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Full text of "North Carolina manual [serial]"

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UNIVERSITY OF N C AT CHAPEL HILL 

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This BOOK may be kept out-TWO WEEKS 
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PUBLICATIONS OF THE 

LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE LIBRARY 



& 



North Carolina Manual 

1937 




COMPILED AND EDITED 

BY 

H. M. LONDON 

LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE LIBRARIAN 

RALEIGH 

1937 



PRESSES OF 

Capital Printing Company 
state printers 

RA1.EIGH, N. C. 



PREFACE 



This volume is issued by the North Carolina Legislative Reference 
Library in order to furnish in succinct form information about the 
State, Its government and institutions, which otherwise would re- 
quire much investigation in many different sources. Unless other- 
wise stated, the data in each case is the latest available. 

Similar manuals were issued by the Secretary of State in 1903, 
1905, and 1907, and by the North Carolina Historical Commission in 
1909, 1911, 1913, 1915, 1917, 1919, 1921, 1923, 1925, 1927, 1929 and 
by the Legislative Reference Library in 1931, 1933, and 1935. The 
demand for these volumes has been so great that all editions except 
those of 1935 have been exhausted. 

The cut in the appropriations for printing, as a result of the gen- 
eral condition of State finances, has compelled a sharp reduction in 
the size and scope of editions of the Manual in recent years. 



to 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Official Register for 1937-1938 7 

The Legislative Department: 

Officers and Members of the Senate 13 

Senators (Arranged Alphabetically) 13 

Senators (Arranged by Districts) 14 

Senatorial Districts 16 

Rules of the Senate. 1937 17 

Standing Committees of the Senate 29 

Officers and Members of the House of Representatives 33 

Representatives (Arranged Alphabetically) 33 

Representatives (Arranged by Counties) 36 

Rules of the House of Representatives 39 

Standing Committees of the House of Representatives 54 

New State Boards and Commissions: 

The North Carolina Rural Electrification Authority 63 

North Carolina Rural Rehabilitation Corporation 64 

North Carolina State Commission for the Blind 65 

The Advisory Parole Board 66 

North Carolina State Planning Board 68 

North Carolina State Board of Photographic Examiners 68 

State Board of Commercial Education 69 

North Carolina Unemployment Compensation Commission 69 

Platforms and Political Parties, 1936: 

Democratic National Platform 73 

Republican National Platform 81 

State Democratic Platform 91 

State Republican Platform 100 

Election Returns: 

Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1936 107 

Popular Vote for President by States, 1924, 1928, 1932 108 

Vote for President by Counties, 1920-1936 110 

[5] 



6 Contents 

PAGE 

Vote tor Governor by Counties, Democratic Primaries 

1932 and 1936 113 

Vote for State Officers in Democratic Primaries June 6 

and July 4, 1936 116 

Vote for State Officers in Democratic Primaries, 1928. 1930, 

1932, 1934 and 1936 122 

Democratic Primary Vote, June 6, 1936, for United States 

Senator 124 

Democratic Primary Vote, June 4 and July 2, 1932, for 

United States Senator 126 

Vote for Chief Justice in 1934 128 

Vote for Governor by Counties, 1920-1936 129 

Vote for United States Senator, 1924-1936 132 

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primary, June 6, 1936, 

by Districts 135 

Vote for Members of Congress, 1924-1936 138 

Vote for Constitutional Amendments 146 

Biographical Sketches : 

Executive Officials 159 

Justices of the Supreme Court 166 

United States Senators 171 

Representatives in Congress 173 

Members of the General Assembly 179 



OFFICIAL REGISTER FOR 1937-1938 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

W. P. HORTON President of Senate Pittsboro 

R. Gregg Chekrv Speaker of House of Representatives Gastonia 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

Clyde R. HoEDf _ Governor Cleveland 

W. P. HoRTON Lieutenant Gov^-rnor Chatham 

Thad Eure Secretary of State Hertford 

C. M. Joh:5son _ Treasurer Pender 

George Ross Pou Auditor Wake 

Clyde A. Erwin Superintendent Public Instruction Rutherford 

A. A. F. Sbawell Attornty General Lee 

Harry McMullan Assistant Attorney General Beaufort 

T. Wade Bruton Assistant Attorney General Montgomery 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT 

SUPREME COURT JUSTICES 

W. p. Stacy Chief Justice New Hanover 

HEiRlOT Claukson Associate Justice Mecklenburg 

Geo. W. Connor Associate Justice Wilson 

Michael Schbnck Associate Justice Henderson 

W. A. Dbvin Associate Justice Granville 

SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES 

Waltek L. Small First District Pasquotank-Elizabeth City 

M. V. Barnhill Second District Nash-Rocky Mount 

R. Hunt Parker Third District Halifax-Roanoke Rapids 

C. L. Williams Fourth District Lee-Sanford 

J. Paul Frizzelle Fifth District Greene-Snow Hill 

H. A. Grady Sixth District _Sampson-Clinton 

W. C. Harris Seventh District Wake- Raleigh 

E. H. Cranmer Eighth District... Brunswick-Sou'thport 

N. A. SlNCL.^.IR Ninth District Cumberland-Fay ctteville 

Marshall T. Spears Tenth District Durham-Durham 

J. H. Clement Eleventh District Forsyth-Winston-SaUm 

H. Hoylb Sink Twelfth District Davidson-Lexington 

F. D. Phillips Thirteenth District Richmond-Rockingham 

W. F. Harding Fourteenth District Mecklenburg-Charlotte 

Frank M. Armstrong Fifteenth District Montgomery-Troy 

Wilson Warlick Sixteenth District Catawba-Newton 

J. A. Rousseau Seventeenth District Wilkes-Wilkcsboro 

J. W. Pless, Jr Eighteenth District McDowell-Marion 

P. A. McElroy Nineteenth District Madisnn-Marshall 

Felix E. Alley Twentieth District Hay wood-Waynesville 

special judges 

G. V. COWPER Lenoir-Kinston 

S. J. Ebvin, Jr Hurke-Morgantiin 

P'rank S. Hill Cherokee-Muri>hy 

emergency judges 

Thos. J. Shaw Guilford-Greonsboro 

F. A. Daniels Wayne-Goldsboro 

T. B. Finley Wilkes- Wilk< sboro 

17] 



8 Official TiE(;ist?:rs 



SOLICITORS 

HHRBI3RT R. LearY First District Chowan- Edenton 

DoNNta^L Gilliam Second District Edgecombe-Tarboro 

W. H. S. BuRGWYN Third District JSTorthampton-Woodland 

C. C. Canaday Fourth District Johnston-Benson 

D. M. Clark _ Fifth District Pitt-Greenville 

J. A. Powers Sixth District Lenoir-Kinston 

Wm. Y. Bickett Seventh District Wake-Raleigh 

J. J. BURNEY Eighth District JSIew Hanover-Wilmington 

T. A. McNeill Ninth District Robeson-Lumberton 

Leo Carr Tenth District Alamance-Burlington 

Allen H. Gw yn Eleventh District Reids ville-Rockingham 

H. L. KooNTZ Twelfth District ....Guilford-Greensboro 

R. S. Prubtte _ Thirteenth District JV^nson-Wadesboro 

J. G. Carpenter Fourteenth District Gaston-Gastonia 

Chas. L. Coggin Fifteenth District Rowan-Salisbury 

L. S. SpuRLING Sixteenth District .Caldwell-Lenoir 

John R. Jones Seventeenth District Wilkes-North Wilkesboro 

C. O. Ridings Eighteenth District Jlutherford-Forest City 

Zebulon V. Netttles Nineteenth District Buncombe-Asheville 

John M. Queen Twentieth District Hay wood-Way nesville 

UTILITIES COMMISSION 

Stanley Winborne Utilities Commissioner Raleigh 

F. W. Hanft Associate Commissioner Chapel Hill 

Fred L. Seely Associate Commissioner Asheville 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 
adjutant general's department 

J. Van B. Metts .The Adjutant General New Hanover 

department of agriculture 
W. Kerr Scott Commissioner Alamance 

department OF L.\B0R 

A. L. Flettcher Commissioner Ashe 

DEPARTMENT OF INSURANCE 

D. C. BONETf Commissioner Lenoir 

DEPARTMEJNT OF REVENUE 

A. J. Maxwell Commissioner Craven 

STATE HIGHW'-AY AND PUBLIC WORKS COMMISSION - 

Capus M. Waynick Chairman Guilford 

Charles Ross Attornty Harnett 

STATE B0.\RD of HB.^LTH 

Dr. C. V. Reynolds Secretary Buncombe 

department of C0NSERV.A.TI0N AND DEVELOPEMENT 

R. Bruce Etheridge Director Dare 

STATE BOARD OF CH.ARITIES AND PUBLIC WELFARE 

Mrs. W. T. Bost Commissioner Wake 



Official Registers 



NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Dr. C. C. Crittenden Secretary Wake 

LIBRARY COMMISSION 

Miss Marjorib Beal Secretary Wake 

STATE library 

Miss Carrie L. Broughton Librarian Wake 

SUPREME COURT LIBRARY 

John A. Livingstone Librarian Wake 

LEGISLATIVE RBFE2RHNCE LIBRARY 

Henry M. London Librarian Wake 

BUDGET BUREAU 

Clyde R. HoETif, ex-ofRcio Director Cleveland 

Frank L. Dunlap Assistant Director Anson 

INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

T. A. Wilson Chairman Forsyth 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT COMMISSION 

W. E. Easterling Secretary Wake 

SCHOOL COMMISSION 

Lloyd E. Griffin Executive Secretary Chowan 

banking COMMISSION 

Gurney' p. Hood Commissioner Wayne 

DIVISION of purchase and contract 
W. H. Pittman Director Edgecombe 

commission for the blind 
Dr. Roma S. Cheiik Executive Secretary Graham 

state HOAiU) OF ELECTIONS 

R. C. Maxwell Executive Secretary Wake 

P.VliOLE COMMISSIONER 

Edwin M. Gill _ Scotland 

RURAL electrification AUTHORITY 

Dudley W. Bagley Currituck 

STATE PLANNING BOARD 

H. W. Odum Secretary Oranne 

T. S. Johnson Consultant Wake 

UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION COMMISSION 

C. G. Powell Chairman Granville 



10 Official Registkrs 

Superior Court Calendar, 1937-1938 

District Spring, 1937 Fall, 1937 Spring, 1938 Fall, 1938 

1 Judge Williams Judge Parker Judge Barnhill Judge Small 

2 Judge Frizzelle Judge Williams Judge Parker Judge Barnhill 

3 Judge Grady Judge Frizzelle Judge Williams _Judge Parker 

4 Judge Harris Judge Grady Judge Frizzelle Judge Williams 

5 Judge Cranmer Judge Harris Judge Grady Judge Frizzelle 

6 Judge Sinclair Judge Cranmer Judge Harris Judge Grady 

7 Judge Spears Judge Sinclair Judge Cranmer Judge Harris 

8 Judge Small Judge Spears Judge Sinclair ,Judge Cranmer 

9 Judge Barnhill Judge Small Judge Spears Judge Sinclair 

10 Judge Parker Judge Barnhill Judge Small Judge Spears 

11 Judge Harding Judge Phillips Judge Sink Judge Clement 

12 Judge Armstrong Judge Harding Judge Phillips Judge Sink 

13 Judge Warlick Judge Armstrong. Judge Harding Judge Phillips 

14 Judge Rousseau Judge Warlick Judge Armstrong.. Judge Harding 

15 Judge Pless Judge Rousseau Judge Warlick Judge Armstrong 

16 Judge McElroy Judge Pless Judge Rousseau Judge Warlick 

17 Judge Alley Judge McElroy Judge Pless Judge Rousseau 

18 Judge Clement Judge Alley Judge McElroy Judge Pless 

19 Judge Sink Judge Clement Judge Alley Judge McElroy 

20 Judge PhilliiJs Judge Sink Judge Clement Judge Alley 



PART I 
THE LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



1. Officers of the Senate. 

2. Membees of the Senate (Arranged Alphabetically). 

3. Members of the Senate (Arranged by Districts). 

4. Senatorial Districts. 

5. Rules of the Senate. 

6. Standing Committees of the Senate. 

7. Officers of the House of Representatives. 

8. Members of the House of Representatives. (Arranged Alpha- 

betically). 

9. Members of the House of Representatives (Arranged by 

Counties). 

10. Rules of the House of Representatives. 

11. Standing Committees of the House of Representatives. 



L n I 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE SENATE 



OFFICERS 



W. p. Horton President 

A. Hall Johnston President pro tem.. 

S. Ray Byerly Principal Clerk 

Herman Scott Sergeant-at-Arms... 

Li. H. Fountain Reading Clerk 



..Chatham 

...Buncombe 

..Lee 

..Chatham 
..Edgecombe 



SENATORS 

(Arranged Alphabetically) 



Name 



Abernethy, L. M., 
Alcock, C. E 



District 



Party 



Twenty-eighth Democrat.. 

Twenty-seventh Democrat.. 



Bacon, F. P 

Bain, Edgar H 

Ballentine, L. Y....- 

Bell, James A 

Bennett, Kelly E 

Blackwelder, B. B 1 Twenty-fifth... 

Brock, B. C I Twenty fourth 



Twenty-seventh Democrat 

Eighth I Democrat 

Thirteenth ; Democrat 

Twentieth \ Democrat ». 

Thirty-third \ Democrat 

Democrat 

Republican 



Britt, W. S I Eleventh.. 



Clark, J. H 

Clark, W. G 

Coburn, R. L 

Eagles, J. C 

Ewing, W. C 

Flanagan, Ed. G.... 

Gay, A. C 

Gold, T. J 

Gravely, L. L 

Greer, Roby T 

Gregory, Edwin C. 



Democrat.. 



Tenth Democrat.. 

Fourth ! Democrat.. 

Second Democrat.. 



Sixth... 
Tenth.. 



Democrat.. 
Democrat-. 



Post Office 



Fifth ] Democrat.. 

Third | Democrat.. 

Seventeenth Democrat.. 

Sixth Democrat.. 

Twenty-ninth Democrat.. 

Twenty-first Democrat.. 



Halstead, W. I First Democrat... 

Hill, John Sprunt ' Sixteenth ' Democrat 

Holt, W. P I Eighth Democrat 

Hughes, J. J I First j D<mocrat 

Hutchin.s, Dr. J. H I Thirtieth I Republican.. 

Ingram, H. L Twelfth j Democrat 

Johnson, Jeff D., Jr Ninth \ Democrat.... 

Johnston, A. Hall j Thirty-first Democrat ... 

Joyner, Jack 1 Twenty-fifth Democrat... 

Larkins, John D., Jr I Seventh Democrat . 

Long, Dr. T. W. M Fourth Democrat.... 



Granite Falls 
Forest City 

Tryon 

Goldsboro 

Varina 

Charlotte 

Bryson City 

Hickory 

Mocksville 

Lumberton 

Elizabethtown 

Tarboro 

Williamston 

Wilson 
Fayetteville 

Greenville 

Jackson 
High Point 
Rocky Mount 
Boone 
Salisbury 

South Mills 
Durham 

Smithfifid 
Kliiyibeth City 
Marshall 

Asheboro 

Clinton 

Ash<'ville 

Statcsvillo 

Trenton 
Roanoke Rapids 



[ 13] 



14 



Legislative Depart.aiext 
E'EN ATORS— Continued 



Name 


District 


Party 


Post Office 


McBryde, Ryan „ 


Twelfth 

Twentieth 

Thirty-second 


Democrat 


Raeford 


McDaniel, John H _ 

McKee, Mrs. E. L 


Democrat 

Democrat 


Concord 
Sylva 


Martin, L. A 

Massey, C. S 


Eighteenth 

Nineteenth 


Democrat 

Democrat 


Lexington 
Waxhaw 


Noell, J. W 


Fifteenth 


Democrat 


Roxboro 


Patterson, J. A 

Pittman, J. C 


Eighteenth 

Thirteenth 


Democrat 

Democrat 


Laurinburg 
Sanford 


Ratcliff, H. M 

Rodman, W. B., Jr 

Rowe, Roy _.. 


Twenty-second 

Second 

Ninth 


Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 


Winston-Salem 

Washington 

Burgaw 


Sanders, Emerson T 

Separk, J. H 

Sparger, S. Gilmer 

Stacy, J. Benton 


Sixteenth 

Twenty-sixth 

Twenty-third 

Seventeenth 


Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 


Burlington 
Gastonia 
Danbury 
Ruffin 


Taylor, H. P 


Nineteenth 


Democrat 


Wadesboro 


Webb, Ernest V 

White. W. W 


Seventh 

Fourteenth 


Democrat 

Democrat 


Kinston 
Manson 



SENATORS 

(Arranged by Districts) 



(Democrats except otherwise stated) 

First District— ^Y. I. Halstead, South Mills; J. J. Hughes, Eliza- 
beth City. 

Second District — W. B. Rodman, Jr., Washington; R. L. Coburn, 
Williamston. 

Third District — A. C. Gay, Jackson. 

Fourth District— W. G. Clark, Tarboro; Dr. T. W. M. Long, 
Roanoke Rapids. 

Fifth District — Ed. G. Flanagan, Greenville. 

Sixth District — J. C. Eagles, Wilson; L. L. Gravely, Rocky Mount. 

Seventh District — John D. Larkins, Jr., Trenton; Ernest V. Webb, 
Kinston. 

Eighth District— \y. P. Holt, Smithfield; Edgar H. Bain, Golds- 
boro. 



Senatorial Distkicts 15 

Ninth District — Jeff D. Johnson, Jr., Clinton; Roy Rowe, Burgaw. 

Tenth District — James Hector Clark, Elizabethtown; Wall C. 
Ewing, Fayetteville. 

Eleventh District — W. S. Britt, Lumberton. 

Tivelfth District — H. L. Ingram, Asheboro; Ryan McBryde, Rae- 
ford. 

Thirteenth District — J. C. Pittman, Sanford; L. Y. Ballentine, 
Varlna. 

Fourteenth District — W. W. "White, Manson. 

Fifteenth District — J. W. Noell, Roxboro. 

Sixteenth District — John S. Hill, Durham; E. T. Sanders, Burling- 
ton. 

Seventeenth District — T. J. Gold, High Point; J. Benton Stacy, 
Rufnn. 

Eighteenth District — L. A. Martin, Lexington; J. A. Patterson, 
Laurinburg. 

Nineteenth District — H. P. Taylor, Wadesboro; C. S. Massey, Wax- 
haw. 

Tu-entieth District — James A. Bell, Charlotte; John H. McDaniel, 
Concord. 

Twenty-first District — Edwin C. Gregory, Salisbury. 

Twenty-second District — H. M. Ratcliff, Winston-Salem. 

Twenty-third District — S. Gilmer Sparger, Danbury. 

Twenty-fourth District — B. C. Brock (R), Mocksville. 

Twenty-fifth District — B. B. Blackwelder, Hickory; Jack Joyner, 
Statesville. 

Twenty-sixth District — J. H. Separk, Gastonia. 

Twenty -seventh District — C. E. Alcock, Forest City; F. P. Bacon, 
Tryon. 

Twenty-eighth District — L. M. Abernethy, Granite Falls. 

Tweniy-ninth District — Roby T. Greer, Boone. 

Thirtieth District — Dr. J. H. Hutchins (R), Marshall. 

Thirty-first District — A. Hall Johnston, Asheville. 

Thirty-second District — Mrs. E. L. McKee, Sylva. 

Thirty-third District— Kelly Bennett, Bryson City. 



SENATORIAL DISTRICTS 



Ch. 161, P. L., 1921 

^ First District — Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Gates, Hertford, Pas- 
quotank and Perquimans counties shall elect two senators. 
^^ Second District — Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin, Pamlico, Tyrrell 
and Washington shall elect two senators. 

Third District — Bertie and Northampton shall elect one senator. 
— Fourth District — Edgecombe and Halifax shall elect two senators. 
Fifth District — Pitt shall elect one senator. 

Sixth District — Franklin, Nash and Wilson shall elect two sena- 
tors. 
'Seventh District — Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, Lenoir, and 
^^ Onslow shall elect two senators. 

Eighth District — Johnston and Wayne shall elect two senators. 
Ninth District — Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and Sampson shall 
<^ elect two senators. 

Tenth District — Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus and Cumberland 
shall elect two senators. 

Eleventh District — Robeson shall elect one senator. 
^^ Twelfth District — Harnett, Hoke, Moore and Randolph shall elect 
two senators. 

- Thirteenth District — Chatham, Lee and Wake shall elect two sen- 
ators. 

Fou7-teenth District — Vance and Warren shall elect one senator. 
Fifteenth District — Granville and Person shall elect one senator. 
^ Sixteenth District — Alamance, Caswell, Durham and Orange shall 
elect two senators. 

Seventeenth District — Guilford and Rockingham shall elect two 
senators. 

Eighteenth District — Davidson, Montgomery, Richmond and Scot- 
'^and shall elect two senators. 

Ni?ietcenth District — Anson, Stanly and Union shall elect two sen- 
'^tors. 

TwentietJi District — Cabarrus and Mecklenburg shall elect two 
''senators. 

Twenty-first District — Rowan shall elect one senator. 
Twenty-second District — Forsyth shall elect one senator. 

[ 16] 



Rules of the Senate 17 

Twenty-third District — Stokes and Surry shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-fourth District — Davie, Wilkes and Yadkin shall elect one 
senator. 

Tiventy-fifth District — Catawba, Iredell and Lincoln shall elect 
^two senators. 

Twenty-sixth Disirict — Gaston shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-seventh District — Cleveland, Henderson, McDowell, Polk 
and Rutherford shall elect two senators. 

Tiventy-eighth District — Alexander, Burke and Caldwell shall 
elect one senator. 

Twenty-ninth District — Alleghany, Ashe and Watauga shall elect 
one senator. 

Thirtieth District — Avery, Madison, Mitchell and Yancey shall 
elect one senator. 

Thirty-first District — Buncombe shall elect one senator. 

Thirty-second District — Haywood, Jackson and Transylvania shall 
elect one senator. 

Thirty-third District — Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon and Swafn 
shall elect one senator. 



RULES OF THE SENATE, 1937 



Order of Biisine.ss 

1. The President having taken the chair at the hour to which 
the Senate shall have adjourned, and a quorum being present, the 
Journal of the pieceding day shall be read, unless otherwise 
ordered by the Senate, to the end that any mistake may be 
corrected. » 

2. After reading and approval of the Journal, the oi-der of 
business shall be as follows: 

(1) Reports of standing committees. 

(2) Reports of select committees. 

(3) Introduction of petitions, bills, and resolutions. 

(4) Unfinished business of preceding day. 

(5) Special orders. 

(G) General orders. First, bills and resolutions on third read- 
ing; second, bills and resolutions on second reading. But mes- 



18 LeGISLATIVK JJErARTAfp:KT 

sages from the Governor and House of Representatives and com- 
munications and reports from State officers and reports from the 
Committee on Engrossed Bills and Enrolled Bills may be received 
and acted on under any order of business. 

I'owcrs and Duties of the President 

3. He shall take the chair promptly at the appointed time and 
proceed with the business of the Senate according to the rules 
adopted. At any time during the absence of the President, the 
President pro tempore, who shall be elected, shall preside, and he 
is hereby vested,, during such time, with all powers of the Presi- 
dent except that of giving a casting vote in case of a tie when he 
shall have voted as a Senator. 

4. He shall assign to doorkeepers their respective duties, and 
shall appoint such pages and laborers as may be necessary, each 
of whom shall receive the same compensation as is now provided 
by law. 

Of the Principal Clerk 

5. The President and the Principal Clerk of the Senate shall 
see that all bills shall be acted upon by the Senate in the order 
in which they stand upon the Calendar, unless otherwise ordered 
as hereinafter provided. The Calendar shall include the numbers 
and titles of bills and joint resolutions which have passed the 
House of Representatives and have been received by the Senate 
for concurrence. 

6. The Principal Clerk shall certify the passage of bills by the 
Senate, with the date thereof, together with the fact whether 
passed by a vote of three-fifths or two-thirds of the Senate, when- 
ever sucfi vote may be required by the Constitution and laws of 
the State. 

7. All necessary supplies and stationery for the Senate, its 
various offices and committees of the Senate shall be purchased 
upon requisition of the Principal Clerk, with the approval of the 
President of the Senate. 

7a. The office of Engrossing Clerk is discontinued, and the 
duties of that office as heretofore performed by the Engrossing 
Clerk shall devolve upon the Principal Clerk, who is charged with 
the responsibility therefor. 



Rules of the Senate 19 

On the Rights and Duties of Senators 

8. Every Senator presenting a paper shall endorse the same; 
if a petition, memorial, or report to the General Assembly, with 
a brief statement of its subject or contents, adding his name; if 
a resolution, with his name; if a report of a committee, a state- 
ment of such report with the name of the committee and member 
making the same; if a bill, a statement of its title, which shall 
contain a brief statement of the subject or contents of the bill, 
with his name; and all bills, resolutions, petitions and memorials 
shall be delivered to the Principal Clerk and by him handed to 
the President to be by him referred, and he shall announce the 
titles and references of the same, which shall be entered on the 
Jotirnal. 

9. All motions shall be reduced to writing, if desired by the 
President or any Senator, delivered at the table, and read by the 
President or Reading Clerk before the same shall be debated; 
but any such motion may be withdrawn by the introducer at any 
time before decision or amendment. 

10. If any question contains several distinct propositions it 
shall be divided by the President, at the request of any Senator, 
provided each subdivision, if left to itself, shall form a substantive 
proposition. 

11. When the President is putting a question, or a division by 
counting shall be had, no Senator shall walk out of or across the 
Chamber, nor when a Senator is speaking, pass between him and 
the President. 

12. Every Senator wishing to speak or debate, or to present 
a petition or other paper, or to make a motion or to report, shall 
rise from his seat and address the President, and shall not pro- 
ceed further until recognized by him. No Senator shall speak 
or debate more than twice nor longer than thirty minutes on the 
same day on the same subject without leave of the Senate, and 
when two or more Senators rise at once, the President shall name 
the Senator who is first to speak. 

13. Every Senator who shall be within \ho bar of the Senate 
when the question is stated by the chair shall v()l(^ thereon, unless 
he shall be excused by the Senate or unless he be directly inter- 
ested in the question; and the bar of the Senate shall Include the 
entire Senate Chamber. 



20 Legislative Department 

14. When a motion to adjourn or for recess shall be affirma- 
tively determined, no member or officers shall leave his place until 
adjournment or recess shall be declared by the President. 

Standing Coniniittecs 

15. The following committees shall be named by the Lieuten- 
ant-Governor: 

On Agriculture. 

On Appropriations. 

On Banks and Currency. 

On Caswell Training School. 

On Claims. 

On Commercial Fisheries. 

On Congressional Districts. 

On Conservation and Development. 

On Consolidated Statutes. 

On Constitutional Amendments. 

On Corporations. 

On Counties, Cities, and Towns. 

On Courts and Judicial Districts. 

On Distribution of Governor's Message. 

On Education. 

On Election Law. 

On Engrossed Bills. 

On Enrolled Bills. 

On Federal Relations. 

On Finance. 

On Immigration. 

On Insane Asylums. 

On Institutions for the Blind. 

On Institutions for the Deaf. 

On Insurance. 

On Internal Improvements. 

On Journal. 

On Judiciary, No. 1. 

On Judiciary, No. 2. 

On Justices of the Peace. 

On Library. 

On Manufacturing, Labor and Commerce. 



Rules of the Senate 21 

On Military Affairs. 

On Mining. 

On Penal Institutions. 

On Pensions and Soldiers' Home. 

On Propositions and Grievances. 

On Public Health. 

On Public Roads. 

On Public Utilities. 

On Public Welfare. 

On Railroads. 

On Rules. 

On Salaries and Fees. 

On Senate Expenditures. 

On Senatorial Districts. 

On Water Commerce. 

16. Joint Coininittees 

On Printing. 

On Trustees of the University. 

17. The Committee on Engrossed Bills shall examine all bills, 
amendments, and resolutions before they go out of the possession 
of the Senate, and make a report when they find them correctly 
engrossed: Provided, that when a bill is typewritten and has no 
interlineations therein, and has passed the Senate without amend- 
ment, it shall be sent to the House without engrossment, unless 
otherwise ordered. 

18. The Committee on Appropriations shall carefully examine 
all bills and resolutions appropriating or paying any moneys out 
of the State Treasury, except bills creating or increasing salaries, 
which shall Ije referred to the proper committee: Provided. .<aid 
committee shall report to the Appropriations Committee the 
amount allowed, and keep an accurate record of the same and 
report to the Senate from time to time. All bills introduced in 
the Senate providing for bond issues, levying taxes, or in any 
manner affecting the taxing power of the State or any subdivision 
thereof, shall, before being considered by the Senate, be referred 
to the Committee on Finance, and l)ills referred to other commit- 
tees carrying any of the provisions herein mentioned shall l)e re- 



22 Legislative Department 

referred to the Senate as being bills to be considered by the 
Finance Committee before proper action may be taken by the 
Senate. 

19. Every report of the committee upon a bill or resolution 
which shall not be considered at the time of making the same, or 
laid on the table by a vote of the Senate, shall stand upon the 
general orders with the bill or resolution; and the report of the 
committee shall show that a majority of the committee were pres- 
ent and voted. 

On General Orders and Special Orders 

20. Any bill or other matter may be made a special order for 
a particular day or hour by a vote of the majority of the Senators 
voting, and if it shall not be completed on that day, it shall be 
returned to its place on the Calendar, unless it shall be made a 
special order for another day; and when a special order is under 
consideration it shall take precedence of any special order or 
subsequent order for the day, but such subsequent order may be 
taken up immediately after the previous special order has been 
disposed of. 

21. Every bill shall receive three readings previous to its being 
passed, and the President shall give notice at each whether it be 
the first, second, or third. After the first reading, unless a motion 
shall be made by some Senator, it shall be the duty of the Presi- 
dent to refer the subject-matter to an appropriate committee. 
No bill shall be amended until it shall have been twice read. 

Proceedings Wlien There Is Not a Quorum Voting 

22. If, on taking the question on a bill, it shall appear that a 
constitutional quorum is not present, or if the bill require a vote 
of a certain proportion of all the Senators to pass it, and it ap- 
pears that such number is not present, the bill shall be again read 
and the question taken thereon; if the bill fail a second time for 
the want of the necessary number being present and voting, the 
bill shall not be finally lost, but shall be returned to the Calendar 
in its proper order. 



Rules of the Senate 23 

Precedence of Motions 

2 3. When a question is befoi-e the Senate no motion shall be 
received except those herein specified, which motions shall have 
precedence as follows, viz.: 

(1) For an adjournment. 

(2) To lay on the table. 

(3) For the previous question. 

(4) To postpone indefinitely. 

( 5 ) To postpone to a certain day. 

(6) To commit to a standing committee. 

(7) To commit to a select committee. 

(8) To amend. 

(9) To substitute. 

24. The previous question shall be as follows: "Shall the main 
question be now put?" and until it is decided shall preclude all 
amendments and debate. If this question shall be decided in the 
affirmative, the "main question" shall be on the passage of the 
bill, resolution, or other matter under consideration; but when 
amendments are pending, the question shall be taken up on such 
amendments, in their inverse order, without further debate or 
amendment: Provided, that no one shall move the previous ques- 
tion except the member submitting the report on the bill or other 
matter under consideration, and the member introducing the bill 
or other matter under consideration, or the member in charge of 
the measure, who shall be designated by the chairman of the 
committee reporting the same to the Senate at the time the bill 
or other matter under consideration is reported to tlie Senate or 
talien up for consideration. 

25. When a motion for the previous question is made and is 
pending, debate shall cease, and only a motion to adjourn or lay 
on the table shall be in order, which motions shall be put as 
follows: adjourn, previous question, lay on the table. After a 
motion for the previous question is made, pending a second 
thereto, any member may give notice that he desires to offer an 
amendment to the bill or other matter under consideration; and 
after the previous question is seconded such member shall be 
entitled to offer his amendment in pursuance of such notice. 



24 LecxIslative Departaient 

other Questions To Be Taken Without Debate 

2 6. The motions to adjourn and lay on the table shall be de- 
cided without debate, and the motion to adjourn shall always be 
in order when made by a Senator entitled to the floor. 

2 7. The respective motions to postpone to a certain day, or to 
commit, shall preclude debate on the main question. 

2 8. All questions relating to priority of business shall be de- 
cided without debate. 

29. When the reading of a paper is called for, except petitions, 
and the same is objected to by any Senator, it shall be determined 
by the Senate without debate. 

30. Any Senator requesting to be excused from voting may 
make, either immediately before or after the vote shall have been 
called for and before the result shall have been announced, a brief 
statement of the reasons for making such request, and the ques- 
tion shall then be taken without debate. Any Senator may ex- 
plain his vote on any bill pending by obtaining permission of the 
President before the vote is put: Provided, that not more than 
three minutes shall be consumed in such explanation. 

Questions That Require a Two-Thirds Vote 

31. No bill or resolution on its third reading shall be acted on 
out of the regular order in which it stands on the Calendar, and 
no bill or resolution shall be acted upon on its third reading the 
same day on which it passed its second reading unless so ordered 
by two-thirds of the Senators present. 

3 2. No bill or resolution shall be sent from the Senate on the 
day of its passage except on the last day of the session, unless 
otherwise ordered by a vote of two-thirds of the Senators present. 

33. No bill or resolution after being laid upon the tal)le upon 
motion shall be taken therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of 
the Senators present. 

Decorum in Debate 

3 4. No remark reflecting personally upon the action of any 
Senator shall be in order in debate unless preceded by a motion 
or resolution of censure. 

3 5. When a Senator shall be called to order he shall take his 
seat until the President shall have determined whether he was in 



Rt'LES OF THE Senate 25 

order or not; if decided to be out of order, he shall not proceed 
without the permission of the Senate; and every question of order 
shall be decided by the President, subject to an appeal to the 
Senate by any Senator; and if a Senator is called to order for 
words spoken, the words excepted to shall be immediately taken 
down in writing, that the President or Senate may be better able 
to judge of the matter. 

Miscellaiieous Rules 

36. When a question has been once put and decided, it shall 
be in order for any Senator who shall have voted in the major- 
ity to move a reconsideration thereof; but no motion for the 
reconsideration of any vote shall be in order after the bill, reso- 
lution, message, report, amendment, or motion upon which the 
vote was taken shall have gone out of the possession of the 
Senate; nor shall any motion for reconsideration be in order 
unless made on the same day or the next following legislative 
day on which the vote proposed to be reconsidered shall have 
taken place, unless same shall be made by the Committee on 
Enrolled Bills for verbal or grammatical errors in the bills, 
when the same may be made at any time. Nor shall any ques- 
tion be reconsidered more than once. 

37. All bills and resolutions shall take their place upon the 
Calendar according to their number, and shall l)e taken up in 
regular order, unless otherwise ordered. 

3 8. No smoking shall be allowed on the floor of the Senate 
Chamber during the sessions. 

39. Senators and visitors shall uncover their heads upon en- 
tering the Senate Chamber while the Senate is in session, and 
shall continue uncovered during their continuance in the Cham- 
ber. 

4 0. No Senator or ofRcei- of the Senate shall depart the ser- 
vice of the Senate without leave, or receive pay as a Senator 
or officer for the time he is absent without leave. 

41. No person other than the executive and judicial officers 
of the State, members and officers of the Senate and House of 
Representatives, and ex-members shall l)e permitted within the 
Senate Chamber. 



26 Legislative Department 

42. No rule of the Senate shall be altered, suspended, or 
rescinded except on a two-thirds vote of the Senators present. 

43. In case a less number than a quorum of the Senate shall 
convene, they are authorized to send the doorkeeper, or any 
other person, for any or all absent Senators, as a majority of 
the Senators present shall determine. 

44. The ayes and noes may be called for on any question be- 
fore the vote is taken, and if seconded by one-fifth of the Sen- 
ators present, the question shall be decided by the ayes and noes, 
and the same shall be entered upon the Journal. 

45. The chairman of the following committees, with the ap- 
proval of the President of the Senate, shall appoint clerks in 
order to expedite the business of the Session of 1937, as follows: 

Finance, Roads, Judiciary, No. 1, Judiciary, No. 2, Counties, 
Cities, and Towns, Election Laws, Insurance, Agriculture, Con- 
servation and Development, Appropriations, Education, Rules, 
Public Health, Manufacturing, Commerce and Labor, Proposi- 
tions and Grievances. 

In addition to the above-named clerks, the President of the 
Senate shall, upon recommendation of the Rules Committee, ap- 
point additional clerks, who shall perform such duties as may 
be assigned them by the Principal Clerk of the Senate. 

All Committee Clerks, when not in attendance upon the direct 
duties connected with the committee to which they are assigned, 
shall report to the Principal Clerk of the Senate and, in order 
to expedite the work of the Senate, shall perform such clerical 
or stenographic work as may be assigned to them. 

4 6. Every bill introduced into the Senate shall be printed or 
typewritten. Amendments need not be typewritten. 

47. All bills shall be read by their titles, which reading shall 
constitute the first reading of the bill, and unless otherwise dis- 
posed of shall be referred to the proper committee. A bill may 
be introduced by unanimous consent at any time during the 
session. 

4S. The Journal of the Senate shall be typewritten in dupli- 
cate, original and carbon, the original to be deposited in the 
office of the Secretary of State as the record, and the other 
(carbon) copy to be delivered to the State Printer. 



Rules of the Senate 27 

49. All bills and resolutions reported unfavorably by the com- 
mittee to which they were referred, and having no minority re- 
port, shall lie upon the table, but may be taken from the table 
and placed upon the Calendar by a two-thirds vote of those 
present and voting. 

50. That in case of adjournment without any hour being 
named, the Senate shall reconvene the next legislative day at 
11 o'clock a. m. 

51. When a bill is materially modified or the scope of its 
application extended or decreased, or if the county or counties 
to which it applies be changed, the title of the bill shall be 
changed by the Senator introducing the bill or by the committee 
having it in charge, or by the Principal Clerk, so as to indicate 
the full purport of the bill as amended and the county or coun- 
ties to which it applies. 

52. The pages of the Senate shall be responsible to and under 
the direction of the President at all times when the Senate is 
in session, and shall not exceed fourteen in number. They shall 
report to the Principal Clerk at other times to be assigned such 
duties as he may direct and shall be under his supervision. 

53. After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass on any 
of its readings, the contents of such bill or the principal pro- 
visions of its subject-matter shall not be embodied in any other 
measure. Upon the point of order being raised and sustained 
by the Chair, such measure shall be laid upon the table, and 
shall not be taken therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of 
the elected membership of the Senate: Provided, no local bill shall 
be held by the Chair as embodying the provisions, or being iden- 
tical with any State-wide measure which has been laid upon the 
table or failed to pass any of its readings. 

54. That in the event of the absence of the President of the 
Senate and the President pro tempore, at any time fixed for the 
reconvening of the Senate, the Principal Clerk of the Senate, or 
in his absence also, some member of the Senate Committee on 
Rules shall call the Senate to order and designate some member 
to act as President. 

55. Whenever a public bill is introduced, a carbon copy there- 
of shall accompany the bill. The Reading Chn-k shall stamp 



28 Legislative Department 

the copy with the number stamped upon the original bill. Such 
copy shall be daily delivered to the joint committee hereinafter 
provided lor. The Principal Clerk shall deliver the carbon copy 
of the bills designated to be printed as hereinafter provided for 
to the public printer and cause 400 copies thereof to be printed. 
On the morning following the delivery of the printed copies the 
Chief Clerk shall cause the Chief Page to have one copy thereof 
put upon the desk of each member, and shall retain the other 
printed copies in his office. A sufficient number of the printed 
copies for the use of the committee to which the bill is referred 
shall be by the Chief Page delivered to the Chairman or Clerk 
of that committee. If the bill is passed, the remaining copies 
shall be by the Chief Page delivered to the Principal Clerk of 
the House for the use of the House. The cost of printing shall 
be paid from the contingent fund of the Senate. The Chairman 
of the Rules Committee of the Senate and the Chairman of the 
Rules Committee of the House shall appoint a subcommittee con- 
sisting of three members of the Senate and two members of the 
House from the body of the Senate and the House, and such 
Chairman shall notify the Principal Clerk of the House and of 
the Senate who has been appointed. Such subcommittee shall 
meet daily and examine the carbon copies of the public bills in- 
troduced and determine which of such public bills shall be print- 
ed and which shall not, and stamp the copies accordingly. If 
the member, introducing a public bill, which the committee shall 
determine, should not be printed, so desires, he may appear be- 
fore the committee at the next meeting thereof with reference 
thereto. 

5 6. When a bill has been introduced and referred to a com- 
mittee, if after ten days the committee has failed to report there- 
on, then the author of the bill may, after three days public notice 
given in the Senate, on motion supported by a vote of two-thirds 
of the Senators present and voting, recall the same from the 
committee to the floor of the Senate for consideration and such 
action thereon as a majority of the Senators present may direct. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE SENATE 



Agriculture — Senators Clark of Edgecombe, Chairman; White, 
Stacy, Ballentine, Britt, Ewing, Hill, Noell, Eagles, McBryde, Pat- 
terson, Johnston of Buncombe, Joyner, Greer, Alcock, Sparger, 
Johnson of Sampson. 

Appropriations — Senators Bell, Chairman; Clark of Bladen, Greer, 
Sparger, McKee, Gold, Separk, Bennett, Johnson of Sampson, Ewing, 
Gravely, Gregory, Noell, Bacon, Coburn, Martin, McDaniel, McBryde, 
Abernethy, Rowe, Brock. 

Banking and Currency — Senators Flanagan, Chairman; Hill, 
Stacy, Taylor, Larkins, Joyner, Gay, Alcock, Johnson of Sampson, 
Ratcliff, Ewing, Clark of Bladen, Bennett, Bain, Gravely, Britt, Mar- 
tin, Sanders. 

Caswell Training School — Senators Holt, Chairman; Webb, Hill, 
Bennett, Flanagan, Eagles, Britt. 

Claims — Senators Britt, Chairman; Ewing, McBryde, White, Hal- 
stead, Joyner, McKee. 

Commercial Fisheries — Senators Halstead, Chairman; Gay, Rod- 
man, Hughes, Larkins, Rowe, Holt, McKee, Brock. 

Congressional Districts — Senators Rodman, Chairman; Bell, 
Gravely, Hill, Johnston of Buncombe, Separk, McDaniel, Abernethy, 
Larkins. 

Conserration and Development — Senators Gravely, Chairman: 
Halstead, Coburn, Long, Webb, Ewing, Clark, Gregory, Greer, John- 
ston of Buncombe, Noell, McBryde, Separk, Patterson, Hill, Sanders, 
Martin, Bennett. 

Consolidated Statutes — Senator Abernethy, Chaivnian; Halstead, 
Joyner, Rodman, Sparger, Larkins, Sanders, Gold. 

Constitutional Amendments — Senators Ratcliff. Chairman; Pitt- 
man, Abernethy, Rodman, Hill, Gregory, Coburn, McDaniel, Ingram. 
McBryde, Halstead, Holt, Britt, Ballentine. 

Corporations — Senators Eagles, Chairman; Hill, Sander.^, .McDan- 
iel, Blackwelder, Separk, Gravely, Ballentine, Ratcliff. 

I 29 J 



30 Legislativk Department 

CoimUes, Cities and Toxcns — Senators Ingram, Chairman; Clark 
of Edgecombe, Ewing, Gay, Abernethy, Halstead, Holt, Rowe, Long, 
Bain, Britt, McBryde, White, Patterson, Stacy, McKee, Bacon. 

Courts and Judicial Districts — Senators Coburn, Chairman; Pitt- 
man, Joyner, Larkins, Taylor, Ingram, Gay, Halstead, Rodman. 

Distribution of Governor's Message — Senators McDaniel, Chair- 
man; Holt, Britt, White, Rowe, Stacy, McKee. 

Education — Senators Noell, Chairman; Taylor, Stacy, Hughes, 
Rodman, Gay, Eagles, Webb, Johnson of Sampson, Clark of Bladen, 
Joyner, Ballentine, Hill, McDaniel, Sparger, Blackwelder, Greer, 
McKee, Johnston of Buncombe, Hutchins. 

Election Laws — Senators Bennett, Chairman; Johnston of Bun- 
combe, Taylor, Gregory, Alcock, Bacon, Ewing, Ratcliff, Gay, Rod- 
man, Clark of Edgecombe, Larkins, Noell, Brock, Sparger. 

Engrossed Bills — Senators Separk, Chairman; Abernethy, Britt, 
Gold, Halstead, Holt. 

Enrolled B;7Zs— Senators Alcock, Chairman; Halstead, Rowe, 
Gregory, Britt, Martin. 

Federal Relations — Senators Greer, Chairman; Hill, Clark of 
Edgecombe, Holt, Britt, Ballentine, Ingram, McKee, Alcock, Black- 
welder. 

Finance — Senators Webb, Chairman; Johnston of Buncombe, 
Stacy, Bell, Taylor, Rodman, Ratcliff, Hill, Gravely, Blackwelder, 
Joyner, Larkins, Pittman, Hughes, Eagles, Ingram, Flanagan, Long, 
Sanders, Hutchins. 

Immigration — Senators Patterson, Chairman; Separk, Halstead, 
Britt, Rowe, Hughes, Ewing. 

Insane Asylums — Senators Clark of Bladen, Chairman; Clark of 
Edgecombe, Webb, Hill, Stacy, McKee, Bell, Gold, Blackwelder, 
Brock. 

Institutions for the Blind — Senators Bacon, Chairman; Ballentine, 
Hill, Clark of Edgecombe, Hutchins, Abernethy. 

Institutions for the Deaf — Senators Taylor, Chairman; Larkins, 
Flanagan, Coburn, Johnson of Sampson, Britt, Bell, McDaniel, Aber- 
nethy. 



Senate Committees 31 

Insurance — Senators Stacy, Chairman; Gravely, Ballentine, John- 
ston of Buncombe, Joyner, Clark of Edgecombe, Gold, Long, Ben- 
nett, Hughes, Plttman, Hill, Flanagan, Bain, Blackwelder, McBryde, 
Ingram, McDaniel, Sanders, Massey. 

Internal I^nprovements — Senators Blackwelder, Chairman; Hal- 
stead, Britt, Ewing, McBryde, Ingram, McKee. 

Journal — Senators White, Chairman; Pittman, Ingram, Gay, Ben- 
nett, Martin, Stacy. 

Judiciary No. 1 — Senators Gold, Chairman; Larkins, Pittman, Rat- 
cliff, Johnston of Buncombe, Joyner, Abernethy, Coburn. Taylor, 
Rodman. 

Judiciary No. 2 — Senators Gay, Chairman; Sparger, Sanders, Mar- 
tin, Gregory, Halstead, Britt, Bell, Brock. 

Justices of the Peace — Senators Sanders, Chairman; Pittman, In- 
gram, Gravely, Greer, Patterson, Britt, Gregory, Brock. 

Library — Senators Hughes, Chairman; Ballentine, Gravely, Hill, 
Martin, Gregory, McKee, Brock. 

Manufactiiri7ig, Labor and Commerce — Senators Hill, Chairman; 
Ballentine, Webb, Gold, Martin, Clark of Edgecombe, Clark of 
Bladen, Bain, Separk, Massey, Long, Blackwelder, Johnson of Samp- 
son. 

Militury Affairs — Senators Bain, Chairman; Rodman, Rowe, Tay- 
lor, McDaniel, Sparger, Brock. 

Penal Institutions — Senators Pittman, Chairman; Sparger, Joy- 
ner, Flanagan, Patterson, Bacon, Halstead, Britt, Alcock, Johnston 
of Buncombe, Larkins, Clark of Bladen, Stacy, Brock. 

Printing — Senators Rowe, Chairman; Alcock, Noell, Gravely, Pat- 
terson, Massey, Greer, McKee. 

Pensions and i-!oldiers' Home — Senators Massey, Chairman; Bell, 
Bacon, Hill, Alcock, Abernethy, McKee. 

Propositions and Grievances — Senators Ballentine, Chairman; 
Ewing, Greer, Holt, Abernethy, Sanders. Hutchins. Gay, McDaniel. 
Taylor, Massey, Hill. 



32 Legislative JJEPAiiXMENT 

Puhlic Health — Senators Long, Chairman; Taylor, Johnson of 
Sampson, Halstead, Rowe, Britt, Massey, Gregory, McKee, Pat- 
terson, Hill, Bain, Hutchins. 

Public Roads — Senators Sparger, Chairman; Ballentine, Ingram, 
Stacy, Taylor, Joyner, Larkins, Gold, Blackwelder, Hill, White, Pitt- 
man, Bacon, Abernethy, Halstead, Ratcliff, Separk, Greer, Eagles, 
Johnston of Buncombe, Bennett. 

Public Utilities — Senators Larkins, Chairman; Noel, Taylor, Bal- 
lentine, Bennett, Blackwelder, Hill, Joyner, Patterson, Britt, Clark 
of Bladen, Sparger. 

Puhlic Welfare — Senators McKee, Chairman; Hill, Coburn, Stacy, 
Martin, Johnson of Sampson, Sanders, Long, Johnston of Buncombe, 
Rodman, Ratcliff, Separk, Rowe, Bain. 

Railroads — Senators Johnson of Sampson, Chairman; Long, Joy- 
ner, Gravely, Ratcliff, Bain, Massey, Hill. 

Rules — Senators Johnston of Buncombe, Chairman; Clark of 
Edgecombe, Gravely, Flanagan, Taylor, Stacy, Ballentine, Gay, Long, 
Sparger. 

Salaries and Fees — Senators Martin, Chairman; Rowe, White, 
Abernethy, Bacon, Ingram, Massey, Patterson, Ballentine, Hill. 

Senate Expenditures — Senators McBryde, Chairman; White, Bal- 
lentine, Hill, Eagles. 

Senatorial Districts — Senators Gregory, Chairman; Abernethy, 
Clark of Edgecombe, Hill, Gravely, Coburn, Sanders, Martin, Bell, 
Sparger, Johnston of Buncombe. 

Trustees of the University — Senators Joyner, Chairman; Stacy. 
Gregory, Alcock, Hill, Long, Gold, White, Pittman, Johnston of Bun- 
combe, McKee, Ratcliff, Rodman, Clark of Edgecomlie, Gravely, 
Brock. 

Water Commerce — Senators Ewing, Chairman; Webb, Rodman. 
Hughes, Long, Coburn, Hill, Johnson of Sampson. 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE 
OF REPRESENTATIVES 



OFFICERS 

R. Gregg Cherry Speaker Gaston 

W. A. Baker, Jr Principal Clerk Wake 

Dan Tompkins Reading Clerk Jackson 

W. Thomas Brown Sergeant-at-Arms Perquimans 

Miss Rosa B. Mund Engrossing Clerk Cabarrus 



REPRESENTATIVES 

(Arranged Alphabetically) 



Name 



County 



Abernathy, C. C _. Nash 

Adams, S. L Robeson. 

Allen, Arch T Wake 

Andrews, Wm. Wiley Wayne. ... 

Atkinson, A. M Halifax.. 

AycLK;k, T. H Warren.. 



Banks, C. P Jones 

Banks, R. G Pamlico. 

Baley, J. M., Jr Madison 

Barker, Oscar G Durham 

Barnes, Troy T Wilson.. 

Best, John J Pender.. 

Best, W. H., Jr Wayne.. 

Benton, J. T 
Berry, F. C... 



Party 



Post Office 



Democrat Spring Hope 

Democrat Kowla nd 

Democrat Raleigh 

Democrat G :ldsboro, R.F.D. 2 

Democrat Enliuid 

Democrat Warrenton 



Democrat Trenton 

Democrat Arapahoe 

Republican Marshall 

Democrat Durham 

Democrat Wilson 

Democrat Burgaw 

Democrat Goldsboro 

Perquimans Democrat Hertford 

Burke Democrat Morganton 



Bost, E. T., Jr Cabarrus Democrat Concord 

Blankenship, Mercer J Mfcklenburg Democrat Charlotte 

Blount, Sam M Beaufort Democrat Washington 

Brooks, P. H Johnston Democrat Smithfield 



Bryant, Victor 
Burgin, L. L... 
Burleson, Jeter 



S. 



Durham Democrat... 

Henderson Democrat... 

Mitchell Republican. 



Cabe, J. F Haywood I Democrat.. 



Caffey, John W. 
Carruthers, Joe T., Jr. 

Cherry, R. G 

Clark, Thorne 

Cooper, H. P 

Cooper, T. E 

Craig, George W 



E. 



Davis, George 

Davis, Roy L 

Davis, W. Bryan.. 

Dellinger, D. P 

Dellinger, T. P.. 



Guilford j Democrat.. 

Guilford Democrat.. 

Gaston Democrat.. 

Line Mn Democrat.. 

Cherokee. Democrat.. 

New Hanovsr Democrat.. 

Buncombe Democrat.. 



Hyde Democrat... 

Dare Democrat... 

Randolph Demcicrat. . 

Gaston Democrat... 

Avery Republican 



Durham 
Horse Shoe, 
Bakersville 

Wayncsville 

Greensboro 

Greensboro 

Gastonia 

Lincolnton 

Murphy 

Wilmington 

Asheville 

Swan (Juartir 

Wanchcse 

Ranilleman, 

Chcrryvillc 
Crussnore 



R.F.D. 



R.F.I). 



[ 3.3 1 



;54 



LeGISLATIVK J)j:rAKTMEMT 



REPRESENTATIVES— Confrnwed 



Name 



County 



Eagles, W. W ' Edgecombe.. 

Elkins, LJoyd S. Bladen.. 

Fenner, W. E Nash. 

Finch, Ronald E Buncombe.. 

Flowers, Ralph Catawba.. 

Fulghum, R. T , Johnston. 

Garret, Joe W I Rockingham. 

Cass, M. Rex Forsyth. 

Gardner, Ernest A Cleveland.. 

Giles, D. F McDowell. 

Grant, John Brewster Davie.. 

Gray, Claude J Gates.. 



Party 



Post Office 



Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 

Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 



Democrat... 
Democrat.... 
Democrat... 
Democrat... 
Rejiublican.. 
Democrat 



Hanford, Ed. R Alamance Democrat.. 

Hash, J. B Ashe Democrat.. 

Hatch, Wm. T Wake Democrat. 

Haynes, Jeter L Yadkin Republican.. 

Hobbs, J. C New Hanover Democrat.. 

Horner, W. E Lee Democrat.. 

Horton, Hugh G Martin Democrat.. 

Howard, B. J Orange Democrat.. 

Howell, C. C Montgomery Democrat.. 

Hutchins, Mrs. Charles Yancey Democrat.. 



Jenkins. T. M i Graham Republican. 

Johnson, E. R Currituck Democrat... 

Johnston, Con C Iredell Democrat... 

Jones, B. C Swain Democrat.... 

Joyner, H. L ' Northampton Democrat... 



King, Jennings G 1 Scotland Democrat.. 

Kimzey, W. Pat Transylvania Democrat.. 

Leary, H. Vincent Camden Democrat.. 

Ledbetter, T. C Jackson Democrat.. 

Leggett, L. W Halifax Democrat. 

Lumpkin, W. L Franklin Democrat.. 



Martin, N. J , 

May, Dr. J. M 

Mayhew, E. L 

Meekins, P. W 

Miller, W. F 

Mitchell, Clarence... 

Moore, J. S 

Murphy, Walter 

McBryde, D. Lacy. 

McDuffie, F. J 

McDowell, T. J 

McNair, R. T 

McNeill, E. B 



Norwood, J. H. 



Surry Democrat ... 

Clay Republican. 

Mecklenburg Democrat.... 

Caldwell Democrat... 

Watauga Democrat.... 

Wake Democrat.... 

Pitt Democrat... 

Rowan Democrat... 

Cumberland Democrat... 

Wilkes Republican. 

Polk Democrat... 

Richmond Democrat.... 

Hoke. Democrat.... 



Stanly Democrat. 



Macclesfield 
Bladenboro 

Rocky Mount 
Black Mountain 
Hickory 

Kenly 

Madison 

Winston-Salem 

Shelby 

Marion 

Mocksville 

Gatesville 

Burlington 

West JelTerson 

Milibrook 

Jonesville 

Wilmington 

Sanford 

Williamston 

Chapel Hill 

Troy 

Burnsville 

Robbinsville 
Currituck 
Mooresville 
Bryson City 
Jackson 

Laurinburg 
Brevard 

Camden 
Cullowhee 
Hobgood 
Louisburg 

Dobson 

Hayesville 

Charlotte 

Lenoir 

Boone 

Raleigh 

Bethel 

Salisbury 

F'ayetteville 

N. Wilkesboro 

Campobello, S. C. 

Rjckingham [RFD 

Rat ford 

Norwood 



Members of House of Eepkesentatives 35 

REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



Name 



County 



Party 



Patton, R. A Macon Democrat Franklin 

Paylor, John Hill Pitt Democrat Farmville 

Peace, J. Merril Vance Democrat Henderson 

Pickens, R. T Guilford Democrat High Point 

Poole, J. H _ Moore Democrat West End 

Pope, R. L Davidson Democrat Thomasville 

Price, Brooks i Union Democrat Wsixhaw, R.F.D. 



Quinn, C. E Duplin Democrat. 



Kfnansville 



Rasberry, E. A Greene Democrat Snow Hill 

Rouse, R. H Lenoir Democrat Kinston 

Royster, Thomas S ; Granville Democrat Oxford 

Scott, R. J Stokes Democrat Danbury 

Seeley, Fred R Carteret Democrat Beaufort 

Sentelle, R. E Brunswick Democrat Southport 

Siler, W. D Chatham Democrat Siler City 

Smith, T. J Robeson Democrat St. Pauls 

Spruill, C. W Bertie ' Democrat Windsor 

Stell, Harry Washington Democrat Plymouth 

Stone, T. C ' Rockingham Democrat Stoncville 

Summersill, R. N t Onslow Democrat Jacksonville 

Tatem, C. W ; Tyrrell Democrat Columbia 

Taylor, D. P : Alleghany Democrat Sparta 

Taylor, W. C Caswell Democrat Blanche 

Thomas, F. E i Anson Democrat Wadesboro 

Thomas, F. S , Harnett Democrat Erwin 

Thornton, T. Spruill ] Forsyth Democrat Winston-Salem 

Underwood, R. H | Hertford Democrat Murfreesboro 

Uzzell, George R ; Rowan Democrat I Salisbury 



Vogler, James B. 
Ward, D. L. 



Mecklenburg Democrat Charlotte 



Craven Democrat New Bern 

Warren, Edgar L Person Democrat Hurdle Mills 

White, John F Chowan Democrat Edenton 

Williams, F. Webb...., Pasquotank Democrat Eli-z^ibeth City 

Williamson, J. R Columbus Democrat _ Whitevillo 

Wilson, Virgil A i Forsyth Democrat Rural Hall 

Wilson, Enoch W Sampson Dtmocrat Newton Grove 

Withrow, Grady Rutherford D<mocrat HoUis 



Zickler, C. R Alexander Democrat Tayl>rsvi!le 



REPRESENTATIVES 

(Arranged by Counties) 



(Democrats except otherwise indicated) 

Ala7nance—Ed. R. Hanford, Burlington. 
Alexander— Br. C. R. Zickler, Taylorsville. 
Alleghany — D. P. Taylor, Sparta. 
Anson — F. E. Thomas, Wadesboro. 
Ashe — J. B. Hash, West Jefferson. 
Avery — T. P. Bellinger (R), Crossnore. 
Beaufort — Sam M. Blount, Washington. 
Bertie — C. W. Spruill, Windsor. 
Bladen — Lloyd S. Elkins, Bladenboro. 
Brimsunvk. — R. E. Sentelle, Southport. 

BMJicom&e— George W. Craig, Asheville; Ronald E. Finch, Black 
Mountain. 

Burke — F. C. Berry, Morganton. 
Caharrus — E. T. Bost, Jr., Concord. 
Caldivell — P. W. Meekins, Lenoir. 
Camden — H. Vincent Leary, Camden. 
Carteret — Fred R. Seely, Beaufort. 
Caswell— W. C. Taylor, Blanche. 
Cataivba—Ralvh Flowers, Hickory. 
Chatham— \W . D. Siler, Siler City. 
Cherokee — H. P. Cooper, Murphy. 
Choican — John F. White, Edenton. 
Clay— Dr. J. M. May (R), Hayesville. 
Cleveland— Ernest A. Gardner, Shelby. 
Columhus—J. R. Williamson, Whiteville. 
Craven — D. L. Ward, New Bern. 
Cuml)erland—'D. Lacy McBryde, Fayetteville. 
Cnrritiick—Yl. R. Johnson, Currituck. 
Dare — Roy L. Davis, Wanchese. 
Davidson— YL. L. Pope, Thomasville. 
Dayie— John Brewster Grant (R), Mocksville. 
Duj)lin—C. E. Quinn, Kenanville. 

[ 36 ] 



Members of Huise ov Representatives 37 

Durham — Victor S. Bryant, Durham; Oscar G. Barker, Diiriuim. 

Edgecombe — W. W. Eagles, Macclesfield. 

Forsyth — M. Rex Gass, Winston-Salem; T. Spruill Thornton, Win- 
ston-Salem; Virgil A. Wilson, Rural Hall. 

Franklin — W. L. Lumpkin, Louishurg. 

traston — R. G. Cherry, Gastonia; D. P. Bellinger, Cherry ville. 

G<ttes — Claude J. Gray, Gatesville. 

Graham — T. M. Jenkins (R), Robbinsville. 

GranviUc — Thomas S. Royster, Oxford. 

Greene — E. A. Rasberry, Snow Hill. 

G^iiilford — John W. Caffey, Greensboro; Joe T. Carruthers, Jr., 
Greensboro: Rupert T. Pickens, Ji., High Point. 

Halifax— lu. W. Leggett, Hobgood; A. M. Atkinson, Enfield. 

Harnett — Fred S. Thomas, Erwin. 

Haywood — J. F. Cabe, Waynesville. 

Henderson — L. L. Burgin, Horse Shoe, R. F. D. 

Het'tford — R. H. Underwood, Murfreesboro. 

Hoke—E. B. McNeill, Raeford. 

Hyde — George E. Davis, Swan Quarter. 

Iredell — C. C. Johnston, Mooresville. 

Jackson — T. C. Ledbetter, Cullowhee. 

Johnston — F. H. Brooks, Smithfield; R. T. Fulghum, Kenly. 

Jones — C. P. Banks, Trenton. 

Lee — W. E. Horner, Sanford. 

Lenoir — R. H. Rouse, Kinston. 

Lincoln — Thorne Clark, Lincolnton. 

Macon — R. A. Patton, Franklin. 

Madison — James M. Baley, Jr. (R), Marshall. 

Martin — Hugh G. Horton, Willlamston. 

McDoucll—D. F. Giles, Marion. 

Mecklenburg — Mercer J. Blankenship, Charlotte; E. L. .^layhew. 
Charlotte; James B. Vogler, Charlotte. 

Mitchell — Jeter C. Burleson (R), Bakersville. 

Montgomery — C. C. Howell, Troy. 

Moore— 3. H. Poole, V\^est End. 

'Nash — C. C. Abernathy, Spring Hope; W. E. P\'nner, Rocky .Mnuiii. 

Ne^o Hanover — T. E. Cooper, Wilmington; J. C. Hobbs. Wilniins;- 
ton. 

Northampton — H. L. Joynor, Jackson. 



38 Legislative Department 

Onslow — R. N. Summersill, Jacksonville. 

Orange — B. J. Howard, Chapel Hill. 

Pamlico — R. G. Banks, Arapahoe. 

Pasquotank — P. Webb Williams, Elizabeth City. 

Pender — John J. Best, Burgaw. 

Perquimans — J. T. Benton, Hertford. 

Person — Edgar L. Warren, Hurdle Mills. 

Pi«— John Hill Paylor, Farmville; J. S. Moore, Bethel. 

Polk~T. J. McDowell, Campobello, S. C, R. F. D. 

Randolph — W. Bryan Davis, Randleman, R. F. D. 

Richmond — R. T. McNair, Rockingham. 

Robeson— T. J. Smith, St. Pauls; S. L. Adams, Rowland. 

Rockingham — T. C. Stone, Stoneville; Joe W. Garrett, Madison. 

Rowan — George R. Uzzell, Salisbury; Walter Murphy, Salisbury. 

Rutherford — Grady Withrow, Hollis. 

Sampson — Enoch W. Wilson, Newton Grove. 

Scotland — Jennings G. King, Laurinburg. 

Stanly — J. H. Norwood, Norwood. 

Stokes — R. J. Scott, Danbury. 

Surry — N. J. Martin, Dobson. 

Stcuin — B. C. Jones, Bryson City. 

Transylvania — W. P. Kimzey, Brevard. 

Tyrrell — C. W. Tatem, Columbia. 

Union — Brooks Price, Waxhaw, R. P. D. 3. 

VaJice — J. Merrill Peace, Henderson. 

Wafce— Arch T. Allen, Raleigh; W. T. Hatch, Millbrook; Clarence 
Mitchell, Raleigh. 

Warren — T. H. Aycock, Warrenton. 

Washington — Harry Stell, Plymouth. 

Watauga — W. F. Miller, Boone. 

Wayne — William Wiley Andrews, Goldsboro, R. F. D. 2; W. H. 
Best, Jr., Goldsboro. 

Wilkes— F. J. McDuffie (R), North Wilkesboro. 

Wilson — Troy T. Barnes, Wilson. 

Yadkin — Jeter L. Hayes (R), Jonesville. 

Yancey — Mrs. Charles Hutchins, Burnsville. 



RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



Touching the Duties of Speaker 

1. It shall be the dtity of the Speaker to have the sessions 
of the House opened with prayer. 

2. He shall take the chair every day at the hour fixed by the 
House on the preceding legislative day, shall immediately call 
the members to order, and, on appearance of a quorum, cause 
the Journal of the preceding day to be approved. 

3. He shall preserve order and decorum, may speak to points 
of order in preference to other members, rising from his seat 
for that purpose, and shall decide questions of order, subject 
to an appeal to the House by any member, on which appeal no 
member shall speak more than once, unless by leave of the House. 
A two-thirds vote of the members present shall be nece;^sary to 
sustain any appeal from the ruling of the Chair. 

4. He shall rise to put a question, but may state it sitting. 

5. Questions shall be put in this form, namely, "Those in favor 
(as the question may be) will say, 'Aye,'" and after the affirm- 
ative voice has been expressed, "Those opposed will say, 'No'." 
Upon a call for a division the Speaker shall count; if required 
he shall appoint tellers. 

6. The Speaker shall have a general direction of the hall. 
He shall have a right to name any member to perform the du- 
ties of the Chair, but substitutions shall not extend beyond one 
day, except in case of sickness or by leave of the House. 

7. All committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, unless 
otherwise specially ordered by the House. 

8. In all elections the Speaker may vote. In all other cases 
he may exercise his right to vote, or he may reserve this right 
until there is a tie; but in no case shall he be allowed to vote 
twice on the same question. 

9. All acts, addresses, and resolutions, and all warrants and 
subpoenas issued by order of the House shall be signed by the 
Speaker. 

10. In case of any disturbance or disorderly conduct in the 
galleries or lobby, the Speaker or other presiding officer shall 
have power to order the same to be cleared. 

[3-j] 



40 LeGISLATIVK I)kI'A1{TMENT 

11. No person except members of the Senate, officers ;'.nd clerks 
of the General Assembly, Judges of the Supreme and Superior 
Courts, State officers, former members of the General Assembly, 
and persons particularly invited by the Speaker shall be ad- 
mitted within the hall of the House: Provided, that no person 
except members of the Senate and officers of the General Assem- 
bly shall be allowed on the floor of the House or in the lobby 
in the rear of the Speaker's desk, unless permitted by the Speaker 
of the House. 

12. Reporters wishing to take down debates may be admitted 
by the Speaker, who shall assign such places to them on the 
floor or elsevv'here, to effect this object, as shall not interfere 
with the convenience of the House. 

13. Smoking shall not be allowed in the hall, the lobbies, or 
the galleries while the House is in session: Provided, that smok- 
ing may be permitted in the lobby in the rear of the Speaker's 
desk. 

Order of Business of the Day 

14. After the approval of the Journal of the preceding day, 
which shall stand approved without objection, the House shall 
proceed to business in the follov/ing order, viz.: 

(1) The receiving of petitions, memorials, and papers ad- 
dressed to the General Assembly or to the House. 

(2) Reports of standing committees. 

(3) Reports of select committees. 

(4) Resolutions. 

(5) Bills. 

(6) The unfinished business of the preceding day. 

(7) Bills, resolutions, petitions, memorials, messages, and 
other papers on the Calendar, in their exact numerical order, 
unless displaced by the orders of the day; but messages and 
motions to elect officers shall always be in order. 

No member shall rise from his seat to introduce any petition, 
resolution, or ))ill out of order unless he is permitted so to do 
by a suspension of the rules. 



Rules of House of REPRESE^'TATIVEs 41 

On Decoi'uni in Debate 

15. When any member is about to speak in debate or deliver 
anj' matter to the House, he shall rise trom his seat and respect- 
fully address the Speaker. 

16. When the Speaker shall call a member to order, the mem- 
ber shall sit down, as also he shall when called to order by an- 
other member, unless the Speaker decides the point of order in 
his favor. By leave of the House a member called to order 
may clear a matter of fact, or explain, but shall not proceed in 
debate so long as the decision stands but by permission of the 
House. Any member may appeal from the decision of the Chair, 
and if, upon appeal, the decision be in favor of the member 
called to order, he may proceed; if otherwise, he shall not, ex- 
cept by leave of the House; and if the case, in the judgment 
of the House, require it, he shall be liable to its censure. 

17. No member shall speak until recognized by the Chair, 
and when two or more members rise at the same time the 
Speaker shall name the member to speak. 

18. No member shall speak more than twice on the main 
question, nor longer than thirty minutes for the first speech 
and fifteen minutes for the second speech, unless allowed to do 
so by the affirmative vote of a majority of the members present; 
nor shall he speak more than once upon an amendment or 
motion to commit or postpone, and then not longer than ten 
minutes. But the House may, by consent of a majority, suspend 
the operations of this rule during any debate on any particular 
question before the House, or the Committee on Rules may 
bring in a special rule that shall be applicable to the debate on 
any bill. 

19. While the Speaker is putting any question, oi- addressing 
the House, no person shall speak, stand up, walk out of or 
cross the House, nor when a member is speaking entertain 
private discourse, stand up, or pass between him and the Chair. 

2 0. No member shall vote on any question when he was not 
present when the question was put by the Speaker, except by 
the consent of the House. Upon a division and count of the 
House on any question, no member without the bar sliall be 
counted. 



42 Lkgislative Department 

21. Every member who shall be in the hall of the House for 
the above purpose vi'hen the question is put shall give his vote 
upon a call of the ayes and noes, unless the House for special 
reasons shall excuse him, and no application to be excused from 
voting or to explain a vote shall be entertained unless made 
before the call of the roll. The hall of the House shall include 
the lobbies and offices connected with the hall. 

2 2. When a motion is made it shall be stated by the Speaker 
or, if written, it shall be handed to the Chair and read aloud 
by the Speaker or Clerk before debate. A motion to table or 
adjourn shall be seconded before the motion is put by the 
Speaker to the vote of the House. 

2 3. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the Speaker 
or any two members request it. 

24. After a motion is stated by the Speaker or read by the 
Clerk, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the House, but 
may be withdrawn before a decision or amendment, except in 
case of a motion to reconsider, which motion, when made by a 
member, shall be deemed and taken to be in possession of the 
House, and shall not be withdrawn without leave of the House. 

2 5. When a question is under debate no motion shall be re- 
ceived but to adjourn, to lay on the table, to postpone indefi- 
nitely, to postpone to a day certain, to commit or amend, which 
several motions shall have precedence in the order in which 
they stand arranged; and no motion to lay on the table, to post- 
pone indefinitely, to postpone to a day certain, to commit or 
amend, being decided, shall be again allowed at the same stage 
of the bill or proposition. 

2 6. A motion to adjourn or lay on the table shall be decided 
without debate, and a motion to adjourn shall always be in- 
order, except when the House is voting or some member is 
speaking; but a motion to adjourn shall not follow a motion to 
adjourn until debate or some other business of the House has 
intervened. 

26a. In case of adjournment without any hour being named, 
the House shall reconvene on the next legislative day at twelve 
o'clock noon. 

27. When a question has been postponed indefinitely, the 



Rules of House of Representatives 43 

same shall not be acted on again during the session, except upon 
a two-thirds vote. 

28. Any member may call for a division of the question, when 
the same shall admit of it, w^iich shall be determined by the 
Speaker. 

29. When a motion has been once made and carried in the 
affirmative or negative, it shall be in order for any member of 
the majority to move for the reconsideration thereof, on the 
same or succeeding day, unless it may have subsequently passed 
the Senate, and no motion to reconsider shall be taken from the 
table except by a two-thirds vote. But unless such vote has 
been taken by a call of the yeas and nays, any member may 
move to reconsider. 

30. When the reading of a paper is called for, which has been 
read in the House, and the same is objected to by any member, 
it shall be determined by a vote of the House. 

31. Petitions, memorials, and other papers addressed to the 
House shall be presented by the Speaker; a brief statement of 
the contents thereof may be verbally made by the introducer 
before reference to a committee, but shall not be debated or 
decided on the day of their first being read, unless the House 
shall direct otherwise. 

32. When the ayes and noes are called for on any question, 
it shall be on motion before the question is put; and if seconded 
by one-fifth of the members present, the question shall be de- 
cided by the ayes and noes; and in taking the ayes and noes, 
or on a call of the House, the names of the members will be 
taken alphabetically. 

33. Decency of speech shall be observed and personal reflec- 
tion carefully avoided. 

34. Any member may arise at any time to speak to a ques- 
tion of personal privilege, and upon objection to him proceeding, 
the Speaker shall determine if the question is one of privilege. 

35. Fifteen members, including the Speaker, shall bo author- 
ized to compel the attendance of absent members. A quorum 
shall consist of a majority of the qualified members of the House. 

36. No member or officer of the House shall absent himself 
from the service of the House without leave, unless from sick- 
ness or inability. 



44 JipjGiSLATivE Department 

37. Any member may excuse himself from serving on any 
committee if he is a member of two standing committees. 

3 8. If any member shall be necessarily absent on temporary 
business of the House when a vote is taken upon any question, 
upon entering the House he shall be permitted, on request, to 
vote, provided that the result shall not be thereby affected. 

39. No standing rule or order shall be rescinded or altered 
without one day's notice given on the motion thereof, and to 
sustain such motion two-thirds of the House shall be required. 

40. The members of the House shall uncover their heads upon 
entering the House while it is in session, and shall continue so 
uncovered during their continuance in the hall, except Quakers. 

41. A motion to reconsider shall be determined by a major- 
ity vote, except a motion to reconsider an indefinite postpone- 
ment, or a motion to reconsider a motion tabling a motion to 
reconsider, which shall require a two-thirds vote. 

4 2. After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass on any 
of its readings, the contents of such bill or the principal pro- 
visions of its subject-matter shall not be embodied in any other 
measure. Upon the point of order being raised and sustained 
by the Chair, such measure shall be laid upon the table, and 
shall not be taken therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of 
the elected membership of House: Provided, no local bill 
shall be held by the Chair as embodying the provisions or being 
identical with any State-wide measure which has Ijeen laid upon 
the table, or failed to pass any of its readings. 

4 2a. A motion to table an amendment sent up from the floor 
shall not be construed as a motion to table the principal bill or 
any other amendment which has been offered thereto, and if 
such motion is carried, only the amendment shall lie upon the 
table. 

4 2b. When a member desires to interrupt a member having 
the floor he shall first obtain recognition by the Chair and per- 
mission of the member occupying the floor, and when so recog- 
nized and such permission is obtained he may propound a ques- 
tion to the member occupying the floor, but he shall not pro- 
pound a series of questions or interrogatories or otherwise in- 
tei'rupt the member having the floor; and the Speaker shall, 
without the point of order being raised, enforce this rule. 



RfLEs OF House of Representatives 45 

Standing ("onunittees 

43. At the commencement of the session a standing commit- 
tee shall be appointed by the Speaker on each of the following 
subjects, namely: 

On Agriculture. 

On Appropriations. 

On Banks and Banking. 

On Commercial Fisheries. 

On Congressional Districts. 

On Conservation and Development. 

On Constitutional Amendments. 

On Corporations. 

On Counties, Cities, and Towns. 

On Courts and Judicial Districts. 

On Drainage. 

On Education. 

On Elections and Election Laws. 

On Engrossed Bills. 

On Expenditures of the House. 

On Federal Relations. 

On Finance. 

On Game. 

On Health. 

On Insane Asylums. 

On Institutions for the Blind. 

On Institutions for the Deaf and Dumb. 

On Insurance. 

On the Journal. 

On Judiciary, No. 1. 

On Judiciary, Uo. 2. 

On Manufactures and Labor. 

On Military Affairs. 

On Oyster Industry. 

On Penal Institutions. 

On Pensions. 

On Propositions and Grievances. 

On Public Utilities. 

On Public Welfare. 



46 Legislative Department 

On Roads. 

On Rules. 

On Salaries and Fees. 

On Senatorial Districts. 

Joint Commit (t-cs 

On Enrolled Bills. 

On Justices of the Peace. 

On Library. 

On Printing. 

On Public Buildings and Grounds. 

On Trustees of University. 

The first member announced on each committee shall be chair- 
man. 

43a. Whenever the House shall decline or refuse to concur 
in amendments put by the Senate to a bill originating in the 
House, or shall refuse to adopt a substitute adopted by the 
Senate for a bill originating in the House, a conference commit- 
tee shall be appointed upon motion made, consisting of the num- 
ber named in the motion; and the bill under consideration shall 
thereupon go to and be considered by the joint conferees on the 
part of the House and Senate. In^ considering matte/rs in 
difference between the House and Senate committed to the con- 
ferees only such matter as are in difference between the two 
houses shall be considered by the conferees, and the conference 
report shall deal only with such matters. The conference re- 
port shall not l)e amended. Except as herein set out, the rules 
of the House of Representatives of Congress shall govern the 
appointment, conduct, and reports of the conferees. 

44. In forming a Committee of the Whole House, the Speaker 
shall leave the Chair, and a Chairman to preside in committee 
shall be appointed by the Speaker. 

4 5. Upon bills submitted to a Committee of the Whole House, 
the bill shall be first read throughout by the Clerk, and then 
again read and debated by sections, leaving the preamble to be 
last considered. The body of the bill shall not be defaced or 
interlined, but all amendments, noting the page and line, shall 
be duly entered by the Clerk on a separate paper as the same 



Rules of House of Representatives 47 

shall be agreed to by the committee, and so reported to the 
House. After report, the bill shall again be subject to be de- 
bated and amended by sections before a question on its passage 
be taken. 

46. The rules of procedure in the House shall be observed in 
a Committee of the Whole House, so far as they may be applica- 
ble, except the rule limiting the time of speaking and the previous 
question. 

47. In a Committee of the Whole House a motion that the com- 
mittee rise shall always be in order, except when a member is 
speaking, and shall be decided without debate. 

48. Every bill shall be introduced by motion for suspension of 
the rules, or by order of the House, or on the report of a commit- 
tee, unless introduced in regular order during the morning hour. 

49. All bills and resolutions shall be reported from the com- 
mittee to which referred, with such recommendations as the 
committee may desire to make. 

50. Every bill shall receive three several readings in the House 
previous to its passage, and the Speaker shall give notice at each 
whether it be its first, second, or third reading. 

51. Any member introducing a bill or resolution shall l)i-iefly 
endorse thereon the substance of the same. 

52. All bills and resolutions shall upon their introduction be 
referred by the Speaker, without suggestion from the introducer, 
to the appropriate committee. No bills shall be withdrawn from the 
committee to which referred except upon motion duly made and 
carried by a majority vote. 

53. The Clerk of the House shall keep a separate calendar of 
the public, local and private bills, and shall number them in the 
order in which they are introduced, and all bills shall be disposed 
of in the order they stand upon the Calendar; l)ut the Committee 
on Rules may at any time arrange the order of precedence in 
which bills may be considered. No bill shall be twice read on the 
same day without the concurrence of two-thirds of the members. 

54. All resolutions which may grant money out of the Treasury, 
or such as shall be of pul)lic nature, shall be treated in all respects 
in a similar manner with public bills. 

5 5. The Clerk of the House shall be deemed to continue in 
office until another is appointed. 



48 Legislative Depaktment 

5 6. On the point of no (luorum being raised, the doors shall be 
closed and there shall be a call of the House, and upon a call of 
the House the names of the members shall be called over by the 
Clerk and the absentees noted, after which the names of the ab- 
sentees shall again be called over. Those for whom no excuse oi- 
sufficient excuses are made may, by order of those present, if 
fifteen in number, be taken into custody as they appear, or may 
be sent for and taken into custody wherever to be found by special 
messenger appointed for that purpose. 

Previous Question 

57. The previous question shall be as follows: "Shall the main 
question be now put?" and, until it is decided, shall preclude all 
amendments and debate. If this question shall be decided in the 
affirmative, the "main question" shall be on the passage of the 
bill, resolution, or other matter under consideration; but when 
amendments are pending, the question shall be taken upon such 
amendments, in inverse order, without further debate or amend- 
ment. If such question be decided in the negative, the main 
question shall be considered as remaining under debate: Provided, 
that no one shall move the previous question except the member 
submitting the report on the bill or other matter under considera- 
tion, and the member introducing the bill or other matter under 
consideration, cr the member in charge of the measure, who shall 
be designated by the chairman of the committee reporting the 
same to the House at the time the bill or other matter under con- 
sideration is reported to the House or taken up for consideration. 

When a motion for the previous question is made and pending 
the second thereto by a majority, debate shall cease; but if any 
member obtains the floor, he may move to lay the matter under 
consideration on the table, or move an adjournment, ansi -.vhen 
both or either of these motions are pending the question shall 
stand: 

( 1 ) Previous question. 

( 2 ) To adjourn. 

(3) To lay on the table. 

And then upon the main question, or amendments, or the mo- 
tion to po.stpone indefinitely, postpone to a day certain, to commit, 



Rules of House of Representatives 49 

or amend, in the order of their precedence, until the main ques- 
tion is reached or disposed of; but after the previous question has 
been called by a majority, no motion, or amendment, or debate 
shall be in order. 

All motions below the motions to lay on the table must be 
made prior to a motion for the previous question; but, pending 
and not after the second therefor, by the majority of the House, 
a motion to adjourn or lay on the table, or both, are in order. 
This constitutes the precedence of the motions to adjourn and lay 
on the table over other motions, in Rule 2 5. 

Motions stand as follows in order of precedence in Rule 26: 

Previous question. 

Adjourn. 

Lay on the table. 

Postpone definitely. 

To commit or amend. 

When the previous question is called, all motions below it fall, 
unless made prior to the call, and all motions above it fall after 
its second by a majority required. Pending the second, the mo- 
tions to adjourn and lay on the table are in order, but not after 
a second. When in order and every motion is before the House, 
the question stands as follows: 

Previous question. 

Adjourn. 

Lay on the table. 

Postpone indefinitely. 

Postpone definitely. 

To commit. 

Amendment to amendment. 

Amendment. 

Substitute. 

Bill. 

The previous question covers all other motions when seconded 
by a majority of the House, and proceeds by regular graduation 
to the main question, without debate, amendment, or motion, 
until such question is reached or disposed of. 



50 Legisi-ative DkI'ARTMKNT 

58. All committees, other than the Committee on Appropria- 
tions, when favorably reporting any bill which carries an appro- 
priation from the State, shall indicate same in the report, and 
said bill shall be re-referred to the Committee on Appropriations 
for a further report before being acted upon by the House. All 
committees, other than the Committee on Finance, when favor- 
ably reporting any bill which in any way or manner raises revenue 
or levies a tax or authorizes the issue of bonds or notes, whether 
public, public-iocal, or private, shall indicate same in the report, 
and said bill shall be re-referred to the Committee on Finance 
for a further report before being acted upon by the House. 

59. The Principal Clerk, the Engrossing Clerk, and the Ser- 
geant-at-Arms may appoint, with the approval of the Speaker, 
such assistants as may be necessary to the efficient discharge of 
the duties of their various offices, and one or more of whom may 
be assigned by the Speaker from the Engrossing Clerk's office to 
the office of the Legislative Reference Librarian for the purpose 
of drafting bills. 

60. The Speaker may appoint a Clerk to the Speaker, and he 
may also appoint ten pages to wait upon the sessions of the 
House, and when the pressure of business may require, he may 
appoint five additional pages. 

61. The chairman of each of the following committees, Appro- 
priations, Counties, Cities and Towns, Education, Finance, and 
Roads, may each appoint a clerk to the said committees; and the 
chairmen of Judiciary Committee, No. 1, and of Judiciary Com- 
mittee, No. 2, may jointly appoint a clerk to serve both of said 
committees; and the chairmen of Agriculture and Banks and 
Banking may jointly appoint a clerk to serve both of said com- 
mittees; and the chairmen of Propositions and Grievances and 
Insurance may jointly appoint a clerk to serve both of said com- 
mittees; and the chairmen of Salaries and Fees and Courts and 
Judicial Districts may jointly appoint a clerk to serve both of 
said committees. All committee clerks heretofore provided for are 
to be appointed by and with the approval of the Speaker. All 
committee clerks after being named as provided by this rule shall 
be subject to assignments by the chairman of the Rules Commit- 
tee when they are not engaged with the committee or committees 
to which they have been regularly assigned. 



Rules of House of Representatives 51 

62. That no clerk, laborer, or other person employed or ap- 
pointed under Rules 59, 60, and 61 hereof shall receive during 
such employment, appointment, or service any compensation from 
any other department of the State Government, or from any other 
source, and there shall not be voted, paid, or awarded any addi- 
tional pay, bonus or gratuity to any of them, but said persons 
shall receive only the pay for such duties and services as now- 
provided by law. When the House is not in session the pages 
shall be under the supervision of the Principal Clerk. 

63. The chairman and five other members of any committee 
shall constitute a quorum of said committee for the transaction 
of business. 

64. The Committee on the Journal shall examine daily the 
Journal of the House before the hour of convening, and report 
after the opening of the House whether or not the proceedings of 
the previous day have been correctly recorded. 

65. When a bill shall be reported by a committee with a recom- 
mendation that it be not passed, but accompanied by a minority 
report, the question before the House shall be "The adoption of 
the minority report," and if failing to be adopted by a majority 
vote, the bill shall be placed upon the unfavorable calendar. 
Such minority report shall be signed by at least three members 
of the committee who were present when the bill was considered 
in committee: Provided, however, that where a minority report is 
filed the proponents and opponents of the question presented 
thereby shall be allowed not to exceed ten minutes on each side 
to explain the question: Provided further, that by a majority vote 
the time may be extended for a discussion of the minority report 
and on the merits of the bill. In the event there is an unfavorable 
report with no minority report accompanying it, the bill shall be 
placed upon the unfavorable calendar. To take a bill from the 
unfavorable calendar, a two-thirds vote shall be necessary. 

65a. A bill from the unfavorable calendar shall not be debata- 
ble, but the movant may make a brief and concise statement of 
the reasons for the motion before making the motion, taking not 
more than five minutes. 

66. Whenever a public bill is introduced a carbon copy thereof 
shall accompany the bill. The Reading Clerk sliall stamp the 



52 Legislative Department 

copy with the number stamped upon the original bill. Such copy 
shall be daily delivered to the joint committee hereinafter pro- 
vided for. The Principal Clerk shall deliver the carbon copy of 
the bills designated to be printed, as hereinafter provided for, to 
the Public Printer and cause four hundred copies thereof to be 
printed. On the morning following the delivery of the printed 
copies the Chief Clerk shall cause the Chief Page to have one copy 
thereof put upon the desk of each member and shall retain the 
other printed copies in his office. A sufficient number of the 
printed copies for the use of the committee to which the bill is 
referred shall be by the Chief Page delivered to the chairman or 
clerk of that committee. If the bill is passed, the remaining copies 
shall be by the Chief Page delivered to the Principal Clerk of the 
Senate for the use of the Senate. The cost of printing shall be 
paid from the contingent fund of the House of Representatives. 
The Chairman of the Rules Committee of the House and the 
Chairman of the Rules Committee of the Senate shall appoint a 
sub-committee consisting of two members of the Senate from the 
body of the House and Senate, and such chairmen shall notify the 
Principal Clerk of the House and of the Senate who has been so 
appointed. Such sub-committee -shall meet daily and examine the 
carbon copies of the public bills introduced and determine which 
of such public bills shall be printed and which shall not, and 
stamp the copies accordingly. Such sub-committee shall serve 
for one week unless for good cause the chairmen of the respective 
rules committees shall determine otherwise. If the member intro- 
ducing a public bill, which the committee shall determine should 
not be printed, so desires, he may appear before the committee at 
the next meeting thereof with reference thereto. 

67. Whenever any resolution or bill is introduced a carbon copy 
thereof shall be attached thereto, and the Principal Clerk shall 
cause said carbon copy to be numbered as the original resolution 
or bill is numbered, and shall cause the same to be available at 
all times to the member introducing the same. In case the reso- 
lution or bill is a public resolution or bill, an additional carbon 
copy shall also be attached thereto for the use of the Public 
Printer, under the provisions of Rule 6 6. 



RuLKS OF House of Repeesentatives 53 

ARTICLE n 

Constitution of North Carolina 

Sf.c. 29. Limitations upon jjoiccr of (invral Assi'iiil>h/ to outrt 
private or special legislation. 

The General Assembly shall not pass any local, private, or 
special act or resolution relating to the establishment of courts 
inferior to the Superior Court; relating to the appointment of 
justices of the peace; relating to health, sanitation, and the abate- 
ment of nuisances; changing the names of cities, towns, and 
townships; authorizing the laying out, opening, altering, main- 
taining, or discontinuing of highways, streets, or alleys; relating 
to ferries or bridges, relating to non-navigable streams; relating 
to cemeteries; relating to the pay of jurors; erecting new town- 
ships, or changing township lines, or establishing or changing the 
line of school districts; remitting fines, penalties, and forfeitures, 
or refunding moneys legally paid into the Public Treasury; regu- 
lating labor, trade, mining, or manufacturing; extending the time 
for the assessment or collection of taxes or otherwise relieving 
any collector of taxes from the due performance of his official 
duties or his sureties from liability; giving effect to informal wills 
and deeds; nor shall the General Assembly enact any such local, 
private, or special act by the partial repeal of a general law, but 
the General Assembly may at any time repeal local, private, or 
special laws enacted by it. Any local, private or special act or 
resolution passed in violation of the provisions of this section 
shall be void. The General Assembly shall have power to pass 
general laws regulating matters set out in this section. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE HOUSE 
OF REPRESENTATIVES 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 



AgriciilUire — Mr. Fenner, Chairman. Messrs. Andrews, Abernathy, 
Aycock, Banks of Jones, Benton, Burgin, Barnes, Cabe, Davis of 
Randolph, Eagles, Gardner, Gass, Hanford, Hash, Joyner, Ledbet- 
ter, Leary, Leggett, Martin, McDowell, Moore, Poole, Rasberry, 
Spruill, Seeley, Smith, Stone, Taylor of Caswell, Warren, Wilson of 
Sampson, White, Burleson. 

Appropriations — Mr. Ward, Chairman. Messrs. Jones, Abernathy, 
Adams, Andrews, Banks of Jones, Best of Pender, Barnes, Berry, 
Blankenship, Bryant, Carruthers, Craig, Cooper of New Hanover, 
Davis of Hyde, Gardner, Giles, Hash, Hatch, Howard, Airs. Hutch- 
ins, Messrs. Joyner, Leggett, Murphy, Paylor, Pickens, Price, Seeley, 
Sentelle, Spruill, Tatem, Thomas of Anson, Thomas of Hartnett, 
Thornton, White, Wilson of Forsyth, Grant, Jenkins. 

Banks and Banking — Mr. Eagles, Chairman. Messrs. Pope, Blank- 
enship, Bost, Brooks, Cabe, Carruthers, Cooper of New Hanover, 
Davis of Randolph, Fenner, Finch, Gardner, Horton, Kimzey, Mar- 
tin, McBryde, Paylor, Royster, Scott, Stone, Summersill, Thornton, 
Uzzell, White, Williamson, Burleson. 

Commercial Fisheries — Mr. Sentelle, Chairman. Messrs. Hobbs, 
Banks of Pamlico, Benton, Blount, Davis of Dare, Davis of Hyde, 
Gray, Johnson of Currituck, Joyner, Leary, Lumpkin, Meekins, Ras- 
berry, Seeley, Stall, Tatem, Underwood, Ward, White, Baley. 

Congressional Districts — Mr. Abernathy, Chairman. Messrs. Pat- 
ton, Blankenship, Carruthers, Flowers, Gardner, Leggett, Ledbetter, 
Taylor of Alleghany, Wilson of Forsyth, Withrow, May. 

Conservation and Development — Mr. Williams, Chairman. Messrs. 
Meekins, Allen, Atkinson, Banks of Pamlico, Blount, Cabe, Caffey, 
Craig, Davis of Dare, Gardner, Gass, Gray, Hash, Horton, Howard, 
Mrs. Hutchins, Messrs. Johnson of Currituck, Johnston of Iredell, 
Leary, Murphy, Patton, Poole, Seeley, Summersill, Ward, White, 
Zickler, Baley. 

[54 ] 



Committees of the House 55 

Constitutional Amendments — Mr. Lumpkin, Chairman. Messrs. 
Murphy, Allen, Bost, Barker, Brooks, Blankenship, Cooper of Chero- 
kee, Dellinger of Gaston, Garrett, Meekins, Mitchell, Pickens, Pay- 
lor, Rouse, Siler, Thornton, Williamson, Baley, Jenkins. 

Corporations— Mv. Royster, Chairman. Messrs. Rouse, Adams, Al- 
len, Best of Pender, Brooks, Clark, Elkins, Garrett, McBryde, Mc- 
Dowell, McNair, Miller, Price, Siler, Tatem, Thornton, Withrow, 
McDuffie. 

Counties, Cities and Towns — Mr. Stone, Chairman. Messrs. Aber- 
nathy. Banks of Jones, Banks of Pamlico, Best of Pender, Brooks, 
Burgin, Carruthers, Eagles, Finch, Flowers, Garrett, Hanford, 
Hobbs, Horner, Joyner, Leggett, McNair, Mitchell, Patton, Quinn, 
Stell, Summersill, Tatem, Thomas of Harnett, Uzzell, Vogler, Wil- 
son of Forsyth, Withrow, Burleson. 

Courts and Jxidicial Districts — Mr. Barker, Chairman. Messrs. 
Pickens, Best of Wayne, Bost, Cooper of Cherokee, Garrett, Horton, 
Kimzey, Lumpkin, Meekins, Peace, Rouse, Scott, Siler, Thornton, 
Williamson, Baley, Jenkins. 

Drainage — Mr. Davis, Chairman. Messrs. Burgin, Benton, Gray, 
Horton, Johnson of Currituck, Leary, Seeley, Stell, White, Williams. 

Education — Mr. Horton, Chairman. Messrs. Rouse, Barker, Barnes, 
Blankenship, Blount, Caffey, Craig, Flowers, Hash, Howard, Howell, 
Mrs. Hutchins, Messrs. Jones, Leggett, McBryde, Mitchell, Moore, 
Peace, Quinn, Rasberry, Scott, Sentelle, Siler, Stell, Stone, Thomas 
of Anson, Thomas of Harnett, Uzzell, Warren, Wilson of P^orsyth, 
Withrow, Zickler, Haynes, May. 

Election and Election Laics — Mr. Jones, Chairman. Messrs. Roy- 
ster, Atkinson, Berry, Blount, Burgin, Dellinger of Gaston, Finch. 
Gardner, Hatch, Horton, Mayhew, McDowell, Murphy, Patton, Pick- 
en.-i, Scott, Stone, Taylor of Caswell, Thornton. Ward. Wilson of 
Sampson, Zickler, Grant. 

Engrossed Bills — Mr. Paylor, Chairman. Messrs. Uoi-ner, Atkin- 
son, Cooper of Cherokee, Davis of Randolph, Howell, McNeill, Wil- 
son of Sampson, Burleson. 

Expenditures of the House — Mr. Fulghum, Chairman. Messrs. 
Pope, Benton, Bost, Davis of Randolph, Hatch, Ledl)etti'r, :\lcBryde. 
McNeill, Quinn, Vogler, Wilson of Forsyth, McDuffie. 



56 Legislativj: Department 

Federal Relations — Mr. Craig, Chairman. Messrs. Garrett, Mc- 
Bryde, Giles, Ledbetter, Moore, Taylor of Alleghany, Taylor of Cas- 
well, Williamson, Grant. 

Finance — Mr. Bryant, Chairman. Messrs. Horton, Allen. Atkinson, 
Barker, Berry, Bost, Blount, Burgin, Caffey, Clark, Cooper of Chero- 
kee, Davis of Dare, Dellinger of Gaston, Eagles, Elkins, Fenner, 
Finch, Fulghum, Gass, Hobbs, Horner, Johnston of Iredell, King, 
Kimzey, Lumpkin. Martin, Meekins, Miller, Poole, Pope, Royster, 
Rouse, Siler, Summersill, Smith, Stone, Thomas of Harnett, Uzzell, 
Vogler, Ward, Wilson of Sampson, Withrow, Williams, McDufRe. 
Haynes. 

Game — Mr. Giles, Chairman. Messrs. Craig. Banks of Pamlico. 
Benton, Davis of Dare, Davis of Hyde, Gray, Hash, Hatch, Johnson 
of Currituck, Johnston of Iredell, Jones, Joyner. McNair, Miller. 
Murphy, Patton, Peace. Poole, Spruill. Thomas of An.son, AVilliam- 
son, Haynes. 

Health — Mr. Howard, Chairman. Messrs. Ziekler, Andrews, Ben- 
ton, Carruthers, Dellinger of Avery, Flowers, Fulghum, Giles, Han- 
ford, Mrs. Hutchins, Johnson of Currituck, Jones, Leggett, May, 
Mayhew, Mitchell, McNair, Norwood, Rasberry, Sentelle. Taylor of 
Alleghany, Taylor of Caswell, Thomas of Harnett, Underwood. Wil- 
son of Forsyth, Burleson, Haynes, Baley. 

I7isane AsylitDis — Mr. Andrews, Chairman. Messrs. Gass, Atkin- 
son, Berry, Burleson, Cahe, Dellinger of Gaston, Fulghum, May. 
Mayhew, McNair, Patton, Peace, Spruill, Stell, Underwood, William- 
son, Warren, Wilson of Sampson. Ziekler, Haynes, May. Burleson. 

Institutions for the Blind — Mr. Hobbs. Chairman. Messrs. Pick- 
ens, Adams, Cabe, Davis of Randolph, Eagles, Hanford. Ledbetter. 
Meekins, McNeill, Martin, Miller, Mayhew, Price, Quinn, Thornton. 
Baley, May. 

Institutions for the Deaf and £>«?»/*— Mr. Patton, Chairman. 
Messrs. Leggett. Barnes, Berry, Burgin, Caffey, Leary, Mayhew, Mc- 
Neill, Rasberry, Seeley, Taylor of Alleghany, Vogler, Wilson of For- 
syth, Grant, May. 

7/!Si<r«/(ce— Mr. Gardner, Chairman. Messrs. Stone, Allen, Barker, 
Best of Wayne, Bost, Bryant, Caffey, Craig, Dellinger of Gaston, El- 



COMMITTES OF THE HouSE 57 

kins, Fenner, Howard, Johnston of Iredell, Lumpkin, Aleekins, Pick- 
ens, Pope, Royster, Scott, Smith, Tatem, Thornton. Ward, Grant, 
Jenkins. 

Journal — Mr. Kimzey Chairman. Messrs. Leggett, Best of Pender, 
Barnes, Cooper of New Hanover, Howell, McDowell, McNair, Poole, 
Scott, Thornton. 

Judiciary No. I — Mr. Blount, Chairman. Messrs. Barnes, Aber- 
nathy. Best of Pender, Bost, Bryant, Carruthers, Finch, Gardner, 
Grant, Gray, Hatch, Horton, Lumpkin, Murphy, Paylor, Peace, 
Rouse, Sentelle, Summersill, Thornton, Ward, White, William.son. 

Jicdiviary No. 2 — Mr. Siler, Chairman. Messrs. Pickens, Allen, 
Barker, Best of Wayne, Blankenship, Brooks, Caffey, Cooper of 
Cherokee, Craig, Bellinger of Gaston, Elkins, Garrett, Giles, Jone:^. 
King, Kimzey, Leggett, Meekins, McBryde, Royster, Scott, Thomas 
of Anson, Uzzell, Baley, Jenkins, McDuffie. 

Manufacturers and Labor — Mr. Uzzell, Chairman. Messrs. Hash, 
Allen, Barber, Barnes, Bost, Cabe, Clark, Bellinger of Gaston, Fen- 
ner, Gardner, Horton, Johnston of Iredell, McBryde, Paylor, Pick- 
ens, Pope, Rasberry, Rouse, Sentelle, Stell, Stone, Thomas of Hart- 
nett, Vogler, Warren, Wilson of Forsyth, Baley. 

Military Affairs — Mr. Bavis of Bare, Chairman. Messrs. Flowers, 
Banks of Jones, Blount, Barnes, Bryant, Craig, Cooper of Cherokee, 
Horton, Johnston of 'Iredell, Uzzell, Williams, Warren. 

Oyster Industry — Mr. White, Chairman. Messrs. Banks of Pam- 
lico, Benton, Bavis of Dare, Hobbs, Johnson of Currituck, Leary, 
Tatem. 

Penal Institutions — Mr. Norwood. Chairman. Messrs. Andrews, 
Cooper of New Hanover, Allen, Aycock, Berry, Blankenship, Bost, 
Cabe, Davis of Bare, Fenner, Gardner, Gass, Horton, King, Leary, 
McBowell, Rasberry, Rouse, Scott, Sentelle, Spruill, Taylor of Al- 
leghany. Taylor of Caswell, Thomas of Anson, Thomas of Harnett. 
White, Bellinger of Avery. 

Pensions — Mr. Carruthers, Chairman. Messrs. Howell. Adams, 
Cooi>er of New Hanover, Eagles, Howard, Leary. McNeill. Moore, 
Norwood, Taylor of Alleghany, McDuffie. 



58 Legislative JJEi•AKT^IE^•T 

Propositions and G-rievances — Mr. Dellinger of Gaston, Chairman. 
Messrs. Patton, Aycock, Brooks, Best of Pender, Craig, Carrutliers, 
Cooper of New Hanover, Clark, Davis of Hyde, Fulglmm, Grant, 
McDowell, Martin, Moore, Price, Peace, Poole, Quinn, Thomas of 
Harnett, Thornton, Underwood, McDuffie. 

Puhlic Utilities — Mr. Rouse, Chairman. Messrs. Johnston of Ire- 
dell, Abernathy, Barker, Barnes, Berry, Bost, Carruthers, Finch, 
Gass, Gray, Hatch, Hobb5, Jones, Kimzey, McNair, Mitchell, Thomas 
of Anson, Uzzell, Vogler, Wilson of Forsyth, Grant. 

Public Welfare — Mrs. Hutchins, Chairman. Messrs. Hobbs, Aber- 
nathy, Andrews, Cooper of Cherokee, Davis of Randolph, Fulghum, 
Giles, Hash, Horner, Howard, May, Miller, Mitchell, McNair, Nor- 
wood, Quinn, Rasberry of Greene, Royster, Thomas of Harnett, Vog- 
ler, Ward, Warren, Williamson, Wilson of Forsyth, Zickler, Burle- 
son, McDuffie. 

Roads — Mr. Johnston of Iredell, Chairman. Messrs. Ward, Allen, 
Aycock, Banks of Jones, Kimzey of Transylvania, Barker, Berry, 
Blount, Brooks, Carruthers, Cooper of Cherokee, Dellinger of Gas- 
ton, Eagles, Fenner, Flowers, Finch, Gass, Hanford, Hobbs, John- 
son of Currituck, Mayhew, Moore of Pitt, McBryde, Norwood, Ras- 
berry, Rouse, Smith, Stone, Tatem, Taylor of Caswell, Thomas of 
Anson, Underwood, Uzzell, Williams, Dellinger of Avery. 

Rules — Mr. Thomas of Anson, Chairman. Messrs. Murphy, Blount, 
Bryant, Caffey, Davis of Dare, Fenner, Finch, Gardner, Hatch, Hor- 
ton, Jenkins, Johnston of Iredell, Jones, Kimzey, King, Lumpkin, 
Pope, Royster, Siler, Vogler, Williams of Pasquotank, Ward. 

Salaries and Fees — Mr. Tatem, Chairman. Messrs. Giles, Aycock. 
Berry, Best of Wayne, Cabe, Davis of Hyde, Davis of Randolph. 
Grant, Hanford, Hobbs, Howell, Johnston of Iredell, Jones, Joyner. 
King, Lumpkin, Miller, Norwood, Taylor of Caswell, Underwood, 
Wilson of Forsyth, Withrow, Vogler, Haynes, Grant. 

Senatorial Districts — Mr. Pickens, Chairman. Messrs. Barnes, At- 
kinson, Best of Pender, Blankenship, Blount, Fenner, Finch, Flow- 
ers, Gardner, Hobbs, Leary, Murphy, McDowell, Price, Rouse, Sen- 
telle, Stone, Smith, Wilson of Forsyth, Withrow. 



committes of the house 59 

Joint Committees 

Etwolled Bills — Mr. Barnes, Chairman. Messrs. Horner, Best of 
Pender, Caffey, Garrett, Howell, Mrs. Hutchins, Messrs. Patton, 
Peace, Quinn, Scott, Sentelle, Jenkins. 

Justices of the Peace — Mr. Caffey, Chairman. Messrs. Finch, Aber- 
nathy. Banks of Pamlico, Brooks, Gray, Ledbetter, McBryde, Mc- 
Neill, Norwood, Paylor, Summersill, Williamson, Bellinger of Avery, 
Haynes. 

Library — Mr. Allen, Chairman. Messrs. Spruill, Blankenship, 
Clark, Howard, Joyner, Moore, Pickens, Pope, Royster, Rouse, Scott, 
Thomas of Harnett, Ward. 

Printing — Mr. Mitchell, Chairman. Messrs. Horner, Adams, Best 
of Wayne, Bellinger of Gaston, Howell, King, McNeill, Price, Bel- 
linger of Avery. 

Public Buildings and Grounds — Mr. Spruill, Chairman. Messrs. 
McNeill, Adams, Aycock, Best of Pender, Banks of Jones, Bavis of 
Randolph, Hanford, Ledbetter, Mayhew, Poole, Bellinger of Avery. 

Trustees of the University — Mr. Murphy, Chairman. Messrs. 
Spruill, Allen, Atkinson, Barnes, Blount, Bryant, Clark, Craig, 
Eagles, Fenner, Howard, Jones, McBryde, Paylor, Poole, Rouse, Roy- 
ster, Thomas of Anson, Ward, Warren, Grant. 



V' 



PART II 



NEW STATE BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 



1. The North Carolina Rural Electrification Authority. 

2. North Carolina Rural Rehabilitation Corporation. 

3. State Commission for the Blind, 

4. The Advisory Parole Board. 

5. North Carolina State Planning Board. 

6. North Carolina Board of Photographic Examiners. 

7. State Board of Commercial Education. 

8. Unemployment Compensation Commission. 



[ fii ] 



THE NORTH CAROLINA RURAL ELECTRIFICATION 

AUTHORITY 



-Chapter 288, P. L. 1935 

Composition — Six members. 

Personnel — Dudley W. Bagley, Chairman, Moyock; Dr. Jane S. 
McKimmon, Raleigh; W. Kerr Scott, Haw River; Dr. S. H. Hobbs, 
Jr., Chapel Hill; J. L. Home, Jr., Rocky Mount; George M. Ste- 
phens, Asheville. 

Appointment — By Governor. 

Terms — Two members two years, two for four yeai's and two for 
six years. 

Compensation — Chairman, $4,000; members l)oard, expenses only. 

The Rural Electrification Authority was created for the purpose 
of promoting and encouraging the fullest pos'^ible use of electric 
energy in the rural areas of the State. The Authority does not 
build nor finance the construction of power lines, confining its ef- 
forts to the coordination of existing facilities to accomplish its pui'- 
poses. In general, investigations are made, communities are as- 
sisted in organizing, negotiations are made with power companies, 
the Federal Government and municipalities for the extension of 
distribution lines for and on behalf of the rural communities that 
desire service. 

The Electric Membership Corporation Act provides for the forma- 
tion of non-profit membership corporations. Applications for loans 
from the United States Government are made through the State 
Authority and not direct to the United States Agency. 

When the North Carolina Rural Electrification Authority began 
to function on July 1, 1935, about 3 per cent of the farms in the State 
were receiving central station service. The December 1936 report 
showed an additional 5,250 miles of power lines had been built, un- 
der construction or authorized to be built at an estimated cost of 
$5,521,280.00 and the percentage of electrified farms rose to about 
12 per cent. 



I <■>■■'. 1 



NORTH CAROLINA RURAL REHABILITATION 

CORPORATION 



Chapter 314, Public Laws 1935 
Composition — A non-profit, non-par value stock company, created 
by authority of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration and 
incorporated under the laws of North Carolina, July 16, 1934. Tho 
stock issue is limited to twelve shares and no stockholder may hold 
more than one share. 

Recognized and designated as state agency, by Legislative Act of 
May 7, 1935. Chapter 314, Public Laws 1935. 

StockJwlders — T. E. Browne, Roy L. Brown, C. A. Dillon, Harriet 
Elliott, T. L. Grier, Leland H. Kitchin, Terry A. Lyon, Howard W. 
Odum, Mrs. Thomas O'Berry, Mrs. Gordon Reid, Carl C. Taylor and 
L 0. Schaub. 

Directors — Same as stockholders. 

Officers — President, Mrs. Thomas O'Berry; 1st Vice-President, Le- 
land H. Kitchin; 2nd Vice-President, Harriet Elliott; Secretary, 
T. L. Grier; Treasurer, C. E. Phinney. 

Terms — Overlapping one, two. three and four years. 

The Rural Rehabilitation program was inaugurated in April, 
1934, as a division of the North Carolina Emergency Relief Admin- 
istration, for the purpose of making it possible for worthy destitute 
farm families eligible for relief to become self-supporting and as 
far as possible own their farms. The Corporation was organized as 
the business agency to transact all business and legal matters of 
the program. A standard form for a corporation set-up was issued 
by the Rural Rehabilitation Division of the Federal Emergency Re- 
lief Administration for information and guidance of the State Emer- 
gency Relief Administration. Following this authorized form, the 
corporation was set up as a non-par value stock company v/ith con- 
trol resting in the Board of Directors, a majority of whom were 
officials of the State Emergency Relief Administration. By direc- 
tion of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, the Board of 
Directors included ranking officials of the designated cooperating 
Federal and State agencies. 

[ r,4 J 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COMMISSION 
FOR THE BLIND 



Chapter 53, Public Laws 1935 
Composition — Chairman and four members. 

Personnel — Judge Sam M. Cathey, Chairman, Asheville; Dr. How- 
ard E. Jensen, Durliam; Mrs. Meyer Sternberger, Greensboro; G. E. 
Lineberry, Raleigli; Charles H. Warren, Raleigh. 

Appointment — The first three above members are appointed by 
the Governor and the last two members serve because of their re- 
spective positions as Superintendent of the State School for the 
Blind and Secretary of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

Ter-m — Five years for the appointive members after the initial 
terms have been served. 

Compensation — Members of the Commission receive no compen- 
sation for their services, but are allowed expenses incuired in the 
performance of their official duties. 

Duties — The North Carolina Commission for the Blind began func- 
tioning in August of 1935. It is charged with improving the condi- 
tion of adult blind in North Carolina and working for the preven- 
tion of blindness in the State. The Commission gives both indus- 
trial and academic training to needy blind persons, and furnishes 
supplies and equipment to establish them in businesses of their own. 
Workshops and industrial training are established in cooperation 
with local groups to furnish training and employment fo the adult 
blind. County Clinics are held for the refraction of needy school 
children and adults, and operations are performed where such oper- 
ations will improve, restore or conserve vision. The Commission 
maintains a register of the blind in the State, which at present in- 
cludes the names and addresses of 5,430 blind persons and gives 
pertinent information regarding each of the persons registered. 



[ or, ] 



THE ADVISORY PAROLE BOARD 



Chapter 414, P. L. 1935 
Composition — Chairman and six members. 

Personnel — Governor J. C. B. Eliringhaus, Chairman; Attorney 
General, A. A. F. Seawell; Superintendent of Public Welfare, Mrs. 
W. T. Bost; Chairman of the State Highway and Public Works 
Commission, Honorable Capus M. Waynick; R. E. Sentelle, South- 
port; J. F. Spruill, Lexington; Judge T. D. Bryson, Durham. 

Ex-officio Memhers — The Governor as Chairman, Attorney General, 
Superintendent of Public Welfare, Chairman of State Highway and 
Public Works Commission. The other three members are appointed 
by the Governor. 

Term — Other than ex-officio members — one for a term of one year, 
one for a term of two years, and one for a term of three years. 

Compensation — Ex-officio members, none. Appointed members, 
$7.00 to $10.00 per diem and actual expenses while attending the 
meetings and performing duties. 

The Advisory Board of Paroles was created by the 1935 Legisla- 
ture to meet with the Governor and formulate parole policies. The 
board has no power to grant paroles — this being placed by the Con- 
stitution solely in the Governor. 



Office of the Commissioner of Pai-oles 

The Present Office as Created by Chapter 414, P. L. 1935 

Composition — Commissioner of Paroles, Assistant Commissioner 
of Paroles, five investigators, four supervisors, secretary and chief 
record clerk. 

Personnel — Edwin M. Gill, Commissioner; E. Hathaway Cross, 
Assistant Commissioner; Malcolm B. Seawell, William Dunn, Jr., 
J. H. Fleming, Elizabeth Frye, James Smathers, Foil Essick, G. L. 
Simpson, Ray S. Farris, Hilda G. Carpenter. 

Term — At the will of the Governor. 

[ 66 ] 



The Advisory Pakole Board 67 

Compensation — Commissioner, |4,500.00; Assistant Commissioner, 
$3,126.00; four investigators, $2,064.00; one investigator, $1,620.00; 
Supervisors, $1,878.00; secretary and general record clerk, $1,500.00. 

The office of the Commissioner of Paroles is a part of the Execu- 
tive Chambers, and functions under the sole direction of the Gov- 
ernor. 

The office as now constituted, was created by the 1935 session of 
the General Assembly of North Carolina, at which time provision 
was made for an assistant to the Commissioner of Paroles, for a 
staff of investigators and supervisors, and stenographic and clerical 
help sufficient to carry out the parole program. 

The office of the Commissioner of Paroles acts in an advisory ca- 
pacity: investigating and recommending to the Governor those pris- 
oners who merit either parole or executive clemency. 

Under the direction of the Governor, the office of the Commis- 
sioner of Paroles, through its supervisors, cooperates with local of- 
ficials in the supervision of all paroled prisoners. The 100 Wel- 
fare Officers of the State are by law the local supervision agents. 

The Governor has assigned to the Commissioner of Paroles the 
further duty of investigating the cases of all prisoners under sen- 
tence of death. 

The Governor and the Commissioner of Paroles have caused to 
be set up a file for every felon confined in the State prison system 
and their cases are heard regardless of whether or not any one ap- 
pears in their behalf. In addition to this, arrangement has been 
made, through the cooperation of the penal division of the State 
Highway and public Works Commission, to furnish information on 
misdemeanants who might be worthy of parole. 

The Parole Office is gathering information and statistics for a 
study of crime and also for the purpose of aiding the United States 
Department of Justice in the Attorney General's Survey of Release 
Methods, a nation-wide survey of parole practices. 

The North Carolina Parole System has been progressing rapidly 
under its policy of cooperation with the Courts and law enforcement, 
welfare and penal agencies. 

The Parole Office not only studies cases with a view to parole, 
but actively supports the Penal Division in an effort to rehabilitate 
a penal population ranging between nine and ten thousand. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PLANNING BOARD 



Chapter 4SS. P. L. 1985 
Composition — Xiue members. 

Personnel — Capiis 'SI. Wayniok. Chairman. Raleigh: Roulieu B. 
Robertson. Asheville; Dr. Clarence Poe. Raleigh; Mrs. W. T. Bost. 
Raleigh; Col. J. W. Harrelson. Raleigh; R. Bruce Etheridge. Raleigh; 
Dr. Howard W. Odum. Chapel Hill; Clyde A. Erwin, Raleigh; Stan- 
ley "Winborue. Raleigh; Theodore S. Johnson, cousultaur. Raleigh. 

Appointment — By the Governor. 

Term — Indefinite. 

Compensation — None. 

Function — To formulate for the State a comprehensive, coor- 
dinated, and long-range basic plan for the use. development, and 
conservation of rhe State's resources and facilities as a means to 
greater and more enduring economic and social benefits and en- 
joyment for the citizens of the State; to cooperate with similar 
planning agencies in adjoining states and with the National Plan- 
ning Board in the coordination of related plans of interstate and 
national importance; and to cooperate and advise with the Gov- 
ernor, the General Assembly, and otlier public officials in the further- 
aTice of the foregoing purposes. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF PHOTO- 
GRAPHIC EXAMINERS 



Chapter 155. Pxiblic Laws 1935 
Secretary 

Composition — Five members. Chairman elected annually. Secre- 
tary-Treasurer appointed by the board and not necessarily a mem- 
ber of the board. 

Personnel — Ben V. Matthews. Winston-Salem. Chairman; Leonard 
C. Cooke. Charlotte; R. W. Foister. Chapel Hill: W. F. Kendrick. 
Mebane; Alfred F. Harrell. Rocky Mount. 

Appointment — By the Governor. 

Term — Three years. 

[ 6S ] 



X. C. State Board of Photogbaphic ExAMI^-ERs G9 

Compensation — Seven dollars per day and actual and necessary 
expenses for each day actually devoted to the performance of their 
duties. 

Function — To regulate and control the practice of photography. 



STATE BOARD OF COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 



Chapter 25.5, P. L. 1935 

Composition — Four members. 

Personnel — Clyde A. Erwin, T. E. Browne, J. Henry Highsmith, 
E. L. Layfield. 

Appointment — One member by Governor, three by statute. 

Term — Three years for the Governor's appointee. 

Compensation — None. 

Qualifications — Director of the Division of Instructional Services, 
Director of Division of Vocational Education and State Superin- 
tendent of Education, who having no vote, is chairman of the 
Board and Ex-ofl5cio Secretary. 

Governor's Appointee — The owner and operator of an accredited 
business or commercial school th^has been in operation within 
the State for five years. 

Function — To license business colleges and commercial .schools 
and to have general supervision over such schools in the State. 



NORTH CAROLINA UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSA- 
TION COMMISSION 



Chapter 1, P. L. ex. 19-36 

Composition — Chairman and two members. 

Personnel — Charles G. Powell. Chairman, Raleigh; Mrs. J. B. 
Spillman, Raleigh; Major A. L. Fletcher, Raleigh, Commissioner of 
Labor, ex-officio. 

Appointment — By Governor. 
Term — Two, four and six years. 

Compensation — Chairman, -$5,000; member, $4,500; ex-officio mem- 
ber, nothing extra. 

E. W. Price, Raleigh, director Unemployment Compensation Di- 



70 N. C. Unemployment Compensation. Commission 

visinn; Mrs. May Thompson Evans, Raleigh, director State Em- 
ployment Service Division. 

The North Carolina Unemployment Compensation Commission 
was created by the North Carolina Unemployment Compensation 
Act, enacted by the special session of the General Assembly in De- 
cember, 1936, called for that purpose to meet the requirements of 
Titles III and IX of the National Social Security Act, as amended. 
The State Act provided for a commission of three members to ad- 
minister the law, through two divisions, the Unemployment Compen- 
sation Division and the State Employment Service Division, the lat- 
ter of which had been created by Chapter 106, Public Laws of 1935. 
All administrative costs of the commission are paid by the Federal 
Government, on requisition of the commission, after the schedule 
of expenditures is approved by the Social Security Board. 

The commission, through its Unemployment Compensation Divi- 
sion, is charged with the collection from employers coming under 
the Act nine-tenths of one per cent in 1936, one and eight-tenths 
per cent in 1937 and two and seven-tenths per cent in 1938 and there- 
after on the payrolls of the employers. These contributions go into 
a special fund and create a reserve from which workers who be- 
come unemployed through no fault of their own and after January 
1, 1938, are paid at the rate of one-half of their normal wages, but 
not to exceed $15 a week nor less than $5 a week, or three-fourths 
of his full-time weekly wage, whichever is lesser. The unemployed 
worker cannot draw benefits for more than 16 weeks in a benefit 
year. The division is required to secure from the State's 9,000 em- 
ployers and keep a complete record of the approximately 400,000 work- 
ers in the State, in order to make the payments of benefits properly. 

The State Employment Service Division, already in operation, 
was taken over by the commission, and its operations enlarged and 
extended. This division maintains employment offices throughout 
the State and seeks to find work for the unemployed, who, while 
drawing benefits are required to report regularly to these employ- 
ment offices in efforts to find suitable work. 

The commission is charged with the task of trying to stabilize 
employment and thus preventing the financial, economic and moral 
ills that follow enforced idleness of workers in the State. It is 
also required to make a study of unemployment, its causes and re- 
sults, and to strive to present methods of reducing this hazard in 
reports to the Governor and the General Assembly. 



PLATFORMS AND POLITICAL PARTIES, 1936 



PART III 



1. Demockatic National Platform. 

2. Republican National Platform. 

3. State Democratic Platform. 

4. State Republican Platform. 



[71] 



DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL PLATFORM 



Convention Hall, Philadelphia, June 25. — (AP) — The text of the 
Democratic national platform follows: 

We hold this truth to be self-evident — that the test of a represen- 
tative government is its ability to promote the safety and happiness 
of the people. 

We hold this truth to be self-evident — that 12 years of Republican 
leadership left our nation sorely stricken in body, mind and spirit; 
and that three years of Democratic leadership have put it back on 
the road to restored health and prosperity. 

We hold this trutli to be self-evident — that 12 years of Republican 
surrender to the dictatorship of a privileged few have been supplanted 
by a Democratic leadership which has returned the people them- 
selves to the places of authority, and has revived in them new faith 
and restored the hope which they had almost lost. 

We hold this truth to be self-evident — that this three-year recov- 
ery in all the basic values of life and the re-establishment of the 
American way of living has been brought about by humanizing the 
policies of the Federal Government as they affect the personal, 
financial, industrial and agricultural well-being of the American 
people. 

Its Obligations 

We hold this truth to be self-evident — that government in a mod- 
ern civilization has certain inescapable obligations to its citizens, 
among which are: 

(1) Protection of the family and the home. 

(2) Establishment of a democracy of oppoi'tunity for all the peo- 
ple. 

(3) Aid to those overtaken by disaster. 

These obligations, neglected through 12 years of the old leader- 
ship, once more have been recognized by American government. 
Under the new leadership they will never be neglected. 

For the Photixtiox of the F.xmii.y and thk Homk 
(1) We have begun and shall continue the successful drive to rid 
our land of kidnappers and bandits. We shall continue to use tiie 

[73] 



74 PoLiTiCxVL Platforms 

powers of government to end the activities of the malefactors of 
great wealth who defraud and exploit the people. 

Savings and Investments 

(2) We have safeguarded the thrift of our citizens by restrain- 
ing those who would gamble with other people's savings, by requir- 
ing truth in the sale of securities; by putting the brakes upon the 
use of credit for speculation; by outlawing the manipulation of 
prices in stock and commodity markets; by curbing the overween- 
ing power and unholy practices of utility holding companies; by 
insuring fifty million bank accounts. 

Old- Age and Social Secukity 

(3) We have built foundations for the security of those who are 
faced with the hazards of unemployment and old age; for the or- 
phaned, the crippled and the blind. On the foundation of the Social 
Security Act we are determined to erect a structure of economic 
security for all our people, making sure that this benefit shall keep 
step with the ever-increasing capacity of America to provide a high 
standard of living for all its citizens. 

Consumer 

(4) We will act to secure to the consumer fair value, honest sales 
and a decreased spread between the price he pays and the price the 
producer receives. 

Rural Electrification 

(5) This administration has fostered power rate yardsticks in 
the Tennessee Valley and in several other parts of the nation. As 
a result electricity has been made available to the people at a lower 
rate. We will continue to promote plans for rural electrification 
and for cheaper power by means of the yardstick method. 

Housing 

(6) We maintain that our people are entitled to decent, adequate 
housing at a price which they can afford. In the last three years 
the Federal government, having saved more than two million homes 
from foreclosure, has taken the first steps in our history to provide 
decent housing for people of meagre incomes. We believe every 
encouragement should be given to the building of new homes by 



Democratic IN'ational Platfok.m 



< ;> 



private enterprise; and that the government should steadily extend 
its housing program toward the goal of adequate housing for those 
forced through economic necessities to live in unhealthy and slum 
conditions. 

Vetekans 

(7) We shall continue just treatment to our war veterans and 
their dependents. 
For the establishment of a democracy of opportunity: 

Agriculture 

We have taken the farmers off the road to ruin. 

We have kept our pledge to agriculture to use all available means 
to raise farm income toward its pre-war purchasing power. The 
farmer no longer is suffering from 15-cent corn, three-cent hogs, 
two and one-half-cent beef at the farm, five-cent wool, 30-cent wheat, 
five-cent cotton and three-cent sugar. 

By Federal legislation we have reduced the farmers' indebtedness 
and doubled his net income. In cooperation with the states and 
through the farmers' own committees, we are restoring the fertility 
of his land and checking the erosion of his soil. We are bringing 
electricity and good roads to his home. 

We will continue to improve the soil conservation and domestic 
allotment program with payments to farmers. 

We will continue a fair-minded administration of agricultural 
laws, quick to recognize and meet new problems and conditions. We 
recognize the gravity of the evils of farm tenancy, and whe pledge 
the full cooperation of the government in the refinancing of farm 
indebtedness at the lowest possible rates of interest and over a long 
term of years. 

We favor the production of all the market will absorb, both at 
home and abroad plus a reserve supply sufficient to insure fair 
prices to consumers; we favor judicious commodity loans on sea- 
sonal surpluses; and we favor assistance within Federal authority 
to enable farmers to adjust and balance producticm with demand, 
at a fair profit to the farmers. 

We faror encouragement of sound, practical farm cooperatives. 

By the purchase and retirement of ten million acres of submar- 
ginal land, and assistance to those attempting to eko out an exist- 



76 Political Platforms 

ence upon it, we have made a good beginning toward proper land 
use and rural rehabilitation. 

The farmer has been returned to the road to freedom and pros- 
perity. We will keep him on that road. 

Labor 

We have given the army of America's industrial workers some- 
thing more substantial than the Republican's dinner pail full of 
promises. We have increased the worker's pay and shortened his 
hours; we have undertaken to put an end to the sweated labor of 
his wife and children; we have written into the law of the land 
his right to collective bargaining and self-organization free from 
the interference of employers; we have provided Federal machinery 
for the peaceful settlement of labor disputes. 

We will continue to protect the worker and we will guard his 
rights, both as wage-earner and consumer, in the production, and 
consumption of all commodities including coal and water power 
and other natural resource products. 

The worker has been returned to the road to freedom and pros- 
perity. We will keep him on that road. 

We have taken the American business man out of the red. We 
have saved his bank and given it a sounder foundation; we have 
extended credit; we have lowered interest rates; we have under- 
taken to free him from the ravages of cut-throat competition. 

Youth 

We have aided youth to stay in school; given them constructive 
occupation; opened the door to opportunity which 12 years of Re- 
publican neglect had closed. 

Our youth have been returned to the road to freedom and pros- 
perity. We will keep them on that road. 

Monopoly am) CoiNCKNTitATiON of Economic Power 

Monopolies and the concentration of economic power, the creation 
of Republican rule and privilege, continue to be the master of the 
producer, the exploiter of the consumer, and the enemy of the in- 
dependent operator. This is a problem challenging the unceasing 
effort of untrammeled public officials in every branch of the gov- 



Democratic National Platform 77 

ernment. We pledge vigorously and fearlessly to enforce the crim- 
inal and civil provisions of the existing anti-trust laws, and to the 
extent that their effectiveness has heen weakened by new corporate 
devices or judicial construction, we propose to restore their ef- 
ficiency in stamping out monopolistic practices and the concentra- 
tion of economic power. 

Aid to Those Overtaken by Disaster 

We have aided and will continue to aid those who have been vis- 
ited by widespread drought and floods and have adopted a nation- 
wide flood-control policy. 

Unemployment 

We believe that unemployment is a national problem, and that it 
is an inescapable obligation of our government to meet it in a na- 
tional way due to our stimulation of private business, more than 
five million people have been reemployed; and we shall continue 
to maintain that first objective of a program of economic security 
is maximum employment in private industry at adequate wages. 
Where business fails to supply such employment, we believe that 
work at prevailing wages should be provided in cooperation with 
state and local governments on useful public projects, to the end 
that the national wealth may be increased, the skill and energy of 
the worker may be utilized, his morale maintained, and the unem- 
ployed assured the opportunity to earn the necessities of life. 

The Constitution 

The Republican platform proposes to meet many pressing national 
problems solely by action of the separate states. AVe know that 
drought, dust storms, floods, minimum wages, maximum hours, child 
labor and working conditions in industry, monopolistic and unfair 
business practices cannot be adequately handled exclusively by 48 
separate state legislatures, 48 separate state administrations and 48 
separate state courts. Transactions and activities which inevitably 
overflow state boundaries call for both state and Federal treatment. 

We have sought and will continue to seek to meet these problems 
through legislation within the Constitution. 

If these problems cannot be effectively solved by legislation within 
the Constitution, we shall seek clarifying amendment as will assure 
to the legislatures of the several states and to the Congress of the 



78 Political Platforms 

United States, each within its proper jurisdiction, the power to 
enact those laws which the state and Federal legislatures, within 
their respective spheres, shall find necessary, in order adequately 
to regulate commerce, protect public health and safety and safe- 
guard economic security. Thus we propose to maintain the letter 
and spirit of the Constitution. 

The Merit System ix Governme>t 

For the protection of government itself and promotion of its ef- 
ficiency we pledge the immediate expansion of the merit system 
through the classified civil service — which was first established and 
fostered under Democratic auspices — to all non-policy-making posi- 
tions in the Federal service. 

"We shall subject to the civil service law all continuing positions 
which, because of the emergency, have been exempt from its oper- 
ation. 

Civil Liberties 

We shall continue to guard the freedom of speech, press, radio, 
religion and assembly which our constitution guarantees; with 
equal rights to all and special privileges to none. 

Government Finance 

The administration has stopped deflation, restored values and en- 
abled business to go ahead with confidence. 

When national income shrinks, government income is imperiled. 
In reviving national income, we have fortified government finance. 
We have raised the public credit to a position of unsurpassed secur- 
ity. The interest rate on government bonds has been reduced to 
the lowest point in 2S years. The same government bonds which in 
1932 sold under S3 are now selling over 104. 

We approve the objective of a permanently sound currency so 
stabilized as to prevent the former wide fluctuations in value which 
injured in turn producers, debtors, and property owners on the one 
hand, and wage-earners and creditors on the other, a currency which 
will permit full utilization of the country's resources. We assert 
that today we have the soundest currency in the world. 

We are determined to reduce the expenses of government. We 
are being aided therein by the recession in unemployment. As the 



Democratic National Platfokm 79 

requirements of relief decline and national income advances, an in- 
creasing percentage of Federal expenditures can and will be met 
from current revenues, secured from taxes levied in accordance with 
ability to pay. Our retrenchment, tax and recovery programs thus 
reflect our firm determination to achieve a balanced budget and the 
reduction of the national debt at the earliest possible moment. 

Foreign Policy 

In our relationship with other nations, this government will con- 
tinue to extend the policy of good neighbor. We reaffirm our oppo- 
sition to war as an instrument of national policy, and declare that 
disputes between nations should be settled by peaceful means. We 
shall continue to observe a true neutrality in the disputes of oth- 
ers; to be prepared, resolutely to resist aggression against our- 
selves; to work for peace and to take the profits out of war; to 
guard against being drawn, by political commitments, international 
banking or private trading, into any war which may develop any- 
where. 

We shall continue to foster the increase in our foreign trade 
which has been achieved by this administration; to seek by mutual 
agreement the lowering of those tariff barriers, quotas and embar- 
goes which have been raised against our exports of agricultural and 
industrial products; but continue as in the past to give adequate 
protection to our farmers and manufacturers against unfair com- 
petition or the dumping on our shores of commodities and goods 
produced abroad by cheap labor or subsidized by foreign govern- 
ments. 

The issue in this election is plain. The American people are 
called upon to choose between a Republican administration that has 
and would again regiment them in the service of privileged groups 
and a Democratic administration dedicated to the establishment of 
equal economic opportunity for all our people. 

We have faith in the destiny of our nation. We are sufficiently 
endowed with natural resources and with productive capacity to 
provide for all a quality of life that meets the standard.-; of real 
Americanism. 

Dedicated to a government of liberal American principles, we ar(> 
determined to oppose equally, the despotism of Communism and 
the menace of concealed Fascism. 



so Political Platforms 

We hold this final ti'uth to be self-evident — that the interests, the 
security and the happiness of the people of the United States of 
America can be perpetuated only under Democratic government as 
conceived by the founders of our nation. 



1936 REPUBLICAN NATIONAL PLATFORM 



Cleveland, June 11. — (AP) — The text of the Republican platform 
follows: 

The Platform of the Reptjblican Pauty, 1936 

America is in peril. The welfare of American men and women 
and the future of our youth are at stake. We dedicate ourselves 
to the preservation of their political liberty, their individual op- 
portunity and their character as free citizens, which today for the 
first time, are threatened by Government itself. 

For three long years the New Deal administration has dishon- 
ored American traditions and flagrantly betrayed the pledges upon 
which the Democratic party sought and received puljlic support. 

The powers of Congress have been usurped by the President. 

The integrity and authority of the Supreme Court have been 
flaunted. 

The rights and liberties of American citizens have been violated. 

Regulated monopoly has displaced free enterprise. 

The New Deal administration constantly seeks to u.surp the rights 
reserved to the states and to the people. 

It has insisted on the passage of laws contrary to the Constitu- 
tion. 

It has intimidated witnesses and interfered with the right of 
petition. 

It has dishonored our country by repudiating its most sacred 
obligations. 

It has been guilty of frightful waste and extravagance, using pub- 
lic funds for partisan political purposes. 

It has promoted investigations to harass and intimidate Ameri- 
can citizens, at the same time denying investigations into its own 
improper expenditures. 

It has created a vast multitude of new offices, filled them with 
its favorites, set up a centralized bureaucracy, and sent out swarms 
of inspectors to harass our people. 

It has bred fear and hesitation in commerce and industry, thus 
discouraging new enterprises, preventing employment and prolong- 
ing the depression. 

[ .^1 I 



82 Political Platforms 

It secretly has made tariff agreements with our foreign competi- 
tors, flooding our markets witli foreign commodities. 

It has coerced and intimidated voters by withholding relief to 
those opposing its tyrannical policies. 

It has destroyed the morale of many of our people and made them 
dependent upon government. 

Appeals to passion and class prejudice have replaced reason and 
tolerance. 

To a free people, these actions are insufferable. This campaign 
can not be waged on the traditional differences between the Repub- 
lican and Democratic parties. The responsibility of this election 
transcends all previous political divisions. We invite all Ameri- 
cans irrespective of party, to join us in defense of American insti- 
tutions. 

Constitutional Government ano Free Enterprise 

We pledge ourselves: 

(1) To maintain the American system of constitutional and local 
self-government, and to resist all attempts to impair the authority 
of the Supreme Court of the United States, the final protector of 
the rights of our citizens against the arbitrary encroachments of 
the legislative and executive branches of government. There can 
be no individual liberty without an independent judiciary. 

(2) To preserve the American system of free enterprise, private 
competition, and equality of opportunity, and to seek its constant 
betterment in the interest of all. 

Re-employment 

The only permanent solution of the unemployment problem is the 
absorption of the unemployed by industry and agriculture, to that 
end, we advocate: 

Removal of restrictions on production. 

Abandonment of all New Deal policies that raise production costs, 
of living, and thereby restrict buying, reduce volume and prevent 
reemployment. 

Encouragement instead of hindrance to legitimate business. 

Witlidrawal of Government from competition v.-ith private pay- 
rolls. 

Elimination of unnecessary and hami>ering regulations. 



1936 Eepublican ISTational Platform 83 

Adoption of such other policies as will furnish a chance for in- 
dividual enterprise, industrial expansion, and the restoration of 
jobs. 

Rexief 

The necessities of life must be provided for the needy, and hope 
must be restored pending recovery. The administration of relief is 
a major failure of the New Deal. It has been faithless to those who 
most deserve our sympathy. To end confusion, partisanship, waste 
and incompetence, we pledge: 

(1) The return of responsibility for relief administration to non- 
political local agencies familiar with community problems. 

(2) Federal grants-in-aid to the states and territories while the 
need exists, upon compliance with these conditions: (a) A fair 
proportion of the total relief burden to be provided from the rev- 
enues of states and local governments; (b) all engaged in relief 
administration to be selected on the basis of merit and fitness; (c) 
adequate provision to be made for the encouragement of those per- 
sons who are trying to become self-supporting. 

(3) Undertaking of Federal public works only on their merits 
and separate from the administration of relief. 

(4) A prompt determination of the facts concerning relief and 
unemployment. 

Security 

Real security will be possible only when our productive capacity 
is sufficient to furnish a decent standard of living for all American 
families and to provide a surplus for future needs and contingen- 
cies. For the attainment of that ultimate objective, we look to the 
energy, self-reliance and character of our people, and to our system 
of free enterprise. 

Society has an obligation to promote the security of the people, 
by affording some measure of protection against involuntary un- 
employment and dependency in old age. The New Deal policies, 
while purporting to provide social security, have, in fact, endan- 
gered it. 

We propose a system of old-age security, based upon the follow- 
ing principles: 



84 Political Platforms 

(1) We approve a pay-as-you-go policy, which requires of each 
generation the support of the aged and the determination of what 
is just and adequate. 

(2) Every American citizen over 65 should receive the supple- 
mentary payment necessary to provide a minimum income suffi- 
cient to protect him or her from want. 

(3) Each state and territory, upon complying with simple and 
general minimum standards should receive from the Federal Gov- 
ernment a graduation cmtribution in proportion to its own, up to 
a fixed maximum. 

(4) To make this program consistent with sound fiscal policy the 
Federal revenues for this purpose must be provided from the pro- 
ceeds of a direct tax widely distributed. All will be benefitted and 
all should contribute. 

We propose to encourage adoption by the states and territories 
of honest and practical measures for meeting the problems of un- 
employment insurance. 

The unemployment insurance and old-age annuity sections of the 
present Social Security Act are unworkable and deny benefits to 
about two-thirds of our adult population, including professional men 
and women and all those engaged in agriculture and domestic serv- 
ice, and the .self-employed while imposing heavy tax burdens upon 
all. The so-called reserve fund estimated at forty-seven billion dol- 
lars for old-age insurance is no reserve at all, because the fund will 
contain nothing but the government's promise to pay, while the 
taxes collected in the guise of premiums will be wasted by the gov- 
ernment in reckless and extravagant political schemes. 

Labor 

The welfare of labor rests upon increased production and the pre- 
vention of exploitation. We pledge ourselves to: 

Protect the right of labor to organize and to bargain collectively 
through representatives of its own choosing without interference 
from any source. 

Prevent governmental job holders from exercising autocratic pow- 
ers over labor. 

Support the adoption of state and interstate compacts to abolish 
sweat shops and child labor, and to protect women and children 



1936 Republican National Platkokm 85 

with respect to maximum hours, minimum wages and working con- 
ditions. We believe that this can be done within the Constitution 
as it now stands. 

Agriculture 

The farm problem is an economic and social, not a partisan prob- 
lem, and we propose to treat it accordingly. Following the wreck 
of the restrictive and coercive AAA, the New Deal administration 
has taken to itself the principles of the Republican policy of soil 
conservation and land retirement. This action opens the way for 
a non-political and permanent solution. Such a solution cannot be 
had under a New Deal administration which misuses the program 
to serve partisan ends, to promote scarcity and to limit by coercive 
methods the farmer's control over his own farm. 

Our paramount object is to protect and foster the family type of 
farm, traditional in American life, and to promote policies which 
will bring about an adjustment of agriculture to meet the needs of 
domestic and foreign markets. As an emergency measure, during 
the agricultural depression, Federal benefit payments or grants-in- 
aid when administered within the means of the Federal Government 
are consistent with a balanced budget. 

We propose: 

(1) To facilitate economical production and increased consump- 
tion on a basis of abundance instead of scarcity. 

(2) A national land-use program, including the acquisition of 
abandoned and non-productive farm lands by voluntary sale or 
lease, subject to approval of the legislative and executive branches 
of the states concerned, and the devotion of such land to appropriate 
public use, such as watershed protection and flood prevention, re- 
forestation, recreation and conservation of wild life. 

(3) That an agricultural policy be pursued for the protection and 
restoration of the land resources, designed to bring about such a 
balance between soil-building and soil-depleting crops as will per- 
manently insure productivity, with reasonable benefits to cooperat- 
ing farmers on family-type farms, but so regulated as to eliminate 
the New Deal's destructive policy towards the dairy and livestock 
industries. 

(4) To extend experimental aid to farmers developing new crops 
suited to our soil and climate. 



86 Political Platfokms 

(5) To promote the industrial use of farm products by applied 
science. 

(6) To protect the American farmer against the importation of 
all livestock, dairy and agricultural products, substitutes therefor, 
and derivatives therefrom, which will depress American farm prices. 

(7) To provide effective quarantine against imported livestock, 
dairy and other farm products from countries which do not impose 
health and sanitary regulations fully equal to those required of our 
own producers. 

(8) To provide for ample farm credit at rates as low as those 
enjoyed by other industries, including commodity and livestock 
loans, and preference in land loans to the farmer acquiring or re- 
financing a farm as a home. 

(9) To provide for decentralized, non-partisan control of the 
farm credit administration and the election by national farm loan 
associations of at least one-half of each board of directors of the 
Federal Land banks, and thereby remove these institutions from 
politics. 

(10) To provide in the case of agricultural products of which 
there are exportable surpluses, the payment of reasonable, benefits 
upon the domestically-consumed portion of such crops in order to 
make the tariff effective. These payments are to be limited to the 
production level of the family type farm. 

(11) To encourage and further develop cooperative marketing. 

(12) To furnish government assistance in disposing of surpluses 
in foreign trade by bargaining for foreign markets selectively by 
countries, both as to exports and imports. We strenuously oppose 
so-called reciprocal treaties which trade off the American farmer. 

(13) To give every reasonable assistance to producers in areas 
suffering from temporary disaster, so that they may regain and 
maintain a self-supporting status. 

Tariff 

Nearly 60 per cent of all imports into the United States are now 
free of duty. The other 40 per cent of imports compete directly 
with the product of our industry. We would keep on the free list 
all products not grown or produced in the United States in com- 
mercial quantities. As to all commodities that commercially com- 
pete directly with the product of our industry. We would keep on 



1936 Republican National Platform 87 

the free list all products not grown or produced in the L'nited 
States in commercial quantities. As to all commodities that com- 
mercially compete with our farms, our forests, our mines, our fish- 
eries, our oil wells, our labor and our industries, sufficient protec- 
tion should be maintained at all times to defend the American 
farmer and the American wage-earner from the destructive com- 
petition emanating from the subsidies of foreign governments and 
the imports from low-wage and depreciated-currency countries. 

We will repeal the present reciprocal trade agreement law. It is 
futile and dangerous. Its effect on agriculture and industry has been 
destructive. Its continuation would work to the detriment of the 
wage-earner and the farmer. 

We will restore the principle of the flexible tariff in order to meet 
changing economic conditions here and abroad and broaden by care- 
ful definition the powers of the Tariff Commission in order to ex- 
tend this policy along non-partisan lines. 

We will adjust tariffs with a view of promoting international 
trade, the stabilization of currencies, and the attainment of a prop- 
er balance between agriculture and industry. 

We condemn the secret negotiation of reciprocal trade treaties 
without public hearing or legislative approval. 

MOXOPOLIKS 

A private monopoly is indefensible and intolerable. It menaces 
and, if continued, will utterly destroy constitutional government and 
the liberty of the citizen. 

We favor the vigorous enforcement of the criminal laws, as well 
as the civil laws, against monopolies and trusts and their officials, 
and we demand the enactment of such additional legislation as is 
necessary to make it impossible for the private monopoly to exist 
in the United States. 

We will employ the full powers of the government to tlie end tliat 
monopoly shall be eliminated and that free enterprise shall be fully 
restored and maintained. 

Regulation of Business 
We recognize the existence of a field within wliidi governmental 
regulation is desirable and salutory. The authority to regulate 
should be vested in an independent tribunal acting under clear and 



88 Political Platforms 

specific laws establishing definite standards. Their determinations 
on law and facts should be subject to review by the courts. We 
favor Federal regulation, within the Constitution, of the marketing 
of securities to protect investors. We favor also Federal regulation 
of the interstate activities of public utilities. 

Civil Skrvice 

Under the New Deal, official authority has been given to inex- 
perienced and incompetent persons. The Civil Service has been 
sacrificed to create a national political machine. As a result the 
Federal Government has never presented such a picture of con- 
fusion and inefficiency. 

We pladge ourselves to the merit system, virtually destroyed by 
New Deal spoilsmen. It should be restored, improved and extended. 

We will provide such conditions as offer an attractive perma- 
nent career in government service to young men and women of abil- 
ity, irrespective of party affiliations. 

GOVEENMENT FINANCE 

The New Deal administration has been characterized by shameful 
waste, and general financial irresponsibility. It has piled deficit 
upon deficit. It threatens national bankruptcy and the destruction 
through inflation of insurance policies and saving bank deposits. 

We pledge ourselves to: 

Stop the folly of uncontrolled spending. 

Balance the budget — not by increasing taxes but by cutting ex- 
penditures, drastically and immediately. 

Revise the Federal tax system and coordinate it with State and 
local tax systems. 

Use the taxing power for raising revenue and not for punitive or 
political purposes. 

Money and Banking 

We advocate a sound currency to be preserved at all hazards. 

The first requisite to a sound and stable currency is a balanced 
budget. 

We oppose further devaluation of the dollar. 

We will restore to the Congress the authority lodged with it by 
the Constitution to coin money and regulate the value thereof by 
repealing all the laws delegating this authority to the executive. 



1936 Repiblican XatioNxVL Platform 89 

We will cooperate with other countries toward stabilization of 
currencies as soon as we can do so with due regard for our national 
interests and as soon as other nations have sufficient stability to 
justify such action. 

Foreign ArrAiRs 

We pledge ourselves to promote and maintain peace by all honor- 
able means not leading to foreign alliances or political commit- 
ments. 

Obedient to the traditional foreign policy of America and to the 
repeatedly expressed will of the American people, we pledge that 
America shall not become a member of the League of Nations nor 
of the World Court nor shall America take on any entangling alli- 
ances in foreign affairs. 

We shall promote, as the best means of securing and maintaining 
peace by the paciiic settlement of disputes, the great cause of inter- 
national arbitration through the establishment of free, independent 
tribunals, which shall determine such disputes in accordance with 
law. equity and justice. 

Natioxai. Defense 

We favor an army and navy, including air forces, adequate for 
our national defense. 

We shall cooperate with other nations in the limitation of arma- 
ments and control of traffic in arms. 

Bill of Rights 

We pledge ourselves to preserve, protect and defend, against all 
intimidation and threat, freedom of religion, speech, press and ra- 
dio; and the right of assembly and petition and immunity from un- 
reasonable searches and seizures. 

We offer the abiding security of a government of laws as against 
the autocratic perils of a government of men. 

FrUTIlFKMORE 

(1) We favor the construction of the Federal Government of 
head-water storage basins to prevent floods, subject to the approval 
of the legislative and executive branches of the government of the 
states whose lands are concerned. 

(2) We favor equal opportunity for our colored citizens. We 
pledge our protection of their economic status and personal safety. 



90 Political Platkokms 

We will do our best to further their employment in the gainfully 
occupied life of America, particularly in private industry, agricul- 
ture, emergency agencies and the civil service. 

We condemn the present New Deal policies which would regi- 
ment and ultimately eliminate the colored citizen from the coun- 
try's productive life, and make him solely a ward of the Federal 
Government. 

(3) To our Indian population we pledge every effort on the part 
of the national government to ameliorate living conditions for them. 

(4) We pledge continuation of the Republican policy of adequate 
compensation and care of veterans disabled in the service of our 
country and for their widows, orphans and dependents. 

(5) We shall use every effort to collect the war debt due us from 
foreign countries amounting to $12,000,000,000 — one-third of our na- 
tional debt. No effort has been made by the present administration 
even to reopen negotiations. 

(6) We are opposed to legislation which discriminates against 
women in Federal and State employment. 

Conclusion 

We assume the obligations and duties imposed upon government 
by modern conditions. We affirm our unalterable conviction that, 
in the future as in the past, the fate of the nation will depend, not 
so much on the wisdom and power of government, as on the char- 
acter and virtue, self-reliance, industry and thrift of the people and 
on their willingness to meet the responsibilities essential to the 
preservation of a free society. 

Finally, as our party affirmed in its first platform in 1S56: "Be- 
lieving that the spirit of our institutions as well as the Constitu- 
tion of our country guarantees liberty of conscience and equality 
of rights among our citizens we oppose all legislation tending to 
impair them," and "we invite the affiliation and cooperation of the 
men of all parties, however differing from us in other respects, in 
support of the principles herein declared." 

The acceptance of the nomination tendered by this convention car- 
ries with it, as a matter of private honor and public faith, an under- 
taking by each candidate to be true to the principles and program 
herein set forth. 



STATE DEMOCRATIC PLATFORM 



Last year approximately 68 cents out of every dollar that was 
collected into the general fund of the State was appropriated to 
the public schools and to higher educational institutions. No State 
in the Union devotes to education such a large ratio of its tax re- 
ceipts. This is the most convincing proof of the true emphasis that 
the Democratic party places on education. 

Tlie Democratic conduct of the State's affairs has always been 
economical, honest and efficient. Only five cents out of the State 
tax dollar goes for the payment of departmental expenses. Some 
States disburse a larger percentage than that for tax collection costs 
exclusively. In all the long years of Democratic control, no scan- 
dal has ever involved any State official. Perhaps this cannot be 
said of any other State. 

Administr-vtiox Praised 

Particularly praiseworthy has been the conduct of the State's 
finances by the present Democratic administration under the lead- 
ership of Governor J. C. B. Ehringhaus. It has established a fiscal 
record which should be a source of pride to every North Carolinian 
and which is unequalled in the nation. Called upon to operate the 
State at a time of profound economic depression, it has met the 
grave problems with courage and wisdom. 

It has steadily kept operating expenses within operating rev- 
enues. 

It has financed the State without borrowing a single dollar. 

It has met all of its bills punctually. Employes have been paid. 

It has actually reduced the State's aggregate indebtedness by ap- 
proximately $24,000,000. 

Today North Carolina's credit stands as high as that of any State 
in the Union. 

All this has been achieved while land taxes were being steadily 
reduced and the State was assuming governmental costs formerly 
borne by the local communities. 

When the General Assembly of 1933 convened, it found itself faced 
with a critical situation. The State had a large accumulated deficit 
and further borrowings were impossible. The school system was 

[91 ] 



92 Political Platforms 

threatened with collapse. Land taxes were impossible of collec- 
tion due to the profound prostration of agriculture resulting from 
the Republican panic. 

The General Assembly wisely resolved that the essential services 
of the State government must be maintained at every cost and that 
the schools must be kept open. 

The State in that emergency determined to assume the full finan- 
cial responsibility for the operation of an eight months school term 
in every community in North Carolina. This meant relief to the 
cities and counties but added expense to the State government. 

Sales Tax 

For many weary weeks of thorough exploration and honest dis- 
cussion, the General Assembly sought the added revenues required 
by this far-reaching policy. As a last resort and as a temporary ex- 
pedient, it adopted the sales tax, devoted the entire pi'.oceeds of this 
levy to the schools. 

The situation was saved. Not a single school in North Carolina 
has closed its doors. Not a single teacher has gone unpaid. Of no 
other State in the Union — save only Maryland — can that be said. 

This desperate situation required a desperate remedy. The cure 
was effective. 

The Democratic party is appreciative today as it had been for 40 
years of the importance of the public schools and it takes pride in 
the fact that the school program as it has now been established is 
supported by the entire State without resorting to a tax on the 
homes and farms of our people. 

The Democratic party appreciates the extraordinarily valuable 
services of its teachers. It rejoices in the fact that every teacher 
has been paid in lawful currency exactly what the State pledged it- 
self to pay. It observes with gratification that the 1935 General 
Assembly was able to increase the salaries of all teachers. 

No An Valorem 

The party renews its pledge to the people of the State to maintain 
an eight months' school term for every child, supported by depend- 
able revenue, without resorting to an ad valorem tax on the land 
and homes of our people. It pledges itself to make a reasonable 
increase in a full school program, looking to the payment of all 



State Democratic Platfokm 93 

teachers of salaries in line with the vital importance of their serv- 
ices and looking also to the broadening of courses in vocational edu- 
cation and to an extension of the system of State-rented school 
books to a system of free school books as speedily as the State rev- 
enue will permit. 

Economic improvement will now permit the immediate elimina- 
tion of the sales tax levy on all necessities of life and on meals at 
boarding houses, and all public eating places and hotels. The Demo- 
cratic party pledges itself to accomplish this at the 1937 session of 
the General Assembly. 

Since the Democratic party pledges itself, to the fullest practi- 
cable participation in the social security program of the national ad- 
ministration, it cannot pledge itself to the complete elimination 
of the sales tax at this time, the schools must be maintained and 
improved. Money to finance old-age pensions and other features of 
the social security program must be found to the limits of the State's 
ability to do this. But the Democratic party bears strongly in mind 
the fact that the sales tax was adopted by the General Assembly only 
as an emergency measure. The Democratic party accepts this as a 
party pledge. 

The Democratic party records with genuine pleasure the sig- 
nificant fact that the per capita property tax in North Carolina for 
all governmental purposes is lower than that of any state in the 
Union. This has been made possible by the fact that the State has 
assumed the complete responsibility for the construction and main- 
tenance of highways and for the operation of the eight months' 
school term. 

Taxes on Business 

The Democratic party notes with equal gratification the fact that 
business is not escaping the proper share of governmental costs in 
North Carolina. 

Only four other states of the Union levy a higher corporation 
franchise tax. Only one other state levies a higher corporation in- 
come tax. In aggregate corporate taxes. North Carolina, is out- 
ranked only by one state. 

The Democratic party does not apologize for these high corporate 
taxes. It regards them as necessary and just. At the same time, 
it recognizes the inescapable truth that industry must not bo driven 
from the State or repelled at our borders by punitive taxes. 



04 Political Platfokms 

The Democrats of North Carolina have observed with pride the 
growing prestige of North Carolina's delegation in the National 
Congress and this convention hereby puts on record its warm appre- 
ciation of the services which the State's Senators and Representa- 
tives are rendering at Washington. 

The democracy of North Carolina is in full and constant sympathy 
with the great objectives of the Roosevelt administration and with 
the principles that animate and direct them. We pledge ourselves 
to continuing cooperation with the President and the Congress. 

Upon this plain record of progress and achievement the democ- 
racy of North Carolina in convention assembled hereby heartily en- 
dorses the National and State Democratic administrations. Since 
the beginning of recorded time there has been a struggle between 
entrenched wealth on the one side and the toiling masses on the 
other — be<tween the reactionary and the liberal. Never were these 
lines more clearly dravrn than at this hour. The Democratic party 
of North Carolina, therefore, cordially invites peoples of all creeds 
and of all party affiliations to enroll under the ample banner of 
equality of opportunity for rich and poor alike. 

When the Democracy of North Carolina assembled in convention 
four years ago, the most devastating depression in the history of 
the republic was raging with increasing fury. 

Millions of jobless men were tramping the streets of our cities 
in black despair. Agricultural products were selling at ruinous 
prices and farm mortgages were being foreclosed on a wholesale 
scale. Our foreign trade had languished to the point of almost vir- 
tual extinction. Thousands of factories were closed. A paralyzed 
retail trade was forcing hundreds of merchants each month into 
bankruptcy. 

Republican leadership was utterly incapable of mastering the 
very conditions which long years of Republican misrule had cre- 
ated. It talked with counterfeit cheerfulness about imminent re- 
covery while it toyed ineffectually with the grave problems. The 
situation grew steadily worse. Despair settled more deeply over 
the nation. 

Today — four years later — the Democracy of North Carolina as- 
sembles in convention under happier circumstances. Where once 
there was only universal anxiety, now there is confidence. The de- 
pression has been conquered. 



State Democratic Platfokji 95 

The army of the jobless is being demobilized into gainful employ- 
ment. The wheels of industry now turn in profitable production. 
The banks of the nation are now in unprecedentedly sound condi- 
tion. The farmer can now plant in the assurance that he will re- 
ceive a fair price for his crop. The nation — the same nation that 
four years ago was overwhelmed with despondency — now smiles as 
it goes happily about the tasks of the day. 

Not Result of Chance 

This amazing change is not the result of chance. It is the nat- 
ural and predestined consequence of a Democratic administration 
and of Democratic policies. 

When the Democratic party was voted into power by the most de- 
cisive majority ever given any party since 1824, it was commis- 
sioned by the American people to do two specific tasks; to end the 
depression and to make such reforms in the economic order as 
would render a repetition of the panic most remote. 

In the person of Franklin Delano Roosevelt the Democratic party 
found the leader which the nation sought. He had the vision, the 
courage and the elevated and practical conception on governmental 
responsibility for which the grave situation called. 

When his firm hands settled upon the reins of Presidential power, 
change quickly manifested itself. He did not trust to Pollyanna 
assurances that all would be well in the fullness of time. Facing 
the facts realistically, he set the mighty machinery of the Federal 
Government to work in ending the depression. His intelligent un- 
derstanding conceived remedies which his indomitalile energy and 
fearlessness quickly and effectively applied. 

Where there was once only futile fumbling, now there was con- 
structive action. The banks of the country were speedily and ef- 
fectively restored to impregnable soundness. Additional employ- 
ment was created by the effective device of shortening hours while 
wages which were being remorselessly driven down to starvation 
levels were started on a definite and irresistible upward surge. The 
full resources of the nation were employed in reviving a tragically 
prostrated agriculture. To those in want was given the promise 
that they would be fed and housed and clothed— a promise that has 
been scrupulously kept. Industry was primed with a far-reaching 



96 Political Platfokms 

public works program which provided needed public improvement 
while creating employment tor the jobless and an immediate de- 
mand for durable goods. 

Business Improves 

The happy result is that while business profits declined 75 per 
cent under President Hoover, they have risen 100 per cent under 
President Roosevelt. The nation has been pulled out of the abyss 
of the depression and is now traveling irresistibly toward abound- 
ing prosperity. 

It was not enough to end this depression. A recurrence must be 
prevented. Man-made conditions produced the panic. These causa- 
tive conditions had to be changed. 

Under the Democratic administration reform has marched with 
recovery. Legislation of far-reaching character has been enacted to 
protect human rights, to provide social security for the aged and 
jobless, to safeguard small investors and depositors, to prevent peril- 
ous speculation and to insure a fairer distribution of the fruits of 
industry. While legitimate and useful business has been accorded 
every proper encouragement, the welfare of the individual has been 
exalted above private profits. In no similar period of American his- 
tory has so much legislation of such beneficial import to the average 
man been passed. 

All this has been achieved without impairing or straining the 
national credit. The government has been able to refinance its out- 
standing indebtedness incurred during the World War at heavy in- 
terest savings and its lowest yield bonds are selling at a premium. 
The national debt has been increased in the same percentage as the 
national wealth has risen during the Roosevelt administration. To- 
day the United States owes less in proportion to its national assets 
than it did when Herbert Hoover left the White House. 

State Ri'X'okd 

Proud as it is of its party's record in the conduct of the nation's 
affairs, the Democracy of North Carolina is equally proud of its 
record in the administration of the State's affairs. 

When the Democratic party under the inspired leadership of the 
immortal Aycock rescued the State from Republican rule. North 
Carolina stood low among the states of the South in economic, edu- 
cational and social advancement. 



State Democratic Platform 97 

All this has been changed. Today North Carolina is in fact and 
in truth the empire State of the Southeast. Today it ranks first 
among the Southeastern states in the value of agricultural crops, 
in the value of manufactured products and in retail store sales. 
Great as has been its economic progress, still more marked has been 
its social and educational progress. 

These truly miraculous changes are not the casual consequences 
of chance. They are the natural results of the far-sighted, prudent, 
efficient and social-minded administration which the Democratic 
party has given to the State's affairs. 

The Democratic party has not been content to rule the State. It 
has been more interested in developing the State and in promoting 
the well-being of all of its people. 

It has always recognized that the primary obligation of every 
State is to conserve and to develop human values. Cradled in the 
principles of Thomas Jefferson, it was held steadfastly to the funda- 
mental Democratic creed of equal rights to all and special privileges 
to none. 

The business of North Carolina is agriculture. Thousands of our 
citizens are dependent upon farming for their livelihood. For agri- 
culture the Democratic party has always had a sympathetic and 
helpful interest. Through appropriate legislative action and depart- 
mental direction, the State has sought in every way to promote 
agricultural progress. It is not without significance that North 
Carolina outranks every State in the Southeast in the value of its 
farm products — a progress that has come only with Democratic con- 
trol and assistance. 

The Democratic party is keenly sensible of the fact that despite 
all of this advancement, the farmer still does not command his 
proper share of the nation's prosperity. The Democracy of North 
Carolina pledges itself that it will exert all appropriate cooperation 
that gives reasonable promise of promoting the economic well-i)eing 
of the rural population of North Carolina. 

Compacts Favored 

We favor State and interstate control of crop production through 
compact legislation in order to assure parity prices to farmers for 
their products. 



98 Political Platfokjis 

In this connectiou a word as to the highway system is in order. 
The State of North Carolina, with the aid of the Federal Govern- 
ment, has built a magnificent system of highways at a cost of more 
than two hundred million dollars. This is the State's largest in- 
vestment. The Democratic party recognizes the responsibility of 
adequate maintenance of these highways and of progressive im- 
provement of local roads serving our rural communities. Highway 
funds should be so conserved and expended as to promote these 
objectives. The rapidly increasing gasoline taxes justify a further 
reduction in automobile license taxes by the next General Assembly. 

Labor Pi.axk 

In these days of a highly industrialized civilization, no state can 
hope to become prosperous unless it has lawful and just encourage- 
ment for legitimate industry. Manufacturing enterprises are neces- 
sary to afford employment, to create a local market for farm pro- 
duce, and to provide tax support for government. 

The Democratic party has been fully appreciative of the policy 
of the frank recognition of the rights of labor to organize and bar- 
gain collectively through representatives of their own choosing, as 
advocated by President Roosevelt, and the policy of a broader dis- 
tribution of employment as a means to a satisfactory and sustain- 
ing progress of industrial development and a more wholesome in- 
dustrial life in this State. 

We oppose any and all forms of intimidation and coercion against 
either worker or employer and urge the enactment of State and in- 
terstate laws to promote the betterment of working conditions, 
wherever such compacts are practicable, and the passage of humani- 
tarian laws, wherever practicable, to afford further protection to 
women and children in regard to maximum hours and working con- 
ditions. 

The wisdom of the Democratic policy is established by the in- 
dustrial progress of the State which has come with the successive 
Democratic administrations and which is the marvel of the nation. 

State Schools 

When the Democratic party under the leadership of Aycock com- 
mitted itself to the fullest extension of the principle of universal 
education, the real impetus to North Carolina's growth was given. 



State Democratic Platform 99 

Then a building program was launched which commanded the ad- 
miration of the nation and which in time brought schools to every 
section, however, isolated, in North Carolina. School terms were 
gradually lengthened, the type of instruction was improved, com- 
pulsory education was adopted. In 1931 the State assumed the re- 
sponsibility for the operation of a six months' term of school. In 
1933 the State lengthened the school term for which it is respon- 
sible to eight months. 



STATE REPUBLICAN PLATFORM 



The 1936 platform for the North Carolina Republican Party, as 
presented to the convention by the platform committee for consid- 
eration, follows: 

The Republican party of North Carolina, in convention duly as- 
sembled at Raleigh, March 24, 1936, declares the following princi- 
ples and purposes as those upon which it proposes to go before the 
people of the State In the next general election with the unquali- 
fied pledge that if entrusted with power it will enact the necessary 
laws and administer the affairs of the State in such manner as to 
effectuate these ends. 

National Ihsuks 

We reaffirm our allegiance to the time honored and progressive 
principles of the Republican party of the Nation and demand: 

(1) That governmental expenditures be drastically reduced; the 
national budget balanced; the national credit maintained, and the 
currency be stabilized. 

(2) That punitive and confiscatory tax law which now harass 
business, retard recovery and promote wasteful and reckless ex- 
penditures be repealed. 

(3) We thereby condemn the efforts of the present administra- 
tion to restrict and destroy agricultural production, to regiment 
industrial groups, to curtail personal liberty, to destroy free speech 
and to close the courts of the local community to aggrieved persons 
by unlawful and unconstitutional enactments. 

(4) That the courts of the United States shall continue to exist 
as a free, independent and separate branch of our national govern- 
ment as designed by our forefathers in the Constitution of the 
country and that their functions shall remain free from political 
or other partisan considerations, both in the appointment of the 
judges and the exercise of their proper jurisdiction and to the end 
that the humblest in our land may be secure in their personal 
rights, opportunities, property, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. 

(5) That all unnecessary bureaus, commissions and governmental 
agencies designed to dictate, control and supplant business and 
other enterprises and engaged in reckless and wasteful pxpendi- 
tures of the people's money shall be abolished. 

[ 100 ] 



State Republican Platform 101 

(6) That local and State responsibility for relief and the admin- 
istration of relief funds shall be recognized; the partisan and waste- 
ful methods now in common use shall be abandoned; the horde of 
unnecessary highly paid officials shall be removed from office and 
that a system of non-partisan, efficient and local administration of 
all relief activities be submitted for the present expensive, extrava- 
gant and partisan set-up. 

Sducation 

We demand that the educational system of North Carolina, both 
in the higher and lower branches, be removed absolutely from the 
fields of politics. That the professors, teachers and instructors in 
the local schools, colleges and university of the State shall be se- 
lected solely upon merit. That all unnecessary expenses connected 
with the general administration of the educational system of the 
State be eliminated and that the pay of teachers and others ac- 
tually engaged in instruction of pupils be increased as rapidly as 
the resources of the State Treasury will permit and until the same 
is adequate, and to that end we further demand that a special sal- 
ary fund be allocated by the Legislature to be used exclusively for 
payment of public school teachers' salary. That an efficient system 
of promotion of teachers be adopted in order that those best quali- 
fied and rendering best services in the way of instruction shall be 
rev/^arded for their superior qualifications. That the system of 
transportation by means of buses be safeguarded and improved in 
every possible way regardless of some extra cost and that free uni- 
form textbooks be furnished all public school children. 

Election 

Honest election laws, honestly and fairly administered, are abso- 
lutely necessary for the preservation of free government. We de- 
mand that the minority party be given equal representation in 
every precinct by the appointment of a registrar for each political 
party. Frequent revision of the list of registered voters, fair rep- 
resentation of the minority party upon all returning boards, re- 
peal of the absentee voters' law, removal of the compulsory fea- 
tures of the primary law and provision for each party to pay for 
such primary elections as its duly constituted authorities demand. 



102 Political Platforms 

Law Enforcement 

We condemn the action ot the legislative branch of the State 
Government for the passage of so-called liquor control laws for 
several counties of the State. We demand strict, impartial and ef- 
fective enforcement of the prohibition laws of the State. 

We demand that all the original laws of the State of North Caro- 
lina shall be enforced. That society shall receive protection to the 
utmost degree from that element among us inclined by criminal, 
dishonest and corrupt methods to prey upon the law abiding people 
of our State. That adequate sentences be imposed on all persons 
convicted of crime to prevent repetition that this undesirable class 
be brought to realize crime does not pay in this State. That ade- 
quate provisions be made for the reformation, segregation and re- 
habilitation in proper cases in a scientific and humane way of those 
punished for crime and confined in penal institutions of the State. 
That the labor of all prisoners be restricted as far as possible from 
competition with free labor and that all prisoners be employed reg- 
ularly in the development and improvement of public highways and 
other enterprises beneficial to the people generally. 

Highways 

We deplore the reckless manner in which the expensive highway 
system of the State is being destroyed by being subjected to ex- 
cessive loads of commercial products transported at excessive and 
unlawful speed to the great danger and expense of the public, for 
the repairs of the highways subjected to this use and abuse they 
were never designed to endure and to the profit of private individ- 
uals. 

Capital and Labor 

We believe that capital is entitled to just return on investments. 
That labor is worthy of a hire commensurate with our American 
standards of living and sufficient to maintain the dignity and honor 
of all labor whether performed in factory or on farm, and that the 
right to organize and bargain, collectively and as an individual, 
shall not be denied to any citizen who toils. 

We demand the enactment by the State of North Carolina of an 
old-age pension law setting up a system of protection for the in- 
digent, aged and infirm to apply equally to all of such citizens re- 



State Eepublic AN Platform 103 

gardless of the vocation followed by such citizens during the pro- 
ductive period of life. 

Taxes 

We demand that all useless offices and agencies existing in the 
State be abolished. That a rigid and effective policy of economy be 
inaugurated, that the amount of expensive salaries be reduced to a 
minimum, that local self-government be reestablished in the sev- 
eral counties of the State and local business of the communities be 
transacted without bothersome State Department interferences. We 
demand that savings thus effected and otherwise possible be used 
in the first instance to abolish the general sales and other nuisance 
taxes, that the tax on automobile license plates be reduced to a 
maximum amount of $4.00 per year on the highest cars and that the 
burden of taxation generally shall be removed from the long suffer- 
ing taxpayers to the greatest extent possible without destroying the 
efficiency and effectiveness of our State, educational, charitable and 
other institutions. 

Civil Service 

If elected to power we pledge the Republican party to place all 
employes of the State, including public school teachers, except 
laborers and those holding executive positions, in the classified 
civil service. This will not only make for efficiency and reduce cost 
of government, but it will free State employes from the baleful 
influence of professional politicians. 



PART IV 



ELECTION RETURNS 



1. Popular xVnd Electokal Vote lou President by States, 1936. 

2. Popular Vote for President by States, 1924-1932. 

3. Vote for President by Counties, 1920-1936. 

4. Vote by Counties for Governor in Demoiuatic Primaries, 

1932-1936. 

5. Vote for State Officers in Democratic Primaries, June 6 and 

July 4, 1936. 

6. Vote for State Officers in Democratic Primaries, 1928, 1930, 

1932, 1934, 1936. 

7. Democratic Primary Vote. June 6, 1936, for United States 

Senator. 

8. Democratic Primary Vote, June 4 and July 2, 1932, for United 

States Senator. 

9. Vote for Chief Justice in 1934. 

10. Vote for Governor by Counties, 1920-1936. 

11. Vote for United States Senator, 1924-1936. 

12. Democractic Primary Vote, June 6, 1936, for Members of Con- 

gress. 

13. Vote for Members of Congress, 1924-1936. 

14. Vote on Constitutional Amendments. 



[ 105 ] 



POPULAR AND ELECTORAL VOTE FOR PRESIDENT 

BY STATES, 1936 



state 



Popular Vote 



Electoral Vote 



o c 
o o 



a a 
i4« 



^2 

> o 

o o 

o c 
o o 



o 

§3 

-3 3 

a & 



Alabama. 

Arizona.- 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho.. 

Illinois.. 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massach iisetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana... 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire. 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York* 

North Carolina.. 
North Dakota... 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina.. 
South Dakota... 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia. 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Totab. 



238,195 

86,722 

140,705 

,706,830 
295,021 
382,129 
69,702 
249,117 
255,304 
126,090 

,282,999 
934,974 
621,756 
404,520 
541,944 
292,894 
126,333 
389,612 
942,716 

,010,794 
098,811 
157,318 

,111,043 

150,339 

347,454 

31,938 

108,400 

,083,549 
105,838 

,293,022 
010,151 
163,148 

,747,122 
501,009 
206,733 

,3.53,788 
164,541 
113,791 
160,137 
328,083 
734,485 
150,240 
02,144 
234,980 
459,579 
502,582 
802,984 
62,624 



27,751,612 



35,358 

33,433 

32,039 

836,431 

181,267 

278,685 

54,014 

78,248 

36,942 

66,499 

1,570,393 

091,570 

487,977 

397,727 

369,702 

30,791 

108,823 

231,430 

768,613 

699,733 

350,461 

4,4.35 

697,891 

61,600 

247,731 

11,882 

104,642 

719,421 

61,710 

2,180,070 

223,284 

72,751 

1,127,709 

245,122 

125,977 

1,090,300 

124,420 

1,646 

125,977 

146,516 

103,711 

64,, 555 

81,027 

98,366 

206,892 

325,3.58 

380,828 

38,739 



16,681,913 



11 

3 

9 

22 

6 

8 

-3 

7 

12 

4 

29 

14 

11 

9 

11 

10 



17 

19 

11 

9 

15 
4 
7 
3 
4 
16 
3 

47 

13 

4 

26 

11 

5 

36 

4 

8 

4 

11 

23 

4 



11 



12 
3 



523 



•Of this total, 274,924 was the American-Labor vote. 

Other totals, Lemke, Unionist, 891,8.58; Thomas, Socialist, 187,342; Rrowdcr, Com- 
munist, 80,181; Colvin, Prohibitionist, 37,009; Aiken, Socialhst-Labor, 12,729; scutU-ring 
and void, 108,911. Percentages: Democniti<', 00.7 (.57.3 in 1932); Republican, 30.4 (39.0 in 
1932); others, 2.9 (3.1 in 1932). 



108 



Election Returns 



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Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska... 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

• New Jersey... 

New Mexico 



YoTE For President By States 



109 



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■ •'^ rt« CD C-l CO 



(Ml— 'ai-rrHco-^co-— iT-i -rPCO'O 



■"M (M C^ --H C^l CO Cr> CI C-] "^ C-l --H ■— I •— I i-H 



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C^^H-»f CO ■^ "f — ' "^ 


CI t^ OO CO CO CO 



CO*- '»ccito»ot--— 'ClCl0CL':^occ'*' 
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r^oi>->jr5»ocooci>ocn-t^ob-t-(McoocO'rfooiC"Mr-fO'-«»oo 
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iooco»ooO"^0'^ooc')i>.Go--oicr^co'— :or--cicot-^t~^':cc^c):o "^ 



i-H CO 1— I 1— I »0 CO -^ -^ 1— • —' '— < '-H 



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tDcocoococo^siOior^c-ao^o-fOtLCO — io-t'iCi>-tcjQor^O'^co 

lOQOOiCO'—CO'^iM'MOCOt-GOr^OOiMCJt-.COaicO^M''^— -c^ococ^J 



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c::cci^ai-HCD'-Ma:'t<"^oo-^MoO't^u2'QO--'0'0-t^O'^o»or^cc---- '00 
-— ic^i^ooooo— i'Mc^ico(Mco»oo<Mr^'MO— 'Oroi-^'-r— icTir-cc — Qocceo 

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lOiMr-.-Tf'— 'OOC^CO^-CMh-CiTt^COCO'M'M'— '^O-HCO — O'CMC^O-t'OOd 
lO Tt^ r^ lO C3 O -H (M CO C-1 Oi »iO I^ O CI I-- (M — ' CI -^ 'f -f CO O QO — ' "Tj- CM — . 

CDcocococo— '»0'f'~<o— •r--rocr)C5QO»OTj<oo— 'OGOcaofoaoM'»ot-»o 



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coc>i>-o^H,— .OODCit--r^oocnio-Hcoo»o;oco-fr-^oooocrito — cooci 
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coi^'OOO-^'-H »o oroiocococ^c^-— 'OcocO'-HOcD'-rco'— '•^■^cn 



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VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN DEMOCRATIC 
PRIMARIES, 1928, 1930, 1932, 1934, AND 1936 



1928 
FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR— 

R. T. Fountain 84,477 

JoH N D. Langston 68,480 

W. H. S. BuRGWYN 62,866 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF LABOR AND PRINTING— 

Frank D. Grist 115,442 

M. L. Shipman 66,391 

Oscar J. Peterson 28,207 

1930 

FOR CORPORATION COMMISSIONER— 

George P. Pell 167,083 

James H. Hollo way 86,227 

1932 
FOR GOVERNOR— 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus 162,498 

Allen J. Maxwell _ _ 102,032 

Richard T. Fountain 115,127 

FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR— 

A. H. Graham , „ 202,592 

Dbnison F. Giles _ 66,887 

David P. Dellinger 58,155 

FOR SECRETARY OF STATE— 

Stacby W. Wade 178,971 

James A. Hartness 140,358 

FOR STATE AUDITOR— 

Baxter Durham 162,918 

Chester O. Bell 94,801 

George Adams 58,226 

FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL— 

Dennis G. Brummitt „ 224,723 

Peyton McSwain 84,881 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF LABOR— 

A. L. Fletcher 76,216 

Clarence Mitchell 74,820 

John D. Norton _ 44,349 

R. R. Lawrence 60,433 

W. Henry Davis _ „ 32,915 

B. F. Smith 22,180 

FOR CORPORATION COMMISSIONER— 

Stanley Winbornh 189,702 

E. C. Macon 102,718 

FOR INSURANCE COMMISSIONER— 

Dan C. Bonby 206,878 

D. W. Morton 9G,20O 

[ 122] 



Vote Foe State Officers 123 

second primary 
for governor— 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus 182,055 

RiCHABD T. Fountain 168,971 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF LABOR— 

A. L. Fletcher 183,513 

Clarence E. Mitcheill 114,971 

1934 
FOR UTILITIES COMMISSIONER— 

Stanley Winborne 235,263 

E. C. Macon 97,760 

1936 
FIRST PRIMARY 

FOR governor- 
Clyde R. HOEY - 193,972 

Ralph McDonald 189,504 

A. H. Graham _ 126,782 

John A. McRab 6,606 

FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR- 
PAUL D. Grady 162,221 

W. P. Horton 138,631 

Gbokgh McNeill 128,661 

FOR SECRETARY OF STATE— 

Stacby W. Wadb 212,687 

Thad Eure 168,970 

M. R. Dunnagan 55,192 

FOR STATE AUDITOR— 

George Ross Pou 223,517 

Baxter Durham 113,850 

Willard L. Do well 61,684 

Charles W. Miller, 42,852 

FOR STATE TREASURER— 

Charles M. Johnson 322,868 

(Mrs.) Helen Robertson Wohl 98,446 

FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION— 

Clyde A. Erwin 247,817 

A. B. Alderman _ 105,659 

Gilbert Craig 67,685 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE— 

W. Kkrr Scott 227,808 

William A. Graham 207,750 

SECOND PRIMARY 

FOR governor- 
Clyde R. Hoey 266,354 

Ralph McDonald 214,414 

FOR lieutenant-governor— 

W. P. Horton 217,230 

Paul D. Grady 208,248 

FOR secretary OF STATE— 

Thad Eure 234,956 

Stacby W. Wadb 194,015 



DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY VOTE, JUNE 6, 1936, 
FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR 



\ 



Counties 


13 

a 


o 


■3 

£3 




a 
■3 

CO 

'> 

Q 


— Alamance . 


389 

21 

36 

247 

39 

16 

102 

68 

267 

81 

1,022 

106 

445 

299 

111 

65 

179 

387 

145 

68 

63 

21 

1,042 

491 

245 

349 

154 

14 

367 

25 

145 

524 

241 

1,491 

725 

764 

108 

12 

167 

105 

616 

359 

183 

351 

178 

59 

68 

61 

362 

99 


3,084 
1,276 
1,123 
1,828 
1,986 

349 
1,923 
1,890 
1,471 

829 

12,059 

2.6.58 

3.760 

2.243 

718 
2.988 
1.230 
3.445 
1,702 
1,597 

743 
1,094 
7.365 
2.349 
2,556 
2,564 
1,071 
1,100 
4,244 

893 
1.577 
5,493 
1,827 
8.904 
1.866 
5,836 

675 

564 
1,866 

793 
8,967 
3,220 
2,358 
4,066 
2,529 

782 

783 

605 
4,819 
2,210 


2.498 

562 

383 

2.277 

857 

144 

2.062 

858 

1.336 

632 

4.808 

1.241 

1.988 

889 

471 

397 

829 

1.1.50 

1.351 

279 

336 

29 

2.875 

2.878 

2.282 

3.028 

516 

126 

1.819 

453 

2.336 

4.563 

3.814 

6.456 

2.636 

2.943 

333 

67 

1.917 

1.665 

4.565 

5,230 

2,783 

2,367 

712 

902 

880 

627 

2,354 

662 


140 


Alexander 


11 


Allechanv -. 


32 




90 


— Ashe 


22 


Avery 


13 


- Beaufort - 


274 


Bertie . 


57 


- Bladen 


134 


Brunswiclc 


78 


Buncombe . 


673 


Burke 


41 


-Cabarrus 


178 


Caldwell 


47 


Camden. . 


63 


- Carteret _. . . 


27 


Caswell - 


67 


Catawba 


97 


-Chatham ..- 


41 


Cherokee - . 


31 


Chowan.. . 


104 


Clay 


24 


Cleveland 


182 


--Columbus -. 


222 


Craven 


129 


-Cumberland 


160 


*» Currituck .. . 


82 


—Dare 


57 


-Davidson 


81 




31 


« Duplin.. 


309 




2.294 


-^Edgecombe 


78 


.-JTorsyth .. 


381 


Franklin 


75 




245 


—Gates - 


30 




12 


,jGranville . - 


76 




30 


-Guilford . . 


605 




264 


-Harnett 


79 




244 


—Henderson ._ _ .- 


84 


-Hertford 


23 


-Hoke _ 

-Hyde 


26 
54 


— Jredell 

— Jackson _ 


213 
50 



[ 124] 



Vote For United States Senator 

Democratic Primary Vote for United States 
Senator — Continued 



125 



Counties 


i 

o 


>> 

o 

'S 

m 


a 
'3 
a 

O 

H 

pi 


a 
■§ 

i-i 
> 

C3 

Q 


Johnston - 


341 

57 
180 
208 
366 

69 

53 
156 
263 
878 

19 

78 
191 
361 
171 
124 
133 
227 

45 
199 

76 
117 
190 
363 
112 
191 
388 
485 
376 
552 
1,112 

73 
697 
239 

86 
175 

79 
113 

50 
665 
260 
907 
109 

47 

47 
485 

98 
377 

56 

45 


2,888 

444 
1,556 
1,862 
1,519 
1,527 
1,9.50 

868 
2,440 
9,663 

797 
1,375 
1,962 
2.244 
2,943 
1,872 

784 
1,934 

815 
1,929 
1,103 

770 
1,243 
3,489 
1.594 
1.845 
2.233 
5.204 
3.900 
4,553 
5,164 
1,424 
1.655 
3.200 
1.470 
4,443 
1.340 
l.,540 

396 
3,096 
1,805 
8,830 
1,525 

785 
1.263 
2,368 
2., 52 7 
2,569 

806 
1.869 


5,838 

1,096 

1,939 

2.422 

942 

386 

473 

1,673 

1.141 

7,138 

77 

961 

1.617 

5.123 

2.008 

1.544 

1.418 

1.356 

496 

573 

1,103 

173 

1,049 

5,057 

262 

1,483 

2,646 

5,219 

1.381 

2.992 

1.770 

1,029 

1,274 

723 

824 

792 

321 

626 

188 

2.307 

2,563 

12.417 

1.448 

869 

2S6 

3.894 

1,115 

3.968 

.592 

437 


129 


-Jones 


98 


-L,ee 


53 


Lenoir 


70 


"Lincoln .. 


38 


—Macon 


52 


•Madison _ -_ 


41 


Martin. 


68 




85 


-Mecklenburg . 


298 


Mitchell - . 


19 


--Montgomery 


22 


Moore _ 


72 


.-Nash 


101 


-New Hanover .- - 


91 


-Northampton . 


42 


"Onslow - - - 


78 


Orange 


136 


—Pamlico _ 


35 


-Pasquotank _ _ 


464 


** ""Pender 


65 


*^erquimans _ _ _ 


19 


-Person 


49 


Pitt -- 


1.55 


-Polk 


49 


-Randolph ... 


48 


Richmond . 


164 




311 


-JJockingham .. 


131 




232 


-Rutherford 


128 


-Sampson . . .. 


24 


Scotland 


88 




50 


-Stokes... .. 


32 


-Surry . . 


49 


-Swain - 


80 




66 


■Tyrrell 


49 


•Union 


165 


•^ance 


112 


JtVake . 


304 


~iVarren 


57 


|. Washington 


58 




13 


"Wayne . 


181 


■Wilkes -. 


46 


-Wilson - 


106 


-i'adkin . 


31 


— i ancey 


67 


Totals . - 


26,171 


247,365 


184,197 


13,281 







DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY VOTE, JUNE 4, AND JULY 2, 
1932, FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR, SHORT TERM* 



Counties 



Alamance.. - 

Alexander... 

Alleghany... 
( Anson 

Ashe -.. 

Avery 

i Beaufort 

Tiertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick.. 

Buncombe.. 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

'Caldwell.... 
' Camden 

Carteret 

- Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

~ Chowan 

Clay 

■^Cleveland... 
^Columbus... 

Craven 

Cumberland 

■ Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

- Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe. 

Forsyth 

-Franklin 

■ Gaston 

■" Gates 

■ Graham 

Granville 

- Greene 

Guilford.-.- 

"Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson.. 

Hertford 

Hoke.. 

-Hyde 

- Iredell 

-Jackson 

Johnston 

■' Jones 



First Primary 



o 



376 
283 
707 
880 
;,841 
112 
290 
373 
668 

27 
508 

40 
356 

60 

33 

73 
124 
202 
955 
232 

53 

82 
388 
833 
284 
335 
113 

63 
318 
192 
452 
443 
199 
,566 
445 
254 
111 

86 
177 
469 
744 
612 
522 
399 

56 
402 
147 
287 
,022 
180 
491 
204 



^y 



373 

25 

18 

215 

32 

12 

1,022 

201 

270 

94 

487 

61 

191 

767 

292 

91 

126 

217 

156 

194 

17 

79 

462 

521 

700 

377 

98 

21 

150 

41 

312 

206 

141 

1,437 

683 

1,398 

63 

26 

342 

349 

706 

243 

216 

137 

47 

93 

88 

396 

312 

196 

294 

412 



o 



2,727 

243 

63 

1,333 

93 

109 

1,590 

639 

772 

782 

2,829 

2,335 

2,240 

307 

304 

1,468 

710 

1,345 

1,442 

593 

300 

282 

3,556 

1,340 

922 

1,387 

777 

619 

2,009 

485 

1,346 

3,075 

1,065 

4,425 



1.098 

4,369 

320 

329 

1,560 

310 

4,623 

1,482 

1,917 

2,476 

1,006 

778 

330 

240 

2,782 

594 

2,974- 

228 



2 



« 



1,174 

260 

53 

2,063 

34 

39 

1,920 

1,135 

1,253 

336 

9,915 

717 

2,071 

237 

441 

611 

774 

759 

401 

576 

1,186 

196 

2,976 

2,335 

2,630 

3,313 

792 

185 

1,996 

156 

1,262 

4,568 

3,062 

3,207 

1,867 

2,231 

322 

119 

1,511 

1,164 

5,366 

4,322 

1,537 

2,984 

1,475 

6.53 

945 

342 

2,116 

1,309 

1,799 

386 



Second Primary 



c 
o 


CO 

T3 


cc 


O 


u 


c 


u 




r^ 


« 


1,611 


2,026 


489 


713 


IVl 


533 


1,508 


3,169 


426 


2,349 


104 


168 


1,435 


2,811 


764 


1,413 


1,077 


2,334 


427 


582 


2,364 


10,795 


1,457 


1,745 


1,618 


2,559 


366 


1,339 


489 


223 


1,030 


747 


512 


971 


1,103 


2,645 


1,539 


1,859 


327 


1,243 


291 


991 


333 


471 


2,594 


5,287 


1,228 


3,498 


686 


2,934 


1,111 


3,571 


709 


975 


601 


285 


1,710 


3,223 


558 


503 


835 


2,0,55 


2,701 


5,024 


1,157 


3,739 


3,193 


4,6.58 


1,1.53 


3,107 


3,038 


4,828 


477 


538 


183 


362 


1,570 


1,646 


411 


1,263 


2,867 


0,339 


1,285 


4,243 


1,620 


1,826 


1,802 


4,106 


732 


2,103 


723 


730 


541 


1,103 


513 


928 


2,185 


3,801 


472 


1,726 


2,301 


3,146 


231 


852 



[ 126 ] 



Demockatic Pkimary Vote, U. S. Senate 



127 



Democratic Primary Vote, June 4, and July 2, 1932, for 
United States Senator, Short Term — Continued 





First Primary 


Second Primary 


Counties 


Bowie 


.2 
'u 


a 
o 

'u 

o 


2 

o 

c 


c 
o 

"C 

u 
o 


— 


— iiee 


545 

845 
208 
208 
142 
145 
4.53 
306 
192 
233 
345 
496 
192 
283 
704 

89 
298 
105 
130 
117 
162 
1,171 

94 
670 
113 
.545 
379 
477 
196 
208 
203 
192 
319 
300 
121 
147 

81 
608 
410 
1,370 
302 
196 
105 
008 
007 
625 
309 

49 


153 

996 

88 

70 

33 

234 

291 

789 

4 

190 

183 

600 

495 

312 

144 

162 

99 

80 

151 

49 

155 

441 

38 

132 

314 

1,760 

428 

518 

780 

123 

157 

110 

245 

317 

27 

18 

35 

382 

249 

1,770 

253 

437 

49 

394 

635 

303 

133 

18 


1,497 

897 

1,706 

457 

420 

713 

1,760 

8,213 

92 

945 

791 

1,320 

2,1,57 

1,973 

477 

1,0.53- 

311 

1,516 

924 

602 

720 

2,182 

974 

1,193 

2,489 

4,104 

1,651 

3,567 

3,793 

1,032 

965 

1,385 

639 

2,458.-- 

248 

400 

115 

2,468 

903 

4,906 

756 

310 

630 

2,703 

959 

1,460 

3,58 

803 


642 

2,519 

705 

568 

809 

1,.500 

1,000 

6,237 

121 

913 

1,931 

3,087 

3,970 

655 

755 

889 

488 

1,373 

747 

502 

637 

3,435 

696 

645 

1,905 

3,523 

1,439 

3,550 

1,0.30 

1,210 

1,401 

607 

314 

189 

435 

1,230 

207 

2,424 

2,140 

7,7,52 

1,338 

491 

270 

3,021 

579 

2,006 

109 

351 


900 

1,381 

1,342 

539 

208 

712 

896 

6,800 

98 

075 

823 

1,602 

1,620 

1,974 

.547 

709 

519 

1,339 

731 

044 

919 

1,791 

087 

1,574 

2,084 

2,921 

904 

1,940 

2,179 

998 

952 

759 

361 

2,895 

97 

307 

104 

2,309 

1,122 

4,617 

785 

329 

963 

2,383 

1,170 

1,180 

418 

582 


1,644 


— Lenoir - 


3,705 


Lincoln 


1,635 


-Macon 


1,251 


Madison 


1,021 


-Martin 


1,792 


-McDowell 


1,819 


■ Mecklenburg 


8,330 


Mitchell 


362 




1,550 


— Moore 


1,984 


-Nash 


4,560 


—New Hanover - -- 


5,135 


-Northampton ...- 


1,003 


^Onslow 


1.599 


- Orange 


1,160 


—Pamlico . 


740 




1.966 


^ Pender 


847 




733 


— Person 


1,186 


-Pitt 


4,838 


-Polk 


1,105 


— Randolp h 


1.719 


-Richmond 


2,387 




4,605 


Rockingham 


1,974 




4,148 


Rutherford 


2.941 




2,062 


Scot and 


1,532 


Stanly 


1,067 


Stokes 


734 




924 


Swain _ _ 


1,240 


■ Transylvania 


1.080 


-Tyrrell 


211 




4.. 524 


^Vance 


2.577 


- Wake 


9,271 


-Warren .. _. 


1,531 


"Washington .. _ 


941 


-Watauga ^ 


767 


-Wavne ... .. 


3.. 544 


Wilkes 


1 . 594 


-Wilson 


3,911 


Yadkin 


443 




1,115 






Totals 


37,748 


31,010 


143,179 


150,548 


120,428 


227,864 







'Arthur Simmons received 4,341 votes for long term l)ut did not file for short term. 



VOTE FOR CHIEF JUSTICE— GENERAL ELECTION 

NOVEMBER, 1934 



Counties 



Alamance... 
Alexander . . 
Alleghany.. 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie _. 

Bladen 

Brunswick.. 
Buncombe.. 

Burke 

Cabarrus.. - 
CaldwelL... 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay __ 

Cleveland... 
Columbus.. 

Craven 

Cumberland 
Currituck... 

Dare 

Davidson... 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville... 

Greene 

Guilford.... 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood... 
Henderson.. 

Hertford 

Hoke -_ 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston... 






C3 cj 



,568 
,703 
,133 
,339 
,838 
544 
,227 
,1.54 
776 
156 
023 
970 
566 
029 
594 
704 
838 
197 
602 
145 
343 
380 
818 
293 
658 
441 
634 
897 
965 
261 
831 
523 
379 
869 
658 
659 
284 
299 
263 
807 
083 
860 
598 
809 
948 
420 
975 
383 
816 
157 
092 



0) 

c 

a> - 
•- c3 



3,394 

2,3.59 

703 

132 

4,183 

1,905 

174 

11 

301 

1,807 

6,665 

4,634 

4,465 

3,795 

73 

1,746 

64 

6,769 

2,014 

3,740 

7 

1,323 

1,191 

309 

159 

221 

13 

308 

6,902 

2,972 

614 

584 

23 

3,691 

47 

5,262 

23 

1,342 

34 

14 

4,448 

52 

1,874 

2,413 

4,741 

10 

41 

31 

3,684 

2.896 

4,381 



Counties 



Jones - 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg.. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery.. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pandico 

Pasquotank... 

Pender 

Perquimans... 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham.. 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain. 

Transylvania. 

Tyrrell 

I'nion _ 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

W'ashington 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Totals-... 



M 



si C> 



661 
,901 
,538 
,228 
,207 
,229 
987 
763 
376 
266 
,912 
,265 
514 
602 
077 
313 
164 
056 
790 
830 
473 
760 
2.33 
232 
398 
949 
821 
309 
088 
632 
203 
257 
208 
528 
307 
120 
569 
225 
943 
983 
904 
064 
298 
176 
555 
508 
472 
381 
998 



319,782 



a 



<pi 



41 

468 

88 

3,942 

2,680 

3,792 

11 

2,560 

1,777 

2,462 

2,545 

1,673 

74 

110 

9 

54 

1,087 

606 

115 

60 

48 

125 

25 

1,616 

6,322 

246 

102 

2,519 

4,376 

5,217 

5,425 

93 

4,843 

3,109 



,070 

1 , 752 

1,642 

12 

315 

44 

358 

11 

500 

3.. 308 

914 

6.859 

79 

3.352 

2,597 



182,577 



[ 128 ] 



Vote For Governor By Counties, 1920-1936 



129 



CO 
Oi 

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o 

CS 



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iz; 
p:; 

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p:: 

o 

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U'B0iiqncJ8>j 

raOSSUQlU-BI^Iir) 


ooai-x>oo<:oa5C-i'^'Mtco--r-*Oh-'*"^ 
00O'rr't--»0G0r--r--o^toO'MCi03C5-— 

otrf'-H ^'c^fi-T i-T — : »o -^r CO '-• 


cr;t--t^cooo-f«^'^C^O 

'JD « .0 Cl CJi C: OC ^ t^ C* 
-C CI — 10 CI CI CO t^ 10 

w ci CO ^' CI ^ ^ 


:tBJ0Om3Q 


(M-MOt^'OCnooOu-D-t^-rt^OCiOO'-OC-lO-fOro^u^iCC-iroCi-^iO 
cor-— 'r^OiooocoOO^cotoc:;o~— oor-'-cooor^tMt-t'^-ocoi^o 
«-hc:jOcooooco-^'— '^otMOoo— 'O^o-^'-dccroco'Mcvcr. ro-^icco 


oo<M(M-rf*io »ocococ^icor^CiO'-(ro(Mc:;coro— • — o«C40ic^'-i 


CO 

05 


UEOiiqnda^I 


oor^<MCi-j=>Oio»!^CiO'— ■^c-3»o — c^j'^c:Ci-f:o-f^cooo— t^oo 
i-^^^o-^'Oai-^Gor^QOOot^ooioaocci-^-Tfoorooccoco^i^c^it^ 

0000(M'35^00 QOOO<MC5iOt- i-^-^oooo-^ C-JGOI--COaO -* 

»oc^{ coc^ »— CO -rt*' CO CO "H tc<^fco — -- 


^BJOOUiaQ 

snBqSnuqa g f 


— '-^lOooocoO'-HOt-^ocot^tootooo^r-icO'^cot^irj^Tft^ 
o-?'coiraococ^j-*oiGO'-'CiCiOTr>tiO(Ma5r-^co»r!co-^yD-rc:t^csi 
oa3c:i'Mt^O'fj''-"0^cn.co^toc^-^aoro-^co--oco^ — ^or^co 


00<M^Tt*-*<^>OC0C^C^3C0»000O COi— 0O^ro^"O0tO^»n:-^^- 


GO 
CI 


uBOqqnday 
na-iiBag -J H 


'00^00-f'^<MOOC0 01COCOOOGOOC:0— 'COi-iCOOIC-lOOi-O-O 

:o 40 — O en r-. -M CO CO »o CI o — • r^ — ->) ic 'O co ko — — r^ -j:; r-- 

-"H c) ci »o — - o 1— 1 — • -^ -^ rr lo cr. i2 — t - T o o o — o --^ X 31 


2,531 

68 

717 


o ci --H CO CO C3 -^ -^ -rti '-jH i-o CO oj r- CO CO « co ci 


^CBJOOUIOQ 


o o CO CO t-^ — 1 <M -o "-0 -r CO t^ — ' -r '^ c^i r-^ c: c^i it: -+ — CO — ' -t- c^ cc t^ 
o CO -f -^ c". Qo -o GO GO -^ C-- -rf c o c^ — lo lO "C f CO :i; to --r: f — GC r^ 

CO-r^OTlO^O-^^CiCOOOCiOCOI-^ClI-^CO — O^^rrOI^COC-JCi 


io c-i ^ CO '^ n* ca cj i-H .o CO "JO CO c^i — tc co -m ^ 1:0 cc co -r « 


1 


UEoqc(ndajj 


COCTiC^iai'— iwCOtOOt'-'-'t^'^tD — C^1COCOC^)r^O-^^00"CO(MOO 

■^ci^oc^iOGooooTf^fMOOocofC-iifr— ooc^icncvic^inooco 

Co' (M* ^ CO oi ^ ^ ^ CO* Co' CM* ■"* :JD CI* C^J ^ •^' —h' .-^ 


^BJOOUiaQ 

Tii3a-[3j\[ AV V 


-^cioo^oo — ■-o^co--or:;ci-f'-cco-r'-'-Hi--co-fCi»o^'*cr;ro 
CO ~ -r C-. 'C --c CO CO c~. c^i CI GO CO r-- CI ^ r- CO i^ -^ CQ CO »o QC CO o^ 
C-. ojcc>cocorrOcoiO'^coo'Ccococoooo'r-ir-i-ot--coocoOQO 


-^C^-^C^jTf CO-^— <"OTt-TfCO C^i— iiCCO" — "COC-ICOCO 


o 

CI 


UBOi^qndajj 


-f CO t^ CI t-- C^l 1^ -^ »-0 to -O <M -^ CI tTJ CI lO -^ CO 

C) -r 00 CI c^ ^ 'T -H 00 :c> CI CI -H 3:1 — . •— C-. i^ -^ — 1 
-^ -^ « -J- 00 -r CI ^ ro L'2 c] CI -* CI M' c. GO 'T — 1 c; 


DC »-0 -* CS ^ ^ 
1^ »« w 'Tf IM 

r; — ^ CM CO 


-f Cl « CO CI CI — — OC CO "O CO "-O CI CI 


^BJOoiuaQ 
aosiajoi\[ uojauiB J 


■^oi--OGOcocr::o^«C3--fTt^co»OTrO'^c;cjcico^cO'*iO'^-o 
r--o-^'TfCiotooocr-'-'— ^-HC^uo--ocn»ccj^coc?cD-H.— -o-^t^':** 

ClC>-rfC0COf».0 00ClC0'^C0COCni.0OCl-^C)r-^t^^C0-TC0C:00 


lOCl'-tCOCO CO'-f^^OCO-^CJ CI— '»CCO^^ lOCOCOCO 




CO 

3 
o 
O 


Alamance 

Alexander 

Alle^lianv- 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort-- 

Bertie 

l^runswiek 

Buneonibe 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell. 

Caniden . - 

Carteret _ _ - 

Caswell _ _ _ ___ 





Chatham _ 

( 'herokee 

Chowan ^ 

Clav 


Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven _ _ 


Cund)erland 

Currituck _ _ . 

Dare... 



i;U) 



E L K( TI( )N lij-JTl K.N S 



'^ 
<» 

s 






CO 

Oi 

tH 

I 

o 

CM 

C5 



W 
I— I 

z 
p 
o 

O 

M 

K 
O 

> 
o 

O 

o 

H 

o 



to 

i 


nt;oiiqndojj 
lUOSSUr) lUBiniO 


— 1 ^- t- -^ t^ O O r- — 1 TO TO <M 00 C-) (M C-J ::7: — — ■ CO 00 O "O — • o t-. t^ ^ o 
OC^'-^TJH O »0 ^ -^ —• « CO ■»3'' TjTcoiO ^ COC-f-^" 


^tiJDomaQ 


-^o»o^--HTt<cO'— tioco^r-c^CTicO'— ^o<^^^-oc'^lO-^co-^cocoQO^-. 
uococ5-^oor~co-H_.oa)cototocOTJ.c^iil^Jo5^F:STOc^^o?5Mm 

a20>OOOt^OOTj*r^Tt^'»J'OOOOCOO»0-405^t^OOO»0»0'i^^O(M'-^'^ 


GOC^1>OOitO<M'^iO^^HCOCS ot'oooO UOC^-H »-H C5 ■»? O ^ CO lO irf CO CO 


CO 


ucoqqnday; 
jotzBJj -Q pjojyna 


c<icoai*^r^ooocoo*i*— 'OcrKMyiJcoo— 'coc-iooofMCJiotoo^^rD 
coocTiooooo — !M-^c-)— .oocv]c^'Oooa>coocooot^-j2-Hroc-) — CO'^^ 
■^ to --H CO c-a to c^i c-1 c^i CI t^ (M r^ o^ c^ r-. t^ oo o — i r^ co oo co >o 

to C3 ^ c^ lo »c ^ o c^iim"-^' cocg-^" coc-i-i''" 


jBiooraaQ 
sn^qSnuqa-gor 


CO 00 c^i »o -rf r^ o t^ -r Ci to r^ o M* c-j to -^ ic u^ »c r^ C-- o to C". o ^ -— r- 
c,, „, ^ r^ oo »o -^ (M — , -r o r^ uo to C5 CO r^ ».o t^ ot 00 t^ -o -^ — o o o t^ 
cO'Tf'OOOOiocvi cr. c^jcooo^irjTjH c^cr-cooo I- :j;coco-:t-^0--o-rci to 


05C^]--<OOiOT^-*C-).-^^COC^100tOOtOtO-^" OO-^Ct '-^CO-^-^COCl 


CO 
(M 
05 


utio^qndajj 


(3-^OTt<ocoiocotoc<)aoo;:o-^to^i-HC<i-*to— 'Oito— 'tot^c-ic-ioo 
c5oo>ototoc5^a5tDCito(Muor^w— tt^c-ioOLoooi-or^coio-Tpto 

C^t^iOOi'^OO^tOCKI^iOCO^CO'^Oi-O^ClTjHt^COC^lCO'-^tOt^iOLO 
OOC'fc^Ji-O Ct 00 ^ CO -f''^''?'' LOCo't^ ^ coc-i'co 


CJ-BJOOUtaQ 

J8npjBO x^K 


coco^^cltoooouocc— "Mcocinr^— '00 — c^3 0to^-fOLOco-t-to 
(Mioor^tor^ — -T'f^'o-t'coc^ir^— 'OocoQoc-jcjcotococ^— "-oo-r — 
(^^ lo CO to to '-H w to r^ c> C'l CO to CO <M 00 oo fM CO r^ »c CO ~ 00 — Ci Lo Lo CO 

rC^co'to 'tt ^TO 00 -^ CO -- CO uo-t^ Tj-'co — ^— " -^'co'io c^ic-fco'ci— T 


CM 


u'Boqqnday 
supiaoK K I 


CM O C^l C^l Ol to O r^ O to CO — CO »0 -f LO to oo C^l Ol OO O; C^ O t^ O C". 00 o 

ooocDiocitor^tocsoco'-O'Oocoir^oCD — iOCDt^'t^ior^or- ^ — 

o-)toor~ c-Jl^^-^^ c-.tt— .-p—oocorr— .—.co^t^oo — tocotoc<i— . 

tO^cfwC-i liO CO to' C^{c-{co" COC^l'^' CICNCO 


^BjaomaQ 
UT3813K AY V 


00 t^ — CO t^ LO r^ -t' -t* — < oo O] to tr; to rr. to to O' r^ '-0 o r ^ oi -?- cc — o 

LO o oo CO CO t^ GO o; to I- ^ CO CO oj CO to to Gc to uo o r^ 03 — to rt -^ i.o CO 

»COOO^C<l-*'000:--OtOOC03 — c^lcOCOLOOOt — tOiC— •t^r^oOtMCttO'T 

to — ^c^itio oir^— ^to" oi — ' ct CO CO -f' co' -^ toco-i*' — ^oiojoi"— ^ 


O 

r-l 


UBoqqnday; 
ja^juj f uqof 


-r CO -^ --f- O-l ~ Ol Ot ^ O CO t^ oo to OC Ol — o to uo — rf to QC »-o -f r^ t^ Oi 

-» 00 c Oi ot uo o -I" en -^ OS o) 00 — -^ to = — o t^ o; Lo CO oi uo c) oi CO o 
oo».ot^-^c^lt^»ct-oiOir^-rr^-rco — too) — -r — cococo — o — oto 

»C oi oi CO to lO t^' CO oi CO rf oi lO — -H CO Ol CO 


;t;j30uiaQ 

UOSUJOJ^ UOjaUlBQ 


t^ ^ oi to lo o to o oi o oi -p *i* o oa t^ iC Lo o o — 00 to ci ct o) to — o 

CDCOCOOOtiOOOO-l— 'tratOtOOifOOlOltOtOt-^iiOCSt^Oi'-HOOClOOO 
Cit0^t^C0 01t^OJOOtOtOtO*0'-OOtC^«iO"C<I'-'COCOOCtcOOOCO'-^CO 

-3i' ^ CO -!?"' CO 00 c^ t^ ' oi— oico CO-*' cs't-h ^H T^to'oio" oiojcooi — 




Counties 


Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin . _ 

Durham 

Edgecombe-. . .._ 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham _. 

Granville ... 

Greene 

Guilford... 

Halifax 

Harnett 

1 1 ay \v ood 

Henderson.. 

Hertford _ 

Hoke 

llvde...._ 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston _._ 

Jones 

Lee... 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon _ 

Madison 



Vote For Goveknok By Counties 1920-1936 



131 






CO ic cc ci c^ --H •-« 



r-l t-- .— ( rji ?0 »0 »C 



-r CO o c^ --H 



CO C^ GO <— « ^ C^ 



C^O iC to C^l CO ~C0n"'^Cri<:0C0'-0O--^OI^ ---—■— CiOC0»0Cr-O00C0OiCC0OC0t^---^O»CC'I-t'OGr3 
Ci.—.-^cOC0C00Dr^"rt*"^O'*OC'?'-HC0C^l»nOCit^Cr^-^-rr'C'100-H00Oc0Q00iC^l !--■--■ t--t-^CiOCSG0I^»0 

eO»C'*ti'— 'COCOtJlJ'-OCOCJCO-HCOiM'— iC5Q0(Mr'-i00^CCOCr:»O'M'OC000C^C') t^CQiO c-{— '"co CO o »o ci^co 



oococ^'~'CTllOcooo■^^^coai^^co■^0'-H^^05'-Hco^^uocO'~H^H■^lOco■^t^QO■^o■-f<'-^ 

C^-fCOC-3Cl — « .— .O CO-t'rf-t'-flMT+ii-H.-H C-l CO— lO 



OO -^ OS 
'J- ■— . C^ UO CO 
to !>. lO »0 lO 

CO ■— < O CO c^ 



lO oi c^i CO c^i 35 "T** 1-- r-- -jD ■— ^ ,-. -t* ri t^ -— ' o oi oo -fi ci r; -t" C"-- r-- o r-. to »ri 00 -JD CO -^ C'l >c o w r- -h (m t-- 'O o 
t^ c» o t-- oi CI c^ :o c^j »o oi ""5^ ■—! ~- CO "^ '-O -r CO t-- c^i '^ Gc cs '^ '-0 i-^ o o CO »o GO t^ 2C n* t-- to c^ 



co-^05i— ici'-^i>.tococ^c^r-icO'-''— ic-:)t^c^i>.Tjii>.i>.c:oo-^c-liocot^c^c^ 



lOCO-^C^T-HCOOiOiOC^ICO 



O M CO to to L*? CI i^r; O 'O i.-^ O O O O O O iC X) O I^ CO -^ -- O — ' 'O O •C' lO O CJ GO »o ri o cri C^l O -f — < ■— ' <o 

oc^^^-^^■^to■xtc^^C'|JO-?^^^c^^^oo•— •ro'^Got-^ro--'C]Cito---i^toc5co-^'tori'3". ocooc^-- 'C^u^-rr^ 
ccc^coco-r^'—ico— <— ir--ocoTt"r--coCTic»oai"^oDr^ai'--i-Hco— "O^^coo-rt^^cooci— 'Or--'Ococ)-oi'^ 



CO r- CO o CO •-' c^ 



,_( -^ ,-H — I Tti O iO lO -rji CO to CI CI — 



lOOCOOGO— <CO^O■^'.OC^O:>CCI>•"^UO■n•C»OC^tD^^■^CC^C>cOcD■^GO^OCOOU7l— '^OCOCXJC^OOtOiO-^ 

Oto— «ooio»ouociocico'tor^'rt^ooc^i>*c^tor-^-^!Oic^— •tococi-rri^c'^r^'^oo'Otocooc^ 

OiOOC^aJOOGOtO•-HTJ'-^C:>C<^lOOO■^C^C<3^00GOOCOCO^^OGOTt'^OC005lO"^ClCOCO<0■— i[-^»Ci— "Clt^ 



CI CO -^ -^ CI 1-H C) 1-H CSI —H 



iiO— .lOCOOrt^^tDiOCJC^COC)-^'— 11— « 



COCJ'— 'CI'— ico-^co-^— 'CI 



eor^oo— HOoQiooo— '-fcocoooGcco'^cor-^to-fOc:iGOcjtocO'35 

Ci »c C3 o to -^ to lO o "-j^' :r- '^ -ti o CO o CO c; GO o — ^ '-0 CO -r •— ' CO C3 

1— liC'— 'tO'OQOI^O'— •CO'— 'C0»OCJClO"rr'^Cli0tD»Ot0 00C0'— '40 



C^ CI '-'C^ --I 



T-i Tl O 



ooco ■ 
c) coco co' 



'35 03:'^^'0■cnco^-^^f-f^~coQo^^oc^ 

C3c:ilr^t--t--O:'^^>OtO3:tC0'T'O-*t000C0 

^ — -^ ^ .-..-. — -^. oo r- c) T-. 'f CO — ' 



1 40 '^ CT-^ '— I I>- O to CO C^ 

CO cT ■^" ci »-t 



c^ ^ to c^^ CI 



C^M<QOl--OC3COOiCCOO'C^OC5t^COC5r'.'iC^OO-HiOOO'— 'OOGO-t'»OC3COCl'— iOI>*tOiO--COOiC~. OJ — ' 

>— "cot'-.-r'— 't--»-ooiOto— 'oci— "OOtoio^— "t---oocot--GO'— tocrioc^-fciaor-oci-^ootooxj-?' -* 
oocfit-^»CQOCicii-->— lOc^ociio-^cotocor^r^-n'cO'— 'Oioc:5Cj»ot^oorj'r-^c)cociooo't'30iC:tocoto I -r 

OCOGO cfc^COO'-*^'— 'CI 1— ..— I .— ICO"— ■'OClTf-rfiO'OCl'— iCOO"rP— I— I ClOCTl'-t dCOCOCJ*— 'Cll-T 



COCOiO»OaiC)GOC]!:DCltO— 't^ClOCl-l' CT-CO't' '— 'C)COCJCOtOCOCT>COC^i:^»OCTi*f 05'*'-HC5tOCO«OiC'* 
OsOtOC^O-rT'— 't^-.C^ClGO^^'— 't^O0C»CO-'^''*CO'— "Ci»CO>CO<^t^C:jl^iO«OCOCiO'^'rt^OI>-iOC;Cit^ 

Tj^iococicocio-^-^oor^O'^to-^u^cococg'— ''— tioccocociciGO-^citOiO'^oocociCitot-'.Tj'cicjio 



CJ CO C3 C3 Ca — 1 



1—1 — (to— iClCO'^-f'J^ 



' CI lO CI ^^ — ( CO 



O C^ to — < CO CI 



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VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN DEMOCRATIC PRI- 
MARY, JUNE 6, 1936, BY DISTRICTS 

SECOND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


John H. Kerr 


A. 0. Dickens 


Bertie 


2,036 
3,381 
1,585 
4,472 
2,535 
2,496 
2,465 
2,813 


1,032 
2,203 
1,067 
4.206 
1,999 
1,287 
679 
3,988 


Edgecombe 


Greene 


Halifax 


Lenoir 


Northampton 


Warren 


Wilson - - 






Totals 


21,783 


16,461 





THIRD CONGRESSIONAL 





Counties 


Charles L. 
Abernethy, Jr. 


Graham A. 
Barden 


Carteret 


1,805 
2,705 
1,347 

847 
1,799 

781 
1,092 

947 
2,728 


1,849 

3,008 

3,025 

826 

996 

774 

1,261 

1,598 

3.873 


Craven _ 


Duplin 


Jones 


Onslow 


Pamlico 


Pender 


Sampson 


Wayne - 






Totals 


14,051 


17 ''10 







FOURTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


Harold D. 

Cooley 


Palmer 
Bailey 




2,353 
4,031 
7,376 
7,104 
2,745 
3,471 
16,471 


427 
332 
649 
194 
334 
321 
1,646 






Nash 




Vance 


Wake , - 






Totals 


43,551 


3,903 





[ 135 1 



136 



Election Returns 





FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL 


DISTRICT 




Counties 


Frank 
Hancock 


Allison 
James 


Caswell -- - -- 


1,864 
9,669 
3,626 
1,541 
4,878 
1,920 
4,318 


298 


Forsyth 






7.093 
371 




Person . 


952 


Rockingham 


1,020 


Stokes 


692 


Surry - - - 


1 162 










Totals 


27,816 


11,588 





SIXTH 


"ONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 




Counties 


William B. 
Umstead 


Charles L. 
Von Noppen 


R. H. 
Watkins 


Bruce H. 
Carraway 


Alamance 


4,585 
9,346 
9,037 
2,720 


465 

642 

1,301 

244 


140 

824 

410 

78 


820 




1,155 


Guilford 


3,520 


Orange - 


383 


Totals 


25,688 


2,652 


1,452 


5,878 



TENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


B.S. 
Whiting 


A. L. 
Bulwinkle 


Claude B. 
Woltz 


William V. 
Scholl 




126 
1,187 
2,694 
4,928 
3,271 
1,728 

590 
7,159 

128 

572 


406 
2,896 
2,283 
6,200 
6,337 
1,272 
1,900 
8,9 72 

787 
1,730 


7 

38 

72 

109 

301 

15 

26 

397 

11 

16 


10 


Burke 


60 


Catawba 


220 

291 


Gaston 


392 




69 




no 


Mecklenburg 


1,507 


Mitchell 


11 


Yancey 


45 






Totals 


22,383 


32,783 


992 


2,715 



Vote For Members of Congress 
eleventh congressional district 

Counties 



137 



Zebulon 


W. B. Fisher 


Weaver 




12,576 


3,596 


1,420 


429 


937 


187 


457 


201 


4,584 


1,667 


2,425 


540 


2,019 


657 


2,861 


651 


1,599 


390 


1,564 


185 


5,846 


1,127 


1,122 


592 


1,407 


159 


38,817 


10,981 



Buncombe 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain , 

Transylvania.. 

Totals.. 



138 



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VOTE FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS, 1932-1936 

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 
(Created in 1931) 





1932 


1934 


1936 




Lh 




M 








1-5 




►-5 


1-5 






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Caswell 


1,790 
14,290 


196 
5.676 


855 

9,884 


2,251 
17,1.56 


196 


Forsyth 


5,552 


Granville 


3,799 
2,375 
7,. 557 
3,. 535 

7.479 


212 

594 

3,057 

2,894 
4,697 


1,275 
774 
5,400 
3,572 
6,455 


4, 139 
2,548 
9,896 
4,170 
8,340 


132 




418 


Rockingham - 


3,119 


Stokes 


3,354 


Surry 


4,900 






Totals 


40.825 


17,326 


28.221 


48,500 


17,671 







SIXTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

(Created in 1931) 





1932 


19.34 


1936 




^ 




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7.813 

7,994 

19,284 

2,983 


5.275 
2.375 
9,342 
1,101 


5,512 
3.567 
9.9.53 
2.209 


3.410 

614 

4.477 

1.036 


9,, 524 
1 1 . 694 
21.449 

3.662 


4,711 


Durham 


2.124 


Guilford 


11.S67 


Orange - 


1.390 






Totab 


38.074 


18,093 


21.241 


9,543 


46.329 


20.092 







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O 



VOTE ON CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS 
BY COUNTIES, 1936 



Proposed Amendments to the Constitution of North Carolina Sub- 
mitted to a Vote of the People at the General Election, 
November 3, 1936. 



Constitutional Amendment Adoi'ted 
Amendment to Section 3, Article V, authorizing the classification 
of real and personal property. 

Chapter 248, Public Laws 1935. 

(a) Strike out all of Section three ending with the words "three 
months" just preceding the words "General Assembly" and insert 
the following: 

"Sec. 3. State Taxation. The power of taxation shall be exer- 
cised in a just and equitable manner, and shall never be surren- 
dered, suspended or contracted away. Taxes on property shall be 
uniform as to each class of property taxed. Taxes shall be levied 
only for public purposes, and every act levying a tax shall state the 
object to which it is to be applied." 

(b) Amend Article VII by striking out Section 9 as to uniform- 
ity of municipal ad valorem taxes and renumbering the sections 
following. 

Constitutional Amendment Adopted 

Amendment to Section 3, Article V, Increasing Limitation of 
Income Tax to 10 per cent. 

Chapter 248, Public Laws 1935. 

In Section 3, Article V, strike out the words and figures "six per 
cent (6%)" and insert "ten per cent (10%)." 

Constitutional Amendment Adopted 
Amendment to Section 4, Article V, Limiting Increase of Public 
Debts. 

Chapter 248, Public Laws 1935. 

Strike out the first part of Section 4 of Article V down to and in- 
cluding the words "fixed for taxation" and insert the following: 

L Mil I 



150 Election Eetukns 

Sec. 4. Limitations vpon the increase of pxiblic debts. The Gen- 
eral Assembly shall have the power to contract debts and to pledge 
the faith and credit of the State and to authorize counties and 
municipalities to contract debts and pledge their faith and credit 
for the following purposes: 

To fund or refund a valid existing debt; 

To borrow in anticipation of the collection of taxes due and pay- 
able within the fiscal year to an amount not exceeding fifty per 
centum of such taxes. 

To supply a casual deficit; 

To suppress riots or insurrections, or to repeal invasions. 

For any purpose other than these enumerated, the General As- 
sembly shall have no power, during any bienuium, to contract new 
debts on behalf of the State to an amount in excess of two-thirds 
of the amount by which the State's outstanding indebtedness shall 
have been reduced during the next preceding biennium, unless the 
subject be submitted to a vote of the people of the State; and for 
any purpose other than these enumerated the General Assembly 
shall have no power to authorize counties or municipalities to con- 
tract debts, during any fiscal year, to an amount exceeding two- 
thirds of the amount by which the outstanding indebtedness of the 
particular county or municipality shall have been reduced during 
the next preceding fiscal year, unless the subject be submitted to a 
vote of the people of the particular county or municipality. In any 
election held in the State or in any county or municipality under 
the provisions of this section, the proposed indebtedness must be 
approved by a majority of those who shall vote thereon. 

Constitutional Amendment Adopted 

Amendment to Section 5, Article V, Exempting from Taxation 
Homes to the Value of One Thousand Dollars. 

Chapter 444, Public Laws 1935. 

Add at the end of Section 5, Article V the following: 

"The General Assembly may exempt from taxation not exceeding 
one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) in value of property held and used 
as the place of residence of the owner." 



Vote on Constitutional Amendments 151 

Constitutional Amendment Adopted 

Amendment to Section 6, Article IV, Giving tlie General Assem- 
bly Power to Increase the Number of Supreme Court Justices to Six. 

Chapter 444, Public Laws 1935. 

Section 6, Article IV amended to read as follows: 

''Supreme Court. The Supreme Court shall consist of a Chief Jus- 
tice and four Associate Justices. The General Assembly may in- 
crease the number of Associate Justices to not more than six when 
the work of the Court so requires. The Court shall have power to 
sit in divisions, when in its judgment this is necessary for the 
proper dispatch of business, and to make rules for the distribution 
of business between the divisions and for the hearing of cases by 
the full Court. No decision of any division shall become the judg- 
ment of the Court unless concurred in by a majority of all the jus- 
tices; and no case involving a construction of the Constitution of 
the State or of the United States shall be decided except by the 
Court in banc. All sessions of the Court shall be held in the City 
of Raleigh. This amendment made to the Constitution of North 
Carolina shall not have the effect to vacate any office or term of of- 
fice now existing under the Constitution of the State, and filled or 
held by virtue of any election or appointment under the said Con- 
stitution, and the laws of the State made in pursuance thereof. 



VOTE ON FOREGOING AMENDMENTS 





Amendment 


Amendment for 


Amendment Pro- 




Provic 


ing for 


Increasing Limita- 


viding for Limita- 




Classification of 


tion of Income Tax 


tion Upon Increase 


Counties 


Property 


to 10 P 


er Cent 


of Public Debt 




For 


Against 


For 


Against 


For 


Against 


Alanianre _ 


3,835 


2,324 


3,783 


2,8,56 


4,491 


2,332 


Alexander 


869 
545 


1,488 
784 


981 
741 


1,551 

815 


1,435 
610 


1 105 


Alleghany . 


826 


Anson... ._ . . 


2, 1,50 


800 


2,083 


907 


2,161 


816 


Ashe . . . 


695 
1,021 


789 
773 


1,3.54 
1,091 


895 
772 


1.585 
813 


736 


Avery 


1,004 


Beaufort 


2, 198 
1,122 
1,422 


1,178 
.547 
755 


2,. 5.54 
1.319 
1,424 


1,025 
517 
885 


2,. 527 
1,382 
1,432 


906 


Bertie 


418 


Bladen 


815 


Brunswick 


1 , 645 
11,873 
1,808 
3,821 
2,4,55 
352 
1,126 


188 
6,681 
1,095 
3,467 
1,397 
198 
340 


1,030 
9,418 
1,724 
3,. 509 
2,604 
.348 
1,110 


245 
9,677 
1,2.58 
4,148 
1 , 097 
707 
330 


1,674 
12,312 
1,762 
3,090 
'"> 422 
"'3.5.5 
1,182 


235 


Buncombe . .. 


0,5.54 


Burke.- . _ . . 


1 189 


Cabarrus .. 


3,. 523 


CaldweU 


1 , 577 


Camden . . . .. 


185 


Carteret 


289 


Caswell _ - . - - 


968 
5,290 
1,340 
1,621 
509 
476 
3,612 


337 

2,021 

1,914 

713 

262 

118 

1 , 760 


900 
5,028 
1,613 
1,4.55 
478 
454 
3.400 


449 

2,493 

1 , 957 

892 

411 

120 

2,333 


927 
5,038 
1,005 
1,429 
490 
450 
3,479 


399 


Catawba 


2 372 


Chatham. .. . 


1,976 


Cherokee .. 


8.50 


Chowan 


258 


Clav .- 


1.34 


Cleveland 


2,042 


Columbus 


2,605 


1,.547 


3,060 


1,530 


2,4.55 


1,721 


Craven 


2,500 
2,931 


700 
1.390 


2.412 
2.910 


987 
1 , 505 


2,5.50 
3.073 


734 


Cumberland 


1 . 252 


Currituck 


818 
712 


130 
188 


797 
712 


1S7 
238 


857 
062 


123 


Dare 


203 


Davidson 


3,812 


5,304 


3,8.50 


5,701 


4,191 


5,305 


Davie,. .. .. 


1,028 
2,105 


998 
1 , 855 


1,109 
2,703 


1,030 
1,394 


1,129 
2,471 


805 


Duplin 


1,.542 


Durham 


5,. 575 
2,102 


3,201 
1,440 


4.. 502 
2.. 564 


4,794 
1,387 


5,378 
2,626 


3,295 


rjdgeco mbe 


1,033 


Forsvth 


7.980 


6,442 


7,848 


7,671 


8,402 


0,224 


Fra nklin 


1,287 


1 , 250 


1,671 


1,1.50 


1,503 


1,050 


Gaston 


6,103 


3,518 


5,082 


4,599 


6,033 


3,718 


Gates - .. 


3.52 
440 


475 
246 


403 

450 


470 

279 


302 
427 


487 


Graham 


268 


Granville 


1,.339 


1,1.59 


1,489 


1 , 239 


1,511 


1,012 


Greene 


862 


549 


1,180 


427 


1,008 


478 


G uilf ord 


10,945 


7,889 


9,790 


10,138 


12,309 


7,207 


Halifax 


3,476 


1.842 


3,025 


1 , 959 


3,937 


1,.530 


Harnett 


3,170 


2,320 


3,718 


2,145 


3,270 


2,247 


H a V wood 


5,083 


1 , 508 


4,929 


2,074 


4,940 


1,706 


Henderson 


2,040 


1,570 


1 . 740 


1,937 


1,847 


1,686 


Hertford 


995 


321 


1.040 


313 


1,068 


256 


Hoke 


696 


591 


729 


609 


701 


577 


Hvde 


447 


150 


519 


138 


483 


108 


Iredell 


4,999 


2,842 


5.078 


3,143 


5,370 


2.716 


Jackson ._ _ 


1.308 


902 


1,340 


1,011 


1,395 


974 


Johnston . 


3,183 

309 

1,372 


2,774 

4.54 

1,003 


3,920 

423 

1 , 069 


2,840 
444 
975 


3,345 

334 

1,592 


2.755 




435 


Lee 


879 


Lenoir 


2,058 


1,053 


2,192 


1,015 


2.180 


858 



[ 152] 



VOTK OX FOREGOINC; AMENDMENTS 



153 



Vote on Foregoing Amendments — Continued 



Counties 



Lincoln. 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin__- 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg-,. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery... 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover. 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Kandolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham.. 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson. 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania . 

Tyrrell 

I.'nion 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington... 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



Amendment 

Providing for 

Classification of 

Property 



For 



Totals. 



415 

427 
529 
467 
913 
178 
093 
544 
357 
706 
090 
358 
616 
949 
626 
520 
727 
481 
824 
460 
434 
624 
311 
516 
120 
028 
526 
635 
930 
.789 
,983 
,989 
726 
,899 
473 
883 
,420 
195 
765 
988 
,431 
,725 
080 
967 
332 
,387 



Against 



242,899 



1.098 

631 

1,294 

655 

1,320 

5,121 

946 

1,357 

1,718 

1,620 

1 , 566 

555 

.557 

948 

296 

480 

839 

187 

499 

2,9.58 

719 

2,719 

998 

2,360 

1,715 

3,177 

3,381 

1,821 

587 

2,492 

869 

2,247 

.571 

829 

180 

1,123 

1 , 027 

5,675 

1,206 

226 

I., 54 6 

2,370 

893 

1.195 

1,3.54 

853 



1,52,516 



Amendment for 
Increasing Limita- 
tion of Income Tax 
to 10 Per Cent 



For 



2,411 
1,310 
1,740 
1,876 
2,640 
8,673 

985 
1 , 759 
2,422 
2^793 
2,093 
1,704 

961 
1,891 

853 
1,548 

991 

585 

905 
4,033 
1,343 
2,882 
2,973 
4,232 
4,437 
4,686 
5,382 
1,987 

769 
1,681 
2,162 
3,074 

681 
1,862 

589 
2,697 
1,406 
9,375 

887 

945 
1,4,33 
2,965 
2,2.33 
3,112 
1,722 
1 , 539 

242,492 



Against 



1 . 256 

861 

1.401 

561 

1,582 

8,898 

962 

1,454 

1,907 

1,828 

2,8.54 

573 

383 

1,234 

273 

653 

834 

177 

580 

2,274 

810 

2,818 

1,384 

2.397 

2,103 

4,060 

3,726 

1,842 

817 

2,969 

927 

2,371 

614 

932 

157 

461 

207 

334 

306 

272 

617 

536 

166 



1.493 



1, 



Amendment Pro- 
viding for Limita- 
tion L'pon Increase 
of Public Debt 



235 
915 



178,373 



For 



2,388 
1,328 
1 , 70S 
1 , 657 
2,979 
11,574 

806 
L687 
2,769 
2,700 
3,247 
1,.573 

920 
1,862 

733 
1 , 595 

871 

585 

913 
3,260 
1 , 526 
3,382 
2,942 
4,142 
4,617 
5,024 
5,224 
1 , 992 

833 
1,90S 
1 , 953 
3,038 

892 
1.909 

462 
2,795 
1 . 533 
9.926 
1.038 

988 
1.788 
3.269 
2.318 
3.021 
1 . 535 
1,339 

2,55,416 



Against 



1,090 

693 

1,302 

,528 

1,178 

5., 361 

1 , 054 

1,428 

1 , 574 

1,464 

1 , 466 

487 

350 

1,122 

248 

542 

862 

149 

494 

2.. 300 

658 

2.. 567 

1.220 

2.232 

1.761 

3.482 

3., 591 

1 , 567 

674 

2.670 

928 

2, 166 

431 

895 

202 

1,217 

946 

4,870 

1,070 

278 

1.428 

2. 008 

1.123 

1.176 

1 . 232 

941 



149.086 



154 



Election Eetukns 



Vote on Foregoing Amendments — Continued 



Alamance 

Alexander 

Alleghany... 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick... 
Buncombe... 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland... 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland. 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham. 

Edgecombe... 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Hertford 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 



Counties 



Amendment Providing 

for Exeniption from 

Taxation to the 

Value of $1,000.00 



For 



5,236 
1,342 

955 
2,536 
1,365 
1 , 755 
2,714 
1,515 
1,730 
2,326 
14,614 
2,342 
4,950 
3.242 

386 
1,771 

950 
7,928 
2,143 
2,211 

507 

519 
4,177 
3,684 
3,070 
3,685 

836 



Against 



2,810 

1,546 

856 

938 

825 

742 

1,247 

575 

824 

188 

6,754 

1,152 

3,834 

1,692 

205 

263 

643 

2,010 

1,952 

842 

365 

139 

2,453 

1,537 

763 

1,563 

O09 



Amendment Providing' 

for Increase of 

Number of Supreme 

Court Justices 



880 


283 


5,133 


5,369 


1,571 


1,033 


2,574 


2,163 


6,366 


4,086 


2,729 


1,4.55 


10,736 


6,. 342 


1,944 


1,190 


7,362 


4,2.35 


324 


648 


609 


234 


1,870 


1,262 


972 


793 


12,695 


9,582 


4,201 


1,905 


4,334 


2,166 


6,384 


1,677 


2,515 


1.674 


1,119 


376 


941 


554 


656 


174 


6,706 


2,675 


1,978 


947 


4,367 


2,925 


467 


499 


2,069 


951 


2,483 


1,241 



For 



4,211 
988 
504 
2, 194 
602 
801 
2,160 
1,207 
1,486 
1,.559 
14,677 
1,676 
4,122 
2,230 
364 
924 
921 
5,186 
1,181 
1,498 
513 
464 
3,785 
2,683 
2,. 530 
3,439 
818 
726 
3,952 
999 
2,029 
6, 765 
2,655 
8,989 
1,227 
7,142 
259 
444 
1,4.50 
891 
11,611 
4,110 
3,907 
5,094 
1,876 
977 
653 
406 
5,387 
1,274 
3,698 
321 
1,450 
1,980 



Against 



2,, 527 
1,6.52 
848 
886 
1,076 
1,094 
1,352 
620 
892 
295 
6,318 
1,433 
3,651 
1,851 
178 
580 
459 
2,502 
2,348 
978 
289 
111 
2,232 
1,810 
831 
1,625 
155 
220 
5,948 
1,124 
2,181 
2,747 
1,287 
6,479 
1,321 
3,703 
589 
339 
1,293 
679 
8,. 572 
1 , 6.58 
2,408 
1,910 
1,927 
335 
701 
155 
3,418 
1,002 
3,142 
471 
1,065 
1,152 



Vote oisr Fokegoing Amendments 



155 



Vote on Foregoing Amendments — Continued 



Counties 


Amendment Providing 

for Exemption from 

Taxation to the 

Value of Sl.000.00 


Amendment Providing 

for Increase of 

Number of Supreme 

Court Justices 




For 


Against 


For 


Against 


Lincoln 


3,300 

1,649 
2,679 
1,911 
3,665 
13,. 3.38 
1,618 
2,719 
3,442 
3,379 
3,667 
1,569 
1,021 
2,195 
1,201 
1,700 
1,061 

652 
1,182 
3,7.52 
1.747 
4.044 
3.697 
4.801 
5.301 
5.907 
6.230 
3.085 
1.286 
2.377. 
2.541 
3.848 
1,165 
2,478 

599 

3,7.55 

1.939 

11,179 

931 
1,080 
1 , 925 
3,324 
3,407 
4,009 
2,136 
2,011 


1.015 

595 

1,278 

815 

1,314 

7,403 

967 

1,176 

1,.589 

1,822 

1,985 

730 

510 

1,315 

262 

669 

932 

223 

548 

2,647 

685 

2,764 

1,123 

2,489 

2,077 

3.706 

3.832 

1.706 

642 

2.807 

913 

2,460 

.540 

840 

234 

1.4.55 

1.136 

5.566 

1.404 

406 

1..505 

2,691 

989 

1,217 

1,223 

1,168 


2,773 
1,264 
1,613 
1,,595 
3.070 
12.215 

905 
1.551 
2.240 
3.420 
3.326 
1.370 

833 
1.876 

507 
1.656 

817 

480 

935 
3.368 
1.381 
2.419 
3.487 
4.185 
4.875 
4.8.58 
5.381 
2. 1.30 
1.064 
1.872 
2.167 
3.. 509 

837 
1.885 

473 

2,714 

1.580 

10.132 

80S 

980 
1 . 293 
2.887 
2.063 
3.0.52 
1.325 
1.811 


1.065 


Macon __ -- 


948 


Madison 


1.490 


Martin _ 


749 


McDowell 


1 . 596 


Mecklenburg _ _ _ __ 


5,780 


Mitchell 


1,181 


Montgomery . . _ _ _ _ 


1,691 


Moore 


1,9.54 


Nash .. .... . _ 


1,368 


New Hanover 


1,615 


Northampton ._ . . - 


801 


Onslow 


510 


Orange . _ 


1,162 


Pamlico 


406 


PasQuotank 


537 


Pender 


935 


Perquimans 


205 


Person 


500 


Pitt 


2,804 


Polk 


818 


Randolph _ _ 


3,415 


Richmond 


974 


Robeson - 


2,484 




1,928 


Rowan _ 


3,768 




3,725 


Sampson 


1,978 




636 


Stanly . . .. 


2,757 




1.002 


Surry - _ - 


2.597 




559 


Transylvania _ - 


986 


Tyrrell 


199 


Union 


1.426 




996 


Wake 


5,483 




1,317 


Washington _ ._ 


337 




1.628 


Wayne . _ .- 


2.497 


Wilkes 


1..505 


Wilson 


1.3.53 


Yadkin 


1.4.54 


Yancey 


9,58 






Totals - 


312.976 


166,7.52 


2,57,980 


168,496 







PART V 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 



1. Executive Officials. 

2. Justices of the Supreme Court. 

3. Senators and Representati\^s in Congress. 

4. Members op the General Assembly. 



I 157 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 



EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS 

CLYDE R. 3IOEY 

GOVERNOR 

Clyde Roark Hoey, Democrat, was born in Shelby, N. C, De- 
cember 11, 1877. Son of Capt. S. A. and Mary Charlotte Cath- 
erine Hoey. Attended Shelby High School, but left school and 
began work October 1. 189 0, in a printing office. Purchased a 
newspaper and began editing and publishing same August 1, 
189 4, and continued in that capacity until January 1, 1908. In 
the meantime, studied law and, after reaching twenty-one, was 
licensed to practice in 189 9. continuing to practice along with 
the newspaper work until 1908, since that time entire time has 
been given to the practice of law. Attended University of North 
Carolina Summer Law School, June-September, 1899. Lawyer. 
Member North Carolina Bar Association, the American Bar As- 
sociation and The North , Carolina State Bar. President Cleve- 
land County Bar Association. Representative from Cleveland 
County in the General Assembly of 1899 and 1901; State Senator. 
1903. Chairman Cleveland County Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee, 1903-1909. Served on State Advisory Democratic Com- 
mittee ten years. Assistant U. S. Attorney for Western District 
of North Carolina, July, 1913 to December, 1919. Member Con- 
gress, December, 1919 to March 4, 1921. Elected Governor of 
North Carolina, November 3, 1936. Mason; Junior Order; Red 
Men; Woodmen of the World; Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows. 
Methodist. Married Miss Bessie Gardner, March 22, 1900. Chil- 
dren: Clyde R. Hoey, Jr., Charles A. Hoey, and Isabel Y. Hoey. 



THADDEUS ARMIE EIRE 

SKCRKTARV OF srAlK 

Thad Eure, Democrat, of Hertford County. Was born Novem- 
ber 15th, 189 9 in Gates County, N. C. Son of Tazewell A. and 
Armecia (Langstun) Eure. Attended Gatesville High School, 

I 1 •'">'.) 1 



160 Bl()(JKAI'HI('AI, SkKTCHKS 

1913-1917; University of North Carolina. 1917-1919; University 
Law School, 1921-1922. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar 
Association; North Carolina State Bar, and Hertford County Bar 
Association. Mayor of Winton, 1923-1928. County Attorney for 
Hertford County, 1923-1931. Member of General Assembly, 
1929. Principal Clerk of the House of Representatives, Sessions 
1931-1933-1935 and Extra Session of 1936. Presidential Elector 
First District of North Carolina, 1932. Escheats Agent, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, 1933-1936. Elected Secretary of State 
in the General Election of November 3, 19 3 6, and assumed the 
duties of this Office December 21, 1936 by virtue of Executive 
appointment, ten days prior to the commencement of his Consti- 
tutional Term, on account of a vacancy that then occurred. Pres- 
ident Ahoskie Kiwanis Club, 192 7. Theta Chi Fraternity. Amer- 
ican Legion. Christian Church. Married Miss Minta Banks of 
Winton, N. C, November 15. 1924. Of this union there are two 
children, a daughter and son, Armecia and Thad Eure, Jr. Ad- 
dress: Home, Winton; Office, Raleigh. 



CHARLES M. JOHNSON 

STATE TREASXTRER 

Charles Marion Johnson, Democrat, of Pender County, was born 
April 9, 1S91, in Burgaw, N. C. Son of M. H. and Minnie (Nor- 
ris) Johnson. Attended Burgaw High School, Buie's Creek 
Academy, Bingham Military School. Married Miss Ruth Moore, 
March 8, 19 20. Deputy Clerk Superior Court Pender County, 
four years; District Tax Supervisor, Third N. C. Tax District, 2 
years; Field Auditor, State Auditor's office, one year; Deputy 
State Auditor, three years; Executive Secretary, County Govern- 
ment Advisory Commission, four years; Director Local Govern- 
ment from March 4. 1931. to November 17, 1932, when ap- 
pointed by Governor Gardner State Treasurer of North Carolina. 
Elected November 2, 1934, for unexpired term ending December 
31, 1936. Re-elected for full term November 3, 1936. Address: 
Raleigh, N. C. ^ 



Executive Officials ' 161 

GEOUGE ROSS POU 

STATE AUDITOK 

George Ross Pou, Democrat, was born in Smithfield, Johnston 
County, N. C, December 19, 1894. Son of Edward W. and 
Carolina (Ihrie) Pou. Attended Pishburne Military School; 
University of North Carolina and Wake Forest. Lawyer. Ap- 
pointed Superintendent State Prison, 19 21. Sergeant Co. "E" 
120th Infantry Signal Corps, A. E. P., 1917- 1918. American 
Legion; La Societe Des 40 Hommes et 8 Chevau; Junior Order 
United American Mechanics; B. P. O. E. Episcopalian. Married 
Miss Lillian Long Sanders. November 11, 1916. Address: 
Raleighi N. C. 



CLYDE ATKINSON ERWLX 

.SUPEHIXTEXDENT OF PCBLIC INSTKC ( TIOX 

Clyde Atkinson Erwin, Democrat, was born in Atlanta, Georgia, 
February 8, 1897. Son of Sylvanus and Mamie (Putnam) Er- 
win. Attended grammar schools of Charlotte and Waco and 
graduated from Piedmont High School, Lawndale, N. C, 1914. 
Attended University of North Carolina 1915-1916 and subsequent 
summer schools. Life member National Education Association; 
meml)er Department Superintendence N. E. A.; North Carolina 
Education Association, President 1932-1933; member National 
Committee on Rural Education; Regional Consultant National 
Committee on Emergency in Education. President Rutherfordton 
Kiwanis Club, 1932. Mason; all branches, including Shrine. 
Principal Gault School, Jonesville, S. C, 1916-1917; Waco High 
School, 1917-1919; Cliffside Public Schools. 1 !•! 9 ; Avondale 
Public Schools, 1923. Superintendent Rutherford County 
Schools, 1925-1934. Appointed State Superintendent of rulilic 
Instruction by Governor J. C. B. Ehringhaus, Oct. 24, ]9;!4. suc- 
ceeding the late Dr. A. T. Allen. Elected for a full ti'rm Novem- 
ber 3, 1936. Methodist. Lay leader in Alarion District: Super- 
intendent Cliffside Sunday School: teaclier Ladies Class Ruther- 
ford M. E. Church for the past ten yeais. Awarded I'd.D. lion- 
orary degre^ Catawba College, Salisburv, N. C. in Ma v. lit 3."). 



162 liuxiHAi'iiicAL Sketches 

Member High School Textbook Commission, 1927-1932. Chair- 
man Elementary Textbook Commission, 1933-34. Married Miss 
Evelyn Miller of Waco, N. C. ; two children, Frances Elizabeth 
age fourteen and Clyde A., Jr., age 7. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



AARON ASHLEY FLOWERS SEA WELL 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

A. A. P. Seawell, Democrat, of Lee County, was born near 
Jonesboro, Moore County, October 30, 1S64. Son of A. A. F. 
and Jeanette Ann (Buie) Seawell. Attended Jonesboro High 
School, 1877-1879; University of North Carolina, Ph.B.; Class 
of 1889, University Law School, 1892. Lawyer. Representative 
in the General Assembly of 1901, 1913, and 1915; State Senator, 
1907 and 19 2 5. Mason; Knights Templar; Shriner; Junior Order 
United American Mechanics; High Priest Royal Arch Masons. 
Representative in General Assembly, 1931. Appointed Assistant 
Attorney-General, July 1, 1931. Appointed Attorney-General by 
Governor J. C. B. Ehringhaus, January 16, 1935, to succeed At- 
torney-General Dennis G. Brummitt. Elected for a full term 
November 3, 1936. Presbyterian; Ruling Elder since 1901. 
Married Miss Bertha Alma Smith, April 12, 1905; four sons and 
two daughters. Address: Chapel Hill, N. C. 



WILLIAM KERR SCOTT 

COMMISSIONER OF AGRICILTIRE 

William Kerr Scott, Democrat, was born at Haw River, N. C, 
April 17, 189 6. Son of Robert Walter and Elizabeth (Hughes) 
Scott. Attended Hawfield Graded School, 1902-1908; High 
School, 1909-1913. B.S. in Agriculture, N. C. State College. 
Farmer. Member American Jersey Cattle Club; President State 
Jersey Cattle Club and President State Dairymen's Association. 
Presented cup by American Jersey Cattle Club in 1925 for out- 
standing work in promoting better quality of J(n-sey cows. Field 
Artillery Officers Training Camp, Louisville, Kentucky, 1918. 
Member National and State Grange; Master Noi'th Carolina State 



Executive Officials 1613 

Grange, 1930-19 33. Organizer world's largest Registered Jersey- 
Calf Club while County Agent. Organizer in Southeastern States 
of Farm Debt Adjustment Program in Farm Credit Administra- 
tion. Public Director Guilford Cooperative Dairy. Member North 
Carolina Rural Electrification Authority. Made first public ad- 
dress in North Carolina on need for rural electrification in 19 30 
at Statesville, N. C. Deacon Hawfields Presbyterian Church, 
1920-32; Elder, 1933-1937. Married Miss Mary Elizabeth White, 
July 2, 1919. Home address: Haw River, N. C; Office: Raleigh, 
N. C. 



DANIEL CLINTON BONEY 

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 

Daniel Clinton Boiiey, Democrat, was born in Elkin, N. C, De- 
cember 6, 189 5. Son of H. F. and Susan (McKinnie) Boney. 
Attended grammar and high schools of Elkin and Kinston; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 1922. Lawyer. Appointed Insurance 
Commissioner by Governor McLean, November 15, 1927, to fill 
unexpired term; elected November 6, 19 28; reelected, November 
8, 1932, and November 3, 1936. Served in World War with 113th 
Field Artillery, A. E. F., June, 1917, to December, 1919. Kappa 
Sigma; Gimghouls, University of North Carolina. Presbyterian. 
Married, October 3, 1928, to Miss Charlotte Elizabeth Johnson. 
Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



ARTIIITR L. FLETCIIEi; 

COJUMISSIOMCI.' OF l.AHnR 

Arthur Lloyd Fletcher, Democrat, was boin in Ashe County, 
near Jefferson, July 7, 1881. Son of R(>v. James Floyd and 
Louisa (Barker) Fletcher. Attended Oak Hill Academy and 
Bridle Creek Academy, in Grayson County, Va., 1895-1899; Wake 
Forest College, B.A., 1907; Wake Forest Law Scliool and Uni- 
versity of North Carolina Law Scliool, obtaining law license in 
1907. Chief Income Tax Division, Office Collector Inleiiial Reve- 
nue, Raleigh, 1919 to 1921; Deputy State Insurance Commission- 



104 liio(iitArjiiCAL Sketches 

er, 1921 to 1932. Elected Commissioner of Labor, November, 
1932; re-elected, November, 1936. President International Asso- 
ciation of Governmental Labor Officials. Member of Secretary 
of Labor's National Committees on "Powers and Duties of State 
Labor Departments" and "Industrial Hygiene." Captain 113th 
F. A. 30th Division, A. E. F., 1917-1919. Captain N. C. National 
Guard, 1920-1929; Major Ordnance Corps, N. C. N. G., since 
1929; Major U. S. Officers Reserve Corps. Member of American 
Legion since its organization; Department Historian for ten 
years; Past Commander Raleigh Post No. 1; Past President Ra- 
leigh Lions Club. Mason. Baptist. Author History 113th F. 
A., History N. C. Department of the American Legion. Married 
Miss Mae Pitzer, of Kernersville, November 1, 1905. Actively 
engaged in newspaper work from 1907 to 1916 with Raleigh 
Times, Rockingham Post, Durham Sun, Lexington Dispatch, and 
Raleigh representative of Charlotte Observer, Asheville Citizen 
and Winston-Salem Journal; on the Mexican border with the 
National Guard as correspondent of the News & Observer and 
army field clerk at Brigade Headquarters. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



ALLEN J. MAXWELL 

commissione:r oi' kkvente 

Allen J. Maxwell was born in Duplin County, January 24, 1873. 
Son of Hugh G. and Nancy (Maready) Maxwell. Attended Golds- 
boro public schools. Mayor Whiteville, 1898; Clerk State Senate, 
189 9. Principal Clerk 1901-1910; Clerk N. C. Corporation Com- 
mission, 1910-1917; member Corporation Commission, 1917- 
1929; ex officio. Securities Commissioner, 1925-1929; President 
National Association Securities Commissioners, 1927; Vice-Presi- 
dent National Association Railroad and Utilities Commissioners, 
1929. Appointed Commissioner of Revenue by Governor Gard- 
ner in March, 1929, until January 1, 1933, succeeding Governor 
R. A. Doughton. who had been appointed Highway Commissioner. 
Reappointed by Governor Ehringhaus in 1933. Ex officio chair- 
man State Board of Assessment and member Local Government 
Commission. President National Association Tax Administra- 
tors, 1936. Baptist. Married Miss Delia May Ward, April, 1893. 



Executive Officials 165 

Four children: J. W. Maxwell, Charlotte; R. C. Maxwell, Raleigh; 
Mrs. E. D. Cranford, Asheboro; A. J. Maxwell, Jr., Goldsboro. 
Married: 1934, Mrs. Minnie Bradshaw, Greensboro. Address: 
Raleigh, N. C. 

CAPUS MILLER WAYXICK 

CHAIRMAN- STATE HIGHWAY AND PUBLIC WORKS (O.M.MISSIOX 

Capus Miller Waynick, Democrat, was boin in Rockingham 
County, December 23, 18 89. Son of Joshua J. N. and Anna 
(Moore) Waynick. Attended Rockingham County School, 1898- 
1902; Greensboro public school, 1902-1907; University of North 
Carolina, 1907-1909. Member of North Carolina Press Associa- 
tion. Entered National Army as a volunteer, 1918; served in 
training camp: commissioned Second Lieutenant after Armistice. 
Representative in General Assembly, 1931; member of Senate, 
1933. State director National Reemployment Service, 1933-34. 
Appointed chairman State Highway and Public Works Commis- 
sion, December, 1934. Presbyterian. Married Miss Elizabeth 
McBee, of Lincolnton, June 19, 1915. Address: High I'oint, N. C. 



STANLEY W INBORNE 

STATE UTILITIES COMMISSIONER ^^ 

Stanley Winborne, Democrat, was born at Murfreesboro, N. C. 
August 2.5, 1886. Son of B. B. and Nellie (Vaughan) Winborne. 
Attended public schools; Dr. E. E. Parham's School, Murfrees- 
boro; University of North Carolina, 1907, Ph. 15. degree. Mem- 
ber of North Carolina Bar Association. Mason. Pi Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity; Order of the Gorgon's Head. Kiwanis Club. Mayor 
Murfreesboro, 1909-1910; County Attorney, 1911-1914; Repre- 
sentative from Hertford County, 1915-1919; Senator from First 
District, 19211; Presidential Elector, 1928. Appointed member 
of the Corporation Commission in February, 1930, by Governor 
Gardner; elected for unexpired term in November, 1930; re- 
elected for regular term, 19 32; appointed Utilities Commissioner 
by Governor Ehringhaus, effective Jiinuary 1st, 1934; elected for 
4 year term in Novenil)fr, 1934. Methodist. Married Miss 
Frances Sharp Jernigan, April 17, 1912. Seven children. Ad- 
dress: Raleigh, N. C. 



JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT 



WALTER PARKER STACY 

CHIEF JUSTICE 

Walter Parker Stacy, born Ansonville, N. C, December 2 6, 
IS 84; son of Rev. L. E. and Rosa (Johnson) Stacy; educated 
Weaverville (N. C.) College, 1895-1898; Morven (N. C.) High 
School, 1899-1902; University of North Carolina, A.B., 1908, at- 
tended Law School, same, 1908-1909, LL.D. (Hon.) 1923; mar- 
ried Maude DeGan Graff, of Lake Placid Club, N. Y., June 15, 
1929; practiced law in partnership with Graham Kenan, 1910- 
1916; represented New Hanover County in General Assembly of 
N. C, 1915; Judge Superior Court, 8th Judicial District, 1916- 
1920; elected, 1920, Associate Justice Supreme Court of North 
Carolina for full term; appointed by Governor A. W. McLean, 
March 16, 1925, to succeed Chief Justice Hoke (resigned) and in 
192 6, and again in 19 34, nominated without opposition in pri- 
mary and elected Chief Justice Supreme Court for 8-year terms, 
now serving; member American and North Carolina Bar Asso- 
ciation, General Alumni Association University of North Carolina 
(president, 1925-1926); lecturer summers, 1922-1925 inclusive. 
In Law School University of North Carolina, tendered deanship of 
same, 1923; lecturer Northwestern University School of Law, 
summer sessions, 192 6-192 7; named by U. S. Board of Mediation, 
under Railway Labor Act, as neutral arbitrator to serve on Board 
of Arbitration (six members), and later elected chairman of 
board to settle wage controversy between the Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers and certain railroads in southeastern ter- 
ritory of United States, 1927-1928; appointed by President Cool- 
idge, 1928, member of Emergency Board of five, under Railway 
Labor Act, to investigate and report respecting a dispute between 
officers and members of the Order of Railway Conductors and 
Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen and certain railroads located 
west of the Mississippi River; named by U. S. Board of Mediation, 
January, 19 31, to serve as neutral arbitrator in controversy be- 
tween Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen and New York Central, 

[ 166] 



Justices of the Supreme Court 167 

the "Big Four" and P. and L. E. Railroads, and again in Novem- 
ber, 19 31, to serve as neutral arbitrator in controversy between 
Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship Clerks, etc., and Railway 
Express Agency. Appointed by President Hoover, 19 32, member 
of Emergency Board of three, later elected chairman of Board, 
to investigate and report concerning a number of questions in 
difference between L. and A. and L. A. and T. Railways and cer- 
tain of their employees. Chairman Commission appointed to re- 
draft Constitution of North Carolina, 19 31-1932. Appointed by 
President Roosevelt 19 3 3-19 3 4, member two Emergency Boards 
under Railway Labor Act. Again appointed by President Roose- 
velt, 1934, Chairman National Steel and Textile Labor Relations 
Boards. Methodist. Democrat. Residence: Wilmington, N. C. 
Office: Raleigh, N. C. 



IIERIOT CLARKSOX 

SENIOR ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Heriot Clarkson, Democrat, of Charlotte, N. C, was born at 
Kingville, Richland County, S. C, August 21, 1S63. Son of Major 
William and Margaret S. (Simmons) Clarkson. Educated at the 
Carolina Military Institute of Charlotte, University Law School 
at Chapel Hill. Licensed by the Supreme Court of North Caro- 
lina to practice law, 18S4. Immediately thereafter began the 
practice of law at Charlotte, N. C. Alderman and Vi(;e-Mayor of 
Charlotte, 1887-1888; same posts in 1891-1892. In IS!)!) nunn- 
ber of House of Representatives, known as "White Supremacy 
Legislature." In that Legislature he introduced and passed in 
the House a bill which resulted in the establishment of the Tex- 
tile Department of the State College. City Attorn(>y of Charlotte, 
1901-1904. Twice codified the city ordinances of Charlotte, 1887 
and 1901; legal adviser under administration of Mayor T. L. 
Kirkpatrick. Solicitor of Twelfth Judicial District. 1904-191(1. 
Author of "The Hornet's Nest," appearing in the "Xortli Carolina 
Booklet" of October, 1901. Delivered address to the Society of 
ihe Cincinnati on "The Heroic Incidents of tlie Life of (leneral 
Francis Marion." On December 10, 1889, married Mary Lloyd 
Osborne, of which union there ai'c lOur living children. .Mason; 



168 Bl()(iHAIMII('AL SKETrilES 

life member Lodge No. 31, A. F. and A. M. at Charlotte; Noble 
of the Mystic Shrine (Oasis Temple); Knights of Pythias; Jr. O. 
U. A. M.; member of the Society of Sons of the Revolution; So- 
ciety of the Cincinnati, and the Huguenot Society of South Caro- 
lina. At one time was Lieutenant of the Hornet's Nest Riflemen 
of Charlotte. Director of the Y. M. C. A. of Charlotte, N. C, for 
over half a century, and on the Interstate Committee of the Caro- 
linas. He is now President of the Y. M. C. A.'s of the Carollnas. 
One of the original founders of the Crittenden Home and the 
Mecklenburg Industrial Home for Women. For many years a di- 
rector of the Chamber of Commerce and "Made in the Carolinas" 
Exposition. Chairman Anti-Saloon League when the saloon was 
■>'oied out of Charlotte, July 5, 190 \. Also President Anti-Saloon 
League when the saloon and distillery were voted out of the State 
on May 27, 190S. Governor Robt. B. Glenn presented him with 
the pen with which he signed the Prohibition Proclamation. 
Trustee State Association Y. M. C. A. of North Carolina. Was 
Chairman of the Good Roads Association Committee that drafted 
the tentative good roads act passed by the Legislature of 19 21 
substantially as drawn. He drafted the Mecklenburg Drainage 
Act and was the leader in establishing the Belmont Vocational 
School at Charlotte, the first of its kind in the State. Episcopa- 
lian; built St. Andrew's Chapel, Chai'lotte; vestryman and senior 
warden of St. Peter's Protestant Episcopal Church for many 
years. Appointed Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina 
by Governor Cameron Morrison, May 26, 1923; elected for un- 
expired term of Justice Piatt D. Walker; elected November 2, 
1926, for term of eight years and re-elected in 1934. LL.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1928. Residence: Charlotte, N. C. 
Office: Raleigh, N. C. 



GEORGE WHITFIELD COXXOIJ 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

George W. Connor was born October 2 4, 1872, at Wilson, N. C. 
Son of Henry Groves and Kate Whitfield Connor. A.B., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, 1892; LL.D.. University of North Carolina. 
1928. Member of the House of Representatives from Wilson 



Justices of thk Supreme Court 100 

County, 1909, 1911, 1913; Speaker of House of Representatives, 
1913; Judge Superior Court, 1913-19 24; Associate Justice Su- 
preme Court since 1924. Re-elected for term beginning January 
1, 1937. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



MICHAEL SCHENCK 

AS.SOCIATE JUSTICE 

Michael Schenck, Democrat, was born at Lincolnton, N. C, De- 
cember 11, 1876. Son of David and Sallie Wilfong (Ramseur) 
Schenck. Attended Graded Schools of Greensboro, N. C; Oak 
Ridge Institute; University of North Carolina, 1897; Law School 
of University of North Carolina, 1902-1903. Member of North 
Carolina Bar Association; past vice-president. Mayor of Hen- 
dersonville, 1907-1909. Solicitor of the Eighteenth Judicial Dis*- 
trict, 1913-1918; Major, Judge Advocate, United States Army, 
1918-1919; Judge of the Eighteenth Judicial District, 1924-1934. 
Member of Commission to redraft Constitution of North Caro- 
lina, 1931-1932. Appointed by Governor J. C. B. Ehringhaus. 
May 23, 193 4, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of North 
Carolina to till out the unexpired term of Justice W. J. Adams, 
deceased; elected in November, 1934, for full term of eiglit years. 
Honorary degree of LL.D. conferred by University of North Caro- 
lina, June, 193 6. Member of Masons (A. F. and A. M.) ; American 
Legion. Episcopal Chui'ch. Married Miss Rose Few, 1909; three 
children: Michael Jr., Rosemary Ramseur and Emily Floried. 
Home address: Hendersonville, N. C. Official address: Raleigh, 
N. C. 



WILLIAM Ar(;rsTrs i>kvi.\ 

ASSOCJATK .IIS IK I-; 

William Augustus Devin, Democrat, was born in (Jranville 
County, July 12, 1871. Son of Robert S. and Mary (Transou) 
Devin. Attended Horner Military School, 1SS3-1SS7: Wake For- 
est College; University of North Caioliiia Law School, 1 Sil 2-1 Sli;!. 
Member North Carolina Bar y\ssociat ion. Mayor Oxford. l!Mi:!- 



170 Biographical Sketches 

1909. Representative in the General Assembly, 1911 and 1913. 
Judge Superior Court, 1913-193 5; Appointed Associate Justice 
Supreme Court by Governor Ehringhaus, October, 1935, succeed- 
ing Associate Justice W. J. Brogden; elected for eight year term, 
November 3, 1936. Member N. C. National Guard; captain, 1901- 
1907; member staff of Gov. Craig with rank of Major. Mason. 
Baptist. Teacher Bible Class since 1915; Superintendent Sunday 
School, 1910-1913. Writer of many addresses and pamphlets on 
religious, fraternal and patriotic subjects. Married Miss Vir- 
ginia Bernard, November 29, 1899. Home address: Oxford, N. 
C. Office: Raleigh, N. C. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 



JOSIAir WILLIAM BAILKY 

UNITED STATES SENATOR 

Josiah William Bailey, Democrat, of Raleigh, Wake County, 
was born September 14, 1873, in Warrenton, N. C, son of Rev. 
Christopher Thomas Bailey (Williamsburg, Va.) and Annie Sa- 
rah (Bailey) Bailey (Greensville County, Va.). Educated in the 
public schools of Raleigh, Raleigh Male Academy (Morson and 
Benson), and Wake Forest College, A.B., 189 3; Wake Forest 
Law School; also private study of law under S. F. Mordecai, of 
Trinity College. Editor Biblical Recorder, 1893-1907. Licensed 
to practice law, February, 19 08. Member Wake County Bar 
Association; N. C. Bar Association. United States Collector In- 
ternal Revenue, 1913-1921; Elector-at-large, N. C, 1908; mem- 
ber North Carolina Constitutional Commission, 1913-1914; mem- 
ber Raleigh Township School Committee and Wake County Boai-d 
of Education. Baptist. Married Miss Edith Walk(>r Pou. 191(5; 
five children, two boys and three girls. Elected to the United 
States Senate, November 4, 19 30, for the term beginning March 
4, 1931, by a majority over his Republican opponent of 113,632. 
Re-elected, November 3, 1936, by a majority of 330,000. lie is a 
member of the Senate Committees on Commerce, Postofflces and 
Post Roads, Military Affairs and Chairman of Committee on 
Claims. Home address: Raleigh, N. C. 



ROBERT RICE IfEYXOLDS 

r.MTKI) STATES SIONATOK 

Robert Rice Reynolds, Democrat; home, Ashevillo, X. C; edu- 
cated in the public schools of Ashevillo and at th(! IMiivcrsity of 
North Carolina, at which latter institution ho served as cai)taiii of 
the varsity track team, member of the Viirsity footl);!)! loiini, and 
associate editf)i' of the university's weekly newspaper; served as 
prosecuting attorney of tlio til'tociitli jiuiicinl district of Xortli 

I 171 I 



172 BiO(;HArni("AL Skktchks 

Carolina for a period of 4 years, and at that time was the first 
Democratic prosecuting attorney ever elected in his district; has 
traveled extensively and is the author of two travel books, name- 
ly, Wanderlust, and Gypsy Trails; Presidential elector on the 
Democratic ticket in 1928; president of the Roosevelt Motor 
Clubs of America in 19 3 2. Methodist. Member of the Beta 
Theta Pi fraternity and also an active member of the Loyal Order 
of Moose, Junior Order of the United American Mechanics, Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks. Vice-president of the Amer- 
ican Automobile Association; was nominated for the United 
States Senate on July 2, 1932, receiving the largest majority ever 
given a candidate for major ofQce in a Democratic primary in 
North Carolina; elected on November 8, 19 32, to the United 
States Senate to serve for a short term expiring March 3, 19 3 3, 
and on the same day, November 8, 1932, was elected to the 
United States Senate for the full term expiring in 19 39. 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS 



LINDSAY CARTER WAR REX 

{First District — Counties: Beaufort, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, 
Dare, Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Martin, Pasquotank, Perquimans, 
Pitt, Tyrrell and Washington. Population 224,788.) 

Lindsay Carter Warren, Democrat, was born at Washington, 
N. C, December 16. 1889. Son of Charles F. and Elizabeth Mut- 
ter (Blount) Warren. Attended the Bingham School, Asheville, 
1903-1906; University of North Carolina, 1906-1908; law school. 
University of North Carolina, 1911-1912; admitted to the bar, 
February, 1912; county attorney, Beaufort County, 1912-192 5; 
State Senator, 1917 and 1919; president pro tempore State Sen- 
ate, 1919; member Code Commission, compiling the Consolidated 
Statutes, 1919; Representative from Beaufort County in General 
Assembly, 1923; trustee. University of North Carolina, 1921- 
1925; appointed by Governor Gardner on June 17, 1931, as a 
member of the Constitutional Commission of North Carolina; 
delegate at large to the Democratic National Convention in 19 3 2 
and one of the floor managers for Governor Roosevelt; perma- 
nent chairman Demcratic State Convention in 1930 and in 1934; 
elected to the Sixty-ninth. Seventieth, Seventy-first, Seventy-sec- 
ond, Seventy-third, Seventy-fourth Congresses, and re-elected to 
the Seventy-fifth Congress. Home address: Washington, N. C. 



JOHN HOSEA KERR 

(Second District — Counties: Bertie, Edgecombe, (Jreene, Halifa.x, 
Lenoir, Northampton, Warren, and Wilson. Population 276,7j)4.) 

John Hosea Kerr, Democrat, of Warrenton, was born at Yan- 
ceyville, December 31, 1S73. Son of Capt. John H. Kerr, of the 
Confederate Army, and Eliza Katherine (Yancey) Kerr. Was a 
student in Bingham School, and graduated from Wake Forest 
College, North Carolina, with degree of A.B. in 18 9.^); studied law 
and was admitted to the bar in 1895, when he moved to Warreu- 
lon and entered upon the practice of his i)ror('ssi()n. :\Iarried 
Miss Ella Foote, of Warrenton, and tlu>y have two sons —John 

L it:5 J 



174 BiooKAi'iiicAL Sketches 

Hosea and James Yancey. Elected Solicitor of the Third Dis- 
trict and served eleven years. While Solicitor was elected Judge 
of the Superior Court and served seven years. While serving on 
the bench w^as nominated for Congress to succeed Hon. Claude 
Kitchin, deceased, and was elected at a special election held No- 
vember 6, 192 3, only one vote being cast against him. Elected to 
the Sixty-ninth, Seventieth, Seventy-first, Seventy-second, Seven- 
ty-third and Seventy-fourth Congresses. Re-elected to the Sev- 
enty-fifth Congress, Nov. 3, 1936, receiving 37,771 votes, his Re- 
publican opponent receiving 1,910 votes. Member the following 
Committees: Committee on Elections, No. 3, chairman; Census; 
Immigration and Naturalization; Public Buildings and Grounds — 
ranking Democrat on the last two. Home address: Warrenton, 
N. C. 



GR.IHAM ARTHUR BARDEX 

(Third District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Duplm. Jones, Ons- 
low, Pamlico, Pender, Sampson, and Wayne. Population 226,465.) 

Graham Arthur Barden, Democrat, was born in Sampson Coun- 
ty, N. C, September 25, 1896. Son of James Jefferson and Mary 
Robinson (James) Barden. Attended Burgaw High School; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, LL.B. degree. Attorney at law. Mem- 
ber of Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; Sigma Chi Fraternity. 
Member of Sudan Shrine; Doric Masonic Lodge; Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks; American Legion; Junior Order United 
American Mechanics; Master of Doric Lodge, 1928; Exalted Ruler 
of the Elks Lodge; Commander of the American Legion; Counsel- 
lor of the Junior Order. Served in the United States Navy during 
the World War. Judge of Craven County Court. Representative 
from Craven County to General Assembly, 19 3 3. Elected to the 
Seventy-fourth Congress. Novembei- 6, 19 34. Re-elected to the 
Seventy-fifth Congress, November, 1936. Presbyterian; Deacon 
of First Presbyterian Church, New Bern. Married Miss Agnes 
Foy; two children: Graham A. Jr.. and Agnes F. Barden. Ad- 
dress: New Bern. N. C. 



Repkesentatives in Congress 17.") 

HAROLD DUNBAR C00LI<:Y 

(Fourth District — Counties: Chatham, Franklin, Johnston, Nash, 
Randolph, Vance, and Wake. Population, 322,346.) 

Harold Dunbar Cooley, Democrat, was born at Nashville, N. C. 
Son of Roger A. P. and Hattie Gertrude (Davis) Cooley. At- 
tended public schools of Nash County; University of North Caro- 
lina; Yale University. Attorney at law. Member of Nash Coun- 
ty Bar Association; Rocky Mount Bar Association; American Bar 
Association; Ex-President of Nash County and Rocky Mount Bar 
Associations. Member of Junior Order United American Me- 
chanics; Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; Phi Delta Theta, Na- 
tional Social Fraternity. In 1918, though under 21 years of age, 
entered the service of United States as a volunteer and was as- 
signed to duty in the Naval Aviation Flying Corps and stationed 
at camp in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In 19 3 2 selected as the 
Presidential Elector from the Fourth Congressional District and 
listed at the State Democratic Headquarters as one of the party's 
chief speakers. Elected, July 7, 1934, from Fourth N. C. District 
to fill the unexpired term of Congressman E. W. Pou, deceased. 
Elected, November 6, 1934, to Seventy-fourth Congress. Re- 
elected to the Seventy-fifth Congress, November 3, 19 36. Baptist; 
deacon. Married Miss Madeline Strickland. Address: Nashville, 
N. C. 



FRANKLIN WILLS HANCOCK. Jr. 

{Fifth District — Counties: Caswell, Forsyth, (iraiiville. Person, 
Rockingham, Stokes, Surry. Population, 293,779.) 

Franklin Wills Hancock, Jr., only son of Franklin Wills Han- 
cock and Lizzie Hobgood Hancock, was born in Oxford, Granville 
County, North Carolina, on November 1, 1894. He graduated 
from the Oxford Graded Schools at the age of 13; attend(Ml Hor- 
ner Military Academy for one year, and completed his education 
at the University of Noi'lh Carolina. In 191.^)-19 1(; he servi'd as 
secretary to his uncle. Colonel F'rank Hobgood, of Greensboro. 
Special Assistant to the Attorney-General of the United States. 
In August, 1916, he received his license to practice law. and has 



176 Bi()(iKArHi('AL Sketches 

continued the practice of his profession in Oxford since that time. 
In 1924 he was elected Chairman of the Democratic Executive 
Committee of Granville County, and in the same year was also 
elected Presidential Elector of the Fifth District of North Caro- 
lina. He was elected without opposition to the State Senate in 
1926 to represent the Twenty-first District, composed of Granville 
and Person counties, and in 1928 was elected without opposition 
to represent Granville County in the State House of Representa- 
tives. He was recognized as a leader in both sessions, and was 
co-author of the school bill which bears has name. He is recog- 
nized as one of the leading business men in his section of the 
State. He is a trustee of the Colored Orphanage of North Caro- 
lina. He is a Mason, Shriner, a member of the North Carolina 
Bar Association, of Kappa Alpha Fraternity; is an ex-service 
man, and is a member of the Oxford Rotary Club and of the Bap- 
tist Church. In 1917 he was married to Lucy Osborn Landis, 
oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hamlin Landis, of Ox- 
ford. He is the father of seven children. On November 4, 1930, 
he was elected to the Seventy-first Congress to fill the unexpired 
term of Major Charles Manly Stedman, and at the same time was 
elected to the Seventy-second Congress. Re-elected to the Seven- 
ty-third, Seventy-fourth and Seventy-fifth Congresses. Home ad- 
dress: Oxford, N. C. 



WILLIAM BRADLEY UMSTEAD 

(Sixth Dist)-ict — Counties: Alamance, Durham, Guilford and 
Orange. Population: 263,517.) 

William Bradley Umstead, Democrat, Durham, N. C. Born in 
Durham County, May 13, 1895; son of John W. and Lulie ( Luns- 
ford ) Umstead. Received A.B. degree University of North Caro- 
lina, 1916; Law School Trinity College, 1919-20. Served with 
American Expeditionary Forces; prosecuting attorney Durham 
County Recorders' Court. 1922-1926; Solicitor Tenth .Judicial 
District, 19 2 7-19 33. Married Miss Merle Davis, of Rutherford 
County, N. C, 19 29; elected to Seventy-third, Seventy-fourth and 
Seventv-fifth Congresses. Home address: Durham, N. C. 



Representatives in Congress 177 

JEROMi: BAYARD CLARK 

{Seventh District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, Cum- 
berland, Harnett, New Hanover, and Robeson. Population, 268,- 
579.) 

Jerome Bayard Clark, Democrat, of Fayetteville, was born 
April 5, 18 82, in Elizabethtown. Son of John Washington and 
Catherine Amelia (Blue) Clark. Educated at Clarkton High 
School, 1900-1902; Davidson College; University of North Caro- 
lina Law School, 1906. Lawyer. Representative in General As- 
sembly from Bladen County, 1915. Presidential Elector Sixth 
District, 1916. Member of State Judicial Conference, 1924-19 2 8. 
Mason; Knights of Pythias, Presbyterian. Married Miss Helen 
Purdie Robinson, June 2, 190 8; four children. Elected to Seven- 
ty-first, Seventy-second, Seventy-third and Seventy-fourth Con- 
gresses. Re-elected to the Seventy-fifth Congress, November 3. 
1936. Home address: Fayetteville, N. C. 



JOHN WALTER LAMBETH. Ju. 

{Eighth District — Counties: Anson, Davidson, Davie. Hoke. Lee, 
Montgomery, Moore, Richmond, Scotland, Union, Wilkes, and 
Yadkin. Population 316,614.) 

John Walter Lambeth, Jr., Democrat, was born in Thomasville, 
January 10, 189 6. Son of John W. and Daisy (Sumner) Lam- 
beth. A.B. Trinity College, 1916; post-graduate work. Harvard 
School of Business Administration, 1916-1917. During the 
World War served with the American Expeditionary Forces. 
State Senator, 1921. Mayor of Thomasville, 1925-1929. Elected 
to the Seventy-second and succeeding Congresses. Home address: 
Thomasville, N. C. 



ROBERT LEE DOUGIITON 

{Ninth District — Counties: Alexander, Alleghany, .\she, Cabarrus. 
Caldwell, Iredell, Rowan, Stanly and Watauga. Population: 
262,213.) 

Robert L. Doughton, Democrat, Laurel Springs, was born at 
Laurel Springs, November 7, 18 63. Educated in the public 



^'''8 BlOGBAl'IIlCAL SkKTCHES 

schools and at Laurel Springs and Sparta High Schools. Farmer 
and stock raiser. Appointed a member of the Board of Agricul- 
ture in 19 03. Elected to the State Senate from the Thirty-fifth 
District in 1908. Served as director of the State Prison from 
1909-1911. Elected to the Sixty-second, Sixty-third, Sixty-fourth, 
Sixty-fifth, Sixty-sixth, Sixty-seventh, Sixty-eighth, Sixty-ninth, 
Seventieth, Seventy-first, Seventy-second, Seventy-third and Sev- 
enty-fourth Congresses. Re-elected to Seventy-fifth Congress, No- 
vember, 193 6. Home address: Laurel Springs, N. C. 



ALFRED LEE BLTLWIXKLE 

(TentJi District— Counties: Mecklenburg, Gaston, Cleveland, Lin- 
coln, Catawba, Burke, Madison, Mitchell, Yancey, and Avery. 
Population: 414,808.) 

A. L. Bulwinkle, Democrat, Gastonia, Gaston County, N. C, 
born April 21, 1SS3. Attended school at Dallas, N. C. Studied 
law at University of North Carolina under private instructor. 
Lawyer. Prosecuting Attorney Municipal Court of City of Gas- 
tonia, 1913-1916. Nominated as Senator for the General Assem- 
bly by the Democratic party, 1916; withdrew on account of mili- 
tary services on the Mexican border. Captain First Infantry, N. 
C. N. G., 1909-1917. Major, commanding Second Battalion, 113th 
Field Artillery, 55th F. A. Brigade, 30th Division, 1917-1919. 
Married Miss Bessie Lewis, Dallas, N. C, 1911; children, Frances 
McKean and Alfred Lewis. Served on various committees of the 
Democratic Party. Member of Gaston Post No. 2 3 of the Amer- 
ican Legion; Stonewall Jackson Post No. 1160, Veterans of For- 
eign War; Mason; Elk; North Carolina Bar Association. Luth- 
eran. Elected to Sixty-seventh to Seventieth Congresses, inclu- 
sive, and from Seventy-second to Seventy-fifth Congresses, in- 
clusive. Member of Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee 
of the House of Representatives. Home address: Gastonia, N. C. 



State Senators 1 79 

ZEBULOX WEAVER 

{Eleventh Disti-ict — Counties: Cherokee, Buncombe, Clay, Graham, 
Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, McDowell, Macon, Polk, Ruther- 
ford, Swain, Transylvania. Population: 300,392.) 

Zebulon Weaver, Democrat, of Buncombe County, was born in 
Weaverville, N. C, May 1, 1872. He is the son of W. E. and 
Hannah E. (Baird) Weaver. A.B. of Weaverville College, 1889. 
Studied law at the University of North Carolina, 1894. Lawyer. 
Represented Buncombe County in the General Assembly of North 
Carolina in 1907 and 1909. State Senator, 1913 and 1915. 
Elected to the Sixty-fifth, Sixty-sixth, Sixty-seventh, Sixty-eighth, 
Sixty-ninth, Seventieth, Seventy-second, Seventy third. Seventy- 
fourth and Seventy-fifth Congresses. Methodist. Married Miss 
Anna Hyman of New Bern, N. C. Has five children. Home ad- 
dress: Asheville, N. C. 



MEMBERS OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
SENATORS 



WILKINS PERRYMAX HORTOX 

PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE 

Wilkins Perrymau Horton, Democrat, Lieutenant-Governor, was 
born in Kansas City, Kansas, September 1, 1889. Son of Thomas 
B. and Mary E. (Wilkins) Horton. Was educatinl in the public 
schools of Chatham County; Draughan's Business College, 1910- 
1911; University of North Carolina 1912-1914. Lawyer. County At- 
torney, Chatham County, from 1916-1919 and from 1924-19;!0. Chair- 
man of Democratic Executive Committee of Chatham County. State 
November 3, 1936. Secretary. State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee, 1930. Mason. Methodist. Married Miss Cassandra C. Mou- 
denhall, June 12, 1918. Address: Pittsboro, N. C. 



180 BiociRArHiCAL Sketches 

LLOYD M. ABERXETIIY 

(Twenty-eighth District — Counties: Alexander, Burke and Cald- 
well. One Senator.) 

Lloyd M. Abernethy, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
eighth Senatorial District, was born in Catawba County, N. C. 
Son of Dolph and Minnie (Mundy) Abernethy. Attended Denver 
High School, 1919-1929; Balls Creek High School, 1920-1922; Ca- 
tawba College, 1922-1924; Wake Forest Law School, 1924-1926. At- 
torney. Member Rotary Club, Granite Falls, N. C; North Carolina 
Bar Association. Attorney, Town of Granite Falls, from May 1, 
1932 to present date; County Attorney, Caldwell County, from De- 
cember 1, 1934 to present date. Baptist. Married Miss Helen Ed- 
wards, May 15, 1926, four children. Address: Granite Falls, N. C. 



CLAREXCE EDWAKD ALCOCK 

(Tioenty-seventh District — Counties: Cleveland, Henderson, Mc- 
Dowell, Polk and Rutherford. Two Senators.) 

Clarence Edward Alcock, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
seventh Senatorial District, was born at Glasgow, Kentucky, May 
7, 1875. Sou of John Lawson and Emma ( Duvall ) Alcock. At- 
tended graded schools at Glasgow, finished at Glasgow Normal 
School. Publisher. Member Rutherford County Club, Forest City 
Kiwanis Club. Former News Editor Spencer Courier, Taylorsville, 
Ky., from 1894 to 1901; instructor of printing. Masonic Home, 
Louisville, Ky., 1915-1918. Purchased Forest City Courier January 
1, 1922. Mason. Shriner. Former member Woodmen of the World 
and Junior Order United American Mechanics. Baptist. Married 
Miss Dot Camnitz, June 26, 1920. Address: Forest City, N. C. 



FRANCIS PICKENS BACON 

(Tioenty-seventh District — Counties: Cleveland, Henderson, Mc- 
Dowell, Polk and Rutherford. Two Senators.) 

Francis Pickens Bacon, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-sev- 
enth Senatorial District, was born in Edgeiield, S. C. Son of John 
E. and Rebecca Calhoun (Pickens) Bacon. Educated in Columbia, 



State Senators 181 

S. C, High School, 1888; University of Montevideo, Uruquay. South 
America, (1885 to 1887). Manufacturer. President of Rotary Club. 
Several times Mayor of Tryon. State Senator 1925. Episcopalian, 
Senior Warden and Vestryman. Married. Address: Tryon, N. C. 



LYNTON YATES BALLEXTINE 

(Thirteenth District — Counties: Chatham, Lee and Wake. Two 
Senators.) 

Lynton Yates Ballentine, Democrat, Senator from the Thirteenth 
Senatorial District, was born at Varina, Wake County, N. C, April 
6, 1899. Son of James Erastus and Lillian (Yates) Ballentine. At- 
tended Oakwood and Cardenas Elementary Schools and Holly 
Springs High School, 1913-1917; B. A., Wake Forest College, 1921, 
specializing in political economy. Dairyman and farmer. Member 
Wake County Board of Commissioners, 1926-1934. Baptist. Ad- 
dress: Varina, N. C. 

EDGAR irOPE BAIX 

(Eighth District — Counties: Johnston and Wayne. Two Sena- 
tors.) 

Edgar Hope Bain, Democrat, Senator from the Eighth Senatorial 
District, was born in Goldsboro, N. C, January 20, 1884. Son of 
Theodore Howard and Susan Elizabeth (Jarvis) Bain. Attended 
Goldsboro High School and North Carolina Military Academy; Uni- 
versity of Delaware, one year. General agent. Life Insurance Com- 
pany. Member Wake County Fire Insurance Agents Exchange; 
Goldsboro Kiwanis Club; Arnold Basswood Club, Northw(>storn Na- 
tional Life Insurance Company. President Kiwanis Club; Presi- 
dent Life Insurance Underwriters' Association. Mayor of Golds- 
boro, 1919-1925. Member National Guard, 1899-1919; Reserve since 
1919. Captain of National Guard; Reserve Colonel of 321st Infan- 
try. Junior Order United American Mechanical Knights of Pythias; 
Brotherhood Relief Club; Mason; Shriner by the New York route; 
Red Men; Woodmen of the World; Odd Fellows; Maccabee; De- 
gree of Pocahontas; Eastern Star; American Legion; Legion of 
Valor. Baptist; Deacon; Director Training Union. Married Miss 
Louise Hobbs, July 25, 1912. Address: Goldsboro, N. C. 



182 BlOGKAPHICAL SKETCHES 

JAMES ARDREY BELL 

(Tweyitieth District — Counties: Cabarrus and Mecklenburg. Two 
Senators.) 

James Ardrey Bell, Democrat, Senator from the Twentieth Sen- 
atorial District, was born in Mecklenburg County, September, 1866. 
Son of Robert C. and Mary Jane (Ardrey) Bell. Educated at Caro- 
lina Academy; A.B. Trinity College, 1886; B.L. University of Vir- 
ginia, 1889. Lawyer. Member American Bar Association, N. C. Bar 
Association and Mecklenburg County Bar Association. Member 
State Democratic Executive Committee, 1908-1930; District delegate 
to National Democratic Convention 1908; Delegate to National Dem- 
ocratic Convention 1928. Member Draft Board for Charlotte and 
later for the Western District of North Carolina; State Senator 1935. 
Methodist. Married Miss Jessie S. Spencer, January 24, 1900. Ad- 
dress: Charlotte, N. C. 



KELLY EDMOND BENNETT 

( TMrty-tliird District — Counties: Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Ma- 
con and Swain. One Senator.) 

Kelly Edmond Bennett, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty-third 
District, was born at Bryson City, February 8. 1890. Son of Dr. 
Aurelius McDonald and Mary Charlotte (Hyatt) Bennett. Attended 
public school of Asheville, 1904-1905; Bryson City High School. 
1905-1909; Graduate School of Pharmacy, University of North Caro- 
lina, 1910-1912. Druggist. Real estate and insurance agent. :\Iem- 
ber American Pharmaceutical Association; North Carolina Phar- 
maceutical Association; Bryson City Lions Club; North Carolina 
Board of Pharmacy, 1920-1925; active member National Association 
of Boards of Pharmacy, 1920-1925; Secretary Horace Kephart Me- 
morial Association; Vice-President Swain, Jackson and Haywood 
Counties Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina; 
Board of Aldermen Bryson City; Mayor Bryson City; Chairman 
Democratic Executive Committee Swain County; Chairman North 
Carolina Membership Committee of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association; Chairman of Legislative Committee of the North Caro- 
lina Pharmaceutical Association; member State Senate from Thirty- 
second District, 1917 and 1931. Active in establishment of Great Smoky 



State Senators 183 

Mountain National Park. Introduced Higliway Bill 1917. Mason 
(32d) K. C. C. H.; Sliriner; A. F. & A. M.; deacon Presbyterian 
Church; member Home Mission Committee of Asheville Presbytery; 
Director Maxwell Training School, Franklin, N. C; Superintend- 
ent Presbyterian Sunday School. Married Miss Ola Tela Zachery, 
December 30, 1913; three children. 



BARREE BASCOM BLACKWELDER 

(Tioenty-fifth District — Counties: Catawba, Iredell and Lincoln. 
Two Senators.) 

Barrie Bascom Blackwelder, Democrat. Senator from the Twen- 
ty-fifth Senatorial District, was born at Catawba, N. C, July 4, 1884. 
Son of John Wilson and Mollie (Long) Blackwelder. Attended Ca- 
tawba College Preparatory School, Newton, N. C, 1899-1900; Lenoir- 
Rhyne College, then Lenoir College, A.B. 1905; University of North 
Carolina, A.B. 1906; University of North Carolina Law School, 1906 
and part term in 1909; Summer School 1911. Cotton Textile manu- 
facturer. Member Cotton Textile Institute; Director and member 
Executive Committee of Solid Braided Cord Manufacturers' Asso- 
ciation; member United States Chamber of Commerce; Rotarian; 
President Rotary Club, 1928-1929; Director Hickory Chamber of 
Commerce, 1920-1934; Vice-President First Building and Loan As- 
sociation since 1932; President of A. A. Shuford Mill Company; 
Pre.^ident Granite Falls Manufacturing Company, Granite Falls, 
N. C; President Granite Cordage Company, Granite Falls, N. C, 
since January, 1933; Municipal Judge City of Hickory, 19L'M914; 
Chairman County Board of Education, 1927-1931; Mayor City of 
Hickory, 1931-32; Director and member executive Committee of 
North Carolina School for the Deaf, Morganton, N. C, 1929-1936; 
Army Service Corps, August, 1918; served to December 24, 1918. 
Camp Upton, New York; member of Masonic Lodge, including Ca- 
tawba Chapter of Royal Arch Masons and Hickory Commandery, 
Knights Templar; Knights of Pythias; Junior Order United Amer- 
ican Mechanics; Royal Arcanum; member American Legion: mem- 
ber Corinth Reform Church; Superintendent Sunday School 1924- 
1926; Deacon since 1925. Married Miss Esther Shuford OcLolJcr 12, 
1910. Address: Hickory, N. C. 



IS-i Biographical Sketchks 

WILLIAM SAMUEL BR ITT 

(Eleventh Distrivt — County: Robeson. One Senator.) 

William Samuel Britt, Democrat, Senator from the Eleventh 
District, was born in Robeson County, N. C, April 6, 1882. Son of 
Samuel Elzie and Martha Victoria (Nance) Britt. Attended pub- 
lic schools Robeson County, 1898-1901; Robe.sou Institute and Bar- 
kers Academy, 1902-1905; Buie's Creek Academy; L.L.B. Wake For- 
est, 1908. Lawyer, Planter; member Board of Finance of Lumber- 
ton, 1912-1913; School Trustees, 1914; Chairman Robeson County 
Board of Elections; Chairman Democratic Executive Committee. 
Robeson County; State Democratic Executive Committee up to 1936. 
Baptist. Married Miss Ada Jocaska Cloyburn of Kershaw, S. C. 
October 20, 1915. Address: Lumberton, N. C. 



BURR COLEY BROCK 

(Ticenty-fourtli District — Counties: Davie, Wilkes and Yadkin. 
One Senator.) 

Burr Coley Brock, Republican, Senator from the Twenty-fourth 
Senatorial District, was born in Farmington, November 26, 1891. 
Son of Moses B. and Vert (Coley) Brock. Attended schools of 
Cooleemee, Woodleaf, Farmington and Clemmons High School, grad- 
uating in 1913. University Law School 1913-14, 1914-15; A.B. De- 
partment 1915-16. Lawyer. Mason; Junior Order United American 
Mechanics; Odd Fellows; President Mocksville Lodge of P. 0. S. 
of A., also county and district president. Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. Teacher of Young Men's Class for eight years. 
Mocksville M. E. Church, South. Now teacher of Men's Wesley 
Bible Class; Chairman of the Circuit Board of Stewards, and lay- 
leader of the Farmington M. E. Circuit. Representative from Davie 
in General Assembly 1917, 1933 and 1935. Minority leader in Gen- 
eral Assembly 1933. Chairman Joint House and Senate Caucus 
Committee 1935. Married to Miss Laura Tabor December 23. 1919. 
Margaret, daughter, appointed honorary page of the Legislature in 
1933. Son, James Moses appointed honorary page of the Legislature 
in 1935. Business address: Mocksville, N. C; home address. Farm- 
ington, N. C. 



State Senators 185 

JAMES HECTOR CLARK 

(Tenth District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus and 
Cumberland. Two Senators.) 

James Hector Clark, Democrat, Senator from the Tenth Senatorial 
District, was born in Elizabethtown, N. C. Son of John Washing- 
ton and Catharine Amelia (Blue) Clark. Graduated from Clark- 
ton High School in 1903; Davidson College one year, term of 1903- 
1904. Banker, Merchant, Farmer. Member State Highway Commis- 
sion, 1931-1932; State Advisory Budget Commission, 1932-1936; ex- 
officio member State Division of Purchase and Contract; Chairman 
Bladen County Board of Education, 1929-1932. Pi Kappa Alpha Col- 
lege Fraternity; Knights of Pythias; Mason. Presbyterian; Elder, 
Superintendent Sunday School, eighteen years; President Men-of- 
Church Club; Wilmington Presbyterian Home Mission Board. 
Married Miss Angelyn Fetzer of Wadesboro. N. C, November 26, 
1919. Address: Elizabethtown. 



WILLIAM GRIMES CL.VRK 

(Fourth District — Counties: Edgecombe and Halifax. Two Sen- 
ators.) 

William G. Clark, Democrat, Senator from the Fourth Senatorial 
District, was born in Tarboro, April 28, 1877. Son of William S. 
and Lossie (Grist) Clark. Attended Horner's School, 1891-1893; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1893-1897. Member D. K. E. Fraternity. 
Fertilizer supply merchant and farmer. President Tarboro Ginning 
Co., Cotton Belt Land Co.; Vice-President Edgecombe Homestead 
Building and Loan; Director Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Co., 
Greensboro; member Board of Trustees Edgecombe General Hos- 
pital; Chairman of the Executive Committee, Board of Directors of 
State Hospital, Raleigh; member Board of Town Commissioners, 
Tarboro, 1901-1907; Chairman Board of County Commissioners, 1914- 
1920. Delegate to National Democratic Convention, Halt iinore, 1912. 
and Chicago, 1932. Member Board University Trustees. State Sen- 
ator, 1927, 1929, 1931, 1933 and 1935. President pro ton of Senate. 
1933. Episcopalian. Married Miss Ruth Duval Ilardisty, April 17, 
1901. Address: Tarboro, N. C. 



i86 Biographical Sketches 

KOBERT LEE COBURN 

(Second District— Counties: Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin, Pam- 
lico, Tyrell and Wasliiugton. Two Senators.) 

Robert Lee Coburn, Democrat, Senator from tlie Second Sena- 
torial District, was born at Dardens, N. C, June 5, 1895. Son of 
William Thompson and Anna Beatrice (McCaskey) Coburn. At- 
tended Dardens Graded School, 1902-1916, and the University of 
North Carolina, 1920-1922. Lawyer. Mayor of Williamston, 1925- 
1933; Chairman School Board since 1932. Served in World War, 
April. 1918, to April, 1919, 105th Engineers of the 30th Division in 
the A. E. F. State Senator, 1935. Married Miss Martha Harrison, 
February 19, 1931. One son, Robert L., Jr. Address: Williamston, 
N. C. 



JOSEPH COLIN EAGLES 

(Sixth District — Counties: Franklin. Nash and Wilson. Two Sen- 
ators.) 

Joseph Colin Eagles, Democrat, Senator from the Sixth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Edgecombe County, September 16, 1871. 
Son of Benjamin Franklin and Sydney Elizabeth (Bradley) Eagles. 
Educated in the county schools, Davis Military Academy and Wake 
Forest College. Tobacconist, Merchant and Farmer. Charter mem- 
ber and former President of N. C. Tobacco Warehouse Association; 
Director WMlson Chamber of Commerce. Episcopalian. Vestryman 
for the past ten years; Junior Warden since June, 1935. Married 
Miss Suzie Whitehead Moye, December 15, 1909. Address: Wilson, 
N. C. 



WALL CHRISTLIN EWING 

(Tenth District— Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus and 
Cumberland. Two Senators.) 

Wall Christian Ewing, Democrat, Senator from the Tenth Sena- 
torial District, was born at Mount Gilead, N. C, April 3, 1891. Son 
of Dr. Joseph Preston and Sallie Hearne (Christian) Ewing. At- 
tended Donaldson Military School. Fayetteville, N. C, 1907; The 
Citadel (South Carolina Military Academy) 1910. Farmer, Manu- 



L? "* 



State Senators IS? 

facturer of fertilizers. Member Cumberland County Democratic 
Executive Committee, 1916-1922; Chairman Cumberland County 
Democratic Executive ' Committee since 1935; Chairman Cumber- 
land County Board of Elections, 1922-1928; member State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee since 1924; member State Board of 
Conservation and Development. Mason, Elk. Presbyterian. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly 1929, 1931 and 1933. Married 
Miss Douglas Southerland, May 14, 1920. Address: Fayetteville, 
N. C. 



EDWARD GASKILL, FLANAGAN 

(Fifth District — County: Pitt. One Senator.) 

Edward Gaskill Flanagan, Democrat. Senator from the Fifth Sen- 
atorial District, was born in Greenville, N. C, December 3, 1875. 
Son of John and Mary Wise Gaskill Flanagan. Attended Green- 
ville High School. President of Greenville Banking and Trust Com- 
pany since 1908; President of Carolina Kelvinator Company of 
Greensville, N. C; President Carolina Sales Corporation; Presi- 
dent of the Armistead Motor Company of Rocky Mount, N. C; 
President of the Pitt Development Co., Inc.; President of the Land 
Investment Co., Inc.. of Greenville, N. C; Chairman of the Board 
of Northside Lumber Co., Inc., of Greenville, N. C; Director Wacho- 
via Bank and Trust Co., Occidental Life Insurance Co., Goldsboro 
Motor Company; member of the Advisory Board of the Reconstruc- 
tion Finance Corporation, Charlotte, N. C; member of the Board 
East Carolina Teachers' College and Chairman of the Building Com- 
mittee since 1927; Vice-Chairman of the Board of Trustees Green- 
ville Graded School; Chairman Finance Committee since 1912; own- 
er John Flanagan Buggy Company, business established 1S6G. Dele- 
gate from First District to the Democratic National Convention at 
Houston, Texas, 1928, and Chicago, 1932. Knights of Pythias, Odd 
Fellows, Red Men. Representative in the General Assembly from 
Pitt County 1927-29-31-33. Baptist. Married Miss Rosa M. Hooker, 
October 18, 1899. Address: Greenville, N. C. 



188 BlOGKAPHICAL SKETCHES 

ARCHIBALD CREE GAY 

(Third District — Counties: Bertie and Northampton. One Sena- 
tor.) 

Archibald Cree day, Democrat, Senator from the Third Senatorial 
District, was born in Jackson, Northampton County, August 20, 
1894. Son of Benjamin S. and Annie (Odom) Gay. Finished Jack- 
son High School, 1911, and Warrenton High School, 1912; attended 
University of North Carolina two years and Wake Forest College 
one year; Wake Forest Law School, 1917-1918. Lawyer. Senior 
member firm of Gay & Midyette, Jackson, N. C. Mayor of Jackson 
four years; County Attorney Northampton County twelve years; 
Chairman County Democratic Executive Committee for the past 
four years. Member Jackson High School Board ten years. Cor- 
poral U. S. Army fourteen months; overseas twelve months; served 
in 81st Division, Company A, 306th Ammunition Train. Mason; 
Shriner; Junior Order United American Mechanics; Woodmen of 
the World; American Legion, Commander local post; Judge Ad- 
vocate of the N. C. State Department of the American Legion. Bap- 
tist. Sunday School Superintendent twelve years and Deacon for 
the past fourteen years. Married Miss Ruth Gee from South Hill, 
Va., June 7, 1922. Two children, Ruth Gee, age 10, and Archibald 
Cree, Jr., age six months. Address: Jackson, N. C. 



THOMAS JACKSON GOLD 

(Seventeenth District — Counties: Guilford and Rockingham. Two 
Senators.) 

Thomas Jackson Gold Democrat, Senator from the Seventeenth 
Senatorial District. Graduate University North Carolina, 1903; 
University Law School, 1904; member law firm of Gold, McAnally 
& Gold of High Point. Representative in the General Assembly, 
1913, 1919 and 1927. Home: Sedgefield. Address: High Point, N. C. 



State Senators 1S9 

LLOYD LEE GRAVELY 

(Sixth District — Counties: Franklin, Nash and Wilson. Two 
Senators.) 

Lloyd L. Gravely, Democrat, Senator from the Sixth Senatorial 
District, was born in Danville, Virginia, December 5, 1889. Son of 
J. 0. W. and Lula (Keen) Gravely. Attended University School, 
Rocky Mount, 1895-1903; Randolph-Macon Academy, 1903-1905; A.B., 
Randolph-Macon College, 1910; attended Law School, University of 
Virginia, 1912, and Law School of University of North Carolina, 
1913. Tobacconist. Member Kiwanis Club. Director, Secretary- 
Treasurer, China-American Tobacco Co. Alderman city of Rocky 
Mount, 1920-21; Mayor, 1925-1928. Phi Delta Theta; Phi Delta Phi 
(legal) fraternities; Junior Order of United American Mechanics; 
Red Men; Mason; Shriner; Knights of Pythias; Sons of American 
Revolution. Methodist; steward; teacher Men's Bible Class. State 
Senator, 1929, 1931 and 1935. Married Miss Mary Clark Hoofnagle, 
August 2, 1916. Address: Rocky Mount, N. C. 



ROBY THOMAS GREER 

(Ticenty-ninth District — Counties: Alleghany, Ashe and Watauga. 
One Senator.) 

Roby Thomas Greer, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-ninth 
Senatorial District, was born in Boone, N. C, February 16, 1887. 
Son of Thomas F. and Mary Elizabeth (Carlton) Greer. Attended 
Appalachian Training School, Boone, N. C, 1903-1906; University 
of North Carolina, 1907. Farmer. Chairman Board County Com- 
missioners, Watauga County. 1924-1930; member Board of Educa- 
tion, Watauga County, 1934-1936. Representative in (he General 
Assembly of 1931 and 1933. Address: Boone, N. C. 



EDWIN CLARKE GREGORY 

(Ticenty- first District — County: Rowan. One Senator.) 
Edwin Clarke Gregory, Democrat. Senator from the Twenty-first 
Senatorial District, was born in the Town of Halifax, .laiiuary 12, 
1875. Son of John Tillery and Ella (Clarke) Gregory. Attended 



190 Btoorapiiical Sketches 

Halifax Schools; Horner Military School, Oxford, N. C, 1889-1892; 
University of North Carolina; B.A. (Magna Cum Laude) degree 
June, 1896; two years Master of Arts course. University of North 
Carolina; University of North Carolina Law School, degree, 1899. 
Lawyer. Member Rowan County Bar Association; North Carolina 
State Bar; Attorney for Rowan County, city of Salisbury and city 
of Spencer. Phythian. Author of Gregory's Supplement Revisal of 
North Carolina (1913); Gregory's Revisal Biennial of North Caro- 
lina (1915), and Gregory's Revisal Biennial of North Carolina 
(1917). Episcopal. Married Miss Mary Margaret Overman, April 
26, 1899. 



WILLIAM IRA HALSTEAD 

(First District— Counties: Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Gates, 
Hertford, Pasquotank and Perquimans. Two Senators.) 

William I. Halstead, Democrat, Senator from the First Sena- 
torial District, was born in Camden County, September 16, 1878. 
Son of Lemuel H. and Laura V. (Lamb) Halstead. Attended At- 
lantic Collegiate Institute, Elizabeth City, 1893; LL.B. Wake For- 
est College, 1909. Lawyer. County Attorney. Mason; Red Men; 
Past Master Masonic Lodge; Past Sachem Red Men. Representa- 
tive in the General Assembly of 1929 and 1931 from Camden 
County. Methodist. Married Miss Pauline Jacobs, May 10, 1903, 
who died September 20, 1935. Address: South Mills, N. C. 



JOHN SPRUNT HILL 

(Sixteenth District— Counties: Alamance. Caswell, Durham and 
Orange. Two Senators.) 

John Sprunt Hill, Democrat, Senator from the Sixteenth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Faison. Duplin County, North Carolina, 
March 17. 1869. Son of William E. and Frances Diana (Faison) 
Hill. Attended Faison High School, 1877-1882; University of North 
Carolina, Ph. B degree in June, 1889; University Law School, 1891- 
1892; Law School Columbia University, 1892-1894; LL.B. degree. 
Banker and Farmer. Member N. C. State Highway Commission, 



State Senators li»l 

1921-1931; Board of Trustees University of Nortli Carolina, 1904 to 
date; Chairman Building Commission University of North Caro- 
lina, 1922-1931; President Board of Trustees of Watts Hospital, 1921 
to date; President Durham Loan and Trust Co., 1904-1932; President 
Home Savings Bank 1921 to date; member American Commission to 
Study Cooperative Banking and Cooperative Markets in Foreign 
Countries, 1913; Delegate to International Forestry Convention a't 
Paris, 1913; Chairman War Savings Stamp Committee, Durham 
County, 1917; member Board of Aldermen, city of Durham, 1908- 
1910; member of Squadron A, New York Cavalry, New York Na- 
tional Guard; Foreign Service Spanish- American War. Member of 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity; Phi Delta Phi Law Fraternity; 
alumni member of Phi Beta Kappa; L 0. 0. F., Golden Link Lodge; 
Lodge No. 568, B. P. 0. Elks; Eno Lodge No. 210 of xMasons. Life 
member N. C. Historical Society; life member Virginia Historical 
Society; life member American Historical Society. Author of: 
Needs of the University, 1903; Cooperation and Work of American 
Commission, 1913; Cooperative Plan to Provide 5% Money for 
Farmers, 1914; Rural Credits, 1915; Organized Credit; the Para- 
mount Need of Tar Heel Farmers, 1915; Put Forestry on the Map 
and Make It Pay to Grow Trees, 1920; Progressive Program for 
Building and Maintaining a Great Primary System of State High- 
ways in North Carolina, 1920; North Carolina, a Story of Triumph- 
ant Democracy, 1924. Received LL.D. from University of North Caro- 
lina June 1933. Member First Presbyterian Church, Durham, 
N. C; member Session 1921 to date. State Senator, 1933 and 1935. 
Married Miss Annie Louise Watts, November 29, 1899. Address: 
Durham, N. C. 



WILLIAM PUCKETT HOLT 

(Eighth District — Counties: Johnston and Wayne. Two Sena- 
tors.) 

William Puckett Holt, Democrat, Senator from the Eighth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Princeton, N. C. Son of Adley Folix 
and Sarah Elizabeth (Edwards) Holt. Attended Priucetdn i)ul)lic 
schools, 1902-1913, and Buies Creek Academy. l!ti:M!lir,. l,;iwyer. 
President Smithfield Building and Loan .Association; I'l-esident 
Smithfield Kiwanis Chil). 1935. (^)unty .Vuditor three terms. 1930- 



192 Bi()(iKAi'nicAL ^Sketches 

19S6. Corporal "World War, December 10, 1917-Noveinber 24, 1918. 
Master St. Patrick's Lodge No. 617, A. F. & A. M., 1928, 1929 and 
1930; Woodmen of World, Camp No. 543. Married Mis-s Minnie L. 
Boyette, December 16, 1929. Address: Smithfield. 



JERRY JOXES HUGHES 

(First District — Counties: Camden, Chowan, Currituck. Gates, 
Hertford, Pasquotank and Perquimans. Two Senators.) 

Jerry Jones Hughes, Democrat. Senator from the First Senatorial 
District, was born in Camden County, December 6, 1S85. Son of 
Marshall Bertram and Mary Burfort (Morrisett) Hughes. Edu- 
cated in the schools of Camden County, 1892-1900, and Tillett's Pri- 
vate School, Elizabeth City, 1901-1903. Wholesale Hosiery dealer. 
Vice-President Elizabeth City Hosiery Company, 1927-1930. Vice- 
President Albemarle Hospital, Elizabeth City, 1933-1936. Member 
Elizabeth City Council, 1920-1936; Chairman Board and Chairman 
Finance Committee since 1924. Modern Woodmen. Baptist. Mar- 
ried Miss Mary Ball Love, October 15, 1913. Address: Elizabeth 
City, N. C. 

JAMES HEXRY HUTCHIXS 

(Thirtieth District— Countiea: Avery, Madison, Mitchell and Yan- 
cey. One Senator.) 

James Henry Hutchins, Republican, Senator from the Thirtieth 
Senatorial District, was born at Mars Hill, N. C, March 4, 1889. 
Son of John Columbus and AUie M. (Tilson) Hutchins. Attended 
Mars Hill College, 1906-1910; Atlanta Dental College, 1911-1914; 
DD.S. Dental surgeon. Member American Dental Association; State 
Dental Society of North Carolina; North Carolina First District 
Dental Society; member Marshall Civitan Club. 1934-1936; Presi- 
dent P.-T. A. Walnut High School. 1933-1937; Chairman Republican 
Executive Committee Madison County, 1928-1930. Representative iu 
the General Assembly, 1929. Thirty-second degree Mason; Shriner; 
Knights of Pythias; Modern Woodmen of America. Baptist. Dea- 
con. Moderator French Broad Baptist Association; Superintendent 
Sunday School, 1923-1931; President B. Y. P. V. Association, 1925- 
1926. Married Miss Bertie Edna Thomas, January 3. 1915. Address: 
Marshall, N. C. 



State Senators 193 

HENRY LEWIS INGRAM 

(Twelfth District — Counties: Harnett, Hoke, Moore and Randolph. 
Two Senators.) 

Henry Lewis Ingram, Democrat, Senator from the Twelfth Sen- 
atorial District, was born at Farmer, N. C, April 10, 1896. Son of 
John Thomas and Christina (Cranford) Ingram. Attended Farmer 
and Asheboro High Schools; University of North Carolina, 1915- 
1917. A.B. Wholesale Distributor of petroleum products. Member 
Travelers' Protective Association; Rotary International; President 
Asheboro Chamber of Commerce. 1931; Treasurer Randolph County 
Democratic Committee, 1936. Enlisted in Army, April 7, 1917; com- 
missioned First Lieutenant Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, August 15, 
1917; promoted to Captain in France, October 16, 1918; 321st Inf. 
Reg., 81st Division and 64th Inf. Reg., 7th Division. State Senator, 
1933. Methodist. Married Miss De Etta Bennet, June 14, 1922. Two 

* 

boys, aged 7 and 12 years. Address: Asheboro, N. C. 



JEFF D. JOHNSON, Jr. 

(Ninth District — Counties: Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and 
Sampson. Two Senators.) 

Jeff D. Johnson, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Ninth Senatorial 
District, was born at Garland, Sampson County, N. C, June 6, 1900. 
Son of Jeff D. and Mary Lilias (Wright) Johnson. Attended Trin- 
ity Park School, Durham, 1917-1918; A.B., Trinity College, 1923; 
Duke Law School, 1926. Lawyer. Town Attorney. Clinton, 1928- 
1936; Chairman Board of Elections of Sampson County, 1928-1934. 
Private World War, 1918. Methodist; member Board of Stewards. 
Married Miss Frances Faison, August 17, 1935. Address: Clinton, 
N. C. 



ANDREW HALL JOHNSTON 

(Thirty-first District — County: Buncombe. One Senator.) 
Andrew Hall Johnston, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty-first 

Senatorial District, was born in Buncombe County, March 13, 1882. 

Son of W. F. and Mary (Glenn) Johnston. Attended common schools. 



194 Biographical Sketches 

Ph.B. University of North Carolina, 1904. Lawyer. Member Amer- 
ican Bar Association, the Buncombe County and North Carolina Bar 
Associations. Solicitor 14th Judicial District. President 19th Ju- 
dicial District Bar Association. Chairman McDowell County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee; Chairman Buncombe County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee; Elector at Large,, 1932. Member B. P. 
O. Elks, Asheville Lodge 1401. State Senator, 1935. Methodist. Mar- 
ried Miss Annie McBroom, April 10, 1907. Address: Asheville, N. C. 



JACK JOYXER 

(Tu-enty-flfth District — Counties: Catawlia, Iredell and Lincoln. 
Two Senators.) 

Jack Joyner, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-fifth Senatorial 
District, was born at (?arysburg, N. C. August 21, 1902. Son of 
William Henry and Mary Ann (Suiter) Joyner. Attended Garys- 
burg Graded School, 1908-1917; Randolph-Macon Academy, 1917- 
1920; University of North Carolina, 1920-1922; University of North 
Carolina Law School, 1923-1925. Lawyer. Member Statesville, Ire- 
dell County, North Carolina and American Bar Associations; Ki- 
wanis Club. Secretary Fifteenth Judicial District Bar Association, 
1935. Member Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Alpha Delta, Law Frater- 
nity; Royal Arcanum; Independent Order Odd Fellows; Junior Or- 
der American Mechanics. Methodist. Married Miss Mary Royall 
Guerrant, November 27, 1929. Address: Statesville, N. C. 



JOHN DAVIS LAKKIXS, Jr. 

(Seventh District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, 
Lenoir and Onslow. Two Senators.) 

John Davis Larkins, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Seventh 
Senatorial District, was born in Morristown, Tennessee, June S, 
1909. Son of John Davis and Emma (Cooper) Larkins. Attended 
public schools Cedartown and Hazelhurst. Georgia; Fayetteville, 
N. C. Graduated Greensboro High School, June, 1925; B.A. Wake 
Forest, 1929. Lawyer. Member N. C. Bar Association. U. S. Con- 



State Senators 195 

ciliation Commissioner-Referee for Jones County, 1934-1936. Sigma 
Delta Kappa, National Legal Fraternity, Alpha Pi Delta Social Fra- 
ternity. Junior Order United American Mechanics; Mason; Zion 
Lodge No. 81, Trenton; New Bern Consistory No. 3 Scottish Rite, 
Shriner, Sudan Temple. Baptist. Deacon; Superintendent Sunday 
School, 1930-1936. Married Miss Pauline Murrill, of Jacksonville, 
N. C, March 15, 1930. Two children, Emma Sue and Pauline, ages 
5 and 2. Address: Trenton, N. C. 



THOMAS WILLIAIMS MASON LONG 

(Fourth District — Counties: Edgecombe and Halifax. Two Sena- 
tors.) 

Thomas Williams Mason Long, Democrat, Senator from the Fourth 
Senatorial District, was born in Northampton County, January 14. 
1886. Son of Lemuel Mackinnie and Betty Gran (Mason) Long. At- 
tended Petersburg, Va., Academy, 1091-1902; V. P. I., 1902-1903; 
University of North Carolina, 1903-1905; University College of Med- 
icine, 1905-1908. Physician. Member Halifax County Medical So- 
ciety and the North Carolina Medical Society. Chairman Board of 
Directors North Carolina Sanatorium, 1922-1931; Roanoke Rapids 
Hospital, 1912-1931. Member State Board of Medical Examiners. 
1921-1931; Director State Hospital, Raleigh, 1918-1920. Mayor Roa- 
noke Rapids 1922-1930; Chairman City Board Commission 
1915-1922; Mason; Junior Order United American Mechanics; Phi 
Chi Medical Society. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1931 and 1933. Episcopalian. Married Miss Maria Greenough 
Burgwyn, December 7, 1910. Address: Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 



LISTER A. MARTIN 

(Eighteefith District — Counties: Davidson, Montgomery, Rich- 
mond and Scotland. Two Senators.) 

Lister A. Martin, Democrat, Senator from the Eighteenth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Leaksville, October 29, 1885. Son of A. 
B. J. and Lula W. (Hubbard) Martin. Attended Leaksville Public 
School; Oak Ridge Institute, 1904; University of North Carolina, 



19G Biographical Sketches 

1906-1908. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association and 
the Davidson County Bar Association. Judge Recorder's Court, 
Thomasville, 1911-1913; Solicitor Recorder's Court, Lexington, 1920; 
member Lexington High School Board, 1925-1926. Repre.sentative 
in General Assembly of 1927 and 1929. Member Lexington Rotary 
Club. Baptist. Member Board of Deacons; Teacher Junior Baraca 
Class. Married Miss Jessie King, May 24, 1911 (Deceased); three 
children, Jessie, Louise and Mary. Address: Lexington, N. C. 



CHARLES SAMUEL MASSEY 

(Nineteenth District — Counties: Anson, Stanly and Union. Two 
Senators.) 

Charles Samuel Massey, Democrat, Senator from the Nineteenth 
Senatorial District, was born at Waxhaw, N. C, September 12, 1865. 
Son of Henry Reese and Mary Elizabeth (Henry) Massey. Attended 
school at Carolina Academy, Fort Mill, S. C. Banker and Merchant. 
President Waxhaw Banking and Trust Company, the A. W. Heath 
Company; President Massey Clark Company, Mount Holly, N. C; 
Vice-President Morrow Brothers & Heath Company, Albemarle, N. 
C; Chairman Board Trustees of Morrison Training School; mem- 
ber Board of Education, Union County. Mason. Presbyterian. Mar- 
ried Miss Maude Josephine Heath, November 24, 1897. Address: 
Waxhaw, N. C. 



RYAN McBRYDE 

(Ticelfth District — Counties: Harnett. Hoke, Moore and Randolph. 
Two Senators.) 

Ryan McBryde, Democrat, Senator from the Twelfth Senatorial 
District, was born in Raeford, N. C, December 22, 1886. Son of Tom 
and Mary (McDuflie) McBryde. Attended Raeford Institute, 1900- 
1905; North Carolina Military Academy, 1906; Davidson College, 
two years, class 1911. Lumber Dealer and Farmer. Member Rae- 
ford Kiwanis Club, President, 1932. Member Raeford School Board, 
1930-1933; Hoke County Board of Education, 1918-1924. State Sen- 
ator, 1933, 1935. Mason. Presbyterian. Polder. Married IVIiss Swan- 
nie Rattz, December 3, 1914. Address: Raeford, N. C. 



State Senators 197 

JOHX HENRY MCDANIEL 

(TwentietJi District — Counties: Cabarrus and Mecklenburg. Two 
Senators.) 

John Henry McDaniel, Democrat, Senator from the Twentieth 
Senatorial District, was born in Woodlief, N. C, September 16, 
1897. Son of Henry Washington and Mary Eliza])eth (Cartner) 
McDaniel. Attended Mt. Pleasant Collegiate Institute, 1916-1919; 
Wittenberg College, Springfield, Ohio; A.B. degree, 1923. Life In- 
surance Agent. Member Life Underwriter' Associations. Head of 
English Department, Mt. Pleasant Collegiate Institute, Mt. Pleasant, 
N. C, 1924-1932. Student Army Training Corps. Roanoke College, 
Salem, Va. Member Phi Kappa Psi, Social Fraternity; Patriotic 
Order Sons of America and Odd Fellows. Lutheran. Married Miss 
Mildred Juanita Barrier, January 3, 1928. Address: Concord, N. C. 



GERTRUDE DILLS McKEE 

(Thirty-second District — Counties: Cherokee. Clay, Graham, Ma- 
con and Swain. One Senator.) (^iA-X-^-wtj CaimjcaaXs.*^ J 

Gertrude Dills McKee, Democrat, from the Thirty-second Sena- 
torial District, was born in Dillsboro, N. C. Daughter of William 
Allen and Alice M. (Enloe) Dills. Graduated from Peace Institute, 
1905. Homemaker. State Senator, North Carolina General Assem- 
bly, 1931. Member North Carolina Federation of Women's Clubs, 
President, 1925-1927; North Carolina Division United Daughters of 
the Confederacy, President, 1928-1930; PresideAt Southern Council 
Federated Club Women, 1926-1928; President Southeastern Council 
Federated Club Women, 1927-1929; member North Carolina Educa- 
tional Commission, 1927-1929; Trustee Western Carolina Teachers' 
College, 1921-1925; Trustee Peace College for Women, 1930; Trustee 
Brevard College. 1934; Trustee U.N.C. 1933. Methodist. Married E. L. 
McKee, August 19, 1913. Two sons. Address: Sylva, N. C. 



198 BlOQKAPHICAL SKETCHES 

JOSEPH WILLIAM NOELL 

(Fifteenth District — Counties: Granville and Person. One Sena- 
tor.) 

Joseph William Noell, Democrat, Senator from the Fifteenth Sen- 
atorial District. Son of Robert Alexander and Mariah Amelia (Har- 
den) Noell. Born at Graham, N. C. Education in private schools 
and Graham College. Editor and publisher of the Roxboro Courier. 
Past President and charter member of Roxboro Rotary Club. State 
Senator, 1933. Married Miss Nelia J. Holman, daughter of the late 
John B. Holman of Iredell County. Address: Roxboro, N. C. 



JAMES ARCHIBALD PATTERSON 

(Eighteenth District — Counties: Davidson, Montgomery, Rich- 
mond and Scotland Neck. Two Senators.) 

James Archibald Patterson, Democrat, Senator from the Eight- 
eenth Senatorial District, was born in Richmond County, 1870. Son 
of James A. and Annie (McNeill) Patterson. Farmer and Merchant. 
Address: Laurinburg, N. C. 



JAMES CARLTON PITTMAN 

(Thirteenth District — Counties: Chatham, Lee and Wake. Two 
Senators.) 

James Carlton Pittman, Democrat, Senator from the Thirteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Gates, N. C, February 25, 1900. 
Son of Thomas T. and Stella M. (Howell) Pittman. Attended Rey- 
noldson High School, Gates, N. C; University of North Carolina, 
LL.B. degree, 1921. Lawyer. Member Lee County Bar Association; 
Fourth District Bar and the State Bar Association. Chairman Board 
of Elections, Lee County, 1928; Judge County Recorder's Court; At- 
torney for town of Sanford, 1927-1928. Sigma Phi Epsilon Frater- 
nity at University; Loyal Order Moose; President Sanford Kiwanis 
Club, 1935; President Business Men's Association, 1936. Baptist. 
Married Miss Hazel Faircloth, April 11, 1925. Address: Sanford. 
N. C. 



State Senators 199 

HUBERT McKAE RATCLIFF 

(Twenty-Second District — County: Forsyth. One Senator.) 
Hubert McRae Ratcliff, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-sec- 
ond Senatorial District, was born in Anson County, April 12, 1890. 
Sou of James Marsliall and Eliza (McRae) Ratcliff. Attended Trin- 
ity Park School, Durham, N. C; Trinity College, Durham, N. C; 
A.B.. 1913; Trinity College Law School, 1913-1915. Lawyer. Private 
to Second Lieutenant during World War, from June, 1917, to De- 
cember, 1918. Methodist. Married Miss Addie Shouse, November 
10, 1920. Address: Winston-Salem, N. C. 



WILLIAM BLOUNT RODIIAN, JR. 

(Second District — Counties: Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin. Pam- 
lico, Tyrrell and Washington. Two Senators.) 

William Blount Rodman, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Second 
Senatorial District, was born in Washington, N. C, July 2, 1889. 
Son of William Blount and Addie (Fulford) Rodman. Attended 
Horner's and Oak Ridge Preparatory Schools; A.B., University of 
North Carolina, 1910. Lawyer. Episcopalian. Married Miss Helen 
Farrell, August 17, 1919. Address: Washington, N. C. 



ROYE ROWE 

(Ninth District — Counties: Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and 
Sampson. Two Senators.) 

Roye Rowe, Democrat, Senator from the Ninth Senatorial Dis- 
trict, was born in Burgaw, N. C, May 29, 1905. Son of Nicholas 
Henry and Mary Belle (King) Rowe. Attended Carolina Industrial 
School, Watha, N. C, 1911-1919; Farm Life School, Vanceboro, N. 
C, 1919-1921; University of North Carolina at various times from 
1923 to 1929. Graduated from Theatre Managers' School, New York 
City, 1930. Theatre owner and Farmer. Member Variety Club of 
America. Mason, Junior Order. Unitarian. Married Miss Nina 
Worsley, February 22, 1929. One child, Tonia Rowe. Address: Pur- 
gaw, N. C. 



200 Biographical Sketches 

EMEKSOX THOMPSOX SANDERS 

(Sixtcentli District — Counties: Alamance, Caswell, Durham and 
Orange. Two Senators.) 

Emerson Thompson Sanders, Democrat, Senator from the Six- 
teenth Senatorial District, was born in New Iberia, Louisiana, May 
17, 1907. Son of Dr. James Wofford and Mary Emerson (Thompson) 
Sanders. Attended public schools of New Iberia and graduated from 
the Marion Military Institute, Marion, Alabama, in 1922; A.B. Wash- 
ington and Lee University, 1927; LL.B. Duke University, 1930. 
Kappa Sigma Fraternity. Modern Woodmen of America. Baptist. 
Address: Burlington, N. C. 



JOSEPH HEXRY SEPARK 

(Twenty-sixth District — County: Gaston. One Senator.) 

Joseph Henry Separk, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-sixth 
Senatorial District, w'as born in Raleigh, N. C, May 21, 1871. Son 
of Joseph Henry and Mary (Ingram) Separk. Attended graded 
school, 1879-1888; Morson and Denson Raleigh Male Academy, 1889- 
1891; Duke University (Trinity College), A.B., 1896. President Se- 
park Sales Company, cotton agency. Member and a past president 
Gastonia Chamber of Commerce, 1917-1918; President, Gaston 
County Textile Manufacturers' Association. 1929-1930; member 
Board of Governors American Cotton Manufacturers' Association, 
1921-1924; member Gastonia Board of Aldermen, 1908-1913; Mayor 
Pro-tem City of Gastonia, 1908-1913. Mason. Gastonia Lodge No. 
369, A. F. & A. M.; Gastonia Council No. 66, Royal Arch Masons; 
Gastonia Commandery No. 28, Knights Templar; Shrine; A. A. 0. 
N. M. S. Oasis Temple Carolina Consistory No. 1; member Rosi- 
crucians; Head Master Burlington Academy, 1986-1897; Assistant 
Superintendent Charlotte Military Institute, 1897-1898; Principal 
Oakland High School, Gastonia, N. C. 1898-1901; member Gastonia 
City School Board, 1906-1908; member and Chairman Gastonia City 
School Board, 1926-1931; Trustee Duke University since 1916; mem- 
ber Executive Committee Duke University since 1924; Past Presi- 
dent Gaston County Duke Alumni Association; Past President Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of Duke University and of Duke University 
affiliated Alumni Club, and of Duke Alumni Council; member Rho 



State Senators 201 

Chapter of Omicron Delta Kappa Chapter, Duke University; past 
member Budget Commission Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
Past President Gaston County Chapter American Red Cross; Direc- 
tor Piedmont Northern Railway Company since 1925; Director First 
National Bank, Gastonia, N. C 1912-1930; Vice-President First Na- 
tional Bank, Gastonia, N. C, 1924-1930; Director and Secretary- 
Treasurer Gray Manufacturing Company, 1912-1931; Parksdale Mills, 
Inc., 1916-1929; Arrow Mills, Inc., 1918-1929; Arlington Cotton Mills. 
1918-1931; Flint Manufacturing Company, 1918-1933; one of the 
Incorporators and First Vice-President Textiles, Inc., 1931-1933; 
Past President Gaston County Library Association; Arkray Mills, 
Inc., 1918-1931; Myrtle Mills, Inc., 1918-1931. Methodist. Steward 
since 1900; Chairman. Board of Stewards, 1904-1910; Superintend- 
ent Sunday School, 1906-1924; Teacher John Wesley Bible Class 
since 1923. Married Miss May E. Gray, May 23, 1901. Address: Gas- 
tonia, N. C. 



S. GIIAIER SPARGER 

(Ttventy-third District — Counties: Stokes and Surry. One Sena- 
tor.) 

S. Gilmer Sparger, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-third 
Senatorial District, was born in Mount Airy, December 15, 1904. 
Son of George W. and Jessie (Gilmer) Sparger. Educated in Mount 
Airy Public Schools, 1911-1919; Jamestown High School. 1920-1923; 
Guilford College, 1923-1925; Duke University, 1925-1928. Lawyer. 
Mason. Member of Tau Kappa Alpha (Forensic Fraternity). Sena- 
tor from the Twenty-third Senatorial District in the General As- 
sembly of 1933; Representative from Stokes County in 1935; Pres- 
ident District Bar of Twelfth Judicial District, 1935-36. Methodist. 
Married Miss Helen Fulton, November 26, 1930. Address: Danbury. 
N. C. 



JOHN BEXTOX STACY 

(Seventeenth District — Counties: Guilford and Rockingham. Two 
Senators.) 

John Benton Stacy, Democrat, Senator fi-om the Seventeenth Sen- 
atorial District, was born May 23, 1891. Son of John Mullins and 
Betty (Benton) Stacy. Educated at Ruffin School 1898-1911 and 



202 Biographical Sketches 

University of North Carolina two years. Merchant, Farmer and 
Banker. President of the Rockingham County Alumni Association 
of U. N. C. about 1930. Postmaster at Ruffin 1913-1923. Sergeant 
First Class in Base Hospital No. 10. Seventeen months in World 
War. Mason; Blue Lodge, Chapter Commandery and Shrine; Elks. 
Member 1935 Senate. Methodist: member Board of Stewards about 
twelve years; Superintendent Sunday School and teacher of Bible 
Class for about tw^elve years. Married Miss Mary Cole, December, 
1922. Address: Ruffin, N. C. 



HOYT PATRICK TAYLOR 

(Nineteenth District — Counties: Anson. Stanly and LTnion. Two 
Senators.) 

Hoyt Patrick Taylor, Democrat, Senator from the Nineteenth 
Senatorial District, was born at Winton, N. C, June 11, 1S90. Son 
of Simeon P. and Kate (Ward) Taylor. Attended Winton Academy; 
Winton High School; Horner Military School; Wake Forest Col- 
lege, 1912-1914. Lawyer. Member Anson County and North Caro- 
lina Bar Associations; Director, Attorney and Secretary-Treasurer, 
Carolina Concrete Pipe Company, Charlotte, N. C. ; Director Spruce 
Pine Mica. Inc.; Director and Attorney Anson Building and Loan 
Association. Mayor of Wadesboro, 1919-1920; Chairman Anson 
County Democratic Executive Committee since 1933. Served in 
World War, 1917-1919. Second Lieutenant, 1917, to First Lieuten- 
ant, 1918, 371st Infantry, to Captain, 1919, 0. R. C, U. S. A. Awarded 
personal citation and Silver Star Medal by General Pershing and 
awarded decoration of the Order of the Purple Heart. Mason. Past 
Commander, Anson County Post No. 31. American Legion. Baptist. 
Deacon; Teacher Men's Bible Class. Married Miss Inez Wooten. 
June 28, 1923. Three children. Address: Wadesboro, N. C. 



ERNEST V. W EBB 

(Seventh District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones 
Lenoir and Onslow. Two Senators.) 

Ernest V. Webb, Senator from the Seventh Senatorial District, 
w^as born in Roxboro, October 15, 1877. Son of William E. and Ella 



Representatives 203 

(Jordan) Webb. Attended private school in Iloxboro, 1883-1892. 
Tobacconist and Farmer. Director U. S. Tobacco Association, 1915- 
1934; President Kinston Chamber Commerce, 1932-1933; President 
Eastern Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Association, 1933-1934. Mem- 
ber Kinston City Council, 1913-1919; Chairman Lenoir Highway Com- 
mission, 1919-1923; Chairman Board of Education, 1927-1932. Mem- 
ber State Salary and Wage Commission, 1925-1928. Private Com- 
pany I, First N. C. Vol. Spanish-American War, 1898. Mason; 
Shriner; Odd Fellow. State Senator, 1935. Methodist. Married 
Miss Mamie J. Winstead,, October 29, 1903. Address: Kinston, N. C. 



WILLIAM WALLACE W'HITE 

(Fourteenth District — Counties: Vance and Warren. One Sen- 
ator.) 

William Wallace White, Democrat, Senator from the Fourteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Manson, N. C, Fel)ruary 22, 1902. 
Son of Charles Mayfield and Sallie Daniel (Boyd) White. Attended 
Nutbush Public School, 1908-1916; Middleburg High School, 1916- 
1919. B.S., N. C. State College, 1924. Farmer. Member County Cot- 
ton Committee, AAA, 1933-1935; President Soil Conservation and 
Erosion Control Project, Vance County, 1936; Vice-President Vance 
Farmers Cooperative Exchange, 1936; Member State Tobacco Ad- 
visory Council, 1936. Private, R.O.T.C, 1919-1920, 1921-1922. Junior 
Order; Woodmen of the World; National Grange; Lambda Gamma 
Delta (Honorary Fraternity.) Master Middleburg Subordinate 
Grange, 1933-1934; Vance Pomona Grange, 1934-1936. Presbyterian; 
Deacon, 1924-1927; Elder, 1927-1936; Sunday School Superintendent, 
1930-1936. Address: Manson, N. C. 



REPRESENTATIVES 

ROBERT GREGG CHERRY 
SPEAKER 

Robert Gregg Cherry, Democrat, Representative from Gaston 
County, was born in York County, S. C, October 17, 1891. Son 
of Chancellor LaFayette and Hattie E. (Davis) Cherry. Attended 



204 BrOORAIMIICAI, SKETniKS 

Gastonia Graded Schools, 1900-1908; A.B., Duke University, 
1912; Duke University Law School, 1913-1914. Law^yer. Mem- 
ber Gaston County Bar Association, North Carolina Bar Associa- 
tion, American Bar Association and Kiwanis Club. Mayor of 
Gastonia, 1919-1923. Captain Co. "A," Machine Gun Battalion, 
30th Division, April 26, 1917, to April 15, 1919; Major, 120th 
N. C. National Guard, 1920-1921. Member Gastonia Lodge No. 
3 69, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Knights Templar; Royal 
Arch Masons; Oasis Temple A. A. O. N. M. S. Shrine; Knights of 
Pythias, Knights of Khorassan; Improved Order of Red Men; Jr. 
O. U. A. M.; I. O. O. F.; Sons Confederate Veterans; American 
Legion, State Commander, 1928-1929; Member of Board Trustees 
Duke University. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1931, 1933 and 193 5. Vice-President North Carolina Bar Asso- 
ciation 1934-1935. Methodist; Member Board of Stewards. Mar- 
ried Miss Mildred Stafford, 1921. Address: Gastonia, N. C. 



CLAUDE CLARENCE ABERNATHY 

Claude Clarence Abernathy, Democrat, Representative from 
Nash County, was born in Spring Hope, N. C, September 27, 
190 5. Son of William Harvey and Rachel Louise (Tyson) Aber- 
nathy. Attended Spring Hope High School; LL.B., Wake Forest 
College, June, 1927. Lawyer. Member State Bar Association. 
Member House of Representatives, 1935. Baptist. Married Miss 
Sadie Mae Walton. Address: Spring Hope, N. C. 



SALATHIEL LIELL ADAMS 

Salathiel Liell Adams, Democrat, Representative from Robe- 
son County was born at Rowland, N. C, December 19, 1910. Son 
of S. L. and Virginia (Coble) Adams (both deceased). Attended 
Rowland High School, 192S; University of North Carolina, 1930. 
Merchant and Farmer. Mem.ber, Town Board of Commissioners, 
1931-1936; Member Junior Order. Presbyterian. Address, 
Rowland, N. C. 



Representatives 205 

ARCH T. ALLEN 

Arch T. Allen, Democrat, Representative from Wake County, 
was born in Salisbury, N. C, September 13, 1910. Son of Arch 
T. and Claribel (McDowell) Allen. Attended Raleigh High School, 
1926; University of Noj'th Carolina, B.S., in Civil Engineering, 
19 30; University of North Carolina Law School, J.D. degree, 
1933. Lawyer; Member North Carolina Bar Association; North 
Carolina State Bar; Wake County Bar Association. Member, 
Sigma Nu and Phi Delta Phi fraternities; Kiwanis Club. Meth- 
odist. Married Miss Annette Reveley Tucker, December 14, 1935. 
Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



WILLLIM WILEY ANDREWS 

William Wiley Andrews, Democrat, Representative from Wayne 
County, was born in that county, October 14, 1886. Son of Icha- 
bod P. and Annie (Crumpler) Andrews. Attended rural schools; 
Guilford College, 1905-1906. Farmer and Fertilizer Dealer. 
Junior Order United American Mechanics. Past Councillor, 1927. 
Trustee and State Representative, 1928. Member of the J. O. U. 
A. M. State Credential Committee, 1934-1935. Chairman Belfast 
School Committee since 1920. Member of the Board of Directors 
of the North Carolina Cotton Growers Cooperative Association 
since 1934. Representative in the General Assembly in 1929 
and 1935. Member Democratic Executive Committee. Methodist; 
Member of Board of Stewards since 19 30. Chairman of Board of 
Stewards, 1934. Representative in the General Assembly, 1935. 
Married Miss Lila Adrene Pearson, May 24, 1911. Address: 
Goldsboro, N. C, Rt. 2. 



ALEXANDER MORSE ATKINSON 

Alexander Morse Atkinson, Democrat, Representative from 
Halifax County, was born in Enfield, N. C, January 19, 1889. 
Son of H. C. and Kate (Martin) Atkinson. Attended Enfield 
High School, 1908; University of North Carolina. B.S. degree, 
1912. Contractor and Engineer. Member, Local Draft Board, 
Halifax County; Chairman, War Savings Stamp Drive during 



200 BlOGKAPHICAL SKETCHES 

World War. First Mayor of Enfield, 1920, re-elected 1930-1931; 
Commissioner and Chairman, Light and Water Committee, 193 5- 
1936; Teacher, University of North Carolina, 1912-113; President 
Kiwauis Club, 1927. Captain U. N. C. Track Team, 1911. Mason. 
Commander in Commandery; Master in Council; District Deputy 
Grand Master in Grand Council. Passed the chairs in Blue Lodge 
and Royal Arch Chapter and Lodge of Perfection and Chapter of 
Rose Croix of Scottish Rite. District Deputy Grand Master, 1928. 
Baptist; Superintendent Sunday School, 1918; Teacher of Baraca 
Class at present; Deacon; Financial Secretary. Married Miss 
Mary Gooch Pitts. August 7, 1930. Address: Enfield, N. C. 



THOMAS HAYWOOD AYCOCK 

Thomas Haywood Aycock, Democrat, Representative from War- 
ren County, was born at Brookston, N. C, June 1, 1880. Son of 
Robert E. and Precila J. (Overton) Aycock. Attended School 
Cedar Rock Academy, Franklin County, N. C, 1896-1897. Far- 
mer and superintendent of prison camp. North Carolina National 
Guard, 1898-1903. Justice of the Peace for sixteen years. Bap- 
tist. Married, (first) Miss Hattie E. Shepherd, December 26, 
1900; (second) Miss Mable Strickland, October 31, 1925. Ad- 
dress: Elberon, N. C. 



ja:\tes :\iajor baley. jr. 

James Major Baley, Jr., Republican, Representative from Madi- 
son County, was born in Greensboro, N. C, January 23, 1912. 
Son of James Major and Mary Catherine (Redmon) Baley. At- 
tended Marshall High School; Asheville High School, 19 27. At- 
tended Mars Hill College, 1929; University of North Carolina, 
1931, A.B.; University of North Carolina Law School, 1933, 
LL.B. Lawyer. Member firm of Roberts & Baley. Baptist. Address: 
Marshall, N. C. 



Representatives 207 

CLAUDE PRESTOX BANKS 

Claude Preston Banks, Democrat, Representative from Jones 
County, was born in Trenton, N. C, December 18, 1894. Son of 
Furney F. and Ida E. (Mallard) Banks. Educated in New Bern 
Schools, 1900-1908; Pollocksville, 1911-1913; Attended Universi- 
ty of North Carolina, 19 20. Tobacconist and Farmer. County 
Commissioner, Craven County, 1932-1936. Mason. Methodist. 
Superintendent, Sunday School, 1922-1936. Steward, 1920 until 
present date. Married Miss Edith G. Harper, July 21, 1918. 
Address: Trenton, N. C. 



ROSCOE GLEXX BANKS 

Roscoe Glenn Banks, Democrat, Representative from Pamlico 
County, was born in Arapahoe, N. C, May 10, 1910. Son of Edgar 
Thomas and Effie Lona (Scott) Banks. Attended Arapahoe High 
School, 1924-1928; Atlantic Christian College, 1928-1932. Teach- 
er. Woodmen of the World. Member, Christian Church. Ad- 
dress: Arapahoe, N. C. 

OSCAR GARLAND BARKER 

Oscar Garland Barker, Democrat, Representative from Durham 
County, was born at Gary, January 12, 189 6. Son of Brinkley 
Dickerson and Martha (Johnson) Barker. Attended Durham High 
School; completed law course at Trinity in 1923. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber North Carolina Bar Association; Attorney Durham Merchants 
Association. Durham County Manager of campaign of J. C. B. 
Ehringhaus in 1932. Durham Lodge Masons, No. 352; Durham 
Shrine Club. First Secretary Durham Shrine Club, 1918. Secre- 
tary Durham Kiwanis Club, 1921-1924. Worked on newspapers 
fifteen years. Most of period spent on Durham Herald and Dur- 
ham Sun; one year, 1918, with Greensboro Record. Served as 
City Editor. Managing Editor and Sports Editor of Durham Her- 
ald. Served as City Editor, Editor, and General Manager Durham 
Sun. Served as Managing Editor of Greensboro Record. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1935. Baptist: Superin- 
tendent First Baptist Sunday School, 1931-1935; Chairman First 
Baptist Board Associate Deacons, 1932-1933. Married Miss Sa- 
rah Mae Terry, February 28, 1923. Address, Durham, N. C. 



208 BiociKAPiiicAT. Ski-:t('iies 

TROY T. BARNES 

Troy T. Barnes, Democrat, Representative from Wilson County, 
was born October 17, 1893. Son of W. A. and Cornelia (Love) 
Barnes. Attended Lucama Graded and High Schools; University 
of North Carolina, 1917, A.B. Degree; Wake Forest Law School, 
1921; King's Business College. Lawyer. Member of Wilson 
County Bar Association; North Carolina Bar Association. Solici- 
tor General County Court, Wilson. Member Wilson County High- 
way Commission, 1925-1928. U. S. Navy Reserve Force. Member 
Junior Order; Mason. Methodist. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 19 3 5. Married Miss. Berta Hinton, November 2 6, 
1919. Address: Wilson, N. C. 



JOHN T. BEXTOX 

John T. Benton, Democrat, Representative from Perquimans 
County, was born in Perquimans County, November 17, 1873. 
Son of Elisha H. and Delithian E. (Twine) Benton. Attended 
Public Schools 1881-1895. Farmer. Member, American Farm 
Bureau Federation. President, American Farm Bureau Federa- 
tion, Perquimans County. Baptist. Sunday School Teacher. 
Married Miss Ida Lee Stallings, February 4, 19 03 (first) Miss 
Mary A. Hendricks, December 29, 192 8 (second). Address: 
Hertford, N. C. 



FOREST COMEDORE BERRY 

Forest Comedore Berry, Democrat, Representative from Burke 
County, was born in Morganton, N. C, October 22, 1876. Son 
of Bartlett A. and Myra Ann (Hennessey) Berry. Attended Am- 
herst Academy, Moravian Falls Academy. Connected with North 
Carolina State Highway & Public Works Commission. Sheriff, 
Burke County ten years: U. S. Revenue Department eight years. 
Member Junior Order. Methodist. Married (wife deceased). 
Address; Morganton, N. C. 



Representatives 209 



JOHN J. BEST 



John J. Best, Democrat, Representative from Pender County, 
was born in Warsaw, N. C, May 19, 1S86. Son of Robert F. and 
Margaret A. (Hollingsworth) Best. Attended Pollock Public 
School, Duplin County; Dell High School, Sampson County; Wake 
Forest, spring of 1910: Wake Forest Law School. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber, District and County Bar Associations; County Attorney, Pen- 
der County, 1916-1922; County Solicitor, Pender County Re- 
corder's Court, 1932-1936; U. S. Commissioner, 1924-1925; 
Chairman, Democratic Executive Committee, Pender County, 
1924; Clerk to and Member, Board Commissioners, Town of Bur- 
gaw, 1926-1932. Mason. Junior, Senior and Master Warden, 
Masonic Lodge, 1933-1935. Missionary Baptist; Deacon, 1930- 
1934; Sunday School Teacher past eight years. Married Miss 
Geneva C. Moore, October IS, 1917. Address: Burgaw, N. C. 



WILLL4M H. BEST, JR. 

William H. Best, Jr., Democrat. Representative from Wayne 
County was born at Goldsboro, N. C, June 17, 190 8. Son of W. 
H. and Eleanor Street (Munroe) Best. Attended Goldsboro High 
School, 1922-1926; Davidson College, B.S. degree, 1930; Wake 
Forest College, 1932-1933. Attorney. Member, North Carolina 
State Bar and Local Bar Associations. Presbyterian. Address: 
Goldsboro, N. C. 



MERCER J. BLAXKEXSHIP 

Mercer J. Blankenship, Democrat, Representative from Meck- 
lenburg County, was born in Vincent, Alabama. Son of Elias 
M. and Maggie B. Blankenship. Attended Charlotte High School, 
1921, 1924-1926; University of North Carolina, 1926-192S. Law- 
yer. Member North Carolina Bar Association; .lunior Chaml)er 
of Commerce; Patriotic Oi'der, Sons of America. Baptist. Mar- 
ried Miss Marjorie Wood, June 24, 1928. Address: Charlotte, 
N. C. 



210 BioGRAPJiicAL Sketches 

SAMUEL, MASTERS BLOUNT 

Samuel Masters Blount, Democrat, Representative from Beau- 
fort County, was born in Washington, N. C, September 28, 1899. 
Son of John Gray and Dena (Angel) Blount. Attended Bingham 
Military School, Asheville, 1914-1917; University of North Caro- 
lina during fall 1917 and 1919; Law School, 1923. Lawyer. 
Member North Carolina Bar Association. Judge Recorder's Court 
192 8-1932; Chairman Beaufort County Board of Elections, 1933; 
City Attorney for Washington since 1930. Enlisted March 9, 
1918, in World War and served until May, 1919; Private First 
Class, Despatch Rider; Special Courier to Woodrow Wilson in 
Paris during Peace Conference. Member House of Representa- 
tives, 19 3 5. Episcopalian. Married Miss Bessie Sue Stacey, 
July 10, 19 2 8. Address: Washington. N. C. 



ELTGEXE THOMPSON BOST. JR. 

Eugene Thompson Bost, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Cabarrus County, was born in Cabarrus County. June 11, 1907. 
Son of E. T. and Zula A. (Hinshaw) Bost. Attended Mount 
Pleasant Collegiate Institute; Duke University, School of Law, 
1930-1933, Bachelor of Law. Lawyer. Member American Bar 
Association; North Carolina Bar Association. Methodist. Ad- 
dress: Concord, N. C. 



FREDERICK HOLLIDAY BROOKS 

Frederick Holliday Brooks, Democrat, Representative from 
Johnston County, was. born in Williamsburg, Virginia, August 
12, 1878. Son of James Mitchell and Nannie A. Rosalia Brooks. 
Attended Mrs. Jones Private School and Williamsburg Public 
Schools; Smithdeal's Business College. Richmond, Virginia; 
North Carolina University Law School. Lawyer. Member North 
Carolina Bar Association; North Carolina State Bar. Delegate 
Democratic National Convention 19 2 8 at Houston Texas. County 
Attorney, Johnston County, two years; City Attorney, two years; 
Judge Recorder's Court, Johnston County, April 1911 to December 



Representatives 211 

1922. Member and President, Smithfield Graded School District 
Trustees. Came to Smithfield, January 2 3, 189 8 as Stenographer 
for Hon. Edward W. Pou, then Solicitor and Member of firm of 
Simmons, Pou and Ward; studied law under the late Judge W. 
S. Stevens, Clerk Superior Court of Johnston County and later at 
University of North Carolina. Secured license February term, 
1901 Supreme Court and formed co-partnership with former em- 
ployer. Hon. Edward W. Pou, under firm name of Pou & Brooks, 
which continued until elected Judge Recorder's Court in Bill 
creating Court by Legislature of 1911. Member, Knights of 
Pythias. Missionary Baptist; Deacon; Superintendent Sunday 
School; Moderator Johnston Baptist Association, two years; 
Teacher, Men's Bible Class and teacher thirty-five years. Mar- 
ried Miss Lelia R. Parker. September 25, 1901, two children. 
Address: Smithfield, N. C. 



VICTOR S. BRYANT 

Victor S. Bryant, Democrat, Representative from Durham 
County, was born at Durham, N. C, September 29, 1898. Son of 
Victor S. and Matilda (Heartt) Bryant. Attended Durham High 
School 1910-1914; University of North Carolina, 1918, A.B. De- 
gree; University of North Carolina Law School, 1919. Lawyer. 
Private U. S. A., 1918. Zeta Psi Fraternity. Member of House 
of Representatives of 1923 and 1935. Presbyterian. Married 
Miss Elizabeth Scales in 19 21. Address: 1012 Vickers Avenue, 
Durham. N. C. 



LAWRENCE LEE BURGIX 

Lawrence Lee Burgin, Democrat, Representative from Hender- 
son County, was born in Henderson County, August 3, 189 3. Son 
of J. H. and Josephine Lee Burgin. Educated in the County 
Schools, The Westminister School, and Davidson College. Farmer. 
A.E.F. Presbyterian — Elder. Married Miss Mary Osborne. Sep- 
tember 3, 1919, four children. Address: Horse Shoo, N. C. 



'2l'-2 Biographical Sketches 

.lETKR C. BUKI.KSOX 

Jeter C. Burleson, Republican, Representative from Mitchell 
County, was born in Bakersville, N. C, July 17, 1899. Sou of 
William Anderson and Hester Ledford Burleson. Attended Bak- 
ersville High School, 1913-1917; Appalachian State Teachers' 
College two years. Engaged in Insurance and Bonding. Princi- 
pal, Glen Ayre Consolidated School for two years. Clerk, Superior 
Court, Mitchell County, 1922-1930; youngest clerk in State elected 
to that office. Chairman, Republican County Executive Commit- 
tee, 19 2 8-19 3 0. Served in Special Session, General Assembly, 
193 6. Member, Bakersville Men's Club. Mason. Baptist. Married 
Miss Atta Rankin 1925. Address: Bakersville, N. C. 



JOHX FRANKLIN CABE 

John Franklin Cabe, Democrat, Representative' from Haywood 
County, was born in Haywood County, January 3, 1869. Son of 
Jos. M. and Martha (Jones) Cabe. Educated in Common Schools. 
Farmer. Deputy Collector from 1912 to 1920; Sheriff, Haywood 
County, 1920-1926. Married Miss Alerdie Burress in 1900. Ad- 
dress: Waynesville, N. C. 



JOHN WILLIAM CAFFEY 

John William Caffey, Democrat, Representative from Guilford 
County, was born in North Wilkesboro (Wilkes County) May 21, 
1903. Son of John Robert and Conna Belle (Moore) Caffey. 
Attended North Wilkesboro Grammar School, 1909-1910; Sum- 
merfleld Public School, 1910-1915; Greensboro Public Schools, 
1915-1921; University of North Carolina, 1921-1923; Wake For- 
est College (Summer School), 1930. Attoi'ney at law. Elk 
Member Dramatic Order of Khorrassan, Knights of Pythias 
Lambda Chi Alpha, National Exchange Clubs (charter member) 
Exalted Ruler, Greensboro Elks Lodge, 1935-1936; First Presi- 
dent, Greensboro Exchange Club, 1935; President, North Caro- 
lina State Exchange Club, 193 6-1937. Presbyterian. President, 



Representatives 213 

Men's Bible Class, 1933; Member Board Deacons since 1933; 
As&istant Superintendent, Sunday School, 19 3 5, 193 6-37. Mar- 
ried Miss Pattie Brawley, September 1. 19 2 6. Address: Greens- 
boro. N. C. 



JOSEPH T. CARRUTHERS. Jr. 

Joseph T. Carruthers, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Guil- 
ford County, was born in Greensboro, December 11, 1906. Son of 
Joseph T. and Ethel (Williamson) Carruthers. Attended Besse- 
mer High School, 1921-1925; Duke University, 1929, A.B. ; Duke 
University Law School, 1932, LL.B. Lawyer. Member American 
Bar Association, North Carolina Bar, and Greensboro Bar Asso- 
ciation. Member Delta Tau Delta, Social Fraternity; Omicron 
Delta Kappa, Honorary Leadership Fraternity; Red Friars, Local 
Honorary Leadership Fraternity, and Gamma Eta Gamma, Legal 
Fraternity. President O.D.K., 1930-31; Master Revolution Lodge 
552, 1936. Methodist. Married Miss Mary Frances Sutton, June 
14, 1936. 



THORNE CLARK 

Thorne Clark, Democrat, Representative from Lincoln County, 
was born in Raleigh, N. C, December 21, 1889. Son of Walter 
and Susan Washington ( Graham ) Clark. Educated in Raleigh 
Public Schools; attended N. C. State, B.E. degree 19 09. Cotton 
manufacturer. Mayor, Town of Lincolnton, 1931-33; Trustee 
School Board, Lumberton, 1933-36. Mason. Baptist. Married 
Miss Mabel Gossett, 1913. Address: Lincolnton, N. C. 



HARRY PRUDEX COOPER 

Harry Pruden Cooper, Democrat, Representative fi-om Chero- 
kee County, was born at Dalton, Georgia, June 2, 1891. Son of 
Robert LaFayette and Grace Pruden Cooper. Attended Georgia 
Military Academy, 1907, 1908-1909; Wake Forest Law School, 



214 Biographical Sketches 

19 29. AUonu'y. Member, North Carolina Bar Association; 
Twentieth Judicial District Bar Association; Twentieth Judicial 
District Bar Association Executive Committee, 1935-36; Board of 
Aldermen, Town of Murphy, 1927-1930; Mayor of Murphy, two 
terms; Assistant Secretary to Senator Robert R. Reynolds, 19 32- 
1933; Member Executive Committee Eleventh District 1932-36. 
Served in World War from April 19, 1917, to December 1, 1919. 
Commissioned officer, served in grade of 2nd Lieutenant, 1st Lieu- 
tenant, Captain, Major; now Lieutenant Colonel, Officers' Reserve 
Corps. Mason. Elk. Shriner. Member American Legion; Re- 
serve Officers' Association. District Commander, the American 
Legion, 19 28-3 6. President Nantahala Chapter, Reserve Officers' 
Association, at present. Southern Methodist. Steward in church, 
1930-31. Married Miss Rosalena Ketron, February 4, 1910. Ad- 
dress: Murphy, N. C. 



THOS. E. COOPER 

Thos. E. Cooper, Democrat, Representative from New Hanover 
County, was born in Mullins, S. C, August 19, 1883. Son of Noah 
B. and Lucinda (Jenerett) Cooper. Attended Mullins, South Car- 
olina, Public Schools and two years at Citadel, Charleston. Gradu- 
ated at "Falls" Business College, Nashville, Tenn. Livestock and 
coal merchant. President North Carolina Bankers' Association, 
1914. Chairman New Hanover County Board of Education for 
ten years. 1915-192.5; also chairman of the New Hanover County 
Democratic Executive Committee. Representative in the General 
Assembly, 19 35. Member of Elks. Methodist. Married Janie 
Laura Collins, of Conway, S. C, November 12, 19 7. Address: 
Wilmington, N. C. 



GEORGE WINSTON CRAIG 

George Winston Craig, Democrat, Representative from Bun- 
combe County, was born in that county June IS, 1894. Son of 
Locke and Annie (Burgin) Craig. Attended public and private 
schools of Asheville and Webb School. Bellbuckle, Tenn., 1911; 



Representatives 215 

University of North Carolina, 1912-1916; Wake Forest Law 
School, 1916. Lawyer. First Lieutenant United States Army, 
Tank Corps, 1917-1919. Board of Education, 1925. Referee in 
Bankruptcy. Representative in the General Assembly of 1935. 
Married Miss Kathryne Taylor, June 8, 19 21. Address: Asheville, 
N. C. 



GEORGE E. DAVIS 

George E. Davis, Democrat, Representative from Hyde County, 
was born in Engelhard in 1870. Son of Thomas M. and Eliza J. 
(Sanderson) Davis. Attended private and public schools, 1879- 
1888. Farmer. Sheriff of Hyde County, 1912-1917. Representa- 
tive in the General Assembly in 1923, 1925, 1929, 1931, and 1933. 
Methodist. Married Miss Orpha Credle, January 6, 1904. Address: 
Lake Landing, N. C. 



ROY LINWOOD DAAIS 

Roy Linwood Davis, Democrat, Representative from Dare 
County, was born at Wanchese, Dare County, December 1, 18 88. 
Son of Samuel Nathan and Irene (Burgess) Davis. Attended 
Wanchese Grammar School and Wanchese Academy, 1894-1906; 
University of North Carolina, 190 6-19 08. Lieutenant. Supply 
Corps, U. S. Navy, Retired. County Commissioner, Dare County, 
1932-1934. Enlisted July 5, 1910, U. S. Navy, and served contin- 
uously until December 1, 19 30, when placed on the retired list. 
Participated in several Cuban and Haitian revolutions; capture of 
Vera Cruz. Mexico, and attached to 5th Battle Squadron, which 
operated with the British Grand Fleet during the World War 
until the surrender of the German High Seas Fleet. Wanchese 
Lodge, No. 521, A. F. and A. M.; Naval Council No. 11, Bremer- 
ton, Wash.; Olympus Chapter No. 27, Bremerton, Wash.; Malta 
Commandery No. 18, Bremerton, Wash.; Nile Temple, A. A. (). N. 
M. S.. Seattle, Wash. Senior Deacon, Wanchese Lodge, 1932; 
Senior Warden. 19 3 3-19 3 4. Methodist. Lay Leader and Teacher 
Men's Bible Class, Wanchese Methodist Church. Rei)resentative 
in the General Assembly, 1933. Married Miss Alma Grace Burrus, 
December 8, 1917. Address: Wanchese N. C, P. O. Box lot. 



216 BiooRAi'iiicAL Sketch Ks 

vvAi/iEi; p.i;ya\ da vis 

Walter Bryan Davis, Democrat, Representative from Randolph 
County, was born at Pine Hall, N. C, September 24, 1897. Son 
of Thomas William and Mary Annie (McPherson) Davis. Attend- 
ed school in Germanton, N. C, 1915; Gray's Chapel, N. C, 1927. 
Farmer. Seaman, June 5, 1918, to December 31, 1918. Member 
Junior Order Council No. 211, Walnut Cove, N. C. Baptist. Mar- 
ried Miss Savannah Georgia Watts, December 15, 19 3 5. Address: 
Randleman, N. C. 



DAVID P. DKLLI.XCJEi; 

David P. Dellinger, Democrat, Representative from Gaston 
County, was born in same county. Son of John C. and Barbara 
(Glenn) Dellinger. Attended Sylvanus Erwin Normal Institute, 
Waco, 1893-1896, after attending the public schools. Graduated 
from Rutherford College (Old), A.B. degree, 1897-99. Attended 
University of North Carolina Law School, 19 00. Licensed by the 
Supreme Court, September, 19 00. Lawyer, President Farmers 
Bank and Trust Company, Cherryville. Delivered alumni address, 
Rutherford College, commencement 1912. Mayor Cherryville. 
City Attorney, 1901-02. Clerk Committee on Finance, House of 
Representatives, 19 09. Member House of Representatives, regu- 
lar and extra sessions, 1912. Reading Clerk, House of Repre- 
sentatives, 1915, 1917, 1919, extra session 1920, 1921, and extra 
session 1923. Member House of Representatives, 1925. Masonic 
Lodge life member; Royal Arch Mason; Knights Templar; Oasis 
Temple Shrine. Knight of Pythias, Dramatic Order Khorassan. 
Junior Order United American Mechanics. Improved Order of Red 
Men. Served Cherryville Masonic Lodge seven years as Master; 
two years as Secretary. District Deputy Grand Master, 2Sth Ma- 
sonic District; now Representative Grand Lodge of the State of 
Arizona. Baptist. Baptist Sunday School Superintendent twenty 
years; organizer and clerk Gaston County Baptist Association 
since 1919. Vice President and Director 1917-1920) and Presi- 
dent (1920-1924) Farmers Bank and Trust Company. Local 
counsel S. A. L. Railway Company, 1913. Married Miss Grace 
Abernethy, 19 03. Address: Cherryville, N. C. 



Representatives 217 

THOMAS PHIl.MOKE DELLIXGER 

Thomas Philmore Bellinger, Republican, Representative from 
Avery County, was born in Altamont, N. C, April 12, 1894. Son 
of Mrs. Minnie A. Bellinger. Attended Berea College 1911, 1912, 
1913; N. C. State College Summer School, 1920 through 1925 and 
19 26. Vocational Agricultural Teacher. Alvisor Y. T. H. F. 
Chapter. Received recognition for ten years teaching service. 
Member Avery County Republican Executive Board, 1926-1936. 
Military private, 1918. Member Junior Order; Mason. Methodist. 
Sunday School Superintendent. Married Carry C. Johnson, April 
12, 1921. Address: Crossmore, N. C. 



WILLIAM WOOTEX EAGLES 

William Wooten Eagles, Bemocrat, Representative from Edge- 
combe County, was born in that county June 19, 18 81. Son of 
Benjamin Franklin and Sidney Elizabeth (Bradley) Eagles. 
Attended Edgecombe High School, 1900; University of North 
Carolina, 190 4, A.B. Farmer and Banker. President Farmer's 
Cooperative Exchange, Raleigh, N. C. Member Board of Birec- 
tors. Southern State Cooperative. President Merchant and Farm- 
er Bank, Macclesfield, N. C. Member Board Commissioners. 
1913. Elected delegate Bemocratic National Convention, 1928. 
Masonic Lodge; Shriner; Modern Woodmen. Master, Masonic 
Lodge, Macclesfield, N. C, 1918. Representative from Edge- 
combe County in General Assembly of 1933 and 1935. Baptist. 
Beacon, 1928-1934. Married Miss Baisy McLean, October 17, 
1918. Address: Macclesfield, N. C. 



LLOYD STANLEY ELKIXS 

Lloyd Stanley Elkins, Bemocrat, Representative from Bladen 
County, was born in Elkton, N. C, October 2 6, 1897. Son of 
George B. and Hattie L. (Shaw) Elkins. Attended Whitsett In- 
stitute, 1914-1916; Trinity College (now Buke University), 
A.B. degree, 1920 (Summa Cum Laude); Trinity College Law 



218 Bl()(iI{AI'III('AL SiCKTCIlKS 

School, 1920-1923. Attorney. Member North Carolina State 
Bar; Bladen County Bar Association. Admitted to N. C. Bar, 
1934; to N. Y. Bar, 1925. Attorney for the Town of Bladenboro 
since 1934. Associate Legal Editor, American Law Reports, 
Rochester, N. Y., 1923-1933; Member, North Carolina Commis- 
sion on Interracial Relations, since 1934. S.A.T.C. Trinity Col- 
lege, fall of 1918; Private, 1st Class; R.O.T.C, Trinity College, 
First Sergeant. Member 9019; Lambdi Chi Alpha; Phi Beta 
Kappa; Sigma Nu Phi. Chancellor, Signu Nu Phi, 192 3. Mar- 
ried Miss Idabel Callihan, October 12, 1924. Address: Bladen- 
boro, N. C. 



WILLLVM EATON FEXXER 

William Eaton Fenner, Democrat, Representative from Nash 
County, was born in Halifax, November 29, ISSO. Son of J. H. 
and Clara (Ferebee) Fenner. Attended Wake Forest College 
two years, 1896-1898; N. C. State College, 1898-1899. Tobacco 
warehouseman. Member Eastern Carolina Warehouse Associa- 
tion; President Warehouse Association; Chairman Warehouse 
Code Authority. Mason. Representative in the General Assem- 
bly of 1935. Married Miss Ethyle Paschall, March, 1930. Ad- 
dress: Rockv Mount, N. C. 



RONALD E. FINCH 

Ronald E. Finch, Democrat, Representative from Buncombe 
County, was born in Bailey, N. C, Nash County, June 2S, 1898. 
Son of Henry T. and Mary Ellen (Adams) Finch. Attended 
Bailey High School; Wake Forest College. Attorney. Member 
North Carolina State Bar; Lions Club; President, Black Moun- 
tain Chamber of Commerce since 1933. Member Buncombe 
County Law Library; Member Local School Board; Chairman, 
F. H. A.; Member Board of Directors, N. C. State Tubercular 
Sanatorium, September, 1936; Mayor, Black Mountain, 19 31- 
1933; Attorney, Town of Black Mountain, 1926-1931. Baptist. 
Chairman, Board of Deacons, 1933-1936; Deacon since 1934. 
Married Miss Josephine Baker, April, 1922. Address: Black 
Mountain, N. C. 



Representatives 210 

RALPH GEORGE FLOWERS 

Ralph George Flowers, Democrat, Representative from Cataw- 
ba County, was born in Granite Falls, N. C, July 30, 1899. Son 
of Doctor George E. and Cora A. (Haas) Flowers. Attended 
Rutherford College, 1915-1916. Served in the United States 
Navy during World War; assigned to Battle Cruiser U. S. S. 
"Montana"; Member, American Legion; Commander, Hickory 
Post, 1934-1935. Methodist. Member Boy Scout Committee. 
Married Miss Margaret Barbara Bisswanger, May 7, 1922. Ad- 
dress: 1621 8th Avenue, Hickory, N. C. 



RAIFORD THOMAS FULGHUM 

Raiford Thomas Fulghum, Democrat, Representative from 
Johnston County, was born in Wilson County, February 16, 1881. 
Son of James Henry and Lenora (Boykin) Fulghum. Studied 
Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina. Formerly Public 
School Teacher. Druggist. Member Lions Club. Mason; Junior 
Order American Mechanics; Shriner. Member House of Repre- 
sentative, 1935. Methodist. Married Miss Nina Darden, Novem- 
ber 14, 1912. Address: Kenley, N. C. 



ERNEST A. GARDNER 

Ernest A. Gardner, Democrat, Representative from Cleveland 
County, was born at Shelby, December 2 3, 189 7. Son of Virgil 
A. and Florence (Nolan) Gardner. Attended Fallston High 
School, 1915-1918; Boiling Springs High School, 1918-1919. 
LL.B. Wake Forest College, 1923. Lawyer. Member House of 
Representatives in 1933 and 1935. Baptist. Married Miss Vera 
Richardson, May 19, 1926. Address: Shelby, N. C. 



JOE W. GARRETT 

Joe W. Garrett. Democrat, Representative from Rockingham 
County, was born in Rockingham County, March 7, 1911. Son 



220 BioGRAPJiioAL Skktches 

of Joe W. and Sallie Elizabeth Garrett. Attended Madison Pub- 
lic Schools, 1917-1927; Wake Forest College, LL.B. Degree. 
1932. Attorney. Member Rockingham County and North Caro- 
lina State Bar; President, Madison Retail Merchants Association. 
7'hree and one-half years service in North Carolina National 
Guard, rank of Staff Sergeant; Member Madison Rotary Club; 
Past Vice-president, Rotary Club at Madison and past Acting 
President, 1935. Address: Madison, N. C. 



MARSHALL REX GASS 

Marshall Rex Gass, Democrat, Representative from Forsyth 
County, was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, December S, 18 79. 
Son of William D. and Rebecca Adeline (Fox) Gass. Attended 
School in Knoxville, Tennessee. Tobacconist. Member. Chamber 
of Commerce; Winston Tobacco Board of Trade, Inc.; Vice-presi- 
dent, Winston Tobacco Board of Trade, Inc., 1931; Supervisor 
of Sales, 1932-1934. Methodist. Member, Board of Stewards. 
1927; Chairman, Finance Committee, 1927. Married Miss Bessie 
Mae Lloyd, December 24, 1912. Address: Box 21, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. 

DENISON FOY GILES 

Denison Foy Giles. Democrat, Representative from McDowell 
County was born in McDowell County, July 26, ISSO. Son of 
M. C. and Julia (Gibbs) Giles. Attended Mount Pleasant Col- 
legiate Institute, Trinity College three years, and the University 
of North Carolina for one year. Educator. County Superinten- 
dent of Public Schools in McDowell County seven years; City 
Superintendent of Public Schools at Marion, N. C, for three 
years; County Superintendent of Public Schools in Wake County 
for three years; Member State Board Institute Conductors for 
two years; Member State Senate 1915 and 192 3. Active in the 
Councils of the National Educational Association, Southern Edu- 
cational Conference, and N. C. Teachers Assembly for a number 
of years. Mason; K. of P.; Redmen; J. O. U. A. M. Methodist. 
Married Miss Kathei'ine Lee Reed in 190 8. Address: Marion, 
N. C. 



Representatives 221 

JOHX BREWSTER GRANT 

John Brewster Grant, Republican, Representative from Davie 
County, was born in Mocksville, N. C, August 14, 1913. Son 
ol A. T. and Helen Brewster Grant. Attended Mocksville High 
School, 1926-1930; Graduated at Davidson College, 1934, B.S. II 
Degree; North Carolina Law School, 1934-19 36. Attorney. 
Member R. O. T. C, Davidson College; Corporal, 1930-1932; 
Member Mocksville Lodge, No. 134, A. F. & A. M. (Masonic); 
Member Lions Club. Address: Box 265, Mocksville, N. C. 



CLAUDE JUDSON GRAY 

Claude Judson Gray, Democrat, Representative from Gates 
County, was born at Hugo, Virginia, October 16, 1910. Son of 
Fianklin Davis and Julia Elizabeth (Bell) Gray. Attended Kee's 
Fork Elementary School, 1917-19 20, Consolidated with Hobbs- 
ville High School, attended there, 1920-1928. Elected President 
Senior Class (received honor of salutatorian at graduation). 
Attended Wake Forest College. 1928-1932. Attorney. County 
Recorder; Solicitor, appointed November, 19 34, to fill unexpired 
term, reappointed August, 1935, resigned November, 1936. 
Member National Legal Fraternity Gamma Eta Gamma; Master 
Mason, Gatesville Lodge No. 126; Treasurer, Beta Gamma Chap- 
ter, Gamma Eta Gamma. 1931-1932. Elected Vice-president Law 
School at Wake Forest, 1931-1932. Baptist. Address: Box 117, 
Gatesville, N. C. 



EDWARD R. IIANFORD 

Edward R. Hanford, Democrat, Representative from Alamance 
County, was born in Alamance County, September 5, 1885. Son 
of Andrew Jackson and Elizabeth (Heritage) Hanford. Attended 
Whitsett Institute, 1905. Brick manufacturer. Member Burling- 
ton School Board, 1926-1930. Member Alamance County Com- 
missioners, 1930-1932. Woodman of the World. Manied Miss 
Ava May Russell, April 30, 1907. Address: Burlington, N. C. 



223 liiouKAi'iucAL Sketches 

.1. BRUCE HASH 

J. Bruce Hash, Democrat, Representative from Ashe County, 
was born at Piney Creek, Alleghany County, January 29, 189 7. 
Son of William W. and Eunice (Halsey) Hash. Attended Bridle 
Creek High School, Independence, Virginia, 1911-1915; Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, 1915-1917; University of Tennessee, Pea- 
body College for Teachers, 1918-1922, Summer Schools. Farmer. 
County Superintendent of Schools Ashe County, 19 31-1935. Sec- 
ond Lieutenant, 1918. Baptist. Married Miss Doris Pennington, 
June 1, 1924. Address: West Jefferson, N. C. 



WILLIA^M THOMAS HATCH 

William Thomas Hatch, Democrat, Representative from Wake 
County was born at Millbrook, N. C. April 1, 1905. Son of 
Nathaniel Ward Hatch (deceased) and Minnie Thomas Hatch. 
Attended Raleigh High School, 1924; Wake Forest College, LL.B. 
Degree, 19 2 8. Attorney. Member Wake County Bar Associa- 
tion; Wake County Junior Bar Association; District Bar Asso- 
ciation and the Noi'th Carolina State Bar. Mason. Member, 
Junior Order, Council No. 3 3 5. Master Neuse Lodge No. 9 7, 
1935-1936; Councillor, Junior Order Council, No. 335, 1935. 
Methodist. Address: Millbrook, N. C. 



JETER L. HAINES 

Jeter L. Haynes, Republican, Representative from Yadkin 
County, was born in Jonesville, N. C, December 2 6, 190 2. Son 
en M. R. and Mary (Vestal) Haynes. Attended Elkins High 
School, 1923-1927; Mars Hill Junior College, 19 29; Appalachian 
State Teachers College. B.S. Degree, 19 33. Teacher. Vice-chair- 
man, Mathematics Teachers; North Western Teachers Associa- 
tion of North Carolina; Chairman of Precinct Executive Com- 
mittee, 1937. Member, International Relations Club and Inter- 
society Debater, while in college. Married Miss Cleo Harrell, 
December 13, 1935. Address: Jonesville, N. C. 



Representatives 223 

JULIUS C. HOBBS 

Julius C. Hobbs, Democrat, Representative from New Hanover 
County, was born in Sampson County, June, 1879. Son of Julius 
C. and Mary E. (Kerr) Hobbs. Attended Private Schools; Golds- 
boro Graded Schools; Oak Ridge Institute: University of North 
Carolina. Electrical Engineer. Secretary New Hanover County 
Democratic Executive Committee, 1924-1926. Member of the 
Fraternitj' of Freemasons and Junior Order United American 
Mechanics. Member Rotary Club. Representative in the Gen- 
eral Assembly, 19 35. Presbyterian. Married Miss Maude E. 
Player, June, 1903. Address: Wilmington. N. C. 



WILLIAM EDWIN HORNER 

William Edwin Horner, Democrat, Representative from Lee 
County, was born in Durham County, November 2 2, 1901. Son 
of Robert D. and Sudie Walker (Mond) Horner. Educated in 
the Durham City Schools, 1907-1918; Trinity College, 1918-1919; 
University of North Carolina, 1919-1922, B.S., in Commerce. 
Newspaper publisher. Member North Carolina Press Associa- 
tion. Junior O.U.A.M.; Modern Woodmen of America; Kiwanis 
Club. Methodist. Married Miss Nannie Andrews, 1924. Ad- 
dress: Sanford, N. C. 



HUGH G. HORTOX 

Hugh G. Horton, Democrat, Representative from Martin Coun- 
ty, was born at Ahoskie, N. C, December 23, 1896. Son of John 
A. and Oda Novella (Byrd) Horton. Attended Ahoskie High 
School and Winton High School; Wake Foi-est Law School, 192 2. 
Lawyer. American Bar Association and North Carolina Bar Asso- 
ciation. Mayor of Williamston, 19 23. Prosecuting Attorney 
Martin County. 1927. Private in 1918, 280 Field Hospital, 20th 
Sanitary Train, Camp Sevier, South Carolina. Skewarkee Lodge 
No. 90, A. F. & A. M., Williamston. Washington, N. C. Lodge 
No. 9 2 2, B. P. O. Elks. Sudan Temple, A. A. O. N. M. Shrine, 



224 BiOGKAi'jiicAh Sketches 

New Bern, N. C. New Bern Consistory No. 3, Scottish Rite Ma- 
sonry. Representative in tlie General Assembly of 19 3 5. Mem- 
ber Williamston Memorial Baptist Church, Williamston, N. C. 
Married Miss Bessie O. Page, November 11, 1923. Address: 
Williamston, N. C. 



BRIXTON JOHN HOWARD 

Britton John Howard, Democrat, Representative from Orange 
County, was born near Jonesboro, N. C, June 3, 1885. Son of 
Allen Sugg and Emma (Thomas) Howard. Attended Broadway 
Normal School; Elon College; University of North Carolina. 
Minister. Member of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and 
the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. Representative 
in the General Assembly of 1935. Member of United (Christian- 
Congregational) Church. Married Miss Malissa Thomas, May 10, 
1916. Address: Chapel Hill, N. C. 



claudp: c. ^o^vET.L 

Claude C. Howell, Democrat, Representative from Montgomery 
County, was born at Troy, N. C, June 10, 18 89. Son of Yance 
B. and Haseltine ( Richaidson) Howell. Attended Troy High 
School, 104-1908; University of North Carolina, 1910. Publisher. 
Treasurer, Montgomery County, 1927-1928; Tax Collector, 19 2 7- 
1932; Chief of Police, 1915-1920; Sheriff, 1926-1934. Mason. 
Master, Montgomery Lodge No. 309, A. F. & A. M. Baptist. 
Married Miss Elector Holler, 1912. Address: Troy, N. C. 



MRS. CHARLES HLTTCHIXS 

Mrs. Charles Hutchins. Democrat, Representative from Yancey 
County, was born in Windom. Yancey County. Daughter of 
John Mills and Martha (Young) Griffith. Educated at Yancey 
Collegiate Institute. Broke the World's Record for Cross-Coun- 
try Hiking, walking from Burnsville to Asheville. a distance of 



Representatives 225 

lorty miles, in seven hours and thirty-eight minutes, April 2 5, 
19 27, shown by Fox News-Reel. Vice-chairman of the Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee of Yancey County, 1930-1934; vice- 
chairman Democratic Executive Committee, 1935-1936. Rep- 
resentative in the General Assembly of 19 35; Representative, 
Special Session, General Assembly, 1936; Chairman, Committee, 
Public Welfare, 19 3 5-19 3 6. Member of Higgins Memorial Meth- 
odist Church; member of Ladies Aid and Missionary Societies. 
Married Charl'^'S Hutchins, Attorney. Address: Burnsville, N. C. 



TIIEO. M. JEXKIXS 

Theo. M. Jenkins. Republican, Representative from Graham 
County, was born in Fairview, Buncombe County, September 25, 
1SS7. Son of S. L. and Sue L. (Redmond) Jenkins. Attended 
Fairview Collegiate Institute, 1905; University of North Carolina 
(Summer School), 1908; Wake Forest Law School, 1917. Law- 
yer. Representative in the General Assembly, 19 23 and 1927. 
Member North Carolina Bar Association. Mayor of Robbinsville, 
1922; County Attorney for Graham County, 1917-1920, 1922; 
United States Government Appeal Agent, Attorney to Local 
Board, Graham County, 1917-1919. Member North Carolina 
Budget Commission. 1923-1925. Mason. Shriner. Oasis Temple; 
Junior Order United American Mechanics. Married Miss Winnie 
Mauney, November 23, 1923. Address: Robbinsville, N. C. 



EDWIX I{. JOIIXSOX 

Edwin R. Johnson. Democrat, Representative from Currituck 
County, was born near Currituck Court House, September 10, 
1868. Son of Silas P. and Carolina (Coulter) Johnson. At- 
tended public school and Atlantic Collegiate Institute of Eliza- 
beth City. Merchant. Chairman County Democratic Executive 
Committee continuously since 189 3. Member State Senate, 1909 
and 1917; member House of Representatives, 1919, 1921, 1925, 



226 Biographical Sketches 

1927, 1929 and 1931; Chairman Board of County Commissioners, 
1907-1909; Chairman Board of Education. Food Administrator 
for Currituck County during the World War. Chairman High- 
way Commission, 1923-1924; Chairman Game Commission, 1923- 
1924. Married Mrs. Genevieve Holloman, 1910. Address: Cur- 
rituck, N. C. 



CYRUS CONRAD JOHNSTON 

Cyrus Conrad Johnston, Democrat, Representative from Iredell 
County, was born in Mooresville, N. C, July 2, 1894. Son of W. 
C. and Margaret (Sloan) Johnston. Attended Oak Ridge, 1910; 
Trinity Park, 1911; Trinity College. Engaged in Hardware and 
Cotton Business. Member of Hardware Association; Mason; 
Shriner. Member of City Council, ten years. Mayor, four years. 
In World War, 1917-1918. State Commander American Legion, 
1931. Member House of Representatives in 1935. Married Miss 
Elizabeth Rankin, June 15, 1927. Address: Mooresville, N. C. 



BAXTER C. JONES 

Baxter C. Jones, Democrat, Representative from Swain County, 
was born in Jackson County, August 6, 1887. Son of Neson P. 
and Emma S. (Woodard) Jones. Attended Cullowhee State Nor- 
mal, 1909-1914 inclusive and graduated with diploma; Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, 1917-1919. Lawyer. County Attorney 
Swain County for past four years and holds this position at 
present. Has been Noble Grand and member of Grand Lodge. 
Served in World War, in the United States Navy, 1918-1919; 
Mason and Odd Fellow. Representative from Jackson County 
in the 1915 session of the Legislature. Member House of Repre- 
sentatives, 1935. Baptist; Sunday School Teacher. Married 
Miss Emma May DeHart, January 5, 1935. Address: Bryson 
City, N. C. 



Representatives 227 

HINTON LEE JOYXER 

Hinton Lee Joyner, Democrat, Representative from Northamp- 
ton County, was born at Seabord, N. C, January 3, 1866. Son 
of Allen E. and Virginia (Barham) Joyner. Attended Seaboard 
High School; Private Preparatory School in Wilson, N. C, and 
Richmond, Virginia, High School. Automobile Dealer. Treasurer 
Tow^n of Seaboard, 1900-1904: Sheriff, Northampton County, 
1904-1934. Mason. Member Junior Order United American 
Mechanics; Junior Deacon, Senior Deacon, Senior Warden, Ma- 
sonic Lodge. Methodist Episcopal. Steward for last thirty years. 
Attended every State Democratic Convention since 1900; delegate 
to National Convention in Chicago, 1932. Married Miss Annie 
Helen Bridgers, May 25, 1887 (first); Miss Mattie E. Reid, No- 
vember 27, 1895, (second). First wife deceased. Address: 
Jackson. N. C. 



WILLIAM PATTON KIMZEY 

William Patton Kimzey, Democrat, Representative from 
Transylvania County, was born in Henderson County, N. C, 
April 14. 1901. Son of William Rucker and Roberta (Patton) 
Kimzey. Attended Brevard High School, 1918; Davidson Col- 
lege, A.B. Degree, 1923; Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., 
LL.B. Degree, 19 26. Attorney. Member North Carolina State 
Bar; Transylvania County Bar Association; President, Transyl- 
vania County Bar Association, 1936-1937; President 18th Judi- 
cial District Bar, 19 3 6-1937; President Brevard Kiwanis Club, 
1934. Attorney for Transylvania County Board of Education, 
1930-1936. First Lieutenant Infantry O. R. O., U. S. Army. 
Commission in effect at present. Member, Lambda Chi Alpha, 
Social Fraternity; Phi Pi, Legal Fraternity. Head of History 
Department University Military School, Mobile, Alabama, 1923- 
1925; Liquidating Agent, all closed banks in Transylvania, Hen- 
derson, Polk and Rutherford Counties, 1933-1936. Presbyterian. 
Married Miss Juanita Sprinkle, March 9, 19 29. Address, Brevard, 
N. C. 



228 IBlOGKAPHICAL SKETCHES 

JENNINGS GRAHAM KING 

Jennings Graham Kins, Democrat, Representative from Scot- 
land Connty, was born in Durham, N. C, July 11, 1908. Son of 
Thomas Wesley and Bessie (Odon) King. Educated in Laurin- 
burg High School, 1921-1925; Duke University, 1925-1929, 
B.A. Degree; Duke University Law School, 1928-1930. Lawyer. 
Member North Carolina State Bar; President, 13th District Bar, 
1936-1937. Member Phi Beta Kappa; Omicron Delta Kappa; 
Tan Kappa Alpha; Sigma Upsilon fraternities. Member Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. Address: Laurinburg, N. C. 



H. VINCENT LEARY 

H. Vincent Leary, Democrat, Representative from Camden 
County, was born in Camden. N. C. April 28. 1909. Son of Hilary 
N. and Carrie Ferbee Leary. Attended Old Trap and Elizabeth 
City High Schools. Farmer. Deputy Sheriff of Camden County. 
Married Miss Marie Mitchell on June 1, 1927. Address: Camden, 
N. C. 



THOMAS CLINGMAN LEDHETTER 

Thomas Clingman Ledbetter, Democrat, Representative from 
Jackson County, was born in Buncombe County. Son of William 
and Louisa (Haynes) Ledbetter. Educated in Public Schools 
and Bethel Academy. Farmer. County Surveyor, Haywood 
County, 189 4-19 03 and of Jackson County, 1910-1914. Member 
County Board of Education, Jackson County. Mason. Baptist. 
Married Miss Ella Knight, 1914. Address: Cullowhee, N. C. 



LOVIRA WRIGHT LEGGETT 

Lovira W. Leggett, Democrat, Representative from Halifax 
County, was born at Louisville, Ky., August 2 6, 1887. Son of 
Dr. Kenelm and August (Wright) Leggett. Attended school at 
Buies Creek, 1898; Oak Ridge Institute. 1900-1901; Trinity 



Representatives 229 

School (Chocowinity), 1901-1905; Wake Forest College, 1905- 
1909; Summer Law School, 1910; two years medicine and two 
years law at Wake Forest College. Lawyer. Representative 
from Halifax County in General Assemblies of 192 5 and 19 3 5. 
Married Miss Sallie Hyman, 1914. Address: Hobgood, N. C. 



WILLIAM L. LUMPKIN 

William L. Lumpkin, Democrat, Representative from Franklin 
County, was born at Youngsville, N. C, May 14, 19 3. Son of 
J. S. and Lena (Parker) Lumpkin. Attended Youngsville High 
School and Franklinton High School; Wake Forest College, 1920- 
1923; Wake Forest Law School. Lawyer. Louisburg Kiwanis 
Club; City Attorney Town of Franklinton. Baptist; Deacon; 
President Franklin County Baraca-Philathea Union, 1924. Rep- 
lesentative in the General Assembly, 1929, 1931, 1933 and 1935. 
Address: Louisburg, N. C. 



D. LACY McBRYDE 

D. Lacy McBryde, Democrat, Representative from Cumberland 
County, was born in Linden, N. C, May 17, 1907. Son of D. L. 
and Lucy (Pender) McBryde. Attended Linden Public School; 
University of North Carolina, 192 7; Wake Forest Law School, 
1929-1930. Lawyer. Solicitor, Cumberland County, 1930-1932; 
Cumberland County Judge, 1932-1934. Member Junior Order 
United American Mechanics; I. W. O. U. Presbyterian; Deacon. 
Address: Fayetteville, N. C. 



TYSON J. Mcdowell 

Tyson J. McDowel, Democrat, Representative from Polk Coun- 
ty, was born in Polk County, May 8, 1888. Son of Henry L. and 
Emma (Alverson) McDowell. Attended the public schools of 
Folk County. Farmer. Baptist. Married Miss Solena Fagan. 
Address: Campobello, S. C, Route No. 1. 



230 Biographical Sketches 

FULTON JONES McDUFFIE 

Fulton Jones McDufQe, Republican, Representative from Wilkes 
Count j% was born in Lee County, (now Moore County). Son of 
D. A. and Sarah Gilmore McDuffie. Attended school in Broad- 
way, N. C, and Wake Forest Law School, 1916. Attorney. 
Mayor, Town of Creedmoor, N. C, 1918-1925. Methodist. Mar- 
ried Miss Nellie Bowman. August 18, 1918. Address: Wilkes- 
boro, N. C. 



ROBERT TERRY McNAIR 

Robert Terry McNair, Democrat, Representative from Rich- 
mond County, was born at Hamlet, N. C, November 22, 1901. 
Son of Duncan and Mary V. (Terry) McNair. Attended High 
School, 1919. Druggist. Town Commissioner, Rockingham, N. 
C, 1935-1936. Mason, Presbyterian. Married Miss Margaret 
McAulay, September, 1923. Address, Rockingham, N. C. 



EVANDER BLUE McNEILL 

Evander Blue McNeill, Democrat, Representative from Hoke 
County, was born in Moore County, Janua^-y 29, 18 68. Son of 
John Norman and Mary Eliza (Blue) McNeill. Educated in 
Union Home School, Moore County, Farmer-merchant. County 
Commissioner, Hoke County. Presbyterian; Deacon; Elder. 
Married Miss Mattie E. Scales, May 20, 1904 (deceased). Ad- 
dress: Raeford, N. C. 



NEWTON J. MARTIN 

Newton J. Martin, Democrat, Representative from Surry Coun- 
ty, was born at Dobson, N. C, July 25, 1877. Son of John W. 
and Ardella (Hamlin) Martin. Received practical education. 
Farmer and Merchant. Mason; member Odd Fellows and Junior 
Order. Master Mason four terms; Odd Fellows — Noble Grand. 
Married Miss Kizzie Bray, March 5, 1925. Address: Dobson, N. C. 



E.EPEESENTATIVES 231 

MOXROE JEFFERSON MAY 

Monroe Jefferson May, Republican, Representative from Clay 
County, was born at Flatts, N. C, in 1S93. Son of S. J. and 
Jane (Jones) May. Attended Hiawassee High School, Hiawassee, 
Georgia; M.D. Atlanta School of Medicine, 1914; Physician. 
Member Tiger Oil Corporation. County Physician and Quaran- 
tine Officer; Coroner for four years; member County Board of 
Health since 1918; head Examining Board for ex-service men, 
1919. Mason; Thirty-second degree Scottish Rite; Junior Order. 
Baptist. Married Miss Lessie McHan in 1914. Address: Hayes- 
ville, N. C. 



EDGAR L. MAYHE^V^ 

Edgar L. Mayhew, Democrat, Representative from Mecklen- 
burg County, was born in Iredell County in 1882. Son of Banks 
and Anah (Elkins) Mayhew. Attended Piedmont Industrial 
Institute. Merchant. Woodman of the World. Methodist; 
Chairman Board of Stewards, 19 29-193 3; Sunday School Super- 
intendent, 1934-1935; Lay Leader, 1925-1935. Married Miss 
Deela May Eaton, February, 1914. Address: Charlotte, N. C, 
R.F.D. 4. 



P. W. MEEKIXS 

P. W. Meekins, Democrat, Representative from Caldwell Coun- 
ty, was born in Manteo, N. C, in 1902. Son of Theo. S. and 
Rosa P. (Midgett) Meekins. Attended Manteo High School. 
1915-1919; University of North Carolina, 1919-1921; Emerson 
Institute, Washington, D. C, 1922; Wake Forest Law School, 
19 23-19 2 5, Bachelor of Laws. Lawyer. Caldwell County Bar 
Association; North Carolina State Bar Association. City Attor- 
ney, Manteo, N. C, 1930-1931; County Attorney, Dare County. 
1927-1931; Prosecuting Attorney, Dare County Recorder's Court. 
19 2 9-1931. Representative in the General Assembly of 1935. 
Phi Beta Nu Law Fraternity; Knights of Pythias. Methodist. 



'2'S'2 lilOGKAi'iilCAL SkETCIIES 

W. FRANK MILLER 

W. Frank Miller, Democrat, Representative from Watauga 
County, was born at Boone, N. C July 12, 18 76. Son of T. 
Calvin and Martha Ann (Todd) Miller. Attended public schools 
o)" Watauga County. Canning of fruits and vegetables. County 
Commissioner, Watauga County, 1931-1935. Mason. Baptist; 
Deacon. Married Miss Ruby Spainhour, January 11, 1911, seven 
children. Address: Boone, N. C. 



CLARENCE EDWIN MITCHELL 

Clarence Edwin Mitchell, Democrat, Representative from Wake 
County, was born in Raleigh November 20, 1886. Son of James 
Wesley and Mary Ann (King) Mitchell. Attended Raleigh public 
schools. Printer. Proprietor of Mitchell Printing Company, 
Raleigh, N. C. Member of Chamber of Commei'ce and Kiwanis 
Club of Raleigh. President of Traveler's Aid Society of Raleigh. 
Member of Advisory Board of the Associated Charities of Ra- 
leigh; Chairman Wake County Board of Public Welfare; mem- 
ber North Carolina Crippled Children's Commission. Raleigh 
Merchants' Association; N. C. Master Printers Association; Hiram 
Lodge. No. 40, A. F. & A. M.; Scottish Rite Mason; Sudan 
Temple A. A. O. N. M. S. of New Bern, N. C; Sir Walter Lodge 
of Odd Fellows, Capital City Council; Jr. O. U. A. M.; Capital 
Chapter No. 162, Order of the Eastern Star; Past President of 
Raleigh Shrine Club. Past Patron Capital Chapter 162, Order 
of the Eastern Star. Past Grand Sentinel of the Grand Chapter 
of North Carolina Order of the Eastern Star. Baptist. Taber- 
nacle Baptist Church; Deacon; Superintendent Calvary Baptist 
Sunday School and one of the organizers. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1935. Married on July 4, 1905. to Miss 
Mary Louise Miller. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



JOHN SAMUEL MOORE 

John Samuel Moore, Democrat, Representative from Pitt 
County, was born in Bethel, N. C, October 24, 1893. Son of 



Representatives 233 

George Lafayette and Jane Susan (Smith) Moore. Attended 
Whitsett Institute, 1908-1910; University of North Carolina, A.B. 
Degree, 192 0; University of California, M.A. Degree, 1924; grad- 
uate work. Duke University, Summer, 19.33; journalistic work, 
Columbia University, Summer, 1915. Farmer and bookkeeper. 
Superintendent Fremont School, 1920-1923; Teacher of Mathe- 
matics and Eiglish, Gallileo High School, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia; Superintendent, Gates County Schools, 1927-1931. Mem- 
ber Junior Order. Methodist. Married Miss Magnolia Taylor, 
xXugust 26, 1916, six children. Address: Bethel, N. C. 



WALTER MURPHY 

Walter Murphy, Democrat, Representative from Rowan County, 
was born in Salisbury, October, 1872. Son of Andrew and Helen 
(Long) Murphy. Educated at the University of North Carolina; 
attended Law School, 189 2-189 4. Lawyer. Trustee of the Uni- 
versity since 1903; Executive Committee of same; General Sec- 
letary of the Alumni of the University. Trustee of the N. C. Sana- 
torium for the treatment of tuberculosis, 19 7-1914. Member 
of State Democratic Executive Committee, 1898, 1913. City 
Attorney for Salisbury, 1903-1908. Member of the General 
Assembly, 1897, 1901, 1903, 1905, 1907, 1913, 1915, 1921, 1923, 
1925, 19 27 and 19 33; Speaker of the House of Representatives 
at Extra Session, 1914; of the Regular Session, 1917; Reading 
Clerk of the Senate, 1899; Elector at Large, 1908. B. P. O. E. 
F. O. E. Red Men: Knights of Pythias; Mason; Sigma Nu (Col- 
lect) Fraternity; President of the General Alumni Association 
of the University; President Salisbury Kiwanis Club; A. A. O. N. 
M. S. ; Oasis Temple. Episcopalian. Married Miss Maud Harvey, 
1903. Address: Salisbury, N. C. 



.JOIIX HEXRY I\OR\\'C)OD 

John Henry Norwood, Democrat, Representative from Stanly 
County, born in Norwood, N. C, June 11, 1872. Son of John 
and Sallie Ann (McSwain) Norwood. Attended the common 



234 BioGKAi'iiicAL Sketches 

schools of Stanly County and the Norwood High School; Sum- 
mer Law School, 1913, Wake Forest College and the University 
Summer Law School, 1914. Lawyer. Taught school in the 
County Schools of Stanly County for ten years before the day of 
Graded Schools, and was in the Civil Service of the Government 
tor thirty years and now retired from that service; Represented 
Stanly County in the 19 3 5 General Assembly; served the Town of 
Norwood as Mayor and Town Clerk; was a member of Board of 
Commissioners; member of Woodmen of the World; Knights of 
Pythias; Junior Order United American Mechanics; Mason; 
Knight Templar; Royal Arch; member of Oasis Temple A. A. 0. 
M. Shrine; Stanly County Pomona Grange; Past Master Pee Dee 
Lodge No. 150, Norwood, N. C; Worthy Patron of Norwood Chap- 
ter No. 164, Order Eastern Star. Methodist; Steward; Head 
Usher; Trustee Church Property; President Men's Bible Class. 
Married Miss Hattie Rosanna Crump, November 13, 1895. Have 
seven children, three girls and four boys. Address: Box 16 5, 
Norwood, N. C. 



ROBERT ANDREW PATTON 

Robert Andrew Patton, Democrat, Representative from Macon 
County, was born in Franklin, N. C, August 11, 1887. Son of 
George R. and- Sarah Anne (Phillips) Patton. Educated in 
Franklin High School, A. & M. (State College), 1906-1908. 
Realtor. Senator, North Carolina General Assembly, 1933; mem- 
ber. State Democratic Executive Committee, 1928-1932. Mason. 
Methodist; Steward; Superintendent Sunday School. Married 
Miss Mamie Dickey Slagle, November 27, 1912 (deceased). Ad- 
dress: Franklin, N. C. 



JOHN HELL PAYLOR 

John Hill Paylor, Democrat, Representative from Pitt County, 
was born in Laurinburg, N. C, October 22, 1896. Son of James 
Monroe and Elizabeth Ann (Hill) Paylor. Attended Laurinburg 
High School, Laurinburg, N. C; University of North Carolina, 
1915-1918; LL.B. Degree, University of North Carolina, 1921. 



Representatives 235 

Lawyer. Member North Carolina State Bar; Pitt County Bar; 
Nortli Carolina Bar Association. Entered United States Army 
August 2 6, 1918; qualified for Commission as Second Lieutenant 
but Armistice declared before it was issued; honorably discharged 
December 16, 1918. Member of Farmville Lodge No. 517, A. F. 
and A. M.; Greenville Chapter No. 50, R. A. M.; Bethlehem Com- 
mandery No. 29, K. T., Greenville; Sudan Temple. A. A. O. N. 
M. S., New Bern, N. C; Farmville Post American Legion, No. 
151, Farmville. N. C; Worshipful Master Farmville Lodge 517 
A. F. & A. M., 1925-1926; Worshipful Master Farmville Lodge 
517 A. F. & A. M., 1934; First Post Commander, Farmville Post 
x\merican Legion No. 151, when organized in December, 19 22, 
and held same office in 1923, 1924, 1926, and 1927; District 
Commander Fifth District American Legion, 1931. Representa- 
tive in the General Assembly of 19 35. Attended University Law 
School, 1919, 1919-1920 and 1920; member Junior Order United 
American Mechanics, Farmville Council No. 141; member White 
Oak Camp No. 917, Woodmen of the World. Completed 28 years 
perfect attendance organized Sunday School on December 20, 
193 6. Member of Morton Memorial Presbyterian Church, Farm- 
ville, N. C; elected Elder April 3, 19 22, and served continuously 
since that date; Superintendent Sunday School since 1924. Mar- 
i-ied to Miss Alice Katherine Flynn, June 11, 1921; two children, 
John Hill Paylor Jr., and Robert Flynn Paylor. Address: Farm- 
ville. N. C. 



JAMES MERRILL PEACE 

James Merill Peace, Democrat, Representative from Vance 
County, was born in Oxford, N. C, August 20, 1892. Son of 
Alexander S. and Ella Courtney (Grandy) Peace. Attended Ox- 
ford Graded School and High School, 1903-1909; Horner Military 
School, Oxford, N. C, 1909-1910; University of North Carolina, 
1910; Wake Forest Law School, 1921. Attorney. Member Vance 
County Bar; North Carolina State Bar. City Alderman. Hender- 
son, N. C, 1921-1923; Secretary, Vance County Democratic Exec- 
utive Committee, 1928-1932; Chairman, Vance County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, 1932-1936. Member, Junior Order 



236 Biographical Sketches 

United American mechanics; Knights of Pythias. Methodist 
Episcopal. Married Miss Virginia Watson Alderman, September, 
1913. Address: Henderson, N. C. 



RUPERT TARPUEY PICKENS 

Rupert Tarpley Pickens, Democrat, Representative from Guil- 
ford County, was born in Lexington, June 2 8, 19 04. Son of 
Rupert Tarpley and Annie Blanche (Armfield) Pickens. At- 
tended High Point High School, 1917-1921; University of North 
Carolina, 1925, A.B.: University of North Carolina Law School, 
192.5-1927. Lawyer. President of High Point Bar Association, 
1934-19 3.5. Member of Phi Beta Kappa National Scholarship 
Fraternity. Representative in the General Assembly of 19 3 5. 
r'irst Methodist Protestant Church, High Point. Married Miss 
Ida Catherine Munyan, June 16, 19 2 8. Address: High Point, 
N. C. 



JULIAN HAWLEY POOLE 

Julian Hawley Poole, Democrat, Representative from Moore 
County, was born in Montgomery County. Son of H. S. and 
Sara A. (McLeod) Poole. Attended Grammar School, Marcus, 
Montgomery County: Jackson Springs School, Moore County: 
Eiscoe High School, Montgomery County, 1913; N. C. State Col- 
lege, B.S. 1917 in Agriculture. Peach grower and farmer. 
Served at Fort Oglethorp Training Camp, May 1917-August 1917; 
Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant Infantry 81st Division, Transferred 
Headquarters, Special Duty; transferred, 156 Depot Brigade; 
promoted to 1st Lieutenant; discharged February, 1919. Mason. 
Presbyterian; Elder, Presbyterian Church since 1934. Married Miss 
Lena N. Booker, September 5. 1925. Address: West End, N. C. 



R. LESTER POPE 

R. Lester Pope, Democrat, Representative from Davidson 
County, was born in Davidson County, July 19, 1888. Son of 



RepreseiXtatives 237 

Robert L. and Elizabeth Fritts Pope. Attended Davidson County 
Schools. Executive Vice-president, First National Bank, Thomas- 
ville, N. C; Chairman, Group Five N. C. Bankers Association, 
1933: member Executive Committee North Carolina Bankers As- 
sociation. 1934-1935; Second Vice-president, North Carolina 
Bankers Association, 1936; member City Council, City of Thom- 
asville, 1914-1930. Mason; member, Thomasville Lodge No. 214, 
A. F. & A. M.; Unity Council No. 219, Junior Order United Amer- 
ican Mechanics: Thomasville Camp Woodmen of the World; 
Thomasville Lodge Patriotic Order Sons of America; Thomas- 
ville Rotary Club; Master Thomasville Lodge No. 214 A. F. & 
A. M., 1915-1920; Treasurer Junior Order, Unity Council No. 
219, 1925-193 6; District Deputy Grand Master, 2 3rd Masonic 
District, 19 3 2-193 6; Special Representative Grand Lodge of Nor- 
way in the Grand Lodge of North Carolina A. F. & A. M., 1935- 
1.936; President Thomasville Rotary Club, 1926. Methodist Epis- 
copal: teacher Men's Bible Class, 1914-1936; Lay Leader, Win- 
ston-Salem District, 192 5-1930; President North Carolina Baraca 
Association, 1920; Chairman Executive Committee, North Caro- 
lina Sunday School Association, 1935-1936; member, Board of 
Stewards, Main Street Methodist Church, Thomasville. Married 
Miss Dora Vivian Yonts, April 15, 19 8. Address: Thomasville, 
N. C. 



BROOKS PRICE 

Brooks Price, Democrat, Representative from Union County, 
was born in Monroe, N. C, February 6, 1898. Son of James 
Newton and Nancy C. (Winchester) Price. Educated in Wesley 
Chapel High School. Merchant and farmer. Police Officer, 
United States Capitol, Washington, D. C, December 1931-May 
1933. Battery D. 113 F. A., 30th Division. Member Junior 
Order United American Mechanics; Recording Secretary Rube 
Weddington Council No. 223. Methodist. Married Miss Mary 
Louise Brooks, February 9, 1922. Address: Waxhaw, N. C. 



236 Biographical Sketches 

CLARENCE EDWARD QUINN 

Clarence Edward Quinn, Democrat, Representative from Dup- 
lin County, was born In Albertson Township, Duplin County July 
14, 1892. Son of Alonza A. and Emma (Phillips) Quinn. At- 
tended Duplin County Public Schools. Merchant and farmer. 
Member, Clerk and Treasurer, Board Commissioners, Town of 
Kenansville, 1925-1936. Mason, J. O. U. A. M.; Secretary, 
Warren Lodge No. 639, Kenansville, 1924-19 30. Methodist; 
member Board of Stewards for twenty-six years; Charge Lay- 
Leader Faison Kenansville since 19 30; Associate District Lay 
Leader, Wilmington District Methodist Church, South, past two 
years; member Trustees Wilmington District Methodist Parson- 
age at Wilmington, N. C; Duplin Trustee United Dry Forces of 
North Carolina; member State Executive Committee United Dry 
Forces. Married Miss Kate Ferrell, January 2, 1913. Address: 
Kenansville, N. C. 

ED^V'IN ALBERT RASBERRY 

Edwin Albert Rasberry, Democrat, Representative from Greene 
County, was born in the same county December 19, 18S5. Son 
of Jacob Robert and Sarah (Speight) Rasberry. Attended Greene 
County Schools and Whitsett Institute. Farmer. County Commis- 
sioner, 1914-1922; Finance Director for 2nd Congressional Dis- 
trict, 193.5, for National Democratic Committee. County Sheriff, 
1922-1930. County Cotton and Tobacco Commissioner, 1933- 
19 3 4. Representative in the General Assembly of 19 35; intro- 
duced legislation providing for new Western N. C. Sanatorium for 
treatment of tuberculosis; Vice-chairman Board of Directors of 
Sanatoria for Treatment of Tuberculosis of N. C. Mason; Junior 
Order. Baptist. Married Miss Kathrine Lee Cobb, December 31, 
1913. Two children, Edwin A. Rasberry Jr., eighteen years of 
age, and Mary Frances Rasberry, thirteen years of age. Ad- 
dress; Snow Hill, N. C. 



ROBERT H. ROUSE 

Robert H. Rouse, Democrat, Representative from Lenoir Coun- 
ty, was born in Kinston. October 15, 1894. Son of N. J. and 



Representatives 239 

Mattie (Rountree) Rouse. Educated at Kinston Public Schools; 
Warrenton High School; University of North' Carolina; Univer- 
sity of Virginia. Lawyer. Member of North Carolina Bar Asso- 
ciation and American Bar Association; Kappa Sigma Fraternity; 
A. E. F., 1917-1919; First Lieutenant; Past Post Commander 
American Legion, Kinston; Past President Kinston Rotary Club; 
member Board of Trustees Atlantic Christian College. Member 
State Democratic Executive Committee, 1928-1936; Representa- 
tive from Lenoir County in General Assembly, 1933-1935, Special 
Session 1936. Disciple. Married Miss Lucile Dixon, April 14, 
1920. Address: Kinston, N. C. 



THOMAS SAMPSON ROYSTER 

Thomas Sampson Royster, Democrat, Represenjtativ'e from 
Granville County, was born at Oxford, November 16, 190.5. Son 
of General Beverly S. and Mamie (Hobgood) Royster. Attended 
Oxford Grammar School, 1912-1919; Oxford High School, 1919- 
1923; University of North Carolina Law School, 19 27-192 8; 
Wake Forest Law School, 1929. Lawyer. North Carolina and 
Granville County Bar Associations. Member Kiwanis Interna- 
tional; Kappa Sigma Fraternity. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1935. Baptist. Married Miss Katherine Watkins, 
May 24, 1930. Address: Oxford, N. C. 



RALPH JAMES SCOTT 

Ralph James Scott, Democrat, Representative from Stokes 
County, was born at Pinnacle, N. C, October 15, 190 5. Son of 
S. M. and Daisy (Cook) Scott. Attended public schools. Stokes 
County; Pinnacle High School; Wake Forest College: Wake 
Forest Callege Law School, 1926-1930, LL.B. Degree. Lawyer. 
Member, Junior Order United American Mechanics. Baptist. 
Married Miss Verna Denny, November 29, 1929. Address: Dan- 
bury, N. C. 



240 Biographical Sketches 

FHKnERICK KOSWELL SEELEY 

Frederick Roswell Seeley, Democrat, Representative from Car- 
teret County, was born at Clifton, Kansas, February 24, 1872. 
Son of Horace H. and Esther Donaldson (Sayre) Seeley. At- 
tended District Schools in Nebraska, 1880-1886. Lumberman 
and Building Contractor. President, Beaufort Chamber of Com- 
merce; General Manager, Secretary-Treasurer and Vice-president, 
Large Saw Mill Companies, 189 6-1924; Secretary-Treasurer 
Beaufort Lumber and Manufacturing Company, 1924-192 6, 1929- 
1936. Member Nebraska National Guard, ISSS; A. F. & A. M., 
Blue Lodge, Chapter, Knights Templar; Shrine; I. O. O. F.; 
Woodmen of the World; held office in Masons, Woodmen, Knights 
Pythias, 189 6-1912. Methodist. Superintendent Sunday School, 
1912-1915, 1917-1918, 1922-1926, 1929-1934; Charge Lay Lead- 
er, 1922-1929; Board of Stewards, 1909, 1933, 1934-1936. Mar- 
ried Miss Alice May Chrissinger, November 28, 189 5 (deceased). 
Address: Beaufort, N. C. 



RICHARD ENNIS SENTELLE 

Richard Ennis Sentelle, Democrat, Representative from Bruns- 
wick County, was born in Waynesville, July 2 7, 1875. Son of 
Rev. R. A. and Rebecca Adeline Sentelle. Attended Bethel Acad- 
emy; Clyde High School (graduated in 1896); A.B. Wake Forest 
College, 1901. Lawyer. County School Superintendent. Or- 
dained Minister of the Gospel. Farmer. Member of North Caro- 
lina Education Association; North Carolina State Bar Associa- 
tion; North Carolina Cotton Growers' Association. Institute 
Conductor for State Department of Education for several years. 
Director Summer School. Chowan College, 1917. Member House 
of Representatives from Wake County in the Session of 19 05. 
Member of faculty. State College Summer School in Raleigh, 
several years. President Brunswick County Unit of N. C. Educa- 
tion Association for several years. Served as Director of Army 
Y M. C. A. work at Oteen, N. C, in 1919. Mason; Junior War- 
den; Councillor Jr. O. U. A. M.; Elk (not active); Pythian (not 
active); Odd Fellows; Farmers' Union; Order of Eastern Star. 
Held highest offices in Odd Fellows' lodges and one or two dis- 



Representatives 241 

trict offices; Worthy Patron in Eastern Star. Taught three short- 
term public schools in Haywood County before entering college. 
Principal Wakefield School in Wake County from 1901 to 1905. 
City Superintendent of Schools in Elizabeth City, 1905-1906; City 
Superintendent of Schools, Lumberton, N. C, 1906-1918; County 
Superintendent of Schools in Edgecombe County, 1918, and again 
from 1920-1926; County Superintendent of Schools in Bruns- 
wick County from 1928 to 1935. School furniture salesman, 
1926-1928. Licensed to practice law in August, 1933. Bruns- 
wick County Representative in the General Assembly of 19 35. 
Baptist Church; held offices of Deacon, Clerk, and Treasurer. 
Ordained as a Minister of the Gospel in Lumberton First Baptist 
Church in 1907. Licensed to preach by Elizabeth City First 
Baptist Church in 190 6. Served as Moderator of Roanoke Bap- 
tist Association in 192 5. Superintendent of Southport Baptist 
Sunday School at present time. Married Annie Jane Terrell of 
Canton, N. C, August 22, 1897. Address: Southport, N. C. 



WALTER D. SILER 

Walter D. Siler, Democrat, Representative from Chatham 
County, was born near present town of Siler City, Chatham 
County, November 25th, 187S, son of Alson R. Siler (a Confed- 
erate soldier) and Nannie (Jones) Siler. Was educated at the 
Thompson Military School and State University; studied law at 
the University; licensed by the Supreme Court February Term, 
1900, and has since that time been actively engaged in that 
practice. Mayor of Siler City, 1901-1902; member General As- 
sembly, 1903; Solicitor 4th Judicial District, 1913-1923; Presi- 
dential Elector at Large, 1924; Special Superior Court Judge, 
1925-1926; Assistant Attorney General, 1927-1934. Chairman 
Democratic Executive Committee, Chatham County. 1916-1926; 
member State Committee since 1916. Member Confederate 
County Pension Board; member Sons of Confederate Veterans. 
Methodist. Married June 29, 1921, to Miss Lida L. Alston (now 
deceased). Address: Pittsboro, N. C. 



242 BiOGRAi'iiicAL Sketches 

THOMAS JOSEPH SJMITH 

Thomas Joseph Smith, Democrat, Representative from Robeson 
County, was born in Danville, Virginia, December 15, 1894. Son 
ol Thomas Joseph and Corinna (Reynolds) Smith. High school 
education. Mayor, St. Pauls, N. C, 19 31-19 3 5. Drafted Novem- 
ber 17, 1917; received Commission May 5, 1918; discharged, 2nd 
Lieutenant, January 4, 1919; member American Legion Forrest 
Post No. 5, St. Pauls, N. C. Married Miss Addine Keith, August 
21, 1920. Address: St. Pauls, N. C. 



CHARLES WAYLAND SPRUILL 

Charles Wayland Spruill, Democrat, Representative from Bertie 
County, was born at Quitsna, April 6, 1889. Son of Charles 
Wayland and Annie E. (Tadlock) Spruill. Attended Oak Ridge 
Institute, 1904-1906; State College, 1908-1909. Merchant, farm- 
er and manufacturer. Member Bertie County Road Commission, 
1920-1921, 1925-1930. Chairman Snake Bite Township; Trustee, 
Republican High School, and Lewiston-Woodville High School. 
President Lewiston Tel. Co.; Vice-president Bank of Roxobel; 
Director Harrington Manufacturing Co. Shriner and Junior Or- 
der. Member House of Representatives, 19 33 and 1935. Baptist. 
Married Miss Ruth Bazemore, November 2 6, 1913. Address: 
Windsor, N. C. 



HARRY STELL 

Harry Stell, Democrat, Representative from Washington Coun- 
ty, was born in Chesterfield County, Virginia, February 8, 18 80. 
Son of George W. and Frances (Norfleet) Stell. Attended Private 
Elementary School, Norfolk, Virginia. Retired Ocean Marine 
Lngineer. Member of Engineer's Beneficial Association, Norfolk, 
Virginia. Mayor of Town of Plymouth; member of Board of 
Councilmen, Plymouth; member of Washington County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee. Member Masonic Fraternity, Per- 
severance Lodge, Plymouth, N. C; New Bern Consistory, No. 3, 



E.EPRESEXTATIVES 243 

New Bern, N. C. ; Sudan Temple, A. A. O. O. Mystic Shrine, New 
Bern; served as Master Perseverance Lodge, Plymouth, 1925 
and 19 26. Member House of Representatives, 1935. Member 
Baptist Church, Plymouth, since 1901. Was Marine Engineer for 
nineteen years; saw service on both inland waters and on ocean 
traffic; retired from that trade in 1919 and went into business 
in Plymouth. Retired from business several years ago on account 
of ill health. Since that time has given practically all his time 
to public matters in connection with the town and county where 
he now lives. Has made his home in Plymouth since 1901. 
Married Miss Jimmie Midgett, Plymouth, March 19, 1902. Ad- 
dress: Plymouth, N. C. 



THOMAS CLARENCE STONE 

Thomas Clarence Stone, Democrat, Representative from Rock- 
ingham County, was born in Stoneville, January 19, 1899. Son 
of Robert Tyler and Mary (Hamlin) Stone. Attended Stoneville 
High School and graduated in 1914. Graduated at Davidson 
College in 1919 with B.S. Degree. Secretary and Treasurer of 
Stoneville Grocery Company (Wholesale Grocers) and operator 
of own insurance agency. Formerly Town Commissioner and 
Mayor of Stoneville. Joined S. A. T. C. at Davidson College In 
October, 1918; discharged 1918; Supply Sergeant in R. O. T. C. 
at Davidson College. Member of Oasis Temple Shrine. Business 
Manager of "Davidsonian" while at Davidson. Past President 
of the Rockingham County Clubs of Young Democrats and has 
been a member of the Rockingham County Democratic Executive 
Committee. Representative in the General Assembly of 1935. 
Presbyterian; Deacon. Married Miss Jane Kane of Gate City, 
Virginia, August 25, 1925. Address: Stoneville, N. C. 



RETUS NOBE SUMMERSILL 

Retus Nobe Summersill, Democrat, Representative from Onslow 
County, was born in Jacksonville, N. C, January 9, 1905. Son 
of E. W. and Estelle (Mills) Summersill. Attended Jacksonville 



244 Biographical Skkiciiks 

Graded School, 1912-1918; Jacksonville High School, 1918-1922; 
Wake Forest College 1922-19 26, LL.B. Lawyer. Mason. Meth- 
odist. Address: Jacksonville, N. C. 



CHARLES WALLACE TATEM 

C. W. Tatem, Democrat, Representative from Tyrrell County, 
was born in Columbia, September 2 5, 1876. Son of Cammillas 
Etheridge and Ellen E. (McClees) Tatem. Attended Columbia 
Academy, 1885-1891; Trinity School, 1892-1893. Civil Engineer. 
Representative in the General Assembly, 1927, 1929, 1931, 1933 
and 1935. Married Miss Ella Gertrude Wynne, September 24, 
189 6. Address: Columbia, N. C. 



DONALD PRESTON TAYLOR 

Donald Preston Taylor, Democrat, Representative from Alle- 
ghany County, was born in Alleghany County. Cranberry Town- 
ship, October 17, 1863. Son of Andrew Jackson and Fannie 
Bledsoe Taylor. Attended Laurel Springs Academy. Stockman 
and farmer. Member Pension Board of Alleghany County. Prim- 
itive Baptist. Married Miss Rebecca Ellen Edwards. March 1, 
188 5. Address: Sparta, N. C. 



WILLIAM CLAIRE TAYLOR 

William Claire Taylor, Democrat, Representative from Caswell 
County, was born in Blanche, N. C, October 23, 1901. Son of 
Nathaniel Jesse and Ada Jane (Pinchback) Taylor. Attended 
Milton High School, 1915-1919; Guilford College. Farmer and 
merchant. Deputy Sheriff, Caswell County, 19 20 through 1928. 
Methodist. Steward in Church since 1930. Married Miss Flor- 
ence Toten Foster, April 26, 1924. Address: Blanche, N. C. 



E.EPEESENTATIVES 245 

FRAKCIS EDGAR THO^FAS 

Francis Edgar Thomas, Democrat, Representative from Anson 
County, was born at Diamond Hil, Anson County. Son of John 
William and Susan (Liles) Thomas. Attended Polkton High 
School; Wake Forest College, LL.B., 1902; University of North 
Carolina Law School. Lawyer. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1913, 1915, 1931, 1933 and 1935. Baptist. Married 
Miss Lucy Josephine Hawkins, 1910; four children. Address: 
Wadesboro, N. C. 



FREDERICK SHEPHERD THOMAS 

Frederick Shepherd Thomas, Democrat. Representative from 
Harnett County, was born in Duke, N. C, April 26, 1905. Son 
of Edward Raglan and Ophelia (Langston) Thomas. Attended 
Trinity Park School; Durham High School, 1923-1924; Duke 
High School; Duke University, '29; N. C. State College, '30; 
Druggist. Member of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity. Representative 
in the General Assembly of 193 5. Episcopalian; member of St. 
Stephens Church, Erwin; Senior Warden, 1934, 1936. Married 
Elizabeth Whitney Holt, June 16, 1936. Business address: Erwin, 
N. C. Residence: Dunn, N. C. 



THOMAS SPRUILL THORNTON 

Thomas Spruill Thornton, Democrat, Representative from 
Forsyth County, was born in Winston-Salem, N. C, October 17, 
1907. Son of Thomas J. and Ida E. (Cable) Thornton. At- 
tended Winston-Salem High School, 1921-192 5; Duke University, 
1929, A.B. Degree; Duke University Law School, 1933, LL.B. 
Degree. Lawyer. Member Winston-Salem Junior Bar Associa- 
tion; Forsyth County Bar Association; President, Winston-Salem 
Junior Chamber of Commerce, 19 3 6. Member Phi Delta Phi, 
National Legal Fraternity; Omicron Delta Kappa. National Hon- 
orary Fraternity; Tau Kappa Alpha. National Forensic Frater- 
nity, and Sigma Chi, National Social Fraternity. Baptist. Ad- 
dress: Winston-Salem, N. C. 



246 Biographical Sketches 

ROBERT ir. UNDERWOOD 

Robert H. Underwood, Democrat, representative from Hert- 
ford County, was born in Murtreesboro, N. C, August 22, 1890. 
Son of John W. and Florence A. (Payne) Underwood. Service 
station operator. Commissioner of Murfreesboro, 1925-1936. 
Mason. Baptist. Married Miss Theodosia Ernest Vaughan, De- 
cember 12, 1915. Address: Murfreesboro, N. C. 



GEORGE RANDOLPH UZZELL 

George Randolph Uzzell, Democrat, Representative from Row- 
an County, was born in Salisbury, November 23, 1903. Son of 
Harry M. and Geneva (Wright) Uzzell. Attended Salisbury 
Graded Schools, 1910-1915; Raleigh Graded Schools, 1915-1919; 
Salisbury High School, 1919-1921; Davidson College, 1921-1923; 
passed State Bar Examination, January 25, 19 2 6. Lawyer. 
Knights of Pythias; Winona Council No. 18, Jr. O. U. A. M.; 
Pi Gamma Sigma, Wake Forest College. Chancellor Commander 
Salisbury-Rowan No. 100, Knights of Pythias, 1927-1929; Finan- 
cial Secretary Winona Council No. IS, Jr. O. U. A. M., 192 9-1930; 
Woodmen of the World; Patriotic Order Sons of America; present 
District Deputy for the 9th District. North Carolina Bar Asso- 
ciation; Rowan County Bar Association. Member of House of 
Representatives in 19 31 and 1935. Teacher of Men's Bible Class 
for past five years; former Superintendent of Adult Department 
of Sunday School; Baptist; Deacon, 1929. Married on November 
23, 1934, to Ruth Harrison of Spencer. Address: Salisbury, N. C. 



JAMES B. VOLGER 

James B. Volger, Democrat, Representative from Mecklenburg 
County, was born in Charlotte, N. C. Son of James A. and Susan 
Caroline (Alexander) Volger. Attended Beard's Military Insti- 
tute in Charlotte. Secretary, North Carolina Food Dealers Asso- 
ciation. Director, National Retail Grocers Secretaries Associa- 
tion; member National Association, Retail Grocers of America; 



Representatives 24-7 

Charlotte Chamber of Commerce; Chairman, Charlotte Fair 
Trade Board, 1930-1931; Secretary, North Carolina Food and 
Grocery Distributors Code Authority, 1934-1935. Member, Patri- 
otic Order Sons of America; United Commercial Travelers; Fed- 
eral Labor Union. Methodist; Chairman, Board of Stewards, 
1934-193 5; now Steward on Board. Married Miss Lillian Ray- 
mel Ketchie June 12, 1916; three children. Address: 180 
Thomas Avenue, Charlotte. 



D. L. WARD 

D. L. Ward, Democrat, Representative from Craven County, 
was born in New Bern, June 2 3, 19 03. Son of D. L. and Carrie 
Louise (Schollenberger) Ward. Attended New Bern Public 
School; University of North Carolina, 1920-24, A.B.; Wake Forest 
Law School, 1924-26. Lawyer; County Solicitor, 1925-30; State 
Board Conservation and Development, 19 30-3 6. Member of Elks, 
Junior Order. Representative in the General Assembly of 1935; 
Secretary State Democratic Committee, 193 6; State Gasoline 
Legislative Committee, 1936. Episcopalian. Married Leah Duval 
Jones, New Bern, N. C, December 10, 1932; one son, D. L. Ward, 
Jr., born July 23, 1935. Address: 95 East Front Street. New 
Bern, N. C. 

EDGAli POE WARREN 

Edgar Poe Warren, Democrat, Representative from Person 
County, was born in Person County, November 16, 1888. Son of 
W. A. and Loucerene (Hester) Warren. Attended Cary High 
School and local preparatory schools; University of North Caro- 
lina, 1907-1911. Farmer. Protestant. Married Miss Effie Bell 
Paynes, September 2 8, 19 2 2. Address: Hurdle Mills, N. C. 



JOHN FERNANDO WHITE 

John Fernando White, Democrat, Representative from Chowan 
County, was born in Edenton, April 16, 1902. Son of Sidney John- 
son and Mary Christian (Goodwin) White. Attended Wake For- 



248 Biographical Sketches 

est College, 1922-1925; University Law School, 1925-1926. Law- 
yer. Judge Chowan County Court, 1928-1930; Delegate Demo- 
cratic State Convention, Raleigh, 1930. Member 115th Ambu- 
lance Company of the 4th Corps Area, Edenton, 1927-1928; rank, 
Sergeant. Member of Houses of Representatives of 19 31 and 
19 3 5. Baptist. Married Miss Carolyn Juanity Bunch, March 16, 
1930. Address: Edenton, N. C. 



FRANK WEBB AVILLLVMS 

Frank Webb Williams, Democrat, Representative from Pasquo- 
tank County, was born in South Mills, N. C, April 19, 189 9. Son 
of Daniel E. and Mamie Elizabeth (Webb) Williams. Attended 
South Mills High School; Wake Forest College. 1916-1918; Uni- 
■versity of North Carolina, 1920-1922. Lumber dealer and farmer. 
Private, S. A. T. C, State College, September to November, 1918. 
Member of Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Representative 
in the General Assembly of 19 3 5. Member of Ebenezer Baptist 
Church, South Mills. Married Miss Pauline Menzel, April 19, 
1924. Address: Elizabeth City. N. C. 



JULIUS ROBERT WILLL\MSON 

Julius Robert Williamson. Democrat, Representative from Co- 
lumbus County, was born at Cerro Gordo, December 25, 1869. 
Son of H. D. and Sarah Elizabeth (Davis) Williamson. Attended 
public schools; Davis School at LaGrange, 1884-1885, and Davis 
School at Winston-Salem, 1891; Greensboro Law School, 1892- 
1893. Merchant. Retired lawyer. Delegate to National Demo- 
cratic Convention of 1908. Representative in General Assembly, 
1913, 1921 and 19 29. Baptist; Superintendent of Sunday School 
eight years; Deacon; Moderator of Cape Fear-Columbus Associa- 
tion for nine years. Married Miss Maggie Lee Williamson in 
189 3. Address: Cerro Gordo, N. C. 



Repkesentatives 249 

E?srOCH W. WILSON 

Enoch W. Wilson, Democrat, Representative from Sampson 
County, was born in Sampson County, October 7, 1895. Son of 
J. L. and Bertie J. (McLamb) Wilson. Attended schools in Fay- 
etteville, N. C. Farmer, time merchant, and manufacturer. First 
Sergeant, 1917-1919. Mason and Shriner; Master Mingo Lodge 
206, A. F. and A. M., Dunn, N. C, 1936. Married Miss Frances 
Vaughn, April, 1922. Address: Newton Grove, N. C. 



VIRGIL ANGELO WILSON 

Virgil Angelo Wilson, Democrat, Representative from Forsyth 
County, was born in Pfafftown, N. C, August 31, 189 5. Son of 
George F. and Ella (Spach) Wilson. Attended Shenandoah Col- 
legiate Institute, 1910-1911; Bethania High School, 1912-1914; 
University of North Carolina, 1914-1917. Automobile dealer. 
Secretary, Forsyth County Executive Committee, 19 3 5-1936. 
World War veteran. Member, Junior Order; American Legion; 
Knights of Pythias. Commander, American Legion, John Yow 
Post 188, 1933-1934. Member, Rural Hall Church of Christ; 
Board of Deacons; Teacher, Young People's Class. Married Miss 
Zella Helsabeck, June 20, 1925. Address: Rural Hall, N. C. 



GRADY WITHROW 

Grady Withrow, Democrat, Representative from Rutherford 
County, was born at Hollis, N. C, September 25, 18 89. Son of 
J. P. D. and Laura (Hamrick) Withrow. Attended Hollis School 
and Boiling Springs High School. Merchant and farmer. Post- 
master sixteen years, Hollis, N. C. Mason; member. Knights of 
Pythias; Redmen; Junior O. U. A. M. Baptist. Married Miss 
Cora Martin, June 22, 1912. Address: Hollis, N. C. 



250 Biographical Sketches 

CHARLES KOBBINS ZICKLER 

Charles Robbins Zickler, Democrat, Representative from Alex- 
ander County. Son of Edward and Loreta (Robbins) Zickler. 
Born in Galveston, Texas, March 17, 1878. Attended Public 
Schools of Galveston and Southern Dental College, Atlanta, 1901. 
Dentist and fruit grower. Mason. Member House of Representa- 
tives, 1935. Methodist. Married Miss Nell Parrott, August 18, 
190 3. Address: Taylorsville, N. C. 




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