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Full text of "North Carolina manual [serial]"

THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 

AT CHAPEL HILL 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 



C917.05 
N87m 
c. 6 



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 



00017482449 



This book may be kept out one month unless a recall 
notice is sent to you. It must be brought to the North 
Carolina Collection (in Wilson Library) for renewal. 



Form No. A-369 



NORTH CAROLINA MANUAL 

1945 




Issued by 

Thad Eure 

Secretary of State 

Raleigh 





1945 






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TO THE 

STATE OFFICIALS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

TO THE 

MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

TO THE 

COUNTY OFFICIALS OF THE STATE 

AND TO THE 

PEOPLE OF THE OLD NORTH STATE 
AT HOME AND ABROAD 

THIS MANUAL IS RESPECTFULLY 
DEDICATED 




Secretary of State. 



JS 
'0 



PRESSES OF 

THE ORANGE PRINTSHOP 
CHAPEL HILI* N. C, 

1945 



CONTENTS 



PART I 
HISTORICAL 

Page 

The State 11 

The State Capitol 15 

Chief Executives of North Carolina 

Governors of Virginia 17 

Executives under the Proprietors 17 

Governors under the Crown 18 

Governors Elected by the Legislature 18 

Governors Elected by the People 20 

The State Flag 23 

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence 24 

The Great Seal of North Carolina 26 

The State Bird 28 

The Halifax Resolution 30 

Name of State and Nicknames 31 

The State Motto 31 

The State Colors 32 

The State Flower 32 

^e State's Most Famous Toast .T. 32 

Legal Holidays in North Carolina 32 

Population of the State since 1675 33 

,State Song 34 

The Constitution of North Carolina 35 

The American's Creed 71 

The American Flag 

Origin .-. 71 

Proper Display 74 

Pledge to the Flag 78 

The National Capitol 80 

Declaration of Independence 83 

Constitution of the United States 88 

PART II 
CENSUS 

Sixteenth Census, 1940 

Population of State HI 

Population of Counties 112 

Population of Cities and Towns 113 

[5] 



6 North Carolina Manual 

PART III 
POLITICAL 

Page 

Congressional Districts „ 121 

Judicial Districts 121 

Senatorial Districts and Apportionment of Senators 122 

Apportionment of Members of the House of Representatives 125 

-State Democratic Platform 126 

* Plan of Organization of the State Democratic Party 134 

Committees of the Democratic Party 

State Democratic Executive Committee 150 

Congressional District Executive Committees 154 

Judicial District Executive Committees 156 

Senatorial Executive Committees 159 

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 162 

•State Republican Platform „ 164 

• Plan of Organization of the State Republican Party 172 

Committees of the Republican Party 180 

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 182 

PART IV 
ELECTION RETURNS 

Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1944 187 

Popular Vote for President by States, 1928-1940 188 

Vote for President by Counties, 1924-1944 _ 190 

Vote for Governor by Counties, Primaries, 1940-1944 193 

Vote for Governor by Counties, General Election, 1924-1944 196 

Vote for State Officials, Democratic Primaries, 1936, 

! ; 1938, and 1940 ;.... 199 

Vote for State Officials by Counties, Primary, 1944 201 

Total Votes Cast— General Election, 1944 204 

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primai-y, May 30, 1942 205 

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primary, May 27, 1944 207 

Vote for Congressmen in Republican Primary, May 27, 1944 211 

Vote for Members of Congress, 1930-1944 212 

Vote for United States Senator, Primary, May 27, 1944 225 

Vote for United States Senator, General Election, 

November 7, 1944 227 

Civilian and Military Absentees Vote, General Election, 1944 229 

Vote on Constitutional Amendments by Counties, 1944 231 

Vote on Prohibition, 1881, 1908 and 1933 238 



Contents 7 

PART V 
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 

Page 

Agencies, Boards and Commissions 243 

Confederate Woman's Home „ .' 255 

North Carolina Institutions 
Correctional 

White 256 

Negro 256 

Educational 

White 257 

Negro 263 

Hospitals 

White ....„....;; :„ 265 

Negro 267 

Examining Boards 268 

Directors State-owned Railroads 273 

PART VI 
LEGISLATIVE 

The General Assembly- 
Senate 

Officers ..„ 277 

Senators (Arranged Alphabetically) 277 

Senators (Arranged by Districts) 278 

Eules '. 279 

Standing Committees .'. 290 

Seat Assignments 297 

House of Representatives 

Officers , 298 

Members (Arranged Alphabetically) ;..:.....:.... 298 

Members (Arranged by Counties) 300 

Rules : 303 

Standing Committees 318 

Seat Assignments 329 

PART VII 
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Executive Officials 333 

Administrative Officials 340 

United States Senators 351 

Representatives in Congress 354 

Justices of the Supreme Court 362 

Members of the General Assembly 

Senators 368 

Representatives , 396 

Occupational and Professional Classification 454 



8 North Carolina Manual 

PART VIII 
OFFICIAL REGISTER 

Page 

United States Government 

President and Vice-President 461 

Cabinet Members 461 

North Carolina Senators and Representatives in Congress 461 

United States Supreme Court Justices 461 

United States District Court 

Judges 461 

Clerks .:; 462 

Solicitors 462 

United States Circuit Court of Appeals 

Judge Fourth District 462 

State Government 

Legislative Department 463 

Executive Department 463 

Judicial Department 463 

Administrative Department 464 

State Institutions -. 465 

Heads of Agencies other than State 466 

County Government 467 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

State Capitol ; 14 

State Flag 22 

State Seal 27 

State Bird 29 

State Song (Words and Music) 34 

Map of North Carolina 70 

The American Flag 72 

Map Showing Congressional Districts 144, 145 

Map Showing Judicial Districts 208, 209 

Map Showing Senatorial Districts 176, 177 

Seating Diagram of Senate Chamber 296 

Seating Diagram of House of Representatives 328 

Pictures 

Governor „ 382 

State Officers 337 

Senators and Congressmen 353, 359 

Justices of the Supreme Court 363 

State Senators 369, 375, 383 

Members House of Representatives 397, 405, 413, 

421, 429, 437, 445 



PART I 
HISTORICAL 



/ 



THE STATE 

North Carolina, often called the "Tar Heel" state, was the 
scene of the first attempt at colonization in America by English- 
speaking people. Under a charter granted to Sir Walter Raleigh 
by Queen Elizabeth, a colony was begun on Roanoke Island. This 
settlement however, was unsuccessful and later became known as 
"The Lost Colony." 

The first permanent settlement was made about 1650 by im- 
migrants from Virginia. In 1663 Charles II granted to eight Lords 
Proprietors a charter for the territory lying "within six and thirty 
degrees northern latitude, and to the west as far as the South seas, 
and so southerly as far as the river St. Matthias, which bordereth 
upon the coast of Florida, and within one and thirty degrees of 
northern latitude, and so west in a direct line as far as the South 
seas aforesaid, ..." and the colony was called Carolina. In 1665 
another charter was granted to these noblemen. This charter ex- 
tended the limits of Carolina so that the northern line was 36 de- 
grees and 30 minutes north latitude, and the southern line was 29 de- 
grees north latitude, and both of these lines extended westward to 
the South seas. 

In 1669 John Locke wrote the Fundamental Constitutions as a 
model for the government of Carolina. The Lords Proprietors adopt- 
ed these constitutions and directed the governor to put into opera- 
tion as much of them as was feasible. In 1670 there were four pre- 
cincts (changed to counties in 1739) : Pasquotank, Perquimans, 
Chowan, and Currituck. North Carolina now has one hundred 
counties. 

Carolina was on Dec. 7, 1710, divided into North Carolina and 
South Carolina, and Edward Hyde, on May 12, 1712, became the 
first governor of North Carolina. 

In 1729 seven of the eight Lords Proprietors sold their interest 
in Carolina to the Crown and North Carolina became a royal 
colony. George Burrington was the first royal governor. Richard 
Everard, the last proprietary governor, served until Burrington 
was appointed. 

North Carolina, on April 12, 1776, authorized her delegates in 

[11] 



12 North Carolina Manual 

the Continental Congress to vote for independence, and on Decem- 
ber 18, 1776, adopted a constitution. Richard Caswell became the 
first governor under this constitution. On November 21, 1789 the 
state adopted the United States Constitution, being the twelfth 
state to enter the federal union. Norh Carolina, in 1788, had re- 
jected the Constitution on the grounds that certain amendments 
were vital and necessary to a free people. 

A constitutional convention was held in 1835 and among several 
changes made in the Constitution was the method of electing the 
governor. After this change the governor was elected by the people 
for a term of two years instead of being elected by the legislature 
for a term of one year. Edward Bishop Dudley was the first gover- 
nor elected by the people. 

North Carolina seceded from the Union May 20, 1861, and was 
admitted to the Union in July, 1868. 

A new state constitution was adopted in 1868 and since that date 
the governor has been elected by the people for four-year terms 
and he cannot succeed himself. There has not been a new constitu- 
tion since 1868, but numerous amendments have been added to it. 

North Carolina has been democratic since 1900, during which 
period it has made its greatest progress. 

North Carolina has had two permanent capitals — New Bern 
and Raleigh — and there have been three capitol buildings. Tryon's 
Palace in New Bern was constructed in the period, 1767-70, and the 
main building was destroyed by fire February 27, 1798. The first 
capitol in Raleigh was completed in 1794 and was destroyed by fire 
on June 21, 1831. The present capitol was completed in 1840. 

The state ceded her western lands which was composed of Wash- 
ington, Davidson, Hawkins, Greene, Sullivan, Sumner, and Tennes- 
see counties, to the federal government in 1790 and in 1796 Tennes- 
see entered the Union as a state. 

North Carolina supports a nine months school for every child 
of school age and maintains a fleet of 4,800 buses by which it trans- 
ports 348,000 children to school each school day in the year. During 
a nine months term these 4,800 buses travel approximately 31,- 
000,000 miles. 

The state also maintains 58,500 miles of roads of which approxi- 
mately 48,000 miles are county roads and 10,500 miles are state 



The State 13 

roads. These roads are maintained from gasoline tax, drivers' 
licenses and licenses for automobiles, trucks, and busses. 

North Carolina extends from the sea coast to the mountains, 
having the highest peak (Mount Mitchell — 6,684 feet) east of the 
Mississippi. It has extensive agricultural and industrial develop- 
ments. Some of the agricultural products are corn, cotton, tobacco, 
wheat, barley, oats, peanuts, soya beans, various types of hay, po- 
tatoes, garden truck, dairy products, beef, pork, poultry and fruits. 
Some of the industrial products are furniture, cloth, hosiery, cot- 
ton yarns, tobacco, canned fruits and vegetables, ceremic products, 
and lumber. There is some mining such as coal, gold, copper, talc, 
mica, and many other products. 

During the war the state has had many camps wherein the serv- 
ice men have received their training for active combat duty. North 
Carolina is proud of the opportunities to serve the nation in provid- 
ing these training camps and it is also justly proud of the more 
than 300,000 men and women who have and are serving the nation 
in this war. 



THE STATE CAPITOL 

The original State Capitol of North Carolina was destroyed by 
fire on June 21, 1831. 

At the session of November, 1832, the Assembly resolved to re- 
build on the old site, and $50,000 was appropriated for the purpose. 
Commissioners were appointed to have the work done. The rub- 
bish was cleared away, the excavations made and the foundations 
were laid. On July 4, 1833, the cornerstone was set in place. 

After the foundations were laid the work progressed more slow- 
ly, and it was so expensive that the appropriation was exhausted. 
The Legislature at its next session appropriated $75,000 more. To 
do the stone and finer work many skilled artisans had been brought 
from Scotland and other countries. The Building Commissioners 
contracted with David Paton to come to Raleigh and superintend 
the work. Mr. Paton was an architect who had come from Scot- 
land the year before. He was the builder, the architect, the de-. 
signer. 

The Legislature was compelled to make appropriations for the 
work from time to time. The following is a table of the several 
appropriations made: 

Session of 1832-33 $ 50,000.00 

Session of 1833-34 75,000.00 

Session of 1834-35 75,000.00 

Session of 1835 : .:. 75,000.00 

Session of 1836-37 '...: '.'. ;..:..; 120,000.00 

Session of 1838-39 ..:....... 105,300.00 

Session of 1840-41... 31,374.46 

Total , $531,674.46 

The stone with which the building was erected was the property 
of the State. Had the State been compelled to purchase this ma- 
terial the cost of the Capitol would have been considerably in- 
creased. 

In the summer of 1840 the work was finished. At last, after 
more than seven years, the sum of $531,674.46 was expended. As 

[15] 



16 North Carolina Manual 

large as that sum was for the time, when the State was so poor 
and when the entire taxes for all State purposes reached less than 
$100,000, yet the people were satisfied. The building had been 
erected with rigorous economy, and it was an object of great pride 
to the people. Indeed, never was money better expended than in 
the erection of this noble Capitol. 



Description of the Capitol, Written by David Paton, 

the Architect 

"The State Capitol is 160 feet in length from north to south by 
140 feet from east to west. The whole height is 971/2 feet in the 

center. The apex of pediment is 64 feet in height. The stylobate 
is 18 feet in height. The columns of the east and west porticoes 
are 5 feet 2% inches in diameter. An entablature, including block- 
ing course, is continued around the building, 12 feet high. 

"The columns and entablature are Grecian Doric, and copied 
from the Temple of Minerva, commonly called the Parthenon, 
which was erected in Athens about 500 years before Christ. An 
octagon tower surrounds the rotunda, which is ornamented with 
Grecian cornices, etc., and its dome is decorated at top with a 
similar ornament to that of the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates, 
commonly called the Lanthorn of Demosthenes. 

"The interior of the Capitol is divided into three stories: First, 
the lower story, consisting of ten rooms, eight of which are appro- 
priated as offices to the Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, and Comp- 
troller, each having two rooms of the same size — the one containing 
an area of 649 square feet, the other 528 square feet — the two com- 
mittee rooms, each containing 200 square feet, and four closets; 
also the rotunda, corridors, vestibules, and piazzas, contain an 
area of 4,370 square feet. The vestibules are decorated with col- 
umns and antae, similar to those of the Ionic Temple on the Ilissus, 
near the Acropolis of Athens. The remainder is groined with 
stone and brick, springing from columns and pilasters of the 
Roman Doric. 

"The second story consists of Senatorial and Representatives' 
chambers, the former containing an area of 2,545 and the latter 



The State Capitol 17 

2,849 square feet. Four apartments enter from Senate Chamber, 
two of which contain each an area of 169 square feet, and the other 
two contain each an area of 154 square feet; also, two rooms enter 
from Representatives' chamber, each containing an area of 170 
square feet; of two committee rooms, each containing an area of 
231 feet; of four presses and the passages, stairs, lobbies, and 
colonnades, containing an area of 3,204 square feet. 

"The lobbies and Hall of Representatives have their columns and 
antse of the Octagon Tower of Andronicus Cyrrhestes and the plan 
of the hall is of the formation of the Greek theatre and the columns 
and antse in the Senatorial chamber and rotunda are of the Temple 
of Erectheus, Minerva Polias, and Pandrosus, in the Acropolis of 
Athens, near the above named Parthenon. 

"Third, or attic story, consists of rooms appropriated to the 
Supreme Court and Library, each containing an area of 693 square 
feet. Galleries of both houses have an area of 1,300 square feet; 
also two apartments entering from Senate gallery, each 169 square 
feet, of four presses and the lobbies' stairs, 988 square feet. These 
lobbies as well as rotunda, are lit with cupolas, and it is proposed 
to finish the court and library in the florid Gothic style." 



CHIEF EXECUTIVES OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Governors of "Virginia" 

Ralph Lane, April , 1585-June , 1586. 

John White, April , 1587-August , 1587. 



Chief Executives Under the Proprietors 

William Drummond, October , 1663-October , 1667. 

Samuel Stephens, October , 1667-December , 1669. 

Peter Carteret, October , 1670- May , 1673. 

John Jenkins, May , 1673- November , 1676. 

Thomas Eastchurch, November , 1676- , 1678. 

Thomas Miller, ,1677- 

John Culpepper, , 1677- , 1678. 

Seth Sothel, , 1678- 



18 North Carolina Manual 

John Harvey, February , 1679-August , 1679. 

John Jenkins, November , 1679- , 1681. 

Seth Sothel, , 1682- , 1689. 

Philip Ludwell, December , 1689- : , 1691. 

Philip Ludwell, November 2, 1691- , 1694. 

Thomas Jarvis, , 1691- ,1694. 

John Archdale, August 31, 1694- , 1696. 

John Harvey, , 1694- , 1699. 

Henderson Walker, , 1699-August 14, 1704. 

Robert Daniel, , 1704- , 1705. 

Thomas Gary, , 1705- , 1706. 

William Glover, , 1706- , 1708. 

Thomas Gary, , 1708-January , 1711. 

Edward Hyde, ...; , 1710-May 9, 1712. 

Edward Hyde, May 9, 1712-September 8, 1712. 
Thomas Pollock, September 12, 1712-May 28, 1714. 
Charles Eden, May 28, 1714-March 26, 1722. 
Thomas Pollock, March 30, 1722-August 30, 1722. 
William Reed, August 30, 1722-January 15, 1724. 
George Burrington, January 15, 1724-July 17, 1725. 
Richard Everard, July 17, 1725-May , 1728. 

Governors Under the Crown 

Richard Everard, May , 1728-February 25, 1731. 
George Burrington, February 25, 1731-April 15, 1734. 
Nathaniel Rice, April 15, 1734-October 27, 1734. 
Gabriel Johnston, October 27, 1734-July 17, 1752. 
Matthew Rowan, July 17, 1752-November 2, 1754, 
Arthur Dobbs, November 2, 1754-March 28, 1765, 
William Tryon, March 28, 1765-December 20, 1765, 
William Tryon, December 20, 1765-July 1, 1771. 
James Hasell, July 1, 1771-August 12, 1771. 
Josiah Martin, August 12, 1771-May , 1775. 

Governors Elected by the Legislature 

Name, County, Term of Office 

Richard Caswell, Dobbs, December 19, 1776-April 18, 1777. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, April 18, 1777-April 18, 1778. 



Governors 19 

Richard Caswell, Dobbs, April 18, 1778-May 4, 1779, 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, May 4, 1779-April, 1780. 
Abner Nash, Craven, April, 1780-June 26, 1781. 
Thomas Burke, Orange, June 26, 1781-April 26, 1782. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, April 26, 1782-April 30, 1783. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, April 30, 1783-April 1, 1785. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, April 1, 1785-December 12, 1785. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, December 12, 1785-December 23, 1786. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, December 23, 1786-December 20, 1787. 
Samuel Johnston, Chowan, December 20, 1787-November 18, 1788. 
Samuel Johnston, Chowan, November 18, 1788-November 16, 1789. 
Samuel Johnston, Chowan, November 16, 1789-December 17, 1789. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, December 17, 1789-December 9, 1790, 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, December 9, 1790-January 2, 1792. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, January 2, 1792-December 14, 1792. 
R. D. Spaight, Craven, December 14, 1792-December 26, 1793. 
R. D. Spaight, Craven, December 26, 1793-January 6, 1795. 
R. D. Spaight, Craven, January 6, 1795-November 19, 1795. 
Samuel Ashe, New Hanover, November 19, 1795-December 19, 1796. 
Samuel Ashe, New Hanover, December 19, 1796-December 5, 1797. 
Sapiuel Ashe, New Hanover, December 5, 1797-December 7, 1798. 
W. R. Davie, Halifax, December 7, 1798-November 23, 1799. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, November 23, 1799-November 29, 1800. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, November 29, 1800-November 28, 1801. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, November 28, 1801-December 6, 1802. 
James Turner, Warren, December 6, 1802-December 1, 1803. 
James Turner, Warren, December 1, 1803-November 29, 1804. 
James Turner, Warren, November 29, 1804-December 10, 1805. 
Nathaniel Alexander, Mecklenburg, December 10, 1805-December 1, 

1806. 
Nathaniel Alexander, Mecklenburg, December 1, 1806-December 1, 

1807. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, December 1, 1807-December 12, 1808. 
David Stone, Bertie, December 12, 1808-December 13, 1809. 
David Stone, Bertie, December 13, 1809-December 5, 1810. 
Benjamin Smith, Brunswick, December 5, 1810-December 9, 1811. 
William Hawkins, Warren, December 9, 1811-November 25, 1812. 
William Hawkins, Warren, November 25, 1812-November 20, 1813. 
William Hawkins, Warren, November 20, 1813-November 29, 1814. 
William Miller, Warren, November 29, 1814-December 7, 1815. 



20 North Carolina Manual 

William Miller, Warren, December 7, 1815-December 7, 1816. 
William Miller, Warren, December 7, 1816-December 3, 1817. 
John Branch, Halifax, December 3, 1817-November 24, 1818. 
John Branch, Halifax, November 24, 1818-November 25, 1819. 
John Branch, Halifax, November 25, 1819-December 7, 1820. 
Jesse Franklin, Surry, December 7, 1820-December 7, 1821. 
Gabriel Holmes, Sampson, December 7, 1821-December 7, 1822. 
Gabriel Holmes, Sampson, December 7, 1822-December 6, 1823. 
Gabriel Holmes, Sampson, December 6, 1823-December 7, 1824. 
H. G. Burton, Halifax, December 7, 1824-December 6, 1825. 
H. G. Burton, Halifax, December 6, 1825-December 29, 1826. 
H. B. Burton, Halifax, December 29, 1826-December 8, 1827. 
James Iredell, Chowan, December 8, 1827-December 12, 1828. 
John Owen, Bladen, December 12, 1828-December 10, 1829. 
John Owen, Bladen, December 10, 1829-December 18, 1830. 
Montfort Stokes, Wilkes, December 18, 1830-December 13, 1831. 
Montfort Stokes, Wilkes, December 13, 1831-December 6, 1832. 
D. L, Swain, Buncombe, December 6, 1832-December 9, 1833. 
D. L. Swain, Buncombe, December 9, 1833-December 10, 1834. 
D. L. Swain, Buncombe, December 10, 1834-December 10, 1835. 
R. D. Spaight, Jr., Craven, December 10, 1835-December 31, 1836. 



Governors Elected by the People 

E. B. Dudley, New Hanover, December 31, 1836-December 29, 1838. 
E. B. Dudley, New Hanover, December 29, 1838-January 1, 1841. 
J. M. Morehead, Guilford, January 1, 1841-December 31, 1842. 
J. M. Morehead, Guilford, December 31, 1842-January 1, 1845. 
W. A. Graham, Orange, January 1, 1845-January 1, 1847. 
W. A. Graham, Orange, January 1, 1847- January 1, 1849. 
Charles Manly, Wake, January 1, 1849-January 1, 1851. 
D. S. Reid, Rockingham, January 1, 1851-December 22, 1852. 
D. S. Reid, Rockingham, December 22, 1852-December 6, 1854. 
Warren Winslow, Cumberland, December 6, 1854-January 1, 1855. 
Thomas Bragg, Northampton, January 1, 1855-January 1, 1857. 
Thomas Bragg, Northampton, January 1, 1857-January 1, 1859. 
John W. Ellis, Rowan, January 1, 1859-January 1, 1861. 
John W. Ellis, Rowan, January 1, 1861-July 7, 1861. 
Henry T. Clark, Edgecombe, July 7, 1861-September 8, 1862. 
Z. B. Vance, Buncombe, September 8, 1862-December 22, 1864. 



Governors 21 

Z. B. Vance, Buncombe, December 22, 1864-May 29, 1865. 

W. W. Holden, Wake, May 29, 1865-December 15, 1865. 

Jonathan Worth, Randolph, December 15, 1865-December 22, 1866. 

Jonathan Worth, Randolph, December 22, 1866-July 1, 1868. 

W. W. Holden, Wake, July 1, 1868-December 15, 1870. 

T. R. Caldwell, Burke, December 15, 1870-January 1, 1873. 

T. R. Caldwell, Burke, January 1, 1873-July 11, 1874. -^ 

C. H. Brogden, Wayne, July 11, 1874-January 1, 1877. 

Z B. Vance, Mecklenburg, January 1, 1877-February 5, 1879. 

T. J. Jarvis, Pitt, February 5, 1879-January 18, 1881. 

T. J. Jarvis, Pitt, January 18, 1881-January 21, 1885. 

A. M. Scales, Rockingham, January 21, 1885-January 17, 1889. 

D. G. Fowle, Wake, January 17, 1889-April 8, 1891. 
Thomas M. Holt, Alamance, April 8, 1891-January 18, 1893. 
Ellas Carr, Edgecombe, January 18, 1893-January 12, 1897. 
D. L. Russell, Brunswick, January 12, 1897-January 15, 1901. 
C. B. Aycock, Wayne, January 15, 1901-January 11, 1905. 

R. B. Glenn, Forsyth, January 11, 1905-January 12, 1909. 
W. W. Kitchin, Person, January 12, 1909-January 15, 1913. 
Locke Craige, Buncombe, January 15, 1913-January 11, 1917. 
Thomas W. Bickett, Franklin, January 11, 1917-January 12, 1921. 
Cameron Morrison, Mecklenburg, January 12, 1921-January 14, 

1925. 
Angus Wilton McLean, Robeson, January 14, 1925-January 11, 1929. 
O. Max Gardner, Cleveland, January 11, 1929- January 5, 1933. 
J. C. B. Ehringhaus, Pasquotank, January 5, 1933-January 7, 1937. 
Clyde R. Hoey, Cleveland, January 7, 1937-January 9, 1941. 
J. Melville Broughton, Wake, January 9, 1941-January 4, 1945. 
R. Gregg Cherry, Gaston, January 4, 1945- 



THE STATE FLAG 

An Act to Establish a State Flag 

The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact: 

Section 1. That the flag of North Carolina shall consist of a blue 
union, containing in the center thereof a white star with the letter 
N in gilt on the left and the letter C in gilt on the right of said 
star, the circle containing the same to be one-third the width of the 
union. 

Sec. 2. That the fly of the flag shall consist of two equally pro- 
portioned bars; the upper bar to be red, the lower bar to be white; 
that the length of the bars horizontally shall be equal to the per- 
pendicular length of the union, and the total length of the flag 
shall be one-third more than its width. 

Sec. 3. That above the star in the center of the union there 
shall be a gilt scroll in semicircular form, containing in black let- 
ters this inscription: "May 20th, 1775," and that below the star 
there shall be a similar scroll containing in black letters the in- 
scription: "April 12th, 1776." 

In the General Assembly read three times and ratified this 9th 
day of March, A.D. 1885. 

No change has been made in the flag since the passage of this 
act. By an act of 1907 it is provided: 

"That the board of trustees or managers of the several State in- 
stitutions and public buildings shall provide a North Carolina flag, 
of such dimensions and material as they may deem best, and the 
same shall be displayed from a staff upon the top of each and 
every such building at all times except during inclement weather, 
and upon the death of any State officer or any prominent citizen 
the Flag shall be put at half-mast until the burial of such person 
shall have taken place. 

"That the Board of County Commissioners of the several coun- 
ties in this State shall likewise authorize the procuring of a North 
Carolina flag, to be displayed either on a staff upon the top, or 
draped behind the Judge's stand, in each and every courthouse in 
the State, and that the State flag shall be displayed at each and 
every term of court held, and on such other public occasions 
as the Commissioners may deem proper." (Rev., s. 5321; 1885, c. 
291; 1907, c. 838.) 

[23] 



THE MECKLENBURG DECLARATION OF 
20th MAY. 1775* 

Declaration 

Names of the Delegates Present 

Col. Thomas Polk , John McKnitt Alexander 

Ephraim Brevard Hezekiah Alexander 

Hezekiah J. Balch Adam Alexander 

John Phifer Charles Alexander 

James Harris Zacheus Wilson, Sen. 

William Kennon Waightstill Avery 

John Ford Benjamin Patton 

Richard Barry Mathew McClure 

Henry Downs Neil Morrison 

Ezra Alexander Robert Irwin 

William Graham John Flenniken 

John Quary David Reese 

Abraham Alexander Richard Harris, Sen. 

Abraham Alexander was appointed Chairman, and John McKnitt 
Alexander, Clerk. The following resolutions were offered, viz.: 

1. Resolved, That whosoever directly or indirectly abetted or in 
any way form or manner countenanced the unchartered and danger- 
ous invasion of our rights as claimed by Great Britain is an enemy 
to this country, to America, and to the inherent and inalienable 
rights of man. 

2. Resolved, That we the citizens of Mecklenburg County, do 
hereby dissolve the political bands which have connected us to the 
mother country and hereby absolve ourselves from all allegiance to 
the British Crown and abjure all political connection contract or 
association with that nation who have wantonly trampled on our 
rights and liberties and inhumanly shed the blood of American 
pati'iots at Lexington. 

3. Resolved, That we do hereby declare ourselves a free and inde- 
pendent people, are, and of right ought to be a sovei'eign and self- 



* The above is found in Vol. IX, pages 126»-«5 of The Colonial Records of North 
Carolina. 

[24] 



Mecklenburg Declaration 25 

governing association under the control of no power other than that 
of our God and the General Government of the Congress to the 
maintenance of which independence we solemnly pledge to each other 
our mutual cooperation, our lives, our fortunes, and our most sacred 
honor. 

4. Resolved, That as we now acknowledge the existence and control 
of no law or legal officer, civil or military within this County, we do 
hereby ordain and adopt as a rule of life all each and every of our 
former laws — wherein nevertheless the Crown of Great Britain 
never can be considered as holding rights, privileges, immunities, or 
authority therein. 

5. Resolved, That it is further decreed that all, each and every 
Military Officer in this Country is hereby reinstated in his former 
command and authority, he acting comformably to these regulations. 
And that every member present of this delegation shall henceforth 
be a civil officer, viz., a justice of the peace, in the character of a 
"committee man" to issue process, hear and determine all matters 
of controversy according to said adopted laws and to preserve peace, 
union and harmony in said county, and to use every exertion to 
spread the love of Country and fire of freedom throughout America, 
until a more general and organized government be established in 
this Province. 



THE GREAT SEAL 

The Constitution of North Carolina, Article III, section 16, re- 
quires that 

"There shall be a seal of the State which shall be kept by the 
Governor, and used by him as occasion may require, and shall be 
called 'The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina.' All grants 
and commissions shall be issued in the name and by the authority of 
the State of North Carolina, sealed with 'The Great Seal of the 
State,' signed by the Governor and countersigned by the Secretary 
of State." 

The use of a Great Seal for the attestation of important docu- 
ments began with the institution of government in North Carolina. 
There have been at various times nine different seals in use in the 
colony and State. 

The present Great Seal of the State of North Carolina is de- 
scribed as follows: 

"The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina is two and one- 
quarter inches in diameter, and its design is a representation of the 
figures of Liberty and Plenty, looking toward each other, but not 
more than half fronting each other, and otherwise disposed as 
follows : Liberty, the first figure, standing, her pole with cap on it 
in her left hand and a scroll with the word 'Constitution' inscribed 
thereon in her right hand. Plenty, the second figure, sitting down, 
her right arm half extended toward Liberty, three heads of wheat 
in her right hand, and in her left the small end of her horn, the 
mouth of which is resting at her feet, and the contents of horn 
rolling out. In the exergon is inserted the words May 20, 1775, 
above the coat of arms. Around the circumference is the legend 
'The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina' and the motto 
'Esse Quam Videri'." (Rev., s. 5339; Code, ss. 3328, 3329; 1868-9, 
c. 270, s. 35; 1883, c. 392; 1893, c. 145.) 



[26] 



THE STATE BIRD 

By popular choice the Cardinal was selected for adoption as our 
State Bird as of March 4, l'J43. (S. L. 1943 c. 595; G. S. 145-2.) 

This bird is sometimes called the Winter Redbird because it is 
most conspicuous in winter and is the only "redbird" present at that 
season. It is an all year round resident and one of the commonest 
birds in our gardens and thickets. It is about the size of a Catbird 
with a longer tail, red all over, except that the throat and region 
around the bill is black; the head is conspicuously crested and the 
large stout bill is red; the female is much duller — the red being 
mostly confined to the crest, wings and tail. There are no seasonal 
changes in the plumage. 

The Cardinal is a fine singer, and what is unusual among birds the 
female is said to sing as well as the male, which latter sex usually 
has a monopoly of that art in the feathered throngs. 

The nest is rather an untidy affair built of weed stems, grass and 
similar materials in a low shrub, small tree or bunch of briars, 
usually not over four feet above the ground. The usual number of 
eggs to a set is three in this State, usually four further North. Pos- 
sibly the Cardinal raises an extra brood down here to make up the 
difference, or possibly he can keep up his normal population more 
easily here through not having to face inclement winters of the 
colder North. A conspicuous bird faces more hazards. 

The cardinal is by nature a seed eater, but he does not dislike small 
fruits and insects. 



[28 1 



THE HALIFAX RESOLUTION 

Adopted by the Provincial Congress of North Carolina in Session 

at Halifax, April 12, 1776 

It appears to your committee that pursuant to the plan concerted 
by the British Ministry for subjugating America, the King and 
Parliament of Great Britain have usurped a power over the persons 
and properties of the people unlimited and uncontrolled; and disre- 
garding their humble petitions for peace, liberty and safety, have 
made divers legislative acts, denouncing war, famine, and every 
species of calamity, against the Continent in general. The British 
fleets and armies have been, and still are, daily employed in destroy- 
ing the people, and committing the most horrid devastations on the 
country. The Governors in different Colonies have declared protec- 
tion to slaves who should imbrue their hands in the blood of their 
masters. That ships belonging to America are declared prizes of war, 
and many of them have been violently seized and confiscated. In con- 
sequence of all of which multitudes of the people have been destroyed, 
or from easy circumstances reduced to the most lamentable distress. 

And Whereas, The moderation hitherto manifested by the United 
Colonies and their sincere desire to be reconciled to the mother 
country on constitutional principles, have procured no mitigation of 
the aforesaid wrongs and usurpations, and no hopes remain of ob- 
taining redress by those means alone which have been hitherto tried, 
your committee are of opinion that the House should enter into the 
following resolve, to wit: 

Resolved, That the delegates for this Colony in the Continental 
Congi'ess be empowered to concur- with the delegates of the other 
Colonies in declaring Independency, and forming foreign alliances, 
reserving to this Colony the sole and exclusive right of forming a 
Constitution and laws for this Colony, and of appointing delegates 
from time to time (under the direction of a general representation 
thereof), to meet the delegates of the other Colonies for such pur- 
poses as shall be hereafter pointed out. 



[30] 



NAME OF STATE AND NICKNAMES 

In 1629 King Charles the First of England "erected into a 
province," all the land from Albemarle Sound on the north to the 
St. John's River on the south, v^rhich he directed should be called 
Carolina. The word Carolina is from the word Carolus, the Latin 
form of Charles. 

When Carolina was divided in 1710, the southern part was called 
South Carolina and the northern or older settlement was called 
North Carolina, or the "Old North State." Historians had re- 
corded the fact that the principal products of this State were "tar, 
pitch and turpentine." It was during one of the fiercest battles 
of the War Between the States, so the story goes, that the column 
supporting the North Carolina troops was driven from the field. 
After the battle the North Carolinians, who had successfully fought 
it out alone, were greeted from the passing derelict regiment with 
the question : "Any more tar down in the Old North State, boys?" 
Quick as a flash came the answer: "No; not a bit; old Jeflf's bought 
it all up." "Is that so; what is he going to do with it?" was asked. 
"He is going to put it on you'ns heels to make you stick better in 
the next fight." Creecy relates that General Lee, hearing of the 
incident, said: "God bless the Tar Heel boys," and from that they 
took the name. — Adapted from Grandfather Tales of North Caro- 
lina by R. B. Creecy and Histories of North Carolina Regiments, 
Vol. Ill, by Walter Clark. 

The State Motto 

The General Assembly of 1893 (chapter 145) adopted the words 
"Esse Quam Videri" as the State's motto and directed that these 
words with the date "20 May, 1775," should be placed with our 
Coat of Arms upon the Great Seal of the State. 

The words "Esse Quam Videri" mean "to be rather than to seem." 
Nearly every State has adopted a motto, generally in Latin. The 
reason for their mottoes being in Latin is that the Latin tongue is 
far more condensed and terse than the English. The three words, 
"Esse Quam Videri," require at least six English words to express 
the same idea. 

Curiosity has been aroused to learn the origin of our State motto. 

[31] 



32 North Carolina Manual 

It is found in Cicero in his essay on Friendship (Cicero de Amicitia, 
chap. 26). 

It is a little singular that until the act of 1893 the sovereign State 
of North Carolina had no motto since its declaration of independ- 
ence. It was one of the very few States which did not have a motto 
and the only one of the original thirteen without one. (Rev., s. 
5320; 1893, c. 145; G. S. 145-2.) 

The State Colors 

North Carolina has no officially designated state colors. 

The State Flower 

The General Assembly of 1941 designated the dogwood as the 
State flower. (Public Laws, 1941, c. 289; G. S. 145-1.) , 

The State's Most Famous Toast 

(Not Officially Designated) 

"Here's to the land of the long leaf pine 
The summer land where the sun doth shine; 
Where the weak grow strong 
And the strong grow great. 
Here's to 'down home' 
The Old North State." 

(Composed in 1904 by Mi^s. Harry C. Martin, former resident of 
Raleigh, N. C, but now living in Tennessee.) 

Legal Holidays 

January 1 — New Year's Day. 

January 19 — Birthday of General Robert E. Lee. 

February 22 — Birthday of George Washington. 

Easter Monday, 

April 12 — Anniversary of the Resolutions adopted by the Pro- 
vincial Congress of North Carolina at Halifax, April 12, 1776, in- 
structing the delegates from North Carolina to the Continental 
Congress to vote for a Declaration of Independence. 

May 10 — Confederate Memorial Day. 

May 20 — Anniversary of the "Mecklenburg Declaration of In- 
dependence." 



Population 33 

May 30 — Memorial Day (Applies to State and National Banks 
only) . 

July 4 — Independence Day, 

September, first Monday — Labor Day. 

November, Tuesday after first Monday — General Election Day. 

November 11 — Armistice Day. 

November, Fourth Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. 

By joint Resolution No. 41 of Congress, approved by the Presi- 
dent December 26, 1941, the fourth Thursday in November in each 
and every year after 1941, was designated as Thanksgiving Day 
and made a legal public holiday to all intents and purposes. 

December 25 — Christmas Day. 



Population 

1675 (Estimated) 4,000 

1701 (Estimated) 5,000 

1707 (Estimated) 7,000 

1715 (Estimated) 11,000 

1729 (Estimated) 35,000 

1752 (Estimated) 100,000 

1765 (Estimated) 200,000 

1771 (Estimated) 250,000 

1786 (Estimated) 350,000 

1790 (Census) 393,751 

1800 (Census) 478,103 

1810 ( Census ) 555,500 

1820 (Census) 638,829 

1830 (Census) 737,987 

1840 (Census) 753,409 

1850 (Census) 869,039 

1860 (Census) 992,622 

1870 (Census) 1,071,361 

1880 (Census) 1,399,7S0 

1890 (Census) 1,617,947 

1900 (Census) 1,893,810 

1910 ( Census ) 2,206.287 

1920 ( Census ) 2,559, 1 23 

1930 (Census) 3,170,276 

1940 ( Census) 3,571,623 



THE OLD NORTH STATE 



(Traditional air as tung in 1926) 



WlLLUM GaSTOM 
With spirit 



Collected and abbimqbd 
BT Mas. E. E. Rancolpe 




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1. Car • o • li • nal Car - o 

2. Tho' she en - vies not 

3. Then let all those who 



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- li - nal heav-en's bless-in|;s at - tend her, 
oth - ers, their mer - it - ed glo - ry, 
love us, love the land that we live in, 




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While we live we will cher - ish, pro 

Say whose name stands the fore - most, in 

As hao - py a re - gion as 



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- tect and de - fend her, Tho' the 
lib - er - ty's sto ■ ry, Tho' too 
on this side of heav-en. Where 

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scorn - er may sneer at and wit - lings de - fame her, Still our hearts swell with 
true to her - self eer to crouch to op -pres-sion, Who can yield to just 
plen - ty and peace, love and joy smile be - fore us. Raise a-loud, rais! to- 

_^e • ^.m. m j= •— r* • — r» * — g^^-f^ — — * <»^*- 

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glad - ness when ev • er we name her. 

rule • more loy - al sub - mis - sion. Hur • rahl 

geth - er the heart thrill - ing cho - rus. 

-* r* • r-» a r« H5> — 



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Old North State for - ev - er, 

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CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF NORTH 

CAROLINA 



PREAMBLE 

We, the people of the State of North Carolina, grateful to Al- 
mighty God, the Sovereign Ruler of Nations, for the preservation 
of the American Union and the existence of our civil, political, and 
religious liberties, and acknowledging our dependence upon Him 
for the continuance of those blessings to us and our posterity, do, 
for the more certain security thereof and for the better govern- 
ment of this State, ordain and establish this Constitution : 

ARTICLE I 

DECLARATION OF RIGHTS 

That the great, general, and essential principles of liberty and 
free government may be recognized and established, and that the 
relations of this State to the Union and Government of the United 
States, and those of the people of this State to the rest of the 
American people, may be defined and affirmed, we do declare: 

Section 1. The equality and rights of men. That we hold it to 
be self-evident that all men are created equal; that they are en- 
dowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among 
these are life, liberty, the enjoyment of the fruits of their own 
labor, and the pursuit of happiness. 

Sec. 2. Political })ower and government. That all political power 
is vested in, and derived from, the people; all government of right 
originates from the people, is founded upon their will only, and is 
instituted solely for the good of the whole.. 

Sec. 3. Internal government of the State. That the people of 
this State have the inherent, sole and exclusive right of regulating 
the internal government and policies thereof, and of altering and 
abolishing their Constitution and form of government whenever it 
may be necessary for their safety and happiness; but every such 
right should be exercised in pursuance of the law, and consistently 
with the Constitution of the United States. 

[35 1 



36 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 4. That there is no right to secede. That this State shall 
ever remain a member of the American Union; that the people 
thereof are a part of the American Nation; that there is no right 
on the part of the State to secede, and that all attempts, from 
whatever source or upon whatever pretext, to dissolve said Union 
01 to sever said Nation, ought to be resisted with the whole power 
of the State. 

Sec. 5. Of allegiance to the United States Government. That 
every citizen of this State owes paramount allegiance to the Con- 
stitution and Government of the United States, and that no law or 
ordinance of the State in contravention or subversion thereof can 
have any binding force. 

Sec. 6. Public debt; bonds issiied under ordinance of Convention 
of 1868, '68-69, '69-70, declared invalid; exception. The State 
shall never assume or pay, or authorize the collection of any debt 
or obligation, express or implied, incurred in aid of insurrection or 
rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or 
emancipation of any slave; nor shall the General Assembly assume 
or pay, or authorize the collection of any tax to pay, either directly 
or indirectly, expressed or implied, any debt or bond incurred, or 
issued, by authority of the Convention of the year one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-eight, nor any debt or bond incurred or 
issued by the Legislature of the year one thousand eight hundred 
and sixty-eight, either at its special session of the year one thou- 
sand eight hundred and sixty-eight, or at its regular sessions of the 
years one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight and one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-nine, and one thousand eight hundred 
and sixty-nine and one thousand eight hundred and seventy, except 
the bonds issued to fund the interest on the old debt of the State, 
unless the proposing to pay the same shall have first been sub- 
mitted to the people, and by them ratified by the vote of a majority 
of all the qualified voters of the State at a regular election held for 
that purpose. 

Sec. 7. Exclusive emoluments, etc. No man or set of men are 
entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or privileges from the 
community but in consideration of public services. 

Sec. 8. The legislative, executive, and judicial powers distinct. 
The legislative, executive, and supreme judicial powers of the gov- 
ernment ought to be forever separate and distinct from each other. 

Sec. 9. Of the power of suspending laivs. All power of sus- 



Constitution 37 

pending laws, or the execution of laws, by any authority, without 
the consent of the representatives of the people, is injurious to 
their rights, and ought not to be exercised. 

Sec. 10. Election free. All elections ought to be free. 

Sec. 11. In criminal prosecutions. In all criminal prosecutions 
every man has the right to be informed of the accusation against 
him, and to confront the accusers and witnesses with other testi- 
mony, and to have counsel for his defense, and not to be compelled 
to give evidence against himself, or to pay costs, jail fees, or neces- 
sary witness fees of the defense, unless found guilty. 

Sec. 12. Answers to criminal charges. No person shall be put 
to answer any criminal charge except as hereinafter allowed, but 
bj'^ indictment, presentment, or impeachment. 

Sec. 13. Right of jury. No person shall be convicted of any 
crime but by the unanimous verdict of a jury of good and lawful 
men in open court. The Legislature may, however, provide other 
means of trial for petty misdemeanors, with the right of appeal. 

Sec. 14. Excessive bail. Excessive bail should not be required, 
nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel or unusual punishments in- 
flicted. 

Sec. 15. General warrants. General warrants, whereby any 
officer or messenger may be commanded to search suspected places, 
without evidence of the act committed, or to seize any person or 
persons not named, whose offense is not particularly described and 
supported by evidence, are dangerous to liberty, and ought not to 
be granted. 

Sec. 16. Imprisonment for debt. There shall be no imprison- 
ment for debt in this State, except in cases of fraud. 

Sec. 17. No person taken, etc., but by law of the land. No per- 
son ought to be taken, imprisoned, or disseized of his freehold, lib- 
erties or privileges, or outlawed or exiled, or in any manner de- 
prived of his life, liberty or property but by the law of the land. 

Sec. 18. Persons restrained of liberty. Every person restrained 
of his liberty is entitled to a remedy to inquire into the lawfulness 
thereof, and to remove the same, if unlawful; and such remedy 
ought out to be denied or delayed. 

Sec. 19. Co7itroversies at law respecting property. In all con- 
troversies at law respecting property, the ancient mode of trial by 



38 North Carolina Manual 

jury is one of the best securities of the rights of the people, and 
ought to remain sacred and inviolable. 

Sec. 20. Freedom of the press. The freedom of the press is 
one of the great bulwarks of liberty, and therefore ought never 
to be restrained, but every individual shall be held responsible for 
the abuse of the same. 

Sec. 21. Habeas corpus. The privileges of the writ of habeas 
corpus shall not be suspended. 

Sec. 22. Property qualification. As political rights and privi- 
leges are not dependent upon, or modified by, property, therefore no 
property qualification ought to affect the right to vote or hold office. 

Sec. 23. Representation and taxation. The people of the State 
ought not to be taxed, or made subject to the payment of any im- 
post or duty without the consent of themselves, or their represen- 
tatives in General Assembly, freely given. 

Sec. 24. Militia and the right to bear arms. A well regulated 
militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of 
the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed; and, as 
standing armies in time of peace are dangerous to liberty, they 
ought not to be kept up, and the military should be kept under 
strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power. Nothing 
herein contained shall justify the practice of carrying concealed 
weapons, or prevent the Legislature from enacting penal statutes 
against said practice. 

Sec. 25. Right of the people to assemble together. The people 
have a right to assemble together to consult for their common good, 
to instruct their representatives, and to apply to the Legislature 
for redress of grievances. But secret political societies are dan- 
gerous to the liberties of a free people, and should not be tolerated. 

Sec. 26. Religious liberty. All men have a natural and unalien- 
able right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of 
their own consciences, and no human authority should, in any case 
v/hatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience. 

Sec. 27. Education. The people have the right to the privilege 
of education, and it is the duty of the State to guard and maintain 
that right. 

Sec. 28. Elections should be frequent. For redress of gi'iev- 
ances, and for amending and strengthening the laws, elections 
should be often held. 



Constitution 39 

Sec. 29. Recurrence to fundamental principles. A frequent re- 
currence to fundamental principles is absolutely necessary to pre- 
serve the blessings of liberty. 

Sec. 30. Hereditary emoluments, etc. No hereditary emolu- 
ments, privileges, or honors ought to be granted or conferred in 
this State. 

Sec. 31. Perpetuities, etc. Perpetuities and monopolies are con- 
trary to the genius of a free State, and ought not to be allowed. 

Sec. 32. Ex post facto laws. Retrospective laws, punishing 
acts committed before the existence of such laws, and by them 
only declared criminal, are oppressive, unjust, and incompatible 
with liberty; wherefore no ex post facto law ought to be made. 
No law taxing retrospectively sales, purchases, or other acts pre- 
viously done, ought to be passed. 

Sec. 33. Slavery jirohibited. Slavery and involuntary servi- 
tude, othei'wise than for crime, whereof the parties shall have been 
duly convicted, shall be, and are hereby, forever prohibited within 
the State. 

Sec. 34. State boundaries. The limits and boundaries of the 
State shall be and remain as they now are. 

Sec. 35. Courts shall be open. All courts shall be open; and 
every person for an injury done him in his lands, goods, person, 
or reputation, shall have remedy by due course of law, and right 
and justice administered without sale, denial, or delay. 

Sec. 36. Soldiers in time of peace. No soldier shall, in time of 
peace, be quartered in any house without the consent of the owner; 
nor in time of war but in a manner prescribed by law. 

Sec. 37. Other rights of the people. This enumeration of rights 
shall not be construed to impair or deny others retained by the 
people; and all. powers not herein delegated remain with the 
people. 

ARTICLE II 

LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. Two branches. The legislative authority shall be 
vested in two distinct branches, both dependent on the people, to- 
wit: a Senate and House of Representatives. 

Sec. 2 Time of assembling. The Senate and House of Representa- 



40 North Carolina Manual 

tives shall meet biennially on the first Wednesday after the first 
Monday in January next after their election; and, when assembled, 
shall be denominated the General Assembly. Neither house shall 
proceed upon public business unless a majority of all the members 
are actually present. 

Sec. 3. Number of senators. The Senate shall be composed of 
fifty Senators, biennially chosen by ballot. 

Sec. 4. Regulations in relation to districting the State for Sen- 
ators. The Senate Districts shall be so altered by the General As- 
sembly, at the first session after the return of every enumeration 
by order of Congress, that each Senate District shall contain, as 
near as may be, an equal number of inhabitants, excluding aliens 
and Indians not taxed, and shall remain unaltered until the return 
of another enumeration, and shall at all times consist of contigu- 
ous territory; and no county shall be divided in the formation of 
a Senate District, unless such county shall be equitably entitled to 
two or more Senators. 

Sec. 5. Regulations in relation to apportionment of representa- 
tives. The House of Representatives shall be composed of one hun- 
dred and twenty Representatives, biennially chosen by ballot, to 
be elected by the counties respectively, according to their popula- 
tion, and each county shall have at least one Representative in the 
House of Representatives, although it may not contain the requi- 
site ratio of representation; this apportionment shall be made by 
the General Assembly at the respective times and periods when the 
districts of the Senate are hereinbefore directed to be laid off. 

Sec. 6. Ratio of representation. In making the apportionment 
in the House of Representatives, the ratio of representation shall be 
ascertained by dividing the amount of the population of the State, 
exclusive of that comprehended within those counties which do not 
severally contain the one hundred and twentieth part of the popu- 
lation of the State, by the number of Representatives, less the 
number assigned to such counties; and in ascertaining the number 
of the population of the State, aliens and Indians not taxed shall 
not be included. To each county containing the said ratio and not 
twice the said ratio there shall be assigned one Representative; to 
each county containing two but not three times the said ratio there 
shall be assigned two Representatives, and so on progressively, and 
then the remaining Representatives shall be assigned severally to 
the counties having the largest fractions. 



Constitution 41 

Sec. 7. Qualifications for senators. Each member of the Senate 
shall not be less than twenty-five years of age, shall have resided 
in the State as a citizen two years, and shall have usually resided 
in the district for which he was chosen one year immediately pre- 
ceding his election. 

Sec. 8. Qualifications for representatives. Each member of the 
House of Representatives shall be a qualified elector of the State, 
and shall have resided in the county for which he is chosen for 
one year immediately preceding his election. 

Sec. 9. Election of officers. In the election of all officers whose 
appointment shall be conferred upon the General Assembly by the 
Constitution, the vote shall be viva voce. 

Sec. 10. Powers in relation to divorce and alimony. The Gen- 
eral Assembly shall have power to pass general laws regulating 
divorce and alimony, but shall not have power to grant a divorce 
or secure alimony in any individual case. 

Sec. 11. Private laws in relation to names of persons, etc. The 
General Assembly shall not have power to pass any private law to 
alter the name of any person, or to legitimate any person not born 
in lawful wedlock, or to restore to the rights of citizenship any 
person convicted of an infamous crime, but shall have power to pass 
general laws regulating the same. 

Sec. 12. Thirty days notice shall he given anterior to passage of 
private laws. The General Assembly shall not pass any private 
law, unless it shall be made to appear that thirty days notice of 
application to pass such a law shall have been given, under such 
direction and in such manner as shall be provided by law. 

Sec. 13. Vacancies. If vacancies shall occur in the General As- 
sembly by death, resignation, or otherwise, writs of election shall 
be issued by the Governor under such regulations as may be pre- 
scribed by law. 

Sec. 14. Revenue. No law shall be passed to raise money on the 
credit of the State, or to pledge the faith of the State, directly or 
indirectly, for the payment of any debt, or to impose any tax upon 
the people of the State, or allow the counties, cities or towns to do 
so, unless the bill for the purpose shall have been read three sev- 
eral times in each House of the General Assembly and passed three 
several readings, which readings shall have been on three different 
days, and agreed to by each House respectively, and unless the 



42 North Carolina Manual 

yeas and nays on the second and third readings of the bill shall 
have been entered on the journal. 

Sec. 15. Entails. The General Assembly shall regulate entails 
in such a manner as to prevent perpetuities. 

Sec. 16. Jou7-nals. Each House shall keep a journal of its pro- 
ceedings, which shall be printed and made public immediately af- 
ter the adjournment of the General Assembly. 

Sec. 17. Protest. Any member of either House may dissent 
from, and protest against, any act or resolve which he may think 
injurious to the public, or any individual, and have the reasons of 
his dissent entered on the journal. 

Sec. 18. Officers of the House. The House of Representatives 
shall choose their own Speaker and other officers. 

Sec. 19. President of the Senate. The Lieutenant-Governor shall 
preside in the Senate, but shall have no vote unless it may be equally 
divided. 

Sec. 20. Other senatorial officers. The Senate shall choose its 
other officers and also a Speaker {pro tempore) in the absence of 
the Lieutenant-Governor, or when he shall exercise the office of 
the Governor. 

Sec. 21. Style of the acts. The style of the acts shall be: "The 
General Assembly of North Carolina do enact." 

Sec. 22. Powers of the General Assembly. Each House shall 
ba judge of the qualifications and election of its own members, shall 
sit upon its own adjournment from day to day, prepare bills to be 
passed into laws; and the two Houses may also jointly adjourn to 
any future day, or other place. 

Sec. 23. Bills and resolutions to be read three times, etc. All 
bills and resolutions of a legislative nature shall be read three times 
in each House before they pass into laws, and shall be signed by the 
presiding officers of both Houses. 

Sec. 24. Oath of members. Each member of the General As- 
sembly, before taking his seat, shall take an oath or affirmation that 
he will support the Constitution and laws of the United States, and 
the Constitution of the State of North Carolina, and will faithfully 
discharge his duty as a member of the Senate or House of Repre- 
sentatives. 

Sec. 25. To-ms of office. The terms of office for Senators and 



Constitution 43 

members of the House of Representatives shall commence at the 
time of their election. 

Sec. 26, Yeas and 7iaijs. Upon motion made and seconded in 
either House by one-fifth of the members present, the yeas and nays 
upon any question shall be taken and entered upon the journals. 

Sec. 27. Election for members of the General Assembly. The 
election for members of the General Assembly shall be held for the 
respective districts and counties, at the places where they are now 
held, or may be directed hereafter to be held, in such manner as 
may be pi'escribed by law, on the first Thursday in August, in the 
year one thousand eight hundred and seventy, and every two years 
thereafter. But the General Assembly may change the time of 
holding the elections. (Changed to Tuesday after first Monday in 
November, c. 275—1876.) 

Sec. 28. Pay of meinbers and officers of the General Assembly. 
The members of the General Assembly for the term of their office 
shall receive a salary for their services of six hundred dollars each. 
The salaries of the presiding officers of the two houses shall be seven 
hundred dollars each: Provided, that in addition to the salaries 
herein provided for, should an extra session of the General As- 
sembly be called, the members shall receive eight dollars per day 
each, and the presiding officers of the two houses ten dollars per day 
each, for every day of such extra session not exceeding twenty 
days; and should an extra session continue more than twenty days, 
the members and officers shall serve thereafter without pay. 

Sec. 29. Limitations upon power of General Assembly to enact 
private or special legislation. The General Assembly shall not pass 
any local, private, or special act or resolution relating to the estab- 
lishment of courts inferior to the Superior Court; relating to the 
appointment of justices of the peace; relating to health, sanitation, 
and the abatement of nuisances; changing the names of cities, 
towns, and townships; authorizing the laying out, opening, alter- 
ing, maintaining, or discontinuing of highways, streets, or alleys; 
relating to ferries or bridges; relating to non-navigable streams; 
relating to cemeteries; relating to the pay of jurors; erecting new 
townships, or changing township lines, or establishing or changing 
the lines of school districts; remitting fines, penalties, and forfeit- 
ures, or refunding moneys legally paid into the public treasury; 
regulating labor, trade, mining, or manufacturing; extending the 
time for the assessment or collection of taxes or otherwise relieving 



44 North Carolina Manual 

any collector of taxes from the due performance of his official duties 
or his sureties from liability; giving effect to informal wills and 
deeds; nor shall the General Assembly enact any such local, pri- 
vate, or special act by the partial repeal of a general law, but the 
General Assembly may at any time repeal local, private, or special 
laws enacted by it. Any local, private, or special act or resolution 
passed in violation of the provisions of this section shall be void. 
The General Assembly shall have power to pass general laws regu- 
lating matters set out in this section. 

Sec. 30. The General Assembly shall not use nor authorize to be 
used any part of the amount of any sinking fund for any purpose 
other than the retirement of the bonds for which said sinking fund 
has been created. 

ARTICLE III 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

Sec. 1. Officers of the Executive Department; Terms of Office. 
The Executive Department shall consist of a Governor, in whom 
shall be vested the supreme executive power of the State ; a Lieuten- 
ant Governor, a Secretary of State, an Auditor, a Treasurer, a 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, an Attorney General, a Com- 
missioner of Agriculture, a Commissioner of Labor and a Commis- 
sioner of Insurance, who shall be elected for a term of four years by 
the qualified electors of the State, at the same time and places and 
in the same manner as members of the General Assembly are elected. 
Their term of office shall commence on the first day of January next 
after their election, and continue until their successors are elected 
and qualified: Provided, that the officers first elected shall assume 
the duties of their office ten days after the approval of this Con- 
stitution by the Congi-ess of the United States, and shall hold 
their offices four years from and after the first day of January. 

Sec. 2. Qualifications of Governor and Lieutenant-Governor. No 
person shall be eligible as Governor or Lieutenant-Governor unless 
he shall have attained the age of thirty years, shall have been a citi- 
zen of the United States five years, and shall have been a resident 
of this State for two years next before the election; nor shall the 
person elected to either of these two offices be eligible to the same 
office more than four years in any term of eight yars, unless the 



Constitution 45 

office shall have been cast upon him as Lieutenant-Governor or 
President of the Senate. 

Sec. 3. Returns of election. The return of every election for of- 
ficers of the Executive Department shall be sealed up and transmit- 
ted to the seat of government by the returning officer, directed to 
the Secretary of State. The return shall be canvassed and the result 
declared in such manner as may be prescribed by law. Contested 
elections shall be determined by a joint ballot of both Houses of 
the General Assembly in such manner as shall be prescribed by 
law. 

Sec. 4. Oath of office for Governor. The Governor, before enter- 
ing upon the duties of his office, shall, in the presence of the members 
of both branches of the General Assembly, or before any Justice of 
the Supreme Court, take an oath or affirmation that he will support 
the Constitution and laws of the United States, and of the State of 
North Carolina, and that he will faithfully perform the duties ap- 
pertaining to the office of Governor, to which he has been elected. 

Sec. 5. Duties of Governor. The Governor shall reside at the 
seat of government of this State, and he shall, from time to time, 
give the General Assembly information of the affairs of the State, 
and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall 
deem expedient. 

Sec, 6. Reprieves, commutations, and pardons. The Governor 
shall have power to grant reprieves, commutations, and pardons, 
after conviction, for all offenses (except in case of impeachment) , 
upon such conditions as he may think proper, subject to such regu- 
lations as may be provided by law relative to the manner of applying 
for pardons. He shall biennially communicate to the General As- 
sembly each case of reprieve, commutation, or pardon granted, stat- 
ing the name of each convict, the crime for which he was convicted, 
the sentence and its date, the date of commutation, pardon, or re- 
prieve, and the reasons therefor. 

Sec. 7. Annual reports from officers of Executive Department 
and of public institutions. The officers of the Executive Department 
and of the public institutions of the State shall, at least five days 
previous to each regular session of the General Assembly, severally 
report to the Governor, who shall transmit such reports, with his 
message, to the General Assembly; and the Governor may, at any 
time, require information in writing from the officers in the Execu- 
tive Department upon any subject relating to the duties of their 



46 North Carolina Manual 

respective offices, and shall take care that the laws be faithfully 
executed. 

Sec. 8. Commander-in-Chief. The Governor shall be Commander- 
in-Chief of the militia of the State, except when they shall be called 
into the service of the United States. 

Sec. 9. Extra sessions of General Assembly. The Govei'nor shall 
have power, on extraordinary occasions, by and with the advice of 
the Council of State, to convene the General Assembly in extra ses- 
sion by his proclamation, stating therein the purpose or purposes 
for which they are thus convened. 

Sec. 10. Officers whose appointments are not otherwise provided 
for. The Governor shall nominate and, by and with the advice and 
consent of a majority of the Senators-elect, appoint all officers whose 
offices are established by this Constitution and whose appointments 
are not otherwise provided for. 

Sec. 11. Duties of the Lieutenant Governor. The Lieutenant 
Governor shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no vote 
unless the Senate be equally divided. He shall receive such com- 
pensation as shall be fixed by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 12. hi case of impeach^nent of Governor, or vacancy caused 
by death or resignation. In case of the impeachment of the Gover- 
nor, his failure to qualify, his absence from the State, his inability 
to discharge the duties of his office, or, in case the office of Governor 
shall in any wise become vacant, the powers, duties and emoluments 
of the office shall devolve upon the Lieutenant-Governor until the 
disability shall cease or a new Governor shall be elected and quali- 
fied. In every case in which the Lieutenant-Governor shall be un- 
able to preside over the Senate, the Senators shall elect one of their 
own number President of their body; and the powers, duties, and 
emoluments of the office of Governor shall devolve upon him when- 
ever the Lieutenant-Governor shall, for any reason, be prevented 
from discharging the duties of such office as above provided, and 
he shall continue as acting Governor until the disabilities are re- 
moved, or a new Governor or Lieutenant-Governor shall be elected 
and qualified. Whenever, during the recess of the General Assembly, 
it shall become necessary for the President of the Senate to ad- 
minister the government, the Secretary of State shall convene the 
Senate, that they may elect such President. 

Sec. 13. Duties of other executive officers. The respective duties 



Constitution 47 

of the Secretary of State, Auditor, Treasui-er, Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, Attorney General, Commissioner of Agriculture, 
Commissioner of Labor, and Commissioner of Insurance shall be 
prescribed by law. If the office of any of said officers shall be 
vacated by death, resignation, or otherwise, it shall be the duty of 
the Governor to appoint another until the disability be removed or 
his successor be elected and qualified. Every such vacancy shall be 
filled by election at the first general election that occurs more than 
thirty days after the vacancy has taken place, and the person chosen 
shall hold the office for the remainder of the unexpired term fixed in 
the first section of this article. 

Sec. 14. Council of State. The Secretary of State, Auditor, Treas- 
urer, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Commissioner of Agri- 
cultui'e, Commissioner of Labor, and Commissioner of Insurance 
shall constitute, ex-officio, the Council of State, who shall advise the 
Governor in the execution of his office, and three of whom shall 
constitute a quorum; their advice and proceedings in this capacity 
shall be entered in a journal, to be kept for this purpose, exclusively, 
and signed by the members present, from any part of which any 
member may enter his dissent; and such journal shall be placed 
before the General Assembly when called for by either house. The 
Attorney General shall be, ex-officio, the legal adviser of the execu- 
tive department. 

Sec. 15. Compensation of executive officers. The officers men- 
tioned in this article shall, at stated periods, receive for their services 
a compensation to be established by law, which shall neither be 
increased nor diminished during the time for which they shall have 
been elected, and the said officers shall receive no other emolument 
or allowance whatever. 

Sec. 16. Seal of State. There shall be a seal of the State, which 
shall be kept by the Governor, and used by him, as occasion may 
require, and shall be called "The Great Seal of the State of North 
Carolina". All grants and commissions shall be issued in the name 
and by the authority of the State of North Carolina, sealed with 
"The Great Seal of the State", and signed by the Governor, and 
countersigned by the Secretary of State. 

Sec. 17. Department of Agriculture, Immigration, and Statis- 
tics. The General Assembly shall establish a Department of Agri- 
culture, Immigration, and Statistics, under such regulations as may 
best promote the agricultural interests of the State, and shall enact 



48 North Carolina Manual 

laws for the adequate protection and encouragement of sheep 
husbandry. 

Sec. 18. Department of Justice. The General Assembly is author- 
ized and empowered to create a Department of Justice under the 
supein^ision and direction of the Attorney-General, and to enact 
suitable laws defining the authority of the Attorney-General and 
other officers and agencies concerning the prosecution of crime and 
the administration of the criminal laws of the State. 

ARTICLE IV 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. Abolishes the distinction between actions at law and 
suits in equity, and feigned issues. The distinction between actions 
at law and suits in equity, and the forms of all such actions and 
suits, shall be abolished; and there shall be in this State but one 
form of action for the enforcement or protection of private rights 
or the redress of private wrongs, which shall be denominated a 
civil action ; and every action prosecuted by the people of the State 
as a party, against a person charged with a public offense, for the 
punishment of the same, shall be termed a criminal action. Feigned 
issues shall also be abolished, and the facts at issue tried by order 
of court before a jury. 

Sec. 2. Division of judicial powers. The judicial power of the 
State shall be vested in a Court for the Trial of Impeachments, a 
Supreme Court, Superior Courts, Courts of Justices of the Peace, 
and such other courts inferior to the Supreme Court as may be es- 
tablished by law. 

Sec. 3. T7'ial court of impeachment. The Court for the Trial of 
Impeachments shall be the Senate. A majority of the members shall 
be necessary to a quorum, and the judgment shall not extend beyond 
removal from and disqualification to hold office in this State; but 
the party shall be liable to indictment and punishment according to 
law. 

Sec. 4. Impeachment. The House of Representatives solely shall 
have the power of impeaching. No person shall be convicted without 
the concurrence of two-thirds of the Senators present. When the 
Governor is impeached, the Chief Justice shall preside. 

Sec. 5. Treason against the State. Treason against the State 
shall consist only in levying war against it, or adhering to its ene- 



Constitution 49 

mies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of 
treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt 
act, or on confession in open court. No conviction of treason or at- 
tainder shall work corruption of blood or forfeiture. 

Sec. 6. Supreme Court. The Supreme Court shall consist of a 
Chief Justice and four Associate Justices, The General Assembly- 
may increase the number of Associate Justices to not more than six, 
when the work of the Court so requires. The Court shall have power 
to sit in divisions, when in its judgment this is necessary for the 
proper dispatch of business, and to make rules for the distribution 
of business between the divisions and for the hearing of cases by 
the full Court. No decision of any division shall become the judg- 
ment of the Court unless concurred in by a majority of all the jus- 
tices; and no case involving a construction of the Constitution of 
the State or of the United States shall be decided except by the Court 
in banc. All sessions of the Court shall be held in the city of Raleigh. 
This amendment made to the Constitution of North Carolina shall 
not have the effect to vacate any office or term of office now existing 
under the Constitution of the State, and filled or held by virtue of 
any election or appointment under the said Constitution, and the 
laws of the State made in pursuance thereof. (By c. 16, 1937, amend- 
ing s. 1403 of the Consolidated Statutes, the number of Associate 
Justices was increased to six.) 

Sec. 7. Terms of the Supreme Court. The terms of the Supreme 
Court shall be held in the city of Raleigh, as now, until othei-wise 
provided by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 8. Jurisdiction of Supreme Court. The Supreme Court shall 
have jurisdiction to review, upon appeal, any decision of the courts 
below, upon any matter of law or legal inference. And the jurisdic- 
tion of said court over "issues of fact" and "questions of fact" shall 
be the same exercised by it before the adoption of the Constitution 
of one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, and the court shall 
have the power to issue any remedial writs necessary to give it a 
general supervision and control over the proceedings of the inferior 
courts. 

Sec. 9. Claims against the State. The Supreme Court shall have 
original jurisdiction to hear claims against the State, but its deci- 
sions shall be merely recommendatory; no process in the nature of 
execution shall issue thereon ; they shall be reported to the next ses- 
sion of the General Assembly for its action. 



50 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 10. Judicial districts for Superior Courts. The State shall 
be divided into nine judicial districts, for each of which a judge shall 
be chosen ; and there shall be held a Superior Court in each county 
at least twice in each year, to continue for such time in each county 
as may be prescribed by law. But the General Assembly may reduce 
or increase the number of districts. (Changed by acts of General 
Assembly to twenty-one districts.) 

Sec. 11. Residences of judges, rotation in judicial districts, and 
special terms. Every judge of the Superior Court shall reside in the 
district for which he is elected. The judges shall preside in the 
courts of the different districts successively, but no judge shall hold 
the courts in the same district oftener than once in four years; but 
in case of the protracted illness of the judge assigned to preside in 
any district, or of any other unavoidable accident to him, by reason 
of which he shall be unable to preside, the Governor may require any 
judge to hold one or more specified terms in said district, in lieu of 
the judge assigned to hold the courts of the said district; and the 
General Assembly may by general laws provide for the selection of 
special or emergency judges to hold the Superior Courts of any 
county, or district, when the judge assigned thereto, by reason of 
sickness, disability, or other cause, is unable to attend and hold said 
court, and when no other judge is available to hold the same. Such 
special or emergency judges shall have the power and authority of 
regular judges of the Superior Courts, in the courts which they are 
so appointed to hold; and the General Assembly shall provide for 
their reasonable compensation. 

Sec. 12. Jurisdiction of courts inferior to Supreme Court. The 
General Assembly shall have no power to deprive the Judicial De- 
partment of any power or jurisdiction which rightfully pertains to 
it as a coordinate department of the government; but the General 
Assembly shall allot and distribute that portion of this power and 
jurisdiction which does not pertain to the Supreme Court among 
the other courts prescribed in this Constitution or which may be es- 
tablished by law, in such manner as it may deem best; provide also 
a proper system of appeals; and regulate by law, when necessary, 
the methods of proceeding in the exercise of their powers of all the 
courts below the Supreme Court, so far as the same may be done 
without conflict with other provisions of this Constitution. 

Sec. 13. In case of waiver of trial by jury. In all issues of fact, 
joined in any court, the parties may waive the right to have the same 



Constitution 51 

determined by a jury; in which case the finding of the judge upon 
the facts shall have the force and effect of a verdict by a jury. 

Sec. 14. Special courts in cities. The General Assembly shall pro- 
vide for the establishment of special courts, for the trial of misde- 
meanors, in cities and towns, where the same may be necessary. 

Sec. 15. Clerk of the Supreme Court. The clerk of the Supreme 
Court shall be appointed by the Court, and shall hold his office for 
eight years. 

Sec. 16. Election of Superior Court clerk. A clerk of the Superior 
Court for each county shall be elected by the qualified voters thereof, 
at the time and in the manner prescribed by law for the election of 
members of the General Assembly. 

Sec. 17. Term of office. Clerks of the Superior Courts shall hold 
their offices for four years. 

Sec. 18. Fees, salaries, and emoluments. The General Assembly 
shall prescribe and regulate the fees, salaries, and emoluments of 
all officers provided for in this article; but the salaries of the judges 
shall not be diminished during their continuance in office. 

Sec. 19. What laws are, and shall be, in force. The laws of North 
Carolina, not repugnant to this Constitution or the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, shall be in force until lawfully altered. 

Sec. 20. Disposition of actions at law and suits in equity, pending 
when this Constitution shall go into effect, etc. Actions at law and 
suits in equity pending when this Constitution shall go into effect 
shall be transferred to the courts having jurisdiction thereof, with- 
_ out prejudice by reason of the change; and all such actions and suits 
commenced before, and pending the adoption by the General As- 
sembly of the rules of practice and procedure herein provided for, 
shall be heard and determined according to the practice now in use, 
unless otherwise provided for by said rules. 

Sec. 21. Elections, terms of office, etc., of Justices of the Supreme 
and Judges of the Superior Courts. The Justices of the Supreme 
Court shall be elected by the qualified voters of the State, as is pro- 
vided for the election of members of the General Assembly. They 
shall hold their offices for eight years. The judges of the Superior 
Courts, elected at the first election under this amendment, shall be 
elected in like manner as is provided for Justices of the Supreme 
Court, and shall hold their offices for eight years. The General As- 
sembly may, from time to time, provide by law that the judges of 



52 North Carolina Manual 

the Superior Courts, chosen at succeeding elections, instead of being 
elected by the voters of the whole State, as is herein provided for, 
shall be elected by the voters of their respective districts. 

Sec. 22. Transactions of business in the Supreme Court. The Su- 
perior Courts shall be, at all times, open for the transaction of all 
business within their jurisdiction, except the trial of issues of fact 
requiring a jury. 

Sec, 23. Solicitors and Solicitorial Districts. The State shall be 
divided into twenty-one solicitorial districts, for eacli of which a 
solicitor shall be chosen by the qualified voters thereof, as is pre- 
scribed for members of the General Assembly, who shall hold of- 
fice for the term of four years, and prosecute on behalf of the State 
in all criminal actions in the Superior Courts, and advise the officers 
of justice in his district. But the General Assembly may reduce or , 
increase the number of the solicitorial districts, which need not cor- 
respond to, or be the same as, the judicial districts of the State. 

Sec. 24. Sheriffs and Coroners. In each county a sheriff and a 
coroner shall be elected by the qualified voters thereof as is pre- 
scribed for the members of the General Assembly, and shall hold 
their offices for a period of four years. In each township there 
shall be a constable elected in like manner by the voters thereof, who 
shall hold his office for a period of two years. When there is no 
coroner in a county the Clerk of the Superior Court for the county 
may appoint one for special cases. In case of a vacancy existing for 
any cause in any of the offices created by this section, the commis- 
sioners of the county may appoint to such office for the unexpired 
term. 

Sec. 25. Vacancies. All vacancies occurring in the offices pro- 
vided for by this article of the Constitution shall be filled by the 
appointments of the Governor, unless otherwise provided for, and 
the appointees shall hold their places until the next regular elec- 
tion for members of the General Assembly, when elections shall be 
held to fill such offices. If any person, elected or appointed to any 
of said offices, shall neglect and fail to qualify, such offices shall be 
appointed to, held and filled as provided in case of vacancies oc- 
curring therein. All incumbents of said offices shall hold until their 
successors are qualified. 

Sec. 26. Terms of office of first officers. The officers elected at the 
first election held under this Constitution shall hold their offices for 



Constitution 53 

the terms prescribed for them, respectively, next ensuing after the 
next regular election for members of the General Assembly. But their 
terms shall begin upon the approval of this Constitution by the Con- 
gress of the United States. 

Sec. 27. Jurisdiction of justices of the peace. The several jus- 
tices of the peace shall have jurisdiction, under such regulations as 
the General Assembly shall prescribe, of civil actions, founded on 
contract, v^^herein the sum demanded shall not exceed two hundred 
dollars, and wherein the title to real estate shall not be in contro- 
versy; and of all criminal matters arising within their counties 
where the punishment cannot exceed a fi ne of fif bL-xi ollar B or im- 
prisonment for thirty days. And the General Assembly may give to 
the justices of the peace jurisdiction of other civil actions wherein 
the value of the property in controversy does not exceed fifty dollars. 
When an issue of fact shall be joined before a justice, on demand of 
either party thereto, he shall cause a jury of six men to be sum- 
moned, who shall try the same. The party against whom the judg- 
ment shall be rendered in any civil action may appeal to the Superior 
Court from the same. In all cases of a criminal nature the party 
against whom the judgment is given may appeal to the Superior 
Court, where the matter shall be heard anew. In all cases brought 
before a justice, he shall make a record of the proceedings, and file 
same with the clerk of the Superior Court for his county. 

Sec. 28. Vacancies in office of justices. When the office of justice 
of the peace shall become vacant otherwise than by expiration of 
the term, and in case of a failure by the voters of any district to 
elect, the clerk of the Superior Court for the county shall appoint to 
fill the vacancy for the unexpired term. 

Sec. 29. Vacancies in office of Superior Court clerk. In case the 
office of clerk of a Superior Court for a county shall become vacant 
otherwise than by the expiration of the term, and in case of a failure 
by the people to elect, the judge of the Superior Court for the county 
shall appoint to fill the vacancy until an election can be regularly 
held. 

Sec. 30. Officers of other courts inferior to Supreme Court. In 
case the General Assembly shall establish other courts inferior to 
the Supreme Court, the presiding officers and clerks thereof shall be 
elected in such manner as the General Assembly may from time to 
time prescribe, and they shall hold their offices for a term not ex- 
ceeding eight years. 



54 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 31. Removal of judges of the various courts for inability. 
Any judge of the Supreme Court, or of the Superior Courts, and the 
presiding officers of such courts inferior to the Supreme Court as 
may be established by law, may be removed from office for mental or 
physical inability, upon a concurrent resolution of two-thirds of both 
Houses of the General Assembly. The judge or presiding officer 
against whom the General Assembly may be about to proceed shall 
receive notice thereof, accompanied by a copy of the causes alleged 
for his removal, at least twenty days before the day on which either 
House of the General Assembly shall act thereon. 

Sec. 32. Removal of clerks of the various courts for inability. 
Any clerk of the Supreme Court, or of the Superior Courts, or of 
such courts inferior to the Supreme Court as may be established by 
law, may be removed from office for mental or physical inability; 
the clerk of the Supreme Court by the judges of said court, the 
clerks of the Superior Courts by the judge riding the district, and 
the clerks of such courts inferior to the Supreme Court as may be 
established by law by the presiding officers of said courts. The clerk 
against whom proceedings are instituted shall receive notice thereof, 
accompanied by a copy of the causes alleged for his removal, at 
least ten days before the day appointed to act thereon, and the clerk 
shall be entitled to an appeal to the next term of the Superior Court, 
and thence to the Supreme Court, as provided in other cases of ap- 
peals. 

Sec. 33. Amendments not to vacate existing offices. The amend- 
ments made to the Constitution of North Carolina by this Convention 
shall not have the effect to vacate any office or term of office now 
existing under the Constitution of the State, and filled, or held by 
vii'tue of any election or appointment under the said Constitution 
and the laws of the State made in pursuance thereof. 

ARTICLE V 

REVENUE AND TAXATION 

Section 1. Capitation tax; exemptions. The General Assembly 
may levy a capitation tax on every male inhabitant of the State over 
twenty-one and under fifty years of age, which said tax shall not 
exceed two dollars, and cities and towns may levy a capitation tax 
which shall not exceed one dollar. No other capitation tax shall be 
levied. The commissioners of the several counties and of the cities 



Constitution 55 

and towns may exempt from the capitation tax any special cases on 
account of poverty or infirmity. 

Sec. 2. Application of proceeds of State and county capitation 
tax. The proceeds of the State and county capitation tax shall be 
applied to the purposes of education and the support of the poor, 
but in no one year shall more than twenty-five per cent thereof be 
appropriated to the latter purpose. 

Sec. 3. State taxation. The power of taxation shall be exercised 
in a just and equitable manner, and shall never be surrendered, sus- 
pended, or contracted away. Taxes on property shall be uniform as 
to each class of property taxed. Taxes shall be levied only for public 
purposes, and every act levying a tax shall state the object to which 
it is to be applied. The General Assembly may also tax trades, pro- 
fessions, franchises, and incomes: Provided, the rate of tax on in- 
come shall not in any case exceed ten per cent (10%), and tliere 
shall be allowed the following exemptions, to be deducted from the 
amount of annual incomes, to-wit: for married man with a wife liv- 
ing with him, or to a widow or widower having minor child or chil- 
dren, natural or adopted, not less than $2,000; to all other persons 
not less than $1,000, and there may be allowed other deductions 
(not including living expenses) so that only net incomes are taxed. 

Sec. 4. Lhnitations upon the increase of public debts. The Gen- 
eral Assembly shall have the power to contract debts and to pledge 
the faith and credit of the State and to authorize counties and mu- 
nicipalities to contract debts and pledge their faith and credit, for 
the following purposes: To fund or refund a valid existing debt; to 
borrow in anticipation of the collection of taxes due and payable 
within the fiscal year to an amount not exceeding fifty per centum 
of such taxes; to supply a casual deficit; to suppress riots or insur- 
rections, or to repel invasions. For any purpose other than these 
enumerated, the General Assembly shall have no power, during any 
biennium, to contract new debts on behalf of the State to an amount 
in excess of two-thirds of the amount by which the State's outstand- 
ing indebtedness shall have been reduced during the next preceding 
biennium, unless the subject be submitted to a vote of the people of 
the State; and for any purpose other than these enumerated the 
General Assembly shall have no power to authorize counties or 
municipalities to contract debts, and counties and municipalities 
shall not contract debts, during any fiscal year, to an amount ex- 
ceeding two-thirds of the amount by which the outstanding indebt- 



56 North Carolina Manual 

edness of the particulai* county or municipality shall have been 
reduced during the next preceding fiscal year, unless the subject be 
submitted to a vote of the people of the particular county or munici- 
pality. In any election held in the State or in any county or munici- 
pality under the provisions of this section, the proposed indebtedness 
must be approved by a majority of those M^ho shall vote thereon. 
And the General Assembly shall have no pow^er to give or lend the 
credit of the State in aid of any person, association, or corporation, 
except to aid in the completion of such railroads as may be unfinished 
at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, or in w^hich the 
State has a direct pecuniary interest, unless the subject be sub- 
mitted to a direct vote of the people of the State, and be approved 
by a majority of those v^^ho shall vote thereon. 

Sec. 5. Property exempt from taxation. Property belonging to 
the State, or to municipal corporations, shall be exempt from taxa- 
tion. The General Assembly may exempt cemeteries and property 
held for educational, scientific, literary, charitable, or religious pur- 
poses; also w^earing apparel, arms for muster, household and kitchen 
furniture, the mechanical and agricultural implements of mechanics 
and farmers; libraries and scientific instruments, or any other per- 
sonal property, to a value not exceeding three hundred dollars. The 
General Assembly may exempt from taxation not exceeding one 
thousand dollars ($1,000.00) in value of property held and used as 
the place of residence of the owner. 

Sec. 6. Taxes levied for counties. The total of the State and 
county tax on property shall not exceed fifteen cents on the one 
hundred dollars value of property, except when the county property 
tax is levied for a special purpose and with the special approval of 
the General Assembly, which may be done by special or general act: 
Provided, this limitation shall not apply to taxes levied for the main- 
tenance of public schools of the State for the term required by article 
nine, section three, of the Constitution : Provided, further, the State 
tax shall not exceed five cents on the one hundred dollars value of 
property. 

Sec. 7. Acts levying taxes shall state objects, etc. Every act of 
the General Assembly levying a tax shall state the special object to 
which it is to be applied, and it shall be applied to no other purpose. 



Constitution 57 

ARTICLE VI 

SUFFRAGE AND ELIGIBILITY TO OFFICE 

Section 1. Who may vote. Every male person born in the United 
States, and every male person who has been naturalized, twenty-one 
years of age, and possessing the qualifications set out in this article, 
shall be entitled to vote at any election by the people of the State, 
except as herein otherwise provided. (The 19th amendment to the 
United States Constitution, ratified Aug. 6, 1920, provided that the 
"right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or 
abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex." 
North Carolina accordingly by c. 18, Extra Session 1920, provided 
for the registration and voting of women.) 

Sec. 2. Qualifications of voters. He shall reside in the State of 
Noi'th Carolina for one year, and in the precinct, ward, or other 
election district in which he offers to vote four months next preceding 
the election: Provided, that removal from one precinct, ward, or 
other election district to another in the same county shall not oper- 
ate to deprive any person of the right to vote in the precinct, ward, 
or other election district from which he has removed until four 
months after such removal. No person who has been convicted, or 
who has confessed his guilt in open court upon indictment, of any 
crime the punishment of which now is, or may hereafter be, im- 
prisonment in the State's Prison, shall be permitted to vote, unless 
the said person shall be first restored to citizenship in the manner 
prescribed by law. 

Sec. 3. Voters to he registered. Every person oflFering to vote 
shall be at the time a legally registered voter as herein prescribed 
and in the manner hereafter provided by law, and the General As- 
sembly of North Carolina shall enact general registration laws to 
carry into effect the provisions of this article. 

Sec. 4. Qualification for registration. Every person presenting 
himself for registration shall be able to read and write any section 
of the Constitution in the English language. But no male person 
who was, on January 1, 1867, or at any time prior thereto, entitled 
to vote under the laws of any State in the United States wherein he 
then resided, and no lineal descendant of any such person, shall be 
denied the right to register and vote at any election in this State by 
reason of his failure to possess the educational qualifications herein 
prescribed: Provided, he shall have registered in accordance with 



58 North Carolina Manual 

the terms of this section prior to December 1, 1908. The General 
Assembly shall provide for the registration of all persons entitled to 
vote without the educational qualifications herein prescribed, and 
shall, on or before November 1, 1908, provide for the making of a 
permanent record of such registration ; and all persons so registered 
shall forever thereafter have the right to vote in all elections by the 
people of this State, unless disqualified under section 2 of this article. 

Sec. 5. Indivisible j)lan; legislative intent. That this amendment 
to the Constitution is presented and adopted as one indivisible plan 
for the regulation of the suff'rage, with the intent and purpose to so 
connect the diff'erent parts, and to make them so dependent upon 
each other, that the whole shall stand or fall together. 

Sec. 6. Elections by people and General Assembly. All elections 
by the people shall be by ballot, and all elections by the General As- 
sembly shall be viva voce. 

Sec. 7. Eligibility to office; official oath. Every voter in North 
Carolina, except as in this article disqualified, shall be eligible to 
office, but before entering upon the duties of the office he shall take 
and subscribe the following oath: 

"I, , do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will 

support and maintain the Constitution and laws of the United States, 
and the Constitution and laws of North Carolina not inconsistent 
therewith, and that I will faithfully discharge the duties of my office 
as So help me, God." 

Sec. 8. Disqualification for office. The following classes of per- 
sons shall be disqualified for office: First, all persons who shall deny 
the being of Almighty God. Second, all persons who shall have been 
convicted or confessed their guilt on indictment pending, and 
whether sentenced or not, or under judgment suspended, of any 
treason or felony, or of any other crime for which the punishment 
may be imprisonment in the penitentiary, since becoming citizens of 
the United States, or of corruption or malpractice in office, unless 
such person shall be restored to the rights of citizenship in a manner 
prescribed by law. 

Sec. 9. When this chapter operative. That this amendment to 
the Constitution shall go into effect on the first day of July, nineteen 
hundred and two, if a majority of votes cast at the next general 
election shall be cast in favor of this suffrage amendment. 



Constitution 59 

ARTICLE VII 

MUNICIPAL CORPORATIONS 

Section 1. County officers. In each county there shall be elected 
biennially by the qualified voters thereof, as provided for the elec- 
tion of members of the General Assembly, the following officers: A 
treasurer, register of deeds, surveyor, and five commissioners. 
(Under authority of the Public Laws of 1935, c. 362, s. 13, provision 
was made for the quadrennial election of registers of deeds, certain 
counties being exempted.) 

Sec. 2. Duty of county commissioners. It shall be the duty of the 
commissioners to exercise general supervision and control of the 
penal and charitable institutions, schools, roads, bridges, levying of 
taxes, and finances of the county, as may be prescribed by law. The 
register of deeds shall be ex officio clerk of the board of commis- 
sioners. 

Sec. 3. Counties to be divided into districts. It shall be the duty 
of the commissioners first elected in each county to divide the same 
into convenient districts, to determine the boundaries and prescribe 
the name of the said districts, and to report the same to the General 
Assembly before the first day of January, 1869. 

Sec. 4. Torvnships have corporate powers. Upon the approval of 
the reports provided for in the foregoing section, by the General As- 
sembly, the said districts shall have corporate powers for the neces- 
sary purposes of local government, and shall be known as townships. 

Sec. 5. Officers of townships. In each township there shall be 
biennially elected, by the qualified voters thereof, a clerk and two 
justices of the peace, who shall constitute a board of trustees, and 
shall, under the supervision of the county commissioners, have con- 
trol of the taxes and finances, roads and bridges of the townships, 
as may be prescribed by law. The General Assembly may provide 
for the election of a larger number of justices of the peace in cities 
and towns, and in those townships in which cities and towns are 
situated. In every township there shall also be biennially elected a 
school committee, consisting of three persons, whose duties shall be 
prescribed by law. (Amended by c. 141, 1877.) 

Sec. 6. Trustees shall assess property. The township board of 
trustees shall assess the taxable property of their townships and 
make returns to the county commissioners for revision, as may be 



60 North Carolina Manual 

presci'ibed by law. The clerk shall be, ex officio, treasurer of the 
township. 

Sec. 7. No debt or loan except by a majority of voters. No county, 
city, town, or other municipal coi'poration shall contract any debt, 
pledge its faith or loan its credit, nor shall any tax be levied or col- 
lected by any officers of the same except for the necessary expenses 
thereof, unless by a vote of the majority of the qualified voters 
therein. 

Sec. 8. No 7noney drawn except by law. No money shall be drawn 
from any county or township treasury except by authority of law. 

Sec. 9. When officers enter on duty. The county officers first elect- 
ed under the provisions of this article shall enter upon their duties 
ten days after the approval of this Constitution by the Congress of 
the United States. 

Sec. 10. Governor to appoint justices. The Governor shall ap- 
point a sufficient number of justices of the peace in each county, who 
shall hold their places until sections four, five, and six of this article 
shall have been carried into effect. 

Sec. 11. Charters to remain in force until legally changed. All 
charters, ordinances, and provisions relating to municipal corpora- 
tions shall remain in force until legally changed, unless inconsistent 
with the provisions of this Constitution. 

Sec. 12. Debts in aid of the rebellion not to be paid. No county, 
city, town, or other municipal corporation shall assume to pay, nor 
shall any tax be levied or collected for the payment of any debt, or 
the interest upon any debt, contracted directly or indirectly in aid 
of or support of the rebellion. 

Sec. 13. Powefs of General Assembly over tnunicipal corpora- 
tions. The General Assembly shall have full power by statute to 
modify, change, or abrogate any and all of the provisions of this 
article, and substitute others in their place, except sections seven, 
nine and thirteen. (Recent amendment repealed old section 9 and 
renumbered sections 10-14.) (Under the general authority of this 
section several statutory amendments have been made. See notes 
supra, ss. 1 and 5.) 

ARTICLE VIII 

CORPORATIONS OTHER THAN MUNICIPAL 

Section 1. Corporations under general laws. No corporation 



Constitution 61 

shall be created, nor shall its charter be extended, altei"fed, or amend- 
ed by special act, except corporations for charitable, educational, 
penal, or reformatoiy purposes that are to be and remain under the 
patronage and control of the State; but the General Assembly shall 
provide by general laws for the chartering and organization of all 
corporations, and for amending, extending, and forfeiture of all 
charters, except those above permitted by special act. All such 
general laws and special acts may be altered from time to time or 
repealed; and the General Assembly may at any time by special 
act repeal the charter of any corporation. 

Sec. 2. Debits of corporations, how secured. Dues from corpora- 
tions shall be secured by such individual liabilities of the corpora- 
tions, and other means, as may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 3. What corporations shall include. The term "Corpora- 
tion" as used in this article shall be construed to include all associa- 
tions and joint-stock companies having any of the powers and 
privileges of corporations not possessed by individuals or partner- 
ships. And all corporations shall have the right to sue, and shall be 
subject to be sued, in all courts in like cases as natural persons. 

Sec. 4. Legislature to provide for organizing cities, towns, etc. 
It shall be the duty of the Legislature to provide by general laws 
for the organization of cities, towns, and incorporated villages, and 
to restrict their power of taxation, assessment, borrowing money, 
contracting debts, and loaning their credit, so as to prevent abuses 
in assessment and in contracting debts by such municipal corpora- 
tions. 

ARTICLE IX 

EDUCATION 

Section 1. Education shall be encouraged. Religion, morality, and 
knowledge being necessary to good government and the happiness 
of mankind, schools and the means of education shall forever be 
encouraged. 

Sec. 2. General Assembly shall provide for schools; separation 
of the races. The General Assembly, at its first session under this 
Constitution, shall provide by taxation and otherwise for a general 
and uniform system of public schools, wherein tuition shall be free 
of charge to all the children of the State between the ages of six and 
twenty-one years. And the children of the white race and the chil- 



62 North Carolina Manual 

dren of the colored race shall be taught in separate public schools; 
but there shall be no discrimination in favor of, or to the prejudice 
of, either race. 

Sec. 3. Counties io be divided into districts. Each county of the 
State shall be divided into a convenient number of districts, in which 
one or more public schools shall be maintained at least six months in 
every year; and if the commissioners of any county shall fail to 
comply with the aforesaid requirements of this section, they shall be 
liable to indictment. 

Sec. 4. What property devoted to educational purposes. The 
proceeds of all lands that have been or hereafter may be granted by 
the United States to this State, and not otherwise appropriated by 
this State or the United States; also all moneys, stocks, bonds, and 
other property now belonging to any State fund for purposes of edu- 
cation, also the net proceeds of all sales of the swamp lands belong- 
ing to the State, and all other grants, gifts, or devices that have been 
or hereafter may be made to the State, and not otherwise appro- 
priated by the State or by the terms of the grant, gift, or devise, 
shall be paid into the State Treasury, and, together with so much of 
the ordinary revenue of the State as m£ty be by law set apart for 
that purpose, shall be faithfully appropriated for establishing and 
maintaining in this State a system of free public schools, and for no 
other uses or purposes whatsoever. 

Sec. 5. County school fund; proviso. All moneys, stocks, bonds, 
and other property belonging to a county school fund; also the net 
proceeds from the sale of estrays; also the clear proceeds of all 
penalties and forfeitures and of all fines collected in the several 
counties for any breach of the penal or military laws of the State ; 
and all moneys which shall be paid by persons as an equivalent for 
exemption from military duty, shall belong to and remain in the 
several counties, and shall be faithfully appropriated for establish- 
ing and maintaining free public schools in the several counties of 
this State : Provided, that the amount collected in each county shall 
be annually reported to the Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Sec. 6. Election of trustees, and provisions for maintenance, of 
the University. The General Assembly shall have power to provide 
for the election of trustees of the University of North Carolina, in 
whom, when chosen, shall be vested all the privileges, rights, fran- 
chises, and endowments thereof in any wise granted to or conferred 
upon the trustees of said University ; and the General Assembly may 



Constitution 63 

make such provisions, laws, and regulations from time to time as 
may be necessary and expedient for the maintenance and manage- 
ment of said University. 

Sec. 7. Benefits of the University. The General Assembly shall 
provide that the benefits of the University, or far as practicable, be 
extended to the youth of the State free of expense for tuition ; also, 
that all the property which has heretofore accrued to the State, or 
shall hereafter accrue, from escheats, unclaimed dividends, or dis- 
tributive shares of the estates of deceased persons, shall be ap- 
propriated to the use of the University. 

Sec. 8. State Board of Education. The general supervision and 
administration of the free public school system, and of the educa- 
tional funds provided for the support thereof, except those mentioned 
in Section five of this Article, shall, from and after the first day of 
April, one thousand nine hundred and forty-five, be vested in the 
State Board of Education to consist of the Lieutenant Governor, 
State Treasurer, the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and 
ten members to be appointed by the Governor, subject to confirma- 
tion by the General Assembly in joint session. The General As- 
sembly shall divide the State into eight educational districts, which 
may be altered from time to time by the General Assembly. Of the 
appointive members of the State Board of Education one shall be 
appointed from each of the eight educational disti-icts, and two 
shall be appointed as members at large. The first appointments 
under this section shall be: Two Members appointed from educa- 
tional districts for terms of two years; two members appointed 
from educational districts for terms of four years; two members 
appointed from educational districts for terms of six years; and 
two members appointed from educational districts for terms of 
eight years. One member at large shall be appointed for a period 
of four years and one member at large shall be appointed Tor a 
period of eight years. All subsequent appointments shall be for 
terms of eight years. Any appointments to fill vacancies shall be 
made by the Governor for the unexpired term, which appointments 
shall not be subject to confirmation. The State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction shall be the administrative head of the ])ublic 
school system and shall be secretary of the board. The board 
shall elect a chairman and vice chaii'man. A majority of the 
board shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. The 



64 North Carolina Manual 

per diem and expenses of the appointive members shall be provided 
by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 9. Powers and Duties of the Board. The State Board of 
Education shall succeed to all the powers and trusts of the President 
and Directors of the Literary Fund of North Carolina and the State 
Board of Education as heretofore constituted. The State Board of 
Education shall have power to divide the State into a convenient 
number of school districts; to regulate the grade, salary and quali- 
fications of teachers; to provide for the selection and adoption of 
the textbooks to be used in the public schools; to apportion and 
equalize the public school funds over the State; and generally to 
supervise and administer the free public school system of the State 
and make all needful rules and regulations in relation thereto. All 
the powers enumerated in this section shall be exercised in conform- 
ity with this constitution and subject to such laws as may be enacted 
from time to time by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 10. Agricultural departynent. As soon as practicable after 
the adoption of this Constitution the General Assembly shall estab- 
lish and maintain, in connection with the University, a department 
of agriculture, of mechanics, of mining, and of normal instruction. 

Sec. 11. Children must attend school. The General Assembly is 
hereby empowered to enact that every child of sufficient mental and 
physical ability shall attend the public schools during the period be- 
tween the ages of six and eighteen years, for a term of not less 
than sixteen months, unless educated by other means. 

ARTICLE X 

HOMESTEADS AND EXEMPTIONS 

Section 1. Exemptions of personal property. The personal prop- 
erty of any resident of this State, to the value of five hundred dol- 
lars, to be selected by such resident, shall be and is hereby exempted 
from sale under execution or other final process of any court issued 
for the collection of any debt. 

Sec. 2. Homestead. Every homestead, and the dwellings and 
buildings used therewith, not exceeding in value one thousand dol- 
lars, to be selected by the owner thereof, or in lieu thereof, at the 
option of the owner, any lot in a city, town, or village with the dwell- 
ings and buildings used thereon, owned and occupied by any resident 
of this State, and not exceeding the value of one thousand dollars, 



Constitution 65 

shall be exempt from sale under execution or other final process 
obtained on any debt. But no property shall be exempt from sale 
for taxes or for payment of obligations contracted for the purchase 
of said premises. ' 

Sec. 3. Homestead exemption from, debt. The homestead, after 
the death of the owner thereof, shall be exempt from the payment of 
any debt during the minority of his children, or any of them. 

Sec. 4. Laborer's lien. The provisions of sections one and two of 
this article shall not be so construed as to prevent a laborer's lien 
for work done and performed for the person claiming such exemp- 
tion, or a mechanic's lien for work done on the premises. 

Sec. 5. Benefit of widow. If the owner of a homestead die, leaving 
a widow but no children, the same shall be exempt from the debts 
of her husband, and the rents and profits thereof shall inure to her 
benefit during her widowhood, unless she be the owner of a home- 
stead in her own right. 

Sec. 6. Property of married women secured to them,. The real 
and personal property of any female in this State acquired before 
marriage, and all property, real and personal, to which she may, 
after marriage, become in any manner entitled, shall be and remain 
the sole and separate estate and property of such female, and shall 
not be liable for any debts, obligations, or engagements of her hus- 
band, and may be devised, and bequeathed, and, with the written as- 
sent of her husband, conveyed by her as if she were unmarried. 

Sec. 7. Husband may insure his life for the benefit of wife and 
children. The husband may insure his own life for the sole use and 
benefit of his wife and children, and in case of the deatli of the hus- 
band the amount thus insured shall be paid over to the wife and 
children, or to the guardian, if under age, for her or their own use, 
free from all the claims of the representatives of her husband, or 
any of his creditors. And the policy shall not be subject to claims 
of creditors of the insured during the life of the insured, if the in- 
surance issued is for the sole use and benefit of the wife and/or 
children. 

Sec. 8. How deed for homestead may be made. Nothing contained 
in the foregoing sections of this Article shall operate to prevent the 
owner of a homestea'd from disposing of the same by deed; but no 
deed made by the owner of a homestead shall be valid without the 
signature and acknowledgement of his wife. 



66 North Carolina Manual 

ARTICLE XI 

PUNISHMENTS, PENAL INSTITUTIONS, AND PUBLIC CHARITIES 

Section 1. Punishments; convict labor; proviso. The following 
punishments only shall be known to the laws of this State, viz.: 
death, imprisonment with or without hard labor, fines, removal from 
office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, 
or profit under this State. The foregoing provision for imprison- 
ment with hard labor shall be construed to authorize the employ- 
ment of such convict labor on public woi'ks or highways, or otlier 
labor for public benefit, and the farming out thereof, where and in 
such manner as may be provided by law; but no convict shall be 
farmed out who has been sentenced on a charge of murder, man- 
slaughter, rape, attempt to commit rape, or arson ; Provided, that no 
convict whose labor may be farmed out shall be punished for any 
failure of duty as a laborer, except by a responsible officer of the 
State; but the convicts so farmed out shall be at all times under the 
supervision and control, as to their government and discipline, of 
the penitentiary board or some officer of this State. 

Sec. 2. Death punishment. The object of punishment being not 
only to satisfy justice, but also to reform the offender, and thus pre- 
vent crime, murder, arson, burglary, and rape, and these only, may 
be punishable with death, if the General Assembly shall so enact. 

Sec. 3. Penitentiary. The General Assembly shall, at its first 
meeting, make provision for the erection and conduct of a State's 
Prison or penitentiary at some central and accessible point within 
the State. 

Sec. 4. Houses of correction. The General Assembly may provide 
for the erection of houses of correction, where vagrants and persons 
guilty of misdemeanors shall be restrained and usefully employed. 

Sec. 5. Houses of refuge. A house or houses of refuge may be es- 
tablished whenever the public interests may require it, for the cor- 
rection and instruction of other classes of offenders. 

Sec. 6. The sexes to be separated. It shall be required, by com- 
petent legislation, that the structure and superintendence of penal 
institutions of the State, county jails, and city police prisons secure 
the health and comfort of the prisoners, and that male and female 
prisoners be never confined in the same room or cell. 

Sec. 7. Provision for the poor and orphans. Beneficient provi- 



Constitution 67 

sions for the poor, the unfortunate, and orphan being one of the 
first duties of a civilized and Christian State, the General As- 
sembly shall, at its first session, appoint and define the duties of a 
Board of Public Charities, to whom shall be entrusted the super- 
vision of all charitable and penal State institutions, and who shall 
annually report to the Governor upon their condition, with sug- 
gestions for their improvement. 

Sec. 8. Orphan houses. There shall also, as soon as practicable, 
be measures devised by the State for the establishment of one or 
more orphan houses, where destitute orphans may be cared for, 
educated, and taught some business or trade. 

Sec. 9. Inebriates and idiots. It shall be the duty of the Legis- 
lature, as soon as practicable, to devise means for the education 
of idiots and inebriates. 

Sec. 10. Deaf mutes, blind, and insane. The General Assembly 
may provide that the indigent deaf-mute, blind, and insane of the 
State shall be cared for at the charge of the State. 

Sec. 11. Self-supporting . It shall be steadily kept in view by 
the Legislature and the Board of Public Charities that all penal 
and charitable institutions should be made as nearly self-supporting 
as is consistent with the purposes of their creation. 

ARTICLE XII 

MILITIA 

Section 1. Who are liable to militia duty. All able-bodied male 
citizens of the State of North Carolina, between the ages of twenty- 
one and forty years, who are citizens of the United States, shall 
"be liable to duty in the militia: Provided, that all persons who may 
be averse to bearing arms, from religious scruples, shall be exempt 
therefrom. 

Sec. 2. Organizing, etc. The General Assembly shall provide for 
the organizing, arming, equipping, and discipline of the militia, 
and for paying the same, when called into active service. 

Sec. 3. Governor commander-in-chief. The Governor shall be 
commander-in-chief, and shall have power to call out the militia 
to execute the law, suppress riots or insurrections, and to repel 
invasion. 

Sec. 4. Exemptions. The General Assembly shall have power 



68 North Carolina Manual 

to make such exemptions as may be deemed necessary, and to enact 
laws that may be expedient for the government of the militia. 

ARTICLE XIII 

AMENDMENTS 

Section 1. Convention, how called. No convention of the people 
of this State shall ever be called by the General Assembly, unless 
by the concurrence of two-thirds of all of the members of each 
House of the General Assembly, and except the proposition, Con- 
vention or NO Convention, be first submitted to the qualified voters 
of the whole State, at the next general election, in a manner to be 
prescribed by law. And should a majority of the votes cast be in 
favor of said convention, it shall assemble on such day as may be 
prescribed by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 2. How the Constitution may be altered. No part of the 
Constitution of this State shall be altered unless a bill to alter the 
same shall have been agreed to by three-fifths of each House of the 
General Assembly. And the amendment or amendments so agreed 
to shall be submitted at the next general election to the qualified 
voters of the whole State, in such manner as may be prescribed by 
law. And in the event of their adoption by a majority of the votes 
cast, such amendment or amendments shall become a part of the 
Constitution of this State, 

ARTICLE XIV 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Section 1. Indictments. All indictments which shall have been 
found, or may hereafter be found, for any crime or offense com- 
mitted before this Constitution takes effect, may be proceeded upon 
in the proper courts, but no punishment shall be inflicted which is 
forbidden by this Constitution. 

Sec. 2. Penalty for fighting duel. No person who shall hereafter 
fight a duel, or assist in the same as a second, or send, accept, or 
knowingly carry a challenge therefor, or agree to go out of the 
State to fight a duel, shall hold any office in this State. 

Sec. 3. Drawing money. No money shall be drawn from the 
Treasury but in consequence of appropriations made by law; and 



Constitution 69 

an accurate account of the receipts and expenditures of the public 
money shall be annually published. 

Sec. 4. Mechanic's lien. The General Assembly shall provide, 
by proper legislation, for giving to mechanics and laborers an ade- 
quate lien on the subject-matter of their labor. 

Sec. 5. Governor to make appointments. In the absence of any 
contrary provision, all officers of ' this State, whether heretofore 
elected or appointed by the Governor, shall hold their positions only 
until other appointments are made by the Governor, or, if the of- 
ficers are elective, until their successors shall have been chosen and 
duly qualified according to the provisions of this Constitution. 

Sec. 6. Seat of government. The seat of government in this 
State shall remain at the city of Raleigh. 

Sec. 7. Holding office. No person who shall hold any office or 
place of trust or profit under the United States, or any depart- 
ment thereof, or under this State, or under any other state or gov- 
ernment, shall hold or exercise any other office or place of trust or 
profit under the authority of this State, or be eligible to a seat in 
either House of the General Assembly : Provided, that nothing herein 
contained shall extend to officers in the militia, notaries public, 
justices of the peace, commissioners of public charities, or com- 
missioners for special purposes. 

Sec. 8. Intermarriage of whites and Negroes prohibited. All 
marriages between a white person and a Negro, or between a white 
person and a person of Negro descent to the third generation, in- 
clusive, are hereby forever prohibited. 




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THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

I believe in the United States of America, as a government of the 
people, by the people, for the people; whose just powers are derived 
from the consent of the governed; a democracy in a republic; a sov- 
ereign nation of many sovereign states; a perfect union, one and 
inseparable; established upon those principles of freedom, equality, 
justice and humanity for which American patriots sacrificed their 
lives and fortunes. I therefore believe it is my duty to my country 
to love it, to support its constitution, to obey its laws, to respect its 
flag, and to defend it against all enemies. 

(The American's Creed by William Tyler Page was adopted 
by an act of Congress, April 6, 1918.) 



THE AMERICAN FLAG, ITS ORIGIN 

In 1775 the Philadelphia Troop of Light Horse carried a standard 
with thirteen alternate blue and silver stripes in the upper left-hand 
corner. At Cambridge on January 2, 1776, Washington without au- 
thorization of the Continental Congress, raised a flag consisting of 
thirteen alternate white and red stripes with the ci'osses of St. 
George and St. Andrew in a blue field in the upper left-hand corner. 
It was called the "Union Flag," "Grand Union Flag" and the "Con- 
tinental Flag," and was employed until displaced by the Stars and 
Stripes adopted by the Continental Congress. 

The beautiful tradition that Betsy Ross, as early as June 1776, 
made a Stars and Stripes flag from a pencil sketch supplied by 
Washington but changed the points of the stars from six to five, 
has become a classic. Historians doubt its accuracy. Half a dozen 
localities claim to have been the place where the Stars and Stripes 
was first used. Within New York State such contention has been 
for Fort Ann on July 8, Fort Stanwix on August 3, Bennington on 
August 13, and Saratoga on September 19, 1777. The flag with 
thirteen stripes and thirteen stars, authorized on June 14, 1777, 
continued to be used as the national emblem until Congress passed 
the following act, which President Washington signed: 

[71] 



The American Flag 73 

"That from and after May 1, 1795, the flag of the United 
States be fifteen stripes, alternate red and white; and that 
the union be fifteen stars, white in a blue field." 

This action was necessitated by the admission of the States of 
Vermont and Kentucky to the Union. 

The flag of 1795 had the stars arranged in three rows of five each 
instead of in a circle, and served for 23 years. 

With the admission of more new states, however, it became 
apparent that the 1795 flag would have to be further modified; hence 
in 1818 a law was passed by Congress providing: 

"That from and after the fourth day of July next, the flag 
of the United States be thirteen horizontal stripes, alter- 
nate red and white ; that the union have twenty stars, white 
in a blue field. 

"That on the admission of every new state into the Union, 
one star be added to the union of the flag; and that such 
addition shall take effect on the Fourth of July next suc- 
ceeding such admission." 

Since 1818 additional stars have been added until today there are 
48 on the flag. No law has been passed to designate how the stars 
shall be arranged. At one time they formed a design of a larger star. 
Now by common practice they form six rows of eight stars each. 

Betsy Ross, it is now said, lived at 233 Arch Street, Philadelphia, 
and not at 239. She made flags, but says Theodoi-e D. Gottlieb, she 
never made the first Stars and Stripes. He adds: "The Department 
of State, the War and Navy departments, the Historical Sites Com- 
mission of Philadelphia and other official bodies repudiate the legend. 
The book and pamphlet material available is overwhelmingly against 
the legend. 

"The story arose for the first time on March 14, 1870, when Wil- 
liam J. Canby read a paper before the Pennsylvania Historical 
Society in which he states that in 1836, when his grandmother, Betsy 
Ross, was 84 years old and he was 11, she told him the story. He 
apparently thought little of it because nothing was done until 1857, 
when at the suggestion of his Aunt Clarissa, oldest daughter of 
Betsy, he wrote out the notes as he remembered the conversation. 

"Nothing further was done until 1870 when he wrote his paper. 
The Historical Society of Pennsylvania thought so little of the paper 



74 North Carolina Manual 

it neither catalogued nor kept a copy of it. Even George Canby, 
younger brother of William, disputed several points in the paper. 

"The legend grew to strength from 1888 to 1893 when promoters 
secured an option on the so-called Flag House. 

"Modei-n historical researchers are giving much thought to 
Francis Hopkinson of New Jersey as the possible designer and the 
Fillmore or Bennington flag as the first flag." 

The Proper Display of the American Flag 

Sec. 2. (a) It is the universal custom to display the flag only from 
sunrise to sunset on buildings and on stationary flagstaffs in the 
open. However, the flag may be displayed at night upon special oc- 
casions when it is desired to produce a patriotic effect. 

(b) The flag should be hoisted briskly and lowered ceremoniously. 

(c) The flag should not be displayed on days when the weather is 
inclement. 

(d) The flag should be displayed on all days when the weather 
permits, especially on New Year's Day, January 1; Inauguration 
Day, January 20; Lincoln's Birthday, February 12; Washington's 
Birthday, February 22; Army Day, April 6; Easter Sunday (vari- 
able) ; Mother's Day, second Sunday in May; Memorial Day (half 
staff until noon). May 30; Flag Day, June 14; Independence Day, 
July 4; Labor Day, first Monday in September; Constitution Day, 
September 17; Columbus Day, October 12; Navy Day, October 27; 
Armistice Day, November 11; Thanksgiving Day, last Thursday in 
November; Christmas Day, December 25; such other days as may 
be proclaimed by the President of the United States ; the birthdays 
of States (dates of admission) ; and on State holidays. 

(e) The flag should be displayed daily, weather permitting, on or 
near the main administration building of every public institution. 

(f ) The flag should be displayed in or near every polling place on 
election days. 

(g) The flag should be displayed during school days in or near 
every schoolhouse. 

Sec. 3. That the flag, when carried in a procession with another 
flag or flags, should be either on the marching right; that is, the 
flag's own right, or, if there is a line of other flags, in front of the 
center of that line. 



The American Flag 75 

(a) The flag should not be displayed on a float in a parade except 
from a staff, or as provided in subsection (i). 

(b) The flag should not be draped over the hood, top, sides, or 
back of a vehicle or of a railroad train or a boat. When the flag 
is displayed on a motorcar, the staff shall be fixed firmly to the 
chassis or clamped to the radiator cap. 

(c) No other flag or pennant should be placed above or, if on the 
same level, to the right of the flag of the United States of America, 
except during church services conducted by naval chaplains at sea, 
when the church pennant may be flown above the flag during church 
services for the personnel of the Navy. 

(d) The flag of the United States of America, when it is displayed 
with another flag against a wall from crossed staffs, should be on 
the right, the flag's own right, and its staff should be in front of the 
staff of the other flag. 

(e) The flag of the United States of America should be at the 
center and at the highest point of the group when a number of flags 
of States or localities or pennants of societies are grouped and dis- 
played from staffs. 

(f ) When flags of States, cities, or localities, or pennants of soci- 
eties are flown on the same halyard with the flag of the United 
States, the latter should always be at the peak. When the flags 
are flown from adjacent staffs, the flag of the United States should 
be hoisted first and lowered last. No such flag or pennant may 
be placed above the flag of the United States or to the right of the 
flag of the United States. 

(g) When flags of two or more nations are displayed, they are to 
be flown from separate staffs of the same height. The flags should 
be of approximately equal size. International usage forbids the 
display of the flag of one nation above that of another nation in 
time of peace. 

(h) When the flag of the United States is displayed from a staff 
projecting horizontally or at an angle from the window sill, balcony, 
or front of a building, the union of the flag should be placed at the 
peak of the staff unless the flag is at half staff. When the flag is 
suspended over a sidewalk from a rope extending from a house to 
8. pole at the edge of the sidewalk, the flag should be hoisted out, 
union first, from the building. 

(i) When the flag is displayed otherwise than by being flown 



76 North Carolina Manual 

from a staff, it should be displayed flat, whether indoors or out. 
When displayed either horizontally or vertically against a wall, 
the union should be uppermost and to the flag's own right; that is, 
to the observer's left. When displayed in a window, the flag should 
be displayed in the same way; that is, with the union or blue field 
to the left of the observer in the street. 

(j) When the flag is displayed over the middle of the street, it 
should be suspended vertically with the union to the north in an 
east and west street or to the east in the north and south street. 

(k) When used on a speaker's platform, the flag, if displayed 
flat, should be displayed above and behind the speaker. When dis- 
played from a staff in a church or public auditorium, if it is displayed 
in the chancel of a church, or on the speaker's platform in a public 
auditorium, the flag should occupy the position of honor and be 
placed at the clei-gyman's or speaker's right as he faces the congre- 
gation or audience. Any other flag so displayed in the chancel or on 
the platform should be placed at the clergyman's or speaker's left 
as he faces the congregation or audience. But when the flag is 
displayed from a staff in a church or public auditorium elsewhere 
than in the chancel or on the platform it shall be placed in the posi- 
tion of honor at the right of the congregation or audience as they 
face the chancel or platform. Any other flag so displayed should be 
placed on the left of the congregation or audience as they face the 
chancel or platform. 

(1) The flag should form a distinctive feature of the ceremony 
of unveiling a statue or monument, but it should never be used as 
the covering for the statue or monument. 

(m) The flag, when flown at half staff, should be first hoisted to 
the peak for an instant and then lowered to the half-staff position. 
The flag should be again raised to the peak before it is lowered for 
the day. By "half staff" is meant hauling the flag to one-half the 
distance between the top and bottom of the staff. Crepe streamers 
may be affixed to spear heads or flagstaff s in a parade only by order 
of the President of the United States. 

(n) When the flag is used to cover a casket, it should be so placed 
that the union is at the head and over the left shoulder. The flag 
should not be lowered into the grave or allowed to touch the ground. 

Sec. 4. That no disrespect should be shown to the flag of the 
United States of America ; the flag should not be dipped to any per- 



The American Flag 77 

son or thing. Regimental colors, State flags, and organizations or 
institutional flags are to be dipped as a mark of honor. 

(a) The flag should never be displayed with the union down save 
as a signal of dire distress. 

(b) The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as the 
ground, the flooi', water, or merchandise. 

(c) The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but al- 
ways aloft and free. 

(d) The flag should never be used as drapery of any sort whatso- 
ever, never festooned, drawn back, nor up, in folds, but always al- 
lowed to fall free. Bunting of blue, white, and red, always arranged 
with the blue above, the white in the middle, and the red below, 
should be used for covering a speaker's desk, draping the front of a 
platform, and for decoration in general. 

(e) The flag should never be fastened, displayed, used, or stored 
in such a manner as will permit it to be easily torn, soiled, or dam- 
aged in any way. 

(f ) The flag should never be used as a covering for a ceiling. 

(g) The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on part- of it, 
nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, figui'e, design, 
picture, or drawing of any nature. 

(h) The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, 
holding, carrying, or delivering anything. 

(i) The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in any 
manner whatsoever. It should not be embroidered on such articles as 
cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise im- 
pressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designed for 
temporary use and discard; or used as any portion of a costume or 
athletic uniform. Advertising signs should not be fastened to a staff 
or halyard from which the flag is flown. 

(j) The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a 
fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, 
preferably by burning. 

Sec. 5. That during the ceremony of hoisting or lowering the flag 
or when the flag is passing in a parade or in a review, all persons 
present should face the flag, stand at attention, and salute. Those 
present in uniform should render the right-hand salute. When not 
in uniform, men should remove the headdress with the right hand 



78 North Carolina Manual 

holding it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Men 
without hats merely stand at attention. Women should salute by 
placing the right hand over the heart. The salute to the flag in the 
moving column should be rendered at the moment the flag passes. 

Sec. 6. That when the national anthem is played and the flag is 
not displayed, all present should stand and face toward the music. 
Those in uniform should salute at the first note of the anthem, re- 
taining this position until the last note. All others stand at attention, 
men removing the headdress. When the flag is displayed, the salute 
to the flag should be given. 

Sec. 7. That the pledge of allegiance to the flag, "I pledge allegi- 
ance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic 
for which it stands, one Nation indivisible, with libei'ty and jusitce 
for all," be rendered by standing with the right hand over the heart; 
extending the right hand, palm upward, toward the flag at the words 
"to the flag" and holding this position until the end, when the hand 
drops to the side. However, civilians will always show full respect 
to the flag when the pledge is given by merely standing at attention, 
men removing the headdress. Persons in uniform shall render the 
military salute. 

Sec. 8. Any rule or custom pertaining to the display of the flag of 
the United States of America, set forth herein, may be altered, modi- 
fied, or repealed, or additional rules with respect thereto may be 
pi-escribed, by the Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of 
the United States, whenever he deems it to be appropriate or desir- 
able; and any such alteration or additional rule shall be set forth in 
a proclamation. 



The Pledge to the Flag 

(Taught in many of the schools and repeated by pupils daily) 

"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, 

And to the Republic for which it stands. 
One Nation, indivisible. 

With liberty and justice for all." 

The Pledge to the Flag, according to a report of the Historical 
Committee of the United States Flag Association (May 18, 1939), 
was written by Francis Bellamy (August 1892), a member of the 



The American Flag 79 

editorial staff of The Youth's Companion, in Boston, Massachusetts. 
It was first repeated at the exercises in connection with the celebra- 
tion of Columbus Day (October 12, 1892, Old Style). The idea of 
this national celebration on Columbus Day was largely that of 
James B. Upham, one of the junior proprietors of The Youth's Com- 
panion. 

Francis Hopkinson, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, 
was the designer of the Stars and Stripes — not Betsy Ross of Phila- 
delphia, who made flags. He also designed the first Great Seal of the 
United States, and a number of coins and several items of paper 
currency in the early days of the Republic. 

Hopkinson, born in Philadelphia (September 21, 1737), and a 
graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, was the first native 
American composer of a secular song, "My Days Have Been So 
Wondrous Free." He was a lawyer and later a judge in New Jersey, 
and then in Pennsylvania. He died in Philadelphia (May 9, 1791). 
His portrait, painted by himself, hangs in the rooms of the Pennsyl- 
vania Historical Society, Philadelphia. He played the organ and the 
harpsichord. 



THE CAPITOL AT WASHINGTON 

The Capitol building in Washington, D. C, is situated on a plateau 
88 feet above the level of the Potomac River and covers an area of 
153,112 square feet, or approximately three and one-half acres. Its 
length, from north to south, is 751 feet, four inches; its width, 
including approaches, is 350 feet; and its location is described as 
being in latitude 380°53'20.4" N. and longitude 770°00'35.7" W. from 
Greenw^ich. Its height above the base line on the east front to the top 
of the Statue of Freedom is 287 feet, five and one-half inches. The 
dome is built of iron, and the aggregate weight of material used in its 
consti'uction is 8,909,200 pounds. 

The Statue of Freedom surmounting the dome is of bronze and 
weighs 14,985 pounds. It was modeled by Thomas Crawford, father 
of Francis Marion Crawford, the novelist, in Rome, and the plaster 
model shipped to this country. It was cast in bronze at the shops 
of Clark Mills, on the Bladensburg Road, near Washington. The 
cost of the casting and the expenses in connection were $20,796.82, 
and the sculptor was paid $3,000 for the plaster model. It was erected 
and placed in its present position December 2, 1863. 

The grounds have had an area of 58.8 acres, at one time a part of 
Cern Abby Manor, and at an early date were occupied by a subtribe 
of the Algonquin Indians known as the Powhatans, whose council 
house was then located at the foot of the hill. By subsequent purchase 
of ground at the north of the Capitol and at the west of the new 
House Office building the area of the grounds has been increased to 
139^ acres. 

The Rotunda is 97 feet 6 inches in diameter, and its height from 
the floor to the top of the canopy is 180 feet, 3 inches. 

The Senate Chamber is 113 feet, 3 inches, in length by 80 feet, 
3 inches, in width and 36 feet in height. The galleries will accommo- 
date 682 persons. 

The Representatives' Hall is 139 feet in length by 93 feet in 
width and 36 feet in height. 

The room, until 1935 the meeting place of the Supreme Court, was, 
until 1859, occupied as the Senate Chamber. Px*evious to that time 
the court opcupied the I'oom immediately beneath, now used as a law 
library. 

[80] 



The National Capitol 81 

The Capitol has a floor area of 14 acres, and 430 rooms are devoted 
to office, committee, and storage purposes. There are 14,518 square 
feet of skylights, 679 windows, and 550 doorways. 

The dome receives light through 108 windows, and from the archi- 
tect's office to the dome there are 365 steps, one for each day of the 
year. 

The southeast cornerstone of the original building was laid Sep- 
tember 18, 1793, by President Washington, with Masonic ceremonies. 
It is constructed of sandstone from quarries on Aquia Creek, Va. 
The original designs were prepared by Dr. William Thornton, and 
the work was done under the direction of Stephen H. Hallet, James 
Hoban, George Hadfield, and B. H. Latrobe, architects. 

The north wing was finished in 1800 and the south wing in 1811. 
A wooden passageway connected them. On August 24, 1814, the 
interior of both wings was destroyed by fire, set by the British. The 
damage to the building was immediately repaired. 

In 1818 the central portion of the building was commenced, under 
the architectural superintendence of Chai'les Bullfinch. The original 
building was finally completed in 1827. Its cost, including the grad- 
ing of the grounds, alterations, and repairs, up to 1827, was 
$2,433,844.13. 

The cornerstone of the extensions was laid on the Fourth of July, 
1851, by President Fillmore, Daniel Webster officiating as orator. 
This work was prosecuted under the architectural direction of 
Thomas U. Walter till 1865, when he resigned, and it was completed 
under the supervision of Edward Clark. The material used in the 
walls is white marble from the quarries at Lee, Massachusetts, and 
that in the columns from the quarries at Cockeysville, Maryland. 
The House extension was first occupied for legislative purpose De- 
cember 16, 1857, and the Senate January 4, 1859. 

The House office building was begun in 1905 and occupied on 
January 10, 1908; later, a story on top was added. The Senate office 
building was started in 1906 and occupied on March 5, 1909. The 
House building cost, with site, $4,860,155; the Senate structure, 
?5,019,251. 

Among the paintings in the Capitol are: 

In Rotunda : Signing of the Declaration of Independence, Surren- 
der of General Burgoyne, Surrender of Lord Cornwallis at York- 



82 North Carolina Manual 

town, Va., George Washington Resigning His Commission as Com- 
mander in Chief of the Army, all by John Trumbull. 

Baptism of Pocahontas, by John G. Chapman; Landing of Colum- 
bus, by John Vanderlyn; Discovery of the Mississippi River, by 
DeSoto, by William H, Powell; Embarkation of the Pilgrims, by 
Robert W. Weir, 

In House Wing: Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way, 
by Emanuel Leutze; First Reading of the Emancipation Proclama- 
tion, by Francis Bicknell Carpenter. 

In Senate Wing: Battle of Lake Erie, by William H. Powell; 
Battle of Chapultepec, by James Walker. 



THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 

(Unanimously Adopted in Congress, July 4, 1776, at Philadelphia) 

When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one 
people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with 
another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate 
and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God 
entitles them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires 
that they should declare the causes which impel them to the sep- 
aration. 

We hold these truths to be self-evident: That all men are created 
equal ; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalien- 
able Rights; that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of 
Happiness. That, to secure these rights, Governments are instituted 
among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the gov- 
erned; ^That, whenever any Form of Government becomes destruc- 
tive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish 
it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundations on such 
principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall 
seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, 
indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be 
changed for light and transient causes; and, accordingly, all expe- 
rience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while 
evils are suff erable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms 
to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and 
usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object, evinces a design 
to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their 
duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for 
their future security. Such has been the patient sufferance of these 
Colonies, and such is now the necessity which constrains them to 
alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the pres- 
ent King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usur- 
pations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute 
Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to 
a candid world. 

He has refused his assent to Laws, the most wholesome and neces- 
sary for the public good. 

He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and 

[83] 



84 North Carolina Manual 

pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his 
Assent should be obtained; and, when so suspended, he has utterly- 
neglected to attend to them. 

He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of 
large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the 
right of Representation in the Legislature — a right inestimable to 
them, and formidable to tyrants only. 

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, un- 
comfortable and distant from the depository of their public Records, 
for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his 
measures. 

He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing 
with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people. 

He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause 
others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of 
Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; 
the State remaining, in the meantime, exposed to all the dangers of 
invasion from without, and convulsions within. 

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these States for 
that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreign- 
ers ; refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither, and 
raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands. 

He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing his 
Assent to laws for establishing Judiciary Powers. 

He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure 
of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries. 

He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms 
of Officers to harass our people, and eat out their substance. 

He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without 
the Consent of our Legislature. 

He has affected to render the Military independent of, and su- 
perior to, the Civil power. 

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction for- 
eign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving 
his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation: 

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us: 

For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any 



Declaration of Independence 85 

Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these 
States : 

For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world : 

For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent: 

For depriving us, in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by jury: 

For transporting us beyond Seas, to be tried for pretended of- 
fenses : 

For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighboring 
Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and en- 
larging its Boundaries, so as to render it at once an example and fit 
instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colo- 
nies: 

For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws, 
and altering, fundamentally, the Forms of our Governments: 

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves 
invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever. 

He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his 
Protection and waging War against us. 

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, 
and destroyed the lives of our people. 

He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercen- 
aries to complete the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already 
begun with circumstances of Cruelty and perfidy scarcely paralleled 
in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a 
civilized nation. 

He has constrained our fellow-Citizens, taken captive on the high 
Seas, to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners 
of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands. 

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has en- 
deavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless 
Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare is an undistinguished 
destruction of all ages, sexes, and conditions. 

In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Re- 
dress in the most humble terms; Our repeated Petitions have been 
answered only by repeated injury. A Prince, whose character is thus 
marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the 
ruler of a free people. 

Nor have we been wanting in attentions to our Britain brethren. 



86 



North Carolina Manual 



We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legisla- 
ture to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have re- 
minded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement 
here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, 
and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to 
disavow these usurpations, which inevitably interrupt our connec- 
tions and correspondence. They, too, have been deaf to the voice of 
justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the 
necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we 
hold the rest of mankind — Enemies in War, in Peace Friends. 

We, Therefore, the Representatives of the United States of 
America, in General Congress Assembled, appealing to the Supreme 
Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the 
Name and by authority of the good People of these Colonies, sol- 
emnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of 
Right ought to be, free and independent States; that they are Ab- 
solved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political 
connection between them and the State of Great Britain is, and 
ought to be, totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent 
States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract 
Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things 
which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of 
this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine 
Pi'ovidence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our For- 
tunes, and our sacred Honor. 



John Hancock 



Button Gwinnett 

Lyman Hall 

Geo. Walton 

Wm. Hooper 

Joseph Hewes 

John Penn 

Edward Rutledge 

Thos. Heyward, Junr. 

Thomas Lynch, Junr. 

Arthur Middleton 

Samuel Chase 

Wm. Paca 

Thos. Stone 

Charles Carroll of Carrollton 



James Wilson 
Geo. Ross 
Caesar Rodney 
Geo. Reed 
Tho. M. Kean 
Wm. Floyd 
Phil. Livingston 
Frans. Lewis 
Lewis Morris 
Richd. Stockton 
Jno. Witherspoon 
Fras. Hopkinson 
John Hart 
Abra Clark 



Declaration of Independence 87 

George Wythe Josiah Bartlett 

Richard Henry Lee Wm. Hippie 

Th. Jefferson Saml. Adams 

Benja, Harrison John Adams 

Thos. Nelson, Jr. Robt. Treat Payne 

Francis Lightfoot Lee Eldridge Gerry 

Carter Braxton Step. Hopkins 

Robt. Morris William EUery 

Benjamin Rush Roger Sherman 

Benja. Franklin Samuel Huntington 

John Morton Wm. Williams 

Geo. Clymer Oliver Woolcott 

Jas. Smith Matthew Thornton 
Geo. Taylor 



THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES 

Preamble 

We, the people of the United States, in order to form a more per- 
fect Union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide 
for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure 
the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain 
and establish this Constitution for the United States of America. 

Article I 

Section 1 — All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested 
in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate 
and House of Representatives. 

Sec. 2 — 1. The House of Representatives shall be composed of 
members chosen every second year by the people of the several 
States, and the electors in each State shall have the qualifications 
requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State 
Legislature. 

2. No person shall be a Representative who shall not have at- 
tained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a citizen 
of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an in- 
habitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. 

3. Repx'esentatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among 
the several States which may be included within this Union, ac- 
cording to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by 
adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound 
to service for a term of years and excluding Indians not taxed, 
three-fifths of all other persons. The actual enumeration shall be 
made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of 
the United States, and within every subsequent term of ten years, 
in such manner as they shall by law direct. The number of Repre- 
sentatives shall not exceed one for every thirty thousand, but each 
State shall have at least one Representative; and until such enum- 
eration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled 
to choose 3; Massachusetts, 8; Rhode Island and Providence Planta- 
tions, 1; Connecticut, 5; New York, 6; New Jersey, 4; Pennsylvania, 



[88] 



Constitution of the United States 89 

8; Delaware, 1; Maryland, 6; Virginia, 10; North Carolina, 5; 
South Carolina, 5; and Georgia, 3.* 

4. When vacancies happen in the representation from any State, 
the Executive Authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill 
such vacancies. 

5. The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and 
.other officers, and shall have the sole power of impeachment. 

Sec. 3 — 1. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of 
two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof, for 
six years; and each Senator shall have one vote.* 

2. Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence of 
the first election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into 
three classes. The seats of the Senators of the first class shall be 
vacated at the expiration of the second year; of the second class at 
the expiration of the fourth year; and of the third class at the ex- 
piration of the sixth year, so that one-third may be chosen every 
second year, and if vacancies happen by resignation, or otherwise, 
during the recess of the Legislature of any State, the Executive 
thereof may make temporary appointments until the next meeting 
of the Legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies.* 

3. No person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to 
the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the United 
States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that 
State for which he shall be chosen. 

4. The Vice President of the United States shall be President of 
the Senate, but shall have no vote, unless they be equally divided. 

5. The Senate shall choose their other officers, and also a President 
pro tempore, in the absence of of the Vice President, or when he 
shall exercise the Office of President of the United States. 

6. The Senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments. 
When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath or affirmation. 
When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice 
shall preside; and no person shall be convicted without the con- 
currence of two-thirds of the members present. 

7. Judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend further 
than to removal from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy 



* See Article XIV. Amendments. 

* See Article XVII, Amendments. 



90 North Carolina Manual 

any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States ; but the 
party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to indict- 
ment, trial, judgment, and punishment, according to law. 

Sec. 4 — 1. The times, places, and manner of holding elections 
for Senators and Representatives shall be prescribed in each State 
by the Legislature thereof, but the Congress may at any time by law 
make or alter such regulations, except as to the places of choosing 
Senators. 

2. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and 
such meeting shall be on the first Monday in. December, unless they 
shall by law appoint a different day. 

Sec. 5 — 1. Each House shall be the judge of the elections, re- 
turns, and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of each 
shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a smaller number may 
adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the at- 
tendance of absent members, in such manner and under such penal- 
ties as each House may provide. 

2. Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish 
its members for disorderly behaviour, and, with the concurrence of 
two-thirds, expel a member. 

3. Each House shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from 
time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may in their 
judgment require secrecy; and the yeas and nays of the members of 
either House on any question shall, at the desire of one-fifth of those 
present, be entered on the journal. 

4. Neither House, during the session of Congress, shall, without 
the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to 
any other place than that in which the two Houses shall be sitting. 

Sec. 6 — 1. The Senators and Representatives shall receive a 
compensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, and paid 
out of the Treasury of the United States. They shall in all cases, 
except treason, felony, and breach of the peace, be privileged from 
arrest during their attendance at the session of their respective 
Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any 
speech or debate in either House they shall not be questioned in anj; 
other place. 

2. No Senator or Representative shall, during the time for which 
he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under the authority of 
the United States which shall have been created, or the emoluments 



Constitution of the United States 91 

whereof shall have been increased during such time; and no person 
holding any office under the United States shall be a member of 
either House during his continuance in office. 

Sec. 7 — 1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the 
House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur 
with amendments, as on other bills. 

2. Every bill which shall have passed the House of Representa- 
tives and the Senate shall, before it becomes a law, be presented to 
the President of the United States; if he approve, he shall sign it, 
but if not, he shall return it, with his objections, to that House in 
which it shall have ox'iginated, who shall enter the objections at lai-ge 
on their journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after such recon- 
sideration two-thirds of that House shall agree to pass the bill, it 
shall be sent, together with the objections, to the other House, by 
which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two- 
thirds of that House, it shall become a law. But in all such cases 
the votes of both Houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, and 
the names of the persons voting for and against the bill shall be 
entered on the journal of each House respectively. If any bill shall 
not be returned by the President within ten days (Sundays except- 
ed) after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a 
law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress by 
their adjournment prevent its return, in which case it shall not be 
a law. 

3. Every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of the 
Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a 
question of adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the 
United States; and before the same shall take effect, shall be ap- 
proved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by 
two-thirds of the Senate and House of Representatives, according 
to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case of a bill. 

Sec. 8 — 1. The Congress shall have power: 

To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the 
debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of 
the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall be uni- 
form throughout the United States; 

2. To borrow money on the credit of the United States; 

3. To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the 
several States, and with the Indian tribes; 



92 North Carolina Manual 

4. To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform 
laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States; 

5. To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, 
and fix the standard of weights and measures; 

6. To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities 
and current coin of the United States; 

7. To establish postoffices and postroads; 

8. To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by secur- 
ing, for limited times, to authors and inventors, the exclusive right 
to their respective writings and discoveries; 

9. To constitute tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court; 

10. To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the 
high seas, and offenses against the law of nations; 

11. To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and 
make rules concerning captures on land and water; 

12. To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money 
to that use shall be for a longer term than two years; 

13. To provide and maintain a navy; 

14. To make rules for the government and regulation of the land 
and naval forces; 

15. To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of 
the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions; 

16. To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the 
militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed in 
the service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively 
the appointment of the officers and the authority of training the 
militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress; 

17. To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever over 
such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession of 
particular States and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat 
of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like author- 
ity over all places purchased by the consent of the Legislature of 
the State in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, maga- 
zines, arsenals, dock-yards, and other needful buildings; — and 

18. To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for 
carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers 
vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, 
or in any department or officer thereof. 



Constitution of the United States 93 

Sec. 9 — 1. The migration or importation of such persons as any 
of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be 
prohibited by the Congress prior to the year one thousand eight 
hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such impor- 
tation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person. 

2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be sus- 
pended, unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public 
safety may require it. 

3. No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

4. No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in pro- 
portion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore directed to be 
taken.* 

5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any State. 

6. No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce 
or revenue to the ports of one State over those of another; nor shall 
vessels bound to, or from, one State be obliged to enter, clear, or pay 
duties in another. 

7. No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in consequence 
of appropriations made by law; and a regular statement and account 
of the receipts and expenditures of all public money shall be pub- 
lished from time to time. 

8. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States; and 
no person holding any office of profit or trust under them, shall, with- 
out the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, 
office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, pi'ince, or 
foreign state. 

Sec. 10 — 1. No State shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or 
confederation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; 
emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and silver coin a tender 
in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder, ex post facto law, 
or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or grant any title of 
nobility. 

2. No State shall, without the consent of the Congress, lay any 
imposts or duties on imports or exports except what may be abso- 
lutely necessary for executing its inspection laws; and the net pro- 
duce of all duties and imposts, laid by any State on imports or 
exports, shall be for the use of the Treasury of the United States; 



* See Article XVI, Amendments. 



94 North Carolina Manual 

and all such laws shall be subject to the revision and control of the 
Congress. 

3. No State shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any duty 
of tonnage, keep troops, or ships of war in time of peace, enter into 
any agreement or compact with another State, or with a foreign 
power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in such im- 
minent danger as will not admit of delay. 

Article II 

Section 1 — 1. The Executive power shall be vested in a President 
of the United States of America. He shall hold his office during the 
term of four years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen 
for the same term, be elected as follows: 

2. Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the legislature 
thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole number 
of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled 
in the Congress; but no Senator or Representative or person holding 
an office of trust or profit under the United States, shall be appointed 
an elector. 

3. The electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by 
ballot for two persons, of whom one at least shall not be an inhabi- 
tant of the same state with themselves. And they shall make a list 
of all the persons voted for, and of the number of votes for each; 
which list they shall sign and certify, and transmit, sealed, to the 
seat of the Government of the United States, directed to the Presi- 
dent of the Senate. The President of the Senate shall, in the pres- 
ence of the Senate and House of Representatives open all the cer- 
tificates, and the votes shall then be counted. The person having the 
greatest number of votes shall be the President, if such number be a 
majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if there be 
more than one who have such majority, and have an equal number of 
votes, then the House of Representatives shall immediately choose 
by ballot one of them for President; and if no person have a major- 
ity, then from the five highest on the list the said House shall in like 
manner choose the President. But in choosing the President, the 
votes shall be taken by States, the representation from each State 
having one vote; a quorum, for this purpose, shall consist of a 
member or members from two-thirds of the States, and a majority of 
all the States shall be necessary to a choice. In every case, after the 



Constitution of the United States 95 

choice of the President, the person having the greatest number of 
votes of the electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should 
remain two or more who have equal votes, the Senate shall choose 
from them by ballot the Vice President.* 

4. The Congress may determine the time of choosing the electors 
and the day on which they shall give their votes; which day shall be 
the same throughout the United States. 

5. No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the 
United States, at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, shall 
be eligible to the office of President; neither shall any pei-son be 
eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the age of thirty- 
five years, and been fourteen years a resident within the United 
States. 

6. In case of the removal of the President from office, or of his 
death, resignation or inability to discharge the powers and duties of 
the said office, the same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the 
Congress may by law provide for the case of removal, death, resigna- 
tion, or inability, both of the President and Vice President, declaring 
what officer shall then act as President, and such officer shall act 
accordingly until the disability be removed, or a President shall be 
elected. 

7. The President shall, at stated times, receive for his services a 
compensation which shall neither be increased nor diminished during 
the period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not 
receive within that period any other emolument from the United 
States, or any of them. 

8. Before he enter on the execution of his office, he shall take the 
following oath or affirmation: 

"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute*the 
office of President of the United States, and will, to the best of my 
ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United 
States." 

Sec. 2 — 1. The President shall be Commander-in-Chief of the 
Army and Navy of the United States, and of the militia of the sev- 
eral States, when called into the actual service of the United States; 
he may require the opinion, in writing, of the principal officer in each 
of the executive departments, upon any subject relating to the duties 
of their respective offices; and he shall have power to grant vc- 



* This clause is superseded by Article XII, Amendments. 



96 North Carolina Manual 

prieves and pardons for oflfenses against the United States, except 
in cases of impeachment. 

2. He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of the 
Senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the Senators present 
concur; and he shall nominate and, by and with the advice and 
consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors, other public min- 
isters and consuls, judges of the Supreme Court, and all other officers 
of the United States, whose appointments are not herein otherwise 
provided for, and which shall be established by law; but the Congress 
may by law vest the appointment of such inferior officers as they 
think proper in the President alone, in the courts of law, or in the 
heads of departments. 

3. The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that may 
happen during the recess of the Senate, by granting commissions 
which shall expire at the end of their next session. 

Sec. 3 — He shall from time to time give to the Congress infor- 
mation of the State of the Union, and recommend to their con- 
sideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; 
he may, on extraordinary occasions, convene both Houses, or either 
of them, and in case of disagreement between them with respect to 
the time of adjournment, he may adjourn them to such time as he 
shall think proper; he shall receive ambassadors and other public 
ministers; he shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed, 
and shall commission all the officers of the United States. 

Sec. 4 — The President, Vice President, and all civil officers of 
the United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment for, 
and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and mis- 
demeanors. 

• Article III 

Section 1 — The judicial power of the United States shall be vested 
in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress 
may from time to time ordain and establish. The judges, both of the 
Supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good 
behavior, and shall, at stated times, receive for their services a 
compensation which shall not be diminished during their continuance 
in office. 

Sec. 2 — 1. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law 
and equity, arising under this Constitution, the laws of the United 



Constitution of the United States 97 

States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their 
authority; — to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public min- 
isters and consuls; to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdic- 
tion; — to controversies to which the United States shall be a 
party; — to controversies between two or more States; — between a 
State and citizens of another State; — between citizens of different 
States; — between citizens of the same State claiming lands under 
grants of different States, and between a State, or the citizens 
thereof, and foreign States, citizens, or subjects. 

2. In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and 
consuls, and those in which a State shall be a party, the Supreme 
Court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before 
mentioned the Supi'eme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both 
as to law and fact, with such exceptions and under such regulations 
as the Congress shall make. 

3. The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, shall Be 
by jury, and such trial shall be held in the State where the said 
crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within 
any State the trial shall be at such place or places as the Congress 
may by law have directed. 

Sec. 3 — 1. Treason against the United States shall consist only 
in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving 
them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason 
unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on 
confession in open court. 

2. The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of 
treason ; but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, 
or forfeiture except during the life of the person attainted. 

Article IV 

Section 1 — P'ull faith and credit shall be given in each State to 
the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other 
State. And the Congress may by general laws prescribe the manner 
in which such acts, records and proceedings shall be proved, and 
the effect thereof. 

Sec. 2 — 1. The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all 
privileges and immunities of citizens in the sevei-al States. 

2. A person charged in any State with treason, felony, or other 



98 North Carolina Manual 

crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another State, 
shall, on demand of the Executive authority of the State from which 
he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having juris- 
diction of the crime. 

3. No person held to service or labor in one State, under the laws 
thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any law or 
regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labor, but 
shall be delivered up on claim of the party to whom such service or 
labor may be due. 

Sec. 3 — 1. New States may be admitted by the Congress into this 
Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within the juris- 
diction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the junction 
of two or more States, or parts of States, without the consent of the 
Legislatures of the States concerned, as well as of the Congress. 

2. The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all 
needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other 
property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this Con- 
stitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims of the 
United States, or of any particular State. 

Sec. 4 — The United States shall guarantee to every State in this 
Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of 
them against invasion, and, on application of the Legislature, or of 
the Executive (when the Legislature cannot be convened), against 
domestic violence. 

Article V 

The Congress, whenever two-thirds of both Houses shall deem it 
necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or, on the 
application of the Legislatures of two-thirds of the several States, 
shall call a convention for proposing amendments, which, in either 
case, shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of this Consti- 
tution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three-fourths of the 
several States, or by conventions in three-fourths thereof, as the one 
or the other mode of ratification may be proposed by the Congress; 
provided that no amendment which may be made prior to the year 
one thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any manner affect the 
first and fourth clauses in the Ninth Section of the First Article; and 
that no State, without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal 
suffrage in the Senate. 



Constitution of the United States 99 

Article VI 

1. All debts contracted and engagements entered into before the 
adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United 
States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation. 

2. This Constitution and the laws of the United States which shall 
be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall 
be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the 
supreme law of the land; and the judges in every State shall be 
bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to 
the contrary notwithstanding. 

3. The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the 
members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and 
judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several States, 
shall be bound by oath or affirmation to support this Constitution; 
but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any 
office or public trust under the United States. 

Article VII 
The ratification of the Conventions of nine States shall be suf- 
ficient for the establishment of this Constitution between the States 
so ratifying the same. 

Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States 
present the Seventeenth Day of September, in the Year of Our Lord 
one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, and of the Inde- 
pendence of the United States of America the Twelfth. In witness 
whereof we have hei'eunto subscribed our names. 

GEO. WASHINGTON, President and deputy from Virginia, 
New Hampshire — John Langdon, Nicholas Gilman, Massachusetts 
— Nathaniel Gorham, Rufus King, Connecticut — Wm. Saml. John- 
son, Roger Sherman, New York — Alexander Hamilton, New Jersey 
— Wil. Livingston, David Brearley, Wm. Patterson, Jona. Dayton, 
Pennsylvania — B. Franklin, Robt. Morris, Thos. Fitzsimmons, 
James Wilson, Thomas Mifflin, Geo. Clymer, Jared Ingersoll, Gouv. 
Morris, Delaware — Geo. Read, John Dickinson, Jaco. Broom, Gun- 
ning Bedford, Jr., Richard Bassett, Maryland — James McHcnry, 
Danl. Carroll, Dan. of St. Thos. Jenifer, Virginia — John Blair, Jas. 
Madison, Jr. North Carolina — Wm. Blount, Hu. Williamson, Richd. 
Dobbs Spaight, South Carolina — J. Rutledge, Charles Pinc-kiicy, 
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, Pierce Butler, Georgia — William 
Few, Abr. Baldwin. Attest: William Jackson, Secretary. 



100 North Carolina Manual 

The Constitution was declared in effect on the first Wednesday in 
March, 1789. 

Amendments to the Constitution of the United States 
The following amendments to the Constitution, Article I to X, 
inclusive, were proposed at the First Session of the First Congress, 
begun and held at the City of New York, on Wednesday, March 4, 
1789, and were adopted by the necessary number of States. The 
original proposal of the ten amendments was preceded by this 
preamble and resolution: 

"The conventions of a number of the States having, at the time of 
their adopting the Constitution, expressed a desire, in order to pre- 
vent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declaratory 
and restrictive clauses should be added, and as extending the ground 
of public confidence in the Government will best insure the beneficent 
ends of its institution: 

"RESOLVED, By the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of Amei-ica, in Congress assembled, two-thirds of both 
Houses concurring, that the following articles be proposed to the 
Legislatures of the several States, as amendments to the Constitu- 
tion of the United States; all or any of which articles, when ratified 
by three-fourths of the said Legislatures, to be valid to all intents 
and purposes, as part of the said Constitution, namely": 

Amendments 

the ten original amendments 

(Sometimes called our Bill of Rights) 

(Declared in force December 15, 1791) 

Article I 
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of reli- 
gion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the free- 
dom of speech or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably 
to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of griev- 
ances. 

Article II 

A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free 
State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be 
infringed. 



Constitution of the United States 101 

Article III 

No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house with- 
out the consent of the owner, nor in time of war but in a manner to 
be presci'ibed by law. 

Article IV 

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, 
papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall 
not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable 
cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing 
the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. 

Article V 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise 
infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand 
jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the 
militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger ; nor 
shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in 
jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case 
to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or 
property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be 
taken for public use, without just compensation. 

Article VI 

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a 
speedy, and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and dis- 
trict wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district 
shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed 
of the nature and cause of the accusation ; to be confronted with the 
witnesses against him; to have compulosry process for obtaining 
witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his 
defense. 

Article VII 

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall 
exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved 
and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any 
court of the United States than according to the rules of the ooiniiion 
law. 



102 North Carolina Manual 

Article VIII 

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, 
nor cruel and unual punishments inflicted. 

Article IX 

The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not 
be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. 

Article X 

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitu- 
tion, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States 
respectively, or to the people. 

Article XI 

The judicial povi^er of the United States shall not be construed to 
extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against 
one of the United States, by citizens of another State, or by citizens 
or subjects of any foreign State. 

(Proposed to the Legislatures of the several States by the Third 
Congress on the 5th of March, 1794, and declared to have been 
ratified by Executive Proclamation, January 8, 1798.) 

Article XII 

The electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by 
ballot for President and Vice President, one of whom at least shall 
not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves; they shall 
name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in dis- 
tinct ballots the person voted for as Vice President; and they shall 
make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of all 
persons voted for as Vice President, and of the number "of votes for 
each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit, sealed, to 
the seat of the Government of the United States, directed to the 
President of the Senate; the President of the Senate shall, in the 
presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the 
certificates, and the votes shall then be counted; the person having 
the gi-eatest number of votes for President shall be the President, 



Constitution of the United States 103 

if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors ap- 
pointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the persons 
having the highest numbers, not exceeding three on the list of those 
voted for as President, the House of Representatives shall choose 
immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing the Presi- 
dent, the votes shall be taken by States, the representation from each 
State having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a 
member or members from two-thirds of the States, and a majority 
of all the States shall be necessary to a choice. And if the House of 
Representatives shall not choose a President, whenever the right 
of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March 
next following, then the Vice President shall act as President, as in 
the case of the death or other constitutional disability of the Presi- 
dent. The person having the greatest number of votes as Vice 
President shall be the Vice President, if such number be a majority 
of the whole number of electors appointed, and if no person have a 
majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the Senate 
shall choose the Vice President; a quorum for the purpose shall 
consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a major- 
ity of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no 
person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be 
eligible to that of Vice President of the United States. 

(Proposed by the Eighth Congress on the 12th of December, 1803, 
declared ratified by the Secretary of State, September 25, 1804. It 
was ratified by all the States except Connecticut, Delaware, Massa- 
chusetts, and New Hampshire.) 

Article XIII 

1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punish- 
ment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, 
shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their 
jurisdiction. 

2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate 
legislation. 

(Proposed by the Thirty-eighth Congress on the 1st of February, 
1865, declared ratified by the Secretary of State, dated December 18, 
1865. It was rejected by Delaware and Kentucky; was conditionally 
ratified by Alabama and Mississippi; and Texas took no action.) 



104 North Carolina Manual 

Article XIV 

1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and sub- 
ject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and 
of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce 
any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens 
of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, 
liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any 
person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. 

2. Representatives shall be apportioned among the sevei'al States 
according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of 
persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when the 
right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President 
and Vice President of the United States, Representatives in Con- 
gress, the executive and judicial officers of a State, or the members 
of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants 
of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the 
United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in 
rebellion or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be 
reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citizens 
shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of 
age in such State. 

3. No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, or 
elector of President and Vice President, or hold any office, civil or 
military, under the United States, or under any State, who, having 
previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as an officer 
of the United States, or as a member of any State Legislature, or as 
an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support the Constitu- 
tion of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or 
rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies 
thereof. But Congress may, by a vote of two-thirds o feach House, 
remove such disability. 

4. The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized 
by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and 
bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall 
not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State shall 
assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection 
or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or 
emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obligations, and 
claims shall be held illegal and void. 



Constitution of the United States 105 

5. The Congress shall have power to enforce by appropriate legis- 
lation the provisions of this article. 

(The Reconstruction Amendment, by the Thirty-ninth Congress 
on the 16th day of June, 1866, declared ratified by the Secretary of 
State, July 28, 1868. The amendment got the support of 23 Northern 
States; it was rejected by Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, and 10 
Southern States. California took no action. Later it was ratified by 
the 10 Southern States.) 

Article XV 

1. The right of the citizens of the United States to vote shall not 
be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on ac- 
count of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. 

2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by ap- 
propriate legislation. 

(Proposed by the Fortieth Congress the 27th of February, 1869, 
and was declared ratified by the Secretary of State, March 30, 1870. 
It was not acted on by Tennessee; it was rejected by California, 
Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland and Oregon; ratified by the remain- 
ing 30 States. New York rescinded its ratification January 5, 1870. 
New Jersey rejected it in 1870, but ratified it in 1871.) 

Article XVI 

The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on in- 
comes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among 
the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-first Congress, July 12, 1909, and declared 
ratified February 25, 1913. The income tax amendment was ratified 
by all the States except Connecticut, Florida, Pennsylvania, Rhode 
Island, Utah, and Virginia.) 

Article XVII 

1. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Sen- 
ators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six years; 
and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each State 
shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numer- 
ous branch of the State Legislatures. 



106 North Carolina Manual 

2. When vacancies happen in the representation of any State in 
the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue writs of 
election to fill such vacancies ; Provided, That the Legislature of any 
State may empower the Executive thereof to make temporary 
appointments until the people fill the vacancies by election as the 
Legislature may direct. 

3. This amendment shall not be so construed as to affect the 
election or term of any Senator chosen before it becomes valid as 
part of the Constitution. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-second Congress on the 16th day of May, 
1912, and declared ratified May 31, 1913. Adopted by all the States 
except Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, 
Maryland, Mississippi, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah and 
Vii'ginia.) 

Article XVIII 

1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manu- 
facture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the 
importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United 
States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for bev- 
erage purposes is hereby prohibited. 

2. The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent 
power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. 

3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been i-ati- 
fied as an amendment to the Constitution by the Legislatures of the 
several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years 
from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-fifth Congress, December 18, 1917, and 
ratified by 36 States; was declared in effect on January 16, 1920.) 

Article XIX 

1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be 
denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account 
of sex. 

2. Congress shall have power, by appropriate legislation, to en- 
force the provisions of this article. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-fifth Congress. On August 26, 1920, it 



Constitution of the United States 107 

was proclaimed in effect, having been ratified (June 19, 1919 — 
August 18, 1920) by three-quarters of the States. The Tennessee 
House, August 31st, rescinded its ratification, 47 to 24.) 

Article XX 

1. The terms of the President and Vice President shall end at 
noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and 
Eepresentatives at noon on the 3rd day of January of the years in 
which such terms would have ended if this article had not been rati- 
fied; and the terms of their successors shall then begin. 

2. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and 
such meeting shall begin at noon on the 3rd day of January, unless 
they shall by law appoint a different day. 

3. If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the Presi- 
dent, the President elect shall have died, the Vice President elect 
shall become President. If a President shall not have been chosen 
before the time fixed for the beginning of his term, or if the Presi- 
dent elect shall have failed to qualify, then the Vice President elect 
shall act as President until a President shall have qualified; and the 
Congress may by law provide for the case wherein neither a Presi- 
dent elect nor a Vice President elect shall have qualified, declaring 
who shall then act as President, or the manner in which one who is 
to act shall be selected, and such person shall act accordingly until 
a President or Vice President shall have qualified. 

4. The Congress may by law provide for the case of the death of 
any of the persons from whom the House of Representatives may 
choose a President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved 
upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the persons from 
whom the Senate may choose a Vice President whenever the right of 
choice shall have devolved upon them. 

5. Sections 1 and 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of October 
following the ratification of this article. 

6. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been rati- 
fied as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of 
three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the date 
of its submission. 

(Proposed by the 72nd Congress, First Session. On Febiuary (>, 
1933, it was proclaimed in effect, having been ratified by thirty-nine 
States.) 



108 North Carolina Manual 

Article XXI 

1. The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the 
United States is hereby repealed. 

2. The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, 
or possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of 
intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby pro- 
hibited. 

3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been rati- 
fied as an amendment to the Constitution by conventions in the 
several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years 
from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Con- 
gress. 

(Proposed by the 72nd Congress, Second Session. Proclaimed in 
effect on December 5, 1933, having been ratified by thirty-six States. 
By proclamation of the same date, the President proclaimed that the 
eighteenth amendment to the Constitution was repealed on December 
5, 1933.) 



PART II 
CENSUS 



POPULATION OF THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Sixteenth Census of the United States: 1940 

Between 1930 and 1940 North Carolina's urban places continued 
to grow faster than the rural areas, according to the final figures 
from the Sixteenth Decennial Census, issued by Director William 
Lane Austin, of the Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce. 

The final count of the Sixteenth Census showed that on April 1, 
1940, North Carolina had a population of 3,571,623, an increase of 
401,347 over the 3,170,276 residents reported in the 1930 Census. This 
change represents an increase of 12.7 per cent as compared with 23.9 
per cent between 1920 and 1930. The population increase in urban 
areas from 1930 to 1940 was 20.3 per cent as compared with 10.0 
per cent in the rural sections. Urban residents accounted for 27.3 
per cent of the State's population in 1940, as compared with 25.5 
per cent in 1930. In 1940, residents of urban areas numbered 974,- 
175, while the rural population amounted to 2,597,448. The Census 
Bureau considers as urban areas the incorporated places of 2,500 
01* more. The remaining territory is classified as rural. 

There were 26 incorporated places of 10,000 or more in North 
Carolina, 5 (Burlington, Greenville, Hickory, Lexington, and Reids- 
ville) having reached this size since 1930. All but one (New Bern) 
of these cities increased between 1930 and 1940, Hickory having had 
the most rapid growth (83.2 per cent). 

Ninety-one of the 100 counties gained population between 1930 
and 1940. Alamance County, with an increase of 36.3 per cent, had 
the most extensive growth. 

The first census of North Carolina was taken in 1790, returning a 
population of 393,751. The population has shown an increase at 
every census since that time, but the rate of increase during the past 
decade was the lowest since that of 1860 to 1870. The population 
passed 1,000,000 between 1860 and 1870, 2,000,000 between 1900 and 
1910, and 3,000,000 between 1920 and 1930. The present population 
represents a density of 72.7 inhabitants per square mile. North 
Carolina's total land area is 49,142 square miles. 

Table 1 presents the figures for counties and for incorporated 
places of 10,000 or more, and Table 2 for incorporated places of 
less than 10,000. 

[Ill] 



112 



North Carolina Manual 



TABLE 1. POPULATION OF COUNTIES AND OF INCORPORATED PLACES 
OF 10,000 OR MORE IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1940 



County or Place 



THB&TA-ni 

Urban 

Rural 

Per Cent Urban 

Countieb: 

Alamance 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen. 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Forsyth 

FnuMn 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 



Population 
1940 



3,571,623 
974,175 

2,597.448 
27.3 



57,427 
13,454 
8,341 
28,443 
22,664 

13,561 
36,431 
26,201 
27,158 
17,125 

108,755 

38,615 

59,393 

35,795 

5,440 

18,284 
20.032 
51,653 
24,726 
18,813 

11,572 
6,405 
58,055 
45,663 
31,298 

59,320 

6,709 

6,041 

63,377 

14,909 

39,739 
80,244 
49,162 
126.475 
30,382 

87,531 
10,060 
6,418 
29,344 
18,548 



County or Place 



Counties — Cont 

Guilford 

Halifajc 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Hertford 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Mecklenburg.. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery.. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover. 

Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank... 

Pender 

Perquimans... 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham.. 
Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 



Population 
1940 



153,918 
56,512 
44,239 
34,804 
28,049 

19,352 
14,937 
7,860 
50,424 
19,366 

63,798 
10,926 
18,743 
41,211 
24,187 

22,996 
15,880 
22,522 
26,111 
151,826 

15,980 
16,280 
30.969 
55,608 
47,935 

28,299 
17.939 
23,072 
9.706 
20,568 

17,710 
9.773 
25.029 
61.244 
11,874 

44,554 
36,810 
76,860 
67,898 
69,206 

45,677 
47,440 
23,232 
32,834 
22,656 



Couaty or Place 



Counties — Cont. 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania.. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total 

Incorporated 
Places of 10,000 
OR More 

Asheville 

Burlington 

Charlotte 

Concord 

Durham 

Elizabeth City. 

Fayetteville 

Gastonia 

Goldsboro 

Greensboro 

Greenville 

Hickory 

High Point 

Kinston 

Lexington 

New Bern 

Raleigh 

Reidsville 

Rocky Mount.. 
Salisbury 

Shelby 

Statesville 

Thomas ville 

Wilmington 

Wibon... 

Winston-Salem. 



Population 
1940 



41.783 
12.177 
12.241 
5.556 
39,097 

29,961 
109.544 
23.145 
12.323 
18,114 

58,323 
43,003 
50,219 
20,657 
17,202 



3,571,623 



51.310 
12.198 
100.899 
15.572 
60,195 

11,564 

17.428 

21,313- 

17.274 

59,319 

12.674 
13.487 
38.495 
15.388 
10.550 

11.815 
46,897 
10,387 
25,568 
19,037 

14,037 
11,440 
11,041 
33,407 
19,234 
79,815 



Population of Cities and Towns 



113 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 10,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1940 



City or Town 



2,500 TO 10,000 

Albemarle 

Asheboro 

Beaufort 

Belmont 

Bessemer City 

Brevard 

Canton 

Chapel Hill 

Cherryville.- 

Clinton 



Dunn 

Edenton 

Elkin 

Farmville 

Forest City 

Graham 

Hamlet 

Henderson 

Hendersonville... 
Kings Mountain. 

Laurinburg 

Lenoir , 

Lincolnton 

Lumberton 

Marion , 



Monroe 

Mooresville 

Morehead City. 

Morganton 

Mount Airy 



Southern Pines. 

Spencer.. 

Spindale 

Tarboro 

Valdese 

Wades boro 

Washington 

Waynes viUe 

White ville 

Williamston 



Coujoty 



Mount Olive 

Newton 

North Wilkesboro 

Oxford 

Roanoke Rapids 

Rockingham 

Roxboro 

Sanford 

Scotland Neck 

Smithfield 



Stanly 

Randolph. 
Carteret.., 

Gaston 

Gaston 



Transylvania . 

Haywood 

Orange 

Gaston 

Sampson 

Harnett 

Chowan 

Surry 

Pitt 

Rutherford... 

Alamance 

Richmond 

Vance 

Henderson 

Cleveland 

Scotland 

Caldwell 

Lincoln. 

Robeson...... 

McDowell 

Union 

Iredell 

Carteret 

Burke. -^ 

Surry 

Wayne 

Catawba 

Wilkes 

GranviUe 

Halifax 



Richmond.. 

Person 

Lee 

Halifax 

Johnston 

Moore 

Rowan 

Rutherford. 
Edgecombe - 
Burke 

Anson 

Beaufort — 
Haywood... 
Columbus.. 
Martin 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,500 

Abbottsburg 

Aberdeen 

Acme 

Addor' 

Advance 



Ahoskie 

Alexander Mills. 

Andrews 

Angier 

Ansonville 

Apex 

Arapahoe 

Archdale 

Arlington' 

Arthur 

Atkinson 

Atlantic.- 

Aulander 

Aurora 

Autryville 



Ayden 

Baileys...-. 
Bakers ville. 
Banner Elk. 
Bath 



' Returned in 1930 as Keyser. 



4,060 
6,981 
3,272 
4,356 
3, 667 

3,061 
5,037 
3,654 
3,225 
3,557 

5,256 
3,835 
2,734 
2,980 
5,035 

4,339 
5,111 
7,647 
5,381 
6,547 

5,685 
7,598 
4,525 
5,803 
2,889 

6,475 
6,682 
3,695 
7,670 
6,286 

2,929 
5,407 
4,478 
3,991 
8,545 

3,657 
4,599 
4,960 
2,559 
3,678 

3,225 
3,072 
3,952 
7,148 
2,616 

3,687 
8,669 
2,940 
3,011 
3.966 
' Incorporated since 1930. 



Battleboro. 

Bayboro 

Beargrass.. 
Belhaven... 



Bennett 

Benson 

Benton Heights. 
Bethel 



Beula ville 

Biltmore Forest. 

Biscoe - 

Black Creek 



Black Mountain. 
Bladenboro 

Blowing Rock 

Boiling Springs.. 



Bolivia... 
Bolton... 

Boone 

Boonville. 
Bostic 



Co only 



Bladen 

Moore 

Columbus... 

Moore 

Davie 

Hertford.... 
Rutherford.. 

Cherokee 

Harnett 

Anson 

Wake 

Pamlico 

Randolph... 

Yadkin 

Pitt 

Pender 

Carteret 

Beftie 

Beaufort 

Sampson 

Pitt 

Nash 

Mitchell 

Avery 

Beaufort 

/Edgecombe.. 

\Nash 

Pamlico 

Martin 

Beaufort 

Chatham 

Johnston 

Union 

Pitt 

Duplin 

Buncombe... 
Montgomery 
Wilson 

Buncombe.-. 

Bladen 

fCaldweU.... 
\Watauga 

Cleveland... 

Brunswick... 
Columbus... 

Wataugk 

Yadkin 

Rutherford . . 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



167 
1,076 
196 
123 
186 

2,313 

819 

1,620 

1.028 

519 

977 
307 
1.097 
440 
181 

312 

711 

1,057 

493 

94 

1.884 
646 
437 
344 
380 

270 

428 
114 

2,360 

229 
1,837 

768 
1,333 

587 
478 
843 
333 

1,042 

724 

654 

613 

203 

780 

1,788 

405 

226 



114 



North Carolina Manual 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 10.000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 19iO— Continued 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,500 
— Continued 

Bowdens 

Bridgeton 

Broadway 

Brookford 

Brunswick 

Bfyson 

Buie 

Buies Creek 

Bunnlevel 

Bunn 

Burgaw 

Burnsville 

Calypso 

Cameron 

Candor 

Carolina Beach 

Carrboro 

Carthage 

Cary 

Cashiers 

Castalia 

Catawba 

Cerro Gordo 

Chad bourn 

Cherry 

China Grove 

Claremont 

Clarkton 

Clajlon 

Cleveland 

Gyde 

Coats 

Colerain 

Columbia 

Columbus 

Conetoe 

Conover 

Conway 

Cornelius 

Council 

Cove City 

Creedmoor 

Creswell 

Crossnore 

Crouse.. 

Culberson 

DaUas 

Davidson 

Deep Run 

Delco 



County 



Duphn 

Craven 

Lee 

Catawba 

Columbus 

Swain 

Robeson 

Harnett 

Harnett 

Franklin 

Pender 

Yancey 

Duplin 

Moore 

Montgomery. 

New Hanover 

Orange 

Moore 

Wake 

Jackson 

Nash 

Catawba 

Columbus 

Columbus. ... 
Washington.. 

Rowan 

Catawba 

Bladen 

Johnston 

Rowan 

Haywood 

Harnett 

Bertie 

TyrreU 

Polk 

Edgecombe... 

Catawba 

Northampton. 
Mecklenburg. 
Bladen 

Craven 

Granville 

Washington... 

Avery 

Lincoln 

Cherokee 

Gaston 

Mecklenburg. 

Lenoir.. 

Columbus 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



220 
616 
338 
910 
227 

1.612 
118 
435 
158 
248 

1,476 

997 
678 
311 
509 

637 
1,455 
1.381 
1,141 

353 

341 

402 

379 

1,576 

108 

1,567 
467 
484 

1,711 
506 

516 
827 
307 
1,090 
390 

194 
1,195 

449 

1,195 

73 

371 
640 
459 
266 
221 

98 

1.704 

1.550 

150 

263 



City or Town 



Less Than 2.500 
— Continued 

Dellview 

Denton , 

Denver 

Dills boro". 

Dobson 

Dover. 

Drexel 

Dublin _. 

Dudley 

Dundarrach 

East Bend 

East Flat Rock.. . 
East Laurinburg.. 
East Lumberton.. 
East Spencer 

Edward 

Ehzabethtown 

Elk Park 

Ellenboro 

Ellerbe 

Elm City 

Elon College 

Enfield 

Eureka 

Everetts 

Evergreen 

Fair Bluff 

Fairmont 

Faison 

Fait^i 

Falcon 

Falkland 

Fountain __. 

Four Oaks 

Frankhn 

Franklins ville 

Franklinton 

Fremont 

Fuquay Springs... 
Garland 

Garner 

Garysburg 

Gatesville 

Germanton.. 

Gibson 

Gibsonville 

Glen Alpine. 

Glenwood 

Godwin 



County 



Gaston 

Davidson 

Lincoln 

Jackson 

Surry 

Craven 

Burke 

Bladen 

Wayne 

Hoke 

Yadkin 

Henderson 

Scotland...... 

Robeson 

Rowan 

Beaufort 

Bladen 

Avery 

Rutherford 

Richmond 

Wilson 

Alamance 

HaUfax 

Wayne 

Martin 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Robeson 

Duplin 

Rowan 

Cumberland . . 

Pitt 

Pitt 

Johnston 

Macon 

Randolph 

Franklin 

Wayne 

Wake 

Sampson 

Wake 

Northampton. 

Gates 

Stokes... 

Scotland 

f Alamance 

\Guilford 

Burke 

McDowell..-. 

Cumberland.. 



Population of Cities and Towns 



115 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 10,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1940— Condnued 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,500 
— Continued 

Gold Hill 

Gold Point 

Goldstoii 

Graingers 

Granite Falls 



Granite Quarry. 

Grifton 

Grimesland 

Grover 

Halifax 



Hamilton 

Hamilton Lakes. 

Harmony 

Harrellaville 

Hassell 



Hayesville.. 
Haywood... 
Hazelwood. 

Hemp^ 

Hertford... 



Highlands. 
Hitdebran. 
Hills boro.. 
Hobgood.. 
Hoffman . . 



Holly Springs. 

Hookerton 

Hope Mills 

Hot Springs. . 
Hudson 



Hunters ville. 

Icemorlee 

Indian Trail. 
Iron Station. 
Jackson 



Jackson Springs. 

Jacksonville 

James ville 

Jefferson 

Jonesboro 



Jonesville... 

Jupiter 

Kelford.... 
Kenansville. 
Kenly 



County 



Rowan... 
Martin... 
Chatham. 

Lenoir 

Caldwell. 



Rowan 

Pitt 

Pitt 

Cleveland. 
Halifax... 



Martin... 
Guilford.. 
Iredell... 
Hertford. 
Martin... 



Clay 

Chatham... 
Haywood... 

Moore 

Perquimans. 

Macon 

Burke.: 

Orange 

Halifax 

Richmond.. 



Wake 

Greene 

Cumberland. 

Madison 

Caldwell 



Mecklenburg.. 

Union 

Union 

Lincoln 

Northampton. 



Moore. . 
Onslow. 
Martin. 
Ashe... 
Lee 



Yadkin.... 
Buncombe. 

Bertie 

Duplin 

Johnston.. 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



249 
142 
416 
120 

1,873 

555 
456 
405 
469 
374 

524 
98 
348 
154 
150 

336 
187 

1,508 
972 

1,959 

569 
357 
1,311 
629 
395 

394 
319 
900 
773 

748 

763 

527 

225 

96 

758 

199 
873 
499 
304 
928 

1,733 

74 

456 

571 

1,095 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,500 
— Continued 

Kerners ville 

Kittrell 

Knightdale. 

La Grange..." 

Lake Lure 

Lake Waccamaw.. 

Landis 

Lansing 

Lasker 

Lattimore.. 

Laurel Park 

Lawndale 

Leaksville 

Lewarae 

Lewiston 

Liborty. 

Lilesville 

Lillington 

Linden 

Littlijton 

Locust 

Longview 

Louisburg 

Lowell 

Lucama 

Lumber Bridge 

McAdenville 

McDonalds 

McFarlan 

Macclesfield 

Macon. 

Madison 

Magnolia 

Maiden 

Manly 

Manteo 

Mapleton 

Marble 

Margaretsville 

Marietta 

Marshall- 

Mars Hill 

Marshville 

Matthews 



County 



Forsyth 

Vance. 

Wake 

Lenoir 

Rutherford 

Columbus 

Rowan 

Ashe. 

Northampton.. 
Clevelana 

Henderson 

Cleveland 

Rockingham... 

Richmond 

Bertie 

Randolph 

Anson 

Harnett 

Cumberland... 

Halifax 

\ Warren 

Stanly 

Catawba 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Wilson 

Robeson 

Gaston 

Robeson 

Anson 

Edgecombe 

Warren 

Rockingham 

Duplin 

Catawba 

Moore 

Dare. 

Hertford 

Cherokee 

Northampton.. 

Robeson 

Madison 

MadisoD 

Union 

,\Iccklcnburg... 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



2,103 
184 
352 

1,647 
212 

429 
1 , 650 
274 
169 
342 

171 
1,006 

1,886 
299 
304 

922 
556 
914 
224 

1,200 

151 

1,489 
2,309 
1,826 

362 
196 
887 
127 
184 

367 
197 

1,6S3 
730 

1,803 

249 
571 
127 
356 
95 



71 
1,160 

517 
1,007 

4N6 



' Incorporated since 1930. 



116 



North Carolina Manual 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPOR.VTED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 10,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1940-C<m<inue<f 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,500 
— Continued 

Maury 

Maxton 

Mayodan 

MaysTille 

Mebane 



Merry Oaks. 

Micro 

Middleburg.. 
Middlesex... 



Milton 

Milwaukee.. 

Mineral Springa. 

Mocksville 

Mooresboro 



Mortimer 

Morven 

Mount Gilead... 

Mount HoUy 

Mount Pleasant- 



Murfreesboro. 

Murphy 

Nags Head 

Nashville 

Nebo 



Newland 

New London... 

Newport 

Newton Grove. 
Norlina 



Norman 

NorthlLumberton. . 

Norwood.. 

Oakboro 

Oak City 



Oakley... 
Old Fort. 
Oriental.. 
Orrum... 
Pactolus.. 
Palm>Ta. 



Pantego 

Parkersbarg. 

Parkton 

P'armele 

Patterson 

Peachland... 



County 



Greene 

Robeson 

Rockingham 

Jones 

(Alamance 

lOrange 



Chatham. 
Johnston. 

Vance 

Nash 



Caswell 

Northampton . 

Union 

Davie 

Cleveland 



CaldweU 

Anson 

Montgomery 

Gaston 

Cabarrus 



Hertford.. 
Cherokee- . 

Dare 

Nash 

McDowell- 



Avery 

Stanly... 
Carteret.. 
Sampson. 
Warren . . 



Richmond. 
Robeson... 

Stanly 

SUnly 

Martin 



Pitt 

McDowell. 
Pamlico... 
Robeson... 

Pitt 

Halifax.... 



Beaufort . 
Sampson. 
Robeson.. 
Martin... 
CaldweU. 
Anson 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



274 
1,658 
2,323 

732 

2,060 



157 
289 
181 
545 

329 

291 

89 

1,607 

296 

42 

602 

915 

2,055 

1,017 

1,550 

1,873 

45 

1,171 

235 

471 
243 
480 
339 
794 

327 
452 
1,515 
503 
512 

27 
774 
535 
173 
369 

93 

294 
105 
441 
417 
158 
390 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,600 
—Continued 

Pembroke 

Pikeville 

Pilot Mountain 

Pinebluff 

Pine Level 

Pinetops 



Pinetown., 
Pineville.. 
Pink Hill.. 
Pitts boro.. 
Plymouth. 



Polkton 

Polloksville. 
Powells viUe. 
Princeton... 
Princeville.. 



Proctorville.. 

Raeford 

Ramseur 

Randleman.. 
Red Springs. 



Rennert.. 
Rhodhiss. 



Richfield.. 
Richlands. 



Rich Square.. 
Roaring Gap.. 
Robbinsville - . 

Roberdel 

Robersonviile. 

Rockwell 

Rocky Point.. 

Ronda.. 

Roper 

Roseboro 



Rose Hill 

Rosman 

Rowland 

Roxobel 

Royal Cotton Mills. 



Rath' 

Rutherford ton. 

Saint Pauls 

Salemburg 

Saluda 

Saratoga' 



County 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



Robeson 

Wayne 

Surry 

Moore 

Johnston... 
Edgecombe. 



Beaufort 

Mecklenburg... 

Lenoir 

Chatham 

Washington 



Anson 

Jones 

Bertie 

Johnston 

Edgecombe, 



Robeson.. 

Hoke 

Randolph - 
Randolph. 
Robeson.. 



Robeson. 
Burke.... 
ICaldwell. 
Stanly... 
Onslow... 



Northampton... 

Alleghany 

Graham 

Richmond 

Martin 



Rowan 

Pender 

Wilkes 

Washington. 
Sampson 



Duplin 

Transylvania. 

Robeson 

Bertie 

Wake 



Rutherford. 
Rutherford. 

Robeson 

Sampson . . . 

Polk 

Wilson 



783 
425 
925 
330 
595 
713 

253 

1,144 

307 

826 

2,461 

521 
408 
267 
512 
818 

209 
1,628 
1,220 
2.032 
1,559 

194 
930 

f 266 

688 

942 

24 

399 

490 

1,407 

825 
416 
379 
716 
939 

727 
529 
999 
332 
417 

318 
2,326 
1.923 
371 
539 
292 



' Incorporated since 1930. 



' Name changed from Hampton in 1930. 



Population of Cities and Towns 



117 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 10.000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: IHO—Conlinutd 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,600 
— Continued 

Seaboard 

Seagrove , 

Sslma 

Severn 

Shallotte City 

Sbarpsburg , 

Shebnerdiae 

Bin City 

Simpson 

Sims 

Smithtown 

Snow Hill 

South Creek 

South Mills , 

Southport 

South Wadesboro.. 

Sparta 

Speed 

Spring Hope 

Spruce Pine , 

Staley 

Stanley 

Stan tons burg 

Star. 

Stedman 

Stem 

Stokes 

StoneviUe 

Stonewall 

Stovall 

Swanquarter 

Swans boro 

Sylva 

Tabor 

Taylorsville 

Teacheys 

Todd 

Townsville 

Trenton 

Trinity 

Troutman 

Troy 



County 



Northampton 

Randolph 

Johnston 

Northampton 
Brunswick... 

f Edgecombe.. 

Nash 

(Wilson 

Pitt 

Chatham 

Rtt 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Greene 

Beaufort 

Camden 

Brunswick... 

Anson 

Alleghany... 
Edgecombe.. 

Nash 

Mitchell...., 

Randolph 

Gaston 

Wilson 

Montgomery. 
Cumberland. 

Granville 

Pitt 

Rockingham. 

Pamlico 

Granville 

Hyde 

Onslow 

Jackson 

Columbus 

Alexander 

Duplin.. 

/Ashe 

\ Watauga 

Vance 

Jones 

Randolph 

IredeU 

Montgomery. 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



562 
316 
2,007 
323 
381 



345 

76 
2.197 

298 
173 
162 
928 
152 

479 
1,760 
502 
648 
127 

1,222 
1,968 

255 
1,036 

595 

611 
356 
.218 
216 
615 

261 
415 
271 
454 
1.409 

1,552 

1.122 

228 

136 

221 
431 
975 
666 
1,861 



City or Town 



Less Than 2,500 
— Continued 

Tryon 

Turkey 

Union 

Union ville 

Vance boro 

Vandcmere 

Vass 

Vaughan . 

Waco 

Wade 

Wagram 

Wake Forest 

Wallace 

WabutCove 

Walstonburg 

Warrens ville' 

Warrenton 

Warsaw 

Washington Park.. 
Watha 

Waxhaw 

Weaverville 

Webster 

Weldon 

Wendell 

West Jefferson 

Whitakers 

Whitehall 

Wilkesboro 

Wilson Mills 

Windsor 

Winfall 

Wingate 

Winterville 

Winton 

Wood 

Woodland 

Woodville 

WrightsvilJe Beach 

Yadkin College 

Yadkinville 

Youns ville 

Zebulon 



County 



Polk 

Sampson 

Hpnford 

Union 

Craven 

Pamlico 

Moore 

Warren 

Cleveland 

Cumberlaad.. 

Scotland 

Wake 

Duplin 

Stokes 

Greene 

Ashe 

Warren 

Duplin 

Beaufort 

Pender 

Union 

Buncombe 

Jackson 

Halifax 

Wake 

Ashe 

/Edgecombe... 
\Nash 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Johnston 

Bertie 

Perquimans... 

Union 

Pitt 

Hertford 

Franklin 

Northampton. 

Bertip 

New Hanover 

Davidson 

Yadkin 

Franklin 

Wake , 



Popula- 
tion 
1940 



2,043 
188 
306 
144 

826 

436 
728 
218 
281 
380 

388 
1,562 
1,050 
1,084 

198 

150 

1,147 

1,483 

295 

214 

611 

880 

84 

2,341 

1.132 

883 

883 

170 
1,309 

436 

1.747 

160 

541 

848 

733 
173 
486 
426 
252 

72 

734 

553 

1,070 



' Incorporated since 1930. 



PART III 
POLITICAL 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS 

(Chapter 3, Public Laws 1941) 

First District — Beaufort, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Dare, 
Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Martin, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Pitt, 
Tyrrell, Washington. 

Second District — Bertie, Edgecombe, Greene, Halifax, Lenoir, 
Northampton, Warren, Wilson. 

Third District — Carteret, Craven, Duplin, Jones, Onslow, Pam- 
lico, Pender, Sampson, Wayne. 

Fourth District — Chatham, Franklin, Johnston, Nash, Handolph, 
Vance, Wake. 

Fifth District — Caswell, Forsyth, Granville, Person, Rockingham, 
Stokes, Surry. 

Sixth District — Alamance, Durham, Guilford, Orange. 

Seventh District — Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, Cumberland, 
Harnett, New Hanover, Robeson. 

Eighth District — Anson, Davidson, Davie, Hoke, Lee, Montgom- 
ery, Moore, Richmond, Scotland, Union, Wilkes, Yadkin. 

Ninth District — Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Cabarrus, Caldwell, 
Iredell, Rowan, Stanly, Watauga. 

Tenth District — Avery, Burke, Catawba, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, 
Mitchell. 

Eleventh District — McDowell, Polk, Rutherford, Cleveland, Gas- 
ton, Madison, Yancey. 

Twelfth District* — Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Hay- 
wood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Swain, Transylvania. 

JUDICIAL DISTRICTS 

Eastern Division 
First Dist7-ict — Camden, Gates, Currituck, Chowan, Pasquotank, 
Beaufort, Hyde, Dare, Perquimans, Tyrrell. 

Second District — Nash, Wilson, Edgecombe, Martin, Washington. 



* Created by 1941 General Assembly. 

[121] 



122 North Carolina Manual 

Third District — Bertie, Hertford, Northampton, Halifax, War- 
ren, Vance. 

Fourth District — Lee, Chatham, Johnston, Wayne, Harnett. 

Fifth Distinct — Pitt, Craven, Carteret, Pamlico, Jones, Greene. 

Sixth District — Onslow, Duplin, Sampson, Lenoir. 

Seventh District — Wake, Franklin. 

Eighth District — Brunswick, Columbus, New Hanover, Pender. 

Ninth District — Robeson, Bladen, Hoke, Cumberland. 

Tenth District — Granville, Person, Alamance, Durham, Orange. 

Western Division 

Eleventh District — Ashe, Forsyth, Alleghany. 

Twelfth District — Davidson, Guilford. 

Thirteenth District — Richmond, Stanly, Union, Moore, Anson, 
Scotland. 

Fourteenth District — Mecklenburg, Gaston. 

Fifteenth District — Alexander, Montgomery, Randolph, Iredell, 
Cabarrus, Rowan. 

Sixteenth District — Catawba, Lincoln, Cleveland, Burke, Cald- 
well, Watauga. 

Seventeenth District — Avery, Davie, Mitchell, Wilkes, Yadkin. 

Eighteenth District — McDowell, Transylvania, Yancey, Ruther- 
ford, Henderson, Polk. 

Nineteenth District — Buncombe, Madison. 

Twentieth District — Haywood, Swain, Cherokee, Macon, Graham, 
Clay, Jackson. 

Twenty-first District — Caswell, Rockingham, Stokes, Surry. 

APPORTIONMENT OF SENATORS BY DISTRICTS IN 

ACCORDANCE WITH THE CENSUS OF 1940 AND 

THE CONSTITUTION 

(Chapter 225, Public Laws 1941) 
First District — Bertie, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Gates, Hert- 
ford, Pasquotank and Perquimans counties shall elect two sena- 
tors. 



District Divisions 123 

Second District — Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin, Pamlico, Tyrrell, 
and Washington shall elect two senators. 

Third District — Northampton, Vance and Warren shall elect one 
senator. 

Fourth District — Edgecombe and Halifax shall elect two senators. 

Fifth District — Pitt shall elect one senator. 

Sixth District — Franklin, Nash and Wilson shall elect two sena- 
tors. 

Seventh District — Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, Lenoir and 
Onslow shall elect two senators. 

Eighth District — Johnston and Wayne shall elect two senators. 
Ninth District — Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and Sampson 
shall elect two senators. 

Tenth District — Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus and Cumberland 
shall elect two senators. 

Eleventh District — Robeson shall elect one senator. 

Twelfth District — Harnett, Hoke, Moore and Randolph shall elect 
two senators. 

Thirteenth District — Chatham, Lee and Wake shall elect two 
senators. 

Fourteenth District — Durham, Granville and Person shall elect 
two senators. 

Fifteenth District — Caswell and Rockingham shall elect one sena- 
tor. 

Sixteenth District — Alamance and Orange shall elect one sena- 
tor. 

Seventeenth District — Guilford shall elect one senator. 
Eighteenth District — Davidson, Montgomery, Richmond and Scot- 
land shall elect two senators. 

Nineteenth District — Anson, Stanly and Union shall elect two 
senators. 

Twentieth District — Mecklenburg shall elect one senator. 
Twenty-first District — Cabarrus and Rowan shall elect two sena- 
tors. 

Twenty-second District — Forsyth shall elect one senator. 
Twenty-third District — Stokes and Surry shall elect one senator. 



124 North Carolina Manual 

Twenty-fourth District — Davie, Wilkes and Yadkin shall elect 
one senator. 

Twenty-fifth District — Catawba, Iredell and Lincoln shall elect 
two senators. 

Twenty-sixth District — Gaston shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-seventh District — Cleveland, McDowell and Rutherford 
shall elect two senators. 

Twenty-eighth District — Alexander, Burke and Caldwell shall 
elect one senator. 

Twenty-ninth District — Alleghany, Ashe and Watauga shall elect 
one senator. 

Thirtieth District — Avery, Madison, Mitchell and Yancey shall 
elect one senator. 

Thirty-first District — Buncombe shall elect one senator. 

Thirty-second District — Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Polk and 
Transylvania shall elect two senators. 

Thirty-third District — Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon and Swain 
shall elect one senator. 



APPORTIONMENT OF MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF 

REPRESENTATIVES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE 

CENSUS OF 1940 AND THE CONSTITUTION 



(Chapter 112, Public Laws 



No. of 
County Reps. 

Alamance 1 

Alexander 1 

Alleghany 1 

Anson 1 

Ashe 1 

Avery 1 

Beaufort 1 

Bertie 1 

Bladen 1 

Brunswick 1 

Buncombe 3 

Burke 1 

Cabarrus 2 

Caldwell 1 

Camden 1 

Carteret 1 

Caswell 1 

Catawba 1 

Chatham 1 

Cherokee 1 

Chowan 1 

Clay 1 

Cleveland 1 

Columbus 1 

Craven 1 

Cumberland 2 

Currituck 1 

Dare 1 

Davidson 1 

Davie 1 

Duplin 1 

Durham :... 2 

Edgecombe 1 

Forsyth 3 



No. of 
County Reps. 

Franklin 1 

Gaston 2 

Gates 1 

Graham 1 

Granville 1 

Greene 1 

Guilford 4 

Halifax 1 

Harnett 1 

Haywood 1 

Henderson 1 

Hertford 1 

Hoke 1 

Hyde 1 

Iredell 1 

Jackson 1 

Johnston 2 

Jones 1 

Lee 1 

Lenoir 1 

Lincoln 1 

Macon 1 

Madison 1 

Martin 1 

McDowell 1 

Mecklenburg 4 

Mitchell 1 

Montgomery 1 

Moore 1 

Nash 1 

New Hanover 1 

Northampton 1 

Onslow 1 

Orange 1 



1941) 

No. of 
County Reps. 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Hockingham 

Rowan 

Ruthei'ford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



[125] 



STATE DEMOCRATIC PLATFORM FOR 1944 

The delegates of this convention, representing the Democratic 
voters of the one hundred counties, adopt the following declara- 
tions as the Platform of the Democratic Party of North Carolina 
for 1944: 

National Affairs 

At this moment in our nation's history, we pledge to our country 
the unswerving and unstinted loyalty of the people of North Caro- 
lina. 

North Carolina has unreservedly supported every measure and 
cheerfully accepted every sacrifice looking to the vigorous and 
victorious prosecution of the war against our enemies. North 
Carolina will continue to support the nation's war policies without 
stint or limit. There is no aid or comfort in this State for half- 
hearted patriotism, for subversive doctrines or practices, for ap- 
peasement. 

We endorse the magnificent record of the National Administra- 
tion in meeting and mastering the unprecedented problems which 
war has brought to this republic. 

We commend the Administration for the farsighted and effective 
policies which it adopted and executed in the critical months be- 
fore Pearl Harbor in strengthening and expanding the nation's 
defenses, and in aiding with lend-lease supplies and moral en- 
couragement those who are now our allies. If these far-reaching 
measures had not been given effect, our dangers today would be 
vastly greater and we would not be able to look forward with sober 
confidence to the early invasion of Europe and to the steady advance 
of our forces in the Pacific. 

We applaud the truly notable achievements of the Administration 
in organizing the human and material resources of this peace-loving 
country for the demands and dangers of modern, all-out war. In 
no other conflict in our history has so much been accomplished in 
such a brief time in bringing the full might of the nation into 
effective action against our foes. 

All this has been achieved under the sagacious, fearless and 

[126] 



District Divisions 127 

energetic leadership of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Great as a 
national leader in meeting the issues and challenges of peaceful 
times, he has proven greater as the war leader of an embattled 
America, 

The United States which he leads today as its commander-in- 
chief can support more easily the financial costs and the social 
strains of all-out war because he labored so effectively during his 
first two administrations in effecting vast economic social and poli- 
tical reforms. 

We commend with particular heartiness the foreign policies of 
the National Administration. North Carolina never faltered in its 
faith in the great vision which Woodrow Wilson had for a world 
liberated from the scourge of war by a concert of nations and by the 
forceful and disinterested leadership of the United States. We 
pledge to our republic the unwavering support of North Carolina 
for any effective measures looking to the preservation of the world's 
peace by America's full and active participation in international 
affairs. 

Congress 

We commend the record of the North Carolina members of the 
Congress of the United States. They have performed their duties 
in these exacting times with patriotism, intelligence and Industry, 
reflecting credit on the people whom they represent. 

State Administration 

We endorse with the highest praise the competent, progressive 
and honest administration which J. Melville Broughton has given 
to the State's affairs. Under his leadership, North Carolina has 
grown in physical resource, has expanded in service to its citizens 
and has enhanced its reputation as one of the most progressive and 
best governed states in the Union. 

The achievements of his administration have extended benefi- 
cently to every phase of our State life but we wish particularly 
to approve and to applaud his notable services to education. The 
General Assembly, responding to his recommendations, has length- 
ened the State school term to nine months, has instituted the twelfth 
grade, has increased teachers' salaries by approximately 20 per- 



128 North Carolina Manual 

cent, has provided a retirement system for superannuated teachers 
and other State employees and has adopted other measures designed 
to enlarge and to enrich the educational opportunities of the chil- 
dren of North Carolina. Perhaps in no similar four-year period 
of our State's history has so much educational progress been 
achieved. 

We wish also to commend the energy, the efficiency and the unself- 
ishness with which he has performed the extra and burdensome 
duties which have fallen upon him as the war-time Governor of 
North Carolina. He has seen to it that every cooperation demanded 
of us by our national government has been freely, swiftly and 
capably given and that the civilian resources of the State were fully 
mobilized for war. 

General Assembly 

We endorse the record of praiseworthy achievement made by the 
1943 General Assembly of North Carolina. We commend the single- 
ness of spirit and purpose with which it, reflecting the solemnity 
of the times, dispatched its business and the excellent cooperation 
which it practised in its relations with the executive branch of the 
State government. 

Finances 

The fiscal position of the general fund of the State of North Caro- 
lina was never sounder than at present. Due to the war-born 
prosperity and to the provident management which the Broughton 
Administration has given to the State's finances, the general fund 
will at the end of the current biennium have a cash surplus suffi- 
cient at least: 

(1) to offset the general fund debt, interest and principal; and 

(2) to provide a reserve adequate for any reasonable contin- 
gency in the immediately foreseeable future. 

The Democratic Party reiterates its faith that good government 
must also be financially sound government and that no state can 
violate the principle of a balanced budget without inviting fiscal 
trouble and without jeopardizing the efficient performance of the 
essential functions of government. 



Democratic Platform 129 



North Carolinians in Service 



We salute the more than 300,000 sons and daughters of North 
Carolina who are now serving in the nation's armed forces. We 
fully appreciate the great sacrifices which they are incurring and 
the problems which they will have to face in readjusting themselves 
to civilian life upon demobilization. They will richly deserve every 
assistance which they can receive from a grateful State. We 
pledge to them that their State — the State of North Carolina — will 
adopt a broad, practical program designed to serve their educa- 
tional, economic and social advantage. 

We urge upon all State officials, present or future, having the 
power of appointing or employing subordinates that in filling va- 
cancies in the State government the fullest consideration be ac- 
corded veterans of the present war. 

We warmly approve the actions of the General Assemblies of 
1941 and 1943 in liberalizing the State election laws for the benefit 
of North Carolinians in the armed services. We promise that the 
maximum efforts of the Democratic Party will be exerted to the 
end that our citizens, absent in our country's sei-vice, are accorded 
the fullest opportunity to vote in all elections, local, state or jia- 
tional. 

Education 

The Democratic Party of North Carolina renews its faith in 
education as the greatest force in democracy and as the chief con- 
cern of an enlightened commonwealth. 

Under the Broughton Administration vast improvements have 
been achieved for the public school system. We hail these better- 
ments as fine expressions of intelligent educational statesmanship. 

While much has been done, more remains to be done. As the in- 
creasing wealth of the State permits, we must spend more rather 
than less on the children of the State. 

Better provision for the health of the school child, an enriched 
curriculum, a reduced teacher load with more individual attention 
for the pupil, more adequate salaries for the teachers, a more 
realistic compulsory school attendance law, an expansion of our 
facilities for vocational education — these are objectives to whose 
attainment the Democratic Party of North Carolina pledges its 
earnest interest and its effective effort. 



130 North Carolina Manual 

We appreciate the heavy demands which will be made on our 
State-supported colleges and universities by the influx of students 
at the close of the war. We promise them the financial assistance 
of the State to the fullest possible extent in meeting these heavy 
demands. There must not be a skipped generation of college-' 
trained leadership in North Carolina as a consequence of this war. 

Highways 

Among the casualties of the war in North Carolina is our state 
highway system. It has gravely deteriorated for lack of necessary 
maintenance and desirable new construction. 

We pledge that: 

1. New construction will be resumed and the necessary repair 
work will be done as and when the national emergency permits; 

2. Every dollar that is now in the highway fund surplus or that 
may accrue in the highway fund surplus during this emergency 
will be expended solely on highways; 

3. Such other funds as may be required to restore the state high- 
way system to at least pre-war conditions should be provided by the 
State. 

The state highway system is one of the great accomplishments 
of the Democratic Party in North Carolina. We will continue to 
support and to expand it to the end that our State be completely 
inter-connected by all-weather roads. 

Health 

We commend the uncommonly useful work which the State 
Health Department is doing. 

We approve unreservedly the recommendations of Governor 
Broughton calling for: 

1. The provision of a standard four-year medical course at the 
University of North Carolina; 

2. The establishment and maintenance of a large hospital center 
in connection with this medical school ; and 

3. The establishment and maintenance of regional hospital cen- 
ters in areas not now adequately served by existing hospital facili- 
ties. 



Democratic Platform 131 

The civilized and Christian state has no more pressing and ap- 
pealing obligation than its duty to its mentally sick. We endorse 
with especial gratification the more generous financial provisions 
v/hich the 1943 General Assembly made for the State hospitals. We 
promise increased support for these institutions. 

We pledge a steady enlargement of the health activities of the 
State along professionally acceptable lines to the end that the health 
of the people may be protected and promoted and the great achieve- 
m.ents of medical science may be made increasingly available to 
our people of all classes and races. 

Public Welfare 

We commend the invaluable activities of the State: 

1. In maintaining charitable and correctional institutions; 

2. In providing institutional training for the deaf and the blind; 
and 

3. In giving financial assistance to the needy aged and to de- 
pendent children in cooperation with the federal government and 
with the county governments. 

Where existing institutions are now inadequate to take care of 
the actual need, either they should be enlarged or additional insti- 
tutions should be established. The program of State aid must be 
continued and expanded as the need develops. 

State Salaries 

The war bonus now being received by State employees as a war- 
time salary adjustment will expire on January 1, 1945. It should 
certainly be continued. The General Assembly should give serious 
and sympathetic consideration to further salary and wage increases 
for State employees in the lower earnings bracket. 

Agriculture 

The Democratic Party believes that we cannot build a sound 
and prosperous State in North Carolina unless we build it upon 
a sound and prosperous agriculture. Through better schools, good 
roads, the elimination of the State tax on land, an alert, progres- 
sive and efficient department of agriculture, and other agencies, 



132 North Carolina Manual 

Democratic administrations have done much to bring the conven- 
iencies, opportunities and profits of modern civilization to the rural 
population of the State. The Democratic Party pledges its un- 
remitting interest in the problems of agriculture and its desire 
to use the full resources of the State Government in promoting 
a more profitable agriculture. 

Labor 

We rejoice in the record for production and for understanding 
cooperation with management which North Carolina labor has made 
during this critical emergency. That record is perhaps without 
a parallel in the nation. In North Carolina the worker enjoys the 
full protection of progressive labor laws. We pledge our fullest 
support of these laws and of the just rights of labor. 

Industries 

Industries are necessary to the well-balanced prosperity of a 
state. They explain much of the economic progress which North 
Carolina has achieved in recent years. We commend the highly 
effective interest which the Broughton Administration has ex- 
hibited in attracting new industries of a desirable character to 
North Carolina. We pledge a continuance of that interest and 
effort. 

Minerals 

We commend the beneficial interest which the State, under Gov- 
ernor Broughton's discerning and forceful leadership, has shown 
in the fullest development of the State's mineral resources. Sur- 
veys and exploratory operations now in progress with the coopera- 
tion of the United States Bureau of Mines will result in better 
understanding and better utilization of our mineral wealth. We 
promise the continued interest and activity of the State in behalf of 
the mineral industry which, fully developed, can greatly enrich 
our State. 

Conservation and Development 

No State or community can continue to prosper and to advance 
without an intelligent and aggressive program for the conserva- 



Democratic Platform 133 

tion and development of its natural resources, including the soils, 
waters, forests and wildlife. These resources are the basis of our 
wealth, a primary source of our income and the facilities for our 
outdoor recreation. Our program for the preservation of these 
God-given resources has been wisely conceived and is being intelli- 
gently administered. 

We pledge continued, uninterrupted and even increased activity 
in conserving the forests and wildlife, in utilizing our water re- 
sources, in developing a comprehensive plan for reforestation, in 
promoting economic development and in advertising the State's re- 
sources and tourist attractions. 

State Aid to Libraries 

We commend the General Assemblies of 1941 and 1943 for ap- 
propriating State funds for State aid to libraries. We promise 
the State's continued financial support of this most valuable ser- 
vice. Libraries are the lighthouses of an informed people in a 
democracy. 

Federal Constitutional Amendment 

The provision in the Federal Constitution requiring a two-thirds 
majority of the Senators present for the ratification of treaties has 
enabled a minority of the Senators to thwart the will of a great 
majority of their colleagues, to disregard the considered opinion of 
the American people and to defeat the best interests of the United 
States. 

We strongly approve and urge an amendment to the Federal 
Constitution that will make the process of ratification more demo- 
cratic in its nature. 



For forty-four years the Democratic Party has given the people 
of this State honest, efficient and progressive government. On the 
basis of that record and of this platform, we invite the continued 
support of all forward-looking citizens of North Carolina. 



PLAN OF ORGANIZATION OF THE DEMOCRATIC 
PARTY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

State and District Committees 

Section 1. The State Democratic Executive Committee shall con- 
sist of twelve members, six men and six women, from each Congres- 
sional District in the State, who shall be elected at the State Con- 
vention by the delegates from the several Congressional Districts. 

Sec. 2. That, as early as practicable after each State Convention, 
the chairman shall call the State Democratic Executive Committee 
to meet for the purpose of electing a chairman and a vice chair- 
man, who shall be a woman, both of whom shall serve for a term of 
two years, and until their successors shall be elected. 

Sec. 3. That the chairman of the State Democratic Executive 
Committee shall as early as practicable after his election, appoint 
his advisory or campaign committee, consisting of not less than five 
or more than twenty, and a secretary of the State Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committee. 

Sec. 4. The Congressional Democratic Executive Committee for 
each disti'ict in the State shall consist of one member from each 
county in said district, who shall be elected at the State Convention 
by the delegates from the several counties of the district. 

Sec. 5. The Judicial Democratic Executive Committee for each 
district in the State shall consist of a member from each county in 
said district, who shall be elected at the State Convention by the 
delegates from the several counties of the district. 

Sec. 6. The State Senatorial Executive Committees for each dis- 
trict in the State which comprises more than one county shall con- 
sist of one member from each county in said districts, who shall 
be elected at the State Convention by the delegates from the several 
counties of the district. In districts composed of only one county 
the Executive Committee of said county shall have jurisdiction as 
in the matter of county candidates. 

Sec. 7. It shall be the duty of the chairman of the State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee within twenty days after the State Con- 
vention to designate one member as chairman and one member as 

[134] 



Plan of Organization 135 

secretary for each of the Executive Committees provided for in the 
three foregoing sections. He shall notify the members so selected 
of their appointment and in case any member shall fail or decline 
to accept such appointment he shall appoint some other member 
in his stead. 

Sec. 8. All Democratic Executive Committees shall meet at such 
times and places as the chairman of the respective committees may 
appoint and designate in his call. If for any reason there should 
occur a vacancy in the chairmanship of any Executive Committee by 
death, resignation, or removal, or if such chairman should be in- 
capacitated, or should fail or refuse to act, the vice chairman or 
secretary, w^hichever in the order of succession as herein provided 
is acting as Chairman, shall call a meeting of said Executive Com- 
mittee for the purpose of electing a successor to said chairman. If 
no meeting be called within five days after such vancancy occurs, 
then any other officer of said Executive Committee, or any three 
members thereof, may act to call a meeting to fill said vacancy. 

Sec. 9. All officers of Executive Committee and the President of 
the Young Democratic Clubs of North Carolina shall be ex officio 
members of the Committee, with the power to vote. 

Sec. 10. All Executive Committees shall have the power to ap- 
point subcommittees or special committees for such purposes and 
with such powers, in their respective jurisdictions, as may be 
i deemed necessary or desirable. 

Sec. 11. In each election year the chairman of the State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee shall convene said committee in the 
City of Raleigh on or before the 10th day of March, and at said 
meeting the following business shall be transacted: 

(a) The time and place of holding the State Convention shall be 
determined and duly published. 

(b) A common day shall be fixed, on which all precinct meetings 
shall be held for the election of delegates to the County Conventions. 

(c) A common day shall be fixed for the holding of a County Con- 
vention in each County in the State for the purpose of electing dele- 
gates to the State Convention. 

Sec. 12. Immediately upon the adjournment of the said State 
Democratic Executive Committee it shall be the duty of the chair- 
man of said committee to publish the proceedings of the same 
and of the secretary thereof to notify, in writing, the several 



136 North Carolina Manual 

chaii'men of the County Democratic Executive Committees in the 
State of the respective dates so fixed for the holding of precinct 
meetings and County Conventions. Upon the receipt of such notice 
it shall be the duty of the chairman of the County Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committees in the State to call meetings of their respective 
County Democratic Executive Committees on a day to be named 
by him, not exceeding fifteen days after the receipt by him of said 
notice. 

County and Precinct Organization 

Sec. 13. The Unit of County organization shall be the voting pre- 
cinct. In each precinct there shall be an Executive Committee, to 
consist of five active Democrats, who shall be elected by the Demo- 
cratic voters at the several precinct meetings or primary elections 
or county conventions in mass, called by the County Executive 
Committee, as hereinafter provided for the nomination of candi- 
dates for legislative, county and township offices. And said com- 
mittee so elected shall elect one of its members as Chairman, who 
shall preside at all committee meetings. At least one woman shall 
be elected to membership on each precinct executive committee. 
Each such committee shall have a vice chairman, and either the 
chairman or the vice chairman shall be a woman. 

Sec. 14. The Chairman of the several precinct committees shall 
compose the County Executive Committee, which shall meet at the 
same time and place as the County Convention first held in each 
election year, and elect a Chairman who shall hold his office until 
his successor shall be elected. Said County Executive Committee 
shall immediately after the election of a Chairman, elect one or 
more Vice Chairmen, the first of which shall be a woman, and if 
more than one Vice Chairman, the order of their succession shall be 
designated, and a Secretary. Said Chairman, Vice Chairman or 
Vice Chairmen, or Secretary, need not be members of the County 
Executive Committee. If, for any reason there should occur any 
vacancy in the Chairmanship of a County Executive Committee, by 
death, resignation, or removal, or if such Chairman should be in- 
capacitated or should fail or refuse to act, then the Vice Chairman 
or Vice Chairmen, in their order of succession, and thereafter the 
Secretary, shall, in such order of succession, be vested with the full 
authority and power of the Chairfnan until such time as said 



PLA^f OF Organization 137 

County Executive Committee has met and duly elected a successor 
to such 'Chairman. A majority of said Precinct Chairmen, in per- 
son or by proxy in the person of some active Democrat of the Pre- 
cinct in which an absent Chairman resides, shall constitute a 
quorum. The County Executive Committee may appoint a central 
committee of five who shall act in its stead when the County Ex- 
ecutive Committee is not in session. 

Sec. 14-A. Any County Chairman of a County Executive Com- 
mittee, who announces his candidacy for any elective office in the 
Primary, shall immediately resign his office as Chairman and the 
same shall be filled as hereinbefore provided. 

Sec. 15. In case there shall be a failure on the part of any pre- 
cinct to elect its Ex^ecutive Committee for a period of thirty days, 
the County Executive Committee shall appoint said committee from 
the Democratic voters of said precinct. 

Sec. 16. The State Democratic Executive Committee shall have 
the power to fill all vacancies occurring in said committee; vacancies 
occurring in Congressional, Judicial and Senatorial Committees 
shall be filled by the Executive Committee of the county in which 
said vacancy occurs; precinct committees shall fill all vacancies 
occurring in their respective committee. 

Delegates to Conventions — County and State 

Sec. 17. The State Convention shall be composed of delegates 
appointed by the several County Conventions. Each county in the 
State shall be entitled to elect to the State Convention one delegate 
and one alternate for every 150 Democratic votes and one delegate 
and one alternate for fractions over 75 Democratic votes cast 
therein for Governor at the last preceding gubernatorial election. 

Sec. 18. All County Conventions shall be called to order by the 
chairman of the Executive Committee of such county, and in his 
absence, by any member of the Executive Committee who may be 
present at the convention, and in case neither the chairman nor a 
member of the Executive Committee is present, then by any dele- 
gate to said convention, and he shall preside until a permanent 
chairman is elected by the convention. 



138 North Carolina Manual 

State Convention Rules 

Sec. 19. A preliminary meeting of the delegates shall be held by 
each Congressional District on the morning of the State Convention, 
at rooms to be designated by the State Executive Committee, for the 
purpose of selecting the following committees and officers of the 
convention : 

1. One member of the Committee on Credentials and Appeals. 

2. One member of the Committee on Permanent Organiaztion, 
Rules, and Order of Business, v^rhich committee will nominate a 
permanent president and secretary of the convention. 

3. One vice president of the convention. 

4. One district assistant secretary. 

5. One member of the Committee on Resolutions and Platform. 

6. Twelve members of the State Democratic Executive Commit- 
tee. 

7. One member for each county of the Congressional, Judicial, 
and Senatorial Executive Committees. 

Sec. 20. Such delegates (or alternates of absent delegates) as 
may be present at any Democratic Convention shall be allowed to 
cast the whole vote to which their precinct or county may be en- 
titled. 

Sec. 21. In all conventions provided for by this plan, after a 
vote is cast, there shall be no change in such vote until the final re- 
sult of the ballot shall be announced by the chairman of said con- 
vention. 

Sec. 22. The chairman of the different county conventions shall 
certify the list of delegates and alternates to the State Convention, 
and a certified list of said delegates and alternates to the secretary 
of the State Executive Committee. 

Sec. 23. The secretary of the State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee shall make up a roll of all delegates and alternates from 
the several counties and transmit the same to the chairman of the 
State Convention. 

Sec. 24. In all conventions a nomination may be made by any 
majority, even though it be a fraction of a vote. 

Sec. 25. In all State Conventions it shall be the duty of the dele- 
gates from the several counties to choose one of their number chair- 



Plan of Organization 139 

man, whose name shall be reported to the president of such conven- 
tion, and whose duty it shall be to cast the vote of his county as 
directed, and the vote as announced by him shall be recorded unless 
some delegate from that county challenge its accuracy, in which 
event it shall be the duty of the president of the convention to cause 
the roll of delegates from that county to be called, when the vote of 
such county shall be tabulated and recorded according to the re- 
sponse of its delegates; but in no event shall the vote of one county 
be challenged by a delegate from another county. 

Nomination of Candidates for House of Representatives, Coun- 
ty AND Township Officers in Counties Not Under Primary Law 

Sec. 26. In all counties in which the selection of candidates for 
members of the House of Representatives and county and township 
offices is not provided for by law, nominations shall be made in the 
following manner: The County Democratic Executive Committee, on 
the day of the county convention hereinbefore provided for, shall 
meet and set a date on which a county convention for the nomination 
of candidates for such offices shall be held, and at such meeting said 
Executive Committee shall determine upon a plan for nominating 
such candidates and may select either of the following methods: 

1. By precinct meetings. 

2. By primary elections. 

3. By county conventions (in mass). 

Provided, that unless the said committee shall adopt one of the 
three plans the first or precinct meeting plan shall be followed. 

Rotation of State Senators in Districts Composed of More 

Than One County 

Sec. 26-A. That in all State Senatorial Districts composed of 
more than one County, in which it has been the custom to concede 
the right to nominate a Senator to one County of the district, by a 
plan of rotation or otherwise, and in which such plan was followed 
in the Primary Election of 1936, the same shall remain in full force 
and effect until terminated as herein provided. 

The Executive Committees of the several counties composing 
such Senatorial District may hereafter adopt a plan for the nomina- 



140 North Carolina Manual 

tion of candidates for the State Senate by one or more counties 
composing such district, but such plan shall not be effective until 
the Executive Committee of each of the counties composing the 
district shall, by a majority vote, approve such plan and file with 
the Chairman of the State Executive Committee a copy of the reso- 
lution approving the same. The agreement in any Senatorial dis- 
trict composed of only two counties may be terminated by a ma- 
jority vote of the County Executive Committee of any one of the 
counties and in districts of more than two counties by a majority 
vote of each of the Executive Committees of at least two counties, 
pi'ovided that notice of the termination of such agreement must be 
filed with the Chairman of the State Executive Committee at least 
120 days in advance of the date of the primary election at which 
the candidates for the General Assembly are to be nominated. The 
Chairman of the State Executive Committee shall promptly notify 
the State Board of Elections of all such agreements and of the 
termination thereof. 

First Method — Precinct Meetings 

Sec. 27. If at the meeting of the County Democratic Executive 
Committee, as herein required, it shall be determined by a majority 
of the full committee, proxies not counted, to nominate candidates 
by delegates chosen at the precinct meeting, then the precinct meet- 
ing shall be held under the following rules and regulations. 

Sec. 28. At the meeting held in each precinct in pursuance to 
said notice, delegates and alternates to represent it in the County 
Convention shall be elected from the body of the Democratic voters 
of the precinct; and said delegates or alternates, or such of them 
as shall attend the County Convention shall be entitled to vote the 
full Democratic strength of their precinct in the nomination of can- 
didates and upon all questions which may come before said County 
Convention. 

If there is a failure to hold a precinct meeting in pursuance of 
said notice, or if said meeting shall fail to elect delegates to repre- 
sent it in said convention, the precinct executive committee shall ap- 
point delegates and alternates from the Democratic voters of the 
precinct. 

At every precinct meeting there shall, if requested, be a vote 
taken for the different candidates for office whose names may be 



Plan of Organization 141 

presented, and the delegates shall vote in the County Convention 
of their respective counties in accordance with this vote; that is 
to say, each candidate shall receive in the County Convention that 
proportion of the vote to which the precinct may be entitled which 
he received in the precinct meeting, and the vote received by any 
candidate in the precinct meeting shall not be changed unless by a 
two-thirds vote of the delegates representing said candidates from 
said precinct. The chairman or presiding officer and secretary of 
the precinct meeting shall certify to the County Convention the vote 
received by each candidate at the precinct meeting, together with the 
names of delegates and alternates selected by said meeting. 

Sec. 29. Each precinct shall be entitled to cast in the County 
Convention one vote for every 25 Democratic votes, and one vote for 
fractions over 12 Democratic votes cast by the precinct for Gov- 
ernor at the last preceding gubernatorial election: Provided that 
every precinct shall be entitled to cast at least one vote in the County 
Convention, and each precinct may appoint as many delegates to 
said convention as it may see fit, not exceeding three delegates and 
three alternates for each vote to which said precinct may be en- 
titled in the County Convention. 

Sec. 30. The Chairman of the Precinct Jgxecutive Committee 
shall preside at all precinct meetings; but in the absence of the 
chairman of said committee, any other member thereof may pre- 
side. 

Sec. 31. The County Executive Committee shall have power to 
make any rules with regard to holding precinct meetings which it 
may deem proper, not inconsistent with the rules prescribed in this 
plan; it shall be the duty of said committee to prepare and furnish 
all forms and blanks needed in making the returns from said pre- 
cinct meeting, and any reported challenges and appeals therefrom; 
and it shall have the power to raise the funds necessary to pay the 
expenses thereof. 

Second Method — Primary Elections 

Sec. 32. If at the meeting of the County Democratic Executive 
Committee, provided for in this plan of organization, it shall be 
determined by a majority of the full committee, proxies not counted, 
to nominate candidates by direct primary election and select dele- 
gates to the County Convention then the same shall be held under 
the following rules and regulations : 



142 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 33. At all primary elections held under this plan the coun- 
ty shall be the unit and the total vote cast throughout the county 
shall control the nomination. 

Sec. 34. At least five days preceding such primary election every 
person desiring to become a candidate for any county, township, or 
legislative office shall signify his intention, in writing, to the Chair- 
man of the County Democratic Executive Committee, and at the 
same time shall deposit such fee as the said chairman may deter- 
mine to be his pro rata part of the expense of printing and dis- 
tributing proper tickets; and every such person shall also sub- 
scribe to a pledge that he will abide by the result of the primary 
election and support the successful candidate or candidates chosen 
in said primary election. 

Sec. 35. When a primary election under this plan shall be or- 
dered, notice thereof, giving the date and the various balloting 
places, and the names of the persons appointed to hold the same, 
shall be published in the Democratic press of said county and copies 
posted at three places in each precinct or township, and such other 
notice given as the County Executive Committee may think proper, 
which notice shall not in any case be less than twenty days. In 
such primary election the County Executive Committee shall desig- 
nate the places where voting shall be had, and they shall select, 
as far as practicable, the places provided by law for holding the 
general State elections. They may, however, select other places if 
the convenience of Democratic voters justifies such change, but 
there shall be at least one voting place in each precinct. 

Sec. 36. For the purpose of holding such primary election, the 
said committee shall appoint three well-known Democratic electors 
of intelligence and reputation for honesty and fair dealing for each 
precinct or other voting district in the county, one of whom shall 
be the secretary and record the names of all the persons voting, 
who shall conduct such election, receive the ballots, count them, 
declare the result and make a written statement thereof. If any 
person appointed to hold a primary election shall decline to serve, 
become incapacitated, or become a candidate before said primary, 
the chairman of the Executive Committee of that township or pre- 
cinct shall have power to designate some qualified Democrat to fill 
such place; and if the chairman of the committee shall not be pres- 
ent, then the remaining poll-holders may designate some person to 



Plan of Organization 143 

assist them in holding the same, and such substituted person shall 
have the same right and authority therein as if he had been origin- 
ally appointed by the County Executive Committee. 

Sec. 37. The said poll-holders shall provide such boxes for the 
reception of ballots as may be necessary, but there shall be sep- 
arate boxes for the following classes of candidates, to wit: Candi- 
dates for General Assembly and all county offices in one box; all 
township officers in one box; the Township Executive Committee 
in one box and the delegates to the County Convention in one box. 
The hours for holding such primary election shall be as follows: 
From 10 o'clock a.m. to 5 o'clock p.m.; Provided, that the County 
Executive Committee may designate other hours within which said 
primary election may be held; but in no case shall the time for 
holding such election be less than four hours. 

Sec. 38. Any Democratic candidate who is voted for in said pri- 
mary election may attend the same, in person or by representatives, 
and be present during the conduct of said election and counting the 
vote. Every Democratic elector shall have the right to vote at his 
proper polling place, and in case the vote of a man claiming to be 
a Democratic elector is challenged on the ground that he is not 
qualified as an elector, and will not be on election day, or is not a 
Democrat, he shall not be denied the privilege of voting except by 
the judgment of a majority of the poll-holders. Every challenge 
shall be recorded, and any candidate or his representative dissatis- 
fied with the result shall have the right to appeal to the County 
Convention, and the County Convention shall hear the same and 
allow or disallow the vote, and shall amend the returns from that 
precinct in accordance with its judgment. 

Sec. 39. At the close of the voting it shall be the duty of the 
pollholders, in the pi'esence of such candidates or their representa- 
tives and any Democrat who wishes to attend, to proceed at once 
to count the ballots and make a list of all persons voted for and the 
offices for which they were voted, and the number of votes received 
by each, and they shall sign such list and send the same immediately 
to the chairman of the County Executive Committee, who shall 
transmit the same to the chairman of the County Convention. They 
shall give any candidate or his representative, upon his request, a 
copy of the said list, and they shall also give to the chairman of the 
County Executive Committee a statement of the number of chal- 



state Congress!) 




nal Districts 




146 North Carolina Manual 

lenges allowed or disallowed, and how said challenged voter voted 
or how he offered to vote when challenged. They shall also preserve 
the list of voters or poll-books, the tally-sheets, and the tickets 
until after the County Convention. 

Sec. 40. At the meeting of the County Convention following the 
holding of such primary election, the said convention shall ascer-- 
tain and declare the result of the said primary election. All can- 
didates for county and legislative offices and all delegates and com- 
mitteemen receiving a majority of the votes cast in such primary 
election shall be declared the nominees of the party for said offices : 
Provided, that at the time the primary election is called the County 
Executive Committee shall prescribe the rules and regulations for 
a second primary election, if one shall be deemed necessary. 

Sec. 41. It shall be the duty of the chairman of the County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee to prepare all tickets for county and 
legislative offices, and distribute them. All names voted for in the 
same box shall be printed on one ticket, and the ballot shall be 
checked with a cross mark opposite the name or names the elector 
wishes to vote for, or the names which he does not wish to vote for 
shall be stricken out. If more names are voted for than is proper 
for any office, the said ticket for such office shall not be counted. 

Sec. 42. The County Democratic Executive Committee may, at 
its discretion, order a registration of all Democratic electors for 
each precinct in any town or city in said county having a popula- 
tion of 3,000 or over, by giving the same notice and complying with 
the regulations prescribed by law for the registration of voters at 
general elections, as nearly as may be practicable. 

Sec. 43. The County Executive Committee shall have the right 
to make any rules with regard to holding primary elections which it 
may deem proper, not inconsistent with the rules prescribed in this 
plan. It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee to prepare 
and furnish all blanks and forms needed in making the returns 
from said primary elections, and any reported challenges and ap- 
peals therefrom. It shall have power to provide for raising the 
funds necessary to pay the expenses thereof. 

Third Method — County Convention (In Mass) 

Sec. 44. If at the meeting of the County Democratic Executive 
Committee it shall be determined, by a majority of the full commit- 



Plan of Organization 147 

tee, to nominate candidates for county and legislative offices, or 
either of them, by a convention of all Democratic electors in said 
county, then the said convention, in mass, shall be held under the 
following rules and regulations: 

Sec. 45. The chairman of the County Executive Committee shall 
give at least twenty days' notice of such convention in the Demo- 
cratic press and by posters at the courthouse door and three public 
places in each precinct or township. 

Sec. 46. In such convention the voting strength of each precinct 
or township shall be preserved as a unit, and all Democratic electors 
present from any precinct or township shall segregate themselves 
from the rest of the convention and express their choice for the 
several candidates and delegates by count or ballot, as may be 
deemed most practicable, and the vote of such precinct or township 
shall be cast accordingly. 

Sec. 47. The chairman shall provide the convention with a suffi- 
cient number of secretaries or ready accountants, who shall reduce 
the votes to decimals and tabulate the same, disregarding all frac- 
tions after the second or hundredth column. 

Sec. 48. Nothing herein contained shall prevent the convention 
from making nomination by viva voce or acclamation where a vote 
by township or precinct is not demanded by any Democratic elector 
present. 

Sec. 49. The County Democratic Executive Committee shall have 
the power to make such other rules and regulations for the holding 
of county conventions in mass, not inconsistent herewith, as may 
be deemed necessary or expedient. 

Appointment of Democratic Members of County 
Board of Elections 

Sec. 49-A. The Chairman of the Democratic Executive Commit- 
tee in each county shall, before submitting to the State Chairman, 
recommendations as to Democratic members of the County Board 
of Elections in such County, call a meeting of the Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the County and submit such recommendations 
for the approval of the Executive Committee, and only when such 
recommendations are approved by a majority of the Committee 
present, shall same be submitted to the State Chairman by the 



148 North Carolina Manual 

County Chairmen. The time of such meeting of the respective 
County Executive Committees for the purpose of passing on such 
recommendations shall be fixed by the State Chairman. 

Miscellaneous Provisions 

Sec. 50. In the several counties of the State where primaries 
are provided for by law, whether optional or mandatory, this plan 
of organization shall nevertheless be followed in all matters not 
inconsistent with such laws. 

Sec. 51. In the nomination of candidates for municipal offices to 
be voted for in the town and city elections, where the same is not 
controlled by charter, or legislative enactment, the Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committee of such town or city shall by a majority vote of 
the full committee, determine whether to hold precinct meetings, 
a primary election, or mass conventions under the appropriate rules 
and regulations prescribed in this plan of organization for the 
same. 

Sec. 52. In the event of a vacancy occurring after the nomina- 
tion of a candidate and before the election, the State committee or 
the district committee for which such vacancy occurs shall fill said 
vacancy except in cases where there is more than one candidate 
for the office, and in such cases the proper committee shall determine 
the manner in which such vacancy shall be filled. 

Sec. 53. The right of appeal shall lie from any subordinate com- 
mittee or convention to the committee or convention next superior 
thereto, and in all County or State Conventions appeals shall be 
first referred to the Committee on Credentials and Appeals, or a 
special committee, provided by the convention, and the findings and 
reports of such committee had before action thereon by the con- 
vention. 

Sec. 54. It shall be the duty of the County Executive Commit- 
tees and their chairmen to make such reports and furnish such in- 
formation to the chairman of the State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee and chairman of the several district committees as the said 
State and district chairmen may desire. 

Sec. 55. It shall be the duty of every precinct Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committee in the State, for the use of the county, district, 
and State chairman, to make, or cause to be made, not later than 



Plan of Organization 149 

October 15th in each election yeai', a complete poll of all qualified 
voters in its precinct. This shall be furnished to the county chair- 
man, and he shall tabulate the same and transmit without delay 
copies thereof to the district and State chairmen. 

Amendments to Plan of Organization 

Sec. 56. The State Democratic Executive Committee shall, by a 
majority vote of the full committee, have power to amend this plan 
of organization. 

The foregoing is the plan of organization of the Democratic Party 
of North Carolina as adopted by the State Democratic Executive 
Committee, at a meeting held in the City of Raleigh on the 5th day 
of March, 1918, together with all amendments thereto up to and in- 
cluding a special meeting of said committee held in the City of 
Raleigh on July 30, 1937. 

William B. Umstead, Chairman. 



COMMITTEES OF THE STATE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

(From list furnished by Secretary, State Democratic Executive 

Committee) 

State Democratic Executive Committee 

1944 

OFFICERS 

Chairman William B. Umstead Durham 

Vice Chairman Mrs. B. B. Everett Palmyra 

Secretary LeRoy Martin Raleigh 

COMMITTEES 

First District 

Beaufort E. A. Daniel Washington 

Beaufort Miss Elizabeth Warren Washington 

Currituck Mrs. Dudley W. Bagley Moyock 

Gates r. Miss Ethel Parker Gatesville 

Hertford J. Carlton Cherry Ahoskie 

Martin Hugh G. Horton Williamston 

Pasquotank John H. Hall Elizabeth City 

Perquimans Charles Whedbee Hertford 

Pitt Dr. Paul E. Jones Farmville 

Pitt Mrs. W. I. Bissette Grifton 

Tyrrell E. Earl Cohoon Columbia 

Washington Carl L. Bailey Plymouth 

Second District 

Bertie W. V. Hoggard Aulander 

Edgecombe Henry Bourne Tarboro 

Edgecombe Mrs. Sally Mary Shore '. Rocky Mount 

Greene Maynard Hicks Snow Hill 

Halifax Waldo Whitaker Enfield 

Halifax Mrs. R. C. Josey, Jr Scotland Neck 

Lenoir S. C. Sitterson Kinston 

Northampton H. R. Harris Seaboard 

Northampton Mi-s. Sallie C. Parker Jackson 

Warren Mrs. W. D. Rodgers Warrenton 

Wilson Mrs. W. A. Lucas Wilson 

Wilson T. B. Ward Wilson 

Third District 

Carteret Capt. J. A. Nelson Morehead City 

Craven Henry P. Whitehurst New Bern 

Duplin Mrs. G. V. Gooding Kenansville 

Duplin R. D. Johnson Warsaw 

Jones W. M. Whitaker Trenton 

Onslow John D. Warlick Jacksonville 

Pamlico T. B. Woodai'd Stonewall 

Pender Clifton L. Moore Burgaw 

Sampson A. McL. Graham Clinton 

Sampson Miss Juanita Butler Roseboro 

[150] 



State Committees, Democratic 151 



Wayne J. Faison Thomson Goldsboro 

Wayne Mrs. Martha Gold Borden Goldsboro 

Fourth District 

Chatham Walter D. Siler Siler City 

Franklin E. H. Malone Louisburg 

Franklin Mrs. B. T. Hilden Louisburg 

Johnston Mrs. Hugh A. Page Clayton 

Johnston Ira Ford Smithfield 

Nash O. B. Moss Spring Hope 

Nash Miss Bessie Bunn Rocky Mount R.F.D. 

Randolph Mrs. George Burkhead Asheboro 

Randolph D. B. McCrary Asheboro 

Vance Mrs. D. D. Hocutt Henderson 

Wake L. S. Brassfield Raleigh 

Wake Mrs. Jessie D. Mills Raleigh 

Fifth District 

Caswell Joseph H. Warren Prospect Hill 

Forsyth Virgil A. Wilson Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Gilbert L. Shermer Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Elsie Flake Winston-Salem 

Granville Mrs. D. G. Brummitt Oxford 

Granville T. G. Stem, Sr Oxford 

Person Claude T. Hall Woodsdale 

Rockingham J. C. Brown Madison 

Rockingham J. Hoyte Stulty Leaksville-Spray 

Stokes S. P. Christian Danbury 

Surry W. M. Allen Elkin 

Surry Mrs. Raymond Smith Mt. Airy 

Sixth District 

Alamance A. M. Carroll Burlington 

Alamance H. J. Rhodes Burlington 

Alamance Mrs. J. H. Vernon, Sr Burlington 

Durham R. P- Reade Durham 

Durham J. R- Patton Durham 

Durham R. H. Sykes Durham 

Guilford L. J. Fisher High Point 

Guilford Mrs. Lynn Hunt Pleasant Garden 

Guilford Ben T. Ward Greensboro 

Orange A. H. Graham Hillsboro 

Orange O. S. Robertson Hillsboro 

Orange..!..!...! J. W. Umstead Chapel Hill 

Seventh District 

Bladen J. A. Bridgers Bladenboro 

Bladen E. T. McColluck Elizabethtown 

Brunswick W. S. Wells Southport 

Brunswick Mrs. Lacey Bennett Ash 

Columbus R- J- Lamb Whiteville 

Columbus Mrs. Sallie Horton Whitevillo 

Harnett Earl M. Westbrook Dunn 

Harnett • Mrs. Neal Salmon Lillington 

New Hanover R- M. Kermon Wilmington 

New Hanover Mrs. W. B. Campbell Wilmington 

Robeson Cutler Moore Lumberton 

Robeson.!!!!! Mrs. J. H. Johnson Barnsville 

Eighth District 

Anson James A. Hardison Wadcsboro 

Davidson !!!.!.! Dr. W. B. Hunt Lexington 



152 North Carolina Manual 



Davie. C. E. Bost Cooleemee 

Hoke J. B. Thomas Raeford 

Lee W. R. Williams Sanford 

Montgomery Paul C. Clark Candor 

Moore S. R. Ransdell Pinehurst 

Richmond J. C. Sedberry Rockingham 

Scotland Thomas J. Gill, Jr Laurinburg 

Union H. B. Smith Monroe 

Wilkes J. R. Rousseau North Wilkesboro 

Yadkin David L. Kelly Yadkinville 

Ninth District 

Alexander Dr. Asa Thurston Taylorsville 

Alleghany Floyd Crouse Sparta 

Ashe Ira T. Johnson Jefferson 

Cabarrus G. C. Maulden Concora 

Cabarrus Mrs. W. A. Foil Concora 

Iredell C. D. Stevenson StatesvilJi. 

Iredell J. Neely Kincaid Statesville 

Caldwell V. D. Guire Lenoii 

Rowan Walter H. Woodson, Sr Salisbury 

Rowan W. C. Coughenour Salisbury 

Stanly W. E. Smith Albemarle 

Stanly R. R. Ingram Albemarle 

Watauga Mrs. Mae Miller Boone 

Tenth District 

Avery R. T. Lewis Minneapolis 

Avery Mrs. Dorothy H. Burleson Elk Park 

Burke W. C. Hudson Morganton 

Burke Mrs. Yates Palmer Valdese 

Catawba D. S. Menzies Hickory 

Catawba Mrs. A. L. Shuford Hickory 

Lincoln M. T. Leatherman Lincolnton 

Lincoln Mrs. Ransom Killian Lincolnton 

Mecklenburg Thomas W. Byrd Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Mrs. Walter Craven Charlotte 

Mitchell C. I. Yelton Bakersville 

Mitchell Clara R. Hensley Bakersville 

Eleventh District 

Cleveland O. M. Mull Shelby 

Cleveland Mrs. George Ray Shelby 

Cleveland Joe Neisler Kings Mountain 

Gaston B. B. Gardner Gastonia 

Gaston H. B. Gaston Gastonia 

Gaston Mrs. W. L. Robinson Gastonia 

Madison Mrs. Guy V. Rhodes Marshall 

McDowell Robert W, Proctor '.Marion 

Polk F. P. Bacon Tryon 

Rutherford C. O. Ridings Forest City 

Rutherford T. Max Watson Forest City 

Yancey Mrs. Charles Hutchins Burnsville 

Twelfth District 

Buncombe E. C. Greene Asheville 

Buncombe Mrs. Ruth Goodson (Mrs. W. A.) Asheville 

Buncombe Brandon P. Hodges Asheville 

Cherokee P. B. Ferebee Andrews 

Clay Allen J. Bell Hayesville 

Graham R. L. Phillips Robblnsville 

Haywood Clifford Brown Clyde 

Henderson H. E. Buchanan Hendersonville 



State Committees, Democratic 153 



Jackson .- Daniel K. Moore Sylva 

Macon Mrs. George Patton Franklin 

Swain Baxter C. Jones Bryson City 

Transylvania A. H. Harris (Resigned) (successor Brevard 

not yet elected) 

EX OFFICIO 

President, Young Democratic 

Clubs of N. C Henrietta Price Asheville 

National Committeeman Wilkins P. Horton . Pittsboro 

National Committeewoman Miss Beatrice Cobb Morganton 



154 North Carolina Manual 

State Democratic Congressional District 
Executive Committees 
1944 

First District 

Beaufort 1 H. C. Carter Washington 

Camden L. S. Leary Camden 

Chowan John W. Graham Edenton 

Currituck S. A. Walker \ Snowden 

L>are Roy L. Davis Manteo 

Gates , L. C. Hand Gatesville 

Hertford R. H. Underwood Murfreesboro 

Hyde M. A. Matthews Engelhard 

J^artin A. E. James Williamston 

Pasquotank J. B. Flora Elizabeth City 

Perquimans J. E. Winslow Hertford 

Pitt W. I. Bissette Grifton 

Tyrrell W. J. White Columbia 

Washington W. R. Hampton Plymouth 

Second District 

Bertie Will S. Pritchard Windsor 

Edgecombe Robert Lee Corbett Macclesfield 

Greene ." Mark Lassiter Snow Hill 

Halifax A. J. Jones, Jr Weldon 

Lenoir Matt Allen .Kinston 

Northampton Eric Norfleet Jackson 

Warren R. W. Thornton Warrenton 

Wilson W. N. Harrell Wilson 

Third District 

Carteret W. H. Bell Newport 

Craven Jasper Witherington New Bern 

Duplin Jerry O. Smith Kenansville 

Jones Geo. R. Hughes Trenton 

Onslow Geo. Phillips Jacksonville 

Pender R. Grady Johnson Burgaw-Raleigh 

Pamlico E. S. Askew Oriental 

Sampson W. G. King ...Clinton 

Wayne Dr. C. H. Rand Fremont 

Fourth District 

Chatham W. H. Scott Chapel Hill No. 3 

Franklin W. L. Lumpkin Louisburg 

Johnston F. H. Brooks Smithfield 

Nash . O. B. Taylor Spring Hope 

Randolph T. Lynwood Smith Asheboro 

Vance Mrs. B. A. Scott Henderson 

Wake P. H. Busbee Raleigh 

Fifth District 

CasweU W. C. Taylor Blanche 

^orsyth Sam Welfare Winston-Salem 

Granville B. S. Royster Oxford 

Person..^ j. s. Merritt Roxboro 

Rockingham James Hairston Reidsville 

Ito'^es H. E. Pepper Danbury 

Surry Arthur P. Fulk Mt. Airy 

Sixth District 

Alamance j. Dolph Long Graham 

Durham r. m. Gantt Durham 



State Committees, Democratic 155 



Guilford J. Frank Hart Greensboro 

Orange O. J. Coffin Chapel Hill 

Seventh District 

Bladen J. A. Bridgers Bladcnboro 

Brunswick S. B. Fink Southport 

Columbus J. K. Powell Whiteville 

Cumberland Aleaxnder McNeill Fayettevillo 

Harnett P. A. Lee Dunn 

New Hanover J. A. Hobbs Wilmington 

Robeson E. M. Johnson Lumberton 

Eighth District 

Anson F. E. Liles Wadesboro 

Davidson George L. Hundley Thomasville 

Davie Jacob Stewart Mocksville 

Hoke Ryan McBryde Raeford 

Lee W. Glenn Edwards Sanford 

Montgomery W. J. Batten Mt. Gilead 

Moore H. Clifton Blue Aberdeen 

Richmond I. S. London Rockingham 

Scotland Dr. J. G. Pate Gibson 

Union R. P. Stegall Marshville 

Wilkes C. B. EUer North Wilkesboro 

Yadkin G. C. Wallace Hamptonville 

Ninth District 

Alexander Sloan Payne Taylorsville 

Alleghany W. F. Osborne Sparta 

Ashe Dr. B. E. Reeves Jefferson 

Cabarrus J. G. Lowe Concord 

Caldwell E. F. Allen Lenoir 

Iredell D. E. Turner Moorosville 

Rowan W. D. Kizziah Salisbury 

Stanly J. Boger Little Albemarle 

Watauga P. O. Brewer Boone 

Tenth District 

Avery Stella H. Lowe Newland 

Burke A. P. Causby Morganton 

Catawba Wade H. Lefler Hickory 

Lincoln Thomas E. Rhodes Lincolnton 

Mecklenburg Joe E. Blythe Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Mrs. W. C. Mitchoms Charlotte 

Mitchell V. D. Hensley Bakersville 

Eleventh District 

Cleveland J- W. Osborne Shelby 

Gaston F. H. Cunningham Gastonia 

Madison Robert Johnson Walnut 

McDowell J. G. Neal ^ Marion 

Polk .. E. B. Cloud Columbus 

Rutherford Z.'Z Charles Z. Flack Forest City 

Yancey Phillip Hensley Bald Creek 

Twelfth District 

Buncombe J- Y. Jordan Ashevillo 



p 



Cherokee.//.'.//.'.'.r.'.'.'.'Z Mrs. Giles W. Cover ^Murphy 

Clay Clarence Davis Hnyosvillo 

Graham ■.■.■.■.■.■■.' R- B. Slaughter Robbinsvijjo 

Haywood H. Arthur Osborne Wnyn.-svi c 

Henderson Guy P. Jordan Hendersonvjlle 

Jackson Raymond Sutton.. Svlva 

Macon R- S. Jones Frnnklin 

o^l^n E. B. Whitaker Bryson City 

Transylvania::;::::":::":: Charles Y. Patten Brevard 



156 North Carolina Manual 

State Democratic Judicial District Executive 

Committees 
1944 

EASTERN DIVISION 
First District 

Beaufort W. B. Rodman Washington 

Camden J. C. Ethridge South Mills 

Chowan R. C. Holland Edenton 

Currituck Chester Harris Currituck 

Dare C. S. Meekins Manteo 

Hyde J. H. Jarvis Englehard 

Gates F. H. Rountree Sunbury 

Pasquotank W. W. Cahoon Elizabeth City 

Perquimans Chas. E. Johnson Hertford 

Tyrrell A. L. Walker Columbia 

Second District 

Edgecombe Geo. M. Fountain Rocky Mount 

Martin J. C. Smith RobersonviUe 

Nash J. N. Sills Nashville 

Washington W. R. Gaylord Plymouth 

Wilson Larry I. Moore Wilson 

Third District 

Bertie Ernest R. Tyler Eoxobel 

Halifax R. L. Applewhite Halifax 

Hertford Alvin J. Eley Ahoskie 

Northampton W. H. S. Burgwyn, Jr Woodland 

Vance J. M. Peace Henderson 

Warren John Kerr, Jr Warrenton 

Fourth District 

Chatham J. B. Ingles Siler City 

Harnett F. H. Taylor Lillington 

Johnston A. M. Noble Smithfield 

Lee D. B. Teague Sanford 

Wayne T. Nelson Ricks Mt. Olive 

Fifth District 

Carteret A. L. Hamilton Morehead City 

Craven D. L. Ward New Bern 

Greene K. A. Pittman Snow Hill 

Jones John D. Larkins, Jr Trenton 

Pamlico Tom Spencer Bayboro 

Pitt J. H. Harrell Greenville 

Sixth District 

Duplin E. W. Stevens Kennansville 

Lenoir Geo. B. Green Kinston 

Onslow J. B. Murrell Jacksonville 

Sampson H. H. Hubbard Clinton 

Seventh District 

Franklin Arthur Strickland Franklinton 

Wake R. N. Simms, Jr Raleigh 

Eighth District 

Brunswick W. J. McLamb Ashe 

Columbus W. H, Dowell Whiteville 



State Committees, Democratic 157 



New Hanover M. S. Haskett Wilmington 

Pender Leon Corbitt Burgaw 

Ninth District 

Bladen C. L. Brady Elizabethtown 

Cumberland Malcolm McQueen Fayetteville 

Hoke H. A. Green Raeford 

Eobeson Daniel M. Britt Luniberton 

Tenth District 

Alamance John H. Vernon Burlington 

Durham W. C. Purceli Durham 

Granville Ed. F. Taylor Oxford 

Orange J. D. Eskridge Hillsboro 

Person R. P. Burns Roxboro 

WESTERN DIVISION 

Eleventh District 

Alleghany R. A. Doughton Sparta 

Ashe R. L. Ballew Jeflferson 

Forsyth J. Erie McMichael Winston-Salem 

Twelfth District 

Davidson Ford M. Myers Thomasville 

Guilford R. S. Wimbish Greensboro 

Thirteenth District 

Anson Fred J. Coy Wadesboro 

Moore W. D. Sabiston, Jr Carthage 

Richmond Dr. B. W. Williams Hamlet 

Scotland Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

Stanly R. L. Brown Albemarle 

Union Page Price Waxhaw 

Fourteenth District 

Gaston John A. Wilkins Gastonia 

Mecklenburg C. W. Tillett Charlotte 

Fifteenth District 

Alexander V. G. Beckham Taylorsville 

Cabarrus Ernest R. Alexander Concord 

Iredell J. Wesley Jones States villa 

Montgomery W. L. Currie Candor 

Rowan Chas. L. Coggins Salisbury 

Randolph J. V. Wilson Asheboro 

Sixteenth District 

Burke O. L. Horton Morganton 

Caldwell Folger Townsend Lenoir 

Catawba Eddie G. Merritt Hickorv 

Cleveland C. C. Home Shelby 

Lincoln Kemp B. Nixon Lincoln ton 

Watauga Wade Brown Boone 

Seventeenth District 

Avery R. W. Wall Newland 

Davie F. H. Bronson Farmington 

Mitchell .Jason B. Deyton Spruce Pine 

Wilkes T. H. Wicker, Jr North Wilkesboro 

Yadkin L. F. Amburn , Boonvillo 



158 North Carolina Manual 



Eighteenth District 

Henderson Arthur J. Redden Hendersonville 

McDowell William D. Lonon Marion 

Polk J. G. Michael Saluda 

Rutherford Harvey Carpenter Rutherfordton 

Transylvania E. H. McMahon Brevard 

Yancey Charles L. Proffitt Burnsville 

Ni)ietee)ith District 

Buncombe J. C. Cheesborough Asheville 

Madison E. Y. Ponder Marshall 

Ttventieth District 

Cherokee Mrs. Winifred T. Wells Murphy 

Clay T. C. Gray Hayesville 

Graham R. B. Morphew Robbinsville 

Haywood Walter Crawford Waynesville 

Jackson Adam C. Moses Sylva 

Macon Guy Houk Franklin 

Swain Thurmond Leatherwood Bryson City 

Tiventy-first District 

Caswell E. F. Upchurch, Sr ...Yanceyville 

Rockingham J. M. Sharpe ReidsviDe 

Stokes Ralph J. Scott Danbury 

Surry W. R. Badgett Mt. Airy 



State Committees, Democratic 159 

State Democratic Senatorial Executive Committees 

1944 

First District 

Bertie Ed Cherry Windsor 

Camden M. D. Sterns Camden 

Chowan Charles T. GriflEith Edenton 

Currituck Roy P. Midgett Coin jock 

Gates Martin Kellogg Sunbury 

Hertford Geo. T. Undei-wood Murfreesboro 

Pasquotank W. C. Dawson Elizabeth City 

Perquimans B. C. Berry Hertford 

Second District 

Beaufort Milton Brown Washington 

Dare Clarence Midgett Manns Harbor 

Hyde T. S. Gibbs Swan Quarter 

Martin T. B. Slade Hamilton 

Pamlico J. C. Wiley Grantsboro 

Tyrrell D. M. Pledger, Sr Columbia 

Washington E. L. Still Plymouth 

Third District 

Northampton A. C. Gay Jackson 

Vance I. B. Watkins Henderson 

Warren John A. Dowtin Warrenton 

Fourth District 

Edgecombe Frank Winslow Rocky Mount 

Halifax J. R. Wallet Halifax 

Fifth District 

Pitt J. H. Blount Greenville 

Sixth District 

Franklin H. C. Kearney Franklinton 

Nash A. W. Deans Battleboro 

Wilson John A. Hackney Wilson 

Seventh District 

Carteret W. M. Webb Morehead City 

Craven J. E. Rhodes, Jr New Bern 

Greene E. J. Harper Snow Hill 

Jones ...H. D. Gray Trenton 

Lenoir H. E. Wallace Kinston 

Onslow Victor Venters Richlands 

Eighth District 

Johnston Norman Duncan Benson 

Wayne Dr. C. C. Henderson Mt. Olive 

Ninth District 

Duplin Alvin Kornegay Seven Springs 

New Hanover Murray James Wilmington 

Pender Wyatt E. Blake Burgaw 

Sampson Abel Warren Garland 



160 North Carolina Manual 



Tenth District 

Bladen H. M. Potts Elizabethtown 

Brunswick W. D. Evans Ashe 

Columbus H. L. Shaw Whiteville 

Cumberland R. H. Dye Fayetteville 

Eleventh District 

Robeson Geo. Lewis Pate ., Rowland 

Twelfth District 

Harnett L. N. Chaffin Lillington 

Hoke N. A. McDonald, Jr. Raeford 

Moore Frank McCaskill Pinehurst 

Randolph L. E. Whitfield Asheboro 

Thirteenth District 

Chatham W. H. Paschal Siler City 

Lee S. Ray Byerly Sanford 

Wake Mrs. J. S. Mitchiner Raleigh 

Fourteenth District 

Durham C. V. Jones Durham 

Granville C. W. Allen Oxford 

Person J. W. Green Roxboro 

Fifteenth District 

Caswell H. L. Gwynn Yancey ville 

Rockingham M. P. Cummings Reidsville 

Sixteenth District 

Alamance Cooper A. Hall ; Burlington 

Orange H. A. Whitfield Chapel Hill 

Seventeenth District 

Guilford Byron Haworth High Point 

Eighteenth District 

Davidson Paul G. Stoner Lexington 

Montgomery E. R. Burk, Jr Biscoe 

Richmond Z. V. McGirt Hamlet 

Scotland W. S. James Laurinburg 

Nineteenth District 

Anson B. T. Hill Wadesboro 

Stanly A. C. Lentz Albemarle 

Union W. B. McManus Monroe 

Twentieth District 

Mecklenburg Lewis G. Ratcliffe Charlotte 

Twenty-first District 

Cabarrus J. S. Hartsell Concord 

Rowan Geo. R. Uzzell Salisbury 

Twenty-second District 

Forsyth •. Fred Hutchins Winston-Salem 



State Committees, Democratic 161 



Twenty-third District 

Stokes Lawrence McRae Walnut Cove 

Surry J. G. Wood Mt. Airy 

Twenty-fourth District 

Davia J. B. Cain Cana 

Wilkes C. C. Faw North Wilkesboro 

Yadkin C. L. Gabard Yadkinville 

Twenty-fifth District 

Catawba J. L. Murphey Hickory 

Iredell J. B. (Tom) Rodgers Statesville 

Lincoln W. H. Childs Lincolnton 

Twenty-sixth District 

Gaston Stewart Atkins Gastonia 

Twenty-seventh District 

Cleveland Clyde Nolan Shelby 

McDowell Charles F. Barnes Marion 

Rutherford S. A. Summey Alexander Mills 

Tu-enty-eighth District 

Alexander Mrs. R. S. Ferguson Taylorsvillc 

Burke C. H. Crabtree Morganton 

Caldwell L. A. Dysart Lenoir 

Twenty-ninth District 

Alleghany J. S. Moxley Sparta 

Ashe W. B. Austin Jefferson 

Watauga S. F. Horton Sugar Grove 

Thirtieth District 

Avery J. F. Hampton Linville 

Madison Levi Ponder Mars Hill 

Mitchell Charles A. Gaitear Spruce Pine 

Yancey C. P. Randolph Burnsville 

Thirty-first District 

Buncombe County Democratic Executive Committee 

Thirty-second District 

Haywood R. E. Sentelle , Canton 

Henderson C. H. Edney Hendersonville 

Jackson T. N. Massie Sylva 

Polk Donald Spurlin Columbus 

Transylvania Mrs. Mary Jane McCrary Brevard 

Thirty-third District 

Cherokee J. B. Gray Murphy 

Clay Geo. C. Jarrett Hayesville 

Graham Dr. J. H. Crawford Robhinsville 

Macon T. D. Bryson, Jr Franklin 

Swain McKinley Edwards Bryson City 



CHAIRMEN DEMOCRATIC COUNTY EXECUTIVE 

COMMITTEES 
1944 

County Name Address 

Alamance A. M. Carroll Burlington 

Alleghany R. F. Grouse Sparta 

Alexander A. C. Barnes Taylorsville 

Anson James A. Hardison Wadesboro 

Ashe B. xi. Duncan Trade, Tenn. 

Avery K. T. Lewis Minneapolis 

Beaufort E. A. Daniel Washington 

Bertie J. B. Davenport Windsor 

Bladen H. H. Clark Elizabethtown 

Brunswick H. Foster Mintz Bolivia 

Buncombe R. R. Williams Asheville 

Burke C. E. Cowan Morganton 

Caldwell Max C. Wilson Lenoir 

Camden J. B. Williams Camden 

Cabarrus J. Lee White Concord 

Carteret Irvin W. Davis Beaufort 

Caswell John O. Gunn Yanceyville 

Catawba Walter C. Hollar Hickory 

Chatham Wilkins P. Horton Pittsboro 

Cherokee H. A. Mattox Murphy 

Chowan Lloyd E. Griffin Edenton 

Clay George C. Jarrett Hayesville 

Cleveland B. G. Beason Boiling Springs 

Columbus R. J. Lamb WTiiteville 

Craven Wm. F. Ward New Bern 

Cumberland W. C. Ewing Fayetteville 

Currituck S. A. Walker Snowden 

Dare ^. M. L. Daniels Manteo 

Davie ."7. J. H. Thompson Mocksville 

Davidson E. C. Byerly Lexington 

Duplin F. W. McGowen Kenans ville 

Durham J. R. Patton Durham 

Edgecombe , Donnell Gilliam Tarftjoro 

Forsyth J. McCrae Dalton Winston-Salem 

Franklin E. H. Malone Louisburg 

Gaston A. C. Jones Gastonia 

Gates Martin Kellogg Siinbury 

Graham R. B. Morphew Robbinsville 

Granville T. S. Rouster Oxford 

Greene Mark C. Lassiter Snow Hill 

Guilford Charles A. Hines Greensboro 

Halifax John W. Martin Roanoke Rapids 

Harnett I. R. Williams Dunn 

Haywood C. E. Brown Clyde 

Henderson M. M. Redden Henderson ville 

Hertford D C. Barnes Murfreesboro 

Hoke W. P. Baker Raeford 

Hyde C. L. Bell Swan Quarter 

Iredell John F. Long Statesville 

Jackson E. L. McKee Sylva 

Johnston J. W. Woodard Smithfield 

Jones H. D. Gray Trenton 

Lee E. M. Underwood Sanford 

Lenoir S. C. Sitter'ion Kinston 

Lincoln Thomas E. Rhodes Lincolnton 

[ 162 ] 



State Committees, Democratic 163 



County Name Address 

Macon E. W. Long Franklin 

Madison F. E. Freeman Marshall 

Martin Elbert S. Peele Williamston 

McDowell rtobert W. Proctor Marion 

Mecklenburg J. M. Scarborough Charlotte 

Mitchell Frank Wilson Bakersville 

Montgomery Garland S. Garris Troy 

Moore M. C. Boyette Carthage 

Nash O. B. Moss Spring Hope 

New Hanover Nathan S. Haskett Wilmington 

Northampton W. J. Long Garysburg 

Onslow C. L. Sabiston Jacksonville 

Orange A. H. Graham Hillsboro 

Pamlico D. C. McCotter , Cash Corner 

Pasquotank W. C. Dawson Elizabeth City 

Pender Wyatt E. Blake Burgaw 

Perquimans C. P. Morris Hertford 

Person '. R. B. Dawes Roxboro 

Pitt Paul E. Jones Farmville 

Polk Carroll P. Rogers Tryon 

Randolph W. C. Lucas Asheboro 

Richmond C. B. Deane Rockingham 

Robeson W. H. Humphrey, Jr Lumberton 

Rockingham Dr. G. P. Dillard Draper 

Rowan Walter H. Woodson, Jr Salisbury 

Rutherford S. A. Summey Forest City 

Sampson ■. J. C. Butler Roseboro 

Scotland W. G. Shaw Wagram 

Stanly : R. R. Ingram Albemarle 

Stokes R. J. Scott Danbury 

Surry R. C. Llewellyn Dobson 

Swain W. E. Elmore Bryson City 

Transylvania J. E. Ruftv Brevard 

Tyrrell A. L. Walker Columbia 

Union J. F. Milliken Monroe 

Vance A. A. Bunn Henderson 

Wake J. W. Bunn Raleigh 

Warren John Kerr, Jr Warrenton 

Washington E. G. Arps Plymouth 

Watauga W. R. Winkler Boone 

Wayne J. T. Flythe Mount Olive 

Wilkes W. A. McNeil North Wilkesboro 

Wilson W. D. P. Sharpe, Jr Wilson 

Yadkin C. E. Hartman Yadkinville 

Yancey C. P. Randolph Burnsville 



REPUBLICAN STATE PLATFORM 1944 

Three things are now uppermost in the minds and hearts of the 
Republicans of North Carolina. The war must be won as quickly 
and with as little bloodshed as possible. A permanent peace must 
be established among the nations of the world. The system of pri- 
vate enterprise and the spirit of freedom must be restored and pre- 
served here in America. 

These three objectives overshadow all others. They are so tre- 
mendously important that Americans everywhere are daily giving 
up their time, their savings, their comforts and their sons that 
they may be accomplished. It is therefore to these great vital, all- 
important purposes that the Republican Party in North Carolina 
today dedicates its heart and mind and strength. 

The first and most immediate objective is the winning of the 
war. Nothing else is quite so important to the thousands of Repub- 
lican fathers and mothers, wives and sweethearts, whose loved ones 
are now suffering the grim realities of war in Italy, the South 
Pacific, and the other changing battlefronts. Nothing must be 
done to prolong the war, and nothing that needs to be done must "be 
left undone if it delays in any measure the end of this terrible con- 
flict. Politicians who would prolong their tenure in office on the 
pretense of their indispensability to the prosecution of the war 
must be looked upon with suspicion. Hypocrisy and cleverly framed 
propaganda must be cast aside and the American people must know 
the truth. 

What is the truth? What great impediment, what tenacious bar- 
rier holds back the successful prosecution of the war? What pre- 
vents unity here in America? What slows down the march of the 
Allied soldiers to Rome, to Berlin, to Tokyo? It is not the American 
people. They are loyal and patriotic. It is not the American soldier. 
He is the most gallantly courageous in the world. It is not our 
military leadership. Generals of the superb character and training 
and genius of Marshall and MacArthur and Eisenhower can devise 
the strategy to win any war. It is the figure of a man grasping 
greedily and constantly for political power. It is the spectacle of 
a man, thrice elected President of the United States, quarreling 
violently and arrogantly with Congress. It is the New Deal Presi- 

[164] 



Republican Platform 165 

dent who craves desperately a fourth term in which to secure for 
himself more power and more personal glory. He is the same in- 
dispensable man of 1940, the same Franklin D. Roosevelt who in 
the last Presidential campaign was allegedly the only man in Amer- 
ica who could keep American boys from foreign soil. He is the 
man who tried to pack the Supreme Court, who squandered billions, 
raked leaves and built doghouses while Hitler was building tanks, 
airplanes, submarines and armies. He is the New Deal Prophet 
who failed to heed the warnings of Ambassador Grew and others, 
and who continued to allow the shipment of oil and iron and the 
essentials of war to a treacherous Japan which now uses them to kill 
our boys. He was the Commander-in-Chief at Pearl Harbor. (He 
w^ould like us to forget that) and with a totally subservient majority 
in House and Senate he was the indispensable man who failed to 
prepare America for war — until the third term fever made him sud- 
denly war conscious. He is the indispensable man who has thrived 
en emergencies and who now would have the American people to 
believe that he, as Commander-in-Chief, alone can win the war. 
This is not true. It is utterly false. America does not need a fourth 
termer. America needs a new leader, a new president who can 
once again unite our great people. A divided nation means a longer 
war, a bloodier war. 

Class and racial hatred, strife between labor and capital, feuds 
within the Cabinet, quibbling between members of the Supreme 
Court, and bitter quarrels between the President and Congress are 
paying their tragic dividends. Overseas in Germany and Japan, 
an already wavering, tottering leadership is taking on new strength 
and added hope that a dis-united America may enable them to pro- 
long the war and escape defeat. We must put an end to this hope 
ill November. We must elect a Republican President whose purpose 
is to win the war, not a fourth term, and whose administration will 
be free from the bitter quarrels that have arisen under the New 
Deal President. Americans cannot be united behind a President 
who distrusts and dislikes his Congress. Of all the Presidential 
candidates in botn major parties, the man who aspires to a fourth 
term is the least capable of giving America that unity so necessary 
for the winning of the war and the preservation of peace thei-eafter. 

The Republicans of North Carolina say proudly to the people of 
America: "There is only ONE indispensable man in connection with 
the winning of the war. He is your BOY, your HUSBAND, your 



166 North Carolina Manual 

NEPHEW, who serves on a ship, or wears the uniform of a marine, 
or who carries the rifle of the United States soldier. He is the 
indispensable man." As great and efficient and brilliant as are our 
leaders. General MacArthur, General Marshall, General Eisenhower 
and others, none are indispensable. They are running the war and 
are doing a great job. They, not the President, devise the military 
strategy. They will continue after November under our Republican 
President to carry forward our American boys to victory. 

For four and one-half long years the world has been grievously 
burdened by a devastating war which is still being relentlessly 
fought. For nearly two and one-half years America has been an 
active participant. The boys over there are anxious to finish the 
war and to come back home. We who are left at home are equally 
as anxious to see them coming back. There is no excuse for inef- 
ficiency and delay either on the battlefront or the homefront. Be- 
cause we conscientiously believe that the New Deal Administration 
is incompetent to secure the maximum war effort that would result 
in a quick and victorious conclusion of the war and the restox'ation 
of free government, we favor the election of a Republican President, 
a Republican House and a Republican Senate pledged to the follow- 
ing general accomplishments: 

1st. Elimination of the vast squandering of public funds for non- 
essential purposes. 

2nd. The discharge of the enormous body of workers now drawing 
salaries from the Federal payroll for work that could be easily done 
by others already employed. 

3rd. A drastic cut in all Federal spending not related to the war 
effort and a careful investigation of all spending to the end that 
vast sums of money shall not be wasted even in the war effort. A 
billion dollars wasted on airplanes never built will never bring a 
Zero down in flames. 

4th. The submission of an amendment to the Federal Constitution, 
limiting the term of all Presidents to two terms of four years each. 
The American system cannot endure another aspirant for a life 
tenure whether he be Democrat or Republican. 

5th. We favor the prompt and immediate elimination of all un- 
necessary regimentation of our people, whether they be farmers, 
businessmen or laborers. 



Republican Platform 167 

6th. We condemn bureaucracy whenever and wherever found. 
Washington under the present New Deal Administration has be- 
come a resort center for crackpots, snoopers, meddlers and bureau- 
crats. Never before since America became free has our great coun- 
try degenerated into a government of bureaus and bureaucrats. We 
are controlled not by laws, but by men and by regulations. No one 
knows today what the bureaucrat will say the rule is tomorrow. 
The result is a constant violation of such rules by honest men. 

7th. We favor more practical sense and more business methods 
in the operation of the OPA. Any government agency must have 
the confidence of the American people if it is to succeed and such 
confidence is not bred in the incompetent and visionary regulations 
of the starry-eyed boys of the New Deal School. 

8th. We believe that the businessmen and the laboring men have 
both learned their lesson. We believe that the intelligent business- 
man has learned that the time has long since passed when he can 
ignore the serious wishes of the laborers in his organization. We 
believe that he has learned that labor has its basic rights and that 
one of these is that it shall have reasonable hours of work, good 
wages and fair treatment. We believe that the intelligent business- 
men have learned that labor should have the right to bargain col- 
lectively. On the other hand we believe that the laboring man has 
learned that his greatest possession is, after all, freedom, that he 
has learned that, if left alone, the laboring man, through his various 
organizations, can bargain with the employer and work out his af- 
fairs to the mutual advantage of himself and his employer. We 
believe that labor has learned the folly of listening to the voice of a 
political demagogue who promises everything and who cannot de- 
liver. Therefore, we favor such laws respecting the rights of labor 
and capital, as will bring about a spirit of mutual cooperation be- 
tween these two great classes of our industrial life. We truly be- 
lieve that the New Deal, by its demagogic appeal to the laboring 
man, has fostered more strikes than any other agency in America. 
We believe that the New Deal has tried to lead labor down a blind 
alley, the last structure on which is the house of slavery. We say 
that there can be no free labor unless there is free enterprise. When 
business loses its freedom, laborers can only expect to become 
servants of the state. 

9th. We challenge the laborers of America and the businessmen 
alike to regain in November, 1944, the liberties they have lost and 



168 North Carolina Manual 

to enter upon a new period of mutual cooperation that will reassure 
the world of the soundness and greatness of American industry. 

10th. The Republicans of North Carolina favor adequate and 
fair Federal assistance to the veterans of the present World War, 
including liberal compensation to the disabled veterans and to the 
wives and children and dependents of those who lose their lives in 
the defense of America. 

11th. We favor the discontinuance of all regimentation after the 
war, including the system of rationing. 

12th. We favor a program of abundance now and after the war. 
We condemn the New Deal for its ruinous program of scarcity re- 
sulting in a serious shortage of food throughout the world at the 
most critical period in all history. 

13th. We demand a simplification of all government reports and 
we challenge the President and his Treasury Department to write 
a simple income tax law. 

14th. Americans are not selfish or stingy. We are willing to 
help people who are in misery and to feed those who are starving, 
but we do strenuously oppose an International WPA squandering 
money in all the nations of the world for the purpose of electing 
Franklin D. Roosevelt head of an international super-state follow- 
ing the war. 

15th. The poor man has begun to feel the direct burden of taxation 
and the result of the extravagance of the White House spendthrift. 
We say the best way to relieve the taxpayer is to stop wasting his 
money. Taxes need not be raised if the rate of unnecessary spending 
is lowered. 

16th. We urge a practical solution of the problems of jobs after 
the war. We oppose the New Deal theory of oppressing and de- 
pressing private enterprise in order that the Federal Government 
may have a wider field in the matter of furnishing work for Ameri- 
can citizens in the post-war period. The New Deal has tried to 
"kill the goose that laid the golden egg." We propose that gov- 
ernment stay out of business and that small and large enterprises 
throughout America be given a decent chance to build and expand 
and to make a reasonable profit without unnecessary government 
interference, so that they may employ free labor and bring back to 
this country once more a natural prosperity. 



Republican Platform 169 

17th. We favor a more vigorous prosecution of the war against 
Japan and we urge the appointment of General Douglas MacArthur 
as Commander-in-Chief of all armies operating against the treach- 
erous but formidable enemy. 

18th. Some day, God grant that it will not be long, this awful war 
will be over. The problem of a just peace will be a difficult one re- 
quiring the best brains of all political parties. We advocate a 
"cooling off" period in order that revenge and hate may not sit 
again at the peace table. We favor the trial and punishment of all 
govei'nmental and military leaders and henchmen of the Axis coun- 
tries who are responsible for the war and the brutalities to all civil- 
ians in occupied countries and to our pi'isoners of war. If a fair 
and just peace is effected, we then favor a cooperative organization 
among the responsible and trustworthy nations of the earth charged 
with the duty, power and responsibility of maintaining peace 
throughout the world. Such an organization, however, will never 
free the American people and their leaders from the duty of con- 
stantly observing in the future the conditions of world affairs. 
We must never again let the national administration go to sleep as 
it did prior to the present war. We favor the maintenance of ai-med 
forces adequate to preserve our territorial integrity, to repel attack 
and preserve peace. Eternal vigilance is the price not only of 
liberty; it is, as we have so bitterly learned, also the price of peace. 

State Affairs 

For forty years the Republicans of North Carolina have begged 
for a decent election law and every two years during that period a 
Democratic Legislature has arrogantly turned a deaf ear to our 
plea. The changes that have been made have been used by po- 
litical henchmen to make the laws more capable of fraud than ever. 
Two years ago, with a world at war and with Republican boys dying 
on foreign battlefields, we begged the Democratic Governor of 
North Carolina and the Legislature for relief that would give the 
minority party at least a partially fair deal. But the same soulless 
political steam roller flattened out the Republican minority and left 
the election laws as bad or worse than it found them. 

We challenge the decent Democratic leaders of North Carolina, 
and the independent voters as well, to help us secure an election 
law that will essentially provide: 



170 North Carolina Manual 

1st. A repeal of the absentee ballot law except for members of 
the armed forces. 

2nd. An assistant Registrar in each precinct who shall be a Re- 
publican and who shall have the right to be present at the registra- 
tion of all voters. 

3rd. The elimination of specific markers with adequate provi- 
sions otherwise made for assistance to all those who are unable to 
mark their ballots. 

4th. That the majority party shall never have in any election 
polling place more than one more official, helper or clerk than is 
allowed the minority party. 

5th. The purging by a bi-partisan committee of the registration 
books of each precinct every two years by the removal of the names 
of all deceased persons and those who are otherwise ineligible to 
vote. Any representative on the committee shall have right of ap- 
peal to a county board of a similar nature and thereafter to the 
State Board of Elections. 

6th. The creation by the Legislatui-e of a special department of 
the State Board of Elections, composed of 3 non-partisan members 
who by their past records have shown themselves to be unpreju- 
diced, non-partisan and of a judicial temperament. These specially 
named men shall be chai'ged with the duty of investigating instances 
of fraud in elections reported to the board from time to time and 
to procure indictments in the courts against those who have been 
found violating the election laws of our state. 

7th. That no absentee ticket shall be issued by the Chairman of 
the County Board of Elections, or by any other official, unless it is 
issued in the presence of the minority party member of said Board, 
who shall have the right to be present during all the hours of the 
days set for issuing said ballots. 

8th. That the county chairman of either political party shall have 
the right to copy or cause to be copied the names on the registration 
books of his county at any time he desires to do so, except during the 
registration periods and on challenge days and primary and elec- 
tion days, provided the work is done at no expense to the taxpayers. 
That he shall also have the right to copy the new registration dur- 
ing each week of the period of registration. 



Republican Platform 171 

Intoxicating Liquors 

While the matter of intoxicating liquors is not essentially a po- 
litical matter, it is of such importance that we think the people of 
North Carolina should have the right to pass upon its manufacture 
and sale in a statewide referendum, to the end that the majority 
opinion may always have the right to prevail. 

War Veterans and State Surplus 

We charge the Democratic politicians with having sought out 
and devised new and unnecessary ways of taxation and thus col- 
lecting from our people vast sums of money over and above the 
necessary expenses of government. 

We now demand that this surplus be spent for the benefit of all 
the people and not to promote the selfish interest of the Democratic 
machine. 

We favor a post-war rehabilitation program for all North Caro- 
lina men and women who have served in the armed forces of the 
United States in this war, and to that end we recommend that the 
State out of its large surplus funds provide free vocational, agri- 
cultural and professional training to all members of our armed 
forces whose educational training was interrupted by their war 
service in order that they may be equipped for life on a parity with 
those who remained at home. 



PLAN OF ORGANIZATION OF THE REPUBLICAN 
PARTY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Adopted in Convention, 1940, at Charlotte 

ARTICLE I 

The Precinct as a Unit 

The unit of party action shall be the election precinct. In each 
precinct there shall be elected an Executive Committee of five voters, 
one of whom shall be designated as Chairman, and another as Vice 
Chairman, who shall be a woman. There shall also be elected a Sec- 
retary. The member of the Precinct Committee, the Chairman, 
Vice Chairman, and Secretary, shall hold their places for two years 
from date of their election, and until their successors are chosen. 
There shall be a precinct meeting in each precinct in each election 
year, to be called by the Chairman of the County Executive Com- 
mittee, who shall designate the time and place of holding the pre- 
cinct meetings, after giving ten days' notice thereof, and the voters 
of each precinct in such meeting assembled shall organize the pre- 
cinct, by the election of a precinct executive committee, precinct 
chairman, vice chairman, and secretary, and such precinct meet- 
ings shall also elect one delegate and one alternate to the County 
Convention (to be called as hereinafter provided), for each fifty 
votes or fraction thereof cast for the Republican candidate for Gov- 
ernor at the latest election. In addition to the regular precinct 
meetings in each election year, others are to be called and held as 
often as necessary at such times and places as will be designated 
by the Chairman of the Precinct Committee, or in the absence of 
the Chairman, by any other members of the Committee, after first 
giving ten days' notice of such meeting. 

That in the event any Chairman of any Precinct fails to act, then 
the Chairman of the County Executive Committee shall have the 
power to appoint some one in his or her place. 

ARTICLE II 

County Conventions and County Committees 

(1) A County Convention shall be called in each election year by 
the Chairman of the County Executive Committee, who shall desig- 

[ 172 ] 



Plan of Organization I73 

nate the time and place for holding same, after giving ten days* 
notice thereof, and the delegates and alternates elected at the pre- 
cinct meetings, called and held as heretofore directed, shall sit as 
delegates and alternates in the County Convention. The County 
Convention shall choose a Chairman, and a Vice Chairman, who 
shall be a woman, and other officers, all of whom shall be qualified 
voters in the County. A County Executive Committee of five or 
more voters shall be chosen in such County Convention, who shall 
hold their places for a term of two years, and until their successors 
are elected. Such biennial County Convention shall elect one dele- 
gate and one alternate to the State, Congressional, Judicial, and 
Senatorial Conventions, for every two hundred votes, or fraction 
thereof, cast for the Republican nominee for Governor at the latest 
election. The notice of ten days required for the holding of pre- 
cinct meetings to be given by the County Chairman, and the ten 
days' notice required for the call of the County Convention by the 
County Chairman in election years may run concurrently, and the 
notice of the precinct meetings designating the time and place for 
the holding of the same may be included in the call for the regular 
biennial County Convention in election years, to be issued by the 
County Chairman. 

(2) That if one-third of the members of the County Executive 
Committee shall desire a meeting of the County Executive Com- 
mittee, it shall be the duty of Chairman of the County Executive 
Committee to call said meeting; and if said Chairman shall fail or 
refuse to call said meeting upon petition of one-third of the mem- 
bers, then one-third of the members may call a meeting of the 
County Executive Committee by giving to the Chairman and Secre- 
tary and the members of the County Executive Committee at least 
five days' notice. 

(3) For good cause shown, any Chairman, Vice Chaii-man, Sec- 
retary, or member of the County Executive Committee may be re- 
moved from his or her position upon a vote of two-thirds of the 
members of the County Executive Committee at a regular or called 
meeting as herein provided, but said cause for removal shall be con- 
fined to inefficiency and party disloyalty. Upon the removal of any 
Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary or any member of the County 
Executive Committee as herein provided, said County Executive 
Committee shall have the authority to appoint his or her successor 
to fill the unexpired term. 



174 North Carolina Manual 

ARTICLE III 

Congressional, Judicial, and Senatorial Committees 

(1) The Republican Congressional Committee, Judicial, and Sen- 
atorial District Committees shall be composed of the Chairmen of 
the several County Executive Committees within the respective 
Districts, and a Chairman and a Secretary of said Convention. The 
aforesaid Congressional, Judicial, and State Senatorial Conven- 
tions shall be called by the respective Chairmen thereof, upon fif- 
teen days' notice of the time and place for holding same, directed 
to the County Chairman residing within the respective Districts, 
and upon the failure for any reason of the aforesaid District Chair- 
man in any case, to fail to call such Convention, the said call may 
be issued as herein provided for the District Chairman by any 
member residing within said Districts, respectively. The various 
Tdembers of the said District Convention shall give the same due 
publicity by giving notice of the said District Conventions for at 
least ten days within their respective counties. 

ARTICLE IV 

State Convention 

(1) The State Convention shall be called by the State Chairman 
at least thirty days before the expiration date for filing notices of 
candidacy for State offices under the State-wide Primary Law, and 
thii'ty days' notice thereof shall be given all members of the State 
Executive Committee, and all chairmen of the several County Ex- 
ecutive Committees, of the time and place of holding the same. The 
State Convention biennially shall choose and elect a State Chair- 
man and a State Vice Chairman, who shall be a woman, and in 
charge of women's activities; the said State Convention each year 
of a Presidential election shall also recommend to the National Re- 
publican Executive Committee for a term of four years the names 
of two persons, one a man, and one a woman, for National Com- 
mitteeman, and a National Committeewoman, respectively. 

ARTICLE V 

Republican State Executive Committee 

(1) The Republican State Executive Committee shall be composed 
of four members from each Congressional District casting ten thou- 



Plan of Organization 175 

sand votes or fractional part thereof for the Republican candidate 
for Governor at the latest preceding election, and one additional 
member from each Congressional District for each additional five 
thousand votes or greater fractional part thereof cast in said Con- 
gressional District for the Republican candidate for Governor at 
the latest preceding election; said members shall be selected by the 
Republican Congressional Convention in the aforesaid Congres- 
sional Districts, and the Chairman and Secretary of the respective 
Congressional Convention shall certify the names and addresses of 
the members so elected to the Secretary of the State Executive 
Committee, and upon such certification the members so declared 
elected shall constitute the membership of the State Executive Com- 
m.ittee from the said Congressional District. Vacancies occurring 
in representation from any Congressional District shall be filled by 
a vote of the majority of the remaining members residing in the 
District in which such a vacancy may occur, at a meeting to be 
called in the District by some member thereof, after at least ten 
days' written notice shall be given to each remaining member there- 
of, giving the time and place and stating the purpose of the meet- 
ing. 

(2) The State Chairman, the State Vice Chairman, the National 
Committeeman, the National Committeewoman, the Secretary and 
Assistant Secretaries of the State Committee, and the permanent 
Chairman of the preceding State Convention shall be members of 
the State Executive Committee ex officio. 

(3) Within fifteen days after the nomination of Governor is duly 
made and certified by the State Board of Elections, the State Execu- 
tive Committee, the candidate for Governor, and the Chairman 
of the Executive Committee shall have the power to elect a Secre- 
tary and an Assistant Secretary, one of whom shall come from the 
Young Republicans Club of North Carolina, a Treasurer, and other 
officers, and the State Executive Committee shall have the power 
to appoint a Campaign Committee and special committees for other 
purposes, and transact any other business which a State Conven- 
tion might duly transact in the interim between the State Con- 
ventions. 

(4) The State Executive Committee shall meet annually upon 
the call of the Chairman and Secretary, or upon the failure of the 
Chairman, upon the call of the Vice Chairman and Secretary, on 



state Senjp 




1 Districts 




178 North Carolina Manual 

or about the annivei'sary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln, which 
meeting shall be followed by an annual state-wide Lincoln Day 
Dinner, to be held under the auspices of the Republican State Ex- 
ecutive Committee, and the Young Republican Clubs of North Caro- 
lina, and the said Committee shall meet upon call as aforesaid, 
biennially, at the beginning of each State Campaign, for the pur- 
pose of organizing the Campaign and for general purposes. 

(5) There shall be a Republican State Central Committee com- 
posed of the State Chairman, the Secretary, Treasui'er, and State 
Vice Chairman, the National Committeeman, the National Commit- 
teewoman, who shall be members ex officio of the Republican State 
Central Committee, and eleven other members of the State Com- 
mittee, one from each Congressional District, to be elected by the 
State Committee at its biennial meetings herein provided for, to 
serve for two years. The State Central Committee shall meet upon 
the call of the Chairman and shall have active management of the 
State Campaigns, with power to appoint a Finance Committee, a 
Publicity Committee, a Campaign Committee, and such other com- 
mittees as it may deem necessary in the proper conduct of the af- 
fairs of the Party, and to do all other things pertaining to party 
affairs which it may be authorized to do from time to time by the 
Republican State Executive Committee in session; and the State 
Central Committee shall report its proceedings to the full State 
Committee at each session. Vacancies in the office of State Chair- 
man, State Vice Chairman, National Committeewoman, National 
Committeeman, shall be filled by the State Committee until the 
next State Convention shall elect successors to fill unexpired terms. 

(6) A member or members of the Committee from the majority 
of the Congi-essional Districts shall constitute a quorum of the 
State Committee for the transaction of business. 

(7) There shall be elected as a member of the State Executive 
Committee from each Congressional District at least one woman 
member thereof, and more when practicable, and there shall be a 
more liberal representation among women wherever practicable. 

(8) When any member of the State Executive Committee be- 
comes an active or regular candidate for an appointment controlled 
either directly or indirectly by recommendation of the State Com- 
mittee, then such member of said State Committee shall forfeit 
his or her membership on State Committee. Upon declaration of 



Plan of Organization 179 

such forfeiture by the Chairman of the said State Committee, said 
members shall have no more right or liberty with said committee 
when seeking its endorsement for appointment than any other 
member of the party in said State might have or exercise with said 
Committee while seeking the same appointment. 

ARTICLE VI 
Voting by Proxy in Convention Not Allowed 
(1) No delegate, alternate or other member of the Convention 
shall cast any vote by proxy, provided, however, that any dele- 
gate or delegates present shall have the right to cast the entire vote 
for the precinct in County Conventions; and of the County in State 
and District Conventions. 

ARTICLE VII 
Convention Procedure 

(1) The State, District, and County Conventions shall be called 
to order by their respective Chaii'men, or in the absence of the 
Chairman, by the Vice Chairman, Secretary, or some member there- 
of, in order stated, who shall have the power to appoint and receive 
the reports of Credentials Committee, to appoint other temporary 
and necessary committees, at or before the convening of the Con- 
vention, and to form a permanent organization. 

(2) The certificate of the Chairman and Secretary of any Con- 
vention authorized to elect delegates and altei'nates shall be deemed 
sufficient to place the name of such delegate and alternate on the 
temporary roll of the respective Conventions, and unless success- 
fully challenged, shall be a complete authorization to said delegates 
and altex'nates to act. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Records, Reports and Accounts 

(1) The Chairman, Secretary, and Treasurer of the State, Dis- 
trict and County Committees shall keep faithful and accurate rec- 
ords of any and all monies received by them for the use of said com- 
mittees, and shall make faithful and accurate report thereof when 
so requested. 



COMMITTEES OF THE STATE REPUBLICAN PARTY 

(From list furnished by Chairman, State Republican Executive 

Committee) 

State Republican Executive Committee 

STATE ORGANIZATION 

Chairman: Sim A. DeLapp Lexington 

Vice Chairman : Mrs. Eugene Hester Reidsville 

Secretary: Fate J. Beal , Charlotte 

Treasurer : C. C. Wall Lexington 

National Committeeman: Charles A. Jonas Lincolnton 

National Committeeivoman: Mrs. W. P. Few Durham 

First District 

W. H. Evans, Harrellsville Clarence Dozier, Elizabeth City 

C. T. Allen, Aurora Wheeler Martin, Williamston 

Second District 

Otis J. Reynolds, Roanoke Rapids E. D. Dickens, Halifax 

S. H. Newberry, Kinston 

Third District 
P. G. Grumpier, Clinton W. H. Fisher, Clinton 

Julian T. Gaskill, Goldsboro A. T. Gardner, Beaufort 

A. L. Butler, Clinton 

Fourth District 
Samuel J. Morris, Raleigh L. P. Dixon, Siler City 

Ezra Parker, Benson W. L. Ward, Asheboro 

A. H. Farmer, Baily 

Fifth District 
W. E. Matthews, Leaksville E. R. Nelson, Mt. Airy 

H. L. Fagge, Leaksville M. F. Law, Pelham 

L. L. Wall, Winston-Salem 

Sixth District 
Martin F. Douglas, Greensboro Lester Lloyd, Hillsboro 

N. D. McNairy, Greensboro Wm. Bramham, Durham 

Walter L. York, High Point R. E. Lowdermilk, Bessemer 

Branch, Greensboro 
T. C. Carter, Mebane 

Seventh District 
Thad H. Pope, Dunn W. C. Downing, Fayetteville 

Mrs. Lillian M. B. Rodgers, Wilmington Dr. L. Baggett, Whiteville 

Charles M. Trott, Southport 

Eighth District 
P. E. Brown, N. Wilkesboro A. M. Snider, Rockingham 

W. B. Somers, N. Wilkesboro Coy S. Lewis, Carthage 

[180] 



State Committees, Republican 181 



T. C. Prim, Yaakinville J. T. Jackson, Lexington 

J. B. Payne, Rt. 4, Winston-Salem R. V. Alexander, Cooleemee 

C. R. Hall, Sanford 

Ninth District 

Carl Graybeal, W. Jefferson G. W. Klutz, Lenoir 

N. C. Jones, Scottville Fred Lowrance, Statesville 

P. E. Deal, Rt. 1, Taylorsville G. C. Peeler, Salisbury 

Beal Poovey, Sparta J. J. Morton, Albemarle 

O. O. Cruse, Rt. 3, Concord Russell D. Hodges, Boone 

Charlie Welsh, Lansing 

Tenth District 

J. Bennett Riddle, Jr., Morganton C. H. Geitner, Jr., Hickory 

D. T. Vance, Plumtree W. A. Abernethy, Lincolnton 

Frank C. Patton, Morganton Geo. W. Dale, Bakersville 

E. J. Presser, Charlotte 

Eleventh District 

J. F. Beam, Dallas G. V. Hawkins, Shelby 

J. S. Dockery, Rutherfordton Hershel Sprinkle, Marshall 

P. M. Banks, Burnsville Walter R. Chambers, Marion 

S. B. Roberts, Marshall, (At Large) 

Twelfth District 

James J. Pace, Hendersonville I. H. Powell, Canton 

Hugh E. Monteith, Sylva Clyde Jarrett, Andrews 

Lewis P. Hamlin, Brevard Theodore Jenkins, Robbinsville 

Ben H. Taylor, Asheville Robert N. Tiger. Hayesville 

S. A. DeHart, Bryson City W. A. Keener, Franklin 



182 



North Carolina Manual 



State Republican, Congressional, Judicial and Senatorial 

District Committees 

The work of the State Republican Congressional, Judicial and 
Senatorial Executive Committees is handled by the Chairmen of 
the Republican County Executive Committees. 

Chairmen, Republican County Executive Committees 

1944 



Alamance — Sam T. Johnston, Graham. 

Alexander — Dallas Campbell, Taylors- 
ville. 

Alleghany — Beale Poole, Sparta. 

Anson — C. A. Bland, Wadesboro. 

Ashe — Bernard Graybeal, West Jeffer- 
son. 

Avery — Roy A. Hannon, Banner Elk. 

Beaufort — Zeno Ratcliff, Pantego. 

Brunswick — F. L. Lewis, Southport. 

Bertie — D. H. Greene, Aulander. 

Bladen — C. C. Atkinson, Elizabethtown. 

Buncombe — Mitchell Lominac, Asheville. 

Burke — J. Bennett Riddle, Jr., Morgan- 
ton. 

Cabarrus — O. O. Cruse, Rt. 3, Concord. 

Caldwell — R. C. Rabbins, Lenoir. 

Camden — J. B. Burgess, Old Trap. 

Carteret — C. H. Bushall, Beaufort. 

Caswell — M. F. Law, Pelham. 

Catawba — Charles H. Geitner. Hickory. 

Chatham — J. C. Dixon, Siler City. 

Cherokee — B. B. Morrow, Farmer, Tenn. 

Chowan — A. S. Smith, Edenton. 

Clay— Ruel White, Hayesville. 

Cleveland— J. Worth Silvers, Shelby. 

Columbus — Dr. L. Baggett, Whiteville. 

Craven — W. B. Rouse, New Bern. 

Cumberland — W. C. Downing, Fayette- 
ville. 

Currituck — B. C. Kinsey, Coinjock 

Dare — W. C. Gaskill, Manteo. 

Davidson — Frank Holton, Lexington. 

Davie — E. C. Morris, Mocksville. 

Duplin — H. B. Kornegay, Calypso. 

Durham — A. A. McDonald. Fidelity 
Bank Bldg., Durham. 

Edgecombe — J. H. Satterthwaite. Rt. 1, 
Tarboro. 

Forsyth — K. E. Shore, Winston-Salem. 

Franklin — W. R. Young, Louisburg. 

Gates — H. A. Eure, Acting Chmn., Cora- 
peake. 

Gaston — Kelly Bumgardner, Mt. Holly. 

Graham — Jack Shuyler, Robbinsville. 

Granville — W. L. Peace, Oxford. 

Greene — Roland E. Jones, Snow Hill. 

Guilford — Z. Hampton Howerton, 
Greensboro. 



Harnett— J. O. West, Dunn. 

Haywood — Glenn A. Boyd, WaynesviUe. 

Henderson — James J. Pace, Henderson- 
ville. 

Hertford— A. S. Mitchell, Winton. 

Hoke — M. L. Sides, RFD 1. Aberdeen. 

Hyde — B. W. Williams, Swan Quarter. 

Halifax — Otis J. Reynolds, Roanoke 
Rapids. 

Iredell — Russell Sherrill, States ville. 

Jackson— E. P. Stillwell, Sylva. 

Johnston — J. Ira Lee, Smithfield. 

Jones — S. J. Harrison, Maysville. 

Lee— C. R. Hall, Sanford. 

Lenoir — S. H. Newberry, Kinston. 

Lincoln — H. A. Jonas, Lincolnton. 

Macon — Paul Potts, Franklin. 

Madison — J. M. Baley, Mai-shall. 

Martin — Wheeler Martin, Williamston. 

McDowell — Clarence M. Pool, Rt. 2, 
Marion. 

Mecklenburg — J. W. Jackson, Box 2.375, 
Charlotte. 

Mitchell— W. C. Berry, Bakersville. 

Montgomery — Herman Beamon, Troy. 

Moore — H. F. Seawell, Jr., Carthage. 

Nash — John C. Matthews, Spring Hope. 

New Hanover — H. E. Rodgers, Wil-. 
mington. 

Northampton — W. F. Outland, Wood- 
land. 

Onslow — Albert N. Venters, Jackson- 
ville. 

Orange— S. H. Basnight, Chapel Hill. 

Pamlico — J. W. Cowell, Bayboro. 

Pasquotank — W. W. Stinemates, Box 
263, Elizabeth City. 

Pender — E. C. Highsmith, Rocky Point. 

Perquimans — T. C. Babb, Hertford. 

Pel-son — O. Y. Clayton, Roxboro. 

Pitt— W. J. Manning, Bethel. 

Polk — Hugh M. Thompson, Saluda. 

Randolph — Lacy Lewis, Asheboro. 

Richmond — B. A. Cox, Ellerbe. 

Robeson— Fred R. Keith, St. Pauls. 

Rockingham — T. L. Gardner, Reidsville. 

Rowan — D. L. Rendleman, Salisbury. 

Rutherford — J. S. Dockery, Rutherford- 
ton. 



State Committees, Republican 



183 



Sampson — Clarence Fisher, Clinton. 
Scotland — C. C. Snead, Laurel Hill. 
Stanly — Henry N. Thompson, New 

London. 
Stokes — Baxter Hall, King. 
Surry^David L. Hiatt,- Mt. Airy. 
Swain — Jack Hicks, Bryson City. 
Transylvania — Ealph Fisher, Brevard. 
Tyrrell — W. E. Bateman, Columbia. 
Union — J. H. Mills, Monroe. 



Vance — Walter Finch, Kittrell. 
Wake — A. Wray White, RaleiRh. 
Warren — W. J. Bishop, Rt. 3, Macon. 
Washington — J. C. Tarkenton, Mackeys. 
Watauga — Earl Cook, Boone. 
Wayne — R. E. Cox, Rt. 4, Goldsboro. 
Wilkes— N. B. Smithey, N. Wilkesboro. 
Wilson — Thos. J. Moore, Wilson. 
Yadkin— R. V. Long, Yadkinville. 
Yancey — Ed Roberts, Bumsville. 



PART IV 
ELECTION RETURNS 



ELECTION RETURNS— 1944 
Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States 





Popular Vote 


Electoral Vote 


State 


Roosevelt 
Democrat 


Dewey 
Republican 


Roosevelt 
Democrat 


Dewey 
Republican 


Alabama 


198,918 

80,926 

148,965 

1,988,564 
234,331 
435,146 
68,166 
339,377 
268,187 
107,399 

2,079,479 
781,403 
499,876 
287,458 
472,589 
281,564 
140,631 
315,490 

1,035,296 

1,106,899 
589,864 
158,515 
807,357 
112,556 
233,246 
29,623 
119,663 
987,874 
81,389 

3,304,238 
527,399 
100,144 

1,570,763 
401,549 
248,635 

1,940,479 

175,356 

90,601 

96,711 

308,707 

821,605 

150,088 

53,820 

242,276 

486,774 

392,777 

650,413 

49,419 


44,540 

56,287 

63,551 

1,512,965 

268,731 

390,527 

56,747 
143,215 

56,506 
100,137 
1,939,314 
875,891 
547,267 
442,096 
392,448 

67,750 
155,434 
292,949 
921,350 
1,084,423 
527,416 
3,742 
761,175 

93,163 
329,880 

24,611 
109,916 
961,335 

70,688 

2,987,647 

263,155 

118,535 

1,582,293 

319,424 

225,365 

1,835,048 

123,487 

4,547 

135,365 

200,311 

191,425 

97,891 

71,527 
145,243 
361,689 
322,819 
674,532 

51,921 


11 
4 
9 

25 




Arizona 




Arkansas 




California 




Co'orado 


g 


Connecticut 


8 
3 
8 

12 
4 

28 




Delaware 




Florida 




Georgia 




Idaho 




Illinois 




Indiana 


13 


Iowa 




10 


Kansas 




s 


Kentucky __ . 


11 
10 




Louisiana _ 




Maine . _- 


5 


Maryland... . . . ... 


8 
16 
19 
11 

9 
15 

4 




Massachusetts _. 




Michigan. .. ... 




Minnesota. .. . 




Mississippi 




Missouri 




Montana 




Nebraska 


6 


Nevada . 


3 

4 

16 

4 

47 

14 




New Hampshire 




New Jersey 








New York 








North Dakota 


4 


Ohio... 




25 


Oklahoma 


10 
6 

35 
4 

8 




Oregon.. . . 




Pennsylvania. 








South Carolina 




South Dakota 


4 


Tennessee 


12 

23 

4 




Texas. 




Utah 




Vermont 


3 




11 
8 
8 














12 






3 








Totals 


25,602,505 


22,006,278 


432 


99 







[187] 



188 



North Carolina Manual 






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Election Returns 



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Election Returns 199 

VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARIES 

1936, 1938 AND 1940 

1936 
FIRST PRIMARY 
FOR GOVERNOR— 

Clyde R. Hoey 193,972 

Ralph McDonald 189,584 

A. H. Graham 126,782 

John A. McRae 6,606 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR— 

Paul D. Grady 162,221 

W. P. Horton 138,631 

George McNeill 128,661 

FOR SECRETARY OF STATE— 

Stacey W. Wade 212,687 

Thad Eure 168,970 

M. R. Dunnagan 55,192 

FOR STATE AUDITOR— 

George Ross Pou 223,517 

Baxter Durham 113,850 

Willard L. Dowell 61,684 

Charles W. Miller 42,852 

FOR STATE TREASURER— 

Charles M. Johnson 322,868 

(Mrs.) Helen Robertson Wohl 98,446 

FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION— 

Clyde A. Erwin 247,817 

A. B. Alderman 105,659 

Gilbert Craig 67,685 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE— 

W. Kerr Scott 227.808 

William A. Graham 207,750 

SECOND PRIMARY 
FOR GOVERNOR— 

Clyde R. Hoey 266,354 

Ralph McDonald 214,414 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR— 

W. P. Horton 217,230 

Paul D. Grady 208,248 

FOR SECRETARY OF STATE— 

Thad Eure 234.956 

Stacey W. Wade 194,015 

1938 
FOR UTILITIES COMMISSIONER— 

Stanley Winbome ?5J'2?o 

Paul D. Grady 198,243 



200 North Carolina Manual 



1940 

FOR GOVERNOR— 

J. Melville Broughton 147,386 

W. P. Horton 105,916 

A. J. Maxwell 102,095 

Lee Gravely 63,030 

Paul D. Grady 15,735 

Thos. E. Cooper 33,176 

Arthur Simmons 2,058 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR— 

R. L. Harris 150,661 

L. A. Martin 76,861 

W. Erskine Smith 127,522 

D. L. Tompkins 42,672 

FOR SECRETARY OF STATE— 

Thad Eure 274,408 

Walter Murphy 137,598 

FOR STATE AUDITOR— 

George Ross Pou 262,870 

Charlie Miller 127,600 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE— 

W. Kerr Scott 252,912 

C. Wayland Spruill 157,933 

FOR INSURANCE COMMISSIONER— 

Dan Boney , :.... 266,974 

William B. Oliver 122,107 



Election Returns 



201 



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204 North Carolina Manual 

TOTAL VOTES CAST— GENERAL ELECTION 

1944 

Democrats Republicans 

President 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 527,399 Thomas E. Dewey 263,155 

Governor 
Gregg Cherry 528.995 Frank C. Patton 230,998 

Lieutenant-Governor 
L. Y. Ballentine 520,850 George L. Greene 227,430 

Secretary of State 
Thad Eure 525,155 W. H. Gragg 225,147 

Auditor 
George Ross Pou 522,363 J. M. Van Hoy 225.797 

Treasurer 
Chas. M. Johnson 521,356 S. B. Roberts 225,588 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 
Clyde A. Erwin 523,752 B. Carl Fussell 224,280 

Attorney General 
Harry McMullan 520,002 Sam J. Morris 226,046 

Commissioner of Agriculture 
W. Kerr Scott 522,806 Clarence T. Allen 225,575 

Commissioner of Labor 
Forrest H. Shuford 519,885 James E. Spence, Jr 225,989 

Insurance Commissioner 
William P. Hodges 519,754 Halsey B. Leavitt 225,118 



Election Returns 



205 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY, 
MAY 30, 1942, BY DISTRICTS* 

FIRST CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 



Beaufort 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Gates 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Martin 

Pasquotank... 
Perquimans... 

Pitt 

Tyrrell 

Washington... 

Total 



Herbert C. 

Bonner 
Democratic 



3,937 

860 

937 

1,361 

822 

670 

1,491 

1,008 

2,448 

2,400 

924 

4,856 

352 

1,262 



23,328 



Marvin K. 

Blount 
Democrat 



405 
298 
357 
385 

17 
231 
300 
388 
664 
367 
309 
3,030 

71 
251 



7,073 



Jack 
Edwards 
Democrat 



50 

40 

139 

96 

9 

133 

78 

31 

56 

104 

818 

948 

18 

56 



2,576 



FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 



D. C. Speas 
Democrat 



John Hamlin 

Folger 

Democrat 



Julian H. 
Wulbem 
Democrat 



Caswell 

Forsyth 

Granville 

Person 

Rockingham. . 

Stokes 

Surry.. 

Total 



93 
3,270 
74 
82 
198 
16 
66 



3,799 



1,199 
4,462 
1,349 
1,286 
3,940 
1,838 
4,670 



18,744 



266 
380 
168 
304 
469 
19 
25 



1,611 



'Congressional Districts defined in 1941 c. 3. 



266 



North Carolina Manual 



Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primary, May 30, 1942, by 

Districts — ( Continued ) 

EIGHTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 



Anson 

Davie 

Davidson 

Hoke. 

Lee 

Montgomery.. 

Moore 

Richmond 

Scotland 

Union 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Total 



W. 0. Burgin 
Democrat 



2,571 

310 

4,947 

1,312 

1,432 

1,357 

2,393 

3,061 

1,589 

2,056 

886 

311 



22,225 



G. Y. Newton 
Democrat 



1,026 

47 

630 

412 

507 

429 

647 

1,723 

892 

633 

82 

42 



6,970 



TENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 



Avery 

Burke 

Catawba 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg.. 
Mitchell 

Total 



Cameron 
Morrison 
Democrat 



212 
2,262 

580 
1,478 
7,908 

151 



12,591 



John A. 
McRae 
Democrat 



95 

1,636 

192 

391 

3,731 

63 



6,108 



ELEVENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


A. L. 
Bulwinkle 
Democrat 


Claude B. 

Woltz 
Democrat 




Cleveland 


5,525 
2,367 
2,814 
1,547 
1,610 
4,242 
343 


1,368 
712 
638 
602 
406 
850 
40 




Gaston . . . 




McDowell . 




Madisnn 




Polk 




Rutherford .. 




Yancey 








Total 


• 18,448 


4,616 









Election Returns 



207 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY, 
MAY 27, 1944, BY DISTRICTS 

SECOND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


John H. 
Kerr 


Cameron S. 
Weeks 


Bertie - - 


963 
1,390 
1,333 
2,688 
1,955 
1,449 
1,742 
2,489 


1,016 




2,836- 


Greene 


775 


Halifax - 


1,938 - 


Lenoir _ - - _ 


1,789 




896 


Warren 


483 


Wilson . . 


1,846 








Total . . . 


14,009 


11,579 







FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



Counties 


John H. 
Folger 


J.N. 
Freeman 


Caswell _ 


808 
5,001 
1,368 

692 
2,892 
1,896 
3,145 


266 


Forsyth . -— . 


3,380 


Granville _- - 


479 




675 


Kockincham - - - - - 


709 


Stokes 


115 




825 








Total . . 


15,802 


6,449 







state Jut 



WE5TEI2N Dl^l 



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EAST ERN DIVISION 




210 



North Carolina Manual 



Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primary, May 27, 1944, by 

Districts — (Continued) 



TENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 




Counties 


Hamilton C. 
Jones 


JoeW. 
Ervin 


JohnC. 
Stroupe 


Avery . ... 


92 

680 

765 

1,256 

7,639 

141 


314 
2,825 
1,148 
1,110 
8,191 

317 


13 


Burke 


245 


Catawba . 


2,848 
368 


Lincoln . 


Mecklenburg 


605 


Mitchell 


7 






Total. . 


10,573 


13,905 


3,986 







Election Returns 



211 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN REPUBLICAN PRIMARY, 

MAY 27. 1944 



NINTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 
(Republican) 



Counties 


Monroe 
Adams 


Emery C. 
McCaU 


Ashe 


76 
76 
47 
57 
30 
83 
87 
93 
30 


187 


Alleghany 


11 


Alexander . . 


213 


Cabarrus 


17 


CaldweU 


740 


IredeU 


75 


Rowan 


60 


Stanly 


41 


Watauga 


216 








Total 


579 


1,560 





212 



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Election Returns 



223 



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224 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS, 1942-1944 

NEW TENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 
(Created 1941) 





1942 


1944 


Counties 


Cameron 

Morrison 

Democrat 


Chas. A. 

Jonas 

Republican 


JoeW. 

Ervin 

Democrat 


Loomis F. 

Klutz 
Republican 


Ayery 


526 

5,318 

6,241 

3,674 

10,472 

554 


1,915 
5,067 
4,672 
3,629 
4,208 
2,044 


787 

6,862 

10,027 

4,144 

27,784 
1,001 


2,992 


Burke .-. -. 


5,531 


Catawba 


6,954 


Lincoln 


3,473 


Mecklenburg 


4,996 


Mitchell -. 


2,811 ' 






Total 


26,785 


21,535 


50,605 


26,757 







NEW ELEVENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 
(Created 1941) 



"• 


1942 


1944 


Counties 


A. L. Bulwinkle 
Democrat 


A. L. Bulwinkle 
Democrat 


E. V. Moss 
Republican 




2,068 
5,093 
1,854 
986 
2,184 
4,969 
3,116 


8,182 
13.909 
2,249 
3,973 
2,439 
7,521 
3,303 


2,140 


Gaston _ 


5,127 


M adison 


4,198 


McDowell 


2,130 


Polk 


1,549 


Rutherford . . - 


4,382 


Yancey - ------ 


2,303 






Total 


20,270 


41,576 


21,829 







NEW TWELFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 
(Created 1941) 





1942 


1944 


Counties 


Zebulon 

Weaver 

Democrat 


Gola P. 

Ferguson 

Republican 


Zebulon 

Weaver 

Democrat 


Lewis P. 

Hamlin 

Republican 


Buncombe. . 


6,362 
3,491 
1,255 
1,087 
4,015 
3,728 
3,530 
2,202 
2,166 
2,602 


1,505 
2,946 
1,163 
1,177 
1,109 
1,840 
2,053 
1,811 
1,357 
1,189 


21,668 
2,572 
1,289 
1,814 
7,659 
5,015 
4,169 
2,855 
2,110 
2,891 


7,908 


Cherokee 


2,581 


Clay — 


1,233 


Graham 


1,359 


Haywood . 


2,738 


Henderson 


4,300 


Jackson .-. 


2,621 


Macon 


2,432 


Swain, - 


1,444 


Transylvania 


2,349 


Totab 


30,438 


16,150 


52,042 


28,965 







Election Returns 



225 



VOTE FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR 
Primary, May 27, 1944 



Counties 


Clyde R. 
Hoey 


Cameron 
Morrison 


Marvin L. 
Ritch 


Arthur 
Simmons 


G. Y. 
Newton 


Alamance 


3,550 

934 

826 

987 
1,137 

222 
2,555 

979 
1,150 

854 
8,966 
2,272 
2,613 
1,525 

586 
1,242 

966 
2,731 
1,510 , 
1,073 

607 

469 
6,003 
2,880 
2,446 
3,624 

796 

715 
3,652 

737 
2,499 
7,054 
2,643 
5,133 
2,610 
7,545 

806 

488 
1,572 
1,475 
8,487 
3,167 
2,864 
1,981 
1,200 
1,011 

811 

577 
2,647 
1,469 
3,482 

702 
1,255 
2,647 
1,465 

835 

494 

936 


963 

204 

364 

651 

619 

184 

672 

884 

561 

261 

2,495 

1,213 

1,226 

484 

224 

588 

119 

1,505 

619 

262 

201 

51 

635 

809 

535 

1,105 

300 

131 

836 

393 

1,015 

2,115 

1,114 

2,631 

535 

1,235 

89 

92 

317 

393 

3,273 

1,088 

947 

1,909 

211 

138 

289 

139 

2,315 

320 

1,174 

139 

492 

907 

868 

382 

563 

1,126 


89 
22 
17 
63 
5 
2 
48 
10 
37 
20 

101 
72 

280 

71 

4 

16 

11 

125 

7 

21 

16 

6 

98 

84 

34 

77 

25 

5 

100 
33 
33 

118 
37 

182 
50 

272 

10 

8 

12 

29 

184 

83 

63 

32 

7 

17 

4 

19 

167 
10 
92 
7 
16 
55 
67 
42 
13 
51 


114 

5 

26 

25 

18 

4 

65 
11 
26 
34 

149 
60 

104 
47 
18 
18 
17 
96 
16 
24 
10 
3 
53 

108 
58 
99 
32 

77 
32 
63 

125 
50 

289 
60 
88 
29 
7 
24 
28 

224 
67 
49 
23 
16 
12 
14 
23 
89 
17 
66 
12 
25 
59 
17 
42 
28 
34 


36 


Alexander __ 


5 


Alleghany 


18 


Anson __ 


48 


Ashe 


7 


Avery 


4 


Beaufort 


28 


Bertie 


6 


Bladen 


23 


Brunswick 


4 


Buncombe 


76 


Burke. . . . . . 


26 


Cabarrus 


50 


Caldwell 


25 


Camden 


3 


Carteret 


9 


Caswell 


6 


Catawba 


54 


Chatham 


5 


Cherokee 


10 




3 


Clay 


1 




71 


Columbus 


54 




46 


Cumberland 


37 




13 


Dare 


3 


Davidson . 


100 


Davie 


41 




17 


Durham. 


38 


Edgecombe _ 


24 


Forsyth 


95 
30 


Gaston 


63 


Gates 

Graham 

Granville. 

Greene 

Guilford . 


8 

8 

14 

10 

117 


Halifax.. 

Harnett 

Haywood . 


42 

25 

8 




5 


Hertford 


11 


Hoke 


17 


Hyde 


7 


Iredell 


51 


Jackson .. 


5 




30 


Jones - . 


10 




32 


Lenoir . . . 


26 


Lincoln i 


18 


Macon ... 


17 




4 


Martin 


17 



226 North Carolina Manual 

Vote for United States Senator — Primary, May 27, 1944 — (Con't.) 



Counties 



McDowell 

Mecklenburg.. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery.. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover. 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank... 

Pender 

Perquimans... 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham.. 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania.. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington... 

Watauga 

Wavne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total 



Clyde R. 
Hoey 



,370 
,189 
371 

879 

,644 

058 

918 

,743 

228 

,334 

429 

,173 

090 

630 

249 

,616 

,010 

502 

,287 

755 

551 

,871 

,091 

,266 

885 

,444 

407 

,980 

,279 

,353 

335 

742 

,512 

100 

739 

581 

683 

,853 

,731 

,892 

921 

896 



211,049 



Cameron 
Morrison 



734 

6,500 
111 
512 
411 

1,095 

1,557 
431 
557 
408 
167 
726 
275 
108 
137 

1,386 
329 
686 

1,710 

2,141 
999 

1,489 
593 
353 
509 
839 
396 

1,422 
299 
195 
18 
946 
529 

2,795 
309 
255 
451 
747 
620 

1,009 
384 



80,154 



Marvin L. 
Ritch 



43 
2,380 



5 
37 
39 
186 
27 
16 
42 

8 
36 
21 

5 
14 
96 
20 

8 
99 
116 
63 
173 
54 
12 
53 
39 
13 
49 
10 
21 

2 
95 
39 
133 
47 
11 


52 
15 
137 
20 
13 



7,428 



Arthur 
Simmons 



52 
108 
2 
12 
19 
42 
88 
21 
54 
19 
10 
11 
29 
10 
14 
138 
20 
12 
62 
124 
67 
92 
51 
14 
23 
28 
25 
85 
4 

36 
1 
20 
45 
97 
22 
21 

56 
48 
51 
10 
14 



4,593 



G. Y. 
Newton 



24 

56 



4 

34 

21 

51 

1 

15 

10 

1 

10 

10 

3 

11 

49 

13 

15 

133 

50 

44 

70 

29 

7 

109 

15 

29 

16 

6 

8 

1 

408 

33 

51 

12 

7 

8 

20 

35 

40 



3,057 



Election Returns 



227 



VOTE FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR 
November 7, 1944 



Counties 


Clyde-it. 

Hocy 
Democrat 


A.I. 

Ferree 
Republican 


Alamance.- . . . _ 


9,529 
2,339 
1,837 
3,565 
4,462 
810 
4,666 
2,926 
2,421 
2,303 

21,997 
6,798 
9,148 
5,421 
758 
3,569 
1,866 

10,237 
3,776 
2,582 
1,273 
1,293 
8,458 
5,576 
5,006 
6,847 
1,129 
969 
9,697 
2,234 
5,319 

13,449 
6,460 

17,100 
3,842 

14,459 
1,045 
1,815 
3,113 
2,275 

24,865 
6,764 
6,510 
7,769 
5,109 
1,863 
1,762 
789 
8,540 
4,191 
8,345 
1,187 
3,529 
5,025 
4,198 
2.875 
2,290 
4,158 


4 174 


Alexander _ _ 


2,891 


Alleghany __ 'J 


1,275 


Anson " ■ _ 


352 


Ashe _ _ _ 


4,441 


Avery 


2,968 - 

787 


Beaufort . - _ _ . . . . 


Bertie 


63 


Bladen _ . 


483 


Brunswick 


1,933 


Buncombe- -- _ - - - . . 


7,638 


Burke 


5,589 


Cabarrus _ - - - - . _ 


3,740 


Caldwell _ 


4,108 


Camden,. . . . . . - . 


88 


Carteret 


1,369 


Caswell-. - ... 


356 


Catawba 


6,807 


Chatham .... 


2,271 


Cherokee 


2,564 


Chowan- ... - - 


69 


Clav 


1,226 


Cleveland -...._ 


2,059 


Columbus 


1,275 


Craven.. 


377 


Cumberland 


1,297 


Currituck . . - 


87 


Dare ,. 


193 


Davidson ... _ - . . 


9,338 


Davie .. 


3,178 


Duplin - -.- .-. - - - - --..-. 


1,261 


Durham. 


2,219 


Edgecombe . . . - . 


197 


Forsyth 


7.984 


Franklin - 


167 


Gaston - 


4,680 


Gates . . - 


83 


Graham 


1,356 


Granville ... . ... ... . ..... . 


191 


Greene .. 


S3 


Guilford.. - 


9,997 


Halifax -. 


160 


Harnett- . . 


2,852 


Haywood.- . . _ 


2,678 


Henderson . 


4,161 


Hertford . 


52 


Hoke... 


109 


Hyde 


212 


Iredell. . 


4,169 


Jackson. _ , . 


2,611 


Johnston . 


4,144 


Jones . - _ . . 


133 


Lee. 


593 


Lenoir . 


295 


Lincoln. .... _ 


3,494 


Macon . . . 


2,420 


Madison ... . . ... 


4,184 


Martin 


95 



228 



North Carolina Manual 



Vote for United States Senator, November 7, 1944 (Con't.) 



Counties 



Clyde R. 


A. L 


Hoey 


Ferree 


Democrat 


Republican 


3,958 


2,136 


28,381 


5,041 


1,026 


3,131 


2,739 


1,858 


3,890 


2,346 


7,417 


480 


9,892 


1,292 


3,344 


87 


2,539 


344 


3,454 


1,122 


1,237 


597 


2,715 


368 


1,731 


309 


929 


96 


2,467 


419 


7,815 


259 


2,462 


1,539 


7,356 


8,830 


5,383 


581 


7,259 


660 


8,525 


2,660 


10,092 


5,121 


7,641 


4,350 


4,193 


5,856 


2,351 


142 


5,643 


5,675 


4,033 


3,328 


7,194 


4,810 


2,120 


1,433 


3,043 


2,174 


595 


228 


5,662 


830 


4,060 


302 


19,108 


2,078 


2,461 


96 


1,799 


441 


3,379 


3,859 


6,213 


1,451 


5,669 


8,947 


6,129 


447 


2,451 


4,358 


3,320 


2,380 



McDowell 

Mecklenburg. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery.. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover. 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange ., 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank... 

Pender 

Perquimans. . . 

Person ._ 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham.. 

Rowan 

Rutherford... 

Sampson 

Scotland , 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania.. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington... 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total 



533,813 



226,037 



Election Returns 



229 



STATE MILITARY AND CIVILIAN ABSENTEES VOTE 
IN GENERAL ELECTION OF 1944 





State Military Absentees 


Civilian Absentees 


Federal War 
Ballots- 


Counties 


Issued 


Returned 


Issued 


Returned 


Received by 
Co. Chairmen 


Alamance 


1,470 

540 

274 

382 

868 

344 

656 

196 

283 

451 

4,160 

1,670 

1,732 

1,008 

64 

743 

208 

2,174 

581 

415 

126 

333 

960 

687 

524 

943 

61 

143 

2,136 

736 

718 

3,666 

1,151 

2,724 

281 

3,081 

126 

365 

352 

197 

3,923 

743 

814 

1,045 

759 

176 

142 

107 

1,129 

874 

861 

123 

371 

669 

912 

525 


762 
323 
161 
240 
443 
142 
384 
139 
125 
234 

2.033 

1,012 
814 
547 
30 
346 
137 

1,219 
303 
213 
101 
207 
548 
420 
375 
560 
35 
66 

1,311 
371 
321 

1,197 
659 

1,728 
182 

1,156 

66 

195 

231 

113 

2,382 

376 

458 

549 

471 

96 

79 

58 

715 

460 

573 

79 

249 

403 

567 

232 


252 
430 
373 

45 

1,097 

104 

190 

107 

22 
101 
835 
828 
264 
264 
4 
155 

28 

1,139 

273 

188 

23 
437 
101 

62 
103 

90 
6 

48 

1,113 

318 

87 
261 
114 
521 

44 
219 

11 
329 

73 

24 
791 
135 
158 
261 
1,003 

24 

47 

21 
551 
677 
360 

19 

80 

73 
278 
312 


200 

347 

335 

36 

781 

68 

176 

106 

19 

62 

691 

625 

228 

208 

2 

135 

27 

897 

210 

150 

22 

437 

86 

57 

83 

79 

2 

36 

968 

278 

77 

222 

93 

453 

37 

170 

9 

268 

65 

20 

694 

123 

132 

190 

1,003 

15 

44 

15 

458 

608 

292 

12 

69 

55 

255 

298 


77 


Alexander 


15 


Alleghany . 


4 


Anson 


29 


Ashe . 


12 


Avery 


6 


Beaufort 

Bertie 


24 
6 


Bladen 


18 


Brunswick 


15 


Buncombe 


85 


Burke 


18 


Cabarrus.. . 


37 


Caldwell 


26 


Camden 

Carteret 


4 

12 


Caswell.. . . . _. 


14 


Catawba 


30 


Chatham . 


25 


Cherokee 


15 


Chowan . 


5 


Clay . . 


3 


Cleveland 


58 


Columbus... 

Craven 

Cumberland 

Currituck. 

Dare 


27 

23 

53 

2 

2 


Davidson 


33 




2 


Duplin 


20 


Durham _ _ 


68 


Edgecombe 


19 


Forsyth _ 


107 


Franklin . . ,. 


18 


Gaston 


103 


Gates 


9 


Graham 


7 


Granville . . 


16 


Greene 


12 


Guilford... 


158 


Halifax 


132 


Harnett 


22 


Haywood 


36 


Henderson 

Hertford 


38 
9 


Hoke 

Hyde... 


12 
6 


Iredell . 


44 


Jackson 


22 


Johnston , 


64 


Jones 


7 


Lee 


15 


Lenoir 


18 


Lincoln 


22 


Macon... 


6 



230 



North Carolina Manual 



STATE MILITARY A^D CIVILIAN ABSENTEES VOTE IN 
GENERAL ELECTION OF 1944 (Con't.) 





State Military Absentees 


Civilian Absentees 


Federal War 
Ballots- 


Counties 


Issued 


Returned 


Issued 


Returned 


Received by 
Co. Chairmen 


M adison 

Martin 


599 
367 

1,020 

4,268 
292 
568 
446 
S36 

1,173 
200 
302 
536 
194 
369 
190 
82 
324 
866 
497 

2,013 
557 
928 

1,262 

1,816 

1,011 
892 
301 

1,668 
871 

1,494 
470 
592 
48 
513 
474 

2,365 
223 
313 
868 
855 

1,604 
766 
642 
622 


278 

218 

416 

2,534 

149 

2fil 

300 

609 

" 741 

135 

290 

355 

106 

240 

92 

50 

212 

593 

294 

868 

310 

511 . 

503 

997 

675 

485 

203 

834 

407 

657 

229 

338 

32 

274 

217 

1,645 

163 

138 

478 

540 

604 

496 

275 

244 


126 

53 

247 

551 

61 

284 

144 

104 

247 

54 

24 

84 

50 

26 

IS 

13 

35 

116 

474 

623 

65 

36 

171 

411 

300 

59 

40 

744 

387 

622 

490 

414 

37 

45 

74 

516 

61 

115 

929 

139 

517 

103 

154 

521 


86 

49 

169 

472 

37 

202 

124 

79 

228 

42 

19 

71 

46 

21 

14 

13 

34 

87 

380 

459 

54 

32 

123 

308 

230 

52 

39 

586 

312 

581 

425 

327 

17 

38 

64 

452 

52 

98 

736 

118 

334 

96 

136 

395 


7 
14 


McDowell 

M ecklenburg 

Mitchell 


19 
170 

8 


Montgomery 

Moore 


14 
30 


Nash.- 


35 


New Hanover 

Northampton 


84 
18 
19 


Orange 

Pamlico . _ _ 


20 
4 


Pasquotank 

Pender..- 


28 
15 


Perquimans 

Person - 


6 
32 


Pitt 


33 


Polk 


10 


Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham 

Rowan 

Rutherford -- 


27 
22 
58 
65 
32 
50 


Sampson.^ 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 


43 
20 
19 

8 


Surry 


24 


Swain 


14 


Transylvania 

Tyrrell 


8 
6 


Union 

Vance _. 


25 
29 


Wake 


108 


Warren. . 


21 


Washington 

Watauga 


10 
11 




52 


Wilkes 


19 


Wilson . -- 


37 


Yadkin 


3 


Yancey 


12 


Total 


86,999 


46,583 ,. 


25,755 


21,265 


2,958 



VOTE ON CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS BY COUNTIES 



Proposed amendments to the Constitution of North Carolina 

submitted to a vote of the people at the General Election 

November 7, 1944 



NO. 1 
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ADOPTED 

Chapter 57, Session Laws 1943. 

Article III, Sections 1, 13, and 14 amended to read as follows: 

"Section 1. Officers of the executive department; terms of of- 
fice. The executive department shall consist of a Governor, in 
whom shall be vested the supreme executive power of the State; 
a Lieutenant Governor, a Secretary of State, an Auditor, a Treas- 
urer, a Superintendent of Public Instruction, an Attorney General, 
a Commissioner of Agriculture, a Commissioner of Labor, and a 
Commissioner of Insurance, who shall be elected for a term of 
four years by the qualified electors of the State, at the same time 
and places and in the same manner as members of the General As- 
sembly are elected. Their term of office shall commence on the 
first day of January next after their election, and continue until 
their successors are elected and qi<alified: Provided, that the 
officers first elected shall assume the duties of their office ten days 
after the approval of this Constitution by the Congress of the 
United States, and shall hold their offices four years from and 
after the first day of January." 

"Sec. 13. Duties of other executive officers. The respective duties 
of the Secretary of State, Auditor, Treasurer, Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, Attorney General, Commissioner of Agricul- 



[231] 



232 North Carolina Manual 

ture, Commissioner of Labor, and Commissioner of Insurance 
shall be prescribed by law. If the office of any of said officers 
shall be vacated by death, resignation, or otherwise, it shall be the 
duty of the Governor to appoint another until the disability be 
removed or his successor be elected and qualified. Every such 
vacancy shall be filled by election at the first general election that 
occurs more than thirty days after the vacancy has taken place, 
and the person chosen shall hold the office for the remainder of 
the unexpired term fixed in the first section of this article." 

"Sec. 14. Council of State. The Secretary of State, Auditor, 
Treasurer, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Commissioner of 
Agriculture, Commissioner of Labor and Commissioner of Insur- 
ance shall constitute, ex officio, the Council of State, who shall 
advise the Governor in the execution of his office, and three of 
whom shall constitute a quorum; their advice and proceedings in 
this capacity shall be entered in a journal, to be kept for this pur- 
pose, exclusively, and signed by the members present, from any 
part of which any member may enter his dissent; and such journal 
shall be placed before the General Assembly when called for by 
either house. The Attorney General shall be, ex officio, the legal 
adviser of the executive department." 



Election Returns 233 

NO. 2 
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ADOPTED 

Chapter 432, Session Laws 1943. 

Article XIV, Section 7. Amended to read as follows: 

"Sec. 7. Holding office. No person who shall hold any office or 
place of trust or profit under the United States, or any depart- 
ment thereof, or under this State, or under any other state or gov- 
ernment, shall hold or exercise any other office or place of trust or 
profit under the authority of this State, or be eligible to a seat in 
either House of the General Assembly: Provided, that nothing 
herein contained shall extend to officers in the militia, notaries 
public, justices of the peace, commissioners of public charities, or 
commissioners for special purposes." 

NO. 3 
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ADOPTED 

Chapter 468, Session Laws 1943. 

Article IX, Section 8. Amended to read as follows: 

"Sec. 8. State Board of Education. The general supervision and 
administration of the free public school system, and of the educa- 
tional funds provided for the support thereof, except those men- 
tioned in Section five of this Article, shall, from and after the 
first day of April, one thousand nine hundred and forty-five, be 
vested in the State Board of Education to consist of the Lieutenant 
Governor, State Treasurer, the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, and ten members to be appointed by the Governor, subject to 
confirmation by the General Assembly in joint session. The General 
Assembly shall divide the State into eight educational districts, 
which may be altered from time to time by the General Assembly. 
Of the appointive members of the State Board of Education, one 
shall be appointed from each of the eight educational districts, 
and two shall be appointed as members at large. The first ap- 



234 



North Carolina Manual 






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Election Returns 237 

pointments under this section shall be: Two members appointed 
from educational districts for terms of two years; two members 
appointed from educational districts for terms of four years; two 
members appointed from educational districts for terms of six 
years; and two members appointed from educational districts for 
terms of eight years. One member at large shall be appointed for 
a period of four years and one member at large shall be appointed 
for a period of eight years. All subsequent appointments shall 
be for terms of eight years. Any appointments to fill vacancies 
shall be made by the Governor for the unexpired term, which ap- 
pointments shall not be subject to confirmation. The State Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction shall be the administrative head of 
the public school system and shall be secretary of the board. The 
board shall elect a chairman and vice-chairman. A majority of the 
board shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. 
The per diem and expenses of the appointive members shall be pro- 
vided by the General Assembly." 



NO. 4 
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ADOPTED 

Chapter 497, Session Laws 1943. 

Article III, Section 11. Amended to read as follows: 

"Sec. 11. Duties of the Lieutenant'Governor. The Lieutenant- 
Governor shall be president of the Senate but shall have no vote 
unless the Senate be equally divided. He shall receive such com- 
pensation as shall be fixed by the General Assembly." 



NO. 5 

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ADOPTED 

Chapter 662, Session Laws 1943. 

Article X, Section 8. Amended to read as follows: 

"Sec. 8. How Deed for Homestead may be Made. Nothing con- 
tained in the foregoing sections of this article shall operate to pre- 
vent the owner of a homestead from disposing of the same by deed; 
but no deed made by the owner of a homestead shall be valid with- 
out the signature and acknowledgment of his wife." 



VOTE ON PROHIBITION 1881 AND 1908 
August, 1881 May, 1908 



For 
Prohibition 

48,370 



Against 
Prohibition 

166,325 



For 
Prohibition 

113,612 



Against 
Prohibition 

69,416 



Vote on calling convention to consider proposed amendment 
to the Constitution of the United States Repealing the 18th 
amendment and Election of Delegates. 



November, 1933 







Delegates 


Delegates 


For 


No 


For Repeal 


Against 


Convention 


Convention 


of 


Repeal of 






18th 


18th 


120,190 


293,484 


Amendment 


Amendment 






115,482 


300,054 



[238] 



PART V 

GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, BOARDS 
AND COMMISSIONS 



GOVERNMENTAL BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 

Advisory Budget Commission 

1925, c. 89; 1929, c. 100 s. 4; 1931, c. 295; G. S. 143-4 

Composition: Six members, Chairman of the Appropriations and 
Finance Committees of the House and Senate. 

Two members appointed by the Governor: 

James H. Clark Elizabethtown 

Appointed by the Legislature: 

T. J. Pearsall Rocky Mount 

John Kerr Warrenton 

Brandon P. Hodges Asheville 

Irving E. Carlyle Winston-Salem 

State Board of Agriculture 

Rev. s. 3931; Code s. 2184; 1901, c. 479, ss. 2, 4; 1907, c. 479, 
s. 1; 1931, c. 360, s. 1; 1937, c. 174; C. S. 4661; G. S. 106-2 

Composition: Eleven members, ten appointed by the Governor. 

W. Kerr Scott, Chairman (Ex-officio member) Raleigh 

Miss Ethel Parker Gatesville 

L. L. Burgin Horseshoe 

Charles F. Gates Mebane 

Lionel Weil Goldsboro 

W. Ivan Bissette Grifton 

J. H. Pool „ West End 

D. Reeves Noland : Waynesville 

Claude T. Hall Woodsdale 

D. J. Lybrook Advance 

L. Y. Ballentine Varina 

State Board of Alcoholic Control 

1937, c. 49, s. 2; and s. 3; c. 411; 1939, c. 185, s. 5; 
1941, c. 107, s. 5; G. S. 18-37; G. S. 18-38 

Composition three members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Carl L. Williamson, Chaii-man Raleigh 

S. C. Brawley : Durham 

Samuel B. Etheridge Washington 

[ 243 ] 



244 North Carolina Manual 

State Department of Archives and History 

Rev. s. 4539; 1903, c. 767, s. 2; 1907, c. 714, s. 1; 
1941, c. 306; 1943, c. 237; C. S. 6141; G. S. 121-1 

Composition: Seven members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. R. D. W. Connor, Chairman Chapel Hill 

Dr. W. T. Laprade Durham 

J. Allan Dunn Salisbury 

Mrs. George McNeill Fayetteville 

Clarence Griffin Forest City 

Mrs. P. F. Patton , Hendersonville 

Miss Gertrude Carraway New^ Bern 

State Board of Assessment 
1939, c. 310, s. 200; 1941, c. 327, s. 6; G. S. 105-273 

Composition: Five members. All Ex-officio under the act. 

A. J. Maxw^ell, Chairman, Director of Tax Research Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General Raleigh 

Stanley Winborne, Utilities Commissioner Raleigh 

Charles M. Johnson, Director Local Government Raleigh 

Edwin Gill, Commissioner of Revenue Raleigh 

J. C. Bethune, Secretary ., Raleigh 

North Carolina State Art Society 

1929, c. 314; G. S. 140-1 

Composition: Sixteen members. Four members, ex-officio. Four 
members appointed by the Governor. Eight appointed by the Art 
Society. 

Ex-officio : 

Governor R. Gregg Cherry Raleigh 

Clyde A. Erwin ......_..............; Raleigh 

Harry McMullan Raleigh 

Miss Elizabeth Crews Walkertown 

Appointed: 

Mrs. Louis V. Sutton Raleigh 

Robert Lee Humber Greenville 

Mrs. Charles A. Cannon Concord 

Dean Alice Baldwin Durham 

Elected: 

Hon. J. Melville Broughton Raleigh 

Dr. Clarence Poe Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 245 



Mrs. Isabelle Bowen Henderson Raleigh 

Mrs. Henry M. London Raleigh 

Mrs. J. Henry Highsmith Raleigh 

Mrs. Annie P. Lovlck Raleigh 

Miss Mabel Pugh Raleigh 

Mr. John Rembert..... Raleigh 

State Banking Commission 

1931, c. 243, s. 1; 1935, c. 266; 1939, c. 91, s. 1; G. S. 53-92 

Composition: Seven members. Two ex-officio. Five appointed 
by the Governor. 

Charles M. Johnson, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Ex-officio Raleigh 

B. B. Massagee Hendersonville 

H. D. Bateman Wilson 

Bascom B. Blackwelder Hickory 

R. P. Holding : Smithfield 

R. C. Llewellyn Dobson 

State Commission for the Blind 

1935, c. 53, s. 1; 1937, c. 285; G. S. 111-1; 111-3 

Composition: Eleven members. Five Ex-officio. Six appointed 
by the Governor. 

Sam M. Cathey, Chairman Asheville 

E. R. Alexander -. Kannapolis 

H. I. McDougle Charlotte 

Thomas S. Payne Washington 

V. J. Ashbaugh Durham 

Dr. Howard E. Jensen '. Durham 

Ex-officio members: 

Dr. Carl V. Reynolds ...: ,. Raleigh 

G. E. Lineberry Raleigh 

Dr. J. S. Dorton , Raleigh 

Lt. Col. Charles H. Warren Raleigh 

Dr. Ellen B. Winston Raleigh 

Dr. Roma S. Cheek, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

N. C. Board of Boiler Rules 

1935, c. 326, s. 1; G. S. 95-54 

Composition: Five members. One Ex-officio member. Four ap- 
pointed by the Governor. 

Forrest H. Shuford, Chairman, Ex-officio Rali-igh 

W. H. Ruffin Durham 



246 North Carolina Manual 

W. E. Shuping, Jr Greensboro 

L. H. Coley '. Salisbury 

W. W. Lloyd Greensboro 

Buildings Code Council 
1933, c. 392, s. 4; 1941, c. 280, s. 2; G. S. 143-139 

Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Walter W. Hook, Chairman Charlotte 

Hill L. Kiser Charlotte 

W. H. Sullivan Greensboro 

Board of Public Buildings and Grounds 
1941, c. 224, s. 2; G. S. 129-2 

Composition: Five members. All Ex-officio under above Act. 

R. Gregg Cherry, Governor Raleigh 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State Raleigh 

Charles M. Johnson, Treasurer Raleigh 

Harry McMuUan, Attorney General Raleigh 

R. G. Deyton, Asst. Director Budget Raleigh 

State Board of Charities and Public Welfare 

Rev. s. 3913; Code, s. 2331; 1868-9, c. 170, s. 2; 1909, c. 899; 
1937, c. 319, s. 1; 1943, c. 775, s. 1; C. S. 5004; G. S. 108-1 

Composition: Seven members. Elected by the General Assembly 
upon recommendation of the Governor. 

W. A. Blair, Chairman Winston-Salem 

E. H. Evans, Vice Chairman Laurinburg 

Frank A. Daniels Raleigh 

Mrs. R. H. Latham Asheville 

Robert Hairston Reidsville 

John A. Gates Fayetteville 

Mrs. Walter C. Crowell .....: ; Monroe 

Board of Conservation and Development 
1925, c. 122, s. 6; 1927, c. 57; 1941, c. 45; G. S. 113-4; 113-5 

Composition: Fifteen members. Appointed by the Governor. 

R. H. Holland, Chairman Wilmington 

Carroll P. Rogers Tryon 

Harry Bailey Spruce Pine 

W. J. Damtoft : Canton 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 247 



Walter Lambeth Charlotte 

K. Clyde Council Wananish 

Charles H. Jenkins Aulander 

Irving Hall Raleigh 

Richard S. Tufts Pinehurst 

Oscar Breece „ Fayetteville 

William Carl Hudson Morganton 

J. Horton Doughton , Statesville 

J. Wilbur Bunn Raleigh 

J. L. Home, Jr Rocky Mount 

W. Roy Hampton Plymouth 

North Carolina Board of Correction and Training 

1943, c. 776; s. 1; G. S. 134-90 * 

Composition: Nineteen members. One Ex-officio. Eighteen ap- 
pointed by the Governor. 

C. A. Dillon, Chairman Raleigh 

J. J. Barnhardt Kannapolis 

J. C. Braswell Rocky Mount 

Herman Cone Greensboro 

Dr. Rachel D. Davis Kinston 

Mrs. Howard G. Etheridge Asheville 

Mrs. Clarence Heer Chapel Hill 

Dr. W. Houston Moore Wilmington 

T. A. Haywood Rockingham 

Dr. Ellen B. Winston (Ex-officio) Raleigh 

Mrs. J. R. Page ; Aberdeen 

Dr. A. M. Proctor Durham 

Mrs. Thomas L. Riddle Sanford 

Dr. William Mai'vin Scruggs Charlotte 

Dr. W. A. Stanbury Winston-Salem 

Miss Gertrude Weil Goldsboro 

Gordon C. Hunter Roxboro 

W. N. Harrell Wilson 

Jas. H. McEwen Burlington 

* (This Board has the management of the Stonewall Jackson 
Training School, Eastern Carolina Training School, State Home 
and Industrial School, Morrison Training School and Farm 
Colony.) 

North Carolina Council for National Defense 
Executive Committee 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Henry L. Stevens, Jr., Chairman Warsaw 

R. L. McMillan, Director Raleigh 



248 North Carolina Manual 

W. H. Weatherspoon Raleigh 

General J. Van B. Metts Raleigh 

D. B. McCrary : Asheboro 

Dr. C. V. Reynolds Raleigh 

Albert Coates Chapel Hill 

R. H. Mason Raleigh 

Geo. K. Snow „ Mount Airy 

I. 0. Schaub Raleigh 

Irving Hall Raleigh 

W. T. Joyner Raleigh 

Jonathan Daniels Raleigh 

C. C. Spaulding Durham 

J. Scott McFayden ; Fayetteville 

John D. Warlick Jacksonville 

Mrs. W. T. Bost Raleigh 

Mrs. J. H. Highsmith Raleigh 

Mrs. Walter G. Craven Charlotte 

State Board of Education 

N. C. Constitution, Art. IX, sec. 8; G. S. 115-116 

Composition: Fifteen members. Three Ex-officio. Twelve ap- 
pointed by the Governor.* 

L. Y. Ballentine, Lieutenant Governor Varina 

Charles M. Johnson, State Treasurer Raleigh 

Clyde A. Erwin, Superintendent of Public Instruction Raleigh 

Appointed by the Governor: 

Districts: 

No. 1 W. C. Dawson Elizabeth City 

2 A. C. Edwards Hookerton 

3 A. McL. Graham Clinton 

4 L. M. Massey „ Zebulon 

5 Santford Martin Winston-Salem 

6 A. S. Brower Durham 

7 Horace E. Stacy Lumberton 

8 Ryan McBryde Raeford 

9 Harry E. Isenhour. Salisbury 

10 Julian S. Miller Charlotte 

11 C. A. Rudisill Cherryville 

12 Mrs. E. L. McKee Sylva 

* By Constitutional amendment adopted in 1944, after April 1, 
1945, the Board will consist of the Lieutenant Governor, State 
Treasurer, Superintendent of Public Instruction and ten members 
appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 249 

^ State Board of Elections 
Rev. 4300; 1901, c. 89, s. 5; 1933, c. 165, s. 1; C. S. 5921; G. S. 163-8 

Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Wm. T. Joyner, Chairman (D) Raleigh 

Walter H. Woodson, Secretary (D) Salisbury 

J. Ray Morgan (D) Waynesville 

Adrian S. Mitchell (R) Winton 

Pressley E. Brown ( R ) Wilkesboro 

R. C. Maxwell, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

Elementary Textbook Commission 
1923, c. 136, s. 325; 1943, c. 627, s. 1; C. S. 5735; G. S. 115-263 

Composition: Seven members. Appointed by the Governor and 
the Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

H. B. Marrow, Chairman Smithfield 

Miss Virginia Kirkpatrick, Secretary Charlotte 

Miss Clara Heame Roanoke Rapids 

A. J. Hutchins Canton 

W. B. Owens, Jr. '. Winston-Salem 

Miss Cynthia Reeves Greensboro 

J. S. Waters Pittsboro 

Fort Fisher National Park Commission 

1939, c. 251, s. 1 

Composition: Five members. Four appointed by the Governor; 
one Ex-officio. 

R. Bruce Etheridge, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

J. A. Taylor Wilmington 

Oscar F. Cooper Wilmington 

Roger Moore Wilmington 

Rev. Andrew J. Howell Wilmington 

Gasoline and Oil Inspection Board 

1937, c. 425, s. 9; 1941, c. 220; G. S. 119-26 

Composition: Five members. Two Ex-officio. Three appointed 
by the Governor. 

Andrew Joyner, Jr. Greensboro 

W. T. Spencer Gastonia 

Sam M. Bason Yanceyville 

Ex-officio: 

Edwin Gill, Commissioner of Revenue, Chairman Raleigh 

H. L. Shankle, Director Gasoline and Oil Inspection 

Division, Secretary Raleigh 



250 North Carolina Manual 

N. C. Local Governmental Employees' Retirement System 
1939, c. 390, s. 8; 1941, c. 357, s. 6; S. L. 1943, c. 535; G. S. 128-28 

Composition: Seven members. Two Ex-officio. Five appointed 
by the Governor and confirmed by Senate. 
(Same Board as Teachers and State Employees Retirement System) 

Charles M. Johnson, State Treasurer, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Clyde A. Erwin, Superintendent Public Instruction, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

L. C. Gifford Hickory 

Millard F. Jones Rocky Mount 

Mrs. Annie Swindell Durham 

Paul Kelly Raleigh 

Jonathan Woody • Waynesville 

Baxter Durham, Secretary Raleigh 

North Carolina State Board of Health 

Rev. s. 4435; Code, s. 2875; 1879, c. 177, s. 1; 1885, c. 237, s. 1; 

1893, c. 214, s. 1; 1911, c. 62, s. 1; 1931, c. 177, s. 1; C. S. 7048; 

G. S. 130-1 

Composition: Nine members. Five appointed by the Governor. 
Four elected by the Medical Society. 

Dr. S. D. Craig, President Winston-Salem 

Dr. J. N. Johnson, Vice President Goldsboro 

Dr. G. G. Dixon Ayden 

Dr. H. Lee Large Rocky Mount 

Larry L Moore, Jr Wilson 

Dr. W. T. Rainey Fayetteville 

Dr. Hubert B. Haywood .'. .'.... Raleigh 

Dr. John Labruce Ward Asheville 

Dr. J. O. Nolan Kannapolis 

State Highway and Public Works Commission 

1933, c. 172, s. 2; 1935, c. 257, s. 1; 1937, c. 297, s. 1; 

1941, c. 57, s. 1; G. S. 136-1 

Composition: Chairman and ten commissioners. Appointed by 
the Governor. 

Charles Ross, Acting Chairman (Official Address) Raleigh 

Carroll Wilson Roanoke Rapids 

John G. Clark Greenville 

Dr. Guy V. Gooding- Kenansville 

John N. Hackney Wilson 

George W. Kane Roxboro 

D. B. McCrary Asheboro 

Charles A. Cannon Concord 

Virgil D. Guire Lenoir 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 251 

T. Max Watson Forest City 

Percy B. Ferebee Andrews 

North Carolina Hospitals Board of Control 

1943, c. 136; G. S. 122-7 

(This Board has the management of the State Hospital at Ral- 
eigh, the State Hospital at Morganton, the State Hospital at Golds- 
boro and the Caswell Training School.) 

Composition: Sixteen members. One Ex-officio and fifteen ap- 
pointed by the Governor and approved by the General Assembly.) 

N. E. Edgerton, Chairman Raleigh 

Mrs. Rivers D. Johnson, Vice Chairman Warsaw 

Carl V. Reynolds, M.D., Secretary Board of Health, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

W. G. Clark , Tarboro 

W. A. Dees Goldsboro 

J. H. Beall ' ; Lenoir 

Lois F. Stanford, M.D Durham 

Mrs. Andrew Blair Charlotte 

Charles C. Poindexter, D.D.S. Greensboro 

C. Wayland Spruill Windsor 

Wingate M. Johnson, M.D. Winston-Salem 

Leonard L. Oettinger Kinston 

J. Dwight Barbour Clayton 

R. H. Crawford, M.D Rutherford 

Horace M. Baker, M.D. Lumberton 

Yates S. Palmer, M.D _ Valdese 

North Carolina Industrial Commission 
1929, c. 120, s. 51; 1931, c. 274, s. 8; G. S. 97-77 

Composition: Three members. Appointed by the Governor. 

T. A. Wilson, Chairman Raleigh 

Pat Kimzey ....". , Brevard 

Buren Jurney Statesville 

The Board of Commissioner of the Law Enforcement Officers 

Benefit and Retirement Fund 

1937, c. 349, s. 8; 1939, c. 6; 1941, cc. 56, 157; 1943, c. 11"); 

G. S. 143-166 

Composition: Seven members. Three Ex-officio. Four appointed 

by the Governor. 

Ex-officio: 

George Ross Pou, Chairman, State Auditor Ralei.^h 

William P. Hodges, Insurance Commissioner Raleigh 

Charles M. Johnson, State Treasure!' Kak'igh 



252 North Carolina Manual 

Appointed by the Governor: 

E. G. Shore ^ Winston-Salem 

Oscar Pitts Asheville 

B. Everett Jordan Burlington 

Walter F, Anderson Charlotte 

Library Commission of North Carolina 

1909, c. 873, s. 1; C. S. 6597; G. S. 125-18 

Composition: Five members. Two Ex-officio. Two appointed 
by the N. C. Library Association. One appointed by the Governor. 

Carrie Broughton, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Clyde A. Erwin, Superintendent Public Instruction, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Frank P. Graham Chapel Hill 

T. W. Allen Creedmore 

Dr. Edgar W. Knight '. Chapel Hill 

Miss Marjorie Beal, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

^ Local Government Commission 

1931, c. 60, s. 7; 1931, c. 296, s. 8; 1933, c. 31, s. 1; G. S. 159-3 

Composition: Nine members. Four Ex-officio. Five appointed 
by the Governor. 

Charles M. Johnson, Treasurer, Chairman and Treasurer, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State, Ex-officio Raleigh 

George Ross Pou, Auditor, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Edwin Gill, Commissioner of Revenue, Ex-officio Raleigh 

John L. Skinner Littleton 

R. Linn Bernhardt Salisbury 

E. K. Butler Lumberton 

James G. Hanes Winston-Salem 

W. F. Carr Durham 

North Carolina Merit System Council 
1941, c. 370, s. 1; G. S. 126-1 

Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Governor. 

J. L. Memory, Chairman Wake Forest 

Harry Wilson Morganton 

R. O. Everett Durham 

S. Amos Maynard Greensboro 

J. W. Harrelson Raleigh 

Dr. Frank DeVyver, Supervisor Durham 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 253 

Municipal Board of Control 

1917, c. 136, sub. ch 2, s. 4; 1935, c. 440; 1941, c. 97; 
C. S. 2779; G. S. 160-196 

Composition: Three members. All Ex-officio under the Act. 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State, Secretary Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General, Chairman Raleigh 

Stanley Winborne, Chairman Utilities Commission Raleigh 

State Board of Pensions 

1921, c. 189, s. 1; C. S. 5168(a); G. S. 112-7 

Composition: Three members. All Ex-oflRcio under the above Act. 

R. Gregg Cherry, Governor Raleigh 

HaiTy McMullan, Attorney General Raleigh 

George Ross Pou, Auditor Raleigh 

The State Planning Board 
1937, c. 345, s. 2; G. S. 143-172 

Composition: Nine members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Collier Cobb, Jr., Chairman Chapel Hill 

D. Hiden Ramsey Asheville 

W. F. Carr Durham 

Robert M. Hanes Winston-Salem 

Capus Waynick '. High Point 

George W. Kane Roxboro 

Harry Caldwell Greensboro 

R. Bruce Etheridge Manteo 

Dr. Howard W. Odum, Secretary Chapel Hill 

State Probation Commission 
1937, c. 132, s. 5; G. S. 15-201 

Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Clyde A. Erwin Raleigh 

W. C. Harris Raleigh 

Dr. John S. Bradway Durham 

Judge Wilson Warlick Newton 

L. P. McLendon Greensboro 

North Carolina Rural Electrification Authority 
1935, c. 288, s. 1; G. S. 117-1 

Composition: Six members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Gwyn B. Price, Chairman Raleigh 

Ed F. Allen Lenoir 



254 "* North Carolina Manual 

Mrs. Jane S. McKinimon Kaleigh 

W. M. Sherard Hendersonville 

D. E. Purcell Reidsville, RFD 

S. H. Hobbs, Jr :' Chapel Hill 

North Carolina Symphony Society, Inc. 
1943, c. 755; G. S. 140-6 

Composition: Sixteen members. Two Ex-officio. Four appointed 

by the Governor. Ten appointed by the Society. 

R. Gregg Cherry, Governor, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Clyde A. Erwin, Superintendent Public Instruction, 

Ex-officio ■ Raleigh 

Appointed by Governor: 

George Stevens Asheville 

Robert Dunn : Charlotte 

T. Holt Haywood Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Kay Dixon Gastonia 

Teachers' and State Employees' Retirement System 
1941, c. 25, s. 6; 1943, c. 719; G. S. 135-6 

Composition: Seven members. Five appointed by the Governor, 

approved by Senate. Two Ex-officio. 

Charles M." Johnson, State Treasurer, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Clyde A. Erwin, Superintendent Public Instruction, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

L. C. Gifford Hickory 

Millard F. Jones Rocky Mount 

Mrs. Annie H. Swindell Durham 

Paul Kelly Raleigh 

Jonathan Woody ^ .........Waynesville 

Baxter Durham, Secretary Raleigh 

Unemployment Compensation Commission 

Ex. 1936, c. 1, s. 10; 1941, c. 108, s. 10; 1941, c. 279, ss. 1-3; 
1943, c. 277, s. 15; G. S. 96-3 

Coinposition: Seven members. Appointed by the Governor. 

A. L. Fletcher, Chairman Raleigh 

R. Grady Rankin Charlotte 

R. Dave Hall ; Belmont 

C. A. Fink Spencer 

Dr. Harry D. Wolfe Chapel Hill 

C. E. Cowan , Morganton 

Mrs. Frank Fuller, Jr. Durham 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 255 

Utilities Commission 
1933, c. 134; 1941, c. 97; G. S. 62-1 

Composition: Three members. Appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the Senate. 

Stanley Winborne, Chairman Raleigh 

Fred C. Hunter, Associate Commissioner Charlotte 

Robert Grady Johnson, Associate Commissioner Raleigh 



N. C. CONFEDERATE INSTITUTION 

Woman's Home at Fayetteville 
1913, c. 62; C. S. 5135; G. S. 112-2 

Composition: Seven members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Charles G. Rose, Chairman Fayetteville 

A. E. Cook, Secretary Fayetteville 

Mrs. E. R. McKethan Fayetteville 

Mrs. Quinton Gregory Halifax 

Mrs. Walter Woodard Wilson 

Mrs. J. S. Rovi'e ^ Hickory 

T. T. Thorne Rocky Mount 

W. W. Home Fayetteville 

Mrs. John H. Anderson, Advisory Member Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA INSTITUTIONS 

CORRECTIONAL (White) 

Eastern Carolina Industrial Training School for Boys, 

Rocky Mount 

1923, c. 254, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 5; 1927, c. 144; C. S. 7362; 

G. S. 134-67 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 

1943, c. 776 

Industrial Farm Colony for Women, Kinston 

1927, c. 219, s. 2; G. S. 134-36 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 

1943, c. 776 

State Home and Industrial School for Girls, Samarcand 

1917, c. 255, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 4; 1929, c. 279, s. 1; 1937, c. 147, 
s. 1; C. S. 7329; G. S. 134-22 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 

1943, c. 776 

Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial School, Concord 

1907, c. 509, s. 6; 1907, c. 955, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 2; 
C. S. 7313; G. S. 134-1 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 

1943, c. 776 

CORRECTIONAL (Negro) 

Morrison Training School, Hoffman 
1921, c. 190, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 6; 1927, c. 63; 1941, c. 241; 

G. S. 134-90 

Under the management of the State Board of Correction and 
Training. 

1943, c. 776 

[ 256 ] 



North Carolina Institutions 257 

State Training School for Negro Girls 
1943, c. 381; G. S. 143-84.1 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 

1943, c, 776 

EDUCATIONAL (White) 

Appalachian State Teachers College, Boone 

Rev. s. 4229; 1903, c. 798, ss. 1, 9, 11; 1907, c. 526, s. 1; 1915, c. 527, 

s. 1; 1917, c. 100, s. 1; 1919, c. 231, s. 1; Pr. 1925, c. 204; 
Pr. 1929, c. 66; G. S. 116-66 

Composition: Nine members. Appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by Senate. 

V. D. Guire, Chairman Lenoir 

G. P. Hagaman, Secretary Boone 

Wm. J. Conrad, Jr. Winston-Salem 

T. C. Bowie West Jefferson 

Hugh Cranor Wilkesboro 

W. M. Moore Statesville 

Mrs. E. F. Reid Lenoir 

H. H. Sullivan Asheville 

Eugene Transou Sparta 

Wade E. Brown Boone 

East Carolina Teachers College, Greenville 

1907, cc. 820, 515; 1911, c. 159, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 7; 1927, c. 164; 
1929, c. 259; C. S. 5866; G. S. 116-59 

Composition: Thirteen members. Twelve appointed by the Gov- 
ernor with the approval of the Senate. One Ex-officio. 

Clyde A. Erwin, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

F. C. Harding Greenville 

John Herbert Waldrop Greenville 

A. B. Corey Greenville 

Mrs. Frank L. Grantham Rocky Mount 

O, P. Makepeace Sanford 

A. B. Andrews Raleigh 

Mrs. Charles M. Johnson Raleigh 

Mrs. Charles S. Forbes Greenville 

Mrs. John G. Dawson Kinston 

Mrs. W. B. Murphy Snow Hill 

Dr. Paul Fitzgerald Greenville 

J. K. Warren Trenton 



258 North Carolina Manual 

North Carolina School for the Deaf, Morganton 

Rev., s. 4203; 1891, c. 399, s. 2; 1901, c. 210; 1925, c. 306, s. 11; 
C. S. 5889; G. S. 116-121 

Composition: Seven members. Appointed by the Governor. 

W. W. Neal, President Marion 

O. A. Betts, Vice President Goldsboro 

Harry L. Wilson, Secretary Morganton 

L. A. Dysart ■■ :. Lenoir 

W. M. Shuford Concord 

Dr. F. E. Motley Charlotte 

Dr. H. E. Rondthaler Winston-Salem 

Oxford Orphanage, Oxford 

Private Laws, 1923, c. 119 

Composition: Three members. Appointed by the Governor. 

R. L. Flowers Durham 

Benjamin Cone Greensboro 

Thomas L. Simmons Rocky Mount 

Pembroke State College for Indians 
1925, c. 306, s. 9; 1929, c. 238; 1931, c. 275; 1941, c. 323; 

G. S. 116-81 
Composition: Eleven members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Rev. L. W. Jacobs, Chairman Pembroke 

John L. Carter, Secretary Pembroke, Rt. 1 

John O. Brooks Fairmont 

Rev. S. A. Hammonds , Lumberton 

J. R. Spaulding , Rowland 

Edmond Lowry 1 Elrod 

Elias Harris '. Maxton, Rt. 3 

M. L. Lowry Pembroke 

Z. A. Lowry Pembroke 

C. L. Maynor Pembroke 

E. B. Sampson Pembroke 

James E. Hillman, Ph.D., Director Raleigh 

N. C. School for the Blind, Raleigh 
Rev., 4187; Code, s. 2227; 1881, c. 211, s. 1; 1917, c. 135, s. 1; 
1925, c. 306, s. 10; G. S. 116-106 
Composition: Eleven members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Alfred Williams, Chairman Raleigh 

J. Edward Allen Warrenton 



NcRTH Carolina Institutions 259 

George R. Bennette Greensboro 

E. J. Britt Lumberton 

W. G. Enloe , Raleigh 

William A. Graham Kinston 

Dr. Carl V. Tyner Leaksville 

Dr. W. A. Rogers Franklin 

Len R. Roberts Durham 

Mrs. W. H. Sullivan Greensboro 

Carroll W. Weathers Raleigh 

G. E. Lineberry, Secretary Raleigh 

TRUSTEES UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

N. C. State College, Raleigh 

Woman's College of North Carolina, Greensboro 

Composition: One hundred members. Elected by the General 
Assembly. The legal term of office expires April 1st of year indi- 
cated. 

C. S. 5789; G. S. 116-4 
*Executive Committee 

Governor R. Gregg Cherry, Chairman, Raleigh 

1946 

Charles Whedbee, Hertford 
John W. Clark, Franklinville 
O. Max Gardner, Shelby 

1948 

John Sprunt Hill, Durham 
Walter Murphy, Salisbury 
John J. Parker, Charlotte 

1950 

Mrs. Laura Weil Cone, Greensboro 
Mrs. May L. Tomlinson, High Point 
Haywood Parker, Asheville 

1952 

Josephus Daniels, Raleigh 

Clarence Poe, Raleigh 

Richard J. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

*Term expires July 1, of year indicated. 



260 North Carolina Manual 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
For Life 

Cameron Morrison Charlotte Mecklenburg 

O. Max Gardner Shelby Cleveland 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus Raleigh :..:.... Wake 

Clyde R. Hoey Shelby Cleveland 

J. Melville Broughton Raleigh Wake 

Ex-Officio 

R. Gregg Cherry, Governor, Gastonia Gaston 

Clyde A. Erwin, State Superintendent of Public 

Instruction, Rutherfordton Rutherford 

Alexander B. Andrews, Secretary to Board, Raleigh Wake 

1947 

J. B. Fearing Windsor ., Bertie 

William H. Sullivan Greensboro Guilford 

Lionel Weil Goldsboro Wayne 

Note — For vacant terms of Emmet H. Bellamy, Burton Craige and 
Harry P. Grier appearing in the 1947 list. 

1953 

Wade Barber Fittsboro Chatham 

Samuel M. Blount Washington Beaufort 

Victor S. Bryant Durham Durham 

Gertrude Carraway New Bern Craven 

John W. Clark Franklin ville Randolph 

Collier Cobb, Jr Chapel Hill Orange 

George S. Coble Lexington Davidson 

Mrs. Laura Weil Cone Greensboro Guilford 

John G. Dawson Kinston Lenoir 

Joseph C. Eagles Wilson ......•.....;,,.....,. Wilson 

Samuel J. Ervin Morganton :.:.......^....-ii.^..:.... „ Burke 

W. Roy Hampton Plymouth '..: ......Washington 

John Sprunt Hill Durham Durham 

Benjamin K. Lassiter Oxford Granville 

John Q. LeGrand Wilmington l..i:...:.:'.... New Hanover 

Henry A. Lineberger Gastonia Gaston 

Mrs. Frances Newsom Miller Raleigh .i'.:.^... Wake 

G'enn C. Palmer Waynesville Haywood 

Edwin Pate Laurinburg Scotland 

James C. Pittman Sanf ord Lee 

J. E. Ramsay Salisbury ..; .~ Rowan 

Roy Rowe Burgaw .....!.. Pender 

J. Benton Stacy Ruffin :.. , Rockingham 

Kenneth S. Tanner Spindale ...i. ;.:..: Rutherford 

W^illiam B. Umstead Durham Durham 



North Carolina Institutions 261 



1947 

Mrs. Kate P. Arrington Warrenton Warren 

H. D. Bateman Wilson Wilson 

Emmett H. Bellamy Wilmington New Hanover 

Burton Craige Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Harry P. Grier Statesville Iredell 

Battle A. Hocutt Clayton Johnston 

Ira T. Johnston Jefferson Ashe 

John H. Kerr, Sr. Warrenton Warren 

J. Heath Klutz Albemarle Stanly 

M. C. Lassiter Snow Hill Greene 

W. L. Lumpkin Louisburg Fz'anklin 

G. L. Lyerly Hickory Catawba 

H. B. Marrow Smithfield Johnston 

Major L. P. McLendon Greensboro Guilford 

William D. Merritt Roxboro Person 

Walter Murphy Salisbury Rowan 

Haywood Parker Asheville Buncombe 

Clarence Poe Raleigh Wake 

J. T. Pritchett Lenoir Caldwell 

Carl A. Rudisill Cherryville Gaston 

George Stephens , Asheville Buncombe 

Fred I. Sutton Kinston } Lenoir 

H. P. Taylor. Wadesboro Anson 

John W. Umstead, Jr. Chapel Hill Orange 

Charles Whedbee Hertford Perquimans 

1949 

Miss Emily Austin Tarboro Edgecombe 

Miss Annie Moore Cherry Enfield Halifax 

David Clark Charlotte Mecklenbilrg 

James H. Clark Elizabethtown Bladen 

Clyde K. Council Wannanish Columbus 

Josephus Daniels Raleigh Wake 

B. B. Everett Palmyra .'. Halifax 

Mrs. R. S. Ferguson... Taylorsville Burke 

James S. Ficklin Greenville Pitt 

James Alexander Gray...... Winston-Salem Forsyth 

R. L. Harris Roxboro Person 

W. E. Horner Sanford Lee 

Hugh Horton Williamston Martin 

Robert Eugene Little Wadesboro Anson 

Dan K. Moore Sylva '. Jackson 

Thomas J. Pearsall Rocky Mount Nash 

J. Hawley Poole West End Moore 

J. A. Pritchett Windsor Bertie 

Claude W. Rankin Fayetteville Cumberland 



262 North Carolina Manual 



Dr. Foy Roberson Durham Durham 

T. Clarence Stone Stoneville Rockingham 

W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro Wayne 

Mrs. May L. Tomlinson High Point Guilford 

F. E. Wallace Kinston Lenoir 

Graham Woodard Wilson Wilson 

1951 

Arch Turner Allen Raleigh Wake 

Alexander B. Andrews Raleigh Wake 

Edward Stephenson Askew Oriental Pamlico 

Kemp Davis Battle Rocky Mount Nash 

James Albert Bridger Bladenboro „ Bladen 

Charles Albert Cannon Concord Cabarrus 

Thurmond Chatham Winston-Salem Forsyth 

William Grimes Clark Tarboro Edgecombe 

Arthur Mills Dixon Gastonia Gaston 

Rufus Alexander Doughton Sparta Alleghany 

Frank Wills Hancock, Jr. Oxford Granville 

Charles Andrew Jonas Lincolnton .,._ Lincoln 

Arthur Hill London Pittsboro Chatham 

Mrs. Sadie McBrayer McCain Sanitorium Hoke 

Mrs. Gertrude Dills McKee Sylva Jackson 

Reid Atwater Maynard Burlington Alamance 

Raymond Maxwell New Bern Craven ^ 

Andrew Lee Monroe Raleigh Wake 

Kemp Battle Nixon Lincolnton Lincoln 

John J. Parker „ Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Robert Wright Proctor Marion McDowell 

Richard Joshua Reynolds Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Benjamin F. Royal Morehead City Carteret 

William B. Shuford Hickory Catawba 

Miss Grace P. Taylor Danbury Stokes 

Western North Carolina Teachers College 

1925, c. 270, s. 2; 1929, c. 251, s. 2; G. S. 116-46 

Composition: Nine members. Appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by Senate. 

D. Hiden Ramsey, Chairman Asheville 

Mrs. D. H. Tillett Andrews 

Han-y E. Buchanan Hendersonville 

E. B. Whitaker ;. Bryson City 

Mrs. J. S. Silversteen Brevard 

E. E. Wheeler Asheville 

Frank Hyatt Bryson City 

Morgan Cooper .;:;: Forest City 

Glenn C. Palmer Clyde, Rt. 1 



North Carolina Institutions 263 

EDUCATIONAL (Negro) 
The Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina 

Rev., s. 4223; 1899, c. 389, as. 2, 3; 1939, c. 65, s. 4; 
1943, c. 132; C. S. 5828; G. S. 116-94 

Composition: Sixteen members. Fifteen appointed by the Gov- 
ei-nor. One Ex-officio. 

Clyde A. Erwin, Ex-officio ...,...., Raleigh 

C. A. Hines, Chairman .".!. : Greensboro 

Guy B. Phillips .:.:..: Chapel Hill 

H. B. Caldwell Greensboro 

Julian Price Greensboro 

Rev. John J. Green Greensboro 

R. R. Ingram Albemarle 

G. Foster Hankins Lexington 

Emmett Bellamy Wilmington 

H. A. Scott Haw River 

J. H. Coward Ayden 

Thomas J. Pearsall Rocky Mount 

W. R. Vaughan Henderson 

Dr. C. T. Whitten High Point 

L. P. McLendon Greensboro 

Shelley B. Caveness Greensboro 

Elizabeth City State Teachers College 

1921, c. 61; 1925, c. 306; G. S. 116-103 

Composition: Nine members. Appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by Senate. 

G. R. Little, Chairman '. Elizabeth City 

Mrs. J. G. Fearing, Secretary .•......; Elizabeth City 

Miles L. Clark :: :...;.....:: -Z Elizabeth City 

W. I. Halstead South Mills 

Capt. J. L. Wiggins ...'..'........ Edenton 

John H. Hall ..Elizabeth City 

Herbert Peele Elizabeth City 

W. Howard Pitt Hertford 

Dr. N. C. Newbold, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Fayetteville State Teachers College 

1921, c. 61; 1925, c. 306, s. 9; G. S. 116-103 

Composition: Nine members. Appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by Senate. 

Major John H. Cook, Chairman Fayetteville 

Richard M. Lilly, Acting Chairman Fayetteville 



264 North Carolina Manual 

Maurice Fleishman, Secretary Fayetteville 

J. L. Emanuel Raleigh 

W. E. Horner Sanford 

Rev. R. I. Johnson New Bern 

Colonel Terry A. Lyon Fayetteville 

Dr. W. L. McRae Red Springs 

Emil Rosenthal Goldsboro 

North Carolina College for Negroes, Durham 

1925, c. 306, s. 9 (a); 1939, c. 65, s. 4; G. S. 116-99 

Composition: Twelve members. Appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by Senate. 

Clyde A. Erwin, Ex-officio Raleigh 

R. L. Flowers, Chairman Durham 

Oscar G. Barker Durham 

R. M. Gantt _ Durham 

Ralph Gardner Shelby 

Edgar W. Knight Chapel Hill 

J. W. Noell Roxboro 

J. T. Pritchett '. ^ Lenoir 

Roy Rowe Burgaw 

C. C. Spaulding Durham 

W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro 

F. E. Wallace Kinston 

Capus Waynick High Point 

The Colored Orphanage of North Carolina, Oxford 

1887, c. 47; 1927, c. 162; G. S. 116-139 

Composition: Thirteen members. Five appointed by the Governor 
and eight under the by-laws of the institution. 

Appointed by the Governor: 

B. W. Parham Oxford 

A. H. Powell Oxford 

B. K. Lassiter ...Oxford 

Dr. R. L. Noblin Oxford 

M. S. Currin : Oxford 

Appointed under by-laws: 

Dr. E. E. Toney, Chairman Oxford 

Rev. N. A. Cheek Elberon 

Dr. David D. Jones Greensboro 

C. C. Spaulding Durham 



North Carolina Institutions 265 

Dr. J. E. Shepherd Durham 

John W. Mitchell Hampton, Va. 

Wm. R. Johnson Norfolk, Va. 

N. C. School for the Blind and Deaf, Raleigh 

Rev., 4187; Code s. 2227; 1881, c. 211, s. 1; 1917, c. 135, s. 1; 
1925, c. 306, s. 10; G. S. 116-106 

Composition: Eleven members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Alfred Williams, Chairman Raleigh 

J. Edward Allen Warrenton 

George R. Bennette Greensboro 

E. J. Britt Lumberton 

W. G. Enloe Raleigh 

William A. Graham Kinston 

Carl V. Tyner Leaksville 

Dr. W. A. Rogers Franklin 

Ben R. Roberts Durham 

Mrs. W. H. Sullivan Greensboro 

Carroll W. Weathers Raleigh 

G. E. Lineberry, Secretary Raleigh 

The Winston-Salem Teachers College 

1921, c. 61; 1925, c. 306, s. 9; G. S. 116-103 

Composition: Nine members. Appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by Senate. 

H. E. Fries, Chairman Winston-Salem 

John C. Whitaker, Vice Chairman Winston-Salem 

W. A. Blair Winston-Salem 

Robert H. Hanes Winston-Salem 

Robert W. Gorrell Winston-Salem 

Gordon Gray Winston-Salem 

O. K. Kirkman High Point 

J. Harmon Linville Kernersville 

Robert Reynolds Winston-Salem 

N. C. Newbold, Ex-officio, Dept. Public Instruction Raleigh 

HOSPITALS (White) 

Caswell Training School, Kinston 
1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 3; C. S. 6159 (a); G. S. 122-7 

Under the North Carolina Hospitals Board of Control. 

1943, c. 136 



266 North Carolina Manual 

Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital 

Pr. 1913, c. 400 

Composition: Fifteen members. Eight members appointed by 
Mrs. Moses H, Cone; three members appointed by the Governor; 
one member appointed by the Greensboro City Commissioner; one 
member appointed by the Guilford County Commissioners; one 
member by Watauga County Commissioners and one by the Guil- 
ford County Medical Association. 

Mrs. Moses H. Cone, President Baltimore, Md. 

Herman Cone, Vice President : Greensboro 

Bernard M. Cone, Secretary-Treasurer Greensboro 

R. R. King Greensboro 

Miss Etta Cone Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. Bertha L. Cone Baltimore, Md. 

Ceasar Cone Greensboro 

N. S. Calhoun Greensboro 

Dr. Samuel F. Ravenel Greensboro 

Thurmond Chatham Winston-Salem 

Sidney J. Stern Greensboro 

L. P. McLendon Greensboro 

Chas. A. Hines Greensboro 

Dr. Frank A. Sharpe Greensboro 

Howard Holderness Greensboro 

J. E. Holshouser Boone 

N. C. SANATORIUMS FOR THE TREATMENT OF 
TUBERCULOSIS 

Black Mountain, Sanatorium and Wilson 

1907, c. 964; Ex. session 1913, c. 40, s. 1; 1923, cc. 96, 127; 1925, 
c. 306, s. 12; 1935, c. 91, ss. 2, 3; 1935, c. 138; 1939, c. 325; 

G. S. 131-62 

Composition: Twelve members. Appointed by the Governor with 
the approval of the Senate. 

Lee L. Gravely, Chairman Rocky Mount 

Dr. Thurman D. Kitchin, Vice Chairman Wake Forest 

Carl C. Council, Secretary Durham 

Dr. G. E. Bell : _ Wilson 

Dr. J. N. Britt Lumberton 

R. E. Finch Black Mountain 

Robert M. Hanes Winston-Salem 

Edwin Morgan Laurel Hill 

Mrs. Max T. Payne Greensboro 

Dr. Paul Ringer Asheville 

Dr. J. R. Terry Lexington 



North Carolina Institutions 267 

Ernest V. Webb Kinston 

Dr. Carl V. Reynolds, Secretary State Board of Health, 

Ex-officio .<.-. Raleigh 

North Carolina Orthopedic Hospital, Gastonia 
1917, c. 199, s. 4; C. S. 7254; G. S. 131-1 

Composition: Nine members. Appointed by the Governor. 

P. C. Whitlock, President ........;: Charlotte 

George Blanton, Chairman Shelby 

Ralph S. Robinson, Secretary Gastonia 

John L. Beal, Treasurer ...'....:;. Gastonia 

Kay Dixon Gastonia 

Herman Weil .!,. Goldsboro 

Paul R. Ervin „,.,. Charlotte 

J. A. Jones „,....'.L. Charlotte 

R. A. Moore, M.D Winston-Salem 

State Hospital for the Insane, Morganton 
1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 3; G. S. 122-7 

Under the North Carolina Hospitals Board of Control. 

1943, c. 136 

State Hospital for the Insane, Raleigh 
1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 3; G. S. 122-7 
Under North Carolina Hospitals Board of Control. 

1943, c. 136 

HOSPITALS (Negro) 

State Hospital at Goldsboro 

1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 3; G. S. 112-1 

Under the management of the North Carolina Hospitals Board 
of Control. 

1943, c. 136 



EXAMINING BOARDS 

State Board of Accountancy 
1913, c. 157; 1925, c. 261, s. 11; 1939, c. 21; C. S. 7008; G. S. 93-12 

Composition: Four members. Appointed by the Governor. 

George E. Perrin, President Greensboro 

Harry W. Bundy, Vice-President Elizabeth City 

W. M. Russ, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

W. Bowen Henderson Asheville 

State Board of Architectural Examination and Registration 
1915, c. 270, s. 1; C. S. 4986; G. S. 83-2 

Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Erie G. Stillwell, President Hendersonville 

Walter W. Hook, Vice President Charlotte 

James B. Lynch, Treasurer Wilmington 

Ross Shumaker, Secretary Raleigh 

J. Burton Wilder Greensboro 

State Board of Barber Examiners 
1929, c. 119, s. 6; G. S. 86-6 

Composition: Three members. Appointed by the Governor. 

M. C. Whitney, Chairman Winston-Salem 

M. B. Berry Roxboro 

J. M. Cheek High Point 

R. P. Branch, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

State Board of Chiropody Examiners 
1919, c. 78, s. 3; C. S. 6765; G. S. 90-190 

Composition: Three members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. Fred W. Isaacs, Chairman Durham 

Dr. O. B. McRae Greensboro 

Dr. L. D. Abernathy, Secretary-Treasurer Charlotte 

North Carolina State Board of Chiropractic Examiners 
1917, c. 73, s. 1; 1933, c. 442, s. 1; C. S. 6711; G. S. 90-140 

Composition: Three members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. L. G. Rollins, President Hickory 

Dr. W. A. Keffer, Vice President Kinston 

Dr. C. H. Peters, Secretary-Treasurer Rocky Mount 

[ 268 ] 



Examining Boards 269 

North Carolina Licensing Board for Contractors 
1925, c. 318, s. 2; G. S. 87-2 
Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Governor. 

C. W. Mengel, Chairman Raleigh 

U. A. Underwood, Vice Chairman Wilmington 

F. D. Cline Raleigh 

V. P. Loftis Charlotte 

F. N. Thompson Charlotte 

W. J. Mann, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

N, C. State Board of Cosmetic Art Examiners 
1933, c. 179; 1935, c. 54, s. 2; G. S. 18-13 

Composition: Three members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Mrs. Sitha E. McConnell, Chairman. .^ Statesyille 

William P. Troutman, Vice Chairman Wilmington 

Mrs. J. M. Carson, Secretary Fayetteville 

Mrs. C. P. Bobbitt, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

State Board of Dental Examiners 

1879, c. 139; 1915, c. 178; 1935, c. 66, s. 1; G. S. 90-22 

Composition: Six members. Elected by the Society and com- 
missioned by the Governor. 

Dr. John R. Pharr, President Charlotte 

Dr. Wilbert Jacl^on, Secretary-Treasurer Clinton 

Dr. Paul E. Jones Farmville 

Dr. A. C. Current Gastonia 

Dr. D. L. Pridgen Fayetteville 

Dr. Neal Sheffield Greensboro 

Board of Examiners of Electrical Contractors 

1937, c. 87, s. 1; G. S. 87-39 

Composition: Five members. Three appointed by the Governor. 
Two Ex-officio. 

N. E. Cannady, Chairman, Ex-officio Oxford 

Leroy M. Keever, Vice Chairman Raleigh 

Marion B. Haynes >, Asheville 

Frank E. Hartis, Ex-officio Durham 

W. A. Darden Greenville 

D. S. Nichols, Field Representative Raleigh 

Mrs. James H. Anderson, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 



270 North Carolina Manual 

Embalmers Licensing Board 

Rev., s. 4384; 1901, c. 338, ss. 1, 2, 3; 1931, c. 174; 
C. S. 6777; G. S. 90-203 

Composition: Five members. Elected by State Board of Health. 

Edwin Branch, President Enfield 

Mrs. W. K. Sturdivant, Vice President North Wilkesboro 

W. N. Vogler, Secretary-Treasui-er Winston-Salem 

Harlow Mims Raleigh 

Durwood Creech Smithfield 

State Board of Registration for Engineers and Land Surveyors 
1921, c. 1, s. 3; C. S. 6055(d); G. S. 89-3 

Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Governor. 

John E. Lear, Chairman Raleigh 

A. C. Lee Charlotte 

J. E. S. Thorpe Franklin 

G. S. Harrell Shannon 

Carroll L. Mann, Secretary Raleigh 

State Board of Law Examiners 

1933, c. 210, s. 10; c. 331; 1935, cc. 31, 61; 1941, c. 344, s. 6; 

G. S. 84-24 

Composition: Seven members. Elected by the Council of the 
N. C. State Bar. 

L. R. Varser, Chairman • Lumberton 

Irving E. Carlyle Winston-Salem 

George B. Greene Kinston 

Kingsland Van Winkle Asheville 

W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro 

Thomas P. Pruitt Hickory 

S. J. Ervin, Jr. Morganton 

Edward L. Cannon, Secretary Raleigh 

State Board of Medical Examiners 

Rev., s. 4492; Code, s. 3123; 1858-9, c. 258, ss. 3, 4; Extra session 
1921, c. 44, s. 1; C. S. 6606; G. S. 90-2 

Composition: Seven members. Appointed by the N. C. Medical 
Society. 

Dr. Charles W. Armstrong Salisbury 

Dr. Ivan M. Proctor, Secretary „..Raleigh 

Dr. M. D. Bonner Jamestown 



Examining Boards 271 



Dr. Leslie Lee Kinston 

Dr. R. B. McKnight Charlotte 

Dr. Paul G. Parker Erwin 

Dr. Malory A. Pittman Wilson 

North Carolina Board of Nurse Examiners 

1917, c. 17, s. 1; 1925, c. 87, s. 2; 1931, c. 56; C. S. 6729; 

G. S. 90-158 

Composition: Five members. Three members elected by the 
association, one each by the State Medical Society and the North 
Carolina State Hospital Association. 

Miss Josephine Kerr, R.N., President Charlotte 

Miss Bessie M. Chapman, R.N., Secretary Raleigh 

Miss Myra Maxwell, R.N Wilson 

Dr. Moir S. Martin Mt. Airy 

Dr. Louten R. Hedgpeth Lumberton 

North Carolina State Board of Examiners in Optometry 

1909, c. 444, s. 3; 1915, c. 21, s. 1; 1935, c. 63; 

C. S. 6689; G. S. 90-116 

Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. Henry B. Day, President Raleigh 

Dr. Robert L. Wilson, Secretary-Treasurer Shelby 

Dr. E. F. Menius New Bern 

Dr. J. A. Palmer Charlotte 

Dr. E. A. Bisanar Hickory 

North Carolina State Board of Osteopathic Examination 

and Registration 

1907, c. 764, s. 1; 1913, c. 92, s. 1; 1937, c. 301, s. 1; 

C. S. 6701; G. S. 90-130' 

Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Govei-nor. 

Dr. E. M. Stafford, President Durham' 

Dr. Frank R. Heine, Secretary-Treasurer Greensboro 

Dr. A. R. Tucker Raleigh 

Dr. T. M. Rowlett Concord 

Dr. T. T. Spence Raleigh 

North Carolina State Board of Pharmacy 
Rev., s. 4473; 1905, c. 108, ss. 5, 7; C. S. 6652; G. S. 90-55 
Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Governor. 

J. Gordon Ballew, President Lenoir 

H. C. McAllister, Secretary-Treasurer Chapel Hill 



272 North Carolina Manual 

Marion B, Melvin Raleigh 

I. Thomas Reamer Durham 

Roger A. McDuffie Greensboro 

N. C. State Board of Photographic Examiners 
1935, c. 155, art. 2, s. 1; c. 318; G. S. 92-2 

Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Governor. 

Charles A. Farrell, Chairman Greensboro 

Ray W. Goodrich Winston-Salem 

B. A. Culberson Asheville 

Ben A. Stimson Statesville 

George M. Hoole Charlotte 

Edwin M. Stanley, Secretary-Treasurer „ Greensboro 

State Board of Examiners of Plumbing and Heating Contractors 
1931, c. 52, s. 1; 1933, c. 57; 1939, c. 224, s. 1; G. S. 87-16 
Composition: Seven members. Appointed by the Governor. 

W, H. Sullivan, Chairman Greensboro 

L. L. Vaughan, Vice Chairman Raleigh 

J. M. Jarrett, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

H. G. Baity Chapel Hill 

R. V. Sisk Charlotte 

R. H. Haley Charlotte 

C. C. Davis Wilmington 

W. F. Morrison, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

Board of Examiners for Licensing Tile Contractors 
1937, c. 86, s. 3; G. S. 87-30 

Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Governor. 

G. W. Carter, President Kinston 

J. Knight Davis, Secretary Wilmington 

B. F. McClamrock Raleigh 

V. J. McDaniel Asheville 

H. T. Thrower Charlotte 

North Carolina Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners 
Rev., s. 5432; 1903, c. 503, s. 2; C. S. 67^5; G. S. 90-180 

Composition: Five members. Appointed by the Governor. 

R. E. Taylor, President Hendersonville 

M. M. Leonai'd, Vice President Asheville 

P. C. McLain, Secretary-Treasurer High Point 

H. J. Rollins Rockingham 

J. H. Brown Tarboro 



STATE OWNED RAILROADS 

DIRECTORS OF STATE-OWNED RAILROADS 
Directors Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad 

Directors : 

W. M. Webb :. Morehead City 

William Dunn New Bern 

Raymond Maxwell New Bern 

L. B, Jenkins .....Kinston 

Selby Anderson Wilson 

Judson H. Blount Greenville 

Dr. D. J. Rose Goldsboro 

Officers : 

Judson H. Blount, President Greenville 

W. M. Webb, Chairman Morehead City 

F. E. Wallace, Secretary-Treasurer Kinston 

Carroll Weathers, Attorney Raleigh 

J. Nat Harrison, Expert Greenville 

Directors North Carolina Railroad 

Directors : 

Harry L. Riddle Morganton 

R. L. Brinson High Point 

E. C. Greene ^ Asheville 

D. P. Stone Belmont 

Reid A. Maynard Burlington 

Monroe M. Redding Hendersonville 

Rufus A. Doughton Sparta 

Henry Belk Goldsboro 

Officers: 

Harry L. Riddle, President Mor_ganton 

M. P. Dawson, Secretary-Treasurer Rocky Mount 

P. V. Critcher, Attorney Lexington 

Henry A. Dennis, Expert Henderson 



[273] 



PART VI 
LEGISLATIVE 



MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA— SESSION 1945 

Officers and Members of the Senate 

OFFICERS 

L. Y. Ballentine President Varina 

Archie C. Gay President pro tern Jackson 

3. Ray Byerly Principal Clerk Sanford 

Robert Rasberry Reading Clerk Grifton 

Herman Scott Sergeant-at-arms Pitsboro, RFD 

senators 
Alphabetically Arranged 

Name District Party Postoffice 

Aiken, John W Twenty-fifth Democrat Hickory 

Applewhite, R. L Fourth Democrat Halifax 

Barker, Carson M Eleventh Democrat Lumberton 

Barnes, Wiley G Thirteenth Democrat Raleigh 

Barnhardtj Luther E Twenty-first Democrat Concord 

Blythe, Joe L Twentieth Democrat Charlotte 

Carlyle, Irving E Twenty-second Democrat Winston-Salem 

Clark, W. G. ' Fourth Democrat Tarboro 

Corey, Arthur B Fifth Democrat Greenville 

Culpepper, W. T First Democrat Elizabeth City 

Currie, Claude Fourteenth Democrat Durham 

Daniel, E. A. Second Democrat Washington 

Davis, Carlos E Twenty-third Democrat Walnut Cove 

Dolley, Steve Twenty-sixth Democrat Gastonia 

Eagles, Joseph C Sixth Democrat Wilson 

Edney, Calvin R, Thirtieth Republican Marshall 

Gay, Archie C. Third Democrat Jackson 

Hampton, W. Roy Second Democrat Plymouth 

Hester, R. J., Jr Tenth Democrat Elizabethtown 

Hodges, Brandon P Thirty-first Democrat Asheville 

Hodges, W. B Thirty-second Democrat Hendersonville 

Horton, O. Lee Twenty-eighth Democrat Morganton 

Hundley, Geo. L Eighteenth Democrat , Thomasville 

Jenkins, Chas. }l First Democrat Aulander 

Kesler, John C. Twenty-first Democrat Salisbury 

Little, R. E. Nineteenth Democrat Wadesboro 

Long, F. D Fourteenth Democrat Roxboro 

Lumpkin, Willie Lee Sixth Democrat Louisburg 

Madry, W. Dennis Sixteenth Democrat Burlington 

Matheny, Wade B. Twenty-seventh Democrat Forest City 

McBryde, Ryan Twelfth Democrat Raeford 

Mitchell, Hugh G Twenty-fifth Democrat Statesville 

O'Berry, Thomas Eighth Democrat Goldsboro 

Pate, Edwin Eighteenth Democrat Laurinburg 

Penland, A. L. Thirty-third Democrat Hayesville 

Penny, George T Seventeenth '..Democrat Greensboro 

Pittman, J. C Thirteenth Democrat Sanford 

Price, J. Hampton Fifteenth Democrat , Leaksville 

Rogers, Carroll P Thirty-second Democrat Tryon 

Rose, Charles G Tenth Democrat Fayetteville 

Ross, Arthur » Twelfth Democrat Asheboro 

Rowe, Roy Ninth Democrat Burgaw 

Smith, W. Erskine Nineteenth Democrat Albemarle 

Somers, W. B Twenty-fourth Republican Wilkesboro 

Thomas, Edison M Twenty-ninth Republican Jefferson 

Vann, Henry Ninth Democrat.. Clinton 

Wallace, Lawrence H Eighth Democrat Smithfield 

Ward, D. L. Seventh Democrat New Bern 

Weathers, Lee B Twenty-seventh Democrat Shelby 

Whitaker, R. A Seventh Democrat Kinston 

[ 277 ] 



278 North Carolina Manual 

SENATORS 

Arranged by Districts 

(Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 
District Name Address 

1st W. T. Culpepper Elizabeth City 

1st Chas. H. Jenkins Aulander 

2nd E. A. Daniel Washington 

2nd W. Roy Hampton Plymouth 

3rd Archie C. Gay Jackson 

4th R. L. Applewhite Halifax 

4th W. G. Clark Tarboro 

5th Arthur B. Corey Greenville 

6th Joseph C. Eagles Wilson 

6th Willie Lee Lumpkin Louisburg 

7th D. L. Ward New Bern 

7th R. A. Whitaker Kinston 

8th Thomas O'Berry Goldsboro 

8th Lawrence H. Wallace Smithfield 

9th Roy Rowe Burgaw 

9th Henry Vann Clinton 

10th R. J. Hester, Jr Elizabethtown 

10th Charles G. Rose .■'. Fayetteville 

11th Carson M. Barker Lumberton 

12th Ryan McBryde Raeford 

12th Arthur Ross Asheboro 

13th Wiley G. Barnes Raleigh 

13th J. C. Pittman Sanford 

14th Claude Currie Durham 

14th F. D. Long Roxboro 

15th J. Hampton Price Leaksville 

16th W. Dennis Madry Burlington 

17th George T. Penny Greensboro 

18th Geo. L. Hundley Thomasville 

18th Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

19th R. E. Little Wadesboro 

19th W. Erskine Smith .-. Albemarle 

20th Joe L. Blythe Charlotte 

21st Luther E. Bamhardt Concord 

21st John C. Kesler Salisbury 

22nd Irving E. Carlyle Winston-Salem 

23rd Carlos E. Davis Walnut Cove 

24th W. B. Somers (R) Wilkesboro 

25th John W. Aiken Hickory 

25th Hugh G. Mitchell Statesville 

26th Steve Dolley Gastonia 

27th Wade B. Matheny Forest City 

27th Lee B. Weathers Shelby 

28th O. Lee Horton Morganton 

29th Edison M. Thomas (R) Jefferson 

30th Calvin R. Edney (R) Marshall 

31st Brandon P. Hodges Asheville 

32nd W. B. Hodges Hendersonville 

32nd Carroll P. Rogers Tryon 

33rd A. L. Penland Hayesville 



RULES AND STANDING COMMITTEES OF 
THE SENATE 

1945 

RULES OF THE SENATE 

Order of Business 

1. The President having taken the chair at the hour to which 
the Senate shall have adjourned, and a quorum being present, 
the Journal of the preceding day shall be read, unless otherwise or- 
dered by the Senate, to the end that any mistake may be corrected. 

2. After reading and approval of the Journal, the order of busi- 
ness shall be as follows: ' 

(1) Reports of standing committees. 

(2) Reports of select committees. 

(3) Introduction of petitions, bills, and resolutions. 

(4) Unfinished business of preceding day. 

(5) Special orders. 

(6) General orders. First, bills and resolutions on third read- 
ing; second, bills and resolutions on second reading. But message 
from the Governor and House of Representatives and communica- 
tions and reports from State officers and reports from the Commit- 
tees on Engrossed Bills and Enrolled Bills may be received and 
acted on under any order of business. 

Powers and Duties of the President 

3. He shall take the chair promptly at the appointed time and 
proceed with the business of the Senate according to the rules 
adopted at any time during the absence of the President, the Presi- 
dent pro tempore, who shall be elected, shall preside, and he is 
hereby vested, during such time, with all powers of the President 
except that of giving a casting vote in case of a tie when he shall 
have voted as a Senator. 

4. He shall assign to doorkeepers their respective duties, and 
shall appoint such pages and laborers as may be necessary, each 
of whom shall receive the same compensation as is now provided 
by law. 

[ 279 ] 



280 North Carolina Manual 

Of the Principal Clerk 

5. The President and the Principal Clerk of the Senate shall 
see that all bills shall be acted upon by the Senate in the order in 
which they stand upon the Calendar, unless otherwise ordered as 
hereinafter provided. The Calendar shall include the numbers and 
titles of bills and joint resolutions which have passed the House 
of Representatives and have been received by the Senate for 
concurrence. 

6. The Principal Clerk shall certify the passage of bills by the 
Senate, with the date thereof, together with the fact whether 
passed by a vote of three-fifths or two-thirds of the Senate, when- 
ever such vote may be required by the Constitution and laws of the 
State. 

7. All necessary supplies and stationery for the Senate, its vari- 
ous offices and committees of the Senate shall be purchased upon 
requisition of the Principal Clerk, with the approval of the Presi- 
dent of the Senate. 

7a. The office of Engrossing Clerk is discontinued, and the duties 
of that office as heretofore performed by the Engrossing Clerk 
shall devolve upon the Principal Clerk, who is charged with the 
responsibility therefor. 

On the Rights and Duties of Senators 

8. Every Senator presenting a paper shall endorse the same; 
if a petition, memorial, or report to the General Assembly, with a 
brief statement of its subject or contents, adding his name; if a 
resolution, with his name; if a report of a committee, a statement 
of such report with the name of the committee and members mak- 
ing the same; if a bill, a statement of its title which shall contain 
a brief statement of the subject or contents of the bill, with his 
name; and all bills, resolutions, petitions, and memorials shall be 
delivered to the Principal Clerk and by him handed to the Presi- 
dent to be by him referred, and he shall announce the titles and 
references of the same, which shall be entered on the Journal. 

9. All motions shall be reduced to writing, if desired by the 
President or any Senator, delivered at the table, and read by the 
President or Reading Clerk before the same shall be debated; 
but any such motion may be withdrawn by the introducer at any 
time before decision or amendment. 

10. If any question contains several distinct propositions it shall 



Senate 281 

be divided by the President, at the request of any Senator, provided 
each subdivision, if left to itself, shall form a substantive propo- 
sition. 

11. When the President is putting a question, or a division by 
counting shall be had, no Senator shall walk out of or across the 
Chamber, nor when a Senator is speaking, pass between him and 
the President. 

12. Every Senator wishing to speak or debate, or to present a 
petition or other paper, or to make a motion or to report, shall rise 
t'rom his seat and address the President, and shall not proceed 
further until recognized by him. No Senator shall speak or de- 
bate more than twice nor longer than thirty minutes on the same 
day on the same subject without leave of the Senate, and when 
two or more Senators rise at once, the President shall name the 
Senator who is first to speak. 

13. Every Senator who shall be within the bar of the Senate 
when the question is stated by the chair shall vote thereon, unless 
he shall be excused by the Senate or unless he be directly interested 
in the question; and the bar of the Senate shall include the en- 
tire Senate Chamber. 

14. When a motion to adjourn or for recess shall be affirma- 
tively determined, no member or officer shall leave his place until 
adjournment or recess shall be declared by the President. 

Standing Committees 

15. The following committees shall be named by the Lieutenant- 
Governor : 

On Agriculture. 

On Appropriations. 

On Banks and Currency. 

On Caswell Training School. 

On Claims. 

On Commercial Fisheries. 

On Congressional Districts. 

On Conservation and Development. 

On Consolidated Statutes. 

On Constitutional Amendments. 

On Corporations. 

On Counties, Cities, and Towns. 

On Courts and Judicial Districts. 



282 North Carolina Manual 

On Distribution of Governor's Message. 

On Education. 

On Election Law. 

On Engrossed and Enrolled Bills. 

On Federal and Interstate Relations. 

On Finance. 

On Immigration. 

On Institutions for the Blind. 

On Institutions for the Deaf. 

On Insurance. 

On Internal Improvements. 

On Interstate Co-operation. 

On Journal. 

On Judiciary No. 1. 

On Judiciary No. 2. 

On Justices of the Peace. 

On Library. 

On Manufacturing, Labor and Commerce. 

On Mental Institutions. 

On Military c Affairs. 

On Mining. 

On Penal Institutions. 

On Pensions and Soldiers' Home. 

On Propositions and Grievances. 

On Public H&alth. 

On Public Roads. 

On Public Utilities. 

On Public Welfare. 

On Railroads. 

On Recodification. 

On Rules. 

On Salaries and Fees. 

On Senate. Expenditures. 

On Senatorial Districts. 

On Unemployment Compensation. 

On Veterans' Affairs. 

On Water Commerce. 

Joint Committees 

16. 

On Printing. 

On Trustees of the University. 



Senate 283 

17. The Committee on Engrossed Bills shall examine all bills, 
amendments, and resolutions before they go out of the possession 
of the Senate, and make a report when they find them correctly 
engrossed; Provided, that v/hen a bill is typewritten and has no 
interlineations therein, and has passed the Senate without amend- 
ment, it shall be sent to the House without engrossment, unless 
otherwise ordered. 

18. The Committee on Appropriations shall carefully examine 
all bills and resolutions appropriating or paying any moneys out 
of the State Treasury, except bills creating or increasing salaries, 
which shall be referred to the proper committee: P-rovided, said 
committee shall report to the Appropriations Committee the amount 
allowed, and keep an accurate record of the same and report to 
the Senate from time to time. All bills introduced in the Senate 
providing for bond issues, levying taxes, or in any manner affect- 
ing the taxing power of the State or any subdivision thereof, shall 
before being considered by the Senate, be referred to the Commit- 
tee on Finance, and bills referred to other committees carrying any 
of the provisions herein mentioned shall be re-referred to the Sen- 
ate as being bills to be considered by the Finance Committee be- 
fore proper action may be taken by the Senate. 

19. Every report of the committee upon a bill or resolution which 
shall not be considered at the time of making the same, or laid on 
the table by a vote of the Senate, shall stand upon the general or- 
ders with the bill or resolution; and the report of the committee 
shall show that a majority of the committee were present and 
voted. 

On General Orders and Special Orders 

20. Any bill or other matter may be made a special order for a 
particular day or hour by a vote of the majority of the Senators 
voting, and if it shall not be completed on that day, it shall be 
returned to its place on the Calendar, unless it shall be made a 
special order for another day; and when a special order is under 
consideration it shall take precedence of any special order or sube- 
quent order for the day, but such subsequent order may be taken 
up immediately after the previous special order has been dis- 
posed of. 

21. Every bill shall receive three readings previous to its being 
passed, and the President shall give notice at each whether it be 
the first, second, or third. After the first reading, unless a motion 



284 North Carolina Manual 

shall be made by some Senator, it shall be the duty of the President 
to refer the subject-matter to an oppropriate committee. No bill 
shall be amended until it shall have been twice read. 

Proceedings When There Is Not a Quorum Voting 

22. If, on taking the question on a bill, it shall appear that a 
constitutional quorum is not present, or if the bill require a vote 
of a certain proportion of all the Senators to pass it, and it ap- 
pears that such number is not present, the bill shall be again read 
and the question taken thereon; if the bill fail a second time for 
the want of the necessary number being present and voting, the 
bill shall not be finally lost, but shall be returned to the Calendar 
in its proper order. 

Precedence of Motions 

23. When a question is before the Senate no motion shall be 
received except those herein specified, which motions shall have 
precedence as follows, viz: 

(1) For an adjournment. 

(2) To lay on the table. 

(3) For the previous question. 

(4) To postpone indefinitely. 

(5) To postpone to a certain day. 

(6) To commit to a standing committee. 

(7) To commit to a select committee. 

(8) To amend. 

(9) To substitute. 

24. The previous question shall be as follows: "Shall the main 
question be now put?" and until it is decided shall preclude all 
amendments and debate. If this question shall be decided in the 
affirmative, the "main question" shall be on the passage of the 
bill, resolution, or other matter under consideration; but when 
amendments are pending, the question shall be taken upon such 
amendments, in their inverse order, without further debate or 
amendment: Provided, that no one shall move the previous question 
except the member submitting the report on the bill or other mat- 
ter under consideration, and the member introducing the bill or 
other matter under consideration, or the member in charge of 
the measure, who shall be designated by the chairman of the com- 
mittee reporting the same to the Senate at the time the bill or 
other matter under consideration is reported on to the Senate or 
taken up for consideration. 



Senate 285 

25. When a motion for the previous question is made and is 
I'ending, debate shall cease and only a motion to adjourn or lay 
on the table shall be in order, which motions shall be put as fol- 
lows: adjourn, previous question, lay on the table. After a motion 
for the previous question is made, pending a second thereto, any 
member may give notice that he desires to offer an amendment to 
the bill or other matter under consideration ; and after the previous 
question is seconded such member shall be entitled to offer his 
amendment in pursuance of such notice. 

Other Qu?stions To Be Taken Without Debate 

26. The motions to adjourn and lay on the table shall be decided 
without debate, and the motion to adjourn shall always be in order 
when made by a Senator entitled to the floor. 

27. The respective motions to postpone to a certain day, or to 
commit, shall preclude debate on the main question. 

28. All questions relating to priority of business shall be de- 
cided without debate. 

29. When the reading of a paper is called for, except petitions, 
and the same is objected to by any Senator, it shall be determined 
by the Senate without debate. 

30. Any Senator requesting to be excused from voting may 
make, either immediately before or after the vote shall have been 
called for and before the result shall have been announced, a brief 
statement of the reasons for making such request, and the ques- 
tion shall then be taken without debate. Any Senator may explain 
his vote on any bill pending by obtaining permission of the Presi- 
dent before the vote is put: Provided, that not more than three 
minutes shall be consumed in such explanation. 

Questions That Require a Two-Thirds Vote 

31. No bill or resolution on its third reading shall be acted on 
out of the regular order in which it stands on the Calendar, and 
no bill or resolution shall be acted upon on its third reading the 
s:^me day on which it passed its second reading unless so ordered 
by two-thirds of the Senators present. 

32. No bill or resolution shall be sent from the Senate on the 
day of its passage except on the last day of the session, unless 
otherwise ordered by a vote of two-thirds of the Senators present. 




286 North Carolina Manual 

33. No bill or resolution after being laid upon the table upon 
motion shall be taken therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds 
of the Senators present. 

Decorum in Debate 

34. No remark reflecting personally upon the action of any 
Senator shall be in order in debate unless preceded by a motion or 
resolution of censure. 

35. When a Senator shall be called to order he shall take his 
seat until the President shall have determined whether he was in 
order or not; if decided to be out of order, he shall not proceed 
without the permission of the Senate; and every question of order 
shall be decided by the President, subject to an appeal to the 
Senate by any Senator; and if a Senator is called to order for words 
spoken, the words excepted to shall be immediately taken down 
in writing, that the President or Senate may be better able to judge 
of the matter. 

Miscellaneous Rules 

36. When a question has been once put and decided, it shall be 
in order for any Senator who shall have voted in the majority to 
move a reconsideration thereof; but no motion for the reconsidera- 
tion of any vote shall be in order after the bill, resolution, mes- 
sage, report, amendment, or motion upon which the vote was taken 
shall have gone out of the possession of the Senate; nor shall any 
motion of reconsideration be in order unless made on the same day 
or the next following legislative day on which the vote proposed 
to be reconsidered shall have taken place, unless same shall 
be made by the Committee on Enrolled Bills for verbal or gram- 
matical errors in the bills, when the same may be made at any time. 
Nor shall any question be reconsidered more -than once. 

37. All bills and resolutions shall take their place upon the Calen- 
dar according to their number, and shall be taken up in regular 
order, unless otherwise ordered. 

38. No smoking shall be allowed on the floor of the Senate 
Chamber during the sessions. 

39. Senators and visitors shall uncover their heads upon enter- 
ing the Senate Chamber while the Senate is in session, and shall 
continue uncovered during their continuance in the Chamber. 

40. No Senator or officer of the Senate shall depart the service 



Senate 287 

of the Senate without leave, or receive pay as a Senator or officer 
for the time he is absent vi^ithout leave. 

41. No person other than the executive and judicial officers of the 
State, members and officers of the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives, and ex-members shall be permitted within the Senate Cham- 
ber. 

42. No rule of the Senate shall be altered, suspended, or rescined 
except on a two-thirds vote of the Senators present. 

43. In case a less number than a quorum of the Senate shall con- 
vene, they are authorized to send the doorkeeper or any other per- 
son, for any or all absent Senators, as a majority of the Senators 
present shall determine. 

44. The ayes and noes may be called for on any question before 
the vote is taken, and if seconded by one-fifth of the Senators 
pi-esent, the question shall be decided by the ayes and noes, and 
the same shall be entered upon the Journal. 

45. The chainnan of the following committees, with the approval 
of the President of the Senate, shall appoint clerks in order to ex- 
pedite the business of the Session of 1945, as follows: 

Finance; Roads; Judiciary, No. 1; Judiciary, No. 2; Counties, 
Cities, and Towns; Election Laws; Insurance; Agriculture; Conser- 
vation and Development; Appropriations; Education; Rules; Pub- 
lic Health; Manufacturing, Commerce and Labor; Propositions and 
Grievances; Banks and Currency; Constitutional Amendments; 
Public Welfare; Unemployment Compensation; Courts and Judicial 
Districts; Salaries and Fees; Mental Institutions; and Federal and 
Interstate Relations. 

In addition to the above-named clerks, the President of the Sen- 
ate shall, upon recommendation of the Rules Committee, appoint 
additional clerks, who shall perform such duties as may be as- 
signed them by the Principal Clerk of the Senate. 

All Committee Clerks, when not in attendance upon the direct 
duties connected with the committee to which they are assigned, 
shall report to the Principal Clerk of the Senate and, in order to 
expedite the work of the Senate, shall perform such clerical or 
stenographic work as may be assigned to them. 

46. Every bill introduced into the Senate shall be printed or 
typewritten. Amendments need not be typewritten. 

47. All bills should be read by their titles, which reading shall 



288 North Carolina Manual 

constitute the first reading of the bill, and unless otherwise dis- 
posed of shall be referred to the proper committee. A bill may be 
introduced by unanimous consent at any time during the session. 

48. The Journal of the Senate shall be typewritten in duplicate, 
original and carbon, the original to be deposited in the office of the 
Secretary of State as the record and the other (carbon) copy to 
be delivered to the State Printer. 

49. All bills and resolutions reported unfavorably by the com- 
mittee to which they were referred, and having no minority report, 
shall lie upon the table ; but may be taken from the table, and placed 
upon the Calendar by a two-thirds vote of those present and voting. 

50. That in case of adjournment without any hour being named, 
the Senate shall reconvene the next legislative day at 11 o'clock 
a. m. 

51. When a bill is materially modified or the scope of its ap- 
plication extended or decreased, or if the county or counties to 
which it applies be changed, the title of the bill shall be changed by 
the Senators introducing the bill or by the committee having it in 
charge, or by the Principal Clerk, so as to indicate the full purport 
of the bill as amended and the county or counties to which it applies. 

52. The pages of the Senate shall be responsible to and under 
the direction of the President at all times when the Senate is in 
session, and shall not exceed fourteen in number. They shall report 
to the Principal Clerk at other times to be assigned such duties as 
•he may direct and shall be under his supervision, 

53. After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass on any 
of its readings, the contents of such bill or the principal provisions 
of its subject-matter shall not be embodied in any other measure. 
Upon the point of order being raised and sustained by the Chair, 
such measure shall be laid upon the table, and shall not be taken 
therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of the elected membership 
of the Senate: Provided, no local bill shall be held by the Chair as 
embodying the provisions, or being identical with any State-wide 
measure which has been laid upon the table or failed to pass any 
of its readings. 

54. That in the event of the absence of the President of the Sen- 
ate and the President pro tempore, at any time fixed for the re- 
convening of the Senate, the Principal Clerk of the Senate, or in 
his absence also, some member of the Senate Committee on Rules 



Senate 289 

shall call the Senate to order and designate some member to act 
as President. 

55. Whenever a public bill is introduced, a carbon copy thereof 
shall accompany the bill. The Reading Clerk shall stamp the copy 
with the number stamped upon the original bill. Such copy shall 
be daily delivered to the joint committee hereinafter provided for. 
The Principal Clerk shall deliver the carbon copy of the bills 
designated to be printed as herinafter provided for the public 
printer and cause 400 copies thereof to be printed. On the morning 
following the delivery of the printed copies the Chief Clerk shall 
cause the Chief Page to have one copy thereof put upon the desk of 
each member, and shall retain the other printed copies in his office. 
A sufficient number of the printed copies for the use of the com- 
mittee to which the bill is referred shall be by the Chief Page de- 
livered to the Chairman or Clerk of that committee. If the bill is 
passed, the remaining copies shall be by the Chief Page delivered 
to the Principal Clerk of the House for the use of the House. The 
cost of printing shall be paid from the contingent fund of the Sen- 
ate. The Chairman of the Rules Committee of the Senate and the 
Chairman of the Rules Committee of the House shall appoint a sub- 
committee consisting of three members of the Senate and two 
members of the House from the body of the Senate and the House, 
and such Chairman shall notify the Principal Clerk of the House 
and of the Senate who has been appointed. Such subcommittee 
shall meet daily and examine the carbon copies of the public bills 
introduced and determine which of such public bills shall be print- 
ed and which shall not, and stamp the copies accordingly. If the 
member, introducing a public bill, which the committee shall deter- 
mine, should not be printed, so desires, he may appear before the 
committee at the next meeting thereof with reference thereto. 

56. When a bill has been introduced and referred to a committee, F 
if after ten days the committee has failed to report thereon, then 
the author of the bill may, after three days public notice given 
in the Senate, on motion supported by a vote of two-thirds of the 
Senators present and voting, recall the same from the committee 
to the floor of the Senate for consideration and such action thereon 
as a majority of the Senators present may direct. 



290 North Carolina Manual 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE SENATE 

Committee on Agriculture 

Senators: Eagles, Chairman, Clark, Long, Pate, Penland, 
Weathers, Corey, O'Berry, Jenkins, Barker, Mitchell, Vann, Wal- 
lace, Hampton, Hester, McBryde, Horton, Davis, Whitaker, Currie. 

Committee on Appropriations 

Senators: Hodges of Buncombe, Chairman, Corey, Rogers, Wea- 
thers, Pittman, Daniel, Currie, Eagles, Hundley, O'Berry, Penny, 
Barker, Mitchell, Hampton, Ross, Gay, Horton, Culpepper, Pen- 
land, Lumpkin, Somers, Pate, Thomas, Wallace, Clark, Hester. 

Committee on Banks and Currency 

5^ENAT0RS: Long, Chairman, Pate, Price, Rose, Clark, Eagles, Wal- 
lace, Hodges of Henderson, Ross, Currie, Rogers, O'Berry, Lump- 
kin, Matheny, Barnhardt, Ward, Weathers, Carlyle, Hundley. 

Committee on Caswell Training School 

Senators: Whitaker, Chairman, Corey, Dolley, Ward, Barker, 
Penland, Rowe, Horton, Jenkins, Clark, O'Berry. 

Committee on Claims 

Senators: Vann, Chairman, Penny, Davis, Matheny, Hampton, 
Long, Penland, Little, Hodges of Buncombe. 

Committee on Commercial Fisheries 

Senators: Hampton, C/iairman, Culpepper, Blythe, Ward, Corey, 
Rogers, Hester, Daniel, Jenkins, Applewhite. 

Committe on Congressional Districts 

Senators: Barnhardt, Chairman, Lumpkin, Aiken, Culpepper, 
Blythe, Hester, Dolley, Price, Penland, Little, Hodges of Hender- 
son, Matheny. 

Committee on Conservation and Development 

Senators: Smith, Chairman, Pittman, Barnes, Blythe, Pate, Jen- 
kins, Madry, Rogers, Hodges of Buncombe, Weathers, Whitaker, 
Hampton, Hester, Rowe, Ross, Clark, Horton, O'Berry, Aiken, 
McBryde. 



Senate 291 

Committee on Consolidated Statutes 

Senators: Little, Chairman, Price, Dolley, Corey, Rose, Kesler, 
Ward, Matheny, Gay, Daniel, Pittman, Mitchell, Whitaker. 

Committee on Constitutional Amendments 

Senators: Daniel, Chairman, Rose, Little, Lumpkin, Penland, 
Matheny, Applewhite, Blythe, Pate, Carlyle, Thomas, Earnhardt, 
Davis, Whitaker, Jenkins. 

Committee on Corporations 

Senators: Ross, Chairman, Eagles, Smith, O'Berry, Mitchell, 
Barker, Weathers, Long, Davis, Price, Dolley, Penny. 

Committee on Counties, Cities and Towns 

Senators: Rowe, Chairman, Smith, Applewhite, Hodges of Hen- 
derson, Ross, Blythe, Long, Penland, Hundley, Gay, Davis, Culpep- 
per, Aiken, Price, Hampton, Wallace, Carlyle, Barker, Somers, 
Penny, Rogers. 

Committee on Courts and Judicial Districts 

Senators: Ward, Chairman, Pittman, Little, Gay, Earnhardt, 
Madry, Mitchell, Horton, Matheny, Hodges of Buncombe, Daniel, 
Lumpkin, Carlyle, Whitaker, Corey, Price. 

Committee on Distribution of Governor's Message 

Senators : Applewhite, Chairman, Smith, Madry, Jenkins, Hund- 
ley, Wallace, Horton, Barker, Hodges of Henderson, Hester, Edney. 

Committee on Education 

Senators: McEryde, Chairman, Pate, Hampton, Carlyle, Lump- 
kin, Jenkins, O'Berry, Gay, Price, Ward, Smith, Whitaker, Blythe, 
Wallace, Davis, Rowe, Hodges of Buncombe, Hester, Penland, Ross, 
Matheny, Pittman, Rose, Currie, Edney, Madry. 

Committe on Election Laws 

Senators: Matheny, Chairman, O'Berry, Ward, Rogers, Vann, 
Culpepper, Davis, Clark, Hodges of Buncombe, Smith, Penland, 
Ross, Aiken, Price, Edney, Horton. 

Committee on Engrossed and Enrolled Bills 

Senators: Kesler, Chairman, Aiken, Ross, Mitchell, Penny, Bar- 
ker, Currie, Culpepper, Somers, Penland. 



292 North Carolina Manual 

Committee on Finance 

Senators : Carlyle, Chairmayi, Blythe, Little, Clark, Vann, Price, 
Madry, Matheny, Dolley, Smith, Jenkins, Ward, Earnhardt, Long, 
Davis, Whitaker, Aiken, Rowe, Hodges of Henderson, Barnes, Kes- 
ler, Rose, Applewhite, McBryde, Edney. 

Committee on Immigration 

Senators: Davis, Chairman, Barker, Culpepper, Rose, Daniel, 
Long, Penland, Hodges of Henderson, Thomas. 

Committee on Institutions for the Blind 

Senators: Barker, C/iatn/ioK, Barnes, Whitaker, O'Bejrry, Dolley, 
Hodges of Henderson, Rowe, Kesler. 

Committee on Institutions for the Deaf 

Senators: Horton, Chairman, Barker, Matheny, Clark, Wallace, 
Price, Currie, Penny, Thomas. 

Committee on Insurance 

Senators: 'Pa.ie, Chairmayi, Hodges of Buncombe, Carlyle, Eagles, 
Blythe, Lumpkin, Penny, Whitaker, Davis, Clark, Kesler, Barn- 
hardt, Rose, Rogers, Little, Jenkins, Hundley, O'Berry, Vann, 
Weathers, Edney, Price. 

Committee on Internal Improvements 

Senators: Barker, Chairman, Mitchell, Long, Matheny, Hodges 
of Hendei'son, Barnes, Hampton, Hundley, McBryde, Vann, Som- 
ers, Davis. 

Committee on* loi^rstate Cooperation 

Senators: Weathers, Chairman, Hodges of Buncombe, Rogers, 
Rowe, O'Berry. 

Committee on Interstate and Federal Relations 

Senators: Weathers, Chaimuin, Eagles, Currie, Hodges of Bun- 
combe, Hester, Long, Rogers, Hampton, O'Berry, Smith, Pittman, 
Rowe, Barnes, McBryde, Blythe, Carlyle, Corey, Davis, Culpepper, 
Clark, Aiken, Pate. 

Committee on Journal 

Senators: Hundley, Chairman, Daniel, Currie, Penny, Dolley, 
Kesler, Ross, Little, Somers, Applewhite. 



Senate 293 

Committee on Judiciary No. 1 

Senators: Price, Chairman, Daniel, Madry, Gay, Earnhardt, 
Hodges of Buncombe, Horton, Pittman, Barnes, Ward, Little, Hes- 
ter, Currie. 

Committee on Judiciary No. 2 

Senators: Lumpkin, Chairman, Smith, Kesler, Carlyle, Aiken, 
Matheny, Dolley, Mitchell, Corey, Whitaker, Edney, Rose. 

Committee on Justices of the Peace 

Senators : Madry, Chairman, Carlyle, Little, Culpepper, Kesler, 
McBryde, Hodges of Buncombe, Barker, Dolley, Currie, Barnhardt. 

Committee on Library 

Senators: Jenkins, Chairman, Long, Kesler, Barnes, Rogers, 
Rose, Penland, Lumpkin, McBryde, Weathers, Applewhite, Wallace, 
Madry, Davis, Thomas, Dolley. 

Committee on Manufacturing, Labor, and Commerce 

Senators: Currie, Chairman, Price, Mitchell, Matheny, Smith, 
Carlyle, Jenkins, Ward, Barnes, Pate, Lumpkin, Kesler, Rowe, 
Hodges of Buncombe, Aiken, Wallace, Weathers, Hester, Rogers. 

Committee on Mental Institutions 

Senators: Clark, Chairman, O'Berry, Hodges of Buncombe, 
Barnes, McBryde, Carlyle, Mitchell, Horton, Barnhardt, Pate, Ross, 
Culpepper, Penny, Hampton, Edney, Smith. 

Committee on Military Affairs 

Senators: Hester, Chairman, Rowe, Eagles, Blythe, Applewhite, 
Smith, Kesler, Mitchell, Rose, Pittman, Currie, Culpepper, Penny, 
Ward, Hundley, Thomas. 

Committee on Mining 

Senators: Rogers, Chairm,an, Ross, Penland, Hodges of Bun- 
combe, Lumpkin, Barnes, Hampton, Matheny, Ward, Smith, Somers. 

Committee on Penal Institutions 

Senators: Penny, Chairman, Price, Hester, Eagles, Kesler, 
Barnes, Applewhite, Matheny, Hodges of Buncombe, Corey, Mc- 
Bryde, Culpepper, Dolley, Vann, Somers. 



294 North Carolina Manual 

Committee on Pensions and Soldiers' Home 

Senators: Culpepper, Chairman, Barker, McBryde, Clark, Eagles, 
Daniel, Earnhardt, Hodges of Henderson, Thomas, Wallace. 

Committee on Printing 

Senators: Penland, Chairman, Lumpkin, Applewhite, Hundley, 
Wallace, Little, Hodges of Henderson, Culpepper, Somers. 

Committee on Propositions and Grievances 

Senators: Mitchell, Chairman, McBryde, Carlyle, Gay, Dolley, 
Daniel, Aiken, Corey, Little, Eagles, Pate, Lumpkin, Ward, Pitt- 
man, Davis, Hundley, Culpepper, Kesler, Edney, Vann. 

Committee on Public Health 

Senators: O'Berry, Chairman, Blythe, Whitaker, Eagles, Hester, 
Pate, Horton, Hundley, Dolley, Carlyle, Earnhardt, Jenkins, Price, 
Hodges of Buncombe, Rovi^e, Weathers, Davis, Daniel, Smith, Lump- 
kin. 

Committee on Public Roads 

Senators: Pittman, Chairman, Rogers, Hundley, Pate, Hodges 
of Buncombe, Hampton, Earnhardt, Gay, Aiken, Jenkins, Mitchell, 
Rowe, Weathers, Wallace, Horton, Vann, Smith, Barnes, Blythe, 
Hester, Penland, Currie, Barker, Long. 

Committee on Public Utilities 

Senators: Barnes, Chairman, Matheny, Blythe, Ward, Kesler, 
Aiken, Culpepper, Earnhardt, Carlyle, Clark, Currie, Smith, Hodges 
of Henderson, Hodges of Buncombe. 

Committee on Public Welfare 

Senators: Blythe, Chairman, Rose, Hodges of Henderson, Wea- 
thers, Corey, Gay, Little, Ross, Kesler, Eagles, McBryde, Daniel, 
Long, O'Berry, Penland, Hester, Mitchell, Horton, Edney. 

Committee on Railroads 

Senators: Rogers, Chairman, Culpepper, Pate, Barnes, Rose, 
Blythe, Davis, Kesler, Whitaker, Hodges of Buncombe. 

Committee on Recodification 

Senators: Rose, Chairman, Price, Little, Carlyle, Earnhardt, 
Matheny, Aiken, Daniel, Madry, Lumpkin, Corey, Pittman, Edney. 



Senate 295 

Committee on Rules 

Senators : Gay, Chairman, Price, Ward, Smith, Rowe, Clark, Mc- 
Bryde, Blythe, Long, Weathers, Pittman, Hodges of Buncombe, 
Pate, Carlyle, Aiken, Eagles, Corey, O'Berry. 

Committee on Salaries and Fees 

Senators: Aiken, Chairman, Eagles, Hundley, Daniel, Gay, 
Eogers, Jenkins, Barnes, Applewhite, Hodges of Henderson, Carlyle, 
Penny, Vann, Dolley, McBryde. 

Committee on Senate Expenditures 

Senators: Hodges of Henderson, Chairman, Rowe, Pittman, 
Hampton, Dolley, Gay, Barker, McBryde, Currie, Long, Edney. 

Committee on Senatorial Districts 

Senators: Dolley, Chairman, Aiken, Long, Hampton, Rogers, 
Gay, Madry, Whitaker, Applewhite, Vann, Little, Pittman, Thomas, 
Hundley. 

Committee on Thustees of the University 

Senators: Wallace, Chairm,an, O'Berry, Hodges of Buncombe, 
Pate, Daniel, Gay, Price, Ross, Blythe, Currie, Rowe, Pittman, 
Madry, Little, Eagles, Ward, Lumpkin, Hampton, Edney, Clark. 

Committee on Unemployment Compensation 

Senators: Corey, Chairman, Weathers, Madry, Rowe, Hundley, 
Currie, Carlyle, Barnhardt, Kesler, Eagles, Aiken, Ross Dolley, 
Applewhite, Hodges of Buncombe, Hester, Somers. 

Committee on Veteran's Afifairs 

Senators: Blythe, Chairman, Aiken, Currie, Corey, Edney, Little, 
Somers, Smith, Horton, Carlyle, Whitaker, Gay, Hampton, Dolley. 

Committee on Water Commerce 

Senators: Culpepper, Chairman, Daniel, Gay, Eagles, Apple- 
white, Hampton, Corey, Hester, Rowe, Ward, Whitaker, Jenkins, 
Wallace. 

Committee on State Commission for the Blind 

Senators: Penland, Chairman, Culpepper, McBryde, Barker, 
Horton, O'Berry, Gay, Blythe, Vann, Clark, Thomas, Whitaker. 



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13 14 15 


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Senate 297 

Seat Assignment Chart — Session 1945 

NORTH CAROLINA SENATE 
(Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

District Name County Address Seat 

1st W. T. Culpepper Pasquotank Elizabeth City .... 3 

1st Chas. H. Jenkins Bertie Aulander 2 

2nd E. A. Daniel Beaufort Washington ...27 

2nd W. Roy Hampton Washington Plymouth 26 

3rd Archie C. Gay Northampton Jackson 22 

4th R. L. Applewhite Halifax Halifax !!41 

4th W. G. Clark Edgecombe Tarboro 1 

5th Arthur B. Corey Pitt Greenville 10 

6th Joseph C. Eagles Wilson Wilson 23 

6th Willie Lee Lumpkin Franklin Louisburg 42 

7th D. L. Ward Craven New Bern .........ZZ 

7th R. A. Whitaker Lenoir Kinston 34 

8th Thomas O'Berry Wayne Goldsboro 16 

8th Lawrence H. Wallace Johnston Smithfield 47 

9th Roy Rowe Pender Burgaw 38 

9th Henry Vann Sampson Clinton 25 

lOth R. J. Hester, Jr. Bladen Elizabethtown 39 

lOth Charles G. Rose ...Cumberland Fayetteville 19 

11th Carson M. Barker Robeson Lumberton 43 

12th Ryan McBryde Hoke Raeford 32 

12th Arthur Ross Randolph Asheboro 31 

13th Wiley G. Barnes Wake Raleigh 9 

13th J. C. Pittman Lee Sanford 8 

14th Claude Currie Durham Durham r. 35 

14th F. D. Long Person Roxboro 20 

15th J. Hampton Price Rockingham Leaksville 21 

16th W. Dennis Madry Alamance Burlington 36 

17th George T. Penny Guilford Greensboro 12 

18th Geo. L. Hundley Davidson Thomasville 30 

18th Edwin Pate Scotland Laurinburg 29 

19th R. E. Little Anson Wadesboro 7 

19th W. Erskine Smith Stanly Albemarle 6 

20th Joe L. Blythe Mecklenburg Charlotte 11 

21st Luther E. Barnhardt Cabarrus Concord 46 

21st John C. Kesler Rowan Salisbury 14 

22nd Irving E. Carlyle Forsyth Winston-Salem 18 

23rd Carlos E. Davis Stokes Walnut Cove 40 

24th W. B. Somers (R) Wilkes Wilkesboro 50 

25th John W. Aiken '. Catawba Hickory 5 

25th Hugh G. Mitchell Iredell Statesville 4 

26th Steve Dolley Gaston Gastonia 15 

27th Wade B. Matheny Rutherford Forest City 28 

27th Lee B. Weathers Cleveland Shelby 37 

28th O. Lee Horton Burke Morganton 45 

29th Edison M. Thomas (R) Ashe Jeflferson 49 

30th Calvin R. Edney (R) Madison Marshall 48 

31st Brandon P. Hodges Buncombe Asheville 17 

32nd W. B. Hodges Henderson Hendersonville 24 

32nd Carroll P. Rogers Polk Trj-on 13 

33rd A. L. Penland Clay Hayesville 44 



Officers and Members of the House of Representaives 

OFFICERS 

Oscar L. Richardson Speaker Monroe 

Mrs. Annie E. Cooper Principal Clerk Raleigh 

Ralph Monger, Jr Reading Clerk Sanford 

H. L. Joyner Sergeant-at-arms Jackson 

REPRESENTATIVES 
Alphabetically Arranged 

Name County Party Poatoffice 

Alexander, R. V. Davie Republican Cooleemee 

Allen, J. LeRoy Wake Democrat Raleigh 

Allison, Dan M. Jackson Democrat Sylva 

Arthur, W. J. (Billy) Onslow Democrat Jacksonville 

Askew, E. S. Pamlico Democrat Oriental 

Averitt, F. M Cumberland Democrat Fayetteville 

Barber, Wade Chatham Democrat Pittsboro 

Barker, Oscar G. Durham Democrat Durham 

Bell, C. L Hyde Democrat Swan Quarter 

Bender, R. P Jones Democrat Pollocksville 

Bennett, W. L., Dr Yancey Democrat Burnsville 

Blalock, U. B Anson Democrat Wadesboro 

Bost, E. T., Jr Cabarrus Democrat Concord 

Boswood, G. C. Currituck Democrat Gregory 

Bridger, James A Bladen Democrat Bladenboro 

Brown, G. W., Dr Hoke Democrat Raeford 

Brown, J. Percy Columbus Democrat Tabor City 

Buie, J. P. Robeson Democrat Red Springs 

Burgess, S. E Camden Democrat Belcross 

Burgin, L. L Henderson Democrat Horse Shoe 

Burgiss, T. Roy Alleghany Democrat Sparta 

Burns, Robert P Person Democrat Roxboro 

Bynum, T. C Cumberland Democrat Hope Mills 

Caveness, Shelley B Guilford Democrat Greensboro 

Chalk, John D Richmond Democrat Rockingham. 

Clark, Irwin Halifax Democrat Scotland Neck 

Cohoon, C. Earl Tyrrell Democrat Columbia 

Cover, Mrs. G. W. Cherokee Democrat Andrews 

Craig, George W Buncombe Democrat Asheville 

Crawford, J. H., Dr Graham Democrat Robbinsville 

Crissman, Walter E. Guilford Democrat High Point 

Currie, Wilbur H Moore Democrat Carthage 

Davis, Geo. W Pitt Democrat Farmville 

Deal, Hayden Alexander Republican Taylorsville 

Dellinger, David P Gaston Democrat Cherryville 

Dobson, Henry C. Surry Democrat Elkin 

Edwards, Alonzo C Greene Democrat Hookertown 

Edwards, McKinley Swain Democrat Bryson City 

Eggers, S. C Watauga Jlepublican Boone 

Evans, Merrill Hertford Democrat Ahoskie 

Fields, W. R Avei-y ...! Republican Elk Park 

Fisher, Ralph R. Transylvania Republican Brevard 

Fountain, Ben E Edgecombe Democrat Rocky Mount 

Gantt, Robert M., Sr Durham Democrat Durham 

Gass, Rex Forsyth Democrat Winston-Salem 

Gibbs, H. S Carteret Democrat Morehead City 

Gobble, F. L Forsyth Democrat Winston-Salera 

Goodman, Arthur Mecklenburg Democrat Charlotte 



[298] 



House of Representatives 299 

Name County Party Postofflce 

Graham, I. P. Robeson Democrat Proctorville 

Griffin, Clarence W Martin Democrat Williamston 

Grimes, Bryan Beaufort Democrat Washington 

Gunn, Jno. O Caswell Democrat Yanceyville 

Hardison, Burl G Craven Democrat New Bern 

Harris, H. R Northampton Democrat Seaboard 

Hart, M. Donley Ashe .Republican Tuckerdale 

Hatch, William T. Wake Democrat Raleigh 

Herbert, F Clay Republican Hayesville 

Honeycutt, Chas. F. Sampson jRepublican Clinton 

Horn, Charles C Cleveland Democrat Shelby 

Horner, W. E Lee Democrat Sanford 

Houser, Chas. F Lincoln Democrat Lincolnton 

Hutchins, J. H., Dr Madison Republican Marshall 

Hutton, Frank R Guilford Democrat Greensboro 

James, Vernon G Pasquotank Democrat Elizabeth City 

Kearney, H. C. Franklin Democrat Franklinton 

Kerr, John, Jr Warren Democrat Warrenton 

LeGrand, John Q. New Hanover Democrat Wilmington 

Loftin, E. L Buncombe Democrat Asheville 

Long, R. B Yadkin Republican Boonville 

Marshall, William F Stokes Democrat Walnut Cove 

Martin, G. A. Johnston Democrat Smithfield 

McCracken, Wayne R. Macon Democrat Franklin, Rt. 4 

McDonald, W. H. Polk Democrat Tryon 

Meekins, Theo. S. Dare Democrat Manteo 

Moore, Larry I., Jr Wilson Democrat Wilson 

Moore, O. L. Scotland Democrat Laurinburg 

Morris, Harvey Mecklenburg Democrat Charlotte 

Morton, J. J. Stanly Republican Albemarle 

Moseley, Robert Guilford Democrat Greensboro 

Overby, Allison L Harnett Democrat Angier 

Palmer, Glenn C Haywood Democrat Clyde 

Pearsall, Thomas J Nash Democrat Rocky Mount 

Peele, W. H. (Jack) Washington Democrat Plymouth 

Peterson, C. A., Dr Mitchell Republican Spruce Pine 

Powers, Lee L Rutherford Democrat Lake Lure 

Pritchett, J. T Caldwell Democrat Lenoir 

Quinn, C. E Duplin Democrat Kenansville 

Rabb, J. C McDowell Democrat Marion 

Ramsay, Kerr Craige ...Rowan Democrat Salisbury 

Ransdell, N. F. Wake Democrat Varina 

Richardson, Oscar L. Union Democrat Monroe 

Richardson, S. Girard Randolph Republican Seagrove 

Rountree, W. J Gates Democrat Hobbsville 

Royster, Fred S Vance Democrat Henderson 

Ruark, J. W. Brunswick Democrat Southport 

Rutledge, J. Carlyle Cabarrus Democrat Kannapolis 

Sellars, Walter R Alamance Democrat Burlington 

Shuford, George A Buncombe Democrat Asheville 

Shuford, Harley F Catawba Democrat Hickory 

Smith, J. A., Dr. Davidson Democrat Lexington 

Spruill, C. Wayland Bertie Democrat Windsor 

Stone, T. Clarence Rockingham Democrat Stoncville 

Stoney, A. B Burke Democrat Morganton 

Story, T. E. Wilkes '■■■ Republican Wilkesboro 

Taylor, W. Frank Wayne Democrat Goldsboro 

Tonissen, Ed. T. Mecklenburg Democrat Charlotte 

Turner, D. E., Sr Iredell Democrat Mooresville 

Umstead, John W., Jr Orange Democrat Chapel Hill 

Uzzell, George R Rowan Democrat Salisbury 

Vernon, O. M Gaston Democrat Mt. Holly 

Vogler, James B Mecklenburg Democrat Charlotte 

Wallace, F. E Lenoir Democrat Kinston 



300 North Carolina Manual 

Name County Party Postoffice 

Wallace, J. P. Montgomery Democrat Troy 

Watkins, Jno. S Granville Democrat Oxford 

Welfare, Sam E Forsyth Democrat Winston-Salem 

White, John F Chowan Democrat Edenton 

White, W. W Perquimans Democrar Hertford 

Whitfield, J. V Pender Democrat Wallace 

Worley, Carl P. Johnston..., Democrat Selma 

Worthi'ngton, Sam O. Pitt Democrat Greenville 

REPRESENTATIVES 

Arranged by Counties 

(Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

County Name Address 

Alamance Walter R. Sellars Burlington 

Alexander Hayden Deal (R) Taylorsville 

Alleghany T. Roy Burgiss Sparta 

Anson U. B. Blalock Wadesboro 

AsJie M. Donley Hart (R) Tuckerdale 

Avery..'..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' W. R. Fields (R) Elk Park 

Beaufort Brj'an Grimes Washington 

jjertie C. Wayland Spruill Windsor 

Bladen James A. Bridger Bladenboro- 

Brunswick J- W. Ruark Southport 

Buncombe George W. Craig. Asheville 

E. L. Loftin Asheville 

George A. Shuford ._. Asheville 

Burke A. B. Stoney Morganton 

Cabarrus E. T. Bost, Jr. Concord 

J. Carlyle Rutledge Kannapolis 

Caldwell J. T. Pritchett Lenoir 

Camden S. E. Burgess Belcross 

Carteret H. S. Gibbs Morehead City 

Caswell Jno. O. Gunn Yanceyville 

Catawba „Harley F. Shuford Hickory 

Chatham Wade Barber Pittsboro 

Cherokee Mrs. G. W. Cover Andrews 

Chowan John F. White Edenton 

Clay F. Herbert (R) Hayesville 

Cleveland Charles C. Horn Shelby 

Columbus J. Percy Brown Tabor City 

Craven Burl G. Hardison New Bern 

Cumberland F. M. Averitt Fayetteville 

T. C. Bynum Hope Mills 

Currituck G, C. Bos wood Gregory 

Dare Theo. S. Meekins Manteo 

Davidson Dr. J. A. Smith Lexington 

Davie R. V. Alexander (R) Cooleemee 

Duplin C. E. Quinn Kenansville 

Durham Oscar G. Barker Durham 

Robert M. Gantt, Sr. Durham 

Edgecombe Ben E. Fountain Rocky Mount 

Forsyth Rex Gass Winston-Salem 

F. L. Gobble Winston-Salem 

Sam E. Welfare Winston-Salem 

Franklin H. C. Kearney Franklinton 

Gaston David P. Dellinger Cherryvillo 

O. M. Vernon Mt. Holly 

Gates W. J. Rountree Hobbsville 

Graham Dr. J. H. Crawford Robbinsville 

Granville Jno. S. Watkins Oxford 

Greene Alonzo C. Edwards Hookerton 

Guilford Shelley B. Caveness Greensboro 



House of Representatives 301 

County Name Address 

Walter E. Crissman High Point 

Frank R. Hutton Greensboro 

Robert Moseley Greensboro 

Halifax Irwin Clark Scotland Neck 

Harnett Allison L. Overby Angier 

Haywood Glenn C. Palmer Clyde 

Henderson L. L. Burgin Horse Shoe 

Hertford Merrill Evans Ahoskie 

Hoke Dr. G. W Brown Raeford 

Hyde C. L. Bell Swan Quarter 

Iredell D. E. Turner, Sr Mooresville 

Jackson Dan M. Allison Sylva 

Johnston G. A. Martin Smithfield 

Carl P. Worley Selma 

Jones R- P. Bender Pollocksville 

Lee W. E. Horner Sanford 

Lenoir F. E. Wallace Kinston 

Lincoln... Chas. F. Houser Lincolnton 

Macon Wayne R. McCracken Franklin, Rt. 4 

Madison Dr. J. H. Hutchins (R) Marshall 

Martin Clarence W. Griflfin Williamston 

McDowell J- C. Rabb Marion 

Mecklenburg Arthur Goodman Charlotte 

Harvey Morris Charlotte 

Ed. T. Tonissen Charlotte 

James B. Vogler Charlotte 

Mitchell Dr. C. A. Peterson (R) Spruce Pine 

Montgomery J. P. Wallace Troy 

Moore Wilbur H. Currie Carthage 

Nash Thomas J. Pearsall Rocky Mount 

New Hanover John Q. LeGrand Wilmington 

Northampton H. R. Harris Seaboard 

Onslow .W. J. (Billy) Arthur Jacksonville 

Orange John W. Umstead, Jr Chapel Hill 

Pamlico E. S. Askew Oriental 

Pasquotank Vernon G. James Elizabeth City 

Pender J- V. Whitfield Wallace 

Perquimans W. W. White Hertford 

Person... Robert P. Burns Roxboro 

Pitt Geo. W. Davis Farmville 

Sam O. Worthington Greenville 

Polk W. H. McDonald Tryon 

Randolph S. Girard Richardson (R) Seagrove 

Richmond John D. Chalk 3Rockingham 

Robeson J. P. Buie Red Springs 

I. P. Graham Proctorville 

Rockingham T. Clarence Stone Stoneville 

Rowan JCerr Craige Ramsay Salisbury 

George R. Uzzell Salisbury 

Rutherford „ Lee L. Powers Lake Lure 

Sampson Chas. F. Honeycutt (R) Clinton 

Scotland O. L. Moore Laurinbur? 

Stanly J- J- Morton (R) Albemarle 

Stokes William F. Marshall Walnut Cove 

Surry Henry C. Dobson Elkin 

Swain McKinley Edwards Bryson City 

Transylvania Ralph R. Fisher (R) Brevard 

Tyrrell C. Earl Cohoon Columbia 

Union Oscar L. Richardson Monroe 

Vance Fred S. Royster Henderson 

Wake J. LeRoy Allen Raleifrh 

William T. Hatch Raleigh 

N. F. Ransdell Varina 



302 North Carolina Manual 

County Name Address 

Warren John Kerr, Jr Warrenton 

Washington W. H. (Jack) Peele Plymouth 

Watauga S. C. Eggera (R) Boone 

Wayne W. Frank Taylor ; Goldsboro 

Wilkes T. K. Story (R) Wilkesboro 

Wilson Larry I. Moore, Jr Wilson 

Yadkin R. B. Long (R) Boonville 

Yancey Dr. W. L. Bennett Burnsville 

Enrolling and Indexing Departments 

Enrolling Clerk Kdwin B. Whitaker Bryson City 

Indexer of Laws Gale K. Burgess Raleigh 



RULES AND STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

1945 

Touching the Duties of Speaker 

1. It shall be the duty of the Speaker to have the sessions of the 
House opened with prayer. 

2. He shall take the chair every day at the hour fixed by the 
House on the preceding legislative day, shall immediately call the 
members to order, and, on appearance of a quorum, cause the 
Journal of the preceding day to be approved. 

3. He shall preserve order and decorum, may speak to points of 
order in preference to other members, rising from his seat for that 
purpose, and shall decide questions of order, subject to an appeal 
to the House by any member, on which appeal no member shall 
speak more than once, unless by leave of the House. A two-thii-ds 
vote of the members present shall be necessary to sustain any 
appeal from the ruling of the Chair. 

4. He shall rise to put a question, but may state it sitting. 

5. Questions shall be put in this form, namely, "Those in favor 
(as the question may be) will say 'Aye'," and after the affirmative 
voice has been expressed, "Those opposed will say, 'No'." Upon 
a call for a division the Speaker shall count; if required he shall 
appoint tellers. 

6. The Speaker shall have a general direction of the hall. He 
shall have a right to name any member to perform the duties of the 
Chair, but substitution shall not extend beyond one day, except in 
case of sickness or by leave of the House. 

7. All committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, unless other- 
wise specially ordered by the House. 

8. In all elections the Speaker may vote. In all other cases he 
may exercise his right to vote, or he may reserve this right until 
there is a tie ; but in no case shall he be allowed to vote twice on 
the same question. 

9. All acts, addresses, and resolutions, and all warrants and 

[303] 



304 North Carolina Manual 

subpoenas issued by order of the House shall be signed by the 
Speaker. 

10. In case of any disturbance or disorderly conduct in the gal- 
leries or lobby, the Speaker or other presiding officer shall have 
power to order the same to be cleared. 

11. No person except members of the Senate, officers and clerks 
of the General Assembly, Judges of the Supreme and Superior 
Courts, State officers, former members of the General Assembly, 
and persons particularly invited by the Speaker shall be admitted 
within the hall of the House: Provided, that no person except 
members of the Senate and officers of the General Assembly shall 
be allowed on the floor of the House or in the lobby in the rear of 
the Speaker's desk, unless permitted by the Speaker of the House. 

12. No motion to suspend the rules for the purpose of extend- 
ing the courtesies of the floor, lobby or gallery shall be made during 
the consideration of the Public Calendar, except upon motion of 
the Speaker. 

13. Reporters wishing to take down debates may be admitted by 
the Speaker, who shall assign such places to them on the floor or 
elsewhere, to effect this object, as shall not interfere with the con- 
venience of the House. 

14. Smoking shall not be allowed in the hall, lobbies, or the gal- 
leries while the House is in session: Provided, that smoking may 
be permitted in the lobby in the rear of the Speaker's desk. 

Order of Business of the Day 

15. After the approval of the Journal of the preceding day, which 
shall stand approved without objection, the House shall proceed to 
business in the following order, viz.: 

(1) The receiving of petitions, memorials, and papers addressed 
to the General Assembly or to the House. 

(2) Reports of standing committees. 

(3) Reports of select committees. 

(4) Resolutions. 

(5) Bills. 

(6) The unfinished business of the preceding day. 

(7) Bills, resolutions, petitions, memorials, messages, and other 
papers on the Calendar, in their exact numerical order, unless 
displaced by the orders of the day; but messages and motions to 
elect officers shall always be in order. 



House of Representatives 305 

No member shall rise from his seat to introduce any petition, 
resolution, or bill out of order unless he is permitted so to do by a 
suspension of the rules. 

On Decorum in Debate 

16. When any member is about to speak in debate or deliver any 
matter to the House, he shall rise from his seat and respectfully 
address the Speaker. 

17. When the Speaker shall call a member to order, the mem- 
ber shall sit down, as also he shall when called to order by another 
member, unless the Speaker decides the point of order in his favor. 
By leave of the House a member called to order may clear a matter 
of fact, or explain, but shall not proceed in debate so long as the 
decision stands but by permission of the House. Any member may 
appeal from the decision of the Chair, and if, upon appeal, the 
decision be in favor of the member called to order, he may proceed ; 
if otherwise, he shall not, except by leave of the House; and if the 
case, in the judgment of the House, require it, he shall be liable to 
its censure. 

18. No member shall speak until recognized by the Chair, and 
when two or more members rise at the same time the Speaker shall 
name the member to speak. 

19. No member shall speak more than twice on the main question, 
nor longer than thirty minutes for the first speech and fifteen min- 
utes for the second speech, unless allowed to do so by the affirma- 
tive vote of a majority of the members present; nor shall he speak 
more than once upon an amendment or motion to commit or post- 
pone, and then not longer than ten minutes. But the House may, 
by consent of a majority, suspend the operations of this rule dur- 
ing any debate on any particular question before the House, or the 
Committee on Rules may bring in a special rule that shall be appli- 
cable to the debate on any bill. 

20. While the Speaker is putting any question, or addressing the 
House, no person shall speak, stand up, walk out of or cross the 
House, nor when a member is speaking, entertain private dis- 
course, stand up, or pass between him and the Chair. 

21. No member shall vote on any question when he was not 
present when the question was put by the Speaker, except by the 
consent of the House. Upon a division and count of the House on 
any question, no member without the bar shall be counted. 



306 North Carolina Manual 

22. Every member who shall be in the hall of the House for 
the above purpose when the question is put shall give his vote upon 
a call of the ayes and noes, unless the House for special reasons 
shall excuse him, and no application to be excused from voting or 
to explain a vote shall be entertained unless made before the call 
of the roll. The hall of the House shall include the lobbies and 
offices connected with the hall. 

23. When a motion is made it shall be stated by the Speaker or, 
if written, it shall be handed to the Chair and read aloud by the 
Speaker or Clerk before debate. A motion to table or adjourn shall 
be seconded before the motion is put by the Speaker to the vote of 
the House. 

24. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the Speaker or 
any two members request it. 

25. After a motion is stated by the Speaker or read by the Clerk, 
it shall be deemed to be in possession of the House, but may be 
withdrawn before a decision or amendment, except in case of a 
motion to reconsider, which motion, when made by a member, shall 
be deemed and taken to be in possession of the House, and shall 
not be withdrawn without leave of the House. 

26. When a question is under debate no motion shall be received 
but to adjourn, to lay on the table, to postpone indefinitely, to post- 
pone to a day certain, to commit or amend, which several motions 
shall have precedence in the order in which they stand arranged; 
and no motion to lay on the table, to postpone indefinitely, to post- 
pone to a day certain, to commit or amend, being decided, shall be 
again allowed at the same stage of the bill or proposition. 

27. A motion to adjourn or lay on the table shall be decided with- 
out debate, and a motion to adjourn shall always be in order, ex- 
cept when the House is voting or some member is speaking; but a 
motion to adjourn shall not follow a motion to adjourn until de- 
bate or some other business of the House has intervened. 

28. In case of adjournment without any hour being named, the 
House shall reconvene on the next legislative day at twelve o'clock 
noon. 

29. When a question has been postponed indefinitely, the same 
shall not be acted on again during the session, except upon a two- 
thirds vote. 

30. Any member may call for a division of the question, when 
the same shall admit of it, which shall be determined by the Speaker. 



House op Representatives 307 

31. When a motion has been once made and carried in the af- 
firmative or negative, it shall be in order for any member of the 
majority to move for the reconsideration thereof, on the same or 
succeeding- day, unless it may have subsequently passed the Senate, 
and no motion to reconsider shall be taken from the table except by 
a two-thirds vote. But unless such vote has been taken by a call 
of the yeas and nays, any member may move to reconsider. 

32. When the reading of a paper is called for, which has been 
read in the House, and the same is objected to by any member, it 
shall be determined by a vote of the House. 

33. Petitions, memoi'ials, and other papers addressed to the 
House shall be presented by the Speaker; a brief statement of the 
contents thereof may be verbally made by the introducer before 
reference to a committee, but shall not be debated or decided on 
the day of their first being read, unless the House shall direct 
otherwise. 

34. When the ayes and noes are called for on any question, it, 
shall be on motion before the question is put; and if seconded by 
one fifth of the members present, the question shall be decided by 
the ayes and noes; and in taking the ayes and noes, or on a call of 
the House, the names of the members will be taken alphabetically. 

35. Decency of speech shall be observed and personal reflection 
carefully avoided. 

36. Any member may arise at any time to speak to a question of 
personal privilege, and upon objection to him proceeding, the 
Speaker shall determine if the question is one of privilege. 

37. Fifteen members, including the Speaker, shall be authorized 
to compel the attendance of absent members. A quorum shall con- 
sist of a majority of the qualified members of the House. 

38. No member or officer of the House shall absent himself from 
the service of the House without leave, unless from sickness or in- 
ability. 

39. Any member may excuse himself from serving on any com- 
mittee if he is a member of two standing committees. 

40. If any member shall be necessarily absent on temporary 
business of the House when a vote is taken upon any question, upon 
entering the House he shall be permitted, on request, to vote, pro- 
vided that the result shall not be thereby affected. 

41. No standing rule or order shall be rescinded or altered with- 



308 North Carolina Manual 

cut one day's notice given on the motion thereof, and to sustain 
such motion two-thirds of the House shall be required. 

42. The members of the House shall uncover their heads upon 
entering the House while it is in session, and shall continue so un- 
covered during their continuance in the hall, except Quakers. 

43. A motion to reconsider shall be determined by a majority 
vote, except a motion to reconsider an indefinite postponement, or 
a motion to reconsider a motion tabling a motion to reconsider, 
which shall require a two-thirds vote. 

44. After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass on any of 
its readings, the contents of such bill or the principal provisions of 
its subject-matter shall not be embodied in any other measure. 
Upon the point of order being raised and sustained by the Chair, 
such measure shall be laid upon the table, and shall not be taken 
therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of the elected member- 
ship of the House: Provided, no local bill shall be held by the 
Chair as embodying the provisions or being identical with any 
State-wide measure which has been laid upon the table, or failed 
to pass any of its readings. 

45. A motion to table an amendment sent up from the floor shall 
not be construed as a motion to table the principal bill or any other 
amendment which has been offered thereto, and if such motion is 
carried, only the amendment shall lie upon the table. 

46. When a member desires to interrupt a member having the 
floor he shall first obtain recognition by the Chair and permission 
of the member occupying the floor, and when so recognized and such 
permission is obtained he may propound a question to the member 
occupying the floor, but he shall not propound a series of questions 
or interrogatories or otherwise interrupt the member having the 
floor; and the Speaker shall, without the point of order being 
raised, enforce this rule. 

Standing Committees 

47. At the commencement of the session a standing committee 
shall be appointed by the Speaker on each of the following sub- 
jects, namely: 

On Agriculture. 
On Appropriations. 
On Banks and Banking. 
On Commercial Fisheries. 



House of Representatives 309 



On Congressional Districts. 

On Conservation and Development. 

On Constitutional Amendments. 

On Corporations. 

On Counties, Cities, and Towns. 

On Courts and Judicial Districts. 

On Drainage. 

On Education. 

On Election and Election Laws. 

On Engrossed Bills. 

On Expenditures of the House. 

On Federal Relations. 

On Finance. 

On Game. 

On Health. 

On Higher Education. 

On Mental Institutions. 

On Institutions for the Blind. 

On Institutions for the Deaf. 

On Insurance. 

On Interstate Cooperation. 

On the Journal. 

On Judiciary No. 1. 

On Judiciary No. 2. 

On Manufactures and Labor. 

On Military Affairs. 

On Oyster Industry. 

On Penal Institutions. 

On Pensions. 

On Propositions and Grievances. 

On Public Utilities. 

On Public Welfare. 

On Recodification. 

On Roads. 

On Rules. 

On Salaries and Fees. 

On Senatorial Districts. 

On Unemployment Compensation. 

On Veterans Legislation. 



310 North Carolina Manual 

Joint Committees 

On Enrolled Bills. 

On Justices of the Peace. 

On Library. 

On Printing. 

On Public Buildings and Grounds. 

On Trustees of University. 

The first member announced on each committee shall be chair- 
man, and where the Speaker so desires he may designate a vice 
chairman. 

48. Whenever the House shall decline or refuse to concur in 
amendments put by the Senate to a bill originating in the House, 
or shall refuse to adopt a substitute adopted by the Senate for a 
bill originating in the House, a conference committee shall be ap- 
pointed upon motion made, consisting of the number named in the 
motion; and the bill under consideration shall thereupon go to and 
be considered by the joint conferees on the part of the House and 
Senate. In considering matters in difference between the House 
and Senate committed to the conferees only such matters as are 
in difference between the two houses shall be considered by the 
conferees, and the conference report shall deal only with such 
matters. The conference report shall not be amended. Except as 
herein set out, the rules of the House of Representatives of Con- 
gress shall govern the appointment, conduct, and reports of the 
conferees. 

49. In forming a Committee of the Whole House, the Speaker 
shall leave the Chair, and a Chairman to preside in committee shall 
be appointed by the Speaker. 

50. Upon bills submitted to a Committee of the Whole House, the 
bill shall be first read throughout by the Clerk, and then again 
read and debated by sections, leaving the preamble to be last con- 
sidered. The body of the bill shall not be defaced or interlined, 
but all amendments, noting the page and line, shall be dully entered 
by the Clerk on a separate paper as the same shall be agi'eed to 
by the committee, and so reported to the House. After report, the 
bill shall again be subject to be debated and amended by sections 
before a question on its passage be taken. 

51. The rules of procedure in the House shall be observed in a 
Committee of the Whole House, so far as they may be applicable. 



House of Representatives 311 

except the rule limiting the time of speaking and the previous 
question. 

52. In a Committee of the Whole House a motion that the com- 
mittee rise shall always be in order, except when a member is 
speaking, and shall be decided without debate. 

53. Every bill shall be introduced by motion for suspension of the 
rules, or by order of the House, or on the report of a committee, 
unless introduced in regular order during the morning hour. 

54. All bills and resolutions shall be reported from the commit- 
tee to which referred, with such recommendation as the committee 
may desire to make. 

55. Every bill shall receive three readings in the House previous 
to its passage, and the Speaker shall give notice at each whether 
it be its first, second, or third reading. 

56. Any member introducing a bill or resolution shall briefly 
endorse thereon the substance of the same. 

57. All bills and resolutions shall upon their introduction be re- 
ferred by the Speaker, without suggestion from the introducer, to 
the appropriate committee. No bills shall be withdrawn from the 
committee to which referred except upon motion duly made and 
carried by a two-thirds vote. 

58. The Clerk of the House shall keep a separate calendar of the 
public, local, and private bills, and shall number them in the order 
in which they are introduced, and all bills shall be disposed of in 
the order they stand upon the Calendar; but the Committee on 
Rules may at any time arrange the order of precedence in which 
bills may be considered. No bill shall be twice read on the same 
day without the concurrence of two-thirds of the members. 

59. All resolutions which may grant money out of the Treasury, 
or such as shall be of public nature, shall be treated in all respects 
in a similar manner with public bills. 

60. The Clerk of the House shall be deemed to continue in office 
until another is appointed. 

61. On the point of no quorum being raised, the doors shall be 
closed and there shall be a call of the House, and upon a call of the 
House the names of the members shall be called over by the Clerk 
and the absentees noted, after which the names of the absentees 
shall again be called over. Those for whom no excuse or sufficient 



312 North Carolina Manual 

excuses are made may, by order of those present, if fifteen in num- 
ber, be taken into custody as they appear, or may be sent for and 
taken into custody wherever to be found by special messenger ap- 
pointed for that purpose. 

Previous Question 

62. The previous question shall be as follows: "Shall the main 
question be now put?" and, until it is decided, shall preclude all 
amendments and debate. If this question shall be decided in the 
affirmative, the "main question" shall be on the passage of the 
bill, resolution, or other matter under consideration; but when 
amendments are pending, the question shall be taken upon such 
amendments, in inverse order, without further debate or amend- 
ment. If such question be decided in the negative, the main ques- 
tion shall be considered as remaining under debate : Provided, that 
no one shall move the previous question except the member submit- 
ting the report on the bill or other matter under consideration, 
and the member introducing the bill or other matter under con- 
sideration, or the member in charge of the measure, who shall be 
designated by the chairman of the committee reporting the same 
to the House at the time the bill or other matter under con- 
sideration is reported to the House or taken up for consideration. 

When a motion for the previous question is made, and pending 
the second thereto by a majority, debate shall cease; but if any 
member obtains the floor, he may move to lay the matter under 
consideration on the table, or move an adjournment, and when both 
or either of these motions are pending the question shall stand: 

(1) Previous question. 

(2) To adjourn. 

(3) To lay on the table. 

And then upon the main question, or amendments, or the mo- 
tion to postpone indefinitely, postpone to a day certain, to commit, 
or amend, in the order of their precedence, until the main ques- 
tion is reached or disposed of; but after the previous question has 
been called by a majority, no motion, or amendment, or debate 
shall be in order. 

All motions below the motions to lay on the table must be made 
prior to a motion for the previous question; but, pending and not 
after the second therefor, by the majority of the House, a motion 
to adjourn or lay on the table, or both, are in order. This consti- 



House of Representatives 313 

tutes the precedence of the motions to adjourn and lay on the table 
over other motions, in Rule 25. 

Motions stand as follows in order of precedence in Rule 26 : 

Previous question. 

Adjourn. 

Lay on the table. 

Postpone definitely. 

To commit or amend. 

When the previous question is called, all motions below it fall, 
unless made prior to the call, and all motions above it fall after 
its second by a majority required. Pending the second, the motions 
to adjourn and lay on the table are in order, but not after a sec- 
ond. When in order and evei'y motion is before the House, the 
question stands as follows: 

Previous question. 

Adjourn. 

Lay on the table. 

Postpone indefinitely. 

Postpone definitely. 

To commit. 

Amendment to amendment. 

Amendment. 

Substitute. 

Bill. 

The previous question covers all other motions when seconded 
by a majority of the House, and proceeds by regular graduation to 
the main question, without debate, amendment, or motion, until 
such question is reached or disposed of. 

63. All committees, other than the Committees on Appropria- 
tions, when favorably reporting any bill which carries an appro- 
priation from the State, shall indicate same in the report, and said 
bill shall be re-referred to the Committee on Appropriations for a 
further report before being acted upon by the House. All com- 
mittees, other than the Committee on Finance, when favorably re- 
porting any bill which in any way or manner raises revenue or 
levies a tax or authorizes the issue of bonds or notes, whether pub- 
lic, public-local, or private, shall indicate same in the report, and 



314 North Carolina Manual 

said bill shall be re-referred to the Committee on Finance for a 
further report befoi-e being acted upon by the House. 

64. The Principal Clerk and the Sergeant-at-Arms may appoint, 
with the approval of the Speaker, such assistants as may be neces- 
sary to the efficient dischai-ge of the duties of their various offices, 
and one or more of whom may be assigned by the Speaker from the 
Principal Clerk's office to the office of the Attorney General for the 
purpose of drafting bills. 

65. The Speaker may appoint a Clerk to the Speaker, and he 
may also appoint ten pages to wait upon the sessions of the House, 
and when the pressure of business may require, he may appoint five 
additional pages. 

66. The Chairman of each of the following committees: Agri- 
culture, Appropriations, Banks and Banking, Congressional Dis- 
tricts, Conservation and Development, Constitutional Amendments, 
Counties, Cities, and Towns, Courts and Judicial Districts, Educa- 
tion, Elections and Election Laws, Finance, Health, Higher Edu- 
cation, Insurance, Judiciary No. 1, Judiciary No. 2, Manufacture 
and Labor, Propositions and Grievances, Public Utilities, Public 
Welfare, Recodification, Roads, Rules, Salaries and Fees, Sena- 
torial Districts, Unemployment Compensation, and Veterans Legis- 
lation, may each appoint a clerk to the said committee. All com- 
mittee Clei'ks heretofore provided for are to be appointed by and 
with the approval of the Speaker. With the exception of the Clerks 
appointed to the Appropriations and Finance, the Clerks to all the 
other above-named committees, when not on duty with their spe- 
cific committee shall report to and be under the supervision of the 
Principal Clerk of the House for assignment to special duty with 
other committees and to serve the convenience of the members of 
the House. 

67. The Chairman of all committees shall notify, or cause to be 
notified, the first named introducer on such bills as are set for 
hearing before their respective committees, the date, time and place 
of such hearing. 

68. That no clerk, laborer, or other person employed or appointed 
under Rules 59, 60, and 61 hereof shall receive during such em- 
ployment, appointment, or service any compensation from any de- 
partment of the State Government, or from any other source, and 
there shall not be voted, paid, or awarded any additional pay, 
bonus or gratuity to any of them, but said persons shall receive 



House of Representatives 315 

only the pay for such duties and services as now provided by law. 
When the House is not in session the pages shall be under the 
supervision of the Principal Clerk. 

69. The chairman and five other members of any committee shall 
constitute a quorum of said committee for the transaction of busi- 
ness. 

70. The Committee on the Journal shall examine daily the Journal 
of the House before the hour of convening, and report after the 
opening of the House whether or not the proceedings of the pre- 
vious day have been correctly recorded. 

71. When a bill shall be reported by a committee with a rec- 
ommendation that it be not passed, but accompanied by a minority 
report, the question before the House shall be "The adoption of the 
minority report," and if failing to be adopted by a two-thirds vote, 
the bill shall be placed upon the unfavorable calendar. Such minor- 
ity report shall be signed by at least three members of the com- 
mittee who were present when the bill was considered in commit- 
tee: Provided^ however, that where a minority report is filed the 
proponents and opponents of the question presented thereby shall 
be allowed not to exceed ten minutes on each side to explain the 
question: Provided, further, that by a majority vote the time may 
be extended for a discussion of the minority report and on the merits 
of the bill. In the event there is an unfavorable report with no 
minority report accompanying it, the bill shall be placed upon the 
unfavorable calendar. To take a bill from the unfavorable cal- 
endar, a two-thirds vote shall be necessary. 

72. A bill from the unfavorable calendar shall not be debatable, 
but the movant may make a brief and concise statement of the 
reasons for the mation before making the motion, taking not more 
than five minutes. 

73. Whenever a public bill is introduced a carbon copy thereof 
shall accompany the bill. The Reading Clerk shall stamp the copy 
with the number stamped upon the original bill. Such copy shall 
be daily delivered to the joint committee hereinafter provided for. 
The Principal Clerk shall deliver the carbon copy of the bill desig- 
nated to be printed, as hereinafter provided for, to the Public 
Printer and cause four hundred copies thereof to be printed. On 
the morning following the delivery of the printed copies, the Chief 
Clerk shall cause the chief page to have one copy thereof put upon 
the desk of each member and shall retain the other printed copies 



316 North Carolina Manual 

in his office. A sufficient number of the printed copies for the 
use of the committee to which the bill is referred shall be by the 
chief page delivered to the chairman or clerk of that committee. 
If the bill is passed, the remaining copies shall be by the chief page 
delivered to the Principal Clerk of the Senate for the use of the 
Senate. The cost of printing shall be paid from the contingent 
fund of the House of Representatives. The Chairman of the Rules 
Committee of the House and the Chairman of the Rules Committee 
of the Senate shall appoint a sub-committee consisting of two mem- 
bers of the House and two members of the Senate from the body 
of the House and Senate, and such chairmen shall notify the Prin- 
cipal Clerk of the House and the Senate who has been so appointed. 
Such sub-committee shall meet daily and examine the carbon copies 
of the public bills introduced and determine which of such bills 
shall be printed and which shall not, and stamp the copies ac- 
cordingly. Such sub-committees shall serve for one week unless for 
good cause the chairmen of the respective rules committees shall 
determine otherwise. If the member introducing a public bill, 
which the committee shall determine should not be printed, so de- 
sires, he may appear before the committee at the next meeting 
thereof with reference thereto. 

74. Whenever any resolution or bill is introduced a carbon copy 
thereof shall be attached thereto, and the Principal Clerk shall 
cause said carbon copy to be numbered as the original resolution 
or bill is numbered, and shall cause the same to be available at all 
times to the member introducing the same. In case the resolution 
or bill is a public resolution or bill, an additional carbon copy shall 
also be attached thereto for the use of the Public Printer, under 
the provisions of Rule 66. 

Procedure Data 

Quorum Majority of Qualified Members 

To compel Attendance of 

Absentees 15 Members (including presiding officer) 

To withdraw Bill from Committee Majority 

Second to Motion for Record Vote One-fifth of those present 

Substitute Motion Majority 

To Overrule the Chair ^ Two-thirds 

Permission to Speak More than Twice on Main Question and 

Once on an Amendment or Motion Majority (or special rule) 

To Suspend Any Rule Two-thirds 

To Sustain Motion to Rescind or Alter Standing Rule Two-thirds 

Motion to Reconsider Majority 



House of Representatives 317 

To Reconsider Motion Laid on Table Two-thirds 

Motion to Postpone Majority 

To Take from Table Two-thirds 

To Reconsider Table Vote Majority 

Second to Motion for Previous Question Majority 

Limit Time of Debate Majority 

Bill to Alter Constitution Three-fifths of Membership 

ARTICLE II 

Constitution of North Carolina 

Sec. 29. Limitations upon power of General Assembly to enact 
private or special legislation. 

The General Assembly shall not pass any local, private, or 
special act or resolution relating to the establishment of courts in- 
ferior to the Superior Court; relating to the appointment of jus- 
tices of the peace; relating to health, sanitation, and the abate- 
ment of nuisances; changing the names of cities, towns, and town- 
ships; authorizing the laying out, opening, altering, maintaining, 
or discontinuing of highways, streets, or alleys; relating to ferries 
or bridges, relating to non-navigable streams, ralating to ceme- 
teries; relating to the pay of jurors; erectcing new townships, or 
changing township lines, or establishing or changing the line of 
school districts; remitting fines, penalties, and forfeitures, or re- 
funding moneys legally paid into the Public Treasury; regulating 
labor, trade, mining, or manufacturing; extending the time for 
the assessment or collection of taxes or otherwise relieving any 
collector of taxes from the due performance of his official duties 
or his sureties from liability; giving effect to informal wills and 
deeds; nor shall the General Assembly enact any such local, private, 
or special act by the partial repeal of a general law, but the Gen- 
eral Assembly may at any time repeal local, private, or special 
laws enacted by it. Any local, private or special act or resolution 
passed in violation of the provisions of this section shall be void. 
The General Assembly shall have power to pass general laws 
regulating matters set out in this section. 



318 North Carolina Manual 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE HOUSE OF 
REPRESENTATIVES 

ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED 

Committee on Rules 

Mr. Gass, Chairman, Messrs: Bost, Hatch, Gantt, Bridger, Uzzell, 
Loftin, LeGrand, Grimes, Griffin, Burns, Pearsall, Currie, Pritchett, 
Stone, Stoney, Taylor, Clark, Wallace of Lenoir, Honeycutt, Cave- 
ness, Barber, Shuford of Catawba. 

Committee on Agriculture 

Mr. Edwards of Greene, Chairman, Mr. Palmer, Vice Chairinan, 
Messrs: Whitfield, Askew, Bender, Blalock, Boswood, Bridger, 
Brown of Hoke, Burgess, Burgin, Burgiss, Bynum, Currie, Davis, 
Evans, Gantt, Gass, Gobble, Graham, Grimes, Gunn, Hardison, 
Harris, Horn, Houser, Hutton, James, McDonald, Martin, Moore 
of Scotland, Moore of Wilson, Morris, Pearsall, Quinn, Rabb, Rans- 
dell, Rountree, Royster, Sellars, Smith, Spruill, Turner, Wallace 
of Lenoir, Wallace of Montgomery, Watkins, White of Perqui- 
mans, Deal, Fields, Hart, Honeycutt, Long, Richardson, Allison, 
McCracken, Worthington. 

Committee on Appropriations 

Mr. Pearsall, Chairman, Mr. Stoney, Vice Chairman, Messrs: 
Barber, Allison, Askew, Averitt, Bell, Bender, Boswood, Brown of 
Hoke, Buie, Burgiss, Burns, Cohoon, Cover, Craig, Crissman, 
Currie, Davis, Dellinger, Edwards of Greene, Edwards of Swain, 
'Evans, Gantt, Gass, Gobble, Gunn, Harris, Hatch, Home, Horner, 
Houser, Hutton, Kerr, McCracken, McDonald, Marshall, Martin, 
Meekins, Morris, Peele, Powers, Pritchett, Rabb, Rountree, Roy- 
ster, Rutledge, Sellars, Stone, Turner, Umstead, Vernon, Wallace 
of Montgomery, Watkins, White of Perquimans, Whitfield, Fields, 
Hutchins, Long, Morton, Story. 

Committee on Banks and Banking 

Mr. Harris, Chairman, Mr. Chalk, Vice Chairman, Messrs: "Ver- 
non, Blalock, Burgess, Burgiss, Crissman, Davis, Edwards of 
Swain, Fountain, Hardison, Hutton, LeGrand, Loftin, Morris, Pal- 
mer, Pritchett, Ramsay, Rountree, Rutledge, Shuford of Buncombe, 
Taylor, Vogler, Worley, Worthington, Deal, Fisher, Herbert, Long, 
Peterson, Richardson. 



House of Representatives 319 

Committee on Commercial Fisheries 

Mr. Boswood, Chairman, Messrs: Gibbs, Arthur, Askew, Bell, 
Bender, Bridger, Brown of Hoke, Chalk, Cohoon, Bellinger, Ed- 
wards of Greene, Evans, Fountain, Grimes, Hatch, Horner, Le- 
Grand, Loftin, Meekins, Ransdell, Ruark, Spruill, Stoney, Vernon, 
White of Chowan, White of Perquimans, Whitfield, Deal, Hart. 

Committee on Congressional Districts 

Mr. Fountain, Chairman, Messrs: Grimes, Averitt, Brown of 
Columbus, Brown of Hoke, Burgiss, Burns, Cover, Crawford, Criss- 
man, Gibbs, Hardison, Horner, Kearney, Kerr, Loftin, Martin, 
Palmer, Powers, Rabb, Ramsay, Ransdell, Royster, Ruark, Sellars, 
Smith, Stoney, Turner, Wallace of Montgomery, White of Chowan, 
Worthington, Alexander, Morton, Richardson. 

Committee on Conservation and Development 

Mr. Stoney, Chairman, Mr. Buie, Vice Chairman, Messrs: Brown 
of Columbus, Allison, Arthur, Askew, Averitt, Barber, Bender, 
Boswood, Bridger, Burgin, Chalk, Clark, Cover, Currie, Davis, 
Edwards of Greene, Edwards of Swain, Gibbs, Griffin, Grimes, 
Gunn, Hardison, Horn, Houser, James, Kearney, McCracken, Mc- 
Donald, Meekins, Moore of Wilson, Morris, Overby, Palmer, Powers, 
Royster, Sellars, Shuford of Buncombe, Uzzell, Wallace of Lenoir, 
Wallace of Montgomery, Whitfield, Eggers, Fisher, Hutchins, Long, 
White of Perquimans. 

Committee on Constitutional Amendments 

Mr. Grimes, Chairman, Messrs: Rutledge, Allen, Averitt, Bla- 
lock, Bridger, Buie, Caveness, Cohoon, Dobson, Edwards of Greene, 
Fountain, Gantt, Gass, Hatch, Kerr, LeGrand, Loftin, Moore of 
Wilson, Moseley, Pearsall, Peele, Spruill, Taylor, Tonissen, Uzzell, 
Wallace of Lenoir, Worley, Honeycutt, Story. 

Committee on Corporations 

Mr. Shuford of Catawba, Chairmayi, Messrs: Umstead, Allison, 
Arthur Averitt, Barber, Bennett, Bost, Brown of Columbus, Chalk, 
Clark, Evans, Gobble, Goodman, Horner, Kearney, McCracken, 
Marshall, Moseley, Overby, Ramsay, Rutledge, Sellars, Shuford 
of Buncombe, Stoney, Uzzell, Watkins, Whitfield, Worthington, 
Herbert, Morton. 



320 North Carolina Manual 

Committee on Counties, Cities, and Towns 

Mr. Horner, Chairman, Mr. Bender, Vice Chairman, Messrs: 
Watkins, Allen, Allison, Arthur, Averitt, Barber, Barker, Bell, 
Boswood, Bridger, Brown of Hoke, Buie, Burgin, Bynum, Craig, 
Crawford, Davis, Edwards of Greene, Gantt, Gibbs, Grimes, Hut- 
ton, Kearney, Kerr, LeGrand, Loftin, McCracken, Marshall, Pal- 
mer, Powers, Quinn, Royster, Ruark, Sellars, Shuford of Catawba, 
Smith, Stoney, Tonissen, Vernon, Vogler, Welfare, Whitfield, 
Worthington, Honeycutt, Hutchins, Morton, Richardson, Story. 

Committee on Courts and Judicial Districts 

Mr. Pritchett, Chah-man, Mr. LeGrand, Vice Chairman, Messrs: 
Edwards of Swain, Allison, Averitt, Barber, Bender, Bost, Burns, 
Clark, Crialsman, Dellinger, Fountain, Gantt, Goodman, Horn, 
Kearney, Kerr, Loftin, Martin, Moore of Scotland, Moseley, Quinn, 
Ramsay, Ransdell, Ruark, Rutledge, Stone, Stoney, Taylor, Tur- 
ner, Wallace of Lenoir, White of Perquimans, Worthington, Peter- 
son, Story. 

Committee on Drainage 

Mr. Buie, Chairman, Messrs: Boswood, Arthur, Bell, Bender, 
Brown of Columbus, Burgess, Bynum, Clark, Evans, Gibbs, Hardi- 
son, Kearney, Meekins, Overby, Peele, Quinn, Rountree, Ruark, 
Spruill, White of Chowan, White of Perquimans, Whitfield, 
Worthington. 

Committee on Education 

Mr. Stone, Chairman, Mr. Moseley, Vice Chairman, Messrs: Ed- 
wards of Greene, Allen, Askew, Averitt, Barber, Barker, Bos- 
wood, Bridger, Brown of Columbus, Burgiss, Bynum, Ch^lk, Co- 
hoon, Currie, Davis, Evans, Gass, Graham, Hardison, Horn, Hor- 
ner, James, Kerr, LeGrand, McDonald, Meekins, Moore of Scotland, 
Moore of Wilson, Palmer, Powers, Quinn, Rabb, Ramsay, Rans- 
dell, Rutledge, Sellars, Shuford of Buncombe, "Shuford of Catawba, 
Stoney, Taylor, Umstead, Vogler, Wallace of Montgomery, Whit- 
field, Worley, Alexander, Eggers, Hutchins, Peterson, Story. 

Committee on Election and Election Laws 

Mr. Edwards of Swain, Chairman, Mr. Kearney, Vice Chairman, 
Messrs: Evans, Allison, Askew, Barber, Blalock, Buie, Burgin, 
Caveness, Crawford, Dobson, Gantt, Griffin, Horn, Loftin, Mc- 



House of Representatives 321 

Cracken, Marshall, Palmer, Pritchett, Ransdell, Ruark, Shuford of 
Buncombe, Smith, Stoney, Tonissen, Wallace of Montgomery, Wat- 
kins, Worthington, Deal, Hart, Story. 

Committee on Engrossed Bills 

Mr. Worthington, Chairman, Messrs: White of Perquimans, Al- 
len, Bender, Burgess, Clark, Crawford, Bellinger, Evans, Gibbs, 
Goodman, James, McDonald, Marshall, Martin, Meekins, Overby, 
Peele, Quinn, Rountree, Ruark, Sellars, Spruill, Turner, Vogler, 
Fields, Fisher, Herbert, Richardson. 

Committee on Expenditures of House 

Mr. Palmer, Chairman, Messrs: Arthur, Averitt, Bell, Boswood, 
Bynum, Craig, Dellinger, Fountain, Gobble, Harris, Houser, Meek- 
ins, Overby, Peele, Quinn, Sellars, Smith, Tonissen, Vernon, Wat- 
kins, Long. 

Committee on Federal Relations 

Mr. Griffin, Chairman, Messrs : Graham, Barber, Barker, Blalock, 
Bridger, Burns, Dodson, Edwards of Greene, Edwards of Swain, 
Fountain, Goodman, Grimes, Hatch, Horner, Kerr, LeGrand, Lof- 
tin, Moore of Scotland, Moore of Wilson, Moseley, Palmer, Pearsall, 
Pritchett, Quinn, Rountree, Rutledge, Sellars, Shuford of Catawba, 
Stoney, Taylor, Umstead, Uzzell, Vogler, Wallace of Lenoir, 
Worthington. 

Committee on Finance 
Mr. Kerr, Chairman, Mr. Taylor, Vice Chairman, Messrs: Bridg- 
er, Allen, Barber, Barker, Bennett, Blalock, Bost, Burgin, Bynum, 
Caveness, Chalk, Clark, Currie, Dobson, Fountain, Gass, Gibbs, 
Graham, Griffin, Grimes, Gunn, Hardison, Hutton, James, LeGrand, 
Loftin, Moore of Wilson, Moseley, Pearsall, Quinn, Ramsay, Rans- 
dell, Shuford of Buncombe, Shuford of Catawba, Smith, Spruill, 
Tonissen, Uzzell, Vogler, Wallace of Lenoir, Welfare, White of 
Chowan, Worley, Worthington, Honeycutt, Richardson, Arthur. 

Committee on Game and Inland Fisheries 

Mr. Askew, Chairman, Messrs: Barber, Bender, Bost, Boswood, 
Buie, Burgiss, Bynum, Chalk, Cohoon, Craig, Currie, Edwards of 
Greene, Evans, Gibbs, Grimes, Horner, Kerr, LeGrand, Meekins, 
Moore of Scotland, Morris, Palmer, Pritchett, Quinn, Ransdell, 



322 North Carolina Manual 

Royster, Shuford of Catawba, Spi'uill, Stone, Stoney, Wallace of 
Lenoir, Fields, Hart, Morton. 

Committee on Health 

Mr. Barker, Chairman, Dr. Smith, Vice Chairman, Messrs: 
Evans, Askew, Bennett, Blalock, Bost, Bridger, Brown, Buie, Bur- 
giss, Bynum, Crawford, Currie, Dobson, Edwards of Greene, Gantt, 
Gass, Gobble, Grimes, Gunn, Harris, Hatch, Horner, Kerr, Mc- 
Donald, Moore of Scotland, Moore of Wilson, Morris, Moseley, 
Peele, Powers, Rountree, Shuford of Buncombe, Stone, Stoney, 
Taylor, Umstead, Uzzell, Wallace of Lenoir, Welfare, Worley, 
Hutchins, Peterson, Story. 

Committee on Higher Education 

Mr. Wallace of Lenoir, Chairman, Messrs: Turner, Barber, 
Brown of Hoke, Burgiss, Clark, Cover, Crissman, Edwards of 
Swain, Goodman, Griffin, Gunn, Hardison, Kerr, Loftin, McCracken, 
McDonald, Meekins, Moseley, Palmer, Powers, Quinn, Rountree, 
Rutledge, Shuford of Buncombe, Stone, Umstead, Uzzell, Vernon, 
Welfare, Whitfield, Fields, Honeycutt, Story. 

Committee on Institutions for the Blind 

Mr. Ramsay, Chairman, Messrs: Allen, Arthur, Bell, Bennett, 
Boswood, Burgess, Cohoon, Dellinger, Evans, Gunn, Kearney, Mc- 
Cracken, Morris, Ransdell, Ruark, Smith, Spruill, Stoney, Vogler, 
Welfare, Herbert, Peterson. 

Committee on Institutions for the Deaf 

Dr. Brown, Chairman, Messrs: Stoney, Allison, Barker, Burgin, 
Burgiss, Crawford, Houser, James, Martin, Overby, Rabb, Ransdell, 
Rutledge, Shuford of Buncombe, Tonissen, White of Chowan, Alex- 
ander, Eggers, Peterson. 

Committee on Insurance 

Mr. Taylor, Chairman, Mr. Ramsay, Vice Chairman, Messrs: 
Stoney, Arthur, Bost, Bridger, Buie, Caveness, Chalk, Clark, Del- 
linger, Gantt, Gibbs, Gobble, Grimes, Gunn, Harris, Hatch, Hor- 
ner, Hutton, Kerr, LeGrand, Loftin, Marshall, Moore of Wilson, 
Moseley, Pearsall, Powers, Pritchett, Rountree, Ruark, Shuford 
of Buncombe, Smith, Stone, Uzzell, Vernon, Wallace of Lenoir, 
Watkins, Worley, Worthington, Alexander, Fisher, Hutchins, Rich- 
ardson, 



House of Representatives 323 

Committee on Interstate Cooperation 

Mr. Rutledge, Chairman, Messrs : Horner, Bridger, Loftin, Worth- 
ington. 

Committee on Journal 

Dr. Burgiss, Chairman, Messrs: Askew, Bell, Bennett, Burgin, 
Cohoon, Cover, Gibbs, Hutton, Meekins, Tonissen, White of Per- 
quimans, Eggers, Peterson. 

Committee on Judiciary No. 1 

Mr. Hatch, Chairman, Messrs: Taylor, Bridger, Burns, Clai'k, 
Fountain, Gantt, Griffin, Grimes, Kearney, Kerr, LeGrand, Moore 
of Wilson, Moseley, Pritchett, Rutledge, Shuford of ' Buncombe, 
Uzzell, Wallace of Lenoir, Story. 

Committee on Judiciary No. 2 

Mr. Craig, Chairman, Messrs: Barber, Averitt, Barker, Bender, 
Bost, Caveness, Crissman, Bellinger, Edwards of Swain, Goodman, 
Horn, Loftin, Martin, Pearsall, Ramsay, Ransdell, Ruark, White 
of Chowan, Worthington. 

Committee on Manufactures and Labor 

Mr. Burns, Chairma^i, Mr. Shuford of Catawba, Vice Chairman, 
Messrs: Vogler, Arthur, Barber, Barker, Bridger, Cover, Crawford, 
Currie, Evans, Gantt, Gass, Hatch, Horn, Horner, Houser, Hutton, 
Kerr, LeGrand, Marshall, Moore of Wilson, Palmer, Pearsall, Pow- 
ers, Pritchett, Ramsay, Royster, Rutledge, Sellars, Stone, Shu- 
ford of Buncombe, Smith, Stoney, Taylor, Tonissen, Umstead, Ver- 
non, Wallace of Lenoir, Watkins, Worley, Alexander, Hart, Honey- 
cutt, Morton, Richardson. 

Committee on Mental Institutions 

Mr. Spruill, Chairman, Messrs: Currie, Allen, Allison, Bennett, 
Boswood, Brown of Hoke, Burgin, Bynum, Caveness, Chalk, Craw- 
ford, Crissman, Edwards of Swain, Gantt, Horn, Houser, James, 
LeGrand, Meekins, Morris, Powers, Quinn, Rabb, Rutledge, Smith, 
Stoney, Taylor, Uzzell, Vogler, Wallace of Lenoir, Welfare, White 
of Chowan, Whitfield, Deal, Herbert, Hutchins, Long, Richardson. 



324 North Carolina Manual 

Committee on Military Aflfairs 

Mr. Caveness, Chairman, Messrs: Burgin, Bender, Blalock, Bridg 
er, Brown of Hoke, Crawford, Dobson, Goodman, Houser, Hutton; 
McCracken, Overby, Quinn, Rabb, Ruark, Sellars, Stoney, Um- 
stead, Watkins, White of Chowan, Whitfield, Eggers, Fisher, 
Story. 

Committee on Oyster Industry 

Mr. Cohoon, Chairman, Messrs:. Meekins, Arthur, Askew, Bell, 
Boswood, Bridger, Burgess, Edwards of Greene, Evans, Gibbs, 
Hardison, LeGrand, Peele, Ruark, Spruill, White of Chowan, Deal. 

Committee on Penal Institutions 

Mr. Quinn, Chairman, Messrs: Morris, Allison, Bost, Bridger, 
Bynum, Clark, Craig, Dobson, Fountain, Gantt, Horn, Houser, 
Kearney, Moore of Scotland, Overby, Rabb, Ransdell, Sellars, 
Spruill, Turner, Wallace of Montgomery, Welfare, White of Cho- 
wan, Worley, Worthington, Alexander, Hart, Herbert, Peterson. 

Committee on Pensions 

Mr. Sellars, Chairman, Messrs: Rabb, Allen, Askew, Averltt, 
Bender, Bost, Buie, Crissman, Davis, Gantt, Goodman, Hutton, 
LeGrand, McCracken, McDonald, Overby, Rountree, Shuford of 
Catawba, Turner, Wallace of Montgomery, White of Chowan, 
White of Perquimans, Fields, Herbert, Morton. 

Committee on Propositions and Grievances 

Mr. Bost, Chairman, Mr. Blalock, Vice Chairman, Messrs: Aver- 
itt, Allen, Barker, Bridger, Burgess, Burgin, Caveness, Currie, 
Gibbs, Grimes, LeGrand, Meekins, Moore of Wilson, Pearsall, Pow- 
ers, Quinn, Shuford of Catawba, Smith, Taylor, Tonissen, Wallace 
of Lenoir, Deal, Hart. 

Committee on Public Utilities 

Mr. Dobson, Chairman, Mrs. Cover, Vice Chairman, Messrs: 
Moore of Wilson, Allison, Barker, Bost, Bridger, Buie, Burgin, 
Edwards of Swain, Gantt, Gass, Hutton, Kearney, Kerr, LeGrand, 
Marshall, Morris, Overby, Rabb, Rutledge, Shuford of Buncombe, 
Stone, Taylor, Umstead, Vernon, Wallace of Lenoir, Wallace of 
Montgomery, Whitfield, Worley, Honeycutt, Morton. 



House of Representatives 325 

Committee on Public Welfare 

Mr. Vogler, Chairman, Mr. Wallace of Montgomery, Vice Chair- 
man, Messrs: Vernon, Allison, Averitt, Barber, Blalock, Bridger, 
Brown of Hoke, Clark, Cover, Crissman, Dobson, Edwards of Swain, 
Graham, Gunn, Harris, Hatch, Houser, Loftin, McCracken, Meek- 
ins, Moore of Wilson, Morris, Moseley, Palmer, Powers, Quinn, 
Eoyster, Sellars, Spruill, Stone, Stoney, Welfare, White of Chowan, 
Worley, Eggers, Fields, Honeycutt, Hutchins. 

Committee on Recodification 

Mr. Loftin, Chairman, Messrs: Pritchett, Averitt, Clark, Ed- 
wards of Swain, Gantt, Goodman, Grimes, Hatch, Kearney, Le- 
Grand, Moseley, Ramsay, Ruark, Rutledge, Taylor, Wallace of 
Lenoir, White of Chowan, Woi'thington, Story. 

Committee on Roads 

Mr. Bridger, Chairman, Mr. Barker, Vice Chairman, Messrs: 
Quinn, Allison, Askew, Barber, Boswood, Brown of Columbus, Buie, 
Burgess, Burgiss, Burns, Bynum, Chalk, Cohoon, Currie, Dobson, 
Edwards of Greene, Edwards of Swain, Gass, Gunn, Hatch, Horn, 
Horner, Kearney, Kerr, McDonald, Moore of Wilson, Morris, Mose- 
ley, Palmer, Powers, Royster, Rutledge, Sellars, Shuford of Bun- 
combe, Smith, Stone, Taylor, Uzzell, Vernon, Vogler, Wallace of 
Lenoir, Wallace of Montgomery, Watkins, Whitfield, Worley, Alex- 
ander, Eggers, Herbert, Honeycutt, Worthington. 

Committee on Salaries and Fees 

Mr. Moore of Scotland, Chairman, Messrs: James, Allen, Bell, 
Boswood, Brown of Columbus, Cohoon, Crawford, Goodman, Mc- 
Cracken, Meekins, Morris, Peele, Rabb, Shuford of Buncombe, 
Tonissen, Turner, Wallace of Montgomery, White of Chowan, Fields, 
Fisher, Hart. 

•Committee on Senatorial Districts 

Mr. Moore of Wilson, Chairman, Messrs: Gunn, Allen, Averitt, 
Bender, Brown of Hoke, Burgiss, Cover, Craig, Dellinger, Edwards 
of Swain, Gobble, Kearney, Martin, Moore of Scotland, Morris, 
Palmer, Quinn, Rutledge, Shuford of Catawba, Smith, Stoney, Wal- 
lace of Montgomery, Watkins, White of Chowan, Fisher, Herbert, 
Long. 



326 North Carolina Manual 

Committee on Unemployment Compensation 

Mr. Uzzell, Chairman, Mr, Bridger, Vice Chairman, Messrs: Wat- 
kins, Allen, Barker, Blalock, Best, Burns, Cohoon, Craig, Crissman, 
Currie, Dobson, Edwards of Greene, Fountain, Graham, Horn, 
James, Kerr, LeGrand, Marshall, Moore of Scotland, Palmer, Pear- 
sail, Royster, Shuford of Buncombe, Shuford of Catawba, Smith, 
Stone, Taylor, Vernon, White of Chowan, Worley, Alexander, Fisher, 
Morton, Richardson. 

Committee on Veterans Legislation 

Mr. Moseley, Chairman, Mr. Gantt, Vice Chairman, Messrs: 
Goodman, Barber, Blalock, Bost, Bridger, Bynum, Clark, Craig, 
Currie, Dobson, Edwards of Swain, Gibbs, Goodman, Graham, Hor- 
ner, Houser, Hutton, Kearney, Kerr, McCracken, Moore of Scot- 
land, Palmer, Pritchett, Shuford of Buncombe, Stone, Stoney, Um- 
stead, Vernon, Wallace of Lenoir, Whitfield, Worthington, Fisher, 
Morton, Richardson. 

Committee on Enrolled Bills 

Mrs. Cover, Chairman, Messrs: Gobble, Bennett, Boswood, Bur- 
giss, Bellinger, Harris, McDonald, Martin, Meekins, Morris, Overby, 
Peele, Ramsay, Ransdell, Ruark, Spruill, Welfare, Hutchins. 

Committee on Justices of Peace 

Mr. Rabb, Chairman, Messrs: Tonissen, Askew, Bender, Bridger, 
Burgiss, Cohoon, Crissman, Bellinger, Edwards of Greene, Ed- 
v/ards of Swain, Evans, Gobble, Gunn, Hatch, Kerr, Loftin, Mc- 
Donald, Overby, Pritchett, Rountree, Ruark, Spruill, Turner, Vog- 
ler, Welfare, White of Perquimans, Worthington, Deal, Honeycutt, 
Richardson. 

Committee on Library 

Mr. Graham, Chairman, Messrs: Umstead, Arthur, Askew, Bar- 
ker, Bost, Caveness, Dellinger, Edwards of Swain, Griffin, Hatch, 
Horner, McDonald, Martin, Morris, Quinn, Rabb, 'Rountree, Rut- 
ledge, Sellars, Stone, Turner, Watkins, White of Perquimans, Alex- 
ander, Deal, Fields, Fisher, 

Committee on Printing 

Mr. Rountree, Chairman, Messrs: Davis, Arthur, Bender, Buie, 
Cover, Goodman, Hatch, Hornei-, Kearney, Marshall, Moore of Scot- 



House of Representatives 327 

land, Palmer, Ramsay, Stoney, Welfare, White of Perquimans, 
Eggers. 

Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds 

Mr. Blalock, Chairman, Messrs: Sellars, Allison, Bost, Brown of 
Columbus, Caveness, Clark, Craig, Bellinger, Graham, Harris, 
Hatch, Kearney, Marshall, Moore of Scotland, Palmer, Powers, 
Quinn, Ramsay, Royster, Stone, Turner, Vernon, Vogler, White of 
Perquimans, Herbert. 

Committee on Trustees of University 

Mr. Umstead, Chairman, Messrs: Kerr, Barber, Bridger, Burns, 
Currie, Edwards of Greene, Fountain, Gibbs, Griffin, Horner, Le- 
Grand, Loftin, Moore of Wilson, Moseley, Pearsall, Pritchett, Ram- 
say, Rutledge, Shuford of Catawba, Smith, Spruill, Stone, Stoney, 
Taylor, Wallace of Lenoir, Welfare, Whitfield, Alexander, Honey- 
cutt, Story. 






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House of Representatives 329 

Seat Assignment Chart — Session 1945 

NORTH CAROLINA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

(Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

County Name Address Seat 

Alamance Walter R. Sellars Burlington 45 

Alexander Hayden Deal (R) Taylorsville .............. J 07 

Alleghany T. Roy Burgiss Sparta 75 

Anson U. B. Blalock Wadesboro 24 

Ashe M. Donley Hart (R) Tuckerdale .... 115 

Avery W. R. Fields (R) Elk Park 108 

Beaufort ». Bryan Grimes Washington 76 

Bertie C. Wayland Spruill Windsor 60 

Bladen James A. Bridger Bladenboro ...,, 7 

Brunswick J. W. Ruark Southport .'. 51 

Buncombe George W. Craig Asheville ..,. 4] 

E. L. Loftin Asheville ...."...' 4C 

George A. Shuford Asheville 39 

Burke A. B. Stoney .Morganton 3 

Cabarrus E. T. Bost, Jr Concord 28 

J. Carlyle Rutledge Kannapolis .. . 27 

Caldwell ...' J. T. Pritchett Lenoir 6 ' 

Camden S. E. Burgess Belcross 80 

Carteret H. S. Gibbs Morehead City ..' 5 

Caswell Jno. O. Gunn Yanceyville 52 

Catawba Harley F. Shuford Hickory 99 

Chatham Wade Barber Pittsboro 65 

Cherokee Mrs. G. W. Cover Andrews 15 

Chowan John F. White Edenton 85 

Clay F. Herbert (R) Hayesville 116 

Cleveland Charles C. Horn Shelby 44 

Columbus J. Percy Bi'own Tabor City 87. 

Craven Burl G. Hardison New Bern 83 

Cumberland F. M. Averitt Fayetteville 82 

T. C. Bynum Hope Mills 81 

Currituck G. C. Boswood Gregory 47 

Dare Theo. S. Meekins Manteo 105 

Davidson Dr. J. A. Smith Lexington 91 

Davie R. V. Alexander (R) Cooleemee 109 

Duplin C, E. Quinn Kenansville 48 

Durham Oscar G. Barker Durham 4 

Robert M. Gantt, Sr Durham 32 

Edgecombe Ben E. Fountain Rocky Mount 26 

Forsyth Rex Gass Winston-Salem 69 

F. L. Gobble Winston-Salem 70 

Sam E. Welfare Winston-Salem 71 

Franklin H. C. Kearney Franklinton Ill 

Gaston David P. Dellinger Cheri-yville 33 

O. M. Vernon Mt. Holly 34 

Gates W. J. Rountree Hobbsville 88 

Graham .Dr. J. H. Crawford Robbinsville 119 

Granville Jno. S. Watkins Oxford 35 

Greene Alonzo C. Edwards Hookerton 17 

Guilford Shelley B. Caveness Greensboro 29 

Walter E. Crissman High Point 30 

Frank R. Hutton Greensboro 57 

Robert Moseley Greensboro 58 

Halifax Irwin Clark Scotland Neck 89 

Harnett Allison L. Overby Angrier 95 

Haywood Glenn C. Palmer Clyde 54 

Henderson L. L. Burgin Horse Shoe 112 

Hertford Merrill Evans A.hoskie 96 

Hoke Dr. G. W. Brown Raeford 94 

Hyde C. L. Bell Swan Quarter 74 



330 North Carolina Manual 



Iredell D. E. Turner, Sr Mooresville 98 

Jackson Dan M. Allison Sylva 72 

Johnston .G. A. Martin Smithfield 66 

Carl P. Worley Selma 67 

Jones R. P. Bender Pollocksville 61 

Lee W. E. Horner Sanford 2 

Lenoir F. E. Wallace Kinston 25 

Lincoln .Chas. F. Houser Lincolnton 73 

Macon Wayne R. McCracken Franklin, R. 4 114 

Madison Dr. J. H. Hutchins (R) .7.. Marshall 102 

Martin Clarence W. Griffin Williamston 46 

McDowell J. C. Rabb Marion 19 

Mecklenburg Arthur Goodman Charlotte 22 

Harvey Morris Charlotte 50 

Ed. T. Tonissen Charlotte 21 

James B. Vogler Charlotte 23 

Mitchell Dr. C. A. Peterson (R) Spruce Pine .' 118 

Montgomery J. P. Wallace Troy 86 

Moore Wilbur H. Currie Carthage 64 

Nash Thomas J. Pearsall Rocky Mount 8 

New Hanover John Q. LeGrand Wilmington 31 

Northampton H. R. Harris Seaboard 16 

Onslow W. J. (Billy) Arthur Jacksonville 62 

Orange John W. Umstead, Jr Chapel Hill 97 

Pamlico E. S. Askew Oriental 9 

Pasquotank Vernon G. James Elizabeth City 78 

Pender J. V. Whitfield WaUace : 49 

Perquimans W. W. White Hertford 77 

Person Robert P. Burns Roxboro 63 

Pitt Geo. W. Davis Farmville 43 

Sam O. Worthington Greenville 4Z 

Polk W. H. McDonald Tryon 113 

Randolph S. Girard Richardson (R) Seagrove , 110 

Richmond John D. Chalk Rockingham 55 

Robeson J. P. Buie Red Springs 93 

I. P. Graham Proctorville 92 

Rockingham T. Clarence Stone StoneviUe 20 

Rowan Kerr Craige Ramsay Salisbury 14 

George R. Uzzell Salisbury 13 

Rutherford Lee L. Powers Lake Lure 88 

Sampson Chas. F. Honeycutt (R) Clinton 106 

Scotland O. L. Moore Laurinburg 18 

Stanly J. J. Morton (R) Albemarle 103 

Stokes .William F. Marshall Walnut Cove 84 

Surry Henry C. Dobson Elkin 53 

Swain McKinley Edwards Bryson City 68 

Transylvania Ralph R. Fisher (R) Brevard 117 

Tyrrell C. Earl Cohoon Columbia 36 

Union Oscar L. Richardson Monroe SPEAKER 

Vance Fred S. Rovster Henderson 56 

Wake J. LeRoy Allen Raleigh 11 

William T. Hatch Raleigh 12 

N. F. Ransdell Varina 10 

Warren John Kerr, Jr Warrenton 1 

Washington W. H. (Jack) Peele Plymouth 79 

Watauga S. C. Eggers (R) Boone 101 

Wayne .W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro 59 

Wilkes T. E. Story (R) Wilkesboro 100 

Wilson .Larry I. Moore, Jr. Wilson 37 

Yadkin R. B. Long (R) Boonville 104 

Yancey JDr. W. L. Bennett Bumsville 90 



PART VII 
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 




R. GREGG CHERRY 
Governor 



Biographical Sketches 

EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS 

ROBERT GREGG CHERRY 

GOVERNOR 

(Elected by the People) 

Robert Gregg Cherry, Democrat, was born in York County, S. C, 
October 17, 1891. Son of Chancellor LaFayette and Hattie E. (Davis) 
Cherry. Attended Gastonia Graded Schools 1900-1908; A.B., Duke 
University 1912; Duke University Law School 1913-1914. Lawyer. 
Member Gaston County Bar Association, North Carolina Bar Asso- 
ciation, American Bar Association and Kiwanis Club. Mayor of Gas- 
tonia 1919-1923. Captain Co. "A," Machine Gun Battalion, 30th 
Division, April 26, 1917, to April 15, 1919; Major, 120th N. C. 
National Guard, 1920-1921. Member Gastonia Lodge No. 369, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Knights Templar; Royal Arch 
Masons; Oasis Temple A.A.O.N.M.S. Shrine; Knights of Pythias, 
Knights of Khorassan; Improved Order of Red Men; Jr.O.U.A.M.; 
LO.O.F.; B.P.O. of Elks; Sons Confederate Veterans; American 
Legion, State Commander 1928-1929. Member Board Trustees Duke 
University. Representative in the General Assembly of 1931, 1933, 
1935, and 1939; Speaker in 1937, State Senator 1941and 1943; Vice 
President North Carolina Bar Association 1934-1935. Elected Gover- 
nor November 7, 1944. Methodist; Member Board of Stewards. Mar- 
ried Miss Mildred Stafford 1921. Address: Gastonia, N. C. 



[333] 



334 North Carolina Manual 

THAD EURE 

secretary of state 

(Elected by the People) 
Thad Eure, Democrat, of Hertford County. Was born Novem- 
ber 15, 1899, in Gates County, N. C. Son of Tazewell A, and Armecia 
(Langstun) Eure. Attended Gatesville High School 1913-1917; 
University of North Carolina 1917-1919; University Law School 
1921-1922. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association; North 
Carolina State Bar, and Hertford County Bar Association. Mayor 
of Winton 1923-1928. County attorney for Hertford County 1923- 
1931. Member of General Assembly 1929, representing Hertford 
County. Principal Clerk of the House of Representatives, Sessions 
1931, 1933, 1935, and extra session 1936. Presidential Elector First 
District of North Carolina 1932. Escheats Agent, University of 
North Carolina 1933-1936. Elected Secretary of State in the Gene- 
ral Election of November 3, 1936, and assumed the duties of the 
office December 21, 1936, by virtue of executive appointment, ten 
days prior to the commencement of Constitutional Term, on ac- 
count of a vacancy that then occurred. Reelected Secretary of State 
in General Elections of 1940 and 1944. President Ahoskie Kiwanis 
Club 1927. Theta Chi Fraternity. Junior Order, B.P.O. Elks; T.P. 
A.; Member Board of Trustees Elon College; American Legion, 
Secretary National Aassociation of Secretaries of State 1938, Vice 
President 1940, President 1942. Congregational Christian Church. 
Married Miss Minta Banks of Winton, N. C, November 15, 1924. 
Of this union there are two children, a daughter and a son, Armecia 
and Thad Eure, Jr. Home address: Winton, N. C. official address: 
Raleigh, N. C. 

GEO. ROSS POU 

state auditor 

(Elected by the People) 
Geo. Ross Pou, Democrat, was born in Smithfield, Johnston Coun- 
ty, N. C, December 19, 1894. Son of Edward W. and Caroline 
(Ihrie) Pou. Attended Fishburne Military School; University of 
North Carolina and Wake Forest. Lawyer. Appointed Superinten- 
dent State Prison 1921, by Governor Cameron Morrison. Reap- 
pointed 1925 by Governor A. W. McLean, 1929, by Governor 0. 



Biographical Sketches 335 

Max Gardner. Appointed Executive Director of the State Highway 
and Public Works Commission in 1933 by Governor J. C. B. Ehring- 
haus. Resigned April 5, 1934. Nominated for State Auditor in Demo- 
cratic Primary, June, 1936, receiving a majority over three other 
candidates. Elected November 3, 1936, for four-year term. Reelected 
November 5, 1940 and Nov. 7, 1944. American Legion; La Societe 
Des 40 Hommes et 8 Chevau; Junior Order United American Me- 
chanics; B.P.O.E., War Dads. Episcopalian. Married Miss Lillian 
Long Sanders, November 11, 1916. Three children (Lillian) Mrs. 
Bryan Carr, wife of Bryan W. Carr, Lt. U. S. Navy, Lieutenant 
Edwin Smith Pou, United States Army Air Force, (Ihrie) Mrs. 
Geo. Watts Carr, Jr., wife of Geo. Watts Carr, Jr. Major U. S. 
Marines. Home address: Smithfield, N. C. Official address: Raleigh, 
N. C. 

CHARLES MARION JOHNSON 

STATE TREASURER 

(Elected by the People) 
Charles Marion Johnson, Democrat of Pender County, was born 
April 9, 1891, at Burgaw, North Carolina, son of M. H. and Min- 
nie (Norris) Johnson. Attended Burgaw High School, Buies Creek 
Academy, Bingham Military School. Field Auditor State Auditor's 
Office one year. Deputy State Auditor three years. Executive Secre- 
tary County Government Advisory Commission four years. Director 
of Local Government from March 4, 1931, to November 17, 1932, 
when appointed State Treasurer by Governor Gardner. Elected 
November 2, 1934, for unexpired term ending December 31, 1936. 
Reelected for full term November 3, 1936, and re-elected Novem- 
ber 5, 1940, re-elected Nov. 7, 1944. In March 1933 made Ex Officio 
Director of Local Government by act of General Assembly. Chair- 
man of Banking Commission, Chairman Teachers' and State Em- 
ployees' Retirement Commission, Chairman Local Government Com- 
mission, and member of State Board of Assessment, State Board 
of Education, Council of State, Veterans' Loan Board, Board of 
Public Buildings and Grounds, Law Enforcement Officers' Bene- 
fiit Fund. Member and Treasurer of the Sinking Fund Commission. 
American Legion. Presbyterian. Married Miss Ruth Moore of Bur- 
gaw, North Carolina, March 8, 1920. One child, Charles Marion 
Johnson, Jr. Address: Raleigh, North Carolina. 



336 North Carolina Manual 

CLYDE ATKINSON ERWIN 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

(Elected by the People) 
Clyde Atkinson Erwin, Democrat, was born in Atlanta, Georgia, 
February 8, 1897. Son of Sylvanus and Mamie (Putnam) Erwin. 
Attended grammar schools of Charlotte and Waco and graduated 
from Piedmont High School, Lawndale, N. C, 1914. Attended Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 1915-1916 and subsequent summer schools. 
Life member National Education Association; member Department 
Superintendent N.E.A.; North Carolina Education Association 
President 1932-1933; member National Committee on Rural Educa- 
tion; Regional Consultant National Committee on Emergency in 
Education. President Rutherfordton Kiwanis Club 1932; honorary 
member for life Rutherford County Club. Mason; all branches, in- 
cluding Shrine; Principal Gault School, Jonesville, S. C, 1916-1917; 
Waco High School 1917-1919; Cliffsicle Public Schools and Avondale 
Public Schools 1919-1923. Superintendent Rutherford County 
Schools 1925-1934. Appointed State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction by Governor J. C. B. Ehringhaus, October 24, 1934, suc- 
ceeding the late Dr. A. T. Allen. Elected for a full term November 
3, 1936. Re-elected in 1940 and 1944. Awarded Pd.D. honorary de- 
gree Catawba College, Salisbury, N. C, in May 1935. Member 
High School Textbook Committee 1927-1932; chairman Elemen- 
tary Textbook Commission 1933-1934. President Southern Council 
Chief School Officers; Member Executive Committee and Legisla- 
tive Committee National Council of Chief School Officers; Consul- 
tant National Safety Council; Consultant Educational Policies 
Committee of the National Education Association. Methodist. Lay 
leader in Marion District; Superintendent Cliff side Sunday School; 
teacher Ladies' Class, Rutherfordton M. E. Church for ten years. 
At present teacher of College Sunday School class, Edenton Street 
Methodist Church. Married Miss Evelyn Miller of Waco, N. C. ; two 
children, Frances Elizabeth, and Clyde A., Jr. Address: Raleigh, 
N. C. 

WILLIAM KERR SCOTT 

COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE 

(Elected by the People) 
William Kerr Scott, Democrat. Born at Haw River, N. C. Attended 
Hawfields Graded School 1902-1908; Hawfields High School 1909- 



lad Eure 

Secretary of State 



George Ross Pou 
Auditor 



Chas. M. Johnson 
Treasurer 



yde A. Erwin 

Superintendent of Public 
Instruction 



Wm. Kerr Scott 

Commissioner of Agriculture 



Forrest H. Shuford 

Commissioner of Labor 



m. P. Hodges 
Commissioner of Insurance 



Harry McMullan 

Attorney General 




State officials who are elected by the people in addition to the Governor and Lieutenant 
Governor. The above officials constitute the Council of State with the exception of the Attorney 
General who is the legal adviser to the Executive Department. 



338 North Carolina Manual 

1913. Four-year honor student and athlete, N. C. State College; B.S. 
degree in Agriculture 1917. Member of American Jersey Cattle 
Club; President State Jersey Cattle Club; presented cup by Ameri- 
can Jersey Cattle Club in 1925 for outstanding work in promoting 
better quality of Jersey cows; organizer of world's largest Regis- 
tered Jersey Calf Club while County Agent. President State Dairy- 
men's Association. Member of North Carolina Rural Electrification 
Authority. First in North Carolina to make a public address on 
need for rural electrification in 1930, Statesville, N. C. Deacon 
Hawsfields Presbyterian Church 1920-1932; Elder 1933-1938. Mar- 
ried Miss Mary Elizabeth White, July 2, 1919. 

Emergency Food Production Agent 1917-1918; Alamance County 
Agricultural Agent 1920-1930; Master of North Carolina State 
Grange 1930-1933; organizer in Southeastern States of Farm Debt 
Adjustment Program in Farm Credit Administration 1933-1936. 
Elected Commissioner of Agriculture 1936. Reelected November 6, 
1940. Reelected November 7, 1944. Received Progressive Farmer 
award, "The Man of the Year," as North Carolina's Agricultural 
Leader of 1937. Farmer and dairyman. Veteran World War I — 
Member Walter B. Ellis Post. Address: Haw River, N. C. 

FORREST HERMAN SHUFORD 

COMMISSIONER OF LABOR 

(Elected by the People) 
Forrest Herman Shuford, Democrat, was born in Cleveland Coun- 
ty, N. C, June 3, 1897. Son of J. M. and Ella (Copeland) Shuford. 
Attended Public Schools of Cleveland County and graduated from 
Piedmont High School, Lawndale, N. C. Attended Berea College, 
Berea, Kentucky; Textile School of North Carolina State College, 
Raleigh, N. C, and Duke University, Durham, N. C, and several 
summer schools. Worked in textile mills in Harrisville, Rhode Is- 
land, and in Gastonia, N. C, 1921-1924. Principal of Ellenboro High 
School 1924-1925; Spindale School 1925-1926. Appointed Boys' Com- 
missioner, City of High Point, High Point, N. C. 1926-1933. Ap- 
pointed Chief Inspector in the Department of Labor in 1933 by 
Major A. L. Fletcher, Commissioner. Appointed in 1934 by the 
Secretary of Labor, to membership on a committee to prepare a 
Factory Inspectors* Manual, which has been accepted as the Nation- 
al Standard. Granted leave of absence from the Department of 



Biographical Sketches 339 

Labor to serve as N.R.A. Labor Compliance Officer for North Caro- 
lina 1934-1935. Appointed Commissioner of Labor by Governor 
Clyde R. Hoey, September 12, 1938. Elected to the office of Com- 
missioner of Labor in the General Electiqji November 8, 1938. Re- 
elected November 5, 1940 and Nov. 7, 1944. Member Society of 
Safety Engineers; Textile Section of the National Safety Council. 
Served in the Navy during the World War. Member American Le- 
gion since its organization; Past Commander of Andrew Jackson 
Post No. 87 of American Legion, High Point, N. C; La Societe 
Des 40 Hommes et 8 Chevau. Methodist. Married Miss May Ren- 
frew, June 3, 1922. Two children: Forrest Herman Shuford, 2nd, 
and Harry Benjamin Shuford. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

WILLIAM PARKER HODGES 

COMMISSIONER OF INSURANCE 

(Elected by the People) 

William Parker Hodges, Democrat, was born in Williamston, 
Martin County, N. C, October 19, 1906. Son of W. J. and Deborah 
(Parker) Hodges. Attended public schools of Williamston, 1924; 
Wake Forest College, LL.B., 1928. Member North Carolina State 
Bar and the Wake County Bar Association. Executive Secretary 
Commission on Revision of the Laws of North Carolina relating to 
Estates, 1936-1939. Kappa Alpha Order, Province Commander, 1935- 
1936, Blue Goose; Rotary Club. Practiced law in Raleigh, 1929- 
1936; appointed Chief Deputy Commissioner of Insurance, July, 
1936; appointed Commissioner of Insurance by Governor Brough- 
ton, September 10, 1942, to fill the unexpired term of Hon. Dan. C. 
Boney, deceased. Elected Commissioner of Insurance in the Gen- 
eral Election, November 7, 1944, for a four year term. Baptist. 
Married Miss Olga E. Dodds, August 6, 1935. Two children: Wil- 
liam Parker, Jr., and Elizabeth. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

HARRY McMULLAN 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

(Elected by the People) 
Harry McMullan, Democrat, was born at Hertford, N. C, July 23, 
1884. Son of Dr. J. H. and Lina (Tucker) McMullan. Attended 
Edenton Public Schools; LL.B., University of North Carolina 1905. 



340 North Carolina Manual 

Lawyer. Member D.K.E. and Gimghoul fraternities. Senator from 
the Second Senatorial District in the General Assembly of 1929. 
Engaged in practice at Washington, N. C, 1907 to 1933; County At- 
torney for Beaufort County 1926 to 1933. Chairman North Carolina 
Industrial Commission. North Carolina Bar Association. American 
Bar Association. Appointed Attorney General by Governor Hoey 
April 30, 1938, to succeed Attorney General A. A. F. Seawell upon 
his appointment to the Supreme Court; elected for the unexpired 
term of A. A. F. Seawell, November 1938; elected for full four- 
year term, November 5, 1940, re-elected Nov. 7th, 1944. Episco- 
palian. Married Miss Pattie M. Baugham of Washington, N. C, 
October 4, 1911. Four children. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

CARRIE L. BROUGHTON 

STATE LIBRARIAN 
CHAIRMAN LIBRARY COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 
Carrie L. Broughton, Democrat, State Librarian and Chairman 
Library Commission, was born in Wake County, Raleigh, N. C. 
Daughter of Needham B. and Caroline R. (Lewis) Broughton. 
Attended Raleigh Public Schools; Peace Junior College; North 
Carolina College for Women; Meredith College. Member American 
and North Carolina Library associations; North Carolina Literary 
and Historical Association. Appointed Assistant State Librarian in 
1902 and State Librarian in 1919. Baptist; Member of Executive 
Committee State W.M.U. Leader of missionary group in local 
church. Address : 125 Hawthorne Rd., Raleigh, N. C. 

CHARLES CHRISTOPHER CRITTENDEN 

SECRETARY OP THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 

(Appointed by the Executive Board of the Department) 

Christopher Crittenden, Democrat, was born in Wake Forest, 
N. C, December 1, 1902. Son of Charles Christopher and Ethel 
(Taylor) Crittenden. Attended Wake Forest Grammar and High 
Schools. A.B. Wake Forest College 1921 and A.M. in 1922; Yale 
University, Ph.D. 1930. Secretary State Department of Archives 
and History (formerly the State Historical Commission) since 
1935; Secretary State Literary and Historical Association since 



Biographical Sketches 341 

1935; Member American Historical and Southern Historical as- 
sociations; Society American Archivists; President American As- 
sociation for State and Local History 1940-1942. Member History 
Club and Watauga Club of Ealeigh. Principal Roxobel, N. C, 
Public School 1922-1923; Instructor in History, Yale University 
1924-1925; Nniversity of North Carolina 1926-1929; Assistant 
Professor of History, University of North Carolina 1930-1935. 
Author oi North Carolina Newspapers before 1770; The Commerce 
of North Carolina 1763-1789 ; and various historical articles and 
book reviews. Editor The North Carolina Historical Review. Baptist. 
Married Miss Janet Quinlan of Waynesville, N. C, 1930. Three 
children: C, Jr., born 1933; Robert Hinton, born 1936; Ann Lane, 
born 1938. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

BAXTER DURHAM 

SECRETARY, TEACHERS' AND STATE EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

(Elected by Board of Trustees) 
Baxter Durham, Democrat, v^^as born in Durham, N. C, August 
20, 1887. Son of Columbus and Lila (Walters) Durham. Attended 
public schools of Durham and Raleigh, 1884-1892; Raleigh Male 
Academy, 1892-1894; Wake Forest College, 1894-1895. Traveling 
auditor. Department of State Auditor. Captain and Major in Na- 
tional Guard, 1907-1919. Elected State Auditor, November 2, 1920; 
re-elected November 4, 1924; re-elected November 6, 1928; re- 
elected November 8, 1932. President National Association of State 
Auditors, Comptrollers and Treasurers, 1923, and 1924, 1927, and 
1928. Secretary State Retirement Commission, April 1939-January 
1, 1941. Appointed Secretary Teachers' and State Employees' Re- 
tirement System, April 1, 1941. President Tar Heel Club, Raleigh, 
1932-33. Baptist. Married Miss Lois Dosher of Southport. Address : 
Raleigh, N. C. 

ROBERT BRUCE ETHERIDGE 

DIRECTOR DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

(Appointed by the Governor) 
Robert Bruce Etheridge, Democrat, Director, Department of Con- 
servation and Development, was born at Manteo, July 31, 1878. Son 
of Van Buren and Matilda Etheridge. Attended public schools of 
Manteo and Atlantic Collegiate Institute, Elizabeth City; A.B. 



342 North Carolina Manual 

Trinity College (now Duke University) 1899. Cashier Bank of 
Manteo 1907-1933. General Insurance, Clerk Superior Court, Dare 
County; Superintendent of Schools; member State Executive Com- 
mittee 1928-1941; Postmaster, Manteo 1914-1922; County Chairman 
Democratic Executive Committee. State Senator from Second 
District 1907. Representative in General Assembly 1903, 1905, 1929, 
1931, and 1933. Director Department of Conservation and Develop- 
ment 1933-1944. Member New York World's Fair Commission. 
Chairman ex-officio Cape Hatteras National Seashore Commission. 
Mason, Treasurer Masonic Lodge twelve years; Junior Order; 
Woodmen of America; Red Men; Kappa Sigma (college fraternity). 
Married Miss Elizabeth Webb, April 22, 1908. Address: Manteo, 
N. C. 

ARTHUR LLOYD FLETCHER 

chairman unemployment compensation commission 

(Appointed by the Governor) 
Arthur Lloyd Fletcher, Democrat, was born July 7, 1881. Son 
of Rev. James Floyd and Louisa (Barker) Fletcher. Attended 
Bridle Creek, Va., Academy; Wake Forest College, A.B. 1907; Law 
School Wake Forest and University of North Carolina; Licensed 
to practice law by the Supreme Court, 1907. Chairman Unemploy- 
ment Compensation Commission since 1941. Member N. C. State 
Bar. Member Interstate Conference, Employment Security Agen- 
cies; President International Association Governmental Labor Offi- 
cials, 1937-1938. Chief, Income Tax Division, Collector Internal Reve- 
nue, 1919-1921; Chief Deputy Insurance Department, 1921-1933; 
N. C. Commission of Labor, 1933-1938; Assistant Administrator 
Wage and Hour Division U. S. Department of Labor, 1938-1941. 
Army Field Clerk, N. C. N. G., Mexican Border Service, 1916-1917; 
Capt. 113th Field Artillery, 30th Div. A.E.F., 1917-1919; Capt. 
120th Inf., N. C. N. G., 1920-1928; Major J.A.G.D., N. C. N. G., 
1928-1940; Major A.U.S., 1940-1942; Lieut. Col., A. U. S., 1942 to 
present. Inactive status since July 1, 1944. Served two years and 
eight months of the present war as member of Presidential Appeal 
Board, National Headquarters Selective Service System. Mason; 
member Hiram Lodge No. 40; Charter member and Past Presi- 
dent Lions Club of Raleigh; American Legion, Forty and Eight; 
Past Commander, Raleigh Post No. 1 and Past Chef de Gere Forty 



Biographical Sketches 343 

and Eight. Past President Raleigh Y. M. C. A. Author of "History 
113th F. A.", and "History N. C. Department American Legion." 
Baptist. Married Miss Mae E. Pitzer. Address: 407 Dixie Trail, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

EDWIN MAURICE GILL 

COMMISIONER OF REVENUE 

(Appointed by the Governor) 
Edwin Maurice Gill, Democrat, was born in Laurinburg, N. C, 
July 20, 1899. Son of Thomas Jeffries and Mamie (North) Gill. 
Graduate from Laurinburg High School; Trinity College, 1922-1924. 
Representative in the General Assembly from Scotland County, 1929 
and 1931. Private Secretary, Governor Gardner, 1931-1933; Com- 
missioner of Paroles, 1933-1942; appointed Commissioner of Reve- 
nue by Governor Broughton, July 1, 1942. Member North Carolina 
Probation Commission since 1937. Admitted to the Bar January 
28, 1924 and practiced law in Laurinburg, 1924-1931 as a member 
of the firm of Gibson and Gill. Member North Carolina Bar As- 
sociation. President American Parole Association, 1940-1941; Pres- 
ident Southeastern States Probation and Parole Association, 1939- 
1940; Vice President, The American Parole Association, 1939-1940; 
Secretary-Treasurer, 1938-1939; Director American Prison Associa- 
tion, 1939-1940; Vice President, 1941-1942. Student Army Training 
Corps, Trinity College, Durham, N. C, 1918. Sigma Nu Phi, 
legal fraternity, Omicron Delta Kappa, leadership fraternity, 
honorary member, Duke University, 1940. Methodist. Elected mem- 
ber of Executive Committee of the National Tax Association in 
Sept. 1944 for three year term. Address : Raleigh, N. C. 

GURNEY POPE HOOD 

COMMISSIONER OP BANKS 

(Appointed by the Governor with Advice and Consent of the Senate) 
Gurney Pope Hood, Democrat, was born in Grantham's Town- 
ship, Wayne County, N. C, November 26, 1884. Son of Solomon 
Pope and Betsey (Rhodes) Hood. Attended Wayne County Public 
Schools 1890-1899; Goldsboro Graded School 1900-1901. Studied 
Law under private teacher 1906-1908; licensed to practice 1908. 
Appointed Commissioner of Banks April 1931. Member National 
Association of Supervisors of State Banks; President 1938-1939; 



344 North Carolina Manual 

Chairman Executive Committee 1937-1938; Chairman District No. 
2, 1940-1943. President Hood Finance Corporation 1924-1929; Presi- 
dent, The Hood System, Inc., 1929-1931; Served as officer for various 
banking institutions in North Carolina. Alderman, Goldsboro, 1911- 
1913; Mayor, Morehead City, 1917-1919. Member House of Repre- 
sentatives from Wayne County in the General Assembly of 1929 
and 1931. Corporal North Carolina National Guard 1906-1908. 
Mason; I.O.O.F.; Woodmen of the World; Past State Councilor, 
Junior Order United American Mechanics, and State Council Treas- 
urer; Member National Board of Trustees 1929-1941; Member Na- 
tional Board of Control since 1941. Methodist; Lay Leader 1919- 
1920; Member Commission on Budget, Annual Conference 1930- 
1940; Member Commission on World Service and Finance, Annual 
Conference since 1940; elected President 1944; Delegate to General 
Conference 1938; Uniting Conference 1939; Jurisdictional Confer- 
ence 1940-1944; General Conference, The Methodist Church 1940- 
1944. Married Miss Marion Lee Stevens, June 16, 1915. Children: 
Robin Pope, Samuel Stevens and Lee Rawlings Hood. Address: 
Goldsboro, N. C. 

FRED CALDWELL HUNTER 

STATE UTILITIES COMMISSIONER 

(Appointed by the Governor virith the approval of the Senate) 

Fred Caldv^^ell Hunter, Democrat, vi^as born in Mecklenburg 
County, N. C, April 14, 1884. Son of J. G. Mc. and Jane E. Hunter. 
Attended Bethany High School, Clover, S. C, 1904-1906; A.B, Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 1911; LL.B. Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity 1915. Judge Mecklenburg County .Recorder's Court 1930- 
1938. Appointed Utilities Commissioner by Governor Broughton, 
April 1941. Presbyterian. Address: Raleigh, N. C. Permanent Ad- 
dress : Newell, N. C. 

ROBERT GRADY JOHNSON 

STATE UTILITIES COMMISSIONER 

(Appointed by the Governor with the approval of the Senate) 
Robert Grady Johnson, Democrat, was born at Burgaw, N. C, 
May 5, 1895. Son of Joab F. and Myrtie (Grady) Johnson. Edu- 



Biographical Sketches 345 

cated at Burgaw High School; University of North Carolina and 
Wake Forest College. Lawyer. Member Board of Aldermen Bur- 
gaw 1922-1928; Chairman County Board of Elections; member 
Democratic Executive Committee. Senator in the General Assembly 
of 1929; Representative from Pender County in 1931 and 1933; 
Speaker, House of Representatives 1935. Private U. S. Army 
February 1918 to May 1919. Mason. Appointed member State High- 
way Commission, May 1937, and appointed Director of Prisons 
ir. September of that year. Appointed Chairman Alcholic Beverage 
Control Board, August 1941. Appointed Utilities Commissioner, 
April 1942. Married Mrs. Louise White Freeman, December 1936. 
Two children : Louise Grady, age six and Robert White, age 4. Ad- 
dress : Raleigh, N. C. 

BUREN JURNEY 

MEMBER NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Buren Jurney, Democrat, was born at Olin, Iredell County, N. C, 
February 23, 1890. Son of Zack T. and Sarah Louise (Patterson) 
Jurney. Attended public schools of Iredell County and Mars Hill 
College from January 1908 until May 3, 1912; University of North 
Carolina 1912-1913; Wake Forest Law School 1914-1915. Lawyer. 
Member Industrial Commission since 1936. Senator in the General 
Assembly of 1923 and 1925. Methodist. Permanent Address: States- 
ville. Official Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

WILLIAM PATTON KIMZEY 

MEMBER NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 
William Patton Kimzey, Democrat, was born in Henderson Coun- 
ty, N. C, April 14, 1901. Son of William Rucker and Reberta (Pat- 
ton) Kimzey. Attended Brevard High School 1918; Davidson Col- 
lege, A.B., 1923; Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., LL.B., 
1926. Lawyer. Member N. C. Bar Association; President Transyl- 
vania County Bar Association 1936-1937; President Eighteenth 
Judicial District Bar 1936-1937. President Brevard Kiwanis Club 
1934. Attorney, Transylvania County Board of Education 1930- 
1939. Attorney for Transylvania County 1936-1939. Representative 



346 North Carolina Manual 

in the General Assembly 1937 and 1939. First Lieutenant Infantry 
Officers Reserve Corps, U. S. Army, 1926-1942. Member Lambda 
Chi Alpha, social fraternity; Phi Pi, Legal fraternity. Appointed 
member of the Industrial Commission in 1939. Head History De- 
partment, University Military School, Mobile, Alabama, 1923-1925. 
Liquidating agent all closed banks in Transylvania, Henderson, Polk 
and Rutherford Counties 1933-1936. Presbyterian. Married Miss 
Juanita Sprinkle, March 9, 1929. One daughter, Patricia Ann Kim- 
zey, born March 18, 1937. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHN VAN BOKKELEN METTS 

THE ADJUTANT GENERAL 

(Appointed by the Governor) 
John Van Bokkelen Metts, Democrat, was born in Wilmington, 
N. C, December 17, 1876. Son of James Isaac and Cornelia Froth- 
ingham (Cowan) Metts. Attended Tileston School and Cape Fear 
Academy 1882-1893; Military School. Member Adjutant General 
and National Guard associations of the United States. Member 
Board of County Commissioners, New Hanover County. In com- 
mand 119th Infantry, 30th Division, World War 1917-1918, award- 
ed Distinguished Service Medal issued by the War Department for 
meritorious service. Brigadier General; commanding General 60th 
Infantry Brigade, June 1, 1926-December 12, 1936. Appointed The 
Ajutant General North Carolina, June 15, 1920. Recommended by the 
Governor and appointed by the President, State Director of Selective 
Service effctive September 17, 1940, and inducted into federal service 
October 15, 1940. Member Saint Johns Lodge No. 1, A.F. and A.M., 
Wilmington, N. C. Episcopalian. Married the late Miss Josephine 
S. Budd, of Petersburg, Virginia, November 1906. Two children: 
Josephine Budd Metts (Mrs. Spotswood Hathaway Huntt) and 
John Van B. Metts, Jr. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

CARL VERNON REYNOLDS 

SECRETARY STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

(Appointed by the North Carolina State Board of Health 
with the Approval of the Governor) 
Carl Vernon Reynolds, Democrat, was born in Asheville, N. C, 
June 13, 1872. Son of John Daniel and Theresa Elmira (Shepherd) 



Biographical Sketches 347 

Reynolds. Attended private school and Asheville Military Academy; 
Wofford College, Spartanburg, S. C, 1889-1891; M.D. University 
of New York 1895; awarded Valentine Mott Gold Medal 1894; post- 
graduate course Brompton Hospital, London. Secretary State Board 
of Health and State Health Officer since 1934. Member State Board 
of Health 1931, president 1933; Fellow American Medical Associa- 
tion 1940 and Member Public Health and Southern Medical associa- 
tions; First Vice President Southern Branch American Public 
Health Association 1939; member Pan American and Provincial 
Health Officers Association; President North Carolina Medical So- 
ciety 1920, Fellow 1926; Secretary, Vice President, and in 1904, 
President of the Buncombe County Medical Society; member Ex- 
ecutive Council Tri-State Medical Society 1911; and Vice President 
Tri-State Medical Society 1916; member Raleigh Academy of Medi- 
cine and National Association for Prevention of Tuberculosis; 
Health Office, City of Asheville; practiced Medicine and was a mem- 
ber of the Medical Staff and Teacher in Mission, Biltmore and 
French Broad Hospitals in Asheville, N. C, member teaching Staff 
School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, N. C, 1936. Vice Mayor 
Biltmore Forest. Kappa Alpha, Wofford College; Editor Health 
Bulletins City of Asheville 1914-1923; author of articles for Medi- 
cal Journals and Societies. Officer and Director Blue Ridge National 
Bank, American National Bank and National Bank of Commerce, 
Asheville, N. C. Chairman, subcommittee Federal Relations Com- 
mittee, State and Territorial Health Officers' Association, for secur- 
ing serologic tests among approximately 16,500,000 men who regis- 
tered throughout the United States during 1940. Vice President 
State, Territorial and Provincial Health Authorities of North 
America 1941; chairman sub-committee on Public Health, Procure- 
ment and Assignment Service, Office of Defense Health and Welfare 
Services 1941; chairman of committee on Public Health, War Man- 
power Commission 1942; elected president of the State, Territorial 
and Provincial Health Authorities of North America 1942; elected 
Vice President of the International Society of Medical Health 
Officers, at a meeting in Saint Louis 1942; chairman of the North 
Carolina Committee on Nutrition; appointed to serve on the cam- 
mittee on Malaria Prevention Activities for the year 1943. Metho- 
dist. Married Miss Edith Holland Randolph, June 1, 1907. One 
child: Alyne Johnston Reynolds. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



348 North Carolina Manual 

CHARLES ROSS 

ACTING CHAIRMAN STATE HIGHWAY AND PUBLIC WORKS COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Charles Ross, Democrat, was born in Randolph County, March 
10, 1878. Son of R. R. and Allen (McCulloch) Ross. Attended Schools 
of Asheboi'o, graduated 1897; University of North Carolina, Class 
of 1905; George Washington University. Lawyer. General Council 
and Acting Chairman State Highway and Public Works Com- 
mission. Member N. C. Bar. Representative from Randolph County 
in the General Assembly of 1901 and 1911. Presbyterian; Elder. 
Married Miss Frances Reid McKay, 1906. Five sons and two 
daughters. Address: Lillington, N. C. 

THOMAS BODDIE WARD 

COMMISSIONER OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

(Appointed by the Governor) 
Thomas Boddie Ward, Democrat, Commissioner of Motor Vehicles, 
was born in Nashville, N. C, January 13, 1890. Son of Willis and 
Rosa Lee (Ricks) Ward. Attended Nashville Collegiate Institute, 
1896-1902; private teacher, 1903-1905; Rhodes Military Institute, 
fall, 1905; Trinity Park, fall 1906. Privately tutored by the late 
Edward W. Pou, 1913-1917, while serving as his Secretary and as 
Clerk to the Committee on Rules, U. S. House of Representatives. 
Attended private business school, Washington, D. C, 1913. Mana- 
ger and owner Carolina Builders Supply Co., Wilson, N. C, owner 
and operator of several farms. President Wilson Chamber of Com- 
merce, 1924. Member State Highway and Public Works Commis- 
sion, 1937-1941; Commissioner Department of Motor Vehicles since 
1941. Elks Lodge, Wilson, N. C. Methodist. Married Miss Marj 
Lucile Rose, of Rocky Mount, N. C, November 5, 1918. Address; 
Wilson, N. C, 

CARL LEVERING WILLIAMSON 

CHAIRMAN BOARD OF ALCHOLIC CONTROL 

(Appointed by the Governor) 
Carl Levering Williamson, Democrat, was born in Raleigh, N. C, 
December 7, 1893. Son of Bailey Peyton and Ella S. (Mial) Wil- 
liamson. Attended Warrenton High School; Virginia Military In- 
stitute and N. C. State College. Commissioner of Public Safety, 
City of Raleigh 1931-1933; Postmaster 1933-1942. Methodist. Mar- 
ried Miss Betty Robertson 1918. Children: Carl L., Jr., Bailey Pey- 
ton, John Clark, Milliard Mial and Benjamin Robert. Address: Ra- 
leigh, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 349 

THURSTON ADGER WILSON 

CHAIRMAN NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 
Thurston Adger Wilson, Democrat, was born in Lexington Coun- 
ty, S. C, August 28, 1895. Son of George Mendenhall and Mary Jane 
(Bowers) Wilson. Attended Public Schools, Columbia, S. C. Ap- 
pointed by Governor Gardner, May 1, 1929, to serve on the first 
State Industrial Commission; appointed Chairman, March 1, 1939. 
Member International Typographical Union since August 5, 1913; 
American Standards Association; American Society Safety Engi- 
neers. North Carolina Socety of Safety Engineers and its first presi- 
dent. President Raleigh Typographical Union 1934-1935; Vice 
President, South Carolina Federation of Labor 1923; President 
North Carolina Federation of Labor 1927-1930; Chairman Textile 
Section and Member Board of Directors 1936-1938, and Member 
Executive Committee 1936-38 of the National Safety Council. 
President, International Association of Industrial Accident Boards 
and Commissions 1944-45. Director, Community Chest of Raleigh 
1942-1944. Organized North Carolina Statewide Safety Conference 
1930, which was the first one in the South; Organized the first State 
Textile Safety Contest 1936, the only one in the United States. 
Served in World War, June 28, 1918-December 9, 1918. Mason; 
Junior Order United American Mechanics; Lions Club; American 
Legion. Lutheran. Married Miss Nancy Davis Ladshaw of Spartan- 
burg, S. C, July 10, 1928. Three children: Mary Joanna, Thurston 
Adger, Jr., and Nancy Lu. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

STANLEY WINBORNE 

CHAIRMAN STATE UTILITIES COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor with approval of the Senate) 
Stanley Winborne, Democrat, Chairman Utilities Commission, 
was born at Murfreesboro, N. C, August 25, 1886. Son of B. B. 
and Nellie (Vaughan) Winborne. Attended public schools; Dr. E. E. 
Parham's School, Murfreesboro; University of North Carolina 
1907; Ph.B. degree. Member of North Carolina Bar Association. 
Mason. Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Order of the Gorgon's Head. 
Kiwanis Club. Mayor, Murfreesboro 1909-1910; County Attorney 
1911-1914; Representative from Hertford County 1915-1919; Sena- 
tor from First District 1921; Democratic nominee for Presidential 
Elector 1928. Appointed member of the Corporation Commission in 
February 1930, by Governor Gardner; elected for unexpired term 
in November 1930; re-elected for regular term 1932. Appointed 
Utilities Commissioner by Governor Ehringhaus, effective January 



350 North Carolina Manual 

1, 1934; elected for four-year term in November 1934; re-elected 
November 8, 1938; made Chairman of present N. C. Utilities Com- 
mission by General Assembly 1941. Methodist. Married Miss Fran- 
ces Sharp Jernigan, April 17, 1912. Four sons, three daughters 
four grandsons and one granddaughter. Address : Raleigh, N. C. 

MRS. ELLEN BLACK WINSTON 

COMMISSIONER OF CHARITIES AND PUBLIC WELFARE 

(Appointed by the State Board of Charities and Public Welfare. 
Subject to approval by the Governor.) 

Mrs. Ellen Black Winston, Democrat, was born in Bryson City, 
N. C, August 15, 1903. Daughter of Stanley Warren and Marianna 
(Fischer) Black. Attended Bryson City Publis Schools, 1909-1920; 
Converse College, Spartanburg, S. C, A.B., 1924; Graduate work at 
N. C. State College and University of North Carolina; M.A. Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1928; Ph.D., 1930. Appointed Commissioner of 
the State Board of Charities and Public Welfare, June 1, 1944. 
Member American Sociological Society, American Statistical As- 
sociation, Population Association of America, American Public 
Welfare Association, National Conference of Social Work, North 
Carolina Conference for Social Service, North Carolina Mental 
Hygiene Society, American Association of University Women, 
North Carolina Business and Professional Women's Club, Raleigh 
Woman's Club and North Carolina Archaeological Society, Presi- 
dent State Legislative Council, 1943-1944; Legislative Chairman 
State Federation of Women's Clubs, 1943-1944. International Re- 
lations Chairman, N. C. Branch American Association of Uni- 
versity Women, 1943-1945. Member various National Committees 
of American Sociological Society. Consultant Federal Works Pro- 
ject Administration, 1939-1943. Consultant National Resources 
Planning Board, 1940-1943. Consultant United States Office of 
Education, 1942-1944. Director North Carolina Mental Hygiene 
Society. Member Board of Directors North Carolina Conference for 
Social Service. Member North Carolina Board of Eugenics. Ex- 
offico member State Commission for the Blind and of the State Board 
of Correction and Training. Listed in "Biographical Directory of 
American Scholars", in "Who's Who in American Education," and 
"Who's Who in the Western Hemisphere." 

Co-author of Seven Lean Years; The Plantation South, 1934- 
1937; and Foundation of American Population Policy. Special tech- 
nical editor National Economic and Social Planning Association 
and for the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Presbyterian. 
Married Sanford Richard Winston, August 30, 1928. Address: Ra- 
leigh, N. C. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 

JOSIAH WILLIAM BAILEY 

UNITED STATES SENATOR 

Josiah William Bailey, Democrat, of Raleigh, Wake County, was 
born September 14, 1873, in Warrenton, N. C, son of Rev. Chris- 
topher Thomas Bailey (Williamsburg, Va.) and Annie Sarah 
(Bailey) Bailey (Greensville County, Va.). Educated in the public 
schools of Raleigh, Raleigh Male Academy (Morson and Denson), 
and Wake Forest College, A.B. 1893; Wake Forest Law School; also 
private study of law under S. F. Mordecai, of Trinity College. Edi- 
tor Biblical Recorder 1893-1907. Licensed to practice law, February 
1908. Member Wake County Bar Association; N. C. Bar Associa- 
tion; American Bar Association. United States Collector Internal 
Revenue 1913-1921; Elector-at-Large, N. C. 1908; member North 
Carolina Constitutional Commission 1913-1914; member Raleigh 
Township School Committee and Wake County Board of Education; 
served as Trustee Wake Forest College, Meredith College, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina and Shaw University. Baptist. Married 
Miss Edith Walker Pou 1916; five children, two boys and three 
girls. Elected to the United States Senate, November 4, 1930, for 
the term beginning March 4, 1931, by a majority over his Republi- 
can opponent of 113,632. Re-elected November 3, 1936 by a ma- 
jority of 330,000. Renominated in the Democratic Primary May 30, 
1942, by a majority vote over his opponent of 116,457, and re- 
elected November 3, 1942, by a majority vote over his Republican 
opponent of 111,262. He is a member of the Senate Committees on 
Finance and Claims, Postoffices and Post Roads, and Chairman of 
Committee on Commerce. Home address: Raleigh, N. C. 

CLYDE R. HOEY 

UNITED STATES SENATOR 

Clyde R. Hoey, Democrat, was born in Shelby, N. C, December 
11, 1877. Son of Capt. S. A. and Mary Charlotte Catherine Hoey. 
Attended Shelby High School, but left school and began work Oc- 
tober 1, 1890, in a printing office. Purchased a newspaper and began 

[ 351 ] 



352 North Carolina Manual 

editing and publishing same August 1, 1894, and continued in that 
capacity until January 1, 1908. In the meantime studied law and, 
after reaching twenty-one, was licensed to practice in 1899, con- 
tinuing to practice along with the newspaper work until 1908, since 
that time entire time has been given to the practice of law. At- 
tended University of North Carolina Summer Law School, June- 
September, 1899. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association, 
the American Bar Association and the North Carolina State Bar. 
President Cleveland County Bar Association. Representative from 
Cleveland County in the General Assembly of 1899 and 1901; State 
Senator, 1903. Chairman Cleveland County Democratic Executive 
Committee, 1903-1909. Served on State Advisory Democratic Com- 
mittee ten years. Assistant U. S. Attorney for "Western District 
of North Carolina, July 1913, to December 1919. Member Congress, 
December 1919, to March 4, 1921. Served as Governor of North 
Carolina, January 7, 1937-January 9, 1941. LL.D. Davidson, 1937; 
LL.D. U. N. C, 1938; LL.D. Duke, 1938. Mason; Junior Order; 
Red Men; Woodmen of the World; Knights of Pythias; Odd Fel- 
lows. Methodist. Married Miss Bessie Gardner, March 22, 1900. 
Children: Clyde R. Hoey, Jr., Charles A. Hoey and Isabel Y. Hoey. 



Senator Josiah W. Bailey 



Bonnei- — First District 
Kerr — Second District 




Harden — Third District 

Cooley — Fourth District 



Folger— Fifth District- 

Durham— Sixth District 



m 


Aik 




4^ 







REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS 

HERBERT COVINGTON BONNER 

{First District — Counties: Beaufort, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, 
Dare, Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Martin, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Pitt, 
Tyrrell and Washington. Population, 239,040.) 

Herbert Covington Bonner, Democrat, was born in Washington, 
N. C, May 16, 1891. Son of Macon Herbert and Hannah Selby 
(Hare) Bonner. Attended Public and Private Schools, Washington, 
N. C; Warrenton High School 1906-1909. Farmer. Sergeant Co. I 
322nd Infantry, 81st Division World War. Attended Officers Train- 
ing School, Longres, France, after Armistice. Commander Beaufort 
County Post 1922, and District Commander American Legion, N. 
C. Dept., 1940. Elected to Seventy-sixth Congress from the First 
Congressional District, November 1940, to succeed Lindsay C. War- 
ren, resigned. Re-elected to Seventy-seventh, Seventy-eighth and 
Seventy-ninth Congress. Episcopalian, Mason, Elk and Legionnaire. 
Married Mrs. Eva Hassell Hackney, August 2, 1924. Address: 
Washington, N. C. 

JOHN HOSEA KERR 

{Second District — Counties: Bertie, Edgecombe, Greene, Halifax, 
Lenoir, Northampton, Warren, and Wilson. Population, 293,297.) 

John Hosea Kerr, Democrat, of Warrenton, was born at Yancey- 
ville, N. C. Son of Captain John H. Kerr, of the Confederate Army, 
and Eliza Katherine (Yancey) Kerr. Was a student in Bingham 
School, Orange County, N. C, just prior to its removal to the City 
of Asheville. Graduated with A.B. degree from Wake Forest Col- 
lege in 1895. Studied law at Wake Forest under Dr. Needham Y. 
GuUey, LL.D., and was one of the first three law students to be 
admitted to the Bar from this institution, and the only one of these 
three to practice law in the State of North Carolina. Eleced Solici- 
tor of what is now the Third Judicial District and served for eleven 
years. While Solicitor was elected Judge of the Superior Court of 
said District and served eight years. While serving on the Bench 
was nominated for Congress to succeed Hon. Claude Kitchin, de- 

[ 354 ] 



Biographical Sketches 355 

ceased. Was elected to the 68th Congress of the United States at a 
Special Election held November 6, 1923, and reelected to the 69th, 
70th, 71st, 72nd, 73rd, 74th, 75th, 76th, 77th, 78th and 79th Congress. 
Member of the Appropriations Committee and one of the ranking 
Democrats on the Sub-Committees of War, Justice, Commerce and 
State of this Committee. Member Democratic House Steering Com- 
mittee. Home address: Warrenton, N. C. 

GRAHAM ARTHUR HARDEN 

{Third District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Duplin, Jones, Ons- 
low, Pamlico, Pender, Sampson, and Wayne. Population, 251,370.) 

Graham Arthur Harden, Democrat, was born in Sampson County, 
N. C, September 25, 1896. Son of James Jefferson and Mary Robin- 
son (James) Harden. Attended Burgaw High School; University of 
North Carolina, LL.B. degree. Attomey-at-law. Member of Phi 
Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; Sigma Chi Fraternity. Member of 
Sudan Shrine; Doric Masonic Lodge; Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks; American Legion; Master of Doric Lodge 1928; Ex- 
alted Ruler of the Elks Lodge; Commander of the American Legion; 
Counsellor of the Junior Order. Served in the United States Navy 
during the World War. Judge of Craven County Court. Represen- 
tative from Craven County to General Assembly 1933. Elected to 
the Seventy-fourth Congress, November. 6, 1934, the Seventy-fifth 
Congress, November 3, 1936; the Seventy-sixth Congress, November 
8, 1938; the Seventy-seventh Congress, November 5, 1940; the 
Seventh-eighth Congress, November 3, 1942, and to the Seventy- 
ninth Congress, November 7, 1944. Chairman Committee on Educa- 
tion. Member of Committees on Education, Rivers and Harbors, 
Labor, Library, and Joint Committees on Library and T.V.A. Inves- 
tigation. Presbyterian; Deacon of First Presbyterian Church, New 
Bern. Married Miss Agnes Foy; two children, Graham A., Jr., and 
Agnes F. Barden. Address: New Bern, N. C. 

HAROLD DUNBAR COOLEY 

{Fourth District — Counties: Chatham, Franklin, Johnston, Nash, 
Randolph, Vance, and Wake. Population, 358,573.) 

Harold Dunbar Cooley, Democrat, of Nashville, N. C, son of the 
late R. A. P. Cooley and Hattie Davis Cooley; born July 26, 1897; 



356 North Carolina Manual 

attended the public schools of Nash County, the University of North 
Carolina, and the law school of Yale University; licensed to prac- 
tice law in February, 1918; served in the Naval Aviation Flying 
Corps during the World War; presidential elector in 1932; president, 
Nash County Bar Association, 1933; member of Junior Order United 
American Mechanics, Phi Delta Theta fraternity, and Phi Delta Phi 
national law fraternity; member of Baptist Church; married Miss 
Madeline Strickland in 1923, and is father of two children — a son, 
Roger A. P. Cooley, 2d, and a daughter, Hattie Davis Cooley. 
Elected to Seventy-third Congress, July 7, 1934; reelected to the 
Seventy-fourth Congress, November 6, 1934, and to each succeed- 
ing Congress. Address: Nashville, N. C. 



JOHN HAMLIN FOLGER 

{Fifth District — Counties: Caswell, Forsyth, Granville, Person, 
Rockingham, Stokes, Surry. Population, 323,217.) 

John Hamlin Folger, Democrat, was born in Rockford, Surry 
County, N. C, December 18, 1880. Son of Thomas Wilson and Ada 
Dillard (Robertson) Folger. Attended Yadkinville Normal School, 
1896-1898; Guilford College; University of North Carolina Law 
School 1901. Lawyer. Member Surry County, N. C. Bar, N. C. 
State Bar and American Bar Associations. Member Committee on 
Membership, N. C. Bar Association. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1927; State Senator, 1931. Mayor of Mount Airy for 
two terms. Member State Equalization Boai'd and State School 
Commission 1928-1941. Chairman Exemption Board, 1918, World 
War I for Surry County. Mason, A.F.«feA.M. Chapter, Commandery, 
and Shrine; Councilor Junior Order, Mount Airy Lodge, No. 73. 
Elected to the Seventy-seventh Congress at a special election June 
14, 1941. Reelected to the Seventy-eighth Congress, November 3, 
1942, and to the 79th Congress, November 7, 1944, Methodist. 
Trustee and Teacher Baracca Class for thirty-five years. Married 
Miss Maude Douglas, November 4, 1899. Children: Fred, Nell 
Folger Glenn, Henry and Frances. Addi-ess: Mt. Airy, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 357 

CARL THOMAS DURHAM 

{Sixth District — Counties: Alamance, Durham, Guilford and Or- 
ange. Population, 314,659.) 

Carl Thomas Durham, Democrat, was born at White Cross, Bing- 
ham Township, Orange County, N. C, August 28, 1892. Son of 
Claude P. and Delia Ann (Lloyd) Durham. Attended White Cross 
Graded School 1898 to 1908; Mandale High School 1909, 1910, 1911, 
and 1912; University of North Carolina School of Pharmacy 1916 
and 1917. Pharmacist. Member N.C.P.A.; vice president N.C.P.A. 
Member Chapel Hill Board of Aldermen 1922 to 1927; Chapel Hill 
School Board 1927 to 1938; Orange County Board of Commissioners 
1933 to December 1, 1938. Elected to the 76th Congress, 77th Con- 
gress, 78th Congress, and 79th Congress. Member Committee on 
Military Affairs. Married Miss Margaret Joe Whitsett, December 
30, 1919. Five children: Celia, Mary Sue, Carl T., Jr., Margaret, 
and Eulalia Ann Durham. Address: Chapel Hill, N. C. 

JEROME BAYARD CLARK 

{Seventh District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, Cum- 
berland, Harnett, New Hanover and Robeson. Population, 318,298.) 

Jerome Bayard Clark, Democrat, of Fayetteville, born April 5, 
1882 at Elizabethtown. Son of John Washington and Catherine 
Amelia (Blue) Clark. Educated at Clarkton High School, Davidson 
College and University of North Carolina. Lawyer. Representative 
in General Assembly from Bladen County 1915. Presidential Elec- 
tor Sixth District 1916. Member of State Judicial Conference 1924- 
1928. Mason, Knights of Pythias and 0. D. K. Presbyterian. Mar- 
ried Miss Helen Purdie Robinson June 2, 1908; four children: Mrs. 
Julian B. Hutaff, Lieut Jerome B. Clark, Jr., U.S.N., Pfc. Heman 
R. Clark, U.S.A., Mrs. Geo. D. Jackson. Elected to Seventy-first 
and each succeeding Congress with opposition in his own party 
only once, and returned to the Seventy-eighth Congress without 
opposition from any source. Reelected to 79th Congress. Fourth 
ranking Democrat on Rules Committee. Home address: Fayette- 
ville, N. C. 



358 North Carolina Manual 

WILLIAM O. BURGIN 

(Eighth District — Counties: Anson, Davidson, Davie, Hoke, Lee, 
Montgomery, Moore, Richmond, Scotland, Union, Wilkes, and Yad- 
kin. Population, 340,457.) 

William 0. Burgin, Democrat, of Lexington, N. C, born in Marion, 
N. C. Lawyer. Mayor of Thomasville 1906-1910. Elected to House 
of Representatives of North Carolina 1930. Elected in 1932 to the 
State Senate. Elected to 76th Congress, November 8, 1938, to the 
77th Congress, November 5, 1940, to the 78th Congress, November 
3, 1942, and to the 79th Congress, November 7, 1944. Member of 
Committee on Foreign Affairs. Man-ied Miss Edith Leigh Greer, 
Lexington, N. C, in December 1912. Address: Lexington, N. C. 

ROBERT LEE DOUGHTON 

(Ninth District — Counties: Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Cabar- 
rus, Caldwell, Iredell, Rowan, Stanly, and Watauga. Population 
310,225.) 

Robert L. Doughton, Democrat, Laurel Springs, was born at 
Laurel Springs, November 7, 1863. Educated in the public schools 
and at Laurel Springs and Sparta High Schools. Farmer and stock 
raiser. Appointed a member of the Board of Agriculture in 1903. 
Elected to the State Senate from the Thirty-fifth District in 1908. 
Served as director of the State Prison from 1909 to 1911. Elected to 
the Sixty-second, Sixty-third, Sixty-fourth, Sixty-fifth, Sixty-sixth, 
Sixty-seventh, Sixty-eighth, Sixty-ninth, Seventieth, Seventy-first, 
Seventy-second, Seventy-third, Seventy-fourth, Seventy-fifth, Sev- 
enty-sixth, Seventy-seventh, Seventy-eighth and Seventy-ninth Con- 
gresses by a large majority. Has been Chairman of the Committee 
on Ways and Means for 12 years. Longer than any other man has 
held this position in the history of the Government. Address: Laurel 
Springs, N. C. 



Senator Clyde R. Hoey 



Clark — Seventh District 

Burgin — Eighth District 



Doughton — Ninth District 
Ervin — Tenth District 



Bulwinkle — Eleventh District 
Weaver — Tvsrelfth District 




J^l 




360 North Carolina Manual 

JOSEPH WILSON ERVIN 

(Tenth District — Counties: Avery, Burke, Catawba, Lincoln, 
Mecklenburg and Mitchell.) 

Joseph Wilson Ervin, Democrat, was born in Morganton, N. C, 
March 3, 1901. Son of Samuel James and Laura (Powe) Ervin. 
Attended primary schools, Morganton, 1907-1908; Mrs. W. R. Mar- 
but's private school, 1908-1912; Morganton Public School, 1913-1916. 
A.B. University of North Carolina, 1921; Law School, 1921-1923. 
Lawyer. Member American, State and Mecklenburg County Bar 
Associations. Solicitor, Charlotte City Recorder's Court, 1927- 
1929; Mecklenburg County Attorney, 1942-1944. Mason. Presby- 
terian. Married Miss Susan Graham Erwin, of Morganton, Septem- 
ber 10, 1930. Elected to the Seventy-ninth Congress November 7, 
1944. Address: Charlotte, N. C. 

ALJFRED LEE BULWINKLE 

{Eleventh District — Counties: Cleveland, Gaston, Madison, Mc- 
Dowell, Polk, Rutherford, and Yancey. Population, 265,757.) 

Alfred Lee Bulwinkle, Democrat, Gastonia, Gaston County, N. C, 
born April 21, 1883. Attended school at Dallas, N. C. Studied law 
under the late Oscar F. Mason of Gaston County, and at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. Admitted to the Bar 1904. Lawyer. 
Prosecuting Attorney Municipal Court of City of Gastonia 1913- 
1916. Democratic Nominee for Senator from Gaston County for 
the General Assembly 1916; withdrew on account of military ser- 
vice on the Mexican border 1917. Captain Company B, 1st Inf. 
N. C. N. G. 1909-1917. Major, commanding Second Battalion, 113th 
Field Artillery, 55th F. A. Brigade, 30th Division 1917-1919. Served 
in American Expeditionary Forces in France. Married Miss Bessie 
B. Lewis, Dallas, N. C; children: Mrs. E. Grainger (Frances Mc- 
Kean) Williams, Little Rock, Arkansas, and Alfred Lewis, Captain, 
Inf. U.S.A. Lutheran. Member of various patriotic and fraternal 
organizations and bar associations. Elected from the Ninth Con- 
gressional District of North Carolina November 1920, to 67th, 
68th, 69th, and 70th Congresses. Elected from the Tenth District 
of N. C. to the 72nd to 77th Congresses, inclusive. Elected from the 
Eleventh District, 1942, to 78th Congress. Reelected to the 79th 
Congress, 1944. Member of Committee on Interstate and Foreign 



Biographical Sketches 361 

Commerce, Joint Committee on Printing, Select Committee on Post- 
War Military Policy, one of United States Delegates to Interna- 
tional Civil Aviation Conference, Chicago, from November 1 to 
December 7, 1944. Office in Washington 1313 House Office Building. 
Address: Gastonia, N. C. 

ZEBULON WEAVER 

{Twelfth District — Counties: Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Gra- 
ham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Swain and Transyl- 
vania. Population, 260,908.) 

Zebulon Weaver, Democrat, of Buncombe County, was born in 
Weaverville, N. C, May 12, 1872. He is the son of W, E. and Han- 
nah E. (Baird) Weaver. A.B. of Weaverville College 1889. Studied 
law at the University of North Carolina 1894. Lawyer. Represented 
Buncombe County in the General Assembly of North Carolina in 
1907 and 1909. State Senator 1913 and 1915. Elected to the Sixty- 
fifth, Sixty-sixth, Sixty-seventh, Sixty-eighth, Sixty-ninth, Seven- 
tieth, Seventy-second, Seventy-third, Seventy-fourth, Seventy-fifth, 
Seventy-sixth, Seventy-seventh, Seventy-eighth, and Seventy-ninth 
Congresses. Member Committee on Judiciary. Methodist. Married 
Miss Anna Hyman of New Bern, N. C. Has five children. Home 
address, Asheville, N. C. 



JUSTICES OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 
SUPREME COURT 

WALTER PARKER STACY 

CHIEF JUSTICE 

Walter Parker Stacy, born in Ansonville, N. C, December 26, 
1884; son of Rev. L. E. and Rosa (Johnson) Stacy; educated Weaver- 
villa (N. C.) College 1895-1898; Morven (N. C.) High School 1899- 
1902; University of North Carolina, A.B. 1908; attended Law School, 
same, 1908-1909, LL.D. (Hon.) 1923; married Maude DeGan Graff, 
of Lake Placid Club, N. Y., June 15, 1929 (since deceased); prac- 
ticed law in partnership with Graham Kenan 1910-1916. Represented 
New Hanover County in General Assembly of N. C. 1915; Judge 
Superior Court, 8th. Judicial District 1916-1920; elected, 1920, As- 
sociate Justice Supreme Court of North Carolina for full term; 
appointed by Governor A. W. McLean, March 16, 1925, to succeed 
Chief Justice Hoke (resigned) and in 1926, in 1934, and again in 
1942, nominated without opposition in primary and elected Chief 
Justice Supreme Court for 8-year terms; member American and 
North Carolina Bar associations. General Alumni Association Uni- 
versity of North Carolina (president 1925-1926); lecturer summers 
1922-1925 inclusive, in Law School University of North Carolina, 
tendered deanship of same 1923; lecturer Northwestern University 
School of Law, sum.mer sessions 1926-1927; named by U. S. Board 
of Mediation, under Railway Labor Act, as neutral arbitrator _to 
serve on Board of Arbitration (six members), and later elected 
chairman of board to settle wage controversy between the Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Engineers and certain railroads in southeastern 
territory of United States 1927-1928; appointed by President Cool- 
idge 1928, member of Emergency Board of five, under Railway 
Labor Act, to investigate and report respecting a dispute between 
officers and members of the Order of Railway Conductors and 
Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, and certain railroads located 
west of the Mississippi River; named by U. S. Board of Mediation, 
January 1931, to serve as neutral arbitrator in controversy between 
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen and New York Central, the "Big 
Four" and P. and L. E. railroads, and again in November 1931 to 

[362] 



Chief Justice Stacy 



Justice Schenck 
Justice Devin 



Justice Barnhill 

Justice Winbome 



Justice Seawell 
Justice Denny 




% 







364 North Carolina Manual 

serve as neutral arbitrator in controversy betw^een Brotherhood of 
Railway and Steamship Clerks, etc., and Railway Express Agency 
Appointed by President Hoover 1932, member of Emergency Board 
of three, later elected chairman of Board, to investigate and report 
concerning a number of questions in difference between L. and A. 
and L. A. and T. railways and certain of their employees. Chair- 
man Commission appointed to redraft Constitution of North Caro- 
lina 1931-1932. Appointed by President Roosevelt in 1933, in 1934 
and again in 1938 to Emergency Boards under Railway Labor Act. 
Appointed by President Roosevelt 1934, Chairman National Steel 
and Textile Labor Relations boards; and again in 1941 as an Al- 
ternate Member of the National Defense Mediation Board; and in 
1942 as an Associate Member of the National War Labor Board 
and also as a Member of the National Railway Labor Panel. Meth- 
odist. Democrat. Residence: Wilmington, N. C. Office: Raleigh, N. C. 

MICHAEL SCHENCK 

associate justice 

Michael Schenck, Democrat, was born at Lincolnton, N. C, 
December 11, 1876. Son of David and Sallie Wilfong (Ramseur) 
Schenck. Attended graded schools of Greensboro, N. C; Oak Ridge 
Institute; University of North Carolina 1893, 1894, 1895; Law 
School of University of North Carolina 1902-1903. Member of North 
Carolina Bar Association. Mayor of Hendersonville 1907-1909, So- 
licitor of the Eighteenth Judicial District 1913-1918; Major, Judge 
Advocate, United States Army 1918-1919. Judge of the Eighteenth 
Judicial District 1924-1934, Member Commission appointed to re- 
draft Constitution of North Carolina 1931-1932, Appointed by Gov- 
ernor J, C. B, Ehringhaus, May 23, 1934, Associate Justice of the 
Supreme Court of North Carolina to fill out the unexpired term 
of Justice W, J, Adams, deceased; elected in November 1934, for 
full term of eight years. Re-elected November 3, 1942. Member 
of Masons (A.F. and A.M,); American Legion; honorary degree 
LL,D. conferred by University of North Carolina, June 1936. Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church, Man-ied Miss Rose Few 1909; three chil- 
dren: Michael, Jr., Rosemary Ramseur (Mrs, E, M, Vaughan), and 
Emily Floried, Home address: Hendersonville, N. C, Official ad- 
dress: Raleigh, N, C, 



Biographical Sketches 365 

WILLIAM AUGUSTUS DEVIN 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

William Augustus Devin, Democrat, was born in Granville County, 
July 12, 1871. Son of Robert Ira and Mary (Transou) Devin. At- 
tended Horner Military School 1883-1887; Wake Forest College; 
University of North Carolina Law School 1892-1893. Member North 
Carolina Bar Association. Mayor Oxford 1903-1909. Representative 
in the General Assembly 1911 and 1913. Judge Superior Court 1913- 
1935; appointed Associate Justice Supreme Court by Governor 
Ehringhaus, October 1935, succeding Associate Justice W. J, Brog- 
den; elected for eight-year term, November 3, 1936, re-elected Nov. 
7, 1944. Honorary degree LL.D. Conferred by the University of 
North Carolina. Member N. C, National Guard; captain 1901-1907; 
member staff of Governor Craig with rank of Major. Mason. Baptist. 
Teacher Bible Class since 1915; Superintendent Sunday school 1910- 
1913. Member American Judicature Society. Author of addresses on 
legal and religious subjects. Married Miss Virginia Bernard, Novem- 
ber 29, 1899. One son, William A. Devin, Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Home address: Oxford, N. C. Office: Raleigh, N. C. 

MAURICE VICTOR BARNHILL 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Maurice Victor Barnhill, Democrat, was born in Halifax County, 
December 5, 1887. Son of Martin V. and Mary (Dawes) BarnhilL 
Attended public schools of Halifax County; Enfield Graded School; 
Elm City Academy; University of North Carolina 1907-09; 'Uni- 
versity of North Carolina Law School, Member North Carolina 
Bar Association. Prosecuting Attorney, Nash County Court, April 
1914; Judge Nash County Court, April 1922; former Chairman 
Nash County Highway Commission and Board of Trustees Rocky 
Mount Graded School District. Judge Superior Court, June 1924. 
Appointed by Governor Clyde R. Hoey, July 1, 1937, Associate 
Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina and elected for 
term of eight years November 8, 1938. Member Phi Delta Phi 
Legal Fraternity ; Mason and Shriner. Married Miss Nannie Rebecca 
Cooper, June 5, 1912. Two children: M. V. Barnhill, Jr.; Rebecca 
Barnhill. Methodist. Address: Rocky Mount, N. C. 



366 North Carolina Manual 

JOHN WALLACE WINBORNE 

associate justice 

John Wallace Winborne, born July 12, 1884, Chowan County, N. C. 
Son of Dr. Robert H. and Annie F. (Parker) Winborne. Attended 
Horner Military School, Oxford 1900-02; A.B. University of North 
Carolina 1906. Married Charlie May Blanton, March 30, 1910; 
children: daughter, Charlotte Blanton now Mrs. Charles M. Shaf- 
ner, Bui-lington, N. C, and a son, John Wallace, Jr., Lt. USNR. 
Taught Bingham Military School, Asheville, N. C, 1906-07. Admit- 
ted to practice, North Carolina 1906. Practiced, Marion, N. C, 
since 1907. Member firm of Pless and Winborne 1907-19; Pless, 
Winborne and Pless 1919-26. Pless, Winborne, Pless and Proctor 
1926-27; Winborne and Proctor 1928-37. Member Board of Alder- 
men 1913-21. Attorney Marion and McDowell County 1918-37. Mem- 
ber Local Selective Board during World War I. Chairman 
Democratic Executive Committee, McDowell County 1910-12; mem- 
ber State Democratic Executive Committee 1916-37. Chairman 
State Democratic Executive Committee 1932-37. Member Local 
Government Commission of North Cai'olina 1931-33. Episcopalian. 
Delta Kappa Epslon, Pythian, J.O.U.A.M., Mason; Marion Kiwanis 
Club (President 1932). Appointed by Governor Hoey Associate 
Justice Supreme Court of North Carolina, July 1, 1937; elected 
for a term of eight years in November 1938. Home address: Marion, 
N. C. Official address: Raleigh, N. C. 

AARON ASHLEY FLOWERS SEAWELL 

associate justice 

A." A. F. Seawell, Democrat, of Lee County, was born near Jones- 
boro, Moore County, October 30, 1864. Son of A. A. F. and Jeannette 
Anne (Buie) Seawell. Attended Jonesboro High School 1877-1879; 
University of North Carolina, Ph.B.; Class of 1889, University 
Law School 1892. Honorary LL.D. University of North Carolina 
1937. Lawyer. Order of Coif, U.N.C. member Phi Delta Phi Legal 
Fraternity. Representative in the General Assembly of 1901, 1913, 
1915 and 1931; State Senator 1907 and 1925. Mason; Knights 
Templar; Shriner; Newcomer Society; Torch Club; History Club, 
(Raleigh). Appointed Assistant Attorney General, July 1, 1931. 
Appointed Attorney General by Governor J. C. B. Ehringhaus, 
January 16, 1935, to succeed Attorney General Dennis G. Brum- 
mitt; elected to full term, November 1936. Appointed Asso- 
ciate Justice Supreme Court by Governor Hoey, April 30, 1938, 
t-j succeed Associate Justice George W. Connor. Elected November 



Biographical Sketches 367 

8, 1938, for unexpired term, ending January 1, 1945. Elected Novem- 
ber 7, 1944, to full term. Presbyterian; Ruling Elder since 1901. 
Married Miss Bertha Alma Smith, April 12, 1905; four sons and 
two daughters. Addx-ess: Raleigh, N. C. 

EMERY BYRD DENNY 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Emery Byrd Denny, Democrat, was born in Pilot Mountain, 
Surry County, N. C, November 23, 1892. Son of Rev. Gabriel and 
Sarah Delphina (Stone) Denny. Attended public schools, Surry 
County, Gilliam's Academy, 1910-1914; Legal education University 
of North Carolina, 1916-1917 and 1919. Admitted to practice law, 
1919. Member law firm of Denny and Gaston, 1919-1921, Mangum 
and Denny, 1921-1980, practiced alone, 1930-1942. Attorney for 
Gaston County, 1927-42; appointed Attorney for North Carolina 
Railroad by Governor Hoey, 1937; Mayor Gastonia, 1929-1937. 
President Gaston County Bar Association and member State and 
American Bar Associations. President Gastonia Chamber Com- 
merce, 1925; President Gaston County Public Library, 1935-1942; 
President Gastonia Civitan Club, 1922. Chairman Board of Elec- 
tions, Gaston County, 1924-1926; Chairman Gaston County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, 1926-1928; Chairman State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, 1940-1942; awarded Citizenship Cup, 
1935, for outstanding civic and community service in the City of 
Gastonia; awarded Silver Beaver, 1942, in recognition of service 
rendered through Piedmont Council, Boy Scouts of America. En- 
listed as private World War I, December 8, 1917, promoted to 
Corporal, Sergeant, First Sergeant, and Master Electrician. Served 
in aviation Section Signal Corps, Kelly Field, Texas, and Van- 
couver Barracks, Washington. Discharged February 22, 1919. Mem- 
ber Gaston Post No. 23, American Legion, Commander, 1926. Past 
Master Holland Memorial Lodge, No. 668, A.F. and A.M.; Past 
High Priest Gastonia Chapter No. 66, Royal Arch Masons and 
member Gastonia Commandery, No. 28, Knights Templar. Ap- 
pointed Associate Justice Supreme Court North Carolina by 
Governor Broughton, January, 1942, to succeed the late Associate 
Justice Heriot Clarkson. Elected to fill out the unexpired term and 
for the full eight-year term, November 3, 1942. Baptist. Deacon. 
Teacher Men's Bible Class for eighteen years. Married Miss Bes- 
sie Brandt Brown. Salisbury, N. C, December 27, 1922. Children: 
Emery Byrd, Jr., Betty Bi'own, Sarah Catherine, and Jean Stone. 
Address: Raleigh, N. C, Home address: Gastonia, N. C. 



Members of the General Assembly 

SENATORS 

LYNTON YATES BALLENTINE 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR AND PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE 

Lynton Yates Ballentine, Democrat, was born at Varina, Wake 
County, N. C, April 6, 1899. Son of James Erastus and Lillian 
(Yates) Ballentine. Attended Oakwood and Cardenas Elementary 
Schools and Holly Springs High School, 1913-1917. A.B. Wake 
Forest College, 1921, specializing in political economy. Dairy- 
man and farmer. Member Board of Agriculture, 1941. Member 
Wake County Board of Commissioners, 1926-1934, State Senator 
from the Thirteenth Senatorial District 1937, 1939, 1941 and 1943. 
Elected Lieutenant Governor November 7, 1944. Baptist. Address : 
Varina, N. C. 

JOHN WILL AIKEN 

(Twenty-fifth District — Counties: Cataw^ba, Iredell and Lin- 
coln. Tw^o Senators.) 

John Will Aiken, Democrat, Senator from the twenty-fifth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Hickory, N. C, December 3, 1895. 
Son of Joseph Henry and Martha (Robinson) Aiken. A.B. Lenoir 
Rhyne College, 1915; University of North Carolina Law School 
1915-1916, Lawyer. City Attorney of City of Hickory, 1925; Muni- 
cipal Judge, 1929-1930. County Attorney, Catawba County, 1930- 
1932. Senator twenty-fifth District Session 1933. Trustee Greater 
University of North Carolina 1933-1936. North Carolina Park 
Commission 1933-1936. Assistant Attorney General of State of 
North Carolina 1935-1936; Special Assistant to the Attorney Gen- 
eral of the United States 1936-1942. Mexican Border Service 
Troop A, N. C. Cavalry 1916-1917; 1st Lieutenant (Pursuit Pilot) 
United States Air Service, American Expeditionary Forces, Sep- 
tember 1917-January 1919. American Legion. Pi Kappa Alpha, 
Tau Chapter, Evangelical and Reformed Church. Married Miss 
Annie Killian. One daughter, Ann, age 7, Address : Hickory, N. C. 

[368] 



Lynton Y. Ballentine 
Lieutenant Governor 
President of the Senate 



Aiken of Catawba 

Applewhite of Halifax 
Barker of Robeson 



Barnes of Wake 

Barnhardt of Cabarrus 
Blythe of Mecklenburg 



Carlyle of Forsyth 
Clark of Edgecombe 
Corey of Pitt 



Culpepper of Pasquotank 
Currie of Durham 
Daniel of Beaufort 



Davis of Stokes 
Dolley of Gaston 
Eagles of Wilson 




370 North Carolina Manual 

ROBERT LAWRENCE APPLEWHITE 

{Fourth District — Counties: Edgecombe and Halifax. Two Sen- 
ators,) 

Robert Lawrence Applewhite, Democrat, Senator from the 
Fourth Senatorial District, was born in Scotland Neck, N. C, 
July 29, 1884. Son of Robert Bertram and Anna (Pennington) 
Applewhite. Educated in private schools and under tutors. Mer- 
chant. Chairman County Board of Education, 1933-1942; Member 
Board of City Commissioners for ten years. Mason; Scottish Rite 
Bodies, Knights Templar and Shrine; Master Royal White Hart 
Lodge ten years. Baptist. Chairman Board of Deacons. Married 
Miss Geneva Cheatham, July 22, 1914. Children: Mrs. W. L. 
Barber, Charlotte, N. C, Mrs. H, B. Grant, Halifax, N. C. and 
Miss Geneva Applewhite. Address: Halifax, N. C. 

CARSON MALLOY BARKER 

{Eleventh District — County: Robeson. One Senator.) 

Carson Malloy Barker, Democrat, Senator from the Eleventh 
Senatorial District, was born in Back Swamp Township, Robeson 
County, N. C, February 11, 1876. Son of W. P. and Susan (Em- 
ory) Barker. Moved to Lumberton in 1897. Attended Robeson 
Institute. Superintendent of Roads, Robeson County; member 
commission for planning Highway No. 20 leading from Wilming- 
ton to Asheville. Member Board of Commissioners, town of Lum- 
berton, 1937-1941; served on committee for erection of Armory 
and Lumberton Municipal Airport. Receiving agent, Robeson 
County, North Carolina Cotton Growers Association for several 
years. Senator from the Eleventh Senatorial District in the Gen- 
eral Assembly of 1943. Baptist. Married Miss Bertha Linkhewer, 
December 25, 1905. Children: Edith and Eleanor. Address: Lum- 
berton, N. C. 

WILEY G. BARNES 

{Thirteenth District — Counties: Chatham, Lee and Wake. Two 
Senators.) 

Wiley G. Barnes, Democrat, Senator from the Thirteenth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Rocky Mount, N. C, March 1, 1888. 
Son of J. H. and Winnie (Taylor) Barnes. Attended University 



Biographical Sketches 371 

of Rocky Mount, 1896-1899; public schools of Wilson, graduated 
from High School; business college. Lawyer. Licensed to prac- 
tice in 1916. Member Wake County Bar Association and North 
Carolina Bar Association. Secretary and Treasurer North Caro- 
lina Railroad dui-ing the administration of Governor McLean, 
1924-1928. Attorney for the City of Raleigh, 1922-1926; Judge 
City Court, and Juvenile Court of Raleigh and Wake County, 
1926-1939. Lieutenant North Carolina National Guard, 1908-1911. 
Chairman Board of Governors, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, Raleigh Lodge, No. 735, 1944-1945. Member Hillyer Me- 
morial Christian Church. Married Miss Meta Gunn Uzzle, of 
Wilson's Mills, November 3, 1915. Address: 119 Hawthorne Road, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

LUTHER ERNEST EARNHARDT 

(Twenty- first District — Counties: Rowan and Cabarrus. Two 
Senators.) 

Luther Ernest Earnhardt, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
first Senatorial District, was born in Concord, N. C, November 
29, 1903. Son of George Thomas and Lillie Virginia (Faggart) 
Earnhardt. Graduated from Concord High School, May, 1921; 
LL.B. Wake Forest College, May, 1925. Lawyer. Member Cabarrus 
County Bar Association, President, 1942: Member State Ear. 
Chairman Cabarrus County Board of Elections, 1933-1944. Pi 
Kappa Alpha (Wake Forest College) National Fraternity; Char- 
ter member Golden Bough: Secretary Student Body. Member Ro- 
tary International. Trustee Concord Community Center, 1940- 
1941; Trustee Public Library, 1943. Baptist. Superintendent Sun- 
day School, 1932-1936; Teacher Business Men's Class, 1936-1939. 
Deacon, Secretary-Treasurer Mecklenburg-Cabarrus Baptist Asso- 
ciation, 1925-1935. Married Miss Burnelle McFarland, June 3, 
1930. Four children: Luther Ernest, Jr.; Phoebe Jean; John Mc- 
Farland; Ann Drucilla Earnhardt. Address: Concord, N. C. 

JOSEPH LEE BLYTHE 

{Twentieth District — County: Mecklenburg. One Senator.) 

Joseph Lee Blythe, Democrat, Senator from the Twentieth Sena- 
torial District, was boi-n in Huntersville, N. C, November 8, 1890. 
Son of Richard Samuel and Virginia (Gamble) Blythe. Attended 



372 North Carolina Manual 

Huntersville High School, 1897-1908. Master Engineer Sr. Gr 
United States Army, May 26, 1917 to July 21, 1919. Vice President 
Blythe Brothers Company; Secretary-Treasurer Caldwell Construc- 
tion Company; President First Federal Savings and Loan Associa- 
tion; President Piedmont Mop Company; President Choate Mills, In- 
corporated; Member of National Association of Manufacturers; 
Member Associated General Contractors and American Road 
Builders Association. Senator from the Twentieth District in the 
General Assembly of 1939, 1941 and 1943. State Director of Finance 
for Democratic National Committee 1941-1944. Masonic Order; 
Shrine (Oasis Temple); Elks; American Legion. Member Associate 
Reformed Presbyterian Church; Elder. Married Miss Cherrye High, 
September 14, 1921. Four children: Mrs. H. R. Richardson; Joseph 
Lee, Jr., USN; Samuel Fitzhugh; Jane Chamblee. Address: 2238 
Pinewood Circle, Charlotte, N. C. 

IRVING EDWARD CARLYLE 

(Twenty-second District — County: Forsyth. One Senator.) 

Irving Edward Carlyle, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
second District, was born in Wake Forest, N. C, September 20, 
1896. Son of Professor John B. and Dora (Dunn) Carlyle. Attended 
Wake Forest High School 1910-1913. A. B., Wake Forest College 
1917; attended Law School in summer; University of Virginia Law 
School 1920-1922. Lawyer. Member American, North Carolina and 
Forsyth County Bar Associations. Member N. C. Board of Law 
Examiners, since 1936; President North Carolina Bar Association, 
1944-1945. Second Lieutenant Field Artillery 1918; Camp Taylor, 
Kentucky; Representative in General Assembly of 1941. Senator in 
1943. Baptist. Married Miss Mary Belo Moore, New Bern, N, C, 
October 20, 1928. Two children: Elizabeth Moore Carlyle, age eleven; 
Mary Irving Carlyle, age eight. Address: 809 Arbor Road, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. 

WILLIAM GRIMES CLARK 

(Fourth District — Counties: Edgecombe and Halifax. Two Sen- 
ators.) 

William G. Clark, Democrat, Senator from the Fourth Senatorial 
District, was born in Tarboro, April 28, 1877. Son of William S. and 



Biographical Sketches 373 

Lossie (Grist) Clark. Attended Horner's School 1891-1893; Univer- 
sity of North Carolina 1893-1897. Member D. K. E. Fraternity. 
Fertilizer supply merchant and farmer. President Tarboro Ginning 
Co.; Cotton Belt Land Co; President Edgecombe Homestead Build- 
ing and Loan; Director Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Co., 
Greensboro; member Board of Trustees Edgecombe General Hospi- 
tal; Chairman of the Executive Committee, Board of Directors of 
State Hospital, Raleigh; member Board of Town Commissioners 
Tarboro 1901-1907; Chairman Board of County Commissioners 1914- 
1920; Chairman Edgecombe County Welfare Dept. ; Chairman Civil- 
ian Defense for Edgecombe County; Director, Carolina Tel. and Telg. 
Co. Delegate to National Democratic Convention, Baltimore 1912 
and Chicago 1932. Member Board University Trustees, State Sena- 
tor 1927, 1929, 1931, 1933, 1935, 1937, 1939, 1941, and 1943. Presi- 
dent pro tern of Senate 1933. Episcopalian. Married Miss Ruth 
Duval Hardisty, April 17, 1901. Children: William Grimes Clark, 
Jr., and John Hardisty Clark. Address: Tarboro, N. C. 

ARTHUR BENJAMIN COREY 

{Fifth District — County: Pitt. One Senator.) 

Arthur Benjamin Corey, Democrat, Senator from the Fifth Sena- 
torial District, was born at Winterville, Pitt County, December 10, 
1891. Son of James Henry and Sudie Delitha (Tucker) Corey. 
Attended Winterville High School, 1907-1910; University of North 
Carolina, 1915-1917. Lawyer. Member and Secretary, Pitt County 
Bar Association, 1924 to 1936; President, 1938; Member North 
Carolina State Bar. Battery "C" 113th Field Artillery, Hq. Co. Past 
Master Greenville Lodge, 284, A. F. and A. M. ; Tar River Lodge, 
No. 93, Knights of Pythias; Withlacoochie Tribe, No. 35, Improved 
Order of Red Men; American Legion; Veterans Foreign Wars. Sena- 
tor from the Fifth Senatorial District, 1933, 1935 and 1939.* Metho- 
dist. Teacher, Carson Wesley Bible Class. Married Miss Hazel Nor- 
man Kennedy, April 7, 1928. Address: Greenville, N. C. 



* County Attorney for Pitt County, Member of Board of Trustees, 
East Carolina Teachers College. 



374 North Carolina Manual 

WILLIAM THOMAS CULPEPPER 

(Fh'st District — Counties: Bertie, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, 
Gates, Hertford, Pasquotank and Perquimans. Two Senators.) 

William Thomas Culpepper, Democrat, Senator from the First 
Senatorial District, was born in Elizabeth City, N. C, June 19", 1884. 
Son of LeRoy and Martha (Davis) Culpepper. Attended Atlantic 
Collegiate Institute. Hardware Merchant. President Culpepper 
Hardware Co., Inc.; Culpepper Motor Co., Inc.; Carolina Amuse- 
ment Company, Inc. Member Merchants Association; Chamber of 
Commerce; Kiwanis Club. Member Elizabeth City Board of Alder- 
men, 1914-1916. Representative in the General Assembly of 1933 from 
Pasquotank County. Appointed Postmaster of Elizabeth City, N. C. 
by Congressman Lindsey C. Warren and took office July 1, 1934, 
serving nine years, resigned July 1, 1943 and retired to private life. 
Mason; Sudan Shrine; President Elizabeth City Shrine Club; B. P. 
O. E. Exalted Ruler, 1917. Baptist. Married Miss Alice G. Butler, 
October, 1909. Address: Elizabeth City, N. C. 

CLAUDE CURRIE 

{Fourteenth District — Counties: Durham, Granville and Person. 
Two Senators.) 

Claude Currie, Democrat, Senator from the Fourteenth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Candor, Montgomery County, N. C, 
December 8, 1890. Son of John C. and Louise (McKinnon) Currie. 
Attended Oak Ridge Military Institute, 1911-1914; University North 
Carolina, A. B. and LL.B., 1927. Building and Loan Association. 
State Senator, Eighteenth Senatorial District, 1927. United States 
Army Air Corps, 1917-1919; Pursuit Observer, Sgt. Presbyterian. 
Address: Durham, N. C. 

E. A. DANIEL 

(Second District — Counties: Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin, Pam- 
lico, Tyrrell, and Washington. Two Senators.) 

E. A. Daniel, Democrat, Senator from the Second Senatorial Dis- 
trict, was born in Washington, N. C, January 6, 1911. Son of E. A. 
and Norfleet (Bryant) Daniel. Attended Washington High School; 
Law School University, North Carolina; licensed to practice law 
January 30, 1933. Lawyer. Member North Carolina State Bar As- 



Bdney of Madison 
Gay of Northampton 
Hampton of Washington 



Hester of Bladen 
Hodges of Buncombe 
Hodges of Henderson 



Horton of Burke 
Hundley of Davidson 
Jenkins of Bertie 



Kesler of Rowan 
Little of Anson 
Long of Person 



Lumpkin of Franklin 
Madry of Alamance 
Matheny of Rutherford 



McBryde of Hoke 
Mitchell of Iredell 
O'Berry of Wayne 



f^ f^T 




376 North Carolina Manual 

sociation. County Attorney for Beaufort County; City Attorney 
for Washington, 1933; Solicitor County Court, 1935-1938; Chairman 
Democratic Executive Committee, since 1939; member State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee since 1939. Member 113th F. A., Bat- 
tery C, 1927-1928, Member Elks. Senator from the Second Sena- 
torial District in the General Assembly of 1943. Methodist. Mar- 
ried Miss Isabelle Gibbs, February 6, 1935. Two children: Isabelle 
Bryant and Mary Long Daniel. Address: Washington, N. C. 

CARLOS EARL DAVIS 

(Twenty-third District — Counties: Stokes and Surry. One Sen- 
ator.) 

Carlos Earl Davis, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-third 
Senatorial District, was born in Danbury, N. C, March 30, 1891. 
Son of Thomas J. and Laura A. (Veach) Davis. Attended Public 
Schools, Stokes County, 1897-1905; King High, 1905-1907; Draug- 
han's Business College, Knoxville, Tenn. Secretary, Treasurer and 
Manager Walnut Cove Veneer Corporation, Chairman Stokes Coun- 
ty Highway Commission, 1923-1925; Chairman Board of Elections, 
1929-1937; Chairman Stokes County Ration Board, 1941-1944; 
Chairman Walnut Cove School Board, 1935-1944. Cashier and Di- 
rector Bank of Stokes County, 1913-1930. Jr. A U A M; Mason, 
member Lodge No. 629, Walnut Cove, N. C, Oasis Temple, A. A. 
0. N. Mystic Shrine, Charlotte. Married Miss Margaret B. Wheeler, 
May 12, 1921. Address: Walnut Cove, N. C. 

STEPHEN BLAND DOLLEY 

(Twenty-sixth District — County: Gaston. One Senator.) 
Stephen Bland Dolley, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-sixth 
Senatorial District, was born in Chesterville, Kent County, Mary- 
land, July 12, 1889. Son of Rev. William Lee and Florence (Peters) 
Dolley. Attended Public Schools, Washington, D. C, 1906; Randolph- 
Macon College, 1906-1910, A.B.; Washington and Lee University, 
1912-1914, LL.B.; Wake Forest College, 1916; Post-graduate work, 
University of Bordeaux, France, 1919. Lawyer. Member North Caro- 
lina Bar Association; Ex-President Gaston County Bar Association. 
Chairman Tenth Congressional District Executive Committee. Ser- 
geant, Infantry A.E.F., 1918-1919; Captain, Infantry, N. C. National 



Biographical Sketches 377 

Guard, March 5, 1921; Major, Infantry, 1927; Lieutenant Colonel, 
September 13, 1940, relieved from active duty for physical disability, 
November 7, 1940. Colonel, Infantry, N. C. State Guard, December 
20, 1941, to June 6, 1942. Representative in the General Assembly 
of 1943. Kappa Sigma, Tau Kappa Alpha, and Phi Alpha Delta. 
Methodist. Author of "Legal Phases of Riot Duty." Married Miss 
Eunice Pennington, December 24, 1917. Children: Aurora DoUey 
and Stephen Dolley, Jr. Address: Gastonia, N. C. 

JOSEPH COLIN EAGLES 

{Sixth District — Counties: Franklin, Nash and Wilson. Two 
Senators.) 

Joseph Colin Eagles, Democrat, Senator from the Sixth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Edgecombe County, September 16, 1871. 
Son of Benjamin Franklin and Sydney Elizabeth (Bradley) Eagles. 
Educated in the schools of Edgecombe County; Davis Military 
Academy, La Grange; Wake Forest College. Tobacconist; member 
of Cozart, Eagles and Co. Sitockholder and President of 
Boykin Grocery Co.; Stockholder and President General Supply Co. 
Farmer. Merchant. Charter member and former President of the 
North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Association. President of Wil- 
son Tobacco Board of Trade. Director of Wilson Chamber of Com- 
merce. Member of State Equalization Board, 1930-1933. State Sena- 
tor, Session of 1937, 1939 and 1943. Episcopalian; Vestryman St. 
Timothy's Church of Wilson for past fifteen years. Senior warden 
for the past five years. Married Miss Suzie Whitehead Moye, De- 
cember 15, 1909. Children: Lt. (jg) Joseph Colin Eagles, Jr.; 
Captain Frederick Moye Eagles; Mrs. Turner Battle Bunn, Jr. Ad- 
dress: Wilson, N. C. 

CALVIN RANSOME EDNEY 

{Thirtieth District — Counties: Avery, Madison, Mitchell and 
Yancey. One Senator.) 

Calvin Ransome Edney, Republican, Senator from the Thirtieth 
Senatorial District, was born in Mars Hill, N. C, April 30, 1888. 
Son of George Newton and Callie Elizabeth (Merrell) Edney. At- 
tended Yancey Collegiate Institute, Burnsville, 1909-1913; Univer- 
sity North Carolina, 1914-1920; A.B., 1920; A.M., 1922; graduate 



378 North Carolina Manual 

work, 1922-1923; Law School, summer sessions; Wake Forest, sum- 
mer law school. Licensed to practice law, 1924. Lawyer. Superinten- 
dent Public Welfare, Madison County, 1937-1944; City Attorney, 
Mars Hill, 1935-1937. Professor History and Economics, Mars Hill 
College, 1919-1921; 1925-1926; Carson Newman College, Jefferson 
City, Tenn., 1923-1924. Land Bank field representative, 1928-1931. 
Mason, Scottish Rite. Shriner. Baptist. Sunday School Teacher. Mar- 
ried Miss Palma Lois Carter, January 3, 1935. Two children: Calvin 
R. Edney, Jr., age 9; Greenwood Edney, age 7. Address: Marshall, 
N. C. 

ARCHIBALD CREE GAY 

{Third District — Counties: Northampton, Vance and Warren. 
One Senator.) 

Archibald Cree Gay, Democrat, Senator from the Third Sena- 
torial District, was born in Jackson, Northampton County, August 
20, 1894. Son of Benjamin Stancell and Annie (Odom) Gay. At- 
tended Jackson High School; Warrenton High School, class of 
1913; University of North Carolina; Wake Forest College Law 
School, 1917. Lawyer. Member North Carolina State Bar and 
District Bar Association. Mayor of Jackson, N. C, 1920-1924; 
County Attorney twelve years; Chairman County Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committee six years. State Senator 1929, 1937 and 1941; 
member House of Representatives, 1931; member State School Com- 
mission four years during Hoey administration. Corporal in U. 
S. Army during World War I; served overseas for twelve months. 
Mason; Woodmen of the World; American Legion. Baptist; Dea- 
con; Superintendent of Sunday School for fifteen years. Married 
Miss Ruth Gee of South Hill, Virginia, June 7, 1922. Two chil- 
dren : Ruth Gee Gay, age eighteen, now a senior at St. Mary's Col- 
lege, Raleigh, N. C, and Archibald Cree Gay, Jr., age eight. Ad- 
dress: Jackson, N. C. 

WILLIAM ROY HAMPTON 

(Second District — Counties: Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin, Pam- 
lico, Tyrrell and Washington. Two Senators.) 

William Roy Hampton, Democrat, Senator from the Second Sen- 
atorial District, was born in Plymouth, N. C. Son of W. H. and 
Lulie Mae (Blount) Hampton. Attended Nazareth Hall, South 



Biographical Sketches 379 

Bethlehem, Pa., preparatory school, 1903-1904; B.S. N. C. State 
College, 1909. Realtor. President Bank of Plymouth and Bank of 
Washington; Chairman Board of Directors, United Commercial 
Bank, Plymouth; Director Bank of Roper. Director Carolina Motor 
Club, Charlotte, and Plymouth Country Club. Chairman Plymouth 
City Council, 1910-1912; Chairman City School Board, 1913-1920 and 
Board of Education, 1920-1928. Chairman Washington County 
Board of Elections; Washington County Executive Committee, 
1928-1932; and member Congressional Committee since 1920. Mem- 
ber Board of Trustees, State College, 1926-1932; Board of Conser- 
vation and Development since 1936 and the Cape Hatteras Sea- 
shore Park Commission since 1940. Lt. Com. Naval Reserve, 1914, 
World War I. Knights of Pythias. Mason: Worshipful Master 
Perseverance Lodge, No. 59, 1918-1920; High Priest Plymouth 
Chapter, 1920-1922. Episcopalian; Treasurer Grace Church, 1912- 
1920; Junior Warden, 1920-1922; Senior Warden, 1922-1932. Mar- 
ried Miss Eliza Hamlin Hampton, June 17, 1913. Three children: 
William Roy Hampton, Jr., Eliza Hamlin Daniels and Thomas Ham- 
lin Hampton. Address: Plymouth, N. C. 

ROBERT JAMES HESTER, JR. 

{Tenth District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus and 
Cumberland. Two Senators.) 

Robert James Hester, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Tenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Elizabethtown, N. C, February 
5, 1904. Son of Robert James and Rena Gaston (Melvin) Hester. 
Attended Elizabethtown High School; Wingate Junior College, 
1920-1923; Wake Forest College, 1923-1926. Lawyer. Member 
North Carolina State Bar. Member Ninth District Bar Association 
and Bladen County Bar Association, served as President and Sec- 
retary of both. Mayor of Elizabethtown, 1927-1928; Judge Bladen 
County Recorders' Court, 1928-1933; Solicitor, 1937-1938. Demo- 
cratic Precinct Chairman about eight years; Chairman Bladen 
County Democratic Executive Committee, 1939-1944; State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, past two years, Selective Service Ad- 
visory Board, past four years; Price Panel Board (OPA) past two 
years. Junior Order United American Mechanics, District Deputy 
and other offices; taking degrees in Masonic Order. Rotary Inter- 
national, Past President Elizabethtown Club; President Red Cross; 



380 North Carolina Manual 

Scoutmaster; War Finance Chairnnan Bladen County, Presby- 
terian. Teacher Men's Bible Class; Deacon. Married Miss Mary 
Pitkin Thomas, June 1, 1927. One child: James Hester, age sixteen. 
Address: Elizabethtown, N. C. 

BRANDON P. HODGES 

{Thirty-first District — County: Buncombe. One Senator.) 

Brandon P. Hodges, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty-first 
Senatorial District, was born in Asheville, N. C, September 6, 1903. 
Son of Daniel Merritt and Clara (Patton) Hodges. Attended City 
Schools of Asheville, Porter Military Academy, 1919-1921. Uni- 
versity North Carolina, January 1922-June 1923; Law School, 
1923-1924; Wake Forest Law School, September 1925-January 
1926. Lawyer, Member Buncombe County Bar Association. Judge 
pro tern Asheville Police Court, 1927-1930; County Attorney, since 
1936. Senator in the General Assembly of 1943. Mason. Sigma 
Chi Fraternity. Presbyterian. Married Miss Genevieve Hare. 
Children: Brandon P., Jr., and Sarah Jane Hodges. Address: Ashe- 
ville, N. C. 

WILLIAM BRYAN HODGES 

{Thirty-second District — Counties: Haywood, Henderson, Jack- 
son, Polk and Transylvania. Two Senators.) 

William Bryan Hodges, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty-sec- 
ond District, was born in Norfolk, Va., October 9, 1900. Son of 
Samuel Thompson and Louisa (Kirk) Hodges. Attended Blue 
Ridge School for boys, Hendersonville, 1916-1917; Davidson Col- 
lege, 1919-1920. Banker. President State Trust Co., Henderson- 
ville. Methodist. Married Miss Elizabeth Corrigan, July 7, 1935. 
Address: Hendersonville, N. C. 

OSSIE LEE HORTON 

{Twenty-eighth District — Counties: Alexander, Burke and Cald- 
well. One Senator.) 

Ossie Lee Horton, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-eighth 
Senatorial District was born in Chatham County, N. C, December 
15th, 1900. Son of Willis G. and Nettie Bernice (Watts) Hortin. 
Attended Bonlee High School 1918-1922; Wake Forest College, 



Biographical Sketches 381 

1922-1926 — LL.B. Degree. Lawyer. Member Burke County Bar 
Association and N. C. State Bar. Member Morganton Lions Club 
since 1929, Past President, Lieutenant-Governor Clubs "West, 1933- 
1934. Member Catawba Valley Masonic Lodge, Past Master. So- 
licitor Burke County Criminal Court, 1930-1933; Judge 1937-1940; 
Chairman Burke County Board of Elections 1934-1937; 1940-1944; 
County Attorney, 1940-1945. Methodist. Married Miss Mozelle 
Kibler, June 14, 1930. Address: Morganton, N. C. 

GEORGE LEE HUNDLEY 

(Eighteenth District. Counties: Davidson, Montgomery, Rich- 
mond and Scotland. Two Senators.) 

George Lee Hundley, Democrat, Senator from the Eighteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Davidson County, January 6, 
1903. Son of D. J. and Minnie (Weir) Hundley. Attended Thomas- 
ville High School; High Point College. Realtor; Insurance and 
Loans. President Thomasville Merchants Association; Member 
North Carolina Real Estate Board; North Carolina Insurance 
Agents Association. Member Lions Club. Mason; Master, Secre- 
tary, Treasurer and Warden of Lodge. Methodist. Married Miss 
Lynette Salmons, June 5, 1943. Two children : Jean H. Foster and 
Georganna Hundley by former marriage. Address: Thomasville, 
N. C. 

CHARLES HENRY JENKINS 

(First District — Counties: Bertie, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, 
Gates, Hertford, Pasquotank and Perquimans. Two Senators.) 

Charles Henry Jenkins, Democrat, Senator from the First Sena- 
torial District, was born in Menola, Hertford County, N. C, Oc- 
tober 8, 1881. Son of Joseph H. and Olevia Frances (Benthall) 
Jenkins. Attended Menola High School, 1896-1900; A.B. Wake 
Forest College, 1904; Law School, 1908; University of North Caro- 
lina Law School, 1909. Automobile dealer and farmer. Member 
Ruritan Club; chai-ter member Ahoskie Kiwanis Club. Founder 
Charles H. Jenkins & Co., Aulander; President Standard Chevro- 
let Company, Ahoskie; President Charles H. Jenkins Motor Co., 
Edenton, Principal Grammar School, Kinston, 1904-1906; Principal 
Grammar Schools, Durham, 1906-1911; Principal High School, City 
of Durham, 1911-1912. President Grammar School Principals, North 



382 North Carolina Manual 

Carolina Education Association, 1910; Member Board of Trustees, 
Chowan College, Murfreesboro, N. C. Member Board of Town Com- 
missioners, Aulander, N. C. 1916-1917. Chairman Liberty Loan 
Committee Bertie County, 1917-1918; Chairman Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committee, 1922-1924; Chairman Bertie County Highway 
Commission, 1920-1927, Delegate to Democratic National Conven- 
tion, 1936. Member Board of Conservation and Development, 1941- 
1944; member Committee on Forests and Parks and Commercial 
Fisheries. Knights of Pythias. Baptist. Member Board of Dea- 
cons, Durham Baptist Church 1910-1912; Deacon Aulander Bap- 
tist Church; Moderator W. Chowan Association five years. Ad- 
dress: Aulander, N. C. 

JOHN C. KESLER 

{Twenty-first District — Counties: Cabarrus and Rowan. Two 
Senators.) 

John C. Kesler, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-first Sena- 
torial District, was born in Rowan County, May 23, 1899. Son 
of G. C. and Fannie (Iddings) Kisler. Attended Spencer City 
School; graduated in 1920; A.B. University North Carolina, 1924; 
J.D., 1928. Lawyer. Member Rowan County Bar Association, Sec- 
retary-Ti-easurer, 1935-1942; Member North Carolina State Bar. 
Prosecuting Attorney Rowan County Court, 1937-1938; Judge, 1939- 
1940. Mason; Spencer Lodge No. 543; Master, 1933-1935. Methodist. 
Member Board of Stewards, 1944. Married Miss Sudie Grace West, 
July 20, 1939. Address: Salisbury, N. C. 

ROBERT EUGENE LITTLE 

(Nineteenth District — Counties: Anson, Stanly and Union. Two 
Senators.) 

Robert Eugene Little, Democrat, Senator from the Nineteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Wadesboro, Anson County, N. C, 
January 10, 1893. Son of Robert Eugene and Mary Austin (Ben- 
nett) Little. Attended Warrenton High School, 1906-1907; Bing- 
ham School, Asheville, from fall term of 1907 through fall term of 
1908; Trinity Park School, Durham, spring of 1909; Bingham 
School, Asheville, fall 1909 through spring term of 1911; University 
of North Carolina, 1911-1915; Wake Forest Law School summei 
1916. Licensed to practice law by the Supreme Court, August term. 



Pate of Scotland 
Penland of Clay 
Penny of Guilford 



Pittman of Lee 

Price of Rockingham 
Rogers of Polk 



Rose of Cumberland 
Ross of Randolph 
Rowe of Pender 



I Smith of Stanly 
j Somers of Wilkes 
Thomas of Ashe 



Vann of Sampson 
Wallace of Johnston 
Ward of Craven 



Weathers of Cleveland 
Whitaker of Lenoir 
Byerly — Principal Clerk 




384 North Carolina Manual 

1916. Lawyer and Farmer, Member North Carolina and American 
Bar Associations. Member Board of Trustees University of North 
Carolina. Clerk Superior Court Anson County, 1930-1942. Served 
in U. S. Army, September 5, 1918 to December 22, 1918. Discharged 
with rank of Sergeant. Mason. Kappa Sigma Fraternity Univer- 
sity North Carolina. Episcopalian. Married Miss Rosa Leak Par- 
sons of Rockingham, N. C, October 14, 1926. Three children: Rosa 
Parsons Little, Mary Bennet Little, and Robert Eugene Little, III. 
Address: Wadesboro, N. C. 

FLEMMIE D. LONG 

(Fourteenth District — Counties: Durham, Granville and Person. 
Two Senators.) 

Flemmie D. Long, Democrat, Senator from the Fourteenth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Person County, N. C, May 3, 1881. 
Son of Daniel D. and Cora A. (Brooks) Long. Attended County 
Public Schools. Farmer, merchant and fertilizer dealer. Chair- 
man Board of County Commissioners 1932-1938. Senator in the 
General Assembly of 1941. Primitive Baptist. Deacon and clerk of 
Church, and Moderator of the Association for twenty-five years. 
Married Miss Ida C. Tillman in 1905. Address: Roxboro, N. C, 
RFD No. 1. 

WILLIAM L. LUMPKIN 

(Sixth District— Counties: Franklin, Nash and Wilson. Two 
Senators.) 

William L. Lumpkin, Democrat, Senator from the Sixth Sena- 
torial District, was born at Youngsville, N. C, May 14, 1903. Son 
of J. S. and Lena (Parker) Lumpkin. Attended Youngsville High 
School and Fi;anklinton High School; Wake Forest College 1920- 
1923; Wake Forest Law School. Lawyer. Louisburg Kiwanis Club; 
City Attorney Town of Franklinton. Baptist; Deacon; President 
Franklin County Baraca-Philathea Union 1924. Representative in 
the General Assembly 1929, 1931, 1933, 1935, 1937, and 1943; 
Member of State Senate 1939 and 1941. Married. Three children. 
Address: Louisburg, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 385 

WILBUR DENNIS MADRY 

(Sixteenth District — Counties: Alamance and Orange. One Sena- 
tor.) 

Wilbur Dennis Madry, Democrat, Senator from the Sixteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Scotland Neck, N. C, August 1, 
1905. Son of Robert Jarratte and Lena Taylor (Allsbrook) Madry. 
A.B. University North Carolina, 1925; LL.B. 1927. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber Alamance County Bar Association; Vice-President, 1943. As- 
sistant Judge General County Court, 1936-1938. Member Rotary 
Club and Chamber of Commerce of Burlington. Lambda Chi Al- 
pha; Phi Alpha Delta Fraternity. Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows; Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; Modern Woodmen 
of America Consul, 1933-1937; State Secretary, 1937. Methodist. 
Married Miss Thelma Worth Starling, October 14, 1930. Two 
children: Wilber Dennis Madry, Jr., and Norman Worth Madry. 
Address: Burlington, N. C. 

WADE BOSTIC MATHENY 

(Twenty-seventh District — Counties: Cleveland, McDowell, and 
Rutherford. Two Senators.) 

Wade Bostic Matheny, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
seventh Senatorial District, was born in Forest City, N. C, Janu- 
ary 26, 1905. Son of John W. and Arrie (Kennedy) Matheny. 
Graduated from Forest City High School in 1924. A.B., Wake 
Forest College, 1928; LL.B., University North Carolina, 1932. 
Lawyer, Ford Automobile Dealer 1944. Member Forest City Ki- 
v/anis Club, President 1937; President Rutherford County Bar 
Association 1938; Vice President Rutherford County Club; Presi- 
dent Young Democratic Club for Rutherford County 1932-1936; 
Secretary Broad River Soil Conservation District since 1938. Teach- 
er in Central High School, Rutherfordton 1929-1931. County So- 
licitor 1934-1938. Attorney for Rutherford County 1942. Kappa 
Phi Kappa; Golden Bough; Knights of Pythias; State Senator 
1941 and 1943. Baptist; Chairman Board of Deacons since 1937; 
teacher Bible Class since 1932. Married Miss Eleanor Calhoun, 
May 2, 1937. One child: Alice Matheny. Address: Forest City, 
N. C. 



386 North Carolina Manual 

RYAN McBRYDE 

(Twelfth District — Counties: Harnett, Hoke, Moore and Ran- 
dolph. Two Senators.) 

Ryan McBryde, Democrat, Senator from the Twelfth Senatorial 
District, was born in Raeford, N. C, December 22, 1886. Son of 
Tom and Mary (McDuffie) McBryde. Attended Raeford Institute 
1900-1905; North Carolina Military Academy 1906; Davidson Col- 
lege two years, class of 1911. Lumber dealer and farmer. Mem- 
ber Raeford School Board 1930-1933; Hoke County Board of Edu- 
cation 1918-1924. State Senator in the General Assembly of 1933, 
1937 and 1941. Member Budget Commission 1941-1942. Member 
State Board of Education 1943-1944. Mason. Presbyterian. Mar- 
ried Miss Swannie Rattz, December 3, 1914. Three children. Ad- 
dress: Raeford, N. C. 

HUGH GORDON MITCHELL 

(Twenty-fifth District — Counties: Catawba, Iredell and Lincoln. 
Two Senators.) 

Hugh Gordon Mitchell, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
fifth Senatorial District, was born in Statesville, N. C, October 5, 
1902. Son of Richard Page and Amelia (Leinster) Mitchell. Gradu- 
ated from Statesville High School, 1920. Attended Geoi'gia School 
of Technology, Atlanta, 1920-1922; University of North Carolina, 
1922-1924; B.S. Commerce, 1924; Graduate student in law. Uni- 
versity North Carolina, 1924-1926. Lawyer. Member North Caro- 
lina State Bar Association, member North Carolina Bar Associa- 
tiorj and American Bar Association. Chairman Iredell County 
Board of Elections, 1930-1942; Delegate from Ninth Congressional 
District to National Democratic Convention in Philadelphia, 1936, 
Chicago 1940, and Chicago 1944. Training in Reserve Officers 
Training Corps in Coast Artillery, Georgia School of Technology, 
1920-1922. President N. C. State Camp, Patriotic Order Sons of 
America, 1928-1931 ; National Vice President Patriotic Order Sons 
of America, 1933-1935; National President 1935-1943. Member Lions 
Club; Governor Lions Clubs of North Carolina, 1931-1933; In- 
ternational Counsellor, Lions International, 1941; Delta Sigma 
Phi Fraternity, Deputy Southeastern District (Va., N. C, S. C, 
and Tenn.), 1928-1930. Chairman Iredell County War Savings 
Campaign Committee, 1942. Director N. C. State Association for 



L 



Biographical Sketches 387 

the Blind. Chairman Zebulon Baird Vance Memorial Commission 
of North Carolina. Government Appeal Agent, Selective Service, 
Iredell County Board No. 1, 1940-1942. State Senator 1943. Pres- 
byterian. Address: Statesville, N. C. 

THOMAS b'BERRY 

{Eighth District — Counties: Johnston and Wayne. Two Senators.) 
Thomas O'Berry, Democrat, Senator from the Eighth Senatorial 
District, was born in Goldsboro, N. C, February 20, 1886. Son of 
Nathan and Estelle (Moore) O'Berry. Attended Horner Military 
Academy, Oxford, N. C, 1902-1903; B.S., University of North 
Carolina 1907. General Insurance, President N. C. Association 
Insurance Agents 1938-1939, and Wayne County Insurance Agents 
1937-1938; Vice President N. C. Pine Association 1924. Member 
District No. 2 Selective Service Appeal Board. Representative in 
the General Assembly 1933 and 1935; State Senator, 1941 and 
1943. Delta Kappa Epsilon, B.P.O. Elks. Presbyterian; Chair- 
man Board of Deacons 1925-1928. Married Miss Annie Land, De- 
cember 14, 1910. Address: Goldsboro, N. C. 

EDWIN PATE 

(Eighteenth District — Counties: Davidson, Montgomery, Rich- 
mond and Scotland. Two Senators.) 

Edwin Pate, Democrat, Senator from the Eighteenth Senatorial 
District, was born in Laurel Hill, N. C, April 16, 1898. Son of Z. 
V. and Sallie (McNair) Pate. Attended North Carolina State Col- 
lege, B.S. 1921. Farmer and Merchant. Senator in the General 
Assembly of 1941. Presbyterian; Deacon 1925-1938. Married Miss 
Marie Whitaker, October 20, 1921. Two children, one boy and 
one girl. Address: Laurinburg, N. C. 

A. LEE PENLAND 

{Thirty-third District — Counties: Cherokee, Clay, Gi'aham, Ma- 
con and Swain. One Senator.) 

A. Lee Penland, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty-third Sena- 
torial District, was born in Hayesville, North Carolina, December 
12,1891. Son of James A. and Arminta (Byrd) Penland. Attended 
Hayesville High School 1908-1913; Wesleyan College 1913-1914, 



388 North Carolina Manual 

Athens, Tennessee; Southern Business College 1914-1915, Atlanta, 
Geoi'gia; Western Carolina Teachers College summers of 1930, 
1933, 1936, and 1938. Teacher and Farmer, Chairman of Demo- 
cratic Party of Clay County 1922-26. Representative from Clay 
County in the General Assembly 1939, and 1941. Methodist. Now 
Charge Lay Leader. Married Miss Annie Lou Herbert, May 19, 
1915. Two children: Alvin L. and Virginia. Address: Rt. 1, Hayes- 
ville, N. C. 

GEORGE T. PENNY 

{Seventeenth District — County: Guilford. One Senator.) 
George T. Penny, Democrat, Senator from the Seventeenth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Guilford County, N. C. Son of Mark 
and Clementine (Wright) Penny. Attended school at Randleman, 
N. C, 1884-1891. Realtor and Auctioneer. Member Re^Il Estate 
Board and Chamber of Commerce of Greensboi'o, Past Exalted 
Ruler, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, 1941-1942. Methodist. 
Trustee. Active President Senior Bible Class. Married Miss Lena 
Welch, September 20, 1906. One daughter (deceased). Address: 
Jefferson Square, Greensboro, N. C. 

JAMES CARLTON PITTMAN 

{Thirteenth District — Counties: Chatham, Lee and Wake. Two 
Senators.) 

James Carlton Pittman, Democrat, Senator from the Thirteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Gates County, N. C, February 
25, 1900. Son of T. T. and Stella M. (Howell) Pittman. Attended 
Reynoldson High School, Gates, N. C, 1912-1916. LL.B., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina 1921. Lawyer. Member Lee County, Fourth 
District and North Carolina Bar Associations. Chairman Board of 
Elections, Lee County 1928; Judge Recorder's Court 1928; Attorney 
for town of Sanford 1927-1935. State Senator from the Thirteenth 
District in the General Assembly of 1937 and 1941. County At- 
torney for Lee County since 1936-1940. Attorney for Town of 
Sanford 1941 to date. President Sanford Kiwanis Club and Lieu- 
tenant Governor of Kiwanis International, Sixth Division of the 
Carolinas Division; President Sanford Business Men's Association. 
Member Sigma Phi Epsilon, Social Fraternity. Baptist. Married 
Miss Hazel Faircloth, April 11, 1925. Two boys: John Thomas and 
William B. Pittman. Address: Sanford, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 389 

JOHN HAMPTON PRICE 

(Fifteenth District — Counties: Caswell and Rockingham. One 
Senator.) 

John Hampton Price, Democrat, Senator from the Fifteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Rockingham County, November 
20, 1899. Son of Robert B. and Hallie (McCabe) Price. Gradu- 
ated from Washington and Lee University 1924, with degree of 
LL.B., Attorney at law. Member Rockingham County Bar Asso- 
ciation, North Carolina Bar Association. Councilor Twenty-first 
Judicial District, North Carolina State Bar. Senator from the 
Seventeenth District in 1939 and 1941; from the Fifteenth District 
in 1943; President Pro Tem of the 1943 Session. Mason. Sons of 
American Revolution; Rotarian; member Lambda Chi Alpha Fra- 
ternity. Methodist. Married Miss Sallie Hester Lane, May 2, 1929. 
Address: Leaksville, N. C. 

CARROLL PICKENS ROGERS 

(Thirty-secoyid District — Counties: Haywood, Henderson, Jack- 
son, Polk, and Transylvania. Two Senators.) 

Carroll P. Rogers, Democrat, was born at Johnston, S. C, De- 
cember 22, 1882. Son of Rev. William A. and Annie Maria (Ander- 
son) Rogers. Attended public schools at Marion, S. C, 1890; pub- 
lic school, Charleston, S. C, 1891-1892; Wofford Fitting School, 
Spartanburg, S. C, 1892-1895; Furman University 1897-1898; 
A.B., Wofford College 1900. Kappa Alpha Fraternity. President 
Pacolet Utilities Co., Tryon, N. C; Feldspar Milling Co., Asheville; 
Blue Ridge Mining Co., Burnsville, N. C. ; Past President Kiwanis 
Club of Tryon and Past President of Tryon Chamber of Com- 
merce. Representative in the General Assembly of 1923 (Hender- 
son Co.), 1929, 1939 and 1941 (Polk County). Mayor East Flat 
Rock 1926-1927. Second Lieutenant Reserve Militia 1917-1918. 
Mason; Shriner; Woodman of the World. Methodist. Married Miss 
Susan Mildred Erskine, June 28, 1911. Three children: Carroll P. 
Rogers, Jr., Susan Rogers Haynes, Hope Rogers Metcalf. Address: 
Tryon, N. C. 



390 North Carolina Manual 

CHARLES GRANDISON ROSE 

{Tenth District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus and 
Cumberland. Two Senators.) 

Charles Grandison Rose, Democrat, Senator from the Tenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Fayetteville, N. C, June 8, 1880. 
Son of George McNeill and Augusta Jane (Steel) Rose. Attended 
Public schools and Fayetteville Military Academy to 1897; David- 
son College, 1897-1898; University of North Carolina, 1898-1900; 
A.B. 1900; LL.D. Honorary Degree, 1944; University Law School, 
1901-1902; Licensed to practice law by the Supreme Court of North 
Carolina, February, 1902. Lawyer. Senior member firm of Rose, 
Lyon and Rose, Fayetteville, N. C. President Ninth District Bar 
Association, 1929; President North Carolina Bar Association, 1930- 
1931; Vice President North Carolina State Bar, 1935-1937; Presi- 
dent, 1937-1938; Member American Bar Association and American 
Law Institute. Representative in the General Assembly of 1911; 
temporary Clerk Superior Court, Cumberland County, 1915. Chair- 
man Board of Directors Confederate Women's Home, since 1924. 
Chairman Local Draft Board No. 1, Cumberland County, 1940- 
1942, Chairman Board of Appeal No. 3, since 1942, Selective Service 
Act. Member and Past President Fayetteville Rotary Club; Presi- 
dent Fayetteville, Y.M.C.A. Mason, Past High Priest Royal Arch 
Masons; Knights of Pythias; Knight Templar; Shrine. Presby- 
terian. Deacon, 1905-1918; Elder since 1918; Superintendent Sun- 
day School, 1905-1932; Moderator, Fayetteville Presbytery, 1938; 
Moderator Synod of North Carolina, 1941-1942; Moderator, Gen- 
eral Assembly Presbyterian Church of the United States, (Southern 
Presbyterian Church), 1942-1943. Member Board of Trustees, 
Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Va., Flora McDonald Col- 
lege, Red Springs, N. C, and Presbyterian Junior College, Max- 
ton, N. C. Married October 11, 1911, Miss Irene Lacy (who died 
June 26, 1934), daughter of State Treasurer Ben R. Lacy and Mary 
Burwell Lacy. Two children: Charles G. Rose, Jr., Ensign, USNR,, 
on active duty with Navy; Chaplain Ben Lacy Rose, Captain 113th 
Cavalry Group, U. S. Army, now on active duty in Holland. Ad- 
dress: Fayetteville, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 391 

ARTHUR ROSS 

{Twelfth District — Counties: Harnett, Hoke, Moore and Ran- 
dolph. Two Senators.) 

Arthur Ross, Democrat, Senator from the Nineteenth Senatorial 
District, was born in Randolph County, N. C, March 17, 1875. 
Son of Romulus R. and Rebecca Ellen (McCulloch) Ross. Attended 
County Schools, Public Schools of Asheboro and Oak Ridge Military 
Institute, 1893-1894. President and Treasurer Tip Top Hosiery Mills, 
Asheboro. One of the organizers in 1926 and first president Asheboro 
Rotary Club; President Asheboro Chamber of Commerce. Leader 
in all civic affairs. Member City Council, 1908-1914; first Chair- 
man Randolph County Highway Commission, 1913-1916; Member 
Democratic State Executive Committee, 1920-1936; State Senator 
from the Twelfth District in 1925; member N. C. State Fair Board 
which rebuilt the fair grounds at Raleigh. Member World War I 
Home Guard. Member N. C. Emergency Council. Former Presi- 
dent and General Manager Bonlee and Western Railroad Co., 1921- 
1927; Secretary-Treasurer and General Manager Moore Central 
Railroad Company since 1925. Presbyterian. Married Miss Minnie 
Alma Smith, 1897. Four children: Hallie (Mrs. Seddon Goode,) 
Lakeland, Fla.; Julia, widow of Dr. W. L. Lambert; Betsy (Mrs. 
Joe Bevis,) Princeton, N. J.; and Arthur Ross, Jr. Address: Ashe- 
boro, N. C. 

ROY ROWE 

{Ninth District — Counties: Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and 
Sampson. Two Senators.) 

Roy Rowe, Democrat, Senator from the Ninth Senatorial Dis- 
trict, born in Burgaw, N. C, May 29, 1905. Son of Nicholas Henry 
and Mary Belle (King) Rowe. Attended Carolina Industrial School, 
Pender County 1911-1920; Vanceboro Farm Life School 1920-1923; 
University of North Carolina from time to time from 1923-1931; 
Theatre Manager School, New York City 1930. Theatre owner and 
operator; Farmer. President, Theatre Owners of North and South 
Carolina (1924-1944), President, Carolina Aero Club (1942-1944), 
Major (1944 — ) in North Carolina Wing of Civil Air Patrol. Licens- 
ed to operate private aircraft; Mason, King Solomon's Lodge 138, 
Burgaw; State Senator from the Ninth District in 1937 and 1941. 
Member House of Rep. 1943; Chairman N. C. Aeronautics Com- 
mission (1943 — ). Unitarian and Universalist. Married Miss Nina 



392 North Carolina Manual 

Lavinia Worsley of Maysville, February 22, 1929. One child: Tonia 
Rowe. Address: Burgaw, N. C. 

WHITMAN ERSKINE SMITH 

{Nineteenth District — Counties: Anson, Stanly and Union. Two 
Senators.) 

Whitman Erskine Smith, Democrat, Senator fi'om Nineteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Norwood, N. C, February 13, 1896. 
Son of R. L. and Ora (Burgess) Smith. Attended Webb School, 
Bell Buckle, Tenn.; Morgan School, Fayetteville, Tenn., 1910-1915; 
Trinity College, 1915-1917; completed Law Course at Trinity Col- 
lege, 1919-1921. Lawyer. Served in United States Navy, 1918-1919. 
Mason. State Senator, 1927, 1929, 1935 and 1939. President pro 
tem Senate, 1939. Methodist. Married Miss Rebecca Rigby, Novem- 
ber 10, 1926. One son: Whitman Erskine Smith, Jr. Address: Al be- 
marle, N. C. 

WILLLIAM BINGHAM SOMERS 

{Twenty -fourth District — Counties: Davie, Wilkes and Yadkin. 
One Senator.) 

William Bingham Somers, Republican, Senator from the Twenty- 
fourth Senatorial District, was born in Wilkesboro, N. C, Decem- 
ber 12, 1896. Son of Charles Hamilton and Lunda (Bingham) Som- 
ers. Attended Wilkesboro High School, graduated in 1916. Farmer 
and owner Georgetown Transportation Company, Georgetown, S. C. 
Member Wilkesboro Board of Commissioners, 1924-1928; Sheriff 
Wilkes County, 1928-1936. Served with 28th Pennsylvania Division 
overseas January, 1917 until May, 1919 with rank of Corporal. 
American Legion; Forty and Eight; Commander Georgetown, S. C. 
Post, 1940. Mason. Methodist. Member Board of Stewards, 1925- 
1939. Married Miss Margery Allen, January 15, 1921. One daughter, 
Margaret Louisa Somers. Address: Wilkesboro, N. C. 

EDISON M. THOMAS 

{Twenty-ninth District — Counties: Alleghany, Ashe and Wata- 
uga. One Senator.) 

Edison M. Thomas, Republican, Senator from the Twenty-ninth 
Senatorial District, was born in Independence, Virginia, February 
20, 1893. Son of Joseph J. and Gincy (Halsey) Thomas. Attended 



Biographical Sketches 393 

preparatory schools of Independence, Va. and Emory and Henry 
College. Farmer and Livestock dealer. Vice-president First National 
Bank, West Jefferson also Chairman Board of Directors. Mayor 
Town of West Jefferson, 1928-1932. Private Co. M. 321st Infantry, 
81st Division. Active Combat duty St. Die and Meuse-Argonne 
offensive, September to November, 1918. Methodist. Address: Gras- 
sy Creek, N. C. 

HENRY VANN 

{Ninth District — Counties: Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and 
Sampson. Two Senators.) 

Henry Vann, Democrat, Senator from the Ninth Senatorial Dis- 
trict, was born in Sampson County, N. C. February 10, 1892. Son 
of Arthur and Portia (McPhail) Vann. Attended County Grammar 
School, 1898-1906; Salemburg High School, 1907-1908; Oak Ridge 
Auto Mechanic School, 1909-1910. Farmer, Auto Dealer; Theatre 
Owner and Operator. President Sampson Cotton Storage Ware- 
house, 1926-1945. Mayor of Clinton, 1925-1929. Mason. Member 
Hiram Lodge, No. 98, Clinton, N. C; Thirty-second degree Masonry 
Wilmington Consistory; Sudan Temple, A.A.O.N.M. Shrine, New 
Bern, N. C. Married Miss Beulah Madge Williamson, August 21, 
1915. One daughter: Mrs. Claire Louise Vann Austin. Address: 
Clintton, N. C. 

LAWRENCE HENRY WALLACE 

{Eighth District — Counties: Johnston and Wayne. Two Senators.) 
Lewrence Henry Wallace, Democrat, Senator from the Eighth 
Senatorial District, was born in Smithfield, N. C, April 25, 1906. 
Son of R. I. and Jenny L. (Massey) Wallace. Attended Smithfield 
High School; University of N. C, three years undergraduate 
work; University of N. C. Law School, LL.B., 1930 Tobacconist 
and Fertilizer Manufacturer. Solicitor Recorder's Court of Johns- 
ton County 1934-1938. "Representative in the General Assembly 
from Johnston County, 1939-1941 and 1943. Member Chi Psi Fra- 
ternity; President Smithfield Kiwanis Club, 1940. Methodist. Mar- 
ried Miss Nell Grantham, December 26, 1930. Three Children: 
Lawrence H., the second; Nell Rose and Michael Holton. Address: 
Smithfield, N. C. 



394 North Carolina Manual 

DAVID LIVINGSTON WARD 

{Seventh District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, 
Lenoir and Onslow. Two Senators.) 

David Livingstone Ward, Democrat, Senator from the Seventh 
Senatorial District, was born in New Bern, June 1903. Son of D. L. 
and Carrie Louise (Schollenberger) Ward. Attended New Bern 
Public School. University of North Carolina 1920-24, A.B.; Wake 
Forest Law School 1924-26. Lawyer. County Solicitor 1925-30; 
State Board Conservation and Development 1930-37. Member of 
Elks, Junior Order. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1935, 1937, 1939, 1941 and 1943. Speaker of the House 1939, Secre- 
tary State Democratic Committee 1936-1940; State Gasoline Legis- 
lative Committee 1936; State Advisory Budget Commission 1937- 
1938; State Division Purchase and Contract 1937-38; the Interstate 
Commission on Crime 1940. Delegate to the National Democratic 
Conventions 1936 and 1940. Episcopalian. Married Miss Leah Du- 
val Jones, New Bern, N. C, December 10, 1932. Two sons. D. L. 
Ward, Jr., born July 23, 1935 and John A. J. Ward, born December 
9, 1944. Address: 95 East Front Street, New Bern, N. C. 

LEE B. WEATHERS 

(Twenty-seventh District — Counties: Cleveland, McDowell and 
Rutherford. Two Senators.) 

Lee B. Weathers, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-seventh 
Senatorial District, was born in Shelby, N. C, September 15, 1886. 
Son of A. P. and Octavia (Nolan) Weathers. Attended Shelby 
Public schools and Shelby High School. B.A., Wake Forest College, 
1908. Editor and Publisher Shelby Daily Star, Member North Caro- 
lina Press and Southern Newspaper Publishers Associations; Presi- 
dent North Carolina Press Association, 1928-1929. Prepared copy 
for Cleveland County Centennial Edition of Shelby Daily Star in 
1940 which embraced history of Cleveland County. Director First 
National Bank and Vice President Cleveland Building and Loan 
Association. Secretary-Treasurer N. C. Railroad Commission, one 
year. Member State Board of Conservation and Development, 1943- 
1944. Senator in the General Assembly of 1943. Mason. Baptist. 
Married Mrs. Breta N. Clary, daughter of fromer State Senator 
J. W. Noell of Roxboro. Children: Lt (jg) Henry L. Weathers, 



Biographical Sketches 395 

USNR on leave from Shelby Daily Star and Miss Pearl Weathers, 
Signal Corps of War Department, Arlington, Va. Address: Shel- 
by, N. C. 

ROMULUS ALONZO WHITAKER 

(Seventh District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, 
Lenoir and Onslow. Two Senators.) 

Romulus Alonzo Whitaker, Democrat, Senator from the Seventh 
Senatorial District, was born in Trenton, N. C, November 11, 1890. 
Son of Romulus Alonzo and Martha Antionette (Bidgood) Whita- 
ker. Attended Rhodes School, Trenton, N. C, until 1901; Kinston 
Public School 1901-1906: A.B. Trinity College (Duke University) 
1910; Oak Ridge Business Courses, 1912-1913; Trinity College (Duke 
University, Law School, 1913-1915; Licensed to practice August, 
1915. Lawyer and Farmer. Member American Bar Association; 
North Carolina Bar Association; North Carolina State Bar and 
President Lenoir County Bar. Member International Association 
Insurance Counsel. Member Kinston Chamber Commerce, President, 
1929; Director Chamber Commerce and National Counsellor U. S. 
Chamber Commerce since 1934. President General Alumni Associa- 
tion, Duke University, 1943-1944; Director Farmers and Merchants 
Bank, 1930; Director, Commercial National Bank, 1940-1941; Presi- 
dent and Director Kinston Country Club. Judge City Recorder's 
Court, 1919-1920; City Attorney, 1939-1941. Air Service World 
War 1, November 1917-December 1918. Aviation Cadet. Kappa 
Sigma Fraternity. Mason; Sudan Temple of Mystic Shrine; Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks; Joseph Dixon Rountree 
Post, No. 43, American Legion. Methodist. Member Board of 
Stewards since 1916; Chairman Finance Committee many terms. 
Married Miss Clara Eoline Padrick, November 25, 1919. Two 
children: Romulus Alonzo Whitaker, Jr. and Neva Bidgood Whita- 
ker, Address : Kinston, N. C. 



REPRESENTATIVES 

OSCAR LEONARD RICHARDSON 

SPEAKER 

Oscar Leonard Richardson, Democrat, Representative from 
Union County, was born February 25, 1896. Son of Pinckney V. 
and Chloe J. (Lathan) Richardson. Graduate of Monroe High 
School; graduate of Trinity College, Durham, N. C, A.B., 1921; 
post graduate work at University of North Carolina. Trinity Col- 
lege Law School, 1922-1924. Lawyer. Member North Carolina State 
Bar and American Bar Associations. Clerk Superior Court of Union 
County, 1925-1934. Veteran of World War I; Foreign service 1917- 
1919; Member American Legion. Representative from Union Coun- 
ty in General Assembly of 1939, 1941 and 1943. Methodist. Mar- 
ried December 6, 1930 to Miss Sara Cowan, Two children: Sara 
Louise and O. L. Richardson, Jr. Address: Waxhaw Road, Mon- 
roe, N. C. 

RAY VON ALEXANDER 

Ray Von Alexander, Republican, Representative from Davie 
County, was born in Wilkes County, February 19, 1892. Son of 
Jesse Franklin and Lodemia (Caudill) Alexander. Attended high 
school; took correspondence courses in textile manufacture, pen- 
manship, labor management, production methods and civil service. 
Sample man in textiles. Member Davie County Defense Bond 
Committee; Patriotic Order Sons of America Defense Bond Com- 
mittee and Davie County Draft Advisory Committee. Secretary 
Patriotic Order Sons of America, 1923-1928, Camp No. 1; District 
President, Davie, Forsyth, Surry Association, 1933-1937; President 
Local Camp No. 56, 1938; Trustee since 1938. Attended nearly all 
State and District Conventions of Patriotic Sons of America since 
1928; served one year as conductor. Vice-Chairman in six War 
Loan Drives and two War Fund Drives for Davie County. Member 
Textile Workers Union since 1940; Secretary Local No. 251, 1941- 
1943. Labor member Appeals Panel, War Manpower commission. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1943. Baptist. Sunday 
School Superintendent, 1928; Secretary and Treasurer, 1933-1941; 
President Men's Bible Class, 1941-1942; Secretary Building Fund 

[ 396 ] 



Oscar L. Richardson 
Speaker 



Alexander of Davie 
Allen of Wake 
Allison of Jackson 



Arthur of Onslow 
Askew of Pamlico 

Averitt of Cumberland 



Barber of Chatham 
Barker of Durham 
Bell of Hyde 



Bender of Jones 
Bennett of Yancey 
Blalock of Anson 



Best of Cabarrus 

Boswood of Currituck 
Bridger of Bladen 




(^. g. ^ 




398 North Carolina Manual 

Committee for term 1940-1945; Chairman and Treasurer Baptist 
Boy Scout Troop No. 33, 1941-1942. Married Miss Lessie Privette, 
September 27, 1912. Four children: Opal, timekeeper for Erwin 
Mill No. 3; Corporal Marcus B., United States Army Air Corps 
since 1942; Maxine, bookkeeper, Ketner's, Inc.; Hazel, bookkeeper, 
Graham Manufacturing Company. Address: Cooleemee, N. C. 

JUNIUS LeROY ALLEN 

Junius LeRoy Allen, Democrat, Representative from Wake Coun- 
ty, was born in Wake County, January 10, 1894. Son of Junius 
LeRoy and Rosa (Fowler) Allen. Attended Wake Forest High 
School 1910; B.A., Wake Forest College 1915. Retail grocer. Mem- 
ber Chamber of Commerce; National Association of Retail Grocers; 
President North Carolina Food Dealers Association 1941; Execu- 
tive Secretary North Carolina Food Dealers Association and Editor, 
Carolina Food Dealer, 1942-1943; Executive Secretary Wake County 
Food Dealers Association 1938-1945; Member Board of Directors, 
North Carolina Merchants Association 1936-1941. Mason. Shriner. 
Member Kiwanis Club, President, 1934; Member House of Repre- 
sentatives 1941 and 1943. Methodist. Married Miss Ruth Couch 
1922. Two sons. Address: 15 S. Dawson St., Raleigh, N. C. 

DANIEL MOORE ALLISON 

Daniel Moore Allison, Democrat, Representative from Jackson 
County, was born in Webster, N. C, October 9, 1904. Son of Thomas 
Bragg and Eugenia (Moore) Allison. Graduated from Webster 
High School, 1921; Western Carolina Teachers College, 1921-1922; 
University of North Carolina 1922-1923. Automobile Dealer; 
Hardware and feed dealer; Gas and Oil Distributor. Clerk Su- 
perior Court Jackson County, 1930-1938. Mason; member Dills- 
boro Lodge No. 459. Member Sylva Rotary Club. Methodist; 
Steward. Married Miss Emma Johnson, February 6, 1926. Four 
children: Two girls and two boys. Address: Sylva, N. C. 

WILLIAM J. ARTHUR 

William J. Arthur, Democrat, Representative from Onslow 
County, was born January 4, 1911. Son of J. A. and Annie V. 
(Eudy) Arthur. Attended Charlotte High School; A.B, in Journal- 



Biographical Sketches 399 

ism, University North Carolina, 1933. Editor and Publisher, News 
and Views. President Kiwanis Club, 1944; member of Business 
Men's Club of Jacksonville, N. C; Lafayette Lodge No. 83, A. F. 
& A. M.; B. P. O. Elks, 784. Representative in the General As- 
sembly of 1943. Methodist. Sunday School Superintendent, 1942- 
43. Address: Jacksonville, N. C. 

EDWARD STEPHENSON ASKEW 

Edward Stephenson Askew, Democrat, Representative from 
Pamlico County, was born in Windsor, N. C, February 17, 1874. 
Son of Richard Watson and Elizabeth (Webb) Askew. Attended 
Windsor Academy, Norfolk Academy; Randolph-Macon College; 
A.B., University North Carolina, 1899, cum laude. Attended Uni- 
versity Law School and was licensed to practice law in 1907. 
Farmer. Chairman, Bertie County Democratic Executive Committee 
for twenty years; member North Carolina Fisheries Commission 
and Board of Conservation and Development for fourteen years. 
Trustee Greater University. Former Member State Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committe. State Senator in the General Assembly of 1927. 
Representative in 1943. Episcopalian. Married Miss Nellie Ashburn 
Bond, July 15, 1909. Four sons in service and one daughter. Ad- 
dress: Oriental, N. C. 

FRANKLIN MURPHY AVERITT 

Franklin Murphy Aveditt, Democrat, Representative form Cum- 
berland County, was born in Fayetteville, N. C, December 12, 
1911. Son of Herschell Strange and Cornelia Andrew (Culbreth) 
Averitt. Attended Fayetteville High School, 1924-1928; A.B. Wake 
Forest, 1932; Wake Forest Law School, 1934-1936. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber Cumberland County Bar Association and North Carolina State 
Bar. Mason, Phoenix Lodge, No. 8. Methodist; Steward, 1941-1943. 
Married Miss Carolyn Wooten Council, February 1, 1936. Three 
children: Cornelia Hern<;lon, Franklin Murphy, Jr. and Carolyn 
Council Averitt. Address: Fayetteville, N. C. 

WADE BARBER 

Wade Barber, Democrat, Representative form Chatham County, 
was born in Wilkes County, April 20, 1893. Son of Wade and Mary 
A. (Hayes) Barber, Attended Pittsboro High School; Guilford Col- 



400 North Carolina Manual 

lege, A.B., 1914; Law School, University of North Carolina. Law- 
yer. Representative in the General Assembly, 1925. State Senator, 
1939 and 1943. Chatham County Prosecuting Attorney, 1928-1938. 
Chairman, Democratic Executive Committee, Chatham County, 
1933-1938. Mason, thirty-second degree; Shrine. Presbyterian. Mar- 
ried Miss Agnes Ferrebee, June, 1923. Three children: Betty Scott, 
Mary Hayes, Wade Barber, Jr. Address: Pittsboro, N. C. 

OSCAR GARLAND BARKER 

Oscar Garland Barker, Democrat, Representative from Durham 
County, was born in Cary, Wake County, North Carolina, January 
12, 1896. Son of Brinkley Dickerson and Martha (Johnson) Bar- 
ker. Educated Durham City Schools and Trinity College, complet- 
ing law course at Trinity in 1923. Lawyer, specializing in consul- 
t£tion and civil practice. Member of North Carolina Bar Association 
and Durham County Bar Association. Durham Lodge Masons, No. 
352; Sudan Temple Mystic Shrine. Formerly newspaper Editor, 
having served with editorial staffs of Durham Herald, Durham Sun 
and Greensboro Record. Represented Durham County in North 
Carolina General Assembly in 1935, 1937, special session of 1938 
and 1943. Candidate for Congress in Sixth District in 1939 and 1941. 
Held numerous important legislative committee assignments and 
was Chairman Courts and Judicial Districts Committee in 1937. 
Serving second term as member Board of Trustees of the North 
Carolina College for Negroes, Durham, North Carolina. Baptist; 
Teacher Men's Bible Class First Baptist Chui'ch, Durham, which 
was named Barker Bible Class in 1941. Member Associate Board 
of Deacons. Married Miss Sarah Mae Terry, February 28, 1923. 
Address: Durham, N. C. 

CLIFTON LINWOOD BELL 

Clifton Linwood Bell, Democrat, Representative from Hyde Coun- 
ty, was born in that County, February 2, 1891. Son of Eugene and 
Delia S. (Swindell) Bell. Attended Hyde County Schools and Oak 
Ridge Institute, 1909-1912; University of North Carolina, 1912. Li- 
censed to practice law by N. C. Supreme Court, 1917. Lawyer. County 
Attorney; Clerk Superior Court about eight years. Chairman Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee about twenty years; Representative 
from Hyde County in the General Assembly of 1921. Appeal Agent, 



Biographical Sketches 401 

* 

Selective Service Act. Served in World War I. 60th Brigade, 30th 
Division, 119th Infantry, Company E. Twelve months over seas. 
In battle of Ypres; BelliCourt and Azincourt. Member Athenian 
Literary Society, Oak Ridge Institute. Mason; member Atlantic 
Lodge, No. 294, Swan Quarter. Address: Swan Quarter, N. C. 

ROBERT PHILEMON BENDER 

Robert Philemon Bender, Democrat, Representative from Jones 
County, was born in Jones County, near Pollocksville, January 1, 
1888. Son of Bryan and Lucy H. (Tolson) Bender. Attended Pol- 
locksville High School, 1911-1914; University of North Carolina 
Law School, 1914-1915. Lawyer. Member Jones County Board of 
Education, 1920-1926; Member Jones County Democratic Executive 
Committee 1918 to the present time. City Attorney, town of Pol- 
locksville, 1921-193L Permanent member Legal Advisory Board 
for Jones County during World War I. Chairman Jones County 
Young People's Democratic Clubs, 1928-1930. Secretary Jones Coun- 
ty Bar Association since July 1933. Served as Vice-President Fifth 
District Bar Association 1935-1937; and President Fifth District 
Bar Association 1937-1938. Woodman of the World;, Clerk of Ever- 
green Camp No. 184, Pollocksville, 1916-1933, inclusive. Member 
State House of Representative from Jones County, 1929, 1931, 1933, 
1935, 1939 and 1943. Presbyterian; Deacon 1917-1924; Elder since 
1924; Superintendent Sunday School 1921-1934, inclusive. President 
Jones County Sunday School Association, 1926 to the present time. 
Married Miss Mary McGee Edwards, September 19, 1917 (deceased). 
Married Miss Bonnie Mae Grimsley, February 14, 1943 (died Sep- 
tember 21, 1937). Married Miss Nellie H. Piner of Morehead City, 
November 30, 1939. Children: two sons, born of first marriage, 
Captain Robert P. Bender, Jr., of U. S. Army Air Corps, age 26, 
and Cpl. J. Virgil Bender of Army Quartermaster Corps, age 23. 
Address: Pollocksville, N. C. 

WILLIAM LEWIS BENNETT 

William Lewis Bennett, Democi-at, Representative from Yancey 
County, was born in Burnsville, N. C, December 25, 1883. Son of 
A. J. and Julia (Bailey) Bennett. Attended public schools of Yancey 
County; Yancey Collegiate Institute and Stanley McCormick, 1898- 
1902; Lincoln Memorial University, 1907; Medical Department, 



402 North Carolina Manual 

1911. Physician. Member Yancey County, and North Carolina Medi- 
cal Societies. Mason, Royal Arch, Knights Templar, Shriner. Rep- 
resentative in the General Assembly of 1943. Baptist. Married Miss 
Nellie Lucile Byrd, September 16, 1909. Six children: 3 boys and 
three girls. Capt. Van B. Bennett in Med Corps South Pacific. T-4 
Mark W. Bennett in the Engineering Dept. in France. Lt. Sam B. 
Bennett Killed in action over Germany, May 28, 1944. Address: 
Burnsville, N. C. 

URIAH BENTON BLALOCK 

Uriah Benton Blalock, Democrat, Representative from Anson 
County, was born in Norwood, North Carolina, April 26, 1873. Son 
of Merritt Edny and Hettie Rosana (Staton) Blalock. Attended 
Norwood High School to 1890; Horner's Military School 1891; Trini- 
ty College 1892-1894 — now Duke University. Farmer and Auto- 
mobile, Tractor and Implement Dealer. Member of Hardware 
Dealers Association of the Carolinas and at one time President. 
Member of Automobile Dealers Association of the Carolinas and 
served one term as President. Genei'al Manager of N. C. Cotton 
Growers Co-operative Association from 1922 to 1934, and Vice- 
President for three years and served as Public Director. President 
of American Cotton Co-operative Association of New Orleans, two 
years 1930 and 1931. President of Pee Dee Electric Membership 
Corporation, Wadesboro. President of Anson County Farm Bureau 
and a Director of the N. C. Farm Bureau Federation. Member of 
the N. C. and of the American Forestry Association. Member of 
Anson County Board of Education 1908-1912. Mayor of Wades- 
boro 1918-1919 and Food Administrator for Anson County during 
the World V/ar period. Representative in the North Carolina Gener- 
al Assembly 1939, 1941 and 1943. Mason. Methodist. Married Miss 
Monte Christian, Mt. Gilead, N. C, January 1906. On September 
18, 1918, married Miss Bessie Dunlap, of Ansonville, N. C. Three 
children: Mrs. Richard F. Roper, nee Monte Christian Blalock; U. 
Benton Blalock, Jr.; David Dunlap Blalock. Both now serving in U. 
S. Army in France. Address: Wadesboro, N. C. 

EUGENE THOMPSON HOST, JR. 

Eugene Thompson Bost, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Cabarrus County, was born in Cabarrus County, June 11, 1907. 
Son of E. T. and Zula A. (Hinshaw) Bost. Attended Mount Pleas- 



Biographical Sketches 403 

ant Collegiate Institute; Duke University, School of Law 1930- 
1933. Bachelor of Law. Lawyer. Member American Bar Associa- 
tion; North Carolina Bar Association. Eepresentative in the Gener- 
al Assembly of 1937, 1939, 1941 and 1943. Methodist. Mason. Mar- 
ried Miss Bernice Hahn, March 27, 1937. Address: Concord, N. C. 

GIDEON C. BOSWOOD 

Gideon C. Boswood, Democrat, Representative form Currituck 
County, was born in Gregory, N. C, January 31, 1891. Son of John 
H. and Ellen (Walker) Boswood. Attended the "Country" schools 
in Currituck County, 1897 to 1905, and Atlantic Collegiate Institute, 
Elizabeth City, N. C, September 1905 to May 1909. Farmer. Merch- 
ant. Dealer in farm products and owner and operator of a cotten 
gin until 1939. Fourth-class Postmaster from 1917 until 1938. Con- 
nected with inspection service Department of Agriculture since 1939. 
Member Currituck County School Board 1927 to 1938. Repre- 
sentative from Currituck County in 1939, 1941, and 1943. Methodist. 
Married Miss Josephine Etheridge Harrell, of Norfolk, Virginia, 
October 1st, 1943. Address: Gregory, N. C. 

JAMES ALBERT BRIDGER 

James Albert Bridger, Democrat, Representative from Bladen 
County, was born in Bladenboro, N. C, July 16, 1900. Son of Robert 
L. and Emma (Stone) Bridger. Attended Bladenboro High School; 
Horner Military School; Wake Forest College 1919-1921; LL.B.; 
Columbia University, 1921; Massey's Business College, Richmond, 
Virginia. Ford Dealer. Texaco Agency for Bladen and Columbus 
Counties. Vice-President of Bladenboro Cotton Mills, Inc. and 
Bridger Corporation. Farmer. Lawyer. Attorney for Bladenboro 
Cotton Mills. Representative in the General Assembly of 1927, 1941 
and 1943. Senator from the Tenth Senatorial District 1929. Chairman 
Democratic Executive Committee, Bladen County, 1939 ; Member of 
Democratic State Executive Committee; Mayor Bladenboro since 
1922; Chairman School Board since 1932; Private U. S. Army Rear 
Ranks, October 1 to December 11, 1918. Mason, Master, 1928; 
Shriner; Woodmen of the World; Rotarian. Trustee N. C. State 
College 1929 until consolidation; University Trustee. Baptist. Mar- 
ried Miss Elise M. Bridger, 1929. Three children. Address : Bladen- 
boro, N. C. 



404 North Carolina Manual 

DR. GEORGE W. BROWN 

George W. Brown, Democrat, Representative from Hoke County, 
was born at Brower's Mill, Randolph County, N. C, December 16, 
1871, Son of W. D. and Mary Elizabeth (Guthrie) Brown. Attended 
Public Schools and Shiloh Academy, 1892; Kentucky School of 
Medicine, Diploma, 1898. Physician. Honorary member Hoke County 
Medical Society and North Carolina Medical Society. Past President 
Hoke County Medical Society. Member County Board of Education, 
1915-1924, Chairman for the last four years. Coroner and County 
Physician and Mayor of Raeford since 1939. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1943. Presbyterian. Married Miss Lola K. 
Crump, May 5, 1905. Four children. Address: Raeford, N. C. 

J. PERCY BROWN 

J. Percy Brown, Democrat, Representative from Columbus Coun- 
ty, was born in Tabor City, N. C, November 8, 1898. Son of C. W. 
and Mary A. (Stephens) Brown. Attended Tabor City Graded 
Schools, 1905-1916. Clerk and Treasurer Town of Tabor City. 
Presbyterian. Married Miss Leona Groover, August 15, 1927. Ad- 
dress: Tabor City, N. C. 

JOHN PAT BUIE 

John Pat Buie, Democrat, Representative from Robeson County, 
was born in Red Springs, N. C, August 20, 1906. Son of Duncan 
Patrick and Cathryne Jane (Humphrey) Buie. Attended Philadel- 
phus High School, 1912-1923. Farmer. Chairman Board of Trustees, 
Philadelphus High School eight years; Chairman Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committee, Philadelphus Township, twelve years. Represen- 
tative from Robeson County, 1943. Presbyterian. Elder ten years. 
Address: Red Springs, N. C. 

SHERMAN EVERETT BURGESS 

Sherman Everett Burgess, Democrat, Representative 
from Camden County, was born in Old Trap, Cam- 
den County, N. C, December 5, 1908. Son of Willie H. and Eva 
Bell (Leary) Burgess. Attended Public Schools Camden County, 



Brown of Hoke 

Brown of Columbus 
Buie of Robeson 



Burgess of Camden 
Burgin of Henderson 
Burgiss of Alleghany 



Burns of Person 

Bynum of Cumberland 
Caveness of Guilford 



Chalk of Richmond 
Clark of Halifax 
Cohoon of Tyrrell 



Cover of Cherokee 
Craig of Buncombe 
Crawford of Graham 



Crissman of Guilford 

Currie of Moore 

Davis of Pitt 







^j 



406 North Carolina Manual 

1914-1925. A.B. Duke University, 1934. Taught in Public Schools 
of Camden County, 1932-1942. Farmer. Member Elizabeth City 
Kotary Club. Mason, Member Widow's Son Lodge No. 75, Cam- 
den, N. C; Past Master 1942; District Deputy Grand Master; 
New Bern Consistory No. 3; Sudan Temple A. A. O. N. 
M. S. of New Bern ; Scottish Rite Service Award Medal Club. Mem- 
ber War Price Administration Board, Camden County; Chairman 
County Chapter American Red Cross since 1937; Chairman United 
War Fund Drive for Camden County, 1943 and 1944. Methodist. 
Sunday School teacher. Married Miss Lorraine Sawyer April 2, 1937. 
Three children: Everett Duke, age 5; David Sawyer, age 4; and 
Diane Burgess, age one. Address: Belcross, N. C. 

LAWRENCE LEE BURGIN 

Lawrence Lee Burgin, Democrat, Representative from Hender- 
son County, was born in Henderson County, August 3, 1893. Son 
of J. H. and Josephine Lee Burgin. Educated in the County Schools, 
the Westminster School, and Davidson College. Farmer. Representa- 
tive in the General Assembly of 1937, 1939, 1941 and 1943. A.E.F. 
Presbyterian. Elder. Married Miss Mary Osborne, September 3, 1919, 
three children : Lawrence Lee Burgin, Jr., Joseph Osborne Burgin, 
and Virginia Douglas Burgin. Address: Horse Shoe, N. C. 

THOMAS ROY BURGISS 

Thomas Roy Burgiss, Democrat, Representative from Alleghany 
County, was born at Jennings, N. C, February 6, 1904. Son of 
Thomas E. and Ella (Parks) Burgiss. Attended Elkin Schools; 
Ph.G., University North Carolina, 1925. Druggist. Secretary and 
Treasurer North Carolina Rexall Druggist, 1932-1942. Chairman, 
Alleghany County Democratic Executive Committee, 1927-1929; 
Mayor, Sparta, 1929-1931; Chairman, City School Committee, 1931- 
1935; Chairman, Alleghany Board of Education, 1938-1942; Chair- 
man, Alleghany County Rationing Board, 1942. Representative in 
the General Assembly of 1943, 2nd Vice President of N. C. Pharma- 
ceutical Association. Baptist. Deacon, 1930-1942. Married Miss 
Lora Reeves, August 20, 1926. Children: Patsy Roy and Tommy 
Address: Sparta, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 407 

ROBERT PASCHAL BURNS 

Robert Paschal Burns, Democrat, Representative from Person 
County, was born in Pittsboro, N. C, May 19, 1899. Son of Augustus 
Merrimon and Eva Matilda (Paschal) Burns. Attended Roxboro 
Public Schools, 1906-1915; B.A., Wake Forest College 1919; LL.B., 
1920. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association and North 
Carolina State Bar. Mayor, Roxboro 1927-1929; County Attorney, 
Person County, 1921-1924 and 1930-1942; Chairman County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee 1923-1924; Member County Board of 
Education 1925-1926. Member S.A.T.C, Wake Forest College, 1918. 
County Attorney, Person County, 1921-1924 and 1930-1944. Member 
House of Representatives 1941 and 1943. Baptist. Married Miss 
Marjorie Dearing Lacy, August 27, 1932. Three children: Bobbie, 
Paul and Norvel Edward. Address : Roxboro, N. C. 

THOMAS CLIFFORD BYNUM 

Thomas Clifford Bynum, Democrat, Representative from Cum- 
berland County, was born in Vass, Moore County, N. C, October 
7, 1885. Son of John Thomas and Mary Alice (Bailey) Bynum. 
Attended private school of Dr. E. W. Snead, 1897-1900. Short 
courses in Fertilizer and Agriculture at A and E College, 1921, 
1922, and 1923. Farmer. Worked with Swift and Company, Chicago 
packers, 1907-1912; Morris and Co., St Louis packers, 1912-1919; 
"Virginia Carolina Chemical Company, 1919-1931; East Coast 
Fertilizer Co., Wilmington, N. C, 1931-1938. Mason, member Le- 
banon Lodge No. 391. Methodist; Steward; District layman; teach- 
er adult classes for past ten years. Married Miss Marjorie Autley, 
of Orangeburg, S. C, 1919. Address: Hope Mills, N. C. RED No. 1. 

SHELLEY B. CAVENESS 

Shelley B. Caveness, Democrat, Representative from Guilford 
County, was born in Randolph County, August 9, 1901. Son of L F. 
and Mary Anne (Bray) Caveness. Attended Greensboro High 
School 1916-1920; University of North Carolina 1924. Lawyer. 
Member Greensboro and North Carolina Bar Associations; Kiwanis 
Club; Judge pro tern Greensboro Municipal Court 1929-1931; Judge 
Civil Division Greensboro Municipal Court 1931-33. Lambda Chi 



408 North Carolina Manual 

Alpha College Fraternity; Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks; Exalted Ruler Elks, 1931-32, District Deputy 1932-33; Ma- 
son; Shriner. Major North Carolina State Guard. Member House of 
Representatives 1941 and 1943. Methodist. Married Miss Elizabeth 
Albright, September 27, 1929. Address: Greensboro, N. C. 

JOHN DELBER CHALK 

John Delber Chalk, Democrat, Representative from Richmond 
County, v^^as born in Lutherville, Md. Son of John D. and Junetta 
(Cockey) Chalk. Attended Baltimore County Schools, 1890-1901; 
Bryant and Stratton Business College, Baltimore, Md. Banker, 
Realtor and Farmer. Commissioner of Game and Inland Fisheries, 
1934-1941. President International Association of Game and Fish 
Commissioners, 1940; President Richmond Insurance and Realty 
Company since 1924. Author of conservation articles for magazines 
and newspaper. Methodist. Married Miss Bessie May Watson, 
November 10, 1915. One son, John D. Chalk, Jr., Lt in Army. Ad- 
dress: Rockingham, N. C. 

IRWIN CLARK 

Irw^in Clark, Democrat, Representative from Halifax County, 
was born in Hamilton, N. C, November 12, 1891. Son of Dr. Henry 
Irwin and Aleathia (Barrow) Clark. Attended Scotland Neck High 
School, 1907; N. C. State, 1909-1910. Studied law under Judge Geo. 
P. Pell. Lawyer. Member Halifax County Bar Association. Lieuten- 
ant United States Naval Reserve, 1917-1921. Mason; Past Master 
Scotland Neck Lodge. Past Commander Roanoke Post Number 34, 
American Legion; Member State Executive Committee, 1925-1927; 
State Vice Commander, 1928. Episcopalian; Vestrayman, 1943. 
Marred Miss Mary Jane Carroll, June 15, 1932. Address: Scotland 
Neck, N. C. 

C. EARL COHOON 

C. Earl Cohoon, Democrat, Representative from Tyrrell County, 
was born in Columbia, N. C, October 4, 1899. Son of Andrew Jack- 
son and Lillian Deleval (Calhoun) Cohoon. Attended Elizabeth 
City High School 1913-1917; Porter Military Academy, Charleston, 
S. C, 1918-1920; Eastman-Gaines Business College, Poughkeepsie, 



Biographical Sketches 409 

N. Y., 1920-1921. Jobber of Petroleum Products; Deputy Sheriff, 
Tyrrell County, 1922-1926; Member Board of Aldermen, Columbia, 
N. C, 1926-1930; Member Board of Education, Tyrrell County, 1936- 
1938; Chairman 1938-1940; President Men's Club, Columbia, N. C, 
1939-1940; Vice President Southern Albemarle Association 1935- 
1942; Mason; Thirty-second Degree; Blue Lodge — Perseverance No. 
59, Plymouth, N. C; Consistory No. 3, New Bern, N. C; Shrine; 
Sudan Temple, New Bern, N. C. Member House of Representatives 
1941 and 1943. Episcopalian; Vestryman 1921-1942; Church Treas- 
urer 1921-1924; Junior Warden 1924-1942. Married Miss Blanche M. 
Walker, December 18, 1921. Two children: Sara Ann, born De- 
cember 3, 1930, and Lillian Gail Cohoon, born September 1, 1939. 
Address: Columbia, N. C. 

LILLIAN MAYFIELD COVER 

Lillian Mayfield Cover, Democrat, Representative from Cherokee 
County, was born in Murphy, N. C, October 8, 1890. Daughter of 
A. M. and Ella (Mayfield) Brittain. Attended Schools of Murphy; 
graduated from high school, 1906; graduated from Davenport 
College, 1908. Home maker and farmer. Delegate National Con- 
vention, 1924; Member State Executive Committee; Vice Chairman 
Democratic County Committee. Member Cullowhee School Board, 
1925-1937; Member County Board of Education, 1932-1942. Dis- 
trict President United Daughters of the Confederacy; President 
Cherokee County Chapter; member Daughters of the American 
Revolution. President Woman's Club. Representative from Chero- 
kee County in the General Assembly of 1943. Methodist. Organist 
for Lutheran Church. Married Giles William Cover, 1908. Three 
children: G. W., Jr., Jane Mayfield, and Eleanor Cover. Address: 
Andrews, N. C. 

GEORGE WINSTON CRAIG 

George Winston Craig, Democrat, Representative from Buncombe 
County, was born in that county June 18, 1894. Son of Locke and 
Annie (Burgin) Craig. Attended public and private schools of 
Asheville and Webb School, Bellbuckle, Tennessee, 1911; Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, 1912-1916; Wake Forest Law School, 1916. 
Lawyer. First Lieutenant United States Army, Tank Corps, 1917- 



410 North Carolina Manual 

1919. Member Board of Education, 1925. Referee in Bankruptcy. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1935, 1937 and 1943. 
Married Miss Kathryne Taylor, June 8, 1921. Children Kathryne 
Taylor Craig, and Mary Locke Craig. Addi-ess: Asheville, N. C. 

DR. JAMES HUAL CRAWFORD 

James Hual Crawford, Democrat, representative from Graham 
County, was born in Clay County, June 27, 1866. Son of James W. 
and Eugenia (Poteet) Crawford. Attended preparatory schools 
1870 to 1882; M.D., University of Chattanooga, Tennessee, 1894. 
Doctor. Coroner Cherokee County, 1910. Representative from Gra- 
ham County in the special session of the General Assembly, 1938 
and Regular session 1939. Mason; Blue Lodge; Shriner; Odd Fel- 
lows. Baptist. Married Miss Hattie Long March 9, 1888. Five chil- 
dren, three sons and two daughters. Address: Robbinsville, N. C. 

WALTER EDGAR CRISSMAN 

Walter Edgar Crissman, Democrat, Representative from Guil- 
ford County, was born in Surry County, N. C, December 11, 1902. 
Son of Charles E. and Ollie (Huff) Crissman. Attended High Point 
High School and graduated in 1922. A.B. University North Caro- 
lina, 1926; University Law School. Lawyer. Member N. C. State 
Bar and High Point Bar Association. Vice-chairman Democratic 
Executive Committee of Guilford County, 1933-1942;; Chairman 
High Point Democratic Executive Committee, 1933-1942. Junior 
Order United American Mechanics; Trustee of State Enrollment 
Fund and Trustee of Orphan's Home. Baptist; Superintendent 
Sunday School since 1938. Married Miss Wilma Planzer, April 6, 
1935. Address: High Point, N. C. 

WILBUR HOKE CURRIE 

Wilbur Hoke Currie, Democrat, Representative from Moore Coun- 
ty, was born in Carthage, N. C, October 6, 1896. Son of John 
Lauchlin and Mary Belle (Mclver) Currie. Attended Carthage 
Schools; High School, 1914; University of North Carolina, 1915- 
1916. Manager J. L. Cui-rie Co.; President and Treasurer Currie 
Mills, Commissioner Town of Carthage, 1922-1926; Mayor, 1926- 



Biographical Sketches 411 

1930; Chairman Moore County Board of Commissioners, 1930-1942. 
Joined Naval Reserves, 1918, not called. Member Phi Kappa Phi; 
Mason, Shriner. Presbyterian. Elder; Sunday School Superinten- 
dent for twenty-two years. Senator from the Twelfth Senatorial 
District in General Assembly of 1943. Married Miss Elizabeth 
Woltz, 1926, deceased August 25th, 1943. Five children: Mary 
Elizabeth, Katherine Mclver, Ann Woltz, Ruth Douglas and John 
Lauchlin. Address: Carthage, N. C. 

GEORGE W. DAVIS 

George W. Davis, Democrat, Representative from Pitt County, 
was born in Hawthorne, Florida, August 4, 1897. Son of George 
Washington and Mary I (Weathersby) Davis. Finished public 
schools of Florida in 1915. Farmer. Member Chamber Commerce; 
Member Pitt County Farm Bureau; Past President Rotary Club 
of Farmville; President Farmville Country Club, 1937-1942. Com- 
missioner Town of Farmville, Chairman Board, 1933-1937; Mayor, 
1937-1945. Member Selectve Service Draft Board No. 1 of Pitt 
County; Chairman Civilian Defense since 1941; Chairman Fifth 
and Sixth War Bond Drive for Farmville Township. Chairman 
Farmvlle Democratic Party. Member Board of Directors of the 
Bank of Farmville since 1937. Manager and buyer dry goods de- 
partment of R. L. Davis & Bros., General Merchants, 1918-1938. 
Mason; Master Lodge No. 517, 1928-1929; Councilor, J.O.U.A.M., 
1931-1932. Baptist. Deacon since 1923; Sunday School Superin- 
tendent since 1925; Teacher Young People's Class for twenty-five 
years; Trustee since 1941; B. T. U. Director, 1944. Married Miss 
Lila E. Lee, February 23, 1927. Three children: Harry Lee, age 
17; Cedric, age 14, and Gerald, age 9. Address: Farmville, N. C. 

HAYDEN AUGUSTUS DEAL 

Hayden Augustus Deal, Republican, Representative from Alexan- 
der County, was born in that county November 15, 1904. Son of 
David Pinkney and Martha Ellen (Frye) Deal. Attended School for 
Church Workers Lenoir Rhyne College, 1930 and 1934. Attended 
three sessions of Farm Preparatory School. Farmer. Member Farm- 
ers Cooperative Purchasing Association. Lutheran. Church Treas- 
urer, 1920-1934; Deacon since 1934; Director Church music since 



412 North Carolina Manual 

1925. Representative in the General Assembly of 1943. Married 
Miss Vida Eva Deal, December 25, 1923. Children: Mabel, Thelma, 
David, and Samuel Deal. Address: Taylorsville, R.F.D. 1. 

DAVID P. DELLINGER 

David P. Delling-er, Democrat, Representative from Gaston Coun- 
ty, was born in same county. Son of John C. and Barbara (Glenn) 
Dellinger, a relative of the late Governor Robert B. Glenn. Attend- 
ed Sylvanus Erwin Normal Institute, Waco, 1893-1896, after at- 
tending the public schools. Graduated from Rutherford College 
(Old), A.B. degree, 1897-99. Attended University of North Caro- 
lina Law School, 1900. Licensed by the Supreme Court, September 
1900. Lawyer. Delivered Alumni Address, Rutherford College, com- 
mencement 1912 and again in 1926. Mayor of Cherryville 1901-02, 
and 1933-35. City Attorney 1900-1935. Clerk to Committee on Fi- 
nance 1909. Member House of Representatives, regular and extra 
sessions 1912-13. Reading Clerk House of Representatives 1915, 
1917, 1919, 1921, 1923, 1927. Member House of Representatives 
1925, 1937, and 1943. Chairman Committee on Insurance 1925. Chair- 
man Committee on Propositions and Grievances 1937. Masonic 
Lodge life member; Royal Arch Mason; Knights Templar; Oasis 
Temple Shrine; Past Chancellor Commander Knights of Pythias; 
D.O.K.K.; Junior Order United American Mechanics; Improved Or- 
der of Red Men; Member all Scottish Rite Bodies, 32nd degree, 
K.C.C.H. Served Cherryville Masonic Lodge over 22 years and 
.now serving as Master; Past District Deputy Grand Master 28th 
District. Past Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of Ari- 
zona, 12 years. Baptist. Baptist Sunday School Superintendent 20 
years. Organizer and Clerk Gaston County Baptist Association of 
45 churches and 17,000 members; Clerk of Association 19 years, 
Executive Vice President Rhyne-Houser Manufacturing Company 
Local Counsel Seaboard Air Line Railway since 1913. Married Miss 
Grace Abernethy of Rutherford College in 1903. One child, Mrs. 
Howard Hamrick of New Orleans, La. One grandchild. Address: 
Cherryville, N. C. 

HENRY CORNELIUS DOBSON 

Henry Cornelius Dodson, Democrat, Representative from Surry 
County, was born in Rockford, N. C, March 12, 1897. Son of John 



Deal of Alexander 
Bellinger of Gaston 
Dobson of Surry 



Edwards of Greene 
Edwards of Swain 
Eggers of Watauga 



Evans of Hertford 
Fields of Avery 

Fisher of Transylvania 



{ 



Fountain of Edgecombe 
Gantt of Durham 
Gass of Forsyth 



Gibbs of Carteret 
Gobble of Forsyth 
Goodman of Mecklenburg 



Graham of Robeson 
Griffin of Martin 
Grimes of Beaufort 




Ak 



^v^ 







414 North Carolina Manual 

Hamlin and Alice Price (Cornelius) Dobson. Attended common 
schools of Surry County and Winston-Salem High School. Manu- 
facturer. Seaman Signalman United States Navy, 1917-1918. Mem- 
ber American Legion. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1935, 1939, 1941 and 1943. Methodist. Married Miss Octavia Ray 
Blake September 18, 1928. Two children: Anna Katharine and Alice 
Blake Dobson. Address: Elkin, N. C. 

ALONZO CLAY EDWARDS 

Alonzo Clay Edwards, Democrat, Representative from Greene 
County, was bom at Hookerton, N. C, September 29, 1904. Son 
of Dr. G. C. and Catherine (Herman) Edwards. Attended schools 
of Hookerton 1910-1921; Trinity College (now Duke University) 
1921-1924. Farmer. Member Greene County Agricultural Adjust- 
ment Administration Committee 1935-1940; Chairman 1938-1940; 
Representative Greenville Production Credit Association 1936-1940; 
North Carolina Farm Bureau State Membership Chairman 1942-1944 
and Member of State Executive Committee 1937-1944; Representa- 
tive from North Carolina to the National Farm Bureau Convention 
1938. Director Peanut Growers Co-operative 1942-1945; Director 
Coastal Plain Soil Conservation District 1942-1945; Commissioner 
Town of Hookerton 1931-1940; Chairman United War Fund for 
Greene County 1943-1944; Mason, Jerusalem Lodge No. 95, A. F. 
& A. M.; Knights Templar; Royal Arch Masons; Sudan Temple, 
A. A. O. N. M. Shrine; Junior Order United American Mechanics; 
Trustee Jr. O. U. A. M. Children's Home, Lexington, N. C, 1941- 
1944; State Councilor 1944-1945; B. P. O. of Elks; Lambda Chi Al- 
pha; State Board of Education, 1943-1944; Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1941 and 1943. Methodist; Steward 1928- 
1945, Charge Lay Leader Hookerton Circuit 1935-1945; Sunday 
School Superintendent 1942-1945. Married Miss Bettie Hardy Tay- 
lor, February 20, 1935. One child, Alonzo Clay Edwards, Jr. Ad- 
dress: Hookerton, N. C. 

McKINLEY EDWARDS 

McKinley Edwards, Democrat, Representative from Swain Coun- 
ty, was born in Madison County, March 27, 1895. Son of W. M. and 
Annie (Morgan) Edwards. Attended Mars Hill High School 1907- 
1912; Mars Hill College 1912-1916; Wake Forest College 1916-1920; 



Biographical Sketches 415 

LL.B., 1920. Lawyer. Councillor North Carolina State Bar for 
Twentieth Judicial District 1936-1938. Judge, Swain County Re- 
corder's Court, 1928-1932; Member Board of Aldermen, Bryson 
Cty, 1932-1936; Chairman. County Attorney 1924-1928; Attorney 
town of Bryson City since 1936. Chairman Swain County Civilian 
Defense Council. Corporal U. S. Marine Corps, World War I. Rep- 
resentative in the General Assembly of 1941-1943. Baptist; Deacon 
since 1920, chairman for twelve years; Church clerk; Member Bap- 
tist State Board since 1939; President Bryson City Baptist Brother- 
hood since 1937; Teacher Men's Bible Class Bryson City Baptist 
Church since 1937. Moderator Tennessee River Baptist Association, 
1940-1944. Married Miss Annie Mae Angel, May 10, 1918. Children: 
Herman Vance, Helen Laura, Annie Marie and Francis Louise. Ad- 
dress: Bryson City, N. C. 

STACY CLYDE EGGERS, SR. 

Stacy Clyde Eggers, Sr., Republican, Representative from Wa- 
tauga County, was born in Forest Grove, N. C, April 17, 1890. 
Son of Ensley R. and Lucinda M. (Johnson) Eggers. Attended 
Watauga County Public Schools, 1897-1908; Cove Creek High School, 
1909; Appalachian Training School, 1909-1912. Farmer and Real 
estate Broker. Taught in Public Schools of Watauga County, 1911 
and 1912. Member Boone Chamber of Commerce. Chairman Board 
of County Commissioners, 1924-1926; Bookkeeper, Sheriff's office, 
four years; County Tax Assessor; United States Commissioner. 
Merchant. President and Secretary-Treasurer, Sugar Grove Na- 
tional Farm Loan Association; Chairman Board of Directors, Moun- 
tain Burley Tobacco Warehouse; Member Board of Directors, 
Wilkesboro National Farm Loan Association; Secretary-Treasurer, 
Boone Tobacco Board of Trade; Member Board of Directors Wa- 
tauga Fair Association. Mason, Thirty-second degree. Baptist. 
Sunday School teacher for the past twenty-five years; Moderator 
Three Forks Association 1940-1944; Member General Board Bap- 
tist State Convention, since 1942. Married Miss Nora South, De- 
cember 3, 1913. Four children: First Lieutenant E. Morris Eggers, 
Air Corps; Christine Eggers, Army Supply Depot, Aberdeen, Mary- 
land; Corporal Stacy C. Eggers, Jr., Air Corps (somewhere in In- 
dia); Margaret Eggers, student at Mars Hill College. Address: 
Boone, N. C. 



416 North Carolina Manual 

MERRILL EVANS 

Merrill Evans, Democrat, Representative Hertford County, was 
born at Grandy, N. C, Currituck County, February 26, 1904. Son 
of Jesse Jarvis and Sirley (Woodhouse) Evans. Attended Elemen- 
tary School, Grandy, Currituck County, 1910-1917; Poplar Branch 
High School, 1917-1921; B.A. Degree William and Mary College, 
Williamsburg, Va., 1925. State Senator, First District, 1941-1943. 
Chairman, Board of Trustees Chowan College. Rotarian. Dealer in 
Fertilizers. Operator Motor Trucks. Baptist. Member Board of 
Deacons, Ahoskie Baptist Church. Married Miss Margaret Irene 
Smith of Fayette, Mississippi, January 18, 1930. Children: Andre 
Evans, age twelve years; Mei-rill Jarvis Evans, age seven. Ad- 
dress: Ahoskie, N. C. 

WILLARD RAYMON FIELDS 

Willard Raymon Fields, Republican, Representative from Avery 
County, was born in Shell Creek, Tenn., June 3, 1899. Son of Jason 
A. and Nancy Lucintha (Winters) Fields. Attended Elk Park, N. 
C. and Johnson City, Tenn., High Schools and graduated in 1918; 
also State Teachers College, Johnson City, Tenn., Catawba 
College, Salisbury, N. C; Appalachian State Teachers 
College, Boone, N. C, 1938; post graduate work University of 
North Carolina, 1942. Avery County Accountant. Teacher in pub- 
lic schools of this State for twenty-three years. Mason, Cranberry 
Lodge, No. 598 A. F. & A. M.; Senior Warden; R. D. Keller Chap- 
ter No. 214, Royal Arch Masons; Holston Council No. 101, Royal 
and Select Masters; Past Patron Order of Eastern Star; Junior 
Order United American Mechanics. Latter Day Saints. Married 
Miss Minnie F. Estes, 1920. Four children: Mrs. Beatrice Fields 
Greer, Williard R., Jr., killed in action in North Africa, September 
5, 1942, Tellis J., now in the army, and Carrol Faye. Address: Elk 
Park, N. C. 

RALPH RUDOLPH FISHER 

Ralph Rudolph Fisher, Republican, Representative from Transyl- 
vania County, was born in Greenville, S. C, February 3, 1892. Son 
of Dr. W. C. and Rhoda Emma (Walker) Fisher. Attended Col- 
umbus Institute, 1903-1904; Furman Fitting School, Greenville, 



Biographical Sketches 417 

S. C, 1909-1910; Mars Hill College, 1910-1914; Wake Forest Col- 
lege, 1917. Lawyer. Practiced law 1917-1935. Business man and 
farmer. Superintendent Transylvania Pipe Company of Brevard, 
affiliate of Kaywoodie Company, New York; engaged in stock rais- 
ing- and farming. President Brevard Chamber Commerce, 1941; 
Vice President Lion's Club, Brevard, 1944-1945. Sei-ved in World 
War I, 1917-1919. Commander Munroe Wilson Post 88, American 
Legion, 1940-1941; District Commander 19th District N. C. Depart- 
ment, 1942-1945; Delegate to National Convention at Omaha, Neb., 
1943. Noble Grande in Odd Fellows; Council Commander, Wood- 
men of the World. Chairman Republican County Executive Com- 
mittee; Delegate to Republican National Convention at Philadelphia, 
1940. Member First Baptist Church, Brevard. Married Miss Thel- 
ma Richardson, of Marion, Va., Jan. 31, 1923. Address: Brevard, 
N. C. 

BENJAMIN EAGLES FOUNTAIN 

Benjamin Eagles Fountain, Democrat, Representative from Edge- 
combe County, was born in that county, January 17, 1897. Son of 
Almon L. and Louisa (Eagles) Fountain. Attended Edgecombe 
County Schools and Tarboro High School; John Graham Prepara- 
tory School, Warrenton, 1915-1917; University North Carolina, 1917- 
1918; Law School, 1921-1923. Lawyer. Member Rocky Mount and 
N. C. Bar Associations. Member Board of Trustees, Rocky Mount 
City Schools, since 1934; Government Appeal Agent, Local Draft 
Board No. 2, Edgecombe County, 1940-1942. Served in U. S. Navy, 
1918; member American Legion; Commander Coleman Pitt Post, 
1927-1928. Presbyterian. Deacon since 1937, chairman Board of 
Deacons 1941-1942. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1943. Married Miss Emmie Jane Green, June 14, 1928. Children: 
Benjamin Eagles, Jr., Arthur Green and Jane Bryson. Address: 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 

ROBERT MELVIN GANTT, SR. 

Robert Melvin Gantt, Sr., Democrat, Representative from Dur- 
ham County, was born in Belwood, Cleveland County, N. C, Febru^ 
ary 10, 1886. Son of Melvin Puckett and Georgianna (Jones) 
Gantt. Attended Belwood Institute, Cleveland County, from school 



418 North Carolina Manual 

age until entering college in 1904. A.B. Trinity College (now Duke 
University) June 1909; Law School 1910-1912. Lawyer. Member 
Durham County Bar Association, President, 1935-1936; Member 
North Carolina Bar Association and North Carolina State Bar. 
Formerly member American Bar Association. State Director Na- 
tional Emergency Council, 1935-1937. Member State Guard, 1907- 
1909. Junior Order United American Mechanics, Councillor for 
State, 1925-1926. Methodist. Married Miss Kathryn Claywell, De- 
cember 16, 1914. Three children: Mrs. J. Carl Clamp, Robert Mel- 
vin Gantt, Jr., and Samuel Fox Gantt. Address: 1007 Gloria Ave- 
nue, Durham, N. C. 

MARSHALL REX GASS 

Marshall Rex Gass, Democrat, Representative from Forsyth 
County, was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, December 8, 1879. Son 
of William and Rebecca Adeline (Fox) Gass. Received his educa- 
tion at Knoxville, Tennessee. Tobacconist. Past Member and Di- 
rector of the Chamber of Commerce; Past President of the Virginia- 
North Carolina Warehousemen's Association. Vice President Win- 
ston-Salem Tobacco Board of Trade, 1931. Representative in the 
General Assembly 1937, 1939, 1941 and 1943. Methodist. Married 
Miss Bessie Mae Lloyd, December 24, 1912. Two children: Rex, 
Jr., and Ralph. Address: Winston-Salem, N. C. 

HENRY SYLVESTER GIBBS 

Henry Sylvester Gibbs, Democrat, Representative from Carteret 
County was born in New Bern, N. C, April 28, 1895. Son of Henry 
Len and Olier Thatch (Farrow) Gibbs. Attended Warrenton High 
School 1911-1914; University of North Carolina 1914-1915. Real 
Estate Dealer and Insurance. Mayor of Morehead City 1933-1939; 
Chairman Carteret County ABC Board 1939-1940; Member More- 
head City Port Commission 1939-1942. Yeoman, U. S. NRF., Fifth 
Naval District 1917-1919. President North Carolina Committee on 
Coastal Defense 1940; President, Morehead City Rotary Club 1940; 
President, Morehead City Community Assistance (Welfare) 1940. 
Member House of Representatives 1941 and 1943. Episcopalian. 
Married Miss Lucille Leary, December 20, 1917. Two children: H. 
S. Gibbs, Jr., born January 9, 1919, and Eric Gregg Gibbs, bom 
November 18, 1921. Address: Morehead City, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 419 

FLEETUS LEE GOBBLE 

Fleetus Lee Gobble, Democrat, Representative from Forsyth Coun- 
ty, was born in Davidson County, N. C, January 1, 1891. Son of 
John H. and Frances (Foster) Gobble. Attended Public Schools 
Davidson County 1897-1910. Entered Atlanta Barber College Janu- 
ary 2, 1911 and completed course. Barber. Barber and Beauty 
School Operator. Member Associated Master Barbers of America; 
President State Association Master Barbers 1934-1935. Member 
Educational and Legislative Committee since 1935. Member Wil- 
son Democratic Club. Member House of Representatives 1941 and 
1943. Methodist. Treasurer 1926-1928; President Men's Bible Class 
1925-1926; Board of Stewards 1925-1932. Married Miss Blanche 
Evans. Three children: Juanita, Dr. Fleetus L., Jr., and James F. 
Address: Route 4, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ARTHUR GOODMAN 

Arthur Goodman, Democrat, Representative from Mecklenburg 
County, was born in Portsmouth, Virginia, March 12, 1897. Son of 
Solomon and Sophia (Steel) Goodman. Attended Grammar and High 
School, Portsmouth, Va., until 1916; private business college, Nor- 
folk, Va., 1916; Duke Law School, 1930-1932. Lawyer. Member 
American Bar Association; N. C. Bar Association; Mecklenburg 
County Bar Association. Life Member Mecklenburg County Humane 
Society, President, 1938-1944. Member Piedmont Kennel Club; 
President, 1941. Member Executive Board, Mecklenburg County 
Boy Scout Council. President N. C. Association of Jewish Men, 
1935-1939. Sailor U. S. Navy, 1917, 1918. Gamma Eta Gamma 
Legal Fraternity. Phalanx Masonic Lodge; Oasis Shi-ine; B'nai 
B'rith; Forty and Eight, American Legion; Adjutant Hornet Nest 
Post No. 9,; 1938 War Dads; Life member Disabled American Veter- 
ans, N. C. State Commander, 1941 ; Commander Queen City Chapter 
No. 10, 1939. Synagogue. Secretary Hebrew United Brotherhood, 
1934-1939; President, 1939-1940; Member Executive Board, Temple 
Beth El, Charlotte, 1942-1943. Married Miss Katherine Cohen, 
Buffalo, N. Y., July 8, 1924. Two children: Elizabeth, student at 
NCCW; Arthur, Jr., U. S. Navy. Address: Route 2, Providence 
Read, Charlotte, N. C. 



420 North Carolina Manual 

IPPIE P. GRAHAM 

Ippie P. Graham, Democrat, Representative from Robeson Coun- 
ty, was born in Proctorville, N. C, 1890. Son of Charles William and 
Mary (Hedgpeth) Graham. Attended Stinson Institute, 1906-1910; 
King's Business College, 1911-1912. Recorder Fairmont District 
Court. Farmer. Proprietor of cotton gin. Member Rotary Club. 
Mayor town of Proctorville. World War, 1917-1919. Mason, past 
and present Master. Cashier Bank of Proctorville, 1913-1917; 1920- 
1922. Representative in the General Assembly of 1939 and 1943. 
Baptist. Sunday School Superintendent Proctorville Baptist Church. 
Married Miss Athesa Powell, October 1920. Three children: Paul, 
Hal, and Stennette. Address: Proctorville, N. C. 

CLARENCE WALTON GRIFFIN 

Clarence Walton Griffin, Democrat, Representative from Martin 
County, was born in Williamston, N. C, April 11, 1912. Son of Wil- 
liam Jesse and Mary Eliza (Roberson) Griffin. Attended Griffin's 
School 1919-1927; Farm Life School 1927-1930; Williamston High 
School 1930; Washington Collegiate Institute 1931. A.B., University 
of North Carolina 1935; LL.B. 1937. Lawyer. Speaker Philanthropic 
Literary Society, University of North Carolina 1935, Winner Robert 
W, Bingham Debating Medal at the University 1934, and of the Mary 
D. Wright Memorial Debating Medal in 1933. Member Lions Club, 
Williamston. General law practice since 1938 in Williamston, N. C. 
Member House of Representatives 1941 and 1943. Address: Wil- 
liamston, N. C. 

BRYAN GRIMES 

Bryan Grimes, Democrat, Representative from Beaufort County, 
was born in Washington, D. C, July 24, 1905. Son of Junius Daniel 
and Ida Catherine (Wharton) Grimes. Attended Episcopal High 
School, Alexandria, Virginia, 1921-1924. A.B., University North 
Carolina, 1929; University Law School, 1927; Wake Forest College 
Law School, 1933-34. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Asso- 
ciation, North Carolina State Bar and Beaufort County Bar Asso- 
ciation. Zeta Psi Fraternity. Episcopalian. Vestryman. Represen- 
tative in the General Assembly of 1943. Married Miss Bobby Mus- 
grave, February 5, 1938. Two children: Bryan, Jr., and William 
Demsie Grimes. Address: Washington, N. C. 



Gunn of Caswell 

Hardison of Craven 
Harris of Northampton 



Hart of Ashe 
Hatch of Wake 
Herbert of Clay 



Honeycutt of Sampson 

Horn of Cleveland 

Horner of Lee 



Houser of Lincoln 
Hutchins of Madison 
Hutton of Guilford 



James of Pasquotank 
Kearney of Franklin 
Kerr of Warren 



Jrand of New Hanover 
Loftin of Buncombe 
Long of Yadkin 




422 North Carolina Manual 

JOHNNIE OLIVER GUNN 

Johnnie Oliver Gunn, Democrat, Representative from Caswell 
County, was born in that County, December 27, 1892, Son of Rich- 
ard Griffin and Nannie Elizabeth (Rudd) Gunn. Attended Public 
Schools of Caswell County. Farmer. Automobile, Tractor and 
Farm Equipment Dealer. Member North Carolina Automobile Deal- 
er's Association, Secretary, July 1943-July 1944. Charter member 
Yanceyville Rotary Club, President July 1943-July 1944. Elected 
"First Citizen" of Yanceyville for 1944 by the Rotary Club. Vice- 
President and Director of the Bank of Yanceyville since 1943. 
Treasurer Caswell County, 1936-1940; Chairman Sanitary District 
Commissioners, 1942-1944; Member Department of Welfare since 
1942; Chairman County Democratic Executive Committee, two 
years. Chairman County USO and United War Fund three years; 
Community Service Member County War Price and Ration Board. 
Secretary and Director Caswell Development Company, five years. 
Chairman District Boy Scouts, Yanceyville, N. C. Mason; Caswell 
Brotherhood Lodge, No. 11; Master, 1922-1923-1925; Secretary, 
1926; Councilor Bartlett Yancey Council No. 322 J.O.U.A.M., 1941; 
Recording Secretary, 1943-1944. Methodist. Superintendent Church 
School, sixteen years; Chairman Board of Stewards, nine years; 
District Steward, eight years; Member commission Town and Coun- 
ty Work, N. C. Methodist Conference, 1944. Married Miss Annie W. 
Newman, June 3, 1930. Two children: Ann Newman, age 8 and 
Johnnie Oliver Gunn, Jr., age 5. Address: Yanceyville, N. C. 

BURL GARLAND HARBISON 

Burl Garland Hardison, Democrat, Representative from Craven 
County, was born in that County, November 14, 1901. Son of L. H. 
and Debbie (Herring) Hardison. Attended Craven County Schools. 
Farmer and merchant. Member Craven County Democratic Execu- 
tive Committee, 1928-1938. State Gasoline Inspector, 1937-1943. 
Mason. Member Christian Church; Deacon. Married Miss Lillie 
Franks Hardison, January 22, 1922. Two children: Burl D., age 20 
and Fannie Louise Hardison Duncan, age eighteen. Address: New 
Bern, N. C, Route 2. 



Biographical Sketches 423 

HENRY RUSSELL HARRIS 

Henry Russell Harris, Democrat, Representative from Northamp- 
ton County, N. C, was born and reared in Northampton County. 
Son of William Exum and Sarah (Boyce) Harris. Attended Jack- 
son School for boys and Seaboard Institute; B.A. Wake Forest Col- 
lege. Banker and Farmer. Mason. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1941 and 1943. Baptist. Married Miss Clara M. Ste- 
phenson. Two children: Henry Russell Harris, Jr., Washington, 
D. C, now in the Armed Forces and Miss M. Elizabeth Harris. Ad- 
dress: Seaboard, N. C. 

MARVIN DONLEY HART 

Marvin Donley Hart, Republican, Representative from Ashe Coun- 
ty, was born in that County, May 29, 1907. Son of Wells William 
and Minnie (Graham) Hart. Attended Graham Junior High School, 
1923. Pastor and farmer. Baptist. Married Miss Norie Gladys Sulli- 
van, September 25, 1925. Five children: Ruby Eugen, Paul, Goro- 
land L., Junior and Bannah Carroll Hart. Address: Tuckerdale, 
N. C. 

WILLIAM THOMAS HATCH 

William Thomas Hatch, Democrat, Representative from Wake 
County, was born at Millbrook, N. C, April 1, 1905. Son of Na- 
thaniel Ward Hatch and Minnie Thomas Hatch. Attended Raleigh 
High School, 1924; Wake Forest College, LL.B. degree, 1928. At- 
torney. Member Wake County Bar Association; District Bar As- 
sociation; North Carolina State Bar; Member Raleigh Chamber of 
Commerce and the Executives Club of Raleigh. Mason; Member 
Junior Order. Representative in the General Assembly of 1937, 
1939, 1941, 1943 and two special sessions. Methodist. Married Miss 
Mabel Penney, Raleigh, N. C, June 24, 1943. Address: Wake For- 
est Road, Raleigh, N. C. 

FRANK HERBERT 

Frank Herbert, Republican, Representative from Clay County, 
was born in Murphy, N. C, January 4, 1886. Son of R. L. and 
Mary Lou (Abbott) Herbert, Attended Clay County Public Schools 



424 North Carolina Manual 

and Old Murphy Baptist High School. Farmer. In general con- 
tracting business building roads and railroads, 1908-1930. Member 
Board of Commissioners of the Town of Hayesville 1928. Member 
Clay Masonic Lodge No. 301; Shrine Oasis. Methodist; Steward 
and Trustee Hayesville Church, 1940. Married Miss Pearl Sander- 
son, November 7, 1907. Children: Martha Herbert Campbell; lona 
Herbert Hogsed; Frank Herbert, Jr., Clara Herbert and Robert 
Herbert. Address: Hayesville, N. C. 

CHARLES FLETCHER HONEYCUTT 

Charles Fletcher Honeycutt, Republican, Representative from 
Sampson County, was born in that County, August 27, 1876. Son 
of John Henry and Chelli (Honeycutt) Honeycutt. Attended Com- 
mon Schools of Sampson County and Railroad Business College, 
Senoia, Georgia, graduating about 1898. Served as United States 
mail clerk on trains for a period of twenty-two years; chief Clerk 
Railroad Mail Service for eleven years, making thirty-three years 
of service with the Postoffice Department. Retired from service. 
Traveling salesman for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Moving Pictures. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1941 and 1943. Mason; 
Shriner. Elks. Methodist. Married Miss Minnie M. McLeary of 
Suffolk, Virginia, December 1907. Two sons: Dr. Charles F. Honey- 
cutt of California, now with the Government and Ensign Harry 
M. Honeycutt, in the Navy at Hampton Roads, Va. Address: Clin- 
ton, N. C. 

CHARLES COLEMAN HORN 

Charles Coleman Horn, Democrat, Representative from Cleve- 
land County, was born in Lawndale, N. C, April 13, 1901. Son of 
J. A. and Lucreita (Lattimore) Horn. Attended Piedmont High 
School; Graduated from Boiling Springs High School, 1923. LL.B. 
Wake Forest College, 1927. Lawyer and Farmer. Member State 
Bar Association and Cleveland County Bar Association. Member 
Shelby Lions Club and Chamber of Commerce. President Young 
Democrats, Ceveland County, 1934-1938; Secretary Cleveland County 
Democratic Executive Committee, 1932-1944. Solicitor Cleveland 
County, 1932-1936; Judge Pro Tem. Cleveland County Recorder's 
Court, 1943-1944. Member State Guard, 1941-1944; Holder Certi- 



BiocRAPHicAL Sketches 425 

ficate of Award of Price Administration for Meritorious Service in 
the War Effort. Mason. Member Board of Directors, Shelby Ma- 
sonic Fellowship Club, 1943-1944. Phi Kappa Beta. Baptist, Mem- 
ber Finance Committee, 1944; President Newton Bible Class, 1944; 
Assistant Teacher, 1943. Married Miss Sarah Roberts, May 6, 
1929. Children: Mary Louise, Charles Alexander and William 
James Horn. Address: Polkville Road, Shelby, N. C. 

WILLIAM EDWIN HORNER 

William Edwin Horner, Democrat, Representative from Lee Coun- 
ty, was born in Durham County, N. C, November 22, 1901. Son of 
Robert Dudley and S-udie Walker (Monk) Horner. Graduated from 
Durham High School 1918; attended Trinity College (now Duke 
University) 1918-1919; B.S. in Comm.erce, University of North 
Carolina 1922. Newspaper publisher. President N. C. Press Asso- 
ciation 1939-1940. Representative from Lee County in the General 
Assembly, 1937, 1941 and 1943. Member Kiwanis Club; President 
Sanford Club 1938; Methodist; member Official Board, and Super- 
intendent Sunday School. Married Miss Nannie M. Andrews, Oc- 
tober 1924. Three children; Nancy, age 18; Louise, age 14; and 
Billy, age 7. Address: Sanford, N. C. 

CHARLES F. HOUSER 

Charles F. Houser, Democrat, Representative from Lincoln Coun- 
ty, was born in that County, August 18, 1891. Son of A. A. and 
Susan (Carpenter) Houser. Attended County Free School. Farmer 
and merchant. Served in World War I 1917 and 1918; rated as gun- 
ner on French 75mm. gun. Lutheran. Married Miss Edmonya Shu- 
ford, March 22, 1922. Two children: Hellen and Charles, Jr. Ad- 
dress: Lincolnton, N. C, Route 2. 

JAMES HENRY HUTCHINS 

James Henry Huthcins, Republican, Representative from Madi- 
son County, was born in Mars Hill, N. C, March 4, 1889. Son of 
John Columbus and Allie (Tilson) Hutchins. Attended schools of 
Mars Hill; Mars Hill College 1906-1910; Atlanta Dental College 
1911-1914; D.D.S. Dentist and Farmer. Member North Carolina 



426 North Carolina Manual 

Dental Society; American Dental Association. President Madison 
County Men's Club 1934-1935; President Walnut High School P.-T. 
A., 1933-1940. Chairman Republican Executive Committee, Madison 
County 1928-1930. Member Madison County Welfare Board and 
Chairman County Red Cross; Member Madison County Board of 
Health since 1940. Representative in the General Assembly 1929, 
1941 and 1943. State Senator from the Thirtieth Senatorial Dis- 
trict 1937; Thirty-second degree Mason; Shriner. Baptist; Deacon; 
Sunday School Superintendent 1923-1931; Moderator French Broad 
Baptist Association 1927-1929. Married Miss Bertie Edna Thomas, 
January 2, 1915. Tw^o children: Bertie Marie (Hutchins) Roberts, 
and C. How^ard Hutchins. Address: Marshall, N. C. 

FRANK ROBERT HUTTON 

Frank Robert Hutton, Democrat, Representative from Guilford 
County, was born in Greensboro, N. C, March 26, 1899. Son of 
Rev. James Robert and Josephine (Coble) Hutton. Attended Greens- 
boro public schools; Western Maryland College; special courses in 
appraising under auspices of National Association of Real Estate 
Boards. Realtor. Member and Past President Greensboro Real Es- 
tate Board; Member National Real Estate Board's Committee on 
Taxation and of the Committee on G. I. Bill; Appraiser for HOLC. 
Past Executive Secretary of the Revaluation Board and of the 
Board of Equalization and Revievir of Guilford County. Co-author 
of Revaluation Manual for Guilford County, 1941. Past Scout 
Master and Troop Committeeman. Private, World War I. Mason. 
Methodist; past chairman Board of Stewards; member Board of 
Trustees. Married Miss Betha L. Morgan, June 16, 1920. Four 
children: Frank R., Jr., Allan H.; Joseph M. and David J. The 
older three sons are serving overseas with the Air Corps. Address: 
2109 Rolling Road, Greensboro, N. C. 

VERNON GRANT JAMES 

Vernon Grant James, Democrat, Representative from Pasquo- 
tank County, was born in that County July 11, 1910. Son of John 
Calvin and Fannie Rogers (Coppersmith) James. Attended Weeks- 
ville High School, finished in 1930; North Carolina State College, 
1930-1931. Farmer. Owner and operator of a truck line. Charter 



Biographical Sketches 427 

member Four H Honor Club ; President Weeksville Vegetable Grow- 
ers Association. R.O.T.C. 1930-1931; N. C. State Guard, 40th Co., 
1943-1944. Member Kiwanis Club; Improved Order of Red Men, 
Pasquotank Tribe No. 8. Baptist. President Young People's Bible 
Training Union, 1931-1933. Married Miss Selma Harris, May 14, 
1933. Two children: John Thomas and Vernon Grant James, Jr. 
Address: Elizabeth City, N. C, Rt. 4. 

HENRY CRAWFORD KEARNEY 

Henry Crawford Kearney, Democrat, Representative from Frank- 
lin County, was born in Franklinton, N. C, February 1, 1899. Son 
of Isaac Henry and Ozella Davis (Williams) Kearney. Attended 
Franklinton Public Schools, 1906-1916; LL.B. Wake Forest College, 
1922. Lawyer. Mayor of Franklinton, 1929-1939. Third N. C. Na- 
tional Guard, 1915-1917; 120th Infantry 1917-1919; First Sergeant. 
Junior Order United American Mechanics; Past and Present Coun- 
cilor. Representative in the General Assembly of 1941. Baptist; 
Trustee. MaiTied Miss Mary M. Gordon, December 20, 1922. Chil- 
dren: Mary Elizabeth and Rachel Gordon. Address: Franklinton, 
N, C. 

JOHN KERR, JR. 

John Kerr, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Warren County, 
was born in Warrenton, N. C, May 19, 1900. Son of John H. and 
Lillian (Foote) Kerr. Attended Warrenton Public Schools until 
1917; A.B., University of North Carolina 1921; attended Wake For- 
est College Law School 1923. Lawyer. Member North Carolina 
Bar Association. Private in World War. Representative in the Gen- 
eral Assem.bly from Edgecombe County in 1929 and from Warren 
County in 1939 and 1941; Speaker, 1943. Baptist. Chairman Warren 
County Democratic Executive Committee since 1932. Married Miss 
Mary Hinton Duke. One son: John Kerr, III. Address: Warren- 
ton, N. C. 

JOHN QUINCE LeGRAND 

John Quince LeGrand, Democrat, Representative from New Han- 
over County, was born in Wilmington, N. C, January 12, 1905. Son 
of George Spencer and Johnnie (Quince) LeGrand. Attended New 



428 North Carolina Manual 

Hanover High School 1918-1922; University of North Carolina, 
LL.B. 1927. Lav^yer. Member Kiwanis Club, Past President 1942; 
New Hanover and State Bar Associations; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Fraternity. President Wilmington Y.M.C.A. 1938. Representative 
in the General Assembly from New Hanover County 1939 and 1941. 
Episcopalian. Assistant Treasurer and member of Vestry of St. 
John's Episcopal Church, Wilmington 1934. Married Miss Lucy 
Wheeler Buck, June 26, 1936. Children: Gordon Buck LeGrand and 
John Lillington LeGrand. Address: Wilmington, N. C. 

EDWARD LANDIS LOFTIN 

Edward Landis Loftin, Democrat, Representative from Bun- 
combe County, was born in Mount Olive, N. C, January 13, 1903. 
Son of M. W. and Pattie (Herring) Loftin. Attended Horner Mili- 
tary School, Charlotte, N. C, 1919; Porter Military Academy, 
Charleston, S. C, 1920; Weaver College, Weaverville, N. C, 1922- 
1924; Asheville University, 1929-1931. Lawyer. Attorney for town 
of Weaverville, 1935-1944. Mason; Shriner; Elks, Methodist. 
Steward, 1934-1943. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1943. Married Miss Nellie Holmer, September 4, 1928. Two chil- 
dren: Pattie Marie, age twelve, and Carl Wainwright, age eight. 
Address: Weaverville, N. C. 

RUTHERFORD BLUM LONG 

Rutherford Blum Long, Republican, Representative from Yadkin 
County, was born in that County, February 6, 1870. Son of George 
and Elizabeth (Vestal) Long. Attended schools of Yadkin County; 
Yadkinville High School, 1888-1889; Boonville High School, 1890. 
Farmer. Member Board of County Commissioners, 1914-1918. Mem- 
ber of the Examining Committee and the Board of Directors of the 
Bank of Yadkin. Representative in the General Assembly of 1943. 
Married Miss Verda Long, March 11, 1917, and Miss Anna Vaden, 
November 17, 1920. Five children: George, Clifton, Matthew, Marie, 
and Blum, Jr. Address: Boonville, N. C. 

WILLIAM FLYNT MARSHALL 

William Flynt Marshall, Democrat, Representative from Stokes 
County, was born at Walnut Cove, N. C, July 16, 1900. Son of 
Albert Franklin and Nannie (Flynt) Marshall. Attended Walnut 



Marshall of Stokes 
Martin of Johnston 
McCracken of Macon 



McDonald of Polk 
Meekins of Dare 
Moore of Wilson 



Moore of Scotland 

Morris of Mecklenburg 
Morton of Stanly 



Moseley of Guilford 
Overby of Harnett 
Palmer of Haywood 



Pearsall of Nash 

Poele of Washington 
Peterson of Mitchell 



Powers of Rutherford 
Pritchett of Caldwell 
Quinn of Duplin 




430 North Carolina Manual 

Cove High School and Commercial School. Lumberman. President 
and Treasurer Stokes Lumber Company, Walnut Cove, N. C. Com- 
missioner Town of Walnut Cove, N. C, 1933-1938 and served as 
Treasurer during that time. Representative from Stokes County in 
the General Assembly of 1939 and 1943; State Senator from the 
Twenty-third Senatorial District, 1941. Member Walnut Cove 
Lodge No. 629, A.F.&A.M.; member Oasis Temple Order Mystic 
Shrine; Member Walnut Cove Baptist Church. Married Miss Iva 
Lee Isaacs, April 24, 1924. Two boys: William Flynt, Jr. and Joe 
Isaacs Marshall. Address: Walnut Cove, N. C. 

GROVER ADLAI MARTIN 

Grover Adlai Martin, Democrat, Representative from Johnston 
County, was born in Yadkin County, N. C, August 21, 1892. Son 
of William Daniel and Mary (Gough) Martin. Attended Yadkin- 
ville Normal School; University North Carolina, B.A. 1915; B.L. 
1917. Lawyer. Member Johnston County Bar Association; Fourth 
District Bar Association; North Carolina Bar Association and North 
Carolina State Bar. President Fourth District Bar Association. 
Attorney for Town of Smithfield, 1932-1936; Member School Board, 
1930-1944. Master Mason. Presbyterian. Married Miss Mary I. 
Currie, July 25, 1917. Five children: Catherine, William A., G. A., 
Jr., Frances, and Floyd. Address: Smithfield, N. C. 

WAYNE R. Mccracken 

Wayne R. McCracken, Democrat, Representative from Macon 
County, was born in Clyde, N. C. Son of R. P. and Adeline (Kirk- 
patrick) McCracken. Attended Franklin High School, 1913; Mars 
Hill College, 1914-1916. Farmer. Served in World War I. Baptist. 
Married Miss Loyal Huggins, June 8, 1921. Three children: James 
R., in England, Jayne and Bill McCracken. Address: Franklin, N. C, 
Route 4. 

WILLIAM HOWARD McDONALD 

William Howard McDonald, Democrat, Representative from Polk 
County, was born in Rutherford County, N. C, March 20, 1908. Son 
of Monroe and Ada (Mooi-e) McDonald. Attended school. Boiling 



Biographical Sketches 431 

Springs, 1925-1928; Boiling Springs Jr. College, 1928-1930; Wake 
Forest College, 1928-1932, B. A. degree. Kappa Pi Kappa, Alpha 
Kappa Pi, and Pi Kappa Mu fraternities. Member Rotary Inter- 
national. Bookkeeper for Southern Mercerizing Co. Representative 
in the General Assembly of 1943. Baptist; Teacher Young Men's 
Class. Married Miss Nina Hall, 1935. Address: Tryon, N. C. 

THEODORE STOCKTON MEEKINS 

Theodore Stockton Meekins, Democrat, Representative from Dare 
County, was born in Rodanthe, N. C, May 21, 1870. Son of Luke 
Mark and Elizabeth Emily (Douglas) Meekins. Attended common 
schools of Dare County six months and private school four months. 
Realtor and Insurance Agent. Member North Carolina Associa- 
tion of Insurance Agents. Justice of the Peace, 1896-1898; Clerk 
Superior Court, Dare County, 1898-1907; Fish Commissioner, 1907- 
1911; U. S. Migratory Game Inspector for Virginia, W. Virginia, 
North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, 1914-1918; Assistant 
Fisheries Commissioner, 1918-1924; Commissioner Town of Manteo, 
1927-1929; member Dare County Board of Education, 1931-1933. 
Surfman U. S. Coast Guard, 1890-1898. Mason, member Wanchese 
Lodge No. 521 since June, 1896. Methodist; Steward Mount Olivet 
Church, Manteo, for fifteen years; District Steward, two years; 
Trustee, fifteen years. Married Miss Rosa P. Midgett, June 6, 1896. 
Five children: Ernest E., Percy W., Alma Ellen, Theodore S., Jr., 
and Gaston Lee Meekins. Address: Manteo, N. C. 

LARRY ICHABOD MOORE, JR. 

Larry Ichabod Moore, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Wilson 
County, was born in Greenville, N. C, January 26, 1904, Son of 
Larry I. and Ella (King) Moore. Attended New Bern Public Schools 
1910-1920; University of North Carolina, A.B. course 1920-1922; 
B.S. course 1922-1924; Law 1924-1926. Lawyer, Farmer, and Dairy- 
man. Solicitor Wilson County General County Court 1929-1934. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1939, 1941 and 1943. 
County Attorney, Wilson County; President, Second Judicial Dis- 
trict Bar Association; Director, General Alumni Association of the 
University of North Carolina. President of Wilson County Alumni 
Association; member Beta Theta Pi Social Fraternity and Phi Delta 



432 North Carolina Manual 

Phi Legal Fraternity; Member Farm Bureau, N. C. Guernsey 
Breeders Association, and N. C. Jersey Cattle Club; Mason, Royal 
Arch Mason, Knights Templar, Shriner (Past Master of Blue Lodge, 
High Priest of Chapter, and Post Commander of the Commandery); 
Member of Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (Exalted Ruler 
1941-1942, Wilson Lodge No. 840). Address: Wilson, N. C. 

ODUS L. MOORE 

Odus L. Moore, Democrat, Representative from Scotland County, 
was born in Cleveland County, N. C, November 8, 1885. Son of 
John F. and Susan (Holland) Moore. Attended Boiling Springs 
High School 1902-1904; Wake Forest College, A.B., 1908. Pub- 
lisher Laurinburg Exchange. Past President Laurinburg Rotary 
Club; President Laurinburg Chamber of Commerce. Chairman Scot- 
land County Civilian Defense Council; Laurinburg Town Commis- 
sioner, 1923-1931; Member Laurinburg School Board since 1931. 
Representative in the General Assembly from Scotland County, 
1939, 1941, and 1943. Baptist. Teacher Men's Bible Class. Chair- 
man Board of Deacons. Married Miss Sue Parker. Three chil- 
dren: 0. L. Moore, Jr., High Point, N. C; John H. Moore, Laurin- 
burg, N. C. and Mary Sue Moox-e, Laurinburg. Address: Laurin- 
burg, N. C. 

HARVEY MORRIS 

Harvey Morris, Democrat, Representative from Mecklenburg 
County, was born in Charlotte, N. C, September 18, 1887. Son of 
P. R. and Pinky Lee (Berryhill) Morris. Finished Charlotte Schools 
in 1905. Dairy farmer. Member Board of County Commissioners, 
1936-1938; County Welfare Board, 1935-1938. National Guard, 
1905-1908. Mason; Elks. Presbyterian. Married Miss Iris Owen. 
Three children. Address: Charlotte, N. C, Rt. 8. 

JOSHUA JURANT MORTON 

Joshua Jurant Morton, Republican, Representative from Stanly 
County, was born in that County July 24, 1892. Son of John M. 
and Tina (Hatley) Morton. Attended Palmerville High School, 1909- 
1911. Merchant. Sheriff, Stanlv County, 1920-1924. Veteran World 



Biographical Sketches 433 

War No. I, 1918. Sergeant. Member, Masons; Shrine; Consistoi-y. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1943. Married Miss 
Selma Lois Tarlton, Jan. 3, 1940. One child: J. J. Morton, Jr. Ad- 
dress: Albemarle, N. C. 

ROBERT FRANKLIN MOSELEY 

Robert Franklin Moseley, Democrat, Representative from Guil- 
ford County, -was born in Sampson County, N. C, February 10, 1891. 
Son of Franklin Faison and Rowena (Royall) Moseley. Attended 
Clinton Public Schools. A.B., University North Carolina, 1919; Uni- 
versity Law School. Lawyer. City Attorney and Assistant City 
Attorney, Greensboro, 1925-1927. Chairman, Guilford County Board 
of Elections, 1930. Member, Greensboro School Board, 1930-1941. 
U. S. Army, 1917-1919; Discharged as 1st Lieut. Infantry. Captain 
16th Co., N. C. State Guard, 1941. Member American Legion. Rep- 
resentative in the General Assembly of 1943. Married Miss Frank 
Hays, 1929. One child: Robert Franklin Moseley, Jr. Address: 
Greensboro, N. C. 

ALLISON L. OVERBY 

Allison L. Overby, Democrat, Representative from Harnett Coun- 
ty, was born n that County. Son of Mack and Julia (Williams) 
Overby. Attended Gcunty Public schools, six years, and Angier 
High School two years; took several business courses and telegraphy. 
Merchant. Mayor of Angier, 1911-1912; Commissioner, 1943-1944. 
Mason. Scottish Rite, Shriner; Junior Order. Baptist. Married Miss 
Louise Tart of Oliver, Georgia, June 23, 1920. Two girls, ages 
thirteen and twenty-three. Address: Angier, N. C. 

GLENN C. PALMER 

Glenn C. Palmer, Democrat, Representative from Haywood Coun- 
ty, was born in Cataloochee, N. C, January 26, 1889. Son of Wil- 
liam A. and Milia (Caldwell) Palmer. Atended Waynesville High 
School 1907-1908. Graduated at Weaverville College 1910. Taught 
school three years 1911-1913. Assisted father as Sheriff and Tax 
Collector of Haywood County for eight years. Chairman, Hay- 
wood County Board of Education 1916-1924. Member County 
Board of Commissioners 1936-1938. Representative from Haywood 
County 1939, 1941 and 1943. Member of the Board of Trustees of 



434 North Carolina Manual 

Western Carolina Teachers College since May 1939. Member of the 
Board of Directors of the First National Bank of Waynesville, N. C, 
since January 1940. Member of the Advisory Council of the United 
States Employment Service at Waynesville, N. C, since January 

1942. Director of Farmers Federation since November 1942. Mem- 
ber Board of Trustees of Haywood County Library Association since 
Jan. 1944. Farmer and Dairyman. Methodist. Member Board of 
Stewards and Church Trustee, since 1916. Married Miss Fannie 
Ferguson, December 22, 1914. Four children: W. Riley, Asheville, 
N. C, Mrs. Emily Ferguson Nesbitt, Route 1, Clyde, N. C, Joe H., 
in Armed forces, and G. C. Palmer, Jr., Clyde, N. C, Route 1. Ad- 
dress: Clyde, N. C, Rt. No. 1. 

THOMAS JENKINS PEARSALL 

Thomas Jenkins Pearsall, Democrat, Representative from Nash 
County, was born in Rocky Mount, N. C, February 11, 1903. Son of 
L, F. and Maryetta (Jenkins) Pearsall. Attended Rocky Mount 
High School 1919-1921; Georgia Military Academy, College Park, 
Ga., 1922-1923; University North Carolina, class of 1927, two 
years of B.S., and two years of Law; Licensed to practice law in 
1927. Farmer, merchant. Lawyer. Member American Farm Bureau; 
American Farm Managers Association; North Carolina Bar As- 
sociation. Prosecuting Attorney, Rocky Mount Recorder's Court 
1928-1933. Chairman, Nash County Civilian Defense Council; Chair- 
man, Nash County USO. Delta Kappa Epsilon and Phi Delta Phi 
fraternities. Representative in the General Assembly of 1941 and 

1943. Episcopalian ; member Vestry. Member State Advisory Budg- 
et Commission 1944. Married Miss Emiley Elizabeth Braswell, 
October 28, 1930. Two children: Thomas Jenkins Pearsall, Jr., and 
Mack Braswell Pearsall. Address: Rocky Mount, N. C. 

WILLIAM HARRY PEELE, SR. 

William Harry Peele, Sr., Democrat, Representative from Wash- 
ington County, was born in Roxobel, Bertie County, N. C, Septem- 
ber 4, 1902. Son of James Edward and Henrietta (Burkett) Peele. 
Attended Roxobel High School. Dry Cleaner. Washington County 
Coroner, 1937-1942; Justice of the Peace, 1943-1944. Member 
Plymouth Lions Club and Plymouth Country Club. Baptist. Mar- 
ried Miss Helen Martin White, July 7, 1934. One child; William 
Harry Peele, Jr., born February 9, 1938. Address: Plymouth, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 435 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS PETERSON 

Charles Augustus Peterson, Republican, Representative from 
Mitchell County, was born in Relief, N. C, October 1, 1882. Son 
of Solomon and Julia (Edwards) Peterson. Attended Mitchell 
County Schools and Dwight Institute, Erwin, Tenn. M. D. North 
Carolina Medical College, 1907; Post-graduate Course, New York 
1910; Tulane University 1922. Physician. Member Mitchell County, 
Tenth District and North Carolina Medical societies; Southern and 
American Medical Association ; Ex-President Mitchell County Medi- 
cal Association and Ex-vice president Tenth District Association. 
Examiner for local Draft Board; Local Surgeon for C.C. and 0. 
R. R. Representative from Mitchell County in the General As- 
sembly of 1923 and 1935. Senator from the Thirtieth Senatorial 
District, 1941. U. S. Pension Examiner. Member Vesper Lodge No. 
554 A.F. and A.M., Bald Creek Chapter No. 56; Cyrene Com- 
mandery No. 5; Oasis Temple A.A.O.N.M.S. and Knights of Pyth- 
ias; Past Master "Vesper Lodge. Married Miss Norene McCall in 
1908. Address : Spruce Pine, N. C. 

LEE LEEPER POWERS 

Lee Leeper Powers, Democrat, Representative from Rutherford 
County, was born in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, April 9, 1899. Son 
of William Hamblen and Leora (Leeper) Powers. Attended public 
schools of Knoxville, Tenn., Mobile, Ala., Birmingham, Ala,, and 
White Pine, Tenn., 1905-1916. Real Estate Broker. Mason, Mem- 
ber Leadvale Lodge No. 398, 1920-1944; Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite of Freemasonry, Southern Jurisdiction, U. S. A., Asheville 
Consistory, 1928-1944; Ancient and Accepted Order Noble Mystic 
Shrine, Oasis Temple, Charlotte, N. C, 1928-1944. Presbyterian. 
Married Miss Thelma Odom, February 14, 1923. Children: Marilyn 
Odom Powers, age 16, and Martha Jane Powers, age 5. Address: 
Lake Lure, N. C. 

JAMES TURNER PRITCHETT 

James Turner Pritchett, Democrat, Representative from Caldwell 
County, was born in Guilford County, August 13, 1889. Son of 
Henry C. and Margaret (Mebane) Pritchett. Attended Lenoir High 
School; A.B., University of North Carolina 1914; University of 



436 North Carolina Manual 

North Carolina Law School and Wake Forest Law School. Lawyer. 
Member of Caldwell County Bar Association ; State Bar and North 
Carolina Bar Association. Mayor of Lenoir 1919-1920. Prosecuting 
Attorney, Caldwell County Recorder's Court 1931-1934. Captain 
United States Army, World War; Alpha Tau Omega College Fra- 
ternity; Past Grand Chancellor, Knights of Pythias. Representa- 
tive from Caldwell County in the General Assembly of 1939, 1941 
and 1943. Presbyterian; Elder since 1937. Married Miss Margaret 
Preston Martin, Salisbury, N. C, December 28, 1920. Two children: 
James Turner Pritchett, Jr., age 22, Mebane Moore Pritchett, age 
10. Address : Lenoir, N. C. 

CLARENCE EDWARD QUINN 

Clarence Edward Quinn, Democrat, Representative from Duplin 
County, was born in Albertson Township, Duplin County, July 14, 
1892. Son of Alonza A. and Emma (Phillips) Quinn. Attended 
Public Schools of Duplin County. Merchant and Farmer. Member 
Board of Commissioners, Town of Kenansville, 1925-36. Mason; 
Member Jr. O.U.A.M.; Methodist; Member Board of Stewards 35 
years. Associate Lay Leader Wilmington District Methodist Church 
six years. Representative from Duplin County in the General As- 
sembly, Special Session 1936, Regular Session 1937; Special Ses- 
sion 1938; Regular Session 1939, and Regular Session 1941 and 
1943. Married Miss Kate Ferrell, January 2, 1914. Children: one 
son, Joseph Edward. Address: Kenansville, N. C. 

JAMES CLYDE RABB 

9 

James Clyde Rabb, Democrat, Representative from McDowell 
County, was born in Lenoir, N. C, February 10, 1891. Son of James 
P. and Sara (Bost) Rabb. Attended Lenoir Preparatory and High 
Schools 1898-1909; Catawba College, Newton, N. C, 1910. Grocer 
and Farmer. Member Marion Chamber of Commerce and Merchants 
Association; President. Member City Council 1923-1927; Chair- 
man Pleasant Garden School Board 1927-1940. Member and Past 
President of Marion Kiwanis Club. Mason. Methodist; Member 
Official Board 1918-1940; Chairman of Stewards 1922-1940. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1941 and 1943. Married Miss 
Louise Burgin, February 23, 1927, deceased March 1943. Seven 
children. Address: Marion, N. C, R.F.D. No. 4. 



Rabb of McDowell 
Ramsay of Rowan 
Ransdell of Wake 



Richardson of Randolph 
Rountree of Gates 
Royster of Vance 



Ruark of Brunswick 
Rutledge of Cabarrus 
Sellars of Alamance 



Shuford of Buncombe 
Shuford of Catawba 
Smith of Davidson 



Spruill of Bertie 

Stone of Rockingham 
Stoney of Burke 



Story of Wilkes 
Taylor of Wayne 
Tonissen of Mecklenburg 




i' 






miM 



438 North Carolina Manual 

KERR CRAIGE RAMSAY 

Kerr Craige Ramsay, Democrat, Representative from Rowan 
County, was born in Salisbury, N. C, July 23, 1911. Son of John E. 
and Elizabeth Erwin (Craige) Ramsay. Graduated from Salisbury 
High School 1927. A.B., University of North Carolina 1931; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina Law School 1931-1932; Yale University 
Law School 1932-1934; LL.B., Yale University 1934. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber Rowan County, Forsyth County, N. C, and American Bar 
Associations. President Salisbury Junior Chamber of Commerce 
1939-1940. Trustee and Secretary Rowan Memorial Hospital since 
1937. Rotarian. Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Nu. Member House of 
Representatives 1941 and 1943. Presbyterian, Deacon since 1936. 
Married Miss Eleanor Walton Newman, June 26, 1940. Children: 
Eleanor Newman Ramsay born March 26, 1941. Address: Salis- 
bury, N. C. 

NEROS FRANKLIN RANSDELL 

Neros Franklin Ransdell, Democrat, Representative from Wake 
County, was born in Franklin County, N. C, September 19, 1903. 
Son of William C. and Mary (Dixon) Ransdell. Attended Sandhill 
Farm Life School, 1923-1927; Mars Hill College and Wake Forest 
College; Wake Forest Law School, 1932-1933. President Euthalian 
Literary Society, Mars Hill College, 1929; awarded improvement 
medal, 1923, Debater's medal, 1929 and Commencement Debater's 
medal, 1929. Inter-Collegiate Debater, 1928-1929. Delegate from 
Wake County to National Farm Bureau Organization in Chicago, 
111., 1944. Lawyer. Member Wake County Bar Association and 
North Carolina State Bar Association. Solicitor Fuquay Springs 
Recorder's Court, 1934-1944. Member Raleigh Elks Club No. 735. 
Presbyterian. One daughter, Sylvia Nan Ransdell. Address: Va- 
rina, N. C. 

r 

S. GIRARD RICHARDSON 

S. Girard Richardson, Republican, Representative from Randolph 
County, was born in that County, June 6, 1893. Son of Stephen R. 
and Adline (Yow) Richardson. Attended local high school and 
Rutherford College, 1913-1914; Rutherford Junior College, 1914- 
1915. Proprietor Seagrove Roller Mill, manufacturing flour, meal and 



Biographical Sketches 439 

feeds. Postmaster at Seagrove, 1922-1927; member Seagrove Town 
Board, 1927-1932. Chairman Local Scout Committee since 1938; 
member District Scout Committee, Randolph County. Member local 
School Board since 1938; teacher, 1916-1922. Served in World War 
I; First Cook Camp Headquarters Co. Mason; Biscoe Lodge No. 
437; Junior-Senior Warden and Master in Olivet Lodge, 1917-1921. 
Member Dixon Post No. 45, American Legion, Asheboro; Fourth 
Vice Commander at present time. Methodist; Sunday School Super- 
intendent since 1932; President Randolph County S. S. Association, 
1930-1932; Trustee, 1934-1938; Member and chairman Board of 
Stewards since 1938; Recording Steward, 1938-1944; charge Lay 
Leader, 1940-1944. Married Miss Bertha Hohn Yow, October 20, 
1919. Two children: Chas., 22 and Carolyn, 16. Address: Seagrove, 
N. C. 

WILLIAM JETHRO ROUNTREE 

William Jethro Rountree, Democrat, Representative from Gates 
County, was born in that county June 22, 1878. Son of Alfred 
Frank and Carolina Elizabeth (Riddick) Rountree. Completed War-' 
wick Academy in 1897. Banker, farmer and undertaker. President 
Bank of Hobbsville and Chaii-man of Board of Directors and Loan 
Board, Constable, Mintonville Township, 1904-1910; Constable and 
Tax Collector, 1918-1922; Sheriff Gates County, 1922-1932. Baptist. 
Clerk and Treasurer Warwick Baptist Church, 1922-1926; Modera- 
tor Yeopim Union, 1924-1928; Deacon Hobbsville Church. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1943. Married Miss Margaret 
Roberts Carter, June 29, 1899. Children: John Lester Rountree; 
Carrie R. Collins; Helen Aswell and Gertie R. Brown. Address: 
Hobbsville, N. C. 

FRED STOVALL ROYSTER 

Fred Stovall Royster, Democrat, Representative from Vance 
County, was born in Dabney, N. C, December 31, 1908. Son of John 
Stovall and Alvada (Green) Royster. Attended Henderson High 
School, 1921-1925; Duke University. Tobaconist and Farmer. Mem- 
ber Tobacco Association of the United States; member Board of 
Governors, 1944-1945; Member Middle Belt Tobacco Warehouse 
Association; President, 1944-1945. Member Henderson Rotary 
Club. Chairman Vance County Board Elections, 1934-1936. Metho- 



440 North Carolina Manual 

dist. Chairman Board of Stewards, 1937-1944. Married Miss Launah 
Parker, January 4, 1942. Address: Henderson, N. C. 

JOSEPH WATTERS RUARK 

Joseph Watters Ruark, Democrat, Representative from Bruns- 
wick County, was born in Southport, N. C, November 29, 1885. 
Son of James Buchanan and Sallie Potter (Longest) Ruark, At- 
tended Southport Public Schools; University of North Carolina 
Law School 1905-1906. Lawyer. Mayor Southport 1915-1921; Re- 
corder, Brunswick County, two terms, 1921-1923; State Senator 
1923, 1927, and 1943. Member House of Representatives 1933 and 
1941. Mason; Pythagoras Lodge No. 249, Southport, N. C; served 
in all chairs and now past master. Methodist. Trustee. Married the 
late Miss Bessie Cross; Married Miss Grace Pridgen 1929. Two 
children. Address: Southport, N. C. 

J. CARLYLE RUTLEDGE 

J. Carlyle Rutledge, Democrat, Representative from Cabarrus 
County was born in Stanley, Gaston County, N. C, December 28, 
1909. Son of Joseph Graham and Frances Virginia (Moore) Rut- 
ledge. Graduated from Stanly High School, 1927, and from Weaver- 
ville College, 1930. A.B., University North Carolina, 1932; Bachelor 
Laws, 1935. Lawyer. Member North Carolina State Bar. Member 
Board of Directors Cannon Memorial Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation, Kannapolis, N. C, since 1937. Methodist. Member Board 
of Stewards since 1937. Married Miss Judith Rea Kuykendal, April 
23, 1938. Representative in the General Assembly of 1943. One 
daughter: Martha Rea Rutledge, born April 2, 1941 and one son: 
James Carlyle Rutledge, born Nov. 17, 1944. Address: Kannapolis, 
N. C. 

WALTER R. SELLARS 

Walter R. Sellars, Democrat, Representative from Alamance 
County, was born in Alamance County, N. C, November 29, 1873. 
Son of Dr. Benjamin Abel and Frusannah Elizabeth (Kime) Sel- 
lars. Attended Burlington schools and Eastman Business College. 
Retail Merchant, Member Burlington Chamber of Commerce, Past 
President Local Merchants Association and Director State As- 
sociation; President, Director and Chairman, Finance Committee 



Biographical Sketches 441 

Morris Plan Industrial Bank; Director and Vice President, Sellars 
Manufacturing Company, Director Jordan Spinning Company; Di- 
rector, Secretary and Treasurer and Manager B. A. Sellars and 
Sons, Inc.; Alderman and Chairman Finance Committee of the 
City of Burlington, five years; served six years on Alamance Coun- 
ty Board of Education and five years as County Commissioner, from 
1927-1938. Junior Order United American Mechanics. Member 
House of Representatives 1941 and 1943. Congregational Christian 
Church; Trustee, Deacon and Sunday school teacher. Married Miss 
Lila Bailey March 1, 1904. Three children, W. Bailey, Elizabeth 
(Mrs. William D. Farmer) and David R. Sellars, (Captain U. S. 
Army). Address: Burlington, N. -C. 

GEORGE ADAM SHUFORD 

George Adam Shuford, Democrat, Representative from Bun- 
combe County, w^as born in Asheville, N. C, September 5, 1895. 
Son of George A. and Julia E. (Dean) Shuford. Attended Ashe- 
ville Schools and graduated from High School, 1913; University 
of North Carolina; LL.B. University of Georgia, 1917. Lawyer. 
Member Buncombe County Bar Association, President, 1940; North 
Carolina Bar Association, American Bar Association. Chairman 
Buncombe County Board of Elections, 1940-1942. Attended first 
Officer's Training Camp in Georgia, May 1917; commissioned 2nd 
Lieutenant Infantry, August 1917. Assigned to 119th Infantry, 
30th Division, November, 1917 and Commissioned 1st Lieutenant 
January 1918. Served in United States and France; discharged at 
Camp Jackson, 1919. Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. Episcopalian. Vestryman Trinity Church. Mar- 
ried Miss Daphne Brown, April 23, 1932. Children : Sydney Herbert, 
age 11 years; Elizabeth Dean, age 9 years and Fuller Adam Shu- 
ford, age 7 years. Address: 10 White Oak Road, Biltmore Forest, 
Asheville, N. C. 

HARLEY FERGUSON SHUFORD 

Harley Ferguson Shuford, Democrat, Representative from Ca- 
tawba County, was born in Hickory, N. C, July 22, 1912. Son of 
A. Alex and Maud (Ferguson) Shuford. Attended Episcopal High 
School of Virginia, 1926-1930; A.B., University North Carolina, 
1934; Harvard Business School, 1935. Textile Manufacturer. Presi- 
dent Hickory Spinning Company; President and Treasurer Val- 



442 North Carolina Manual 

dese Weaving Company; Vice President Granite Cordage Com- 
pany; Secretary and Treasurer, Hickory Chair Co. Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon Fraternity. Rotarian, Representative in the General As- 
sembly of 1943. Evangelical and Reformed Church. Married Miss 
Nancy Pope, August 22, 1934. Four children. Address: Hickory, 
N. C. 



DR. J. ALEXANDER SMITH 

J. Alexander Smith, Democrat, Representative from Davidson 
County, was born in Lexington, N. C, July 8, 1889. Son of A. W. 
and Loanna (Leonard) Smith. Attended Davidson County schools 
and Crescent Academy, Rowan County; Catawba College, two 
years; North Carolina Medical College, three years; Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia, one year, M.D. Degree. Physician and Surgeon. 
Member County and State Medical Society and the Ameiican Medi- 
cal Association. Mayor of Lexington, 1931-35. Member Home Guard, 
World War I. Shrine and Oasis Temple. Member Lexington Utility 
Commission which operates the water and light plant. Representa- 
tive in the General Assembly of 1943. First Evangelical and Re- 
formed Church of Lexington. Elder and Chairman Finance Com- 
mittee. Married Miss Blanche Penington, May 17, 1916. One child. 
Address: Lexington, N. C. 

CHARLES WAYLAND SPRUILL 

Charles Wayland Spruill, Democrat, Representative from Bertie 
County, was born at Quitsna, April 6, 1889. Son of Charles Way- 
land and Annie E. (Tadlock) Spruill. Attended Oak Ridge Insti- 
tute, 1904-1906; State College 1908-1909. Merchant, farmer and 
manufacturer. Member Bertie County Road Commission, 1920-1921, 
1925-1930. Chairman Snake Bite Township. Trustee, Republican 
High School and Lewiston-Woodville High School. President Lewis- 
ton Tel. Co. Vice President Bank of Roxobel. Director Harrington 
Manufacturing Co. Member of State Planning Board. Member of 
Mental Hospital Board of Control; Member of Executive Board 
of State Hospital. Chairman of Appeal Board No. 1. Shriner and 
Junior Order. Senator, 1939. Member House of Representatives, 
1933, 1935, 1937 and 1943. Baptist. Married Miss Ruth Bazemore, 
November 26, 1913. Two children: Hanah Ruth and H. B. Spruill. 
Address: Windsor, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 443 

THOMAS CLARENCE STONE 

Thomas Clarence Stone, Democrat, Representative from Rock- 
ingham County, was born in Stoneville, January 19, 1899. Son of 
late Robert Tyler and Mary (Hamlin) Stone. Attended Stoneville 
High School and graduated in 1914. Graduated at Davidson College 
in 1919 with B.S. Degree. Secretary and Treasurer of Stoneville 
Grocery Company (Wholesale Groceries) and operator of own in- 
surance agency. Formerly Town Commissioner and Mayor of Stone- 
ville. Member N. C. Unemployment Compensation Commission. 
Joined S.A.T.C. at Davidson College in October 1918; Discharged 
1918; Supply Sergeant in R.O.T.C. at Davidson College. Business 
Manager of Davidsonian while at Davidson College. Past President 
of the Rockingham County Clubs of Young Democrats and has been 
a member of the Rockingham County Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee. Representative in the General Assembly of 1935, 1937, 
1939, 1941 and 1943. Presbyterian; Deacon. Mai-ried Miss Jane 
Kane, of Gate City, August 25, 1925. One daughter: Mary Frances 
Stone, 18 years of age. Address: Stoneville, N. C. 

ANDREW BURNET STONEY 

Andrew Burnet Stoney, Democrat, Representative from Burke 
County, was born in Camden, S. C, December 15, 1892. Son of Rev. 
James Moss and Jeannie Shannon Stoney. Attended Graded School, 
Camden, S. C, and High School, 1899-1910; A.B., University of 
South Carolina, 1914; Law School, 1914-1915; Harvard Law School, 
1915-1917; Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity; Ensign, U. S. Navy, 
1917-1918; Lieutenant 1918-1919. Burke Post No. 21, American 
Legion. Mason. Junior Order United American Mechanics. Mimosa 
Golf Club; Mimosa Fishing Club. Co-ordinator, Civilian Defense 
for Burke County. President Morganton Kiwanis Club, 1942. 
Polio Campaign Chairman, 1944. General Insurance Business. Rep- 
resentative in the General Assembly of 1941 and 1943. Episcopalian; 
Vestryman since 1938; Treasurer, 1938; Member Finance Com- 
mittee since 1939; Secretary to Vestry, 1943 and 1944. Married 
Mrs. Mary Wilson Kistler, August 15, 1938. Step-children: Mrs. 
Mary Kistler Craven; Charles E. Kistler, Jr., and Andrew M. Kist- 
ler, IL Address: Morganton, N. C. 



444 North Carolina Manual 

THOMAS EDGAR STORY 

Thomas Edgar Story, Republican, Representative from Wilkes 
County, was born in Blowing Rock, N. C. Son of Joshua Clingman 
and Martha Ann (Day) Story. Attended Watauga County Schools 
1896-1904; Appalachian Training School, Boone, N. C, 1905-1909; 
Trinity College 1909-1910; University of North Carolina 1910-1913; 
A.B. 1913; M.A. 1919; Wake Forest Law School 1933. Teacher and 
High School Principal 1913-1939; President Wilkes County Teach- 
ers Association 1927-1933; President High School Principals, N. C. 
Educational Association 1924; Vice President Northwest Division 
of the N. C. Educational Association 1931 and 1932; President, 
Northwest District Teachers Association 1938-1939; Life Member 
National Education Association since 1925; Vice President Wilkes- 
boro Building and Loan Association 1932-1939; Town Clerk, Trini- 
ty, N. C, 1922-1924; Elected Dry Delegate for Wilkes County, 
November 7, 1933. Lawyer. Member Wilkes County and Seventeenth 
Judicial District Bar Associations. Junior Order United American 
Mechanics, Councillor 1923-1924; Knights of Pythias; Chancellor 
Commander 1928-1929; Mason, Master Lodge 1936 and 1942; 
Worthy Patron, Order Eastern Star, 1939-1940; Master Wilkesboro 
Subordinate Grange 1936-1938; Master Wilkes Pomona Grange 
1938; Secretary Kiwanis Club 1932-1945. Chairman of Wilkesboro 
Scout Troop Committee No. 32, 1932-1940. Vice Chairman of Wilkes 
Scout District 1941-1943. Sec. Wilkes County Republican Executive 
Committee 1944. Member of Appeals Panel War Man Power Com- 
misson 1944. Representative in the General Assembly of 1941 and 
1943. Baptist. Secretary Board of Deacons 1925-1940; Sunday School 
Superintendent 1927-1944. Moderator Brushy Mountain Associa- 
tion 1934-1944. Married Miss Mary Clarissa Downs, September 3, 
1918, Three children: Thomas Edgar, Jr., Donald Downs and Wil- 
liam Robert. Address: Wilkesboro, N. C. 

WALTER FRANK TAYLOR 

Walter Frank Taylor, Democrat, Representative from Wayne 
County, was born in Duplin County, April 4, 1889. Son of Luther 
and Ettie (Crow) Taylor. Attended Faison Male Academy; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, A.B. Degree, 1911; LL.B. Degree 1914. 
Lawyer. Member The American Bar Association ; The N. C. State 
Bar; Wayne County Bar; President N. C. Bar Association 1943- 



Turner of Iredell 
Umstead of Orange 
Uzzell of Rowan 



Vernon of Gaston 

Vogler of Mecklenburg 
Wallace of Lenoir 



Wallace of Montgomery 

Watkins of Granville 

Welfare of Forsyth 



White of Chowan 

White of Perquimans 
Whitfield of Pender 



Worley of Johnston 
Worthington of Pitt 

Cooper — Principal Clerk 




^M^k 




446 North Carolina Manual 

1944. Member Goldsboro Kiwanis Club. Member B. P. 0. Elks. 
Phi Beta Kappa; Tau Kappa Alpha; Golden Fleece. State Sena- 
tor in the General Assembly of 1921 ; Representative from Wayne 
County, 1939, 1941 and 1943. Member of the Board of Trustees 
of the University of North Carolina and of the North Carolina 
College for Negroes; Member State Board of Law Examiners and 
of the Re-Codification Commission, 1941-1943. Member of the 
Board of Aldermen of the City of Goldsboro for six years. Meth- 
odist; Member Board of Stewards for several years and Chair- 
man of the Finance Committee for the past several years. Mar- 
ried Miss Elizabeth Gibson, December 16, 1933. One child: Kath- 
erine Patterson Taylor, age seven years. Address: Goldsboro, N. C. 

EDWARD THEODORE TONISSEN 

Edward Theodore Tonissen, Democrat, Representative from 
Mecklenburg County, was born in New York, N. Y., March 25, 1885. 
Son of John Garrett and Julia (Reiners) Tonissen. Attended Dick- 
son High School, Jersey City, N. J., and Eagan's Business College, 
New York. Salesman, Vice President Consolidated Cork Corpora- 
tion, Brooklyn, N. Y. Member Charlotte Boxing Commission 1925; 
Expert, North Carolina R. R. 1933-1937. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1935, 1941 and 1943. Mason; Shriner; Scot- 
tish Rite; B. P. O. E., Charlotte Lodge. Lutheran. Married Miss 
Elva C. Risk, November 15, 1922. Address: Charlotte, N. C. 

DAVID ELMER TURNER, SR. 

David Elmer Turner, Sr., Democrat, Representative from Ire- 
dell County, was born in Vance, N. C, February 21, 1876. Son 
of W. W. and Margaret E (Knox) Turner. Attended Barnes Acad- 
emy, Lenior, N. C, 1892; Davidson, 1899. Hardware dealer. Mem- 
ber Hardware Association of Carolinas. Chairman Selective Ser- 
vice Board No. 2 Iredell County; Member Congressional Executive 
Committee, Ninth District; County Commissioner twelve years; 
County Board Education two years. Kiwanis Club. Representa- 
tive in the General Assembly of 1929, 1931, 1933 and 1943. Presby- 
terian. Married Miss Minnie Lee McNeely, December 17, 1901. Two 
boys. Address: Mooresville, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 447 

JOHN WESLEY UMSTEAD, JR. 

John Wesley Umstead, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Or- 
ange County, was born in Mangum Township, Durham County, 
April 7th, 1889. Son of John Wesley and Lula (Lunsford) Um- 
stead. Attended public schools of Durham County. Entered Uni- 
versity of North Carolina in September 1905 and graduated with 
the Class of 1909. Director General Alumni Association of Uni- 
versity of North Carolina since 1921. Trustee of Greater University 
of North Carolina. State Senator from the Sixteenth Senatorial 
District in 1931 and 1939. Member of House of Representatives 
from Orange County in 1941 and 1943. Member of State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee. Mason, Elk, Grange, Methodist. Mar- 
ried Sallie Hunter Reade of Person County on January 20th, 1914. 
Three children living: Frank Graham Umstead, Lieutenant Colonel 
U. S. Marine Corps; Sarah Elizabeth Umstead, Corporal Women's 
Reserve of U. S. Marine Corps and Anne Reade Umstead. A son, 
John Wesley Umstead, III Captain U. S. Marine Corps, was killed 
in action on Saipan Island June 14th, 1944. Manager Durham 
Branch Office of Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company. Ad- 
dress: Chapel Hill, N. C. 

GEORGE RANDOLPH UZZELL 

George Randolph Uzzell, Democrat, Representative from Rowan 
County, was born in Salisbury, November 23, 1903. Son of Harry 
M. and Geneva (Wright) Uzzell. Attended Salisbury graded schools 
1910-1915; Raleigh graded schools 1915-1919; Salisbury High School 
1919-1921; Davidson College 1921-1923; Wake Forest College 1924- 
1926; passed State Bar Examination, January 25, 1926. Lawyer. 
President Rowan County Bar Association. Civitan. Knights of 
Pythias; D.O.K.K., Suez Temple, No. 73; Winona Council No. 18, 
Jr. O.U.A.M. ; Kappa Sigma, Wake Forest College. Chancellor 
Commander Salisbury-Rowan No. 100, Knights of Pythias, 1927- 
1929; Financial Secretary Winona Council No. 18, Jr. O.U.A.M. 
1929-1930; Woodmen of the World; Patriotic Order, Sons of Amer- 
ica; Past President of Washington Camp No. 24; North Carolina 
Bar Association; Rowan County Bar Association. Chairman Demo- 
cratic Judicial Committee of 15th Judicial District. Member of 
House of Representatives of 1931, 1935, 1937, 1939, 1941 and 1943. 
Baptist, Deacon 1929; Teacher of Men's Bible Class for past 13 



448 North Carolina Manual 

years; former Superintendent of Adult Department of Sunday 
School. Married on November 23, 1934, to Miss Ruth Harrison, of 
Spencer, N. C. Two children: George Randolph Uzzell, Jr., born 
May 9, 1944 and Betty Ruth, born April 11, 1938. Address: Salis- 
bury, N. C. 

ORON MONTREVILLE VERNON 

Oron Montreville Vernon, Democrat, Representative from Gas- 
ton County, was born in Angeline, Henderson County, N. C. Son 
of Hilliard Watson and Julia Ann (Freeman) Vernon. Attended 
Public Schools of Henderson County; John Marshall Law School, 
Charlotte, N. C. Banker. President First State Bank and Trust 
Company, Bessemer City and Mount Holly. Member Mt. Holly 
Lions Club; formerly a Director. Mason; Master Whetstone Lodge 
No. 515, Bessemer City, 1933, 1934, 1935, and 1937. Member Mt. 
Holly Lodge and Gastonia, No. 66. Methodist. Chairman Board of 
Stewards, Mt. Holly. Delegate to General Conference, Atlantic 
City, 1932, and appointed on Board of Foreign Missions, serving 
four years. Married Miss Lillian Frances Kennedy, August 28, 
1912. Three children: Oron M., Jr., Robert K. and Carmen. Ad- 
dress, Mount Holly, N. C 

JAMES B. VOGLER 

James B. Vogler, Democrat, Representative from Mecklenburg 
County, was born in Charlotte, N. C, April 13, 1895; Son of the 
late James A. Vogler and Susan Caroline (Alexander) Vogler. At- 
tended the public schools of the city of Charlotte and Beard's Mili- 
tary Institute. Served as Secretary for the North Carolina Food 
and Grocery Distributors Code Authority during the NRA, and 
organized North Carolina under the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration for the food and grocery industry. Served as Director of 
the National Association of Retail Grocers Secretaries Association, 
as Chairman of the Fair Trades Council of the City of Charlotte. 
President of the Mecklenburg County Food Trades Council. In 
Januray of 1942 vas appointed by His Excellency, Governor J. 
Melville Broughton, as Director of the War Production Board Sal- 
vage activities in North Carolina and served in this capacity until 
March 15, 1944. Executive Secretary and Manager of the North 
Carolina Food Dealers Association and Editor of the Carolina 



Biographical Sketches 449 

Food Dealer. Methodist. Chairman of the Board of Stewards of 
the Brevard Street Methodist Church 1934-1935. Served in the 
General Assembly in the 1936 Special Session, the 1937 Session; 
was a member and Chairman of the Committee on Manufactures 
and Labor in the 1939 Session and in the 1941 Session was Chair- 
man on Counties, Cities and Towns; was the author of House Bill 
No. 815 introduced by Bost of Cabarrus, Vogler of Mecklenburg and 
Rudisill of Gaston, establishing the North Carolina Vocational 
Textile School. Married Miss Lillian Raymelle Ketchie, June 12, 
1916. Three children: James Brevard Vogler, Jr., U. S. Army Air 
Forces; John Thomas Vogler, Electrical Architect, Charleston Navy 
Yard, Charleston, S. C. and Dorothy Claudine Vogler, student Cen- 
tral High School, Charlotte, N. C. Address: 2011 Crescent Avenue, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

FITZHUGH ERNEST WALLACE 

Fitzhugh Ernest Wallace, Democrat, Representative from Le- 
noir County, was born in Wallace, N. C, December 14, 1889. Son 
of David Hugh and Mary Charlotte (Ellsworth) Wallace. Attended 
Davidson College two years; University of North Carolina three 
years, class of 1911; Law School, University of North Carolina. 
Lawyer. President North Carolina Bar Association and Member 
American Bar Association. Served as member. Council The North 
Carolina State Bar 1933-1938. Representative in the General As- 
sembly from Lenoir County 1939, 1941 and 1943. Mason. Shriner. 
Member Kappa Sigma Fraternity. Presbyterian. Married Miss 
Erwin Carter (Wallace), November 10, 1915. Four children: F. E. 
Wallace, Jr., Erwin C. Wallace, Hennie Greene and William Car- 
ter. Address: 306 West Washington Street, Kinston, N. C. 

JOSEPH PAUL WALLACE 

Joseph Paul Wallace, Democrat, Representative from Montgom- 
ery County, was born in Troy, N. C, October 29, 1905. Son of 
James Rufus and Abbie Lou (Wooley) Wallace. Graduated from 
Troy High School, 1925. Tire Recapping and Service Station Op- 
erator. Vice President Troy Rotary Club. Chairman Board of 
Commissioners of the Town of Troy, 1940-1942. President Young 
Democratic Club of Montgomery County, 1938-1942. Methodist. 
Church Treasurer, 1940-1942. Married Miss Miriam Rebecca Mc- 



450 North Carolina Manual 

Kenzie, December 25, 1934. Senator from the Eighteenth Senatorial 
District in the General Assembly of 1943. Two children: Patricia 
Susan and Rebecca Louise. Address: Troy, N. C. 

JOHN STRADLEY WATKINS 

John Stradley Watkins, Democrat, Representative from Gran- 
ville County, was born in Granville County, October 8, 1879. Son 
of John A. and Margaret (Reid) Watkins. Attended public schools 
of Granville County, 1885-1898; Scottsburg Normal College, 1898- 
1899. Farmer and Warehouseman. Member of Masons and Wood- 
men of the World. Secretary and Treasurer of Granville County 
Branch of the Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance Co., 1914 to present. 
Representative from Granville County in House of Representatives 
in 1923, 1925, and 1927. State Senator in 1935, 1939 and 1943. 
Baptist; Chairman of Board of Deacons. Married Miss Belle Nor- 
wood, 1905. Ten children. Address: Oxford, N. C, R.F.D. 4. 

SAMUEL EUGENE WELFARE 

Samuel Eugene Welfare, Democrat, Representative from For- 
syth County, was born July 30, 1883. Son of Edward Alexander 
and Susan Elizabeth (Rominger) Welfare. Attended Salem Boys 
School, 1889-1899; University of North Carolina School of Phar- 
macy, 1904-1905. Pharmacist; Owner Welfare's Drug Store; in 
same location for about thirty-two years. Member North Carolina 
and American Pharmaceutical Associations; President North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 1916; National Association of 
Retail Druggists; Winston-Salem Retail Merchants Association. 
Chancellor Commander Knights of Pythias. Moravian, Home 
Church. Sunday School Superintendent; Member Church Choir; 
Usher, twenty-five years. Married Miss Margaret Evans Smith, 
August 14, 1907. Five children. Address: 421 S. Main St., Winston- 
Salem, N. C. 

JOHN FERNANDO WHITE 

John Fernando White, Democrat, Representative from Chowan 
County, was born in Edenton, April 16, 1902. Son of Sidney John- 
son and Mary Christian (Goodwin) White. Attended Wake Forest 
College, 1922-1925; University Law School, 1925-1926. Lawyer. 



Biographical Sketches 451 

Judge Chowan County Court, 1928-1930. Member 115th Ambulance 
Company of the 4th Corps Area, Edenton, 1927-1928; rank, Ser- 
geant. Member of House of Representatives of 1931, 1935, 1937, 
1939 and 1943. City Attorney, 1940, 1941-1942. County Solicitor. 
Baptist. Married Miss Carolyn Juanita Bunch, March 16, 1930. 
One daughter: Carolyn Juanita, born July 10, 1933. Address: 
Edenton, N. C. 

WALTER WELLINGTON WHITE 

Walter Wellington White, Democrat, Representative from Per- 
quimans County, was born in that County, September 1, 1909. 
Son of J. N. and Mary L. (Overman) White. Attended schools of 
Hertford and Elizabeth City, N. C, Southern Shorthand and Busi- 
ness University, Norfolk, Virginia. Timber dealer. Chrysler and 
Plymouth Dealer; Oil Distributor. Member House of Representa- 
tives 1943. Married Miss Hazel Bright, 1939. One son: W. W., Jr., 
age four. Address: Hertford, N. C. 

JAMES VIVIAN WHITFIELD 

James Vivian Whitfield, Democrat, Representative from Pender 
County, was born in Seven Springs, N. C, July 23, 1894. Son of 
James Alexander and Helen Vivian (Powers) Whitfield. Attended 
Wallace High School; Horner Milietary School, Oxford, N. C, 
1909-1911; A.B. University North Carolina, 1915; M.A., 1919. 
Farmer. Captain in Reserve Corps of the Army, 1915-1917; Com- 
mandant Horner Military School, 1915-1917; Military Instructor, 
University North Carolina, 1917-1918. Member United States For- 
eign Service 1919-1927; served at Montevideo, Uruguay; Bahia 
Blanca, Argentina; Havana, Cuba; Matanzas, Cuba and Monterey, 
Mexico. Baptist. One child: John Whitfield. Address: Wallace, 
N. C, Rt. 3. 

CARL PERSON WORLEY 

Carl Person Worley, Democrat, Representative from Johnston 
County, was born in Pine Level, N. C, April 25, 1905. Son of Paul 
C. and Rosa (Barnes) Worley. Attended Selma High School. 
Manufacturer Carbonated Beverages. President North Cai'olina 
Bottlers Association, 1937-1939. Member Board of Commissioners 



452 North Carolina Manual 

Town of Selma; Chairman Johnston County Democratic Executive 
Committee, 1936-1940. Served in United States Navy, 1919. Mem- 
ber Selma Lodge No. 320, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
Sudan Temple, New Bern, N. C, Ancient and Arabic Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine; New Bern Consistory, No. 3, Ancient and Accepted 
Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Thirty-second Degree. Baptist. 
Church Clerk for several years. Married Miss Grace Willians, 
November 18, 1924. Two children: Carl P. Worley, Jr. (C-M) 
USNR, South Pacific, and Iris Christine Worley. Address: Selma, 
N. C. 

SAMUEL OTIS WORTHINGTON 

Samuel Otis Worthington, Democrat, Representative from Pitt 
County, was born in Winterville, N. C, January 24, 1898. Son of 
Samuel G. and Lydia Campbell (Smith) Worthington. Attended 
Rural Schools 1905-1912; Winterville High School 1912 to 1917; 
University of North Carolina, two years of academic work and 
two years of law, fall of 1917 through summer of 1921. Attorney. 
Served in the Naval unit of the S. A. T. C. at the University from 
about September 1, 1918, to some time in November 1918. Served 
in N. C. State Guard October, 1943 to October, 1944. Representa- 
tive from Pitt County in the General Assembly of 1939, 1941 and 
1943. Member Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity. Grand Chancellor 
of the Order of Knights of Pythias in the State of North Carolina 
from June 1930 to July 1931. Supreme Representative from Do- 
main of North Carolina to Supreme Lodge Knights of Pythias, 
1938-1946. Epscopalian. Married Miss Bessie Harrison April 29, 
1926. Two children: Lina Hackett Worthington, age fifteen; 
Samuel Otis Worthington, Jr., age nine. Address: Greenville, N. C. 

ANNIE E. COOPER 

principal clerk 

Mrs. Annie E. Cooper, Democrat, from Wake County, Principal 
Clerk of the House of Representatives, was born in Cleveland Coun- 
ty, June 7, 1901, daughter of John K. and Dora M. (Hough) Eaves. 
Attended Elementai-y and High Schools of Cabarrus County, also 
private schools; Kings Business College. Housewife; Seccretary- 
Treasurer Reliable Transport, Inc. Member Business and Prof es- 



Biographical Sketches 453 

sional Woman's Club. Eastern Star; Officer, 1944; Chaplain, 1945. 
Methodist. Married George B. Cooper, December 4, 1920. Two 
children: George B. Cooper, Jr. and Dora Anne Cooper. Address: 
201 Dixie Trail, Raleigh, N. C. 



OCCUPATIONS OF MEMBERS OF THE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 1945 



Senate 



LAWYERS 

Aiken, John W. 
Barnes, Wiley G. 
Earnhardt, Luther E. 
Carlyle, Irving E. 
Corey, Arthur B. 
' Daniel, E. A. 
Dolley, Steve 
Edney, Calvin R, 
Gay, Archie C. 
Hester, R. J., Jr. 
Hodges, Brandon P. 
Horton, 0. Lee 
Kesler, John C. 
Little, R. E. 
Lumpkin, Willie Lee 
Madry, W. Dennis 
Matheny, Wade B, 
Mitchell, Hugh G. 
Pittman, J. C. 
Price, J. Hampton 
Rose, Charles G. 
Smith, W. Erskine 
Ward, D. L. 
Whitaker, R. A. 

FARMERS 

Clark, W. G. 

Dolley, Steve 
Eagles, Joseph C. 
Jenkins, Chas. H. 
Little, R. E. 
Long, F. D. 
McBryde, Ryan 
Pate, Edv^-in 



Penland, A. L. 
Rowe, Roy 
Somers, W. B. 
Thomas, Edison M. 
Vann, Henry 
Whitaker, R. A. 

AUCTIONEER 

Penny, George T, 

AUTOMOBILE DEALERS 

Jenkins, Chas. H. 
Vann, Henry 

BANKERS 

Hodges, W. B. 

BUILDING & LOAN 

Currie, Claude 

BUSINESSMEN 

Barker, Carson M. 
Rogers, Carroll P. 

CONTRACTORS 

Blythe, Joe L. 

FERTILIZER DEALERS 

Clark, W. G. 
Long, F. D. 

FERTILIZER 

MANUFACTURER 

Wallace, Lawrence H. 



[454] 



Occupations 



455 



INSURANCE 

O'Berry, Thomas 



PUBLISHERS 

Weathers, Lee B. 



INSURANCE & LOANS 

Hundley, Geo. L. 

LIVE STOCK DEALERS 

Thomas, Edison M. 

LUMBERMAN 

McBryde, Ryan 

MANUFACTURERS 

Blythe, Joe L. 
Davis, Carlos E. 
Ross, Arthur 

MERCHANTS 

Applewhite, R. L. 
Clark, W. G. 
Culpepper, W. T. 
Eagles, Joseph C. 
Long, F. D. 



REALTORS 

Hampton, W. Roy 
Hundley, Geo. L. 
Penny, George T. 

TEACHERS 

Penland, A. L. 

THEATRE OWNERS 

Rowe, Roy 
Vann, Henry 

TOBACCONISTS 

Eagles, Joseph C. 
Wallace, Lawrence H. 

TRANSPORTATION CO. 
OWNERS 

Somers, W. B. 



House of Representatives 



LAWYERS 

Averitt, F. M. 
Barber, Wade 
Barker, Oscar G. 
Bell, C. L. 
Bender, R. P. 
Bost, E. T., Jr. 
Bridger, James A. 
Burns, Robert P. 
Caveness, Shelley B. 
Clark, Irwin 
Craig, George W. 
Crissman, Water E. 



Dellinger, David P. 
Edwards, McKinley 
Fountain, Ben E. 
Gantt, Robert M., Sr. 
Goodman, Arthur 
Griffin, Clarence W. 
Gi'imes, Bryan 
Hatch, William T. 
Horn, Charles C. 
Kearney, H. C. 
Kerr, John, Jr. 
LeGrand, John Q. 
Loftin, E. L. 



456 



North Carolina Manual 



Martin, G. A. 
Moore, Larry I., Jr. 
Moseley, Robert 
Pearsall, Thomas J. 
Pritchett, J. T. 
Ramsay, Kerr Craige 
Ransdell, N. F. 
Richardson, Oscar L. 
Ruark, J. W. 
Rutledge, J. Carlyle 
Shuford, George A. 
Story, T. E. 
Taylor, W. Frank 
Uzzell, George R. 
Wallace, F. E. 
White, John F. 
Worthington, Sam 0. 



Herbert, F. 
Horn, Charles C. 
Houser, Chas. F. 
Hutchins, J, H., Dr. 
James, Vernon G. 
Long, R. B. 
McCracken, Wayne R. 
Moore, Larry L, Jr. 
Palmer, Glenn C. 
Pearsall, Thomas J. 
Quinn, C. E. 
Rabb, J. C. 
Rountree, W. J. 
Royster, Fred S. 
Spruill, C. Wayland 
Watkins, Jno. S. 
Whitfield, J. V. 



FARMERS 

Askew, E. S. 
Blalock, U. B. 
Boswood, G. C. 
Bridger, James A. 
Buie, J. P. 
Burgess, S. E. 
Burgin, L. L. 
Bynum, T. C. 
Chalk, John D. 
Cover, Mrs. G. W. 
Davis, Geo. W. 
Deal, Hayden 
Edwards, Alonzo C. 
Eggers, S. C. 
Fisher, Ralph R. 
Graham, L P. 
Gunn, Jno. 0. 
Hardison, Burl G. 
Harris, H. R. 
Hart, M. Donley 



ACCOUNTANTS 

Fields, W. R. 

AUTOMOBILE DEALERS 

Allison, Dan M. 
Blalock, U. B. 
Bridger, James A. 
Gunn, Jno. 0. 
White, W. W. 

BANKERS 

Chalk, John D. 
Harris, H. R. 
Rountree, W. J. 
Vernon, O. M. 

BARBERS 

Gobble, F. L. 

BOOKKEEPERS 

McDonald, W. H. 



Occupations 



457 



BUSINESSMEN 

Fisher, Ralph R. 

CLERGYMEN 

Hart, M. Donley 

DAIRYMEN 

Moore, Larry I., Jr. 
Morris, Harvey 
Palmer, Glenn C. 

DENTISTS 

Hutchins, J. H, 

DRY CLEANERS 

Peele, W. H. (Jack) 

FERTILIZER DEALERS 

Evans, Merrill 

GINNERS 

Graham, I. P. 

HOMEMAKERS 

Cover, Mrs. G. W. 

INSURANCE 

Gibbs, H. S. 
Meekins, Theo. S. 
Stone, T. Clarence 
Stoney, A. B. 
Umstead, John W., Jr. 

JOBBER PETROLEUM 
PRODUCTS 

Cohoon, C. Earl 

LUMBERMEN 

Marshall, William F. 
White, W. W. 



MANUFACTURERS 

Bridger, James A. 
Currie, Wilbur H. 
Dobson, Henry C. 
Sellars, Water R, 
Shuford, Harley F. 
Spruill, C. Wayland 
Worley, Carl P. 

MERCHANTS 

Allen, J. LeRoy 
Allison, Dan M. 
Blalock, U. B. 
Boswood, G. C. 
Cohoon, C. Earl 
Eggers, S. C. 
Hardison, Burl G. 
Houser, Chas. F. 
Morton, J. J. 
Overby, Allison L. 
Pearsall, Thomas J. 
Quinn, C. E. 
Rabb, J. C. 
Sellars, Walter R. 
Spruill, C. Wayland 
Stone, T. Clarence 
Turner, D. E., Sr. 
Vogler, James B, 

OIL DISTRIBUTORS 

Allison, Dan M. 
White, W. W. 

PHARMACISTS 

Burgiss, T. Roy 
Welfare, Sam E. 

PHYSICIANS 

Bennett, W. L. 
Brown, G. W. 
Crawford, J. H. 



458 



North Carolina Manual 



Peterson, C. A. 
Smith, J. A. 



TEXTILES 

Alexander, R. V, 



PUBLISHERS 

Arthur, W. J. (Billy) 
Horner, W. E. 
Moore, 0. L. 



TIRE RECAPPING AND 
SERVICE STATION 
OPERATOR 

Wallace, J. P. 



RAILROAD MAIL CLERK 
(Retired) 
Honeycutt, Chas. F. 

REALTORS 

Chalk, John D. 
Eggers, S. C. 
Gibbs, H. S. 
Hutton, Frank R. 
Meekins, Theo. S. 
Powers, Lee L. 

ROLLER MILLS 

Richardson, S. Girard 

SALESMEN 

Honeycutt, Chas. P. 
Tonissen, Ed. T. 



TOBACCONISTS 

Gass, Rex 
Royster, Fred S. 

TOWN OFFICER 

Brown, J. Percy 

TRUCK LINE OWNERS 

Evans, Merrill 
James, Vernon G. 

UNDERTAKERS 

Rountree, W. J. 

WAREHOUSEMEN 

Watkins, Jno. S. 



PART VIII 
OFFICIAL REGISTER 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, New York 

Vice President Harry S. Truman, Missouri 

The Cabinet 

Secretary of State Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., New York 

Secretary of the Treasury .; Henry Morgenthau, Jr., New York 

Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson, New York 

Attorney General Francis Biddle, Pennsylvania 

Postmaster General Frank C. Walker, New York 

Secretary of the Navy James V. Forrestal, New York 

Secretary of the Interior , Harold L. Ickes, Illinois 

Secretary of Agriculture Claude R. Wickard, Indiana 

Secretary of Commerce Henry A. Wallace, Iowa 

Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins, New York 

NORTH CAROLINA SENATORS AND 
REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS 

Senators 

JosiAH W. Bailey Raleigh 

Clyde R. Hoey Shelby 

Representatives 

First District Herbert C. Bonner Washington 

Second District John H. Kerr Warrenton 

Third District Praham A. Barden New Bern 

Fourth District Harold D. Cooley Nashville 

Fifth District John H. Folger Mount Airy 

Si.\th District Carl T. Durham Chapel Hill 

Seventh District J. Bayard Clark Fayetteville 

Eighth District W. O. Burgin < Lexington 

Ninth District R. L. Doughton Laurel Springs 

Tenth District Joe W. Ervin Charlotte 

Eleventh District A. L. Bulwinklb Gastonia 

Twelfth District Zebulon Weaver Asheville 

UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT 

Harlan Fisk Stone Chief Justice New York 

Owen J. Roberts Associate Justice Pennsylvania 

Hugo L. Black Associate Justice Alabama 

Stanley Form an Reed Associate Justice Kentucky 

Felix Frankfurter .Associate Justice Massachusetts 

William O. Douglas Associate Justice Connecticut 

Frank Murphy Associate Justice Michigan 

Robert H. Jackson Associate Justice New York 

Wiley B. Rutledge Associate Justice Iowa 

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

Judges 

Eastern District I. M. Meekins Elizabeth City 

Middle District J. J. Hayes Wilkcsboro 

Western District E. Y. Webb Shelby 



[461] 



462 North Carolina Manual 

Clerks 

Eastern District Mrs. Madelyn D. Dixon Raleigh 

Middle District Henry Reynolds Greensboro 

Western District J. Y. Jordan Asheville 

District Attorneys 

Eastern District J. O. Carr Wilmington 

Middle District Carlisle W. Higgins Sparta 

Western District T. L. Caudle, Jr Wadesboro 

UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS 

For the Fourth Circuit 
Judge John J. Parker Charlotte 



STATE GOVERNMENT 

LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

President of the Senate L. Y. Ballentine Wake 

Speaker of the House of 

Representatives Oscar L. Richardson Union 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

Governor R. Gregg Cherry Gaston 

Lieutenant-Governor L. Y. Ballentine Wake 

Secretary of State *Thad Eure Hertford 

Auditor *George Ross Pou Johnston 

Treasurer *Charles M. Johnson Pender 

Superintendent of Public 

Instruction *Clyde A. Erwin Rutherford 

Commissioner of Agriculture *W. Kerr Scott Alamance 

Commissioner of Labor *Forrest H. Shuford Guilford 

Commissioner of Insurance *Williani P. Hodges Martin 

Attorney-General Harry McMuIlan Beaufort 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT 

Justices of the Supreme Court 

Chief Justice W. P. Stacy New Hanover 

Associate Justice Michael Schenck Henderson 

Associate Justice W. A. Devin Granville 

Associate Justice M. V. Barnhill Nash 

Associate Justice J. Wallace Winborne McDowell 

Associate Justice A. A. F. Seawell Lee 

Associate Justice E. B. Denny ^ Gaston 

Judges of the Superior Courts 

First District C. Everett Thompson Pasquotank-Elizabeth City 

Second District W. J. Bone Nash-Nashville 

Third District R. Hunt Parker Halifax-Roanoke Rapids 

Fourth District Clawson L. Williams Lee-Sanford 

Fifth District J. Paul Frizzelle Greene-Snow Hill 

Sixth District Henry L. Stevens, Jr Duplin-Warsaw 

Seventh District W. C. Harris Wake-Raleigh 

Eighth District J. J. Burney New Hanover-Wilmington 

Ninth District Q. K. Nimocks, Jr Cumberland-Fayetteville 

Tenth District Leo Carr Alamance-Burlington 

Eleventh District J. H. Clement Fors>-th-Walkertown 

Twelfth District H. Hoyle Sink Guilford-Greensbora 

Thirteenth District F. D. Phillips Richmond-Rockingham 

Fourteenth District William H. Bobbitt Mecklenburg-Charlotte 

Fifteenth District Frank M. Armstrong Montgomery-Troy 

Sixteenth District Wilson Warlick Catawba-Newton 

Seventeenth District J. A. Rousseau Wilkes-Wilkesboro 

Eighteenth District J. W. Pless, Jr McDowell-Marion 

Nineteenth District Zeb V. Nettles Buncombe- Asheville 

Twentieth District Felix E. Alley Haywood- Waynesville 

Twenty-first District Allen H. Gwyn Bockingham-Reidsville 

* Compose the Council of State (Attorney-General is the legal adviser to the- 
Executive Department). 



[463] 



464 North Carolina Manual 

Special Judges 

W. H. S. Burgwyn Northampton-Woodland 

Richard D. Dixon Chowan-Edenton 

Luther Hamilton Carteret-Morehead City 

Jeff D. Johnson, Jr Sampson-Clinton 

Hubert E. Olive Davidson-Lexington 

J. C. Rudisill Catawba-Newton 

Emergency Judges 

H. A. Grady Craven-New Bern 

G. V. Cowper Lenoir-Kinston 

Solicitors 

First District Chester R. Morris Currituck-Currituck 

Second District Donnell Gilliam Edgecombe-Tarboro 

Third District E. R. Tyler Bertie-Roxobel 

Fourth District W. J. Hooks Johnston-Kenly 

Fifth District D. M. Clark Pitt-Greenville 

Sixth District J. Abner Barker Sampson-Roseboro 

Seventh District William Y. Bickett Wake-Raleigh 

Eighth District Clifton L. Moore Pender-Burgaw 

Ninth District F. E. Carlyle Robeson-Lumberton 

Tenth District William H. Murdock Durham-Durham 

Robert H. Sykes (acting) Durham 

Eleventh District J. Erie McMichael Forsyth-Winston-Salem 

Twelfth District J. Lee Wilson.,.., Davidson-Lexington 

Thirteenth District Edward H. Gibson Scotland-Laurinburg 

Fourteenth District J. G. Carpenter Gaston-Gastonia 

Fifteenth District Chas. L. Coggin Rowan-Salisbury 

Sixteenth District L, S. Spurling Caldwell-Lenoir 

Seventeenth District A. E. Hall Yadkin-Yadkinville 

Eighteenth District C. O. Ridings Rutherford-Forest City 

Nineteenth District J. S. Howell Buncombe-Asheville 

Twentieth District John M. Queen Haywood-Waynesville 

Twenty-first District R. J. Scott Stokes-Danbury 

HEADS OF ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS 
AND COMMISSIONS 

Adjutant General J. Van B. Meets New Hanover 

Department of Agriculture W. Kerr Scott, Commissioner Alamance 

Board of Alcoholic Control Carl L. Williamson, Chairman Wake 

State Department of Ar- 
chives and History C. C. Crittenden, Director .'. Wake 

Banking Department Gurney P. Hood, Commissioner Wayne 

Commission for the Blind Dr. Roma S. Cheek, Eexcutive Secretary Graham 

Budget Bureau R. G. Deyton, Assistant Director Yancey 

Buildings and Grounds John Bray, Superintendent Wake 

State Board of Charities and 

Public Welfare Dr. Ellen B. Winston, Commissioner Wake 

Department of Conservation 

and Development R. Bruce Etheridge, Director Dare 

Board of Correction and 

Training S. E. Leonard, Commissioner Edgecombe 

N. C. Council for National 

Defense R. L. McMillan, Director Wake 

State Board of Education Paul Reid, Acting Comptroller Surry 

State Board of Elections R. C. Maxwell, Executive Secretary Wake 

State Employment Service (Loaned to War Manpower Commission 

for duration) 
State Board of Health Dr. Carl V. Reynolds, Secretary Buncombe 



State Government 465 

State Highway and Public 

Works Commission Charles Ross, Acting Chairman Harnett 

N. C. Hospitals Board of 

Control R. M. Rothgeb, Business Manager Wake 

Industrial Commission T. A. Wilson, Chairman Forsyth 

Department of Insurance William P. Hodges, Commissioner Martin 

Bureau of Investigation Thomas Creekmore, Director Wake 

Department of Justice Harry McMullan, Attorney General Beaufort 

Department of Labor Forrest H. Shuford, Commissioner Guilford 

Library Commission Miss Marjorie Beal, Secretary Wake 

State Library Miss Carrie L. Broughton, Librarian Wake 

Local Government Commission W. E. Easterling, Secretary Wake 

Merit System Council "Dr. Frank T. DeVyver, Supervisor Durham 

Department Motor Vehicles T. Boddie Ward, Commissioner Wilson 

Municipal Board of Control Thad Eure, Secretary (Ex-offcio) Hertford 

-Paroles Commission William Dunn, Jr. Acting Commissioner Craven 

State Planning Board Felix A. Grisette, Managing Director Orange 

Probation Commission J. Harry Sample, Director Buncombe 

Division of Purchase and 

Contract W. Z. Betts, Director Wake 

Retirement System Baxter Durham, Secretary Wake 

Department of Revenue Edwin Gill, Commissioner Scotland 

Rural Electrification Authority Gwyn B. Price, Chairman Ashe 

Department of Tax Research ... A. J. Maxwell, Director .Wake 

Unemployment Compensation 

Commission , A. L. Fletcher, Chairman Wake 

Utilities Commission Stanley Winborne, Chairman Hertford 

War Man Power Commission ... Dr. J. S. Dorton, Director Cleveland 

Weights and Measures C. D. Baucom, Superintendent Wake 

World War Veterans' Loan 

Fund Mi-s. Grace W. Hinton, Acting Commissioner.... Vfz.'ke 

HEADS OF STATE HOSPITALS, CORRECTIONAL AND 
EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

Confederate Woman's Home Mrs. Ina Foust Smith Fayetteville 

Correctional 

White 
Eastern Carolina Industrial Training 

School for Boys Wm. D. Clark Rocky Mount 

Industrial Farm Colony for Women Mrs. Maude Jimison Kinston 

State Home and Industrial School for 

Girls, Samarcand Miss Reva Mitchell Eagle Springs 

Stonewall Jackson Manual Training 

and Industrial School S. G. Hawfield Concord 

Negro 

Morrison Training School for 

Negro Boys Paul R. Brown Hoffman 

Training School for Negro Girls Miss May D. Holmes Rocky Mount 

Educational 

White 

Appalachian State Teachers College R. B. Dougherty Boone 

East Carolina Teachers College Howard J. McGinnis (Acting) ... Greenville 

N. C. School for the Deaf Dr. C. E. Rankin Morganton 

Oxford Orphanage Rev. C. K. Proctor Oxford 

* Address : Durham, N. C. All other official addresses: Raleigh, N. C. 



466 North Carolina Manual 

Pembroke State College for Indians Ralph D. Wellons Pembroke 

The State School for the Blind G. E. Lineberry Raleigh 

University of North Carolina ; president Frank P. Graham Chapel Hill 

Chapel Hill Unit— Chancellor R. B. House Chapel Hill 

State College Unit— Chancellor J. W. Harrelson Raleigh 

Woman's College Unit — Chancellor W. C. Jackson Greensboro 

Western North Carolina Teachers 

College H. T. Hunter Cullowhee 

Negro 

Agricultural and Technical College F. D. Bluford Greensboro 

Elizabeth City State Teachers College ...H. L. Trigg Ehzabeth City 

Fayetteville State Teachers College J. W. Seabrook Fayetteville 

N. C. College for Negroes, Durham J. E. Shepherd Durham 

The Colored Orphanage of North 

Carolina T. A. Hamme Oxford 

The State School for the Blind x^ , . , 

and Deaf G. E. Lineberry Raleigh 

Winston-Saiem State Teachers College ...F. L. Atkins Winston-Salem 

Hospitals 

White 

Caswell Training School Dr. W. T. Parrott Kinston 

N. C. Sanatoriums for Treatment of 

Tuberculosis: „ ^ ,, ^ . c j. • 

N. C. Sanatorium Dr. P. P. McCain Sanatorium 

Eastern Sanatorium Dr. H. F. Eason Wilson 

Western Sanatorium Dr. S. M. Bittinger Black Mountain 

N. C. Orthopedic Hospital Dr. W. M. Roberts Gastoma 

State Hospital Dr. John R. Saunders Morganton 

State Hospital , Dr. J. F. Owen Raleigh 

Negro 
State Hospital Dr. Frank L. Whelpley Goldsboro 

HEADS OF SOME ORGANIZATIONS OTHER THAN STATE AGENCIES 

N. C. Association Clerks „,. „ , 

Superior Court W. E. Church, Secretary-Treasurer Wmston-Salem 

N. C. Association County 

Commissioners J. L. Skinner Secretary Littleton 

State Board of Housing W. T. Hatch, Secretary ; S^H^I? 

N. C. Burial Association Claude C. Abernathy, Commissioner Raleigh 

N. C. Citizens Association, _ t-i-l 

jjjc Lloyd Gnffin, Executive Vice President Raleigh 

N. C. Education Association. Miss Ethel Perkins, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

N. C. Inspection and -n i • i_ 

Rating Bureau Landon Hill, Secretary Kaleigh 

Institute of Government Albert Coates, Director Chapel Hill 

N. C. League of « . t, . 

Municipalities Mrs. Davetta L. Steed, Acting Executive 

Secretary Raleigh 

N. C. Negro Teachers „ _, , . , 

Association W. L. Green, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

Division Public Assistance.... Roy Eugene Brown, Director Raleigh 

Sheriffs Association John R. Morris, Secretary-Treasurer Wilmington 

Social Security Board John H. Ingle, Manager 5^!''i^^ 

N C State Bar E. L. Cannon, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT 

ALAMANCE 

Alamance County was fonned in 1849 from Orange. The name is supposed to 
be derived from an Indian word meaning "blue clay". The county gets its name 
from Alamance Creek, on the banks of which was fought the battle between the 
colonial troops under Governor Tryon and the Regulators, May 16, 1771. 

Population, 57,427 County Seat, Graham 

State Senator 16th District W. Dennis Madry Burlington 

Member House of Representatives Walter R. Sellars Burlington 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court F. L. Williamson Graham 

Register of Deeds J. G. Tingen Graham 

Sheriff E. L. Ivey Graham 

Treasurer Geo. E. Holt, Jr Graham 

Tax Supervisor C. M. Williams Graham 

Tax Collector M. A. Coble Graham 

County Accountant .C. M. Williams Graham 

Coroner Dr. F. L. Smith Burlington 

Surveyor W. T. Hall Graham 

Supt. of Health Dr. J. Lindsay Cook Graham 

Supt. of Schools M. E. Yount Graham 

Supt. of Public Welfare Miss Clyde Norcum Graham 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Katherine Millsap Burlington 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Carrie S. Wilson Graham 

Farm Dem. Agent J. W. Bason Graham 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Hai^vey Johnson Graham 

Chmn. Bd. Education T. E. Powell, Jr Elon College 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. L. Shoffner Burlington 

Game Warden Vance Perry Graham 

County Attorney L. C. Allen Burlington 

County Librarian Mary Cutler Burlington 

General County Court : 

Judge A. M. Carroll Burlington 

Solicitor George A. Long Burlington 

Commission*:rs 

Chairman C. M. Williams Burlington 

Commissioner A. B. Fitch Mebane 

Commissioner W. C. Sartin Burlington 

Commissioner Ralph H. Scott Haw River, Rt. 1 

Commissioner J. Griffin McClure Graham 

ALEXANDER 

Alexander County was formed in 1847 from Iredell, Caldwell, and Wilkes. 
Was named in honor of William J. Alexander, of Mecklenburg County, several 
times a member of the Legislature and Speaker of the House of Commons. 

Population, 13,454 County Seat, Taylorsville 

State Senator 28th District O. Lee Horton Morganton 

Member House of Representatives . Hayden Deal Taylorsville 

Clerk of Court Dallas A. Campbell Taylorsville 

Register of Deeds Rayford F. Poole Taylorsville 

Sheriff U- L. Hafer Taylorsville 

Auditor Walter Owen Burlington 

Tax Supervisor Rom Moose Taylorsville 

[467] 



468 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Tax Collector U. L. Hafer Taylorsville 

County Accountant .W. F. Woodfin Taylorsville 

Coroner JE. A. Adams Taylorsville 

Surveyor Seth Deal Pores Knob 

Supt. of Schools Sloane W. Payne Taylorsville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Luther Dyson .^.....Taylorsville 

Home Dem. Agent Lois Marsh Taylorsville 

Farm Dem. Agent M. C. Colvard Taylorsville 

Chmn. Bd. Education W. S. Patterson Stony Point 

Chmn. Bd. Elections R. L. Snow Taylorsville 

Game Warden R. W. Pearson Pores Knob 

County Attorney Sam Poole Taylorsville 

Commissioners 

Chairman H. D. Fincannon Hiddenite 

Commissioner F. S. Childers Taylorsville 

Commissioner P. L. Ritchie Tayloi-sville 

ALLEGHANY 

Alleghany County was formed in 1859 from Ashe. The name is derived from 
an Indian tribe in the limits of North Carolina. 

Population, 8,341 County Seat, Sparta 

State Senator 29th District Edison M. Thomas Jefferson 

Member House of Representatives T. Roy Burgiss Sparta 

Clerk of Court S. O. Gambill Sparta 

Register of Deeds ..L. E. Edwards Sparta 

Sheriff Jesse Moxley Sparta 

Treasurer Jesse Moxley Sparta 

Auditor Miss Clyde Fields Sparta 

Tax Supervisor Johnnie Gambill Independence, Va. 

Tax Collector Jesse Moxley Sparta 

County Accountant Miss Clyde Fields Sparta 

Coroner Dr. B. O. Choate Sparta 

Surveyor C. G. Fender Stratford 

Supt. of Schools Miss Clyde Fields Sparta 

Supt. of Public Welfare Swanson Edwards Sparta 

Home Dem. Agent : Frances E. Capel Sparta 

Farm Dem. Agent R- E. Black Sparta 

Chmn. Bd. Education G. N. Evans Barette 

Chmn. Bd. Elections G. Glenn Nichols Sparta 

Game Warden R. D. Gentry Sparta 

Forest Warden R. D. Gentry Sparta 

County Attorney R. F. Crouse Sparta 

Juvenile Court: _ 

Judge S. O. Gambill, Clerk Sparta 

Commissioners 

Chairman Jas. Mc. D. Wagoner Whitehead 

Commissioner G. Tom Perry Piney Creek 

Commissioner R. L. Hendrix Glade Valley 

ANSON 
Anson County was formed in 1749 from Bladen. Was named in honor of 
George, Lord Anson, a celebrated English admiral who circumnavigated the globe. 
He lived for awhile on the Peedee in South Carolina. In 1761 he was given the 



County Government 469 

honor of bringing to her marriage with King George III, Charlotte, Princess of 
Meclclenburg, for whom Mecklenburg County was named. 

Population, 28,443 County Seat, Wadesboro 

State Senators 19th District W. Erskine Smith Albemarle 

R. E. Little Wadesboro 

Member House of Representatives U. B. Blalock Wadesboro 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court Harrington T. Hill Wadesboro 

Register of Deeds Francis E. Liles Wadesboro 

Sheriff S. M. Gaddy Wadesboro 

Auditor F. E. Liles Wadesboro 

Tax Supervisor F. E. Liles Wadesboro 

Tax Collector W. C. Mangum Wadesboro 

County Accountant F. E. Liles Wadesboro 

Coroner H. H. Leavitt Wadesboro 

Surveyor Frank S. Clarke Ansonville 

Supt. of Health Dr. L. Wallin Wadesboro 

Supt. of Schools J. O. Bowman Wadesboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Miss Mai-y Robinson Wadesboro 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Rosalind Redfeam Wadesboro 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Margaret C. Rogers Wadesboro 

Farm Dem. Agent J. W. Cameron Wadesboro 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent W. C. Cooper Wadesboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education , K. M. Hardison Wadesboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. L. Ashcraft Wadesboro 

Game Warden P. J. Kiker, Jr Wadesboro 

Forest Warden Jesse R. Ratliff Wadesboro Rt. 3 

County Attorney H. P. Taylor Wadesboro 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge S. F. Caligan Wadesboro 

Solicitor Geo. C. Childs Wadesboro 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. F. Allen Wadesboro 

Commissioner E. Y. Ratliff Wadesboro Rt. 3 

Commissioner J. Paul Teal Wadesboro 

Commissioner J. B. Wall Lilesville 

Commissioner L. Huntley Peachland Rt. 2 

ASHE 

Ashe County was formed in 1799 from Wilkes. Was named in honor of 
Samuel Ashe of New Hanover, brother of General John Ashe. Samuel Ashe was a 
revolutionary patriot, one of the first judges of the state, and afterwards governor. 

Population, 22,664 County Seat, Jefferson 

State Senator 29th District Edison M. Thomas Jefferson 

Member House of Representatives M. Donley Hart Tuckerdale 

Clerk of Court C. S. Neal Jefferson 

Register of Deeds J. D. Stansberry Jefferson 

Sheriff John W. Goodman Jefferson 

Treasurer..., John W. Goodman Jefferson 

Tax Supervisor ,H. H. Burgess Jefferson 

Tax Collector Mrs. Elizabeth Miller Jefferson 

County Accountant C, S. Neal Jefferson 

Coroner R. R. Badger W. Jefferson 

Surveyor W. P. Colvard Grassy Creek 

Supt. of Schools A. B. Hurt Jefferson 

Supt. of Public Welfare Miss Ruth Tugman W. Jefferson 



470 North Carolina Manual 

OSJice Officer Address 

Home Di>m. Agent Doris Whitesides Jefferson 

Farm Dom. Agent Roy H. Grouse Jefferson 

Chmn. H(l. Education V. C. Lillard Creston 

Chmn. lUl. Elections H. H. Lemly Fleetwood 

Game Warden H. T. Goodman Jefferson 

County Attorneys W. B. Austin Jefferson 

Ira T. Johnston Jefferson 

Commissioners 

Chairman W. E. Vannoy W. Jefferson 

Commissioner Mack G. Edwards W. Jefferson 

Commissioner Edward Osborne Fig 

AVERY 

Avery County was formed in 1911 from Mitchell, Watauga, and Caldwell. Was 
named in honor of Colonel Waightstill Avery "of Revolutionary fame," Attorney- 
general of North Carolina, 1777-1779. 

Population, 13,561 County Seat. Newland 

State Senator 30th District Calvin R. Edney Mars Hill 

Member House of Representatives W. R. Fields Elk Park 

Clerk of Court C. H. Pittman Newland 

Register of Deeds Grant Webb Newland 

Sheriff A. T. Garland Newland 

Treasurer Avery County Bank Newland 

Auditor .W. R. Fields Newland 

Tax Supervisor Ernest Johnson Newland 

Tax Collector Ernest Johnson .' Newland 

County Accountant .W. R. Fields Newland 

Coroner Dr. E. H. Sloop Crossnore 

Surveyor T. W. Clapp Plumtree 

Supt. of Health Dr. B. B. McGuire Spruce Pine 

Supt. of Schools George Bowman Elk Park 

Supt. of Public Welfare W. W. Braswell Montezuma 

Home Dem. Agent Georgia P. Cohoon Newland 

Farm Dem. Agent C. B. Baird Newland 

Chmn. Bd. Education Carl Wiseman Ingalls 

Chmn. Bd. Elections ...Lloyd Franklin Three Mile 

Game Warden F. Y. Benbow Newland 

Forest Warden Jim Vance Crossnore 

County Attorney Chas. Hughes Newland 

County Librarian". .Mrs. D. H. Hughes Newland 

Commissioners 

Chairman Lee Sturgill Linvilje 

Commissioner Robert S. Burleson Senia 

Commissioner Sam L. Heaton Ingalls 

BEAUFORT 

Beaufort County was formed in 1705 from Bath. Was first called Archdale 
and name changed to Beaufort about 1712. It was named in honor of Henry 
Somerset, Duke of Beaufort, who in 1709 became one of the Lords Proprietors of 
Carolina. He purchased the share originally owned by the Duke of Albemarle. 

Population, 36,431 County Seat, Washington 

State Senators 2nd District .W. Roy Hampton Plymouth 

E. A. Daniel Washington 

Member House of Representatives Bryan Grimes Washington 

Clerk of Court N. Henry Moore Washington 

Register of Deeds C. C. Duke Washington 



County Government 471 

Office Officer Address 

Sheriff William Rumley Washington 

Treasurer J. S. Benner Washington 

Auditor .J. S. Benner Washington 

Tax Supervisor J. S. Benner Washington 

Tax Collector W. A. Blount, Jr Washington 

County Accountant J. S. Benner Washington 

Coroner Richard F. Cherry Washington 

Surveyor H. H. Wesley Washington 

Supt. of Health Dr. D. E. Ford Washington 

Supt. of Schools M. T. Lambeth Washington 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Eliza H. Randolph Washington 

Home Dem. Agent Violet Alexander Washington 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Vivian Harris Washington 

Farm Dem. Agent W. L. McGahey Washington 

Chmn. Bd. Education Charles Cowell Washington 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Jno. G. Bragaw Washington 

Game Warden D. Warren Lupton, Jr. Pantego 

Forest Warden Albert Woolard Washington 

County Attorney E. A. Daniel Washington 

County Librarian Miss Elizabeth H. House Washington 

Recorder's Courts : 

Beaufort 

Judge L. E. Mercer (Acting) Washington 

Solicitor ..John A. Mayo (Acting) Washington 

Aurora 

Solicitor John A. Mayo Washington 

Belhaven 

Judge .W. S. Reddick Belhaven 

Solicitor John A. Mayo Washington 

Commissioners 

Chairman .W. R. Roberson, Sr Washington 

Commissioner Plummer Nicholson Washington 

Commissioner Ben Winfield Chocowinity 

Commissioner D. Oscar Moore Chocowinity 

Commissioner E. V. Swindell Bath 

BERTIE 

Bertie County was formed in 1722 from Bath. Was named in honor of James 
and Henry Bertie, Lords Proprietors, who in 1728 owned the share of Lord 
Clarendon. 

Population, 26,201 County Seat, Windsor 

State Senators First District Chas. H. Jenkins Aulander 

W. T. Culpeper Elizabeth City 

Member House of Representatives . C. Wayland Spruill Windsor 

Clerk of Court Geo. C. Spoolman Windsor 

Register of Deeds L. S. Mizelle Windsor 

Sheriff F. M. Dunstan Windsor 

Treasurer Mrs. Ethel R. Cherry Windsor 

Tax Supervisor L. S. Mizelle Windsor 

Tax Collector Lacy M. Early Windsor 

County Accountant L. S. Mizelle Windsor 

Coroner Goodwin Byrd .Windsor 

Surveyor J. B. Parker Windsor 

Supt. of Health Dr. J. M. Jackson Windsor 

Supt. of Schools Herbert W. Early Windsor 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Harry Smith Colerain 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Virginia Patrick Windsor 



472 North Carolina Manual 

Office Offi.cer Address 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Pennie P. Battle Windsor 

Farm Dem. Agent B. E. Grant Windsor 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent JMaurice W. Coleman Windsor 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. P. Rascoe Windsor 

Chmn. Bd. Elections E. G. Cherry Windsor 

Game Warden W. L. Smallwood ^'Windsor 

Forest Warden B. F. Burkett Windsor 

County Attorney John R. Jenkins Windsor 

Recorder's Court : 

Jufige J. B. Davenport Windsor 

Solicitor J. H. Spruill Windsor 

Commissioners 

Chairman W. R. Lawrence Colerain 

Commissioner H. O. Raynor Powellsville 

Commissioner J. C. Joyner Anlander RFD 

Commissioner J. W. Cooper Windsor 

Commissioner H. G. Bland Kelford 

BLADEN 

Bladen County was formed in 1734 from Bath. Was named in honor of 
Martin Bladen, one of the members of the Board of Trade which had charge of 
colonial affairs. 

Population, 27,156 County Seat, Elizabethtown 

State Senators 10th District Charles G. Rose Fayetteville 

R. J. Hester, Jr Elizabethtown 

Member House of Representatives James A. Bridger Bladenboro 

Clerk of Court *Carl C. Campbell Elizabethtown 

Mrs. Carl C. Campbell, 

„ . Acting C.S.C. Elizabethtown 

Register of Deeds Donald T. Townsend Elizabethtown 

Sheriff H. Manly Clark Elizabethtown 

Treasurer Bank of Elizabethtown Elizabethtown 

Auditor jD. M. Calhoun Elizabethtown 

Tax Supervisor D. M. Calhoun Elizabethtown 

Ta.x Collector H. Milton Chason Elizabethtown 

Coroner T. Weston Young Elizabethtown 

Surveyor. R. s. Gillespie Elizabethtown 

Supt. of Health Dr. R. S. Cromartie Elizabethtown 

Supt. of Schools J. S. Blair Elizabethtown 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Martha P. Taylor Elizabethtown 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Lillie L. Hester Elizabethtown 

Negro Home Dem. Agent .'. Mrs. Mamie P. Moore Elizabethtown 

Farm Dem. Agent R. B. Harper Elizabethtown 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Alvin C. McLendon Elizabethtown 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. S. S. Hutchinson Bladenboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections P. W. Jessup Elizabethtown 

Game Warden E. W. Woodell " Dublin 

Forest Warden JVI. H. McQueen Clarkton 

County Attorney ,H. H. Clark Elizabethtown 

County Librarian Miss Thelma Cromartie Elizabethtown 

Recorder's Court: 

J"'?^.e W. Leslie Johnson White Oak 

Solicitor Henry L. Williamson Elizabethtown 

Commissioners 

Chainnan Milton L. Fisher Elizabethtown 

Commissioner F. L. Tatum White Oak 

Commissioner....^ H. J. White Bladenboro 

* Serving in Armed Forces. 



County Government 473 

brunswick 

Brunswick County was formed in 1764 from New Hanover and Bladen. Was 
named in honor of the famous House of Brunswick, of which the four Georges, 
Kings of England, were members. 

Population, 17,125 County Seat, Southport 

State Senators 10th District Charles G. Rose Fayetteville 

R. J. Hester, Jr Elizabethtown 

Member House of Representatives J. W. Ruark Southport 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court S. T. Bennett Southport 

Register of Deeds A. J. Walton Southport 

Sheriff C. P. Willetts Southport 

Auditor R. C. St. George Southport 

Tax Supervisor W. P. Jorgenson Southport 

Tax Collector ". W. P. Jorgenson Southport 

County Accountant R. C. St. George Southport 

Coroner W. E. Bell Southport 

Supt. of Health Mrs. Lou Smith Southport 

Supt. of Schools Annie Mae Woodside Southport 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Maude Phelps Southport 

Home Dem. Agent vElizabeth Norfleet Southport 

Farm Dem. Agent J. E. Dodson Supply 

Chmn. Bd. Education R. T. Woodside Southport 

Chmn. Bd. Elections David Ross Southport 

Game Warden Craven Nelson Shallotte 

Forest Warden Dorman Mercer Bolivia 

County Attorney E. J. Prevatte Southport 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge J. B. Ward Ash 

Solicitor J. W. Ruark Southport 

Commissioners 

Chairman ,0. P. Bellamy Shallotte 

Commissioner Stephen Mintz Leland 

Commissioner A. P. Russ Ash 

BUNCOMBE 

Buncombe County was formed in 1791 from Burke and Rutherford. Was 
named in honor of Colonel Edward Buncombe, a Revolutionary soldier who was 
wounded and captured at the battle of Germantown, October 4, 1777, and died a 
paroled prisoner. May 1778, in Philadelphia. Colonel Buncombe lived in Tyrrell 
County. He was noted for his hospitality. Over the door of his house were these 
lines : "Welcome all to Buncombe Hall." 

Population, 108,755 County Seat, Asheville 

State Senator 31st District Brandon P. Hodges Asheville 

Members House of Representatives ...George W. Craig Asheville 

E. L. Loftin Weaverville 

George A. Shuford Asheville 

Clerk of Court J. E. Swain Asheville 

Register of Deeds Geo. A. Digges, Jr Asheville 

Sheriff L. E. Brown Asheville 

Treasurer James C. Garrison Asheville 

Auditor James C. Garrison Asheville 

Tax Supervisor W. Z. Penland ....Asheville 

Tax Collector J. P. Brown Asheville 

County Accountant James C. Garrison Asheville 

Coroner .^ Dr. George F. Baier, Jr AsTJeville 

Surveyor .7 Solon Wells Asheville 



474 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Supt. of Health Dr. W. N. Sisk Asheville 

Supt. of Schools 1. C. Roberson Asheville 

Supt. of Public Welfare K. K. Connor Asheville 

Home Dem. Agent JMrs. Mamie Sue Evans Asheville 

Farm Dcm. Agent W. Riley Palmer Asheville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. Bernice E. Morgan Asheville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Clyde W. Bradley Asheville 

Game Warden E. F. Sorrells Asheville 

Forest Warden iClarence R. Jenkins Arden 

County Attorney Brandon P. Hodges Asheville 

County Librarian Miss Evelyn Parks Asheville 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Sam M. Cathey Asheville 

Solicitor Marshall W. Orr Asheville 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. A. Richbourg Asheville 

Commissioner John C. Vance Asheville 

Commissioner Harry L. Parker Asheville 

BURKE 

Burke County was formed in 1777 from Rowan. Was named in honor of Dr. 
Thomas Burke, member of the Continental Congress and governor of North 
Carolina. 

Population, 38,615 County Seat, Morganton 

State Senator 28th District O. Lee Horton Morganton 

Member House of Representatives A. B. Stoney Morganton 

Clerk of Court J. F. Bowers Morganton 

Register of Deeds W. Alvin Berry Morganton 

Sheriff R. C. Chapman Morganton 

Treasurer First National Bank Morganton 

Auditor Geo. Scott & Co Charlotte 

Ta.x Supervisor A. Parks McGimsey Morganton 

Tax Collector X. H. Cox , Morganton 

County Accountant R. M. Davis Morganton 

Coroner Ted Shirley Morganton 

Surveyor James A. Harbison Morganton 

Supt. of Health Dr. S. V. Lewis Lenoir 

Supt. of Schools R. L. Patton Morganton 

Supt. of Public Welfare M. J. Lynam ...'. Morganton 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Helen L. Curry Morganton 

Farni Dem. Agent R. L. Sloan Morganton 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. P. Whisnant Morganton Rt. 2 

Chmn. Bd. Elections T. Earl Franklin Morganton 

Game Warden J. M. Starrett Morganton 

Forest Warden Simon Conley Morganton 

County Attorney C. E. Cowan Morganton 

County Librarian Mrs. M. R. McVey Morganton 

Commissioners 

Chairman Parks McGimsey Table Rock 

Commissioner Lawrence Love Morganton 

Commissioner R. Harper Singleton Morganton 

Commissioner Ben Gibbs Morganton 

Commissioner Ed Micol Valdese 

CABARRUS 
Cabarrus County was formed in 1792 from Mecklenburg, was named in honor 



County Government 475 

of Stephen Cabarrus, of Edenton, sevei-al times a member of the Legislature and 
often Speaker of the House of Commons. 

Population, 59,393 County Seat, Concord 

State Senators Twenty-first 

District John C. Kesler Salisbury 

Luther E. Earnhardt Concord 

Members House of Representatives ...E. T. Bost, Jr Concord 

J. Carlyle Rutledge Kannapolis 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court D. Ray McEachern Concord 

Register of Deeds John R. Boger Concord 

Sheriff Ray C. Hoover Concord 

Treasurer Margie M. White Concord 

Auditor Chas. N. Field Concord 

Tax Supervisor Chas. N. Field Concord 

Tax Collector Ray C. Hoover Concord 

County Accountant Chas. N. Field Concord 

Coroner N. J. Mitchell ; Concord 

Surveyor S. Glenn Hawfield, Jr Concord (US Armv) 

Supt. of Health Dr. M. B. Bethell Concord 

Supt. of Schools C. A. Furr Concord 

Supt. of Public Welfare E. Farrell White Concord 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Mabel R. Blume Concord 

Farm Dem. Agent R. D. Goodman Concord 

Chmn. Bd. Education G. G. Allen Concord 

Chmn. Bd. Elections P. B. Fetzer Concord Rt. 2 

Game Warden R. O. Caldwell Concord 

County Attorney Hartsell & Hartsell Concord 

County Librarian Miss Olivia Burwell Concord 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Z. A. Morris, Jr Concord 

Solicitor E. R. Alexander Kannapolis 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. Lee White Concord 

Commissioner C. M. Crowell Mt. Pleasant 

Commissioner W. M. Morrison Harrisburg 

Commissioner Ray W. Cline Concord 

Commissioner H. L. Fink Concord 

CALDWELL 

Caldwell County was formed in 1841 from Burke and Wilkes. Was named in 
honor of Joseph Caldwell, the first president of the University of North Carolina. 
He was one of the first and strongest advocates of the public school system and of 
the railroad through the center of the state from Morehead City to Tennessee. 

Population, 35,795 County Seat, Lenoir 

State Senator 28th District O. Lee Horton Morganton 

Member House of Representatives J. T. Pritchett Lenoir 

Clerk of Coui't F. H. Hoover Lenoir 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Margaret B. Moore Lenoir 

Sheriff J. F. Parlier Lenoir 

Tax Supervisor James H. Sherrill Lenoir 

Tax Collector Mrs. J. F. Parlier Lenoir 

County Accountant Stella H. Spencer Lenoir 

Coroner J. R. Swanson Lenoir 

Surveyor Jasper E. Moore Collettsville 

Supt. of Health , Dr. S. V. Lewis Lenoir 



476 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Supt. of Schools Luther B. Robinson Lenoir 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Ina K. Carpenter Lenoir 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Atha C. Wright Lenoir 

Farm Dem. Agent Max Gulp Lenoir 

Chmn. lUI. Education Dr. J. F. Reece Lenoir 

Chmn. lid. Elections J. B. Bernard Lenoir 

Game Warden Clyde McLean, Sr Collettsville 

Forest Warden Lee G. Steele Lenoir 

County Attorney Li. H. Wall Lenoir 

County Librarian Mi-s. Barrett Jones Lenoir 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge A. R. Crisp Lenoir 

Solicitor James C. Farthing U. S. Service 

(Hunter Martin, Act. Solicitor) 

Commissioners 

Chairman ."; W. T. Carpenter Lenoir 

Commissioner Mark Goforth Lenoir 

Commissioner P. L. Poovey Granite Falls 

CAMDEN 

Camden County was formed in 1777 from Pasquotank. Was named in honor 
of the learned Englishman, Charles Pratt, Earl of Camden, who was one of the 
strongest friends of the Americans in the British Parliament. He took their side 
in the dispute over taxation without representation. 

Population, 5,440 County Seat, Camden 

State Senators 1st District Chas. H. Jenkins Aulander 

W. T. Culpepper Elizabeth City 

Member House of Representatives S. E. Burgess Belcross 

Clerk of Court L. S. Leary Camden 

Register of Deeds '. J. G. Etheridge Camden 

Sheriff M. D. Stevens '. Camden 

Treasurer The First & Cit. NatL Blf. Elizabeth City 

Auditor Matilda Bartlett Camden 

Tax Supervisor Calvin Bray Camden 

County Accountant Matilda Bartlett Camden 

Coroner Sam L. Forbes Riddle 

Supt. of Health Dr. Daniel C. Hackett Elizabeth City 

Supt. of Schools E P. Leary Old Trap 

Supt. of Public Welfare Roy B. Godfrey Belcross 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Mamie Sawyer Elizabeth City 

Farm Dem. Agent A. L. Eagles Camden 

Chmn. Bd. Education....; W. I. Sawyer South Mills 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. J. Burgess Shiloh 

Game Warden J. W. Jones South Mills 

Forest Warden W. D. Stevens ' Shiloh 

County Attorney W. I. Halstead South Mills 

Recorder's Court : '' 

Judge R. L. Whaley Camden 

Commissioners 

Chairman D. F. Bartlett Belcross 

Commissioner R. K. Benton South Mills 

Commissioner R. L. Bray Belcross 



County Government 477 

carteret 

Carteret County was formed in 1722 from Bath. Was named in honor of Sir 
John Carteret, afterwards (1744) Earl Granville, one of the Lords Proprietors. 
When the other Lords Proprietors sold their shares to the king in 1728, Carteret 
refused to sell, and an immense tract of land in North Carolina was laid off as his 
share in 1744. It was called the Granville District and was the cause of a great 
deal of trouble. He lost it by confiscation when the Revolution freed North Carolina 
from British rule. 

Population, 18,284 County Seat, Beaufort 

State Senatoi-s 7th District R. A. Whitaker Kinston 

D. L. Ward New Bern 

Member House of Representatives H. S. Gibbs Morehead City 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court L. W. Hassell Beaufort 

Register of Deeds Irvin W. Davis Beaufort 

Sheriff C. G. Holland Beaufort 

Auditor James D. Potter Beaufort 

Tax Supervisor James D. Potter Beaufort 

Tax Collector E. O. Mopre^ Beaufort 

County Accountant James D. Potter Beaufort 

Coroner A. H. James Morehead City 

Surveyor Phillip Ball Morehead City 

Supt. of Health Capt. Robt. K. Oliver Beaufort 

Supt. of Schools J. G. Allen Beaufort 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. George Henderson Morehead City 

Home Dem. Agent JMiss Dorothy Banks Beaufort 

Fann Dem. Agent R. M. Williams Beaufort 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. L. W. Moore Beaufort 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Fred R. Seely Beaufort 

Game Warden Alex Davis Davis 

County Attorney A. L. Hamilton Morehead City 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Paul Webb Morehead City 

Solicitor M. L. Davis Beaufort 

Commissioners 

Chaii-man Dr. K. P. B. Bonner Morehead City 

Commissioner C. Z. Chappell Beaufort 

Commissioner Wallace Styron Stacy 

Commissioner L. W. Pelletier Stella 

Commissioner Tilden Davis Harkers Island 

CASWELL 
Caswell County was formed in 1777 from Orange. Was named in honor of 
Richard Caswell, member of the First Continental Congress, first Governor of 
North Carolina after the Declaration of Independence, six times reelected Governor, 
and Major-General in the Revolutionary army. 

Population, 20,032 County Seat, Yanceyville 

State Senator 15th District J. Hampton Price Leaksville 

Member House of Representatives Jno. O. Gunn Yanceyville 

Clerk of Court H. R. Thompson Yanceyville 

Register of Deeds J. B. Blaylock Yanceyville 

Sheriff J. H. Gunn Yanceyville 

Treasurer James N. Slade Yanceyville 

Auditor Allen E. Strand Greensboro 

Tax Supervisor R. E. Wilson Yanceyville Rt. 1 

Tax Collector R. E. Wilson Yanceyville Rt. 1 



478 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

County Accountant James N. Slade Yanceyville 

Supt. of Health ur. B. M. Drake Spray 

Supt. of Schools Holland McSwain Yanceyville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Miss Leona Graham Yanceyville 

Home Dem. Agent .r Miss Louise Homewood Yanceyville 

Negro Home Dem. Agent ..Helen McCoy Payne Yanceyville 

Farm Dem. Agent J. E. Zimmerman Yanceyville 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent T. Dewey Williamson Yanceyville 

Chmn. Bd. Education O. A. Powell Yanceyville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections H. H. Page Yanceyville 

Game Warden W. R. Satterfield Yanceyville 

County Attorney R. T. Wilson Yanceyville 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge J. C. Gibbs Pelham 

Solicitor E. F. Upchurch Yanceyville 

Commissioners 

Chairman E. A. Allison Yanceyville 

Commissioner Emery Hooper Mebane Rt. .3 

Commissioner Wallace W. Pointer Blanch Rt. 1 

Commissioner E. S. Butler Reidsville Rt. 1 

Commissioner C. S. Walters Blanch 

CATAWBA 

Catawba County was formed in 1842 from Lincoln. Was named after a tribe 
of Indians which dwelt in that section of the State. Catawba county voted with 
Gaston and Lincoln until 1854. 

Population, 51,653 County Seat, Newton 

State Senators 25th District Hugh G. Mitchell Statesville 

John W. Aiken Hickory 

Member House of Representatives Harley F. Shuford Hickory 

Clerk of Court P. W. Deaton Newton 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Willie Trott Newton 

Sheriff Ray E. Pitts Newton 

Treasurer J. L. Hoyle Newton 

Auditor A. H. Burgess Newton 

Tax Supervisor C. E. Guin Newton 

Tax Collector J. L. Hoyle Newton 

County Accountant J. L. Hoyle Newton 

Coroner Rex Reynolds , Conover 

Surveyor G. Sam Rowe Newton 

Supt. of Health ..Dr. H. C. Whims Newton 

Supt. of Schools M. C. Campbell Newton 

Supt. of Public Welfare Miss Joseline Harding Newton 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Wylie Knox Newton 

Farm Dem. Agent Earl Brintnall Newton 

Chmn. Bd. Education E. M. Yoder Hickory 

Chmn. Bd. Elections D. Lee Setzer Nevrtou 

Game Warden J. M. Yount Newton 

County Manager N. J. Sigmon Newton 

County Attorney T. P. Pruitt Hickory 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge Eddy S. Merrit Hickory 

Solicitor Joseph L. Murphy Hickory 

Commissioners 

Chairman R. K. Bolick Conover 

Commissioner C. B. Cline Hickory 



County Government 479 

Office Officer Address 

Commissioner :Caleb Rudisill Vale 

Commissioner George Winters Claremont Rt. 1 

Commissioner H. B. Lindler Sherrills Ford 

CHATHAM 
Chatham County was formed in 1770 from Orange. Was named in honor of 
the great Englishman who won for England all of French America and was the 
most eloquent defender of the American cause in the British Parliament during the 
Revolution — William Pitt, Earl of Chatham. 

Population, 24,726 County Seat, Pittsboro 

State Senators 13th District Wiley G. Barnes Raleigh 

J. C. Pittman Sanford 

Member House of Representatives Wade Barber Pittsboro 

Clerk of Court E. B. Hatch Pittsboro 

Register of Deeds J. W. Emerson, Jr Pittsboro 

Sheriff...' G. H. Andrews Pittsboro 

Treasurer Bank of Pittsboro Pittsboro 

Auditor T. V. Riggsbee Pittboro Rt. 1 

Tax Supervisor J. W. Emerson Pittsboro 

Tax Collector G. H. Andrews Pittsboro 

County Accountant T. V. Riggsbee Pittsboro 

Coroner J. A. Dark Siler City 

Surveyor Floyd E. Womble Siler City 

Supt. of Health Dr. Gaston Rogers Pittsboro 

Supt. of Schools J. S. Waters Pittsboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. C. K. Strowd Chapel Hill 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Flossie Whitley Pittsboro 

Farm Dem. Agent J. B. Snipes Bynum 

Chmn. Bd. Education W. A. Hinton Apex Rt. 3 

Chmn. Bd. Elections C. M. Pattishall Sanford Rt. 4 

Game Warden Robert Hatcher Pittsboro 

Forest Warden JRobert Hatcher Pittsboro 

County Attorney W. P. Horton Pittsboro 

County Librarian Mrs. Milton Heath Siler City 

County Criminal Court: 

Judge Walter D. Siler Siler City 

Solicitor J. Lee Moody Siler City 

Commissioners 

Chairman E. E. Walden Moncure 

Commissioner R. G. Beckwith -. Apex Rt. 3 

Commissioner R. W. Dark Siler City 

CHEROKEE 

Cherokee County was formed in 1839 from Macon. Was named after an 
Indian tribe which still dwells in that section of the state. 

Population, 18,813 County Seat, Murphy 

State Senator 33rd District A. L. Penland '. Hayesville 

Member House of Representatives ... Mrs. G. W. Cover Andrews 

Clerk of Court J. L. Hall Murphy 

Register of Deeds B. L. Padgett Murphy 

Sheriff L. L. Mason Murphy 

Auditor P C. Hyatt Murphy 

Tax Supervisor Paul Sudderth Murphy 

Tax Collector L. L. Mason Murphy 



480 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

County Accountant P. C. Hyatt Murphy 

Coroner Dr. Harry Miller Murphy 

Surveyor O. G. Anderson Culberson 

Supt. of Health Dr. M. P. Whichard Murphy 

Supt. of Schools Lloyd Hendrix Murphy 

Supt. of Public Welfare _Miss Laura H. Freeman Murphy 

Home Dem. Agent Mary Comwell Murphy 

Karm Dem. Agent .'. A. Q. Ketner Murphy 

Chmn. Bd. Education Noah Hembree Murphy 

Chmn. Bd. Elections A. J. Hembree Murphy 

Game Warden D. M. Birchfield Andrews 

Forest Warden E. S. Burnett Murphy 

County Attorney J. B. Gray Murphy 

County Librarian Dora Ruth Parks Murphy 

Commissioners 

Chairman E. A. Wood Andrews 

Commissioner T. P. Calhoun Murphy 

Commissioner .J. M. Anderson Culberson 

CHOWAN 

Chowan County was formed in 1672 from Albemarle. Was named for an Indian 
tribe dwelling in the northeastern part of the State when the English first came to 
North Carolina. 

Population, 11,572 County Seat, Edenton 

State Senators 1st District Chas. H. Jenlcins Aulander 

W. T. Culpepper Elizabeth City 

Member House of Representatives John F. White Edenton 

Clerk of Court E. W. Spires Edenton 

Register of Deeds...' M. L. Bunch Edenton 

Sheriff J. A. Bunch Edenton 

Treasurer Geo. C. Hoskins Edenton 

Tax Supervisor P. S. McMullan '. Edenton 

Tax Collector J. A. Bunch Edenton 

County Accountant E. W. Spires Edenton 

Supt. of Health Dr. J. M. Jackson Edenton 

Supt. of Schools .W. J. Taylor Edenton 

Supt. of Public Welfare 3Irs. J. H. McMullan Edenton 

Home Dem. Agent ; JUiss Rebecca W. Colwell Edenton 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Onnie S. Charlton Edenton 

Farm Dem. Agent C. W. Overman Edenton 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent J. B. Small Edenton 

Chmn. Bd. Education T. W. Jones Edenton 

Chmn. Bd. Elections X.. C. Burton Edenton 

Game Warden J. G. Perr>- Edenton 

County Attorney W. D. Pruden Edenton 

County Librarian Miss Elizabeth Copeland Edenton 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Marvin P. Wilson Edenton 

Solicitor J. N. Pruden Edenton 

Commissioners 

Chairman D. M. Warren Edenton 

Commissioner A. C. Boyce Edenton RFD 2 

Commissioner J. A. Webb Edenton RFD 2 

Commissioner J. R. Peele Edenton RFD 3 

Commissioner .E. N. Elliott Tyner 



County Government 481 

CLAY 

Clay County was formed in 1861 frojn Cherokee. Was named in honor of the 
great orator and statesman, Henry Clay. Prior to 1868 Clay voted with Cherokee. 

Population, 6,405 County Seat, Hayesville 

State Senator 33rd District A. L. Penland Hayesville 

Member House of Representatives F. Herbert Hayesville 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court Chne E. McClure Hayesville 

Register of Deeds W. A. Jones Hayesville 

Sheriff Neal R. Kitchens Hayesville 

Treasurer Neal R. Kitchens Hayesville 

Auditor F. B. Garrett Hayesville 

Tax Supervisor W. A. Jones Hayesville 

Tax Collector Neal R. Kitchens Hayesville 

County Accountant F. B. Garrett Hayesville 

Coroner Dr. P. B. Killian Hayesville 

Supt. of Health Dr. W. P. Whichard Murphy 

Supt. of Schools Allen J. Bell Hayesville 

Supt. of Public Welfare... Betty Cabe Hayesville 

Home Dem. Agent Buena B. Hedden ; Hayesville 

Fai-m Dem. Agent R. G. Vick Hayesville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Perry D. Tipton Hayesville 

Chrnn. Bd. Elections B. H. Martin Hayesville 

Game Warden P. C. Scroggs Hayesville 

County Attorney T. C. Gray Hayesville 

County Librarian Dora Ruth Parks Hayesville 

Commissioners 

Chairman H. M. Moore Hayesville 

Commissiner G. W. Tipton Hayesville 

Commissiner Fred O. Scroggs Hayesville 

CLEVELAND 

Cleveland County was formed' in 1841 from Rutherford and Lincoln. Was 
named in honor of Colonel Benjamin Cleveland, a noted partisan leader on the 
western Carolina frontier in the Revolution, and one of the "Heroes of King's 
Mountain." 

Population, 58,055 County Seat, Shelby 

State Senators 27th District Wade B. Matheny Forest City 

Lee B. Weathers Shelby 

Member House of Representatives Charles C. Horn Shelby 

Clerk of Court E. A. Houser, Jr Shelby 

Register of Deeds A. F. Newton Shelby 

Sheriff J. R. Cline Shelby 

Treasurer Mrs. J. C. Newton Shelby 

Auditor Chas. G. Dilling ; Shelby 

Tax Supervisor Chas. G. Dilling Shelby 

Tax Collector E. L. Webb Shelby 

County Accountant Chas. G. Dilling Shelby 

Coroner R. E. Lutz Shelby 

Surveyor D. R. S. Frazier Shelby 

Supt. of Health Dr. Z. P. Mitchell Shelby 

Supt. of Schools J. H. Grigg Shelby 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Mary Bums Parker Shelby 

Home Dem. Agent Miss LaUna Brashears Shelby 

Farm Dem. Agent John Wilkins Shelby 

Chmn. Bd. Education A. L. Calton Lattimore 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. L. Angel Lattimore 



482 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Game Warden Robert Gidney Lattimore 

County Attorney Henry B. Edwards Lattimore 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge A. A. Powell Shelby 

Solicitor Bynum E. Weathers Slielby 

Commissioners 

Chairman Glee A. Bridges Kings Mountain 

Commissioner Max Washburn Shelby 

Commissioner D. D. Lattimore Lawndale, Rt. 1 

COLUMBUS 

Columbus County was formed in 1808 from Bladen and Brunswick. Was 
named in honor of the Discoverer of the New World. 

Population, 45,663 County Seat, Whiteville 

State Senators 10th District Charles G. Rose Fayetteville 

R. J. Hester, Jr Elizabethtown 

Member House of Representatives J. Percy Brown Tabor City 

Clerk of Court D. L. Gore Whiteville 

Register of Deeds Leo L. Fisher Whiteville 

Sheriff H. D. Stanley '. Whiteville 

Auditor M. K. Fuller Whiteville 

Tax Supervisor Venie Harrelson Whiteville 

Tax Collector B. L. Martin Whiteville 

Coroner Paul B. Avant Chadbourn 

Supt. of Health Dr. Floyd Johnson Whiteville 

Supt. of Schools H. D. Browning, Jr. Whiteville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Johnsie R. Nunn Whiteville 

Home Dem. Agent Genevieve Eakes Whiteville 

Farm Dem. Agent C. D. Raper Whiteville 

Chmn. Bd. Education A. L. Griffin Cerro Gordo 

Chmn. Bd. Elections A. E. Powell, Jr. Whiteville 

Game Warden Earl Bass Whiteville 

Forest Warden B. Frank Batton ...Chadbourn, Rt. 2 

County Attorney E. K. Proctor Whiteville 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. E. Harrelson Whiteville 

Solicitor J. W. Brown Whiteville 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. L. Robinson Whiteville 

Commissioner W. L. Hobbs Delco 

Commissioner „ Arthur W. Williamson Cerro Gordo 

Commissioner L. P. Ward Clarendon 

Commissioner J. A. Hooks Whiteville 

CRAVEN 

Craven County was formed about 1712 from Bath. Was named in honor of 
William, Lord Craven, one of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. 

Population, 31,298 County Seat, New Bern 

State Senators 7th District D. L. Ward New Bern 

R. A. Whitaker Kinston 

Member House of Representatives Burl G. Hardison New Bern 

Clerk of Court L. E. Lancaster New Bern 

Register of Deeds J. S. Holland New Bern 



County Government 483 

Office Officer Address 

Sheriff R. B. Lane New Bern 

Treasurer Branch Bkg. Trust Co. 

(Dept.) New Bern 

Auditor Ben O. Jones New Bern 

Tax Supervisor Ben O. Jones New Bern 

Tax Collector C. C. Pritchett New Bern 

County Accountant Ben O. Jones New Bern 

Coroner U. W. Daugherty New Bern 

Supt. of Health R. S. McGeachy New Bern 

Supt. of Schools R. L. Pugh New Bern 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. J. D. Whitford New Bern 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Jessie Trowbridge New Bern 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Marietta M. Carrington New Bern 

Farm Dem. Agent A. T. Jackson New Bern 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Otis E. Evans New Bern 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. A. Seifert New Bern 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Wm. Dunn New Bern 

Game Warden Raymond Watson New Bern 

Forest Warden S. B. Norris New Bern 

County Attorney .R. A. Nunn New Bern 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. J. Lansche, Jr New Bern 

Solicitor D. C. McCotter, Jr New Bern 

Commissioners 

Chairman G. W. Ipock Ernul 

Commissioner T. W. Haywood New Bern 

Commissioner R. A. Adams New Bern 

Commissioner C. D. Lancaster New Bern 

Commissioner A. L. Dail New Bern 

CUMBERLAND 

Cumberland County was formed in 1754 from Bladen. Was named in honor of 
William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, second son of King George II. Cumber- 
land was the commander of the English army at the battle of CuUoden, in which 
the Scotch Highlanders were so badly defeated. Many of them came to America, 
and their principal settlement was at Cross Creek in Cumberland County. 

Population, 59,320 County Seat, Fayetteville 

State Senators 10th District R. J. Hester, Jr. Elizabethtown 

Charles G. Rose Fayetteville 

Members House of Representatives... F. M. Averitt Fayetteville 

T. C. Bynum Hope Mills 

Clerk of Court C. W. Broadfoot Fayetteville 

Register of Deeds J. W. Johnson Fayetteville 

Sheriff N. H. McGeachy Fayetteville 

Treasurer R. E. Nimocks Fayetteville 

Auditor R. E. Nimocks Fayetteville 

Tax Supervisor T. G. Braxton Fayetteville 

Tax Collector B. C. Bramble Fayetteville 

Coroner W. C. Davis Fayetteville 

Supt. of Health Dr. M. T. Foster Fayetteville 

Supt. of Schools A. B. Wilkins Fayetteville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Jeanie G. Austin Fayetteville 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Elizabeth Gainey Fayetteville 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Genevieve Kyer Fayetteville 

Farm Dem. Agent J. T. Monroe Fayetteville 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Bertram B. Gaillard Fayetteville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Ernest Breece Fayetteville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections F. B. Rankin Fayettevilfe 



484 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Game Warden Dan C. Short! Pine Blufll 

Forest Warden P. P. Smith Fayetteville 

County Attorney C. C. Howard Fayetteville 

County Librarian Doris Widener Fayetteville 

Recorder's Court 

Judge Lacy S. Collier Fayetteville 

Solicitor Von C. Bullard Fayetteville 

Commissioners 

Chairman D. L. McLaurin Fayetteville, Rt. 1 

Commissioner W. McK. Monroe Fayetteville 

Commissioner F. G. Kinlaw Fayetteville, Rt. 5 

Commissioner W. H. Clark Hope Mills, Rt. 1 

Commissioner J. B. Wilkins Linden 

CURRITUCK 

Currituck County was formed in 1672 from Albemarle. Was named after an 
Indian tribe. 

Population, 6,709 County Seat, Currituck 

State Senators 1st District Chas. H. Jenkins Aulander 

W. T. Culpeper Elizabeth City 

Member House of Representatives G. C. Boswood Gregory 

Clerk of Court Ray P. Midgett Currituck 

Register of Deeds W. S. Gregory Currituck 

Sheriff L. L. Dozier Jarvisburg 

Treasurer Bank of Currituck .Currituck 

Auditor... W. S. Gregory Currituck 

Tax Supervisor .W. S. Gregory Currituck 

Tax Collector L. L. Dozier Jarvisburg 

County Accountant W. S. Gregory Currituck 

Coroner Bryan Smith Spot 

Surveyor Russell E. Snowden Currituck 

Supt. of Health Dr. K. C. Moore : Currituck 

Supt. of Schools E. C. Woodard .-... Currituck 

Supt. of Public Welfare J^orman Hughes Currituck 

Home Dem. Agent 3Irs. Kathleen Snyder Currituck 

Farm Dem. Agent X,. A. Powell Currituck 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. P. White Poplar Branch 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. A. Summerall Spot 

Game Warden B. U. Evans Grandy 

Forest Warden John Evans Grandy 

County Attorney ;e. R. Woodard Coinjock 

Recorder's Court: 

Judee J. W. Sanderlin Shawboro 

Solicitor E. R. Woodard Coinjock 

Commissioners 

Chairman M. B. Fisher Jarvisburg 

Commissioner C. A. Aydlett Grandy 

Commissioner M. A. Guard Currituck 

Commissioner Harry Powers Moyock 

Commissioner Norwood Ansell Knotts Island 

DARE 
Dare County was formed in 1870 from Currituck, Tyrrell, and Hyde. Was 
named in honor of Virginia Dare, the first English child bom in America. 

Population, 6,041 County Seat, Manteo 



County Government 485 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 2nd District E. A. Daniel Washington 

W. Roy Hampton Plymouth 

Member House of Representatives Theo. S. Meekins Manteo 

Clerk of Court ; C. S. Meekins Manteo 

Register of Deeds Melvin R. Daniels Manteo 

Sheriff D. Victor Meekins Manteo 

Treasurer The Bank of Manteo Manteo 

Auditor C. S. Meekins Manteo 

Tax Supervisor E. S. Wise Manteo 

Tax Collector D. Victor Meekins Manteo 

County Accountant C. S. Meekins Manteo 

Coroner Marvin Rogers Manteo 

Supt. of Health Dr. K. C. Moore Currituck 

Supt. of Schools R. I. Leake .t Manteo 

Supt. of Public Welfare I. P. Davis Manteo 

Home Dem. Agent Sadie Hendley Manteo 

Farm Dem. Agent W. H. Shearin Manteo 

Chmn. Bd. Education E. N. Baum Kitty Havck 

Chmn. Bd. Elections G. T. Wescott Manteo 

Game Warden Edgar A. Perry Kitty Hawk 

Forest Warden A. B. Hooper Stumpy Point 

County Attorney Martin Kellogg, Jr.... Manteo 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. F. Baum Manteo 

Solicitor Martin Kellogg, Jr Manteo 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. E. Ferebee Manteo 

Commissioner J. A. Meekins Rodanthe 

Commissioner C. L. Midgett Manns Harbor 

Commissioner W. B. Tillett Wanchese 

Commissioner L. W. Stetson Colington 



DAVIDSON 

Davidson County was formed in 1822 from Rowan. Was named in honor of 
General William Lee Davidson, a soldier of the Revolution, who was killed at the 
battle of Cowan's Ford. When General Greene retreated across North Carolina 
before Cornwallis in 1781, he stationed some troops under General Davidson at 
Cowan's Ford over the Catawba River to delay the British army. The British 
attacked the Americans, killed General Davidson, and forced the passage. The 
United States has erected a monument in his honor on Guilford Battleground. 

Population, 53,377 County Seat, Lexington 

State Senators 18th District Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

Geo. L. Hundley Thomasville 

Member House of Representatives Dr. J. A. Smith Lexington 

Clerk of Court E. C. Byerly Lexington 

Register of Deeds Charles H. Johnson Lexington 

Sheriff Raymond Bowers Lexington 

Treasurer Charlotte Shoaf Lexington 

Auditor French H. Smith Lexington 

Tax Supervisor French H. Smith Lexington 

Tax Collector Raymond Bowers Lexington 

County Accountant French H. Smith Lexington 

Coroner Dr. W. G. Smith Thomasville 

Surveyor N. R. Kinney Lexington 

Supt. of Health Dr. G. C. Gambrell Lexington 

Supt. of Schools Paul F. Evans Lexington 



486 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Supt. of Public Welfare E. C. Hunt Lexington 

Home Dem. Agent Mary Sue Moser Lexington 

Farm Dem. Agent W. H. Wooten Lexington 

Chmn. Bd. Education Ralph H. Wilson Thomasville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. M. Daniel Lexington 

Game Warden R. F. Dorsett Winston-Salem, Rt. 5 

County Manager French H. Smith Lexington 

County Attorney P. V. Critcher Lexington 

County Librarian Mrs. Paul Sink Lexington 

County Court: 

Judge T. S. Wall Lexington 

Solicitor S. E. Raper Lexington 

Thomasville Recorder's Court: 

Judge W. H. Steed Thomasville 

Solicitor L. Roy Hughes Thomasville 

Denton Recorder's Court: 
Judge .-. A. L. Snider Denton 

Commissioners 

Chairman G. W. Smith Lexington 

Commissioner W. B. May Thomasville 

Commissioner W. H. Lomax Linwood, Rt. 1 

Commissioner Fred Sechrest Lexington, Rt. 6 

Commissioner Clyde T. Zimmerman Lexington, Rt. 4 

DAVIE 
Davie County was formed in 1836 from Rowan. Was named in honor of 
William R. Davie, distinguished as a soldier of the Revolution, member of the 
Federal Convention of 1787, Governor of North Carolina, special Envoy Extra- 
ordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to France, "Father of the University of 
North Carolina." 

Population, 14,909 County Seat, Mocksville 

State Senator 24th District W. B. Somers Wilkesboro 

Member House of Representatives R. V. Alexander Cooleemee 

Clerk of Court S. H. Chaffin Mocksville 

Register of Deeds C. E. Vogler Mocksville 

Sheriff L. S. Bowden ^ Mocksville 

Tax Supervisor Miss Inez Naylor Mocksville 

Tax Collector Wm. H. Hoots Mocksville 

County Accountant Miss Inez Naylor Mocksville 

Coroner Dr. S. A. Harding Mocksville 

Surveyor Sam Talbei-t Advance 

Supt. of Health Dr. J. Roy Hege Winston-Salem 

Supt. of Schools C. C. Erwin Mocksville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Lucille M. Donnelly Mocksville 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Florence Mackie Mocksville 

Farm Dem. Agent Geo. B. Hobson Mocksville 

Chmn. Bd. Education T. C. Pegram Cooleemee 

Chmn. Bd. Elections T. P. Dwiggins Mocksville 

Game Warden Rufus Brown Mocksville 

County Attorney A. T. Grant Mocksville 

County Librarian Mrs. Paul B. Blackwelder Mocksville 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. S. Gales Cooleemee 

Commissioners 

Chairman R. P. Martin Mocksville 

Commissioner C. F. Ward Mocksville. Rt. 3 

Commissioner Donald Reavis ..: Mocksville, Rt. 2 



County Government 487 

DUPLIN 

Duplin County was formed in 1749 from New Hanover. Was named in honor 
of George Henry Hay, Lord Duplin, an English nobleman. 

Population, 39,739 County Seat, KenansviUe 

State Senators 9th District Roy Rowe Burgaw 

Henry Vann Clinton 

Member House of Representatives C. E. Quinn KenansviUe 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court R. V. Wells KenansviUe 

Register of Deeds A. T. Outlaw KenansviUe 

Sheriff « D. S. Williamson KenansviUe 

Treasurer D. S. Williamson KenansviUe 

Auditor F. W. McGowan KenansviUe 

Tax Supervisor F. W. McGowan KenansviUe 

Tax Collector I. N. Henderson KenansviUe 

County Accountant F. W. McGowan KenansviUe 

Coroner Ralph J. Jones Warsaw 

Surveyor R. V. Wells Beulaville 

Supt. of Health Dr. C. H. Woodburn KenansviUe 

Supt. of Schools O. P. Johnson KenansviUe 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Inez C. Bdney Rose Hill 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Hilda Clontz KenansviUe 

Farm Dem. Agent L. F. Weeks KenansviUe 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Claude L. Taylor KenansviUe 

Chmn. Bd. Education R. M. Carr WaUace 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Garland P. King KenansviUe 

Game Warden McKoy Kennedy KenansviUe 

Forest Warden Ralph Miller Beulaville 

County Attorney Vance B. Gavin KenansviUe 

General County Court: 

Judge H. E. Phillips KenansviUe 

Solicitor N. B. Boney KenansviUe 

Commissioners 

Chairman L. P. Wells Mt. Olive 

Commissioner Geo. D. Bennett „ Warsaw 

Commissioner A. C. Hall Wallace 

Commissioner Tyson Lanier Beulaville 

Commissioner Arthur Whitfield KenansviUe 

DURHAM 

Durham County was formed in 1881 from Orange and Wake. Was named 
after the town of Durham, a thriving manufacturing city. 

Population, 80,244 County Seat, Durham 

State Senators 14th District F. D. Long Roxboro 

Claude Currie Durham 

Members House of Representatives ..Robert M. Gantt, Sr Durham 

Oscar G. Barker Durham 

Clerk of Court W. H. Young Durham 

Register of Deeds R. Garland Brooks Durham 

Sheriff JE. G. Belvin Durham 

Treasurer J. D. Pridgen, Sr Durham 

Auditor D. W. Newsom Durham 

Tax Supervisor ,H. T. Warren Durham 

Tax Collector .W. T. Pollard Durham 

County Accountant D. W. Newsom Durham 

Coroner Dr. R. A. Harton Durham 



488 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Surveyor S. M. Credle Durham 

Supt. of Health Dr. J. H. Epperson Durham 

Supt. of Schools W. M. Jenkins Durham 

Supt. of Public Welfare W. E. Stanley Durham 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Lorna Langley Durham 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Estelle T. Nixon Durham 

Farm Dem. Agent W. B. Pace Durham 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent J. C. Hubbard Durham 

Chmn. Bd. Education T. O. Sorrell Durham 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Sigmund Meyer Dui-ham 

Game Warden W. E. Lowe Durham 

Forest Warden J. C. Horton Durham, Rt. 2 

County Manager.-. D. W. Newsom Durham 

County Attorney R. P. Reade ; Durham 

County Librarian; Miss Clara Crawford Durham 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge A. H. Borland Durham 

Solicitor S. C. Brawley, Jr , Durham 

Commissioners 

Chairman R. L. Brame Durham 

Commissioner Geo. F. Kirkland Durham 

Commissioner L. G. Cheek Durham 

Commissioner LeRoy S. Proctor Durham 

Commissioner O. A. McCullers Durham 

EDGECOMBE 

Edgecombe County was formed in 1735 from Bertie. Was named in honor of 
Richard Edgecombe, who became Baron Edgecombe in 1742, an English nobleman 
and a lord of the treasury. 

Population, 49,162 County Seat, Tarboro 

State Senators 4th District R. L. Applewhite Halifax 

W. G. Clark Tarboro 

Member House of Representatives Ben E. Fountain Rocky Mount 

Clerk of Court A. T. Walston Tarboro 

Register of Deeds Miss M. B. Bunn Tarboro 

Sheriff W. E. Bardin Tarboro 

Auditor M. L. Laughlin Tarboro 

Tax Supervisor M. L. Laughlin Tarboro 

Tax Collector G. J. Eason Tarboro 

County Accountant M. L. Laughlin Tarboro 

Coroner Dr. J. G. Raby Tarboro 

Supt. of Health Dr. W. K. McDowell Tarboro 

Supt. of Schools E. D. Johnson Tarboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Mary Ellen Forbes Tarboro 

Home Dem. Agent .Mrs. Eugenia VanLandingham Tarboro 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Hazel S. Parker Tarboro 

Farm Dem. Agent J. C. Powell Tarboro 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent F. D. Wharton Tarboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. W. W. Green Tarboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Robt. P. Cherry , Tarboro 

Game Warden Wm. Whitley ; Tarboro 

Forest Warden Thad. J. Harrell Macclesfield 

County Attorney C. H. Leggett Tarboro 

County Librarian Miss Janie Allsbrook Tarboro 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Lyn Bond Tarboro 

Solicitor M. C. Staton Tarboro 



County Government 489 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. W. Forbes Tarboro 

Commissioner Leslie Calhoun Rock^ Mount, RFD 

Commissioner B. C. Mayo Tarboro 

Commissioner E. Y. Lovelace Ma_cclesfield, RFD 

Commissioner ...J. T. Lawrence Tarboro, RFD 

FORSYTH 

Forsyth County was formed in 1849 from Stokes. Was named in honor of 
Colonel Benjamin Forsyth, U. S. A., a citizen of Stokes County, who was killed 
on the Canadian frontier on June 28, 1814, during the second war with Great 
Britain. 

Population, 126,475 County Seat, Winston-Salem 

State Senator 22nd District Irving E. Carlyle Winston-Salem 

Members House of Representatives... F. L. Gobble Winston-Salem 

Sam E. Welfare Winston-Salem"* 

Rex Gass Winston-Salem 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court W. E. Church Winston-Salem 

Register of Deeds J. M. Lentz Winston-Salem 

Sheriff E. G. Shore Winston-Salem 

Auditor W. N. Schultz Winston-Salem 

Tax Supervisor Virgil W. Joyce Winston-Salem 

Tax Collector .J. Kenneth Pfohl, Jr Winston-Salem 

County Accountant W. N. Schultz Winston-Salem 

Coroner Dr. W. N. Dalton Winston-Salem 

Surveyor A. M. Linville Winston-Salem 

Supt. of Health Dr. J. Roy Hege Winston-Salem 

Supt. of Schools T. H. Cash Winston-Salem 

Supt. of Public Welfare A. W. Cline Winston-Salem 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Elizabeth Tuttle Winston-Salem 

Farm Dem. Agent R. W. Pou Winston-Salem 

Chmn. Bd. Education Frank A. Stith Winston-Salem 

Chmn. Bd. Elections H. Bryce Parker Winston-Salem 

Game Warden J. E. Scott Clemmons 

County Attorney Nat S. Crews Winston-Salem 

County Librarian Janet Berkley Winston-Salem 

Winston-Salem Municipal Court: 

Judge Leroy Sams Winston-Saleni 

Solicitor L. V. Scott Winston-Salem 



Commissioners 

Chairman James G. Hanes Winston-Salem 

Commissioner J. M. Shouse Winston-Salem 

Commissioner Dr. D. C. Speas Winston-Salem 

FRANKLIN 

Franklin County was formed in 1779 from Bute. Was named in honor of 
Benjamin Franklin. 

Population, 30,382 County Seat, Louisburg 

State Senators 6th District Willie Lee Lumpkin Louisburg 

Joseph C. Eagles Wilson 

Member House of Representatives H. C. Kearney Franklinton 

Clerk of Court Willie V. Avent Louisburg 

Register of Deeds Alex T. Wood... Louisburg 

Sheriff J. P. Moore Louisburg 

Treasurer First Citizens Bank & Trust Co Louisburg 



490 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Auditor J. H. Boone Louisburg 

Tax Supervisor J. H. Boone Louisburg 

Tax Collector S. O. Wilder Louisburg 

County Accountant J. H. Boone Louisburg 

Coroner R. A. Bobbitt Louisburg 

Supt. of Health Dr. S. P. Burt Louisburg 

Supt. of Schools Wiley F. Mitchell Louisburg 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. J. F. Mitchiner Louisburg 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Lillie Mae Braxton Louisburg 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Mildred B. Payton Louisburg 

Fai-m Dem. Agent W. C. Boyce Louisburg 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Hersey H. Price Louisburg 

Chmn. Bd. Education P. W. Elam Louisburg 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Phil R. Inscoe Castalia, Route 

Game Warden ...Phil Wilson Bunn, Route 

County Attorney John F. Matthews Louisburg 

County Librarian Miss Mary Phillips Raleigh 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge J. E. Malone, Jr Louisburg 

Solicitor John F. Matthews Louisburg 

Commissioners 

Chairman T. S. Dean Louisburg, Route 

Commissioner P. W. Joyner Louisburg 

Commissioner L. O. Tharrington Louisburg 

Commissioner J. Ira Weldon Henderson, Route 

Commissioner H. S. Pearce Franklinton 

GASTON 

Gaston County was formed in 1846 from Lincoln. Was named in honor of 
Judge William Gaston, Member of Congress and Justice of the Supreme Court of 
North Carolina. From 1846 to 1852 Gaston voted with Lincoln and Catawba. 

Population 87,531 County Seat, Gastonia 

State Senator 26th District Steve B. Dolley Gastonia 

Member House of Representatives O. M. Vernon Mount Holly 

David P. Dellinger Cherryville 

Clerk of Court Paul E. Monroe Gastonia 

Register of Deeds H. R. Thompson Gastonia 

Sheriff C. O. Robinson Gastonia 

Treasurer E. L. Froneberger Gastonia 

Auditor C. E. Dent Gastonia 

Tax Supervisor T. L. Ware Gastonia 

County Accountant C. E. Dent Gastonia 

Coroner C. C. Wallace Gastonia 

Supt. of Health Dr. R. E. Rhyne Gastonia 

Supt. of Schools Hunter Huss Gastonia 

Supt. Public Welfare Miss Agnes Thomas Gastonia 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Lucille Tatum Gastonia 

Farm Dem. Agent J. Paul Kiser Gastonia 

Chmn. Bd. Education M. A. Stroup Cherryville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections L. B. Hollowell Gastonia 

Game Warden W. L. Armstrong Belmont 

County Attorney H. B. Gaston Belmont 

County Librarian Miss Barbara Eaker Gastonia 



County Government 491 

Recorder's Courts : 
Bessemer City : 

Judge Claude Woltz Bessemer City 

Solicitor Henry L. Kizer Bessemer City 

Cherryville: 

Judge R. R. Carpenter Cherryville 

Solicitor David P. Bellinger Cherryville 

Gastonia : 

Judge A. C. Jones : Gastonia 

Solicitor O. F. Mason, Jr Gastonia 

Commissioners 

Chairman R. L. Stowe Belmont 

Commissioner B. B. Gardner Gastonia 

Commissioner J. W. Summey Dallas 

Commissioner Roy E. Eaker Cherryville 

Commissioner C. E. Hutchison, Jr Mount Holly 

Commissioner M. Fred Ormand Bessemer City 

GATES 

Gates County was formed in 1778 from Chowan, Perquimans, and Hertford. 
Was named in honor of General Horatio Gates, who commanded the American 
Army at the battle of Saratoga. At this battle an entire British army was cap- 
tured, but General Gates contributed nothing to that success. It is regarded as 
one of the most important battles in the history of the world. 

Population, 10,060 County Seat, Gatesville 

State Senators 1st District W. T. Culpepper Elizabeth City 

Chas. H. Jenkins Aulander 

Member House of Representatives W. J. Rountree Hobbsville 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court X,. C. Hand Gatesville 

Register of Deeds Tazewell D. Eure Gatesville 

Sheriff L. F. Overman Gatesville 

Treasurer Bank of Gates Gatesville 

Auditor Tazewell D. Eure Gatesville 

Tax Supervisor Tazewell D. Eure Gatesville 

Tax Collector L. F. Overman Gatesville 

County Accountant Tazewell D. Eure Gatesville 

Surveyor A. C. Hollowell Corapeake 

Supt. of Health Dr. J. M. Jackson Windsor 

Supt. of Schools W. Henry Overman Gatesville 

Supt. Public Welfare Miss Clarine Catling Gates 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Ona Patterson Gatesville 

Negro Home l)em. Agent Elizabeth Andrews Gatesville 

Farm Dem. Agent John W. Artz Gatesville 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent H. L. Mitchell Gatesville 

Chmn. Bd. Education H. F. Parker Eure 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. A. Eason Gatesville 

Game Warden D. E. Barnes Corapeake 

Forest Warden P. V. Taylor Eure 

County Attorney Hubert Eason Gatesville 

County Court: 

Judge E. S. A. Ellenor Gates 

Solicitor Hubert Eason Gatesville 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman C. H. Carter Hobbsville 

Commissioner A. H. Russell Gates 



492 North Carolina Manual 

Commissioner W. L. Askew Eure 

Commissioner J. E. Gregory Sunbury 

Commissioner Robert L. Brown Hobbsville 

GRAHAM 

Graham County was formed in 1872 from Cherokee. Was named in honor of 
Governor William A. Graham, United States Senator, Governor of North Carolina, 
Secretary of the Navy, Confederate States Senator. Graham County voted with 
Cherokee until 1883. 

Population, 6,418 County Seat, Robbinsville 

State Senator 33rd District A. L. Penland Hayesville 

Member House of Representatives Dr. J. H. Crawford Robbinsville 

Office Officer AMress 

Clerk of Court Arthur Ford Robbinsville 

Register of Deeds William L. Colvin Robbinsville 

Sheriff G. B. Brewer Robbinsville 

Treasurer Citizens Bank & Trust Co Andrews 

Auditor F. O. C. Fletcher Asheville 

Tax Supervisor E. Cooper Robbinsville 

Tax Collector iG. E. Brewer Robbinsville 

County Accountant S.- P. Jenkins Robbinsville 

Coroner Bob Howell Robbinsville 

Surveyor R. O. Sherrill Yellow Creek 

Supt. of Health Dr. M. P. Whichard Murphy 

Supt. of Schools F. S. Griffin Robbinsville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Cora Jean Thetford Robbinsville 

Home Dem. Agent Elizabeth Craft Robbinsville 

Farm Dem. Agent D. W. Bennett Robbinsville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Patton Phillips Robbinsville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. H. Jones Robbinsville 

Game Warden C. L. Garland Robbinsville 

Forest Warden Arnold Buchanan Robbinsville 

County Attorney T. M. Jenkins Robljinsville 

County Librarian Dora Ruth Parks Murphy 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. F. Hyde Robbinsville 

Commissioner , F. J. Howell Robbinsville 

Commissioner J. D. Allen Tapoco 

GRANVILLE 

Granville County was formed in 1746 from Edgecombe. Was named in honor 
of John Carteret, Earl GranviUe, who owned the Granville District. He was 
Prime Minister under King George II, and a very brilliant man. 

Population, 29,344 County Seat, Oxford 

State Senators 14th District Claude Currie Durham 

F. D. Long Roxboro 

Member House of Representatives Jno. S. Watkins Oxford, Rt. 4 

Clerk of Court :A. W. Graham, Jr Oxford 

Register of Deeds C. R. Dickerson Oxford 

Sheriff E. P. Davis Oxford 

Treasurer Oxford Nafl. Bank & 

Union Nat'l. Bank Oxford 

Auditor W. J. Webb Oxford 

Tax Supervisor .w. J. Webb Oxford 

Tax Collector :e. P. Davis Oxford 

County Accountant W. J. Webb Oxford 

Coroner •W. D. Bryan 1 Oxford 



County Government 493 

Office Officer Address 

Supt. of Health Dr. Ballard Norwood (acting) Oxford 

Supt. of Schools B. D. Bunn Oxford 

Supt. of Public Welfare Ina V. Young Oxford 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Eunice Williams Oxford 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mary Irene Parham Oxford 

Farm Dem. Agent C. V. Morgan Oxford 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent J. R. Redding Oxford 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. R. L. Noblin Oxford 

Chmn. Bd. Elections T. S. Royster Oxford 

Game Warden R. I. Burroughs Henderson, Rt. 3 

County Attorney T. G. Stem Oxford 

County Librarian Mrs. Edith F. Cannady Oxford 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Ben K. Lassitei' Oxford 

Solicitor W. M. Hicks Oxford 

Commissioners 

Chairman R. T. Eakes Oxford, Rt. 4 

Commissioner W. D. Mangum Oxford, Rt. 1 

Commissioner Pielding Knott Oxford, Rt. 2 

Commissioner R. K. Taylor Oxford 

Commissioner R. H. Whitfield Creedmoor 

GREENE 

Greene County was formed in 1799 from Glasgow. Was named in honor of 
General Nathaniel Greene, Washington's "right-hand man." Next to Washing- 
ton, General Greene is regarded as the greatest soldier of the Revolution. He 
fought the battle of Guilford Courthouse and saved North Carolina from the British. 

Population, 18,548 County Seat, Snow Hill 

State Senators 7th District D. L. Ward New Bern 

R. A. Whitaker Kinston 

Member House of Representatives Alonzo C. Edwards Hookerton 

Clerk of Court J. E. Mewborn Snow Hill 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Beulah R. Edwards Snow Hill 

Sheriff H. K. Cobb Snow Hill 

Treasurer B. S. Albritton Snow Hill 

Auditor Geo. W. Edwards Snow Hill 

Tax Supervisor Geo. W. Edwards Snow Hill 

Tax Collector JRoland Edwards Snow Hill 

County Accountant Geo. W. Edwards Snow Hill 

Surveyor 31. C. Lassiter Snow Hill 

Supt. of Health Dr. S. B. McPheeters Goldsboro 

Supt. of Schools A. B. Alderman Snow Hill 

Supt. Public Welfare .Miss Rachel Payne Sugg Snow Hill 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Virginia Lancaster Snow Hill 

Farm Dem. Agent A. J. Harrell Snow Hill 

Chmn. Bd. Education E. S. Taylor Walstonburg 

Chmn. Bd. Elections H. Maynard Hicks Snow Hill 

Game Warden J. Carson Joyner Snow Hill, Rt. 3 

Forest Warden J. Carson Joyner Snow Hill, Rt. 3 

County Attorney Walter G. Sheppard Snow Hill 

County Court: 

Judge , Walter G. Sheppard Snow Hill 

Solicitor C. W. Beaman ...Snow Hill 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. S. Whitley Walstonburg 

Commissioner Lemuel Dawson Snow Hill 

Commissioner L. F. Herring Snow Hill 

Commissioner W. B. Gay Walstonburg 

Commissioner E. E. Butts Hookerton 



494 North Carolina Manual 

guilford 

Guilford County was formed in 1770 from Rowan and Orange. Was named 
in honor of Francis North, Earl of Guilford, an English nobleman. He was the 
father of Lord North, who was Prime Minister under King George III during 
the Revolution. Lord North afterwards succeeded his father as Earl of Guilford. 
Population, 153,916 County Seat, Greensboro 

State Senator 17th District George T. Penny Greensboro 

Members House of Representatives. ...Shelley B. Caveness Greensboro 

Robert Moseley Greensboro 

Frank R. Hutton Greensboro 

Walter E. Crissman High Point 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court J. P. Shore Greensboro 

Register of Deeds J. H. McAdoo Greensboro 

Sheriff John C. Story Greensboro 

Treasurer W. C. Johnson Greensboro 

Auditor J. T. Harrington Greensboro 

Tax Supervisor Troy A. Short Greensboro 

Tax Collector Troy A. Short Greensboro 

County Accountant J. T. Harrington Greensboro 

Coroner Dr. W. W. Harvey Greensboro 

Surveyor JRalph D. Stout Greensboro 

Supt. of Health Dr. R. M. Buie Greensboro 

Supt. of Schools T. R. Foust Greensboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Blanche Carr Sterne Greensboro 

Home Dem. Agent JJ^ell Kennett Greensboro 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Rosa T. Winchester Greensboro 

Farm Dem. Agent J. I. Wagoner Greensboro 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent B. A. Hall Greensboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. H. Joyner Whitsett 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. Leslie Abbott Greensboro 

Game Warden A. M. Benbow Oak Ridge 

County Manager Harry J. Weatherly Greensboro 

County Attorney Thomas C. Hoyle, Sr Greensboro 

County Librarian Mrs. Nellie Rowe Jones Greensboro 

Greensboro Municipal County 
Court: 

Judge Criminal Division Adam Younce Greensboro 

Judge Civil Division S. Bernard Weinstein Greensboro 

Solicitor E. D. Kuykendall Greensboro 

High Point Municipal County 
Court : 

Judge D. C. MacRae High Point 

Solicitor Thos. W. Sprinkle High Point 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. E. Millis High Point 

Commissioner James A. Doggett GTreensboro 

Commissioner C. J. Hunt Pleasant Garden 

Commissioner Lloyd C. Amos Greensboro 

Commissioner William G. Ragsdale, Jr. Jamestown 

HALIFAX 

Halifax County was formed in 1758 from Edgecombe. Was named in honor 
of George Montagu Dunk, Earl of Halifax, president of the board of trade, which 
had control of the colonies before the Revolution. 

Population, 66,512 County Seat, Halifax 

State Senators 4th District W. G. Clark Tarboro 

R. L. Applewhite Halifax 

Member House of Representatives Irwin Clark Scotland Neck 



County Government 495 

OSice Officer Address 

Clerk of Court George A. Hux (acting) Halifax 

Register of Deeds F. D. Wilson Halifax 

SheriflE Harry A. House Halifax 

Treasurer Bank of Halifax Halifax 

Auditor C. S. Vinson Halifax 

Tax Supervisor C. S. Vinson Halifax 

Tax Collector E. H. Smith Halifax 

County Accountant C. S. Vinson Halifax 

Coroner F. N. Rowe Weldon 

Supt. of Health Dr. W. K. McDowell Halifax 

Supt. of Schools V. C. Matthews Halifax 

Supt. Public Welfare J. B. Hall Halifax 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Florence Cox Halifax 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Ruth V. Whitworth Halifax 

Farm Dem. Agent W. O. Davis Halifax 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent D. J. Knight Enfield 

Chmn. Bd. Education R. C. Rives Enfield 

Chmn. Bd. Elections S. W. Dickens Enfield 

Game Warden .C. T. Lawrence Scotland Neck 

Forest Warden C. T. Lawrence Scotland Neck 

County Attorney Kelly Jenkins Roanoke Rapids 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge Chas. R. Daniel Weldon 

Solicitor Wade H. Dickens Scotland Neck 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. R. Wrenn Roanoke Rapids 

Commissioner G. H. Johnson Scotland Neck 

Commissioner D. G. Dickens Littleton, Rt. 3 

Commissioner J. B. Davis Enfield 

Commissioner Meade H. Mitchell Weldon 

HARNETT 

Harnett County was formed in 1855 from Cumberland. Was named in honor 
of Cornelius Harnett, eminent Revolutionary patriot. President of the Provincial 
Council, President of the Council of Safety, delegate to the Continental Congress, 
author of the Halifax Resolution of April 12, 1776. Harnett voted with Cumber- 
land until 1865. 

Population, 44,239 County Seat, Lillington 

State Senators 12th District Ryan McBryde Raeford 

Arthur Ross Asheboro 

Member House of Representatives Allison L. Overby Angier 

Clerk of Court Howard Godwin Lillington 

Register of Deeds Inez Harrington Lillington 

Sheriff W. E. Salmon Lillington 

Auditor J. Earl Ward Lillington 

Tax Supervisor J. Earl Ward Lillington 

Tax Collector W. D. Harrington Lillington 

County Accountant , J. Earl Ward Lillington 

Coroner -J. M. McLean Lillington 

Surveyor Walter Lee Johnson Lillington 

Supt. of Health John A. Lineberry Lillington 

Supt. of Schools G. T. Proffit Buies Creek 

Supt. Public Welfare Wilma Williams Angier 

Home Dem. Agent Maude Searcy Lillington 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Ida P. Hinnant Lillington 

Farm Dem. Agent C. R. Ammons Lillington 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent !•. K. Boston Lillington 

Chmn. Bd. Education ._^ G. L. Hooper Dunn 

Chmn. Bd. Elections .^ H. C. Strickland Angier 

Game Warden T. J. Turlington Dunn. Rt. 3 

Forest Warden T. J. Turlington Dunn, Rt. 3 



496 North Carolina Manual 

OMce Officer Address 
County Attorney H. C. Strickland Angier 

County Recorder's Court: 

Judge F. H. Taylor Buies Creek 

Solicitor M. O. Lee Lillington 

Dunn Recorder's Court: 

Judge D. C. Wilson Dunn 

Solicitor C. L. Guy Dunn 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. B. Ennis Benson, Rt, 1 

Commissioner L. R. Byrd Erwin, Rt. 1 

Commissioner R. L. Pate Erwin 

Commissioner Ferd. D. Jackson Buies Creek 

Commissioner Angus A. Cameron Jonesboro, Rt. 1 

HAYWOOD 

Haywood County was formed in 1808 from Buncombe. Was named in honor 
of John Haywood, who for forty years (1787-1827) was the popular Treasurer 
of the State. 

Population, 34,804 County Seat, Waynesville 

State Senators 32nd District W. B. Hodges Hendersonville 

Carroll P. Rogers 'Tryon 

Member House of Representatives Glenn C. Palmer Clyde, Rt. 1 

Clerk of Court C. H. Leatherwood Waynesville 

Register of Deeds B. D. Medford Waynesville 

Sheriff R. V. Welch Waynesville 

Treasurer 

Auditor 

Tax Supervisor J. E. Ferguson Waynesville 

Tax Collector J. E. Ferguson Waynesville 

County Accountant 

Coroner JJr. J. Frank Pate Canton 

Surveyor JHorace Ledbetter Waynesville 

Supt. of Health Dr. C. N. Sisk Waynesville 

Supt. of Schools JM. H. Bowles Waynesville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. S. L. Queen Waynesville 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Mary M. Smith Waynesville 

Farm Dem. Agent Howard Clapp Waynesville 

Chmn. Bd. Education i..R. T. Messer Waynesville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections C. G. Bryson Waynesville 

Game Warden G. C. Plott Waynesville 

Forest Warden R. E. Caldwell Waynesville 

County Manager .George A. Brown, Jr Waynesville 

County Attorney .M. G. Stamey Waynesville 

County Librarian Margaret Johnson Waynesville 

Commissioners 

Chairman George A. Brown, Jr. Waynesville 

Commissioner J. R. Hipps Waynesville 

Commissioner D. J. Noland Waynesville 

HENDERSON 

Henderson County was formed in 1838 from Buncombe. Was named in honor 
of Leonard Henderson, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina. 

Population, 26,049 County Seat, Hendersonville 

State Senators 32nd District Carroll P. Rogers Tryon 

W. B. Hodges Hendersonville 

Member House of Representatives L. L. Burgin Horse Shoe 



County Government 497 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court Geo. W. Fletcher Hendersonville 

Register of Deeds Frank L. Fitzsimmons Hendex'sonviUe 

Sheriff F. D. Dalton Hendersonville 

Treasurer State Trust Co. Hendersonville 

Auditor D. G. Wilkie Hendersonville 

Tax Supervisor Mrs. Virginia Harrell Hendersonville 

Tax Collector J. M. Stewart Hendersonville 

County Accountant D. G. Wilkie Hendersonville 

Coroner J. F. Brooks Hendersonville 

Surveyor Geo. W. Justice Hendersonville 

Supt. of Health Dr. T. W. Sumner Hendersonville 

Supt. of Schools R. G. Anders Hendersonville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Miss Norma Spence Hendersonville 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Ilia Pence Hendersonville 

Farm Dem. Agent John S. Holloman Hendersonville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Floyd Osborne Arden 

Chmn. Bd. Elections L. T. Dermid Hendersonville 

Game Warden S. S. Whitaker Horse Shoe 

Forest Warden Wm. F. Ball Hendersonville 

County Attorney M. M. Redden Hendersonville 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge O. B. Crowell Hendersonville 

Solicitor J. E. Shipman Hendersonville 

Commissioners 

Chairman D. G. Wilkie Hendersonville 

■Commissioner F. V. Hunter Hendei-sonville 

Commissioner M. L. Walker Hendersonville 

HERTFORD 

Hertford County was formed in 1759 from Chowan, Bertie and Northampton. 
Was named in honor of Francis Seymour Conway, Marquis of Hertford, an English 
nobleman. He was a brother of General Conway, a distinguished British soldier 
and member of Parliament, who favored the repeal of the Stamp Act. The word 
Hertford is said to mean "Red Ford." 

Population, 19,352 County Seat, Winton 

State Senators, 1st District W. T. Culpepper Elizabeth City 

Chas. H. Jenkins Aulander 

Member House of Representatives Merrill Evans Ahoskie 

Clerk of Court A. W. Greene Winton 

Register of Deeds T. D. Northcott Winton 

Sheriff C. W. Parker Winton 

Treasurer 

Auditor H. J. Brown Winton 

Tax Supervisor .T. M. Condon Winton 

Tax CoUector T. M. Condon Winton 

County Accountant H. J. Brown Winton 

Coroner J. G. Lumsden Ahoskie 

Surveyor John W. Moore Winton 

Supt. of Health Dr. W. R. Parker Winton 

Supt. of Schools J. R. Brown Winton 

Supt. of Public Welfare J. R. Raper Winton 

Home Dem. Agent Lydia Deyton Winton 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Clara O. York Winton 

Farm Dem. Agent J. W. Ballentine Winton 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent L. J. McDougle Winton 

Chmn. Bd. Education Geo. T. Underwood Murfreesboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections R. E. Lee Murfreesboro 



498 North Carolina Manuai^ 

Office Officer Address 

Game Warden J. R. Jordan Winton 

Forest Warden J. R. Jordan Winton 

County Attorney W. D. Boone Winton 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. D. Boone Winton 

Solicitor J. Craig Revelle Murfreesboro 

Commissioners 

Chaii-man J. A. Shaw Winton 

Commissioner B. N. Sykes Ahoskie 

Commissioner ,T. W. Sears Ahoskie, RFD 

Commissioner Hunter Sharp Harrellsville 

Commissioner J. B. Worrell Como 

Commissioner W. C. Ferguson Murfreesboro 

HOKE 

Hoke County was formed in 1911 from Cumberland and Robeson. Was named 
in honor of Robert F. Hoke, of North Carolina, Major-General in the Confederate 
States Army. 

Population, 14,937 County Seat, Raeford 

State Senators 12th District Ryan McBryde Raeford 

Arthur Ross Asheboro 

Member House of Representatives Dr. G. W. Brown Raeford 

Clerk of Court J. B. Cameron Raeford 

Register of Deeds W. W. Roberts Raeford 

Sheriff D. H. Hodgin Raeford 

Treasurer J. A. McGoogan Raeford 

Auditor J. A. McGoogan Raeford 

Tax Supervisor J. A. McGoogan Raeford 

Tax Collector D. H. Hodgin Raeford 

County Accountant J. A. McGoogan Raeford 

Coroner Dr. R. A. Matheson Raeford 

Supt. of Health Dr. R. L. Murray Raeford 

Supt. of Schools K. A. MacDonald Raeford 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. C. H. Giles Raeford 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Josephine Hall Raeford 

Farm Dem. Agent A. S. Knowles Raeford 

Chmn. Bd. Education A. W. Wood Rockfish 

Chmn. Bd. Elections C. L. Thomas Raeford 

Game Warden A. T. Perry Raeford 

County Attorney A. D. Gore Raeford 

County Librarian Mrs. Ina Bethune Raeford 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Henry McDiarmid Raeford 

Solicitor ...N. McNair Smith Raeford 

Commissioners 

Chairman N. H. G. Balfour Lumber Bridge, RFD 

Commissioner J. Knox Watson Red Springs, RFD 

Commissioner E. R. Pickler Aberdeen, Rt. 1 

Commissioner Hector McNeill Raeford, Rt. 1 

Commissioner F. A. Monroe Raeford, Rt. 1 

HYDE 
Hyde County was formed in 1705 from Bath. Called Wickham until about 



County Government 499 

1712. Named Hyde in honor of Governor Edward Hyde, of North Carolina, a 
grandson of the Earl of Clarendon. The Earl was one of the Lords Proprietors. 
Governor Hyde was a first cousin of Queen Anne. 

Population, 7,860 County Seat, Swan Quarter 

State Senators 2nd District E. A. Daniel Washington 

W. Roy Hampton Plymouth 

Member House of Representatives C. L. Bell Swan Quarter 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court Ralph L. Roper Swan Quarter 

Register of Deeds .Bonner R. Lee Swan Quarter 

Sheriff -C. Pratt Williamson Swan Quarter 

Treasurer Engelhard Bank & Trust Co Swan Quarter 

Auditor Mrs. Maude Jones Swan Quarter 

Tax Supervisor Mrs. Maude Jones Swan Quarter 

Tax Collector Mrs. Maude Jones Swan Quarter 

County Accountant Mrs. Maude Jones Swan Quarter 

Supt. of Health Dr. D. E. Ford Windsor 

Supt. of Schools N. W. Shelton Windsor 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. E. O. Spencer Swan Quarter 

Home Dem. Agent Iberia Roach Windsor 

Farm Dem. Agent J. P. Woodard Windsor 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. J. W. Miller Engelhard 

Chmn. Bd. Elections B. F. Mason Swan Quarter 

Game Warden Oscar Chadwick New Holland 

Forest Warden A. G. Berry Fairfield 

County Attorney O. L. Williams Fairfield 

County Librarian Miss Elizabeth House Washing£on 

Recorder's Court : _ • 

Judge E. S. Fisher Scranton 

Solicitor O. L. Williams Swan Quarter 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. S. Mason Swan Quarter 

Commissioner A. L. Cuthrell Fairfield 

Commissioner Ed Berry Lake Landing 

IREDELL 

Iredell County was formed in 1788 from Rowan. Named in honor of James 
Iiedell, of Edenton, who was one of the foremost lawyers of the State. In 1788 
and 1789 he was one of the leaders in the State in advocating the adoption of the 
Constitution of the United States. His speeches in the Convention of 1788 at 
Hillsboro were among the ablest delivered by any of the advocates of the Con- 
stitution. Washington appointed him in 1790 a Justice of the Supreme Court of 
the United States. 

Population, 50,424 County Seat, Statesville 

State Senators 25th District John W. Aiken..: Hickory 

Hugh G. Mitchell Statesville 

Member House of Representatives D. E. Turner, Sr Mooresville 

Clerk of Court Carl G. Smith Statesville 

Register of Deeds L. F. Ervin Statesville 

Sheriff Walter D. Morrison Statesville 

Treasurer J. E. Scroggs , Statesville 

Auditor C. D. Stevenson Statesville 

Tax Supervisor .C. D. Stevenson Statesville 

Tax Collector J. E. Scroggs Statesville 

County Accountant C. D. Stevenson Statesville 

Coroner N. D. Tomlin Statesville 

Supt. of Health Dr. Reid Morrison Statesville 



500 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Supt. of Schools T. Ward Guy Statesville 

Supt. Public Welfare Mrs. Christine Rickert Statesville 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Turner Page Statesville 

Farm Dem. Agent Maury Gaston Statesville 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent E. C. Lackey Statesville 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. H. Knox Statesville, Rt. 4 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. W. Hartness Statesville, Rt. 2 

Game Warden O. L. Lippard Statesville 

County Manager C. D. Stevenson Statesville 

County Attorney Z. V. Turlington Mooresville 

County Recorder's Court : 

Judge C. B. Winberry Statesville 

Solicitor Macon M. Simons Statesville 

Mooresville Recorder's Court: 

Judge A. L. Starr Mooresville 

Solicitor Geo. A. Morrowr Mooresville 

Commissioners 

Chairman John F. Long Statesville, Rt. 1 

Commissioner W, E. Webb Statesville 

Commissioner J. L. McLain Troutman 

Commissioner R. L. Shumaker Nevsr Hope 

Commissioner R. H. Kennedy... Harmony 

JACKSON 

Jackson County was formed in 1851 from Haywood and Macon. Named in 
honor of Andrew Jackson, who was born in Mecklenburg County (the site of his 
birthplace is now in Union), won the brilliant victory over the British at New 
Orleans, in 1815, and was twice elected President of the United States. 

Population, 19,36G County Seat, Sylva 

State Senators 32nd District W. B. Hodges Hendersonville 

Carroll P. Rogei's Tryon 

Member House of Representatives Dan M. Allison Sylva 

Clerk of Court Roy M. Cowan Sylva 

Register of Deeds .Glenn Hughes Sylva 

Sheriff Leonard Holden Sylva 

Treasurer T. Walter Ashe Sylva 

Auditor T. Walter Ashe Sylva 

Tax Supervisor Leonard Holden Sylva 

Tax Collector Leonard Holden Sylva 

County Accountant Jennings A. Bryson Sylva 

Coroner .C. W. Dills Dillsboro 

Surveyor Lyman Stewart Erastus 

Supt. of Health Dr. C. N. Sisk Waynesville 

Supt. of Schools Adam Moses Sylva 

Supt. of Public Welfare Cary Henson Sylva 

Home Dem. Agent Josephine Johnston Sylva 

Fai-m Dem. Agent G. R. Lackey ..Sylva 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. E. Smith Sylva 

Chmn. Bd. Elections G rover Bishop CuUowhee 

Game Warden Mack Ashe Sylva 

Forest Warden Mack Ashe Sylva 

County Attorney W. R. Sherrill Sylva 

County Librarian JMrs. Blanche M. Jones Sylva 

Commissioners 

Chairman T. Walter Ashe Sylva 

Commissioner J. C. Passmore Cashiers 

Commissioner Ed Fisher Sylva, RFD 



County Government 501 

johnston 

Johnston County was formed in 1746 from Craven. Afterwards parts of 
Duplin and Orange were added. Was named in honor of Gabriel Johnston, Gov- 
ernor of North Carolina from 1734 to 1752. 

Population, 63,798 County Seat, Smithfield 

State Senators 8th District Thomas O'Berry Goldsboro 

Lawrence H. Wallace Smithfield 

Members House of Representatives. ..G. A. Martin Smithfield 

Carl P. Worley Selma 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court H. V. Rose Smithfield 

Register of Deeds <W. G. Massey Smithfield 

Sheriff C. L. Denning Smithfield 

Treasurer J. Narvin Creech Smithfield 

Auditor E. V. Wilkins Smithfield 

Tax Supervisor E. V. Wilkins Smithfield 

Tax Collector G. Ira Ford Smithfield 

Coroner Dr. Edward N. Booker Selma 

Surveyor C. B. Fulghum '. Selma 

Supt. of Health Dr. E. S. Grady Smithfield 

Supt. of Schools H, B. Marrow Smithfield 

Supt. Public Welfare W. T. Woodard Selma 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Ruby Pearson Smithfield 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Lucy H. Toole Smithfield 

Farm Dem. Agent M. A. Morgan Smithfield 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Ju. R. Johnson ...Smithfield 

Chmn. Bd. Education W. H. Call Selma 

Chmn. Bd. Elections L. L. Levinson Benson 

Game Warden W. H. Norton Smithfield 

Forest Warden Alfred Coates Four Oaks 

County Attorney James R. Pool Smithfield 

County Librarian Miss Virginia Williamson Smithfield 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge Larry F. Wood Smithfield 

Solicitor W. I. Godwin Selma 

Commissioners 

Chairman R. P. Holding Smithfield 

Commissioner .Jesse H. Austin Clayton 

Commissioner Jack B. Wooten Princeton, RFD 

Commissioner ,...R. M. Pleasants Pleasant Grove 

Commissioner J. Dobbin Bailey Kenly 

JONES 

Jones County was formed in 1778 from Craven. Was named in honor of 
Willie Jones, of Halifax. He was one of the leading patriots of the Revolution, 
was President of the Council of Safety, and was opposed to the adoption of the 
Constitution of the United States. It was due to his influence that the Convention 
of 1788 rejected it. 

Population. 10,926 County Seat, Trenton 

State Senators 7th District R. A. Whitaket Kinston 

D. L. Ward New Bern 

Member House of Representatives R. P. Bender Pollocksville 

Clerk of Court George R. Hughes Trenton 

Register of Deeds Geo. G. Noble Trenton 

Sheriff J. W. Creagh Trenton 

Treasurer Branch Banking & Trust Co. Trenton 



502 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Auditor Swindell Pollock Trenton 

Tax Supervisor Swindell Pollock Trenton 

Tax Collector Zell Pollock Trenton 

County Accountant Swindell Pollock Trenton 

Surveyor .J. R. Burt ; Trenton 

Supt. of Schools B. B. C. Kesler Trenton 

Supt. of Public Welfare F. J. Koonce Trenton 

Home Dem. Agent Dorothy Turner Trenton 

Farm Dem. Agent Jack Kelly Trenton 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent W. N. Payton, Jr Trenton 

Chmn. Bd. Education E. M. Philyaw Comfort 

Chmn. Bd. Elections B. L. Brock Trenton 

Game Warden C. R. Parker Pollocksville 

County Attorney J. K. Warren Trenton 

Commissioners 

Chairman W. Guy Hargett Richlands 

Commissioner B. O. Taylor Kinston, Rt. 3 

Commissioner J. C. Foscue Maysville 

Commissioner L. B. Dillahunt Comfort 

Commissioner G. O. Mallard Trenton 

LEE 

Lee County was formed in 1907 from Chatham and Moore. Named in honor 
of Robert E. Lee. 

Population, 18,743 County Seat, Sanford 

State Senators 13th District Wiley G. Barnes Raleigh 

J. C. Pittman Sanford 

Member House of Representatives W. E. Horner Sanford 

Clerk of Court E. M. Underwood Sanford 

Register of Deeds John W. Mcintosh Sanford 

Sheriff A. G. Buchanan Sanford 

Auditor Everette, Zane & Muse Sanford 

Tax Supervisor Flora Wyche Sanford 

Tax Collector .W. H. Campbell Sanford 

County Accountant Flora Wyche Sanford 

Coroner Dr. J. F. Foster Sanford 

Supt. of Health Dr. Lynn Mclver Sanford 

Supt. of Schools G. R. Wheeler Sanford 

Supt. of Public Welfare J. D. Pegram Jonesboro 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Pearl Peebles Sanford 

Farm Dem. Agent L. A. Marsh Sanford 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. A. Overton Sanford 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. F. Olmstead Sanford 

Game Warden Tom Rollins Jonesboro 

Forest Warden A. C. Farrell Sanford 

County Attorney D. B. Teague Sanford 

County Librarian Marion Middleton Sanford 

County Court : 

Judge W. F. Olmstead Sanford 

Solicitor J. Glenn Edwards Sanford 

Commissioners 

Chairman K. E. Seymour Sanford 

Commissioner John W. Gamer Jonesboro, RFD 

Commissioner H. H. Brewer Jonesboro 

Commissioner J. T. Ledwell Sanford 

Commissioner J. F. Loving Sanford 



County Government 503 

LENOIR 

Lenoir County was formed in 1791 from Dobbs and Craven. Was named in 
honor of General William Lenoir, one of the heroes of King's Mountain. 

Population, 41,211 County Seat, Kinston 

State Senators 7th District D. L. Ward New Bern 

R. A. Whitaker Kinston 

Member House of Representatives .. ..F. E. Wallace Kinston 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court John S. Davis Kinston 

Register of Deeds Camille Aldridge Kinston 

Sheriff S. R. Churchill Kinston 

Auditor Katie Cobb Kinston 

Tax Supervisor M. G. Williams Kinston 

Tax Collector M. G. Williams Kinston 

Coroner F. A. Garner Kinston 

Surveyor .J. L. Foy Kinston 

Supt. of Health Dr. G. F. Meadows Kinston 

Supt. of Schools * E. E. Sams Kinston 

Supt. of Public Welfare G. B. Hanrahan Kinston 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Sara Cox Kinston 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Gloria J. W-ashington Kinston 

Farm Dem. Agent M. E. Aycock Kinston 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Peter G. Fuller Kinston 

Chmn. Bd. Education Horace Sutton Kinston 

Chmn. Bd. Elections R. T. Allen Kinston 

Game Warden M. L. Hill Kinston 

Forest Warden Isaac E. Brown Kinston, Rt. 3 

County Attorney T. J. White Kinston 

County Librarian Elizabeth Stiff Kinston 

Recorder's Court of LaGrange: 

Judge S. D. McCuUen LaGrange 

Municipal County Court of Kinston 
and Lenoir County : 

Judge Joe Dawson Kinston 

Solicitor P. H. Crawford, Jr Kinston 

Commissioners 

Chairman W. L. Measley LaGrange, RFD 

Commissioner J. L. Kilpatrick Kinston, RFD 

Commissioner Harry Sutton Kinston 

Commissioner Joe S. May Kinston 

Commissioner M. N. Smith Deep Run 

LINCOLN 

Lincoln County was formed in 1779 from Tryon. Was named in honor of 
General Benjamin Lincoln, a distinguished general of the Revolution, whom Wash- 
ington appointed to receive the sword of Lord Comwallis at the surrender of 
Yorktown. 

Population, 24,187 County Seat, Lincolnton 

State Senators 25th District John W. Aiken Hickory 

Hugh G. Mitchell Statesville 

Member House of Representatives Chas. F. Houser Lincolnton 

Clerk of Court Thomas E. Rhodes Lincolnton 

Register of Deeds W. H. Boring Lincolnton 

Sheriff Geo. E. Rudisill Lincolnton 

Auditor W. H. Boring Lincolnton 



504 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Tax Supervisor R. B. Gates Lincolnton 

Tax Collector R. B. Gates Lincolnton 

County Accountant W. H. Boring Lincolnton 

Coroner Frank P. Heavner Lincolnton 

Surveyor Hoke S. Heavner Lincolnton 

Supt. of Health Dr. H. C. Whims Newton 

Supt. of Schools Joe R. Nixon Lincolnton 

Supt. of Public Welfare Ruth Grigg Lincolnton 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Elizabeth Raby Lincolnton 

Farm Dem. Agent Joseph G. Morrison Stanley, Rt. 1 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. W. G. Bandy Lincolnton 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. H. Childs Lincolnton 

Game Warden J. Loyd Thompson Lincolnton 

County Attorney M. T. Leatherman Lincolnton 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge Kemp B. Nixon Lincolnton 

Solicitor S. M. Roper Lincolnton 

Commissioners 

Chairman W. E. Garrison Lincolnton 

Commissioner Don Cherry Davidson, Rt. 1 

Commissioner P. A. Hoover , ^ Vale 

Commissioner C. L. Beam Cherryville 

Commissioner J. H. Shrum Lincolnton 



MACON 

Macon County was formed in 1828 from Haywood. Was named in honor of 
Nathaniel Macon, Speaker of the National House of Representatives, United States 
Senator, President of the Constitutional Convention of 1835. 

Population, 15,880 County Seat, Franklin 

State Senator 33rd District A. L. Penland ...Hayesville 

Member House of Representatives Wayne R. McCracken Franklin, Rt. 4 

Clerk of Court A, R. Higdon Franklin 

Register of Deeds Lake V. Shope Franklin 

Sheriff J. P. Bradley Franklin 

Treasurer J. P. Bradley Franklin 

Auditor R. C. Birmingham Charlotte 

Tax Supervisor Lake V. Shope Franklin 

Tax Collector J. P. Bradley Franklin 

County Accountant Lake V. Shope Franklin 

Coroner George Wallace Franklin, Rt. 1 

Surveyor W. M. Parrish Otto 

Supt. of Health Dr. W. A. Rogers Franklin 

Supt. of Schools G. L. Honk Franklin 

Supt. of Public Welfare Eloise Franks Franklin 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Florence S. Sherrill Franklin 

Farm Dem. Agent Sam W. Mendenhall Franklin 

Chmn. Bd. Education ,C. G. Moore Franklin 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. G. Mann ...Franklin, Rt. 2 

Game Warden J. Fred Bryson Franklin 

County Attorney G. L. Honk Franklin 

County Librarian JUrs. Blanche M. Jones Franklin 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman Gus Leach Franklin 

Commissioner W. W. Edwards Highlands 

Commissioner C. L. Blaine Franklin, Rt. 1 



County Government 505 

MADISON 

Madison County was formed in 1851 from Buncombe and Yancey. Was named 
in honor of James Madison, fourth President of the United States. 

Popvdation, 22,522 County Seat, Marshall 

State Senator 30th District Calvin R. Edney Marshall 

Member House of Representatives Dr. J. H. Hutchins Marshall 

Offi,ce . Officer Address 

Clerk of Court Fred English (acting) Marshall 

Register of Deeds A. W. Coates Marshall 

Sheriff Jeter P. Ramsey Marshall 

Treasurer - Citizens Bank and Bank of 

French Broad Marshall 

Auditor L. Z. Eller Marshall 

Tax Supervisor Woodson Ray Marshall 

Tax Collector R. W. Ponder Marshall 

County Accountant L. Z. Eller Marshall 

Coroner C. D. Bowman Marshall 

Surveyor Birchard Shelton Marshall, Rt. 3 

Supt. of Schools Mrs. Edna G. Rhodes Marshall 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Vanda D. Wooten '. Marshall 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Edith McGlamery Marshall 

Farm Dem. Agent Phillip R. Elam r.. Marshall 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. Clyde Brown Waverly 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Glenn Reemes .' Marshall. Rt. 1 

Game Warden Moody Chandler Marshall, Rt. 3 

County Attorney J. C. Ramsey Marshall 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman L. G. Buckner Mars Hill, Rt. 2 

Commissioner J. B. McDevitt Marshall, Rt. 3 

Commissioner Hermon English Flag Pond, Tenn., Rt. 1 

MARTIN 

Martin County was foi-med in 1774 from Halifax and Tyrrell. Was named in 
honor of Josiah Martin, the last royal governor of North Carolina. It is probable 
that this name would have been changed like those of Dobbs and Tryon, but for 
the popularity of Alexander Martin, who was Governor in 1782 and again in 1790. 

Population, 26,111 County Seat, Williamston 

State Senators 2nd District E. A. Daniel Washington 

W. Roy Hampton , Plymouth 

Member House of Representatives Clarence W. Griffin Williamston 

Clerk of Court L. Bruce Wynne Williamston 

Register of Deeds J. Sam Getsinger Williamston 

Sheriff C. B. Roebuck Williamston 

Treasurer R. H. Smith Williamston 

Auditor J. Sam Getsinger Williamston 

Tax Supervisor M. L. Peel Williamston 

Tax Collector M. L. Peel Williamston 

County Accountant J. Sam Getsinger Williamston 

Coroner S. R. Biggs Williamston 

Surveyor A. Corey James ville 

Supt. of Health Dr. John W. Williams Williamston 

Supt. of Schools James C. Manning ■. Williamston 

Supt. of Public Welfare Miss Mary W. Taylor Williamston 

Home. Dem. Agent Miss Mildred Pigg Williamston 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Cleopatra A. Tyner Williamston 

Farm Dem. Agent ..T. B. Brandon Williamston 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Oliver Carter Parmelee 



B06 North Cajrolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. D. Woolard Williamston 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Sylvester Peel Williamston 

Game Warden W. O. Abbitt Williamston 

Forest Warden Marvin H. Leggett Jamesville 

County Attorney E. S. Peele Williamston 

County Librarian Elizabeth House Williamston 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge J. C. Smith Robersonville 

Solicitor E. S. Peele Williamston 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chaii-man R. L. Perry Williamston, RFD 

Commissioner Joshua L. Coltrain Williamston, RFD 

Commissioner C. Abram Roberson Robersonville 

Commissioner R. A. Haislip Hassell 

Commissioner C. D. Carstarphen Williamston 

McDowell 

McDowell County was formed in 1842 from Rutherford and Burke. Was 
named in honor of Colonel Joseph McDowell, an active officer of the Revolution. 
McDowell voted with Rutherford and Burke until 1854. 

Population, 22,996 County Seat, Marion 

State Senators 27th District Wade B. Matheny Forest City 

Lee B. Weathers Shelby 

Member House of Represetnatives J. C. Rabb .' Marion, Rt. 4 

Clerk of Court J. F. Moody Marion 

Register of Deeds Z. L. Lackey Marion 

Sheriff G. T. Nichols Marion 

Treasurer Z. L. Lackey _ Marlon 

Tax Supervisor Mrs. Mary G. Burgin Marion 

Tax Collector G. T. Nichols Marion 

County Accountant Mrs. Mary G. Burgin Marion 

Coroner S. J. Westmoreland Marion 

Surveyor E. A. Allanach Old Fort 

Supt. of Schools N. F. Steppe Marion 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Pearl Kirkpatrick Marion 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Jean Steele Marion 

Farm Dem. Agent S. L. Homewood Marion 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. J. B. Johnson Old Fort 

Chmn. Bd. Elections T. W. Gowan Marion, Rt. 4 

Game Warden T. W. Gowan Marion, Rt. 4 

Forest Warden Lewen Westmoreland Marion, Rt. 1 

County Attorney R. W. Proctor Marion 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge Paul J. Story Marion 

Solicitor Wm. D. Lonon Marion 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman I. L. Caplan Old Fort 

Commissioner C. A. Workman Marion 

Commissioner C. L. Holland Marion, Rt. 2 

MECKLENBURG 

Mecklenburg County was formed in 1762 from Anson. Was named in honor 
of Princess Charlotte, of Mecklenburg. Queen of George IH, King of England. 



County Government 507 

The county seat, Charlotte, one of the prettiest cities in the State, was also named 
in her honor. Mecklenburg County was the scene of some of the most stirring 
events of the Revolution. 

Population, 151,826 County Seat, Charlotte 

State Senator 20th District Joe L. Blythe Charlotte 

Members House of Representatives. ..James B. Vogler Charlotte 

Arthur Goodman Charlotte 

Ed. T. Tonissen Charlotte 

Harvey Morris Charlotte 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court J. Lester Wolfe Charlotte 

Register of Deeds John R. Renfrow Charlotte 

Sheriff G. Mack Riley Charlotte 

Treasurer Jessie Caldwell Smith Charlotte 

Auditor G. D. Bradshaw Charlotte 

Tax Supervisor J. Arthur Henderson .". Charlotte 

Tax Collector Plato W. Davenport Charlotte 

County Accountant G. D. Bradshaw Charlotte 

Coroner W. M. Summerville Charlotte 

Sur\'eyor J. W. Spratt Charlotte 

Supt. of Health Dr. E. H. Hand Pineville 

Supt. of Schools J. W. Wilson Charlotte 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Louise O. Neikirk Charlotte 

Home Dem. Agent .Helen John Wright Charlotte 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Eulah B. Williams Charlotte 

Farm Dem. Agent W. D. Reynolds Charlotte 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent ,W. B. Harrison Charlotte 

Chmn. Bd. Education -W. B. McClintock Charlotte 

Chmn. Bd. Elections. Chase Brenizer Charlotte 

Game Warden Paul S. Keen Charlotte 

County Attorney .Taliaferro & Clarkson Charlotte 

County Librarian Hoyt R. Galvin Charlotte 

County Recorder's Court: 

Judge Fred H. Hasty Charlotte 

Solicitor C. W. Bundy Charlotte 

City Recorder's Court: 

Judge E. McA. Currie Charlotte 

Solicitor Mercer Blankenship Charlotte 

Domestic Relations Conrt: 

Judge Marion F. Redd Charlotte 

Solicitor Baxter L. Baker Charlotte 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman Sid Y. McAden Charlotte 

Commissioner J. Caldwell McDonald Charlotte 

Commissioner Carl J. McEwen Matthews 

Commissioner Arnie D. Cashion Davidson 

Commissioner Sandy G. Porter Charlotte 

MITCHELL 

Mitchell County was formed in 1861 from Yancey, Watauga, Caldwell, Burke 
and McDowell. Was named in honor of Dr. Elisha Mitchell, a professor in the 
University of North Carolina. While on an exploring expedition on Mt. Mitchell, 
the highest peak east of the Rocky Mountains, Dr. Mitchell fell from a high peak 
and was killed. His body is buried on top of this lofty mountain. Mitchell County 
voted with Yancey County until 1868. 

Population, 15,980 County Seat, Bakersville 

State Senator 30th District Calvin R. Edney Marshall 

Member House of Representatives Dr. C. A. Peterson Spruce Pine 

Clerk of Court J H. McKinney Bakersville 



508 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Register of Deeds R. P. Greene Bakersville 

Sheriff W. G. Honeycutt Bakersville 

Treasurer B. B. Burleson Bakersville 

Auditor J. Dont Street Bakersville 

Tax Supervisor J. Dont Street Bakersville 

Tax Collector B. B. Burleson BakeTsville 

County Accountant J. Dont Street Bakersville 

Coroner Hughes Burleson Spruce Pine 

Surveyor 

Supt. of Health Dr. B. B. McGuire Spruce Pine 

Supt. of Schools Jason B. Deyton Spruce Pine 

Supt. of Public Welfare Rayburn Yelton Bakersville 

Home Dem. Agent Margaret Perry Bakersville 

Farm Dem. Agent L. J. P. Stone Bakersville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Harper Wilson Bakersville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. C. Wilson Toecane, Rt. 1 

Game Warden S. B. Putnam Bandana 

County Attorney W. C. Berry Bakersville 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman T. W. Dale Spruce Pine, Rt. 1 

Commissioner Sam Whitson Ewart 

Commissioner Dave Bryant Ewart 

MONTGOMERY 

Montgomery County vsras formed in 1778 from Anson. Was named in honor of 
the brave General Richard Montgomery, who lost his life at the battle of Quebec 
in 1775 v/hile trying to conquer Canada. 

Population, 16,280 County Seat, Troy 

State Senators 18th District Geo. L. Hundley Thomasville 

Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

Member House of Representatives ..J. P. Wallace Troy 

Clerk of Court T. R. Baldwin Troy 

Register of Deeds A. A. Maness Troy 

Sheriff Earl D. Bruton Troy 

Treasurer J. S. Smitherman Troy 

Auditor J. S. Smithemian Troy 

Tax Supervisor A. A. Maness Troy 

Tax Collector J. C. Beckwith Troy 

County Accountant J. S. Smitherman.! Troy 

Coroner E. T. Reynolds Troy 

Supt. of Health Dr. W. T. Harriss Troy 

Supt. of Schools J. S. Edwards Troy 

Supt. Public Welfare C. J. McLeod Troy 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. D. Harriss Troy 

Farm Dem. Agent R. E. Davenport Troy 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. D. G. Ridenhour Mt. Gilead 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. J. Batten Mt. Gilead 

Game Warden Clete Poole Troy 

Forest Warden Clay L. Bruton. Mt. Gilead 

County Attorney W. L. Currie Troy 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. L. Currie Troy 

Solicitor Bob V. Howell Troy 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman ' .John R. McKinnon Mt. Gilead, RFD 

Commissioner D. J. McLeod Biscoe 

Commissioner W. I. Farrell Troy 



County Government 509 

MOORE 

Moore County was formed in 1784 from Cumberland. Was named in honor of 
Captain Alfred Moore, of Brunswick, a soldier of the Revolution and afterwards 
a Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. 

Popxilation, 30,969 County Seat, Carthage 

State Senators 12th District Ryan McBryde Raeford 

Arthur Ross Asheboro 

Member House of Representatives Wilbur H. Currie Carthage 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court John Willcox Carthage 

Register of Deeds Miss Bessie McCaskill Carthage 

Sheriff C. J. McDonald Carthage 

Treasurer Bank of Pinehurst Pinehurst 

Auditor John C. Muse Sanford 

Tax Supervisor Miss Maida Jenkins Carthage 

Tax Collector W. T. Huntley Carthage 

County Accountant Miss Maida Jenkins Carthage 

Coroner R. G. Fry, Jr Carthage 

Surveyor H. H. Fry Carthage 

Supt. of Health Dr. J. W. Willcox West End 

Supt. of Schools H. Lee Thomas Carthage 

Supt. of Public Welfare Miss Pauline Covington Carthage 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Flora McDonald Carthage 

Fann Dem. Agent E. H. Garrison, Jr Carthage 

Chmn. Bd. Education John W. Graham Aberdeen 

Chmn. Bd. Elections John A. Fry Carthage 

Game Warden Alex Fields Southern Pines 

Forest Warden R. S. White Lakeview 

County Attorney M. G. Boyette Carthage 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge J. Vance Rowe Aberdeen 

Solicitor W. A. Leland McKeithen Pinehurst 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman Gordon M. Cameron Pinehurst 

Commissioner L. R. Reynolds Leaman 

Commissioner W. J. Dunlap Robbins 

Commissioner John M. Currie Carthage 

Commissioner T. L. Blue Carthage 

NASH 

Nash County was formed in 17.77 from Edgecombe. Was named in honor of 
General Francis Nash, a soldier of the Revolution, who was mortally wounded while 
fighting under Washington at Germantown. The United States has erected a 
monument in his honor at the Guilford Battleground near Greensboro. 

Population, 55,608 County Seat, Nashville 

State Senators 6th District Joseph C. Eagles ,. Wilson 

Willie Lee Lumpkin Louisburg 

Member House of Representatives Thomas J. Pearsall Rocky Mount 

Clerk of Court J. N. Sills Nashville 

Register of Deeds Wm. S. Bunn '. Nashville 

Sheriff .C. V. Faulkner Nashville 

Treasurer J. C. Ellis (acting) Nashville 

Auditor J. C. Ellis Nashville 

Tax Supervisor J. C. Ellis Nashville 

Tax Collector C. V. Faulkner Nashville 

County Accountant J C. Ellis Nashville 



510 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Coroner M. C. Gulley Nashville 

Supt. of Health Dr. John S. Chamblee Nashville 

Supt. of Schools Linwood S. Inscoe Nashville 

Supt. of Public Welfare James A. Glover Nashville 

Home Dem. Agent JVIrs. Effie Vines Gordan Rocky Mount 

Farm Dem. Agent M. E. Hollowell Nashville 

Chmn. Bd. Education G. L. Jones Nashville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections William Collins Nashville 

Game Warden W. F. Whitley Tarboro 

Forest Warden Leo Cooke Nashville 

County Attorney J. P. Bunn Rocky Mount 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge J. W. Grissom Rocky Mount 

Solicitor John M. King Rocky Mount 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman J. Henry Vaughan Elm City, RFD 

Commissioner F. V. Avent Whitakers 

Commissioner J. B. W. Overton Rocky Mount 

Commissioner T. A. Williams Battleboro 

Commissioner G. R. Strickland Middlesex, RFD 

NEW HANOVER 

New Hanover County was formed in 1729 from Bath. Was named after 
Hanover, a country in Europe whose ruler became King of England with the title 
of George I. 

Population, 47,935 County Seat, Wilmington 

State Senators 9th District Henry Vann Clinton 

Roy Rowe Burgaw 

Member House of Representatives John Q. LeGrand Wilmington 

Clerk of Court A. L. Meyland Wilmington 

Register of Deeds A. B. Rhodes ...Wilmington 

Sheriff .C. David Jones Wilmington 

Treasurer J. A. Orrell Wilmington 

Auditor ; J. A. Orrell Wilmington 

Tax Supervisor Addison Hewlett Wilmington 

Tax Collector .'. C. R. Morse Wilmington 

County Accountant J. A. Orrell Wilmington 

Coroner A. W. Allen Wilmington 

Supt. of Health Dr. A. H. Elliot Wilmington 

Supt. of Schools H. M. Roland Wilmington 

Supt. Public Welfare J. A. Hollis Wilmington 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Ann Mason Wilmington 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Rebecca Lawrence Wilmington 

Farm Dem. Agent R. W. Galphin Wilmington 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. John T. Hoggard Wilmington 

Chmn. Bd. Elections H. G. Carney Wilmington 

Game Warden W. P. Floyd Wilmington 

County Attorney Marsden Bellamy Wilmington 

County Librarian Miss Emma Woodward Wilmington 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge H, Winfield Smith Wilmington 

Solicitor J. A. McNorton Wilmington 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman Addison Hewlett Wilmington 

Commissioner Barry R. Gardner Wilmington 

Commissioner George W. Trask Wilmington 



County Government 511 

Office Officer Address 

Commissioner Louis J. Coleman Wilmington 

Commissioner James M. Hall Wilmington 

NORTHAMPTON 

Northampton County was formed in 1741 from Bertie. Was named in honor 
of George, Earl of Northampton, an English nobleman. His son, Spencer Comp- 
ton. Earl of Wilmington, was high in office when Gabriel Johnston was Governor 
of North Carolina, who had the town of Wilmington named in his honor. 

Population, 28,299 County Seat, Jackson 

State Senator 3rd District Archie C. Gay Jackson 

Member House of Representatives H. R. Harris Seaboard 

Clerk of Court Geo. P. Burgwyn Jackson 

Register of Deeds A. H. Martin Jackson 

Sheriff J. C. Stephenson Jackson 

Treasurer Farmers Bank Woodland 

Auditor Harvey D. Hart Jackson 

Tax Supervisor Harvey D. Hart Jackson 

County Accountant Harvey D. Hart Jackson 

Coroner R. L. Grant Jackson 

Surveyor C. R. Revelle Conway 

Supt. of Health Dr. W. R. Parker ..Jackson 

Supt. of Schools N. L. Turner Rich Square 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. J. W. Brown Jackson 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Anne Perry Jackson 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Annie Mae Rich Rich Square 

Farm Dem. Agent E. L. Norton Jackson 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent L. J. Morris Rich Square 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. J. W. Parker, Jr Seaboard 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. H. S. Burgwyn, Jr Jackson 

Game Warden J. H. Ramsey Seaboard 

Forest Warden H. C. Bottoms Margarettsville 

County Attorney Buxton Mideytte Jackson 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Eric Norfleet Jackson 

Solicitor Ballard S. Gay Jackson 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman W. G. Edwards Seaboard 

Commissioner H. D. Holloman Rich Square 

Commissioner J. R. Woodard Conway 

Commissioner John E. Boone Jackson 

Commissioner R. W. Thompson Garysburg 

ONSLOW 

Onslow County was formed in 1734 from Bath. Was named in honor of 
Arthur Onslow, for more than thirty years Speaker of the House of Commons in 
the British Parliament. 

Population, 17,939 County Seat, Jacksonville 

State Senators 7th District R. A. Whitaker Kinston 

D. L. Ward New Bern 

Member House of Representatives W. J. (Billy) Arthur Jacksonville 

Clerk of Court J. R. Gurganus Jacksonville 

Register of Deeds J. B. Murrill Jacksonville 

Sheriff B. F. Morton Jacksonville 

Treasurer First Citizens B. & T. Co Jacksonville 

Tax Supervisor L. D. Sea well Jacksonville 



512 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Tax Collector I. D. Sanders Jacksonville 

County Accountant J. J. Cole Jacksonville 

Coroner G. W. Jones Jacksonville 

Supt. of Health Dr. H. W. Stevens Jacksonville 

Supt. of Schools A. H. Hatsell Jacksonville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Laura M. Starling Jacksonville 

Home Dem. Agent Laura Beatty Jacksonville 

Farm Dem. Agent Hugh Overstreet ...Jacksonville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. W. T. Turlington Jacksonville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections R. V. Venters Richlands 

Game Warden W. I. Mallard Maysville 

Forest Warden Geo. R. Melville Jacksonville 

County Attorney ..John D. Wariick Jacksonville 

County Criminal Court: 

Judge Harvey Boney Jacksonville 

Solicitor George W. Phillips Jacksonville 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman H. M. Ennett Sneads Ferry 

Commissioner J. C. Petteway Jacksonville 

Commissioner W. V. Venters Richlands 

Commissioner H. B. Moore Swansboro 

Commissioner T. J. Marshall Jacksonville, Rt. 2 

ORANGE 

Orange County was formed in 1753 from Granville, Johnston, and Bladen. 
Was named in honor of William of Orange, who became King William III of 
England. He was one of the greatest of the kings of England and saved the 
English people from the tyranny of James II. His name is held in honor wherever 
English liberty is enjoyed. 

Population, 23,072 County Seat, Hillsboro 

State Senator 16th District W. Dennis Madry Burlington 

Member House of Representatives... John W. Umstead, Jr Chapel Hill 

Clerk of Court E. M. Lynch Hillsboro 

Register of Deeds J. E. Laws Hillsboro 

Sheriff S. T. Latta, Jr Hillsboro 

Treasurer G. G. Bivins Hillsboro 

Auditor G. W. Ray Hillsboro 

Tax Supervisor G. W. Ray Hillsboro 

Tax Collector C. C. Davis Hillsboro 

County Accountant : G. W. Ray Hillsboro 

Coroner H. J. Walker Hillsboro 

Surveyor J. Ralph Weaver Chapel Hill 

Supt. of Health Dr. O. David Garwin Hillsboro 

Supt. of Schools R. H. Claytor Hillsboro 

Supt. Public Welfare M. T. Mattox Hillsboro 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Woodard Byars Hillsboro 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Ruby C. Carraway Hillsboro 

Farm Dem. Agent Don S. Matheson Hillsboro 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent M. C. Burt Hillsboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. S. Compton Hillsboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections C. A. Bivins Hillsboro 

Game Warden Jlobert F. Logan Chapel Hill 

Forest Warden P. H. Johns ' Hillsboro 

County Attorney A. H. Graham Hillsboro 

County Librarian Mrs. Ethel W. Whetstone Hillsboro 

Chapel Hill Recorder's Court: 

Judge H. A. Whitfield Chapel Hill 

Solicitor T A. Henry Chapel Hill 



County Government 513 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman Collier Cobb, Jr Chapel Hill 

Commissioner Ben F. Wilson Efland 

Commissioner H. G. Laws Hurdle Mills, Rt. 1 

PAMLICO 

Pamlico County was formed in 1872 from Craven and Beaufort. Was named 
after the sound of the same name, which was the name of a tribe of Indians in 
eastern North Carolina. There was a Pamlico Precinct in North Carolina as early 
as 1705. Pamlico County voted with Beaufort up to 1883. 

Population, 9,706 County Seat, Bayboro 

State Senators 2nd District E. A. Daniel Washington 

W. Roy Hampton Plymouth 

Member-House of Representatives E. S. Askew Oriental 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court ■ Mrs. Alice G. McCotter Bayboro 

Register of Deeds T. Z. Spencer Bayboro 

Sheriff R. A. Whorton Bayboro 

Treasurer The Bank of Aurora Bayborc 

Auditor T. Z. Spencer Bayboro 

Tax Supervisor T. Z. Spencer Bayboro 

Tax Collector R. A. Whorton Bayboro 

County Accountant .^^ T. Z. Spencer Bayboro 

Coroner G. F. (Jack) Harris Bayboro 

Surveyor R. C. Holton New Bern, Rt. 1 

Supt. of Health Miss Sina Campen „ Bayboro 

Supt. of Schools Thomas S. Hood Bayboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Thelma C. Charles Bayboro 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Gladys Brooks Oriental 

Farm Dem. Agent James Stovall Bayboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. A. Tingle, Jr. Alliance 

Chmn. Bd. Elections P. E. McCotter Alliance 

Game Warden Herman Spain Stonewall 

Forest Warden J. T. Whorton Merritt 

County Attorney Z. V. Rawls Bayboro 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge Julius G. Dees Bayboro 

Solicitor Z. V. Rawls Bayboro 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman C. D. Fentress Maribel 

Commissioner E. A. Hunnings Grantsboro 

Commissioner E. R. Goodwin Oriental 

Commissioner W. I. Sadler Merritt 

Commissioner T. G. Potter Lowland 

PASQUOTANK 

Pasquotank County was formed in 1672 from Albemarle. Was named for 
a tribe of Indians in eastern North Carolina. 

Population, 20,568 County Seat, Elizabeth City 

State Senators 1st District Chas. H. Jenkins Aulander 

W. T. Culpepper Elizabeth City 

Member House of Representatives Vernon G. James Elizabeth City 

Clerk of Court N. E. Aydlett Elizabeth City 

Register of Deeds J. C. Spence Elizabeth City 



514 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Sheriff W. L. Thompson Elizabeth City 

Treasurer First & Citizens Nat'l. Bank Elizabeth City 

Auditor J. F. Ferrell Elizabeth City 

Tax Supervisor J. I. Saunders Elizabeth City 

Tax Collector .W. L. Thompson Elizabeth City 

County Accountant J. F. Ferrell Elizabeth City 

Coroner Dr. W. H. C. White Elizabeth City 

Supt. of Health Dr. D. C. Hackett Elizabeth City 

Supt. of Schools M. P. Jennings Elizabeth City 

Supt. Public Welfare Rev. A. H. Outlaw Elizabeth City 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Celeste Spivey Elizabeth City 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Willa Jones Batton ^..Elizabeth City 

Farm Dem. Agent P. H. Jameson r.. Elizabeth City 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Ernest McCoy Elizabeth City 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. M. Scott Elizabeth City, Rt. 4 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Thos. J. Boswell Elizabeth City 

Game Warden B. A. Morgan Elizabeth City, Rt. 3 

County Attorney M. B. Simpson Elizabeth City 

County Librarian Miss Doris Abbott Elizabeth City 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge L. S. Blades. Jr Elizabeth City 

Solicitor W. W. Cohoon Elizabeth City 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman Noah Burfoot Elizabeth City 

Commissioner Cecil Reel Elizabeth City 

Commissioner M. J. Reid Elizabeth City, Rt. 1 

Commissioner G. E. Halstead Weeksville 

Commissioner P. A. Pritchard Elizabeth City, Rt. 3 

Commissioner B. F. Pritchard Elizabeth City, Rt. 3 

Commissioner W. O. Etheridge Elizabeth City, Rt. 3 

PENDER 

Pender County was formed in 1875 from New Hanover. Was named in honor 
of General William D. Pender, of Edgecombe County, a brave Confederate soldier 
who was killed at the battle of Gettysburg. The last order ever given by the 
famous ''Stonewall" Jackson on the battle field was to General Pender: "You must 
hold your ground. General Pender, you must hold your ground," he cried as he 
was carried off the field to die. General Pender held his ground. 

Population, 17,710 County Seat, Burgaw 

State Senatoi-s 9th District Henry Vann Clinton 

Roy Rowe Burgaw 

Member House of Representatives ... J. V. Whitfield Wallaca 

Clerk of Court C. D. Murphy (acting)) Burgaw 

Register of Deeds H. C. Walker Burgaw 

Sheriff J. T. Brown Burgaw 

Treasurer Bliss W. Rivenbark Burgaw 

Auditor George F. Lucas Burgaw 

Tax Collector L. R. Bradshaw Burgaw 

County Accountant George F. Lucas Burgaw 

Coroner H. E. Blake Burgaw 

Supt. of Health Dr. H. W. Stevens Jacksonville 



County Government 515 

Office Officer - Address 

Supt. of Schools T. T. Murphy Burgaw 

Supt. of Public Welfare Ruth Patterson Burgaw 

Home Dem. Agent Frances D. Weston Burgaw 

Farm Dem. Agent R. R. Rich Burgaw 

Chmn. Bd. Education D. J. Farrior Burgaw 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Arthur Anderson Watha 

Game Warden W. J. Murray Burgaw 

Forest Warden Joe F. Johnston Burgaw 

County Attorney Leon H; Corbett Burgaw 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge I. S. Bowen Burgaw 

Solicitor Leon H. Corbett Burgaw 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman K. D. Pigford Willard 

Commissioner J. Fred Bradshaw / Burgaw 

Commissioner A. H. Page Burgaw 

PERQUIMANS 

Perquimans was formed in 1672 from Albemarle. Was named after a tribe 
of Indians. 

Population, 9,773 County Seat, Hertford 

State Senators 1st District W. T. Culpepper Elizabeth City 

Chas. H. Jenkins Aulander 

Member House of Representatives W. W. White Hertford 

Clerk of Court -. W. H. Pitt Hertford 

Register of Deeds J. W. Ward Hertford 

Sheriff J. E. Winslow Hertford 

Treasurer Jacob L. White Hertford 

Auditor W. F. C. Edwards Hertford 

Tax Supervisor 

Tax Collector J. E. Winslow Hertford 

County Accountant W. F. C. Edwards Hertford 

Coroner Dr. C. A. Davenport Hertford 

Supt. of Health Dr. T. P. Brinn Hertford 

Supt. of Schools ; E. T. Johnson Hertford 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Sarah Brinn Perry Hertford 

Home Dem. Agent Frances Maness Hertford 

Farm Dem. Agent Xi. W. Anderson Hertford 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent J. B. Small Edenton 

Chmn. Bd. Education T. S. White Hertford 

Chmn. Bd. Elections L. N. Hollowell Hertford 

Game Warden J. H. Newbold .-. Hertford 

Forest Warden J. W. Nowell Winfall, Star Rt. 

County Attorney Chas. Whedbee Hertford 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Chas. E. Johnson Hertford 

Solicitor Carroll Holmes Hertford 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman E. M. Perry Hertford 

Commissioner G. W. Jackson Hertford 

Commissioner L. L. Winslow Belvidere 

Commissioner R. T. Brinn Hertford 

Commissioner .Chas. E. White Hertford 



516 North Carolina Manual 

PERSON 

Person County was formed in 1791 from Caswell. Was named in honor of 
General Thomas Person, Revolutionary patriot, member of the Council of Safety, 
and trustee of the University. He gave a large sum of money to the University, 
and a building was erected in his honor called Person Hall. 

Popxilation, 25,029 County Seat, Roxboro 

State Senators 14th District Claude Currie Durham 

F. D. Long Roxboro 

Member House of Representatives R. P. Burns Roxboro 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court Sue C. Bradsher Roxboro 

Register of Deeds W. T. Kirby Roxboro 

Sheriff M. T. Clayton Roxboro 

Treasurer J. B. Riggsbee Roxboro 

Auditor J. S. Walker Roxboro 

Tax Supervisor J. S. Walker Roxboro 

Tax Collector M. T. Clayton Roxboro 

County Accountant J. S. Walker Roxboro 

Coroner Dr. A. F. Nichols Roxboro 

Surveyor W. R. Gates Roxboro 

Supt. of Health Dr. O. Davis Garvin Roxboro 

Supt. of Schools R. B. Griffin Roxboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. T. C. Wagstaff Roxboro 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Evelyn Caldwell Roxboro 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Annie Mae Tuck Roxboro 

Farm Dem. Agent H. K. Sanders Roxboro 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent C. J. Ford Roxboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education E. E. Bradsher Roxboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. H. Harris, III Roxboro 

Game Warden B. G. Hurdle Hurdle Mills 

County Manager J. S. Walker Roxboro 

County Attorney R. P. Burns Roxboro 

County Librarian ......Mrs. Ethel W. Whetstone Roxboro 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge F. O. Carver, Sr Roxboro 

Solicitor Geo. W. Davis Farmville 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman J. A. Long, Jr. Roxboro 

Commissioner W. H. Gentry Roxboro, Rt. 2 

Commissioner .J. B. Hester Roxboro, Rt. 1 

PITT 

Pitt County was formed in 1760 from Beaufort. Was named in honor of Wil- 
liam Pitt. (See Chatham County.) 

Population, 61,244 County Seat, Greenville 

State Senator 5th District Arthur B. Corey Greenville 

Members House of Representatives ..Sam O. Worthington Greenville 

Geo. W. Davis Farmville 

Clerk of Court r J. F. Harrington Greenville 

Register of Deeds-. Roy T. Cox Greenville 

Sheriff Rual W. Tyson Greenville 

Treasurer Guaranty Bank & Trust Co Greenville 

Auditor J H. Coward Greenville 

Tax Supervisor J. H. Coward Greenville 

Tax Collector H. L. Andrews Greenville 

County Accountant J. H. Coward Greenville 



County Government 517 

Office Officer Address 

Coroner G. L. Rouse Greenville 

Surveyor F. McCoy Tripp Winterville 

Supt. of Health Dr. N. Thos. Ennett Greenville 

Supt. of Schools D. H. Conley Greenville 

Supt. of Public Welfare K. T. Futrell Greenville 

Home Dem. Agent Verona Lee Joyner Greenville 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Amelia Capehart Greenville 

Farm Dem. Agent F. F. Hendrix Greenville 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent D. D. DuPree Greenville 

Chmn. Bd. Education W. H. Woolard Greenville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. H. Harrell Greenville 

Game Warden J. O. Teel Greenville 

Forest Warden N. S. Tyson Greenville 

County Attorney Arthur B. Corey Greenville 

County Librarian Miss Irene Hester Greenville 

County Court : 

Judge Dink James Greenville 

Solicitor Charles Whedbee Greenville 

Farmville Recorder's Coui-t : 

Judge George W. Davis Farmville 

Greenville Municipal Court : 

Judge J. W. H. Roberts Greenville 

Solicitor Eli Bloom Greenville 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman D. T. House Bethel 

Commissioner G. H. Pittman Falkland 

Commissioner G. S. Porter Chicod 

Commissioner M. B. Hodges Grifton 

Commissioner J. N. Williams ...Greenville 

POLK 

Polk County was formed in 1855 from Rutherford and Henderson. Was named 
in honor of Colonel William Polk, "who rendered distinguished services in the 
battles of Germantown, Brandywine,, and Eutaw,, in all of wtiich he was 
wounded." Polk County voted with Rutherford until 1868. 

Population, 11,874 County Seat, Columbus 

State Senators 32nd District W. B. Hodges Hendersonville 

Carroll P. Rogers Tryon 

Member House of Representatives W. H. McDonald Tryon 

Clerk of Court Roy T. Baisden, Jr Columbus 

Register of Deeds C. W. Ballenger Columbus 

Sheriff W. D. Hines Columbus 

Treasurer W. C. Hague Columbus 

Auditor W. Y. Wilkins Columbus 

Tax Supervisor W. Y. Wilkins Columbus 

Tax Collector W. C. Hague Columbus 

County Accountant W. Y. Wilkins Columbus 

Coroner G. H. Bridgman Columbus 

Surveyor Weldon Green Mill Spring 

Supt. of Health..' Dr. B. E. Washburn Rutherfordton 

Supt. of Schools N. A. Melton Columbus 

Supt. of Public Welfare : Jeanette MacGregor Try6n 

Home Dem. Agent Gladys Hamrick Tryon 

Farm Dem. Agent .J. A. Wilson Columbus 

Chmn. Bd. Education John Williams Columbus 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Ned Anderson Saluda 

Game Warden Arthur Pack Tryon 



518 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Forest Warden O. C. Fagan Columbiis 

County Attorney J. T. Arledge.. Tryon 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman G. C. Feagan Melvin Hill 

Commissioner ^E. G. Thompson Mill Spring 

Commissioner .W. D. Westbrook Mill Spring 

RANDOLPH 

Randolph County was formed in 1779 from Guilford. Was named in honor of 
Peyton Randolph, of Virginia, the President of the first Continental Congress. 

Population, 44,554 County Seat, Asheboro 

State Senators 12th District Arthur Ross Asheboro 

Ryan McBryde Raeford 

Member House of Representatives S. Girard Richardson Seagrove 

Clerk of Court Kermit R. Frazier Asheboro 

Register of Deeds Alese M. Ward Asheboro 

Sheriff .W. M. Bingham Asheboro 

Auditor Fred J. Phillips .....Asheboro 

Tax Supervisor J. M. Yates Asheboro 

County Accountant Alese M. Ward Asheboro 

Coroner Carl Loflin Liberty 

Surveyor Clarence Cagle Seagrove 

Supt. of Health Br. G. H. Sumner Asheboro 

Supt. of Schools T. Fletcher Bulla Asheboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare James E. Burgess Asheboro 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Martha B. Thompson Asheboro 

Farm Dem. Agent ..JE. S. Millsaps Asheboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education L. F. Ross ; Asheboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections A. B. Cox Asheboro 

Game Warden Lawrence Davis Asheboro 

County Attorney J. G. Prevette Asheboro 

County Librarian Mrs. Ruby Byrd Campbell Asheboro 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman Clifford Hammond Asheboro 

Commissioner L. C. Gallimore Trinity 

Commissioner M. F, Hinshaw Randleman 

Commissioner G. Russell Hodgin Coleridge 

Commissioner W. Lee Meredith Trinity 

RICHMOND 

Richmond County was formed in 1779 from Anson. Was named in honor of 
Charles Lennox, Duke of Richmond, principal Secretarj- of State in William Pitt's 
second administration. He was a strong friend of the American colonies and 
made the motion in the House of Lords that they be granted their independence. 

Population, 36,810 County Seat, Rockingham 

State Senators 18th District Geo. L. Hundley Thomasville 

Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

Member House of Representatives John D. Chalk Rockingham 

Clerk of Court Thos. L. Covington Rockingham 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Agnes C. Flake Rockingham 

Sheriff Carl H. Holland Rockingham 

Treasurer ^. Farmers Bank & Trust Co Rockingham 

Auditor Miss Mary T. Covington Rockingham 

Tax Supervisor JMiss Mary T. Covington Rockingham 

Tax Collector Carl H. Holland Rockingham 

County Accountant Miss Mary T. Covington Rockingham 



County Government 519 

Office Officer Address 

Coroner W. W. King Rockingham 

Surveyor A. L. McNeill Rockingham 

Supt. of Health Dr. Robt. Young Rockingham 

Supt. of Schools L. J. Bell Rockingham 

Supt. Public Welfare O. G. Reynolds Rockingham 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Frances Ryburn Rockingham 

Farm Dem. Agent N. L. Hendrix Rockingham 

Chmn. Bd. Education W. R. Land Hamlet 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. R. Jones Rockingham 

Game Warden W. M. Bray Rockingham 

Forest Warden W. C. Brown Rockingham, Rt. 1 

County Attorney McLeod & Webb Rockingham 

Richmond County Special Court : 

Judge W. S. Thomas Rockingham 

Solicitor J. Thos. Page .^ Rockingham 

Hamlet Recorder's Court: 

Judge B. R. Carroll Hamlet 

Solicitor A. A. Reaves Hamlet 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman Dr. G. C. Caddell Hoffman 

Commissioner J. W. Hamer Rockingham 

Commissioner Paul A. Brown Rockingham 

Commissioner A. L. Capel Rockingham 

Commissioner P. N. Nicholson Mt. Gilead, Rt. 3 

ROBESON 

Robeson County was formed in 1786 from Bladen. Was named in honor of 
Colonel Thomas Robeson, a soldier of the Revolution. He was one of the leaders 
at the battle of Elizabethtown, which was fought in September, 1781. By this 
battle the Tories in the southeastern part of the State were crushed forevei'. The 
commander of the Whigs was Colonel Thomas Brown. 

Population, 76,860 County Seat, Lumberton 

State Senator 11th District Carson M. Barker Lumberton 

Members House of Representatives. J. P. Buie Red Springs 

I. P. Graham Proctorville 

Clerk of Court W. C. Watts Lumberton 

Register of Deeds N. R. Kinlaw Lumberton 

Sheriff E. C. Wade Lumberton 

Treasurer E. K. Butler Lumberton 

Auditor E. K. Butler Lumberton 

Tax Supervisor E. K. Butler Lumberton 

Tax Collector /...L. McKay Parker Lumberton 

County Accountant E. K. Butler Lumberton 

Coroner -D. W. Biggs ._. Lumberton 

Surveyor Grady Harrell Shannon 

Supt. of Health Dr. E. R. Hardin Lumberton 

Supt. of Schools ....C. L. Green Maxton 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Kate S. McLeod Lumberton 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Ann B. Chandler Lumberton 

Negro Home Dem. Agent La Senia McCrimmons Lumberton 

Farm Dem. Agent O. P. Owens Lumberton 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent S. T. Brooks Lumberton 

Chmn. Bd. Education A. B. McRae Rowland 

Chmn. Bd. Elections G. L. Pate Rowland 

Game Warden i W. E. McConnaughey Red Springs 

Forest Warden J. W. Burns Rowland. RFD 



520 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

County Manager ^E. K. Butler Lumberton 

County Attorney Henry A. McKinnon Lumberton 

Recorder's Court: 
Lumberton District: 

Judge Robert E. Floyd Lumberton 

Solicitor L. J. Huntley Lumberton 

Fairmont District: 

Judge D. R. Mitchell Fairmont 

Solicitor F. Wayland Floyd Fairmont 

Red Springs District: 

Judge W. N. Gibson Red Springs 

Solicitor Z. V. McMillan Red Springs 

Maxton District: 

Judge Tom Caddell Maxton 

Solicitor J. A. Shaw Maxton 

St. Pauls District: 

Judge Clayton Ross Parkton 

Solicitor John D. Canady St. Pauls 

Rowland District: 

Judge ,..F. L. Adams Rowland 

Solicitor " 11. L. Campbell Rowland 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman C. A. Hasty Maxton 

Commissioner R. B. Tolar St. Pauls 

Commissioner .W. E. Graham Lumber Bridge 

Commissioner J. D. Herring Lumberton 

Commissioner .V. J. Griflfin Fairmont 

Commissioner Rufus McQueen Elrod 

ROCKINGHAM 

Rockingham County was formed in 1785 from Guilford. Was named in honor 
of Charles Watson Wentworth, Marquis of Rockingham, who was the leader of 
the party in the British Parliament that advocated American independence. He 
was Prime Minister when the Stamp Act was repealed. 

Population, 57,898 County Seat, Wentworth 

State Senator 15th District J. Hampton Price Leaksville 

Member House of Representatives T. Clarence Stone Stoneville 

Clerk of Court .Theodore C. Bethea Wentworth 

Register of Deeds R. E. Wall Wentworth 

Sheriff Leon W. Worsham Wentworth 

Treasurer Eugene Irvin Wentworth 

Auditor Eugene Irvin Wentworth 

Tax Supervisor Eugene Irvin Wentworth 

Tax Collector Eugene Irvin Wentworth 

County Accountant Eugene Ir\'in Wentworth 

Coroner Dr. M. P. Cummings Reidsville 

Surveyor J. S. Trogdon Leaksville 

Supt. of Health Dr. B. M. Drake Spray 

Supt. of Schools J. C. Colley Wentworth 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. John Lee Wilson MadisoTi 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Grace E. Holcomb Reidsville 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Zodie Vemelle Jackson Reidsville 

Farm Dem. Agent Fred S. Walker Reidsville 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent R. L. Hannon Reidsville 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. L. Roberts Madison 

Chmn. Bd. Elections P. W. Glidewell, Jr Reidsville 

Game Warden A D. Neal Stokesdale 



County Government 521 

Office Officer Address 

County Attorney J. C. Brown Madison 

County Librarian JVIiss Marianne Martin Leaksville 

Leaksville Recorder's Court : 

Judge Henry P. Lane Leaksville 

Solicitor Allan D. Ivie, Jr Leaksville 

Reidsville Recorder's Court: 

Judge E. H. Wrenn Reidsville 

Solicitor D. F. Mayberry Reidsville 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman V. H. Idol .^Madison 

Commissioner G. H. Helmus Reidsville 

Commissioner J. D. Pearman Reidsville 

Commissioner .Harry Davis Leaksville 

Commissioner J. J. Webster Stoneville, RFD 

ROWAN 

Rowan County was formed in 1753 from Anson. Was named in honor of 
Matthew Rowan, a prominent leader before the Revolution, and, for a short time 
after the death of Governor Gabriel Johnston, acting governor. 

Population, 69,206 County Seat, Salisbury 

State Senators 21st District John C. Kesler Salisbury 

Luther E. Earnhardt Concord 

Members House of Representatives ..Kerr Craige Ramsay Salisbury 

George R. UzzeU Salisbury 

Clerk of Court Paul A. Swicegood Salisbury 

Register of Deeds Wm. D. Kizziah Salisbury 

Sheriff J. H. Krider Salisbury 

Treasurer J. E. Haynes Salisbury 

Auditor J. E. Haynes Salisbury 

Tax Supervisor J. E. Haynes Salisbury 

Tax Collector Jl. L. Shoe Salisbury 

County Accountant Phillip Miller Salisbury 

Coroner Dr. T. W. Seay Spencer 

Surveyor ; J. D. Justice Salisbury 

Supt. of Health Dr. C. W. Armstrong Salisbury 

Supt. of Schools S. G. Hasty Salisbury 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Mary O. Linton Salisbury 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Locke Holland Salisbury 

Negro Home Dem. Agent. Mrs. Annie J. Johnson Salisbury 

Farm Dem. Agent P. H. Satterwhite Cleveland 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent A. C. Grant Salisbury 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. Frank Link Salisbury 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. G. Hudson Salisbury 

Game Warden Ed. Burt Salisbury 

County Attorney Kerr Craige Ramsay Salisbury 

County Librarian 3Iiss Edith Clark Salisbury 

Rowan County Court: 

Judge Clinton Eudy Salisbury 

Solicitor J. Allan Dunn Salisbury 

Spencer Recorder's Court : 

Judge T. P. Fowler Spencer 

Solicitor .W. H. Woodson, Jr. Salisbury 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman R. Linn Bernhardt Salisbury 

Commissioner J. T. Graham Cleveland 

Commissioner C A. Long Salisburj-, Rt. 4 

Commissioner J. B. McCombs Granite Quarry 

Commissioner Hearne Swink Salisbury, Rt. 2 



522 North Carolina Manual 

rutherford 

Rutherford County was formed in 1779 from Tryon and Burke. Was named in 
honor of General Griffith Rutherford, one of the most prominent of the Revolu- 
tionary patriots. He led the expedition that crushed the Cherokees in 1776, and 
rendered other important services, both in the Legislature and on the battlefield. 

Population, 45,577 County Seat, Rutherfordton 

State Senators 27th District Lee B. Weathers Shelby 

Wade B. Matheny Forest City 

Member House of Representatives Lee L. Powers Lake Lure 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court Frank S. Hall Rutherfordton 

Register of Deeds W. O. Geer Rutherfordton 

Sheriff .C. C. Moore Rutherfordton 

Auditor Chas. R. Yopp Rutherfordton 

Tax Supervisor Lloyd Williamson Rutherfordton 

Tax Collector Rex Bridges Rutherfordton 

County Accountant Chas. R. Yopp Rutherfordton 

Coroner Jtussell Northey Spindale 

Supt. of Health Dr. B. E. Washburn Rutherfordton 

Supt. of Schools J. J. Tarlton Rutherfordton 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. O. C. Turner Rutherfordton 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Sue Koone Spindale 

Farm Dem. Agent F. E. Patton Rutherfordton 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. Harvey Carpenter Rutherfordton 

Chmn. Bd. Elections S.. E. Price Rutherfordton 

Game Warden J. W. Moss Forest City 

Forest Warden Louis Summey Forest City 

County Attorney Wade B. Matheny Forest City 

County Librarian Mrs. Martha K. Barr Rutherfordton 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge B. T. Jones, Jr Forest City 

Solicitor Forrest I. Robertson Rutherfordton 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman Clarence P. Parks Spindale 

Commissioner Bire H. Bridges Forest City 

Commissioner C. P. Hamrick Cliffside 

Commissioner Letcher S. Rollins Bostic 

Commissioner Rybum Edwards Union Mills, Rt. 3 

SAMPSON 

Sarnpson County was formed in 1784 from Duplin and New Hanover. Was 
named in honor of Colonel Sampson, who was a member of Governor Martin's 
Council. 

Population, 47,440 County Seat, Clinton 

State Senators 9th District Roy Rowe Burgaw 

Henry Vann Clinton 

Member House of Representatives Chas. F. Honeycutt Clinton 

Clerk of Court F. C. Butler Clinton 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Pearl N. Britt Clinton 

Sheriff C. C. Tart Clinton 

Treasurer First Citizens Bk. & Tr. Co Clinton 

Auditor R. p. Spell Clinton 

Tax Supervisor R. P. Spell Clinton 

Tax Collector R. p. Spell Clinton 

County Accountant R. p. Spell Clinton 

Coroner Dr. D. M. Royal Salemburg 



County Government 523 

Office Officer Address 

Surveyor H. W. Johnson Kerr 

Supt. of Health Dr. J. H. Williams Clinton 

Supt. of Schools D. V. Carter Clinton 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. R. B. Wilson Clinton 

Home Dem. Agent Margaret Clark Clinton 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Edna Amelia Brinson Clinton 

Farm Dem. Agent E. J. Morgan Clinton 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Frank Faison, Jr Clinton 

Chmn. Bd. Education John C. Warren Newton Grove 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Jack C. Morisey Clinton 

Game Warden W. I. Wright, Jr Ingold 

Forest Warden W. King Newkirk Clinton 

County Attorney A. L. Butler Clinton 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge P. G. Grumpier Clinton 

Solicitor C. M. Faircloth Clinton 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman W E. Johnson Kerr 

Commissioner Arthur Naylor Clinton, RFD 

Commissioner L A. Hall Autryville 

SCOTLAND 

Scotland County was formed in 1899 from Richmond. Was named after the 
country of Scotland, the northern part of the island of Great Britain. Most of the 
people of this county ai'e descendants of Scotch Highlanders. 

Population, 23,232 County Seat, Laurinburg 

State Senators 18th District Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

Geo. L. Hundley Thomasville 

Member House of Representatives O. L. Moore Laurinburg 

Clerk of Court Carl L. Jones Laurinburg 

Register of Deeds ..C. E. Muse Laurinburg 

Sheriff W. D. Reynolds Laurinburg 

Treasurer .....Thos. J. Gill Laurinburg 

Auditor Thos. J. Gill Laurinburg 

Tax Supervisor .W. M. Monroe Laurinburg 

Tax Collector Miss Coy Cameron Laurinburg 

County Accountant Thos. J. Gill Laurinburg 

Coroner M. J. McDougald Laurinburg 

Surveyor E. M. Mathews Laurinburg 

Supt. of Health Dr. Robert F. Young Ellerbe 

Supt. of Schools J. J. Pence Laurinburg 

Supt. of Public Welfare E F. Murray Laurinburg 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Grace Newell Laurinburg 

Farm Dem. Agent E. O. McMahan Laurinburg 

Chmn. Bd. Education T. L. Henly Laurinburg 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Angus D. Phillips Laurinburg 

Game Warden Roy Bostick Laurel Hill 

Forest Warden A. R. McMillan Laurinburg 

County Attorney E. H. Gibson Laurinburg 

County Librarian Miss Virginia Grumpier Laurinburg 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge J. B. McKinnon Laurinburg 

Solicitor Joe M. Cox, U. S. Navy 

Thos. J. Dunn (acting) Laurinburg 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman W. N. McKenzie Gibson 

Commissioner E. P. Jones Johns 



524 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Commissioner Dan T. McGirt Wagram 

Commissioner ^J. A. Bostick Laurinburg 

Commissioner Lonnie Hammond Laurinburg 

STANLY 
Stanly County was formed in 1841 from Montgomery. Was named in honor 
of John Stanly, for many years a member of the Legislature, and several times 
Speaker of the House of Commons. 

Population, 32,834 County Seat, Albemarle 

State Senators 19th District R. E. Little Wadesboro 

W. Erskine Smith Albemarle 

Member House of Representatives J. J. Morton Albemarle 

Clerk of Court J. A. Little Albemarle 

Register of Deeds Xi. R. Almond Albemarle 

Sheriff Robt. L. Furr Albemarle 

Treasurer Pirst Nat'l. and Cabarrus 

Bank & Trust Co Albemarle 

Auditor A. V. Thomas Albemarle 

Tax Supervisor .C. I. Moose Albemarle 

Tax Collector Henry N. Thompson Albemarle 

County Accountant A. V. Thomas Albemarle 

Coroner Dr. John S. Gaskin ^ Albemarle 

Surveyor Charley Harward Oakboro, Rt. 1 

Supt. of Health Dr. W. N. McKinzie Albemarle 

Supt. of Schools James P. Sifford Albemarle 

Supt. of Public Welfare ,Otto B. Mabry Albemarle 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Margaret Waters Albemarle 

Farm Dem. Agent W. Z. Smith Albemarle 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. B. Miller Albemarle 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. D. Forrest Albemarle 

Game Warden A. Dock Hartsell Albemarle 

County Attorney G. Hobart Morton Albemarle 

County Librarian Evelyn Peeler Albemarle 

County Court: 

Judge O. J. Sikes Albemarle 

Solicitor H. C. Turner Albemarle 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman Cecil H. Lovi^der Albemarle 

Commissioner Vernon Hunsucker Albemarle 

Commissioner J. Luther Little Oakboro 

STOKES 

Stokes County was formed in 1798 from Surry. Was named in honor of 
Colonel John Stokes, a brave soldier of the Revolution, who was desperately 
wounded at the Waxhaw massacre, when Colonel Buford's regiment wa? cut to 
pieces by Tarleton. After the war Washington appointed him a judge of the 
United States Court in North Carolina. 

Population, 22,656 County Seat, Danbury 

State Senator 23rd District Carlos E. Davis Walnut Cove 

Member House of Representatives William F. Marshall Walnut Cove 

Clerk of Court ..J. Watt Tuttle Danbur^' 

Register of Deeds R. L. Smith Danbury 

Sheriff J. J. Taylor Danbury 

Treasurer J. J. Taylor Danbury 

Auditor B. P. Bailey Danbury 



County Government 525 

Office Officer Address 

Tax Supervisor J. J. Taylor .> Danbury 

Tax Collector J. J. Taylor Danbury 

Coroner S. P. Christian Danbury 

Surveyor Golden Baker King 

Supt. of Health Dr. Roy C. Hege Winston-Salem 

Supt. of Schools J. C. Carson Danbury 

Supt. of Public Welfare Christine Anderson Danbury 

Home Dem. Agent Eva Ralston Pine Hall 

Farm Dem. Agent E. S. Stokes Danbury 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. G. E. Stone Kini? 

Chmn. Bd. Elections A. J. Ellington Danbury 

Game Warden Carl Ray Flinchum Danbury 

County Attorney R. J. Scott Danbury 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman Howard L. Gibson Pine Hall 

Commissioner -J. A. Joyce Sandy Ridge 

Commissioner Harvey G. Johnson Germanton 

SURRY 

Surry County was formed in 1770 from Rowan. Was named in honor of Lord 
Surrey, a prominent member of Parliament who opposed the taxation of the 
American colonies by Parliament. 

Population, 41,789 County Seat, Dobson 

State Senator 23rd District Carlos E. Davis Danbury 

Member House of Representatives Henry C. Dobson Elkin 

Clerk of Court Fred Llewellyn Dobson 

Register of Deeds Bertha M. Shinault Dobson 

Sheriff Sam Patterson Dobson 

Treasurer Surry County Loan & Trust Co Dobson 

Auditor E. G. Welch Dobson 

Tax Supervisor J. P. Fulk Dobson 

Tax Collectors W. J. Snow Elkin 

Mrs. Jessye B. Blackwelder Dobson 

Geo. B. Reid Pilot Mountain 

County Accountant Geo. E. Welch Dobson 

Coroner John L. Woltz Mt. Airy 

Surveyor I. W. Barber Mt. Airy 

Supt. of Health Dr. R. J. Loville Mt. Airy 

Supt. of Schools John W. Comer Dobson 

Supt. of Public Welfare Miss Bausie Marion Dobson 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Grace Brown Dobson 

Farm Dem. Agent Neil M. Smith Dobson 

Chmn. Bd. Education G. C. Hauser Mt. Airy 

Chmn. Bd. Elections A. P. Fulk Pilot Mountain 

Game Warden Geo. Royall Roaring Gap 

Forest Warden J. R. Norman Mountain Park 

County Attorney Fred Folger Mt. Airy 

Mt. Aii-y Recorder's Court: 

Judge H. H. Llewellyn Mt. Airy 

Solicitor R. S. Westmoreland Mt. Airy 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman M. Q. Snow Elkin 

Commissioner S. M. Smith Pilot Mountain 

Commissioner R. P. Jones Mt. Airy 



526 North Carolina Manual 

SWAIN 

Swain County was formed in 1871 from Jackson and Macon. Was named in 
honor of David Lowrie Swain, Governor of North Carolina and president of the 
University. 

Population, 12,177 County Seat, Bryson City 

State Senator 33rd District A. L. Penland Hayesville 

Member House of Representatives McKinley Edwards Bryson City 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court H. J. Truett Bryson City 

Register of Deeds E. J. Seay Bryson City 

Sheriff Frank Hyatt Bryson City 

Treasurer ; R. C. Brendle Bryson City 

Auditor R. C. Brendle Bryson City 

Tax Supervisor R. D. Estes Bryson City 

Tax Collector R. C. Brendle Bryson City 

County Accountant R. C. Brendle Bryson City 

Coroner H. H. Welch Bryson City 

Surveyor E. P. Breedlove Wesser, RFD 

Supt. of Health W. L. Latham Bryson City 

Supt. of Schools W. L. Latham Bryson City 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Lucinda C. Cole Bryson City 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Helen Higdon Bryson City 

Farm Dem. Agent Clarence Mingus Bryson City 

Chmn. Bd. Education S. W. Black Bi-yson City 

Chmn. Bd. Elections _ T. J. Cathey Bryson City 

Game Warden D. J. Dean Bryson City 

Forest Warden D. J. Dean Bryson City 

County Attorney B. C. Jones Bryson City 

County Librarian JMrs. Blanche N. Jones Bryson City 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman R. D. Estes Bryson City 

Commissioner R. E. Breedlove Needmore 

Commissioner I. B. Jenkins Bryson City 

TRANSYLVANIA 

Transylvania County was formed in 1861 from Henderson and Jackson. The 
name is derived from two Latin words, "trans" across, "sylva" woods. Transyl- 
vania County voted with Henderson until 1868. 

Population, 12,241 County Seat, Brevard 

State Senators 32nd District W. B. Hodges Hendersonville 

Carrol] P. Rogers Tryon 

Member House of Representatives Ralph K. Fisher Brevard 

Clerk of Court N. A. Miller Brevard 

Register of Deeds Mrs. Melvin Gillespie Brevard 

Sheriff B. H. Freeman Brevard 

Tax Supervisor Mrs. Tom Mitchell Brevard 

Tax Collector Frank King Brevard 

County Accountant Mrs. Tom Mitchell Brevard 

Coroner Purd Osborne - Brevard 

Supt. of Health Dr. C. N, Sisk Waynesville 

Supt. of Schools J. B. Jones Brevard 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Dora M. Paton Brevard 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Anabel Teague Brevard 

Farm Dem. Agent J. A. Glazener Brevard 

Chmn. Bd. Education A. A. Trantham Brevard 

Chmn. Bd. Elections .- Pred Shuford Brevard 



County Government 527 

Office Officer Address 

Game Warden Elam Galloway Kostnan 

Forest Warden Frank Morgan Rosman 

County Attorney Ralph H. Ramsey, Jr Brevard 

County Librarian Mrs. Lehman Kapp Brevard 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman W. W. Brittain Brevard 

Commissioner Gaston Whitmire Brevard 

Commissioner Lewis Osborne Brevard 

TYRRELL 

Tyrrell County was formed in 1729 from Albemarle. Was named in honor of 
Sir John Tyrrell, who at one time was one of the Lords Proprietors. 

Popualtion, 5,556 County Seat, Columbia 

State Senators 2nd District E. A. Daniel Washington 

W. Roy Hampton Plymouth 

Member House of Representatives C. Earl Cohoon Columbia 

Clerk of Court C. R. Chaplin Columbia 

Register of Deeds Sara L. Taft Columbia 

Sheriff : B. Ray Cohoon Columbia 

Treasurer Engelhard Banking & Trust Co Columbia 

Auditor H. S. Swain Columbia 

Tax Supervisor Miss Magnolia Owens Columbia 

County Accountant H. S. Swain Columbia 

Supt. of Health J. W. Hamilton Columbia 

Supt. of Schools W. J. White Columbia 

Supt. of Public Welfare J. W. Hamilton Columbia 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Cornelia Simpson Columbia 

Farm Dem. Agent H. H. Harris Columbia 

Chmn. Bd. Education E. R. Davenport Columbia 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Needum Brickhouse Columbia 

Game Warden B. H. Culipher Columbia 

Forest Warden J. Edward Swain Columbia, Rt. S 

County Attorney Sam S. Woodley Columbia 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge W. W. Sawyer Columbia 

Solicitor Sam S. Woodley Columbia 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman H. T. Davenport Columbia 

Commissioner B. B. Jones Columbia 

Commissioner E. S. Brickhouse Columbia; 

UNION 

Union County was formed in 1842 from Anson and Mecklenburg. 

Population, 39,097 County Seat, Monroe 

State Senators 19th District W. Erskine Smith Albemarle 

R. E. Little Wadesboro 

Member House of Representatives ...Oscar L. Richardson Monroe 

Clerk of Court J. Emmett Griffin Monroe 

Register of Deeds Clara Laney Monroe 

Sheriff B. F. Niven Monroe 

Treasurer American Bank & Trust Co Monroe 

Auditor Roy J. Moore Monrofr 



528 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Tax Supervisor Roy J. Moore Monroe 

Tax Collector J. Hamp Price Monroe 

County Accountant Roy J. Moore Monroe 

Coroner C. C. Jones Monroe 

Surveyor Ralph W. Elliott '...Monroe 

Supt. of Health Dr. Clem Ham Monroe 

Supt. of Schools W. M. Jenkins Monroe 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. George S. Lee, Jr. Monroe 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Ruth Clapp Monroe 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Bertha J. Bethel Monroe 

Farm Dem. Agent T. J. W. Broome Monroe 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Cleveland Harris Monroe 

Chmn. Bd. Education B. Ward Laney Monroe, Rt. 4 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. David Simpson Monroe, Rt. 5 

Game Warden S. M. Annfield Marshville 

County Attorney J. F. Milliken Monroe 

County Librarian Mrs. Sarah Napier Monroe 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge P. H. Johnson Monroe 

Solicitor H. B. Smith Monroe 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman J. Ray Shute Monroe 

Commissioner J. Vernon Griffin Wingate 

Commissioner C. M. Rogers Monroe, Rt. ■S 

Commissioner B. F. Price Waxhaw 

Commissioner Fred C. Staton Marshville, Rt. 3 

VANCE 
Vance County was formed in 1881 from Granville, Warren, and Franklin. 
Was named in honor of Zebulon B. Vance, "the Great War Governor," a Member 
of Congress, Governor of North Carolina, United States Senator. 

Population, 29,961 County Seat, Henderson 

State Senator 3rd District Archie C. Gay Jackson 

Member House of Representatives Fred S. Royster Henderson 

Clerk of Court Elvin O. Falkner Henderson 

Register of Deeds H. M. Robinson Henderson 

Sheriff JE. A. Cottrell Henderson 

Auditor Miss Dorothea Woodlief Henderson 

Tax Supervisor Miss Dorothea Woodlief Henderson 

Tax Collector F. M. Dorsey Henderson 

County Accountant Miss Dorothea Woodlief Henderson 

Coroner A. P. Paschall Middleburg 

Supt. of Health Dr. A. D. Gregg Henderson 

Supt. of Schools E. M. Rollins Henderson 

Supt. of Public Welfare Miss Clara Mae Ellis Henderson 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. J. K. Plummer Middleburg 

Farm Dem. Agent J. W. Sanders Henderson 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent L. L. Peace Henderson 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. J. White Henderson 

Chmn. Bd. Elections D. P. McDuffee Henderson 

Game Warden R. I. Burroughs Henderson 

County Attorney Irvine B. Watkins Henderson 

County Librarian Mrs. Flora M. Perry Henderson 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge R. E. Clements Henderson 

Solicitor Irvine B. Watkins Henderson 



County Government 529 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman Henry W. Hight Henderson 

Commissioner G. W. Knott Henderson 

Commissioner S. B. Rogers Henderson 

Commissioner W. W. Grissom Oxford, Rt. 3 

Commissioner .E. L. Fleming Middleburg 

WAKE 

Wake County was formed in 1770 from Johnston, Cumberland, and Orange. 
Was named in honor of Governor Tryon's wife, whose maiden name was Margaret 
Wake. Some historians say that the county was named for "Esther Wake," the 
popular sister of Tryon's wife, but there is no reason to suppose that any such 
person ever existed. She is purely a creature of the imagination. 

Population, 109,544 * County Seat, Raleigh 

State Senators 13th District J. C. Pittman Sanford 

Wiley G. Barnes Raleigh 

Members House of Representatives... N. F. Ransdell Varina 

William T. Hatch Raleigh 

J. Leroy Allen Raleigh 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court W. G. Mordecai Raleigh 

Register of Deeds Hunter Ellington Raleigh 

Sheriff N. F. Turner Raleigh 

Treasurer J. Milton Mangum Raleigh 

Auditor A. C. Hall Raleigh 

Tax Supervisor D. Bryant Harrison Raleigh 

Tax Collector C. C. Rich Raleigh 

County Accountant A. C. Hall Raleigh 

Coroner Roy Banks Raleigh 

Surveyor J. Pittman Stell....'. Zebulon 

Supt. of Health Dr. A. C. Bulla Raleigh 

Supt. of Schools Randolph Benton Raleigh 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Josephine Kirk Raleigh 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Maude Mclnnes Raleigh 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Bertha M. Edwards Raleigh 

Farm Dem. Agent Lloyd T. Weeks Raleigh 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent M. H. Crockett Raleigh 

Chmn. Bd. Education Dr. N. Y. Gulley Wake Forest 

Chmn. Bd. Elections L. A. Doub Knightdale 

Game Warden Hobert Dixon Perry Wake Forest 

Fire Warden R. L. Lassiter. Raleigh, Rt. 1 

County Attorney Leon S. Brassfield Raleigh 

County Librarian Miss Clyde Smith Raleigh 

Recorder's Court : 

Wake Forest District: 

Judge Donald Gulley Wake Forest 

Solicitor Lawrence Harris Wake Forest 

Wendell District: 

Judge W. A. Brame Wendell 

Solicitor Albert Doub Raleigh 

Fuquay Springs District: 

Judge C. C. Cunningham Raleigh 

Solicitor Robert A. Gotten Fuquay Springs 

Apex District: 

Judge Arthur A. Aronson Raleigh 

Solicitor R. W. Johnson Apex 

Zebulon District: 

Judge L D. Gill Zebulon 



530 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Solicitor F. D. Finch Zebulon 

City Court : 

Judge Paul C. West Raleigh 

Solicitor Wilbur Royster Raleigh 

Juvenile Court: 

Judge J. L. Fountain Raleigh 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman John P. Swain Raleigh 

Commissioner T. Floyd Adams Willow Springs 

Commissioner M. Wallace Chamblee Zebulon 

Commissioner George E. Upchurch Apex 

Commissioner W. W. Holding Wake Forest 

WARREN 

Warren County was formed in 1779 from Bute. Was named in honor ©f 
General Joseph Warren, a brave Massachusetts soldier who fell while fighting at 
the battle of Bunker Hill. 

Population, 23,145 County Seat, Warrenton 

State Senator 3rd District Archie C. Gay Jackson 

Member House of Representatives John Kerr, Jr Warrenton 

Clerk of Court — , Joe N. Ellis Warrenton 

Register of Deeds Sam E. Allen Warrenton 

Sheriff W. J. Pinnell Warrenton 

Treasurer Citizens Bank Warrenton 

Auditor J. T. Ellington Warrenton 

Tax Collector ; W. J. Pinnell Warrenton 

Coroner R. E. Davis Macon 

Supt. of Health Dr. F. P. Hunter Warrenton 

Supt. of Schools J. Edward Allen Warrenton 

Supt. of Public Welfare Lora P. Wilkie Warrenton 

Home Dem. Agent Eleanor Barber Warrenton 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Annie B. Branche Warrenton 

Fai-m Dem. Agent R. H. Bright Warrenton 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent C. S. Wynn Warrenton 

Chmn. Bd. Education Harry Walker Norlina 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Richard R. Davis Warrenton 

Game Warden E. H. Pinnell Warrenton. 

Forest Warden E. H. Pinnell Warrenton 

County Attorney John H. Kerr, Jr Warrenton 

County Librarian Miss Mabel Davis Warrenton 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge John M. Picot Littleton 

Solicitor William W. Taylor, Jr Warrenton 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman W. H. Burroughs Warrenton 

Commissioner R. L. Capps Areola 

Commissioner H. L. Wall Elams 

Commissioner A. L. Fleming :..... Norlina 

Commissioner J. T. Harris Inez 

WASHINGTON 

Washington County was formed in 1799 from Tyrrell. Was named in honor of 
George Washington. 

Population, 12,323 County Seat, Plymouth 

State Senators 2nd District E. A. Daniel Washington 

W. Roy Hampton Plymouth 

Member House of Representatives W. H. (Jack) Peele PljTnoutb 



County Government 531 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court W. M. Darden Plymouth 

Register of Deeds J. R. Campbell Plymouth 

Sheriff J. K. Reid Plymouth 

Treasurer B. B. & Trust Co Plymouth 

Auditor E. J. Spruill Plymouth 

Tax Supervisor J. C. Knowles Plymouth 

Tax Collector J. E. Davenport Plymouth 

Coroner J. L. Horner Plymouth 

Supt. of Health Dr. C. McGowan (acting) Plymouth 

Supt. of Schools H. H. McLean Plymouth 

Supt. of Public Welfare Ursula Bateman Plymouth 

Home Dem. Agent Frances Darden Plymouth 

Farm Dem. Agent W. V. Hays Plymouth 

Chmn. Bd. Education P. M. Arps Plymouth 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. W. White Roper 

Game Warden J. T. Terry Plymouth 

Forest Warden S. F. Darden Plymouth 

County Attorney W. L. Whitley Plymouth 

County Recorder's Court: 

Judge W. R. Gaylord Plymouth 

Solicitor W. B. Rodman Plymouth 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman H. H. Allen , Plymouth 

Commissioner J. C. Knowles Roper 

Commissioner H. W. Pritchett Creswell 

WATAUGA 

Watauga County was formed in 1849 from Ashe, Wilkes, Caldwell and Yancey. 
Was named after an Indian tribe. 

Population, 18,114 County Seat, Boone 

State Senator 29th District Edison M. Thomas Jefferson 

Member House of Representatives S. C. Eggers Boone 

Clerk of Coui-t Austin E. South Boone 

Register of Deeds Helen Underdo wn Boone 

Sheriff C. M. Watson Boone 

Auditor Paul A. Coffey Boone 

Tax Supervisor Paul A. Coffey Boone 

Tax Collector E. D. Cook Boone 

County Accountant Paul A. Coffey Boone 

Coroner Jake Caudill Boone 

Surveyor I. A. Bumgamer Vilas 

Supt. of Health Wade E. Eller Boone 

Supt. of Schools S. F. Horton Sugar Grove 

Supt. of Public Welfare Dave P. Mast Sugar Grove 

Home Dem. Agent Elizabeth Bridge Boone 

Farm Dem. Agent H. M. Hamilton, Jr Boone 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. B. Horton Vilas 

Chmn. Bd. Elections R. T. Greer Boone, RFD 

Game Warden Walter Edmisten Boone 

County Attorney J. E. Holshouser Boone 

County Librarian Mrs. Maude Ingle Boone 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman W. M. Winkler Boone 

Commissioner -A. G. Miller Deep Gap 

Commissioner H. O. Aldridge Shulls Mills 



532 North Carolina Manual 

WAYNE 

Wayne County was formed in 1779 from Dobbs and Craven. Was named in 
honor of General Anthony Wayne, one of Washington's most trusted soldiers. His 
courage was so great as to amount almost to rashness, and his soldiers called him 
"Mad Anthony Wayne." 

Population, 58,328 County Seat, Goldsboro 

State Senators 8th District Lawrence H. Wallace Smithfield 

Thomas O'Berry Goldsboro 

Member House of Representatives W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court J. Floyd Barden Goldsboro 

Register of Deeds Eula B. Whitley Goldsboro 

Sheriff Paul C. Garrison Goldsboro 

Auditor John H. Hawley, Jr. Goldsboro 

Tax Supervisor John H. Hawley, Jr. Goldsboro 

Tax Collector A. G. Pelt Goldsboro 

County Accountant John H. Hawley, Jr. Goldsboro 

Coroner W. A. Seymour Goldsboro 

Surveyor D, A. Holden Goldsboro 

Supt. of Health Dr. S. B. McPheeters.,...^ Goldsboro 

Supt. of Schools R S. Proctor Goldsboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare J. A. Best Goldsboro 

Home Dem. Agent Gertrude Bundy Goldsboro 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Lillian A. Woodhouse GolBsboro 

Farm Dem. Agent C. S. Mintz ■. Goldsboro 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent Molton Robert Zachary Goldsboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education .W. R. Allen Goldsboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. Spicer Holmes Goldsboro 

Game Warden Charlie Warren Goldsboro 

Forest Warden E. D. Ham Pikeville 

County Attorney Fred P. Parker „ Goldsboro 

County Librarian Miss Susan Borden Goldsboro 

Recorder's Court : 

Judge Paul B. Edmundson Goldsboro 

Solicitor Chas. P. Gaylor Goldsboro 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman M. E. Robinson Goldsboro 

Commissioner J. I. Musgrave Pikeville 

Commissioner W. P. Grant Goldsboro, Rt. 4 

Commissioner Dr. G. F. Herring Mount Olive 

Commissioner J. Clarence Grantham Four Oaks, RFD 

WILKES 

Wilkes County was formed in 1777 from Surry and Burke. Was named in 
honor of John Wilkes. Wilkes was a violent opponent of the Tory party in Eng- 
land, who would not let him take his seat in Parliament to which he had been 
elected. The Americans imagined he was suffering in the cause of liberty and 
named the county in his honor. 

Population, 43,003 County Seat, Wilkesboro 

State Senator 24th District W. B. Somers Wilkesboro 

Member House of Representatives T. E. Stoi-y Wilkesboro 

Clerk of Court C. C. Hayes Wilkesboro 

Register of Deeds Troy C. Foster Wilkesboro 

Sheriff C. G. Poindexter Wilkesboro 

Tax Supervisor J. C. Grayson Wilkesboro 



County Government 533 

Office Offi.cer Address 

Tax Collector C. G. Poindexter Wilkesboro 

County Accountant J. C. Grayson Wilkesboro 

Coroner I. M. Myers N. Wilkesboro 

Surveyor -T. G. Casey Cycle 

Supt. of Health Dr. A. J. Eller Wilkesboro 

Supt. of Schools C. B. Eller N. Wilkesboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Chas. C. McNeill Wilkesboro 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Annie H. Green N, Wilkesboro 

Farm Dem. Agent J. B. Snipes N. Wilkesboro 

Chmn. Bd. Education C. O. McNeill N. Wilkesboro 

Chmn. Bd. Elections C. J. Jones Millers Creek 

Game Warden Robt. S. Johnson Wilkesboro 

Forest Warden Frank C. Hendren Wilkesboro 

County Attorney F. J. McDuffie Wilkesboro 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman M. F. Absher ■. Hayes 

Commissioner ..C. C. Sidden N. Wilkesboro 

Commissioner , Wm. S. Tomlinson N. Wilkesboro 

WILSON 

Wilson County was foimed in 1855 from Edgecombe, Nash, Johnston, and 
Wayne. Was named in honor of Louis D. Wilson, many times a member of the 
Legislature from Edgecombe County, a soldier of the Mexican War who died near 
Vera Cruz of fever, and the benefactor of the poor of his native county. From 
1856 to 1868 Wilson County voted with Edgecombe. 

Population, 50,219 County Seat, Wilson 

State Senators 6th District Willie Lee Lumpkin Louisburg 

Joseph C. Eagles Wilson 

Member House of Representatives Larry I. Moore, Jr Wilson 

Clerk of Court Chas. C. Lamm Wilson 

Register of Deeds Sadie H. Collins Wilson 

Sheriff W. A. Weathersby Wilson 

Auditor B.. J. Herring Wilson 

Tax Supervisor H. J. Herring Wilson 

Tax Collector Carl F. Batts Wilson 

Coroner V. C. Martin Wilson 

Surveyor W. L. Trevathan Wilson 

Supt. of Health Dr. W. H. Anderson Wilson 

Supt. of Schools K. R. Curtis Wilson 

Supt. Public Welfare M. G. Fulghum Wilson 

Home Dem. Agent Lois Rainwater Wilson 

Negro Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Jane Amos Boyd Wilson 

Farm Dem. Agent J. O. Anthony Wilson 

Negro Farm Dem. Agent C W. Foster Wilson 

Chmn. Bd. Education Doane Herring Wilson 

Chmn. Bd. Elections J. M. Jennings Wilson 

Game Warden J. Harold King Wilson 

Forest Warden L. W. Morris Wilson 

County Attorney Moore & Brinkley Attys. Wilson 

County Librarian Nancy Gray Wilson 

General County Court : 

Judge O. P. Dickinson Wilson 

Solicitor Silas R. Lucas Wilson 

Municipal Recorder's Court: 

Judge Chas. B. McLean Wilson 

Solicitor Wade A. Gardner Wilson 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chairman John T. Boyette , Wilson 

Commissioner W. Oscar Harrison Wilson 



534 North Carolina Manual 

OSice Officer Address 

Commissioner Walter Blalock Lucama 

Commissioner L. A. Gardner ; Saratoga 

Commissioner A. D. Williams Wilson, Rt. 2 

YADKIN 

Yadkin County was formed in 1850 from Surry. Its name is derived from the 
Yadkin river which i-uns through it. It is supposed to be an Indian name. Yadkin 
voted with Surry in 1852. 

Population, 20,657 County Seat, Yadkinville 

State Senator 24th District W. B. Somers Wilkesboro 

Member House of Representatives R. B. Long Boonville 

Clerk of Court Lon H. West Yadkinville 

Register of Deeds Ray T. Moore Yadkinville 

Sheriff A. L. Inscore Yadkinville 

Treasurer J. Roy Pendry Yadkinville 

Auditor J. Roy Pendry Yadkinville 

Tax Supervisor J. Roy Pendry Yadkinville 

Tax Collector A. L. Inscore Yadkilville 

County Accountant J. Roy Pendry Yadkinville 

Coroner W. H. Gregory Yadkinville 

Surveyor L. A. Shore Yadkinville 

Supt. of Health Dr. J. Roy Hege Winston-Salem 

Supt. of Schools Fred C. Hobson Yadkinville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. A. T. Banks Yadkinville 

Home Dem. Agent Irene Brown Yadkinville 

Farm Dem. Agent D. R. Perkins Yadkinville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Paul P. Davis Yadkinville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. T. Steelman Yadkinville 

Game Warden Frank Mackie Yadkinville 

County Attorney F. D. B. Harding Yadkinville 

COMMISSIONERS 

Chaii-man Oscar J. Fleming Boonville 

Commissioner C. G. Mathis Jonesvillo 

Commissioner D. A. Smitherman East Bend 

Commissioner Arthur Renegar Yadkinville 

Commissioner S. H. Brewbaker Cana 

YANCEY 

Yancey County was formed in 1833 from Burke and Buncombe. Was named 
in honor of Bartlett Yancey, an eloquent orator, many times a member of the 
Legislature, Speaker of the State Senate, and a Member of Congress. He was 
one of the earliest advocates of the public school system of North Carolina. 

Population, 17,202 County Seat, Bumsville 

State Senator 30th District Calvin R. Edney Marshall 

Member House of Representatives Dr. W. L. Bennett Bumsville 

Clerk of Court Fred Proffitt Bumsville 

Register of Deeds Yates Bennett Bumsville 

Sheriff R. E. Neill Bumsville 

Treasurer J. A. Goodin Bumsville 

Tax Supervisor W. O. Griffith Bumsville 

County Accountant J. A. Goodin Bumsville 

Coroner J. C. Turner Toledo 

Surveyor Arthur Patton Colo 

Supt. of Health Dr. B. B. McGuire Bumsville 



County Government 535 

Office Officer Address 

Supt. of Schools Miss Hope Buck Burnsville 

Supt. of Public Welfare L. G. Deyton Burnsville 

Home Dem. Agent Miss Elizabeth Russell Burnsville 

Farm Dem. Agent V. J. Goodman Burnsville 

Chmn. Bd. Education A. P. Honeycutt Burnsville, Rt. 1 

Chmn. Bd. Elections James Hutchins Windom 

Game Warden John Craig English Burnsville 

Forest Warden John Craig English Burnsville 

County Attorney D. R. Fouts Burnsville 

COJiIMISSIONERS 

Chairman Lloyd Fortner Micaville 

Commissioner E. N. Stamey Burnsville 

Commissioner L. Q. Miller Ramseytown 



PARTS INDEX 



PARTS INDEX 



PART I 
HISTORICAL 

Page 

The State 1 11 

The State Capitol 15 

Chief Executives of North Carolina 

Governors of Virginia 17 

Executives under the Proprietors 17 

Governors under the Crown 18 

Governors Elected by the Legislature 18 

Governors Elected by the People 20 

The State Flag 23 

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence 24 

The Great Seal of North Carolina 26 

The State Bird 28 

The Halifax Resolution 30 

Name of State and Nicknames „ 31 

The State Motto 31 

The State Colors 32 

The State Flower 32 

The State's Most Famous Toast 32 

Legal Holidays in North Carolina 32 

Population of the State since 1675 33 

State Song 34 

The Constitution of North Carolina 35 

The American's Creed 71 

The American Flag 

Origin 71 

Proper Display 74 

Pledge to the Flag 78 

The National Capitol 80 

Declaration of Independence 83 

Constitution of the United States 88 

PART II 
CENSUS 

Sixteenth Census, 1940 

Population of State Ill 

Population of Counties 112 

Population of Cities and Towns 113 

[539] 



540 North Carolina Manual 

PART III 
POLITICAL 

Page 

Congressional Districts 121 

Judicial Districts 121 

Senatorial Districts and Apportionment of Senators 122 

Apportionment of Members of the House of Representatives 125 

State Democratic Platform 126 

Plan of Organization of the State Democratic Party 134 

Committees of the Democratic Party 

State Democratic Executive Committee 150 

Congressional District Executive Committees 154 

Judicial District Executive Committees 156 

Senatorial Executive Committees 159 

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 162 

State Republican Platform 164 

Plan of Organization of the State Republican Party 172 

Committees of the Republican Party 180 

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 182 

PART IV 
ELECTION RETURNS 

Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1944 187 

Popular Vote for President by States, 1928-1940 188 

Vote for President by Counties, 1924-1944 190 

Vote for Governor by Counties, Primaries, 1940-1944 193 

Vote for Governor by Counties, General Election, 1924-1944 196 

Vote for State Officials, Democratic Primaries, 1936, 

1938, and 1940 199 

Vote for State Officials by Counties, Primary, 1944 201 

Total Votes Cast— General Election, 1944 204 

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primai-y, May 30, 1942 205 

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primary, May 27, 1944 207 

Vote for Congressmen in Republican Primary, May 27, 1944 211 

Vote for Members of Congress, 1930-1944 212 

Vote for United States Senator, Primary, May 27, 1944 225 

Vote for United States Senator, General Election, 

November 7, 1944 227 

Civilian and Military Absentees Vote, General Election, 1944 229 

Vote on Constitutional Amendments by Counties, 1944 231 

Vote on Prohibition, 1881, 1908 and 1933 • 238 



Parts Index 541 

PART V 
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 

Page 

Agencies, Boards and Commissions 243 

Confederate Woman's Home 255 

North Carolina Institutions 
Correctional 

White 256 

Negro 256 

Educational 

White 257 

Negro 263 

Hospitals 

White 265 

Negro 267 

Examining Boards 268 

Directors State-owned Railroads 273 

PART VI 
LEGISLATIVE 

The General Assembly 
Senate 

Officers „ 277 

Senators (Arranged Alphabetically) :..... 277 

Senators (Arranged by Districts) 278 

Rules 279 

Standing Committees 290 

Seat Assignments 297 

House of Representatives 

Officers 298 

Members (Arranged Alphabetically) 298 

Members (Arranged by Counties) 300 

Rules 303 

Standing Committees 318 

Seat Assignments 329 

PART VII 
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Executive Officials 333 

Administrative Officials. 340 

United States Senators 351 

Representatives in Congress 354 

Justices of the Supreme Court 362 

Members of the General Assembly 

Senators ; 368 

Representatives 396 

Occupational and Professional Classification 454 



542 North Carolina Manual 

PART VIII 
OFFICIAL REGISTER 

Page 

United States Government 

President and Vice-President 461 

Cabinet Members 461 

North Carolina Senators and Representatives in Congress 461 

United States Supreme Court Justices 461 

United States District Court 

Judges 461 

Clerks 462 

Solicitors 462 

United States Circuit Court of Appeals 

Judge Fourth District 462 

State Government 

Legislative Department 463 

Executive Department 463 

Judicial Department 463 

Administrative Department 464 

State Institutions 465 

Heads of Agencies other than State 466 

County Government 467 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

State Capitol 14 

State Flag 22 

State Seal _.._ 27 

State Bird 29 

State Song (Words and Music) 34 

Map of North Carolina 70 

The American Flag 72 

Map Showing Congressional Districts 144, 145 

Map Showing Judicial Districts 208, 209 

Map Showing Senatorial Districts 176, 177 

Seating Diagram of Senate Chamber 296 

Seating Diagram of House of Representatives 328 

Pictures 

Governor 332 

State Officers II'."' .."'' 337 

Senators and Congressmen 353, 359 

Justices of the Supreme Court 363 

State Senators 369, 375, 383 

Members House of Representatives 397, 405, 413, 

421, 429, 437, 445 



07/1B/97 32596 ^ 



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