10,969 

12,262 

7,811 

6,516 

16,281 

17,888 

8,810 


12,225 

12,175 

8,022 

5,265 

10,084 

15.799 

9,259 


13 816 


8 Bertie 


12 851 


9 Bladen. 


9 767 


10 Brunswick _ 


7 272 


11 Buncombe 


13 4''5 


12 Burke 

13 Cabarrus 


7,772 
9 747 


14 Caldwell 


6,317 

6,049 

6,939 

15,269 

8 862 


15 Camden 


4,033 

3,732 

10,096 


4,191 
4,399 
8,701 


5,347 

4,823 

11,757 


6,347 

5.609 

13.253 


6,733 

6,597 
15,785 


5,663 

6,592 

14,693 


16 Carteret... . . 


17 Caswell 

18 Catawba.. __ _ 


19 Chatham 


9,221 


11,861 


12,977 


12',661 


15,405 


16,242 
3.427 
6,690 


18,449 
6,838 
6,721 


20 Cherokee.. 


21 Chowan . . 


5,011 


5,132 


5.297 


6,464 


6.697 


22 Clav 


23 Cleveland 














10,396 
5 909 


24 Columbus 






3,022 

12,676 
9,382 
6,985 


3,912 
13,394 
14.446 

8.098 


4,141 
13.734 
14,834 

7,655 


3,941 
13,438 
15,284 

6,703 


25 Craven 


10,469 
8,671 
5,219 


10,245 

9,264 
6,928 


14 709 


26 Cumberland 


20,610 
7 236 


27 Currituck 


28 Dare.... 




29 Davidson.. ._ 










13,389 


14,606 

7.574 

11.182 


15,320 

7 866 


30 Davie 










31 Duplin 


5,662 


6,796 


7,863 


9,744 


11,291 


13 514 


32 Durham 




33 Edgecombe 

34 Forsyth 


10,225 


10,421 


12,423 


13,276 


14,935 


15,708 


17,189 
11,168 


35 Franklin 

36 Gaston 


7,559 


8,529 


10,166 


9,741 


10,665 


10,980 


11,713 
8 173 


37 Gates 


5,392 


5,881 


5,965 


6,837 


7,866 


8,161 


8 426 


38 Graham 




39 Granville 

""40 Greene*... . 

41 Guilford 

42 Halifax 

43 Harnett 


10.982 
6,983 
7,191 

13,965 


14,015 

4,218 

9,442 

13,945 


15,576 

4,867 

11,420 

13,620 


18.222 

4,533 

14.511 

17.237 


19.355 

6,413 

18,737 

17.739 


18,817 

6.595 

19,175 

16,865 


21,249 

6,619 

19,754 

16,589 


44 Haywood 






2,780 


4,073 


4,578 


4,975 
5.129 
4,484 


7 074 


45 Henderson _ 






6,853 


46 Hertford 


5,828 


6,701 


6,052 


7,712 


8,537 


8 142 


47 Hoke _ 




48 Hyde 


4,120 
5,435 


4,829 
8,856 


6,029 
10.972 


4,967 
13.071 


6,184 
14.918 


6,458 
15.685 


7 636 


49 Iredell 

50 Jackson _ 


14,719 


51 Johnston 

52 Jones ... 


5,634 
4,822 


6,30! 
4,339 


6,867 
4,968 


9,607 
5,216 


10,938 
5.608 


10,599 
4,945 


13.726 
5 038 


53 Lee 




54 Lenoir 

55 Lincoln 

56 McDowell 


9,224 


4,005 
12,660 


5,572 
16,359 


6,799 
18,147 


7,723 
22,455 


7,605 
26,160 


7,828 
7,746 
6.246 



*In 1758 Dobbs County was formed from part of Johnston. In 1791 Dobbs was divided into Le- 
noir and Glasgow. In 1799 the name of Glasgow was changed to Greene. 



North Carolina 



125 



1 


CENSUS OF NORTH' CAROLINA, 1860-1931} 






\ 




« 












Land 

Area in 




1860 


1870 


1880 


1890 


1900 


1910 


1920 


l'$0 


Square 
Miles 




11,852 


11,874 


14,613 


18,271 


25,665 


28,712 


32,718 


42,140 


492 


1 


6,022 


6,868 


8,355 


9,430 


10,960 


11,592 


12,212 


12,922 


289 


2 


3,598 


3,691 


5,486 


6,523 


7,759 


7,745 


7,403 


7,186 


234 


3 


13,664 


12,428 


17,994 


20,027 


21,870 


25,465 


28,334 


29,349 


556 


4 


7,956 


9,573 


14,437 


15,628 


19,581 


19,074 


21,001 
10,335 
31,024 


21,019 
11,803 
35,026 


427 
238 
840 


5 

6 


14,766 


13,011 


17,474 


21,072 


26,404 


30,877 




14,310 


12,950 


16,399 


19,176 


20,538 


23,039 


23,993 


25,844 


703 


8 


11,995 


12,831 


16,158 


16,763 


17,677 


18,006 


19,761 


22,389 


976 


9 


8,406 


7,754 


9,389 


10,900 


12,657 


14,432 


14,876 


15,818 


790 


10 


12,654 


15,412 


21,909 


35,206 


44,288 


49,798 


64,148 


97,937 


682 


11 


9,237 


9,777 


12,809 


14,939 


17,699 


21,408 


23,297 


29,410 


534 


12 


10,546 


11,954 


14,964 


18,142 


22,456 


26,240 


33,730 


44,331 


390 


13 


7,497 


8,476 


10,291 


12,298 


15,694 


20,579 


19,984 


28,016 


471 


14 


5,343 


5,361 


6,274 


5,667 


5,474 


5,640 


5,382 


5,461 


220 


15 


8,186 


9,010 


9,784 


10,825 


11,811 


13,776 


15,384 


16,900 


573 


16 


16,215 


16,081 


17,825 


16,028 


15,028 


14,858 


15.759 


18.214 


402 


17 


10,729 


10,984 


14,946 


18,689 


22,123 


27,918 


33,839 


43.991 


408 


18 


19,101 


19,723 


23,453 


25,413 


23,912 


22,635 


23,814 


24,177 


696 


19 


9.166 


8,080 


8,182 


9,976 


11,860 


14,136 


15,242 


16,151 


454 


20 


6,842 


6,450 


7,900 


9,167 


10,258 


11,303 


10,649 


11,282 


165 


21 




2,461 


3,316 


4,197 


4,532 


3,909 


4,646 


5,434 


220 


22 


12,348 


12,696 


16,571 


20,394 


25,078 


29,494 


34,272 


51,914 


496 


23 


8,597 


8,474 


14,439 


17,856 


21,274 


28,020 


30,124 


37,720 


933 


24 


16,268 


20,516 


19,729 


20,533 


24,164 


25,594 


29,048 


30,665 


660 


25 


16,369 


17,035 


23,836 


27,321 


29,249 


35,284 


35,064 


45,219 


670 


26 


7,415 


5,131 


6,476 


6,747 


6,529 


7,693 


7,268 


6,710 


292 


27 




2,778 


3,244 


3,768 


4,757 


4.841 


5,115 


5,202 


377 


28 


16,601 


17,414 


20,333 


21,702 


23,403 


29,404 


35,201 


47,865 


569 


29 


8,494 


9,620 


11,096 


11,621 


12,115 


13,394 


13,578 


14,386 


258 


30 


15,784 


15,542 


18,773 


18,690 


22,405 


25,442 


30,223 


35,103 


790 


31 








18,141 


26,233 


35,276 


42,219 


.67,196 


312 


32 


17,376 


22,970 


26,181 


24,113 


26,591 


32,010 


37,995 


47.894 


509 


33 


12,692 


13,050 


18,078 


28,434 


35,261 


47,311 


77,269 


111,681 


388 


34 


14,107 


14,135 


20.829 


21,098 


25,116 


24,692 


26,1,67 


29,456 


468 


35 


9,307 


12,602 


14,254 


17,764 


27,903 


37,063- 


51,242 


78,093 


363 


36 


8,443 


7,724 


8,897 


10,252 


10,413 


10,455 


10,537 


10,551 


359 


37 






2 , 335 


3,313 


4,343 
23,263 


4,749 


4,872 


5.841 


298 


38 


23,396 


24,831 


31 ! 286 


24^840 


25! 102 


26,846 


28,723 


503 


39 


7,925 


8,687 


10,037 


10,039 


12,038 


13,083 


16,212 


18,656 


252 


40 


20,056 


22,736 


23,585 


28,052 


39,074 


60,497 


79,272 


133,010 


691 


41 


19,442 


20,408 


30,300 


28,908 


30,793 


37,646 


43,766 


53,246 


676 


42 


8,039 


8,895 


10,862 


13,700 


15,988 


22,174 


28,313 


37,911 


588 


43 


5,081 


7,921 


10,271 


13,346 


16,222 


21,020 


23,496 


28,273 


546 


44 


10,448 


7,706 


10,281 


12,589 


14,104 


16,262 


18,248 


23,404 


358 


45 


9,504 


9,273 


11,843 


13,851 


14,294 


15,436 


16,294 

11,722 

8,386 


17,542 

14,244 

8,550 


341 

417 


46 
47 


7,732 


6,445 


7,765 


8,903 


9,278 


8,840 


617 4S 


15,347 


16,931 


22,675 


25,462 


29,064 


34,315 


37,956 


46,693 


588 


49 


5,515 


6,683 


7,343 


9,512 


11,853 


12,998 


13,396 


17,519 


494 


50 


15,656 


16,897 


23,461 


27,239 


32,250 


41,401 


48.99S 


57,621 


807 


51 


5,730 


5,002 


7,491 


7,403 


8,226 


8,721 


9,912 


10,428 


417 


52 












11,376 

22.769 


13,400 

29,555 


16,996 
35,716 


261 


53 


10,220 


10,434 


15,344 


14,879 


18,639 


390 54 


8,195 


9,573 


11,061 


12,586 


15,498 


17,132 


17,862 


22,872 


299 55 


7,120 


7,592 


9,836 


10,939 


12,567 


13,538 


16,763 


20,336 


400 


56 



126 



Census 



Census of North Carolina, 1790-1850- 


—Continued 


/ 


Counties 

V 


Date of 
Forma- 
tion 


1790 


1800 


1810 


1820 


1830 


1840 


1850 


57 Macon 


ISL'S 

1851 
1774 
1762 
1861 
1779 
1784 
1777 
1729 
1741 
1734 
1752 
1872 
1672 
1875 
1672 
1791 
1760 
1855 
1779 
1779 
1786 
1785 
1753 
1779 
1784 
1899 
1841 
1789 
1771 
1871 
1861 
1729 
1842 
1881 
1770 
1779 
1799 
1849 
1779 
1777 
1855 
1850 
1833 










5,333 


4,869 


6,389 


58 Madison 












59 Martin. 

60 Mecklenburg... 

61 Mitchell .. 


6,080 
11,395 


5,629 
10,439 


5,987 
14,272 


6,320 
16,895 


8,539 
20,073 


7,637 
18,273 


8,307 
13,914 


62 Montgomery 

63 Moore 


4,725 
3,770 
7,393 
6,831 
9,981 
5,387 
12,216 


7,677 
4,767 
6,975 
7,060 

12,353 
5,623 

16,362 


8,430 

6,367 

7,268 

11,465 

13,082 

6,669 

20,135 


8,693 

7,128 

8,125 

10,866 

13,242 

7,016 

23,492 


10,919 
7,745 
8,490 

10,959 

13,391 
7,814 

23,908 


10,780 
7,988 
9,047 

13,312 

13,369 
7,527 

24,356 


6,872 
9,342 


64 Nash. 


10,657 


65 New Hanover 

66 Northampton 

67 Onslow.. 


17,668 

13,335 

8,283 


68 Orange . 


17,055 


69 Pamlico 




70 Pasquotank 


5,497 


5,379 


7,674 


8,008 


8,641 


8,514 


8,950 


71 Pender 




72 Perquimans 


5,440 
8,275 


5,708 
6,402 
9,084 


6,052 

6,642 
9,169 


6,857 

9,029 

10,001 


7,419 
10,027 
12,093 


7,346 

9,790 

11,806 


7,332 


73 Person 

74 Pitt 


10,781 
13,397 


75 Polk . 




76 Randolph 


7,276 
5,055 
5,326 
6,187 
15,828 
7,808 
6,065 


9,234 
5,623 

6,839 

8,277 

20,064 

10,753 

6,719 


10,112 

6,695 

7,528 

10,316 

21,543 

13,202 

6,620 


11,331 

7,537 

8,204 

11,474 

26,009 

15,351 

8,908 


12,406 
9,396 
9,433 
12,935 
20,786 
17,557 
11,634 


12,875 
8,909 
10,370 
13,442 
12,109 
19,202 
12,157 


15,832 


77 Richmond . . 


9,818 


78 Robeson 


12,826 


79 Rockingham __ 

80 Rowan 

81 Rutherford 


14,495 
13,870 
13,550 


82 Sampson 


14,585 


83 Scotland 




84 Stanly.. 














6,922 


85 Stokes.. 


8,528 
7,191 


11,026 
9,509 


11,645 
10,306 


14,033 
12,320 


16,196 
14,504 


16,265 
15,079 


9,206 


86 Surry 


18,443 


87 Swain . 




















89 Tyrrell... 


4,744 


3,395 


3,364 


4,319 


4,732 


4,657 


5,133 


90 Union 


10,151 


91 Vance 
















92 Wake. 


10,192 
9,397 


13,437 

11,284 

2,422 


17,086 

11,004 

3,464 


20,102 

11,158 

3,986 


20,398 

11,877 

4,452 


21,118 

12,919 

4,525 


24,888 


93 Warren 


13,912 


94 Washington 


5,664 


95 Watauga 


3,400 


96 Wavne 


6,133 
8,143 


6,772 
7,247 


8,687 
9,054 


9,040 
9,967 


10,331 
11,968 


10,891 
12,577 


13,486 


97 Wilkes 


12,899 


98 Wilson 




99 Yadkin 
















100 Yancey 












5,962 


8,204 
















Totals.. 


393,751 


478,103 


555,500 


638,829 


737,987 


753,409 


869,039 









North Carolina 



127 





Census of North Carolij^, 1860-1930 — Continue 






















Land 




















Area in 




I860 


1870 


1880 


1890 


1900 


1910 


1920 


1930 


Square 
Mites 






















(3,004 


6,615 


8,064 


10,102 


12,104 


12,191 


12,887 


13,672 


513 


57 


5,908 


8,192 


12,810 


17,805 


20,644 


20,132 


20,083 


20,311.; 


436 


58 


10,195 


9,647 


13,140 


15,221 


15,383 


17,797 


20,826 


23,400 


438 


59 


17,374 


24,299 


34,175 


42,673 


55,268 


67,031 


80,695 


127,971 


597 


60 




4,705 

7,487 


9,435 
9,374 


12,807 
11,239 


15,221 
14,197 


17,245 
14,967 


11,278 
14,607 


13,962 

16.218 


213 

498 


61 


7,649 


62 


11,427 


12,048 


16,821 


20,479 


23,622 


17,010 


21,388 


28,215 


639 


63 


11,687 


11,077 ■ 


17,731 


20,707 


25,478 


33,727 


41,051 


52,782 


586 


64 


21,715 


27,978 


21,376 


24,026 


25,785 


32,037 


40,620 


43,010 


216 


65 


13,372 


14,749 


20,032 


21,242 


21,150 


22,323 


23,184 


27.161 


504 


66 


8,856 


7,569 


9,829 


10,303 


11,940 


14,125 


14,703 


15,289 


743 


67 


16,947 


17,507 


23 , 698 


14,948 


14,690 


15',064 


17,895 


21,171 


390 


68 






6,323 
10,369 


7,146 
10,748 


8,045 
13,660 


9,966 


9,060 
17,670 


9,299 
' 19.143 


350 
223 


69 


8,940 


8,131 


70 






12,468 
9,466 


12,514 
9,293 


13,381 
10,091 


15,471 
11,054 


14,788 
11,137 


15,686 
10,668 


815 
252 


71 


7,238 


7,745 


72 


11,221 


11,170 


13,719 


15,151 


16,685 


17,356 


18,973 


22,039 


391 


73 


16,080 


17,276 


21,794 


25,519 


30,889 


36,340 


45,569 


54,466 


627 


74 


4,043 


4,319 


5,062 


5,902 


' 7,004 


7,640 


8,832 


10,216 


251 


75 


16,793 


17.551 


20,836 


25,195 


28,232 


29,491 


30,856 


36,259 


803 


76 


11,009 


12,882 


18,245 


23,948 


15,855 


19,673 


25,567 


34,016 


521 


77 


15,489 


16,262 


23.380 


31,483 


40,371 


51,945 


54.674 


66,512 


990 


78 


16,746 


15,718 


21,744 


25,363 


33,163 


36,442 


44,149 


51.083 


579 


7" 


14,589 


16,810 


19.965 


24,123 


31,066 


37,521 


44,062 


56,665 


489 


V!() 


11,573 


13,121 


15,198 


18,770 


25,101 


28,385 


31,426 


40,452 


544 


81 


16,624 


16,436 


22,894 


25,096 


26,380 


29,982 


36,002 


40.082 


886 


82 










12.553 
15,220 


15,363 
19,909 


15,600 

27,42') 


20,174 
30,216 


349 

416 


83 


7,801 


8,315 


10,505 


12,136 


84 


10,402 


11,208 


15,353 


17,199 


19,866 


20,151 


20,575 


22,290 


480 85 


10,380 


11,252 


15,302 


19,281 


25,515 


29,705 


32,464 


39,749 


520 


86 






3,784 
5,340 
4,545 


6,577 
5,881 
4,225 


8,401 
6,620 
4,980 


10,403 
7,191 
5,219 


13,224 
9,303 
4,849 


11,568 
9,589 
5,164 


553 
379 
390 


S7 




3,536 
4,173 


SS 


4,944 


v 


11,202 


12,217 


18,056 


21,259 


27,150 


33,277 


36,029 


40,979 


565 90 








17,581 
49,207 


16,684 
54,626 


19,425 
63,229 


22,799 
75,155 


27,294 

94.757 


279 

824 


91 


28,627 


35,617 


47,939 


92 


15,726 


17,768 


22,619 


19,360 


19,151 


20,266 


21,593 


23.364 


425 


93 


6,357 


6,516 


8,928 


10,200 


10,608 


11,062 


11,429 


11 -.603 


327 


94 


4,957 


5,287 


8,160 


10,611 


13,417 


13,556 


13,447 


15,165 


303 95 


14,905 


18,144 


24,951 


26,100 


31,356 


35,698 


43,640 


53,013 


571 


06 


14,749 


15,539 


19,181 


22,675 


26,872 


30,282 


32,644 


36,162 


735 


97 


9,720 


12,258 


16,064 


18,644 


23,596 


28,269 


36,813 


44,914 


373 


98 


10,714 


10,697 


12,420 


13,790 


14,083 


15,428 


16,391 


is. mo 


312 


99 


8,655 


5,909 


7,694 


9,490 


11,464 


12,072 


15,093 


14,486 


298 


100 


992,622 


1,071,361 


1,399,750 


1,617,947 


1,893,810 


2,206,287 


2,559,123 


3,170,276 


48,580 





128 



Census 



POPULATION OF NORTH CAROLINA CITIES AND TOWNS 

1900-1930 



City or Town 


County 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 






157 

1,382 

237 

230 

1,940 

3,493 


78 

858 

183 

280 

1,429 

2,691 


159 
794 






Moore - 


559 




Columbus.- 






Davie. . 


283 

924 

2,116 

118 


273 




Hertford 


302 






1,382 










Rutherford .. 


831 










146 
1,634 
375 
486 
926 


98 
936 
221 
486 
681 






Cherokee 


1,748 
760 
532 
863 
290 
628 
131 












Anson 






Wake 


349 










Randolph . 


178 


145 


182 




Pitt 










151 

1,865 
18,762 
115 
524 
543 
440 
77 
990 
195 
416 


137 




Randolph 


5,021 

50,193 

331 

685 

1,041 

429 

119 

1,607 

631 

426 

340 

361 

330 

468 

131 

2,987 

2,458 

4,121 

248 

1,522 

715 

3,739 

1,149 

494 


2,559 
28,504 
296 
610 
803 
524 
99 

1,673 
518 
332 
264 
274 
309 
349 
108 

2,968 

1,816 

2,941 
190 

1,123 
324 

2,176 
817 
354 


992 




Buncombe 


14,694 




Pender 












Bertie... 


342 




Beaufort 


314 




Sampson .. 


61 




Pitt 


557 




Nash 






Mitchell . 


511 








Hath 


Beaufort 


283 

211 

370 

56 

2,483 

2,863 

1,176 


400 


Battleboro 


Edgecombe and Nash 

Pamlico 


229 




292 










Carteret 


2,195 




Beaufort 


383 






145 












800 


384 










Gaston . 


1,529 
569 


1,100 


Bethel 


Pitt 


457 








Big Lick* 




162 
173 

697 
219 
311 
276 
261 
796 


132 






313 

819 
365 
737 
587 
503 
158 
672 
156 
976 
228 


172 
755 
274 
531 
459 
338 
828 


71 








Black Creek 


Wilson . 


196 




Buncombe . 


200 








Blowing Rock _. 




331 


Columbus . 


604 


Boiling Springs .. 








199 
699 
178 


























85 
179 

28 
209 






Watauga 


1,295 
394 
238 
214 


374 
162 
206 
418 


155 




Yadkin... 


183 


Bostic 




97 


Bowdens 


Duplin.. _ 





Towns marked * are not listed in the U. S. Census, 1930. 



Cities and Towns 



129 



Population of Cities and Towns — Continued 



City or Town 


County 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 




Transylvania 

Wilson 


2,339 


1,658 


919 
50 
348 
149 
725 


584 


Bridgersville* 


42 


Bridgeton 


Craven 

Lee 


721 

347 

694 

416 

1,806 

77 

376 

96 

243 

1,209 

9,737 

866 

538 

287 

462 

5,117 

96 

1,242 

1,129 

909 

216 

292 

340 

325 

1,311 

2,699 

82,675 

106 

2,756 

1,258 


548 
250 
709 










Catawba 






Onlnmhns 






Swain 


882 

78 

291 


612 

66 

249 


417 


Buie 


Robeson _ _. 






Harnett .. . 






Harnett. . 






Franklin 


150 
1,040 
5,952 








Pender . 


956 

4., 808 

422 


387 




Alamance 


3 , 692 




Yancey 


207 




Duplin. 


405 

241 

267 

2,584 






Moore 


259 

160 

1,393 


218 




Montgomery 




Canton _ _ _ . 


Haywood. 


230 










1,129 
962 
645 








Moore . 


863 
383 


605 


Cary . 


Wake 


333 










Nash 


263 

250 

262 

1,121 

1,483 

46,338 

99 

1,884 

1,027 


219 
222 
323 

1,242 

1,149 

34,014 

76 

1,153 
852 
127 
297 
147 
276 

1,441 
426 

1,101 
344 
160 
189 
80 
848 
122 

8.715 
158 


163 




Catawba.. .. ... 


169 




Columbus 


123 




Columbus 


243 


Chapel Hill 


Orange 


1,099 




Mecklenburg 


18,091 


Cherry. _ 


Washington.. 




Cherry ville . _- 


Gaston .. . 


1,008 






887 




Beaufort 






Catawba 


368 
150 
458 
1,533 
435 
2,712 
458 
562 
229 
136 
864 
340 
11,820 
196 
384 
973 


435 
135 
368 

1,423 
366 

2,110 
363 
526 
215 
123 
738 
168 

9,903 
160 


160 




Columbus 












Johnston 


754 




Rowan -. . 


198 


Clinton 


Sampson .. __ 


958 


Clyde 


Haywood 


244 




Harnett 






Bertie 


.Mir 




Caldwell 


57 




Tyrrell 


382 




Polk 


334 




Cabarrus 


7.911) 




Edgecombe 


132 


Connelly Springs _ _ 








681 


421 

246 


413 












400 

1,230 

90 

194 
388 
350 
181 
225 
196 


294 

1,141 

92 

258 

392 

393 

190 








833 

74 
308 

;m 

I?:. 


























224 














Culberson.. 


Cherokee 





Towns marked * are not listed in the CJ, 8. Census, 1930. 



130 



Census 



Population of Cities and Towns — Continued 



City or Town 


County 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 




Cumberland.. 




80 
1,397 
1,156 


300 
1,065 
1,056 


343 




Gaston.. 


1,489 

1,445 
160 
180 
10 
540 
222 
284 
446 
621 
781 
189 
147 

4,558 

52,037 

470 

1,062 


514 






904 




Lenoir 




Delco 


Columbus - 


210 
















Davidson 


559 

243 

228 

368 

670 

392 

99 

240 

2,805 

21,719 

508 


320 

282 
277 
360 
737 






Lincoln.. 


199 






279 




Surry 


327 




Craven 

Burke. 








Dublin 


Bladen 








Wayne 


164 

1,823 

18,241 

522 






Harnett ... 


1,072 




Durham 


6,679 




Yadkin.. . 


444 


East Flat Rock 






East Kings Mountain* 

East Laurinburg 




835 

541 

1,011 

2,239 

2,777 

153 

8,925 

335 

1,195 

452 

383 

473 

425 

1,648 


383 

577 

881 

1,729 

2,789 

171 

8,412 

117 

886 

377 

293 

""266" 
1,167 
81 
162 
146 
248 
441 
730 
519 
352 






813 

1,111 

2,098 

3,563 

124 

10,057 

765 

2,357 

488 

431 

615 

373 

2,234 
















Chowan. . 


3,046 




Beaufort 


99 


Elizabeth Citv 


Pasquotank. 


6,348 




Bladen 


144 


Elkin 


Surry. . 


860 


Elk Park* 


Avery .. 


498 




Rutherford 


172 




Richmond .. -. 






Alamance . 


638 




Halifax. 


361 






93 






198 
270 
189 
806 

1,314 
589 
434 
279 
187 

2,056 
13,049 

4,069 


187 

230 

139 

397 

1,000 

477 

348 

200 

198 

1,780 

8,877 

2,312 


123 




Martin. _. . 


127 


Evergreen. __ _ 

Fair Bluff 








328 




Robeson 


432 




Duplin . . 


308 


Faith 


Rowan. 










Falkland 


Pitt 


132 

816 
7,045 
1,592 
137 
189 
329 
379 


139 




Pitt 


262 




Cumberland 


4,670 


Forest City _ 


Rutherford . 


1,090 


Wake 


157 




Pitt 


360 

684 

1,094 

676 

1,320 

1,316 

963 

509 

476 

284 

17,093 

320 

121 


243 

583 

773 

631 

1,058 

1,294 

555 

301 

376 

263 

12,871 




Four Oaks.. - . 


Johnston . .. .. 

Macon 


171 




335 










Franklin 


809 
951 
127 


761 




Wayne. 


435 




Wake 










Wake 


284 
169 
5,759 
203 
154 






Northampton 


269 




Gaston . . 


4,610 






200 


Germantown . 


Stokes. . . 


132 


129 



Towns marked * are not listed in the U. S. Census, 1930. 



Cities and Towns 



131 



Population of Cities and Towns — Continued 




City or Town 


County 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 




Scotland 


417 

1,605 
529 
138 
136 
156 
121 
14,985 
312 

2,972 
66 

2,147 

507 

53,569 

9,194 
403 
377 
435 
321 
508 
83 

4,801 
297 
337 


264 

1,302 

346 

132 

90 

261 

130 

11,296 

239 

2,366 








Alamance-Guilford 

Burke - 


1,162 
308 
119 
102 
304 
126 

6,107 
240 

2,504 


521 




137 




McDowell -_- 

Cumberland 








Gold Hill 


Rowan . 

Martin 


514 


Gold Point 


124 




Wayne 


5.877 




Chatham. . _ 






Alamance 


2,052 










Caldwell 


1,101 

466 
19,861 
5,772 
375 
463 
296 
299 
474 


381 
363 
15,895 
4,101 
291 
330 
209 
314 
452 


277 




Rowan _ 






Guilford — 


10.035 




Pitt 


2. 5ii5 




Pitt... 


229 




Pitt... 


277 




Cleveland _ 


174 




Halifax _ 


306 




Martin... . ... 


493 




Guilford 






Richmond 


3,808 
175 


2 , 173 

205 


639 




Rutherford.. 






Iredell 




Hardin Mills* 






230 

140 

90 


205 






159 

169 

305 

105 

1,168 

6,345 

5,070 

1,914 

7,363 

1,514 

443 

36,745 

246 

1,232 

557 

569 

362 

153 

307 

971 

637 

650 

800 

596 

269 


131 

85 

257 

141 

484 

5,222 

3,720 

1,704 

5,076 

1,062 

313 

14,302 

172 

1,180 

336 

385 

333 

107 

294 

783 

495 

403 

833 

447 

224 


109 


Hassell 


Martin 






Clay 






Chatham . 


162 

428 

4,503 

2,818 

1,841 

3,716 

487 

267 

9,525 

140 

857 

165 

175 

261 

126 

204 

964 

443 

411 

591 

398 

154 

124 

107 

527 














3,746 






1,917 




Perquimans . 


1,382 




Catawba .. 


2,525 




Catawba. 






Macon 


249 


High Point 


Guilford 


4,163 




Burke. .. 


109 




Orange.. 


707 






122 




Richmond .- . 


184 




Wake -- 


219 


Hollvville 


Pamlico - 








139 


Hope Mills 




881 




Madison 


445 




Caldwell 






Mecklenburg 


533 














Ingold* 




V, 




129 
677 
267 
783 
344 


22:i 
579 








441 












656 
389 


505 

398 

60 

184 

799 


109 






235 












296 
838 


196 

SKi, 


230 


Joneshoro _ 




640 



Towns marked * are not listed in the U. S. Census, 1930. 



132 



Census 



Population of Cities and Towns — Continued 



City or Town 


County 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 




Yadkin 

Buncombe 


1.306 
100 
458 
400 
965 

1,754 
75 

5,632 

11,362 

220 

243 

1,500 
204 
405 

1,388 
267 
201 
270 
127 

3,312 
728 

1,814 


787 

87 

223 

302 

827 

1,219 

113 

2,800 

9,771 

223 


621 
111 

316 

270 

726 

1,128 

170 

2,218 

6,995 

242 






127 


Kelford 


Bertie 

Duplin. 


167 




271 




Johnston 


260 


Kernersville 


Forsyth 

Moore . 


652 




180 




Cleveland-Gaston 


2,062 




Lenoir 


4,106 


Kittrell 


Vance.- 


168 




Wake 






Lenoir . 


1,399 


1,007 


853 




Rutherford .- 






Columbus. 


237 
972 








Rowan _ . 


437 






Ashe - 




Lasker 


Northampton 


196 
262 


203 
297 


121 




Cleveland . 


108 










Scotland 


2,643 

774 

1.606 


2,322 
568 

1,127 
151 
153 

3,364 
279 
262 

4,163 
474 
386 
380 

2,413 


1,334 




Cleveland . 




Leaksville __ 


Rockingham - 


688 




Beaufort 


100 




Buncombe 






126 




Caldwell 


6,532 
235 
412 

9,652 
873 
406 
752 

3,781 
174 

1,133 
103 

1,262 

2,182 

1,664 
363 
214 

4,140 
914 
141 
138 
353 
227 

1,497 
802 

1,628 
269 
547 
74 
304 
138 
130 

2,467 


3,718 
424 
244 

5,254 
636 
440 
593 

3,390 
191 

1.010 

95 

755 

1,954 

1,151 
316 
202 

2,691 

1,162 
120 
219 
294 
149 

1,247 
694 

1,266 
141 
394 
99 
166 
147 
85 

1,784 


1,296 




Richmond 






Bertie. 


163 




Davidson 


1,234 


Liberty . 


Randolph 


304 


Lilesville 


Anson 


213 




Harnett - 


65 




Lincoln 


828 




Cumberland . 






Halifax-Warren 


1,152 






.Stanly 

Catawba .. 

Franklin 

Gaston 






243 
1,775 
876 
266 
165 
2,230 
983 






1,178 




290 


Lucama. 


Wilson 

Robeson _ 

Robeson 


236 


Lumber Bridge 


181 




849 


McAden ville 


Gaston 


1,144 








McFarland 


Anson 


186 


112 




Edgecombe 






189 
1,033 
653 
664 
220 
408 
52 


157 


Madison- . 


Rockingham 


813 


Magnolia 


Duplin . . 


454 


Maiden _ _ 


Catawba . 


614 


Manly _ _ 


Moore 


176 


Manteo . 


Dare. 


312 




Hertford 




Marble 






Margaretts ville 


Northampton 


107 


123 










McDowell 


1,519 
225 
802 
301 


1,116 




Pitt 


111 




Madison . .. 


1.132 
455 


748 
364 


337 


Mars Hill 


Madison 


289 



Towns marked * are not listed in the U. S. Census, 1930. 



Cities and Towns 



133 



Population of Cities and Towns — Continued 



City or Town 


County 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 


Marshville -- 


Union 


933 
454 


828 
310 


499 
396 
141 


349 


Matthews - 


Mecklenburg . 


378 




Pitt 




Maury 


Greene 


147 

1,386 

1,948 

797 

1,568 

179 

222 

138 

559 

314 

321 

114 


61 

1,397 

1,886 

536 

1,351 

118 

183 

104 

697 

375 

197 

84 




Maxton 


Robeson 


1,321 
874 
345 
693 
88 
74 
117 
467 
419 


935 


M ayodan 


Rockingham 


904 


Maysville.. 


Jones. 


98 


Mebane.. 


Alamance-Orange ... 


218 


Merry Oaks 


Chatham... _• 

Johnston 




Micro .- 


61 


Middleburg . . 


Vance 


169 


Middlesex.. 


Nash 




Milton 


Caswell . . 


490 


Milwaukee 


Northampton 




Mineral Springs 


Union 


86 
194 

1,063 
100 

4,082 
254 
198 

3.400 

2,039 

2.712 
151 
261 
498 

3,844 
723 
526 

1,071 
753 
347 
809 
977 




Mint Hill* 


M ecklenburg 


192 


Mocksville 


Davie 


1,503 

144 

6,100 


1,146 

136 
4,084 

167 

228 
4,315 
2,958 
2,867 

166 
88 

631 
4,752 

975 
1,160 
2,297 

770 


745 


Moncure.. 


Chatham 




Monroe 


Union 


2,427 


Montezuma* . 


Mitchell 


219 


M ooresboro 


Cleveland 


270 
5,619 
3,483 
6,001 

161 
50 

590 
6,045 
1,011 
2,254 
2,685 

838 


144 


Mooresville 


Iredell 


1,533 


Morehead City 


Carteret 


1,379 


Morganton.. 


Burke 


1,928 


Morrisville 


Wake 


100 


Mortimer 


Caldwell 




Morven 


Anson. 


447 


Mount Airy.. 


Surry 


2,680 


Mount Gilead 


Montgomery 


395 


Mount Holly 


Gaston 


630 


Mount Olive 


Wayne 


617 


Mount Pleasant 


Cabarrus 


444 


Mountain Island* 


Gaston 


450 


Murfreesboro.. 


Hertford 


1,000 

1.612 

39 

1,137 

237 


621 
1,314 


657 


Murphy . . 


Cherokee . 


604 


Nags Head.. 


Dare 




Nashville.. 


Nash 


939 
243 


750 

160 

95 

9,961 


479 


Nebo 


McDowell . 




New Hill* 


Wake 




New Bern 


Craven 


11,981 

328 

246 

481 

4,794 

250 

761 

453 

3,688 

1,452 

421 

481 

41 

866 


12,198 

289 

228 

404 

3,021 

125 

673 

367 

2,363 

1,221 

282 

397 

49 

931 


8,090 








New London 


Stanly 


312 

321 

2,316 

73 


■2W 


Newport 


Carteret 


328 


Newton 


Catawba. . 


1,583 


Newton Grove. 


Sampson 


75 
















North Wilkesboro.. 


Wilkes 


1,902 
928 


918 


Norwood 


Stanly.. 


663 




Stanly 




Oak City... 


Martin . . 


251 
57 

778 
94 

645 

214 
3,018 

154 
94 


115 




Pitt 




Old Fort.. 


McDowell . . 




Ore Hill* 






Oriental 


Pamlico 


601 

209 

4.101 

349 

91 


607 

86 

3 . 606 

210 

103 


300 








Oxford 


Granville- 




Pactolus 


Pitt ... 


52 


Palmyra 


Halifax 


131 



Towns marked * are not listed in the U. S. Census, 1930. 



134 



Census 



Population of Cities and Towns — Continued 



City or Town 



Pantego.. -- 

Parkersburg - 

Parkton 

Parmele 

Patterson 

Peachland 

Pee Dee* 

Pembroke 

Pendleton* 

Pikeville - 

Pilot Mountain 

Pinebluff 

Pine Level 

Pinetops 

Pinetown 

Pineville 

Pink Hill 

Pittsboro 

Plymouth 

Polkton 

Pollocks ville 

Powellsville 

Princeton 

Princeville . 

Proctor ville 

Raeford 

Raleigh 

Ramseur. 

Randleman 

Red Springs 

Reids ville 

Rennert 

Rhodhiss 

Richfield 

Richlands 

Rich Square 

Ringwood*... 

Roanoke Rapids 

Robbins ville 

RoberdeL. 

Roberson ville 

Rockingham 

Rockwell.. - 

Rocky Mount 

Rocky Point 

Rocky Mount Mills*. 

Roles ville* 

Ronda 

Roper.. -*■- -. 

Roseboro 

Rose Hill 

Rosman 

Rowland 

Roxboro.- 

Roxobel 

Royal Cotton Mills.. 
Rutherford College . . 

Rutherfordton 

St. Pauls 



County- 



Beaufort 

Sampson — 

Robeson 

Martin 

Caldwell 

Anson 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Northampton 

Wayne 

Surry 

Moore 

Johnston 

Edgecombe 

Beaufort 

Mecklenburg 

Lenoir 

Chatham 

Washington 

Anson 

Jones 

Bertie 

Johnston 

Edgecombe 

Robeson 

Hoke 

Wake 

Randolph 

Randolph 

Robeson 

Rockingham 

Robeson 

Caldwell 

Stanly 

Onslow 

Northampton 

Halifax.. 

Halifax 

Graham 

Richmond 

Martin 

Richmond 

Rowan.. — 

Edgecombe-Nash. 

Pender 

Nash 

Wake 

Wilkes 

Washington 

Sampson 

Duplin. .- 

Transylvania 

Robeson 

Person 

Bertie 

Wake. 

Burke.. 

Rutherford 

Robeson 



1930 



329 
94 
436 
341 
187 
203 



524 



449 

1,010 

289 

497 

603 

300 

1,108 

188 

675 

2,139 

534 

357 

194 

509 

614 

185 

1,303 

37,379 

1,220 

1,863 

1,300 

6,851 

212 

954 

221 

503 

800 



3,404 

345 

559 

1,181 

2,906 

696 

21,412 

382 



344 
660 
768 
554 
484 
915 
,657 
334 
470 
330 
,020 
,080 



1920 



335 

76 
382 
355 
183 
196 
838 
329 



333 

707 

165 

373 

465 

332 

650 

166 

584 

1,847 

575 

339 

157 

403 

562 

204 

1,235 

27,076 

1,014 

1,967 

1,018 

5,333 

292 

835 

177 

548 

475 



3,369 

119 

476 

1,199 

2,509 

453 

12,742 



833 



1,043 
749 
516 
527 
767 

1,651 
330 
442 
275 

1,693 

1,147 



1910 



324 

67 
219 
272 

86 
232 
628 
258 

62 
210 
652 

92 
394 
211 
412 
688 

58 

502 

!,165 

287 

227 

75 
354 
627 



580 

19,218 

1,022 

1,950 

1,089 



828 

1,179 
370 
210 
445 
367 
147 

1,670 
122 
422 
616 

2,155 
249 

8,051 



480 
170 



819 
183 
364 
145 
787 

1,425 
491 
437 
229 

1,062 
419 



1900 



253 
57 



336 
"156 



86 
168 
710 

266 



585 

"424 
1,011 
276 
198 
44 
281 
552 



13,643 
769 

2,190 
858 

3,262 
133 

73 
160 
232 

98 
1,009 



275 
1,507 

~2~937 



605 
155 



63 



357 

1,021 

227 



880 



Towns marked * are not listed in the U. S. Census, 1930. 



Cities and Towns 



135 



Population of Cities and Towns — Continued 



City or Town 


County 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 


Salemf - 


Forsyth 






5,533 


3 642 


Salemburg 


Sampson 


318 

16,951 

558 

4,253 


215 

13,884 

549 

2,977 




Salisbury 


Rowan 


7,153 
235 

2,282 
136 

1,726 
280 


6.277 
211 


Saluda.. 


Polk 


Sanf ord 


Lee 


1 044 


Saratoga* 


Wilson 


123 


Scotland Neck 


Halifax 


2,339 
534 
245 

1,857 

354 

214 

275 

10,789 

39 


2,061 


1 348 


Seaboard 


Northampton 


287 


Seagrove.. 


Randolph 


189 

1,601 

284 

174 

334 

3,609 

93 




Selma 


Johnston ._ 


1,331 


816 


Severn 


Northampton ._ 

Brunswick.. 




Shallotte.. 


139 
121 
3,127 
315 
308 
895 


149 


Sharpsburg 


Nash 

Cleveland 




Shelby.. 


1 874 


Shelmerdine 


Pitt 




Shore* 


Yadkin .. 




Siler City 


Chatham 


1,730 
209 
122 

2,543 
826 


1,253 


440 


Simpson 


Pitt 




Sims 


Wilson.. . 








Smithfield 


Johnston 


1,895 
700 
245 
326 
743 
373 

1,664 
293 
159 


1,347 
450 
238 


764 


Snow Hill . 


Greene 


405 


South Biltmore* . 


Buncombe 


312 


South Creek.. 


Beaufort 


133 

2,524 

404 

1,760 

224 

466 

95 

3,128 

3,066 

1,222 

1,546 

241 

1,084 

607 

634 

10,490 

289 

256 

127 

238 

564 

329 




Southern Pines 


Moore 

Camden 


542 
390 
1,484 
202 
199 


517 


South Mills 




Southport . . 


Brunswick 


1.336 


South Wadesboro 


Anson 


154 


Sparta _. 


Alleghany 


501 


Speed 


Edgecombe 




Spencer.. _ 


Rowan. . 

Rutherford 

Nash , . 


2,510 


1,915 




Spindale. . 




Spring Hope. 


1,221 
717 
157 
584 
424 
467 

7,895 
121 
245 
138 
179 
472 
218 


1,246 


666 


Spruce Pine. .. 


Mitchell 




Staley 


Randolph . 






Stanley . 


Gaston.. . 


321 

204 

239 

4,599 


441 


Stantonsburg 


Wilson 




Star 


Montgomery 

Iredell 


211 


Statesville 


3,141 


Stedman . 






Stem . 


Granville 

Pitt . 






Stokes 


79 
159 
404 
161 
82 
305 
185 
390 
698 
418 

4,129 
662 
154 

3,877 
269 




Stokesdale . 


Guilford 




Stoueville. 






Stonewall 


Pamlico 


168 


Stouts* . 






Stovall... 




415 

223 

394 

1,340 

1,165 

6,379 

926 

140 

10,090 


414 

184 

420 

863 

782 

4,568 

1,122 

164 

5,676 




Swan Quarter 


Hyde 




Swansboro 


Onslow 


265 


Sylva.. _ 


Jackson. 


281 


Tabor 


Columbus 




Tarboro.. . 


Edgecombe 


2 499 


Tavlors ville 


Alexander.. 


413 








Thomas ville 


Davidson.. _. 


751 


Tillery* 


Halifax 


258 


Todd 


Ashe __ 


104 


92 





tReported under Winston-Salem. 
Towns marked * are not listed in the U. S. Census, 1930. 



136 



Census 



Population of Cities and Towns — Continued 



City or Town 


County 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 


Toisnott 


Wilson. 






590 


560 




Vance... 

Jones .. 

Randolph 


244 

500 
554 

432 

1.522 

1.670 

156 

213 

140 


206 
488 
400 
342 
1,102 
1,067 
142 
146 
147 
156 
135 
540 




Trenton 

Trinity . 


331 
332 
230 
1.055 
700 
43 


338 
274 


Troutman 

Troy 


Iredell 

Montgomery... . 


878 


Tryon 


Polk 

Hertford 


324 


Tunis 












Hertford . 


139 
155 


17'! 


Union Mills* 


Rutherford 






Union 


140 

742 

1.816 

360 

602 

211 

176 

362 

3,124 

309 

1,536 








392 


291 




Burke ... _ 






Pamlico 


308 
467 
273 
189 
190 

2,648 
174 

1,425 


296 
273 
420 
185 


169 




Moore 






Warren 






Cleveland 


160 


Wade 








Anson 


2,376 


1,546 




Scotland 






Wake 


1,443 
287 
444 
215 
480 
127 
807 
723 

6,211 


823 


Wakefield* 


Wake 


142 




Duplin 


734 


648 


218 


Walnut* 


Madison.. . 






Stokes . . 


1,081 
178 

1,072 

1,222 

7,035 
193 
227 
840 

2,414 
848 
134 

2,323 
980 

1,706 
704 


651 

158 

927 

1,108 

6.314 


336 




Greene 






Warren 


836 




Duplin 


576 




Beaufort . 


4,842 


Washington Park 






Pender 


181 
750 

1,942 

606 

74 

1.872 

1 . 239 

1 , 266 

462 


169 
602 

2,008 
442 
227 

1,999 
759 
846 






Union.. 


752 




Havwood. 


1.307 




Buncombe 


329 










Halifax.. 


1,433 


Wendell 


Wake 




West Hickory 


Catawba.. .. 


213 












231 

46 

755 

179 

1.368 

216 

45 

799 

53 

1.574 

25,748 

6,717 




Westray* ._ 






48 

723 

164 

• 1.664 

261 




Edgecombe-Nash 


930 

156 

2,205 

287 


388 


Whitehall.. 


Wayne 

Columbus 


114 


Whiteville 


643 


Whittier 






Wilbanks* 




46 


Wilkesboro 


Wilkes 


1,042 


814 


635 




Yadkin 






Martin . 


2,731 

32,270 

12.613 

359 

1,425 

426 

526 

75.274 


1.800 
33,372 
10.612 


912 


Wilmington 

Wilson 


New Hanover. 

Wilson 


20.976 
3,525 


Wilson Mills 








Bertie - 


1.210 

288 

470 

48.395 


684 

289 

353 

17.167 


597 


Winfall 


Perquimans 


222 








Winston-Salem 


Forsvth 


10.008 



{Reported under Elm City. 
Towns marked * are not listed in the U. 



Census, 1930. 



Cities and Towns 



137 



Population of Cities and Towns — Continued 



City or Town 


County 


1930 


1920 


1910 


1900 




Pitt 


654 
582 
121 
501 


650 
489 
193 
400 


484 

624 


243 




Hertford . 


688 


Wood 


Franklin 






Northampton 


312 
187 


242 


Woodleaf* 


Rowan 






Bertie _ . 


464 
313 
109 
64 
590 


38i 
367 

20 






Randolph 


393 
54 
130 
432 
338 
431 
483 


467 


Wrights ville Beach .. 

Yadkin College* 


New Hanover 


22 


Davidson ._ . - 


210 




Yadkin... 


445 


292 




Caswell - 






Franklin 


395 
860 


414 
953 


345 




Wake 











Towns marked * are not listed in the U. S. Census, 1930. 



138 



Census 



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Economic Development of North Carolina 141 



SUMMARY OF NORTH CAROLINA'S ECONOMIC PROGRESS 

The following table is copied from the copyrighted Blue Book of Southern 
Progress, 1930, page 216, by permission of the publishers, Manufacturers Record, 
Baltimore, Md. 
Total Area: 52,426 Sq. Miles; Land, 48,740 Sq. Miles; Water, 3,686 Sq. Miles. 



Population 

Property, true value 

Assessed value property 

Manufactures: 

Capital 

Products, value 

Mines and Quarries: 

Capital 

Products 

Cotton Manufacturing: 

Capital 

Products, value 

Spindles, number active... 

Looms, number active 

Cotton consumed, bales. .. 
Cottonseed Oil Mills: 

Capital 

Products, value 

Furniture Manufacturing: 

Products, value 

Pig-iron made, tons 

Lumber cut, feet 

Mineral products, value 

Coal mined, tons 

Iron ore mined, tons 

Total land area, acres 

All land in farms, acres 

Improved land, acres.. 

Number of farms 

Value all farm property 

Value farm land 

Farm products, value 

Farm crops, value 

Farm crops, acres 

Cotton Crop: 

Acreage 

Bales, number 

Value lint 

Value seed 

Tobacco crop, pounds 

Value. 

Acreage 

drain Crop: 

Corn, bushels 

Value. 

Acreage 

Wheat, bushels 

Value 

Acreage 

Oats, bushels 

Value. 

Acreage 

Live .Stock: 

Cattle, number 

Sheep, number 

Swine, number 

Horses, number.. 

Mules, number 

Banking: 

Aggregate resources 

Paid-in capital... .. 

Individual deposits 

Pailroad mileage 

Motor vehicles, number. . 
Highway expenditures. - . - 
Public schools, expenditures. 



1900 



1,893,810 
$681,982,000 
$306,579,715 

$68,283,005 
$85,274,083 



$924,000 

$33,012,000 

$28,373,000 

1,134,909 

25,469 

404,535 



$2,676,871 

$1,023,000 

***38,049 

1,278,399,000 

$1,458,848 

17,734 

ttt 



22,749,356 

8,327,106 

224,637 

$233,834,693 

$141,955,840 

$89,310,000 

$68,625,000 

5,609,000 

1,007,000 

433,000 

$15,697,000 

$2,291,000 

127,503,400 

$8,038,691 

203,023 

29,790,000 

$16,980,000 

2,483,000 

5,961.000 

$4,888,000 

621,000 

5,046,000 

$2,271,000 

363,000 

625.000 
302,000 

1,300,000 
159.000 
136,000 



$16,758,000 
3.831 



ft$624,381 

$950,000 



1910 



2. 

t$l,685, 

$613, 

$217, 
$216, 

$5, 
$1, 

$96, 

$72, 
3, 



>4 



II 

1,824 

$2 



206,287 
408,000 
000,000 

185,588 
656,055 

985,112 
358,617 

993,000 
680,000 
163,199 
55,600 
754,483 

432,010 

,504.477 

547.000 
'*49,490 
722,000 
616,131 



65,278 



22 



$537 
$343 
$176 
$131 
5 

1 

$49 

$9 

138 

$13 



49 

$37 

2 

6 

$7 



$112 
- 16 
$67 



il$5 

$3 



,439,129 
813,056 
253,725 
,716,210 
164,945 
,262,000 
,072,000 
,736,000 

,478,000 
706,000 
,710,000 
,666,000 
,813,163 
,847,559 
221,890 

,290,000 
,460,000 
,650,000 
,817,000 
,499,000 

598,000 
,022,000 
,413,000 

221,000 

701.000 
214,000 
,228,000 
166,000 
175,000 

,213.762 
,376,508 
,285,654 
4,932 
tti. 178 
,215, 191 
,037,000 



l'.rjx 



2,938,000 
t$4, 543, 110,000 
$2,903,545,000 



0,132,564 
88,051 

1.596,759 



$16,335,000 



°1, 055, 222, 000 
°$1 1,704, 000 



"20,021,736 

"8,198,409 

*269,763 

*|1, 250, 166,995 

"$857,815,000 

$437,917,000 

$359,212,000 

7,151,000 

1,860,000 
836,000 
$77,330,000 
$14,84(1,000 
499,408,000 
$97,385,000 
728,000 

42,642,000 

$43,921,000 

2,305,000 

5,150,000 

$7,828,000 

444,000 

4,202,000 

$3,278,000 

191,000 

511,000 
94,000 

945,000 
98,000 

271 I 

$519,691,000 
138,494,000 

$359. 085, 01 ll l 

5,223 

464.376 

- II 289,012 

°°$30,980 022 



1929 



tttt3, 

«!$5,396, 

$2,972, 

*$669, 
"11,154 

*$2, 
*$2, 

*$268, 

"$311, 

6, 

1 

*$14, 
$16 



170,276 
000,000 
917,000 

144,000 
646,612 

250,434 
736,543 

323,000 
155,673 
129,392 

88,232 
642,107 

586,456 
396.000 



"$53,551,220 



'i 1,020 
r $ll 



893,000 
480,000 



*$1,050 
"686 

$373 
$294 



1 



$61 

$9 

508 

$93 



48 

$48 
■) 



$495 

$331 



$35 
<I$38 



"Census 1920. fl912. 
Missouri, tftlncluded with ( 



11922. 
eorgia. 



1928. "1927. ** 
ttttCensus 1930. 



1925, ffl904. H1914. °°1924. 



34,000 
,193,600 
,593,670 

.738.S26 
•283,482 
,015,835 
,424,921 
,562,000 
,857.000 
,339,000 

,782,000 
735.000 
,372,000 

.4.54,000 

,060.000 

.991.000 

764,000 

,568,000 
,568,000 
,259,000 

,317.000 
. 53!) , 000 

457,000 
,192, 

.644.000 

258,000 

537,000 
103,000 
803 000 
93 000 
279,000 

,243,000 
,335,000 

.700.000 

5,194 

5 

,950,425 

Includes 



PART IV 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 



1. Executive Officials. 

2. Justices of the Supreme Court. 

3. Senators and Representatives in Congress. 

4. Members of the General Assembly. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 



EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS 

OLIVER MAX GARDNER 

GOVERNOR 

Oliver Max Gardner, of Cleveland County, Democrat, was born 
at Shelby, N. C, March 22, 1882. Son of Dr. 0. P. and Margaret 
(Young) Gardner. B. S. of the N. C. A. and M. College, 1903. 
Studied law at the University of North Carolina. Won debater's 
and orator's medal. Two years instructor in Chemistry at N. C. A. 
and M. College. Lawyer. In 1908, was State Organizer of Demo- 
cratic Clubs. County Chairman Cleveland County, 1908-1910. 
Member of the State Democratic Executive Committee. Member 
of the Board of Trustees of the N. C. A. and E. College. Member 
of the North Carolina Bar Association. State Senator, 1911-1915. 
President pro tempore of Senate, 1915. Lieutenant-Governor, 1917- 
1921. Elected Governor, November 6, 1928. Odd Fellow. Jr. O. 
U. A. M. Sigma Nu Fraternity and Gorgon's Head (college fra- 
ternities). Baptist. Married, November 6, 1908, Miss Fay Lamar 
Webb, daughter of Judge James L. Webb, Shelby, N. C. Four 
children. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



JAMES A. HARTNESS 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

James A. Hartnes,s, Democrat, of Iredell County, was born 
July 28, 1863, six miles north of Statesville. Son of Hiram and 
Martha (Gibson) Hartness. Educated in the rural schools of 
Iredell County, and the Statesville Academy. Studied law under 
private teacher and was licensed to practice in 1887. Editor of 
Statesville Mascot. Member of General Assembly 1897. Clerk 
of Court of Iredell County, 1898-1928. Chairman Democratic 
Executive Committee Iredell County, 1900-1928. Member State 
Democratic Executive Committee. Appointed Secretary of State 



146 Biographical Sketches 

in 1928 to fill unexpired term of W. N. Everett; elected for full 
term, November 6, 1928. Mason; Knights of Pythias. Anti-Saloon 
League. Presbyterian. Married Miss Jennie Henderson, Rowan 
County, March 28, 1888. Of this union there are eight children. 
Married Miss Annie Sloan of Winston-Salem, September 20, 1923. 
Address: home, Statesville; office, Raleigh. 



BAXTER DURHAM 

STATE AUDITOR 

Baxter Durham, Democrat, was born in Durham, N. C, August 
20, 1878. Son of Columbus and Lila (Walters) Durham. At- 
tended public schools of Durham and Raleigh, 1884-1892; Raleigh 
Male Academy, 1892-1894; Wake Forest College, 1894-1895. Trav- 
eling Auditor, Department of State Auditor. Served as private, 
sergeant, captain and major in National Guard, 1907-1919. Elected 
State Auditor, November 2, 1920; reelected, November 4, 1924; 
reelected, November 6, 1928. President National Association of 
State Auditors, Comptrollers and Treasurers, 1923 and 1924, 1927 
and 1928. Baptist. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



NATHAN O'BERRY 

STATE TREASURER 

Nathan 'Berry, Democrat, of Wayne County, was born in 
Tarboro, January 26, 1856. Son of Thomas and Cinderella (Pope) 
O'Berry. Attended Wilkinson's School, 1865-1868. Director State's 
Prison, 1900-1904; State Hospital, Goldsboro, 1921-1929. Mason; 
Past Grand Chancellor, Knights of Pythias. Appointed by Gov- 
ernor Gardner February 23, 1929 as State Treasurer, succeeding 
B. R. Lacy, deceased; elected to fill the unexpired term, Novem- 
ber 4, 1930. Married Miss Estelle Moore, 1882. Home address: 
Goldsboro, N. C; office, Raleigh, N. C. 



Executive Officials 147 

arch turner allen 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Arch Turner Allen, Democrat, was born in Alexander County 
on January 10, 1875. Son of George J. and Mary Elizabeth 
(Campbell) Allen. Attended the one-teacher school at Rocky 
Spring. For one year was under the tutelage of Dr. Brantley 
York. Was prepared for college at the Vashti High School and 
the Patton School at Morganton. Graduated from the University 
of North Carolina in 1897; D. C. L. Elon College, 1924; LL. D. 
University of N. C, 1927. Member of the Phi Beta Kappa and 
Phi Delta Kappa. Spent one term at Columbia University. Prin- 
cipal of the Statesville Public Schools, 1897-1904; principal Wash- 
ington, N. C, Public Schools, 1904-1905; principal Dilworth School, 
Charlotte, 1905-1907; superintendent of the Graham City Schools, 
1907-1910; superintendent Salisbury City Schools, 1910-1917; mem- 
ber Text Book Commission, 1916; member State Board of Ex- 
aminers and Institute Conductors, 1917-1919; secretary State 
Board of Examiners, 1919-1921; director Teacher Training, State 
Department of Education, 1921-1923; appointed Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, June 11, 1923, to fill unexpired term of Dr. 
Brooks; elected Superintendent of Public Instruction on Novem- 
ber 4, 1924; reelected November 6, 1928. Identified with the 
North Carolina Teachers' Assembly for many years. President 
of Department of City Superintendents in 1915; President of the 
N. C. Teachers' Assembly in 1917; Secretary, 1919-1922; President 
of the National Council of State Superintendents and Commis- 
sioners of Education, 1928. Married Miss Claribel McDowell, 
June 19, 1909. Two children, Arch Turner, Jr., and Elizabeth Mc- 
Dowell. Methodist; Jr. O. U. A. M. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



DENNIS G. BRUMMITT 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Dennis G. Brummitt, Democrat, of Granville County, was born 
on a farm in Granville County, February 7, 1881. Son of Thomas 
Jefferson and Caroline (Bradford) Brummitt. LL. B. of Wake 
Forest College, 1907. Secretary of Granville County Democratic 
Executive Committee, 1908-1910; chairman, 1910-1914, 1922-1924. 



148 Biographical Sketches 

Member of State Democratic Executive Committee, 1913-1924. 
Mayor of Oxford, 1909-1913. Member Board of Town Commis- 
sioners, 1913-1915. Representative in General Assembly, 1915, 
1917, 1919; speaker of House of Representatives, 1919. Trustee 
Oxford Graded Schools, 1921-1925. Democratic Elector, 1920. 
Trustee of State College, 1923-1925. Trustee Wake Forest College, 
1925; Member General Board Baptist State Convention, 1926. 
Elected Attorney-General, 1924; reelected November 6, 1928. Ma- 
son; Odd Fellow; W. O. W.; M. W. A.; Jr. O. U. A. M. Baptist. 
Married, June 25, 1912, Miss Kate Hays Fleming. Home Address: 
Oxford, N. C. 



FRANKLIN DAVIS GRIST 

COMMISSIONER OF LABOR AND PRINTING 

Frank D. Grist, was born at Lenoir, Caldwell County, July 
23, 1891. Son of John Taylor and Mary Nancy (Davis) Grist. 
Elected Commissioner of Labor and Printing, 1924; reelected, No- 
vember 6, 1928. Served in World War with First Regular Army 
Division in France. Member House of Representatives, session 
1923. Married in 1919 to Miss Jessie Deal. Address: Raleigh, 
N. C. 



WILLIAM A. GRAHAM 

COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE 

William A. Graham, Democrat, of Lincoln County, was born at 
old Graham homestead in same county. Son of Major William A. 
and Julia (Lane) Graham. Attended Piedmont Seminary, Hor- 
ner Military School, and University of North Carolina. Farmer. 
State Senator from the Twenty-fifth Senatorial District, session 
1923; Chairman Committee on Agriculture at that session. Ap- 
pointed Commissioner of Agriculture by Governor Morrison, De- 
cember 26, 1923, to fill unexpired term of his father, deceased. 
Elected, November 4, 1924, to succeed himself for a full term; re- 
elected, November 6, 1928. Has been active in Democratic Party 
all his life; been member of precinct executive committee since 
becoming twenty-one years of age, now chairman; member execu- 



Executive Officials 149 

tive committee, Lincoln County, also a former member of the 
State Democratic Executive Committee. Member executive com- 
mittee Southern Association of Commissioners of Agriculture; 
former member of executive committee and president of National 
Association of Commissioners, Secretaries and Departments of 
Agriculture; Member of the National Conference on Weights and 
Measures. K. of P. Baptist. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



DANIEL CLINTON BONEY 

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 

Daniel Clinton Boney, Democrat, was born in Elkin, N. C, De- 
cember 6, 1895. Son of H. F. and Susan (McKinnie) Boney. At- 
tended grammar and high schools of Elkin and Kinston; Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, 1922. Lawyer. Appointed Insurance 
Commissioner by Governor McLean, November 15, 1927, to fill un- 
expired term; elected November 6, 1928. Served in World War 
with 113th Field Artillery, A. E. F., June, 1917, to December, 1919. 
Kappa Sigma; Junior Order; Gimghouls, University of North 
Carolina. Presbyterian. Married, October 3, 1928, to Miss Char- 
lotte Elizabeth Johnson. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



ALLEN J. MAXWELL 

COMMISSIONER OF REVENUE 

Allen J. Maxwell was born in Duplin County, January 24, 1873. 
Son of Hugh G. and Nancy (Maready) Maxwell. Attended Golds- 
boro public schools. Mayor Whiteville, 1898; Clerk State Senate, 
1899; Principal Clerk, 1901-1910; Clerk N. C. Corporation Com- 
mission, 1910-1917; member Corporation Commission, 1917-1929; 
ex-officio, Securities Commissioner, 1925-1929; President National 
Association Securities Commissioners, 1927; Vice-President Na- 
tional Association Railroad and Utilities Commissioners, 1929. 
Appointed Commissioner of Revenue by Governor Gardner in 
March, 1929, until January 1, 1933, succeeding Governor R. A. 
Doughton, who had been appointed Highway Commissioner. Bap- 
tist. Married Miss Delia May Ward, April, 1893. Address: 
Raleigh N. C. 



150 Biographical Sketches 

rufus a. doughton 

HIGHWAY COMMISSIONER 

Rufus A. Doughton was born in Alleghany County, N. C, 
January 10, 1857. Son of J. Horton and Rebecca (Jones) Dough- 
ton. Educated at Independence (Va.) High School, 1876-1877; 
University of North Carolina. Studied Law at University of 
North Carolina, 1880. Lawyer, farmer and banker. President of 
Bank of Sparta. Representative in the General Assembly, 1887, 
1889, 1891, 1903, 1907, 1909, 1911, 1913, 1915, 1917, 1919, and 
1921; Speaker of the House, 1891; Lieutenant Governor, 1893-1897. 
Member of the State Highway Commission, but resigned upon en- 
tering upon his duties as Commissioner of Revenue to which he 
was appointed by Governor Morrison in January, 1923; elected 
Commissioner of Revenue, November 4, 1924; reelected, Novem- 
ber 6, 1928. Appointed Highway Commissioner by Governor Gard- 
ner in March, 1929, until April 1, 1931, succeeding Frank Page, 
resigned. Mason. Methodist. Married, January 3, 1883, Miss 
Sue B. Parks. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



Justices of the Supreme Court 151 

justices of the supreme court 



WALTER PARKER STACY 

CHIEF JUSTICE 

Walter Parker Stacy: born Ansonville, N. C, December 26, 
1884; son of Rev. L. E. and Rosa (Johnson) Stacy; educated 
Weaverville (N. C.) College, 1895-98, Morven (N. C.) High School, 
1899-1902, University of North Carolina, A. B. 1908, attended Law 
School, same, 1908-09, LL. D. (hon.) 1923; married Mrs. Maude 
DeGan Graff of Lake Placid Club, N. Y., June 15, 1929; practiced 
law, 1910-16; represented New Hanover County in General As- 
sembly of N. C, 1915; Judge Superior Court, 8th Judicial District. 
1916-20; elected,. 1920, Associate Justice Supreme Court of North 
Carolina for full term; appointed by Governor A. W. McLean, 
March 16, 1925, to succeed Chief Justice Hoke (resigned) and in 
1926 nominated without opposition in primary and elected Chief 
Justice Supreme Court for 8-year term, now serving; member 
American and North Carolina Bar Associations, General Alumni 
Association University of North Carolina, (president, 1925-26) ; 
lecturer summers, 1922-25 inclusive, in Law School University of 
North Carolina, tendered deanship of same, 1923; lecturer North- 
western University School of Law, summer sessions, 1926-27; 
named by U. S. Board of Mediation, under Railway Labor Act, 
as neutral arbitrator to serve on Board of Arbitration (six mem- 
bers) and later elected chairman of board, to settle wage con- 
troversy between the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, and 
certain Railroads in Southeastern Territory of U. S., 1927-28; 
appointed by President Coolidge, 1928, member of Emergency 
Board of five, under Railway Labor Act, to investigate and report 
respecting a dispute between officers and members of the Order of 
Railway Conductors and Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, and 
certain railroads located west of the Mississippi River; Methodist; 
Democrat. Residence: Wilmington, N. C; Office: Raleigh, N. C. 



152 • Biographical Sketches 

william jackson adams 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

William Jackson Adams, Democrat, Associate Justice of the 
Supreme Court, was born at Rockingham, January 27, 1860. Son 
of Rev. S. D. and Mary (Jackson) Adams. A. B., University of 
North Carolina, 1881; LL.D., 1924. Two-year law course at the 
University; admitted to the bar in 1883 and began practicing at 
Carthage. Member of the North Carolina House of Representa- 
tives in 1893; of the State Senate in 1895 and of the Board of 
Internal Improvements, 1899-1901. Appointed by Governor Glenn 
as Judge of the Superior Court succeeding Judge Walter H. Neal, 
resigned, in December, 1908 and elected to the same office in 1910 
and 1918 for a term each of eight years. Resigned in September, 
1921, upon appointment by Governor Morrison as Associate Justice 
of the Supreme Court succeeding Justice W. R. Allen, deceased 
and elected to the same office in 1922 for the unexpired term ; 
elected for a full term in 1926. Member of the American and 
State Bar Associations. Married Miss Florence Wall, of Rocking- 
ham. Methodist. Home address: Carthage, N. C; Office, Raleigh, 
N. C. 



HERIOT CLARKSON 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Heriot Clarkson, Democrat, of Charlotte, N. C, was born at 
Kingville, Richland County, S. C, August 21, 1863. Son of Major 
William and Margaret S. (Simmons) Clarkson. Educated at the 
Carolina Military Institute of Charlotte, University Law School 
at Chapel Hill. Licensed by the Supreme Court of North Carolina 
to practice law, 1884. Immediately thereafter began the practice 
of law at Charlotte, N. C. Alderman and Vice-Mayor of Char- 
lotte, 1887-88, same posts in 1891-92. In 1899 member of House 
of Representatives, known as "White Supremacy Legislature." 
In that Legislature he introduced and passed in the House a bill 
which resulted in the establishment of the Textile Department of 
the State College. City Attorney of Charlotte, 1901-04. Twice 
codified the city ordinances of Charlotte, 1887 and 1901; legal ad- 
viser under administration of Mayor T. L. Kirkpatrick. Solicitor 
of Twelfth Judicial District, 1904-10. Author of "The Hornet's 



Justices of the Supreme Court 153 

Nest," appearing in the North Carolina Booklet of October, 1901. 
Delivered address to the Society of the Cincinnati on "The Heroic 
Incidents of the Life of General Francis Marion." On December 
10, 1889, married Mary Lloyd Osborne, of which union there are 
four living children. Mason; life member Lodge No. 31, A. F. and 

A. M. at Charlotte; Noble of the Mystic Shrine (Oasis Temple); 
Knights of Pythias; Jr. O. U. A. M.; member of the Society of 
Sons of the Revolution; Society of the Cincinnati, and the Hugue- 
not Society of South Carolina. At one time was Lieutenant of the 
Hornet's Nest Riflemen of Charlotte. Thirty odd years director 
in the Charlotte Y. M. C. A. One of the original founders of 
the Crittendon Home and the Mecklenburg Industrial Home for 
Women. For many years a director of the Chamber of Commerce 
and "Made in the Carolinas" Exposition. Chairman Anti-Saloon 
League when the saloon was voted out of Charlotte, July 5, 1904. 
Also President Anti-Saloon League when the saloon and distillery 
were voted out of the State on May 27, 1908. Governor Robt. 

B. Glenn presented him with the pen with which he signed the 
Prohibition Proclamation. Trustee State Association Y. M. C. A. 
of North Carolina. Was Chairman of the Good Roads Association 
Committee that drafted the tentative good roads act passed by the 
Legislature of 1921 substantially as drawn. He drafted the Meck- 
lenburg Drainage Act and was the leader in establishing the Bel- 
mont Vocational School at Charlotte, the first of its kind in the 
State. Episcopalian; built St. Andrew's Chapel in Charlotte; ves- 
tryman and senior warden of St. Peter's Protestant Episcopal 
Church for many years. Appointed Justice of the Supreme Court 
of North Carolina by Governor Cameron Morrison, May 26, 1923; 
elected for unexpired term of Justice Piatt D. Walker; elected 
November 2, 1926, for term of eight years. LL. D., University of 
North Carolina, 1928. Residence: Charlotte, N. C; Office, Raleigh, 
N. C. 



WILLIS JAMES BROGDEN 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 



Willis James Brogden, Democrat, Associate Justice of the Su- 
preme Court, was born near Goldsboro, October 18, 1877; son of 
Willis H. and Virginia (Robinson) Brogden. Attended Goldsboro 
Graded Schools, 1891-1894; Ph. B., University of North Carolina, 



154 Biographical Sketches 

1898; Trinity College and University Law School. Licensed to 
practice in 1907. Member American and North Carolina Bar As- 
sociations. Mayor of Durham, 1911-1915. A. F. and A.M.; Past 
Master Durham Lodge No. 352; member Kiwanis Club. Appointed 
by Governor McLean as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court 
to fill the unexpired term of Judge Varser; elected to same office 
for the unexpired term, November 2, 1926 ; elected for the full term 
November 6, 1928. Baptist. Married Miss Lila Markham, Janu- 
ary 9, 1917. Home address: Durham, N. C; Office, Raleigh, N. C. 



GEORGE WHITFIELD CONNOR 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

George W. Connor was born October 24, 1872, at Wilson, N. 
C. Son of Henry Groves and Kate Whitfield Connor. Prepared 
for college by Rev. B. S. Bronson, Wilson, N. C. ; A. B., University 
of North Carolina, 1892; LL. D., University of North Carolina, 
1928. Member of the House of Representatives from Wilson 
County, 1909, 1911, 1913; Speaker of House of Representatives, 
1913; Judge Superior Court, 1913-1924; appointed by Governor 
Morrison Justice of the Supreme Court, succeeding Judge Hoke ; 
elected Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, 1924; reelected 
for full term, November 6, 1928. Married Miss Bessie Hadley. 
Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



Members of Congress 155 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 



CAMERON MORRISON 

Cameron Morrison, Democrat, of Charlotte, was born in Rich- 
mond County, North Carolina, October 5, 1869. Son of Daniel M. 
and Martha (Cameron) Morrison. Educated in the private schools 
of N. C. McCaskill at Ellerbe Springs and Dr. William Carroll at 
Rockingham. Read law under Judge Robert P. Dick, of Greens- 
boro, and licensed to practice law in February, 1892. Lawyer. 
Mayor of Rockingham, 1893; Chairman Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee Richmond County, 1898; Presidential Elector at Large, 
1916; Governor of North Carolina in 1921-1925. During his ad- 
ministration he inaugurated the great constructive system of hard- 
surface and dependable roads, the program of progress including 
the rebuilding of the educational and charitable institutions of the 
State. Elected member of the Democratic National Committee 
in 1928; appointed United States Senator, December 13, 1930, by 
Governor O. Max Gardner to succeed Senator Lee S. Overman, 
deceased, until the next general election, November 3, 1932. Pres- 
byterian. Twice married: first, to Miss Lottie May Tomlinson, of 
Durham, December 6, 1905, who died November 12, 1919; one 
child, Angelia; second, to Mrs. Sarah Virginia (Ecker) Watts, 
widow of George W. Watts, of Durham, April 2, 1924. Home 
address: Charlotte, N. C. 



JOSIAH WILLIAM BAILEY 

Josiah William Bailey, Democrat, of Raleigh, Wake County, 
was born September 14, 1873, in Warrenton, N. C. Son of Rev. 
Christopher Thomas Bailey (Williamsburg, Va.) and Annie Sarah 
(Bailey) Bailey (Greenville County, Va.) Educated in the public 
schools of Raleigh, Raleigh Male Academy (Morson and Denson), 
and Wake Forest College, A. B., 1893; Wake Forest Law School; 
also private study of law under S. F. Mordecai, of Trinity Col- 
lege. Editor Biblical Recorder 1893-1907. Licensed to practice 



156 Biographical Sketches 

law, February, 1908. Member Wake County Bar Association; N. 
C. Bar Association; American Bar Association. United States 
Collector Internal Revenue, 1913-1921; Elector-at-Large N. C, 
1908; member North Carolina Constitutional Commission, 1913- 
1914; member Raleigh Township School Committee and Wake 
County Board of Education. Baptist. Married Miss Edith Walker 
Pou, 1916; five children, two boys and three girls. Elected to the 
United States Senate November 4, 1930, for the term beginning 
March 4, 1931, by a majority over his Republican opponent of 
113,632, the largest ever given in North Carolina to a Senatorial 
candidate. Home address: Raleigh, N. C. 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS 



LINDSAY CARTER WARREN 

(First District — Counties: Beaufort, Camden, Chowan, Curri- 
tuck, Dare, Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Martin, Pasquotank, Perqui- 
mans, Pitt, Tyrrell and Washington. Population (Census 1920), 
206,137.) 

Lindsay Carter Wari^en, Democrat, was born at Washington, 
N. C, December 16, 1889. Son of Charles F. and Elizabeth Mutter 
(Blount) Warren. Received his preparatory education at Bing- 
ham School, Asheville, 1903-1906. Student University of North 
Carolina, 1906-1908; Law School, U. N. C, 1911-1912. Admitted to 
the bar, February, 1912. Chairman Democratic Executive Commit- 
tee of Beaufort County, 1912-1925. County Attorney of Beaufort 
County, 1912-1925. State Senator, 1917 and 1919. President pro 
tempore State Senate, f919. Member Code Commission compiling 
Consolidated Statutes, 1919. Representative from Beaufort 
County, 1923. Trustee University North Carolina, 1921-1925. 
Member Alpha Tau Omega (College) fraternity. Elk. Episco- 
palian. Married Miss Emily D. Harris, February, 1916; three 
children. Elected to Sixty-ninth Congress, Seventieth Congress, 
and Seventy-first Congress, and reelected to the Seventy-second 
Congress. Home address: Washington, N. C. 



Members of Congress 157 

john hosea kerr 

{Second District — Counties: Bertie, Edgecombe, Greene, Hali- 
fax, Lenoir, Northampton, Warren and Wilson. Population, (Cen- 
sus 1920) 233,111.) 

John Hosea Kerr, Democrat, of Warrenton, was born at Yan- 
ceyville, N. C, December 31, 1873. Son of Capt. John H. Kerr, of 
the Confederate Army, and Eliza Katherine (Yancey) Kerr. Was 
a student in Bingham School, and graduated from Wake Forest 
College, North Carolina, with degree of A. B., in 1895; studied 
law and was admitted to the bar in 1895, when he moved to War- 
renton and entered upon the practice of his profession. Married 
Miss Ella Foote, of Warrenton, and they have two sons — John 
Hosea and James Yancey. Elected Solicitor of the Third District 
and served eleven years; while solicitor, was elected Judge of the 
Superior Court and served seven years. While serving on the 
bench, was nominated for Congress to succeed Hon. Claude Kitchin, 
deceased, and was elected at a special election held November 6, 
1923, only one vote being cast against him. Reelected to the 
Sixty-ninth, Seventieth and Seventy-first Congresses. Reelected 
to Seventy-second Congress by a vote of approximately (Nov. 4, 
1930), 20,000 Democratic, 3,000 Republican. Home address: War- 
renton, N. C. 



CHARLES LABAN ABERNETHY 

(Third District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Duplin, Jones, On- 
slow, Pamlico, Pender, Sampson and Wayne. Population, (Census 
1920) 202,760.) 

Charles Laban Abernethy, Democrat, from the Third District, 
was born at Rutherford College, N. C, March 18, 1872. He is the 
son of Rev. Turner Abernethy and Martha Ann Scott Abernethy. 
He was educated at Mount Olive preparatory schools, Rutherford 
College, and the Law School of the University of North Carolina. 
Lawyer. Member of the Kiwanis Club of New Bern and New 
Bern Chamber of Commerce. County Attorney of Carteret County, 
1896. Presidental elector, 1900 and 1904. Solicitor Third and 
Fifth Judicial Districts for about twelve years. Elected to the 
Sixty-eighth, Sixty-ninth, Seventieth, and Seventy-first Con- 
gresses. Reelected to Seventy-second Congress, November 4, 1930. 



158 Biographical Sketches 

Odd Fellow, K. of P., B. P. O. E., Red Men, Jr. O. U. A. M., Wood- 
man of the World, Mason, Shriner. Methodist. Married Miss 
Minnie May, in 1895. Has one son, Charles L. Abernethy, Jr., 
now practicing law with him. Home address: New Bern, N. C. 



EDWARD WILLIAM POU 

(Fourth District — Counties: Chatham, Franklin, Johnston, 
Nash, Vance and Wake. Population, (Census 1920) 238,594.) 

Edward William Pou, Democrat, of Johnston County, was born 
at Tuskegee, Ala., September 9, 1863. Son of Edward W. and 
Anna Maria (Smith) Pou. Was married to Carrie Haughton 
Ihrie in 1887 and has three living children. Presidential Elector 
in 1888. Elected Solicitor of the Fourth Judicial District of North 
Carolina in 1890, 1894 and 1898. Elected to the Fifty-seventh, 
Fifty-eighth, Fifty-ninth, Sixtieth, Sixty-first, Sixty-second, Sixty- 
third, Sixty-fourth, Sixty-fifth, Sixty-sixth, Sixty-seventh, Sixty- 
eighth, Sixty-ninth, Seventieth, and Seventy-first Congresses. Re- 
elected to Seventy-second Congress, November 4, 1930, by a ma- 
jority of 16,385 votes. Home address: Smithfield, N. C. 



FRANKLIN WILLS HANCOCK, JR 

(Fifth District — Counties: Alamance, Caswell, Durham, For- 
syth, Granville, Guilford, Orange, Person, Rockingham, Stokes, 
Surry. Population, (1920 Census) 408,138.) 

Franklin Wills Hancock, Jr., only son of Franklin Wills Han- 
cock and Lizzie Hobgood Hancock, was born in Oxford, Granville 
County, North Carolina, on November 1, 1894. He graduated 
from the Oxford Graded Schools at the age of thirteen; attended 
Horner Military Academy for one year, and completed his educa- 
tion at the University of North Carolina. In 1915-16 he served 
as secretary to his uncle, Colonel Frank Hobgood of Greensboro, 
Special Assistant to the Attorney General of the United States. 
In August, 1916, he received his license to practice law, and has 
continued the practice of his profession in Oxford since that time. 
In 1924 he was elected Chairman of the Democratic Executive 
Committee of Granville County, and in the same year was also 



Members of Congress 159 

elected Presidential Elector for the Fifth District of North Caro- 
lina. He was elected without opposition to the State Senate in 
1926, to represent the Twenty-first District, composed of Granville 
and Person Counties, and in 1928 was elected without opposition 
to represent Granville County in the State House of Representa- 
tives. He was recognized as a leader in both sessions, and was 
co-author of the school bill which bears his name. He is recognized 
as one of the leading business men in his section of the State. 
He is a director of and attorney for The First National Bank of 
Granville; vice-president, of the Granville Real Estate and Trust 
Company, and trustee of the Colored Orphanage of North Caro- 
lina. He is a Mason, Shriner, a member of the North Carolina 
Bar Association, of Kappa Alpha Fraternity; is an ex-service 
man, and is a member of the Oxford Rotary Club, and of the 
Baptist Church. In 1917 he was married to Lucy Osborn Landis, 
oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hamlin Landis of Ox- 
ford. He is the father of six children. On November 4, 1930, 
he was elected to the Seventy-first Congress to fill the unexpired 
term of Major Charles Manly Stedman, and, at the same time, 
was elected to the Seventy-second Congress. Home address: Ox- 
ford, N. C. 



JEROME BAYARD CLARK 

(Sixth District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, Cum- 
berland, Harnett, New Hanover and Robeson. Population, (Cen- 
sus 1920) 223,434.) 

Jerome Bayard Clark, Democrat, of Fayetteville, was born 
April 5, 1882, in Elizabethtown. Son of John Washington and 
Catharine Amelia (Blue) Clark. Educated at Clarkton High 
School, 1900-1902; Davidson College; University of North Carolina 
Law School, 1906. Lawyer. Representative in General Assembly 
from Bladen County, 1915. Presidential Elector Sixth District. 
1916. Member of State Judicial Conference, 1924-1928. Mason; 
Knights of Pythias. Presbyterian. Married Miss Helen Purdie 
Robinson, June 2, 1908; four children. Elected to Seventy-first 
Congress, November 6, 1928; reelected to Seventy-second Congress 
November 4, 1930. Home address: Fayetteville, N. C. 



160 Biographical Sketches 

hinton james 

(Seventh District— Counties: Anson, Davidson, Davie, Hoke, 
Lee, Montgomery, Moore, Randolph, Richmond, Scotland, Union, 
Wilkes and Yadkin. Population, (1920 Census) 295,917.) 

Hinton James, Democrat, was born in Richmond County, April 
24, 1884. Son of A. L. and Mary (Patterson) James. Attended 
Laurinburg High School, Davidson College. Banker, Farmer and 
Cotton Merchant. Member School Board, City Council; Mayor of 
Laurinburg. Rotarian; Mason. Presbyterian; Ruling Elder. 
Elected November 4, 1930, to fill out the unexpired term of Wil- 
liam C. Hammer, deceased, in the Seventy-first Congress, expiring 
March 4, 1931. Married Miss Anita Bryant, October 16, 1918; 
five children, four girls and one boy, Hinton James III. Home 
address: Laurinburg, N. C. 



JOHN WALTER LAMBETH, JR. 

(Seventh District — Counties: Anson, Davidson, Davie, Hoke, 
Lee, Montgomery, Moore, Randolph, Richmond, Scotland, Union, 
Wilkes and Yadkin. Population, (1920 Census) 295,917.) 

John Walter Lambeth, Jr., Democrat, was born in Thomasville, 
January 10, 1896. Son of John W. and Daisy (Sumner) Lambeth. 
A. B. Trinity College, 1916; post graduate work Harvard School 
of Business Administration, 1916-1917. State Senator, 1921. 
Mayor of Thomasville, 1925-1929. Enlisted as private and served 
with first American Army at St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne, World 
War. Rotarian. Mason; Jr. O. U. A. M.; P. O. S. A.; Sons of 
the American Revolution; American Legion; Kappa Sigma. Meth- 
odist. Furniture Manufacturer, banker and farmer. Elected to 
the Seventy-second Congress, November 4, 1930. Home Address: 
Thomasville, N. C. 



ROBERT LEE DOUGHTON 

(Eighth District — Counties: Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Ca- 
barrus, Caldwell, Iredell, Rowan, Stanly and Watauga. Popu- 
lation, (1920 Census) 217,254.) 

Robert L. Doughton, Democrat, Laurel Springs, was born at 
Laurel Springs, November 7, 1863. Educated in the public schools 



Members of Congress 161 

and at Laurel Springs and Sparta High Schools. Farmer and 
stock raiser. Appointed a member of the Board of Agriculture in 
1903. Elected to the State Senate from the Thirty-fifth District 
in 1908. Served as a director of the State Prison from 1909 to 
1911. Elected to the Sixty-second, Sixty-third, Sixty-fourth, Six- 
ty-fifth, Sixty-sixth, Sixty-seventh, Sixty-eighth, Sixty-ninth, Sev- 
entieth and Seventy-first Congresses. Reelected to the Seventy- 
second Congress, November 4, 1930. Home address: Laurel 
Springs, N. C. 



ALFRED LEE BULWINKLE 

(Ninth District — Counties: Mecklenburg, Gaston, Cleveland, 
Lincoln, Catawba, Burke, Madison, Mitchell, Yancey and Avery. 
Population, (1920 Census) 297,996. 

A. L. Bulwinkle, Democrat, Gastonia, Gaston County, N. C, 
born April 21, 1883. Attended school at Dallas, N. C. Studied 
law at University of North Carolina under private instructor. 
Lawyer. Prosecuting Attorney Municipal Coui't of City of Gas- 
tonia, 1913-1916. Nominated as Senator for the Genei-al As- 
sembly by the Democratic Party, 1916, withdrew on account of 
military service on the Mexican Border. Captain First Infantry, 
N. C. N. G., 1909-1917. Major, commanding Second Battalion, 
113th F. A., 55th F. A. Brigade, 30th Division, 1917-1919. 

Married Miss Bessie Lewis, Dallas, N. C, 1911; two children, 
Frances McKean and Alfred Lewis. Served on various commit- 
tees of the Democratic Party from 1904-1920. Member of Gas- 
ton Post No. 23, American Legion. Mason, Jr. O. U. A. M., Mem- 
ber of North Carolina and American Bar Associations; Lion, Lu- 
theran. Elected to Sixty-seventh, Sixty-eighth, Sixty-ninth, and 
Seventieth Congresses, defeated for reelection to the Seventy-first 
Congress and reelected to the Seventy-second Congress, November 
4, 1930. Home Address: Gastonia, N. C. 



162 Biographical Sketches 

zebulon weaver 

(Tenth District — Counties: Cherokee, Buncombe, Clay, Gra- 
ham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, McDowell, Macon, Polk, 
Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania. Population (1920 census), 
231,483.) 

Zebulon Weaver, Democrat, of Buncombe County, was born in 
Weaverville, N. C, May 12, 1872. He is the son of W. E. and 
Hannah E. (Baird) Weaver. A.B. of Weaverville College, 1889. 
Studied law at the University of North Carolina, 1894. Lawyer. 
Represented Buncombe County in the General Assembly of North 
Carolina in 1907 and 1909. State Senator, 1913 and 1915. After 
a close contest with James J. Britt, Republican, in 1916, was 
declared elected Representative in the Sixty-fifth Congress. Was 
elected to the Sixty-sixth, Sixty-seventh, Sixty-eighth, Sixty-ninth 
and Seventieth Congresses. Reelected to the Seventy-second Con- 
gress, November 4, 1930. Methodist. Married Miss Anna Hyman 
of New Bern, N. C. Has five children. Home address: Asheville, 
N. C. 



State Senators 163 

members of the general assembly 



SENATORS 



RICHARD TILMAN FOUNTAIN 

PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE 

Richard Tilman Fountain, Democrat, Lieutenant-Governor, 
was born in Edgecombe County, February 15, 1885. Son of Al- 
mon L. and Louisa (Eagles) Fountain. Was educated in the 
public schools of Edgecombe County and the Tarboro Male 
Academy; University of North Carolina, 1905-1907. Lawyer. 
Member of the North Carolina Bar Association. Vice-President 
of said Association, 1922-1923; also member of the American 
Bar Association. President Rocky Mount Bar Association. Judge 
of the Municipal Court of Rocky Mount, 1911-1918. Trustee of 
the Rocky Mount Graded Schools; Secretary to the Board, 1917- 
1921; Chairman of the Board since July 1, 1924. Chairman of 
the Board of Trustees of the Eastern Carolina Industrial Train- 
ing School for Boys. Member of the Legislature, sessions of 
1919, 1921, 1923 and 1925; Speaker of the House of Representa- 
tives, 1927. Knight of Pythias; Jr. 0. U. A. M. Presbyterian. 
Married Miss Susan Rankin, October, 1918. Four children: 
Susan Rankin, Anne Sloan, Margaret Eagles and Richard Til- 
man, Jr., two years of age. Address: Rocky Mount, N. C. 



JOHN ROBERT BAGGETT 

{Twelfth Senatorial District — Counties: Harnett, Hoke, 
Moore and Randolph. Two Senators.) 

John Robert Baggett, Democrat, Senator from the Twelfth 
Senatorial District. Was born in Sampson County, October 1, 
1871. Son of Silas E. and Winifred (Wilson) Baggett. At- 
tended Glenco High School, 1892-1894; Salemburg High School, 
1894-1895; University of North Carolina, 1896-1900; University 
Law School, 1900 and 1908. Lawyer. Member North Carolina 
Bar Association. Mayor of Lillington, 1912-1918; Chairman 



164 Biographical Sketches 

Lillington High School Board, 1916-1930; member Board of Di- 
rectors Caswell Training School, 1911-1926; North Carolina 
School for Blind and Deaf, 1926-1930. State Senator, 1911 and 
1923. Mason; Scottish Rite Lodge; Jr. O. U. A. M.; Master 
Buie's Creek Lodge A. F. and A. M.. Baptist; Superintendent 
Sunday school. Married Miss Allene Keeter, September 8, 1901. 
Address: Lillington, N. C. 



KELLY EDMOND BENNETT 

(Thirty-third District — Counties: Cherokee, Clay, Graham, 
Macon and Swain. One Senator.) 

Kelly Edmond Bennett, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty- 
third District. Was born at Bryson City, February 8, 1890. Son 
of Dr. Aurelius McDonald and Mary Charlotte (Hyatt) Bennett. 
Attended public schools of Asheville, 1904-1905; Bryson City 
High School, 1905-1909; graduate School of Pharmacy, University 
of North Carolina, 1910-1912. Druggist. Real estate and in- 
surance agent. Member American Pharmaceutical Association; 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association; Bryson City Lions 
Club; North Carolina Board of Pharmacy, 1920-1925; active 
member National Association of Boards of Pharmacy, 1920- 
1925; Board of Aldermen, Bryson City; Mayor Bryson City; 
Chairman Democratic Executive Committee, Swain County; 
Chairman North Carolina Membership Committee of the Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association; Chairman of Legislative Com- 
mittee of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association; mem- 
ber State Senate from Thirty-second District, 1917. Mason, 32nd 
K. C. C. H.; Shriner. Deacon Presbyterian Church; member 
Home Mission Committee of Asheville Presbytery. Married, De- 
cember, 1913, to Miss Ola Tela Zachery. Three children, Mary 
Alice, Gwendolyn and Jean. Address: Bryson City, N. C. 



SILAS GARRETT BERNARD 

(Thirty- first District — County: Buncombe. One Senator.) 

Silas Garrett Bernard, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty- 
first Senatorial District. Was born in Franklin County, Virginia, 
March 26, 1876. Son of Benjamin F. and Adeline E. (Cooke) 



State Senators 165 

Bernard. Attended public schools of Asheville; University of 
North Carolina Law School, 1901. Lawyer. Member North Caro- 
lina Bar Association, Buncombe County Bar Association and the 
American Bar Association. President Buncombe County Bar 
Association, 1925; Chairman Executive Committee, North Caro- 
lina Bar Association, 1930; member Legislative Committee, 
American Bar Association, 1930; Corporation Counsel, City of 
Asheville, 1909-1911, 1913-1915; Chairman Board of Elections, 
Buncombe County, 1921-1925. Sergeant 1st. N. C. V. I., 1898- 
1899, Spanish-American War. Knights of Pythias. Christian. 
Married Miss Sara Haigh Jones, June 4, 1912. Address: Ashe- 
ville, N. C. 



MARVIN KEY BLOUNT 

(Fifth District — County: Pitt. One Senator.) 

Marvin K. Blount, Democrat, Senator from the Fifth Sena- 
torial District. Was born at Bethel, March 18, 1892. Son of 
Marion Orland and Florence Blount. Attended Culver Military 
Academy, Culver, Indiana; A.B., Randolph Macon College, 1914; 
LL.B., University of North Carolina, 1916. Lawyer. Member 
North Carolina Bar Association and Kiwanis Club. Director and 
attorney for Bank and Building Loan Association. Chairman 
Pitt County Democratic Executive Committee, 1924-1926. Mem- 
ber Phi Delta Theta Fraternity; member Board of Trustees, 
University of North Carolina. Shriner. Methodist. State Sena- 
tor, 1927 and 1929. Married Miss Ruth Elizabeth Baldwin, 
January 22, 1920. Address: Greenville, N. C. 



JOHN T. BURRUS 

(Seventeenth District — Counties: Guilford and Rockingham. 
Two Senators.) 

John T. Burrus, Democrat, Senator from the Seventeenth Sena- 
torial District. Was born in Surry County, July 13, 1876. Son 
of John G. and Bettie (Reece) Burrus. Attended Yadkinville 
Institute; Davidson College, M. D., 1898; M. D. Baltimore Medi- 
cal College, 1900; Grant University, 1901. Surgeon. Member 



166 Biographical Sketches 

North Carolina Medical Association; Tri-State Medical Asso- 
ciation; Southern Medical Association; American Medical Asso- 
ciation; Fellow American College of Surgeons. Owner and Chief 
Surgeon, High Point Hospital and Burrus Clinic. Consulting 
Surgeon, Southern Railway, Thomasville Baptist Orphanage and 
Davidson Hospital. President North Carolina Medical Society, 
1928. Two years in World War, rank of Colonel. Chief of 
Surgical Service Base Hospital, Camp Beauregard; Commanding 
Officer, U. S. Army Base Hospital, Camp Beauregard. Mason; 
Shriner; Knights of Pythias; Junior Order United American Me- 
chanics; Odd Fellow; Elks. Baptist. Married Miss Mary B. At- 
kins, April 2, 1899. Address: High Point, N. C. 



EDGAR RAMSEY BURT 

{Eighteenth District — Counties: Davidson, Montgomery, Rich- 
mond and Scotland. Two Senators.) 

Edgar Ramsey Burt, Democrat, Senator from the Eighteenth 
Senatorial District. Was born at Osgood, Chatham (now Lee) 
County, October 2, 1869. Son of Jessie G. and Delanie (Thomas) 
Burt. Attended Holly Springs Academy, 1886. Gasoline and 
Oil merchant. President Biscoe Oil Co., Inc.; President Inde- 
pendent Oil Jobbers Association. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1921. Knights of Pythias. Methodist. Married Miss 
Henrietta Adams, 1900. Address: Biscoe, N. C. 



WILLIAM BAUGHAM CAMPBELL 

(Ninth District — Counties: Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and 
Sampson. Two Senators.) 

William Baugham Campbell, Democrat, Senator from the Ninth 
Senatorial District, was born at Yatesville, Beaufort County, No- 
vember 29, 1888. Son of Charles A. and Martha V. (Wilkinson) 
Campbell. Attended Rhodes Military Institute, 1903-1905; Oak 
Ridge Institute, 1906-1907; University Law School, 1912-1913. 
Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association; New Hanover 
County Bar Bar Association; Lions Club. Member National Guard 



State Senators 167 

for two years. Junior 0. U. A. M. Episcopalian; Vestryman; 
Junior and Senior Warden. Representative in the General As- 
sembly of 1927. Married Miss Jeannette Robbins, July 31, 1917. 
Address: Wilmington, N. C. 



WILLIAM GRIMES CLARK 

(Fourth District — Counties: Edgecombe and Halifax. Two 
Senators.) 

William G. Clark, Democrat, Senator from the Fourth Sena- 
torial District. Was born in Tarboro, April 28, 1877. Son of 
William S. and Lossie (Grist) Clark. Attended Horner's School, 
1891-1893; University of North Carolina, 1893-1897. Member D. 
K. E. Fraternity. Fertilizer supply merchant and farmer. Presi- 
dent Tarboro Ginning Co.; Cotton Belt Land Co.; Vice-Presi- 
dent Edgecombe Homestead Building and Loan; President 
Edgecombe National Bank; Director and member Finance Com- 
mittee, Tarboro Unit, North Carolina Bank and Trust Co.; Di- 
rector Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Co., Greensboro; Chair- 
man Board of Trustees, Edgecombe General Hospital; member 
Board of Directors of State Hospital, Raleigh; member Board 
of Town Commissioners, Tarboro, 1901-1907; Chairman Board 
of County Commissioners, 1914-1920. Delegate to National Demo- 
cratic Convention, Baltimore, 1912. State Senator, 1927 and 1929. 
Episcopalian. Married Miss Ruth Duval Hardisty, April 17, 
1901. Address: Tarboro, N. C. 



FRANCIS OSBORNE CLARKSON 

(Twentieth District — Counties: Cabarrus and Mecklenburg. 
Two Senators.) 

Francis Osborne Clarkson, Democrat, Senator from the Twen- 
tieth Senatorial District. Was born in Charlotte, August 26, 
1895. Son of Heriot and Mary Lloyd (Osborne) Clarkson. At- 
tended Charlotte public schools and Charlotte University School 
up to 1912; University of North Carolina, A.B., 1916; LL.B., 
1917. Lawyer. Member Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 
and American Bar Associations. Director, Charlotte Y. M. C. A.; 



168 Biographical Sketches 

Trustee, Thompson Orphanage Endowment and Building Fund. 
Solicitor Fourteenth Judicial District, 1922, filling an unexpired 
term. United States Naval Aviation, Ensign, 1918; Marine Corps 
Aviation, Second Lieutenant, 1919. Mason; Jr. O. U. A. M. 
Episcopalian ; Vestryman and Warden. Married Miss Cama 
Burgess, June 27, 1924. Three children; Sarah Burgess, Cama 
Mary and Francis O., Jr. Address: Charlotte, N. C. 



HAYDEN CLEMENT 

{Twenty-first District — County: Rowan. One Senator.) 

Hayden Clement, Senator from the Twenty-first Senatorial 
District. Was born in Mocksville, September 25, 1879. Son of 
Louis H. and Mary C. (Buehller) Clement. Attended Salisbury 
High School; Horner's Military School; University of North 
Carolina, 1899-1903; University Law School, 1903. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber North Carolina Bar Association. Delegate to National 
Democratic Convention, Baltimore, 1912. Assistant Attorney 
General, 1907-1909; Solicitor Fifteenth Judicial District, 1914- 
1923. Mason; Junior Order United American Mechanics; Sigma 
Nu Fraternity. Episcopalian; Junior Warden and Vestryman. 
Married Miss Clay W. Croxton, Winchester, Ky., June 25, 1913. 
Address: Salisbury, N. C. 



HUGH DORTCH 

{Eighth District — Counties: Johnston and Wayne. Two Sena- 
tors.) 

Hugh Dortch, Democrat, Senator from the Eighth Senatorial 
District. Was born in Goldsboro, April 24, 1897. Son of Col. 
W. T. and Elizabeth (Lewis Dortch. Grandson of Confederate 
States Senator, W. T. Dortch, who served as both Speaker of 
the House and President of the State Senate and member of 
the Confederate Senate. Attended Goldsboro graded schools; 
Goldsboro High School; Bingham Military School, 1915; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, class of 1919; Law School, 1919- 
1920. Lawyer. Member Wayne County and North Carolina 



State Senators 169 

Bar Associations; Grievance Committee, North Carolina Bar 
Association, 1929-1931. First man from the University to enlist 
for service, enlisting April 19, 1917; Machine Gun Co., 119th 
Infantry, 30th Division; served overseas one year, attaining rank 
of Sergeant. Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, Goldsboro 
Lodge No. 139; Zeta Psi Fraternity. Episcopalian; Vestryman, 
1928-1930. Married Miss Agnes Pearce Quinerly, October 26, 
1921. One son: Hugh Dortch, Jr., aged seven years. 



FRANK LEMUEL DUNLAP 

{Nineteenth District — Counties: Anson, Stanly and Union. 
Two Senators.) 

Frank L. Dunlap, Democrat, Senator from the Nineteenth 
Senatorial District. Was born at Wadesboro, Anson County. Son 
of Joseph I. and Charlotte B. (Bennett) Dunlap. Educated at 
Horner's Military School, 1902-19*03-1904; University of North 
Carolina, LL.B., 1908. Lawyer and farmer. Civitan. Clerk of 
Superior Court, Anson County, 1910. Solicitor Recorder's Court, 
Anson County, 1911-1914. Senator General Assembly, 1921, 1925 
and 1927. Served in World War, 1917-1919; First Lieutenant 
Infantry, U. S. A., A. E. F. Episcopalian. Address Wadesboro, 
N. C. 



JOHN HAMLIN FOLGER 

{Twenty-third District — Counties: Stokes and Surry. One 
Senator.) 

John Hamlin Folger, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
third Senatorial District. Was born at Rockford, N. C. Son of 
Thos. Wilson and Ada Dillard (Robertson) Folger. Educated at 
Dobson High School, 1895; Yadkinville Normal School, 1896- 
1898. Attended Guilford College, 1898, and the University Law 
School in 1901. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Associ- 
ation and the American Bar Association. Mayor of Mount Airy, 
1909-1910. Member Granite Lodge, A. F. & A. M., No. 322; Blue 
Ridge Council No. 72; Jr. O. U. A. M. Methodist; Trustee. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1927. Married Miss 
Maude Douglas, November 4, 1899. Address: Mount Airy. X. C. 



170 Biographical Sketches 

floyd galloway gower 

{Eighth District — Counties: Johnston and Wayne. Two Sena- 
tors.) 

Floyd Galloway Gower, Democrat, Senator from the Eighth 
Senatorial District. Was born in Johnston County, May 7, 1887. 
Son of Anderson and Bettie (Bridges) Gower. Attended Clayton 
High School, 1904-1906; Atlanta Dental College, Dental Surgeon, 
1910. Farmer and real estate. Member North Carolina Dental 
Society. Mayor of Clayton, 1927-1931. Served in Army, May, 
1918, to December, 1918, rank as hospital assistant; four weeks' 
training in heavy artillery service. Knights of Pythias; Elks; 
Junior Order United American Mechanics. Methodist; President 
Sunday School Class, 1928-1929. Married Miss Bertie Taylor, 
July 23, 1921. Practiced Dentistry six years at Graham and 
Wendell; traded real estate and operated gins and saw mills and 
farms since 1906. Address: Clayton, N. C. 



A. TURNER GRANT 

{Twenty -fourth District — Counties: Davie, Wilkes and Yad- 
kin. One Senator.) 

A. Turner Grant, Republican, Senator from the Twenty- 
fourth Senatorial District. Was born at Mocksville, June 2, 1876. 
Son of A. T. and Rebecca (Parker) Grant. Educated at Mocks- 
ville Academy, 1896-1897, and University of North Carolina. 
Lawyer. Member of House of Representatives, 1903, 1905, 1907, 
1909, 1921, 1927 and 1929. State Senator, 1913, 1925. Food Ad- 
ministrator for Davie County, 1917-1918. Chairman Liberty Loan 
Committee, Davie County, during World War. Supervision Cen- 
sus, Seventh North Carolina District, 1910. District member 
Constitutional Amendment Commission, 1913. Married Miss 
Helen L. Brewster, March 18, 1908. Address: Mocksville, N. C. 



State Senators 171 

lloyd lee gravely 

(Sixth District — Counties: Franklin, Nash and Wilson. Two 
Senators.) 

Lloyd L. Gravely, Democrat, Senator from the Sixth Sena- 
torial District. Was born in Danville, Virginia, December 5, 
1889. Son of J. O. W. and Lula (Keen) Gravely. Attended 
University School, Rocky Mount, 1895-1903; Randolph-Macon 
Academy, 1903-1905; A.B., Randolph-Macon College, 1910; at- 
tended Law School, University of Virginia, 1912, and Law School 
of University of North Carolina, 1913. Tobacconist. Member 
Kiwanis Club. Director, secretary-treasurer, China-American To- 
bacco Co.; director, Planters National Bank and Trust Co. Al- 
derman, city of Rocky Mount, 1920-1921; mayor, 1925-1928. Phi 
Delta Theta; Phi Delta Phi (legal) Fraternities; Mason; 
Shriner; Knights of Pythias; Sons of American Revolution. 
Methodist; steward; teacher Men's Bible Class. State Senator, 
1929. Married Miss Mary Clarke Hoofnagle, August 2, 1916. 
Address: Rocky Mount, N. C. 



HARRY PERCY GRIER, SR. 

(Twenty-fifth District — Counties: Catawba, Iredell and Lin- 
coln. Two Senators.) 

Harry Percy Grier, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-fifth 
Senatorial District. Was born in Yorkville, S. C, March 20, 
1871. Son of William Lowndes and Mary (Barron) Grier. At- 
tended Statesville High School. Read law under Major Harvey 
Bingham of Statesville, was licensed by the Supreme Court of 
North Carolina at September term, 1893. Lawyer. Mayor States- 
ville, 1907-1911. Representative in the General Assembly of 1913, 
1915, 1917, 1919; Speaker of the House of Representatives, 1921. 
Member commission that revised and published the Consolidated 
Statutes of North Carolina, 1919. Woodmen of the World. Asso- 
ciate Reformed Presbyterian; Deacon; Elder. Married Miss 
Marietta Leinster. October 10, 1895. Address: Statesville, N. C. 



172 Biographical Sketches 

allen hatchett gwyn 

(Seventeenth District — Counties: Guilford and Rockingham. 
Two Senators.) 

Allen H. Gwyn, Democrat, Senator from the Seventeenth 
Senatorial District. Was born near Yanceyville, November 12, 
1893. Son of Joseph P. and Sarah E. (Hatchett) Gwyn. At- 
tended Yanceyville graded school; Trinity Park School, 1913- 
1914; A.B., Trinity College, 1913; Trinity College, 1919-1921. 
Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association and the Ameri- 
can Bar Association. Enlisted as a Private, September 19, 1917; 
commissioned Second Lieutenant, Infantry, June, 1918; dis- 
charged January 24, 1919; commissioned Captain, N. C. National 
Guard, 1923; now commanding Headquarters Co., 120th Infantry, 
N. C. National Guard. Mason. Methodist; Steward, 1926-1930. 
Married Miss Janie Johnston Gwyn, August 25, 1917. Address: 
Reidsville, N. C. 



IRA MAY HARDY 

(Seventh District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, 
Lenoir and Onslow. Two Senators.) 

Ira May Hardy, Democrat, Senator from the Seventh Sena- 
torial District. Was born in LaGrange, July 22, 1874. Son of 
Jesse Hutchins and Martha Ann (Stanton) Hardy. Attended 
Davis Military School; LaGrange Collegiate Institute; Goldsboro 
public schools; A. and E. College, 1895-1896; University of North 
Carolina, 1896-1898; M. D. Medical College of Richmond, 1901. 
Physician. ■ Member County, Seaboard, State, Southern and 
American Medical Societies. Ex-President Beaufort County 
Medical Society, Lenoir County Society, and Seaboard Medical 
Society; First Superintendent Caswell Training School; Ex- 
President County Alumni Association. Captain, World War, 
1918; Medical Examiner for County Exemption Board; Major 
Medical Reserves, 1919-1930. Knights of Pythias, Deputy Grand 
Chancelor, 1898-1899; Junior Order United American Mechanics; 
Woodmen of the World; Mason, Chapter Commandry; Shriner; 
Eastern Star; Sons of the American Revolution. Episcopalian; 
Vestryman fourteen years; Trustee Thompson Orphanage fifteen 



State Senators 173 

years. Author of "What It Cost," various medical papers, and 
"Schools for the Feeble Minded, the State's Best Insurance 
Policy." Married Miss Mary Eliza Mansfield Baynor, January 
1, 1902. Four children: Mary, Martha, Huldah and Jesse. 
Address: Kinston, N. C. 



ROY A. HARMON 

(Thirtieth District — Counties: Avery, Madison, Mitchell and 
Yancey. One Senator.) 

Roy A. Harmon, Republican Senator from the Thirtieth Sena- 
torial District. Was born at Beech Creek, November 2, 1894. 
Son of William M. and Mary M. (Harmon) Harmon. Attended 
Beech Creek elementary school, 1903 to 1909; Appalachian Train- 
ing School, 1910 to 1913. Taught in public schools of Watauga 
and Avery Counties. Banker. Sergeant, United States Army, 
from February 3, 1915, to October 15, 1919. Four years' service 
in Philippine Islands. Representative in the General Assembly 
of 1925. Baptist; clerk, 1920. Married Miss Alma B. Ollis, 
December 23, 1923. Address: Elk Park, N. C. 



THOMAS HENRY HATCHETT 

(Sixteenth District — Counties: Alamance, Caswell, Durham 
and Orange. Two Senators.) 

Thomas Henry Hatchett, Democrat, Senator from the Six- 
teenth Senatorial District. Was born in Caswell County, July 
16, 1895. Son of Thomas Henry and Elizabeth (Owen) Hatchett. 
Attended public schools of Caswell County. Farmer and Justice 
of the Peace. County Commissioner, 1914-1927; Representative 
in the General Asembly of 1913; Judge Recorder's Court, 1927; 
Justice of the Peace, 1928-1930. First Sergeant Home Guards, 
1918. Junior Order United American Mechanics; Thirty-second 
degree Mason, Scottish Rite; Master Masonic Lodge, 1911; Coun- 
cilor Junior Order, 1911. Methodist; Sunday School Superin- 
tendent, 1888-1910; Steward. Married Miss Virginia T. Owen, 
1888, who died May 18, 1902. Four children: two sons and two 
daughters. Address: Yanceyville, N. C. 



174 Biographical Sketches 



FABIUS J. HAYWOOD 



(Twentieth District — Counties: Cabarrus and Mecklenburg. 
Two Senators.) 

Fabius J. Haywood, Democrat, Senator from the Twentieth 
Senatorial District. Was born in Raleigh, November 14, 1876. 
Son of Fabius Julius and Nannie Grimes Haywood. A.B., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1897. Teacher, 1897-1898. Banker, 
1898-1905; State Bank Examiner, 1905-1909. Cotton manu- 
facturer since 1909. Married Miss Elizabeth Joyner Burton, 
October 7, 1908. Episcopalian. State Senator, 1927 and 1929. 
Address: Concord, N. C. 



WILLIAM MAYHEW HENDREN 

(Twenty-second District — County: Forsyth. One Senator.) 
William Mayhew Hendren, Democrat, Senator from the 
Twenty-second Senatorial District. Was born in New Bern, Oc- 
tober 13, 1871. Son of Linville L. and Mary Elizabeth (Mayhew) 
Hendren. Attended Winston-Salem graded schools, 1887-1889; 
University of North Carolina, 1890-1892; University Law School, 
1894. Lawyer. Member American Bar Association; North Caro- 
lina Bar Association; President, 1925-1926; Forsyth County Bar 
Association. Methodist. Married Miss Annie J. Rawley, March 
28, 1899. Address: Winston-Salem, N. C. 



ARCHIBALD ARRINGTON HICKS 

(Fifteenth District — Counties: Granville and Person. One 
Senator.) 

Archibald Arrington Hicks, Democrat, Senator from the Fif- 
teenth Senatorial District. Was born near Oxford, on a farm 
called White Oak Villa, September 9, 1862. Son of Benjamin W. 
and Isabella (Crews) Hicks. Attended Pleasant Hill Academy, 
1867-1876; Shilo Academy, 1878-1879; Yadkin College, 1879-1883. 
Studied law under instruction of T. T. Hicks. Lawyer. President 
Granville County Bar Association; member State Bar Associa- 
tion, and member of the Executive Committee; Oxford Chamber 



State Senators 175 

of Commerce. Mayor of Oxford, 1892-1894; Chairman Democratic 
Executive Committee, four terms; Attorney for Granville County 
Commissioners for the past twenty years. State Senator, 1899, 
1903, 1907, 1911 and 1923. Appointed Major by Governor 
Kitchen. Member Oxford Lodge No. 396, A. F. and A. M., hold- 
ing all offices, including one term as Master; Royal Arch Chapter 
and Knights Templar; member Oxford Lodge No. 103, I. O. O. F., 
holding all offices, including Chief Patriarch in Camp. Methodist 
Protestant; delegate to general conference in Washington, D. C, 
about 1912. Married Miss Hettie Minor, August 8, 1894. Four 
children: Alleine B., Elizabeth A. (Mrs. Leslie R. Hummell of 
Wilmington), Will Minor and Julia Brent Hicks. Took an active 
part in the Legislature of 1899 in passing the Constitutional 
amendment known as the Suffrage Amendment. Address: Oxford, 
N. C. 



JOHN WETMORE HINSDALE 

(Thirteenth District — Counties: Chatham, Lee and Wake. 
Two Senators.) 

John W. Hinsdale, Democrat, Senator from the Thirteenth 
Senatorial District. Was born in Raleigh, August 21, 1879. Son 
of John Wetmore and Ellen (Devereaux) Hinsdale. Attended 
private schools; A.B., University of North Carolina, 1900; Uni- 
versity Law School. Lawyer. Representative in the General As- 
sembly of 1909. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



WILKINS PERRYMAN HORTON 

(Thirteenth District — Counties: Chatham, Lee and Wake. Two 
Senators.) 

Wilkins Perryman Horton, Democrat, of Chatham County, 
Senator from the Thirteenth District, was born at Kansas City, 
Kansas, September 1, 1889. Son of Thomas B. and Mary E. 
(Wilkins) Horton. Was educated in the public schools of Chat- 
ham County; Draughan's Business College, 1910-1911; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1912-1914. Lawyer. County Attorney 
from 1916-1919 and from 1924-1930. Chairman of Democratic 



176 Biographical Sketches 

Executive Committee of Chatham County. Senator from Chat- 
ham, 1919 and 1927. Secretary, State Democratic Executive 
Committee, 1930. Mason. Methodist. Married Miss Cassandra 
C. Mendenhall, June 12, 1918. Address: Pittsboro, N. C. 



MURDOCH M. JOHNSON 

{Twelfth District — Counties: Hoke, Moore and Randolph. 
Two Senators.) 

Murdoch M. Johnson, Democrat, Senator from the Twelfth 
Senatorial District. Was born in Bethune, S. C, September 30, 
1888. Son of Henry T. and Flora H. Johnson. Attended Welsh 
Neck High School, Hartsville, S. C. (Now Coker College), 1906- 
1908; Wake Forest College; University of North Carolina; L.L.B., 
University of South Carolina, 1912. Lawyer. Member Moore 
County Bar Association. North Carolina Bar Association and the 
American Bar Association. Mayor of Jefferson, S. C, 1914-1915; 
Representative in South Carolina Legislature from Kershaw 
County, 1918-1922; Chairman Aberdeen School Board, 1928-1930; 
member Board of Commissioners, Aberdeen. Mason; Shriner; 
Knights of Pythias; Worshipful Master, Macedonia Lodge, Jef- 
ferson, S. C, 1914-1915; Chancellor Jefferson Lodge Knights of 
Pythias, 1915. Presbyterian. Married Miss Amilie Blume John- 
son, July 15, 1916. Address: Aberdeen, N. C. 



RIVERS DUNN JOHNSON 

(Ninth District — Counties: Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and 
Sampson. Two Senators.) 

Rivers Dunn Johnson, Democrat, Senator from the Ninth 
Senatorial District. Was born in Wilson, December 29, 1885. 
Son of Seymour Anderson and Annie E. (Clark) Johnson. Edu- 
cated at James Sprunt Institute, Warsaw High School and 
Wake Forest. Attended Wake Forest Law School, 1908-1909. 
Lawyer. Member American Bar Association, North Carolina Bar 
Association and Duplin County Bar Association. Mayor Warsaw, 
1909-1910. State Senator, 1911, 1915, 1923 and 1927. Cadet, 
First Officers Training Camp, Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. Thirty- 



State Senators 177 

second Degree Mason, Scottish Rite Bodies; Shriner, Sudan 
Temple; Jr. O. U. A. M.; Eastern Star. Member Warsaw Rotary 
Club. Master Masonic Lodge, 1911-1915; Councilor, Jr. O. U. 
A. M., two years; President Shrine Club, 1919-1926; President 
Rotary Club, 1926-1927. Episcopalian. Married Miss Olivia R. 
Best, May 23, 1921. Address: Warsaw, N. C. 



WALTER RALEIGH JONES 

(Eighteenth District — Counties: Davidson, Montgomery, Rich- 
mond and Scotland. Two Senators.) 

Walter Raleigh Jones, Democrat, Senator from the Eighteenth 
Senatorial District. Was born in Surry County, December 3, 
1881. Son of Francis and Eliza (McGrady) Jones. Attended 
Mt. Airy graded school, 1898-1900; Bridle Creek Academy (Va.), 
1900-1901; Peabody College, 1901-1903; L. I., 1903; University 
of North Carolina, 1904-1906; A.B., 1906; University Law 
School, 1913. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association. 
Prosecuting Attorney, Richmond County Court, 1915-1916. Ma- 
son; member Oasis Shrine Temple. Married Miss Edith White 
Fayssoux, March 2, 1910. Winner inter-society debaters' medal, 
Bridle Creek Academy, 1901; Peabody College, 1903; Willie P. 
Mangum Orators' Medal, 1906; Principal Woodlawn, Va., High 
School, 1903-1904. Insurance business, 1906-1909; manager real 
estate business, 1909-1913; began practice of law, 1913. Address: 
Rockingham, N. C. 



LLOYD J. LAWRENCE 

(First District — Counties: Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Gates, 
Hertford, Pasquotank, and Perquimans. Two Senators.) 

Lloyd J. Lawrence, Democrat, Senator from the First Sena- 
torial District. Was born in Murfreesboro in 1871. Son of James 
N. and Mary Elizabeth (Pruden) Lawrence. Attended Mur- 
freesboro High School, 1883-1888; Murfreesboro Military Acad- 
emy, 1888-1890; University of North Carolina Law School, 1890- 
1892. Lawyer. Member State Bar Association; Commercial Law 



178 Biographical Sketches 

League of America. President of Citizens Bank, 1911-1919; 
President of the First National Bank of Murfreesboro, 1919- 
1922; Mayor of Murfreesboro, 1893-1901; Chairman of Board of 
Education; Chairman of Board of Elections; County Attorney; 
Town Attorney. President Ahoskie Kiwanis Club, 1929. Repre- 
sentative in General Assembly of 1901 and 1923; State Senator, 
1927 and 1929; Supervisor First North Carolina District, 1920 
census. Methodist. Married in 1895 to Miss Eva Alberta Eldridge; 
in 1919 to Miss Olive B. Vinson. Address: Murfreesboro, N. C. 



T. H. LINDSEY 

{Tenth District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus and 
Cumberland. Two Senators.) 

T. H. Lindsey, Democrat, Senator from the Tenth Senatorial 
District. Was born in Orange County. Son of John M. Lindsey. 
Attended preparatory schools of Durham; B.S., Scottsburg 
Normal College; B.E., Holbrook Normal College; A.M. and B.O., 
Tennessee Normal College. Engaged in school and college work, 
Dean of Department, Dixon College, platform entertainment until 
1916; Alderman, 1917-1921. Mason; Shriner; Jr. Order United 
American Mechanics; Past Councilor. Baptist. Married Miss 
Kate Fulghum, November 21, 1916. Address: Southport, N. C. 



WILLIAM RICHARD LOVILL 

{Twenty -ninth District — Counties: Alleghany, Ashe and Wa- 
tauga. One Senator.) 

William Richard Lovill, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
ninth Senatorial District, was born at Siloam, Surry County, No- 
vember 27, 1868. Son of Edward Francis and Josephine Loretta 
(Marion) Lovill. Attended Sutherland Seminary and Boone High 
School. Studied law under Major Harvey Bingham, Statesville. 
Lawyer. Methodist. Married Miss Jennie D. Sutherland, De- 
cember 31, 1890, who died October 16, 1916. Married Miss Lucy 
Graybeal, September 9, 1923. Address: Boone, N. C. 



State Senators 179 

william edward lynch 

(Eleventh District — County: Robeson. One Senator.) 
William Edward Lynch, Democrat, Senator from the Eleventh 
Senatorial District. Was born in Edgefield, S. C, October 12, 
1892. Son of William Edward and Kate (Holstien) Lynch. At- 
tended Edgefield graded and High School until 1909; Davidson 
College, B.S., 1913; University of North Carolina Law School, 
1915. Lawyer. Prosecuting Attorney, Robeson County Recorder's 
Court, 1923-1930. Private in World War about fifteen months. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity. Presbyterian. Married Miss 
Virginia Pullen, June 6, 1923. Address: Rowland, N. C. 



GERTRUDE DILLS McKEE 

(Thirty-second District — Counties: Cherokee, Clay, Graham, 
Macon and Swain. One Senator.) (Vo-\^vn*j C^\aaOnjU^ ^^-cX«-o 

Gertrude Dills McKee, Democrat from the Thirty-second [^jutUmiL 
Senatorial District. Was born in Dillsboro, N. C. Daughter of .. 
W. A. and Alice (Enloe) Dills. Graduated from Peace Institute, *s<vMtA 
1905. Homemaker. Member North Carolina Federation of 
Women's Clubs, President, 1925-1927; North Carolina Division 
United Daughters of the Confederacy, President, 1928-1930; 
President Southern Council Federated Club Women, 1926-1928. 
Member North Carolina Educational Commission, 1927-1929; 
Member County Government Commission, 1927-1929; Trustee 
Western Carolina Teachers' College, 1921-1925; Trustee Peace 
College for Women, 1930. Methodist; pianist of Sunday School. 
Married E. L. McKee, August 19, 1913. Address: Sylva, N. C. 



WILLIAM KATHRINE McLEAN 

(Twenty-seventh District — Counties: Cleveland, Henderson, 
McDowell, Polk and Rutherford. Two Senators.) 

William K. McLean, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
seventh Senatorial District, was born at Democrat, N. C, De- 
cember 2, 1899. Son of Dr. I. N. and Julia M. (Buckner) McLean. 
Attended Elon College, 1914-1918; A.B., Wake Forest College, 



180 Biographical Sketches 

1924. Lawyer. Private in World War, 1918-1919, serving with 
the A. E. F. from August until the armistice was signed, in the 
battle of St. Mihiel, Argonne-Meuse offensive and west of the 
Meuse River. Mason. Baptist. Married Miss Clara Nell White- 
head, July 8, 1919. Address: Columbus, N. C. 



PEYTON McSWAIN 

(Twenty-seventh District — Counties: Cleveland, Henderson, 
McDowell, Polk and Rutherford. Two Senators.) 

Peyton McSwain, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-seventh 
Senatorial District. Was born in Cleveland County, May 4, 
1895. Son of D. F. and Margaret (Holland) McSwain. At- 
tended public schools of Cleveland County; Piedmont High 
School, Lawndale, 1911-1913; University of North Carolina, 1914- 
1916; Universite de Toulouse, Toulouse, France, 1919; Uni- 
versity Law School, 1914-1916. Received license to practice law, 
August 28, 1916. Lawyer. Member Cleveland County Bar Asso- 
ciation, Vice-President, 1929-1930; North Carolina Bar Associa- 
tion; American Bar Association. Presidential Elector for Ninth 
Congressional District, 1928; member Governor McLean's per- 
sonal staff, 1924-1928. Representative in the General Assembly 
of 1921 ; carried all five counties in Twenty-seventh Senatorial 
District in the November election, receiving the largest majority 
ever given a candidate in the district. Private, 322nd Infantry, 
81st. Division, September 16, 1917-July 29, 1919, A. E. F.; Cap- 
tain, U. S. R. C, April 26, 1922; Captain 120th Infantry, N. C. 
National Guard, June 16, 1923: Commanding Officer, Company 
"K", 120th Infantry, Shelby, N. C. A. F. and A. M., Cleveland 
Lodge, No. 202; Shrine, Oasis Temple, Charlotte; American 
Legion, Past Commander Warren F. Hoyle Post, Past District 
Commander, Ninth District; Junior Order United American Me- 
chanics; Red Men; Sons American Revolution. Presbyterian; 
teacher Men's Bible Class. Married Miss Ethel Parker, August 
9, 1927. Address: Shelby, N. C. 



State Senators 181 

kemp battle nixon 

{Twenty-fifth District — Counties: Catawba, Iredell and Lin- 
coln. Two Senators.) 

Kemp B. Nixon, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-fifth 
Senatorial District. Was born in Lincoln County, August 12, 
1883. Son of Alfred and Iola Jane (Robinson) Nixon. At- 
tended Lincolnton graded school; B.S. University of North Caro- 
lina, 1905; Trinity Law School, 1905-1907; admitted to Bar, 
August, 1907. Lawyer. Private Secretary Judge E. Y. Webb, 
1907-1908. Chairman Board of Education fifteen years. Mem- 
ber Kiwanis Club; First Lieutenant, Troop "A", Calvary, Lin- 
colnton; member Advisory Board, Lincoln County, during World 
War. Mason; Past Master Lincoln Lodge, No. 137, A. F. and 
A. M.; Lincoln Chapter, No. 22, R. A. M.; Shriner, Hickory 
Commandry No. 19, and Oasis Temple, Charlotte. Methodist; 
Steward twenty-two years. Address: Lincolnton, N. C. 



ELBERT SYDNEY PEEL 

(Second District- — Counties: Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin, 
Pamlico, Tyrrell and Washington. Two Senators.) 

Elbert Sidney Peel, Democrat, Senator from the Second Sena- 
torial District. Was born at Jamesville, N. C, December 14, 
1894. Son of R. J. and Sadie F. (Woolard) Peel. Attended 
Williamston High School, 1900-1910; A.B., University of North 
Carolina, 1914; University Summer Law School, 1916 and 1919. 
Lawyer. Solicitor, Martin County Recorder's Court, 1922-192G. 
State Senator, 1929. First Lieutenant, 317th Field Artillery, 
1917-1919. Mason; Junior Order; Elk. Christian. Married Miss 
Fannie Manning, 1920. Address: Williamston, N. C. 



WALTER HOGUE POWELL 

(Tenth District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus and 
Cumberland. Two Senators.) 

Walter Hogue Powell, Democrat, Senator from the Tenth 
Senatorial District. Was born September 9, 1887. Son of R. H. 
and Nott (McKinnon) Powell. Attended Horner's Military 



182 Biographical Sketches 

School, Oxford, 1905-1907; Whiteville High School; University 
of North Carolina, 1907-1911. Lawyer. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1919. Thirty-second degree Mason; Shriner; 
Kappa Alpha. Baptist; Deacon. Married Miss Toccoa Caine, 
October 20, 1915. Address: Whiteville, N. C. 



HENRY LAWSON PRICE 

(Nineteenth District — Counties: Anson, Stanly and Union. 
Two Senators.) 

Henry Lawson Price, Democrat, Senator from the Nineteenth 
Senatorial District. Was born in Union County, N. C, August 
1, 1871. Son of J. McCollum and Sarah (McNeely) Price. At- 
tended Wesley Chapel High School, 1885-1891; Trinity College 
(now Duke University), 1891-1892. Merchant and farmer. Mem- 
ber Board of County Commissioners, Union County, 1902-1906, 
and Chairman of Board, 1904-1906. Representative in General 
Assembly, 1913; State Senator, 1929. Modern Woodmen of the 
World. Methodist; Steward. Married Miss Nora Winchester, 
March 1, 1893. Eleven children. Address: Monroe, N. C, R. 5. 



JOHN ALBERT PRITCHETT 

(Third District — Counties: Bertie and Northampton. One 
Senator.) 

John Albert Pritchett, Democrat, Senator from the Third 
Senatorial District, was born at Ruffin, Rockingham County, 
October 7, 1896. Son of William E. and Mary J. (Page) 
Pritchett. Attended Ruffin High School, 1911-1915; Clifton High 
School, Rawlings, Va., 1915-1916; University of North Carolina, 
A.B., LL.B., 1921. Lawyer. Member Bertie County Bar Associ- 
ation; Director Eastern Carolina Chamber of Commerce; Com- 
missioner Windsor, 1927-1928; Mayor, 1928-1930; Attorney for 
Bertie Board of Education since 1927; Bertie County Repre- 
sentative Citizens Military Training Camps since 1926. Military 
training at University of North Carolina, 1917-1919. A. F. and 
A. M.; Charity Lodge, No. 5. Windsor; Temple Chapter, No. 6, 



State Senators 183 

High Priest, 1926-1930; Bethlehem Commandery, No. 9, Green- 
ville; Shrine, Sudan Temple, New Bern; Junior Order United 
American Mechanics, Bertie Council, No. 124, First Councilor, 
1927-1929; Deputy State Councilor, 1929; Phi Alpha Delta Law 
Fraternity. Methodist; Trustee since 1927; Teacher Men's Bible 
Class since 1925. Married Miss Mamie W. Stokes, June 30, 1927. 
Address: Windsor, N. C. 



RUFUS GRADY RANKIN 

(Twenty-sixth District — County: Gaston. One Senator.) 

Rufus Grady Rankin, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
sixth Senatorial District, was born at Belmont, February 25, 
1891. Son of Rufus Pinkney and Zoe (Hand) Rankin. Gradu- 
ated from Gastonia High School, 1906; attended University of 
North Carolina, 1906-1909. Manufacturer. President Ridge Mills, 
Inc.; Secretary and Treasurer Hanover Mills, Inc. Member 
Board of Gaston County Commissioners, 1919-1925. Mason, in- 
cluding Blue Lodge, Chapter, Commandery, Scottish Rite, Shrine; 
Improved Order of Red Men; P. O. S. of A. Methodist; Stew- 
ard. Married Miss Ruth Boyce, January 23, 1913. Address: 
Gastonia, N. C. 



T. O. RODWELL 

(Fourteenth District — Counties: Vance and Warren. One 
Senator.) 

T. O. Rodwell, Democrat, Senator from the Fourteenth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Warren County, February 17, 1870. 
Son of William Brown and Mary D. (Egerton) Rodwell. At- 
tended Macon High School; Wake Forest Law School, 1900. 
Lawyer. Judge Recorder's Court, Warren County, 1915-1930. 
Representative in the General Assembly, 1907, 1909 and 1911. 
Methodist. Address: Warrenton, N. C. 



184 Biographical Sketches 

john wesley umstead, jr. 

(Sixteenth District — Counties: Alamance, Caswell, Durham 
and Orange. Two Senators.) 

John Wesley Umstead, Democrat, Senator from the Sixteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Durham County, April 7, 1889. 
Son of John Wesley and Lula Elizabeth (Lunsford) Umstead. 
Attended public schools of Durham County until 1903; Mangum 
High School, Mangum Township (first consolidated school in 
North Carolina) ; University of North Carolina, A.B., 1909. 
Life insurance. Mason; Shrine; Elks; Pythians; Junior Order 
United American Mechanics, occupied all chairs in Junior Order 
at Tarboro; Exalted Ruler Elks, Durham, 1927. Methodist. Mar- 
ried Miss SaDie Hunter Reade January 20, 1924. Address: 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



THOMAS RANDOLPH UZZELL 

(Sixth District — Counties: Nash and Wilson. Two Senators.) 

Thomas Randolph Uzzell, Democrat, Senator from the Sixth 
Senatorial District, was born in Wilson County, October 7, 1889. 
Son of John Randolph and Pattie (Woodard) Uzzell. Educated 
in Wilson graded schools; Oak Ridge Institute; University of 
North Carolina. Lawyer. U. S. Naval Reserve Force during 
World War. Married Miss Grace Butler, June 20, 1923. Ad- 
dress: Wilson, N. C. 



HALLETT SYDNEY WARD 

(Second District — Counties: Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin, 
Pamlico, Tyrrell and Washington. Two Senators.) 

Hallet Sydney Ward, Democrat, Senator from the Second 
Senatorial District, was born in Gates County, August 31, 1870. 
Son of Nathan O. and Martha Eliza (Matthews) Ward. At- 
tended public school, 1876-1884; Buckhorn Academy, under a 
great teacher of that day, Capt. Julian Picot, 1890; University 
of North Carolina Summer Law School, 1893. Mayor of Plym- 
outh, 1898; Solicitor First District, 1904-1910; United States 



State Senators 185 

Congressman, 68th and 69th Congress, from the first Congressional 
District, 1921-1925. State Senator, 1899 and 1901. Mason, Orr 
Lodge, Washington, N. C. Episcopalian; Vestryman. Twice 
married; first to Miss Aileen Latham, September 23, 1896; sec- 
ond to Miss Dora F. Bonner, August 6, 1929. Address: Wash- 
ington, N. C. 



WILLIAM FARRIOR WARD 

(Seventh District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, 
Lenoir and Onslow. Two Senators.) 

William F. Ward, Democrat, Senator from Seventh Sena- 
torial District, was born at Kenansville, November 28, 1893. Son 
of Alfred Decatur and Carolina Virginia (Farrior) Ward. Edu- 
cated at New Bern High School; Warrenton High School, 1910- 
1911-1912; A.B., Wake Forest College, 1916; attended Wake 
Forest College Law School. Lawyer. Representative from Craven 
County in General Assembly, 1921 and 1925; State Senator, 1929. 
World War veteran; Lieutenant (junior grade) United States 
Naval Reserve. Served on both sides of ocean, Commanding 
Officer U. S. Submarine Chaser No. 332, following rating and 
rank: Seaman, first class; Quartermaster (signal), first class; 
Ensign and Lieutenant (junior grade). Member American Le- 
gion; Elks; Kiwanis. Baptist; Trustee. Married, 1920, Miss Car- 
rie Duffy Wooten. Address: New Bern, N. C. 



CHARLES WHEDBEE 

(First District — Counties: Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Gates, 
Hertford, Pasquotank and Perquimans. Two Senators.) 

Charles Whedbee, Democrat, Senator from the First Sena- 
torial District, was born at Hertford, September 7, 1875. Son 
of James Monroe and Mary Fannie (Skinner) Whedbee. At- 
tended University of North Carolina, 1897. Lawyer. Member 
Board of Trustees, University of North Carolina. State Senator, 
1929. Married Miss Mabel Martin, January, 1901; Married Miss 
Evelyn Copeland, January, 1917. Address: Hertford, N. C. 



186 Biographical Sketches 

buford franklin williams 

(Ttoenty-eighth District — Counties: Alexander, Burke and 
Caldwell. One Senator.) 

Buford Franklin Williams, Democrat, Senator from the 
Twenty-eighth Senatorial District, was born at Grover, N. C, 
November 7, 1884. Son of James Franklin and Candace Jose- 
phine (Stroupe) Williams. Attended Shelby graded schools; 
Bethel Hill Institute; University of North Carolina; LL.B., 
Wake Forest College, 1909. Lawyer. Member Lenoir Chamber 
Commerce; Rotary Club. Mayor Lenoir, 1914-1917; 1929-1930; 
Attorney for Caldwell County Board of Education. Chairman 
Democratic Executive Committee, Caldwell County, 1928-1930. 
Newspaper business, 1906-1909; teacher, 1905-1906; Captain, Bat- 
tery "E", 113th Field Artillery, World War. Mason; Knights of 
Pythias, Chancellor Commander, 1916-1917; Odd Fellows; Moose. 
Baptist; teacher Young Men's Class. Married Miss Sallie Ram- 
sey Ivey, March 26, 1915. Address: Lenoir, N. C. 



ALLEN CAULAIN ZOLLICOFFER 

(Fourth District — Counties: Edgecombe and Halifax. Two 
Senators.) 

Allen Caulain Zollicoffer, Democrat, Senator from the Fourth 
Senatorial District, was born in Northampton County, January 
18, 1893. Son of Dr. Dallas B. and Kate (Thomas) Zollicoffer. 
Attended Weldon graded schools, 1900-1909; Warrenton High 
School, 1909-1912; University of North Carolina, class of 1916; 
University Law School, 1915-1916; Wake Forest College Summer 
Law Course, 1917; Blackstone's Old Inns Court, London, England, 
1919. Lawyer. Chairman Halifax County Democratic Executive 
Committee, 1926-1930. Ambulance driver, 318th Ambulance Com- 
pany, 80th Division, 1917-1918. Mason; Knights Templar; Shrine; 
Delta Kappa Epsilon. Delegate from Beta Chapter, D. K. E., 
University of North Carolina, to National Convention at World's 
Exposition, San Francisco, July, 1915. Methodist. Lay leader and 
Steward, 1922-1928. Married Miss Jennie Mann Clarke, Novem- 
ber 18, 1925. Address: Rosemary, N. C. 



Representatives in General Assembly 187 
representatives 



WILLIS SMITH 

SPEAKER 

Willis Smith, Democrat, Representative from Wake County, 
was born in Norfolk, Virginia, December 19, 1887. Son of Willis 
and Mary (Creecy) Smith. Attended Atlantic Collegiate Insti- 
tute, Elizabeth City; A.B., Trinity College, 1910; studied law at 
Trinity, 1910-1912. Lawyer. Member Wake County Bar Asso- 
ciation, North Carolina Bar Association, American Bar Asso- 
ciation and Commercial Law League. Inheritance Tax Attorney 
for North Carolina, 1916-1919. Private, Company 16, C. B., C. 
A. C, Fortress Monroe, 1918. Member General Assembly, 1927 
and 1929. Methodist. Married Miss Anna Lee, April 30, 1919. 
Address: Smith & Joyner, Lawyers, Raleigh, N. C. 



CLAUDE WILLIAM ALLEN 

Claude William Allen, Democrat, Representative from Gran- 
ville County, was born in that county, December 6, 1895. Son 
of Glandiers L. and Emma (Bragg) Allen. Attended Creed- 
more High School, 1910-1914. Farmer. President Granville 
County Board of Agriculture. Private, Medical Department, 
130th Division, March 23, 1918-January 10, 1919; overseas seven 
months, captured and wounded. Junior Order United American 
Mechanics, Secretary, 1920-1925; Councilor, 1927. Baptist; Chair- 
man Board of Deacons, 1926-1931. Married Miss Mary Norwood, 
October 4, 1924. Address: Creedmore, N. C. 



ROBERT PHILEMON BENDER 

Robert P. Bender, Democrat, Representative from Jones 
County, was born in Jones County, near Pollocksville. Son of 
Bryan and Lucy H. (Tolson) Bender. Attended Pollocksville 
High School, 1911-1914; University of North Carolina Law 
School, 1914-1915. Lawyer. Member Jones County Board of 
Education, 1920-1926; member Jones County Democratic Execu- 
tive Committee, 1918-1930; City Attorney, town of Pollocksville, 



188 Biographical Sketches 

1924-1930. Permanent member Legal Advisory Board for Jones 
County during World War. Chairman Jones County Young Peo- 
ple's Democratic Clubs, 1928-1930. Woodman of the World, Clerk 
of Camp No. 184, Pollocksville, 1916-1930. Presbyterian; Deacon, 
1915-1924; Elder since 1924; President Jones County Sunday 
School Association, 1927-1930. Representative in the General As- 
sembly of 1929. Married Miss Mary McGee Edwards, September 
19, 1917. Two sons, Robert P., Jr., 12, and James Virgil, age 9. 
Address: Pollocksville, N. C. 



HUGH NELSON BINFORD 

Hugh Nelson Binford, Democrat, Representative from Rock- 
ingham County, was born at Cascade, Pittsylvania County, Vir- 
ginia. Son of Dr. Walter Lee and Nannie (Page) Binford. 
Taught at home by mother and private teacher. Merchant, 
tobacconist and real estate dealer. Presbyterian; Elder. Married 
Miss Dora Cahill (now deceased), November 24, 1888. Address: 
Madison, N. C. 



SAMUEL BLACK 

Samuel Black, Democrat, Representative from Cabarrus 
County, was born in that county, January 24, 1875. Son of John 
M. and Sarah (Erwin) Black. Attended Mooresville High School, 
1889-1892. Farmer and merchant. Justice of the Peace, 1900- 
1918. Representative in the General Assemblies of 1925, 1927 
and 1929. Presbyterian; Elder; Sunday School Superintendent 
since 1913. Address: Harrisburg, N. C, R. 2. 



J. JACKSON BRINSON 

J. Jackson Brinson, Republican, Representative from Pamlico 
County, was born at Arapahoe, N. C. Son of G. C. and Pherebe 
Martin. Attended public schools; Farmville Institute, 1884-1885. 
Farmer. County Commissioner, Pamlico County. Member General 
Assembly, 1907. Member Charitable Brotherhood. Christian. 
Chairman Board of Elders and Deacons. Married Miss Kate 
Pipkin, February 9, 1890. Address: Grantsboro, N. C. 



Representatives in General Assembly 189 

CHARLES LEON BRADDY 

Charles Leon Braddy, Democrat, Representative from Bladen 
County, was born at Council, January 5, 1886. Son of Capt. K. J. 
and Anna Jane (Stevens) Braddy. Attended Coharie High 
School, Clarkton Military School and Nixon Commercial College, 
Austin, Texas. Farmer and stock raiser. Mason. Presbyterian. 
Married Miss Ruby Johnston, March 28, 1929. Address: Council, 
N. C. 



EUGENE CLYDE BROOKS, JR. 

Eugene C. Brooks, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Dur- 
ham County, was born in Monroe, N. C, January 31, 1903. Son 
of Eugene Clyde and Ida (Sapp) Brooks. Attended Durham 
High School, 1916-1919; Virginia Military Institute, 1920; A.B., 
Trinity College, 1923. Attended Duke University Law School, 
1923-1924; University Summer Law School, 1924, and Harvard 
Law School, 1924-1925. Lawyer. Member American Business 
Club. Private, Virginia National Guard. Director of Publicity 
of the North Carolina Child Welfare Commission, 1923-1924. 
Kappa Alpha College Fraternity. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1929. Methodist. Married Miss Ruth White, June 
11, 1928. Address: Durham, N. C. 



WILLIAM THOMAS BROWN 

William Thomas Brown, Democrat, Representative from Per- 
quimans County, was born in Bertie County, November 1, 1878. 
Son of William J. and Sarah E. (Lewis) Brown. Attended 
Windsor Academy. Traveling salesman. Mason. Episcopalian. 
Married Miss Mary E. Picard, November 15, 1916. Address: 
Hertford, N. C. 



THOMAS WADE BRUTON 

Thomas Wade Bruton, Democrat, Representative from Mont- 
gomery County, was born at Capelsie, N. C, September 10, 1902. 
Son of David Dudley and Susan Eleanor (Wade) Bruton. At- 
tended Biscoe High School, 1915-1919; Trinity College, 1919-1921, 



190 Biographical Sketches 

pre-medical ; A.B., Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Va., 
1921-1925; Duke University Law School, 1925-1927. Lawyer. 
U. S. R. O. T. C, 1921-1925. Commissioned Second Lieutenant 
Cav. Res., June, 1925, 309 Cav., 63rd Div., U. S. A.; active duty 
training, Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., July, 1926 and 1929; First Lieu- 
tenant Calvary Reserves, 1929. Member Kappa Sigma Fratern- 
ity, Eta Prime Chapter, Duke University. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1929. Methodist. Married Marion Sheppard 
Piatt, daughter of William McKinney and Marion Sheppard Piatt 
of Durham, N. C, February 1, 1928. Address: Troy, N. C. 



WILLIAM OLIN BURGIN 

William Olin Burgin, Democrat, Representative from David- 
son County, was born at Marion, July 28, 1877. Son of Merrett 
and Mary Elizabeth (Smith) Burgin. Attended the Rutherford- 
ton Military Institute, 1900-1903; University Law School, 1904. 
Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association. Trust Officer 
Bank of Lexington; President Industrial Bank of Lexington; 
President Carolina Panel Co.; Director Bank of Lexington, In- 
dustrial B. & L. Association, and Industrial Corporation. Mayor 
of Thomasville, 1908-1909. County Attorney, 1922-1928. Captain, 
Co. "L", N. C. National Guard, Thomasville, 1909. Member and 
President, 1928, Thomasville Rotary Club. Mason; Jr. O. U. 
A. M.; Knights of Pythias. Methodist. Member Board of Stew- 
ards; Teacher Wesley Bible Class ten years. Married Miss Edith 
Leigh Greer, December 12, 1912. Address: Lexington, N. C. 



ALGERNON LEE BUTLER 

Algernon Lee Butler, Republican, Representative from Samp- 
son County, was born in Clinton, August 2, 1905. Son of George 
Edwin and Eva Boykin (Lee) Butler. Attended Clinton High 
School; Trinity College, 1924; University of North Carolina, 
1924-1928; University Law School, 1926-1928. Member North 
Carolina Bar Association; member Clinton Rotary Club; Sigma 
Nu (college fraternity). Episcopalian; Superintendent Sunday 
School, 1921-1924; Senior Warden of the Vestry, 1930. Author 



Representatives in General Assembly 191 

of articles in the North Carolina Law Review, 1928, and of 
"The South Interviews Herself," published in the Carolina Maga- 
zine, 1926. Associate Editor North Carolina Law Review, 1928. 
Winner of the Hill Law Review Prize for contributions to the 
North Carolina Law Review. Address: Clinton, N. C. 



ROBERT GREGG CHERRY 

Robert Gregg Cherry, Democrat, Representative from Gaston 
County, was born in York County, S. C, October 17, 1891. Son of 
Chancellor LaFayette and Hattie E. (Davis) Cherry. Attended 
Gastonia graded schools, 1900-1908; A.B., Duke University, 1912; 
Duke University Law School, 1913-1914. Lawyer. Member Gaston 
County Bar Association, North Carolina Bar Association, Ameri- 
can Bar Association and Kiwanis Club. Mayor of Gastonia, 1919- 
1921. Captain, Co. "A", Machine Gun Battalion, 30th Division, 
April 26, 1917, to April 15, 1919; Major, 120th N. C. National 
Guard, 1920-1921. Member Gastonia Lodge No. 369, Ancient Free 
& Accepted Masons; Knights Templar; Royal Arch Masons; 
Oasis Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. Shrine; Knights of Pythias, 
Knights of Khorassan; Improved Order of Red Men; Jr. O. U. 
A. M. ; I. O. O. F.; Sons Confederate Veterans; American 
Legion, State Commander, 1928-1929. Methodist. Married Miss 
Mildred Stafford, 1921. Address: Gastonia, N. C. 



EDGAR BURGESS CLOUD 

Edgar Burgess Cloud, Democrat, Representative from Polk 
County, was born at Columbus, February 22, 1872. Educated in 
public schools; Summer Law School, Wake Forest College, 1905. 
Lawyer. State Senator, 1915 and 1919. Several times mayor 
of Columbus; number of years director Polk County Bank and 
Trust Company. Knights of Pythias, having filled the office of 
Chancellor Commander and Prelate in the local lodge. Presby- 
terian; Deacon for many years. County Attorney for Polk 
County. Chairman Polk County Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee. Married Miss Ada Walker, April 19, 1914. Address: 
Columbus, N. C. 



192 Biographical Sketches 

orus reid coffield 

Orus Reid Coffield, Democrat, Representative from Rutherford 
County, was born in Apex, December 3, 1876. Son of Robert 
P. and Henrietta (Betts) Coffield. Attended Apex High School. 
Station Agent and Operator. Member Chamber Commerce; Mayor 
Ellenboro fifteen years; Chairman School Board twenty years. 
Mason; Shriner; Jr. O. U. A. M. ; Knights of Pythias; District 
Deputy, K. of P., 1906-1907; 1927-1931. Presbyterian; Elder. 
Married Miss Ada Mae Martin, January 15, 1906. Address: 
Ellenboro, N. C. 



HENRY GROVES CONNOR 

Henry G. Connor, Democrat, Representative from Wilson 
County, was born at Wilson, July 19, 1876. Son of Henry 
Groves and Kate (Whitfield) Connor. Was educated at Wilson 
graded schools; private schools in Wilson; B.S., University of 
North Carolina, 1897; Law School, University of North Caro- 
lina, 1898. Lawyer. Chairman County Democratic Executive 
Committee; Delegate National Democratic Convention, 1916 and 
1924. Sigma Alpha Epsilon (college fraternity). Member of the 
State Senate, 1919; House of Representatives, 1921, 1923, 1925 
and 1927. Married Miss Elizabeth Clark, April 17, 1901. Ad- 
dress: Wilson, N. C. 



ROBERT MARTIN COX 

Robert Martin Cox, Democrat, Representative from Forsyth 
County, was born in that county, July 9, 1876. Son of Romulus 
L. and Susan E. (Barrow) Cox. Farmer. Representative in the 
General Asembly, 1907, 1917, 1919, 1921, 1923, 1925, 1927 and 
1929. Methodist Protestant. Married, 1917, Miss Lillian Miller. 
Two children. Address: Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Representatives in General Assembly 193 
thomas augustus cox 

Thomas Augustus Cox, Democrat, Representative from Jack- 
son County, was born in Greenville, S. C, August 19, 1863. Son 
of Thomas Mason and Hannah Julia (Skinner) Cox. Attended 
Peabody School, Greenville, S. C, 1870-1872; W. Christy Ben- 
nett's Private School, 1873; Phillip P. Mazycks' Private School 
and Furman University, 1874-1879; W. B. Hall Training School, 
Baltimore, 1880; Cooper Institute Night School, 1883. Civil 
engineer and surveyor. Member Sylva Chamber of Com- 
merce, President, 1929-1930; Director Jackson County Bank 
and Secretary 15 years; Director and Trustee Cullowhee Mining 
and Reduction Co.; Chairman Jackson County Highway Com- 
mission, 1921-1923; Jackson County Jury Commission, 1919-1923. 
State Senator, 1911. Episcopalian. Married Miss Cora Kate 
Davies, at Cullowhee, St. Davids Church, 1887. Address: Cullo- 
whee, N. C. 



HUGH A. CRANOR 

Hugh A. Cranor, Democrat, Representative from Wilkes 
County, was born in that county. Son of John S. and Sarah 
(Taylor) Cranor. Attended Wilkes County Schools; University 
of North Carolina; Wake Forest College. Lawyer. President 
Wilkes County Bar Association; member North Carolina Bar 
Association"; Mayor Wilkesboro, 1911-1932; public administrator. 
Master and Past Master Liberty Lodge No. 45, A. F. & A. M.; 
Knights of Pythias; Jr. O. U. A. M. Married Miss Jennie 
Hackett, June 26, 1907. Four children. Address: Wilkesboro, 
N. C. 



RUSH FLOYD CROUSE 

Rush Floyd Crouse, Democrat, Representative from Alle- 
ghany County, was born in Sparta, July 5, 1892. Son of Floyd 
and Ellen (Gamble) Crouse. Attended Elk Creek Training 
School, Elk Creek, Va.; Weaver College, 1909-1912; University 
of North Carolina, 1912-1916, A.B.; Harvard Law School, 191H- 
1922, LL.B., 1922. Lawyer. Second Lieutenant, Air Service, in 
France one year during World War. Mason. Address: Sparta, 
N. C. 



194 Biographical Sketches 

JOHN BODDIE CRUDUP 

John Boddie Crudup, Democrat, Representative from Vance 
County, was born at Kittrell, February 5, 1902. Son of Thomas 
Henry and Mary Pender (Coffield) Crudup. Attended Evanston, 
Illinois, Township High School, 1917-1918; Raleigh High School, 
1918-1920; U. S. Naval Academy, 1920-1922; A.B., University 
of North Carolina, 1922-1925; University Law School, 1925- 
1927. Lawyer. Sigma Alpha Epsilon social fraternity. Member 
House of Representatives, 1929. Episcopalian. Address: Hen- 
derson, N. C. 



GEORGE E. DAVIS 

George E. Davis, Democrat, Representative from Hyde 
County, was born in Engelhard in 1870. Son of Thomas M. and 
Eliza J. (Sanderson) Davis. Attended private and public schools, 
1879-1888. Farmer. Sheriff of Hyde County, 1912-1917. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly in 1923, 1925 and 1929. 
Methodist. Married Miss Orpha Credle, January 6, 1904. Ad- 
dress: Lake Landing, N. C. 



JOHN SHAKESPEARE DAVIS 

John Shakespeare Davis, Democrat, Representative from War- 
ren County, was born in that County, August 19, 1871. Son of 
James A. and Mary (Cheek) Davis. Attended County Schools, 
1878-1885. Farmer. Member Warren County Board of Education, 
1917-1918. Representative in the General Asembly of 1919. Bap- 
tist; Superintendent Sunday School, 1896-1899. Married Miss 
Mamie Allen Davis, February 8, 1893. Address: Creek, N. C. 



ROBERT BURNS DAVIS 

Robert Burns Davis, Democrat, Representative from Edge- 
combe County, was born in Wilmington, September 24, 1872. 
Son of Robert B. and Cornelia J. (Nixon) Davis. Attended 
Highland Academy, Hickory, N. C, 1881-1885. Insurance; real 
estate; Building and Loan; banking. Chairman Rocky Mount 



Representatives in General Assembly 195 

Unit North Carolina Industrial Bank; secretary and treasurer 
Rocky Mount Homestead and Loan Association; vice-president 
and general manager Rocky Mount Insurance and Realty Co.; 
director North Carolina Bank and Trust Co., Carolina Telephone 
and Telegraph Company, and N. C. Joint Stock Land Bank; 
ex-president Chamber Commerce and Merchants' Association; 
cashier First National Bank of Rocky Mount, 1909-1919; ex- 
president Rotary Club; member Rocky Mount Board of Alder- 
men, 1920-1924; County Commissioner, Edgecombe County, 1926- 
1928. Mason. Episcopalian; ex-member Vestry. Married Miss 
Annie Lee Bunn, October 14, 1909. Address: Rocky Mount, N. C. 



NERE ELEXUS DAY 

Nere Elexus Day, Democrat, Representative from Onslow 
County, was born in Boone, May 9, 1889. Son of Jesse J. and 
Rebecca (Cook) Day. Attended Appalachian Training School, 
1903-1905; Crescent Academy, Rowan County, 1905-1906; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1906-1907; University Law School, 
1909-1910. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association; 
member State Democratic Executive Committee, 1926-1930. Army 
Field Clerk, 1918-1919, stationed at Port of Embarkation, New- 
port News, Va., during World War; American Legion. Method- 
ist; Steward, 1924-1931. Married Miss Christine Sylvester, Rich- 
lands, N. C, November 19, 1915. Two boys, Sylvester, and Nei'e, 
Jr., ages ten and eight. Address: Jacksonville, N. C. 



JAMES DeHART 

James DeHart, Democrat, Representative from Swain County, 
was born in that county, December 30, 1873. Son of William 
Joseph and Eliza (Gibson) DeHart. Attended schools of Bryson 
City; University of Nashville (collegiate and medical), with M.D. 
degree. Physician. County Physician, Swain County. Alderman. 
Mason; Woodman. Member General Asembly of 1923. Baptist; 
Deacon. Married Miss Emma Jane May, February 15, 1906. One 
daughter, Gladys Jane DeHart. Address: Bryson City, N. C. 



196 Biographical Sketches 

♦john henry dillard 

John H. Dillard, Democrat, Representative from Cherokee 
County, was born in Rockingham County, June 17, 1862. Son of 
John Henry and Anne I. (Martin) Dillard. Taught by governess 
in home until 1868; attended Miss Lina Porter's School, Greens- 
boro, until 1875; Finley High School, Lenoir, 1876; Smith's 
Academy, Leaksville, 1877-1878; University of North Carolina, 
member class of 1881, but did not graduate. Studied law under 
Judge R. P. Dick and Judge John H. Dillard, 1879-1883. Lawyer. 
Mason; Senior Warden Greensboro Lodge No. 76, A. F. & A. M. ; 
Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias, having filled all offices in the 
last two. Representative in the General Assembly of 1911 and 
1923. Mayor of Murphy, 1921-1922. Lieutenant in National 
Guard, 1880-1882. Presbyterian; Elder for thirty years. Mar- 
ried Miss Dixie King, August 19, 1888. Address: Murphy, N. C. 



WILBUR RANDALL DOSHER 

Wilbur Randall Dosher, Democrat, Representative from New 
Hanover County, was born in Southport, September 22, 1881. Son 
of William Sterling and Mary Martha (Price) Dosher. Attended 
public schools of Wilmington. Plumbing and heating contractor. 
Member National Association Master Plumbers, Secretary, 1925- 
1926; Director, 1929-1930; President North Carolina Association 
Master Plumbers, 1913; Vice-Chairman New Hanover County 
Commissioners, 1920-1930. Second Lieutenant, Co. "C", 115th 
Machine Gun Battery, 30th Division, World War. A. F. and 
A. M., St. John's Lodge No. 1; Wilmington Lodge of Elks; 
Sudan Shiine Temple, Drum Major, Drum Corps. Methodist; 
Steward twenty-five years; Choir Director fifteen years; Presi- 
dent Men's Bible Class seven years. Married Miss Frances A. 
Gardner, June 26, 1907. Address: Wilmington, N. C. 



HENRY BARRY EDWARDS 

Henry Barry Edwards, Democrat, Representative from Cleve- 
land County, was born in Scotland Neck, February 14, 1904. 
Son of John Burton and Ella (Harrington) Edwards. Attended 



Died February 11, 1931. 



Representatives in General Assembly 197 

Scotland Neck schools; graduated, 1921; A.B., Wake Forest Col- 
lege, 1925. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association, 
Cleveland County Bar Association and Commercial Law League 
of America. Member Cleveland Lodge No. 202, A. F. & A. M.; 
Jr. O. U. A. M.; Kiwanis Club. Baptist; Deacon, 1930. Married 
Miss Jewel Pritchard Askew, July 1, 1927. Address: Shelby, 
N. C. 



SAMUEL JAMES ERVIN, Jr. 

S. J. Ervin, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Burke County, 
was born at Morganton, September 27, 1896. Son of Samuel 
James and Laura (Powe) Ervin. Graduated from University of 
North Carolina with A.B. degree, 1917, and from Harvard Uni- 
versity with LL.B. degree, 1922. Admitted to bar, 1919. Lawyer. 
Served in France with First Division for eighteen months in 
World War and cited for gallantry in action and twice wounded 
in battle. First Lieutenant in North Carolina National Guard 
and United States Officers Reserve Corps, 1924-1926, serving 
with Company "B", 105th Engineers, North Carolina National 
Guard. Chairman Burke County Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee, 1924. Chairman Democratic World War Veterans' 9th 
Congressional District, 1928; member State Democratic Executive 
Committee, 1930. Representative from Burke County in General 
Assemblies of 1923 and 1925. County Attorney, 1926-1928; mem- 
ber of Board of Trustees of the Morganton graded schools, 1927- 
1930, being Chairman thereof in 1929-1930. Deacon in Presby- 
terian Church. Member of the Morganton Kiwanis Club, North 
Carolina Bar Association, Harvard Law School Association, State 
Literary and Historical Association, Society of Mayflower De- 
scendants in the State of North Carolina, American Legion, 
Masons, Royal Arch Masons, Knights Templar, Scottish Rite 
Masons, Pythians, Dokies, Patriotic Order Sons of America, and 
Junior Order. Author, "A Colonial History of Rowan County, 
North Carolina." Married Miss Margaret Bell of Concord, June 
18, 1924. One son, Samuel James Ervin, 3rd. Address: Morgan- 
ton, N. C. 



198 Biographical Sketches 

robert bruce etheridge 

Robert Bruce Etheridge, Democrat, Representative from Dare 
County, was born at Manteo, July 31, 1878. Son of Van Buren 
and Matilda Etheridge. Attended public schools of Manteo and 
Atlantic Collegiate Institute, Elizabeth City; A.B., Trinity Col- 
lege (now Duke University), 1899. Cashier Bank of Manteo. 
General Insurance. Clerk Superior Court, Dare County; Superin- 
tendent of Schools; member State Executive Committee, 1928; 
Postmaster, Manteo, 1914-1922; County Chairman Democratic 
Executive Committee. State Senator from Second District, 1907; 
Representative in General Assembly, 1929. Mason, Treasurer Ma- 
sonic Lodge about seven years; Junior Order; Woodmen of 
America; Kappa Sigma (college fraternity). Married Miss Eliza- 
beth Webb, April 22, 1908. Address: Manteo, N. C. 



JOHN EWBANK 

John Ewbank, Democrat, Representative from Henderson 
County, was born in that county. Son of Ernest Lucas and 
Amelie Virginia (Wyttenbach) Ewbank. Attended public schools; 
Charleston University School, 1903-1904; Wake Forest Law 
School. Lawyer and farmer. Editor and publisher Western 
North Carolina Times, 1921-1924. Member County Road Com- 
mission, 1924-1927. Knights of Pythias. Episcopalian; Vestry- 
man; Sunday School Superintendent. Married Miss Grace Schaef- 
fer, June 1, 1921. Address: Hendersonville, N. C. 



WALL CHRISTIAN EWING 

Wall Christian Ewing, Democrat, Representative from Cum- 
berland County, was born at Mount Gilead, N. C, April 3, 1891. 
Son of Dr. Joseph Preston and Sallie Hearne (Christian) Ewing. 
Attended Donaldson Military School, Fayetteville, N. C, 1907; 
The Citadel (South Carolina Military Academy), 1910. Farmer; 
manufacturer of fertilizers. Member Cumberland County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, 1916-1922; Chairman Cumberland 
County Board of Elections, 1922-1928; member State Democratic 



Representatives in General Assembly 199 

Executive Committee since 1924; member State Board of Con- 
servation and Development. Mason; Elk. Presbyterian. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly, 1929. Married Miss Douglas 
Southerland, May 14, 1920. Address: Fayetteville, N. C. 



EDWARD GASKILL FLANAGAN 

Edward G. Flanagan, Democrat, Representative from Pitt 
County, was born in Greenville, December 3, 1875. Son of John 
and Mary W. (Gaskill) Flanagan. Attended Greenville High 
School. President Greenville Banking and Trust Co., Armistead 
Motor Co., and Pitt Development Co.; Director Wachovia Bank 
and Trust Co., Occidental Life Insurance Co., and Jos. R. Wil- 
liamson, Inc. Member Board of Trustees East Carolina Teachers' 
College and Chairman Building Committee; member Board of 
Trustees Greenville graded schools. Owner and General Manager 
John Flanagan Buggy Company. Odd Fellows; Knights of 
Pythias, twice Chancellor Commander local lodge. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1927 and 1929. Married 
Miss Rosa M. Hooker, October 18, 1927. Address: Greenville, 
N. C. 



RAIFORD THOMAS FULGHUM 

Raiford Thomas Fulghum, Democrat, Representative from 
Johnston County, was born in Wilson County, February 16, 1881. 
Son of James Henry and Lenora (Boykin) Fulghum. Studied 
pharmacy at the University of North Carolina. Formerly public 
school teacher. Druggist. Member Lions Club. Mason; Junior 
Order American Mechanics; Shriner. Methodist. Married Miss 
Nina Darden, November 14, 1912. Address: Kenly, N. C. 



JOE GARIBALDI 

Joe Garibaldi, Democrat, Representative from Mecklenburg 
County, was born in Charlotte, July 15, 1865. Son of John and 
Louisa Garibaldi. Attended Charlotte High School and Capt. 
Burrier's Military School. Jeweler (retired). Member Chamber 



200 Biographical Sketches 

Commerce; Rotary Club; Director Charlotte National Bank; 
member Governing Board St. Peter's Hospital; President Gov- 
erning Board Salvation Army; City Commissioner, Charlotte, 
eight years; member State Guard and Hornet's Nest Riflemen 
ten years. Knights of Pythias. Episcopalian. Married Miss 
Edna Dunklin. Address: Charlotte, N. C. 



SAMUEL MALLET GATTIS, Jr. 

Samuel Mallet Gattis, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Orange County, was born in Hillsboro, August 22, 1891. Son of 
Samuel Mallet and Margaret (Parish) Gattis. Attended War- 
renton High School, 1907-1908; University of North Carolina, 
A.B., 1912; University Law School, 1913-1914. Lawyer. Member 
North Carolina Bar. Asociation; Hillsboro Chamber of Commerce. 
Lieutenant U. S. Army, April, 1917, to October, 1919. Mason; 
Master Hillsboro Lodge, 1928. Methodist. Married Miss Vir- 
ginia Parris, January 7, 1921. Address: Hillsboro, N. C. 



GLADSTONE DAUGHTRY GATLING 

Gladstone Daughtry Gatling, Democrat, Representative from 
Gates County, was born in Gates, April 27, 1880. Son of Rid- 
dick and Penina (Willey) Gatling. Atttended private schools, 
1887-1892; Reynoldson Academy, 1894-1896. Farmer. Member 
Board of Education and Tax Supervisor, Gates County. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly, 1913 and 1915. Mason, Wor- 
shipful Master, 1910-1918. Episcopalian; Senior Warden. Mar- 
ried Miss Lillian Baxter Harrill, October 7, 1914. Four children. 
Member Four-Minute Men during World War. Address: Gates, 
N. C. 



ARCHIBALD CREE GAY 

Archibald C. Gay, Democrat, Representative from North- 
ampton County, was born in Jackson, Northampton County, Aug- 
ust 20, 1894. Son of Benjamin S. and Annie (Odom) Gay. 
Finished Jackson High School, 1911, and Warrenton High 



Representatives in General Assembly 201 

School, 1912; attended University of North Carolina; Wake 
Forest College; Wake Forest Law School, 1917-1918. Lawyer. 
Member North Carolina Bar Association and the American Bar 
Association. Mayor of Jackson, 1920-1922; County Attorney for 
Northampton County; Director Bank of Northampton. Corporal 
U. S. Army fourteen months during World War; twelve months 
service in France; entered Army April 26, 1918, discharged June 
26, 1919. Mason; Junior Order; Shriner, Sudan Temple; mem- 
ber Kiwanis Club. Baptist. Superintendent Sunday School : Dea- 
con. State Senator, 1929. Married Miss Ruth May Gee, June 7, 
1922. One child. Address: Jackson, N. C. 



EDWIN MAURICE GILL 

Edwin Maurice Gill, Democrat, Representative from Scotland 
County, was born at Laurinburg, July 20, 1899. Son of Thomas 
Jeffries and Mamie Spann (North) Gill. Graduated Laurinbui'g 
High School; attended Duke University Law School. Lawyer. 
Sigma Nu Phi (legal fraternity). Executive Secretary of the 
North Carolina Young People's Democratic organization. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1929. Methodist. Address: 
Laurinburg, N. C. 



ERNEST GRAHAM 

Ernest Graham, Democrat, Representative from Robeson 
County, was born in Red Springs, February 5, 1891. Son of 
Daniel McN. and Maggie (McGirt) Graham. Attended Red 
Springs schools; Davidson College, two years; graduated Oak 
Ridge Institute. Merchant and farmer. Mayor Red Springs, 
1921-1922; Chairman Red Springs School Board, 1921-1930; mem- 
ber Board of Trustees Flora McDonald College, 1925-1930; Di- 
rector Bank, 1924-1927; Manager Graham Company, 1919-1930; 
President Red Springs Rotary Club, 1930. Mason; Scottish Rite; 
Shriner; Knights of Pythias. Private, World War, 1918. Pres- 
byterian; Elder, 1922-1930. Married Miss Carrie Belle McNeill, 
April 10, 1918. Address: Red Springs, N. C. 



202 Biographical Sketches 

roby thomas greer 

Roby Thomas Greer, Democrat, Representative from Watauga 
County, was born in that county, February 16, 1889. Son of 
Thomas Frankling and Mary (Carlton) Greer. Attended Wa- 
tauga Academy and Appalachian Training School, 1903-1907; 
University of North Carolina. Farmer and stock raiser. Chair- 
man Board of County Commissioners, 1926-1930. Address, Blow- 
ing Rock, N. C. 



JAMES ALONZO GROVES 

James Alonzo Groves, Democrat, Representative from Stanly 
County, was born in Lowell, N. C, November 26, 1873. Son of 
Robert Alexander and Margaret Lawing (Waddell) Groves. Cot- 
ton manufacturer. Methodist. Married Miss Nellie Hearne, 1924. 
Address: Albemarle, N. C. 



JOHN L. GWALTNEY 

John L. Gwaltney, Democrat, Representative from Alexander 
County, was born in Alexander County. Son of James and 
Clarinda (Stephenson) Gwaltney. Attended Cedar Run Academy, 
1867-1868; Rutherford College, 1869-1873; studied law in a pri- 
vate school. Lawyer. Local counsel for Southern Railroad for 
ten years; County Attorney six years; Attorney for Taylors- 
ville eight years; Register of Deeds six years; member Board of 
Education two years; City Alderman two years; Director of the 
Penitentiary during Aycock's administration, four years; teacher 
fifteen years. Representative in the General Assembly of 1927. 
Mason; Eastern Star; Junior Order United American Mechanics, 
Master of Lodge, Secretary; District Deputy Grand Master; 
Worthy Patron Eastern Star; Councillor Junior Order. Baptist; 
Deacon twenty years; Moderator Alexander County Association, 
sixteen years. Married Miss Emma Connally, March 12, 1876. 
Address: Taylorsville, N. C. 



Representatives in General Assembly 203 
nathan hunt gwyn 

Nathan Hunt Gwyn, Democrat, Representative from Caldwell 
County, was born at Yadkin Valley, May 3, 1892. Son of Na- 
than Hunt and Mary (Moore) Gwyn. Attended Lenoir City 
Schools; Trinity Park School, Durham, 1910-1911. Automobile 
dealer. Married Miss Alice E. Courtney, February 19, 1921. 
Address: Lenoir, N. C. 



WILLIAM IRA HALSTEAD 

William I. Halstead, Democrat, Representative from Camden 
County, was born in that county, September 16, 1878. Son of 
Lemuel H. and Laura V. (Lamb) Halstead. Attended Elizabeth 
City Academy, 1893; LL.B., Wake Forest College, 1909. Lawyer. 
County Attorney. Mason; Red Men; Modern Woodmen of the 
World; Past Master Mason. Delegate to Grand Camp, St. Louis, 
1921, and Secretary New Lebanon Lodge. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1929. Methodist; Steward. Married Miss 
Pauline Jacobs, May 10, 1903. Address: South Mills, N. C. 



LUTHER HAMILTON 

Luther Hamilton, Democrat, Representative from Carteret 
County, was born at Atlantic, February 20, 1894. Son of Samuel 
E. and Rebecca (Fulcher) Hamilton. Attended Oak Ridge Insti- 
tute, 1910-1911; University of North Carolina, 1911-1915; Uni- 
versity Law School, 1914-1915. Lawyer. State Senator, 1921 
Mayor Morehead City, 1924-1929; County Attorney, 1924-1928. 
Commissioned Second Lieutenant at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., 1917; 
assigned to Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas, with 34th Infantry, 
eight months; thence overseas; twenty-three months' service. 
Mason; Ocean Lodge No. 405, Morehead City; Sudan Temple 
(Shrine), New Bern. Methodist; Steward and teacher Baraca 
Class since 1916. Married Miss Marie Long, July 6, 1918. Ad- 
dress: Morehead City, N. C. 



204 Biographical Sketches 

robert march hanes 

Robert March Hanes, Democrat, Representative from Forsyth 
County, was born in Winston-Salem, N. C, September 22, 1890. 
Son of John W. and Anna (Hodgin) Hanes. Attended Winston- 
Salem High School, 1901-1905; Woodberry Forest, 1905-1906; 
A.B., University of North Carolina, 1912; graduate School of 
Business Administration, Harvard University, 1913. Major, A. 
E. F., 1917-1919. Banker. Methodist. Representative in the Gen- 
eral Assembly of 1929. Married Miss Mildred Borden, 1917. Ad- 
dress: Winston-Salem, N. C. 



REGINALD LEE HARRIS 

Reginald Lee Harris, Democrat, Representative from Person 
County, was born in Roxboro, September 9, 1890. Son of Wil- 
liam H. and Rosa Lee (Jordan) Harris. Attended Virginia Mili- 
tary Institute. Cotton manufacturer. Member House of Repre- 
sentatives, 1927 and 1929. Member Educational Commission, 1930. 
Roxboro Rotary Club. Methodist. Kappa Alpha Fraternity. Mar- 
ried Miss Katherine Long, December 10, 1913. Address: Rox- 
boro, N. C. 



CALEB HILL HAYNES 

Caleb H. Haynes, Democrat, Representative from Surry 
County, was born near Mount Airy, April 16, 1863. Son of 
Caleb H. and Margaret (Davis) Haynes. Attended country free 
school and Mount Airy Male Academy. Real estate dealer. Mem- 
ber Kiwanis Club; Director Bank of Mount Airy ten years. 
Elected Register of Deeds, 1892, 1894; Clerk Superior Court, 
1898, 1902; elected sheriff, 1908, 1910, 1922, 1924 and 1926; 
elected Alderman, 1898; Chairman County Democratic Executive 
Committee, 1908; State Democratic Committee, 1908, served six 
years; Delegate to National Democratic Convention, 1912; mem- 
ber Mount Airy School Board, 1915-1918. Appointed Deputy 
Collector Internal Revenue, September, 1913; promoted to Field 
Deputy, Western District, 1918, headquarters Statesville, holding 
said position until consolidation of the districts. Appointed by 



Representatives in General Assembly 205 

J. W. Bailey Chief Field Deputy, holding said position until 1921. 
Appointed Deputy State Tax Supervisor under A. D. Watts, 
January, 1922; resigned December, 1922. Elected to the 1931 
General Assembly by a majority of 2,461. Mason; Lodge No. 
322. Baptist. Married Miss Lizzie Bunker, January 10, 1889. 
Address: Mount Airy, N. C. 



T. L. A. HELMS 

T. L. A. Helms, Democrat, Representative from Union 
County, was born near Monroe, January 25, 1857. Son of Joseph 
and Frances A. (McLarty) Helms. Attended public schools in 
county and Monroe High School about 1878. Farmer. Mayor 
of Unionville, 1916-1918. Magistrate, 1919. Mayor of Benton 
Heights, 1926; Corporal in the State Guard, 1878. Representative 
in the General Assembly of 1927. Methodist; Steward; Sunday 
School Superintendent, 1896-1919. Married Miss Ellie Caldwell, 
1885. Address: Monroe, N. C. 



WILLIAM MARSH HENRY 

William Marsh Henry, Democrat, Representative from Tran- 
sylvania County, was born in Henderson County, August 3, 1867. 
Son of William Blythe and Atilla Delilah (Brittain) Henry. At- 
tended public schools of Transylvania County; Rutherford Col- 
lege, Connelly Springs, 1886-1888. Farmer. Register of Deeds, 
1898-1904; County Commissioner, 1906-1910; Mayor Brevard, 
1911-1913; Postmaster, 1915-1923; Alderman, 1925-1930. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1905. Member Dunns Rock 
Lodge No. 267, A. F. & A. M., Brevard; Jr. O. U. A. M. Bap- 
tist; Deacon; Church Clerk; Moderator Transylvania Associ- 
ation, 1925-1926. Married Miss Mattie M. Williams, November 
23, 1897. 



206 Biographical Sketches 

robert edgar hipps 

Robert Edgar Hipps, Democrat, Representative from Hay- 
wood County, was born in Madison County, December 18, 1872. 
Son of L. H. and Cady Hipps. Attended schools of Canton and 
Delwood. Farmer and real estate dealer. Mayor of Canton, 
1915-1919; County Chairman Near East Relief; member School 
Board. Junior Order. Methodist; Steward; Sunday School Su- 
perintendent. Married Miss Sallie Smathers, October 3, 1900. 
Address: Canton, N. C. 



JOHN W. HOLMES 

John W. Holmes, Democrat, Representative from Pitt County, 
was born in Johnston County. Son of Warren and Polly Ann 
(Allen) Holmes. Attended Benson Academy, 1898-1901. Mer- 
chant and farmer. Mason; Shrine Temple. Baptist; Deacon 
twenty-five years. Married Miss Emily W. Britt, 1902. Ad- 
dress: Farmville, N. C. 



GURNEY POPE HOOD 

Gurney Pope Hood, Democrat, Representative from Wayne 
County, was born in Grantham's Township, Wayne County, No- 
vember 26, 1884. Son of Solomon Pope and Betsey (Rhodes) 
Hood. Attended public schools, 1890-1899; Goldsboro graded 
schools, 1900-1901. Studied law under private teacher, 1906- 
1908; licensed, 1908. Banker. President Hood Finance Corpora- 
tion, 1924-1929; President The Hood System, Incorporated, 1929- 
1931; Vice-President Hood System Industrial Bank, Winston- 
Salem, 1927-1931. Alderman Goldsboro, 1911-1913. Mayor More- 
head City, 1917-1919. Corporal, North Carolina National Guard, 
1906-1908. Mason; Odd Fellow; Woodmen of the World; Junior 
Order United American Mechanics, State Council, Treasurer, 
1921-1929; member National Board of Trustees, 1929-1931. Meth- 
odist. Vice-Chairman Board of Stewards, 1928-1929. Lay Leader, 
North Carolina Conference, 1919-1920. Member House of Repre- 
sentatives, 1929. Married Miss Marion Lee Stevens, June 16, 
1915. Address: Goldsboro, N. C. 



Representatives in General Assembly 207 
james spears howell 

James Spears Howell, Democrat, Representative from Bun- 
combe County, was born in Asheville, December 29, 1893. Son 
of Frank F. and Mary T. Howell. Attended schools of Asheville; 
University of North Carolina; University Law School. Lawyer. 
Member American Business Club; Mount Hermon Lodge, Ashe- 
ville; Scottish Rite. City Solicitor, 1923-1927. Sergeant, 1917- 
1918, during World War. Presbyterian; Chairman Board of 
Deacons. Married Miss Katherine C. Williamson, June 15, 1929. 
Address: Asheville, N. C. 



EWART WILLIAM GLADSTONE HUFFMAN 

E. W. G. Huffman, Democrat, Representative from Rowan 
County, was born in Hickory, June 24, 1898. Son of William 
P. and Mary C. (Fry) Huffman. Attended schools of Hickory; 
Lenoir-Rhyne, A.B., 1919; graduate work University of North 
Carolina, English and Journalism, 1919-1920; University Law 
School. Lawyer. Secretary-Treasurer North and South Carolina 
Association of Civitan Clubs, 1930; Past President Salisbury 
Club. Solicitor Spencer's Recorder's Court, 1924-1926; Rowan 
County Court, 1926-1928; City Attorney, China Grove, East 
Spencer, Faith and Rockwell. Served in World War, 1918. Lu- 
theran; Sunday School teacher; member Church Council. Mar- 
ried Miss Willie Costner, September 14, 1919. Two boys. Mem- 
ber editorial staff, News and Observer, Durham Sun, Durham 
Herald, Greensboro News and Greensboro Record; Managing 
Editor Salisbury Evening Post. Address: Salisbury, N. C. 



JOHN CALVIN JAMES 

John Calvin James, Democrat, Representative from Pasquo- 
tank County, was born in Weeksville, March 9, 1873. Son of 
John Calvin and Elizabeth (Davis) James. Farmer and General 
Manager Weeksville Ginning Co., Inc. Member Pasquotank 
Board of Education, 1907-1910; County Commissioner, 1910- 
1918; Justice of the Peace twenty years. Married Miss Fannie 
Coppersmith, May 22, 1901. Address: Weeksville, N. C, R. 1. 



208 Biographical Sketches 

edwin bedford jeffress 

Edwin B. Jeffress, Democrat, Representative from Guilford 
County, was born in Canton, Haywood County, at "Garden 
Creek," May 29, 1877. Son of Charles J. and Maria Love (Os- 
borne) Jeffress. Attended Salisbury High School; graduated 
Asheville High School, 1903; University of North Carolina, A.B., 
1907. Publisher Greensboro Daily News and Greensboro Record. 
Teacher, 1907-1909. Reporter, Asheville Gazette-News, 1909-1911; 
Correspondent, 1911; Business Manager, Secretary-Treasurer and 
President Greensboro News, 1911-1918; member Associated Press; 
American Newspaper Publishers' Association; Southern News- 
paper Publishers' Association; Audit Bureau of Circulations; 
North Carolina Press Asociation, Secretary-Treasurer, 1920- 
1921; National Advertising Executives' Association; North Caro- 
lina Advertising Managers' Association; Vice-President Greens- 
boro Chamber of Commerce, 1921, President, 1922-1923; Presi- 
dent Community Chest, 1930. Director University Alumni Asso- 
ciation, 1924-1927; North Carolina Bank and Trust Company, 
1929; Roaring Gap, Inc., 1929; Greensboro Historical Museum, 
1927-1929. Mayor Greensboro, 1925-1929; President World War 
Memorial Stadium Commission; member County Board of Health; 
member Kiwanis Club; Merchants' and Manufacturers' Club; 
Greensboro and Sedgefield Country Clubs. Mason; Knights Temp- 
lar; Shriner; D. O. K. K.; Moose; Elks; Phi Beta Kappa 
honorary society, University, 1907; Sons of American Revolu- 
tion. Episcopalian; Vestryman, 1922-1928; Junior Warden, 1926. 
Married Miss Louise Bond Adams, July 17, 1913. Address: 
Greensboro, N. C. 



DOCTOR MAC JOHNSON 

Doctor Mac Johnson, Democrat, Representative from Hali- 
fax County, was born at St. Pauls, August 24, 1892. Son of 
Rev. W. S. and Katherine (Howard) Johnson. Attended public 
schools of St. Pauls; A.B., Wake Forest College, 1914. Lawyer. 
Chairman Enfield School Board, 1923-1928. Two years in World 
War; Major, 321st Infantry Reserve. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1929. Mason. Baptist. Married Miss Osee 
Long, August 1, 1918. Address.: Enfield, N. C. 



Representatives in General Assembly 209 
edwin r. johnson 

Edwin R. Johnson, Democrat, Representative from Currituck 
County, was born near Currituck Court House, September 10, 
1868. Son of Silas P. and Carolina (Coulter) Johnson. Attended 
public schools and Atlantic Collegiate Institute of Elizabeth City. 
Merchant. Chairman County Democratic Executive Committee 
continuously since 1893. Member State Senate, 1909 and 1917; 
member House of Representatives, 1919, 1921, 1925, 1927 and 
1929; Chairman Board of County Commissioners, 1907-1909; 
Chairman Board of Education. Food Administrator for Curri- 
tuck County during the World War. Chairman Highway Com- 
mission, 1923-1924; Chairman Game Commission, 1923-1924. Mar- 
ried Mrs. Genevieve Holloman, 1910. Address: Currituck, N. C. 



ROBERT GRADY JOHNSON 

Robert G. Johnson, Democrat, Representative from Duplin 
County, was born at Burgaw, N. C, May 5, 1895. Son of Joab 
F. and Myrtie (Grady) Johnson. Educated at Burgaw High 
School; University of North Carolina, and Wake Forest College. 
Lawyer. Member Board of Aldermen, 1922-1928; Chairman 
County Board of Elections; member Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee. Member of the State Senate, 1929. Private, U. S. Army, 
February, 1918, to May, 1919. Mason. Address: Burgaw, N. C. 



VICTOR RICHARDSON JOHNSON 

Victor Richardson Johnson, Democrat, Representative from 
Chatham County, was born at Mt. Vernon Springs, N. C, July 
18, 1893. Son of R. P. and Clara (Hanner) Johnson. Attended 
Pittsboro High School, 1908-1910; Round Hill Academy, Union 
Mills, N. C, 1910-1911; Wake Forest College, B.A., 1915, LL.B., 
1915; University Grenoble, France, 1919. Lawyer. Cashier 
Farmers Bank, 1923-1925. A. E. F., 323rd Machine Gun Com- 
pany, 81st Division, 1918-1919. Mason; Master Columbus Lodge 
No. 102, Pittsboro, 1923-1924; District Grand Master 13th Ma- 
sonic District, 1923-1924; Sanford Chapter; Southern Pines Com- 



210 Biographical Sketches 

mandery; Shriner, Oasis Temple, Charlotte. Baptist; Moderator 
Sandy Creek Association; Superintendent Sunday School, 1928- 
1930. Married Miss Nellie Pilkington, May 11, 1922. Two chil- 
dren, George Pilkington and Eleanor Winfrey Johnson. Address: 
Pittsboro, N. C. 



IRA THOMAS JOHNSTON 

Ira T. Johnston, Democrat, Representative from Ashe County, 
was born at Hopkins, Ashe County, August 1, 1892. Son of 
John Romulus and Cisco (Fletcher) Johnston. Attended Appa- 
lachian Training School, 1907-1911; A.B., Wake Forest Col- 
lege, 1915; University Summer Law School, 1917-1919; LL.B., La 
Salle University, 1921. Lawyer. Member American Bar Asso- 
ciation; Vice-President Ashe County Civitan Club, 1929; Presi- 
dent, 1930. Attorney town of Jefferson, 1924; West Jefferson, 
1925; Alderman, Jefferson, 1923, Mayor, 1930; Chairman Ashe 
County Welfare Board, 1921-1925; Chairman Ashe County 
Democratic Executive Committee, 1924-1930, Secretary, 1922- 
1924; member Democratic Congressional Committee, 1928-1930. 
First Sergeant, U. S. Army, 1918-1919. Mason; American 
Legion; Service Officer, local Post, 1929-1930. Baptist; Church 
Clerk, 1923-1930; Chairman Executive Committee, Ashe County 
Association, 1923-1930; Secretary Sunday School Association, 
1925, President, 1926-1929; member General Board, Baptist State 
Convention, 1925-1930; Teacher Men's Bible Class, West Jeffer- 
son Sunday School, 1929-1930. Married Miss Mary Adelaide 
Shull, July 9, 1919. One son, Thomas Shull Johnston. Address: 
Jefferson, N. C. 



JULIUS JOHNSTON 

Julius Johnston, Democrat, Representative from Caswell 
County, was born in Yanceyville, December 30, 1890. Son of 
Julius and Willie (Russell) Johnston. Attended public schools 
of Yanceyville; Horner Military School, Oxford, 1907-1908; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1911-1914. Farmer. Representative in 
the General Assembly of 1929. Address: Yanceyville, N. C. 



Representatives in General Assembly 211 
daniel monroe jolly 

Daniel Monroe Jolly, Democrat, Representative from Dup- 
lin County, was born in Whiteville, N. C. Son of James and 
Trecinda (Bright) Jolly. Attended Whiteville and Chadbourn 
High Schools, 1908-1912; Wake Forest College, 1914-1918. Law- 
yer. Member North Carolina Bar Association; Duplin County 
Bar Association. Mayor Kenansville, 1920-1928; County Attorney, 
1922-1926. Served with A. E. F. from May 27, 1918, to August, 
1919. Mason; Master Warren Lodge No. 639, three terms; 
American Legion, Past Commander Charles R. Gavin Post, 
Warsaw. Baptist. Married Miss Lucy Southerland. Address: 
Kenansville, N. C. 



HENRY HUGH JONES 

Henry H. Jones, Democrat, Representative from Hertford 
County, was born in Winton Township, that county, November 
1, 1872. Son of William Henry and Ellen (Powell) Jones. At- 
tended public and private schools, 1879-1890; Massey's Business 
College, Columbus, Ga. Farmer. County Commissioner, 1914- 
1920. Mason, Lodge No. 327, Winton; Scottish Rite, Sudan 
Temple, and Mystic Shrine, Sudan Temple, New Bern; Junior 
Warden and Secretary. Married Miss Ha A. Newsome, Novem- 
ber 10, 1897. Address: Cofield, N. C. 



PAUL B. KILLIAN 

Paul B. Killian, Democrat, Representative from Clay County, 
was born at Hiwassee, Ga., January 5, 1872. Son of Dr. D. W. 
and Martha A. (McClure) Killian. Attended Hayesville public 
school, 1879-1890; Hayesville Junior College, two years; M.D., 
Atlanta College of P. and S.; Emory University, 1900. Physi- 
cian. Member County and State Medical Society; County Physi- 
cian; Member Board Examiners World War. Mason; Woodmen 
of the World; Junior Order; Representative in the General As- 
sembly, 1915. Methodist. Married Miss Maud Moss, May 18, 
1898. Address: Hayesville, N. C. 



212 Biographical Sketches 

clement satterfield kitchin* 

Clement S. Kitchin, Democrat, Repi-esentative from Halifax 
County, was born at Roxboro, June 19, 1902. Son of William 
W. and Musette (Satterfield) Kitchin. Attended public schools 
of Raleigh; Wake Forest College, 1920-1922; University of 
North Carolina, 1922-1924; University Law School. Lawyer. 
Junior Order; Zeta Psi Fraternity. Baptist. Address: Scotland 
Neck, N. C. 



HARRY HENDERSON LEAKE 

Harry Henderson Leake, Democrat, Representative from 
Stokes County, was born in that county, March 1, 1895. Son 
of Peter J. and Lourinda J. (Bingmon) Leake. Correspondence 
courses (I. C. S.) in Bookkeeping and Business Forms; Short- 
hand and Typewriting; Good English; La Salle University Ex- 
tension Course in American Law and Procedure. Lawyer. Chair- 
man Board of Education, Stokes County, 1897-1930; member 
Democratic Executive Committee of North Carolina, 1928. 
Cashier Bank of Stokes County, King branch, eight years. Mo- 
ravian; Secretary and Treasurer. Married Miss Elsie V. Sprinkle, 
August 24, 1922. Address: King, N. C. 



JOHN PHILLIPS LeGRAND 

John Phillips LeGrand, Democrat, Representative from Davie 
County, was born in Richmond County, November 7, 1895. Son 
of Wade Hampton and Willie Anne (Brown) LeGrand. At- 
tended Mocksville High School. Owner LeGrand's Pharmacy, 
Mocksville. Sergeant, Company "C", 306th Ammunition Train, 
Camp Jackson, and A. E. F. eighteen months; Post Commander, 
American Legion. Mason; Junior Order. Methodist. Married 
Miss Elizabeth Earl Johnson of Allendale, S. C, June 9, 1925. 
Address: Mocksville, N. C. 



*Died December 21, 1930. 



Representatives in General Assembly 213 
james adolph long 

J. Dolph Long, Democrat, Representative from Alamance 
County, was born in Graham, January 17, 1880. Son of Joseph 
Thomas and Nannie (Pritchard) Long. Attended Graham public 
schools until 1900; Ph.B., Elon College, 1905; University Law 
School, 1907-1908. Lawyer. Episcopalian. Married Miss Hannah 
Attmore, December 8, 1909. Address: Graham, N. C. 



THOMAS WILLIAMS MASON LONG 

Thomas Williams Mason Long, Representative from Halifax 
County, was born in Northampton County, January 14, 1886. Son 
of Lemuel MacKinnie and Betty Gray (Mason) Long. Attended 
Petersburg, Va., Academy, 1901-1902; V. P. I., 1902-1903; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1903-1905; University College of Medi- 
cine, 1905-1908; M.D., 1908. Physician. Member Halifax County 
Medical Society and the North Carolina Medical Society. Chair- 
man Board of Directors North Carolina Sanatorium, 1922-1931, 
Roanoke Rapids Hospital, 1912-1931. Member State Board of 
Medical Examiners, 1921-1931; Director State Hospital, Raleigh, 
1918-1920. Mayor Roanoke Rapids, 1922-1930; Chairman City 
Bond Commission, 1915-1922. Mason; Junior Order United Ameri- 
can Mechanics; Phi Chi Medical Society. Episcopalian. Married 
Miss Maria Greenough Burgwyn, December 7, 1910. Address: 
Roanoke Rapidsj N. C. 



ED S. LOVEN 



Ed S. Loven, Democrat, Representative from Avery County, 
was born in Burke County, 1872. Son of Anderson and Mary 
(Webb) Loven. Received education in public schools. Merchant. 
Sheriff of Avery County, 1911-1912. Representative from Avery 
County in the General Assembly, 1923 and 1927. Mason. Pres- 
byterian. Married Miss Myrtle L. Clay in 1895. Address: Lin- 
ville, N. C. 



214 Biographical Sketches 

willie lee lumpkin 

Willie Lee Lumpkin, Democrat, Representative from Franklin 
County, was born at Youngsville, N. C, May 14, 1903. Son of 
J. S. and Lena (Parker) Lumpkin. Attended Youngsville High 
School and Franklinton High School; Wake Forest College, 1919- 
1922; Wake Forest Law School. Lawyer. Member Kiwanis In- 
ternational. City Attorney, town of Franklinton. Baptist; Dea- 
con; President Franklin County Baraca-Philathea Union, 1924. 
Representative in the General Asembly, 1929. Married Miss 
Margaret B. Ray, 1922. Address: Franklinton, N. C. 



JOHN MITCHELL LYON 

John M. Lyon, Democrat, Representative from Yancey County, 
was born in Greenville, Tennessee, August 12, 1860. Son of 
James Benjamin and Martha (Britton) Lyon. Attended Green- 
ville, Tenn., schools, 1870-1875; Tusculum College, Tusculum, 
Tenn., 1878-1880; graduate Knoxville, Tenn., Business College, 
1882. Chairman Yancey County Board of Commissioners, 1918- 
1920. Mason; Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows, head uniform 
rank, Greenville, 1902. Presbyterian; Elder since 1915. Married 
Miss Mary Cecelia Lewis, June 22, 1884. Address: Burnsville, 
N. C. 



ANGUS D. MacLEAN 

Angus D. MacLean, Democrat, Representative from Beaufort 
County, was born in Maxton, July 12, 1877. Son of John A. and 
Mary Virginia (Brown) MacLean. Educated in private school 
at Maxton and Laurinburg High School; attended University of 
North Carolina, 1894-1895 and 1896-1897; University Law School, 
1898. Member North Carolina Bar Association and American 
Bar Association. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1927 and 1929. Member law firm of MacLean & Rodman. B. P. 
O. E.; Knights of Pythias. Presbyterian. Married Miss Annetta 
Everett, October 24, 1900. Address: Washington, N. C. 



Representatives in General Assembly 215 

JOHN CALHOUN McBEE 

John Calhoun McBee, Republican, Representative from Mitch- 
ell County, was born at Mica, August 19, 1876. Son of James A. 
and Rachael (Mace) McBee. Attended Bowman Academy, 1892- 
1895; LL.B., Wake Forest College, 1911. Lawyer. Mayor of 
Bakersville, 1912-1920. Private, Co. "B", 16th U. S. Infantry, 
1899-1902; served in Army of Philippine Islands two years; 
seven years in Civil Service, Department of Education Insular 
Government. Delegate to National Republican Convention, 1920. 
Representative in the General Asembly in 1917 and 1921. Ma- 
son; Junior Order United American Mechanics. Baptist. Mar- 
ried Miss Margaret C. Thomas, August 12, 1902. Address: 
Bakersville, N. C. 



N. B. McDEVITT 

N. B. McDevitt, Democrat, Representative from Madison 
County, was born in that county, December 22, 1875. Son of 
Rev. P. and Sarah E. (Rice) McDevitt. Educated at Mars Hill 
and Wake Forest College. Wholesale grocer. County Tax As- 
sessor, Madison County; Clerk Superior Court; member Board 
of County Commissioners six years, Chairman four years; mem- 
ber Board of Education four years; Chairman County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee for many years; member Board of 
Trustees Western Carolina Teachers' College. Teacher three 
years. Representative in the General Assembly of 1927. Married 
Miss Alice Hurt. Five children, all living; three finished college, 
one in college and one in high school. Address: Marshall, N. C. 



LAURIE McEACHERN 

Laurie McEachern, Democrat, Representative from Hoke 
County, was born in Marlow, Georgia, May 28, 1896. Son of 
John F. and Margaret G. (Baker) McEachern. Attended War- 
renton High School, 1910-1913; Washington and Lee University. 
Farmer. President Raeford Kiwanis Club, 1930. Presbyterian. 
Address: Raeford, N. C. 



216 Biographical Sketches 

duncan franklin mcgougan 

Duncan Franklin McGougan, Democrat, Representative from 
Columbus County, was born near Cerro Gordo, N. C. Son of Dr. 
J. M. and Mary L. (Powell) McGougan. Attended County Schools 
and school at Fair Bluff, 1885-1887; Burroughs High School, 
Conway, S. C, 1890-1891; Clemson College, 1894-1896. Farmer 
and banker. Member North Carolina Bankers Association. County 
Commissioner 1926-1930, chairman in 1928. Cadet officer at Clem- 
son, serving as second lieutenant. Mason; Woodmen of the World. 
Baptist; Treasurer since 1908. Twice married: first to Miss Jen- 
nie E. Bryant, 1897, two children; second to Miss Dula V. Alls- 
brook of Allsbrook, S. C, 1903; nine children. Address: Tabor, 
N. C. 



JOHN ALBERT McRAE 

John Albert McRae, Democrat, Representative from Mecklen- 
burg County, was born at White Store, Anson County, December 
29, 1875. Son of Dr. John Albert and Lavinia (Boggan) McRae. 
Attended Public Schools; Marshville High School, 1894-1899; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina; University Law School. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber North Carolina State Bar Association, President, 1921; Amer- 
ican Bar Association; Mecklenburg County Bar Association, Presi- 
dent, 1921; Charlotte Chamber of Commerce; Kiwanis Club, Presi- 
dent, 1924. City Attorney of Charlotte, 1907-1909, 1927-1929; At- 
torney for Mecklenburg County Exemption Board during World 
War. Knights of Pythias; D. O. K. K.; Woodmen of the World. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1903; State Senator, 
1915. Methodist; Steward. Married Miss Mattie Theodosia Ham; 
children: Martha Ham, John Albert, Jr., and William Haywood 
McRae. Address: Charlotte, N. C. 



JAMES A. MARSHALL 

James A. Marshall, Democrat, Representative from Forsyth 
County, was born in that county March 25, 1866. Son of J. Matt 
and Sallie (Haizlip) Marshall. Educated in public and private 
schools. Farmer. Justice of the Peace thirty-two years. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly, 1925 and 1927. Junior Order 



Representatives in General Assembly 217 

United American Mechanics, past Councilor. Married Miss Vic- 
toria B. Allen, November 28, 1889. Address: Walnut Cove, N. C. 



LILY MOREHEAD MEBANE 

Lily Morehead Mebane, Democrat, Representative from Rock- 
ingham County. Was born at Spray, August 13, 1870. Daughter 
of J. Turner and Lily (Connally) Morehead. Taught by governess 
before attending Peace Institute and Southern Home School, Balti- 
more. Cotton manufacturer. Baptist. Married February 8, 1896, 
to B. Frank Mebane. Address: Spray, N. C. 



OTWAY BINNS MOSS 

Otway Binns Moss, Democrat, Representative from Nash 
County. Was born in Wilson, October 20, 1890. Son of Vernon F. 
and Loula A. (Binns) Moss. Attended Wilson graded schools; 
LL.B., Wake Forest, 1913. Lawyer. Vice-Recorder, Nash County 
Court, 1916-1922. Supervisor Census Fourth Congressional Dis- 
trict, 1919-1920. Member School Board, 1919-1922. Chairman 
Democratic Executive Committee, Manning's Township, 1916-1930; 
Member County Executive Committee, 1916-1930. State Senator, 
1923 and 1925; Representative, 1927 and 1929. Mason; Shriner, 
Sudan Temple. Baptist; Superintendent Sunday School, 1920; 
Teacher Men's Bible Class, 1929-1930. Married Miss Dolly Ed- 
wards, June 2, 1915; two children. Address: Spring Hope, N. C. 



JAMES CLAYTON MOYE 

James Clayton Moye, Democrat, Representative from Greene 
County. Was born in that county July 19, 1890. Son of James 
Franklin and Mary E. (Meeks) Moye. Attended public schools; 
Whitsett Institute, 1908; Ayden Free Will Baptist Theological 
Seminary, 1912-1916. Minister. Chevrolet automobile dealer. Mayor 
of Snow Hill, 1926-1929. Modern Woodmen of the World. Moder- 
ator Central Conference of Free Will Baptist Church, 1918-1920. 
Free Will Baptist. Representative in the General Assembly, 1929. 
Married Miss Ethel Brooks, January 24, 1921. Address: Snow 
Hill, N. C. 



218 Biographical Sketches 

robert bruce morphew 

Robert Bruce Morphew, Democrat, Representative from Gra- 
ham County. Was born in Robbinsville, N. C, in 1901. Son of 
Thomas Arthur and Lillian (Slaughter) Morphew. Graduated from 
Robbinsville High School, 1919; attended Cullowhee Normal School, 
1920; B.A., Tusculum College, 1925; Duke University, 1926-'27; 
Summer School, Wake Forest, 1927. Lawyer. Sigma Nu Phi, legal 
fraternity. National Guard, 1924-1926, Troop D, Cavalry, at camp 
during summer, corporal. Methodist. Address: Robbinsville, N. C. 



WILLIAM WEAVER NEAL 

William W. Neal, Democrat, Representative from McDowell 
County, was born in Marion, February 15, 1874. Son of G. H. 
and Rowena (Weaver) Neal. Representative in the General As- 
sembly, 1919, 1921, 1923 and 1925. Address: Marion, N. C. 



HARRISS NEWMAN 

Harriss Newman, Democrat, Representative from New Han- 
over County. Was born in Wilmington, October 2, 1897. Son of 
Joseph and Rolinda (Jacobs) Newman. Attended public schools; 
Cape Fear Academy, Trinity College; LL.B., University of North 
Carolina, 1919. Lawyer. Member New Hanover County Bar As- 
sociation; North Carolina Bar Association; Chamber of Com- 
merce, member Executive Committee; Chairman Wilmington 
Chapter Red Cross, Roll Call Chairman, 1927-1929; Executive 
Commander Boys' Brigade; Member Board of Directors Baby's 
Hospital, Travelers Aid Society; National Jewish Hospital, Den- 
ver, Col.; Member New Hanover County High School Committee; 
Vice-Chairman State Allied Jewish Campaign, 1930; Mason, Wil- 
mington Lodge No. 219; B. P. O. E.; Shriner; Past President Wil- 
mington Independent Order B'nai Brith; Goldenrod Chapter East- 
ern Star. Of Jewish faith. Address: Wilmington, N. C. 



Representatives in General Assembly 219 
zeb vance norman 

Zeb Vance Norman, Democrat, Representative from Wash- 
ington County, was born in Tyrrell County, February 2, 1888. Son 
of Cicero J. and Celesta (Wood) Norman. Attended Plymouth 
High School, 1902-1906; Trinity College, 1906-1908; University 
of Virginia, summer, 1913; University of North Carolina Medical 
School, 1908-1909; Law School, 1915-1916. Lawyer. Member Wash- 
ington County Bar Association and North Carolina Bar Associ- 
ation. President Plymouth Chamber Commerce, 1929-1930; Mayor, 
1918-1919; Prosecuting Attorney Washington County, 1919-1924; 
Recorder, 1924-1929. Mason; Worshipful Master Perseverance 
Lodge No. 59, A. F. & A. M., 1919, Plymouth; Shriner; Sudan 
Temple, New Bern. Methodist; Charge Lay Leader; Trustee. 
Married Miss Florence Ryan Bell, September 27, 1919. Address: 
Plymouth, N. C. 



FRED P. PARKER, JR. 

Fred P. Parker, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Wayne 
County, was born in Goldsboro, November 28, 1902. Son of Fred 
P. and Matilda (Fort) Parker. Attended Goldsboro High School, 
1918-1921; University of Illinois, 1922; University of North Caro- 
lina, B. S. Commerce, 1925; University Law School, 1925-1928, 
LL.B., 1928. Lawyer. Member Goldsboro Bar, Wayne County 
Bar, North Carolina Bar and the American Bar Associations; 
Member Chamber Commerce; Kiwanis Club. Chairman Young 
People's Democratic Club of Wayne, 1928. Junior Order United 
American Mechanics; Delta Psi; Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; 
Delta Sigma Pi, International Commercial Fraternity, and Epsilon 
Phi Delta. Presbyterian. Assistant Sunday School Superintendent, 
1928-1930; Chairman Finance Committee, 1930. President Wayne 
County Taxpayers League; organizer of Taxpayers Leagues in 
Eastern Carolina. Address: Goldsboro, N. C. 



JOEL C. PINNIX 

Joel C. Pinnix, Republican, Representative from Yadkin 
County, was born in that county November 17, 1855. Son of 
Frederick and Sarah (Dobbins) Pinnix. Attended Boonville Acad- 



220 Biographical Sketches 

emy, 1877, and Trap Hill Academy, 1882. Farmer. Taught in 
academic and public schools twenty-two years. Postmaster at 
Marler, 1894-1900; Justice of the Peace, 1895-1897; Deputy Col- 
lector Internal Revenue, 1889-1893, 1901-1904; Representative in 
the General Assembly of 1885, 1887, 1897 and 1905; State Senator, 
1901, 1911. Mason, having held all offices up to Worshipful 
Master. Baptist; Church Clerk, 1878-1884; Sunday School Super- 
intendent eighteen years. Married Miss Catharine Shore, Novem- 
ber 25, 1877. Ten children. Address: Cycle, N. C. 



OSCAR THEODORE PITTS 

Oscar T. Pitts, Democrat, Representative from Catawba County, 
was born in Hickory, May 11, 1899. Son of R. M. and Emma E. 
(Townsend) Pitts. Attended North Hickory Public Schools, 1906- 
1907; Lenoir Rhyne College, 1916-1919. Real Estate Broker and 
Auctioneer. Lutheran; Elder since 1926. Married Miss Mary Ruth 
Miller, June 15, 1922. Address: Hickory, N. C. 



JOHN FRONEBERGER PUETT 

John F. Puett, Democrat, Representative from Gaston County, 
was born in Dallas, N. C, April 28, 1883. Son of John Colier and 
Mary Elizabeth (Froneberger) Puett. Attended Dallas Public 
Schools. Farmer. Director Bank of Dallas and Fairfield Chair 
Co.; Mayor Dallas; member School Board. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1917. Methodist; Steward and Trustee since 
1910. Married Miss Sallie Young Coppedge, December, 1916. Ad- 
dress: Dallas, N. C. 



JAMES BUTLER READLING 

James Butler Readling, Democrat, Representative from Meck- 
lenburg, was born near Huntersville, Mecklenburg County, May 
25, 1879. Son of Charles Robert and Jane (Carver) Readling. At- 
tended Mt. Zion Academy, 1893-1897. Insurance. Mayor of Cor- 
nelius, 1919-1923. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1929. Methodist. Married Miss Minnie L. Goodrum, 1899. Six 
children. Address: Cornelius, N. C. 



Representatives in General Assembly 221 
mark l. reed 

Mark L. Reed, Democrat, Representative from Buncombe 
County, was born in that county June 5, 1853. Son of Joseph and 
Catherine (Miller) Reed. Attended Col. Stephen D. Lee's School, 
Asheville, 1867-1870. Deputy Commissioner, State Revenue De- 
partment. Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue, 1913-1918; Chair- 
man Board of County Commissioners, 1900-1908. Representative 
in the General Assembly of 1891. Mason; Scottish Rite; Shriner; 
Knight Templar. Baptist. Address: Asheville, N. C. 



WILEY A. ROGERS 

Wiley A. Rogers, Democrat, Representative from Macon 
County, was born in Franklin, May 3, 1872. Son of C. T. and 
Margaret (Reid) Rogers. Attended Franklin High School; Uni- 
versity North Carolina; University Nashville, M.D., 1898. Phy- 
sician. Member Macon-Clay Medical Society; State Medical So- 
ciety, honorary member, having paid dues for thirty years. Presi- 
dent Bank of Franklin. Director State School for Blind, twelve 
years. County Health Officer about fifteen years. Medical Ex- 
aminer for Macon County during World War. Mason; Worshipful 
Master Junaluska Lodge, No. 145, Franklin; Knights Templar, 
Waynesville, No. 31; Shriner, Oasis Temple A. A. 0. N. M. S., 
Charlotte. Representative in the General Assembly of 1905 and 
1921. Methodist; Steward. Married Miss Marie Renner, May 24, 
1911. Address: Franklin, N. C. 



JOSEPH BLOUNT RUFFIN 

Joseph B. Ruffin, Democrat, Representative from Bertie 
County, was born at Powellsville, N. C, 1878. Son of J. B. and 
Mary E. Ruffin. Attended Winton High School; College of Phy- 
sicians, Baltimore; M.D., University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn., 
1900; post-graduate work Illinois Polyclinic, Chicago, 1901. 
Physician. Member Bertie County Medical Society, North Caro- 
lina Medical Association, the Seaboard Medical Association and 
American Medical Association. Medical Examiner of the Selective 
Draft Board of Bertie County during the World War. Member 



222 Biographical Sketches 

Broitton Lodge No. 554, A. F. & A. M. and Powellsville Camp 
No. 406, W. O. W. Baptist; Deacon of Powellsville Church since 
organization. Married Miss Mary Elizabeth Owen, February, 
1900. Address: Powellsville, N. C. 



DAWSON EMERSON SCARBOROUGH 

Dawson Emerson Scarborough, Democrat, Representative from 
Richmond County, v/as born at Mt. Gilead, August 11, 1900. Son 
of Alfred D. and Mary Christian Scarborough. Attended Hoffman 
High School, 1909-1917; LL.B., University North Carolina, 1923. 
Lawyer. Prosecuting Attorney for Richmond County, 1929-1930. 
Two months in Students Army Training Corps at Chapel Hill, 
1918. Methodist. Winner of J. W. Bailey Prize offered by the 
North Carolina Club, University of North Carolina, 1923. Address: 
Rockingham, N. C. 



AARON ASHLEY FLOWERS SEAWELL 

A. A. F. Seawell, Democrat, Representative from Lee County, 
was born near Jonesboro, Moore County, October 30, 1864. Son 
of A. A. F. and Jeannette Ann (Buie) Seawell. Attended Jones- 
boro High School, 1877-1879; University of North Carolina, Ph.B., 
class of 1889, University Law School, 1892. Lawyer. Representa- 
tive in the General Assembly of 1901, 1913 and 1915; State Sen- 
ator, 1907 and 1925. Mason; Knights Templar; Shriner; Junior 
Order United American Mechanics; High Priest Royal Arch Ma- 
sons. Presbyterian; Ruling Elder thirty years. Married Miss 
Bertha Alma Smith, April 12, 1905. Address: Sanford, N. C. 



WILLIAM HENRY SIGMON 

William Henry Sigmon, Democrat, Representative from Lincoln 
County, was born in Catawba County, November 25, 1867. Son of 
Harrison and Sallie (Howard) Sigmon. Attended common schools 
and Oak Institute, Mooresville, N. C. Farmer. Register of Deeds 
for Lincoln County, 1908-1914. Knights of Pythias, Chancellor 
Commander, 1912; Jr. O. U. A. M. Methodist; Steward, 1915- 



Representatives in General Assembly 223 

1927; Sunday School Teacher, 1915-1930; Chairman Parsonage 
Building Committee, 1928. Married Miss Nannie E. Dean, De- 
cember 21, 1901. Address: Denver, N. C. 



J. CALVIN SMITH 

J. Calvin Smith, Democrat, Representative from Martin County, 
was born near Farmville, Pitt County. Son of J. Thomas and 
Emily (Tyson) Smith. Attended private schools and public schools 
of Pitt County; Wake Forest Law School, 1907. Licensed to 
practice law, August, 1907. Lawyer. Mayor of Robersonville, 
1915-1918; Judge Martin County Court, 1919-1926. Married Miss 
Margaret J. Chandler of Mebane, September 6, 1911. Address: 
Robersonville, N. C. 



UNION LEE SPENCE 

Union Lee Spence, Democrat, Representative from Moore 
County, was born in Stanly County, August 20, 1867. Son of 
Daniel and Mary Ann (Reeves) Spence. Attended Palmerville 
Schools; graduated Oak Ridge Institute, 1890; completed Law 
Course at University of North Carolina under Judge Manning. 
Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association and American 
Bar Association. Mayor of Carthage several times. State Senator, 
1903; Representative in General Assembly, 1929. Delegate to 
Democratic National Convention, 1924 and 1928. Kiwanian; Ma- 
son; Knights Templar; Worshipful Master. Methodist. Married 
Miss Mary Worthy, April 24, 1912. Two children. Address: Carth- 
age, N. C. 



FREDERICK ISLER SUTTON 

Frederick I. Sutton, Democrat, Representative from Lenoir 
County, was born at Kinston, September 7, 1886. Son of L. M. 
and Cora Elizabeth (Grimsley) Sutton. Educated at Miss Dora 
Miller's School, 1893-96; Dr. Richard H. Lewis' School; Kinston 
High School; University of North Carolina, A.B. Degree, 1908; 
Harvard Summer School, 1907; Harvard Law School, 191)8-1911. 



224 Biographical Sketches 

LL.B. Degree. Lawyer. Member Kinston Bar Association; North 
Carolina Bar Association; Harvard Law School Association; Amer- 
ican Bar Association. Secretary-Treasurer Carolina Municipal 
Association. Vice-President North Carolina Good Roads Associ- 
ation. Attorney city of Kinston. Director and Attorney Caswell 
Banking and Trust Company. Director and Attorney National 
Bank of Kinston. Mayor city of Kinston, 1913-1919. Member of 
State Board of Conservation and Development. Chairman of the 
Committee on Game and Game Fish. Representative in the Gen- 
eral Assemblies of 1925, 1927 and 1929. Trustee University of 
North Carolina. Served as Corporal in Home Guard. Member St. 
John's Lodge No. 4, A. F. and A. M.; Caswell Chapter No. 38, 
Royal Arch Masons; St. Paul's Commandery No. 18, Knights 
Templar; Sudan Temple A. A. 0. N. M. S.; Jr. O. U. A. M. Lenoir 
Council; Alpha Tau Omega and Pi Sigma Fraternities; Kiwanis 
Club. President Kinston Shrine Club and Kinston Kiwanis Club. 
Married Miss Annie Gray Fry of Greensboro, 1915. Address: 
Kinston, N. C. 



CHARLES WALLACE TATEM 

Charles Wallace Tatem, Democrat, Representative from Tyrrell 
County, was born in Columbia, September 25, 1876. Son of Cam- 
milas Etheridge and Ellen E. (McClees) Tatem. Attended Co- 
lumbia Academy, 1885-1891; Trinity School, 1892-1893. Civil Engi- 
neer. Representative in the General Assembly of 1927 and 1929. 
Married Miss Ella Gertrude Wynne, September 24, 1896. Address: 
Columbia, N. C. 



FRANCIS EDGAR THOMAS 

Francis Edgar Thomas, Democrat, Representative from Anson 
County, was born at Diamond Hill, Anson County, December 25, 
1871. Son of John William and Susan (Liles) Thomas. Attended 
Polkton High School; Wake Forest College, LL.B., 1902; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina Law School. Lawyer. Representative in 
the General Assembly of 1913 and 1915. Baptist. Married Miss 
Lucy Josephine Hawkins, 1910. Address: Wadesboro, N. C. 



Representatives in General Assembly 225 
james william thompson 

James William Thompson, Democrat, Representative from 
Brunswick County, was born in Southport, January 28, 1875. Son 
of Thomas Mann and Mary E. (Mintz). Attended schools of 
Smithville (Southport), 1882-1887; Atlanta, Ga., 1887-1890; Gradu- 
ate Sullivan and Crichton Business College, Atlanta, 1892. Re- 
tired wholesale Commission Merchant and Contractor. Member 
United Charities Association; Chamber Commerce, Southport, 
1910-1930. Inspector State Fisheries Commission, 1912-1914; 
Charter Member and Director Peoples United Bank, Southport, 
1921-1930; member Board for Distribution Fuel, N. C. Coast 
Quartermaster's Department, World War; Alderman Southport; 
Delegate to State Democratic Conventions many times; Volunteer 
in Spanish-American War, rejected on account of physical dis- 
ability; volunteer World War, rejected account age limit. Mason; 
Worshipful Master Pythagoras Lodge, three terms; Thirty-second 
Degree Scottish Rite, Wilmington; Sudan Shrine Temple, New- 
Bern. Methodist. Contributor of short stories to game periodicals 
and magazines. Pioneer producer high grade cottonseed oil in 
Georgia, 1899-1906; on Board of Refiners and Crushers for de- 
termining grades of cottonseed oil for lard and salad oil, 1889- 
1906; demonstrated cottonseed and hulls and meal as stock food, 
1890-1894. Married Miss Anna E. Butler of Edgefield, S. C, April 
14, 1898. Address: Southport, N. C. 



DAVID ELMER TURNER 

David E. Turner, Democrat, Representative from Iredell 
County, was born in Vance, N. C, February 21, 1876. Son of 
W. W. and Margaret E. (Knox) Turner. Attended Barnes Acad- 
emy, Lenoir, N. C, 1892; Davidson, 1899. Hardware dealer. Mem- 
ber Hardware Association of Carolinas. Kiwanis Club. County 
Commissioner, six and one-half years; County Board of Edu- 
cation, two years; City Alderman, ten years; Clerk, Executive 

IBjauaQ eqi ui aAi^uasaaday; f^uaui^iBdaQ d*i& jaiqo ipiBog 
Assembly of 1929." Presbyterian; Scout Master. Married Miss 
Minnie Lee McNeely, December 17, 1901. Address: Mooresville, 

N. C. 



226 Biographical Sketches 

THOMAS TURNER, Jr. 

Thomas Turner, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Guilford 
County, was born in that county, October 3, 1900. Son of Henri 
Catlett of Mt. Sterling, Ky., and Elizabeth Little (Dowd) Turner. 
A.B., University of North Carolina, 1923; University Law School, 
1923-1924. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association and 
High Point Bar Association. Vice-Chairman Guilford County 
Democratic Executive Committee, 1927-1929. Sigma Alpha Ep- 
silon, College Fraternity. Episcopalian; Vestryman; Junior War- 
den, 1926. Married Miss Elizabeth Nolan of Marietta, Ga., Oc- 
tober 28, 1925; two children, Thomas Turner, III, and Marion 
Nolan Turner. Address: High Point, N. C. 



GEORGE RANDOLPH UZZELL 

George Randolph Uzzell, Democrat, Representative from Rowan 
County, was born in Salisbury, November 23, 1903. Son of Harry 
M. and Geneva (Wright) Uzzell. Attended Salisbury Graded 
Schools, 1910-1915; Raleigh Graded Schools, 1915-1919; Salisbury 
High School, 1919-1921; Davidson College, 1921-1923; passed State 
Bar Examination, January 25, 1926. Lawyer. Knights of Pythias; 
Winona Council No. 18, Jr. O. U. A. M.; Pi Gamma Sigma, Wake 
Forest College. Chancellor Commander Salisbury-Rowan No. 100, 
Knights of Pythias, 1927-1929; Financial Secretary Winona Coun- 
cil No. 18, Jr. O. U. A. M., 1929-1930; Present Council Deputy. 
Baptist; Deacon, 1929; General Secretary Sunday School, 1929; 
Superintendent Adult Department Sunday School, since 1930. Ad- 
dress: Salisbury, N. C. 



JOHN SHERWOOD UPCHURCH 

J. Sherwood Upchurch, Democrat, Representative from Wake 
County, was born in Raleigh, N. C, October 28, 1872. Son of 
Alvin and Mary Ann (Overby) Upchurch. Attended Centennial 
School, Raleigh, N. C. Representative General Outdoor Adver- 
tising Company. Auditor of City of Raleigh, 1907-1908; Alder- 
man for fourteen years; Health Officer and Sanitary Inspector, 
1913-1917. Member Junior Order; Royal Arcanum; Knights of 



Representatives in General Assembly 227 

Maccabees; Loyal Order of Moose. Episcopalian. Member House 
of Representatives, 1929. Married Miss Mary Mills Hardy, Sep- 
tember 4, 1903. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



WILEY LEE WARD 

Wiley Lee Ward, Republican, Representative from Randolph 
County, was born in that county, January 6, 1882. Son of James 
Buchanon and Rufine (Fields) Ward. Attended Asheboro graded 
school. Cotton manufacturer. Secretary and Treasurer Leward 
Cotton Mills, Worthville. Member Board of Aldermen of Ashe- 
boro four terms; County Commissioner for five terms serving as 
chairman for three terms; President Asheboro Chamber of Com- 
merce. Junior Order United American Mechanics. Methodist 
Protestant; member Board of Trustees; Chairman Board of 
Stewards; Sunday School Superintendent fifteen years; Secretary 
Board of Trustees High Point College; President Board of Con- 
ference Trustees North Carolina Annual Conference; Treasurer 
Board of Church Extension. Married Miss Mary Elizabeth Bor- 
oughs, January 13, 1901. Address: Asheboro, N. C. 






CAPUS M. WAYNICK 

Capus M. Waynick, Democrat, Representative from Guilford 
County, was born in Rockingham County, December 23, 1889. Son 
of Joshua J. N. and Anna (Moore) Waynick. Attended County 
Schools; graduated from Greensboro High School, 1907; University 
of North Carolina, two years. Editor High Point Enterprise. En- 
tered National Army as a volunteer, 1918; served in training 
camp ; commissioned second lieutenant, after Armistice. Presby- 
terian. Married Miss Elizabeth McBee of Lincolnton, June 19, 
1915. Address: High Point, N. C. 



ALBERT EDWIN WHITE 

Albert Edwin White, Democrat, Representative from Robeson 
County, was born in Forsyth County, January 7, 1863. Son of 
Andrew J. and Hariett A. (Jones) White. Attended Forsyth 



228 Biographical Sketches 

County Schools. Merchant. Mayor Lumberton eight terms. Mem- 
ber State Prison Board for past four years. Representative in 
the General Assembly of 1929. Methodist; Chairman Board of 
Stewards. Married Miss Ellen Ophelia Fuller, November, 1888. 
Address: Lumberton, N. C. 



JOHN FERNANDO WHITE 

John Fernando White, Democrat, Representative from Chowan 
County, was born in Edenton, April 16, 1902. Son of Sidney John- 
son and Mary Christian (Goodwin) White. Attended Wake Forest 
College, 1922-1925; University Law School, 1925-1926. Lawyer. 
Judge Chowan County Court, 1928-1930; Delegate Democratic 
State Convention, Raleigh, 1930. Member 115th Ambulance Com- 
pany of the 4th Corps Area, Edenton, 1927-1928, rank Sergeant. 
Baptist. Married Miss Carolyn Juanita Bunch, March 16, 1930. 
Address: Edenton, N. C. 



RAYFORD BRYANT WHITLEY 

Rayford Bryant Whitley, Democrat, Representative from Wake 
County, was born in Johnston County, March 19, 1862. Son of 
N. R. and Martha (Richardson) Whitley. Attended public schools 
of Johnston County. Merchant, planter and banker. President of 
the Bank of Wendell; Director Commercial National Bank, 
Raleigh. Representative from Johnston County in the General 
Assembly of 1893. Member World War Exemption Board from 
Wake County, 1917-1918. Honorary member Junior Order United 
American Mechanics. Methodist; Steward and Trustee. Married 
Miss Marietta Harper, April 4, 1893. 



DAVID HENRY WILLIS 

David Henry Willis, Democrat, Representative from Craven 
County, was born at Sea Level, N. C, February 29, 1892. Son of 
Timothy and Mollie (Smith) Willis. Attended Gilliams Academy, 
Altamahaw, N. C, graduating in 1916; Wake Forest College; 



Representatives in General Assembly 229 

Wake Forest Law School. Lawyer. Member Craven County Bar. 
Sergeant, World War, 11 months in France. Mason; Odd Fel- 
lows; Elks. Married Miss Lucy Swindell, October 22, 1923. Ad- 
dress: New Bern, N. C. 



PRESTON WOODALL 

Preston Woodall, Democrat, Representative from Johnston 
County, was born in that county, May 4, 1874. Son of William 
Ransom and Mary (Creech) Woodall. Attended Public Schools of 
Johnston County and Turlington Institute, Smithfield. Merchant 
and farmer. Formerly Vice-President Commercial National Bank 
and President Citizens Bank & Trust Company of Benson; Mem- 
ber Town Board; County Welfare Board since organization. Mem- 
ber Kiwanis Club. Presbyterian; Elder since 1916. Married Miss 
Emma C. Woodall, April, 1899. Address: Benson, N. C. 



WILLIAM COLEMAN WOODARD 

William Coleman Woodard, Democrat, Representative from 
Nash County, was born at Rocky Mount, N. C, June 8, 1889. Son 
of William C. and Charlotte Woodard. Attended Wilkinson's 
School, Tarboro, 1900-1904; A.B., University of North Carolina, 
1908; Law School, 1911. General Agent Atlantic Life Insurance 
Company. Member Chamber of Commerce and Kiwanis Club. 
Director of Chamber of Commerce, Planters National Bank, At- 
lantic Life Insurance Company, and Citizens Building and Loan. 
Member of Board of Aldermen, 1925. Representative in the Gen- 
eral Assembly of 1927 and 1929. Order of Gimghouls; Corinthian 
Lodge No. 230; Rocky Mount Chapter, St. Bernard Commandery, 
Sudan Temple. Episcopalian. Married February 4, 1915, to Miss 
Katharine Bunn. Address: Rocky Mount, N. C. 



JAMES ROBERT YOUNG 

James Robert Young, Democrat, Representative from Harnett 
County, was born in Dunn, January 27, 1896. Son of Ernest 
Foster and Alma (Fleming) Young. Attended Warrenton High 
School, 1911-1913; Tennessee Military Institute, 1913-1914; Uni- 



230 Biographical Sketches 

versity of Tennessee, 1914-1915; University of North Carolina, 
1915-1917; University Law School, 1919-1920; Wake Forest Law 
School, 1920-1922; licensed to practice law, January, 1922. Lawyer. 
Member North Carolina Bar Association. Solicitor Recorders 
Court of Dunn, 1929-1930. Private 119th Infantry, June 22, 1917- 
June 26, 1917; Color Sergeant, June 26, 1917-July, 1917; Brevet 
Sergeant Major, July, 1917-April 11, 1919; Served overseas with 
119th Infantry, 30th Division, April 1918-April, 1919; graduated 
from Army Candidates School, Langres, France, December 31, 
1918. At present, Captain Headquarters Battery, 113th Field 
Artillery, N. C. National Guard. Thirty-second degree Mason; 
Knights of Pythias; Sigma Nu, Psi Chapter, College Fraternity, 
University of North Carolina. Methodist. Married Miss Hazel 
Virginia Fetner of Savannah, Ga., November 22, 1922. Address: 
Dunn, N. C. 



VICTOR VERNON YOUNG 

Victor Vernon Young, Democrat, Representative from Durham 
County, was born in Durham, N. C, November 23, 1901. Son of 
W. H. and Annie Bertha (Clark) Young. Attended Durham High 
School, 1914-1918; A.B., University of North Carolina, 1923. At- 
tended Trinity and Wake Forest College Law Schools. Lawyer. 
Member Durham County Bar Association and State Bar Associ- 
ation. R. O. T. C, 1918, University of North Carolina. Chi Phi 
Fraternity. Representative in the General Assembly, 1929. Bap- 
tist. Married Miss Mildred Love Waters of Portsmouth, Va., 
November 27, 1926. Address: Durham, N. C.