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Full text of "North Carolina manual [serial]"

NORTH CAROLINA 
1^ MANUAL 
1955 





JONATHAN DANIELS 



THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 

PRESENTED BY 

Jonathan Daniels 



CO17.05 
N87in 
1955 
C.3 



UNIVERSITY OF N C. AT CHAPEL HILL 



00017482537 



This book is due on the last date stamped 
below unless recalled sooner. It may be 
renewed only once and must be brought to 
the North Carolina Collection for renewal. 






IMft 



JUN 1 2004 



Form No. A -369 



NORTH CAROLINA MANUAL 

1955 




Issued by 

Thad Eure 

Secretary of State 

Raleigh 



1955 



JANUARY 

S M T W T I" S 
1 

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9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



FEBRUARY 

5 M T W T F S 

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27 28 



MARCH 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

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APRIL 

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MAY 

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29 30 31 



JUNE 

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JULY 

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31 



AUGUST 

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12 3 4 5 6 

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14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 

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OCTOBER 

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30 31 



NOVEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

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DECEMBER 

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1956 



JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 II 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
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APRIL 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

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15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 



MAY 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
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JUNE 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 II 12 13 14 15 16 
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JULY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

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29 30 31 



AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

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SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
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2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 II 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 



OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 II 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
I 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
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DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
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9 10 II 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



TO THE 

1955 MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
OF NORTH CAROLINA 



TO THE 

STATE, COUNTY, CITY AND TOWN OFFICIALS 



AND TO THE 

PEOPLE OF THE OLD NORTH STATE 
AT HOME AND ABROAD 



THIS MANUAL IS RESPECTFULLY 
DEDICATED 




Secretary of State 



Printed by 

WINSTON PRINTING COMPANY 

Winston-Salem, N. C, U. S. A. 



CONTENTS 

PART I 
HISTORICAL 

Page 

The State 3 

The State Capitol 15 

Chief Executives of North Carolina 

Governors of Virginia 18 

Executives under the Proprietors 18 

Governors under the Crown 19 

Governors Elected by the Legislature 19 

Governors Elected by the People 21 

List of Lieutenant Governors 23 

The State Flag — - 25 

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence 26 

The Great Seal of North Carolina 28 

The State Bird 31 

The Halifax Resolution 32 

Name of State and Nicknames 33 

The State Motto 33 

The State Colors 34 

The State Flower 34 

The State's Most Famous Toast 34 

Legal Holidays in North Carolina 34 

Population of the State since 1675 35 

State Song 36 

The Constitution of North Carolina 37 

The American's Creed 77 

The American Flag 

Origin 77 

Proper Display 79 

Pledge to the Flag 83 

The National Capitol 85 

Declaration of Independence 88 

Constitution of the United States -— 93 

PART II 

CENSUS 

Seventeenth Census, 1950 

Population of State — 117 

Population of Counties 118 

Population of Cities and Towns 

Incorpoi-ated places of 10,000 or more 118 

Incorporated places of 2,500 to 10,000 ._-... 119 

Incorporated places of 1,000 to 2,500 119 

Incorporated places of less than 1,000 121 



VI North Carolina Manual 

PART III 

POLITICAL 

Page 

Cong:ressional Districts 127 

Judicial Districts 127 

Senatorial Districts and Apportionment of Senators 128 

Apportionment of Members of the House of Representatives _.._ 131 

State Democratic Platform 132 

Plan of Organization of the State Democratic Party 151 

Committees of the Democratic Party 

State Democratic Executive Committee 164 

Congressional District Executive Committees 170 

Judicial District Executive Committees 174 

Senatorial District Executive Committees 178 

State Democratic Solicitorial District 

Executive Committees 181 

Chairman of the County Executive Committees 185 

State Republican Platform 187 

Plan of Organization of the State Republican Party 190 

Committees of the Republican Party 

State Republican Executive Committee 197 

Congressional, Judicial and Senatorial 

District Committees . 202 

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 202 

PART IV 

ELECTION RETURNS 

Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1952 205 

Popular Vote for President by State, 1936-1948 206 

Vote for President by Counties, 1932-1952 208 

Vote for Governor by Counties, Primaries, 1952 __ 211 

Vote for Governor by Counties, General Elections, 1932-1952 ._.. 213 

Vote for State Officials, Democratic Primaries, 1944 and 1948 ._ 216 

Vote for State Officials by Counties, Primary, 1952 217 

Total Votes Cast— General Election, 1952 225 

Vote for Governor in Democratic Primaries, 1924-1952 226 

Vote for State Officials in Democratic Primary, May 29, 1954 .. 227 

Vote for State Officials in General Election, November 2, 1954 __ 229 
Vote for Justices of Supreme Court in General Election, 

November 2, 1954 231 

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primary, May 29, 1954 ._-. 233 

Vote for Members of Congress, 1940-1954 _ -.... 235 

Vote for United States Senator, Democratic Primary, 

May 29, 1954 -: 247 

Vote for United States Senator, General Election, 

November 2, 1954 251 

Vote for Constitutional Amendments by Counties, 1954 253 

Vote on Prohibition, 1881, 1908, 1933 ..-.. 259 



Contents VII 

PART V 
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 

Page 

Agencies, Boards and Commissions 263 

North Carolina Institutions 
Correctional 

White 290 

Negro 290 

Educational 

White - 291 

Negro 299 

Hospitals 

White 302 

Negro 305 

Confederate Woman's Home 306 

Examining Boards 307 

State Owned Railroads 315 

PART VI 
LEGISLATIVE 

The General Assembly 

Senate 

Officers . 319 

Senators (Arranged Alphabetically) 319 

Senators (Arranged by Districts) 320 

Rules 321 

Standing Committees 337 

Seat Assignments 342 

House of Representatives 

Officers . 343 

Members (Arranged Alphabetically) 343 

Members (Arranged by Counties) 345 

Rules 347 

Standing Committees 363 

Seat Assignments 378 

PART VII 
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Executive Officials 383 

Administrative Officials 392 

United States Senators 412 

Representatives in Congress 415 

Justices of the Supreme Court .. 426 

Members of the General Assembly 

Senators — 433 

Representatives 464 

Occupational and Professional Classification 530 



VIII North Carolina Manual 

PART VIII 

OFFICIAL REGISTER 

Page 
United States Government 

President and Vice-President 537 

Cabinet Members 537 

North Cai-olina Senators and Representatives in Congress 537 

United States Supreme Court Justices 537 

United States District Court 

Judges -_- 537 

Clerks 537 

District Attorneys 537 

United States Circuit Court of Appeals 

Judge Fourth District 537 

State Government 

Legislative Department - 538 

Executive Department 538 

Judicial Department 538 

Administrative Department 539 

State Institutions 540 

Heads of Agencies other than State 541 

County Government 542 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

State Capitol 16 

State Flag-. .. 24 

State Seal 29 

State Bird 30 

State Song (Words and Music) 36 

Map of North Carolina 74 

The American Flag 76 

Map Showing Congressional Districts 136, 137 

Map Showing Senatorial Districts 168, 169 

Map Showing Judicial Districts 200, 201 

Seating Diagram of Senate Chamber 341 

Seating Diagram of House of Representatives 379 

Pictures 

Governor 382 

State Officers 387 

Senators and Congressmen 411, 420 

Justices of the Supreme Court 425 

State Senators - 432, 443, 454 

Members of the House of Representatives 

466, 473, 482, 489, 498, 505, 514 



PART 1 
HISTORICAL 



THE STATE 

North Carolina, often called the "Tar Heel" state, was the scene 
of the first attempt to colonize America by English-speaking peo- 
ple. Under a charter granted to Sir Walter Raleigh by Queen 
Elizabeth, a colony was begun in the 1580's on Roanoke Island. 
This settlement, however, was unsuccessful and later became 
known as "The Lost Colony." 

The first permanent settlement was made about 1650 by immi- 
grants from Virginia. In 1663 Charles II granted to eight Lords 
Proprietors a charter for the territory lying "within six and 
thirty degrees of the northern latitude, and to the west as far as 
the south seas, and so southerly as far as the river St. Mattias, 
which bordereth upon the coast of Florida, and within one and 
thirty degrees of northern latitude, and so west in a direct line as 
far as the south seas aforesaid; . . ." and the colony was called 
Carolina. In 1665 another charter was granted to these noble- 
men. This charter extended the limits of Carolina so that the 
northern line was 36 degrees and 30 minutes north latitude, and 
the southern line was 29 degrees north latitude, and both of these 
lines extended westward to the South Seas. 

In 1669 John Locke wrote the Fundamental Constitutions as a 
model for the government of Carolina. The Lords Proprietors 
adopted these constitutions and directed the governor to put into 
operation as much of them as was feasible. In 1670 there were 
four precincts (changed to counties in 1739) ; Pasquotank, Per- 
quimans, Chowan, and Currituck. North Carolina now has one 
hundred counties. 

Carolina on December 7, 1710, was divided into North Carolina 
and South Carolina, and Edward Hyde, on May 12, 1712, became 
the first governor of North Carolina. 

In 1729 seven of the eight Lords Proprietors sold their interest 
in Carolina to the Crown and North Carolina became a royal 
colony. George Burrington was the first royal governor. Richard 
Everard, the last proprietary governor, served until Burrington 
was appointed. 

North Carolina, on April 12, 1776, authorized her delegates in 
the Continental Congress to vote for independence, and on Decem- 
ber 18, 1776, adopted a constitution. Richard Caswell became the 



4 North Carolina Manual 

first governor under this constitution. On November 21, 1789, the 
state adopted the United States Constitution, being the twelfth 
state to enter the Federal Union. North Carolina, in 1788, had 
i-ejected the Constitution on the grounds that certain amendments 
were vital and necessary to a free people. 

A Constitutional convention was held in 1835 and among several 
changes made in the Constitution was the method of electing the 
governor. After this change the governor was elected by the peo- 
ple for a term of two years instead of being elected by the Legis- 
lature for a term of one year. Edward Bishop Dudley was the 
first governor elected by the people. 

North Carolina seceded from the Union May 20, 1861, and was 
readmitted to the Union in July, 1868. 

A new State Constitution was adopted in 1868 and since that 
date the governor has been elected by the people for four-year 
terms and he cannot succeed himself. There has not been a new 
constitution since 1868, but numerous amendments have been 
added to it. 

North Carolina has had a democratic administration since 1900, 
during which period it has made its greatest progress. 

North Carolina has had two permanent capitals — New Bern and 
Raleigh — and there have been three capitol buildings. Tryon's 
Palace in New Bern was constructed in the period, 1767-1770, and 
the main building was destroyed by fire February 27, 1798. The 
first capitol in Raleigh was completed in 1794 and was destroyed 
by fire on June 21, 1831. The present capitol was completed in 1840, 

The state in 1790 ceded her western lands, which was composed 
of Washington, Davidson, Hawkins, Greene, Sullivan, Sumner, 
and Tennessee counties, to the Federal government, and between 
1790 and 1796 the territory was known as Tennessee Territory, 
but in 1796 it became the fifteenth state in the Union. 

In 1738, the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act 
authorizing the establishment of district courts which served as 
appelant courts. These courts were authorized to be held in Bath, 
New Bern, and New Town — now Wilmington. In 1746, the Gen- 
eral Assembly repealed the act of 1738 and established district 
courts to be held at Edenton, Wilmington, and Edgecombe. From 
1754 until 1790, other districts were formed as the state expanded 
in territory and developed needs for these districts. By 1790, there 



The State 6 

were eight judicial districts divided into two ridings of four dis- 
tricts each. In 1806, the General Assembly passed an act estab- 
lishing a superior court in each county. The act also set up judi- 
cial districts composed of certain contiguous counties, and this 
practice of expanding the districts has continued from five dis- 
tricts in 1806 until now there are twenty-one districts. 

When North Carolina adopted the Federal Constitution on 
November 21, 1789, she was authorized to send two senators and 
five representatives to the Congress of the United States accord- 
ing to the constitutional apportionment. In 1792, when the first 
federal census had been completed and tabulated, it was found 
that North Carolina was entitled to ten representatives. It was 
then that the General Assembly divided the state into ten congres- 
sional districts. In 1812, the state had grown and increased in 
population until it was entitled to thirteen representatives in Con- 
gress. Between 1812 and 1865, however, the population decreased 
so much in proportion to the population of the other states of the 
Union that North Carolina was by that time entitled only to 
seven representatives. Since 1865 the population of the state has 
shown a slow but steady increase, and now there are twelve con- 
gressional districts. The state, therefore, has two senators and 
twelve representatives in the Congress of the United States. 

Agriculture 

North Carolina from its earliest time has been an agricultural 
State. Approximately 62 per cent of the State's total land area of 
31,422,080 acres is in farm land. The United States Census for 
1950 shows that 1,376,560 or nearly one-third of the people in 
North Carolina live on farms, giving it the largest farm popula- 
tion of any State in the Nation. According to the United States 
Census of 1950, the average size of farms was 67 acres. 

In 1953 cash receipts from farming totaled nearly $904,000,000 
— third highest of record. For the same period. North Carolina 
ranked fourth among all states in cash receipts from crops, 23rd 
in receipts from livestock and products, and held 12th position in 
total cash receipts from farming. North Carolina farmers re- 
ceived about 76 per cent of their cash receipts from sales of crops, 
and 24 per cent from sales of livestock and livestock products. 



6 North Carolina Manual 

From the standpoint of cash returns, tobacco is by far the most 
important single crop produced in the State, contributing almost 
51 per cent of the total cash receipts during 1953. Cash receipts 
from cotton lint and cottonseed during 1953 accounted for a little 
over 10 per cent of the total cash farm income, making it the sec- 
ond in importance from this standpoint. Peanuts ranked "third 
with North Carolina farmers receiving 3.8 per cent of the total 
cash farm income from this source. Cash receipts from mai-ketings 
of poultry and eggs, including turkeys, amounted to 10.4 per cent 
of the total cash receipts. Dairy products accounted for 6.2 per 
cent, hogs 5.4 per cent, and cattle and calves 2 per cent. 

North Carolina produced 832.3 million pounds of flue-cured 
tobacco in 1953, or about 65 per cent of all flue-cured tobacco pro- 
duced in the United States. The production of hurley tobacco 
totaled 20.5 million pounds, making total tobacco production in the 
State during the year 852.8 million pounds, having a total value 
of slightly more than $458,000,000. 

Corn w^as produced on 2,137,000 acres in the State during 1953, 
and is the biggest single crop from the standpoint of acreage pror 
duced in the State. The total production of corn amounted to ap- 
proximately 58 million bushels valued at $92,300,000, making it 
the second most important crop from the standpoint of value of 
production. The State produced 453,000 bales of cotton during 
1953 from 775,000 acres. Cotton lint production was valued at 
$74,100,000, with the cottonseed crop worth about $9,500,000, 
making a total value of $83,600,000. 

During the year 878,000 acres was devoted to the production of 
small grains (wheat, oats, barley and rye). The production of 
all small grains amounted to 26.2 million bushels, with a value 
of $32,100,000. The 1953 all hay crop was worth $37,200,000. Hays 
were cut from 1,164,000 acres, with a total hay production of 
1,145,000 tons. Lespedeza is the biggest single hay crop in the 
State, making about 36 per cent of the total production in 1953. 

The 1953 peanut crop had a value of approximately $32,500,- 
000. This crop is concentrated largely in the northeastern section 
of the State, and is a major cash crop in this area. Practically all 
of the peanuts produced in North Carolina are the edible type, 
and are grown for commercial purposes. About 271 million pounds 
were produced in North Carolina in 1953 from 177,000 acres. 



The State 7 

Soybeans are another important cash crop in Coastal areas. 
About 263,000 acres of soybeans were harvested for beans in 1953. 
Total production amounted to 3,800,000 bushels, having a total 
value of about $9,700,000. North Carolina also produces a wide 
variety of truck crops for commercial purposes. Commercial truck 
crops, excluding Irish potatoes, were harvested from approxi- 
mately 80,000 acres during 1953. The total value of all truck crops 
produced during the year was .$14,500,000. 

The State also produced a 24 million pound lespedeza seed crop, 
having a value of slightly more than $4,000,000. 

The total Irish potato crop for the year was 6.1 million bushels, 
having a value of $5,600,000. Sweet potatoes are produced gen- 
erally over the State, with commercial production concentrated in 
eastern counties. The 1953 crop totaled 4.7 million bushels and 
was worth $12,300,000. 

North Carolina also produces considerable quantities of cer- 
tain fruits and nuts. Normally the State produces slightly over 
a million bushels of commercial apples, but in 1953, due to cli- 
matic factors, the crop amounted to only 873,000 bushels. In addi- 
tion to apples, the State produced 1,180,000 bushels of peaches 
during the year, approximately half of which goes for commer- 
cial purposes. The 1953 pecan crop totaled almost 3.8 million 
pounds — the largest pecan crop ever produced in the State. 

January 1, 1954 inventories of livestock on North Carolina 
farms show 961,000 head of cattle and calves, having a total value 
of $68,200,000. This is the largest inventory of cattle and calves 
in the State on record and reflects the trend toward the use of 
livestock for further diversification and added source of income. 
Of this total, 606,000 head were being kept primarily for milk 
production, with the remaining 355,000 being primarily beef stock. 
On this same date there were 1,035,000 head of hogs and pigs on 
North Carolina farms, worth $30,222,000. All chickens on farms 
numbered 12,404,000 having a total value of $15,505,000. The in- 
ventory of turkeys showed 67,000 on hand January 1, with a total 
value of $429,000. 

Conservation and Development 
In the conservation and development of its natural resources, 
North Carolina is making notable progress. Efforts being made 



8 North Carolina Manual 

to promote wiser and more profitable use of these resources are 
paying: dividends. 

Considerable progress is being made in bringing about a better 
balance between agriculture and industry. More payrolls of a 
year-around nature are being provided through the industrial 
expansion program that is receiving so much attention during 
the present administration. 

Long known for its leadership in the various types of industry, 
North Carolina is gaining recognition as a state in which many 
diversified products are manufactured for the markets of the 
Nation and the world. In sales volume, textiles, tobacco, furni- 
ture, food and chemicals are highest. 

The electrical and electronics equipment industry is the newest 
and the fastest growing in the State. Its rapid growth is attracting 
to the State some of the most respected names in industry. Before 
World War II this industry was practically non-existent in North 
Carolina. Now there are 40 such plants with more than 22,000 
employees engaged in the production of electrical and electronics 
equipment and supplies. 

At the end of 1953 there were approximately 7,500 manufac- 
turing plants in operation in the State. They employed some 
464,000 persons, who had a total income of approximately $1,802,- 
000,000. These workers, who have won wide acclaim for their 
productivity from many out-of-state industrialists locating new 
plants in North Carolina, produced products valued at $6,599,- 
000,000. An indication of how North Carolina is growing indus- 
trially is seen in comparison with products manufactured in 1939. 
That year they were valued at $1,421,000. There are now about 
3,500 more manufacturing plants in the State than there were in 
1945. 

The approximately 1,100 textile plants in the State employed 
some 234,000 workers in 1953. They had gross earnings of about 
$944,000,000, and they turned out products valued at $2,819,000,- 
000. Textile products manufactured in the State in 1939 had a 
value of $550,000,000. 

The State's textile industry is becoming more and more diversi- 
fied within itself. In addition to cotton, it produces a wide variety 
of synthetic and woolen textiles. 

More than 40 per cent of America's hosiery is produced in 
North Carolina. 



The State 



Although textiles and tobacco account for more than half the 
dollar value in production, healthy diversification of the State's 
industrial development is shown in the following table' of the 
eleven largest classifications, listed according to 1953 rank: 





1939 


1951 


1952 


1953 


Textiles -. 


$ 549,700,000 
538,400,000 
69,200,000 
58,800,000 
50,000,000 
45,800,000 
50,700,000 
26,000,000 


$ 2,688,000,000 

1,284,000,000 

478,000,000 

239,000,000 

300,000,000 

305,000,000 

343,000,000 

244,000,000 

68,000,000 

123,000,000 

9,000,000 

400,000,000 


$ 2,870,000,000 
1,476,000,000 
487,000,000 
276,000,000 
315,000,000 
.300.000.000 
259.000.000 
197.000,000 

67.000.000 
127,000,000 

12,000,000 
.355,000,000 


$ 2,819,000,000 


Tobacco 


1,661,000.000 


Foods _ 


490,000,000 


Furniture 


332,000,000 


Tourists 

Lumber 


.325,000,000 
271,000,000 


Chemicals^ 


197,000,000 


Paper 


194,000,000 


Elect. Machinery 


162,000,000 


Apparel 


19.000,000 

1,000,000 

62,700,000 


125,000,000 


Rubber Mfg. 


18,000,000 


Others .. 


324,000,000 








$ 1,471,300,000 


$ 6,481,000,000 


$ 6,741,000,000 


1 6,924,000,000 



' Source — Blue Book of Southern Progress. 

* Synthetic yarns and fabrics included under Te.xtiles. 

Other examples of the State's growing industrial diversifica- 
tion are the manufacturing of boilers and other metal products, 
cigarette paper, cellophane, electric equipment, automatic type- 
writers, aluminum windows and jalousies, electric blankets, smok- 
ing pipes, wooden screws, fire arms, pottery, hypodermic needles, 
fish nets, silverware, and a variety of lesser known items. 

North Carolina is proud of its national leadership in the man- 
ufacture of textiles, tobacco, and wooden furniture. 

Its approximate 100 tobacco plants in 1953 employed 39,000 per- 
sons, who had gross earnings of $161,000,000. They produced 
products valued at $1,661,000,000 as compared with an output 
valued at $539,000,000 in 1939. The State's approximate 400 
furniture plants employed 35,000 persons in 1953. They had gi'oss 
earnings of $125,000,000 and produced goods valued at $332,000,- 
000. Value of furniture manufactured in the State in 1939 was 
$59,000,000. 

Approximately 58 per cent of the State's total land area of 
49,142 square miles is in woodlands. Products manufactured from 
the State's forests in 1953 had a combined value of $797,000,000. 

The State is becoming more and more attractive to tourists. 
Its scenic and other attractions, plus a systematic advertising 
program, bring hundreds of thousands of people into the State 



10 North Carolina Manual 

annually. The tourist industry in the State is estimated to be 
worth $325,000,000 a year. The State has 16 public parks, which 
provide recreation for hundreds of thousands of persons. 

Commercial fisheries is another expanding industry in the State. 
During the past biennium it had a total overall value of $19,577,- 
478 as compared with $16,367,632 for the previous two-year period. 
The commercial fishing industry provides livelihood for more than 
25,000 people living in the State's Coastal areas. 

With many industries depending upon North Carolina minerals, 
the development in this field is progressing. Systematic studies 
in this field include detailed surveying, mapping and evaluating 
of mineral deposits. There are more than 300 kinds of rock and 
minerals occurring in the State, with 70 being commercially 
valuable. 

The State also aids in develpoment of its navigable waters for 
their use by commercial as well as pleasure boats. It carries on a 
continuing program of cooperation with the United States Geolog- 
ical Survey in obtaining and studying data relating to surface 
and underground water, in the making of chemical analyses of 
water supplies for domestic as well as for industrial use, and 
operates 140 stream-gauging stations on major watersheds located 
within the State. 

Health 

The sei'vices of public health now are available to those living 
in every one of North Carolina's 100 counties. This goal was not 
easily accomplished, but the progress of extending all the services 
of public health to the local level has been steady, even if slow 
at times. 

During the past few years, public health in North Carolina 
has been made more democratic; that is, its administration has 
been given into the hands of local officials. Of course, the general 
pattern is the same throughout the State, but local health de- 
partments now administer their affairs to meet their peculiar 
needs, with no interference from a highly centralized state 
department in Raleigh. 

The year 1949 was destined to become a turning point in the 
public health program in North Carolina. The Legislature of 
that year did more for Public Health than any of its predecessors. 
There was a spirit of close cooperation between public health 



The3 State IJ 

officials, the Governor and members of the General Assembly. As 
an outcome of this, approximately $800,000 in new money was 
voted for each fiscal year of the new biennium for local health 
work, which had only been receiving $350,000 a year. This meant 
an increase to $1,150,000 in State funds. 

Effective February 1, 1950, the State Health Department be- 
came streamlined, the number of divisions being reduced from 
14 to 6, exclusive of central administration. While it is neces- 
sary for a central public health department to be maintained 
with offices in Raleigh, at the same time it is realized that, to be 
thoroughly effective, the services of public health must be avail- 
able, through local administrations, to the inhabitants of every 
home in North Carolina. In other words, public health is as close 
to every citizen of this State as his or her nearest local health 
officer. 

While there were various laws and statutes relating to public 
health measures passed prior to that time, the State Board of 
Health was created by the General Assembly of 1877, and has 
been functioning, with changes from time to time, ever since. 
Guilford has the distinction of being the first county in the United 
States to inaugurate full time county health work. That was in 
1911. The following year, Robeson became the first purely rural 
county in the United States to take this step. 

State Highway Systems 

As of January 1, 1954, the State had under its direct jurisdic- 
tion 68,190 miles of highways, roads, and streets, which is equiva- 
lent to more than two and one half times around the world at the 
equator. This vast mileage constitutes more than 10 per cent of 
the gross length of all roads under state control in the Nation. 
The three basic systems of this network of roads are as follows: 

The Rural State Highway System which is made up of all U. S. 
and N. C. routes has a length of 10,770 miles of which 10,566 
are hard surfaced. The largest of the three systems is the Rural 
County or Secondary Road System. This system had a total of 
54,969 miles of which 20,551 miles have been hard surfaced. 
Phenominal growth has taken place in the hard surfacing of 
county roads in recent years. Since January 1, 1949, hard sur- 
faced mileage on this system has increased from 5,106 miles to 
20,551 miles, an increase of 15,445 miles. This paving program 



12 North Carolina Manual 

was financed by a special bond issue approved by the people in an 
election held in June of 1949 and represents, by far, the greatest 
paving program in the history of the State. North Carolina has 
more rural hard surfaced mileage than any of the States except 
Texas, California, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. 

In addition to the two rural systems, the State also has exclusive 
jurisdiction over 2,451 miles of streets which form a part of State 
Highway and County Road Systems in municipalities. Of this 
Municipal System, 2,102 miles are hard surfaced. 

Considering these three systems as a whole, the State operates a 
network of 33,219 miles of hard surfaced and 34,971 miles of non- 
hard surfaced roads and streets. North Carolina has direct juris- 
diction over more miles of roads and streets than has any other 
road governing body in the Nation. In terms of size, population 
and wealth, no other state exceeds North Carolina in terms of 
highway and road services provided for its people. 

Since 1921, the entire road program has been financed exclu- 
sively from the gasoline tax, motor vehicle license fees, and Fed- 
eral Aid, without recourse to property taxation or aid from the 
General State Fund. During the past fiscal year the State High- 
way Fund expended $113,059,185.75 for highway, road, and street 
construction, maintenance, betterments, and improvements, in- 
cluding the operation of the Motor Vehicle Bureau, Highway 
Patrol, the Highway Safety Division, several other State agen- 
cies, and the retirement of bonded indebtedness. 

Rural Electric and Telephone Service 

Rural areas of North Carolina received little benefits from 
rural electrification prior to 1935, which is often spoken of as the 
starting point. At that time, only 1,884 miles of rural lines sei'v- 
ing 11,558 farms were recorded by the North Carolina Rural 
Electrification Authority, which was created in that year to se- 
cure electric service for the rural areas. Today the Authority i-e- 
ports in operation 74,994 miles of rural lines serving 508,863 con- 
sumei's. In addition to this, there were 3,292 miles under con- 
struction or authorized for construction to serve 16,177 consumers. 
Electrification has contributed considerably to the great progress 
in agricultural development over the past few years. The electri- 
fied farm provides for comfort and health in farm living through 
lighting, refrigeration, ranges, washing machines, freezers, plumb- 



The State 13 

ing and all the other many useful household electric appliances. 
Electricity is essential to modern farm production. Farmers have 
motors for universal use — yard and building lighting, running 
water, poultry incubators, brooders for chickens, pigs and stock, 
milking, grain and hay driers, irrigation, and many other useful 
pieces of farm producing equipment. Electricity affords fire pro- 
tection and the operation of the many labor saving devices for 
the rural home and farm activities. Electric service is absolutely 
essential, for example, for a farm to qualify as a grade A dairy. 

The 1945 United States Census indicated that only 14,539 North 
Carolina farms had telephone service. The desire and need in the 
rural areas for communication, so essential to the well-being of 
the people, was so widespread that the 1945 General Assembly 
enacted the Rural Telephone Act, charging the North Carolina 
Rural Electrification Authority with the responsibility of assist- 
ing rural residences in securing telephone service. Funds and per- 
sonnel were first assigned to the program in 1949, which might 
well be tei'med the active beginning. Through the activities of the 
State Authority and other State Agencies and as a result of co- 
operation on the part of the telephone industry and the organiza- 
tion of a number of member owned Telephone Membership Coi'- 
porations, three times as many farms now have telephone service 
as in 1945. In addition, approximately 45,000 rural non-farm resi- 
dences also have service. 

Public Schools 

North Carolina provides a basic, state-supported nine months 
public school term. Sixty-three of the 174 units supplement this 
locally. Separate schools are maintained for different races. Pub- 
lic School enrollment in 1953-1954 was 965,000. There were 31,056 
teachers and 1,850 principals and supervisors and 174 superintend- 
ents. More than two-thirds of all general fund taxes collected by 
the State are used for education. The State operates the largest 
bus fleet in the world, 7,200 vehicles, to transport 452,000 chil- 
dren to the public schools. Attendance is compulsory for children 
between ages 7 and 16. 

There are 3,284 public school buildings, and a $125,000,000 
building program is now in progress. Value of public school prop- 
erty in 1952-1953 was $393,892,587. 



14 North Carolina Manual 

Colleges and Universities 

The University of North Carolina, chartered in 1789, was the 
first State university to open its doors. The Greater University of 
North Carolina is comprised of the University at Chapel Hill, 
State College at Raleigh, and Woman's College in Greensboro. In 
all there are 59 institutions of higher learning in the State. Twelve 
are state-supported. Forty-three are private or denominational. 
Four are public institutions but without state support. Thirteen 
of these institutions are exclusively for Negroes and one for In- 
dians. Duke University in Durham is one of the most heavily en- 
dowed institutions of higher learning in the world. Total univer- 
sity and college enrollment in 1954 was 42,911. 



THE STATE CAPITOL 

The original State Capitol of North Carolina was destroyed by 
fire on June 21, 1831. 

At the session of November, 1832, the Assembly resolved to 
rebuild on the old site, and $50,000 was appropriated for the pur- 
pose. Commissioners were appointed to have the work done. The 
rubbish was cleared away, the excavations made and the founda- 
tions were laid. On July 4, 1833, the cornerstone was set in place. 

After the foundations were laid the work pi-ogressed more 
slowly, and it was so expensive that the appropriation was ex- 
hausted. The Legislature at its next session appropriated $75,000 
more. To do the stone and finer work many skilled artisans had 
been brought from Scotland and other countries. The Building 
Commissioners contracted with David Paton to come to Raleigh 
and superintend the work. Mr. Paton was an architect, who had 
come from Scotland the year before. He was the builder, the archi- 
tect, and designer. 

The Legislature was compelled to make appropriations for the 
work from time to time. The following is a table of the several 
appropriations made: 

Session of 1832-33 $ 50,000.00 

Session of 1833-34 75,000.00 

Session of 1834-35 75,000.00 

Session of 1835 75,000.00 

Session of 1836-37 120,000.00 

Session of 1838-39 105,300.00 

Session of 1840-41 31,374.46 

Total $531,674.46 

The stone with which the building was erected was the property 
of the State. Had the State been compelled to purchase this ma- 
terial the cost of the Capitol would have been considerably in- 
creased. 

In the summer of 1840 the work was finished. At last, after 
more than seven years, the sum of $531,674.46 was expended. As 
large as that sum was for the time, when the State was so poor 
and when the entire taxes for all State purposes reached less than 

15 



The State Capitol 17 

$100,000, yet the people were satisfied. The building had been 
erected with rigorous economy, and it was an object of great pride 
to the people. Indeed, never was money better expended than in 
the erection of this noble Capitol. 

Description of the Capitol, Written by David Paton, 

the Architect 

"The State Capitol is 160 feet in length from north to south 
by 140 feet from east to west. The whole height is 97 ¥2 feet in the 
center. The apex of pediment is 64 feet in height. The stylobate 
is 18 feet in height. The columns of the east and west porticoes 
are 5 feet 2^^ inches in diameter. An entablature, including block- 
ing course, is continued around the building, 12 feet high. 

"The columns and entablature are Grecian Doric, and copied 
from the Temple of Minerva, commonly called the Parthenon, 
which was erected in Athens about 500 years before Christ. An 
octagon tower surrounds the rotunda, which is oi'namented with 
Grecian cornices, etc., and its dome is decorated at top with a 
similar ornament to that of the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates, 
commonly called the Lantorn of Demosthenes. 

"The interior of the Capitol is divided into three stories: First, 
the lower story, consisting of ten rooms, eight of which are appro- 
priated as offices to the Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, and Comp- 
troller, each having two rooms of the same size — the one contain- 
ing an area of 649 square feet, the other 528 square feet — the two 
committee rooms, each containing 200 squaie feet and four clos- 
ets; also the rotunda, corridors, vestibules, and piazzas, contain 
an area of 4,370 square feet. The vestibules are decorated with 
columns and antze, similar to those of the Ionic Temple on the 
Ilissus, near the Acropolis of Athens. The remainder is groined 
with stone and brick, springing from columns and pilasters of 
the Roman Doric. 

"The second story consists of Senatorial and Representatives' 
chambers, the former containing an area of 2,545 and the latter 
2,849 square feet. Four apartments enter from Senate Chamber, 
two of which contain each an area of 169 square feet, and the 
other two contain each an area of 154 square feet; also, two 
rooms enter from Representatives' chamber, each containing an 
area of 170 square feet; of two committee rooms, each containing 



18 North Carolina Manual 

an area of 231 square feet; of four presses and the passages, 
stairs, lobbies, and colonnades, containing- an area of 3,204 square 
feet. 

"The lobbies and Hall of Representatives have their columns 
and antae of the Octagon Tower of Andronicus Cyrrhestes and 
the plan of the hall is of the formation of the Greek theatre and 
the columns and antas in the Senatorial chamber and rotunda are 
of the Temple of Erectheus, Minerva Polias, and Pandrosus, in 
the Acropolis of Athens, near the above named Parthenon. 

"Third, or attic story, consists of rooms appropriated to the 
Supreme Court and Library, each containing an area of 693 square 
feet. Galleries of both houses have an area of 1,300 square feet; 
also two apartments entering from Senate gallery, each 169 square 
feet, of four presses and the lobbies' stairs, 988 square feet. These 
lobbies as well as rotunda, are lit with cupolas, and it is proposed 
to finish the court and library in the florid Gothic style." 

CHIEF EXECUTIVES OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Governors of "Virginia" 

Ralph Lane, April ...., 1585-June ...., 1586. 
John White, April ...., 1587-August ...., 1587. 

Chief Executives Under the Proprietors 

William Drummond, October ...., 1663-October ...., 1667. 
Samuel Stephens, October ...., 1667-December ...., 1669. 
Peter Carteret, October ...., 1670-May ...., 1673. 
John Jenkins, May ...., 1673-November — ., 1676. 

Thomas Eastchurch, November...., 1676- , 1678. 

Thomas Miller, , 1677- 

John Culpepper, , 1677- , 1678. 

Seth Sothel, , 1678- 

John Harvey, February ...., 1679-August ... ., 1679. 

John Jenkins, November ...., 1679- , 1681. 

Seth Sothel, , 1682- , 1689. 

Philip Ludwell, December . .., 1689- , 1691. 

Philip Ludwell, November 2, 1691- , 1694. 

Thomas Jarvis, .., 1691- , 1694. 

John Archdale, August 31, 1694- , 1696. 



Governors 19 

John Harvey, , 1694- , 1699. 

Henderson Walker, , 1699-August 14, 1704. 

Robert Daniel, , 1704- , 1705. 

Thomas Gary, , 1705- , 1706. 

William Glover, , 1706- , 1708. 

Thomas Gary, , 1708-January ...., 1711. 

Edward Hyde, , 1710-May 9, 1712. 

Edward Hyde, May 9, 1712-September 8, 1712. 
Thomas Pollock, September 12, 1712-May 28, 1714. 
Charles Eden, May 28, 1714-March 26, 1722. 
Thomas Pollock, March 30, 1722-August 30, 1722. 
William Reed, August 30, 1722-January 15, 1724. 
George Burrington, January 15, 1724-July 17, 1725. 
Richard Everard, July 17, 1725-May ., 1728. 

Governors Under the Crown 

Richard Everard, May ...., 1728-February 25, 1731. 
George Burrington, February 25, 1731-April 15, 1734. 
Nathaniel Rice, April 15, 1734-October 27, 1734. 
Gabriel Johnston, October 27, 1734-July 17, 1752. 
Matthew Rowan, July 17, 1752-November 2, 1754. 
Arthur Dobbs, November 2, 1754-March 28, 1765. 
William Tryon, March 28, 1765-December 20, 1765. 
William Tryon, December 20, 1765-July 1, 1771. 
James Hasell, July 1, 1771-August 12, 1771. 
Josiah Martin, August 12, 1771-May ...., 1775. 

Governors Elected by the Legislature 

Name, Gounty, Term of Office 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, December 19, 1776-April 18, 1777. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, April 18, 1777-April 18, 1778. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, April 18, 1778-May 4, 1779. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, May 4, 1779-April, 1780. 
Abner Nash, Craven, April, 1780-June 26, 1781. 
Thomas Burke, Orange, June 26, 1781-April 26, 1782. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, April 26, 1782-April 30, 1783. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, April 30, 1783- April 1, 1785. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, April 1, 1785-December 12, 1785. 
Richard Caswell, Dobbs, December 12, 1785-December 23, 1786. 



20 North Carolina Manual 

Richard Caswell, Dobbs, December 23, 1786-December 20, 1787. 
Samuel Johnston, Chowan, December 20, 1787-November 18, 1788. 
Samuel Johnston, Chowan, November 18, 1788-November 16, 1789. 
Samuel Johnston, Chowan, November 16, 1789-December 17, 1789. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, December 17, 1789-December 9, 1790. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, December 9, 1790-January 2, 1792. 
Alexander Martin, Guilford, January 2, 1792-December 14, 1792. 
R. D. Spaight, Craven, December 14, 1792-December 26, 1793. 
R. D. Spaight, Craven, December 26, 1793-January 6, 1795. 
R. D. Spaight, Craven, January 6, 1795-November 19, 1795. 
Samuel Ashe, New Hanover, November 19, 1795-December 19, 1796. 
Samuel Ashe, New Hanover, December 19, 1796-December 5, 1797. 
Samuel Ashe, New Hanover, December 5, 1797-December 7, 1798. 
W. R. Davie, Halifax, December 7, 1798-November 23, 1799. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, November 23, 1799-November 29, 1800. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, November 29, 1800-November 28, 1801. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, November 28, 1801-December 6, 1802. 
James Turner, Warren, December 6, 1802-December 1, 1803. 
James Turner, Warren, December 1, 1803-November 29, 1804. 
James Turner, Warren, November 29, 1804-December 10, 1805. 
Nathaniel Alexander, Mecklenburg, December 10, 1805-December 

1, 1806. 
Nathaniel Alexander, Mecklenburg, December 1, 1806-December 

1, 1807. 
Benjamin Williams, Moore, December 1, 1807-December 12, 1808. 
David Stone, Bertie, December 12, 1808-December 13, 1809. 
David Stone, Bertie, December 13, 1809-December 5, 1810. 
Benjamin Smith, Brunswick, December 5, 1810-December 9, 1811. 
William Hawkins, Warren, December 9, 1811-November 25, 1812. 
William Hawkins, Warren, November 25, 1812-November 20, 1813. 
William Hawkins, Warren, November 20, 1813-November 29, 1814. 
William Miller, Warren, November 29, 1814-December 7, 1815. 
William Miller, Warren, December 7, 1815-December 7, 1816. 
William Miller, Warren, December 7, 1816-December 3, 1817. 
John Branch, Halifax, December 3, 1817-November 24, 1818. 
John Branch, Halifax, November 24, 1818-November 25, 1819. 
John Branch, Halifax, November 25, 1819-December 7, 1820. 
Jesse Franklin, Surry, December 7, 1820-December 7, 1821. 
Gabriel Holmes, Sampson, December 7, 1821-December 7, 1822. 
Gabriel Holmes, Sampson, December 7, 1822-December 6, 1823. 



Governors 21 

Gabriel Holmes, Sampson, December 6, 1823-December 7, 1824. 
H. G. Burton, Halifax, December 7, 1824-December 6, 1825. 
H. G. Burton, Halifax, December 6, 1825-December 29, 1826. 
H. G. Burton, Halifax, December 29, 1826-December 8, 1827. 
James Iredell, Chowan, December 8, 1827-December 12, 1828. 
John Owen, Bladen, December 12, 1828-December 10, 1829. 
John Owen, Bladen, December 10, 1829-December 18, 1830. 
Montford Stokes, Wilkes, December 18, 1830-December 13, 1831. 
Montford Stokes, Wilkes, December 13, 1831-December 6, 1832. 
D. L. Swain, Buncombe, December 6, 1832-December 9, 1833. 
D. L. Swain, Buncombe, December 9, 1833-December 10, 1834. 

D. L. Swain, Buncombe, December 10, 1834-December 10, 1835. 

R. D. Spaight, Jr., Craven, December 10, 1835-December 31, 1836. 

Governors Elected by the People 

E. B. Dudley, New Hanover, December 31, 1836-December 29, 1838. 
E. B. Dudley, New Hanover, December 29, 1838-January 1, 1841. 
J. M. Morehead, Guilford, January 1, 1841-December 31, 1842. 

J. M. Morehead, Guilford, December 31, 1842-January 1, 1845. 

W. A. Graham, Orange, January 1, 1845-January 1, 1847. 

W. A. Graham, Orange, January 1, 1847-January 1, 1849. 

Charles Manly, Wake, January 1, 1849-January 1, 1851. 

D. S. Reid, Rockingham, January 1, 1851-December 22, 1852. 

D. S. Reid, Rockingham, December 22, 1852-December 6, 1854. 

Warren Winslow, Cumberland, December 6, 1854-January 1, 1855. 

Thomas Bragg, Northampton, January 1, 1855-Januaiy 1, 1857. 

Thomas Bragg, Northampton, January 1, 1857-January 1, 1859. 

John W. Ellis, Rowan, January 1, 1859-January 1, 1861. 

John W. Ellis, Rowan, January 1, 1861-July 7, 1861. 

Henry T. Clark, Edgecombe, July 7, 1861-September 8, 1862. 

Z. B. Vance, Buncombe, September 8, 1862-December 22, 1864. 

Z. B. Vance, Buncombe, December 22, 1864-May 29, 1865. 

W. W. Holden, Wake, May 29, 1865-December 15, 1865. 

Jonathan Worth, Randolph, December 15, 1865-December 22, 1866. 

Jonathan Worth, Randolph, December 22, 1866-July 1, 1868. 

W. W. Holden, Wake, July 1, 1868-December 15, 1870. 

T. R. Caldwell, Burke, December 15, 1870-January 1, 1873. 

T. R. Caldwell, Burke, January 1, 1873-July 11, 1874. 

C. H. Brogden, Wayne, July 11, 1874-January 1, 1877. 



22 North Carolina Manual 

Z. B, Vance, Mecklenburg, January 1, 1877-February 5, 1879. 

T. J. Jarvis, Pitt, February 5, 1879-January 18, 1881. 

T. J. Jarvis, Pitt, January 18, 1881-January 21, 1885. 

A. M. Scales, Rockingham, January 21, 1885-January 17, 1889. 

D. G. Fowle, Wake, January 17, 1889-April 8, 1891. 

Thomas M. Holt, Alamance, April 8, 1891-January 18, 1893. 

Elias Carr, Edgecombe, January 18, 1893-January 12, 1897. 

D. L. Russell, Brunswick, January 12, 1897-January 15, 1901. 

G. B. Aycock, Wayne, January 15, 1901-January 11, 1905. 

R. B. Glenn, Forsyth, January 11, 1905-January 12, 1909. 

W. W. Kitchen, Person, January 12, 1909-January 15, 1913. 

Locke Craige, Buncombe, January 15, 1913-January 11, 1917. 

Thomas W. Bickett, Franklin, January 11, 1917-January 12, 1921. 

Cameron Morrison, Mecklenburg, January 12, 1921-January 14, 

1925. 
Angus Wilton McLean, Robeson, January 14, 1925-January 11, 

1929. 
O. Max Gardner, Cleveland, January 11, 1929-January 5, 1933. 
J. C. B. Ehringhaus, Pasquotank, January 5, 1933-January 7, 1937. 
Clyde R. Hoey, Cleveland, January 7, 1937-January 9, 1941. 
J. Melville Broughton, Wake, January 9, 1941-January 4, 1945. 
R. Gregg Cherry, Gaston, January 4, 1945-January 6, 1949. 
W. Kerr Scott, Alamance, January 6, 1949-January 8, 1953. 
William B. Umstead, Durham, January 8, 1953-November 7, 1954. 
Luther H. Hodges, Rockingham, November 9, 1954- 



Lieutenant Governor 



23 



LIST OF PERSONS WHO HAVE SERVED AS 
LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR SINCE JULY 1, 1868 

This List Has Been Compiled From The North Carolina 
Manual of 1913 And The Manuals Published Each 
Two Years Since That Date. 



Name 


County 


Term Elected 


Term Served 


Tod R Caldwelli - . 


Burke 


1868-1872 
1872-1876 
1876-1880 
1881-1885 
1885-1889 
1889-1893 
1893-1897 
1897-1901 
1901-1905 
1905-1909 
1909-1913 
1913-1917 
1917-1921 
1921-1925 
1925-1929 
1929-1933 
1933-1937 
1937-1941 
1941-1945 
1945-1949 
1949-1953 
1953-1957 


1868-1870 


Curtis H. Brogden2 . .. . ... .- 


Wayne.- ._ 

Pitt 

Macon.. 

New Hanover. .- 

Alamance 

Alleghany 

Forsyth 

Iredell 


1872-1874 


Thomas J Jarvis^ . . . 


1876-1878 


James L. Robinson . 


1881-1886 


Charles M Steadman - -- 


1885-1889 


Thomas M. Holt'' .. 


1889-1891 




1893-1897 


Charles A Reynolds . 


1897-1901 


W.D.Turner . ... 


1901-1905 


Francis D Winston .... 


Bertie. .. 


1905-1909 


William C. Newland 


Caldwell 

Edgecombe 

Cleveland 

New Hanover... 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Orange . - 


1909-1913 




1913-1917 


0. Max Gardner . 


1917-1921 


W.B.Cooper . . -- 


1921-1925 


J. Elmer Long . . 


1925-1929 


Richard T. Fountain . - .. 


1929-1933 


A. H. Graham . 


1933-1937 


W. P. Morton 


Chatham 

Person 


1937-1941 




1941-1945 


L. Y. Ballentine 


Wake 


1945-1949 


H. P. Taylor 


Anson .. 


1949-1953 


Luther H. HodgesS 


Rockingham 


1953-1954 



Became Governor December 15, 1870 when W. W. Holden was impeached, tried, and put out of 

office. 
Became Governor July 11, 1874 when Tod R. Caldwell died in office. 
Became Governor February 5, 1879 when Governor Vance was elected U. S. Seanator. 
Became Governor April 9, 1891 when D. G. Fowle died in office. 
Became Governor November 9, 1954 when William B. Umstead died in office. 




"A 



THE STATE FLAG 
An Act to Establish a State Flag 

The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact: 

Section 1. That the flag of North Carolina shall consist of a blue 
union, containing in the center thereof a white star with the letter 
N in gilt on the left and the letter C in gilt on the right of said 
star, the circle containing the same to be one-third the width of 
the union. 

Sec. 2. That the fly of the flag shall consist of two equally pro- 
portioned bars; the upper bar to be red, the lower bar to be white; 
that the length of the bars horizontally shall be equal to the per- 
pendicular length of the union, and the total length of the flag 
shall be one-third more than its width. 

Sec. 3. That above the star in the center of the union there 
shall be a gilt scroll in semicircular form, containing in black let- 
ters this inscription: "May 20th, 1775," and that below the star 
there shall be a similar scroll containing in black letters the in- 
scription: "April 12th, 1776." 

In the General Assembly read three times and ratified this 9th 
day of March, A.D., 1885. 

No change has been made in the flag since the passage of this 
act. By an act of 1907 it is provided: 

"That the board of trustees or managers of the several State in- 
stitutions and public buildings shall provide a North Carolina flag, 
of such dimensions and materials as they may deem best, and the 
same shall be displayed from a staff upon the top of each and 
every such building at all times except during inclement weather, 
and upon the death of any State officer or any prominent citizen 
the Flag shall be put at half-mast until the burial of such person 
shall have taken place. 

"That the Board of County Commissioners of the several coun- 
ties in this State shall likewise authorize the procuring of a North 
Carolina flag, to be displayed either on a staff upon the top, or 
draped behind the Judge's stand, in each and every courthouse in 
the State, and that the State flag shall be displayed at each and 
every term of court held, and on such other public occasions as 
the Commissioners may deem proper." (Rev., s. 5321; 1885 c. 291; 
1907, c. 838.) 

25 



THE MECKLENBURG DECLARATION OF 
20th May, 1775* 

Declaration 

Names of the Delegates Present 

Col. Thomas Polk John McKnitt Alexander 

Ephraim Brevard Hezekiah Alexander 

Hezekiah J. Balch Adam Alexander 

John Phifer Charles Alexander 

James Harris Zacheus Wilson, Sen. 

William Kennon Waightstill Avery 

John Ford Benjamin Patton 

Richard Barry Mathew McClure 

Henry Downs Neil Morrison 

Ezra Alexander Robert Irwin 

William Graham John Flenniken 

John Quary David Reese 

Abraham Alexander Richard Harris, Sen. 

Abraham Alexander was appointed Chairman, and John Mc- 
Knitt Alexander, Clerk. The following resolutions were offered, 
viz: 

1. Resolved. That whosoever directly or indirectly abetted or in 
any way form or manner countenanced the unchartered and dan- 
gerous invasion of our rights as claimed by Great Britain is an 
enemy to this country, to America, and to the inherent and in- 
alienable rights of man. 

2. Resolved, That we the citizens of Mecklenburg County, do 
hereby dissolve the political bands which have connected us to the 
mother country and hereby absolve ourselves from all allegiance 
to the British Crown and abjure all political connection contract 
or association with that nation who have wantonly trampled on 
our right and liberties and inhumanly shed the blood of American 
patriots at Lexington. 

3. Resolved, That we do hereby declare ourselves a free and in- 
dependent people, are, and of right ought to be a sovereign and 



♦The above is found in Vol. IX, pages 1263-65 of the Colonial Records of 
North Carolina. 

26 



The Mecklenburg Declaration 27 

self-governing association under the control of no power other 
than that of our God and the General Government of the Congress 
to the maintenance of which independence we solemnly pledge to 
each other our mutual cooperation, our lives, our fortunes, and 
our most sacred honor. 

4. Resolved, That as we now acknowledge the existence and con- 
trol of no law or legal officer, civil or military within this County, 
we do hereby ordain and adopt as a rule of life all each and every 
of our former laws — wherein nevertheless the Crown of Great 
Britain never can be considered as holding rights, privileges, im- 
munities, or authority therein. 

5. Resolved, That it is further decreed that all, each and every 
Military Officer in this County is hereby reinstated in his former 
command and authority, he acting comformably to these regula- 
tions. And that every member present of this delegation shall 
henceforth be a civil officer, viz., a justice of the peace, in the 
character of a "committee man" to issue process, hear and deter- 
mine all matters of controversy according to said adopted laws 
and to preserve peace, union and harmony in said county, and 
to use every exertion to spread the love of Country and fire of 
freedom throughout America, until a more general and organized 
government be established in this Province. 



THE GREAT SEAL 

The Constitution of North Carolina, Article III, section 16, re- 
quires that 

"There shall be a seal of the State which shall be kept by the 
Governor, and used by him as occasion may require, and shall be 
called 'The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina.' All grants 
and commissions shall be issued in the name and by the authority 
of the State of North Carolina, sealed with 'The Great Seal of the 
State,' signed by the Governor and countersigned by the Secretary 
of State." 

The use of a Great Seal for the attestation of important docu- 
ments began with the institution of government in North Carolina. 
There have been at various times nine different seals in use in 
the colony and State. 

The present Great Seal of the State of North Carolina is de- 
scribed as follows: 

"The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina is two and one- 
quarter inches in diameter, and its design is a representation of 
the figures of Liberty and Plenty, looking toward each other, but 
not more than half fronting each other, and otherwise disposed, as 
follows: Liberty, the first figure, standing, her pole with cap on it 
in her left hand and a scroll with the word 'Constitution' inscribed 
thereon in her right hand. Plenty, the second figure, sitting down, 
her right arm half extended toward Liberty, three heads of wheat 
in her right hand, and in her left the small end of her horn, the 
mouth of which is resting at her feet, and the contents of horn 
rolling out. In the exergon is inserted the words May 20, 1775, 
above the coat of arm. Around the circumference is the legend 
'The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina' and the motto 
'Esse Quam Videri'." (Rev., s. 5339; Code ss. 3328, 3329; 1868-9, 
c. 270, s. 35; 1883, c. 392; 1893, c. 145.) 



28 



THE STATE BIRD 

By popular choice the Cardinal was selected for adoption as 
our State Bird as of March 4, 1943. (S. L. 1943 c. 595; G. S. 
145-2.) 

This bird is sometimes called the Winter Redbird because it is 
most conspicuous in winter and is the only "redbird" present at 
that season. It is an all year round resident and one of the com- 
monest birds in our gardens and thickets. It is about the size of a 
Catbird with a longer tail, red all over, except that the throat and 
region around the bill is black ; the head is conspicuously crested 
and the large stout bill is red; the female is much duller — the red 
being mostly confined to the crest, wings and tail. There are no 
seasonal changes in the plumage. 

The Cardinal is a fine singer, and what is unusual among birds 
the female is said to sing as well as the male, which latter sex 
usually has a monopoly of that art in the feathered throngs. 

The nest is rather an untidy affair built of weed stems, grass 
and similar materials in a low shrub, small tree or bunch of briars, 
usually not over four feet above the ground. The usual number of 
eggs to a set is three in this State, usually four further North. 
Possibly the Cardinal raises an extra brood down here to make 
up the difference, or possibly he can keep up his normal population 
more easily here through not having to face inclement winters 
of the colder North. A conspicuous bird faces more hazards. 

The Cardinal is by nature a seed eater, but he does not dislike 
small fruits and insects. 



31 



THE HALIFAX RESOLUTION 

Adopted by the Provincial Congress of North Carolina in Session 
at Halifax, April 12, 1776. 

It appears to your committee that pursuant to the plan concerted 
by the British Ministry for subjugating America, the King and 
Parliament of Great Britain have usurped a power over the per- 
sons and properties of the people unlimited and uncontrolled; and 
disregarding their humble petitions for peace, liberty and safety, 
have made divers legislative acts, denouncing war, famine, and 
every species of calamity, against the Continent in general. The 
British fleets and armies have been, and still are, daily employed 
in destroying the people, and committing the most horrid devasta- 
tions on the country. The Governors in different Colonies have de- 
clared protection to slaves who should imbrue their hands in the 
blood of their masters. That ships belonging to America are de- 
clared prizes of war and many of them have been violently seized 
and confiscated. In consequence of all of which multitudes of the 
people have been destroyed, or from easy circumstances reduced 
to the most lamentable distress. 

And WHEaiEAs, The moderation hitherto manifested by the 
United Colonies and their sincere desire to be reconciled to the 
mother country on constitutional principles, have procured no 
mitigation of the aforesaid wrongs and usurpations, and no hopes 
remain of obtaining redress by those means alone which have been 
hitherto tried, your committee are of opinion that the House should 
enter into the following resolve, to wit: 

Resolved, That the delegates for this Colony in the Continental 
Congress be empowered to concur with the delegates of the other 
Colonies in declaring Independency, and fonning foreign alliances, 
reserving to this Colony the sole and exclusive right of forming 
a Constitution and laws for this Colony, and of appointing dele- 
gates from time to time (under the direction of a general repre- 
sentation thereof) , to meet the delegates of the other Colonies for 
such purposes as shall be hereafter pointed out. 



32 



NAME OF STATE AND NICKNAMES 

In 1629 King Charles the First of England "erected into a 
province," all the land from Albemarle Sound on the north to the 
St. John's River on the south, which he directed should be called 
Carolina. The word Carolina is from the word Carolus, the Latin 
form of Charles. 

When Carolina was divided in 1710, the southern part was 
called South Carolina and the northern or older settlement was 
called North Carolina, or the "Old North State." Historians had 
recorded the fact that the principal products of this State were 
"tar, pitch and turpentine." It was during one of the fiercest 
battles of the War Between the States, so the story goes, that the 
column supporting the North Carolina troops was driven from the 
field. After the battle the North Carolinians, who had successfully 
fought it out alone, were greeted from the passing derelict regi- 
ment with the question: "Any more tar down in the Old North 
State, boys?" Quick as a flash came the answer: "No; not a bit; 
old Jeff's bought it all up." "Is that so; what is he going to do 
with it?" was asked. "He is going to put it on you'uns heels to 
make you stick better in the next fight." Creecy relates that Gen- 
eral Lee, hearing of the incident, said: "God bless the Tar Heel 
boys," and from that they took the name. — Adapted from Grand- 
father Tales of North Carolina by R. B. Creecy and Histories of 
North Carolina Regiments, Vol. Ill, by Walter Clark. 

The State Motto 

The General Assembly of 1893 (chapter 145) adopted the words 
"Esse Quam Videri" as the State's motto and directed that these 
words with the date "20 May, 1775," should be placed with our 
Coat of Arms upon the Great Seal of the State. 

The words "Esse Quam Videri" mean "to be rather than to 
seem." Nearly every State has adopted a motto, generally in Latin. 
The reason for their mottoes being in Latin is that the Latin 
tongue is far more condensed and terse than the English. The 
three words, "Esse Quam Videri," require at least six English 
words to express the same idea. 

Curiosity has been aroused to learn the origin of our State 
motto. It is found in Cicero in his essay on Friendship (Cicero de 

Amicitia, Chap. 26.) 

33 



34 North Carolina Manual 

It is a little singular that until the act of 1893 the sovereign 
State of North Carolina had no motto since its declaration of in- 
dependence. It was one of the very few States which did not have 
a motto and the only one of the original thirteen without one. 
(Rev., s. 5320; 1893, c. 145; G. S. 144-2.) 

The State Colors 

The General Assembly of 1945 declared Red and Blue of shades 
appearing in the North Carolina State Flag and the American 
Flag as the official State Colors. (Session Laws, 1945, c. 878; G. S. 
144-6.) 

The State Flower 

The General Assembly of 1941 designated the dogwood as the 
State flower. (Public Laws, 1941, c. 289; G. S. 145-1.) 

The State's Most Famous Toast 

(Not Officially Designated) 

"Here's to the land of the long leaf pine 
The summer land where the sun doth shine; 
Where the weak grow strong 
And the strong grow great, 
Here's to 'down home' 
The Old North State." 
(Composed in 190 Jf by Mrs. Harry C. Martin, forvier resident of 
Raleigh, N. C, but now living in Tennessee.) 

Legal Holidays 

January 1 — New Year's Day. 

January 19 — Birthday of General Robert E. Lee. 

February 22 — Birthday of George Washington. 

Easter Monday. 

April 12 — Anniversary of the Resolutions adopted by the Pro- 
vincial Congress of North Carolina at Halifax, April 12, 1776, 
instructing the delegates from North Carolina to the Continental 
Congi'ess to vote for a Declaration of Independence. 

May 10 — Confederate Memorial Day. 

May 20 — Anniversary of the "Mecklenburg Declaration of In- 
dependence." 



Population 35 

May 30 — Memorial Day (Applies to State and National Banks 
only). 

July 4 — Independence Day. 

September, first Monday — Labor Day. 

November, Tuesday after first Monday — General Election Day. 

November 11 — Armistice Day. 

November, Fourth Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. 

By joint Resolution No. 41 of Congress, approved by the Presi- 
dent December 26, 1941, the fourth Thursday in November in each 
and every year after 1941, was designated as Thanksgiving Day 
and made a legal public holiday to all intents and pui"poses. 

December 25 — Christmas Day. 

Population 

1675 (Estimated) 4,000 

1701 (Estimated) 5,000 

1707 (Estimated) 7,000 

1715 (Estimated) 11,000 

1729 (Estimated) 35,000 

1752 (Estimated) 100,000 

1765 (Estimated) 200,000 

1771 (Estimated) 250,000 

1786 (Estimated) 350,000 

1790 (Census) 393,751 

1800 (Census) 478,103 

1810 (Census) 555,500 

1820 (Census) 638,829 

1830 (Census) 737,987 

1840 (Census) 753,409 

1850 (Census) 869,039 

1860 (Census) 992,622 

1870 (Census) 1,071,361 

1880 (Census) 1,399,750 

1890 (Census) 1,617,947 

1900 (Census) 1,893,810 

1910 (Census) 2,206,287 

1920 (Census) 2,559,123 

1930 (Census) 3,170,276 

1940 (Census) 3,571,623 

1950 (Census) 4,061,929 



THE OLD NORTH STATE 



(Traditional air as sung in 1926) 



William Gaston 

With spirit 



Collected ams abbanobo 
BT Mas. E. E. Randolpb 




Pi 



^Ei 



fc^=t 






1. Car - - li • nal Car 

2. Tho' she en - vies not 

3. Then let all those who 



li - nal heav-en's bless-ings at - tend her, 
oth - ers, their mer - it - ed glo - ry, 
love us, love the land that we live in, 





* l ' S S ^ 



g= 



:t 



dl^^rtz 



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While we live we willcher-ish, pro - tect and 

Say whose name stands the fore - most, in lib - er 

As hap • py a re - gion as on this side 



g !J , J <^ 



^ 



de-fend her, Tho' the 
ty's sto • ry, Tho' too 
of heav-en, Where 





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I 3^ tf» 



scorn - er may sneer at and wit - lings de - fame her. Still our hearts swell with 
true to her - self e'er to crouch to op-pres-sion, Who can yield to just 
plen - ty and peace, love and joy smile be - ' 



fore us, Raise a.loud, rais: to- 



E3: 



3tj_Ti: 



^ 




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i^^ir 



T^ — r 



Chorus 



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fe 



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e 



glad - ness when ev - er we name her. 

rule • more loy - al sub - mis - sion. Hur • rahl 

geth ■ er the heart thrill - ing chorus. 

• -m * r* • r-» z ■■♦ riS"- 

, -t>r I g — ^- \\ r V \t—%- 



Hur - rahl 



the 



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I 

Old North State for - ev 

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er, 



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rahl 

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Hur -rahl the good Old North State. 



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i 



CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF NORTH 

CAROLINA 



PREAMBLE 



We, the people of the state of North Carolina, grateful to Al- 
mighty God, the Sovereign Ruler of Nations, for the preservation 
of the American Union and the existence of our civil, political, 
and religious liberties, and acknovi^ledging our dependence upon 
Him for the continuance of those blessings to us and our posterity, 
do, for the more certain security thereof and for the better gov- 
ernment of this State, ordain and establish this Constitution: 

ARTICLE I 

DECLARATION OF RIGHTS 

That the great, general, and essential principles of liberty and 
free government may be recognized and established, and that the 
relations of this State to the Union and Government of the United 
States, and those of the people of this State to the rest of the 
American people, may be defined and affirmed, we do declare: 

Section 1. The equality and rights of persons. That we hold it 
to be self-evident that all persons are created equal ; that they 
are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights ; that 
among these are life, liberty, the enjoyment of the fruits of their 
own labor, and the pursuit of happiness. 

Sec. 2. Political power and government. That all political power 
is vested in, and derived from, the people; all government of right 
originates from the people, is founded upon their will only, and 
is instituted solely for the good of the whole. 

Sec. 3. Internal governmeyit of the State. That the people of 
this State have the inherent, sole and exclusive right of regulat- 
ing the internal government and policies thereof, and of altering 
and abolishing their Constitution and form of government when- 
ever it may be necessary for their safety and happiness; but 
every such right should be exercised in pursuance of the law, and 
consistently with the Constitution of the United States. 

37 



38 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 4, That there is no right to secede. This this State shall 
ever remain a member of the American Union; that the people 
thereof are a part of the American Nation ; that there is no right 
on the part of the State to secede, and that all attempts, from 
whatever source or upon whatever pretext, to dissolve said Union 
or to sever said Nation, ought to be resisted with the whole power 
of the State. 

Sec. 5. Of Allegiance to the United States Government. That 
every citizen of this State owes paramount allegiance to the Con- 
stitution and Government of the United States, and that no law 
or ordinance of the State in contravention or subversion thereof 
can have any binding force. 

Sec. 6. Public debt; bonds issued under ordinance of Conven- 
tion of 1868, '68-'69, '69-'70, declared invalid; exception. The State 
shall never assume or pay, or authorize the collection of any 
debt or obligation, express or implied, incurred in aid of insur- 
rection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for 
the loss or emancipation of any slave; nor shall the General 
Assembly assume or pay, or authorize the collection of any tax 
to pay, either directly or indirectly, expressed or implied, any 
debt or bond incurred, or issued, by authority of the Convention 
of the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, nor any 
debt or bond incurred or issued by the Legislature of the year one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, either at its special ses- 
sion of the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, or at 
its regular sessions of the years one thousand eight hundred and 
sixty-eight and one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine, and 
one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine and one thousand eight 
hundred and seventy; except the bonds issued to fund the interest 
on the old debt of the State, unless the proposing to pay the same 
shall have first been submitted to the people, and by them ratified 
by the vote of a majority of all the qualified voters of the State 
at a regular election held for that purpose. 

Sec. 7. Exchisive emoluments, etc. No person or set ©f persons 
are entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or privileges from 
the community but in consideration of public services. 

Sec. 8. The legislative, executive, and judicial powers distinct. 
The legislative, executive, and supreme judicial powers of the 
government ought to be forever separate and distinct from each 
other. 



Constitution 39 

Sec. 9. Of the power of suspending laws. All power of suspend- 
ing laws, or the execution of laws, by any authority, without the 
consent of the representatives of the people, is injurious to their 
rights, and ought not to be exercised. 

Sec. 10. Elections free. All elections ought to be free. 

Sec. 11. In criminal prosecutions. In all criminal prosecutions, 
every person charged with crime has the right to be informed 
of the accusation and to confront the accusers and witnesses with 
other testimony, and to have counsel for defense, and not be com- 
pelled to give self-incriminating evidence, or to pay costs, jail 
fees, or necessary witness fees of the defense, unless found guilty. 

Sec. 12. A^iswers to criminal charges. No person shall be put 
to answer any criminal charge except as hereinafter allowed, but 
by indictment, presentment or impeachment, but any person, when 
represented by counsel, may, under such regulations as the Leg- 
islature shall prescribe, waive indictment in all except capital 
cases. 

Sec. 13. Right of jury. No person shall be convicted of any 
crime but by the unanimous verdict of a jury of good and lawful 
persons in open court. The Legislature, may, however, provide 
other means of trial for petty misdemeanors, with the right of 
appeal. 

Sec. 14. Excessive bail. Excessive bail should not be required, 
nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel or unusual punishment in- 
flicted. 

Sec. 15. General warrants. General warrants, whereby any 
officer or messenger may be commanded to search suspected places, 
without evidence of the act committed, or to seize any person or 
persons not named, whose offense is not particularly described 
and supported by evidence, are dangerous to liberty, and ought not 
to be granted. 

Sec. 16. Imprisonment for debt. There shall be no imprison- 
ment for debt in this State, except in cases of fraud. 

Sec. 17. No person taken, etc., but by law of the land. No per- 
son ought to be taken, imprisoned, or disseized of his freehold, 
liberties or privileges, or outlawed or exiled, or in any manner 
deprived of his life, liberty or property but by the law of the land. 

Sec. 18. Persons restrained of liberty. Every person restrained 
of his liberty is entitled to a remedy to inquire into the lawful- 



40 North Carolina Manual 

ness thereof, and to remove the same, if unlawful; and such 
remedy ought not to be denied or delayed. 

Sec. 19. Controversies at law respecting property. In all con- 
troversies at law respecting property, the ancient mode of trial by 
jury is one of the best securities of the rights of the people, and 
ought to lemain sacred and inviolable. No person shall be excluded 
from juiy service on account of sex. 

Sec. 20. Freedom of the press. The freedom of the press is one 
of the great bulwarks of liberty, and therefore ought never to be 
restrained, but every individual shall be held responsible for the 
abuse of the same. 

Sec. 21. Habeas corpus. The privileges of the writ of habeas 
corpus shall not be suspended. 

Sec. 22. Property qualification. As political rights and privi- 
leges are not dependent upon, cr modified by, property, therefore 
no property qualification ought to affect the right to vote or hold 
ofl[ice. 

Sec. 23. Representation and taxation. The people of the State 
ought not to be taxed, or made subject to the payment of any im- 
post or duty without the consent of themselves, or their repre- 
sentatives in General Assembly, freely given. 

Sec. 24. Militia and the right to bear arms. A well regulated 
militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of 
the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed; and, as 
standing armies in time of peace are dangerous to liberty, they 
ought not to be kept up, and the military should be kept under 
strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power. Nothing 
herein contained shall justify the practice of carrying concealed 
weapons, or prevent the Legislature from enacting,' penal statutes 
against said practice. 

Sec. 25. Right of the people to assemble together. The people 
have a right to assemble together to consult for their common good, 
to instruct their representatives, and to apply to the Legislature 
for redress of grievances. But secret political societies are dan- 
gerous to the liberties of a free people, and should not be tolerated. 

Sec. 26. Religious liberty. All persons have a natural and in- 
alienable right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates 
of their own consciences, and no human authority should, in any 
case whatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience. 



Constitution 41 

Sec. 27. Education. The people have a right to the privilege 
of education, and it is the duty of the State to guard and main- 
tain that right. 

Sec. 28. Elections should be frequent. For redress of grievances, 
and for amending and strengthening the laws, elections should 
be often held. 

Sec. 29. Recurreyice to fundamejital principles. A frequent re- 
currence to fundamental principles is absolutely necessary to pre- 
serve the blessings of liberty. 

Sec. 30. Hereditary emoluments, etc. No hereditary emoluments, 
privileges, or honors ought to be granted or conferred in this State. 
Sec. 31. Perpetuities, etc. Perpetuities and monopolies are con- 
trary to the genius of a free State, and ought not to be allowed. 
Sec. 32. Ex post facto laws. Retrospective laws, punishing acts 
committed before the existence of such laws, and by them only 
declared criminal, are oppressive, unjust, and incompatible with 
liberty; wherefore no ex post facto law ought to be made. No law 
taxing retrospectively sales, purchases, or other acts previously 
done, ought to be passed. 

Sec. 33. Slavery prohibited. Slavery and involuntary servitude, 
otherwise than for crime, whereof the parties shall have been duly 
convicted, shall be, and are hereby, forever prohibited within the 
State. 

Sec. 34. State boundaries. The limits and boundaries of the 
State shall be and remain as they now are. 

Sec. 35. Courts shall be open. All courts shall be open; and 
every person for an injury done him in his lands, goods, person, 
or reputation, shall have remedy by due course of law, and right 
and justice administered without sale, denial, or delay. 

Sec. 36. Soldiers in time of peace. No soldier shall, in time of 
peace, be quartered in any house without the consent of the owner ; 
nor in time of war but in a manner prescribed by law. 

Sec. 37. Other rights of the people. This enumeration of rights 
shall not be construed to impair or deny others retained by the 
people; and all powers not herein delegated remain with the 
people. 



42 North Carolina Manual 

ARTICLE II 

legislative department 

Section 1. Two branches. The legislative authority shall be 
vested in two distinct branches, both dependent on the people, 
to-wit: a Senate and House of Representatives. 

Sec. 2. Time of assemblhig. The Senate and House of Represent- 
atives shall meet biennially on the first Wednesday after the first 
Monday in January next after their election ; and, when asembled, 
shall be denominated the General Assembly. Neither house shall 
proceed upon public business unless a majority of all the members 
are actually present. 

Sec. 3. Number of senators. The Senate shall be composed of 
fifty Senators, biennially chosen by ballot. 

Sec. 4. ReguIatio7is in relation to districting the State for Seyi- 
ators. The Senate Districts shall be so altered by the General 
Assembly, at the first session after the return of every enumera- 
tion by order of Congress, that each Senate District shall contain, 
as near as may be, an equal number of inhabitants, excluding 
aliens and Indians not taxed, and shall remain unaltered until the 
return of another enumeration, and shall at all times consist of 
contiguous territory; and no county shall be divided in the for- 
mation of a Senate District, unless such county shall be equitably 
entitled to two or more Senators. 

Sec. 5. Regulations in relation to apportionment of representa- 
tives. The House of Representatives shall be composed of one hun- 
dred and twenty Representatives, biennally chosen by ballot, to 
be elected by the counties respectively, according to their popula- 
tion, and each county shall have at least one Representative in the 
House of Representatives, although it may not contain the requi- 
site ratio of representation ; this apportionment shall be made by 
the General Assembly at the respective times and periods when 
the districts of the Senate are hereinbefore directed to be laid off". 

Sec. 6. Ratio of representation. In making the apportionment 
in the House of Representatives, the ratio of representation shall 
be ascertained by dividing the amount of the population of the 
State, exclusive of that comprehended within those counties which 
do not severally contain the one hundred and twentieth part of the 
population of the State, by the number of Representatives, less 



Constitution 43 

the number assigned to such counties; and in ascertaining the 
number of the population of the State, aliens and Indians not 
taxed shall not be included. To each county containing the said 
ratio and not twice the said ratio there shall be assigned one 
Representative; to each county containing twice but not three 
times the said ratio there shall be assigned two Representatives, 
and so on progressively, and then the remaining Representatives 
shall be assigned severally to the counties having the largest 
fractions. 

Sec. 7. Qualificatio7is for senators. Each member of the Senate 
shall not be less than twenty-five years of age, shall have resided 
in the State as a citizen two years, and shall have usually resided 
in the district for which he was chosen one year immediately 
preceding his election. 

Sec. 8. Qualifications for representatives. Each member of the 
House of Representatives shall be a qualified elector of the State, 
and shall have resided in the county for which he is chosen for 
one year immediately preceding his election. 

Sec. 9. Election of officers. In the election of all officers whose 
appointment shall be conferred upon the General Assembly by the 
Constitution, the vote shall be viva voce. 

Sec. 10. Powers in relation to divorce and alimony. The Gen- 
eral Assembly shall have power to pass general laws regulating 
divorce and alimony, but shall not have power to grant a divorce 
or secure alimony in any individual case. 

Sec. 11. Private laws hi relation to names of persons, etc. The 
General Assembly shall not have power to pass any private law 
to alter the name of any person, or to legitimate any person not 
born in lawful wedlock, or to restore to the rights of citizenship 
any person convicted of an infamous crime, but shall have power 
to pass general laws regulating the same. 

Sec. 12. Thirty days notice shall be given anterior to passage 
of private laws. The General Assembly shall not pass any private 
law, unless it shall be made to appear that thirty days notice of 
application to pass such a law shall have been given, under such 
direction and in such manner as shall be provided by law. 

Sec. 13. Vacancies. If a vacancy shall occur in the General 
Assembly by death, resignation or otherwise, the said vacancy 
shall be filled immediately by the Governor appointing the person 
recommended by the Executive Committee of the county in which 



44 North Carolina Manual 

the deceased or resigned member was resident, being the Execu- 
tive Committee of the political party with which the deceased or 
resigned member was affiliated at the time of his election. 

Sec. 14. Revenue. No law shall be passed to raised money on the 
credit of the State, or to pledge the faith of the State, directly or 
indirectly, for the payment of any debt, or to impose any tax 
upon the people of the state, or allow the counties, cities, or towns 
to do so, unless the bill for the purpose shall have been read three 
several times in each House of the General Assembly and passed 
three several readings, which readings shall have been on three 
different days, and agreed to by each House respectively, and 
unless the yeas and nays on the second and third readings of the 
bill shall have been entered on the journal. 

Sec. 15. Entails. The General Assembly shall regulate entails 
in such a manner as to prevent perpetuities. 

Sec. 16. Journals. Each House shall keep a journal of its pro- 
ceedings, which shall be printed and made public immediately 
after the adjournment of the General Assembly. 

Sec. 17. Protest. Any member of either House may dissent 
from, and protest against, any act or resolve which he may think 
injurious to the public, or any individual, and have the reasons 
of his dissent entered on the journal. 

Sec. 18. Officers of the House. The House of Representatives 
shall choose their own Speaker and other officers. 

Sec. 19. President of the Senate. The Lieutenant-Governor shall 
preside in the Senate, but shall have no vote unless it may be 
equally divided. 

Sec. 20. Other senatorial officers. The Senate shall choose its 
other officers and also a Speaker (pro tempore) in the absence of 
the Lieutenant-Governor, or when he shall exercise the office of 
governor. 

Sec. 21. Style of the acts. The style of the acts shall be: "The 
General Assembly of North Carolina do enact." 

Sec. 22. Powers of the General Assembly. Each House shall be 
judge of the qualifications and election of its own members, shall 
sit upon its own adjournment from day to day, prepare bills to 
be passed into laws; and the two Houses may also jointly adjourn 
to any future day, or other place. 

Sec. 23. Bills and resolutions to be read three times, etc. All 
bills and resolutions of a legislative nature shall be i-ead three 



Constitution 45 

times in each House before they pass into laws, and shall be 
signed by the presiding officers of both Houses. 

Sec. 24. Oath of members. Each member of the General Assem- 
bly, before taking his seat, shall take an oath or affirmation that 
he will support the Constitution and laws of the United States, 
and the Constitution of the State of North Carolina, and will 
faithfully discharge his duty as a member of the Senate or House 
of Representatives. 

Sec. 25. Terms of office. The terms of office for Senators and 
members of the House of Representatives shall commence at the 
time of their election. 

Sec. 26. Yeas and nays. Upon motion made and seconded in 
either House by one-fifth of the members present, the yeas and 
nays upon any question shall be taken and entered upon the 
journals. 

Sec. 27. Election for members of the General Assembly. The 
election for members of the General Assembly shall be held for the 
respective districts and counties, at the places where they are now 
held, or may be directed hereafter to be held, in such manner as 
may be prescribed by law, on the first Thursday in August, in the 
year one thousand eight hundred and seventy, and every two years 
thereafter. But the General Assembly may change the time of 
holding the elections. (Changed to Tuesday after first Monday in 
November, c. 275—1876.) 

Sec. 28. Pay of Members and Presiding Officers of the General 
Assembly. The members of the General Assembly for the term 
for which they have been elected shall receive as a compensation 
for their services the sum of fifteen dollars ($15.00) per day for 
each day of their session, for a period not exceeding ninety days; 
and should they remain longer in session they shall serve with- 
out compensation. The compensation of the presiding officers of 
the two houses shall be twenty dollars ($20.00) per day for a 
period not exceeding ninety days. Should an extra session of the 
General Assembly be called, the members and presiding officers 
shall receive a like rate of compensation for a period not exceed- 
ing twenty-five days. 

Sec. 29. Limitations upon power of General Assembly to enact 
private or special legislation. The General Assembly shall not 
pass any local, private, or special act or resolution relating to the 
establishment of courts inferior to the Superior Court; relating 



46 North Carolina Manual 

to the appointment of justices of the peace; relating to health, 
sanitation, and the abatement of nuisances; changing the names 
of cities, towns, and townships; authorizing the laying out, open- 
ing, altering, maintaining, or discontinuing of highways, streets, 
or alleys; relating to ferries or bridges; relating to non-navigable 
streams; relating to cemeteries; relating to the pay of jurors; 
erecting new townships, or changing township lines, or establish- 
ing or changing the lines of school districts; remitting fines, 
penalties, and forfeitures, or refunding moneys legally paid into 
the public treasury; regulating labor, trade, mining, or manufac- 
turing; extending the time for the assessment or collection of 
taxes or otherwise relieving any collector of taxes from the due 
performance of his official duties or his sureties fi"om liability; 
giving effect to informal wills and deeds; nor shall the General 
Assembly enact any such local, private, or special act by the 
partial repeal of a general law, but the General Assembly may at 
any time repeal local, private, or special laws enacted by it. Any 
local, private or special act or resolution passed in violation of 
the provisions of this section shall be void. The General Assembly 
shall have power to pass general laws regulating matters set out 
in this section. 

Sec. 30. The General Assembly shall not use nor authorize to 
be used any part of the amount of any sinking fund for any 
purpose other than the retirement of the bonds for which said 
sinking fund has been created. 

Sec. 31. The General Assembly shall not use, or authorize to 
be used, nor shall any agency of the State, public officer or public 
employee use or authorize to be used the funds, or any part of the 
funds, of the Teachers' and State Employees' Retirement System 
except for retirement system purposes. The funds of the Teachers' 
and State Employees' Retirement System shall not be applied, 
diverted, loaned to or used by the State, any State agency, State 
officer, public officer or employee except for purposes of the Re- 
tirement System: Provided, that nothing in this Section shall pro- 
hibit the use of said funds for the payment of benefits, administra- 
tive expenses and refunds as authorized by the Teachers' and 
State Employees' Retirement Law, nor shall anything in this pro- 
vision prohibit the proper investment of said funds as may be 
authorized by law. 



Constitution 47 

ARTICLE III 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. Officers of the Executive Department; Terms of Of- 
fice. The Executive Department shall consist of a Governor, in 
whom shall be vested the supreme executive power of the State; a 
Lieutenant Governor, a Secretary of State, an Auditor, a Treas- 
urer, a Superintendent of Public Instruction, an Attorney Gen- 
eral, a Commissioner of Agriculture, a Commissioner of Labor 
and a Commissioner of Insurance, who shall be elected for a term 
of four years by the qualified electors of the State, at the same 
time and places and in the same manner as members of the Gen- 
eral Assembly are elected. Their term of office shall commence 
on the first day of January next after their election, and continue 
until their successors are elected and qualified: Provided, that 
the officers first elected shall assume the duties of their office ten 
days after the approval of this Constitution by the Congress of 
the United States, and shall hold their offices four years from 
and after the first day of January. 

Sec. 2. Qualifications of Governor and Lieut eyiant-Govemor. No 
person shall be eligible as Governor or Lieutenant-Governor unless 
he shall have attained the age of thirty years, shall have been a 
citizen of the United States five years, and shall have been a resi- 
dent of this State for two years next before the election ; nor shall 
the person elected to either of these two offices be eligible to the 
same office more than four years in any term of eight years, unless 
the office shall have been cast upon him as Lieutenant-Governor 
or President of the Senate. 

Sec. 3. Returns of elections. The return of every election for of- 
ficers of the Executive Department shall be sealed up and trans- 
mitted to the seat of government by the returning officer, directed 
to the Secretary of State. The return shall be canvassed and the 
result declared in such manner as may be prescribed by law. Con- 
tested elections shall be determined by a joint ballot of both 
Houses of the General Assembly in such manner as shall be pre- 
scribed by law. 

Sec. 4. Oath of office for Governor. The Governor, before enter- 
ing upon the duties of his office, shall, in the presence of the mem- 
bers of both branches of the General Assembly, or before any Jus- 



48 North Carolina Manual 

tice of the Supreme Court, take an oath or affirmation that he will 
support the Constitution and laws of the United States, and of the 
State of North Carolina, and that he will faithfully perform the 
duties appertaining to the office of Governor, to which he has 
been elected. 

Sec. 5. Duties of Governor. The Governor shall reside at the 
seat of government of this State, and he shall, from time to time, 
give the General Assembly information of the affairs of the State, 
and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall 
deem expedient. 

Sec. 6. Reprieves, commutations, and pa}-do7is. The Governor 
shall have power to grant reprieves, commutations, and pardons, 
after conviction, for all offenses (except in cases of impeachment), 
upon such conditions as he may think proper, subject to such 
regulations as may bo provided by law relative to the manner of 
applying for pardons. lie shall biennially communicate to the 
General Assembly ea?h case of reprieve, commutation, or pardon 
granted, stating the name of each convict, the crime for which 
he was convicted, the sentence and its date, the date of commuta- 
tion, pardon, or reprieve, and the reasons therefor. The terms re- 
prieves, commutations and pardons shall not include paroles. 
The General Assembly is authorized and empowered to create a 
Board of Paroles, provide for the appointment of the members 
thereof, and enact suitable laws defining the duties and authority 
of such Board to grant, revoke and terminate paroles. The Gov- 
ernor's power of paroles shall continue until July 1, 1955, at 
which time said power shall cease and shall be vested in such 
Board of Paroles as may be created by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 7. Annual reports from officers of Executive Department 
and of public institutions. The officers of the Executive Depart- 
ment and of the public institutions of the State shall, as least live 
days previous to each regular session of the General Assembly, 
severally report to the Governor, who shall transmit such reports, 
with his message, to the General Assembly; and the Governor 
may, at any time, require information in writing from the officers 
in the Executive Department upon any subject relating to the 
duties of their respective offices, and shall take care that the laws 
be faithfully executed. 

Sec. 8. Commander-in-Chief. The Governor shall be Commander- 



Constitution 49 

in-Chief of the militia of the State, except when they shall be 
called into the service of the United States. 

Sec. 9. Extra sessions of General Assembly. The Governor shall 
have power, on extraordinary occasions, by and with the advice of 
the Council of State, to convene the General Assembly in extra 
session by his proclamation, stating therein the purpose or pur- 
poses for which they are thus convened. 

Sec. 10. Officers whose appointments are not otherwise provided 
for. The Governor shall nominate and, by and with the advice and 
consent of a majority of the Senators-elect, appoint all officers 
whose offices are established by this Constitution and whose ap- 
pointments are not otherwise provided for. 

Sec. 11. Duties of the Lieutenant Governor. The Lieutenant 
Governor shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no vote 
unless the Senate be equally divided. He shall receive such com- 
pensation as shall be fixed by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 12. In case of impeachment of Governor, or vacancy caused 
by death or resignation. In case of the impeachment of the Gov- 
ernor, his failure to qualify, his absence from the State, his in- 
ability to discharge the duties of his office, or, in case the office of 
Governor shall in any wise become vacant, the powers, duties and 
emoluments of the office shall devolve upon the Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor until the disability shall cease or a new Governor shall be 
elected and qualified. In every case in which the Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor shall be unable to preside over the Senate, the Senators 
shall elect one of their own number President of their body; and 
the powers, duties, and emoluments of the office of Governor shall 
devolve upon him whenever the Lieutenant-Governor shall, for 
any reason, be prevented from discharing the duties of such 
office as above provided, and he shall continue as acting Governor 
until the disabilities are removed, or a new Governor or Lieuten- 
ant-Governor shall be elected and qualified. Whenever, during the 
recess of the General Assembly, it shall become necessary for the 
President of the Senate to administer the government, the Secre- 
tary of State shall convene the Senate, that they may elect such 
President. 

Sec. 13. Diities of other executive officers. The respective duties 
of the Secretary of State, Auditor, Treasurer, Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, Attorney General, Commissioner of Agricul- 
ture, Commissioner of Labor, and Commissioner of Insurance shall 



50 North Carolina Manual 

be prescribed by law. If the office of any of said officer shall be 
vacated by death, resignation, or otherwise, it shall be the duty 
of the Governor to appoint another until the disability be removed 
or his successor be elected and qualified. Every such vacancy 
shall be filled by election at the first general election that occurs 
more than thirty days after the vacancy has taken place, and the 
person chosen shall hold the office for the remainder of the unex- 
pired term fixed in the first section of this article. Provided, that 
when the unexpired term of any of the offices named in this Section 
in which such vacancy has occurred expires on the first day of 
January succeeding the next General Election, the Governor shall 
appoint to fill said vacancy for the unexpired term of said office. 

Sec. 14. Council of State. The Secretary of State, Auditor, 
Treasurer, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Commissioner of 
Agriculture, Commissioner of Labor, and Commissioner of Insur- 
ance shall constitute, ex-officio, the Council of State, who shall ad- 
vise the Governor in the execution of his office, and three of whom 
shall constitute a quorum ; their advice and proceedings in this 
capacity shall be entered in a journal, to be kept for this purpose, 
exclusively, and signed by the members present, from any part of 
which any member may enter his dissent; and such journal shall 
be placed before the General Assembly when called for by either 
house. The Attorney General shall be, ex-officio, the legal adviser 
of the executive department. 

Sec. 15. Compensation of executive officers. The officers men- 
tioned in this article shall, at stated periods, receive for their 
services a compensation to be established by law, which shall 
neither be increased nor diminished during the time for which 
they shall have been elected, and the said officers shall receive no 
other emolument or allowance whatever. 

Sec. 16. Seal of State. There shall be a seal of the State, which 
shall be kept by the Governor, and used by him, as occasion may 
require, and shall be called "The Great Seal of the State of North 
Carolina." All grants and commissions shall be issued in the name 
and by the authority of the State of North Carolina, sealed with 
"The Great Seal of the State," signed by the Governor, and coun- 
tersigned by the Secretary of State. 

Sec. 17. Department of Agriculture, Immigration, and Statis- 
tics. The General Assembly shall establish a Department of Agri- 
culture, Immigration, and Statistics, under such regulations as 



Constitution 51 

may best promote the agricultural interest of the State, and shall 
enact laws for the adequate protection and encouragement of 
sheep husbandry. 

Sec. 18. Department of Justice. The General Assembly is au- 
thorized and empowered to create a Department of Justice under 
the supervisicn and direction of the Attorney-General, and to 
enact suitable laws defining the authority of the Attorney-General 
and other officers and agencies concerning the prosecution of 
crime and the administration of the criminal laws of the State. 



ARTICLE IV 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT 

Section 1. Abolishes the distinctions between actions at law and 
suits in equity, and feigned issues. The distinctions between ac- 
tions at law and suits in equity, and the forms of all such actions 
and suits, shall be abolished; and there shall be in this State but 
one form of action for the enforcement or protection of private 
rights or the redress of private wrongs, which shall be denomi- 
nated a civil action; and every action prosecuted by the people 
of the State as a party, against a person charged with a public 
offense, for the punishment of the same, shall be termed a crim- 
inal action. Feigned issues shall also be abolished, and the facts 
at issue tried by order of court before a jury. 

Sec. 2. Division of judicial powers. The judicial power of the 
State shall be vested in a Court for the Trial of Impeachments, 
a Supreme Court, Superior Courts, Courts of Justices of the Peace, 
and such other courts inferior to the Supreme Court as may be 
established by law. 

Sec. 3. Trial court of impeachment. The Court for the Trial of 
Impeachments shall be the Senate. A majority of the members 
shall be necessary to a quorum, and the judgment shall not ex- 
tend beyond removal from and disqualification to hold office in this 
State; but the party shall be liable to indictment and punish- 
ment according to law. 

Sec. 4. Impeachment. The House of Representatives solely shall 
have the power of impeaching. No persrn shall be conviete 1 with- 
out the concurrence of two-thirds of the Senators present. When 
the Governor is impeached, the Chief Justice shall preside. 



52 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 5. Treason, against the State. Treason against the State 
shall consist only in levying- war against it, or adhering to its 
enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be con- 
victed of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the 
same overt act, or on confession in open court. No conviction of 
treason or attainder shall work corruption of blood or forfeiture. 

Sec. 6. Supreme Court. The Supreme Court shall consist of a 
Chief Justice and four Associate Justices. The General Assembly 
may increase the number of Associate Justices to not more than 
six, when the work of the Court so requires. The Court shall have 
power to sit in divisions, when in its judgment this is necessary 
for the proper dispatch of business, and to make rules for the dis- 
tribution of business between the divisions and for the hearing 
of cases by the full Court. No decision of any division shall be- 
come the judgment of the Court unless concurred in by a majority 
of all the justices; and no case involving a construction of the 
Constitution of the State or of the United States shall be decided 
except by the Court in banc. All sessions of the Court shall be 
held in the city of Raleigh. This amendment made to the Consti- 
tution of North Carolina shall not have the effect to vacate any 
office or term of office now existing under the Constitution of the 
State, and filled or held by virtue of any election or appointment 
under the said Constitution, and the laws of the State made in 
pursuance thereof. The General Assembly is vested with authority 
to provide for the retirement of members of the Supreme Court 
and for the recall of such retired members to serve on said Court 
in lieu of any active member thereof who is, for any cause, tem- 
porarily incapacitated. (By c. 16, 1937, amending s. 1403 of the 
Consolidated Statutes, the number of Associate Justices was in- 
creased to six.) 

Sec. 7. Terms of the Supreme Court. The terms of the Supreme 
Court shall be held in the city of Raleigh, as now, until otherwise 
provided by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 8. Ju)isdietion of Supreme Court. The Supreme Court shall 
have jurisdiction to review, upon appeal, any decision of the 
couHs below, upon any matter of law or legal inference. And the 
jurisdiction of said court over "issues of fact" and "questions of 
fact" shall be the same exercised by it before the adoption of the 
Constitution of one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, and 
the court shall have the power to issue any remedial writs neces- 



Constitution 53 

sary to give it a general supervision and control over the proceed- 
ings of the inferior courts. 

Sec. 9. Claims against the State. The Supreme Court shall have 
original jurisdiction to hear claims against the State, but its de- 
cisions shall be merely recommendatory; no process in the nature 
of execution shall issue thereon ; they shall be reported to the 
next session of the General Assembly for its action. 

Sec. 10. Judicial Dist}icts for Superior Courts. The General 
Assembly shall divide the State into a number of judicial districts 
which number may be increased or reduced and shall provide for 
the election of one or more Superior Court judges for each dis- 
trict. There shall be a Superior Court in each county at least 
twice in each year to continue for such time in each county as 
may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 11. Judicial Districts; Rotation; Special Superior Court 
Judges; Assignment of Superior Court Judges by Chief Justice, 
Each Judge of the Superior Court shall reside in the district for 
which he is elected. The General Assembly may divide the State 
into a number of judicial divisions. The judges shall preside in 
the courts of the different districts within a division successively; 
but no judge shall hold all the courts in the same district oftener 
than once in four years. The General Assembly may provide by 
general laws for the selection or appointment of Special or emer- 
gency Superior Court Judges not assigned to any judicial dis- 
trict, who may be designated from time to time by the Chief Jus- 
tice to hold court in any district or districts within the State; 
and the General Assembly shall define their jurisdiction and shall 
provide for their reasonable compensation. The Chief Justice, 
when in his opinion the public interest so requires, may assign any 
Superior Court Judge to hold one or more terms of Superior Court 
in any district. 

Sec. 12. Jurisdiction of courts inferior to Supreme Court. The 
General Assembly shall have no power to deprive the Judicial De- 
partment of any power or jurisdiction which rightfully pertains 
to it as a coordinate department of the government; but the Gen- 
eral Assembly shall allot and distribute that portion of this power 
and jurisdiction which does not pertain to the Supreme Court 
among the other courts prescribed in this Constitution or which 
may be established by law, in such manner as it may deem best; 
provide also a proper system of appeals; and regulate by law, 



54 North Carolina Manual 

when necessary, the methods of proceeding in the exercise of their 
powers of all the courts below the Supreme Court, so far as the 
same may be done without conflict with other provisions of this 
Constitution. 

Sec. 13. In case of waiver of t)'ial by jury. In all issues of fact, 
joined in any court, the parties may waive the right to have the 
same determined by a jury; in which case the finding of the judge 
upon the facts shall have the force and effect of a verdict by a 
jury. 

Sec. 14. Special courts in cities. The General Assembly shall 
provide for the establishment of special courts, for the trial of mis- 
demeanors, in cities and towns, where the same may be necessary. 

Sec. 15. Clerk of the Supreme Court. The clerk of the Supreme 
Court shall be appointed by the Court, and shall hold his office 
for eight years. 

Sec. 16. Election of Superior Court clerk. A clerk of the Su- 
perior Court for each county shall be elected by the qualified 
voters thereof, at the time and in the manner prescribed by law 
for the election of members of the General Assembly. 

Sec. 17. Term of office. Clerks of the Superior Courts shall hold 
their offices for four years. 

Sec. 18. Fees, salaries, and emoluments. The General Assembly 
shall prescribe and regulate the fees, salaries, and emoluments of 
all officers provided for in this article; but the salaries of the 
jud'-^es shall not be diminished during their continuance in office. 

Sec. 19. What laws are, and shall be, in force. The laws of 
North Carolina, not repugnant to this Constitution or the Consti- 
tution and laws of the United States, shall be in force until law- 
fully altered. 

Sec. 20. Disposition of actions at law and suits in equity, pend- 
ing tvhen this Constitution shall go into effect, etc. Actions at law 
and suits in equity pending when this Constitution shall go into 
effect shall be transferred to the courts having jurisdiction thereof, 
without prejudice by reason of the change; and all such actions 
and suits commenced before, and pending at the adoption by the 
General Assembly of the rules of practice and procedure herein 
provided for, shall be heard and determined according to the prac- 
tice now in use, unless otherwise provided for by said rules. 

Sec. 21. Elections, teryns of office, etc. of Justices of the Su- 
preme and Judges of the Superior Courts. The Justices of the Su- 



Constitution 55 

preme court shall be elected by the qualified voters of the State, 
as is provided for the election of members of the General Assem- 
bly. They shall hold their offices for eight years. The judges of the 
Superior Courts, elected at the first election under this amend- 
ment, shall be elected in like manner as is provided for Justices of 
the Supreme Court, and shall hold their offices for eight years. 
The General Assembly may, from time to time, provide by law 
that the judges of the Superior Courts, chosen at succeeding elec- 
tions, instead of being elected by the voters of the whole State, 
as is herein provided for, shall be elected by the voters of their 
respective districts. 

Sec. 22. T)-ansactions of business in the Superior Court. The 
Superior Courts shall be, at all times, open for the transaction 
of all business within their jurisdiction, except the trial of issues 
of fact requiring a jury. 

Sec. 23. Solicitors and Solicitorial Districts. The State shall be 
divided into twenty-one solicitorial districts, for each of which a 
solicitor shall be chosen by the qualified voters thereof, as is pre- 
scribt-d for members of the General Assembly, who shall hold 
office for the term of four years, and prosecute on behalf of the 
Stctce in all criminal actions in the Superior Courts, and advise the 
officers of justice in his district. But the General Assembly may 
reduce or increase the number of the solicitorial districts, which 
need not correspond to, or be the same as, the judicial districts 
of the state. 

Sec. 24. Sheriffs and Coroners. In each county a sheriff and 
coroner shall be elected by the qualified voters thereof as is pre- 
scribed for members of the General Assembly, and shall hold their 
offices for a period of four years. In each township there shall 
be a constable elected in like manner by the voters thereof, who 
shall hold his office for a period of two years. When there is no 
coroner in a county the Clerk of the Superior Court for the county 
may appoint one for special cases. In case of a vacancy existing 
for any cause in any of the offices created by this section, the 
commissioners of the county may appoint to such office for the 
unexpired term. 

Sec. 25. Vacancies. All vacancies occurring in the offices pro- 
vided for by this Article of the Constitution shall be filled by the 
appointment of the Governor, unless otherwise provided for, and 
the appointees shall hold their places until the next regular elec- 



56 North Carolina Manual 

tion for members of the General Assembly that is held more than 
30 days after such vacancy occurs, when elections shall be held 
to fill such offices. Provided, that when the unexpired term of any 
of the offices named in this Article of the Constitution in which 
such vacancy has occurred, and in which it is herein provided 
that the Governor shall fill the vacancy, expires on the first day 
of January succeeding the next General Election, the Governor 
shall appoint to fill said vacancy for the unexpired term of said 
office. If any person, elected or appointed to any of said offices, 
shall neglect and fail to qualify, such offices shall be appointed to, 
held and filled as provided in case of vacancies occurring therein. 
All incumbents of said offices shall hold until their successors are 
qualified. 

Sec. 26. Teryyis of office of first officers. The officers elected at 
the first election held under this Constitution shall hold their of- 
fices for the terms prescribed for them, respectively, next ensuing 
after the next regular election for members of the General Assem- 
bly. But their terms shall begin upon the approval of this Consti- 
tution by the Congress of the United States. 

Sec. 27. Jurisdiction of justices of the peace. The several jus- 
tices of the peace shall have jurisdiction, under such regulations as 
the General Assembly shall prescribe, of civil actions, founded on 
contract, wherein the sum demanded shall not exceed two hundred 
dollars, and wherein the title to real estate shall not be in contro- 
versy; and all of criminal matters arising within their counties 
where the punishment cannot exceed a fine of fifty dollars or im- 
prisonment for thirty days. And the General Assembly may give 
to the justices of the peace jurisdiction of other civil actions 
wherein the value of the property in controversy does not exceed 
fifty dollars. When an issue of fact shall be joined before a justice, 
on demand of either party thereto, he shall cause a jury of six 
men to be summoned, who shall try the same. The party against 
whom the judgment shall be rendered in any civil action may 
appeal to the Superior Court from the same. In all cases of a crim- 
inal nature the party against whom the judgment is given may 
appeal to the Superior Court, where the matter shall be heard 
anew. In all cases brought before a justice, he shall make a record 
of the proceedings, and file the same with the clerk of the Supe- 
rior Court for his county. 



Constitution 57 

Sec. 28. Vacancies in office of justices. When the office of justice 
of the peace shall become vacant otherwise than by expiration of 
the term, and in case of a failure by the voters of any district 
to elect, the clerk of the Superior Court for the county shall ap- 
point to fill the vacancy for the unexpired term. 

Sec. 29. Vacancies in office of Superior Court clerk. In case the 
office of clerk of a Superior Court for a county shall become vacant 
otherwise than by the expiration of the term, and in case of a 
failure by the people to elect, the judge of the Superior Court for 
the county shall appoint to fill the vacancy until an election can 
be regularly held. 

Sec. 30. Officers of other courts inferior to Supreme Court. In 
case the General Assembly shall establish other courts inferior to 
the Supreme Court, the presiding officers and clerks thereof shall 
be elected in such manner as the General Assembly may from time 
to time prescribe, and they shall hold their offices for a term not 
exceeding eight years. 

Sec. 31. Removal of judges of the various courts for inability. 
Any judge of the Supreme Court, or of the Superior Coui'ts, and 
the presiding officers of such courts inferior to the Supreme Court 
as may be established by law, may be removed from office for 
mental or physical inability, upon a concurrent resolution of two- 
thirds of both Houses of the General Assembly. The judge or pre- 
siding officer against whom the General Assembly may be about 
to proceed shall receive notice thereof, accompanied by a copy 
of the causes alleged for his removal, at least twenty days before 
the day on which either House of the General Assembly shall act 
thereon. 

Sec. 32. Removal of clerks of the various courts for inability. 
Any clerk of the Supreme Court, or of the Superior Courts, or of 
such courts inferior to the Supreme Court as may be established 
by law, may be removed from office for mental or physical in- 
ability; the clerk of the Supreme Court by the judges of said 
court, the clerk of the Superior Courts by the judge riding the 
district, and the clerks of such courts inferior to the Supreme 
Court as may be established by law by the presiding officers of 
said courts. The clerk against whom proceedings are instituted 
shall receive notice thereof, accompanied by a copy of the causes 
alleged for his removal, at least ten days before the day appointed 
to act thereon, and the clerk shall be entitled to an appeal to the 



58 North Carolina Manual 

next term of the Superior Court, and thence to the Supreme Court, 
as provided in other cases of appeals. 

Sec. 33. Ameyidments not to vacate existing offices. The amend- 
ments made to the Constitution of North Carolina by this Conven- 
tion shall not have the effect to vacate any office or term of office 
now existing under the Constitution of the State, and filled, or 
held by virtue of any election or appointment under the said Con- 
stitution and the laws of the State made in pursuance thereof. 



ARTICLE V 

REVENUE AND TAXATION 

Section 1. Capitation tax; exemptions. The General Assembly 
may levy a capitation tax on every male inhabitant of the State 
over twenty-one and under fifty years of age, which said tax shall 
not exceed two dollars, and cities and towns may levy a capitation 
tax which shall not exceed one dollar. No other capitation tax 
shall be levied. The commissioners of the several counties and of 
the cities and towns may exempt from the capitation tax any 
special cases on account of poverty or infirmity. 

Sec. 2. Application of proceeds of State and county capitation 
tax. The proceeds of the State and county capitation tax shall be 
applied to the purposes of education and the support of the poor 
but in no one year shall more than twenty-five per cent thereof 
be appropriated to the latter purpose. 

Sec. 3. State taxation. The power of taxation shall be exercised 
in a just and equitable manner, and shall never be surrendered, 
suspended, or contracted away. Taxes on property shall be uni- 
form as to each class of property taxed. Taxes shall be levied 
only for public purposes, and every act levying a tax shall state 
the object to which it is to be applied. The General Assembly may 
also tax trades, professions, franchises, and income: Provided, 
the rate of tax on income shall not in any case exceed ten per 
cent (10%), and there shall be allowed the following exemptions, 
to be deducted from the amount of annual incomes, to-wit: for 
married man with a wife living with him, or to a widow or 
widower having minor child or children, natural or adopted, not 
less than $2,000; to all other persons not less than $1,000, and 



Constitution 59 

there may be allowed other deductions (not including living ex- 
penses) so that only net incomes are taxed. 

Sec. 4. Limitations upon the increase of public debts. The Gen- 
eral Assembly shall have the power to contract debts and to pledge 
the faith and credit of the State and to authorize counties and 
municipalities to contract debts and pledge their faith and credit, 
for the following purposes: To fund or refund a valid existing 
debt; to borrow in anticipation of the collection of taxes due and 
payable within the fiscal year to an amount not exceeding fifty 
per centum of such taxes; to supply a casual deficit; to suppress 
riots or insurrections, or to repel invasions. For any purpose 
other than these enumerated, the General Assembly shall have 
no power, during any biennium, to contract new debts on behalf 
of the State to an amount in excess of two-thirds of the amount 
by which the State's outstanding indebtedness shall have been re- 
duced during the next preceding biennium, unless the subject be 
submitted to a vote of the people of the State; and for any purpose 
other than these enumerated the General Assembly shall have no 
power to authorize counties or municipalities to contract debts, 
and counties and municipalities shall not contract debts, during 
any fiscal year, to an amount exceeding two-thirds of the amount 
by which the outstanding indebtedness of the particular county 
or municipality shall have been reduced during the next preceding 
fiscal year, unless the subject be submitted to a vote of the people 
of the particular county or municipality. In any election held in 
the State or in any county or municipality under the provisions 
of this section, the proposed indebtedness must be approved by a 
majority of those who shall vote thereon. And the General Assem- 
bly shall have no power to give or lend the credit of the State in 
aid of any person, association, or corporation, except to aid in 
the completion of such railroads as may be unfinished at the time 
of the adoption of this Constitution, or in which the State has 
a direct pecuniary interest, unless the subject be submitted to a 
direct vote of the people of the State, and be approved by a ma- 
jority of those who shall vote thereon. 

Sec. 5. Propertij exempt from taxation. Property belonging to 
the State, or to municipal corporations, shall be exempt from tax- 
ation. The General Assembly may exempt cemeteries and property 
held for educational, scientific, literary, charitable, or religious 
purposes; also wearing apparel, arms for muster, household and 



60 North Carolina Manual 

kitchen furniture, the mechanical and agricultural implements of 
mechanics and farmers; libraries and scientific instruments, or 
any other personal property, to a value not exceeding three hun- 
dred dollars. The General Assembly may exempt from taxation 
not exceeding one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) in value of prop- 
erty held and used as the place of residence of the owner. 

Sec. 6. Taxes levied for counties. The total of the State and 
county tax on property shall not exceed tvi^enty cents (20c) on the 
one hundred dollars ($100) value of property, except when the 
county property tax is levied for a special purpose and with the 
special approval of the General Assembly, which may be done by 
special or general act: Provided, this limitation shall not apply 
to taxes levied for the maintenance of the public schools of the 
State for the term required by Article IX, Section 3, of the Con- 
stitution: Provided, further, the State Tax shall not exceed five 
cents (5c) on the one hundred dollars ($100) value of property. 

Sec. 7. Acts levying taxes shall state objects, etc. Every act of 
the General Assembly levying a tax shall state the special object 
to which it is to be applied, and it shall be applied to no other 
purpose. 



ARTICLE VI 

SUFFRAGE AND ELIGIBILITY TO OFFICE 

Section 1. Who may vote. Every person born in the United 
States, and every person who has been naturalized, twenty-one 
years of age, and possessing the qualifications set out in this 
article, shall be entitled to vote at any election by the people of 
the State, except as herein otherwise provided. (The 19th amend- 
ment to the United States Constitution, ratified August 6, 1920, 
provided that the "right of citizens of the United States to vote 
shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any 
state on account of sex." North Carolina accordingly by c. 18, 
Extra Session 1920, provided for the registration and voting 
women.) 

Sec. 2. Qualifications of voters. Any person who shall have re- 
sided in the State of North Carolina for one year, and in the pre- 
cinct, ward or other election district in which such person offers 
to vote for thirty days next preceding an election, and possessing 



Constitution 61 

the other qualifications set out in this Article, shall be entitled to 
vote at any election held in this State ; provided, that removal from 
one precinct, ward or other election district to another in this State 
shall not operate to deprive any person of the right to vote in the 
precinct, ward oi- other election district from which such person has 
removed until thirty days after such removal. No person who has 
been convicted, or who has confessed his guilt in open court upon 
indictment, of any crime the punishment of which now is, or may 
hereafter be, imprisonment in the State's Prison, shall be per- 
mitted to vote, unless the said person shall be first restored to 
citizenship in the manner prescribed by law. 

Sec. 3. Voters to be registered. Every person offering to vote 
shall be at the time a legally registered voter as herein prescribed 
and in the manner hereafter provided by law, and the General 
Assembly of North Carolina shall enact general registration laws 
to carry into effect the provisions of this article. 

Sec. 4. Qualification for registration. Every person presenting 
himself for registration shall be able to read and write any section 
of the Constitution in the English language. But no male person 
who was, on January 1, 1867, or at any time prior thereto, en- 
tiled to vote under the laws of any Stats in the United States 
wherein he then resided, and no lineal descendant of any such 
person, shall be denied the right to register and vote at any elec- 
tion in this State by reason of his failure to possess the educa- 
tional qualifications herein prescribed: Provided, he shall have 
registered in accordance with the terms of this section prior to 
December 1, 1908. The General Assembly shall provide for the 
registration of all persons entitled to vote without the educational 
qualifications herein prescribed, and shall, on or before November 
1, 1908, provide for the making of a permanent record of such 
veq-istraticn; and all persons so registered shall forever thereafter 
have the right to vote in all elections by the people in this State, 
unless disqualified under section 2 of this article. 

Sec. .5. lytd^vis^hle plan; legislative intent. That this amen 1- 
ment to the Constitution is presented and adopted as one indi- 
visible plan for the regulation of the suffrage, with the intent and 
purpose to so connect the different parts, and to make them so 
dependent upon each other, that the whole shall stand or fall 
together. 



62 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 6. Elections by people and General Assembly. All elections 
by the people shall be by ballot, and all elections by the General 
Assembly shall be viva voce. 

Sec. 7. Eligibility to office; official oath. Every voter in North 
Carolina, except as in this article disqualified, shall be eligible to 
office, but before entering upon the duties of the office he shall 
take and subscribe the following oath: 

"I, , do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will 

support and maintain the Constitution and laws of the United 
States, and the Constitution and laws of North Carolina not in- 
consistent therewith, and that I will faithfully discharge the duties 
of my office as - So help me, God." 

Sec. 8. Disqualification for office. The following classes of per- 
sons shall be disqualified for office: First, all persons who shall 
deny the being of Almighty God. Second, all persons who shall 
have been convicted or confessed their guilt on indictment pend- 
ing, and whether sentenced or not, or under judgment suspended, 
of any treason or felony, or of any other crime for which the 
punishment may be imprisonment in the penitentiary, since be- 
coming citizens of the United States, or of corruption or malprac- 
tice in ofl[ice, unless such person shall be restored to the rights of 
citizenship in a manner prescribed by law. 

Sec. 9. Wheyi this chapter operative. That this amendment to 
the Constitution shall go into effect on the first day of July, nine- 
teen hundred and two, if a majority of votes cast at the next gen- 
eral election shall be cast in favcr of this suffrage amendment. 



ARTICLE VII 

MUNICIPAL CORPORATIONS 

Section 1. County officers. In each county there shall be elected 
biennially by the qualified voters thereof, as provided for the elec- 
tion of members of the General Assembly, the following officers: 
A treasurer, register of deeds, surveyor, and five commissioners. 
(Under authority of the Public Laws of 1935, c. 362, s. 13, pro- 
vision was made for the quadrennial election of registers of deeds, 
certain counties being exempted.) 

Sec. 2. Duty of county commissioners. It shall be the duty of 
the commissioners to exercise a general supervision and control of 



Constitution 63 

the penal and charitable institutions, schools, roads, bridges, levy- 
ing of taxes, and finances of the county, as may be prescribed by 
law. The register of deeds shall be ex officio clerk of the board of 
commissioners. 

Sec. 3. Counties to be divided into districts. It shall be the duty 
of the commissioners first elected in each county to divide the 
same into convenient districts, to determine the boundaries and 
prescribe the name of the said districts, and to report the same 
to the General Assembly before the first day of January, 1869. 

Sec. 4. Townships have corporate powers. Upon the approval of 
the reports provided for in the foregoing section, by the General 
Assembly, the said districts shall have corporate powers for the 
necessary purposes of local government, and shall be known as 
townships. 

Sec. 5. Officers of townships. In each township there shall be 
biennially elected, by the qualified voters thereof, a clerk and two 
justices of the peace, who shall constitute a board of trustees, 
and shall, under the supervision of the county commissioners, have 
control of the taxes and finances, roads and bridges of the town- 
ships, as may be prescribed by law. The General Assembly may 
provide for the election of a larger number of justices of the peace 
in cities and towns, and in those townships in which cities and 
towns are situated. In every township there shall also be bien- 
nially elected a school committee, consisting of three persons, 
whose duties shall be prescribed by law. (Amended by c. 141, 
1877.) 

Sec. 6. Trustees shall assess property. The township board of 
ti-ustees shall assess the taxable property of their townships and 
make returns to the county commissioners for revision, as may be 
prescribed by law. The clerk shall be, ex officio, treasurer of the 
township. 

Sec. 7. No debt or loan except by a majority of voters. No 
county, city, town, or other municipal corporations shall contract 
any debt, pledge its faith or loan its credit, nor shall any tax 
be levied or collected by any officers of the same except for the 
necessary expenses thereof, unless approved by a majority of 
those who shall vote thereon in any election held for such purpose. 

Sec. 8. No money drawn except by law. No money shall be 
drawn from any county or township treasury except by authority 
of law. 



64 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 9. When officers enter on duty. The county officers first 
elected under the provisions of this article shall enter upon their 
duties ten days after the approval of this Constitution by the 
Congress of the United States. 

Sec. 10. Governor to appoint justices. The Governor shall ap- 
point a sufficient number of justices of the peace in each county, 
who shall hold their places until sections four, five, and six of this 
article shall have been carried into effect. 

Sec. 11. Charters tu remain in force until legally changed. All 
charters, ordinances, and provisions relating to municipal corpora- 
tions shall remain in force until legally changed, unless incon- 
sistent with the provisions of this Constitution. 

Sec. 12. Debts in aid of the rebellion not to be paid. No county, 
city, town, or other municipal corporation shall assume or pay, 
nor shall any tax be levied or collected for the payment of any 
debt, or the interest upon any debt, contracted directly or in- 
directly in aid of or support of the rebellion. 

Sec. 13. Powers of General Assembly over mtinicipal corpora- 
tions. The General Assembly shall have full power by statute to 
modify, change, or abrogate any and all of the provisions of this 
article, and substitute others in their place, except sections seven, 
nine and thirteen. (Recent amendment repealed old section 9 and 
renumbered section 10-14.) (Under the general authority of this 
section several statutory amendments have been made. See notes 
supra, ss. 1 and 5.) 

ARTICLE VIII 

CORPORATIONS OTHER THAN MUNICIPAL 

Section 1. Corporations under general laws. No coi*poration 
shall be created, nor shall its charter be extended, altered, or 
shall be created, nor shall its charter be extended, altered, or 
amended by special act, except corporations for charitable, educa- 
tional, penal, or reformatory purposes that are to be and remain 
under the patronage and control of the State; but the Genei'al 
Assembly shall provide by general laws for the chartering and 
organization of all corporations, and for amending, extending, and 
forfeiture of all charters, except those above permitted by special 
act. All such general laws and special acts may be altered from 



Constitution 65 

time to time or repealed; and the General Assembly may at any 
time by special act repeal the charter of any corporation. 

Sec. 2. Debts of corporatio7is, how secured. Dues from corpora- 
tions shall be secured by such individual liabilities of the corpora- 
tions, and other means, as may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 3. What corporations shall include. The tenn "Corpora- 
tion" as used in this article shall be construed to include all 
associations and joint-stock companies having any of the powers 
and privileges of corporations not possessed by individuals or 
partnerships. And all corporations shall have the right to sue, and 
shall be subject to be sued, in all courts in like cases as natural 
persons. 

Sec. 4. Legislature to provide for organizing cities, towns, etc. 
It shall be the duty of the Legislature to provide by general laws 
for the organization of cities, towns, and incorporated villages, 
and to restrict their power of taxation, assessment, borrowing 
money, contracting debts, and loaning their credit, so as to prevent 
abuses in assessment and in contracting debts by such municipal 
corporations. 

ARTICLE IX 

EDUCATION 

Section 1. Education shall be encouraged. Religion, morality, 
and knowledge being necessary to good government and the hap- 
piness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall for- 
ever be encouraged. 

Sec. 2. Geyieral Assembly shall provide for schools; separation 
of the races. The General Assembly, at its first session under this 
Constitution, shall provide by taxation and otherwise for a general 
and uniform system of public schools, wherein tuition shall be 
free of charge to all the children of the State between the ages 
of six and twenty-one years. And the children of the white race 
and the children of the colored race shall be taught in separate 
public schools; but there shall be no discrimination in favor of, 
or to the prejudice of, either race. 

Sec. 3. Comities to be divided into districts. Each county of the 
State shall be divided into a convenient number of districts, in 
which one or more public schools shall be maintained at least six 



66 North Carolina Manual 

months in every year; and if the commissioners of any county 
shall fail to comply with the aforesaid requirements of this sec- 
tion, they shall be liable to indictment. 

Sec. 4. What property devoted to educational purposes. The 
proceeds of all lands that have been or hereafter may be granted 
by the United States to this State, and not otherw^ise appropriated 
by this State or the United States; also all money, stocks, bonds, 
and other property now belonging to any State fund for purposes 
of education, also the net proceeds of all sales of the swamp lands 
belonging to the State, and all other grants, gifts, or devices that 
have been or hereafter may be made to the State, and not other- 
wise appropriated by the State or by the terms of the grant, gift, 
or devise, shall be paid into the State Treasury, and, together 
with so much of the ordinary revenue of the State as may be by 
law set apart for that pui^pose, shall be faithfuly appropriated 
for establishing and maintaining in this State a system of free 
public schools, and for no other uses or purposes whatsoever. 

Sec. 5. County school fund; proviso. All moneys, stocks, bonds, 
and other property belonging to a county school fund; also the 
net proceeds from the sale of estrays; also the clear proceeds of 
all penalties and forfeitures and of all fines collected in the several 
counties for any breach of the penal or military laws of the State; 
and all money which shall be paid by persons as an equivalent 
for exemption from military duty, shall belong to and remain in 
the several counties, and shall be faithfully appropriated for 
establishing and maintaining free public schools in the several 
counties of this State: Provided, that the amount collected in each 
county shall be annually reported to the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction. 

Sec. 6. Election of trustees, and p)-ovisions for maintenance of 
the University. The General Assembly shall have power to provide 
for the election of trustees of the University of North Carolina, 
in whom, when chosen, shall be vested all the privileges, rights, 
franchises, and endowments thereof in any wise granted to or 
conferred upon the trustees of said University; and the General 
Assembly may make such provisions, laws, and regulations from 
time to time as may be necessary and expedient for the mainte- 
nance and management of said University. 

Sec. 7. Benefits of the University. The General Assembly shall 
provide that the benefits of the University, as far as practicable, 



Constitution 67 

be extended to the youth of the State free of expense for tuition ; 
also, that all the property which has heretofore accrued to the 
State, or shall hereafter accrue, from escheats, unclaimed divi- 
dends, or distributive shares of the estates of deceased persons, 
shall be appropriated to the use of the University. 

Sec. 8. State Board of Education. The general supervision and 
administration of the free public school system, and of the educa- 
tional funds provided for the support thereof, except those men- 
tioned in Section five of this Article, shall, from and after the 
first day of April, one thousand nine hundred and forty-five, be 
vested in the State Board of Education to consist of the Lieuten- 
ant Governor, State Treasurer, the Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, and ten members to be appointed by the Governor, sub- 
ject to confirmation by the General Assembly in joint session. The 
General Assembly shall divide the State into eight educational 
districts, which may be altered from time to time by the General 
Assembly. Of the appointive members of the State Board of Edu- 
cation one shall be appointed from each of the eight educational 
districts, and two shall be appointed as members at large. The 
first appointments under this section shall be: Two Members ap- 
pointed from educational districts for terms of two years; two 
members appointed from educational districts for teims of four 
years; two members appointed from educational districts for terms 
of six years; and two members appointed from educational dis- 
tricts for terms of eight years. One member at large shall be 
appointed for a period of four years and one member at large 
shall be appointed for a period of eight years. All subsequent 
appointments shall be for terms of eight years. Any appointments 
to fill vacancies shall be made by the Governor for the unexpired 
term, which appointments shall not be subject to confirmation. 
The State Superintendent of Public Instruction shall be the admin- 
istrative head of the public school system and shall be secretary 
of the board. The board shall elect a chairman and vice chair- 
man. A majority of the board shall constitute a quorum for the 
transaction of business. The per diem and expenses of the 
appointive members shall be provided by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 9. Powers and Duties of the Board. The State Board of 
Education shall succeed to all the powers and trusts of the Presi- 
dent and Directors of the Literary Fund of North Carolina and 
the State Board of Education as heretofore constituted. The State 



68 North Carolina Manual 

Board of Education shall have power to divide the State into a 
convenient number of school districts; to regulate the grade, salary 
and qualifications of teachers; to provide for the selection and 
adoption of the textbooks to be used in the public schools; to 
apportion and equalize the public school funds over the State; and 
generally to supervise and administer the free public school system 
of the State and make all needful rules and regulations in rela- 
tion thereto. All the powers enumerated in this section shall be 
exercised in conformity with this constitution and subject to such 
laws as may be enacted from time to time by the General 
Assembly. 

Sec. 10. Agricultural departments. As soon as practicable after 
the adoption of this Constitution the General Assembly shall estab- 
lish and maintain, in connection with the University, a depart- 
ment of agriculture, of mechanics, of mining, and of normal in- 
struction. 

Sec. 11. Children must attend school. The General Assembly is 
hereby empowered to enact that every child of sufficient mental 
and physical ability shall attend the public schools during the 
period between the ages of six and eighteen years, for a term of 
not less than sixteen months, unless educated by other means. 

ARTICLE X 

HOMESTEAD AND EXEMPTIONS 

Section 1. Exemptions of personal property. The personal prop- 
erty of any resident of this State, to the value of five hundred 
dollars, to be selected by such resident, shall be and is hereby ex- 
empted from sale under execution or other final process of any 
court issued for the collection of any debt. 

Sec. 2. Homestead. Every homestead, and the dwellings and 
buildings used therewith, not exceeding in value one thousand dol- 
lars, to be selected by the owner thereof, or in lieu thereof, at the 
option of the owner, any lot in a city, town, or village with the 
dwellings and buildings used thereon, owned and occupied by any 
resident of this State, and not exceeding the value of one thousand 
dollars, shall be exempt from sale under execution or other final 
process obtained on any debt. But no property shall be exempt 
from sale for taxes or for payment of obligations contracted for 
the purchase of said premises. 



Constitution 69 

Sec. 3. HoTnestead exetnption from debt. The homestead, after 
the death of the owner thereof, shall be exempt from the payment 
of any debt during the minority of his children, or any of them. 

Sec. 4. Laborer's lien. The provisions of sections one and two 
of this article shall not be so construed as to prevent a laborer's 
lien for work done and performed for the person claiming such 
exemption, or a mechanic's lien for work done on the premises. 

Sec. 5. Benefit of widow. If the owner of a homestead die, leav- 
ing a widow but no children, the same shall be exempt from the 
debts of her husband, and the rents and profits thereof shall inure 
to her benefit during her widowhood, unless she be the owner of a 
homestead in her own right. 

Sec. 6. Property of married women secured to them. The real 
and personal property of any female in this State, acquired before 
marriage, and all property, real and personal, to which she may, 
after marriage, become in any manner entitled, shall be and 
remain the sole and separate estate and property of such female, 
and shall not be liable for any debts, obligations, or engagements 
of her husband, and may be devised, and bequeathed, and, with 
the written assent of her husband, conveyed by her as if she were 
unmarried. 

Sec. 7. Husband may insure his life for the benefit of wife and 
children. The husband may insure his own life for the sole use 
and benefit of his wife and children, and in case of the death of 
the husband the amount thus insured shall be paid over to the 
wife and children, or to the guardian, if under age, for her or 
their own use, free from all the claims of the representatives of 
her husband, or any of his creditors. And the policy shall not be 
subject to claims of creditors of the insured during the life of the 
insured, if the insurance issued is for the sole use and benefit of 
the wife and/or children. 

Sec. 8. How deed for homestead may be made. Nothing con- 
tained in the foregoing section of this Article shall operate to 
prevent the owner of a homestead from disposing of the same by 
deed; but no deed made by the owner of a homestead shall be 
valid without the signature and acknowledgment of his wife. 



70 North Carolina Manual 

ARTICLE XI 

PUNISHMENT, PENAL INSTITUTIONS, AND PUBLIC CHARITIES 

Section 1. Punishment; convict labor; proviso. The following- 
punishments only shall be known to the laws of this State, viz.: 
death, imprisonment with or without hard labor, fines, removal 
from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of 
honor, trust, or profit under this State. The foregoing provisions 
for imprisonment with hard labor shall be construed to authorize 
the employment of such convict labor on public works or highways, 
or other labor for public benefit, and the farming out thereof, 
where and in such manner as may be provided by law; but no 
convict shall be farmed out who has been sentenced on a charge 
of murder, manslaughter, rape, attempt to commit rape, or arson; 
Provided, that no convict whose labor may be farmed out shall 
be punished for any failure of duty as a laborer, except by a 
responsible officer of the State; but the convicts so farmed out 
shall be at all times under the supervision and control, as to their 
government and discipline, of the penitentiary board or some 
officer of this State. 

Sec. 2. Death punishment. The object of punishments being not 
only to satisfy justice, but also to reform the offender, and thus 
prevent crime, murder, arson, burglary, and rape, and these only, 
may be punishable with death, if the General Assembly shall so 
enact. 

Sec. 3. Penitentiary. The General Assembly shall, at its first 
meeting, make provision for the erection and conduct of a State's 
Prison or penitentiary at some central and accessible point within 
the State. 

Sec. 4. Houses of correction. The General Assembly may pro- 
vide for the erection of houses of correction, where vagrants and 
persons guilty of misdemeanors shall be restrained and usefully 
employed. 

Sec. 5. Houses of refuge. A house or houses of refuge may be 
established whenever the public interest may require it, for the 
correction and instruction of other classes of offenders. 

Sec. 6. The sexes to be separated. It shall be required, by com- 
petent legislation, that the structure and superintendence of penal 
institutions of the State, the county jails, and city police prisons 



Constitution 71 

secure the health and comfort of the prisoners, and that male and 
female prisoners be never confined in the same room or cell. 

Sec. 7. Provision for the poor and orphans. Beneficient provi- 
sions for the poor, the unfortunate, and orphan being one of the 
first duties of a civilized and Christian State, the General Assem- 
bly shall, at its first session, appoint and define the duties of a 
Board of Public Charities, to whom shall be entrusted the super- 
vision of all charitable and penal State institutions, and who shall 
annually report to the Governor upon their condition, with sug- 
gestions for their improvement. 

Sec. 8. Orphan houses. There shall also, as soon as practicable, 
be measures devised by the State for the establishment of one or 
more orphan houses, where destitute orphans may be cared for, 
educated, and taught some business or trade. 

Sec. 9. Inebriates and idiots. It shall be the duty of the Legisla- 
ture, as soon as practicable, to devise means for the education of 
idiots and inebriates. 

Sec. 10. Deaf mutes, blind, and insane. The General Assembly 
may provide that the indigent deaf-mute, blind, and insane of the 
State shall be cared for at the charge of the State. 

Sec. 11. Self-supporting. It shall be steadily kept in view by 
the Legislature and the Board of Public Charities that all penal 
and charitable institutions should be made as nearly self-support- 
ing as is consistent with the purposes of their creation. 

ARTICLE XII 

MILITIA 

Section 1. Who are liable to militia duty. All able-bodied male 
citizens of the State of North Carolina, between the ages of twenty- 
one and forty years, who are citizens of the United States, shall 
be liable to duty in the militia: Provided, that all persons who 
may be averse to bearing anns, from religious scruples, shall be 
exempt therefrom. 

Sec. 2. Organizing, etc. The General Assembly shall provide for 
the organizing, arming, equipping, and discipline of the militia, 
and for paying the same, when called into active service. 

Sec. 3. Governor, commander-in-chief. The Governor shall be 
commander-in-chief, and shall have power to call out the militia 



72 North Carolina Manual 

to execute the law, suppress riots or insurrections, and to repel 
invasion. 

Sec. 4. Exemptions. The General Assembly shall have power to 
make such exemptions as may be deemed necessary, and to enact 
laws that may be expedient for the government of the militia. 

ARTICLE XIII 

AMENDMENTS 

Section 1. Convention, how called. No convention of the people 
of this State shall ever be called by the General Assembly, unless 
by the concurrence of two-thirds of all of the members of each 
House of the General Assembly, and except the proposition, Con- 
vention or NO Convention, be first submitted to the qualified voters 
of the whole State, at the next general election, in a manner to 
be prescribed by law. And should a majority of the votes cast be 
in favor of said convention, it shall assemble on such day as may 
be prescribed by the General Assembly. 

Sec. 2. How the Constitution may be altered. No part of the 
Constitution of this State shall be altered unless a bill to alter 
the same shall have been agreed to by three-fifths of each House 
of the General Assembly. And the amendment or amendments so 
agreed to shall be submitted at the next general election to the 
qualified voters of the whole State, in such manner as may be 
prescribed by law. And in the event of their adoption by a majority 
of the votes cast, such amendment or amendments shall become 
a part of the Constitution of this State. 

ARTICLE XIV 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Section 1. Indictmeyits. All indictments which shall have been 
found, or may hereafter be found, for any crime or offense com- 
mitted before this Constitution takes effect, may be proceeded 
upon in the proper courts, but no punishment shall be inflicted 
which is forbidden by this Constitution. 

Sec. 2. Penalty for fighting duel. No person who shall hereafter 
fight a duel, or assist in the same as a second, or send, accept, or 



Constitution 73 

knowingly carry a challenge therefor, or agree to go out of the 
State to fight a duel, shall hold any office in this State. 

See. 3. Drawing money. No money shall be drawn from the 
Treasuiy but in consequence of appropriations made by law; and 
an accurate account of the receipts and expenditures of the public 
money shall be annually published. 

Sec. 4. Mechanic's lien. The General Assembly shall provide, by 
proper legislation, for giving to mechanics and laborers an ade- 
quate lien on the subject-matter of their labor. 

Sec. 5. Governor to make appointments. In the absence of any 
contrary provision, all officers of this State, whether heretofore 
elected or appointed by the Governor, shall hold their positions 
only until other appointments are made by the Governor, or, if 
the officers are elective, until their successors shall have been 
chosen and duly qualified according to the provisions of this Con- 
stitution. 

Sec. 6. Seat of the government. The seat of government in this 
State shall remain at the city of Raleigh. 

Sec. 7. Holding office. No person who shall hold any office or 
place of trust or profit under the United States, or any depart- 
ment thereof, or under this State, or under any other state or 
government, shall hold or exercise any other office or place of 
trust or profit under the authority of this State, or be eligible to 
a seat in either House of the General Assembly: Provided, that 
nothing herein contained shall extend to officers in the militia, 
notaries public, justices of the peace, commissioners of public 
charities, or commissioners for special purposes. 

Sec. 8. Intermarriage of whites and Negroes prohibited. All 
marriages between a white person and a Negro, or between a white 
person and a person of Negro descent to the third generation, 
inclusive, are hereby forever prohibited. 



77 



THE AMERICAN'S CREED 



I believe in the United States of America, as a government of 
the people, by the people, for the people; whose just powers are 
derived from the consent of the governed; a democracy in a re- 
public; a sovereign nation of many sovereign states; a perfect 
union, one and inseparable; established upon those principles of 
freedom, equality, justice and humanity for which American 
patriots sacrificed their lives and fortunes. I therefore believe it 
is my duty to my country to love it, to support its constitutions, 
to obey its laws, to respect its flag, and to defend it against all 
enemies. 

(The American's Creed by William Tyler Page was adopted 
by an act of Congress, April 6, 1918.) 

THE AMERICAN FLAG, ITS ORIGIN 

In 1775, the Philadelphia Troop of Light Horse carried a stand- 
ard with thirteen alternate blue and silver stripes in the upper 
left-hand corner. At Cambridge on January 2, 1776, Washington 
without authorization of the Continental Congress, raised a flag 
consisting of thirteen alternate white and red stripes with the 
crosses of St. George and St. Andrew in a blue field in the upper 
left-hand corner. It was called the "Union Flag," "Grand Union 
Flag," and the "Continental Flag," and was employed until dis- 
placed by the Stars and Stripes adopted by the Continental Con- 
gress. 

The beautiful tradition that Betsy Ross, as early as June 1776, 
made a Stars and Stripes flag from a pencil sketch supplied by 
Washington but changed the points of the stars from six to five, 
has become a classic. Historians doubt its accuracy. Half a dozen 
localities claim to have been the place where the Stars and Stripes 
was first used. Within New York State such contention has been 
for Fort Ann on July 8, Fort Stanwix on August 3, Bennington 
on August 13, and Saratoga on September 19, 1777. The flag with 
thirteen stripes and thirteen stars, authorized on June 14, 1777, 
continued to be used as the national emblem until Congress passed 
the following act, which President Washington signed: 

"That from and after May 1, 1795, the flag of the United 
States be fifteen stripes, alternate red and white; and that the 
union be fifteen stars, white in a blue field." 



78 North Carolina Manual 

This action was necessitated by the admission of the States of 
Vermont and Kentucky to the Union. 

The flag of 1795 had the stars arranged in three rows of five 
each instead of in a circle, and served for 23 years. 

With the admission of more new states, however, it became 
apparent that the 1795 flag would have to be further modified; 
hence in 1818 a law was passed by Congress providing: 

"That from and after the fourth day of July next, the flag 
of the United States be thirteen horizontal stripes, alternate red 
and white; that the union have twenty stars, white in a blue field. 

"That on the admission of every new state into the Union, one 
star be added to the union of the flag; and that such addition 
shall take effect on the Fourth of July next succeeding such 
admission." 

Since 1818 additional stars have been added until today there 
are 48 on the flag. No law has been passed to designate how the 
stars shall be arranged. At one time they formed a design of a 
larger star. Now by common practice they form six rows of eight 
stars each, 

Betsy Ross, it is now said, lived at 233 Arch Street, Philadelphia, 
and not at 239. She made flags, but says Theodore D. Gottlieb, 
she never made the first Stars and Stripes. He adds: "The Depart- 
ment of State, the War and Navy departments, the Historical Sites 
Commission of Philadelphia and other official bodies repudiate the 
legend. The book and pamphlet material available is overwhelm- 
ingly against the legend. 

"The story arose for the first time on March 14, 1870, when 
William J. Canby read a paper before the Pennsylvania Historical 
Society in which he states that in 1836, when his grandmother, 
Betsy Ross, was 84 years old and he was 11, she told him the 
story. He apparently thought little of it because nothing was done 
until 1857, when at the suggestion of his Aunt Clarissa, oldest 
daughter of Betsy, he wrote out the notes as he remembered the 
conversation. 

"Nothing further was done until 1870 when he wrote his paper. 
The Historical Society of Pennsylvania thought so little of the 
paper it neither catalogued nor kept a copy of it. Even George 
Canby, younger brother of William, disputed several points in the 
paper. 



The American Flag 79 

"The legend grew to strength from 1888 to 1893 when pro- 
moters secured an option on the so-called Flag House. 

"Modern historical researchers are giving much thought to 
Francis Hopkinson of New Jersey as the possible designer and 
the Fillmore or Bennington flag as the first flag." 

The Proper Display of the American Flag 

Sec. 2. (a) It is the universal custom to display the flag only 
from sunrise to sunset on buildings and on stationary flagstaffs 
in the open. However, the flag may be displayed at night upon 
special occasions when it is desired to produce a patriotic effect. 

(b) The flag should he hoisted briskly and lowered ceremoniously. 

(c) The flag should not be displayed on days when the weather 
is inclement. 

(d) The flag should be displayed on all days when the weather 
permits, especially on New Year's Day, January 1; Inauguration 
Day, Januaiy 20; Lincoln's Birthday, February 12; Washington's 
Birthday, February 22; Army Day, April 6; Easter Sunday (var- 
iable;) Mother's Day, second Sunday in May; Memorial Day 
(half staff until noon), May 30; Flag Day, June 14; Independence 
Day, July 4; Labor Day, first Monday in September; Constitution 
Day, September 17; Columbus Day, October 12; Navy Day, Octo- 
ber 27; Armistice Day, November 11; Thanksgiving Day, fourth 
Thursday in November; Christmas Day, December 25; such other 
days as may be proclaimed by the President of the United States; 
the birthdays of States (dates of admission) ; and on State holi- 
days. 

(e) The flag should be displayed daily, weather permitting, on 
or near the main administration building of every public institu- 
tion. 

(f) The flag should be displayed in or near every polling place 
on election days. 

(g) The flag should be displayed during school days in or near 
every schoolhouse. 

Sec. 3. That the flag, when carried in a procession with another 
flag or flags, should be either on the marching right; that is, the 
flag's own right, or, if there is a line of other flags, in front of 
the center of that line. 

(a) The flag should not be displayed on a float in a parade 
except from a staff, or as provided in subsection (i). 



80 North Carolina Manual 

(b) The flag should not be draped over the hood, top, sides, or 
back of a vehicle or of a railroad train or a boat. When the flag 
is displayed on a motorcar, the staff shall be fixed firmly to the 
chassis or clamped to the radiator cap. 

(c) No other flag or pennant should be placed above or, if on 
the same level, to the right of the flag of the United States of 
America, except during church services conducted by naval chap- 
lains at sea, when the church pennant may be flown above the 
flag during church services for the personnel of the Navy. 

(d) The flag of the United States of America, when it is dis- 
played with another flag against a wall from crossed staffs, should 
be on the right, the flag's own right, and its staff should be in 
front of the staff of the other flag. 

(e) The flag of the United States of America should be at the 
center and at the highest point of the group when a number of 
flags of States or localities or pennants of societies are grouped 
and displayed from staffs. 

(f) When flags of States, cities, or localities, or pennants of 
societies are flown on the same halyard with the flag of the United 
States, the latter should always be at the peak. When the flags 
are flown from adjacent staffs, the flag of the United States should 
be hoisted first and lowered last. No such flag or pennant may 
be placed above the flag of the United States or to the right of 
the flag of the United States. 

(g) When flags of two or more nations are displayed, they are 
to be flown from separate staffs of the same height. The flags 
should be of approximately equal size. International usage forbids 
the display of the flag of one nation above that of another nation 
in time of peace. 

(h) When the flag of the United States is displayed from a staff 
projecting horizontally or at an angle from the window sill, bal- 
cony, or front of a building, the union of the flag should be placed 
at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half staff. When the 
flag is suspended over a sidewalk from a rope extending from a 
house to a pole at the edge of the sidewalk, the flag should be 
hoisted out, union first, from the building. 

(i) When the flag is displayed otherwise than by being flown 
from a staff, it should be displayed flat, whether indoors or out. 
When displayed either horizontally or vertically against a wall, 
the union should be uppermost and to the flag's own right; that 



The American Flag 81 

is, to the observer's left. When displayed in a window, the flag 
should be displayed in the same way; that is, with the union or 
blue field to the left of the observer in the street. 

(j) When the flag is displayed over the middle of the street, it 
should be suspended vertically with the union to the north in an 
east and west street or to the east in the north and south street. 

(k) When used on a speaker's platform, the flag, if displayed 
flat, should be displayed above and behind the speaker. When dis- 
played from a staff in a church or public auditorium, if it is dis- 
played in the chancel of a church, or on the speaker's platform 
in a public auditorium, the flag should occupy the position of honor 
and be placed at the clergyman's or speaker's right as he faces the 
congregation or audience. Any other flag so displayed in the chancel 
or on the platform should be placed at the clergyman's or speaker's 
left as he faces the congregation or audience. But when the flag 
is displayed from a staff" in a church or public auditorium else- 
where than in the chancel or on the platform it shall be placed 
in the position of honor at the right of the congregation or audi- 
ence as they face the chancel or platform. Any other flag so dis- 
played should be placed on the left of the congregation or audi- 
ence as they face the chancel or platform. 

(1) The flag should form a distinctive feature of the ceremony 
of unveiling a statue or monument, but it should never be used 
as the covering for the statue or monument. 

(m) The flag, when flown at half staff', should be first hoisted 
to the peak for an instant and then lowered to the half-staff posi- 
tion. The flag should be again raised to the peak before it is low- 
ered for the day. By "half-staff" is meant hauling the flag to one- 
half the distance between the top and bottom of the staff. Crepe 
streamers may be affixed to spear heads or flagstaffs in a parade 
only by order of the President of the United States. 

(n) When the flag is used to cover a casket, it should be so 
placed that the union is at the head and over the left shoulder. The 
flag should not be lowered into the grave nor allowed to touch the 
ground. 

Sec. 4. That no disrespect should be shown to the flag of the 
United States of America; the flag should not be dipped to any 
person or thing. Regimental colors. State flags, and organizations 
or institutional flags are to be dipped as a mark of honor. 



82 North Carolina Manual 

(a) The flag should never be displayed with the union down 
save as a signal of dire distress. 

(b) The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as 
the ground, the floor, water, or merchandise. 

(c) The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but 
always aloft and free. 

(d) The flag should never be used as drapery of any sort what- 
soever, never festooned, drawn back, nor up, in folds, but always 
allowed to fall free. Bunting of blue, white, and red, always ar- 
ranged with the blue above, the white in the middle, and the i"ed 
below, should be used for covering a speaker's desk, draping the 
front of a platform, and for decoration in general. 

(e) The flag should never be fastened, displayed, used, or stored 
in such a manner as will permit it to be easily torn, soiled, or 
damaged in any way. 

(f) The flag should never be used as a covering for a ceiling. 

(g) The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on part of 
it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, figure, de- 
sign, picture, or drawing of any nature. 

(h) The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, 
holding, carrying, or delivering anything. 

(i) The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in 
any manner whatsoever. It should not be embroidered on such 
articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or other- 
wise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is de- 
signed for temporary use and discard; or used as any portion of a 
costume or athletic uniform. Advertising signs should not be fas- 
tened to a staff or halyard from which the flag is flown. 

(j) The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a 
fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, 
preferably by burning. 

Sec. 5. That during the ceremony of hoisting or lowering the 
flag or when the flag is passing in a parade or in a review, all 
persons present should face the flag, stand at attention, and salute. 
Those present in uniform should render the right-hand salute. 
When not in uniform, men should remove the headdress with the 
right hand holding it at the left shoulder, the hand being over 
the heart. Men without hats merely stand at attention. Women 
should salute by placing the right hand over the heart. The salute 



The American Flag 83 

to the flag in the moving column should be rendered at the moment 
the flag passes. 

Sec. 6. That when the national anthem is played and the flag is 
not displayed, all present should stand and face toward the music. 
Those in uniform should salute at the first note of the anthem, 
retaining- this position until the last note. All others stand at at- 
tention, men removing the headdress. When the flag is displayed, 
the salute to the flag should be given. 

Sec. 7. That the pledge of allegiance to the flag, "I pledge al- 
legiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the 
Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, 
with liberty and justice for all," be rendered by standing with the 
right hand over the heart: extending the right hand, palm upward, 
toward the flag at the words "to the flag" and holding this position 
until the end, when the hand drops to the side. However, civilians 
will always show full respect to the flag when the pledge is given 
by merely standing at attention, men removing the headdress. Per- 
sons in uniform shall render the military salute. 

Sec. 8. Any rule or custom pertaining to the display of the flag 
of the United States of America, set forth herein, may be altered, 
modified, or repealed, or additional rules with respect thei'eto may 
be prescribed, by the Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy 
of the United States, whenever he deems it to be appropriate or 
desirable; and any such alteration or additional rule shall be set 
forth in a proclamation. 

The Pledge to the Flag 

(Taught in many of the schools and repeated by pupils daily) 

"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, 
And to the Republic for which it stands. 
One Nation under God, indivisible, 
With liberty and justice for all." 

The Pledge to the Flag, according to a report of the Historical 
Committee of the United States Flag Association (May 18, 1939), 
was written by Francis Bellamy (August 1892), a member of the 
editorial staff of The Youth's Companion, in Boston, Massa- 



84 North Carolina Manual 

ehusetts. It was first repeated at the exercises in connection with 
the celebration of Columbus Day (October 12, 1892, Old Style). 
The idea of this national celebration on Columbus Day was largely 
that of James B. Upham, one of the junior proprietors of The 
Youth's Co7npanion. 

Francis Hopkinson, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, 
was the designer of the Stars and Stripes— not Betsy Ross of 
Philadelphia, who made flags. He also designed the first Great 
Seal of the United States, and a number of coins and several 
items of paper currency in the early days of the Republic. 

Hopkinson, born in Philadelphia (September 21, 1737), and a 
graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, was the first native 
American composer of a secular song, "My Days Have Been So 
Wondrous Free." He was a lawyer and later a judge in New Jersey 
and then in Pennsylvania. He died in Philadelphia (May 9, 1791). 
His portrait, painted by himself, hangs in the rooms of the Penn- 
sylvania Historical Society, Philadelphia. He played the organ and 
the harpsichord. 



THE CAPITOL AT WASHINGTON 

The Capitol building in Washington, D. C, is situated on a 
plateau 88 feet above the level of the Potomac River and covers 
an area of 153,112 square feet, or approximately three and one- 
half acres. Its length, from north to south, is 751 feet, four inches; 
its width, including approaches, is 350 feet; and its location is 
described as being in latitude 38°53'20.4" N. and longitude 
77°00'35.7" W. from Greenwich. Its height above the base line on 
the east front to the top of the Statue of Freedom is 287 feet, 
five and one-half inches. The dome is built of iron, and the aggre- 
gate weight of material used in its construction is 8,909,200 pounds. 

The Statue of Freedom surmounting the dome is of bronze and 
weighs 14,985 pounds. It was modeled by Thomas Crawford, 
father of Francis Marion Crawford, the novelist, in Rome, and 
the plaster model shipped to this country. It was cast in bronze 
at the shops of Clark Mills, on the Bladensburg Road, near Wash- 
ington. The cost of the casting and the expenses in connection 
were $20,796.82, and the sculptor was paid $3,000 for the plaster 
model. It was erected and placed in its present position December 
2, 1863. 

The grounds have had an area of 58.8 acres, at one time a part 
of Cern Abby Manor, and at an early date were occupied by a 
subtribe of the Algonquin Indians known as the Powhatans, whose 
council house was then located at the foot of the hill. By sub- 
sequent purchase of ground at the north of the Capitol and at 
the west of the new House Office building the area of the grounds 
has been increased to 139% acres. 

The Rotunda is 97 feet 6 inches in diameter, and its height from 
the floor to the top of the canopy is 180 feet, 3 inches. 

The Senate Chamber is 113 feet, 3 inches, in length by 80 feet, 
3 inches, in width and 36 feet in height. The galleries will ac- 
commodate 682 persons. 

The Representatives' Hall is 139 feet in length by 93 feet in 
width and 36 feet in height. 

The room, until 1935 the meeting place of the Supreme Court, 
was, until 1859, occupied as the Senate Chamber. Previous to that 
time the court occupied the room immediately beneath, now used 
as a law library. 

86 



86 North Carolina Manual 

The Capitol has a floor area of 14 acres, and 430 rooms are de- 
voted to office, committee, and storage purposes. There are 14,518 
square feet of skylights, 679 windows, and 550 doorways. 

The dome receives light through 108 windows, and from the 
architect's office to the dome there are 365 steps, one for each day 
of the year. 

The southeast cornerstone of the original building was laid Sep- 
tember 18, 1793, by President Washington, with Masonic cere- 
monies. It is constructed of sandstone from quarries on Aquia 
Creek, Va. The original designs were prepared by Dr. William 
Thornton, and the work was done under the direction of Stephen 
H. Hallet, James Hoban, George Hadfield, and B. H. Latrobe, 
architects. 

The north wing was finished in 1800 and the south wing in 1811. 
A wooden passageway connected them. On August 24, 1814, the 
interior of both wings was destroyed by fire, set by the British. 
The damage to the building was immediately repaired. 

In 1818 the central portion of the building was commenced 
under the architectural superintendence of Charles Bullfinch. The 
original building was finally completed in 1827. Its cost, including 
the grading of the grounds, alterations, and repairs, up to 1827, 
was $2,433,844.13. 

The cornerstone of the extensions was laid on the Fourth of 
July, 1851, by President Fillmore, Daniel Webster officiating as 
orator. This work was prosecuted under the architectural direction 
of Thomas U. Walter until 1865, when he resigned, and it was 
completed under the supervision of Edward Clark. The material 
used in the walls is white marble from the quarries of Lee, Mas- 
sachusetts, and that in the columns from the quarries of Cokeys- 
ville, Maryland. The House extension was first occupied for legis- 
lative purposes December 16, 1857, and the Senate January 4, 1859. 

The House office building was begun in 1905 and occupied on 
January 10, 1908; later a stoiy on top was added. The Senate office 
building was started in 1906 and occupied on March 5, 1909. The 
House building cost, with site, $4,860,155; the Senate structure, 
$5,019,251. 

Among the paintings in the Capitol are: 

In Rotunda: Signing of the Declaration of Independence, Sur- 
render of General Burgoyne, Surrender of Lord Cornwallis at 



The National Capitol 87 

Yorktown, Va., George Washington Resigning- His Commission as 
Commander in Chief of the Army, all by John Trumbull. 

Baptism of Pocahontas, by John G. Chapman; Landing of Co- 
lumbus, by John Vanderlyn; Discovery of the Mississippi River 
by DeSoto, by William H. Powell; Embarkation of the Pilgrims, 
by Robert W. Weir. 

In House Wing: Westw^ard the Course of Empire Takes Its Way, 
by Emanuel Leutze; First Reading of the Emancipation Procla- 
mation, by Francis Bicknell Carpenter. 

In Senate Wing: Battle of Lake Erie, by William H. Powell; 
Battle of Chapultepec, by James Walker. 



THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 

(Unanimously Adopted in Congress, July 4, 1776, at Philadelphia) 
When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for 
one people to dissovie the political bands which have connected 
them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, 
the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and 
of Nature's God entitles them, a decent respect to the opinions of 
mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel 
them to the separation. 

We hold these truths to be self-evident: That all men are created 
equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain in- 
alienable Rights; that among these are Life, Liberty and the pur- 
suit of Happiness. That, to secure these rights, Governments are 
instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent 
of the governed ; That, whenever any Form of Government becomes 
destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter 
or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its founda- 
tions on such principles, and organizing its powers in such forms, 
as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happi- 
ness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long estab- 
lished should not be changed for light and transient causes; and, 
accordingly, all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more 
disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right them- 
selves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But 
when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably 
the same Object, evinces a design to reduce them under absolute 
Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Gov- 
ernment, and to provide new Guards for their future security. 
Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies, and such 
is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former 
Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great 
Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all hav- 
ing in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over 
these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid 
world. 

He has refused his assent to Laws, the most wholesome and 
necessary for the public good. 

88 



Declaration of Independence 89 

He has foi-bidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and 
pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his 
Assent should be obtained; and, when so suspended, he has utterly 
neglected to attend to them. 

He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of 
large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the 
right of Eepresentation in the Legislature — a right inestimable to 
them, and formidable to tyrants only. 

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, un- 
comfortable and distant from the depository of their public Rec- 
ords, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with 
his measures. 

He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing 
with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people. 

He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause 
others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of 
Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exer- 
cise; the State remaining, in the meantime, exposed to all the 
dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within. 

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these States for 
that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreign- 
ers; refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither, 
and raising the conditions of new Appropi-iations of Lands. 

He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing 
his Assent to laws for establishing Judiciary Powers. 

He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure 
of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries. 

He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither 
swarms of Officers to harass our people, and eat out their sub- 
stance. 

He has kept among us, in times of peace. Standing Armies with- 
out the Consent of our Legislature. 

He has affected to render the Military independent of, and 
superior to, the Civil power. 

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction 
foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giv- 
ing his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation: 

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us: 



90 North Carolina Manual 

For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any 
Murders which they should commit on the inhabitants of these 
States: 

For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world: 

For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent: 

For depriving us, in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by 
jury : 

For transporting us beyond Seas, to be tried for pretended 
offenses : 

For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbor- 
ing Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and 
enlai'ging its Boundaries, so as to render it at once an example 
and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these 
Colonies : 

For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable 
Laws, and altering fundamentally, the Forms of our Governments: 

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves 
invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever. 

He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his 
Protection and waging War against us. 

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, 
and destroyed the lives of our people. 

He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mer- 
cenaries to complete the works of death, desolation and tyranny, 
already begun with circumstances of Cruelty and perfidy scarcely 
paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the 
Head of a civilized nation. 

He has constrained our fellow-Citizens, taken captive on the 
high Seas, to bear Arms against their Country, to become the exe- 
cutioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by 
their Hands. 

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has en- 
deavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merci- 
less Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare is an undis- 
tinguished destruction of all ages, sexes, and conditions. 

In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Re- 
dress in the most humble teiTns; Our repeated Petitions have been 
answered only by repeated injury. A Prince, whose character is 
thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be 
the ruler of a free people. 



Declaration of Independence 91 

Nor have we been wanting in attention to our British brethren. 
We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their 
legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We 
have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and 
settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and 
magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our com- 
mon kindred to disavow these usurpations, which inevitably inter- 
rupt our connections and correspondence. They, too, have been deaf 
to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, 
acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and 
hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind — Enemies in War, in 
Peace Friends. 

We, Therefore, the Representatives of the United States of 
America, in General Congress Assembled; appealing to the Su- 
preme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, 
in the Name and by authority of the good People of these Colonies, 
solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and 
of Right ought to be free and independent States; that they are 
Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all 
political connection between them and the State of Great Britain 
is, and ought to be, totally dissolved; and that as Free and Inde- 
pendent States, they have full power to levy War, conclude Peace, 
contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts 
and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for 
the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the pro- 
lection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other 
our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor. 

John Hancock 

Button Gwinnett Edward Rutledge 

Lyman Hall Thos. Heyward, Junr. 

Geo. Walton Thomas Lynch, Junr. 

Wm. Hooper Arthur Middleton 

Joseph Hewes Samuel Chase 

John Penn Wm. Paca 

Thos. Stone Carter Braxton 



92 



North Carolina Manual 



Charles Carroll of Carrollton 

James Wilson 

Geo. Ross 

Caesar Rodney 

Geo. Reed 

Tho. M. Kean 

Wm. Floyd 

Phil. Livingston 

Frans. Lewis 

Lewis Morris 

Richd. Stockton 

Jno. Witherspoon 

Fras. Hopkinson 

John Hart 

Abra Clark 

George Wythe 

Richard Henry Lee 

Th. Jefferson 

Benja. Harrison 

Thos. Nelson, Jr. 

Francis Lightfoot Lee 



Robt. Morris 
Benjamin Rush 
Benja. Franklin 
John Morton 
Geo. Clymer 
Jas. Smith 
Geo. Taylor 
Josiah Bartlett 
Wm. Hippie 
Saml. Adams 
John Adams 
Robt. Treat Payne 
Eldridge Gerry 
Step. Hopkins 
William Ellery 
Roger Sherman 
Samuel Huntington 
Wm. Williams 
Oliver Woolcott 
Matthew Thornton 



THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES 

Preamble 

We, the people of the United States, in order to form a more 
perfect Union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquality, pro- 
vide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and 
secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do 
ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of 
America. 

Article I 

Section 1 — All legislative pov^^ers herein granted shall be vested 
in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate 
and House of Representatives. 

Sec. 2 — 1. The House of Representatives shall be composed of 
members chosen every second year by the people of the several 
States, and the electors in each State shall have the qualifications 
requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State 
Legislature. 

2. No person shall be a Representative who shall not have at- 
tained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a citi- 
zen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an 
inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. 

3. Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among 
the several States which may be included within this Union, ac- 
cording to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by 
adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound 
to service for a term of years and excluding Indians not taxed, 
three-fifths of all other persons. The actual enumeration shall be 
made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress 
of the United States, and within every subsequent term of ten 
years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. The number 
of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty thousand, 
but each State shall have at least one Representative; and until 
such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire 
shall be entitled to choose 3; Massachusetts, 8; Rhode Island and 
Providence Plantations, 1; Connecticut, 5; New York, G; New 

93 



94 North Carolina Manual 

Jersey, 4; Pennsylvania, 8; Delaware, 1; Maryland, 6; Virginia, 
10; North Carolina, 5; South Carolina, 5; and Georgia, 3.* 

4. When vacancies happen in the representation from any State 
the Executive Authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill 
such vacancies. 

5. The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and 
other officers, and shall have the sole power of impeachment. 

Sec. 3—1. The Senate of the United States shall be composed 
of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature there- 
of for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote.f 

2. Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence of 
the first election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into 
three classes. The seats of the Senators of the first class shall be 
vacated at the expiration of the second year; of the second class 
at the expiration of the fourth year; and of the third class at the 
expiration of the sixth year, so that one-third may be chosen every 
second year, and if vacancies happen by resignation, or otherwise, 
during the recess of the Legislature of any State, the Executive 
thereof may make temporary appointments until the next meeting 
of the Legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies. f 

3. No person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to 
the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the United 
States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that 
State for which he shall be chosen. 

4. The Vice President of the United States shall be President of 
the Senate, but shall have no vote, unless they be equally divided. 

5. The Senate shall choose their other officers, and also a Presi- 
dent pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice President, or when he 
shall exercise the Office of President of the United States. 

6. The Senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments. 
When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath or affirmation. 
When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice 
shall preside; and no person shall be convicted without the con- 
currence of two-thirds of the members present. 

7. Judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend further 
than to removal from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy 
any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States; but 



*See Article XIV, Amendments. 
tSee Article XVII, Amendments. 



Constitution of the United States 95 

the party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to in- 
dictment, trial, judgment, and punishment, according to law. 

Sec. 4 — 1. The times, places, and manner of holding elections 
for Senators and Representatives shall be prescribed in each State 
by the Legislature thereof, but the Congress may at any time by 
law make or alter such regulations, except as to the places of 
choosing Senators. 

2. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and 
such meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless 
they shall by law appoint a different day. 

Sec. 5 — 1. Each House shall be the judge of the elections, re- 
turns, and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of 
each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a smaller num- 
ber may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to com- 
pel the attendance of absent members, in such manner and under 
such penalties as each House may provide. 

2. Each House may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish 
its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of 
two-thirds, expel a member. 

3. Each House shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from 
time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may in 
their judgment require secrecy; and the yeas and nays of the 
members of either House on any question shall, at the desire of 
one-fifth of those present, be entered on the journal. 

4. Neither House, during the session of Congress, shall, without 
the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor 
to any other place than that in which the two Houses shall be 
sitting. 

Sec. .6 — 1. The Senators and Representatives shall receive a 
compensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, and paid 
out of the Treasury of the United States. They shall in all cases, 
except treason, felony, and breach of the peace, be privileged from 
arrest during their attendance at the session of their respective 
Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for 
any speech or debate in either House they shall not be questioned 
in any other place. 

2. No Senator or Representative shall, during the time for 
which he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under the 
authority of the United States which shall have been created, or 



96 North Carolina Manual 

the emoluments whereof shall have been increased during such 
time; and no person holding any office under the United States 
shall be a member of either House during his continuance in office. 
Sec. 7 — 1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the 
House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur 
with amendments, as on other bills. 

2. Every bill which shall have passed the House of Representa- 
tives and the Senate shall, before it becomes a law, be presented 
to the President of the United States; if he approves, he shall 
sign it, but if not, he shall return it, with his objections, to that 
House in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the objec- 
tions at large on their journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If 
after such reconsideration two-thirds of that House shall agree to 
pass the bill, it shall be sent together with the objections, to the 
other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if 
approved by two-thirds of that House, it shall become a law. But 
in all such cases the votes of both Houses shall be determined by 
yeas and nays, and the names of the persons voting for and 
against the bill shall be entered on the journal of each House re- 
spectively. If any bill shall not be returned by the President within 
ten days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to 
him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had signed it, 
unless the Congress by their adjournment prevent its return, in 
which case it shall not be a law. 

3. Every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of 
the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (ex- 
cept on a question of adjournment) shall be presented to the Presi- 
dent of the United States; and before the same shall take effect, 
shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be 
repassed by two-thirds of the Senate and House of Representatives, 
according to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case of a 
bill. 

Sec. 8 — 1. The Congress shall have power: 

To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the 
debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of 
the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall be 
uniform throughout the United States; 

2. To borrow money on the credit of the United States; 

3. To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the 
several States, and with the Indian tribes; 



Constitution of the United States 97 

4. To establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform 
laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States; 

5. To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign 
coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures; 

6. To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securi- 
ties and current coin of the United States; 

7. To establish postoffices and postroads; 

8. To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securi- 
ing, for limited times, to authors and inventors, the exclusive 
right to their respective writings and discoveries; 

9. To constitute tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court; 

10. To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the 
high seas, and offenses against the law of nations; 

11. To declare war, grant letters of marque and leprisal, and 
make rules concerning captures on land and water; 

12. To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money 
to that use shall be for a longer term than two years; 

13. To provide and maintain a navy; 

14. To make rules for the government and regulation of the 
land and naval forces; 

15. To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws 
of the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions; 

16. To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the 
militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed 
in the service of the United States, reserving to the States respec- 
tively the appointment of the officers and the authority of training 
the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress; 

17. To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever over 
such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may by cession 
of particular States and the acceptance of Congress, become the 
seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like 
authority over all places purchased by the consent of the Legisla- 
ture of the State in which the same shall be, for the erection of 
forts, magazines, arsenals, dock-yards, and other needful build- 
ings; — and 

18. To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for 
carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers 
vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, 
or in any department or officer thereof. 



98 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 9 — 1. The migration or importation of such persons as any 
of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be 
prohibited by the Congress prior to the year one thousand eight 
hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such 
importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person. 

2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be sus- 
pended, unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public 
safety may require it. 

3. No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

4. No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in 
proportion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore directed to 
be taken.* 

5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any 
State. 

6. No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce 
or revenue to the ports of one State over those of another; nor 
shall vessels bound to, or from, one State be obliged to enter, clear, 
or pay duties in another. 

7. No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in conse- 
quence of appropriations made by law; and a regular statement 
and account of the receipts and expenditures of all public money 
shall be published from time to time. 

8. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States; 
and no person holding any office of profit or trust under them, 
shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, 
emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, 
prince, or foreign state. 

Sec. 10 — 1. No State shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or 
confederation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; 
emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and silver coin a ten- 
der in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder; ex post facto 
law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or grant any 
title of nobility. 

2. No State shall, without the consent of the Congress, lay any 
imposts or duties on imports or exports except what may be abso- 
lutely necessary for executing its inspection laws; and the net pro- 
duce of all duties and imposts, laid by any State on imports or 



*See Article XVI, Amendments. 



Constitution of the United States 99 

exports, shall be for the use of the Treasury of the United States; 
and all such laws shall be subject to the revision and control of 
the Congress. 

3. No State shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any duty 
of tonnage, keep troops, or ships of war in time of peace, enter 
into any agreement or compact with another State, or with a 
foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in 
such imminent danger as will not admit of delay. 

Article II 

Section 1 — 1. The Executive power shall be vested in a Presi- 
dent of the United States of America. He shall hold his office 
during the term of four years, and, together with the Vice Presi- 
dent, chosen for the same term, be elected as follows: 

2. Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the legislature 
thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole num- 
ber of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be 
entitled in the Congress; but no Senator or Representative or 
person holding an office of trust or profit under the United States 
shall be appointed an elector. 

3. The electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote 
by ballot for two persons, of whom one at least shall not be an 
inhabitant of the same state with themselves. And they shall make 
a list of all the persons voted for, and of the number of votes for 
each; which list they shall sign and certify, and transmit, sealed, 
to the seat of the Government of the United States, directed to 
the President of the Senate. The President of the Senate shall, 
in the pi'esence of the Senate and House of Representatives open 
all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted. The per- 
son having the greatest number of votes shall be the President, if 
such number be a majority of the whole number of electors ap- 
pointed; and if there be more than one who have such majority, 
and have an equal number of votes, then the House of Representa- 
tives shall immediately choose by ballot one of them for President; 
and if no person have a majority, then from the five highest on 
the list the said House shall in like manner choose the President. 
But in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by States, 
the representation from each State having one vote; a quorum, 
for this purpose, shall consist of a member or members from two- 



100 North Carolina Manual 

thirds of the States, and a majority of all the States shall be 
necessary to a choice. In every case, after the choice of the Presi- 
dent, the person having- the greatest number of votes of the electors 
shall be the Vice-President. But if there should remain two or 
more who have equal votes, the Senate shall choose from them by 
ballot the Vice President.* 

4. The Congress may determine the time of choosing the elec- 
tors and the day on which they shall give their votes; which day 
shall be the same throughout the United States. 

5. No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the 
United States, at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, 
shall be eligible to the office of President; neither shall any per- 
son be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the 
age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen years a resident within 
the United States. 

6. In case of the removal of the President from office, or of his 
death, resignation or inability to dischaige the powers and duties 
of the said office, the same shall devolve on the Vice President, 
and the Congress may by law provide for the case of removal, 
death, resignation, or inability, both of the President and Vice 
President, declaring what officer shall then act as President, and 
such officer shall act accordingly until the disability be removed, 
or a President shall be elected. 

7. The President shall, at stated times, receive for his services a 
compensation which shall neither be increased nor diminished dur- 
ing the period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall 
not receive within that period any other emolument from the 
United States, or any of them. 

8. Before he enters on the execution of his office, he shall take 
the following oath or affirmation : 

"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I vdll faithfully execute 
the office of President of the United States, and will, to the best 
of my ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of 
the United States." 

Sec. 2 — 1. The President shall be Commander-in-Chief of the 
Army and Navy of the United States, and of the militia of the 
several States, when called into the actual sei-vice of the United 
States; he may require the opinion, in writing, of the principal 



*Tbis clause is superseded by Article XII, Amendments. 



Constitution of the United States 101 

officer in each of the executive departments, upon any subject re- 
lating to the duties of their respective offices; and he shall have 
power to grant reprieves and pardons for offenses against the 
United States, except in cases of impeachment. 

2. He shall have pov/er, by and with the advice and consent of 
the Senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the Senators 
present concur; and he shall nominate and, by and with the advice 
and consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors, other public 
ministers and consuls, judges of the Supreme Court, and all other 
officers of the United States, whose appointments are not herein 
otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law; but 
the Congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior 
officers as they think proper in the President alone, in the courts 
of law, or in the heads of departments. 

3. The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that 
may happen during the recess of the Senate, by granting commis- 
sions which shall expire at the end of their next session. 

Sec. 3 — ^He shall from time to time give to the Congress infor- 
mation of the State of the Union, and recommend to their consid- 
eration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; 
he may, on extraordinary occasions, convene both Houses, or either 
of them, and in case of disagreement between them with i-espect to 
the time of adjournment, he may adjourn them to such time as he 
shall think proper; he shall receive ambassadors and other public 
ministers; he shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed, 
and shall commission all the officers of the United States. 

Sec. 4 — The President, Vice President, and all civil officers of 
the United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment 
for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and 
misdemeanors. 

Article III 

Section 1 — The judicial power of the United States shall be 
vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the 
Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The judges, 
both of the Supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices 
during good behavior, and shall, at stated times, receive for their 
services a compensation which shall not be diminished during their 
continuance in office. 



102 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 2 — 1. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law 
and equity, arising under this Constitution, the laws of the United 
States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their 
authority; — to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public min- 
isters and consuls; to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdic- 
tion; — to controversies to which the United States shall be a party; 
— to controversies between two or more States; — between a State 
and citizens of another State ; — between citizens of different States ; 
— between citizens of the same State, claiming lands under grants 
of different States, and between a State, or the citizens thereof, 
and foreign States, citizens, or subjects. 

2. In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and 
consuls, and those in which a State shall be a party, the Supreme 
Court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before 
mentioned the Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, 
both as to law and fact, with such exceptions and under such regu- 
lations as the Congress shall make. 

3. The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, shall 
be by jury, and such trial shall be held in the State where the said 
crimes shall have been committed ; but when not committed within 
any State the trial shall be at such place or places as the Congress 
may by law have directed. 

Sec. 3 — 1. Treason against the United States shall consist only 
in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giv- 
ing them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason 
unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or 
on confession in open court. 

2. The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of 
treason ; but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, 
or forfeiture except during the life of the person attainted. 

Article IV 

Section 1 — Full faith and credit shall be given in each State to 
the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other 
State. And the Congress may by general laws prescribe the man- 
ner in which such acts, records and proceedings shall be proved, 
and the effect thereof. 

Sec. 2 — 1. The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all 
privileges and immunities of citizens in the several States. 



Constitution op the United States 103 

2. A person charged in any State with treason, felony, or other 
crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another State, 
shall, on demand of the Executive authority of the State from 
which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having 
jurisdiction of the crime. 

3. No person held to service or labor in one State, under the 
laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any 
law or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labor, 
but shall be delivered up on claim of the party to whom such 
service or labor may be due. 

Sec. 3 — 1. New States may be admitted by the Congress into 
this Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within the 
jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the 
junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the con- 
sent of the Legislatures of the States concerned, as well as of the 
Congress. 

2. The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all 
needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other 
property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this Con- 
stitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims of the 
United States or of any particular State. 

Sec. 4 — The United States shall guarantee to every State in this 
Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of 
them against invasion, and, on application of the Legislature, or 
of the Executive (when the Legislature cannot be convened), 
against domestic violence. 

Article V 

The Congress, whenever two-thirds of both Houses shall deem it 
necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or, on 
the application of the Legislatures of two-thirds of the several 
States, shall call a convention for proposing amendments, which, 
in either case, shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as part 
of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three- 
fourths of the several States, or by conventions in three-fourths 
thereof, as the one or the other mode of ratification may be pro- 
posed by the Congress; provided that no amendment which may be 
made prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight shall 
in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in the Ninth 



104 North Carolina Manual 

Section of the First Article; and that no State, without its con- 
sent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the Senate. 

Article VI 

1. All debts contracted and engagements entered into before the 
adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United 
States under this Constitution, as under the Confedei"ation. 

2. This Constitution and the laws of the United States which 
shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which 
shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be 
the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every State shall 
be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any 
State to the contrary notwithstanding. 

3. The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the 
members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and 
judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several 
States, shall be bound by oath or affirmation to support this Con- 
stitution ; but no religious test shall ever be required as a quali- 
fication to any office or public trust under the United States. 

Article VII 

The ratification of the Conventions of nine States shall be suf- 
ficient for the establishment of this Constitution between the States 
so ratifying the same. 

Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States 
present the Seventeenth Day of September, in the Year of Our 
Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the Twelfth. In 
witness whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names. 

GEO. WASHINGTON, President and deputy from Virginia, 
New Hampshire — John Langdon, Nicholas Gilman, Massachusetts 
— Nathaniel Gorham, Rufus King, Connecticut — Wm. Saml. John- 
son, Roger Sherman, New York — Alexander Hamilton, New Jersey 
— Wil. Livingston, David Brearlev, Wm. Patterson, Jona. Dayton, 
Pennsylvania — B. Franklin, Robt. Morris, Thos. Fitzsimmons, 
James Wilson, Thomas Mifflin, Geo. Clymer, Jared Ingersoll, Gouv. 
Morris, Delaware — Geo. Read, John Dickinson, Jaco. Broom, Gun- 
ning Bedford, Jr., Richard Bassett, Maryland — James McHenry, 



Constitution of the United States 105 

Danl. Carroll, Dan. of St. Thos. Jenifer, Virginia — John Blair, Jas. 
Madison, Jr. North Carolina — Wm. Blount, Hu. Williamson, Richd. 
Dobbs Spaight, South Carolina — J. Rutledge, Charles Pinckney, 
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, Pierce Butler, Georgia — William 
Few, Abr. Baldwin. Attest: William Jackson, Secretary. 

The Constitution was declared in effect on the first Wednesday 
in March, 1789. 

Amendments to the Constitution of the United States 

The following amendments to the Constitution, Article I to X, 
inclusive, were proposed at the First Session of the First Congress, 
begun and held at the City of New York, on Wednesday, March 4, 
1789, and were adopted by the necessary number of States. The 
original proposal of the ten amendments was preceded by this 
preamble and resolution : 

"The conventions of a number of the States having, at the time 
of their adopting the Constitution, expi-essed a desire, in order to 
prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further de- 
claratory and restrictive clauses should be added, and as extending 
the ground of public confidence in the Government will best insure 
the beneficient ends of its institution: 

"RESOLVED, By the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the United States of America, in Congress assembled, two-thirds of 
both Houses concurring, that the following articles be proposed to 
the Legislatures of the several States, as amendments to the Con- 
stitution of the United States; all or any of which articles, when 
ratified by three-fourths of the said Legislatures, to be valid to all 
intents and purposes, as part of the said Constitution, namely": 

Amendments 

the ten original amendments 
(Sometimes called our Bill of Rights) 
(Declared in force December 15, 1791) 

Article I 

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of re- 
ligion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the 
freedom of speech or of the press; or the right of the people 
peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress 
of grievances. 



106 North Carolina Manual 

Article II 

A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free 
State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be 
infringed. 

Article III 

No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house 
without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war but in a man- 
ner to be prescribed by law. 

Article IV 

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, 
papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, 
shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon prob- 
able cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly de- 
scribing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be 
seized. 

Article V 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise in- 
famous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand 
jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the 
militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger; nor 
shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in 
jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal 
case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, lib- 
erty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private 
property be taken for public use, without just compensation. 

Article VI 

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to 
a speedy, and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State ond 
district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which dis- 
trict shall have been previously ascertained by law, and be in- 
formed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted 
with the witnesses against him ; to have compulsory process for 
obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of 
counsel for his defense. 



Constitution of the United States 107 

Article VII 

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall 
exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved 
and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any 
court of the United States than according to the rules of the com- 
mon law. 

Article VIII 

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, 
nor cruel and unusual punishments inflcted. 

Article IX 

The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not 
be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. 

Article X 

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitu- 
tion, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States 
respectively, or to the people. 

Article XI 

The judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to 
extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted 
against one of the United States, by citizens of another State, or 
by citizens or subjects of any foreign State. 

(Proposed to the Legislatures of the several States by the Third 
Congress on the 5th of March, 1794, and declared to have been 
ratified by Executive Proclamation, January 8, 1798.) 

Article XII 

The electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by 
ballot for President and Vice President, one of whom at least shall 
not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves ; they shall 
name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in dis- 
tinct ballots the person voted for as Vice President; and they shall 
make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of all 
persons voted for as Vice President, and of the number of votes for 
each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit, sealed, 
to the seat of the Government of the United States, directed to the 



108 North Carolina Manual 

President of the Senate; the President of the Senate shall, in the 
presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the 
certificates, and the votes shall then be counted; the person having 
the greatest number of votes for President shall be the President, 
if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors ap- 
pointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the per- 
sons having the highest numbers, not exceeding three on the list of 
those voted for as President, the House of Representatives shall 
choose immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing the 
President, the votes shall be taken by States, the representation 
from each State having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall 
consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the States, and 
a majority of all the States shall be necessary to a choice. And if 
the House of Representatives shall not choose a President, when- 
ever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth 
day of March next following, then the Vice President shall act as 
President, as in the case of the death or other constitutional dis- 
ability of the President. The person having the greatest number of 
votes as Vice President shall be the Vice President, if such number 
be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed, and if no 
person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the 
list, the Senate shall choose the Vice President; a quorum for the 
purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Sena- 
tors, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a 
choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of 
President shall be eligible to that of Vice President of the United 
States. 

(Proposed by the Eighth Congress on the 12th of December, 

1803, declared ratified by the Secretary of State, September 25, 

1804. It was ratified by all the States except Connecticut, Dela- 
ware, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire.) 

Article XIII 

1. Neither slavery nor involuntai-y servitude, except as a punish- 
ment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, 
shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their 
jurisdiction. 

2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appro- 
priate legislation. 



Constitution of the United States 109 

(Proposed by the Thirty-eighth Congress on the 1st of February, 
1865, declared ratified by the Secretary of State, dated December 
18, 1865. It was rejected by Delaware and Kentucky; was condi- 
tionally ratified by Alabama and Mississippi; and Texas took no 
action.) 

Article XIV 

1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and 
subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States 
and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or en- 
force any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of 
citizens of the United States ; nor shall any State deprive any per- 
son of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor 
deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of 
the laws. 

2. Representatives shall be apportioned among the several 
States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole 
number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But 
when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for 
President and Vice President of the United States, Representatives 
in Congress, the executive and judicial officers of a State, or the 
members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male 
inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citi- 
zens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for 
participation in rebellion or other crime, the basis of representa- 
tion therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number 
of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citi- 
zens twenty-one years of age in such State. 

3. No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, 
or elector of President and Vice President, or hold any office, civil 
or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, 
having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as 
an officer of the United States, or as a member of any State Legis- 
lature, or as an executive or judicial ofl^cer of any State, to support 
the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insur- 
rection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the 
enemies thereof. But Congress may, by a vote of two-thirds of 
each House, remove such disability. 

4. The validity of the public debt of the United States, author- 
ized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and 



110 North Carolina Manual 

bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall 
not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State 
shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of in- 
surrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for 
the loss of emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obliga- 
tions, and claims shall be held illegal and void. 

5. The Congress shall have jjower to enforce by appropriate 
legislation the provisions of this article. 

(The Reconstruction Amendment, by the Thirty-ninth Congress 
on the 16th day of June, 1866, was declared ratified by the Secre- 
tary of State, July 28, 1868. The amendment got the support of 23 
Northern States; it was rejected by Delaware, Kentucky, Mary- 
land, and 10 Southern States. California took no action. Later it 
was ratified by the 10 Southern States.) 



Article XV 

1. The right of the citizens of the United States to vote shall 
not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on 
account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. 

2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by 
appropriate legislation. 

(Proposed by the Fortieth Congress the 27th of February, 1869, 
and was declared ratified by the Secretary of State. March 30, 
1870. It was not acted on by Tennessee; it was rejected by Cali- 
fornia, Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland and Oregon; ratified by the 
remaining 30 States. New York rescinded its ratification January 
5, 1870. New Jersey rejected it in 1870, but ratified it in 1871.) 



Article XVI 

The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on in- 
comes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment 
among the several States, and without regard to any census or 
enumeration. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-first Congress, July 12, 1909, and de- 
clared ratified February 25, 1913. The income tax amendment was 
ratified by all the States except Connecticut, Florida, Pennsylvania, 
Rhode Island, Utah, and Virginia.) 



Constitution of the United States 111 

Article XVII 

1. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two 
Senators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six 
years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each 
State shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most 
numerous branch of the State Legislatures. 

2. When vacancies happen in the representation of any State 
in the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue 
writs of election to fill such vacancies; Provided, That the Legis- 
lature of any State may empower the Executive thereof to make 
temporary appointments until the people fill the vacancies by 
election as the Legislature may direct. 

3. This amendment shall not be so construed as to aflfect the 
election or term of any Senator chosen before it becomes valid as 
part of the Constitution. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-second Congress on the 16th day of May, 
1912, and declared ratified May 31, 1913. Adopted by all the States 
except Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, 
Maryland, Mississippi, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah and 
Vii'ginia.) 

Article XVIII 

1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manu- 
facture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the 
importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the 
United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof 
for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited. 

2. The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent 
power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. 

3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been 
ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the Legislatures 
of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven 
years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the 
Congress. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-fifth Congress, December 18, 1917, and 
ratified by 36 States; was declared in effect on January 16, 1920.) 

Article XIX 

1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not 
be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on 
account of sex. 



112 North Carolina Manual 

2. Congress shall have power, by appropriate legislation, to 
enforce the provisions of this article. 

(Proposed by the Sixty-fifth Congress. On August 26, 1920, it 
was proclaimed in effect, having been ratified (June 19, 1919 — 
August 18, 1920) by three-quarters of the States. The Tennessee 
House, August 31st, rescinded its ratification, 47 to 24.) 

Article XX 

1. The terms of the President and Vice President shall end at 
noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and 
Representatives at noon on the 3rd day of January of the years 
in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been 
ratified; and the terms of their successors shall then begin. 

2. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and 
such meeting shall begin at noon on the 3rd day of January, unless 
they shall by law appoint a different day. 

3. If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the 
President, the President elect shall have died, the Vice President 
elect shall become President. If a President shall not have been 
chosen before the time fixed for the beginning of his term, or if 
the President elect shall have failed to qualify, then the Vice 
President elect shall act as President until a President shall have 
qualified ; and the Congress may by law provide for the case 
wherein neither a President elect nor a Vice President elect shall 
have qualified, declaring who shall then act as President, or the 
manner in which one who is to act shall be selected, and such 
person shall act accordingly until a President or Vice President 
shall have qualified. 

4. The Congress may by law provide for the case of the death 
of any of the persons from whom the House of Representatives 
may choose a President whenever the right of choice shall have 
devolved upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the 
persons from whom the Senate may choose a Vice President when 
the right of choice shall have devolved upon them. 

5. Sections 1 and 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of October 
following the ratification of this article. 

6. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been 
ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures 



Constitution of the United States 113 

of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the 
date of its submission. 

(Proposed by the 72nd Congress, First Session. On February 6, 
1933, it w^as proclaimed in effect, having been ratified by thirty- 
nine states.) 



Article XXI 

1. The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of 
the United States is hereby repealed. 

2. The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, 
or possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of 
intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby 
prohibited. 

3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been 
ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by conventions in the 
several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years 
from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Con- 
gress. 

(Proposed by the 72nd Congress, Second Session. Proclaimed 
in effect on December 5, 1933, having been ratified by thirty-six 
States. By proclamation of the same date, the President proclaimed 
that the eighteenth amendment to the Constitution was repealed 
on December 5, 1933.) 



PART II 
CENSUS 



POPULATION OF THE STATE OF NORTH 

CAROLINA 

Seventeenth Census of the United States: 1950 

Based on preliminary population figures, North Carolina's urban 
places continued to grow faster than rural areas between 1940 
and 1950, according to the seventeenth decennial census, issued by 
Director Roy V. Peel, of the Bureau of the Census, Department 
of Commerce. 

According to the final figures, the total urban population in- 
creased from 974,175 in 1940 to 1,368,101 in 1950, or 40.4 per cent, 
while the rural population increased from 2,597,448 in 1940 to 
2,693,828 in 1950 or an increase of 3.3 per cent. The final count 
of the Seventeenth Consus for the entire state on April 1, 1950 
was 4,061,929 compared to 3,571,623 for 1940, showing an increase 
of 13.7 per cent. Urban residents accounted for 33.7 per cent of 
the State's population in 1950 as compared with 27.3 per cent for 
1940. Rural areas in 1950 accounted for 66.3 per cejit of the total 
population. The Census Bureau considers as ui'ban areas the in- 
corporated places of 2500 or more, or unincorporated places of 2500 
or more located outside an urbanized area. The remaining terri- 
tory is classified as rural. 

There were 30 incorporated places of 10,000 or more in 1950 
according to preliminary counts. Four of these (Albemarle, Hen- 
derson, Monroe, and Sanford) reached this size since 1940. All of 
these cities increased in population between 1940 and 1950. 

The final figures, by counties, of the 1950 census showed that 
there was a gain in population in 78 of the 100 counties. Onslow 
county, with an increase of 133.3 per cent had the most extensive 
growth, followed by Cumberland with 61.8 per cent. Craven with 
55.5 per cent, Orange with 49.2 per cent and New Hanover with 
32.1 per cent. 

The first census of North Carolina was taken in 1790, returning 
a population of 393,751. The population has shown an increase at 
every census since that time. The population passed 1,000,000 be- 
tween 1860 and 1870, 2,000,000 between 1900 and 1910, 3,000,000 
between 1920 and 1930, and 4,000,000 between 1940 and 1950. The 
present population represents a density of 77.1 inhabitants per 
square mile. North Carolina's total area in square miles is 52,712. 
Land area is 49,142 square miles; water area is 3,570 square miles. 

Table 1 presents the figures for counties and foi- incorporated 
places of 10,000 or more, and Table 2 for incorporated places of 
less than 10,000. 117 



118 



North Carolina Manual 



TABLE 1. POPULATION OF COUNTIES AND OF INCORPORATED PLACES 
OF 10,000 OR MORE IN NORTH CAROLINA: 19?0 



County or Place 


Population 


County or Place 


Population 


County or Place 


Population 


The State 


4,081,929 

1,368,101 

2,693,828 

33.7 

71,220 

14,554 

8,1.55 

26,781 
21,878 

13,. 352 
37,134 
26,439 
29,703 
19,238 

124,403 

45,518 

63,783 

43,3,52 

5,223 

23,059 
20,870 
61,794 
25,392 
18,294 

12,540 

6,006 

64,357 

50,621 

48,823 

96,006 

6,201 

5,405 

62.244 

15,420 


Counties — Cont. 
Duplin 


41,074 
101,6.39 

51,634 
146,135 

31,341 

110,836 

9,555 

6,886 

31,793 

18,024 

191,057 
58,377 

47,605 
37,631 
30,921 

21,453 
15,756 
6,479 
56,303 
19,261 

65,906 
11,004 
23,522 
45,953 
27,459 

16,174 
20,, 522 
27,938 
25,720 
197,052 

15.143 
17,260 
.33,129 
59,919 
63,272 


CavNTiES^Cont. 

Northampton 

Onslow... 






28,432 


Rural .. . 


Durham 


42,047 


Per Cent Uhb4n. 


Edgecombe 

Forsyth 


Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 


34,435 
9,993 




Franklin 


24,347 


Counties: 


Gaston 


18,423 


Alexander 


Gates 


9,602 




Graham 


24,361 




Granville 

Greene 


63,789 


Ashe 


Polk . 


11,627 


Avery 


Guilford 


Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly. .. 


50,804 


Beaufort 


Hahfax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson... 

Hertford 

Hoke.. 


39,597 


Bertie . 


87,769 


Bladen. 


64,816 


Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Burke 


75,410 

46,356 
49,780 


Cabarrus 


Hyde 


26,336 


Caldwell.. 


Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones . 


37,130 


Camden 


Stokes 


21,520 


Carteret... 


Surry 

Swain. 


45,593 


Caswell 


9,921 


Catawba .. 


Lee 


Transylvania 

Tyrrell 


15,194 


Chatham.. 


Lenoir 


5,048 


Cherokee 

Chowan 


Lincob 

Macon.- 


Union... 

Vance... . . . 


42,034 
32,101 


Clay . 


Madison 

Martin 


Wake 


136,450 


Cleveland 


Warren 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 


23,539 


Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland . 


McDowell 

Mecklenburg 

Mitchell 


13,180 
18,342 

64,267 


Currituck. 


Montgomery 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 


45,243 


Dare . 


Wilson 

Yadkin 


54,506 


Davidson 

Davie . 


22.1.33 
16,306 









Incorporated Places or 10,000 or More 



Albemarle 

Asheville 

Burlington 

Charlotte 

Concord.. 


11,798 
53,000 
24,560 
134,042 
16,486 

71,311 
12,685 
34,715 
23,069 
21,454 


Greensboro 

Greenville 

Henderson 

Hickory 

High Point 


74,389 
16,724 
10,996 
14,765 
39,973 

18,336 
13,571 
10,140 
15,812 
65,679 


Reidsville 

Rocky Mount 

Salisbury 

Sanford 

Shelby 

Statesville 

Thomasville 

Wilmington 

Wilson 


11,708 
27,697 
20,102 
10,013 
15 508 


Durham .. 


16,901 


EHzabeth City... 

Fayetteville 

Gastonia 


Lexington 

Monroe 

New Bern 

Raleigh 


11,154 
45,043 
23,010 


Goldsboro 


Winston-Salem... 


87,811 



Population of Cities and Towns 



119 



TABLE 2. population OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 10,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1950 

2.500 to 10,000 



City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 


City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 


Ahoskie 


Hertford 

Randolph 

Carteret 

Gaston 


3,579 
7,701 
3,212 
5,330 
3,961 

2,973 
3,908 
4,906 
9,177 
3,492 

4,414 
3,629 
6,316 
4,468 
2,842 

2,942 
4,971 
5,026 
5,061 
6,103 

3,960 
7,206 
7,134 
4,045 

7,888 

5,423 
2,545 
9,186 
2,740 
7,121 


Morchead City 

Morgan ton • 

Mount Airy 

Mount Olive 

Newton 


Carteret 

Burke 


5 144 




8,311 


Beaufort 


Surry 


7 192 






3,732 


Bessemer City 


Gaston. -- 


Catawba 

Wilkes 


6 039 


Boone 


Watauga 

Transylvania 

Haywood 

Orange 


North Wilkesboro... 
Oxford. 


4 379 


Brevard 


Granville 

Washington 

Halifax 

Richmond 

Person 


6,685 


Canton. .. ...... 


Plymouth 


4,486 


Chapel Hill 


Roanoke Rapids 

Rockingham 

Roxboro. 

Rutherfordton 

Scotland Neck 

Selma 


8,156 


Cherry ville . . 


Gaston 


3,356 


Clinton. 


Sampson 

Rockingham 

Harnett 

Chowan 

Surry _ _ 

Pitt 

Rutherford 

Alamance 

Richmond 

Henderson 

Onslow 

Cleveland 

Scotland 

Rockingham 

Caldwell 

Lincoln 

Franklin 

Robeson 

McDowell 

Iredell 


4,321 


Draper 


Rutherford 

Halifax 

Johnston 

Johnston- 

Moore 


3,146 




2,730 


Eden ton 


2,639 


Elkin 


Smithfield 

Southern Pines 

Silencer..- -- 

Spindale 


5,574 




4,272 


Forest Citv 


Rowan 

Rutherford 

Edgecombe 

Burke 


3,242 


Graham 


3,8£1 


Hamlet 


Tarboro . 


8,12G 


Hendcrsonville. . 


Valdese .... 


2,730 


Jacksonville 


Wadesboro 


Anson 

Wake 


3,408 




Wake Forest 

Washington 

Waynesville 

Whiteville .. 


3,704 


Lauriiihurg 

Leaksville 

Lenoir 


Beaufort 

Haywood 

Columbus 

Martin 


9.698 
5,295 

4,238 


Lincolnton 

Louisburg ._ 

Lumherton 

Marion 

Mooresville 


Williamston 


4.975 



1,000 to 2,500 



Aberdeen 

Andrews 


Moore 

Cherokee 

Harnett 

Wake 


1,603 
1,397 
1,182 
1,065 
1,218 

1,112 
2,282 
2,528 
2,102 
1,402 

1,034 
1,174 
1,145 
1,499 
1,613 


Bur.isviUe 

Carolina Beach 

Carrboro 

Carthage 

Cary 

Chadbourn 

China Grove 

Clayton 

Coats- 

Columbia 

Conover 

Cornelius 

Dallas 

Davidson 

East Flat Rock 


Yancey 

New Hanover... 

Orange 

Moore 

Wake 

Columbus 

Rowan 

Johnston 

Harnett 

Tyrrell 

Catawba 

Mecklenburg 

Gaston 


1,341 
1,080 


Angier 


1,795 


Apex 


1,194 


Archdale .... . 


Randolph 

Bertie 

Pitt 


1.446 


Aulander 

Ayden 


2,103 
1,491 


Belhaven 


Beaufort 

Johnston - 

Pitt 

Montgomery 

Buncombe 

Cleveland 

Swain 

Pender 


2.229 


Benson 

Bethel 

Biscoe 

Black Mountain 

Boiling Springs 

Bryson City 

Burgaw 


1.047 
1,161 

1,164 
1,548 
2,454 


Mecklenburg 

Henderson- 


2,423 
1,285 



120 



North Carolina Manual 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 2,500 IN NORTH CAROLINA: l%0— Continued 





1,000 to 2,50C 


) — Continued 






City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 


City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 


East Lumberton 

East Spencer 


Robeson .__ 

Rowan 


1,106 
2,444 
1,611 
1,109 
2,361 

1,056 
2,319 
1,975 
1,414 
1,395 

1,992 
1,180 
1,218 

} 1,866 

2,286 

1,769 
2,096 
1,329 
1,082 
1,077 

1,768 
1,129 
2,396 
1,852 

1,827 

1,342 
1,061 

1 1,173 

2,291 
2,313 

1,789 
1,952 
1,404 
1,258 
1,974 

2,246 
1,060 

1 2,068 

1,909 
1,201 


Mount Holly 

Mount Pleasant 

Murfreesboro 

Murphy . .. 


Gaston 

Cabarrus 

Hertford 

Cherokee 

Nash 


2,241 
1,019 


Elizabeth town 


Bladen 


2,140 


Elon CoUege 

Enfield 


Alamance 

Halifax .__ 

Columbus 

Robeson 

Macon 


2,433 


Nashville . 


1,302 


Fair Bluff 


Norwood 


Stanly 


1,735 




Pembroke 


Robeson 

Surry 


1,212 


Franklin 


Pilot Mountain 

Pinetops .. 


1.092 


Frauklinton 


Franklin -. 

Wayne. 


Edgecombe 

Mecklenburg 

Chatham 

Hoke 


1,031 




Pineville 


1,373 


Fuquay Springs 


Wake 


Pittsboro 


1,094 


Wake 


Raeford 


2,030 




Northampton 

Alamance 

Guilford 

Caldwell 

Haywood 

Perquimans 

Orange 


Ramseur __ .. 


Randolph 

Randolph 

Robeson 

Moore 


1,134 


Gibsonville I 

Granite Falls 

Hazelwood 


Randleman 


2,066 


Red Springs 

Robbins-. .... 


2,245 
1,158 


Hertford 


Roberson ville 

Roseboro . _. 


Martin... 


1,414 


Hillsboro 


Sampson 

Robeson 

Robeson 

Chatham 

Brunswick 

Nash 


1.241 


Holly Ridge -_ 


Onslow 


Rowland.. 


1,293 


Cumberland 

Yadkin 


Saint Pauls 


2,251 


Jonesville 


SilerCity 


2,501 


Kenly 


Johnston 

Forsyth 

Lenoir. . 


Southport 


1,748 


Kernprsvillp 


Spring Hope 

Spruce Pine 


1,275 




Mitchell 

Gaston.. .._ . 


2,280 


Landis 


Rowan 


Stanley 

Sylva 


1,644 




Randolph 

Harnett 

Halifax 


Jackson 

Columbus 

Alexander 

Montgomery 

Polk 


1,382 




Tabor City 


2,033 


Littleton { 


Taylorsville 

Troy 


1,310 
2,213 




Catawba 

Gaston . 


Tryon 


1,985 


Lowell 


Wallace 


Duplin 

Stokes 




Madison 


Rockingham 

Catawba 

Madison 

Union 


1,622 


Maiden 


Walnut Cove. - 

Warren ton ... . 


1,132 


Mars Hill 


Warren 

Duplin 


1,166 


Marshvillp 


Warsaw 


1,598 




Robeson 

Rockingham 

Gaston 

Alamance 


Weaverville ... 


Buncombe 

Halifax 


1,111 




Weldon 


2,295 




Wendell 


Wake 


1,253 


Mebane \ 




Wilkes 


1,370 


Windsor 


Bertie 


1,781 






Zebulon 


Wake 


1,378 


Mount Gilead 


Montgomery 









Population of Cities and Towns 



121 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 1,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 195Q-Continued 

Less Than 1,000 



City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 


City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 


Acme 

Addor 


Columbus 

Moore 

Davie . 


139 
110 
216 

885 
545 

273 
525 
294 
844 
49 

525 
151 

743 
428 
462 

381 

\ 329 

453 
128 
190 

236 

259 
724 
657 
316 

796 

1 661 

215 
606 
502 

227 
239 
805 
469 
768 

190 
177 
255 

688 
284 

617 
305 
421 
506 
265 


Cherry 

Claremont. . .. 


Washington 

Catawba 

Bladen 

Rowan 

Haywood 

Bertie 

Polk... 

Edgecombe 

Northampton 

Bladen 


73 
669 


Advance 


Clarkton 


5S9 


Alexander Mills 


Rutherford 

Anson 


Cleveland 


580 




Clyde 


598 


Arapahoe 


Pamlico 

Yadkin 

Pender 


Colerain 


367 


Arlington 


Columbus - .. 


486 


Atkinson . 


Conetoe 


172 


Atlantic. 


Carteret 

Carteret 

Beaufort 

Sampson 

Nash 


Conway 


618 


Atlantic Beach. 


Council 


64 


Aurora 


Cove City 


Craven 


465 


Autrvville .. 


Creedmoor 


Granville. 

Washington 

Avery 


852 


Baileys 


Creswell 


425 


Bakersville 


Mitchell 

Avery 


Crossnore . .. 


240 


Banner Elk 


Crouse 


Lincoln 

Cherokee 

Lenoir 


303 


Bath . 


Beaufort 

Edgecombe 

Nash 


Culberson 




Battleboro | 


150 


Deep Run 


142 


Bayboro 


Pamlico 

Martin... 


Deico . .. 


Columbus 

Gaston . 


257 




Dellview . . 


7 


Bell Arthur 


Pitt. 


Denton 


Davidson 

Lincoln 

Jackson 

Surry 


766 


Bennett 


Chatham 

Bertie ... 


Denver 


415 


Bertie 


Dillsboro -. 


198 


Beaulaville 


Duplin 


Dobson - .. 


609 


Biltmore Forest 


Buncombe 

Wilson 




Craven 


638 


Black Creek 


Drexel 


Burke 


988 


Bladenboro 


Bladen 


Dublin 


Bladen 


243 


Blowing Rock I 

Bolivia.. . 


Caldwell 

Watauga 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Yadkin 


Dudley 


Wayne 


133 


Dundarrach 

East Bend 


Hoke 


134 


Yadkin 


475 


Bolton 

Boonville ... 


East Laurinburg 

Edward 


Scotland. 

Beaufort. 

Avery 


745 


Bostic. . 


Rutherford 

Duplin 


155 


Bowdens 


Elk Park 


545 


Bridffeton 


Craven 


Elienboro .... 


Rutherford 

Richmond 

Wilson 


537 


Broadway 


Lee 


Ellerbe 


773 




Catawba 

Columbus 

Harnett 

Franklin 


Elm City . 


839 






Wayne 


192 


Bimlevel 


Everetts 


Martin 


244 


Bunn 




Columbus 

Duplin 


245 


Calypso 


Faison 


768 


Cameron 


Moore 


Faith 


Rowan -- 


490 


Candor 


Montgomery 

Jackson 

Nash 


Falcon 


Cumberland 

Pitt.... 


245 


Cashiers 


Falkland 


174 




Fountain 


Pitt -. 


451 


Catawba 


Catawba 

Columbus 


Four Oaks 


Johnston 

Randolph 


942 


Cerro Gordo _. 


Franklin villa. 


778 



122 



North Carolina Manual 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 1,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1950— Continued 

Less Than 1,000 — Continued 



City or Town 


County 


Ponula- 
tion 


City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 


Garland.. . 


Sampson 

Northampton. __ 
Gates .. 


5.39 

S-14 
323 
118 
609 

R95 
145 
132 
372 
168 

591 
510 
414 
535 
346 

514 

882 
374 
167 
147 

137 
356 
169 
515 
529 

603 
398 
406 
253 
721 

922 
916 
308 
232 
843 

246 
748 
529 
359 
136 

405 

674 
189 
461 

228 


Lake Lure 


Rutherford 

Columbus 

Northampton 

Cleveland 

Henderson 

Cleveland 

Bertie... 


174 


Garysburg 

Gatesville , . 


Lake Waccamaw 

Lasker 


575 
177 


Germanton . 


Stokes 


Lattimore 


286 


Gibson 


Scotland 

Burke 


Laurel Park 

Lawndale 


302 


Glen Alpine .. 


964 


Godwin _. . 


Cumberland 

Martin 

Chatham 

Lenoir 

Rowan 


Lewiston 


339 


Gold Point 


Lilesville .... . 


Anson .. 


605 


Goldston. .... 


Linden 


Cumberland 

Stanly 


194 


Grainger . __ . 


Locust 

Lucama 


216 


Granite Quarrv ., . 


Wilson 


405 


Grifton . ... 


Pitt 


Lumber Bridge 

Macclesfield 

Macon 


Robeson 

Edgecombe 

Warren 

Duplin 

Moore 


154 


Grimesland . . 


Pitt 


370 


Grover 


Cleveland 

Hahfax.. 


238 


Halifax.... .. .. 


MaoTiolia 


585 


Hamilton 


Martin __ 


Manlv 


280 


Hamilton Lakes 


Guilford 

Iredell 


Manteo 


Dare . 


635 


Harmony 


Margaretsville 

Marietta 


Northampton... 

Robeson 

Madison 

Mecklenburg 

Greene 

Jones 

Robeson 

Anson 


113 


Harrellsville. . .. 


Hertford 

Sampson 

Martin 

Clav 


94 


Harrels Store. 


Marshall 


983 


Hassell ... . .. 


Matthews 


589 


Hayesville 


Maurv 


251 


Haywood-.- ... 


Chatham 

Macon 


Mavsville ... 


818 


Highlands 


McDonalds 


78 


Hildebran.. 


Burke. . 


McFarlan 


136 


Hobgood. . ... _ 


Halifax 

Richmond 

Wake 

Greene 

Madison 

Caldwell 

Mecklenburg 

Union 

Lincoln 

Northampton ... 

Moore 

Guilford 

Martin. . 


Merry Oaks 

Micro . 


Chatham 

Johnston 

Vance... 


160 


Hoffman 


310 


Hollv Springs 


Middleburg 


217 


Hookerton 


Middlesex 

Midway. 


Nash 


446 


Hot 3;)rings 


Richmond 

Caswell _ _ 

Northampton 

Union. 


479 


Hudson 

Huntersville 


Milton 

Milwaukee. 


317 
302 


Indian Trail 


Mineral Springs 

Morrisville 


135 


Iron Station 


Wake 

Caldwell 

Anson.- 

Stanly. 


221 


Jackson . .. . 


Mortimer.. .. 


13 


Jackson Springs 

Jamestown 


Morven 


601 


New London 

Newland 

Newport 

Newton Grove 

Norlina 

Norman 

North Lumberton . . . 

Oak City 

Oakboro 


285 


Jamesville 


Avery,.- -- 

Carteret 

Sampson 

Warren _ - . 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Martin 

Stanly 


425 


Jefferson 


Ashe 


676 


Jupiter - 


Buncombe 

Bertie 

Duplin. 

Vance 

Wake 


374 


Kelford.. 

Kenansville 


874 
300 


Kittrcll 

Knightdale 


423 
518 


Kure Beach 


New Hanover... 


631 



Population of Cities and Towns 



123 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 1,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: \950~Cnntir,ncd 

Less Than IfiOO^Continued 



City or Town 



Oiklev--- 
Old Fort. 
Oriental.. 
Orrum _ . . 
Pactolus. 




Palmyra 

Pantego 

Parkersburg. 

Parkton 

Parmele 



Patterson . . 
Peachland. 
Pikeville,.. 
PmeHilL. 
Pine Level. 



Pinebluff 

Pinetown 

Polkton 

Pollocksville. 
Powellsville. 



Princeton... 
Prince ville.. 
Proctorville. 

Rhodhiss--. 

Richfield... 



Rich Square. 

Richlands 

Robbinsville. 

Roberdel 

Rockwell 



Rolesville. 

Ronda 

Roper 

Rose Hill. 
Rosman... 



Roxobel... 
Ruth 

Salemburg. 

Saluda 

Saratoga. . 



Seaboard. 
Seagrove . 

Severn 

Shallotte. 



Sharpsburg . 



Pitt 

McDowell. 

Pamlico 

Robeson... 
Pitt 



Halifax... 
Beaufort. 
Sampson . 
Robeson. 
Martin... 



Caldwell . 

Anson 

Wayne... 

Lenoir 

Johnston . 

Moore 

Beaufort. 

Anson 

Jones 

Bertie 



Johnston 

Edgecombe. 

Robeson 

Burke 

Caldwell-.-. 
Stanly 



Northampton. 

Onslow 

Graham 

Richmond 

Rowan 



Wake 

Wilkes 

Washington.. 

Duplin 

Transvlvania. 



Bertie 

Rutherford. 

Sampson 

Polk 

Wilson 




Northampton... 

Randolph 

Northampton... 

Brunswick 

Edgecombe 

Nash 

Wilson-. 


745 
319 
340 
493 

415 



5S 
771 
590 
162 
265 

67 
275 
114 
527 
406 

195 
485 
464 
386 
602 

575 
301 
459 
420 
250 

60S 
919 
232 

923 

237 

971 
877 
515 
451 
852 

288 
545 
793 
896 
535 

394 
324 
435 
547 

366 




Shelmerdine. 

Simpson 

Sims 

Smithtown.. 
Snow Hill 



South Creek 

South Wadesboro. 

Sparta 

Speed 

Staley 



Stantonsburg. 

Star 

Stedman 

Stem 

Stokes 



Stoneville 

Stonewall 

Stovall 

Swan Quarter. 
Swansboro 



Teacheys... 

Todd 

Townsville. 

Trenton 

Trinity 



Troutman.. 

Turkey 

Unionville.. 
Vanceboro.. 
Vandemere. 



Vass 

Vaughn 

Waco 

Wagram 

Walstonburg. 



Warrensville 

Washington Park. 

Watha 

Waxhaw 

Webster 



West Jefferson . 

Whitakers 

Whitehall 

Wilson Mills... 
Winfall. 



Pitt.... 
Pitt... 
Wilson. 
Yadkin. 
Greene. 



Beaufort 

Anson 

Alleghany. . 
Edgecombe. 
Randolph . . 



Wilson 

Montgomery. 
Cumberland. 

Granville 

Pitt 



Rockingham. 

Pamlico 

Granville 

Hyde 

Onslow 



DupHn... 

Ashe 

Watauga. 

Vance 

Jones 

Randolph . 

Iredell.... 
Sampson.. 

Union 

Craven 

Pamlico... 



Moore 

Warren 

Cleveland . 
Scotland.. 
Greene 



Ashe 

Beaufort. 
Pender... 

Union 

Jackson . . 



Ashe 

Edgecombe. 

Nash 

Wayne 

Johnston 

Penjuimans. 



32 

278 
207 
182 
946 

108 
390 
820 
103 
236 

627 
677 
424 
217 
217 

786 
272 
410 
212 
559 

226 

89 

219 
469 

764 

613 
223 
124 
753 
475 

757 
181 
310 
397 
177 

120 
421 
222 
818 
142 

871 

962 

197 
349 
421 



124 



North Carolina Manual 



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF LESS 
THAN 1,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1950— Continued 

Less Than 1,000— Continued 



City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 


City or Town 


County 


Popula- 
tion 


Wingate 


Union 


793 
870 
834 
128 
590 


Woodville 

Wrightsville Beach . . 

Yadkin College 

Yadkin ville _- 

Youngsville ._ 


Bertie 


387 


Winterville 


Pitt 

Hertford 

Franklin __ 

Northampton... 


New Hanover.-. 

Davidson 

Yadkin .- 

Franklin 


711 


Winton . 


82 


Wood 

Woodland 


820 
619 









PART III 
POLITICAL 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS 

(Chapter 3, Public Laws 1941) 

First District — Beaufort, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Dare, 
Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Martin, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Pitt, 
Tyrrell, Washington. 

Second District — Bertie, Edgecombe, Greene, Halifax, Lenoir, 
Northampton, Warren, Wilson. 

Third District — Carteret, Craven, Duplin, Jones, Onslow, Pam- 
lico, Pender, Sampson, Wayne. 

Fourth District — Chatham, Franklin, Johnston, Nash, Randolph, 
Vance, Wake. 

Fifth Dist)ict — Caswell, Forsyth, Granville, Person, Rocking- 
ham, Stokes, Surry. 

Sixth District — Alamance, Durham, Guilford, Orange. 

Seventh District — Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, Cumberland, 
Harnett, New Hanover, Robeson. 

Eighth District — Anson, Davidson, Davie, Hoke, Lee, Montgom- 
ery, Moore, Richmond, Scotland, Union, Wilkes, Yadkin. 

Ninth District — Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Cabarrus, Cald- 
well, Iredell, Rowan, Stanly, Watauga. 

Tenth District — Avery, Burke, Catawba, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, 
Mitchell. 

Eleventh District — McDowell, Polk, Rutherford, Cleveland, Gas- 
ton, Madison, Yancey. 

Twelfth District'* — Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Hay- 
wood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Swain, Transylvania. 

JUDICIAL DISTRICTS 

Eastern Division 

First District — Camden, Gates, Currituck, Chowan, Pasquotank, 
Beaufoi-t, Hyde, Dare, Perquimans, Tyrrell. 

Second District — Nash, Wilson, Edgecombe, Martin, Washing- 
ton. 



'Created by the 1941 General Assembly. 

127 



128 North Carolina Manual 

Third Distinct — Bertie, Hertford, Northampton, Halifax, War- 
ren, Vance. 

Fourth District — Lee, Chatham, Johnston, Wayne, Harnett. 

Fifth District — Pitt, Craven, Carteret, Pamlico, Jones, Greene. 

Sixth District — Onslow, Duplin, Sampso-n, Lenoir. 

Seventh District — Wake, Franklin. 

Eighth District — Brunswick, Columbus, New Hanover, Pender. 

Ninth District — Robeson, Bladen, Hoke, Cumberland. 

Tenth District — Gi'anville, Person, Alamance, Durham, Orange. 

Western Division 

Eleventh District — Ashe, Forsyth, Alleghany. 

Twelfth District — Davidson, Guilford. 

Thirteenth District — Richmond, Stanly, Union, Moore, Anson, 
Scotland. 

Fourteenth District — Mecklenburg, Gaston. 

Fifteenth District — Alexander, Montgomery, Randolph, Iredell, 
Cabarrus, Rowan. 

Sixteenth District — Catawba, Lincoln, Cleveland, Burke, Cald- 
well, Watauga. 

Seventeenth District — Avery, Davie, Mitchell, Wilkes, Yadkin. 

Eighteenth District — McDowell, Transylvania, Yancey, Ruther- 
ford, Henderson, Polk. 

Nineteenth District — Buncombe, Madison. 

Twentieth District — Haywood, Swain, Cherokee, Macon, Gra- 
ham, Clay, Jackson. 

Twenty-first District — Caswell, Rockingham, Stokes, Surry. 

APPORTIONMENT OF SENATORS BY DISTRICTS 

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CENSUS OF 1940 

AND THE CONSTITUTION 

(Chapter 225, Public Laws 1941) 

First District — Bertie, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Gates, 
Hertford, Pasquotank and Perquimans counties shall elect two 
senators. 



District Divisions 129 

Second District — Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin, Pamlico, Tyr- 
rell and Washington shall elect two senators. 

Third District — Northampton, Vance and Warren shall elect one 
senator. 

Fourth District — Edgecombe and Halifax shall elect two sena- 
tors. 

Fifth District — Pitt shall elect one senator. 

Sixth District — Franklin, Nash and Wilson shall elect two 
senators. 

Seventh District — Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, Lenoir and 
Onslow shall elect two senators. 

Eighth District — Johnston and Wayne shall elect two senators. 

Ninth District — Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and Sampson 
shall elect two senators. 

Tenth District — Bladen, Brunsvdck, Columbus and Cumberland 
shall elect two senators. 

Eleventh District — Robeson shall elect one senator. 

Twelfth District — Harnett, Hoke, Moore and Randolph shall 
elect two senators. 

Thirteenth District — Chatham, Lee and Wake shall elect two 
senators. 

Fourteenth District — Durham, Granville and Person shall elect 
two senators. 

Fifteenth District — Caswell and Rockingham shall elect one 
senator. 

Sixteenth District — Alamance and Orange shall elect one sen- 
ator. 

Seventeenth District — Guilford shall elect one senator. 

Eighteenth District — Davidson, Montgomery, Richmond and 
Scotland shall elect two senators. 

Nineteenth District — Anson, Stanly and Union shall elect two 
senators. 

Twentieth District — Mecklenburg shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-first District — Cabarrus and Rowan shall elect two 
senators. 



130 North Carolina Manual 

Twenty-secona District — Forsyth shall elect one senator. 
Twenty-third District — Stokes and Surry shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-fourth District — Davie, Wilkes and Yadkin shall elect 
one senator. 

Twenty-fifth District — Catawba, Iredell and Lincoln shall elect 
two senators. 

Twenty-sixth District — Gaston shall elect one senator. 

Twenty-seventh District — Cleveland, McDowell and Rutherford 
shall elect two senators. 

Twenty-eighth District — Alexander, Burke and Caldwell shall 
elect one senator. 

Twenty-ninth District — Alleghany, Ashe and Watauga shall 
elect one senator. 

Thirtieth District — Avery, Madison, Mitchell and Yancey shall 
elect one senator. 

Thirty-first District — Buncombe shall elect one senator. 

Thirty-second District — Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Polk and 
Transylvania shall elect two senators. 

Thirty-third District — Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon and 
Swain shall elect one senator. 



APPORTIONMENT OF MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE 

OF REPRESENTATIVES IN ACCORDANCE WITH 

THE CENSUS OF 1940 AND THE CONSTITUTION 

(Chapter 112, Public Laws 1941) 



No. of 
County Reps. 

Alamance 1 

Alexander 1 

Alleghany 1 

Anson 1 

Ashe 1 

Avery 1 

Beaufort 1 

Bertie 1 

Bladen 1 

Brunswick 1 

Buncombe 3 

Burke 1 

Cabarrus 2 

Caldwell 1 

Camden 1 

Carteret 1 

Caswell 1 

Catawba 1 

Chatham 1 

Cherokee 1 

Chowan 1 

Clay 1 

Cleveland 1 

Columbus 1 

Craven 1 

Cumberland 2 

Currituck 1 

Dare 1 

Davidson 1 

Davie 1 

Duplin 1 

Durham 2 

Edgecombe 1 

Forsyth 3 



No. of 
Cotinty Reps. 

Franklin 1 

Gaston 2 

Gates 1 

Graham 1 

Granville 1 

Greene 1 

Guilford 4 

Halifax 1 

Harnett 1 

Haywood 1 

Henderson 1 

Hertford 1 

Hoke 1 

Hyde 1 

Iredell 1 

Jackson 1 

Johnston 2 

Jones 1 

Lee 1 

Lenoir 1 

Lincoln 1 

Macon 1 

Madison 1 

Martin 1 

McDowell 1 

Mecklenburg .... 4 

Mitchell 1 

Montgomery .... 1 

Moore 1 

Nash 1 

New Hanover ... 1 

Northampton ... 1 

Onslow 1 

Orange 1 



No. of 
County Reps. 

Pamlico 1 

Pasquotank 1 

Pender 1 

Perquimans 1 

Person 1 

Pitt 2 

Polk 1 

Randolph 1 

Richmond 1 

Robeson 2 

Rockingham .... 1 

Rowan 2 

Rutherford 1 

Sampson 1 

Scotland 1 

Stanly 1 

Stokes 1 

Surry 1 

Swain 1 

Transylvania ... 1 

Tyrrell 1 

Union 1 

Vance 1 

Wake 3 

Warren 1 

Washington 1 

Watauga 1 

Wayne 1 

Wilkes 1 

Wilson 1 

Yadkin 1 

Yancey 1 



131 



STATE DEMOCRATIC PLATFORM FOR 

1954 

The Democrats of North Carolina, in convention duly assembled 
in the City of Raleigh, adopt the following statement as the plat- 
form of the Democratic Party of North Carolina for 1954: 

National Affairs 

During the great and prosperous period, 1932-1952, while the 
affairs of the Federal Government were under the control and 
the direction of the Democratic Party, a great number of pro- 
gressive and forward-looking measures were enacted. These vari- 
ous measures were designed to protect and promote the well-being 
of all of the people of America. 

During this period from 1932-1952, representatives of the Re- 
publication Party went up and down this land and condemned 
each of the forward-looking Democratic measures when they were 
first proposed, and charged that the Democratic Party was im- 
posing creeping socialism upon America. 

In 1952, the Republican Party, upon a great array of promises 
held out to the common men and women of America, succeeded 
in gaining the Presidency of the United States and the control 
of the Federal Government. It embraced each and all of the great 
Democratic measures, which its representatives had fought and 
opposed. Notwithstanding the fact that the Republican Party 
embraced such measures, and the fact that it has not attempted to 
repeal any of them, it is woefully weak in administration. It is 
lacking in spirit and will power. Illustrative of this is its activi- 
ties in the field of agriculture. The duty and the responsibility 
for the administration of the agricultural programs has been 
entrusted to administrators who appear to be not only out of 
sympathy with the existing farm programs inaugurated by the 
Democratic Party, but gives the impression that they are down- 
right antagonistic to them. In this dilemma, their alternative 
consists mainly of the questionable, flexible price support program 
— a program which will support most when the fai'mers' need is 
least — a program which will support least when the farmers' 
need is greatest. 

132 



Democratic Platform 133 

In other fields of activity, the American people are suffering 
because the present administration does not possess the willpower 
and the spirit necessary to properly administer the great foi-ward- 
looking progressive measures which were inaugurated and adopted 
during the democratic administration. Those now in charge of the 
administration of the national affairs seem to be wholly lacking in 
the common touch, and appear to be unable to see anything from 
the vantage point of the common man. The American people must 
not suffer on the account of weak-kneed and lame administrative 
of these great programs designed to improve the standard of 
living and the general welfare of all Americans. 

Congress 

The Democratic Party is especially proud of the fine record 
made by our United States Senators and our Democratic mem- 
bers of the national House of Representatives. Their valiant 
efforts to uphold and defend the principles of the Democratic 
Party, in the face of a Republican national administration and 
a Republican controlled Congress, have not gone unnoticed. The 
statesman-like manner of our Senators and Representatives has 
reflected vast credit on our State. 

Many of our Democratic members were chairmen of important 
committees, both in the House and in the Senate, during the 
period of Democratic control. They set examples in efficiency, 
honesty, and fair play, which the present chairmen would do well 
to emulate. We are proud of their records. 

The General Assembly 

The General Assembly of 1953 is to be commended for meeting 
and solving in the North Carolina way the many large problems 
then facing our State. The splendid relationship and the coopera- 
tion between the executive branch of our government and the 
General Assembly is worthy of particular note. 

We are confident that the General Assembly of 1955 will work 
in close cooperation with Governor Umstead in treating and deal- 
ing with the large, and in some instances unprecedented, prob- 
lems which will confront our State. 



134 



State Conres 




Dial Districts 



135 




136 North Carolina Manual 

The Umstead Administration 

We pay tribute to our great Governor, William B. Umstead, 
who has dedicated himself to the best interests of all of the people 
of North Carolina. Honesty, sincerity, and fair play — in official, 
public and private life — have been his guiding stars. He has 
given to North Carolina an administration with a conscience. 

His program for the further development of education in public 
schools and in the institutions of higher learning; his program 
for improving the mental institutions and the care and treatment 
given to the mentally ill; his program for the development of the 
agricultural interests of the State; his program for the develop- 
ment of commerce and industry, the natural resources, the tourist 
trade, and other economic phases of our State; his program of 
highway safety; his program for improving the parole system of 
North Carolina; and his program to impiove the status of the 
working man and woman and to promote industrial harmony; have 
all contributed, and will continue to make a mighty contribution, 
to the welfare and advancement of North Cai'olina. 

We commend him for the vigorous way and manner in which 
he has acted to protect the best interests of all of North Carolina 
without fear or favor of any man. When his record is written, 
and the roll of his accomplishments is called, history will record 
that Governor Umstead has been one of North Carolina's finest 
Governors, 

For all these things, the Demorcatic Party commends our Gov- 
ernor, and takes this opportunity to express its appreciation for 
his work and service to the State. 

Education 

Recognizing always that a state and its people are made and 
kept strong through a sound system of education, the Democratic 
Party proudly submits, for tempered judgment and appraisal, its 
remarkable record of accomplishment in this vital and essential 
area of life. 

We say without fear of successful contradiction that no state 
at any time has taken a more substantial portion of its tax re- 
sources and applied it more equitably and productively to the edu- 
cational advantage of all of the people. 



Democratic Platform 137 

To comprehend fully the educational program in which North 
Carolina is engaged, we must recognize the fact that more than 
975,000 of our youth are being afforded educational opportunity 
and service. In the public schools there are approximately 953,000 
pupils; in colleges and universities, more than 22,000; in other 
institutions, 850. 

Evidence of our sense of obligation to all young people of North 
Carolina is best attested by tangible appropriations and expendi- 
tures. The 1951 Legislature appropriated $211,685,000.00 to the 
public schools for the 1951-1953 biennium. For 1953-1955, the 
Legislature of 1953 appropriated the sum of $247,351,000.00, and 
an added amount of $9,930,000.00 for retroactive salary payments 
to school personnel for the year 1952-1953, a total of $257,381,000.00. 

In addition, the 1953 Assembly, on recommendation of the Gov- 
ernor, authorized a bond issue in thie amount of $50,000,000.00 
for school building construction. By an overwhelming vote, the 
people approved this measure last October 3. Since 1949, 100 
million dollars in State funds have become available for capital 
outlay purposes. The results have been highly gratifying. The 
State appropriations have stimulated local units to extend their 
building programs through local bond issues amounting to more 
than $116,000,000.00 which means that the post-war program 
will approximate $216,000,000.00, or more. In addition, between 
two and three million dollars in Federal allotments have been 
made available for the construction of school building facilities 
at Federal installations in the State. Consolidation of small schools 
has moved forward. Educational surveys in local units have 
quickened public interest in better educational opportunities. New 
and modern structures, conducive to better teaching, are being 
erected in accordance with the best thinking in school design and 
architecture. 

Along with employees in other state agencies and departments, 
educational personnel were the recipients of added advantages 
accruing from 1953 legislation and appropriations designed to 
increase retirement benefits. 

Through an annual appropriation of $550,000.00 for school 
health, a program begun in 1949, thousands of children have re- 
ceived physical examinations whereby symptoms of ill health 
could be discovered and physical deficiencies corrected. In addition 
to instruction in health education, 25,954 separate medical services 



138 North Carolina Manual 

were rendered children last year. This program has stimulated 
the teachers and children of the State to become more concerned 
about both personal and public health. 

A program of special education for handicapped children, 
created by the 1947 General Assembly, and begun on an experi- 
mental basis with 50 teachers, has grown to the extent that more 
than 9,000 children with mental and physical handicaps are now 
receiving the type of education which will make them useful and 
productive citizens of the State. 

In recognition of the increasing traffic on our highways, and of 
the need for alert and capable drivers, the last General Assembly 
approved funds with which to promote and supervise programs 
of driver training and safety education in our high schools. 

In keeping with the trend to diversify occupational interests, 
and to increase the per capita income of the State, the program 
of vocational education in our public schools has been extended. 
The industrial development of this State has been facilitated be- 
cause many of our youth have been trained in the skills and com- 
petencies necessary in establishing technical and industrial oper- 
ations. 

To institutions of higher learning, the 1953 Legislature appro- 
priated for the 1953-1955 biennium the sum of $36,609,000.00 for 
operating costs, plus $14,090.00 for permanent improvements. 

All in all we can truly say that North Carolina, under the 
guidance of the Democratic Party, has established and developed 
a fine system of public education, which is unsurpassed in any of 
the states of this Union. Our State has met problem after prob- 
lem in this field, and has successfully solved all of them. 

We may be sure that our State, under the guidance of the Demo- 
cratic Party, will meet and successfully solve all problems, known 
and unknown, which confront public education in this anxious 
hour. 

Agriculture 

Prosperity will not long endure in either the State or the Nation 
without a sound and prosperous agriculture. We recognize this 
as a basic economic principle and, therefore, we advocate govern- 
mental policies which will promote the well-being of our farmers 
and encourage the consei^vation of our agricultural resources. 



Democratic Platform I39 

We are proud of the record of the Democratic Party in having 
the vision to conceive and the courage to put into effect the great 
agricultural programs which in our time have rescued farmers 
from the economic peonage of the 'twenties and the early 'thirties, 
have enabled them to share more equitably in the fruits of their 
labor, and have restored dignity and grace to rural living. 

We are especially proud of legislation which has enabled our 
tobacco, cotton, and peanut growers to gear their production to 
market needs, and, after doing so, to enjoy the benefits of reason- 
able price supports. Without such legislation, farming in North 
Carolina would soon revert to the gamble of "boom" and "bust" 
with speculators benefiting more than those who have put their 
toil and money into the production of crops. 

We also take great pride in the accomplishments of the Soil 
Conservation Service, the Agricultural Conservation Program, the 
Rural Electrification Administration, and the great system of 
agricultural credit facilities created under Democratic sponsorship. 

We strongly advocate extension of fixed, high-level price supports 
(at least 90 per cent of parity) for basic commodities, when the 
producers have agreed to reasonable production controls. We also 
favor price supports for other commodities, both storable and 
perishable, when practical; but not to the extent of encouraging- 
over-production for the sake of price-support payments. In the 
case of basic, storable commodities, we recognize the importance 
of allowing suflScient time for the liquidation of any surplus that 
should develop, and feel that adequate provision should be made 
for disposing of such sui'plus commodities over a period of several 
years. 

We also advocate: 

(1) Continued emphasis on agricultural research, at both state 
and national levels, with a view to further improvement of pro- 
duction efl!iciency. 

(2) Greater effort in the development of new uses and expand- 
ing markets for farm commodities, the encouragement of increased 
agricultural exports, and the promotion of better marketing facil- 
ities at home. 

(3) Expansion of agricultural education, using that term in 
its broadest sense. 

(4) Continuation of the Soil Conservation Service as a national 
program to maintain and build up our precious resources of soil 



140 North Carolina Manual 

and water — a program which must transcend purely local interest. 

(5) Continuation of the Rural Electrification Administration 
and the Rural Telephone Program under vigorous, progressive 
policies, which have marked their success under previous Demo- 
cratic administration. 

(6) Further development of diversified farming in North Caro- 
lina, with concerted effort directed toward the improvement of 
pastures and expansion of livestock production. 

(7) Support of adequate agricultural credit facilities making it 
possible for farmers to buy their own farms, and to finance their 
production at reasonable rates of interest. 

(8) Expansion of crop insurance, as need and experience 
dictate. 

We recognize the farm family as a highly desirable social unit, 
and the family farm as the most practical and efficient unit for 
agricultural production. We therefore commit ourselves to pro- 
tect the farm family and to defend the family and to defend the 
family farm. 

We greatly resent efforts to discredit farm people and to under- 
mine certain agricultural reforms of the past two decades, and 
we pledge ourselves to expose and oppose such tactics whenever 
they are used. If the Republican Party wants to destroy the 
agricultural reforms of the Roosevelt and Truman administration, 
then let them do it openly, instead of by indirection or by piece- 
meal tactics. 

Roads 

In 1921, the General Assembly of North Carolina, acting with 
the full support of the people of the State, embarked on a road 
building program with the goal of providing adequate transporta- 
tion facilities for all people in our State. This program has been 
characterized through the years by continued expansion, save for 
the period of World War II, so that, as of January, 1954, North 
Carolina has a total of 31,117 miles of paved rural roads and 34,- 
622 miles of unpaved rural roads which are kept in substantially 
all-weather condition. In addition, there are 2,451 miles of streets 
in the State highway system, almost all of which are paved, thus, 
making a total of 68,190 miles of roads now being maintained 
by the State Highway and Public Works Commission. 



Democratic Platform 141 

Upon the completion of the two hundred million dollar rural 
road program, many paved roads were added to our State High- 
way system. This made it necessary that the road system receive 
closer supervision in order that defects in the paved roads might 
be detected and repaired before major damage could occur to the 
roads. Governor Umstead, and the General Assembly of 1953, 
in order to meet this problem, increased the highway districts 
in the State from 10 to 14. This change has been smoothly accom- 
plished resulting in greater service to the people and a better 
utilization of highway personnel and equipment. The State High- 
way and Public Works Commission has done everything possible 
with the funds available to improve the roads and highways of 
North Carolina. 

We commend the General Assembly, Governor Umstead, the 
State Highway and Public Works Commission, and all persons who 
have had a part in performing this great service for the people. 
We pledge our continued support for a wholly adequate highway 
system for the entire State, and for a program which will bring 
the primary system to a standard that is adequate for the present 
day heavy traffic that our highways support. The Democratic 
Party will continue to urge its Governcrs and legislatures to 
adequately provide for all-weather means of transportation for 
all the people in every section of the State. 

Prisons 

While the State Highway and Public Works Commission has 
made splendid progress in the expansion and improvement of our 
road system, it has simultaneously administered the State prison 
system with increased efficiency. The State prison system has 
been costing about nine million dollars a year. There are now 
more than 8,500 prisoners. It was found that, along with a proper 
rehabilitation program, it was absolutely necessary to establish 
in the system a definite plan of business and administrative con- 
trol. This has been done. The prison farm program has been im- 
proved and enlarged and is now under the direct control of gradu- 
ates of Agricultural Colleges. In addition to agriculture, the 
inmates of our prison system are afforded opportunity to learn 
many trades which will enable them to be self-supporting upon 
their return to society. The rules and regulations relating to the 



142 North Carolina Manual 

prisons have been reviewed, amended, and changed, to conform 
to the modern methods of prison administration. The morale of 
the prisoners has greatly improved, and the efforts to rehabilitate 
the prisoners have been more successful. 

The Democratic Party v^^ill continue to exert its efforts to see 
to it that the prison system of the State is operated according to 
modern methods, with the aim of rehabilitating the prisoner and 
discharging him as a useful member of society. 

Paroles Commission 

The 1953 General Assembly, upon the recommendation of Gov- 
ernor Umstead, established a Parole Board consisting of three 
members. This is one of the important acts of the past General 
Assembly. The Board is rapidly working out a plan of procedure, 
rules, and regulations, which will result in a first class parole 
system. Tremendous progress has already been made. 

We shall constantly endeavor to improve our parole system to 
the end that it may better perform its duties and be more effective 
in rehabilitating prisoners. 

Highway Safety 

Under the administration of Governor Umstead, a determined 
and sustained effort has been made to make our highways and 
streets safer for our people. We are proud of the progress which 
has been made. As of this date, the number of deaths and injuries 
upon the highways of the State, since January 1, 1954, has been 
reduced by about 20% as compared with the same period last 
year. The State Highway Patrol, the Commissioner of Motor 
Vehicles, and the Governor, have undertaken to do evei*ything 
possible to bring about a greater degree of highway safety. 

We pledge our best efforts and encouragement to the Adminis- 
trative Officials of the State who are striving to bring about 
further safety on the highways. 

State Employees 

The great and unparalled success of the Democratic Party in 
running the Government of the State of North Carolina has been 
made possible solely through its fine officials and employees. No 



Democratic Platform 143 

finer group of men and women can be found anywhere. We are 
all impressed with the splendid morale, honesty, and devotion to 
the State, on the part of the State employees. The Democratic 
Party appreciates them and is proud of the splendid manner in 
which the activities of the state have been carried on. 

Upon the recommendation of the Governor, the last General 
Assembly increased the pay of all permanent State employees, 
on the payroll at the time of the enactment of the law, by ten 
per cent for the current biennium and made the increase retro- 
active to July 1, 1952. 



Public Welfare 

It is fortunate for North Carolina that the Democratic Party 
has the vision and the leadership to encompass all the economic 
and social needs of the State's citizens within the circle of its 
concern. With the steadily increasing growth of our population, 
and the many changes in our way of living, there has developed 
a better understanding of the varied ways through which welfare 
services strengthen the State. 

Through the years, the Democratic Party has stood for a broad 
and comprehensive program for the economic and social well- 
being of all groups of our citizens. 

Such a program has been proved to be essential to the develop- 
ment of a progressive and balanced State. Based upon the human- 
itarian concepts of our great State, the welfare program not only 
provides for the needy but also contributes to the betterment of 
the State as a whole. 

Within this humanitarian concern are the needy, aged, neglected 
and dependent children, and citizens sei'iously handicapped in 
body or mind. 

Important as are provisions for the necessities of everyday liv- 
ing. North Carolina has also recognized the State's obligation 
to provide a broad program of welfare services to alleviate in- 
dividual and family problems. 

Even more important are the steps necessary for the prevention 
of social and economic problems. Programs of prevention repre- 
sent a sound investment in human welfare and in the conservation 
of our human resources. 



144 North Carolina Manual 

Purposeful plans for the rehabilitation of the handicapped of 
our State have been strongly emphasized in our welfare programs 
in recent years. Not only does such emphasis reclaim individuals 
to constructive living, but their rehabilitation is a saving to the 
State. 

In developing these emphasis upon protection, prevention, and 
rehabilitation, in our welfare services, the State Board of Public 
Welfare has worked closely and cooperatively with county oflficials, 
and with many related groups in our State. 

Within the limits of a balanced budget the Democratic Party 
has sought to keep abreast of the needs of the citizens of our 
State. To the children, we pledge, adequate protection and care 
through specialized programs and through protective legislation 
to meet their varied needs. To the older citizens, we pledge pro- 
gi'ams adapted to their growing numbers. To our citizens in need, 
we pledge the necessary financial aid so that they may share in 
the security, dignity, and opportunity of our democratic heritage. 

Public Health 

The growth of North Carolina's public health program has 
attracted wide attention. Beginning with Guilford County in 1911, 
the other counties of the State have become organized and now 
the entire State is enjoying public health service. 

There has been a constant increase in the amount of money 
expended in the field of public health. For the fiscal year 1953-54 
the total budget for public health, locally administered in the 
democratic way is $5,301,112.08, of which $1,132,000.00 represents 
State funds, $3,873,002.08 local funds, and only $296,110.00 federal 
funds. It is expected that more cuts in the federal funds are in 
prospect under the National Republican Administration. 

Public health now has expanded to a point where problems here- 
tofore untouched are being studied with a view to bring about 
solutions through the application of the principles of preventative 
medicine. We are indeed proud of the great progress which has 
been made by the health agencies of the State. 

The Democratic Party will continue its efforts and activities in 
the field of public health, looking toward the prolongation of human 
life and alleviation of suffering, which in the ultimate, will mean 



Democratic Platform 145 

higher standards of living and promotion of happiness and pros- 
perity for all our people. 

State Institutions For The Mentally 111 

Upon the recommendation of the Governor, the General Assem- 
bly authorized, and submitted to the people, a bond issue of 
$22,000,000.00 to provide for additional facilities at the mental 
institutions and to provide for the construction and equipment of 
facilities for feebleminded white and Negro children of the State. 
This bond issue was approved by the people by an overwhelming 
majority on October 3, 1953. 

In addition to this, additional funds were provided for personnel, 
and great general improvement has been made in the mental insti- 
tutions throughout the State. Increased emphasis has been placed 
upon the treatment and care of the mentally ill. 

Some of the contracts for facilities at the institutions have been 
made, and plans are rapidly proceeding for the two schools for 
the feebleminded. When the facilities provided for by the bond 
issue have been constructed, and when the improvements in per- 
sonnel provided for have been attained, North Carolina can take 
pride in the great progress which it has made in its system of 
care, treatment and cure of its mentally ill. 

Labor 

A large percentage of our people earn their living in employ- 
ment. Some of the finest men and women in our State are wage 
earners, and occupy responsible positions in their plants and 
communities. They have added greatly to the income of the State 
through increased value added by manufacturing. 

A large percentage of the wage earners are members of the 
Democratic Party. The Democratic Party is proud of them. It is 
now, and has always been, their friend. 

The Democratic Party is anxious for peace and harmony to pre- 
vail between labor and management. We are happy that the re- 
lations between management and labor in North Carolina are 
unusually friendly and cooperative. There have been during the 
past two years relatively few strikes. Both management and labor 
are to be commended. 



146 North Carolina Manual 

We commend the Department of Labor for the fine work which 
it has done for and on behalf of the working- men and women of 
North Carolina. Workers of North Carolina may be sure that 
the Department of Labor is ever ready to devote its facilities to 
their aid and assistance. 

The Democratic Party, always the friend of labor, pledg-es its 
fullest support to the proper demands of those who contribute to 
the State's prosperity with their skills and their exertions. 

Conservation and Development 

The importance of the task of developing and conserving the 
resources of North Carolina cannot be over-emphasized. For this 
purpose, the State created the Department of Conservation and 
Development. This Administration has placed great emphasis on 
the work of this Department, including the matter of arousing the 
people of the State to the necessity of expansion of local industry 
and the obtaining of new and diversified industry. This is one of 
the best ways to provide an adequate and broadened tax base to 
care for the expanding needs of the people. Geared to this pro- 
gram is an alert advertising campaign, pointing out the potentiali- 
ties of North Carolina for business and industrial development. 

That the results are worthwhile is indicated by the fact that 
more than two hundred million dollars have been spent, or def- 
initely committed, for the expansion of prevaling business and for 
new plants and equipment. This will result in larger payrolls, 
finer markets, and a substantial increase in economic activity. 

In addition, substantial progress has been made in the seafood 
industry, which offers great potentiality for this particular type 
of development on the seacoast and in our numerous sounds. Special 
attention is being given to improve methods of processing and 
packaging seafood, as well as scientific research for the benefit of 
those who earn their living from the products of the sea. 

Emphasis has been placed on advertising the beauty of North 
Carolina, and encouraging tourists and new residents to come into 
the State. This has resulted in a large increase of visitors, so that 
at the present time our tourist industry may well be termed the 
third largest in the State, in terms of financial return. 

The Department of Conservation and Development is constantly 



Democratic Platform 147 

working on further development of the forests of the State and 
of the mineral resources which abound in the soil of North Caro- 
lina. 

Great attention is being paid to the development of inland ports 
and waterways, and to their improvement, to the end that we may 
attract more people to utilize these facilities. 

Considerable attention also is being given to the development of 
our ports at Wilmington and Morehead City. A re-organized and 
vigorous program for the development of incoming and outgoing 
traffic through the ports has been put in force and effect. The 
importance of our water transportation resources to the overall 
economy of the State has taken on a new emphasis. 

The forward-looking program planned by the Department of Con- 
servation and Development is most important to the people of the 
State. The Democratic party pledges its continued and whole- 
hearted support to the program to the end that the resources of the 
State may be conserved and developed to the greatest possible 
extent for the benefit of all of our citizens. 

Utilities 

The rapid growth and expansion of North Carolina along all 
lines has resulted in a tremendous increase in the demand for 
services provided by the utilities of the State. The utilities have 
been ever mindful of their obligation to the public, and have been 
alert to the part which they play in the development of North 
Carolina, and have freely expended their resources in making their 
services adequate. 

Until recent years, most of the industrial gi'owth has been in 
the Piedmont and Western sections of North Carolina; but, in the 
past several years, we have also experienced large industrial 
growth in the Eastern part of the State. This wide-spread indus- 
trial growth throughout the State has necessitated the investment 
of many millions of dollars in utility equipment, to supply ade- 
quately the present and future needs. 

Huge electric generating plants have been constructed in both 
the Eastern and Western sections of North Carolina. Others are 
being constructed at this time, which, when completed, will provide 
adequate electric energy to meet all prospective requirements. 

The telephone companies of North Carolina have made great 



148 North Carolina Manual 

strides in making telephone services available to our people. The 
present plans of the various companies call for the continued 
expansion of telephone service until every section of the State 
is adequately served. 

A few^ years ago, it was prophesied that certain sections of 
North Carolina would soon be served with natural gas. This is 
no longer a prophecy, but is an actuality. Many of the larger 
cities of North Carolina are now using natural gas, and pipe 
lines are under construction to others. Plans for further extension 
of the service to other sections of the State are under consideration. 

The need of the public for adequate shipping facilities both on 
land and on water is ever increasing and will continue to increase 
with the growth and development of North Carolina. Truly the 
State moves on wheels. The trucking industry has brought ship- 
ping facilities to every section of our State. In the interest of the 
general welfare the Democratic Party will make certain that ade- 
quate shipping facilities of all kinds are available, at reasonable 
rates, to all parts of the State, however remote. 

The democratic administration fully realizes that the services of 
utilities and the rates which are charged for such services vitally 
effect the daily lives of all the citizens of North Carolina. Being 
acutely cognizant of these facts, the present administration, 
through the Utilities Commission, is making every possible effort 
to carry out its responsibility in a way which will serve and pro- 
mote the development of our State and the best interests of the 
citizens of North Carolina. 

Administration of Justice and Law Enforcement 

We believe in the supremacy of the law for all citizens, and 
that the law must be enforced fairly and impartially. We con- 
demn, without reservation, every effort of men, singly or in or- 
ganized groups, to set themselves above the law. 

We insist that every Agency of our State Government shall, at 
all times, be vigilant and relentless in the enforcement of high 
standards of conduct for all public servants, and that our law 
enforcement Agencies continue to act with firmness and promptness- 
in bringing to the bar of justice those who violate the criminal law. 

CONCLUSION 

In conclusion, we acknowledge with humility and recall with 
pride that the people of North Carolina have entrusted the conduct 



Democratic Platform 149 

and management of their public affairs to the Democratic Party, 
without interruption, for more than a half century. During that 
time, the record of our Party has been one of constructive, econom- 
ical, and progressive leadership. Consistently, the Democratic Party 
has supplied great Governors who have not only served but led 
our people to greater heights of achievement. Consistently, the 
Democratic Party has manned our General Assemblies so that 
they have been responsive to the will of the people. Consistently, 
the Democratic Party has conducted the State's affairs on such 
a high plane that the State has become known far and wide for 
its honest and efficient government. 

The Democratic Party has demonstrated throughout its history 
that it is a living, dynamic force capable of making changes, and 
timely adopting new programs and new ideas, designed to promote 
and protect the best interests of all the people — the supreme 
objective of government. 

We commend the record of the Democratic Party to all those 
forward-thinking people who have given their support to our 
Party and who have continued to support this way of life in our 
State. 



PLAN OF ORGANIZATION OF DEMOCRATIC 
PARTY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

State and District Committees 

Section 1. The State Democratic Executive Committee shall con- 
sist of nine men and nine women from each congressional district 
in the State, who shall be elected at the preliminary meetings of 
delegates from the congressional districts, held on the morning of 
the State Convention as provided in Section 29, hereof; provided, 
however, that every county shall have as least one member on the 
Committee. 

Sec. 2. As early as is practical after each State Convention, the 
Chairman shall call the State Democratic Executive Committee 
to meet for the purpose of electing a chairman and a vice chair- 
man, one of whom shall be a woman, and each of whom shall serve 
for a term of two years, and until his or her successor shall be 
elected. 

Sec. 3. The Chairman of the State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee, as early as practicable after his election, shall appoint his 
advisory or campaign committee, consisting of not less than six 
nor more than twenty-four, with equal representation as to men 
and women, and a secretary of the State Democratic Executive 
Committee. 

Sec. 4. The congressional Democratic Executive Committee for 
each congressional district in the State shall consists of two mem- 
bers from each county in said district, who shall be elected at the 
preliminary meetings of delegates from the congressional districts 
held on the morning of the State Convention as provided by Sec- 
tion 29 hereof; provided, however, that in any congressional dis- 
trict embracing less than five counties, the committee shall consist 
of three members from each county in the district. 

Sec. 5. The Judicial Democratic Executive Committee for each 
judicial district in the State shall consist of two members from 
each county in said district, who shall be elected at the prelimi- 
nary meetings of delegates from the congressional districts held 
on the morning of the State Convention as provided by Section 29 
hereof; provided, however, that in any judicial district embracing 
less than five counties, the committee shall consist of three mem- 
bers from each county in the district. 

151 



152 North Carolina Manual 

Sec. 5-A. The Solicitorial Democratic Executive Committee for 
each solicitorial district in the State shall consist of two members 
from each county in said district, who shall be elected at the pre- 
liminary meeting's of delegates from the congressional districts 
held on the morning- of the State Convention as provided by Sec- 
tion 29 hereof; provided, however, that in any solicitorial district 
embracing less than five counties, the committee shall consist of 
three members from each county in the district. 

Sec. 6. The State Senatorial Executive Committee for each sena- 
torial district in the State which comprises more than one county 
shall consist of one member from each county in said district, 
who shall be elected at the preliminary meetings of delegates from 
the congressional districts held on the morning of the State Con- 
vention as provided by Section 29 hereof. In districts composed 
of only one county, the County Democratic Executive Committee 
of said county shall have jurisdiction as in the matter of county 
candidates. 

Sec. 7. It shall be the duty of the Chairman of the State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, as soon as practicable after the State 
Convention, to designate one member as chairman and one mem- 
ber as secretary of each of the executive committees provided for 
in each of the foregoing four sections. The State Chaii-man shall 
notify the members so selected of their appointment, and in case 
any member shall fail or decline to accept such appointment, he 
shall appoint some other member in his stead. 

Sec. 8. All Democratic Executive Committees shall meet at such 
times and places as the chairman of the respective committees may 
appoint and designate in the call. If for any reason there should 
occur a vacancy in the chairmanship of any executive committee, 
or if such chairman should be incapacitated or should fail or 
refuse to act, the secretary shall call a meeting of said executive 
committee for the purpose of electing a successor to the said 
chairman. If no meeting shall be called within five days after 
such vacancy occurs, then any other officer of said executive com- 
mittee, or any three members thereof, may call a meeting to fill 
said vacancy; provided, however, if such vacancy shall be in a 
state senatorial executive committee, in that event, any member 
thereof after said vacancy shall have existed for five days, may 
call a meeting to fill such vacancy. 



Plan of Organization 153 

Sec. 9. The State Democratic Executive Committee shall have 
the power to fill all vacancies occurring in said committee; vacan- 
cies occurring in congressional, judicial, and senatorial committees 
shall be filled by the executive committee of the county in which 
such vacancies occur; precinct committees shall fill all vacancies 
occurring in their respective committee. 

Sec. 10. All officers of the State Executive Committee and the 
National Committeeman and the National Committeewoman from 
the State and the President of the Young Democratic Clubs of the 
State shall be ex oflficio members of the Committee with the power 
to vote. 

Sec. 11. All executive committees shall have the power to ap- 
point subcommittees or special committees for such purposes and 
with such powers, in their respective jurisdictions, as may be 
deemed necessary or desirable. 

Sec. 12. In each election year the Chairman of the State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee shall convene said Committee in the 
City of Raleigh on or before the 10th day of March, and at said 
meeting the following business shall be transacted: 

(a) The time and place of holding the State Convention shall 
be determined and duly published. 

(b) A common day shall be fixed, on which all precinct meet- 
ings shall be held for the election of delegates to the county con- 
ventions. 

(c) A common day shall be fixed for the holding of a county 
convention in each county in the State for the purpose of electing 
delegates to the State Convention. 

Sec. 13. Immediately after the adjournment of the aforesaid 
meeting of the State Democratic Executive Committee, it shall be 
the duty of the chairman to publish the proceedings of the same, 
and it shall be the duty of the secretary of the committee to notify, 
in writing, the several chairmen of the County Democratic Execu- 
tive Committees in the State of the respective dates so fixed for 
the holding of precinct meetings and county conventions. Directly 
after receipt of such notice, it shall be the duty of each chairman 
of a County Democratic Executive Committee in the State to fix 
the hour and places for holding the precinct meetings in his 
county, the hour and place for holding the meeting of the County 
Democratic Executive Committee required by the provisions of 
Section 20 to be held on the day of the county convention; and 



154 North Carolina Manual 

thereupon the said chairman shall issue a call for the precinct 
meetings, the county convention, and the meetings of the County 
Democratic Executive Committee. The call shall be in writing and, 
at least ten days before the day set for the precinct meetings, it 
shall be posted at the courthouse door of the county and copies 
thereof shall be sent to the chairmen of all precinct committees in 
the county; a copy of the call also shall be sent as a news item to 
each newspaper published in the county. 

County and Precinct Organization 

Sec. 14. The unit of county organization shall be the voting pre- 
cinct. In each precinct there shall be an executive committee con- 
sisting of five active Democrats, at least two of whom shall be 
women, who shall be elected by the Democratic voters at the pre- 
cinct meeting called by the chairman of the County Democratic 
Executive Committee as provided in this plan of organization. The 
precinct committee so elected shall elect from its membership a 
chairman and a vice chairman, one of whom shall be a woman. 

Sec. 15. The precinct meetings shall be presided over by the 
chairman of the precinct committee, but in his absence, the vice 
chairman of the committee shall preside, and in the absence of 
both the chairman and the vice chairman, any member of the com- 
mittee may preside. 

Sec. 16. At the said precinct meeting, the Democratic voters in 
attendance shall elect delegates and alternates to represent the 
precinct in the county convention ; and said delegates or alternates, 
or such of them as shall attend the county convention, shall be 
entitled to vote the full democratic strength of their precinct upon 
all questions, nominations, or elections which may come before 
the county conventions. The chairman, or presiding officer, and the 
secretary of the precinct meeting shall certify to the county con- 
vention the names of the delegates and alternates selected at the 
meeting. 

Sec. 17. Each precinct shall be entitled to cast in the county 
convention one vote for every 25 Democratic votes, and one vote 
for fractions over 12 Democratic votes cast by the precinct for 
Governor at the last preceding gubernatorial election: provided 
that every precinct shall be entitled to cast at least one vote in 



Plan of Organization 155 

the county convention, and each precinct may appoint as many 
delegates to said convention as it may see fit, not exceeding three 
delegates and three alternates for each vote to which said pre- 
cinct may be entitled in the county convention. 

Section 18. At every precinct meeting, if requested, a vote shall 
be taken on the different questions, nominations, and elections 
anticipated to come before the county convention, and in that 
event, the chairman or presiding officer and the secretary of the 
precinct meeting shall certify to the county convention the vote 
so cast, and the relative vote as fixed in the precinct meeting shall 
not be changed in the county convention, except by two-thirds 
vote of the entire unit of delegates desiring to change its vote. 

Sec. 19. In case there shall be a failure to hold a precinct 
meeting in pursuance of the call of the chairman of the county 
democratic executive committee, or if at any meeting there shall 
be a failure to elect delegates to the county convention, in either 
event, the precinct democratic executive committee shall appoint 
the delegates and alternates from the Democratic voters of the 
precinct. 

Sec. 20. The chairman of the several precinct committees shall 
compose the County Democratic Executive Committee, which shall 
meet on the same day as the county convention first held in each 
election year, the meeting to be held either before or after the 
convention at an hour and place to be designated in the call issued 
in pursuance of Section 13 hereof. At said meeting a chairman 
of said county executive committee shall be elected. Immediately 
after the election of the chairman, the committee shall elect one 
or more, but not exceeding three, vice chairman, and also a seci'e- 
tary. If more than one vice chairman shall be elected, the order 
of their succession shall be designated by title, e.g., first vice 
chairman, second vice chairman, third vice chairman. Either the 
chairman or the first vice chairman shall be a woman. The chair- 
man, vice chairman or vice chairmen, or secretary need not be 
members of the County Democratic Executive Committee, but all 
of said officers shall be ex-officio members of the committee, with 
the power to vote, however, at any organizational meeting of said 
County Democratic Executive Committee said ex-officio members 
shall not have the power to vote. If for any reason there should 
occur any vacancy in the chairmanship of a county executive com- 



156 North Carolina Manual 

mittee, by death, resignation, or removal, or if such chairman 
should be incapacitated or should fail or refuse to act, then the 
vice chairman or vice chairmen, in their order of succession, and 
thereafter the secretary, shall, in such order of succession, be 
vested w^ith the full authority and power of the chairman until 
such time as said county executive committee has met and duly 
elected a successor to such chairman. A majority of said precinct 
chairman, in person or by proxy in the person of some active 
Democrat of the precinct in which an absent chairman resides, 
shall constitute a quorum. The county executive committee may 
appoint a central committee of five who shall act in its stead when 
the county executive committee is not in session. 

Sec. 21. In case there shall be a failure to elect any precinct 
executive committee prior to the day of the county convention, 
the County Democratic Executive Committee at its meeting held 
on the day of the said convention shall appoint the committee for 
such precinct. 

Sec. 22. The county executive committee shall have power to 
make any rules with regard to holding precinct meetings which it 
may deem proper, not inconsistent with the rules prescribed in 
this plan ; it shall be the duty of said committee to prepare and 
furnish all forms and blanks needed in making the returns from 
said precinct meetings, and any reported challenges and appeals 
therefrom ; and it shall have the power to raise the funds neces- 
sary to pay the expenses thereof. 

Sec. 23. All county conventions shall be called to order by the 
chairman of the executive committee of such county, and in his 
absence, by the vice chairman or by one of the vice chairmen in 
the order of succession set out in Section 20 hereof, and in his or 
their absence, by any member of the county executive committee 
who may be present at the convention, and in case none of the 
foregoing persons shall be present, then by any delegate to the 
convention, and he shall preside until a permanent chairman is 
elected by the convention. 

Sec. 24. The chairman shall provide the convention with a suf- 
ficient number of secretaries or ready accountants, who shall re- 
duce the votes to deciminals and tabulate the same, disregarding all 
fractions after the second or hundredth column. 



Plan of Organization 157 

Sec. 25. Nothing herein contained shall prevent the convention 
from making nomination by viva voce or acclamation vi^here a 
vote by township or precinct is not demanded by any Democratic 
elector present. 

Sec. 26. The County Democratic Executive Committee shall have 
the povi^er to make such other rules and regulations for the holding 
of county conventions not inconsistent herewith, as may be deemed 
necessary or expedient. 

Sec. 27. Any chairman of a county executive committee who 
announces his candidacy for an elective office in the primary 
shall resign immediately as such chairman and the vacancy shall 
be filled as heretofore provided; but any chairman who shall so 
resign may be reelected to such chairmanship if and when a va- 
cancy occurs after the primary. 

State Convention Rules 

Sec. 28. The state convention shall be composed of delegates 
appointed by the several county conventions. Each county in the 
State shall be entitled to elect to the State Convention one dele- 
gate and one alternate for every 150 Democratic votes and one 
delegate and one alternate for fractions over 75 Democratic votes 
cast therein for Governor at the last preceding gubernatorial 
election. 

Sec. 29. A preliminary meeting of the delegates shall be held 
by each congressional district on the morning of the State Con- 
vention, at rooms to be designated by the State Executive Com- 
mittee, for the purpose of selecting the following committees and 
officers of the convention: 

1. One member of the committee on Resolutions and Platform. 

2. One member of the committee on Permanent Organization, 
Rules, and Order of Business, which committee will nominate a 
permanent president and secretary of the convention. 

3. One vice president of the convention. 

4. One district assistant secretaiy. 

5. One member of the committee on Credentials and Appeals. 

6. Nine men and nine women as members of the State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, with at least one member being se- 
lected from each county. 



158 North Carolina Manual 

7. Two members from each county for the Congressional, Judi- 
cial, and Solicitorial District Democratic Executive Committees; 
provided, however, in districts embracing less than five counties, 
three members of each said committee shall be elected from each 
county in said district. 

8. One member for each county of the State Senatorial Execu- 
tive Committee where the district embraces more than one county. 

Sec. 30. Such delegates (or alternates of absent delegates), as 
may be present at any Democratic Convention shall be allowed to 
cast the whole vote to which their precinct or county may be 
entitled. 

Sec. 31. In all conventions provided for by this plan, after a 
vote is cast, there shall be no change in such vote until the final 
result of the ballot shall be announced by the chairman of said 
convention. 

Sec. 32. The chairman of the different county conventions shall 
certify the list of delegates and alternates to the State Conven- 
tion, and a certified list of said delegates and alternates to the 
secretary of the State Executive Committee. 

Sec. 33. The secretary of the State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee shall make up a roll of all delegates and alternates from 
the several counties and transmit the same to the chairman of 
the State Convention. 

Sec. 34. In all conventions a nomination may be made by any 
majority, even though it be a fraction of a vote. 

Sec. 35. In all State Conventions it shall be the duty of the 
delegates from the several counties to choose one of their number 
chairman, whose name shall be reported to the president of such 
convention, and whose duty it shall be to cast the vote of his 
county as directed, and the vote as announced by him shall be 
recorded unless some delegate from that county shall challenge its 
accuracy, in which event it shall be the duty of the president of the 
convention to cause the roll of delegates from that county to be 
called, when the vote of such county shall be tabulated and re- 
corded according to the response of its delegates; but in no event 
shall the vote of one county be challenged by a delegate from 
another county. 



Plan of Organization 159 

Rotation of State Senators in Districts Composed 
of More Than One County 

Sec. 36. That in all State Senatorial Districts composed of more 
than one county, in which it has been the custom to concede the 
right to nominate a senator to one county of this district, by a 
plan of rotation or otherwise, and in which such plan was fol- 
lowed in the Primary Election of 1936, the same shall remain in 
full force and effect until terminated as herein provided. 

The executive committees of the several counties composing 
such Senatorial District may hereafter adopt a plan for the nomi- 
nation of candidates for the State Senate by one or more counties 
composing such district, but such plan shall not be effective until 
the executive committee of each of the counties composing the 
district shall, by a majority vote, approve such plan and file with 
the chairman of the State Executive Committee a copy of the 
resolution approving the same. The agreement in any senatorial 
district composed of only two counties may be tenninated by a 
majority vote of the county executive committee of any one of the 
counties and in districts of more than two counties by a majority 
vote of each of the executive committees of at least two counties, 
provided that notice of the termination of such agreement must 
be filed with the chairman of the State Executive Committee at 
least 120 days in advance of the date of the primary election at 
which the candidates for the General Assembly are to be nomi- 
nated. The chairman of the State Executive Committee shall 
promptly notify the State Board of Elections of all such agree- 
ments and of the termination thereof. 

Nomination of Candidates for County and Township Offices 

and for the General Assembly in Counties 

Not Under Primary Law 

Sec. 37. In all counties in which the selection of candidates for 
members of the General Assembly and county and township offices 
is not provided for by the primary law, nominations shall be 
made in the following manner: 

(a) The county democratic executive committee shall meet and 
set a time and place for holding a county convention for the nomi- 



160 North Carolina Manual 

nation of candidates for the aforesaid offices, and shall also set 
the time and places for holding the necessaiy preliminary precinct 
meetings, and thereupon the chairman of the county executive 
committee shall issue a call for the precinct meetings and the 
county convention, notice of which call shall be sent to the pre- 
cinct officials and published in such manner and form as shall be 
directed by the said county executive committee. 

(b) At the meeting held in each precinct in pursuance of said 
notice, delegates and alternates to represent it in the county con- 
vention shall be elected from the body of the Democratic voters 
of the precinct; and said delegates or alternates, or such of them 
as shall attend the county convention shall be entitled to vote the 
full Democratic strength of their precinct in the nomination of 
candidates and upon all questions which may come before said 
county convention. 

If there is a failure to hold a precinct meeting in pursuance of 
said notice, or if said meeting shall fail to elect delegates to rep- 
resent it in said convention, the precinct executive committee shall 
appoint delegates and alternates from the Democratic voters of 
the precinct. 

(c) Each precinct shall be entitled to cast in the county con- 
vention one vote for every 25 Democratic votes, and one vote for 
fractions over 12 Democratic votes cast by the precinct for Gov- 
ernor at the last preceding gubernatorial election : provided that 
every precinct shall be entitled to cast at least one vote in the 
county convention, and each precinct may appoint as many dele- 
gates to said convention as it may see fit, not exceeding three 
delegates and three alternates for each vote to which said pre- 
cinct may be entitled in the county convention. 

(d) The precinct meetings shall be presided over by the chair- 
man of the precinct committee, but in his absence, the vice chair- 
man of the committee shall preside, and in the absence of both 
the chairman and vice chairman, any member of the committee 
may preside. 

(e) The county executive committee shall have power to make 
any rules with regard to holding precinct meetings which it may 
deem proper, not inconsistent with the males prescribed in this 
plan; it shall be the duty of said committee to prepare and furnish 
all forms and blanks needed in making the returns from said pre- 
cinct meetings, and any reported challenges and appeals therefrom. 



Plan of Organization 161 

Appointment of Democratic Members of 
County Board of Elections 

Sec. 38. The chairman of the Democratic Executive Committee 
in each county shall, before submitting to the State Chairman 
recommendations as to Democratic members of the county Board 
of Elections in such county, call a meeting of the democratic 
executive committee of the county and submit such recommenda- 
tions for the approval of the executive committee, and only when 
such recommendations are approved by a majority of the com- 
mittee present, shall same be submitted to the State Chairman by 
the county chairman. The time of such meeting of the respective 
county executive committees for the purpose of passing on such 
recommendations shall be fixed by the State Chairman. 

Miscellaneous Provisions 

Sec. 39. In the several counties of the State where primaries 
are provided for by law, whether optional or mandatory, this plan 
of organization shall nevertheless be followed in all matters not 
inconsistent with such laws. 

Sec. 40. In the nomination of candidates for municipal offices 
to be voted for in any town or city election, where the same is not 
controlled by charter or legislative enactment, a municipal demo- 
cratic executive committee may be created for the purpose of 
facilitating the orderly selection of such candidates. The com- 
mittee shall be composed of five residents of the municipality, at 
least two of whom shall be women, to be elected biennially at a 
meeting of all members of the regular precinct executive com- 
mittee or committees, who reside in the municipality, the meeting 
to be called and presided over by the chairman of the county 
democratic executive committee. It shall be the sole function of 
any municipal democratic executive committee created under the 
provisions of this section to supervise and direct the selection of 
candidates for municipal offices, and in so doing, the committee 
shall follow in principle the procedure set out in Section 37 hei-eof, 
and to that end, the committee may formulate such rules and 
regulations as may be deemed necessary, practicable and fair in 
applying in principle the procedure set out in said Section 37. 
The committee shall elect from its membership a chairman and 



162 Plan of Organization 

vice chairman, one of whom shall be a woman; and all vacancies 
in membership shall be filled by the committee. 

Filling Vacancies Among Candidates and 
Selecting Candidates in Special Elections 

Sec. 41. In the event any person nominated as a candidate of 
the democratic party of a state office shall die, resign, or for any 
reason become ineligible or disqualified between the date of nomi- 
nation and the ensuing general election, the vacancy caused thereby 
shall be filled by the action of the state executive committee; in the 
event of such vacancy in the case of a district office (except in a 
state senatorial district operating under a rotation agreement 
which concedes the candidate for senator or one of the candidates 
for senator to one county), the vacancy shall be filled by the action 
of the executive committee for such district; and in the event of 
such vacancy in the case of a county office, or the house of rep- 
resentatives, or the state senate in a district composed either of 
only one county or of two or more counties operating under a 
rotation agreement which concedes the candidate for senator or 
any one of the candidates for senator to one county, in either of 
said events, the vacancies shall be filled by action of the county 
executive committee of the county wherein such vacancy occurs; 
provided, that should a vacancy occur in any office after a nomi- 
nation has been made, or if a special election shall be ordered to 
fill a vacancy either in the Congress of the United States or in the 
General Assembly of North Carolina, in any or either of said 
event or events, a nomination shall be made by the appropriate 
■committee in like manner as hereinbefore provided. Any nomi- 
nation made under the provisions of this section shall be certified 
immediately by the chairman and secretary of the nominating 
committee to the board or boards of elections, State or county, 
having the responsibility of printing and distributing the ballots 
on which the name of the nominee shall appear. 

Sec. 42. The right of appeal shall lie from any subordinate 
committee or convention to the committee or convention next su- 
perior thereto, and in all county or state conventions appeals shall 
first be referred to the committee on Credentials and Appeals, or 
a special committee provided by the convention, and the findings 
and reports of such committee had before action thereon by the 
convention. 



State Committees, Democratic 163 

Sec. 43. It shall be the duty of the county executive committees 
and their chairmen to make such reports and furnish such informa- 
tion to the chairman of the State Democratic Executive Committee 
and chairman of the several district committees as the said State 
and district chairmen may desire. 

Sec. 43-A. The State Democratic Executive Committee shall 
appoint a committee of three whose duty it shall be to audit, not 
less frequently than biennially, the financial accounts and balances 
of the Committee. 

Amendments to Plan of Organization 

Sec. 44. The State Democratic Executive Committee shall, by 
a majority vote of the full committee, have poM^er to amend this 
plan of organization. 

The foregoing is the plan of organization of the Democratic 
party of North Carolina as adopted by the State Democratic 
Executive Committee, at a meeting held in the city of Raleigh 
on the 5th day of March, 1918, together with all amendments 
thereto up to and including a special meeting of said committee 
held in the City of Raleigh on August 20, 1952, 

John D. Larkins, Jr., 

Chairniav.. 



164 North Carolina Manual 



COMMITTEES OF THE STATE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

(From list furnished by Secretary, State Democratic 
Executive Committee) 

State Democratic Executive Committee 

1954 

OFFICERS 

Chairman John D. Larkins, Jr. 

Vice-Chairman Mrs. John T. Richardson 

Secretary .Herman A. Moore 

Committees 
First District 

Beaufort John C. Rodman Washington 

Beaufort Mrs. L. H. Redditt Edward 

Camden Mrs. Jerry Forbes Camden 

Chowan T. C. Byrum Edenton 

Currituck Mrs. Dudley Bagley Moyock 

Dare R. Bruce Etheridge Manteo 

Gates A. P. (5od win ,Jr Gatesville 

Hertford D. C. Barnes Murfreesboro 

Hyde Mrs. Dick 'Neal Swan Quarter 

Martin Mrs. Elbert Peele Williamston 

Martin Hugh Horton Williamston 

Pasquotank Mrs. Glen W. Pendleton Elizabeth City 

Pasquotank John H. Hall Elizabeth City 

Perquimans Mrs. Jack Konoy Hertford 

Pitt Mrs. W. I. Bissette Grifton 

Pitt Dr. PaulE. Jones Farmville 

Tyrrell Mrs. Margaret McClees Columbia 

Washington Carl Bailey Plymouth 

Second District 

Bertie Charles H. Jenkins Aulander 

Bertie Mrs. C. W. Beasley Colerain 

Edgecombe Don Gilliam, Jr Tarboro 

Edgecombe Mrs. J. W. Se.xton Rocky Mount 

Greene Bruton Taylor Walstonburg 

Greene Mrs. H. Maynor Hicks Snow Hill 

Halifax Eric W. Rodgers Scotland Neck 

Halifax Mrs. A. L. Hux Roanoke Rapids 

Lenoir A. H. Jeffries Kinston 

Lenoir Mrs. Woodrow Taylor Deep Run 

Lenoir John G. Dawson Kinston 

Northampton Guy Revelle Conway 

Northampton Mrs. Grace W. Parker Lasker 

Northampton Mrs. Hugo Umstead Severn 

Warren John Kerr, Jr Warren ton 

Warren Mrs. Barker Williams Warrei: ton 

Wilson James Manning Wilson 

Wilson Mrs. Everett Blake Wilson 

Third District 

Carteret C. G. Holland Beaufort 

Carteret Mrs. Sam .^dler Morehead City 

Craven D. L. Ward New Bern 

Craven Theresa Shipp New Bern 

Duplin Rivers D. Johnson Warsaw 



State Committees, Democratic 165 

Duplin Mrs. Vance D. Gavin Kenansville 

Jones W. M. Whitaker Trenton 

Jones Mrs. J. D. Larkins, Jr._._ "Trenton 

Onslow C. L. S.ibiston _ ....Jacksonville 

Onslow ..Mrs. E. W. Summersill Jacksonville 

Pamlico M. D. Brinson Grantsboro 

Pamlico Mrs. E. R. Goodwin Oriental 

Pender Ashley M. Murphy ...Atkinson 

Pender Mrs. Robert Grady Johnson ..Bureaw 

Sampson Henry Vann Clinton 

Sampson Mrs. A. N. John.son Garland 

Wayne W. Dortch Lan-^ston ...Goldsboro 

Wayne Mrs. J. B. Hooks, Jr Fremont 

Fourth District 

Chatham J. Speight Wrenn Siler City 

Chatham Mrs. Margaret W. Sharpe R-3, Chapel Hill 

Franklin Walter Fuller Louisburg 

Franklin Mrs. A. E. Hall Youn'-sville 

Johnston Adam Whitley ..R-1, Sraithfield 

Johnston James R. Poole .' Smithfield 

Johnston Mrs. Tom Davis Selma 

Nash .Bessie Bunn R-1 , Rocky Mount 

Nash 0. B. Moss Sprin? Hope 

Nash Mrs. Ben H. Neville Whitakers 

Randoinh E. D. Cranford Asheboro 

Randolph Mrs. S. J. Barrow, Jr Asheboro 

Vance Fred Rovster Henderson 

Vance Mrs. Jewel Finch Henderson 

Wake Arch T.Allen Raleieh 

Wake Mrs. J. M. Brouihton Raleirh 

Wake Mrs. L. M. Massey Zebulon 

Wake Thomas A. Banks Raleigh 

Fifth District 

Caswell Sam Bason Yancey ville 

Caswell Joseph Warren Prospect Hill 

Forsyth Mrs. Mary Belo Carlyle ..Winston-Salem 

Forsyth E. T. Piillen, Jr Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Calvin Graves Winston-Salem 

Granville Mrs. Dennis G. Brummitt Oxford 

Granville .W. S. Flemins Oxford 

Granville N. E. Cannady Oxford 

Person F. D. Lon<r .Roxboro 

Person E. P. Warren Hurdle Mills 

Rockingham J. Hoyt Stultz Draper 

Rockingham Mrs. J. C. Johnson Mayodan 

Rockingham J. B. Balsley, .Jr Reids\-ille 

Stokes Mrs. Grace Rodenbough Walnut Cove 

Stokes W. F.Marshall Walnut Cove 

Surry Mrs. Raymond Smith. -Mt, Airy 

Surry .R. J. Harris Pilot Mountain 

Surry Hugh Chatham Elkin 

Sixth District 

Alamance Mrs. John H. Vernon, Sr Burlincton 

Alamance D.J. Walker, Jr.. .Burhnpton 

Alamance A. M. Carroll Burhngton 

Alamance D. B. Paris RFD No. 1, Graham 

Durham Sam B. Brockwell ..Durham 

Durham J. S.Stewart Durham 

Durham ..J. L. Atkins, Jr Durham 

Durham E. C. Brooks, Jr Durham 

Durham Mrs. Mary Trent Semans ...Durham 

Guilford .Eugene G. Shaw Greensboro 

Guilford Mrs. LesUe E. Hoyle Greensboro 



166 



State S 




Districts 



167 



PERSON I 



f f 

VANCE ■ 



CI' rL.MAKCEORAnoJ N ^ 




168 North Carolina Manual 

Guilford Mrs. Neal Ward... Greensboro 

Guilford Lee Wharton Greensboro 

Guilford Howard Holderness Greensboro 

Guilford Mrs. Ruth Dobson -.High Point 

Guilford 0. A. Kirkman Hizh Point 

Orange R.O. Forest Hillsboro 

Orange..- .Mrs. Roland McCIamrock Chapel Hill 

Seventh District 

Bladen Mrs. Edward B. Clark Elizabethtown 

Bladen J. A. Bridger.. Bladenboro 

Brunswick Odell Williamson _ Shallotte 

Brunswick Myrtle Boyd. Longwood 

Columbus W.A. Thompson Hallsboro 

Columbus Mrs. Sallie Horton Whiteville 

Columbus Ann B. McGougan Tabor City 

Cumberland Heman Clark Fayetteville 

Cumberland L. G. Carter, Jr Fayetteville 

Cumberland Mrs.J. M. Pringle Fayetteville 

Harnett A.R. Taylor Lillington 

Harnett. Mrs. Helen C. Byrd Lillington 

New Hanover R. M. Kermon Wilmington 

New Hanover ..Mrs. Thomas Gause Wilmington 

New Hanover Alan Marshall Wilmington 

Robeson David M. Britt Fairmont 

Robeson Mrs. W. S. Alexander McDonald 

Robeson ..L M. Biggs Lumberton 

Eighth District 

Anson J. A. Hardison Wadesboro 

Davie G. H. Schutt Moeksville 

Davidson P. V. Critcher... Lexington 

Davidson F. M. Meyers Thomasville 

Hoke J. B. Thomas Raeford 

Lee W. R. Williams Sanford 

Lee .H. M. Jackson Sanford 

Montgomery T. Wade Bruton Troy 

Moore W. P. Saunders Southern Pines 

Moore Bessie McCaskill Carthage 

Richmond J. E. Webb Rockingham 

Richmond Norma Lee Rockingham 

Scotland 0. Ij. Moore Laurinburg 

Union H. B. Smith Monroe 

Union Edith Marsh Monroe 

Wilkes.- Mrs. R. J. Hinshaw North Wilkesboro 

Wilkes R. M. Brame, Jr North Wilkesboro 

Yadkin Albert Martin Boon vi lie 

Ninth District 

Alexander Harry Miller Stony Point 

Alexander Mrs. R. E. Current Taylorsville 

Alleghany R.F. Crouse Sparta 

Alleghany Mrs. Edna Thompson Sparta 

Ashe Mrs. Elizabeth Hensley West Jefferson 

Ashe Ira T. Johnston Jefferson 

Cabarrus G. Lee White Concord 

Cabarrus Mrs. H. B. Robinson Kannapolis 

Caldwell E. F.Allen Lenoir 

Caldwell Mrs. Margaret B. Moore Lenoir 

Iredell D. D. Nantz, Sr Statesville 

Iredell Mrs. John White Moore Mooresville 

Rowan George R. Uzzell. Salisbury 

Rowan.- Mrs. Ervin Lambert Salisbury 

Stanly Vann B.Smith -- -.- -Oakboro 



State Committees, Democratic I59 

Stanly Mrs. Everett Beam Albemarle 

Watauga Dr. H. B. Perry ..Boone 

Watauga Mrs. R. C. Rivers. Jr [Boone 

Tenth District 

Avery...- R. T. Lewis -Minneapolis 

Avery Hope B. Teaster Minneapolis 

Burke E, A. Kirksey Morganton 

Burke Joe K.Byrd Drexel 

Burke Lillian Ross Morganton 

Catawba Mrs. Helen Ross Newton 

Catawba Stanley Came- Newton 

Catawba Hugh Fritts Hickory 

Lincoln - Mrs. Hal Heafner Lincolnton 

Lincoln E.C. Land, Jr Lincolntcn 

Mecklenburg _.- Mrs. Charles Tillett ..Charl(t;e 

Mecklenburg Mrs. Peggy Hurt Charlote 

Meckle.iburg Mrs. R. E. McDowell .Charlot'e 

Mecklenburg David McConnelL Charlotte 

Mecklenb'jr^- James J. Harris ..Charlotte 

Mecklenburg H. Haywood Robbins Charlotte 

Mitchell Nathan Yelton Bakersville 

Mitchell Mrs. U. D. Hensley Bakersville 

Eleventh District 

Chveland 0. M. Mull Shelby 

Clevelind Clyde Noland Shelby 

Cievehnd ...B. T. Falls, Jr - Shelby 

Gaston L. B. Hollowell Gastonia 

Gaston W. 0. Barrett ...Mt. Holly 

Gaston Mrs. Ruby D. Ryhne Gastonia 

Madisoa F.E. Freeman Marshall 

Madison A. E. Leake Marshall 

McDowell S. J. Westmoreland Marion 

McDowell R. W. Proctor ..Marion 

McDowell Mrs. J. A. Poteat Marion 

Polk ._.B. Frank Rogers R-1, Landrum, S. C. 

Polk- Mrs. R. S. Wolcott ---.Tryon 

Rutherford M. G. Goforth - Ruthcrfordton 

Rutherford Mrs. Mildred Moore Forest City 

Rutherford Charles C. Dalton Spindale 

Yancey Reece Mcintosh Burnsville 

Yancey Mrs. E. L. Briggs Burnsville 

Twelfth District 

Buncombe Mrs. Ruth Goodson Asheville 

Buncombe Philip Cocke Asheville 

Buncombe Don Elias Asheville 

Cherokee Mrs. H. A. Mattox Murphy 

Clay A. L. Penland Hayesville 

Graham Mrs. Ed Ingram Robbinsville 

Haywood Mrs. Jack West Waynesville 

Haywood Tom Leatherwood... Clyde 

Henderson H. E. Buchanan... Hendersonvillc 

Henderson Mrs. John Forest Hendersonvillc 

Jackson ...Mrs. Paul Raid Cullowhee 

Jackson Dan K. Moore Sylva 

Macon... Clyde West Franklin 

Macon-.. Bruce Palmer Franklin 

Swain W. T. Jenkins.- Bryson City 

Swain Mrs. H. J. Truett Bryson City 

Transylvania ,. Mrs. Freeman Hayes Brevard 

Transylvania Thomas R. Eller, Jr Brevard 



170 North Carolina Manual 

ex-officio 

President Young Democratic Clubs of „ , ■ , 

N. C John R.Jordan, Jr Raleigh 

National Committeeman B. Everett Jordan ..Saxapahaw 

National Committeewoman Mrs. B. B. Everett Palmyra 



State Democratic Congressional District Executive 

Committee 

1954 

First District 

Beaufort a M. Blount Washington 

Beaufort - Mrs. G. W. Marsh A^ashmgton 

Camden J. W. Cary Camden 

Camden - -Mrs. P. P. Gregory Camden 

Chowan - - ...P. S. McMullan Edenton 

Chowan A. B. Harless Edenton 

Currituck Dudley Bagley Moyock 

Currituck S.A.Walker Snowden 

Dare ..M. K. Penning, Sr Manteo 

Dare - P. A. Tillet Kitty Hawk 

Gates- L. C. Hand Gatesvi e 

Gates R. E. Miller _ GatesviUe 

Hertford' A.W.Green Ahoskie 

Hertford R. H. Underwood Murfreesboro 

Hyde --W. J. Lupton Swan Quarter 

Hyde J. H. Swindell. Jr Swan Quarter 

Martin - J. R. Winslow RobersonviUe 

Martin Hugh Horton Wilhamston 

Pasquotank ...J.B.Flora Elizabeth City 

Pasquotank Mrs. W. C. Dawson Elizabeth City 

Perquimans. C.P.Morris P/^H^"'^ 

Perquimans .-S. M. Whedbee Hertford 

Pitt W. I. Bissette Grifton 

Pitt . ...J. H. Harrell Greenville 

Tyrrell Julian Swain Columbia 

Tyrrell W.J.White Columbia 

Washington Dr. J. M. Phelps Creswell 

Washington. _ E.L.Owens Plymouth 

Second District 

Bertie H. B. SpruiU JJ'indsor 

Bertie ..Mrs. L. D. Perry £,°'l'''^'" 

Edgecombe Vinson Bridgers J^V'"''' 

Edgecombe Clarence Wickham ...Tarboro 

Greene H.S.Taylor Hookertown 

Greene Mark C. Lassiter Snow Hill 

Halifa.x Mrs. Joyce Shearm Roanoke Rapids 

Halifax W. B. Allsbrook Roanoke Rapids 

Lenoir A. Forrest Waller R-5, Kinston 

Lenoir C. Brantley Aycock Kinston 

Northampton Mrs. Julian Porter ...Severn 

Northampton.. J. Ivey Bridgers Conway 

Warren . W. E. Turner... R-2, Henderson 

Warren R. W. Thornton Littleton 

Wilson.""" T.H. Woodard Jikon 

Wilson V. S. Daughtridge Wilson 



State Committees, Democratic 171 

Third District 

Carteret. Irvin W. Davis Beaufort 

Carteret Mrs. Roma Davis .'.".-Atlantic 

Craven J. E. VVetherington "Vanceboro 

Craven Mrs. N. C. Reed, Jr New Bern 

Duplin H. E. Latham Rose Hill 

Duplin Mrs. Hugh S. Johnson I. "."Rose Hill 

Jones John D. Larkins, Jr "Pollocksville 

Jones Mrs. George R. Hughes Pollocksville 

Onslow Albert J. Ellis Jacksonville 

Onslow Mrs. Graham Eubanks R-1, Maysville 

Pamlico J.C.Wiley Grantsboro 

Pamlico Mrs. Sadie B. Lupton ..Vandermere 

Pender Leon H. Corbett Burgaw 

Pender Mrs. A. B. Herring Watha 

Sampson Walter T. Britt ..Clinton 

Sampson Mrs. Polly Pool Clinton 

Wayne J. Edgar Kornegay Mt. Olive 

Wayne Mrs. Edwin Borden Goldsboro 

Fourth District 

Chatham Daniel L. Bell Pittsboro 

Chatham Mrs. J. B. Wood Siler City 

Franklin Charles P. Green Louisburg 

Franklin Mrs. Richard Whitfield Franklinton 

Johnston ___ J. Ed Johnson Benson 

Johnston Mrs. Bernadette Hoyle Sniithfield 

Nash Don Evans Rocky Mount 

Nash John D. Weaver ..Rocky Mount 

Randolph Glen Gilmore Julian 

Randolph Eli Seawall ...Bennett 

Vance M. F. Legg, Sr Henderson 

Vance J. C. Cooper, Sr Henderson 

Wake Banks Arendell Raleigh 

Wake John H. Anderson Raleigh 

Fifth District 

Caswell W.C.Taylor Blanche 

Caswell A. L. Florence Yanceyville 

Forsyth Spruill Thornton Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Paul Bennett.. Winston-Salcm 

Granville. B. S. Royster, Jr Oxford 

Granville L E. Harris Creedmoor 

Person J. E. Kirby Ro.xboro 

Rockingham Wm. C. Stokes Reidsville 

Rockingham Tom Van Noppen Madison 

Stokes Mrs. Charles Christian .Danbury 

Stokes. Cecil H.Frye RFD— Pinnacle 

Surry Franklin Folger ..Elkin 

Surry Lester Haynes Mt. Airy 

Sixth District 

Alamance Eugene A. Gordon.. Burlington 

Alamance John H. Vernon, Jr Burlington 

Alamance George Bason .Burlington 

Durham D. B. Martin Durham 

Durham Wilbur Hobby Durham 

Durham: S. E. Blaine Durham 

Guilford George Hampton Greensboro 

Guilford Roy Bowman Greensboro 

Guilford Herman Burrows High Point 

Orange 0. J. Coffin Chapel Hill 

Orange Harriet Herring Chapel Hill 

Orange Alex Herd... Chapel Hill 



172 North Carolina Manual 

Seventh District 

Bladen Thomas Carroll .Duplin 

Bladen R. J. Hester __ EUzabethtown 

Brunswick James Bellamy Shallotte 

Brunswick Mrs. W. T. Russ Shallotte 

Columbus W.A. Williams Tabor City 

Columbus ...T. H. Kellar_ Cerro Gordo 

Cumberland Lector Ray .Fayetteville 

Cumberland Steve Nimocks Fayetteville 

Harnett H. S. HoUoway Lillington 

Harnett Mrs. W. A. Nichols Coats 

New Hanover Addison Hewlett... Wilmington 

New Hanover Bradford Tillery Wilmington 

Robeson Grady Harrell McDonald 

Robeson Mrs. D. A. McCormick McDonald 

Eighth District 

Anson B.T.Hill Wadesboro 

Anson W. E. Brock Wadesboro 

Davidson C. F. Harris Thomasville 

Davidson Mrs. Arnold Weaver Le.xington 

Davie J. B. Cain Cana 

Davie . Mrs. R. C. Tatum Cooleemee 

Hoke N. H. G. Balfour ...Lumber Bridge 

Hoke ...JohnM cGoogan Raef ord 

Lee Robert W. Dalrymple Sanford 

Lea Glenn Edwards Sanford 

Montgomery G. T. McAuley Mt. Gilead 

Montgomery P. A. Clark Candor 

Moore Hubert McCaskill Pinehurst 

Moore Mrs. G. Brown Carthage 

Richmond J. D. Myers Hoffman 

Richmond C. H. Causey Rockingham 

Scotland J. G. King. Laurinburg 

Scotland Lee McCollum __ Gibson 

Union M.K. Armfield M arsh ville 

Union C. F. Griffin Monroe 

Wilkes _. Lee Walsh Purlear 

Wilkes C. C. Faw, Sr North Wilkesboro 

Yadkin Johnnie Poindexter East Bend 

Vadkin Lydia Underwood. Yadkin ville 

Ninth District 

Alexander A.C. Thompson Tay lorsville 

Alexander.. Mrs. T. D. Crouch Stony Point 

Alleghany W. F. Osborne Sparta 

Alleghany Edwin Duncan Sparta 

Ashe Wade E. Vannoy West Jefferson 

Ashe Thomas Bowie West Jefferson 

Cabarrus D. Ray M cEachern Concord 

Cabarrus. Dr. J. 0. Nolan Kan napolis 

Caldwell F. H. Talbert Lenoir 

Caldwell F. H. Hoover Lenoir 

Iredell _. Ralph Millsaps, Jr Mooresville 

Iredell Mrs. Mary Lee Miller Statesville 

Rowan Paul A. Swicegood Salisbury 

Rowan Wm. D.Kizziah Salisbury 

Stanly J.R. Little Albemarle 

Stanly 0. J. Sikes. Albemarle 

Watauga Dr. D. J. Whitener Boone 

Watauga Grady Moretz. Boone 



State Committees, Democratic 173 

Tenth District 

Avery E.L.Smith ___ .Minneapolis 

Avery. .._ _.. Mrs. Evelyn Riddle ..Banner Elk 

Burke T. Earl Franklin Morganton 

Burke A. B. Stoney Morganton 

Catawba _._ _ D. Locke Russell _ Hickory 

Catawba Mrs. L. L. Hurley Newton 

Lincoln _..W.E. Garrison Lincolnton 

Lincoln _ ..Marshall P. Hudspeth .R-4, Lincolnton 

Mecklen burg. Hamilton C. Jones Charlotte 

Mecklenburg W. Carl Ewing Charlotte 

Mitchell R. B. Phillips Spruce Pine 

Mitchell W.B.Ellis Lundy 

Eleventh District 

Cleveland Robert Morgan Shelby 

Cleveland David Royster Shelby 

Gaston. James M. Wallace Gastonia 

Gaston George W. Ransom, Jr Gastonia 

Madison J. Clyde Brown Mars Hill 

Madison E. Y. Ponder Marshall 

McDowell J. W. Streetman, Jr Marion 

McDowell S. R. Perkins Marion 

Polk J. W. Durham _ .Tryon 

Polk Mrs. Margaret Arledge Tryon 

Rutherford Robert Blan ton Forest City 

Rutherford Jack Camp Rutherfordton 

Yancey Ralph Edwards ■ Cane River 

Yancey R. H.Howell Bald Creek 

Twelfth District 

Buncombe John A. Goode Asheville 

Buncombe E. L. Loften Weaverville 

Cherokee Frank Forsyth Murphy 

Cherokee Mrs. Clarence Hendrix Murphy 

Clay Mrs. C. L. Davis Hayesville 

Clay George Jarrett _ Hayesville 

Graham Mrs. Marie Rogers Robbinsville 

Graham.. C. P. Sawyer Robbinsville 

Haywood Jack Abbott.. Canton 

Haywood Richard Queen Wayncsville 

Henderson Monroe Redden ,Jr Henderson ville 

Henderson R. L. Whitmire, Jr Henderson ville 

Jackson Ed Bryson Cullowhce 

Jackson Crawford Shelton _.. Wh itt icr 

Macon George Byrd Franklin 

Macon W. C. Burrell Franklin 

Swain. Ed Whitaker Bryson City 

Swain McKinley Edward Bryson City 

Transylvania. D. T. Abercrombie Brevard 

Transylvania Mrs. J. E. Osborne Brevard 



174 North Carolina Manual 

State Democratic Judicial District Executive Committees 

1954 

EASTERN DIVISION 

First District 

Beaufort.: Harry McMuIlan, Jr Washington 

Beaufort Mrs. Jesse Manning Washington 

Camden R. L. Bray Camden 

Camden R. L. Whaley Camden 

Chowan Marvin Wilson Edenton 

Chowan John Graham Edenton 

Currituctc Wilton Walker, Jr Currituck 

Currituck W. W. Jarvis, Jr Moyock 

Dare Martin Kellogg, Jr Manteo 

Dare Wallace R. Gray Manteo 

Gates J. E. Gregory Sunbury 

Gates Hubert Eason Gatesville 

Hyde George T. Davis Swan Quarter 

Hyde Wm. G. Cockran Swan Quarter 

Pasfjuotank F.T. Horner Elizabeth City 

Pasquotank Miles Ferebee Elizabeth City 

Perquimans Walter Oakey, Jr Hertford 

Perquimans C. R. Holmes Hertford 

Tvrrell E. L. Moseley Columbia 

Tyrrell W. C. Cohoon Columbia 

Second District 

Ed'jecombe Otley Leary Tarbor o 

Ed?;ecombe Cameron S. Weeks Tarboro 

Martin Paul Roberson Robersonville 

Martin A. Corey Jamesville 

Nash Robert Jones Bailey 

Nash L. L. Davenport Nashville 

Washington W. Blount Rodman Plymouth 

Washington Carl Bailey, Jr Plymouth 

Wilson Luke Lamb Wilson 

Wilson L. H. Gibbons Wilson 

Third District 

Bertie E. R.Tyler Roxobel 

Bertie Joe W. Parker Windsor 

Halifax I. F. Rochelle Roanoke Rapids 

Halifax Mrs. Calvin Kennerman Roanoke Rapids 

Hertford J. Carlton Cherry Ahoskie 

Hertford J. William Copeland Murfreesboro 

Northampton A. A. McKellar Jackson 

Northampton R. H. Johnson Conway 

Vance A. W. Gholson, Jr Henderson 

Vance Arthur A. Bunn Henderson 

Warren D. M. Picot Littleton 

Warren R. H. Wright Warrenton 

Fourth District 

Chatham George H. Andrews Pittsboro 

Chatham Mrs. Nell E. Lane Mt. Vernon Springs 

Harnett Neil Salmon Lillington 

Harnett Henry Strickland Lillington 

Johnston Jack Hooks Kenly 

Johnston Ed Batton Smithfield 

Lee Gabe Holmes Sanford 

Lee D. B. Teague Sanford 

Wayne J. F. Mclnnis Goldsboro 

Wayne W. A. Dees, Jr Goldsboro 



State Committees, Democratic 175 

Fifth District 

Carteret Luther Hamilton, Sr Morehead Citj- 

Carteret Mrs. Clayton Fulcher Atlantic 

Craven John Simpson Vanceboro 

Craven Mrs. John Rhodes New Bern 

Greene George W. Evans Snow Hill 

Greene Walter G. Shepherd Snow Hill 

Jones George R. Hughes Pollocksville 

Jones Mrs. R. P. Bender Pollocksville 

Pamlico Judge T. B. Woodard Bayboro 

Pamlico Mrs. R. A. Whorton Stonewall 

Pitt J. B. Lewis Farmville 

Pitt S. B. Underwood. Greenville 

Sixth District 

Duplin R. D. Johnson, Jr Warsaw 

Duplin Mrs. R. D. Johnson, Jr Warsaw 

Lenoir W. A. Allen Kinston 

Lenoir John G. Dawson ..Kinston 

Onslow Z. L. Riggs Jacksonville 

Onslow Mrs. W. Victor Venters Richlands 

Sampson C. Graham Tart Clinton 

Sampson R. E. Pendergrass Tomahawk 

Seventh District 

Franklin. Hamilton H. Hobgood Louisburg 

Franklin Edward F. Yarborough Louisburg 

Franklin Mrs. Walter E. Fuller R-3, Louisburg 

Wake W. T. Joyner Raleigh 

Wake A.L. Purrington Raleigh 

Wake.. Clyde A. Douglas Raleigh 

Eighth District 

Brunswick R. H. Holden. Shallotte 

Brunswick Cornelius Thomas Winnabow 

Columbus E. K. Proctor Whiteville 

Columbus D. F. McGougan, Jr Tabor City 

New Hanover Cicero Yow Wilmington 

New Hanover Mrs. Alice Strickland Carolina Beach 

Pender Mrs. J. F. Howard Hampstead 

Pender J. J. Best Burgaw 

Ninth District 

Bladen Leon B. Smith Elizabethtown 

Bladen Mrs. John Ferguson Clarkton 

Cumberland Jerome Clark Fayetteville 

Cumberland Duncan Shaw Fayetteville 

Hoke J. M. Andrews Red Springs 

Hoke Chariie Hostetler Racford 

Robeson H.A. McKinnon Lumberton 

Robeson Mrs. E. H. Alexander Red Springs 

Tenth District 

Alamance W. R. Dalton, Jr Burlington 

Alamance Melvin H. Hern Burlington 

Alamance Lewis C. Allen, Jr Burlington 

Durham M. H. Thompson Durham 

Durham John E. Markham Durham 

Durham... E. R. Williamson Durham 

Granville Edward F.Taylor Oxford 

Granville W. W. Whitfield Creedmoor 

Orange W.S.Stewart Chapel Hill 

Orange Jerry B. Stone Hillsboro 

Orange Mrs. George Sheppard - 

Person R. P. Burns... Roxboro 

Person R.B.Dawes - ...Roxboro 



176 North Carolina Manual 

Eleventh District 

Alleghany Worth Folger Sparta 

Alleghany C. R. Irvin Sparta 

Ashe Mrs. Ed M. Anderson West Jefferson 

Ashe J. I. Miller __ West Jefferson 

Forsyth J. Erie McMichael Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Robert Brawley Winston-Salem 

Forsyth William E. Church Winston-Salem 

Twelfth District 

Davidson H. E. Olive Lexington 

Davidson W. H. Steed Thomasville 

Guilford A. W. Sapp Greensboro 

Guilford- _ Mrs. R. Kennedy Harris Greensboro 

Guilford Mrs. Hunter Dal ton, Sr High Point 

Thirteenth District 

Anson Avery Hightower __ Wadesboro 

Anson Fred J. Coxe Wadesboro 

Moore W. L. Brown.. Southern Pines 

Moore V. L. Spence Carthage 

Richmond Palmer Nicholson R-.3, M t. Gilead 

Richmond Hugh Lee Rockingham 

Scotland J. D. Phillips, Jr Laurinburg 

Scotland James W. Mason Laurinburg 

Stanly _. .R. P. Ingram Albemarle 

Stanly P. D. Lowder . Albemarle 

Union J. Hampton Price Monroe 

Union Mrs. Henry H. Wilson, Jr Monroe 

Fourteenth District 

Gaston Max L. Childess _ -Mt. Holly 

Gaston P. C. Froneberger. ...Gastonia 

Mecklenburg Fred Helms Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Hugh Campbell _ Charlotte 

Fifteenth District 

Alexander L. P. Zachary Taylorsville 

Alexander Mrs. J. C. Connelly Taylorsville 

Cabarrus B. L Williford _ _ _ _ . . Kannapolis 

Cabarrus R. H. Irvin, Jr Kannapolis 

Iredell I. T. Avery, Jr Statesville 

Iredell W.R. Pope Mooresville 

Montgomery Garland S. Garris Troy 

Montgomery Charles H. Dorsett Mt. Gilead 

Rowan T. K. Carlton Salisbury 

Rowan J. G. Hudson, Jr Salisbury 

Randolph Archie Smith __ Asheboro 

Randolph W. N. Richardson , Jr Randleman 

Sixteenth District 

Burke H. J. Hatcher Morganton 

Burke ..John H. McMurray Morganton 

Caldwell Coit Barber Lenoir 

Caldwell W. C. Suddreth __ _ Lenoir 

Cleveland ...C. C. Horn __ Shelby 

Cleveland .B. T. Falls, Sr ..Shelby 

Lincoln _ C.E. Leatherman Lincolnton 

Lincoln Clifton Lowe ..Boger City 

Watauga Wade E. Brown Boone 

Watauia Gordon Winkler - Boone 

Catawba Hubert Kelley Newton 

Catawba Robert D. Carlisle Hickory 

Catawba WadeLefier... ...Newton 



State Committees, Democratic 177 

Seventeenth District 

Avery _ Lee Roy Riddle Banner Ellc 

Avery _ Mrs. George Bowman Ellc Park 

Davie _ George Martin .V.VMocksville 

Davie Mrs. R. S. McNeill Mocksville 

Mitchell Frank Watson Spruce Pine 

Mitchell Mrs. W. B. Young "_ Bakersville 

Wilkes MaxFerree North Wilkcsboro 

Wilkes - Larry S. Moore North Wilkcsboro 

Yadkin T. H. Poindexter Cana 

Yadkin Frank Hobson ...Boonville 

Eighteenth District 

Henderson Sam Hunt.. Hcndersonville 

Henderson Frank Todd Hcndersonville 

McDowell E. P. Dameron Marion 

McDowell H. F. Beam Marion 

Polk _ James Armond Columbus 

Polk Mrs. John Spurlen ...Columbus 

Rutherford _.. __ B. T. Jones, Jr Forest City 

Rutherford _. __ Clyde Keeter , .Lake Lure 

Transylvania _ Robert T. Gash Brevard 

Transylvania Mrs. Ray Winchester Brevard 

Yancey C. P. Randolph Burnsville 

Yancey Dover Fouts .Burnsville 

Nineteenth District 

Buncombe Francis J. Heazel Asheville 

Buncombe S. J. Bernard _. Asheville 

Madison _.W. T. Moore R-1, Hot Springs 

Madison Listen Ramsey Marshall 

Madison Carl R. Stuart Marshall 

Twentieth District 

Cherokee _ L. L. Mason, Jr Murphy 

Cherokee Herman Edwards Murphy 

Cherokee.. Mrs. A. J. Bell Murphy 

Clay Phil Lewis ._ Hayesville 

Graham _ Mrs. Kate Brown Fon tana 

Graham F. S. Griffin Robbinsville 

Haywood Homer Cagle Canton 

Haywood Clayton Walker. Waynesville 

Jackson David M. Hall, Jr Sylva 

Jackson Mrs. Wilma Jones Sylva 

Macon _._ Richard Jones Franklin 

Macon C. Banks Finger Franklin 

Swain H. J. Truett Bryson City 

Swain W. E. Elmore _._ Bryson City 

Twenty-First District 

Caswell C. L. Pemberton Yancey ville 

Caswell D. E. Scarborough Yancey ville 

Rockingham W. Ben Trotter Leaksyille 

Rockingham Lon Folger Madi.'on 

Stokes H. G. Johnson Danbury 

Surry P. 0. Wilson ..Pilot Mountain 

Surry A. B. Carter Mt. Airy 



178 North Carolina Manual 

State Democratic Senatorial Executive Committees 

1954 

First District 

Bertie Raleigh Lawrence Tolerain 

Camden H. C. Ferebee Camden 

Chowan Gibson Brickie Edenton 

Currituck E. R. Johnson Moyock 

Gates Martin Kellosg, Sr Sunbury 

Hertford Gordon Maddrey Ahoskie 

Pasquotank Bascom Sawyer Elizabeth City 

Perquimans Robert L. Hollowell Hertford 

Second District 

Beaufort Mrs. John Oden Pinetown 

Dare R. D. Wise Stumpv Point 

Hyde 1 L. B. Tumnell New Holland 

Martin Clarence Griffin Williamston 

Pamlico Robert B. Bowers Bavboro 

Tyrrell C.R.Chaplin Columbit! 

Washington Thomas H. Hampton Cressville 

Third District 

Northampton A. A. Bolton Rich Squar3 

Vance Mrs. M. L. Hight Henderson 

Warren W. R. Drake Macon 

Fourth District 

Edsecombe H. G. Shelton Speed 

Halifax CD. Moss R-2, Enfield 

Fifth District 

Pitt County Democratic Executive Committee 

Sixth District 

Franklin J. Fred Perry R-2, Zebulon 

Nash J. B. A vent Rocky Mount 

Wilson J. ^L Braswell Wilson 

Seventh District 

Carteret Moses Howard Newport 

Craven Norris C. Reed, Jr New Bern 

Green Percy B. Holden Snow Hill 

Jones R. P. Bender Pollocksville 

Lenoir John Shackleford R-1, Hookerton 

Onslow A. V. Cowell Jacksonville 

Eighth District 

Johnston Gilbert Gradv Four Oaks 

Wayne Ray S. Smith Pikeville 

Ninth District 

Duplin H. E. Phillips Kenansville 

New Hanover John Bright Hill Wilmington 

Pender A. H. Davis Burgaw 

Sampson W. L. McPhail Tomahawk 

Tenth District 

Bladen Frank T. Grady Elizabethtown 

Brunswick John B. Ward, Sr Ash 

Culumbus A. B. Mallard Tabor City 

Comberland Thomas Williams Fayetteville 



State Committees, Democratic 179 

Eleventh District 

Robeson County Democratic Executive Committee 

Twelfth District 

Harnett James Spence Lillington 

Hoke Harry A. Greene Raeford 

Moore Dan McDonald Carthage 

Randolph J. R. Ross Asheboro 

Thirteenth District 

Chatham Mrs. Elizabeth Blair Pittsboro 

Lee.- Dr. J. H. Byerly Sanford 

Wake - John Mills Wake Forest 

Fourteenth District 

Durham. Dan K. Edwards Durham 

Granville Joe A. Watkins Oxford 

Person J. W. Green Roxboro 

Fifteenth District 

Caswell W. W. Pointer _ Blanche 

Rockingham E. S. Powell Reidsville 

Sixteenth District 

Alamance W'. F. Harris, Sr Mebane 

Orange Mrs. Charles Stanford, Sr - Chapel Hill 

Seventeenth District 

Guilford County Democratic Executive Committee 

Eighteenth District 

Davidson Wade H. Phillips Lexington 

Montgomery R. L. Asbill --- Biscoe 

Richmond L. S. Allen Rockingham 

Scotland Charles Barrett Laurinburg 

Nineteenth District 

Anson Paula Kitchen Wadcsboro 

Stanly Crayon C. Efird... Albemarle 

Union Mac Lane Brooks - ...Monroe 

Twentieth District 

Mecklenburg. County Democratic Executive Committee 

Twenty-First District 

Cabarrus John R. Boger, Jr Concord 

Rowan Nelson Woodson. Salisbury 

Twenty-Second District 

Forsyth County Democratic Executive Committee 

Twenty-Third District 

Stokes R.L. Smith ---- Danbury 

Surry Glenn Stone - Pilot Mountam 

Twenty-Fourth District 

Davie J.M.Horn.. -. - Mocksville 

Wilkes .Homer Brookshire.. North W ilkesboro 

Yadkin Ralph Carter - Cycle 



180 North Carolina Manual 



Twenty-Fifth District 

Catawba J. Henry Hill, Jr _ . _ Hickory 

Iredell Mrs. Mary Bryant Statesville 

Lincoln Frank Kuck - Lincoln ton 

Twenty-Sixth District 

Gaston County Democratic Executive Committee 

Twenty-Seventh District 

Cleveland D. W. Royster Shelby 

McDowell V. E. Price Marion 

Rutherford Frank West _ Caroleen 

Rutherford O.A. Harrill Spindale 

Twenty-Eighth District 

Alexander Harvey WiUett Hiddenite 

Burke Mrs. Geneva Duckworth R-1, Moreanton 

Burke _ Charles A. Bumgarner R-1, Connelly Springs 

Caldwell D. Archie Coffey Lenoir 

Twenth-Ninth D-strict 

Alleghany Cloy Cox Scottsville 

Ashe W. B. Austin Jefferson 

Watauga fem Horton Sugar Grove 

Thirtieth District 

Avery. W. Kenneth Anderson Newland 

Avery Mrs. Dayton X. Jones R-1, E'k Park 

Madison Hilliard Teague Marshall 

Mitchell Clarence Hensley __- Bandana 

Mitchell Rex Wilson Spruce Pine 

Yancey Charles Proffitt Burnsville 

Thirty-First District 

Buncombe County Democratic Executive Committee 

Thirty-Second District 

Haywood Bruce E. Brown Clyde 

Henderson Mrs. E. C. Richardson Hendersonville 

Jackson Hoyle Deitz R-2, Syl va 

Polk Mrs. W. A. McFarland Columbus 

Transylvania Dewey Burton Bosman 

Thirty-Third District 

Cherokee James Bryson Marble 

Clay 0. A. Kitchen Hayesville 

Graham Don England Cheoah 

Macon Jerry Franklin Franklin 

Swain Frank Hyatt Bryson City 



State Committees, Democratic 181 

State Solicitorial District Executive Committees 

1954 

EASTERN DIVISION 
First District 

Beaufort James Younce Belhaven 

Beaufort Mrs. Scott Topping -...1"/."".'."" Pantego 

Camden Ashton Leary Camden 

Camden... _..\V. F. Williams Camden 

Chowan Mrs. Josie Ruth Carr '. Eden ton 

Chowan W. P. Jones Edenton 

Currituck L. L. Dozier " Jarvisburg 

C'imtii'^^ B B.Flora .".Shawboro 

Dare _._ Robert Midgett Manteo 

Dare M. K. Fearing, Jr "!!^Manteo 

Gates Tazewell Eure Gatesville 

Gates W. L. Askew ." Eure 

Hyde E. A. Williams Swan Quarter 

Hyde Russell A. Swindell Swan Quarter 

Pasquotank W. F. Thompson _ Elizabeth City 

Pasquotank _J. F. Ferrell Elizabeth City 

Perquimans A. W. Hefren Hertford 

Perquimans Chas. Johnson __ Hertford 

Tyrrell C. E. Morris '.".".Columbia 

Tyrrell H. T. Davenport .Columbia 

Second District 

Edgecombe W. E. Clark, Jr. _ Tarboro 

Edgecombe John Price Tarboro 

Martin Elbert S. Peele Williamston 

Martin Hugh Martin Williamston 

Nash .Homer Burns _ Middlesex 

Nash. S. T. Valentine Nashville 

Washington Z. V. Norman ...Plymouth 

Washington ._.W. R. Gaylord Plymouth 

Wilson Robert Farris Wilson 

Wilson V. D. Constable Wilson 

Third District 

Bertie Maitland Loyner Lewiston 

Bertie Julia Harrington Lewiston 

Halifax R. E. Shervette Enfield 

Halifax Harry Fishel Roanoke Rapids 

Hertford _ .J. B. Burden Ahoskie 

Hertford R. T. Vann Murfreesboro 

Northampton E. N. Kiddle Jackson 

Northampton _ Garland D. Barnes Severn 

Vance. Mrs. B. A. Scott _ Henderson 

Vance Carroll V. Singleton Henderson 

Warren F.H. Gibbs Warrenton 

Warren .Howell Steed Warren ten 

Fourth District 

Chatham Mrs. Herman Scott R-3, Chapel Hill 

Chatham John M. McKeever ..Gulf 

Harnett Roger Mann - Lillington 

Harnett M. 0. Lee .LiUincton 

Johnston W. R. Britt Smithficld 

Johnston Roy Atkinson Clayton 

Lee Ray Byerly __ Sanford 

Lee _ Dela Harris... --- Sanford 

Wayne Ralph Howell... Goldsboro 

Wayne Clarence Whitley R-3, Goldsboro 



182 North Carolina Manual 

Fifth District 

Carteret.. James D. Potter Beaufort 

Carteret Mrs. C. G. Holland Beaufort 

Craven _. C. D. Lancaster New Bern 

Craven Mrs. Leonora Carawan New Bern 

Green L J. Horton Snow Hill 

Green C. 0. Kearney Snow Hill 

Jones Starling Pelletier Maysville 

Jones Mrs. John M. Hargett R-3, Trenton 

Pamlico Floyd H. Reel Eelsboro 

Pamlico _._Mrs. G. B. Campen Alliance 

Pitt C. D. Langston Winterville 

Pitt C. W. Everette Bethel 

Sixth District 

Duplin - Henry L. Stevens, III Warsaw 

Duplin _ Mrs. Winifred T. Wells Wallace 

Lenoir R. A. Whi taker Kinston 

Lenoir Ronald Smith Rt. No. 1 — Seven Springs 

Onslow Carl V. Venters Jacksonville 

Onslow Mrs. John N. Starling Hubert 

Sampson Sam Turlington Clinton 

Sampson R.A. Peale Clinton 

Seventh District 

Franklin _.. Willard Wilder Franklin ton 

Franklin John King Louisburg 

Franklin Mrs. Hugh W. Perry Louisburg 

Wake W. A. Hinton Apex 

Wake Howard E. Manning Raleigh 

Wake Charles H. Young Raleigh 

Eighth District 

Brunswick Sam T. Bennett South port 

Brunswick Mac Jones Leland 

Columbus Jack Hooks Whiteville 

Columbus R. H. Burns Whiteville 

New Hanover Mrs. Hannah Block __W'ilmington 

New Hanover Rudolph Mintz Wilmington 

Pender W.E. Blake Burgaw 

Pender... Mrs. H. P. Bell, Jr Currie 

Ninth District 

Bladen C.L. Braddy Council 

Bladen Mrs. Hobson Sangletary Tar Heel 

Cumberland D. P Russ Fayetteville 

Cumberland Franklin Clark Fayetteville 

Hoke G B.Rowland Raef.ird 

Hoke Harry Harrison Raeford 

Robeson Joe Prevatte Lumberton 

Robeson Mrs. E. K. Butler Lumberton 

Tenth District 

Alamance M. G. Pickard Burlingtrn 

Alamance D. M. McClellan Burlington 

.4lama nee W.S. Harris, Jr Mebane 

Durham T. R. Bane Durham 

Durham A. D. Atwater ..Durham 

Durham Mrs. M vrtle Dunn Durham 

Granville.. T.W.Allen. RFD, Creedmoor 

Granville W. M. Hicks Oxford 

Orange L.J. Phiops Chapel Hill 

Orange Charles Hobson Chapel Hill 

Orange Mrs. M anly Snipes Hillsboro 

Person Richard G. Lang Roxboro 

Person T. F. Davis Roxboro 



State Committees, Democratic 183 

WESTERN district 
Eleventh District 

Alleghany Alton Thompson Sparta 

Alleghany Amos Wagoner, Jr ...Sparta 

Ashe ..Rusell W. Barr West Jefferson 

Ashe Mrs. B. W. Tugman _ West Jefferson 

Forsyth Winfield Blackwell Winston-Salem 

Forsyth Hosea Price Winston-Salem 

Twelfth District 

Davidson C. F. Hauze... .Lexington 

Davidson ...Leroy Hughes Thomasville 

Guilford _J. P. Shore Greensboro 

Guilford E. C. McLean Greensboro 

Guilford Amos Kearns High Point 

Thirteenth District 

Anson. -_ R. E. Underwood Wadesboro 

Anson Bennett Edwards Wadesboro 

Moore Robert Page. Aberdeen 

Moore Douglas David Pine Bluff 

Richmond-- William Ussery - -.. R-1, Mt. Oilead 

Richmond. _ CO. Taylor Hamlet 

Scotland Joe Cox Laurinburg 

Scotland M.T. Livingston Laurinburg 

Stanly George Harris. New London 

Stanly Hal Turner Albemarle 

Union _ H. H. Wilson, Jr Monroe 

Union Talmadge McBryde Marshville 

Fourteenth District 

Gaston W. J. Allrand, Jr Cherryville 

Gaston J. Mack Holland Gastonia 

Mecklenburg Ellis Surles Charlotte 

Mecklenburg Haywood Robbins Charlotte 

Fifteenth District 

Alexander Loy Wittenberg R-2, Hickory 

Alexander Mrs. Solon Moose Taylorsville 

Cabarrus Webster Medlin.. (^oncord 

Cabarrus. C. W. Barrier Concord 

Iredell J. G. Lewis, Jr Statesville 

Iredell Louis Gordon Statesville 

Montgomery D. H. Armstrong Troy 

Montgomery Ernest King. Jr Troy 

Rowan Robert M. Davis Salisbury 

Rowan Archie Ruffy Salisbury 

Randolph Fred Thomas Ranisour 

Randolph Mrs. Nancy Finch _ Trinity 

Sixteenth District 

Burke Jack B. Kirksey Morganton 

Burke. H. M. Estes .- .Morganton 

Caldwell Dr. Dennis Cook Lenoir 

Caldwell Wallace Huntley Lenoir 

Catawba Mrs. Ray Morrow Claremont 

Catawba ...Harry VanderLinden .Hickory 

Cleveland Ernest Gardner Shelby 

Cleveland A. A. Powell.. _. Shelby 

Lincoln Paul Bangle ..Lincoln ton 

Lincoln Joe Graham - Iron Station 

Watauga J. H. Thomas Boone 

Watauga.. Jack Edmisten Boone 



184 North Carolina Manual 

Seventeenth District 

Avery - Dr. W. D. Tennant Crossnore 

Avery Mrs. Arizona Hughes R-1, Newland 

Davie Bryan Sells.. Mocksville 

Davie- _ Mrs. Grady Smith Farmington 

Mitchell Mrs. Robert E. Morton Bakersville 

Mitchell George Barlett._ Spruce Pine 

Wilkes Robert M. Gambill North Wilkesboro 

Yadkin Fred J. Brandon Yadkin ville 

Yadkin Paul Speer, Jr Boonville 

Eighteenth District 

Henderson. Fred Toms Henderson ville 

Henderson Arthur Shepard Hendersonville 

McDowell E.J. House Marion 

McDowell Dr. J. B. Johnson Old Fort 

Polk. Eugene Anderson Saluda 

Polk ...Mrs. Arliene Dalton Mill Springs 

Rutherford James Burnell Spindale 

Rutherford George Morrow Forest City 

Transylvania Cecil J. Hill Brevard 

Transylvania Mrs.S.M. MacFie, Jr Brevard 

Yancey E.L. Briggs BurnsviUe 

Yancey Bill Atkins BurnsviUe 

Nineteenth District 

Buncombe Ervin Crawford Asheville 

Buncombe Kester Walton Asheville 

Madison Herbert Hawkins Mars Hill 

Madison Marty Buckner Mars Hill 

Madison Zeno Ponder Alexander 

Twentieth District 

Cherokee Percy Ferebee Andrews 

Cherokee H. A. Maddox Murphy 

Clay T.C.Gray Hayesville 

Clay Mrs. Neil R. Kitchen Hayesville 

Graham Tony T. Ayres Tapoca 

Haywood Joe Campljell Waynesville 

Haywood Arthur Shephard Waynesville 

Jackson Raymond Nicholson, Sr Sylva 

Jackson Lawrence Reed Sylva 

Macon Tom Alley Otto 

Macon Frank Gibson Franklin 

Swain A. J. Sutton Bryson City 

Swain Lawson Shuler Bryson City 

Twenty-First District 

Caswell Ralph Vernon Blanche 

Caswell W.A.Cobb R-l,Ruffin 

Rockingham Earl Vaughn Draper 

Rockingham J. C.Brown Madison 

Stokes C. E. Davis.. ...Walnut Cove 

Surry John Llewelyn Dobson 

Surry Wilson Barber .Mt. Airy 



State Committees, Democratic 185 

COUNTY CHAIRMEN— DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE 

COMMITTEE 

1954 

County Chairman Address 

Alamance D. K. Muse Mebane 

Alexander ..W. S. Patterson R-1, Stony Point 

Alleghany _R. F. ('rouse.. _ R-2, Sparta 

Anson. James A. Hardison VVadesboro 

Ashe. W. D. McMillan West Jefferson 

Avery R. T. Lewis Minneapolis 

Beaufort Milton S. Brown ...Washington 

Bertie John R. Jenkins, Jr Aulander 

Bladen Robert J. Hester, Jr Elizabethtown 

Brunswick W. T. Russ Shallotte 

Buncombe Pat M. Burdett Asheville 

Burke Sam Ervin, III ...Morganton 

Cabarrus E. T. Bost, Jr Concord 

Caldwell .James C. Farthing Lenoir 

Camden Dempsey B. Burgess Shiloh 

Carteret Irvin W. Davis Beaufort 

Caswell Clarence L. Peraberton Yancey ville 

Catawba Charles C. Bost Conover 

Chatham Wade Barber. Pittsboro 

Cherokee L. L. Love Andrews 

Chowan... Lloyd E. Griffin Eden ton 

Clay Bill Lewis. Hayesville 

Cleveland C.C.Horn ..Shelby 

Columbus W. Avery Thompson Halkboro 

Craven William F. Ward New Bern 

Cumberland - H. R. Clark Fayetteville 

Currituck S. A. Walker .Snowden 

Dare M. L. Daniels Manteo 

Davidson Hubert E. Olive .Lexington 

Davie Gordon Tomlinson Mocksville 

Duplin F. W. McGowen Kcnansville 

Durham J. Leslie Atkins, Jr ...Durham 

Edgecombe W. G. Clark, Jr Tarboro 

Forsyth Spruill Thornton Winston-Salem 

Franklin Walter E. Fuller Louisburg 

Gaston ..L. B. Hollowell Gastonia 

Gates Martin Kellogg, Sr Sunhury 

Graham C. P. Sawyer Robbinsvillo 

Granville Edward F. Taylor O.xford 

Greene K. A. Pittman Snow Hill 

Guilford Frank R. Hutton Greensboro 

Halifax Joe Branch Enfield 

Harnett W. A. Johnson Lillington 

Haywood Frank D. Ferguson Waynesville 

Henderson R. L. Whitmire, Jr Hendersonville 

Hertford .. ... ... ..D.C.Barnes . Murfrcesboro 

Hoke Dr. Walter P. Baker. Raoford 

Hyde W. J. Lupton Swan Quarter 

IredeU John F.Long RFD 1, Statesville 

Jackson R. U. Sutton Sylva 

Johnston Ed. L. White ...Pine Level 

Jones R. P. Bender Pollockaville 

Lee Ralph Monger, Jr.... Sanford 

Lenoir A. H. Jeffress Kinston 

Lincoln J. H. Ross ..Lincolnton 

Macon Franks. Murray.. Franklin 

Madison Glen Reems RFD 1, Marshall 

Martin. James H. Gray, Sr Robersonville 



186 North Carolina Manual 

County Chairman Address 

McDowell S. J. Westmoreland- Marion 

Mecklenburg ._ _ David McConnell Charlotte 

Mitchell C. I. Yelton Bakersville 

Montgomery Miles Paul Poole Troy 

Moore Lemon t Brown Southern Pines 

Nash Wm. B. Harrison Rocky Mount 

New Hanover Alan Marshall Wilmington 

Northampton Buxton Midyette. Jackson 

Onslow Marion A. Cowell Jacksonville 

Orange Robert 0. Forrest __ Hillsboro 

Pamlico J. C. Wiley Gran tsboro 

Pasq uotank Noah Burfoot Elizabeth City 

Pender R. H. Balcombe Rocky Point 

Perquimans Wm. F. Ainsley Hertford 

Person R.B. Dawes Roxboro 

Pitt John G.Clark ....Greenville 

Polk_.__ W. M. McDonald Tryon 

Randolph ThadT. Moser Asheboro 

Richmond _. ..Athos Cockman Rockingham 

Robeson ._ E. M. Johnson Lumberton 

Rockingham Jule McMichael .Reidsville 

Rowan Walter H. Woodson ,Jr Salisbury 

Rutherford Charles G. Dalton _ .Spindale 

Sampson Stewart B. Warren Clinton 

Scotland Thomas J. Gill Laurinburg 

Stanly Henry C. Doby, Jr Albemarle 

Stokes R.J. Scott Danbury 

Surry Mrs. R. C. Lewellyn Dobson 

Swain I. B. Jenkins Bryson City 

Transvlvania Thomas R. Eller Brevard 

Tyrrell D. M. Pledger, Jr Columbia 

Union Oscar L. Richardson Monroe 

Vance George T. Blackburn Henderson 

Wake Wm. T. Hatch Raleigh 

Warren John Kerr, Jr Warren ton 

Washington C. L. Bailey Plymouth 

Watauga D. Frank Baird. ...Valle Crucis 

Wayne J. T. Flythe Mt. Olive 

Wilkes.-- C. Watson Brame North Wilkesboro 

Wilson Rex Best.Jr Stantonsburg 

Yadkin J. W. Hudspeth Yadkin\'ille 

Yancey Woodrow Anglin R-1, Burnsville 



NORTH CAROLINA REPUBLICAN STATE 
PLATFORM 1954 

Issued by 

NORTH CAROLINA REPUBLICAN STATE COMMITTEE 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

We, the Republicans of North Carolina in convention duly as- 
sembled in the City of Charlotte on March 6, 1954, rededicate our 
party to the service of the people of our state and our nation. "We 
submit herewith to the people of North Carolina the following 
statement of our beliefs and our objectives. 

We wholeheartedly commend the Republican National Admin- 
istration under the leadership of our great President, Dwight D. 
Eisenhower. We are thankful that this Republican Administration 
has returned our government to the fundamental principles of 
requiring honesty, integrity and ability from its public servants. 
We commend the Republican National Administration for return- 
ing our government to the fundamental American belief in the 
responsibility of the individual and of local governments. We 
commend this Republican National Administration for proving 
to the world that we can have prosperity based on peace. We are 
thankful that this Republican National Administration has elimi- 
nated wasteful and excessive government spending, and is steer- 
ing this nation's government toward a sound and solvent economic 
basis. 

We are proud that this Republican National Administration has 
established a firm and workable foreign policy which has returned 
our nation to its proper position of respect in the eyes of the rest 
of the world. We are particularly thankful that this National Re- 
publican Administration has brought about an end to the bloody, 
costly and useless war in Korea. We wholeheartedly endorse the 
dynamic and sound administration which our party is providing 
and reassert our belief in the policies enumerated by President 
Dwight D. Eisenhower. 

The American people have long demanded that the government 
of foreign countries recognize their minority parties and give 

187 



188 North Carolina Manual 

them representation in their government in accordance with the 
American concept of representative government. It is our belief 
that 60% of a people should not be permitted to politically en- 
slave the other 40% of the people. The Republican party of North 
Carolina has suffered from political oppression by the Democratic 
party for more than 50 years. The political oppression exercised 
by the Democrat party has not been limited solely to members of 
the Republican party but has also been inflicted upon the inde- 
pendents and enlightened Democrats in this state. The Democratic 
Party in North Carolina and elsewhere in the South has pro- 
tested loud and long against the imposition of a loyalty pledge by 
the Democratic National Convention ; but through unfair election 
laws, (GS-163-50) and (GS-163-119), they attempt to impose a 
loyalty oath on the voters of our state in violation of article 10 
of the constitution of North Carolina. 

In the sincere hope of resolving the inequities existing under 
the present Democrat machine in North Carolina and in an effort 
to inaugurate much needed reforms in our state affairs, the Repub- 
lican party of North Carolina pledges itself to do the following, 
if entrusted to political power in the coming November Election: 

1. Adopt an honest and fair election law which will apply to 
primaries and general elections alike; repeal the absentee ballot 
law except for citizens in the Armed Forces and those who are 
sick and unable to attend the voting place on election day; create 
a bi-partisan State Board of Elections required by law to investi- 
gate and prosecute all election law violations. 

2. Re-align Congressional and State Senatorial Districts on a 
fair and equitable basis; eliminate the unconscionable practice of 
gerrymandering Congressional and Judicial Districts; and take 
the judiciary entirely out of politics. 

3. Provide for two-party representation upon all Commissions, 
Boards and Bureaus in proportion to the percentage of votes cast 
by the respective parties. 

4. Take the operation of the State Highway system out of 
partisan politics. 

5. Inaugurate a State Civil Sei-vice System for all state em- 
ployees. 

6. Provide that members of County Boards of Education be 
elected by the people of the respective counties in non-partisan 



Republican Platform 189 

elections, and take the operation of the public school system en- 
tirely out of partisan politics. 

7. Increase exemptions for income tax purposes to $2,500.00 
for married persons and to $400.00 for each dependent, allow de- 
ductions for Federal income Tax, give full deduction for hospital 
and medical bills and a deduction of $500.00 per year for educa- 
tional expenses of each dependent attending college and com- 
pletely revise our tax laws to eliminate their many inequities. 

8. Assume the Constitutional mandate to provide a general and 
uniform system of public schools for both races, including state 
construction, equipment and maintenance of school buildings; to 
strive toward further reductions in class load per teacher and 
adopt an adequate and commensurate salary schedule for certified 
teachers; and provide adequate funds for current expense items. 

9. Provide adequate facilities and competent care for the in- 
sane, orphans, and delinquents. 

10. Repeal the infamous secrecy law adopted by the Demo- 
crat controlled legislature in 1953. 

11. Provide for the people of North Carolina a state wide 
referendum on the question of manufacture and sale of intoxicat- 
ing beverages. 

12. To give the people of North Carolina an opportunity to 
amend our constitution so as to give the right to vote to all citi- 
zens of North Carolina who have reached the age of 18 years. 

13. Adopt a modern state constitution. 

14. Provide the increased and improved services to the people 
as herein indicated by practicing strict economy in administra- 
tion. We believe adequate funds will be available for these serv- 
ices without increasing taxation if there is a complete reorganiza- 
tion of the state government and a consequent elimination of use- 
less and expensive agencies and bureaus, and this we promise to 
accomplish. 

These are our pledges to the people of North Carolina. We love 
our state and take pride in her traditions, and believe that this 
year many people are prepared to place country above party. To 
all those who are willing to do so, we extend the right hand of 
fellowship and invite them to help us make North Carolina a finer 
and better place in which to live. 



190 North Carolina Manual 

PLAN OF ORGANIZATION OF THE REPUBLICAN 
PARTY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Adopted in Convention, March 6, 1954, at Charlotte 

ARTICLE I 
The Precinct as a Unit 

1. The unit of party action shall be the election precinct. In 
every precinct in each General Election year there shall be selected 
in mass-meeting in every precinct in the State, a Precinct Com- 
mittee of five or more voters, one of whom shall be designated as 
Chairman, one as Vice-Chairman, one of whom shall be a woman 
and a secretary. 

2. The members and officers of the precinct committee shall 
hold their places for two years from the date of election and until 
their successors are chosen. The County Chairman shall call pre- 
cinct meetings at the polling place in each precinct at such time 
as shall be designated by the Chairman of the State Republican 
Executive Committee, after giving ten days notice thereof. Pre- 
cinct meetings shall elect one delegate and one alternate to the 
County Convention, plus one additional delegate and alternate for 
each fifty votes, or major fraction thereof, cast for the Republican 
Candidate for Govex-nor in the last General Election. New precincts 
shall use the highest state official at the latest election. Other 
precinct meetings may be called and held at such times and places 
as shall be designated by the Chairman of the Precinct Committee 
after first giving TEN DAYS notice of such meeting. In the 
event any Chairman of any precinct fails to act, then the Chair- 
man of the County Committee shall appoint someone in his or her 
place to serve until a Precinct meeting can be held and the new 
chairman elected. The County Chairman shall call such a meet- 
ing within thirty (30) days. 

ARTICLE II 

County Conventions and County Committees 

1. A County Convention shall be called in each general election 
year by the Chairman of the County Committee, at the County 
seat, at the date set by the Chairman of the State Republican 
Executive Committee, after giving FIFTEEN days notice thereof, 



Republican Platform 191 

and the delegates and alternates elected in the precinct meetings 
shall sit as delegates and alternates in the County Convention. 
The County Convention shall choose a chairman and a Vice-Chair- 
man, one of whom shall be a woman, and other officers, all of whom 
shall be qualified voters in the County. A County Committee of five 
or more voters shall be chosen in the County Convention and shall 
hold their places for a term of TWO YEARS, and until their 
successors are elected. Nominations may be made by the precinct 
meetings for membership upon the County Committee. Such bien- 
nial County Convention shall elect one delegate and one alter- 
nate to the STATE and all DISTRICT CONVENTIONS, for every 
two hundred votes, or major fraction thereof, cast for the Repub- 
lican nominee for Governor at the latest election in said county. 
Every county shall have at least one vote. In addition thereto, 
each county shall be entitled to one additional delegate and alter- 
nate for each Republican member of the STATE HOUSE OF 
REPRESENTATIVES elected by the County in the preceding 
election. 

2. That if one-third of the members of the County Committee 
shall desire a meeting of the County Committee, it shall be the 
duty of the Chairman of the County Committee, to call said 
meeting; and if said Chairman shall fail or refuse to call said 
meeting upon petition of one-third of the members, the one-third 
of the members may call the meeting of the County Committee 
by giving the Chairman and Secretary and members of the County 
Committee at least FIVE DAYS NOTICE. 

3. For good cause shown, any Chairman, Vice-Chairman, Sec- 
retary, or member of the County Committee may be removed from 
his or her position upon a vote of two-thirds of the members of 
the County Committee, but said cause for removal shall be con- 
fined to inefficiency and party disloyalty. Upon such removal the 
County Committee shall have the authority to fill the unexpired 
term. 

4. The Vice-Chairman shall function as Chairman for the re- 
spective Republican Executive Committee in the absence of the 
Chairman. 

5. In case of death or resignation of any officer of the County 
Republican Committee, the resulting vacancy shall be filled by the 
County Committee. 



192 North Carolina Manual 

ARTICLE III 

Congressional, Judicial and Senatorial Committees 

The Republican Conp^resaional, Judicial and Senatorial District 
Committees shall be composed of the Chairman of the several 
County Committees within the District, and the Chairman and 
Vice-Chairman, one of whom shall be a woman, and Secretai'y of 
the said District, and shall be elected biennially at the Cong^res- 
sional Convention. The aforesaid Congressional, Judicial and State 
Senatorial Conventions shall be called by their respective Chair- 
man on the date designated by the Chairman of the State Re- 
publican Executive Committee upon TWENTY DAYS notice of 
the time and place for holding same. Upon the failure for any 
reason of the District Chairman in any case to call a District 
Convention, the said call may be issued by the Secretary of the 
District Committee. 

ARTICLE IV 

State Convention 

A State Convention shall be called in every General Election 
year by the Chairman of the Republican State Executive Com- 
mittee after FORTY-FIVE days notice thereof, to all members 
of the State Executive Committee, all Chairmen of the several 
County Executive Committees, and the Chairman of all District 
Committees, of the time and place of holding same. In the call 
for the State Convention the Chairman of the State Republican 
Executive Committee shall desienate the date for the piecinct 
meetings, the County and District Conventions. The State Con- 
vention biennially shall elect a State Chairman and a State Vice- 
Chairman, one of whom shall be a woman. The State Convention, 
each year of a Presidential election, shall recommend to the Na- 
tional Republican Executive Committee, for a term of FOUR 
YEARS, the name of two persons, a man and a woman, for Na- 
tional Committeeman and National Committeewoman respectively. 
Vacancies in the office of State Chairman and State Vice-Chair- 
man shall be filled by the State Committee until the next terms. 
In the event of vacancy in the National Committeeman or National 
Committeewoman, the State Committee shall recommend to the 
National Committee for the appointment of successors to fill the 
unexpired termg, 



Republican Platform 193 

ARTICLE V 
Republican State Committees 

1. The Republican State Committee shall be composed of FOUR 
members from each Congressional District, and one additional 
member from each Congressional District for every 3,000 votes 
or major fraction thereof cast in said Congressional District for 
the Republican candidate for Governor at the last election. The 
members of the State Committee in each Congressional District 
shall be elected for a term of two years, or until successors are 
elected and qualified by the delegates to the Congressional Con- 
vention of the respective Districts. The number of members on the 
State Executive Committee representing each county shall be de- 
termined by the number of votes cast by said county for Gover- 
nor in the last election. Vacancies occurring in representation from 
any Congressional District shall be filled by a vote of the majority 
of the remaining members residing in the district in which such 
vacancy may occur. 

2. The State Chairman, State Vice-Chairman, National Com- 
mitteeman, National Committeewoman, and the permanent Chair- 
man and Secretary of the preceding State Convention, the Presi- 
dent, National Committeeman, National Committeewoman of the 
State Young Republicans, the President of the State Women's 
Republican Federation, the Secretary, and the Ti'easurer, of the 
State Republican Executive Committee, shall be members of the 
State Committee, Ex-Officio. 

3. The State Committee shall have the power to elect a Sec- 
retary and an Assistant Secretary, one of whom shall come from 
the Young Republicans, a Treasurer, and other officers which may 
appear necessary, who shall serve for a term of two years and 
until their successors are chosen. 

4. The State Committee shall meet annually upon the call of 
the Chairman and Secretary, or upon the failure of the Chair- 
man, upon the call of the Vice-Chairman and Secretaiy. 

5. There shall be a Republican State Executive Board com- 
posed of the State Chairman, Vice-Chairman, Secretary, Treas- 
urer, the National Committeeman and the National Committee- 
woman of the Republican State Committee, the President of the 
State Young Republicans, the President of the State Women's 
Republican Federation, five Republican members of the General 



194 North Carolina Manual 

Assembly of North Carolina to be chosen by the Republican State 
Executive Board, and one member from each of the twelve Con- 
gressional Districts to be selected by and from the members of 
the State Republican Executive Committee residing in the Con- 
gressional District. 

The Republican State Executive Board shall meet during the 
first month of each calendar quai'ter upon the call of the State 
Chaimian, or upon the failure of the Chairman upon the call of 
the State Vice-Chairman. 

The Republican State Executive Board shall have active man- 
agement of State Campaigns, with power to appoint a Finance 
Committee, a Publicity Committee, a Campaign Committee, an 
Organization Committee, and such other committees as it may 
deem necessary in the proper conduct in the affairs of the Party; 
to adopt a budget and supei'vise the expenditure of all monies 
coming into the hands of the State Chairman of the State Execu- 
tive Committee; and to do all other things pertaining to Party 
affaii's which it may be authorized to do from time to time by 
the Republican State Committee in session. The Republican State 
Executive Board shall keep accurate accounts of its proceedings 
and shall make reports to the State Executive Committee at each 
annual session. 

6. A member or members of the State Committee from a ma- 
jority of the counties shall constitute a quorum of the State Com- 
mittee for the transaction of business. 

7. When any member of the State Committee becomes an ac- 
tive or regular candidate for an appointment controlled either 
directly or indirectly by recommendation of the State Committee, 
then such member of said State Committee shall forfeit his or her 
membership on the State Committee. 

ARTICLE VI 

Acting by Proxy in Convention Not Allowed 

No delegate, alternate, or other member of a Convention shall 
cast any vote by proxy, provided, however, that any delegate or 
delegates present shall have the right to cast the entire vote of 
the precinct in County Conventions and of the County in State 
and District Conventions. 



Republican Platform 195 

ARTICLE VII 
Convention Procedure 

1. The State, District and County Conventions shall be called 
to order by their respective chairman, or in the absence of the 
Chairman, by the Vice-Chairman, Secretary, or some member 
thereof, in order stated, who shall have the pow^er to appoint and 
receive the reports of the Ci'edentials Committee, to appoint other 
temporary and necessary committees, at or before the convening 
of the Convention, and to form a permanent organization. 

2. The certificate of the Chairman and Secretary of any con- 
vention authorized to elect delegates and alternates shall be 
deemed sufficient to place the name of such delegate and alter- 
nate on the temporary roll of the respective conventions, and un- 
less successfully challenged, shall be a complete authorization to 
said delegates and alternates to act. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Records, Reports and Accounts 

The Chairman, Secretary and Treasurer of the State, District 
and County Committees shall keep faithful and accurate records 
of any and all moneys received by them for the use of said Com- 
mittees and shall make faithful and accurate report thereof when 
so requested. 

ARTICLE IX 
Vacancies 

1. When a vacancy occurs in a Federal office on a local or 
county level, such vacancy shall be filled by recommendation of the 
Republican County Executive Committee. 

2. When a vacancy occurs in a Federal office on a District level, 
such vacancy shall be filled by recommendation of the members of 
the State Republican Executive Committee residing in such Dis- 
trict. 

3. When a vacancy occurs in a Federal office on the State level, 
such vacancy shall be filled by recommendation of the Republican 
State Executive Committee. 



196 North Carolina Manual 

4. In all meetings of any Committee to make recommendation 
to fill any vacancy no member of the Committee shall vote by 
proxy and all such recommendations shall be made by a majority 
vote of the respective committee, a quorum of the Committee be- 
ing present. A quorum shall consist of fifty per cent of the mem- 
bership of the Committee. 

5. The Chairman of the Republican County Executive Commit- 
tee shall call meetings of the County Committee after giving each 
member TEN days notice; the District and State meetings shall 
be called by the State Chaii'man after giving each member of the 
Committee FIFTEEN days notice. 

ARTICLE X 

All references herein to voters, delegates, alternates, chairman, 
vice-chairman and other precinct, county and state officials shall 
in all cases be construed to mean persons identified and registered 
with the Republican Party. 



Republican Platform 197 

COMMITTEES OF THE STATE REPUBLICAN PARTY 

(From list furnished by Chairman, State 
Republican Executive Committee) 

State Republican Executive Committee 

STATE ORGANIZATION 

Chairman: Ray Jennings Taylorsville 

Vice Chairman: Mrs. Walter Zachary Yadkiiiville 

Secretary: Clyde Greene Boone 

Treasurer: Dr. James W. Davis Statesville 

National Committeeman: J. E. Broyhill Lenoir 

National Committeewoman: Mrs. VV. P. Few Durham 

First District 

J. B. Burgess, Shiloh H. T. Liverman, Columbia 

Cecil Winslow, Hertford Zeno 0. Ratcliff, Sr., Pantego 

G. L. Markham, Elizabeth City C. T. Allen, Aurora 

Second District 

Mrs. Bessie U. Wood, Littleton Thomas J. Moore, Wilson 

J. C. Vogt, Wilson J. Ray Cameron, Kinston 

W. T. Outland, Woodland 

Third District 

A. L. Butler, Clinton John Cowell, Bayboro 
Joe A. Dunn, Clinton A. L. Wilson, Newport 
Owen N. Matthis, Clinton Dr. R. A. Wilkins, Mt. Olive 
Freddie C. Butler, Roseboro Dr. H. M. Stenhouse, Goldsboro 

Steve Wilkins, Rose Hill 

Fourth District 

George D. Manning, Asheboro A. J. Brower, Liberty 

S. C. Frazier, Asheboro W. R. Young, Youngsvillc 

E. T. Walton, Asheboro A. H. Farmer, Bailey 

E. J. Straughan, Siler City Reva Rothrock, Raleigh 

J. C. Dixon, Bennett Paul C. West, Raleigh 

0. B. Batten, Kenly Sam J. Morris, Raleigh 

Joel Johnson, Four Oaks 

Fifth District 
Grady Swicher, Kernersville Buford T. Henderson, Winston-Salem 

Ivan 0. Hurrah, Winston-Salem W. L. Stafford, Winston-Salem 

James Longworth, Winston-Salem Joe New, King 

Jim Tuttle, Winston-Salem John G. Fulton, Walnut Cove 

W. Lindsay Sapp, Winston-Salem Charles Matthews, Pilot Mountain 

John J. Ingle, Winston-Salem David A. Hiatt. Mt. Airy 

John Motsinger, Winston-balem W. T. Combs, Jr., Leaksville 

Mrs. Eugene Hester, Reidsville 

Sixth District 

W. L. York, High Point Rufus K. Hayworth, High Point 

Fred Metcalfe, High Point N. D. McNairy, Greensboro 

Worth L. Henderson, Greensboro Henry Danieley, Burlington 

Robert E. Lowdermilk, Sr., Greensboro Paul Messick, Burlington 

Percy H. Sears, Greensboro Russell N. Barringer, Durham 

B. Frank Millikan, Greensboro A. A. McDonald, Durham 
Dr. H. M. Patterson, Burlington John F. Crawford, Chapel Hill 

Dr. Graham Harden, Burlington 



198 



State Jiiid 




199 



)istricts 




200 



North Carolina Manual 



J. A. Maultsby, Jr., Whiteville 
W. D. Cross, Elizabethtown 
Charles Trott, Long Beach 
G. H. Cannon, Wilmington 



Seventh District 

J. 0. West, Dunn 
J. W. Sellers, Jr., Fayetteville 
H. T. Atkins, Lillington 
George W. Hair, Fayetteville 
T. S. Hall, St. Pauls 



H. H. Tarleton, Peachland 
H. H. Ward, Denton 
J. E. Snyder, Lexington 
Wylie Taylor, Thomasville 
H. F. Sea well, Jr., Carthage 
W. C. Barrett, Carthage 
M. A. Nicholson, Troy 
John Hammond, Rockingham 
D. A. Monroe, Jr., Laurinburg 



Eighth District 

B. C. Brock, Mocksville 
Claude Hicks, Mocksville 
H. 0. Wooten, Vass 
Harold W. Gavin, Sanford 
P. E. Brown, Wilkesboro 
H. P. Eller, North Wilkesboro 
T. R. Bryan, Wilkesboro 
W. E. Rutledge, Yadkinville 
Avalon E. Hall, Yadkinville 
A. D. Baucomb, Monroe 



C. H. Vestal, Sparta 
B. B. Graybeal, W. Jefferson 
Rex Morton, W. Jefferson 
Dallas A. Campbell, Taylorsville 
N. K. Martin, Stony Point 
0. 0. Cruse, Concord 
W. S. Bogle, Concord 
Henry D. Carpenter, Concord 
McNeil Petrea, Concord 
E. C. McCall, Lenoir 
Fred Lawrence, Statesville 
W. L. Ward, Statesville 



Ninth District 

F. L. Smith, Lenoir 
John Anderson, Whitnel 
Luther Little, Oakboro 
H. N. Thompson, New London 
Raymond S. Barker, Albemarle 
Branch Lilly, Norwood 
C. C. Peeler, Salisbury 
Carl E. Sloop, Sr., China Grove 
J. A. Perkins, Salisbury 
R. C. Pittman, Salisbury 
Monroe Adams, Statesville 
S. C. Eggers, Boone 
W. H. Gragg, Boone 



Ernest M. Morgan, Charlotte 

Mrs. W. E. Rixon, Charlotte 

Jesse Page, Charlotte 

Alex Hanes, Jr., Charlotte 

William Alexander, Charlotte 

Mrs. L. A. Pearman, Charlotte 

Joe Bath, Charlotte 

Ivor Vance, Plum Tree 

Charles Von Cannon, Banner Elk 

W. E. Cobb 

N. 0. Pitts, Sr., Glen Alpine 



Tenth District 

Kenneth Thomas, Hickory 
John McFarland, Hickory 
Carrol Abernethy, Jr., Hickory 

D. Reuben Burns, Hickory 
Richard Williams, Maiden 
Hubert M. Craig, Lincolnton 
Claude S. Nantz, Lincolnton 
W. 0. Gouge, Bakersville 
Bill McKinney, Spruce Pine 

E. J. Presser, Charlotte 
Arthur Hoffman, Newton 

R. M. Lineberger, Morganton 



G. V. Hawkins, Shelby 
C. M. Morrison, Shelby 
J. S. Carter, Gastonia 
Tom Hanna, Mt. Holly 
Miles Wiggins, Gastonia 
Paul L. Best, Bessemer City 
Ray Frisby, Marshall 
George M. Pritchard, Marshall 



Eleventh District 

W. R. Chambers, Marion 

Nolan Pace, Saluda 

Fred D. Hamrick, Jr., Rutherfordton 

Brownlow Martin, Rutherfordton 

D. G. Melton, Bostic 

Donald Banks, Burnsville 

Johnny Russell, Gastonia 

C. M. Poole, Marion 



Lewis P. Hamlin, Brevard 
M. F. Lominac, West Asheville 
James Riekert, Asheville 
Tilman Powell, Canton 
Glenn Boyd, Waynesville 
Charles W. Cunningham, Arden 
Zan Eller, HayesviUe 
R. N. Tiger, Jr., HayesviUe 
Mrs. Millard Teague, Brevard 



Republican Platform 



Twelfth District 

^■■ank Waldroup, Hendersonville 

A. K. Higdon, Franklin 

n i' 9?'"P'"'ter, Franklin 

C. E. Hyde, Murphy 

0. L. Anderson, Murphy 

Fred L. Hooper, Sylva 

Mrs Gola P. Ferguson, CuIIowhee 

Clyde Crisp, Bryson City 

Arthur Ford. RobbiJsvSe ''"'"'' «°''binsville 



201 



202 



North Carolina Manual 



STATE REPUBLICAN CONGRESSIONAL, JUDICIAL, 
AND SENATORIAL DISTRICT COMMITTEES 

The work of the State Republican Congressional, Judicial and 
Senatorial Executive Committees is handled by the Chairmen of 
the Republican County Executive Committees. 

Chairmen, Republican County Executive Committees 

1954 



Alamance — W. C. Elder, Burlington 
Alexander — William M. White, Taylorsville 
Alleghany — W. Beale Poole, Sparta 
Anson — C. A. Bland, Wadesboro 
Ashe — Grant Bauguess, Jefferson 
Avery — Charles Von Cannon, Banner Elk 
Beaufort — John L. Ratcliff, Pantego 
Bertie — D. H. Greene, Aulander 
Bladen — W. D. Cross, Elizabethtowa 
Brunswick — H. L. Willets, Bolivia 
Buncombe — Jack A. Crawford, Asheville 
Burke — Dan R. Simpson, Morgan ton 
Cabarrus — James C. White, Concord 
Caldwell— Emory C. McCall, Lenoir 
Camden — J. B. Burgess, Shiloh 
Carteret — Roy T. Garner, Newport 
Caswell— S. R. Alked, R-2, Burlington 
Catawba — Kenneth D. Thomas, Hickory 
Chatham — Archie M. Ellis, Siler City 
Cherokee — J. Doyle Burch, Murphy 
Chowan — Aubrey C. Turbeville, Edenton 
Clay — Horace McClure, Hayesville 
Cleveland — J. Worth Silver, Shelby 
Columbus — J. A. Maultsby, Jr., Whiteville 
Craven — W. B. Rouse, New Bern 
Cumberland — J. W. Sellers, Jr., Fayetteville 
Currituck — John Welch, Moyock 
Dare — V. G. Williams, Wanchese 
Davidson — E. R. Everhart, Lexington 
Davie — E. C. Morris, Mocksville 
Duplin— H. G. Ward, Rose Hill 
Durham — A. A. McDonald, Durham 
Edgecombe — J. H. Satterthwaite, R-1, Tarboro 
Forsyth — W. Lindsay Sapp, Winston-Salem 
Franklin — W. R. Young, Youngsville 
Gaston — Love B. Jones, Gastonia 
Gates — H. A. Eure, Corapeake 
Graham — Arthur Ford, Robbinsvillc 
Granville — J. U. Gilmore, Oxford 
Greene— L. R. Aldridge, R-2, Snow Hill 
Guilford — N. D. McNairy, Greensboro 
Halifax — E. Dana Dickens, Halifax 
Harnett— J. 0. West, Dunn 
Haywood — Elmer Miller, Canton 
Henderson — Richard C. Clarke, Jr., 

Henderson ville 
Hertford— R. G. Battisby, Winton 
Hoke — T. C. Scarborough, Raeford 
Hyde — Dan L. Berry, Swan Quarter 
Iredell— A. Z. Goforth, Statesville 
Jackson — Velt Wilson, Sylva 



Johnston — Joel A. Johnson, R-3, Four Oaks 
Jones — H. M. Mallard, Trenton 
Lee — 0. F. Patterson, Sanford 
Lenoir — J. E. Cameron, R-1, Kinston 
Lincoln — D. H. Mauney, Lincolnton 
Macon — George Reece, Franklin 
Madison — Calvin R. Edney, Marshall 
Martin — 

McDowell— C. M. Poole, R-2, Marion 
Mecklenburg — Ernest M. Morgan, Charlotte 
Mitchell — Warren H. Pritchard, Spruce Pine 
Montgomery — Marvin C. Cole, Candor 
Moore — W. Clement Barrett, Carthage 
Nash — John C. Matthews, Spring Hope 
New Hanover — W. A. Erwin, Wilmington 
Northampton — W. T. Outland, Woodland 
Onslow — Fowler Manning, R-1, Richlands 
Orange — M. L. Cates, Hillsboro 
Pamlico — George M. Holton, Grantsboro 
Pasquotank — G. L. Markham, Elizabeth City 
Pender — E. C. Highsmith, Rocky Point 
Perquimans — Cecil C. Winslow, Hertford 
Person — 0. V. Clavton, Roxboro 
Pitt— X. E. Manning, Bethel 
Polk — John B. Moore, Tryon 
Randolph — Lacy S. Lewis, Asheboro 
Richmond — John C. Hammond, Rockingham 
Robeson — Ed F. Hodges, Fairmont 
Rockingham — W. Forest Bedell, Reidsville 
Rowan — A. M. Miller, Salisbury 
Rutherford — L. E. Sherrill, Spindale 
Sampson — Perry B. Lockerman, Clinton 
Scotland — D. A. Monroe, Jr., Laurinburg 
Stanly — E. H. Morton, Jr., Albemarle 
Stokes — M. 0. Jones, Walnut Cove 
Surry — David L. Hiatt, Mt. Airy 
Swain — Ray Gregory, Bryson City 
Transylvania — Lewis P. Hamlin, Brevard 
Tyrrell — Irvin R. Swain, Columbia 
Union — Edgar Traywich, Marshville 
Vance — J. Lee Lassister, Jr., Henderson 
Wake — Sam J. Morris, Raleigh 
Warren— J. B. White, R-2, Norlina 
Washington — T. D. Somerville, Plymouth 
Watauga — Earl D. Cooke, Boone 
Wayne — J. Thomas O'Berrv, Dudley 
Wilkes— E. R. Eller, Wilkesboro 
Wilson — Thomas J. Moore, Wilson 
Yadkin — Walter Zachary, Yadkinville 
Yancey — Donald Banks, Burnsville 



PART IV 
ELECTION RETURNS 



ELECTION RETURNS— 1952 
Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States 





Popular Vote 


Electoral Vote 


State 


Stevenson 
Democrat 


Eisenhower 
Republican 


Stevenson 
Democrat 


Eisenhower 
Republican 


Alabama... .. .. 


275,075 
109,428 
226,300 

2,197.548 
245,504 
481,649 
83,315 
444,950 
452,323 
95,081 

2,013,920 
801,530 
451,513 
273,296 
495,729 
345,027 
118,806 
395,337 

1,083,525 

1,230,657 
608,458 
172,553 
929,830 
106,213 
188,057 
31,688 
106,663 

1,015,902 
105,661 

3,104,601 

652,802 

76,694 

1,600,302 
430,939 
270,579 

2,146,269 

203,293 

173,007 

90,426 

443,710 

970,128 

135,364 

43,355 

268,677 

492,845 

453,578 

622,175 

47,934 


149,231 
150,032 
177,155 

2,897,310 
379,782 
611,012 
90,059 
544,036 
198,979 
180,707 

2,457,327 

1,136,259 
808,906 
616,302 
495,029 
.306,925 
232,353 
499,424 

1,292,325 

1,551,529 
763,211 
112,966 
959,429 
157,394 
421,603 
50,502 
166,287 

1,374,613 
132,170 

3,952,815 
558,107 
191,712 

2,100.456 
518.045 
420,815 

2,415,789 
210,935 
168,113 
203,857 
446,147 

1,102,878 
194,190 
109,717 
349,037 
599,107 
419,857 
979,744 
84,107 


11 




Arizona _ 


4 


Arkansas ,. . 


8 


California.. ...... ...... 


32 
6 


Colorado . . 




Connecticut .. .. 




8 


Delaware . . 




3 


Florida. . 




10 


'ieorgia 


12 




Idaho . ._ 


4 


Illinois _ 




27 


Indiana. .. . .. 




13 


Iowa. ..... 




10 


Kansas.. _. . . .. 




8 


Kentucky. .. 


10 
10 




Louisiana .. . 




Maine .. 


5 


Maryland- 




g 


Massachusetts .... 




16 


Michigan 




20 


Minnesota . 




11 


Mississinpi. . . . 


8 






13 


Montana 




4 






6 


Nevada 




3 


New Hampshire 




4 


New Jersey. . .. .. .. . 




16 






4 


New York . ..... 




45 


North Carolina 


14 




North Dakota 


4 


Ohio 




25 


Oklahoma 




8 






fi 


Pennsylvania 




32 


Rhode Island. 




4 


South Carolina 


8 




South Dakota 


4 


Tennessee 




11 


Texas 




24 


Utah 




4 






3 


Virginia 




12 






9 




8 




Wisconsin 


12 


Wyoming 




3 








Totals 


27,312,217 


33,938,285 


89 


442 



205 



206 



North Carolina Manual 



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211 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR BY COUNTIES— PRIMARY 1952 



Counties 


Olive 


Umstead 


Dunaway 


Alamance 


5,948 

914 

343 

1,860 

797 

320 

1,190 

1,754 

2,1.39 

1,715 

9,677 

3,560 

5,573 

2,946 

420 

1,621 

1,058 

1,852 

1,637 

616 

377 

182 

4,014 

3,290 

2,001 

4,257 

392 

539 

9,031 

768 

3,032 

8,037 

4,006 

10,565 

2,331 

6,985 

397 

481 

761 

1,090 

9,546 

3,897 

3,262 

5,037 

985 

1,229 

565 

507 

3,717 

1,298 

4,885 

1,023 

1,838 

2,163 

1,815 

821 

835 

1.978 


4,232 

1,306 

1,133 

2,230 

2.033 

305 

2,318 

1,159 

2,058 

1,199 

11,467 

3,133 

4,725 

2,756 

762 

2,517 

1,073 

4,441 

2,192 

1.626 

599 

539 

5,040 

3,979 

2,831 

4,298 

1,038 

875 

807 

583 

2,375 

11,378 

3,769 

8,422 

1,871 

6,603 

712 

594 

2,597 

1,326 

11,890 

4,771 

2,777 

1,858 

1,717 

876 

839 

564 

6,188 

1,816 

4,256 

768 

2,186 

4,187 

2,631 

1,119 

1.118 

1,704 


34 

13 
3 

36 
8 
2 

a 


Alexander 


Alleghany 


Anson 


Ashe -- 


Avery 


Beaufort _ _ _ 


Bertie 


18 


Bladen - 


iR 


Brunswick . - 


34 


Buncombe _ ___ _______ 


300 


Burke. , 


23 


Cabarrus ._ - 


21 


Caldwell 


63 


Camden - . - . 


21 


Carteret. . 


23 


Caswell 


17 


Catawba . . . . _. 


40 


Chatham.. 


36 




37 


Chowan 


10 


Clay... . . . 


14 


Cleveland . . 


46 


Columbus ... 


92 


Craven .. 


43 


Cumberland 


76 


Currituck 


21 


Dare 


9 


Davidson. . .. .. ... 


25 


Davie... .. 


4 


Duplin.. .... _...--.. 


58 


Durham 


153 


Edgecombe . . . ... 


38 


Forsyth . 


239 


Franklin _ .. . 


34 


Gaston. .. 


65 


Gates. 


11 


Graham.. . ...... . .. 


9 


Granville 


17 


Greene . .... ... 


12 


Guilford 


140 


Halifax . 


120 


Harnett 


24 


Haywood. 


32 


Henderson . . . 

Hertford. 


24 

8 


Hoke 


16 


Hyde. . 


25 


Iredell 


169 


Jackson 


29 


Johnston .. . ..... 


53 


Jones 


2 


Lee.... 


22 


Lenoir 


36 


Lincoln 


15 


Macon ...... 


23 


Madison 


17 


Martin.. .. 


34 



212 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR BY COUNTIES— PRIMARY 1952 

(Continued) 



Counties 


Olive 


Umstead 


Dunaway 


McDowell. .. . . 


2,464 

11,950 

380 

976 

1,658 

4,840 

4,973 

2,086 

2,177 

1,594 

640 

781 

1,422 

1,044 

1.711 

3,336 

781 

2,087 

4,046 

4,052 

3,613 

7,187 

2,029 

2,180 

1.903 

2,109 

828 

4,170 

977 

864 

561 

2,586 

3,478 

12,817 

1,545 

1,082 

253 

3,634 

1,519 

3,429 

1,204 

832 


2,029 
17,326 

323 
1,018 
2,997 
4,618 
7,317 
2,180 
1,683 
3,314 

526 
1,620 
1,219 

651 
2,371 
3,960 
1,310 
2,102 
2,698 
6,451 
3,893 
5,165 
5,258 
2,313 
2,228 
2,378 
1.520 
3,266 

784 
1,755 

665 

2,650 

2,093 

14,654 

1,615 

760 
1,345 
3,928 
3,011 
3. .26 

787 

477 


43 


Mecklenburg 


400 


Mitchell 


2 


Montgomery 


9 


Moore . . . . . _. 


37 


Nash - . 


41 


New Hanover 


137 


Northampton 


35 


Onslow . ....... .. 


36 


Orange . 


27 


Pamlico .. 


11 


Pasquotank 


17 


Pender... .. 


20 


Perquimans .. . . 


5 


Person 


25 


Pitt 


42 


Polk ... 


30 


Randolph .. . . 


20 


Richmond.- . . 


65 


Robeson 


131 


Rockingham 


45 


Rowan . . ... 


112 


Rutherford . 


104 




47 


Scotland 


38 


Stanly 


36 


Stokes 


12 


Surry 


27 


Swain.. 


13 




55 


Tyrrell 


18 


Union 


72 


Vance . ...... 


30 


Wake... 


120 


Warren 


12 


Washington 


12 


Watauga . . 


3 




56 


Wilkes 


14 




54 


Yadkin 


18 


Yancey _ _ 


5 






Total 


265,675 


294,170 


4,660 







Election Returns 



213 



I 



10-— '■^OCCOCOC^'— >t--0C)C^CCCO'— '.— 'OiOOOS 



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214 



North Carolina Manual 



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tJLECiTiON Returns 



215 






eo c^ ■* -H M 



CCO-^^H-^CICOIO 



OO CO CO ■— ■ CQ 1—1 





CO 


«DO^OlCOco■^Oi^^^o«ooico^^c»(^^lOco■^^^c»!^40•^•-Hfcc^co^ccDlO'^^r'•oool>•■Tt'05(:o 
<^0'-^ocKcooco»C'*c^r--c»u7ocoa:ccioc^oi'<r^ot-^--oior--cot--c^M<ri<:ccocoGoo500 


CD 






CD 


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CD 1— « QO .— ,00— i-^t^-— 't— ir-ii— 1»— (cor^ ,— ._.o^^- 


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CO 





c^ 


iCioooc^Ot--occcor^co^coco--^OiO-^'<*'t-^t--c^"*ccccocor^O''-*iccr-^Oi'«»'cooocDcsicD 
oi>--^ococDcccocD'<t't-^Oic^)OitO'— coc^)Oiocot^iO'-'^cc^oaou:r^iCOt^ao.--iO!ro-<*'r^ 


10 


.-t(N-^00CTiCOC0T»"^(M.-H CCOOlMOO^CGOOOt-^^OC^JCD'^J'OOCSICQ '^'-f-HC^l^COt^ttSCDCSlCO 




"3 


cooas-^r^cDO'-'-Hi^ascs'"'*oc^cJ5--.i-~oocoo5coc^)OOOiOr--a3ioocD-^^^c^t-^ccoi 

"^OOI^C^|COOiiOCO--r--<— "tC-^t^CDOiOlQOQOiOOOM'iCiOOlCCOiC^COOCOOu^CDi— 1-^000500 

<— 'CXJcciOiTO CO-— icoccc^-— •'^c^3»^»ou^cor^c^j"^a;^-t^c^t^Tr— .c^joccocc-— ■^oC'^cO'^roco 


00 

Oi 

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CMCDascCC^i0C0CH00tM--'a0^^CJiCCO-*COCDCOi0»0QC'CD0S'<J'O — 

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COOOO-Vt^C^ — CD-— '-^C^ 


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— (Mr^fMt^iftir^oOOil^-^C^iCcCit^ 


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— CO CO »0 CO -M CO 


00 


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(M!>.COCCt^ 1— lOOirjCSi— 1.— .CS-— '■^OCOt^COt^OiOO'— ■CQt^'— 'CCOCCiCCv)-* eCiOCO-^fCO^-CD 


U5 



OOOWSCCOiO'— 'OOTP(MO*Ot^OSCDCMCCOOCDI--01CDCDCOtr)OsasOOa5t^OO(MCD05^^00CMCDeDO 

c»coTfoo---cocoooo50cO"^c^co-^c^cMCMQCi'-Hajt--ooDc*7co-^r-.ccco»otDuO'--CMcoccir---oco 

CCO'^C^JOSI-^C^t-~CO'^<>J'— OCT>iOM*'^C^OOCiOOiCO'— i00'*CMOQ0(Nt^r^("-I^'--'CCCO"*O 
1— CO'^QOCOCOCs|CO--^COM'— 'COOSC^QOCDOl-— CCCXJiOC^CO'^OOC'JCC — CO--it<OOC^ — C0^^t--t^COM 



i— iO>COCDOiCSCDeDOOCDCOCDOM»C--OCOt^'^»OOOC-)CDOO'— t>-0S05O"— '1— '■^C^COOOI>-"^'— 'lO 
CCOiOOOiOiCO"<*<C»^*COOI>-'— i'<*'CMI>.0GO'— ICMCCCDOOOJOOOC'-- 'OSCCODi/SCOCOi— OOiMCCCDO -^ 

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■* C^ *0 CM — I 



CC CM 00 -— I -^ CM 



.^i^,_,^Ct000C0iCC0CCC0»CC0»O'--'OCC'*»Ct^r^cDOl'— 'COOSOC<lC0050'--CMOC7ii— 'CMiOC^OC' 
COCMeOOSOOTp-VCncDCCCDCD-^COt^^- — ^-C^>OCO»OOlOOOCCO»OCQOODt^ — CDOiCCM-^OOO 

^coocoot^'^'^O'^oc-j'— cccM»coc;i^Oi^-'^cvioC'--ooocDOC'05(rMr-.'-- ■r^r^oiOcMOOt'.io 



1-HCOCOCDCDC^CMCO'— iCOO*-— 'CMOC'CMI-^iOasOOOOSiOCMCDCCOGCMC^ 



-C0»O<M— 'CQCOCOIOC^CO 



^-Oi*O00Q0■^^^C0Oi^^C0•^O'— 't^O:'— iCCt^iOOO'— ^-■^^CCO'^OO'^iO'^'— 'lOiOOlOlOOOO-^Oi 
*0r--00C005CM(MOliOCDC0iOOC^CO'— I'S'COC^)^*' — ^-Or-*"— •'— 'CDCMt"-r^Oit^l^l~^iO^— "C^WSCO 
MCMM^COt^'— ■C^IOO-'— 'CM — COCM'<f*Ct^t>-^^*Ct~^»C»— "'— 'Oit^OiI>'C^OOC^'^ tO'— 'C0I>.»0*C»/3 



CO ^ ^ ^ 



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216 North Carolina Manual 

VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARIES 

1944 AND 1948 

1944 
FOR GOVERNOR— 

R. Gregg Cherry 185,027 

Ralph McDonald . 134,661 

011a Ray Boyd 2,069 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR— 

L. Y. Ballentine __ 181,002 

W. L Halstead 59,246 

Jamie T. Lyda 18,940 

FOR SECRETARY OF STATE— 

ThadEure 218,984 

W. N. Crawford 55,274 

FOR STATE AUDITOR— 

George Ross Pou . . 197,348 

Freds. Hunter 71,151 

FOR STATE TREASURER— 

Charles M. Johnson . 219,198 

L. J. Phipps 45,475 

1948 

First Primary 
FOR GOVERNOR— 

Charles M . Johnson 1 70, 141 

W. Kerr Scott 161,293 

R. Mayne Albright 76,281 

OscarBarker .... .... 10,871 

W. F. Stanley, Sr . 2,428 

OUa Ray Boyd 2,111 

Second Primary 

W.Kerr Scott 217,620 

Charles M. Johnson 182,684 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR— 

H. P. Taylor 240,251 

Dan Tompkins 100,079 

FOR SECRETARY OF STATE— 

ThadEure 257,260 

John T.Armstrong 103,118 

FOR STATE AUDITOR— 

Henry L. Bridges .. 192,458 

Charles W. Miller 128,797 

FOR STATE TREASURER— 

Brandon P. Hodges 180,340 

James B. Vogler 122,656 

Z. W. Frazzelle 36,200 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF LABOR— 

Forrest Shuford 212,139 

Donald B. Sherrill 114,532 

FOR COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE— 

Watt H. Gragg (R) 9,798 

G. L. Willard (R) 5,288 



Election Returns 



217 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE PRIMARIES, 
1952, BY COUNTIES 



Counties 


Lieutenant Governor 


Commissioner 
of Insurance 


d 

Is 


o 


-J a; 


3 


K 

^(5 








Alamance . -- 


1,031 

161 

246 

252 

307 

36 

134 

105 

177 

154 

1,029 

366 

1,135 

666 

32 

148 

128 

597 

244 

388 

39 

78 

951 

445 

266 

716 

49 

36 

2,343 

319 

200 

1,230 

480 

2,268 

316 

1,309 

42 

41 

280 

109 

2,811 

548 

419 

419 

99 

109 

91 

56 

1,844 

111 

498 


1,569 

754 

132 

751 

461 

164 

971 

990 

2,092 

647 

4,024 

1,624 

3,512 

867 

209 

2,312 

184 

1,779 

1,182 

790 

326 

331 

2,093 

2,331 

2,297 

2,544 

426 

408 

1,640 

145 

2,544 

5,982 

3,486 

1,886 

1,741 

3,328 

223 

511 

881 

698 

3,635 

2,607 

1,273 

1,541 

1,417 

496 

487 

177 

1,250 

1,186 

3,205 


5,288 

556 

464 

1,975 

1,234 

222 

1,509 

969 

997 

664 

12,584 

3,444 

3,858 

2.544 

368 

824 

1,358 

2,581 

1,584 

703 

346 

188 

3,606 

2,036 

1,181 

2,546 

415 

420 

3,859 

636 

1,194 

8,036 

2,065 

7,224 

1,289 

6,331 

298 

247 

1,466 

813 

11,730 

3,857 

2,847 

3,161 

800 

829 

515 

437 

4,508 

1,398 

2,927 


834 
116 
101 
605 
191 
59 
243 
227 
377 
833 

1,727 
444 

1,084 
640 
203 
294 
149 
.397 
352 
114 
77 
53 

1,058 

1,116 
417 

1,166 
233 
149 
677 
71 
.337 

1,831 
530 
700 
391 

1,055 

146 

60 

251 

169 

1,370 
768 
761 
529 
188 
176 
158 
131 

1,245 
150 
895 


52 

13 

12 

11 

33 

1,994 

16 

4 

4 

54 

218 

56 

104 

124 

1 

48 

9 

487 

34 

93 

4 

24 

82 

17 

18 

89 



7 

172 

58 

6 

72 

4 

247 

4 

173 

5 

174 



1 

212 

11 

27 

103 

289 

3 

8 

4 

75 
29 
66 


8 

6 

4 

2 

1 

465 

4 



1 

34 

46 

17 

30 

50 



6 



69 

3 

6 

2 

2 

10 

19 

4 

11 



2 

29 

11 

5 

14 

2 

39 

1 

34 

1 

35 





73 

3 

7 

15 

59 



4 

1 

18 

2 

24 


6,019 

892 

536 

1.631 

1.309 

284 

1.807 

1,444 

1,991 

1,131 

10,563 

3,480 

6,217 

2,734 

411 

2,735 

1,033 

3,142 

2,615 

1,192 

491 

386 

4.077 

3,780 

2,504 

4,408 

543 

481 

5.254 

647 

2,726 

15,257 

4,599 

10,649 

2,599 

6,451 

319 

391 

2,176 

1,182 

13,907 

5,321 

3,887 

3,193 

1.414 

1.020 

824 

473 

6.392 

1.694 

5.137 


2 122 


Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson - 


396 

200 

1 623 


Ashe 


378 


Avery 


157 


Beaufort . _ - 


7.30 


Bertie 


532 


Bladen 


1,201 


Brunswick .. . .. _ 


746 


Buncombe _ 


6,463 


Burke 


1,759 


Cabarrus _ _ _ _ __ 


2,731 


Caldwell 


1,490 


Camden 


318 


Carteret . . . 


616 


Caswell 


563 


Catawba.- . . . 


1,473 


Chatham... ....... 


528 


Cherokee.. . .. 


612 


Chowan .. 


192 


Clav . . 


215 


Cleveland.- . . . 


2,791 


Columbus.. -. - 


1,750 


Craven . . . 


1,070 




1,965 


Currituck . .. 


437 


Dare. .... . ._ 


391 


Davidson . _ 


2,476 


Davie 


259 


Duplin 


996 




1 , 797 


Edgecombe ....... 


1,348 


Forsyth... . . 


5,479 


Frankhn 


933 


Gaston , . 


4,484 


Gates ..-._ 


258 


Graham 


317 


Granville 


519 




3.53 


Guilford . . .. 


3,943 


Halifax 


1,962 


Harnett ..... 


1,124 


Haywood . . . 


1,944 


Henderson 


694 


Hertford 


393 


Hoke 


356 


Hyde 


■-'33 


Iredell . 


2,476 




896 


Johnston 


1,611 



218 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE PRIMARIES, 
1952, BY COUNTIES— (Continued) 



Counties 



Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank.. 

Pender 

Perquimans.. 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham.. 

Rowan 

Rutherford... 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington.. 

Watauga 

Wayne. 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total.. 



Lieutenant Governor 



o 



S« 



77 

304 

480 

396 

126 

73 

173 

267 

2,278 

30 

127 

318 

493 

415 

258 

237 

282 

35 

76 

55 

50 

529 

331 

136 

417 

478 

892 

769 

1,638 

357 

315 

191 

319 

762 

2,109 

237 

141 

36 

226 

336 

2,688 

164 

61 

94 

428 

665 

654 

603 

71 



55,055 



470 

386 

1,820 

1,053 

334 

623 

709 

808 

6,603 

183 

255 

1,192 

3,459 

5,779 

1,099 

1,388 

969 

312 

790 

2,065 

526 

1,853 

2,428 

633 

323 

1,438 

3,205 

457 

3,128 

1,797 

1,310 

684 

1,111 

267 

713 

350 

374 

183 

752 

2,183 

9,872 

985 

649 

672 

2,548 

2,478 

3,455 

90 

207 



151,067 



^X 



450 

2,759 

1,881 

1,863 

976 

764 

1,583 

2,046 

14,223 

244 

1,161 

2,033 

3,154 

1,807 

1,692 

696 

2,644 

398 

743 

285 

435 

856 

2,893 

696 

2,440 

2,851 

3,269 

5,660 

5,405 

4,261 

1,090 

1,671 

1,932 

966 

2,853 

618 

1,569 

382 

2,753 

1,803 

10,211 

1,241 

591 

641 

2,567 

1,343 

1,369 

787 

681 



226,167 






179 
280 
621 
352 
265 
122 
367 
494 

3,459 
163 
184 
657 
679 

3,427 
490 
358 
349 
82 
324 
144 
127 
246 
520 
326 
363 
980 

1,404 
273 

1,038 
462 
458 
589 
498 
90 
356 
136 
278 
134 
686 
511 

2,342 
293 
258 
41 
701 
188 
554 
142 
78 



52,916 



IXt3 



^£ 



1 

31 

13 

90 

16 

780 

3 

43 

617 

1,730 

444 

41 

6 

62 

3 

2 

24 

8 

11 

5 

5 

10 

7 

486 

1,003 

52 

20 

36 

124 

53 

118 

6 

415 

69 

42 

17 

39 

7 

22 

15 

174 

3 

6 

19 
20 
179 
23 
1,177 
35 



13,463 



OS 
i & 

■73-^ 




2 
5 

16 

8 

111 

1 

8 

151 

193 

57 

11 


31 
2 
1 
5 
1 
2 
2 


1 
145 
143 

19 
6 
7 

35 
9 

29 
1 

50 
9 

10 

2 
1 
8 
2 

59 
1 
4 

2 

72 

5 

390 

2 



2,798 



Commissioner 
of Insurance 



o 



716 
2,625 
3,686 
2,185 

805 

882 

1,978 

2,014 

15,620 

311 
1,339 
3,229 
5,285 
6,071 
2,259 
1,547 
3,311 

502 
1,172 
1,112 

694 
2,057 
4,304 

798 
3,317 
3,544 
5,873 
4,022 
7,834 
4,191 
2,280 



,36- 
2,361 

922 
3,381 

700 
1,394 

448 

2,288 

3,317 

21,055 

1,949 

988 

953 
4,334 
3,009 
4,207 

810 

585 



313,979 



Election Returns 



219 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE PRIMARIES, 
1952, BY COUNTIES— (Continued) 

Votes Cast for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court in the 
Primary of May 31, 1952. (Short Term) 



Counties 


R. Hunt 
Parker 


William H. 
Bobbitt 


Itimous T. 
Valentine 


Oscar 0. 
Efird 


Alamance 


3,413 

194 

120 

492 

260 

73 

1,448 

2,137 

1,762 

1.235 

3.950 

1.722 

1,343 

697 

615 

1,990 

433 

951 

1,499 

581 

438 

162 

1,354 

2,048 

2,350 

4,614 

895 

768 

1,616 

122 

2,084 

11,446 

2,249 

1,965 

1,350 

1,241 

567 

145 

1,998 

665 

6,045 

7.017 

2.884 

1,315 

449 

1,568 

721 

371 

1,119 

504 

3,820 

607 

1,617 

3,139 


1,195 
628 
364 

1,856 
964 
201 
356 
83 
477 
224 
11,821 

2,058 

4,259 

2,256 

93 

237 

265 

1,989 

472 

668 

67 

256 

4,346 
539 
428 
696 
90 
100 

2,489 
450 
264 

1,120 
437 

3,746 
430 

7,599 

47 

369 

268 

109 

6,697 
220 
483 

2,921 

905 

56 

195 

60 

5,064 

1,474 
791 
123 
578 
388 


2,881 

272 

182 

505 

559 

163 

780 

293 

728 

398 

2,182 

1.231 

2,524 

751 

134 

1.167 

555 

1.012 

944 

243 

242 

155 

859 

2.873 

938 

1,217 

125 

138 

2,284 

193 

1,147 

4,192 

3,469 

2,426 

1,800 

1,010 

123 

148 

483 

784 

4.292 

934 

1.311 

923 

586 

187 

201 

286 

988 

387 

2,454 

38^ 

889 

1,103 


856 


Alexander 


175 


Alleghany 


109 


Anson 


608 


Ashe 


157 


A very - 


38 


Beaufort 


166 


Bertie 


51 


Bladen 


364 


Brunswick . - 


303 


Buncombe 


1,622 


Burke 


585 


Cabarrus 


1,394 


Caldwell 


811 


Camden 


51 


Carteret 


147 


Caswell .. 


265 


Catawba - - 


726 


Chatham 


208 


Cherokee 


210 


Chowan 


44 


Clay 


51 


Cleveland 


7,55 




498 


Craven 


315 




684 


Currituck 


49 




50 


Davidson . 


1,479 


Davie . .. .. 


238 


Duplin. .. 


480 


Durham _.. 


928 


Edgecombe 


194 


Forsyth . 


9,651 


Frankhn ... 


155 




1,944 


Gates .. 


61 




85 


Granville 


172 


Greene ... . 


101 


Guilford... 


1,792 


Halifax 


125 


Harnett 


,557 


Haywood . 


445 


Henderson 


275 


Hertford 


36 


Hoke... 


135 


Hyde . 


59 


Iredell-. 


1,398 




198 


Johnston 


483 


Jones.-. 


54 


Lee 


386 




438 







220 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE PRIMARIES, 

1952, BY COUNTIES— (Continued) 

Votes Cast for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court in the 
Primary of May 31, 1952. (Short Term) 



Counties 



Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank.. 

Pender 

Perquimans.. 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. 

Rowan 

Rutherford _ . . 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly _ 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington.. 

Watauga 

Wavne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Totals- 



R. Hunt 
Parker 



494 
391 
610 
,116 
558 
,546 
67 
342 
,061 
,230 
,665 
,693 
,606 
,352 
546 
,535 
,127 
701 
,170 
,911 
338 
761 
,283 
,241 
.653 
,475 
,215 
,389 
730 
716 
196 
758 
335 
464 
404 
684 
,314 
,903 
,617 
623 
135 
136 
453 
798 
172 
135 



165,817 



William H. 
Bobbitt 



1,616 

492 

507 

190 

2,126 

24,192 

160 

592 

1,539 

337 

1,297 

106 

205 

540 

56 

173 

206 

69 

226 

498 

701 

1,346 

1,893 

1,184 

1,593 

5,786 

3,699 

276 

1,032 

1,340 

297 

2,006 

451 

1,387 

63 

1,959 

175 

3,856 

127 

117 

728 

508 

,289 

525 

476 

715 



1, 



142,907 



Itimous T. 

Valentine 



647 

607 

326 

1,614 

528 

1,183 

196 

387 

1,066 

7,294 

1,906 

978 

636 

952 

212 

253 

511 

342 

629 

2,076 

267 

1,096 

1,174 

2,737 

1,528 

2,123 

828 

654 

650 

682 

522 

975 

398 

326 

251 

644 

564 

9,274 

171 

743 

260 

1,180 

958 

3,131 

295 

123 



110,930 



Oscar 0. 
Efird 



629 
108 
77 
104 
300 

1,122 

30 

328 

388 

145 

1,831 

76 

190 

373 

37 

124 

198 

80 

197 

553 

369 

314 

1,240 
821 
664 

1,439 
723 
190 
445 
832 
476 

1,098 
108 
159 
38 
932 
160 

1,454 

57 

73 

117 

463 

394 

456 

443 

45 



53,561 



Election Returns 



221 



Votes Cast for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court in the 
Primary of May 31, 1952. (Regular Term) 



Counties 


R. Hunt 
Parker 


William H. 
Bobbitt 


Itimous T. 
Valentine 


Allen H. 
Gwyn 


F. Donald 
Phillips 


Oscar 0. 
Efird 


Alamance 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 


2,348 

115 

36 

202 

109 

37 

1,251 

2,114 

1,437 

1,045 

3,228 

1,199 

801 

318 

532 

1,728 

83 

601 

1,206 

399 

380 

102 

981 

1,673 

2,138 

4,275 

776 

703 

944 

70 

1,771 

10,205 

2,144 

1,402 

1,256 

926 

496 

107 

1,703 

548 

3,740 

6,807 

2,621 

907 

279 

1,517 

554 

308 

757 

310 

3,156 

579 

1,264 

2,894 


853 
427 
152 
884 
555 
128 
278 
73 
365 
185 
10,409 

1,157 

2,942 

1,276 

65 

194 

47 

1,540 

336 

565 

61 

118 

2,990 
407 
384 
600 
98 
103 

1,714 
303 
189 
918 
354 

2,950 
344 

6,550 

36 

243 

200 

96 

5,075 
226 
386 

2,424 

629 

45 

133 

54 

3,763 

1,246 
625 
113 
435 
302 


2,174 
167 
68 
181 
299 
84 
628 
261 
600 
321 

1,678 
780 

1,509 
437 
136 
988 
75 
734 
723 
155 
288 
92 
597 

2,488 
872 

1,061 
116 
118 

1,667 
151 

1,031 

3,691 

3,150 

1,847 

1,677 
871 
115 
106 
356 
707 

2,682 
889 

1,160 
780 
381 
174 
168 
214 
767 
267 

2,078 
343 
719 

1,014 


2,063 
442 
574 
158 
659 
150 
357 
36 
255 
116 

1,164 

1,606 

2,065 

1,328 

41 

305 

1,731 

823 

384 

262 

22 

228 

987 

391 

167 

291 

46 

31 

1,784 
293 
171 

1,725 
339 

2,454 
147 
783 
35 
91 
501 
208 

5,381 
123 
324 
840 
810 
43 
78 
118 

1,201 
496 

1,060 

43 

492 

167 


364 
109 
100 
2,019 
335 

76 

90 

28 
298 
170 
1,223 
714 
1,155 
672 

28 
122 

28 
639 
258 
310 

43 

60 

1,.363 

414 

135 

317 

28 

28 
852 

67 
299 
383 
218 
1,203 
129 
691 

23 
172 

48 

40 
1,213 
112 
213 
238 
165 

15 
245 

66 

1,093 

244 

241 

56 
229 
249 


611 
92 
43 

250 


Ashe 


62 


Avery 


15 


Beaufort ■ 

Bertie. 


126 
36 


Bladen 


312 


Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Burke . . 


242 

1,275 

249 


Cabarrus 

CaldweU 

Camden 


959 

473 

27 


Carteret 


92 


Caswell .. . .- 


44 


Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan . 


425 

165 

107 

32 


Clay 


32 


Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 


532 
427 
265 


Cumberland 

Currituck 


582 
40 
34 


Davidson 


1.040 
140 


Duplin 


422 


Durham 


622 


Edgecombe 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 


160 
7,790 

122 
1,604 


Gates 


52 


Graham 


30 


Granville 

Greene . 


130 
78 


Guilford 


1,282 


Halifax ... . 


97 


Harnett 


436 


Haywood 

Henderson 

Hertford 

Hoke .. 


340 

184 

36 

94 


Hyde 


37 


Iredell.. 


1,009 


Jackson 

Johnston.. 

Jones 


125 

339 

52 


Lee 


299 


Lenoir 


402 



222 



North Carolina Manual 



Votes Cast for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court in the 
Primary of May 31, 1952. (Regular Term)— (Continued) 





R. Hunt 


William H. 


Itimous T. 


Allen H. 


F. Donald 


Oscar 0. 


Counties 


Parker 


Bobbitt 


Valentine 


Gwyn 


Phillips 


Efird 


Lincoln 


348 
267 
509 


1,163 
365 
362 


434 
517 
295 


799 
201 
320 


263 

198 

68 


428 


Macon 


62 


Madison 


49 


Martin. 


1,004 


142 


1,475 


124 


88 


93 


McDowell 


435 


1,610 


418 


697 


168 


188 


Mecklenburg 


1,300 


23,002 


1,013 


483 


1,049 


911 


Mitchell 


48 


121 


162 


119 


78 


29 


Montgomery 


232 


343 


241 


253 


389 


241 


Moore. 


532 
1,119 
5,093 


893 

274 

1,206 


476 
7.192 

1,725 


305 

228 
374 


1,850 
119 
530 


171 


Nash. 


115 


New Hanover 


1,574 


Northampton 


2,696 


98 


895 


67 


49 


66 


Onslow _ 


1,413 

1,949 

470 

1,314 


156 

498 

52 

124 


582 
785 
197 
190 


112 

417 

30 

126 


131 

203 

31 

79 


140 


Orange 


292 


Pamlico 


36 


Pasquotank 


108 


Pender 


1,076 
613 


165 
59 


399 
322 


81 
36 


80 
41 


167 


Perquimans 


84 


Person 


1,876 

2,554 

133 

505 


156 
435 
321 
936 


451 

1,860 
154 
834 


470 
593 
906 
706 


no 

192 

99 

300 


141 


Pitt 


486 


Polk 


179 


Randolph 


242 


Richmond 


340 


470 


351 


160 


4.877 


262 


Robeson 


3,455 
403 


849 
354 


2,113 
283 


529 
5,545 


1,403 
122 


615 


Rockingham 


1.34 


Rowan.. 


981 
859 


4,313 

3,057 


1,6.39 
694 


1,918 
902 


881 
473 


1,124 


Rutherford 


578 


Sampson 


1,977 


242 


545 


140 


158 


161 


Scotland. 


213 


347 


181 


142 


2,459 


119 


Stanly 


395 


6';4 


297 


362 


1,512 


527 


Stokes 


66 


116 


128 


1,356 


34 


171 


Suny. 


373 


1,089 


367 


3,291 


311 


445 


Swain . 


164 
323 


313 
1,041 


296 
260 


186 
394 


125 
244 


102 


Transylvania 


87 


Tvrreli 


312 


63 


258 


24 


24 


37 


Union 


379 


1,252 


443 


355 


1,504 


513 


Vance 


4,120 


159 


492 


197 


52 


133 


Wake 


9,852 


3,460 


8,172 


1,615 


856 


1,209 


Warren 


2,568 


102 


161 


56 


23 


41 


Washington 


589 


113 


674 


62 


52 


58 


Watauga 


59 


309 


124 


479 


317 


56 


Wayne.. 


3,590 

188 


431 
521 


1,004 
451 


679 
1,121 


150 
1,655 


433 


Wilkes 


137 


Wilson 


1,136 
76 


279 
357 


2,074 
171 


2,. 351 
384 


130 
177 


266 


Yadkin 


284 


Yancey . .. 


93 


559 


92 


217 


72 


29 






Totals. 


135,079 


109,476 


86,462 


66,301 


43,356 


37,794 



Election Returns 



223 



Votes Cast for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court in the 
Primary of June 28, 1952. 





(Short Term) 


(Regular Term) 


Counties 


R. Hunt 
Parker 


William H. 
Bobbitt 


R. Hunt 
Parker 


William H. 
Bobbitt 




332 
355 
400 
576 

277 

61 

503 

1,213 

1,761 

1,917 

4,348 

635 

2,296 

489 

899 

665 

89 

82 

431 

355 

170 

167 

156 

3,680 

2,073 

4,678 

976 

238 

180 

51 

2,165 

5,597 

845 

1,784 

396 

250 

142 

216 

677 

272 

923 

3,949 

2,749 

983 

267 

984 

182 

120 

677 

443 

4,302 

118 

347 

1,504 


151 

748 

379 

1.826 

878 

186 

99 

25 

551 

429 

12,126 

297 

5,390 

2,255 

159 

56 

155 

1,114 

54 

1,185 

55 

348 

1,062 

1,066 

577 

1,089 

109 

26 

543 

201 

514 

862 

118 

3,104 

102 

2,408 

14 

569 

149 

22 

1,424 

118 

616 

2,949 

1,010 

22 

63 

16 

3,188 

1,503 

1,077 

54 

94 

261 


319 

400 

391 

487 

257 

45 

506 

1,200 

1,702 

1,849 

4,231 

708 

2,337 

502 

852 

654 

97 

79 

406 

363 

168 

181 

137 

3,676 

1,960 

4,757 

904 

261 

174 

51 

2,079 

5,637 

846 

1,744 

379 

261 

142 

212 

663 

266 

915 

3,952 

2,677 

957 

288 

986 

179 

121 

683 

447 

4,159 

114 

347 

1,441 


149 
719 


Alexander 


Alleghany .. 


380 


Anson 


1 T"?*! 


Ashe. ._ . 


890 


Avery ._ 


181 


Beaufort _ 


go 


Bertie-. _ 


25 


Bladen . 


604 


Brunswick . _ 


412 


Buncombe 


11 4.55 


Burke. 


287 


Cabarrus 


5 473 


Caldwell . 


2 198 


Camden.- 


147 


Carteret . 


58 


Caswell... . 


154 


Catawba 


1,115 


Chatham . . 


51 


Cherokee . 


1,208 


Chowan . . 


55 


Clay.. 


,333 


Cleveland . . .. 


1,051 




1,008 


Craven 


561 




1,046 


Currituck... 


112 




26 


Davidson.. . . 


537 




192 


Duplin .. 


457 




819 


Edgecombe . . 


101 


Forsyth . . 


2,999 


Franklin . . .. 


99 




2,394 


Gates 


15 




530 


Granville 


148 




36 


Guilford 


1,363 


Halifax 


107 


Harnett 


600 




2,887 


Henderson 


1,008 




22 


Hoke 


59 


Hyde... 


16 


Iredell 


3,124 




1,467 


Johnston 


1,004 




55 


Lee 


97 


Lenoir 


226 



224 



North Carolina Manual 



Votes Cast for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court in the 
Primary of June 28, 1952. — (Continued) 



Counties 



(Short Term) 


(Regular Term) 


R. Hunt 


William H. 


R. Hunt 


William H. 


Parker 


Bobbitt 


Parker 


Bobbitt 


442 


1,108 


392 


1,027 


390 


771 


367 


811 


472 


130 


469 


136 


333 


91 


342 


90 


71 


463 


66 


455 


1,185 


12,747 


1,102 


12,505 


15 


98 


15 


104 


63 


172 


64 


164 


884 


1,675 


724 


1,637 


646 


415 


641 


408 


4,400 


1,020 


4,372 


1,019 


3,203 


211 


3,119 


186 


880 


165 


833 


163 


457 


148 


454 


139 


169 


51 


167 


50 


343 


10 


315 


8 


371 


39 


360 


42 


781 


146 


854 


128 


1,787 


473 


2,145 


485 


998 


216 


989 


191 


339 


1,211 


331 


1,170 


150 


297 


148 


297 


829 


1,384 


869 


1,164 


4,592 


1,734 


4,671 


1,668 


200 


550 


167 


578 


1,761 


6,099 


1,661 


6,126 


821 


2,747 


839 


2,726 


540 


54 


540 


53 


328 


736 


290 


649 


540 


1,783 


531 


1,829 


29 


520 


31 


529 


79 


757 


72 


743 


119 


574 


137 


550 


178 


1,093 


170 


1,090 


84 


15 


84 


15 


398 


1,724 


413 


1,614 


4,177 


254 


3,950 


216 


3,703 


1,556 


3,594 


1,508 


1,507 


55 


1,512 


43 


103 


28 


100 


24 


159 


1,609 


162 


1,624 


1,241 


107 


1,204 


117 


94 


531 


98 


528 


738 


134 


699 


140 


26 


171 


21 


173 


44 


189 


49 


186 


100,614 


99,457 


99,282 


96,994 



Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg- 

Mitchell 

Montgomery- 
Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton, 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank.. 

Pender 

Perquimans. - 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. 

Rowan 

Rutherford... 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania- 
Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington-. 

Watauga 

Wayne 

WUkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Totals- 



Election Returns 



225 



TOTAL VOTES CAST— GENERAL ELECTION 

1952 

President 



Democrats 

Adlai E. Stevenson 
652,803 




Republicans 

Dwight D. Eisenhower 
558,107 


William B. Umstead 
796,306 


Governor 


H. F. Seawell, Jr. 
383,329 


Luther H. Hodges 
783,792 


Lieutenant-Governor 


Warren H. Pritchard 
374,530 


Thad Eure 

784,404 


Secretary of State 


Frank G. Carr 
373,216 


Henry L. Bridges 
780,415 


Auditor 


J. A. Maultsby, Sr. 
370,643 


Brandon P. Hodges 

781,575 


Treasurer 


S. C. Eggers 
370,633 



Superintendent of Public Instruction (Regular Term) 
Charles F. Carroll Jeter L. Haynes 

780,293 368,797 

Superintendent of Public Instruction (Short Term) 
Charles F. Carroll 



783,468 



Harry McMuUan 
780,095 



L. Y. Ballentine 
779.023 

Forrest H. Shuford 
779,826 



Waldo C. Cheek 
780,417 



William A. Devin 
774,475 



Attorney General 



Avalon E. Hall 
371,980 



Commissioner of Agriculture 

Joel A. Johnson 
372,993 



Commissioner of Labor 



W. E. Rutledge 
372,286 

Commissioner of Insurance 

John Tucker Day 
371,028 

Chief Justice Supreme Court 

C. Clifford Frazicr, Sr. 
372,409 



Associate Justice Supreme Court Short Term) 
R. Hunt Parker 

785,798 

Associate Justice Supreme Court (Regular Term) 

R. Hunt Parker Algernon L. Butler 

782,100 ,369,198 

Jeff D. Johnson, Jr. Robert H. McNeill 

774.784 372,580 



226 North Carolina Manual 

VOTE FOR GOVERNOR IN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARIES 

1924-1952 

1924 

Angus Wilton McLean ^oJ'r^I 

Josiah William Bailey ''^•^'■* 

NO PRIMARY IN 1928 
1932 
First Primary 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus -J?!'fo7 

Richard T. Fountain tno'noo 

Allen J. Maxwell W^,^)i^ 

Second Primary 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus }«1'q7? 

Richard T.Fountain. lb8,971 

1936 
First Primary 

Clyde R. Hoey.. }83,972 

Ralph McDonald Jok'^qo 

A. H. Graham rlni 

JohuA. McRae ''•''"'' 

Second Primary 

Clyde R, Hoey 266,354 

Ralph McDonald 214,414 

1940 

J. Melville Broughton lii'lA 

W.P.Horton J05,91b 

A. J Maxwell ---- g'^^O 

Lee (jrravely ooi-e 

Thos. E. Cooper H'-ki. 

Paul D.Grady ^^•'f„ 

Arthur Simmons 

1944 

R. Gregg Cherry If/fR, 

Ralph McDonald onfio 

011a Ray Boyd ^•"'"* 

1948 
First Primary 

Charles M.Johnson --- - Ifi^'ooi 

W.Kerr Scott Vaiin 

R. Mayne .\lbright jg'^°} 

Oscar Barker o'^os 

W. F. Stanley, Sr -- -- p^u 

011a Ray Boyd ^•''' 

Second Primary 

nr rr C' t-t. ill,OZU 

^^ . Kerr Scott loo Rsi 

Charles M. Johnson l»z,D»4 

1952 

William B. Umstead ocHt? 

Hubert E. Olive A'iiSt 

Manley R. Dunaway *•"'»" 



Election Returns 



227 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE DEMOCRATIC 
PRIMARY OF MAY 29, 1954. 





State Treasurer 


Commissioner of Insurance 


Counties 


Joshua S. 
James 


Edwin Gill 


Charles F. 
Gold 


John F. 
Fletcher 




2,490 

369 

259 

1.262 

633 

125 

960 

542 

1,398 

929 

4,659 

1,815 

3,262 

1,524 

155 

1,168 

785 

2,494 

952 

582 

320 

198 

2,726 

2,526 

1,887 

2,686 

333 

202 

1,883 

335 

2,907 

1,631 

1,198 

4,403 

1,349 

5.009 

161 

375 

963 

925 

4,436 

2,759 

2,257 

1,764 

706 

483 

361 

273 

2,331 

1,313 

2,940 

538 

932 

1,599 


5,566 

925 

675 

2,581 

1,496 

358 

2,481 

1,875 

3,216 

2,056 

12,608 

3,663 

5,663 

2,951 

588 

3,015 

1,751 

4,296 

2,810 

2,018 

897 

566 

5,476 

5,008 

3,453 

7,057 

1,007 

696 

5,003 

508 

2,803 

8,286 

3,734 

9,994 

3,277 

9,781 

736 

612 

3,338 

1,460 

12,025 

5,762 

4,591 

4,341 

2,282 

1,699 

1,347 

677 

5,894 

2,102 

6,429 

1,030 

2,514 

4,230 


3,827 

918 

464 

2,027 

982 

303 

1,792 

1,328 

2,370 

1,692 

10,412 

2,859 

3,610 

2,332 

339 

2,771 

1,736 

3,569 

2,281 

1,340 

542 

497 

6,734 

1,415 

2,442 

4,898 

616 

462 

3,985 

539 

3,090 

4,883 

3,163 

8,509 

2,685 

9,162 

305 

485 

2,764 

1,194 

11,323 

4,553 

3,439 

3,435 

1,555 

1,298 

1,135 

448 

5,303 

1,971 

5,428 

717 

1,651 

3,217 


3 903 


Alexander 


370 




362 


Anson 


1 679 




1,096 


Avery 


164 


Beaufort 


1,345 


Bertie 


941 


Bladen 


2,058 


Brunswick 


1,204 


Buncombe . _ - 


6,699 


Burke 

Cabarrus _. 


2,470 
5,383 


Caldwell 


2,196 


Camden . _ 


352 


Carteret 


1,265 


Caswell 


1,166 


Catawba... ..... 


3,189 


Chatham 


I,3S2 


Cherokee . . .. 


1,064 


Chowan 


640 


Clay . . . 


281 




1,567 


Columbus 


2,969 


Craven 


2,586 


Cumberland 


4,788 




641 


Dare. 


415 


Davidson. 


2,876 


Davie 


286 


Duplin 


1 , 958 


Durham 


4,081 


Edgecombe 


1,.588 


Forsyth .. 


5,348 


Franklin 


1.727 


Gaston . . 


5,616 


Gates 


470 


Graham 


427 


Granville 


1,539 


Greene.. . 


929 


Guilford 


4,777 


Halifax 


3,761 


Harnett . . .. 


3,221 


Haywood- 


2,625 


Henderson.. . . ... 


1..551 


Hertford 


795 


Hoke 


538 


Hyde 


360 


Iredell 


3.028 


Jackson .. 


1,314 


Johnston _ 


3,509 


Jones ._ 


703 


Lee 


1,614 


Lenoir 


2,270 



228 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE DEMOCRATIC 
PRIMARY OF MAY 29, 1954.— (Continued) 



Counties 



Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg. 

Mitchell 

Montgomery. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton . 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank.. 

Pender 

Perquimans.. 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham.. 

Rowan 

Rutherford... 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania. 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington... 

Watauga 

Wavne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Totals.. 



State Treasurer 



Joshua S. 
James 



,311 

520 

585 

,250 

,174 

,155 

132 

480 

,236 

,993 

,255 

810 

,640 

,432 

453 

382 

,566 

232 

,030 

,079 

669 

,416 

,419 

,713 

,716 

,304 

,205 

,118 

589 

,283 

444 

,778 

367 

733 

206 

,684 

849 

,434 

433 

349 

218 

,701 

668 

,619 

384 

387 



149,473 



Edwin Gill 



2,940 
1,701 



,088 
,358 
,384 
13,271 
367 
1,599 
3,577 
5,378 
8,156 
2,361 
2,122 
3,504 
724 
1,428 
1,104 
727 
2,721 
6,167 
1,437 
3,778 
5,276 
7,751 
5,031 
6,753 
5,148 
2,089 
3,132 
2,512 
1,286 
4,290 
1,062 
1,591 
612 
2,767 
4,125 
15,928 
2,476 
1,020 
1,081 
4,690 
2,542 
4,067 
831 
637 



344,796 



Commissioner of Insurance 



Charles F. 
Gold 



2,481 
1,013 
1,351 
2,359 
2,196 
9,423 
233 
1,158 
2,700 
4,479 
6,147 
1,717 



1, 



,748 

,533 

551 

866 

,109 

455 

1,885 

5,594 

1,537 

3,395 

3,479 

5,662 

4,043 

4,757 

7,976 

1,719 

1,638 

1,850 

1,180 

3,784 

655 

1,071 

386 

2,179 

2,933 

14,495 

1,450 

811 

969 

4,514 

2,282 

3,782 

763 

810 



278,913 



John F. 

Fletcher 



1,759 
1,069 

475 

1,186 

1,402 

10,399 

214 

796 
1,979 
2,544 
5,812 
1,257 
1,618 
2,132 

525 

826 
1,123 

440 
1,741 
4,244 

632 
1,684 
4,003 
4,532 
2,447 
5,091 

461 
1,339 
1,543 
1,771 

494 
2,185 

791 
1,218 

370 
1,976 
1,980 
7,405 
1,284 

553 

297 
1,530 

856 
1,725 

430 

210 



197,432 



Election Returns 



229 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE GENERAL ELECTION 

OF NOVEMBER 2, 1954 





State Treasurer 


Commissioner of 
Insurance 


Commissioner 
of Labor 


Counties 


Edwin 

Gill 

Democrat 


Rex 

Morton 

Republican 


Charles F. 

Gold 
Democrat 


Fred G. 

Frick 

Republican 


Frank 

Crane 

Democrat 


Alamance. . _ 


9,272 
3,420 
1,932 
1,882 
4,531 
1,048 
1,938 
1,295 
1,221 
3,092 

14,390 
7,969 
9,899 
7,967 
549 
4,517 
1,453 

11,203 

3,045 

3,264 

503 

1,409 

3,627 

2,605 

3,056 

3,042 

761 

882 

10,960 
2,341 
3,097 
4,084 
2,286 

11,381 
1,611 

11,982 

404 

1,436 

1,363 

1,059 

13,731 

2,549 

4,678 

5,480 

4,865 

985 

912 

359 

8,039 

4,382 

7,808 

782 

2,069 

2.146 


3,513 

2,695 

1,308 

213 

4,051 

2,136 

241 

34 

124 

2,176 

4,795 

6,170 

5,620 

6,408 

54 

1,011 

192 

9,762 

1,259 

3,479 

30 

1,414 

853 

240 

214 

476 

61 

306 

8,125 

2,489 

289 

850 

74 

4,976 

59 

4,091 

33 

1,679 

82 

17 

5,542 

118 

985 

1,687 

4,925 

39 

32 

59 

4,603 

2,998 

2,103 

38 

400 

191 


9,202 

3,415 

1,931 

1,877 

4,565 

1,045 

1,933 

1,304 

1,211 

3,073 

14,249 

7,955 

9,874 

7,912 

548 

4,502 

1,452 

10,929 

3,019 

3,058 

499 

1,410 

3,626 

2,595 

3,037 

3,034 

760 

862 

10,802 

2,332 

3,085 

4,039 

2,292 

11,334 

1,595 

11,960 

399 

1,437 

1,376 

1,058 

13,709 

2,546 

4,654 

5,354 

4,849 

981 

912 

357 

8,025 

4,380 

7,790 

784 

2,064 

2,141 


4,325 

2,694 

1,304 

213 

3,931 

2,126 

236 

35 

125 

2,182 

4,847 

6,157 

5,661 

6,446 

56 

1,103 

185 

10,241 

1,251 

3,521 

33 

1,411 

836 

240 

219 

466 

61 

302 

8,126 

2,486 

279 

835 

74 

4,926 

70 

4,094 

31 

1,683 

85 

17 

5,512 

119 

989 

1,785 

4,980 

39 

32 

60 

4,. 590 

2,998 

1,926 

38 

393 

190 


9 307 


Alexander 


3 421 


Alleghany - _- 


1 931 


Anson 


1 890 


Ashe _ __ 


4 572 


Averv 


1,051 


Beaufort 


1 929 


Bertie.. . . . 


1 286 


Bladen 


1 216 


Brunswick . _ . .. 


3,072 


Buncombe. 


14,438 


Burke 


8,005 


Cabarrus .. 


10,070 


Caldwell 


7,981 


Camden.. . 


548 


Carteret .. 


4,,')01 


CaswelL . 


1,435 


Catawba 


11,220 


Chatham . _ . 


3,007 


Cherokee.. . 


3,267 


Chowan 


500 


Clay 


1,414 


Cleveland-.. 


3,623 


Columbus . . . .. 


2,592 


Craven 


2,971 


Cumberland - - . 


3,029 


Currituck . . 


761 


Dare. . 


866 




10,991 


Davie 


2,340 


Duplin... - - 


3,076 


Durham. 


4,080 


Edgecombe.. 


2,282 


Forsyth . . . 


11,569 


Franklin 


1,594 


Gaston.. .... _ . 


12,0,S7 


Gates. 


400 


Graham... 


1,427 


Granville ... 


1,366 


Greene 


1,057 


Guilford... 

Halifax 


13,858 
2,542 
4,651 


Haywood 


5,482 




4,886 


Hertford 

Hoke 


982 
906 


Hyde.. 


355 


IredeU. 

Jackson .. 


7,772 
4,394 


Johnston.. 


7,788 


Jones.. 


782 


Lee 


2.020 


Lenoir... 


2,161 



230 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS IN THE GENERAL ELECTION 
OF NOVEMBER 2, 1954.— (Continued) 





State Treasurer 


Commissioner of 
Insurance 


Commissioner 
of Labor 


Counties 


Edwin 

Gill 

Democrat 


Rex 

Morton 

Republican 


Charles F. 

Gold 
Democrat 


Fred G. 

Frick 

Republican 


Frank 

Crane 

Democrat 


Lincoln .- 


6,395 
3,448 
4,106 
1,964 
4,872 
21,535 

874 
3,002 
3,067 
3,036 
3,560 
1,998 
1,686 
2,978 
1.277 
1,372 

919 

410 
1,357 
9,189 
2,539 
8,028 
2,775 
3,546 
7,506 
10,917 
6,010 
6.359 
1,326 
8,239 
3,524 
6,381 
2,186 
3,636 

390 
2,717 
1,491 
9.247 
1.064 

848 
3,6.33 
3,074 
5,968 
1,852 
2,049 
3,529 


4,482 

3,386 

3,140 

39 

2,327 

10,186 

2.208 

2.336 

1,407 

149 

670 

49 

93 

622 

557 

194 

42 

48 

126 

280 

1,834 

7,719 

270 

140 

1,940 

6,628 

2,506 

4,600 

60 

6,951 

2,951 

4,066 

1,518 

2,606 

64 

411 

125 

1,495 

38 

193 

3,359 

493 

7,731 

164 

3,131 

2,780 


6,360 
3,443 
4,101 
1,964 
4,860 
21.301 

868 
2.995 
3.045 
3.079 
3., 501 
1,982 
1,687 
2,848 
1,264 
1,369 

912 

400 
1,.341 
9,165 
2.580 
8.012 
2,752 
3,524 
7,468 
10,836 
6,221 
6,348 
1,294 
8.230 
3,523 
6,. 395 
2.186 
3,.";35 

388 
2,707 
1 , 483 
9,221 
1,057 

845 
3,633 
3,060 
6,092 
1,750 
2,047 
3,534 


4,480 

2,383 

3,139 

38 

2,453 

10,231 

2,087 

2.334 

1.408 

154 

684 

55 

95 

633 

554 

194 

44 

48 

127 

280 

1,821 

7,707 

279 

143 

1,915 

6,763 

2,450 

4,596 

61 

6,949 

2,950 

4,050 

1,510 

2.632 

64 

407 

121 

1.463 

41 

191 

3,353 

485 

7,739 

163 

3,133 

2.776 


6.372 


Macon 


3 . 466 


Madison 


4.102 


Martin 


1.954 


McDowell 


4,845 


Mecklenburg ._ 


21,561 


Mitchell 


871 


Montgomery - 


3.008 


Moore. 


3.071 


Nash 


2,997 


New Hanover 


3,5.35 


Northampton 

Onslow. 


1,978 
1.685 


Orange ,. 


2.963 


Pamlico 


1.266 


Pasquotank 


1.374 


Pender . . 


918 


Perquimans ....... 


403 


Person... .. . _. 


1..3.33 


Pitt . 


9,157 


Polk... 


2,542 


Randolph-- . 


8,004 


Richmond .. 


2,759 


Robeson 


3,521 


Rockingham 


7,474 


Rowan 

Rutherford . ... 


11,011 
6,016 


Samnson 


6,340 


Scotland- ........ 


1,295 


Stanly. _ .. 


8,257 


Stokes 


3,518 


Surry .. 


6,. 398 


Swain - 


2,189 


Transylvania 


3,669 


Tyrrell- . 


384 


Union .. 


2,734 


Vance 


1,485 


Wake 


9,193 


Warren _ ... 


1.059 


Washington 


845 


Watauga..- . . 


3.365 


Wayne -.. 


3,019 


Wilkes 


5,954 


Wilson . .... 


1,850 


Yadkin 

Yancey 


2,049 
3,529 


Totals 


406,440 


201,433 


404,338 


201,747 


406,019 



Election Returns 



231 



VOTE FOR CHIEF JUSTICE AND ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF 
THE SUPREME COURT IN THE GENERAL ELECTION OF 

NOVEMBER 2, 1954. 





Chief Justice 


Associate Justices 




Term Ending 
12-31-58 


Term Ending 
12-31-62 


Term Ending 
12-31-54 


Term Ending 
12-31-62 


Term Ending 
12-31-58 


Counties 


M. V. 
Barnhill 
Democrat 


Buford T. 
Henderson 
Republican 


William H. 

Bobbitt 

Democrat 


William H. 

Bobbitt 

Democrat 


J. Wallace 
Winborne 
Democrat 


Carlisle W. 

Higgins 

Democrat 


Alamance 

Alexander 

Alleghany 


9,147 

3,409 

1,930 

1,869 

4,568 

1,043 

1,932 

1,303 

1,211 

3,069 

14,196 

7,973 

9,860 

7,925 

548 

4,485 

1,431 

11,093 

3,003 

3,255 

498 

1,410 

3,585 

2,577 

3,052 

3,032 

757 

864 

10,862 

2,323 

3,068 

4,039 

2,288 

11,092 

1,601 

12,014 

403 

1,418 

1,356 

1.057 

13,473 

2,546 

4,614 

5,425 

4,818 

986 

911 

3,55 

7,914 

4,385 

7,758 

1 784 


3,439 

2,705 

1,305 

209 

3,gl9 

2,120 

241 

34 

128 

2,183 

4,844 

6,167 

5,638 

6,413 

56 

1,147 

189 

9,788 

1,280 

3,527 

31 

1,413 

861 

248 

213 

488 

61 

304 

8,135 

2,485 

282 

866 

73 

5,221 

69 

4,134 

33 

1,596 

92 

16 

5,621 

121 

996 

1,706 

4,947 

39 

30 

66 

4,638 

2,999 

2,097 

38 


9,293 
3,424 
1,931 
1,886 
4,576 
1,053 
1,925 
1,295 
1,216 
3,073 

14,489 
8,031 

10,094 

8,010 

547 

4,514 

1,432 

11,240 

3,010 

3,266 

499 

1,413 

3,635 

2,590 

3,052 

3,041 

761 

860 

10,998 
2,349 
3,068 
4,078 
2,286 

11,639 
1,604 

12,112 

401 

1,432 

1,367 

1,056 

13,982 

2,553 

4,634 

5,489 

4,896 

981 

909 

355 

8,108 

4,387 

7,774 

781 


9,219 

3,415 

1,927 

1,877 

4,565 

1,047 

1,914 

1,296 

1,210 

3,055 

14,385 

8,000 

10,044 

7,980 

547 

4,147 

1,421 

11,174 

3,000 

3,261 

499 

1,415 

3,600 

2,577 

3,045 

3,015 

756 

863 

10,947 

2,343 

3,045 

4,057 

2.279 

11,531 

1,596 

12.021 

397 

1,429 

1,359 

1,056 

13.817 

2,538 

4,600 

5,455 

4,819 

978 

904 

351 

8,008 

4,385 

7,699 

779 


9,270 

3,378 

1,930 

1,875 

4,566 

1,047 

1,919 

1,296 

1,216 

3,052 

14,410 

8,009 

10,036 

7,949 

547 

4,494 

1,416 

11,157 

3,000 

3,246 

499 

1,413 

3,588 

2,573 

3,044 

2,793 

758 

859 

10,914 

2,332 

3,046 

4,054 

2,277 

11,500 

1,499 

12,001 

401 

1,410 

1,363 

1,056 

13,656 

2,534 

4,628 

5,451 

4,891 

984 

904 

352 

7,959 

4,374 

7,703 

781 


9,244 
3,321 
1,979 
1,873 


Ashe 


4,585 




1,045 


Beaufort 

Bertie 


1,916 
1,290 


Bladen.. 


1,208 


Brunswick 

Buncombe.. 

Burke 


3,066 
14,386 

7,988 


Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 


10,044 

7,948 

547 


Carteret 


4,494 


Caswell 


1,417 


Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 


11.143 

3,000 

3,256 

500 

1,420 


Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie. 


3,598 

2,569 

3,040 

2,991 

757 

8.50 

10,929 

2,337 


Duplin. 


3.049 


Durham 


4.043 


Edgecombe. .. 
Forsvth 


2.267 
11,663 


Franklin .-. 

Gaston 


1.592 
11,996 


Gates. 


398 


Graham. . . 


1,412 


Granville 

Greene 


1,362 
1.0,56 


Guilford 


13,866 


Halifax. 


2,527 


Harnett 


4,610 


Haywood 

Henderson 

Hertford 

Hoke... 


5,452 

4,889 

978 

907 


Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 


354 
7,969 
4,368 
7,687 

778 



232 



North Carolina Manual 



VOTE FOR CHIEF JUSTICE AND ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF 

THE SUPREME COURT IN THE GENERAL ELECTION OF 

NOVEMBER 2, 1954.— (Continued) 





Chief Justice 




Associate Justices 






Term Ending 
12-31-58 


Term Ending 
12-31-62 


Term Ending 
12-31-54 


Term Ending 
12-31-62 


Term Ending 
'.2-31-5S 


Counties 


M.V. 
Barnhill 
Democrat 


Buford T. 
Henderson 
Republican 


William H. 

Bobbitt 

Democrat 


WiUiam H. 

Bobbitt 

Democrat 


J. Wallace 
Winborne 
Democrat 


Carlisle Vi\ 

Higgins 

Democrat 


Lee 


2,030 
2,129 
6,339 
3,428 
4,100 
1,95.5 
4,818 
20,940 

869 
2,998 
3,038 
3,057 
3,492 
1,986 
1,686 
2,932 
1,265 
1,360 

911 

399 
1,321 
9,137 
2,526 
7,956 
2,748 
3,527 
7,395 
10,795 
5,982 
6,334 
1,288 
8,279 
3,503 
6,339 
2,181 
3,626 

385 
2,701 
1,486 
9,193 
1,057 

843 
3,624 
3,025 
5,923 
1,856 
2,041 
3,527 


406 

195 

4,484 

2,399 

3,148 

43 

2,308 

10,349 

2,290 

2,333 

1,412 

150 

695 

50 

95 

695 

556 

195 

45 

48 

127 

296 

1,842 

7,722 

274 

139 

1,962 

6,685 

2,644 

4,599 

59 

6,949 

2,959 

4,075 

1,508 

2,636 

64 

416 

125 

1,504 

39 

197 

3,552 

500 

7,732 

166 

3,148 

2,780 


2,022 
2,156 
6,366 
3,453 
4,105 
1,956 
4,874 
23,405 

874 
3,014 
3,077 
2,998 
3,537 
1,978 
1,689 
2,979 
1,259 
1,369 

916 

401 
1,330 
9,156 
2,550 
8,011 
2,771 
3,522 
7,480 
11,061 
5,951 
6,336 
1,292 
8,256 
3,510 
6,417 
2,173 
3,679 

384 
2,730 
1,485 
9,220 
1,076 

842 
3,638 
3,017 
5,962 
1,853 
2,056 
3,527 


1,998 
2,152 
6,354 
3,439 
4,101 
1,942 
4,842 
22,918 

822 
2,987 
3,040 
2.987 
3,491 
1.972 
1,689 
2,951 
1,249 
1,362 

912 

398 
1,325 
9,128 
2,532 
7,982 
2,756 
3,511 
7,430 
10,962 
5,992 
6,314 
1,290 
7,934 
3,515 
6,190 
2,182 
3,660 

385 
2,722 
1,482 
9,183 
1,067 

844 
3,630 
3,005 
5,941 
1,838 
2,052 
3,528 


2,020 
2,150 
6,339 
3,438 
4,104 
1,944 
4,928 
21,470 

872 
2,984 
3,030 
2,993 
3,496 
1,983 
1,685 
2,962 
1,246 
1,362 

912 

401 
1,326 
9,125 
2,523 
7,964 
2,763 
3,507 
7,400 
10,909 
5,940 
6,323 
1,283 
8,226 
3,510 
6,370 
2,182 
3,661 

384 
2,702 
1,478 
9,228 
1,059 

842 
3,625 
3,000 
5,941 
1,845 
2,048 
3,532 


1 994 


Lenoir 


2,147 


Lincoln 


6,344 


Macon 


3,441 


Madison 


4,095 


Martin 


1,940 


McDowell 

Mecklenburg 

Mitchell 


4,831 

21,331 

896 


Montgomery 

Moore 


2,991 
3,028 


Nash 


2,977 


New Hanover 

Northampton 

Onslow 


3,461 
1,971 
1,685 


Orange 


2,938 


Pamlico. - 


1,244 


Pasquotank 

Pender.. . . 


1,355 
907 


Perquimans 

Person.- . 


398 
1,322 


Pitt . 


9,112 


Polk 


2,517 


Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 


7,963 
2,763 
3,506 


Rockingham 

Rowan 


7,413 
10.92! 


Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland _. 

Stanly . 


5,990 
6,323 
1,282 
8,222 


Stokes 


3,514 


Surry _. 


6,395 


Swain . 


2,170 


Transylvania 

Tyrreil 


3,658 
381 


Union 


2,705 


Vance _ 


1,477 


Wake 


9,123 


Warren 


1,054 


Washington 

Watauga 

Wayne 


840 
3,629 
2,975 


Wilkes 


5,955 


Wilson 


1,835 


Yadkin .. 


2,047 


Yancey 


3,530 






Totals 


402,845 


201,846 


409,108 


405,633 


404,425 


404,516 



Election Returns 



233 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN IN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY, 
MAY 29, 1954, BY DISTRICTS 

SECOND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





L. H. 

Fountain 


Herbert T. 
Bailey 


Bertie 


3,003 
5.140 
2,786 
8,301 
6,378 
3,721 
2,752 
6,370 


145 

730 

129 

1,183 

fin? 


Edgecombe 


Greene .. 


Halifax 


Lenoir _ 


Northampton 


184 
362 


Warren 


Wilson 


351 






Totals 


38,451 


3,686 





SIXTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





H. C. 

Sprinkle 


Carl T. 
Durham 


Alamance 


1,424 

1,478 

2,813 

704 


7,635 

8,529 

14 745 


Durham 


Guilford 


Orange 


4 725 






Totals 


6,419 


35,634 





SEVENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





F. Ertel 
Carlyle 


Seavy 
Carroll 


Bladen 


3,498 
1,872 
5,360 
5,418 
4,355 
6,778 
9,994 


1,994 


Brunswick . . 


1,734 


Columbus.. 


3,834 


Cumberland 


0,503 


Harnett 


3,065 


New Hanover . 


7,381 


Robeson 


3,174 






Totals 


37,275 


27,685 







234 



North Carolina Manual 



EIGHTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 





C.B. 
Deane 


Coble 
Funderburk 


Anson 


3,310 
6,910 
878 
1,583 
3,203 
2,001 
4,356 
5,909 
2,921 
1,832 
2,903 
1,380 


1,363 


Davidson . . - 


779 


Davie . __ . . 


131 


Hoke 


269 


Lee 


559 


Montgomery . _ _. 


306 


Moore 


865 


Richmond.. .. ------ 


2,725 


Scotland . - . 


768 


Union 


4,001 


Willies . . . - 


696 


Yadkin - -- 


82 






Totals 


37,186 


12,544 







TENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 






Marvin Lee 
Ritch 


J. C. 

Sedberry 


Avery 


94 
1,136 
2,157 
1,252 
9,943 
179 


448 


Burke 


4,519 


Catawba . - . 


4,853 


Lincoln 


3,349 


Mecklenburg . . - . . - . 


13,133 


Mitchell 


299 






Totals - . 


14,761 


26,601 







Election Returns 



285 







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CO 


c^ 


cs 


cs 


cs 


o 

CO 




EO 












; 








ca 


OS 






0^ 


















c 

to 
c 
si 


5 




c 


^ 


ai 






■n 


o 












3 


B 

S 

G 
3 




> 


B 

C3 
?! 

Urn 


§ 


a- 
-a 

c 


c 
c 

V 


o 


c 
'5 


H 






pa 


O 


c 


o 


W 


K 


02 


H 





Election Returns 



247 



VOTE FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR 

DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY, MAY 29, 1954 

REGULAR TERM 



Counties 



Alamance... 
Alexander.. 
Alleghany... 

Anson 

Ashe _. 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick.. 
Buncombe.. 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell... . 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland... 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland. 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe.. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston. 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford.. 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson... 

Hertford 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones.. _ 

Lee 

Lenoir 



W. Kerr 

Scott 



,687 
646 
621 
,089 
,481 
283 
,472 
,424 
502 
,624 
112 
,197 
,803 
265 
477 
859 
,165 
,568 
738 
,609 
825 
354 
239 
539 
413 
823 
586 
538 
648 
700 
020 
503 
592 
320 
494 
134 
546 
663 
779 
208 
837 
352 
224 
312 
283 
997 
180 
023 
922 
014 
197 
596 
33 
458 



Alton 
Lennon 



1,918 
1,072 

926 
2,704 
1,526 

365 
1,992 

770 
3,208 
2,461 
10,277 
2,256 
5,951 
3,805 

551 
2,147 
1,255 
4,947 
1,716 
1,494 

872 

556 
5,191 
6,335 
3,164 
5,686 
1,080 

776 
2,347 

406 
3,021 
4,622 
2,169 
8,020 
2,081 
11,817 

644 

670 
2,400 
1,071 
9,130 
3,818 
1,730 
2,522 
2,352 

819 

752 

349 
5,742 
1,966 
3,245 

677 
1,415 
3,261 



Alvin 

Wingfield, 

Jr. 



162 
5 
14 
40 
10 
2 
53 
28 
45 
25 

197 
24 
91 
56 
8 
19 
71 
71 
58 
20 
11 
5 
65 
50 
61 

188 

23 

6 

119 
17 
27 

522 
47 

510 
60 

181 



271 
14 

313 

176 
43 
35 
29 
5 
26 
5 

114 
26 

107 
13 
66 
33 



Henry L. 
Sprinkle 



30 

4 

5 

11 

7 

1 

6 

6 

29 

5 

180 

16 

41 

41 

5 

11 

19 

41 

7 

25 

5 

4 

35 

39 

17 

53 

18 

5 

37 

16 

16 

99 

8 

117 

13 

66 

3 

7 

18 

4 

109 

43 

14 

28 

27 

7 

3 

4 

70 

14 

44 

7 

15 
9 



W. M. 
Bostick 



6 

3 

2 

7 

3 



3 

3 

11 

11 

83 

7 

29 

19 

1 



24 
4 
7 
1 
3 

12 

18 

10 

37 

14 

3 

12 

1 

22 

16 

8 

36 

5 

36 



2 

6 

4 

28 

27 

10 

16 

8 

1 

1 

1 

30 

7 

32 

6 

10 

8 



A.E. 
Turner 



OUa 
Ray Boyd 



4 

1 

7 

22 

3 

1 

10 

7 

21 

14 

86 

9 

39 

37 

3 

7 

25 

43 

5 

15 

8 

4 

23 

33 

25 

60 

18 

6 

17 

3 

21 

20 

46 

53 

20 

77 

5 

8 

17 

17 

95 

115 

13 

37 

17 

16 

3 

3 

70 
11 
57 
10 
10 
106 



9 

5 



41 

5 

13 

9 

59 

6 

20 

18 

4 

9 

16 

30 

5 

15 

7 

2 

23 

17 

20 

S3 

8 

1 

20 

9 

6 

26 

9 

40 

15 

56 



6 

12 

5 

40 

66 

10 

19 

14 

6 

2 

2 
40 
17 
47 

6 
15 
20 



248 



North Carolina Manual 



Vote for United States Senator 
Democratic Primary, May 29, 1954 

(Regular Term) — (Continued) 



Counties 


W. Kerr 

Scott 


Alton 
Lennon 


Alvin 

Wingfield. 

Jr. 


Henry L. 
Sprinkle 


W. M. 

Bostick 


A. E. 
Turner 


011a 
Ray Boyd 


Lincoln . 

Macon 

Madison 


2,205 
1,620 
1,069 
3,768 
3,037 
7,871 
311 
1,373 
2,978 
5,446 
2,576 
2,508 
2,985 
4,062 
989 
799 
999 
494 
2,880 
7,234 
927 
4,426 
5,020 
7,258 
5,708 
5,7.')6 
2,805 
2,794 
2,051 
2,555 
1,322 
4,662 
1,048 
1,246 
1,089 
2,827 
2,869 
14,806 
1,585 
1,256 
482 
3,929 
1,381 
3,698 
1,232 
443 


3,067 
1,099 
1,364 
1,164 
1,820 
16,870 

332 
1,133 
2,499 
3,193 
12,155 
1,514 
2,485 
1,575 

692 
1,329 
2,190 

912 
2,152 
5,040 
1,689 
1,923 
3,597 
6,470 
3,903 
6,107 
5,876 
1,532 
2,031 
2,313 
1,246 
3,553 

741 
1,477 

307 
2,855 
2,941 
9,464 
1,590 

481 
1,072 
4,012 
2,320 
3,335 

420 

843 


28 
16 
6 
22 
32 

545 

3 

27 

63 

66 

184 
26 
24 

264 

22 

7 

25 

1 

295 
89 
19 
81 
90 
77 

149 

139 
62 
33 
50 
36 
44 

128 
2 

22 

3 

78 

173 

686 

44 

8 

3 

59 

26 

42 

14 

5 


16 

9 

9 

9 

27 

113 

3 

1 

15 

15 

47 

11 

10 

26 

5 

9 

6 

1 

44 

21 

22 

19 

42 

62 

57 

65 

51 

19 

21 

15 

6 

47 

26 

16 

2 

40 

54 

46 

15 

4 

2 

19 

5 

20 

11 

1 


18 

7 

3 

8 

11 

78 

1 

4 

4 

5 

25 

2 

9 

9 

2 

3 

2 

2 

13 

16 

22 

4 

41 

44 

34 

22 

26 

19 

22 

12 

5 

24 

7 

5 

1 

14 

14 

32 

3 

3 



16 

4 

23 

4 

2 


7 

9 

7 

93 

17 

95 



1 

14 

24 

38 

15 

7 

13 

8 

9 

1 

2 

21 

62 

23 

8 

31 

36 

51 

34 

33 

11 

14 

11 

5 

33 

9 

12 

2 

16 

28 

73 

18 

6 

1 

28 

7 

16 
6 
3 


13 
5 
5 


Martin 


18 


McDowell 

Mecklenburg 

Mitchell 


15 

114 




Montgomery 

Moore .- 


5 

12 


Nash 


18 


New Hanover 

Northampton 

Onslow 


23 
5 

8 


Orange. . 


18 


Pamlico.. .. 


16 


Pasquotank 

Pender 


4 
4 


Perquimans 

Person . 


5 
12 


Pitt 


57 


Polk 


12 


Randolph 


9 


Richmond 

Robeson . 


29 
37 


Rockingham 

Rowan 


34 

29 


Rutherford 

Sampson 


16 

7 


Scotland 


9 


Stanlv .. 


5 


Stokes 


3 


Surry .. 


33 


Swain.. . .... 


7 


Transylvania 

Tyrreil .. 


10 
1 


Union.. 


26 


Vance. . . 


13 


Wake 


42 


Warren . . .. 


12 


Washington 

Watauga 


5 
3 


Wayne 


17 


Wilkes- 


4 


Wilson 


24 


Yadkin... _. 


6 


Yancey . . . 


3 






Totals -_ 


312,053 


286,730 


7,999 


2,548 


1,293 


2,361 


1,674 



Election Returns 



249 



VOTE FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR 
DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY. MAY 29, 1954 

(SHORT TERM) 



Counties 


W. Kerr 
Scott 


Alton 
Lennon 


Alvin 
Wingfield 


Henry L. 
Sprinkle 




6,639 

586 

503 

1,885 

1,294 

234 

2,137 

2,132 

2,171 

1,379 

7,392 

3,741 

3,525 

1,905 

416 

2,490 

1,835 

3,123 

2,419 

1,342 

722 

319 

3,777 

3,243 

2,921 

5,093 

525 

472 

5,195 

594 

4,213 

7,079 

3 133 

7,366 

3,014 

5,455 

489 

505 

2,321 

1,886 

8,028 

4,837 

5,491 

4,371 

1,110 

1,597 

1,061 

903 

3,510 

1,740 

7,107 

1,369 

2,357 

3,993 


2,022 

938 

793 

2,449 

1,315 

317 

1,884 

662 

2,770 

2,133 

9,687 

2,077 

5,640 

3,237 

505 

2,022 

1,130 

4,286 

1,622 

1,303 

798 

458 

4,792 

5,661 

2,962 

5,337 

1,022 

732 

2,246 

353 

2,569 

4,434 

2,033 

7,409 

1,876 

10,751 

600 

534 

2,116 

968 

8,689 

3,701 

1,636 

2,270 

2,027 

787 

693 

416 

5,263 

1,810 

3,007 

612 

1,303 

3,007 


249 
22 
14 
44 
25 
16 
59 
39 
74 
41 

350 
50 

171 

108 
18 
46 
79 

133 

85 

38 

15 

3 

125 

109 

117 

310 
35 
10 

174 
30 
51 

577 
86 

773 
76 

357 

14 

8 

290 
30 

466 

242 

100 
71 
45 
26 
32 
12 

213 
34 

225 
29 
97 
97 


79 




9 




8 




25 


Ashe 


9 


Avery 


3 




8 


Bertie ,. 


10 


Bladen . 


40 


Brunswick 


27 


Buncombe - 


324 


Burke 


24 


Cabarrus 


95 


Caldwell , .. 


68 


Camden 


9 


Carteret 


18 


Caswell - 


23 


Catawba . 


109 


Chatham 


17 


Cherokee 


33 


Chowan 


11 


Clay . . 


5 


Cleveland 


69 




51 


Craven 


32 


Cumberland 


128 


Currituck - 


19 




4 


Davidson - 


73 


Davie _ __ 


19 


Duplin . 


20 




150 


Edgecombe 


22 




243 


Franklin 


26 




148 


Gates . . - 


4 




15 


Granville . . 


27 




i 


Guilford 


329 


Halifax... 


106 


Harnett 


39 




48 


Henderson 


21 


Hertford 


16 


Hoke . 


9 


Hvde 


8 


Iredell . 


139 


Jactoon 


20 


Johnston 


88 


Jones 


12 


Lee.. . 


27 


Lenoir 


33 



250 



North Carolina Manual 



Vote for United States Senator 

Democratic Primary, May 29, 1954 

(Short Term)— (Continued) 



Counties 


W. Kerr 
Scott 


Alton 
Lennon 


Alvin 
Wingfield 


Henry L. 
Sprinkle 


Lincoln 


1,950 
1.350 
965 
3,361 
2,447 
7,292 
240 
1,254 
2,621 
4,849 
2,356 
2,320 
2,468 
3,544 
844 
716 
889 
439 
2,397 
6,366 
851 
3,868 
4,552 
6.394 
4,611 
5,094 
2,512 
2,354 
1,794 
2,080 
1,159 
3,972 
834 
1,103 
858 
2,468 
2,598 
13,609 
1,414 
1,070 
446 
3,539 
1,253 
3,323 
984 
323 


2,791 
892 
1,182 
1,098 
1,614 
16,257 
288 
1,001 
2,340 
3,065 
11,101 
1,482 
2,143 
1,441 
620 
1,263 
2,026 
810 
1,956 
4,746 
1,563 
1,789 
3,355 
6,054 
3,323 
5,604 
5,284 
1,341 
1,860 
2,051 
1,025 
3,224 
668 
1,357 
281 
2,684 
2,776 
9,121 
1,481 
426 
1,008 
3,750 
2,220 
3.081 
374 
785 


49 
27 
15 
46 
43 
797 
3 

46 
114 
101 
358 
33 
50 
301 
35 
27 
40 
12 
322 
167 
46 
123 
180 
139 
199 
303 
95 
52 
77 
72 
56 
179 
15 
38 
10 
95 
207 
1,026 
59 
15 
5 
102 
45 
73 
27 
8 


29 




18 


Madison 


9 


Martin 


12 




45 


Mecklenburg.. .. 


245 


Mitchell 


4 


Montgomery 


9 


Moore 


33 


Nash 


38 


New Hanover 


109 


Northampton . 


16 




31 




72 


Pamlico .. _ 


10 


PasQuotank 


9 


Pender 


8 




3 


Person. . 


55 


Pitt 


75 


Polk 


33 




44 


Richmond . 


70 


Robeson 


88 


Rockingham 


103 




179 


Rutherford. . -. 


66 


Sampson 


27 


Scotland 


29 


Stanly . . 


39 


Stokes .. .- -- 


9 


Surry 


96 


Swain 


32 




32 


Tyrrell 


6 


Union 


66 




67 


Wake . 


150 




19 


Washington . 


7 


Watauga 


1 


Wayne . . 


55 


Wilkes ... 


15 


Wilson 


31 


Yadkin . 


8 


Yancey 


12 


Totals 


274,674 


264.265 


12,372 


5.013 







Election Returns 



251 



VOTE FOR UNITED STATES SENATORS 
NOVEMBER 2, 1954 



Counties 



Regular Term 



W. Kerr 

Scott 
Democrat 



Paul C. 

West 

Republican 



Short Term 



W. Kerr 

Scott 
Democrat 



Unexpired 
Term 



Sam J. 
Ervin. Jr. 
Democrat 



Alamance 

Alexander... 
Alleghany... 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick.. 
Buncombe.. 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

CasweU 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay , 

Cleveland 

Columbus. -. 

Craven 

Cumberland. 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe.. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Hertford 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 



11, 
2, 
3, 
3, 
2, 

11, 
1, 

11, 

1, 
1, 

1, 
13, 
2, 
4, 
5, 
4, 



,304 
,447 
,959 
,859 
,607 
,141 
,971 
,209 
,234 
,164 
,171 
,989 
,799 
912 
549 
745 
,523 
973 
,153 
,323 
494 
413 
513 
,624 
037 
,004 
771 
941 
168 
402 
195 
978 
294 
024 
613 
708 
410 
455 
366 
064 
379 
544 
764 
597 
885 
996 
912 
391 
975 
442 
266 
796 
104 
147 



3,264 

2,714 

1,326 

241 

3,952 

2,236 

255 

41 

142 

2,194 

5,158 

6,298 

5,915 

6,594 

56 

1,099 

208 

10,244 

1,293 

3,526 

40 

1,410 

967 

268 

258 

584 

72 

313 

8,101 

2,511 

295 

1,048 

99 

5,627 

83 

4,595 

34 

1,680 

107 

18 

6,092 

144 

1,025 

1,695 

5,032 

41 

36 

61 

5,107 

3,007 

2,144 

38 

425 

215 



9,475 
3,428 
1,936 
1,873 
4,586 
1,103 
1,922 
1,299 
1,226 
3,100 

14,138 
7,977 
9,854 
7,920 
548 
4,620 
1,480 

10,987 

3,065 

3,276 

493 

1,414 

3,504 

2,460 

3,031 

2,994 

758 

911 

11,024 
2,369 
3,132 
3,990 
2,276 

11,085 
1,595 

11,746 

406 

1,436 

1,344 

1,062 

13,278 

2,514 

4,667 

5,529 

4,804 

988 

908 

367 

7,907 

4,405 

7,970 

786 

2,023 

2,149 



9,360 
3,445 
1,952 
1,883 
4,577 
1,087 
1,935 
1,297 
1,219 
3,023 

14,507 
8,378 

10,173 

8,167 

549 

4,523 

1,434 

11,458 

3,033 

3,270 

501 

1,412 

3,660 

2,591 

3,064 

3,047 

761 

889 

11,061 
2,352 
3,081 
4,131 
2,274 

11,691 
1,599 

12,112 

402 

1,436 

1,375 

1,059 

14,144 

2,549 

4,637 

5,531 

4,938 

987 

911 

353 

8,211 

4,388 

7,760 

783 

2,030 

2,164 



252 



North Carolina Manual 



Vote for United States Senators, November 2, 1954 — (Continued) 




Regular Term 


Short Term 


Unexpired 
Term 


Counties 


W. Kerr 

Scott 
Democrat 


Paul C. 

West 

Republican 


W. Kerr 

Scott 
Democrat 


Sam J. 
Ervin, Jr. 
Democrat 


Lincoln 


6,341 
3,498 
4,151 
1,994 
5,006 
19.361 

921 
2,752 
3,045 
3,026 
3,244 
2,013 
1,703 
3,109 
1,353 
1,349 

913 

407 
1,383 
9,244 
2,587 
8,315 
2,707 
3,551 
7,712 
10,982 
5,845 
6,114 
1,289 
8,264 
3,576 
6,534 
2,204 
3,656 

411 
2,720 
1,446 
8,774 
1,055 

867 
3,633 
3,105 
5,961 
1,819 
2,129 
3,539 


4,503 

2,410 

3,160 

46 

2,390 

12,587 

2,292 

2,359 

1,519 

208 

1,014 

58 

110 

690 

567 

239 

56 

56 

139 

358 

1,894 

7,708 

354 

173 

2,080 

6,933 

2,701 

4,615 

79 

7,029 

2,979 

4,189 

1,519 

2,666 

65 

441 

156 

2,142 

58 

198 

3,570 

547 

7,907 

205 

3,138 

3,287 


6,337 
3,452 
4,120 
1,963 
4,882 
20,202 

837 
2,878 
3,006 
2,997 
3,282 
1,989 
1,685 
3,020 
1,309 
1,168 

902 

404 
1,349 
9,168 
2,531 
8,028 
2,721 
3,520 
7,480 
10,882 
5,846 
6,470 
1,276 
8,229 
3,544 
6,421 
2,192 
3,642 

398 
2,713 
1,457 
8,856 
1,043 

853 
3,632 
3,040 
5,938 
1,842 
2.096 
3,530 


6,408 


Macon ... 


3,450 


Madison 


4,105 


Martin 


1,949 


McDowell 


4,909 


Mecklenburg. 


22,816 


Mitchell... 


903 


Montgomery 


3,005 


Moore . . 


3,077 


Nash 


3,014 


New Hanover 


3,596 


Northampton 


1,989 


Onslow. 


1,693 


©range . 


3,002 


Pamlico . 


1,266 


Pasq uotank 


1,369 


Pender 


919 


Perquimans . ... 


400 


Person .. 


1,347 


Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 


9,194 
2,565 
8,028 


Richmond. . .... 


2,777 


Robeson 


3,520 


Rockingham 


7,526 


Rowan 

Rutherford . . .. 


11,078 
5,992 


Sampson 


6,311 


Scotland 

Stanly . . . 


1,297 
8,279 


Stokes 

Surry., 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 


3,537 
6,430 
2,190 
3.670 
386 


Union . 


2,729 


Vance 


1,488 


Wake 


9,244 


Warren ... .. 


1,062 


Washington 


847 


Watauga 


3,649 


Wayne 


3,017 


Wilkes . - - 


5,948 


Wilson 


1,848 


Yadkin . 


2,060 


Yancey 


3,531 






Totals 


408,312 


211,322 


402,268 


410,574 



Election Returns 253 

VOTE ON CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS BY COUNTIES 



Proposed amendments to the Constitution of North Carolina 

submitted to a vote of the people at the General Election, 

November 2, 1954. 



No. 1 

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ADOPTED 
Chapter 611, Session Laws 1953. 
Article 4, Section 6 

"The General Assembly is vested with authority to provide for 
the retirement of members of the Supreme Court and for the recall 
of such retired members to serve on said Court in lieu of any 
active member thereof who is, for any cause, temporarily 
incapacitated." 

No. 2 

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ADOPTED 

Chapter 621, Session Laws 1953. 
Article 3, Section 6 

"The terms reprieves, commutations and pardons shall not in- 
clude paroles. The General Assembly is authorized and empowered 
to create a Board of Paroles, provide for the appointment of the 
members thereof, and enact suitable laws defining the duties and 
authority of such board to grant, revoke and terminate paroles. 
The Governor's power of paroles shall continue until July 1, 1955, 
at which time said power shall cease and shall be vested in such 
Board of Paroles as may be created by the General Assembly." 

No. 3 

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT FAILED OF ADOPTION 

Chapter 803, Session Laws 1953. 
Article 2, Section 4 

"Sec. 4. Regulations in Relation to Districting the State for 
Senators. The senate districts shall be so altered by the General 



254 North Carolina Manual 

Assembly, at the first session after the return of every enumera- 
tion by order of Congress, that each senate district shall contain, 
as near as may be, an equal number of inhabitants, excluding 
aliens and Indians not taxed, and shall remain unaltered until 
the return of another enumeration, and shall at all times consist 
of contiguous territory; and where any senatorial district consists 
of one county, such county shall only be entitled to one senator in 
the General Assembly of North Carolina; provided that in no 
event shall any one county be entitled to more than one senator 
at any one time." 

No. 4 

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ADOPTED 

Chapter 972, Session Lav^^s 1953. 
Article 6, Section 2 

"Any person who shall have resided in the State of North Caro- 
lina for one year, and in the precinct, ward or other election dis- 
trict in which such person offers to vote for thirty days next 
preceding an election, and possessing the other qualifications set 
out in this Article, shall be entitled to vote at any election held 
in this State; provided, that removal from one precinct, ward or 
other election district to another in this State shall not operate to 
deprive any person of the right to vote in the precinct, ward or 
other election district from which such person has removed until 
thirty days after such removal." 

No. 5 

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ADOPTED 

Chapter 1033, Session Laws 1953. 
Article 3, Section 13 

"Provided, that when the unexpired term of any of the offices 
named in this Section in which such vacancy has occurred expires 
on the first day of January succeeding the next General Election, 
the Governor shall appoint to fill said vacancy for the unexpired 
term of said office." 



Election Returns 



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259 



VOTE ON PROHIBITION 1881 AND 1908 



August, 1881 



May, 1908 



For 

Prohibition 

48,370 



Against 

Prohibition 

166,325 



For 
Prohibition 
113,612 



Against 

Prohibition 

69,416 



Vote on calling convention to consider proposed amend- 
ment to the Constitution of the United States repealing 
the 18th amendment and Election of Delegates. 



November, 1933 







Delegates 


Delegates 






For Repeal 


Against 


For 


No 


of 


Repeal of 


Convention 


Convention 


18th 


18th 






Amendment 


Amendment 


120,190 


293,484 


115,482 


300,054 



PART V 

GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, 
BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 



GOVERNMENTAL BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 



ADVISORY BUDGET COMMISSION 

1925, c. 89; 1929, c. 100; 1931, c. 295; 1951, c. 768; G. S. 143-4 
Composition: Six members. Chairman of the Appropriations 
and Finance Committees of the House and Senate, and two mem- 
bers appointed by the Governor. 
Appointed by the Governor: 

LeRoy Martin Raleigh 

Alonzo C. Edw^ards Hookerton 

Appointed by the Legislature: 

J. C. Eagles, Jr Wilson 

Nelson Woodson Salisbury 

J. K. Doughton Sparta 

Wm. B. Rodman Washington 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL HALL OF FAME 

1953, c. 1129; G. S. 106-568.14 

Composition : Eight members. Five Ex-officio, three appointed 
by the Governor. 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner State Board of Agriculture, 

Chairman, Ex-ofRcio Raleigh 

David S. Weaver, Director North Carolina Agricultural 

Extension Service, Ex-officio Raleigh 

A. L. Teachey, State Supervisor of Vocational 

Agriculture, Ex-officio Raleigh 

A. D. Williams, President North Carolina Farm 

Bureau Federation, Ex-officio Wilson 

Harry B. Caldwell, Master of State Grange, 

Ex-officio Greensboro 

Dean L 0. Schaub Raleigh 

T. E. Browne Murfreesboro 

Mrs. Charles Graham Linwood 

263 



264 North Carolina Manual 

STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Rev. s. 3931; Code s. 2184; 1901, c. 479, ss. 2, 4; 1907, c. 497, s. 1: 
1931, c. 360, s. 1; 1937, c. 174; C. S. 4667; G. S. 106-2 

Composition: Eleven members. Ten appointed by the Governor. 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner of Agriculture, 

Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Glenn G. Gilmore Julian 

Hoyle C. Griffin Monroe 

Claude T. Hall Roxboro 

O. J. Holler Union Mills 

J. Muse McCotter New Bern 

George P. Kittrell Corapeake 

Charles F. Phillips Thomasville 

J. H. Poole West End 

A. B. Slagle Franklin 

J. E. Winslow^ Greenville 

STATE BOARD OF ALCOHOLIC CONTROL 

1937, c. 49, ss. 2, 3; c. 411; 1939, c. 185, s. 5; 1941, c. 107, 
s. 5; G. S. 18-37; G. S. 18-38 

Composition : Three members appointed by the Governor. 

T. W. Allen, Chairman Raleigh 

Frank T. Ei-vdn Durham 

Sam B. Etheridge Washington 

Roy L. Davis, Secretary Raleigh 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 

Rev. s. 4539; 1903, c. 767, s. 2; 1907. c. 714, s. 1; 1941, c. 306; 
1943, c. 237; 1945, c. 55; C. S. 6141; G. S. 121-1 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

McDaniel Lewis, Chairman Greensboro 

W. T. Laprade Durham 

Gertrude Sprague Carraway New Bern 

Mrs. P. F. Patton Hendersonville 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 265 

Mrs. B. T. Williams Stedman 

Clarence W. Griffin Forest City 

Josh L. Home, Jr Rocky Mount 

Dr. C. C. Crittenden, Director Raleigh 

STATE ART COMMISSION 

1947, c. 1097; 1951, c. 1168; 1953, c. 696; G. S. 140-5.6 

Composition : Five members appointed by Governor from mem- 
bership of State Art Society. 

Robert Lee Humber, Chairman Greenville 

Mrs. Katherine P. Arrington Warren ton 

Edwin Gill Raleigh 

Dr. Clarence Poe Raleigh 

Dr. Clemens Sommer Chapel Hill 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE ART SOCIETY 
1929, c. 314; 1943, c. 752; G. S. 140-1 

Composition: Sixteen members. Four members Ex-officio; four 
members appointed by the Governor; eight members elected by 
the Art Society. 
Ex-officio : 

Luther H. Hodges, Governor Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent of 

Public Instruction Raleigh 

Mrs. Ralph Miller, Art Dept., Chairman, N. C. Feder- 
ation of Women's Clubs Raleigh 

Appointed : 

Dr. Sylvester Green Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Charles Cannon Concord 

Robert Lee Humber Greenville 

Mrs. Louis Sutton Raleigh 

Elected: 

Mrs. Isabelle Bowen Henderson Raleigh 

Dr. Clarence Poe Raleigh 



266 North Carolina Manual 

Edwin Gill Raleigh 

Dr. Clemens Sommer Chapel Hill 

Henry Bridges Raleigh 

Jonathan Daniels Raleigh 

Gregory Ivy Greensboro 

Mrs. Kenneth Mountcastle, Jr Winston-Salem 

Lucy Chen-y Crisp, Executive Secretary Raleigh 



STATE BOARD OF ASSESSMENT 
1939, c. 310, s. 200; 1941, c. 327, s. 6; 1947, c. 184; G. S. 105-273 

Composition : Five members, all Ex-officio under the Act. 

Eugene G. Shavv^, Commissioner of Revenue, Chairman . . Raleigh 

Stanley Winbome, Chairman Public Utilities Commission Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General Raleigh 

Edw^in Gill, Director of Local Government Raleigh 

James S. Currie, Director Department of Tax Research . . Raleigh 

J. C. Bethune, Secretary Raleigh 

STATE BANKING COMMISSION 

1931, c. 243; 1935, c. 266; 1939, c. 91; 1949, c. 372; 
1953, c. 1209; G. S. 53-92 

Composition: Eleven members. Two Ex-officio, nine appointed 
by . the Governor. 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General, Ex-officio Raleigh 

A. K. Barrus Kinston 

Don S. Elias Asheville 

R. P. Holding Smithfield 

James R. McKenzie Laurinburg 

Oscar J. Mooneyham Forest City 

W. P. Saunders Southern Pines 

John W. Spears Lillington 

M. B. Fowler Durham 

Garland Johnson, Secretary Elkin 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 267 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE BAR COUNCIL 

1933, c. 210; 1937, c. 51; G. S. 84-17 

Composition: Twenty-five members. Four Ex-officio as officers 
of the Noi-th Carolina State Bar, and one each from the twenty-one 
Judicial Districts of the State. 

Officers : 

W. H. McElwee, President North Wilkesboro 

John H. Hall, First Vice President Elizabeth City 

Robert W. Proctor, Second Vice President Marion 

Edward L. Cannon, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

Councilors : 

Bryan Grimes, First District Washington 

L D. Thorp, Second District Rocky Mount 

B. H. Perry, Third District Henderson 

J. C. Pittman, Fourth District Sanford 

Albion Dunn, Fifth District Greenville 

Rivers D. Johnson, Sr., Sixth District Warsaw 

Charles P. Green, Seventh District Louisburg 

James B. Swails, Eighth District Wilmington 

Horace E. Stacy, Ninth District Lumberton 

R. P. Reade, Tenth District Durham 

G. H. Hastings, Eleventh District Winston-Salem 

Don A. Walser Lexington 

J. F. Milliken, Thirteenth District Monroe 

Francis H. Fairley, Fourteenth District Charlotte 

H. M. Robins, Fifteenth District Asheboro 

B. F. Williams, Sixteenth District Lenoir 

W. G. Mitchell, Seventeenth District North Wilkesboro 

Paul J. Story, Eighteenth District Marion 

John C. Cheesborough, Nineteenth District Asheville 

Frank D. Ferguson, Jr., Twentieth District Waynesville 

P. W. Glidewell, Sr., Twenty-first District Reidsville 



2(58 North Carolina Manual 

STATE COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND 

1935, c. 53, s. 1; 1937, c. 285; G. S. 111-1; 111-3 

Composition: Eleven membeis. Five Ex-officio, six appointed 
by the Governor. 

Judge Sam M. Cathey, Chairman Asheville 

Dr. Howard E. Jensen, Chairman, Exec. Com Durham 

H. C. Bradshaw Durham 

Joe W. Hood Wilmington 

Frank C. King Brevard 

Sam Alford Henderson 

Ex-officio members : 

Dr. J. W. R. Norton, Secretary Raleigh 

J. W. Beach Raleigh 

Charles H. Warren Raleigh 

E. N. Peeler Raleigh 

Dr. Ellen B. Winston Raleigh 

H. A. Wood, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

N. C. BOARD OF BOILER RULES 

1935, c. 326; 1953, c. 569; G. S. 95-54 

Composition : Six members. One Ex-officio, five appointed by 
the Governor. 

Frank Crane, Commissioner of Labor, Chairman, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

W. E. Shuping, Jr Charlotte 

W. W. Lloyd Greensboro 

William H. Ruffin Durham 

Gordon Thomas Raleigh 

Wilkes C. Price Asheville 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 269 

BUILDING CODE COUNCIL 

1933, c. 392, s. 4; 1941, c. 280, s. 2; G. S. 143-139 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Bernard Crocker, Jr., Chairman Raleigh 

Eccles D. Everhart High Point 

W. Price Hand Belmont 

George Robb High Point 

L. H. Rouse Wilmington 

BOARD OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

1941, c. 224, s. 2; G. S. 129-2 

Composition: Five members, all Ex-officio under above Act. 

Luther H. Hodges, Governor Raleigh 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State Raleigh 

Edwin Gill, Treasurer Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General Raleigh 

D. S. Coltrane, Assistant Director Budget Raleigh 

CAROLINA-VIRGINIA TURNPIKE AUTHORITY 

1953, c. 1159; G. S. 136-89.3 

Composition: Four members. One Ex-officio, three appointed by 
the Governor. 

A. H. Graham, Chairman State Highway and Public Works 

Commission, Ex-officio Raleigh 

John G. Clark, Chairman Greenville 

W. J. Sermons, Vice-Chairman Washington 

Guy H. Lennon, Secretary-Treasurer Mantec 

STATE CIVIL AIR PATROL 

1953, c. 1231; G. S. 167-1 

Composition : Nine members. Six Ex-officio and three appointed 
by the Governor. 



270 North Carolina Manual 

Ex-officio: 

Major General John Hall Manning, Adjutant 

General Raleigh 

Lt. Col. Stanhope Lineberry, Deputy Wing 

Commander Charlotte 

Lt. Col. J. Toms Dover, Wing Executive Officer .... Charlotte 
Major Mary B. Reid, Wing Adjutant (acting 

Secretary) Charlotte 

Lt. Col. Robert D. McCallum, Wing Director of 

Communications Charlotte 

Major Louis H. Smith, Coordinator of Civil 

Defense Boone 

Appointed: 

Lt. Col. James L. Hamilton, Chairman Charlotte 

Roy Rowe Burgaw 

(Two vacancies) 

BOARD OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

1925, c. 122, s. 6; 1927, c. 57; 1941, c. 45; 1945, c. 638; 1953, c. 81; 

G. S. 113-4; 113-5 

Composition : Fifteen members appointed by the Governor. 

Luther H. Hodges, Governor, Honorary ChaiiTnan Raleigh 

Miles J. Smith, 1st Vice Chairman Salisbury 

W. J. Damtoft, 2nd Vice Chairman Canton 

Charles S. Allen Durham 

W. B. Austin Jefferson 

H. C. Buchan, Jr '. . North Wilkesboro 

Scroop W. Enloe, Jr Spnace Pine 

R. M. Hanes Winston-Salem 

Leo H. Harvey Kinston 

Charles H. Jenkins Ahoskie 

Amos R. Kearns High Point 

Cecil Morris Atlantic 

Hugh M. Morton Wilmington 

Henry Rankin, Jr Fayetteville 

W. Eugene Simmons Tarboro 

T. Max Watson Spindale 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 271 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF CORRECTION 

AND TRAINING 

1943, c. 776, s. 1; 1945, c. 847; 1947, c. 226; G. S. 134-90* 

Composition: Ten members. One Ex-officio, nine appointed by 
the Governor. 
Dr. Ellen Winston, Commissioner Department of Public 

Welfare, Ex-officio Raleigh 

C. A. Dillon, Chairman Raleigh 

M. S. Hayworth Rocky Mount 

Paul B. Bissette Wilson 

Joseph W. Nordan Raleigh 

Pearl Thompson Salisbury 

T. Clyde Auman West End 

Mrs. Lyal Shoemaker Asheville 

Steed Rollins Durham 

S. E. Leonard, Commissioner Raleigh 

*{This Board has the management of the Stonewall Jackson Training 
School, Eastern Carolina Training School, State Home and Industrial School, 
Morrison Training School and State Training School for Negro Girls.) 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

N. C. Constitution, Art. IX, sec. 8; G. S. 115-16.1 

Composition: Thirteen members. Three Ex-officio; ten appointed 
by the Governor and confirmed by the General Assembly. 

Edwin Gill, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll, Secretary, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dist. No. 

1 J. A. Pritchett Windsor 

2 A. McL. Graham, Vice Chairman Clinton 

3 A. S. Brower Durham 

4 Paul S. Oliver Fainnont 

5 Santford Martin, Chairman Winston-Salem 

6 O. L. Richardson Monroe 

7 Claude Farrell Elkin 

8 Gerald Cowan Asheville 

* B. B. Dougherty Boone 

* H. L. Trigg Raleigh 

(one vacancy) 

C. D. Douglas, Controller Raleigh 

*StatG at larere appointments. 



272 North Carolina Manual 

STATE BOARD OF ELECTIONS 

Rev. 4300; 1901, c. 89; 1933, c. 165; 1953, c. 428; 
C. S. 5921; G. S. 163-8 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

J. Hampton Price, Chaimian (D) Leaksville 

John G. Dawson, Secretary (D) Kinston 

H. A. Maddox (D) Murphy 

J. E. Holshouser (R) Boone 

J. E. Hill (R) Denton 

R. C. Maxwell, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

EMPLOYMENT SECURITY COMMISSION 

Ex. 1936, c. 1, s. 10; 1941, c. 108, s. 10; 1941, c. 279, ss. 1-3; 
1943, c. 377, s. 15; 1947, c. 598; G. S. 96-3 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Henry E. Kendall, Chairman Raleigh 

Crayon C. Efird Albemarle 

R. Dave Hall Belmont 

Mrs. Quenton Gregory Halifax 

C. A. Fink Spencer 

W. Benton Pipkin Reidsville 

Dr. Harry D. Wolf Chapel Hill 

EUGENICS BOARD OF NORTH CAROLINA 
19.33, c. 224; G. S. 35-40 

Composition : Five members, all Ex-officio under above act. 

Dr. Ellen Winston, Commissioner State Board of Public 

Welfare Raleigh 

Dr. J. W. R. Norton, Secretary State Board of Health . . Raleigh 

Dr. Ira C. Long, Superintendent State Hospital Goldsboro 

Dr. Walter A. Sikes, Superintendent State Hospital at 

Raleigh Raleigh 

Harry McMuIlan, Attorne.y General Raleigh 

Ethel Speas, Executive Secretary Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 273 

GASOLINE AND OIL INSPECTION BOARD 

1937, c. 425, s. 9; 1941, c. 220; 1949, c. 1167; G. S. 119-26 

Composition : Five members. Two Ex-officio, three appointed by 
the Governor. 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner of Agriculture, 

Chairman, Ex-ofRcio Raleig-h 

C. D. Baucom, Secretary Raleigh 

G. E. Bobbitt Raleigh 

E. W. McDaniel Elkin 

G. Allen Ives New Bern 

GENERAL STATUTES COMMISSION 

1945, c. 157; 1947, c. 114; G. S. 164-14 

Composition: Nine members appointed as follows: One each by 
the President of the North Carolina State Bar and North Caro- 
lina Bar Association; one each by the Deans of the law schools 
of Duke, Wake Forest, and the University of North Carolina; 
one each by the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the 
House, and two by the Governor. 

Robert F. Moseley, Chairman Greensboro 

Frank W. Hanft, Vice Chairman Chapel Hill 

James H. Pou Bailey Raleigh 

Henry A. McKinnon Lumberton 

William Joslin Raleigh 

Robert E. Lee Wake Forest 

Buxton Midyette Jackson 

Wm. F. Womble Winston-Salem 

E. C. Bryson Durham 

Charles G. Powell, Jr., Secretary, Ex-officio Raleigh 



274 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

Rev. s. 4435; Code, s. 2875; 1879, c. 177, s. 1; 1885, c. 237, s. 1; 

1893, c. 214, s. 1; 1911, c. 62, s. 1; 1931, c. 177, s. 1; 1945, 

c. 281; C. S. 7048; G. S. 130-1 

Composition: Nine members. Five appointed by the Governor, 
four elected by the Medical Society. 

Dr. G. Grady Dixon, President Ayden 

Dr. Hubert B. Haywood, Vice President Raleigh 

Dr. John R. Bender Winston-Salem 

Dr. A. C. Current Gastonia 

Dr. Ben J. Lawi'ence Raleigh 

Dr. G. Curtis Cnamp Asheville 

Dr. H. C. Lutz Hickory 

Mrs. J. E. Latta Hillsboro 

Dr. John P. Henderson, Jr Sneads Ferry 

Dr. J. W. R. Norton, State Health Officer, 

Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

STATE HIGHWAY AND PUBLIC WORKS COMMISSION 

1933, c. 172; 1935, c. 257; 1937, c. 297; 1941, c. 57; 
1945, c. 895; 1953, c. 115; G. S. 136-1 

Composition : Fifteen members appointed by the Governor. 

A. H. Graham, ChaiiTnan Raleigh 

J. Emmett Winslow Hertford 

H. Maynard Hicks Snow Hill 

C. Heide Trask Rocky Point 

M. E. Robinson Goldsboro 

Donnie A. Sorrell Durham 

C. A. Hasty Maxton 

J. Van Lindley Greensboro 

Forrest Lockey Aberdeen 

James A. Gray, Jr. Winston-Salem 

James A. Hai'dison Wadesboro 

W. Ralph Winkler Boone 

June F. Scarborough Statesville 

J. F. Snipes Marion 

Harry E. Buchanan Hendersonvllle 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 275 

STATE (HOSPITAL) ADVISORY COUNCIL 
1945, c. 1096; 1947, c. 933; 1949, c. 1019; G. S. 131-120 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Claude F. Gaddy, Chairman Raleigh 

Dr. Fred C. Hubbard North Wilkesboro 

James P. Richardson Charlotte 

James G. Stikeleather, Jr Asheville 

Dr. David A. Young Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA HOSPITALS BOARD OF CONTROL 
1943, c. 136; 1945, c. 925; G. S. 122-7* 

Composition : Fifteen members appointed by the Governor. 

W. G. Clark, Chairman Emeritus Tarboro 

John W. Umstead, Jr., Chairman Chapel Hill 

R. P. Richai-dson, Vice-Chairman Reidsville 

Mrs. Vance B. Gavin, Secretary Kenansville 

H. W. Kendall Greensboro 

Warren R. Williams Sanford 

Bedford W. Black Kannapolis 

John T. Rodgers Asheville 

Dr. Yates S. Palmer Valdese 

D. W. Royster Shelby 

John S. Ruggles Southern Pines 

Mrs. E. H. Lasater Erwin 

Thomas O'Berx-y Goldsboro 

J. Melville Broughton, Jr Raleigh 

C. Wayland Spruill Windsor 

(One vacancy) 



*(This Board has thp maiiaKPmpnt of the Statp Hospital at Ralei(th, thr 
State Hospital at MorKanton, the State Hospital at Goldsboro, the State 
Hospital at Butner, and the Caswell Training School.) 



276 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

1929. c. 120, s. 51; 1931, c. 274, s. 8; G. S. 97-77 

Composition : Three members appointed by the Governor. 

J. W. Bean, Chairman Spencer 

Frank H. Gibbs Warrenton 

N. F. Ransdell Varina 

NORTH CAROLINA INSURANCE ADVISORY BOARD 

1945, c. 383; G. S. 58-27.1 

Composition: Seven members. One statutory and six appointed 
by the Governor, 

Charles F. Gold, Commissioner of Insurance, 

Chairman (Statutory) Raleigh 

Wm. H. Andrews, Jr Greensboro 

Jack C. Koonce Jacksonville 

L. M. Buchanan Greenville 

D. M. Woodard, Jr Conway 

J. Leslie Atkins, Jr Durham 

W. H. Nelson Spray 

NORTH CAROLINA JUDICIAL COUNCIL 

1953, c. 74; G. S. 7-448 

Composition: Fourteen members. One member of Supreme Court, 
two judges of the Supei'ior Court, one member of Attorney Gen- 
eral's Office, two Solicitors from Superior Court and eight addi- 
tional members, two of whom shall be appointed by the Governor, 
one by the President of the Senate, one by the Speaker of the 
House, and four by the Council of the North Carolina State Bar. 

J. Wallace Winborne, Chairman Raleigh 

E. T. Bost Concord 

Leo Carr Burlington 

David Clark Lincolnton 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 277 

M. G. Boyette Carthage 

Fred B. Helms Charlotte 

Ralph Moody Raleigh 

Z. V. Norman Plymouth 

J. Will Pless, Ji- Marion 

Louis J. Poisson Wilmington 

John C. Rodman Washington 

Malcolm Seawell Lumberton 

Don A. Walser Lexington 

Nelson Woodson Salisbury 

Dewey W. Wells, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE LAW 

ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS' BENEFIT 

AND RETIREMENT FUND 

1937, c. 349, s. 8; 1939, c. 6; 1941, cc. 56, 157; 1943, c. 145; 
1949, c. 1055; 1951, c. 382; 1953, c. 883; G. S. 143-166 

Composition : Seven members. Three Ex-officio, four appointed 
by the Governor. 

Henry L. Bridges, State Auditor, Chairman 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

Charles F. Gold, State Insurance Commissioner, 

Secretary, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer, Ex-officio Raleigh 

C. C. Stoker High Point 

B. Everett Jordan Saxapahaw 

W. B. Lentz Raleigh 

Robert J. Pleasants Raleigh 



LIBRARY COMMISSION OF NORTH CAROLINA 

1909, c. 873; 1953, c. 1102; C. S. 6597; G. S. 125-18 

Composition: Eight members. Two Ex-officio, four appointed 
by the North Carolina Library Association and two appointed by 
the Governor. 



278 North Carolina Manual 

Carrie Broughton, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent Public 

Instruction, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Mrs. Ford S. Worthy Washington 

Paul S. Ballance Winston-Salem 

John Harden Greensboro 

Dr. Roy B. McKnight Charlotte 

Mrs. T. Lenoir Gwyn Waynesville 

Rev. George F. Hill Elizabeth City 

Mrs. Elizabeth House Hughey, Secretary Raleigh 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT COMMISSION 

1931, c. 60, s. 7; 1931, c. 296, s. 8; 1933, c. 31, s. 1 ; G. S. 159-3 

Composition : Nine members. Four Ex-officio, five appointed by 
the Governor. 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer, Chairman Ex-officio Raleigh 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Henry L. Bridges, State Auditor, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Eugene Shaw, Commissioner of Revenue, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Walter A. Coble Guilford College 

S. Preston Douglas Lumberton 

L. B. Hollowell Gastonia 

W. T. Moss Youngsville 

C. W. Roberts Leaksville 

W. E. Easterling, Secretary Raleigh 

LOCAL GOVERNMENTAL EMPLOYEES' 
RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

1938, c. 390, s. 8; 1941, c. 357, s. 6; 1943, c. 535; 1945, c. 526; 
1947, c. 259; G. S. 128-28 

Composition : Ten members. Two Ex-officio, eight appointed by 
the Governor and approved by the Senate. 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer, Chairman Ex-officio Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 279 

Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent of Public 

Instruction, Ex-officio Raleigh 

H. L. Stephenson Smithfield 

Clyde W. Gordon Burlington 

Sam J. Burrow, Jr Asheboro 

Thomas F. Royall Wadesboro 

Mrs. Annie H. Swindell Durham 

Ralph Moody Raleigh 

D. H. Umstead Durham 

James A. Glover Nashville 

Nathan H. Yelton, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA MEDICAL CARE COMMISSION 

1945, c. 1096; G. S. 131-117 

Composition: Twenty members. Two Ex-officio, eighteen ap- 
pointed by the Governor. 

James H. Clark, Chairman Elizabeth to\v7i 

Dr. Clarence Poe, Vice Chairman Raleigh 

Dr. J. Street Brewer Roseboro 

Dr. George L. Carrington Burlington 

Dr. Wm. M. Coppridge Durham 

E. C. Daniel Zebulon 

Sample B. Forbus Durham 

Dr. G. Fred Hale Raleigh 

Lloyd D. Hardy Raleigh 

Dr. Walter L. Jackson High Point 

Dr. Harry L. Johnson Elkin 

Dr. P. L. Pearson Apex 

Marshall I. Pickens Charlotte 

Ralph H. Ramsey, Jr Brevard 

Wm. M. Rich Durham 

Dr. Wm. Raney Stanford Durham 

Flora Wakefield, R. N Raleigh 

Dr. Paul F. Whitaker Kinston 

Dr. J. W. R. Norton, State Health Officer, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Ellen B. Winston, State Commissioner of 

Public Welfare, Ex-officio Raleigh 



280 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA MERIT SYSTEM COUNCIL 

1941, c. 378; G. S. 126-1 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Rev. Warren Carr, Chairman Durham 

Robert B. Justice Enka 

Mrs. J. V. Whitfield Burgaw 

Rev. J. B. Willis Hamlet 

Dr. Frank T. DeVyver, Supervisor Durham 

(One vacancy) 

NORTH CAROLINA MILK COMMISSION 

1953, c. 1338; G. S. 106-266.7 

Composition: Seven members. One Ex-officio, six appointed bj 
the Governor. 
L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner of Agriculture, Ex-officio. .Raleigh 

W. W. Fitzpatrick, Chairman Rougemonl 

John Burn Shelby 

Fred M. Eagles Wilson 

H. G. Strom Ashevillt 

0. A. Swavingen Concord 

J. E. Wilson Albemarle 

J. V. Whitaker, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

N. C. MUNICIPAL BOARD OF CONTROL 

1917. c. 136, sub. c. 2, s. 4; 1935, c. 440; 1941, c. 97; 
C. S. 2779; G. S. 160-195 

Composition: Three members. All Ex-officio under the Act. 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General, Chairman Raleigh 

Thad Eure, Secretary of State, Secretary Raleigh 

Stanley Winborne, Chairman Utilities Commission Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF PAROLES 
195.3, c. 17; G. S. 148-52 

Composition: Three members appointed by the Governor. 

Clarence H. Patrick, Chairman Wake Forest 

Johnson Matthews Durham 

W. A. Brame Wendell 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 281 

STATE BOARD OF PENSIONS 
1921, c. 189, s. 1; C. S. 5168 (a); G. S. 112-7 

Composition : Three members. All Ex-ofRcio under the above Act. 

Luther H. Hodges, Governor, Chairman Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General Raleigh 

Henry L. Bridges, State Auditor, 

Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PERSONNEL COUNCIL 

1949, CO. 718, 1174; 1953, c. 1085; G. S. 143-35 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Fred Royster, Chairman Henderson 

Wade Barber Pittsboro 

Earl Crump Wilson 

John Harden Greensboro 

Macon Miller Spray 

J. W. McDevitt, Director Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
1945, c. 1097; 1949, c. 892; 1953, c. 191; G. S. 143-216 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the governor. 

Edwin Pate, Chairman Laurinburg 

Raymond A. Bryan, Vice Chairman Goldsboro 

W. Avery Thompson, Secretary-Treasurer Hallsboro 

Harold F. Coffey Lenoir 

Harvey W. Moore Concord 

J. Harry White Winston-Salem 

Henry A. Lineberger Belmont 

Richard S. Marr, Executive Director Wilmington 



282 North Carolina Manual 

PRISON ADVISORY COUNCIL 

1949, c. 359; G. S. 148-86 

Composition: Seven members, two Ex-officio, five appointed by 
the Governor. 

Dr. Ellen Winston, Superintendent State Department 

of Public Welfare, Ex-officio Raleig'h 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. William McGehee, Chairman Spray 

Mrs. J. Melville Broug'hton, Secretary Raleigh 

Mrs. J. Wilbur Bunn Raleigh 

Wiley Andrews Goldsboro 

Linn D. Garibaldi Matthews 



STATE PROBATION COMMISSION 
1937, c. 132, s. 5; G. S. 15-201 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Judge Wilson Warlick, Chairman Newton 

Dr. John S. Bradway Durham 

Allen Langston Raleigh 

L. P. McLendon Greensboro 

N. F. Ransdell Varina 

J. D. Beaty, Director Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Rev. s. 1913; Code s. 2331; 1868-9, c. 170, s. 2; 1909, c. 899; 1917. 

c. 170, s. 1; 1937, c. 319, s. 1; 1943, c. 775, s. 1; 1945, c. 43; 

C. S. 5004; G. S. 108-1 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Frank A. Daniels, Chairman Raleigh 

E. Hervey Evans, Vice Chairman Laurinburg 

Irving E. Carlyle Winston-Salem 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 283 

Thomas Cornwell Shelby 

Jack B. Kirksey Morganton 

Mrs. R. E. Stratford Haw River 

Louis H. Sylvester Richlands 

Dr. Ellen Winston, Commissioner Raleigh 



DIVISION OF PURCHASE AND CONTRACT 

1931, cc. 261, 396; C. S. 7502; G. S. 143-48 

David Q. Holton, Director Raleigh 

Board of Award : 

J. C. Eagles, Jr Wilson 

Nelson Woodson Salisbury 

J. K. Doughton Stratford 

Wni. B. Rodman Washington 

LeRoy Martin Raleigh 

Alonzo C. Edwards Hookerton 



NORTH CAROLINA RECREATION COMMISSION 

1945, c. 757, s. 3; G. S. 143-207 

Composition : Eleven members. Four Ex-officio, seven appointed 
by the Governor. 

Luther H. Hodges, Governor, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent of Public 

Instruction, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Ellen Winston, Commissioner of Public 

Welfare, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Ben E. Douglas, Director, Department of 

Conservation and Development, Ex-officio Raleigh 

R. L. McMillan, Chairman Raleigh 

Rev. Charles S. Hubbard Chapel Hill 

W. J. Kennedy, Jr Durham 

Mrs. John F. Matheson Mooresville 



284 North Carolina Manual 

"Wilbur L. Fay Kinston 

Charles L. McCullers Kinston 

Max A. Parrish Gastonia 

R. W. Watkins Boone 

ROANOKE ISLAND HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION 

1945, c. 953; G. S. 143-200 

Composition: Twenty-four members. Three Ex-officio, twenty- 
one appointed by the Association. 

OFFICERS: 

Martin Kellogg, Jr., Chairman Manteo 

Mrs. Katherine P. Arrington, 

Honorary Vice Chairman Warrenton 

W. D. Carmichael, Jr., Honorary Vice Chairman Chapel Hill 

R. Gi-egg Cherry, Honorary Vice Chairman Gastonia 

Clarence Poe, Honorary Vice Chairman Raleigh 

Lindsey C. Warren, Honorary Vice Chairman Washington 

Russell M. Grumman, Vice Chairman Chapel Hill 

Isaac P. Davis, Secretary Winton 

C. S. Meekins, Treasurer Manteo 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Historian Raleigh 

DIRECTORS: 

Luther H. Hodges, Governor, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Harry McMullan, Attorney General, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Director Department 

Archives and History, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Paul Green Chapel Hill 

Sam Selden Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Charles Cannon Concord 

Jonathan Daniels Raleigh 

Bill Sharpe Raleigh 

Miles Clark Elizabeth City 

Melvin Daniels Manteo 

Chester S. Davis Winston-Salem 

Bruce Etheridge Manteo 

M. Keith Fearing, Sr Manteo 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 285 

Mrs. Inglis Fletcher Edenton 

Sylvester Green Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Roy Homewood Chapel Hill 

Guy H. Lennon Manteo 

Hugh Morton Wilmington 

Harry Buchanan Hendersonville 

John W. Parker Chapel Hill 

Eric W. Rogers Scotland Neck 

Lawrence Swain Manteo 

Leigh Winslow Hertford 

Bishop Thomas Wright Wilmington 

W. Kerr Scott Haw River 

NORTH CAROLINA RURAL ELECTRIFICATION AUTHORITY 

1935, c. 288, s. 1; G. S. 117-1 
Composition : Six members appointed by the Governor, 
Gwyn B. Price, Chairman Raleigh 

C. L. Ballance St. Pauls 

Dr. S. H. Hobbs, Jr Chapel Hill 

George R. Hughes Trenton 

Glenn C. Palmer Clyde 

D. E. Purcell Reidsville 

David S. Weaver Raleigh 

STATE STREAM SANITATION COMMITTEE 

1945, c. 1010; 1947, c. 786; 1951, c. 606; 1953. c. 1295; 

G. S. 143-213 

Composition : Eight members. Two Ex-officio, six appointed by 
the Governor. 

J. M. Jarrett, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

B. C. Snow, Vice-Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Scott B. Berkeley Goldsboro 

Carroll P. Rogers Tryon 

Mrs. Karl Bishopric Spray 

J. N. Vann Ahoskie 

J. V. Whitfield Burgaw 

E. C. Hubbard, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

(One vacancy) 



286 North Carolina Manual 

THE NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY SOCIETY, INC. 

1943, c. 755; 1947, c. 1049; G. S. 140-6 

Composition : Not less than sixteen members. Two Ex-officio, 
four appointed by the Governor, balance chosen by the members 
of the Symphony Society. 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS: 

Governor Luther H. Hodges Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll Raleigh 

OFFICERS: 

Dr. Charles E. Jordan, President Durham 

Russell M. Grumman, Executive Vice-President .... Chapel Hill 

James G. K. McClure, Vice-President Fairview 

L. C. Gifford, Vice-President Hickory 

A. C. Hall, Treasurer Raleigh 

Thomas M. Stanback, Jr., Secretary Chapel Hill 

Benjamin F. Swalin, Director Chapel Hill 



TEACHERS' AND STATE EMPLOYEES' 
RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

1941, c. 25, s. 6; 1943, c. 719; 1947, c. 259; G. S. 135-6 

Composition: Eight members. Two Ex-officio, six appointed by 
the Governor and approved by the Senate. 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll, Supt. Public Instruction, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

H. L. Stephenson Smithfield 

Clyde W. Gordon Burlington 

Sam J. Burrow, Jr Asheboro 

Thomas F. Royall Wadesboro 

Mrs. Annie H. Swindell Durham 

Ralph Moody Raleigh 

Nathan H. Yelton, Executive Secretary Raleigh 



Governmental Boards and Commissions 287 

TEXTBOOK COMMISSION 

1923, c. 136, s. 325; 1943, c. 627, s. 1; 1945, c. 707, ss. 4, 12; 
C. S. 5735; G. S. 115-278.4 

Composition : Twelve members appointed by the Governor and 
the Superintendent of Public Instruction: 

I. E. Ready, Chairman Roanoke Rapids 

Elementary Division: 

Mrs. Carrie Abbott Bryson City 

Mary Greenlee Mooresville 

Marie Haigwood Shelby 

Cornelia McLaughlin Lillington 

Luther Medlin Greensboro 

Mrs. Helen D. Wolff Greenville 

High School Division: 

Mrs. Mary P. Brantley Raleigh 

Bertha Cooper Elizabeth City 

Mrs. Phebe Emmons Washington 

C. B. Martin Robersonville 

0. L. Norment Asheville 



NORTH CAROLINA TURNPIKE AUTHORITY 

1951, c. 1159; 1953, c. 1116; G. S. 136-89.14 

Composition: Ten members. One Ex-officio, nine appointed by 
the Governor, five of v^^hom shall be members of the State High- 
way and Public Works Commission. 

A. H. Graham, Chairman State Highway and 

Public Works Commission, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Orton A. Boren, ChaiiTnan Pleasant Garden 

Ben E. Roney Rocky Mount 

Nello L. Teer, Sr Durham 

Edwin L. Jones Charlotte 

M. E. Robinson Goldsboro 

Forrest Lockey Aberdeen 



288 North Carolina Manual 

James A. Hardison Wadesboro 

J. F. Snipes Marion 

June F. Scarborough, Secretary Statesville 

UTILITIES COMMISSION 

1933, c. 134; 1941, c. 97; 1949. c. 1009; G. S. 62-1 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor and 
approved by the Senate. 

Stanley Winborne, Chairman Raleigh 

Edward H. McMahan Raleigh 

Harry T. Wescott Raleigh 

Mary Laurens Richardson, Chief Clerk Raleigh 

(Twro vacancies) 

VETERANS COMMISSION 

1945, c. 723; G. S. 165-5 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Herbert H. Taylor, Jr., Chairman Tarboro 

S. Amos Maynard Greensboro 

Staton P. Williams Albemarle 

Ray Galloway Raleigh 

F. W. Swan Andrews 

J. M. Caldwell, Director Raleigh 

Leonard W. Barrett, Assistant Director Raleigh 

N. C. WILDLIFE RESOURCES COMMISSION 

1947, c. 263; G. S. 143-241 

Composition : Nine members appointed by the Governor. 

District 1 0. L. Woodhouse Granby 

District 2 Robert S. Sadler Bayboro 

District 3 G. E. Beal Red Oak 



North Carolina State Institutions 289 

District 4 E. D. McGougan Lumber Bridge 

District 5 H. C. Kennett Durham 

District 6 Thurman Briggs Lexington 

District 7 R. Floyd Grouse, Chairman Sparta 

District 8 James A. Connelly Morganton 

District 9 Charles T. Wilson Biltmore 

Clyde P. Patton, Director Raleigh 



290 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA INSTITUTIONS 

CORRECTIONAL (White) 

Eastern Carolina Industrial Training School for Boys, 

Rocky Mount 

1923, c. 254, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 5; 1927, c. 144; C. S. 7362; 

G. S. 134-67 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 
1943, c. 776; G. S. 134-90 

State Home and Industrial School for Girls, Samarcand 

1917, c. 255, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 4; 1929, c. 279, s. 1; 1937, c. 147, 
s. 1; 1947, c. 226; C. S. 7329; G, S. 134-22 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 
1943, c. 776; G. S. 134-90 

Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial School, 

Concord 

1907, c. 509, s. 6; 1907, c. 955, s. 2; 1925, c. 306. s. 2; 
C. S. 7313; G. S. 134-1 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 
1943, c. 776; G. S. 134-90 

CORRECTIONAL (Negro) 

Morrison Training School, Hoffman 

1921, c. 190, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 6; 1927, c. 63; 1941, c. 241; 

G. S. 134-90 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 
1943, c. 776; G. S. 134-90 

State Training School for Negro Girls, Kinston 
1943, c. 381; 1947, c. 226; G. S. 134-84.1 

Under the North Carolina Board of Correction and Training. 
1943, c. 776; G. S. 134-90 



North Carolina State Institutions 291 

EDUCATIONAL (WHITE) 
APPALACHIAN STATE TEACHERS' COLLEGE, BOONE 

Rev. s. 4229; 1903, c. 798, ss. 1, 9, 11; 1907, c. 526, s. 1; 1915, 

c. 527, s. 1; 1917, c. 100, s. 1; 1919, c. 231, s. 1; Pr. 1925, 

c. 204; Pr. 1929, c. 66; G. S. 116-66 

Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the Senate. 

William J. Conrad, Chairman Winston-Salem 

B. C. Brock, Vice-Chairman Mocksville 

J. R. Hix North Wilkesboro 

W. W. Mast Valle Cnisis 

Fred Colbard Jefferson 

Mrs. Harry B. Caldwell Greensboro 

Mrs. Eunice Moose Taylorsville 

S. P. Jones Statesville 

L. A. Dysart Lenoir 

EAST CAROLINA COLLEGE, GREENVILLE 

1907, c. 820, s. 15; 1911, c. 159, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 7; 1927, c. 164; 
1929, c. 259; 1951, c. 641; C. S. 5866; G. S. 116-59 
Composition: Thirteen members. Twelve appointed by the Gov- 
ernor with the approval of the Senate. One Ex-officio. 

Charles F. Carroll, State Superintendent of 

Public Instruction, Chairman, Ex-officio Raleig:h 

Jane Hall Raleig-h 

Fred Willetts Wilmington 

Janet Palmer Hookerton 

R. J. White Conway 

R. M. Garrett Greenville 

Henry Belk Goldsboro 

Mrs. B. T. Williams Stedman 

E. E. Rawl Greenville 

Dr. Lewis H. Swindell Washington 

I. H. O'Hanlon Fayctteville 

Merrill Evans Ahoskie 

Arthur L. Tyler Rocky Mount 

Agnes W. Barrett, Secretary Greenville 



292 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF 
AT MORGANTON 

Rev. s. 4203; 1891, c. 399, s. 2; 1901, c. 210; 1925, c. 306, s. 11; 
C. S. 5889; G. S. 116-121 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. H. E. Rondthaler, President Winston-Salem 

Rev. James R. Fortune, Vice-President Durham 

William S. McCord, Secretary Charlotte 

H. L. Wilson Morganton 

Howard Moose Nev^^ton 

0. H. Pons Valdese 

R. J. Morris Marion 



OXFORD ORPHANAGE, OXFORD 

Private Laws, 1923, c. 119 

Composition : Three members appointed by the Governor. Nine 
under the by-Iav^^s of the Institution. 

Appointed by the Governor: 

Benjamin Cone, Vice-President Greensboro 

J. Edward Rooker Warrenton 

Thomas L. Simmons Rocky Mount 

Appointed under by-laws: 

R. L. Pugh, Chairman New Bern 

C. H. Pugh, Vice-Chairman Gastonia 

Dr. C. P. Eldridge, President Raleigh 

E. T. Howard High Point 

L. T. Hartsell, Jr Concord 

Judge J. Wallace Winborne Raleigh 

A. D. Leon Gray, Secretary Oxford 

M. E. Parham, Treasurer Oxford 

(Two vacancies) 



North Carolina State Institutions 293 

PEMBROKE STATE COLLEGE, PEMBROKE 

1925, c. 306, s. 9; 1929, c. 238; 1931. c. 275; 1941, c. 323; 
1949, c. 58; G. S. 116-81 

Composition: Eleven members appointed by the Governor. 

L. W. Jacobs, Chairman Pembroke 

Lester Bullard Maxton 

J. 0. Brooks Fairmont 

Lacy Cummings Rowland 

Steve Hammond, Jr Lumberton 

C. L. Maynor Pembroke 

A. G. Lowry Rowland 

D. F. Lowry Pembroke 

Z. A. Lowry Pembroke 

J. A. Sampson Pembroke 

John L. Carter, Secretary Pembroke 



THE STATE SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND 
AND THE DEAF, RALEIGH 

Rev. 4188; Code s. 2228; 1899. cc. 311, 540; 1901. c. 707; 1905, c. 67; 
1925, c. 306, ss. 10, 13. 14; C. S. 5873; G. S. 116-106 

Composition: Eleven members appointed by the Governor. 

Ben R. Roberts, Chainnan Durham 

D'Arcy Bradsher Roxboro 

Fulton A. Huntley Wadesboro 

Mrs. Julian B. Hutaff Fayetteville 

Mrs. B. C. Mangum Henderson 

Tom L. Pendergrass Durham 

James Penland Asheville 

S. Linton Smith Raleigh 

J. B. Spilman, Jr Greenville 

Carroll W. Weathers Wake Forest 

Egbert N. Peeler, Secretary, Ex-officio Raleigh 



294 North Carolina Manual 

TRUSTEES UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

The State College of Agriculture and Engineering of the 
University of North Carolina at Raleigh 

Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

at Greensboro 

C. S. 5789; G. S. 116-4 

Composition : One hundred members. Elected by the General 
Assembly. The legal term of office expires April 1st of year indi- 
cated. 

*Executive Committee 
Governor Luther H. Hodges, Chairman Raleigh 

1956 

Edwin Pate Laurinburg 

John J. Parker Charlotte 

L. P. McLendon Greensboro 

1958 

Mrs. May L. Tomlinson High Point 

Victor S. Bryant Durham 

Mrs. A. H. Lathrop Asheville 

1960 

Thomas J. Pearsall Rocky Mount 

Clarence Poe Raleigh 

A. H. Harris Oriental 

1962 

John W. Umstead, Jr Chapel Hill 

John W. Clark Franklinville 

W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro 



*T«"rm expires July 1st of year indicated. 



North Carolina State Institutions 295 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES FOR LIFE 

R. Gregir Cherry Gastonia 

W. Kerr Scott Haw River 

EX-OFFICIO 

Luther H. Hodges, Governor Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll, State Superintendent of 

Public Instruction Raleigh 

SECRETARY TO THE BOARD 

Arch T. Allen Raleigh 

Miss Billie Curtis, Assistant Chapel Hill 

1957 
David Clark Charlotte Mecklenburg 

B. B. Everett Palmyra Halifax 

Mrs. R. S. Ferguson Taylorsville Alexander 

James S. Ficklen Greenville Pitt 

Harry A. Greene Raeford Hoke 

F. D. B. Harding Yadkinville Yadkin 

R. L. Harris Roxboro Person 

Mrs. Albert Lathrop Asheville Buncombe 

R. E. Little Wadesboro Anson 

Kemp B. Nixon Lincolnton Lincoln 

G. N. Noble Trenton Jones 

Thomas J. Pearsall Rocky Mount Nash 

H. L. Riddle, Jr Morganton Burke 

John C. Rodman Washington Beaufort 

Roy Rowe Burgaw Pender 

C. Wayland Spruill Windsor Bertie 

Mrs. Chas. W. Stanford ...Chapel Hill, Rt. 1 Orange 

John P. Stedman Lumberton Robeson 

Lacy C. Tate Chadbourn Columbus 

H. P. Taylor Wadesboro Anson 

W. Frank Taylor Goldsboro Wayne 

Mrs. Mary L. Tomlinson . . . High Point Guilford 

F. E. Wallace Kinston Lenoir 

David Livingston Ward . . . New Bern Craven 

James L. Woodson Salisbury Rowan 



296 North Carolina Manual 



1959 



Arch T. Allen Raleigh Wake 

Mrs. Ed. M. Anderson ....West Jefferson Ashe 

Wm. C. Barfield Wilmington New Hanover 

Kemp D. Battle Rocky Mount Nash 

Jack F. Blythe Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Charles A. Cannon Concord Cabarrus 

Mrs. Nancy Hall Copeland .Murfreesboro Hertford 

W. C. Harris, Jr Raleigh Wake 

Hugh Horton Williamston Martin 

Dr. Paul E. Jones Farmville Pitt 

A. H. London Pittsboro Chatham 

Mrs. P. P. McCain Red Springs Robeson 

A. L. Monroe Raleigh Wake 

John J. Parker Charlotte Mecklenburg 

J. Hampton Price Leaksville Rockingham 

Claude W. Rankin Fayetteville Cumberland 

Ben F. Royal Morehead City Carteret 

B. S. Royster Oxford Granville 

Wm. P. Saunders Aberdeen Moore 

Fred I. Sutton Kinston Lenoir 

Dr. Shahane Taylor Greensboro Guilford 

Oscar Vatz Fayetteville Cumberland 

Herman Weil Goldsboro Wayne 

Hill Yarborough Louisburg Franklin 

J. Robert Young Dunn Harnett 

1961 

Wade Barber Pittsboro Chatham 

Frank H. Brown, Jr Cullowhee Jackson 

Victor S. Bryant Durham Durham 

John W. Clark Franklinville Randolph 

W. Lunsford Crew Roanoke Rapids Halifax 

Floyd Grouse Sparta Alleghany 

Horton Doughton Statesville Iredell 

A. C. Edwards Hookerton Greene 

Henry A. Foscue High Point Guilford 

Robert M. Hanes Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Dr. L. J. Herring Wilson Wilson 

Mrs. J. B. Kittrell Greenville Pitt 



North Carolina State Institutions 297 

John D. Larkins, Jr Trenton Jones 

Dr. Harvey B. Mann Lake Landing Hyde 

C. Knox Massey Durham Durham 

Reid A. Maynard Burlington Alamance 

Glenn C. Palmer Clyde Haywood 

Edwin S. Pou Raleigh Wake 

Mrs. Grace T. Rodenbough .Walnut Cove Stokes 

Alex A. Shuford, Jr Hickory Catawba 

Dr. L. H. Swindell Washington Beaufort 

Mrs. Charles Tillett Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Carl V. Venters Jacksonville Onslow 

J. Shelton Wicker Sanford Lee 

E. Leigh Winslow Hertford Perquimans 

1963 

Mrs. Oscar Barker Dui ham Durham 

H. D. Bateman Wilson Wilson 

Irwin Belk Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Mitchell Britt Warsaw Duplin 

Mrs. Mebane H. Burgwyn . .Jackson Northampton 

Sam N. Clark, Jr Tarboio Edgecombe 

T. J. Collier Bayboro Pamlico 

A. Roy Cox Asheboro Randolph 

Eugene Cross Marion McDowell 

Ben E. Fountain Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

0. Max Gardner, Jr Shelby Cleveland 

John G. H. Geitner Hickory Catawba 

George Watts Hill Durham Durham 

John H. Kerr, Jr Warrenton Warren 

W. C. Lassiter Snow Hill Greene 

J. Spencer Love Greensboro Guilford 

D. L. McMichael Madison Rockingham 

Rudolph I. Mintz Wilmington New Hanover 

Thomas 0. Moore Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Ashley M. Murphy Atkinson Pender 

Mrs. B. C. Parker Albemarle Stanly 

Thomas Turner Greensboro Guilford 

John W. Umstead, Jr Chapel Hill Orange 

Sam L. Whitehurst New Bern Craven 

Macon M. Williams Lenoir Caldwell 



298 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA VOCATIONAL TEXTILE SCHOOL 

1945, c. 806; G. S. 115-255.1 

Composition : Seven members. One Ex-officio, six appointed by 
the Governor. 

J. Warren Smith, Director of Vocational Education, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

Otis M. Mull, Chairman Shelby 

R. L. Stowe, Jr Belmont 

John F. Matheson Mooresville 

R. S. Dickson Charlotte 

Ben R. Rudisill Cherryville 

R. Grady Rankin Gastonia 

WESTERN CAROLINA COLLEGE, CULLOWHEE 

1925, c. 270; 1929, c. 251; 1951, c. 1167; 1953, c. 1282; 

G. S. 116-46 

Composition : Twelve members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the Senate. 

Philip Woollcott, Chairman Asheville 

E. J. Whitmire Franklin 

J. Ramsey Buchanan Sylva 

H. A. Helder Canton 

Charles F. Gold Raleigh 

James J. Harris Charlotte 

Frank H. Watson Spruce Pine 

W. H. McDonald Tryon 

Robert Russell Asheville 

Allen J. Bell Hayesville 

Hieronymous Bueck Murphy 

Mrs. F. S. Griffin Robbinsville 



North Carolina State Institutions 299 

EDUCATIONAL (NEGRO) 

THE NEGRO AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE 
OF NORTH CAROLINA, GREENSBORO 

Rev., s. 4223; 1891, c. 549, s. 4; 1899, c. 389, ss. 2, 3; 1939, c. 65, 
s. 4; 1943, c. 132; C. S. 5828; G. S. 116-94 

Composition : Sixteen members. One Ex-officio, fifteen appointed 
by the Governor. 

Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

Judge Charles A. Hines, Chairman Greensboi'o 

Shelley B. Caveness, Vice-Chairman Greensboro 

J. W. Jeffries Mebane 

L. W. James Ahoskie 

Geo. Sockw^ell Elon College 

C. H. Dearman Statesville 

H. A. Scott Haw River 

Dr. W. L. T. Miller Greensboro 

Robert H. Frazier Greensboro 

Wade H. Paschal Siler City 

A. A. Morrisey Winston-Salem 

Geo. T. Ashford Red Springs 

J. Wilson Alexander Huntersville 

E. R. Merrick Durham 

Dr. Murray Davis High Point 



ELIZABETH CITY STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, 
ELIZABETH CITY 

1921, c. 61; 1925, c. 306, s. 9; G. S. 116-103 

Composition : Nine members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the Senate. 

G. R. Little, Chairman Elizabeth City 

G. H. Ferguson Raleigh 

Dudley Bagley Moyock 

W. C. Chappell Belvidere 



800 North Carolina Manual 

J. W. Davis Edenton 

T. S. Cooper Sunbury 

T. C. Sawyer, Sr Belcross 

E. P. Leary Old Trap 

Dr. E. L. Hoffler, Secretary Elizabeth City 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, 
FAYETTEVILLE 

1921, c. 61; 1925, c. 306, s. 9; G. S. 116-103 

Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the Senate. 

John H. Cook, Chairman Fayetteville 

Gurney E. Edgerton, Secretary Fayetteville 

Dr. W. P. DeVane Fayetteville 

Victor Dawson Fayetteville 

Dr. C. W. Furlonge Smithfield 

R. J. Hester Elizabethtown 

W. E. Horner Sanford 

Stewart B. Warren Clinton 

Emil Rosenthal Goldsboro 



NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE AT DURHAM 

1925, c. 306, s. 9 (a); 1939, c. 65, s. 4; 1947; c. 189; G. S. 116-99 

Composition: One Ex-officio. Twelve members appointed by the 
Governor, approved by the Senate. 

Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

Ex-officio Raleigh 

R. M. Gantt, Chairman Durham 

Bascom Baynes, Vice-Chairman Durham 

Dr. J. M. Hubbard, Sr., Secretary Durham 

Dr. J. W. Black Rocky Mount 

Walter Jones, Jr Rockingham 

B. I. Satterfield Timberlake 

Frank Banzet Warrenton 



North Carolina State Institutions 301 

C. A. Dandelake Tarboro 

T. W. Ellis, Jr Henderson 

Ernest B. Johnson Winston-Salem 

Banks Wilkins Sanford 

Nelson Woodson Salisbury 



THE COLORED ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA, 

OXFORD 

1887, c. 47; 1927, c. 162; G. S. 116-139 

Composition : Thirteen members. Five appointed by the Gov- 
ernor and eight under the by-laws of the Institution. 

Appointed by the Governor: 

Dr. R. L. Noblin Oxford 

M. S. Currin, Secretary-Treasurer Oxford 

Judg-e B. K. Lassiter Oxford 

W. T. Yancey Oxford 

N. W. Weldon Oxford 

Appointed under by-laws: 

Dr. E. E. Toney, Chairman Oxford 

R. L. Shepard Oxford 

S. B. Simmons Greensboro 

L. E. Austin Durham 

Dr. G. D. Carnes Wilmin^on 

Dr. J. W. Seabrook Fayetteville 

Dr. P. A. Bishop Rich Square 

Mrs. Ellen S. Alston Raleigh 



THE STATE SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND AND 
THE DEAF, RALEIGH 

Rev. 4188; Code s. 2228; 1899, cc. .311, .540; 1901, c. 707; 1905, 
c. 67; 1925, c. 306 ss. 10, 13, 14; C. S. 5873; G. S. 116-106 

Composition: Eleven members appointed by the Governor. 

Ben R. Roberts, Chairman Durham 

D'Arcy Bradsher Roxboro 



302 North Carolina Manual 

Fulton A. Huntley Wadesboro 

Mrs. Julian B. Hutaflf Fayetteville 

Mrs. B. C. Mangum Henderson 

Tom L. Pendergrass Durham 

James Penland Asheville 

S. Linton Smith Raleigh 

J. B. Spilman, Jr Greenville 

Carroll W. Weathers Wake Forest 

Egbert N. Peeler, Secretary, Ex-officio Raleigh 



THE WINSTON-SALEM TEACHERS COLLEGE, 
WINSTON-SALEM 

1921, c. 61; 1925, c. 306, s. 9; G. S. 116-103 

Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor, ap- 
proved by the Senate. 

John C. Whitaker, Chairman Winston-Salem 

William F. Womble, Vice-Chairman Winston-Salem 

Dr. Rufus S. Hairston, Secretary Winston-Salem 

Thomas Winfield Blackwell Winston-Salem 

J. Harmon Linville Kernersville 

L. D. Long Reynolda 

Clarence Pemberton Yanceyville 

Julian Robertson Salisbury 

Mrs. Birdie G. Robinson Winston-Salem 



HOSPITALS (WHITE) 

CASWELL TRAINING SCHOOL, KINSTON 

1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 3; 1945, c. 925, s. 1; 
C. S. 6159 (a); G. S. 122-7 

Under the North Carolina Hospitals Board of Control. 

1943, c. 136; G. S. 122-7 



North Carolina State Institutions 303 

THE NORTH CAROLINA HOSPITAL FOR THE TREATMENT 
OF SPASTIC CHILDREN, DURHAM 

1945, c. 504; G. S. 131-128 

Composition : Nine members appointed by the Governor. 

Thomas O'Berry, Chairman Goldsboro 

Dr. Ellen Winston, Secretary Raleigh 

Grizzelle Norfleet Winston-Salem 

Felix S. Barker Raleigh 

Russell M. Grumman Chapel Hill 

Hubert 0. Teer Durham 

Dr. W. M. Roberts Gastonia 

Margarette Wood Smethurst Raleigh 

George R. Hughes Pollocksville 

THE MOSES H. CONE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 
GREENSBORO 

Pr. 1913, c. 400 

Composition : Fifteen members. Eight members appointed by 
Mrs. Moses H. Cone; three members appointed by the Governor. 

OFFICERS: 

Ben Cone, President Greensboi'o 

Ceasar Cone, Vice-President Greensboro 

N. S. Calhoun, Treasurer Greensboro 

Howard Holderness, Assistant Treasurer Greensboro 

TRUSTEES: 

Dr. Merle D. Bonner Jamestown 

Herman Cone Greensboro 

Mrs. Julius W. Cone Greensboro 

James A. Doggett Greensboro 

Charles A. Hines Greensboro 

Joseph T. Maitin Greensboro 

Roger A. McDuffie Greensboro 

Major L. P. McLendon Greensboro 

Miss Mereb E. Mossman Greensboro 



304 North Carolina Manual 

General James R. Townsend Greensboro 

C. M. Vanstory, Jr Greensboro 

Dr. Joseph S. Lichty, Secretary Greensboro 

Harold L. Bettis, Assistant Secretary Greensboro 

NORTH CAROLINA ORTHOPEDIC HOSPITAL, GASTONIA 

1917, c. 199, s. 4; C. S. 7254; G. S. 131-1 

Composition: Nine members appointed by the Governor. 

P. C. Whitlock, President Charlotte 

George Blanton, Chairman Shelby 

Frank Dowd, Secretary Charlotte 

W. L. Balthis, Treasurer Gastonia 

Kay Dixon Gastonia 

Mrs. R. E. McDowell Charlotte 

Helen Kaiser Durham 

R. Gregg Cherry Gastonia 

J. Harold Lineberger Belmont 

N„ C. SANATORIUMS FOR THE TREATMENT OF 
TUBERCULOSIS 

BLACK MOUNTAIN, McCAIN AND WILSON 

1907, c. 964; Ex. session 1913, c. 40, s. 1; 1923, cc. 96, 127; 1925, 

c. 306, s, 12; 1935, c. 91, ss. 2, 3; 1935, c. 138; 

1939, c. 325; G. S. 131-62 

Composition : Two Ex-officio. Twelve members appointed by the 
Governor with the approval of the Senate. 

Dr. J. W. R. Norton, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Edwin Gill, Ex-officio Raleigh 

Carl C. Council, Chairman Durham 

A. E. Gibson, Vice-Chairman Wilmington 

E. A. Rasberry, Secretary Snow Hill 

Charles A. Cannon Concord 

P. D. Jones Laurinburg 

0. Arthur Kirkman High Point 



North Carolina State Institutions 305 

J. Elmer Lone: Durham 

Mrs. P. P. McCain Southern Pines 

Mrs. Roy Parker Ahoskie 

Dr. M. A. Pittman Wilson 

Carl C. Scott Newland 

Hardy Talton Pikeville 

STATE HOSPITAL AT BUTNER 
1947, c. 537; G. S. 122-1 

Under the North Carolina Hospitals Board of Control 
1943, c. 136; G. S. 122-7 

STATE HOSPITAL AT MORGANTON 

1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925, c. 306, s. 3; 1947, c. 537; G. S. 122-7 

Under the Noith Carolina Hospitals Board of Control 

1943, c. 136; G. S. 122-7 

STATE HOSPITAL AT RALEIGH 

1921, c. 183. s. 2; 1925, c. .306, s. 3; 1947, c. 537; G. S. 122-7 

Under the North Carolina Hospitals Board of Control 

1943, c. 136; G. S. 122-7 

HOSPITALS (NEGRO) 

STATE HOSPITAL AT GOLDSBORO 

1921, c. 183, s. 2; 1925. c. .306, s. 3; G. S. 122-7 

Under the North Carolina Hospitals Board of Control 
1943, c. 136; G. S. 122-7 



306 North Carolina Manual 

N. C. CONFEDERATE INSTITUTION 

Woman's Home at Fayetteville 

1913, c. 62; C. S. 5135; G. S. 112-2 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

Mrs. E. R. McKeithan, Chairman Fayetteville 

A. E. Cook, Secretary Fayetteville 

Mrs. Robert Bruce Cook Durham 

Mrs. J. Y. Gatevv^ood Yanceyville 

Mrs. Robert Grady Johnson Burgaw 

E. Binace McFayden Fayetteville 

Mrs. H. L. Stevens, Jr Warsavv^ 



Examining Boards 307 

EXAMINING BOARDS 

STATE BOARD OF CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 

EXAMINERS 

1913, c. 157; 1925, c. 261, s. 11; 1939, c. 21; 1951, c. 844; 
C. S. 7008; G. S. 93-12 

Composition: Four members appointed by the Governor. 

Ernest W. Smith, President Lenoir 

A. T. Allen, Vice-President Raleigh 

M. L. Black, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer Durham 

Frank P. Buck Salisbury 

R. R. Rains, Administrative Secretary Chapel Hill 

Katharine D. Guthrie, Administrative Assistant .... Chapel Hill 

STATE BOARD OF ARCHITECTURAL EXAMINATION 
AND REGISTRATION 

1915, c. 270, s. 1; C. S. 4986; G. S. 83-2 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Henry Irven Gaines, President Asheville 

Eric G. Flannagan, Sr., Vice-President Henderson 

Leon McMinn, Secretary-Treasurer Greensboro 

William A. Bowles Charlotte 

John Erwin Ramsay Salisbury 

Ross Shumaker, Executive Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

STATE BOARD OF BARBER EXAMINERS 

1929, c. 119, s. 6; G. S. 86-6 

Composition : Three members appointed by the Governor. 

J. M. Cheek, Chairman High Point 

J. W. Lanning Asheville 

W. E. Motley Raleigh 

Mrs. Jo Ann Smith, Administrative Assistant Raleigh 



308 North Carolina Manual 

STATE BOARD OF CHIROPODY EXAMINERS 

1919, c. 78. s. 3; C. S. 6765; G. S. 90-190 

Composition: Three members appointed by the North Carolina 
Pedic Association. 

Dr. Charles Darby, Chairman Statesville 

Dr. W. W. Potter Charlotte 

Dr. L. D. Abernethy, Sr., Secretary Charlotte 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF CHIROPRACTIC 

EXAMINERS 

1917, c. 73, s. 1; 1933, c. 442, s. 1 ; C. S. 6711; G. S. 90-140 

Composition : Three members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. J. B. Morris, President Durham 

Dr. P. M. Starnes, Vice-President Hickory 

Dr. Carl H. Peters, Secretary-Treasurer Rocky Mount 

NORTH CAROLINA LICENSING BOARD FOR 
CONTRACTORS 

1925, c. 318, s. 2; G. S. 87-2 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

R. A. Bryan, Chairman Goldsboro 

V. B. Higgins, Vice-Chairman Greensboro 

R. D. Beam Raleigh 

N. K. Dickerson, Jr Monroe 

Roy L. Goode Charlotte 

James M. Wells, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

N. C. STATE BOARD OF COSMETIC ART EXAMINERS 

1933, c. 179; 1935, c. 54, s. 2; G. S. 88-13 

Composition : Three members appointed by the Governor. 

Mrs. R. J. Hinshaw, Chairman North Wilkesboro 

Mrs. Anne S. Jenkins, Vice-Chairman Edenton 

Mrs. Ralph Hanna, Secretary Dunn 

Mrs. Dorothy L. Burchette, Executive Secretary Raleigh 



Examining Boards 309 

STATE BOARD OF DENTAL EXAMINERS 

1879, c. 139; 1915, c. 178; 1935, c. 66, s. 1; G. S. 90-22 

Composition: Six members elected by the Society and commis- 
sioned by the Governor. 

Dr. E. M. Medlin, President Aberdeen 

Dr. A. T. Jennette Washington 

Dr. Cleon W. Sanders Benson 

Dr. William M. Matheson Boone 

Dr. Darden J. Eure Morehead City 

Dr. Frank 0. Alford, Secretary-Treasurer Charlotte 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

1937, c. 87, s. 1; G. S. 87-39 

Composition : Five members, three appointed by the Governor, 
two Ex-officio. 

N. E. Cannady, Chairman Oxford 

W. A. Darden, Vice-Chairman Greenville 

R. S. Fouraker Raleigh 

E. C. Peele Burlington 

W. W. Hanks Charlotte 

Elizabeth E. Andeison, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

EMBALMERS LICENSING BOARD 

Rev., s. 4384; 1901, c. 388, ss. 1, 2, 3; 1931, c. 174; 1945, c. 98, s. 1; 
1949, c. 951, s. 1; C. S. 6777; G. S. 90-203 

Composition: Seven members elected by The North Carolina 
Funeral Directors and Burial Association, Inc. 

David W. Bumgardner, Jr., President Belmont 

Paul L. Hofler, Vice-President Gatesville 

J. Ollie Harris, Secretaiy Kings Mountain 

Raymond Pollock New Bern 

Jack T. Pugh, Jr Asheboro 

W. N. Hovis Charlotte 

Hiram Rose Benson 



310 North Carolina Manual 

STATE BOARD OF REGISTRATION FOR ENGINEERS 
AND LAND SURVEYORS 

1921, c. 1, s. 3; C. S. 6055(d); G. S. 89-3 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Walter J. Seeley, Chairman Durham 

Arvin Page, Vice-Chairman Winston-Salem 

Robert B. Rice, Secretary Raleigh 

Wm. G. Brown, Jr Concord 

G. S. Harrell Shannon 



N. C. BOARD OF LAW EXAMINERS 

1933, c. 210, s. 10; c. 331; 1935, cc. 33, 61; 1941, c. 344, s. 6; 

G. S. 84-24 

Composition : Seven members elected by the Council of the N. C. 
State Bar. 

L. R. Varser, Chairman Lumberton 

George B. Greene Kinston 

Kingsland Van Winkle Asheville 

L. T. Hartsell, Jr Concord 

Buxton Midyette Jackson 

Thomas H. Leath Rockingham 

Arch K. Schoch High Point 

Edward L. Cannon, Secretary Raleigh 



STATE BOARD OF MEDICAL EXAMINERS 

R:v. s. 4492; Co'e, s, 3123; 1858-9, c. 258, ss, 3, 4; Extra 
Session 1921 s. 44, s. 1 ; C. S. 6606; G. S. 90-2 

Composition : Seven members appointed by the North Carolina 
Medical Society. 

Dr. Amos N. Johnson, President Garland 

Dr. Joseph J. Combs, Secretary Raleigh 

Dr. Newsom P. Battle Rocky Mount 



Examining Boards 811 

Dr. L. Randolph Doffermyre ; ; ; . t)unn 

Dr. Clyde R. Hedrick Lenoir 

Dr. James P. Rousseau Winston-Salem 

Dr. Heyward C. Thompson Shelby 



NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF NURSE REGISTRATION AND 

NURSE EDUCATION 

1917, c. 17; 1925, c. 87; 1931, c. 56; 1953, c. 1199; C. S. 6729; 

G. S. 90-158 

Composition : Nine members appointed by the Governor. 

Joyce Warren, R.N., Chairman Winston-Salem 

Dr. Moir S. Martin, Vice-Chairman Mount Airy 

Mrs. Priscilla D. Ballance, R.N Wilson 

Elizabeth White, R.N Charlotte 

Louise Harkey, R.N Concord 

Mrs. Lillian D. James, R.N Hamlet 

J. Lyman Melvin Rocky Mount 

R. M. Gantt, Jr Albemarle 

Dr. Louten R. Hedgpeth Lumberton 

Miriam Daughtry, R.N., Executive Secretaiy Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF OPTICIANS 
1951, c. 1089; G. S. 90-238 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Frank McBryde, President Fayetteville 

H. L. Ridgeway, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

J. B. Barnett Charlotte 

W. B. Fluharty, Jr Asheville 

H. R. Tolar Goldsboro 

Robert R Albertson Fayetteville 



312 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS 

IN OPTOMETRY 

1909, c. 444, s. 3; 1915, c. 21, s. 1; 1935, c. 63; C. S. 6689; 

G. S, 90-116 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. P. N. DeVere, President Morganton 

Dr. James A. Palmer, Secretary-Treasurer Charlotte 

Dr. Kenneth L. Quiggins Greenville 

Dr. Kenneth W. Ramsey Marion 

Dr. John D. Costabile Wilson 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF OSTEOPATHIC 
EXAMINATION AND REGISTRATION 

1907, c. 764, s. 1; 1913, c. 92, s. 1; 1937, c. 301, s. 1 ; C. S. 6701; 

G. S. 90-130 

Composition: Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. A. H. Zealy, President Goldsboro 

Dr. F. R. Heine, Secretary-Treasurer Greensboro 

Dr. S. D. Foster Asheville 

Dr. Neva A. McCoy Charlotte 

Dr. T. T. Spence Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 
Rev., s. 4473; 1905, c. 108, ss. 5, 7; C. S. 6652; G. S. 90-55 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Wade A. Gilliam, President Winston-Salem 

Robert N. Watson, Vice-President Sanford 

Frank W. Dayvault Lenoir 

Roger A. McDuffie Greensboro 

H. C. McAllister, Secretary-Treasurer Chapel Hill 



Examining Boards 313 

STATE EXAMINING COMMITTEE OF PHYSICAL 
THERAPISTS 

1951, c. 1131; G. S. 90-257 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Helen Kaiser, Chairman Durham 

Maria Kennedy Charlotte 

Celeste Hayden Raleigh 

Margaret Moore, Secretary-Treasurer Chapel Hill 

Dr. George Miller Gastonia 

STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBING 
AND HEATING CONTRACTORS 

1931, c. 52, s. 1; 1933, c. 57; 1939, c, 224, s. 1; G. S. 87-16 

Composition: Seven members appointed by the Governor. 

W. H. Sullivan, Chairman Greensboro 

L. L. Vaughan, Vice-Chairman Raleigh 

J. M. Jarrett, Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

H. G. Baity Chapel Hill 

C. C. Davis Wilmington 

R. H. Haley Charlotte 

R. O. McGary Charlotte 

W. F. Morrison, Executive-Secretary Raleigh 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR LICENSING TILE 
CONTRACTORS 

1937, c. 86, s. 3; G. S. 87-30 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

David G. Allen, Chairman Raleigh 

Ervin R. Bean, Vice-Chairman Asheville 

George W. Carter, Secretary-Treasurer Kinston 

0. A. Ritch Charlotte 

F. R. Smith Winston-Salem 

F. E. Wallace, Jr., Executive Secretary Kinston 



314 North Carolina Manual 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF VETERINARY 
MEDICAL EXAMINERS 

Rev., s. 5432; 1903, c. 503, s. 2; C. S. 6755; G. S. 90-180 

Composition : Five members appointed by the Governor. 

Dr. Bruce H. Staton, President Rocky Mount 

Dr. B. H. Kinsey, Vice-President Washington 

Dr. J. I. Corn well, Secretary-Treasurer Asheville 

Dr. C. E. Nicks Elkin 

Dr. M. G. Edwards Wilkesboro 



Examining Boards 315 

STATE OWNED RAILROADS 
Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad 



Directors: 



J. H. Blount Greenville 

M. G. Mann Raleigh 

Irvin W. Davis Beaufort 

Harold Maxwell New Bern 

W. R. Taylor Goldsboro 

Kenneth R. Smith Raleigh 

William F. Dowdy, Sr New Bern 

George W. Ipock Eraul 

Allen Ives New Bern 

H. S. Gibbs Morehead City 

(Two vacancies) 

Officers: 

J. H. Blount, Chairman of the Board Greenville 

M. G. Mann, President Raleigh 

G. Paul LaRoque, Secretary-Treasurer Kinston 



North Carolina Railroad 
Directors : 

J. Bobo Langston Charlotte 

W. E. King Rocky Mount 

Harry L. Nettles Asheville 

Charles I. Rouzer Salisbury 

Watson Brame North Wilkesboro 

E. W. McDaniel Elkin 

D. N. Stewart Raleigh 

Harry Miller Stony Point 

Alexander Webb Raleigh 

W. M. Russ Raleigh 

James H. Pou Bailey Raleigh 

LeRoy Martin Raleigh 



316 North Carolina Manual 

Officers: 

J. Bobo Langston, President Charlotte 

W. M. Russ, Vice-President Raleigh 

Heman R. Clark, Secretary-Treasurer Fayetteville 

Milton Abbott, Asst. Secretary-Treasurer Raleigh 

Fred Hoover, Expert Lenoir 

Eddy S. Merritt, Attorney Hickory 



PART VI 
LEGISLATIVE 



Senate 319 

MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA— SESSION 1955 
Officers and Members of the Senate 

OFFICERS 

Luther E. Earnhardt President _,_ Concord 

Dr. Paul E. Jones President pro tem ._ Farmville 

S. Ray Byerly Principal Clerk Sanford 

William H. Byrd Reading Clerk. ___ Lillincton 

Herman Scott. Sergeant-at-Arms Chapel Hill 

SENATORS 
(Alphabetically Arranged) 

Name District Party Address 

Aydlett, N. Elton First. _ Democrat Elizabeth City 

Earnhardt, Luther E Twenty-first Democrat ...Concord 

Elythe, F.J Twentieth __ Democrat Charlotte 

Britt, Mitchell Ninth Democrat Warsaw 

Erock, B. C Twenty-fourth Republican _ Moeksville 

Eunn, C. Settle Si.xth. Democrat ...Spring Hope 

Cook, Dennis S., Dr Twenty-eighth Democrat Lenoir 

Cooke, Frank Patton Twenty-sixth . _ Democrat Gastonia 

Crew, W. Lunsford Fourth Democrat Roanoke Rapids 

Currie, Claude Fourteenth Democrat Durham 

Eagles, J. C, Jr Si.xth. _.. __ Democrat Wilson 

Garrison, William E Twenty-fifth Democrat Lincolnton 

Godwin, A. Pilston, Jr First Democrat Gatesville 

Graves, Calvin Twenty-second Democrat Winston-Salem 

Hall, David M Thirty-second Democrat Sylva 

Hancock, Wills Fourteenth Democrat Oxford 

Henkel, C. V., Jr Twenty-fifth Democrat Tuniersburg 

Hicks, CarlT Seventh Democrat ..Walstonburg 

Hightower, E. Avery Nineteenth . Democrat ..Wadesboro 

James, W. D., Dr Eighteenth Democrat Hamlet 

Jones, PaulE., Dr.. Fifth Democrat ...Farmville 

,Jones, R. Posey Twenty-third Democrat Mt. Airy 

Kerr, John, Jr Third Democrat Warrenton 

Kirkman, 0. Arthur Seventeenth Democrat Hi^rh Point 

Medford , W'illiam Thirty-second Democrat Wayncsville 

Moore, Cutlar Eleventh Democrat ..Lumbertoii 

Moore, H. M Thirty-third Democrat Hayesvillc 

Morgan, Robert... Twelfth __ Democrat Lillington 

Morgan, Robert F Twenty-seventh Democrat Shelby 

Owens, Edward L Second _ .Democrat ..Plymouth 

Paschal, Wade H Thirteenth Democrat Siler City 

Perry, H. B., Dr Twenty-ninth Democrat ...Boone 

Poole, J. Hawley Twelfth Democrat West End 

Poole, Otis Eighteenth _. ...Democrat Candor 

Poyner, James M Tliirteenth. Democrat Raleigh 

Reynolds. Chas. H Twenty-seventh Democrat Spindale 

Rose, D. J., Dr Eighth Democrat Goldsboro 

Ross, L. H Second ..Democrat .Washington 

Scott, Ralph H Sixteenth Democrat Haw Rivor 

Shuford, John F Thirty-first ..Democrat Ashcville 

Stone, T. Clarence Fifteenth... Democrat Stoncville 

Summersill, E. W Seventh Democrat ...Jacksonville 

Thomas, J. Max Nineteenth.. Democrat Marshvillc 

Walton, Ray H. ..Tenth Democrat Southport 

Weeks, Cameron S Fourth Democrat Tarboro 

Whitley, Adam J., Jr Eighth. Democrat Smithfield 

Williamson, Arthur W .Tenth . Democrat Cerro (!ordo 

Winters, B. H.. Thirtieth Democrat... Elk Park 

Woodson, Nelson Twenty-first Democrat ..Salisbury 

Yow, Cicero P Ninth Democrat Wilmington 



320 North Carolina Manual 

senators 

Arranged by Districts 
(Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

District Name Address 

1st— N". Elton Aydlett Elizabeth City 

1st— A. Pilston Godwin, Jr Gatesville 

2nd— Edward L. Owens Plymouth 

2nd— L. H. Ross Washington 

3rd — John Kerr, Jr Warrenton 

4th — W. Lunsford Crew Roanoke Rapids 

4th— Cameron S. Weeks Tarboro 

5th— Dr. Paul E. Jones Farmville 

6th— C. Settle Bunn Spring Hope 

6th— J. C. Eagles, Jr Wilson 

7th— Carl T. Hicks Walstonburg 

7th — E. W. Summersill Jacksonville 

8th— Dr. D.J. Rose ...Goldsboro 

8th— Adam J. Whitley, Jr Smithfield 

9th— Mitchell Britt Warsaw 

9th— Cicero P. Yow. Wilmington 

10th— Ray H. Walton Southport 

10th— Arthur W. Williamson Cerro Gordo 

11th— Cutlar Moore - Lumberton 

12th— Robert Morgan Lillington 

12th— J. Hawley Poole West End 

13th— Wade H. Paschal Siler City 

13th— James M. Poyner Raleigh 

14th— Claude Currie Durham 

14th— Wills Hancock Oxford 

15th— T. Clarence Stone Stoneville 

16th— Ralph H. Scott Haw River 

17th— 0. Arthur Kirkman High Point 

18th— Dr. W. D. James Hamlet 

18th— Otis Poole Candor 

19th— E. Avery Hightower Wadesboro 

19th— J. Max Thomas Marshville 

20th— F. J. BIythe Charlotte 

21st— Luther E. Barnhardt Concord 

21st— Nelson Woodson Salisbury 

22nd— Calvin Graves Winston-Salem 

23rd— R. Posey Jones Mt. Airy 

24th— B. C. Brock (R) Mocksvilie 

25th— C. V. Henkel,Jr Turnersburg 

25th— William E. Garrison Lincoln ton 

26th— Frank Patton Cooke Gastonia 

27th— Robert F. Morgan - - Shelby 

27th— Chas. H. Reynolds Spindale 

28th— Dr. Dennis S. Cook Lenoir 

29th— Dr. H. B. Perry Boone 

30th— B. H. Winters Elk Park 

31st— John F Shuford .Asheville 

32nd— David M. Hall Sylva 

32nd— William Medford Waynesville 

33rd— H. M. Moore Havesville 



Senate 321 

RULES AND STANDING COMMITTEES 
OF THE SENATE 

1955 

Powers and Duties of the President 

1. The President shall take the chair at the hour fixed by law 
or at the time fixed by the Senate upon adjournment on the pre- 
ceding: legislative day, and shall call the members to order. 

2. It shall be the duty of the President, upon order being ob- 
tained, to have the Sessions of the Senate opened with prayer. 

3. In the absence of the President, the President pro tempore 
shall reconvene the Senate and preside, and during such time shall 
be vested with all powers of the President except that of casting 
a vote in case of a tie when he shall have voted as a Senator. 
And in the event of the absence of the President and President pro 
tempore at any time fixed for the reconvening of the Senate, the 
Principal Clerk of the Senate, or in his absence also, some member 
of the Senate Committee on Rules, shall call the Senate to order 
and designate some member to act as President. 

4. After the prayer, and upon appearance of a quorum, the 
President shall cause the Journal of the preceding day to be read 
and approved, unless the Chairman of the Committee on Journal 
or some member of the Senate by motion sustained by a majority 
of the members present, have the reading thereof dispensed with 
and the same approved as written. 

5. The President shall preserve order and decorum and proceed 
with the business of the Senate according to the rules adopted. 
He shall decide all questions of order, subject to an appeal to the 
Senate by any member, on which appeal no member shall speak 
more than once unless by leave of the Senate. A two-thirds vote 
of the members present shall be necessary to sustain any appeal 
from the ruling of the Chair. 

6. All questions for a vote shall be put as follows: "Those in 
favor say 'Aye'," and after the affirmative vote is expressed — 
"Opposed 'No'." After which the President will announce the 
result. If a division on any vote is desired, it must be called for 
immediately before the result of the voting is announced on any 



322 North Carolina Manual 

question, and upon such call, the President shall require the mem- 
bers to stand and be counted for and against any proposition under 
consideration. 

7. The ayes and noes may be called for on any question before 
the vote is taken, and if the call is sustained by one-fifth of the 
Senators present, the roll of the Senate shall be called and the 
ayes and noes taken, and the same shall be entered upon the 
Journal. If a Senator desires the ayes and noes recorded on any 
question, he shall address the Chair and obtain recognition and 
say, "Upon that vote or question I call for the ayes and noes." 
Whereupon the President shall say, "Is the call sustained?" If 
one-fifth of the members present then stand the roll is called and 
the ayes and noes recorded. If less than one-fifth present stands, 
the Chair announces, "An insufficient number up" and a viva voce 
vote is then taken. 

8. If any question contains several distinct propositions, it 
shall be divided by the President, at the request of any Senator, 
provided each subdivision, if left to itself, shall form a substantive 
proposition. 

9. The President shall have general direction of the Hall of 
the Senate, and in case of any disturbance or disorderly conduct 
in the galleries or lobbies, he shall have the power to order the 
same cleared. 

10. He shall have the right to call on any member to perform 
the duties of the Chair, but substitution shall not extend beyond 
one day. 

11. The Lieutenant Governor, as President of the Senate, being 
a Constitutional Officer shall not have the right to debate any 
question or to address the Senate upon any proposition unless 
by permission of the majority members present, and shall have 
the right to vote only when there is a tie vote upon any question 
or election. 

12. The President of the Senate, unless he shall have by law 
disqualified himself from that office, shall have the exclusive right 
and authority to appoint all Committees, regular or special, but 
he may delegate said authority in any instance, as he may choose. 

13. All acts, addresses and resolutions, and all warrants and 
subpoenas issued by order of the Senate shall be signed by the 
President. 



Senate 323 

14. The President shall appoint door-keepers and pages, and 
such laborers as may be necessary, and shall assign to them their 
duties during sessions, and when not in session they shall be under 
the direction of the Principal Clerk and Sergeant-at-Arms, to 
perform such duties as are necessary and proper to the conduct of 
the Senate. 

15. No person except members of the Senate, members of the 
House of Representatives, clerks of the General Assembly, Judges 
of the Supreme and Superior Courts, State Officers, former mem- 
bers of the General Assembly and persons particularly invited 
and extended the privileves of the floor by the President shall be 
admitted to the floor of the Senate during its sessions: Provided, 
that no person except members of the House of Representatives 
and officers of the General Assembly shall be allowed on the floor 
of the Senate or in the lobby in the rear of the President's desk, 
unless permitted by the President of the Senate; Provided further, 
no Registered Lobbyist shall be admitted to the floor or any of the 
lobbies of the Senate while the Senate is in Session. 

16. The President of the Senate, in the interest of orderly 
procedure and in order properly to expedite the business of the 
Senate, may refuse to recognize any member for the purpose of 
extending the courtesies of the floor, lobbies or galleries to any one 
or gi'oup during any particular order of business, but shall recog- 
nize such member for said purpose at the close of such order of 
business if he then desires recognition. 

17. The President may assign such space or place on the floor 
of the Senate as he desires proper to Reporters desiring to take 
the proceedings of the sessions, provided such does not interfere 
v/ith members of the Senate and its officers and clerks in the per- 
formance of their duties. 

18. Smoking shall not be allowed on the floor or galleries of the 
Senate during sessions: Provided that smoking may be permitted 
in the side lobbies and in the lobby in the rear of the President's 
desk. 

19. The pages of the Senate shall be responsibile to and under 
the direction of the President at all times when the Senate is 
in session, and shall not exceed fourteen in number. They shall 
report to the Principal Clerk at other times to be assigned such 
duties as he may direct and shall be under his supervision. 



324 North Carolina Manual 

Order of Business 

20. After approval of the Journal, the order of business shall 
be as follows: 

(1) Reports of standing committees. 

(2) Reports of select committees. 

(3) Introduction of bills, petitions, and resolutions. 

(4) Messages from the House of Representatives. 

(5) Unfinished business of preceding day. 

(6) Special Orders. 

(7) General Orders — First, local bills on third reading roll 
call, then local bills on second reading roll call. After that the viva 
voce second reading local calendar in numerical order, taking up 
the Senate bills in first order. After disposition of the local calen- 
dar, the public calendar of bills will be considered in the same 
order, that is : 

(a) First, third reading roll call bills. 

(b) Second reading roll call bills. 

(c) Second reading bills to be considered viva voce, with Sen- 
ate bills taking precedence in order over House bills. 

But messages from the Governor and House of Representatives 
and communications and reports from State ofiicers and repoi'ts 
from the Committee on Engrossed and Enrolled Bills may be re- 
ceived and acted on under any order of business. 

21. Any bill or other matter may be taken up out of order upon 
order of the President or upon motion sustained by a majority 
of the membership present and voting. 

Powers and Duties of Principal Clerk 

22. The President and the Principal Clerk of the Senate shall 
see that all bills shall be acted upon by the Senate in the order in 
which they stand upon the Calendar, unless otherwise ordered as 
hereinafter provided. The Calendar shall include the numbers and 
titles of bills and joint resolutions which have passed the House 
of Representatives and have been received by the Senate for con- 
currence. 

23. The Principal Clerk shall certify the passage of bills by 
the Senate, with the date thereof, together with the fact whether 



Senate 325 

passed by vote of three-fifths or two-thirds of the Senate, when- 
ever such vote may be required by the Constitution and laws of 
the State. 

24. All necessary supplies and stationei-y for the Senate, its 
various offices and committees of the Senate shall be purchased 
upon requisition of the Principal Clerk with the approval of the 
President of the Senate. 

25. The office of Engrossing Clerk is discontinued, and the 
duties of that office as heretofore performed by the Engrossing 
Clerk shall devolve upon the Principal Clerk, who is charged with 
the responsibility therefor. 

26. The Principal Clerk shall cause the Journal of the Senate 
to be typewritten in duplicate, original and carbon, the original 
to be deposited in the office of the Secretary of State as the record, 
and the other (carbon) copy to be delivered to the State Printer. 

27. All Committee Clerks, when not in attendance upon the 
direct duties connected with the committee to which they are as- 
signed, shall report to the Principal Clerk of the Senate and, in 
order to expedite the work of the Senate, shall perform such cler- 
ical or stenographic work as may be assigned to them. 

Standing Committees 

28. The following committees shall be named by the President 
of the Senate: 

1. Agriculture 

2. Appropriations 

3. Banks and Currency 

4. Conservation and Development 

5. Counties, Cities and Towns 

6. Courts and Judicial Districts 

7. Education 

8. Election Laws and Senatorial Districts 

9. Finance 

10. Insurance 

11. Interstate and Federal Relations 

12. Journal, Engrossing, Enrolling, Printing 

13. Judiciary No. 1 

14. Judiciary No. 2 

15. Manufacturing, Labor and Commerce 



326 North Carolina Manual 

16. Mental Institutions 

17. Penal Institutions 

18. Propositions and Grievances 

19. Public Health 

20. Public Roads 

21. Public Utilities 

22. Public Welfare 

23. Retirement-Employment Security 

24. Rules 

25. Salaries and Fees 

26. University Trustees 

27. Veterans and Military Affairs 

28. Wildlife 

.Joint Committees 

29. "The Chairman of the Committee on Education, with the 
approval of the President, shall appoint a sub-committee of three 
members (the first of whom shall be the Chairman) from the 
membership of the Education Committee, to be known and desig- 
nated as the Sub-Committee on Libraiy." 

The Committee on Trustees of the Greater University, the Com- 
mittee on .Journal, Engrossing, Enrolling and Printing, and the 
sub-committee on Library, provided for under this rule shall act 
as the joint committees for the Senate. 

Provided: When any Senate Committee shall sit jointly with 
the House Committee, the Senate Committee reserves the right 
to vote separately from the House Committee. 

30. Membership on standing committees shall consist of not 
more than sxiteen Senators, including the Chairman and Vice 
Chairman who shall be designated by the President, Provided the 
committee membership on the Committee on Rules, the Committee 
on Appropriations, the Committee on Finance, the Committee on 
Agriculture, the Committee on Roads and the Committee on Edu- 
cation shall not be limited as to membership. No Senator shall 
hold membership on more than nine standing' committees unless 
the Rules Committee provides otherwise. 

30%. The Senate recognizes that the House of Representatives, 
by adoption of its Rules No. 5SV2, had abrogated G. S. 143-14 and 



Senate 327 

G. S. 143-15 to the extent of the conflict of said Rule with the pro- 
visions of said sections which heretofore constituted rules of each 
branch of the General Assembly. 

Notwithstanding the inherent right of any committee or sub- 
committee to hold Executive Sessions, no committee or subcom- 
mittee shall take any final action on any measure or thing before 
it except in open session. 

31. The Committee on Engrossed Bills shall examine all bills, 
am.endments, and resolutions before they go out of the possession 
of the Senate, and make a report when they find them correctly 
engrossed: Provided, that when a bill is typewritten and has no 
interlineations therein, and has passed the Senate without amend- 
ment, it shall be sent to the House without engrossment, unless 
otherwise ordered. 

32. All bills inti'oduced in the Senate providing for appropri- 
ations from the State, or any subdivision thereof, shall, before 
being considered by the Senate, be referred to the committee on 
Appropriations, and bills referred to other Committees carrying 
any of the provisions herrin mentioned, shall be re-referred to the 
Senate as being bills to be considered by the .Appropriations Com- 
mittee before proper action may be taken by the Senate. All bills 
introduced in the Senate providing for bond issues, levying taxes, 
or in any manner afi'ecting the taxing power of the State or any 
subdivision thereof, shall before being considered by the Senate, 
be referred to the Committee on Finance, and bills referred to 
other committees carrying any of the provisions herein mentioned 
shall be re-referred to the Senate as being bills to be considered by 
the Finance Committee before proper action may be taken by the 
Senate. 

"All bills prepared to be introduced by departments, agencies or 
institutions of the State must be introduced in the Senate not later 
than Maich 10th of this Session. All local bills must be introduced 
in the Senate not later than March 1 of this Session." 

33. Every report of the committee upon a bill or resolution which 
shall not be considered at the time of making the same, or laid on 
the table by a vote of the Senate, shall stand upon the general 
orders with the bill or resolution ; and the report of the committee 
shall show that a majority of the committee were present and 



328 North Carolina Manual 

voted. "A quorum of any committee shall consist of a majority of 
the committee." 

34. ''The Chairman of the following Committees, with the ap- 
proval of the President of the Senate, shall appoint Clei'ks who 
shall be stenographers in order to expedite the business of the 
Session of the Senate: 

Agriculture 

Appropriations 

Conservation and Development 

Counties, Cities and Towns 

Courts and Judicial Districts 

Education 

Finance 

Judiciary No. 1 

Judiciary No. 2 

Propositions and Grievances 

Public Health 

Public Roads 

Public Welfare 

Rules 

Wildlife 

In addition to the above-named clerks, the President of the Sen- 
ate, upon recommendation of the Rules Committee, shall appoint 
additional clerks to perform such duties as may be assigned them 
by the Principal Clerk of the Senate. 



Decorum in Sessions 

35. When any Senator is about to speak in debate or deliver 
any matter to the Senate, he shall rise from his seat and respect- 
fully address the President. 

36. No member shall speak until recognized by the President 
and when two or more members rise at the same time, the Presi- 
dent shall nam.e the member to speak. 

37. No remark reflecting personally upon the action of any 
Senator shall be in order in debate unless preceded by a motion 
or resolution of censure. 



Senate 329 

38. When a Senator shall be called to order he shall take his 
seat until the President shall have determined whether he was in 
order or not; if decided to be out of order, he shall not proceed 
without the permission of the Senate; and every question of order 
shall be decided by the President, subject to an appeal to the Sen- 
ate by any Senator; and if a Senator is called to order for words 
spoken, the words excepted to shall be immediately taken down in 
writing, that the President or Senate may be better able to judge 
of the matter. 

39. No Senator shall speak or debate more than twice nor longer 
than thirty minutes on the same day on the same subject without 
leave of the Senate. 

40. When the President is putting a question, or a division by 
counting shall be had, no Senator shall walk out of or across the 
Chamber, nor when a Senator is speaking, pass between him and 
the President. 

41. Every Senator who shall be within the bar of the Senate 
when the question is stated by the chair shall vote thereon, unless 
he shall be excused by the Senate or unless he be directly interested 
in the question ; and the bar of the Senate shall include the entire 
Senate Chamber. 

42. When a motion to adjourn or for recess shall be affirma- 
tively determined, no member or officers shall leave his place until 
adjournment or recess shall be declared by the President. 

43. Senators and visitors shall uncover their heads upon enter- 
ing the Senate Chamber while the Senate is in session, and shall 
continue uncovered during their continuance in the Chamber. 

44. No Senator or officer of the Senate shall depart the service 
of the Senate without leave, or receive pay as a Senator or officer 
for the time he is absent without leave. 

Procedural Rules in Debate 

45. Every bill introduced into the Senate shall be printed or 
typewritten. Amendments need not be typewritten. 

46. All bills should be read by their titles, which I'eading shall 
constitute the first reading of the bill, and unless otherwise dis- 
posed of shall be referred to the proper committee. A bill may be 
introduced by unanmious consent at any time during the session. 



330 North Carolina Manual 

47. Every Senator presenting a paper shall endorse the same; 
if a petition, memorial, or report to the General Assembly with 
a brief statement of its subject or contents, adding his name; if 
a resolution, with his name; if a report of a committee, a state- 
ment of such report with the name of the committee and members 
making the same; if a bill, a statement of its title which shall 
contain a brief statement of the subject or contents of the bill, 
with his name; and all bills, resolutions, petitions, and memorials 
shall be delivered to the Principal Clerk and by him handed to 
the President to be by him referred, and he shall announce the 
titles and references of the same, which shall be entered on the 
Journal. 

48. When a bill is materially modified or the scope of its appli- 
cation extended or decreased, or if the county or counties to which 
it applies be changed, the title of the bill shall be changed by the 
Senator introducing the bill or by the Committee having it in 
charge, or by the Principal Clerk, so as to indicate the full pur- 
port of the bill as amended and the county or counties to which it 
applies. 

49. After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass on any 
of its readings, the contents of such bill or the principal pro- 
visions of its subject-matter shall not be embodied in any other 
measure. Upon the point of order being raised and sustained by 
the Chair, such measure shall be laid upon the table, and shall not 
be taken therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of the elected 
membership of the Senate: Provided, no local bill shall be held 
by the Chair as embodying the provisions, or being identical with 
any State-wide measure which has been laid upon the table or 
failed to pass any of its readings. 

50. Whenever a public bill is introduced, seven carbon copies 
thereof shall accompany the bill. The Reading Clerk shall stamp 
the copy with the number stamped upon the original bill. Such 
copy shall be daily delivered to the joint committee hereinafter 
provided for. The Principal Clerk shall deliver the carbon copy 
of the bills designated to be printed as hereinafter provided for 
the public printer and cause 400 copies thereof to be printed. On 
the morning following the delivery of the printed copies the Chief 
Clerk shall cause the Chief Page to have one copy thereof put 
upon the desk of each member, and shall retain the other printed 



Senate 331 

copies in his office. A sufficient number of the printed copies for 
the use of the committee to which the bill is referred shall be by 
the Chief Page delivered to the Chairman or Clerk of that Com- 
mittee. If the bill is passed, the remaining copy shall be by the 
Chief Page delivered to the Principal Clerk of the House for the 
use of the House. The cost of printing shall be paid from the 
contingent fund of the Senate. The Chairman of the Rules Com- 
mittee of the Senate and the Chairman of the Rules Committee 
of the House shall appoint a sub-committee consisting of three 
members of the Senate and two members of the House from the 
body of the Senate and the House and such Chairman shall notify 
the Principal Clerk of the House and of the Senate who has been 
appointed. Such sub-committee shall meet daily and examine the 
carbon copies of the public bills introduced and detennine which 
of such public bills shall be printed and which shall not, and stamp 
the copies accordingly. If the member introducing a public bill, 
which the committee shall determine should not be printed, so 
desires, he may appear before the committee at the next meeting 
thereof with reference thereto. 

51. When a bill has been introduced and referred to a com- 
mittee, if after ten days the committee has failed to report there- 
on, then the author of the bill may, after three days' public notice 
given in the Senate, on motion supported by a vote of two-thirds 
of the Senators present and voting, recall the same from the 
committee to the floor of the Senate for consideration and such 
action thereon as a majority of the Senators present may direct. 

52. All motions shall be reduced to writing, if desired by the 
President or a Senator, delivered at the table, and read by the 
President or Reading Clerk before the same shall be debated; but 
any such motion may be withdrawn by the introducer at any time 
before decision or amendment. 

52a. When a bill is reported by a committee with an unfavor- 
able report, but accompanied by a minority report, the minority 
report shall be placed on the calendar and considered the follow- 
ing day, and the question before the Senate shall be "The adoption 
of the Minority Repoi-t" and if failing to be adopted by a majority 
vote, the bill shall be placed upon the unfavorable calendar. Before 
a minority report can be considered by the Senate, it must be 



•,iS2 North Carolina Manual 

signed by at least three (3) members of the committee who were 
present and voted on the bill when the bill was considered in the 
committee. 

On General Orders and Special Orders 

53. Any bill or other matter may be made a special order for 
a particular day or hour by a vote of the majority of the Senators 
voting, and if it shall not be completed on that day, it shall be 
returned to its place on the Calendar, unless it shall be made a 
special order for another day; and when a special order is under 
consideration it shall take precedence of any special order or sub- 
sequent order for the day, but such subsequent order may be 
taken up immediately after the previous special order has been 
disposed of. 

54. Every bill shall receive three readings previous to its 
being passed, and the President shall give notice at each whether 
it be the first, second, or third. After the first reading, unless a 
motion shall be made by some Senator, it shall be the duty of the 
President to refer the subject-matter to an appropriate committee. 
No bill shall be amended until it shall have been twice read. 

On Precedence of Motions 

55. When a question is before the Senate no motion shall be 
received except those herein specified, which motion shall have 
precedence as follows, viz. : 

(1) For adjournment. 

(2) To lay on the table. 

(3) For the previous question. 

(4) To postpone indefinitely. 

(5) To postpone to a certain day. 

(6) To commit to a standing committee. 

(7) To commit to a select committee. 
. (8) To amend. 

(9) To substitute. 

56. The previous question shall be as follows: "Shall the main 
question be now put?" and until it is decided shall preclude all 
amendments and debate. If this question shall be decided in the 



Senate 333 

affirmative, the "main question" shall be on the passage of the 
bill, resolution, or other matter under consideration; but when 
amendments are pending, the question shall be taken upon such 
amendments, in their inverse order, without further debate or 
amendment: Provided, that no one shall move the previous ques- 
tion except the member submitting the report on the bill or other 
matter under consideration, and the member introducing the bill 
or other matter under consideration, or the member in charge 
of the measure, who shall be designated by the chairman of the 
committee reporting the same to the Senate at the time the bill 
or other matter under consideration is reported to the Senate or 
taken up for consideration. 

57. When a motion for the previous question is made and is 
pending, debate shall cease and only a motion to adjourn shall be 
in order, which motions phall be put as follows: adjourn, previous 
question, lay on the table. After a motion for the previous ques- 
tion is made, pending a second thereto, any member may give 
notice that he desires to offer an amendment to the bill or other 
matter under consideration; and after the previous question is 
seconded such member shall be entitled to offer his amendment in 
pursuance of such notice. 

Some Questions To Be Taken Without Debate 

58. The motions to adjourn and lay on the table shall be de- 
cided without debate, and the motion to adjourn shall always be 
in order when made by a Senator entitled to the floor. 

59. The respective motions to postpone to a certain day, or to 
commit, shall preclude debate on the main question. 

60. All questions relating to priority of business shall be de- 
cided without debate. 

61. When the reading of a paper is called for, except petitions, 
and the same is objected to by any Senator, it shall be determined 
by the Senate without debate. 

62. Any Senator requesting to be excused fi'om voting may 
make, either immediately before or after the vote shall have been 
called for and before the result shall have been announced, a brief 
statement of the reasons for making such request, and the question 
shall then be taken without debate. Any Senator may explain his 



334 North Carolina Manual 

vote on any bill pending by obtaining permission of the President 
before the vote is put : Provided, that not more than three minutes 
shall be consumed in such explanation. 

Questions That Require a Two-Thirds Vote 

63. No bill or resolution on its third reading shall be acted on 
out of the regular order in which it stands on the Calendar, and 
no bill or resolution shall be acted upon on its third reading the 
same day on which it passed its second reading unless so ordered 
by two-thirds of the Senators present. 

64. No bill or resolution shall be sent from the Senate on the 
day of its passage except on the last day of the session, unless 
otherwise ordered by a vote of two-thirds of the Senators present. 

65. No bill or resolution after being laid upon the table upon 
motion shall be taken therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds 
of the Senators present. 

66. No rule of the Senate shall be altered, suspended, or re- 
scinded except on a two-thirds vote of the Senators present. 

67. When a bill has been introduced and referred to a com- 
mittee, if after ten days the committee has failed to report thereon, 
then the author of the bill may, after three days' public notice 
given in the Senate, on motion supported by a vote of two-thirds 
of the Senators present and voting, recall the same from the com- 
mittee to the floor of the Senate for consideration and such action 
thereon as a majority of the Senators present may direct. 

68. All bills and resolutions reported unfavorably by the com- 
mittee to which they were referred, and having no minority re- 
port, shall lie upon the table, but may be taken from the table, 
and placed upon the Calendar by a two-thirds vote of those present 
and voting. 

69. After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass on any 
of its readings, the contents of such bill or the principal provisions 
of its subject-matter shall not be embodied in any other measure. 
Upon the point of order being raised and sustained by the Chair, 
such measure shall be laid upon the table, and shall not be taken 
therefrom except by a vote of two-thirds of the elected member- 
ship of the Senate: Provided, no local bill shall be held by the 



Senate 335 

Chair as embodying- the provisions, or being identical with any 
State-wide measure which has been laid upon the table or failed 
to pass any of its readings. 

Proceedings When There Is Not a Quorum Voting 

70. If, on taking the question on a bill, it shall appear that a 
constitutional quorum is not present, or if the bill requires a vote 
of a certain proportion of all the Senators to pass it, and it ap- 
pears that such number is not present, the bill shall be again read 
and the question taken thereon; if the bill fails a second time for 
the want of the necessary number being present and voting, the 
bill shall not be finally lost, but shall be returned to the Calendar 
in its proper order. 

On Conference Committee and Report 

71. Whenever the Senate shall decline or refuse to concur in 
amendments put by the House to a bill originating in the Senate, 
or shall refuse to adopt a substitute adopted by the House for a 
bill originating in the Senate, a conference committee shall be 
appointed upon motion made, consisting of the number named in 
the motion; and the bill under consideration shall thereupon go 
to and be considered by the joint conferees on the part of the Sen- 
ate and House. In considering matters in difference between the 
Senate and House committed to the conferees only such matters 
as are in difference between the two houses shall be considered by 
the conferees, and the conference report shall deal only with such 
matters. The conference report shall not be amended. Except as 
herein set out, the rules of the House of Representatives of Con- 
gress shall govern the appointment, conduct, and reports of the 
conferees. 

Miscellaneous 

72. When a question has been once put and decided, it shall 
be in ordei- for any Senator who shall have voted in the majority 
to move a reconsideration thereof: but no motion for the recon- 
sideration of any vote shall be in order after the bill, resolution, 
message, report, amendment, or motion upon which the vote was 



336 North Carolina Manual 

taken shall have gone out of the possession of the Senate; nor 
shall any motion for reconsideration be in order unless made on 
the same day or in the next following legislative day on which the 
vote proposed to be reconsidered shall have taken place, unless 
same shall be made by the Committee on Enrolled Bills for verbal 
or grammatical errors in the bills, when the same may be made 
at any time; Provided that when the next Legislative day has by 
motion of the Senate, been restricted as to matters which may be 
considered, a motion to reconsider shall be in order on the next 
succeeding day upon which regular business is conducted. Nor 
shall any question be reconsidered more than once. 

73. In case a less number than a quorum of the Senate shall 
convene, they are authorized to send the doorkeeper or any other 
person, for any or all absent Senators as a majority of the Sen- 
ators present shall determine. 

74. No papers, writings, pamphlets, or printed matter shall 
be placed on the desks of the Senators or distributed in the Sen- 
ate Chamber without the approval of the Principal Clerk. 

75. That is case of adjournment without any hour being named, 
the Senate shall reconvene the next legislative day at 11 o'clock 
A.M. 

76. In the event the Senate Rules do not provide for, or cover 
any point of order raised by any Senator, the rules of the United 
States House of Congress shall govern. 



Senate 337 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE SENATE 

Committee on Agriculture 

Senators: Whitley, Chairman; Jones of Surry, Vice-Chair man; 
Poole of Montpfomery, Vice-Chaiyman; Britt, Brock, Bunn, Eagles, 
Henkel, Hicks, Jones of Pitt, Morgan of Cleveland, Paschal, Rose, 
Scott, Weeks, Williamson. 

Committee on Appropriations 

Senators: Eagles, Chairman; Henkel, Vice-Chairman; Shu- 
ford, Vice-chairman; Aydlett, Britt, Brock, Godwin, Hicks, Jones 
of Pitt, Jones of Surry, Kerr, Moore of Clay, Moore of Robeson, 
Morgan of Harnett, Owens, Paschal, Perry, Poole of Montgomery, 
Ross, Scott, Stone, Summersill, Weeks, Whitley, Williamson, 
Woodson. 



Committee on Banks and Currency 

Senators: Jones of Surry, Chairman; Britt, Vice -Chairman; 
Crew, Moore of Clay, Moore of Robeson, Morgan of Harnett, Pas- 
chal, Perry, Poole of Moore, Poyner, Shuford, Summersill, Thomas, 
Walton, Whitley, Williamson. 

Committee on Conservation and Development 

Senators: Medford, Chairman; Bunn, Vice -Chairman; Aydlett, 
Blythe, Henkel, Kirkman, Poole of Moore, Reynolds, Shuford, 
Walton, Winters, Woodson. 

Committee on Counties, Cities, and Towns 

Senators: Morgan of Cleveland, Chairman; Hall, Vice-Chair- 
man; Crew, Hancock, Jones of Surry, Kiikman, Moore of Clay, 
Owens, Paschal, Ross. 

Committee on Courts and Judicial Districts 

Senators: Weeks, Chairman; Kerr, Vice-Chairman; Cooke of 
Gaston, Vice-Chairman; Godwin, Graves, Hall, Medford, Poyner, 
Ross, Thomas, Woodson, Yow. 



338 North Carolina Manual 

Committee on Education 

Senators: Hicks, Chairman; Moore of Robeson, Vice-Chair- 
man; Ross, Vice-Chairman; Cooke of Gaston, Eagles, Godwin, 
Graves, Henkel, Jones of Pitt, Kerr, Kirkman, Medford, Paschal, 
Reynolds, Rose, Summersill, Woodson. 

Committee on Election Laws and Senatorial Districts 

Senators: Henkel, Chairman; Perry, Vice-Chairman; Godwin, 
Hall, Jones of Surry, Moore of Robeson, Summersill, Weeks. 

Committee on Finance 

Senators: Woodson, Chairman; Crew, Vice-Chairman; Yow, 
Vice-Chairman; Blythe, Bunn, Cook of Caldwell, Cooke of Gaston, 
Currie, Eagles, Garrison, Graves, Hall, Hancock, Hightower, 
James, Kirkman, Medford, Morgan of Cleveland, Poole of Moore, 
Poyner, Reynolds, Rose, Thomas, Walton, Winters. 

Committee on Insurance 

Senators: Kirkman, Chairmam.; James, Vice-Chairman; Blythe, 
Cooke of Gaston, Crew, Hancock, Morgan of Harnett, Scott, Stone, 
Thomas. 

Committee on Interstate and Federal Relations 

Senators: Summersill, Chairman; Kirkman, Vice-Chairman; 
Garrison, Hancock, Hightower, James, Walton, Whitley, Winters. 

Committee on Journal, Engrossing, Enrolling and Printing 

Senators: Moore of Clay, Chairman; Brock, Vice-Chairman; 
Bunn, Currie, Owens, Paschal, Perry, Williamson. 

Committee on Judiciary I 

Senators: Graves, Chairman; Poyner, Vice-Chairman, Aydlett, 
Britt, Brock, Cooke of Gaston, Currie, Eagles, Hall, Medford, 
Owens, Weeks, Yow. 



Senate 339 

Committee on Judiciary II 

Senators: Godwin, Chairman; Thomas, Vice-Chairman; Crew, 
Hig-htower, Kerr, Kirkman, Morgan of Harnett, Ross, Shuford, 
Summersill, Walton, Woodson. 

Committee on Manufacturing Labor and Commerce 

Senators: Moore of Robeson, Chairman; Winters, Vice-Chair- 
man; Aydlett, Godwin, Henkel, Hicks, Jones of Pitt, Medford, 
Poole of Montgomery, Ross, Thomas. 

Committee on Mental Institutions 

Senators: Bunn, Chairman; Garrison, Vice-Chairman; Cook of 
Caldwell, Hancock, Hightower, James, Owens, Rose, Stone, 
Williamson. 



Committee on Penal Institutions 

Senators: Poole of Moore, Chairman; Morgan of Harnett, Vice- 
Chairman; Bunn, Kerr, Medford, Moore of Clay, Poyner, Scott, 
Winters. 



Committee on Propositions and Grievances 

Senators: Scott, Chairman; Weeks, Vice-Chairman; Blythe, 
Eagles, Jones of Pitt, Medford, Morgan of Cleveland, Perry, 
Shuford, Yow. 

Committee on Public Health 

Senators: Perry, Chairman; Rose, Vice-Chairman; Blythe, 
Bunn, Cook of Caldwell, Currie, Garrison, Hicks, James, Jones 
of Pitt. 

Committee on Public Roads 

Senators: Currie, Chairmav; Stone, Vice-Chairmu)i ; Reynolds. 
Vice-Chairman; Aydlett, Eagles, Graves, Jones of Surry, Kerr, 
Moore of Clay, Poole of Montgomery, Yow. 



n40 North Carolina Manual 

Committee on Public Utilities 

Senators: Crew, Chairman; Britt, V ice-Chairman ; Aydlett, 
Blythe, Cooke of Gaston, Currie, Graves, Stone, Woodson. 

Committee on Public Welfare 

Senators: Blythe, Chairman; Williamson, Vice -Chairman; 
Garrison, Moore of Clay, Moore of Robeson, Morgan of Harnett, 
Perry, Scott, Stone, Yow. 

Committee on Retirement Employment Security 

Senators: Kerr, Chairmayi ; Hightower, Vice -Chair man; God- 
win, Hancock, Moore of Robeson, Morgan of Cleveland, Poole of 
Montgomery, Reynolds, Whitley. 

Committee on Rules 

Senators: Jones of Pitt, Chairman; Brock, Crew, Currie, 
Eagles, Godwin, Graves, Hall, Henkel, Hicks, Jones of Surry, 
Kerr, Medford, Morgan of Cleveland, Stone, Whitley. 

Committee on Salaries and Fees 

Senators: Paschal, Chairman; Owens, Vice -Chairman; Cook 
of Caldwell, Hancock, James, Poole of Moore, Summersill, Weeks, 
Winters. 

Committee on University Trustees 

Senators: Currie, Chairman; Adylett, V ice-Chairman; Britt, 
Brock, Cook of Caldwell, Cooke of Gaston, Eagles, Graves, Hall, 
Jones of Pitt, Kirkman, Poole of Moore, Poyner, Reynolds, Scott, 
Stone, Whitley, Woodson. 

Committee on Veterans and Military Affairs 

Senators: Hancock, Chairman; Walton, Vice-Chairman; Brock, 
Garrison, Henkel, Hicks, Hightower, Morgan of Cleveland, Poole 
of Moore, Poyner, Reynolds. 

Committee on Wildlife 

Senators: Stone, Chairman; Cook of Caldwell, Vice -Chairman; 
Moore of Robeson, Poole of Montgomery, Rose, Shuford. 



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342 North Carolina Manual 

SEAT ASSIGNMENT CHART— SESSION 1955 

NORTH CAROLINA SENATE 
(Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

District Name County Address Seat 

1st— N. Elton Aydlett Pasquotank Elizabeth City 7 

1st— A. Pilston Godwin, Jr Gates Gatesville 6 

2nd— Edward L. O^-ens Washington Plymouth 3 

2nd— L. H. Ross Beaufort Washington __ 15 

3rd— John Kerr, Jr Warren Warrenton 37 

4th— W. Lunsford Crew Halifax Roanoke Rapids 32 

4th— Cameron S. Weeks Edgecombe ..Tarboro 21 

5th— Dr. Paul E. Jones Pitt Farmville 16 

bth— C. Settle Bunn Nash Spnng Hope 12 

6th— J. C. Eagles, Jr Wilson Wilson 13 

7th— Carl T. Hicks Greene Walstonburg 20 

7th— E. W. Summersill Onslow Jacksonville 24 

8th— Dr. D. J. Rose Wayne Goldsboro 29 

Sth— Adam J. Whitlev, Jr Johnston Smithfield 28 

9th— Mitchell Britt Duphn Warsaw 49 

9th — Cicero P. Yow New Hanover Wilmington 26 

10th— Ray H. Walton Brunswick Southport 44 

10th— Arthur W. U'llhamson Columbus Cerro Gordo 36 

11th— Cutlar Moore Robeson Lumberton 22 

12th— Robert Morgan Harnett Lillington 25 

12th— J Hawlev Poole Moore West End 9 

13th— Wade H. Paschal Chatham Siler City 43 

13th— James M. Poyner Wake Raleigh 14 

14th— Claude Currie Durham Durham 5 

14th— Wills Hancock Granville O.\ford 41 

15th— T. Clarence Stone Rockingham Sjtoneville 10 

IBth— Ralph H. Scott Alamance Haw River 27 

17th— 0. Arthur Kirkman Guilford High Point 38 

18th— Ur, W. D. James Richmond Hamlet 34 

18th— Otis Poole Montgomery Candor 8 

19th— E. Avery High tower Anson Wadesboro 47 

19th— J. Max Thomas Union Marshville 48 

20th— F. J. Blythe Mecklenburg Charlotte 11 

21st— Luther E. Barnhardt_ Cabarrus Concord 17 

21st— Nelson Woodson Rowan Salisbury 18 

22nd— Calvin Graves Forsyth Winston-Salem 19 

23rd— R. Posev Jones Surry Mt. Airy 2 

24th— B. C. Brock (R) Davie Mocksville 42 

25th— C. V. Henkel, Jr Iredell Turnersburg 23 

25th— William E. Garrison Lincoln Lincolnton 45 

26th— Frank Patton Cooke Gaston Gastonia 4 

27th— Robert F. Morgan Cleveland Shelby 1 

27th— Chas. H. Reynolds Rutherford Spindale 39 

28th— Dr. Dennis S. Cook Caldwell Lenoir 40 

29th— Dr. H. B. Perry Watauga Boone 30 

30th— B. H. Winters Avery Elk Park 35 

31st— John F. Shuford Buncombe Asheville 31 

32nd— David M. Hall Jackson Sylva 46 

32nd— William Medford Haywood Waynesville 33 

33rd— H. M.Moore --Clay Hayesville 50 



Officers and Members of the House of Representatives 

OFFICERS 

Larry I. Moore, Jr Speaker Wilson 

Mrs. Annie E. Cooper Principal Clerk . Raleigh 

W.J. Arthur Reading Clerk Chapel Wll 

C. WaylandSpruilL-. Sergeant-at-Arms Windsor 

REPRESENTATIVES 
(Alphabetically Arranged) 

Name County Party Address 

Anderson, John L — Caldwell Republican.. Whitnel 

Askew, Allen E... Gates Democrat Gatesville 

Barker, Oscar G Durham Democrat Durham 

Barnes, Stewart J Watauga Democrat Boone 

Bell, D. G.._ Carteret Democrat .....l.Morehead City 

Bennett, Kelly E Swain Democrat Bryson City 

Bennett, Mark W Yancey Democrat Burnsville 

Blue, H. Clifton Moore Democrat Aberdeen 

Brantley, R. E Polk Democrat ...V .Tryon 

Bridger, Dewey H., Sr., Dr Bladen Democrat Bladenboro 

Bryant. Charles K., Sr ..Gaston .Democrat. ...Gastonia 

Buchanan, Marcellus Jackson Democrat Sylva 

Burleson, Jeter C Mitchell Republican "..'.".'.. Bakers ville 

Carr, Robert M Duplin Democrat Wallace 

Clark, David Lincoln Democrat ..Lincoln ton 

Coates, Roy C Johnston Democrat Smithfield 

Collier, T.J Pamlico Democrat Bayboro 

Craig, George W ...Buncombe Democrat Asheville 

Cummings, Theodore F Catawba ...Democrat Hickory 

Davis, J. Toliver Rutherford Democrat Forest City 

*Dill, Thomas G Edgecombe ..Democrat Rocky Mount 

Doughton, J. K ..Alleghany Democrat Sparta 

Edwards, A. C Greene Democrat Hookerton 

Etheridge, R. Bruce Dare Democrat Manteo 

Everett, R. Frank Martin _ Democrat Hamilton 

Falls, B. T., Jr Cleveland Democrat Shelby 

Falls, Charles B., Jr Gaston Democrat Gastonia 

Fisher, Ralph R Transylvania Republican Brevard 

Floyd, F. Wayland Robeson Democrat Fairmont 

Floyd, W. F Columbus Democrat Whiteville 

Forbes, J. Wilbert Camden Democrat Shawboro 

Fowler, Joe, Jr Surry Democrat Mt. Airy 

Gavin, W. Ed Randolph Republican Asheboro 

Gentry, Todd H Ashe Democrat West Jefferson 

Gobble, F. L Forsyth ...Democrat Winston-Salem 

Goodman, Arthur Mecklenburg Democrat Charlotte 

Greene, Harry A Hoke Democrat Raeford 

Gregory, Carson Harnett Democrat .Angier 

Hairston, Peter W Davie Democrat Advance 

Hargett, John M Jones Democrat Trenton 

Harris, Shearon Stanly Democrat Albemarle 

Harriss, Clyde H Rowan Democrat Salisbury 

Haworth, Byron Guilford Democrat.. High Point 

Hayes, J. W Richmond Democrat ..Hamlet 

Henderson, G. P Robeson Democrat Maxton 

Hewlett, Addison, Jr New Hanover Democrat Wilmington 

Holcombe, Fred Madison Democrat Mars Hill 

Holmes, Carroll R .Perquimans Democrat. Hertford 

Houk, G. L Macon Democrat Franklin 

Hunt, Joseph M., Jr Guilford Democrat Greensboro 

Jenkins, T. M Graham Republican ...Robbinsville 

Johnson, E. R Currituck Democrat. ..Moyock 

Jones, Walter Pitt Democrat ..Farmville 

Jordan, John Y., Jr Buncombe Democrat.. ..Asheville 

Kemp, W. P ..Wayne Democrat .Goldsboro 

Kiser, Roger C ..Scotland Democrat Laurinburg 

Kittrell, Robert G., Jr Vance Democrat Henderson 

343 



344 North Carolina Manual 

Name County Party Address 

Lackey, W. Ray Alexander Democrat Stony Point 

Long, George A Alamance Democrat Burlington 

Love, Jack Mecklenburg Democrat Charlotte 

Maddrey, C. Gordon Hertford Democrat Ahoskie 

**McShane, Wm. T Henderson _ Republican Hendersonville 

Moore, Larry I., Jr Wilson Democrat Wilson 

Murphy, Ashley M Pender Democrat Atkinson 

O'Dell, Virgil Cherokee Republican Murphy 

O'Hanlon, I. H Cumberland Democrat Fayetteville 

O'Herron, E. M., Jr Mecklenburg Democrat Charlotte 

Phelps, J. M., Dr Washington Democrat Creswell 

Philpott, H. Cloyd Davidson Democrat Lexington 

Pittman, Frank S Halifax.. Democrat Scotland Neck 

Pou, Edwin S Wake Democrat Raleigh 

Powe, E. K Durham Democrat Durham 

Powell, Radford G Rockingham Democrat Reidsville 

Propst, Clyde L., Jr Cabarrus Democrat Concord 

Quiun, Dwight W Cabarrus Democrat Kannapolis 

Randall, George W Iredell Democrat Mooresville 

Rodenbough, Grace Taylor Stokes Democrat Walnut Cove 

Rodman, Wm. B., Jr Beaufort Democrat Washington 

Rogers, Jack R Clay Democrat Hayesville 

Rogers, Jerry M Haywood Democrat Hazelwood 

Satterfield, B. I Person Democrat Timberlake 

Sawyer, Bascom _. ..Pasquotank Democrat Elizabeth City 

Sawyer, D. M Tyrrell Democrat Columbia 

Shomalcer, Roby A Avery Republican Newland 

Shreve, Clyde A Guilford Democrat Summerfield 

Speight, J. A Bertie Democrat Windsor 

Stikeleather, James G., Jr Buncombe Democrat Asheville 

Stone, Clarence E., Jr Forsyth, Democrat Belews Creek 

Story, T. E Wilkes Republican North Wilkesboro 

Sullivan, Kirby__ Brunswick Democrat Southport 

Swindell, Russell A Hyde Democrat Swan Quarter 

Taylor, H. P., Jr Anson Democrat Wadesboro 

Taylor, William W., Jr Warren ..Democrat Warrenton 

Thomas, C. Blake Johnston Democrat Smithfield 

Thompson, W. Reid Chatham Democrat Pittsboro 

Turner, Thomas Guilford .Democrat Greensboro 

Umstead, J. \V. Jr Orange ...Democrat Chapel Hill 

LTzzell, George R Rowan Democrat Salisbury 

Valentine, Itimous T., Jr Nash Democrat Nashville 

Vann, P. R Sampson Democrat Clinton 

Venters, Carl V Onslow Democrat Jacksonville 

Vernon, Livingston Burke Democrat Morgan ton 

Vogler, James B.^ Mecklenburg Democrat. Charlotte 

Wall, W. W McDowell Democrat Marion 

Wallace, J. Paul Montgomery Democrat Troy 

Watkins, Joe A Granville Democrat Oxford 

White, John F Chowan Democrat Edenton 

White, Thomas J Lenoir Democrat Kinston 

Whitehurst, Sam L Craven Democrat New Bern 

Whitley, PhiHp R Wake Democrat Wendell 

Wicker, J. Shelton Lee Democrat Sanford 

Williams, H. Smith Yadkin Republican Yadkinville 

Wilson, Edward H Caswell Democrat Blanche 

Wilson, Henry H., Jr Union Democrat Monroe 

Womble, W. Brantley Wake Democrat Gary 

Womble, William F Forsyth Democrat Winston-Salem 

Woodard, J. Raynor Northampton Democrat Conway 

Worthington, Sam Pitt Democrat Greenville 

Yarborough, Edward F ...Franklin Democrat Louisburg 

Yarborough, Wilson F., Sr Cumberland Democrat Fayetteville 

*Appointed Feb. 1, 1955 to succeed Ben E. Fountain, resigned. 
"Appointed Jan. 10, 1955 to succeed Wiltshire Griffith, resigned. 



House of Representatives 345 

representatives 

Arranged by Counties 
(Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

County Name Address 

Alamance George A. Long Burlington 

Alexander ._ W. Ray Lackey Stony Point 

Alleghany J. K. Doughton Sparta 

Anson H. P. Taylor, Jr ...Wadesboro 

Ashe Todd H. Gentry_._ W. Jefferson 

Avery Roby A. Shomaker (R) Newland 

Beaufort Wm. B. Rodman, Jr Washington 

Bertie J. A. Speight Windsor 

Bladen Dr. Dewey H. Bridger, Sr._ Bladenboro 

Brunswick Kirby Sullivan Southport 

Buncombe George W. Craig ...Ashevillc 

John Y. Jordan, Jr _ Asheville 

James G. Stikeleather, Jr Asheville 

Burke Livingston Vernon Morganton 

Cabarrus Clyde L. Propst, Jr Concord 

Dwight W. Quinn ...Kannapolis 

Caldwell John L. Anderson (R) Whitnel 

Camden J. Wilbert Forbes .Shawboro 

Carteret D. G. Bell Morehead City 

Caswell Edward H. Wilson Blanche 

Catawba Theodore F. Cummings Hickory 

Chatham W. Reid Thompson Pittsboro 

Cherokee.. Virgil O'Dell (R) Murphy 

Chowan.. John F. White Edenton 

Clay Jack R. Rogers .Hayesville 

Cleveland B. T. Falls, Jr._ Shelby 

Columbus W. F. Floyd Whiteville 

Craven Sam L. Whitehurst __New Bern 

Cumberland I. H. O'Hanlon _FayetteviUe 

Wilson F. Yarborough, Sr Fayctteville 

Currituck E. R.Johnson Moyock 

Dare _R. Bruce Etheridge Manteo 

Davidson H. Cloyd Philpott Lexington 

Davie Peter W. Hairston Advance 

Duplin Robert M. Carr Wallace 

Durham Oscar G. Barker Durham 

E. K. Powe Durham 

Edgecombe *Thomas G. Dill Rocky Mount 

Forsyth F. L. Gobble Winston-Salem 

Clarence E. Stone, Jr Belews Creek 

William F. Womble Winston-Salem 

Franklin Edward F. Yarborough Louisburg 

Gaston Charles K. Bryant, Sr Gastonia 

Charles B. Falls, Jr Gastonia 

Gates Allen E. Askew Gatcsvillc 

Graham T. M.Jenkins (R) Robbinsville 

Granville Joe A. Watkins Oxford 

Greene A. C. Edwards Hookerton 

Guilford.. Byron Haworth High Point 

Joseph M. Hunt, Jr .Greensboro 

Clyde A. Shreve Summerfield 

Thomas Turner ..Green.sboro 

Halifax ..Frank S. Pittman Scotland Neck 

Harnett Carson Gregory .-. Angicr 

Haywood Jerry M. Rogers Hazelwood 

Henderson **Wm. T. McShane. (R) Hendersonvillc 

Hertford _ C.Gordon Maddrey - Ahoskie 

Hoke Harry A. Greene... - Raeford 

Hyde Russell A. Swindell Swan Quarter 

Iredell George W. Randall.. ..MooresviUe 

Jackson Marcellus Buchanan Sylva 



346 North Carolina Manual 

County Name Address 

Johnston .,Rov C. Coates Smithfield 

C. Blake Thomas Smithfield 

Jones John M. Hargett Trenton 

Lee .._J. Shelton Wicker Sanford 

Lenoir Thomas J. White Kinston 

Lincoln David Clark Lincolnton 

Macon G. L. Houk. Franklin 

Madison Fred Holcombe Mars Hill 

Martin R. Frank Everett . Hamilton 

McDoweU WAV. Wall Marion 

Mecklenburg Arthur Goodman Charlotte 

Jack Love Charlotte 

E. M. O'Herron. Jr Charlotte 

James B. Vogler Charlotte 

Mitchell Jeter C. Burleson (R) Bakersville 

Montgomery -.J. Paul Wallace Troy 

Moore H. Clifton Blue Aberdeen 

Nash -Itimous T. Valentine, Jr Nashville 

New Hanover_ Addison Hewlett, Jr Wilmington 

Northampton J. Raynor Woodard Conway 

Onslow Carl V. Venters Jacksonville 

Orange J. W. Umstead, Jr Chapel Hill 

Pamlico T. J. Collier ..Bayboro 

Pasquotank Bascom Sawyer Elizabeth City 

Pender Ashley M. Murphy Atkinson 

Perquimans Carroll R. Holmes Hertford 

Person B. 1. Satterfield fimberlake 

Pitt Walter Jones Farmville 

Sam 0. Worthington Greenville 

Polk R. E. Brantley Tryon 

Randolph W. Ed Gavin (R) Asheb'oro 

Richmond J. W. Hayes Hamlet 

Robeson F. Wayland Floyd F'airmont 

G. P. Henderson Maxton 

Rockingham Radford G. Powell Reidsville 

Rowan Clyde H. Harriss Salisbury 

George R. Uzzell Salisbury 

Rutherford J. Toliver Davis Forest City 

Sampson P. R. Vann Clinton 

Scotland Roger C. Kiser .Laurinburg 

Stanly Shearon Harris Albemarle 

Stokes Grace Taylor Rodenbough Walnut Cove 

Surry Joe Fowler, Jr Mt. Airy 

Swain Kelly E. Bennett Bryson City 

Transylvania Ralph R. Fisher (R) Brevard 

Tyrrell D. M. Sawyer Columbia 

Union Henry H. Wilson, Jr Monroe 

Vance Robert G. Kittrell, Jr Henderson 

Wake Edwin S, Pou Raleigh 

Philip R. Whitley .Wendell 

W. Brantley Womble Gary 

Warren William W. Taylor, Jr Warrenton 

Washington... .Dr. J. M. Phelps Creswell 

Watauga Stewart J. Barnes Boone 

Wayne W. P. Kemp Goldsboro 

Wilkes T.E.Story (R) North Wilkesboro 

Wilson Larry L Moore, Jr __ .. .. .Wilson 

Yadkin H.Smith Williams (R) Yadkinville 

Yancey Mark W. Bennett Burnsville 

'Appointed Fed. 1, 1955 to succeed Ben E. Fountain, resigned. 
**Appointed Jan. 10, 1955 to succeed Wiltshire Griffith, resigned. 

Enrolling and Indexing Departments 

Enrolling Clerk L. M. Chaffin Lillington 

Indexer of Laws William Lassiter Raleigh 



House of Representatives 347 

RULES AND STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

1955 
Rules of the House 

Touching the Duties of Speaker 

1. It shall be the duty of the Speaker to have the sessions of 
the House opened with prayer. 

2. He shall take the chair every day at the hour fixed by the 
House on the preceding legislative day, shall immediately call the 
members to order, and, on appearance of a quorum, cause the 
Journal of the preceding day to be approved. 

3. He shall preserve order and decorum, may speak to points 
of order in preference to other members, rising from his seat for 
that purpose, and shall decide questions of order, subject to an 
appeal to the House by any member, on which appeal no member 
shall speak more than once, unless by leave of the House. A two- 
thirds vote of the members present shall be necessary to sustain 
any appeal from the ruling of the Chair. 

4. He shall rise to put a question, but may state it sitting. 

5. Questions shall be put in this form, namely, "Those in favor 
(as the question may be) vdll say 'Aye'," and after the affirmative 
voice has been expressed. "Those opposed will say, 'No'." Upon a 
call for a division the Speaker shall count; if required he shall 
appoint tellers. 

6. The Speaker shall have a general direction of the hall. He 
shall have a right to name any member to perform the duties 
of the Chair, but substitution shall not extend beyond one day, 
except in case of sickness or by leave of the House. 

7. All committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, unless 
otherwise specially ordered by the House. 

8. In all elections the Speaker may vote. In all other cases he 
may exercise his right to vote, or he may reserve this right until 
there is a tie; but in no case shall he be allowed to vote twice on 
the same question. 



348 North Carolina Manual 

9. All acts, addresses, and resolutions, and all warrants and 
subpoenas issued by order of the House shall be signed by the 
Speaker. 

10. In case of any disturbance or disorderly conduct in the gal- 
leries or lobby, the Speaker or other presiding officer shall have 
power to order the same to be cleared. 

11. No person except members and officers and clerks of the 
General Assembly, Judges of the Supreme and Superior Courts, 
State officers, former members of the General Assembly who are 
not registered under the provisions of Article 9 of Chapter 120 of 
the General Statutes of North Carolina, and persons particularly 
invited by the Speaker shall be admitted within the hall of the 
House: Provided, that no person except members and officers of 
the General Assembly shall be allowed on the floor of the House 
or in the lobby in the rear of the Speaker's desk, unless permitted 
by the Speaker of the House. 

12. No motion to suspend the rules for the purpose of extend- 
ing the courtesies of the floor, lobby or gallery shall be made 
during the consideration of the Public Calendar, except upon 
motion of the speaker. 

13. Reporters wishing to take down debates may be admitted 
by the Speaker, who shall assign such places to them on the floor 
or elsewhere, to effect this object, as shall not interfere with the 
convenience of the House. 

14. Smoking shall not be allowed in the hall, lobbies, or the 
galleries while the House is in session : Provided, that smoking 
may be permitted in the lobby in the rear of the Speaker's desk. 

Order of Business of the Day 

15. After the approval of the Journal of the preceding day, 
which shall stand approved without objection, the House shall 
proceed to business in the following order, viz. : 

(1) The receiving of petitions, memorials, and papers ad- 
dressed to the General Assembly or to the House. 

(2) Reports of standing committees. 

(3) Reports of select committees. 

(4) Resolutions. 



House of Representatives 349 

(5) Bills. 

(6) The unfinished business of the preceding day. 

(7) Bills, resolutions, petitions, memorials, messages, and other 
papers on the Calendar, in their exact numerical order, unless 
displaced by the orders of the day; but messages, and motions to 
elect officers shall always be in order. 

No member shall rise from his seat to introduce any petition, 
resolution, or bill out of order unless he is permitted so to do by 
a suspension of the rules. 



On Decorum in Debate 

16. When any member is about to speak in debate or deliver 
any matter to the House, he shall rise from his seat and respect- 
fully address the Speaker. 

17. When the Speaker shall call a member to order, the mem- 
ber shall sit down, as also he shall when called to order by another 
member, unless the Speaker decides the point of order in his favor. 
By leave of the House a member called to order may clear a 
matter of fact, or explain, but shall not proceed in debate so long 
as the decision stands but by permission of the House. Any mem- 
ber may appeal from the decision of the Chair, and if, upon ap- 
peal, the decision be in favor of the member called to order, he 
may proceed; if otherwise, he shall not, except by leave of the 
House; and if the case, in the judgment of the House, requires it, 
he shall be liable to its censure. 

18. No member shall speak until recognized by the Chair, and 
when two or more members rise at the same time the Speaker 
shall name the member to speak. 

19. No member shall speak more than twice on the main ques- 
tion, nor longer than thirty minutes for the first speech and fifteen 
minutes for the second speech, unless allowed to do so by the 
affirmative vote of a majority of the members present; nor shall 
he speak more than once upon an amendment or motion to com- 
mit or postpone, and then not longer than ten minutes. But the 
House may, by consent of a majority, suspend the operations of 
this rule during any debate on any particular question before the 



350 North Carolina Manual 

House, or the Committee on Rules may bring in a special rule that 
shall be applicable to the debate on any bill. 

20. While the Speaker is putting any question, or addressing 
the House, no person shall speak, stand up, walk out of or cross 
the House, nor when a member is speaking, entertain private dis- 
course, stand up, or pass between him and the Chair. 

21. No member shall vote on any question when he was not 
present when the question was put by the Speaker, except by the 
consent of the House. Upon a division and count of the House on 
any question, no member without the bar shall be counted. 

22. Every member who shall be in the hall of the House for 
the above purpose when the question is put shall give his vote upon 
a call of the ayes and noes, unless the House for special reasons 
shall excuse him, and no application to be excused from voting 
or to explain a vote shall be entertained unless made before the 
call of the roll. The hall of the House shall include the lobbies and 
offices connected with the hall. 

23. When a motion is made it shall be stated by the Speaker or, 
if written, it shall be handed to the Chair and read aloud by the 
Speaker or Clerk before debate. A motion to table or adjourn 
shall be seconded before the motion is put by the Speaker to the 
vote of the House. 

24. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the Speaker 
or any two members request it. 

25. After a motion is stated by the Speaker or read by the 
Clerk, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the House, but may 
be withdrawn before a decision or amendment, except in case of 
a motion to reconsider, which motion, when made by a member, 
shall be deemed and taken to be in possession of the House, and 
shall not be withdrawn without leave of the House. 

26. When a question is under debate no motion shall be re- 
ceived but to adjourn, to lay on the table, to postpone indefinitely, 
to postpone to a day certain, to commit or amend, which several 
motions shall have precedence in the order in which they stand 
arranged; and no motion to lay on the table, to postpone indef- 
initely, to postpone to a day certin, to commit or amend, being 
decided, shall be again allowed at the same stage of the bill or 
proposition. 



House of Representatives 351 

27. A motion to adjourn or lay on the table shall be decided 
without debate, and a motion to adjourn shall always be in order, 
except when the House is voting or some member is speaking; but 
a motion to adjourn shall not follow a motion to adjourn until 
debate or some other business of the House has intervened. 

28. In case of adjournment without any hour being named, the 
House shall reconvene on the next legislative day at twelve o'clock 
noon. 

29. When a question has been postponed indefinitely, the same 
shall not be acted on again during the session, except upon a 
two-thirds vote. 

30. Any member may call for a division of the question, when 
the same shall admit of it, which shall be determined by the 
Speaker. 

31. When a motion has been once made and carried in the 
affirmative or negative, it shall be in order for any member of the 
majority to move for the reconsideration thereof, on the same or 
succeeding day, unless it may have subsequently passed the Senate, 
and no motion to reconsider shall be taken from the table except 
by a two-thirds vote. But unless such vote has been taken by a 
call of the ayes and noes, any member may move to reconsider. 

32. When the reading of a paper is called for, which has been 
read in the Houses, and the same is objected to by any member, 
it shall be determined by a vote of the House. 

33. Petitions, memorials, and other papers addressed to the 
House shall be presented by the Speaker; a brief statement of the 
contents thereof may be verbally made by the introducer before 
reference to a committee, but shall not be debated or decided on 
the day of their first being read, unless the House shall direct 
otherwise. 

34. When the ayes and noes are called for on any question, it 
shall be on motion before the question is put; and if seconded by 
one fifth of the members present, the question shall be decided by 
the ayes and noes; and in taking the ayes and noes, or on a call 
of the House, the names of the members will be taken alphabeti- 
cally. 

35. Decency of speech shall be observed and personal reflectiQH 
carefully avoided. 



352 North Carolina Manual 

36. Any member may arise at any time to speak to a question 
of personal privilege, and upon objection to him proceeding, the 
Speaker shall determine if the question is one of privilege. 

37. Fifteen members, including the Speaker, shall be authorized 
to compel the attendance of absent members. A quorum shall 
consist of a majority of the qualified members of the House. 

38. No member or officer of the House shall absent himself from 
the service of the House without leave, unless from sickness or 
inability. 

39. Any member may excuse himself from serving on any com- 
mittee if he is a member of two standing committees. 

40. If any member shall be necessarily absent on temporary 
business of the House when a vote is taken upon any question, 
upon entering the House he shall be permitted, on request, to 
vote, pi-ovided that the result shall not be thereby affected. 

41. No standing rule or order shall be rescinded or altered 
without one day's notice given on the motion thereof, and to sus- 
tain such motion two-thirds of the House shall be required. 

42. The members of the House shall uncover their heads upon 
entering the House while it is in session, and shall continue so 
uncovered during their continuance in the hall, except Quakers. 

43. A motion to reconsider shall be determined by a majority 
vote, except a motion to reconsider an indefinite postponement, or 
a motion to reconsider a motion tabling a motion to reconsider, 
which shall require a two-thirds vote. 

44. After a bill has been tabled or has failed to pass on any 
of its readings, the contents of such bill or the principal provisions 
of its subject-matter shall not be embodied in any other measure. 
Upon the point of order being raised and sustained by the chair, 
such measure shall be laid upon the table, and shall not be taken 
therefrom except by a vote of two-thii-ds of the elected member- 
ship of the House: Provided, no local bill shall be held by the Chair 
as embodying the provisions or being identical vdth any State- 
viade measure which has been laid upon the table, or failed to pass 
any of its readings. No amendment or rider to a bill before the 
House shall be in order unless such rider or amendment is germane 
to the bill under consideration. 



House of Representatives 353 

45. A motion to table an amendment sent up from the floor 
shall not be construed as a motion to table the principal bill or any 
other amendment which has been offered thereto, and if such mo- 
tion is carried, only the amendment shall lie upon the table. 

46. When a member desires to interrupt a member having the 
floor he shall first obtain recognition by the Chair and permission 
of the member occupying the floor, and when so recognized and 
such permission is obtained he may propound a question to the 
member occupying the floor, but he shall not propound a series 
of questions or interrogatories or otherwise interrupt the mem- 
ber having the floor; and the Speaker shall, without the point of 
order being raised, enforce this rule. 



Standing Committees 

47. At the commencement of the session a standing committee 
shall be appointed by the Speaker on each of the following sub- 
jects, namely: 

On Agriculture. 

On Appropriations. 

On Banks and Banking. 

On Commercial Fisheries and Oyster Industry. 

On Commission and Institutions for the Blind. 

On Congressional Districts. 

On Conservation and Development. 

On Constitutional Amendments. 

On Corporations. 

On Counties, Cities, and Towns. 

On Courts and Judicial Districts. 

On Drainage. 

On Education. 

On Elections and Election Laws. 

On Employment Security. 

On Engrossed Bills. 

On Expenditures of the House. 

On Federal and Interstate Cooperation. 

On Finance. 

On Health. 

On Higher Education, 



354 North Carolina Manual 

On Institutions for the Deaf. 

On Insurance. 

On the Journal. 

On Judiciary No. 1. 

On Judiciary No. 2. 

On Justices of the Peace. 

On Local Government. 

On Manufacturers and Labor. 

On Mental Institutions. 

On Military Affairs. 

On Penal Institutions. 

On Propositions and Grievances. 

On Public Buildings and Grounds. 

On Public Utilities. 

On Public Welfare. 

On Roads and Highway Safety. 

On Rules. 

On Salaries and Fees. 

On Senatorial Districts. 

On Teachers' and State Employees' Retirement. 

On Veterans' Legislation. 

On Wildlife Resources. 

Joint Committees 

On Enrolled Bills. 

On Library. 

On Printing. 

On Trustees of University. 

The first member announced on each committee shall be chair- 
man, and where the Speaker so desires he may designate one or 
more vice chairmen. In any joint meeting of the Senate and House 
Committees, the House Committee may in its discretion reserve 
the right to vote separately. 

48. Whenever the House shall decline or refuse to concur in 
amendments put by the Senate to a bill originating in the House, 
or shall refuse to adopt a substitute adopted by the Senate for a 
bill originating in the House, a conference committee shall be 
appointed upon motion made, consisting of the number named in 



House of Representatives 355 

the motion; and the bill under consideration shall thereupon go to 
and be considered by the joint conferees on the part of the House 
and Senate. In considering matters in difference between the House 
and Senate committed to the conferees only such matters as are 
in difference between the two houses shall be considered by the 
conferees, and the conference report shall deal only with such 
matters. The conference report shall not be amended. Except as 
herein set out, the rules of the House of Representatives of Con- 
gress shall govern the appointment, conduct, and reports of the 
conferees. 

49. After passage of a motion to form a Committee of the 
whole House, the Speaker shall appoint a chairman to preside in 
committee, and the Speaker shall leave the Chair. A Committee 
of the whole House shall not be formed if there be objection by 
any member except by suspension of the rules. 

50. Upon bills submitted to a Committee of the Whole House, 
the bill shall be first read throughout by the Clerk, and then again 
read and debated by sections, leaving the preamble to be last con- 
sidered. The body of the bill shall not be defaced or interlined, but 
all amendments, noting the page and line, shall be duly entered 
by the Clerk on a separate paper as the same shall be agreed to 
by the committee, and so reported to the House. After report, the 
bill shall again be subject to be debated and amended by sections 
before a question on its passage be taken. 

51. The rules of procedure in the House shall be observed in a 
Committee of the Whole House, so far as they may be applicable, 
except the rule limiting the time of speaking and the previous 
question. 

52. In a Committee of the Whole House a motion that the com- 
mittee rise shall always be in order, except when a member is 
speaking, and shall be decided without debate. 

53. Evei'y bill shall be introduced in regular order of business 
unless introduced under suspension of the rules, or on the report 
of a committee. Each bill not introduced on the report of a com- 
mittee shall immediately upon its introduction be referred by 
the Speaker to such committee as he deems appropriate. 

53 1/^. Standing committees and subcommittees of standing com- 
mittees shall be furnished with suitable meeting places. Standing 



356 North Carolina Manual 

committees and subcommittees thereof shall permit other mem- 
bers of the General Assembly, the press, and the general public 
to attend all sessions of said committees or subcommittees: Pro- 
vided, however, that the chairman or other presiding- officer shall 
have general direction of the meeting place of the committee or 
subcommittee and, in case of any disturbance or disorderly con- 
duct therein, or if the peace, good order, and proper conduct of the 
legislative business is hindered by any individual or individuals, 
said chairman or presiding officer shall have power to exclude from 
the session any individual or individuals so hindering the legisla- 
tive business or, if necessary, to order the meeting place cleared of 
all persons not members of the committee or subcommittee. Pro- 
vided further, that upon the affirmative vote of a majority of the 
members of any standing committee or subcommittee executive ses- 
sions may be held, but in no event shall final action be taken in 
executive sessions. 

54. All bills and resolutions shall be reported from the com- 
mittee to which referred, with such recommendations as the com- 
mittee may desire to make. 

55. Every bill shall receive three readings in the House previous 
to its passage, and the Speaker shall give notice at each whether 
it be its first, second, or third reading. 

56. Any member introducing a bill or resolution shall briefly 
endorse thereon the substance of the same. 

57. When a bill has been introduced and referred to a commit- 
tee, if after ten days the committee has failed to report thereon, 
then the author of the bill may, after three days' public notice 
given in the House, on motion supported by a vote of two-thirds 
of the members present and voting, recall the same from the com- 
mittee to the floor of the House for consideration and such action 
thereon as a majority of the members present may direct. 

58. The Clerk of the House shall keep a separate calendar of 
the public, local, and private bills, and shall number them in the 
order in which they are introduced, and all bills shall be disposed 
of in the order they stand upon the Calendar; but the Committee 
on Rules may at any time arrange the order of precedence in 
which bills may be considered. No bill shall be twice read on the 
same day without the concurrence of two-thirds of the members. 



House of Representatives 357 

59. All resolutions which may grant money out of the Treasury, 
or such as shall be of public nature, shall be treated in all respects 
in a similar manner with public bills. 

60. The Clerk of the House shall be deemed to continue in office 
until another is appointed. 

61. On the point of no quorum being raised, the doors shall be 
closed and there shall be a call of the House, and upon a call of 
the House the names of the members shall be called over by the 
Clerk and the absentees noted, after which the name of the absen- 
tees shall again be called over. Those for whom no excuse or suffi- 
cient excuses are made may, by order of those present, if fifteen 
in number, be taken into custody as they appear, or may be sent 
for and taken into custody wherever to be found by special mes- 
senger appointed for that purpose. 



Previous Question 

62. The previous question shall be as follows: "Shall the main 
question be now put?" and, until it is decided, shall preclude all 
amendments and debate. If this question shall be decided in the 
affirmative, the "main question" shall be on the passage of the bill, 
resolution, or other matter under consideration; but when amend- 
ments are pending, the question shall be taken upon such arilend- 
ments, in inverse order, without further debate or amendment. If 
such question be decided in the negative, the main question shall 
be considered as remaining under debate : Provided, that no one 
shall move the previous question except the member submitting the 
report on the bill or other matter under consideration, and the 
member introducing the bill or other matter under consideration, 
or the member in charge of the measure, who shall be designated 
by the chairman of the committee reporting the same to the House 
at the time the bill or other matter under consideration is reported 
to the House or taken up for consideration. 

When a motion for the previous question is made, and pending 
the second thereto by a majority, debate shall cease; but if any 
member obtains the floor, he may move to lay the matter under 
stand : 



.358 North Carolina Manual 

consideration on the table, or move an adjournment, and when 
both or either of these motions are pending the question shall 
stand: 

(1) Previous question. 

(2) To adjourn. 

(3) To lay on the table. 

And then upon the main question, or amendments, or the motion 
to postpone indefinitely, postpone to a day certain, to commit, or 
amend, in the order of their precedence, until the main question is 
reached or disposed of; but after the previous question has been 
called by a majority, no motion, or amendment, or debate shall 
be in order. 

All motions below the motions to lay on the table must be made 
prior to a motion for the previous question; but, pending and not 
after the second therefor, by the majority of the House, a motion 
to adjourn or lay on the table, or both, are in order. This con- 
stitutes the precedence of the motion? to adjourn and lay on the 
table over other motions, in Rule 25. 

Motions stand as follows in order of precedence in Rule 26: 

Previous question. 

Adjourn. 

Lay on the table. 

Postpone definitely. 

To commit or amend. 

When the previous question is called, all motions below it fall, 
unless made prior to the call, and all motions above it fall after 
its second by a majority required. Pending the second, the motions 
to adjourn and lay on the table are in order, but not after a 
second. When in order and every motion is before the House, 
the question stands as follows : 

Previous question. 

Adjourn. 

Lay on the table. 

Postpone indefinitely. 

Postpone definitely. 

To commit. ^ 



House of Representatives 359 

Amendment to admendment. 

Amendment. 

Substitute. 

Bill. 

The previous question covers all other motions when seconded 
by a majority of the House, and proceeds by regular graduation 
to the main question, without debate, amendment, or motion, until 
such question is reached or disposed of. 

63. All committees, other than the Committee on Appropri- 
ations, when favorably reporting any bill which carries an appro- 
priation from the State, shall indicate same in the report, and 
said bill shall be referred to the Committee on Appropriations for 
a further report before being acted upon by the House. All com- 
mittees, other than the Committee on Finance, when favorably 
reporting any bill which in any way or manner raises revenues or 
levies a tax or authorizes the issue of bonds or notes, whether 
prblic, public-Jocal, or private, shall indicate same in the report, 
and said bill shall be referred to the Committee on Finance for a 
further lepcrt before being acted upon by the House. 

64. The Principal Clerk and the Sergeant-at-Ai-ms may ap- 
point, with the approval of the Speaker, such assistants as may be 
necessary to the efficient discharge of the duties of their various 
offices, and one or more of whom may be assigned by the Speaker 
from the Principal Clerk's office to the office of the Attorney Gen- 
eral for the purpose of drafting bills. 

65. The Speaker may appoint a Clerk to the Speaker, a Chap- 
lain of the House, and he may also appoint ten pages to wait 
upon the sessions of the House, and when the pressure of business 
may require, he may appoint five additional pages. 

66. The Chairman of each of the following committees: Agri- 
culture, Appropriations, Banks and Banking, Conservation and 
Development, Constitutional Amendments, Corporations; Counties, 
Cities and Towns, Courts and Judicial Districts, Education, Elec- 
tions and Election Laws, Employment Security, Finance, Health, 
Higher Education, Insurance, Judiciary No. 1, Judiciary No. 2, 
Local Government, Manufacturers and Labor, Mental Institutions, 
Military Affairs, Penal Institutions, Propositions and Grievances, 
Public Utilities, Public Welfare, Roads and Highway Safety, Rules, 



360 North Carolina Manual 

Salaries and Fees, Senatorial Districts, Veterans Legislation and 
Wildlife Resources may each appoint a clerk to the said Commit- 
tee. The Leader of the minority party may be assigned a com- 
mittee clerk with the approval of the Speaker, and whenever he 
deems advisable he may assign a clerk to act for two or more com- 
mittees. All Committee Clerks heretofore provided for are to be 
appointed by and with the approval of the Speaker. With the 
exception of the Clerks appointed to the Appropi'iations and 
Finance, the Clerks to all the other above named committees, when 
not on duty with their specific committee shall report to and be 
under the supervision of the Principal Clerk of the House for 
assignment to special duty with other committees and to serve 
the convenience of the members of the House. 

67. The Chairman of all committees shall notify, or cause to 
be notified, the first named introducer on such bills as are set 
for hearing before their respective committees, the date, time and 
place of such hearing. 

68. That no clerk, laborer, or other person employed or ap- 
pointed under Rules 64, 65, and 66 hereof shall receive during 
such employment, appointment, or service any compensation from 
any department of the State Government, or from any other 
source, and there shall not be voted, paid or awarded any addi- 
tional pay, bonus or gratuity to any of them, but said persons 
shall receive only the pay for such duties and services as now 
provided by law. When the House is not in session the pages shall 
be under the supervision of the Principal Clerk. 

69. The Chairman and five other members of any committee 
shall constitute a quorum of said committee for the transaction 
of business. 

70. The Committee on the Journal shall examine daily the 
Journal of the House before the hour of convening, and report 
after the opening of the House whether or not the proceedings of 
the previous day have been correctly recorded. 

71. When a bill shall be reported by a committee with a recom- 
mendation that it be not passed, but accompanied by a minority 
report, the question before the House shall be "The adoption of the 



House of Representatives 361 

minority report," and if failing to be adopted by a majority vote, 
the bill be placed upon the unfavorable calendar. Such minority 
report shall be signed by at least one-fourth of the members of 
the Committee who were present and voting when the bill was 
considered in Committee. In the event there is an unfavorable 
report with no minority report accompanying it, the bill shall be 
placed upon the unfavorable calendar. To take a bill from the 
unfavorable calendar a two-thirds vote shall be necessary. 

72. A bill from the unfavorable calendar shall not be debatable, 
but the movant mj,y make a brief and concise statement of the 
reasons for the motion before making the motion, taking not more 
than five minutes. 

73. Whenever a public bill is introduced seven carbon copies 
thereof shall accompany the bill, and any bill submitted without 
the required number of copies shall be immediately returned to 
the introducer. The Clerk shall stamp the copies with the number 
stamped upon the original bill. Such copies shall be daily de- 
livered to the joint committee hereafter provided for. The Clerk 
shall deliver the carbon copies of the bill designated to be printed, 
as hereinafter provided for, to the Public Printer and cause four 
hundred copies thereof to be printed. On the morning following 
the delivery of the printed copies, the Chief Clerk shall cause the 
chief page to have one copy thereof put upon the desk of each 
member and shall retain the other printed copies in his office. 
A sufficient number of the printed copies for the use of the com- 
mittee to which the bill is referred shall be by the chief page 
delivered to the chairman or clerk of that committee. If the bill 
is passed, the remaining copies shall be by the chief page delivered 
to the Principal Clerk of the Senate for the use of the Senate. The 
cost of printing shall be paid from the contingent fund of the 
House of Representatives. The Chairman of the Rules Committee 
of the House and the Chaimnan of the Rules Committee of the 
Senate shall appoint a subcommittee consisting of two members 
of the House and two members of the Senate from the body of 
the House and Senate, and such chairmen shall notify the Prin- 
cipal Clerk of the House and the Senate who has been so appointed. 
Such sub-committee shall meet daily and examine the carbon 
copies of the public bills introduced and detei*mine which of such 
bills shall be printed and which shall not, and stamp the copies 



362 North Carolina Manual 

accordingly. Such sub-committees shall serve for one week unless 
for good cause the chairmen of the respective rules committees 
shall determine otherwise. If the member introducing a public 
bill, which the committee shall determine should not be printed, 
so desires, he may appear before the committee at the next meet- 
ing thereof with reference thereto. 

74. Whenever any resolution or bill is introduced a carbon 
copy thereof shall be attached thereto, and the Principal Clerk 
shall cause said carbon copy to be numbered as the original resolu- 
tion or bill is numbered, and shall cause the same to be available 
at all times to the member introducing the same. In case the 
resolution or bill is a public resolution or bill, an additional carbon 
copy shall also be attached thereto for the use of the Public 
Printer, under the provisions of Rule 66. 



ARTICLE II 

Constitution of North Carolina 

Sec. 29. Limitatio')is iipon poiver of General Assembly to enact 
private or special legislation. 

The General Assembly shall not pass any local, private, or 
special act or resolution relating to the establishment of courts 
inferior to the Superior Court; relating to the appointment of 
justices of the peace; relating to health, sanitation, and the abate- 
ment of nuisances; changing the names of cities, towns, and town- 
ships; authorizing the laying out, opening, altering, maintaining, 
or discontinuing of highv/ays, streets, or alleys; relating to ferries 
or bridges, relating to non-navigable streams, relating to ceme- 
teries; relating to the pay of jurors; erecting new townships, or 
changing township lines or establishing or changing the line of 
school districts; remitting fines, penalties, and forfeitures, or 
refunding moneys legally paid into the Public Treasury; regulating 
labor, trade, mining, or manufacturing; extending the time for the 
assessment or collection of taxes or otherwise relieving any col- 
lector of taxes from the due performance of his official duties or 



House of Representatives 363 

his sureties from liability; giving effect to informal wills and 
deeds; nor shall the General Assembly enact any such local, pri- 
vate, or special act by the partial repeal of a general law, but the 
General Assembly may at any time repeal local, private, or special 
laws enacted by it. Any local, private or special act or resolution 
passed in violation of the provisions of this section shall be void. 
The General Assembly shall have power to pass general laws 
regulating matters set out in this section. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE HOUSE 

OF REPRESENTATIVES 

Alphabetically Arranged 

COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE 

Mr. Edwards, Chairman 

Mr. Gregory, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Rodenbough, V ice-Chairman 

Mr. Whitehurst, Vice-Chmrman 

Messrs: Askew, Blue, Bridger, Bryant, Coates, Dill, Doughton, 
Everett, Floyd of Robeson, Forbes, Fowler, Gentry, Greene, Hair- 
ston, Hargett, Henderson, Holmes, Jones, Kiser, Kittrell, Maddrey, 
Pittman, Powell, Rogers of Haywood, Satterfield, Sawyer of 
Tyrrell, Shomaker, Shreve, Speight, Stone, Taylor of Warren, 
Thomas, Valentine, Venters, Vogler, Watkins, White of Lenoir, 
Whitley, V/icker, Wilson of Caswell, Woodard, Yai'borough of 
Cumberland, Yarborough of Franklin, Bell. 

COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS 

Mr. Doughton, Chairman 
Mr. Venters, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. Bryant, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. Hewlett, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Hunt, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Anderson, Barnes, Bennett of Yancey, Brantley, Burle- 
son, Carr, Collier, Cummings, Dill, Edwards, Etheridge, Everett, 
Fisher, Floyd of Robeson, Floyd of Columbus, Gavin, Gentry, 



364 North Carolina Manual 

Gobble, Gregory, Hairston, Hargett, Harriss of Rowan, Haworth, 
Houk, Johnson, Jones, Kittrell, Lackey, Love, Maddrey, Murphy, 
O'Hanlon, Phelps, Powe, Propst, Randall, Rodman, Rogers of 
Haywood, Shreve, Speight, Stikeleather, Story, Sullivan, Taylor 
of Anson, Taylor of Wan-en, Thomas, Umstead, Vann, Vernon, 
Whitehurst, Wicker, Williams, Wilson of Caswell, Wilson of 
Union, Womble of Wake, Woodard, Yarborough of Franklin. 

COMMITTEE ON BANKS AND BANKING 

Mr. Yarborough of Franklin, Chairman 
Mr. Collier, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. Whitley, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Askew, Bennett of Yancey, Brantley, Bridger, Bryant, 
Craig, Coates, Doughton, Fisher, Floyd of Robeson, Forbes, Harriss 
of Rowan, Hayes, Holmes, Hunt, Kittrell, Long, Love, McShane, 
O'Herron, Rodenbough, Taylor of Warren, Thompson, Turner, 
Venters, Watkins, White of Chowan, White of Lenoir, White- 
hurst, Wicker, Womble of Forsyth, Womble of Wake, Woodard. 

COMMITTEE ON COMMERCIAL FISHERIES AND 
OYSTER INDUSTRY 

Mr. Swindell, Chairman 
Mr. Collier, Vice-Chainnan 
Mr. Forbes, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Bell, Etheridge, Hargett, Hewlett, Holmes, Johnson, 
Murphy, Phelps, Rodman, Sawyer of Pasquotank, Sawyer of 
Tyrrell, Speight, Sullivan, Venters, White of Chowan, Whitehurst, 
Yarborough of Cumberland. 

COMMITTEE ON COMMISSIONS AND INSTITUTIONS 

FOR THE BLIND 

Mr. Powell, Chairman 

Mr. Sawyer of Pasquotank, Vice-Chairmun 

Mr. Stone, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Anderson, Barker, Barnes, Falls of Gaston, Floyd of 



House of Representatives 365 

Columbus, HaiTiss of Rowan, Riser, Kittrell, O'Dell, Pou, Sho- 
maker, Umstead, Wall, Wilson of Caswell. 

COMMITTEE ON CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS 

Mr. Brantley, Chairman 

Mr. Fowler, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Murphy, V ice-Chairman 

Messrs: Askew, Blue, Bryant, Craig, Davis, Everett, Hunt. 
Long, Philpott, Powell, Quinn, Rogers of Clay, Speight, Uzzell, 
Vernon, Whitley, Williams. 

COMMITTEE ON CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

Messrs: Blue, Etheridge, Joiyit Chairman 
Mr. Coates, Vice-Chuirman 
Mr. Hewlett, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. Randall, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Askew, Bell, Bennett, of Swain, Bridger, Clark, Collier, 
Craig, Edwards, Fowler, Gobble, Greene, Hairston, Harris of 
Stanly, Henderson, Hunt, Jenkins, Jones, Lackey, Maddrey, O'Han- 
lon, O'Herron, Phelps, Philpott, Pittman, Pou, Powe, Rodenbough, 
Rodman, Satterfield, Sawyer of Pasquotank, Sawyer of Tyrrell, 
Speight, Stikeleather, Stone, Story, Sullivan, Taylor of Anson, 
Taylor of Warren, Thomas, Valentine, Vann, Wallace, Whitehurst, 
Wilson of Caswell, Woddard. 

COMMITTEE ON CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS 

Mr. Worthington, Chairman 

Mr. O'Hanlon, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Wilson of Union, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Bennett of Swain, Blue, Clark, Coates, Craig, Falls of 
Cleveland, Floyd of Columbus, Gentry, Goodman, Haworth, Holmes, 
Jordan, Lackey, O'Dell, Rogers of Clay, Shomaker, Shreve, Turner, 
Vogler, Williams, Womble of Forsyth, Yarborough of Franklin. 



366 North Carolina Manual 

COMMITTEE ON CORPORATIONS 

Mr. Long', Chairman 
Mr. Floyd of Columbus, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. Vernon, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Buchanan, Clark, Dill, Falls of Gaston, Gavin, Good- 
man, Harris of Stanly, Harriss of Rowan, Hewlett, Kemp, Kittrell, 
Lackey, Maddrey, Philpott, Powe, Propst, Satterfield, Shreve, 
Taylor of Anson, Taylor of Warren, Thompson, Turner, Uzzell, 
Valentine, White of Chowan, White of Lenoir, Wilson of Union, 
Womble of Forsyth, Womble of Wake, Worthington. 

COMMITTEE ON COUNTIES, CITIES AND TOWNS 

Mr. Shreve, Chairman 

Mr. O'Hanlon, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Thomas, Vice-Chairmun 

Messrs: Barker, Barnes, Blue, Carr, Coates, Craig, Davis, 
Everett, Falls of Gaston, Fisher, Floyd of Columbus, Floyd of 
Robeson, Gavin. Greene, Harriss of Rowan, Holcombe, Jones, 
Kemp, Long, O'Dell, Phelps, Pittman, Pou, Rogers of Haywood, 
Sawyer of Pasquotank, Sawyer of Tyrrell. Story, Valentine, Vann, 
Wall, Watkins, Whitley, Wicker, Williams, Womble of Forsyth, 
Woodard. 

COMMITTEE ON COURTS AND .JUDICIAL DISTRICTS 

Mr. Clark, Chairman 
Mr. Floyd of Robeson, Vice-Chmrman 

Messrs: Buchanan, Cummings, Dill, Edwards, Falls of Cleve- 
land, Fisher, Harris of Stanly, Haworth, Hewlett, Holmes, Houk, 

Mr. Womble of Forsyth, Vice-Chairman 
Jenkins, Jordan, Kittrell, Long, O'Hanlon, Rodman, Story, Sullivan, 
Taylor of Warren, Thomas, Thompson, Turner, Uzzell, Valentine, 
Venters, Vernon, White of Chowan, White of Lenoir, Womble of 
Wake, Worthington, Yarborough of Cumberland, Yarborough of 
Franklin. 



House of Representatives 367 

COMMITTEE ON DRAINAGE 

Mr. White of Rowan, Chairman 
Mr. Sawyer of Pasquotank, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Anderson, Askew, Collier, Etheridge, Forbes, Gregory, 
Hargett, Holmes, Johnson, Kiser, Phelps, Rodman, Sawyer of 
Tyrrell, Speight, Sullivan, Swindell, Wall. 

COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION 

Mr. Maddrey, Chairman 

Mr. Bennett of Swain, Vice-Chairnian 

Mr. Hargett, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Philpott, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Anderson, Barnes, Bennett of Yancey, Blue, Burleson, 
Carr, Collier, Dill, Etheridge, Gavin, Gentry, Goodman, Harriss of 
Rowan, Haworth, Hayes, Henderson, Holmes, Houk, Jenkins, Jones, 
Kemp, Kiser, Lackey, Murphy, Powe, Quinn, Randall, Rodenbough, 
Rogers of Clay, Rogers of Haywood, Satterfield, Shreve, Story, 
Sullivan, Taylor of Warren, Thomas, Thompson, Umstead, Uzzell, 
Valentine, Wall, Watkins, White of Lenoir, Wilson of Caswell, 
Womble of Forsyth, Woodard, Yarborough of Cumberland, Yar- 
borough of Franklin. 

COMMITTEE ON ELECTIONS AND ELECTION LAWS 

Mr. Gentry, Chairman 

Mr. Vogler, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. White of Lenoir, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Barnes, Bell, Bennett of Swain, Blue, Brantley, 
Bridger, Buchanan, Burleson, Clark, Coates, Doughton, Etheridge, 
Everett, Fowler, Gobble, Greene, Harris of Stanly, Hewlett, Hol- 
combe, Holmes, Houk, Johnson, Jordan, Lackey, O'Herron, Quinn, 
Rodenbough, Rodman, Story, Sullivan, Uzzell, Venters, Vernon, 
Wallace, Wilson of Union, Yarboi'ough of Cumberland. 



368 North Carolina Manual 

COMMITTEE ON EMPLOYMENT SECURITY 

Mr. Quinn, Chairman 

Mr. O'Herron, Vice -Chairman 

Mr. Philpott, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Anderson, Barker, Bryant, Falls of Gaston, Goodman, 
Harris of Stanly, Hewlett, Kemp, Kittrell, Love, Powell, Propst, 
Randall, Rogers of Clay, Vann, Vernon, Vogler, Whitehurst, Wil- 
son of Union, Womble of Wake, Worthington. 

COMMITTEE ON ENGROSSED BILLS 

Mr. Gobble, Chairman 

Messrs: Bryant, Gavin, Hairston, Harris of Stanly, Houk, Stike- 
leather, Taylor of Anson, Valentine. 

COMMITTEE ON EXPENDITURE OF HOUSE 

Mr. Gregory, Chairman 
Mr. Moore, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Askew, Buchanan, Coates, Doughton, Gavin, Gobble, 
Holmes, Hunt, Kemp, Philpott, Rodman. 

COMMITTEE ON FEDERAL AND INTERSTATE 
COOPERATION 

Mr. Craig, Chairman 

Mr. Fisher, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. White of Chowan, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Bridger, Davis, Hayes, Love, McShane, Quinn, Rogers 
of Haywood, Stikeleather, Swindell, Vann, Watkins, Wicker, Worn- 
ble of Wake. 



House of Representatives 369 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

Mr. Rodman, Chainnan 

Mv. Falls of Cleveland, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Greene, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Holmes, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Womble of Forsyth, Vice-Chadrtnan 

Messrs: Askew, Barker, Bell, Bennett of Swain, Blue, Bridger, 
Buchanan, Clark, Coates, Craig, Davis, Doughton, Edwards, Falls of 
Gaston, Foi-bes, Fowler, Goodman, Harris of Stanly, Hayes, Hen- 
derson, Holcombe, Jenkins, Jordan, Kemp, Kiser, Long, McShane, 
O'Dell, O'Herron, Philpott, Pittman, Pou, Powell, Quinn, Roden- 
bough, Rogers of Clay, Satterfield, Sawyer of Pasquotank, Sawyer 
of Tyrrell, Shomaker, Stone, Swindell, Thompson, Turner, Uzzell, 
Valentine, Vogler, Wall, Wallace, Watkins, White of Chowan, 
White of Lenoir, Whitley, Worthington, Yarborough of Cumber- 
land. 

COMMITTEE ON HEALTH 

Mr. Hewlett, Chairman 
Mr. Bridger, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. Randall, V ice-Chair^nan 

Messrs: Anderson, Barker, Bell, Bennett of Swain, Blue, 
Brantley, Bryant, Burleson, Clark, Collier, Falls of Gaston, Floyd 
of Columbus, Hairston, Henderson, Jones, Kemp, Maddrey, Phelps, 
Philpott, Pittman, Propst, Rodenbough, Shomaker, Stikeleather, 
Sullivan, Thomas, Umstead, White of Lenoir, Wilson of Caswell, 
Woodard, Yarborough of Cumberland, Yarborough of Franklin. 

COMMITTEE ON HIGHER EDUCATION 

Mr. Barker, Chairm.an 

Mr. O'Hanlon, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Rodenbough, Vice-Chair nun) 

Messrs: Barnes, Buchanan, Collier, Cummings, Dill, Falls of 
Gaston, Forbes, Goodman, Greene, Gregory, Haii'ston, Henderson, 



370 North Carolina Manual 

Holcombe, Jenkins, Kemp, Kiser, Lackey, McShane, O'Herron, 
Rogers of Clay, Sawyer of Pasquotank, Shreve, Taylor of Anson, 
Umstead, Venters, Wall, Watkins, Williams, Wilson of Union, 
Womble of Forsyth, Yarborough of Franklin. 

COMMITTEE ON INSTITUTIONS FOR THE DEAF 

Mr. Askew, Chan-man 
Mr. Vernon, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Anderson, Barker, Bennett of Yancey, Bridger, 
Buchanan, Cummings, Hayes, Holcombe, Murphy, O'Hanlon, 
Speight, Thomas, Wall. 

COMMITTEE ON INSURANCE 

Mr. Falls of Cleveland, Chmrman 

Mr. Goodman, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Hunt, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs : Blue, Carr, Coates, Davis, Everett, Fisher, Floyd of 
Columbus, Forbes, Fowler, Harris of Stanly, Harriss of Rowan, 
Hayes, Jones, Jordan, Kemp, Kiser, Long, McShane, Murphy, 

O'Herron, Phelps, Philpott, Pittman, Pou, Powe, Propst, Randall, | 

Stikeleather, Sawyer of Pasquotank, Thompson, Turner, Umstead, j 

Uzzell, Vann, White of Lenoir, Whitehurst, Whitley, Wilson of | 

Union, Womble of Forsyth, Yarborough of Cumberland, Yar- ^ 

borough of Franklin, Clark. j 

( 

» 

f 
COMMITTEE ON JOURNAL ! 

Mr. Gregory, Chairman 
Mr. Thomas, Vice-Chah-man \ 

Messrs: Craig, Hayes, Jenkins, Sawyer of Pasquotank, Sho- { 
maker, Wallace. ' 



House of Representatives 371 

COMMITTEE ON JUDICIARY NO. 1 

Mr. Uzzell, Chairman 

Mr. Floyd of Robeson, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. White of Lenoir, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Barker, Buchanan, Craig, Falls of Gaston, Fisher, 
Goodman, Harris of Stanly, Holmes, Houk, Long, Phelps, Rodman, 
Shreve, Sullivan, Taylor of Anson, Turner, Whitley, Williams, 
Wilson of Union, Worthington, Yarborough of Franklin. 

COMMITTEE ON JUDICIARY NO. 2 

Mr. Taylor of Warren, Chairman 

Mr. Jordan, Vice-Cliairman 

Mr. Vernon, Vice-Chairm,an 

Messrs: Clark, Cummings, Davis, Dill, Falls of Cleveland, 
Gavin, Hairston, Haworth, Hewlett, Jenkins, Kittrell, Powe, 
Propst, Satterfield, Story, Thompson, Valentine, Venters, White 
of Chowan, Womble of Forsyth, Womble of Wake. 

COMMITTEE ON JUSTICES OF THE PEACE 

Mr. Collier, Chairman 
Mr. Rogers of Haywood, Vice-Chair^nan 

Messrs: Askew, Barnes, Carr, Coates, Cummings, Davis, Hen- 
derson, Holcombe, O'Dell, Turner, Vann. 

COMMITTEE ON MANUFACTURERS AND LABOR 

Mr. Bryant, Chairman 
Mr. Kemp, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. Powell, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Bell, Bennett of Yancey, Blue, Brantley, Burleson, 
Carr, Davis, Doughton, Falls of Cleveland, Fisher, Forbes, Dill, 
Gentry, Greene, Harriss of Rowan, Hayes, Hewlett, Hunt, Lackey, 
Love, Maddrey, Murphy, O'Dell, Philpott, Quinn, Randall, Stone, 
Swindell, Taylor of Warren, Wallace, Wickei-, Womble of Wake, 
Woodard, Yarborough of Cumberland. 



372 North Carolina Manual 

COMMITTEE ON LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

Mr, Venters, Chairman 
Mr. Askew, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. Quinn, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Bell, Bennett of Swain, Brantley, Forbes, Gobble, 
Gregory, Hairston, Hayes, Holmes, Hunt, Johnson, Jordan, Mc- 
Shane, Murphy, Philpott, Powell, Speight, Taylor of Warren, 
Vogler, Wallace, White of Lenoir, Womble of Wake, Worthington, 
Yarborough of Franklin. 

COMMITTEE ON MENTAL INSTITUTIONS 

Mr. Unistead, Chairman 

Mr. Bennett of Sv/ain, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Bridger, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Wallace, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Anderson, Barnes, Bennett of Yancey, Buchanan, Clark, 
Cummings, Dill, Etheridge, Falls of Cleveland, Forbes, Greene, 
Gregoiy, Haworth, Holcombe, Holmes, Hunt, Jones, Kemp, Mad- 
drey, Murphy, O'Hanlon, Pou, Powell, Randall, Satterfield, Sawyer 
of Tyrrell, Stone, Sullivan, Vernon, Vogler, Watkins, White of 
Lenoir, Whitley, Wilson of Caswell, Womble of Wake, Woodard, 
Rodenbough. 

COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS 

Mr. Whitley, Chairman 
Mr. Coates, Vice-Chuirmxin 
Mr. Floyd of Columbus, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Askew, Bell, Bryant, Clark, Everett, Fisher, Fowler, 
Gavin, Greene, Hargett, Kiser, Murphy, O'Herron, Pou, Powe, 
Quinn, Rodman, Swindell, Turner, Valentine, Whitehurst, Wilson 
of Caswell, Yarborough of Franklin. 



House of Representatives 373 

COMMITTEE ON PENAL INSTITUTIONS 

Mr. Turner, Chairrmtn 
Mr. Clark, Vice-Chairvfian 
Mr. Vann, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Bennett of Yancey, Bryant, Burleson, Carr, Cummings, 
Doughton, Edwards, Etheridge, Floyd of Columbus, Goodman, 
Harriss of Rowan, Haworth, Henderson, Kittrell, O'Hanlon, O'Her- 
j'on, Pittman, Powe, Propst, Randall, Rodenbough, Rodman, Sho- 
maker, Speight, Stone, Taylor of Warren, Thomas, Wall, Wilson 
of Caswell, Womble of Forsyth, Worthington. 



COMMITTEE ON PROPOSITIONS AND GRIEVANCES 

Mr. Greene, Chairman 

Mr. Johnson, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Wilson of Union, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Barker, Bell, Bennett of Yancey, Brantley, Bridger, 
Etheridge, Everett, Falls of Cleveland, Floyd of Robeson, Forbes, 
Harris of Stanly, Hayes, Holcombe, Houk, Hunt, Jenkins, Jordan, 
Kittrell, Lackey, Love, McShane, Phelps, Rogers of Haywood, 
Swindell, Umstead, Uzzell, Vann, Wall, White of Chowan, Womble 
of Wake, Worthington, Yarborough of Cumberland. 



COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Mr. Vogler, Chairman 
Mr. Murphy, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Bennett of Yancey, Bryant, Buchanan, Carr, Coates, 
Davis, Dill, Edwards, Everett, Gavin, Gentry, Hargett, Harriss 
of Rowan, Johnson, Jones, Love, McShane, O'Dell, Pou, Powe, 
Shreve, Stikeleather, Vann, Yarborough of Cumberland. 



374 North Carolina Manual 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC UTILITIES 

Mr. Pou, Chairman 
Mr. Jordan, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. Kemp, Vice-Chairmun 

Messrs: Barker, Bennett of Yancey, Blue, Brantley, Bryant, 
Clark, Davis, Doughton, Edwards, Fisher, Fowler, Harris of 
Stanly, Hayes, Hewlett, Hunt, Long, Love, Maddrey, O'Dell, 
O'Hanlon, Philpott, Pittman, Quinn, Randall, Rodman, Rogers of 
Haywood, Sawyer of Pasquotank, Speight, Stone, Uzzell, Vogler, 
White of Lenoir, Whitehurst, Wilson of Union, Womble of For- 
syth, Womble of Wake, Worthington. 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC WELFARE 

Mr. Holmes, Chainnan 

Mr. Bennett of Swain, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Vann, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs : Anderson, Blue, Brantley, Buchanan, Collier, Cum- 
mings. Dill, Edwards, Etheridge, Falls of Gaston, Forbes, Fowler, 
Hargett, Haworth, Hewlett, Jenkins, Riser, Love, Maddrey, 
Murphy, Philpott, Powell, Propst, Rodenbough, Rogers of Clay, 
Rogers of Haywood, Sawyer of Tyrrell, Speight, Taylor of Anson, 
Umstead, Venters, Vogler, Wallace, White of Lenoir, Whitehurst, 
Wicker, Woodard, Yarborough of Cumberland, Yarborough oi 
Franklin. 

COMMITTEE ON ROADS AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

Mr. O'Herron, Chairynan 
Mr. Murphy, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. Speight, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. Turner, Vice-Chainnan 

Messrs: Barker, Barnes, Bell, Brantley, Bridger, Bryant, 
Buchanan, Carr, Clark, Craig, Davis, Edwards, Everett, Falls of 
Cleveland, Floyd of Columbus, Floyd of Robeson, Forbes, Gobble, 
Greene, Gregory, Harris of Stanly, Hewlett, Holcombe, Hunt, 



House of Representatives 375 

Johnson, Kemp, Long, Love, McShane, O'Dell, O'Hanlon, Phelps, 
Pittnian, Pou, Powell, Rodman, Shomaker, Stikeleather, Taylor of 
Warren, Uzzell, Vernon, Vogler, Wallace, White of Chowan, 
Wicker, Williams, Wilson of Union, Womble of Forsyth, Womble 
of Wake, Worthington. 

COMMITTEE ON RULES 

Mr. Womble of Wake, Chairman 
Mr. Carr of Duplin, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. Fowler of Surry, V ice-Chairynan 

Messrs: Bell, Blue, Bryant, Carr, Doughton, Edwards, Falls of 
Cleveland, Fisher, Floyd of Robeson, Fowler, Gentry, Gobble, 
Greene, Hewlett, Holmes, Hunt, Harris of Stanly, Johnson, Jordan, 
Kemp, O'Hanlon, Philpott, Quinn, Randall, Rodenbough, Rodman, 
Shreve, Swindell, Taylor of Anson, Uzzell, Venters, Womble of 
Wake, Worthington. 

COMMITTEE ON SALARIES AND FEES 

Mr. Floyd of Robeson, Chairman 
Mr. Foibes, Vice -Chairman 
Mr. Wicker, Vice-Chaiy-man 

Messrs: Anderson, Bennett of Yancey, Brantley, Burleson, 
Collier, Cummings, Falls of Gaston, Fisher, Floyd of Columbus, 
Goodman, Gregory, Haworth, Henderson, Holcombe, Houk, Jones, 
Lackey, Propst, Rogers of Clay, Shomaker, Vernon. 

COMMITTEE ON SENATORIAL DISTRICTS 

Mr. Carr, Chairman 

Mr. Gentry, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Brantley, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Askew, Barnes, Bryant, Cummings, Doughton, Ed- 
wards, Forbes, Greene, Gregory, Hairston, Hargett, Harris of 
Stanly, Harriss of Rowan, Holcombe, Holmes, Houk, Long, Murphy, 
O'Hanlon, O'Herron, Powell, Quinn, Rogers of Haywood, Story, 
Swindell, Thomas, Thompson, Turner, White of Lenoir, Williams, 
Womble of Forsyth, Worthington, Yarborough of Franklin. 



14 



376 North Carolina Manual 

COMMITTEE ON TEACHERS' AND STATE EMPLOYEES' 

RETIREMENT 

Mr. Kiser, Chairnmn 
Mr. Collier, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Barker, Barnes, Bennett of Yancey, Burleson, Clark, 
Floyd of Columbus, Goodman, Hairston, Hargett, Harriss of 
Rowan, Haworth, Holcombe, Long, O'Herron, Phelps, Pittman, Pou, 
Powe, Propst, Rodenbough, Shreve, Taylor of Anson, Vernon. 

COMMITTEE ON VERTERANS LEGISLATION 

Mr. Satterfield, Chairman 
Mr. Stone, Vice-Chairtnan 

Messrs : Barnes, Everett, Fisher, Haworth, Hewlett, Kiser, Love, 
O'Herron, Phelps, Propst, Rogers of Clay, Sawyer of Tyrrell, 
Stikeleather, Taylor of Anson, Thompson, Turner, Whitehurst, 
Whitley, Wilson of Union, Womble of Forsyth. 

COMMITTEE ON WILDLIFE RESOURCES 

Mr. Woodard, Chairman 

Mr. Fowler, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Swindell, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Wicker, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Anderson, Bell, Bennett, of Swain, Bridger, Bryant, 
Buchanan, Carr, Davis, Everett, Floyd of Columbus, Forbes, Gen- 
try, Greene, Gregory, Hargett, Henderson, Holmes, Hunt, Jenkins, 
Lackey, O'Dell, O'Hanlon, Powe, Rogers of Clay, Satterfield, 
Sawyer of Pasquotank, Sawyer of Tyrrell, Stikeleather, Turner, 
Wall, Whitley, Williams. 



1 



House of Representatives 377 

JOINT COMMITTEES 

COMMITTEE ON ENROLLED BILLS AND PRINTING 

Mr. Wallace, Chairman 
Mr. Johnson, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Barnes, Bennett of Yancey, Burleson, Gobble, Hender- 
son, Houk, McShane, Rogers of Clay, Watkins. 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY 

Mr. Goodman, Chairman 

Mr. Speight, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Stone, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Anderson, Bennett of Swain, Collier, Dill, Everett, 
Fisher, Hairston, Houk, Jones, Riser, Lackey, Satterfield, Thomp- 
son, Vann, Wall, Watkins, Whitley, Wilson of Caswell, Yarborough 
of Cumberland. 

COMMITTEE ON TRUSTEES OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Mr. Umstead, Chmrman 

Mr. Brantley, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Turner, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Whitehurst, Vice-Chairman 

Messrs: Barker, Bridger, Bryant, Buchanan, Burleson, Carr, 
Clark, Collier, Cummings, Dill, Edwards, Floyd of Columbus, 
Floyd of Robeson, Fowler, Greene, Hargett, Hayes, Henderson, 
Hewlett, Jordan, Kiser, Kittrell, Lackey, Maddrey, Murphy, 
O'Hanlon, O'Herron, Pou, Quinn, Rodenbough, Shreve, Stone, 
Story, Sullivan, Taylor of Warren, Thompson, Valentine, Venters, 
Vernon, Vogler, Wall, White of Lenoir, Whitley, Williams, Wilson 
of Caswell, Womble of Wake, Woodard, Yarborough of Franklin. 



.'>78 North Carolina Manual 

SEAT ASSIGNMENT CHART— SESSION 1955 

NORTH CAROLINA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

(Democrats unless otherwise indicated) 

County Name Address Seat 

Alamance George A. Long Burlington 66 

Alexander W. Ray Lackey Stony Point.. 81 

Alleghany J. K. Doughton Sparta 2 

Anson H. P. Taylor, Jr Wadesboro 51 

Ashe.__ Todd H. Gentry W. Jefferson 68 

Avery Roby A. Shomaker (R) Newland 108 

Beaufort Wm. B. Rodman, Jr Washington 28 

Bertie J. A. Speight Windsor 55 

Bladen Dr. Dewey H. Bridger, Sr Bladenboro 52 

Brunswick Kirby Sullivan Southport 92 

Buncombe George W. Craig Asheville 39 

John Y. Jordan, Jr Asheville.. 41 

James G. Stikeleather, Jr Asheville 40 

Burke. Livingston Vernon M organton 112 

Cabarrus Clyde L. Propst , Jr Concord 26 

Dwight W. Quinn Kannapolis 27 

Caldwell John L. Anderson (R) Whitnel 104 

Camden J. Wilbert Forbes Shawboro 114 

Carteret D. G. Bell Morehead City 93 

Caswell Edward H. Wilson Blanche 117 

Catawba Theodore F. Cummings Hickory 106 

Chatham W. Reid Thomnson.. Pittsboro 96 

Cherokee Virgil O'Dell (R) Murphy 100 

Chowan John F. White Edenton. 113 

Clay Jack R. Rogers Havesville. 95 

Cleveland B. T. Falls, Jr Shelby.. 1 

Columbus W. F. Floyd Whiteville 78 

Craven Sam L. Whitehurst New Bern 63 

Cumberland I. H. O'Hanlon Fayetteville 98 

Wilson F. Yarborough, Sr Fayetteville 99 

Currituck E. R. Johnson Moyock... 75 

Dare ..R. Bruce Etheridge Manteo 25 

Davidson H. Cloyd Philpott Lexington 45 

Davie Peter W. Hairston Advance 72 

Duplin Robert M. Carr. Wallace 83 

Durham Oscar G. Barker Durham 85 

E. K. Powe._ Durham.... 86 

Edgecombe *Thomas G. Dill Rocky Mount 36 

Forsyth F. L. Gobble Winston-Salem.. 69 

Clarence E. Stone, Jr Belews Creek 71 

William F. Womble Winston-Salem 70 

Franklin Edward F. Yarborough Louisburg 57 

Gaston Charles K. Bryant, Sr Gastonia 33 

Charles B. Falls, Jr Gastonia 34 

Gates Allen E. Askew .Gatesville 47 

Graham T. M. Jenkins (R) Robbinsville 107 

Granville .Joe A . Watkins Oxford 74 

Greene A. C. Edwards Hookerton 17 

Guilford ...Byron Haworth High Point 30 

Joseph M. Hunt, Jr Greensboro 31 

Clyde A. Shreve. Summerfield. 32 

Thomas Turner Greensboro 29 

Halifax... Frank S. Pittman Scotland Neck 56 

Harnett Carson Gregory Angier 4 

Haywood Jerry M. Rogers Hazelwood 119 

Henderson "Wm. T. McShane (R) Hendersonville 109 

Hertford C. Gordon Maddrey Ahoskie 59 

Hoke Harry A. Greene. Raeford 3 






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380 North Carolina Manual 

County Name Address Seat 

Hyde Russell A. Swindell Swan Quarter 76 

Iredell George W. Randall Mooresville 65 

Jackson Marcellus Buchanan Sylva 118 

Johnston Rov C. Coates Smithfield 20 

C. Blake Thomas Smithfield 105 

Jones John M. Hargett _ ..Trenton 91 

Lee J. Shelton Wicker Sanford 84 

Lenoir Thomas J. White Kinston 46 

Lincoln David Clark Lincolnton 38 

Macon. __ G. L. Houk Franklin. 88 

Madison Fred Holcombe Mars Hill 80 

Martin R. Frank Everett Hamilton 87 

McDowell W. W. Wall Marion 94 

Mecklenburg Arthur Goodman Charlotte 21 

Jack Love Charlotte 23 

E. M. O'Herron, Jr Charlotte 24 

James B. Vogler Charlotte 22 

Mitchell Jeter C. Burleson (R) Bakersville 110 

Montgomery J. Paul Wallace _ Troy 82 

Moore H. Clifton Blue Aberdeen.. 16 

Nash Itimous T. Valentine, Jr Nashville 73 

New Hanover Addison Hewlett, Jr Wilmington -. 54 

Northampton J. Raynor Woodard Conway 58 

Onslow Carl V. Venters Jacksonville 7 

Orange... J. W. Umstead, Jr Chapel Hill _ 97 

Pamlico T. J. Collier Bayboro 5 

Pasquotank Bascom Sawyer Elizabeth City 60 

Pender Ashley M. Murphy ..Atkinson 49 

Perquimans Carroll R. Holmes Hertford 8 

Person B. I. Satterfield Timberlake 19 

Pitt Walter Jones Farmville 64 

Sam 0. Worthington Greenville 6 

Polk R. E. Brantley Tryon 15 

Randolph W. Ed Gavin (R) Asheboro 103 

Richmond J. W. Hayes Hamlet 89 

Robeson F. Wayland Floyd .Fairmont 48 

G. P. Henderson Maxton 50 

Rockingham ..Radford G. Powell Reidsville. 44 

Rowan Clyde H. Harriss Salisbury 14 

George R. Uzzell Salisbury 13 

Rutherford _ J. Toiiver Davis Forest City Ill 

Sampson P. R. Vann Clinton 61 

Scotland Roger C. Kiser Laurinburg 53 

Stanly Shearon Harris Albemarle 62 

Stokes Grace Taylor Rodenbough Walnut Cove 42 

Surry Joe Fowler, Jr Mt. Airy 90 

Swain Kelly E. Bennett Bryson City 43 

Transylvania Ralph R. Fisher (R) Brevard 9 

Tyrrell D. M. Sawyer Columbia 115 

Union Henry H. Wilson, Jr Monroe 77 

Vance Robert G. Kittrell, Jr Henderson 35 

Wake Edwin S. Pou Raleigh 11 

Philip R. Whitley Wendell.. 12 

W. Brantlev Womble Gary 10 

Warren William W. Taylor, Jr.. Warrenton 37 

Washington... Dr. J. M. Phelps .Creswell .116 

Watauga Stewart J. Barnes Boone 79 

Wayne W. P. Kemp Goldsboro If 

Wilkes T. E. Story (R) North Wilkesboro 102 

Wilson Larrv I. Moore, Jr Wilson Speaker 

Yadkin H.Smith Williams (R) .Yadkinville.. 101 

Yancey Mark W. Bennett Burnsville 67 

'Appointed Feb. 1, 1955 to succeed Ben E. Fountain, resigned. 
•'Appointed Jan. 10, 1955 to succeed Wiltshire GriflBth, resigned. 



PART VII 
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 




Luther Hartwell Hodges 
Governor 



Biographical Sketches 

EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS 
LUTHER HARTWELL HODGES 

GOVERNOR 

(Elected by the People) 

Luther Hartwell Hodges, Democrat, was born in Pittsylvania 
County, Virginia (only eight miles from his present home in Leaks- 
ville. North Carolina), March 9, 1898. Son of John James and Lov- 
icia (Gammon) Hodges. Attended public schools in Leaksville and 
Spray; graduated from Leaksville High School in 1915; University 
of North Carolina, A.B. degree, 1919; awarded honorary LL.D. 
degree by University of North Carolina in 1946. WorkecT as office 
boy in local textile plant, 1910-1911, and as mill hand during sum- 
mers; after graduation in 1919 became Secretary to General Man- 
ager of local mills; in 1938 was appointed General Manager of all 
mills of Marshall Field and Company and became Vice President 
of this corporation in 1943; retired in 1950. Spent over a year in 
West Germany as head of the Industry Division of the Economic 
Corporation Administration; consultant to State Department in 
the latter months of 1951 on the International Management Confer- 
ence; head of the Textile Division of the OPA in 1944 and con- 
sultant to the Secretary of Agriculture in 1945. Active in com- 
munity, state and national affairs throughout career; organized 
one of the first vocational schools in the State; taught for ten 
years in night school. Formerly active in Boy Scout work. Mem- 
ber Masonic Order; fonner Commander of local American Legion 
Post; organized and became first Secretary of the Leaksville-Spray 
Rotary Club; former Governor of North Carolina Rotary Clubs; 
Past President New York City Rotary Club; International Direc- 
tor Rotary, 1953-1954; former Avorld-wide campaign chairman of 
the American Leprosy Society; former State Chairman for the 
North Carolina Society for Crippled Children Campaign, the State 

383 



384 North Carolina Manual 

Cancer Campaign and the State United Fund Campaign; member 
of the Y.M.C.A. since 1910; former member of the Board of South- 
ern Y.M.C.A. Industrial Conference, Silver Bay Conference and 
Metropolitan Y.M.C.A. of New York City. Served as a member of 
the State Board for Vocational Education under Governor O. Max 
Gardner and of the State Highway and Public Works Commission 
under Governor J. C. B. Ehringhaus. Has been active in the Demo- 
cratic Party at precinct and congressional levels. Elected Lieuten- 
ant Governor of North Carolina in November, 1952 and succeeded 
to Governorship in November of 1954 upon the death of Governor 
William B. Umstead. Methodist; former Lay Leader and Steward 
of Leaksville Methodist Church. Married Miss Martha Blakeney 
of Union County in 1922. Two daughters, Betsy (Mrs. D. M. Ber- 
nard, Jr.) of Anacortes, Washington, and Nancy (Mrs. John C. 
Finlay) of New Delhi, India; one son, Luther, Jr., a Sophomoi'e at 
the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Address: Leaks- 
ville, N. C. 



TRAD EURE 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

(Elected by the People) 

Thad Eure, Democrat, of Hertford County, was born November 
15, 1899, in Gates County, N. C. Son of Tazewell A. and Armecia 
(Langstun) Eure. Attended Gatesville High School. 1913-1917; 
University of North Carolina, 1917-1919; University Law School, 
1921-1922. Lawyer. Past member, North Carolina Bar Associa- 
tion ; North Carolina State Bar, and Hertford County Bar Associa- 
tion. Mayor of Winton, 1923-1928. County attorney for Hertford 
County, 1923-1931. Member of General Assembly of 1929, repre- 
senting Hertford County. Principal Clerk of the House of Rep- 
resentatives, Sessions of 1931, 1933, 1935, and Extra Session, 1936. 
Presidential Elector First District of North Carolina, 1932. 
Escheats Agent, University of North Carolina, 1933-1936. Elected 
Secretary of State in the General Election of November 3, 1936, 
and assumed duties of the office December 21, 1936, by virtue of 
executive appointment, ten days prior to the commencement of 
Constitutional term, on account of a vacancy that then occurred. 



Biographical Sketches 385 

Re-elected Secretary of State in General Elections of 1940, 1944, 
1948 and 1952. President, Ahoskie Kiwanis Club, 1927. Theta Chi 
Fraternity; Junior Order; B.P.O. Elks; President, N. C. Elks 
Association, 1946; T. P. A.; Member Board of Trustees, Elon Col- 
lege; President Elon College Foundation; American Legion, Forty 
and Eight; President, National Association of Secretaries of State, 
1942. Keynote speaker. Democratic State Convention, 1950. Con- 
gregational Christian Church. Married Miss Minta Banks of Win- 
ton, N. C, November 15, 1924. Of this union there are two chil- 
dren, a daughter and a son, Mrs. J. Norman Black, Jr., and Thad 
Eure, Jr. Legal residence, Hertford County, N. C. Official address: 
State Capitol, Raleigh. 

HENRY LEE BRIDGES 

STATE AUDITOR 

(Elected by the People) 

Henry Lee Bridges, Democrat, was born in Franklin County, 
N. C, June 10, 1907. Son of John Joseph and Ida Loraine (Carroll) 
Bridges. Attended Wakelon High School, 1914-1920; Wiley School, 
Raleigh, 1921; Wakelon High School, 1922; Millbrook High School, 
1923-1925; Mars Hill Junior College, A.B. degree, 1929; Wake 
Forest College, B.A. degree, 1931; Wake Forest Law School, 1932- 
1933. Attorney-at-Law. Member of the Greensboro Bar Associa- 
tion; N. C. State Bar. Deputy Clerk, Superior Court of Guilford 
County, August, 1935-September, 1940; December, 1941-October, 
1942; December, 1945-June 1, 1946. (Break in dates caused by 
Military Service) . Secretary and Treasurer, Guilford County De- 
mocratic Executive Committee, 1933-1940. Member and Past Mas- 
ter of Greensboro Lodge No. 76 Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons. Choraz in Chapter No. 13 Royal Arch Masons; Ivanhoe 
Commandery No. 8 Knights Templar; Sudan Temple A. A. O.N. M.S.; 
Societas Rosecrucians in Civitatibus Foederatis. Enlisted in Na- 
tional Guard May, 1934, as a Private; promoted to Seigeant, Feb- 
ruary, 1935; commissioned Second Lieutenant, June 18, 1935; com- 
missioned First Lieutenant, November 18, 1939; promoted to Cap- 
tain, January 28, 1943; to Major on inactive status, January 17, 
1947. Entered Federal Service, September 16, 1940; released from 
active duty November 2, 1941; recalled to active duty October 7, 



386 North Carolina Manual 

1942; relieved from active duty December 14, 1945. Veteran World 
War II, Post No. 53 American Leg'ion Local; Local No. 506 Forty 
and Eight. Deacon, Hayes Barton Baptist Church; Member Board 
of Trustees Wake Forest College. Appointed State Auditor Feb- 
ruary 15, 1947; elected four-year term 1948; re-elected 1952. Mar- 
ried Miss Clarice Hines, December 12, 1936. Two children : Joseph 
Henry, age twelve years; George Hines, age eight years. Home 
address: 2618 Grant Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 

EDWIN MAURICE GILL 

state treasurer 
(Elected by the People) 

Edwin Maurice Gill, Democrat, was born in Laurinburg, N. C, 
July 20, 1899. Son of Thomas Jeffries and Mamie (North) Gill. 
Graduate of Laurinburg High School; Trinity College, 1922-1924. 
Representative in the General Assembly from Scotland County, 
1929 and 1931. Private Secretary, Governor Gardner, 1931-1933; 
Commissioner of Paroles, 1933-1942; appointed Commissioner of 
Revenue by Governor Broughton, serving from July 1, 1942 to 
July 1, 1949. Admitted to the Bar, January 28, 1924, and practiced 
law in Laurinburg, 1924-1931 as a member of the firm of Gibson 
and Gill, and practiced law in Washington, D. C, 1949-1950 as a 
member of the firm of Gardner, Morrison & Rogers. Member of 
North Carolina Bar Association and the Bar of the District of 
Columbia. Collector and Director of Internal Revenue, Greensboro, 
N. C, 1950-1953; Appointed by Governor Umstead Treasurer of 
North Carolina, July 20, 1953, and elected to this office November 
2, 1954. President American Parole Association, 1940-1941 ; Presi- 
dent Southeastern States Probation and Parole Association, 1939- 
1940; Director American Prison Association, 1939-1940. Elected 
member of Executive Committee of the National Tax Association 
in 1944 for three year term. Elected member of Executive Com- 
mittee of National Association of Tax Administrators in 1946 for 
two-year term. Former member of N. C. Probation Commission. 
Member of State Art Commission since August 1, 1951. Member 
of the American Legion. Sigma Nu Phi, Legal Fraternity, Omicron 
Delta Kappa, Leadership Fraternity, honorary member, Duke Uni- 
versity, 1940. Methodist. Address: Raleigh, N, C. 



'?iad Eure 
I Secretary of State 

Henry L. Bridges 
State Auditor 

Edwin Gill 
1 State Treasurer 



arles F. Carroll 
Superintendent of Public 
Instruction 

JHarry McMullan 

Attorney General 

L. Y. Ballentine 

Commissioner of Agriculture 



lank Crane 

Commissioner of Labor 

pharles F. Gold 

Commissioner of Insurance 








State officials, who are elected by the people in addition to the Governor and Lieutenant 
< ernor. The above officials constitute the Council of State with the exception of the Attorney 
' leral who is the legal adviser to the Executive Department. 



388 North Carolina Manual 

CHARLES FISHER CARROLL 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

(Elected by the People) 

Charles Fisher Carroll, Democrat, was born in Warsaw, North 
Carolina, March 31, 1900, son of Charles Fisher and Agnes (Rob- 
inson) Carroll. Attended public schools of Warsaw, 1906-1915; 
Trinity Park School, 1915-1917; A.B. Trinity College, 1921; M.Ed. 
Duke University, 1930, LL.D. (honorary) 1954; LL.D. (honorary), 
High Point College, 1952. Teacher and coach of athletics Vance 
County Farm Life School, Middleburg, N. C, 1921-1922. Principal 
Buena Vista High School, R.F.D., Henderson, N. C, 1922-1923; 
Newport Consolidated School, Newport, N. C, 1923-1924 and 1925- 
1929; Long Creek-Grady School, Pender County, 1924-1925; Bry- 
son City Elementary and Swain County High Schools, Bryson City, 
N. C, 1929-1932. Superintendent Swain County Schools and Super- 
vising Principal of Bryson City Elementary and Swain County 
High Schools, 1932-1937. Superintendent High Point City Schools, 
High Point, N. C, 1937 to August, 1952. State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction for North Carolina since August, 1952. Mem- 
ber North Carolina Education Association, National Education 
Association, American Association of School Administrators. Mem- 
ber N. C. High School Textbook Committee, 1936-1943; Member 
N. C. Committee on Secondary Schools, Southern Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools, 1945-1950; Member N. C. Educa- 
tion Commission, 1947-1949; Former member Policies Committee 
of Superintendents' Division of North Carolina Education Asso- 
ciation. Chairman, Ex-officio Board of Trustees of East Carolina 
College. Member, Ex-Officio Board of Trustees of Greater Uni- 
versity, North Carolina College, Agricultural and Technical 
College; Member of Board, Ex-Officio, of N. C. State Art Society, 
Library Commission of N. C, Local Government Employees' Re- 
tirement System, Teachers' and State Employees' Retirement 
System, N. C. Recreation Commission, The N. C. Symphony So- 
ciety, Inc.; N. C. Commission on Interstate Cooperation, Finance 
Committee Southern Regional Education Board; President As- 
sociated Public School System, 1951-1952. Member Advisory Com- 
mittee, School of Education, State College of Agriculture and 
Engineering of the University of North Carolina. Former State 



Biographical Sketches 389 

Director of Rural Education of the Department of Rural Educa- 
tion of the National Education Association. Honorary member 
and past president of Rotary Club of High Point. Former mem- 
ber High Point Housing Authority, Parks and Recreation Com- 
mission, Library Board, and former chainnan of Budget Commit- 
tee of High Point Community Chest. Mason. Member Beta 
Omega Sigma, Kappa Delta Pi, and Omicron Delta Kappa Frater- 
nities. Methodist. Former Chairman of Board of Stewards in 
Bryson City Methodist Church and Wesley Memorial Church in 
High Point. Student Army Training Corps, 1918. Past Com- 
mander Sergeant Freeman Post, American Legion. Coordinator 
of Civilian Defense, High Point, 1943-1945. Married Miss Nellie 
Jane Wynne of Williamston, N. C. One child, Charles, Jr. Address: 
Raleigh, N. C. 

LYNTON YATES BALLENTINE 

COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE 

(Elected by the People) 

Lynton Yates Ballentine, Democrat, was born at Varina, Wake 
County, N. C, April 6, 1899. Son of James Erastus and Lillian 
(Yates) Ballentine. Attended Oakwood and Cardenas Elementary 
Schools and Holly Springs High School, 1913-1917. Graduated 
from Wake Forest College in 1921 with an A.B. degree, having 
specialized in political economy. Dairyman, farmer, and business- 
man. Member Wake County Board of Commissioners, 192(5-1934. 
State Senator from the Thirteenth Senatorial District, 1937, 1939, 
1941, and 1943. Member Board of Agriculture, 1941-1944. Elected 
Lieutenant Governor November 7, 1944. Elected Chairman State 
Board of Education, 1945. Elected Commissioner of Agriculture, 
November 2, 1948; re-elected November 4, 1952. A charter mem- 
ber of the Fuquay Springs Post of the American Legion. Baptist. 
Address: Varina, N. C. 

FRANK CRANE 

COMMISSIONER OF LABOR 

(Elected by the People) 

Frank Crane, Democrat, was born at Waxhaw, N. C, August 
18, 1907, Son of James Thomas and Mary Emma (Lathan) Cran^, 



390 North Carolina Manual 

Attended Marvin Elementary School, 1913-1918; Weddinp:ton In- 
stitute, 1919-1922; Prospect High School, 1923-1927; University 
of North Carolina, A.B., 1931; University of North Carolina Sum- 
mer School of 1931. 1932, 1933 and 1934; night course in Per- 
sonnel Management, North Carolina State College, 1939. Director 
and Instructor, Welcome High School in Davidson County, 1931- 
1934. Appointed Safety Director, North Carolina Industrial Com- 
mission, 1934-1938; Administrative Assistant, North Carolina Em- 
ployment Service, 1938-1939; Factory and Wage and Hour Inspec- 
tor, North Carolina Department of Labor. 1939-1940; Director of 
Conciliation and Arbitration Division, 1941-1954. Appointed Com- 
missioner of Labor by Governor William B. Umstead for the 
unexpired term of the late Forrest H. Shuford, June 3, 1954; 
elected to the office of Commissioner of Labor in the General 
Election of November 2, 1954. Member International Association 
of Governmental Labor Officials ; Association of State Mediation 
Agencies; Society for the Advancement of Management; American 
and State Foresty Associations. Attended twenty annual meetings 
of Southern Industrial Relations Conference. Member Carolina 
Bird Club; Raleigh Torch Club; Executives Club of Raleieh. 
Methodist. Married Miss Edith Peacock, January 1, 1938. Address: 
802 Williamson Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 

CHARLES FORTUNE GOLD 

COMMISSIONER OF INSURANCE 

(Elected by the People) 

Charles Fortune Gold, Democrat, was born in Ellenboro. N. C, 
December 17, 1911. Son of Hattie Poe (Johnson) and the late Dr. 
Charles F. Gold. Attended Blue Ridsre School for Boys. Hender- 
sonville, N. C, graduating in 1930; Davidson College, B.S., 1934; 
University of North Carolina Law Schco', LL. B.. 1937. Attorney. 
Member, Rutherford County Bar Association and North Carolina 
State Bar; Rutherford County Club. Member and former Com- 
mander of Fred Williams Post No. 75, American Legion; Forty 
and Eight and Disabled American Veterans. Member, Sigma Phi 
Epsilon Fraternity. Solicitor of Rutherford County Recorder's 
Court, 1939 and 1940; Judge, 1941, resigning in summer of 1942 
jn order to enter armed forces. Secretary to Congressman A. L. 



Biographical Sketches 391 

Bulwinkle from December 1, ]948 to March 1, 1950. President 
Rutherford County Young Democratic Club, 1939. National Com- 
mitteeman of the Young Democratic Clubs of North Carolina, 
1941-1946. Chairman Board of Trustees Alexander Schools at 
Union Mills, and member of Board of Trustees of Western Caro- 
lina Teachers College at Cullowhee. Private in Army Air Corps 
from July 27, 1942 to March 5, 1943. State Senator from the 
Twenty-seventh Senatorial District, 1951. Appointed Commis- 
sioner of Insurance November 16, 1953 to fill unexpired term; 
nominated and elected for remainder of term in November, 1954. 
Episcopalian; Vestryman. Married Miss Ernestine Bailey, June 
6, 1946. Two daughters, Patsy Lee Gold and Elizabeth Foushee 
Gold. Home Address: Rutherfordton, N. C. 

HARRY McMULLAN 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

(Elected by the People) 

Harry McMullan, Democrat, v.'as born at Hei'tford, N. C, July 
23, 1884. Son of Dr. J. H. and Lina (Tucker) McMullan. At- 
tended Edenton Public Schools; LL.B., University of North Caro- 
lina, 1905; LL.D. (honorary). University of North Carolina, 1946. 
Lawyer. Member D.K.E. and Gimghoul fratei'nities. Senator from 
the Second Senatorial District in the General Assembly of 1929. 
Engaged in practice at Washington, N. C, 1907 to 1933; County 
Attorney for Beaufort County, 1926 to 1933; Chairman North 
Carolina Industrial Commission, 1935-1936. North Carolina Bar 
Association. Ameiican Bar Association. Appointed Attorney Gen- 
eral by Governor Hoey April 30, 1938, to succeed Attorney Gen- 
eral A. A. F. Seawell upon his appointment to the Supreme Court; 
elected for the unexpired term of A. A. F. Seawell, November, 
1938; elected for full four-year term, November 5, 1940; re-elected 
November 7th, 1944, November 2, 1948, and November 4, 1952. 
Episcopalian. Married Miss Pattie M. Baugham of Washington, 
N. C, October 4, 1911. Four children. Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



392 North Carolina Manual 

J. W. BEAN 

chairman north CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

J. W. Bean, Democrat, was born in Montgomery County, N. C, 
December 7, 1893. Son of 0. D. and Annie (Cornelison) Bean. 
Attended Montgomery County grammar and high schools; Ether 
Academy. Taught two years in a public school. Accepted a posi- 
tion with the Southern Railway as Clerk, 1916, at Spencer, N. C, 
and was promoted to various positions, including General Fore- 
man of Southern Railway Supply Department. Identified with 
several railroad organizations. Served as alderman and mayor 
pro tem of Town of Spencer, N. C. Chairman, Spencer School 
Board, 1928-1946. Served as Chairman of the Rowan County 
School Board Association and as Chairman of Spencer Precinct 
Democratic Executive Committee for a number of years. Secretary 
to Rowan County Democratic Executive Committee, 1928-1950. 
Representative from Rowan County in the General Assembly of 
1933 and 1935. Secured leave-of-absence from the Southern Rail- 
way Company in 1935 for six months to help organize the North 
Carolina Works Progress Administration as State Director of 
Labor-Management and Relations. Appointed by Governor Hoey 
as a member of the North Carolina Manpower Commission. Ap- 
pointed by Governor Broughton as a member of the Selective 
Service Board of Appeals, District No. 6,. serving for the dura- 
tion of the war. Appointed by Governor Cherry as a member of 
a nine-man committee to study the needs of Area Vocational 
Schools in North Carolina. Appointed by Governor Cherry in 
1945 to a one-year term on the North Carolina Medical Care 
Commission and re-appointed in 1946 for a four-year term. Ap- 
pointed North Carolina Industrial Commissioner by Governor 
Scott on April 1, 1949, to fill two-year unexpired term; reappointed 
on May 1, 1951, for full six-year term. Appointed Chairman North 
Carolina Industrial Commission by Governor Hodges on December 
22, 1954. Baptist. Married Miss Annie Stutts of Seagrove, N. C. 
Three children: two sons and one daughter. Address: Raleigh, 
N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 393 

JAMES DAVIS BEATY 

DIRECTOR STATE PROBATION COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the North Carolina State Probation Commission 
with the approval of the Governor) 

James Davis Beaty, Democrat, was born in Lancaster, S. C, 
January 27, 1891. Son of Robert T. and Mary Elizabeth (Davis) 
Beaty. Attended Lancaster High School, graduating in 1909. 
Member National Probation and Parole Association; Southern 
States Probation and Parole Association, Treasurer, 1954 — ; An- 
cient and Accepted Free Masons. Presbyterian; Ruling Elder 
since 1917. Married Miss Roberta Porter, September 3, 1913. 
Children: Mrs. J. M. Beckley and Mrs. R. H. Dickert. Permanent 
address: Wrightsville Beach, N. C. Official addi-ess: Raleigh, 
N. C. 

CAKRIE L. BROUGHTON 

STATE LIBRARIAN 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Carrie L. Broughton, Democrat, was born in Wake County, Ra- 
leigh, N. C. Daughter of Needham B. and Caroline R. (Lougee) 
Broughton. Attended Raleigh Public Schools; Peace Junior Col- 
lege; North Carolina College for Women; Meredith College. Mem- 
ber American and North Carolina Library Associations; North 
Carolina Literary and Historical Association; Chairman Library 
Commission. Appointed Assistant State Librarian in 1902 and 
State Librarian in 1917. Baptist; active in church work. Address: 
125 Hawthorne Rd., Raleigh, N. C. 

GEORGE BRYAN CHERRY 

SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

(Appointed by Board of Public Buildings and Grounds) 
George Bryan Cherry, Democrat, was born in Windsor, N. C, 
January 10, 1901. Son of Solomon and Elizabeth Webb (Gray) 
Cherry. Attended Windsor High School, 1914-1917; North Caro- 
lina State College, B.E. degree in Civil Engineering, 1922. Former 
Director N. C. Society of Engineers; member and past President 
Raleigh Engineers Club. Past President Needham B. Broughton 



394 North Carolina Manual 

PTA and Raleigh Civic Council; former Director N. C. State 
College Alumni Association, Wake County Tuberculosis Society; 
member and past President Raleigh Lions Club; District Governor, 
Lions International, 1954-1955. Member State Employees Associ- 
ation; former member Raleigh Parking Advisory Committee and 
Wake County Democratic Executive Committee. Mason. Second 
Lieutenant U. S. Army Reserve, 1922-1927. Episcopalian; past 
President Batte Men's Bible Class; former member of Vestry; 
former Director Brotherhood of Saint Andrew. Married Miss 
Winifred Eugenia Beddingfield, of Raleigh, N. C, January 9, 
1924. Children: George Bryan Cheri*y, Jr. and Alexander Bedding- 
field Cherry. Address: 1916 Craig Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

CHRISTOPHER CRITTENDEN 

DIRECTOR OF THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 

(Appointed by the Executive Board of the Department) 
Christopher Crittenden, Democrat, was born in Wake Forest, 
N. C, December 1, 1902. Son of Charles Christopher and Ethel 
(Taylor) Crittenden. Attended Wake Forest Grammar and High 
Schools. A.B. Wake Forest College 1921 and A.M. in 1922; Yale 
University, Ph.D. 1930. Director State Department of Archives 
and History (formerly the State Historical Commission) since 
1935; Secretary State Literary and Historical Association since 
1935; Member American Historical and Southern Historical asso- 
ciations; President Society of American Archivists, 1946-1948; 
President American Association for State and Local History 
1940-1942; President Ai-cheological Society of North Carolina, 
1948-1950; Secretary Board of Trustees, Olivia Raney Library; 
Member Executive Board, National Trust for Historic Preserva- 
tion; Member Watauga Club. Principal Roxobel, N. C. Public 
School 1922-1923; Instructor in History, Yale University 1924- 
1925; University of North Carolina 1926-1929; Assistant Profes- 
sor of History, University of North Carolina 1930-1935. Author 
of North Carolina Newspapers before 1770; The Commerce of 
North Carolina 1763-1789; and various historical articles and 
book reviews. Editor The North Carolina Historical Review. 
Baptist. Married Miss Janet Quinlan of Waynesville, N. C, 1930. 
Three Children: C, Jr., born 1933; Robert Hinton, born 1936; 
Ann Lane, bom 1938, Address: Raleigh, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 395 

BEN ELBERT DOUGLAS 

DIRECTOR DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Ben Elbert Douglas, Democrat, was born in Iredell County, 
September 3, 1894. Son of Dr. Benjamin Franklin Douglas and 
Margaret Louisa (Miller) Douglas. Attended Gastonia Public 
Schools; Brown's College of Embalming. Merchant. Founded 
Douglas Village in Charlotte. President of Douglas Furs, Inc., 
Charlotte; also operates with sons Ladies Ready-to-Wear, Dry 
Cleaning and Laundry establishments in Charlotte. Mayor of 
Charlotte, 1935-41 ; credited with being one of builders of present 
day Charlotte; Douglas Municipal Airport of Charlotte named for 
him. President North Carolina League of Municipalities, 1939; 
vice-president and trustee U. S. Conference of Mayors while 
serving as Mayor of Charlotte. Assistant Director and Director 
North Carolina Civilian Defense, 1941-42. Member State Highway 
and Public Works Commission, 1945-49 ; spearheaded construction 
of Independence Boulevard in Charlotte and praised for other 
work as Seventh Division Highway Commissioner. District and 
Regional Director, Office of Price Stabilization (OPS), 1950-51; 
cited for work by Federal Price Administrator, Michael V. Di Salle. 
Appointed Director Department of Conservation and Development 
by Governor Umstead July 20, 1953. First Lieutenant, Company 
"A," 115th Machine Gun Bn., 30th Division, in World War 1; 
participated in breaking of Hindenburg Line and other offensives 
against German forces. Member American Legion, Veterans of 
Foreign Wars, and Disabled American Veterans. Past Commander 
Gaston Post, No. 23, and Hornets' Nest Post, No. 9, American 
Legion, and Post 1060, Veterans of Foreign Wars. President 
Charlotte Kiwanis Club, 1931. Member Masons, Shriners and 
Jesters. Elder in Westminster Presbyterian Church in Charlotte. 
Married Miss Harlee Todd, June 2, 1920, deceased. Married Miss 
Carolyn Wilkes October 1, 1931. Three children: Ben E., Jr., 
Robert Lee, and Carolyn Jean. Home address: 1909 Cx-escent 
Avenue, Charlotte, N. C. Official address: Education Building, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



;)9() North Carolina Manual 

CLARENCE DeWITT DOUGLAS 

CONTROLLER STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

(Appointed by the State Board of Education with the approval 

of the Governor) 

Clarence DeWitt Douglas, Democrat, was born in Surry County, 
N. C, October 19, 1894. Son of Frances Bryan and Susan (Cocker- 
ham) Douglas. Attended Fruitland Institute, 1910-1911; Brevard 
Institute, 1911-1915; A.B. degree, Trinity College (Duke Uni- 
versity), 1920. Member North Carolina Education Association; 
American Association of School Administrators; Board of Trus- 
tees, Greensboro College; Raleigh History Club. Assistant Direc- 
tor and Director Division of Finance, State Department of Public 
Instruction, 1920-1939. Director Division of Auditing and Account- 
ing in State School Commission and State Board of Education, 
1939-1949. Controller, State Board of Education, September 9, 
1949. Charter member of Raleigh Lions Club. Served in the 
U. S. Armed Forces, Hq. 156 Field Artillery Brigade, 81st Division, 
Corporal, 1918-1919; American Expeditionary Forces; discharged 
June 23, 1919. Methodist; Steward. Married Miss Mary Teresa 
Peacock of Salisbury, August 25, 1931. Address: 2621 Dover 
Road, Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHN ATKINSON FERRELL 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY NORTH CAROLINA MEDICAL CARE 

COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the North Carolina Medical Care Commission 
with the approval of the Governor) 

John Atkinson Ferrell, Democrat, was born in Clinton, N. C, 
December 14, 1880. Son of James Alexander and Cornelia 
(Murphy) Ferrell. Attended Clinton Graded School; University 
of North Carolina, B.S., 1902; University of North Carolina Med- 
ical School, M.D., 1907; Johns Hopkins University^ School of 
Hygiene, Doctor Public Health, 1919. Honorary LL.D. degree con- 
ferred by the University of North Carolina, 1940. Member Wake 
County Medical Society; Medical Society of North Carolina; 
American Medical Association; American Public Health Associ- 
ation, President, 1933; Assistant Director Rockefeller Sanitary 



Biographical Sketches 397 

Commission, 1910-1914; Associate Director International Health 
Division, Rockefeller Foundation, New York, 1914-1944; Medical 
Director Markle Foundation, 1944-1946. Appointed Executive Sec- 
retary N. C. Medical Care Commission, 1946. Author of "Health 
Departments of States and Provinces of the United States and 
Canada," U.S.P.H.S. Bulletin 184, 1932 (785 pp.) ; "History of 
Health Organizations of the United States and Canada," U.S.P.H.S. 
Bulletin 222, 1933 (469 pp.) ; "State and Provincial Health Or- 
ganizations," Chapter III of Volume on Administrative Medicine, 
Nelsoyi's Loose Leaf Medicine. Episcopalian. Married Miss Lucile 
Devereaux Withers, January 28, 1909. Children: John A. Ferrell, 
Jr., Benjamin W. Ferrell (deceased); Bettie D. Ferrell. Address: 
Hotel Carolina, Raleigh, N. C. 

FRANK HERBERT GIBBS 

MEMBER NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Frank Herbert Gibbs, Democrat, was born in Rockingham, 
August 4, 1895. Son of J. T. and Mary Alice (Overbaugh) Gibbs. 
Attended Trinity College, 1912-1914 (academic) ; Law School, 
1914-1916. Lawyer. Mayor of Warrenton, May, 1920 to Novem- 
ber, 1934 and from December, 1941, to November, 1947. Ensign, 
U. S. N. R. F. (Naval Aviator): enrolled Decem.ber 11, 1917; 
active service, March 4, 1918 to December 23, 1918. Sigma Chi 
Fraternity. State Senator in the General Assembly of 1935, 1939 
and 1949. Methodist. Married Miss Mary Tasker Polk, December 
15, 1921. Two children: Mary Tasker, now Mrs. Barnaby W. 
McAusland, and Frank H., Jr. Address: Warrenton, N. C. 

ALEXANDER HAWKINS GRAHAM 

CHAIRMAN STATE HIGHWAY AND PUBLIC WORKS COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Alexander Hawkins Graham, Democrat, was born in Hillsboro, 
August 9, 1890. Son of John W. and Maggie F. (Bailey) Graham. 
Educated in the Episcopal High School, Alexandria, Va., 1906- 
1908. A.B. University of North Carolina, 1912. Attended Uni- 



398 North Carolina Manual 

versity of North Carolina Summer Law School, 1912-1913, and 
Harvard Law School, 1913-1914. Lawyer. Member North Carolina 
Bar Association. Commissioned Second Lieutenant at Fort Ogle- 
thorpe in 1917; promoted to First Lieutenant and then to Cap- 
tain, serving- overseas with the 81st Division. Member of the 
House of Representatives, 1921, 1923, 1925, and 1927; Speaker of 
the House of Representatives, 1929. Served as Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor from January 1933 to January 1937. Appointed Chairman 
of the State Highway and Public Woi'ks Commission May 1, 194B, 
serving to February 1, 1949. Again appointed chairman of the 
State Highway and Public Works Commission, May 12, 1953. 
Episcopalian. Married Miss Kathleen Long in August 1917. 
Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

DAVID QUINTON HOLTON 

DIRECTOR DIVISION OF PURCHASE AND CONTRACT 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

David Quinton Holton, Democrat, was born in Forsyth County, 
November 14, 1910. Son of A. E. and Elizabeth (Petty) Holton. 
Attended Winston-Salem High School, 1925-1930; Wake Forest 
chasing Officials. Postmaster of Edenton, N. C, 1952-1953. Mem- 
College, B.S., 1935. Member National Association of State Pur- 
ber Edenton City Council, 1942-1944; N. C. State Ports Authority, 
1948-1953. Mason and Elk. Appointed Director of N. C. Division 
of Purchase and Contract by Governor William B. Umstead in 
September of 1953. Methodist; Steward, 1940-1953. Married Miss 
Kathryn Leggett in 1937. Children: Frances, age 12; Walter, age 
10; David, age 7. Permanent address: Edenton, N. C. Present 
address: 3020 Eton Rd., Raleigh, N. C. 

MRS. ELIZABETH H. HUGHEY 

SECRETARY AND DIRECTOR, NORTH CAROLINA 
LIBRARY COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the North Carolina Library Commission) 

Mrs. Elizabeth House Hughey, Democrat, was born in Rober- 
sonville, N. C, February 2, 1916. Daughter of Thomas Lawrence 
and Susan Elizabeth (Mizell) House. Attended Keel's School, 



Biographical Sketches 399 

1921-1927; Robersonvxlle Public School, 1927-1931; Atlantic Chris- 
tian College, A.B., 1936; School of Library Science, George Pea- 
body College for Teachers, B.S. in Library Science, 1938. Member 
American Library Association; Southeastern Library Association; 
North Carolina Library Association ; North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association; Adult Education Association of America; 
Advisory Committee, Recreation Commission ; North Carolina 
Family Life Council. Trustee, Atlantic Christian College. Mem- 
ber Raleigh Woman's Club; Beta Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma 
Disciples of Christ. Married A. Miles Hughey. Address: 211 
Taylor Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

WILLL4M WRIGHT JONES 

COMMISSIONER OF BANKS 

(Appointed by the Goveinor with the approval of the Senate) 

William Wrig-ht Jones, Democrat, was born in Raleigh, N. C, 
April 21, 1903. Son of Charles Hinton and Beulah (Thompson) 
Jones. Attended Raleigh Public Schools, 1908-1919; accounting 
courses, Raleigh Business School and American Institute of Bank- 
ing. Associated with Commercial National Bank, Raleigh, 1919- 
1931; State Banking Department, 1933-1937. Organizer and Treas- 
urer, State Employees' Credit Union, 1937-1951. Honorary Life 
Member, State Employees Association. Managing Director, North 
Carolina Credit Union League, 1938-1939; Editor, League News. 
Member, Board of Trustees, Teachers and State Employees Retire- 
ment System, 1949-1951. Secretary-Treasurer, North Carolina 
Railroad, 1950-1951. Appointed Commissioner of Banks, April 14, 
1951. Member, National Association of Supervisors of State Banks. 
Member, Raleigh Lodge No. 500, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Raleigh Chapter No. 10, Royal Arch Masons; Enoch 
Council No. 5, Royal and Select Masters; Raleigh Commandery 
No. 4, Knight Templar; Thirty-second Degree Scottish Rite 
Mason, Wilmington Consistory; Shriner, Sudan Temple. Member, 
Capital Grange. Member, Christ Episcopal Church, Raleigh, N. C. 
Married Miss Ruth Florence Doi"val of Bywood, Pennsylvania, 
June 2, 1924. Four children: Charles Lawrence, William Wright, 
Jr., Ronald Arthur, and Dorval Thompson Jones. Address: Ra- 
leigh, N. C. 



400 North Carolina Manual 

HENRY E. KENDALL 

chairman employment security commission 
(Appointed by the Governor) 

Henry E. Kendall, Democrat, was born in Shelby, N. C, August 
24, 1905. Son of Henry E. and Mary Whitelaw (Wiseman) Ken- 
dall. Attended Shelby Public schools; N. C. State College, 1922-26, 
B.S. degree in Civil Engineering. Member Pi Kappa Alpha; Theta 
Tau Engineering Fraternity; Tau Beta Pi (Scholastic) and Phi 
Kappa Phi (Honor) fraternities. Engineer with Plumer Wise- 
man & Co., Danville, Va., 1926-30; Assistant office manager Di- 
brell Bros, tobacconists, Shanghai, China, 1931-36; engineer N. C. 
State School Commission, Raleigh, N. C, 1937-42. Commissioned 
1st Lt. Engineers Corps, U. S. Army, September 18, 1942; served 
twenty months in European Theatre Operations and eight months 
in Asiatic Pacific; separated with rank of Lt. Colonel, August 
7, 1946. Appointed Chairman, Unemployment Compensation Com- 
mission (now Employment Security Commission) by Governor R. 
Gregg Cherry, July 1, 1946; reappointed by Governor W. Kerr 
Scott in 1949 for 4-year term; reappointed by Governor William 
B. Umstead in 1953 for 4-year term. Member Lions Club; N. C. 
Society of Engineers; Raleigh Engineers Club; American Legion 
(member of State Administrative Committee 1950-54). Mason. 
Registered Engineer. President General Alumni Association N. C. 
State College, 1949-50 ; Chairman Executive Committee Alumni 
Association 1950-51. Vice-President Region III Interstate Con- 
ference of Employment Security Agencies 1950-52. President 
Interstate Conference of Employment Security Agencies 1953-54. 
Member Legislative Committee same organization. Listed in Who's 
Who in the South and Southwest. Married Miss Eliza Katharine 
Kerr of Yanceyville, N. C. Presbyterian. Address: 2814 Exeter 
Circle, Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHN HALL MANNING 

the adjutant general 
(Appointed by the Governor) 

John Hall Manning, Democrat, was born in Durham, N. C, 
September 27, 1889. Son of James Smith and Julia Tate (Cain) 
Manning. Attended Durham High School, 1902-1905; University 



Biographical Sketches 401 

of North Carolina, A.B. degree, 1909; University of North Caro- 
lina Law School, 1911-1913. Former attorney at law. Member Wake 
County Bar Association; North Carolina State Bar; National 
Guard Association of the United States. Assistant United States 
Attorney, 1934-1946; United States Attorney, Eastern District 
of North Carolina, 1946-1951. Member North Carolina National 
Guard, December 23, 1913 to Aug-ust 16, 1919 and May 2, 1921 to 
September 30, 1951. Rank: Private; First Lieutenant, January 7, 
1914; Captain, April 7, 1914; Major, October 4, 1918; Lt. Colonel, 
May 2, 1921; Colonel, February 1, 1937; Major General of the 
Line, September 11, 1947. Retired, Major General, September 
30, 1951. Appointed Adjutant General of North Carolina, Oc- 
tober 1, 1951. Mason, Sudan Temple. Episcopalian. Married to Miss 
Jane Hildenbrand Stillman, November 23, 1920. Children: Jane 
Stillman Manning (Mrs. Charles A. McKenney, Jr.) ; Richard r'e 
Yarmon Manning. Address: 2911 Fairview Road, Raleigh, N. C. 

EDWARD H. McMAHAN 

STATE UTILITIES COMMISSIONER 
(Appointed by the Governor) 

Edward H. McMahan, Democrat, was born in Yancey County, 
N. C, June 20, 1905. Son of William Hayes and Eva Mae (Riddle) 
McMahan. Attended Marion Elementary and High Schools, 1911- 
1923; Wake Forest College, 1923-1927, LL.B. Attorney at Law. 
Member, N. C. Bar Association. Methodist. Married Miss Sarah 
Kathleen Jenkins, December 19, 1925. Two children: Edward H. Mc- 
Mahan, Jr., age 27; Sarah Jaudon McMahan, age 23. Legal ad- 
dress: Brevard, N. C. Official address: Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHN WILLIAM ROY NORTON, M.D. 

SECRETARY. STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

(Appointed by the North Carolina State Board of Health vdth 
the approval of the Governor) 

John William Roy Norton, Democrat, was born in Scotland 
County, July 11, 1898. Son of Lafayette and lola Josephine (Rey- 
nolds) Norton. Attended Snead's Giove School, 1916-1920; A.B. 
degree, Trinity College (Duke University) June 1920; one year's 



402 North Carolina Manual 

work in the Law School Trinity College, 1922-1923. Principal and 
athletic coach, Lumberton, 1921-1922 and Snead's Grove (Scot- 
land County), 1923-1924. University of N. C. Medical School, 
Chapel Hill, 1924-1926; Vanderbilt University Medical School, 
1926-1928, M.D. degree, 1928; interne at Henry Ford Hospital, 
Detroit, Mich., July 1928-June 1929; member medical staff of the 
Henry Ford Hospital, July 1929-June 1930; chief of the medical 
department Holt-Krock Clinic, Fort Smith, Arkansas, July 1930- 
August 1931. City Health Superintendent, Rocky Mount 1931- 
1935; Harvard School of Public Health, MPH degree 1936; Assist- 
ant Division Director State Board of Health, 1936-1938; Pro- 
fessor Public Health Administration, University of North Caro- 
lina, 1938-1940. Private to Second Lieutenant of Field Artillery, 
1918; Captain to Colonel in Medical Corps, 1940-1945; Medical 
Inspector Fort Bragg; Assistant Chief Preventive Medicine Euro- 
pean Theatre; Deputy Chief Hygiene Allied Force Headquarters; 
Medical Inspector Seventh Army; Director Epidemiology for 
Army; Chief Preventive Medicine Ninth Service Command. 
Awarded battle stars Tunisian and Sicilian Campaigns and Army 
Commendation Citation for service as Army Epidemiology Chief. 
Chief Health Officer TVA 1946-1948; N. C. State Health Officer since 
July 1948; Visiting Associate Professor Public Health, School 
of P. H., UNC. Member Wake County, Sixth District, North 
Carolina, Southern and American Medical Associations; Past 
Secretary-Treasurer Edgecombe-Nash County and Vice-President 
Fourth District and Past Secretary and Chairman Section on 
Public Health and Education of N. C. Medical Society and of 
Public Health Section of SMA; Member N. C, Southern Branch 
and American Public Health Associations; Secretary-Treasurer 
and Executive Committee NCPHA; Chairman Health Officers Sec- 
tion, Governing Council and Executive Com., Secretary-Treasurer 
and President (1953-1954), Southern Branch APHA; Governing 
Council, Secretary and Chairman Health Officers Section APHA; 
Am. Asso. P.H. Physicians; International Society of Medical 
Health Officers, Secretary-Treasurer (1954); State and Terri- 
torial Health Officer's Asso. Exec. Com. and Chmn. Mental Health 
Section; Fellow Am. College of Physicians; Am. Academy of 
General Practice; Fellow N. C. Academy of Preventive Medicine 
and Am. College of P.M. and President (1954-1955); Diplomate 



Biographical Sketches 403 

Am. Bd. Prev. Med.; President Association State and Territorial 
Health Officers; Honorary Member North Carolina Dental So- 
ciety; Bd. Directors Planned Parenthood Federation of Am. and 
Recipient Lasker Foundation Award (1953) ; Exec. Com. N. C. 
Div. Am. Cancer Society, N. C. Dental Foundation and N. C. Heart 
Assoc; Bd. Dir. N. C. Conf. Social Service, Pres. 1951; Med. Ad- 
visory Bd. N. C. Military District and N. C. Selective Service 
System; N. C. Civil Defense Council; Pres. Wake Co. Duke Alumni 
Asso. 1953; Pres. Harvard P.H. Alumni Asso. 1951 and N. C. 
Harvard Alumni Asso. 1952; Am. Legion Capital City Post 297; 
Commander 1952 and N. C. Dept. Boy's State Committee; Exec. 
Com. Bd. Trustees N. C. Cancer Institute; Consultant Nat'l. Mental 
Health Institute USPHS; Governor's Com. on Interstate Coopera- 
tion; N. C. Med. Care Commission; Delta Omega (Public Health) 
and Sigma Xi (Scientific) Honorary Societies; Scientific Exhibit 
Award (N. C. Med. Soc.) 1947, and Reynolds Medal (NCPHA) 
1948; WOW and Mason; Delta Sigma Phi, Alpha Kappa Kappa 
and Sigma Nu Phi Fraternities; listed in Who's Who in America. 
Author of Rabies Control ; Diptheria Control ; Observations on 
1948 Polio Epidemic in North Carolina; Planning a Public Health 
Program; A Mid-Century Review of Public Health Activities in 
North Carolina; Joint Responsibilities of Public Health and Pri- 
vate Practice; Public Health Aspects of Civil Defense; Looking 
Ahead for Health in North Carolina; Strengthening Local Health 
Departments — A Vital Security Need. "A Century of Medical 
Leadership in Public Health in North Carolina"; "Looking Ahead 
Twenty-Five Years in Public Health"; Many articles in N. C. 
Health Bulletin. Methodist; Steward, First Methodist Church, 
Rocky Mount, 1934-1935 and 1950, Edenton Street Church, Ra- 
leigh. Married Juanita Harris Ferguson, 1928. Three children: 
Geraldine, 25; Jean, 21; Lafayette Ferguson, 15. Address: 2129 
Cowper Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 

JAMES WILLIAMS POWELL 

DIRECTOR OF THE STATE BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

(Appointed by the Attorney General) 

James Williams Powell, Democrat, was born in Laurens, S. C, 
August 24, 1909. Son of James W. and Tallulah (Caine) Powell. 



404 North Carolina Manual 

Attended public schools of New Hanover and Lenoir Counties; 
graduated from Cape Charles (Va.) High School, 1926; Virginia 
Military Institute, Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engi- 
neering, 1930. Also completed courses in following; Boyd Busi- 
ness School, Washington, D. C, 1932; Institute of Criminal Science, 
Washington, D. C, 1937; U. S. Army Counter-intelligence School, 
Chicago, 111., 1942; British School of Military Intelligence, Matlock, 
England, 1944. Member Intei-national Association of Chiefs of 
Police ; Academy for Scientific Interrogation ; North Cai'olina 
Sheriffs' Association; Vice President N. C. Police Executives Asso- 
ciation. Major, Military Intelligence Division, United States Army, 
1942-1946; Major, 113th Field Artillery Battalion, 30th Division, 
N. C. National Guard, 1948-1951. Mason, Raleigh Lodge No. 500. 
Presbyterian. Married Miss Frances Shute of Monroe, N. C, 
March 26, 1938. One daughter, Kitty Tallulah Powell, age 15. 
Address: 3108 Lewis Farm Road, Raleigh, N. C. 



NEROS FREDERICK RANSDELL 

MEMBER NORTH CAROLINA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Neros Frederick Ransdell, Democrat, was born in Franklin 
County, N. C, September 19, 1903. Son of William C. and Mary 
(Dixon) Ransdell. Attended Sandhill Farm Life School, 1923- 
1927; Mars Hill College; Wake Forest College; Wake Forest Law 
School, 1930-1933. President, Euthalian Literary Society, Mars 
Hill College, 1929; awarded improvement medal, 1928; Debater's 
Medal, 1929; Commencement Debater's Medal, 1929, Inter-Collegi- 
ate Debater, 1928-1929. Delegate from Wake County to National 
Farm Bureau Organization in Chicago, 111., 1944. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber Wake County Bar Association; North Carolina State Bar As- 
sociation. Solicitor, Fuquay Springs Recorder's Court, 1934-1944 
and 1954-1955. Representative from Wake County in the General 
Assembly of 1945 and 1947. Chief Enrolling Clerk during 1949 
Session of the General Assembly. Appointed Director of State 
Probation Commission by the North Carolina State Probation Com- 
mission and the Governor, January 21, 1950. Appointed Com- 
missioner of Paroles for the State of North Carolina by Governor 



Biographical Sketches 405 

Scott, June 2, 1952. Appointed a member of the North Carolina 
Probation Commission by Governor Scott, August 20, 1952. Ap- 
pointed a member of the Noith Carolina Industrial Commission 
by Governor Hodges, Januaiy 14, 1955. Member Fuquay-Varina 
Lions Club. Presbyterian. One daughter: Sylvia Nan Ransdell. 
Address : Varina, N. C. 

EDWARD SCHEIDT 

COMMISSIONER OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Edwai-d Scheldt, Democrat, was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, 
January 20, 1903. Son of John and Anna (Kerber) Scheldt. At- 
tended Winston-Salem High School, Class of 1921; University of 
North Carolina, A.B., 1926; University of North Carolina Law 
School, LL.B., 1931. Worked with Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion, 1931-1953, serving as Special Agent in Charge of the Char- 
lotte, New York City and Detroit offices. Member Society of former 
Special Agents of the F. B. I.; Raleigh Executives Club; Chi Phi 
Social Fraternity; Omicron Delta Kappa Honorary Fraternity. 
Lutheran. Married Miss Ruth Schwenck, August 28, 1933. Two 
children, Elsa and Ruth. Address: 2338 Hathaway Road, Raleigh, 
N. C. 

EUGENE GUILFORD SHAW 

COMMISSIONER OF REVENUE 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Eugene Guilford Shaw, Democrat, was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., 
April 2, 1899. Son of James Henry and Lillian (White) Shaw. 
Attended Greensboro High School, 1912-1917; Oak Ridge Military 
Institute, 1917-1918; University of North Carolina, 1920-1923; 
University of North Carolina Law School. Attorney at law. Tax 
administrator. Member, Greensboro Bar Association; N. C. Bar 
Association; American Bar Association; Executives Club; Greens- 
boro Real Estate Board; American Title Association. Past Presi- 
dent Bar Association of 12th Judicial District. Charter member 
and Past President, Guilford County Young Democratic Club. 



406 North Carolina Manual 

Former Secretary, Guilford County Board of Elections. Former 
Executive Vice-Chairman, Guilford County Democratic Executive 
Committee. Deputy Clerk of the Superior Court Guilford County, 
1923-1925. Public Administrator in Guilford County, 1942-1949. 
Seaman 2. c, U. S. Navy in World War I. Member, Corinthian 
Lodge No. 542 Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Past Master, 
1929-1930. Member Oasis Temple Ancient Arabic Order Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. Appointed Commissioner of Revenue on 
April 26, 1949 by Governor Kerr Scott. Trustee of Alumni Asso- 
ciation of Oak Ridge Military Institute; President of National 
Association of Tax Administrators, 1952-53 ; President of South- 
eastern States Association of Tax officials, 1952-53; First Vice- 
President of Tax Institute, Incorporated, of Princeton, New Jer- 
sey, 1953. Presbyterian. Married Miss Alice Elizabeth Lindsay of 
Taylorsville, N. C, April 3, 1926. One son: Eugene Guilford 
Shaw, age 27. 0. C. S. of U. S. Air Force. Address: 1616 Not- 
tingham Road, Greensboro, N. C. 

HARRY TRACY WESTCOTT 

state utilities commissioner 
(Appointed by the Governor) 

Harry Tracy Westcott, Democrat, was born in Manteo, N. C, 
April 13, 1906. Son of George Thomas and Odessa (Tillett) West- 
cott. Attended Manteo Graded School, 1914-1920; Manteo High 
School, 1920-1924; North Carolina State College, B.S. degree, 
1928. Attended and completed School of Transportation and Mar- 
keting conducted by the University of Chicago in cooperation 
with the U. S. Department of Agriculture in New York, 1938. 
President, Inspectors Association of America, 1941. Marketing- 
Specialist, N. C. Department of Agriculture, 1936-1948. Adminis- 
trator, Federal Marketing Agreement and Order No. 81 States of 
N. C. and Virginia. 1948. Director of Markets, State of North 
Carolina, 1948-1950. Appointed by Governor Scott as a member 
of the Utilities Commission, March 1, 1950. Reappointed for a term 
of six years, February 1, 1951. Methodist. Married Miss Helen 
Rankin of Gastonia, N. C, March 21, 1942. Two children: Helen 
Rankin Westcott; Robert Thomas Westcott. Address: 3046 Gran- 
ville Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 407 

STANLEY WINBORNE 

CHAIRMAN STATE UTILITIES COMMISSION 

(Appointed by the Governor) 

Stanley Winborne, Democrat, was born at Murfreesboro, N. C, 
August 25, 1886. Son of B. B. and Nellie (Vaughan) Winborne. 
Attended public schools; Dr. E. E. Parham's School, Murfrees- 
boro; University of North Carolina, 1907; Ph. B. degree. Member 
of North Carolina Bar Association. Member of the North Caro- 
lina Society of the Cincinnati. Mason. Pi Kappa Alpha Frater- 
nity; Order of the Gorgan's Head. Kiwanis Club. Mayor, Mur- 
freesboro 1909-1910; County Attorney 1911-1914; Representative 
from Hertford County 1915-1919; Senator from First District 1921 ; 
Democratic nominee for Presidential Elector 1928. Appointed 
member of the Corporation Commission in February 1930, by 
Governor Gardner; elected for unexpired term in November 1930; 
re-elected for regular term 1932. Appointed Utilities Commis- 
sioner by Governor Ehringhaus, effective January 1, 1934; elected 
for four-year term in November 1934; re-elected November 8, 1938; 
made Chairman of present N. C. Utilities Commission by General 
Assembly 1941; reappointed Chairman by Governor Cherry, 1947; 
reappointed Chairman by Governor Umstead in 1953. Methodist. 
Married Miss Frances Sharp Jernigan, April 17, 1912. Four 
sons, three daughters, ten grandsons and six granddaughters. 
Address: Raleigh, N. C. 

DR. ELLEN WINSTON 

COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

(Appointed by the State Board of Public Welfare. Subject to 
approval by the Governor) 

Dr. Ellen Winston, Democrat, was born in Bryson City, N. C. 
Daughter of Stanley Warren and Marianna (Fischer) Black. At 
tended Bryson City Public Schools; Converse College, Spartan- 
burg, S. C, A.B.; Graduate work at N. C. State College and 
University of North Carolina; University of Chicago, M.A.; Ph.D. 
Honorary L.H.D., Woman's College of University of North Caro- 
lina, 1948; Honorary LL.D., Converse College, 1952. Appointed 
Commissioner of the State Board of Public Welfare, June 1, 1944. 



408 North Carolina Manual 

Member American Sociological Society, American Public Welfare 
Association, National Conference of Social Work, North Carolina 
Conference for Social Service, North Carolina Mental Hygiene 
Society, American Association of University Women, Raleigh Busi- 
ness and Professional Women's Club, Raleigh Woman's Club, and 
International Conference of Social Work. President State Legis- 
lative Council, 1943-1944; Legislative Chairman State Federation 
of Women's Clubs, 1943-1944. International Relations Chairman, 
N. C. Branch American Association of University Women, 1943- 
1946. Chairman Administrative Board of State Nutrition Com- 
mittee, 1947-1948. President, N. C. Conference for Social Service, 
1948-1950. Head, Department of Sociolog'y and Economics, Mere- 
dith College, 1940-1944. Consultant Federal Works Project Ad- 
ministration, 1939-1943. Consultant National Resources Planning 
Board, 1940-1943. Consultant United States Office of Education, 
1942-1944. Member, Board of Directors, North Carolina Mental 
Hyg-iene Society, North Carolina Conference for Social Service, 
Mental Health Council, and Hospital for Treatment of Children 
Affected with Spastic Ailments. Chairman, North Carolina Board 
of Eugenics. Ex-officio Member N. C. Medical Care Commission, 
State Recreation Commission, State Commission for the Blind, 
Prison Advisory Council, Advisory Board of Paroles, and State 
Board of Correction and Training-. Member, Policy Committee and 
Board of Directors, American Public Welfare Association. Chair- 
man, North Carolina Committee on Refugee Act of 1953. Member, 
Committee on Federal Aid to Welfare of Commission on Intergov- 
ernmental Relations. Member, Factfinding- Committee, Midcentury 
White House Conference on Children and Youth 1948-1950; Mem- 
ber Slum Clearance Advisory Committee, U. S. Housing and Home 
Finance Agency, 1950-1954; Member, Executive Committee, Na- 
tional Conference of Social Work, 1951-1954. Listed in "Biographi- 
cal Directory of American Scholars," "Who's Who in the Ameri- 
can Education," "Who's Who in the Western Hemisphere," and 
"Who's Who in America." Co-author of "Seven Lean Years"; 
"The Plantation South, 1934-1937"; "Foundations of American 
Population Policy." Autlior of numerous articles dealing- with so- 
cial and economic problems. Formerly special technical editor Na- 
tional Economic and Social Planning Association and for the Car- 
negie Corporation of New York. Presbyterian. Married Dr. San- 
ford Winston. Address : 1712 Piccadilly Lane, Raleigh, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 409 

HENRY ALTON WOOD 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY, N. C. STATE COMMISSION FOR THE BLINL 

(Appointed by the Commission) 

Henry Alton Wood, Democrat, was born in Lincolnton, N. C, 
September 7, 1904. Son of John Henry and Ella (Heavner) Wood. 
Attended Valle Crucis Industrial School; Lincolnton High School; 
A.B., University of North Carolina, 1927; University of North 
Carolina Graduate School, 1928-1931. Member, National Rehabili- 
tation Association; N. C. Society Social Service; N. C. Society 
Crippled Children; Exceptional Child; lAPES; American Associa- 
tion for the Blind; National Society for the Prevention of Blind- 
ness; Association of Rehabilitation Workers for the Blind, National 
President, 1949; Director, Amei'ican Association Workers for the 
Blind, 1950, Director, North Carolina State Association fer the 
Blind. Trustee, American Foundation for the Blind. First Vice 
President, States' Council of Agencies for the Blind, 1954. Direc- 
tor, States Council National Rehabilitation Association. Member, 
U. S. Delegation, World Council for the Welfare of the Blind, 
Paris, France, 1954. Member, Raleigh Lions Club. Episcopalian. 
Married Miss Pauline Patton, June 17, 1933. One daughter, Polly 
Patton, age 18. Address: 2619 Grant Avenue, Raleigh, N. C. 

NATHAN HUNTER YELTON 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY, TEACHERS' AND STATE EMPLOYEES' 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

(Elected by Board of Trustees) 

Nathan Hunter Yelton, Democrat, was born at Bakersville, 
N. C, April 5, 1901. Son of David and Sarah Jane (Deyton) Yel- 
ton. Attended Berea Academy, Ky., 1916-1918; Friendville High 
School, (Tenn.) 1921-1922; Yancey Colleg:iate Institute, Burnsville, 
N. C, 1922-1923; Maryville College, Tenn., 1923-1924; Summer 
Schools, University of Tennessee; B.S., Vanderbilt University; 
George Peabody College, Nashville, Tenn., 1928; Graduate work at 
the University of North Carolina, 1930, and in School Administra- 
tion, George Peabody, 1931. Member of Municipal Finance Officers 
Association, U. S. and Canada; Southern Conference on Teacher 
Retirement, National Council on Teacher Retirement. President 



410 North Carolina Manual 

Hio-h School Principals Association, Western District, N. C. E. A., 
1931; Western District, Superintendent's Association, N. C. E. A., 
1934. Superintendent, Mitchell County Schools, 1931-1937; State 
Director Public Assistance 1937-1941 ; Executive Secretary, State 
School Commission, 1941, 1942; Controller State Board of Educa- 
tion, 1942-1943; Director and Executive Secretary of the North 
Carolina Local Governmental Employees' Retirement System for 
cities and counties of North Carolina which began July 1, 1945. 
Immediate past president of Southern Conference Retirement Oflfi- 
cials. Chairman Mitchell County Democratic Executive Committee, 
Philadelphia; member State Democratic Executive Committee, 
1933-1937. Delegate to 1936 National Democratic Convention in 
1933-1943; elected again in 1945 and at present a member of The 
State Democratic Executive Committee. Former member Board of 
Directors National Council on Teacher Retirement and Chairman 
Legislative Committee. Immediate past president. Southern Con- 
ference on Teacher Retirement. Chairman National Council on 
Teacher Retirement, a division of the National Education Associa- 
tion, State Director of Public Employees Social Security program 
for cities, counties, and towns not covered by an existing retire- 
ment system. Board of Directors Raleigh United Fund. Pvt.. Stu- 
dent Army Training Corps, 1918; Captain U. S. Army, December 
19, 1943 to October 7, 1945 vdth eighteen months overseas. At- 
tached to British 11th Armored Division for eight months; partici- 
pated in the invasion of Normandy, North France and Rhineland 
Campaigns. Attached to 3rd Army with headquarters in Munich 
in charge of Military Government Education program for Bavaria 
in the denazification of the German School System. Promoted to 
rank of major and now holds this commission in the Officer Reserve 
corps. Mason, member Raleigh Lodge 500. Member American 
Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Raleigh Lions Club. Presbyte- 
rian; Deacon. Married Miss Cerena Sue Polk on April 16, 1922. 
One daughter, Natalie. Address: 113 Lake Boone Trail, Raleigh, 
N. C. 



Senator W. Kerr Scott 



Bonner — First District 



Fountain — Second District 



Barden— Third District 



Cooley — Fourth District 



Chatham— Fifth District 



Durham — Sixth District 




UNITED STATES SENATORS 

SAM J. ERVIN, JR. 

UNITED STATES SENATOR 

Sam J. Ervin, Jr., Democrat, of Morganton, N. C; born at 
Morganton September 27, 1896, a son of Samuel James and Laura 
(Powe) Ervin; graduated from University of North Carolina wit^ 
A.B. degree, 1917 and Harvard Law School with an LL.B. degree, 
1922; granted honorary LL.D. by University of North Carolina, 
1951; served in France with First Division in First World War; 
twice wounded in battle, twice cited for gallantry in action and 
awarded French Fourragere, Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster, 
Silver Star and Distinguished Service Cross; admitted to North 
Carolina Bar, 1919; practiced law at Morganton from 1922 until 
present, except during service on the bench; Representative 
fi-om Burke County in the North Carolina General Assembly, 
1923, 1925, 1931 ; Chairman Burke County Democratic Executive 
Committee, 1924; member North Carolina State Democratic Exec- 
utive Committee, 1930-1937; Judge, Burke County Criminal Court, 
1935-1937; Judge North Carolina Superior Court. 1937-1943; 
member North Carolina State Board of Law Examiners, 1944- 
1946; Representative from the Tenth North Carolina District in 
79th Congress, 1946-1947; Chairman, North Carolina Commission 
for the Improvement of the Administration of Justice, 1947-1949; 
Associate Justice, North Carolina Supreme Court, from February 
3, 1948 until June 11, 1954, when he qualified as a United States 
Senator fi-om North Carolina under appointment of Governor 
William B. Umstead as successor to the late Clyde R. Hoey; elected 
to the Senate at the general election on November 2, 1954, for a 
term expiring on January 3, 1957; Trustee, Morganton Graded 
Schools (1927-1930), University of North Carolina (1932-1935, 
1945-1946), and Davidson College (1948-1955); member American 
Bar Association, American Judicature Society, North Carolina 
Bar Association, North Carolina State Bar, American Legion, 
Army and Navy Legion of Valor, Disabled American Veterans, 
Society of the First Division, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Knights 
Templar, Scottish Rite Masons, Junior Order, Knights of Pythias, 
American Historical Association, North Carolina Society for the 



Biographical Sketches 4i3 

Preservation of Antiquities, North Carolina Society of Mayflower 
Descendants, South Carolina Historical Society, Southern His- 
torical Association, State Literary and Historical Association, 
Western North Carolina Historical Association, Morganton Ki- 
wanis Club, General Alumni Association of the University of 
North Carolina (President, 1947-1948). Presbyterian. Married 
Miss Margaret Biuce Bell of Concord, North Carolina, June 18, 
1924; three children: Sam J. Ei-vin, III, Margaret Leslie Ervin, 
and Laura Powe Ervin. Address: Morganton, N. C. 



414 North Carolina Manual 

WILLIAM KERR SCOTT 

UNITED STATES SENATOR 

William Kerr Scott, Democrat, was born at Haw River, Ala- 
mance County, on April 17, 1896. Son of R. W. and Elizabeth 
Hughes Scott. Attended Hawnelds Graded School, 1902-1908; 
Hawfields High School 1909-1913; N. C. State College 1913-1917; 
B.S. degree in Agriculture, honor student and athlete. Farmer 
and dairyman. Emergency Food Production Agent, U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, 1917; Private Field Artillery, 1918; Ala- 
mance County Farm Agent, 1920-30; Master North Carolina State 
Grange, 1930-33; Regional Director, Farm Debt Adjustment Pro- 
gram of Resettlement Administration, 1934-36; State Commis- 
sioner of Agriculture 1936. Reelected 1940, 1944. Resigned Febru- 
ary 14, 1948, to become candidate for Governor. Elected Governor 
November 2, 1948. Elected to the United States Senate, November 
2, 1954. Member American Jersey Cattle Club; N. C. Jersey Cattle 
Club (President) ; N. C. Rural Electrification Authority and first 
North Carolinian to make public address advocating rural electri- 
fication (Statesville in 1930) ; N. C. Dairy Association (President); 
State Farmers Convention (President) 1934; N. C. Cotton Growers 
Cooperative Association (Advisory Board) ; Walter B. Ellis Post 
No. 63 American Legion, Burlington; Originator Tobacco Advisory 
Council; Tobacco Advisory Board (Chairman 1945); National 
Association of Commissioners, Secretaries and Commissioners of 
Agriculture (President 1947) ; National Advisory Committee of 
Agricultural Research and Marketing 1946-1948; Special Com- 
mission to Mexico to study Hoof and Mouth Disease 1947. Re- 
ceived Progressive Farmer award "Man of the Year" as N. C. 
Agricultural Leader in 1937. Junior Order American Mechanics. 
Hawfields Presbyterian Church (Deacon 1920-32, Elder 1933-48). 
Married Miss Mary Elizabeth White of Hawfields, July 2, 1919. 
Three children: Osborne W., Haw River; Mary Kerr (Mrs. A. J. 
Loudermilk), Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio; Robert W., Private First Class 
with U. S. Army in Japan. Address: Haw River, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 415 

REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS 

HERBERT COVINGTON BONNER 

(First District — Counties: Beaufort, Camden, Chowan, Curri- 
tuck, Dare, Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Martin, Pasquotank, Perqui- 
mans, Pitt, Tyrrell and Washington. Population 247,894.) 

Herbert Covington Bonner, Democrat, was born in Washington, 
N. C. Son of Macon Herbert and Hannah Selby (Hare) Bonner. 
Attended Public and Private Schools, Washington, N. C. ; Warren- 
ton High School 1906-1909. P'armer. Sergeant Co. I, 322nd In- 
fantry, 81st Division Woild War I. Attended Officers Training 
School, Longres, France, after Armistice. Commander Beaufort 
County Post 1922, and District Commander American Legion, 
N. C. Dept., 1940. Elected to Seventy-sixth Congress from the 
First Congressional District, November 1940, to succeed Lindsay 
C. Warren, resigned. Re-elected to Seventy-seventh, Seventy- 
eighth, Seventy-ninth, Eightieth, Eighty-first, Eighty-second, 
Eighty-third and Eighty-fourth Congresses. Episcopalian, Mason, 
Shriner, Elk and Legionnaire. Married Mrs. Eva Hassell Hackney, 
August 2, 1924. Address: Washington, N. C. 

LAWRENCE H. FOUNTAIN 

(Second District — Counties: Bertie, Edgecombe, Greene, Hali- 
fax, Lenoir, Northampton, Warren, and Wilson. Population, 
306,904.) 

Lawrence H. Fountain, Democrat, was born in the village of 
Leggett, N. C, Edgecombe County, April 23, 1913. Son of Sallie 
(Barnes) and the late Lawrence H. Fountain. Educated in public 
schools of Edgecombe County. Received A.B. degree, 1934, LL.B. 
degree, 1936, at the University of North Carolina. Winner of 
Wiley P. Mangum Oratorical Medal and Mary D. Wright Debate 
Medal; President Philanthi'opic Liteiary Society; Member, Debate 
Council; Board of Directors Graham Memorial Building; 
Y. M. C. A. Deputation Team while at University of North Caro- 
lina. Law partner of V. E. Fountain in the Law Firm of Foun- 
tain & Fountain, Tarboro, N. C, Member, Edgecombe County 



416 North Carolina Manual 

Bar Association; North Carolina State Bar; North Carolina 
Bar Association; American Bar Association; Tarboro Merchants 
Association; Tarboro Chamber of Commerce; Tarboro Kiwanis 
Club, Past President, 1940, Lt. Governor Sixth Division of 
Carolinas District of Kiwanis International, 1950. Retired mem- 
ber Tarboro Junior Chamber of Commerce. Elected Tarboro's Man 
of the Year in 1948. Director of Edgecombe County Chapter 
American Red Ci'oss. Former President Young Democratic Club 
of Edgecombe County; Eastern Organizer of YDC's of North 
Carolina during administration of Ralph W. Gardner; former 
Chairman Second Congressional District Executive Committee of 
YDC's of North Carolina. Reading Clerk in North Carolina State 
Senate, 1936, Special Session; 1937 Regular Session; 1938 Spe- 
cial Session; 1939 Regular Session; 1941 Regular Session. State 
Senator from Fourth Senatorial District of North Carolina in 
General Assembly of 1947, 1949 and 1951. Enlisted in Army of 
United States March 4, 1942, with grade of Private, advanced 
to Corporal and Staff Sergeant, released from service as Major, 
J. A. G. C. March 4, 1946. Elected to the Eighty-Third Congress 
November 4, 1952; reelected to the Eighty-Fourth Congress on 
November 2, 1954. Member Howard Memorial Presbyterian Church, 
Tarboro, N. C; Deacon 1941-1946; ordained as Elder in June, 
1946. Sunday School attendance record of 36 years without ab- 
sence; teacher Men's Bible Class, Howard Memorial Presbyterian 
Church. Married Miss Christine Dail of Mount Olive, N. C, May 
14, 1942. Address: Tarboro, N. C. 

GRAHAM A. HARDEN 

(Third District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Duplin, Jones, 
Onslow, Pamlico, Pender, Sampson, and Wayne. Population, 308,- 
470.) 

Graham Arthur Barden, Democrat, was born in Sampson County, 
N. C, September 25, 1896. Son of James Jefferson and Mary Rob- 
inson (James) Barden. Attended Burgaw High School; University 
of North Carolina, LL.B. degree. Attorney-at-law. Member of 
Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; Sigma Chi Fraternity. Member 
Sudan Shrine; Doric Masonic Lodge; Benevolent and Protective 
Qrder of Elks; American Legion; Master of Doric Lodge 1928; 



Biographical Sketches 417 

Exalted Ruler of the Elks Lodge; Commander of the American 
Legion. Served in the United States Navy during World War L 
Judge of Craven County Court. Representative from Craven 
County to General Assembly 1933. Elected to the Seventy-fourth 
Congress, the Seventy-fifth Congress, the Seventy-sixth Congress, 
the Seventy-seventh Congress; the Seventy-eighth Congress, the 
Seventy-ninth Congress, the Eightieth Congress, the Eighty-first 
Congress, the Eighty-second Congress, the Eighty-third Congress, 
and the Eighty-fourth Congress. Presbyterian; Deacon of First 
Presbyterian Church, New Bern. Married Miss Agnes Foy; two 
children, Graham A., Jr., and Agnes F. Barden. Address: New 
Bern, N. C. 

HAROLD D. COOLEY 

(Fourth District — Counties: Chatham, Franklin, Johnston, 
Nash, Randolph, Vance, and Wake. Population, 401,913.) 

Harold Dunbar Cooley, Democrat, of Nashville, N. C, son of 
the late R. A. P. Cooley and Hattie Davis Cooley; born July 26, 
1897; attended the public schools of Nash County, the University 
of North Carolina, and the law school of Yale University; licensed 
to practice law in February, 1918; served in the Naval Aviation 
Flying Corps during World War I; presidential elector in 1932; 
President, Nash County Bar Association, 1933; member of Junior 
Order United American Mechanics, Phi Delta Theta fraternity, 
and Phi Delta Phi national law faternity; member of Baptist 
Church; married Miss Madeline Strickland in 1923, and is father 
of two children — a son, Roger A. P. Cooley, 2nd, and a daughter, 
Hattie Davis Cooley Lawrence. Elected to Seventy-third Con- 
gress, July 7, 1934; re-elected to the Seventy-fourth Congress, 
November 6, 1934, and to each succeeding Congress. Chairman, 
House Committee on Agriculture, Eighty-first and Eighty-second 
Congresses. Address: Nashville, N. C. 

THURMOND CHATHAM 

(Fifth District — Counties: Caswell, Forsyth, Granville, Person, 
Rockingham, Stokes and Surry. Population, 355,088.) 

Thurmond Chatham, Democrat, of Winston-Salem, N. C; born 
in Elkin, N. C, August 16, 1896; attended Woodberry Forest 



418 North Carolina Manual 

School, 1912-1915; University of North Carolina 1915-16; Yale 
University, 1916-17; during the First World War enlisted in the 
United States Navy as seaman second class, and served from 
May 1917 to June 1919; in World War II again served in the 
Navy from February 14, 1942, to November 25, 1945, with combat 
duty in the Southwest Pacific; decorated with the Bronze Star 
Medal, the Secretary of the Navy's Commendation Medal, and 
the Royal Order of Nassau with Swords from the Dutch Govern- 
ment. American Theater Ribbon, European Theater Ribbon, 
Asiatic Theater Ribbon with three battle stars, Woi'ld War 
I Ribbon, and the Victory Ribbon; went to work in the mills 
of the Chatham Manufacturing Company in July 1919 and rose 
through various positions to the presidency of the company and 
chairman of the board of directors; engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits as owner and operator of Klondike Farm at Elkin, N. C; 
former president of North Carolina Dairymen's Association, mem- 
ber of State Board of Conservation and Development, and county 
commissioner of Forsyth County; is a member of the National 
Grange, the Farm Bureau, member of the visiting committee of 
Woman's College at Greensboro, and director of Hugh Chatham 
Memorial Hospital at Elkin; member, Society of Cincinnati; elected 
to the Eighty-first Congress on November 2, 1948, and reelected to 
the Eighty-second Congress on November 7, 1950; reelected without 
opposition to the Eighty-third Congress on November 4, 1952; re- 
elected to Eighty-fourth Congress on November 2, 1954. Married 
to Mrs. Patricia Firestone Coyner, November 16, 1950; two sons 
by former marriage, Hugh Gwyn Chatham and Richard Thurmond 
Chatham, Jr.; one son by present marriage, Walter Firestone 
Chatham, born January 7, 1952. Address: Winston-Salem, N. C. 

CARL T. DURHAM 

(Sixth District — Counties: Alamance, Durham, Guilford and 
Orange. Population, 398,351.) 

Carl Thomas Durham, Democrat, was born at White Cross, 
Bingham Township, Orange County, N. C, August 28, 1892. Son 
of Claude P. and Delia Ann (Lloyd) Durham. Attended White 
Cross Graded School 1898 to 1908; Mandale High School 1909, 
1910, 1911 and 1912; University of North Carolina School of 



Biographical Sketches 419 

Pharmacy 1916 and 1917. Pharmacist. Member N.C.P.A.; vice- 
president, N.C.P.A. Member Chapel Hill Board of Aldermen 1922 
to 1927; Chapel Hill School Board 1927 to 1938; Orange County 
Board of Commissioners 1933 to December 1, 1938. Elected to the 
76th Cong-ress, 77th Congress, 78th Congress, 79th Congress, 80th 
Congress, 81st Congress, 82nd Congress, 83rd Congress and 84th 
Congress. Third ranking member of the Armed Services Com- 
mittee and Vice-Chairman 84th Congress Joint Committee on 
Atomic Energy. Married Miss Margaret Joe Whitsett (now de- 
ceased), December 30, 1919. Five children: Mrs. Gregg Murray, 
Margaret, Anne, Carl T., Jr. and Mrs. Bill D. Sessler. Address: 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

FRANK ERTEL CARLYLE 

(Seventh District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, 
Cumberland, Harnett, New Hanover and Robeson. Population, 
394,214.) 

Frank Ertel Carlyle, Demociat, of Lumberton, N. C; lawyer; 
born in Lumberton, N. C, April 7, 1897, son of William W. and 
Lillian 0. Carlyle; educated in the public schools of Robeson 
County, Wilson Memorial Academy, Nyack, N. Y., and the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina; licensed to practice law in January 1921. 
Served in the United States Navy during World War I ; former 
member Robeson County Board of Elections; former chairman 
Robeson County Democratic Executive Committee; former presi- 
dent 9th Judicial District Bar Association; past president Lum- 
berton Kiwanis Club and Lumberton Rotary Club; member of the 
American Legion for more than 25 years and past commander of 
Lumberton Post; member Forty and Eight; 32nd degree Mason, 
Shriner; B. P. 0. Elks; Phi Delta Theta Fraternity; elected So- 
licitor 9th Judicial District of North Carolina in 1938, and re- 
elected in 1942 and 1946; elected to the 81st Congress November 
1948; re-elected to the 82nd Congress November 1950; re-elected 
to the 83rd Congress November 1952; re-elected to the 84th Con- 
gress November 1954; member of the Committee on Interstate and 
Foreign Commerce. Baptist. Married Lois Godwin Caldwell, 
daughter of Luther H. and Nora G. Caldwell, May 19, 1927. One 
daughter, Mrs. Doran Berry. 



Senator Sam J. Ervin, Jr. 



Carlyle — Seventh District 



Deane — Eighth District 



Alexander — Ninth District 



Jonas — Tenth District 



Jones — Eleventh District 



Shuford— Twelfth District 




Biographical Sketches 421 

CHARLES BENNETT DEANE 

(Eighth District — Counties: Anson, Davidson, Davie, Hoke, Lee, 
Montgomery, Moore, Richmond, Scotland, Union, Wilkes, and 
Yadkin. Population, 369,455.) 

Charles Bennett Deane, Democrat, of Rockingham, N. C, was 
born in Anson County; son of John Leaird and Florence (Boyette) 
Deane. Attended grade school Pee Dee Academy, Rockingham, 
N. C; preparatory education Trinity Park School, Durham, N. C. ; 
graduated from Wake Forest College, 1923 with LL.B. degree; 
awarded ODK Wake Forest 1951; licensed attorney; Register of 
Deeds of Richmond County, 1926-34; retired to engage in practice 
of law, and in the operation of general insurance business; com- 
piler of United States Congressional Directory (1935-39) ; attorney. 
Wage and Hour Division, Washington, D. C, 1939; chairman Rich- 
mond County Democratic Executive Committee, 12 years; served as 
a trustee of Wake Forest College; acted as recording secretary, 
North Carolina Baptist State Convention since 1932. Elected on 
November 5, 1946 to the Eightieth Congress and re-elected to all 
succeeding Congresses. Baptist; married Agnes Cree, Rocking- 
ham, N. C, October 15, 1927; two daughters, Cree Deane and Carol 
Deane, and one son Charles Deane, Jr. Address: Rockingham, 
N. C. 

HUGH QUINCY ALEXANDER 

(Ninth District — Counties : Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Ca- 
barrus, Caldwell, Iredell, Rowan, Stanly and Watauga. Popula- 
tion, 338,907.) 

Hugh Quincy Alexander, Democrat, U. S. Representative, 9th 
N. C. District; was born in Glendon, N. C, August 7, 1911. Son 
of O. S. and Mary Belle (Reynolds) Alexander. Attended Goldston 
Grammar School, 1918-1925; West Durham High School, 1925- 
1928; Durham High School, 1928-1929; Duke University, 1929- 
1932; University of North Carolina Law School, 1934-1937, LL.B. 
Lawyer. Member of the N. C. Bar Association; Cabarrus County 
Bar. Shriner, Oasis Temple, President Cabarrus County Shrine 
Club, 1946; Member of Executive Club; Kannapolis Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce; Cannon Memorial Y's Men's Club; Past Presi- 



422 North Carolina Manual 

dent of Interstate Y.M.C.A.; Youn^ Men's Council N. C. and S. C; 
President Kannapolis Y. D. C. 1948; Beaver-Pittman Post Ameri- 
can Legion, Commander, 1946. State Commander of American 
Legion, 1950; Past Judge Advocate 12th District V. F. W.; Chair- 
man Public Affairs Committee of North Carolina Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce 1949; Representative in the N. C. General As- 
sembly Sessions of 1947 and 1949. Solicitor Cabarrus County- 
Court, 1950-1952; Member National American Legion Boy's State. 
Entered service as Ensign, U.S.N.R., June 19, 1942; discharged 
as Lieutenant, U.S.N.R., December 25, 1945. Elected to Eighty- 
third Congress, November 5, 1952; re-elected to Eighty-fourth 
Congress, November 2, 1954. Presbyterian. Married Miss Myrtle 
Elizabeth White, September 25, 1942. One daughter, Elizabeth 
Rippy Alexander, and three sons, Hugh Q. Alexander, Jr., Stephen 
Alexander, and William George Alexander. Address: 207 S. Main 
St., Kannapolis, N. C. 



CHARLES RARER JONAS 

(Tenth District — Counties : Avery, Burke, Catawba, Lincoln, 
Mecklenburg and Mitchell. Population, 360,318.) 

Charles Raper Jonas, Republican, of Lincolnton, N. C, was born 
in Lincoln County, N. C, December 9, 1904. Son of Charles An- 
drew and Rosa (Petrie) Jonas. Attended Lincolnton High School, 
1918-1921; University of North Carolina, A.B., 1925; University 
of North Carolina Law School, J.D., 1928. Attorney at law. 
Member Lincoln County, North Carolina and American Bar 
Associations. President North Carolina Bar Association, 1946- 
1947. Member North Carolina National Guard since December 
29, 1928; active duty in United States Army, 1941-1946, being 
discharged as Lieutenant-Colonel; at present Colonel, North Caro- 
lina National Guard. Elected to Congress from the Tenth North 
Carolina Congressional District, November 4, 1952; re-elected 
November 2, 1954. Methodist. Married Miss Annie Elliott Lee, 
August 14, 1929. Children: Charles Jonas, Jr., age 13; Richard 
Elliott Jonas, age 11. Address: Lincolnton, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 423 



WOODROW WILSON JONES 



(Eleventh District — Counties: Cleveland, Gaston, Madison, Mc- 
Dowell, Polk, Rutherford, and Yancey. Population, 295,724.) 

Woodrow Wilson Jones, Democrat, was born near Rutherford- 
ton, N. C, January 26, 1914. Son of Bernard Bartlett and Carl 
Jane (Nanney) Jones. Attended Forest City and Gilkey, N. C. 
Grammar Schools, 1921-1928; Gilkey High School, 1928-1930; 
Rutherfordton-Spindale High School, 1930-1932; Mars Hill Col- 
lege, Mars Hill, N. C, 1932-1934; Wake Forest College Law School, 
1934-1937, LL.B. degree. Attorney. Member of the North Caro- 
lina Bar Association ; Rutherford County Bar Association, Presi- 
dent, 1943; 18th Judicial District Bar Association; Rutherfoi-dton 
Kiwanis Club; President, 1943, Director, 1947; Rutherfordton 
Junior Chamber of Commerce. City Attorney for Rutherfordton, 
N. C, 1941-1943; Solicitor, Rutherford County Recorder's Court, 
1941-1944. Representative from Rutherford County in the General 
Assembly of 1947 and 1949. Elected to the Eighty-first Congress, 
November 7, 1950 to fill out the unexpired teim of Honorable A. L. 
Bulwinkle, deceased. Elected to the Eighty-second Congress, No- 
vember 7, 1950; elected to the Eighty-third and Eighty-fourth 
Congresses; member Committee on the Judiciary. Baptist; 
Teacher, Baraca Sunday School Class, 1940-1944; Deacon; 
Teacher, Young Men's Sunday School Class. Lieutenant (jg) 
United States Naval Reserve; active duty, 1944-1946. Married 
Miss Rachel Elizabeth Phelps of Lillington, November 21, 1936. 
Two children: Woodrow Wilson Jones, Jr., age 14 years; Michael 
Anthony Jones, age 12 years. Address: Rutherfordton, N. C. 

GEORGE ADAMS SHUFORD 

(Twelfth District — Counties: Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Gra- 
ham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Swain and Transyl- 
vania. Population, 284,691.) 

George Adams Shuford, Democrat, was born in Asheville, N. C, 
September 5, 1895. Son of George A. and Julia E. (Dean) Shu- 
ford. Attended Asheville public schools and graduated from Ashe- 
ville High School in 1913; attended University of North Carolina 
and thereafter the University of Georgia, receiving LL.B. degree 



424 North Carolina Manual 

at the latter university in 1917; admitted to the practice of law 
in the State of Georgia in 1917. Attended First Officer's Training 
Camp, Fort McPherson, Georgia, May, 1917 and commissioned 
2nd Lieutenant Infantry, AugTast, 1917; thereafter in November, 
1917 was assigned to the 119th Infantry Regiment of the 30th 
Combat Division; commissioned First Lieutenant in January, 1918 
and served with the 19th Infantry Regiment in the United States 
and France until discharged at Camp Jackson in 1919. Licensed 
to practice law in the State of North Carolina following military 
service, August 1920. Member Buncombe County Bar Association, 
President in 1940; North Carolina State Bar Association; Chair- 
man Buncombe County Board of Elections, 1940-1942. Representa- 
tive from Buncombe County in the North Carolina General As- 
sembly of 1945 and 1947. Appointed Superior Court Judge for 
the State of North Carolina in the fall of 1947 and served as such 
until July, 1949. Elected to the Eighty-third Congress, November 
4, 1952. Member of House Committee, Interior and Insular Affairs. 
Re-elected to the Eighty-fourth Congress November 2, 1954. Mem- 
ber Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity; thirty-second degree Mason 
and Shriner; Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Episcopalian. 
Married Miss Daphne Brown, April 23, 1932. Children: Sydney 
Herbert Shuford, Elizabeth Dean Shuford, Fuller Adams Shuford. 
Address: Asheville, N. C. 



Chief Justice Barnhill 



Justice Winborne 



Justice Denny 



Justice Johnson 



Justice Parker 



Justice Bobbitt 



Justice Higgins 




JUSTICES OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 
SUPREME COURT 

MAURICE VICTOR BARNHILL 

CHIEF JUSTICE 

Maurice Victor Barnhill, Democrat, was born in Halifax County, 
December 5, 1887. Son of Martin V. and Mary (Dawes) Barn- 
hill. Attended public schools of Halifax County; Enfield Graded 
School; Elm City Academy; University of North Carolina Law 
School, 1907-1909; LL.D., University of North Carolina, 1946. 
Member North Carolina Bar Association. Prosecuting- Attorney, 
Nash County Court, April 1914; member Legislature (House) 
1921; Judge Nash County Court, April 1923; former Chairman 
Nash County Highway Commission and Board of Trustees Rocky 
Mount Graded School District. Judge Superior Court, June 1924. 
Appointed by Governor Clyde R. Hoey, July 1, 1937, Associate 
Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina and elected for 
term of eight years November 8, 1938; re-elected November 1946; 
appointed Chief Justice by Governor William B. Umstead, Febru- 
ary 1, 1954; elected November 2, 1954 to fill unexpired term of 
W. P. Stacy, deceased. Chairman of the N. C. Judicial Council, 
1951, 1954. Member Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; Mason and 
Shriner. Married Miss Nannie Rebecca Cooper, June 5, 1912. 
Two children: M. V. Barnhill, Jr. and Rebecca Barnhill. Metho- 
dist. Address: Rocky Mount, N. C. 

JOHN WALLACE WINBORNE 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

John Wallace Winborne was born in Chowan County, N. C, 
July 12, 1884. Son of Dr. Robert H. and Annie F. (Parker) Win- 
borne. Attended Horner Military School, Oxford, 1900-1902; A.B., 
University of North Carolina, 1906; LL.D., University of North 
Carolina, 1946. Married twice: first to Charlie May Blanton, 
March 30, 1910 who died November 4, 1940. To them two children 
were born : daughter, Charlotte Blanton now Mrs. Charles M. 
Shaffer, Chapel Hill, N. C, and a son, John Wallace, Jr., of 



Biographical Sketches 427 

Northampton, Mass. Second marriage to Mrs. Lalage Gates Rori- 
son, June 14, 1947. Taught Bingham Military School, Asheville, 
N. C, 1906-1907. Admitted to practice, North Carolina, 1906. 
Practiced, Marion, N. C, after 1907. Member firm of Pless and 
Winborne, 1907-1919; Pless, Winborne and Pless, 1919-1926; Pless, 
Winborne, Pless and Proctor, 1926-1927; Winborne and Proctor, 
1928-1937. Member of Boaid of Aldermen, 1913-1921; Attorney, 
Marion and McDowell County, 1918-1937; Member local Selective 
Service Board during World War I. Chairman Democratic Execu- 
tive Committee, McDowell County, 1910-1912; Member State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, 1916-1937; Chairman, State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, 1932-1937. Member Local Govern- 
ment Commission of North Carolina, 1931-1933. Chairman N. C. 
Judicial Council, 1954. Delta Kappa Epsilon; Mason; Grand 
Master of Masons of North Carolina, 1931; Executive Club of 
Raleigh. Member North Carolina State Bar Association and 
American Bar Association. Honorary member of North Carolina 
Society of the Cincinnati; Honorary member Phi Delta Phi; 
Marion Kiwanis Club (president, 1923). Appointed by Governor 
Hoey Associate Justice Supreme Court of North Carolina, July 1, 
1937; elected for a term of eight years in November, 1938; re- 
elected for a term of eight years in November, 1946; re-elected for 
a term of eight years in November, 1954. Home address: Marion, 
N. C. Official address: Raleigh, N. C. 



EMERY B. DENNY 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Emery Byrd Denny was born in Surry County, North Carolina, 
November 23, 1892. Son of Rev. Gabriel and Sarah Delphina 
(Stone) Denny. Attended public schools of Surry County, Gilliam 
Academy, and University of North Carolina. Honorary degree of 
LL.D. conferred by the University of North Carolina in 1946 and 
by Wake Forest College in 1947. Admitled to practice law, 1919. 
Member law firm of Denny & Gaston, 1919-1921, Mangum & Denny, 
1921-1930, practiced alone 1930-1942. Attorney for Gaston County, 
1927-1942, and North Carolina Railroad, 1937-1938; Mayor of 
Gastonia 1929-1937. Private, corporal, sergeant and master elec- 
trician in aviation section, Signal Corps, World War I. President, 



428 North Carolina Manual 

Gastonia Chamber of Commerce, 1925; Chairman, Gaston County 
Board of Elections, 1924-1926; Chairman, Gaston County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, 1926-1928; Chairman, State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, 1940-1942. President and director 
Ranlo Manufacturing Company, 1936-1941; Trustee, University 
of North Carolina, 1941-1943; Chairman, Board of Ti-ustees of 
Gaston County Public Library, 1935-1942; Chairman, Board of 
Trustees of Garrison Memorial Hospital, 1934-1939 ; special counsel 
for the Governor during the General Assembly of 1941. Member 
American Legion; Phi Delta Phi; Watauga Club; Holland Me- 
morial Lodge No. 668, A. F. & A. M.; Gastonia Chapter No. 66, 
Royal Arch Masons; Gastonia Commandery No. 28, Knights Tem- 
plar and St. Titus Conclave No. 72, Red Cross of Constantine. 
Past Grand Marshall of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina. 
Baptist. Tiiistee, North Carolina Baptist Hospital, Winston- 
Salem, N. C, 1949, 1951, 1955-1958; Trustee and member of 
Executive Committee of the Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary, Wake Forest, N. C. Appointed Associate Justice 
Supreme Court of North Carolina by Governor Broughton, Febru- 
ary 3, 1942, to succeed the late Associate Justice Heriot Clarkson. 
Elected to till out the unexpired term and for a full eight-year 
term, November 3, 1942; re-elected for a term of eight years No- 
vember 7, 1950. Married Bessie Brandt BroMrn, Salisbury, N. C, 
December 7, 1922. Children, Emery B., Ji-., Betty Brown, Sarah 
Catherine (now Mrs. Bailey P. Williamson of Raleigh), and Jeane 
Stone. Address: Raleigh, N. C. Home address: Gastonia, N. C. 



JEFFERSON DEEMS JOHNSON, JR. 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Jefferson Deems Johnson, Jr., Democrat, was born in Garland, 
N. C, June 6, 1900. Son of Jefferson Deems and Mary Lily 
(Wright) Johnson. Attended Trinity Park School, Durham, N. C, 
1917-1918; A.B., Trinity College, 1923; graduated from Duke 
University Law School, 1926. Entered practice of law in Clinton, 
fall of 1926. Appointed Special Superior Court Judge by Gover- 
nor J. M. Broughton, 1941; reappointed in 1943, serving until June 
1945. Resumed practice of law in Clinton. Was nominated by 
Democratic Executive Committee and elected in November 1950 



Biographical Sketches 429 

to fill out unexpired term of Justice A. A. F. Seawell, deceased, 
of the Supreme Court of North Carolina; re-elected for a term 
of eight years November 4, 1952. Member North Carolina Bar 
Association. Town Attorney of Clinton, 1928-1941. State Senator 
from the Ninth Senatorial District in the General Assemblies of 
1937 and 1941. Member of the Commission of Recodification of 
statute law of the State, 1941-1943; former member State Board 
of Law Examiners. Member, Sigma Chi and Omicron Delta Kappa 
Fraternities. Private in World War I. Past Commander of the 
Clinton Post of the American Legion. Methodist. Married Miss 
Frances Faison, August 17, 1935. Children : Frances, age seven- 
teen; Mary Lily, age fifteen; Jeff" D., IH, age thirteen. Residence: 
Clinton, N. C. Official address: Raleigh, N. C. 



ROBERT HUNT PARKER 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Robert Hunt Parker, Democrat, was born in Enfield, N. C, Feb- 
ruary 15, 1892. Son of R. B. and Victoria C. (Hunt) Parker. At- 
tended Enfield Giaded School; graduating in 1908; University of 
North Carolina, 1908-1911; University of Virginia, 1911-1912, B.A.; 
University of Virginia Law School, 1912-1915, LL.B.; Wake For- 
est Law School, summer of 1914. Field Artillery officer in World 
War I with nearly seventeen months of service in France. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1923. Solicitor for the State 
Third Judicial District, February 23, 1924-September 24, 1932; 
Judge Superior Court, September 24, 1932-November 25, 1952; 
having been nominated and elected without opposition in 1934, 
1942 and 1950. Nominated in Democratic Primary of 1952 for 
Associate Justice of the N. C. Supreme Court and elected No- 
vember 4, 1952, assuming office November 25, 1952. Member 
American Legion; 40 & 8; Veterans of Foreign Wars. Episco- 
palian. Married Mrs. Rie Williams Rand of Greensboro, N. C, 
November 28, 1925. Home address: Roanoke Rapids, N. C. Official 
address: Raleigh, N. C. 



430 North Carolina Manual 

WILLIAM HAYWOOD BOBBITT 

associate justice 
William Haywood Bobbitt, Democrat, was born in Raleigh, N. C, 
October 18, 1900. Son of James Henry and Eliza May (Burkhead) 
Bobbitt. Attended graded schools of Baltimore, Md.; Charlotte 
High School of Charlotte, N. C, 1913-1917; University of North 
Carolina, A.B., 1921; University of North Carolina School of 
Law, 1920-1921. Licensed to practice law January 30, 1922; asso- 
ciated with firm of Stewart & McRae until September 1, 1922; 
member of firm of Parker, Stewart, McRae & Bobbitt from Sep- 
tember 1, 1922 to October 1, 1925; member of firm of Stewart, 
McRae & Bobbitt from October 1, 1925 to October 1, 1930; mem- 
ber of firm of Stewart & Bobbitt from October 1, 1930 through 
December 31, 1938; admitted to practice in State Courts of North 
Carolina, United States District Court, United States Circuit 
Court of Appeals, Fourth Circuit, and the Supreme Court of the 
United States. Member Mecklenburg County Bar Association; 
North Carolina Bar Association ; American Bar Association ; 
American Judicature Society. Received honorary LL.D. degree 
from Davidson College, 1953. Member N. C. Commission to study 
Improvement of Administration of Justice in N. C, 1947-1949; 
N. C. Judicial Council, 1949-1954; Past President and life member 
of Charlotte Civitan Club; Trustee of Brevard College, 1933-1952; 
President, General Alumni Association, University of North Caro- 
lina. Elected resident Superior Court Judge of the 14th Judicial 
District in 1938 and again in 1946; served as Superior Court 
Judge continuously from January 1, 1939 through January, 1954; 
appointed by Governor William B. Umstead as Associate Justice, 
North Carolina Supreme Court, February 1, 1954, and served 
under such appointment until 1954 General Election ; elected with- 
out opposition in 1954 General Election to unexpired portion of 
term of former Associate Justice Barnhill and for full eight-year 
term beginning January 1, 1955. Member Dilworth Methodist 
Church, Charlotte, N. C; member Official Board; Teacher Men's 
Bible Class. Married Miss Sarah Buford Dunlap, February 28, 
1924. Children: Mrs. John W. Carter, Weldon, N. C; Wm. H. 
Bobbitt, Jr., Charlotte, N. C; Mrs. Ekkehart Sachtler, Forest 
Hills, N. Y.; Harriet Bobbitt, Greensboro College, Greensboro, 
N. C. Home address: Charlotte, N. C. Official address: Raleigh, 
N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 431 

CARLISLE WALLACE HIGGINS 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

Carlisle Wallace Higgins, Democrat, was born at Ennice, N. C, 
October 17, 1889. Son of Martin A. and Jennie C. (Bledsoe) Hig- 
gins. Attended Bridle Creek Academy, Independence, Va., 1905- 
1908; University of North Carolina, A.B., 1912; University of 
North Carolina Law School, 1913-1914. Member North Carolina 
Bar Association; Forsyth County Bar Association; North Caro- 
lina State Bar. Solicitor, Eleventh Judicial District, 1930-1934; 
United States Attorney, Middle District of North Carolina, 1934- 
1947; Assistant Chief and Acting Chief International Prosecution 
Section, International Military Tribunal, Tokyo, 1945-1947. Repre- 
sentative from Alleghany County in the General Assembly of 1925 
and State Senator from the Twenty-ninth Senatorial District in 
the General Assembly of 1929. Appointed Associate Justice 
Supreme Court of North Carolina by Governor Umstead, June 8, 
1954 to succeed Sam J. Ervin, Jr. Member Masonic Lodge; Ameri- 
can Legion; Forty and Eight. Methodist. MaiTied Miss Myrtle 
Bryant. Children: C. W. Higgins, Jr., Galax, Vii-ginia; Mrs. Mary 
Cecile Bridges, Greensboro, N. C. Official address: Raleigh, N. C. 



Luther Ernest Earnhardt 

President of the Senate 



Aydlett of Pasquotank 
Blythe of Mecklenburg 
Britt of DupHn 



Brock of Davie 
Bunn of Nash 
Cook of Caldwell 



Cooke of Gaston 
Crew of Halifax 
Currie of Durham 



Eagles of Wilson 
Garrison of Lincoln 
Godwin of Gates 



Graves of Forsyth 
Hall of Jackson 

Hancock of Granville 




MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

SENATORS 

LUTHER ERNEST EARNHARDT 

PRESIDENT OF SENATE 

(Twenty-first District — Counties: Rowan, and CabaiTus. Two 
Senators.) 

Luther Ernest Earnhardt, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
first Senatorial District, was born at Concord, N. C, November 
29, 1903. Son of George Thomas and Lillie Virginia (Faggart) 
Earnhardt. Graduated from Concord High School, May, 1921; 
LL.E. Wake Forest College, May, 1925. Lawyer. Member Cabar- 
rus County Bar Association, President, 1942; member State Ear 
and American Bar Associations. Chairman Cabarrus County Board 
of Elections, 1933-1944. Pi Kappa Alpha National Fraternity 
(Wake Forest College) ; Charter member Golden Bough, Wake 
Forest College; Omicron Delta Kappa, Beta Alpha Circle, National 
Honor Society, Wake Forest College; Secretary Student Body, 
Wake Forest College. Member Rotary International. Trustee Con- 
cord Community Center, 1940-1941; Trustee Public Library, 1943- 
1949. Member General Statutes Commission, 1945-1953; Director 
Concord Chamber of Commerce, 1949-1951 ; National Counsellor, 
U. S. Chamber of Commerce, 1947-1950; Past Vice-President and 
Director Concord Community Boys' Club, Inc. State Senator in 
the General Assembly, 1945, 1947, 1949, 1951 and 1953. Methodist; 
Member Board of Stewards; Teacher Adult Bible Class. Married 
Miss Eurvelle McFarland, June 3, 1930. Four children: Luther 
Ernest, Jr.; Phoebe Jean; John McFarland; Ann Drucilla Earn- 
hardt. Address: Concord, N. C. 

N. ELTON AYDLETT 

{First District — Counties: Bertie, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, 
Gates, Hertford, Pasquotank and Perquimans. Two Senators.) 

N. Elton Aydlett, Democrat, Senator from the First Senatorial 
District, was born at Harbinger, Currituck County, N. C. Son of 
N. T. and Lydia (Duncan) Aydlett. Attended University of North 
Carolina, Class of 1925; University of North Carolina Law School, 



434 North Carolina Manual 

LL.B., 1926. Lawyer. Member North Carolina State Bar. Clerk 
Superior Court and Juvenile Judge of Pasquotank County, 1928- 
1946; Chairman Pasquotank County Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee, 1943-1954; member State Democratic Executive Committee, 
1950-1954; Mayor Elizabeth City, 1951-1955. Director and Gen- 
eral Counsel Kill Devil Hills Memorial Society; Director N. C. 
League of Municipalities; President Elizabeth City Chamber of 
Commerce, 1948-1951; Past President and Director Elizabeth City 
Kiwanis Club; Past President Elizabeth City Concert Association. 
Member Lambda Chi Alpha Social Fraternity; Phi Alpha Delta 
Legal Fraternity; B.P.O. Elks; Improved Order of Red Men. 
Baptist. Married Miss Pantha L. Houser, June 6, 1928. One 
daughter, Patricia Ann Aydlett, age 24. Address: 1006 West 
Church Street, Elizabeth City, N. C. 



FRANKLIN JACKSON BLYTHE 

(Twentieth District — County: Mecklenburg. One Senator.) 

Franklin Jackson Blythe, Democrat, Senator from the Twentieth 
Senatorial District, was born in Mecklenburg County, N. C, Sep- 
tember 27, 1888. Son of Richard Samuel and Virginia (Gamble) 
Blythe. Attended Huntersville High School; University of North 
Carolina. President Blythe Brothers Company. Member American 
Society of Civil Engineers; N. C. Educational Radio & TV Com- 
m_ission; former member N. C. Medical Care Commission; Trus- 
tee Greater University of North Carolina; Director N. C. En- 
gineering Foundation; Director United Community Services of 
Charlotte and Mecklenburg County; Chairman Board of Commis- 
sioners of Charlotte Memorial Hospital. Member Oasis Temple of 
the Shrine. Senator in the General Assembly of 1949. Presby- 
terian ; Deacon. Married Miss Grace Frazier, December 23, 1913. 
Children: F. J. Blythe, Jr., Richard Neal Blythe and Mrs. Sara 
Virginia Blythe Williamson. Address: 2505 Sharon Lane, Char- 
lotte, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 435 

ALBERT MITCHELL BRITT 

(Ninth District — Counties: Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and 
Sampson. Two Senators.) 

Albert Mitchell Britt, Democrat, Senator from the Ninth Sena- 
torial District, was born at Turkey, N. C, February 25, 1918. Son 
of Albert T. and Minnie <:. (Blount) Britt. Attended Warsaw 
Public Schools, 1925-1936; University of North Carolina, A.B., 
1940; University of North Carolina Law School, LL.B., 1948. Law- 
yer and farmer. Member Phi Alpha Delta Leg:al Fraternity. 
Served in United States Navy as Lieutenant (j.g.), 1942-1945. 
Presbyterian. Married Miss Clara McPhail, March 20, 1943. One 
daug:hter, Dorothy Britt, age 6. Address: Warsaw, N. C. 

BURR COLEY BROCK 

(Twenty-fourth District — Counties: Davie, Wilkes and Yadkin. 
One Senator.) 

Burr Coley Brock, Republican, Senator from the Twenty-fourth 
Senatorial District, was born in Farmington, N. C, November 26, 
1891. Son of Moses B. and Vert (Coley) Brock. Attended schools 
of Cooleemee, Woodleaf, Farmington and Clemmons High School, 
graduating in 1913; University Law School, 1913-1915; A.B., 1916. 
Lawyer. Mason; Junior Order United American Mechanics; Odd 
Fellows; Woodmen of the World; President Mocksville Lodge of 
P.O.S. of A., also county and district president. Chairman Boy 
Scout Committee, Farmington, 1940-1949. Member School Com- 
mittee, 1941-1949. Trustee Appalachian State Teachers College, 
1949-1952, Vice Chairman, 1952-1956. Representative in the Gen- 
eral Assembly from Davie County in 1917, 1933, 1935; Minority 
Leader in 1951. State Senator, 1937, 1943 and 1949. Minority 
Leader in the General Assembly, 1933; Chairman Joint House and 
Senate Caucus Committee, 1935. Methodist; Teacher Young Men's 
Class for eight years, Mocksville M. E. Church, South; now teach- 
ing Men's Wesley Bible Class; Chairman Circuit Board of Stew- 
ards and Lay Leader Farmington Methodist Circuit; Chairman of 
Board of Stewards; Chairman, Building Committee; Superintend- 
ent of Sunday School for four years ; Associate Lay Leader, Elkin 
District, 1940-1941; Lay Leader, 1942-1943; Associate Lay Leader 



436 North Carolina Manual 

of Thomasville District; Secretary and Treasurer of District Trus- 
tees and Chairman of the Location and Building Committee. Gov- 
ernment appeal agent, World War II. Married Miss Laura Tabor, 
December 23, 1919. Children: B. C. Brock, Jr.; Margaret Jo, 
Francis, John Tabor, James Moses, Richard Joe, William Laurie 
and Rufus Leo. Address: Mocksville, N. C. 

CHARLES SETTLE BUNN 

{Sixth District — Counties: Franklin, Nash and Wilson. Two 
Senators.) 

Charles Settle Bunn, Democrat, Senator from the Sixth Sena- 
torial District, was born at Spring Hope, N. C, February 4, 1892. 
Son of Charles Dew and Sidney Hawkins (Bissette) Bunn. At- 
tended Stanhope School, 1900-1910; Trinity Park Prep School, 
1910-1913; Trinity College, A.B., 1917. Farmer. Superintendent 
and teacher in one of Nash County high schools, 1917-1918; Officer 
Candidate, 1917-1918, Technical Military Training School, State 
College; Officers Training School, Camp Taylor, Louisville, Ky. ; 
President, N. C. Swine Breeders Association, 1936-1944; Com- 
mander, American Legion Post No. 91, 1937-1940; Proctor Citizen- 
ship Cup Lions Club, 1937; Chairman N. C. Area School Com- 
mission, 1945-1947; member N. C. Education Committee, 1947- 
1948; President, N. C. Crop Improvement Association, 1947-1948; 
Master Farm Family Award by Progressive Farmer and N. C. 
State College Extension Service, 1951; Trustee and Chairman of | 
Building and Grounds Committee of Louisburg College, 1954. 
Elected President of the N. C. Master Farmers Club, 1951. Repre- 
sentative from Nash County in the General Assembly of 1949. 
State Senator in the General Assembly of 1953. Methodist; Stew- 
ard and Trustee, 1918-1952; Sunday School Teacher and Superin- 
tendent, 1912-1952. Married Miss Agnes Mable Smith, 1917. Chil- 
dren: Charles Ivy, Esper Nan, Mark Settle, Braxton Craven, 
Agnes Sidney and Spruill Gilmore. Address; Spring Hope, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 437 

DENNIS SHELTON COOK 

(Twenty-eighth District — Counties: Alexander, Burke and Cald- 
well. One Senator.) 

Dennis Shelton Cook, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-eighth 
Senatorial District, was born at Globe, N. C, July 28, 1907. Son 
of Job Filmore and Lula (Stroup) Cook. Attended Caldwell and 
Watauga County Public Schools; Lenoir City Schools; University 
of North Carolina, Pre-Dental, 1927-1928; Emory University, 
1928-1932, D.D.S. Dental surgeon. Member Tri-County Dental So- 
ciety, President, 1936; N. C. Dental Society; American Dental So- 
ciety. Member Lenoir City Council, 1946-1955; Lenoir City Public 
Health Committee, 1946-1955; Lenoir City Water Committee, 1950- 
1955; Chairman Lenoir City Street Committee, 1948-1955; Mayor 
pro tern. City of Lenoir, 1950-1955. Served in World War II with 
rank of Major in Medical Corps of Army Air Force, June 7, 1941 
to June 7, 1945; Chief Dental Surgeon, U. S. Air Force Base Hos- 
pital, Barksdale Field, La., 1942-1944. Member Delta Sigma Delta 
Fraternity. Mason, Shriner, Scottish Rite (32nd degree). Presby- 
terian; Deacon; Vice President Men's Bible Class. Married Miss 
Annabev Whitmire, September 24, 1932. Children: Dennis Shelton 
Cook, Jr., age 19 and Carol K. Cook, age 12. Address 210 Norwood 
Street, Lenoir, N. C. 



FRANK PATTON COOKE 

(Twenty-sixth District — County: Gaston. One Senator.) 

Frank Patton Cooke, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-sixth 
Senatorial District, was born in Floyd County, Georgia, January 1, 
1921. Son of Caric Moore and Florence Hearn Cooke. Attended 
Cramerton High School, 1934-1938; Emory University, 1939; Uni- 
versity of Georgia Extension in Atlanta, 1940-1943, BCS degree; 
University of North Carolina Law School, 1946-1948, LL.B. degree. 
Lawyer. Member American Bar Association ; North Carolina State 
Bar Association; Gaston County Bar Association; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; Phi Alpha Delta; Sigma Pi. Served as Sergeant United States 
Army Air Force, 1943-1946. Member First Presbyterian Church 
of Gastonia; former Chairman Board of Deacons of Cramerton 



438 North Carolina Manual 

Presbyterian Church. Married Miss Doiothy Irene Carlton, April 
6, 1940. Three daughters. Address: County Club Road, Gastonia, 
N. C. 

WILLIAM LUNSFORU CREW 

{Fourth District — Counties: Edgecombe and Halifax. Two Sen- 
ators.) 

William Lunsford Crew, Democrat, Senator from the Fourth 
Senatorial District, was born in Northampton County, October 29, 
1917. Son of James Winfield, Sr. and Texas A. (Stanley) Crew. 
Attended Pleasant Hill Grammar School, 1923-1930; Roanoke Rap- 
ids High School, 1930-1934; University of North Carolina, A.B., 
1938; University of North Carolina Law School, LL.B., 1941. Law- 
yer. Member American Bar Association and North Carolina Bar 
Association. Organizer, Director and Attorney for First Federal 
Savings and Loan Association of Roanoke Rapids. Member Phi 
Gamma Delta, Secretary, 1938; Civic Music Club; Roanoke Rapids 
Chamber of Commerce; Roanoke Rapids Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce, President, 1949; Roanoke Rapids Exchange Club, President, 
1948-1949 and at present District Governor; American Legion; 
Veterans of Foreign Wars ; Roanoke Rapids Civic Music Associa- 
tion, President; Roanoke Rapids Executive Club. Lieutenant (j.g.) 
United States Navy from July 1943 to April, 1946. State Senator 
in the General Assembly of 1953. Methodist; Sunday School 
teacher, 1947-1952. Married Miss Nancy Trotter Horney, Novem- 
ber 14, 1940. Children: William Lunsford Crew, Jr., age 6; Nancy 
Alexander Crew, age 12. Address: Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

CLAUDE CURRIE 

{Fourteenth District — Counties : Durham, Granville and Person. 
Two Senators.) 

Claude Currie, Democrat, Senator from the Fourteenth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Candor, Montgomery County, N. C, 
December 8, 1890. Son of John C. and Louise (McKinnon) Currie. 
Attended Oak Ridge Military Institute, 1911-1914; University of 
North Carolina, A.B. and LL.B., 1926. Executive Vice-President 



Biographical Sketches 439 

Security Building and Loan Association. State Senator, Eight- 
eenth Senatorial District, 1927; Fourteenth Senatorial District 
1945, 1947, 1949 and 1953. United States Army Air Corps, 1917- 
1919; Pursuit Observer, Sgt. Presbyterian. Address: Durham, 

N. C. 



JOSEPH COLIN EAGLES, JR. 

{Sixth District — Counties: Franklin, Nash and Wilson. Two 
Senators.) 

Joseph Colin Eagles, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Sixth 
Senatorial District, was born at Wilson, N. C, October 5, 1910. 
Son of J. C. and Susie Whitehead (Moye) Eagles. Graduated from 
Wilson High School, 1927; University of North Carolina, A.B., 
1931; University of North Carolina Law School, J.D., 1934; To- 
bacconist and farmer. Member of Kappa Sigma and Phi Beta 
Kappa Fraternities. Partner in Cozart, Eagles & Company, To- 
bacco Warehouses; Director Boykin Grocery Company, Inc.; Direc- 
tor Watson Warehouse, Inc.; Director North Carolina Medical 
Foundation; Director Branch Banking & Trust Co.; Director Gen- 
eral Supply Store, Inc.; President North Carolina Hereford Breed- 
ers Association; Member Farm Bureau; Grange; Board of Gov- 
ernors Bright Belt Warehouse Association. Lieutenant U. S. Navy, 
1944-1946. State Senator in the General Assembly of 1949 and 
1951. Episcopalian, Vestryman, 1943-1944. Married Miss Betty 
Ledford Sparkes, 1938. Two children: Betsy Boyden Eagles and 
Joseph Colin Eagles, III. Address: 1100 West Nash Street, 
Wilson, N. C. 

WILLIAM EARNEST GARRISON 

(Twerity-fifth District — Counties: Catawba, Iredell and Lincoln. 
Two Senators.) 

William Earnest Garrison, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
fifth Senatorial District, was born in Lincoln County, March 2, 
1892. Son of William L. and Docia (Clanton) Garrison. Attended 
public schools of Gaston and Lincoln counties. General building 
contractor. Also conducts real estate and rental business. Member 



440 North Carolina Manual 

General Contractors Association. Received Master Builder Honor- 
ary Plaque given by First Baptist Church in 1951. City Alderman 
for four years; Chairman Lincoln County Board of Commissioners 
for seven years; served on Nominating Committee and Executive 
Committee of State Association of County Commissioners. Member 
Deacon Club of Wake Forest College; Councilor for Boy Scouts; 
Past President Goodfellow's Club. Has directed Bond, Health Wel- 
fare, Recreation and other drives. Served special appointments 
under Governors Broughton and Cherry. Served as Coordinator 
Civil Defense throughout World War II. Appointed by Governor 
Broughton to Labor Mobilization Board; appointed Liaison Oflficer 
under Col. William Prichard, Fort Bragg, N. C. Member Knights 
of Pythias; Eastern Star; Mason and Shriner. Baptist; Sunday 
School Superintendent; Teacher; Chairman Board of Deacons; 
Treasurer; Trustee; Director Training Union; formerly Vice Mod- 
erator and member of Executive Committee of South Fork Asso- 
ciation. Married Malvena Hovis Garrison, April 8, 1917. Chil- 
dren: Dr. Robert L. Garrison, Charlotte, N. C; Mrs. Garland 
Allen, Walnut Ridge, Ark.; Mrs. W. L. Morris, Lincolnton, N. C; 
William E. Garrison, Jr., a student at North Carolina State Col- 
lege; David Ray Garrison, serving in United States Navy. Ad- 
dress: 422 East Main Street, Lincolnton, N. C. 

ADOLPHUS PILSTON GODWIN, JR. 

{First District — Counties: Bertie, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, 
Gates, Hertford, Pasquotank and Perquimans. Two Senators.) 

Adolphus Pilston Godwin, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the First 
Senatorial District, was born in Gatesville, N. C, October 6, 1912. 
Son of Adolphus Pilston, Sr., and Mabel Clair (Hayes) Godwin. 
Attended Gatesville High School, 1930; Mars Hill College, 1930- 
1931; Campbell College, 1931-1932; Wake Forest College, 1932- 
1937; Wake Forest School of Law, LL.B. Degree, 1937. Lawyer. 
Member N. C. State Bar; President First Judicial District Bar, 
1952-1953. Special Agent with F.B.I., 1942-1945. Member Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee. State Senator in the General Assem- 
bly of 1953. Master, Gatesville Lodge No. 126, A. F. & A. M., 1952. 
Member Gatesville Baptist Church. Married Miss Mildred Vann of 
Ahoskie, August 10, 1940. Children: Adolphus Pilston Godwin, III 
and Gretchen Vann Godwin. Address: Gatesville, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 441 

CALVIN GRAVES 

(Twenty-second District — County: Forsyth. One Senator.) 

Calvin Graves, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-second Sen- 
atorial District, vi^as born in Mount Airy, N. C, July 2, 1909. Son 
of Calvin, Sr. and Mary Elizabeth (Johnson) Graves. Attended 
Mount Airy High School, 1922-1926; University of North Carolina, 
A.B., 1930; University of North Carolina Law School, LL.B., 1932. 
Lawyer. Member American Bar Association, North Carolina Bar 
Association, Forsyth County Bar Association. President Forsyth 
County Bar Association, 1947. Chairman Forsyth County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, 1948-1952. City Attorney for Winston- 
Salem, 1943. Served in U. S. Marine Corps, 1944-1945. Member of 
State Democratic Executive Committee. State Senator in the 
General Assembly of 1953. Methodist; Teacher of Men's Bible 
Class; Member of Board of Stewards. Married Miss Julia Benton 
Pendergraph, February 16, 1933. Three children: Julianne Graves, 
Nancy Bailey Graves and Mary Watkins Graves. Address: 1416 
North Hawthorne Road, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

DAVID McKEE HALL, JR. 

(Thirty-Second District — Counties: Haywood, Henderson, Jack- 
son, Polk and Transylvania. Two Senators.) 

David McKee Hall, Jr.. Democrat, Senator from the Thirty- 
second Senatorial District, was born in Sylva, N. C, May 16, 1918. 
Son of David McKee and Edith Enloe (Moore) Hall. Attended 
Jackson County Public Schools; Sylva Elementary School; Sylva 
Central High School from 1931 to 1933 and intermittently through 
Spring of 1938 without graduating; University of North Carolina 
as a special student; University of North Carolina Law School, 
Certificate of Law, 1947 and LL.B., 1948. Lawyer. Member Jack- 
son County Bar Association ; North Carolina State Bar ; Jackson 
County Chamber of Commerce, President, 1953-1954 and Vice- 
President, 1952-1953; Jackson County Merchants Association, Ex- 
officio Chairman, 1953-1954; Jackson County Highlanders, Ex- 
officio Chairman ; Jackson County Industrial Committee, Ex-officio 
Chairman; President Jackson County Industries, Inc. since 1952; 
Treasurer Jackson County Industrial Committee since 1951. At- 



442 North Carolina Manual 

torney for Town of Dillsboro since 1948, County of Jackson since 
1952 and Town of Sylva, 1948-1949. President Jackson County 
Young Democratic Club, 1952-1954; Vice Chairman Jackson 
County Democratic Executive Committee, 1948-1954. Member 
Sylva Rotary Club, Past Director; Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; 
Exchequer of Vance Inn, Phi Delta Phi, 1945-1946; Magister 
Vance Inn, 1946-1947; Phi Delta Phi Law Student of Year, 1946- 
1947. First special student to graduate from the University of 
North Carolina Law School and first special student to receive 
regular LL.B. degree from University. Contracted osteomyelitis 
at age of 12 resulting in paraplegia at age of 15. Has had approxi- 
mately 200 surgical operations and spent about 8 years in various 
hospitals. Confined to wheel chair since 1933. Was a self-help 
student at the University of North Cai-olina and earned part of 
educational expenses by reading to blind students and preparing 
law briefs. Presently a member of Jackson County Morehead 
Scholarship Committee, U.N.C. Contributed materials to "Archives 
of Physical Medicine"; also contributed to "Studies in Rehabilita- 
tion" printed by New York University Department of Physical 
Medicine and by Institute for the Crippled and Disabled; assisted 
H. A. Littledale (formerly on editorial staff of New York Times) 
in preparation of book, "Mastering Your Disability", published 
by Rinehart and Company. Methodist; Steward, 1949-1952; Trus- 
tee since 1952; President Men's Bible Class, 1949; Chairman 
Finance Commission since 1952. Married to Miss Sarah McCollum 
of Bradenton, Florida, July 14, 1944. Children: Sarah Anne Hall, 
horn September 24, 1948; Edith Allison Hall, born May 7, 1950; 
Hannah McKee Hall, born October 23, 1954. Address: Sylva, N. C. 

FRANKLIN WILLS HANCOCK, III 

{Fourteenth District — Counties: Durham, Granville and Person. 
Two Senators.) 

Franklin Wills Hancock, III, Democrat, Senator from the Foui"- 
teenth Senatorial District, was born in Oxford, N. C, June 1, 
1918. Son of Frank, Jr. and Lucy (Landis) Hancock. Attended 
University of North Carolina, 1939; B.S. degree in Commerce, 
Northwestern University. Real estate dealer and farmer. Mem- 
ber of American Legion ; Phi Beta Kappa ; Beta Gamma Sigma, 



enkel of Iredell 
Hicks of Greene 

Hightower of Anson 



ames of Richmond 
Jones of Pitt 
Jones of Surry 



! 



err of Warren 
Kirkman of Guilford 
Medford of Haywood 



[wre of Clay 
Moore of Robeson 
Morp:an of Cleveland 



wgan of Harnett 
Owens of Washiniprton 
Paschal of Chatham 



rry of Watauga 
Poole of Montgomery 
Poole of Moore 




4\i^iUl^ 



444 North Carolina Manual 

Captain, U. S. Army, February 1942-March 1946. North Carolina 
National Guard, 30th Inf. Div. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1947; State Senator in the General Assembly of 1951. 
Baptist. Married Mary Kathryn Foerster, October 6, 1945. One 
son: Franklin Wills Hancock, IV; three daughters: Mary Helen 
Hancock, Lucy Osborn Hancock, Patricia Peyton Hancock. Ad- 
dress: 103 West Front Street, Oxford, N. C. 

COLUMBUS VANCE HENKEL, .JR. 

{Twenty-fifth District — Counties: Catawba, Iredell and Lincoln. 
Two Senators.) 

Columbus Vance Henkel, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Twen- 
ty-fifth Senatorial District, was born in Statesville, N. C, Sep- 
tember 16, 1908. Son of Columbus Vance and Lila (Dunavant) 
Henkel. Attended Woodberry Forest School, Class of 1926; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, two years. Engaged in textiles and 
farming. State Senator in the General Assembly of 1953. Presby- 
terian. Married Miss Marguerite Nunan in 1944. Address Turners- 
burg N. C. 



CARL T. HICKS 

(Seventh District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, 
Lenoir and Onslow. Two Senators.) 

Carl T. Hicks, Democrat, Senator from the Seventh Senatorial 
District, was born in Rockingham, N. C, October 14, 1899. Son 
of Daniel Thomas and Sara Kate (Burns) Hicks. Attended Rock- 
ingnam High School, 1905-1917; State College, September 1918 to 
December 6, 1918. Farming-Business Manager. Chairman, Greene 
County Board of Education 1949-1950. Chairman, N. C. Farm 
Bureau, Tobacco Committee, 1934; President Flue-Cured Tobacco 
Cooperative Stabilization Corporation since 1946. Mason. Private, 
S.A.T.C, State College, 1918, discharged December 6, 1918. State 
Senator in the General Assembly of 1951 and 1953. Methodist. 
Married Miss Emily Minshew, November 11, 1922. Address: 
Walstbnburg, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 445 

ERWIN AVERY HIGHTOWER 

(Nineteenth District— Counties : Anson, Stanly and Union. Two 
Senators.) 

Erwin Avery Hightower, Democrat, Senator from the Nine- 
teenth Senatorial District, was born in Wadesboro, N. C, July 29, 
1914. Son of Forace Monroe and Bettie Elizabeth (Ratliff) High- 
tower. Attended University of North Carolina, 1931-1933; Wake 
Forest College, 1933-1936, LL.B. Lawyer. Clerk Superior Court 
of Anson County, 1946-1954. Member American Legion; Veterans 
Foreign Wars ; Woodmen of the World ; Secretary Kilwinning 
Lodge No. 64 Ancient Free & Accepted Masons of Wadesboro. 
Attended U. S. Coast Guard Academy Reserve School, Class of 
May, 1943; commissioned Ensign; released from active duty as 
Lieutenant (j.g.), November 1945. Presbyterian. Married Miss 
Marg-aret Elizabeth Edmunds, May 31, 1939. Children Erwin 
Avery Hightower, II and Bette Anne Hightower. Address Wades- 
boro, N. C. 

WILLIAM DUER JAMES 

(Eighteenth District — Counties: Davidson, Montgomery, Rich- 
mond and Scotland. Two Senators.) 

William Duer James, Democrat, Senator from the Eighteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Hamlet, N. C, October 29, 1916, 
Son of Dr. William Daniel and Lillian Delia (Duer) James. At- 
tended Hamlet High School, 1929-1931; Woodberry Forest School, 
1931-1934; University of North Carolina, 1934-1938, A.B.; Louisi- 
ana State University Medical School, 1938-1942, M.D. Surg-eon. 
Member American Medical Association; North Carolina Medical 
Society; Richmond County Medical Society, President, 1942 and 
1948; Seaboard Railway Surgeons. Chief Surgeon, Hamlet Hos- 
pital. Member Rotary International; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Phi Chi 
Medical Fraternity; Commander American Legion, 1948; Presi- 
dent Richmond County Country Club, 1949. Captain in United 
States Army Medical Corps, 1943-1946. Presbyterian; Deacon. 
Married Miss Sara Brooks Nair, January 29, 1946. Children: Sara 
Nair James, Betty Brooks James and Lillian Duer James. Address : 
306 Entwistle Street, Hamlet, N. C. 



446 North Carolina Manual 

PAUL ERASTUS JONES 

(Fifth District — County: Pitt. One Senator) 

Paul Erastus Jones, Democrat, Senator from the Fifth Sena- 
torial District, was born near Bethel, Pitt County, April 9, 1890. 
Son of Solomon Major and Gertrude (Whichard) Jones. Gradu- 
ated from Bethel High School, 1907. Attended Richmond College, 
Virginia, one year; Medical College of Virginia, 1907. Doctor of 
Dental Surgery, 1910. Dentist and farmer. First Lieutenant 
World War I, June 30, 1918-March 15, 1919. Member of Pitt 
County Medical and Dental Society; American Dental Association, 
served as delegate since 1931. Member of Council of Legislation 
American Dental Association six year term; Chairman Board of 
Trustees of American Dental Association, 1954. Member Fiith 
District of N. C. Dental Society and served as Secretary and Presi- 
dent. Fellow of the American College of Dentists; Fellow Inter- 
national College of Dentists. Elected to N. C. State Board of 
Dental Examiners, 1938, serving until 1947. Vice President Ameri- 
can Association of Dental Examiners 1943, serving two terms, 
President 1946. Director of the Bank of Farmville, 1921-1937. 
Member Farm Bureau; Rotary Club; Local School Board (twenty- 
five years, Chairman five years) ; Pitt County Board of Education, 
1944-1949; Pitt County Democratic Executive Committee (Chair- 
man seven years) ; State Democratic Executive Committee, 1945 
until present. Appointed to N. C. Board of Health, 1944 (served 
four years) ; Author of several Essays before the N. C. Dental 
Society, including a Presidential Address in 1931; Presidential 
Address to American Association of Dental Examiners in 1946. 
State Senator in the General Assembly of 1949, 1951 and 1953. 
Chairman Advisoi-y Committee of the N. C. Dental Society to the 
Dental College Committee of the Faculty of the University of 
North Carolina, 1951-1952. Elected a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the University of North Carolina for an eight year 
term in 1951. Elected President of the Dental Foundation of 
North Carolina, Inc., 1951. Re-elected President in 1952. Member 
Christian Church; Deacon ten years. Married Miss Vernice Lee 
Lang, October 22, 1913. Two children: Mrs. Charles M. Duke; 
Dr. P. E. Jones, Jr. One grandson and one granddaughter. 
Address: 502 North Main Street, Farmville, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 447 

ROBERT POSEY JONES 

(T IV enty -third District — Counties: Stokes and Surry. One 
Senator.) 

Robert Posey Jones, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-third 
Senatorial District, was born in Surry County, N. C, October 14, 
1902. Son of George Thomas and Mary Anna (Moseley) Jones. 
Attended the Surry County Public Schools; Booneville High School; 
Edwards' Business College, Winston-Salem, N. C. Tobacco ware- 
houseman; I.H.C. farm equipment and truck dealer. President, 
Blue Ridge Insurance Agency, Inc. Member, Mount Airy Tobacco 
Board of Trade, President, 1935-1946; North Carolina Insurance 
Association; Merchants' Association; Carolina Farm Equipment 
Dealer's Association, Past Director. Vice-President and Director 
Surry County Loan & Trust Company. Surry County Commis- 
sioner, 1938-1946; member, Surry County Welfare Board, 1940- 
1946. 32nd Degree Mason ; member of Granite Masonic Lodge No. 
322, Past Master, 1949; Shriner; member Oasis Temple, Charlotte, 
N. C; member of Kiwanis Club, Director. State Senator in the 
General Assembly of 1947 and 1951. Member First Baptist Church, 
Mount Airy, N. C. Married Miss Lucile Simmons Jones, June 15, 
1933. Two children. Address: 1202 Cresent Drive, Mount Airy, 
N. C. 

JOHN KERR, JR. 

(Third Senatorial District — Counties: Northampton, Vance and 
Warren. One Senator.) 

John Kerr, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Third Senatorial 
District, was born in Warrcnton, N. C. Son of John H. and Lillian 
(Foote) Kerr. Attended Warrenton Public Schools until 1917; 
A.B., University of North Carolina, 1921; attended Wake Forest 
College Law School, 1923. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar 
Association. Private in World War I. Representative in the 
General Assembly from Edgecombe County in 1929 and from 
Warren County in 1939, 1941, 1943, 1945, 1947 and 1949. Speaker, 
1943. Chairman Warren County Democratic Executive Committee 
since 1932. Baptist. Married Miss Mary Hinton Duke. One son, 
John Kerr, III. Address: Warrenton, N. C. 



448 North Carolina Manual 

OSCAR ARTHUR KIRKMAN 

(Seventeenth District — County: Guilford. One Senator.) 

Oscar Arthur Kirkman, Democrat, Senator from the Seventeenth 
Senatorial District, was born in High Point, N. C, April 16, 1900. 
Son of Oscar Arthur, Sr., and Lulu Blanche (Hammer) Kirkman. 
Attended Public Schools of High Point, graduating in 1918; Uni- 
versity of Virginia, B.S., 1923; University of Virginia, M.S., 1924; 
one year of law at the University of Virginia, 1924-1925; two 
years of law, Oxford University (England) 1926-1928. Admitted 
to North Carolina Bar, 1929. Executive Vice-President and Gen- 
eral Manager High Point, Thomasville & Denton Railroad Com- 
pany of High Point, N. C. President, Atlantic B. and L. Associ- 
ation, High Point, since 1937; Director Southern Fuiniture Ex- 
position Building, High Point. Director, American Short Line 
Railroad Association, Washington, D. C, since 1930. Member 
Board of School Commissioners, High Point, 1932-1939; Guilford 
County Board of Public Welfare, 1938-1939; Board of Trustees 
of Winston-Salem Teachers College, three terms. Member Board 
of Trustees High Point Memorial Hospital; member Board of 
Trustees, North Carolina Sanatorium for Treatment of Tuber- 
culosis; American Cancer Society, President, 1953-1954. Member 
Railway Industry Advisory Committee, National Production 
Authority. Mayor, City of High Point, 1939-1943; Councilman, 
1945-December 27, 1948. Federal Operating Manager, railroads 
of Puerto Rico on special assignment from the Office of Emergency 
Management, 1943-1944. Teacher of Spanish, three years, Uni- 
versity of Virginia; Business Law, High Point College, one year. 
Member of Elks; Masons; Woodmen of World; Royal Arcanum; 
Private U. S. Army, 1918; American Legion, Adjutant in the 
20's; Alpha Kappa Psi Fraternity. National President, Alpha 
Kappa Psi (Commerce and Business Administration Fraternity), 
Indianapolis, Indiana, 1929-1933. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1949 and 1951. State Senator in the General As- 
sembly of 1953. Methodist; member Board of Stewards. Married 
Miss Katharine Morgan of Salisbury, N. C, March 10, 1933. Chil- 
dren: Larkin, age 17; Carolina, age 15; John, age 13; Susan, 
age 6. Address; 501 West High Street, High Point, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 449 

WILLIAM MEDFORD 

(Thirty-second District — Counties: Haywood, Henderson, Jack- 
son, Polk and Tz-ansylvania. Two Senators.) 

William Medford, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty-second 
Senatorial District, was born in Bryson City, N. C, January 29, 
1909. Son of A. T. and Verna (Welch) Medford. Attended Biyson 
City High School, 1923-1927; University of North Carolina, A.B., 
1931; University of North Carolina Law School, 1930-1933, LL.B, 
Lawyer. Member of the North Carolina Bar Association and 
District Associations; Waynesville Rotary Club. Lieutenant Com- 
mander in the United States Navy, 1942-1945. State Senator in 
the General Assembly of 1947 and 1951. Baptist. Married Miss 
Martha Mock, November 23, 1940. One son: James Allen Medford. 
Address: 205 North Main Street, Waynesville, N. C. 

DU BRUTZ CUTLAR MOORE 

(Eleventh District — County: Robeson. One Senator.) 

Du Brutz Cutlar Moore, Democrat, Senator from the Eleventh 
Senatorial District, was born in Burgaw, N. C, August 6, 1895. 
Son of John Bailey and Serena Lee (Corbett) Moore. Attended 
Burgaw High School; University of North Carolina, 1913 and 
1914. Real estate dealer. Member North Carolina Association of 
Realtors; N. C. Democratic Executive Committee for six years. 
Secretary, 1934-1936. Chairman of N. C. Alcoholic Control Board, 
1937-1941. Mason. Member Benevolent Protective Order of Elks; 
Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion. Private in U. S. 
Army, 1917-1919, serving in Europe as member of the Wilming- 
ton Light Infantry. State Senator in the General Assembly of 
1953. Presbyterian; Member Board of Deacons. Married Miss 
Ruth Robeson Norment, June 28, 1922. Children : Du Brutz Cutlar 
Moore, Jr.; Mary Corbett Moore; Ruth Norment Moore. Address: 
Box 985, Lumberton, N. C. 

HARVE M. MOORE 

(Thirty-third District — Counties: Cherokee, Clay, Graham, 
Macon, and Swain. One Senator,) 

Hai-ve M, Moore, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty-third 
Senatorial District, was born in Hayesville, N. C, February 4, 



450 North Carolina Manual 

1887. Son of T. C. and Callie (Caldwell) Moore. Attended Hayes- 
ville schools, 1906-1909; Tennessee Summer School, 1910-1911; 
N. C. Summer Schools, 1912-1939; Cullowhee Teachers College, 
1940, Class A. Teachers Elementary Certificate. Teacher and 
farmer. County Commissioner, 1930-1934, 1938-1946. Member of 
the Junior Order United American Mechanics. R. S. Secty., 1915- 
1952; Member Board Trustees, Lexington Orphans Home, Lexing- 
ton, N. C, 1946-1952. Methodist; Superintendent and Teacher in 
Sunday School 1940-1950. Representative in the General Assembly 
of 1947, 1951 and 1953. Married Miss Delta Arthur Moore, Benton, 
Tenn., 1910. Children: seven living, two deceased. Address: Hayes- 
ville, N. C. 

ROBERT BURREN MORGAN 

(Twelfth District — Counties: Harnett, Hoke, Moore and Ran- 
dolph. Two Senators.) 

Robert Burren Morgan, Democrat, Senator from the Twelfth 
Senatorial District, was born in Harnett County, October 5, 1925. 
Son of James Harvey and Alice (Butts) Morgan. Attended 
Lillington High School, 1938-1942; East Carolina Teachers Col- 
lege, 1946; Wake Forest Law School, LL.B., 1950. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber Harnett County Bar Association; N. C. State Bar; N. C. State 
Bar Association; Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity, Justice, 1950; 
Masonic Lodge; Order of Eastern Star, Patron, 1951-1952; Rotary 
Club, Past President. Clerk Superior Court of Harnett County, 
1950-1954. Served as Lieutenant in U. S. Navy, 1944-1946, 1952. 
Baptist; Sunday School Teacher; Deacon, 1951-1954. Address: 
Route 1, Lillington, N. C. 

ROBERT FOSTER MORGAN 

(Twenty-seventh District — Counties: Cleveland, McDowell, and 
Rutherford. Two Senators.) 

Robert Foster Morgan, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
seventh Senatorial District, was born in Anderson County, South 
Carolina, June 24, 1922. Son of O. Z. and Minnietta (Foster) 
Morgan. Attended Cleveland County Public Schools and Boiling 
Springs High School; Gardner-Webb College, A.A. degree, 1941; 



Biographical Sketches 451 

Yale University, 1943-1944. Part owner of Morgan & Company, 
Inc., Shelby. Member N. C. Seedsmen Association National Cotton 
Council; Executive Committee N. C. Seedsmen Association; Past- 
President of Cleveland County Ginner's Association. Member of 
Rotary Club and Director of Shelby Junior Chamber of Commerce. 
Member of Shelby Lodge of Masonic Order. Enlisted as Private 
in Air Force, 1942, and discharged as Captain in 1946. Member of 
Inactive Reserve Air Force at present. State Senator in the Gen- 
eral Assembly of 1953. Member Beaver Dam Baptist Church; 
Deacon; Teacher Young Men's Bible Class; Vice-President Brother- 
hood; Chairman Finance Committee. Address: 1106 N. Washing- 
ton St., Shelby, N. C. 

EDWARD LINDSAY OWENS 

(Second District — Counties: Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin, 
Pamlico, Tyrrell and Washington. Two Senators.) 

Edward Lindsay Owens, Democrat, Senator from the Second 
Senatorial District, was born in Plymouth, N, C, July 1, 1904. 
Son of Ambrose L. and Luceille (Willey) Owens. Attended Ply- 
mouth High School; University of North Carolina, A.B. and LL.B., 
1926. Lawyer, farmer and real estate dealer. Member Washing- 
ton County Bar Association; N. C. State Bar; North Carolina 
Bar Association; Plymouth Rotary Club, charter member; Delta 
Theta Phi Legal Fraternity; Perseverance Lodge No. 59 Sudan 
Temple (York Rite), Master, 1945. Member Board of Aldermen, 
Town of Plymouth, 1927-1928; Attorney for Washington County, 
1929-1930; Judge Washington County Recorder's Court, 1931-1932, 
1944-1946, 1951-1952. Methodist; Steward, 1930-1931. Married 
Miss Eloise McArthur, June 27, 1932. Children: Luceille Shelton 
Owens, age 21 and Suzanne McArthur Owens, age 14. Address: 
322 East Main St., Plymouth, N. C. 

WADE H. PASCHAL 

(Thirteenth District — Counties: Chatham, Lee and Wake. 
Two Senators.) 

Wade H. Paschal, Democrat, Senator from the Thirteenth Sena- 
torial District, was born near Siler City, N. C, April 12, 1895. 
Son of J. R. and Leona (Jones) Paschal. Attended public schools 



452 North Carolina Manual 

of Chatham County; Siler City High School; Wake Forest College, 
B.A., 1918. Farmer and teacher. President, Chatham News. Past 
President Chatham County Farm Bureau ; Chairman Chatham 
County Board of Education; member Siler City Chamber of Com- 
merce; Siler City School Board; Patriotic Order of Sons of 
America; Junior Order United American Mechanics; National 
Grange; Past President, Siler City Rotary Club. Representative 
from Chatham County in the General Assembly of 1941 and 1943. 
Married Miss Mary Lee Clark, December 24, 1930. Four chil- 
dren, three girls and one boy. Address: Siler City, N. C. 

HENRY BAKER PERRY 

(Twenty-ninth District — Counties: Alleghany, Ashe and Wa- 
tauga. One Senator.) 

Henry Baker Perry, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-ninth 
Senatorial District, was born at Sugar Grove, N. C, September 
1, 1879. Son of John Kenedy and Sarah Louise (Dougherty) 
Perry. Attended Public Schools of Watauga County; Boone High 
School, 1899-1902; University of North Carolina, 1902-1903; Med- ' 
ical School; North Carolina Medical College, 1905, M.D. Practic- 
ing physician. Member of Ashe-Watauga Medical Society, Presi- 
dent, 1948; Medical Society of North Carolina; American Medical 
Association. Member of Board of Aldermen, Town of Boone, N. C, 
1929-1935. Served on Local Board of Watauga County as Medical 
Examiner, 1917-1919. State Senator from the Twenty-ninth Sena- 
torial District, 1949. Baptist. Married Miss Doris L. Taylor, 
September 2, 1909. Two children: Gertrude V. Perry, H. B. Perry, 
Jr. Address: Boone, N. C. 

JULL4N HAWLEY POOLE 

(Twelfth District — Counties: Harnett, Hoke, Moore, and Ran- 
dolph. Two Senators.) 

Julian Hawley Poole, Senator from the Twefth Senatorial Dis- 
trict, was born in Jackson Springs, N. C, March 29, 1890. Son 
of H. S. and Sarah A. (McLeod) Poole. Graduated from Biscoe ^ 
High School, 1913; B.S. in Agriculture, State College, 1917. Peach 



Biographical Sketches 453 

grower. Director, Tri-State Peach Growers Society; member State 
Board of Agriculture and Board of University Trustees; Director, 
Bank of Pinehurst; Chairman, Board Supervisors Upper Cape 
Fear Soils Conservation District; State President, Supervisors 
N. C. Soils Conservation, 1950; member National Distributors of 
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables; Past Chairman, Moore County Agri- 
cultural Club; Director North Carolina Peach Growers Council; 
President N. C. Mutual Peach Growers Society; President, Sand- 
hills Kiwanis Club, 1949. Representative in the General Assembly 
from Moore County, 1937, 1941 and 1943. State Senator in the 
General Assembly of 1951. Served at Fort Oglethorpe Officers 
Training Camp, Second Lieutenant, May 1917 to August 29, 1917; 
First Lieutenant, Junior Reserve Corps to 1927. Mason; Master 
Elberta Lodge 654, West End, 1940. Presbyterian; Elder, 1935; 
Moderator Fayetteville Presbytery, 1950. Married Miss Lena Nel- 
son Booker, September 5, 1925. Two children: One girl and one 
boy. Address: West End, N. C. 



MARSHALL OTIS POOLE 

(Eighteenth District — Counties: Davidson, Montgomery, Rich- 
mond and Scotland. Two Senators.) 

Marshall Otis Poole, Democrat, Senator from the Eighteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Montgomery County, July 12, 
1896. Son of Hartwell Spain and Sarah Ann (McLeod) Poole. 
Graduated from Candor High School, 1918. Farmer. Member 
State Highway and Public Works Commission, 1949-1953; Secre- 
tary Montgomery County Board of Elections, 1936-1938; Member 
Board of Directors of Bank of Candor; Secretary-Treasurer of 
Candor Cotton Company; Vice President of Candor Lions Club. 
Served in World War 1, 1918-1919, with service overseas as Ser- 
geant attached to 42nd Division. Presbyterian ; Chairman Board 
of Deacons for ten years. Married Miss Irene Woodley, December 
30, 1924. Two children, Mrs. Mary Ruth Poole Wood and Car^ 
Ann Poole. Address: Candor, N. C. 



Poyner of Wake 

Reynolds of Rutherford 
Rose of Wayne 



Ross of Beaufort 
Scott of Alamance 

Shuford of Buncombe 



Stone of Rockingham 
Summersill of Onslow 
Thomas of Union 



Walton of Brunswick 
Weeks of Edgecombe 
Whitley of Johnston 



Williamson of Columbus 
Winters of Avery 
Woodson of Rowan 



Yow of New Hanover 
Byerly — Principal Clerk 




Biographical Sketches 455 

JAMES M. POYNER 

(Thirteenth District — Counties: Chatham, Lee and Wake. Two 
Senators.) 

James M. Poyner, Democrat, Senator from the Thirteenth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Raleigh, N. C, September 18, 1914. 
Son of James Marion and Mary Sherwood (Smedes) Poyner. 
Attended Raleigh Grammar Schools; Needham Broughton High 
School, graduating in 1930; N. C. State College, B.S. in Chemical 
Engineering, 1935 and M.S. in Chemical Engineering, 1937; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina Law School, summer of 1938; Duke 
University, 1940, LL.B. Lawyer. Member Wake County Bar 
Association ; North Carolina Bar Association ; American Bar Asso- 
ciation. While in college was leader of "Jimmy Poyner and his 
Collegians," a widely known and popular dance orchestra. Served 
as President of Wake County Young Democrats Club, 1947. Mem- 
ber Sigma Nu Social Fraternity; Raleigh Kiwanis Club; Raleigh 
Country Club; Carolina Country Club; Sphinx Club; Director 
Raleigh YMCA; Past Diiector Ralei<;h Chamber of Commerce. Re- 
ceived commission as Second Lieutenant in Infantry Reserves, 
1935; promoted to First Lieutenant, 1938; to Captain in June of 
1942; to Major in December of 1942 and to Lieutenant Colonel in 
December of 1945. Active duty from 1942 to 1946 in Chemical War- 
fare Service; awarded Legion of Merit Medal; now Lieutenant 
Colonel in Army Reserves. Member St. Michael's Episcopal Church; 
assisted in organization as member of Mission Committee. Married 
Miss Florence I. Chan of Dallas, Texas, February 24, 1945. Chil- 
dren : Susan, Florence, Margaret and Edythe. Address: 710 
Smedes Place, Raleigh, N. C. 

CHARLES HOGE REYNOLDS 

(Twenty-seventh District — Counties: Cleveland, McDowell and 
Rutherford. Two Senators.) 

Charles Hoge Reynolds, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty- 
seventh Senatorial District, was born in Gate City, Virginia, May 
26, 1916. Son of Henderson H. and Ella (Semones) Reynolds. 
Attended Shoemaker Elementary School and Shoemaker High 
School, Gate City, Va., 1922-1934; Lincoln Memorial University, 



456 North Carolina Manual 

Harrogate, Tenn., 1934-1935; North Carolina State College for 
three years, B.S. in Textiles, 1939. Vice-President and Resident 
Manager of Spindale Mills, Inc., Spindale, N. C. Member Sigma 
Tau Sigma; Phi Psi; Rutherfordton Kiwanis Club, Past Presi- 
dent. Active in Boy Scout Work and received Silver Beaver Award 
for service to Boyhood in 1952. Methodist; Steward for number 
of years and Chairman of Board in 1952. Married Miss Mary 
Stegall of Fieldale, Virginia, August 21, 1937. Children: James 
Henderson, age 16 and Peggy Sue, age 11. Address: Rutherford- 
ton, N. C. 

DAVID .JENNINGS ROSE 

(Eighth District — Counties : Johnston and Wayne. Two Sena- 
tors.) 

David Jennings Rose, Democrat, Senator from the Eighth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Wayne County, N. C, September 26, 
1896. Son of Joel L. and Mary Elizabeth (Stafford) Rose. At- 
tended Grantham Consolidated School of Wayne County; Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1916-1920; Tulane University, 1920- 
1922, M.D.; University of Vienna, Austria. Surgeon (retired) and 
farmer. Fellow American College of Surgeons. Mason and 
Shriner. Member Sigma Nu and Theta Kappa Psi fraternities. 
President N. C. State School Board Association for two years; 
President National School Board Association for two years; Chaii-- 
man Neuse River Watershed Authority; Director Branch Banking 
and Trust Company for past fifteen years; Director Citizens 
Building and Loan Association fifteen years; Chairman Housing 
Authority City of Goldsboro past five years; Recipient Silver 
Beaver and Silver Antelope in Scouting. Served in U. S. Navy 
during World War I, 1917-1918. Member Christian Church. Married 
Miss Janet T. Conway in 1925. Children : Conway Rose, David 
J. Rose, Jr. and Marjorie Rose. Address: 1402 E. Mulberry St., 
Goldsboro, N. C. 

LEMUEL HIRAM ROSS 

(Second District — Counties: Beaufort, Dare, Hyde, Martin, 
Pamlico, Tyrrell and Washington. Two Senators.) 

Lemuel Hiram Ross, Democrat, Senator from the Second Sena- 



Biographical Sketches 457 

torial District, was born in Beaufort County, February 4, 1909. 
Son of Lemuel Hiram and Sallie (Hodges) Ross. Attended Wash- 
ington High School, graduating in 1926; University of North Caro- 
lina; Jefferson School of Law (University of Louisville), LL.B., 
1936. Lawyer. Judge Beaufort County Recorder's Court, 1940- 
1942 and 1946-1951; City Attorney, Washington, N. C, 1951-1953; 
County Attorney for Beaufort County since 1953. Member Elks; 
Improved Order of Red Men; American Legion; Veterans of 
Foreign Wars. Served in United States Navy, 1942-1945. Member 
Christian Church; Deacon. Married Miss Lyle Golden, 1946. One 
daughter, Elizabeth Lyle Ross. Address: Washington, N. C. 



RALPH H. SCOTT 

(Sixteenth District — Counties : Alamance and Orange. One 
Senator.) 

Ralph H. Scott, Democrat, Senator from the Sixteenth Sena- 
torial District, was born near Haw River, N. C, December 12, 
1903. Son of Robert Walter and Elizabeth (Hughes) Scott. At- 
tended Hawfields High School, 1916-1920; North Carolina State 
College, B.S., 1924. Partner and Manager, Melville Dairy; Presi- 
dent of Smith Melville Dairies, Inc., Raleigh, N. C. Member 
Kiwanis Club, President 1942; Chamber of Commerce, President, 
1944-1945; Merchants Association; North Carolina Dairy Pi'oducts 
Association, President, 1947; North Carolina Jersey Breeders As- 
sociation, President, 1939; Raleigh, Durham, Burlington Dairy 
Council, President, 1945-1946; Alamance County Tuberculosis 
Association, President, 1942, 1953 and 1954. Member, North Caro- 
lina State Grange; North Carolina Farm Bureau; Trustee, May 
Memorial Library; County Commissioner, 1944-1950. Mason; Bula 
Lodge No. 409, A. F. & A. M.; member Burlington BPO Elks No. 
1633. State Senator in the General Assembly of 1951 and 1953. 
Presbyterian; Chairman Board of Deacons, 1938-1950. Married 
Miss Hazeleene Tate, November 11, 1925. Children: Miriam Tate 
Scott; Ralph Henderson Scott, Jr.; William Clevenger Scott. Ad- 
dress: Haw River, N. C. 



458 North Carolina Manual 

JOHN FRANKLIN SHUFORD 

(Thirty-first District — County: Buncombe. One Senator.) 

John Franklin Shuford, Democrat, Senator from the Thirty- 
first Senatorial District, was born in Asheville, N. C, September 
19, 1920. Son of W. E. and Cora Johnson (Fortune) Shuford. 
Attended Asheville Public Schools; University of North Carolina, 
A. B., 1941; University of North Carolina Law School, 1944. 
Lawyer. Member Buncombe County Bar Association; North Caro- 
lina State Bar; American Bar Association. Private First Class, 
U. S. Army Air Force, 1943. Presbyterian. Married Miss Caney 
Marg'aret Brown, 1942. Two children : Caney Cornelia Shuford 
and Alice Elizabeth Shuford. Address: 15 Buena Vista Road, 
Asheville, N. C. 

THOMAS CLARENCE STONE 

(Fifteenth Senatorial District — Counties: Caswell and Rocking- 
ham. One Senator.) 

Thomas Clarence Stone, Democrat, Senator from the Fifteenth 
Senatorial District, was born in Stoneville, January 19, 1899. Son 
of the late Robert Tyler and Mary (Hamlin) Stone. Attended 
Stoneville High School and graduated in 1914. Graduated at 
Davidson College in 1919 with B. S. degree. Secretary and Treas- 
urer of Stoneville Grocery Company (Wholesale Groceries) and 
operater of own insurance agency. Secretary and Treasurer of 
Superior Oil Company. Formerly Town Commissioner and Mayor 
of Stoneville. Member N. C. Unemployment Compensation Com- 
mission. Joined S. A. T. C. at Davidson College in October, 1918; 
Discharged 1918; Supply Sergeant in R. 0. T. C. at Davidson 
College. Business Manager of Davidsonian while at Davidson 
College. Past President of the Rockingham County Clubs of Young 
Democrats and has been a member of the Rockingham County 
Clubs of Young Democrats and the Rockingham County Democratic 
Executive Committee. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1935, 1937, 1939, 1941, 1943, 1945 and 1947. Former member Ad- 
visory Budget Commission. Presbyterian; Deacon. Married Miss 
Jane Kane, of Gate City, August 25, 1925. One daughter: Mary 
Frances Stone, deceased. Address: Stoneville, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 459 

Lenoir and Onslow. Two Senators.) 

EDWARD WHITE SUMMERSILL 

(Seventh District — Counties: Carteret, Craven, Greene, Jones, 

Edward White Summersill, Democrat, Senator from the Seventh 
Senatorial District, was born in Jacksonville, N. C, April 25, 
1902. Son of E. W. and Estelle Mills Summersill. Attended Jack- 
sonville Public Schools; Wake Forest College, LL.B., 1923. Lawyer. 
Member N. C. Bar Association; 6th Judicial District Bar, Presi- 
dent, 1950; Masonic Lodge; Kiwanis Club of Jacksonville, Presi- 
dent, 1934. City Attorney of Jacksonville, 1950-1954; Attorney for 
Onslow County, 1926-1942. State Senator in the General Assembly 
of 1933 and 1935. Methodist; Steward, 1945-1954. Married Miss 
Alice Beddingfield, August 18, 1937. Children: Mary Beth, age 6 
and E. W., Jr., age 4. Address: Jacksonville, N. C. 

JOE MAX THOMAS 

(Nineteenth District — Counties: Anson, Stanly and Union. Two 

Senators.) 

Joe Max Thomas, Democrat, Senator from the Nineteenth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Marshville, N. C, July 9, 1915. Son 
on John W. and Lillian Maude (Hasty) Thomas. Attended Marsh- 
ville High School, graduating in 1931 ; Wake Forest College, 1932- 
1934; Wake Forest College Law School, 1934-1937, LL.B. Lawyer. 
Also engaged in farming and turkey production. Partner Marsh- 
ville Motor Company and President Thomas Insurance and Realty 
Co. Member Union County Bar Association; North Carolina Bar 
Association; North Carolina State Bar, Inc. Judge Union County 
Recorder's Court, 1948-1952. Member Marshville Lions Club, Presi- 
dent, 1947-1948; Floyd Staton Post No. 121, American Legion 
Monroe Executive Club, Director, 1950-1953; Mason; Master 
Beaver Dam Lodge No. 276, 1953. Served in U. S. Army with 
rank of Staff Sergeant, 1942-1945. Baptist; Deacon; Associate 
Superintendent of Sunday School, 1953-1954; Sunday School 
Teacher for several years. Twice married: first to Miss Myrtle 
Herron Glenn in April of 1940, who died in June of 1946; second 
to Miss Vergie Emma Griffin, July 6, 1947. Children: Kathryn 
Ann Thomas, born February 2, 1946; Rebecca Sue Thomas, born 
October 26, 1949; Kenneth Griffin Thomas, born November 23, 
1951. Address: Marshville, N. C. 



460 North Carolina Manual 

RAY H. WALTON 

(Tenth District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus and 
Cumberland. Two Senators.) 

Ray H. Walton, Democrat, Senator from the Tenth Senatorial 
District, was born in Brunswick County, July 2, 1921. Son of Amos 
J. and Carrie (Bennett) W^alton. Attended Waccamaw High 
School, 1928-1939; Spartanburg- Junior College of Spartanburg, 
S. C; Wofford College; Wake Forest College School of Law, 
1947-1950, LL.B. Lawyer. Member Brunswick County Bar Asso- 
ciation; North Carolina State Bar Association; American Bar 
Association. Attorney for Town of Shallotte, N. C, 1953-1954; 
Brunswick County Solicitor, 1953-1954. Mason, Pathagros Lodge 
249; Southport Lions Club, President, 1951-1952. Methodist; 
Chairman Board of Stewards since 1953. Married Miss Mae 
Parker, October 27, 1946. Address: Southport, N. C. 



CAMERON S. WEEKS 

(Fourth District— Counties: Edgecombe and Halifax, Two 
Senators.) 

Cameron S. Weeks, Democrat, Senator from the Fourth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Tarboro, N. C, November 19, 1910. 
Son of Dr. George Earle and Lena Rivers (Pittman) Weeks. At- 
tended Tarboro High School ; University of North Carolina Law 
School, LL.B., 1936. Lawyer. Member N. C. Bar Association; 
N. C. State Bar, Inc.; American Bar Association; Edgecombe 
County Bar. Solicitor Edgecombe County Recorder's Court, 1941- 
1942; Judge Edgecombe County Recorder's Court, 1942-1944. 
Member State Democratic Executive Committee, 1952-1954. Repre- 
sentative from Edgecombe County in the General Assembly of 
1941 ; State Senator in the General Assembly of 1953. Presbyterian. 
Married Miss Glennes Dodge, December 18, 1935. One son : Ronald 
Dodge Weeks, age 8. Address : Tarboro, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 461 

ADAM JACKSON WHITLEY, JR. 

(Eighth District — Counties: Johnston and Wayne. Two Sen- 
ators.) 

Adam Jackson Whitley, Jr., Democrat, Senator from the Eighth 
Senatorial District, was born in Johnston County, N. C, April 
14, 1894. Son of Adam Jackson and Abigail (Casey) Whitley. 
Attended Smithfield Grammar and High School, 1901-1914; N. C. 
State College, 1915-1917. Farmer. Member, Junior Order; Ameri- 
can Legion, Commander of American Legion Post No. 132 of 
Smithfield, N. C, 1953-19.54; Rotary Club, charter member when 
organized in 1944. Mason and Shriner. Member Democratic Execu- 
tive Committee, 1953-1954, Chairman, 1945-1947; Precinct Com- 
mitteeman, 1939-1945. Served as a Sergeant in World War I, 
1917-1918. State Senator in the General Assembly of 1949, 1951 
and 1953. Baptist; Deacon, 1927-1948; Chairman, Board of Dea- 
cons, 1929-1952; Moderator of Johnston Baptist Association, 1936- 
1954. Married Miss Florence Elizabeth Lassiter, February 14, 
1923. Three children: Adam J. Whitley, III; Dennis Whitley; 
Leah Lassiter Whitley. Address: Rt. 1, Smithfield, N. C. 



ARTHUR W. WILLIAMSON 

(Tenth District — Counties: Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus and 
Cumberland. Two Senators.) 

Arthur W. Williamson, Democrat, Senator from the Tenth Sena- 
torial District, was born at Cerro Gordo, N. C, November 6, 1911. 
Son of Marshall Edcar and Annie Belle Williamson. Attended 
Cerro Gordo High School, 1917-1928; Wake Forest College, 1929. 
Fanner and fertilizer dealer. Member Columbus County Board 
of Health, 1944-1947; Columbus County Board of Welfare, 1945- 
1950; Chairman Columbus County Board of Commissioners, 1940- 
1950; Chairman Columbus County Board of Education, 1953-1954; 
District Supervisor U. S. Census, 7th Congressional District, 1950. 
Baptist. Married Miss Elizabeth Peal, November 7, 1930. Five 
children. Address: Cerro Gordo, N. C. 



462 North Carolina Manual 

BELMONT HAROLD WINTERS 

(Thirtieth District — Counties: Avery, Madison, Mitchell and 
Yancey. One Senator.) 

Belmont Harold Winters, Democrat, Senator from the Thirtieth 
Senatorial District, was born at Elk Park, N. C, June 14, 1897. 
Son of George Clayton and Daisy M. (Lewis) Winters. Attended 
Elk Park Elementary School ; Avery County High School ; Uni- 
versity of Tennessee; Johnson City Business College. Insurance 
business. Mayor Town of Elk Park. Postmaster of Elk Park, 
1935-1952. Chairman Democratic Executive Committee, 1933-1935. 
Member Avery County Chamber of Commerce; Director and Past 
President Elk River Falls Fishing and Country Club. Mason; 
Past Master Cranberry Lodge No. 598 A. F. & A. M. Sergeant 
U. S. Army, 1916-1918. Member American Legion; Past Com- 
mander Avei-y Post Number 190; Past Commander 30th American 
Legion District. Baptist; Superintendent Sunday School for past 
two years; Chairman Board of Deacons, eight years. Married 
Miss Erleene S. Brown, October 14, 1921. Children: Harold B. 
Winters and Mrs. Kirk W. Sullivan. Address: Elk Park, N. C. 

NELSON WOODSON 

(Twenty-first District — Counties: Cabarrus and Rowan. Two 
Senators.) 

Nelson Woodson, Democrat, Senator from the Twenty-first Sena- 
torial District, was born at Salisbury, N. C, March 26, 1909. Son 
of Walter H. and Pauline (Bernhardt) Woodson. Attended Salis- 
bury High School, 1921-1925; University of North Carolina, A.B. 
degree, 1929; University of North Carolina Law School, LL.B. 
degree, 1932. Lawyer. Member of Rowan County Bar Association; 
North Carolina Bar Association; American Bar Association. 
Partner, Woodson & Woodson, Attorneys. Served in the U. S. 
Army, 1942-1946; 77th Infantry Division in the Pacific; dis- 
charged as Captain. Rotarian and Elk. State Senator in the 
General Assembly of 1949, 1951 and 1953. Episcopalian. Married 
Miss Mary Holt Whittle, October 19, 1946. Children: Walter Nel- 
son Woodson and Mary Holt Woodson. Address : 225 South Fulton 
Street, Salisbury, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 463 

CICERO PRESTON YOW 

(Ninth District — Counties: Duplin, New Hanover, Pender and 
Sampson. Two Senators.) 

Cicero Preston Yow, Democrat, Senator from the Ninth Sena- 
torial District, was born in Randolph County, December 24, 1914. 
Son of Amos H. and Cassie (Langley) Yow. Attended Wake For- 
est College; Wake Forest Law School, LL.B., 1942. Lawyer. 
Member New Hanover County Bar Association, President, 1951; 
North Carolina Bar Association; State Bar Association. Attorney 
for New Hanover County. Former Solicitor of New Hanover 
County Recorder's Court; Assistant United States Attorney for 
Eastern District of North Carolina, March of 1951 to January 
of 1954. Member Masonic Order, Sudan Temple; Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity; ODK Honorary Fraternity. Served in United States 
Army Air Force, 1942-1943. Episcopalian; served on Vestry, 
1950-1953. Married Miss Mary Elizabeth Hardwicke, June 5, 1958. 
Address: 410 South Front Street, Wilmington, N. C. 



464 North Carolina Manual 

REPRESENTATIVES 

LARRY ICHABOD MOORE, JR. 

speaker 

Larry Ichabod Moore, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Wil- 
son County, was born in Greenville, N. C, January 26, 1904. Son 
of Larry L and Ella (King) Moore. Attended New Bern Public 
Schools, 1910-1920; University of North Carolina, A.B. course, 
1920-1922; B.S. course, 1922-1924; Law, 1924-1926. Lawyer, 
farmer and dairyman. Solicitor Wilson County General County 
Court, 1929-1934. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1939, 1941, 1943, 1945, 1947, 1949, 1951 and 1953. County At- 
torney, Wilson County, 1943-1955; Past President Second Judicial 
District Bar Association ; Past President Wilson County Young 
Democrats Club; served 8 years as Director, General Alumni 
Association of the University of North Carolina and several years 
as President of Wilson County Alumni Association; member State 
Board of Health, 1943-1944; Advisory Budget Commission, 1949, 
1950, 1951 and 1952, Chairman, 1951-1952; Beta Theta Pi Social 
Fraternity and Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; Farm Bureau, 
State Grange; Mason (Past Master) ; Royal Arch Mason, (Past 
High Priest), Mt. Lebanon Council, No. 13, Royal and Select 
Masters (Past Illustrious Master) ; Knights Templar (Past Com- 
mander) ; Shriner, Past President Wilson County Shrine Club; 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (Exalted Ruler 1941-42) ; 
Wilson Lodge No. 840 (Honorary Life Member) ; Loyal Order 
of Moose. Married Miss Grace Thompson, February 7. 1946. Three 
daughters, Grace Thompson Moore, born November 26, 1946; 
Meta King Moore and Frances Holt Moore (twins) born June 
21, 1950; two sons, Larry I. Moore, III, born July 1, 1948, and 
Craige Ramsay Moore, born July 9, 1952. Address: Wilson, N. C. 

JOHN LELAND ANDERSON 

John Leland Anderson, Republican, Representative from Cald- 
well County, was born in that county, August 15, 1906. Son of 
Leland Lofeyette and Cornelia (Oxford) Anderson. Graduate 
of Caldwell County High Schools; local business training under 



Biographical Sketches 465 

private tutor. Furniture and tapestry dealer. Active in Com- 
munity and county organizations, P.-T.A. Member Community 
Betterment; Patriotic Sons of America, having held all offices 
of local camp as well as Deputy State President. President of 
Whitnel Kiv^^anis Club, 1955. Representative in the General As- 
sembly of 1953. Methodist; Superintendent of Sunday School, 
Trustee, Lay Leader and Sunday School Teacher. Married Miss 
Margie Arney, November 5, 1929. One daughter: Jerolene, now 
Mrs. T. G. Messick, Jr. Address: Route 9, Lenoir, N. C. 

ALLEN EDGAR ASKEW 

Allen Edgar Askew, Democrat, Representative from Gates 
County, was born in Eure, N. C, March 6, 1918. Son of William 
John and Venie (Piland) Askew. Attended Eure Grammar School, 
1925-1932; Gatesville High School, 1932-1936; Elon College, B.A.. 
1940. Merchant. Mason, Lodge 126, Gatesville. Served in U. S. 
Army from February 4, 1940, to September 27, 1945, with Sixth 
Armored Division with rank of Corporal. Repiesentative in the 
General Assembly of 1951 and 1953. Member of Christian Church; 
Teacher of Men and Women Sunday School Class. Married Miss 
Martha Elizabeth Stokes, July 18, 1944. One son: Allen Edgar 
Askew, Jr. Address: Gatesville, N. C. 

OSCAR GARLAND BARKER 

Oscar Garland Barker, Democrat, Representative from Dux-ham 
County, was born in Gary, Wake County, North Carolina, Janu- 
ary 12, 1896. Son of Brinkley Dickerson and Maitha (Johnson) 
Barker. Educated Durham City Schools and Trinity College, com- 
pleting law course at Trinity in 1923. Lawyer, specializing in 
Consultation and civil practice. Member of North Carolina Bar 
Association and Durham County Bar Association. Durham Lodge 
Masons, No. 352; Sudan Temple Mystic Shrine. Formerly news- 
paper editor, having served with editorial staffs of Durham Herald, 
Durham Sun and Greensboro Record. Represented Durham County 
in North Carolina General Assembly in 1935, 1937, special session 
of 1938, 1943, 1945, 1947, 1951, and 1953. Candidate for Congress 
in Sixth District in 1939 and 1941. Baptist; Teacher Men's Bible 
Class First Baptist Church, Durham, which was named Barker 
Bible Class in 1941. Member Board of Deacons. Married Miss 
Sarah Mae Terry. Address: Durham, N. C. 



Larry I. Moore, Jr. — Speaker 



Anderson of Caldwell 
Askew of Gates 
Barker of Durham 



Barnes of Watauga 
Bell of Carteret 
Bennett of Swain 



Bennett of Yancey 
Blue of Moore 
Brantley of Polk 



Bridger of Bladen 
Bryant of Gaston 

Buchanan of Jackson 



Burleson of Mitchell 
Carr of Duplin 
Clark of Lincoln 




T^i 



■ wl 



#^ 



Biographical Sketches 467 

STEWART JAMES BARNES 

Stewart James Barnes, Democrat, Representative from Watauga 
County, was born in Boone, N. C, September 25, 1894. Son of 
George Washington and Mary Elizabeth (Byers) Barnes. Attended 
Boone Grammar School, 1902-1910; Boone High School, 1911-1913. 
Farmer. Member Farm Bureau; Snow Masonic Lodge No. 363 of 
Boone, Junior and Senior Warden, 1925-1926. Served as Corporal 
in World War I with 30th Division, 1916-1919. Member Perkins- 
ville Missionary Baptist Church; Chairman Board of Deacons. 
Married Miss Estella Coffey, February 13, 1924. Children: James 
Andrew Barnes; Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Richards; Betty Ruth 
Barnes; Rebecca Ann Barnes. Address: Route 2, Boone, N. C. 

DANIEL GRAHAM BELL 

Daniel Graham Bell, Democrat, Representative from Carteret 
County, was born in Morehead City, N. C, August 9, 1913. Son 
of Daniel Graham and Madie A. Bell. Attended Morehead City 
High School, 1921-1932. Merchant. Commissioner, Town of More- 
head City since 1947; Mayor Pro-tem since 1951. Member Elks 
Club; Past President Morehead City Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce; Past President Morehead City Chamber of Commerce; 
Commodore Morehead City Sailing Club, 1946-1950. Winner of the 
J. C. Young Man of the Year Award, Morehead City, 1939. Metho- 
dist; Steward, 1938-1942, 1946-1948. Address: Morehead City, 
N. C. 



KELLY EDMOND BENNETT 

Kelly Edmond Bennett. Democrat, Representative from Swain 
County, was born near Qualla Indian Reservation in Jackson 
County, February 8, 1890. Son of Dr. Aurelius McDonald and 
Mary Charlotte (Hyatt) Bennett. Attended Bryson City Grammar 
School, 1897-1904, 1905-1906; Orange Street School of Asheville, 
1904-1905; Bryson City High School, 1906-1910; University of 
North Carolina; University of North Caiolina School of Pharmacy, 
1910-1912; Ph.G. Pharmacist. Member American Phajmaceutical 
Association; National Association of Retail Druggists; North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association; Western North Cai'olina 



468 North Carolina Manual 

Drug Club; North Carolina Board of Pharmacy, 1920-1925; Na- 
tional Association Boards of Pharmacy; host to the organization 
meeting of Western North Carolina Associated Communities and 
served as Vice-Pi"esident, also member of Board of Directors, 
1945-1954; one of the founders and trustee Cherokee Historical 
Association "Unto These Hills," 1948-1954; member North Caro- 
lina Hospitals Board of Control, 1947-1953; Bryson City School 
Board, 1914-1934; National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis and 
Chairman Swain County Chapter, 1942-1954; Wilderness Society; 
North Carclina State Automobile Association, Inc.; President and 
member Board of Directors Swain County Chamber of Commerce 
for five years; charter member and President Bryson City Rotary 
Club, 1933-1954; Chairman United States Bond sales, 1941-1954; 
associate member Soil Conservation Society of America; honorary 
member Association of Law Enforcement Oflficers of the Caro- 
linas ; permanent contributing member Shriners Crippled Children ; 
member Board of Directors of Morrison Training School, 1920- 
1926. Colonel on the staff of the Governor of Kentucky. Received 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association Award "Pharmacist 
of Year," 1954; National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis 
Award for Meritorious Service, 1954; United States Treasury 
Award for achievement in the United States Savings Bonds Pro- 
gram; President Dwight D. Eisenhower Achievement Award for 
patriotic service in the United States Savings Bonds Program; 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association Award in Recognition 
of Exceptional Meritorius Service to the Advancement of Public 
Health and Welfare, 1954. Rotary International Governor, Dis- 
trict 280, 1955-1956; member Board of Aldermen of Bryson City, 
1914-1918; Chief Clerk Swain County Local Draft Board; Mayor 
Town of Bryson City, 1924-1926, 1947-1955; Chairman Swain 
County Democratic Executive Committee, 1929-1931; member and 
Chairman North Carolina National Park. Parkway and Forest 
Development Commission, 1947-1955. State Senator in the General 
Assembly of 1917, 1931 and 1937. Member Oconee Lodge No. 427 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Worshipful Master; Bryson 
City Chapter No. 63 Roy.l Arch Masons. High Priest; Doric 
Council No. 20 Royal and Select Masters; Waynesville Command- 
ery No. 31 Knights Templar; Asheville Consistory Ancient and 
Accepted Scottish Rite 32 degree; Knights Commander Court of 



Biographical Sketches 469 

Honor; Oasis Temple; Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine; Tuckaseegee Chapter No. 16 Order of the Eastern 
Star, Worthy Patron; District Deputy Grand Master Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons of North Carolina, 1933. Presbyterian ; Dea- 
con and Elder; Superintendent Sunday School, 1909-1910; mem- 
ber Home Mission Committee of Asheville Presbytery, 1922-1926. 
Married Miss Ola Tela Zachavy, December 30, 1913. Children: 
Mrs. Mary Alice Greyer, Mrs. Sam J. Coleman and Mrs. William 
J. Swan. Address: 108 Everett Street, Bryson City, N. C. 

MARK WILSON BENNETT 

Mark Wilson Bennett, Democrat, Representative from Yancey 
County, was born at Bald Creek, N. C, November 7, 1913. Son 
of Dr. W. L. and Nell Byrd Bennett. Graduated from Bald Creek 
High School, 1930; Weaver Colle.s:e, Weaverville, N. C, 1932. 
Utility (electric) employee. Member Yancey County Board of 
Education, 1951-1952; Mayor Town of Burnsville, 1948-1951. Mem- 
ber Burnsville Men's Club and Lions Club. Served in U. S. Army 
with rank of Serg-eant, June 24, 1943 to December 17, 1945. 
Member Earl-Horton Post Number 122 of American Legion, Com- 
mander from 1946 to 1947; District Commander, 31st District 
American Legion, 1948. Methodist; Steward. Married Miss 
Elizabeth Fleetwood, August 9, 1938. Children: Julia Byrd Ben- 
nett, Amanda Blanche Bennett and Mark Wilson Bennett, Jr. 
Address: Burnsville, N. C. 

HERBERT CLIFTON BLUE 

Herbert Clifton Blue, Democrat, Representative from Moore 
County, was born in Hoke County, N. C. (then Cumberland), 
August 28, 1910. Son of John Patrick and Christian (Steward) 
Blue. Graduated from Vass-Lakeview High School in 1929. Pub- 
lisher "The Sandhill Citizen," Aberdeen, N. C. Member, Town of 
Aberdeen Board of Commissioners, 1945; President, Moore County 
YDC Club, 1941-1946; Elected Eighth Congressional District YDC 
Chairman, 1946; Secretary North Carolina Young Democratic 
Clubs, 1947-1948; President North Carolina Young Democratic 
Clubs, 1948-1949; Secretary State Democratic Executive Commit- 
tee, 1949 to present time; Member Moore County Democratic Ex- 



470 North Carolina Manual 

ecutive Committee; Mooi-e County representative on Eighth Dis- 
trict Congressional Committee. Former President, Central Caro- 
lina Press Association; Secretai-y-Treasurer, Aberdeen Tobacco 
Board of Trade. Charter member, Aberdeen Lions Club; President 
of the Club for the 1946-1947 term; Zone Chainnan 1947-1948; 
deputy district governor, 1953-1954. Mason. Woodman of the 
World. President Vass-Lakeview High School Alumni Association, 
1933-1935; also 1942 to the present. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1947, 1949, 1951 and 1953. Presbyterian. Served as 
Superintendent of Cypress Sunday School, 1930-1940; Deacon in 
Cypress Church, 1931-1941; Superintendent, Bethesda Presbyterian 
Sunday School, 1940 to present time; Deacon, Bethesda Church, 
1941-1946; elected Elder, Bethesda Church, 1946. Married Miss 
Gala Lee Nunnery, July 4, 1937. Three children: Patricia Joyce, 
age 16; Herbert Clifton, Jr., age 14; John Lee, age 9. Address: 
Aberdeen, N. C. 

ROBERT EARLEY BRANTLEY 

Robert Earley Brantley, Democrat, Representative from Polk 
County, was born in Zebulon, N. C, January 19, 1900. Son of 
R. F. and Mrs. Lecy (Puckett) Brantley. Attended Wakelon High 
School, graduating in 1916. Theatre owner and operator. Chair- 
man of the Board of County Commissioners of Polk County, 1947- 
1950. Director, Tryon Bank & Trust Company; Chairman of Har- 
mon Field Commission; Past President Tryon Rotary Club; Past 
President Tryon Merchants Association; Past President Tryon 
Chamber of Commerce; Past Director of Tryon Country Club; 
Past Treasurer Polk County Red Cross. Representative in the Gen- 
eral Assembly of 1951 and 1953. Member Congregational Church. 
Married Miss Sallie V. Baker, January 28, 1925. Three children: 
Mrs. Jean Brantley Durham, Mrs. Marguerite Brantley Howell, 
and Mrs. Emily Rose Brantley Scoggins. Address: Tryon, N. C. 

DEWEY HERBERT BRIDGER 

Dewey Herbert Bridger, Democrat, Representative from Bladen 
County, was born at Bladenboro, N. C, March 3, 1899. Son of 
Henry C. and Carrie (Love) Bridger. Attended Bladenboro High 
School; Wake Forest College, A.B. degree, 1920; Jefferson Medical 



Biographical Sketches 471 

College, M.D., 1922. Physician. Member of The American Academy 
of General Practice; Bladen County Medical Society, President, 
1944; N. C. Medical Society; Southern Medical Society; Seaboard 
Medical Society, Vice-President, 1947; Local Seaboard Surgeon; 
Trustee, Wake Forest College; Vice-President, Bank of Bladenboro; 
Vice-President, Bladenboro Cotton Mills; County Chairman, North 
Carolina Good Health Program. S.A.T.C, 1918 and 1919; Medical 
Examiner, draftees. Second World War. Phi Chi Medical Frater- 
nity; Mason; Shriner; Rotarian. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1949. Baptist; Deacon; Chairman, Board of Deacons, 
1940 to 1946. Married Miss Lois Dickson, Wake Forest, N. C, 
April 11, 1923. Two children: Mrs. Kenneth McLean, Lincolnton, 
N. C. and Dewey H. Bridger, Jr., Bladenboro, N. C. One grand- 
child, Dewey H. Bridger, IIL 

CHARLES KING BRYANT, SR. 

Charles King Bryant, Sr., Democrat, Representative from Gas- 
ton County, was born in Iredell County, April 25, 1894. Son of 
R. J. and Lydia C. (White) Bryant. Graduated from High School, 
1913; New York Electrical School, 1914-1916. Electrical engineer 
and farmer. Chaimian of Board of Bryant Electric and Bryant 
Supply Co. Member, American Institute of Electrical Engineers; 
National Industrial Service Association. Member, Gastonia Elks 
Club; Gastonia Rotary Club, Past President. President, Piedmont 
Council Boy Scouts of America. Member, Electric Contractors In- 
dustry Advisory Committee, Department of Commerce, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Member and Director of Gaston County Farm Bureau; 
Director of Gaston Technical Institute; Director N. C. Engineering 
Foundation, Inc.; Director Gastonia Chamber of Commerce. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1951 and 1953. Presbyterian. 
Married Miss Mary L. Miller, June 30, 1915. Five children: four 
boys, one girl; seven grandchildren: four boys, three girls. Ad- 
dress: New Hope Road, Gastonia, N. C. 

MARCELLUS BUCHANAN 

Marcellus Buchanan, Democrat, Representative from Jack.son 
County, was born in Sylva, N. C, September 30, 1923. Son of 
Marcellus, Jr. and Rebecca (Cathey) Buchanan. Attended Sylva 



472 North Carolina Manual 

High School, graduating in 1940; Western Carolina Teachers Col- 
lege, 1941-1942; University of North Carolina Law School, LL.B., 
1949. Lawyer. Member Jackson County Bar Association and N. C. 
Bar Association. Attorney for Town of Sylva; former Chairman 
Jackson County Democratic Executive Committee; President Jack- 
son County Y.D.C., 1950-1952. Member Sylva Lions Club; Chi 
Phi Fraternity; Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity. Served in 
World War II, January 1943 to October 1945. Methodist. MaiTied 
Miss Jane Poteet in 1943. Address: Sylva, N. C. 

JETER C. BURLESON 

Jeter C. Burleson, Republican, Representative from Mitchell 
County was born in Bakersville, N. C, July 17, 1899. Son of Wil- 
liam Anderson and Hester Ledford Burleson. Attended Bakers- 
ville High School, 1913-1917; Appalacian State Teachers' College 
two years. Engaged in insurance and bonding. Owner and man- 
ager of The J. C. Burleson Lumber Co., Bakersville, N. C. Princi- 
pal, Glen Ayre Consolidated School for two years. Clerk, Superior 
Court, Mitchell County, 1922-1930; youngest clerk in State elected 
to that office. Chainnan, Republican County Executive Committee, 
1928-1930. Served in Special Session of General Assembly, 1936, 
regular sessions 1937, 1939, 1943, 1947, and 1951. Member, Bakers- 
ville Men's Club. Mason. Baptist. Married Miss Atta Rankin, 
1925. Two sons: Bruce Eugene, teacher at UCLA, and William 
Anderson, law student at U.N.C. Address: Bakersville, N. C. 

ROBERT MYRON CARR 

Robert Myron Carr, Democrat, Representative from Duplin 
County, was born near Rose Hill, N. C, December 10, 1900. Son 
of Solan Clarence and Susan Ann Carr. Graduated from Burgaw 
High School, 1918; Bowen's Business College, Columbia, S. C, 
September, 1919. Distributor Gulf Oil Products, Wallace, since 
March 12, 1927. Member Duplin County Board of Education since 
1934, Chairman for past fourteen years. Member Wallace Lodge 
No. 595 A.F. & A.M., Master, 1934; Junior Order United Ameri- 
can Mechanics. President of Wallace Deer Club since 1935. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1951 and 1953. Presbyterian. 
Married Miss Lela Smith, December 21, 1921. Three children: 
Christine, Margaret Ann, and Bobby. Address: Wallace, N. C. 



•tes of Johnston 
oilier of Pamlico 
' Craig of Buncombe 



C:nmings of Catawba 
avis of Rutherford 
Dill of Edgecombe 



I ghton of Alleghany 
dwards of Greene 
■ Etheridge of Dare 



E rett of Martin 
!alls of Cleveland 

, Falls of Gaston 

I 
I 



F er of Transylvania 
oyd of Columbus 
Floyd of Robeson 



f" >es of Camden 
>wler of Surry 
Gavin of Randolph 




474 North Carolina Manual 

DAVID CLARK 

David Claik, Democrat, Representative from Lincoln County, 
was born in Lincolnton, N. C, July 4, 1922. Son of Thorne and 
Mabel (Gossett) Clark. Attended Lincolnton Hig-h School, 1935 
to 1939; Darlington School, 1939 to 1940; Washington and Lee 
University, 1941 to January, 1943, 1946; University of North 
Carolina Law School. Lawyer and farmer. Member N. C. Judicial 
Council; Secretary, 16th Judicial District Bar Association. Mem- 
ber Phi Delta Phi; Phi Delta Theta; Knights of Pythias; V.F.W., 
Vice-Commander; American Legion. Mason. Member State Gov- 
ernment Reorganization Commission; Co-chairman of N. C. Citizens 
Committee for Hoover Report, 1951. Chairman, Lincoln County 
Red Cross, 1950, 1951. Member Junior Chamber of Commerce, 
State Chaii-man of Amei'icanism Committee, 1950. First Lieu- 
tenant, Air Force, 1943 to 1946. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1951 and 1953. Presbyterian. Married Miss Kathryn 
King Goode of Charlotte, N. C. April 18, 1951. Address: Lincoln- 
ton, N. C. 



ROY COLUMBUS COAXES 

Roy Columbus Coates, Democrat, Representative from Johnston 
County, was born in Johnston County, July 4, 1918. Son of Joseph 
B. and Lula (Smith) Coates. Attended Wilsons Mills Elementary 
School, 1924-1931; Srnithfield High School, 1932-1936; North Caro- 
lina State College, 1937-1939. House moving contractor. Member 
Carolina Roadbuilders Association. Member 4-H Club during 
school days; 4-H State Champion Seed Judging Team, 1935; State 
President of 4-H Clubs, 1935. Entered military service in 1940 
with rank of Private; received pilot training as Aviation Cadet 
and commissioned Second Lieutenant upon graduation; received 
subsequent promotions up to Major in U. S. Army Air Force and 
released from active duty December 6, 1946. Mason; member 
Smithfield Lions Club. Representative in the General Assembly 
of 1953. Baptist; Deacon; Assistant Director of Baptist Train- 
ing Union, 1951-1952. Married Miss Lacy Ruth Powell, December 
24, 1942. One daughter, Kaye Ruth Coates. Address: Route 3, 
Smithfield, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 475 

THEODORE JOSEPH COLLIER 

Theodore Joseph Collier, Democrat, Representative from Pamlico 
County, was born in Wayne County, October 16, 1908. Son of 
Josiah and Matilda (Johnson) Collier. Attended Pikeville Ele- 
mentary and High School, 1914-1925; University of North Caro- 
lina, 1929, A.B. degree. Building supplies dealer. Teacher and 
principal in Pamlico County Schools from 1930-1942; in Washing- 
ton County, 1942-1945. Mason. Member of Ruritan Club; Lions 
Club; First President of Pamlico County Chamber of Commerce; 
Commissioner, East Carolina Reg-ional Housing- Authority; Tri- 
ang-le Club. Sigma Phi Epsilon and Phi Beta Kappa Frateniities. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1949, 1951, and 1953. 
Methodist; District Stevi^ard; Member and Treasurer of Board 
of Trustees and Board of Directors of Camp Don-Lee, Inc.; Lay 
Leader. Married Miss Mildred Muse of Oriental, N. C, October 
25, 1930. Two children: Joseph, 14 years old, and Betsy, 9 years 
old. Address : Bayboro, N. C. 

GEORGE WINSTON CRAIG 

George Winston Craig-, Democrat, Representative from Bun- 
combe County, was born in that county June 18, 1894. Son of 
Locke and Annie (Burgin) Craig. Attended public and private 
schools of Asheville and Webb School, Bellbuckle, Tennessee, 1911; 
University of North Carolina, 1912-1916; Wake Forest Law 
School, 1916. Lavv^er. First Lieutenant United States Army, Tank 
Corps, 1917-1919. Member Board of Education, 1925. Referee in 
Bankruptcy. Representative in the General Assembly of 1935, 
1937, 1943 and 1945. Married Miss Kathryne Taylor, of Hickory, 
N. C, June 8, 1921. Children: Mrs. Milton G. Smith and Mrs. 
Walter H. Davis. Address: 176 Governor's View Road, Asheville, 
N. C. 

THEODORE FRANKLIN CUMMINGS 

Theodore Franklin Cummings, Democrat, Representative from 
Catawba County, was born in Kings Mountain, N. C, June 15, 
1904. Son of Theodore Franklin and Lillie Jane (Ware) Cum- 
mings. Attended Raleigh City Schools, Wake Forest College and 



476 North Carolina Manual 

Wake Forest College Law School. Lawyer. Member Catawba 
County Bar Association, President, 1951-1952 ; North Carolina 
Bar Association; North Carolina State Bar Association; Ameri- 
can Bar Association ; Executive Committee of the Sixteenth 
Judicial District Bar Association, 1954-1955. Judge Municipal 
Court, City of Hickory, 1934-1944. Member Benevolent & Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, Hickory Lodge No. 1654; Loyal Order of 
Moose, Hickory Lodge No. 1312. Methodist; foiTner Sunday School 
Teacher. Married Miss Annie Louise Cloninger, July 18, 1935. 
Children: Theodore F. Cummings, III; Michael R. Cummings; Ann 
Connor Cummings. Address: 367 6th Street, N.W., Hickory, N. C. 

JAMES TOLIVER DAVIS 

James Toliver Davis, Democrat, Representative from Ruther- 
ford County, was born in Forest City, N. C, June 21, 1922. Son 
of James Webb and Lois Elizabeth (Cagle) Davis. Attended 
Forest City Elementary School, 1928-1934; Cool Springs High 
School of Forest City, 1934-1938; Mars Hill Junior College, 1938- 
1940; Wake Forest College Law School, 1940-1943, LL.B. Lawyer. 
Member North Carolina Bar Association, Inc.; North Carolina 
State Bar, Inc.; Rutherford County Bar Association; Loyal Order 
of Moose; President Rutherford County Young Democrats, 1949; 
member of Rutherford County Board of Elections, 1953; City 
Attorney for Town of Forest City since 1947. Served in the United 
States Navy, 1943-1945; now holds commission as Lieutenant in 
U. S. Naval Reserves. Baptist. Married Miss Jackie Jones, March 
13, 1946. Children: Sharon Elizabeth Davis and Gayle Gray Davis. 
Address: Forest City, N. C. 

THOMAS GREEN DILL* 

Thomas Green Dill, Democrat, Representative from Edgecombe 
County, was born in New Bern, N. C, January 19, 1922. Son of 
Alonzo Thomas and Clara Maria (Green) Dill. Attended New 
Bern Public Schools; New Bern High School, graduating in 1939; 
University of North Carolina, 1939-1943, A.B. degree; University 
of North Carolina Law School, 1943, 1946-1947, LL.B. degree. 
Lawyer. Member Edgecombe County Bar Association; Rocky 
Mount-Nash County Bar Association; N. C. Bar Association; N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 477 

State Bar. Staff member North Carolina Law Review, 1947. 
Member Edgecombe County Democratic Executive Committee. 
Prosecuting Attorney, City of Rocky Mount, 1950-1955. Member 
Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; Phi Beta Kappa, University of 
North Carolina, 1943; Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity; Rocky 
Mount Junior Chamber of Commerce; Rocky Mount Current Topics 
Club, President, 1952; American Legion; Edgecombe County Farm 
Bureau; Edgecombe County Young Democratic Club. Served 
in U. S. Naval Reserve, 1943-1946; attended Midshipman's School, 
Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; commissioned Ensign 
in 1943; served with Amphibious Forces in Central Pacific and 
China; released to inactive duty as Lieutenant (jg), U.S.N.R., 
1946. Presbyterian; Deacon since 1950; Chairman Board of Dea- 
cons, 1953; member Men of Church Organization; Vice President 
of Men of Church, Albemarle Presbytery, 1952-1953; Assistant 
Superintendent Sunday School; Teacher Young Adults Class. 
Married Miss Ann Sloan Fountain of Rocky Mount, November 3, 
1944. Children: Ann Sloan Dill, Harriet Fountain Dill and Susan 
Green Dill. Address: 417 Sycamore Street, Rocky Mount, N. C. 



♦Appointed Feb. 1, 1955 to succeed Ben E. Fountain, resigned. 

JAMES KEMP DOUGHTON 

James Kemp Doughton, Democrat, Representative from Alle- 
ghany County, was born at Sparta, N. C, May 18, 1884. Son of 
Rufus A. and Sue (Parks) Doughton. Attended Oak Ridge In- 
stitute and University of North Carolina. Farmer. Trust Officer, 
Northwestern Bank, North Wilkesboro. Formerly bank official; 
State and National Bank Examiner; Manager Richmond Agency 
Reconstruction Finance Corporation; General Agent and Chair- 
man Board Farm Credit Administration, Baltimore. Representa- 
tive in General Assembly of 1949, 1951 and 1953. Methodist. First 
marriage to Miss Josephine Brown of Raleigh, N. C. Three chil- 
dren. Second marriage to Miss Ivy G. Doughton of Laurel Springs. 
Address: Rt. 3, Sparta, N. C. 

ALONZO CLAY EDWARDS 

Alonzo Clay Edwards, Democrat, Representative from Greene 
County, was born at Hookerton, N. C, September 29, 1904. Son of 



4"?^ North Carolina Manual 

Dr. G. C. and Catherine (Herman) Edwards. Attended schools of 
Hookerton, 1910-1921; Trinity College 1921-1924. Farmer. Member 
Greene County Agricultural Adjustment Administration Committee 
1935-1940; Chairman, 1938-1940; North Carolina Farm Bureau 
State Membership Chairman 1942-1948 and Member of State Execu- 
tive Committee 1937-1953. Representative from North Carolina to 
the National Farm Bureau Convention 1938, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 
1950, 1951 and 1952; President North Carolina Farm Bureau 1949- 
1950; awarded "Distinguished Service Award for Agriculture — 
1952" presented by North Carolina Farm Bureau. Director, Peanut 
Growers Cooperative 1942-1953. Director Coastal Plain Soil Con- 
servation District 1942-1955; President, North Carolina Association 
of Soil Conservation District Supervisors, 1946; Commissioner, 
Town of Hookerton 1931-1940; Chairman United War Fund for 
Greene County 1943, 1944, 1945. Mason; Jerusalem Lodge No. 95. 
A. F. & A. M., Knights Templar; Royal Arch Masons; Sudan 
Temple, A. A. O. N. M. Shrine; Junior Order United American 
Mechanics; Trustee, Jr. O.U.A.M. Children's Home, Lexington, 
N. C, 1941-1955; State Councilor, 1944-1945; National Representa- 
tive, Jr. O.U.A.M., 1945-1949; B.P.O. of Elks; Lambda Chi Alpha; 
State Board of Education, 1943-1948; Chairman, Duke National 
Council 1951-1952; Member N. C. Advisory Budget Commission, 
1949-1955. Member Board of Awards, 1949-1955. Representative 
in the General Assembly of 1941, 1943, 1945, 1947, 1949, 1951 and 
1953. Methodist; Steward, 1928-1955; Charge Lay Leader Hooker- 
ton Circuit, 1935-1955; Sunday School Superintendent, 1942-1955. 
Married Miss Bettie Hardy Taylor, February 20, 1935. One son, 
Alonzo Clay Edwards, Jr. Address: Hookerton, N. C. 



ROBERT BRUCE ETHERIDGE 

Robert Bruce Etheridge, Democrat, Representative from Dare 
County, was born at Manteo, July 31, 1878. Son of Van Buren and 
Matilda Etheridge. Attended public schools of Manteo and Atlan- 
tic Collegiate Institute, Elizabeth City; A.B. Trinity College (now 
Duke University) 1899. Cashier Bank of Manteo 1907-1933. Gen- 
eral Insurance. Clerk Superior Court, Dare County; Superintend- 
ent of Schools; Member State Executive Committee 1928-1952; 
Postmaster, Manteo 1914-1922; County Chairman Democratic 



Biographical Sketches 479 

Executive Committee. State Senator from Second Disti'ict 1907. 
Representative in General Assembly 1903, 1905, 1929, 1931, 1933, 
1951, and 1953. Director Department of Conservation and Develop- 
ment 1933 to May, 1949. Member New York World's Fair Com- 
mission. Chairman Ex-officio Cape Hatteras National Seashore 
Commission. Mason, Treasurer Masonic Lodge twelve years; Junior 
Order; Woodmen of America; Red Men; Kappa Sigma (College 
fraternity). Married Miss Elizabeth Webb, April 22, 1908. Ad- 
dress: Manteo, N. C. 

RICHARD FRANK EVERETT 

Richard Frank Everett, Democrat, Representative from Martin 
County, was born in Hamilton, N. C. Son of LeRoy and Maggie 
.Tarvis (Davenport) Everett. Graduated from Oak City High 
School in 1937. Merchant. Served two terms as Town Commis- 
sioner and two terms as Mayor of Town of Hamilton. Captain, 
U. S. Marine Coi-ps, 1939-1946. Baptist; President of Young 
Men's Class. Married Delma Faye Everett, May 2, 1942. Three 
children. Address: Hamilton, N. C. 

BAYARD THURMAN FALLS, JR. 

Baynard Thurman Falls, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Cleveland County, was born at Shelby, N. C, September 14, 1911. 
Son of B. T. and Selma E. Falls. Attended Shelby Public Schools, 
1917-1929; LL.B., Wake Forest College, 1939. Lawyer. Member 
North State Bar. Gamma Eta Gamma, Law Fraternity. President 
Shelby Junior Chamber of Commerce. Charter member Shelby 
Lodge No. 1709 B.P.O.E. Member N. C. Democratic Executive 
Committee. Representative in the General Assembly of 1943, 1949, 
1951, and 1953. Episcopalian. Married Miss Sara Hines, Novem- 
ber 12, 1938. Two children: Betsy Falls, age 12 and Selma Falls, 
age 8. Address: Shelby, N. C. 

CHARLES BOYCE FALLS, JR. 

Charles Boyce Falls, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Gas- 
ton County, was born in Kings Mountain, N. C, August 23, 1907, 
Son of Charles Boyce, Sr. and Sara Susan (Huffstettler) Falls. 



480 North Carolina Manual 

Attended -Kings Mountain Public Schools; Rutherford College; 
Duke University, A.B. 1928; Duke University Law School, 1929- 
1931. Lawyer and realtor. Member Gaston County Bar Associa- 
tion, President, 1952-1953; North Carolina Bar Association; Gas- 
ton Board of Realtors; Gastonia Executives Club; Gastonia Lions 
Club, Chairman Activities Committee, 1951-1952 and Chairman 
Program Committee, 1952-1953. Mason. Baptist. Married Miss 
Martha Madeline Moore, May 13, 1930. Children: Mrs. Fannie 
Sue Falls Colvin, Martha Moore Falls and Mary Madeline Falls. 
Address : Kirby Sti-eet, Gastonia, N. C. 

RALPH RUDOLPH FISHER 

Ralph Rudolph Fisher, Republican, Representative from Transyl- 
vania County, was born at Greenville, S. C, February 3, 1892. Son 
of Dr. W. C. and Rhoda Emma (Walker) Fisher. Attended Colum- 
bus Institute, 1903-1904; Furman Fitting School, Greenville, S. C, 
1909-1910; Mars Hill College, 1910-1914; Wake Forest College, 
1917. Lawyer. President, Eighteenth District Bar; President, 
North Carolina Railroad Company. President, Brevard Chamber of 
Commerce, 1941. Served in World War I, 1917-1919. Seven times 
Commander Munroe Wilson Post 88, American Legion ; Dept. Mem- 
bership Chairman, 1949-1950; Delegate to National Convention at 
Omaha, Neb., 1943; Fifth Division Commander, 1949-1950; Mem- 
ber, Administrative Committee N. C. Department of American 
Legion. Noble Grande in Odd Fellows; Council Commander, Wood- 
men of the World. Chairman, Republican County Executive Com- 
mittee; Member State Republican Executive Committee; Delegate 
to Republican National Convention at Philadelphia, 1940. Repre- 
sentative in General Assembly, Regular Session, 1921; Special Ses- 
sion, 1922; Regular Session, 1945, 1949, 1951, and 1953. Minority 
leader, 1953 Session. Member of First Baptist Church, Brevard. 
Married Miss Thelma Richardson, of Marion, Va., January 31, 
1923. Address: Brevard, N. C. 

FRANCIS WAYLAND FLOYD 

Francis Wayland Floyd, Democrat, Representative from Robeson 
County, was born in Lumberton, N. C, May 23, 1904. Son of 
Francis A. and Nora Mae (Lewis) Floyd. Attended Wake Forest 



Biographical Sketches 481 

College and Wake Forest Law School. Lawyer and farmer. Solic- 
itor Robeson County Recorder's Court, 1936-1940 and 1944-1948. 
Member Fairmont Civitan Club, Past President; Past Lieutenant 
Governor of N. C. District Civitan International; 32nd Degree 
Mason; Shriner, Sudan Temple, New Bern, N. C; Woodman of 
the World; Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Past President 
Fairmont Chamber of Commerce. Attorney for Town of Fair- 
mont, 1936-1946. Representative in General Assembly in 1949, 
1951 and 1953. Baptist. First marriage to Miss Meddie Thompson, 
July 5, 1926 (deceased) ; second marriage to Miss Lillian Faulk, 
November 6, 1954. Children: Robert F. Floyd and Edwin 0. 
Floyd. Address: Fairm.ont, N. C. 

WILLIAM F. FLOYD 

William F. Floyd, Democrat, Representative from Columbus 
County, was born at Green Sea, S. C, November 3, 1907. Son of 
Dr. J. W. and Rebecca (Cunningham) Floyd. Attended Tabor 
City High School, 1921-1925; University of North Carolina for 
two years. General Insurance Business. Member National, State 
and County Insurance Associations. County Commissioner, 1946- 
1948, 1948-1950; Chairman of Board, 1950-1952. Member White- 
ville Civitan Club; Moose Club; Country Club. Entered U. S. 
Army, March 21, 1942; OCS September 12, 1942 and commissioned 
December 13, 1942; separated as Captain, October 14, 1945. Repre- 
sentative in General Assembly of 1953. Presbyterian; Deacon. 
Married Miss Mary Lesesne Brown, May 10, 1942. Children: 
Mary Frances, age 12, Joseph Walker, age 8, William Frederick, 
Jr., age 6. Address: Whiteville, N. C. 

JACOB WILBERT FORBES 

Jacob Wilbert Forbes, Democrat, Representative from Camden 
County, was born in that county. Son of Jacob Foster and Ida 
(Dozier) Forbes. Attended Oak Ridge Militaiy Institute, 1933- 
1934; Wake Forest College, 1934-1936. Farmer. Member South 
Ruritan Club (Camden) ; Masonic Order, Lodge No. 54, A. F. & 
A. M. Representative in the General Assembly of 1953. Baptist. 
Married Miss Jerry Louise Wilcox, November 28, 1936. Children: 
Larry, age 16; Marie, age 11; Ida, age 8. Address: Shiloh, N. C. 



Gentry of Ashe 
Gobble of Forsyth 

Goodman of Mecklenburg 



Greene of Hoke 

Gregory of Harnett 
Hairston of Davie 



Hargett of Jones 
Harris of Stanly 
Harriss of Rowan 



Haworth of Guilford 
Hayes of Richmond 
Henderson of Robeson 



Hewlett of New Hanover 
Holcombe of Madison 
Holmes of Perquimans 



Houk of Macon 
Hunt of Guilford 
Jenkins of Graham 




Biographical Sketches 483 

BENJAMIN EAGLES FOUNTAIN* 

Benjamin Eagles Fountain, Democrat, Representative, from 
Edgecombe County, was born in that county, January 17, 1897. 
Son of Almon L. and Louisa (Eagles) Fountain. Attended Edge- 
combe County Schools; Tarboro High School; John Graham Pre- 
paratory School, Warrenton, 1915-1917; University of North Caro- 
lina, 1917-1918; Law School, 1921-1923. Lawyer, farmer, realtor. 
Member Rocky Mount and N. C. Bar Associations. Member Board 
of Trustees, Rocky Mount City Schools, 1934 to 1947; Trustee of 
Greater University of N. C. ; Government Appeal Agent, Local 
Draft Board No. 2, Edgecombe County, 1940-1942. Served in U. S. 
Navy, 1918; member American Legion; Commander Coleman Pitt 
Post, 1927-1928. Presbyterian; Deacon since 1937; Chairman Board 
of Deacons 1941-1942. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1943, 1945, 1947, 1949, 1951 and 1953. Married Miss Emmie Jane 
Green of Fountain Inn, S. C, June 14, 1928. Children: Benjamin 
Eagles, Jr., Arthur Green and Jane Bryson. Address: Rocky 
Mount, N. C. 



♦Resigned January 31, 1955. 

JOSEPH RALPH FOWLER, JR. 

Joseph Ralph Fowler, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Surry 
County, was born in Faison, N. C, November 17, 1925. Son of 
Joe R., Sr. and Bernie (Allen) Fowler. Attended Mt. Airy High 
School, 1938-1942; University of North Carolina, 1942-1943; 
Cornell College, Mt. Vernon, Iowa, 1946-1948, A.B. in Political 
Science and Economics. Automobile dealer. Member N. C. Auto- 
mobile Dealer's Association, Area Chairman 1950-1954; National 
Automobile Dealer's Association; Farm Bureau. Phi Delta Theta; 
Mu Lambda Sigma, Vice-President and Pledge Master, 1947; Ren- 
fro Masonic Lodge No. 691, A. F. & A. M. of Mt. Airy; Lions 
Club, Vice-President 1950 and Zone Chairman 1951. Surry County 
Y.D.C., Vice-President 1945 and President 1948-1949; Chairman 
Fifth District Y.D.C., 1950-1951; Central Division Organizer of 
Y.D.C. in 1951. United States Navy, H.A. 1/c, Aviation Cadet, 
active duty August 1943 to September 1945; inactive duty, Septem- 
ber 1945 to September 1947. Commander American Post 123, 1954; 



484 North Carolina Manual 

Member Mt. Airy Jay Cees. Representative in the General As- 
sembly of 1953. Methodist; Steward. Married Miss Patricia Shine, 
September 25, 1945. Two children : Glory Williams Fowler and 
Joy Allen Fowler. Address: 118 East Lebanon Street, Mt. Airy, 
N. C. 

WILEY EDWIN GAVIN 

Wiley Edwin Gavin, Republican, Representative from Randolph 
County, was born in Sanford, N. C, March 3, 1921. Son of E. L. 
and Mary Caudle Gavin. Attended Sanford Grammar Schools, 
1927-1934; Sanford High School, 1934-1938; Wake Forest College, 
1938-1942, B.S. degree; Wake Forest Law School, 1946-1948, LL.B. 
Member of Law Firm of Coltrane and Gavin, Asheboro, N. C. Tax 
Attorney for Randolph County. Served in U. S. Army, 1942-1946; 
October 1950-April 1952, Captain, Judge Advocates Gen. Corps. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1953. Baptist; Deacon 
since 1949. Address: Asheboro, N. C. 

TODD H. GENTRY 

Todd H. Gentry, Democrat, Representative from Ashe County, 
was born in Ashe County, April 23, 1912. Son of J. B. and Leora 
(Trivett) Gentry. Graduated from West Jefferson High School, 
1932; attended Lees McRae College. Secretary-Treasurer of Oak 
Flooring Company, Inc., West Jefferson, N. C. Member of Ashe 
County Chamber of Commerce. Elk; Mason; Shriner. Member 
Jefferson Rotary Club. Member Board of Directors, Blue Ridge 
Electric Membership Corporation. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1949, 1951 and 1953. Chairman of the Ashe County 
Democratic Executive Committee, 1944-1952. Methodist; Steward. 
Married Nina Houck, September 1, 1934. Children: Tony, Diane 
and Sara. Address: West Jefferson, N. C. 

FLEETUS LEE GOBBLE 

Fleetus Lee Gobble, Democrat, Representative from Forsyth 
County, was born in Davidson County, N. C, January 1, 1891. Son 
of John H. and Frances (Foster) Gobble. Attended Public Schools 
Davidson County 1897-1910. Entered Atlanta Barber College Janu- 



Biographical Sketches 485 

ary 2, 1911 and completed course. Barber. Barber and Beauty 
School Operator. Member Associated Master Barbers of America; 
President State Association Master Barbers 1934-1935. Member 
Educational and Legislative Committee since 1935. Member Wil- 
son Democratic Club. Member of Chamber of Commerce. Member 
House of Representatives 1941, 1943, 1945, 1949, 1951, and 1953. 
Methodist. Treasurer 1926-1928; President Men's Bible Class 1925- 
1926; Board of Stewards 1925-1932. Married Miss Blanche Evans. 
Three children: Juanita, Dr. Fleetus L., Jr., and James F. Ad- 
dress: 1710 West Clemmonsville Road, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



ARTHUR GOODMAN 

Arthur Goodman, Democrat, Representative from Mecklenburg 
County, was born in Portsmouth, Virginia, March 12, 1897. Son 
of Solomon and Sophia (Steel) Goodman. Attended Grammar and 
High School, Portsmouth, Va., until 1916; private business col- 
lege, Norfolk, Va., 1916; Duke Law School, 1930-1932. Lawyer. 
Member American Bar Association; N. C. Bar Association; Meck- 
lenburg County Bar Association. Life Member Mecklenburg 
County Humane Society, President, 1938-1944. Member Piedmont 
Kennel Club, President, 1941. President, N. C. Association of 
Jewish Men, 1935-1939. Served in U. S. Navy 1917-1918. Gamma 
Eta Gamma Legal Fraternity. Phalanx Masonic Lodge; Oasis 
Shrine; Past Patron Eastern Star; B'nai B'rith; Forty and Eight; 
American Legion; Adjutant Hornet Nest Post No. 9, 1938; War 
Dads; Life Member Disabled American Veterans; N. C. State 
Commander, 1941 ; Commander Queen City Chapter No. 10, 1939. 
Synagogue, Secretary Temple Israel, 1934-1939; President, 1939- 
1940; Member Executive Board Temple Beth El, Charlotte, 1942- 
1943. Representative in the General Assembly 1945 and 1953. 
President United Cerebral Palsy of N. C, 1952. Married Miss 
Katherine Cohen, Buffalo, N. Y., July 8, 1924. Two children, Eliza- 
beth Klein and Arthur, Jr. Address; 1721 Westbury Road, Char- 
lotte, N. C, 



486 North Carolina Manual 

HARRY ALEXANDER GREENE 

Harry Alexander Greene, Democrat, Representative from Hoke 
County, was born in Rock Hill, S. C, March 11, 1898. Son of 
James Alfred, Sr., and Mabel (Andrews) Greene. Fertilizer and 
cotton dealer. Coroner, Hoke County, 1945-1946. Judge, Hoke 
County Recorder's Court, 1952. Thirty-second Degree Mason; 
Shriner, Sudan Temple. Trustee, Greater University of North 
Carolina, 1949 to present. Member, North Carolina Wildlife Re- 
sources Commission, 1947-1950. Sergeant, 1917-1919 in the Army 
of the U. S.; First Lt., N. C. National Guard, 1923-1929. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1947, 1949, 1951 and 1953. 
Presbyterian, Deacon, 1942 to present. Married Miss Hazel Hat- 
sell, August 14, 1937. Two children: Frances Ward Greene and 
James Worthy Greene. Address: Raeford, N. C. 

CARSON GREGORY 

Carson Gregory, Democrat, Representative from Harnett 
County, was born in that county, August 11, 1911. Son of Alex 
and Carra (PaiTish) Gregory. Attended Campbell College one 
year. Farmer; dealer in dairy cattle; interested in Carolina Auc- 
tion Cattle Company; breeder of Registered Spotted Poland China 
Swine; partner in Red Bird Cab Company; interested in Cafe. 
Member Board of Directors N. C. Spotted Poland China Breed- 
ers Association. Member Local AAA Committee of Harnett County 
for several years; former Chairman and Vice Chairman of Har- 
nett County Farm Bureau ; member of Harnett County Kellogg 
Committee; Commissioner Harnett County, December 1948 to 
December 1950. Member W.O.W., Erwin Lodge; member 
J.O.U.A.M., Coats Lodge No. 417, Board of Trustees and Financial 
Secretary, Vice Council 18th District. Shriner of Sudan Temple; 
Mason; Angler Lodge No. 686; 32nd Degree Mason; Coats Fel- 
lowship Club; District Finance Chairman for the Boy Scouts 
Drive of Harnett County District of Occoneechee Council. Repre- 
sentative from Harnett County in the General Assembly of 1951 
and 1953. Member Coats Missionary Baptist Church, Coats, N. C; 
member Nichols Sunday School Class. Married Miss Blanche Wil- 
liams, November 4, 1939. Three children: Carson Gregory, Jr., Joe 
Gregory and Frances Gregory. Address: Rt. 2, Angler, N. C. 



I 



Biographical Sketches 487 

WILTSHIRE GRIFFITH* 

Wiltshire Griffith, Republican, Representative from Henderson 
County, was born in Greenville, S. C., January 20, 1886. Son of 
Richa- d Henry and Mary Ann (Coleman) Griffith. Attended Welsh 
Neck High School of Hartsville, S. C, 1900-1902; University of 
Texas, 1905-1906; School of Pharmacy of University of North 
Carolina, Ph.G., 1908. Pharmacist. Member North Carolina Phar- 
maceutical Association ; National Association of Retail Druggists. 
Received North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association Award "In 
Recognition of Exceptional Meritorious Service to the Advance- 
ment of Public Health and Welfare", 1954. United States Commis- 
sioner, 1927-1931. Member Board of Commissioners, City of Hen- 
dersonville, 1912-1913; Hendersonville City School Board, 1925- 
1931 and 1938-1943. Member Phi Kappa Psi National Collegiate 
Fraternity; Woodmen of World; Lions Club, Director, 1945-1946; 
Charter Member and first Commander local American Legion 
Post. Thirty-second Degree Mason. Served in U. S. Army, 1917- 
1919; discharged with rank of Captain. Episcopalian; Vestryman, 
1916. Married Miss Inez Waldrop, November 11, 1914. Children: 
Mrs. Florence Ann Bushnell, of Asheville, N. C. and Wiltshire 
Griffith, Jr., of Hendersonville, N. C. Address: Hendersonville, 
N. C. 

PETER WILSON HAIRSTON 

Peter Wilson Hairston, Democrat, Representative from Davie 
County, was born in Davie County, August 2, 1913. Son of Peter 
Wilson and Margaret Elmer (George) Hairston. Attended Vir- 
ginia Episcopal School, Lynchbuig, Va., 1927-1930; University of 
North Carolina, A.B., 1933; University of North Carolina Law 
School, LL.B., 1935. Lawyer and farmer. Member of North Caro- 
lina State Bar; Delta Theta Phi; Sigma Nu. Served in World 
War II as Captain, Tank Destroyer, 1942-1946. Protestant Epis- 
copal Church; member of Vestry, 1938, 1949-1953. Married to 
Miss Lucy M. Dortch, August 6, 1950. Children: George Ryan 
Hairston and Peter Wilson Hairston, Jr. Address: Route 2, Ad- 
vance, N. C. 



♦Resigned January 10, 1955. 



488 North Carolina Manual 

JOHN McKENZIE HARGETT 

John McKenzie Hargett, Democrat, Representative from Jones 
County, was born in Jacksonville, N. C, July 15, 1899. Son of 
John Sandlin and Olivia (Steed) Hargett. Graduated from Tren- 
ton High School in 1917; University of North Carolina, 1917-1921, 
A.B. degree; also various summer schools. Farmer and service 
station owner. Served as high school teacher and principal for 
twenty-two years. Several times Vice Chairman of Jones County 
P.M. A. Committee and former member F.H.A. Committee. Past 
member Blue Lodge Mason of Trenton and Royal Arch (7 degrees) 
of New Bern. County Chairman of Red Cross for 1955. Served in 
U. S. Ai-my from October 1, 1918 to December 11, 1918 while a 
student at University of North Carolina. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1953. Methodist. Married Miss Linda lona 
Thigpen, September 11, 1942. Address: Route 2, Trenton, N. C. 



SHEARON HARRIS 

Shearon Harris, Democrat, Representative from Stanly County, 
was born at Middleburg, N. C, September 12, 1917. Son of Joseph 
Pegues and Lucy (Shearon) Harris. Attended Beaufort High 
School, graduating in 1932; Wake Forest College, A. B., 1936 and 
LL.B., 1938. Lawyer; General Counsel for Queen City Coach Com- 
pany. Member Stanly County, 13th Judicial District, North Caro- 
lina and American Bar Associations; North Carolina State Bar. 
President 13th Judicial Bar, 1949. Member Legislation and Law 
Reform Committee of North Carolina Bar Association; Chairman 
of Legislative Committee, National Association of Motor Bus 
Operators. Principal Clerk, North Carolina House of Represent- 
atives, 1941 and 1943. Entered U. S. Army as Private on April 
23, 1943 and relieved from active duty as First Lieutenant, De- 
cember 21, 1945. Baptist; Deacon, Trustee and Sunday School 
Teacher. Married Miss Helen Finch Morgan of Albemarle, June 
27, 1942. Children: Sarah Helen, age 8; Jennie Grace, age 5; 
Susan Finch, age 2. Address: 516 North Ninth Street, Albemarle, 
N. C. 



ohnson of Currituck 
i Jones of Pitt 
I Jordan of Buncombe 



temp of Wayne 
I Kiser of Scotland 
i Kittrell of Vance 



aekey of Alexander 
Long of Alamance 
Love of Mecklenburg 



addrey of Hertford 
I McShane of Henderson 
1 Murphy of Pender 



'Dell of Cherokee 
O'Hanlon of Cumberland 
O'Herron of Mecklenburg 



ihelps of Washington 
Pbilpott of Davidson 
Pittman of Halifax 




490 North Carolina Manual 

CLYDE HAMPTON HARRISS, SR. 

Clyde Hampton Harriss, Sr., Democrat, Representative from 
Rowan County, was born in Laurinburg, N. C, December 2, 1902. 
Son of T. W. and Cornelia Baldwin Harriss. Graduated from 
Laurinburg High School, 1919; Georgia Military Academy, Busi- 
ness Administration, 1921. Automobile, automobile finance and 
insurance business. Member N. C. Automobile Dealers Associa- 
tion, former Director; National Automobile Dealers Association; 
American Finance Conference; N. C. Association of Automobile 
Finance Companies, Past President; Salisbury Sales Executives 
Club, President. Served on General Motors Dealers Council, 1942- 
1946. Red Cross Drive Chairman for several years; Past Presi- 
dent of Red Cross Chapter; County War Bond Chairman during 
World War IL Member Lions Club, Past President; Elks Club; 
The Sphinx Club of Raleigh; Salisbury Country Club; Salisbury 
Chamber of Commerce; Knights of Pythias; Y.M.C.A. Mason. 
Lutheran. Married Miss Mildred Godfrey, December 10, 1927. 
Three children, two sons and one daughter. Address: Milford 
Drive, Milford Hills, Salisbury, N. C. 

BYRON HAWORTH 

Byron Haworth, Democrat, Representative from Guilford 
County, was born in Danville, Indiana, June 27, 1907. Son of Her- 
man L. and Smythie (Hadley) Haworth. Graduated Burlington 
High School, 1924; Guilford College, A.B., 1928; Duke University 
Law School, LL.B., 1934. Lawyer. Member High Point Bar Associ- 
ation; N. C. Bar Association; Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity; 
Woodman of the Woi'ld; Masonic Order. Judge High Point Juve- 
nile Court, 1937-1939; Solicitor High Point Municipal Court, 
1939-1941 ; Chairman High Point Township Democratic Executive 
Committee, 1944-1948; Vice-Chairman Guilford County Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee, 1944-1948. Member Society of 
Friends; Clerk Springfield Monthly Meeting, 1952-1954; Execu- 
tive Committee of American Friends Committee and Friends 
Committee on National Legislation, 1942-1954. Married Miss 
Sarah C. Clapp, April 1, 1950. Children: Sarah Ann Haworth, age 
3; Byron Allen Haworth, Jr., age 2. Address: 101 W. Green St., 
High Point, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 491 

JAMES WOODROW HAYES 

James Woodrow Hayes, Democrat, Representative from Rich- 
mond County, was born in Bladen County, N. C, September 21, 
1915. Son of James Calvin and Maiy Elizabeth (Shaw) Hayes. 
Attended public schools of Bladen and Richmond counties. Con- 
ductor, Seaboard Air Line Railroad and State Representative, 
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. Member Brotherhood of Rail- 
road Trainmen ; Legislative Representative Lodge 794, Brother- 
hood of Railroad Trainmen, Hamlet, N. C, 1944-1947; Executive 
Secretary, North Carolina Legislative Board, Brotherhood of Rail- 
road Trainmen, 1947-1951 and Chairman Grievance Committee, 
1947-1951; State Legislative Representative for North Carolina, 
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, 1951-1954. Secretary of Rich- 
mond County Board of Elections, 1950-1954. Appointed by Gov- 
ernor William B. Umstead as representative from North Carolina 
to National Conference on Labor Legislation held in Washington, 
D. C, February 24-26, 1954. Methodist; Steward. Married Miss 
Ruth Spence Blalock, May 27, 1933. Children: Mrs. W. K. Leach, 
Harris Hayes and Wilson Hayes. Address: 314 High Street, Ham- 
let, N. C. 

GEORGE PATRICK HENDERSON 

George Patrick Henderson, Democrat, Representative from 
Robeson County, was born in Gaston County, February 19, 1906. 
Son of Lucus Leonard and Margaret (Patrick) Henderson. At- 
tended Gastonia High School, 1922-1926; Davidson College, B.S., 
1930. Farmer. Member N. C. Farm Bureau; Maxmus Club of 
Maxton; Maxton School Board, 1945-1954; Trustee Presbyterian 
Junior College; Beta Theta Pi Fraternity. Mason. Presbyterian; 
Deacon, 1943. Married Miss Louise McLeod, December 23, 1931. 
Children: George Patrick Henderson, Jr., age 17; Robert McLeod 
Henderson, age 15; Louis Leonard Henderson, age 12. Address: 
Route 2, Maxton, N. C. 

ADDISON HEWLETT, JR. 

Addison Hewlett, Jr., Democrat, Representative from New Han- 
over County, was born at Masonboro Sound, Wilmington, N. C, 
May 4, 1912. Son of Addison, Sr. and Ethel (Herring) Hewlett. 



492 North Carolina Manual 

Attended Masonboro Elementary School, 1918-1924; New Hanover 
High School, Wilmington, 1924-1929; Wake Forest College, B.S., 
1933; Wake Forest Law School, 1933-1934. Attorney at Law. 
Member, New Hanover County Bar Association; President, 1948; 
North Carolina Bar Association. Member, Improved Order of Red 
Men, Sachem of Cherokee Tribe No. 5, 1937; Wilmington Civitan 
Club, President, 1941; American Legion, Commander of Wilming- 
ton Post No. 10, 1948. Trustee of Wake Forest College, 1950. 
Entered Army as private, June 12, 1942; separated as Captain, 
March 11, 1946. Representative in the General Assembly of 1951 
and 1953. Baptist. Married Miss Annie Crockett Williams, June 
19, 1939. One son: Theodore Herring Hewlett. Address: Mason- 
boro Sound, Wilmington, N. C. 

FRED HERSCHEL HOLCOMBE 

Fred Herschel Holcombe, Democrat, Representative from Madi- 
son County, was born near Mars Hill, N. C, November 29, 1888. 
Son of Milas and Elzie Holcombe. Attended Mars Hill College. 
Undertaker. Member State Board of Funeral Directors. Oper- 
ated mercantile business in Mars Hill for eighteen years. Post- 
master at Mars Hill from 1934-1949, retiring with fifteen years 
of service. Member Mars Hill Board of Aldermen, 1924-1930; 
Madison County Board of Education, 1930-1932. Member Vance 
Masonic Lodge Number 104. Baptist. Married Ellen Flo Hol- 
combe. Seven children. Address: Route 1, Mars Hill, N. C. 

CARROLL RANSOM HOLMES 

Carroll Ransom Holmes, Democrat, Representative from Per- 
quimans County, was born in Benson, N. C, August 6, 1902. Son 
of John William and Emily Wilmouth (Britt) Holmes. Attended 
Fork Union Military Academy, 1921-1922; Wake Forest College, 
B.S., Civics, 1926; University of North Carolina Law School, 1926- 
1928. Attorney at law. Member, N. C. State Bar. Prosecuting 
Attorney, Perquimans County Recorder's Court, 1943-1944. Mem- 
ber, Perquimans Lodge, A. F. & A. M. No. 106, Jr. and Sr. War- 
den and Secretary; York Rite Masonic Bodies, Elizabeth City, 
N. C. Director, Hertford Rotary Club, President, 1953-1954; Eliz- 
abeth City Executives Club. Representative in the General As- 



Biographical Sketches 498 

sembly of 1951 and 1953. Baptist; Chairman, Board of Deacons, 
1949, 1950, 1951. Married Miss Hannah Mae Fleetwood, June 12, 
1929. One daughter, Catherine Anne; one son, John W., III. Ad- 
dress: Hertford, N. C. 



GUY LACKEY HOUK 

Guy Lackey Houk, Democrat, Representative from Macon 
County, was born in Morganton, N. C, August 2, 1897, Son of 
H. O. and Lura (Lackey) Houk. Attended Morganton High School, 
graduating in 1912; Emory & Henry College, A.B., 1916; graduate 
work, Emory University and North Carolina State College. Law- 
yer. Mayor Town of Franklin, 1938-1939; Macon County Super- 
intendent of Schools, 1939-1951 ; County Attorney for Macon 
County, 1939-1948. Mason; Grand Orator, Grand Lodge of N. C, 
1947; American Legion; District Governor, Rotary International, 
1937. Served in United States Marine Corps during World War I, 
1918-1919. Methodist. Married Miss Lynn Johnson, June 8, 1924. 
One son, Fred J. Houk. Address: Franklin, N. C. 



JOSEPH MARVIN HUNT, JR. 

Joseph Marvin Hunt, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Guil- 
ford County, was born in Greensboro, N. C, October 19, 1906. 
Son of Joseph M., Sr. and Pattie (Kirkman) Hunt. Attended 
Riverside Military Academy, graduating in 1924; Duke Univer- 
sity. General insurance business. Vice President, Wimbish Insur- 
ance Agency. Member Greensboro Association of Insurance 
Agents; Greensboro Chamber of Commerce; Duke University 
Athletic Council; former Mayor Pro Tem, Town of Hamilton 
Lakes. Representative in the General Assembly in 1953. Method- 
ist; Member Board of Stewards, Muir's Chapel Methodist Church, 
1948-1950. Married Miss Grace Boren, October 21, 1933. Chil- 
dren: Joseph M. Hunt, III, born July 2, 1939; Etta Elizabeth 
Hunt, born August 18, 1947. Address: 3308 Starmount Drive, 
Greensboro, N. C. 



494 North Carolina Manual 

THEODORE MOORE JENKINS 

Theodore Moore Jenkins, Republican, Representative from Gra- 
ham County, was born at Fairview, N. C, September 25, 1887. 
Son of Columbus Lafayette and Susan Lou (Redman) Jenkins. 
Attended public schools of Buncombe County; Fairview Collegiate 
Institute; University of North Carolina (Summer School); Wake 
Forest College Law School. Lawyer. Member North Carolina State 
Bar; Twentieth District Bar Association, President, 1933-1934 
and 1954-1955; Graham County Bar Association, Secretary, 1919- 
1928 and President, 1928-1954; Graham County Board of Educa- 
tion; N. C. Budget Commission, 1924-1925; Mayor, Town of Rob- 
binsville, 1921-1923; County Attorney for Graham County; At- 
torney for Town of Robbinsville, 1948-1954. Member Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, Robbinsville Lodge No. 672 ; Worshipful 
Master of Robbinsville Lodge; Bryson City Chapter Royal Arch; 
Waynesville Commandery No. 31; K.T. Oasis Temple Ancient 
Arabis Order Nobles Mystic Shrine; Order of Eastern Star, Rob- 
binsville Chapter No. 224, Worthy Patron ; District Deputy Grand 
Master of Masons, N. C. 43rd District; Benevolent Order of Elks, 
Asheville Lodge No. 1402. Representative in the General Assem- 
bly of 1923, 1927 and 1937. Baptist. Widower. One daughter, Mrs. 
Ruth Jenkins Garland. Address: Robbinsville, N. C. 



EDWIN R. JOHNSON 

Edwin R. Johnson, Democrat, Representative from Currituck 
County, was born near Currituck Court House, September 10, 
1868. Son of Silas P. and Carolina (Coulter) Johnson. Attended 
public school and Atlantic Collegiate Institute of Elizabeth City. 
Merchant. Chairman County Democratic Executive Committee, 
1893-1937. Member State Senate, 1909, 1917; Representative in the 
General Assemblies of 1919, 1921, 1925, 1927, 1929, 1931, 1937, 1949, 
1951 and 1953. Chairman Board of County Commissioners, 1907- 
1909; former Chairman Board of Education. Food Administrator 
for Currituck County during World War I. Chairman Highway 
Commission, 1923-1924; Chairman Game Commission, 1923-1924. 
Married Mrs. Genevieve Holloman, 1910. Address: Currituck, N. C. 



Biographical SKExcHEg 495 

WALTER BEAMAN JONES 

Walter Beaman Jones, Democrat, Representative from Pitt 
County, was born in Fayetteville, N. C, August 19, 1913. Son of 
Walter G. and Fannie M. (Anderson) Jones. Attended Elise 
Academy, 1926-1930; North Carolina State College, B.S. in Edu- 
cation, 1934. Office equipment dealer. Member Board of Commis- 
sioners, Town of Farmville, 1947-1949; Mayor Pro-tern, 1947-1949; 
Mayor Town of Farmville and Judge Farmville Recorder's Court, 
1949-1953. Member Masonic Lodge; Rotary Club, President, 1949; 
Loyal Order of Moose; Junior Order. Baptist; Deacon since 1945. 
Married Miss Doris Long, April 26, 1934. Children: DotDee Long 
Jones and Walter B. Jones, IL Address: Farmville, N. C. 

JOHN YATES JORDAN, JR. 

John Yates Jordan, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Bun- 
combe County, was born in Elizabethton, Tenn., June 8, 1896. Son 
of John Yates and Meena (Smith) Jordan. Attended Asheville 
High School, 1910-1914; Mars Hill College, 1914-1915; University 
of North Carolina, 1915-1918, 1920-1921; University of North 
Carolina Law School, 1917-1918, 1920-1921. Lawyer. Served as 
American Vice Consul, Brest, France, 1918-1920. Member Bun- 
combe County, North Carolina and American Bar Associations; 
International Association of Insurance Counsel ; Commercial Law 
League of America; American Judicature Society. Phi Delta Phi. 
Piesident Buncombe County Bar Association, 1936. Chairman 
Asheville Boxing Commission, 1932-1939 and 1943-1952. Member 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Asheville Lodge No. 
1401; Mount Hermon Lodge No. 118 A.F. & A.M.; Asheville Con- 
sistory A. & A.S.R.; Oasis Temple A. A. O.N. M.S. Potentate Oasis 
Temple, 1949. Representative in the General Assembly of 1953. 
Baptist. Address: 86 Midland Drive, Asheville, N. C. 

WILLIAM POWELL KEMP 

William Powell Kemp, Democrat, Representative from Wayne 
County, was born in Easton, Maryland, July 19, 1899. Son of 
William H. and Sallie K. (Powell) Kemp. Attended Easton (Md.) 
Public Schools, 1905-1913; George School (Pa.), 1914-1917; 



496 North Carolina Manual 

Swarthmore College, B.A., 1921. Furniture manufacturer. Phi 
Kappa Psi, Swarthmore College. Vice President Southern Furni- 
ture Manufacturers Association. Member Goldsboro Chamber of 
Commerce and Rotary Club. Private, S.A.T.C., Swarthmore Col- 
lege, 1918. Representative in the General Assembly of 1953. So- 
ciety of Friends. Married Miss Elizabeth Middleton Atherholt, 
June 8, 1922. Children: William P. Kemp, Jr.; Robert L. Kemp; 
Philip S. Kemp. Address: 1518 E. Mulberry St., Goldsboro, N. C. 

ROGER CLINTON KISER 

Roger Clinton Kiser, Democrat, Representative from Scotland 
County, was born in Yadkin Township, Stokes County, August 
30, 1894. Son of Edwin Kiser and Amy Florence (Butner) Kiser. 
Attended public and private schools in Stokes County; Piedmont 
High School, Cleveland County; Guilford College; University of 
North Carolina; Teachers College of Columbia University. Teacher 
and farmer. Mason. Rotarian ; Legionnaire ; Member Christian 
Church. Representative from Scotland County in the General 
Assembly of 1949, 1951 and 1953. Married Miss Gertrude Mar- 
garet Bedell, Ridgewood, N. J., August 14, 1926. Two children: 
Mrs, Philip J. Crutchfield and Edwin Marten Kiser. Address: 318 
Vance Street, Laurinburg, N. C. 



ROBERT GILLIAM KITTRELL, JR. 

Robert Gilliam Kittrell, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Vance County, was born in Henderson, N. C, October 2, 1921. 
Son of Robert Gilliam and Mary Memucan (Perry) Kittrell. At- 
tended Henderson High School, 1934-1938; Virginia Episcopal 
School, 1938-1939; University of North Carolina, B.S. in Com- 
merce, 1943; University of North Carolina Law School, LL.B., 
1948. Lawyer. Member North Carolina State Bar; North Carolina 
Bar Association; American Bar Association. Served on City Coun- 
cil of Henderson, 1950-1954; alternate delegate (4th District) 1952 
Democratic National Convention. Member Henderson Rotary Club, 
Secretary, 1950. Lieutenant, United States Naval Reserve; com- 
manding officer of a motor torpedo boat and served three years 



BioGRAPHicAi. Sketches 497 

during World War II, of which fifteen months were in combat in 
the Solomon Islands, New Guinea and the Philippine Islands. 
Presbyterian; Deacon, 1949-1951, 1953-1954. Address: 301 Chest- 
nut Street, Henderson, N. C. 



WILLIAM RAY LACKEY, SR. 

William Ray Lackey, Sr., Democrat, Representative from Alex- 
ander County, was born in that county, December 20, 1925. Son 
of Earl J. and Bessie B. (Childers) Lackey. Attended Hiddenite 
High School; North Carolina State College, 1943-1944. Former 
Register of Deeds, Alexander County. Member Register of Deeds 
Association. Served as President Alexander Young Democrats for 
four years. Member Catawba Chapter No. 60 Royal Arch Masons; 
Stony Point Lodge No. 593 A.F.A.M., Master, 1954; Stony Point 
Lions Club, Vice-President, 1954; Stony Point Post No. 354 Amer- 
ican Legion, Vice-Commander, 1953; Voiture Locale No. 915 Forty 
and Eight. Baptist. Married Miss Modean C. Lackey, April 17, 
1946. Children : Rebecca Jane Lackey and William Ray Lackey, 
Jr. Address: Stony Point, N. C. 



GEORGE ATTMORE LONG 

George Attmore Long, Democrat, Representative from Alamance 
County, was born in Graham, North Carolina, March 10, 1911. 
Son of J. Dolph and Hannah (Attmore) Long. Attended Graham 
Public Schools, 1919-1926. A.B. degree, University of North Caro- 
lina, 1930; LL.B. degree, 1932. Attorney at law. Member Ameri- 
can Bar Association ; North Carolina Bar Association ; North 
Carolina State Bar; President, Alamance Bar Association, 1950; 
Chairman, Burlington Planning Board, 1950-1951. Solicitor, Ala- 
mance General County Court, 1943-1946; Judge 1948-1950. Mem- 
ber Phi Beta Kappa Fraternity. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1951 and 1953. Episcopalian. Married Miss Helen 
Brooks Long, October 16, 1937. Children: James Eugene Long, 
Hannah Elizabeth Long, and Julia Margaret Long. Address: 1201 
West Davis Street, Burlington. 



Pou of Wake 

Powe of Durham 

Powell of Rockingham 



Propst of Cabarrus 
Quinn of Cabarrus 
Randall of Iredell 



Rodenbough of Stokes 
Rodman of Beaufort 
Rogers of Clay 



Rogers of Haywood 
Satterfield of Person 
Sawyer of Pasquotank 



Sawyer of Tyrrell 
Shomaker of Avery 
Shreve of Guilford 



Speight of Bertie 

Stikeleather of Buncombe 
Stone of Forsyth 




Biographical Sketches 499 

JACK D. LOVE 

Jack D. Love, Democrat, Representative from Mecklenburg 
County, was born in Concord, N. C, June 20, 1919. Son of Lon- 
nie A., Sr. and Elsie (Love) Love. Attended Central High School 
of Charlotte, N. C, graduating in 1934; The Citadel. Vice Presi- 
dent, Queen City Trailways, Charlotte, N. C. Member National 
Defense Transportation Association ; National Association Motor 
Bus Operators, Chairman of Safety Committee; North Carolina 
Bus Association; Chamber of Commerce; Quarterback Club. 
Served in United States Navy, July 6, 1944-July 11, 1945. Member 
St. Paul Presbyterian Church, Charlotte, N. C; served ten years 
as Chairman Board of Stewards, Love's Chapel Methodist Church, 
Stanfield, N. C. Married Miss Emily Pulley, February 3, 1939. 
Children: Jack D. Love, Jr., age 14; Richard Bruce Love, age 
12; Emily Carol Love, age 9. Address: 5015 Albemarle Road, 
Charlotte, N. C. 



CHARLES GORDON MADDREY 

Charles Gordon Maddrey, Democrat, Representative from Hert- 
ford County, was born at Seaboard, N. C, November 9, 1904. Son 
of J. T. and Rowena Milner (Stephenson) Maddrey. Attended 
Seaboard High School, 1911-1922; Wake Forest College, A.B. de- 
gree, 1926. University of North Carolina, several summers. 
Farmer and merchant. Past President Hertford County Farm 
Bureau. Member of Rotary Club; Member from N. C. Southern 
Regional Education Legislative Council, 1953-1954; Past Presi- 
dent Scotland Neck Kiwanis Club; Past President State Farm 
Bureau; member Beechwood Country Club. Executive member 
East Carolina Council BSA. Mason. Representative in the Gen- 
eral Assembly of 1949, 1951, and 1953. Baptist. Teacher of Young 
Men's Bible Class. Married Miss Mabel Claire Hoggard, Decem- 
ber 26, 1931. Two sons: Charles Hoggard Maddrey, age 18; Joseph 
Gordon Maddrey, age 13. Address: 421 N. Colony Ave., Ahoskie, 
N. C. 



500 North Carolina Manual 

WILLIAM THOMAS McSHANE* 

William Thomas McShane, Republican, Representative from 
Henderson County, was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, April 
25, 1911. Son of James V. and Anna M. (Schuetzner) McShane. 
Attended Wheeling Public Schools; Triadelphia District High 
School, 1926-1930; Wittenberg College; West Liberty College, 
West Liberty, W. Va., A.B., 1936. Distributor of funeral coaches 
and ambulances in North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, 
Member Hendersonville Rotary Club, Board of Directors, 1950- 
1952; Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 1616, 
Lecturing Knight, 1954-1955. Methodist. Married Miss Elma Hen- 
derson Knoke, December 30, 1937. Children: Elma Jane, age 11 
and Kathryn Ann, age 8. Address: 1042 Kanuga Road, Hender- 
sonville, N. C. 

ASHLEY MONROE MURPHY 

Ashley Monroe Murphy, Democrat, Representative from Pender 
County, vv^as born in Atkinson, N. C, August 14, 1909. Son of 
John Alexander, Sr. and Mary (Campbell) Murphy. Graduated 
from Atkinson High School, 1926. Attended N. C. State College, 
1930; University of North Carolina; Emory University, A.B., 
LL.B., 1934. Farmer and insurance dealer. Member, Alpha Lambda 
Tau Social Fraternity; Elks Club; Atkinson Ruritan Club, Secre- 
tary 1950-1952; American Legion Post No. 165; Veterans of For- 
eign Wars Post No. 9961. Sergeant, U. S. Army, January 19, 1942 
to December 5, 1945, serving in Africa and Italy with 1st Armored 
Division, 27th F. A. Chairman, Democratic Executive Committee, 
Pender County. Representative in the General Assembly of 1953. 
Presbyterian. Elder. Married Miss Alice Hill Reeves, January 18, 
1947. One daughter: Priscilla Katherine Murphy. Address: Box 
87, Atkinson, N. C. 

VIRGIL O'DELL 

Virgil O'Dell, Republican, Representative from Cherokee County, 
was born near Murphy, N. C. Son of James W. and Mary (Woody) 
O'Dell. Attended Murphy High School; Mt. Berry School, Rome, 



♦Appointed Jan. 10, 1955 to succeed Wiltshire Griffith, resigned. 



Biographical Sketches 501 

Ga. Cafe owner and bus station manager. Experimental labora- 
tory technician with B. F. Goodrich Tire and Rubber Company of 
Akron, Ohio, 1939-1946. Served in United States Navy for two 
years as Chief Petty Officer. Baptist; Choir Director for several 
years. Married Miss Norva Barnes, November 25, 1937. Three 
children. Address: Murphy, N. C. 

ISAAC H. O'HANLON 

Isaac H. O'Hanlon, Democrat, Representative from Cumberland 
County, was born in Fayetteville, N. C, September 5, 1911. Son 
of the late George A. and Dora (Hawley) O'Hanlon. Attended 
Haymount Graded School, 1918-1924; Fayetteville High School, 
1925-1930; Wake Forest College. Pest Control Manager, Orkin 
Exterminating Co., Inc. Member National Pest Control Associa- 
tion, Inc.; Fayetteville Chamber of Commerce; Fayetteville Execu- 
tives Club; Knights of Pythias. Chairman Cumberland County 
Chapter of Infantile Paralysis since 1947; President Cumberland 
County Youth Council; President Kiwanis Little League (Base- 
ball); Member Board of Trustees, East Carolina College; Chair- 
man of Cumberland District Boy Scouts of America. Member 
Board of Directors, Fayetteville Y.M.C.A.; Member North Caro- 
lina Pest Conti'ol Association. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1953. Episcopalian; Superintendent of Sunday School 
and member of Vestry since 1946. Married Miss Emma Merle 
Sikes, September 1, 1935. Two children: William Hawley O'Hanlon 
and Edward Wilkins O'Hanlon. Address: Box 1068, Fayetteville, 
N. C. 

EDWARD M. O'HERRON, JR. 

Edward M. O'Herron, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Meck- 
lenburg County, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, November 6, 
1915. Son of Edward M. and Salley E. O'Herron. Attended Culver 
Military Academy 1930-1934; U. S. Naval Academy; University of 
North Carolina, A.B. degree, 1938. Merchant. Captain, U. S. 
Marine Corps, 1942-1946. Representative in the General Assembly 
of 1951 and 1953. Episcopalian. Married Miss Margaret Aston 
Blackman, October 14, 1938. Four children. Address: 128 North 
Tryon St., Charlotte, N. C. 



502 North Carolina Manual 

JOHN MAHLOW PHELPS 

John Mahlow Phelps, Democrat, Representative from Washing- 
ton County, was born in Plymouth, N. C, August 8, 1906. Son of 
John L. and Ida (Walker) Phelps. Attended Creswell High 
School; Virginia Episcopal School, Lynchburg, Va., 1920-1923; 
Wake Forest College, B.S., 1928 and B.S. Med., 1930; Jefferson 
Medical College, M.D., 1932. Doctor. Member Tri-County Medical 
Society and N. C. State Medical Society. Member Town Board 
of Creswell, 1937; Washington County A.B.C. Board, 1951-1954; 
Director Branch Bank and Trust Company of Plymouth. Mason, 
Shriner. Member Lambda Chi Alpha Social Fraternity; Phi Chi 
Medical Fraternity; Disabled Officers Association; N. C. State 
Highway Employees Association; Washington County Farm Bu- 
reau; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; B.P.O. Elks. 
Served as Captain in Medical Corps, 1942-1944. Episcopalian; 
member of Vestry, 1940-1954. Married Miss Caredwyn Thomas 
Sheets, 1934. Children: Donald Edgar Phelps and Robert David 
Phelps. Address: Creswell, N. C. 



HARVEY CLOYD PHILPOTT 

Harvey Cloyd Philpott, Democrat, Representative from David- 
son County, was born in Bassett, Va., April 6, 1909. Son of Benja- 
min Cabell and Daisy (Hundley) Philpott. Attended Lexington 
High School, 1921-1925; Virginia Military Institute, A.B. degree, 
1929. Furniture Manufacturer; President, United Furniture Cor- 
poration of Lexington, N. C. President Southern Furniture Manu- 
facturer's Association, 1950-1951; Member Board of Directors, 
National Association of Manufacturers. Director Mutual Build- 
ing and Loan Association. Member Lexington School Board, 1934- 
1945, Chairman, 1943-1945; Lexington Utilities Commission, 1949- 
1952. Mayor of Lexington, 1945-1949. Member Junior Order 
United American Mechanics ; Patriotic Order Sons of America ; 
Lexington Rotary Club, Pa.=t President, 1933-1934. Captain of 
Lexington Company, North Carolina State Guard, 1941-1946. Rep- 
resentative in General Assembly of 1953. Baptist; Deacon and 
Teacher of Women's Bible Class; Superintendent of Sunday School, 
1935-1937; Chairman Board of Deacons, 1941-1943. President 



Biographical Sketches 503 

Board of Trustees, Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina, 1953- 

1954. Married to Miss Frances Thompson, June 11, 1931. Three 
children: Kathleen Hundley Philpott, Cloyd Philpott, Jr., and 
Betty Joe Philpott. Address: Lexington, N. C. 

FRANK SHIELDS PITTMAN 

Frank Shields Pittman, Democrat, Representative from Halifax 
County, was born in Scotland Neck, N. C, October 24, 1908. Son 
of Loertes Morgan and Lelia (Shields) Pittman. Attended Scot- 
land Neck High School, 1922-1925; Wake Forest College, 1925- 
1926. Merchant, grower and processor of hybrid seed corn. Mem- 
ber N. C. Merchants Association; N. C. Seedsmen Association, 
President, 1951 and Secretary, 1947-1950; Southern Seedsmen As- 
sociation ; American Seed Trade Association ; N. C. Crop Improve- 
ment Association; N. C. Foundation Seed Producers Association, 
Inc., President, 1952; Halifax County Farm Bureau, President, 
1953. Member Scotland Neck Masonic Lodge No. 689; Scottish 
Rite Bodies, Enfield, N. C. and New Bern, N. C; York Rite Bodies, 
Rocky Mount, N. C; Shriner Sudan Temple, New Bern, N. C. 
Baptist; Member Board of Deacons, Scotland Neck Baptist Church, 
1936-1939; Member Board of Deacons, Enfield Baptist Church, 
1945-1948. Married Miss Virginia Blackwell, October 14, 1937. 
Children: Frank Shields Pittman, Jr. and Fayetta Neff Pittman. 
Address: 201 South Church St., Scotland Neck, N. C. 

EDWIN S. POU 

Edwin S. Pou, Democrat, Representative from Wake County, 
was born in Smithfield, N. C, December 7, 1919. Son of George 
Ross and Lillian (Sanders) Pou. Attended Raleigh Public Schools; 
North Carolina State College; University of North Carolina; Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh (Scotland). Owner of general insurance 
agency, oil distributor. World War II, Captain, U. S. 8th and 9th 
Air Force, served 27 months overseas. Member of Disabled Ameri- 
can Veterans ; American Legion ; Rotary Club ; Chamber of Com- 
merce ; Advisory Board of N. C. Forestry Association. Representa- 
tive from Wake County in the General Assembly of 1951, 1953 and 

1955. Episcopalian; Member of the Church of the Good Shepherd. 



18 



504 North Carolina Manual 

Married Miss Frances Cooper of Greenville, N. C, June 25, 1942. 
Five daughters: Mary Spotswood, Lillian Sanders, Mildred San- 
ders, Frances Cooper, and Carolina Ihrie. Address: 2517 Ander- 
son Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 

EDWARD KNOX POWE 

Edward Knox Powe, Democrat, Representative from Durham 
County, was born in Durham, N. C, November 18, 1921. Son of 
E. K., Jr. and Louise (Watkins) Powe. Attended Episcopal High 
School, Alexandria, Va., 1937-1940; University of North Carolina, 
A.B., 1948; University of North Carolina School of Law, LL.B., 
1950. Lawyer. Member North Carolina State Bar; North Carolina 
Bar Association ; American Bar Association ; Durham County Bar 
Association; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Delta Phi. Captain in In- 
fantry, United States Army, 1942-1946. Episcopalian. Married 
Miss Sibyl Goerch, December 27, 1946. Children: Louise Banks, 
Katherine Street and Josephine Erwin. Address: 1007 N. Gregson 
Street, Durham, N. C. 

RADFORD GILMORE POWELL 

Radford Gilmore Powell, Democrat, Representative from Rock- 
ingham County, was born at Reidsville, N. C, December 9, 1903. 
Son of Wiliam Johnson and Ophelia (Strader) Powell. Attended 
Mt. Carmel School; Reidsville High School, 1918. Employee of 
American Tobacco Company. Former First Vice President N. C. 
State Federation of Labor; President Local 192 T.W.LU., Reids- 
ville; President Tobacco Workers International Union, A.F. of L., 
1943-1944; Served as member of Board of Directors, Reidsville 
Chamber of Commerce, 1942-1943; Appointed by Ex-Governor 
Broughton during war to serve on Unemployment Compensation 
Board of Reidsville; former member Junior Order of American 
Mechanics, 1925. Boy Scout worker. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1949, 1951 and 1953. Methodist; Former Superintend- 
ent of Sunday School; Teacher of Men's Bible Class for twenty- 
four years. Married Miss Effie Mae Chapmon, April 11, 1925. 
Four children: Eleanor Gail Powell and Harvey Glen Powell and 
two sons deceased. Address: Route 3, Reidsville, N. C. 



story of Wilkes 
Sullivan of Brunswick 
Swindell of Hyde 



Taylor of Anson 
Taylor of Warren 
Thomas of Johnston 



Thompson of Chatham 
Turner of Guilford 
Umstead of Orange 



Uzzell of Rowan 
Valentine of Nash 
Vann of Sampson 



Venters of Onslow 
Vernon of Burke 
Vogler of Mecklenburg 



Wall of McDowell 
Wallace of Montgomery 
Watkins of Granville 




506 North Carolina Manual 

CLYDE L. PROPST, JR. 

Clyde L. Propst, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Cabarrus 
County, was born in Concord, N. C, May 27, 1925. Son of Clyde 
L, and Ellen (Pounds) Propst. Graduated from Concord High 
School, 1942; Duke University, A.B., 1950; Duke University School 
of Law, LL.B., 1952. Lawyer. Member N. C. State Bar; N. C. 
Bar Association; Cabarrus County Bar Association. Served in 
U. S. Army with rank of Corporal, August 21, 1943 to March 16, 
1946. Presbyterian. Married Miss Frances Ann Wilkinson, Septem- 
ber 1, 1948. One daughter, Carol Frances Propst, born August 18, 
1954. Address: 101 Ingleside Drive, Concord, N. C. 



DWIGHT WILSON QUINN 

Dwight Wilson Quinn, Democrat, Representative from Cabarrus 
County, was born in York, S. C, September 12, 1917. Son of Wil- 
liam Lytle and Lucy (Wilson) Quinn. Attended Kanapolis Public 
Schools; Night and Correspondence Schools, taking courses in 
Business Law, Bookkeeping and Accounting, Typing, Business 
Management and Textiles. Supervising capacity. Textile Cannon 
Mills Company. Member Cabarrus County YDC, President, 1948, 
and has served on various State YDC committees. Precinct Regis- 
trar, 1948-1950. Voted Kannapolis Man of the Year in 1948 by 
the Jaycees. Received Amvets National Distinguished Service 
Award for outstanding community service, 1953. Member Na- 
tional Y.M.C.A. Young Men's Council; District Boy Scout Com- 
mittee; Board of the National Cerebral Palsy Association; Board 
of the Cabarrus Chapter of the North Carolina Heart Association ; 
President, Inter-Club Council; Advisor to Hi-Y. Served in United 
States Army, 1944-1945. Member American Legion, Post 115, 
sej-ving as Vice-Commander; 40 & 8. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1951 and 1953. Lutheran; Church Council, 1947-1950; 
Secretary of Congregation, 1947-1950; Assistant General Super- 
intendent of Sunday School and former Sunday School Teacher. 
Married Miss Marian Elizabeth Isenhour, February 23, 1936. One 
daughter, Linda Jo Quinn, age 17. Address: Box 314, Kannapolis, 
N. C. 



Biographical Sketches hot 

GEORGE WASHINGTON RANDALL, JR. 

George Washington Randall, Jr., Democrat, Representaive from 
Iredell County, was born in West Blocton, Ala., July 13, 1910. Son 
of George Washington and Carrie Leland (White) Randall. At- 
tended West Blocton, Ala., High School, 1923-1927; Alabama Poly- 
technic Institute (Auburn), 1927-1929; University of Alabama, 
1929-1931; University of Alabama Law School, 1931-1932. Office 
Manager. Member Iredell County Democratic Executive Committee, 
1949-1951; Mooresville Planning Board; Mooresvile Chamber of 
Commerce, Director; Mooresville Rotary Club, President, 1948- 
1949. Member Phi Delta Theta Fraternity. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1953. Episcopalian; Vestryman. Married 
Miss Satie Graham of Sumter, S. C, January 19, 1935. Three chil- 
dren: George Robert Randall (deceased) ; Martha Leland Randall, 
age 7; and Rosemary Randall, age 3 mos. Address: 215 West 
Stewart Ave., Mooresville, N. C. 

GRACE TAYLOR RODENBOUGH 

Grace Taylor Rodenbough, Democrat, Representative from Stokes 
County, was born in Danbury, N. C, October 5, 1899. Daughter 
of James Spotswood and Nellie Pemberton (Moon) Taylor. At- 
tended Guilford College Preparatory School, 1912-1914; Guilford 
College, 1914-1917, A.B. degree; Woman's College of the University 
of North Carolina, M.A. degree. Supervisor Stokes County Schools. 
Agent for 3,500 acre ancestral estate; also manages own farm of 
several hundred acres. Taught for number of years at Salem 
College. Member, National Educational Association; North Caro- 
lina Educational Association; Association of Supervision, Curricu- 
lum and Development; Stokes County School Masters Club; Stokes 
County Library Board; Delta Kappa Gamma (National Teachers' 
Honorary Society) ; Secretary Stokes County Unit N.C.E.A., 1938- 
1939. President, 1939-1940. Serving second term as Member of 
Board of Trustees of the University of North Carolina. Member 
of the Commission for the Study of State Supported Institutions 
of Higher Learning, appointed by Governor Umstead in 1953. 
President Hanging Rock Park Foundation, Inc. President Stokes 
County Young Democratic Club, 1936-1937; Vice President North 
Carolina Young Democratic Club, 1938-1939. Stokes County Presi- 



508 North Carolina Manual 

dent, American Red Cross, 1942-1943; Executive Director Ameri- 
can Red Cross (Tallahassee, Fla.), 1945-1946; Field Representa- 
tive, American Red Cross (N. C), 1946-1947; Stokes County 
Chairman, War Savings Bonds, 1943-1945. Member Daughters 
American Revolution; United Daughters Confederacy; North Car- 
olina Literary and Historical Association; North Carolina Society 
for the Preservation of Antiquities. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1953. Presbyterian; Sunday School teacher. Married 
to Stanley Leigh Rodenbough, Jr., August 4, 1947. Two stepsons: 
Leigh and Charles. Address: "Covington", Walnut Cove, N. C. 

WILLIAM BLOUNT RODMAN, JR. 

William Blount Rodman, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Beaufort County, w^as born in Washington, N. C, July 2, 1889. 
Son of Col. William Blount and Addie (Fulford) Rodman. Attended 
Horner's Military Academy; Oak Ridge School; A.B., University 
of North Carolina, 1910; Law School, University of North Caro- 
lina. Licensed North Carolina Supreme Court September, 1911. 
Law firm, Rodman & Rodman, Washington, North Carolina. For- 
mer President of North Carolina Bar, Inc.; Mayor of Washington, 
1919-1920. State Senator in the General Assembly of 1937, 1939. 
Representative in the General Assembly, 1951 and 1953. Lieuten- 
ant U. S. N. (R), World War I. Married Miss Helen Farnell, 
August 17, 1918. Address: Washington, N. C. 

JACK RUSSELL ROGERS 

Jack Russell Rogers, Democrat, Representative from Clay 
County, was born in Hayesville, N. C, July 26, 1920. Son of James 
David and Lola (Bradley) Rogers. Attended Young Harris Col- 
lege, Young Harris, Ga.; Western Carolina College. School teacher. 
Served in World War II as Staff Sergeant, 1941-1945. Baptist. 
Married Miss Nell Ledford, November 29, 1947. Address, Hayes- 
ville, N. C. 

JERRY MORGAN ROGERS 

Jerry Morgan Rogers, Democrat, Representative from Haywood 
County, was born in Haywood County, August 14, 1909. Son of 
Grover C. and Fannie C. (Redmond) Rogers. Attended Clyde High 



Biographical Sketches 509 

School, 1924-1927; Police School of Institute of Government, Chapel 
Hill, N. C; Job Relation Training at N. C. Shipbuilding Company, 
Wilmington, N. C. Attendance Officer for Haywood County and 
Canton City Schools. Member State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee, 1948-1954; 12th District Y.D.C. Organizer for two terms; 
President Haywood County Y.D.C, 1936-1939; State Treasurer 
Y.D.C, 1953-1954. Member Waynesville Lions Club for six years; 
Waynesville Toastmasters Club; Local Committee for aid to Han- 
dicapped. Baptist; Sunday School Superintendent since 1952; 
Chairman Building Committee; President of Brotherhood. Married 
Miss Eva E. Blackwell, February 20, 1929. One daughter, Mrs. 
Carol Underwood. Address: Hazelwood, N. C 

BYRD ISAAC SATTERFIELD 

Byrd Isaac Satterfield, Democrat, Representative from Person 
County, was born in that County on September 29, 1898. Son of 
Albert G. and Mollie E. (Paylor) Satterfield. Attended Public 
Schools of Person County, 1906-1915; Roxboro High School, 1915- 
1917; Trinity College, A.B., 1922; Columbia University, A.M., 
1925; University of Virginia, 1922; University of N. C Law School, 
summer, 1927; Wake Forest Law School, summer, 1929. Farmer 
and lawyer. Received law license, 1929. Member North Carolina 
Farm Bureau ; Grange. Person County Superintendent of Schools, 
1925-1929. Private in the U. S. Army, 1918. Member American 
Legion; Forty and Eight. U. S. Engineer Corps (Real Estate 
Branch), 1941-1946. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1951 and 1953. Methodist; Charge Lay Leader, 1950-1954. Mar- 
ried Miss Sarah Winnie Jones, June 11, 1931. Children: Mary 
Emily Satterfield; Winnie Davis Satterfield; Byrd Austin Satter- 
field. Address: Timberlake, N. C 

BASCOM SAWYER 

Bascom Sawyer, Democrat, Representative from Pasquotank 
County, was born in Camden County, July 20, 1888. Son of Cor- 
nelius and Mary Elizabeth Sawyer. Attended Camden High 
School. Merchant. Member Chamber of Commerce; City Council, 
1921-1923, 1929-1933; President Merchants Bureau for two years; 
Trustee, Graded School, 1924-1928; City Fire Commission, 1947- 



510 North Carolina Manual 

1951. Mason, Scottish Rite, Shriner; Jr. O.U.A.M., Recording Sec- 
retary fourteen years, three terms as State Representative, three 
terms as Councilor. Representative in the General Assembly of 
1953. Chairman Senatorial Democratic Executive Committee, Isf 
District. Methodist; Member Official Board since 1926; Chairman 
Finance Committee for five years; Board of Trustees; President 
Men's Bible Class for three years. Chairman of the Official Board 
First Methodist Church. Married Miss Lillian Berry, April 7, 
1908. Three children: one son, Bascom Sawyer, Jr., killed in 
World War II; two daughters, Mrs. S. Holland Williams and Mrs. 
Carlton T. Barclift. Address: 1127 Riverside Drive, Elizabeth 
City, N. C. 



DELBERT MICHAEL SAWYER 

Delbert Michael Sawyer, Democrat, Representative from Tyrrell 
County, was born in Ransonville, Beaufort County, N. C, March 
19, 1916. Son of William Michael and Mary Elizabeth (Robins) 
Sawyer. Attended Ransonville Elementary School, 1923-1931 ; 
Pantego High School, 1931-1934; Belhaven High School, 1934-1935. 
Hardware dealer. Member Hardware Association of the Carolinas. 
National Council Member representing East Carolina Council Boy 
Scouts of America, 1952-1954; member Executive Board East Car- 
rolina Council, 1952-1954; District Commissioner Wasmarty Dis- 
trict Boy Scouts of America, 1952-1954. Member Rotary Club, Past 
President; Columbia Junior Chamber of Commerce, President, 
1950; Masonic Order; Columbia Chapter 281 Order of Eastern 
Star, Worthy Patron, 1952-1953; District Deputy Grand Patron 
Order of Eastern Star, 1953-1954; Woodmen of the World; Com- 
mander Nip McClees Post of Veterans of Foreign Wars, 1947-1948. 
Enlisted in U. S. Navy, September 25, 1942; discharged with rank 
of Storekeeper First Class, October 25, 1945. Christian; Chairman 
Church Board, 1944-1954; Superintendent Bible School, 1941-1948; 
Bible School Teacher, 1939-1954; Treasurer Albemarle Christian 
Missionary Union, 1945-1954. Married Miss Gladys Rice, October 
17, 1937. Address: Columbia, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 511 

ROBY ALAN SHOMAKER 

Roby Alan Shomaker, Republican, Representative from Avery 
County, vv^as born at Banner Elk, N. C, April 20, 1887. Son of 
Robert T. and Louise (Johnson) Shomaker. Attended Walnut 
Grove Institute, Watauga County, N. C, 1907. Farmer, business 
man. Register of Deeds Avery County, 1924-1932; Alderman, 
Town of Newland, N. C, 1939; First Deputy Sheriff, Avery 
County, 1932-1937. Member of Masonic Order, Linville Lodge No. 
489 A. F. & A. M., Newland, N. C, Secretary, 1929. Representa- 
tive in the General Assembly of 1949. Baptist. Married Miss Sarah 
Fina Reece, February 22, 1914. Children: Eudine N. Shomaker 
Duncan; Lois Shomaker; Mary Louise Shomaker Bare; Sarah Vic- 
toria Shomaker Swan ; Helen Ernestine Shomaker Williams. Ad- 
dress: Newland, N. C. 

CLYDE ALLISON SHREVE 

Clyde Allison Shreve, Democrat, Representative from Guilford 
County, was born in Rockingham County, N. C, June 25, 1908. 
Son of J. A. and Bessie D. (Lester) Shreve. Attended Bethany 
High School, Rockingham County, 1923-1927; University of North 
Carolina, 1928-1931; Woodrow Wilson College of Law, Atlanta, 
Ga.; LL.B., 1935. Lawyer. Member State Bar; Greensboro Bar 
Association; American Bar Association; N. C. State Grange; N. C. 
State Farm Bureau; A. F. & A. M., Stokesdale Lodge No. 428; 
Jr. O. U. A. M., Summerfield Council No. 174; State Vice Council- 
lor, 1942-1943; State Councillor, Jr. 0. U. A. M., 1943-1944; Deputy 
National Councillor, 1945; Sertoma Club. Instructor Business 
Law, Greensboro Evening College, 1949-1950. Member State Board 
of Civil Air Patrol ; Representative from Guilford County in the 
General Assembly of 1943, 1947, 1949, 1951 and 1953. Baptist. 
Married Miss Ruth Marie Doggett, December 27, 1933. One son 
and one daughter: Clyde Allison Shreve, Jr. and Donna Ruth 
Shreve. Address: Summerfield, N. C. 

JAMES ALEXANDER SPEIGHT 

James Alexander Speight, Democrat, Representative from Bertie 
County, was born in Windsor, N. C. Son of Thomas T. and Mar- 
garet 0. (Sharrock) Speight. Attended Bules Creek Academy, 



512 North Carolina Manual 

1908-1911; Wake Forest College, 1911-1912, 1914. Farmer. Mem- 
ber Bertie County Board of Commissioners, 1937-1940 and Chair- 
man of Board for over three years; North Carolina Municipal 
Road Board, 1949-1950. Member Junior Order. Served in U. S. 
Marine Corps two years, 1917-1919. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1953. Baptist; teacher of Men's Bible Class for 
twenty years. Married Miss Millie Celia Harrell of Colerain, N. C, 
December 26, 1922. Two children: Thomas Sharrock Speight and 
Mary Celia Speight. Address: Windsor, N. C. 

JAMES GUDGER STIKELEATHER, JR. 

James Gudger Stikeleather, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Buncombe County, was born in Asheville, N. C, September 8, 1911. 
Son of James Gudger and Nancy (Weaver) Stikeleather. Attended 
Asheville High School, 1925-1929; University of North Carolina, 
B.S. in Commerce, 1934. General insurance and real estate dealer. 
Member Asheville Real Estate Board; Asheville Insurance Agents 
Exchange, President, 1949-1950; Sigma Chi Fraternity. Entered 
U. S. Naval Reserve December, 1943; discharged as Lieutenant 
(j.g.), March 1946. Methodist. Married Miss Dorothy Kimberly, 
November 6, 1937. Children: Jane Stikeleather, age 16; Rebecca 
Stikeleather, age 13; James G. Stikeleather, III, age 9. Address: 
221 Kimberly Avenue, Asheville, N. C. 

CLARENCE E. STONE, JR. 

Clarence E. Stone, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Forsyth 
County, was born in Pinnacle, N. C, September 23, 1914. Son of 
Clarence E. and Annie Irene (Moore) Stone. Attended Wiley 
School and Reynolds High School of Winston-Salem; University of 
North Carolina. Wholesale grocery business and farming. Member 
"The United Commercial Travelers" U. C. T., Senior Councillor, 
1953; Winston-Salem Commercial Civic Club, Treasurer, 1952; 
Forsyth County Chapter N. C. Society for Crippled Children and 
Adults, member of Board, 1951-1952; The Forsyth County Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, President, 1948-1950 and 
Chairman of Board, 1950-1952; The D. D. Schouler Humane Society 
of Forsyth County, President, 1950-1951; The Belews Creek Project 
Club, President, 1952. Served as Private in U. S. Army, July 22, 



Biographical Sketches 513 

1942 to November 20, 1945. Representative in the General Assem- 
bly of 1953. Member of The Fourth Street Church of Christ, 
Winston-Salem, N. C. Married Miss Virgie C. Yokeley, June 26, 
1938. Address: Route 1, Belews Creek, N. C. 



THOMAS EDOAR STORY 

Thomas Edgar Story, Republican, Representative from Wilkes 
County, was born in Blowing Rock, N. C. Son of Joshua Clingman 
and Martha Ann (Day) Story. Attended Watauga County Schools, 
1896-1904; Appalachian Training School, Boone, N. C, 1905-1909; 
Trinity College, 1909-1910. University of North Carolina, 1910- 
1913; A.B., 1913; M.A., 1919; Wake Forest Law School, 1933. 
Teacher, 1906 and 1907 and High School Principal, 1913-1939; 
President, Wilkes County Teachers Association, 1927-1933; Presi- 
dent, High School Principals, N. C. Educational Association, 1924; 
Vice-President, Northwest Division of the N. C. Educational Asso- 
ciation, 1931 and 1932; President, Northwest District Teachers 
Association, 1938-1939; Life Member National Education Associa- 
tion since 1925; Vice-President, Wilkesboro Building and Loan 
Association, 1932-1939; Town Clerk, Trinity, N. C, 1922-1924; 
Elected Dry Delegate for Wilkes County, November 7, 1933. Law- 
yer. Member, Wilkes County and Seventeenth Judicial District 
Bar Association; Junior Order United American Mechanics, Coun- 
cillor, 1923-1924; Knights of Pythias; Chancellor Commander, 
1928-1929; Mason, Master Lodge 1935 and 1942; Worthy Patron, 
Order of Eastern Star, 1939-1940; Master, Wilkesboro Subordinate 
Grange, 1936-1938; Master, Wilkes Pomona Grange, 1938; Secre- 
tary, Kiwanis Club, 1932-1955; Chairman of Wilkesboro Scout 
Troop Committee No. 32, 1932-1940; Vice-Chairman of Wilkes 
Scout District, 1941-1943. Secretary, Wilkes County Republican 
Executive Committee, 1944-1954. Chairman N. C. State Republi- 
can Executive Committee, 1953. Member of Appeals Panel War 
Man Power Commission, 1944. Representative in the General As- 
sembly of 1941, 1943, 1945, 1947 and 1949. Appointed Judge Wilkes 
County General Court, 1952. Baptist; Secretary, Board of Dea- 
cons, 1925-1940; Sunday School Superintendent, 1927-1953. Mod- 
erator, Brushy Mountain Association, 1934-1950. Treasurer, 



Whitf of Chowan 
White of Lenoir 

Whiteburst of Craven 



Whitley of Wake 
Wicker of Lee 

Williams of Yadkin 



Wilson of Caswell 
Wilson of Union 
Womble of Forsyth 



Wonible of Wake 

Woodard of Northampton 
Worthington of Pitt 



Yarborough of Cumberland 

Yarborough of Franklin 

Annie Cooper — 

Principal Clerk 




Biographical Sketches 515 

Brushy Mountain Association, 1950-1955. Member General Board, 
N. C. Baptist State Committee, 1949, 1951. Married Miss Mary 
Clarissa Downs, September 3, 1918. Three children: Thomas Ed- 
gar, Jr., Donald Downs, and William Robert. Address: Wilkes- 
boro, N. C. 



KIRBY SULLIVAN 

Kirby Sullivan, Democrat, Representative from Brunswick 
County, was born at Town Creek, Brunswick County, October 2, 
1927. Son of Richard Cleve and Clara Lee Sullivan. Attended Le- 
land High School, 1934-1945; University of North Carolina, A.B., 
1948; University of North Carolina Law School, LL.B., 1950. 
Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar and other bar associations. 
Solicitor Brunswick County Recorder's Court, June, 1950 to No- 
vember, 1951. Member Phi Beta Kappa. Entered U. S. Army with 
rank of Private, October, 1951 and discharged as First Lieutenant, 
April, 1953. Baptist; former Sunday School Teacher; Sunday 
School Superintendent, 1953-1954; Associate Moderator of Bruns- 
wick Baptist Association since 1953. Address: Southport, N. C. 



RUSSELL A. SWINDELL 

Russell A. Swindell, Democrat, Representative from Hyde 
County, was born in Swan Quarter, N. C, May 14, 1916. Son of 
John Harold, Sr. and Mary (Atkinson) Swindell. Attended Swan 
Quarter High School, 1932-1935; Louisburg College, 1938. Farmer. 
Mason. Charter member and Past President of Swan Quarter 
Lions Club; Chairman Hyde County Polio Foundation; Scout 
Master; Past President Hyde County U.S.D.A. ; Past President 
Hyde County Farm Bureau; Chaplain American Legion. Private 
in the United States Army, 1945. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1951 and 1953. Methodist; Steward since 1945 and 
now Chairman of Board. Married Miss Martha Easterling, Decem- 
ber 1, 1939. Three children: Sandra Sue, Mary Anne and Albin B. 
Address: Swan Quarter, N. C. 



516 North Carolina Manual 

HOYT PATRICK TAYLOR, JR. 

Hoyt Patrick Taylor, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Anson 
County, was born in Wadesboro, N. C, April 1, 1924. Son of 
H. P. and Inez (Wooten) Taylor. Attended McCallie School, Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn., 1940-1942; University of North Carolina, B.S. in 
Commerce, 1945; University of North Carolina Law School, LL.D., 
1948. Lawyer. Member of staff of North Carolina Law Review. 
Member Civitan Club; American Legion; Junior Chamber of 
Commerce ; Young Democrats ; Phi Gamma Delta ; Delta Sigma 
Pi; Phi Delta Phi. Served in United States Marine Corps, 1945- 
1946; 1951-1952 as First Lieutenant. Methodist. Married Miss 
Elizabeth Lockhart, March 17, 1951. Address: Wadesboro, N. C. 

WILLIAM WOODRUFF TAYLOR, JR. 

William Woodruff Taylor, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Warren County, was born in Warrenton, N. C, April 1, 1912. Son 
of Dr. W. W. and Elizabeth (Poindexter) Taylor. Attended John 
Graham High School, Warrenton, 1924-1928; Davidson College, 
1928-1929; University of North Carolina, 1929-1930; Wake Forest 
College Law School, 1931-1933. Lawyer. Member N. C. Bar Asso- 
ciation; Vice-President, N. C. Bar Association, 1954-1955; N. C. 
State Bar; Warrenton Chamber of Commerce; Kappa Alpha Fra- 
ternity; American Legion; Warrenton Rotary Club; President, 
1947-1948. Solicitor, Warren County Recorder's Court, 1942-1949; 
Attorney for Town of Warrenton, 1941-1943, 1947-1949; County 
Attorney for Warren County. Veteran of World War II. Repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly of 1951 and 1953. Episcopalian; 
Vestryman, 1944-1947, 1949-1952. Married Miss Ida Satterfield 
Winstead, April 12, 1941. Two children: William Woodruff Tay- 
lor, III, born July 30, 1944; Elizabeth Gordon Taylor, born Janu- 
ary 13, 1954. Address: Warrenton, N. C. 

CORNELIUS BLAKE THOMAS 

Cornelius Blake Thomas, Democrat, Representative from Johns- 
ton County, was born in that county, November 3, 1893. Son of 
Rufus Daniel and Easter Pherlicia (Temple) Thomas. Attended 
Four Oaks High School and Benson High School. Farmer. Member 



Biographical Sketches 517 

American Farm Bureau. Former school teacher, instructor in 
vocal music, city mail carrier and postal employee. Member and 
Chairman of Johnston County Local Production and Marketing 
Administration, and Vice-Chairman of Johnston County PMA for 
one year. Served in World War I, June 26, 1918-December 26, 1918, 
being discharged with rank of Sergeant. Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1953. Baptist; Sunday School Teacher; Chor- 
ister; Church Treasurer; Deacon; Chairman Beard of Deacons. 
Married Miss Letha Lee of Sampson County, April 14, 1918. Chil- 
dren: Norwood J., Alene Joyce, Letha Jessamine, Mildred Lee, 
Mary Elizabeth and Grace Darling. Address: Route 1: Smith- 
field, N. C. 

WILLIAM REID THOMPSON 

William Reid Thompson, Democrat, Representative from Chat- 
ham County, was born in Durham, N. C, August 13, 1924. Son 
of William Reid and Myrtle (Siler) Thompson. Attended Pitts- 
boro High School; University of North Carolina. B.S., Commerce, 
1948; Harvard Law School, LL.B., 1949. Lawyer. Member Ameri- 
can Bar Association; North Carolina Bar Association; Chatham 
County Bar Association ; President Chatham County Bar Associ- 
ation, 1954. Lieutenant (j.g.). United States Navy, 1943-1946. 
Methodist; President, Methodist Men's Club, 1953-1954; Teacher, 
Young Men's Bible Class, 1952-1954. Married Miss Mary Louise 
Milliken, August 16, 1952. One daughter, Mary Elizabeth Thomp- 
son, born December 23, 1953. Address: Pittsboro, N. C. 

THOMAS TURNER 

Thomas Turner, Democrat, Representative from Guilford 
County, was born in that county, October 3, 1900. Son of Henry 
Catlett Turner, of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, and Elizabeth Little 
(Dowd) Turner, of Mecklenburg County; grandson of Col. Thomas 
Turner, member of Congress from Kentucky. A.B., University of 
North Carolina, 1923; Graduate study at Harvard University; 
University Law School, 1923-1924. Lawyer. Member North Caro- 
lina, Greensboro and American Bar Associations. Vice Chairman 
Guilford County Democratic Executive Committee, 1927-1929. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, College Fraternity. Member, Elk's Lodge, 



518 North Carolina Manual 

former Exalted Ruler; Knights of Pythias, Cone Lodge No. 158; 
Greensboro Kiwanis Club; Merchants and Manufacturers Club and 
Greensboro Country Club. Veterans of Foreign Wars; American 
Legion; Disabled American Veterans; Society of Forty and Eight; 
served 32 months overseas, World War II, with 82nd A B division, 
Fifth Infantry Division and 28th Infantry Division; five battle 
stars. Awarded Croix de Guerre with palm and Criox de Guerre 
of Luxembourg. After hostilities. Commanding Officer of Military 
Government for district of Hanau, one of largest industrial areas 
in American occupation zone, Lieutenant-Colonel; Reserve Officer; 
Reserve Officers Association, Lt. Colonel, USRC-JAGC. Represent- 
ative in the General Assembly of 1931, 1933, 1943, 1951 and 1953. 
Episcopalian ; former Vestryman ; former Secretary Parish. Mar- 
ried Miss Elizabeth Nolan of Marietta, Georgia, October 28, 1925. 
Three children: Thomas Turner, III, Marion Nolan Turner and 
Henry Catlett Turner. Address: Greensboro, N. C. 



JOHN WESLEY UMSTEAD, JR. 

John Wesley Umstead, Jr., Democrat, Representative from 
Orange County, was born in Mangum Township, Durham County, 
April 7, 1889. Son of John Wesley and Lula (Lunsford) Umstead. 
Attended Public Schools of Durham County. Entered University 
of North Carolina in September. 1905 and graduated with the 
Class of 1909. Director, General Alumni Association of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina since 1921. Trustee and Member of 
Executive committee of the Greater University of North Carolina; 
Chairman Hospitals Board of Control; Chairman of Commission 
on Merit System for Teachers; Member Study Commission on 
Education. State Senator from the Sixteenth Senatorial District, 
1931, 1939. Member of House of Representatives from Orange 
County in 1941, 1943, 1945, 1947, 1949, 1951 and 1953. Mason; 
Elk; Grange; Farm Bureau. Methodist. Married Sallie Hunter 
Reade of Person County, January 20, 1914. Three children living: 
Frank Graham Umstead, Sarah Elizabeth Umstead, and Anne 
Umstead Maultsby. A son, John Wesley Umstead, III, Captain in 
U. S. Marine Corps, was killed in action on Saipan Island, June 
14, 1944. Representative of Jefferson Standard Life Insurance 
Company. Address: Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 519 

GEORGE RANDOLPH UZZELL 

George Randolph Uzzell, Democrat, Representative from Rowan 
County, was born in Salisbury, November 23, 1903. Son of Harry 
M. and Geneva (Wrig-ht) Uzzell. Attended Salisbury Graded 
Schools 1910-1915; Raleigh Graded Schools 1915-1919; Salisbury 
High School 1919-1921; Davidson College 1921-1923; Wake Forest 
College 1924-1926; Passed State Bar Examination, January 25, 
1926. Lawyer. President, Rowan County Bar Association, Civi- 
tan (President); Knights of Pythias; D.O.K.K., Suez Temple, 
No. 78; Winona Council No. 18, Jr. O. U. A. M.; Kappa Sigma, 
Wake Forest College. Chancellor Commander, Salisbury-Rowan 
No. 100, Knights of Pythias, 1927-1929; Woodman of the World; 
Member of B. P. 0. E. No. 699, Salisbury; Patriotic Order, 
Sons of America; Past President of Washington Camp No. 24; 
North Carolina Bar Association ; Rowan County Bar Association. 
Member, State Democratic Platform Committee; State Democratic 
Executive Committee. Member of House of Representatives of 
1931, 1935, 1937, 1939, 1941, 1943, 1945, 1947, 1951, and 1953. 
Baptist. Teacher of Men's Bible Class since 1932. Moderator of 
First Baptist Church. Married on November 23, 1934, to Miss 
Ruth Harrison of Spencer, N. C. Two children: Betty Ruth, born 
April 11, 1938, and George Randolph Uzzell, Jr., born May 9, 
1944. Address: Salisbury, N. C. 



ITIMOUS THADDEUS VALENTINE, JR. 

Itimous Thaddeus Valentine, Jr., Democrat, Representative fi-om 
Nash County, was born in Rocky Mount, N. C, March 15, 1926. 
Son of Itimous T. and Hazel Graham (Armstrong) Valentine. At- 
tended Nashville High School, 1939-1943; The Citadel, A.B., 1948; 
University of North Carolina Law School, LL.B., 1952. Lawyer. 
Member North Carolina Bar Association; Phi Alpha Delta Law 
Fraternity; Clerk of Thomas Euffin Chapter, Phi Alpha Delta, 
University of North Carolina Law School, 1951-1952. Sergeant, 
United States Army Air Corps, 1944-1946. Baptist; Teacher of 
Young Peoples Class of Sunday School since 1952. Married Miss 
Elizabeth Salyer Carr, September 6, 1953. Address: Nashville, 
N. C. 



520 North Carolina Manual 

PERCY R. VANN 

Percy R. Vann, Democrat, Representative from Sampson County, 
was born in Newton Grove, N. C, May 9, 1896. Son of R. D. and 
Ellen (Tart) Vann. Attended Glencoe Preparatory School; Clin- 
ton High School; Campbell College, 1917. Automobile dealer and 
farmer. Formerly wholesale merchant in Clinton for twelve years. 
Past member Chamber of Commerce; Merchants Association; Ro- 
tary Club; Elks Club; Junior Order U.A.M.; President of Rose- 
boro Lion's Club, 1955. Served in World War I with service over- 
seas. Representative in the General Assembly of 1953. Methodist; 
Steward; Church Treasurer, 1947-1951; Official Board, 1951-1955. 
Married Miss Marie Turlington, of Clinton, October 2, 1926. Chil- 
dren: Ida Rae Vann and J. E. Vann. Address: Clinton, N. C. 



CARL VERNON VENTERS 

Carl Vernon Venters, Democrat, Representative from Onslow 
County, was born at Richlands, N. C, January 18, 1906. Son of 
Wayne B. and Julia G. (Stevens) Venters. Attended Richlands 
High School, 1918-1921; A. B. degree, University of North Caro- 
lina, 1926; LL.B., 1929. Attorney at Law. Member of N. C. State 
Bar and N. C. Bar Association. Editorial Staff, Edward Thompson 
Co., Law Publishers, Northport, L. L, N. Y., January 1930-August, 
1935; Associate Member Law Firm of Milbank, Tweed & Hope, 15 
Broad St., New York, N. Y., September, 1935 to August, 1943; 
Associate Member Law Firm of Oliver & Donnally, 110 E. 42nd 
St., New York, N. Y. September, 1943 to September, 1945. Solici- 
tor, Onslow County Criminal Court, 1947-1948. Member of Phi 
Gamma Delta (Social) and Phi Delta Phi (Legal) Fraternities. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1949, 1951 and 1953. 
Episcopalian; member of Vestry, St. Pauls Episcopal Church, 
Northport, N. Y., 1932-1935; member of Vestry, St. Anne's Epis- 
copal Church, Jacksonville, N. C, 1946-1950. Married Miss Mar- 
garet Dean Burnette, April 30, 1930. Three children: Carl V. 
Venters, Jr., Wayne B. Venters, Margaret Gayle Venters. Ad- 
dress: Jacksonville, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 521 

LIVINGSTON VERNON 

Living-ston Vernon, Democrat, Representative from Burke 
County, was born in Morg-anton, N. C, November 17, 1922. Son 
of Dr. James W. and Sarah Cole (Taylor) Vernon. Attended Mor- 
ganton City Schools; University of North Carolina, A.B. degree, 
1943; University of North Carolina Law School, LL.B., 1949. At- 
torney. Member Burke County Bar Association and North Caro- 
lina Bar Association. Attorney for Town of Morganton from 
May, 1951 to May, 1952. Member Kappa Sigma and Phi Delta Phi 
fraternities. Member Board of Editors of North Carolina Law Re- 
view, 1948-1949. Member of Kiwanis (Director, 1952); Jaycees 
(Director, 1952); Morganton Chamber of Commerce; American 
Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; B. P. 0. Elks; Royal Order of 
Moose. Served in United States Navy, 1943-1946, with twenty- 
one months of sea duty; discharged as Lieutenant (j.g.), U. S. 
Naval Reserve. Representative in General Assembly of 1953. 
Presbyterian; Deacon, 1950-1952. Married Miss Ann Elizabeth 
Walker, November 27, 1943. Address: Box 364, Morganton, N. C. 



JAMES B. VOGLER 

James B. Vogler, Democrat, Representative from Mecklenburg 
County, was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, April 13, 1895. 
Son of the late James A. and Susan Carolina (Alexander) Vogler. 
Attended the Public Schools of the city of Charlotte; Baird's 
Military Institute. Executive Secretary and Manager of the North 
Carolina Food Dealers Association; Editor of the CAROLINA 
FOOD DEALER. Served as Secretary for the North Carolina Food 
and Grocery Distributors Code Authority during the NRA. Organ- 
ized North Carolina under the National Recovery Administration 
for the food and grocery industry. President, National Association 
of Retail Grocers Secretaries Association. Chairman, Fair Trade 
Council of the City of Charlotte. President, Mecklenburg County 
Food Trades Council. President, Charlotte Chapter of American 
War Dads. In January of 1942 was appointed by His Excellency, 
Governor J. Melville Broughton, as Director of the War Produc- 
tion Board Salvage Activities in North Carolina and served in 
this capacity until March 15, 1944. Member of the General As- 
sembly, 1936 Special Session; 1937; 1938 Special Session; 1939; 



522 North Carolina Manual 

1941; 1945; 1947; and 1951. 1939 Regular Session, Chairman of 
Committee on Manufacturers and Labor; 1941 Regular Session, 
Chairman of Committee on Counties, Cities and Towns; Author of 
House Bill No. 815 introduced by Bost of Cabarrus, Vogler of 
Mecklenburg, and Rudisill of Gaston, establishing the North Caro- 
lina Vocational Textile School; 1945 Regular Session, Chairman 
of Committee on Public Welfare; 1947 Regular Session, Chairman 
of Election and Election Laws; 1951 Regular Session, Chairman 
of Committee on Printing. Methodist; Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees, Memorial Methodist Church, formerly the Brevard Street 
Methodist Church. Married Miss Lillian Raynelle Ketchie, June 
12, 1916. Three children: James Brevard Vogler, Jr., Major, U. S. 
Air Forces; John T. Vogler and Mrs. Louis H. Layne of Charlotte. 
Home Address: 2011 Crescent Avenue, Charlotte, N. C. 



WALTER WILBORN WALL 

Walter Wilborn Wall, Democrat, Representative from McDow- 
ell County, was born in Marion, N. C, October 30, 1911. Son of 
A. U. and Affie (White) Wall. Owner of W. W. Wall Co., manufac- 
turers of garments. Married Miss Hettie Joe Walker, November 
16, 1934. Children: Avery Dean Wall, age 13 and Melinda Carole 
Wall, age 10. Address: Oak St., Marion, N. C. 



JOSEPH PAUL WALLACE 

Joseph Paul Wallace, Democrat, Representative from Montgom- 
ery County, was born in Troy, N. C, October 29, 1905. Son of 
James Rufus and Louise (Wooley) Wallace. Graduated from Troy 
High School, 1925. Automobile dealer and service station operator. 
Past President of Young Democratic Club of Montgomery County; 
Past President of Troy Rotary Club; President of Troy Merchants 
Association; Chairman of Board of Commissioners of the Town 
of Troy, 1940-1942. Mason. Senator from the Eighteenth Senatorial 
District in the General Assembly of 1943 ; Representative in the 
General Assembly of 1945, 1947, and 1949. Methodist; Church 
Treasurer, 1940-1944. Married Miss Miriam Rebecca McKenzie, 
December 25, 1934. Three children. Address: Troy, N. C. 



Biographical Sketches 52? 

JOSEPH ADAMS WATKINS 

Joseph Adams Watkins, Democrat, Representative from Gran- 
ville County, was born in that county, May 25, 1908. Son of John S. 
and Belle (Norwood) Watkins. Attended Cornwall Grade School, 
1914-1922; Oak Hill High School, 1922-1927; Wake Forest Col- 
lege, A.B. degree, 1931. Automobile dealer. Member N. C. Auto 
Dealers Association and National Automobile Dealers Association. 
Commissioner, City of Oxford, 1945-1954; Mayor Pro-tem, City of 
Oxford, 1953-1954. Member Adoniram Masonic Lodge; Oxford 
Kiwanis Club, former Director, Vice-President and President; 
Granville County Chamber of Commerce, former Director and 
Vice-President. Baptist. Married Miss Doris Poole of Virgilina, 
Va., October 1, 1938. Two daughters, Jo Anna Watkins and Doris 
Poole Watkins. Address: 415 Broad St., Oxford, N. C. 

JOHN FERNANDO WHITE 

John Fernando White, Democrat, Representative from Chowan 
County, was born in Edenton, April 16, 1902. Son of Sidney John- 
son and Mary Christian (Goodwin) White. Attended Wake Forest 
College, 1922-1925; University Law School, 1925-1926. Lawyer. 
Judge Chowan County Court, 1928-1930. Member 115th Ambu- 
lance Company of the 4th Corps Area, Edenton, 1927-1928; rank. 
Sergeant. Member of House of Representatives of 1931, 1935, 1937, 
1939, 1943, 1945, 1951, and 1953. City Attorney, 1940, 1941-1942. 
County Solicitor. Baptist. Married Miss Carolyn Juanita Bunch, 
March 16, 1930. One daughter: Carolyn Juanita, born July 10, 
1933. Address: Edenton, N. C. 

THOMAS JACKSON WHITE 

Thomas Jackson White, Democrat, Representative from Lenoir 
County, was born in Concord, N. C, March 6, 1903. Son of Thomas 
Jackson, Sr. and Mary Isabelle (Gulp) White. Attended Cabarrus 
County Elementary Schools, 1909-1914; Kershaw, S. C, County 
Elementary Schools, 1915-1917; Charlotte University School, 1917; 
Bailey Military Institute, 1918-1919; Concord High School, 1919- 
1920; North Carolina State College, 1920-1922; University of 
North Carolina Law School, 1924-1927. Lawyer. Lenoir County 



524 North Carolina Manual 

Attorney since 1938. Member Lenoir County Bar Association, 
President, 1952; President 6th District Bar Association, 1954. 
North Carolina State Bar Association, Inc.; North Carolina Bar 
Association; American Bar Association; American Judicature 
Society; Phi Gamma Delta (Epsilon Chapter, U. N. C.) ; Phi 
Alpha Delta Law Fraternity; Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks (Kinston Lodge No. 740). Member Wildlife Resources 
Commission, 1947-1949 and Chairman, 1948-1949. Member of 
Company E, 120th Infantry, N. C. National Guard, 1921-1924. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1953. Episcopalian. 
Married Miss Virginia Edwards, December 29, 1937. Children: 
Isabella White (daughter by former marriage) ; Sarah Ellen 
White; Thomas Jackson White, III; Mrs. Virginia Turley Mose- 
ley (stepdaughter). Address: Box 603, Kinston, N. C. 

SAM LATHAM WHITEHURST 

Sam Latham Whitehurst, Democrat, Representative from Cra- 
ven County, was born near New Bern, N. C, July 30, 1922. Son 
of Fred Hancock and Sallie Tingle Whitehurst. Attended Fish- 
burne Military School ; North Carolina State College, 1941. 
Farmer. Past President Craven County Farm Bureau. Member 
Doric Lodge No. 568, A. F. & A. M. Served U. S. Army with rank 
of Corporal, January 1943 to December 1945. Representative in 
the General Assembly of 1953. Methodist; Board of Stewards. Ro- 
tarian; V.F.W.; American Legion, Director of N. C. Dairy Foun- 
dation. Married Miss Frances Wells July 5, 1943. Children; Sam 
Latham Whitehurst, Jr., Frances Gay Whitehurst, Fred Hancock 
Whitehurst, II. Address: Route 1, New Bern, N. C. 

PHILIP RAY WHITLEY 

Philip Ray Whitley, Democrat, Representative from Wake 
County, was born in Selma, N. C, July 1, 1905. Son of Raford 
Bryant and Mamie (Harper) Whitley. Attended the public schools 
of Wendell; University of North Carolina, LL.B., 1929. Merchant 
and farmer. Wake County Democratic Chairman, 1934-1942. Ma- 
son; American Legion, (40 & 8). Volunteered for duty day follow- 
ing Pearl Harbor; Captain, Infantry, January 1942, to October 
1945; commanded an infantry company in France. Representative 
in the General Assembly of 1951 and 1953. Member, Wendell Chris- 
tian (Disciples) Church; Chairman Official Board 1949; Chairman 



Biographical Sketches 525 

Building Committee, 1950. Married Miss Ruth Ballard, July 20, 
1936. Two children: Ruth Raye, age 17, and Philip Hugh, age 14. 
Address: Wendell, N. C. 

J. SHELTON WICKER 

J. Shelton Wicker, Democrat, Representative from Lee County, 
was born in Sanford, N. C, December 10, 1917. Son of S. A. and 
Sally Jane (Stone) Wicker. Attended Sanford High School; North 
Carolina State College, B.S. in Agriculture, 1941. Wholesale gas 
and oil jobber. Shell Oil Company, in Lee and Harnett Counties. 
Member Lee County Board of Commissioners. Member Lion's Club; 
Elks Lodge; Forty & Eight; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American 
Legion. Member, Lee County Wildlife Club ; Chairman of District 
5B North Carolina Wildlife Federation. Trustee of the Greater 
University of North Carolina. Drafted into United States Army, 
December 1942; served sixteen months overseas with 290th In- 
fantry, 75th Division; separated January of 1946 with rank of 
First Lieutenant. Representative in General Assembly of 1953. 
Methodist. Married Miss Clarice M. Burns, August 3, 1942. Four 
children: Bobby, Sharon, Michael and Dennis. Address: R.F.D. 
No. 4, Sanford, N. C. 

H. SMITH WILLIAMS 

H. Smith Williams, Republican, Representative from Yadkin 
County, was born in Yadkinville, N. C, May 13, 1924. Son of Co- 
lumbus and Pearl (Davis) Williams. Graduated from Yadkinville 
High School, 1941; University of North Carolina, A.B. degree, 
1949; University of North Carolina Law School, LL.B. degree, 
1951. Lawyer. Member North Carolina Bar Association; Delta 
Theta Phi Legal Fraternity, Vice-Dean, 1950 and 1951; Farm 
Bureau; American Legion. Served in United States Navy from 
April, 1944 to June, 1946. Representative in the General Assem- 
bly of 1953. Member Pilot View Friends Church; Treasurer and 
Teacher at present. Address: Yadkinville, N. C. 

EDWARD HOWELL WILSON 

Edward Howell Wilson, Democrat, Representative from Cas- 
well County, was born in Danville, Va., December 16, 1916. Son 
of William T. and Vela L. (Farmer) Wilson. Attended Bartlett 



526 North Carolina Manual 

Yancey High School, 1930-1934; North Carolina State College, 
1934-1938, B.S. in Agriculture Education. Teacher and farmer. 
Served in World War II, 1941-194G, and Korean War, 1951-1953, 
with rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Member Kiwanis Club, President 
in 1950. Presbyterian; Deacon. Married Miss Jeanette R. Ziglar, 
June 20, 1942. Children: Edward H. Wilson, Jr., James R. Wilson 
and Connie Sue Wilson. Address: Route 1, Blanche, N. C. 



HENRY HALL WILSON, JR. 

Henry Hall Wilson, Jr., Democrat, Representative from Union 
County, was born in Monroe, N. C, December 6, 1921. Son of H. H. 
and Annie V. (Sanders) Wilson. Attended Monroe Elementary 
School, 1927-1932; Monroe Junior High School, 1932-1934; Mon- 
roe High School, 1934-1938; Duke University, A.B. degree, 1942; 
Duke University Law School, LL.B., 1948. Lawyer. Member Mon- 
roe Lion's Club, American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars. 
Permanent Chairman 1953 State Y.D.C. Convention; 1953-54 
State Y.D.C. Organizer; Member of State Civil Air Patrol Com- 
mission; State Vice-Chairman Resolutions Committee of Junior 
Chamber of Commerce; State District Chairman Junior Bar Asso- 
ciation; North Carolina Bar Association. Entered U. S. Army, 
January, 1943; discharged in July, 1946 as First Lieutenant. Rep- 
resentative in the General Assembly of 1953. Baptist. Married 
Miss Mary C. Walters, January 11, 1944. Three children: Mary 
Jean Wilson, age 8; Nancy Ellen Wilson, age 5; Henry H. Wilson, 
III, age 3. Address: Box 261, Monroe, N. C. 



WILLIAM BRANTLEY WOMBLE 

William Brantley Womble, Democrat, Representative from Wake 
County, was born in that county, August 6, 1896. Son of Andrew 
Thomas and Carrie Lee (Edwards) Womble. Attended Wake 
County Public Schools; Cary High School; University of North 
Carolina, 1918-1921. La-wyer. Member of Wake County and North 
Carolina Bar Association. Theta Chi Fraternity; Phi Alpha Delta 
(Law) ; Order of the Grail. Mason. Representative in the General 
Assembly of 1933, 1951 and 1953. Baptist. Married Miss Aetna 
Katherine Smith, October 22, 1923. Two children: Mrs. Aetna 



BiOGKAPHicAi. Sketches 527 

Katherine (Womble) Dowst, New York City; Mrs. Bai-bara 
(Womble) Innman, Norfolk, Virginia. Married Miss Eliza N. 
Womble, October 23, 1934. Married Miss Dorothy K. Riddle, May 
22, 1948. Two children: Janet Lee Womble and Patricia A .r, 
Womble. Address: Route 1, Gary, North Carolina. 

WILLIAM FLETCHER WOMBLE 

William Fletcher Womble, Democrat, Representative from For- 
syth County, was born in Winston-Salem, N. C, October 29, 1916. 
Son of B. S. and Edith (Willingham) Womble. Attended Reyn- 
olds High School, graduating in 1933; Duke University, A.B., 
1937; University of North Carolina Law School, Summer Session 
of 1938; Duke University Law School, LL.B., 1939. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber N. C. General Statutes Commission ; Member American Bar 
Association; N. C. Bar Association; Forsyth County Bar Associa- 
tion; Winston-Salem Junior Bar Association, President, 1954. 
Council Member Junior Bar Conference of American Bar Associ- 
ation representing Fourth Circuit for 1951-1952. Member Board of 
Ti'ustees High Point College; Board of Directors local Y.M.C.A.; 
Board of Directors Association for the Handicapped, Inc. Chair- 
man Forsyth County Community Chest Campaign, 1948. Member 
Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity and Phi Delta Theta Social Fra- 
ternity. Drafted July, 1941 and released from active duty with 
rank of Major in Air Forces, January 1946. Representative from 
Forsyth County in General Assembly of 1953. Methodist; Mem- 
ber Board of Stewards of Centenary Methodist Church, 1946-1951. 
Married Miss Jane Gilbert, October 11, 1941. Three children: Wil- 
liam F. Womble, Jr.; Jane Womble; Russell G. Womble. Address: 
2027 Virginia Road, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

JOHN RAYNOR WOODARD 

John Raynor Woodard, Democrat, Representative from North- 
ampton County, was born at Pendleton, N. C, July 6, 1906. Son of 
Donald M. and Maggie (Maddrey) Woodard. Attended Buies Creek 
Academy, 1924-1925; Wake Forest College, graduating 1930, B.S. 
degree. Merchant and farmer. Town Treasurer of Conway, 1941- 
1948; Member of Northampton County Board of Education, 1942- 
1943; Member of Northampton County Board of Commissioners 



528 North Carolina Manual 

1943-1948; Member Board of Trustees Chowan College 1948-52; 
Chairman of Board of Trustees of Chowan College 1952. President 
Northampton County Farm Bureau 1951-52. Member of Masonic 
Lodge; Scottish Rite Mason; York Rite Mason; Member of Sudan 
Temple Shrine; Member Roanoke Valley Shrine Club; Member of 
Raleigh Shrine Club; Master, Pendleton Masonic Lodge, 1943-48. 
Representative in the General Assembly of 1949, 1951 and 1953. 
Baptist; Deacon, 1939 — ; Sunday School School Superintendent, 
1940-1946; Sunday School Teacher, 1931-1940, 1947-1952. Married 
Miss Bernice Norris, June 4, 1933. Two sons: John Raynor Wood- 
ard, Jr.; James Anderson Woodard. Address: Conway, N. C. 



SAMUEL OTIS WORTHINGTON 

Samuel Otis Worthington, Democrat, Representative from Pitt 
County, was born in Winterville, N. C, January 24, 1898. Son of 
Samuel G. and Lydia Campbell (Smith) Worthington. Attended 
rural schools, 1905-1912; Winterville High School, 1912 to 1917; 
University of North Carolina, two years of academic work and two 
years of law, fall of 1917 through summer of 1921. Attorney. 
Served in the Naval Unit of S.A.T.C. at the University from 
September 1, 1918 to November 1918. Served in N. C. State Guard 
October, 1943 to October, 1944. Representative from Pitt County 
in the General Assembly of 1939, 1941, 1943, 1945, 1947, 1949, 
1951 and 1953. Member Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity. Grand 
Chancellor of the Order of Knights of Pythias in the State of 
North Carolina from June, 1930 to July, 1931. Supreme Represent- 
ative from Domain of North Carolina to Supreme Lodge Knights 
of Pythias, 1938-1948. Member Greenville Exchange Club; Treas- 
urer, N. C. State Exchange Clubs, 1953-1955. Episcopalian. Mar- 
ried Miss Bessie Harrison, April 29, 1926. Two children: Lina 
Hackett Worthington, age 24; Samuel Otis Worthington, Jr., age 
19. Address: Greenville, N. C. 



EDWARD FOSTER YARBOROUGH 

Edwin Foster Yarborough, Democrat, Representative from 
Franklin County was born in Louisburg, N. C, February 10, 1910. 
Son of William Henry and Eloise (Hill) Yarborough. Graduated 



Biographical Sketches 529 

Louisburg High School, 1927; attended Woodberry Forest School, 
Woodberry Forest, Va., 1927-1928; University of North Caro- 
lina, 1928-1931; Wake Forest College Law School. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber N. C. Bar Association and American Bar Association. Presi- 
dent, Seventh Judicial District Bar Association, 1954-1955. Mem- 
ber of Louisburg Lions Club, Director, 1948-1949, 1950-1951, Vice- 
President, 1953 to date. Mason, Shriner, Member of Sudan Tem- 
ple, Secretary of Franklin County Shrine Club, 1954-1955. Served 
in Army of the United States, 1942-1946, overseas service in Asi- 
atic-Pacific Theater of Operations; discharged as Captain. Major, 
North Carolina National Guard, 1947-1952; Lt. Colonel, 1952 to 
date; Commanding Officer 113th Field Artillery Battalion of 30th 
Infantry Division since 1951. Commander, Louisburg Post of 
American Legion, 1948-1949. Member of Forty and Eight. Rep- 
resentative in the 1951 and 1953 sessions of the North Carolina 
General Assembly. Episcopalian; Secretary of St. Paul's Episco- 
pal Church, Louisburg, N. C, 1948 to date; Bible Class Teacher 
since 1946; Lay Reader, 1949-1952; Member of Vestry, 1947 to 
date. Married Miss Nancy Hayes, February 8, 1948. Address: 
Louisburg, N. C. 



WILSON FRANKLIN YARBOROUGH, SR. 

Wilson Franklin Yarborough, Sr., Democrat, Representative 
from Cumberland County, was born in that county, December 10, 
1908. Son of Franklin Curtis and Romelia (Marsh) Yarborough. 
Attended Gray's Creek High School, 1915-1925; Brevard College, 
Commercial Law and Bookkeeping, 1927. Automobile and real 
estate dealer. Member North Carolina Automobile Dealers Asso- 
ciation, Director from 1945 to 1954; President North Carolina 
Automobile Dealers Association, 1954-1955. Member Fayetteville 
City Council, 1942-1943. President Fayetteville Rotary Club, 1953- 
1954. Mason and Shriner. Served one term as Page and one term 
as Chief Page of N. C. Senate. Methodist. Member Board of Stew- 
ards since 1946; Chairman Board of Stewards, 1953; Chairman 
Finance Committee, 1946-1947. Married Miss Mary Pearl Butler, 
October 10, 1928. Children: Wilson F. Yarborough, Jr.; Ramon L. 
Yarborough; David B. Yarborough. Address: 1703 Raeford Road, 
Fayetteville, N. C. 



OCCUPATIONS OF MEMBERS OF THE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 1955 



SENATE 



AUTOMOBLE DEALER 

Thomas, J. Max 

BUILDING & LOAN 

Currie, Claude 
Kirkman, O. Arthur 

CONTRACTORS 

Blythe, F. J. 
Garrison, William E. 

DAIRYMAN 

Scott, Ralph H. 

DENTAL SURGEON 

Cook, Dr. Dennis S. 

DENTIST 

Jones, Dr. Paul E. 

FERTILIZER DEALER 

Williamson, Arthur W. 

FARM EQUIPMENT & 

TRUCK DEALER 

Jones, R. Posey 

FARMERS 

Britt, Mitchell 
Bunn, C. Settle 
Eagles, J. C, Jr. 
Hancock, Wills, III 
Henkel, C. V., Jr. 
Hicks, Carl T. 
Jones, Dr. Paul E. 



Moore, H. M. 
Owens, Edward L. 
Paschal, Wade H. 
Poole, Otis 
Rose, Dr. D. J. 
Thomas, J. Max 
Whitley, Adam J., Jr. 
Williamson, Arthur W. 

INSURANCE 

Jones, R. Posey 
Stone, T. Clarence 
Thomas, J. Max 
Winters, B. H. 

LAWYERS 

Aydlett, N. Elton 
Earnhardt, Luther E. 
Britt, Mitchell 
Brock, B. C. 
Cooke, Frank Patton 
Crew, W. Lunsford 
Godwin, A. Pilston, Jr. 
Graves, Calvin 
Hall, David M., Jr. 
Hightower, E. Avery 
Kerr, John, Jr. 
Medford, William 
Morgan, Robert 
Owens, Edward L. 
Poyner, James M. 
Ross, L. H. 
Shuford, John F. 
Summersill, E. W. 



530 



Occupations 



531 



Thomas, J. Max 
Walton, Ray H. 
Weeks, Cameron S. 
Woodson, Nelson 
Yow, Cicero P. 

MERCHANTS 

Morgan, Robert F. 
Stone, T. Clarence 

PEACH GROWER 

Poole, J. Hawley 

PHYSICIAN 

Perry, Dr. H. B. 

RAILROAD OFFICIAL 

Kirkman, O. Arthur 

REAL ESTATE DEALERS 

Garrison, William E. 
Hancock, Wills, III 
Mcore, Cutler 



Owens, Edward L. 
Thomas, J. Max 

SURGEONS 

James, Dr. W. D. 

Rose, Dr. D. J. (retired) 

TEACHERS 

Moore, H. M. 
Paschal, Wade H. 

TEXTILES 

Henkel, C. V., Jr. 
Reynolds, Chas. H. 

TOBACCONIST 

Eagles, J. C, Jr. 

TURKEY PRODUCER 

Thomas, J. Max 

WAREHOUSEMAN 

Jones, R. Posey 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

AUTOMOBILE DEALERS 



Fowler, Joe, Jr. 
Harriss, Clyde H. 
Vann, P. R. 
Wallace, J. Paul 
Watkins, Joe A. 
Yarborough, Wilson F., 

AUTOMOBLIE FINANCE 

Harriss, Clyde H. 

BANK OFFICIAL 

Dough ton, J. K. 



BARBER & BEAUTY 

SCHOOL OPERATOR 

Gobble, F. L. 

BONDING & INSURANCE 

Burleson, Jeter C. 

Sr. BUILDING SUPPLY DEALER 

Collier, T. J. 

BUSINESSMAN 

Shomaker, Roby A. 

CAFE OWNER 

O'Dell, Virgil 



532 



North Carolina Manual 



COTTON DEALER 

Greene, Harry A. 

COUNTY SCHOOL OFFICL\L 

Rogers, Jerry M. 

DAIRYMEN 

Gregory, Carson 
Moore, Larry L, Jr. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 

Bryant, Charles K., Sr. 

EXTERMINATING COMPANY 
OFFICIAL 

O'Hanlon, I. H. 

FARMERS 

Barnes, Stewart J. 
Bryant, Charles K., Sr. 
Clark, David 
Doughton, J. K. 
Edwards, A. C. 
Floyd, F. Wayland 
Forbes, J. Wilbert 
Fountain, Ben E. 
Gregory, Carson 
Hairston, Peter W. 
Hargett, John M. 
Henderson, G. P. 
Kiser, Roger C. 
Maddrey, C. Gordon 
Moore, Larry I., Jr. 
Murphy, Ashley M. 
Satterfield, B. I. 
Shomaker, Roby A. 
Speight, J. A. 
Stone, Clarence E., Jr. 
Swindell, Russell A. 
Thomas, C. Blake 



Vann, P. R. 
Whitehurst, Sam L. 
Whitley, Philip R. 
Wilson, Edward H. 
Woodard, J. Raynor 

FERTILIZER DEALER 

Greene, Harry A. 

FORMER COUNTY OFFICIAL 

Lackey, W. Ray 

FUNERAL COACH AND 
AMBULANCE DISTRIBUTOR 

McShane, William T. 

FURNITURE 

MANUFACTURERS 

Kemp, W. P. 
Philpott, H. Cloyd 

FURNITURE & TAPESTRY 

DEALER 

Anderson, John L. 

GARMENT MANUFACTURER 

Wall, W. W. 

GAS & OIL DISTRIBUTOR 

Carr, Robert M. 
Wicker, J. Shelton 

GROWER & PROCESSOR OF 
HYBRID SEED CORN 

Pittman, Frank S. 

HARDWARE DEALER 

Sawyer, D. M. 

HOG BREEDER 

Gregory, Carson 



Biographical Sketches 



533 



HOUSE MOVING 

CONTRACTOR 

Coates, Roy C. 

INSURANCE 

Burleson, Jeter C. 
Etheridge, R. Bruce 
Floyd, W. F. 
Harriss, Clyde H. 
Hunt, Joseph M., Jr. 
Murphy, Ashley M. 
Pou, Edwin S. 
Stikeleather, James G., Jr. 
Umstead, J. W., Jr. 

LAWYERS 

Barker, Oscar G. 
Buchanan, Marcellus 
Clark, David 
Craig-, George W. 
Cummings, Theodore F. 
Davis, J. Toliver 
Dill, Thomas G. 
Falls, B. T., Jr. 
Falls, Charles B., Jr. 
Fisher, Ralph R. 
Floyd, F. Wayland 
Gavin, W. Ed 
Goodman, Arthur 
Fountain, Ben E. 
Hairston, Peter W. 
Harris, Shearon 
Haworth, Byron 
Hewlett, Addison, Jr. 
Holmes, Carroll R. 
Houk, G. L. 
Jenkins, T. M. 
Jordan, John Y., Jr. 
Kittrell, Robert G., Jr. 
Long, George A. 



Moore, Larry I., Jr. 
Powe, E. K. 
Propst, Clyde L., Jr. 
Rodman, Wm. B., Jr. 
Satterfield, B. I. 
Shreve, Clyde A. 
Taylor, H. P., Jr. 
Taylor, William W., Jr. 
Story, T. E. 
Sullivan, Kirby 
Thompson, W. Reid 
Turner, Thomas 
Uzzell, George R. 
Valentine, Itimous T., Jr, 
Venters, Carl V. 
Vernon, Livingston 
White, John F. 
White, Thomas J. 
Williams, H. Smith 
Wilson, Henry H., Jr. 
Womble, W. Brantley 
Womble, William F. 
Worthington, Sam O. 
Yarborough, Edward F. 



LUMBER COMPANY 



OFFICIAL 



Burleson, Jeter C. 



LUMBER MANUFACTURER 

Gentry, Todd H. 

MERCHANTS 

Askew, Allen E. 
Bell, D. G. 
Everett, R. Frank 
Johnson, E. R. 
Maddrey, C. Gordon 
O'Herron, E. M., Jr. 
Pittman, Frank S. 



534 



North Carolina Manual 



DEALER 



Sawyer, Bascom 
Vogler, James B. 
Whitley, Philip R. 
Woodard, J. Raynor 

OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

Jones, Walter 

OFFICE MANAGER 

Randall, George W. 

OIL DISTRIBUTOR 

Pou, Edwin S. 

PHARMACISTS 

Bennett, Kelly E. 
Griffith, Wiltshire 

PHYSICIANS 

Bridger, Dr. Dewey H., Sr. 
Phelps, Dr. J. M. 

PUBLISHER 

Blue, H. Clifton 

RAILWAY CONDUCTOR 

Hayes, J. W. 

REAL ESTATE DEALERS 

Falls, Charles B., Jr. 
Fountain, Ben E. 
Stikeleather, James G., Jr. 
Yarborough, Wilson F., Jr. 



SCHOOL SUPERVISOU 

Rodenbough, Grace Taylor 

SERVICE STATION 

OPERATORS 

Hargett, John M. 
Wallace, J. Paul 

TEACHERS 

Kiser, Roger C. 
Rogers, Jack R. 
Wilson, Edward H. 

TEXTILE MILL SUPERVISOR 

Quinn, Dwight W. 

THEATRE OWNER 

Brantley, R. E. 

TOBACCO COMPANY 

EMPLOYEE 

Powell, Radford G. 

TRANSPORTATION 

Love, Jack 
O'Dell, Virgil 

UNDERTAKER 

Holcombe, Fred 

UTILITY EMPLOYEE 

Bennett, Mark W. 

WHOLESALE GROCER 

Stone, Clarence E., Jr. 



PART VIH 
OFFICIAL REGISTER 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Kansas 

Vice President Richard M . Nixon, California 

THE CABINET 

Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, New York 

Secretary of the Treasury George M. Humphrey, Ohio 

Secretary of Defe-ise Charles E. Wilson, M iehigan 

Attorney General.. Hebert Brownell, New York 

Postmaster General Arthur E. Summerfield, Michigan 

Secretary of the Interior Douglas McKay, Oregon 

Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson, Utah 

Secretary of Commerce Sinclair Weeks, Massachusetts 

Secretary of Labor James P. Mitchell. New Jersey 

Secretary of Health, Education & Welfare Mrs. Oveta Culp Hobby, Texas 

NORTH CAROLINA SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS 

SENATORS 

W. Kerr Scott Haw River 

Sam J.Ervin, Jr Morgan ton 

REPRESENTATIVES 

First District _ .Herbert C. Bonner Washington 

Second District L. H. Fountain Tarboro 

Third District Graham A. Barden New Bern 

Fourth District Harold D. Cooley Nashville 

Fifth District Thurmond Chatham Winston-Salem 

Sixth District Carl T. Durham ..Chapel Hill 

Seventh District F. Ertel Carlyle Lumberton 

Eighth District C. B. Deane Rockingham 

Ninth District Hugh Q. Alexander Kannapolis 

Tenth District Charles R . Jonas Lincolnton 

Eleventh District Woodrow W. Jones Rutherfordton 

Twelfth District George A. Shuford Asheville 

UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT 

Earl Warren Chief Justice.. California 

Harold L. Burton Associate Justice Ohio 

Hugo L. Black Associate Justice Alabama 

Stanley F. Reed ...Associate Justice Kentucky 

Felix Frankfurter Associate Justice Massachusetts 

William 0. Douglas Associate Justice Washington 

Thomas C. Clark Associate Justice Texas 

Sherman Min ton Associate Justice — Indiana 

John M . Harlan Associate Justice New York 

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 
JUDGES 

Eastern District Don L. Gilliam Tarboro 

Middle District J.J. Hayes Wilkesboro 

Western District . Wilson Warlick Newton 

CLERKS 

Eastern District A. Hand James ..Raleigh 

Middle District Henry Reynolds Greensboro 

Western District Thomas E. Rhodes Asheville 

DISTRICT ATTORNEYS 

Eastern District Julian T. Gaskill Goldsboro 

Middle District Edwin M.Stanley - Greensboro 

Western District .J. M. Baley, Jr Marshall 

UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS 
For the Fourth Circuit 
Judge John J. Parker.. Charlotte 

537 



STATE GOVERNMENT 

President of the Senate Luther E. Earnhardt Cabarrus 

Speaker of the House of Representatives Larrv I. Moore, Jr . _ Wilson 

EXECUTIVE" DEPARTMENT 

Governor.- Luther H. Hodges Rockingham 

Secretary of State *ThadEure Hertford 

Auditor _ *Henry L. Bridges Guilford 

Treasurer ♦Edwin Gill Scotland 

Superintendent of Pub. Instruction *Charles F. Carroll Duplin 

Attorney General Harry McMullan Beaufort 

Commissioner of Agriculture *L. Y. Ballentine Wake 

Commissioner of Labor *Frank Crane .'.' Union 

Commissioner of Insurance *Charles F. Gold .Rutherford 

♦Constitute the Council of State (Attorney General is the legal advisor to the Executive Department). 

JUDICIAL DEPARTME.VT 
Supreme Court 

Chief Justice M. V. Barnhill *Raleigh 

Associate Justice J. Wallace Winborne 'Raleigh 

Associate Justice E. B. Denny *Raleigh 

Associate Justice JefF D. Johnson, Jr '"*Raleigh 

Associate Justice R. Hunt Parker *Raleigh 

Associate Justice Wm. H. Bobbitt 'Raleigh 

Associate Justice Carlisle Higgins *Raleigh 

♦Official (not legal) residences. 

Judges of Superior Court 

First District Chester R. Morris Coinjock 

Second District Walter J. Bone Nashville 

Third District Joseph W. Parker . ' Windsor 

Fourth District Clawson L. Williams Sanford 

Fifth District J. Paul Frizzelle Snow Hill 

Si.xth District .Henry L.Stevens, Jr Warsaw 

Seventh District Wm. Y. Bickett Raleigh 

Eighth District Clifton L. Moore . Burgaw 

Ninth District Q. K. Nimocks, Jr Favetteville 

Tenth District, Leo Carr.... Burlington 

Eleventh District Walter E. Johnston, Jr ...Winston-Salem 

Twelfth District Walter E. Crissman High Point 

Thirteenth District _...F. Donald Phillips Rockingham 

l^ourteenth District Francis 0. Clarkson . Charlotte 

fifteenth District .Frank M. Armstrong Trov 

Sixteenth District ._._J. C. Rudisill Newton 

Seventh District. J. A. Rousseau N. Wilkesboro 

Eighteenth District J. W. Pless, Jr Marion 

Nineteenth District Zeb V. Nettles Asheville 

Twentieth District Dan K. Moore.. Sylva 

Iwenty-first District Allen H. Gwyn Reidsville 

Special Judges 

George M. Fountain Tarboro 

Clarence W. Hall Durham 

Howard H. Hubbard _ _ _ " Clinton 

J. Frank Huskins ;. ;.\v:.\\\\\v:.":;;::;:;;:;;;;;;:;:;:;:Burnsviiie 

Grover A Martin Smithfield 

\\ . A. Leland McKeithen Pinehurst 

p'l H P^^^'"" Shelby 

Geo B.Patton. F,3„ljli„ 

Malcolm C. Paul Washington 

Susie Sharp Reidsville 

R.LeeWhitmire.. Hendersonville 

538 



State Government 539 

Emergency Judges 

W. H. S. Burgwyn Woodland 

John H. Clement Walkertown 

W. A. Devin Oxford 

Henry A. Orady New Bern 

H. Hoyle Sink Greensboro 

Solicitors 

First District Walter Cohoon Elizabeth City 

Second District Elbert S. Peel Williamston 

Third District E. R. Tyler. Roxobel 

Fourth District W. Jack Hooks Kenly 

Fifth District Robert D. Rouse, Jr Farmville 

Sixth District Walter T. Britt Clinton 

Seventh District Lester V. Chalmers Raleigh 

Eighth District John J. Burney Jr Wilmington 

Ninth District Malcolm B. Seawell Lumberton 

Tenth District WiUiam H. Murdock Durham 

Eleventh District Harvey A. Lupton Winston-Salem 

Twelfth District Horace R. Kornegay Greensboro 

Thirteenth District M. G. Boyette Carthage 

Fourteenth District Basil L. Whitener Gastonia 

Fifteenth District Zeb A. Morris Concord 

Sixteenth District James C. Farthing Lenoir 

Seventeenth District J. Allie Hayes N. Wilkesboro 

Eighteenth District Clarence 0. Ridings Forest City 

Nineteenth District Robert S. Swain Asheville 

Twentieth District T. D. Bryson, Jr Bryson City 

Twenty-first District Ralph J. Scott Danbury 

HEADS OF ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENTS, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 

Adjutant General John Hall Manning Wake 

Department of Agriculture L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner Wake 

Board of Alcoholic Control T. W. Allen, Chairman Granville 

State Dept. of Archives and History Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Director Wake 

Art Society Lucy Cherry Crisp, Exec. Sec'y ....Pitt 

Banking Dept W. W. Jones, Commissioner Wake 

Commission for the Blind H. A. Wood, Exec. Sec'y Lincoln 

Budget Bureau D. S. Coltrane, Assistant Director Randolph 

Buildings and Grounds George B. Cherry, Supt Wake 

N. C. Burial Asso Don Gilliam, Jr., Commissioner Edgecombe 

Department of Conservation and 

Development Ben E. Douglas, Director Mecklenburg 

Board of Correction and Training S>. E. Leonard, Commissioner Edgecombe 

State Board of Education C. D. Douglas, Controller Wake 

State Board of Elections. R. C. Maxwell, Ex. Sec'y Wake 

Employment Security Com Henry E. Kendall, Chairman Cleveland 

State Board of Health Dr. J. W. R. Norton, Secretary Wake 

State Highway Patrol James R. Smith, Commander New Hanover 

State Highway and Public Works 

Commission A. H. Graham, Chairman... Orange 

N. C. Hospitals Board of Control Dr. David A. Young, General Supt Wake 

R. M. Purser, Business Manager Wayne 

Industrial Commission J. W. Bean, Chairman Rowan 

Department of Insurance Charles F. Gold, Commissioner Rutherford 

Bureau of Investigation James W. Powell, Director Wake 

Department of Justice Harry McMullan. Attorney General Beaufort 

Department of Labor Frank Crane, Commissioner Union 

Library Commission Mrs. Elizabeth House Hughey, Secretary Martin 

State Library Carrie L. Broughton. Librarian.. .Wake 

Local Government Commission W. E. Easterling, Secretary Wake 

Medical Care Commission -Dr. John A. Ferrell, Exec. Sec'y Wake 

Merit System -Dr. Frank T. DeVyver, Supervisor Wake 

N. C. Milk Commission -J. V. Whitaker, Exec. Sec'y Wake 

Department Motor Vehicles Ed Scheldt, Commissioner Wake 

Municipal Board of Control Thad Eure, Secretary (Ex-officio) .Hertford 



540 North Carolina Manual 

Paroles Commission Clarence H. Patrick, Chairman .Wake 

Personnel Department J. W. McDevitt, Director Madison 

Probation Commission J. D. Beaty, Director ._ Wake 

Dept. of Public Instruction, _ Dr. Chas. F. Carroll, Superintendent Duplin 

State Board of Public Welfare -Dr. Ellen B. Winston, Commissioner Wake 

Div. of Purchase and Contract David Q. Holton, Director. Chowan 

Recreation Commission Ralph J. Andrews, Director Wake 

Retirement System Nathan Yelton, Secretary Mitchell 

Department of Revenue Eugene 0. Shaw, Commissioner. Guilford 

Rural Electrification Authority Gwyn B . Price, Chairman _ Ashe 

Supreme Court Max 0. Cogburn, Administrative Assistant to Chief 

Justice Buncombe 

Dillard S. Gardner, Librarian and Marshal Orange 

.Adrian J. Newton, Clerk Davidson 

John M. Strong, Reporter - _ _ - - Wake 

Department of Tax Research James S. Currie, Director Orange 

Utilities Commission Stanley Winborne, Chairman . _ _ _ Hertford 

Veterans Commission James M. Caldwell, Director _-_ ...Cabarrus 

WildHfe Resources Commission Clyde P. Patton, Exec. Director Wake 



All official addresses, Raleigh, N. C. 

HEADS OF STATE HOSPITALS, CORRECTIONAL AND 
EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

Confederate Women's Home Mrs. Pauline Carter Fayetteville 

Correctional 
White 

Eastern Carolina Training 

School for Boys Wm. D. Clark Rocky Mount 

State Home and Industrial School 

for Girls, Samarcand Reva Mitchell Eagle Springs 

Stonewall Jackson Manual Training 

and Industrial School J. Frank Scott _ Concord 

Negro 

Morrison Training School fo Negro Boys Paul R. Brown Hoffman 

Training School for Negro Girls Mae D. Holmes Kinston 

Educational 
White 

Appalachian State Teachers College B. B. Dougherty Boone 

East Carolina College J. D. Messick Greenville 

N. C. School for the Deaf Dr. C. E. Rankin Morganton 

O.xford Orphanage A. D. Leon Gray Oxford 

Pembroke State College Ralph D. Wellons Pembroke 

The State School for the Blind and Deaf E. N. Peeler Raleigh 

University of North CaroHna: 

President Gordon Gray Chapel Hill 

Chapel Hill Unit, Chancellor R. B. House" Chapel Hill 

State College Unit, Chancellor Carey H. Bostian Raleigh 

Woman's College Unit, Chancellor Edward K. Graham .Greensboro 

Western Carohna College Paul A, Reid CuUowhee 

Negro 

Agricultural and Technical College F. D. Bluf ord Greensboro 

Elizabeth City State Teachers College S. D. Williams Elizabeth City 

Fayetteville State Teachers College J. W. Seabrook Fayetteville 

N. C. College at Durham Alfonso Elder Durham 

The Colored Orphanage of North Carolina.. Rev. T. H. Brooks Oxford 

The State School for the Blind and Deaf E. N. Peeler Raleigh 

Winston-Salem State Teachers College F. L. Atkins Winston-Salem 



State Government 541 

Hospitals 

White 

Caswell Training School. Dr. Julian Lokey Kinston 

N. C. Sanatoriums for Treatment of 
Tuberculosis: 

N. C. Sanatorium Dr. W. M. Peck McCain 

Eastern Sanatorium Dr. H. F. Eason Wilson 

Western Sanatorium Dr. C. D. Thomas Black Mountain 

N. C. Orthopedic Hospital Dr. W. M. Roberts Gastonia 

State Hospital Dr. James Murdoch Butner 

State Hospital ..Dr. J. S. McKee, Jr Morgan ton 

State Hospital Dr. Walter A. Sikes. _.- Raleigh 

Negro 
State Hospital Dr. Ira C. Long Goldsboro 

HEADS OF SOME ORGANIZATIONS OTHER THAN STATE AGENCIES 

N. C. Association Clerks Superior Court Institute of Government, Secretarial Agency.-. Chapel Hill 

N. C. Association County Commissioners J. Henry Vaughan, Secretary Elm City 

N. C. Citizens Association, Inc Lloyd Griffin, E.xec. Vice-President Raleigh 

N. C. Education Association Mrs. Ethel Perkins Edwards, Executive Sec'y Raleigh 

N. C. Fire Insurance Rating Bureau W. S. Bizzell, Manager Raleigh 

Institute ot Government Albert Coates, Director Chapel Hill 

N. C. League of Municipalities Mrs. Davetta L. Steed, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

N. C. Teachers As.sociation W. L. Greene, Executive Secretary Raleigh 

Sheriff's Association John R. Morris, Sec'y-Treas Wilmington 

Social Security Board J. H. Ingle, Manager Raleigh 

N. C. State Bar ..E. L. Cannon, Sec'y-Treas Raleigh 

State Employees' Credit Union. J. M. Brothers, Treasurer Raleigh 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT 

ALAMANCE 

Alamance County was founded in 1849 from Orange. The name is supposed to be derived from an 
Indian word meaning "blue clay." The county gets its name from Alamance Creek, on the banks of which 
w as fought the battle between the colonial troops under Governor Tryon and the Regulators, May 16,1771. 

Population 71,220 County Seat, Graham 

Office Office Address 

State Senator 16th District Ralph H. Scott Haw River 

Member House of Representatives George A. Long Burimgton 

Clerk of Court D. M. McLelland Graham 

Register of Deeds J. G. Tingen Graham 

Sheriff Joe W. Cole Graham 

Treasurer George E. Holt, Jr Graham 

Auditor Owen, Hogan, & McMillan Burlington 

Tax Supervisor D. K. Muse Graham 

Tax Collector D. K. Muse Graham 

County Accountant C. V. Holt Graham 

Coroner Dr. J. B. Walker, Jr Graham 

Co. Health Officer Dr. Wm. L. Norville Burlington 

Supt. of Schools M. E. Yount Graham 

Supt. of Public Welfare Gerard J.Anderson Burhngton 

Home Dem. Agent 

White Katherine Millsaps Burlington 

Colored Carrie S. Wilson Graham 

Farm Dem. Agent 

White .. J. W. Bason Graham 

Colored Plese Corbett Graham 

Chmn. Bd. Education Henry Scott Haw River 

Chmn. Bd. Elections H. Clay Hemric Burhngton 

Wildlife Protector Vance M. Perry Graham 

County .Attorney Eugene A. Gordon Burlington 

Veterans Service Officer James Porter Scott Burlington 

General County Court: 

Judge __ John H. Vernon Burlington 

Solicitor L. C. Allen, Jr Burlington 

Elon College Municipal Recorder's Court: 

Judge E. L. Smith Elon CoUege 

Sohcitor T. D. Cooper, Jr Burlington 

Burlington Municipal Recorder's Court: 
Judge C. C. Gates, Jr Burlington 

Solicitor Kenneth W. Young Burlington 

Commissioners 

Chairman Garland M. Newlin Rt. 1, Haw River 

Commissioner W. Hale Duncan Burlington 

Commissioner J. B. Long Elon College 

Commissioner L. P. Best Mebane 

Commissioner Thomas E. Mitchell Elon College 

ALEXANDER 

Alexander County was formed in 1847 from Iredell, Caldwell, and Wilkes. Was named in honor of 
William J. Alexander, of Mecklenburg County, several times a member of the Legislature and Speaker of 
the House of Commons. 

Population, 14,554 County Seat, Taylorsville 

Office Officer Address 

State Senator 28th District Dr. Dennis S. Cook Lenoir 

Member of House Representatives W. Ray Lackey Stony Point 

542 



County Government 543 

Office Officer Address 

Clerk of Court Charlie R. Watts Taylorsville 

Register of Deeds Herman E. Lackey Taylorsville 

Sheriff T. E. Bebber Taylorsville 

Treasurer J.R- Stewart Taylorsville 

Auditor J-R- Stewart Taylorsville 

Tax Supervisor .--J. R. Stewart Taylorsville 

Tax Collector J. R. Stewart Taylorsville 

County Accountant J. R. Stewart Taylorsville 

Coroner L. M. Warren Taylorsville 

Surveyor W. I^. Harrington Taylorsville 

Co. Health Officer Dr. Benton V. D. Scott Newton 

Supt. of Schools Sloane W. Payne Taylorsville 

Supt. of Public Welfare Luther Dyson Taylorsville 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Agnes Watts Taylorsville 

Farm Dem. Agent Grover Dobbins Taylorsville 

Chmn. Bd. Education W. S. Patterson Stony Point 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Parks M. Crouch Stony Point 

Wildhfe Protector Frank Reese Taylorsville 

Forest Ranger Glenn Lackey Hiddenite 

County Attorney -A. C. Payne Taylorsville 

Veterans Service Officer Dewey R. Warren Taylorsville 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge Sam Poole Taylorsville 

Solicitor A. C. Payne Taylorsville 

Commissioners 

Chairman J- C. Fnrtner Taylorsville 

Commissioner Gill Dellinger Hiddenite 

Commissioner Elbert Bowman Taylorsville 



ALLEGHANY 

Alleghany County was formed in 1859 from Ashe. The name is derived from an Indian tribe in the 
limits of North Carolina. 

Population, 8,155 County Seat, Sparta 

State Senator 29th District Dr. H. B. Perry . Boone 

Member House of Representatives J. K. Dough ton . Sparta 

Clerk of Court Gene R. Irwin . Sparta 

Register of Deeds Ernest E. Edwards Sparta 

Sheriff Dent B. Pugh Sparta 

Treasurer Dent B. Pugh Sparta 

Auditor Ruby Irwin Sparta 

Tax Supervisor.. Ernest E. Edwards - Sparta 

Tax Collector... Dent B. Pugh Sparta 

County Accountant Ruby Irwin Sparta 

Coroner Charlie Wooten Sparta 

Surveyor C. G. Fender .Sparta 

Co. Health Officer Dr. M. B. H. Michael Sparta 

Supt. of Schools Miss Clyde Fields ..Sparta 

Supt. of Public Welfare Doris W. Busic Sparta 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Francis Wagoner Sparta 

Farm Dem. Agent.. R. E. Black Sparta 

Chmn. Bd. Education Greek J. Hill ..? Sparta 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Worth B. Folger Sparta 

Wildhfe Protector D. T. Bryan Sparta 

Forest Ranger George Royall Roaring Gap 

County Attorney.. R. F. Crouse ..Sparta 

County Librarian Carrie Askew Sparta 

Veterans Service Officer Gene R. Irwin.,-,,,-,-,.----- Spart^ 



544 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Commissioners 

Chairman Dillon Eldwards _ Sparta 

Commissioner Guy Perry _,. _. _'_. Sparta 

Commissioner Lonnie Edwards Whitehead 

ANSON 

Anson County was formed in 1749 from Bladen. Was named in honor of George Lord Anson, a cel- 
ebrated English admiral who circumnavigated the globe. He lived for a while on the Pee Dee in South 
Carolina. In 1761 he was given the honor of bringing to her marriage with King George III, Charlotte, 
Princess of Mecklenburg, for whom Mecklenburg County was named. 

Population, 26,781 County Seat, Wadesboro 

State Senators 19th District E. A. High tower Wadesboro 

., ^ „ ,„ J. Max Thomas Marshville 

Member House of Representatives _H. P. Taylor. Jr _ _ Wadesboro 

Clerk of Court H. C. Tucker Wadesboro 

Register of Deeds Francis E. Liles _. Wadesboro 

Sheriff . ._.. Hubert E.Rayfield Wadesboro 

Tax Supervisor Francis E. Liles Wadesboro 

Tax Collector W. C. Hardison Wadrstcro 

County Accountant. Francis E. Liles Wadesb&i.'/ 

Coroner.. _. Harvey H. Leavitt, Jr . . Wadesboro 

Surveyor Frank S. Clarke Wadesboro 

Co. Health Officer Dr. W. D. Carter Wadesboro 

bupt. of Schools 1. 0. Bowman Wadesboro 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Esther C. Humphreys Wadesboro 

Home Dem. Agent 

White Mrs. Ada B. Dalla Pozza... .Wadesboro 

Colored Mrs. Margaret R. Kirk Wadesboro 

Farm Dem. Agent 

White lohn R.Potter.. ___ Wadesboro 

Colored ... H.H.Price Wadesboro 

thmn. Bd. Education Baxter T. McRae Peachland 

Chmn. Bd. Elections W. L. Ashcraft Wadesboro 

Wildhfe Protector Ralph H. Griffin Wadesboro 

Forest Ranger Earl Robertson.. Rt. 2, Wadesboro 

County Attorney Taylor, Kitchin & Taylor Wadesboro 

County Librarian Mrs. Shepherd L. Pritchett Wadesboro 

Veterans Service Officer .R. C. Covington.... Wadesboro 

County Criminal Court: 

Judg?-- -- Barrington T. Hill Wadesboro 

Solicitor George C. Childs. Wadesboro 

Commissioners 

Chairman F. Y. Sorrell Wadesboro 

Commissioner L. C. Springer.... Rt. 2, Wadesboro 

Commissioner Paul B. Little Rt. 3, Wadesboro 

Commissioner James A. Leak Wadesboro 

Commissioner .,..., Marion B, Dutton ..Rt. 1, Pageland, S. C. 



County Government 545 

ASHE 

Ashe County was formed in 1 799 from Wilkes. Was named in honor of Samuel Ashe of New Hanover, 
brother of GeneralJohn Ashe. Samuel Ashe was a Revolutionary patriot, one of the first judges of the 
state, and afterwards governor. 

Population, 21,878 County Seat, Jefferson 

Office Officer Address 

State Senator 29th District Dr. H.B.Perry Boone 

Member House of Representatives Todd H. Gentry W'est Jefferson 

Clerk of Court P. T. McNeill Jefferson 

Register of Deeds J. D. Stansberry Jefferson 

Sheriff Kenneth Miller Jefferson 

Treasurer Kenneth Miller Jefferson 

Auditor Smith & Grisette Jefferson 

Tax Supervisor John Gentry Jefferson 

Tax Collector EUzabeth V. Miller Jefferson 

Coroner C. W. Anderson Jefferson 

Surveyor Charles F. Sexton Grassy Creek 

Co. Health Officer Dr. Mary Michael Jefferson 

Supt. of Schools A. B. Hurt- Jefferson 

Supt. of Public Welfare Frances Tucker Jefferson 

Home Dem. Agent Sue Norman West Jefferson 

Farm Dem. Agent. ._ A. B. Addington West Jefferson 

Chmn. Bd. Education Bradley Sturgill Grassy Creek 

Chmn. Bd. Elections - H. H. Lemly West Jefferson 

Wildlife Protector Roland Koontz _ .Jefferson 

County Forester. J. F. Clayton West Jefferson 

County Librarian... Mrs. Chessie Neal West Jefferson 

Veterans Service Officer Leonard Shepherd West Jefferson 

Commissioners 

Chairman Q.A. Duncan West Jefferson 

Commissioner George W. Shepherd Laurel Springs 

Commissioner Edd Davis Tuckerdale 

AVERY 

Avery County was formed in 1911 from Mitchell, Watauga, and Caldwell. Was named in honor of 
Colonel Waightstill Avery "of Revolutionary fame," Attorney-general of North Carolina, 1777-1779, 

Population, 13,352 County Seat, Newland 

State Senator 30th District ...B. H. Winters Elk Park 

Member House of Representatives Roby A. Shomaker Newland 

Clerk of Court --J. Walter Buchanan Newland 

Register of Deeds Grant Webb Newland 

Sheriff Fred Banner Newland 

Treasurer Morris Isaacs Newland 

Auditor Morris Isaacs Newland 

Tax Sipervisor Morris Isaacs -. Newland 

TaxCjUector Richard Horney Newland 

County Accountant Morris Isaacs Newland 

Coroner Earl Lobacker Newland 

Surveyor Paul Banner Banner Elk 

Co. Health Officer Dr. Cameron F. McRae Newland 

Supt. of Schools K. W. Anderson Newland 

Supt. of Public Welfare -.W. W. Braswell Montezuma 

Home Dem. Agent Marie Scott Newland 

Farm Dem. Agent... Sam Gartner.. Newland 

Chmn. Bd. Education R. L. Lewis ..Minneapolis 

Chmn. Bd. Elections -W. D. Tennant Crossnore 

Wildlife Protector... - Wallace Carpenter Three Mile 



546 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Forest Ranger Julice Ollis Cranberry 

County Attorney Charles Hughes Newland 

County Librarian Mrs. E. T. Tanner Elk Park 

Veterans Service Officer Robert Lacy Newland 

Commissioners 

Chairman Fornie Green Cranberry 

Commissioner Ben Isaacs... Newland 

Commissioner Grover Wiseman Ingalls 



BEAUFORT 

Beaufort County was formed in 1705 from Bath. Was first called Archdale and name changed to 
Beaufort about 1712. It was named in honor of Henry Somerset, Duke of Beaufort, who in 170(i became 
one of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. He purchased the share originally owned by the Duke of Albe- 
marle. 

Population, 37,134 County Seat, Washington 

State Senators 2nd District Edward L. Owens Plymouth 

L. H. Ross Washington 

Member of House of Representatives Wm. B. Rodman, Jr Washington 

Clerk of Court Mrs. Ada M. Taylor Washington 

Register of Deeds C. C. Duke Washington 

Sheriff WilUam Rumley Washington 

Treasurer W. A. Blount Washington 

Auditor W. A. Blount Washington 

Ta.\ Supervisor W. A. Blount Washington 

Tax Collector D. E. Redditt Washington 

County Accountant W. A. Blount Washington 

Coroner J. Bonner Paul Washington 

Co. Health Officer L. E. KKng Washington 

Supt. of Schools... _ W. F. Veasey Washington 

Supt. of Public Welfare R. A. Phillips Washington 

Home Dem. Agent 

White Mrs. Rita C. Preston Washington 

Colored Vivian M.Morris Washington 

Farm Dem. Agent 

White Maxwell P. Chestnutt Washington 

Colored Chester Bright Washington 

Chmn. Bd. Education Ralph Hodges Washington 

Chmn. Bd Elections John G. Bragaw ...Washington 

Wildlife Protector Jesse L. Eaker Washington 

Forest Ranger Albert Woolard Washington 

County Attorney L. H. Ross Washington 

Veterans Service Officer James T. McKeel Washington 

Recorder's Court: 
Aurora: 

Judge W. W. Langley Aurora 

Belhaven: 

Judge Marvin M. Jones Belhaven 

Washington: 

Judge L. E. Mercer Washington 

Solicitor J. D. Grimes, Jr Washington 

Commissioners 

Chairman. Allen D.Swindell... Pantego 

Commissioner L. Carmer Alligood RFD, Washington 

Commissioner Alton Cayton Chocowinity 

Commissioner William A. Magee, Jr Aurora 

Commissioner ..James A. Hackney, Jr . Washington 



County Government 547 

BERTIE 

Bertie County was formed in 1722 from Bath. Was named in honor of James and Henry Bertie, 
Lords Proprietors, who in 1728 owned the share of Lord Clarendon 

Population, 26,439 County Seat, Windsor 

Office Officer Address 

State Senators 1st District N.Elton Aydlett Ehzabeth City 

A. Pilston Godwin, Jr... Gatesville 

Member House of Representatives. ._ J. A. Speight Windsor 

Clerk of Court Geo. C. Spoolman Windsor 

Register of Deeds L. Su Mizelle Windsor 

Sheriff Thos. E. Joyner Windsor 

Treasurer Mrs. Ethel R. Cherry Windsor 

Auditor L. S. Mizelle .Windsor 

Tax Supervisor L. S. Mizelle Windsor 

Tax Collector Lacy M. Early Windsor 

County Accountant L. S. Mizelle Windsor 

Coroner Goodwin Byrd Windsor 

Surveyor J. B. Parker Rt. 1, Windsor 

Co. Health Officer Dr. W. S. Cann .Windsor 

Supt. of Schools John L. Dupree Windsor 

Supt. of Public Welfare Mrs. Norma P. Smith Windsor 

Home Dem. Agent 

White.- .Mrs. Agnes B. Moore Windsor 

Colored Gladys L. Ruffin Windsor 

Farm Dem. Agent 

White B. E.Grant Windsor 

Colored... M. W. Coleman Windsor 

Chmn. Bd. Education J. S. Powell Windsor 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Robert E. Williford Lewiston 

Wildlife Protector W.L. Smallwood Windsor 

Forest Ranger Miles White. Windsor 

County Librarian Mrs. Joe L. Byrd Windsor 

Veterans Service Officer Mrs. E. S. Pugh Windsor 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge .J. B. Davenport Windsor 

Solicitor M. B. Gillam Windsor 

Commissioners 

Chairman W. R. Lawrence Colerain 

Commissioner ...B.F. Hoggard Aulander 

Commissioner T. N. Peele Lewiston 

Commissioner W. L. Powell Windsor 

Commissioner C. D. Bazemore Rt. 1, Windsor 

BLADEN 

Bladen County was formed in 1734 from Bath. Was named in honor of Martin Bladen, one of the 
members of the Board of Trade which had charge of colonial affairs. 

Population, 29,703 County Seat, Elizabethtown 

State Senators 10th District Ray H. Walton... Southport 

Arthur W. Williamson Cerro Gordo 

Member House of Representatives Dr. Dewey H. Bridger, Sr .Bladenboro 

Clerk of Court. Carl C. Campbell Ehzabeth town 

Register of Deeds D. T. Townsend Elizabethtown 

Sheriff John B. Allen ..- Ehzabethtown 

Treasurer. Bank of Elizabethtown Ehzabethtown 

Auditor P. G. C'ain Ehzabethtown 

Tax Supervisor ..P. G. Cain. Elizabethtown 

Tax Collector H. M. Chason. Elizabethtown 



548 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Coroner .- Gordon Kinlaw Elizabethtown 

Surveyor A. A. Robbins. Sr._ ..Elizabethtown 

Co. Health Officer^ M. Dr. Georgia V. Mills Elizabethtown 

Supt. of Schools D- M- Calhoun Ehzabethtown 

Supt. of Public Welfare ...Bessie R. Lyon. Elizabethtown 

Home Dem. Agent „„„ „, , 

White - -. Fleta Harrelson RED, Clarktown 

Colored.'..-- Mamie P. Moore Elizabethtown 

Farm Dem. Agent „,. , , 

White --R- B. Harper Ehzabethtown 

Colored' " W. G. Pierce Elizabethtown 

Chmn. Bd" "Education J- R- Ferguson Clarkton 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Wilson L. Fisher Ehzabethtown 

Wildlife Protector Sam Culbreth Elizabethtown 

Forest Ranger M. M. McQueen Clarkton 

County Attorney Lloyd S. Elkins Bladenboro 

County Librarian Thelma Cromartie RFD, \\ hite Oak 

Veterans Service Officer Louis T. Vaught, Jr Elizabethtown 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge W. Leslie Johnson Elizabeth town 

Sohcit'or". Leon D. Smith Elizabethtown 

Commissioners 

Chairman - Luther Brisson Bladenboro 

Commissioner G.Ellis Clark Elizabethtown 

Commissioner C. Dixon Brisson Dublin 

Commissioner F. L. Tatum White Oak 

Commissioner H. Graden Melvin RFD 2, Ehzabethtown 

BRUNSWICK 

Brunsw'ck County was formed in 1764 from New Hanover and Bladen. Was named in honor of the 
famous House of Brunswick, of which the four Georges, Kings of England, were members. 

Population, 19,238 County Seat, Southport 

State Senators 10th District Ray H. Walton Southport 

Arthur W. Williamson Cerro Gordo 

Member House of Representatives Rirby Sullivan Southport 

Clerk of Court Jack E. Brown Southport 

Register of Deeds A. J. Walton Southport 

SheriJ E. H. Gray Southfort 

Auditor . .. R. Whatley Southport 

Tax Supervisor.... R. Whatley Southport 

Tax Collector M. D. .Anderson ._ .Southport 

Coroner John G. Caison Southport 

Co. He.iith Officer N. M. Hornstein Southport 

Supt. of Schools H. C. Stone Shallotte 

Supt. of Public Welfare Ed Sexton Southport 

Home Dem. Agent Thelma Lee Hinson Supply 

Farm Dem. Agent A. S. Knowles Supply 

Chmn. Bd. Elections ....R. 0. Lewis Shallotte 

Wildlife Protector Pawnee DuvalL. Ash 

County Attorneys ..Frink & Herring Southport 

Veterans Service Officer ..C. L. Rourk Southport 

Recorder's Court: 

Judge W. E. Bellamy, Jr Shallotte 

Solicitor J. C. Bowman Southport 

Commissioners 

Chairman .-. R. L. Rabou .Winnabow 

Commissioner Leo Medlin Leland 

Commissioner Herbert Swain Southport 



County Government 549 

buncombe 

Buncombe County was formed in 1791 from Burke and Rutherford. Was named in honor of Colonel 
Edward Buncombe, a Revolutionary soldier who was wounded and captured at the battle of German town, 
October 4, 1777, and died a paroled prisoner. May 1778, in Philadelphia. Colonel Buncombe lived in 
Tyrrell County. He was noted for his hospitality. Over the door of his house were these lines. "Wel- 
come all to Buncombe Hall." 

Population, 124,403 County Seat, Asheville 

Office Officer Address 

State Senator .31st District John F. Shuford Asheville 

Members House of Representatives George W. Craig Asheville 

John Y. Jordan, Jr._ Asheville 

James G. Stikeleather, Jr Asheville 

Clerk of Court J. E. Swain Asheville 

Register of Deeds Geo. A. Digges, Jr Asheville 

Sheriff Laurence E. Brown Asheville 

Treasurer J. C. Garrison Asheville 

Auditor J. C. Garrison Asheville 

Tax Supervisor Rupert J. Crowell Asheville 

Tax Collector John P. Brown Asheville 

County Accountant J. C. Garrison Asheville 

Cor6ner Dr. P. R. Terry Asheville 

Surveyor.- Roy P. Roberts Asheville 

Co. Health Officer Dr. H. W. Stevens Asheville 

Supt. of Schools T. C. Roberson. Candler 

Supt. of Public Welfare Geo. H. Lawrence Asheville 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Mamie Sue Evans Asheville 

Farm Dem. Agent W. Riley Palmer Asheville 

Chmn. Bd. Education Frank E. Laycock Asheville 

Chmn. Bd. Elections Clyde W. Bradley Asheville 

Wildlife Protector ^ Roy Wayne Beard Asheville 

Forest Ranger Woody Reeves Leicester 

County Attorney Roy A. Taylor Black Mountain 

Veterans Service Officer Thomas Mallonee Candler 

General County Court: 

Judge Burgin Pennell Asheville 

Solicitor Zebulon Weaver, Jr Asheville 

Asheville City Court: 

Judge Sam M. Cathey _ Asheville 

Solicitor W. C. Hampton Asheville 

Domestic Relations Court: 
Judge ..Wm. A. Hart Weaverville 

Commissioners 

Chairman Coke Candler. Candler 

Commissioner John C. Vance Asheville 

Commissioner George D. Young Swannanoa 

BURKE 

Burke County was formed in 1777 from Rowan. Was named in honor of Dr. Thomas Burke, mem- 
ber of the Continental Congress and governor of North Carolina. 

Population, 45,518 County Seat, Morganton 

State Senator 28th District Dr. Dennis S. Cook Lenoir 

Member House of Representatives Livingston Vernon - Morganton 

Clerk of Court W. C. Ross Morganton 

Register of Deeds W. Alvin Berry Morganton 

Sheriff Ray A. Sigmon Morganton 

Treasurer ..Lillian Ross Morganton 

Auditor - Lillian Ross Morganton 



590 North Carolina Manual 

Office Officer Address 

Tax Supervisor John A. Bleynat _ Morganton 

Tax Collector-. William Avery Morganton 

County Accountant Lillian Ross Morganton 

Coroner R- F- Setzer Morganton 

Surveyor J- A. Harbison Morganton 

Co Health Officer Dr. C. C. Janowsky Morganton 

Supt. of Schools R- L. Patton Morganton 

Supt. of Public Welfare --M. J. Lynam _ ...Morganton 

Home Dem. Agent Mrs. Evelyn Wiggins Watson Morganton 

Farm Dem. Agent ...Herbert M. Speas Morganton 

Chmn. Bd. Education Lester H. McN'eely Morganton 

Chmn. Bd Elections. HowellJ. Hatcher Morganton 

Wildlife Protector Robin Rhyne Morganton 

Forest Ranger S- B- Conley... Morganton 

County Attorney W. Harald Mitchell Valdese 

County Librarian Mrs. Miltanna R. McVey Morganton 

Veterans Service Officer Jack Windchester Morganton 

County Criminal Court: 

Judge T. Earl Franklin Morganton 

Solicitor Sam J. Ervin, III Morganton 

Commissioners 

Chairman John A. Bleynat V'aldese 

Commissioner Ben H. Brackett Morganton 

Commissioner X. H. Cox Morganton 

Commissioner J- J- Hallyburton Morganton 

Commissioner Arthur H. Whisenant Icard 

CABARRUS 

Cabarrus County was formed in 1792 from Mecklenburg. Was named in honor of Stephen Cabarrus, 
of Edenton, several times a member of the Legislature and often Speaker of the House of Commons. 

Population. 63,783 County Seat, Concord 

State Senators 21st Di.strict Luther E. Barnhardt Concord 

Nelson Woodson Salisbury 

Members House of Representatives Clyde L. Propst, Jr Concord 

Dwight W. Quinn Kannapolis 

Clerk of Court D. Ray McEachern.. Concord 

Register of Deeds John R. Boger Concord 

Sheriff E. M. Logan Concord 

Treasurer Margie M. White Concord 

Auditor Charles N. Field Concord 

Tax Supervisor Robert C. Harris Concord 

Tax Collector Ray A. Cline Concord 

County Accountant ...Charles N. Field Concord 

Coroner CHfford H. Brown Concord 

Surveyor Walter L. Furr, Jr Concord 

Co. Health Officer Dr. J. Roy Hege Concord 

Supt. of Schools C. A. Furr Concord 

Supt. of Public Welfare E. Farrell White Concord 

Home Dem. Agent Sarah Wise..-.....: Concord 

Farm Dem. Agent J. Rav Allen Concord 

Chmn. Bd. Education Boyd Biggers Concord 

Chmn. Bd. Elections John Sharpe Hartsell Concord 

Wildlife Protector Hal Rericha Concord 

County Forester Joe Bennett.. Concord 

County Attorneys John Sharpe Hartsell Concord 

Luther E. Barnhardt Concord 

County Librarian Elizabeth Plexico Concord 

Veterans Service Officer Corum F. Miller Concord 



County Government 551 

Office Officer Address 

County Recorder's Court: 

Judge E. Johnston Irvin Concord 

Solicitor Briee J. Willeford Kannapolis 

Domestic Relations Court: 
Judge Fannie Memory Farmer Concord 

Commissioners 

Chairman J. Lee White Concord 

Commissioner P. E. Stallings-. Harrisburg 

Commissioner W. Franlc McCray _Kannapolis 

Commissioner L. Bowman Barrier Mt. Pleasant 

Commissioner M. Smoot Lyles Concord 

CALDWELL 

Caldwell County was formed in 1841 from Burke and Wilkes. Was named in honor of Joseph Cald- 
well, the first president of the University of North Carolina. He was one of the first and strongest ad- 
vocates of the public school system and of the railroad through the center of the state from Morehead 
City to Tennessee. 

Population, 43,352 County Seat, Lenoir 

State Senator 28th District- Dr. Dennis S. Cook Lenoir 

Member House of Representatives John L. Anderson Whitnel 

Clerk of Court _G. W.Sullivan Lenoir 

Register of Deeds Margaret B. Moore Lenoir 

SherifT Clyde W. Roberts Lenoir 

Auditor Mrs. Stella H. Spencer Lenoir 

Tax Supervisor James H. Sherrill Lenoir 

Tax Collector James H. Sherrill Lenoir 

County Accountant Mrs. Stella H. Spencer Lenoir 

C3roner Ted K. Greer Lenoir 

Surveyor Thomas P. Isbell Lenoir 

Co. Health Officer Dr. William Happer Lenoir 

Supt. of Schools C. M. Abernethy Lenoir 

Supt. of Public Welfare Joseph R. Eller Lenoir 

Home Dem. Agent _._Ruth Kesler Lenoir 

Farm Dem. Agent Max A. Culp Lenoir 

Chmn. Bd. Education George W. Boutwell Lenoir 

Chmn. Bd. Elections CecilW. Hailey Lenoir 

Wildlife Protector _._ Cecil Lindsay Lenoir 

Forest Ranger E. P. Simmons Lenoir 

County Attorney L. H. WalL Lenoir 

County Librarian Mrs. Vera B. Melton Lenoir 

Veterans Service Officer Cecil W. Hailey Lenoir 

Recorder s Court: 

Judge. L. M. Abernethy.. Granite Fallr 

Solicitor Benjamin Beach.. Lenois 

Commissioners 

Chairman Robert L. Bradley .Lenoir 

Commissioner Coit F. Barber ...Lenoir 

Commissioner .Danny M. Courtney Lenoir 

Commissioner J. B. Myers Lenoir 

Commissioner .Stewart Lingle Lenoir 



552 North Carolina Manual 

CAMDEN 

Camden County was formed in 1777 from Pasquotank. Was named in honor of the learned English- 
man, Charles Pratt, Earl of Camden, who was one of the strongest friends of the Americans in British 
Parliament. He took their side in the dispute over taxation without representation. 

Population, 5,223 County Seat,